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82d Congress, 2d Session

Occupational Wage Survey
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
January 1952

Bulletin No. 1094

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INT R O D U C T I O N ................................................................................

1

A R E A .........................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ................................................................

2

THE LOS ANGELES METROPOLITAN

TABLES!
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Offioe occupations ............................................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ......................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant o c cupations.....................................
A-4
Custodial| warehousing, and shipping occupations ..................... .......
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2031 Canned sea f o o d ......... .................... ................................
B-2071 Candy and other confectionery products ..........................................
B-2337 Women's and misses' coats and s u i t s ....................... ...................
B-2431
M i l l w o r k ......................................................................
B-2911
Petroleum r e f i n i n g ...........................................................
B-3099 Rubber products, other than tires and tubes ..................................
B-336
Foundries, nonferrous ....... .................................................
B-342
Cutlery, hand tools, and h a r d w a r e .............................................
B-3439
Heating apparatus ............................................................
B-3444
Sheet-metal work .............................................................
R-34&8 Electroplating, plating,and polishing ...................................... .
B-35
Machinery industries:
M a c h i n e r y ....................
Oil field m a c h i n e r y ........................................................
Machine-tool accessories — jobbing shops .................................
Machine-tool accessories — production shops ..............................
B-3661
Radio, television, and related p r o d u c t s ...........................
B-372
Aircraft parts ...............................................
B-40
Railroads .....................................................................
B-5452
Milk dealers .................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ...........................................................

3
13
14
17
20
20
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
2425
25
26
27
27
28
28
30
30
31

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction........................................................
C-205
Bakeries ......................................................................
C-2082
Malt liquors .....................................................................
C-27
Printing ......................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ............................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ...............................................
C-44
Ocean transport — unlicensed personnel .........................................
C-44&
Stevedoring ...................................................................
C-541
Grocery stores and meat markets ..............................................
C-58
Restaurants, Cafeterias, and Lunchrooms ......................................
C-591
Drug stores ...................................................................
C-7G11
Hotels ........................................................................

32
32
32
32
32
32
33
34
34
35
35
35

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .....................................

36

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ................................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ........................................................
E-3
Paid holidays .................................................................
E-4Paid vacations ................................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave .........................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses .........................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension p l a n s ..............

37
38
38
39
4.0
42
42

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y .................... ................................ .......

43

I N D E X ........................................................................................

45

* NOTE - Additional occupationalearnings reports are available upon request
for women's cement process shoes - slip lasted (August 1951), women's cement
process shoes - conventional lasted (August 1951), auto repair shops (April
1951), ferrous foundries (June 1951), paints and varnishes (March 1951), power
laundries (April 1951), and wood furniture, other than upholstered (August 1951).
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 25 cents

Jun« 5, 1952

82d Congress, 2d Session

Introduction l!

Wage and salary workers in nonagricultural pursuits
numbered 1,624,000 in January 1952. The importance of the area
as a focal point for manufacturing activities in the West is
shown In the employment of 520,000, or about a third of the labor
force, in a wide variety of manufacturing industries. Although
a little more than half the manufacturing employment was in
metalworking industries in 1952, the remainder was in such diver­
sified production as men's and women's apparel, office and house­
hold furniture, food products, rubber tires and tubes, petroleum
products, industrial chemicals, and clay and glass products.

The Los Angeles area is lof 4.0 major labor markets in
vhieh the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational vage surveys 0 Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis 0 Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilised in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional and technical; (c)
maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping. In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.

A fourth of the manufacturing workers were employed in
the aircraft industry (including aircraft parts).
Machinery
manufacturing, predominantly oil-field equipment and refrigera­
tion apparatus, accounted for 74,000 workers; other fabricated
metal manufacturers employed 43,000. Food processing industries
provided employment for 40,000 workers and the apparel indus­
tries employed 38*000.

Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data for these
jobs are presented in Series B tables. Union scales (Series C
tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational
earnings for several industries or trades in which the great
majority of the workers are employed under terms of collective­
bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are in­
dicative of prevailing pay practices.

Among nonmanufacturing industries, employment in whole­
sale and retail trade numbered 366,000 and a labor force of
232,000 was employed in the services industries. An important
segment of this latter group, with 34,000 employees, was the
motion-picture industry which is popularly identified with
the Los Angeles area economy. In the public utilities group of
industries, including communication and transportation, 117,000
were employed. Finance, insurance, and real estate establish­
ments had 74*000 workers, and the functions of Federal, State,
and local governments were carried out in Los Angeles by 200,000.
The building construction industry, significant in an area of
constantly increasing population, employed 101,000 workers.

Data were collected and summarised on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The Los Angeles Metropolitan Area

Among the industry and establishment-size groups sur­
veyed:, three-fourths of the workers in nonoffice jobs were em­
ployed in establishments having written agreements with labor
organizations. Virtually all plant workers in the public utili­
ties group of industries were employed under union contract pro­
visions, and in manufacturing and trade the ratio of plant work­
ers in unionized establishments was greater than 75 percent.

The estimated population of the Los Angeles Metropoli­
tan Area was A,367,900 in 1950. Of these, slightly less than
half lived in the city of Los Angeles and the others were widely
spread within the confines of Los Angeles and Orange Counties an expanse of almost 5,000 square miles0
Extensive land use by this latter rural-urban popula­
tion is reflected in a labor force of about 100,000 engaged in
fanning in 1950. These, however, constituted less than 5 per­
cent of the total civilian labor force in the area.

A fourth of the Los Angeles office workers were in
firms which had collective-bargaining agreements covering pay
and working conditions for office workers. The highest degree
of unionization for these workers was found in the public utili­
ties group (75 percent) and in durable-goods manufacturing 2/
(36 percent).

1/ Prepared in the Bureau f regional office in San Francisco,
s
Calif., by William P0 O'Connor under the direction of John L.
Dana, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The plan­
ning and central direction of the program was carried on in the
Bureau's Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Jj See appendix table for listing
able-goods industries.

L
)

of durable- and nondur-

2

Although seme instances of collective bargaining on
the multiemployer, industry-wide, master-agreement scale existed
in the Los Angeles area, most negotiations were carried out on
a single-unit basis.

Occupational Wage Structure
During the year preceding the survey, wages were for­
mally adjusted upward by establishments employing three-fourths
of the plant workers. These pay raises were almost invariably
for 5 or more cents an hour, and amounted to 10 or more cents
for two-thirds of those receiving increases. On an industry
group basis, the largest proportion of workers receiving increases
was in the public utilities group. More than nine-tenths of the
plant workers in these establishments received formal wage ad­
justments.
More than 60 percent of the office workers in the area
were employed in establishments which formally raised salaries
during the 1-year period. Of these workers, almost half had
weekly pay raises of at least $4, In addition to these general
wage increase recipients, many other Los Angeles office workers
vere granted raises on an individual or merit basis.
Formalized rate structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing 95 percent of Los Angeles
plant workers. Approximately half of these were in establish­
ments which stipulated single rates for each job classification,
with the remainder working under plans which provided ranges of
rates. Among office workers, 80 percent were in firms having
formalized rate structures, and almost all of these structures
were of the rate-range type. For other office workers, salaries
were determined on an individual basis.
In the Los Angeles area, the establishment of minimum
entrance rates for inexperienced plant workers was the practice
in nearly all firms. On an all-industry basis, 90 percent of
the workers were employed in establishments paying an hourly
minimum of 85 cents or more; more than half were in establish­
ments which paid $1,10 or more. Highest minimum entrance rates
were generally found In the manufacturing, public utilities, and
wholesale trade groups.




Supervisory pay was based on a fixed relationship to
the rates of workers supervised in establishments employing about
30 percent of the Los Angeles area plant workers0 Among the
industry groups studied, these formalized plans were most preva­
lent in the durable-goods manufacturing group - nearly 40 per­
cent of the plant workers were employed in establishments with
such plans. Formal plans for the establishment of supervisory
pay typically were based on a cents-per-hour differential above
the highest rates of those supervised; however, percentage dif­
ferentials were also frequent. Cents-per-hour
differentials
ranged from the top rate of the highest classification supervised
to 50 cents an hour more than the rate of the highest-paid work­
ers supervised.
Salaries of office workers in manufacturing industries
were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing. In 24 of 37
office job classifications permitting comparison, salaries of
workers in manufacturing plants were higher than those in non­
manufacturing o However, average salaries in one nonmanufactur­
ing segment— motion pictures— exceeded averages in both manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing in all cases permitting compari­
son.
The relatively high rate structures in the motionpicture industry largely accounted for the high occupational
averages of plant workers in nonmanufacturing. In 18 of 31
occupations permitting comparison, average hourly earnings in
nonmanufacturing establishments were higher than in manufactur­
ing o Averages In the motion picture production industry exceeded
both those in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing in all instances.
About a fourth of the workers in Los Angeles manufac­
turing plants were employed on late shifts in January 1952, All
but a small number of these were paid shift premiums, usually
expressed in terms of cents-per-hour over day-shift rates. The
most frequently reported premium for second-shift work was 8
cents. Few employees worked on third shifts.

Almost 85 percent of the women office workers were
scheduled to work a 4-0-hour week in January 1952, In the finance
group and the service industries, women office workers were on
a somewhat shorter workweek. Four of every five plant workers
were on a 40-hour weekly schedule, whereas most of the remainder
worked 48 hours or more a week.

Cross-Industry Occupations

A:

Table A-l>

Q jffa e Q cG H fxM O M t.

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A v er a g e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
Weekly
erig $
anns
h urs
o
(tnad (tnad
Sadr) Sadr)
32.50
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 4 5 . 0 0 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
j

$
95.00
and
over

Ken

Billers, machine (billing machine) ......
Nonmanufacturing ....................

76
76

Bookkeepers. h a n d ........ ..............
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .............. .
Nonmanufacturing ....................

499
236
133
103
263
71
50

40.0
40.0

*
59.00
59.00

~

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

-

“

15
15

_

1

1? ___ 24
34
13

9

“

_

_

_

_

5
5

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

24
16
16
8
.
ui

53
37
20
17
16

32
27
5
22
5

33
20
15
5
13

70
16
11
5
54
23

74
18
2
16
56
<J
C.

6?
39
32
7
26
13

86
43
32
11
43
3
1
J K?
-

46
17

_

6

11

10

1

Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ........................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ......................
Motion pictures ..................

82.00
U t
t 81.00
T
40.0
80.50
40.0
81.50
83.00
40.5
80.50
40 5
40j )

.

40.5

46

41.0

83.50

15
24

45.0
40.0

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) ................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

Clerks, accounting .....................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods ............................................... ...
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................................
Public utilities * ..........................................................
Wholesale trade ...........*......
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) .......... ..............
Finance ** .............. ........
Services (excluding motion
pictures) .......................
Motion pictures .....................................................................
Clerks, file, class A ....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................................
Finance ** .................................................. ...................................

4

-

-

-

67.50
99.50

-

_
1

-

-

;

-

_

-

_

1;

_

51

-

1
-

_

1
-

3
i

27

6
6
-

\

*
-

49
10
39

-

i

-

!

40.0
60.50
40.0 “ 64.50
40.0
59.50

”
j

~j

29
21

24
19

1,162
568“
409
159
594
50
281

40.0
40.0

“

40.0
40.0

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
40.5

_

60.50
63.50

62.00
63.00

-

_1

-

-1
—

-

-

_

65.50
6 5 .0 0

63.00
69.50
66.50
58.00
72.50

i

1

-

-

“

-

-

!

1

-

- 1
- 1

1'

_

- ;

i
40
153

40.0
40.0

68.00
58.00

45
25

39.5
40.0

54.00
84.50

40.0

53.00
“ 53.50
49.50

43

33

4 0 .0

26

40.0

-

-

9
9

2

-

1

_

~

2

3
2

j

15
-

15

_

_

1
'

71
25
24
1
46
9
2

16
7
7

2

29

3

19

4

6

1

-

41
31
30
1
10
4

-

9
5

89
49
46
3
40
18
3

-

27

-

12
_

4
2

7
6

5
5

154
74
51
23
80
22

104
72
60
12
32
1
15

114.
46
27
19
68
4
21

6
52

9
6

7
33

_

3

_

10
j

5

_

_

_

_

-

-

5

-

-

_

_

_

4
4

_

_

_

_

1
1

5
5!

3
3

-

-

2
2

-

1
1

-

17
29
*
1
1
1
.
H
5

_
19

_

12

3
1

!

_

1

_

-

1

2

1!
14

_

1

!

-

3
1

2
-1

-

J

_

_

-

-

92
61
61

53
37
19
18
16
1
15

_

31
1
12

64

36
23
13
28
7
17

_

105
44
6
38
61
54

"

-

3

_|---------------!
_j
-

_

3

-

-

-

u

4

138
79
42 1 36 i
20 I
31
11 1 16 !
102
37

15
8
4
4
7

_
_

_
_

4

4

_

_

29

91

2

7

2

1

3

i

!

_

1

_
-

“

“1

3

.
.

-

-

1

8

1

!

—

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2
-

1

01

1
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...
Manufacturing .......................

-

1

1

j
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing...... ..............

-

4

-

—

—

12
12
12

9

14
14
14

3
3

_

_

_

_

2
_
15
1

_

_

4

-

-

1

6

4

5

1
1

1

1
1

_

_

2
2

6

4

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

u

Oj^icC 0cC44fuUiO4ti - G o4ituU €*d

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EEKLY EAR N IN G S OF—

%

$

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

$

Under 12.50 15.00 17.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 to.00 & 2.50 I5.OO 17.50 70.00 fa.5 0 75.00 80.00 I5.OO 90.00 95.00
and
32.50
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95,00 over

Men - Continued

Clerks, file, class B
Manufacturing .....
Nonmanuf&cturing .

Clerks, general, se n i o r .............. .
Manufacturing..................... .
Durable goods ........... ....... .
Nondurable goods ............... .
Nonmanufacturing..... ........ .
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ............. .
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ...................... .
Finance ** ..................... .
Motion pictures................ .

Clerks, general, intermediate ...
Manufacturing ..............
Durable g o o d s .......... .
Nondurable goods ........ .
Nonmanufacturing............
Public utilities * ......
Wholesale t r a d e ..........
Finance *» ..............
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ..............
Motion pictures..........

76
27
49

39.5
40.0
39.5

%
53.50
53.50
53.50

556
l 6S'
147
21
388
41
136

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0

74.50
73.50
73.00
75.50
75.50
84.00
76.00

44
148
19

40.0
39.5
40.0

75.50
69.50
97.50

1,229
305“
260
43
926
203
452
94

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0

66.00
62.00
61.00
69.00
67.50
75.00
66.00
52.50

40.0
40.0

56.00
86.00

30
48

2

2

_

_

_

_

-

2

2

“

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

Clerks, order ........................ .
Manufacturing ..................... .
Durable goods .................. .
Nondurable goods ................ .
Nonmanufacturing.................. .
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ....................... .

387

40.0

107

40.0

44
63
280
104
16

40.0
39.5
40.5
40.0
40.0

57.50
54.50
52.00
56.00
58.50
54.00
70.00

1.350
*233~
99
134
1,117
1,062

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

68.00
73.50
79.50
69.00
67.00
67.00

40.0

**

12
2
10

7
3
4

2

5

8

4

2

5

8
-

-

-

-

3

_

"

_

_

4

2

2j

7
3
4

2

17

3

13

-

-

_

_
-

-

1

_

1

10

-

3

- !

1

- !

70
29
29

1

!

i
62
13
13

8
2
2
6

10

I

2

1

2

1

63
7
7

72
34
31
3
38
1
3

10
5
5

1

_____ 1

1

3

2?
16

2

10 i
i
.16

_
8

2
-

38
15
13
2
23

62
26
26
36

_

_

8

14

15

56
2
30

15

6
16

12
18

8
16

-

j

13
5
-!

2j
1!

_

8

_

-

-

83
38
32
6
45
_

-

!

115 121
28
52
42
24
10
4
63
93
4
4
33 | 56
2
9

108
20
14
6
88
27
39

94
10 i
10

28
4
4

2
26
6

-1

-

-

-

13

17

-

-

-

-

-

2

17

3

7

15
2

_ ^

_

_

_

_

6

_

6

i

4
2
2

4
-

3

-

-

-

17

53
20
20
33
4
15
8

-

-

2

-

-

4

-!
- ;

-

4

4

2

-

-

-1
2

-

3
-

3
3

5
3

1
2
2
-

35
17
14
3
18

77
19
5
14
58

4

48

n

2
6

-

-,

_

-

_

_

-

3
3

-

-

- ;

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

41
8
15
18
_

32
17
8
9

1
5
2
102
2
2
100
96

49
4
30 ;
6
9

20
10
10 j

_ |

10 1
-

47
3
3
44
44

105 1 137
44
49
41 ; 42
31
7
61 | 88
15
29 ! 56
1
7 2
1

51
17
*

13
34
29
1

3

1

35
18

62
4

18
17
15
-

58
1

1

-

3

-

-

84

24

-

_

76
1

23

136
8
4
4
128
68
46

-

-

_

_

_

3

-

30
13
13

8
5
3

1
1

1

69.50

51

_

_

!

Clerks, general, junior
Manufacturing .....
Durable goods ...,
Nondurable goods .
Nonmanufacturing ....
Wholesale trade .
.
Motion pictures .
.

-

~

12
2
10

4

-

6
6

1

10

3

43

4

1

43

-1
2

4

-

20
4
4

4
30
10
2
12
6

93
9
9!

84 !
69 !
7
~i

-

16
11
3
1

-

12

28
4
4
-i
24 !

5

9

-

-

5

9

-

-

3
-

-

_

J

_

_

8

3-5

2

9

2

1
_

-

-

3

1

4

1

2|

-

152
19

88

24

72
14

•

4

133
124

24
64
54

44

177
21
9
12
156
154

9

10

14

2
_l
2j

-

_
_

-

-

24
12;
!
12

12
6
6

18
9
9

12 !
12 i

6

2

7

2

7

10
58

93

53 1

36
17
40
40

_




9
9
*

■

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

-

1

9'

_

8
11

-

16
1
3

-

4

17
66
64

1

16

-

!

_

261
23
2
21
238
231

18

~

-

-

102 112
13 ! 1 3
i 12
1
13
89
99
92
89

84

-

34
4

101
22
18
4
79
11
52
J
16

2

3

“

6

5

Otfiem Occupation* - Continued

T»bi. m i

\J

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings
for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952 )

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, ooeupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
Weekly (fader 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 6 5 . 0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 . 0 0 90.00 95.00
Weekly
erig 1
anns
hours
and
( t n a d ( t n a d 32.50
Sadr) Sadr)
3 5 .OO 37.50 40.00 42.10 45.00 47.50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 55tOO 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 7 0 . 0 0 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 * 0 0 90.00 95.00 over

Men - Continued
4
Clerks, navroll ........................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods .....................
nondurable goods .... .............
Nonmanufsuturing .....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) .........................
Motion pictures ...................

Du d licatinx-aachine operators ...........
Nonm&nufacturing......... .......... .
Wholesale trade ...................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ......................
Motion pictures ...................

Office boys ............................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
WkAlmealm lus^m
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ......................
Motion pictures ...................

418
“ 255
154
51
213
14
65
19
81

4 0 .0

7 2 .5 0

"40.0” "57.00
40.0
6 5 .5 0
40.0
71.50
40.0
78.00
4 0 ,0
59.00
65.50
39.5
40.0
40.0

40.0
115
.109 “ ■"40.0
28
40.0

-

-

-

-

-

5
2
2

-

9
2
2

17
~
-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

7

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

17
2
15

2

2
2

_

68.00
94.50

-

~

-

-

-

-

~

57.00
57.00“
55.50

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

12
12
8

-

35
31
-

2
2
2

9i
9
8

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

29 i

“

35
17
15
2
18
JC
8

-

54
18

40.0
40.0

55.50
63.00

-

502
152
90
62
350
64
137

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
3 9 I5

45.50
47.00
50.00
42.50
45.00
46.00
a. 00

6
6
- i
6
-

54
61

38.0
40.0

4 1 .5 0
4 9 .0 0

-

-

2
19 ;

24
4
- j
4 I
20

5
~ !
j

9

79
17

i
1!
43 i
20

9

14

44
1

j

4!

17
62
15
V,
9
1 28

95
30
15
15
65
17
•o
s
X I
9

80
29
19
10
51
g
15
i
8|
20

27
14
12
2
13

46
17
16
1
29
24

18
18
5

3

2
1

6
2
2
4

19
7
3
4
12

42
36
25
11
6

52
13
4
9
40

_

8

3

15

_

_

_

13

7

50

2

4
1

4
-

2
2

2
1

7

—

19
4
4
15

23

7
_
7

57
57

26
26
2

17
4
4
13

3
-

7
6
3

3
3
-

2
2
-

3
3
3

-

-

1
1
-

_
-

_

22
1

9

1

3

2

1

-

-

~

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

17
6
6

2

1

1

11

2!

1

1

j

L

22
9
9
13

24
14
3
11
10
3

-

_

-

9

21
2;

22
19
17
2
3

19
19
14
5
-

5

3

52
38
36
2
14
L
H
10

27
27
24
3

-

|

^
3
3

7

4

2

“

1

3
2

4

-

-

1

-

“

-

-

26
8
3

“

21
19 i
;

i
Secretaries ............................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Motion piotures...................

T&bul&tirut-m&chine operators............
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ........................
Finance ** .......................
Isf^An v4 nnma
fv
\
...... .

68
44
12

510
“ 510
200
10
300
109
34
115
19

40.0
40.0
40.0

81.50
83.50

66.50
40.0
67.00“
“ 40.0
67.00
40.0
70.50
40.0
39.5 1 66.00
40.0
6 8 .5 0
40.0
39.0
40.0

63.50
61.00
83.50

1
X

i

!

_ i

.
.

-

-

- ;
-

-

-

-

6
-

11
4

6
-

28
1
1
27
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
5

7

6

15

-

-

-

-

1

j

6
-

11

-

8
2
2

-

1
10 j
1
- :
1!
9
1
|
- 1
8[

43
42

40.0
40.0

47.50
48.00

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




11
11

2
]
_

3
O
J

10
10

4
4

2
2

3
3

20
8

3
15

1

|
Typists, class B ..................... ..

26 ___64____6Z_
26
37
3
2
26
36
1
1
38
30
23
11
9
4
2
17

I
1
1

4

3

4

3

1

_
94 ___4Z.___22.___44, ___32_j __28 _
2
56
31
15
33
3
56
32
15
31
2
1
3
18
16
11
26
38
29
21
20
16
1
5
5
!
2
4
4
9
3
7
7
4
1
6
2
2

4
3

8
8
5

____1
7
3
1
1

2
2
-

2
_

2

4
4
4
L

-

4

—
-

2

6

O ^ io e O c c u p a tio n ^

Table A-i:

-

C o n tin u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY E ARNING S OF—

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num ber
of
w o rk e rs

$
95.00
and
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47*50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 55.00 57*50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over
$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

W e e k ly
W e e k ly Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 7 0 . 0 0 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 . 0 0
h o u rs
e a rn in g s \
(S ta n d a rd ) (S ta n d a rd ) 32.50

9 0 .0 0

Women

%

Billers, machine (billing machine) ......
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ........ .......... .
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ...... ............. .
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ................. .
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ................... .

929
264

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ...
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ....................... .
Finance ** ........................

122

4 0 .0

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0

51.00
53.00
54.00

142
665
136
458

40.0

5 2 .0 0

59

39.0

191
71—

4 0 .0

55.50
60.50
52.50

5 2 .0 0

50.50
49.00

36
36
36

-

-

-

-

58
9
-'
9
49
49
-

87

a
34
16
18
47

121

9
184
17
156

20

45

74
31
43
47
3
44 j

3

11

6

2

”

!

6

-

26
-

16

-

2

6

26

15 !

34
19
!5

8
2
6

2

-

4

4 1
2 |

12
2

34
17
13
4
17

18
13
13
5
5
_

21

8

22

7
1

17

~

30
30
57
15
39

199
15

a
40

99
19
19
80
13
61

2

42.00

4 0 .0

-

-

-

6

2

31
3
3
28
7

55

29

10
8
2

2

2

14

29
29

45
16

29

-

_

_

-

-

1

-

-

"

~

38
41
7

-

-

-

-

'

'

3

29
29
4

1

1

120

29
14

""40.0“
40.0

- |
- 1
1

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

i52.50

- j

4 6 .0 0

"

Bookkeepers, hand ......................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ...............
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ........................
Finance
.......................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ......................

891
204
159
45
687
34
206

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

40.0

I
i

68.50
6 8 .0 0

40.0

!67.50
!69.50
!6 8 . 5 0
!6 7 . 0 0
!6 9 . 0 0

77
103

41.0
40.5

i69.00
|63.50

247

40.0

- i
i
- ;

- i
”
i

-

100

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

622
29
345

40.0
39.5
40.0

60.00

58
153

41.5
39.5

64.00
53.50

36

40.0

"

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

?6

36
-

47
32
30
2

15
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

u
-

-

5

-

-

-

2

4

3

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

3
1

;

16

33

-

“

16
6

83
32l

85

66

32

85
13
29

-

51
-

8
8

-

—

1

~

1

-

_

—

5

1

5

-

33

2

1

3
2

-

15
51
2

5L
23
14
9
31
2

_

122

32
31
1

90
00
^7

~

71

75
3

33
14

1
2

12
2

72

19
-

111

24
45

-1
66

26

1

11

-

2

11
100

2
8

!

1

!

2

L L

3

1
6

2

1

28

5
-

7

5

10

30

6
6

6

-

9 ■
-

21

-

15

-

1

1

15

-

13

1

1

23

11

37

24

25

11

28

22

22

41
9

108
16

72_- 1 1 2 , 118
58
15
25
21
3
37
21
12
4
60
57
107
9
20
35
58
51

79
43
23

10

36

A5
29
28
1
16

31

11

31

-

5

2

7
27

2

26

15
15
11

-

3

29

1

29

2

-

-

-

5

3
3
- i

2

-

—

'

-

-

i

39 !
10 !
29
1

5

58
3

29

9
32

16
92

3
55

6

_

70

8

5 9 .5 0

-

12
1
11

PQ

'

59.50
6 1 .5 0

63.50
58.50
59.00

-

—
'

57.50

859
237
137

-

_
-

1

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




- —
- j
-

67.00

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

'

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Manufacturing.................... .
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable g o o d s ..... .......... .
Nonmanufacturing ................... .
n u i »• *
............
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ........................
Finance * * ................. .....
Services (excluding motion

6

*
*

1

!

3

21

29

21

46

2

3

1

1

26 !
3
22

-

20

-

-

3

82

22 _ 44_
_

17

5
5
17

7
65

15
15
29
29

17
-

-

.16 | __ 3_
_
- |
1 6

15
1

-

!

1

3

-

-

_

_

_

_

- i

- !

-

-

-

-

-

-

!

3 |

1

1

Office Occupation* - C ontinued

M a le A -it

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNING S OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num ber
of

$
$
$
$
*
W e e k ly Under §2.50 J5 . 0 0 17.50 4 0 . 0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 I 5 .OO 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 . 0 0 90.00 95.00
W e e k ly
e a rn in g s $
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd ) (S ta n d a rd )
? ? . 0 0 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 4 7 . 5 0 50.00 52.30 55.00 57.50 6 0 . 0 0 62.50 65.00 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 2 . 5 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 . 0 0 9 5 . 0 0
over

Women - Continued
*

Bookkeeping-machine operators. Class B . . . .
Manufacturing.... ....................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable g o o d s .... ..............
Nonmanufacturing...................
Public utilities * .................
Wholesale trade ...............•••••
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) .........................
Finance * * ........................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ................,......

1,764
53
314

40.5
40.6

4 8 *5 0

56.50

_

88
1,238

40.0
40.0

48.00
45.00

-

66

39.5

55.00

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) .................................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing................••••••
Public utilities * .................
Wholesale t r a d e ......... ..........
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) .........................

2.557
766
307
459
1,791
140
1,033

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
39.5

56.00
57.50
57.50
57.50
55.00
54.50
54.50

_
-

484

40.0

58.50

—

1,969
205
75
130

4 0 .0

40.0
40.0
39.5
4 0 .0

48.50
52.00
51.50

-

5 2 .0 0
4 8 .0 0

-

22

24
_
24

-

322

97

22

253

_
_
97

_
_

6

21
6

2

2

56

50

28

_
_

-

48

- ;
_

-

48
48

_

-

-

-

. . - . . . . . . ._ . . . . . .
_

I-

;
_

!

38

3
2
2

_

9

1

36

1

5
4

_
_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

u

4

4
4

4

4

8
8
_
8

_
_

_

4

1

4
21

1
3

2
2

_
_

“

-

28

“

-

6

-

-

-

267
85
34
51
182
13
119

305
123
74
49
182
25
109

454
146
42
104
308
7
222

lf.ft

79
35
44
69
12
42

108
44
35
9
64
2
25

109
50
8
42
59
4
19

50
14
14

173
5
_

_

36
6
9

5
168
10
73

23
8
_
8
15
15

_

_
_

65

45

42

67

15

37

35

21

84

-

-

15
4
11

4
4

_

_

_

_

_

4
4

_

_

_
_

7

56
27
29
29

5

7

87
15
72
56
15

1

-

-

2

12

145
9
_
9
136
19
26

155
25
2
23
130
14
63

90
25
4
21
65
12
34

385
128
59
69
257
16
164

16

43

12

1

_

15
9
6

7
_

g

35

5

5

_

_

5
3

3

„

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
36

3

18

6

2

19

9
_
_

_
_

10
a

1

42
4
4

_
_

17
86

- - - IT- - - - - _
-_
1_

4
46

21
2

37

44
9
9
35
_
33

_
32
_
32 !

A

15

~

32

-

-

18

50

_
2

16
181

~

8
22

15

25
275

11
228

1
96

15
55

48
30 4

14

266

2

1
13

*

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) .....................
52.00
194
39.5
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63. . . "39'.. 5 . . . . .51.06 . . . . .
.
. . . . .
. . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . .......... . .
. . . . . .
52.00
131
39.5
Wholesale t r a d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 . . . .40.0 . . . . . 53.00. . . . .
. .
. . . .
. . . . .
Finance ** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34. . . . 38.0. .
. .
. . . .
50.00

25

7
13
115

20

11

8

76

20

181

11

135

12
11

23
4
19
219

10

204
23

242

26

17
9
353

2

8

_

8

_
24

379

46
_(
15
_
31
276
253

2

-

-

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

-

_

_
_

1
1

i

i

i
i

Clerics, accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . 3,889 . . . 40.0
. . . . . .
. . .
54.50
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . l!366 ~
. .
T
O
3
$7.60 —
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 898 . . . . 40.0 . . . . . 57.50. .
. . .
. . . .
. . . . .
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .• . . • . . . • . . .• . . •468. . . . 40.0 . . . . 56.50
. . .
. . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . 2,523
...
40.0
53.00
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
347
40.0
55.00
Wholesale t r a d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519
40.0
57.00
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .437 . . . . . . 40.0. . . . 54.50
.....
.......
Finance ** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 854. . . . . . .39.5. .
.....
......
47.00
Services (excluding motion
pictures) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309. . . . . . 40.0. .
.....
.......
54.00
Motion pictures .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 57
.
. 40.0 .
.
. 80.50.
.

70 ; 1 0 3 ! 167
1—
!
7

. . . . . -. . . . . . . - . . 1
-

;

70

-

_

_
.

l_

60
59

27
160

18
106

18 _

19

39

•

281
5

15
40

8

-

442
145
95
50
297
37
93

459
229
152
77
230
25
56

14
106

93
20

10
93

46 :
60

47

36

19

62

313
113
52
61
200
46
32 I

.

371
151
106
45
220
23
29

400
231
141
90
169
13
64

231
119
95
24
112
34
37

74
41
38
3
33
4
17

152
71
64
7
81
7
33

145
57
26
31
88
12
42

61
5
2
3
56
25
3

62

3
4

8

11
6

34

21

1
9
8
O

J

_

_

_

_ _

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




9
85

1102

5 ;
65 !

31

r

-

!
_

-

.

-

-

-

.

8_

7
160
12
11

223
6
“ 73
30
57 _
9
43
150
215
38 I 42
14
45

_

31

_

318
54
38
16
264
29
29

-

31

_ _

_ _

_ _

_ _

_

_

_

_

J

33

_
_

20
4

_

3

21
2!
2
19

li
2 i

16

3

1
_

1
_

f

1*

_
16

3

5

_

6

_
_

5
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

0

<

16

3

5

8

O ffic e 0cC 44fuU lO H & - G <m J<H 44m d

Table A - 1 j

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EEKLY EAR N IN G S OF—

A verage

$
$
8 0 .0 0 8*5.00 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0
and

8

$
*
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
Weekly Under 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .00 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 1,5.00 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0
Weekly
hours
earnings 1
(Standard) (Standard) 3 2 .5 0
3 5 .00 3 7 .5 0 UO. 00 4 2 .5 0 !45*00 4 7 .5 0 5 0 ,0 0 5 2 ,5 0 55*00 57*50 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0

8

Number
of
workers

r - ___ a .
m

Sex, occupation, and industry division

8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 95.OO

over

Women - Continued

Clerks, file, class A ,
Manufacturing ....
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ..
Wholesale trade ,
Finance * * .... .
Motion pictures

Clerks, file, class B ................ .
Manufacturing..... ................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores)...................... .
Finance * * ..................... .
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ....................
Motion pictures
..............

Clerks, general, senior ..............
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing..................
Wholesale t r a d e................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ......................
Finance «* .....................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ....................
Motion pictures ................

Clerks, general, intermediate .........
Manufacturing ................... .
Durable goods ................. .•
Nondurable goods ..... .
Nonmanufacturing .... .............. .
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale t r a d e ................ .
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ...................... .
Finance ** ..................... .
Services (excluding motion
pictures) .....................
Motion pictures ................

637
139
96
43
498
186
237
17

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

*
4 9 .5 0
5 5 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
5 1 .0 0
4 8 .0 0
4 7 .0 0
4 6 .5 0
7 9 .0 0

2 ,2 7 3
360
98
1 ,8 1 5
331
272

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

4 2 .5 0
4 8 .0 0
4 8 .0 0
4 9 .0 0
! 4 1 .0 0
J 4 6 .0 0
4 7 .5 0

97
956

4 0 .0
3 8 .5

4 7 .0 0
3 7 .0 0

144
15

3 9 .0
4 0 .0

3 7 .0 0
6 7 .0 0

833
206
132
74
627
73

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

! 6 4 .5 0
7 2 .5 0 j
6 9 .0 0
7 8 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
6 7 .5 0

53
292

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

! 7 4 .0 0
5 6 .0 0

-

70
15

4 1 .5
4 0 .0

5 9 .5 0
8 9 .0 0

_

5 ,7 2 1
2 ,5 4 5
2 ,2 9 6
249
3 ,1 7 6
454
1 ,0 3 5

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

18 4
1 ,0 8 3

4 0 .5
3 8 .5

5 7 .5 0
4 9 .0 0

372
48

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

5 1 .5 0
7 5 .0 0

! 5 5 .0 0
5 6 .0 0 “
5 6 .0 0
5 5 .0 0
5 4 .5 0
6 6 .0 0
5 5 .0 0

9
_
-

-

9
9

362
114 ! 362
- )
16
- !

114
-

_

>

91 : 296
23 i
-

50

36

31
-

36

31
6
25

25

278
1
-

36
15
21

90
8
8
82
54
16

57
1
1
56
14
30

135
25
6
19
no
69
30

35
27
27
58
20
34

25
19
10
9
6
6

1
_

2
_

2
_

6
-

~

1
1

2
2
_

2
1
1

6
6

7
2

8
5
4
1
3
-

58
-

6
-

2
-

-

1
-

-

-

17
10
9
1
7
2
2
1

45
9
9
36
36
-

3
-

4
2
1

44
12

20
-

35
31
31
-

10
4
4
6
1
-

7
-

-

132
11
5
6
121
13
40

256
155
128
27
101
8
41

I83
131
104
27
52
5
17

89
56
42
14
33
9
5

98
44
42
2
54
40
11

39
10
10
29
29
-

12
32
20
-

- !
20 !
7
2

2
5
3
2

58 i

6

2

-

1

50

3

-

-

32
7 ;
4
239 1 108 i 103

2
66

12
40

1

16
3

_

_

12

11

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

-

_

_

_

_

_ i

_

“

8

3 |

2

*"

42
17
17
-

49
32
32
-

25
-

17
8

5
9

-

-

9

4

_

14
15

11

_

-

n

15
-

35
~

_

7
21

_

-

”

1

-

2
- !
- i
- i

50
_
_
_

14
-

56
-

73
_
-

2 1

50
2
j

14
-

56
4

73
-

_

_

_

26

14

52

3
70

15

22

_

_

_

_

-

_ j
_
- 1
- !

.

_

_

-

- 1

_
-

-

-

-

-

“

_

_

_ ,

_

_ ‘

-

-

-

_

_

2
_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

1

“

~

~

60
20
- i
20
40
-

16
-

21
9
9
12

13
9
9
4
-

-

10
-

-

7

1

-

|

21
- i
21
5
1

-

U

28
L 1
_ :
_
28
“
21 !
7

°

]

___ s _ ■ - .6 7 j
4
47
2
41
2 i
9
6
20
31
47
18
3
9

152
22
22
130
-

.3 9
22
7
15
17
8

8

3
7

9
6

1 1
7

7

1 |
4

6
31

3

_

1

3915
11
4 |
24
17

16
8

i

19
9

4
61
_

-

21

19

45

481
47
38
9
434
6
128

5

2
8

4
29 :

3
86

11
147

10
219

_

_

7

9

52

71

~

-

_

-

_

19
_
- 1
-

65
4
-

~

269
144
27
14
15 ;
4
12 !
10
117 i 255
-

'

643 |
321!
319 |
2 j
322 1

821
428
369
59
393
1 13
111 i 182

583
418
384
34
165
18
59

488
231
199
32
257
25
101

669
386
386
283
23
73

573
395
340
55
178
49
105

324
72
66
6
252
148
41

10
24
149 ( 138

2

5
73

42
96

2
22

22
19

15
10

53

46
3

_

22

24
3

4

45
3

36
'

a

5

'

~
'

271 ...... 32
180
20
160
16
20
4
12
91
2
1
1
38

43 ____52_
2
2
52
41
16
47

_

20

_

I

1

-

-

2
6

_

-

5

5

131 ___ 6 i _
131
65
88
56
6

24
1
2

_

-

3 !

— 14~
r
_ !
14
_
9
-

_

-

3

_

-

-

-

-

1
277
19

-

7
7
1

399
26
23
3
4 ,
175
373
- ! 197
25 | 41

See footnote at end of table.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_ 1

185
10
6

_______ 1

*

36

28
28 j
3
12

-

-

_
7

-

-

3

4

3 ______ 1
3
3
3
3
-

-

-

1

3

-

-

9

O ffjfio e O c c u p a t i o n * - C o n t in u e d

Table A-l*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

1

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
>
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
jnder 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52-50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
$
and
32.50
65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over
35-0° 37*50 1*0.00 ^2.50 1*5.00 l*7.5o 50,00 52,50 55.00 57.50 60.00

W
omen - continued
Clerks, general, junior u m m . u m m u h
Manufacturing
........ .
Durable goods . . . . . . . • • . • • • • • • • • • • 4
Nondurable goods
Nonnanufacturing ................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ...........
Wholesale trade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . .
R eta il trade (excluding department
sto res) ..........................
Finance * * .................................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) • • • • ............... .
Motion pictures

5,13b
27555“
1,681
558
i, 895
58U
637

39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0

$
1*9.00
51.00“
52.00
1*9.00
1*7.00
S3.50
50.50

275
1,067

1*0.0
39.5

306
26

52

166
18

153

209
6

609
209
161
1*8
1*00
1*7
121

1*81*
216
150
66
268
51
57

611*
339
231*
105
275
62
90

$87
288
227
61
299
73
55

1)62
321
316
5
H*1
1*3
32

637
519
372
lb7
118
57
30

230
15b
11*5
9
76
bl
26

153
52
52

28
85

25
98

7
11*2

3
61

18
13

153

18
11*8

6
203

-

16

32

2

51*1*
105
21*
81
1*39
51*
53

l*l*.5o
1*3.50

6
21*

31*
59

8
88

6
11*8

1*6
218

65
131

37.0
1*0.0

1*0.00
67.00

22

1)1*

20

1*7

68

36

758
516
21*5
71
UU
2
202

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

56.50
56.50
55.50
59.00
57.00
61.00

Clerks, pay r o l l ............. ........................... .
Manufacturing . . . « • • . • • ...........
Durable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • 4
Nondurable goods » ••••« .••••••••••<
Nonnanufacturing
Public u t i l i t i e s * • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • .
Wholesale trade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ,
R etail trade (excluding department
stores) • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • .............<
Finance * * ..................................... .
Services (excluding motion
pictures) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .........
Motion pictures • • • • • • • • • • . . • • • • . • 4

1,391*
657
358
339
697
175
209

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5

59.50
59.00
59.00
59.00
59.50
5U.50
62.50

100
92

1*0.0
1*0.0

61*.00
53.00

100
21

1)0.0
1*0.0

56.50

Duplicating-machine o p e r a to r s............♦ .<
Manufacturing • • • • • • • ...............
Durable goods • • ............... .
Nondurable goods . . . . . . • • • • • • • • • • • 4
Nonmamfaeturing
Wholesale trade • • • • • • • • • • ...........
R etail trade (excluding department
stores)
Finance « * • • • • • • • • • • ......................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) • • • • . . . • . • • • • • • • • • • • . • 4

378
” 105
81
28
269
11*9

1*0.0
“T .O
jO
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

50.50

26
1*5
21

Clerks, order ............. .
Manufacturing •••••<
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Wholesale trade .

-

52
-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-1
"!

•
-

-

“
_

-

1

3
~

_1
!
1 -- ^ “1 36
-

_

•

“

-

-

-!
-

-j

-

“

1

-

-

36
36

19
19
15
1*
-

-

63
30
30 j

Si

-

-

33
3

51
31

28
86
15 -S B 6
32
16
9
38
13
6
8

-

57
33
33
-

21*
6

j
.

.

_

1

99
81
77
b
18
8
118
29
b
25
89
8
51

12

101
26
73

12
156
130
6

12

b

1

19

5

5

1

1

71
37
15
22
3b
32

12}

56
39
28
11
17
9

13
13
13

132 166
76 r~ S T
50
23
26
59
56
8b
15
17
11
21

160
118
bb
7b
1*2
12
1

2

111
11
2
9
100
18

32
30
2
91
7

1*

17

6

5

19

1

-

10
10

15

1

7

20

27

9

3

90
27

33
16

35

11
63
b7

n
17
10

b
2
29
9

11
3
3

7
b
2
2
3

7
6

1
3

3
13

2

1*9.50
53.00
51.00
50.50

2
•

2
-

2
-

23
-

1*9
«

si
32
32

-

2
-

1*9
28

9
3

59.50
1*8.50

-

2

2
„
2

23
10

1*0.0
1)0.0

2
.
2

_
-

_
9

1
3

53
21
19
2
32
2b
_
5

38.0

1*3.50

-

-

-

8

11

-

-

16

5

5

6

8
2
2

-

-

19b 131
100 " T
b6
65
20
5b
1)6
9b
6
bl
21
37

6
17

11

.
-

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), eosmonication, and other public utilities,
«* Finance, insurance, and real estate.




3
-

.
.

22

1*7
“I
!

168
12

16
13

1

2
1
_

16

33

5

33

5

.

16

-

_

35
_

7

•

1

b

5

1*2
lb
5
9
28
27

1*2
18
18

b7
lb
8
6
33
33

10
b

8
b
b

33
15
1
lb
18
8

33
27
85
5b
23
35
13 — 1T
.
29
b
b
6
8
19
9
10 M 19 - l b
77
1
1
k 6
60
-

-

.

2b
2b

9

2

15

1

7

2

5

2

5

2

2

2

5

2

b
6
6

b
b

2

21
16

-

-

-

_

_

21

29

8

10
6

“

_

-

“

_
_
_

_

-

-

3b
17
17

5

17 !

_

_
_

_
-

_
-

5

.

7

z

5

1

_1
5!

3
1
-

_

-

_

_

_
.

15
_

15
_

.

m
15

10

Office QccHfuMoHA Go+Uutued

Table A-li

-

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EEKLY E A RNING S OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$

Weekly
Weekly Under
hours
earnings %
(Standard) (Standard)

32.50

35.00 37.50 ftO.OO [42.50 45,00

47.50 i5 0.00 52.50

$

$

55xOP_ 57.50 £0*00.62.50

65.00 67.50

$

85.00

90.00

70*00. 72,50 7 1 * 0 8 0* Q 85*QO 90.00
QQ

95.00

60.00 62.50 65.00

50 35.00 37.50 W . 00 42.50 45.00 147.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50

80.00

67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00

95.00
and

Women - Continued

Kev-nunch operators ......................
Manufacturing................... .
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing.....................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) .........................
Finance ** ........................
Motion pictures...................

1,238
463
336
127
775
104
265

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0

55.50
57.00
58.00
54.00
55.00
62.00
56.50

_
_
-

_
_
_

7

5

36

7
-

5
-

36
1
6

I

2
4

88
221
53

40.0
38.5
40.0

5 0 .0 0

-

-

1

2
2

1 i
26
1

44
55

48.50
72.00

116

4
!

4

j
! 112

109
38 i
11
27
71
10
28
3
20

81
22
9 !
13 i
59 1
1
23
28

111
56

18

95
54
54
_
41
3
13

4
30

3
22

31
25

55

i

167
66
50
16
101
10
62
8
9 |
3

89
45
39
6
44
7
11

132
69
45

26

63
13 !
45 1

82
52
38
14
30
8
7

4 j
_ 1
1

j
!
s
!
:
|

12
2
1

&

114
56
55
1
58
13
31

22

3

19

2

_
_

_

3

19

_
_
2
_

1
1
_
- 1

_
_
_

_
_
_

_ 1

_
1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

47
1
_
1
46
29
10

_
22
5
7

5 !
_ !
9

9

-

i
_ ;

;

_

'

2

-

- 1
_ |

3

_

5

2

19

-

!
j

Office K i r i s ..... .......................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing................... .
Public utilities * ................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ..................... .
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ....................... .
Motion pictures ...................

Manufacturing........................
Durable goods .................... .
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing.....................
Public utilities * ....... . ....... .
Wholesale trade .................. .
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ........................ .
Finance * * ...........................................................................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) .........................................................................

804
202
122
80
602
188

43.00
46,50 —
48^50
43.50
41.50
42.50
y o no
.

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
on n

6

6
-

45
■
*

40.0
' i QO

42.00
37.00

-

54
51

38.0
40.0

43.00
45.50

-

5.747
1,889
1,290
599
3,858
346
852

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
39.5

65.00
64.50
65.50
62.50
65.50
70.00
65.50

1
148
1,283

40.0
39.0

66.00
60.00

835

39.5
40.0

62.50
85.00

QQ J.

166
82
107
c i
g
y ! I* !
2
1
2
4
5 ! li
160
77 t 94
- 1 50
71
23
27
16

58
V

58
-

134
42
17
25
92
17
AS
HP

20

5

1
- 1 14
22

12
12

6
4

-

7
7

10
10

93

92

-

9
47

10

28

13 '
42

11
42

6

5

1
20

i
- —
-

1-

- ~i - n
-

-

-

- j

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

44
87
42 — 2
T
17
31
1
11
9 1
18
45
10
13
10
1
10

|
I
1

7

-

-

-

26

-

28
12

3

14

-

1
9
4
2

j
13 1
2
2

**




-

-

-

1

1

_

~

1

!
-

5

1

1

-

11
2

1

2

4

-

-

98
8
8
90
“2
25

357
61
15
46
296
9
50

270
57
15
42
213
15
29

368
125
89
36
243
17
61

842
269
183
86
573
35
79

521
258
129
129
263
21
109

715
260
62
393
18
107

401 199
167
32
202
12
36

7
33

5
193

6
137

7
116

7
220

18
71

5
144

23

39

26

42

232

42
2

118
1

3

!

i

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1

-

3

1

5

1

“

3

i

2

8

-

13
9

3

35
26
26
9
5
3
p

l

~

-

54
26

322

-

1

-

-

-

549.
188
144
44
361
33
128

403
202
163
39
201
64
65

171
72
42
30
99
14
14

320

312
64
59
5
248
25
50

11
89

3
116

30
21

4
20

22 |
28

8 !
48

37
17

80
1

10
11

26
21

38
61

22 ;
50
67 j H 5 ,

-

56
18
38
264
43
72

- j

-

67
17
7

68
68
2
3

2

1

; 1 7 5 ; _ 62L
_
7

6
1
! 168
; 19
|
9

!
!

i
i
I
j

3 |

-

-

3

38

-

2
60

11

Table

O ffic e O c c n p c tio n i - C o n tin u e d

a -i s

(Average straight-time weekly hours »wd earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A v eb a g b
N

Sex, occupation, and industry division

u

m

o
w

f
o

r k

b
W

he

r

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
32.50 35.00 37.50 4 0 . 0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 5 . 0 0
s
and
r d
)
32.50
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52,50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75,00 80.00 85.00 90,00 95*oo over

e Indery
k l
l y e
g
or s u
r e s a r n \i n
ta a r nd
d)
a
t a
n ( dS
e

kW

e

0
0

( S

e

Women - Continued

%

Stenographers, general ................ .
Manufacturing..................... .
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities * .............. ,
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ...................... .
Finance * * .....................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) .....................
Motion pictures .................

Stenographers, technical ........
Nonmanufacturing ............
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ..............
Motion pictures ..........

19
19
-

42
42
-

_

-

_
12

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
39.5

55.50
56.50“
56.50
57.00
55.00
59.00
57.50

207
1,583

40.0
39.5

56.00
50.50

_

510
340

39.0
40.0

51.00
71.50

238
235

40.0
40.0

63.00
63.00

54
40

40.0
40.0

_
_
-

34
16
18
59

20
12
8
37

250
.
47
39
8
203

18
8
8
10

10
10

7

24

14

59

-

-

-

-

_

6
-

5
-

5
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_
139

_
10

_
10

_

29

_
18

-

_
4

4
4

4
4

3
3

15
15

14
14

11
11

_

_

-

-

6

12
_
_
_
12
_
-

6.210
2,386
1,872
514
3,824
249
935

2

2

1

10

8

11

■

-

58
31
11
20
27
23
-

34
34
_
10

14
3
2
1
11
6

16
4
4
12
1

52
_
52
3

4
4
-

1

-i
-|

2
2
_

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
13

_
5

11

_
49

_
4

3
2
2
1
-

3

4

-

41
2
2
39
_
35

3
3

-

2

_

-;
-i
4!
- |

1

2

-

410
55
47
8
355
1
51

582
203
167
36
379
19
33

851
322

9
137
3
-

296
40
23
17
256
1
36

246
76
529
16
164

813
442
368
74
371
23
139

66?
352
264
88
311
18
47

865
417
342
75
448
44
159

379
192
137
55
187
24
63

64
105

19

41

_
116

9
149

8
218

24
224

13
231

20
158

28
124

70
149

13
72

6
70

-

-

_

1
-

18
-

61
-

73
4

79
“

101
4

31
-

78
16

17
9|

15
-

26
29

2
34

8
34

1
1

1
1

29

29

25
25

38
38

33
33

25
25

18
15

-

11

14

11

11

146
9

58.00
79.00

1
1

"

!

14
14

3
3 !

7

238
132
107
25
106
36
34

395
95
89
6
300

67
18
15
3
49

_

_

2_

_ _2 _ _

_. 5 _ 2 _

-

j

___ L
-

4

1

Switchboard operators .................
Manufacturing..................... .
Durable g o o d s .................. .
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing.................. .
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ...................... .

1,354
3l4
201
113
1,040
110
203

40.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
40.0

1 53.00
! 57.00
: 57.50
! 55.50
;5 1 . 5 0
; 57.00
| 52.00

69
247

40.0
40.5

51.00
1 48.50

pictures) ....................
Motion pictures .................

311
100

42.0
39.5

!45.00
|73.50

Switchboard operator-receptionists ....
Manufacturing.... .................
Durable goods ....... ...........
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale t r a d e ....................

1.712
602
362
240
1,110
62
370

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
39.5

52.00
53.00
i 53.00
| 53.00
1 51.50
53.00
! 54.50

88
235

41.0
39.5

54.50
49.00

337
18

39.5
40.0

48.50
68.50

F i n a n c e * * .......................... .
S e r v i c e s ( e x c l u d i ng m o t i o n

- 1
--- “ j
- j
_
_ 1

!

-

78 ! 147
_
78 1 147
_
9
35

94
11
11
83
2
29

180
20
7
13 '
160 j
2
15

_
26

14 |
1
14

4
25

19 !
32 !

34

23

92 !

3

78
114
12
44
8 1 25
19
4
70
66
8
8
5
1

_

_

-

-

_

_
12

_ |

2

3
16

43 !
|

93
-

18
9
9

-

|

77
15
15

86
29
26
3
57
10
9

117
39
21
18
78
10
55

147
50
46
4
97
8
22

12
26

4
8

2
26

_

1

39

_

1

6
36 !

10

15

;
j

!
1
i

81
51
35
16
30
25

37 !
20
20
17
5

2

-

2

1

-

-

1

_
11

5i
6

1
_
3

R e t a i l t r a d e ( e x c l u d i n g dep a r t m e n t

stores) ......................
Finance ** .....................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ....................
Motion pictures .................

-

_
-

_

_

-

-

_

_

_
-

-

9

2

|
-

_

,

;

_

_
!

16

!

_

7

46

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

-

210
i 43

i

;

33
10

! 167
i
9
l 71

_
28

63

1 j
36 j

42

76

50

5

345
112 |
46 !
66
233 1
2;
X01

-

79
65
27

38
14
7
-

49
48

6

33

1

186
101. ___52_ ___34_
102
21
7
29
6
70
12
24
1
32
5
9
84
75
27
31
2
1
11
2
32 ; 39
16

155
79
46
33
76
14
15
4 !
4
!

39

j
j _____

_

17:
19
12
3 j

!

i




:

284
107
81
26
177
8
25

-

15

24
1

_

9
7
7

1

_

-

_
-

1

_
2

1

i
I

1

1
_
-

-;
-

_
_

3

1

;

-

1
1

116
9
;
9
62 ! 107
- i
6
31

-

1j
"

~
-

1
1

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

12
O ^ ic e 0 cC 4 4 fU iiiO 4 ti - G o n tU U fd

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis U j . Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

Average
Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

o
f

workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY E ARNING S OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 32.50 35.00 3 7 . 5 0 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 $
55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 . 0 0 90.00 95.00
♦
and
32.50
35.00 37.50 4 0 . 0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 . 0 0 95.00 over

Women - Continued

Tabulatimwnachine operators............
Manufacturing ..................... .
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * .....TT...... Tt
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) .........................
Finance ** .......................

332
85
54
31
247
24
118

39.5

*
62.00

4 0 .0

6 3 .0 0

40.0
4 0 .0

39.5
i0 O
,
40.0

64.50
59.50
62.00

8

-

_

-

_

_

8

8

7

7

19

22

2
2

4 4 ,5 0

8

_
_

17

22

10

40.0
38.5

63.50
54.00

11

4 0 ,0

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
38.5

50.50
53.00
50.00
52.50
46.50

-

-

6

6
6

13
19

38

2

1
2

25

7
4
9

23

22

_

4
5

_

5

2

2

10

JG

11

2
16

20
11

-

-

_

-

_

7

6

7

3

!

29
6

4
2

23
W

8 6 ,0 0

75
407
161
182

40
15
5

44

G
J

-

63.50

19
58

38
19

J

57
17
17
_
40
O
J

13

8

2

7
7

_

1

2

_
_
9

2

8

_
_

_
_

2
11

1
.
H

8

32

2
1

_

5

5

2

T
X

_
_
_
G
X

2

6

9

2

_

_
_
6

_
_
_

_

_

_
_

_
-

_
_
2

_
_
2

i
Transcribing-machine operators, general ..
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ..................
Fin a n c e
___ _ T ............. T1I
Services (excluding motion
pictures) .........i............

462

36

40.0

5 2 .0 0

Tvoists. class A .......................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable g o o d s ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * .... .
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ........................
Finance *#v .........................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ......................
Motion pictures ..................

2,697
844
625
219
1,853
166
527

39.5

51.50
54.00
54.00
55.50

Typists, class B .......................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ............................
Public utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade (excluding department
stores) ............. ...................
Finance ** ................................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ......................
Motion pictures ..................

3
-

4
_

3
_
3

-

62

12 1

82
3
79
31

48

21

19
29
3
25

-

-

1

-

11

1

22

336
2 B37
33
4
299

233
26
16

682

249
139
125
14
no
15
30

101

3

%

3
_
2

4

7
87
23
63

1

98

1

61

48

64
22

!
42 1

10
9

70
11

26
11

!

15
13 j

59

52

17
!

1

4!

3

4
_

3

2

1

16
15

_
_

_

2
2

_
_

6

1

3

-

_

_

-

_

_
_

_

2

_

_
J

1/
*
**

4 0 .0

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0

5 0 .0 0

53.00
53.50

12

18 1 2 9 1
--- -1\—
_
- 1
- i
29 ;
18
_

-

70
873

40.0
39.0

46.50
47.00

-

186
31

39.5
40.0

50.00

_

39.5
40.0
40.0

12

_
-

_

28
-

70

9
8

12

10
20?

32
24

192

154
38
490
12

203

104
65
47
18
39!

12

20

18

15

-

3

8

1

1

78
48
48

42

40

51

22

8

-

-

8

8

30
24
4

42

18
14

43

341
179
103
76
162

38

5
48

248

145

144

170

_
50

21

_

830

611
219
2,737
370
482
112

1,196
542
35

12

_

21
8

7
11

_

4 6 .0 0

8

60

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

60

312

190

50.00
50.50

-

9

21

4

21

104

15

2

190

4 0 .0

4 8 .0 0

-

39.5
40.0
40.0

44.50

8
_

40.0
39.0

47.00
42.50

_

_

_

7

22

80

39.5

42.00
55.00

1

38

- j

4 8 .0 0

49.50

11

4 0 .0

_

no

j

44

621
54

8

22

526

2

547
89
44
45
458
28
129

10

1

414

416

208

221

201

187
34
193
13
54

186
15
215
18
125

132
102

13

32
567
60
77

5
181

4
289

298

23
199

111

7

93

61

93

79

12

35

39

30

3

30
76
44
5
2
2

2

8

_

15

-

13
4

4

4
9

2

_
1

_
_

11

54

1

10
66

1

3

rl
i
_

1

_
-

_
_

1

_

_

_

«|

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

9

2

-

3

-

1

-

~

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

5

51

4

—
_

20

4

J

_!

14

1

1

54

25

7

54

7
_

15

1
2

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2

14

94
28
18

10

9

36
482
U5
13

11
301
0

42 !
28
26

16

6 8 .0 0

3,567

-

126
67
56
n
59

3

_
-

309
47
19
28
262
23
64

11

_

_

_

_

-

_

13

P 'u^ clidoH al a n d ^JectuU cal O ccu pation *

Table A-2:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

Average
Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

o
f

workers

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNING S OF—

i$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
and
and
(Standard) (Standard) inder
1 7 . 5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 over
*

Men

Draftsmen, chief .......................
Manufacturing.......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

214
176
159
17
38

40.0
40.6

Draftsmen ..............................
Manufacturing................ ......
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Fln»nf»*»
TT-T ITT.... 1 ......
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ......................
Motion pictures ...........................................

1,140
945
879

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

Draftsmen, junior ....................................................
Manufacturing ......................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................................

333
294
39

67
194
52
17
15

67

1
109.00
109.00
108.00

40.0

1
1

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

8 7 .0 0

84.00
8 4 .0 0

_

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

12
12
12

27
27
27

17
15
15

93
92
74
18

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1

1
1

82.00
1 0 1 .0 0

83.50
95.00

4 0 .0

_

57
46
35

59
44
34
10

!

15
41

11
11

2
8

94.00

-

_

-

-

_!

71
65

40.0
40.0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

6 8 .0 0
66.50
77.50

57.50
57.50

~

_!
~

-

11

8;
8!

-

12

28

55
55 i

“!
i
20
20

20

11

15

- |

-

1

_

_

_

3
•
Ja

_
_

30
19
15
4

-

1

2

11

29
15
15

2

6

44

1
1

14

_

_

_

_

_
_

-

6

44

2

_

2

_

15

_
_

2

«.

_
_

_

2

50
49
45
4

51
36
32
4
15

_

62
61
61
_

1
-

14

_

7

5

8

4 0 .0

; 6 i.o o

Nurses, industrial (registered) .........
Manufacturing ......................................................
Durable goods ...............................................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ....................

240

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

i 70.50

40.0
39.0
42.5

6 2 .5 0

8

67.50

■>

174
131
43

66
21
14
13

70.00
70.50
: 69.50
: 71.50

l !
l ;

1

-

-

l !
- j

1

i

_

'
1
-

_

-

27 I

6

J

24

6

-

i

3

4

8

1

3

4

-

-

-

2

1

49
43

28
21
20
1
7

10

3

-

3

-

59
4

1
1

-

1

"

-

~

2

1

-

-

-

1
1

I

.................................................................................................................

m*in£
Durable goods

Mf i mt f s r t

........................... , t (

.

.......................................................................

22
22
22

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4o! o

5 6.00
5 6.00
5 6.00

_

i |
1--------

2

I
i

16

24
9
9

3

2
2

9

27
25
16
9

1
1

16 i
8!
6
2
8i
1

2

a

1

_

6
-

6

4

3

29

35

22

29
28
1
6
5

13
9

7
1
2

17 i

3!

i

-

-i

37

6
6

2

5

_

_

_

_

-

_

5

_

2

-

-

1

_

2

7i

_

-

7i

5

_j
I
1

9

1

3

9

_

;

_

1
1

_

!
1

-

I

1

3

t

i_

1_

"

_

_

_

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-t.ime salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
..
, w
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952




-

|-------—

6

1

Q
7

5

5

_
1/
*
**

“

1

2
1

3

5

5

4
-

2

-

i

|
i

42

1
23
15

*

|

8

|

9 6 .0 0

i l

i

15

1

S

41
!
41

1
Tracers

6

-

11

25

_

1
1

1
1

33

38
32

i

40.0 ! 79.50

28

........................ ........................................

15

12
1
1

2

11
11

“

12
2

11

-

18
18

14

Draftsmen, junior ...................................................

Motion pictures

6

18
18
18
_

1

42
*33
24
9
9

42

Women

Puhl 1 r> ut.I TI t l am *
pi napnA IH i - i i i i t __ . T. . T................... , (
fr

93
92
80

12

j

|

91
76
70

47
30
5

3

1

12

4
9

159
159

_

_

-

25
16

2

206

12
2

3

9
2

8
6
6

-

206
194
194

97
89
87

!

8 9 .0 0

4 0 .0

_

-

-

1
1

Draftsmen .....................................................................

21
18
18
3

1 1 0 .5 0

1

Tracers ..........................................................................
Manufacturing ......................................................

4
4
4
-

1

1 0 9 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

.

„„„„

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

H

MQ44tt '*MQ>MCM Q*ut„ PoW4b P la n t

Table A-3i

jftttA

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EA R N IN G S OF—

Num ber
of
w o rk e rs

Occupation and industry division

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
* , $
$
Jnder 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 4 0 2 . 5 0 2.60 2.70 1.80
and
1.15
1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1 . 9 0 1.95 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2.30 2 . 4 0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

*
Caroenters. maintenance..................... *......

_
_
_
* T__ _ tT_ TT_ ,....

PiihUe

Retail trade (excluding department stores) .....

Electricians, maintenance..... ..................... .

2 .0 2

24

9

1.94
1.91
1.99
2.13
1.99
1.94
2.14

21
21

2
2

1.023
606
401
205
417
30
48
129
42
99
69

1.85
2.75

3

1*834

2 .1 0

6

1 ,0 4 6

2 .0 3
2 .1 2
2 .2 6

19
Jl
*
J

3
3

7

16

Engineers, stationary ...............................
^

(|

^

(

(

( T ..................................................

it

t i i i

I I I
I1 1 1 ■ -* 1 1
1
| l | l i l l - i I - - - - r - - i | I I |

r
II

m g n r 4m
w
(
(
it
Nonmanufacturing ................. .
Retail trade (excluding department stores) .....
Services (excluding motion pictures) ...........

373
415
140

31
28
62
146

17

u

57
L3
**
4
33
J*

2

7

2

125
O C

10

15

127
118
87
31

64
58

34
24

100
2
2

9

30
31

61
23
3
14
5

6

15

5
L
H

30

3

20

66

9

33
j
OC

4

2

1

106

120

6

3

181
150

3
8

3
_

l 1

48
11,
Xf
i

3

1

?

69

3

15

69

58
4
4

IX
XH
34

54

3
25

50

-

5

-

-

-

15

1

4

3

69

5

4

9
1

52
16
16

4
4

6
2

5
L

8

5

5

3

82
70
90
fv

36
19

24
19
10
7

12
7

2

77
44
22
22

V kj

j

10

3
10

4
i

17

3

245 231 306 493
207 219 279 J,57
QJ.O
1A7 1 0 2 A O ^4*0
30
27 mi, TOO
t O J
< ■ ( Xvlf XU7
12
38
36
27
7
Q
^3
'L
l
-l
X
7
L
2
2
9
H
1
1
9

30
11

L

*6

7
19
X7
c
?
9
3

45
43
J3
28

29
29
6
33

2

2 9 _____ 2
9
15

15
14

9

14

-

158

158

*
2

13

-

12

146

1.99
1.99
1.99
1.99

379
36
123

42
28

2

VI
■O

1.91
2.06
1.91
2.16
2.75

381

41
24
15
0

3

2 .1 1

817
438
57

3
2

2.05
HiiraVila g t r f TIfttttTttI-tT-TTT____ iTttitii««».
rnit
N r < i * i la gnnrt* T..TT .__________ __ T.TTtlTItlt
nt1njK
_
Nonmanufacturing ............................... .
PiihUft
# Trfr.rT..T..r.....rrTttt,,<Itf
,
Whnl a a a Ia t.raHA tttTTT.T.......... .. TTT,, , ,,,,,
Retail trade (excluding department stores) ......
Services (excluding motion pictures) ...........
Unf ^
(
ii■ii ti
iii

35
-t
j*o
12
20

8

12

i

30
30

80

34

i

g

2

30

_

'

2 .0 1

i

" 1

1.79

51
/o
.
*7
4
U

2
32

80

4
5

80

1

2

1?

26

4

26
12

4

68
68
12

2

32

8
12

17
12

1 .9 8

56

215
66

99
80

5
61
149
15

80
19
19

97
70
1f
X7

6?
49
H/

m

X6
*Q
7
14

j

j

27
2

-

6

32

6

4

32

.
Hy
4

-

-

6

-

-

1

Firemen, stationsr y b o iler..........................
Manufacturing ....................................
Durable goods ................................ .
p g

(

i i i i i f i f T T - T f

T i ri

I TI I

Services (excluding motion pictures) ...........

271
217
52
165
54
37

1.79
1.83
1.74
1 .8 6

1.59
1.48

11

------------1-----------1 --i'

i

9
9|

:

9 '

i
— I

3_
J
-

-

-

-

33 !
10 1

46
46
30

5

7

16

6
10

!

23
23

11

6
6

10

2

~
"|
2

3
3

1

Helpers, trades, maintenance ........................
Manufacturing ....................................
Durable goods
N n n r iiim h l e

g n n r is

T t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

..................

......................................

16
86

. ............................

Retail trade (excluding department stores)
H nonna

Services (excluding motion pictures)

650

616
951
684
89
46

Nonmanufacturing ................................ .....
W k n l m e f l l M f i«e/4m

2,217
1,266

30

1 .6 0

1.60
1.46
1.75
1.59
1.55
1.69
1.53
1.50
1.73
2.04

52
52

I

6 i

1

5

!

83
44
35
9
39

80
77
53
24
3

8 ;

3
-

-

-

"

65
65

14
14
4

14

30

65

10

74

28
28

18

-

15

" j

84; 82 : 36
30 i 30 ; 30
30 | 3° ; 30
54

30
30

-

1

1
2

20
11

82 142
58
84
82
49
9 1 2
24
58
42
5
16

-

108
94
94

-

8
8

£

40
24

20

14
14

204

11?

94
i

16

18
13

75
75

~

1

I

2 1

3

-

236

57
85
36
29
21
56
119 179
113 165
!

2
1

3

1

1

1

4

i

317
45

43
32
18
14

70

11

138
16 ,

39
26
13

8
6

-

W
! 372
125 ! 327

40

44

18

2

4 2 !

83
164

10

-

4

10

7
1

1

-

60
32

6
6

-

-

-

-

12

7

-

-

12

j

_______ 1

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

**

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

j




-

28

-

15

M aintenance and Powe* P lan t Occupation^ • Continued

Table a-3:

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY E ARNING S OF—
N um ber
of
w orkers

Occupation and industry division

$

A ve rag e
h o u rly

Under 1 . 1 5

$
L .2 5

$
L .3 0

$
L .3 5

$
1 .4 0

$
1 .4 5

$
L .5 0

$
1 .5 5

$ X
1 .6 0

$
1 .7 0

$
1 .7 5

$

$

$

s

1 .8 5

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

$
2 .3 0

$

1 .8 0

$
1 .9 0

$

1 .6 5

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

$
2 .7 0 1 .8 0

L .2 5

1 .3 0

1 .3 5

1 .4 0

1 .4 5

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2

11

57

94

61

59

241

462

4

2

2
2

10
i n
XU

57

94

61

59

239

460

L .2 0

2

59

239

460

2

*
1 .0 2 3

Machinists, maintenance .................................................................................................
Manufacturing ........................................................................................................................
Durable goods .................................
Nondurable goods ..............................

2 .0 4

Maintenance men. general utility ....................
Manufacturing ........................................................................................................................
Durable goods .............................................................................................................
N n n r in r A h l m

(

l l l I I 1 T I 1 I - , t t r T - r --

t

lr

■ -.»

-

-

30

2 .0 9

18

2 .0 3
2 .0 2

18

2 .0 4

18

37
36

1 ,2 9 5
$8$
513

2

232

Retail trade (excluding department stores) .................
Services (excluding motion pictures) ....................................

44

1 ,7 8 4

(

| | (| 1 (| | IIT I1 _ -tT r| 1 1 .._ .
a

lb . n u f a . e t u r i n g

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T T i i i t . f T t t r . T t __ - ___ - -___ . _ _ . _ T _ T T T
(
( .
( . . 1. . . j 1T] _
j r

rh^»AV>1 a

Nonmanufacturing
^n ^ f ^

........................................................................................................... ..
f 4 mm ♦
.
. . . . . . .
rt

V K m l mm&^m f |«nHm

.

%

Retail trade (excluding department stores)

.................
. T ............................. ( f

53

2

8

_1 9 2 _ JZ 2
311
263
48

147
29
118

12
7

___ 1 3 -

___ 1

—

27

13

5

13

5

7
52

93

387

1 .9 9
1 .9 2

-

"

~

-

19

18

32

21

~

19

18

24

21

18

15
9

31

263

~

-

■

"

1 .9 4
1 .9 0

155
78

-

~

-

-

-

2

-

"

A
M

137

25

71
52

245

26

235

130

143
91

163

17
8

43
9

231
4

44
86

19
72

107
56

54

16

14

67
i.

19
4

10

7
5
2

52
7

131
4

31
2

40

24

-

-

-

g
2

-

35
10

86
1

29

35
5

2

**

“ !

~

“

“

87
27
18
0

637
120

139
82
4

28

12

24

1

16

239
41
11

104

30

78

2

517
418

198

fl

-

24

l

140

21

48

45
13

24
12

-

-

x

10

a

8

92

"

”

2

19
16

6
6

22

59

6

162

44

312

20

6

19

34
18

31
9

22

142

16
10

281

60

120

6

263

27
8

1

~

“

3
3

~

1 .8 4
2 .0 1

1 ,3 9 7
1 ,0 5 7

40
16

1

19

2
2

18

|

15
I

2 .0 4

124

Services (excluding motion pictures) ...........

54

............. ...

25

1 .3 7 9

1 .9 1

1 ,1 7 7

1 .9 0

725
452

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

3

57

2

57

6
2

7

15

1 .8 5

294

91
60

56

10

24

16

2

26

8

~
-

6

12

-

2

_

A
M

2

n 4 m f nnm m

Moraanufacturing

P..K14m

T

n f in t la a

T 1 ...................

....................................................

202

#

........................... .

_

_

_

1 .8 0

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), aosununication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




4
22

1 .9 7
1 .9 8

52

4,

_

44

8

27

6

27

6

17
16
7

17
7

2
2

1

9

1

185
178
138
40
7

3

17

10
7

47

101

194

39

7

27
12

94
78

191
H I

8

16
7

80

3

185
87

3

26

5

5

3

29$
272

26

A
M

2

-

-

-

-

-

12

8
3

-

15

2 .7 6

Mechanicsr Maintenance.... .................................................................................. ...
Manufacturing ..... .................................. ............................................................
Durable goods

2

1 .9 0

If n f 4 A n

3

2 .0 3
2 .0 4

♦ ♦

26

_

14

45

24

-

1 .9 5
1 .9 6

28

F ^ n a n i« a

26

7

25
X

26

27

SSh

71
46

51

“

15
4

1 .9 1
2 .0 2

Mechanics, automotive, maintenance.................................................................

“

2 .0 1

^ mu ♦

40
2

153
21

_lZk

-

11

1 .9 4
1 .9 1
1 .8 8

■ T1I I ■ I I

P m H I ^ f* n f

174

58

5

1 .9 6

V H a I SM a I m f

111
111

-2 2 - - J A .
26
14
18
14

2 .9 0

375
407
26

Nonmanufacturing .................................

60
58
18

13

h

-

2 .5 0

53

94

At
OX

13

2 .4 3
1 .9 8
2 .1 0

52

---------~
- -------- ?

27

2 .0 4

955

178

Wholesale trade ........................................................................................................
Services (excluding motion pictures) ...........
Motion pictures ...............................

30
30

1 ,1 3 3
599
356

and
over

1

2 .0 4

1 ,0 1 4
1 ,0 1 4

$

$

1
1 .1 5

Machine-tool operators, toolroom .....................
Manufacturing................................... .

$

L$. 2 0

-

85

-

-

11

46

218
207

48
9

$$
64

26

87

9

20

120
11

39

10
8

4
4

1

17

39

21
9

_

47

9

8

24

12

2

4

1

16

McUnteHanc* and Paws* P lan t Occupation*, • Con tin u ed

Table A-3 «

(Average hourly earnings i/ Tor men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Los AngAles, Salif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY E A R N IN G S OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

milvriffhts .........................................

Retail trade (excluding department stores) .....

Oilers .............................................
Manufacturing ....................................

606
594
511
#3
14
14

421
278

Average
hourly
earnings

*
2.05
2 .0 5 '

V K a I am ml m f

...

Retail trade (excluding department stores) . . . . . .
Services (excluding motion pictures) ..............................
...........

Pit>e fitters, maintenance ............................................................................
^ in n f

^
i ~ i i T i a T i i i i a i i ~ i _- - ___________i i i i i i t i
gAA/lft (
( (
_. T_ t l - 1 | (
iriii
llAnHm aeKl m rrAAfle
_
..........................................................

PliMfcara, maintenance ............ ................ •••
lift n il f a rtf iii* 4 m

. _ ...........

........

........................

.

Durable goods .................................
Nondurable goods ....................... ......
nma I a y a I nH4 n o hia^ 4 n n rt4

in*M* 1

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance....................
Manufacturing ............. .. ......................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................................................

Tool-and-die makers ...........................................................................................
Manufacturing ...................................................................................................
P yroV i] s grvw 4t
i
ffAn/limoKI a 0AAi4e

iitii

i

iiiiTiri'

r

rrr

24
24

2 .0 5

12
12

2.09

1.71
1.64

771
563
337

1.97
1.93
1.81

-

-

-

1
1

5
5
C
?'

19
14
1L

32
32

75
72

>

70

42
38
-A
i
JO

2
3

25
23
o*

5

4

2.09
96
#oi
2.18
1.95

425
30§
117
191

-

-

-

-

3
3

2 .0 1

2

2
2
2

12
12
12

26

12
12
12

25
25

8
8

g

2

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

1

4
2
2

g
2

24

37

46

34

8

34

g

24

37
37

26
16
10
8
2

10
_

1
2

155
145

222
ooo

16

3

9

50
31
JH
17
19

55
44
g
■A
a
JO

39
39
37

6?
52
35
17

2

11

11

6

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

1

2

3

6

6

10
-

_
_

20

L

_
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

84

90
64
46

18
26
Oi.

-

20
20

84

2
-

4

01A

2

114

77
37
40
37
g
26
3
-

79
51
43
g
28
Q
7
1e

3
-

54
43

8

43

j
1

12

27

18

71

11

7

83
71

-

18

_

-

15
3

_

-

-

-

_

15

1

22
20
2

2

-

1

3

3
3

2.44
1 7s
2.77

15

15
13

3
1

18
14

1

2 .2 0
2 .0 ?
2 .0 1
2 .2 1

_

2
-

_
1

5
7

-

-

-

-

6
8
4
1

2

29
29
25

4

134
112

48
81

4

9
9

129
129

9
7

9

7

-

2

14
98

75
75
72
3

4

2
2
2
-

4

4
4

28
28
-

1
1

28

1

47

-

-

3

-

3

47

3

47

2 .4 6
2 7*5

-

-

-

2 .2 0

1,345
1,312

29

a
7
5

4

2.07

1 ,3 6 6

76

6

1
1

1 .9 9

20
1*

27

j
£

27

2.04

2.03
1.97

-

-

2 .7 5

148
128“

2.19
2.19
2.15

jj

21
8

13

2 .1 0

208
47
49
38
31
27

3
-

\J

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

*

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




-

1 .8 5

226

213

171
171
171

10

1.80

137
97
40
76
17
50

9
9
9

100

45

3
3
j

2 .1 0
2 .1 0

205
73
143

Painters, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing ....................................
PlIfM * QfWVllI »»»l,lIIllt«TI-T--TT-TT*--I»TTitI11
s
i
iit ,T,,((ftt__ *tn -_ 11 iiitia
_
Honmanufacturing .................................
PuKHf* <itll0.1aa *
...........
. _

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
L.20 L.25 1.30 L.35 L.40 L.45 L. 5 0 L. 5 5 L.60 L.65 L.70 L.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 . 3 0 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
Jnder U1 5
and
L.15
L.20 L. 2 5 L.30 L.35 L.40 L,45 L.50 L. 5 5 l.6o L.65 1.70 L.75 L.80 1.8? 1 . 9 0 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 . 3 0 2.40 2 . 5 0 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

;

-

-

-

_

3
3

7
7

3
3

10
10

3
3

2
2

16
12

4

-

1
1
-

19
19
13
£

7
7

14
14

32
32

-

-

-

23
23

23

30
30
28
2

13
10

3

217

412

217
205
12

412
411
1

14
14
-

56O
560
556
4

1
1
-

22

10
10

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
20
12
g

13
13
13

9
-

-

54
54
54

17

Trti» A-V: C u sto d ia l, ‘k Ja'iekouM auf, a n d S k ip p in g

Occu pation*

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNING S OF—

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) .....

Number
o
f
workers

514
413
101

75
Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and
over) ............................................
Manufacturing ....................................
G u a r d s .................................. ...........

278
277

"

1.61
1.57

Services (evc.l udlng mot.Ion pi ohurea) TTT..TT...»»
Unf 4f n
t
((

244
579
81
52

_

_

_

_

3

3

13

1

6?
45
45

26
14

20
20

12
12

14

1.59
1.72
1 28
1*72
1.84

125
125

46
45

304
189

398
371

16
16

175

363
8

4

4

5

_

1 .5 7

Nondurable g o o d s ......... .....................
Nonmanufacturing .................................

_

_

1.85
1.85

2,244
1 665

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average $
h u l 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2 . 2 0 2.30 2.40
ory
erig
a n n s and
and
under
.70 .75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 O 2.40 over
$
2
16
8
6
2 4 6 -231 __ 51
1 .7 0
12
19
4
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
2
12
), 6 8
213
no
12
45
3
4
19
6
2
2
10
1,77
25
33
i
4
2
6
15
33
15
1.73

3

3

3

3

39
37
36
1
2
2

141
132

69
63
9

115

82
82

130
121

632

121

512
86

9

33
25

34

6

14
115

27

16
-

357
60
18
42
299

90
90

-

"

-

*
-

"
j

_
-

-

-

_

_
-

_

_

_

_
_
-

-

3

6

j
!

13
13

598

8
8

17
87

21

278

27

J

1

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ................
Manufacturing .............
................
Durable goods .................................
Nondurable goods ..............................
Nonmanufacturing.................................
Public utilities * ............. ...............
Whol h m ]e I.raHa .T..IllIlr,1TrtrT-1,1I,rT.1IT,ITr
Ratal 1 traria (snrnlndl ng dApartmant. storafl)
....
Finance ** .................. ...... .
Qanvlcas
mot.Ion pi ct.nresj ,.T.r
,
Mot.Ion pi ct.nre* ,__
rTTtt.., Itl

8,334
2,665
1,648
1,017
5,669
584
584
634
948
2 6 J)
i
278

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) .............. 2,307
VannfAct.nrIng .........TT.r..Ttrrf.T.,TT..TT.TTTTTTT
210
Ihirahlm gooda
, ,,,,
168
NondimAhla goods ..................Itr,TTT1(IilIt
42
Nonmanufacturing .................................
2,097
P u M Ic n . Tlt.Ies *
tI
24
Whol aaal e t.rade .......___ tttr___ TrT--TTitrrrtTT
38
Finance IHt . ....... .... , ,
.
643
Services (excluding motion pictures) ........... 1,287
Mot.IOn pi at.llfaa ,irii,TTir-«iT»r«i
>
i
87
Order fillers.... ........ ......... ................
2.913
Manufacturing ....................................
592
TVnrahl e good a .....__ ..._ ................._ ,
_
_
207
Mondi^nah^ a good p
,,,,,
385
Nonmanufacturing........................ ........
2,321
Wholesale t r a d e .................. ............
1,662
Retail trade (excluding department stores) .....
609

1.26
1.39
1.38
1.41
1 .2 0

1.38

_
_

1

_

|

1 .1 2
1 .6 3

1.06
1.28

1

159
24
24
135
-

6

23
17

51
31

17

6

20

502

7
66

48 j 1 2
25

-

525
23

6

22

177

113

792 1549

93
267
49

769 1498
2
61
20
13
16
35
167 3 8 8
552 1013

11

11

! 77 !

4

99

j
1
11

j

11

i

_

11

_

4

99

j
1

11

2

_

93

-

77

358 1182 i137
“ lT
12

386

516
130

484
324
269
55
160
23
29
83
4

67
63
386

50
75
53

41
27
11

12

14
293

196

21

_

16
2
358 1166 ; 1 2 5
9 ; 1
g
2
349 o i t i t 47
9 911
69

_
4
-

_

- 1

69
34
34

40
18
14

54

35

4
4

7
2
1

22
1

46

25

11

22

30

27

42
19
19

87
26
17

55
1

10

1

77

!

•99

1.57
1.54
1.47

570
184
141
43

355
199
149
50
156

4
63
8

462

824

263
127
136
199
36
23
70

472
317
155
352
50
64

557
260

199
61
297
210

732
520
242
278

436

212

301
1

94

135
46
89

33

104

23

236

10

n

2

27

1

68

26
26

4

-

15

15
4
11

42

3,921

_
-

_
-

_

5

«
- j

4
~

12

67

5

27
15

23

2
2

_
“

_

_
_

_
_

“

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
_

4

-

1 .5 0

1.62
1.53
1.43
1.23

—

>1

-

J

44

56
56
54

6
6

2

31
26
26

5

1

_
|

87

1

87

_

_

_

_

_
87

_

_

-

2 Q2

296

127

355
42

231
45

n?

73
64
a
129
109

36
313
35
243

-O
y Jj
186 108
2
44
64
173

5
.
5

5
5

_
_
-

65
58
7

30
_
30

27
23

92
14

34

_

2

68

242

_

146

30

69

24

21

6

6

_
1040
129
50
79
911
895
20
16

g
78
58

34
23

18

173
172

118

3

1

4

10
1
1

66
5
1
4

332

133

60

88

250

J O

O H
HL

206

o

9

9

61

272

!

-

8
1

47
14

270

7

61
61

23
23

64

96
87
Of
15
*

8

20

11

! 72
62
61
1

_

122

27
-aa
j j

45
42
3

4

_

_

_

_

4

_

4

_

L
H

-

_

•

_
_

_
_

_

12

63

2
2

23
15

_;

3

a
38
35

4

6

i

_

5

19

9

1.54
1,56

376
451
3,094
1,061
99

J
i
-

2

70

L

Packers (men) ............................... .......
Mp
ng ••*e#ee*eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee«eeeeeeeeee
Durabla goods ...............................__ .
Nondnrahi f good a .......___ .....................
Nonmanufacturing......................... .......
Wholesale trade ................. .............
Retail trade (excluding department stores) .....

32
5
24

_!
I

1

1 .5 8

1.57
1.50
1-74

11

9
9
9
-

9
J

6

75

80
48
37

y j L

1 .1 2
1 .2 0
1 .0 1
1 .6 2

184
-

2

11

1 .3 0
1 .2 0

1.04

i

184

38
_

50
- ; - 1 12 ! 50
-

1

1 .3 2
1 .2 7

1.06

38

12

115
169
130

35

594 2060

315
276

k

0A 0

3

9

3
3

9
9

-

L

7
t

LI.
H H
13
344 2 0 2 2
92
334
10
“

13

_

39
32
7

L
4
9
9

_

_

_

_

i ___
_
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18

m i

* a -4*

Gtttio dia l, WaftmUouimfy cuut Skippin g Oooupattonl - Gontinumd
(Average hourly earaiigs 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation and Industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
).65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 . 0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1 . 6 0 1.70 1.80 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2.30 2.40
and
and
inder
.70 ,75 .80 .85 .90 •95 L. 0 0 1 . 0 5 1 . 1 0 1 . 1 5 1 . 2 0 1 . 2 5 1 , 3 0 1 , 3 5 1 , 4 0 1,45 1.50 1 , 6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2,30 2.40 over

%

Packers (women) ................... .................
Manufacturing..................... ....... ......
Nondurable goods ..............................
Nonmanufacturing.................................

Receiving clerics ....................................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nondurable g o o d s ..............................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Wholesale trade ...............................

Shipping clerks .....................................
Manufacturing ............................. ......
Durable goods .................................
Nonriurabla good a -..--.-T__
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Who!ea&la trade ..T_-..T--__ t-TTt..-Tr..lt-TTtTT
Retail trade (excluding department stores) .....

1 ,8 8 6

1,454
794
660

432

1,018
416
303
113
602

408
175

1.134
W '
470
198

466
405
33

1.35
1.35

_

_

9
9

-

11

_

9

6

17
4

48
22

1 .3 2

1.39
1.35

1.59
1.62
1 59
1.71
1.56
1.53

_

_

4

_

_

-

-

-

-

9
-

-

2

1
3

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

_

_

105
20
20

6

22
26

16
4

85

10

9

18

30

25

1

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

10
_ 1 2

17
_
17

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

468
412
281
131
56

18
55

101

( (

24
40

10

1

88

40

43

71

21
12

_

_

1

11

24
9

659
421
421
38

6

15

Q

41

42

9

-

-

-

143
58
45
13
85
39
44

83
33

17
4

31
24

_
18
16

68

223

166

64
42

127
123
4
96
78
13

29
16
13
137
124
13

129

160

1?8

129

43
39

22

4
5
5

4
2
2

q
7
19
g

40
25
25

116

HL

43
l. 'X

117
106

15
15

2

1

k ?

17

2

17

61

3

12
3

17
17

22

1.61
1.47

18

J

10

_

22

1 *58

441
401

31
14
14

3

25
15

_
30
29

22

_

-

81
26

32
28
4
69
59

1

1 .6 4

1.65
1.69
1.65
1.80

12?
121
105

-

87
79
3

71
71

10

176
61
34

0
< 7f

115
108 j
1
3

3

27
50
_
48

100

65
25
L f
Hv \
35

-

3
1

2

-

17
15
15

2

_
-

17

6

4
13

18
7

1
12

6

35
30
17
1Q
5

56
51
15
36
5

1
2
2

15
15

2

—
2

1
1

-

-

24
34
34 ! 23
21
23

9
9
-

19
19
15

2

9

4

-

-

-

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
-

21

_

_

-

-

-

n

1

sK

5

’

!
Shipping-and-receiving clerks .......................
Manufacturing....................................
Durable goods .................................
Nondurable goods ..............................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Wholanal a trade T-TT..... ------ -T-Tt--T1-ItTri
Retail trade (excluding department stores) .....
Services (excluding action pictures) ..........

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ...................
Manufacturing ....................................
Durable g o o d s ............ ....................
Nondurable goods ...................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................................................
PuhUr utlUtian * ................................... T..................................T.
Who'] anal a f.v*ada ITlttr-I-lltttTtTTtttIttlirlT.TIRetail trade (excluding department stores) ..............
Services (excluding motion pictures) ...........

967
449
305
144
518
340
121

51

7,298
4,490
2,465
2,025
2,808
479
1,780
522
27

1.67
1.67
1.60
1.81

3
-

_

-

2 ,1 0 1

-

-

1 .5 6

-

501
248
253
1 ,6 0 0

628
247
154

_

_

8

24

_

_

-

-

1

|
- !

!

1

!
_ |

_

-

-

_

-

24 |
I

I
!
t

-

55
26
18

!
—
- i
4

_

-

-

4 !
-

3

13

_

-

-

-

8

_

2
6

1

5

2

3

133
, 44
_
30
44
8
89
30

i

165 j244 166
73 h s o i 1 3 8
73 1 60 1 0 2
- 1
36
28
92 184

87

72

-

2

20

7

1

3

-

1

38

5

—

-

1

1

-

1

-

-

-

1

5

89

7 I 23
-

-

-

-

-

3

7 ; 23

1

_

_

_

_

3

_

_

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

37
V )f
J

29
29

259
126
108
18
133

133

88

?
63
55

19

8

66

42
16
25
-

4
123
•JO
T
f
50

173
107

126

5

177
6

1

-

8

g
-

-

-

-

2

161
144

162
134
108
26
28

794
236

1581

10
7

25

262

972
699
519
180
273
118
1 i7
M.
f

1

22

5

89
89

n
17
-

-

“

121

23
17

3

118
38 ! 88
32
30 | 23
32
30
23
86 |

33

227
9
558
g
286
2

2
6

65
15
15

6
1
1

1733
905 1439
448 701
457 738
676 294
184 1 5A
LLQ
nX 7
1 o
40
25
3

106

92
79
13
14

162
64
48
16

56

50
47

j

■a

3

68

36

15

2

2

1

24

25

58

10

10
6

89
15l
72
_!
2
72
13.
17
9

_
-

38
2

_
2
36
1 <
1
xp

5

98

520
361
2

488

359
159

126
44
82
362

146
5

259
103

563
128
14
114
435
25

76
6

3

63
46
_

46
17
12

61
55
30
25

531
110
_

no

70

421

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_

66
_
_
_

154

66

154

_
-

_

_

373
33

_
_
_

6

5

6
_

_
_
-

-

_
_

_

_

6

_

66

-

154
!




6?
28
28

[
1
8

-

- 1

1

_

-

i

:

-

-

3 !

-

-

1.50
1.62
1.51
I.5 5
1.51
1.50

1.72
1.65
1.49
1.80
1.75
1.74
1.58
2.18

-

|
1

i

|
Truck drivers, light (under li tons) .................
Manufacturing ....................................
Durable goods .................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................................................
Wholanal a tr*d« T- TT- r - T. T r . - T. - TTTTTTr - - - T r i t I t T
Services (excluding motion pictures) ..............................
Motion pictures .....................................................................................

_

8

1.54

1 .2 0

_

-

1 .6 8
1 .6 5

1.81
1.54

1

'

19

a-4: Custodial, WanduMUitup, and SUipfUHf Occupation^ - Gontinum
d
(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$

Average
hourly
earnings

Occupation and industry division

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
L tons) ....................................
Manufacturing ............................ .
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing............... ..........
Wholesale trade ........................,
Retail trade (excluding department stores)
Services (excluding motion pictures) .... .
Motion pictures .........................

4,035
1,86^
433
1,430
2,175
897
283
57
143

$
1.79
1.87
1.70
1.92
1.73
1.72
1.91
1.62
2.18

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
type) ........... ......................... .
Manufacturing ............................
Durable goods .............. ........... .
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing.................. .......
Public utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade ......... «.............
Retail trade (excluding department stores)
Motion pictures .............. .........

2,558
346
127
219
2,212
1,316
494
293
109

1.80
1.74
1.68
1.78
1.80
1.66
1.96
2.02
2.20

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) .............................
Manufacturing............. ............. .
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade (excluding department stores)
Motion pictures ........................

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ..................
Manufacturing ............................
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable g o o d s........ ..............
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade (excluding department stores)

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ........
Manufacturing ............................

Watchmen .................. ..................
Manufacturing .............................
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable g o o d s ........... ...........
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Wholesale trade .... ...................
Retail trade (excluding department stores)
Finance ** ............................
Services (excluding motion pictures) ....
Motion pictures ........................

15

-50

27

991 J22
72 175
51 137
21
38
919 217
282 157

403

18

44

232
83
18
65
149
144
1
4

2.40

892

801 J 5 1
584

688
204
37
165

518
217

66

151

120

97
143
|

~

T

1,102
496
50
73

1 2

7

f

101
101

9

3

~ Tj S

748

J6 - 2 1

676

455
105

11

1.31

7
1.37
1.43
1.24
1.24
1.45
1.07
1.17
1.62

40

6 -22

J

220
.

O

M

27 I 51

4

0

"

20

17

5

»
|

- I 2
27 ( 49

39

15

56
48
30
18
8

30

30

53

27

27

14 s 61

14

18
18

10

74

_65

_54 M

102
99
3
45
4
5

30

- i 27

E xcludes p r e m i u m pay for overtime and night work.
S t u d y limited to m e n w orkers except where otherwise indicated.
T r a n s p ortation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

**

Finance, insurance, and real estate.

16

76

207
115
160

100

5

20

18

18
222
180
42

55
!

20

2
53

20

4
114
78
36

645

68
l

5

el ,240;...55i„
.

811
12l
691
727j
- 241
|
6

221

130

42
42

51 !

l 482
322 322

192

50
50

4381 259j

15j
!
36'
14
161| 387: 259
i
l
i
651 203l 141
961 183! 14j
|
- 104j
|
I
!
i
I

60

1.77

T

175
14

362

113

T75T

917

536
134
7
127

-

1 6 1 32
1
32
15
1

T

1.63
1.67
1.70
1.67
1.81

406

234
207
476
30
30
148
103
44

492
30

1.67

1,830

441

575
53
'43

10
522 402

1.70
1.93
1.95
1.94
2.04
2.28

154
99

1,098
“W

430

1.92

1,355

TI4
T5-

24

1/
2/
*




2,30 2.40
and

1.90 2.00
1.25 1.30 1.35
0.65 .70 |0.75 0.80 p.85 (0.90 (0.95 |1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15
1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70
and
under
95 i.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 3-.30 11.35
70 .75 .80 | ,85 .90
1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90

75
75

96

11

98

26

17

22

_15_
15

JUL

20

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Canned Sea tyood i
t

Tall* l-2031t

N U M B E R O P W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
Average s
$ x $
hul
o r y 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 I . 7 0 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2 . 0 5 2.10 2.15 2.20
erig
a n n s and
under
y
1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 . 8 0 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 . 0 5 2,10 2.15 2.20 2.25

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and sex

Men
%

Adjusters, machine ................................
Butchers ..........................................
Cooks .............................................
Cooks, assistant .................................
Cutters and slicers ...............................

1.80
1.70
1.80
1.75
1.60
2.10
1.75
1.95
1.88
1.89
1.91
1.60
1.8U

38
63
16
20
216
2U
U6
33
15
30
35
31
33

Mechanics, maintenance .............................
Oilmen ............................................
Reduction-plant operators ..........................
Retort operators ..................................
Sorter-trimmers ...................................
Weighmen ..........................................

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

216

-

20

38
16
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

63
-

_

U6

_

_

-

-

-

-

10
22
-

2U
2
30

3
6
5

~

_

23

-

7

'1

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23

31
-

“

_

_

_

h

-

-

2
-

-

1
-

2

1

-

“

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

h
-

Women

t

, ..................

(

726

1.60

110

Sorter-trimmers ...................................

1 .6 0

-

726
109

-

-

1/ The study covered establishments with 21 or more workers primarily engaged in cooking and canning fish, shrimps, oysters, clams, crabs, and
other sea food. Data relate to a March 1952 payroll period..
Z f Exoludes premium pay for overtime or night work. All workers were paid on a time basis.

Table B- 2 0 7 1 1

G

o

t

u

S

U

f

a

n

d

O

t

U P ea

J o* uL

Uc G

o

n1

/f

a

t

i

o

n

e

/

u

f

1/ The study covered establishments with 21 or more workers engaged in the manufacture of oandy and other oanfectionery products as defined in Group 2071 in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
(19235 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
O c c u p a tio n a l Wage S u rv e y , Los A n g e le s, C a l i f . , J a n u a ry 1 95 2
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
2 / Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
Bureau o f la b o r S t a t i s t i c s
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




21

T&ble B-23371

T

d

J

o

m

&

n

'

&

a

n

d

M

i

d 1/ e

&

d

'

C

o

a

i

d

a

n

d

S

u

i

t

_

_

NU M B ER OP W ORKERS R EC EIV IN G STR A IG H T -T IM E H O U RLY E A R N IN G S OF—
Number

o
f

Occupation and sex

workers

$
1*
$
i
0.90 1 . 0 0 p . 1 0
Jnder
$
3 / 0.90 1 , 0 0 1 . 1 0 1 1 . 2 0
r
r
*
48 121 !123
37
2.49
17 ! 2 0
3.19
4
3
1.91
45 1 0 4 : 1 0 3
33

Average
hourly
earnings

Total .......................
M e n ............ .........
Women ....................

4,232
3,929
2,303

Cutters and markers (249 men and 8 women) 2/a .......
Inspectors, final (examiners) (5 men and
38 women) 2 / a ....................................
Pressers, machine (men) ^/b .......... ...............
Pressers, hand and machine (376 men and
8 women) 2 A .....................................
Sewers, hand (finishers) (18 men and
1,009 women) 2 A > ..................................
Sewing-machine operators, section system

257

3.28

43
105

1.40
3.07

-

384

3.53

-

-

1,027

1.97

4

9

447
118
329

2.09
2.65
1.89

-

1,128
776
352

3.09
3.43
2.36

1
- j
1
1

2
- 1
2 1
!
-

All plant occupations j

Men 2/b .........................................
Women % / ...................... .................
b
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand (tailor)
system (men and women) 3 / b ............ ...........
Men 2/b .........................................
Women 2 / 6 ...........*....... ....................

_

$

$
1 .2 0

1 .3 0

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1$
$
$
$ , s
$ y $
1.40 1 . 5 0 j
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 0 2.40 2.60 2.80 3 . 0 0 3 . 2 0 3.40 3.60 3.80 4 . 0 0 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80

1,30 1 . 4 0 h
j2 0 6
32
j 174

191
16
175

1

1Q . 6 _
0

£

149
16
133

- j

-

—

5

1

6

9

1

t
|

-

159

137
15
122

184
45
139

1

-

_
4

196
27
169

237
87
150

273
119
154

197
104
93

215
142
73

200
132

158

211

170

144
158

110

48

178
33

162

68

3

19

21

12

25

17

15

2

1
3

11

5
-

30

13

-

-

7

4

1
1

16

_

302

146
122

24

' 76
75
1

78
10

70
67
3

44

35

22

11

4

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

27

6

-

-

22

13

37

3

2

3

4
4

_
_
_

4
4

86 1 76 i 89 1 38 1 34
15
72 j 74 1 80 1 37 ! 31 ; 1 5
14 1
2
!
3
! 9
t

20
20

78
78
-

-

1
—!

36
33
3

138

135
3

1
1

2

2

1

1

5

42

18

22

24

24

27

52

15

82

44

53

65 ! 7 3

78

67

107

89

72

85

58

32

25

7

11

4

9

22
5
17

77
5
72

18
4
14

25
4
21

33
3
30

21
3
18

1
26 1 W
51 1
18
21

17
27
6 i 15
11 ; 12

14
4
10 1

8
3
5

5

11

15
2
13

8
2
6

26 ! 2 5
10 ! 6
16 1 19
i

14
2
12

41
13
28

70
43
30 i 52
13

i
97 1 80
67
52:
30
j 28

9

88

8

1

19 | 28
3 i
— I
3 j
!
4
-!
4 !

1.80 1.90 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 0 1 . O 2 . 6 0 2.80 3 . 0 0 1 . 2 0 3.40 3 . 6 0 3,80 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4.40 4 . 6 0 4.8 over
2 4
0|
l ---

175

4

1 2

j

148

30
118

3

;
1

1 .7 0

! 1
4 1 10

1

2 !
i

20
18
48
38 I 7 ! 7
30 1 11
13
l
49
85 | 88
23
45 | 48
26
40
40

30
15
15

8
8!
-|

i

| 18

16! 2 1 1 36
1

7

7! 1 2 ;
4
'
7!
8i

1

!
1j
i

1

4!
i
4

l/ The study covered regular (inside) shops with 8 or more workers in part of industry group 2337 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
Budget. Establishments manufacturing fur coats or single skirts were excluded from the study. Data relate to a September 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




Table B-2431*

1

/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation

2/

Num ber
of
w o rk e rs

A ve ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 . 9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .30

$

undej
y

1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5

2 .30 2.35

%

Assemblers, sash, door, or frame .................. .
Cut-off-saw operators (treadle-operated or
swinging) ..................................................................................................
Molder and sticker operators (set-up and
operate) ....»....................................
Mftlri#nr and s tick er* o p e r a t o r * ( fe e d o n l y )

Off-bearers, machine ...............................
Planer operators (set-up and operate) ...............
Rip-saw operators ..................................
StnfiW hsnrfl a r s anri t.m elrara^ hand
, r lr
,
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
4 tons) ............................... ...........

90
50

1 .8 0
2 .0 6

66

1 .7 8

52
29
81
10
44
104

2 .0 1
1 .7 2
1 .6 1
2 .0 3
1 .8 5
1 .6 1

36

1 .7 9

a
-

53

_
-

-

-

42

1

-

9

6

3
1

11

22

-

-

-

-

_

19
8

6
1

2

2

_

-

1

47

-

-

-

-

26

<'

3

3
25

1
10

5

_
-

i

_

•

_

18

_

-

11

8

-

-;
i

1
18

34

31

1 ___ i
_
1

-

54
-

_

_

_

11

3

1

-J

_

3

_

1

_

6

1

-

3
1

_
_

-

-

“

2

-

*

_
1

_
_

-

2

____ i
_

_ i

_

/ The study covered establishments with 21 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of sash, doors, blinds, mantels, window and door

frames, and similar fabricated millwork from purchased limber. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers. All workers were paid on a time basis.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
D.S. DEPARTMENT OF UBQR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_

_

d

sable »-*m*
O ccu p a tio n

Number
of
workers

2/

PmhaUum RefitUnf 1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF$
$
$
$
$ .
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
Average $
$
$
$
hburly 1 . 4 0 1.45 1 . 5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.7 0 1.75 1. 8 0 1.85 1.9 0 1.95 2
.00 2 . 0 5 2.10 2 . 1 5 2. 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 3 0 2 . 3 5 2 . 4 0
2
earnings
and
under
*5
.10
*2? . 1 . 8 0 1 8 1.90 1 * 9 ? 2
,00 2 . 0 5 2 2.15 2 , 2 0 2 , 2 5 2 , 3 0 2 , 3 ? 2 , 4 0 2.45
1 . 4 ? l . ? 0 I aI I 1 . 6 0 1 * 65 . 1 . 7 0 1

3
/

A s s is t a n t a t il lm e n , c r a ck in g ( o t h s r t h a n c a t a l y t i c ) • • •

l /*9
134
113

78

11
*

1
2 09

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

G agers
Guards
t r s d As , dia1

Tuaf
m v c4 mum av
Ja *|4f
mm
L tbO l^rS • • a e e e e aaaaaa* ae nae e aae aaaa«e e e a# ae e e e e e # e ae e a
M m nr* f minVit
f lI
1(
) 1 - I . tT. t
% o h i n i ete m* 1
oe «ttitiTrn»tii-i»T
Ummkaei4 An ma4fif aMflnnn
....
p4«\a W * fawa Ma4nt.inftni m _____ __ ____
s

MMMM
MMMM

25
34
145
44
6 40
mj
jj

-

-

-

-

-

20
.0

6

-

-

19
56

17

5

9

*

33
49

25

5

«o
d

84

M
fM ^itt A M IlkAMt # % M __ __~ m . ^ M * . M M M . M M Mm M . MM M M 2M1 4 M M
0r
i
C441 1 wairt MMaalr4l na^a1«44a 1
...... ......
o7
Ci 411 man a m
na fM k t * f kan AAf.alv4 |
fi
05
4 ft
o
S to c k c le r k s
52
T rea ters, l ig h t o i l s
12
1
Yismai a n a ^ kml name 1 4 ark+ n 4 l a ................................ ....................
58
Tmi<k iIiHw p r
..............................................................................
248
Gft
L ig h t (u nder l a tons)
-t
f*
Ilm4 4nm f l # 4 ft lllf) 4nft 1 llH4 riff
t.ftftA J __ . ____
< 2
Uae mi fa v a m i. 4 n n a 4 m a 41a m 4.irr\A 1
............ ...............
1 53

<

:
i

il
J

L

135

3

28

9 f5
V

12

1. 6
8

2
0
10

41
2

1.98
2.24

_

3

1.98
1.90
1
l#7v

1

x^

2 10

- :

1 07
X#7 r

;

4
9

“
*

**

“

"

~
**
a
m

6

26
m
XXX

g

“

x
211
12

4

33
16

42

43

30

6
0

H ?

%

23
128

”
3
1
3

246
32

ff
tt
XX
ff
tt

1

x
4

■
*

ft
X
16
0/
3h
m
33

o c s

A
©

1f
t
XU
1 ft
XU

A
0
ift
X5

*
6

4

x

36

9

18

38

24

i

7
3

2

3
28

«n

14
4

1
1
1
2
1
0

13
13

4

23

i

-

84

1.87

f 1t
t f

**
*

-

L

ri

84

1
6

3

84

O)
f

"

4

4

0*1*5
*. /

4

“

~

2
94

12

4
14
4

4

4

19
.0

4

A
B
7*

~

51

75

2. 0
1
21
.2

<A5
.t
9 99

1
ft

hX
16

18

ft 1ft
4»LC

255
182

fO
ft
X

40

9

x

52
6

35

ftft

74

g
5

2 12
.

-

8

1. 6 9
1.92

1 55
213

-

1.79
1.8 2

1

1 f?
X7 *

1
4
21
1A
X©

20
.0
1.97

r
5

-

2 14
36

F irem en, s t i l l s , c r a c k in g ( o t h e r th a n c a t a l y t i c ) « • • • • •

f
o

46
40
o<

5

2. 6
0
21
.2
203

-

54

4

-

2,0 9

J ____ !____ ____ :

j

!

1

69

j

”1
i

150
X<7

|

s

4

0

1/ The study covered establishments with 51 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of gasoline, fuel oils, lubricants, illuminating oils, and other products
from crude petroleum and its fractionation products in petroleum refineries.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y
Includes data for truck drivers not presented separately.
Table 1-3099:

RaJmL&i Pboduddy Qtltei

* i e , and
Jbd

1
/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY E A R N IN G S OF—

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
%
$
$
$
s
$
$
8.80 8.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 . 4 0 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 . 7 5 1.80 1.85 1.90 1 . 9 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 0 5 2.10
and

2/

.90

.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1 . 1 5 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2 . 0 5 2 . 1 0 2.15

Men
opBrsl/ors ••**•••••*•*•«••♦••**•*****•**
ft«*464nm mcAk^nA AnaMflfyiMfl
ff m«iM am4 niv
tt

..... ................
..............

Tubing-machine operators (other than tire tread
83d t>u)}68) **••#•••••••••••••*•«••«********+*"******
Ull

___

52
8
138
25
377

$
1.70
1.63
1 5?
1.69
1.59
1.60

28

1.64

16
212

1.35
1.23

9

5

2
2

5
2
2

5
4

15

2
2
4

x

IX
Xf
4
23

4,
7

3

C
7

32
4

31-V S J t ?e

7
41

55
13
Po

e
J

7

10

2

10

C

44

14

2

2

8

1

ft

30

A
O

X

8

am

•
f
t
f
t

Women

Trimmers and finishers. hand •«•»»•»••••»•••••••••»•••

4

8

4

4

2

_

7

6

4

73

45

5

17

40

4
5

|

1/ The study covered establishments with 21 or more workers engaged in the manufacture of industrial and mechanical rubber goods, rubberized fabrics and vulcanized rubber clothing, and miscellaneous
rubber specialties and sundries. Data relate to a March 1952 payroll period.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2
3
Table B-336 :

l/

4 4 * ld n ,i e 4, ,

fy o

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

£/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2
$
1 ~ $
3
$ ^ $ - $
Jnder 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.kO l.k5 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 . 8 0 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2.10 2 . 2 0 2.30 i . k o 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0
*
and
1 .1 0

1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.kO 1.V5 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 I . 7 0 1.75 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1.90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 .ko 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0 over

Men
Carpenters, Maintenance ........... .................
Chlppors and grinders ................. ......... .
Care assemblers and finishers ......................
Corenakers, hand ...................................
Tnneee tenders ................... ........... .
Inspectors, class C ....... ......... ...............
Maintenance non, general u t i lity...................
lfelders. f l o o r ....................... .............
Holders. hand, bench .................. .............
Holders, machine...... ................. ...........
Patternmakers, wood ................................
Permanent-mold-machine operators ...................
Pourers, m e t a l .....................................
Sand mixers ..................................... .
Shake-out men .................. ...................
Stock clerks .......................................
Watchmen ................... ............ .

9

339
79
18*
130
20
2k

97
117
162

75

$
1.97
1 .kl
l.6 k
1.78

1

_
_

k
2

2

10
9

k k

k6
k2

116

k

25

5

20

2k

_

1

2
11

9

1 .6 8

2

2
7

3

6

1.51

190

1 .8 0

56
72
119
17
35

1.55
1.32
1.30
l.k8
1.23

9

5

11

2

9
28

6
1

13

6 9

3

8

k

lk

5

3

11

1 .6 3

1.93
1.91
1.79
2 .*7

7

13

lk

k

2

12
3

9

20

_

_

_

"

_

_

32

3

8
1

6
2
9

2
2

10

2
6

k
2

31
38

lk

12
21

k

k

2

3

6

3

11

"

21

21
21

7

Q
7

12

k2

12

2
22

IO
J jC

I

1 8

mm
J
O
c.

10

28

23

3

1

13

6

3

5

2

3
1
c
0

“

2

1

4

3

1
X

37
do
cl
7

3

-

■
■

lk
13

"

0%
d

n
X

2

*
*

"
7

d

0

13
9

“
12
1

■
'
“
“
“

21

k

6
1

“

*
*
■

"
“

“
"

3

*

k
■

*

k

18

~

3
“

2

2
8

7

k

k

2

2k

1
X

"

25

6

15

2

2
2

9

"
_

12
8

k

5

k

3

11

1

k

9
*

20

I
k

1
2

"

*

*

6

Women
Hnri U M n I i U r i ami flnlatiara

1 2

12

S

1

2

|

|

l/

1

1

The study covered independent nonferroue foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or nore workers. Data relate to a July 1951 payroll period.

5 / Excludes prenlun pay for overtime and night work. A ll or a Majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a tine basis.

Table B-3k2:

G

u

t

l

e

U

f

,

<

OJ

j Ht
A

a

^+

fu

to

b

* d l/ o M o
l u

Sl

Ad

r*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

U

$
$
$
%
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
Uhdex 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.kO i.k 5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .10 2.15 2.20 2.25 I .30
%
and
1.05
1.10 1.1? 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.kO l.k? 1.50 i . » 1.60 1.6? 1.70 1 -7 ? 1.80 1.8? I.9 0 1 . 9? 2 .00 2.0? 2 .1 0 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 over

Men
Assemblers, c la ss B j/ a ......................................................
Assemblers, e la ss Ct T o t a l .......................... ...................
Time ..........................................
Incentive .................................
Inspectors, e la ss B ^ / a ................................. ...................
Machine-tool operators, production, cla ss A ^/a .........
Machine-tool operators, production,
c la ss B 2 /a, k j . ................. .............................. ...........
B rill-p ress operators, single- or multiplespindle, c la ss B 2/ * ...................... * .........................
Machine-tool operators, produotisn,
e la ss C 2 /a, k j ..................................................... .........
B rill-p ress operators, single- or multiplespindle, ela ss C 2 / a .............................. .
Set-up men, machine to o ls ^/a ..........................................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand 3 / * ............................
Tool-and-dle makers j / a ................................................ .

10

%

12
88

1.55
1.39
1.25
1.52
1.56
2.03

16
2
lk

159

1.65

-

-

-

-

22

1.66

-

-

-

-

115

l.k2

-

-

-

1

-

15

20

1.36
1.97
1.39

-

.

_

1

.

5

.

_

_

1

6

95

kk

51

37
30
82

2.27

58
109
32

1.38
1.25
1.28

6
6

8
8

_
_

3

6
5
1

_

2

5

2

2

2

19
13

1

3
8
8

1

1

1

k

2

k

2

1

2

1

1

k

2

k

2

1

3

1

2

2

2

12

11

2k

22

19

35

lk

_

2

2

k

1

2

_

5

1

2

1

1

_

3

6

6

16

_

1

.

6

_

15

25

12

21

1

8

2

2
3

3

1

_

3

3

_

1

12

5
2

1
5

6

_

2

7

17

3

_

2

6

2

2

5

5

1

1

ih

k3
1

10

3

j

5

3

12

2

2
1

2

It
8

3

5

h

lk

35

2

3

W
omen
Assemblers, c la ss B ^ / a .....................................................
Assemblers, e la ss C j / b ..............................................................................
Inspectors, e la ss C £ / * ..............................................................................

_
20

_ _
38

1

2

_

“

“

8

k

2
*

8

10

k

15
16

3
2

3

32
2

2
1

10
2

_

1

2

3

2

1

-

‘

1 / The study covered establishaents with 21 or nore workers prinarily engaged in
ifacturlng cutlery, hand to o ls, and hardware (droop 3k2)
( 19*5 ed itio n ) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Bata relate to a Deoehber 1951 payroll period.
1951
_ ,
Excludes prenlun pay for overtine and night work.
In su fficien t data to warrant presentation o f separate averages by i thod o f wage payment.
’
(a) A ll or predominantly tin e workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly incentive workers.
Includes data for operators of other naohlne tools in addition to those shown separately.

v~




defined in the Standard industrial C lassification Manual
Occupational Vage Survey, Los A ngeles, C a l i f . , January 1952
U.8. BKPAOTMHT OF LABOB
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

2k

Table B-3439*

J

f

e

a

t

U

u

f

A

p

f

&

i

a

U

u

1

/

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY E A RNING S OF—

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly f.15
earnings and
under
y

Assemblers, class B y
I n n awiV I a WS
s

a

319
33
38
44

1.57
1.56
1.32
1*60

_

39
37
32

&
............................

I a OO P. /

Assemblers, class C (women) £/a .......................................................................
Chippers and grinders £/a ...........................................................................................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B y
.....................................................................................................
&
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C y
.....................................................................................................
&
Inspectors, class A y
..................................................................................................
&
Janitors, porters, and cleaners y
................
&

202
102
116
26

173

5
24

-

0

“

“

12

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
1 .6 0

1*62,

1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95

32

11
1

6

36

_

-

1.41
1.81
1.31
1.81
1.61
1.65
1.51
1.47
1.52
2.17
2.07
1.87
1.50

38
31
156
183
113

_

15

3

1.61

60

.................
Punch-press operators, class A y
&
Punch-press operators, class B £/b .................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand £ / a ..............
Stove mounters y
.................................
&
Tool-and-die makers £ / a ..............................................................
Welders, hand, class A y
& .......................................................
Welders, machine, class A l j \ .................................................
>
Welders, machine, class B £/a .................................................

$
s
$
%
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 . 5

1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.5?

1 .2 0

%

i.2 0

2

1

2

2

3

”

2

65

66

9

5

-

_

22
1

1

-

~

12

9

6

—

1

“

11

“

4

2

5

3

6

2

6

-

-

-

-

5

18

7

6

3

2

3

3

2

_
-

_

_

3
4
4
59

11
6

17

-

13

2

7
38
45
25
54

1
3
1

25
4

5

35
15
3

2.05 2

5

19

.1 0

2.15

$

2.15
2 .2 0

4

%
$
$
$
2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45
and
2.25 2 . 3 0 2.35 2.40 2.45 over

$
2 .2 0

$

1

8

2

1

—

15

—

5

1

“

-

-

-

2

6

18

4

2 .0 0

$
$
$
2 . 0 0 2.05 2 , 1 0

5

5

2

8

3

1

9

—

—

”

~

-

5
6
3

20

3

3

2

-

10

2

8

13
13
30

5
1

5
20

15
60

15
5
4

21

1

11

3
39

12

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

6

3

3

-

4

24

15

8

38

10

43

27
9

-

5
7

11

2

9

1

_

-

2

_

_

9

2

6

44

4

6

1

7
-

3

18

7
4

2

2

-

1

2

3
-

1

1

13

1

11

-

5

-

1

-

2

-

,

-

_
5

7

-

-

1

4

-

1

-

“

—

22

6

-

-

_____ i____
1
_

10

2

-

-

13
7
-

I
i

1/

The study covered establishments with 21 or more workers orimarily engaged in the manufacture of domestic and industrial oil burners (Group 3432) and nonelectrical heating and cooking apparatus
( G r o 3439) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
u p
2/ Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y
Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-3444:

S

h

e

e

t

-

M

e

1/
t

a

l

W

o

n

h

N U M BER OF WORKERS REC EIV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E H O U RLY E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation 2/

Number
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

y
Assemblers, class A ij/a...........
Assemblers, class B i a ...........
j
Forming-machine operators, power 4/a
Janitors, porters, and cleaners I kJ .•
Lay-out men, class A y
& ....
Power-brake operators, class A y
*
Power-shear operators, class A 4/a
Power-shear operators, class B 4/a
Punch-press operators, class A 4/b
Punch-press operators, class B _
_
Sheet-metal workers, production 4/a
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ij/a
Tool-and-die makers £/a .............
Welders, hand, class A 4/a ..........
Welders, hand, class B y
& ..........

y*

92
209
9

$

28

12

I 2.26

42
17

I 2.05
! 1.73

19
17
7
15
23

138

*

1$
M

1.88

1.66
1.74
1.41
2.28
2.14
1.89
1.58
1.80
1.49
2.39
1.57

22
11

$
1$
$
'$
$
$
$
$
!$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!$
!$
$
1$
$
$
;!■.35 1 .4 0 11.45 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 11.60 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 i l. 8 5 11.90 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2..301 2 .3 5 2 .4 0 2 .4 5 2 .5 0
and
i
1 . 3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1,,50 1 ,5 5 1 ,6 0 1 .6 5 1 ,7 0 1 .7 5 1 ,8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 ,95 2 ,0 0 2 ,0 ? 2 ,1 0 2 ,1 5 2 ,2 0 2 ,2 5 2 .3 0 ' 2..351 2.4Qi 2 .4 5 2 ,5 0 o v e r
t

1$
U n d eif ^

- t
- i
- j
- ;
-

- 1
2

3

6
5
-

-

- '
3;

10
4
- J

-

“

-

_
:

-

_ 1
1
-

3
3
-

2

9
1

3
2
-

3
1 '
-

5 ■
-

-

- 1

-

-

28
1
1
3

1
-

- J
-!

1
4
2

28 i
- !
4 ;
-

39
3

33
-

-

1
~

1
_

J!
- !
_
-

4
-

3
-

-

30
22
_
3
1
6

5
1
1

-

- !
1
2
10

6
25
2
1
1
2
4
4
6
3
8
4

20 j
21
3
3
3 |
_ | _
| - :
~
i
2.+
2;
10
;
i

li
7
3
6

2
3
_
7

3
-

3
-

_

_
3
-

3!
-i

2

_
—

3|
-!

_

3!
-!
|

3
-

-

“

“

-

-

“

1

_j
!
1
-

_
_
1
2;

"

2|

_
_j
1
1

l!
-

-

-

I

_
-

-

2
3

-

_

_

_

-

_
-

I

-

1
3

_

-

I1

-1
1

-

-!

_

_

_

:
,

1
2

_
1

1
9
1

H

_
2
-

119

_
_

J
10

-

1

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of sheet-metal products (Group 3444) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
2 J Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
S
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
U
Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
S
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
’
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




25

Table B -31*68: C

J

U

c

f

o

c

f

l

a

t

u

u

f

,

P

l

a

t

U

u

}

,

a

4

>

u

l

P

o

I

t

i

U

b

t

f

y

N U M BER OF W ORKERS R EC E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E HOURLY E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

ll

Janitors, porters, and cleaners ......
Maintenance men, general utility .....
Platers .............................
Platers' helpers .................... .
Platers' helpers (women) .............
Polishers and buffers, metal .........
Polishing-and-buffing-machine operators
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ....

$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!$
$
$
$
$
'$
$
0.80 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 j i .05 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 . 5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 . 8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 ! 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0

and
under
.85

%
1 .2 8
1 .8 3
1 .7 8
1 .3 2
1 .0 5
1 .8 2
1 .6 4
1 .3 0

16
20
206
353
254
283
21
16

[
.9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0

.9 0
1

1

1
-

2

21

1

- I
! 10
15 1
71
19 j 18

!

and
1 .4 0 U 4 5 _ 1 .5 0

1 . 1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 ^ 30_

!

2

15

1

2

26
34

-

28 i 21
28
13

43
5

i

2
3

!

i
1 !

1

L

1

1

1
11
54
7

-

2

6

1

2

4
31
4
13
4

2
13
1
-

1

5
20
9

1 .6 0 i i ± 6 l 1 .7 0 l * l i j 1 .8 0 1 *8 1 1 .9 0 JLs-21 2 ,0 0 2*0$. 2 .1 0 over
!

4

4
17
4
5
-

51
4
5
2

4
12
3
26
3

8
4
5
1

13
16
10
-

4
25
1
6
11

1
34
67

3
23
54

4
27
- i
-

- i
-

3
19
21

-

31 | 23

J

i

_

1
8

5

11
11

_____

l/ The study covered establishments vith more than 7 workers engaged in all types of electroplating, plating, and metal polishing (Group 3463) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
(1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data rele^e to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
y
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

MacUiH&uf, SnAuAbueA V

Table B-35:

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex 2/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
Average
hourly Under 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 . 7 5 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 ‘ . 1 5 1.20 2 . 3 0 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70
2
earnings 1
1.20
2/
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 2 . 4 0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80

Number
of
workers

Machinery 4/
%

Assemblers, class A .................................
Assemblers, class B ............... ..................
___.........
ARnanVi] pfp (]nnp f llt ItI
•
i
Assemblers, class B (women) .........................
Assemblers, class C (women) .........................
Electricians, maintenance ...........................
Inspectors, class A .................................
Inspectors, class B .................................
rOaftR f 1It ,________________ ..T........
i
Inspectors, class A (women) .........................
Inspectors, class B (women) .........................
Inspectors, class C (women) .........................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners .....................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A £ / ...................... .................
_1ofVin Aporo+r»T*ft^ a I da s A
TT^ "" p|»noo ApAV*n . \ »
>»j |J
+/rc
AAA A
Drills-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A ...............................
Engine-lathe operators, class A ..................
Grinding-machine operators, class A ............. .
Milling-machine operators, Class A ...............
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A ........................

_ _

_

108
459
107
373
117
98
16
63
151
447

1.83
1.59
1.31
1.39
1.21
2.06
1.89
1.66
1.43
1.62
1.34
1.13
1.35

_
5/124 78
12
3
5/131 225
2 21

1
21
4
8
1

3
14
2
12
1
2

_
1
4 12
31 49
10
4
10
9
1
3
4 , 15

53
26

30
2
102

84

64

21
2
65

14

13
2
6
14
1
2
3
26

1,887
149
77

1.91
2.05
1.85

-

-

-

-

3

2

13

no
512
286
164

1.69
1.90
1.94
1.89

-

309

1.91

712
816
u

p

1 J 89

20

-

-

-

3
-

10
-

2
-

105
41

10
3

2
139
40
2
35
9
10
2

41
369

32

2
9

21

63

1

37
41
70
16
10

75
58

_
5
12

8
8
12
1

60
30

n5
7

6
41
17

n
76
8

1

35
51

_

150
-

153
-

62
_

12
-

6
_

6

18
98
-

14
28
-

6
19
-

_

1

96

_
_

-

_

_

_

8
19
_

5
_
-

2
8
-

_
2
-

6
4

_
4

40
7
f
1
X

103
«
j

13

72
A?

43
20

_

_

17

_
_
_

3

1
17
48
18
11

_

a

-

3

1

-

71

198

191

5

20

7

18
17

445 149
62
12
A

17
2

19
4
25
6

5
26
13
2

n
6
9
21

20
H7
16
4

2
43
29
27

6
53
32
21

5
ns
73
29

14
19
10

1
43
10
9

1

2

2

10

12

62

48

74

77

3

_

1

65
g
1

1
•

4,

239

-

\

5
7
-

n

12
J
C
J

7

_

37

_
_

5
2

7

5
5

J
-

-

28
14
6

7
3
1

1

1

.

l
24

n
8
2

_
1
4
2

21
16

_

_
_
_

14
'

See footnotes at end of table,




Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-35t

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and sex 2/

MacUU&uf JnJlittikM ’ 1 • Gontinumd
/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
s
$
S
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
<
Average
hul
o r y Under 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2.05 2 . 1 0 2.15 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70
erig 1
anns
/

1 .2 0

1,771
129

1.65
l

-

318
271
241
2 48

1.57
1.69
1.71

-

1 .6 8

102

1 .6 6

1

1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.4? 1 . 5 0 1.55 1.60 I . 6 5 1,70 1,75 1,80 1 , 8 5 1,90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2 , 0 5 2 . 1 0 2.15 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 4 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2.70 2.80

Machinery 4/ - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 2/ ......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B ..............................
Engine-lathe operators, class B .................
Grinding-machine operators, class B ............
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B .......................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B (women) ..................................
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 8 / ......
Automatic-lathe operators, class C ..............
Engine-lathe operators, class C ............. ..
Grinding-machine operators, class C .............
Milling-machine operators, class C ..............
Machine-tool operators, toolroom...................
Machinists, production.............................
Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d ..................
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) ...................................
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) ........
Welders, hand, class A ........................................
Welders, hand, class B ............ ........................ .

60
1,323
14
64
61

53
111

827
220

361
367
985
238

1.44
1.36
1.58
1.57
1.42
1.45
1.97
1.98
1.39
2.28

-

-

19

4
-

-

_

.

30
3
5

472
-

20

24

6

79

182
58

126

293

13

1

65

22

32
15
9

14

26

5
3

49
50
31
16

12
104

4

24

71

3

48

3

1
2

2
2
2

.

-

2

2

5

28

14
108

4

3
48
3
14

8

11

7
51
1
1

2
2

5
5

2

-

_

-

18

7

12

-

223

20

9

161

6

66

93

245 1 0 1
3
16

23
27
51
23

17
33

33

16

36
.

25

48

8

3

28

2

20
1
8

7
5

2
22

14

7

5

16

5

_

5

_

K
J
2

-

-

3
7

1

1

-

-

2

6

1

14
107

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

34

13

9

16

15
5

12

74

4
-

8

2

11
8

6

6

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

.

30

26

16

71

27

-

2

12
10
-

86
7

17

57
105

175

11

7

-

6

1

14
7

21

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

6

26

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

50

-

16
1

6

57

95

26

1

2

18

50

4
18

2
2

14
13
23

6

19
2

80
57
15

90
75
3

98
7

55
19
3

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_ _

_

2

8

10

-

84
55

185

126

43
-

4
192
2

6

2

17
31

16
13

20
6

21

21

27

4

2

5
28

11

1
6

1
2

.

1
1

45
4

132

20

42

6

1

_

21
2

82
7

6

1

4

12

4
53

-

-

6
8

8

118

1

2 .1 2

1.91
1.71

169

1
1
6
2

15

5
9

331
18

19
52

112

146

2

30
139

-

_

-

-

-

-

Oil Field Machinery
Assemblers, class A
Asasmblera, elnan B

............................................
1 . t I I i r , t l T t I l t , , I i r t i r . T T T I . T tlTI

Assemblers, class C ............................................
Electricians, maintenance ....................................
Inspectors, class A ............................................
Inspectors, class B ...........................................
J n n l torsf porters, a n d e l a a n a r a ,IT,ritTttT....... TTI.T
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 8 / ......
Drill-press operators, radial, class A ..........
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplea p l n d l a, c l a n s A __1..TITIIIltTI,TtIir.TtITTTIIt
Engine-lathe operators, class A ........................
flr^ndl ng_jnneV)1 r A npAnn+Yvna^ el n a n A _t, r.
i
Milling-machine operators, class A ..............
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
a e r A V m n e h l rm) . e l a a a A r . . T t T. . I I T T T T r . 1 r. T.T.T
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 8 / .... .
Automatic-lathe operators, class B ..............
Drill-press operators, radial, class B ...........
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B ..............................
Engine-lathe operators, class B .................
Grinding—n w e hInn

npAmtora,

elans

R

..

. T . , . T ___r T _

Milling-machine operators, class B ....................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
semv

mnehlnalj

el a s

s

R

.r.

See footnotes at end of table.




144
96
37
23
72
26
102

429
35

1.84
1.67
1.49
1.94
1.87
1.63
1 .2 9
1 .8 6

_

«
.

2

3

3

-

-

-

-

25

3

_

_

_

8

8

2

2

6

18

6

6

4

12

14
3

-

-

_

-

-

2
3

6
4.

2
6

1
8

2

1
1

2

4
.

_
2

1
1

13
5

21
1

16

43

83

4

20

-

2

1.74

-

1
3
5 21
_
3

_
1

3

3

5

2

1 .8 8

4

16

4

30

1.78
1.89

4

4

1

8
2

10

32
47

12

1

18

7

10

3

4

54

1.87
1.65
1.75
1.54

2

3

16

2

24

7

28
3

6
1

8
8

13

2

1.72

206

212
22
21
8

1.70
1.62
1.64

35

1.61

-

_

-

_

3

7

14
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

4

7

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

1

1

2

4
2
5
2 H
3 16

3

1

1 .6 2

37
24
37

_

-

-

-

_

.

-

16

67

37

26

1
2

8
2

-

2

-

1

6

3

20

22

8

3
q
7

9

24

_

4

_

4

_

1

_ _

-

_

2
7

Table B-35:

Occupation and sex 2/

Number
o
f
workers

M

a

e

l

t

i

H

&

u

f

. GO

on

n J t U

i

u H

tM

^/

eU

dM

1

/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
s
Average
hul
o r y Under 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05
erig 1
anns
1.20
1 /
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10

OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 . 1 0 2.15 2.20 2.30 2.40 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2.70
2 .1 5

2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2 . 6 0 2.70 2 . 8 0

Oil Field Machinery - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production, class C £ / ......
Automatic-lathe operators, class C ..............
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C ..............................
Grinding-machine operators, class C ..............
Machinists, production .............................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ..................

86

7
8

13
261

34
43
339

1.42
1.49

-

2

1

14

-

-

1

-

1

-

4

5
-

1.46
1.47
1.97
1.36

-

-

-

-

-

3
4

2

2

1

2

-

3

4

-

-

5

13

8

3

3

-

-

12

24

11

16

1
1

18

1 .2 2

4
1

98
8

1.77

25
27
16

-

-

45

34

55

77

6

5

3

-

3

10

3

8

17

1

2

3

3

115

51

20
2

5

2

7
-

_

-

_

_

2

-

12

2

-

3

22

-

2

2 .0 4
1 .8 3

_

_

37

x

x

6

Machine-tool Accessories - Jobbing Shoos
Assemblers, class B ................................
Assemblers, class B (women) ........................
TnapAft+^r* ^ i>laaa A
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ....................
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 8 / ......
Engine-lathe operators, class A .................
Grinding-machine operators, class A .............
Milling-machine operators, class A ..............
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 8 / ......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B ..............................
h a _1
ApnT*c
sOada f
t
Grinding-machine operators, class B .............
MillIng-machlna npflratnrSj cl a s s B -.... .........
Mafth'lnA>tnn1
+ot*.«5^ prwlnc+,1 nn } cl a s s (1 ........
_
nAafjvtl ApoT*n+nro
t»
aatti
Machinists, production .............................
Tool-and-die makers ................................
Welders, hand, class A .............................

12

195
54
26
20

1.50
2.24
1.25

_
12

_

1

3

4

„ • _
6

2
2

6

7

8

5

1

1

1

2

1

_

2 .0 0

-

-

5

5

2

1

12

1

5

2

16

5

4

2 .1 0

2

-

-

19

12

2

14

2

8

2

36

-

-

4

2

2

14

-

6

2

92
361

1.45
1.79
1.77
1.90
I. 4 3
2.13
2.09
2.28

11

2 .0 2

11

135
18
43
24
117

1.82
1.28
1.32
1.84
1.91
1.94
1.71
1.50
1.58
1.51
1.47
1.28

26
30
15
29

1.23
1.31
1.25
1.98

21

_

4

15

9
3

6

2

8

4,

-

1

2
1

_

6

2

18
4,

2
10

_

_

2

1

4
_

/
4
_
.

1

2.05
2.04
1.63

9
35
45

_

x

155

16

_

2
3

4
1

x

2

-

30

24

33

12

2

8
6
1
6

30

8

25

6

12

4
3

12

-

-

3
1

4

1

3
5

4

.
7

2
2

6

2
2

-

15
90

2

2

-

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

2

2

_

_

_

_

_

5

*

6

1

2
8
1
5

2

-

3
3
9

4,

3

a
2■
2

5

5

4
-

2

8

/
—

2

2

12
6
1

10
12
1

26
6

2

_

_

6

2

_
-

-

J

2

2
2

14
-

6

-

36
80
-

6
2

_

10
2
6
2

-

-

1

2

2

1

8
2
2

14
3
5
-

7
3
_

6

2

3
2

_
_

4
_

1

6

3

1

_
55

34

1

1

13
-

9

2

8

2

Machine-tool Accessories - Production Shoos
Assemblers, class A ......... .......... ............
Assemblers, class C (women) ........................
janitors, porters, and cleaners ....................
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 8 / ......
Engine-lathe operators, class A .................
Grinding-machine operators, class A ..............
Milling-machine operators, class A ..............
Machine-tool operators, production, class B $ / ......
Engine-lathe operators, class B .................
Grinding-machine operators, class B .............
Milling-machine operators, class B ..............
Machine-tool operators, production, class C £/ ......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplesplryl1®, < 1a
*
( lllltttlill__ ..................
J
Grinding-machine operators, class C ..............
Milling-machine operators, class C ..............
Tool-and-die makers ................................

25
11

131
18
44
21

1

3
2

-

5
-

3

3

4

2

2

1

-

-

-

2
1

2

7
1

1

-

3

2

8

7

17
2

3
2/29

14

13

6
3
5

9

5

2
2

5
3

4
3
12

4
2

4

28

1
2

2
2
2

20
11

8
2

18

6

2

4
.
2
-

-

1
6
6

4

4

2
8

1

4
7

4

1
6
2

2

-

4
4

23

2
12

2

28

2
2

-

1

40
4

26

3

5
2
2

-

-

6

-

-

1
2

4
4
-

1

2

10

2

—

'
1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a November 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated. All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.

y
y
6/
2/
8/
2/

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes o il field machinery establishments and machine-tool accessory establishments for which separate data are also presented.
Workers were
distributed asfollows: 75
at
$1.10 - 1 .1 5 ; and 49 at $1.15 - 1.20.
Workers were
distributed asfollows: 9 at $0.35 - .90; 19 at $0.90 - .95 ; 20 at$0.95 - 1 ;
9at $1 - 1.05; 31 at $1.05 - 1.10 ; 27 at $1.10 - 1 .1 5 ; arxl 16 at $ 1.15 - 1.20.
Workers were
distributed asfollows: 81
at
$1.05 - 1.10 ; 2 at $1.10 - 1 .1 5 | and6 at $ 1.15
- 1.20.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Workers were
distributed asfollows: 10
at
$1 - 1.05; 16 at $1.10 - 1 .1 5 ; and 3at $1.15 1.20.




28

T ati* B-3661:

R a d io * , *7 e J e w

lio * , a n d

R

e la t e d

1/

P r o d u c t&

N U M B E R O F W 0 R K E R 8 R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
s
s
$
$
$
i . 2 0 1.25 i . 3 0 i . 3 5 l.i*o 1.1*5 i.5o 1.55 1.60 1.65 1 . 71.75 1.80 i.8S 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1*0
hourly 5.90 <5.95 1.00 i.05 f.10 u
0
earnings and
and
index
y
L.00 1.05 1.10 1 . 1 5 1.20 1 . 2 5 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1 .1*5 i.5o 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1 . 9 0 1,95 2,00 2.10 2,20 2 , 3 0
?.k0 over

Men
V
cl
B trtfttftirtttttttr-ttttT__ ...M M
Asseoblers, class C ....... ....................... .
ravmmnlmme am4 nfnnan^A
..
1?1 mmi w4 a 4 enm na^nfananhA
....
Tn«flAAfi%HA / la m A
t
.
. .....
.. ....
.

132
315
231
9
10

82

1 ,6 2

1.38
1.13
1.7h

15

9

28

5

35
21

103

39
27

3

10
u*

59
3

20

69
12

10

31
6

18

2
«

10
10

O

L
4

1
X

2

1

-

-

.

6

8

9

6

9

10

1
12
8

2

-

5

12

16
7

3

8

8

.

1

15

10

2
2

_
.
_
t
•
*

-

2

2

_

1

17

11

n*

7

k

16

9
h

3

2_
8

18

i

_
.
7

_
!
_

_

2

7
5

2

22

12

k

6
20

12

28

»

_

-

-

2
1

1

-

3

13
23
11

u
1*9

JI

8

g

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

8

lt
i

in
XV
i
X

1
X
7

_

j

8

10

17
If

_

k

1*

1*

_

1

6

-

2

k

1*

-

1

2

h

h

17

2
6

6

_

_

6

5

-

1.53

-

2

2

7

1*
1*

t
u

26

.
.

1

5

-

5
5

10

_

7

_

k

1
1

1
1

J*

k

J0

2 .1 5
1 .1**
1
1 .2 1

1O
X7

X

1 .2 9

1.83
1.59
1 .1*6
1 .1*2
1.78

15

27

2

1.67

30
117
50
115
55
U2

20
60

2 .0 0
1 .8 8

101

Jan^ tArflj paptars^ and elaanara ,11.ITirrttT........t
Punch-press operators, class A ......................
Repair operators........ ..........................
Stock clerks ............ .........................
g^cclr hanrt]«fn ayid ffiinlrAra hand ttlI iiTTrirtttt.it
C^aAA 1^
M n ■ iiiiiitstrttft__rill
fonl .anri.(H a aalrapa .i ttit ■i t r rT-TT---T---T___Tr11
*
Truck drivers 3 / ................... ......... .
Light (under 1$ tons) ................. ....... .
Medium (1$ to and including 1 tons) .............
*

$

20

12
2

f

3

23

16

_

Women
Asaanfalant, class p t
Tt >t t r . Tr. . T. T. Tr TttTTTttT
Assemblers, class C ................................
W inders, c o i l ............. r t t t t . t . t . t t t t t t r . - 1 t . . t . t . ■ ■ 1 1 1

209
2,558
60

1 .2 0

1.11
1.29

25

228

175

280

15
1*90

50

317

291

1

10

88
663
16

20
10

»
8

8

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 50 workers engaged in the manufacture of radios, radio and television equipment (except radio tubes) radar and related detection apparatus, and phono­
graphs (Group 3661) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a November 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. All workers were paid on a time basis.
Includes other types of trucks in addition to those shown separately.

3/

Table B-372 :

A

i

s

t

&

o

&

j

f

t

P

o

s

i

t

i

-

f

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS O F —

O cc u p a t io n , g r a d e , and se x

Number
of
workera

Average
hourly
earnings

2J

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$•
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ , $
$.1
1$ 5 1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5
.0
and
and
m d er
L .10 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 over
$

$

$

Men
P r o d u c t io n D epartm ents
A ssem b lers, c l a s s A
Bench:
9A
295
A ssem b lers, c l a s s B
B ench:
N o n e le c t r i c a l ............................................................................
F l o o r .......................................... ...................................
A ssem b lers, c l a s s C
B ench :
F lo o r

..............................................................................

See footnotes at end of table




%
1 .8 2
1 .7 8

127
221
64

1 .5 1
1.A8
1 .4 7

38
74
93

1 .3 3
1 .3 0
1 .3 2

1
1

11

1
9

4
35

75

18
12

23
33

25
36

9
1

1
4

1

6
5

1

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

6

-

5
53

13
34
2

34
30
49

30
65
3

15
23
10

14
9

3

2

2

1
15

11

1
35
1

4
23
62

1

6

6

-

13
64

3
14

2

~

-

-

30

'

'

"

i

i

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT (F LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

29

dibcbajt Patti i •Continued
f

***!• 1-372 1

Occupation, grade, and sex

Number
o
f
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average S
hul
o r y 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1 . 3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 . 5 0
1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
earmn^s and
under
1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1 . 9 0 1-95 2 . 0 0

OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 . 0 0 2.05 2 . 1 0 2.15 2 . 2 0 2.25 2.30 2.35
and
2,05 2 , 1 0 2,15 2 , 2 0 2,25 2.30 2.35 over

Men - Continued
Production Departments - Continued

,

Electricians, maintenance ............. ..............

9

134
45
131

1.98

6
-

5

8
5

-

18
9
1

16 1 8
29 32
1/
--*4
-

2

Sheet-metal workers, production ......... ............
Tool-and-die makers (other than jig and
fixture builders) .................................
Jig and fixture builders......... ...................
Welders, hand, class A ...............................

515
189
73
40
75
43
47
24
228

2.03
1 .89
1.67
1.53
1.95
1 .5 1
1.72
1 4?
1.55
1.42

213
138
236
50

2 .2 2
1.95
1 .8 2
1.48

83
394
26
22

1.48
i on
1.32
J-Ov/

2
1
5
7
2
19
3

26
n
1
1
2

3
2

5

5

2

4

-

5
7
5
1

2
1
24
8
2

7
12
4
8

6
5
1]
8

22
63
14
31

24
10
2
10

15
10

5
3
1
13
15

27
9

40
7

32
7

32
10

75
2

26

19
2

3
4

9
2

3

6
A
2
4
1

1
5
13
16
4
3
19

4
17
11

6
34
1

32
5

35
53
11

25
7
2

101
10

79
7

148
10

73
6

3

3

14

-

-

21

-

22

-

-

-

7

A

2

5

4
5

8

lb

lb

18

31

5

2

3

-

-

-

-

1
4
5
5

1
4
7
1

1
4
16
3

1
9
15
2

1
7
37
2

5
10
43

3
2
27

7
10
34

21
lb
13

39
7
2

34
38

20
5

30
1

1

11

3

13
12

/
25
2
4

18
43
7
4

7
107
4

9
93
6
13

10
102
7

10
10

5
10

4
7
1
1
2
22
4
1

1.97
2 .1 0
2.09
2.06

0 0 .3

Milling-machine operators, class B ...................
Milling-machine operators, class C ..................

1.38
1.49
1.24
1.38
1.53

26

Helpers, trades, maintenance ........................

88
21
112
323
171

2

32
26
2

8

7
1

1.57
1.46

54

8

1
8

5

2

1

_

-

1

-

-

-

1
2

2
2

1

_

7

i
4

5
29

11
68

11
49

11
43

10
62

1
2

1
1

4
4

1
2

4
1

22
46

3
8
1
16
4

2
10
10
18
1

1

2

3

1

2

3
6

41
17
XQ

1
2
3
44
j j

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

7
3

1
9

1
4

2
4

-

23

-

5

1
13

8
32

3
2
1
2
1
4
8
16

2
8
4
10
1
5
4
36

7
6
22

2
4
2
5
7
18

2
2
4

5
2
2

4
4
1

1
2
3
6

1
8
4
4

3
15

2

15
5

27
21

12

2

2
2

_

4

9

-

3

_

_

-

-

6

7

30
2

-

-

lb

31

-

-

-

-

Experimental Departments

Machinists, experimental ....... ................
Sheet-metal workers, experimental ....................

1

-

6
-

Women
Production Departments
Assemblers, class B:
Bench:
3

Assemblers, class C:
Bench:
t i ooT
?

147
4*
-ec
j j
23
28
42
101
37

n 0^
-LoO
1»67
1.37
1 *16
X * jtJ
1 ICl

-O X

X

7
f

10
6

o

0

VK
O 70

5
o

X

/
4

1

3
2

63
24
13
X?
8

5

3

100
11
/0
xc
j
4

1 /4
9

51
80
1
8
2

5
18
O
5

8
33
6

3

-

8

9
j

2
13
n

3

5

5

3

1
6
4

1
3
10
10

/
4-

4

1

2

2
2

8
4
2

3

3

2

2

5

3

2

1/ The study covered establishments in Los Angeles and San Diego Counties with 100 or more workers and engaged in the manufacture, prior to January 1951, of aircraft parts and aircraft engine parts
(Groups 3729 and part of 3722) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




R < u bu u u U

Table B-40:

y

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G 8 T R A IG H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and sex 2/

Average
hourly
earnings
2 /

Number
of
workers

1 .9 7
1 .9 5
1 .9 7

49
18
589
1,114
417
436
936
113
171
10
33
617
790
190
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 4 tons)....
n m V t A / I Al n I/ r w / ■Aa ■'T 11O * tV V 1. *. . . .
S i
A
r ^i t f t r Mo
f M f '
. Q
T . T i
16
46
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ....................................
............... .
.
Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over)...

1/
Bureau
2/
2/




1.69
1.52
1.51
1.97
1.91
1.95
1.97
1.84
1.97
1.66
1.76
1.83
1.75

$
$
1.40 1.45
and
under
1.45 1.50

$
1.50

1.55

$
1.60

¥
1.65

*
1.70

$
1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

$
1.90

$
1.95

$
2.00

$
2.05

$
2.10

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

2.10

2.15

_

_

_

_

_

12
2

49
5
555

-

-

..
.

3
-

246
283

_

14
109
183

4
1

47
44
19

1051
11
-

-

-

24
2
-

-

-

8
-

-

-

-

_
-

1
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

•

-

_
-

_

•

•
- -

936
-

-

-

_

-

-

_

7

89
8

16

140

_

10
-

-

_

-

_

32

1
617

101
-

_

-

_

-

-

158
1

458

7

1

-

_

_

_■

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

73
189

_

38

-

The study covered railroads (Group 4
-0) with more than 100 workers as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the
of the Budget.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-5452*

M

*

t

1

U

/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R 8 R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation £/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/
Engineers, stationary.......................... .
Filling-machine tenders..........................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ...............
Order fillers........ ..... .......... .......... .
Pasteurizers ••••.................................

Truck d riv ers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) ...
Washers, bottle, machine ............. ............
Washers, can, machine ............................

*
1.99
1.72
1.97
1.72
1.85
1.71
1.90
1.71
1.69

47
119
89
156
76
80
39
32
15

*
%
1.60 1.65
and
under
1,95 1.79

-

3
3

6
3
-

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
1.80

1.85

$
1.90

$
1.95

$
2.00

$
2 .0 5

2.10

1.75

1.8Q

1.35

1.90

1.95

2.09

3,95

3,19

2.15

95
141
74
32
12

12

3
9
73

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
-

-

$

-

-

-

-

44
89
-

-

39
-

-

3
-

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation g/

Number
of
workers

Average ----- i--------weekly
7iii°
earnings
under
80.00
L /

|
80.00

»
85.00

85.00

90.00

23

36

----- 1----------90.00
95.00

$

Routemen (driver-salesmen), retail j i ...
j/
Routemen (driver-salesmen), wholesale

1,314
365

76.50
79.50

1314
288

18

1/ The study covered retail milk dealer establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the distribution of dairy products (Group 5452)
as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a December
1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
U
Straight-time earnings.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
2/ Routemen generally work a 5-day workweek.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-63:

Average

Occupation and sex

Clerks, accounting.........
Section heads ......... ....
Tabulating-machine operators
Underwriters ............. .

9

t

t

4

4

f

r

G

4

u

e

3

&

w

U

e

b

l

'

y

$
$
120.00
90.00 95
10 5 110 1 1 5
,
Under(32.50 (35.00 37.50 iO.OO 1*2.50 1^5.00 f*7.50 50.00 55.00 50.00 65.00 70.00
and
1
*
32 «50^5.00 [37.50 1*0.00 *2.50 45.00 1 7 . feO.OO 55.00 50.00 55.00 [70.00 [75.00 bO.OO ^5.00 90.00 95.00 100.0dl05.0dll0.0C|ll5.0C|l20.0( over
5 0

7
$5.00 bo.oo 185.00

.ocfLoo.ooj

.oq

*
51.50
85.00

1

12

8

60.50

10
20

12
7

15

22

6

11

27

50

32

43

29

10

17

18

6

26

9

3

4

3

.oc:

3

1

1

16

.oq

13

19

5
1
16

21

12

2
16

15

3

24
133
66
275

39.0
38.5
39.0

79.50

28
376
32
97
740
127
206
226
123
184

38.5
39.0
38.0
39.0
38.5
39.5
38.5
38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.0
38.5
38.5
39.0

39.50
45.50
49.50
42.50
37.00
43.50
48.50
46.00
47.50
59.00
48.50
54.00
44.50
41.00
65.00

38.0

>

NU M BER OF W ORKERS R EC E IV IN G STR A IG H T-TIM E W EEKLY EA R N IN G S O F -

2/

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

4

6

1
4

Women

Assemblers ...............
Clerks, accounting.........
Clerks, actuarial .........,
Clerks, file, class A ..... ,
Clerks, file, class B .....
Clerks, premium-ledger-card
Clerk8, underwriter .......
Key-punch operators .......
Premium acceptors .........
Section heads ............
Stenographers, general ....
Tabulating-machine operators
Typists, class A ..........
Typists, class B ..........
Underwriters .............

502
41
385
732

111

12

7

11

-

31

-

9
19i 203
2
11

13
276
14

40
4
15

100
3

_

2

11

-

4

11

5

10

—

|

-

4
!
-

12
24

9 !
6
69 j 185

5
53

2
a

2

3
15
23
37
21

11
109
10
17
36
18

42
45
207

63
25
5
84
1
179
154

-

58
5
9
6
22
37
36
12
7
104
6
74
63

2
39

2
19
4
14
45
36
33
8
69

8
38

21

11
44
28
29
43
124
9

22

5
1

3
29

12
5
34
51

6
33

1
48
13
7

4
1

1 / The study covered insurance carriers (Group 6 3 ) with more than 20 workers as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared b y the Bureau of the Budget.
relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2 / Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey,

j-o s

Data

Angeles, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

32

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15:

B

u

i

l

d

u

p

G

o

4

April 1, 1952

.................................

Carpenters •••••••••••••••••••••••■••••••••••
Electricians (inside wiremen) and
fixture hangers

40
40

2.750
2.380
3.125
2.750
1.750

40
35
40
40
40

....................................

Building laborers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • •

Table 0205:

B

a

J

z

&

l

Hours
per
week

$3,000
2.350

P a i n t e r * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........
P I a * t e r e r * T ____ t t t T t , ......... . . . . . ..........
Plumbers

i

e

d

,

July 1, 1951

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Bread - Hand shops:
Working f o r e m e n........... ............. $1,915
1.815
Mixers, ovenmen .........................
Benchmen
«,••••«•« 1.685
1.415
Helpers
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
2.170
Foremen, working ................. .
2.070
Ovenmen, dough mixers ................
1.980
Benchmen.............. ............ .
Agreement B:
Pnreman
........................ 2.170
Dough mixer8, ovenmen, doughnutmen .... 2.070
1.980
Machine and bench hands ........ .....
1.980
Dough mixers' helpers ........ .......
Twisters, moldermen, oven
dumpers ........................... . 1.980
1.980
Oven feeders, ingredientmen ..........
Machinemen, wrapping ................ . 1.810
Machine and bench-hand helpers,
1.660
flour dumpers, bread rackers .......
1.660
Pan washers, greasers ...... .........
1.640
Hand w rappers............. ........ .
Conveyermen, tallers, bun
1.590
sllcers, packers
Agreement C:
F o r e m e n ....... ........................
2.170
Ovenmen, mixers, icing mixers ••.•••••• 2.070
Bench hands ................ ........ . 1.980
Machine operators, depositors ••••••.•• 1.980
1.820
Ingredient scalers ............... ..
1.660
Oven helpers .......... •••••••.......
1.620
Auxiliary w o r k e r s ............ ••••••••
Packers and help e r s....... ......... . 1.570
1.660
Pan washers, unskilled help ........ .
Women employees:
1 .4 1 0
leers •••••••••.................. .
Machine wrappers ••••••••••••••.•••• 1.360
1.300
Experienced help ........ .........
Inexperienced help •••••••........ . 1.170




A

.

f

r

i

4

4

J

c Table C-2082: M
U o 4 i >

&

U

J

i

d

x

j

u

o

j

u

Table C-41:

January 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Brinklayera

i

Hours
per
week

48
48
48
48

Rate
per
week

Bottlers:
First shift ....................... .....
Second shift ............ .......... .
Third shift .............................
Brewers:
First shift .............................
Second shift .......... ............... .
Third shift .............................
Clerks (shipping and receiving) and checkers:
First shift .............................
Second s h i f t ........... ................
Third shift .............................
Drivers: keg beer, bottle beer, shipping
and special t r u c k s .................... .
Helpers: keg beer, bottle beer, shipping
and special trucks ......................
Washers, truck:
First shift .............................
Second shift .................... .

Hours
per
week

s

U

c

C

o

l

$77.00
79.00
81.00

40
40
40

81.50
83.50
85.50

40
40
40

77.00
79.00
81.00

40
40
40

80.50

40

77.50

40

77.50
79.50

n

b

i

t

U

j

Rate Hours
per
per
hour. week _

Classification

1-man cars and busses:
Los Angeles Transit Lines:
First 6 m o n t h s .......... ............. $1,460
After 6 months ........................ 1.550
Pacific Electric Railway Co.:
1.540
First 6 months
.............
1.580
After 6 months ...................
2-man cars:
Los Angeles Transit Lines:
First 6 m o n t h s ........ ..... ......... 1.340
1 .4 2 0
After 6 m o n t h s ................. .....
Pacific Electric Railway Co.:
1.440
First 6 m o n t h s ......... ............
After 6 m o n t h s ..... ......... ........ 1.480
Single track:
1.490
First 6 months •••.................
After 6 months .«••••••............
1.530

40
40

_
-

40
40
_
_

-

40
40
Table C-42:

P

£

October 1, 1951

Classification

Table C-27;

j

,

July 1, 1951

M

<

U

o

b

t

f

U

l

c

k

<4*td Jtelp&id
July 1, 1951

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Book and job shops:
Bindery w o m e n ...................
Bookbinders....... ............. .
Compositors, h a n d .... ...... ..
Electrotypers...... ............ .
M a i l e r s .............. .
Photoengravers .................. .
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder presses - 1 color ....<
Cylinder presses - 2 color ....,
Platen presses ••••........... .
Pressmen, cylinder.... .
Pressmen, platen ............ .
Pressmen, web - flat b e d ........ .
Stereotypers:
Agreement A ...... ........... .
Agreement B ........ ......... .
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work .....
Compositors, hand - night work ...,
Mailers - day work •••••......... .
Mailers - night work •••••••......
Photoengravers - day work .«•••••.,
Photoengravers - night work ......
Pressmen, web presses - day work .
,
Pressmen, web presses - night work
Pres smen-in-charge - day w o r k ....
Pre8smen-in-charge - night work ...
Stereotypers - day w o r k ..........
Stereotypers - night work .........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,540

2.566
2.600
2.733
2.533
2.702
2.175

2.228

1.876

2.566
2.460
2.598
2.619
2.600

37f
37t

2.613
2.733
2.329
2.396
2.773
2.899

2.640
2.860
2.840

3.071
2.485
2.552

37*
35,

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Aircraft:
Drivers - Day:
First 3 months ........................ $1,590
After 3 m o n t h s .......... ............. 1,700
Building - Material:
Under 6 tons ............................. 1.830
6 - 1 0 tons ••••.................... •••••
1.850
10 - 15 tons ............................
1.900
15 - 20 ton..............................
1.980
Sand and gravel:
Flat truck
Under 5 t o n s .........
1.625
5 tons and o v e r ............... .
1.725
Truck and trailer
1.825
Concrete-mixer t r u c k .................
1.825
4-wheel t r u c k ..... ................... 1.625
6-wheel truck ........................
1.675
Lumber:
26,000 pounds and under ............... 1.625
26,000 - 5 2 , 0 0 0 p o u n d s ............. .
1.725
Over 52,000 p o u n d s ........... ........ 1.875
Ross carrier........ ................. 1.760
General - Freight:
Local hauling:
108-inch bed or l e s s .............. .
1.500
3 axles or less ......................
1.500
4 axle* ............................... 1.570
5 axles or m o r e ..................... . 1.600
Helpers ............................... 1.425

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

48
48
48
48
48

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

S

t

'

U

33

Table C-42*

M

*

t

o

*

t

*

U

c

A

<and JfetpeM -Continued
Rate
per
M

General - Freight* - Continued
Transfer*
Agreement A ........ .
Helpers ..............
Agreement B ........... .
Agreement C .... .......,
Grocery - Wholesales
Days
Under 7^ tons ......... .
7 ^ - 1 6 t o n s .......... .
1 6 - 2 2 tons .......... .
Over 22 t o n s .......... .
Helpers ............... .
Night*
7 k - 16 t o n s ...... .
Home a p pliance.............. .
H e l p e r s....... ..........
Ices
First 3 months ••••••••••••<
Thereafter............... .
Laundry and linen*
First 3 0 d a y s ..... .
Second 30 d a y s ........... .
Thereafter .................
Helpers, new (90 days) .....
Meats
Branch houseI
L o c a l ....... ••••••••••<
S a l e s ....... ..........
Line .................. .
Packinghouse*
Agreement A*
L o c a l .............. .
E x t r a ..... .
S a l e s .............. .
Student ..............
Agreement Bt
L o c a l ....... .......••••
C o u n t r y ......... .
Extra ...................
Provision and jobbing house*
l£ tons or l e s s ...... ..
Over l£ tons ••••.•••••••
Sales truck ............
E x t r a ..................
Foul try*
City ....................
Country .............. .
Rabbit*
Sales drivers .
Buying drivers .
Helpers ...... .
Miscellaneous - Food*
Route salesmen*
Less than 2 months
After 2 months •..
Moving and storage ......
Helpers ............ .




b

^

U Table C-42* A
a
e
M

W

f

e

t

o

^

U

i

c

A

S

b

'

JtelpefU - Cont inued

U

O
&
U
Table C-42* M

W

$1,435
1.353

Hours
per
ttgek .

1.210
1.500

40
40
40
48

1.763
1.838
1.913
2.013
1.663

40
40
40
40
40

1.938
1.565
1.465

40
40
40

1.420
1.470

40
40

1.440
1.490
1.580

40
40
40
40

1.280
1.774
2.150
1.827

40
40
40

1.828

40
40
40
40

1.995

2.150

1.956
1.780

40
1.840 40
1.780 40

1.848
1.848

40
40
40
40

1.500
1.550

40
40

1.785

1.848

1.668

1.668

1.459

40
40
40

1.810 45
1.960
1.570
1.440

45
48
48

Classification

o

t

o

b

f

r

l

U

c

A

and JtelpmU - Continued

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

Classification

^

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Oil*
Tank truck*
$1,710
Agreement A - Transport........... .
Agreement B - City delivery - 2,000
1.810
gallons ....... ....... ........... .
Agreement Ct
Transport - Over 2,000 gallons •••••• 2.000
City delivery - Under 2,000
gallons*
First 6 m o n t h s ....... •••••...... 1.837
7 - 1 2 months •••••••..... ....... 1.878
1 3 - 1 8 months .......... ...... . 1.914
1.952
1 9 - 2 4 months •••••.............
25 - 30 months ................. . 1.980
Agreement Dt
Transport - Over 2,000 gallons •••••• 2.000
City delivery - Ubder 2,000
gallons t
First 6 months •••••••••••.••••••• 1.800
7 - 1 2 months ••••••••••..... •••• 1.860
After 1 y e a r ..... ............. . 2.000
Agreement E:
Transport - Over 2,000 gallons •••••• 2.000
City delivery - Under 2,000
gallons*
First 6 m o n t h s ...... ............ 1.790
7 - 1 2 m o n t h s ..... .........
1.826
1.870
13 - 18 months •••••••...... .
1.900
1 9 - 2 4 m o n t h s ........ ••••••••••
1.950
25 - 30 m o n t h s ....... .
Agreement Ft
Transport - Over 2,000 gallons •••••• 2.060
City delivery - Under 2,000
gallons*
First 6 m o n t h s .... ••••••••...... 1.790
7 - 1 2 months ...... .......•••••• 1.800
1.850
1 3 - 1 8 months ..................
1.900
1 9 - 2 4 months ..................
After 2 years ••.••••••••••••••••• 1.975
Pa c k a g e...... ••••••........••••• 1.975
Agreement Gt
City delivery - Under 2,000
gallons s
1 .8 2 0
First 6 months ..................
1.850
7 - 1 2 months ••••••••...........
1 3 - 2 4 months ••••............. . 1.935
2.000
After 2 years ...................
Paper*
General ............... .
1.610
Box*
Semi truck - H e a v y .......... .......•••• 1.720
Semitruck - M e d i u m ...... .............
1.660
Bobtail truck .............. ........ .
1.550
Stock and supply*
Over 108-inch Be d i n e n.... .
1.610
Produce*
1.600
Wholesale - General market ...............
Railway ex p r e s s.......... ...... ...........
1.711

Hour 8
per
week

60
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Rendering and reduction*
Plant d r i v e r s .... ...........••••.... .
Buying d r i v e r s........ .•••••••••••••••••
Packinghouse pick-ups •••••..... .
Extra route m e n...... ......... •••••••.••
Helpers - First 3 m o n t h s .......... ••••••
Helpers, experienced •••••••........ •••••
Hides and w o o l .......... .•••••••••.....
Sawdust .....................................
Soft drink - Branch delivery*
Less than 7 k tons .................. .
Over 7 k and less than 16 tons ...........
Over 16 and less than 22 tons ...........
Over 22 t o n s .... .......................
Helpers ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Steel*
Drivers - Over 7 k t o n s .......... .......
Drivers - Under 7 k tons .................
Bobtail trucks - Under 7 k tons ..........
Studio*
Studio rates*
Chauffeurs and truck drivers
Special equipment ................. .
Location rates*
Chauffeurs and truck d r i v e r s ....... ..
Special equipment..... ..............

40

40
40
40
40
40
40

$1,840
1.950
1.840
1.680
1.590
1.740
1.828
1.474

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.775
1.850
1.900
2.025
1.725

40
40
40
40
40

1.850
1.750
1.650

40
40
40

1.945
2.280

40
40

1.945
2.280

40
40

fyuli&enbed PeM onn el 1/
January 1, 1952

Classification

figfik

40

Hours
per
week

Table C-44*

40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Rate
per
m o nth

Hours
per
week

2/

Day men*
A.B. maintenance m e n .................
Boatswains*
Vessels of 15,001 to 20,000
gross t o n s ..... ..... ..... .
Vessels of 10,001 to 15,000
gross t o n s .................... .
Vessels under 10,000 gross tons ....
Carpenters*
Vessels of 15,001 to 20,000
gross tons ......................
Vessels of 10,001 to 15,000
gross t o n s ....... ............. .
Vessels under 10,000 gross tons ••••
Carpenters' mates •••••........ .
Deck storekeepers •••••...............
See footnotes at end of table.

$315.00

44

1*19.00

44

1*02.00
360.00

44
44

37U.OO

44

368.00
337.00
332.00
321.00

44
44
44
44

3

>

b

i

a

3k

t*bi» c-u-.

(boean ^AanipoAi -

fyjtlic+tUAid PaA4ohh*1

1/ -

3o*Uimtad

Table C-44:

0 0 4 0 4 1

^ A & H & p& U

fyjtlic&HAed P&Uohh+I 1/

-

-

GontUmod

Table C -U t

Q /G ea H

^ A K U h ip O / U -

'UsUic+Mi+d P#Uo*u*+l

6oHti*U4*d

1/ •

January 1 , 1952

January 1 , 1952

Footnotes - Continued
C la ssific a tio n

Rate Hours
per
per
month week

Deck departmenti 2 / - Continued
Hatch men:
Able bodied seamen (3 years) ................. #288*00
Able bodied seamen (le s s than 3
years) ....................................................... 273 .00
315 .00
Boatswains' mates .................................. .
Ordinary seamen ........................................ 228.00
288.00
Q uarterm asters..............• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
288 .00
Watchmen (3 y e a r s ) .............................
2 73 .00
Watchmen (le s s than 3 y e a r s ) ...............
Day men:
Chief e le c tr ic ia n s :
P-2 tu rb o -electric v e sse ls .............
P-2 turbine v e sse ls .............................
C -l, C-2, C-3, Victory Ships, and
CIMAVI v e ss e ls ..................................
C-4 v e s s e l s ..........................................
Chief reefer engineers:
Freight v e s s e ls , le s s than
52,000 cubic fe e t .............................
Deck engineers:
Class A and B passenger v e sse ls • •• •
Freighters ........................................ .
Firemen .............................. .
Unlicensed juniors
Wipers ...............................

Watch men*
Chief reefer engineers:
R-2 refrig era to r steam type
v e sse ls ................... ...........................
Freight refrig era to r v e s s e ls ,
52,000 cubic fe e t and over
Freight or passenger refrigerator
v e s s e ls , le s s than 52,000 • • • • . . . •
Class A passenger v e sse ls with
a ir conditioning
Firemen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oilers ....................................................... ..
Second e le c tr ic ia n s :
P-2 tu rb o-electric v e sse ls . . . . ........
P-2 turbine v e sse ls ............................
Unlicensed juniors • • • • • . . , ............... . . .
Watertenders ....................... .......................
Stewards department: 3 /
F reighters:
A ssistant cooks:
Offshore trade ............... .....................
Alaska trade ...................................... .
Chief cooks:
Offshore trade .............................. . . . .
Alaska trade ..................... .............




48
48
48
48
48
48
48

522.63
496 .17

40
40

4 48.56
4 6 5 .49

40
40

417.87

40

3 5 5 .94
3 42.21
3 13.08
362.83
2 74.79

40
40
40
40
40

442 .91

40

384.42

40

361 .41

40
40
40

403.22
377 .28
299 .49
262*98

40
40
40
40

Stewards department: 3 / - Continued
Freighters: - Continued
Chief stewards:
Offshore trade ............
#330.71 44
Alaska trade • • • • ................... .............. 356.12 44
Missmen and u t i l i t y men:
Offshore trade ...................................... 226.46 44
Alaska trade .......................................... 232.82 44
Passenger v e ss e ls:
A ssistan t laundrymen:
Class A v e sse ls .................................... 232.82 44
Class B v e ss e ls .................................... 232.82 44
Chefs, olass A v e ss e ls ............................ 584.71 44
Chief cooks, olass B v e sse ls
372.51 44
Head w aiters, c la ss A v e sse ls ............... 307.96 44
LLnenmen:
Class A v e s s e l s ...........................• • • •• 266.16 44
Class B v e s s e l s ..................... • • • • • • • • 232.82 44
Missmen and w aiters:
Class A v e sse ls
226.46 44
Class B v e ss e ls ............... ...............
226.46 44
Room stewards, o lass A v e sse ls
226.46 44
Second stewards:
Class A v e sse ls .......... ......................... 416.95 44
Class B v e sse ls ..........................
337.60 44
Silverman:
Class A v e sse ls ........ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 252.93 44
Class B v e sse ls ................................... 239.69 44
Storekeepers:
Class A v e sse ls • • . . . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • o 286.27 44
Class B v e s s e l s ................................... 286.27 44
Third stewards:
Class A v e sse ls .................................... 303.19 44
Class B v e sse ls • • • • • • • • • • . ............... 284.15 44

2 / The M r i m straight-tim e hours which may be worked
per week a t sea* The maximum straight-tim e hours which nay
be worked per week in port are AO fo r both day men and watch
men* At sea , the basic workweek i s 56 hours, with deck
department watch men being paid 8 hours, deck department day
men 12 hours, and engine-room day men and engine-room watch
men 16 hours, a t overtime r a te s*
3 / The
straight-tim e hours which may be worked
per week both a t sea and in port* At sea, the b asic workweek
for members of the stewards department i s 56 hours, with 12
hours being paid a t the overtime rate*

Table 446:

S te 4 A 4 ( l( ^ U iU f

January 1 , 1952
Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

C la s sific a tio n

Longshoremen:
General cargo ...................
# 1 .9 7 0
Paper and pulp in packages o f 300 lb *
2 .0 7 0
or more . • • • • . o . o . . . * . . . . .
Shoveling jobs ....................................... • • • • • * 2 .1 7 0
2 .2 7 0
Phosphate rook in b u l k ............ ....................
Bulk sulphur, soda ash and crude
untreated p o t a s h ............................................ 2*4 2 0
Damaged c a r g o ................................. * .................. 2 .8 2 0
Explosives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 .9 4 0
Burton men, general c a r g o .......................... .
2 .0 7 0
Winch d riv ers, general cargo ............................... 2 .0 7 0
Hatch tenders, general cargo ............................... 2 .0 7 0
Guy men, general c a r g o .......................................... 2 .0 7 0
L ift- jitn e y d riv ers, general c a r g o .................... 2 .0 7 0

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

40

384.42
262.98
262 .98

C la ssifica tio n

Rate Hours
per
per
month week

Table c-5 4 1 *

2 66.16
266.16

44
44

299 .49
300.02

44
44

A ll ratings receive $ 7 .5 0 per month clothing allowance
which i s included in the basic rates shown. A ll ratings of
unlicensed departments a lso receive additional payment in
accordance with conditions as follow s)
1 . Cta v e sse ls carrying explosives in 50-ton lo ts or
over, 10 percent of basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded.
2 . C v e sse ls carrying sulphur in amount of 25 per­
ta
cent or mare of dead weight carrying capacity,
#1 0 per voyage is added.
3 . Cn v e sse ls operated in described areas of China
co a sta l w aters, 75 percent or 100 percent of
d a ily basic wages, including allowances in lie u
of overtime for Sunday day men, i s added accord­
ing to degree o f proximity to the China coast
and adjacent areas rendered unsafe by h o s t ili­
tie s o

Q

s

i

o

&

e

s

u

f

S

t

o

r

e

3 j

M

&

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t

M

s

c

v

i

k

e

January 1 , 1952
C la s sific a tio n
Grocery and vegetable departments:
Department heads ........................... 0. . . 0...........
Experienced clerk s ............................................
Apprentice clerk s:
F ir s t 4 months ....................................
Second 4 months ........................... .............
Third 4 months .......................................... .
Box boys
••••••o

Rate Hours
per
per
week week
# 8 2 .6 0
7 4 .0 0

40
40

57.0 0
6 2 .8 0
6 8 .2 0
4 1 .0 0

40
40
40
40

i

d

d

<

3$

T a b le C -541 *

M

Q/UU>eSl4f,

/

i

A

S t o r e d

J • zG

&o

f
t

T a b le C -58*

< 2 n d

fd

t

i

n

n

January 1 , 1952

Bakery and candy departments:
Apprentices:
F ir s t 4 m on ths............ ................... o. . . . . . $45*60
Second 4 months ........................... ................ 51.40
Experienced c l e r k s ................... . . . ................... 57*00
Head clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60*00
Junior m anagers............ .......... .......................... 6 2 .8 0
68*20
Department managers ......................... .
General merchandise department:
Apprentices:
F ir s t A months ............................................ . 4 5 .6 0
Second A months ....................................« . . .
51.40
Experienced clerks ........................................
57.00
Head olerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60*00
Junior department heads ................................
62*80
Department heads .............................................. . 68*20
Meat departments:
Head meat cutters ............................................. 100*00
Back room m en ............................... . .................... 90*00
Journeymen meat cutters ....................... .......... 8 8.00
Apprentices:
F ir s t y e a r ........ ........................................
6 2.0 0
Second year • ••<,......................................... 69.5 0
Third year ....................• • • • • ....................
7 7 .0 0
Wrappers and cash iers:
F ir s t 3 m on ths.............. ............................... 6 1 .0 0
T h e r e a fte r ...................................................... 7 0 .0 0
R e d tc U tflO + U d ,

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

G & l& t & U o d ,

and JLuncJt/utomA
January 1 , 1952
C la s sific a tio n

Rate
per
day

H otels, restau ran ts, d u b s and night clubs:
Cooks:
Chefs ..................................... ........................ (open)
Night, ahefe and pestry ohofi . . . . . . . . . . . $ 15 .28
15.2 8
F ir s t x fcllef cooks
Roast cooks, b r o ile r cooks and head
fr y cooks * * o . * * o o * * * * * o * « . * * . * * . * o * * * 14.63
Fry cooks, second pastry cooks and
second r e l i e f cooks • • . « . . . . . . . . * * * . * . 1 3.03
Vegetable cooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o * * * * . * 11*93
Head Inkers ........... ................ 1 5.28
Second bakers
• o* * * «* * «. * * * 13.03
Bakers ............................
11.93
Hired butchers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * . 1 5 .2 8
Butchers • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • o * * * * * * * * * * * 13.03
Head pantrymen • • • • • • • • • • • • • « o * * * * * * * * * * 13.03
Pantrymen ....................... ............................... 11.93




d

T a b le C -5 8 :

G & f a t & U a l f

Hours
per
day

8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8

C la ssifica tio n

ReAtcU4/Ui4tbl,

G/C^ie^Uai^

and dLunclt/ioemd C ontinued

and JLunclvioamd - Continued

-

January 1 , 1952

January 1 , 1952
Rate Hours
per
per
week week

C la ssific a tio n

Table C-58:

e

ReAtcUi/U+nti,

Rate
per
day

Hotels, restaurants, du bs and night
clubs: - Continued
Dining room employees:
Head w aiters and head w aitresses ............ $11 .93
10*28
Captains (m en ).....................• • • • • •
9 .7 8
Head hostesses (women) ...........................
8 .6 8
Hostesses (women)........ • • • • • . . o . . . . o . . . .
Vl r s and w aitresses:
Cite
Straight s h if t . . . . ..................... * .........
6 .53
S p lit s h if t , w ithin 11 hours ..............
7 .0 3
9 .7 8
Service fountain men and women • • • • • • • • •
Front fountain men and women...................
7 .5 8
9 .7 8
Food checkers • • • • • • • • • . • • • o * * * * * * * * * * * *
Combination cashiers and food
9 .7 8
c h e c k e r s................• • • • • • • ...............• • • • •
7 .5 8
Head bus boys and g ir ls .............................
Bus boys and g ir ls • • • • • • • • • • • • • .............
6.53
C afeterias, dairy lunches and drive-ins:
Cooks:
Pastry chefs and dinner cooks ................. 1 4.38
Second pastry ohefs ..................... ............. 12.1 8
Pastry cooks • • • • • • ...................................... 1 1.06
Roast cooks .....................
13.83
Fry oooks • • • • • ..................... * 1 .................. * 1 2.28
Vegetable codes ..................... • * . * • • ........... 11.0 8
Dish-up m en.............................• • • • • ............. 11.0 8
Cooks* helpers .............................................
8 .3 8
Head butchers ............................ ................. 14.3 8
Butchers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • * 1 2.18
Head pantrymen .............................. .............. 1 2.18
Pantrymen ................................................ .
1 1 .0 8
Waiters and w aitresses:
C afeterias:
7 .2 8
Line s e r v e r s ........ ...................................
Combination lin e servers and
carvers .................................. * ............
9 .9 8
Cashiers ................... ...............................
8 .6 8
9 .78
Checkers ...<...............................• • • • • • •
Combination cashiers and
9 .7 8
checkers ........ .............................. . * • •
Bus boys and g ir ls :
6 .7 8
Straight s h i f t ........ ........................
7 .2 8
S p lit s h if t , within 11 hours ........
Dairy lunches:
Counter men and women:
8 .3 8
Straight s h if t ..................................
S p lit s h if t , w ithin 11 h o u r s ........
8 .8 8
Bus boys and g ir ls :
6 .7 8
Straight s h if t ..................................
S p lit s h if t , w ithin 11 h o u r s ........
7 .2 8
D rive-ins:
Service fountain men and women * . . * . *
8.93
Front fountain men
6 .7 8
front fountain women:
6 .7 8
Straight s h if t ..................................
S p lit s h if t , w ithin 11 h o u r s ........
7 .2 8

Hours
per
day

8
8

8

8
8
8
8
8
8

waiters and w aitresses: - Continued
D rive-ins: - Continued
Combination w aitresses and
fountain women:
$ 6 .7 8
Straight s h i f t .........................
S p lit s h if t , within 11 hours . . . . . . 7 .2 8
Bus buys and g ir ls :
Straight s h i f t ................... ............... 6 .78
S p lit s h if t , within 11 hours .......... 7 .2 8
Car hops • • • • • • • ................. ..................... 5.78

T a b le C -5 9 1 :

8
8
8

Pharmacists

Table C-7011:

8
8
8
8

( 101.40

40

4 0.0 0
4 2 .5 0
4 5 .0 0
47.5 0
52.00

40
40
40
40
40

56.25

40

J to te U

January 1 , 1952
Rate Hours
per
per
day
day

C la ssifica tio n

8

8
8

8
8
8

Rate Hours
per
per
week week

Regular olerks:
F ir s t 3 months ...................................... .
Second 3 m onths..............................................
Third 3 m onths........ • • • • • • ............ ...............
Fourth 3 months .........................
A fter 12 months .................
A fter 12 months and 4 months continuous
with one employer .................................. .

8
8
8

8
8

8
8

S t o r e d

C la ssifica tio n

8

8
8

Jb'MUf

Hours
per
day

January 1 , 1952

8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8

Rate
per
day

C la ssifica tio n

Room clerk s

...................... ...............

$10.25
8 .80
6.25
3.95
6.45
Working housekeepers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.25
A ssistan t housekeepers
8.05
Maida ............... ........................................................
7 .4 5
Linen room attendants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 .6 1
Storeroom men
o » « . . . o . . . •••.••
8.75
Housemen and vacuum men . . . . . . . . • • • . • • • • • • • • • o
8.25
Telephone operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 .8 6
Patrolmen . • . . . . . . . • • • • • • • • . . • • • • • « . . . • • • • . • a .
8.75
Hendymen • • • • • o . . . . . . . . . . o . . . • • • • . . • . ••••••••<>
9.75
Elevator operators ..................... ....................... .
7 .85
.

Key, information and mall clerks

.......... .

B ell captains . . . • • • • • * • • . . • • . • • a . . . o . o . . . . o . .
Bellmen . . . o . . . » • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • •
Combination bellmen—
elevator operators . . . . . . .

8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8

36

D:
Table D-i*

M

i

n

i

Entrance Rates
m

u

m

f

l

n

t

i

a

M

C

e

H

a

t

e

d

,

f

o

b

P

l

a

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in Manufacturing
Minimum rate (in cents)

All
industries
2/

Under 65 .......................
6 5 .............................
7 0 .............................
Over 70 and under 75 ............
75 .............................
Over 75 and under 8 0 ............
8 0 .............................
Over 80 and under 85 ............
8 5 ........................................
Over 85 and under 90 .................
9 0 ........................................
Over 90 and under 9 5 ..... .
9 5 ........................................
Over 95 and under 1 0 0 ................
1 0 0 .......................................
Over 100 and under 105 ..........
1 0 5 ............................
Over 105 and under 1 1 0 ......... .

0.7
.2
.4
.6
1.8
.5
1.6
1.0
2.6
2.0
2.2
1.3
2.3
2.6
5.4
6.6
11.5
.6
3.2
2.4
3.9
3.2
2.3
2.5
6.6
4.3
1.3
5.4
1.2
4.1
1.2
2.1
.5
3.3
1.8
1.1

n o

.......................................

Over n o and under 1 1 5 ......... • • • •
n 5 .......................................
Over n 5 and under 120 ...............
1 2 0 .......................................
Over 120 and under 125 • • • • • . * • • • • •
1 2 5 ............................
Over 125 and under 130 * ..... .....
1 3 0 .......................................
Over 130 and under 1 3 5 .............
1 3 5 .......................................
Over 135 and under 140 ............. .
1 4 0 .......................................
Over 140 and tinder 1 4 5 ........ • • • • •
145 ............................
Over 145 and under 1 5 0 ..............
1 5 0 .......................................
Over 150 and tinder 1 5 5 ........ • • • • •
155 .......................................
Over 155 and under 160 ..............
160 and o v e r ...........................

501 or
more
workers

100.0

100.0

... 100.0

Public
utilities*

100.0

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade
y

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.4

-

1.3
1.9

0.9

-

-

3.3

6.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.1

-

-

-

-

-

7.2
5.8

3.1
5.4
2.1
2.2
1.6
5.1
7.4
6.7

13.5

-

-

-

-

2.2
1.5
4.2
3.9
2.3
3.7
2.8

-

-

2.4
3.9
2.5

4.2

-

-

3.3

8.9

-

-

10.8
3.3
2.1
2.7
2.0
.5
2.5
3.9
2.8
3.0
3.3
2.7
2.9
4*8
2.8
•2

1.1
12.5
2.9
16.7
12.5

-

-

2.1
-

6.0
4.0
7.4
18.1
-

2.5
4.5
1.2
38.2
-

-

-

12.1
6.7

9.8

12.3
-

-

3.1
15.1
6.7
4.0
3.9
4.1
8.5

-

-

6.2
1.5

-

2.5
11.9

3.4

-

6.1
4.4
5.7
16.8
6.5

-

2.8

-

-

.8
4*8

31.4
-

-

-

12.5
2.5
2.0

1.3
5.1
-

-

4.1

2.7
3.3
5.0
12.7
3.0

-

1.9
-

-

-

-

5.0

2.7

-

-

-

-

4.2

11.9

-

-

-

6.0
4.8

11.5
10.0
1.2
1.6
2.5

•8

2.0
1.5

8.4

-

1 . 0

-

1.3
_
-

Services
(except
motion
pictures)

o

100.0

101-500
workers

i
1
Nondurable foods
ents with 5 0 1 or
101-500
more
workers
workers

8
H

All establishments •••......••••••

Durable foods

9.8
3.4

Motion
pictures
y

100.0

-

_

2.1

15.7

-

-

8.6
4*8
8.9
9.9
2.9
3.4
-

3.2
3.6
6.7
2.5
1.7
-

1.3
1.6
1.4
.3
_

2.0
1.4

_
-

27.2
.3
-

-

-

.5

-

1.3
7.2

-

-

4.3

19.7

-

-

—

2.8
3.6
1.1
1.3
10.0

2.3

-

-

4.2
7.6

2.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.6

-

1 . 0

6.2
.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8
2.5

-

-

-

“

“

1.4
"

-

3.4

9.2

Establishments with no
established minimum...........*

.9

-

-

-

-

“

•2

“

8.8

-

Information not available ........

1.5

-

-

-

-

1.8

.7

5.7

-

16.1

y
2
y
i

(5/)

.8
.3

-

-

-

2.2

14.0

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen*
J Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate*

Excludes department stores*
J Limited to establishments primarily engaged in the production of motion pictures (Group 7811) as defined in the Standard Industrial Glassification Manual (1949
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget*
y
Less than .05 of 1 percent*
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




n

t

W

a

i

k

&

37
E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Table E-l:

B

U

i

f

t

P

a

a

U

u hU

U

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in All manufacturing industries 1/
Shift differential

Nondurable
goods

Durable
goods

All industries
2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments .................

19*6

_ _4.1
_

21.4

Receiving shift differential ...•••

19.2

3.7

20.9

2.4
.4
.1
_
1.0
.2
(2/)
.5
.2

18.2
-

Uniform cents (per hour)
Under 3 c e n t s ...... .
3 c e n t s ............ .
4 cents .....................
5 cents ••••................
6 c e n t s ............. .
7 cents .................. .
7^ cents ....................
8 cents ............... •••••
10 c e n t s ..... ...........
Over 10 cents ...............

17.2
.7
.5
1.3
2.0
1.3
.6
(2/)
9.4
• 1.1
.3

-

1.0
1.2
1.4
.7
13.1
.6
.2

3d or
other
snift

Gandy and
other conMillwork
fectionery
2/
products
2/

Petroleum
refining

Cutlery, hand
tools, and
hardware

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

2d
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

15.1

5.8

0.5

7.0

1A.0

11.3

_ 11*9

. 2,5

2.9

15.1

5.8

.5

7.0

14.0

11.3

4.7

2.0

15.5

1.0
.7
.1
.1
.1

14.8
2.3
1.8
2.0
3.7
1.0
.2
.2
.6
2.4
.6

5.5
1.3
.4
1.7
.5
(2/)
1.3
.3

.5
-

7.0
2.3
1.5
3.2
-

7.0
-

14.0
-

11.3
-

1.3

-

-

-

-

-

.5
-

-

14.0
-

11.3
-

-

.8
-

-

-

-

7.0

-

1.3

”

.8
~

'

.4
.1
.3

( 2
-

Full day's pay for
reduced hours ................

.1

.1

Other ............... ..........

1.5

1 .2

2.2

.4

.4

.5

Receiving no differential ...... .

2/
2/
2/

«/>
2/ )

/ )

.5
(2/)
.5

(2/)
(2/)

.2
.2
-

.1

Uniform percentage .............
5 percent ...................
7^ percent ..................
10 percent ..............

"

‘

-

-

-

.3

-

2.5

1 .8

.5

.1
.1

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

Sheetmetal Electroplating,
plating, and
work
polishing
2/
2d
shift

2d
shift

-

14.9

6.2

-

14*9
-

5.3
1.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

5.7
9.2
—

1.2

3d or
other
shift

1 .0

3.3
—

1 .0

.6
-

.6

-

.2

-

-

-

-

.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.2

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

1.6

16.3

1.6

11.2
.2
2.1
.2

1.5
_
.2
-

-

.6
1.4
5.6
1.1

-

(2/)
.1
1 .2

"

.3

-

Machinery
industries

1.0

14.9

'

.1

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
No workers employed on 3d or other shifts.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.




Heating
apparatus

-

.5

-

-

-

.5
.2
.3

-

-

.9

.4

2.2

8.5

1.2

-

-

-

2.4

-

-

-

8.2

-

.2

-

.1

0

/

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

)

38
Table E-2»

S ch ed u led Wj^eJzLf JlounA.

Percent o f o ff ic e workers 1 / employed in -

Percent o f plan t workers employed in -

Manufacturing
Weekly hours

All establishments .....................
Under 35 hours .........................
35 h o u r s ........... %...................
Over 35 and under 37£ h o u r s ............
37& hours ...............................
Over 37fc and under 40 hours ............
40 hours ...............................
Over 40 and under 44 h o u r s .............
44 h o u r s .............. ................ .
Over 44 &nd under 48 hours .............
48 h o u r s ................ ...............
Over 48 and under 52 h o u r s .............
52 hours and o v e r ................. .. ...
Information not available ..............

1/
2/
2/
Bureau
4 /
*
**

All
indus­
tries

Services
All
Public Whole­ Retail
Motion
utili­ sale
Non­
trade Finance** (except
pictures indus­
Durable
motion
tries
durable ties* trade
2/
2/
goods
pictures)
y
goods

All

100.0 100.0
0.1
2.4
.2
6.8
1.3
84.3
.5
1.3
2.8
.3

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

_

_
0.2
1.7
.4
89.1
.9
7.7
-

0.5
89.0
10.5
-

-

-

-

-

-

100.0

100.0

0.5
6.2
89.7
3.6
-

1.1
94.8
3.7
.4
-

-

-

-

100.0

.
.
1.7
6.2
90.5
1.6
-

_

-

-

100.0

100.0

_

_
96.2
3.8
-

6.3
15.7
4.8
71.3
1.2
.7
-

-

-

100.0

100.0

1.3
.3
.4
1.9
79.4
.9
1.3
2.4
7.2
2.8
1.4
.7

_

0.4
.5
.7
3.0
78.2
1.2
3.2
7.2
4.0
1.6

-

100.0
-

-

-

-

-

-

—

~

100.0

1.0
7.9
18.7
64.5
.4
2.8
2.3
2.4

All

—

_
-

-

80.8
.7

100.0 100.0

100.0

9.2
-

0.5

1.4
1.6
2.4
10.0
71.9
2.4

-

74.4
5.1

-

_
_
_
92.1
1 .0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

_
_
_
85.5
1.0
1.4

_

1.1
-

2.0
73.1
2.8
3.5
14.9

88.7
-

-

-

4.5
6.3
5.4
2.3

-

1 .0

-

9.6
.7

2.3
4.2
2.0
1.8

1.7

7.8

-

_

•

_

_

2.6

_

4.3

•

-

“

P

&

i

d

c

M

v

l

u

l

&

i

f

4.3

.4
-

_

11.0

.3

l

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Percent of office workers employed in -

Manufacturing

Manufacturing
Number of paid holidays

All establishments .....................
Establishments providing paid
holidays .............................
d a y ...............................
days ..............................
3 d a y s ............................. .
4 days ..............................
4i days .............................
5 d a y s ....... .......................
6 days ..............................
6 J d a y s .............................
7 days ..............................
8 days ..............................
8 5 - days .............................
9 days ..............................
9 ^ days .............................
10 d a y s ....... ......................
10£ days ............................
11 days .............................
lli days ............................
12 d a y s ......................... .

1
2

Establishments providing no paid
holidays .............................
Information not available ..............

1

100.0

Whole­ Retail Services Motion
sale
trade (except pictures
motion
trade
y
2/
pictures)

Data relate to women workers.
Excludes department stores.
Limited to establishments primarily engaged in the production of motion pictures (Group 7811) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the
of the Budget.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Table E-3:

/ Excludes department stores.

2/
Bureau
2/
4 /
*
**

PnKHrt
Non­ utili­
Durable
durable ties*
goods
goods

All
indus­
tries

1 0 0 .0

All

1 0 0 .0

99.7 1 0 0 . 0
.7
.4
3.2
7.2
(4?)
1 .8
.7
51.0 83.1
.7
.3
1 2 .0
4.9
1 1 .2
2.7
.1
.1
.3
2.7
1.5
10.2
4.1
.8
-

.3
-

All
Services
Public Whole­ Retail
Motion
trade Finance** (except
pictures indus­
utili­ sale
Non­
Durable
motion
tries
ties* trade
durable
2/
V
goods
pictures)
y
goods
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

.9
9.2
.8

87.1
1.4

.3
69.3
3.1
17.2

.6

1 0 .1

-

—
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

99.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1.6
-

78.3
17.3
3.4
-

_

_

1 .0

-

-

-

-

-

.1

.4
2 1 .2

1 .8

75.6
.5
.4
-

-

1 0 0 .0

1 .2
1 .8

1.7
42.5
43.2
8 .0

.2

3.5
3.2
9.3
4.4
.2

10.3
6.2
42.5
17.0
3.2

1 0 0 .0

96.6
6 .0
5 6 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

89.9

-

.9
.4

1 0 0 .0

18.8
10.3
4.7
-

-

3.4
-

-

All

LOO.O

Whole­ Retail Services Motion
sale
trade (except piotures
motion
trade
2/
1 /
pictures)

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

91.0

92.3

87.8

79.5

1 .6

2 .2

58.8
-

—
21.9
4.7
49.6
1.8
1.5
-

1 .0
.7
2.5
4.3
.7
.7
6 3 .6
74.4
1 2 .8
6.9
7.5
2.4
.2
(4/)
.1
.2
9.7
.4

Public
utili­
Non­
Durable
durable ties*
goods
goods

9.0
~

1 .0
6 .1

1 .1

80.9
1 .0

7.7
“

2 1 .0
8 .0

—
12.2
~

20.5

—

99.1
—
7.9
1.3
—
47.4
34.0
7.5
1 .0

.9

"

1 0 0 .0

93.1
1 .1

—
45.5
46.5
3.9
3.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

81.8

1 0 0 .0

3.8
1.3
74.6
-

—
-

1 .0
.8

.3
18.2

1 0 0 .0

“

.. “

.
v
Limited to establishments primarily engaged in the production of motion pictures (Group 7311) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition; prepared by the
of the Budget.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




39

E-U:

Table

P a id fyiCUC4iti04td> (tyo b m o l PAO&i&iOHA)

Percent of office workers employed in -

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Manufacturing

Vacation policy

A ll establishm ents....................................

A ll
indus­
trie s
100.0

Services Notion A ll
Public Whole­ Retail
Non­ u t i l i ­ sale trade Finance** (except piotures indus­
trie s
motion
A ll Durable durable ties* trade
2/
i/
goods goods
pictures)
2/
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.6
.1
27.9
6A.A
7.2

99.5
26.A
63.8
9.3

100.0
.3
33 .A
66.3
-

100.0 99 .A
89.3 A3.7
10 .7 55.7
-

99.8
69.7
30 .1
-

100.0
.5
99.5
-

93.9
26.3
65.8
1.0
.8

100.0 100.0

Manufacturing

Whole­ R etail
Io n - u t i l i ­ sale trade
A ll Durable durable ties* trade
i/
goods goods

Services Motion
(except
motion piotures
2/
piotures)

100.0

100.0

aoo.o

100.0 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.5
.3
66.5
2.3
23.3
1 .7
2.5

98.6
.5
7 0 .1
1 .7
22.0
A.3

98.6
68.0
1.0
23.5
6 .1

98.A
1 .7
75.0
3.2
18 .5
-

98.2 9A.6
_
66.A 65.3
1 1 .A
18.9 29.3
1 .5
-

95.7
76.4
19.3
_
-

85.2
_
57.2
_
23.9
2.6
1.5

97.4
55.8
41.6
-

2.9
.5

l.A
-

l.A
-

1.6
-

5.A
-

1 .3
3.0

14.8
-

2.6
-

97.2
3A.A
6.7
50.8
2.8
2.5

98.6
A3.7
9.5
A l. l
A.3

98.6
A7.3
1 1 .3
33.9
6 .1

98 .A
3 5 .1
5.0
58.3
-

98.2 97 .A
4*2 40.0
5.6 1.0
76.8 56.4
11 .6
-

95.7
25.3
_
70.4
-

91.2
32.7
7.7
46.8
2.6
1.4

97.A
«
55.8
41.6
-

2.3
.5

l.A
-

l.A
-

1.6
-

2.6
-

1 .3
3.0

8.8
-

2.6
-

97.2
5.8
1 .1
82.0
3.7
2 .1
2.5

98.6
6 .1
1 .7
8A.2
2.3
A.3

98.6
7.3
1.0
8A.2
6 .1

98 .A
3 .1
3.2
8A.3
7.8
-

98.2 97.4
7 .1
1.9
_
1.3
79.2 84.5
15.8
5 .1
.7
-

95.7
3.0
_
87.9
_
4.8

91.2
12.9

97.4

73.2
2.6
2.5

55.8
41.6
_
-

2.3
.5

l.A
-

l.A

1.6
-

1 .3
3.0

8.8

2.6
-

97.2
5. A
1 .1
61.2
3.A
23.6
2.5

98.6
5.5
1 .7
63.0
2A.1
A.3

98.6
6.5
1.0
69.0
16.0
6 .1

98.A
3 .1
3.2
A8.6
A3.5

95.7
3.0
_
80.4
_
12.3

91.2
12.9

97.4

71.3

55.8
41.6

-

-

-

2.3
.5

l.A

l.A

1.6

1.8

2.6
~

1 year of sarvica
Establishments with paid vacations . . . .
Under 1 weak...........................................
1 weak ......................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....................
2 weeks............................... .....................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
3 weeks ....................................................

99.3
<4/>
30. A
65.0
.9
3.0

Establishments with no paid
vacations ...................................................
Information not available ........................

.7
-

.A
-

.5
-

Establishments with paid vacations . . . .
1 week ......................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks....................
2 weeks .....................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
3 weeks .....................................................

99.A
12.0
1.8
8 1.7
.9
3.0

99.6
17.9
A.2
70.3
7.2

99.5
19.5
5.3
65. A
9.3

Establishments with no paid
vacations ...................................................
Information not available ........................

.6
-

.A
-

.5
-

Establishments with paid vacations . . . .
1 week ......................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................
2 weeks ....................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................
3 weeks ....................................................
Over 3 weeks..........................................

99.A
1.0
90.5
3.0
2.0
2.9

99.6
.2
89.7
2.5
7.2

99.5
90.2
9.3

Establishments with no paid
vacations ..................................................
Information not available .......................

.6
-

.A
-

.5
-

99.A
1.0
67.6

99.6
68.5
23.7
7.2

99.5
70.7
19.5
9.3

.A

.5

-

-

.6
-

.2

100.0 99.9
5.8 21.0
.A
9A.2 78.5
-

99.8
13 . A
86. A
-

-

6 .1
-

100.0
53.7
A6.3
-

1.8

2 years of service
100.0
12.3
.3
87. A
-

-

.1
-

.2
-

100.0 99.9
1.8
100.0 90.6
6.6
.9
-

99.8
98.3
1 .5
-

100.0
.2
99.8
-

9A.A
12 .7
.2
79.0
1.6
.9
5.6
-

100.0
53.7
A6.3
-

1.8

5 years of servioe
100.0
.9
87.9
1 1 .2
“

-

.1
-

.2
-

100.0
.2
92.3
A.9
2.6
-

9A.A
8.8
80.8
1.6
3.2
-

100.0
53.7
A6.3
-

5.6

-

-

-

-

1.8

2.6
-

-

_

15 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations . . . .
1 week......................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks....................
2 weeks ....................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................
3 weeks ....................................................
Over 3 weeks ...........................................
Establishments with no paid
vacations ..................................................
Information not available .................

2.5

2A.8
3.5
.6

.2

"

100.0
.9
60.8
38.3

100.0 99.9
1.8
30.3 63 .A
5.A
69.7 29.3

-

-

-

-

-

.1

—

99.8
6A.1
35.7
-

.2

—

100.0
.2
83.8
3.8
9.6
2.6
—

9A.A
8.8
71.3
1.6
12 .7

100.0
53.7
46.3
-

-

-

5.6

“

_

98.2 97 .A
7 .1
1.9
1.3
29.3 58.8
15.8
.8
A9.9 30.7

2.6

4.4

_
-

1.3
3.0

8.8
-

2.6
-

1/ Excludes department stores.
2/ Limited to establishments primarily engaged in the production of motion pictures (Group 7311) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-9 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget.
2 / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
I j J Less than .05 of 1 percent.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF IAB0R
*
Transportation (excluiing railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




ko

Table E-5:

P

a

i

d

S

i

c

J

z

J

I

&

G

4

J

4

'

(

Percent of office workers employed in -

indus­
tries

All establishments ....................

100.0...

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

All

Services
Motion
Public Whole­ Retail
(except
Non­
trade Finance**
pictures
utili­ sale
motion
Durable
durable ties* trade
d
2 /
pictures)
goods
goods

22.1

.8
3.1
-

14.5
4.8
5.6
.9
3.3

_
1.1
5.1
8.2
7.7
-

4.2
4.5
2.6
3.0
12.5
20.2
•

12.0
2.1
.2
2.1
6.8
-

96.1

70.9

77.9

53.0

76.8

23.9

17.5

46.1

3.9

.1
4.0
6.6
2.8
1.3
1.1
5.0
5.4
.3
.2
.7
•4

.2
6.9
5.9
4.2
1.6
.9
1.2
.8
.5
1.7
-

.2
8.3
4.3
2.1
.6
.4
1.0
.6
-

1.8
11.7
11.5
5.3
4.2
4.0
«
7.6
-

_

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

72.1

76.1

82.5

53.9

-

-

-

47.0

29.1

27.9

-

-

o

b

m

a

l

p

All
indus­
tries

-

-

-

O

t

A

U

i

a

t

All

1/

Services
Motion
Public Whole­ Retail
(except
pictures
trade
Non­
utili­ sale
motion
Durable
durable ties* trade
2 /
V
pictures)
goods
goods

23.2

100.0

-

6.3

5.7

3.0

.
.

-

A

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

2 d a y s .... ...............
3 days .............................
5 days .... ....... ••••••..... •••••
6 days .............................
7 days ........................
8 days .............................
10 days
12 days ....................... .
14 days ........... ................
15 d a y s ..... .......................
22 days ............................
Over 22 days ........................

Information not available ...•••.......

f

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Manufacturing
Provisions for paid sick leave

r

.

_

_

9.3
3.1
”

1.9
1.4
.7
.6
.3
1.2
.2
•

2.6
.7
.2
1.1
.5
.6
-

3.0
-

1.8
2.4
.6
3.7
1.6
2.0
-

87.6

93.3

94.3

97.0

87.9

12.4

-

.4

-

-

12.1

-

' 15.9

5.4

4.3

3.4
■
>
4.1
-

11.4
1.4
2.4
.7
-

1.0
4.4
-

.
.2
.5
.5
1.5
1.6
-

92.5

84.1

91.6

95.7

7.5

-

-

3.0

-

100.0
-

-

'rLxeac_p|-._ge;plag
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

48.7

5 0 .0

46.3

63.1

38.0

54.7

27.2

52.0

32.6

97.8

3 d a y s ........... ..................
4 d a y s .......... *.... .......... .
5 d a y s .............................
6 days •< .... ..o...............•••.<>
>
7 days .... ........•............
9 days .............................
10 days .............................
11 days ••••••«..... o........o.... .
12 days ..»••••.... .................
14 d a y s .... .••••••••.••.........
15 days ......e.•••••«•••••••...... .
16 days ...........................
20 days .............................
22 days ........... ...........••••••
23 days ...................•••.••••••
Over 23 d a y s .... ....... ..........

.8
.1
13.9
8.3
2.1
.1
12.3
.2
1.1
.3
1.3
.7
1.1
.7
4.8
.9

2.1
.2
21.6
14.2
1.8
5.4
.5
.8
1.2
1.7
.5

.9
.2
23.9
14.2
.8
3.7
1.0
1.0
.6

6.5
13.8
14.4
5.3
11.3
2.4
1.8
7.6
-

4.8
.8
23.6
8.8
-

24.7
1.9
9.8
4.5
8.1
5.7

.
*
3.0
14.2
10.0
-

1.4
6.0
5.8
15.6
3.0
20.2
”

11.1
2.1
12.5
6.7
.2
-

8.0
«
89.2
.6
“

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

51.3

50.0

53.7

36.9

62.0

45.3

72.8

48.0

67.4

2.2

Information not available ............




.6
7.9
7.5
.6
.4
2.5
.3
1.0
.1
(A/)

78.7

22.2

22.7

20.9

21.6

33.3

16.5

9.7

15.2

1.0
9.9
8.8
1.1
.9
.5
-

11.0
11.7
-

3.4
7.1
1.9
3.7
3.2
1.6
-

.
1.3
3.4
10.4
6.5
~

21.1
2.5
5.5
2.1
1.9
.2

1.0
15.5
-

2.5
.5
4.6
1.6
.5
“

5.0
9.4
.8
“

77.8

77.3

79.1

78.4

66.7

80.5

90.3

84.8

3.0

.4
'

See footnotes at end of table,

20.9

'

'

"

'

u.s.

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
department

of

labor

Bureau of Labor Statistics

U

)

Table E-5:

P a id S icJz Jl&aue, (fyokm al Pa ou M oh ^) .G o n iin u ed

Percent of office workers employed in Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments .....................

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

100,0 .

All

Services
Motion
Public Whole­ Retail
(except
Non­
pictures
trade Finance**
utili­ sale
Durable
motion
durable ties* trade
1/
d
goods
pictures)
goods

100.0 ^L0Q*0

100.0 -1Q0.0

All
indus­
tries
3/

Manufacturing

All

100.0 .JLQQaQJ 1 0 0 ^

100.0

100.0

100.0

52.8

32.6

97.8

21.1

22.2

13.0
-

1.4
4.2
3.3
15.0 *
1.8
3.8
3.1
20.2
“

_
.6
2.1
21.4
6.8
.2
1.5
-

8.0
89.2
.6
-

.6
7.5
7.4
.7
2.7
. .7
-

1.0
9.9
8.7
1.2
.6
.8
-

72.8

47.2

67.4

2.2

77.8

Services
Public Whole­ Retail
Motion
trade (except
pictures
Non­
utili­ sale
Durable
motion
durable ties* trade
1 pictures)
/
2/
goods
goods

100.0

1C0.0

100.0

lOQoQ

100,0

100,0

22.7

20.9

21.6

34.2

16.5

9.7

15.2

.
11.0
11.7
-

3.5
7.1
1.5
4.0
1.9
-

1.3
10.3
3.5
-

_
-

2.9
-

6.5
-

_
5.0
9.4
.8
»

2.9
.1

_
15.5
1.0
_
-

77.3

79.1

78.4

65.8

83.0

100.0_ 100,0

< L . X b § of_g.ervj.pe
§ £

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

49.0

50.0

46.3

63.1

38.6

55.3

3 days ............................ ..
4 days ..............................
3 days ...................... .........
6 days .............................. .
7 days ............ ............... .
10 days ............ ............•••••
11 days ....0....................... .
12 days ............................. .
14 days ..............................
15 days ..............................
16 days .................... .........
20 d a y s .............. ...............
22 d a y s .......... ...................
23 days ..................... .
over 23 d a y s .... ..................

•8
.1
11.6
7.8
1.5
14.3
.2
1.6
.3
2.2
.7
1.5
.7
4.8
.9

2.1
.2
20.3
14.2
1.8
6.5
.5
.8
1.0
.5
1.7
.4

.9
.2
23.0
14.2
.8
4.4
1.0
.5
.7
.6

6.5
10.9
14.4
5.3
13.6
2.4
2.4
7.6
“

.
4.8
23.6
.8
8.8
.6
-

•
18.2
1.9
16.2
4.5
8.8
5.7

Establishments with no formal
provisions for paid sick leave •••«••••

51.0

50.0

53.7

36.9

61.4

44.7

Information not available............. .

-

-

-

-

-

-

27.2
1 4 .2

-

-

-

-

1.3
.2
(4/)

78*9
.4

-

-

-

-

-

17.7
2.5
8.9
2.1
-

-

3.0

2.3
.5
4.8
1.6
.5
-

-

-

90.3

-

84.8

-

-

15 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid, sick l e a v e ...... ............

56.6

66.2

3 days ........................... .
4 days ...............................
5 days ...............................
6 d a y s ............ ..................
7 d a y s ..............................
8 days .......... •••••.............
10 days .................... ........
11 days ................ ............
12 days ........ .....................
14 days ........................... .
15 d a y s ....... ......................
16 days ..............................
20 days ............. ................
22 days .......... ..................
23 days ................... ...........
3 0 days .............................
Over 30 days ........................

.8
.1
11.1
6.8
1.4
16.6
.2
2.6
1.2
3.7
.7
2.6
.2
4.8
.6
3.2

2.1
.2
20.3
14.2
1.8
19.5
.5
.8
1.7
2.5
-

43.4

Establishments with no formal
provisions for paid sick leave .......

63.1

38.6

55.3

46.6

53.8

32.6

97.8

6.5
10.9
14.4
5.3
9.7
2.4
5.7
.6

5.2

14.2
10.8
2.2
19.4

_
1.4
2.6
15.0
6.0
.7
3.1
3.8
1.0
20.2
-

_
8.0
89.2
.6
-

7.6

.
17.5
1.9
6.6
4.5
9.6
5.0
3.3
6,9

_
.6
2.1
11.0
6.8
10.4
.2
-

.4
2.2

.9
.2
23.0
14.2
.8
22.4
1.0
.5
2.9
.6
.6

15.2
.8
17.4
-

33.8

32.9

36.9

61.4

44.7

53.4

46.2

67.4

-

67.1

-

-

-

-

26.5
.6
7.3
7.4
.6
.1
6.5
.7
(4/)
2.3
.3
-

31.0

35.2

1.0
9.9
8.7
1.1
.1
8.8
1.1
-

.
11.0
11.7
12.5
-

.3
-

-

20.9

21.6

3.5
7.1
1.5
3.6
.3
3.6

5.4
3.5

1.3
-

11.5
-

36.6

17.7
2.5
3.8
2.1
5.1
1.3
-

'

'

15.2

_

15.5
1.0
-

2.3
.5
4.6
1.6
.2
.5

5.0
9.4
.8
•
•

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

4.1

1.8

-

-

1.2

-

“

78.4

63.4

78.7

2.2

73.1

69.0

64.8

79.1

'

90.3

84.8

3.0

.4
'

9.7

1.5

Information not available....... .
'

18.3

_

'

'

1/ Excludes department stores.
2/ Limited to establishments primarily engaged in the production of motion pictures (Group 7811) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual prepared by the Bureau of the
Budget.
2/ Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
t J Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and real estate.




"

1*2

Table £-6:

B

o

H

H

l

e

A

Percent of office workers employed in -

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Manufacturing
Type of bonus

All establishments .....................
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 1*/ ..........................
Christmas or year-end ...............
Profit-sharing .....................
Other ..............................

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses .............................
Information not available .............

£/
Bureau
3/
4/
*
**

Manufacturing

Services
All
Motion
Public Whole­ Retail
(except
indus­
trade Finance**
utili­ sale
pictures
Non­
motion
Durable
tries
durable ties* trade
1/
pictures)
goods
3/
goods

Services
Motion
Public Whole­ Retail
(except
pictures
Non­
utili­ sale
trade
notion
Durable
durable ties* trade
1/
pictures)
goods
goods

All
indus­
tries

All

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

35.8

20.1

12.1

48.1

2.2

42.7

39.6

74.9

33.8

1.3

22.0

21.9

16.9

33.7

y

33.1*
2.2
1.7

18.4
3.0
.9

12.1
1.6
1.1

4o.5
7.6

64.0
.2

79.9

87.9
~

51.9

2.2
“

36.9
6.9
3.5

37.5
2.0
.7

71.6
3.3

31.9
.5
1.4

55.9
1.4

60.4
-

25.1

66.2
-

y

20.3
2.9
1.1

98.7

•

20.3
4.0
1.1

15.3
5.1
1.6

32.2
1.5
“

77.5
.5

1.3
-

97.8
"

All

78.1

83.1

66.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

34.1

39.0

19.1

2.6

_
-

31.0
3.7
.3

37.2
1.8
1.7

13.7
1.6
3.8

2.6
*
•

64.0
1.9

58.0
3.0

80.9

97.4

100.0

100.0
“

Excludes department stores.
Limited to establishments primarily engaged in the production of motion pictures (Group 7811) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the
of the Budget.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7:

a

n

d

P

J

&

H

l

Percent of office workers employed in -

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Manufacturing
Type of plan

Services
All
Public Whole­ Retail
Motion indus­
(except
trade Finance**
utili­ sale
Non­
pictures
tries
Durable
motion
durable ties* trade
V
pictures)
goods
3/
goods

All
indus­
tries

All

All establishments ....................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance
or pension plans 4/ .................

88.3

82.9

79.0

96.6

99.6

Life insurance .....................
Health insurance...... .............
Hospitalization ....................
Retirement pension ..................

79.6
72.7
66.9
44.7

80.8
77.4
75.6
39.8

77.5
76.8
76.8
36.9

92.4
79.6
71.6
50.0

52.4
90.8
43.4
90.5

11.6
.1

17.1

21.0

3.4
-

.4
“

8.8
~

2.9
1.7

Establishments with no
insurance or pension p l a n s ...... .
Information not available.............

y

~

100.0 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

91.2

95.4

95.5

68.6

88.3
73.2
68.8
42.0

80.0
65.7
68.8
25.2

91.7
73.8
73.8
47.8

51.8
25.6
24.7
15.5

31.4
"

2.8

4.5
(*/)

100.0

Manufacturing

All

Services
Motion
Public Whole­ Retail
(except
Non­
utili­ sale
trade
pictures
Durable
motion
durable ties* trade
1/
goods
pictures)
goods

y

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.2

82.7

87.1

87.3

78.5
51.8
51.8
44.9

70.7
70.4
65.1
37.5

82.2
77.4
75.1
40.4

81.3
81.7
81.7
38.2

16.3
1.0

12.9

12.7
-

13.2
■

100.0

100.0

86.8

96.3

78.1

84.3
67.0
59.3
45.7

51.4
85.3
52.9
75.7

1.9
1.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

79.5

46.3

81.4

31.2

56.4
57.2
58.9
8.8

32.5
31.9
27.9
12.1

81.4
59.2
59.2
32.2

21.9
-

14.5
6.0

53.7
”

18.6

64.0
6 0 .0

] J Excludes department stores.
2/ Limited to establishments primarily engaged in the production of motion pictures (Group 7811) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (191*9 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., January 1952
Unduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

I




1*3
Appendix

Scope

With the exception of the union soale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was oolleoted by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed*
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered In compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations * (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (e) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A)* The covered industry groupings are i manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services*
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




id Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, waa given its proper weight in the
combination of data by- industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but eost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are inoluded. Where weekly hours
are reported as for offioo olerioal, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for whioh the straighttime salaries are paid) average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest $0 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e«, those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information cm wage practices refers to all offioe
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed la
offloss
(or plant departments) that observe the praotioe In
question, except in the section relating to women offioe workers
of the table sumnarising scheduled weekly hours • Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits m ay be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
siek leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It exoludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid far by employers.
Health insurance is inoluded, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN LOS ANGELES, CALIF., 1/
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 1952

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Item

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis

101
101
101

2,894
652
351
301
2,242

353
108
49
59
245

685,200
356,100
250,000
106,100
329,100

340,660
183,820
144,720
39,100
156,840

83,640
38,760
33,540
5,220
44,880

101
21
101
21
21
21

All divisions..... ........................ . •..
Manufacturing .............................
Durable goods 2/ .......................
Nondurable goods (J ....................
Nonmanufacturing............. .............
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...........................
Wholesale t r a d e ...... ............. .
Retail trade (except department stores)..
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Services (except motion pictures) 2 / ....
Motion pictures 6/ .....................

65
866
165
414
694
38

20
63
36
50
60
16

70,700
70,600
64,700
51,800
50,200
21,100

55,010
13,790
30,610
25,690
13,100
18,640

12,040
3,990
3,020
20,240
3,150
2,440

21
21
8/
8
21
51
21
8
21
21
21
8
2/ 21
51
100
101
21
21

11
22
116
28
16
40
54
27
23
15
67
317
22
27
7
9
76

10
12
35
14
9
15
18
13
11
9
24
78
10
20
7
5
22

4,304
1,867
4,705
1,276
10,929
3,596
3,541
2,982
5,822
1,535
1,787
35,128
8,999
34,083
23,621
4,208
15,538

4,154
1,293
2,261
876
8,393
2,350
2,276
2,212
4,510
1,267
1,041
18,366
7,687
33,142
23,621
3,588
10,107

302
89
76
63
582
204
155
175
518
105
46
3,190
958

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 7/
Canned sea food ...............................
Candy and other confectionery products .........
Women's and misses' coats and suits ............
Millwork ......................................
Petroleum refining............................
Rubber products, other than tires and t u b e s ....
Foundries, nonferrous .........................
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware..............
Heating apparatus ..............................
Sheet-metal w o r k ..............................
Electroplating, plating,and polishing..........
Machinery industries ..........................
Radio, television, and related products ........
Aircraft parts ................................
Railroads ................ ........ ............
Milk dealers ..................................
Insurance carriers ............................

•

-

296
7,494

1/ Los Angeles Metropolitan Area (Los Angeles and Orange Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment.
3/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
y Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
i/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion-picture distribution,
service industries and theaters; nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Motion-picture production.
77 Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
§7
shops (manufacturing jobbers) with k or more workers were included.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




1*5
Index
Page

Page
A.B. maintenance man (ocean t r a n s p o r t ) .............. ................
Adjuster, machine (canned sea food) ..................................
Assembler (aircraft parts)
..... ........ .
Assembler (cutlery, hand tools, and h a r d w a r e ) ........... ............
Assembler (heating a p p a r a t u s ) .................... ................ ...
Assembler (insurance carriers) ........................... ...... .
Assembler (machinery) ........... ............ ....... ................ .
Assembler (millwork) ................ ............... ............. .....
Assembler (radio, television, and related products) ...... ...........
Assembler (sheet-metal work)
.....••••.•.....•..... .
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) .................................
Bellman (hotels) .......................................................
Bench hand (bakeries) ....... ...... .................................. *
Biller, m a c h i n e ................ .............. ........ ...............
Boatswain (ocean transport) .......... ................. •••••........ .
Bookbinder (printing) .......«•...... ...... ........... ............ .
Bookkeeper, hand ........... ........... ......................... ......
Bookkeeping-machine operator .................... ......................
Bottler (malt liquors) .......... •••••...... •••••••••••••••••........
Brewer (malt l i q u o r s ) ............... .................................
Bricklayer (building construction) ........... ........ .............. .
Bus boy and girl (restaurants, cafeterias, and lunch r o o m s ) ..........
Butcher (canned sea food) •••••••••................. ............. .
Calculating-machine operator ••••................ •••••••••••..... ....
Candy maker (candy and other confectionery products) ...... .
Carpenter (building construction) ........... ••••••...................
Carpenter, m a i n t e n a n c e .......... ..••••••••......... ....... ••••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) •••••.............................
Carpenter (ocean transport) ......................... ............. .
Cashier (grocery stores and meat markets) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Chipper and grinder (heating a p p a r a t u s ) ............. ............. .
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) ••••••....................
Cleaner •••••••••............................... ....... ......... ......
Cleaner ( r a i l r o a d s ) ......•••••••............ ••••••••••........ ••••••
Clerk, accounting ............ ........ ............ ......... ........ .
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ............... ....... ••••••••
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) ........ .............. .
Clerk (drug stores) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••...... ......... •••••
Clerk, file ................................. ......... ••••••......... .
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) •••••........... ........... •••••••••
Clerk, general ...................... ...... ......... ......... .
Clerk (grocery stores and meat markets) ••••••••..... •••••••••......
Clerk, order ........... ......... ............ ............. ...........
Clerk, p a y r o l l .... ................. ••»•••••••••••....................
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) •••••••••...... .
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ............ .
Compositor, hand (printing) ••••••••••••••...................... •••••
Compounder, rubber (rubber products, other than tires and tubes) ....
Cook (canned sea food) ........... ............................... •••••
Cook (restaurants, cafeterias, and lunchrooms) ................. •••••
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) •••••.............
Crane operator, electric bridge
Crane operator, electric bridge ( r ailroads)..... ......... ..........
Cutter and marker (women's and misses' coats and s u i t s ) .... .
Cutter and slicer (canned sea food) ••••••••••••••................. .
Dipper (cancfcrand other confectionery products) .......................
Draftsman ...... ................ ............ •••••......... ......... .
Drill-press operator (aircraft parts) .............. ..................
Drill-press operator (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware)
Drill-press operator (heating a p p a r a t u s ) .... .......................
Drill-press operator ( m a c h i n e r y ) ............ ••••••••........... •••••
Duplicating-machine operator ..........................................
Electrician (building c o n s t r u c t i o n ) ..... .......................
Electrician, maintenance ................. ........................... ..
Electrician, maintenance (aircraft parts) • •••...... ................




33

20

28

, 29
23

21*
31
25, 2 6 , 27

21
28

21

*

25,

26

, 27
35
32

3, 6
33
32

3, 6
3,

6

, 7
32
32
32
35

20

3, 7

20
32
1k

30
33
35

21*
23
17
30
3, 7
31
31
35
3, U, 8
31
1, 8 , 9
*
3U, 35

hi 9

5, 9
31
31
32

22
20
35
23
17
30

21
20
20
13
29
23

21*
25,

26

, 27
5, 9
32

11

*

29

Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ............................. ..
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) •••••.................... .
Elevator operator (hotels) ............................................
Engine-lathe operator (aircraft parts) .................. .
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ......... •••••••••••••••••.........
Engineer (ocean transport) ................ •..... .......... •••••.••••
Engineer, s t a t i o n a r y ..........
Engineer, stationary (milk dealers) ..... ......... ................ .
Filling-machine tender (ndlk dealers) ................... ........ ..
Fireman (ocean transport) • •............... ............... •••••......
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r ..........
Fireman, stills (petroleum refining) ......... .
Forming-machine operator, power (sheet-metal work) ••••••............
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries)
.............
Gager (petroleum refining) ........................
Grinding-machine operator (aircraft parts) ............ ......... ..
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ...............•...... ........ ..
G u a r d ..................................................................
Helper (bakeries) •••••.•••••••••••••............... ......... .
Helper, motortruck driver .......... ...................... •••••...... .
Helper, trades,
maintenance •••••............
Helper, trades,
maintenance (aircraft parts) .......
Helper, trades,
maintenance (petroleum refining) ...... .............
Helper, trades,
maintenance (railroads) ...........
Housekeeper (hotels) ...... .................................•••••.....
Inspector (aircraft parts) .............. •••••••••••••••••••.........
Inspector (cutlery, hand tools, andhardware)
Inspector ( m a c h i n e r y ).... .............. ......... ....................
Inspector (radio, television, and related products) ........•••••••••
Inspector, final (examiner) (women's and misses' coats and suits) ...
Instrument repairman (petroleum refining) ........................... .
J a n i t o r ......................
Janitor (aircraft p a r t s ) .... .......... ......................... ..
Janitor (machinery) ...... .................. ..........................
Janitor (railroads)
................... ..................... .....
Janitor (sheet-metal work) .............. .
Jig and fixture builder (aircraft parts) .........
Key-punch operator ...........................
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ....................... ......
Labeler (canned sea food) ........... ..................•«•••••..... .
Laborer (building construction) ••••..................................
Laborer (petroleum refining) ..............
Lay-out man (sheet-metal work) ............................. .
Loader (petroleum refining) ........ •••••........................... ..
Longshoreman (stevedoring)
..... •••••••••••
Machine-tool operator, production (cutlery, hand tools, and
h a r d w a r e ) .... .......
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ...................... ..
Machine-tool operator, toolroom ...... •••••.......... ........ ........
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) ...................... ...
Machinist, maintenance .............................
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) .... .
.................
Machinist, production (aircraft parts) ....................... ........
Machinist, production (machinery) .......... ...... ...... ............ .
Maid (hotels) .............. ......... ....... ........... ..............
Mailer (printing) .................. ...... .............. ............ .
Maintenance man, general utility ............. ................. ......
Meat cutter (grocery stores and meat m a r k e t s ) .... .
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ....... ........................... .
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk dealers) ...................
Mechanic, maintenance
............. ....... ............. .........
Milling-machine operator (aircraft parts) ............ .............. .
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ...••••..... ...................
Millman (rubber products, other than tires and tubes) .............. .
M i l l w r i g h t ........................... ..................................

25, 26
30
35
29
25, 2 6 , 27
3U
ll*
30
30
3l*
ll*
22

2h

23
22

29
25, 26, 27
17
32
32, 33
lit
29
22
30
35
29
23
25, 26, 27
28
21
22
17
29
25, 26, 27
30

2h

29
10
31

20
32
22

2h

22
3lt

25,

23
27
15
2 6 , 27
15
30
29
26, 27

26,

35
32
15
35

15
30

15
29
25, 2 6 , 27
22
16

U6
Index •GantUut& d
Page

Page
Mixer (bakeries) .................................... ..................
Holder and sticker operator (millwork) ......................... .
Molder (bakeries) ....... .......... ...... ...... .......... ......... .
Holder (nonferrous foundries) .......................... ........ .
Motortruck driver ......................................................
Nurse, industrial (registered) ...... ............ •..... .
Office boy ....................
Office g i r l .........................................................
O i l e r ...................................................
Operator (local transit) ..... ........................ ........ .
Order filler ..................... ............ ......... ........ .
Order filler (milk dealers) .................. ........ ................
Ovenman (bakeries).... ......................................
Packer ................. ....... ..... ............ ............ ...... .
Packer (bakeries) ...... .............. ........ .............. ........ .
Packer (candy and other confectionery products) ..... ........ .
Painter (aircraft parts) ............................ .......... .......
Painter (building construction) ..... ............. ...................
Painter, maintenance ............................ ••••••••«••...... ..
Painter, maintenance (railroads) .......... ............... ...... .
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) ......................... ....
Patternmaker, wood (nonferrous f o u n d r i e s ) .... .............. ••••••••
Permanent-mold-machine operator (nonferrous f o u n d r i e s ) .... .........
Pharmacist (drug stores) ............. ................... ........... ..
Photoengraver (printing) .... ....................... .
Pipe fitter, ma i n t e n a n c e .............. ......... .......... ..........
Pipe fitter, maintenance (petroleum refining)
.............. ,......
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ..................... .
Planer operator (millwork) •»••••••••••...... .......... .
Plasterer (building construction) ....... ........... ........ .
Plater (electroplating, plating, and polishing) ........... ........ ..
Plumber (building construction) •••••••................ ...... .
Plumber, maintenance ....... •••••••...................... ....... ......
Plumber, maintenance (railroads)
........................
Polisher and buffer, metal (electroplating, plating, and polishing)..
Polishing-and-buffing-machine operator (electroplating, plating,
and polishing) .......... .................... .
Porter ............... .............. ....... ...... ........... .........
Pourer, metal (nonferrous foundries) ............ .
Power-brake operator (sheet-metal work) ...... .......................
Power-shear operator (heating apparatus) ..... ....................
Power-shear operator (sheet-metal work)
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ......... ••••••••..... .
Press assistant (printing) ........................... .................
Press feeder (printing) .............................. .
Presser (women's and misses 1 coats and suits) ..................... .
Pressman (printing).......... ............... ............ ............
Pressman (rubber products, other than tires and t u b e s ) .... ....... .
Punqpman (petroleum refining) ............................. ........ .
Punch-press operator (aircraft parts)
........... ............ ••••••
Punch-press operator (heating apparatus) ...................
Punch-press operator (sheet-metal work)
Quartermaster (ocean transport) ....................................
Receiving clerk .......... ........................................ .
Reduction-plant operator (canned sea food) ....... ....................
Retort operator (canned sea food)
..........•••••••
Room clerk (hotels) .................. ............... ..................
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) ......... .
Sand mixer (nonferrous foundries) ..................... ................
Sanitary man (milk dealers) .................... .
Saw operator (millwork).... ......... .......... ...................
Seaman, able bodied (ocean t r a n s p o r t ) .......... ......................
Seaman, ordinary (ocean t r a n s p o r t ) ..... ............ .................
Secretary ....................................... ........ ......... .
Section head (insurance carriers) .................. .
Set-up man, machine tools (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) •••••••




32
21
32

23
32

,

33

13
5

32
17
30
17, 18
32
20
29
32
16
30
30
23
23
35
32
16
22
30
21
32
25
32
16
30
25
25

17
23

2k
2k
2k

31
32
32
21
32
22
22
29

2k
2k
3k

18

20
20
35
30

23
30

21

3k
3k
5,

10

31
23

Sewer, hand (finisher) (women's and misses' coats and suits) ........
Sewing-machine operator (women's and misses' coats and suits) .......
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries) •••••••................. ....... .
Sheet-metal worker (aircraft parts) ......... ........... ......... .
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ...........
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) ............... ......
Sheet-metal worker, production (sheet-metal work) ...............«••••
10
Shipping c l e r k ................. ...................... ............ .
16
Shipping-and-receiving clerk
.... ..••••••••••••...... ..........
Stenographer ........
Stenographer (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ......... •••••«.............••••••••
Stereotyper (printing) ....... ....... .......... ...............
32
Steward (ocean transport) ......... ......... ...........................
Stillman (petroleum refining) .....
Stock clerk (radio, television, and related products) ••.••••••.....
Stock h a n d l e r ........................................................
Stock handler (machinery) ........................ .....................
Stock handler (railroads) •••••......
•••••••
Stock handler (sheet-metal work) ...................... ................
Stove mounter (heating apparatus) ......... ................... ........
Switchboard operator ......................... ........ ................
Switchboard ope rater-receptionist ............ ••••••••••..............
Tabulating-machine o p e r a t o r .............. ................. •••••......
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) •••••............••••
Tester (radio, television, and related products) ••••••...... ••••••••
Tester, routine, laboratory (petroleum refining) ••••••••••••••.... .
Tool-and-die m a k e r ..... ........ .......... .................... .......
Tool-and-die maker (aircraft parts) ...................................
Tool-and-die maker (heating apparatus) ........................ .......
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) •••••............... ............ .
Tool-and-die maker (sheet-metal w o r k ) ..... ...........................
Tracer ......... ......... ........... ................. ................. .
Transcribing-machine operator ......... ......... .................. ..
Treater, light oils (petroleum refining) »..•••••••..... ............
Trimmer and finisher, hand (rubber products, other than tires
and tubes) ....................................................... .
Truck driver ........................... ........ ...... ...... ..........
Truck driver (milk d e a l e r s ) .............. ...................... .....<>
Truck driver (petroleum refining)
.... ...... •••••••••«
Truck driver (railroads) ............................... ...............
Trucker, h a n d ................................ .........................
Trucker, hand (cutlery, hand tools, and h a r d w a r e ) ............. .
Trucker, hand (machinery) ................ ........................ .
Trucker, hand (railroads) ......... ........ ...........................
Trucker, hand (sheet-metal work) ........... ...... ......... ..........
Trucker, p o w e r ..................... ....................... ......
Trucker, power (railroads)..... ..............••••••••••••••........ .
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) •••••......••••••••••........
T y p i s t ..................................................................
Typist (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .... ................ *...... ............ .
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ......................... ......... .
Waiter (restaurants, cafeterias, and lunchrooms) ................. •••«
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers) ......... ............. .
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) .................................
Watchman ..... ....... ................................. .......... ••••••
Watchman (ocean transport) ............................................
Watertender (ocean transport) ..... ........ ................ ......... .
Welder, hand (aircraft parts) ....................... ......... ....... .
Welder, hand (heating apparatus) ...... .......... ...... ...............
Welder, hand (machinery).... ....................... .
Welder, hand (petroleum refining) ............ ....................... .
Welder, hand (sheet-metal w o r k ) ....... . . . . . . . c ............ .
Winder, coil (radio, television, and related products) ...............
Wrapper (bakeries)
...... ........ .................. ......... •••••••
Wrapper (candy and other confectionery products) •••••••••••••»••••••
Wrapper (grocery stores and meat markets) ........

21
21
23
29
16

30

2k

18
18
11
31
32

3k

22
28
16

26, 27
30

2k
2k

11
11
5> 12
31

28
22
16

29

2h

26, 27

2k

13
12
22
22

, 19
30
22
30
18
23
26, 27
30

18

2k

19
30
2 5 , 26
5, 12
31
31
35
30
30

19

3k
3k

29

2k

26, 27
22

☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1952 0 - 2 1 1 6 2 1

2k

28
32
20
35

THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGS SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
City

BLS Bulletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Oklahoma City,. Oklahoma
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
Seattle, Washington

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1064
1067
1068
1070

1042
1058
1069
1057

Price
20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15

25
15
20
15

15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

This report was prepared in the Bureau's Western Regional Office* Commi
may be addressed to:
Max D. Kossoris, Regional Director
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

Room 1074
870 Market Street
San Francisco 2, California
The services of theBureau of Labor Statistics’ regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing*




The Western Region includes the following States:
Arizona
New Mexico
California
Oregon
Colorado
Utah
Idaho
Washington
Nevada
Wyoming


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102