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NONFARM HOUSING
STARTS 1889-1958
Evolution of the statistical series
Type of structure
Private and public ownership
Location of the housing
Construction cost




NONFARM HOUSING STARTS
1889 -1 95 8

Bulletin No. 1260
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner
For s a le b y the S u p e r in te n d e n t o f D o cu m en ts, U.S. G o v e r n m e n t Printing O ffic e , W a s h in g to n 2 5 , D.C. - Price oO ce n ts







PREFACE
This bulletin was planned as a handbook for users of housing sta tistic s and
presents detailed estimates of new permanent nonfarm dwelling units started during the
70-year period, 1889-1958. The statistical tables provide a gage of the level and trend
of dwelling unit construction during the entire seven decades. For parts of this period,
they distinguish between single-family houses and multifamily structures and include
information on the location, ownership (whether private or public), and construction
costs of new housing.
The statistical presentation is confined to estim ates of housing starts. However,
since building permits provide the principal source data for housing starts, the history
of the building permit reporting system is reviewed from its modest beginning in 1920
when annual reports were obtained from about 200 large trities, to mid-1959, when approx­
imately 7,300 permit-issuing places reported monthly to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The derivation of housing starts estimates is outlined in a series of separate time
periods which mark significant changes in estimating procedures. The reliability and
coverage of the series and the work done by private groups and individuals outside the
Bureau in developing the concepts and historical estim ates of housing starts are de­
scribed briefly.
Without the cooperation of many private and public groups, it would not have been
possible to bring the nonfarm housing starts series to the place of prominence it holds in
the Nation’ s body of economic intelligence. The voluntary cooperation of local building
permit officials, the financial aid received from other Government agencies, and the
special studies made by private groups using the Bureau’ s building permit data, were
all important contributions.
This bulletin is a final report of the work done by the Division of Construction
Statistics, of the U.S. Department of Labor’ s Bureau of Labor Statistics, in the develop­
ment of the nonfarm housing starts series. Effective July 1, 1959> the responsibility for
the compilation and publication of housing starts sta tistic s was transferred to the Bureau
of the Census of the U.S. Department of Commerce.
The bulletin was prepared by Mary F. Carney. Numerous people in the Bureau of
Labor Statistics contributed to the development of housing starts estimates and to insti­
tuting and continuously extending the underlying building permit system since 1920.
Herman B. Byer, H. E. Riley, Arnold E. Chase, Marvin Wilkerson, and Henry F . Haase
had primary responsibility for these estim ates at various developmental stages of the
program.




in




CONTENTS
PAGE

Introduction .......................................................................................................................................

1

Building permits ...............................................................................................................................

1

Initiation of building permit reporting.............................................................................

1

Special building permit stu d ie s ..........................................................................................

2

Urban and rural nonfarm estim ates......................................................................................

3

Estimating nonfarm housing starts................................................................................................

4

The 1946-47 revision.........................................................................................................

4

Seasonally adjusted estim ates........................................................................................

5

The 1954 revision...................................................................................................................

6

Public housing starts..........................................................................................................

7

Reliability of the e stim ates.............................................................................................

9

Limitations on cov erage.................................................................................................

9

Historical estim ates........................................................................................................................
Definitions..........................................................................................................................................

10
12

Tables:
1. New nonfarm dwelling units started: Totals, annually, 1889-1958;
type of structure, annually, 1900-58 ......................................................................

15

2. New nonfarm dwelling units started: Private and public ownership,
by type of structure, annually, 1935-58.................................................................

17

3. New nonfarm dwelling units started: Totals, monthly, 1939-58; and
private and public ownership, monthly, 1940-58 ................................................

18

4. Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: Seasonally
adjusted annual rates, monthly, 1946-58...............................................................

19

5. New nonfarm dwelling units started: Type of structure,
monthly, .1940-58..........................................................................................................

20




v

CONTENTS-Continued
PAGE

Tables (Continued):
6. Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: Type
of structure, monthly, 1940-58 .........................................................................

22

7. New nonfarm dwelling units started: Private and public ownership
and location, annually—
urban-rural nonfarm, 1920-53, and
metropolitan-nonmetropolitan, 1950-58 ..........................................................

24

8. New nonfarm dwelling units started: (Jrban-rural nonfarm location,
monthly, 1939-53; and metropolitan-nonmetropolitan location,
monthly, 1953-58...................................................................................................

25

9. New nonfarm dwelling units started in four broad regions,
annually, 1948-58.................................................................................................

26

10. New nonfarm dwelling units started in four broad regions,
monthly, 1954-58....................................................*...............................................

26

11. New nonfarm dwelling units started in 20 selected States:
Private and public ownership, annually, 1954-58 ........................................... 27
12. New nonfarm dwelling units started in 20 selected States:
Total and privately owned, quarterly, 1956-58 ..............................................

29

13. New nonfarm dwelling units started: Private and public ownership
and type of intended financing for private units, annually, 1935-58.......

30

14. Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started under the Wherry
Amendment to the National Housing Act,monthly, 1949-56......................

31

15. Publicly owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: Federal
or State and local ownership and program, annually, 1949-58..................

32

16» Publicly owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: Ownership
and program, monthly, 1949-58 ............................................................................

33

17. Publicly owned new nonfarm dwelling units started under the Capehart
amendment to the National Housing Act, monthly, 1956-58.........................

34

18. New nonfarm dwelling units started: Number and total construction cost,
by private and public ownership, annually, 1920-58 .......................................

34

19. Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: Average
construction cost, all types of units and 1-family houses,
monthly, 1940-58.....................................................................................................

35

Selected referen ces....................................................................................................
vi




3^

NONFARM HOUSING STARTS, 1889-1958
Evolution of the Statistical Series
INTRODUCTION

For almost 40 years, the Bureau of Labor Statistics was responsible for compiling and
estimating statistic s on the volume of new nonfarm dwelling unit construction in the United
States. Like most statistical series, the development of the Nonfarm Housing Starts series
paralleled the expansion of source data, as well a s the growing experience with the sta tistic s
and the application of scientific estimating and tabulating methods. Continuity in the housing
starts series and the development of historical estimates for earlier years were possible because
the primary source of information was the local building permit, and because the Bureau’ s
permit reports from the beginning showed the number of new dwelling units authorized. Briefly,
in deriving the housing starts series various adjustments were made in the number of units for
which building permits were issued to allow for canceled or lapsed permits and delays in
starting construction after the permit was obtained.
Improvements in the housing starts series and expansions in the amount and variety of
data produced were geared to meet u sers’ needs, within the resources available. Over the
years, the series was used as an indicator of the economic and social health of the Nation and
for market analysis. The legislative and executive branches of the Federal Government used
the housing starts statistics in determining national policy with respect to the kinds of leg is­
lation and regulations that affect not only the quantity and quality of housing, but also rent
levels, the availability and prices of materials and equipment, consumer credit and mortgage
financing, and the volume of employment—
both directly in the building trades and in related
and supporting industries.

BUILDING PERMITS
Initiation of Building Permit Reporting

To meet the needs of a congressional committee investigating housing, and of other
groups interested in finding a solution to the acute housing shortage that developed during and
after World War I, the Bureau began in 1920 to collect data from local officials who issued
building permits.
Prior to that time, building permit information had been collected from about 200 principal
cities by the U.S. Geological Survey, whose primary interest was in the kinds of materials used
in new residential and nonresidential building (that is, whether the structures were built of
wood, brick, stone, or concrete).1 Their annual reports did not show the number of new dwelling
units provided.
Learning that the Geological Survey was about to drop its. program, the BLS arranged in
1920 to continue the building permit reporting system as an important source of economic intel­
ligence on building activity. Plans were devised to acquire and publish facts on the value,
number, and intended use of new nonresidential buildings, and the value and number of new
family dwelling units being provided.
1
The G eological Survey’s objective presumably was to relate materialsand requirements to
use
the availability of raw materials in or near each of the urban areas of the time.




(1)

2

At the beginning, Bureau agents were sent to the cities to compile the building permit
data, because only a few cities were making reports on building construction and each of these
used a different reporting form. Much of the early survey and investigative work was accom­
plished through the cooperation of local building inspectors of the Building O fficials’ Con­
ference of America. Subsequently, a reporting form designed by the Bureau was adopted by
almost all cities, and, since 1930, data from all reporting places have been collected by mail on
uniform schedules. The reporting form is used also by those States and other groups that have
cooperated with the Bureau in collecting the raw building permit data, and it has been adopted
by many localities for their own use.
In 1920, the BLS received building permit reports from 189 of the 287 cities in the United
States that had populations of 25,000 or more. The following year, coverage was increased to
257 of such cities, and by 1932, reports were being received from almost all (360 out of a total
of 376) cities of this population size.
During the period 1921-28, data were collected and published annually for 257 identical
cities, and semiannually for cities having populations of 100,000 or more. The Bureau publica­
tions showed the quantity and value of various types of new nonresidential structures authorized
by local building permits; the number and value of new dwelling units provided (by type of
structure); and the value of additions, alterations, and repairs to existing buildings. The re­
ports included information on publicly financed projects, which was derived from notifications
of construction contracts awarded by public agencies.
Beginning in September 1929, the BLS initiated monthly collection and publication of
these sta tistic s for all cities with 25,000 or more population. Cities were added to the published
list whenever Census reports showed that their populations had reached that figure.2
Between 1929 and 1933, the coverage of building permit reports was extended to include
all cities (about 820) having populations of 10,000 and over. A further expansion, begun in
1936, brought in all urban places, that is, all incorporated cities having populations of 2,500
or more. After this extension, more than 1,700 localities were reporting, and the number was
increased to 2,400 by January 1938, when‘building permit coverage included places with popu­
lations of 1,000 or more.3
Special Building Permit Studies
Meantime, the Bureau conducted a variety of special studies that widened the scope and
improved the usefulness of the building sta tistic s.
A comprehensive Building Permit Survey, undertaken in 1935, was designed to provide
(1) complete data from permits issued during 1928-35 in all cities of 10,000 or more population,
and (2) historical annual data for years prior to 1920 for as many a s possible of the large cities
included in Bureau reports after 1920.4 For the latter group, data were obtained from 1870 in
some c ase s and from 1890 for 25 cities, and the number of localities having information available
for later years increased stead ily-to 344 for the year 1920. Subsequently, the survey was ex­
tended to cover building during the 1936-38 period in 884 cities having 10,000 or more population.
2 Building permit statistics for the 257 identical cities having populations of 25,000 or more are
available annually for the period 1921-48. See Building Construction in Principal Cities of the United
States, 1921-48, and Trends in Building Permit Activity (BLS Bull. 1243, May 1959).
3 Incorporated places of less than 2,500 population, as well as unincorporated places excluding
farms, were designated as rural nonfarm on the basis of definitions established for the 1930 Census.
4 The Building Permit Survey was conducted with the cooperation of 3 other Federal agencies--the
Federal Housing Administration, the Home Loan Bank Board, and the Works Progress Administration.
WPA funds financed the study.




3

Publication of detailed results of the Building j/ermit Survey began in 1937, and was
completed for the large cities, but the study was terminated (in 1940) before data could be
tabulated and published for the smaller cities. Both published and unpublished data (which
included cost classification by type of material) were used later, however, in developing h is­
torical estimates of housing starts, and in other public and private research p rojects in the
field of building construction, including capital formation and the financing of residential
construction.
In addition, sample surveys of building permit use, begun in the late 1920’ s and conducted
periodically since then, noted the extent to which building permits failed to result in construc­
tion (lapse or cancellation of a permit), the time lag between permit issuance and start of con­
struction, how long it took to complete various types of structures, and the gap between permit
valuations and actual construction costs. The range of information covered in individual sur­
veys varied with the needs of a given period, but there was continuous inquiry into the lag and
lapse rate of permits issued for dwelling units, and the ratio of construction costs to permit
valuations.5
Another special study, the Defense Housing Survey, covered residential building opera­
tions during 1940, 1941, and 1942 in 148 defense-connected areas.6 This survey produced the
Bureau’ s first comprehensive data on the relationship of housing activity in urban and rural
parts of metropolitan areas, and was used in refining the procedures for estimating nonfarm
housing volume. It permitted also an analysis of the size of builders’ operations during the
period. Survey data given to defense agencies were used to determine the amount and kinds of
shelter needed for war workers.
Urban and Rural Nonfarm Estim ates
Up to 1938, the Bureau’ s published reports on residential construction dealt only with
information received from reporting cities. However, the steady expansion in coverage, coupled
with continuous reporting of data for 257 identical cities, made it possible to prepare estim ates
of the number of dwelling units provided in the entire urban area of the United States. This was
done by relating per capita building rates to variations in population growth in reporting urban
cities, and applying the resulting ratios to population changes in nonreporting urban cities.
The new statistical series, beginning with quarterly data for 1936-37, was first published by
the BLS in January 1938.7
The National Bureau of Economic Research had prepared similar estim ates for 1936, and
they also compiled annual estimates back to 1920, covering housing activity in rural nonfarm
as well as in urban areas. In developing their estim ates, the NBER used the BLS historical
statistic s for the 257 identical cities as well as the enlarged body of building permit data for
incorporated and unincorporated p laces—
which they related to changes in population and family
formation and other factors.8

5 Results of some of the building permit use studies were published in separate reports and
bulletins that are included among the selected references beginning on p. 36.
6 The Defense Housing Survey was conducted at the request of die Office of the Defense Housing
Coordinator. Survey objectives are described in Activities of the Bureau of Labor Statistics in World
War II (Historical Reports of War Administration, Bureau of Labor Statistics, No. 1, June 1947, p. 49).
7 See Volume of Residential Construction, 1929-37 (in Monthly Labor Review, January 1938,
p. 248).
8 See Number of Dwelling Units Built in Urban and Nonfarm Areas, 1920-36 (in Monthly Labor
Review, January 1938, p. 254); and Non-farm Residential Construction 1920-36 (National Bureau of
Economic Research, Bull. 65, September 15, 1937).




4

The BLS continued to compile and publish the series established by the N BER, which
provided a total estimate of nonfarm housing built in the United States. Subsequently, in
1941-42, substantial upward revisions were made in the data when information from the 1940
Census became available. The urban estim ates for the 1930,s were adjusted to conform to
revised definitions of urban areas, and to take account of population shifts between rural
nonfarm and urban localities. At the same time, entirely new estim ates of rural nonfarm housing
activity were developed— the basis of "year-built” data from the 1940 Census of Housing.9
on
There were few changes between 1940 and 1953 in the BLS method of deriving estim ates
of new urban dwellings, but su ccessiv e changes occurred in the estimating procedures for the
rural nonfarm segment.
For the private urban total, building permit data from reporting cities (generally repre­
senting 85 percent of the urban population) were expanded to represent all urban areas by
"matching” nonreporting to reporting urban places on the basis of city population siz e and
location (within States and inside or outside metropolitan areas), and applying trend ratios for
reporting places to nonreporting places. Public housing figures obtained from appropriate
agencies were added to the private urban and rural nonfarm estimates to arrive at the total
nonfarm housing estimate.
For the private rural nonfarm segment, estim ates for 1940-42 were derived by projecting
data from the 1940 Census of Housing on the b asis of urban-rural nonfarm ratios found in the
BLS Defense Housing Survey. From 1943 until the fall of 1946, the rural nonfarm estim ates
were projected on the b asis of trend in reporting places, and were adjusted, when necessary,
for consistency with urban trends. Data from building priorities granted during World War II
provided a check against gross error.10
ESTIMATING NONFARM HOUSING STARTS
The estim ates described above represented the total number of nonfarm dwelling units
authorized, or scheduled to be started, in urban and rural nonfarm places. Until the close of
World War II, it was assumed there was no appreciable difference between the number of units
scheduled and the number actually started. However, the sharp uptrend in building activity at
that time met with critical shortages of materials and labor, resulting both in abandonment of
intentions to build and delays in starts on a sizable amount of construction. The need for a
current and realistic measure of homebuilding activity led to the development of nonfarm housing
starts estim atesj beginning in 1945. Preliminary estim ates were released about 15 days after
the close of a given month, and the revised estim ates were issued 3 months later— practice
a
followed thereafter.
The 1946*47 Revision
Between 1945 and the fall of 1947, the Bureau took several step s to improve the accuracy
of its housing starts statistics. The number of monthly building permit reporters was increased
to nearly 5,200 (including 2,513 cities and 2,660 rural nonfarm places); a consistent periodic
check of building permit use was introduced; and (in October 1946) a field canvass of nonfarm
housing being built in a selected sample of nonpermxt-issuing places was initiated. Much of
this work was made possible by financial assistan ce from the National Housing Agency, which
9
See Housing and the Increase in Population (in Monthly Labor Review, April 1942, p. 869), and
Building Construction, 1941 (BLS Bull. 713, June 1942), p. 17.
1
0
In the spring of 1942, all housing was placed under a Federal priorities system in order to re­
duce pressure on the materials markets and, at the same time, insure an adequate provision of dwelling
units in defense areas.




5

desired improved housing statistics generally and complete data for a number of individual areas
in particular. The program involved a comprehensive study of housing activity in 90 sample
areas, comprised of industrial and nonindustrial counties.11
After some adjustments, a procedure was put into effect in October 1947 which retained
the permit b a sis for obtaining the urban estimate, but divided the rural nonfarm estimate into
two segments—
one representing all permit-issuing places and the other, all nonpermit places.
Briefly, preliminary estimates of nonfarm housing starts were derived from (1) permit reports
regularly received early in the month, and (2) data from a sample of permit and nonpermit p laces.
Final estimates were based on virtually complete building permit returns, plus data from a con­
siderably broadened sample of nonpermit places, and the tabulating procedures were much more
detailed for all segments of the total housing starts figure.
In both the preliminary and final estim ates, the building permit information was converted
into dwelling units started during a given month, by application of factors derived from the
Bureau's building permit use studies. An allowance was made for units never started (lapsed or
canceled permits), and the current "sta rts pattern" was applied to the balance of the units
authorized. The "sta rts pattern" represented the rate at which dwelling units were started in
the month of permit issuance or in succeeding months.
For rural places without permit system s, the preliminary nonfarm housing starts estimate
was derived by projecting the previous month's figure—
using the trend shown by permit-issuing
places. The revised estimate for this segment was based on the complete count of nonfarm
units begun in a selected sample of 96 counties. These counties were surveyed continuously,
but on a cycle b asis, that is, each county was visited once in each quarter and at each visit
the number of units begun in each of the 3 previous months was ascertained. Then, the weight
given each sample county (for the estimating cell it represented) was applied to the units
reported for the county, and the weighted figures were added to give the total estimate for
rural nonpermit-issuing places. The weight for each county was the relationship of the number
of dwelling units standing in 1940 in the rural nonfarm permit-issuing parts of a county, to the
number of 1940 rural nonfarm dwelling units in the entire cell represented by the county.12
Seasonally Adjusted Estim ates
In the summer of 1952, the Bureau inaugurated the publication of seasonally adjusted
estimates of nonfarm housing starts. At that time, consumer demand for mortgage credit w as
under the restraining influence of Regulation X and the companion curbs imposed in October
1950, under provisions of the Defense Production Act of 1950.13 Amendments to th is act,
1 This program and later studies permitted publication of estimates for individual metropolitan
1
areas. See Housing Volume and Construction Cost of 1-Family Houses (Supplement to Construction,
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 1951)*
1 A complete description of techniques used in compiling the preliminary and revised nonfarm
2
housing starts estimates, and in selecting the sample of 96 counties, is delineated in Estimating National
Housing Volume (BLS Bull. 993), Ch. HI, pp. 13-19.
^ Regulation X was an anti-inflation measure designed to restrict die volume of mortgage credit
for conventionally financed real estate, including residential construction, by setting m
axim
um loan-tovalue limits. Similar restrictive measures applied to housing mortgages coming under programs of the
Federal Housing Administration, Veterans Administration, and the Department of Agriculture. W
hen
Regulation X was under consideration, and later when its effects were being assessed, the BLS provided
early and unpublished results of special surveys, including those on home financing in metropolitan
areas, and the size of homebuilders’ operations. See Housing in Metropolitan Areas, 1949*51 (BLS Bull.
1115, September 1952), and Structure of the Residential Building Industry in 1949 (BLS Bull. 1170,
November 1954).
The real estate credit provisions of the Defense Production Act expired as of June 30, 1953, after
suspension of Regulation X and related mortgage credit curbs in the fall of 1952.




6

in 1952, provided for relaxation of housing credit controls if the seasonally adjusted annual
rate of housing starts was below 1,200,000 for 3 consecutive months, and* conversely, for con­
tinuation or reimposition of controls if the rate held at or above the 1.2-million level for a
3-month period. In Executive Order 10373 (which amended Executive Order 10161), responsi­
bility for preparing the seasonally adjusted estim ates was delegated to the Secretary of Labor,
and the function of determining housing credit control policy (using the Bureau’ s housing data)
was delegated to the President of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, sub­
ject to concurrence of the Housing and Home Finance Administrator.
Because these Federal credit control determinations were to be based on month-to-month
levels of total housing starts volume, the BLS compiled annual rate estim ates of public as well
as private starts. With the expiration of Regulation X in June 1953, monthly estim ates of the
annual rate of public starts were discontinued, since the wide fluctuations in public housing
starts were related primarily to legislative actions and administrative decisions. Seasonally
adjusted data on the private segment, however, were retained as an integral part of the nonfarm
housing starts series.
To derive the seasonal index of private starts, one of the standard techniques was used:
a ratio of starts for each month to a 12-month moving average. Twelve-month moving averages
were computed, centered about each month in the period January 1940 through December 1951.
Ratios were then computed by dividing the actual starts figure by the corresponding 12-month
moving average for each month of the period. The' monthly ratios for each of the years 1942
and 1945 were eliminated because of developments associated with World War II in 1942, and
its cessation in 1945* In addition, extreme monthly ratios (those abnormally high or low) were
eliminated for other years. The monthly ratios remaining were then averaged and monthly in­
dexes computed. The seasonally adjusted annual rate of private starts for any month was
obtained by dividing the private starts estimate for that month by the respective season al index,
and multiplying the result by 12.14
Meantime, a major revision of the housing starts series was underway, and as additional
data became available, it was apparent that a real shift in the basic season al pattern had oc­
curred. Starts after 1951 tended to show a "flatter” pattern, with more homebuilding activity in
the fall and winter months than existed previously. This resulted partly from new construction
techniques and practices, and from shifts in the geographical distribution of new housing. Con­
sequently, considerable work was done to see if an index more representative of the seasonal
swing of later postwar years could be derived, and separate treatment was given to starts data
for the periods 1946-50 and 1951-55*
After derivation and study of a tentative index, a new BLS interim index was introduced in
May 1956. The housing starts data were processed also through the Census Bureau’ s Univac
electronic computer seasonal index procedure, which permitted several elaborate smoothing ad­
justments in the basic ratio-to-moving-average results to produce a moving seasonal adjustment.
Seasonally adjusted data were revised for 1946-53 (using the Univac procedure), and thereafter
a BLS interim shifting-base index was used for seasonal adjustment of current data pending the
final Univac revision. For example, 1952-56 data were used for BLS interim adjustment of
1957 starts, and 1953*57 data for adjustment of 1958 starts. The final Univac revision of 1954
data was done in 1956, 1955 data in 1957, and so on .15
*4 See Method of Compiling Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rates of Housing Starts (in Construction,
August 1952, pp. .3-8).
See Technical Note: Revised BLS Seasonal Index of Private Nonfarm Housing Starts (in Monthly
Labor Review, August 1956, pp. 938-940).




7

Th e 1954 Revision
A major revision in the nonfarm housing starts series, completed in mid-1954, took into
account the vast changes in population and housing distribution that occurred between 1940 and
1950, and the extensive spread of building permit system s. Following a thorough statistical
an alysis, the series was improved by (1) development of a new sample design and an up-to-date
sample of nonpermit-issuing places, using results of the 1950 Census plus information from the
Bureau’ s studies of housing built in selected metropolitan areas during 1949*51; and (2) a major
expansion of the number of building permit reporters, to cover virtually all places known to
issu e building permits.
In preparation for establishment of the permit-issuing universe, an intensive effort was
made to identify building permit issuing localities and to solicit monthly reports from them.
As a result, almost 2,000 new places were added to the Bureau’s reporting group, bringing the
total number of reporters to about 7,000 by mid-1954.1^ After this expansion, coverage of the
building permit universe included localities accounting for 80 percent of the total nonfarm
population (based on 1950 Census data), 94 percent of the nonfarm population residing in the
168 metropolitan areas, and 53 percent of nonfarm population in nonmetropolitan p la c e s.17 Com­
parable figures prior to the 1954 revision were 68 percent, 81 percent, and 46 percent, respec­
tively.
With this improvement in building permit coverage, the Bureau increased from 75 to 85
percent that portion of the private starts figure that was based on direct reports, and reduced
the area of estimation (the derived nonpermit segment) from 25 to 15 percent of the private total.
The need for redesigning the sample portion of the private housing starts estimate stemmed
from increases in the number of communities beginning to issu e permits (compared with 1947),
and the shifts in population after 1940 (the previous 96-county sample design was based on 1940
population distribution). The primary sampling unit was changed from a single county b asis to a
group of contiguous counties containing a number of nonpermit-issuing minor c iv il divisions.
The sample of places inaugurated in 1954 consisted of 53 such clusters of counties, which in­
cluded 131 individual counties, 29 metropolitan areas, and 1,200 separate localities. The
revised sample design, a product of scientific sampling technology, permitted more efficient
operations and a greater degree of accuracy than the sample used previously.
In selecting .the sample, intensive analysis of housing activity data for a large number of
areas indicated that a ratio type of estimate for the nonpermit segment, based on the relationship
between the volume of housing starts in the nonpermit parts of an area and the volume of units
authorized in the permit parts, would be more efficient than an independent estimate for this
segment. Thus, the following procedure was put into effect.
Within each sample area, separate totals were obtained for all units authorized by building
permits and all units started in nonpermit parts of the sample area. Each of these totals was
then weighted by the reciprocal of the probability used in selecting the sample area. These
weighted quantities were then combined for all 53 sample areas and an overall ratio of nonpermit
1(* Early in 1959, the Bureau was receiving reports regularly from about 7,350 building-permitissuing p laces, including 6,050 cities and towns, 1,080 townships, and 220 counties. More than 4,000 o f
these reports came from p laces located outside the 168 metropolitan areas.
17
As a byproduct o f die expanded building permit coverage, die Bureau's Building Permit Activity
reports were enlarged to provide detailed building statistics for a number o f individual metropolitan
areas, showing the volume o f various types o f new building inside and outside the central cities. See
Building in Metropolitan Areas (in Monthly Labor Review, June 1957, pp. 689-696), and.Suburban and
Central City Building in Metropolitan Areas, 1957 (in Construction Review, May 1958, pp. 13-16).




8

starts to permit authorizations was obtained. This ratio was applied to the estimate for the
entire permit universe to obtain the estimate of total units started in the nonpermit universe.
The final step meant adding the starts data for the permit and nonpermit universes to obtain the
estimate of total private nonfarm housing starts. To this was added the dwelling units in new
public projects, which were reported by the agencies administering public housing programs. 18
The revised techniques used the same two basic sources of data as before—
reports of
building permits issued and field surveys in a sample of nonpermit-issuing lo calities, and the
latter continued to be canvassed on the cycle b asis described earlier. The building permit data
were adjusted to take account of permits not used, the delay between permit issuan ce and the
start of construction, and the differences between permit valuation and actual construction
costs. Also, as before, tabulation of the revised, or final, housing starts estimate was done in
much more detail than the preliminary estimate, and was based on virtually complete building
permit returns, plus complete data from the sample areas used in deriving the nonpermit
segment.
The 1954 revision brought certain changes, however, in the classification of some of the
data, and permitted publication of more detail than was feasible in previous periods. The
former classification of urban or rural nonfarm was abandoned because of the problem of resolv­
ing differences between the geographic boundaries used for building permit system s and the
urban areas a s defined in the 1950 Census . 19 Instead, housing starts are c la ssifie d a s metro­
politan or nonmetropolitan. (See Definitions, p. 12.) As a result of improved methodology,, it
became possible to publish starts estim ates on a regional b asis (the four broad Census regions),
and for a group of selected States. More detail by type of structure became available—
that is,
unit volume in 2-4 and 5:or-more-family structures, a s well as a continuation of former c la ssi­
fication of new units in 1 -family, 2-family, and 3-or-more-family structures.
Preliminary reports included private or public ownership, the seasonally adjusted annual
rate figure, and metropolitan-nonmetropolitan data, and at the time of the final estimate (3
months later), information was available on the regional and State location, the type of struc­
ture, and the average construction cost of privately owned units.

Public Housing Starts
The public housing figures incorporated in the Bureau’s nonfarm housing starts series
represent an actual count of starts as reported by the Federal Public Housing Administration,
other Federal agencies (e.g., Defense Department, Atomic Energy Commission, and the Bureau
of Reclamation), and State and local housing authorities. The BLS kept progress records of
starts in programs underway, and made continual checks on the completeness and accuracy of
the reports.
Publicly owned housing was not identified separately in the nonfarm housing starts series
until 1935- The volume of permanent public units built before that time probably was insignif­
icant, and resulted chiefly from intermittent emergency programs devised to meet specific needs
during defense, war, and ecpnomic depression periods. Housing provided under most of the
18 The methodology introduced by the BLS in.1954, including die sampling plan, is described fully
in Estimating Rational Housing Volume (BLS Bull. 1168), Ch. 2, pp. 8-1519 The 1950 urban category includes not only incorporated p la ces o f 2,500 or more population, but
also a large number o f unincorporated specially delineated loca lities, and the densely settled but unin­
corporated fringes adjacent to large cities. These unincorporated areas were defined on die b a s is o f
housing or population density and their boundaries in general are not political but follow such identi­
fiable physical characteristics as streets, roads, railroads, streams, etc. On the other hand, building
permit systems usually cover entire political subdivisions: cities, villages, townships, counties, etc.;
it is not p ossib le to obtain reports which segregate building activity by urban and nonurban areas within
su ch . subdivisions.




9

Federal emergency programs, including those of World War II, consisted largely of units in
temporary and converted structures, and, therefore, would not have been included in the nonfarm
housing starts s e r i e s . 2 0

R e lia b ility of the.Estimates
After the 1954 revision, approximately 85 percent of the total private nonfarm housing
starts estimate was derived from building permits, and, since this segment consisted largely of
reported data, it contained little estimation. It was subject to some nonsampling errors
because of incorrect reporting by building officials, and possible omission of some construc­
tion. Extensive work with local permit data by the Bureau has, however, failed to uncover any
serious reporting inaccuracies, and a limited number of permit adequacy checks have indicated
that only a negligible percentage of new dwelling units were started in permit areas without a
permit being taken out. In addition, the Bureau maintained a continuing program to help report­
ing officials submit accurate and consistent reports.
The sampling error in the nonpermit segment is estimated at 5 to 7 percent, depending on
the size of the monthly figure. It is possible that a larger error in this segment arose out of
simple failure to locate all of the new housing built within the sample areas. In an attempt to
overcome this problem, the Bureau’ s field supervisors conducted periodic quality control
checks of work done by local field agents. The resources available for this purpose were
inadequate, however, to permit these checks to be made as frequently or thoroughly as they
should have been.
Study of the revisions that occurred between the preliminary and the final estim ates
showed that they were caused primarily by the difference between the final nonpermit estimate
based on complete field survey data, and the projected figure used for the preliminary nonpermit
estimate.

Lim itations on Coverage
Several influences have combined to limit the coverage of the official housing starts series
to new nonfarm dwelling units. Some of the limitations grew out of the use of building permits
as the principal source of information, and others reflected the demand for specific types of
housing information and the uses to which it was put.
Over the years from 1920, it would have been prohibitively expensive to obtain the needed
statistics on the amount of housing being provided without depending on the readily available
building permits as a source. Otherwise* a costly canvassing of a large sample of land areas
or individual builders would have been necessary. The large majority of new dwelling units
have been 1-family houses, and until the mass-production phenomena of recent years, these
homes were constructed mostly by small volume builders scattered throughout the United
S tates.21
Building permits usually are required where building codes and zoning regulations have
been adopted. For the most part, this excludes strictly rural areas, so that development of the
20 For example, the public war housing program of the U.S. Department of Labor’s earlier Bureau
of Industrial Housing and Transportation, initiated in 1918; the su b sisten ce housing provided under die
Public ‘ orks Program in the 1930’ s; and the public war housing and veterans’ reuse housing programs
^
authorized in 1945 under the Lanham Act. Of die 628,263 units provided in th e latter program, 70 per­
cent were temporary. All of the emergency programs were destined for liquidation through d isp o sa l of
the Federal Government’s holdings. See Housing and Home Finance Agency, Third Annual Report, 1949>
pp. 319-321.
21 See Structure o f the R esidential Building Industry in 1949 (BLS Bull. 1170), and Builders of
One-Family H ouses, 1955-56 (in Construction Review, August-September 1958, pp. 5-15).




10

housing starts series was limited to nonfarm housing Although building permits usually are
required for the remodeling or conversion of existing structures, especially when an additional
dwelling unit is being created, this requirement is known to be widely evaded. It was not,
therefore, possible to use building permits as a reliable source of information to estimate the
number of dwelling units provided through conversion. Thus, the housing starts series reflects
the extent of activity in the production of new housing only.
The development stages of the housing starts sta tistic s coincided also with the major
types of demand for specific housing data and the uses to which the figures were put. Some of
these, for example, were: the formulation of Government housing and mortgage credit policy,
market an alysis, and to help measure economic progress.22
Until recently, u sers’ interest in the Bureau’s homebuilding sta tistic s centered around the
number of families being provided for in standard living quarters through new construction.
The implications were (1) that there was little social or economic concern with the living ar­
rangements of single individuals or nonfamily groups unless they occupied standard family
dwellings, and (2) that living quarters not providing complete housekeeping facilities, or not
affording suitable shelter for comfortable year-round living should not be counted. Consequently,
types of facilities normally intended for transient, seasonal, or nonhousekeeping use were
excluded from the housing starts series, a s were substandard, temporary, or makeshift quarters.
(See Definitions, p. 12.)
On the other hand, the cen suses of housing, with le ss restricted definitions, covered
existing as well as new housing and counted almost any shelter where people lived as a dwell­
ing unit, because it is desirable to know about all types of living accommodations in use,
whatever their type and quality. For example, in the Bureau of the Census 1956 National
Housing Inventory, trailers, boats, tents, and railroad cars were included in the dwelling unit
inventory if they were occupied as living quarters at the time the count was made*25
Because of the differences in coverage, definitions, and survey objectives, the BLS
nonfarm housing starts statistic s are not directly comparable with BLS building permit data on
residential construction or data from the various cen suses of housing.

H IS T O R IC A L E S TIM A TE S
As noted earlier, the Bureau’s building permit sta tistic s provided a principal source of
data for deriving historical estimates of homebuilding volume. The first estimates of total non­
farm dwelling units built were made by David L. Wickens and Ray R. Foster, and were published
by the National Bureau of Economic Research in 1937. They were annual estim ates of the
number of urban and rural nonfarm dwelling units constructed during 1920-36.24 The spade work
done in these studies, and the techniques developed, had a marked influence on the extension
and revision of the housing estim ates, both backward and forward in time from the decade of
the-1920’s*.
22 Use o f the housing starts series as the basis for estimating a part o f gross private dom estic
investment in the national product account also has affected its coverage. The starts series excludes
house trailers, mobile homes, and houseboats because they are covered under personal consumption
expenditures and would be duplicated i f included also under investment.
23 See 1956 National Housing Inventory, Characteristics o f the 1956 Inventory, United States and
R egions, Vol. Ill, Pt. 1, p. 2.
24 Non-Farm Residential Construction, 1920-36 (Bull. 65> Nationaf Bureau o f Econom ic Research,
September 16, 1937). The detailed statistics and methodology are given in Residential Real Estate
(a study o f real estate financing and econom ic stability, published by the NBER in 1941).




11

Annual estimates of the number of nonfarm dwelling units built prior to 1920 were first
made by Lowell W Chawner, and were published by the National Resources Committee in
.
1939-25 They were followed closely by different estim ates prepared by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics and published in 1942, and still different estim ates prepared by Miles L . Colean that
were published by the Twentieth Century Fund in 1944.2 ^
The estim ates most widely accepted for the years 1889-1919 were compiled by David M.
Blank (published by the National Bureau of Economic Research in 1954), who used the BLS
building permit data as his basic source material.27 He also developed and used more refined
estimating techniques than any previously employed in making estim ates for the years prior to
1920. For his use, additional unpublished data from the BLS special Building Permit Survey
conducted during the 1930’s were made available under special arrangements by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics to the National Bureau of Economic Research. The BLS adopted the Blank
series for 1889-1919 a s the official series for those years. The Wickens-Foster estim ates for
the 1920’s were adopted as the official estim ates for that period, except that the BLS shifted
data for satellite places of le ss than 2,500 population to a rural nonfarm from an urban
classification.
25
Residential Building (Housing Monograph .Series No. 1, National R esources Committee, 1939)2 > Building Construction, 1941 (BLS Bull. 713, June 1942), and American Housing (The Twentieth
^
Century Fund, 1944).

27
The Volume o f R esidential Construction, 1889-1950 (T echnical Paper No. 9 , Studies in Capital
Formation and Financing, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc., 1954).




12

DEFINITIONS

The following definitions were observed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in classifying,
tabulating, and reporting the accompanying sta tistic s on the volume of new permanent nonfarm
dwelling units put under construction in the United States during a given period of time.
Housing Start Construction of a housing unit is considered to have started when ground is
broken, that is, when excavation is begun for the basement or foundation. In the case of a
project consisting of single-family houses, the count of starts for a given period covers only
those units for which excavation is begun during the period. All of the units in an apartment
structure are considered as started when excavation is begun for the structure.
Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate* An adjustment of the actual number of housing starts each
month to eliminate the normal seasonal variation, leaving only the fluctuations that result from
other causes. The adjusted monthly figures are converted to annual rates to permit comparison
of the rate for a particular month with actual annual totals.
Dwelling Unit. A room or group of rooms, intended as separate living quarters for a house­
keeping unit, and containing permanent cooking facilities, that is, the minimum built-in facili­
ties essen tial to housekeeping.28 The dwelling unit figures include prefabricated housing, if
permanent. They exclude units resulting from conversion (that is, the creation of additional
units through structural alterations or changes in the use of existing structures); and types of
facilities normally intended for transient or nonhousekeeping use, such as hotels, motels,
cabins, dormitories, clubhouses, and barracks. Units in apartment hotels are excluded unless
most of the space in the structure is devoted to housekeeping units. Excluded also are all
temporary dwellings (such as those built for temporary use during war and defense periods),
mobile housing or trailers, and houseboats.
One-Family House. A dwelling unit intended for one family, which has a separate entrance from
the outside, an individual heating plant, separating walls which reach from the ground to the
roof, and which can be sold independently of adjoining or nearby units. A one-family house may
be detached, semidetached, or one of a continuous row of attached houses.
Multifamily Structure. One building containing any combination of two or more dwelling units
(with or without commercial space for stores or offices) that have some common facility such as
entrance from the outside, stairway, heating plant, or basement. The units may be arranged side
by side, one above the other, or in any other manner. The dwelling units are classified by type
of structure according to the number of units in a building, as follows: 2-to-4-family, 3-or-morefamily, and 5-or-more family structures. A single dwelling unit that comprises part of a structure
having commercial space is classified with 2-family structures.
Urban and Rural Nonfarm Location. Place of residence as defined by the Bureau of the Census.
The 1920-29 housing starts data are classified according to the definitions established for the
1930 Census, and the 1930-53 data according to the 1940 Census definitions. For the earlier
period, "urban” comprised all incorporated places having populations of 2,500 or more. The
definition was expanded in the 1940 Census to include a small number of p laces, usually minor
civil divisions, that were classified as urban under a special rule. Urban housing was related
to definite geographic areas, while rural nonfarm housing reflected intended use.
28
The definition of a dwelling unit, the common denominator of housing data, has varied between
different agencies and sometimes between different time periods (e.g., decennial censuses) and usually
has been developed to suit the objectives of specific surveys or agencies. The Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics definition in the Nonfarm Housing Starts Series is designed to reflect the extent of activity in the
construction of new housing only.




13

Metropolitan Area. The 168 Standard Metropolitan Areas as defined by the Bureau of the Budget
and used in the 1950 Census of Population and Housing. Except in New England, a standard
metropolitan area is defined as a county or a group of contiguous counties which contains at
least one city of 50,000 inhabitants or more. Contiguous counties to the one containing such a
city are included in a standard metropolitan area if, according to certain criteria, they are essen ­
tially metropolitan in character and are socially and economically integrated with the central
city. In New England, where the city and town are administratively more important than the
county, they were the units used in defining standard metropolitan areas.
Housing started outside the 168 standard metropolitan areas is classified as nonmetro­
politan.
Geographic Region.
follows:

The regional groupings are those used by the Bureau of the Census, as

Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, M assachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Penn­
sylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
North Central: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, K ansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North
Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Lou­
isian a, Maryland, M ississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas,
Virginia, and West Virginia.
West: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah,
Washington, and Wyoming.
Privately Owned Housing Starts. Dwelling units built and owned by private individuals or
organizations, including those started under Federal Government programs for insurance or
guarantee of mortgage loans, and those receiving such public aid as tax exemptions and do­
nations of land.
Federal Government Programs. Covers new privately owned nonfarm housing built under in­
spection procedures of the Federal Housing Administration or the Veterans Administration.
The inspection procedures involve adherence to established minimum property requirements, or
standards, as a condition of eligibility for an FHA-insured or VA-guaranteed mortgage.2^
Wherry H o u s i n g .
Privately owned and operated dwelling units built,
under a special FHA mortgage-insurance program, at or near military or
Federal atomic energy installations for voluntary rental occupancy by
military and defense-connected personnel.^0 In some c a ses, agreements
between the owner and the occupant entitled the occupant to acquire
ownership of the premises subsequently. (See also Capehart housing
on page 14.)

2^ These agencies do not build dwelling units and, except for a relatively small direct loan program
conducted by the VA, they do not make mortgage loans; they do insure or guarantee the holder of an
approved mortgage against default.
30
'itie W
herry housing program was authorized in Title VIII of the 1949 amendments to the National
Housing Act (in Public Law 211, 81st Congress, approved August 8, 1949)* In the 1955 amendments
(Public Law 345, 84th Congress, approved August 11, 1955), die Capehart program was authorized in
sec. 803 of a new Title VIII. See Review of Military Housing Programs, Senate Report No. 231 (85th
Congress, 1st session), April 12, 1957, of the Committee on Banking and Currency.




14

All Other Privately Owned, Conventionally financed housing, that is, units started without
Federal mortgage assistan ce. This category represents the residual after deducting private
starts under the FHA-VA inspection procedures from the BLS total of private housing starts.
Publicly Owned Housing. Dwelling units owned by Federal, State, or local government bodies,
for which construction was financed by the use of public funds (including appropriated funds
and funds derived from the sale of bonds to private groups), and, in some c a s e s , through the
medium of Government-insured mortgages held by private groups until amortized.
Federally Owned Housing. Mainly dwelling units built at military and Atomic Energy Commis­
sion installations, and a small number of units at national parks, reclamation projects, and
other federally owned projects.
Capehart Military Housing. Dwelling units privately built at military
installations under a special program in which the mortgages are insured
by the FI1A and mortgage payments are guaranteed by the Defense Depart­
ment. The defense agency also inspects the units while under construc­
tion; acquires the builders’ capital stock in completed projects; acquires
control of each dwelling unit as completed; and maintains, operates, and
assign s the housing to military and defense-connected personnel. The
FHA-insured mortgages are amortized by use of the living quarters
allowances of military personnel and the rental payments of civilian
personnel.

State and Locally Owned Housing. Dwelling units built under the auspices and programs of
State and local public housing bodies, including units begun under Federal aid programs. The
latter helped provide low-rent housing for low-income families, for students and faculty at col­
leges, and for personnel at hospitals and other institutions. Similar type programs, including
also housing for veterans and the elderly, were in many c a se s financed entirely by the State
and local public housing agencies.
Federally Aided Low-Rent Housing. Dwelling units for low-income fami­
lie s built by local housing authorities with Federal aid. The Federal aid
involves (1) capital loans to local authorities to help plan and build the
housing and (2) annual cash contributions (Federal subsidy) which repre­
sents the difference between operating costs and the rents which lowincome families can afford to pay.




1
5
Table 1: New nonfarm dwelling units started: Totals, annually, 1889-1958; by type of structure, annually, 1900-58
Number o f new d w e llin g u n it s ( I n thousands)

Year
................
................
1 8 9 1 ................
1 8 9 2 ................
1 8 9 3 ................
1 8 9 U................
18 8 9
18 9 6

................
................
1 8 9 7 ................
1 8 9 8 ................
1 8 9 9 ................

18 95
18 96

A ll
types of
structures
3 ^2 . 0

1

-family
houses

2 6 5 .0

..
..
..
—
—
—

309.0
257.0

__
—

3 2 8 .0
2 9 8 .0
3 8 1 .0
2 6 7 .0

2 9 2 .0
2 6 2 .0
2 8 2 .0

..
—

P ercen t o f new d w e llin g u n it s i n -

Multifamily structures
■ 1 -family
3 -or-more
A ll
2 -family
houses
family
—
—
-—
--

—
—
—

_
—
_
..
—

__
—
..
__
—

..

..
_
_
—
—
--

__
..
—
—
—

_
—

—

_
—
_

_
—

_
—

--

--

--

—

--

6 5 .I
64.4
71.3

3b.9
35.6

16.4
1 1 .6

6 9 .2

2 8 .7
3 0 .8

18.5
24.0
1 5 .b

1 1 .8

1 9 .0

65.7

3b.3

l b .3

2 0 .0

33.7
35.1

1 2 .6

2 1 .1

14.2

20.9

19 0 0

.............
.............
1 9 0 2 ..............
1903..............
1 9 0 1 * ................

1 8 9 .0

1 2 3 .0

6 6 .0

3 1 .0

275.0
240.0
253.0
315.0

177.0

35.0

190 1

9 8 .0

3 2 .0

6 6 .0

37.0
48.0
6 3 .O

1905.............
.............
1907.............
1 9 0 8 ................
1909............. ..

507.0
487.0
432.0
416.0
492.0

1 9 1 0 ...............
1911...............
1912...............
1913...............
1 9 1 fc................

387.0
395-0
426.0
421.0
421.0

1915...............
1 9 1 6 ................
1917................
1 9 1 8 ................
1919................

433.0
.O
240.0

1 9 2 0 ................
1921................
1 9 2 2 ................
1923................
1924................

190 6

1925................
................
1927................
1 9 2 8 ................
1929................
192 6

437

1 7 1 .0

6 9 .0

3 2 .0

175.0

7 8 .0

3 0 .0

1 0 8 .0

45.0

3 3 6 .0

1 7 1 .0

3 1 6 .0

1 7 1 .0

2 0 7 .0

2 9 1 .0

141.0

2 8 6 .0

1 3 0 .0

3 2 8 .0

164.0

b .0
.O
59.0
6 5 .O
73.0

2 5 1 .0
2 4 9 .0

I 3 6 .O
146.0

6 2 .0

2 5 8 .0

1 6 8 .0

264.0

157.0

7 1 .0
7 2 .0

8 5 .0

2 6 3 .0

1 5 8 .0

7 1 .0

8 7

2 6 2 .0

1 7 1 .0

2 6 7 .0

1 7 0 .0

73.0
6 9 .O

1 6 6 .0

74.0

6

1 0 7 .0

6 6 .3

1 0 2 .0

64.9
67.4

3 2 ,6

1 3 .6

1 9 .0

6 8 .8

3 1 .2

1 5 .6

1 5 .6

9 1 .0

6 6 .7

3 3 .3

14.8

18.5

79.0
84.0
97.0

64.9
6 3 .O

3 5 .1
3 7 .0

6 0 .6

.b
21.3
22.7

6 2 .7

3 7 .3

l b .7
15.7 .
16.7
17.1

6 2 .5

3 7 .5

1 6 .9

2 0 .6

6 0 .5
6 1 .1

39‘ 5
38.9

1 6 .9
1 5 .8

57.0

3 1 .0

9 1 .0

2 7 .0

1 3 .0

315-0

239.0

7 6 .0

3 6 .0

247.0
449.0

2 0 2 .0

45.0
133-0
279.0
358.0
359.0

7 1 6 .0
8 7 1 .0

893-0

437.0
513-0
534.0

b. 0

7 0 .0

146.0
175.0
173.0
157.0

3 1 6 .0

330.0
254.0
134.0
93.0

2 2 7 .0

1 0 3 .0

2 9 .0

1 8 7 .0

6 7 .0

2 2 .0

1 1 8 .0

1 6 .0

7 6 .0

1 7 .0

8 1 0 .0

753-0
509-0

572.0
491.0
454.0
436.0

2

365.0
358.0
356.0
317.0
193.0

937-0
849.0

1 1 7 .0

99.0
7 8 .0
5 1 .0

8 2 .0
65

.O

.O

9 8 .0
1 0 1 .0

43.0
14.0
40.0

6 9 .2

3 0 .8

12.9

2 2 .9

1 1 .0

8 1 .8

1 8 .2

70.4

9.7

2 9 .6

1 5 .6

1 8 .6

2 0 .1

2 1 .0

1 8 6 .0

39.0
41.1
40.2

20.4

58.9
59 .‘8

19.4

2 0 .8

2 0 8 .0

6 1 .0

1 6 .8

241.0
257.0
239.0
142.0

57.8

2 2 .2
28

6 1 .0

5 6 .0

57.9
6 2 .1

7b.0
45.0
9.0

8 8 .1

1 2 .0

8 1 .7

1 2 .0

8 6 .5
8 2 .8

1 0 9 .0

1 7 .0

1 8 3 .0

3 8 .0

8 .0

3 0 .0

1936................
1937................
1938................
1939................

319-0
336.0
406.0
515.0

244.0

75.0

lb.O

6 1 .0

2 6 7 .0

6 9 .0

1 6 .0

317.0
399-0

53.0

76.5
79-5

8 9 .0

1 8 .0

7 1 .0

7 8 .1

1 1 6 .0

2 9 .0

8 7 .0

77.5

6 0 2 .6

485.7
603.5

II6 .9

37.3
3b.3

79.6

1 0 2 .6

2 9 2 .8

6 3 .2

143.6
117-7

47.4
24.1

141.8

See n o ie a t end o f t a b l e .




2 2 .6

23.1
17-9
11.9
12.7

.O
133.0
1 8 3 .O

1 2 6 .0

1 9 1 .0

11.4

2 0 .2

63

2 2 1 .0

356.0

24.1

20

2 1 .0

7.0
5.0
5.0

7 0 6 .1

39.b

77.1
75.9

1930................
1931................
1932................
1933................
1931*................
1935................

1 9 ^ 0 ................
19^1................
1 9 ^ 2 ................
19*0................
1 9 UU................

13.3

69

1 1 8 .0

3 1 6 .0

Multifamily structures
3 -or-more
All
2 -family
family
_
__
..
__
__
—
—
—
-—
—
----

39.0
42.2
44.0
42.1
37.9
3 1 .2

8 .8

26.4
11.9
18.3
13.5

8.7
5.2
5*b
4.0
3.6

1 7 .2

23.5
20.5
21.9
22.5
19 A
l b .5

b3-l

8 2 .2

1 7 .8

75.2
.O

24.8
3-7*0

2 9 .6

13.5

10.4
1 0 .0

6 8 .8

85.5

1 0 .6

1 2 .2

73.6

6 8 .3

2 0 .1
1 7 .8

1 3 .8

8 0 .6

83

4.4
4.8
4.4

8.5
lb.O

.b
31.7
31.7
27-9
.b
17-7
6.7
12.9
9.5
13.6
22

19.1
1 5 .8

5 .6

17.5
16.9

6 .2

13 -2

4.8
5.6
9.3
7-5

9.7
1 2 .1

15.5
9-5

Table 1: New nonfarm dwelling units started: Totals, annually, 1889-1958; by type of structure^ annually, <19i)D?58-Continued

Year
19**5................
................
19V7................
1 9 1 * 8 ................
19^9................
191*6

Number of new dwelling units (in thousands)
Percent of new dwelling units in —
A ll
Multifamily structures
Multifamily structures
1-family
1-family
types of
houses
A ll
2-family 3-or-more houses
A ll
2-family 3-or-more
structures
family
family
8.8
1 8 U. 6
88.2
11.8
4.2
7.6
209.3
2U.7
1 5 .9
590.0
5 6 .2
88.0
12.0
8.4
3.6
6 7 0 .5
80.5
21*.3
81*9.0
7l*0.2
108.8
8 7 .2
12.8
4.0
8.8
33.9
7 1 * .9
7 6 6 .6
I 6 5 .O
1 1 8 .1
931.6
5.0
14-6.9
8 2 .3
17.7
12.7
1 ,0 2 5 .1
230.8
3.6
36.5
77.5
22.5
1 8 .9
79**-3
191**3

1950................
1951................
1952................
1953................
195b................

1,396.0
1,091.3
1,127.0
1 , 1 0 3 .8
1,220.1*

l,1 5 l*.l
900.1
9^2.5
937.8
1,077.9

1955................
1956................
1957................
1958................

1,328.9
1 ,1 1 8 .1
1,01*1.9
1,209.1*

1

195k................
1955................
1956................
1957..................
1958................
N o te :

1,220.1*
1,328.9
1 ,1 1 8 .1
1,01*1.9
1,209.1*

, 1 9 1 * . l*
989.7

21*1.9
1 9 1 .2
18 1

*. 5

1 6 6 .0
1

U .5
2

13***5
.*

128 1

8 7 2 .7

1 6 9 .2

97$.1

23U.3

1,077-9
l,19l*.i*
989.7

11*2.5
13**.5
128.1*

8 7 2 .7

1 6 9 .2

975.1

23U.3

1*1*.8
1*0.1*
1*5.9
1*1.5

1 9 7 .1
1 5 0 .8
1 3 8 .6

121*.5

8 5

3 1 * .2

1 0 8 .3

8 8 .3

3 2 .8

101.7
97-5
135.9
195.U
5 -or-more
family

30.9
33-3
38.9
2-to-l*
family
5 1 .9
1 9 .2

*
1*6.1*
51.8
62.9

.O

8 9 .9
8 8 .5
8 3 .8
8 0 ,6

9 0 .6

8 8 .3

8 5 .3
8 2 .0

89.9

17.3
17.5
1 6 .4
1 5 .0

11.7
10.1
11.5
1 6 .2

19.lt
11.7
10.1
11.5

.**

8 8 .5
8 3 .8

1 6 .2

171.1
*

8 0 .6

19.U

1 17

Because o f rounding, sum o f item s may n o t e qu al t o t a l s .




8 2 .7
8 2 .5
8 3 .6

3.2
3.7
4.1
3.7
2.8

14.1
13.8
12.3
11.3
8.9

2.5
2.8
3.2
3.2
2-to-4
family
4.3
3.7
4.2
5.0
5.2

7.6
8.7
1 3 .0

1 6 .2

5-or-more
family
7.4
6.4
7.3
11.3
14.2

IT

Table 2: New nonfarm dwelling units started: Private and public ownership, by type of structure, annually, 1935-58
N um ber o f

new

d w e llin g

u n its

(in

th o u sa n d s)

P r iv a te
Year

p r iv a te

T o ta l

2 2 1 .0

3o r-m o re

2A ll

h o u ses

fa m ily

pub­
lic

s tru c tu re s

1 -

A ll

h o u ses

y

3 3 .5

7 .7
1 3 .3

fa m ily

2 5 .8

6 5 .7
6 6 .6

5 2 .1 *

1 9 3 7 .....................

3 3 6 .0

3 3 2 . i*

2 3 8 .5
2 6 5 .8

1 9 3 8 ......................

1*0 6 . 0

3 9 9 .3

3 1 6 . 1*

8 2 .9

1 5 .3
1 8 .0

5 1 5 .0

1 * 5 8 .b

3 7 3 .0

8 5.k

1 9 .7

5 .3
l b .8

5 1 .3
6 1 * .9

1 9 3 9 ......................

6 5 .7

1 9 U0 ......................

6 0 2 .6

5 2 9 .6

bb7 .6

8 2 .0

2 5 .6

7 0 6 .1

5 3 3 .2

3 5 6 .0

2 5 2 .3

8 6 .3
1*8 . 9

28.b

1 9 1 * 2 ......................

6 1 9 .5
3 0 1 .2

2 k , 1

b .5

b .2

5 .5
1 .2

9 .3
2 .b

8 .6

.6

6 .1

1 .7
6 .1

2 6 .0

3 0 .6

2 1 .3

7 3 .0
8 6 .6

3 8 .1

3 b .9
1 6 .3

2 3 .2

7 0 .3

5b . 8

5 7 -9
3 1 .1 *

1 3 6 .3
111*. 6

3 .6

0 .8

6 .7
5 6 .6

5 6 . 1*

1 9 1 * 1 ......................

3/

3o r-m o re

fa m ily

fa m ily

1 8 2 .2

2 1 5 .7
30 U .2

3 1 9 .0

s tru c tu re s
T o ta l

fa m ily

& /

p u b lic

M u ltifa m ily

1 -

and

1 9 3 5 ......................
1 9 3 6 ......................

P u b lic
M u ltifa m ily

T o ta l,

b O .5

lb .3

1 1 .7

1 7 .5
1 7 .8

2 9 .6

7 .3

7 .3

0 0

1 0 .6

1 3 .5

3 .1

3 .1

1 0 .b

0 0

X9 U3 ......................

1 9 1 .0

1 8 3 .7

1 9 1 *1* ......................

1 1 *1 . 8

1 3 8 .7

1 9 ^ 5 ......................
1 9 1 * 6 ......................

2 0 9 .3

2 0 8 .1

1 8 1 * .6

2 3 .5

8 .8

(b )

1 .2

1 .2

6 6 2 .5
8 1 * 5 .6

5 9 0 .0

7 2 .5
10 5 .b

2b .3

li* .7
1*8 . 2

1 .2

6 7 0 .5
8 1 * 9 .0

8 .0

(b )

8 .0

8 .0

9 13 -5
9 8 8 .8

3 3 .9
b 6 .3

7 1-5
10 1* .0

3«b
1 8 .1

(b )
3 -b

3 -b

9 3 1 .6

3 -b
lb .l

3 b .7

1 6 1 .7

3 6 .3

1 .9

l b .7
3b .b

2 0 1 .5

b 2 .3

15 9 -2

b 3 .8

3 -b

b O .b

1 2 7 .9
12 9 .b

b O .b

8 7 .5

7 1 .2

7 .8

6 3 .b

b 5 -9
b l.5
3b . 2

8 3 .5
9 1 * .0

5 8 .5

1 3 5 .5
1 2 b .b

3 -b
5 .0

1 9 V 7 ......................
1 9 1 * 8 ......................
1 9 * * 9 ......................

1 ,0 2 5 .1

k

71*0 . 2
7 6 3 .2

1 5 0 .3
19 6 .b

7 9 2 .1 *

1 9 5 0 .....................

1 ,3 9 6 .0

1 , 3 5 2 .2

1 9 5 1 ......................
1 9 5 2 ......................

1 ,0 9 1 .3
1 , 1 2 7 .0

1 , 0 2 0 .1
1 , 0 6 8 .5

1 9 5 3 ......................

1 , 1 0 3 .8

1 , 0 6 8 .3

9 3 9 -1
9 3 2 .8

1 9 5 ^ ......................

1 , 2 2 0 . 1*

1 , 2 0 1 .7

1 ,0 7 7 - 3

1 9 5 5 ......................
1 9 5 6 . . . ..............

1 ,3 2 8 .9
1 , 1 1 8 .1

1 9 5 7 ......................
1 9 5 8 ......................

l . k

1 ,1 5 0 .7
8 9 2 .2

1 1 9 .5
1 1 3 .2

3 2 .8

8 6 .7

1 9 .b

b .b

1 5 .0

1 5 .0

3 0 .9

8 2 .3

2 b .2

9 .0

1 5 .2

l , 0U l .9

9 8 0 .7
8 1 * 0 .2

1 5 2 .6

3 3 .1

b 9 .1

1 5 .2
1 6 .b

1 ,1 1 * 1 .5

9 3 2 .5

20 9*0

3 8 .9

3 2 .5
b 2 .£

1 6 .6

1 ,2 0 9 .1 *

1 1 9 .5
1 7 0 .1

1 9 5 1* ......................

1 , 2 2 0 . 1*

1 , 2 0 1 .7

1 ,3 2 8 .9
1 , 1 1 8 .1

1 ,3 0 9 .5

1 9 5 7 ......................
1 9 5 8 ......................

1 ,0 1 * 1 .9

1 ,0 9 3 .9
9 9 2 .8

12 b . b

1 ,0 7 7 - 3
1 , 1 9 0 .0
9 8 0 .7
8 1 * 0 .2

2/
h art
17

1 , 2 0 9 . 1*

I n c lu d e s
(p ,

3 1).

I n c lu d e s

am endm ent t o

(p p .
3/

See

fo r

a ls o ,

6 2 ,0 9 0
th e

p r iv a te ly

ow ned

v o lu n ta r y
d e fin itio n s

p u b lic ly

re n ta l
(p .

ow ned u n i t s

N a t io n a l H o u sin g A c t ,

b u ilt

occupan cy b y

12)

fo r

(m a in ly

fo r

fa m ily
1 7 .7
lb .9

1 5 .2
1 6 .6

1 5 .9

2 5 .b

2 3 .3

2 b .2

9 .0

b 9 .1

3 2 .5

6 7 .9

m ilita r y

1 -fa m ily

1 8 .1
1 5 .0

1 1 *8 . 2

d e s c r ip tio n

a s s ig n e d

.6

6 7 .3
1 0 1 .5

d u r in g

1 9 U9 - 5 6 ,
and

U2 . S

under

h o u ses)

th e

b u ilt

d u r in g

lb .7

W h erry a m e n d m e n tto

d e fe n s e -c o n n e c te d

o f W h erry h o u sin g

o ccu p an cy b y m ilita r y

p
v

b .b

1 8 .7
1 9 .b

7 2 .9
7 0 . 1*

6 0 .8

2 0 9 .0

2 5 .3
5a y * . rU lV i
nnr
VI

5 1 .1

lo w - c o s t u n it s

2 5 .b

fa m ily

1* 5 . 9

1 5 2 .6

6 7 .9

5a
o y *«i yiv\y*e
r- n o ra

5 1 .5
1 * 9 .1

1 1 9 .5
1 1 3 .2

9 3 2 .5

1 ,1 1 * 1 .5

8 2 ,5 9 5

N a t io n a l H o u s in g A c t ,
lb

5 5 .1
30o5
1 8 .1

1 , 1 9 0 .0

1 9 5 5 ......................
1 9 5 6 ......................

ta b le

5 5 .1
3 0 .5
1 8 .1

1 , 3 0 9 .5

2 - to - l*

th e

3 7 .9
6 3 .b

1 , 0 9 3 .9
9 9 2 .8

fa m ily

l/

3 2 .6

.6

3 5 .5
1 8 .7

9 0 .2

0 0
(b )

p e r s o n n e l.

See

p ro g ram .
19 5 6 -5 8 *

p e r s o n n e l.

under

See

th e

ta b le s

Cape15

and

32 an d 3b, r e s p e c t i v e l y ) . S e e a l s o , d e f in it io n s (p . i 2 ) , f o r d e s c r ip t io n o f C a p e h a rt h o u sin g p ro g ra m .
T h e n u m b e r o f u n i t s i n 2 - f a m i l y a n d 2 - t o - b f a m i l y s t r u c t u r e s w a s t o o s m a ll t o sh ow s e p a r a t e l y .

]
F ew er th a n
N o te :
B ecau se

%




50 u n i t s .
o f r o u n d in g ,

su m o f

ite m s

m ay n o t

equal

to ta ls .

18

Table 3: Hew nonfarm dwelling units started: Totals, monthly, 1939-58; and by private and public ownership, monthly, 1949-58
N um ber o f
Year

Jan.

Feb.

M ir .

A p r.

M ay

n ew d w e l l i n g
June

u n its

J u ly

A ug.

T o ta l- - P r iv a te
1 9 3 9 ...................
1 9 * * 0 ...................

3 2 .3
2 7 .0

3 0 .7
3 4 .8

1*2 . 9

1 * 2 .9

5 3 .3

4 6 .8

5 6 .5

5 7 .7

7** • 5
4 8 .8

1 9 U1 ...................

4 1 .2

1 * 3 .7

5 9 .6

1 9 * * 2 ...................

3 2 .8

51-6

X 9 * * 3 ...................
19 ****...................

9 -5
1 2 .2

5 1-3
1 0 .2

17 -4

1 1 .8

l l * .0

1 9 * * 5 ...................
1 9 U6 ...................

7 .9
4 2 .4

1 0 .6

3 7 .5

6 2 .0

3 9 -3

4 2 .8

5 6 .0

5 0 .1

7 6 .1 *

1 9 * * 9 ...................

5 3 -5
5 0 .0

5 0 . 1*

6 9 . 1*

8 8 .3

1 9 5 0 ...................

7 8 .7

8 2 .9

1 9 5 1 ...................
1 9 5 2 ...................

8 0 .6

117 -3
9 3 .8

1 3 3 . *l
9 6 .2

1 9 5 3 ...................

8 5 .9
6 4 .9
7 2 .1

7 7 .7
7 9 -2

1 0 3 .9
1 0 5 .8

1 9 5 * 1 ...................

6 6 .4

75 -2

9 5 -2

1 9 5 5 ...................
1 9 5 6 ...................

8 7 .6

8 9 .9
7 8 . 1*

1 9 * * 7 ...................
1 9 1 * 8 ...................

1 9 5 7 ...................
1 9 5 8 ...................

7 -0

7 5 -1
61* . 2
6 7 .9

1* 5 . 9 '
5 0 .0 »

6 9 .7

7 3 .7
2 3 .0

2 5 .9
1 9 .6

15 -3
13 -0

th o u sa n d s)

S e p t.

O c t.

N ov.

4 4 .2

5 1 .2

4 2 .4

5 7 .4

5 6 .5
6 9 .6

5 7 .8

1 * 2 .9
6 6 .0

4 5 .1

4 1 .2 !
4 3 -* ;
3 2 .8 !

7 0 6 .1

6 5 .O

5 6 .1

2 3 .4

2 2 .8

2 2 .2

1 6 .7

1 5 .2 !

3 5 6 .0

2 0 .1
1 1 .5

1 6 .3
9 -6

1 8 .3

1 3 .0

1 5 .9
9 .2

1 3 .1
7 .2

1 9 1 .0
ll* 1 . 8

1 7 .1
6 5 .4

2 9 .1

2 0 9 .3
6 7 0 .5
8 U9 .O

7 3 -6

1 2 . 1*

1 4 .6

1 8 .6

1 7 .0

6 7 .1

6 4 .1

6 2 .6

6 7 -1

7 2 .9

7 7 .2

8 1 .1

8 6 .3

9 9 -5

1 0 0 .3

9 7 .8

9 5 .0

9 5 .5

9 6 .1

8 6 .7
9 9 .0

2 0 .1

9 -7
2 5 .6

5 7 .6

5 7 .8

2 9 .3
4 7 .7

9 3 -8

9 4 .0

7 9 .7

8 2 .3

6 3 .7

5 2 .9

9 3 1 .6

1 0 2 .9

7 3 -4
1 0 4 .3

9 5 .5

7 8 .3

1 ,0 2 5 .1

9 3 .6
6 0 .8

11*9 . 1

11*1* . 3

1 4 4 .4

1 4 1 .9

1 2 0 .6

1 0 2 .5

8 7 .3

1 0 1 .0

1 3 2 .5

8 9 .1

9 6 .4

9 0 .0

1 0 6 .2

1 0 9 .6

1 0 0 .8

1 0 1 .0

1 0 8 .3

9 9 .1
9 3 -2

7 4 .5
8 6 .1

1 1 1 . 1*

10 3 -5
1 0 1 * .6

9 0 .5
1 0 2 .6

9 5 .1

9 0 .1

1 0 8 .5

1 1 6 .5

1 1 4 .3

1 1 3 .8

10 7 -7
1 3 2 .0

1 3 7 .6

1 3 * 1 .5

1 1 0 .7
1 0 5 .8

9 8 .6

1 1 1 . 1*

1 0 7 .* *

1 2 2 .7
1 0 1 .1

1 1 5 .7
1 1 4 .9
9 3 .9

9 3 .6

9 9 .9
1 1 2 .9

6 5 .8

8 7 .0

9 3 .7

8 1 .4

9 9 .1

1 0 8 .5

5 1 5 .0
6 0 2 .6

2 2 .3
1 7 .6

6 7 .0

6 6 .1

to ta l

4 8 .5
4 6 .6

1 7 .7
1 5 .2

1 1 3 .7
1 0 3 .0

A nnual

D ec.

an d p u b lic

1 5 .4

9 5 . *i

Ci n

9 6 .7
1 1 6 .0

1 2 4 .7

3 9 .3
5 8 .8

1 ,3 9 6 .0
1 ,0 9 1 .3
1 , 1 2 7 .0

8 1 .5
1 0 3 .6

7 1 .5
6 5 .8

1 , 1 0 3 .8

9 0 .6

1 , 2 2 0 . 1*

8 9 .2

7 6 .2

7 7 .4

6 3 .6

1 ,3 2 8 .9
1 , 1 1 8 .1

9 7 .8

1 0 3 .9
1 0 0 .0

9 1 .9

9 7 .0

7 8 .2

6 3 .4

1 , 0 U1 . 9

1 1 2 .8

1 2 4 .0

1 2 1 .0

1 1 5 .0

1 0 9 .4

9 1 .2

1 ,2 0 9 .1 *

P r iv a te
1 9 *i0 ...................

2 1* . 1

1 9 * i l ...................
1 9 U2 ...................

3 6 .5
2 7 .8

1 9 * i 3 . , ................
1 9 *1*1...................

9 -3
1 2 .2

1 9 * i 5 ...................
1 9 * 1 6 ...................

7 .0
3 6 .9
3 8 .2

5 2 .1 *

5 3 .0

6 1 .6
1*2 . 0

6 5 .1
2 0 . 1*

1 5 .2

1 8 .9

1 2 .8

7 .5
1*2 . 1*

1 3 .* i
1 0 .6

1 2 . 1*

1 4 .7
1 4 .6

6 2 .0

6 7 .0

6 7 .1

1*2 . 8

5 6 .0

7 2 .9
9 9 .2
9 1 .2

3 0 .9
3 5 -2

H 3 -7
5 1-2

3 5 -5
9 .8

1* 7 -7
ll* .9

1 1 .7

1 9 * i 7 ...................
1 9 1 * 8 ...................

5 2 .5

1 * 8 .9

7 6 .3

6 7 .1
9 8 .1

1 9 * i 9 ...................

1*6 . 3

1 * 7 .8

6 5 .3

8 5 .O

1 9 5 0 ...................

7 7 .8
8 2 .2

8 2 .3

1 1 6 .0

1 3 1 .3

7 6 .5

9 0 .2

9 2 .3
9 7 .0

1 9 5 1 ...................
1 9 5 2 ...................

6 1 . 1*

1 9 5 3 ...................

6 8 .2

7 * 1 .3
7 3 -8

9 1 .1
9 6 .I

1 9 5 * 1 ...................
1 9 5 5 ...................
1 9 5 6 ...................

6 5 .1

7 3 -9

8 7 .3

8 7 .9
7 7 .0

9 3 .2
1 1 2 .8

1 9 5 7 ...................
1 9 5 8 ...................

7 3 -7
6 0 .1
6 2 .9

6 3 .1
6 1 .0

7 7 .0

5 0 .4

5 2 .0

3 8 .2

5 1 .0

4 1 .8

3 3 .5
3 0 .0

2 0 .7

2 1 .6

5 3 .8
2 1 .6

1 8 .1

1 6 .7
1 2 .4

1 9 .6

1 6 .3

1 8 .0

1 4 .5
1 4 .4

1 3 .0

1 8 3 .7

1 1 .1

7 .2

1 7 .0

9 -7
2 5 .6

9 .0

1 6 .6

9 .U
2 0 .1

2 9 .1

6 1 .3
8 1 .1

6 1 .9
8 6 .1

5 7 .6

5 6 .5

9 3 -5

9 3 .5

2 9 .3
4 7 .7
7 8 .9

1 3 8 .7
2 0 8 .1

8 5 .1
9 6 .6

8 0 .5
1 0 0 .6

7 1 .9
1 0 1 .9

6 1 .3
9 3 .4

1 3 7 .8

1 1 6 .1

1 0 0 .8

9 5 .3
9 9 .2
9 2 .1

8 8 .9
9 9 .2

8 2 .7
7 2 .2

9 0 .1

7 9 .9

6 4 .5

1 ,0 6 8 .3

1 1 3 .4

1 0 3 .3
8 8 .4

8 9 .9

1 ,2 0 1 .7

1 1 3 .6

1 1 0 .5
1 0 4 .8
9 1 .2
8 8 .4

7 7 .0

7 3 .5
6 2 .9

7 5 .7
1 0 7 .0

6 2 .5

1 ,0 9 3 .9
9 9 2 .8

8 9 .5

1 ,1 4 1 .5

1 0 .3
4 .8

1 0 .1
2 .8

7 3 -0
8 6 .6

2 .2

2 .6

5 4 .8

1 .5
.2

.1

7 .3

9 6 .6

9 3 .7

9 1 .0

9 2 .7

1 4 3 .4

1 3 9 .7
8 6 .8

9 6 .9
1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .1

8 8 .3
9 7 .4

9 6 .4

9 2 .2

1 1 2 .6
1 3 1 .4

1 1 2 .9
1 2 1 .9

1 1 3 .0
1 2 2 .3

1 0 4 .6

9 9 .0

1 0 3 .2

9 4 .5
1 0 1 .3

9 3 .9
1 0 8 .6

9 6 .8

9 0 .7
9 0 .2

1 1 4 .6

1 1 0 .9

1 1 2 .9

5 .3
8 .4

7 .^
1 1 .2

1 4 .0

1 0 5 .6
1 0 7 .4

1 0 6 .5

1 3 5 .1
1 1 0 .8

1 3 0 .5

7 9 .3

1 5 .1
1 8 .3
6 2 .8

5 1 .2
6 1 .2

1 0 1 .0

1 0 7 .1 *

7 7 .3

1 8 .7
1 7 .6

5 2 .4
6 8 .0

1 4 5 .7
9 7 .6

1 0 9 .9
9 1 .U
91* . 2

9 3 -9

4 7 .«
6U . 1

9 6 .9
1 0 1 .3

9 0 .3

8 2 .3

5 2 9 .6
6 1 9 .5
3 0 1 .2

1 2 .6

6 6 2 .5
8 4 5 .6

3 9 .3
5 8 .5
4 9 .4

9 1 3 .5
9 8 8 .8

7 7 .0
7 8 .6

1 , 3 5 2 .2

5 9 .5
6 7 .6

1 , 0 2 0 .1
1 , 0 6 8 .5

1 ,3 0 9 .5

P u b lic
1 9 1 * 0 ...................

2 .9

3 -9

1 9 1 * 1 ...................
1 9 U2 ...................

4 .7
5 -0

8 .5
15-8

1 9 * i 3 ...................

.2

.4

19 ****...................

(1 )

.1

1 9 * i 5 ...................
1 9 1 * 6 ...................

(1 )
.6

.4

1 9 * i 7 ...................
1 9 1 * 8 ...................

1 .1

1 9 * i 9 ...................

4 .7
4 .6

2 .2

5 .0

9 .6

5 .5
•7

4 .3
.1

5 .6
1 .6

.7

.1
.2

•5
.4

(1 )
.2

•3

.4

.1

(1 )

1 .3

3 .5
.2

(1 )

(1 )

(1 )

(1 )

1 .0

(1 )
.1

(1 )
1 .4

(1 )
1 .1

1 .2

3 .7

2 .6

4 .1

3 .3

4 .2

4 .5

1-3
3 -6
1 2 .8

2 .1

3 .4

3 .9
9 .2
4 .0

3 .4
8 .6

.6
4 .1

3 -5

3 -4

1 9 5 3 ...................

3 -9

5 -4

1 9 5 * i ...................

1 .3
-3
1 .4

1-3
2 .0
1 .4

4 .1

2 .7

5 -0

5 -1

1/
F ew er th a n
N o te :
B ecause

4 -7

1 .5

7 -7
4 .1

2 .3

2 .9
6 .1

4 .9

7 .2

and

becau se

•3
(1 )
(1 )
1 .3
.5

1 .3
3 .4

1 .6

•3
1 .8

2 .4

2 .3

1 .5
2 .4

.9
4 2 .2

4 .7

4 .1

3 .7

.8

4 .5
1 .1

1 .7
1 .1

6 .6

1 .5

(1 )

U )
(1 )
.8
2 .4

3 6 .3

4 .6

1 5 .0

4 3 .8

2 .3
3 .8
1 .6

1 .3

7 1 .2

1 .9

3 .0

3 .9
3 .1
2 .8

3 .1
.8

1 .3
2 .4

2 .3

(1 )
.2

2 .1

1 .0
2 .4

5 .4
1 1 .6

3 .9
4 .2

.7
3 .2

1 .3
3 .2
1 .7

8 .6

9 .4

1 0 .1

2 .1

2 .4

to o

s m a ll

to

sh ow

8 .0

1 .3

1 .6

a m o u n ts

(1 )

2 .1

1 .7
1 .0

in c lu d e

3 .1
1 .2
3 .4
1 8 .1

•3

to ta ls

(1 )

(1 )

3 .5

2 .6

2 .5

1 .0 *

50 u n it s .
o f r o u n d in g ,

equal to ta ls .




1 .2
1 .5

1 .3
.2

2 .7
1 .1

9 -7
2 .0

5 .1
4 .1

1 .2

.1

(l)

1 .8

•9
.6

(1 )
1 .2

-9

m ay n o t

3 -9
2 -5
.6

.

(1 )

3 -7

ite m s

. l

(1 )

1 9 5 1 ...................
1 9 5 2 ...................

1 9 5 7 ...................
1 9 5 8 ...................

k

1 2 .9
6 .8

(1 )

1 9 5 0 ...................

1 9 5 5 ...................
1 9 5 6 ...................

3 -1
8 .4

.3

3 .9

5 8 .5

1 .3
.7

3 5 .5

2 .7

1 8 .7
1 9 .4

.4

.7

2 4 .2

2 .5

.9

4 9 .1

1 .7

6 7 .9

.3
.8

s e p a r a te ly ,

su m o f

19

Table 4: Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: Seasonally adjusted annual rates, monthly, 1946-58
N um ber o f
Jan.

Feb.

new

p r iv a te

M ar.

d w e llin g

A p r.

u n its :

M ay

S e a s o n a lly

June

J u ly

a d ju s te d
A ug.

1 9 U6 ...................

& jk

706

T J k

710

1 9 ^ 7 ...................
1 9 W ...................

690

717
8 13

7 0 1*

1 9 * * 9 ...................
1 9 5 0 ...................

800

1 ,0 2 7
892

997
911

1 ,3 1 0

779
1 ,3 0 0

699
950
803
1 ,1 * 0 5

1 ,3 8 2

l,* * 5 7

1 9 5 1 ..................
1 9 5 2 ...................

1 ,1 7 1
1 ,1 1 2

1 ,0 7 1
1 ,0 7 2

975
1 ,0 2 8

981*

9b l

1 ,0 0 1

1 ,0 2 9

1 ,0 1 6

1 , 131*
1 ,1 1 6

1 ,0 8 3
1 ,1 0 2

1 ,0 7 1
1 ,1 8 0

1 ,0 3 6
1 ,2 2 0

1 ,0 0 7
1 ,2 2 6

1 ,3 6 3

1 ,3 8 1

1 ,3 7 2

1 ,3 1 6

1 , 11 *6

1 ,0 9 1

1 ,0 7 0

991*

995

1 ,0 3 9

1 ,0 5 7

928

1 ,3 6 0

1 9 5 3 ...................

1 , 10 1*

1 ,0 9 2

1 ,1 2 8

1 9 5 1* ...................

1 ,0 5 1

1 ,1 0 0

1 ,1 0 3

1 9 5 5 ...................
1 9 5 6 ...................

1 , 1* 10

1 ,3 2 b

1 ,1 9 5
962

1 ,1 2 7

1 ,3 ^ 9
1 ,0 9 1 *

935

933

1 ,1 5 7
962

1 ,0 2 0

9 15

9 18

983

1 9 * 7 ...................
1 9 5 8 ...................




689
71*0

annual
S e p t.

656

61+1

61*3

605

797

81+3

993

975
961+

899
897
1 ,0 2 8

993
863
1 ,0 9 2

1 , 1+68

1 ,U 8 6

1 ,2 7 1

918

961

1 ,0 8 0

1 ,0 6 6

1 ,0 5 b
1 ,1 0 1

935
1 , 1+82

ra te

(in

th o u sa n d s)

O c t.

N ov.

6 13
1 ,0 3 1
802

6 11*

6b8

1 ,0 2 7
806

963

l,lb 9
l,lb 2

D ec.

1 ,2 4 1 *

8 13
1 ,2 6 6

1 ,1 0 7

1 ,2 9 2

1 ,0 1 2

970

973

1 , 10 1*

1 ,0 9 7

1 ,0 2 9

1 ,1 3 1
1 ,0 3 b

1 ,0 6 8

1 ,2 7 3

1 ,2 7 5

1 ,3 7 6

1 ,0 3 9
l,b b 3

1 ,3 1 1
1 ,1 3 6

1 ,2 8 5
1 ,0 0 8

1 , 2 1b

1 ,1 7 6

1 ,0 5 2

1 ,0 2 7

1 ,0 1 5

1 ,0 5 6

1 ,0 1 2

1 ,0 2 0

1 ,0 0 9

1 ,0 0 0

1 ,1 7 b

1 ,2 2 8

1 ,2 2 5

1 ,3 0 3

1 ,1 * 2 7

l,b 3 2

1 ,1 7 b
1 ,0 2 0

20

Table 5: New nonfarm dwelling units started: by Type of structure, monthly, 1940-58
T o ta l
Year

Jan.

Feb.

M ar.

A p r.

num ber o f
M ay

n ew

June

d w e llin g
J u ly

1 - fa m ily
1 9 4 0 ................

1 9 .3

2 5 .8

3 7 -7

b 5 .6

4 7 .2

4 3 .2

1 9 4 1 ................

3 5 -7
3 7 .6

5 0 .3
b b .6

6 3 .0

5 9 -5
2 2 .8

6 3 .0

1 9 4 2 ................

3 2 .3
2 7 .0

1 9 4 3 ................
1 9 4 4 ................

7 .0

8 .5

lb .b

H -5

1 0 .1

9 -9
6 .b

1 1 .8

1 0 .5
1 0 .1

6 .1

1 9 4 5 ................
1 9 4 6 ................

9 -0

4 0 .0

th o u sa n d s)
O c t.

N ov.

D ec.

A nnual
to ta l

h ou ses

b 8 .9
63.b

b 8 .2

b 6 .2

b 9 .6

6 1 .b

b 9 -8

19 -9

15 -0

19 -9
1 3 .2

1 7 .6

5 8 .0
1 9 .2

13 -5

1 3 .7

1 1 .6

1 2 .3

1 2 .4

11-3

8 .2

1 6 .7

lb .5
5 5 -6

9 -5
1 5 .b

3 9 -2
3 8 .8

3 5 -0 1

4 8 5 .7

2 8 .3
1 2 .b

6 0 3 .5
2 9 2 .8

1 2 .5
8 .0

13 -5
1 2 .7
7-6

1 0 .0

1 4 3 .6

6 .1

1 8 .2

2 3 .1

2 6 .b

2 5 .8

1 1 7 .7
1 8 4 .6

5 1-9

5 0 .7
8 0 .1

b 3 .6

3 5 -0

5 9 0 .0

6 7 -3

7 4 0 .2

6 2 .0

5 2 .5
7 7 -b

b 9 -9
b l.l
6 1 .1

7 9 4 .3

1 8 .3

3 2 .4

3 7 -5

5 4 .2

5 9 .9

1 2 .9
5 8 .8

3 9 -1
3 8 .2

4 9 .9
6 2 .5

6 0 .5

6 5 .8

4 2 .2

8 3 .9

7 8 .3

7b .8

8 0 .7
6 9 .b

3 9 -7

5 b .5

7 9 .5
6 9 .6

6 7 .3
8 2 .2

3 7 .1

1 9 ^ 9 ................

71-9

7 2 .1

7 b .3

7 6 .9

7 7 -7

1 1 7 .3
7 7 .6

1 0 0 .8

8 7 .7

6 7 -9
5 1 .6

8 5 .8

8 6 .5
8 1 .0

7 9 .5
8 7 .b

7 1-5
6b .0

1 ,1 5 4 .1

8 1 .6

7 2 .1

7 9 -3
1 0 0 .3

7 0 .3
9 2 .8

5 8 .5
5 3 -8

9 4 2 .5
9 3 7 .8

80.b

7 9 -5
6 8 .5
5 3 -b

1 ,0 7 7 .9
1 ,1 9 4 .4

5 5 -3

7 0 .5

1 9 5 0 ................

6 2 .b

6 8 .2

9 5 .4

1 1 0 .6

1 2 4 .8

1 2 4 .9

1 2 2 .6

1 9 5 1 ................
1 9 5 2 ................

7 1 .1
5 4 .0

6 7 .3

7 8 .b

8 2 .9

8 5 .9

8b .2

7 6 .0

6 5 -7

7 9 .6
8b .8

5 3 -1

6 5 .1
6 4 .7

8 9 -7
9 3 -6

8 7 .0

1 9 5 3 ................
1 9 5 4 ................

8 5 .7
9b .b

8 3 .2

9 6 .1

7 8 .9
6 9 .1

1 0 0 .1

119 -9
1 0 0 .1

9 7 -7
1 2 2 .2

5 4 .3
5 3 .0

75 -7

5 9 .6

1 9 5 5 ................
1 9 5 6 ................

7 8 .3

1 9 5 7 ................
1 9 5 8 ................

5 3 .4

6 6 .9
Sw O

8 6 .1
6 5 .1

8 0 .3
7 8 .8

1 9 4 0 ................

7*7

9 -0

9 -1

1 0 .9

1 9 4 1 ................

8 .0
13 -7

9 -3
7 -0

11-5
8 .8
3 -8

9 0 .0

1 0 1 .6

8 1 .5
1 0 3 .0

1 2 1 .8

1 1 3 .5

1 1 1 .6

1 0 3 .9
10 b .1

9 3 -2
8 2 .3

8 2 .9

9 5 -1
8 1 .8

7 8 .2

7 8 .8

6 7 -7
6b . 9

1 0 2 .9

9 8 .9

9 5 .0

8 5 .1

9 6 .5

9 0 .7

8 2 .7

8b . 3
9 0 .6

8 7 .5

1 0 .5
1 0 .2

1 9 4 2 ................

8 .9
5 .8

1 9 4 3 ................
1 9 4 4 ................

2 .5
2 .1

1 .7

3 -0

1-9

2 .2

2 .5

•9

1-5

1 .6

2 .3

b .9
3 -7

7 .8

7 -1
6 .6

13 -9
lb .9
2 1 .9
1 5 -b

1 9 4 7 ................
1 9 4 8 ................

1 1 .3

11-9

1 9 4 9 ................

1 2 .9

1 0 .7

1 9 5 0 ................

1 6 .3
l b .8

b .3

lb .7
13 -3
1 2 .0

6 .1

1 9 5 1 ................
1 9 5 2 ................

1 0 .9

1 9 5 3 ................
1 9 5 4 ................

1 2 .5

lb .l

1 3 .3

1 9 5 5 ...............
1 9 5 6 ................

9 -3
8 .2

1 0 .5
1 1 .0

13 -7

9 -3

1 2 .5

1 9 5 7 ...............
1 9 5 8 ...............

1 0 .8

11-5
jL 3 a

11-3
1 6 .3

13*9

2b .3
2 1 .0
1 2 .0

o th e r
6 .8

1 0 .7

1-7

5 .1

9 3 .7
a ll

3 -1

1 9 4 5 ................
1 9 4 6 ................

8 .7
1 0 .2

8 .3
8 .2

9 -3
7-8

3 .6

3 -9
5 -8

3 -2

1 .7

2 .0
1 .7

9 -9
15 -6

1 0 .6

1 0 .3
1 2 .2

2 0 .0

8 .3
7 -1
1 6 .b

2 .5
7 .0

1 8 .7

2 3 -5

2 3 .b

1 6 .7
2 1 .8

11-9
2 2 .1

2 2 .8

2b .3

1 9 .b

2 1 .8

2b .6

19 -8

13 -3
2 0 .5
17 -0

1 5 .1

b 8 .3

1 1 .5

lb .8

1 9 .9
lb .7
1 0 .8

1 6 .5
lb .6

lb .5
1 2 .1
1 2 .3
lb .b

13 -3
1 1 .7

lb .3
lb .l

1 1 .3

9 .2
10 .b

13 -1
1 0 .7

1 1 .0

1 3 .5
2 2 .2

1 7 .7
2 1 .1

1 3 .7
2 2 .1

11-3
13 -b
2 0 .3

15 -b
1 2 .b
1 6 .5
2 1 .0

lb .5
1 2 .7
1 0 .9
1 7 .2
1 9 .3
in

2 -fa m ily

T X

2T

2 .5

” ""T X

b .O

2 .7

3 -6

2 .2

2 .8

3*3

3 .7

1 9 4 2 ................

1 .7

2 .9

3 -3
1 .1

3 -1
1 .2

1 9 4 3 ................
1 9 4 4 ................

•9

.7

2 .7
1 .1

3 -2
1 .2
1 .8

1 .8

1 .6

1 .0

1 .2

1 .5
1 .1

1 .0

•9

-9
2 .b

-9
2 .b

-9
3 -0

1 .5
.6

3 .1

1 9 4 5 ................
1 9 4 6 ................

.2

-5
.b

1 .3

1 .6

1 9 4 7 ................
1 9 4 8 ................

1 .5
2 .9

1 .6

2 .2

2 .8

3 -1

2 .5

b .6

3 -2
b .l

2 .7

1-9

2 .5

5 -3
3 -6

b .2

1 9 4 9 ................

7-7
3 -b

3 -0

1 9 5 0 ................

2 .9
3 -b
3 .0

2 .9
3 -b

5 -0
b .6

b .O

b .b

1 9 5 1 ................
1 9 5 2 ................

3 -0

3 -b

1 9 5 3 ................
1 9 5 4 ................

3 -1
2 .2

3 -b

1 9 5 5 ................
1 9 5 6 ................

2 .2

2 .3
2 .6

b .3
3 -8
2 .8

3 -9
b .b

2 .2

2 .b

2 .0
2 .h




6 .3

1-9
8 .8

1 9 4 1 ................

b .3

b .3
b .O

3 -1

3 -0
3 -3

3 -1
2 .8

2 .b

3 -7
3 -0
2 .6

3 -0

3 -1
2 .8

2 .U

2 .9

3 .$

3 .6

:ee n o t e a t end o f t a b l e .

1 6 .b

7 .0

3 .5
6 .b

U n its
“

1 1 .6

b .7
b .l

3 -1

3 -1
b .6

5 1 .3
7 0 .5

7 6 6 .6

9 0 0 .1

9 8 9 .7
8 7 2 .7
9 7 5 .1

( m u ltifa m ily ) s t r u c t u r e s

b .5
2 .8

1 1 .6
1 2 .1

8 2 .0

1 0 2 .0

8 6 .5

in

5 5 -1
7 b .1

9 0 .5
8b .b

1 0 1 .3

U n its

1 9 5 7 ...............
1 9 5 8 ................

(in
S e p t.

3 5 .0

1 9 4 7 ................
1 9 4 8 ................

1 9 4 0 ................

u n its

A ug.

.7
2 .2

b .7
l.b

3 -2

8 .6

1 1 6 .9

b .5
2 .8

1 0 2 .6

3 -1
1 .1

4 7 .4
2 4 .1

3 -3

2 4 .7

b .3

8 0 .5
1 0 8 .8

6 3 .2

1-7

1 .6

1 .9
5 .7

2 .5

2 .9
b .l

1 3 .1
1 2 .9

13 -9
1 1 .b

1 1 .2

8 .9
1 1 .8

2 5 .2

2 2 .3

1 8 .1

1 7 .2

2 3 0 .8

l b .8

1 5 .8

13 -7
1 0 .8

1 0 .5
lb .O
1 1 .2

2 5 .7
9 .2
1 3 .0

2 4 1 .9

1 0 .5

1 2 .0

1 1 .8

10 .b

1 0 .8

1 1 .1

1 6 6 .0
1 4 2 .5

1 0 .8

1 0 .7
1 1 .8

8 .8
9 .7

7 .7
1 0 .2

1 3 4 .5
1 2 8 .4

1 8 .2

1 3 .3

1 2 .1

1 6 9 .2

2 0 .0

2 b .3

2 0 .7

2 3 U .3

b .2

2 .8

2 .b

3 7 .3

2 .8

1-9
l.b

1 .6

3 4 .3
2 0 .1

7 -1

1 2 .b

I 6 5 .O

1 9 1 .2
1 8 4 .5

stru c tu re s
3*5
3 -0

b .5
3 -b

•9
2 .2

1 .2

l.b

1 .8

1-9
.8

.7
.6
2 .0

.6
.7
2 .0

.8

l.b
.7
1 .0

1-3
1 .1
.6

1 7 .8
1 0 .6

l . l

8 .8

1-3
2 .8

2 4 .3

3 -3

3 -3
3 .9
2 .8

3 -3
3 -2

2 .8

3 -3
3 -2

1 .7
3 -b
2 .b

b .O

3 -b

3 -2

3 6 .5

b .l

b .6

b .3

3 -b

3 -b

3 -3
3 -8

3 -b

3 .8

3 -5
3 -8

2 .9
2 .6

2 -9
2 .b

4 0 .4

3 .5

3 -1
b .O

3 -3

4 5 -9

3*b

3 -9

3 -2

2 .9

2 .9
3 -0
2 .6

3 -1

3 -1

3 -1

4 1 .5
3 4 .2
3 0 .9

2 .5
3 .b

1-9

2 .8

3 3 -9
4 6 .9

b .7
3 .2

3 -5

3 -b
2 .8

2 .7
2 .b

2 .8
2 .b

2 .5

2 .6

2 .3
2 .1

4 4 .8

2 .7

2 .7

3 -1
2 .b

2 .5

2 .b

3 -3

2 .7
2 .8

2 .7

3 .0

3 -3

2 .8

2 .6

3 3 -3

3 .0

3 .1

3 .3

3 .U

3 .7

3 .9

3 .2

3 8 .9

3 2 .8

21

Table 5: New nonfarm dwelling units started: by Type of structure, monthly, 1940-58*-Continued
T o ta l
Year

num ber o f new d w e llin g

Jan.

Feb.

M ar.

A p r.

M ay

6 .3
6 .7

6 .7
5 .2

6 .6
6 .0

7 .5
7 .8

6 .5
7 .0

U .l
1 .6

1 0 .3

U .3

5 .7

1 9 l * 3 ................

1 .0

2 .3

1 .9
2 .8

191*1*................

1 .1

l.U

2 .1

1 9 1 * 5 ................
1 9 ) 4 6 ................

.7

l.U
l . l

1 .9
1 .0

.8

3 .8
2 .8

3 .3
2 .1

5 .)*

k

3 .9

3 .8

5 .3
l* .o

8 .1 *

9 .U
8 .8

9 .3
1 2 . 1*

1 2 .3

1 1 .8
9 .9

1 6 .1

June

U n its
1 9 U 0 ................
1 9 1 * 1 ................
1 9 l * 2 ................

1 9 1 * 7 ................
1 9 l t 8 ................
1 9 1 * 9 ................

1 0 .2

1 9 5 0 ................

1 3 .U
11. U

1 9 5 1 ................
1 9 5 2 ................
1 9 5 3 ................

5 .2

2 .0

3 .5

2 .6

2 .U

2 .7

i* .2

1 .3

2 .5
.8

.9

.9

1 .3

1 .8

1 .3
1 .1

2 .9
.8
1 .2

6 .3

1 * .3

8 .3

1 .7
5 .2

1 1 .1

6 .5
U .l*

7 .1 *
1 2 .6

8 .9
8 .6

1 5 .3

1 9 .9

2 0 .1 *

1 9 .0

1 8 .9

1 6 .9

1 8 .8

1 9 .9

1 5 .3

1 7 .2

9 .U

1 2 .1
1 5 .6

1 5 .0
*

2 0 .3
8 .1*

1 2 .7
1 1 .2

1 1 .1
8 .6
8 .1*

1 1 .6

1 1 .3

.7

l . h
. l

1 7 .2

1 2 .7

8 .2
8 .U

9 .2

1 0 .0

8 .5
9 .0

1 2 .1

9 .7

6 .5

6 .0
8 .8

6 .9

9 .5

8 .5

9 .3

8 .3

7 .7

9 .1

8 .7

1 0 .U

1 3 .7

1 3 .9

1 1 .5

1 0 .7

13 .U

1 6 .8

17 .

1 6 .3

1 0 .7
7 .3

k

1 3 .5
1 5 .9
5 6 .2

3 .0

3 .7
9 .8

1 0 .6

2 .U
9 .0

6 .1

9 .0

8 .2

8 .3

9 .0

7 1 * .9
1 1 8 .1

2 2 .U

1 3 .3

1 U .7

1 U .0

1 9 1 * .3

16 .u

ll.U
7 .0

1 2 .9

2 2 .8
6 .8

1 9 7 .1
1 5 0 .8

9 .7

1 3 8 .6

1 1 .0

7 .9

7 .1

8 .1

9 7 .5

1 0 .7

1 0 .7

1 U .9

1 0 .5

9 .5

1 3 5 .9

1 9 .1

1 7 .3

1 8 .7

1 6 .3

20. U

1 7 .5

1 9 5 .1 *

2 - to - l*

fa m ily

. l

l* .l*

3 .9

3 .9

1*.8

5 .1

1*.2

5 .1

5 .3

in

.5
2 .2

9 .3

k

5 .6

1 .9

8 .3

k . 6

5 .2

1 * 3 .1
2 9 .6

8 .U
8 .6

k

h . 9

1 .5
2 .0

7 .7

U .U

U .O

1 .8

8 .7

3 .9

3 .9

2 .5
3 .9

8 .2
1 0 .1*
8 .2
1 5 .0

l* .l*

. l

6 8 .3

1 0 .6
8 .U
8 .0
6 .U

U .3

3 .7

7 9 .6

2 .9

9 .9

k . k

3 .2

6 .2

5 .9
1 .8

7 .3

5 .1

3 .5

6 .5

3 .5

9 .6

h .2

. l

1 2 .2

1 0 .9

. l

5 .0

7 .1
3 .6

9 .3

k

k

A nnual
to ta l

8 .5

U .6

3 .5
3 .9
3 .6

U n its

5 - o r -m o re

9 .1

12 1*. 5

8 .0

1 0 8 .3

5 .U

1 0 1 .7

s tru c tu re s

U .l*
3 .8

i* . 5
3 .6

U .5

U .5

5 .0

5 1 .9

3 .7

U .3

3 .2

3 .7
U .2

3 .7
1 * .7

U .l*
U .8

3 .9
U .2

3 .9

1 9 .2
*
1 6 .1 *
*
5 1 .8

5 .8

5 .7

6 .1

5 .3

6 2 .9

7 .3
7 .2

5 .9
7 .0

6 .3

6 .1

9 0 .6

1 * .5
5 .8

U .5
7 .0

8 5 .3
8 2 .0

6 .0
fa m ily

3 .2

s tru c tu re s

7 .0

7 .9

7 .0

6 .6

1 0 .2

1 0 .0

6 .9

7 .1

8 .7

l . k

1 0 .3

5 .3

8 .1

6 .5

7 .2

7 .2
3 .3

9 .3
7 .0

7 .3

5 .7
7 .8

8 .3
7 .0

1 1 .7

9 .3

1 3 .5

7 .3
9 .0

1 3 .U

9 .1

8 .2

1 1 7 .1 *

1 0 .0

9 .1

11. U

1 5 .1

1 5 .U

1 6 .9

1 5 .1

1 6 .3

1 U .3

1 8 .2

1 5 .U

1 7 1 .1 *

1 9 5 1 * ................

9 .h

1 9 5 5 ................
1 9 5 6 ................

5 .7
5 .0

1 9 5 7 ................
1 9 5 3 ................
N o te :

in

D ec.

s tru c tu re s

7 .1

U n its

1 9 5 7 ................
1 9 5 8 ................

N ov.

l . k

8 .6

3 .9
3 .6

O c t.

i* .8

1 0 .7

7 .1

th o u sa n d s)

5 .1

9 .h

1 9 5 5 ................
1 9 5 6 ................

1 9 5 5 ................
1 9 5 6 ................

fa m ily

(in
S e p t.

U .l

1 . 9

1 1 .1

1 9 5 1 * ................

3 -o r-m o re

1 0 .8
2 0 .0

1 9 5 1 * ................

1 9 5 7 ................
1 9 5 3 ................

in

J u ly

u n its

A ug.

B ecau se




o f

r o u n d in g ,

su m

o f

8 .0

ite m s

1 2 .1
11* . 2

m ay n o t e q u a l

to ta ls .

7 .U

22

Table 6: Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: by Type of structure, monthly, 1940?58

dumber of privately owned hew dwellinjg units (in thousands)
Year

Jan* Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

M
ay

June

36.2

i*u.i

1 5 .5
*

U2 .1
56.1
15.7
13.1
12.3
16.7
55.3
67.3
81.U
71.9

July

Aug.

Annual
total

Nov.

Dec.

3 2 .5

27.0
26.8
9.9
9.9
6.1
25.8
35.0
U9.9
Ul.O
61.0

U 7 .6
U

65.7
51.3
58.3
53.6
79.5
53.3
50.9
70.1

1,150.7
892.2
939.1
932.8
1,077.3
1,190.0
980.7
3U0.2
932.5
86.3
U8.9
U7.U
2U.1
23.5
72.5
105.U
150.3
196.U

Sept.

Oct.

U3.7
U8.0
18.0
11.6
8.0
13.2
51.9
30.7
69.2
77.5

U3.9
U5.0
15.2
12.2
8.0
23.1
50.7

110.2 121*.6 12U.9 122.3 117.3 100.3
82.8
85.6
78.7
75.5 77.5 31.5
85.2
86.5 90.3
65.1*
39 .5
85.5 36.5
63.8
83.7
9l*.2
93 . 1
* 89.6 8U.U 81.5 80.9
96.0
97.6 101.9 101.6 103.0 103.9
61*.5 83.1
78.9 100.0 119.9 122.1 120.5 113.U 111.5 1QU.1
99.6 100.7
90.0 93.0 81.2
68.7
83.7
95 .U
78.8
52.8 68.0
81.6
8 l.l
81.7
76.9
80.3
83.6
88.1
1*9.0 62 . u 76.6
93.2
8U.7
95.7

87.7
79.5
87.2
79.3
100.3
95.1
81.2
73.8
9U.1

80.2

66.0

67 . $
6U.2
8U.8

1-family houses
19U0..........
19U1..........

1 9 k 2 .........

19U3..........
19UU..........
19U5..........
19b6..........
19U7..........
191*8..........
1 9 U 9 ...*..

1950..........
1951..........
1952..........
1953..........
195U..........
1955..........
1 9 5 6 *... • •
1957..........
1958..........

18.7
28.5
2U.1*
6.8
10.1
6.1
32.1
*
3 5 .0

1*2.1
37.1
62.3
70.8
53.8
58.2
53.1
78 . 3 ,
66 . 1
*
50 .1
50.2

23.7
29.1
29.1
8.1
9.8

6.U
37.5
39.1
38.0
39.7
68.2

6 7.0

1*3.0
1*1.2
11.9
11.2
9.0
51*.2
1*9.9
62 .U
5b.b

53.0

3b.1
U . 1*
10.3
10.1
59.9

60.5
78.1*
69.5

55.5
17.9
u *.3
u .6
12.9

58.8
65.8
83.7
71.5

U5.U
53.3
17.0
12.6
10.7
1U.5
55.6
70.5
78.3
7U.1

UU.8
55.3
18.2
13.2
9.1
15.U
55.1
7U.1
7U.2
76.5

95.3

78.2
78.9

80.1

62.0
31.9

U
ni1ts in a ll other (2-or-more family) structuresi

19b0.• • • • •
1 9 lil......
191*2..........
191*3..........
191*1*..........
191*5..........
191*6..........
191*7..........
191*8..........
191*9..........
1950..........
1951..........
1952..........
1953..........
1951*..........
1955..........
1 9 5 6 ......
1957..........
1958..........

5.1*

8 .0

3.1*
2 .5

2.1
.9
b.5
3.2
lo .b
9.3
15.5
11. b
7.6
10 .0

12.0
9.0
7.3
10.0
12.7

1 9 1 *0 ......
191*1..........
19l*2. . . . . .
1?1*3..........
191*1*..........
1 9 1 *5 ......
191*6..........
191*7..........
191*8..........
19l*9. . . . . .

1.2
1.6
1.3

1950..........
1951..........
1952..........
1953..........
1951*..........
1955..........
1956..........
1957..........
1958..........

2.8
3.b
3.0
3.1
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.0
2.U

.9

1.0
.2
1.3
1.5
2.8
2.7

7.2
6.1
6.1
*
1.7
1.9
1.1
h .9

3.7
10.9
8.1
1U.1
9.5
8.9
10.0
9 .h

9.0
8.3
10.3
12.0
1.7
1.9
1.7
.7
.5
.b
1.6
1.6

2.5

1.8

2.9

3.U
3.b
3.b
2.3
2.6

2.1*
2.1*
2.b

3.0
2.2
1.6
7.8
6.1
13.9
10.9

8.3
8.6
7.9
3.8
2.5
2.3
7.1
6.6
19.7
15.5

7.5
9.6
2.5
U.6
3.1
1.7
8.3
7.1
1.5.5
19.7

20.7
12.0
12.2
12.b
10.1
12.8
10.2
11.3
lb .9

21.1
9.5
11.8
13.2
10.5
10.6
10.3
12.6
17.6

21.1
12.0
u .5
12.2
9.8
13.0
10.1
15.3
17.7

2.0
2.8
2.3
1.1
1.2

2.6
2.9
2.9
1.5
1.1

7.5
8.2
6 .5

.9

1.0
1.8
1.0

.9

2.U
2.2
b.6
2.$

2.1*
2.8
7.6
3.1*

3.0
3.1
5.2
3.0

b.6
b.6
b.3
3.8
2.8
3.7
3.0
2.6
2.9

'3 .8
3.9
b.b
1*.3
3.1
3.1
2.8
3.0
3.5

b.2
3.0
b.3
b.O
3.0
3.3
3.1
2.7
3.6

See note at end of table.




.9

2.b

71.U

63.8

72.0
70.2
92.8

533.2

252.3
136.3
11U.6
13U.6
590.0
7U0.2
763.2
792.U

3.0
U.5
2.8
1.6
7.5
9.7
15.2
19.1

7.0
9.7
3.7
b .l
1.7
2.1
5.7
10.6
15.b
18.6

6.b
5.9
3.b
6.b
2.0
1.6
6.8
12.0
10.9
20.1

6.7
5.8
3.6
b.7
l.b
1.9
5.7
12.8
11.3
23.1

8.1
6.0
2.9
5.3
1.7
2.5
5.8
13.b
9.9
19.9

5.7
7.2
2.9
3.2
1.6
2.9
b .l
11.6
8.8
16.1

6.5
3.2
2.7
3.1
1.1
3.3
b.3
8.6
8.b
16 X
)

13.5
11.6
10 .U
12.U
10.7
10.9
9.2
lb . 2
16.6

17.b
11.3
10.8
12.0
11.3
8.5
9.0
12.8
20.5

20.5
10.8

15.3
13.8

13.1
9.b

11.3
8.b

10.7
10.0
10.8
10.2
15.1
18.9

11.2
9.5
9.5
9.5
13.3
17.7

10.3
10.2
9.7
10.0
lb .6
18.8

9.7
10.5
8.2
9.5
11.5
22.2

12.9
8.2
9.3
10.9
lO.b
7.5
9.6
11.6
19.b

201.5
127.9
129.U
135.5
12U.U
119.5
113.2
152.6

2.1
2.8
1.1
1.8
1.5
.6
2.5
3.b
b.2
2.9

2.b
2.6
1.2
1.6

2.b
2.6
.8
2.2
.7
.6
2.0
3.3
3.1 •
2.9

2.6
2.7
1.2
1.8
.6
.7
2.0
3.3
3.9
2.7

2.8
2.5
1.3
1.9
.3
.8
1.9
3.3
3.2
3.8

1.8
1.6
l.b
l.b
.7
1.0
1.7
3.b
2.b
3.1

1.6
1.5
1.3
1.1
.6
1.1
1.3
2.8
2.8
3.1

25.6
28 .U
17.5
17.8
10.6
8.8
2U.3
33.9
U6.3
3U.7

3.9
3.1

3.3
3.8
b.7
3.2
3.1
2.b
2.b
3.0
3.b

3.2
3.5
3.8
3.5
2.7
2.b
2.5
3.3
3.7

2.8
2.6
3.b
2.8
2.8
2.b
2.6
2.8
3.9

2.7
2.b
3.3
2.9
3.1
2.3
2.1
2.6
3.2

U2.3
Uo.U
U5.9
U1.5
3U.2
32.8
30.9
33.1
38.9

5.7

8 .0

11.9

12.7

Units in 2-family structures

2.9

3U.6
11.6
11.2
7.U
26.u
U3.6
67.3
52.5
77.3

b.O
3.3
3.8
3.b
2.9
3.0
2.6
3.2
3.0

.9

.7
2.2
3.2
b.O
2.8
b .l
3.b
3.5
3.9
3.1
2.7
2.7
2.8
3.1

b.O
3.2
3.1
2.7
2.5
2.7
3.8

1 2 .0

10.3

82.0

209.0

23

Table 6: Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: by Type of structure, monthly, 1940-58-Continued

Number of privately owned new dwelling units [in thousands)
Year

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

M
ay

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec. Annual
total

5.3
3.5
1.6
3.9
.9
1.7
3.9
10.1
6.7
16.1

3.9
5.6
1.5
1.8
.9
1.9
2.U
8.2
6.U
13.0

U.9
1.7
l.U
2.0
.5
2.2
3.0
5.8
5.6
12.9

56.1*
57.9
31.1*
29.6
13.5
U*.7
1*8.2
71.5
10l*.0
161.7

9.9
5.9
8.2
7.3
7.5
7.3
7.5
11.3
15.1

8.5
5.8
6.9
6.9
7.7
5.8
6.9
8.7
18.3

10.2
5.8
6.0
8.0
7.3
5.2
7.5
9.0
16.2

159.2
87.5
83.5
9l*.0
90.2
86.7
82.3
119.5
170.1

U.5
3.7
U.U
U.8
5.6

U.5
U.3
3.9
U.2
6.1

5.0
3.2
3.1
3.8
5.3

51.5
1*9.1
1*5.9
51.1

5 .7
6 .0
5.6
9.8

6 .0
3.9
5.6
7 .3

13.2

16.1

5 .1
*
1*.3
6.5
7.8
l i * .l

72.9
70.1*
67.3
101.5
11*8.2

Units in 3-or-more family structures
19l*0..........
191*1..........
19U2..........
19U3..........
191*1*..........
191*?..........
191*6..........
191*7..........
191*8..........
191*9..........

U.2

6 . 1*

2.1
1.6
1.1
.7
3.2
1.7
7.6
6.6

5.7
5.7
5.0
2.3
i.U
l.U
U.7

5.5
U.2
U.7
1.0
1.1*
.7
3.3
2.1
8.1*
6.3

5.U
U.2
1.9
1.0
.7
5.1*
3.9
9.3
8.U

12.1
12.1

16.1
7.1*
7.9
8.6
7.3
9.1
7.2
8.7
12.0

17.3
5.6
7.U
8.9
7.U
7.5
7.5
9.6
1U.1

5 .5

3.8

1 9 ^ 0 ......
i9 5 l• • • • • •
1952..........
1953..........
1951*..........
1955..........
1 9 5 6 ......
1957..........
1958..........

12.7
8.0
U.6
6.9
9.8
6.8
5.1
10.3

11.2
6.1
5.5
6.6
7.1
6.U
5.9
7.9
9.6

1951*..........
1955..........
1 9 5 6 ......
1957..........
1958..........

3.9
3.6
3.1
3.1*
•3.8

3.5
3.9
3.1*
3.7
3.8

U .l
5.0
U.U
U.l
U.5

U.6
U.6
U.l
U.6
5.2

1951*..........
1955..........
1956..........
1957..........
1958..........

8.1
5.U
U.2
6.6
8.9

5.9
5.1
U.9
6.6
8.2

6 .0
7.8
5.8
7 .2
10.1
*

5.9
6 .0
6.2
8 .0

8 .0

12 .U

5.1
6.7

1.5

2.8
2 .1

.8
5.3
U.o
10.3

16.7

3.6
5.2
1.9
2.7
1.3
1.0
5.0
6.3
11.0
16.2

U.6
7.1
2.5
2.5
.8
l.U
3.5
7.U
ll.U
15.8

U.o
3.3
2.6
U.2
1.3
1.0
U.8
8.7
7.8
17.2

16.6
12.0
16.9
1U.5 13.3
9.0
10.0
7.7
8.3
7.9
6.6
7.2
8.0
7.3
7.9
8.1
8.2
9.0
8.0
7.5
6.8
7.8
8.2
6.9
6.U
8.1
5.8
9.7
7.9
7.1
6.6
7.0
7.7
7.1
6.3
12.6
11.0 10.0 12 .U 10.3
1U.1 13.6
17.U
15.1 1U.3
Units in 2-to-U family structures
U.2
U.U
U.l
U.3
U.U
3.6
3.8
5.1
U.U
3.9
3.8
3.9
3.7
3.7
U.U
U.8
U.2
U.7
U .l
U.7
U.6
5.2
5.3
5.9
5.5
Units in 5-or--more family structures
6.6
5.6
5.7
6.9
5.1
U.6
7.0
6.5
5.9
7 .9
5.8
5.7
5.U
6.5
5.1
10.6
8.6
8.6
11.0
9.U
12 . 1
* 12.0
13.0 12.2
15.3

Note: Because of rounding, sum of items may not equal totals.




U.l
3.1
2.U
2.9
.8
1.2
3.7
9.5
7.U
20.U

60.8

24
Table 7: New nonfarm dwelling units started: Private and public ownership and location, annually-urban-rural nonfarm, 1920-53,
and metropolitan-nonmetropolitan, 1950-58
Number o f new dwelling units (in thousands)

Private and public
Location
Rural
Total
Urban
nonfarm

Total

1920.........
1921.........
1922.........
1923.........
1921*.........

21*7.0
1*1*9.0
716.0
871.0
893.0

192$.........
1926.........
1927....... .
1928.........
1929.........

937.0
81*9.0
810.0
7$3.0
$09.0

61*3.0
$9l*.0
1*00.0

1930.........
1931.........
1932.........
1933.........
1931*.........

330.0
2$1*.0
131*. 0
93.0
126.0

236.0
171*.0
61*.0
l*$.o
1*9.0

193$.........
1936.........
1937.........
1938.........
1939.........

221.0
319.0
336.0
1*06.0
$1$.0

117.0
211.0
218.0
262.0
3$9.0

108.0
118.0
1 *.0
1*1

19l*0.........
191*1.........
19U2.........
191*3.........
191*1*.........

602.6‘
706.1
3$6.0
191.0
11*1.8

396.6
1*31*.3
227.1*
121*.1*
96.2

206.0
271.8
128.6
66.6
1*5.6

19U$.........
191*6.........
19U7.........
191*8.........
191*9.........

209.3
670.$
81*9.0
931.6
l,02$.l

133.9
1*03.7
1*79.8
$2l*.9
$88.8

19$0.........
19$1.........
19$2.........
19$3.........

1,396.0
1,091.3
1,127.0
1,103.8

Year

19$0.........
19$1.........
19$2.........
19$3.........
19$!*.........

1,396.0
1,091.3
1,127.0
1,103.8
1,220.1*

19$$.........
19$6.........
19$7.........
19$3.........

1,328.9
1,118.1
1,01*1.9
1,209.1*

1/

196.0
3$9.0
$71*.0
698.0
716.0

$ .0
1
90.0
11*2.0
173.0
177.0

21*7.0
1*1*9.0
716.0
871.0
893.0

7$2.0

18$. 0
168.0

9l*.0

681.0

80.0

70.0
1*8.0
77.0
10l*.0
1$6.0

7$.l*

266.8

369.2
1*06.7
1*36.3

97$.8
779.8
699.7
827.0

3$3.1
338.3
31*2.2
382.1*

196.0

Total

Public
Location
Rural
Urban
nonfarm
—
—

716.0

51.0
90.0
11*2.0
173.0
177.0

937.0
31*9.0
810.0
7$3.0
$09.0

7$2.0
681.0
61*3.0
$91*. 0
1*00.0

168.0
167.0
1$9.0
109.0

185.0

—
—
—
—
—
—
—

330.0
2$1*.0
131*. 0
93.0
126.0

171*.0
61*.0
1*5.0
1*9.0

91*.0
80.0
70.0
1*8.0
77.0

—
—
—
~

—
—
—

—
—
—
—

21$. 7
301*. 2
332.1*
399.3
1*$8.!»

112.6
197.6
211*.1*
25$. 3
303.5

103.1
106.6
118.0
ll*l*.0
15U.9

5.3
12*.8
3.6
6.7
56.6

i*.i*
13. U
3.6
6.7
55.5

0.9
1.2*
(1)
(1)
1.1

$29.6
619.$

333.2
369.5
191*. 9
119.7
93.2

196.1*
2$0.0
116.3
61*.0
1*5.5

73.0
66.6
5L.3
7.3
3.1

63. h
6i*.8
2*2.5
2*.7
3.0

9.6
21.8
12.3
2.6
.1

132.7
395.7
1*76.1*
510.0
$$6.6

75.1*
266.8
369.2
1*03.5
1*32.2

1.2

1.2
8.0
3.2*
1U.9
32.2

(1)
(1)
(1)
3.2
2*.l

78$.6
531.3
551*.6
533.2
Metro­
politan

2*3.8
71.2
58.5
35.5

776.9
979.1*

$66.6
1*38.8
$13.9
$35.1
Nonmetro­
politan
365.2
297.0
317.9
291.1*
322.3

960.1
766.$
677.1*
789.0

31*9.1*
327.1*
315.1*
352.5

19.1*
2l*.2
1*9.1
67.9

301.2

183.7
138.7
209.1

662 .$

31»$.6
913.$
983.8

$68.2 1,3$2.2
827.8
1*96.0 1,020.1
$9$.3
609.6
$17.1* 1,068.$
$38.8 1,068.3
$6$.0
Metro­ Nonmetro­
politan politan
1,021.6
37U.1* 1,3$2.2
776.8
3H*.$ 1,020.1
332.1 1,063.$
79l*.9
803. $
300.3 1,068.3
896.9
323.$ 1,201.7

Fewer than 50 un its.




167.0
1$9.0
109.0

Private
Location
Rural
Urban
nonfarm

1,309.$
1,093.9
992.8
1,11*1.$

3$9.0
$71*. 0

698.0

236.0

987.0
723.1
750.6

—
—
—

8.0

3J*
18.1
36.3

13.3
*
71.2

$3.5
35.5
18.7

__
—
—
—

—

—

—
—

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

__
—

2*2.2
62*.0
55.0
31.8
Metro­
politan
32*.6
53.7
2*2*.3

1.6
7.2
3.5
3.7
N onm etro­

17.5

politan
9.2
17.5
12*.2
8.9
1.2

15.7
13.3
22.3
38.0

3.7
10.9
26.8
29.9

26.6

25
Table 8: Hew nonfarm dwelling units started: Urban-rural nonfarm location, monthly, 1939-53;
and metropolitan-nonmetropolitan location, monthly, 1953-58

Year
1939............
19l*0............
i9 ia ............
191*2............
19U3............

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

23.2

21.7
2i*.S
28.1
36.1
6.3

30.1

18.9
2 7 .5

21.3
5.9

31.6
36 .0

31.9
11.3

8 .0
5.6

9.6
7.2

25.0

38.0
31.8
1 3 .1
*

19 h h ............
19l*5............
19U6............
191*7............
191*8............

8.2
1*.8
22.1*
2l*.2
30.8

191*9............
1950............
1951............
1952............
1953............

29.5
1*8.2
1*9.6
36.1
38.1*

28.0
5 1 .0
1 7 .0
*
1 2.8
*

1939............
19l*0............
191*1............
191*2............
191*3............

9.1
8.1
13.7
11.5
3.6

9.0

191*1*............
191*5............
19l*6 • • • • . • •
191*7............
191*8............

25.0
29.1

36.7

68.6
51.2
58.5
59.1

Number of new dwelling units (in thousands)
M
ay June July Aug. Sept. Oct.
Apr.
In urban areas
28.6

38.3
1*7.9
31.1
10.0
8.6
8.7
1 1 .0
*
37.6
55.0
1 9 .5
*
78.8

51.9

38.2
37.9
1*3.1*
16.6
12.9

31.8
29.9

29.8
36.6

U k .5

h h .l

13.7
11. k

13.9
U .3

1 0 .5

10.1
11.0
39.0
U2.2

8.7
11.1
37.3

9.9
1*1.0
39.3
56.7
53.9
85.5
55.1*

5 k .h

52.2

53.9
82.7
8U.7
56.1
53.3

53.3
31*. 2
U5.9
52.1*
1*8.1

55.9
83.6
1*5.9
50.8
1*6.1*

h h .5

60.7

ll*.3
18.2
26.6
17.7
5.3

15.1
19.8
26.3
9.3
6.7

u * .i

n*.i*

15.6
15.2
3.9

12.8
15.2
23.6
19.7
6.1

29.2
9.3
6.3

U.o
2.2
15.1
15.1
22.7

3.8
2.3
17.1*
17.8
21.0

l*.l*
3.1*
2l*.0
21*.2
33.3

l*.l*
3.7
26.0
29.5
l*l*.5

1».9
1*.7
26.1
33.6
1*3.6

191*9............
1950............
1951............
1952............
1953............

20.5
30.5
36.3

22.1*
31.9
33.6
3U.9
36.1

32.7
1*8.7
1*2.6
1*5.1*
1*6.7

38.8
5U.6
1*1*.3
1*7.2
51*.o

1953............
1951*............
1955............
1956............
1957............
1958............

51.3

1*9.7
68.1
51*.3
1*1*.0
1*1*.5

56.3
53.5

66.9

57.6
1*6.6
lilt.l*

76.8
71.1
86.8
71.9
58.5
5U.8

80.1*
79.1*
96.8
76.2
63.5
67.1*

77.1
99.7
77.6
68.2
73.9

1953............
1951*............
1955............
1956............
1957............
1958............

20.8
16.7
19.5
20.8
20.2
23.1*

22.9
21.7
23.0
20.8
19.2
21.7

29.0
21*.1
27.0
26.7
28.5
26.6

31.0
28.3
35.2
35.2
30.2
31.7

27.2
31.1*
37.9
36.1
31*.8
31*.6

55.2

1*1.6
ll*.6
13.1

28.3
38.6
39.8
u *. 2
10.9

7.7
11.1
39.5
1*7.1*
1*7.7

59.0
57.1
*

1*3.1

3 5 .5
36.9

Nov.

Dec*

Annual
total

1*3.1
33.7
15.1*
11.8

32.3
3 1 .1
27.8
10.6
10.9

30.8
28.9
19.3
8.0

8.6

l*3l*.3
227.1*
12l*.l*

6 .5
18.0
28.6
1 8.0
*
3 3 .1

5.0
17.8
23.7
36.3
32.2

96.2
133.9
1*03.7
1*79.8
521*. 9

28.7

359.0
396.6

6.1
*
12.7
33.6

50.3
1*1*.3

6.9
16.0
3l*.6
53.2
1*1.3

62.1*
70.1*
1*9.1*
52.8
1*7.1

60.0
59.1*
l*U.lt
53.8
1*3.1

56.7
53.1
38.5
1*6.0
38.8

1*9.0
62.3
31.1*
1*0.6
35.0

588.8
827.3
595.3
609.6
565.0

In rural nonfarra areas

28.8

33.7

1 0 .0

ll*.l

28.9
8.1*
6.3

15.7
19.6
28.0
8.8
7.0

19.2
25.2
8.6
5.1*

H*. 2
22.9
22.1*
6.8
6.5

12.8
17.1*
18.8
6.1
5.0

10.1*
ll*.7
13.5
7.2
1*.5

156.0
206.0
271.8
128.6
66.6

5.1
7.6
25.1
35.0
1*3.1*

1*.3
5.9
25.3
36.6
1*2.8

3.8
6.0
25.9
38.9
39.0

3.2
7.1*
2l*.0
1*3.5
38.0

2.8
9.6
23.2
1*0.8
32.1

2.7
11.3
19.1
31.7
25.6

2.2
11.3
15.6
22.5
20.7

1*5.6
75.1*
266.8
369.2
1*06.7

1*1.5
63.6
1*5.6
1*8.9
53.1

1*1.6
61.6
1*7.8
1*7. i*
51.3

1*2.8
60.2
1*1*.6
50.2
1*8.6

1*3.1
58.3
1*3.2
1*8.3
1*6.8

1*0.5
5t>.2
1*7.0
1*8.0
1*8.0

1*1*.3
1*3.1
1*5.6
1*7.3
1*7.0

38.8
3U.2
36.0
1*0.1
1*2.7

29.3
31.3
30.9
30.8

2 9 .h

1*36.3
568.2
1*96.0
517.1*
538.8

81.1

76.6
87.5
98.3
7U.5
68.6
76.8

69.0
82.7
83.5
62.3
61.5
85.0

63.8
80.1*
76.5
61*.9
61.8
79.1

59.5
75.7
61*.6
51*. 8
52.5
73.9

1*9.9
69.7
51*.7
1*5.1
1*3.1*
63.8

803.5
896.9
975.8
779.8
699.7
827.0

26.3
30.3
29.3
28.7
35.2
35.9

22.0
27.9
2l*.6
22.6
25.7
35.5

15.9
20.9
21.5
18.5
20.0

300.3
323.5
353.1
338.3
31*2.2
382.1*

20.1

20.8

In m
e-bropolitan areas
7 1 .5

87.5
88.1*
69.7
63.i*
80.6

67.3
82.6
91.5
70.9
67.7
82. a

C nonmetropolitan areas
n
28.0

29.0
36.2
32.9
31.3
36.2

25.2
28.5
31*. 3
31.1*
31..1*
32.2

25.9
31.7
33.2
33.0
32.3
1 1 .2
*

26.1
33.0
31.1*
31.6
30.1*
36.0

frfote: §ecause of rounding, sum of i*bem m not a:Lways equal to->als*
s ay




2 7 .k

26
Toble 9: New nonfarm dwelling units started in four broad regions, annually, 1948-58

Tear

Number of new dwelling units (in thousands)
All
North
South
West
regions Northeast Central

Percent of new dwelling units in—
North
Northeast Central
South
West

191*8.........
191*9.........
1950.........
1951.........
1952.........

931.6
1,025.1
1,396.0
1,091.3
1,127.0

198.0
21*7.8
323.0
21*9.7
251.1*

20U.8
225.8
336.9
262.7
262.1

315.7
355.8
1*1*8.9
361.6
367.0

213.1
195.7
287.2
217.3
21*6.5

21.3
2l*.2
23.1
22.9
22.3

22.0
22.0
2l*.l
2l*.l
23.2

33.9
3lw7
32.2
33.1
32.6

22.8
19.1
20.6
19.9
21.9

1953.........
1951*.........
1955.........
1956.........
1957.........
1958.........

1,103.8
1,220.1*
1,328.9
1,118.1
1,01*1.9
1,209.1*

251*.7
21*3.1
273.1
223.8
195.5
210.9

270.5
325.8
356.0
303.1
258.1*
289.6

327.6
359.7
389.0
331*.2
31*6.3
1*13.3

251.0
291.8
310.8
252.0
21*1.7
295.6

23.1
19.9
20.6
20.$
18.8
17 .1*

2l*.5
26.7
26.8
27.1
2l*.8
2l*.0

29.7
29.5
29.2
29.9
33.2
3U.2

22.7
23.9
23. h
22.5
23.2
2U.U

Table 10: Hew nonfarm dwelling units started in four broad regions, monthly, 1954-58

Year

Jan.

Feb.
75.2

1956.............
1957.............
1 9 5 8 ........

66.1*
87.6
75.1
61*.2
67.9

1951*........
1955.............
1956.............
1 9 5 7 ........
1 9 5 8 .•••••••

16.0
12.1*
9.3
8.0

1951*.............
1955.............
1 9 5 6 ........
1957.............
1 9 5 8 ........

13.3
15.6
15.7
10.7
11.1

1951*........
1955......... .
1 9 5 6 ........
1 9 5 7 ••••••••
1958.
1951*........
1 9 5 5 ••••••••
1 9 5 6 ........
1 9 5 7 ........
1958............

Num of new dwelling units (in thousands)
ber
Apr.
M
ay June July Aug. ] Sept. Oct.
|

1951* . . . . . . . .
1955 .............

Mar.

95.2 107.7
89.9 113.3 132.0
78.1* 98.6 111.1*
65.8 87.0 93.7

66.1

81.1*

99.1

10875
137.6
113.7
103.0
108.5

13.3
13.5

21.1
23.6
18.9
11*.8
12.3

21.7
28.6
23 . 1
*
19.9

13.9

21.6
30.3
2l*.7
20.9
23.1*

16.2
19.7

i6.u
llt.O
11.2

23.2
28.1
26.1
22.1
18.0

31.1
37.3
33.6
23.7
25.7

32.9
1*0.0
33.3
25.7
27.0

22.5
30.6
27.2
26.0
28.7

26.1
32.1*
26.8
2l*.6
28.7

29.0
32.9
29.2
29.U
30.7

29.3
35.7
31.1
28.1
33.0

30.0
37 . u
32.8
33.7

32.6

17.6
25.1*
19.8
18.2
20.1

19.6
2l*.3
20.8
17.5
19.2

21.9
29.2
2l*.i*
20.7
20.U

25.6
30.1*
23.3
22.0
21.5

2l*.0
29.9
22.9
22.7
25.5

13.0




Ik .k

9.7
7.0

Nov.

Total—a ll regions
116.5 116.0 11U.3 115.7 110.7 103.6
131*. 5 122.7 12U.7 111*. 9 105.8 89.2
107.1* 101.1 103.9 93.9 93.6 77.1*
99.9 97.8 100.0 91.9 97.0 78.2
113.0 112.8 12l*.0 121.0 115.0 109.!*
Northeast
2h.O 25.3 2l*.8 22.lt 21.6 19.0
30.2 27.1 2l*.9 23.1* 23.5 17.7
2l*.2 21.8 20.8 19.2 20.1 16.5
19.9 19.2 21.8 16.9 19.5 13.8
21.5 19.6 22.2 21*.0 19.9 20.8
North Central
3l*.l* 33.3 32.6 31.9 30.1 26.8
39.3 35.6 38.0 3l*.i* 29.1* 23.0
31.2 29.9 29.2 28.1 26.2 19.2
27.8 27.0 27.3 25.0 21*.2 17 .1*
26.7 28.6 30.7 32.3 31.8 ' 28.9
South
31.6 32.2 31.7 36.0 31.8 31.5
36.6 32.7 3U.8 31.9 28.5 27.8
29.3 27.7 30.7 28.1 27.5 22.7
31.0 31.5 31.0 28.7 30.1 28.2
37.7 36.2 1*2.1* 39.3 36.3 31».6
West
26.5 25.2 25.2 25.1* 27.2 26.3
28 . 1 27.3 27.0 25.2 2l*.l* 20.7
*
22.7 21.7 23.2 18.5 19.8 19.0
21.2 20.1 19.9 21.3 23.2 18.8
27.1 28.1* 28.7 25.1* 27.0 25.1

Dec.

Annual
totals

90.6
76.2
63.6
63.1*
91.2

1,118.1
1,01*1.9
1,209.1*

15.3
ll*.3
12.1*
9.8
13.3

21*3.1
273.1
228.8
195.5
210.9

20.0
15.6

325.8
356.0
303.1
258.1*
289.6

28.0

27.7
21.1
2l*.0
33.1

359.7
389.0
33U.2
31*6.3
1*13.3

27.3
18.6
15.9
16.1
27.2

291.8
310.8
252.0
21*1.7
295.6

U*.2
13.5
17.6

1 , 220 . 1
*
1 , 328.9

27
Table 11: Hew nonfarm dwelling units started in 29.selected States: Private and public ownership, annually, 1954-58

State

dumber of new dwelling units (in thousands)
195U

1955

1956

1957

1958

As percent of United States total
195U 1 1955

1956

1957

1958

All dwelling units private and public)
U ITED STATES, TO A . . 1,220.U
N
T L1.
Selected States, to ta l..
926.7

1,328.9 1,118.1 1.0U1.9 1,209.U 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
780.2
1,015.1
853.1
891.U 75.9 76.1* 76.3 71*.9

100.0
73.7

Arizona.• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
California......................
Colorado..........................
Connecticut....................
District of Columbia....

12.3
199.lt
19.U
18.1
2.9

1U.U
21U.7
21.2
19.3
2.8

13.2
178.3
15.U
18.9
2.2

17.0
169.0
13.6
16.8
3.1

21.5
195.1
18.6
15.1
U.9

1.0
16.3
1.6
1.5
.2

1.1
16.2
1.6
1.1*
.2

1.2
15.9
1.1*
1.7
.2

1.6
16.2
1.3
1.6
.3

1.8
16.1
1.5
1.2
.1
*

Florida.• • • • ...................
Illin o is..........................
Maryland.• • • • • • ..............
Massachusetts..................
Michigan.• • • • • • • • • » .......

61.1
61.9
31.5
23.5
63.2

76.1
30.8
27. U
66.6

69.3

77.7
• 5 .8
6>
23.0
25.0
52.6

86.5
53.9
22.7
18.6
U3.9

96.6
57.U
25.0
20.U
U2.U

5.0
5.1
2.6
1.9
5.2

5.2
5.7
2.3
2.1
5.0

6.9
5.9
2.1
2.2
1*.7

8.3
5.2
2.2
1.8
1*.2

8.0
1*.7
2.1
1.7
3.5

N Jersey....................
ew
N York..........................
ew
Ohio.................................
Oregon........ .............. .
Pennsylvania................ .

U8.U
92.6
6U.8
10.0
51.8

55 .U
98.5
60.8

U*.0
l
80.7
60.9
8.0
U9.9

3U.7
69.6
51.U
5.9
U3.7

38.6
82.8
56.7
9.0
U2.U

J*.o
7.6
5.3
.8
1*.2

H.2
7.1*
5.1*
.8
i*.6

3.9
7.2
5.1*
.7
i*.5

3.3
6.7
1*.9
.6
1*.2

3.2
6.8
i*.7
.7
3.5

Texas................................
Utah.................................
Virginia..........................
Washington.......................
Wisconsin.........................

80.U

86.U
8.2
3U. 2
22.9
2U.8

63.1
6.7
28.2
16.2
23.3

6U.2
6.1
22.6
15.U
21.5

87.2
7.8
27.6
20.5
21.8

6.6
.6
2.6
1.9
1.9

6.5
.6
2.6
1.7
1.9

5.6
.6
2.5
1.1*
2.1

6.2
.6
2.2
1.5
2.1

7.2
.6
2.3
1.7
1.8

992.8 1.1U1.5 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
75U.6
8U9.0 75.8 76.3 76.1* 76.0

100.0
7l*.i*
1.8
16.6
1.5
1.3
.3

7.3
31.6
23.1
23 .U

71.2
10.1

Private
U ITED STATES, T T L1. . . 1,201.7
N
OA
Selected States* to ta l.•
911.0
Arizona............................
California.......................
Colorado..........................
Connecticut............... .
District of Columbia....

12.2
197.1*
19.1*
18.0
2.7

Florida............................
Illin o is...........................
Maryland.........................
Massachusetts.• • • • .........
Michigan......................

60.1*
31.0
23.3
63.0

N Jersey.....................
ew
N York..........................
ew
O h io ..............................
Oregon............................ .
Pennsylvania.• • • • • • • • • • •
Texas................................
Utah.................................
Virginia. ......................
Washington....... ..............
Wisconsin.• • • • • ..............

18.9
1.6

lit. 8

16.0
166.U
13.0
16.3
2.2

20.U
189.8
17.3
1U.6
3.9

1.0
16.1*
1.6
1.5
.2

1.1
16.1*
1.6
1.5
.2

1.2
16.3
1.1*
1.7
.1

1.6
16.8
1.3
1.6
.2

66.2

76.8
61*.2
23.0
2U.0
51.8

8U.0
53.6
20.7
17.7
U2.3

95.0
55.0
2U.8
18.1
Ul.3

5.1
5.0
2.6
1.9
5.2

5.3
5.6
2.3
2.0
5.1

7.0
5.9
2.1
2.2
1*.7

8.5
5.1*
2.1
1.8
1*.3

1*6.6
86.1
6U.2
10.0
51.2

53.3
92.0
71.2
10.1
60.6

ltli.0
73.0
60.9
8.0
U9.lt

33.2
62.1
50.U
5.9
U3.5

35.5
72.U
55.1
8.5
U
0.8

3.9
7.2
5.3

i*.i
7.0
5.1*

1*.3

1*.6

l*.o
6.7
5.6
.7
1*.5

3.3
6.3
5.1
.6
l*.i*

.7
3.6

80.3
7.3
31.0
23.1
23.0

85.5

61.9
6.7
26.2
15.7
23.2

63 .U

82.7
7.7
25.8

6.7
.6
2.6
1.9
1.9

6.5
.6
2.6
1.7
1.9

5.7
.6
2.1*
1.1*
2.1

6.1*
.6
2.2
1.5
2.2

7.2
.7
2.3
1.6
1.9

60.8

See note at end of table.




1,309.5 1,093.9
999.0
835.3

ll*.l*

21i*.l*
21.0
19.1
2.8
69.2
73.6
30.1*
26.8

8.2

33.5
21.9

2i*.8

13.1
178.1

6.0

21.5
i5.o
2 1 .U

18.8

21.U

.8

.8

8.3

1*.8
2.2
1.6
3.6

3.1
6.3

1*.8

Toble 11: New nonfarm dwelling units started in 29 Selected States: Private and public ownership, annually, 1954-58—Continued

As percent of United States total

Number of new dwelling units (in thousands)
State

195U

1956

1958

1957

195U

1955

1956

1957

1958

Public

U ITED STATES, TO L . . .
N
TA
Selected States, to tal..

18.7
15.7

Arizona........................ .
California. . . . . . . . ....... .
Colorado..........................
Connecticut.....................
District of Columbia....

.1
2.0
(2)
.1
.2

Florida............................
Illin o is...........................
Maryland. . . • • • • • • • ....... .
Massachusetts• • • • • • • • • • •
Michigan....... • • • • • • • • • • •

.3
1.5
.5
.2
.2

N Jersey............• • • • • •
ew
N Y o rk ......................
ew
Ohio..................................
Oregon........ ....................
Pennsylvania.

1955

1.8

6.5
.6

(2)

.6

(2)
.3
.2
.2
(2)

2lt.2
17.8

h 9.1

.2

19.lt
16.1

1.0
2.6
.6
.5

.2
.6
.1
.6

.1
2.5
•
U
.6

.9
1.6
.1
1.0

•1*

.7

2.1
6.5
(2)
(2)
.2

(2)
7.7
(2)
(2)
•
U

25.6

67.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
U2.ii 8U.0 83.0 73.6 52.1

.9

1.1
5.3
1.3
.5
1.0

.5
10.7
(3)
.5
1.1

2.5
.3
2.0
.9
1.6

1.6
2.U
.2
2.3
1.1

1.6
8.0
2.7
1.1
1.1

1.5
7.5
1.0
(2)
.2

3.1
10.ii
1.6
.5
1.6

9.6
3lt.8
3.2
(3)
3.2

100.0
62.6

.8
.8
2.5
•
It
2.5

2.0
5.3
1.2
1.0
1.8

1.6
7.8
1.9
.7
1.5

.5
12.9
2.1
3.1
2.1

3.7
6.6
.It
U.l
2.9

5.1
.6
U.l
1.8
3.3

2.U
3.5
.3
3.U
1.6

10.8
33.5
(3)
(3)
1.0

(3)
31.8
(3)
(3)
1.7

3.1
15.3
2.0
(3)

U.6
15.3
2.U

•U

2.U

(3)
1.5
1.0
1.0

(3)

.7

.8
1.2
U.6
Texas..................• • • • • • • •
1.6
6.6
.1
5.0
.9
U.5
.5
Utah..................................
.2
(2)
(2)
.1
.1 (3)
(2)
.1
(3)
(3)
.6
1.8
Virginia..........................
2.0
3.6
2.2
1.1
.7
3.2
2.7
8.3
.8
1.0
Washington...................
5.2
(2)
2.1
.5
.U
1.7 (3)
2.5
Wisconsin. ......................
.1
(2)
.1
2.1 (3)
.2
.6
•
U
•
U
.it
1/ Does not include Alaska.
2/ Fewer than 50 units. 3/ Less than one-half of 1 percent.
N TE: Because of rounding and because totals include amounts too small to show separately, sum of
O
items may not equal totals.




29

Table 12: Hew nonfarm dwelling units started in 20.selected States: Total and privately owned, quarterly 1956-58

State

IFITiD STATES, TO A
T L1..
Selected States, total.
As percent of U..S.
total.......................

Number oi? new dwelling units (in thousands)
1958 quarters
1956 quarters
1957 quarters
Uth
1st
2d
3d
Uth
1st
2d
3d
l*th
1st
2d
3d
All dwelling units, private and public
252.1 332.5 293.9 231*.6 217.0 296.6 289.7 238.6 215.U 320.6 357.8 315.6
195.7 250.7 221*.8 181.8 162.0 22U.U 213.9 180.0 158.U 236.6 261.6 23U.8
(77.6) (75.U) (75.2) (77.5) (7U.7) (75.7) (73.8) (75.1*) (73.5) (73.8) (73.1) (7U.U)

Arizona............ .............
California........ • • • • • • •
Colorado..................• • • •
Connecticut.• • • • • • • • • • •
District of Columbia...

3.2
U7.6
3.7
3.2
•U

3.3
U6.6
U.8
6.0
.5

3.3
1*1*.7
3.6
5.3
.5

3.U
39.1*
3.3
u.i*
.8

U.2
U0.7
3.U
3.2
.U

3.8
U6.7
3.3
5.3
1.1

U.6
U0.5
3.8
5.1
.3

U.3
1*1.1
3.1
3.2
1.3

U.9
U .O
O
3.U
2.0
1.1

5.1
U7.1
5.8
U.5
.9

5.2
55.0
U.6
U.6
1.6

6.3
53.0
U.8
U.O
1.3

Florida..................• • • • •
Illin o is.........................
Maryland.........................
Massachusetts................
Michigan....................... .

18.8
1U.0
5.7
5.2
ll.U

19.2
20.5
6.7
7.7
16.5

19.8
17.5
5.7
6.9
15.3

19.9
13.9
U.9
5.2
9.1*

18.9
11.3
5.3
3.3
7.5

21.2
16.6
7.6
6.2
13 .U

22.U
1U.7
5.3
U.9
1U.2

2U.1
ll.U
U.5
U.2
8.7

23.0
9.1
U.5
2.5
5.3

22.3
15.0
6.6
6.6
11.7

25.1
16.3
7.U
6.1
1U.0

26.2
17.0
6.5
5.2
ll.U

N Jersey.....................
ew
N York.......................
ew
O hio....................... .
Oregon. ...................
Pennsylvania..................

10.0
16.8
10.7
1.8
9.0

13.0
21*.5
19.6
2.8
17.7

11.2
22.6
18.1*
2.1
13.0

9.8
16.8
12.1
1.3
10.2

6.6
11.3
9.0
1.3
7.7

11.0
20.U
15.5
1.6
13.9

9.6
20.3
16.1
1.8
13.8

7.5
17.7
10.8
1.3
8.3

6.0
9.2
8.1
1.8
6.1

11.8
2U.U
16.1
2.3
12.7

11.0
27.U
18 .U
2.5
13.2

9.8
21.8
lU.l
2.U
10.U

Texas..............................
Utah................................
Virginia...........• • • • • • • •
Washington.• • • • • • • • • • . .
Wisconsin.............. « ••••
U ITED STATES, TO A
N
T L1..
Selected States, total.
As percent of U. S.
to ta l......................

16.7 17.3 1U.5 18 .U 22.1 26.1 20.6
1.6
2.2
2.2
2.1
1.9
1.3
1.3
8.1
U.8
7.2
7.3
7.U
6.U
U.5
6.1
3.8
U.9
U.7
5.7
U.U
3.5
5.6
6.2
6.U
6.7
6.9
U.7
3.1
Private
2UU.6 325.3 292.9 231.1 202.5 282.8 280.8 226.6 201.2 296.8 33U.1 309.U
190.0 2U6.1 219.8 179.1 158. U 215.9 208.9 171.6 151.8 221.2 2U5.U 230.U
18.0
1.7
6.U
3.8
U.3

16.U
2.2
9.6
5.0
8.1

15.6
1.8
7.1
U.2
6.0

12.8
1.0
5.1
3.2
U.9

15.6
1.3
U.5
2.8
3.7

(77.7) (75.7) (75.0) (77.5) (78.2) (76.3) (7U.U) (75.7) (75.U) (7U.5) (73.5) (7U.5)

Arizona..........................
California............ • • • • •
Colorado................. ....
Connecticut...................
District of Columbia...

3.1
U7.6
3.7
3.2
.U

3.3
U6.6
U.3
6.0
.5

3.3
UU.5
3.5
5.3
.5

3.6
3.U
39. U Uo.5
3.2
2.9
3.2
u.u
.2
.3

3.8
U6.3
3.2
U.9
.7

U.6
39.9
3.8
5.0
.3

U.O
39.8
3.1
3.1
.9

U.O
39.1
3.U
1.8
1.1

5.0
U6.2
u.6
U.U
.u

5.2
51.6
U.5
U.U
l.l

6.2
52.9
U.8
U.o
1.3

Florida..........................
Illin o is.........................
Maryland.........................
Massachusetts................
Michigan.........................

18.$
12.8
£.7
U.5
ll.U

19.0
20.0
6.7
7.7
16.3

19.3
17.5
5.7
6.6
1U.8

19.9
13.9
U.9
5.1
9.3

18.5
11.1
U.6
3.3
7.5

21.1
16.5
6.U
5.6
13.2

22.0
1U.6
5.3
U.9
13.2

22.U
11.3
U.U
3.9
8.U

21.7
8.2
U.U
2.U
5.3

22.1
lU.l
6.5
5.3
ll.l

25.0
16.2
7.U
5.5
13.7

26.2
16.5
6.5
U.8
11.2

N Jersey.» • • • • • • • • . • •
ew
N York............. •• • • •
ew
Ohio...............................
Oregon................... . • • • •
Pennsylvania..................

10.0
1U.6
10.7
1.8
9.0

13.0
22.3
19.6
2.8
17.3

11.2
20.1
18.U
2.1
13.0

9.8
16.0
12.1
1.3
10.2

6.6
10.5
9.0
1.3
7.7

9.6
13.7
15.0
1.6
13.8

9.5
13.8
15.6
1.8
13.7

7.5
1U.2
10.8
1.3
8.3

5.8
9.1
8.0
1.6
5.9

9.5
21.3
15.0
2.2
12.2

10.8
22.1

9.3
19.9
18.0 lU.l
2.3
2.U
12.U 10.3

15.7
1.8
6.5
U.o
6.0

12.7
1.0
U.5
3.0
U.8

15.6
1.3
U.U
2.8
3.7

16.6
1.6
6.2
U.2
6.9

16.9
1.8
6.U
U.6
6.2

1U.3
1.3
U.5
3.5
U.6

17.0
1.3
U.8
3.8
3.1

21.2
2.1
6.7
5.0
6.3

2U.0
2.1
7.5
5.1
6.5

Texas.............................. 17.1 16. U
Utah................................
2.2
1.7
Virginia....... .............. .
6.1
9.1
Washington. ......... .........
3.8
U.9
8.1
Wisconsin.• • • • • • ...........
U.3
l / Does not include Alaska.
N TE: Because of rounding, sum of
O




items m not equal totals.
ay

20.5
2.2
6.8
U.9
5.6

30
Table 13: New nonfarm dwelling units started: Private and public ownership and type of intended financing
for private units, annually, 1935-58

Total,
private
Year
and
public

Num of new dwelling units (in thousands)
ber
Private
Federal Government
All
AU Dri- Federal
vate2/3/ Housing Veterans F A other public^/
H
pri­
Adminis- . Adminis­ and vate
trationS' tration vav
U*.o
ll*.0 20 1.7
2 15 .7
5 .3
—
3d *.2
iu.8
1*9.1* 251*.8
1*9.1*
—
332.1*
60.0
60.0 272.1*
3 .6
— 118.7 280.6
118.7
6 .7
399.3
56.6
1*58.1*
158.1
158.1 300.3
~

1937....
1938 . . . .
1939....

221.0
319.0
336.0
1*
06.0
515.0

19l»0....
191*1....
191*2....
19l*3. . . .
191*1*....

602.6
706.1
356.0
191.0
11*1.8

529.6
619.5
301.2
183.7
138.7

180.1
220.1*
165.7
11*6.2
93.3

19l*5.. . .
191*6....
191*7----191*8....
191*9....

209.3
670.5
81*9.0
931.6
1,025.1

208.1
662.5
81*5.6
913.5

1956....
1951....
1952....
1953....
1951*....

1,396.0
1,091.3
1,127.0
1,103.8
1,220.1*

1955.*..
1956....
1957....
1958....

1935....
1936 . . . .

As percent
of total

Pri­
vate
97.6
95 .U
98.9
98.3
89.0

°f

As percerit
private 1
:otal
\

All
H
A
Pub­ F A in­ V in­
spected spected other
l ic
private
2 .k

lw6
1.1
1.7
1.1

6 .5
16 .2
1 8 .1

_
—
—

93.5
33.8
8 1.9

29.7
31*. 5

—

70.3
65.5

31*.2
35.6
55.0
79.6
67.3

—
—
—
(5)

65.3
61*. 1
*
1*5.0
20.1*
(5)

(5)

180.1
220.1*
165.7
11*6.2
(5)

31*9.5
399.1
135.5
37.5
(5)

73.0
86.6
51*.8
7.3
3.1

81*.6
96.2
97.8

12.1
12.3
15.U
3.8
2.2

988.8

1*1.2
69.0
229.0
291*.1
363.8

(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)

(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)

(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)

1.2
8.0
3.1*
18.1
36.3

99.2*
98.8
99.6
93.1
96.5

.6
1.2
.h
1.9
3.$

19.8
10.1*
27.1
32.2
36.8

(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)

(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)

1,352.2
1,020.1
1,068.$
1,068.3
1,201.7

1*86.7
263.5
279.9
252.0
276.3

(5)
11*8.6
11*1.3
156.6
307.0

(5)
1*12.1
1*21.2
1*08.7
533.3

(5)
607.9
61*7.3
659.7
618.1,

1*3.8
71.2
58.5
35.5
18.7

96.9
93.5
91*.8
96.8
98.5

3.1
6.5
$.2
3.2
1.5

36.0
25.8
26.2
23.6
23.0

(5)
11*.6
13.2
U*.6
25.5

(5)
59.6
60.6
61.8
51.5

1,328.9 1,309.5
1,118.1 1,093.9
992.8
1,01*1.9
1,209.1* 1,11*1.5

276.7
189.3
168.1*
295.1*

392.9
270.7
128.3
102.1

669.6 639.9
1*60.0 633.9
296.7 696.1
397.5 7l*l*.0

19.1*
21*. 2
1*9.1
67.9

98.5
97.8
95.3
9l*.l*

1.5
2.2

21.1
17.3
17.0
25.9

30.0
2l*.8
12.9
8.9

1*3.9
57.9
70.1
65.2

_ _

—

—
—

87.9
87.7

k .l

5.6

Housing Administration and the Veterans Administration, as reported by the respective agencies. See
definitions (p. 12 ).
2 j Includes 82 , 395 new privately owned low-cost units built during 19U9-56, under the W
?
herry amendment
to the National Housing Act, for voluntary rental occupancy by military and defense-connected personnel. See
also, table lU (p. 31 ); and definitions (p. 12 ).
Excludes 62,090 new publicly owned units begun during 1956-58, with FKA-insured Mortgages, under the
Capehart amendment to the National Housing Act, for assigned occupancy by military personnel. See also,
table 17 (p. 3k ); and definitions (p. 12 ).
3/ Includes an unknown number of new dwelling units started during 19UU-50, under inspection procedures
of the Veterans Administration. Reporting of the number of new units begun under V inspection was initiated
A
with data for June 1950. During the la st 7 months of 1950, the number of new units started under inspection
of the FH and the V amounted to 38.5 percent and 15.6 percent, respectively, of a ll private units begun
A
A
during the period.
k / Includes new dwelling units built during 1956-58 under the Capehart military housing program, but,
excludes privately owned units built during 19u9-56, under the W
herry housing program for voluntary rentai
occupancy by military and defense-connected personnel. See also, tables 1U and 17 (pp. 31, and 3I4
.,
respectively).
f>/ Data not available. See footnote 3.




1
Table 14: Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started under the Wherry amendment
to the National Housing Act, monthly, 1949-561
Year

Jan,

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

Num oJ new dwelling units [in thousands)
ber Z
M
ay June July Aug.
Sept. Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Annual
totals

—
191*9.............
(2 )
0.3
y o .3
0.1
0.2
1950.............
0.8
1.8
1.1
1.1
11.8
0.7
0.7
0.9
1.5
1.7
1.3
1.0
1.6
2.3
1.2
2.1
*
3.2
2.0
2.0
23.6
1951.............
l.U
3.1*
2.3
.7
1.8
2.2
1952............
2.1
1.6
.7
2.0
1.1
1.5
1.7
3.5
2.7
2.3
23.1
1.2
.6
1.6
2.2
1.1
1.2
.7
1953.............
1.5
1.5
1.3
.9
.5
11*.!*
.8
.8
.9
..8
.9
1951*............
.1
.5
.1
.3
.1
*
.5
.3
6.5
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
1955.............
.1
.1
.3
(2 )
(2 )
.5
, . 2.1
1956.............
(2 )
(2 )
.1
.1
.2
.3
.1
.1
3/ .9
—
—
—
1/ For voluntary rental occupancy by military and defense-connected personnel. See also, table 17
(p.3U7> and definitions (p. 12), The proportion of Wherry housing units built in rural-nonfarm and in nonmetro­
politan areas is as follows: 19l*9—100 percent; 1950—95 percent; 1951—92 percent; 1952—81 percent; 1953—
9h percent; 1951*—59 percent; 1955—36 percent; and 1956—100 percent,
2/ Fewer than 50 units,
3/ Totals given here are for the last 2 months of 19U9, when starts under the W
herry program were fir s t
reported; and for the f ir s t 8 months of 1956, when housing starts activity ceased under this program, and
began under the new Capehart military housing program. See table 17 (p. 3U) •
Note: Because of rounding, and because totals include amounts too small to show separately, sum of
items m not always equal totals.
ay




32

Table 15: Publicly owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: Federal or State and local ownership and program, annually, 1949-58
N um ber o f new d w e l l i n g u n i t s
S t a t e a n d l o c a l l y ow ned
New Y o r k C i t y H o u s in g A u t h b r i t y

F e d e r a l l y ow ned
Year

1 9 l* 9 ....
1 9 5 0 ....
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 1 * ....
1 9 5 5 ....
1 9 5 6 ....
1 9 5 7 ....
1 9 5 8 ....

A ll
p u b lic
p ro g ra m s

At
A l l o th e r
T o ta l m ilit a r y f e d e r a lly
ow ned2/
base s i'

2, i a o

7 1 ,2 0 5
5 8 ,5 2 0
35,1*85

3 ,9 6 5
1 ,0 5 5
1 ,0 6 0
620
105

1 8 ,7 0 0
1 9 ,5 2 5
2 U ,2 3 5
1*9,105
6 7 ,9 0 5

21*5
5 ,0 1 0
8 ,7 5 0
2 5 ,5 2 0
3 6 ,3 1 0

(5 )
I t , 885
8 ,1 0 5
2 5 ,0 8 5
3 6 ,0 5 0

3 6 ,3 2 0

1 3,800
*

170
1*1*5
1*30
60

l,5 5 o
885
615
190
00
235
125
61*5
1*35
260

F e d e r a lly
a id e d
T o ta l
lo w -r e n t s '

F e d e r a lly
a id e d
T o ta l!/
lo w -r e n t

3 2 ,3 6 0
1*2,71*5
70,11*5
5 7 ,9 0 0
3 5 ,3 8 0

780
2 6 ,8 7 5
6 5 ,2 0 0
52,71*5
3 1 ,3 8 0

1 9 ,6 6 0
1*,075
7 ,5 9 5
5 ,2 0 0

5 ,2 6 0
2,61*0
5 ,8 6 0
2,21*5

18,1*50
U * , 510
15,1*85
2 3 ,5 8 5
3 1 ,5 9 5

11*,155
8 ,5 7 0
1*,795
17,1*75
1 9 ,9 7 0

5,91*5
7 ,7 8 5
6 ,1 7 0
5 ,6 2 0
7,1*20

2 ,2 9 0
3 ,9 1 5
980
2 ,8 5 5
1 ,1 0 0

9,660

(5 )

A l l o th e r
N . Y . C . H o u s in g
A u th o r ity
1 9 ,6 6 0
1*,1*00
ljl* 3 5
1 ,7 3 0

A l l o th e r
S t a t e and
lo c a lly
ownedif/

2 ,9 5 5

1 1 ,9 1 5
11,1*70
3 ,5 1 0
3,1*20
1 ,1 1 0

3 ,6 5 5
3 ,8 7 0
5 ,1 9 0
2 ,7 6 0
6 ,3 2 0

61*0
2 ,0 7 0
5 ,5 0 0
3 ,3 5 0
5 ,3 0 5

1 / I n c l u d e s 6 2 ,0 9 0 new p u b l i c l y ow ned u n i t s s t a r t e d d u r i n g 1 9 5 6 -5 8 , w i t h F H A -i n s u r e d m o r t g a g e s , u n d e r
t h e C a p e h a r t am endm ent t o t h e N a t i o n a l H o u s in g A c t .
S ee t a b l e 17 ( p . 3 U ) • S e e a l s o , t a b l e l U ( p . 3 1 ) ; a n d
d e f i n i t i o n s ( p . 1 2 ) .T h e r e m a in d e r o f t h e m i l i t a r y h o u s i n g u n i t s i n c l u d e d h e r e w e re b u i l t u n d e r p r o v i s i o n s o f
F e d e r a l l a w s c o v e r i n g a u t h o r i z a t i o n s a n d a p p r o p r i a t i o n s f o r F e d e r a l d e f e n s e a g e n c ie s (n o w t h e D e p a rt m e n t o f
D e fe n s e ).
2 / I n c l u d e s a b o u t 3 ,0 0 0 u n i t s s t a r t e d a t A t o m ic E n e r g y C o m m is s io n s i t e s , m o s t o f w h ic h w e re b u i l t p r i o r
t o 19*?2.
( T h e A t o m ic E n e r g y C o m m u n ity A c t o f 1955 made p r o v i s i o n f o r t e r m i n a t i o n o f G o v e rn m e n t m anagem ent
a n d o w n e r s h ip o f c o m m u n it ie s ow n ed b y t h e A E C , t o t h e e x t e n t t h a t t h e t e r m i n a t i o n w i l l n o t im p e d e p u r p o s e s
a n d p ro g ra m s e s t a b l i s h e d i n t h e A t o m ic E n e r g y A c t o f 1 9 5 U » )
T h e r e m a in d e r o f t h e u n i t s i n t h e a l l o t h e r
f e d e r a l l y o w n ed c a t e g o r y w e re b u i l t a t n a t i o n a l p a r k s , r e c l a m a t i o n p r o j e c t s , a n d a t s i m i l a r f e d e r a l l y ow ned
p ro je c ts .
3 / I n c l u d e s f e d e r a l l y a i d e d l o w - r e n t u n i t s b u i l t u n d e r a u s p i c e s o f t h e New Y o r k C i t y H o u s in g A u t h o r i t y ,
a n d sho w n s e p a r a t e l y h e r e .
k / I n c l u d e s S t a t e a n d l o c a l l y . f i n a n c e d h o u s i n g b u i l t f o r l o w - a n d m o d e r a t e -in c o m e g r o u p s .
In c lu d e s
a l s o ," " h o u s i n g b u i l t w i t h F e d e r a l l o a n s u n d e r t h e C o m m u n ity F a c i l i t i e s A c t o f 1950— m a i n l y c o l l e g e h o u s i n g
f o r s t u d e n t s a n d f a c u l t y , a n d a s m a ll am o u n t o f h o u s i n g f o r s t a f f a t h o s p i t a l s a n d i n s t i t u t i o n s .
T h e v o lu m e
o f c o l l e g e h o u s i n g w as s m a ll e a r l y i n t h e p ro g ra m b e c a u s e , u n t i l A u g u s t 1 9 5 3 , c o l l e g e s w e re r e q u i r e d t o show
a d e f e n s e -r e la t e d n e ed t o q u a l i f y f o r a F e d e r a l c o lle g e h o u s in g l o a n .
A n e s t im a t e d 10,21*5 c o l l e g e h o u s i n g
u n i t s w e re b e g u n d u r i n g t h e 1 9 5 6 -5 8 p e r i o d .
5 / F e w e r t h a n 50 u n i t s .
N o te :
B e c a u s e o f r o u n d i n g , a n d b e c a u s e t o t a l s i n c l u d e a m o u n ts t o o s m a ll t o sh o w s e p a r a t e l y , sum o f
it e m s m ay n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




33

Table 16: Publicly owned new nonfarm dwelling units started, by ownership and program, monthly, 1949-58
N u m ber o f new p u b l i c l y o w n ed d w e l l i n g u n i t s
Year

Ja n .

Feb.

M a r.

A p r.

M ay

1 9 U 9 ...............
1 9 5 0 ...............
1 9 5 1 ...............
1 9 5 2 ...............
1 9 5 3 ...............
1 9 5 U ...............
1 9 5 5 ...............
1 9 5 6 ...............
1 9 5 ? ...............
1 9 5 3 ...............

3 .7
.9
3 .7
3 .5
3 .9
1 .3
.3
l.U
U .l
5 .0

2 .6
.6
U .l
3 .U
5.1*
1 .3
2 .0
l.u
2 .7
5 .1

u .l
1 .3
3 .6
1 2 .8
9 .7
2 .0
1 .0
U .7
7 .7
U .l

3 .3
2 .1
3 .9
9 .2
U .o
1 .2
1 .5
1 .5
2 .3
U .9

U .2
3 .U
3 .U
8 .7
2 .7
1 .1
2 .5
2 .9
6 .1
7 .2

1 9 1 9 ...............
1 9 5 0 ...............
1 9 5 1 ...............
1 9 5 2 ...............
1 9 5 3 ...............
1 9 5 U ...............
1 9 5 5 ...............
1 9 5 6 ...............
1 9 5 7 ...............
1 9 5 8 ...............

3 .7
.9
3 .3
3 .5
3 .8
1 .3
.3
.9
.8
1 .7

2 .5
.2
U .o
3 .U
5 .U
1 .2
1 .2
1 .0
l.U
1 .8

3 .9
1 .3
3 .6
1 2 .8
9 .7
2 .0
.9
2 .3
(2 )
1 .8

2 .8
1 .9
3 .7
9 .2
U .o
1 .1
1 .5
1 .0
1 .0
3 .1

3 .U
3 .3
3 .3
8 .7
2 .7
1 .1
2 .U
2 .2
1 .8
U .o

Ju n e

J u ly

Aug.

S e p t.

(in

th o u s a n d s )

O c t.

N ov.

D ec.

Annual
t o ta ls

A L L P U B L IC FROGRAi'IS 1 /
U .5
.9
U 2 .2
6 .6
2 .6
3 .9
3 .1
2 .8
5 .U
1 1 .7

3 .U
U .7
3 .7
1 .5
.3
3 .1
.8
2 .1
U .o
U .2

2 .U
u .l
.8
1 .7
1 .0
1 .3
2 .U
.7
3 .2
9 .U

2 .3
U .5
l .l
1 .6
3 .0
2 .3
1 .3
3 .2
1 .7
1 0 .1

2 .U
1 .7
1 .1
1 .8
(2 )
.2
1 .0
2 .U
8 .6
2 .1

2 .0
U .6
2 .3
3 .8
1 .6
.3
.8
•U
2 .5
2 .U

l.U
1 5 .0
1 .3
3 .9
1 .3
.7
2 .7
.7
.9
1 .7

3 6 .3
1*3.8
7 1 .2
5 8 .5
3 5 .5
1 8 .7
1 9 .5
21*. 2
1*9.1
6 7 .9

2 .3
1 .7
1 .1
1 .7
(2 )
.2
1 .0
1 .8
U .7
l.U

2 .0
U .6
2 .3
3 .8
1 .6
.3
.6
.2
2 .5
2 .2

l.U
1 U .9
1 .1
3 .9
1 .3
.7
.2
.6
.7
1 .6

32.1*
1*2.8
7 0 .1
5 7 .9
35.1*
1 8 .5
H * .5
1 5 .5
2 3 .6
3 1 .6

A L L S T A T E AND L O C A L L Y OWNED
3 .3
.8
U 2 .1
6 .5
2 .6
3 .9
1 .9
1 .9
3 .6
5 .3

3 .2
U .7
3 .7
1 .5
.3
3 .1
.7
l.U
2 .2
1 .8

1 .6
U .l
.8
l.U
1 .0
1 .3
2 .U
.u
3 .1
2 .2

2 .3
u .u
1 .1
1 .5
3 .0
2 .3
1 .3
1 .7
1 .7
U .7

S t a t e a n d l o c a l l o w - r e n t u n d e r F e d e r a l - a i d p ro g ra m s ( U . S . H o u s in g A c t o f 1 9 U 9 , a s a m e n d e d )3 /
1 9 U 9 ...............
1 9 5 0 ...............
1 9 5 1 ...............
1 9 5 2 ...............
1 9 5 3 ...............
1 9 5 U ...............
1 9 5 5 ...............
1 9 5 6 ...............
1 9 5 7 ...............
1 9 5 8 ...............

0
0
2 .0
3 .2
3 .6
1 .2
.2
.1
.2
1 .3

0 .1
0
3 .5
3 .U
U .9
1 .1
.9
.2
1 .0
1 .6

0

0

•U
3 .3
1 1 .8
9 .3
1 .9
.3
l.U
0
1 .6

.U
2 .U
9 .0
3 .0
1 .0
1 .2
.5
.9
1 .5

0
1 .2
3 .0
8 .7
1 .8
1 .1
.9
.3
1 .7
2 .6

0
.1
U l.8
6 .2
1 .8
3 .6
.9
.6
3 .U
U .3

0
1 .6
3 .5
1 .1
(2 )
1 .5
.3
1 .0
1 .8
1 .3

0
1 .8
.3
l.U
1 .0
.7
2 .3
0
1 .7
1 .7

.2
1 U .5
l .l
3 .6
1 .3
0
0
0
.3
1 .2

.8
2 6 .9
6 5 .2
5 2 .7
3 1 .3
lit .2
8 .5
1*.8

3 .3
.5

.5
2 .8
2 .2
3 .0
1 .6
.3
.3
0
1 .6
.8

2 .3
.3
0
1 .2
(2 )
0
1 .0
1 .2
l.U
.8

1 .5
1 .8
.1
.8
0
0
.3
.2
.9
1 .3

1 .2
.U
0
.3
0
.7
.2
.6
•U
.5

3 1 .6
1 5 .9
U .9
5 .2
l* .l
U .3
5 .9
1 0 .6
6 .2
1 1 .6

.2
3 .5
0
.1
0
.7
.3
0
0
0

1 9 .7
9 .7
U .l
7 .6
5 .2
5 .9
7 .8
6 .2
5 .6
7 .U

0
2 .7
1 .1
.8
3 .0
1 .6
1 .2
.2
1 .5
l.U

0
l.U
l .l
.5
0
.2
0
.6

1 7 .5
2 0 .0

A l l o t h e r S t a t e a n d l o c a l l y o .n e d 3 /
1 9 U 9 ...............
1 9 5 0 ......
1 9 5 1 ...............
1 9 5 2 ...............
1 9 5 3 ...............
1 9 5 U ...............
1 9 5 5 ...............
1 9 5 6 ...............
1 9 5 7 ...............
1 9 5 8 ...............

3 .7
.9
1 .3
.3
.2
.1
.1
.8
.6
•U

2 .U
.2
.5
0
.5
.1
.3
.8
.U
.1

3 .9
.9
.3
1 .0
.U
.1
.6
.9
(2 )
.2

1 9 U 9 ...............
1 9 5 0 ...............
1 9 5 1 ...............
1 9 5 2 ...............
1 9 5 3 ...............
1 9 5 U ...............
1 9 5 5 ...............
1 9 5 6 ...............
1 9 5 7 ...............
1 9 5 8 ...............

3 .5
0
.8
0
.1
0
.1
.7
.3
0

2 .3
0
0
0
.8
.U
.1
.5
.U
0

2 .3
0
0
1 .9
.8
0
.U
.1
0
.1

2 .8
1 .5
1 .3
.2
1 .0
.1
.3
.5
.1
1 .6

3 .U
2 .1
.3
0
.9
0
1 .5
1 .9
.1
1 .3

3 .3
.7
.3
.3
.8
.3
1 .0
1 .3
.2
l.o

3 .2
3 .1
.2
.U
.3
1 .6
.U
.U
•U
.u

1 .6
2 .3
.5
0
0
.6
.1
.u
l.U
.6

2 .3
1 .7
0
.7
0
.7
.1
1 .5
.2
3 .3

U n d e r a u s p i c e s o f t h e New Y o r k C i t y H o u s in g A u t h o r i t y i£/
2 .6
.1
.3
0
l.U
.1
l.U
.3
0
.8

1 .8
.5
0
1 .6
l.U
0
1 .1
.7
0
1 .2

1 .8
0
2 .6
.9
.7
.3
1 .6
1 .2
0
1 .3

1 .9
1 .1
.1
.1
(2 )
2 .6
0
l.U
.1
0

.U
.8
.2
0
0
.6
.7
.2
1 .3
1 .1

1 .0
2 .2
0
.6
0
1 .3
.8
.9
0
2 .8

1 .6
.3
0
.5
0
0
.6
.2
2 .9
.u

•U
1 .0
0
1 .9
0
0
.6
0
.6
.7

1 / I n c l u d e s n e w f e d e r a l l y o w n ed d w e l l i n g u n i t s n o t sho w n s e p a r a t e l y h e r e .
S ee t a b l e 15 ( p .
n u m b e r o f f e d e r a l l y ow ned u n i t s s t a r t e d a n n u a l l y .
2 / F e w e r t h a n $0 u n i t s .
3 / I n c l u d e s d w e l l i n g u n i t s b e g u n u n d e r a u s p i c e s o f t h e New Y o r k C i t y H o u s in g A u t h o r i t y .
U / In c lu d e s d w e llin g u n it s b e g u n u n d e r F e d e r a l-a id p ro g ra m s .
S e e a l s o , t a b l e 13 ( p 3 2 ) .
W o te s B e c a u s e o f r o u n d i n g , a n d b e c a u s e t o t a l s i n c l u d e a m o u n ts t o o s m a l l t o sh o w s e p a r a t e l y ,
it e m s may n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




32 ) , f o r t h e

sum o f

34

Table 17: Publicly owned new nonfarm dwelling unirs started under the Capehart amendment
to the Motional Housing Act, monthly, 1956*531
N u m ber o f new p u o l i c l y ow ned d w e l l i n g u n i t s

1 9 5 6 ..................
1 9 5 7 ..................
1 9 5 8 ..................

Ja n .

Feb.

—

A p r.

M ay

Ju n e

J u ly

.9
7 .5
2 .0

0
1 .1
1 .7

0
U .o
3 .2

.3
1 .2
$ .8

.5
1 .7
2 .U

—

3 .3
3 .3

M a r.

______ 1

Year

1 .1
3 .2

S e p t.
0
.1
6 .3

1 .3
0
$ .2

(in

th o u s a n d s )

O c t.
.6
3 .7
.7

N ov.
0
0

.1
.3

Annual
to ta ls

D ec.

0
0

y
-

3 .9
23.6
31*. 7

1 / F o r a s s ig n e d o c c u p a n c y b y m i l i t a r y p e r s o n n e l.
S ee a l s o t a b l e 1U ( p . 3 l ) ; a n d d e f i n i t i o n s ( p . 1 2 ) .
T h e p r o p o r t io n o f C a p e h a rt h o u s in g u n i t s b u i l t i n n o n m e t ro p o lit a n a re a s i s a s f o l l o w s :
I n 1 9 $ 6 , a lm o s t 100
p e r c e n t ; 1 9 5 7 --7 5 p e r c e n t ; a n d 195 $— 55 p e r c e n t .
2 / C o v e r s v o lu m e f o r t h e f i r s t 10 m o n th s o f 1 9 5 6 , w hen h o u s i n g s t a r t s a c t i v i t y b e g a n u n d e r t h i s p r o g r a m .
W o te :
B e c a u s e o f r o u n d i n g , a n d b e c a u s e t o t a l s i n c l u d e a m o u n ts t o o s m a ll t o sho w s e p a r a t e l y , sum o f
it e m s may n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

Table 18: New nonfarm dwelling units started: Number and total construction cost, by private and public ownership, annually, 1920-58

Year

t o t a l c o n s t r u c t i o n c o s t o f ne w
d w e llin g u n it s ( i n m illio n s )

N um ber o f new d w e l l i n g u n i t s
( i n th o u sa n d s)
T o ta l

P r iv a te

1 9 2 0 ......................................
1 9 2 1 ......................................
1 9 2 2 ......................................
1 9 2 3 ......................................
1921*......................................
1 9 2 5 ......................................
1 9 2 6 ......................................
1 9 2 7 ......................................
1 9 2 8 ......................................
1 9 2 9 ......................................

21*7 .0
1 1 9 .0
**
716.0
871.0
893.0
937.0

21*7 .0
1 1 9.0
**
716.0
871.0
893.0
937.0

81*9.0
8 1 0 .0
7 5 3 .0
5 0 9 .0

81*9.0
8 1 0 .0
7 5 3 .0
5 0 9 .0

1 9 3 0 ................................ ..
1 9 3 1 ......................................
1 9 3 2 ......................................
1 9 3 3 ......................................
1 9 3 U ......................................
1 9 3 5 ......................................
1 9 3 6 ......................................
1 9 3 7 ......................................
1938 ......................................
1 9 3 9 ......................................

3 3 0 .0
251*.0
1 3 U .0
9 3 .0
1 2 6 .0
2 2 1 .0
3 1 9 .0
3 3 6 .0
1 06.0
*
5 1 5 .0

3 3 0 .0
2 5 U .O

191*0......................................
191*1......................................
191*2......................................
191*3......................................

6 0 2 .6
7 0 6 .1
3 5 6 .0
1 9 1 .0
11*1.8

131*.0
9 3 .0
1 2 6 .0
2 1 5 .7
30l* .2
332.1*
3 9 9 .3
1*58.1*
5 2 9 .6
6 1 9 .5
3 0 1 .2
1 8 3 .7
1 3 8 .7
2 0 3 .1

T o ta l

P u b lic

P r iv a te 2 /

P u b lic 11

$ 1 , 068.0
1 , 7 71.0
2 , 957.0
3 , 77 5.0
1*,0 6 5 .0
1*, 1*75.0
1»,1 1 2 .0
3 ,9 1 0 .0
3 ,6 1 3 .0
2,1*53.0

$ 1 , 068.0
1 , 7 7 1 .0
2 ,9 5 7 .0
3 , 7 7 5 .0
1*, 065.0
I t , 1*75.0
1*, 1 1 2 .0
3 ,9 1 0 .0
3 , 6 1 3 .0
2,1*53.0

....

1,1*91*. 5
1,1 0 1 * .6
1*07.0
285.1*
3 6 8 .5
7 3 2 .5
1 ,1 9 3 .7
1 ,3 6 5 .8
1 , 5 6 1 .6
1 ,7 6 3 .9

....

5 .3
1 U .8
3 .6
6 .7
5 6 .6

l,l* 9 l* .5
l ,1 0 l* .6
1*07.0
285.1*
3 6 8 .5
757.1*
1 ,2 7 1 .0
1,382.2*
1 ,5 8 3 .9
1,91*8.3

—
—
«...
$ 2 U .9
7 7 .3
1 6 .6
2 2 .3
l8 U .il

2,299.1*
2 ,8 2 6 .2
1 ,31*3.5
6 8 9 .1
1*96.1
9 6 5 .7
3 ,7 6 9 .8
5>61*3.l*
7 ,2 0 3 .1
7 ,7 0 3 .0

2 ,0 7 2 .2
2 ,5 3 0 .8
1 ,1 3 3 .8
6 6 0 .5
1*83.2
9 5 9 .3
3 ,7 1 3 ,8
5,617.1*
7 , 0 2 9 .0
7,371*.3

2 2 7 .3
2 9 5 .U
2 0 9 .6
2 3 .7
1 2 .8
6 .U
5 6 .0
2 6 .0
1 7 U .1
3 2 8 .7

1 1 ,7 8 8 .6
9 ,8 0 0 .9
1 0 ,2 0 9 .0
1 0 ,1*88 .0
12,1*78.2
l i t , 52*1*. 6
1 3 ,0 7 7 .0
1 2 ,691* .0

11,1*18.1*
9 ,1 8 6 .1
9 ,7 0 6 .3
1 0 ,1 8 1 .2
1 2 ,3 0 9 .2
11*, 31*5.8
12,811*.8
1 2 ,1 2 6 .8

3 7 0 .2
6 1 U .8
5 0 2 .7
3 0 6 .8
1 6 9 .0
1 9 8 .8

11*,1*99.1*

1 3 ,6 7 8 .5

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—

—
—
—

__

191*1*......................................
191*5......................................
191*6......................................
191*7......................................
191*8......................................
191*9......................................

2 0 9 .3
6 7 0 .5
81*9.0
9 3 1 .6
1 ,0 2 5 .1

6 6 2 .5
81*5.6
9 1 3 .5

988.8

7 3 .0
8 6 .6
5 U .8
7 .3
3 .1
1 .2
8 .0
3 .k
1 8 .1
3 6 .3

1 9 5 0 ......................................
1 9 5 1 ......................................
1 9 5 2 ......................................
1 9 5 3 ......................................
1951*......................................
1 9 5 5 ......................................
1 9 5 6 ......................................
1 9 5 7 ......................................
1 9 5 8 .................. ...................

1 ,3 9 6 .0
1 ,0 9 1 .3
1 ,1 2 7 .0
1 ,1 0 3 .8
1,220.1*
1 ,3 2 8 .9
1 ,1 1 8 .1
1,01*1.9
1,209.1*

1 ,3 5 2 .2
1 ,0 2 0 .1
1 ,0 6 8 .$
1 ,0 6 8 .3
1 ,2 0 1 .7
1 ,3 0 9 .5
1 ,0 9 3 .9
9 9 2 .3
1 ,11*1.5

U 3 .8
7 1 .2
5 8 .$
3 5 .5
1 8 .7
1 9 .k
2 h .2
U 9 .1
6 7 .9

—
—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—

2 6 2 .3
5 6 7 .2
8 2 0 .9

1 / C o v e r s th e c o s t o f l a b o r , m a t e r ia ls , and s u b c o n tr a c te d w o rk , and t h a t p a r t o f th e b u ild e r * s o v e rh e a d
a n d p r o f i t c h a r g e a b l e d i r e c t l y t o t h e b u i l d i n g o f n o n fa rm d w e l l i n g u n i t s s t a r t e d i n s p e c i f i e d p e r i o d s .
I n c l u d e d a r e t h e c o s t s o f e q u ip m e n t w h ic h
b ecom es a n i n t e g r a l p a r t o f t h e s t r u c t u r e a n d i s e s s e n t i a l t o i t s
g e n e ra l u s e .
E x c l u d e d a r e t h e c o s t s o f l a n d , s i t e im p ro v e m e n t , a r c h i t e c t u r a l f e e s , a n d s a l e s p r o f i t .
2 / B a se d o n c o n t r a c t v a lu e s o r e s t im a t e d c o n s t r u c t io n c o s t s f o r i n d i v i d u a l p r o j e c t s , a s r e p o r t e d b y
a g e n c T e s a d m in is t e r in g p u b l i c h o u s in g p ro g ra m s .
N o te :
B e c a u s e o f r o u n d i n g , sum o f it e m s m ay n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .




35

Table 19: Privately owned new nonfarm dwelling units started: Average construction cost,
all types of units and 1-family houses, monthly, 1940-58
A v e ra g e c o n s t r u c t io n
Year

Ja n .

Feb.

M a r.

A p r.

M ay

c o s t o f p r i v a t e l y ow n ed d w e l l i n g u n i t s

Ju n e

J u ly

A l l ty p e s o f u n it s
1 9 1 * 0 ....
1 9 l* l....
1 9 1 * 2 ....
1 9 1 * 3 ....
19l*U____

8 3 ,9 5 0 S 3 ,8 5 0 $ 3 ,8 o o $ 3 ,8 7 5 ^ 3 ,9 0 0
3 ,9 5 0 3 ,9 5 0 i* ,0 0 0 l * ,i o o
l* ,o 5 o
3 ,7 0 0
3 ,8 2 5
3 ,8 2 5 3 ,9 0 0
3 ,7 7 5
3,1*50 3,1*00 3,1*50 3 ,6 0 0
3 ,6 c 5
3 ,6 7 5 3 ,7 0 0
3 ,7 2 5
3,1*75 3 ,3 7 5

1 9 1 * 5 ....
191*6____
1 9 1 * 7 ....
1 9 1 * 3 ....
1 9 1 * 9 ....

3 ,3 0 0
5 ,3 0 0
5 ,6 5 0
7 ,3 50
7 ,3 7 5

1 9 5 0 ____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ...,
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 1 * ....

7,1*75
3 ,7 7 5
3 ,7 5 0
3 ,9 5 0
9 ,3 0 0

1
1
1
1

95
95
95
95

5 ....
6 ....
7 ....
8 ....

1 0 ,2 0 0
1 0 ,8 7 5
1 1 ,7 2 5
1 1 ,7 2 5

Aug.

S e p t.

O c t.

N ov.

D ec.

Annual
a v e ra g e

(h o u s e s and a p a rtm e n ts )

3 ,6 5 0
3,1*75

$ 3 ,9 2 5
1*,150
3 ,7 2 5
3 ,6 2 5
3,1*50

$ 3 ,9 0 0
U , 150
3 ,6 0 0
3 ,6 7 5
3 ,5 2 5

$ 3 ,9 2 5
1*,150
3 ,7 0 0
3 ,5 7 5
3 ,5 2 5

$ 3 ,9 7 5
I* ,l5 0
3 ,7 7 5
3 ,6 2 5
3 ,3 0 0

$ 3 ,9 5 0
1*,000
3 ,7 2 5
3 ,6 0 0
3 ,2 0 0

$1*,000
l* ,o ? 5
3 ,5 7 5
3 ,7 2 5
3 ,2 0 0

$ 3 ,9 2 5
1*,0?5
3 ,7 7 5
3 ,6 0 0

$ 3 ,9 0 0
l * ,i 5 o

3,800

3,1*75

3 ,6 2 5
5,1*50
5 ,7 0 0
7 ,3 5 0
7,1*75

3 ,7 0 0
5 ,9 0 0
6 ,0 7 5
7 ,3 7 5
7 ,5 2 5

1*,200
5 ,5 2 5
6 ,2 0 0
7 ,6 5 0
7>>7?

i* ,1 7 5
5 ,5 2 5
6 ,3 5 0
7 ,3 5 0
7,1*50

l*,i*25
5,1*00
6 ,6 5 0
7 ,8 7 5
7 ,3 7 5

i*,6 00
5 ,6 0 0
6 ,8 2 5
3 ,2 5 0
7,1*75

1*,600
5 ,5 5 0
6 ,8 7 5
7 ,7 5 0
7,1*25

5 ,2 2 5
5 ,7 5 0
7 ,2 2 5
7 ,8 0 0
7,1*25

5 ,1 2 5
5 ,8 5 0
7 ,3 2 5
7 ,7 0 0
7 ,5 5 0

5,1*50
5 ,6 7 5
7,1*00
7 ,7 2 5
7 ,3 0 0

1*,625
5 ,6 0 0
6 ,6 5 0
7 ,7 0 0
7,1*50

7 ,7 0 0

3 ,2 0 0
7 ,9 7 5
8 ,2 7 5
8 ,7 5 0
9 .1 7 5
3 ,9 7 5
8 ,9 5 0
9 ,0 2 5
9 ,1 7 5
9 ,3 5 0
9 ,5 2 5
9,1*75
9 ,6 7 5 1 0 ,2 7 5 1 0 ,5 0 0

•3,575
9 ,l5 o
9 ,3 2 5
9 ,5 7 5
10,1*25

8 ,6 5 0
9 ,1 2 5
9 ,2 0 0
9 ,7 5 0
10,1*75

8 ,9 2 5
9 ,0 0 0
9 ,0 5 0
10,1*00

8 ,6 5 0
9 ,2 7 ?
9 ,1 2 5
9 ,7 5 0
1 0 ,3 2 5

8 ,9 5 0
8 ,9 5 0
9 ,1 7 5
9 ,8 0 0
10,1*75

8 ,7 5 0
9 ,0 0 0
9 ,1 2 5
9 ,5 7 5
10,1*50

8 ,8 5 0
8 ,8 5 0
9 ,0 7 5
9,1*75
1 0 ,5 0 0

8,1*50
9 ,0 0 0
9 ,0 7 5
9 ,5 2 5
1 0 ,2 5 0

1 1 ,0 2 5
1 1 ,8 5 0
1 2 ,3 2 5
1 2 ,1 5 0

1 1 ,1 7 5
1 1 ,9 0 0
1 2 ,3 0 0
1 2 ,0 7 5

1 1 ,0 2 5
1 1 ,8 5 0
1 2 ,1 5 0
1 1 ,7 5 0

1 1 ,2 0 0
1 2 ,3 0 0
1 2 ,1 0 0

1 1 ,1 5 0
1 1 ,8 2 5
12,1*25
1 2 ,2 0 0

1 1 ,1 5 0
1 2 ,0 2 5
1 2 ,1 7 5
1 1 ,8 5 0

1 1 ,1 2 5
1 1 ,6 5 0
1 2 ,0 2 5
1 1 ,6 7 5

1 0 ,9 5 0
1 1 ,7 2 5
1 2 ,2 2 5
1 1 ,9 7 5

8,800
8,800
9 ,1 5 0
9 ,3 5 0

1 0 ,6 2 5 10,800
1 1 ,3 2 5 1 1 ,6 0 0
1 1 ,9 2 5 1 2 ,3 0 0
1 1 ,7 7 5 1 1 ,9 7 5

3 ,9 0 0
5 ,6 7 5
6 ,2 2 5
7 ,5 0 0
7 ,5 0 0

1 0 ,9 0 0
1 1 ,7 7 5
1 2 ,3 0 0
1 2 ,0 7 5

1 0 ,9 5 0
1 1 ,8 5 0
1 2 ,3 0 0
1 2 ,2 2 5

9,800

11,800

O n e - f r m ily h ou se s o n ly
1 9 1 * 0 ....
1 9 1 * 1 ....
1 9 1 * 2 ....
1 9 1 * 3 ....
191*1*----------

5 3 ,9 7 5 SI*, 000 $ 3 ,9 5 0 $1*,050 $ l» ,o 5 o
1*,150 1*,125 1*,175 1*,275 1*,250
1*,000 l* ,o o o 1*,025 3 ,8 5 0 3 ,8 5 0
3 ,5 5 0 3,1*75 3 ,5 2 5
3 ,7 5 0
3 ,7 2 5
3 ,6 5 0 3 ,6 7 5 3,1*00 3 ,3 5 0
3 ,6 7 5

$2*,050
1*,300
3 ,8 7 5
3 ,8 2 5
3 ,3 7 5

$1*,100
1*,300
3 ,7 7 5
3 ,7 5 0
3,1*25

$1*,025
1*,300
3 ,6 7 5
3 ,6 2 5
3,1*50

$1*,075
1*,300
3 ,8 5 0
3 ,6 5 0
3,1*50

$1*,125
1*,300
3 ,8 5 0
3 ,6 7 5
3 ,2 7 5

$1*,125
1*,15’0
3 ,9 0 0
3 ,6 2 5
3 ,1 7 5

$1*,200
1*,200
3 ,7 7 5
3 ,7 7 5
3 ,2 2 5

$1*,075
i* ,2 5 0
3 ,9 0 0
3 ,6 7 5
3,1*50

1*,225
5,1*75
6 ,2 5 0
7 ,9 5 0
7 ,6 5 0

1*,225
5,1*25
6,1*50
8 ,o 5 o
7 ,6 7 5

1*,500
5 ,3 7 5
6 ,7 2 5
8 ,0 5 0

1*,575
5,1*50
7 ,0 2 5
7 ,9 0 0
7 ,7 2 5

5 ,2 0 0
5 ,6 2 5
7 ,2 7 5
7 ,8 2 5
7 ,6 7 5

5 ,1 5 0
5 ,6 7 5
7 ,5 2 5
7 ,9 0 0
7 ,6 7 5

5 ,6 0 0
5 ,5 7 5
7 ,6 5 0
7 ,9 0 0

7 ,5 2 5

1*,600
5,1*50
6 ,9 5 0
8 ,1 0 0
7 ,6 5 0

7 ,6 2 5

1*,650
5 ,5 2 5
6 ,7 5 0
7 ,8 5 0
7 ,6 2 5

8,1*50 8,1*50
9,1*75
9 ,3 2 5
9 ,5 5 0
9 ,5 7 5
9,600 9,800 1 0 ,0 0 0 9 ,9 0 0
9 ,8 0 0 1 0 ,0 7 5 1 0 ,6 0 0 1 0 ,8 5 0

8 ,7 5 0
9,1*75
9 ,6 7 5
1 0 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,7 5 0

8 ,8 7 5
9,1*00
9 ,5 0 0
1 0 ,1 2 5
1 0 ,8 5 0

9 ,1 2 5
9 ,3 0 0
9,1*25
1 0 ,1 7 5
1 0 ,7 5 0

8 ,9 0 0
9,1*50
9 ,6 0 0
1 0 ,2 0 0
1 0 ,6 7 5

9 ,2 0 0
9 ,2 2 5
9 ,5 2 5
1 0 ,1 7 5
1 0 ,8 0 0

9 ,0 7 5
9 ,2 5 0
9 ,5 5 o
9 ,9 7 5
1 0 ,8 5 0

9 ,2 0 0
9 ,1 2 5
9 ,5 2 5
1 0 ,0 0 0
1 1 ,0 7 5

8 ,6 7 5
9 ,3 0 0
9,1*75
9 ,9 5 0
1 0 ,6 2 5

11,1*00
1 2 ,3 0 0
1 3 ,2 5 0
1 3 ,1 5 0

11,1*00
1 2 ,3 0 0
1 3 ,1 5 0
1 3 ,0 2 5

11,1*75
1 2 ,3 7 5
1 3 ,0 5 0
1 3 ,0 2 5

11,1*25
1 2 ,2 7 5
1 2 ,9 2 5
1 2 ,5 5 0

1 1 ,5 2 5
1 2 ,3 2 5
1 3 ,0 7 5
1 2 ,9 2 5

1 1 ,5 7 5
12,1*25
1 3 ,3 7 5
1 3 ,1 2 5

1 1 ,5 7 5
1 2 ,6 7 5
1 3 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,9 2 5

1 1 ,6 2 5
1 2 ,3 5 0
1 2 ,9 2 5
1 2 ,8 0 0

1 1 ,3 5 0
1 2 ,2 2 5
1 3 ,0 2 5
1 2 ,9 5 0

1 9 1 * 5 ....
1 9 1 * 6 ....
1 9 1 * 7 ....
1 9 1 * 8 ....
1 9 1 * 9 ....

3 ,2 5 0
5 ,2 5 0
5 ,7 0 0
7 ,2 5 0
7 ,6 5 0

3 ,5 5 0
5 ,l* o o
5 ,8 2 5
7,1*50
7 ,5 2 5

3 ,7 2 5
5 ,8 5 0
6 ,1 5 0
7 ,5 5 0
7,1*50

1 9 5 0 ____
1 9 5 1 ....
1 9 5 2 ....
1 9 5 3 ....
1 9 5 1 * ....

7 ,6 2 5
9 ,1 0 0
9 ,0 5 0
9,1*00
9 ,7 5 0

7 ,8 5 0
9 ,2 5 0
9 ,2 7 5

8 ,2 2 5
9 ,1 7 5
9 ,3 5 0

1 0 ,5 7 5 1 1 ,1 2 5
1 1 ,3 2 5 1 1 ,7 5 0
1 2 ,6 0 0 12,800
1 2 ,7 7 5 1 2 ,8 7 5

1 1 ,2 5 0
1 2 ,1 5 0
1 2 ,9 5 0
1 3 ,0 0 0

1 9 5 5 ....
1 9 5 6 ....
1 9 5 7 ....
1 9 5 8 ....

1*,000
5 ,5 7 5
6 ,2 7 5
7 ,7 7 5
7 ,5 o o

1 1 ,2 5 0
1 2 ,2 7 5
1 3 ,0 2 5
1 3 ,1 0 0

1 / See t a b l e 1 8 , f o o t n o t e 1#
T h e c o n s t r u c t i o n c o s t a v e r a g e s a r e a f f e c t e d b y v a r i a t i o n s i n t h e s i z e an d
d e s i g n o f t h e d w e l l i n g u n i t s , i n t h e s i z e a n d t y p e o f p r o j e c t s s t a r t e d , an d b y d i f f e r e n c e s i n c o n s t r u c t i o n
m e th o d s , a s w e l l a s by c h a n g e s i n t h e c o s t o f m a t e r i a l s a n d l a b o r .
T h e y do n o t r e p r e s e n t t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n
c o s t o f a t y p i c a l d w e l l i n g u n i t o r 1 - f a m i l y h o u s e , a n d s h o u ld n o t be c o n f u s e d w i t h s e l l i n g p r i c e .




SELECTED REFERENCES

36

The Bureau of Labor Statistics publications listed below provide supplementary informa­
tion on the statistical series shown in this bulletin. They contain sta tistic s a s well as de­
scriptive and interpretive text. Starred (*) items may be purchased from the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C., or from any of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics Regional Offices (see inside back cover for addresses). Publications
designated with t are out of print, but may be found in many public and university libraries.
Periodicals

* Monthly Labor Review. Monthly. Annual subscription, $6.25- 55 cents per copy.
Includes current housing and construction sta tistic s, developments m industrial rela­
tions, occasional articles on housing and construction, and brief reviews of new publications.
* Construction Review. Monthly. Annual subscription, $3* 30 cents per copy.1
Includes current housing and construction sta tistic s, articles interpreting the various
statistical series and results of special surveys, and summaries of legislation and regulations
affecting housing and construction, ilousing starts trends for each of the years 1954-58,
were analyzed in annual review articles appearing in the January issu e of 1955, 1956, and
1957; and the February 1958, and March 1959 issu e s.
Bulletins and Special Reports

T Volume of Residential Construction, 1920-37. Monthly Labor Review, Jan. 1933, pp. 243-254.
t Number of Dwelling Units Built in Urban and Nonfarm Areas, 1920-36. Monthly Labor Review,
Jan. 1938, pp. 254-256.
t Building Construction, 1940. Bulletin 693* 140 pp. Text, tables, and charts,
t Building Construction, 1941. Bulletin 713. 130 pp. Text, tables, and charts.
Housing and the Increase in Population. Monthly Labor Review, Apr. 1942, pp. 869-880.
Reprint No. 1421. (The reprint was expanded to include definitions and estimating pro­
cedures.)
t Elapsed Time and Cost in Residential Construction. Construction, Oct. 1946, pp. 3-13.1
t Contractors' Use of Homebuilding Permits Issued. Monthly Labor Review, Jan. 1952, 2 pp.
Reprint No. 2101. (The reprint was expanded to include results of a sample survey made
in June 1952.)
t Estimating National Ilousing Volume. In Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series. Bulletin 993, Ch. Ill, pp. 13-19*
* Estimating National Housing Volume. In Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series. Bulletin 1168, Ch. II, pp. 8-15* 65 cents.
t Method of Compiling Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate of Housing Starts.
Construction,
Aug. 1952, pp. 3*8.1
t Technical Note: Revised BLS Seasonal Index of Private Nonfarm Ilousing Starts. Monthly
Labor Review, Aug. 1956, pp. 938-940.
FIIA and VA Housing Statistics and the Housing Market.
pp. 4-13.

Construction Review, June 1957,

Construction Review was issued jointly by the U.S. Department o f Labor and die U.S. Department
o f Commerce from January 1955 through July 1959, and thereafter by the Department o f Commerce. Con­
struction, a Bureau of Labor Statistics publication initiated in 1944, was replaced by Construction
Review.




37

* Construction in the War Years, 1942-45.
55 cents.

Bulletin 915.

179 PP*

Text, tab les, and charts.

* Construction and Housing, 1946-47. Bulletin 841. 47 pp. Text, tables, and charts. 25 cents.
* Construction: 1948 in Review. Bulletin 984* 49 PP* Text, tables, and charts. 30 cents.
* Structure of the Residential Building Industry in 1949*
tables. 30 cents.

Bulletin 1170.

f Housing Volume and Construction Cost of 1-Family Houses.
May 1951. S ta tistic s for 15 metropolitan areas.

38 pp.

Text and

Supplement to Construction,

* New Housing in Metropolitan Areas, 1949*51. Bulletin 1115. 64 pp. Text and tables. 35 cents.
* New Housing and Its Materials, 1940-56.
40 cents.

Bulletin 1231.

64 pp.

Text, tab les, and charts.

* Trends in Building Permit Activity. Bulletin 1243* May 1959* 120 pp. Text, tables, and
charts.
(This bulletin includes a comprehensive list of earlier bulletins, reports, and
special articles, from 1 9 2 0 forward, that include housing data compiled from building
permit reports.)
5 5 cents.
*




U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1959 O—SI 1325