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National Emergency Disputes
Under the Labor Management
Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act
1947-65




Bulletin No. 1482

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner




National Emergency Disputes
Under the Labor Management
Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act

1947-65

Bulletin No. 1482

March 1966
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 -




P r ic e 4 0 c e n t s




Preface
T h is b u l le t in , p r e p a r e d in th e B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s
D iv is io n of I n d u s t r i a l and L a b o r R e l a t i o n s , c o v e r s th e a c ti o n s of a ll
T a f t - H a r t l e y e m e r g e n c y b o a r d s a p p o in te d th r o u g h 1965. T h e c h r o ­
n o lo g ie s of th e 1959 l o n g s h o r e an d b a s i c s t e e l d i s p u t e s p r e s e n t e d in
B L S R e p o r t 169> O c t o b e r 1963, h a v e b e e n e x p a n d e d , an d a s e l e c t e d
b i b l i o g r a p h y on n a ti o n a l e m e r g e n c y d i s p u t e s h a s b e e n a d d e d .

Contents
Page
I n t r o d u c t i o n ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1

B o a r d s of I n q u i r y a p p o i n t e d 1947—6 5, u n d e r N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y P r o v i s i o n s
of th e L a b o r M a n a g e m e n t R e l a t i o n s A c t of 1947 ----------------------------------------------------------------

3

1. A to m ic E n e r g y D is p u te , 1948— A to m ic T r a d e s a n d L a b o r C o u n c il (A F L )
v. C a r b i d e a n d C a r b o n C h e m i c a l s C o r p . -----------------------------------------------------------------2. M e a tp a c k in g D is p u te , 1948— U n ite d P a c k i n g h o u s e W o r k e r s (CIO)
v. fiv e m a j o r m e a t p a c k i n g f i r m s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------3. B it u m in o u s C o a l M i n e r s ' P e n s i o n D is p u te , 1948— U n ite d M in e W o r k e r s
of A m e r i c a (ind . ) v. b itu m in o u s c o a l m in e o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------------4. T e le p h o n e D is p u te , 1948— A m e r i c a n U n io n of T e le p h o n e W o r k e r s (CIO)
v. A m e r i c a n T e le p h o n e an d T e l e g r a p h C o . -------------------------------------------------------------5. M a r i t i m e I n d u s t r y D is p u te , A tl a n tic , P a c i f i c , a n d G u lf C o a s t s , an d
G r e a t L a k e s , 1948— M a r i t i m e u n io n s v. s h ip p in g c o m p a n i e s ---------------------------6. B it u m in o u s C o a l M i n e r s ' C o n t r a c t D is p u te , 1948----U n ite d M in e W o r k e r s
of A m e r i c a (in d . ) v. b itu m in o u s c o a l m in e o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------------7. D o c k w o r k e r s D is p u te o n th e A tla n tic C o a s t , 1948----I n t e r n a t i o n a l
L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c i a t i o n (A F L ) v. s h ip p in g c o m p a n i e s --------------------------------8. B it u m in o u s C o a l M i n e r s ' C o n t r a c t D is p u te , 1949—50— U n ite d M in e W o r k e r s
of A m e r i c a (in d . ) v. b itu m in o u s c o a l m in e o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------------9. N o n f e r r o u s M e t a l s D is p u te , 1951— I n t e r n a t i o n a l U n io n of M in e ,
M ill a n d S m e l t e r W o r k e r s (ind . ) v. c o p p e r a n d o t h e r
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s i n d u s t r y -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10. A m e r i c a n L o c o m o t i v e C o. D is p u te , 1952----A lc o P r o d u c t s D iv is io n P la n t ,
D u n k ir k , N. Y. v. U n ite d S t e e l w o r k e r s of A m e r i c a ( C I O ) ---------------------------------11. L o n g s h o r e m e n 's D is p u te o n th e A tla n tic C o a s t , 1953----I n t e r n a t i o n a l
L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c i a t i o n (I n d .) , I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n 's
A s s o c i a t i o n (A F L ) v. s h ip p in g a n d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s -------------------------------------




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Contents— Continued
Page
B o a r d s of I n q u i r y a p p o i n t e d 1947—65, u n d e r N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y P r o v i s i o n s
of th e L a b o r M a n a g e m e n t R e l a t i o n s A c t of 1947— C o n tin u e d
12. A t o m ic E n e r g y D is p u te , 1954— C a r b i d e an d C a r b o n C h e m i c a l s C o. ,
a D iv is io n of U n io n C a r b i d e an d C a r b o n C o r p . v. U n ite d G a s ,
C o k e a n d C h e m i c a l W o r k e r s (CIO) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------13. A t o m i c E n e r g y D is p u te , 1954— C a r b i d e a n d C a r b o n C h e m i c a l s C o. ,
a D iv is io n of U n io n C a r b i d e a n d C a r b o n C o r p .
v 0 A t o m i c T r a d e s a n d L a b o r C o u n c il (A F L ) ---------------------------------------------------------------14. L o n g s h o r i n g D is p u te on th e A t l a n t i c an d G u lf C o a s t s , 1956—57—
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n ’s A s s o c i a t i o n ( in d .)
v. s h ip p in g an d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s --------------------------------------------------------------------------15. A t o m i c E n e r g y D i s p u te , 1957— O il, C h e m i c a l a n d A to m i c W o r k e r s
I n t e r n a t i o n a l U n io n ( A F L —CIO) v. G o o d y e a r A to m i c C o r p . , a
s u b s i d i a r y of th e G o o d y e a r T i r e an d R u b b e r C o . --------------------------------------------------------16. L o n g s h o r i n g D is p u te on th e A tl a n t i c an d G u lf C o a s t s , 1959—
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c i a t i o n
v. s h ip p in g an d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------—
17. B a s i c S te e l I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 1959— U n ite d S t e e l w o r k e r s of
A m e r i c a (A F L - C I O ) v. b a s i c s t e e l i n d u s t r y -----------------------------------------------------------------18. M a r i t i m e I n d u s t r y D i s p u te , A t l a n t i c , P a c i f i c , an d G u lf C o a s t s , 1961—
M a r i t i m e u n io n s v. c e r t a i n s h i p o w n e r s an d o p e r a t o r s in th e
U n ite d S ta te s f o r e i g n an d d o m e s t i c t r a d e ---------------------------------------------------------------------19. M a r i t i m e I n d u s t r y D is p u t e , W e s t C o a s t a n d H a w a ii, 1962— S e a f a r e r s ' I n t e r ­
n a ti o n a l U n io n of N o r t h A m e r i c a (3 s u b d i v i s io n s ) v. s h i p o w n e r s a n d
o p e r a t o r s r e p r e s e n t e d b y th e P a c i f i c M a r i t i m e A s s o c i a t i o n ------------------------------------20. R e p u b lic A v ia tio n C o r p . , F a r m i n g d a l e , L o n g I s la n d , N . Y. , 1962—
v. I n t e r n a t i o n a l A s s o c i a t i o n of M a c h i n i s t s (A F L —C IO )-----------------------------------------------21. L o n g s h o r i n g D is p u te on th e A t l a n t i c a n d G u lf C o a s t s , 1962—63—
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c i a t i o n (A F L - 'CIO)
v. s h ip p in g an d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s --------------------------------------------------------------------------22. A e r o s p a c e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 1962 L o c k h e e d A i r c r a f t C o r p .
v. I n t e r n a t i o n a l A s s o c i a t i o n of M a c h i n i s t s ( A F L ~ C I O ) -----------------------------------------------23. A e r o s p a c e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 1962—63 B o e in g C o. v. I n t e r n a t i o n a l
A s s o c i a t i o n o f M a c h i n i s t s ( A F L - C IO )-----------------------------------------------------------------------------2 4 u L o n g s h o r i n g D is p u te on th e A tl a n t i c an d G u lf C o a s t s , 1964- 65---I n te r n a tio n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c ia t io n (A F L -C IO )
v. s h ip p in g an d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

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A p p e n d ix e s :

A . L a b o r M a n a g e m e n t R e l a t i o n s A c t, 1947, a s a m e n d e d
by P u b l i c L aw 8 6 - 2 5 7 , 1959, in S e c s . 2 0 6 -2 1 0 ,
N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c i e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------B . S e l e c t e d B i b l i o g r a p h y on N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y D i s p u t e s ------------------------------------------------




iv

65
67

N ational Emergency Disputes U nder the Labor M anagem ent
R elations (Taft-H artley) Act, 1947—65
In trod u ction
The n a tio n a l e m e r g e n c y m a c h i n e r y p ro v id e d u n d e r the L a b o r M a n a g e ­
m ent R e la tio n s (T a ft -H a r tle y ) A ct (1 947) 1 f o r the in v e s tig a t io n of la b o r d is p u te s
w as in vok ed by the P r e s i d e n t in 24 d is p u te s f r o m the tim e of its p a s s a g e in
19 4 7 th ro u gh 1 9 6 5 . S e v e n of th e s e d isp u tes o c c u r r e d d uring the f i r s t y e a r f o l ­
lowing p a s s a g e of the a ct. Subsequent d is p u te s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d as fo l lo w s : One
each in 1 9 5 0 , 1 9 5 1 , 1 9 5 2 , 1 9 5 3 , 19 5 6 , 19 5 7 , 1 9 6 1 , 1 9 6 3 , and 1 9 6 4 ; two each in
1 9 5 4 and 1 9 5 9 ; and fo u r in 1 9 6 2 . E v e r y P r e s i d e n t holding o ffic e sin ce p a s s a g e of
the act h as in vok ed its n a tio n a l e m e r g e n c y p r o v i s io n s at l e a s t once.
The s t e v e d o rin g in d u s t r y has b een a ffe c te d d i r e c t l y by s ix d is p u te s, w h ile
ato m ic e n e r g y in s t a lla t i o n s have b een in v o lv e d in fo u r , the m o s t r e c e n t of w h ich
o c c u r r e d in 1 9 5 7 . The bitu m in ou s c o a l and m a r i t i m e in d u s t r ie s each h ave been
in v o lv e d in t h r e e d is p u te s, w ith a ll th o se in v o lv in g the f o r m e r group o c c u r r in g
during the 1 9 4 8 —
50 p e rio d .
Of the t h r e e m o st re c e n t n a tio n a l e m e r g e n c y d i s ­
pu tes, two h ave in v o lv e d the a e r o s p a c e in d u s try , the on ly o th e r group to be
d i r e c t l y a ffe c te d m o r e th an on ce.
O th er in d u s t r ie s to w h ich th e s e p r o v i s io n s
have been ap p lied a r e m e atp ack in g , c o m m u n ic a tio n s, f a b r ic a t e d s t e e l, n o n fe r r o u s
m e t a ls , a i r c r a f t m a n u fa c tu rin g , and b a s ic s t e e l.
The e m e r g e n c y p r o c e d u r e s h ave been u se d m o r e often to halt w o r k s t o p ­
pages a l r e a d y in p r o g r e s s th an to a v e r t th r e a te n e d s t r i k e s .
Stoppages of v a r y in g
d u ra tio n w e r e in e ffe c t in 1 4 of the d is p u te s in w h ich th e s e p r o c e d u r e s w e r e i n ­
voked.
In t h r e e in s t a n c e s , a B o a rd of In q u iry w a s appointed on the day the
s t r i k e began.
At the o th e r e x t r e m e , the A m e r i c a n L o c o m o tiv e Co. s t r i k e in
1 9 5 2 and the b a s ic s t e e l in d u s t r y s t r ik e in 19 5 9 continued f o r a p p r o x i m a te ly
3 m onths b e fo r e such a c tio n w a s d e e m e d n e c e s s a r y .
W o rk stop p ag es began on the day fo llo w in g the ap pointm ent of a B o a rd of
In q u iry in 3 of the 10 d isp u tes in w h ich a s t r i k e t h r e a t e x is te d at the tim e the
act w as in vok ed ; and, in two o th e r c a s e s , of th is ty p e , stopp ages o c c u r r e d f o l ­
low ing the e x p ir a tio n of the 8 0 - d a y in ju n ction.
Thus, s t r i k e s w e r e e i th e r in
e ffe c t o r su b se q u e n tly m a t e r i a l i z e d in 19 of the 24 n a tio n a l e m e r g e n c y d is p u te s .
The B o a rd s of In q u iry 2 su b m itte d an in itia l r e p o r t in e v e r y d ispute e x ­
cept that in vo lvin g the co m m u n ic a tio n s in d u s t ry in 1 9 4 8 . The tim e r e q u i r e d f o r
th e s e B o a rd s to conduct t h e i r in q u ir ie s into the c a u s e s and c i r c u m s t a n c e s of the
d is p u te s, and r e p o r t t h e i r findings ra n g e d f r o m 1 day in 3 d isp u tes to 24 days
in the 1 9 4 8 m ea tp a ck in g d isp u te.
In the s e v e n m o st r e c e n t e m e r g e n c y d is p u te s,
the B o a rd s r e q u i r e d an a v e r a g e of 4 d ays to p e r f o r m th e s e d u ties.

* See appendix A.
2
These Boards were composed of three members each in all but the 1948 maritime industry dispute. In the
latter situation, a five -member Board was appointed to allow hearings to be held simultaneously on the East and
West Coasts.




1

2

A s a r e s u l t of the B o a r d s 1 fin d in gs, in ju n ctio n s w e r e sought and ob tained
in 20 d is p u te s . 3 In the 1 9 4 8 m a r i t i m e s t r i k e , t h r e e in ju n ction s w e r e obtained—
one each f o r p o r t s along the A tla n tic and G ulf C o a s ts , the G r e a t L a k e s , and the
P a c if ic C o a st.
T h ese c o u rt o r d e r s w e r e e ff e c tiv e in haltin g o r p re v e n tin g s t o p ­
p ag es in a l l but the 1 9 4 9 —
50 bitu m in ou s c o a l d isp u te.
F i n a l r e p o r t s p re s e n t in g in f o r m a t io n on the e f f o r t s t o w a r d s e t tle m e n t,
the c u r r e n t p o sitio n s of the p a r t i e s , and the e m p l o y e r ’ s “l a s t o f f e r , 11 w e r e p r e ­
p a r e d by the B o a rd s of In q u iry in 18 d is p u te s, and b allotin g on the e m p l o y e r ' s
" last o f f e r " w a s h eld fo llo w in g the is s u a n c e of t h e s e r e p o r t s in 1 4 d is p u te s .
In
a l l c a s e s , the e m p l o y e r ’ s p r o p o s a l w a s r e j e c t e d . 4
S e tt le m e n ts w e r e re a c h e d during the 8 0 - d a y in ju n ctio n p e r io d in 10 d i s ­
p u te s .
In s e v e n of the re m a in in g situ atio n s in w h ich in ju n c tiv e a ctio n w a s tak en ,
s t r i k e s e i t h e r o c c u r r e d f o r the f i r s t ti m e o r w e r e r e s u m e d at the end of the
s t a t u t o r y 8 0 - d a y p e rio d . F iv e of th e s e l a t t e r d is p u te s o c c u r r e d in the s t e v e d o rin g
in d u s t r y , w h ile two o c c u r r e d e l s e w h e r e in the m a r i t i m e in d u s t ry .
The fin a l a ctio n p r e s c r i b e d by the statu te, a "full and c o m p r e h e n s iv e "
P r e s i d e n t i a l r e p o r t of the p ro c e e d in g s to C o n g r e s s , w a s ta k en in o n ly fo u r d i s ­
p u te s: A to m ic e n e r g y ( 1 9 4 8 ), bitum inous c o a l (1 9 4 8 ), 5* n o n fe r r o u s m e t a ls ( 1 9 5 1 ) ,
6
and the m a r i t i m e s t r i k e ( 1 9 6 1 ) .
M a jo r d e v e lo p m e n ts in the n a tio n a l e m e r g e n c y d isp u tes to date a r e d e ­
s c r ib e d in seq u en ce in the follow in g p a g e s.
A s e le c t e d b ib lio g ra p h y on th is
g e n e r a l su b je ct a p p e a rs in appendix B.

3

In the 1948 meatpacking dispute, an injunction was not sought despite the fact that a work stoppage was in
progress at the time the Board of Inquiry submitted its report.
In the 1948 maritime dispute, one of the unions involved—the International Longshoremen's and Warehouse­
men's^. Union— boycotted the election.
Two disputes were covered in a single report.
6 See James E. Jones, Jr. , "The National Emergency Disputes Provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act: A View from a
Legislative Draftsman's Desk," Western Reserve Law Review, October 1965, pp. 135-256.



Boards of Inquiry Appointed 1947—65, Under National Emergency Provisions
of the Labor Management Relations Act of 1947
1. A to m ic E n e r g y D is p u te , 1948— A to m ic T r a d e s an d L a b o r C o u n c il (A F L )
v. C a r b i d e a n d C a r b o n C h e m i c a l s C o r p .
M a r c h 5, 1 9 4 8 ________

B o a r d of I n q u i r y a p p o in te d b y th e P r e s i d e n t to i n v e s t i g a t e a n d r e p o r t
on th e l a b o r d is p u te a t O ak R id g e N a tio n a l L a b o r a t o r y o v e r w a g e
a d j u s t m e n t s a n d r e t e n t i o n of s ic k l e a v e b e n e f i t s . M e m b e r s ; J o h n L o r d
O 'B r i a n , N ew Y o r k an d W a s h in g to n a t t o r n e y , c h a i r m a n ; C. C a n b y
B a l d e r s t o n , W h a r t o n S ch o o l of F i n a n c e a n d C o m m e r c e , U n i v e r s i t y
of P e n n s y l v a n i a ; an d S ta n le y F . T e e l e , H a r v a r d G r a d u a t e S c h o o l of
B u sin ess A d m in istratio n .

M a r c h 1 5 ______________

F i r s t r e p o r t of th e B o a r d s u b m itt e d to th e P r e s i d e n t . T h e B o a r d
fo u n d t h a t th e i s s u e s in d is p u te r e m a i n e d u n s e t t l e d an d th e t h r e a t of
strik e w as u n a lte re d .

M a r c h 19

D e p a r t m e n t of J u s t i c e r e q u e s t e d an d o b t a in e d in ju n c ti o n f r o m th e
U.S. D i s t r i c t C o u r t of E a s t T e n n e s s e e .

M a r c h 24

B o a r d of I n q u i r y r e c o n v e n e d b y th e P r e s i d e n t .

M a y 1 8 _________________

S e c o n d r e p o r t of th e B o a r d s u b m i t t e d to th e P r e s i d e n t . It c o n ta i n e d
a s t a t e m e n t of th e e m p l o y e r 's " l a s t o f f e r " a n d s t a t e d th a t th e p o s i t i o n s
of th e p a r t i e s r e m a i n e d u n a l t e r e d a n d th e d is p u te u n s e t tle d .

J u n e 1—2 _______________

T h e N a t i o n a l L a b o r R e l a t i o n s B o a r d c o n d u c t e d a s e c r e t b a ll o t to
a s c e r t a i n w h e t h e r w o r k e r s w is h e d to a c c e p t th e fin a l o f f e r of th e
e m p l o y e r . B y a v o te of 771 to 26 th e e m p l o y e r ' s l a s t o f f e r w a s
r e j e c te d .

J u n e 1 1__

I n ju n c tio n d i s s o l v e d by c o u r t , u p o n m o tio n of th e A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l.

J u n e 1 5_... .

T h e p a r t i e s r e a c h e d a g r e e m e n t on th e t e r m s of a n e w c o n t r a c t w h ic h
g r a n t e d w o r k e r s w a g e i n c r e a s e s r a n g in g f r o m 6 l/z to 4 0 1/2 c e n t s an
h o u r , r e t r o a c t i v e to D e c e m b e r 18, 1947, a n d s ic k le a v e b e n e f i ts
v a r y i n g in a m o u n t a c c o r d i n g to le n g th of s e r v i c e .

J u n e 18_________________

T h e P r e s i d e n t r e p o r t e d to C o n g r e s s on th e d is p u te a n d r e c o m m e n d e d
t h a t a s p e c i a l s tu d y b e m a d e of th e p r o b l e m of p e a c e f u l a n d o r d e r l y
s e t t l e m e n t of l a b o r d i s p u t e s in G o v e r n m e n t - o w n e d , p r i v a t e l y o p e r a t e d
a t o m i c e n e r g y i n s t a l l a t i o n s . H e p r o p o s e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t of a c o m ­
m i s s i o n to s tu d y p o s s i b l e n e e d of s p e c i a l l e g i s l a t i o n to a v e r t la b o r
s h u td o w n s in s u c h p l a n t s . T h e m e m b e r s of th e c o m m i s s i o n w e r e to
b e a p p o in te d w ith th e a d v ic e of th e A to m ic E n e r g y C o m m i s s i o n a n d
th e J o i n t C o m m i t t e e on A to m ic E n e r g y .

2, M e a tp a c k in g D is p u te , 1948----U n ite d P a c k i n g h o u s e W o r k e r s (CIO)
v. fiv e m a j o r m e a t p a c k i n g f i r m s
M a r c h 15, 1948_______




B o a r d of I n q u i r y a p p o in te d by th e P r e s i d e n t to i n v e s t i g a t e th e d is p u te
in th e m e a t p a c k i n g i n d u s t r y o v e r th e u n i o n 's d e m a n d f o r i n c r e a s e d
w a g e s . M e m b e r s of th e B o a r d : N a th a n P . F e i n s i n g e r , U n i v e r s i t y
of W i s c o n s in L a w S c h o o l, c h a i r m a n ; P e a r c e D a v is , D e p a r t m e n t of
B u s i n e s s an d E c o n o m i c s , I llin o is I n s t itu te of T e c h n o lo g y ; an d W a l t e r V.
S c h a e f e r , N o r t h w e s t e r n U n i v e r s i t y L a w S c h o o l.

3

4

2. M eatpacking D ispute, 1948— United P ackinghouse W orkers (CIO)
v. five m ajor m eatpacking fir m s— Continued
M arch 16, 1948_______ Strike began in plants of the 5 com p anies in 20 S tates. A p proxi­
m ately 83, 000 w ork ers w ere involved.
A p ril 8 ------------------------- R eport of the B oard settin g forth and analyzing the p osition s of the
p a r tie s, subm itted to the P resid en t.
May 2 1 ------------------------- Strike w as term inated at Swift, A rm our, Cudahy, and M orrell plants
follow ing the union’s accep tan ce of a 9 -ce n t hourly w age in c r e a se .
June 5 -------------------------- Strike was ended at W ilson and Co. under approxim ately the sam e
term s.
3. B itum inous Coal M in ers1 P en sion D ispute, 1948— United M ine W orkers of A m erica (In d .)
v. bitum inous coal m ine op erators
M arch 15, 1948_______
M arch 2 3 ---------------------

M arch 3 1 ---------------------

A p ril 3 ------------------------A p ril 10-----------------------A p ril 12_______________

A p ril 19_______________

A p ril 21_______________
A p ril 24—2 6 ----------------June 23________________
June 26-------------------------




Work stoppage began. Within a few days approxim ately 320, 000
w ork ers we re-in v o lv ed .
B oard of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em bers of the Board:
F ed eral Judge Sherm an M inton, chairm an; G eorge W. T aylor, W harton
School of F inance and C om m erce, U n iversity of P ennsylvania; M ark
E thridge, L o u isv ille C ourier Journal. P rin cip al is su e w as the union's
charge that em p loyers had failed to " activa te” a pen sion plan as
provided for in the contract of July 1947.
R eport of the Board subm itted to the P resid en t. The B oard found
that action of the union p resid en t in the form of com m u nications to
o fficer s and m em b ers of the union induced the m in ers to stop work
in a con certed fashion and that the stoppage w as not independent action
by m in ers acting individually and sep arately.
T em porary restra in in g order issu e d by the U.S. D istr ic t Court for the
D istr ic t of C olum bia, effectiv e for 10 d ays.
The Speaker of the H ouse of R ep resen tatives su ggested Senator S tyles
B rid ges of New H am pshire as the neu tral m em b er of the board of
tr u ste e s. This w as acceptable to the union and industry re p resen ta ­
tiv es of the board of tru ste e s.
Senator B rid ges proposed a plan w hereby p en sion s of $ 100 a m onth
would be paid to those m em b ers of the union who, on and after
May 29, 1946, had com pleted 20 y ea rs' se r v ic e in the m in es and had
reached 62 y e a rs of age. This plan was adopted, the op erators'
tru stee d issen tin g.
The court found John L. L ew is and the UMWA guilty of both crim in al
and c iv il contem pt of court; fin es of $20,000 again st the union p resid en t
and $ 1 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0 against the union w ere lev ied on the b a sis of the
crim in al ch a rges.
E ighty-day injunction issu e d in W ashington, D .C ., by J u stice Tf. Alan
G oldsborough forbidding continuance or resum ption of a nationw ide
coal strik e.
M ost m in ers returned to work.
Court d isso lv ed the injunction of A pril 21.
F inal report subm itted by Board.

5

4. T elephone D ispute, 1948— A m erican Union of T elephone W orkers (CIO)
v. A m erican T elephone and T elegraph Co.
M ay 18. 1948

B oard of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em bers: Sum ner H.
S lich ter of H arvard U niversity, chairm an; C harles A. H orsky, attorney,
W ashington, D.C .; and A aron H orvitz, in d u strial relation s expert,
of New York City. R eport to be m ade to the P resid en t by June 8.
The p rin cip al is su e s w ere dem ands for in cr ea sed w ages and changes
in w orking ru les.

M ay 25_____ __________

F o rm a l h earin gs w ere scheduled to begin but w ere postponed until
June 8.
The com pany and union signed a 21-m onth agreem ent which did not
provide for a gen era l w age in cr ea se but provided for im provem en ts
in w orking conditions and for the reopening of the wage question at
any tim e.

June 4_ __ _____ __

5. M aritim e Industry D ispute, A tlantic, P a c ific , and Gulf C o asts, and G reat Lakes
1948— M aritim e u n io n s1 v. shipping com panies
June 3, 1948__________ B oard of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em bers: Harry Shulman
of Y ale U n iversity Law School, chairm an; Andrew Jackson, attorney,
New York City; Arthur P . A llen, U n iversity of C alifornia Institute
of Industrial R elations; J e ss e F reid in , attorney, New York City;
G eorge Cheney, San D iego labor rela tio n s consultant. P rin cip al
is su e s w ere higher w ages and retention of union hiring h a lls. Board
h ea rin gs held con currently in New York and San F ra n cisco .
June 11_______ ________ R eport of the B oard subm itted to the P resid en t. It pointed out
that the b a sic dispute (the question of retaining hiring halls) " a rises
from the am endm ent of the N ational Labor R elations Act by the
T aft-H a rtley A ct."
T em porary restrain in g ord ers issu e d by F ed er a l d istr ic t courts in
June 14
New York, San F r a n c isc o , and C leveland.
June 2 2 _______________ F ed er a l d istrict courts in San F ra n c isc o and C leveland issu e d second
10-day restra in in g o rd ers.
June 2 3 _______ _______ The court in New York issu e d an 80-d a y injunction b arring strik es
of m aritim e w o rk ers on the A tlantic and Gulf C oasts.
June 3 0 __...________ ___ The court in C leveland issu ed an 80-d a y injunction coverin g the Great
L akes area.
July 2
The court in San F r a n c isc o issu ed an 80-d a y injunction coverin g the
P a cific C oast area.
A ugust 10_____________ Som e m em b ers of the Board reconvened in San F ra n c isc o .
August 11_____________ Other m em b ers of the Board reconvened in New York.
August 14_____________ F in al report of the B oard subm itted to the P resid en t, including a
statem ent of the em p loyers' "last offer" of settlem en t.
See footnote at end of table.




6

5. M aritim e Industry D ispute, A tlantic, P a c ific , and Gulf C o a sts, and G reat L akes,
1948— M aritim e unions 1 v. shipping com p an ies— Continued
A ugust 18, 1948

N ational M aritim e Union and shipping op erators of A tlantic and Gulf
C oasts reached an agreem en t providing for w age in c r e a se s and r e ­
tention of union hiring h alls pending court rulings on th eir leg a lity .

A ugust 25

N ational M arine E n g in ee rs’ B en eficia l A sso cia tio n and A tlantic and Gulf
C oast op erators reached an agreem en t providing for w age in c r e a se s,
union hiring h alls to be continued until th eir leg a l status determ ined
by court action.

A ugust 27--------------------- A m erican Radio A sso cia tio n sign ed a new contract providing for w age
in c r e a se s and renew al of hirin g h all p ro v isio n s of old con tract pending
court ruling on th eir leg ality .
A ugust 30—3 1 --------------- N ational Labor R elations Board conducted a se c r e t ballot of W est
C oast em p loyees on the question of accepting the em p lo y ers’ ’’la st
o f f e r .” The International L on gsh orem en 's and W arehousem en's Union
boycotted the balloting and did not vote; m em b ers of the other W est
C oast unions receiv ed b allots by m a il.
S ep tem ber 1
S ep tem ber 2
Sep tem ber 2
Septem ber 2
N ovem ber 25

The 8 0 -day injunction co verin g the A tlantic and Gulf C oasts d isso lv ed
by court action.
The 8 0 -day injunction co verin g the W est C oast d isso lv ed .
N ational M aritim e Union and G reat L akes op erators reached an a g r e e ­
m ent retaining the h irin g -h a ll c la u se s, pending a final court d ec isio n
on the issu e .
Stoppage began at P a cific C oast p orts over w age and hirin g-hall is s u e s .
A pproxim ately 28, 000 lon gsh orem en and ship crew m em b ers w ere
d irectly involved.
Settlem en t reached betw een em p lo yers and ILWU (CIO), providing for
w age in cr ea se of 15 cents an hour and reten tion of union hiring h alls
pending court rulings on their leg a lity . W ithin the next few days,
the other strik in g unions secu red settlem en ts varying am ong unions.

1 International Longshoremen’s and Warehousemen’s Union (CIO); National Maritime Union (CIO); National Union of Marine
Cooks and Stewards (CIO); National Marine Engineers’Beneficial Association (CIO); Pacific Coast Marine Firemen, Oilers, Watertenders
and Wipers' Association (Ind.); and American Radio Association (CIO). The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (AFL)
through one of its locals, representing marine radio operators, was involved also.

6. B itum inous Coal M iners' C ontract D ispute, 1948— United M ine W orkers
of A m erica (in d .) v. bitum inous co al m ine op erators
J une 19, 1948.




Board of Inquiry
con tract dispute
M em bers: David
E. Wight Bakke of
of P ennsylvania.

appointed by the P resid en t to report on the coal
over w ages and other conditions of em ploym ent.
L. C ole, attorney, of P aterson , N. J. , chairm an;
Y ale U n iversity; Waldo E. F ish er of the U n iversity

7

6. B itum inous Coal M iners' C ontract D ispute, 1948— United M ine W orkers
of A m erica (Ind.) v. bitum inous coal m ine op erators— Continued
A greem en t coverin g co m m ercia l m in es reach ed on a 1 -yea r contract
providing for a w age in cr ea se of $1 a day and for doubling the
operators' paym ents into the w elfa re and retirem en t fundr—from 10
to 20 cen ts a ton of coal m ined.
June 2 6 ------------------------ B oard rep orted to the P resid en t that the th reat of a coal strik e
affecting the public in te r e st had been averted. 1

June 24, 1948_________

1 The agreement negotiated with the commercial bituminous mine operations was not accepted by operators of "captive" mines.
The union-shop clause was the issue in dispute. Approximately 42,000 employees of "captive" mines were on strike for about 9 days
in July. Operators then accepted the union-shop clause with the proviso that it would be modified if court rulings required.

7. D ockw orkers D ispute on the A tlantic C oast, 1948— International
L on gsh orem en 's A sso cia tio n (AFL) v. shipping com p anies
A ugust 17, 1948______

August 2 0 ______ ______

A ugust 2 1 _____________

Board of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em bers: Saul W allen,
labor attorney, B oston , M a ss., chairm an; Josep h L. M iller, labor
consultan t, W ashington, D.C.; Julius K ass, attorney, New York City.
P rin cip al is s u e s w ere w age in c r e a s e s and application of overtim e rates.
R eport of the B oard subm itted to the P resid en t. It stated that the
dispute over overtim e paym ents had blocked n egotiation s and that
agreem en t on other term s m ight be reach ed quickly if the overtim e
question could be reso lv ed .

The F ed er a l d istr ic t court in New York issu e d a 10-day restrain in g
order prohibiting str ik es and lockouts by lon gsh orem en and em p lo yers
at A tlantic C oast p orts.
A ugust 24
E igh ty-d ay injunction issu e d by the court. The effect of th is w as to
prohibit str ik e s or lockouts until N ovem ber 9.
A ugust 26
The B oard reconvened by the P resid en t.
O ctober 21____________ Sub m ission to the P resid en t of the B oard 's fin al report including a
statem ent of the em p loyers' "last offer" of settlem en t.
N ovem ber 4—5 _______ N ational Labor R elation s B oard conducted a p oll of union m em b ers
on the question of accepting em p loyers' "last offer." The em p lo yees
rejected the offer by a large m ajority.
N ovem ber 9
Union o fficer s and shipping rep resen ta tiv es concluded an agreem en t
providing for w age in c r e a se s of 10 cents an hour in stra ig h t-tim e
ra tes and 15 cen ts in ov ertim e ra tes. A n tistrik e injunction d isso lv ed
by court action.
N ovem ber 10__________ Sporadic stoppages developed along the co a st as lon gsh orem en voted
to reject the agreem en t.
N ovem ber 12
M ajority of union lo c a ls rejected ten tative agreem en t and an o fficia l
strik e w as sanctioned by the union. A p proxim ately 4 5 ,0 0 0 dockw orkers
from M aine to V irginia w ere involved.
N ovem ber 25________ _ A greem en t reached, providing for a 13-cen t hourly in cr ea se in
str a ig h t-tim e ra te s, I 9V 2 cen ts in o vertim e ra te s, a w elfa re plan,
and im proved vacation b en efits.
N ovem ber 28
A fter agreem en t w as ra tified by the m em bership, dockw orkers returned
to work.




8

8. B itum inous C oal M in ers’ C ontract D ispute, 1949—50— United M ine W orkers
of A m erica (in d .) v. bitum inous co al m in e op erators
Septem ber 19, 1949__ N ationw ide w ork stoppage of bitum inous co al and anthracite m in ers
began over term s of a new con tract to rep lace the agreem en t w hich
had expired June 30, 1949.
O ctober 3
A nthracite and w estern bitum inous coal m in ers returned to w ork
but the rem aining 320, 000 bitum inous co al m in ers stayed out until
N ovem ber 9. Subsequently, sporadic stoppages recu rred in variou s
bitum inous coal fie ld s.
F ir s t w eek of
F ebru ary 1950______ S trik es again becam e g en era l throughout the bitum inous co al m ining
industry.
F ebru ary 6 ___________ B oard of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em b ers: D avid L.
C ole, law yer of P aterson , N. J., chairm an; W. W illard W irtz, N orth­
w estern U n iversity Law School; and John T. Dunlop, H arvard Graduate
School of B u sin ess A d m in istration . P rin cip a l union dem ands cen tered
on in crea sed em p loyer paym ents to the union p en sion and w elfa re fund,
w age in c r e a se s, and a reduced w orkday. The m ine op erators sought to
elim in ate from the contract certain p ro v isio n s, including the union-shop
req u est, the ’’able and w illing" to w ork cla u se, the cla u se perm ittin g
w ork stoppages during " m em orial p er io d s," and the p ro v isio n lim itin g
paym ents from p en sion and w elfa re funds to union m em b ers.
F ebru ary 11---------------- The B oard reported that "this is b a sica lly a dispute . . . over the
w age and w elfa re fund contribution is s u e s . Behind the ta ctica l m a n eu verin gs of the n egotiators is fundam entally an issu e of d o lla rs and
cen ts. " Although nonwage m a tters w ere found to involve " issu es of
sign ifican t p rin cip le," the B oard stated that "m utually acceptable term s
coverin g th ese nonwage is su e s can be negotiated once the m oney is s u e s
are reso lv ed . "
The B oard’s report, w hich noted that im m ed iate settlem en t of the
dispute w as not lik ely , w as follow ed on the sam e day by a F ed era l
court injunction aga in st the continuance of the strik e.
F ebru ary 20---------------- Contem pt p roceed in gs w ere in itiated again st the union when the m in ers
refu sed to return to work d esp ite in stru ction s from th eir p resid en t,
on F ebru ary 11 and again on F ebruary 17, ca llin g for com p lian ce
w ith the court ord er.
M arch 2 ---------------------- The F ed era l d istr ic t court in W ashington, D. C. , found the union not
guilty on the ground that the G overnm ent had failed to produce su ffi­
cien t evid en ce to support ch a rges of eith er c iv il or crim in a l contem pt.
M arch 3 ---------------------- P resid en t Trum an asked C on gress for sp ecia l leg isla tio n to p erm it
the G overnm ent to s e iz e and op erate the co al m in es in view of the
"dangerous" cu rtailm en t of coal production.
M arch 5 ---------------------- C onclusion of an agreem en t b etw een the disputants in bitum inous coal. 1
The settlem en t provided for in c r e a se s of 70 cen ts in the b a sic daily
w age and of 10 cen ts per ton— from 20 to 30 cen ts— in the em p loyers'
paym ents into the. w elfa re and retirem en t fund; continuance of the
union shop "to the e x t e n t ..........................p erm itted by law "; lim itation
of " m em orial period" stoppage to 5 days a y ear; and elim in ation of the
"able and w illing" cla u se . The new contract, effectiv e until July 1,
1952, p erm itted reopening on w age questions after A p ril 1, 1 9 5 1 .2
1 An agreement covering the anthracite miners, patterned largely on the bituminous coal contract, was signed on March 9.
2 The miners' agreement, like many other long-term contracts, was reopened before its scheduled date. By agreement reached
in late January 1951, bituminous coal miners were granted a wage increase of 20 cents an hour and the termination date of the
existing contract was changed to March 31, 1952. The contract was to continue after that date unless either the mine operators
or the union should give 60 days' notice of termination.




9

9. N onferrous M etals D ispute, 1951— International Union of M ine, M ill and
S m elter W orkers (Ind.) v. copper and other n onferrous m eta ls industry
A ugust 27. 1951

N ationw ide strik e ca lled by the MMSW to en force its w age and p en sion
p ro p o sa ls. The strik e halted virtu a lly a ll copper production and
cu rtailed sub stan tially the production of zin c, lea d , m anganese,
m olybdenum , and tungsten. S ev era l A F L unions and two railroad
brotherhoods w hich w ere also involved in the dispute, did not d irectly
engage in the strik e but resp ected MMSW pick et lin e s, bringing the
total num ber idled to approxim ately 40, 000. P resid en t T rum an
im m ed ia tely re fe rre d the dispute to the W age Stabilization B oard for
in vestigation and recom m endations as to a settlem en t.
The MMSW rejected a WSB req u est that the strik e be term in ated as a
A u g u s t 29
condition to B oard con sid eration of the is su e s in the dispute.
August 3 0 _____________ B oard of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em bers: Ralph T.
Sew ard, chairm an, P ittsb u rgh , P a ., and G. A llen D ash, P hiladelphia,
P a ., arb itrators; Josep h L. M iller, in d u strial relation s consultant,
W ashington, D.C.
A ugust 31
The MMSW and the K ennecott Copper C o., la r g e st producer in the
industry, reached a settlem en t, re tro a ctiv e to July 1, 1951. T erm s
included a g en era l w age in cr ea se of 8 cen ts an hour, an average
in c r e a se of 7 cents an hour to cover job rate r e v isio n s, and a
com pany-paid p en sion plan estim ated to co st 4*/2 cen ts an hour.
W age sc a le s w ere m ade subject to ren egotiation after January 1, 1952.
The other th ree m ajor producers in the industry— P h elp s Dodge Corp.,
A m erican Sm elting and R efining C o., and Anaconda Copper M ining
Co.— rejected the K ennecott settlem en t pattern.
S ep tem ber 4
R eport of the B oard of Inquiry subm itted to the P resid en t. The B oard
found that the strik e w as causing or aggravating c r itic a l sh ortages
of v ita l m a ter ia ls and that its continuation posed a threat to the
d om estic econom y and the national d efen se program . Thereupon,
the P resid en t d irected the A ttorney G eneral to seek a court injunction
to halt the strik e.
Sep tem ber 5__________ A tem p orary injunction, ordering the union to term in ate the w alkout,
w as issu e d by the F ed era l circuit court in D enver, Colo.— headquarters
of the union.
S ep tem ber 6_____ _____ The union ord ered an im m ed iate return to work; by Septem ber 10 the
m ajority of w ork ers had returned.
Sep tem ber 2 7 _________ Settlem en t reached w ith the P h elp s Dodge Corp., providing for an
8 -ce n t gen era l hourly w age in c r e a se , 73/4 cen ts an hour to co ver job
rate r e c la ssific a tio n s plus 2 cen ts an hour for com m on lab or, and
4 j/2 cen ts an hour for p en sion s.
O ctober 9
Com panywide agreem en t reached with the A m erican Sm elting and
R efining C o., providing for an 8 -cen t g en era l hourly w age in c r e a se ,
varying hourly adjustm ents to cover job rate r e c la ssific a tio n s, a third
w eek 's vacation after 15 years' se r v ic e , in cr ea sed shift d ifferen tia ls,
and a com pany-paid pen sion plan.
N ovem ber 5 __________

The B oard of Inquiry reported that agreem en ts had been concluded
w ith Anaconda Copper M ining C o., another m ajor producer, and with
virtu a lly all of the other fir m s that had been involved in the dispute.

N ovem ber 20__________ "L ast offer" b allo ts conducted by NLRB in plants of eight com p anies.
W orkers rejected the offer.




10

10. A m erican L ocom otive Co. D ispute, 1952— A lco P rodu cts D iv isio n Plant, Dunkirk, N. Y.
v. United S teelw ork ers of A m erica (CIO) 1
A ugust 29, 1 9 5 2 ______

Work stoppage that idled som e 1, 600 production, m aintenance, and
c le r ic a l w ork ers began follow ing the c o lla p se of negotiations over the
union's p ro p osals for a union shop and a w age and frin ge ben efit
"package" in c r e a se estim ated to am ount to about 21V2 cen ts an hour,
re tro a ctiv e to F ebru ary 1, 1952, the day follow ing the expiration date
of the p reviou s agreem en t.
D ecem b er 3----------------- Board of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. 2 M em bers: Abraham J.
H arris, chairm an, and P hilip L evy, attorn eys, W ashington, D .C .; and
G eorge Cheney, labor rela tio n s consultan t, San D iego, C alif.
D ecem b er 1 1 __________ The B oard reported to the P resid en t that the w ork stoppage w as " im ­
m ed ia tely and ser io u sly d elaying the production of equipm ent and of
fissio n a b le m a ter ia ls e sse n tia l for atom ic w eapons needed for the
national d efen se, " and that resum ption of production w as im p erative if
the atom ic energy program w as to m ee t its sch ed u le.

D ecem b er 1 2 ---------------

D ecem b er 2 9 _________

January 5, 1 9 5 3 ---------F eb ru ary 2 0 ----------------

M arch 2------------------------

F ollow ing the B oard 's report, the P resid en t d irected the D epartm ent
of J u stice to p etition for an injunction again st the strik e.
A tem p orary restra in in g ord er, prohibiting continuation of the strik e
and d irectin g a resum ption of bargaining, w as issu e d by the F ed era l
d is tr ic t cou rt in B uffalo, N. Y.
The union im m ed ia tely ord ered a return to w ork; by D ecem b er 15 m o st
of the w ork ers had returned.
An 80-day injunction, expiring M arch 2, 1953, w as issu e d by the d istr ic t
court. The court rejected the S teelw ork ers' argum ents challenging
the con stitu tion ality of the T aft-H artley A ct's "national em ergen cy"
p ro v isio n s.
The Suprem e Court denied the union's req u est for im m ed iate review of
the d istr ic t court ruling.
A "m em orandum of understanding" on b a sic settlem en t term s was
announced by the F ed era l M ediation and C onciliation S erv ice. It p ro ­
vided for a "package" in cr ea se in w age and other b en efits estim ated to
am ount to 16 cen ts an hour; a $ 150 lu m p -su m paym ent in lieu of
retro a ctiv e pay for each em p lo yee who had w orked 75 p ercen t of the
regu larly sched uled w orking tim e sin ce the p reviou s contract expired,
w ith proportionate paym ents to em p lo y ees who had w orked le s s than
the required tim e; and a union shop w ith an "escape" p r o v isio n .3
The union's appeal from the d istr ic t court injunction w as denied by the
U. S. C ircu it Court of A ppeals in N ew York.

1 The dispute at the Dunkirk plant was included in the President's certification to the Wage Stabilization Board, on December 22,
1951, of disputes involving basic steel companies and the Steelworkers. This dispute, however, was treated separately from the basic
steel dispute. Subsequently, a separate WSB panel held extensive hearings in the Dunkirk dispute, but before it could formulate its
recommendations, the Defense Production Act was amended, effective July 1, 1952, to abolish the Board's disputes authority.
2 The Executive order establishing the Board did not apply to disputes involving the Steelworkers at the company's plants in
Auburn and Schenectady, N.Y. (producers of diesel engines, Army tanks, and diesel locomotives). Approximately 1,000 production
and clerical workers at the Auburn plant went on strike October 20, 1952. Two days later, about 6,800 production woricers walked out
at the Schenectady plant; some 500 office workers at 1he plant joined the strike on December 8. The walkouts were called to enforce
demands similar to those involved in the dispute at the Dunkirk plant.
3 The settlement covered the company's Auburn and Schenectady, N .Y ., plants, as well as the Dunkirk, N .Y ., plant. Following
ratification of the settlement by union members at each of the three plants in late February and early March, separate agreements were
reached on certain local issues and on distribution of the "package" adjustment among wage increases and fringe benefits. Employees
on strike at the Auburn and Schenectady plants were back at work by March 2 and March 9, respectively.




11

11. L on gsh orem en 's D ispute on the A tlantic C oast, 1953— International L on gsh orem en 's
A sso cia tio n (Ind.), International L on gsh orem en 's A sso cia tio n (AFL)
v. shipping and stevedoring com p anies
O ctober 1, 1 9 5 3 .._____ W ork stoppage of 3 0 ,0 0 0 dockw orkers began in A tlantic C oast ports
after the New York Shipping A sso cia tio n and the ILA (Ind.) failed to
agree on a new contract. A union riv a lry dispute a lso ex isted , in ­
volving the ILA (Ind.) and the new ly created ILA (A FL). Board of
Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em bers: David L. C ole, form er
d irector of the F ed era l M ediation and C onciliation S er v ice , chairm an;
Dr. H arry J. C arm an, dean em eritu s of C olum bia C ollege at C olum bia
U n iversity, New York C ity, and a m em b er of the N ew York State
M ediation S ervice; Rev. D ennis J. C om ey, S .J., d irector of the Institute
of Industrial R elation s, St. Josep h 's C o llege, P hiladelphia, P a.
O ctober 5_____________

R eport of the B oard subm itted to the P resid en t stated that the im pact
of the stoppage w as " extrem ely seriou s" and that the p o ssib ility of
getting the m en back to w ork through co lle c tiv e bargaining w as rem ote.
F ollow ing the B oard 's rep ort, the P resid en t in stru cted the A ttorney
G eneral to apply for a court injunction. A tem p orary 10-day r e ­
straining ord er w as issu e d by Judge Edward W einfeld in the U.S.
D istrict Court in New York C ity. The union im m ed ia tely ordered a
return to work; m ost of the lon gsh orem en reported for w ork O ctober 6.

O ctober 15___________ The tem p orary injunction against the International L ongshorem en's
A sso cia tio n (Ind.) w as extended 10 days to O ctober 25. At the req u est
of the J u stice D epartm ent, it w as broadened to include the rival
lon g sh o rem en 's union re cen tly ch artered by the A FL .
O ctober 20

An 80-d ay injunction (expiring D ecem b er 24) w as issu e d in New York
City by Judge W einfeld barring any strik e along the E ast C oast by
the International L on gsh orem en 's A sso cia tio n (Ind.).

O ctober 2 2 ____________

The New York Shipping A sso cia tio n p etitioned the N ational Labor
R elations Board to conduct an im m ed iate p oll of the dockw orkers in the
P ort of New York to determ in e w hether th ey p referred rep resen tation
by the International L ongshorem en's A sso cia tio n (Ind.) or the new
A F L International L on gsh orem en 's A sso cia tio n .

O ctober 2 3 ____________ Judge W einfeld signed an order extending the 8 0 -day injunction to the
ILA (AFL) stating that the group w as a party to the o rigin al dispute
and that it w as involved in the g en era l c o llectiv e bargaining situation.
O ctober 2 6 ____________

The New York Shipping A sso cia tio n announced that it w as resum ing
negotiations w ith the ILA (Ind.) at the req u est of the union, but that
no agreem en t could be concluded until the NLRB d eterm ined which
union w as to be bargaining agent.

N ovem ber 8___________

The C hairm an of the N ew York Shipping A sso cia tio n urged P resid en t
E isenhow er to d irect the NLRB to expedite an electio n so that the
em p lo yers could know, not la ter than D ecem b er 1, with which union
they w ere to deal.




12
11. L on gsh orem en's D ispute on the A tlantic C oast, 1953— International L ongshorem en's
A sso cia tio n (ind. ), International L ongshorem en's A sso cia tio n (AFL)
v. shipping and stevedoring com p an ies— Continued
N o v e m b e r 16, 1 9 5 3 ___

N L R B o p e n e d h e a r in g s on a r e p r e s e n ta tio n e le c tio n . T h e N ew Y o rk
S h ip p in g A s s o c ia tio n p ro p o s e d th a t th e B o a rd c a ll fo r a v o te by a ll
d o c k w o r k e r s in th e P o r t o f N ew Y o rk ; th e L o n g s h o r e m e n 's U n io n
(A F L ) p ro p o s e d th a t o n ly lo n g s h o r e m e n in th a t p o r t b e in c lu d e d ; an d
th e IL A (In d .) p ro p o s e d th a t a ll d o c k w o r k e r s f r o m M a in e to V ir g in ia
b e d e c la r e d e lig ib le to v o te in th e e le c tio n .

N o v e m b e r 20

A s th e h e a r in g s c o n tin u e d , th e IL A (A F L ) file d w ith th e N L R B u n f a ir
la b o r p r a c t i c e c h a r g e s a g a in s t b o th th e N ew Y o rk S h ip p in g A s s o c ia tio n
an d th e IL A ( I n d .) . (T h e A F L u n io n h e ld th a t th e A s s o c ia tio n h a d
d o m in a te d an d g iv e n fin a n c ia l a s s i s t a n c e to th e IL A (In d .). It c h a r g e d
th a t th e in d e p e n d e n t u n io n h a d e x a c te d m o n e y f r o m th e s h ip p in g g ro u p
f o r s e r v ic e s n o t p e r f o r m e d .)

N o v e m b e r 24

T he N L R B s e t D e c e m b e r 16 an d 17 a s th e d a te s f o r a c o a s tw id e b a llo t
on th e q u e s tio n of a c c e p tin g th e e m p lo y e r s ' " l a s t o f f e r . "

D e c e m b e r 3.

T h e B o a rd of In q u iry r e c o n v e n e d in N ew Y o rk C ity .
S h ip p in g A s s o c ia tio n r e i t e r a t e d it s " l a s t o f f e r . "

D e c e m b e r 4.

T h e B o a rd o f In q u iry r e p o r te d to th e P r e s i d e n t th a t a s tr i k e w a s lik e ly
to o c c u r D e c e m b e r 24 a t th e e x p ir a tio n o f th e in ju n c tio n . T h e B o a rd
s ta te d th a t th e is s u e o f u n io n r e p r e s e n ta tio n o v e rs h a d o w e d a ll o th e r s .
It a ls o s ta te d th a t a n y " l a s t o f f e r " o f th e e m p lo y e r s w o u ld p ro b a b ly
b e r e je c te d .

D e c e m b e r 11

T h e N L R B c a n c e le d th e s c h e d u le d
" l a s t o ffe r. "

D e c e m b e r 17

T h e N L R B s c h e d u le d a r e p r e s e n ta tio n e le c tio n f o r D e c e m b e r 22 an d
23, to in c lu d e lo n g s h o r e m e n a n d o th e r d o c k w o r k e r s in th e P o r t of
N ew Y o rk ; b u t e x c lu d e d th o s e w ho h a d w o rk e d f e w e r th a n 700 h o u r s
in th e y e a r e n d in g S e p te m b e r 30, 1953, a s w e ll a s th o s e w ho h a d n o t
r e g i s t e r e d f o r e m p lo y m e n t a s r e q u ir e d in N ew Y o rk an d N ew J e r s e y . 1

D e c e m b e r 24

O u tc o m e of e le c tio n h e ld D e c e m b e r 22 an d 23 w a s a n n o u n c e d a s 9, 060
v o te s fo r IL A ( I n d .) , 7 ,5 6 8 f o r IL A (A F L ), 95 f o r no u n io n , an d
4, 405 c h a lle n g e d .

T h e N ew Y o rk

r e f e r e n d u m on th e e m p lo y e r s '

D e c e m b e r 3 1 ---------------- A F L P r e s id e n t G e o rg e M e a n y p e titio n e d to N L R B to s e t a s id e th e
e le c tio n , c h a rg in g v io le n c e a n d in tim id a tio n a g a in s t A F L m e m b e r s
b y th e r i v a l u n io n . 2

1 Under bi-State legislation enacted in June 1953, which was designed to deal with waterfront corruption, the Waterfront
Commission of New York Harbor took control of longshore hiring in the port on December 1, 1953.
2 On April 1, 1954, the NLRB invalidated the December representation election and ordered a new election.




13

Sum m ary of D evelop m ents in 1954
A b rie f su m m ary of m ajor 1954 developm ents com pleting the h isto ry of th is prolonged
dispute follow s. T hese events involved further action by the N ational Labor R elations Board
and the cou rts, but did not re su lt in a rein vocation of the national em ergen cy p ro v isio n s of
the Labor M anagem ent R elations (T aft-H artley) A ct.
The New York w aterfront dispute betw een the old ILA and the new A FL union continued
in ea rly 1954. The A FL union petitioned the NLRB to set a sid e the rep resen tation election on
the ground that co ercio n and intim idation had prevented a free ex p ressio n of the w orkers' w ill.
Unfair labor p ra ctice ch a rges w ere filed by the ILA (Ind.) against G overnor D ew ey
and A FL P resid en t G eorge M eany, w ith the b a sic com plaint that they had conspired to in terfere
w ith fr e e ch oice in the rep resen tation election . The NLRB regional d irector in New York City,
on January 11, recom m ended that the B oard void the election . On F ebru ary 17, the NLRB
ord ered a fu ll hearing on ch arges of intim idation in the N ew York w aterfront election .
In February, also , m em b ers of the ILA (Ind.) refu sed to w ork on the M oore M cC orm ack
L ines p ier in New York b ecau se an ILA (AFL) shop stew ard w as em ployed. Subsequently, th is
p ier w as pick eted by m em b ers of the ILA (AFL) after the stew ard w as d ism issed . M em bers
of the T ea m sters Union (AFL) refu sed to c r o ss the picket lin e. In retaliation , the ILA (Ind.)
d eclared a boycott of all truck freigh t handled by the T ea m sters union, w hich, in turn, picketed
the docks.
The NLRB on M arch 4 obtained a tem p orary F ed era l court restra in in g ord er, under
the secon d ary boycott p ro v isio n s of the T aft-H artley A ct, d irectin g the ILA (Ind.) and eight
of its New York and New J e r se y lo c a ls to avoid strik es or other in terferen ce with the loading
or unloading of truck s at the p ie r s. M em bers of th is union stopped all w ork in the
New York port on the follow ing day in defiance of the court order. T his w ork stoppage
continued into ea rly A pril.
The A rm y, on M arch 16, began hirin g dockw orkers, under c iv il serv ic e ru le s, to
load troop and cargo ships. S ev era l thousand m em b ers of the ILA (AFL) reported for work
at other p ier s a ssu red of p olice p rotection. H ow ever, the stoppage rem ained portw ide m ost
of the m onth, w ith o cca sio n a l violen t cla sh e s betw een m em b ers of the two longshore unions.
The New York Shipping A sso cia tio n , on M arch 25, offered a 10-cen t hourly package
in c r e a se , retro a ctiv e to O ctober 1, 1953, to all lon gsh orem en who returned to th eir jobs
by the end of the m onth. H ow ever, the offer failed to induce a gen era l back-to-w ork m ovem ent.
On A p ril 1, the NLRB set asid e the D ecem ber 1953 rep resen tation electio n and
ord ered a new p oll. The B oard indicated that the ILA (Ind.) w ould be om itted from the ballot
if it did not ce a se "conduct d esigned to thw art or abuse p r o c e s s e s of the Board." The
N ew York State Suprem e Court, on A pril 2, a lso ordered the union to ca ll off the strik e,
and the union's p resid en t in stru cted his m em b ers to return to their jobs.
A F ed era l d istrict court judge in M ay lev ied fin es of $50, 000 on the national ILA (Ind.)
and sm a ller am ounts on eight of its lo c a ls, and sentenced th ree lo ca l o fficer s to prison
term s for contem pt of court. (The NLRB had petitioned the court for contem pt action after
the M arch stoppage occu rred in defiance of the M arch 4 injunction.) The court granted the
p etition sought by the D epartm ent of J u stice to put the union into re ceiv e rsh ip to im prove
the G overnm ent's chances of co llectin g the fin es.
The secon d NLRB election w as held on May 26 w ith the follow ing resu lts: ILA (Ind.)
9 ,1 1 0 votes; ILA (AFL) 8,7 9 1 ; neither union 51; voided 49; and challenged 1, 797.
On A ugust 27, 1954, after n ea rly a year of b itter stru ggle, the ILA (Ind.) w as
certified by the NLRB as co llective bargaining agent for lon gsh orem en in the P ort of N ew York.
During th is in terv al no form al contract ex isted coverin g lon gsh ore op erations in the port.




14

Sum m ary of D evelop m ents in. 1954— Continued
E arly in Septem ber, the ILA (In d .) began n egotiation s w ith the New York Shipping
A sso cia tio n . In itia l dem ands included a w age in c r e a se of 10 cen ts an hour and a 3 -cen t
in cr ea se in health and w elfa re contributions, both retro a ctiv e to O ctober 1, 1953. L ater in
the m onth, the union low ered its dem ands for retro a ctiv e in c r e a se s to 8 cents in d irect w ages
and 2 cen ts in w elfa re fund contributions. The union sought to lim it in itial n egotiations to
the settlem en t of the retro a ctiv ity but the a sso cia tio n contended that dem ands could not be
sep arated from negotiations for a new contract and the appointm ent of a w orking arbitrator
to handle "quickie" str ik es in the port.
A 2-day strik e of 25, 000 New York dockw orkers ended O ctober 6 after the New York
Shipping A sso cia tio n agreed to give the lon gsh orem en an 8 -ce n t hourly w age in c r e a se r e t­
roactive to O ctober 1, 1953. In turn, the independent lon g sh o rem en ’s union pledged not to
strik e again for 45 days, pending n egotiations on a new contract.
On D ecem b er 31, agreem en t was reached on a new 2 -y ea r contract, w hich was
ratified by ra n k -an d -file union m em b ers on January 5, 1955. The new con tract included
p ro v isio n s for a union shop; a 7 -cen t hourly w age in c r e a se retro a ctiv e to O ctober 1, 1954,
w ith an additional 6 cents in O ctober 1955; and a lib er a lize d pen sion and w elfa re plan.

12. A tom ic E nergy D ispute, 1954— Carbide and C arbon C h em icals Co. ,
a D iv isio n of Union C arbide and Carbon Corp. v. United Gas, Coke
and C hem ical W orkers (CIO) 1
July 6, 195 4--------------- B oard of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t to in v estig a te and rep ort
on the labor dispute at Oak Ridge, Term., and Paducah, K y., fa c ilitie s
of the A tom ic E nergy C o m m ission . The is su e w as the am ount of
a proposed a c ro ss-th e-b o a rd w age in c r e a se . M em bers: T. K eith
Glennan, p resid en t of the C ase Institute of T echnology, chairm an;
John F. F loberg, attorney, W ashington, D. C. ; P aul H. Sanders, p ro ­
fe s s o r of law at V anderbilt U n iv ersity .
July 7-------------------------- Work stoppage involving 4, 500 production w ork ers rep resen ted by
the United G as, Coke and C h em ical W orkers (CIO), at Oak R idge,
Term., and Paducah, Ky., began w ith the rejectio n of a 6 -cen t hourly
across-th e-b oard wage in cr ea se p reviou sly recom m ended by the A tom ic
E nergy Labor M anagem ent R elations P anel. The em ployer had agreed
to the w age in c r e a se .
July 9-------------------------- The S ecretary of Labor and union o ffic ia ls proposed a G overnm ent
rev iew of housing, health, and com m unity fa c ilitie s and other problem s
affecting the w elfare of the w ork ers and th eir fa m ilies. The S ecretary
of Labor a lso announced that a study would be initiated to seek im ­
provem en t of labor m anagem ent relation s in the atom ic energy field .
The Board reported to the P resid en t that a "state of c r isis " had not
been reached but that it seem ed in evitab le if the strik e continued.
The w ork ers returned to th eir jobs that day and the G overnm ent
postponed obtaining an 80-day injunction.
August 11-------------------- T em porary restra in in g ord er, effectiv e for 10 days, issu ed by the
F ed eral d istr ic t court in K noxville, Tenn., to avert a threatened strik e.

July 1 0 -----------------------

S ee footnote at end of table.




15

12. A tom ic E nergy D ispute, 1954— Carbide and Carbon C h em icals C o.,
a D ivision of Union Carbide and Carbon Corp. v. United G as, Coke
and C hem ical W orkers (C IO )1— Continued
O ctober 11, 1954_____

Board of Inquiry reported to the P resid en t that the v iew s of the
em ployer and the union rem ained unchanged.

O ctober 21—22_________ The NLRB conducted a secr et ballot of em p lo yees on the acceptance
or rejection of the em p lo yer's "last offer" of a 6 -cen t hourly wage
in cr ea se effective A p ril 15, 1954. The w ork ers voted to re je ct the
offer.
O ctober 3 0 ____________

The 80-d ay injunction w as d isso lv ed .

N ovem ber 7

A greem ent reached on a c ro ss-th e-b o a rd w age in cr ea se of 6 cents
an hour effectiv e A p ril 15, 1954, and an additional 4 cen ts, effective
January 15, 1955. H oliday pay p ra ctice w as adjusted to perm it the
ob servan ce of certain recogn ized holidays on F rid ay when they fa ll
on Saturday.

1 There were two separate disputes affecting employees of the Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Co. (See No. 13.) Although the
members of the Board of Inquiry were identical in each case, the Boards were created by separate Executive orders and their hearings
were also conducted separately.

13. A tom ic E nergy D ispute, 1954— C arbide and Carbon C h em icals C o., a D iv ision of
Union C arbide and Carbon Corp. v. A tom ic T rades and L abor Council (AFL) 1
July 6, 1954__________

Board of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t to in vestigate and report
on the labor dispute at Oak R idge N ational L aboratory and other
fa c ilitie s of the A tom ic E nergy C om m ission at Oak R idge, Tenn.
The prin cipal issu e in the dispute w as the amount of a proposed
a c ro ss-th e-b o a rd w age in cr ea se. M em bers; T. K eith Glennan, p r e s ­
ident of the C ase Institute of T echnology, chairm an; John F . F lob erg,
attorney, W ashington, D.C .; P aul H. Sand ers, p ro fesso r of law at
V anderbilt U n iversity.

B oard reported to the P resid en t that no im m ediate threat of a work
stoppage existed .
August 18__________ ___ A greem ent reached on a 6 -cen t hourly w age in c r e a se , effective
A pril 15, 1954, w ith a wage reopening on January 15, 1955.
N ovem ber 8
A greem ent reached on a 4 -ce n t hourly w age in c r e a se , effective
January 15, 1955, and an adjustm ent in holiday pay p ra ctice to
p erm it the ob servan ce of certain recogn ized holidays on F rid ay
when they fa ll on Saturday.
J u ly 19-------------------------

* There were two separate disputes affecting employees of the Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Co. (See No. 12.) Although die
members of the Board of Inquiry were identical in each case, the Boards were created by separate Executive orders and iheir hearings
were also conducted separately.




16

14. L ongshoring D ispute on the A tlantic and Gulf C o asts, 1956—57— International
L ongshorem en's A sso cia tio n (in d .) v. shipping
and steved orin g com panies
N ovem ber 16, 1956___ Work stoppage of approxim ately 60, 000 dockw orkers began after the
N ew York Shipping A sso cia tio n and the ILA (Ind.) failed to reach
agreem en t on term s of a new contract. 1 D isagreem en t over the ap­
p ropriate bargaining unit, w age in c r e a se s tied to length of contract,
slingload lim itation s, 8-hour work gu aran tees, and gang s iz e led to
failu re of p restrik e n egotiation s.
N ovem ber 2 1 --------------- At req u est of N ational Labor R elations Board, Judge F red rick Van
P elt B ryan, U. S. D istr ic t Court for Southern New York, issu e d a
tem porary ord er restra in in g the ILA (Ind.) from continuing dem and
that the N ew York Shipping A sso cia tio n negotiate a coastw ide con tract.
N ovem ber 2 2 --------------- B oard of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t and h earin gs began in
W ashington, D .C . M em bers: Thom as W. Holland, P r o fe sso r of Labor
E con om ics and Industrial R elations, G eorge W ashington U n iversity,
W ashington, D .C ., chairm an; Arthur Stark, E xecu tive S ecretary, New
York B oard of M ediation; Jacob J. B la ir, P r o fe sso r of Industry,
U n iversity of P ittsburgh, P ittsburgh, Pa.
N ovem ber 2 4 --------------- The B oard reported to the P resid en t that the "continuation of this
(industryw ide bargaining) is su e as an u n settled m atter is preventing
the com p letion of co lle c tiv e bargaining co n tracts in a ll p orts. " Im ­
m ed ia tely follow ing the B oard 's report, the P resid en t d irected the
D epartm ent of J u stice to petition the appropriate d istr ic t court for an
injunction again st the strik e. A 10-day restra in in g ord er w as issu ed
by Judge B ryan. The union ord ered a return to work; m o st of the
lon gsh orem en reported for work N ovem ber 26.
N ovem ber 3 0 --------------- O riginal 10-day restra in in g order extended to the fu ll 80-day period
authorized by the Labor M anagem ent R elations (T aft-H artley) A ct by
Judge Bryan; he acted o ra lly as the w ave of slow dow ns and re fu sa ls
of lon gsh orem en to work during the noon hour and at night reportedly
continued for the second day.
D ecem b er 4 ----------------- Judge B ryan signed exten sion order issu e d on N ovem ber 30, prohibiting
the union from "taking part in any strik e in the m a ritim e industry in
the United States" and d irectin g the union to in stru ct its m em b ers to
return to work. O rder provided that any in c r e a se s in w ages, p en sion s,
and w elfa re contributions would be re tro a ctiv e to O ctober 1.
D ecem b er 1 2 --------------- Judge B ryan issu ed tem porary injunction prohibiting the ILA (In d .)
from in sistin g upon industryw ide bargaining in its negotiations with
N ew York em p lo yers; the injunction to continue in force until NLRB
ruled on New York Shipping A sso cia tio n 's charge of unfair labor
p ra c tic e s. B oard had tw ice d ecided that bargaining for em p lo yees of
N ew York Shipping A sso cia tio n should be lim ited to P ort of N ew York.
January 3, 1957--------- ILA (Ind.) and New York w aterfront em p lo yers conducted fir st serio u s
joint negotiating s e s s io n sin ce N ovem ber 19.
January 1 5 ------------------ The F ed eral M ediation and C on ciliation S er v ice su ggested arbitration
to se ttle dispute. C ounsel for union requ ested P resid en t to appoint
a factfinding co m m issio n .
January 1 6 ------------------ N ational Labor R elations Board tria l exam in er recom m ended that full
B oard bar union's u se of econom ic p r e ssu r e , including a strik e, to
fo rce sh ip p ers to agree to con tract coverin g m ore than P ort of New
York, on the ground that the union's dem and for coastw ide contract,
w hile sh ip p ers in sisted on confining negotiations to certify in g a b a r­
gaining unit (N ew York and vicin ity ), am ounted to refu sal to bargain,
and w as th erefore an unfair labor p ra ctice.
See footnote at end of tab le.




17

14. L ongshoring D ispute on the A tlantic and Gulf C o asts, 1956—57— International
L ongshorem en’s A sso cia tio n (Ind.) v. shipping
and steved orin g com p anies— Continued
January 18, 1957
January 2 2 ___,_________

January 2 3 -----------------January 3 1 -----------------F ebruary 2_______ _____
F eb ru ary 5____________
F ebruary 7

F eb ru ary 8___________
F eb ru ary 9
F eb ru ary 12__________
F eb ru ary 13__________
F eb ru ary 17
F eb ru ary 19__________
F eb ru ary 2 2 ---------------F eb ru ary 2 3 __________

S ecreta ry of Labor M itchell, acting for the P resid en t, rejected the
union's req u est for estab lish m en t of factfinding co m m issio n , citing
p ro ced u res provided by T aft-H artley Law and urging em p lo yers and
union to continue n egotiation s.
New York Shipping A sso cia tio n and other port em ployer groups
p resen ted fin al term s for settlem en t to P resid en tia l Board of Inquiry.
N ational Labor R elations Board announced dockw orkers would vote on
em p loyers' " last offer" at ports from P ortland, M aine, to B row n sv ille,
T ex., F eb ru ary 4 through F eb ru ary 7, 1957.
B oard reported to the P resid en t on the em p loyers' "last offers."
F ed er a l M ediation and C onciliation S erv ice proposed form ula for
settlem en t.
F ed era l M ediation and C onciliation S erv ice form ula w as withdrawn
pending the outcom e of the w orkers' vote on em p loyers' "last offers."
U.S. Court of A ppeals unanim ously upheld Judge B ryan 's D ecem ber
order prohibiting the ILA (Ind.) from dem anding that em p lo yers bargain
on a coastw ide sca le.
D ockw orkers rejected em p loyers' " last offers" by a vote of 14, 458 to
1, 185, w ith 416 b allo ts voided or challenged. New York Shipping
A sso cia tio n offered to subm it the dispute to arbitration.
ILA (Ind.) rejected the em p loyers' offer to arb itrate.
Union and em p lo yers agreed to negotiate on b a sis of F ed era l M ediation
and C onciliation S erv ice p rop osal of January 31, 1957.
About 35, 000 dockw orkers again stopped w ork at A tlantic C oast ports
from P ortland, M aine, to Hampton R oads, V a., as 80 -day injunction
expired. 2
8 0 -day injunction w as fo rm a lly d isch arged by court action.
A greem ent on term s of a 3 -y ea r "m aster" contract reached betw een
the ILA (Ind.) and New York Shipping A sso cia tio n , subject to ratification
by ILA m em b ersh ip .
D isagreem en t over contract term s at P hiladelphia, B altim ore, and
N orfolk continued to id le dockw orkers at A tlantic C oast ports from
M aine to V irginia.
A greem en t reached on term s of a new contract in N orfolk, the la st
port to reach a settlem en t.
D ockw orkers returned to w ork at a ll p orts. The "m aster" agreem en t
for a ll ports from M aine to V irginia provided hourly w a g e-ra te
in c r e a se s of 18 cen ts retroactive to O ctober 1, 1956, and 7 cents
m ore in O ctober 1957 and 1958; in cr ea sed em ployer w elfa re co n tri­
butions; and included a co st-o f-liv in g esca la to r cla u se. L ocal a g r e e ­
m ents negotiated for each port co vered w orking conditions, vacation s,
h olid ays, and w elfa re and pension b en efits.

1 Two contract extensions following the September 30 expiration date had kept dock employees working through November 15.
Contracts were first extended after the National Labor Relations Board, on September 24, directed a representation election in the
Port of Greater New York following filing of a petition .>y International Brotherhood of Longshoremen (AFL—
CIO). On October 18, the
NLRB announced that the ILA (Ind.) had won the election and was duly certified as collective bargaining agent for longshoremen.
After the NLRB election, the New York Shipping Association filed charges with NLRB, alleging that the union was refusing to bargain
in good faith because of its insistence on industrywide bargaining. Before striking, the union was prepared to accept a form of industry
bargaining based on the employers' acceptance of certain issues.
2 New Orleans dockworkers signed a 3-year contract January 30; other locals from North Carolina to Texas quickly indicated
that they would accept employers' terms.




18

15. A tom ic E nergy D ispute, 1957— Oil, C h em ical and A tom ic W orkers
International Union (AFLr-CIO) v. G oodyear A tom ic Corp. ,
a su b sid iary of the G oodyear T ire and Rubber Co.
M ay 10, 1957_________

May 1 4 ________________
May 1 5 ________________

May 1 6 ________________
May 2 3 -------------------------

July 16 ------------------------July 23—24_____________
A ugust 4 ---------------------A ugust 5 ----------------------

Work stoppage idling approxim ately 1, 500 production and m aintenance
w ork ers rep resen ted by the O il, C h em ical and A tom ic W orkers In ter­
national Union (A FL—CIO) began at the P ortsm outh plant of the A tom ic
E nergy C o m m ission , operated by the G oodyear A tom ic C orp ., near
W averly, Ohio. On May 7, the union m em b ersh ip voted to re je ct a
new 3 -y ea r agreem en t reached by the union's negotiating com m ittee
and rep resen ta tiv es of the G oodyear A tom ic Corp. , b ecau se of d is ­
sa tisfa ctio n over contract p ro v isio n s, including w age in c r e a se s, health
and safety and sen iority p ro v isio n s, con tract length, and lack of job
d escrip tio n s.
B oard of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em bers: Guy F arm er,
form er chairm an of the N ational Labor R elations Board, chairm an;
R. W. F lem ing, d irecto r, Institute of Labor and Industrial R elations,
U n iversity of Illin ois; and G eorge S. B radley, T oledo, Ohio, attorney.
B oard reported to the P resid en t that the is su e s in the labor dispute
w ere u n resolved and that the strik e se r io u sly affected a substan tial
part of the atom ic energy industry and im p eriled the national safety.
The P resid en t d irected the J u stice D epartm ent to seek an 8 0 -day
injunction to halt the strik e. F ed era l Judge John H. D ruffel, C incinnati,
Ohio, issu e d a 10-day injunction ord erin g the union m em b ers to return
to work w ithin 24 hours.
Union ordered w orkers back to work; by May 17, w ork ers had returned.
D irecto r of F ed eral M ediation and C onciliation S erv ice asked r e p r e ­
sen tatives of the com pany and union to m ee t May 27, 1957, w ith a panel
of th ree m ed iators to help r e so lv e the is s u e s in dispute. With the
con sen t of a ll p a rties, an 8 0 -day injunction (expiring A ugust 5, 1957),
restra in in g em p loyees from strik in g at the P ortsm outh plant w as
issu e d by Judge D ruffel.
The B oard 's final report to the P resid en t stated that both p a rties to
the dispute had m ade concessions; how ever, settlem en t "over w ages and
tied in with the term s of a new labor agreem ent" had not been reached.
B allot conducted by NLRB on em p lo yers' " last offer" w as rejected by
w o rk ers.
Injunction d isso lv ed .
A new 3 -y ea r contract w as signed, providing hourly w age in c r e a se s of
11 cen ts, retroactive to A p ril 30, 1957, an additional 2 cents on
A ugust 5, 1957, and 9 cen ts on A p ril 30, 1958. It a lso provided for
the reopening of wage negotiations on A pril 30, 1959.

16. L ongshoring D ispute on the A tlantic and Gulf C o asts, 1959— International L ongshorem en’s
A s s o c ia tio n 1 v. shipping and steved orin g com p an ies
A ugust 10, 1959---------- Joint bargaining se ssio n s began betw een the New York Shipping A s s o ­
c ia tio n 2 and the International L on gsh orem en 's A sso cia tio n . The union
p resen ted its dem ands, w hich included: An exten sion of the M aster
C ontract to cover a ll ports of the United States from Searsport,
M aine, to B ro w n sv ille, T ex. , in w hich ILA is the bargaining r e p r e ­
sentative; a 6-hour day (at a rate of $ 2 2 .4 0 per day); a guarantee
of a day's pay each tim e a m an is ordered out; in crea sed pen sion
and w elfa re b en efits; and a fr e e z e on the 20-m an work gang.
S ee footnotes at end of table




19

16. L ongshoring D ispute on the A tlantic and Gulf C o asts, 1959—
International L ongshorem en's A sso c ia tio n 1 v. shipping
and steved orin g com panies— Continued
A ugust 17, 1959 ------- The N ew York Shipping A sso cia tio n , in a cou n terp rop osal, sought to
extend the p resen t agreem en t for 3 y ea rs with changes allow ing e m ­
p lo y ers the right to im prove the efficien cy of th eir operations by
giving them g reater " flexib ility of labor. " Among the other p ro ­
v isio n s put forth w ere a flex ib le lunch hour, changes in tra v el pay
arran gem en ts, and recogn ition by the NYSA of the p rin cip le that p ro ­
tection be provided against lo ss of job opportunities which m ay resu lt
from autom ation.
Sep tem ber 1 7 ------------ The N ew York Shipping A sso cia tio n and the ILA announced they w ere
callin g on F ed era l and city labor m ed iators in an attem pt to head off
a strik e at the expiration of the 3-y ea r agreem en t on Septem ber 30.
Sep tem ber 18 ----------- M anagem ent m ade its fir s t m onetary o ffer, proposing y ea rly in c r e a se s
of 8, 3, and 4 cents an hour in a 3-y ea r agreem en t, to be allocated
am ong w a g es, p en sio n s, w elfa re, and paid holidays by the union, on
the condition that the union agree that em p lo yers be given the right
to im prove the efficien cy of th eir operations (by such m eans as m e ­
chanical cargo handling g ea r, co n ta in ers, and container sh ip s). A lso
sought by m anagem ent w ere changes in tra v e l pay arran gem en ts, a
p ro v isio n for tighter quitting tim e c la u se s, and a m ore flex ib le lunch
hour. The p rop osal contained a ssu ran ce that adequate safeguards
again st lo ss of job opportunities would be provided.
Septem ber 19 ----------- A counterproposal was put forth by the ILA elim inating its origin al
dem and for a 6-hour day. Instead, a straigh t 40 cents an hour wage
in c r e a se , plus a guarantee of 8 hours' w ork per day and in crea sed
frin ge b en efits, w ere sought in a 2 -y ea r agreem en t.
Sep tem ber 23 ----------- The ILA m odified its dem ands "all along the line" with reductions
in w age dem ands and in the length of a guaranteed working day.
Sep tem ber 24 ----------- E m p loyers countered with an offer of a 3 -y ea r agreem en t calling for
a m oney package of 24 cents— 12 cen ts in the fir s t y ea r, 6 in the
secon d , and 6 in the third— that would be applied to w a ges, p en sio n s,
w e lfa re, an d /or other item s chosen by the union. The offer was
contingent upon union acceptance of m od ification s in work ru le s. The
offer w as term ed as not "a fair one" by the union.
F ed er a l, State, and city m ed iators w ere asked by both sid es to take
an active part in n egotiation s, as a sta n d still had apparently been
reached. N egotiations in southern ports a lso w ere stalem ated over
issu e s of slin gload lim its and gang s iz e .
Sep tem ber 28 ----------- The ILA again cut its dem ands to a package worth approxim ately
50 cen ts an hour in a 3-yea r agreem en t. L ater in the day, the sh ip ­
p ers rejected the p rop osal as " still too high. "
Sep tem ber 29 ----------- Shippers in crea sed their offer to 30 cents an hour— 20 cents the fir st
year and 5 cents in each of two follow ing y e a r s— in a 3-y ea r co n ­
tract conditioned on new w ork rule changes.
S ep tem ber 30 ----------- A threatened strik e was averted when the New York Shipping A s s o ­
ciation and the ILA agreed on a 15-day contract ex ten sio n , with any
subsequent in c r e a se s retro a ctiv e to O ctober 1.
T elegram s from S ecreta ry M itch ell, G overnor N elso n R o ck efeller,
and M ayor R obert F . W agner urged the p a rties to negotiate without
interrupting w ork.
S ee footnote at end of tab le.




20

16. L ongshoring D ispute on the A tlantic and Gulf C o a sts, 1959—
International L on gsh orem en 's A s so c ia tio n 1 v. shipping
and steved orin g com panies— Continued
O ctober 1 , 1959 —

O ctober 5

O ctober 6

L ongshorem en in N ew O rleans struck as con tracts exp ired , follow ing
a refu sa l by southern shippers to grant retro a ctiv ity on in c r e a se s
included in a proposed new agreem en t. The walkout was joined by
m em b ers in other southern p orts on South A tlantic and Gulf C oasts.
D esp ite a contract exten sion in the N orth, Captain W illiam V. B rad ley,
p resid en t of ILA, pledged support of the strik in g southern dockw orkers
and d eclared that m em b ers would not w ork on ships diverted from
the South. The stoppage spread to the en tire ea st co a st, shutting
down p orts from M aine to T ex a s, affecting som e 5 0 ,000 w ork ers and
220 cargo sh ip s. The New York Shipping A sso cia tio n voted not to
resu m e bargaining until O ctober 15 u n less w ork ers returned im m ed i­
a tely, claim in g that the strik e was ille g a l, and further in sisted that
the union m u st give a ssu ran ce that it would ca rry out any agreem en t
reached w ith northern sh ippers reg a rd less of developm ents in south­
ern p o rts.
By the follow ing day, union lea d ers cla im ed the strik e "100 p ercen t
effectiv e from M aine to T exas. "
M ediators w ere unable to arrange a join t m eetin g .
A F ed era l D istr ic t Judge in N ew O rleans issu ed a tem p orary r e str a in ­
ing order against two N ew O rleans lo c a ls, N o s. 1418 and 1419, as
req u ested by the N ational Labor R elations B oard, acting on a co m ­
plaint by New O rleans sh ip p ers charging that the two lo c a ls failed
to se r v e a 30-day strik e n o tice, as required by law , b efore the
contract exp ired. *
P resid en t E isen h ow er appointed a B oard of Inquiry to report to him by
O ctober 10. M em bers of the B oard w ere Guy F a rm e r, form er ch a ir­
m an of the N ational Labor R elations Board; G eorge F ran k en th aler,
form er Surrogate Judge and form er m em b er of the N ew York State
Suprem e Court; and John F . Sem b ow er, a C hicago law yer active in
labor arb itration work.
The B oard began its work late in the afternoon with the expectation,
ex p ressed by M r. F a rm e r, that the rep ort would be ready before
the 10th.

O ctober 7

C om pleting its study of the strik e late in the day, the Board fo r ­
w arded it to the P resid en t. E a rlier testim o n y indicated an im p a sse
over ju risd ictio n and autom ation. The B oard noted that the m ajor
u n resolved is su e s w ere w age r a te s, certain fringe b en efits, p r o c e ­
dures for in stallin g m ech an ica l d ev ices and effecting con tain erization ,
and gang s iz e . Upon re ceip t, the P resid en t d irected the A ttorney
G eneral to seek an injunction at once.
As a resu lt of union co m p lain ts, the W aterfront C om m ission of New
York H arbor obtained a court ord er callin g on th ree steam sh ip lin es
to show ca u se why they should not be enjoined from using " u n reg is­
tered longshorem en" to handle baggage. 4

S ee footnotes at end of tab le.




21

16. L ongshoring D ispute on the A tlantic and Gulf C o asts, 1959—
International L ongshorem en's A s so c ia tio n 1 v. shipping
and steved orin g com panies— Continued
O ctober 8, 1959 ------- A tem p orary 10-day restrain in g order w as issu e d by F ed era l D istr ic t
Judge Irving R. Kaufman in New Y ork, acting upon application of the
G overnm ent to seek injunctive r e lie f in the str ik e. The Judge found
that the strik e had affected a su b stan tial part of the m a ritim e co m ­
m er ce of the United S ta tes, that its continuance would im p eril the
national health and sa fety , and that " im m ediate and irrep a ra b le dam ­
age would result" if the restrain in g ord er was not granted. H earings
on the issu a n ce of a tem porary injunction for the rem aining 70-day
p eriod w ere scheduled for the 15th.
O ctober 9 ------------------- Work w as resu m ed at a ll ports with p rio rity given to about a dozen
v e s s e ls containing p er ish a b les. The A m erican A sso cia tio n of R a il­
roads lifted its freig h t em bargo put into effect on the fir s t day of
the str ik e. B argaining was expected to resu m e on O ctober 19# a l­
low ing tim e for the p orts to return to norm al operating le v e ls.
O ctober 1 5 ---------------- F ollow ing an attem pt by the G overnm ent to have the tem porary r e ­
strain in g ord er replaced by a p relim in a ry injunction (on O ctober 14),
Judge Kaufm an extended his o rigin al order until he ruled on the m o ­
tion for a further 70-day injunction. ILA o fficia ls asked the court to
have an injunction guarantee that an anticipated pay in cr ea se be m ade
retro a ctiv e to the day m em b ers returned to w ork. Judge Kaufman
re se rv ed d ecisio n on this point.
O ctober 17 ---------------- Judge Kaufman issu e d a fu ll injunction a ssu rin g continuation of work
for the statutory period as provided for in the act. At the sam e
tim e, he denied the union's request for retro a ctiv ity by a ssertin g he
w as n eith er em pow ered nor inclin ed to u se the injunctive p ro cess
for "m atters ord in arily left to negotiation. "
O ctober 20 ---------------- N egotiations resu m ed with no sign ifican t p ro g re ss reported. A set
of "broad p rin cip les" and " sp ecific recom m endations" w ere proposed
by em p lo yers for dealing with the prob lem s of autom ation. D eta ils
w ere not m ade public.
O ctober 26 ----------------- The ILA rejected the shipping a sso cia tio n 's p ro p osals as "not a fair
o ffer. "
N ovem ber 4 --------------- E m p loyers rejected union p ro p osals for royalty paym ents on each ton
of cargo handled in shipping con tain ers u n less the union agreed to
reductions in the w ork fo rc e. P r e v io u sly , sh ip p ers had offered to
pay into a fund 25 cents a ton on "unitized" or "containerized" cargo
loaded or unloaded on the docks by w orkers other than longshorem en .
A lso sought w as agreem en t to allow in stallation of autom atic cargo
handling equipm ent and the right to regu late the s iz e of work gangs.
N ovem ber 2 4 ------------- A s a "basis" for settlem en t, the ILA accepted p ro p osals of F ed era l
m ed ia to rs ca llin g for a 41-cen t-a n -h o u r p ackage, with a 1 2 -ce n t-a n hour r a ise retro a ctiv e to O ctober 1, and 5 -cen t in c r e a se s to follow
on O ctober 1, I960, and O ctober 1, 1961. In addition, the w elfa re
contribution would be in crea sed by 7 cents an hour, of w hich 3 cents
would be earm arked for c lin ic s, and the p en sion fund contribution
would be in crea sed by 7 cents an hour. T hree new paid holidays
would be added to the p resen t 5 at the rate of 1 a y ea r, and v a ­
cation s would be lib era lized . E m p loyers w ere noncom m ital on the
p ro p o sa ls.
S ee footnote at end of tab le.




22

16. L ongshoring D ispute on the A tlantic and Gulf C o asts, 1959—
International L on gsh orem en ’s A sso c ia tio n 1 v. shipping
and steved orin g com p an ies— Continued
N ovem ber 27, 1959 __ The union rejected an em p loyer solution to the problem of introd uc­
tion of lab orsavin g equipm ent w hich ca lled for a 6-m onth period of
d irect n eg o tia tio n s, after the contract w as sign ed , on using and m an­
ning m ech an ical d ev ices. If an a greem en t could not be reached in
the 6 m onths, the issu e would go to arb itration , accord ing to the
proposal.
D ecem b er 1 __________ N egotiators reached a b asic agreem en t including a m a ster contract
settin g term s for w ages and b en efits for d ockers from M aine to V ir ­
ginia. M onetary term s w ere e sse n tia lly the sam e as proposed ea r lie r
in the 4 1-cen t-an -h o u r package, co n sistin g of 12 cen ts retro a ctiv e
to O ctober 1, 1959; an additional 5 cen ts effectiv e O ctober 1, I960,
and 5 cen ts effectiv e O ctober 1, 1961; sixth , seven th, and eighth paid
holidays added in fir s t, secon d , and third con tract y ea r, resp ectiv ely ;
qualifying tim e for 2 and 3 w eek s' vacation pay reduced to 1, 100 and
1,300 hours a y ea r, re sp e c tiv e ly (w ere 1,2 0 0 and 1,500); 14 cents
an hour com pany paym ent to pen sion fund (was 7 cents); 21 cen ts
an hour com pany paym ent to w elfa re fund (was 14 cen ts), including
3 cen ts for m ed ical c lin ic s.
M echanization issu e — em p lo yers agreed not to reduce the s iz e of the
standard 20-m an w ork gang and to u se ILA m em b ers to load or reload
con tain ers when work is done at the p ier. The question of a penalty
paym ent to the union for con tain ers loaded off the p ier w as left for
further negotiation. If no settlem en t was reached in 2 w eek s, it was
agreed that this issu e would be arb itrated , with a d ecisio n to be m ade
w ithin 30 days of su b m ission .

D ecem b er 3 __

D ecem b er 6 ____
D ecem b er 7 ____

D ecem b er 10

S ettlem en ts subsequently reached at other A tlantic and Gulf C oast
ports during D ecem ber provided b en efits sim ila r to the agreem en t
with the New York Shipping A sso cia tio n , except for lo c a l w ork ru les.
Union m em b ers w ere to vote on the ag reem en t on D ecem ber 10.
A "m em orandum of settlem en t” w as signed including a ll but one of
the p ro vision s agreed upon e a r lie r . Contract talks resu m ed in New
O rleans and G alveston, as w ell as in other ports in the South, w here
a greem en ts a re negotiated on a port b a sis g en era lly patterned after
the New York agreem en t.
A g reem en ts w ere reached on lo c a l conditions and the 4 1-cen t-an -h o u r
wage package in B oston, B a ltim o re, and P hiladelphia.
The P resid en tia l Board of Inquiry reconvened in W ashington. T e s ti­
m ony p resen ted by rep resen ta tiv es of the union and em p loyers in d i­
cated su b stan tial p ro g ress tow ard a settlem en t. The B oard 's second
report was tran sm itted to the P resid en t.
A greem en t was reached for N orfolk—Ham pton R oads.
ILA m em b ers in ports from M aine to V irgin ia overw h elm ingly ratified
the new agreem en t. P ort of P hiladelphia w ork ers did not vote, but
union and em p loyers had agreed upon a m a ster contract. The union
drew up a sep arate agreem en t coverin g w orking conditions with the
P hiladelphia M arine Trade A sso cia tio n . Issu e s at South A tlantic and
Gulf ports s till rem ained u n settled .

See footnote at end of table.




23

16. L ongshoring D ispute on the A tlantic and Gulf C o a sts, 1959—
International L on gsh orem en ’s A sso c ia tio n 1 v. shipping
and steved orin g co m p an ies— Continued
D ecem b er 14, 1959 — The N ew York w age pattern was offered in M o b ile» N ew O rlean s, and
G alveston. Other is su e s rem ained u n settled .
D ecem b er 1 7 -------------- P h ilad elp h ia lon gshorem en ratified a 3 -y ea r contract. F ed era l m e d i­
ators in G alveston announced that final offers by em p lo yers and
dem ands by the union had been rejected .
D ecem b er 2 3 ------------- L ongshorem en and em p loyers in New O rleans agreed on a 3 -y ea r pact
averting a renew ed strik e on the 28th. M oney term s of the contract
w ere id en tical with the agreem en t reached in N ew York. On the 21st
and 22d, Gulf C oast lon gsh orem en had voted overw h elm ingly again st
the "last offer" of the sh ip p ers. A greem en t had not been reached
in M obile over the s iz e of work crew s.
S ettlem en t w as reached in G alveston on a ll is s u e s .
D ecem b er 2 6 ------------- Shippers and union o fficia ls in M obile, the only rem aining unsettled
p ort, agreed to the 3 -y ea r contract. On D ecem b er 27, the injunction
w as lifted .
1 Affiliated with AFL-CIO on November 17, 1959.
2 The association bargains for 170 steamship lines and contracting stevedores.
3 Labor-Management Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act, Sec. 8 (d) (3).
* New York—New Jersey law, under which the commission operates, made it mandatory for anyone doing pier work to be regis­
tered by the agency—a process that involves screening to bar criminals from the piers.

17. B a sic S teel Industry D isp u te, 1959— United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(AFL—CIO) v. b asic s te e l industry
J anuary—F eb ru ary—
M arch 1959_________

Indications of an im pending dispute over new contract term s becam e
evident ea rly in 1959. P relim in a ry ta ctics w ere confined to gen era l
sta te m en ts, tending to show how far apart industry and union w ere
lik ely to be in their in itia l con tacts. Com pany sp ok esm en ex p ressed
their opposition to "inflationary" w age b o o sts. S teel production ro se
as co n su m ers built up in v en to ries. F oreign com p etition , w hich was
to be cited m any tim es in the loom ing d isp u te, w as introduced by
p rod u cers as a factor to be co n sid ered in n egotiation s.
P resid en t E isen h ow er, in a F ebru ary p r e ss co n feren ce, stated that
"I have alw ays urged that w age in c r e a se s should be m easu red by in ­
c r e a se of prod u ctivity, and I think there would be no inflationary effect
if they w ere m easu red by that criterio n . "
A p ril 1 ------------------------ K a iser S teel Corp. , replacing P ittsb u rgh S teel Co. , joined the "big
tw elve" com panies who w ere to p articip ate in negotiations sched uled
to begin M ay 1 8 .1 Individual com pany m eetin g s w ith re p resen ta tiv es
of the United S teelw ork ers of A m erica w ere sched uled for the w eek
of M ay 18, after which talks would be r e c e s s e d until June 1. At that
tim e, negotiations w ere to be resu m ed , to be handled for the industry
by re p resen ta tiv es from three of the com p anies— United States S teel,
R epublic S teel, and B ethlehem S teel— instead of by the 12 m ajor p ro ­
d u cers. R ep resen tatives from the sam e th ree top p roducers also
handled the 1956 negotiations.
S ee footnote at end of table.




24

17. B a sic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959— United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(A FL —CIO) v. b a sic s te e l industry— Continued
A p ril 1, 1959—
Continued ---------------- R. Conrad C ooper, of U .S . S teel, w as to lead the in d u stry’s bargaining
group, w hich a lso included R. H eath L arry , of U .S . S teel, H. C. Lum b,
cou n sel for R epublic S teel, and John H. M o rse, co u n sel for B ethlehem
S teel. David J. M cDonald was to head the union n eg o tia to rs, a s s iste d
by Howard R. H ague, union v ice p resid en t, I. W. A b el, se c r e ta r y ,
and Arthur J. G oldberg, g en era l cou n sel.
A p ril 10
A 1-y ea r exten sion of curren t w ages and other b en efits was proposed
in a letter sen t by the 12 com panies to the union p resid en t. It was
a lso proposed that co st-o f-liv in g esca la to r cla u se s contained in curren t
agreem en ts be elim in ated . M r. M cDonald prom ptly rejected the
p ro p o sa ls.
In a letter to the ste e l p ro d u cers, the union head proposed: (1) That
A p ril 13
negotiations begin M ay 4 in stead of M ay 18, (2) no p ric e in c r e a se s
during the life of any new agreem en t reach ed , and (3) that any s e ttle ­
m ent should p rotect rea l w ages and provide in c r e a se s in w ages and
other b en efits-ju stified by in crea sed output and industry p ro fits.
In rep ly to M r. M cDonald, industry sp ok esm en agreed to ea r lie r b a r ­
A p ril 1 5
gaining s e s s io n s , but rejected or refu sed to d isc u ss the other parts
of the union p rop osal.
Industry and union agreed to sta rt con tract talks in New York on M ay 5.
A p ril 20
United S teelw ork ers' w age p o licy co m m ittee drew up a " com p re­
A p ril 30—M ay 1
hensive" bargaining program ca llin g for "substantial" w age in c r e a s e s ,
c o st-o f-liv in g adjustm ents , im proved in su ran ce and p e n sio n s, in crea sed
w eekend pay, sh orter w orkw eeks , im proved supplem ental unem ploym ent
b en efits, additional paid holidays and g rea ter vacation b en efits, rev ised
g rievan ce p ro ced u res, and im proved contract term s coverin g m any
other is s u e s .
M ay 5
As negotiations got underw ay, industry reitera ted its req u est for
a 1 -y ea r contract exten sion which drew a secon d rejection from
M r. M cDonald.
In the co u rse of a p r e ss co n feren ce, P resid en t E isenhow er ca lled on
both sid es for a d isp lay of "good s e n s e , w isd om , and b u sin ess-la b o r
sta tesm a n sh ip ," adding that the country could not, in the long run,
stand s till and do nothing in the ab sen ce of such voluntary restra in t.
H ow ever, he did em p h asize h is relu ctan ce to have the G overnm ent take
a d irect hand in co llectiv e bargaining, and his opposition to leg a l
ce ilin g s on p ro fits, p r ic e s , and w a ges.
M ay 6




Industry spok esm en stated that two prop osed m oves w ere under co n sid ­
eration should the union depart from its u sual p rocedu re of striking
the en tire industry at the exp iration of co n tracts. One w as a form
of m utual a ssista n c e , or strik e in su ra n ce, w h ere profits of the o p e r­
ating con cern s are used to aid th ose stru ck . The secon d step , a
voluntary industryw ide shutdown, w as provided for by sending contract
term in ation n otices to the union, a leg a l form ality under the T aftH artley A ct, w hich would allow the plants to c lo se after June 30 should
the union attem pt a d ivid e-an d -con q u er technique. T his m arked the
secon d tim e in the post T aft-H artley h isto ry of s te e l n egotiations (the
fir s t tim e was in 1956) that com pany term ination n o tices on an in d u s­
tryw ide m ove had been sent.

25

17. B asic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959—United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(AFL»—
CIO) v . b a sic s te e l industry— Continued
M ay 11 . 1959

Since n egotiations betw een ex ecu tives from the 12 s te e l com p anies
and union rep resen ta tiv es conducted during the p revious w eek failed
to produce any sign ifican t develop m en ts, 4-m an co m m ittees from in ­
dustry and labor began a secon d phase of con tract talk s.

May 2 7 ________________ L ead ers of the ste e l industry, gathered for the 67th annual m eeting
of the A m erican Iron and S teel In stitu te, d eclared their opposition to
any w age in c r e a s e s . It w as d isc lo se d that the union was being ask ed
to allow r e v isio n s in " local practice" c la u s e s 2 to allow m anagem ent
m ore control over em p loyee p lacem en t. The elim in ation of r e s t r ic ­
tive p ra ctices w as a lso m entioned.
June 9 _______ — ____ M r. M cDonald n otified industry n egotiators that the union w ished
to resu m e com p any-by-com p any m eetin g s the follow ing w eek (16th).
M r. Cooper m ade cle a r that w hile esca la tio n c la u se s would be e lim ­
inated under the in d u stry's p rop osal, the steelw o rk ers would keep
the 17-cen t c o st-o f-liv in g allow an ces added to w ages over the past
3 y e a rs— but only on an "add on" b a sis rather than as part of the
b asic w age.
M r. Cooper indicated that the se s sio n s w ere sta lled on industry d e­
m ands for rev isio n of lo ca l p ra ctice c la u se s. N egotiations had reached
a sta lem a te over what both groups term ed the in flexib le p osition of
the op p osite party. H ow ever, both M r. M cDonald and M r. C ooper,
in sep arate p r e ss co n fe ren c es, agreed that the union had not put a
sp ecific d o lla rs and cen ts tag on its dem ands.
June 10

A sh ift in the in d u stry's p osition w as indicated in a le tte r from
M r. Cooper to the union p resid en t containing an eigh t-p oin t program
for broad contract changes w hich dealt with lo c a l w orking conditions;
p ro v isio n s aga in st "wildcat" str ik e s, slow dow ns, and picketing; m an ­
agem en t's right to develop in cen tives and standards; cla rifica tio n of
com p an ies' right to change w ork sch ed u les; vacation req u irem en ts;
elim in ation of overlapping or duplication of ben efits; sim p lifica tio n
of p roced u res for estab lish in g sen io rity units; and cla rifica tio n of
con tract language. The com panies stated that agreem en t by the union
on language changes relatin g to this eigh t-p oin t program w as a p r e ­
req u isite to agreem en t by them on a package com p osed of a "m odest"
w age in cr ea se and certain frin ge ben efit im p ro vem en ts. A lso , the
com p anies stated that they would continue to be rep resen ted by the
fou r-m an team . The union rejected the p ro p osals.

June 11

N egotiation s reach ed a deadlock over the qu estion of the form of n e ­
g o tiation s, that is , w hether bargaining should be conducted on an in ­
dustryw ide (four-m an com m ittee) or on a com p any-by-com p any b a sis
(which the union dem anded) or a com bination of both. M r. M cDonald
serv e d n otice that the full 435 -m em b er union negotiating com m ittee
would be on hand June 16.

June 19

A fter 2 days of m eetin g s betw een la r g er com pany-union co m m ittee s,
industry and union to p -le v e l team s resu m ed talk s w ith the p rocedu ral
dispute apparently settled .

S ee footnote at end of table.




26

17. B a sic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959—U nited S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(AFLr-CIO) v. b a sic s te e l industry— Continued
June 22, 1959 ----------- Industry n eg otiators m aintained that the union had yet to com e up
w ith a reason ab le b a sis for a new con tract. T his w as in resp o n se
to an u n d isclo sed union p rop osal offered on June 19 as a substitute
for its orig in a l lis t of 250 individual item s (subm itted during the
ea rly sta g es of n egotiation s) on w hich it w ish ed to bargain. Industry
stated, in resp o n se to in form al su ggestion s for a r is e in p en sion s
and w elfa re b en efits, that such adjustm ents would be ju st as in flation ­
ary as higher w a g es. M r. C ooper m et in W ashington w ith Josep h F .
Finnegan, d irector of the F ed er a l M ediation and C onciliation S er v ice .
M r. M cDonald had m et w ith M r. Finnegan during the p reviou s w eek.
June 24—2 5 ____ — ___ Indefinite ex ten sio n of co n tracts beyond the expiration date, can celab le
on 10 d a y s’ n otice, w as proposed by the industry. The union's coun­
terp ro p o sa l o ffered con tract ex ten sio n until July 15. In addition, the
union w age p olicy co m m ittee, w h ile sanctioning the 15-day exten sion ,
stip ulated that any settlem en t negotiated should be retro a ctiv e to
July 1. T his retro a ctiv ity , the com p an ies rep lied , w as u naccep tab le.
June 27------------------------- P resid en t E isen h ow er, in a letter to M r. M cDonald, urged both sid es
to ’‘bargain without interruption of production until a ll term s and
conditions of a new con tract are agreed upon. " T his w as in reply
to a letter sent to the W hite H ouse on June 25 by M r. M cDonald,
req u estin g the estab lish m en t of a factfinding board to exam ine is su e s
such as w a ges, p ro fits, and productivity in the ste e l industry. The
P resid en t rejected the su ggestion , a ssertin g that C o n gress had sp e ­
cific a lly lim ited the u se of P resid en tia l B oards of Inquiry to national
e m e rg en cies.
June 28------------------------- A greem en t w as reach ed on extending con tracts for 2 w eek s, without
any com m itm en t on retro a ctiv ity .
M e e t i n g w ith V ice P resid en t R ichard M. N ixon in P ittsburgh,
M r. M cDonald inform ed him that the union would not agree to another
strik e d ela y. On the follow ing day, the steelw o rk ers rejected a r e ­
new ed p lea by P resid en t E isen h ow er for an in d efin ite ex ten sio n of the
2-w eek tru ce. M r. M cDonald said he w as su re the P resid en t "does
not intend that w e negotiate fo re v er. " Industry’s n egotiators seconded
the P r e sid e n t’s p lea for an indefinite ex ten sio n .




L ead ers on both sid es exchanged id eas on re v ise d con tract cla u se s
governing w orking ru les and changes in operating p r a c tic e s. In a
p r e ss r e le a s e , the industry indicated its w illin g n ess to n egotiate a
2-y ea r con tract with an in c r e a se in in su ran ce and pen sion b en efits
during the fir s t year and a m od est w age r a ise during the secon d y ear,
if the union would accep t contractual changes p rop osed b y the industry.
(See June 10.)
T alks broke down over com pany " local p ractice" dem ands and p ro p os­
als to tighten p ro v isio n s again st w ild cat s tr ik e s. The union agreed
to continue d iscu ssin g w age is s u e s w hile referrin g the other points
to a joint co m m ittee for study during the term of a new con tract.
Industry offered eith er a straigh t 1-y ea r ex ten sio n of curren t contracts
or an indefinite exten sion , ca n cela b le on 5 day’s n otice, w h ile talks
continued. The union rejected both.

27

17. B a sic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959—United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(A FL-C IO ) v. b a sic s te e l industry— Continued
July 13, 1959 _________ A p lea from P resid en t E isen h ow er for a revival of talks again brought
both sid es togeth er in an attem pt to break the sta lem a te. M ills m ade
p reparations for shutting down to p ro tect fu rn aces and equipm ent for
the secon d tim e in 2 w eek s.
July 14 ________________ P resid en t E isen h ow er recom m ended that m anagem ent and labor rep ­
resen ta tiv es ca ll on F ed era l m ed ia to rs for a ssista n c e in reaching
agreem en t. A la st m inute exchange of le tters betw een the p a rties
failed to break the im p a sse, although the union proposed a co n cessio n
by changing contract language of "local w orking p ra ctice cla u ses" in
all ste e l contracts to read: "The p ro v isio n s of this sectio n a re not
intended to prevent the com pany from continuing to m ake p r o g r e ss. "
T his p ro vision w as in the 1956 B eth leh em S teel Corp. contract. How­
ev er, industry turned down the offer.
July 15

The s te e l strik e began at 12:01 a .m . , July 15. Joseph Finnegan,
D irector of the F ed eral M ediation and C onciliation S er v ice , with a
sta ff of th ree, co n sistin g of Robert H. M oore, deputy d irector;
W alter A. M aggiolo, d irecto r of M ediation A ctivity; and R obert W.
Donnahoo, region al d irecto r, R egion Two, arrived in New York for
co n feren ces with each sid e. F ollow ing 3 hours of sep arate talk s with
industry and union le a d e r s, M r. Finnegan reported that the strik e w as
not su scep tib le to easy or ea rly solution. E a r lie r , the union called
for the appointm ent of a th ree-m a n factfinding board— one from in ­
du stry, one from labor, and a neu tral m em b er se le c te d by Suprem e
Court C hief J u stice E arl W arren. The p rod u cers rejected the p r o ­
p o sa l, a ssertin g that both sid es alread y knew the fa cts. M r. M cDonald
urged the top ex ecu tiv es of the big s te e l com p anies to particip ate
d irectly in negotiations; this w as rejected by prod u cers on the ground
that the negotiating team had am ple authority.
In h is new s co n feren ce, P resid en t E isen h ow er said the conditions w ere
not yet p resen t to ju stify seeking a T aft-H artley injunction to keep
the w orkers on the job. He a lso rejected the need for a factfinding
board, and reaffirm ed h is b elie f that co lle c tiv e bargaining should
continue without G overnm ent in tervention, but aided by the M ediation
and C onciliation S erv ice.

July 20

F ed era l m ed ia to rs continued th eir sep arate talks with the p a r tie s.
M r. F innegan re a sse r te d h is p reviou s con clu sion that there would be no
ea sy or ea rly solution to the stoppage. Since the 14th th ere had been
no fa c e -to -fa c e s e s sio n s betw een industry and union re p resen ta tiv e s.

July 21

S ecretary of Labor Jam es P. M itchell announced that he w as form ally
taking on the function of G overnm ent factfin d er and would report to
the P resid en t p erio d ica lly . A ssista n c e would be sought from S e c r e ­
tary of C om m erce F red erick H. M ueller; C hairm an of the P resid en t's
Council of E conom ic A d visors Raymond J. S au ln ier, and other appro­
p ria te o fficia ls of the F ed era l G overnm ent. Both industry and labor
a ssu red the S ecretary of their cooperation.

July 27

The M ediation S erv ice called the fir s t joint m eeting w ith the p a rties
in New York C ity, the fir s t to take p lace sin ce the strik e began.
T here w as no change in p osition on the part of the p a r tie s.




28

17. B a sic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959— United S teelw o rk ers of A m erica
(A FL —
CIO) v. b asic s te e l industry— Continued
July 28, 1959 _________ United States S teel rep orted that its net p ro fits in the fir st h alf of
the year had set a record . M r. M cDonald term ed th ese earnings and
th ose of other m ajor com p anies " astron om ical. "
A ugust 1
S ecreta ry M itchell c r itic iz e d labor and m anagem ent for not m aking
a serio u s effort to se ttle the strik e and appealed to both sid es to
hold daily talk s.
A ugust 3 _ _ _
A fter sep arate m eetin g s w ith the p a rties on July 28, 29, 30, and 31,
the M ediators ca lled a join t m eetin g in N ew York City w ith the full
bargaining team s from both sid es p resen t. It w as agreed that te c h ­
n icia n s be brought in from both sid es to w ork with the co m m ittee
and that a g en era l review of the con tract cla u se s in d isa g reem en t
be m ade.
F ollow ing the joint m eetin g , an exchange of ch arges was m ade, each
sid e blam ing the other for the prolongation of the strik e. The erup­
tion indicated that attitu des had hardened sin ce the strik e began and
that the p a rties view ed the G overnm ent’s ro le in the dispute quite
d ifferen tly . S everal tim es the union had asked for G overnm ent fa ct­
finding. Industry lea d ers in siste d that the G overnm ent should stay
out of the str ik e, contending that governm ental in terferen ce in the
p ast had alw ays resu lted in "inflationary" settle m en ts.
A ugust 1 2 _____________ In a new s co n feren ce, the P resid en t held to h is p osition of keeping
F ed eral in terferen ce to a m inim um . The union again ca lled for the
appointm ent of a sp ecia l factfinding board to recom m en d settlem en t
term s.
A ugust 17______________ T alks proceed ed without M r. M cD onald, who had indicated he would
not attend the talks until industry rep laced the four-m an negotiating
team with top ranking o ffic ia ls. F u rth er joint s e s sio n s w ere scheduled
to co n sid er m inor contract changes.
A ugust 1 9 _____________ S ecreta ry M itch ell r e le a se d the D ep artm en t’s p resentation of back­
ground facts on som e of the econ om ic q u estion s related to the ste e l
s t r ik e — w a g e s , p r o d u c t iv it y , p r ic e s , and p ro fits. 3 No co n clu sion s
w ere drawn. E ach sid e hailed the rep ort a s supporting its position .
A ugust 26
M r. M cDonald returned to the bargaining s e s sio n s after an a b sen ce
of a lm o st 3 w eek s. No headw ay tow ard a settlem en t w as reported.
A ugust 29 ___ ________ A su rvey of 31 in d u strial a rea s conducted by the D epartm ent of Labor
found that, by A ugust 15, th ere had been 7 1 ,0 0 0 "secondary" layoffs
as a re su lt of the str ik e. T his was in terp reted to m ean that, after
1 m onth, the strik e had re la tiv e ly little im pact on the 31 ste e l p ro­
ducing and consum ing a rea s studied.
S ep tem ber 2 __________ S teelw ork ers receiv ed "a fir s t down paym ent" of $ 1 m illio n in aid
from other unions (later repaid). P lan s w ere m ade for ra isin g
additional funds at the biennial A F L —CIO convention beginning on
Septem ber 17.
Sep tem ber 6 __________ S ecreta ry M itch ell announced that if sh ortages appeared and further
unem ploym ent resu lted and the strik e took on the a sp ects of an e m e r ­
gen cy affecting the national health and sa fety , he would recom m en d
that the P resid en t co n sid er invocation of the em ergen cy p ro vision s of
the T aft-H artley A ct.
S ee footnote at end of table.




29

17. B a sic S teel Industry D isp u te, 1959— United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(AFLr~CIO)v. b a sic s te e l industry— Continued
Sep tem ber 17—18,
I959 -------------------------- The AFLr-CIO convention, m eeting in San F ra n c isc o , devoted co n sid ­
erab le attention to the s te e l strik e. A resolu tio n called upon P resid en t
E isenhow er to convene a W hite H ouse m eeting of resp o n sib le union
and industry re p resen ta tiv e s. If this failed to produce a settlem en t,
the resolu tio n then urged the appointm ent of a public factfinding board
to m ake recom m en d ation s. The F ed eration 's G eneral Board r e co m ­
m ended the estab lish m en t of a S teelw ork ers D efen se Fund. S ecreta ry
M itch ell, ad d ressin g the convention, restated his p osition on G overn­
m ent intervention and on the invocation of T aft-H artley p roced u res
should national health and safety be affected .
Sep tem ber 2 5 ------------ The steelw o rk ers ended 3 w eeks of negotiations w ith M r. M cDonald
d ecla rin g , "We are going hom e. This fa r c ic a l filib u ster that has
gone on sin ce M ay 5 has ended. " He indicated that the talks should
be m oved from N ew York City to another location , eith er W ashington
or P ittsburgh.
Sep tem ber 3 0 ------------ R ep resen tatives of industry and labor m et sep arately with the P r e s ­
ident. At the con clu sion of the ta lk s, the P resid en t said he hoped
that an agreem en t would be reached before he returned from a sch ed ­
uled trip to C alifornia on O ctober 8. F ollow ing th is, M r. M cDonald
m et with R oger M. B lough, chairm an of the board, United States
S teel Corp. , and four other industry lea d ers. A joint com m unique
issu e d at the end of the s e s sio n said that talks would be resum ed
the follow ing day in P ittsburgh.
O ctober 4
The ste elw o rk er s' execu tive board rejected in d u stry's fir s t econom ic
o ffe r 4 in the 82-day old disp u te, subject to action by the union's w age
p olicy com m ittee. Included in the com p anies' offer w ere im p ro v e­
m ents in the pen sion , in su ran ce, and supplem ental unem ploym ent
b en efit p rogram s in the fir s t year of a 2 -y ea r agreem en t, and in ­
crea sed w age rates at the beginning of the secon d y ea r, the in c r e a se s
ranging from 6 cents for the low est job c la ss to 12 cents for the
h igh est. O ver the 2 -y ea r p eriod , the total package would in cr ea se
"em ploym ent costs" by 15 cents per m an-hour w orked, or about 2 p e r ­
cent a y e a r, according to com pany e stim a te s. As a part of this
o ffer, am endm ents to the b asic labor agreem en ts with the follow ing
stated ob jectiv es w ere sought: (1) Continue paym ent of the 17-cen tp er-h ou r c o st-o f-liv in g allow ance in effect at the expiration of the
p reviou s a g reem en ts, but elim in ate p ro vision s for future esca la to r
changes in either d irection; (2) enable m anagem ent to take reason ab le
step s to elim in ate w a ste and im prove efficien cy , but p ro tect the rights
of em p lo yees to r e so r t to grievan ce and arbitration procedure; (3) p e r ­
m it flex ib ility in scheduling of work; and (4) d eter w ildcat str ik es by
p erm itting the d isch arge of any em ployee engaging in such action.
The steelw o rk ers rejected the p roposal, replying that it would reduce
w o rk ers' take hom e pay during the fir s t year b ecau se of an in c r e a se in
in suran ce c o sts, and evaluated the w orth of the 2 -y ea r package at le s s
than the com p anies' figu re. F u rth erm ore, the conditions regarding
contract changes attached to the offer w ere unacceptable to the union.
Top industry ex ecu tives and union o fficia ls con ferred in an effort to
O ctober 6 __
break the deadlock but the talks broke off in a fresh sta lem a te. No
further talks w ere sched uled. Company o fficia ls stood firm ly behind
th eir offer, which the union continued to reject as "totally inadequate. "
See footnote at end of table.




30

17. B asic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959— United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(AFLr-CIO) v. b asic s te e l industry— Continued
O ctober 7, 1959______ M r. M cDonald stated that the union would fight a T aft-H a rtley injunc­
tion in the courts but pledged that, failing to u p set the injunction, the
union would ’’obey the law of the land." He again ca lled for a public
factfinding board to sift the strik e is su e s and recom m en d a settlem en t.
S ecreta ry M itch ell m et with union lea d ers to a scer ta in the bargain ­
_
O ctober 8
ing situation, after w hich he w as expected to report to P resid en t
E isen h ow er w hether there w as any hope f o r a voluntary accord .
F ollow ing a statem ent w herein he concluded that the str ik e, if p e r ­
O ctober
m itted to continue, would im p er il the national health and sa fety ,
P resid en t E isenhow er issu e d an E xecu tive o r d e r 5 creatin g a B oard of
Inquiry co n sistin g of G eorge W. T aylor of P en n sylvan ia, chairm an,
John P erk in s of D elaw are, and P aul N. L ehoczky of Ohio. The
B oard was to report to the P resid en t, in accord an ce w ith Section 206
of the T aft-H artley A ct, on or before O ctober 16, 1959.
A fter m eeting on O ctober 11 sep a ra tely with industry and union o ffi­
O ctober 12 ____
c ia ls in "ex p loratory” talk s aim ed at defining and narrow ing disputed
is s u e s , the B oard of Inquiry began its public h ea rin gs.
A rthur G oldberg told the Board that the union’s ob jective was a
’’package” im provem en t w orth 15 cen ts an hour, in a 1-, 2 -, or
3 -y ea r contract.
O ctober 13------------------- D r. T aylor d eclared that the B oard ’s m ed iatory efforts w ere being
im peded by d ifficulty in defining the is s u e s , and that he m ight a sk
for an exten sion of the deadline for the B oard 's report.
O ctober 14------------------ P resid en t E isen h ow er, by E xecu tive O rder 10848, extended the date
for su b m ission of the B oard 's rep ort to O ctober 19. The Board had
req u ested an exten sion of tim e and S ecreta ry M itch ell obtained the
P r esid en t's a ssen t.
O ctober 15------------------ A siza b le cut in its m oney dem ands in a 2 -y ea r contract was p ro­
p osed by the ste elw o rk er s. This served as a prelude to the r e ­
sum ption of negotiations sched uled for the follow ing day.
Included in the "package" offer w ere fir s t year im p rovem en ts confined
to in su ran ce, p en sio n s, and supplem ental unem ploym ent b en efits valued
by the union at about 10 cents an hour over a 2 -y ea r period. In the
secon d y ea r, w ages would be ra ised about I 0V2 cen ts an hour, of
w hich 7 cen ts would be a g en era l rate in c r e a se . A m axim um c o sto f-liv in g adjustm ent of 3 cen ts an hour in the second year w as a lso
proposed. It was m ade known la ter that the union proposed that each
ste e l com pany provide for the appointm ent of a n in e-m em b er co m ­
m ittee— three from industry, th ree from labor, and th ree ex p erts of
high standing— to recom m en d for con sid eration a lon g -ran ge form ula
for equitable sharing betw een the sto ck h old ers, the em p lo y ees, and
the public, of the fruits of the com pany's p ro g re ss.
O ctober

M r. Cooper offered a counterproposal w hich ca lled for a 3 -y ea r con­
tract with im proved b en efits the fir s t y ea r, follow ed by w age in c r e a se s
during the next 2 y ea rs and other con tract im p ro vem en ts. The co m ­
panies su ggested the estab lish m en t of a Human R elations R esea rch
C om m ittee to plan and o v e r se e stu d ies and recom m en d solu tion s in
such a rea s as: G uides for the d eterm ination of w ages and ben efits;
em ploym ent problem s; job cla ssifica tio n ; w age in cen tives; and seniority.

S ee footnote at end of table.




31

17. B asic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959— United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(AFL—CIQ) v. b asic ste e l industry— Continued
O ctober 18, 1959_____ M r. Cooper proposed that the is su e of re v isio n of w ork ru les be
re so lv ed by subm itting to a th ree-m a n arb itration board (one co m ­
pany, one union, and one selected by the two) the follow ing question:
"What, if any, changes should be m ade in the lo ca l working conditions
p ro v isio n s to enable the com panies to take reason ab le step s to im ­
prove efficien cy and elim in ate w aste w ith due regard for the w elfare
of the em p lo y ees? " The union rejected the m odification as " rid ic­
ulous" and "phony. "
Edgar K a iser, chairm an of the board of K aiser S teel Corp. , agreed
to halt his sep arate talks with the union.
O ctober 19____________ In subm itting its rep ort to the P resid en t, the Board stated that "the
p arties have failed to reach an agreem en t and we se e no p ro sp ects
for an ea rly ce ssa tio n of the strik e. The Board cannot point to a
sin gle issu e of any consequence w h atsoever upon w hich the p arties
a re in agreem en t. " Although th ere w ere m any issu e s in the dispute,
the m ajor roadblocks w ere in the broad a rea s of "econom ics" and
"work r u le s ." 6 Upon receivin g the rep ort, the P resid en t in stru cted
the A ttorney G eneral to seek an injunction, as provided for in the
T aft-H artley A ct.
O ctober 20
T h e U .S . D epartm ent of Ju stice petitioned the F ed era l D istr ic t Court
in P ittsburgh for an 80-day injunction under the T aft-H artley A ct, 7
em ph asizing the im portance of the industry, le v e ls of ste e l su p p lies,
d efen se n eed s, and unem ploym ent. The G overnm ent a sse r te d that,
u n less the strik e w as enjoin ed, the country would suffer im m ediate
and irrep arab le injury. The court w as asked to find that the str ik e,
if continued, would " im peril the national health and safety. "

O ctober 2 1 ____

M r. G oldberg, union cou n sel, con tested the petition, m aintaining that
the strik e did not im p eril the country's health or safety in a str ic t
and lite r a l se n se . The language and le g isla tiv e h isto ry of the statute,
he m aintained, m ake clea r that the national em ergen cy p ro vision s
would apply to this strik e only if, in som e w ay, it d ire ctly and im ­
m ed iately threatened the p h ysical health or safety of the N ation.
M r. G oldberg said the union intended to show that the strik e posed
no such threat, in that su fficien t quan tities of ste e l w ere being p ro­
duced by com p anies not on strik e. It w as further stated that the
injunction p ro vision s w ere unconstitutional, a s they con ferred on the
courts duties w hich are not ju d icial and are not connected with any
c a se or co n troversy .
F ed era l D istr ic t Judge H erbert P. Sorg in P ittsburgh ordered the
injunction aga in st the steelw o rk er s, upholding the G overnm ent's con­
tention that the prolongation of the dispute would im p eril the national
health and safety, causing irrep arab le dam age to the country. The
court m ade no d ecisio n regarding retro a ctiv ity of any subsequent
agreem en t. A lso left un settled was the ap p licab ility of any c o s t-o flivin g adjustm ent required under the term s of the expired con tracts
during the injunction period. M r. G oldberg req u ested the Judge to
defer h is order long enough to p erm it an appeal to Judge A ustin L.
Staley of the U .S . Court of A ppeals for the Third C ircu it, which was
granted. Judge Staley extended the stay until 10 a. m . the follow ing
day in order to p re se rv e the status quo until a full court could pass
on M r. G old berg's appeal.

S ee footnotes at end of table.




32

17. B a sic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959— U nited S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(AFLr-CIO) v. b a sic ste e l in d u stry— Continued
O ctober 22, 1959------- F ollow ing a h earing, the U .S . Third C ircu it Court of A ppeals put off
until the follow ing w eek a d ecisio n on the ste elw o rk er s' appeal, at the
sam e tim e granting a further stay of the injunction pending a d ecisio n
on the appeal.
O ctober 2 6 ----------------- K aiser S teel Corp. and the union agreed on a new 20-m onth contract
providing package in c r e a se s evaluated by the com pany at 22V2 cents
an hour over the 20-m onth p eriod , including a p o ssib le 3-cen t c o sto f-liv in g adjustm ent. Work rules is su e s w ere refe rre d to a lab o rm anagem ent com m ittee with authority to re so lv e p rob lem s by m utual
agreem en t. A lso se t up w as a trip artite com m ittee to develop a
lon g -ran ge plan for an "equitable sharing of econom ic p r o g r e s s ." 8
O ctober 2 7 ----------------- By a 2 to 1 vote, the Court of A ppeals upheld the petition for an
injunction but ordered that the issu a n ce of the injunction be delayed
until at le a st N ovem ber 2 to p erm it the steelw o rk ers to ask for a
review by the Suprem e Court. The union co u n sel announced that he
would not file -a p etition for c e rtio ra r i— a form al d ev ice to obtain
review — until N ovem ber 2.
O ctober 2 8 ----------------- The J u stice D epartm ent petition ed the Suprem e Court to expedite con ­
sid era tio n of the u n io n 's p etition , with a p rop osed filing deadline by
noon, O ctober 29. Should the Court d ecide to review the Third C ircu it's
d ec isio n on F riday, O ctober 30, a hearing could be s e t for M onday,
N ovem ber 2. L ater in the day, the Suprem e Court denied the G overn­
m ent m otion, thus upholding the Third C ircu it Court of A p p ea ls' ruling
giving the steelw o rk ers until N ovem ber' 2 to seek a Suprem e Court
review .
M r. Finnegan sent both p a rties a teleg ra m inform ing them that if they
had not reached an agreem en t by m idnight Sunday, N ovem ber 1, they
would be expected to attend a s e s sio n with m ed ia to rs in W ashington
on M onday, N ovem ber 2.
M r. M cDonald indicated that the union regarded the K a iser agreem en t
as providing the groundwork for contracts to be agreed upon by other
com p an ies. Industry lea d ers d eclared the p act would fo rce an in flation ­
ary r is e in ste e l p r ic e s and fa il to elim in ate w astefu l work p r a c tic e s.
O ctober 3 0 ----------------- F ollow ing the filin g of the u n io n 's petition for c e rtio ra r i and the G ov­
ern m en t's resp o n se asking the Court to deny review , the U nited States
Suprem e Court granted the steelw o rk ers' req u est and a ssign ed oral
argum ents for T uesday, N ovem ber 3.
N ovem ber 1 --------------- Secondary layoffs caused by s te e l sh ortages jum ped sharply during the
la st half of O ctober, the D epartm ent of Labor reported. M ore than
132,000 w ork ers w ere in d irectly involved in 31 m ajor s te e l producing
and consum ing a r ea s.
N ovem ber 7---------------- By an 8 to 1 m ajority, the Suprem e Court upheld the constitutionality
of the T aft-H artley em ergen cy p roced u re (Sec. 208) and its applicability
to the s te e l str ik e. The Court did not r e so lv e the dispute over the
m eaning of the term "national health , " but supported its judgm ent on
the ground that the strik e im p eriled the national safety. J u stice
D ouglas, d issen tin g , did not d eal with the constitutional qu estion s but
disputed the concepts of health and safety and em ph asized the tra d i­
tional flex ib ility of equity courts in relation to the p articu lar situ ation
See footnote at end of tab le.




33

17. B a sic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959— United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(A FL-C IO ) v. b a sic s te e l in d u stry— Continued
N ovem ber 7, 1959—
C on tin u ed----------------- found in the ste e l strik e concerning national safety. He further stated
that he would rem and the ca se to the D istrict Court for "particu­
la rized findings" as to how the strik e im p er ils the "national health" and
what plants need be reopened to produce the s te e l needed for "national
safety. "
T eleg ra m s w ere dispatched im m ed ia tely by the union directin g its
m em b ers to "resum e work forthw ith. " Steps w ere taken to get the
m ills producing as quickly as p o ssib le.
N ovem ber 8
S ecreta ry M itchell said P resid en t E isen h ow er would recom m end to
C ongress w ays to prevent resum ption of the strik e if no agreem en t
w as reached during the injunction p eriod .
N ovem ber 10
P resid en t E isenhow er reconvened the s te e l B oard of Inquiry, headed
by Dr. T aylor, which w as to report to the P resid en t on the efforts
tow ard settlem en t, and on the em p lo y ers' la st offer if a settlem en t
w as not reached at the end of a 60-d ay period.
N ovem ber 12
The ste elw o rk er s' w age p olicy co m m ittee voted unanim ously to renew
the 116-day strik e if agreem en t w as not reached b efore the injunction
expired on January 26. The prod u cers w ere again urged to follow
the K a iser contract as a pattern.
It was announced by the s te e l industry that a new offer on a 3 -y ea r
N ovem ber 15
agreem en t had been m ade to the union. The union rejected it as
being sub stan tially the sam e as the one p reviou sly offered .
N ovem ber 28 —
L ittle chance of reaching a settlem en t b efore the expiration of the in ­
junction p eriod was held out by the union in a le tter from M r. G oldberg
to S ecretary of C om m erce M ueller. M r. G oldberg ad vised the D epart­
m ent to arrange for ste e l r e se r v e s that m ight be required for G overn­
m ent co n tracts. O th erw ise, the le tter stated , the G overnm ent m ight
have to contend with the sam e p ro b lem s it faced during the strik e.
D ecem b er 1
The s te e l industry indicated that the p rop osal m ade 2 w eeks b efore was
its "last offer;" that is , should an electio n be conducted the follow ing
m onth, this would be the offer em p lo yees m u st eith er accep t or reject
by s e c r e t b allot to be conducted by the G overnm ent.
D ecem b er 3
P resid en t E isen h ow er, in a p lea a d d ressed to both p a r tie s, urged
a rou n d -th e-clock negotiation s.
M r. M cDonald had e a r lie r su ggested to the P resid en t that the B oard
of Inquiry m ake recom m en dations. A fter the P r e s id e n t's sp eech ,
M r. M cDonald again offered his origin al su ggestion for reco m m en ­
dations and another calling for a m eetin g d irectly with top s te e l
ex ecu tiv e s.
D ecem b er 8 ---------------- S ecreta ry M itchell su ggested three p o ssib le w ays of settlin g the d is ­
pute; (1) The p a rties could a g ree to ask a board to m ake re co m ­
m endations; (2) they could ask M r. Finnegan to m ake a recom m en ­
dation; or (3) they could seek voluntary arbitration.
D ecem b er 9 ---------------- The industry rejected S ecretary M itc h e ll's su ggestion s for breaking
the deadlock in bargaining by d eclarin g that third party intervention
would resu lt in recom m en dations that the union had refu sed to accept
or in a m ore co stly settlem en t "which would cle a rly be inflationary."




34

17. B a sic S teel Industry D isp u te, 1959— United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(AFLr-CIO) v. b a sic ste e l industry— Continued
D ecem b er 10, 1959 __ M r. Finnegan suspended n egotiation s in d efin itely , noting both the lack
of p ro g ress m ade and that the union w as about to devote its attention
to alum inum n eg otiation s. M eanw hile, the union m ade th ree dem ands
upon ste e l com panies: (1) A return to com p any-by-com p any bargaining;
(2) an agreem en t m aking any new settlem en t retro a ctiv e to co ver the
injunction period; and (3) an acknow ledgem ent now that a c o st-o f-liv in g
adjustm ent would be due January 1 under term s of the ex istin g a g r e e ­
m en ts and an agreem en t to put th ese adjustm ents into effect b efore
C h ristm as. The union contended that, under the injunction o rd er, the
em p lo yees w ere w orking "under a ll te r m s and conditions in effect on
June 30, 1959," and th is, to the union, "plainly en co m p a sses the
January c o st-o f-liv in g p ro vision w hich req u ires a change to be m ade
each January 1 and each July 1, without refe ren c e to year . . ."
M r. C ooper, in rep ly, noted the p reviou sly stated industry opposition
to retro a ctiv ity and the Court*s r e se rv a tio n s on the q u estion s of c o sto f-liv in g and retro a ctiv ity .
D ecem b er 17
M r. M cDonald put forth p ro p osals that w ere to be p resen ted to the
B oard of Inquiry on the 28th. He stated that the new dem ands would
be "slightly higher" in co st to the industry than the K a iser agreem en t.
D ecem b er 22
The 11 m ajor s te e l com p anies agreed , w ith r e se r v a tio n s, to union
dem ands for com p any-by-com p any s e s s io n s . T alks betw een the fo u rm an tea m s as scheduled by F ed era l m ed ia to rs w ere to be ca rried on
s im ultaneou s ly .
Since July 15 the F ed era l m ed ia to rs had conducted 47 joint m eetin g s
w ith the p a rties and som e 30 fu ll-sc a le sep arate talk s w ith the p a rties.
D ecem b er 23
____ Stuart Rothm an, G eneral C ounsel of the N ational Labor R elation s
B oard, estim ated that 6 00 ,00 0 w ork ers would be elig ib le to vote on
m a n a g em en ts "last o ffe r ," set for January 11 to 13. The s te e l­
w o rk er s1 cou n sel said he would ask D istrict Judge Sorg to hear the
steelw ork ers* plea to order the s te e l com p an ies to pay w ork ers a
4 -ce n t c o st-o f-liv in g in cr ea se (under term s of p reviou s a greem en ts)
starting in January, and to m ake any new contract agreem en t r e tr o ­
a ctive to N ovem ber 2. On the follow ing day, the steelw o rk ers filed
th eir petition and a hearing b efore Judge Sorg w as scheduled for
January 4.
The B oard of Inquiry reconvened to ca rry out its re sp o n sib ilitie s under
D ecem b er 2 8 ____
the act w hich include a rep ort to the P resid en t on the current p osition s
of the p a r tie s, the efforts w hich had been m ade for settlem en t, and
the em ployers* la st o ffers. F ollow ing 2 days of public h ea rin g s,
D r. T aylor stated that the d iffere n ces betw een the union and industry
w ere w ider than ev er. The B oard set about to devote its rem aining
tim e tow ard com p letion of its rep ort, due January 6.
January 1, I9 6 0 __

S ecreta ry of Labor M itch ell m et sep arately with industry and union
sp okesm en. V ice P resid en t N ixon and S ecreta ry M itch ell, it w as
rep orted , had been conducting a s e r ie s of s e c r e t co n feren ces aim ed
at reaching a voluntary settlem en t b efore the NLRB balloting on
January 11 to 13.

January 4 _____________ A greem ent betw een the 11 com p anies and the union w as reached fo l­
low ing a ll-d a y and a ll-n ig h t bargaining s e s sio n s.




35

17. B a sic S teel Industry D ispute, 1959— United S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(A FL —CIO) v. b asic ste e l industry— Continued
January 5, I960




M em oranda of agreem en t w ere signed betw een the m ajor ste e l p ro­
d u cers and union re p resen ta tiv es follow ing approval by the union wage
policy co m m ittee. T erm s of the a greem en ts included: A w age in ­
c r e a s e , d eferred until D ecem ber 1, I960, to average 9 .4 cen ts an
hour including estim ated effect on in cen tive pay (average 8. 3 cen ts in
hourly ra te s— 7 cen ts gen eral in cr ea se plus 0.2-cen t in cr ea se in in c r e ­
m en ts betw een 31 job c la s s e s , with top job c la s s receiv in g 13 cents);
effectiv e O ctober 1, 1961, additional averag e 8 .6 cen ts including e s t i­
m ated effect on incentive pay (average 7. 6 cen ts in cr ea se in hourly
r a te s— 7 cen ts gen era l in cr ea se plus 0. 1-cent in c r e a se in in crem en ts
betw een job c la s s e s , with top c la ss re ceiv in g 10 cents); esca la to r
cla u se re v ise d to retain curren t 17 cen ts c o st-o f-liv in g allow an ce,
provide two c o st-o f-liv in g rev iew s and lim it m axim um additional ad ­
justm ent to 6 cen ts effectiv e O ctober 1, 1961, of w hich m axim um
3 cen ts c o st-o f-liv in g adjustm ent effectiv e D ecem ber 1, I960, to be
reduced by 0. 1 cent for each fu ll 18 cen ts in cr ea se in insuran ce co st
over b ase averag e m onthly net in suran ce co st of $20 . 16 per em p loyee.
A lso , m inim um $ 2. 5 0 -a-m onth pension for each y e a r 's se r v ic e prior
to January 1, I960, and $ 2 .6 0 a m onth for each year th ereafter
for a m axim um of 35 y e a rs (w as $ 2 .4 0 a m onth for se r v ic e prior to
N ovem ber 1, 1957, and $ 2 .5 0 a m onth th ereafter for m axim um of
30 y e a rs) or additional $5 a m onth for future r e tir e e s when applying
altern ate 1-percent form ula in com puting pen sion ben efits; 13 w e e k s1
vacation pay (le s s vacation pay during year) in lump sum on r e tir e ­
m ent w ith regular pension beginning fourth month; ea rly retirem en t
(by m utual agreem en t) at fu ll benefit at age 60 after 15 y e a r s' se r v ic e
(w as at reduced b en efits), or at age 55 after 20 y e a rs' se r v ic e if
term in ated by reason of perm anent shutdown, layoff, or sick n e ss r e ­
sulting in break in se r v ic e provided em ployee has attained age 53 and
18 y e a r s' se r v ic e on date he c e a se s work; $100 a m onth future m in i­
m um d isa b ility benefit (w as $90); com p anies a lso in crea sed ex istin g
pen sion s by $ 5 a m onth.
A lso , com p anies to a ssu m e fu ll co st of in su ran ce program (was
50-50 contribution) and program im provem ent to provide: $ 4 ,0 0 0 to
$ 6 ,5 0 0 life insuran ce (w as $ 3 , 500 to $ 6 ,0 0 0 at m ost com p an ies),
life in su ran ce retained during fir s t 2 y e a r s of layoff with em ployee
paying 60 cen ts per $ 1 ,0 0 0 after fir s t 6 m onths; $53 to $68 w eekly
sick and accident ben efit (w as $42 to $57 at m ost com p an ies), and
6 -m onth retention of h osp ital, su rg ic a l, and related co v era g es for
la id -o ff em p lo yees with 2 y e a rs' serv ice; higher ex istin g b en efits co n ­
tinued for em p lo yees alread y on payroll at A llegheny Ludlum , A rm co,
Inland, and W heeling, and ex istin g h osp ital and su rg ica l program at
Inland continued for a ll em p loyees; p reviou s supplem ental unem ploy­
m ent b en efits plan extended with com p anies paying 3 cen ts ca sh and
2 cen ts contingent lia b ility (the contingent lia b ility w hich had been
ca n celed in accord ance with prior agreem en t w as resto red ).
A lso , agency shop w as provided w here State law s banned the union shop.
A joint Human R elations R esea rch C om m ittee w as esta b lish ed to study
and recom m en d solutions of m utual p roblem s relatin g to equitable
w age and benefit ad justm ents, job cla ssific a tio n , in cen tive pay, p ro­
tectio n of lo n g -se r v ic e em p lo yees against la y o ffs, m ed ica l c a r e , and
other p rob lem s. Q uestions of lo ca l w orking conditions w ere to be
r e fe rre d to a joint study com m ittee headed by a neu tral chairm an,
w hich w as to report by N ovem ber 30, I960.

36

17. B a sic S teel Industry D isp u te, 1959— U nited S teelw ork ers of A m erica
(A FL —CIO) v. b a sic s te e l industry— Continued
January 7, I9 6 0 ______ The B oard of Inquiry form ally ended its duties w ith su b m ission of
its final rep ort to the P resid en t. The rep ort d escrib ed both p a rties'
p osition s ju st b efore settlem en t and the " last offers" of the p roducers
at that tim e.
January 8
A llegheny Ludlum w as the fir s t of the 11 m ajor prod u cers to sign
a form al con tract w ith the ste elw o rk er s union. Inland, B ethlehem ,
Jones and L aughlin, Y oungstow n Sheet and Tube, C olorado F uel and
Iron, and U nited States S teel a lso signed. O thers w ere expected to
follow .
January 20 ___________ P ollin g of som e 14,000 steelw o rk ers w as conducted by the N L R B on the
final con tract o ffers of 7 ste e l com p anies w hich had not as y et signed
the b asic industry a g reem en t. E a r lie r , a group of 31 iron ore m ining
con cern s settled th eir d ifferen ces w ith the union. A p proxim ately
11,000 other steelw o rk ers faced the p o ssib ility of resum ing the strik e
when the injunction exp ired . They did not vote b ecau se the com p anies
had withdrawn th eir " last o ffer, " accord ing to the union, thus leaving
no b a sis for balloting. The ste elw o rk er s ask ed the U .S . D istrict
Court to d isso lv e the injunction and to ord er paym ent of a 4 -c e n t
c o st-o f-liv in g in c r e a se retro a ctiv e to January 1. A lso , the union
sought retro a ctiv ity of any w age in c r e a se s won to cover the p eriod of
the injunction. Judge Sorg denied the m otion to d isso lv e the injunction
w hile re se rv in g d ec isio n on the other req u ests.
January 24

P ittsburgh S teel Co. , the la st unsigned m ajor prod u cer, a g reed to
an indefinite con tract ex ten sio n , ca n celab le by either sid e on 5 days'
n otice. T hree sm a ll com p anies s till rem ained unsigned.
The NLRB announced that its p oll of w ork ers em ployed by four co m ­
panies (P ittsburgh S teel, Josep h T. R yerson and Sons, M oltrop S teel
P rod u cts, and A cm e Steel) voted by a 2 to 1 m argin to re je ct m an­
agem en t's " last o ffer."

January 26 ___________ Judge Sorg d isso lv ed the T aft-H a rtley injunction, thus m aking it p o s­
sib le for th ose w ork ers s till w orking without con tracts to renew the
str ik e. Judge S org's c o st-o f-liv in g d ecisio n sp ecified that w orkers
s till w ithout con tracts would be en titled to the 4 -ce n t in crem en t for
w ork p erfo rm ed under the injunction " unless new agreem en ts a re en ­
tered into providing oth erw ise. "
January 27 ___________ The union d ecided not to str ik e , for the tim e being, any of the m ills
and w a reh o u ses s till unsigned.
January 28 ___________ P ittsburgh S teel Co. and the union reached an agreem en t, affecting
som e 7,300 w ork ers in 6 p lan ts. Incen tive pay rates w ere the con ­
tentious issu e ; h ow ever, this w as to be reso lv ed by a joint incentive
study co m m ittee w hich m u st hand down a d ecisio n by July 15. If the
co m m ittee's rep ort is re je cted , the union m ay ca ll a strik e upon
5 days' n otice. The r e st of the settlem en t w as su b stan tially the sam e
as that betw een the union and the other m ajor p ro d u cers.
1 United States Steel Corp., Bethlehem Steel Corp. , Republic Steel Corp., Jones and Laughlin Steel Corp., Youngstown Sheet
and Tube Co., Inland Steel Co., Armco Steel Corp., Great Lakes Steel Corp., Kaiser Steel Corp., Colorado Fuel and Iron Corp.,
Wheeling Steel Corp., and Allegheny Ludlrnn Steel Corp.




Footnotes continued on page 37

37

F ootnotes----Continued
2 The so-called section 2-B clauses in the U. S. Steel agreement, also found in other, but not all, major steel agreements,
and which figured prominently in later discussions of "local practices" read as follows:
Local Working Conditions. The term "lo ca l working conditions1 as used herein means specific practices or customs which re­
'
flect detailed application of the subject matter within the scope of wages, hours of work, or other conditions of employment and in­
cluded local agreements, written or oral, on such matters. It is recognized that it is impracticable to set forth in this agreement all
of these working conditions, which are o f a local nature only, or to state specifically in this agreement which of these matters
should be changed or eliminated.
The following provisions provide general principles and procedures which explain the status of these
matters and furnish necessary guideposts for the parties hereto and the Board /o f Arbitration/.
1. It is recognized that an employee does not have the right to have a local working condition established, in any given
situation or plant where such condition has not existed, during the term of this agreement or to have an existing local working con­
dition changed or eliminated, except to the extent necessary to require the application of a specific provision of this agreement.
2. In no case shall local working conditions be effective to deprive any employee of rights under this agreement.
Should
any employee believe that a local working condition is depriving him of the benefits of this agreement, he shall have recourse to
the grievance procedure and arbitration, if necessary, to require that the local working condition be changed or eliminated to
provide the benefits established by this agreement.
3. Should there be any local working conditions in effect which provide benefits that are in excess of or in addition to the
benefits established by this agreement, they shall remain in effect for the term of this agreement, except as they are changed or
eliminated by mutual agreement or in accordance with paragraph 4 below.
4. The company shall have the right to change or eliminate any local working condition if, as the result of action taken
by management under Section 3— Management, the basis for the existence of the local working condition is changed or eliminated,
thereby making it unnecessary to continue such local working condition; provided, however, that when such a change or elimination
is made by the company any affected employee shall have recourse to the grievance procedure and arbitration, if necessary to have
the company justify its action.
5. No local working condition shall hereafter be established or agreed to which changes or modifies any of the provisions
of this agreement.
In the event such a local working condition is established or agreed to, it shall not be enforceable to the ex­
tent that it is inconsistent with or goes beyond the provisions of this agreement, except as it is approved by an international officer
of the union and the industrial relations executive of the company.
Background Statistics Bearing on the Steel Dispute, United States Department of Labor, August 1959.
4 Contract proposals were handed to the union on October 1 and were restated and clarified on October 3.
5 Executive Order 10843.
6 Report to the President,
The 1959 Labor Dispute in the Steel Industry, submitted by the Board of Inquiry under Executive
Order 1G843 and 10848, Oct. 19, 1959.
^ Title II, Section 208.
The Government and union agreed to proceed directly to the injunction question which, if granted,
would be final for the entire 80-day period, with an immediate full hearing for the union.
Customarily, the Government asks for a
temporary restraining order (limited to 10 days) in which only its arguments need be heard.
8 See Monthly Labor Review, December 1959, pp. 1345 and 1378.




38

18. M aritim e Industry D ispute, A tlantic, P acific, and Gulf C oasts, 1961— M aritim e
unions 1 v. certain shipow ners and op erators in the United States
foreign and d om estic trade
June 16, 1961

June 17

June 23

June 24

June 26

June 27

June 28

June 29

Work stoppage of m aritim e w ork ers began in A tlantic, P a cific, and
Gulf ports after the m aritim e unions and the shipow ners and op erators
failed to agree on the u n ion s’ dem and that th eir con tracts be extended
to co ver w orkers on ships owned and operated by United States in ­
te r e sts but flying foreign fla g s. Other dem ands varied among the
unions and related to in eq u ities betw een lice n se d and u n licen sed p e r ­
sonnel with regard to vacation s, travel, and lodging allow an ces, and
work ru les.
S ecretary of Labor Arthur J. G oldberg, who upon req u est of the
P resid en t had been d irectin g m ed iation efforts in New York sin ce
June 15, asked all p arties in the dispute to resu m e d ire ct n egotiation s.
S er ies of joint m eetin g s conducted by the F ed era l M ediation and C on­
cilia tio n S erv ice ended with no p ro g re ss reported.
S ecretary G oldberg recom m ended to all p a rties that they subm it their
u n resolved is su e s to an im p artial public group for a period of 60 days
for study and recom m endation and subsequent negotiations ,and that
m eanw hile they resu m e op eration s. Ship op erators agreed to this
p roposal; the unions rejected it.
P resid en t Kennedy ordered an in vestigation into the im pact of the
strik e on the N ation1 s health, econom y, and safety, p reparatory to
his d ec isio n on w hether to invoke the em ergen cy p ro vision s of the
T aft-H artley A ct. The S ecretary of Labor ascerta in ed that the sto p ­
page of shipping was affecting a substan tial portion of trade, co m ­
m er ce, and transportation, and that it would im p eril the national
health and safety if the stoppage w ere p erm itted to continue.
Board of Inquiry appointed by the P resid en t. M em bers: David L.
C ole of P aterson , N. J. , law yer and form er d irecto r of the F ed eral
M ediation and C onciliation S erv ice, chairm an; Sam uel I. Rosenm an,
law yer of New York City and form er New York State Suprem e Court
Ju stice; and Jam es J. H ealy, P r o fe sso r of Industrial R elations, G rad­
uate School of B u sin ess A dm inistration, H arvard U n iversity. In
addition to the duties of the Board as required by the statute, the
P resid en t requested that the B oard d irect its im m ediate attention to
achieving a settlem en t. He in stru cted the B oard to report to him on
or b efore June 30.
The Board m et in New York in public s e s sio n b riefly , then m et
p riv ately with shipow ners and union rep resen ta tiv es to determ in e
w hether the B oard could arrange prom pt resum ption of the deadlocked
n egotiation s. The M arine E ngineers' B en eficia l A sso cia tio n and the
International O rganization of M asters, M ates and P ilo ts, through th eir
attorneys, told the Board that their m em b ers w ere excluded from the
p ro vision s of the T aft-H artley Act b ecau se of th eir su p erviso ry status.
M eetings continued, including both form al h earin gs and inform al in ­
q u iries into the facts and is su e s under Board of Inquiry—F ed eral
M ediation and C onciliation S erv ice a u sp ice s. T hese m eetin g s at tim es
included both em p loyers and unions; at other tim es they w ere held
sep arately with different union and m anagem ent groups.
P resid en t Kennedy postponed until 9 a. m . , July 3, the deadline for
the Board to report the facts of the dispute to him .

See footnote at end of table.




39
18.

M a r i t i m e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , A t l a n t i c , P a c i f i c , an d G u lf C o a s t s , 1 9 6 1 — M a r i t i m e
u n i o n s 1 v . c e r t a i n s h i p o w n e r s and o p e r a t o r s in th e U n it e d S t a t e s
f o r e i g n an d d o m e s t i c t r a d e — C o n ti n u e d

J u l y 1, 1 9 6 1 ____ __ __ A t a jo i n t c o n f e r e n c e a t te n d e d
and C o n ciliatio n S erv ice and
M a rin e E n g in e e rs ' B en eficial
P a c ific M a ritim e A sso c ia tio n
of 150 s h ip s .
J u l y Z_____ _____ _____

b y th e D i r e c t o r of th e F e d e r a l M e d i a ti o n
a m e m b e r of th e B o a r d of I n q u i r y , th e
A s s o c i a t i o n r e a c h e d a g r e e m e n t w ith th e
w h ic h la id th e g r o u n d w o r k f o r m o v e m e n t

T h e B o a r d s u b m i t t e d tw o r e p o r t s to th e P r e s i d e n t . T h e m a i n r e p o r t
o u t lin e d th e d i s p u t e s a n d in d i c a t e d t h a t a lth o u g h t h e r e h a d b e e n
a g r e e m e n t b e t w e e n s o m e of th e p a r t i e s , f u ll a c c o r d h a d n o t b e e n
r e a c h e d a n d th e s t r i k e w a s c o n tin u in g . T h e s u p p l e m e n t a l r e p o r t
o u t lin e d th e m e d i a t i o n w o r k th e B o a rd h a d u n d e r t a k e n at th e P r e s i d e n t 's
r e q u e s t a n d r e p o r t e d t h e i r fin d in g s o n th e p r o p o s a l s m a d e f o r m i n i ­
m i z i n g th e e f f e c t of th e s t r i k e on n a ti o n a l h e a l t h a n d s a f e ty .
A g r e e m e n t s w e r e s ig n e d b y a g r o u p of G ulf C o a s t s h i p o w n e r s w ith
tw o u n i o n s — M a s t e r s , M a te s an d P i l o t s an d th e A m e r i c a n R a d io
A s s o c ia t io n .

Ju ly 3

T h e P r e s i d e n t d i r e c t e d th e A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l to p e ti tio n th e U.S.
D i s t r i c t C o u r t f o r th e S o u th e r n D i s t r i c t of N ew Y o r k f o r a n in ju n c tio n .
Judge S y lv ester J. R yan issu e d a te m p o ra ry 5 -d ay re stra in in g o rd e r.
A t t o r n e y s f o r th e N a t io n a l M a r i n e E n g i n e e r s ' B e n e f i c i a l A s s o c i a t i o n ,
S e a f a r e r s ' I n t e r n a t i o n a l U n io n , a n d th e I n t e r n a t i o n a l O r g a n i z a t i o n of
M a s t e r s , M a t e s an d P i l o t s s o u g h t a s t a y of th e r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r
u n t il a h e a r i n g of th e a p p e a l w h ic h h a d b e e n f i le d b y t h e s e d e f e n d a n t s
f r o m t h a t o r d e r . J u d g e C l a r k of th e U.S. C i r c u i t C o u r t of A p p e a ls
d e n ie d th e s ta y .

Ju ly 6

A g r e e m e n t r e a c h e d b e t w e e n N a t io n a l M a r i t i m e U nion a n d th e A m e r i c a n
M e r c h a n t M a r i n e I n s t i t u t e a f t e r a s e r i e s of c o n f e r e n c e s h e l d u n d e r
jo i n t a u s p i c e s of th e B o a r d of I n q u i r y a n d F e d e r a l M e d i a ti o n an d
C o n c ili a ti o n S e r v i c e .
S a i lin g s of A m e r i c a n s h ip s in p o r t s o n t h r e e c o a s t s w e r e n e a r l y
n o r m a l . M o r e th a n h a lf of th e 9 5 0 - s h i p U n ite d S t a t e s fla g f l e e t w e r e
a b le to s a i l u n d e r a g r e e m e n t s r e a c h e d w ith u n io n s o r u n d e r c o n t r a c t s
w ith o t h e r u n io n s n o t in v o lv e d in th e s t r i k e .

J u l y 7_____ _____ ___ ___

H e a r i n g w a s h e ld on th e G o v e r n m e n t 's m o t i o n f o r a p r e l i m i n a r y
in ju n c ti o n a n d th e t e m p o r a r y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r w a s e x te n d e d u n t il
J u l y 1Z.

J u l y 10 ____________ ___

J u d g e R y a n e x te n d e d th e t e m p o r a r y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r to a n 8 0 - d a y
in ju n c ti o n u n d e r th e e m e r g e n c y p r o v i s i o n s of th e T a f t - H a r t l e y A ct
p r e v e n t i n g a n y r e n e w a l of th e w a lk o u t u n t il S e p t e m b e r Z l. H e d i r e c t e d
th e u n io n s a n d th e s ix c o m p a n y g r o u p s to c o n tin u e c o ll e c t i v e b a r g a i n i n g
in a n e f f o r t to s e t t l e t h e i r d i f f e r e n c e s b e f o r e e x p i r a t i o n of th e in ju n c tio n .
J u d g e R y a n d i s m i s s e d th e a r g u m e n t o f f e r e d b y th e M a s t e r s , M a te s
a n d P i l o t s a n d th e M a r i n e E n g i n e e r s ' B e n e f i c i a l A s s o c i a t i o n th a t th e y
w e r e b e y o n d th e p u r v i e w of th e a c t b e c a u s e t h e i r m e m b e r s w e r e
s u p e r v i s o r y p e r s o n n e l r a t h e r th a n e m p l o y e e s .
A g r e e m e n t w a s r e a c h e d b e tw e e n th e A m e r i c a n R a d io A s s o c i a t i o n an d
E a s t C o a s t d r y - c a r g o c o m p a n i e s a f t e r m a n y m e e t i n g s b e t w e e n th e
p a r t i e s , p a r t i c i p a t e d in b y m e m b e r s of th e B o a r d of I n q u i r y a n d th e
F e d e r a l M e d i a ti o n a n d C o n c ili a ti o n S e r v i c e .

S e e f o o t n o t e at en d o f t a b l e .




40
18.

M a r it im e In d u s try D isp u te , A tla n tic , P a c i f ic , and G u lf C o a s t s , 1 9 6 1 — M a r it im e
u n io n s 1 v . c e r t a i n s h i p o w n e r s and o p e r a t o r s in t h e U n it e d S t a t e s
f o r e i g n a n d d o m e s t i c t r a d e ----C o n t i n u e d

A u g u st 17, 1 9 6 1 ---------

T h e U .S . C o u rt o f A p p e a ls h e ld h e a r in g s o n th e u n io n p e titio n to
d is m i s s th e in ju n c tio n .

A u g u s t 22 --------------------

T h e P r e s i d e n t r e c o n v e n e d th e B o a rd o f I n q u iry an d m e e tin g s w e r e
h e ld in N ew Y o rk . W o rk in g w ith th e B o a r d , F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s r e ­
s u m e d m e e tin g s w ith m a r iti m e g ro u p s in an e f f o r t to b rin g a b o u t an
a g r e e m e n t. T h e U .S . C o u rt o f A p p e a ls u p h e ld a U .S . D i s t r i c t c o u r t
in ju n c tio n of J u ly 10 a g a in s t r e n e w a l o f th e m a r iti m e s t r i k e b e f o r e
S e p te m b e r 21.

A u g u st 24 --------------------

T h e t h r e a t o f a r e n e w a l of th e s t r i k e v ir tu a lly d is a p p e a r e d a s th e
M a r in e E n g in e e r s B e n e f ic ia l A s s o c ia tio n a n n o u n c e d a g r e e m e n ts
c o m p le te d w ith A tla n tic an d G u lf d r y - c a r g o an d ta n k e r c o m p a n ie s .

A u g u s t 25 --------------------

T a n k e r c o m p a n ie s r e a c h e d a g r e e m e n t w ith th e I n te r n a tio n a l O r g a n i­
z a tio n of M a s t e r s , M a te s an d P ilo ts o n th e E a s t C o a s t.
T h e N a tio n a l L a b o r R e la tio n s B o a rd m a ile d la s t - o f f e r b a llo ts to
m e m b e r s of m a r i t i m e u n io n s . B a llo ts w e r e m a ile d in a d v a n c e to
p o r ts w h e re th e u n io n m e m b e r s ’ s h ip s w e r e s c h e d u le d to p u t in .

S e p te m b e r 1 ---------------- F in a l r e p o r t o f th e B o a rd o f In q u iry s u b m itte d to th e P r e s i d e n t .
T h e B o a rd r e p o r te d th a t th e fo llo w in g d is p u te s r e m a in e d in p r o g ­
r e s s : T h e A lc o a S te a m s h ip C o. an d th e S e a f a r e r s ' I n te r n a tio n a l
U n io n ; th e P a c if ic M a r itim e A s s o c ia tio n an d th e I n te r n a tio n a l O r g a n i­
z a tio n of M a s te r s , M a te s an d P ilo ts ,' th e P a c if ic M a r itim e A s s o ­
c ia tio n an d th e A m e r ic a n R a d io A s s o c ia tio n . T h e r e p o r t in c lu d e d
th e l a s t o ffe r m a d e by th e c o m p a n ie s to th e u n io n s th a t h a d n o t
a g r e e d o n a c o n tr a c t.
S e p te m b e r 7 ---------------- M a s t e r s , M a te s an d P ilo ts in d ic a te d r e je c ti o n o f th e N L R B b a ll o t­
in g d u e to e lig ib ility of v o te r s b e in g lim ite d to th o s e e m p lo y e d —
a p p r o x im a te ly o n e - th ir d o f th e m e m b e r s h ip . A m e r ic a n R a d io A s ­
s o c ia tio n r e f u s e d to n e g o tia te w ith P a c if i c M a r itim e A s s o c ia tio n
p e n d in g o u tc o m e o f d is p u te w ith th e M a s t e r s , M a te s an d P ilo ts .
S e p te m b e r 9 ---------------- O f f ic e r s of W e st C o a s t s h ip s w e r e v o tin g in v a r io u s w o rld p o r ts
c o n tr a c t o f f e r s s u b m itte d b y th e P a c if i c M a r itim e A s s o c ia tio n to
I n te r n a tio n a l O r g a n iz a tio n o f M a s t e r s , M a te s an d P ilo ts an d
A m e r ic a n R a d io A s s o c ia tio n an d b y th e A lc o a S te a m s h ip C o. to
S e a f a r e r s ' I n te r n a tio n a l U n io n .
S e p te m b e r 1 6 -------------

on
th e
th e
th e

B o a rd m e m b e r J a m e s J . H e a ly w a s r e ta in e d a s a s p e c ia l m e d ia to r
to tr y to s e tt le th e P a c if ic C o a s t m a r iti m e d is p u te s p r i o r to e x p i r a ­
tio n of th e in ju n c tio n .
A m e r ic a n R a d io A s s o c ia tio n re a c h e d a g r e e m e n t w ith P a c if i c C o a s t
s h ip o w n e rs d u r in g c o n f e r e n c e s h e ld u n d e r jo in t a u s p ic e s of F e d e r a l
M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e an d th e B o a rd of In q u iry . T h e
c o n tr a c t w a s p r o m p tly r a tif ie d b y th e m e m b e r s h ip .

S e p te m b e r 18 -------------

S e c r e t a r y G o ld b e rg a n n o u n c e d th e a p p o in tm e n t of a c o m m itte e to
s tu d y th e f o r e ig n fla g is s u e an d m a k e r e c o m m e n d a tio n s . M e m b e rs :
U n d e r S e c r e t a r y o f L a b o r W . W illa rd W ir tz , c h a ir m a n ; E d w a rd
G u d e m a n , U n d e r S e c r e t a r y of C o m m e r c e ; an d D o n a ld B . S tr a u s ,
N ew Y o rk , la b o r a r b i t r a t o r .

S e e f o o t n o t e a t end o f t a b l e .




41
18. M a r itim e In d u s tr y D is p u te , A tla n tic , P a c if ic , a n d G u lf C o a s ts , 1961— M a r itim e
u n io n s 1 v. c e r t a i n s h ip o w n e rs an d o p e r a t o r s in th e U n ite d S ta te s
f o r e ig n an d d o m e s tic t r a d e — C o n tin u e d
S e p te m b e r 20, 1961 —

M a s te r s , M a te s an d P ilo ts r e je c te d th e " f in a l o f f e r " o f P a c if ic M a r i­
tim e A s s o c ia tio n . N a tio n a l L a b o r R e la tio n s B o a rd s u s p e n d e d ta b u ­
la tio n o f th e v o tin g b e c a u s e of a p p a r e n t e r r o r in l a s t o ffe r s u b m itte d
to M a s te r s , M a te s an d P ilo ts e m p lo y e d m e m b e r s .

S e p te m b e r 2 1 --------------

T h e 8 0 -d a y in ju n c tio n e x p ir e d . A lc o a S te a m s h ip C o. an d th e S e a f a r e r s 1
I n te r n a tio n a l U n io n c o n c lu d e d a 1 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t a fe w h o u rs b e f o r e
th e e x p ir a tio n . F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s c o n tin u e d to ta k e p a r t in n e g o ­
tia tio n s in th e P a c if ic C o a s t d is p u te in v o lv in g th e M a s te r s , M a te s
an d P i l o t s . 2

S e p te m b e r 2 5 --------------

T h e in ju n c tio n w a s d is s o lv e d by F e d e r a l J u d g e S y lv e s te r J . R y a n on
m o tio n by th e G o v e rn m e n t, e f fe c tiv e S e p te m b e r 21.

J a n u a r y 25, 1962 _____

T h e P r e s id e n t s u b m itte d a r e p o r t o n th e d is p u te to C o n g r e s s . H e
c o n c lu d e d w ith th e in f o r m a tio n th a t th e in ju n c tio n h a d b e e n lifte d ,
e f fe c tiv e S e p te m b e r 21, an d th a t s e tt le m e n t s w e r e re a c h e d by a ll
p a r t i e s to th e d is p u te .

National Maritime Union of Am erica, Seafarers' International Union of North Am erica, National Marine Engineers' Beneficial
Association, International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, American Radio Association, Radio Officers Union, and the
Staff Officers Association of America.
2 Strike involving this union and the member companies of the Pacific Maritime Association began at Pacific Coast ports
September 28.
This dispute was the only part of the national maritime strike which was not settled before the expiration of the
injunction.
By October 4, 28 ships were tied up.
On October 5, the Secretary of Labor appointed a Board of Inquiry, composed
of W . Willard Wirtz, Under Secretary of Labor; W illiam E. Simkin, Director, Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service; and
James J. Healy, member of the President's Board of Inquiry.
Settlement was reached October 11, and the union voted to ratify the
contract and return to work. Negotiations were to continue on some issues.

19. M a r itim e I n d u s tr y D is p u te , W e st C o a s t an d H a w a ii, 1962— S e a f a r e r s ' I n te r n a tio n a l
U n io n o f N o rth A m e r ic a (3 s u b d iv is io n s ) 1 v . s h ip o w n e rs a n d o p e r a t o r s
r e p r e s e n te d by th e P a c if ic M a r itim e A s s o c ia tio n
S e p te m b e r 30, 1961 —

C o n tr a c t e x p ir e d . N e g o tia tio n s b r o k e d o w n in F e b r u a r y 1962, a f te r
th e p a r t i e s fa ile d to r e a c h a g r e e m e n t on w a g e s , o v e r tim e , w e lf a r e
b e n e f its , an d v a c a tio n s .

F e b r u a r y 18, 1 9 6 2 -----

W o rk s to p p a g e of W e st C o a s t m a r i t i m e w o r k e r s , th r e a te n e d f o r
F e b r u a r y 20, a v e r te d a f te r a p p o in tm e n t o f a s p e c ia l m e d ia tio n p a n e l
b y W illia m E . S im k in , D ir e c t o r o f th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n ­
c ilia tio n S e r v ic e . M e m b e r s : R o b e r t H. M o o re , D e p u ty D i r e c t o r of
th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e ; J a m e s J . H e a ly ,
p r o f e s s o r o f i n d u s tr i a l r e la tio n s , G ra d u a te S c h o o l o f B u s in e s s A d m in ­
i s t r a t i o n , H a r v a r d U n iv e r s ity ; an d C o m m is s io n e r G e o rg e H ille n b ra n d ,
o f th e S an F r a n c is c o o ffic e o f th e M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e .

F e b r u a r y 2 6 -----------------

T h e p a n e l m e t in S a n F r a n c is c o w ith s h ip o w n e rs an d n e g o tia tin g c o m ­
m it te e s of th e u n lic e n s e d m a r iti m e u n io n s , a n d c o n tin u e d m e e tin g s f o r
a lm o s t 3 w e e k s , b u t w a s u n a b le to e f fe c t a s e ttle m e n t.

S e e footnote




a t en d o f t a b l e .

42
19.

M a r i t i m e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , W e s t C o a s t an d H a w a i i , 1 9 6 2 — S e a f a r e r s ' I n t e r n a t i o n a l
U n io n o f N o r t h A m e r i c a (3 s u b d i v i s i o n s ) 1 v . S h i p o w n e r s a n d O p e r a t o r s
r e p r e s e n t e d b y th e P a c i f i c M a r i t i m e A s s o c i a t i o n — C o n t i n u e d

M a rc h 16, 1962 _______

W o rk s to p p a g e s b e g a n ; 22 s h ip s w e r e im m e d ia te ly tie d u p , an d o th e r s
w e r e s tr u c k a s th e y r e a c h e d p o r t. 2 A b o u t 5, 000 w o r k e r s w e r e d ir e c t ly
id le d a t p e a k o f s tr i k e .
L o n g s h o r e m e n p le d g e d to s u p p o r t th e s t r i k e b y h o n o rin g p ic k e t lin e s ,
b u t th e P a c if ic M a r itim e A s s o c ia tio n . o b ta in e d a F e d e r a l c o u r t o r d e r
p r o h ib itin g th e s t r i k e r s fr o m in te r f e r i n g w ith th e u n lo a d in g o f m il ita r y
a n d p e r i s h a b le c a r g o , b a g g a g e , an d m a il f r o m s h ip s .

M a rc h 17----------------------- S trik in g s e a m e n w ith d re w p ic k e t lin e s f r o m a ll S an F r a n c is c o p i e r s in
c o m p lia n c e w ith c o u r t o r d e r .
M a r c h 19_____ __________ S tr ik e s p r e a d to W e st C o a s t p o r ts f r o m P u g e t S ound to S an D ie g o
a n d H a w a ii.
M a r c h 2 0 ----------------------- S h ip o w n e rs a c c e p te d a F e d e r a l ju d g e 's p r o p o s a l fo r a r b i t r a t i o n o f th e
d is p u te ; th e s tr ik in g u n io n s r e je c te d th e p r o p o s a l.
M a rc h 2 1 _______________

S h ip o w n e rs a n d th e s tr ik in g u n io n s a g r e e d to r e s u m e n e g o tia tio n s w ith
th e a s s i s t a n c e o f a F e d e r a l m e d ia to r .

M a rc h 2 9 —-------------------- G o v e rn o r W illia m T. Q u in n o f H a w a ii fle w to S an F r a n c is c o to s e e k
p e r m i s s io n f o r th e u n lo a d in g o f e ig h t f r e i g h t e r s tie d up in H o n o lu lu .
H e e m p h a s iz e d im m e d ia te a c tio n w a s n e c e s s a r y .
A p r il 2 ---------------------------

S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r A r th u r J . G o ld b e rg m e t w ith c o m p a n y an d u n io n
n e g o tia to r s in W a sh in g to n . I m m e d ia te ly a f te r th e m e e tin g , h e a p p o in te d
a th r e e - m a n p a n e l to p u r s u e f u r t h e r m e d ia tio n e f f o r ts . T h e p a n e l
w a s d ir e c t e d to r e p o r t b a c k to th e S e c r e t a r y by n o o n , A p r il 7. P a n e l
m e m b e r s : W. W illa rd W irtz , U n d e r S e c r e t a r y o f L a b o r , c h a ir m a n ;
R o b e r t H. M o o re , D e p u ty D ir e c t o r o f th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d
C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e ; an d P r o f e s s o r J a m e s J . H e a ly .
A fte r m e e tin g w ith th e p a r t i e s o n A p r il 5 a n d 6, th e p a n e l r e p o r te d
th a t no a c c o r d c o u ld b e r e a c h e d .

A p r il 3__________________

G o v e rn o r Q u in n p r o c la im e d a s ta t e of e m e r g e n c y in H a w a ii, an d s e n t a
r a d io g r a m to P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y r e q u e s tin g im m e d ia te sh ip p in g r e lie f .

A p r il 7 ---------------------------

B o a rd o f In q u iry a p p o in te d by th e P r e s id e n t. M e m b e r s : P r o f e s s o r
J a m e s J . H e a ly , c h a ir m a n ; F r a n k J . D u g a n , p r o f e s s o r , G e o rg e to w n
U n iv e rs ity L a w S c h o o l; L a w re n c e E . S eibel, a r b i t r a t o r , W ash in gton , D .C .
T h e B o a rd w as in s t r u c t e d to r e p o r t to th e P r e s id e n t b y A p r il 11.
T e le g r a m s to th e p a r t i e s in f o r m e d th e m th a t th e B o a rd w o u ld m e e t
in W a sh in g to n A p r il 9. T h e p a r t i e s w e r e in v ite d to a p p e a r , an d e a c h
w a s r e q u e s te d to s u b m it a w r itte n s ta te m e n t o f its p o s itio n . B o th
p a r t i e s s u b m itte d s ta te m e n ts , b u t d e e m e d a p e r s o n a l a p p e a r a n c e u n ­
n e c e s s a r y , s in c e th e B o a rd c h a ir m a n h a d s p e n t m a n y d a y s a s a
m e m b e r o f tw o s p e c ia l m e d ia tio n p a n e ls , an d w a s c o n s id e r e d to h a v e
k n o w le d g e o f th e p a r t i e s ' p o s itio n s a n d th e f a c ts w ith r e s p e c t to th e
d is p u te .

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .




43
19.

M a r i t i m e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , W e s t C o a s t and H a w a i i , 1 9 6 2 ----S e a f a r e r s ' I n t e r n a t i o n a l
U n io n of N o r t h A m e r i c a (3 s u b d i v i s i o n s ) 1 v . S h i p o w n e r s a n d O p e r a t o r s
r e p r e s e n t e d b y the P a c i f i c M a r i t i m e A s s o c i a t i o n — C on tinu ed

A p r il 11, 1 9 6 2 _________

T h e B o a r d s u b m itte d its r e p o r t to th e P r e s id e n t. T h e r e p o r t in d ic a te d
th a t a g r e e m e n t h a d b e e n r e a c h e d on a few i s s u e s ( m o s tly n o n e c o n o m ic ),
b u t s ta te d th a t a n u m b e r of w o rk r u le c h a n g e s an d e c o n o m ic is s u e s
r e m a in e d u n s e ttle d . T h e r e p o r t s u m m a r iz e d th e p o s itio n s of th e
p a r t i e s on th e u n s e ttle d is s u e s an d s ta te d th a t th e u n d e r ly in g is s u e in
d is p u te w a s th e to ta l c o s t of a p a c k a g e s e ttle m e n t. In c o n c lu s io n , th e
B o a rd r e a f f ir m e d th e v ie w of th e 1961 M a r itim e B o a rd of In q u iry — th a t
o ne of th e m o s t im p o r ta n t o b s ta c le s to s e ttle m e n t w a s th e m u ltip lic ity
of a g r e e m e n ts in th e m a r iti m e in d u s tr y .
T h e P r e s i d e n t d ir e c t e d th e A tto rn e y G e n e r a l to p e titio n th e U n ite d
S ta te s D i s t r i c t C o u rt fo r th e N o r th e r n D is tr i c t of C a lif o r n ia fo r an
in ju n c tio n .
J u d g e G e o rg e B. H a r r i s , F e d e r a l D i s t r i c t ju d g e in S an F r a n c is c o ,
is s u e d a te m p o r a r y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r , a n d s e t A p r il 16 to h e a r
a r g u m e n ts on th e m o tio n fo r p r e l im in a r y in ju n c tio n .

A p r il 17_________________

N e g o tia to r s m e t a t th e r e q u e s t of J u d g e H a r r i s . A r th u r C. V ia t,
R e g io n a l D ir e c t o r of th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e ,
r e p o r t e d no p r o g r e s s w a s m a d e .

A p r il 18_________________

J u d g e H a r r i s e x te n d e d th e te m p o r a r y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r to a n 8 0 -d a y
in ju n c tio n , u n d e r th e e m e r g e n c y p r o v is io n s of th e T a f t - H a r tle y A c t,
p re v e n tin g a n y re n e w a l of th e s t r i k e u n til J u n e 3 0.

M ay 9

T h e S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r a p p e a le d to th e s h ip o w n e rs an d u n io n s to
s e ttle th e i r d is p u te .

J u n e 1 ----------------------------

T h e B o ard of In q u iry re q u e ste d th e p a r t ie s to s u b m it w r itte n s ta te m e n ts
c o n c e rn in g th e e f f o r ts to w a r d s e ttle m e n t a n d th e i r p r e s e n t p o s itio n .

J u n e 6 ___________________

T h e P a c if ic M a r itim e A s s o c ia tio n a s k e d P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y to a p p o in t
a s p e c ia l p a n e l to s tu d y th e i s s u e s a n d m a k e a r e c o m m e n d a tio n fo r
s e ttle m e n t.

J u n e 11

T h e B o a rd of In q u iry r e p o r t e d to th e P r e s id e n t. T h e v a r io u s s o lu tio n s
e x p lo r e d , a n d f o r m s of a r b i tr a ti o n s u g g e s te d , w e r e r e p o r te d . T he
r e p o r t c o n c lu d e d th a t th e 6 0 -d a y p e r io d h a d w itn e s s e d a s u b s ta n tia l
n a rro w in g of d if f e r e n c e s b e tw e e n th e p a r t i e s ; th a t r e m a in in g d iff e re n c e s
d id n o t ju s tif y r e s u m p tio n of a s tr i k e ; an d th a t a s e ttle m e n t sh o u ld
b e a tta in a b le .
T h e N a tio n a l L a b o r R e la tio n s B o a rd m a ile d b a llo ts to m e m b e r s of th e
th r e e s tr ik in g u n io n s fo r a v o te o n th e P a c if ic M a r itim e A s s o c ia tio n 's
fin a l o ffe r. T h e v o tin g p e r io d w a s to e n d J u n e 26. M o r r i s W e is b e r g e r ,
h e a d n e g o tia to r fo r th e u n io n , u r g e d m e m b e r s n o t to v o t e .3

J u n e 12---------------------------

P r e s id e n t K e n n e d y n a m e d J a m e s J . H e a ly a s a s p e c ia l m e d ia to r to
t r y to s e ttle th e d is p u te . P r o f e s s o r H e a ly a n n o u n c e d h e w o u ld h o ld
"sh o w d o w n " m e e tin g s , b o th s e p a r a te an d jo in t, u n til e i th e r a s e t t l e ­
m e n t w a s r e a c h e d o r th e r e w a s a fin a l d e a d lo c k .

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d of t a b l e .




44
19 .

M a r i t i m e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , W e s t C o a s t a n d H a w a ii, 1 9 6 2 ----S e a f a r e r s ' I n t e r n a t i o n a l
U n io n of N o r t h A m e r i c a (3 s u b d i v i s i o n s ) 1 v . S h i p o w n e r s a n d O p e r a t o r s
r e p r e s e n t e d b y th e P a c i f i c M a r i t i m e A s s o c i a t i o n — C o n t i n u e d

J u n e 2 1, 1962 __________

J u ly 2____________________
J u ly 16

C o n tr a c t a g r e e m e n t r e a c h e d .4 R e p r e s e n t a ti v e s of th e s h ip o w n e rs
an d u n io n s a g r e e d to s u b m it th e a g r e e m e n t to th e i r r e s p e c tiv e m e m ­
b e r s h ip s w ith r e c o m m e n d a tio n s fo r a p p ro v a l.
J . P a u l S t. S u r e , P r e s i d e n t of th e P a c if ic M a r itim e A s s o c ia tio n , c a lle d
th e 4 4 x/2 -m o n th c o n tr a c t a " m a jo r a c h ie v e m e n t" b e c a u s e it m e a n t
th a t a ll m a r iti m e c o n tr a c ts o n th e W e st C o a s t w o u ld h a v e a c o m m o n
e x p ir a tio n d a te — J u n e 15, 1965.
C o u rt in ju n c tio n o ffic ia lly d is c h a r g e d .
T h e S e a f a r e r s ' I n te r n a tio n a l U n io n n o tifie d th e P a c if ic M a r itim e
A s s o c ia tio n of o f f ic ia l r a tif ic a ti o n of th e c o n tr a c t b y th e S a i l o r s ' U nion
of th e P a c if ic , P a c if ic C o a s t M a rin e F ir e m e n , O il e r s , W a te r te n d e r s ,
a n d W ip e r s A s s o c ia tio n , a n d th e M a r in e C o o k s a n d S te w a r d s ' U nion .

Three subdivisions of the Seafarers' International Union involved— Sailors' Union of the Pacific; Pacific Coast Marine Firemen,
Oilers, Watertenders, and Wipers Association; and the Marine Cooks and Stewards Union.
2 This was the third strike of maritime workers on the West Coast within 10 months— the first occurred in June 1961; the second
occurr|d in late September 1961.
Results of the National Labor Relations Board vote were not certified to the Attorney General, since a settlement was reached
before the end of the voting period.
4 The contract provided for a 2-percent increase in base, penalty, and overtime rates effective October 1, 1961; maximum of
7. 85-percent adjustment effective October 1963 for work mle changes; 5 days' vacation (was 3) for each 30 days worked retroactive
to October 1, 1961; $ 1 5 0 -a-month maximum pension benefit (was $125), normal retirement at age 62 (was 65) and early retirement
at age 57 (was 60) effective October 1, 1962; companies to pay $1. 10 a day to welfare fund (was 80 cents) retroactive to October 1,
1961, with existing benefits guaranteed during agreement term; companies to pay 5 cents a day to work stabilization fund and 5 cents
a day to industry fund effective October 1, 1962— money to be placed in escrow pending decision on use of funds.
NOTE: Following protests of the unions and the Pacific Maritime Association during the period of the injunction, Judge Harris
modified the restraining order to (1) permit seamen to walk off ships in American ports at the expiration of the truce; (2) hold seamen
in violation of the injunction if they refused to sign onto ships which would not complete voyage by June 29; and (3) provide for
seamen to remain aboard ships until cargo is unloaded, even if they return to port after the truce expires and the strike resumes.
In late April, the unions filed appeals in the Ninth U .S . Circuit Court of Appeals, charging that these modified orders deprived
the unions of the right to strike.
The Circuit Court ruled that unions must sign on for trips of normal length throughout the 80-day
"cooling o ff' period, but left the unions free to walk off the ships as soon as the injunction ended.
The U .S . Supreme Court refused
to review the lower court's ruling and, in effect, upheld ruling of the U . S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

20. R e p u b lic A v ia tio n C o r p . , F a r m in g d a l e , L o n g I s la n d , N . Y . , 1962—
v . I n te r n a tio n a l A s s o c ia tio n o f M a c h in is ts (A F L —C IO )1
M a rc h 5, 1962

C o m p a n y an d u n io n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s m e t in d i r e c t n e g o tia tio n s . T h e y
w e r e jo in e d b y F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s in m id - M a r c h . T h e m a j o r i s s u e s
in d is p u te r e la te d to jo b s e c u r i ty , s e n io r it y , an d s e v e r a n c e p a y .
D a ily m e e tin g s w e r e h e ld u n d e r F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n a n d C o n c ilia tio n
S e r v ic e a u s p ic e s th ro u g h A p r il 1.
A p r il 1 __________________ T w o - y e a r c o n tr a c t e x p ir e d . T h e u n io n r e je c te d th e c o m p a n y 's f in a l
o ffe r an d v o te d to s tr i k e .
A p r il 2 __ _____ __ __ S trik e b y m a c h in is ts b e g a n a t 12:01 a .m ., id lin g a b o u t 8, 800 p ro d u c tio n
w o r k e r s ; c r a f t u n io n s jo in e d th e s t r i k e so o n th e r e a f t e r .
A p r i l ------------------------- B e tw e e n A p r il 6 an d 3 0, c o m p a n y a n d u n io n n e g o tia to r s h e ld s e v e r a l
jo in t m e e tin g s u n d e r th e a u s p ic e s of F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s .
M ay 7
N e g o tia tio n s b r o k e d ow n an d b a r g a in in g s e s s io n s w e r e r e c e s s e d s u b je c t
to c a ll.
S e e f o o t n o t e a t end of t a b l e .




45
20.
v.

R e p u b l i c A v i a t i o n C o r p . , F a r m i n g d a l e , L o n g I s l a n d , N. Y . , 1 9 6 2 —
I n t e r n a t i o n a l A s s o c i a t i o n o f M a c h i n i s t s ( A F L — I O ) 1— C o n t i n u e d
C

M ay 14, 1962 _________

W illia m E . S im k in , D ir e c t o r of th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n
S e r v ic e , m e t w ith b o th s id e s in W a sh in g to n . T e n m e e tin g s w e r e h e ld
b e tw e e n M ay 14 an d M ay 23.

M ay 2 2 __________________

T h e D e fe n s e D e p a r tm e n t a n n o u n c e d th a t th e 5 3 - d a y - o ld s tr i k e h ad
s lo w e d d e li v e r ie s o f a i r c r a f t to a p o in t w h e re th e im p a c t w o u ld b e f e lt
b y A ir F o r c e d e fe n s e in s ta lla tio n s in E u r o p e an d th e P a c if ic .

M ay 2 8 --------------------------- S e c r e t a r y o f L a b o r A r th u r J . G o ld b e rg , A s s is ta n t S e c r e t a r y J a m e s J .
R e y n o ld s , an d r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s o f th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n a n d C o n c il­
ia tio n S e r v ic e m e t w ith b o th p a r t i e s . T h e D ir e c t o r o f F M C S c o n tin u e d
n e g o tia tio n s o n M ay 29. N o a g r e e m e n t w a s re a c h e d an d m e e tin g s
w e r e r e c e s s e d s u b je c t to c a ll.
J u n e 7___________________ B o a rd o f In q u iry a p p o in te d by th e P r e s id e n t. M e m b e r s : L lo y d K .
G a r r is o n , a tto r n e y , N ew Y o rk C ity , c h a ir m a n ; A r th u r S ta r k an d
J a m e s C . H ill o f N ew Y o rk , b o th a r b i t r a t o r s .
J u n e 1 1 -------------------------

T h e B o a rd o f In q u iry h e ld h e a r in g s J u n e 11 a n d 12 in N ew Y o rk C ity .

J u n e 1 4 _________________

T h e B o a rd r e p o r t e d to
s e ttle m e n t w h ic h h a v e
r e m a i n s . " T h e B o a rd
im m e d ia te p o s s ib ility o f

J u n e 1 5 -------------------------

P r e s id e n t K e n n e d y o r d e r e d th e J u s tic e D e p a r tm e n t to h a lt th e s tr i k e
by o b ta in in g a n 8 0 -d a y in ju n c tio n .

th e P r e s id e n t th a t " a f te r a ll th e e f f o r ts a t
b e e n m a d e by th e G o v e rn m e n t, a n im p a s s e
a ls o r e p o r t e d th a t th e r e a p p e a r e d to b e no
th e p a r t i e s s e ttlin g th e d is p u te .

F e d e r a l J u d g e W a lte r B r u c h h a u s e n o f B ro o k ly n s ig n e d a r e s t r a i n i n g
o r d e r th a t d ir e c t e d th e s t r i k e r s to r e t u r n to w o rk M o n d ay m o rn in g .
J u d g e B ru c h h a u s e n s e t J u n e 20 fo r a h e a r in g on th e G o v e r n m e n t's
p e titio n f o r a te m p o r a r y in ju n c tio n a g a in s t th e s tr i k e .
J u n e 1 8 -------------------------

S trik in g m a c h in is ts an d c r a f t u n io n s c o m p lie d w ith th e G o v e rn m e n t
o r d e r an d r e tu r n e d to w o rk .

J u n e 2 0 -------------------------

J u d g e B ru c h h a u s e n is s u e d a n in ju n c tio n a g a in s t th e u n io n s r e s t r a i n i n g
th e m f r o m s tr ik in g fo r 80 d a y s . T he o r d e r w as p r e d a te d to J u n e 16,
a n d p r o h ib ite d a r e s u m p tio n o f th e s tr i k e u n til S e p te m b e r 4.

J u n e 2 8 -------------------------

M e d ia tio n e f f o r ts r e s u m e d an d R e p u b lic a n n o u n c e d s e tt le m e n t w ith
IB E W , L o c a l 25 ( a g r e e d u p o n J u n e 27), m a r k in g th e f i r s t b r e a k in
th e s tr i k e .

J u ly 2 ----------------------------

T h e R e g io n a l D i r e c t o r of th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n
S e r v ic e in N ew Y o rk s u m m o n e d n e g o tia to r s fo r b o th s id e s to a jo in t
m e e tin g J u ly 5, th e f i r s t f a c e - to - f a c e m e e tin g s in c e M ay 28.

J u ly 19________________ -

T h e c o m p a n y a n n o u n c e d 60 n ew c o n tr a c t s h ad b e e n o b ta in e d a n d th a t,
in s te a d of m a s s la y o ffs , it a c tu a lly w o u ld h ir e m o r e m e n .

A u g u s t 1------------------------

T h e D ir e c t o r o f th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n a n d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e r e ­
q u e s te d th a t n e g o tia tio n s b e s h if te d to W a sh in g to n , a f te r m e d ia to r s
r e p o r t e d th a t b o th s id e s w e r e s t i l l d e a d lo c k e d . W h en th e u n io n r e p r e ­
s e n ta tiv e s w e r e u n a b le to c o m e to W a sh in g to n , th e D ir e c t o r an d o th e r
r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s o f F M C S c o n tin u e d n e g o tia tio n s in th e N ew Y o rk a r e a .

S e e f o o t n o t e a t en d o f t a b l e .




46
20.
v.

R ep u blic A v ia tio n C o rp . , F a r m in g d a le , Long Islan d , N . Y . , 19 6 2 —
I n t e r n a t i o n a l A s s o c i a t i o n o f M a c h i n i s t s ( A F L — I O ) 1— C o n t i n u e d
C

A u g u st 12, 1 9 6 2 _______
A u g u st 14_______________
A u g u st 28_______________
S e p te m b e r 7 ____ _______

IA M r a tif ie d a n ew 3 - y e a r c o n tr a c t, 2 r e a c h e d on A u g u st 10. R e p u b lic
a ls o a n n o u n c e d it h a d r e a c h e d s e ttle m e n ts w ith th e c r a f t u n io n s .
T h e B o a rd of In q u iry m a d e its f in a l r e p o r t to th e P r e s id e n t. T h e
r e p o r t in d ic a te d th a t a ll p a r t i e s , e x c e p t J o h n G. S h a rp ( c o n c e s s io n a ir e ) ,
an d H o te l a n d R e s ta u r a n t W o r k e r s , h a d r e a c h e d a g r e e m e n t.
A d d e n d u m to B o a r d ’s fin a l r e p o r t in d ic a te d th a t a ll u n io n s h a d r e a c h e d
a g r e e m e n t.
In ju n c tio n d is s o lv e d .

1 The International Association of Machinists was supported by four craft unions— United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners,
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, International Union of Operating Engineers, and United Association of Journeymen and
Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry— and by Hotel & Restaurant Employees and Bartenders International Union in the
plant cafeteria (John G. Sharp, operator).
^
The IAM contract provided 6 1 2 -cent wage increase retroactive to June 15, 1962; additional average 7 S c e n ts effective
/
April 1, 1963, and average 8 cents effective April 6, 1964; additional 1 0 -cents-an-hour inequity adjustment to certain classifications;
two new top labor grades established and upgrading procedure revised; current 6-cen t cost-of-living allowance incorporated into base
rates (includes 1-cent adjustment under the new agreement— company had granted similar increase to salary and nonunion hourly
employees effective April 2, 1962).
Other benefits effective April 1, 1962:
Improved holiday provisions; 3 weeks' vacation after
10 years (was 12); additional 2-cent-an-hour cost to company for improved insurance, including semiprivate hospital room (was $18);
improved surgical schedule and up to 31 days' coverage for laid -off employees; establishment of $50 lump-sum severance benefit for
, each year's service (maximum $500) financed by initial $1 m illion company payment and 5 cents an hour thereafter; lim it on duration
of supplementary jury-duty pay eliminated (was 2 weeks a year).
Several other issues were agreed upon including improved seniority
application and a clarification of work out of classification.

21. L o n g s h o rin g D is p u te on th e A tla n tic an d G ulf C o a s ts , 1962—63— I n te r n a tio n a l
L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c ia tio n (A F L —CIO ) v . s h ip p in g an d
s te v e d o r in g c o m p a n ie s
J u n e 13, 1 9 6 2 __________
J u ly 1 6 __________________
A u g u st 23_______________

S e p te m b e r 4 ___________
S e p te m b e r 1 1__________

T h e f i r s t b a r g a in in g se ssio n b e tw e e n u n io n r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s a n d o ffic ia ls
of th e N ew Y o rk S h ip p in g A s s o c ia tio n w a s h e ld .1 T h e u n io n p r e s e n te d
its p r o p o s a ls fo r c o n tr a c t r e v is io n . M a jo r ite m s c o n c e rn e d w a g e s
an d h o u r s of w o rk .
T h e N ew Y o rk S h ip p in g A s s o c ia tio n p r e s e n te d i t s c o u n te r p r o p o s a ls ,
o ffe rin g a w a g e in c r e a s e an d p e n s io n a n d w e lf a r e p la n im p r o v e m e n ts ,
c o n d itio n e d on w o r k - r u le c h a n g e s .
W illia m E . S im k in , D ir e c t o r of th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n a n d C o n c ilia tio n
S e r v ic e , a p p o in te d a s p e c ia l m e d ia tio n p a n e l to a tte m p t to r e s o lv e
th e e c o n o m ic i s s u e s fo r a ll E a s t C o a s t p o r ts f r o m M a in e to V ir g in ia . 2
P a n e l M e m b e r s ; R o b e rt H . M o o re , D e p u ty D ir e c to r of F M C S , c h a ir m a n ;
H e r b e r t S c h m e r tz , G e n e r a l C o u n s e l, F M C S ; T h o m a s G. D o u g h e rty ,
an d D a n ie l F . F itz p a tr ic k , F M C S c o m m is s i o n e r s f r o m th e N ew Y o rk
r e g io n a l o ffic e . J o h n A n d re w B u r k e , M a r itim e C o o rd in a to r f o r th e
F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e , a s s i s t e d th e p a n e l.
J o s e p h F . F in n e g a n , c h a ir m a n of th e N ew Y o rk S ta te D e p a r tm e n t of
L a b o r , a n d H a r o ld F e lix , N ew Y o rk C ity D e p a r tm e n t of L a b o r , a ls o
a p p o in te d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s to w o rk w ith th e m e d ia tio n p a n e l.
J o in t n e g o tia tio n s r e s u m e d u n d e r a u s p ic e s of th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n
an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e .
T h e u n io n n o tifie d S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r W. W illa rd W ir tz , G o v e rn o r
H u g h e s of N ew J e r s e y , a n d G o v e rn o r R o c k e f e lle r of N ew Y o rk th a t
n e g o tia tio n s w e r e d e a d lo c k e d a n d th a t a s tr i k e w a s in p r o s p e c t.

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d of t a b l e .




47
21.

L o n g s h o r i n g D i s p u t e on t h e A t l a n t i c a n d G u lf C o a s t s , 1 9 6 2 — 3 — I n t e r n a t i o n a l
6
L o n g sh o rem e n 's A s so c ia tio n (A F L —
CIO) v . s h i p p i n g and
s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s — C o n ti n u e d

S e p te m b e r 12, 1962 —

B o th in d u s tr y an d u n io n o ffic ia ls s e n t te le g r a m s to P r e s id e n t K e n n ed y
a l e r tin g h im to a n im p e n d in g s tr i k e .

S e p te m b e r 1 3 -------------S e p te m b e r 2 0 _________

T a lk to p a r t i e s in N ew Y o rk by A s s is ta n t S e c r e t a r y o f L a b o r R e y n o ld s .
V o te by IL A in N ew Y o rk on e m p lo y e r o f f e r . R e je c te d .

S e p te m b e r 2 4 --------------

T h e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e p ro p o s e d a 1 - y e a r
c o n tr a c t e x te n s io n , w ith no c h a n g e s e x c e p t w ith r e s p e c t to w ag e an d
f r in g e ite m s , p e n d in g a jo in t stu d y of th e d is p u te d m a n p o w e r u tiliz a tio n
a n d jo b s e c u r i ty i s s u e s . U n io n r e je c te d ; N ew Y o rk S h ip p in g A s s o ­
c ia tio n w o u ld a c c e p t, p ro v id in g u n r e s o lv e d is s u e s w e n t to b in d in g
a r b i tr a ti o n .
M e e tin g s h e ld u n d e r F M C S a u s p ic e s in M ia m i, M o b ile , N ew O r le a n s ,
a n d G a lv e s to n .
U po n th e e x p ir a tio n of th e c o n tr a c t, a s t r i k e of a p p ro x im a te ly 50, 000
lo n g s h o r e m e n b e g a n a t 12:01 a .m ., ty in g up p o r ts f r o m M a in e to T e x a s .

S e p te m b e r 27—2 8 ______
O c to b e r 1 ---------------------

O c to b e r 2 --------------------O c to b e r 4 ---------------------

O c to b e r 6 ______________

B o a rd o f In q u iry a p p o in te d by th e P r e s i d e n t 10 h o u rs a f te r s tr i k e
b e g a n . M e m b e r s : R o b b e n W. F le m in g , p r o f e s s o r o f la w a t th e U n i­
v e r s it y of Illin o is , c h a ir m a n ; V e rn o n H, J e n s e n , p r o f e s s o r of in d u s tr i a l
a n d la b o r r e la tio n s a t C o r n e ll U n iv e r s ity ; an d R o b e r t L . S tu tz , a s ­
s o c ia te p r o f e s s o r o f in d u s tr i a l a d m in is tr a ti o n a t th e U n iv e r s ity of
C o n n e c tic u t.
T h e B o a rd b e g a n h e a r in g s in N ew Y o rk C ity .
T h e B o a rd r e p o r te d to th e P r e s id e n t th a t d e s p ite r e p e a te d m e e tin g s
an d m e d ia tio n e f f o r ts , a lm o s t no p r o g r e s s h a d b e e n m a d e to w a rd an
a g r e e m e n t, an d th a t th e w id e s p r e a d im p a c t in a ll th e m a j o r p o r ts
c r e a te d an in to le r a b le c o n d itio n w h ic h n e c e s s it a te d r e s u m p tio n o f w o rk
an d a n e a r ly s e ttle m e n t o f th e d is p u te .
T h e P r e s i d e n t im m e d ia te ly s ig n e d th e o r d e r d ir e c tin g th e A tto rn e y
G e n e r a l to p e titio n th e a p p r o p r ia te d i s t r i c t c o u r t f o r an in ju n c tio n
a g a in s t th e s tr i k e .
J u d g e F . X. M c C o h ey , F e d e r a l D i s t r i c t C o u rt, is s u e d a 1 0 -d a y t e m ­
p o r a r y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r , e f fe c tiv e a t 4 :2 5 p. m . 3 J u d g e M c C o h e y s e t
O c to b e r 10 f o r a h e a r in g to d e te r m in e w h e th e r to e x te n d th e in ju n c tio n
to th e fu ll 80 d a y s .
L o n g s h o r e m e n r e tu r n e d to w o rk in a ll E a s t an d G u lf C o a s t p o r ts .

O c to b e r 10— -------------

Ju d g e M c G o h ey e x te n d e d o r ig in a l 1 0 -d a y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r to fu ll 8 0 -d a y
p e r io d a u th o r iz e d b y th e L a b o r M a n a g e m e n t R e la tio n s ( T a f t- H a r tle y )
A c t, p ro h ib itin g a r e s u m p tio n o f th e s tr i k e u n til D e c e m b e r 23.

O c to b e r 16_____________

T h e B o a rd of In q u iry b e g a n e x p lo r a to r y ta lk s w ith in d u s tr y an d u n io n
r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s . T h e B o a rd m e t jo in tly an d s e p a r a te ly w ith th e p a r t i e s
b e tw e e n O c to b e r 16 an d O c to b e r 31, b u t b o th s id e s r e m a in e d a d a m e n t
in th e i r r e s p e c tiv e p o s itio n s .
T h e B o a rd te r m in a te d its m e d ia tio n e f f o r ts a f te r th e u n io n r e je c te d a
r e c o m m e n d a tio n to p u t o ff d e m a n d s f o r a 6 -h o u r d ay an d h ig h e r b a s e
p a y r a te , an d th e e m p lo y e r s r e je c te d th e r e c o m m e n d a tio n to d e f e r
th e i r d e m a n d s f o r c h a n g e s in w o rk g an g s iz e s .

S e e fo o tnote




a t end o f t a b l e .

48

21. L o n g s h o r in g D is p u te o n th e A tla n tic a n d G ulf C o a s ts , 1962—63— In te r n a tio n a l
L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c ia tio n (A F L —CIO) v . s h ip p in g an d
s te v e d o r in g c o m p a n ie s — C o n tin u e d
O c to b e r 23, 1 9 6 2 _____
N o v e m b e r 7 ___________
N o v e m b e r 27

D ecem ber 3

D e c e m b e r 14__________
D e c e m b e r 17__________
D e c e m b e r 19__________
D e c e m b e r 23

D e c e m b e r 25__________
J a n u a r y 16, 1 9 6 3 _____

J a n u a r y 20 _

S ee fo o tn o te




D e p u ty D ir e c t o r a n d C o o rd in a to r m e t w ith S o u th A tla n tic a n d G ulf IL A
d e le g a te s in N ew Y o rk . R e s u m p tio n of n e g o tia tio n s w a s b e g u n .
U n d e r s p o n s o r s h ip of F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s , th e p a r t i e s b e g a n a
p o in t- b y - p o in t d is c u s s io n of th e d is p u te d i s s u e s .
T h e u n io n w a g e s c a le c o m m itte e r e c o m m e n d e d r e je c tio n of th e e m ­
p lo y e r s ' fin a l o ffe r, w h ic h p r o p o s e d th a t w o r k g a n g s be re d u c e d b y
one m a n a y e a r d u rin g th e n e x t 3 y e a r s a n d a to ta l w a g e o ffe r of a
2 7 - c e n t- a n - h o u r in c r e a s e o v e r a 3 - y e a r p e r io d .
T h e B o a rd of In q u iry s u b m itte d i t s s e c o n d r e p o r t to th e P r e s id e n t.
T h e r e p o r t s ta te d th a t n e g o tia tio n s in N ew Y o rk fo u n d e r e d on th e
m a n p o w e r u tiliz a tio n is s u e , a n d th a t t h e r e h a d b e e n no s u b s ta n tia l
c h a n g e in th e p o s itio n s of th e p a r t i e s . B e c a u s e of th e p a tte r n s e ttin g
p o te n tia l of th e N ew Y o rk c o n tr a c t, lo c a l n e g o tia tio n s in b o th A tla n tic
a n d G ulf C o a s ts p o r ts h a d b e e n p e r f u n c to r y o r h e ld in a b e y a n c e .
V o te on e m p lo y e r s ' l a s t o ffe r b e g a n in N ew Y o rk u n d e r a u s p ic e s of th e
N a tio n a l L a b o r R e la tio n s B o a rd ; v o tin g in o th e r p o r ts w a s s c h e d u le d
fo r D e c e m b e r 17 an d 18. J o in t m e e tin g in W a s h in g to n u n d e r a u s p ic e s
of L a b o r S e c r e t a r y W irtz .
P a r t i e s r e s u m e d m e e tin g in N ew Y o rk .
T h e N L R B r e p o r te d th a t lo n g s h o r e m e n r e je c te d th e e m p lo y e r s ' l a s t
o ffe r b y a v o te of 25 to 1.
E ig h ty - d a y in ju n c tio n e x p ir e d . L o n g s h o r e m e n r e je c te d P r e s i d e n t
K e n n e d y 's p le a fo r a 9 0 - d a y t r u c e , an d r e s u m e d th e s t r i k e . 4 T h e
P r e s id e n t h a d te le g r a p h e d in d u s tr y an d u n io n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s , p ro p o sin g
th a t a c o m m itte e o r g a n iz e d b y th e S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r s tu d y m a n p o w e r
u tiliz a tio n , jo b s e c u r ity an d re la te d is s u e s , an d th a t a n o th e r c o m m itte e ,
h e a d e d b y J u d g e H a r o ld R. M e d in a , re c o m m e n d s e ttle m e n ts o n a ll
o th e r m a t t e r s b y F e b r u a r y 15.
T h e N a tio n a l M a r itim e U nion of A m e r ic a s ta te d it s m e m b e r s w o u ld
h o n o r th e IL A p ic k e t lin e s . S ix o th e r m a r iti m e u n io n s h a d a ls o p le d g e d
to s u p p o rt th e IL A s tr i k e .
P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y a p p o in te d a t h r e e - m a n b o a r d to m e d ia te th e s tr i k e
s h o r tly a f te r th e S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r r e p o r t e d th a t n e g o tia tio n s h a d
c o lla p s e d .
B o a rd m e m b e r s : S e n a to r W ay n e M o r s e , c h a ir m a n ; J a m e s J . H e a ly ,
H a r v a r d U n iv e r s ity p r o f e s s o r ; an d T h e o d o re K h e e l, N ew Y o rk C ity
a rb itra to r.
T h e P r e s i d e n t i n s t r u c t e d th e B o a rd to p r o p o s e a c tio n to C o n g re s s if
no c o n tr a c t s e ttle m e n t c o u ld b e r e a c h e d b y J a n u a r y 20.
T h e B o a rd m a d e th e fo llo w in g re c o m m e n d a tio n s f o r en d in g th e s tr i k e :
2 4 - c e n t- a n - h o u r w a g e i n c r e a s e o v e r th e n e x t 2 y e a r s (15 c e n ts r e t r o ­
a c tiv e to O c to b e r 1, 196 2), p lu s 13 c e n ts f o r im p ro v e d p e n s io n s ,
h e a lth , an d w e lf a r e b e n e fits .
T h e re c o m m e n d a tio n s a ls o in c lu d e d p r o v is io n s f o r a " s tu d y b y th e
D e p a r tm e n t of L a b o r u n d e r th e d ir e c tio n of th e S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r of
th e p r o b le m s of m a n p o w e r u tiliz a tio n , jo b s e c u r ity an d a ll o th e r re la te d
is s u e s w h ic h a f fe c t th e lo n g s h o re in d u s tr y ." P r o v is io n w a s a ls o m a d e
fo r a n e u tr a l b o a r d to m a k e re c o m m e n d a tio n s to w a r d im p le m e n tin g th e
fin d in g s of th e stu d y in th e e v e n t th a t th e p a r t i e s f a il to a g r e e b y
J u ly 31, 1964.

a t en d of ta b le .

49

21. JL o n g sh o rin g D is p u te on th e A tla n tic a n d G u lf C o a s ts , 1962—63— I n te r n a tio n a l
L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c ia tio n (A F L —CIO) v . s h ip p in g an d
s te v e d o r in g c o m p a n ie s — C o n tin u e d
J a n u a r y 22, 1963

T h e N ew Y o rk S h ip p in g A s s o c ia tio n a n n o u n c e d a c c e p ta n c e o f th e
B o a r d 's r e c o m m e n d a tio n .

J a n u a r y 26

L o n g s h o r e m e n in th e P o r t o f N ew Y o rk r e tu r n e d to w o rk . S e ttle m e n ts
w e r e c o m p le te d in a ll o th e r p o r ts by J a n u a r y 27, an d n o r m a l o p e r a tio n s
w e r e r e s u m e d J a n u a r y 28.
T h e B o a rd r e p o r te d to th e P r e s id e n t. T h e r e p o r t s u m m a r iz e d th e
B o a r d 's m e d ia tio n e f f o r ts , th e r e c o m m e n d a tio n s m a d e , an d th e g u id in g
c r i t e r i a u s e d in fo rm u la tin g its p r o p o s a l.

F e b r u a r y 20,

1 The New York Shipping Association was empowered to bargain for management groups from Maine to Virginia on "Master
Contract" items.
Traditionally, negotiations in New York on the Master Contract, while not binding in the South Atlantic and Gulf
ports, set the pattern for settlement there.
Employer groups involved included the following: New York Shipping Association, In c.;
Harbor Carriers of the Port of New York; Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, In c.; Philadelphia Marine Trade Association;
New Orleans Steamship Association; Hampton Roads Maritime Association; Mobile Steamship Association; West Gulf Maritime Industry;
Boston Shipping Association; and South Atlantic Employers Association.
2 After the 1959 contracts were signed, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service maintained continuous liaison with the
parties in an effort to avoid a crisis in 1962.
In January 1962, Federal mediators met with top union and industry representatives
and suggested that bargaining get underway early. A t that time, both sides undertook factual surveys on several key points.
°
This was the fourth time since 1948 that the longshoremen have been ordered back to work by Federal court injunction, and
the eighth time that workers in the maritime field have been under directive of the Taft-Hartley A ct.
4 This was the fourth time a longshore strike had occurred or resumed after an 80-day "cooling off" period.

22. A e r o s p a c e In d u s try D is p u te , 1962 1— L o c k h e e d A i r c r a f t C o rp .
v . I n te r n a tio n a l A s s o c ia tio n of M a c h in is ts (A F L —CIO )
J u ly 21, 1962 _________

In c o m p lia n c e w ith th e r e c o m m e n d a tio n s of W illia m E . S im k in , D i­
r e c t o r o f th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e , P r e s id e n t
K e n n e d y c a lle d fo r a 6 0 -d a y tr u c e an d a p p o in te d a t h r e e - m a n b o a rd
o f p u b lic c itiz e n s to a s s i s t F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s in n e g o t ia t io n s .2 M e m ­
b e r s : D r. G e o rg e W. T a y lo r, p r o f e s s o r o f in d u s tr y a t th e U n iv e rs ity
o f P e n n s y lv a n ia , c h a ir m a n ; R a lp h T . S e w a rd , u m p ir e fo r B e th le h e m
S te e l C o. an d th e U n ite d S te e lw o r k e r s o f A m e r ic a , an d D r. C h a r le s C.
K illin g s w o rth , p r o f e s s o r of e c o n o m ic s a t M ic h ig a n S ta te U n iv e r s ity .

J u ly 2 8 ---------------------------

T h e u n io n s a g r e e d to th e tr u c e an d th e B o a rd b e g a n h e a r in g s a t th e
F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e o ffic e in L o s A n g e le s on
th e k e y i s s u e s — w a g e s , u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e f its , a n d u n io n sh o p . N e a rly
3 w e e k s w e r e s p e n t in s e p a r a te an d jo in t m e e tin g s , b u t n e g o tia tio n s
r e m a in e d d e a d lo c k e d .
A fte r e m p h a s iz in g to th e p a r t ie s th e n e c e s s ity of r e e x a m in in g th e i r
p o s itio n s a s a p r e lu d e to f u r t h e r an d in te n s if ie d n e g o tia tio n s , th e
B o a rd re c o n v e n e d in W a sh in g to n , D . C.

A u g u st 1 9 --------------------S e p te m b e r 1___________

In th e r e p o r t to th e P r e s id e n t, th e B o a rd s u m m a r iz e d th e p o s itio n s
o f th e p a r t i e s an d th e i r r e c o m m e n d a tio n s f o r r e s o lv in g th e d is p u te .

S e p te m b e r 4 -----------------

T h e B o a rd s u b m itte d its r e c o m m e n d a tio n s to th e p a r t i e s . T h e s e
in c lu d e d r e c o m m e n d a tio n s fo r 3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t s ; g e n e r a l w ag e i n ­
c r e a s e s ; in c r e a s e in c o m p a n y c o n tr ib u tio n s to la y o ff b e n e fit p la n s ;
an d an e m p lo y e e v o te in e a c h b a r g a in in g u n it to r e s o lv e th e u n io n
sh o p i s s u e . 3 T he p a r t ie s w e r e u rg e d to ta k e n o te o f th e r e c o m ­
m e n d a tio n s an d to re n e w th e i r e f f o r ts to s e tt le th e d is p u te .

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .




50
22.
v.

A e r o s p a c e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 1 9 6 2 1---- L o c k h e e d A i r c r a f t C o r p .
I n te rn a tio n a l A s s o c ia t io n of M a c h in is ts ( A F L —
CIO)— C o n ti n u e d

S e p te m b e r 11, 1962__

T h e B o a r d 's f in a l r e p o r t to th e P r e s i d e n t s ta te d th a t n e g o tia tio n s h a d
b e e n r e s u m e d u n d e r a u s p ic e s of th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n a n d C o n c ilia tio n
S e r v ic e ; th a t s u b s ta n tia l p r o g r e s s h a d b e e n m a d e on s o m e i s s u e s ;
an d th a t th e u n io n sh o p is s u e r e m a in e d th e chief ro a d b lo c k to s e ttle m e n t.

O c to b e r 23

T h e I n te r n a tio n a l A s s o c ia tio n of M a c h in is ts u r g e d th e F e d e r a l G o v e rn ­
m e n t to s e iz e a n d o p e r a te L o c k h e e d A ir c r a f t C o r p . a s a n a lte r n a tiv e
to a s tr i k e .

O c to b e r 26______________

D ir e c to r of th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n an d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e r e q u e s te d
th e c o m p a n y an d u n io n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s to re n e w n e g o tia tio n s in
W a sh in g to n .

N o v e m b e r 28

A s tr i k e of a p p r o x im a te ly 21, 000 w o r k e r s b e g a n a t o p e r a tio n s of
L o c k h e e d in C a lif o r n ia , F lo r id a , an d H a w a ii. P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y
im m e d ia te ly in v o k e d th e T a f t - H a r tle y A c t an d a p p o in te d a B o a rd of
In q u iry to in v e s tig a te th e d is p u te . M e m b e r s ; A r th u r M . R o s s ,
p r o f e s s o r of i n d u s tr i a l r e la tio n s a t th e U n iv e r s ity of C a lif o r n ia ,
c h a ir m a n ; F r e d e r i c k H . B u lle n , P u e b lo , C o lo ., an d P a u l D. H a n lo n ,
P o r tla n d , O r e g ., b o th e x p e r ie n c e d a r b i t r a t o r s .
T h e D ir e c t o r of th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n a n d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e s e n t
te le g r a m s to th e p a r t ie s a d v is in g th e m of th e a p p o in tm e n t of th e
B o a rd , an d r e q u e s tin g th a t th e s t r i k e b e te r m in a t e d im m e d ia te ly .

N o v e m b e r 29

B o th p a r t i e s c o m p lie d w ith th e r e q u e s t a n d th e s tr i k e w a s h a lte d
p e n d in g th e o u tc o m e of th e B o a r d 's s tu d y . W o rk w a s r e s u m e d o n th e
e v e n in g s h ift.

N o v e m b e r 3 0__________

T h e B o a rd b e g a n h e a r in g s in L o s A n g e le s .

D ecem ber 3

T h e B o a rd r e p o r t e d to th e P r e s id e n t. T h e r e p o r t s ta te d n o p r o g r e s s
h a d b e e n m a d e to w a r d a s o lu tio n of th e u n io n s e c u r i ty is s u e s in c e
th e T a y lo r B o a r d 's p r o p o s a ls , a lth o u g h th e s a m e is s u e h a d b e e n
d is p o s e d of p e a c e a b ly in m o s t o th e r a e r o s p a c e c o m p a n ie s . T h e r e p o r t
c a lle d th e t r u c e " p r e c a r i o u s , " s in c e th e s t r i k e w a s s u s p e n d e d o n ly
p e n d in g th e B o a r d 's stu d y a n d r e p o r t to th e P r e s id e n t.
T h e P r e s i d e n t i n s t r u c t e d th e A tto r n e y G e n e r a l to s e e k a F e d e r a l
C o u rt in ju n c tio n to p r e v e n t a r e s u m p tio n of th e s tr i k e . A c o m p la in t
w a s f ile d in th e U n ite d S ta te s D i s t r i c t C o u r t in L o s A n g e le s , an d
F e d e r a l D is tr i c t J u d g e J e s s e C u r tis is s u e d a 1 0 -d a y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r
a g a in s t b o th th e c o m p a n y an d u n io n . J u d g e C u r tis s e t D e c e m b e r 10
f o r a h e a r in g on th e G o v e r n m e n t's p e titio n f o r a te m p o r a r y in ju n c tio n
a g a in s t th e s tr i k e .

D e c e m b e r 10

J u d g e C u r tis e x te n d e d th e r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r to a f u ll 8 0 - d a y in ju n c tio n .
N e g o tia tio n s w e r e r e s u m e d u n d e r a u s p ic e s of F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s , b u t
w e r e r e c e s s e d in d e fin ite ly 3 d a y s l a t e r .

S e e f o o t n o t e a t en d o f t a b l e .




51

ZZ.
v.

A e r o s p a c e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 19 6Z 1 — L o c k h e e d A i r c r a f t C o r p .
In tern a tio n a l A s s o c ia tio n of M a c h in ists (A F L —
CIO)— C o n t i n u e d

J a n u a r y Z, 1 963_______

L o c k h e e d a n n o u n c e d a g r e e m e n ts w ith u n its of th e M a c h in is ts a t
H o n o lu lu a n d a t R e d la n d s , C a lif. , m a r k in g th e f i r s t b r e a k in th e lo n g
d is p u te .

J a n u a r y Z 1_____________

C o m p a n y an d u n io n r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s m e t w ith N a tio n a l L a b o r R e la tio n s
B o a rd o f f ic ia ls to d is c u s s p la n s fo r a v o te o n th e c o m p a n y 's f in a l
o ffe r in o u tly in g a r e a s .
N e g o tia tio n s r e m a in e d d e a d lo c k e d o n th e u n io n sh o p is s u e d e s p ite
a lm o s t c o n tin u o u s n e g o tia tio n s s in c e e a r ly J a n u a r y .

J a n u a r y Z7--------------------

T h r e e - y e a r c o n tr a c t, w h ic h in c lu d e d e c o n o m ic b e n e fits b u t no u n io n
sh o p c la u se , w a s w o rk e d o u t w ith th e a s s i s t a n c e o f F e d e r a l m e d i a t o r s . 4

J a n u a r y Z8_____________

T h e u n io n r a tif ie d c o n tr a c t.

The aerospace industry dispute developed in the early summer, and involved the International Association of Machinists, the
United Automobile Workers, and several major firms in the industry.
Despite the efforts of Federal mediators, numerous strike calls
were issued for July 23.
The companies and unions specified in the Taylor Board's assignment included North American Aviation, Inc. , Ryan Aero­
nautical Co. , and the United Autom obile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of Am erica; and General Dynamics C orp.,
Aerojet-General C orp., Lockheed Aircraft Corp. , and the International Association of Machinists.
The Board's reports to the President
did not deal with the issues at Aerojet-General Corp. , where a union shop was already in effect, but addressed a letter to this firm
September 6, making the same recommendations on the general wage increase issue.
3 A ll of the parties, except the Lockheed Aircraft Corp. , agreed to undertake collective bargaining with respect to all issues.
Lockheed maintained its fixed position on the union shop issue.
4 Contract provided a 5 - to 8-cent wage increase, retroactive to July 23, 1962, 6 to 8 cents effective July 22, 1963, and
6 to 9 cents effective July 20, 1964; additional 3 - to 16-cent adjustment (inequity and classification) affecting substantial numbers
of employees; total current 7-cent cost-of-living allowance (including 1-cent adjustments effective July 1962, October 1962, and
January 1963 under extension of previous agreement) incorporated into base rates and escalation clause continued; 8th paid holiday—
day after Thanksgiving beginning 1962; double time (was straight time) plus holiday pay for holiday work; 3 weeks' vacation after
10 years (was 12) and 4th week after 25 years; $30-day hospital (was $23) and $825 maximum surgical benefit (was $500)— company
paid for employees and company assumes $2 week of cost of dependent insurance premium retroactive to November 26, 1962, with
coverage extended to age 23 for full-tim e students; $75 lump-sum extended layoff benefit for each year's service to 15 (was $50 for
each year up to 10); life insurance made available at group rates to employees between ages 65 and 68, or until retired; pay for
unused sick leave increased to include shift premium, cost-of-living allowance, and odd workweek bonuses.

Z3. A e r o s p a c e In d u s tr y D is p u te , 196Z—63 1----B o e in g C o. v . I n te r n a tio n a l
A s s o c ia tio n of M a c h in is ts (A F L —C IO )
J u ly 16, 196Z

N e g o tia tio n s to r e p la c e a c o n tr a c t e x p irin g on S e p te m b e r 15, 196Z,
b e g a n in W ic h ita , K a n s . T h e u n io n p r o p o s e d a 3 - p e r c e n t w a g e i n ­
c r e a s e w ith an e s c a la to r c la u s e , im p ro v e d h e a lth an d w e lf a r e an d
p e n s io n p r o g r a m s , an d a u n io n sh o p o r a g e n c y sh o p c la u s e . 2 N e g o ­
tia tio n s s u b s e q u e n tly m o v e d to S e a ttle , W a sh . , w h e re c o m p a n y w id e
b a rg a in in g w a s c o n d u c te d .

A u g u st 8

T h e c o m p a n y , in its c o u n te r p r o p o s a ls w h ic h th e u n io n r e je c te d , o f f e r e d
a 1 5 - to Z 6 - c e n t- a n - h o u r w ag e in c r e a s e o v e r a 3 - y e a r p e r io d , an d i n ­
c r e a s e s in in s u r a n c e an d b a s ic m o n th ly p e n s io n b e n e f its , b u t r e je c te d
th e u n io n r e q u e s t fo r a u n io n o r a g e n c y sh o p .

S e e f o o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b l e .




52
23 .

A e r o s p a c e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 1 9 6 2 —6 3 1— B o e i n g C o. v . I n t e r n a t i o n a l
A s s o c ia tio n of M a c h in ists (A F L —
CIO)— C o n t i n u e d

A u g u s t 25 , 1962

S e a ttle M a c h in is ts v o te d a u th o r iz a tio n f o r a s t r i k e , a s th e i r c o u n t e r ­
p a r t s in V a n d e n b e rg , C a lif ., C a p e C a n a v e r a l, F la ., a n d W ic h ita , K a n s .,
h a d d o n e e a r l i e r in th e m o n th . N o s tr i k e d a te w as s e t, p e n d in g v o te
on th e c o m p a n y 's f in a l o ffe r.

A u g u s t 27

N e g o tia tio n s r e m a in e d d e a d lo c k e d on th e m a j o r i s s u e s , a n d th e u n io n
n o tifie d th e F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n a n d C o n c ilia tio n S e r v ic e th a t a s e r io u s
d is p u te e x is te d .

A u g u s t 28

F e d e r a l M e d ia to r A lb in P e t e r s o n m e t w ith m e m b e r s of th e u n io n
b a rg a in in g c o m m itte e a n d s c h e d u le d a m e e tin g w ith c o m p a n y n e g o ­
t i a t o r s fo r A u g u st 29.

S e p te m b e r 4 ..

F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s m e t w ith c o m p a n y a n d u n io n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s in
S e a ttle . A re v ie w of th e i s s u e s d id n o t in d ic a te a n y m a t e r i a l c h a n g e
in th e r e s p e c tiv e p o s itio n s o f th e p a r t i e s . M e d ia tio n e f f o r ts c o n tin u e d
in s e p a r a te a n d jo in t m e e tin g s th ro u g h S e p te m b e r 10.

S e p te m b e r 13__________ P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y a p p o in te d a th r e e - m a n fa c tfin d in g b o a r d to s u p p le ­
m e n t th e e f f o r ts of th e F M C S . B o a rd m e m b e r s w e re : S a u l W a lle n ,
B o s to n , c h a ir m a n ; L e w is M . G ill, P h ila d e lp h ia , a n d P a t r i c k J . F i s h e r ,
I n d ia n a p o lis , a ll e x p e r ie n c e d a r b i t r a t o r s . T h e b o a r d w a s r e q u e s te d
to r e p o r t to th e P r e s i d e n t b y O c to b e r 15. B o th th e c o m p a n y a n d
th e u n io n a g r e e d to c o n tin u e w o rk u n d e r th e p r e s e n t c o n tr a c t u n til
N o v e m b e r 15.
S e p te m b e r 17__________ T h e b o a r d m e t w ith th e p a r t ie s in S e a ttle , W a sh . , a n d fo r 4 d a y s
r e c e iv e d o r a l a n d w r itte n s ta te m e n ts of th e i r r e s p e c tiv e p o s itio n s .
O nly a lim ite d n u m b e r o f k e y is s u e s w e r e c o n s id e r e d in d e ta il— u n io n
s e c u r i ty , w a g e s , p e r f o r m a n c e a n a ly s is s y s te m , m a n a g e m e n t r ig h ts ,
s u b c o n tr a c tin g , a n d th e c o m p a n y ’s p r o p o s a l f o r a m o d ific a tio n of th e
g r ie v a n c e p r o c e d u r e s . T h e b o a r d c o n c lu d e d th a t th e u n io n s e c u r ity
is s u e w a s th e c h ie f im p e d im e n t to a s e tt le m e n t , a n d d e c id e d th a t it
w o u ld b e d e s ir a b l e to o b ta in e x p r e s s io n s of o p in io n f r o m B o e in g e m ­
p lo y e e s . T h e p a r t ie s jo in e d in a r e q u e s t th a t th e b o a r d b e a llo w e d
to d e f e r its r e p o r t to th e P r e s i d e n t u n til N o v e m b e r 15.
S e p te m b e r 24__________ T h e b o a r d n o tifie d th e p a r t i e s th a t h e a r in g s w o u ld b e r e s u m e d in
W a s h in g to n , D. C . , b e g in n in g O c to b e r 1.
O c to b e r 4 ______________ T h e b o a r d r e c e s s e d th e h e a r in g s in W a s h in g to n . T h e p a r t ie s a g r e e d
to r e t u r n to S e a ttle a n d m e e t w ith F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s to r e s u m e e f f o r ts
to r e s o lv e th e is s u e s n o t b e in g c o n s id e r e d b y th e b o a r d .
O c to b e r 1 0 _____________ B o th p a r t ie s s u b m itte d a l i s t o f th e u n s e ttle d i s s u e s to a F e d e r a l
M e d ia tio n a n d C o n c ilia tio n p a n e l in S e a ttle . T h r e e m in o r is s u e s w e r e
r e s o lv e d ; s e v e r a l o th e r i s s u e s w e r e r e s o lv e d in s u b s e q u e n t m e e tin g s
b e tw e e n O c to b e r 10 a n d O c to b e r 28.
N o v e m b e r 6 ___________ P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y a n n o u n c e d th a t th e u n io n h a d a g r e e d to p o s tp o n e
s t r i k e a c tio n u n til a t l e a s t J a n u a r y 15, 1963, to p e r m i t a p o ll on th e
u n io n sh o p is s u e . T h e p o ll, w h ic h w o u ld n o t b in d th e c o m p a n y to
g r a n t th e u n io n sh o p n o r r e q u ir e th e u n io n to r e lin q u is h its d e m a n d f o r
o n e , w a s s c h e d u le d to b e g in on D e c e m b e r 4. T h e b o a r d w a s a llo w e d
to d e f e r its r e p o r t to th e P r e s i d e n t u n til J a n u a r y 5, 1963.
S ee foo tnote




a t end o f t a b l e .

53
23.

A e r o s p a c e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 1 9 6 2 —6 3 1— B o e in g C o . v . I n t e r n a t i o n a l
A s s o c i a t i o n of M a c h i n i s t s ( A F L —
CIO)— C o n t i n u e d

N ovem ber

11 ,

D ecem ber

11 ___________

1962 ___

D ecem ber

A ll r e m a in in g u n s e ttle d
w ith F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s .
of th e fo rth c o m in g p o ll
o th e r is s u e s b e fo re th e
b e m a d e a t th a t tim e .

is s u e s w e r e re v ie w e d in d ir e c t n e g o tia tio n s
A c o m p a n y s p o k e s m a n in d ic a te d th a t in v iew
o f e m p lo y e e s , a n d u n til r e c o m m e n d a tio n s on
b o a r d w e r e k n o w n , n o f u r t h e r p r o g r e s s c o u ld

T h e N a tio n a l L a b o r R e la tio n s B o a rd a n n o u n c e d th a t in th e n o n b in d in g
p o ll B o e in g e m p lo y e e s fa v o r e d a u n io n sh o p by n e a r ly 3 to 1.
T h e b o a r d m e t w ith th e p a r t ie s in S an F r a n c i s c o . M e e tin g s c o n tin u e d
th ro u g h D e c e m b e r 20.

D e c e m b e r 2 8 __________ T h e b o a r d re c o n v e n e d m e e tin g s w ith th e p a r t i e s in W a s h in g to n , D . C .
D e s p ite th e b o a r d ’s p r o p o s a l fo r s o lv in g th e u n io n sh o p is s u e , n e g o ­
tia tio n s r e m a in e d d e a d lo c k e d . T h e b o a r d te r m in a t e d m e d ia tio n e f f o r ts
a n d b e g a n w o rk in g on its r e p o r t to th e P r e s id e n t.
J a n u a r y 2, 1 9 6 3 _______ T h e b o a rd r e p o r t e d to th e P r e s i d e n t th a t its e f f o r ts to h e a d o ff a
J a n u a r y 15 s tr i k e h a d c o lla p s e d b e c a u s e o f m a n a g e m e n t's r e s i s t a n c e
to th e u n io n d e m a n d f o r a u n io n sh o p . T h e b o a r d r e c o m m e n d e d th a t
th e c o m p a n y r e c o n s id e r its p o s itio n on th e u n io n s e c u r i ty i s s u e , a n d
th a t th e p a r t ie s n e g o tia te a n a d d itio n a l p r o v is io n fo r u n io n s e c u r i ty
o v e r a n d a b o v e th e p r e s e n t m a in te n a n c e o f m e m b e r s h ip c la u s e . T h e
b o a r d a ls o r e c o m m e n d e d th a t th e w ag e is s u e b e s e ttle d in c o n fo rm a n c e
w ith th e c o m p a n y 's o f f e r .
J a n u a r y 10

T h e p a r t ie s m e t in W a s h in g to n , D . C . , w ith a p a n e l o f F e d e r a l m e d i­
a t o r s . T h e c o m p a n y p r e s e n te d th e p a n e l w ith a n ew s e t of p r o p o s a ls
w h ic h d if f e r e d in s e v e r a l im p o r ta n t r e s p e c t s f r o m th o s e p r e s e n te d in
A u g u s t 1962. In te n s iv e m e d ia tio n e f f o r ts c o n tin u e d th ro u g h J a n u a r y 18.

J a n u a r y 15

W illia m E . S im k in , D ir e c t o r of th e F M C S , a n n o u n c e d th a t c o n s id e r a b le
p r o g r e s s h a d b e e n m a d e in r e c e n t n e g o tia tio n s a n d th a t th e u n io n h a d
a g r e e d to h is r e q u e s t to p o s tp o n e a n y s t r i k e a c tio n , a t l e a s t u n til
m id n ig h t J a n u a r y 18.

J a n u a r y 19

T h e F M C S D ir e c to r a n n o u n c e d th a t th e u n io n h a d f u r t h e r p o s tp o n e d a
s t r i k e p e n d in g r e s u l t s of b a llo tin g o n th e c o m p a n y 's la t e s t o f f e r .

J a n u a r y 22 _____________ T h e c o m p a n y r e v i s e d its f in a l o ffe r to th e u n io n , a m e n d in g a p o r tio n
of its p r o p o s a l o n th e k e y " p e r f o r m a n c e a n a ly s is " is s u e , a n d re d u c in g
s e n io r ity r e q u ir e m e n ts fo r p u r p o s e s of r e c a l l f r o m la y o ff, b u t r e ­
je c tin g th e u n io n 's p r o p o s a l to a r b i t r a t e th e u n r e s o lv e d i s s u e s .
J a n u a r y 23 _____________ T h e u n io n r e je c te d th e c o m p a n y o ffe r a n d o r d e r e d a s t r i k e to b e g in
J a n u a r y 26.
P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y , s ta tin g th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e a t th e a e r o s p a c e
f i r m w o u ld b e a s e r i o u s t h r e a t to th e N a tio n 's d e fe n s e e f f o r t, im m e ­
d ia te ly in v o k e d th e T a f t - H a r tle y A c t a n d a p p o in te d a th r e e - m a n B o a rd
o f I n q u iry to in v e s tig a te th e d is p u te . B o a rd m e m b e r s w e re : B e n ja m in
A a r o n , D ir e c t o r o f th e I n s titu te of I n d u s tr i a l R e la tio n s a t th e U n i­
v e r s i t y o f C a lif o r n ia , c h a ir m a n ; L lo y d U lm a n , P r o f e s s o r o f E c o ­
n o m ic s a n d I n d u s tr i a l R e la tio n s a t th e U n iv e r s ity o f C a lif o r n ia , a n d
J . B . G illin g h a m , c h a ir m a n o f th e D e p a r tm e n t of E c o n o m ic s a t th e
U n iv e r s ity of W a s h in g to n .
S ee foo tnote




a t en d o f t a b l e .

54
23.

A e r o s p a c e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 1 9 6 2 —6 3 1— B o e i n g C o . v . I n t e r n a t i o n a l
A s s o c i a t i o n of M a c h i n i s t s ( A F L —
CIO)— C o n t i n u e d

J a n u a r y 2 5, 1963 _____ T h e B o a rd o f In q u iry r e p o r t e d to th e P r e s i d e n t . T h e r e p o r t s u m ­
m a r iz e d th e b a c k g ro u n d a n d p r e s e n t s ta tu s of th e d is p u te , a n d c o n ­
c lu d e d th a t a s tr i k e a p p e a r e d to b e im m in e n t.
P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y o r d e r e d th e J u s tic e D e p a r tm e n t to s e e k an in ju n c ­
tio n on th e g ro u n d s th a t th e n a tio n a l s a f e ty w o u ld b e e n d a n g e re d by a
s t r i k e . U .S . D i s t r i c t J u d g e W illia m J . L in d b e r g , S e a ttle , W a s h .,
g r a n te d a te m p o r a r y in ju n c tio n a n d o r d e r e d b o th s id e s to a p p e a r b e ­
f o r e h im on F e b r u a r y 1 to sh o w c a u s e w hy i t s h o u ld n o t b e m a d e
p e r m a n e n t fo r th e 8 0 -d a y p e r io d p r e s c r i b e d b y th e L a b o r M a n a g e m e n t
R e la tio n s ( T a f t- H a r tle y ) A c t.
F e b ru a ry 1

J u d g e L in d b e rg e x te n d e d th e in ju n c tio n to 80 d a y s , th u s p r o h ib itin g
a n y s tr i k e u n til A p r il 15.

F e b r u a r y 7 ____________ U .S . A tto rn e y B ro c k A d a m s jo in e d a tto r n e y s f o r th e u n io n in
J u d g e L in d b e rg to a d d la n g u a g e to th e 8 0 -d a y in ju n c tio n to
th a t a ll p r o v is io n s of th e l a s t u n io n c o n tr a c t r e m a in in f o r c e
th e t e r m of th e in ju n c tio n . T h is w o u ld p e r p e tu a te th e c o n t r a c t 's
te n a n c e o f m e m b e r s h ip c la u s e .
F e b ru a ry 8

a s k in g
s p e c if y
d u rin g
m a in ­

J u d g e L in d b e rg d e n ie d th e r e q u e s t.

F e b r u a r y 9 ____________ U n io n a tto r n e y s m a ile d a n e m e r g e n c y a p p e a l to th e U .S . C o u rt o f
A p p e a ls in S an F r a n c is c o .
F e b r u a r y 15

T h e U .S . C o u rt of A p p e a ls a g r e e d to h e a r a r g u m e n ts th a t B o e in g w as
p r e s s u r i n g m a c h in is ts to r e s i g n f r o m th e i r u n io n . S u b s e q u e n tly , th e
c o u r t u p h e ld th e u n io n 's p o s itio n a n d th e m a in te n a n c e o f m e m b e r s h ip
c la u s e w a s r e ta in e d in th e e x p ir e d c o n tr a c t fo r th e p e r io d of th e
in ju n c tio n .
T h e c o m p a n y s e n t a te le g r a m to P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y re q u e s tin g th a t
h e s e e k c o n g r e s s io n a l a c tio n s i m i l a r to th a t ta k e n in th e r e c e n t lo n g ­
s h o r e c a s e , so th a t " th is d is p u te c a n b e s e tt le d ."

F e b r u a r y 1 9 ___________ N e g o tia tio n s r e s u m e d .
M a r c h 2 4 _______________ T h e B o a rd of I n q u iry re c o n v e n e d in S e a ttle a n d to o k w r itte n a n d o r a l
r e p o r t s of th e p o s itio n s of a ll p a r t i e s to th e d is p u te .
M a r c h 2 6 _______________ T h e B o a rd of In q u iry m a d e its fin a l r e p o r t to th e P r e s i d e n t , in d ic a tin g
th a t th e p a r t i e s r e m a in e d d e a d lo c k e d on th e m a j o r i s s u e s , d e s p ite
m e d ia tio n e f f o r ts in 11 s e s s io n s in S e a ttle a n d W a s h in g to n , D . C . , b e ­
tw e e n F e b r u a r y 19 a n d M a r c h 22.
A p r il 8
A p r il 15

S ee fo o tn o te




T h e N a tio n a l L a b o r R e la tio n s B o a rd a n n o u n c e d th a t u n o ff ic ia l r e tu r n s
o f b a llo tin g o n th e c o m p a n y 's fin a l o f f e r in d ic a te d th a t th e u n io n h a d
r e je c te d th e o ffe r.
T h e c o m p a n y a n d u n io n a n n o u n c e d a te n ta tiv e a g r e e m e n t on t e r m s o f
a n e w c o n tr a c t j u s t h o u r s b e f o r e th e e x p ir a tio n o f th e T a f t- H a r tle y
in ju n c tio n , th u s a v e r tin g a s t r i k e s e t fo r m id n ig h t. T h e u n io n u r g e d
its m e m b e r s h ip to a c c e p t th e p r o p o s a l, w h ic h in c lu d e d w a g e a n d fr in g e
b e n e fit i n c r e a s e s to ta lin g f r o m 2 2 - to 3 2 - c e n ts - a n - h o u r o v e r 3 y e a r s ,
p lu s a c o s t- o f - liv in g c la u s e , im p r o v e d jo b e v a lu a tio n p e r f o r m a n c e
a n a ly s is , a n d a m o d ifie d u n io n s e c u r i ty c la u s e w h ic h a llo w s n e w ly
h ir e d w o r k e r s to d e c id e a g a in s t u n io n m e m b e r s h ip , b u t s tip u la te s th a t
a t end of ta b le .

55
23.

A p r il 15, 1963—
C o n tin u e d ..

A e r o s p a c e I n d u s t r y D i s p u t e , 1 9 6 2 —6 3 1— B o e in g C o . v . I n t e r n a t i o n a l
A s s o c i a t i o n o f M a c h i n i s t s (A F L r-C IO )— C o n t i n u e d

b o th th e u n io n a n d th e c o m p a n y m u s t b e n o tifie d of th is d e c is io n in
w ritin g d u rin g th e e m p lo y e e 's " p e r io d o f e l e c tio n ," d e fin e d a s th e
10 -d a y p e r io d fo llo w in g th e e m p lo y e e 's in it ia l 30 d a y s of e m p lo y m e n t.
In d iv id u a ls w ho fa il to p ro v id e s u c h n o tic e a r e r e q u ir e d to jo in th e
u n io n w ith in 20 d a y s a f te r th e e x p ir a tio n of th e i r p e r io d of e le c tio n .

A p r il 1 7 ________________ In S e a ttle , th e u n io n v o te d to a c c e p t th e c o n tr a c t. H o w e v e r, m a c h in is ts
a t C a p e C a n a v e r a l, F la . , r e je c te d it, a n d in W ic h ita , K a n s . , a u n io n
m e e tin g a d jo u rn e d w ith o u t a v o te b e in g ta k e n . 3
A p r il 1 8 ________________ S e c r e t a r y o f L a b o r W . W illa r d W ir tz , a n d W illia m E . S im k in , D i­
r e c t o r of F M C S , u r g e d th e w o r k e r s in C a p e C a n a v e r a l to r e c o n s id e r
th e i r v o te .
A p r il 1 9 ________________ T h e W ic h ita u n io n v o te d to r e j e c t th e c o n tr a c t.
A p r il 22 ________________ U n io n o f f ic ia ls m e t w ith c o m p a n y n e g o tia to r s in S e a ttle .
A p r il 2 9 ________________ T h e u n io n a n n o u n c e d a tim e ta b le fo r p r o g r e s s i v e w a lk o u ts a t B o e in g
o p e r a tio n s a c r o s s th e N a tio n .
M ay 1

A f te r th e c o m p a n y m a d e s o m e n ew p r o p o s a ls , P r e s i d e n t K e n n e d y
w ir e d th e u n io n s ta tin g th a t a n y in te r r u p tio n of o p e r a tio n s a t B o e in g
f a c i lit ie s w o u ld h a v e a s e r io u s im p a c t on th e d e fe n s e p o s tu r e o f th e
N a tio n . H e u r g e d th e u n io n to w ith h o ld s t r i k e a c tio n a n d to s u b m it
th e n ew p r o p o s a ls to th e u n io n m e m b e r s h ip fo r a v o te .
A . J . H a y e s , I n te r n a tio n a l P r e s i d e n t o f IA M , n o tifie d th e a f fe c te d
lo c a ls th a t a ll s tr i k e s a n c tio n s w e r e b e in g te m p o r a r il y w ith d ra w n
p e n d in g r e s u l t s of th is v o te .

M ay 10

IA M m e m b e r s r a tif ie d th e c o n t r a c t , 4 en d in g 10 m o n th s of n e g o tia tio n s .

1 Although this dispute began during the summer of 1962, the national emergency provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act were not in­
voked until January 1963.
The Executive Order creating the Board of Inquiry directed this body to investigate the dispute at the
Boeing Company and its Vertol Divisions, as well as a dispute at the Rohr Corporation in Auburn, Wash. , the latter a supplier of
aircraft and missile components for the Boeing Company's commercial and military aircraft.
Unions involved in the disputes included,
in addition to the International Association of Machinists (AFL—CIO), the United Automobile Workers (AFL—CIO), the International
Union of United Weldors (Ind. ), the International Union of Operating Engineers (AFL—CIO) and the United Plant Guard Workers of
America (Ind. ).
2 Agency shop clauses were proposed for areas where the union shop is prohibited; contracts with this company had not included
union-shop clauses since 1948.
3 Following rejection of the contract, brief wildcat strikes occurred at several locations from mid-April to early May.
4 The 3-year contract provided for wage increases of 11 to 14 cents retroactive to September 16, 1962, 5“ 1 /2 to 9 cents addi­
tional effective both September 16, 1963, and September 16, 1964, and the equivalent of 4 cents an hour per employee for revisions
in wage rates; a cost-of-living escalator clause was established with maximum adjustments up to 3 cents each year; $2. 25 a month
pension payments for each year of future service (was $1. 75)— minimum $50 a month; relocation policies to be made uniform and
written into agreement, effective June 1, 1963; company assumed rate increase in company-paid hospital-medical-surgical insurance
for employees (previously paid $8. 65-$10. 50 a month, varying by location).
The union security proposal mentioned under date of
April 15 was also incorporated into the contract.




56
24.

L o n g s h o r i n g D i s p u t e on t h e A t l a n t i c a n d G u l f C o a s t s , 1 9 6 4 —6 5 —
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n ' s A s s o c i a t i o n ( A F L - CIO)
v . s h i p p in g a n d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s

J u n e 16, 1964

R e p r e s e n ta tiv e s of th e I n te r n a tio n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n ’s A s s o c ia tio n 's
(IL A ) A tla n tic C o a s t D i s t r i c t a n d its S o u th A tla n tic a n d G u lf C o a s t
D i s t r i c t m e t in N ew Y o rk C ity to d r a f t c o n tr a c t p r o p o s a ls fo r s u b ­
m is s i o n to th e N ew Y o rk S h ip p in g A s s o c ia tio n (N Y SA ). 1

June 25

R e p r e s e n ta tiv e s o f th e N Y SA m e t b r ie f ly w ith IL A n e g o tia to r s to
a c c e p t th e u n io n 's c o n tr a c t p r o p o s a ls p r e s e n te d b y IL A P r e s i d e n t
T h o m a s W. G le a s o n , w h ic h c a lle d f o r a 3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id in g ,
a m o n g o th e r th in g s , a w a g e in c r e a s e o f 35 c e n ts o v e r th e t e r m of
th e c o n tr a c t; a n 8 - h o u r d a ily g u a r a n te e ; an i n c r e a s e in p e n s io n s ; a n
a d d itio n a l h o lid a y e a c h y e a r , r a is in g th e n u m b e r to 12; a n d r e te n tio n
of th e 2 0 - m a n w o rk g a n g .
J a m e s J . R e y n o ld s , A s s is ta n t S e c r e t a r y o f L a b o r , p r e s e n te d c o p ie s
o f th e U. S. D e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r 's r e p o r t o n m a n p o w e r u tiliz a tio n
a n d jo b s e c u r i ty in th e P o r t of N ew Y o rk to 22 u n io n a n d m a n a g e ­
m e n t r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s . T h is r e p o r t , 1 of 10 p r e p a r e d b y th e D e ­
p a r t m e n t on A tla n tic a n d G u lf C o a s t p o r t s , w a s a u th o r iz e d b y th e
J a n u a r y 1963 " M e m o ra n d u m -o f S e ttle m e n t" w h ic h b r o u g h t th e 1962—63
lo n g s h o re s t r i k e to a c lo s e . 2

J u ly 1

J u ly 7

C o n tr a c t n e g o tia tio n s b e g a n in N ew Y o rk . A le x a n d e r C h o p in , C h a ir ­
m a n o f th e N ew Y o rk S h ip p in g A s s o c ia tio n , s o u g h t to b e g in th e s e s s io n
w ith a d is c u s s io n of th e L a b o r D e p a r tm e n t's fin d in g s , a c o u r s e of
a c tio n r e je c te d b y T h o m a s G le a s o n , w ho in s i s t e d on f i r s t r e c e iv in g
th e e m p lo y e r 's c o u n te r p r o p o s a ls . M a n a g e m e n t r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s a g r e e d
to p r e s e n t t h e i r p r o p o s a ls a t th e n e x t m e e tin g .

J u ly 14

T h e c o u n te r p r o p o s a ls p r e s e n te d b y th e N Y SA c a lle d f o r a 5 - y e a r
a g r e e m e n t w ith a w a g e - r e o p e n e r c la u s e a f t e r th e th ir d y e a r , a n d p r o ­
v id e d , a m o n g o th e r th in g s , fo r th e e lim in a tio n o f ro y a lty p a y m e n ts
on c o n ta in e r iz e d c a r g o . C o u n te r d e m a n d s to th e u n io n 's r e q u e s t fo r
w a g e i n c r e a s e s w e r e d e f e r r e d u n til d is c u s s io n s h a d b e e n h e ld on m a n ­
p o w e r u tiliz a tio n . A m a n a g e m e n t p r o p o s a l th a t a jo in t c o m m itte e b e
e s ta b lis h e d to d is c u s s th e l a t t e r w a s a c c e p te d by th e u n io n . T h is
jo in t c o m m itte e w a s s c h e d u le d to h o ld d a ily m e e tin g s d u r in g th e w e e k
o f J u ly 20, a n d w a s to r e p o r t its fin d in g s to th e fu ll n e g o tia tin g c o m ­
m itte e o n J u ly 27.

J u ly 29

F e d e r a l M e d ia to rs R o b e rt H , M o o re , J . A n d re w B u r k e , a n d H e r b e r t
S c h m e r tz r e c e iv e d a p r o g r e s s r e p o r t in s e p a r a te m e e tin g s w ith e a c h
o f th e p a r t i e s .
T h e p a r t i e s , in a c c o r d a n c e w ith th e J a n u a r y 1963 M e m o ra n d u m of
S e ttle m e n t, s e le c te d a n e u tr a l b o a r d to a s s i s t th e m in th e r e s o lu tio n
of t h e i r d if f e r e n c e s . A t t h e i r r e q u e s t, S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r W . W illa rd
W irtz a p p o in te d to th is b o a r d th e m e n w h o h a d p a r t ic ip a te d in th e
s e tt le m e n t o f th e 1962—63 lo n g s h o re s tr i k e : S e n a to r W a y n e M o r s e ,
c h a ir m a n ; T h e o d o re W . K h e e l, N ew Y o rk C ity a tto r n e y a n d a r b i t r a t o r ;
a n d P r o f . J a m e s A. H e a ly of th e H a r v a r d S c h o o l o f B u s in e s s A d m in is ­
tr a ti o n . D ue to th e p r e s s u r e of h is s e n a to r i a l c o m m itm e n ts , S e n a to r
M o rs e w a s u n a b le to s e r v e , a n d , a t th e p a r t i e s ' r e q u e s t, A s s is ta n t
L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s s e r v e d a s c h a ir m a n in h is p la c e . D a v id
S to w e , d i r e c t o r of th e L a b o r D e p a r tm e n t s tu d y , w a s a s s ig n e d a s a d ­
v i s o r to th e b o a rd .

J u ly 30

C o n tr a c t ta lk s o p e n e d in N ew O r le a n s .
S e e fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




57
24.

L o n g s h o r i n g D i s p u t e on t h e A t l a n t i c a n d G u l f C o a s t s , 1 9 6 4 —6
In tern atio n al L o n g sh o rem e n 's A s so c ia tio n (A F L —
CIO)
v . s h i p p in g a n d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s — C o n t i n u e d

A u g u s t 11, 1964

T h e n e u tr a l b o a r d h e ld s e p a r a te m e e tin g s w ith IL A a n d N Y SA r e p r e ­
s e n ta tiv e s . T h e b o a rd s u b s e q u e n tly m e t r e g u la r ly w ith th e p a r t i e s ,
b o th s e p a r a te ly a n d jo in tly , th ro u g h S e p te m b e r 30.

A u g u s t 18 __

D u rin g a 5 -h o u r m e e tin g w ith th e n e u tr a l b o a r d , th e u n io n e x p r e s s e d
a w illin g n e s s to c o n s id e r a re d u c tio n in g a n g s iz e in r e t u r n fo r a
g u a r a n te e d a n n u a l w a g e .

A u g u s t 29 ___

N e g o tia to r s fo r th e S o u th A tla n tic p o r ts o p e n e d 7 d a y s of c o n tr a c t
ta lk s in M ia m i.

S e p te m b e r 3

T h e n e u tr a l b o a r d a s k e d th e IL A n e g o tia tin g c o m m itte e to s u b m it its
p r o p o s a l f o r c h a n g e s in th e o p e r a tio n of th e h ir in g c e n te r s in th e
P o r t o f N ew Y o rk . W h ile th e u n io n h a ile d th is r e q u e s t a s a p o s s ib le
b r e a k in th e s ta l e m a t e , th e s iz e o f th e w o rk g an g r e m a in e d th e k e y
u n r e s o lv e d is s u e . T h e b o a r d s c h e d u le d a S e p te m b e r 8 m e e tin g w ith
th e W a te r f r o n t C o m m is s io n 3 to d is c u s s th e h ir in g c e n te r is s u e .

S e p te m b e r 16

C o n tr a c t n e g o tia tio n s b e g a n in G a lv e s to n fo r th e W e s t G u lf p o r ts .

S e p te m b e r 18 _

U n io n a n d m a n a g e m e n t r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s f o r th e S o u th A tla n tic p o r ts
r e s u m e d n e g o tia tio n s . M e e tin g s w e r e h e ld d a ily th ro u g h S e p te m b e r 30.

S e p te m b e r 21 _

T h e N Y SA o f f e r e d to s u b m it a ll u n r e s o lv e d is s u e s to fin a l a n d b in d ­
ing a r b i t r a t i o n .

S e p te m b e r 23 _

U n io n m e m b e r s in N o r th A tla n tic p o r ts v o te d to r e j e c t th e N Y S A 's
a r b i t r a t i o n p r o p o s a l.

S e p te m b e r 2 5 ___

T h e n e u tr a l b o a r d , in a c c o r d a n c e w ith it s m a n d a te , s u b m itte d to th e
p a r t i e s th e r e c o m m e n d a tio n s it h a d p r e p a r e d f o r r e s o lu tio n of th e
r e m a in in g is s u e s in th e P o r t o f N ew Y o rk . A t th e p a r t i e s ' r e q u e s t,
th e r e c o m m e n d a tio n s w e r e n o t c o n fin e d to th e jo b s e c u r i ty — m a n ­
p o w e r u tiliz a tio n p r o b l e m s , b u t c o v e r e d a ll a s p e c ts of th e d is p u te .
A m o n g th e r e c o m m e n d a tio n s w e r e a p h a s e d re d u c tio n in g an g s iz e
in r e t u r n f o r a g u a r a n te e d a n n u a l w a g e , g r e a t e r f le x ib ility in th e a s ­
s ig n m e n t of m e n , a n d th e e a r ly c u r t a i lm e n t o f n ew e n tr a n ts in to th e
lo n g s h o r e la b o r f o r c e .

S e p te m b e r 26—29

T h e n e u tr a l b o a rd c o n tin u e d its in te n s iv e e f f o r ts to h e lp th e p a r t ie s
a c h ie v e a s e tt le m e n t on th e b a s is of its re c o m m e n d a tio n s .

S e p te m b e r 2 9 __________ N e g o tia to r s in N ew O r le a n s r e p o r t e d th a t th e y h a d r e a c h e d " a g r e e ­
m e n t in p r in c ip le " on a l l n o n e c o n o m ic i s s u e s .
S e p te m b e r 3 0 _________ N e g o tia tio n s b ro k e o ff d u rin g th e a f te r n o o n fo llo w in g T h o m a s W.
G le a s o n 's a n n o u n c e m e n t th a t th e u n io n 's "n o c o n tr a c t— n o w o r k " p o lic y
w o u ld go in to e f fe c t a t m id n ig h t w h e n th e o ld a g r e e m e n t e x p ire d .
P r e s i d e n t J o h n s o n in v o k e d th e " n a tio n a l e m e r g e n c y " p r o v is io n s of th e
T a f t - H a r tle y A c t a n d a p p o in te d th e fo llo w in g th r e e - m a n B o a rd of In ­
q u ir y to in v e s tig a te th e d is p u te :4 H e r b e r t S c h m e r tz , W a s h in g to n a t ­
to r n e y a n d a r b i t r a t o r , c h a ir m a n ; J a m e s J . H e a ly ; a n d T h e o d o re W .
K h e e l. T h e l a t t e r tw o m e n h a d s e r v e d o n th e n e u tr a l b o a rd s e le c te d
in la te J u ly .
S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b l e .




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24.

L o n g s h o r i n g D i s p u t e on th e A t l a n t i c an d G u l f C o a s t s , 1 9 6 4 —65—
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n ' s A s s o c i a t i o n ( A F L —CIO)
v . s h i p p in g and s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s ----C o n t i n u e d

O c t o b e r 1, 19 6 4 --------- L o n g s h o r e m e n in p o r t s f r o m M a in e to T e x a s s to p p e d w o r k . T h e
B o a r d of I n q u i r y 's r e p o r t , s u m m a r i z i n g th e b a c k g r o u n d a n d p r e s e n t
s t a t u s of th e d i s p u t e , w a s s u b m i t t e d to th e P r e s i d e n t . T h e B o a r d
c o n c lu d e d : " T h e r i g i d i t y o f p o s i t i o n s o n m a n y of th e m a i n i s s u e s ,
p lu s th e c o m p l e x i t y of i t e m s c o n c e r n e d w ith th e r e l a t e d c r a f t s , m a k e s
th e p o s s i b i l i t y o f a n e a r l y s e t t l e m e n t m o s t r e m o t e . "
P r e s i d e n t J o h n s o n d i r e c t e d th e J u s t i c e D e p a r t m e n t to s e e k an i n j u n c ­
tio n on th e g r o u n d s t h a t a c o n tin u a ti o n o f th e s t r i k e w o u ld i m p e r i l
th e n a ti o n a l h e a l t h a n d s a f e ty . U. S. D i s t r i c t J u d g e F r e d e r i c k v a n
P e l t B r y a n s ig n e d a 1 0 - d a y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r a t 8 p. m . an d o r d e r e d
b o th s i d e s to a p p e a r b e f o r e h i m on O c t o b e r 8 to s h o w c a u s e w hy th e
in ju n c ti o n s h o u l d n o t b e e x te n d e d f o r th e 8 0 - d a y p e r i o d p r e s c r i b e d
b y th e T a f t - H a r t l e y A c t.
IL A o f f i c ia ls c o m p lie d w ith th e c o u r t o r d e r a n d n o tif ie d t h e i r m e m b e r s
to r e t u r n to w o r k .
O c t o b e r 8 -------------------- A d e c i s i o n on th e G o v e r n m e n t 's p e t i t i o n f o r a n in ju n c ti o n w a s d e f e r r e d
a f t e r th e IL A q u e s t i o n e d i t s l e g a l i t y . J u d g e I r v i n g B e n C o o p e r , w ho
h e a r d th e a r g u m e n t s , a s k e d u n io n a n d m a n a g e m e n t a t t o r n e y s to file
a d d iti o n a l p a p e r s b y 2:30 p . m . , O c t o b e r 9.
O c t o b e r 1 0 ------------------- J u d g e C o o p e r e x te n d e d th e in ju n c t i o n to 80 d a y s , th u s p r o h i b i t i n g a
r e s u m p t i o n of th e s t r i k e u n t il D e c e m b e r 20.
O c t o b e r 21—3 1 ------------- C o n t r a c t ta lk s in N e w Y o r k r e s u m e d o n O c t o b e r 21, c e n t e r i n g i n i ­
t i a l l y on th e d e m a n d s o f th e c a r p e n t e r s , c o o p e r s an d m a i n t e n a n c e m e n .
A t th e p a r t i e s ' r e q u e s t , th is m e e t i n g a n d th o s e h e ld s u b s e q u e n t l y
w e r e c o n d u c t e d by A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s , a s s i s t e d b y
D a v id S to w e .
N o v e m b e r 1 ---------------- A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s r e p o r t e d th a t th e n e g o t ia t io n s r e ­
m a i n e d s t a l e m a t e d o v e r th e s a m e m a n p o w e r u t i l i z a t i o n i s s u e s w h ic h
h a d s p a r k e d th e s t r i k e . A m a n a g e m e n t d e m a n d f o r g r e a t e r f l e x i ­
b ili ty in a s s i g n i n g w o r k to c a r g o c h e c k e r s w a s o n e of th e m a i n p o in ts
at issu e.
N o v e m b e r 5 ---------------- T h e S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r , c o n c e r n e d by th e d e a d lo c k e d n e g o t i a t i o n s ,
c a l l e d u n io n an d e m p l o y e r n e g o t ia t in g t e a m s to W a s h in g to n f o r s e p a ­
r a t e m e e t i n g s on N o v e m b e r 6 .
N o v e m b e r 9—25 ----------

F r e q u e n t m e e t i n g s , b o th jo i n t a n d s e p a r a t e , w e r e h e ld u n d e r th e d i ­
r e c t i o n of A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s a n d D a v id S to w e .

N o v e m b e r 2 0 --------------

T h e IL A p e t i t i o n e d th e
r a t e l y on th e e m p l o y e r s '
g io n a l d i r e c t o r , d e n ie d
sch ed uled for D e c e m b e r

N L R B to a llo w it s s i x c r a f t s to v o te s e p a ­
" f in a l" o f f e r . Iv a n C. M c L e o d , N L R B r e ­
th is r e q u e s t o n N o v e m b e r 25. V o tin g w a s
10—15.

N o v e m b e r 2 4 ------------- A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s s u g g e s t e d th a t th e p a r t i e s a c c e p t
a 1 - y e a r c o n t r a c t on w a g e s a n d f r i n g e b e n e f i ts w h ile th e y c o n tin u e d
to n e g o t i a t e th e u n r e s o l v e d m a n p o w e r i s s u e s . T h is a p p r o a c h w a s
a c c e p t a b l e to th e u n io n , b u t w a s r e j e c t e d by m a n a g e m e n t .
L a b o r a n d m a n a g e m e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s in N e w O r l e a n s m e t f o r t h e i r
f i r s t ta lk s s i n c e S e p t e m b e r 30.




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24.

L o n g s h o r i n g D i s p u t e on th e A t l a n t i c an d G u l f C o a s t s , 1 9 8 4 —
65
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n ' s A s s o c i a t i o n (A F L ~ C I O )
v. s h i p p in g an d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s — C o n ti n u e d

N o v e m b e r 28, 1 9 8 4 —

T h e B o a r d of I n q u i r y h e a r d th e e m p l o y e r s ' " f in a l" o f f e r a t a 2 - h o u r
m e e t i n g w ith u n io n an d m a n a g e m e n t o f f i c i a l s .

N o v e m b e r 3 0 --------------

T h e B o a r d of I n q u i r y , in its s e c o n d r e p o r t to th e P r e s i d e n t , s t a t e d
th at c o n tra c t te r m s fo r th re e c ra ft g ro up s had b een a g re e d upon, but
t h a t a n i m p a s s e h a d b e e n r e a c h e d in d i s c u s s i o n s on th e w o r k a s s i g n ­
m e n t s o f c l e r k s , c h e c k e r s , an d t e r m i n a l l a b o r . T h e B o a r d r e p o r t e d
th a t th e p a r t i e s h a d a f f i r m e d t h e i r " w i l l i n g n e s s to e n g a g e in n e g o t i a ­
tio n s a s e x t e n s i v e l y a s n e c e s s a r y to u s e a n y a n d a ll o p p o r t u n i t i e s to
a c h i e v e a s e t t l e m e n t p r i o r to th e e x p i r a t i o n of th e in ju n c tio n . "

D e c e m b e r 6 ---------------- N e g o tia tio n s f o r th e S o u th A tl a n tic p o r t s w e r e r e s u m e d in M ia m i; t a lk s
c o n tin u e d th r o u g h D e c e m b e r 12.
D e c e m b e r 9 ---------------- T h e IL A e n t e r e d in to a m e m o r a n d u m of u n d e r s t a n d i n g w ith o f f i c ia ls
of th e B r o o k ly n A r m y T e r m i n a l , s ta t in g t h a t m i l i t a r y c a r g o w o u ld b e
h a n d l e d s h o u ld th e u n io n s t r i k e a t th e e x p i r a t i o n of th e in ju n c ti o n .
A lth o u g h th e u n io n h a s t r a d i t i o n a l l y fo llo w e d a p o l ic y of h a n d lin g
m i l i t a r y c a r g o e s , it r e p o r t e d l y h a d n e v e r b e f o r e b o u n d i t s e l f to do
s o by a w r i t t e n a g r e e m e n t .
D e c e m b e r 1 8 --------------

E m p l o y e r a n d u n io n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a n n o u n c e d th a t te n t a t i v e a g r e e ­
m e n t h a d b e e n r e a c h e d o n a 4 - y e a r c o n t r a c t f o r th e P o r t of N ew Y o r k .
In c lu d e d in th e a g r e e m e n t , w h ic h p r o v i d e d an 8 0 - c e n t w a g e - f r i n g e
p a c k a g e , w e r e p r o v i s i o n s f o r a p h a s e d r e d u c t i o n in g an g s i z e an d
a g u a r a n t e e d a n n u a l w a g e . V o tin g on r a t i f i c a t i o n of th e a g r e e m e n t
w a s s c h e d u l e d f o r J a n u a r y 8 , 1985.
IL A o f f i c ia ls in a l l b u t th e W e s t G u lf p o r t s a g r e e d to e x te n d c o n ­
t r a c t t a lk s th r o u g h J a n u a r y 10; in th e W e s t G u lf, t a lk s w e r e c o n ­
tin u e d on a d a y - t o - d a y b a s i s o n ly .

D e c e m b e r 20

T h e 8 0 - d a y in ju n c ti o n e x p i r e d a t 8 p . m .

D ecem ber

L o n g s h o r e m e n a t m o r e th a n h a lf of th e p i e r s in th e P o r t of N ew Y o r k
w a lk e d off t h e i r j o b s , p r o m p t i n g u n io n o f f i c ia ls to u n d e r t a k e a c a m ­
p a ig n to a d v i s e th e m e m b e r s h i p of th e m e r i t s o f th e n ew a g r e e m e n t .
D u r in g th e w e e k w h ic h fo llo w e d , b r i e f s p o r a d i c w a l k o u t s a l s o o c c u r r e d
a t th e p o r t s of B a l t i m o r e , B o s to n , G a l v e s t o n , an d H o u s to n .

21

D e c e m b e r 22

N e g o tia tio n s f o r th e W e s t G u lf p o r t s w e r e r e s u m e d u n d e r th e d i r e c ­
tio n of A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s . M e d i a ti v e a s s i s t a n c e
w a s s u b s e q u e n t l y p r o v i d e d by D a v id S to w e an d A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e ­
t a r y R e y n o ld s in t a l k s h e ld in G a l v e s t o n d u r in g D e c e m b e r 23—24,
D e c e m b e r 28—31, a n d J a n u a r y 5—10. A m o n g th e h o s t of u n r e s o l v e d
i s s u e s w e r e th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t of a m i n i m u m g an g s i z e , th e m o n e t a r y
s i z e of th e a g r e e m e n t , an d th e r e t r o a c t i v i t y of th e a g r e e m e n t .

J a n u a r y 8 , 1985

L o n g s h o r e m e n in th e P o r t of N e w Y o r k v o te d d o w n th e a g r e e m e n t
r e a c h e d on D e c e m b e r 18. T h o m a s W. G l e a s o n , IL A p r e s i d e n t , o r d e r e d
a s t r i k e to b e g in a t 12:01 a. m . on J a n u a r y 11.

J a n u a r y 10

S t e a m s h i p o p e r a t o r s a p p e a le d to P r e s i d e n t J o h n s o n th r o u g h A s s i s t a n t
L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s to s e e k l e g i s l a t i o n f o r c in g th e IL A to c o m ­
p u lso ry a rb itra tio n .




60
24.

Jan uary

11,

L o n g s h o r i n g D i s p u t e on th e A t l a n t i c a n d G u l f C o a s t s , 1 9 6 4 —
65—
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n ' s A s s o c i a t i o n (A F L ~ C I O )
v . s h i p p in g and s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s — C o n t i n u e d

1965 ------

L o n g s h o r e m e n f r o m M a in e to T e x a s r e s u m e d th e s t r i k e . 5 U n io n o f ­
f i c i a l s in N ew Y o r k b e g a n a c a m p a i g n to e x p la i n th e a d v a n ta g e s o f th e
r e j e c t e d a g r e e m e n t to th e m e m b e r s h i p .

J a n u a r y 1 2 ------------------- T h e N a t io n a l M a r i t i m e U n io n an d th e S e a f a r e r s ' I n t e r n a t i o n a l U n io n
n o tif ie d s t e a m s h i p c o m p a n i e s th a t th e y w o u ld h o n o r th e l o n g s h o r e ­
m e n 's p i c k e t l i n e s .
J a n u a r y 1 3 ------------------- IL A P r e s i d e n t G l e a s o n c a l l e d u p o n u n io n l e a d e r s a t p o r t s f r o m B o s to n
to G a l v e s t o n to r e s u m e n e g o t i a t i o n s o n l o c a l i s s u e s .
J a n u a r y 1 4 ------------------- C o n t r a c t n e g o t ia t io n s r e s u m e d in B a l t i m o r e .
J a n u a r y 1 5 ------------------- In G a l v e s t o n , D a v id S to w e p r o v i d e d m e d i a t i v e a s s i s t a n c e in d a il y n e g o ­
ti a t i o n s th r o u g h J a n u a r y 20, a n d f r o m J a n u a r y 22—31.
J a n u a r y 21 ------------------- L o n g s h o r e m e n in th e P o r t o f N e w Y o r k a p p r o v e d b y m o r e t h a n a
2 to 1 m argin., th e 4 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t th e y h a d p r e v i o u s l y r e j e c t e d ,6
b u t c o n tin u e d th e s t r i k e p e n d in g s e t t l e m e n t s in o t h e r p o r t s .
J a n u a r y 2 2 ------------------- T h e IL A lif te d it s e m b a r g o o n U . S . - f l a g p a s s e n g e r v e s s e l s a n d on
p e r i s h a b l e c a r g o e s in th e P o r t of N e w Y o r k .
J a n u a r y 2 4 ------------------- L o n g s h o r e m e n in B o s to n v o te d to a c c e p t th e t e r m s of th e m a s t e r c o n ­
t r a c t ; n e g o t ia t io n s c o n tin u e d o v e r l o c a l i s s u e s .
J a n u a r y 2 7 ------------------- B a l t i m o r e l o n g s h o r e m e n r e j e c t e d a n e w c o n t r a c t .
J a n u a r y 2 8 ------------------- T h e N e w Y o r k S h ip p in g A s s o c i a t i o n , in a t e l e g r a m m a d e p u b l i c , a p ­
p e a l e d to th e P r e s i d e n t to ta k e a c t i o n " to t e r m i n a t e th is s e n s e l e s s ,
s u i c i d a l a n d u n j u s t i f i e d s t r i k e a n d r e o p e n o u r p o r t s , p e n d in g c o n ­
g r e s s i o n a l a c ti o n t o w a r d s c o m p u l s o r y a r b i t r a t i o n . "
A s e t t l e m e n t w a s r e p o r t e d a t M o b i le , A l a b a m a .
2 9 ------------------- In N e w O r l e a n s , w h e r e A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s h a d
a id e d in n e g o t ia t io n s s i n c e J a n u a r y 16, l o n g s h o r e m e n r a t i f i e d a
4 -y e a r ag reem ent.
J a n u a r y 31 ------------------- A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o l d s , w ho h a d b e e n in G a l v e s t o n s i n c e
J a n u a r y 29, a n n o u n c e d th a t b a r g a i n i n g t a lk s f o r th e W e s t G u lf p o r t s
had co llap sed .
F e b r u a r y 1 ----------------- B a l t i m o r e l o n g s h o r e m e n v o te d to a c c e p t a r e v i s e d v e r s i o n of th e
a g r e e m e n t th e y h a d r e j e c t e d e a r l i e r .
P r e s i d e n t J o h n s o n , th r o u g h L a b o r S e c r e t a r y W i r t z , u r g e d l o n g s h o r e
l e a d e r s to e a s e th e i m p a c t o f th e s t r i k e b y s e n d i n g m e n b a c k to w o r k
a t p o r t s w h e r e a g r e e m e n t s h a d b e e n r e a c h e d . U n io n a c ti o n on th e
P r e s i d e n t ' s a p p e a l w a s d e f e r r e d p e n d in g th e o u t c o m e of n e g o t ia t io n s
in P h i l a d e l p h i a . A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s a r r i v e d in th e
l a t t e r p o r t w h e r e h e p r o v i d e d m e d i a t i v e a s s i s t a n c e th r o u g h F e b r u a r y 8 ,
w h e n a g r e e m e n t on th e l o n g s h o r e c o n t r a c t w a s r e a c h e d .

J an u ary

T h e IL A r e s c i n d e d its e x e m p ti o n o n p e r i s h a b l e s , s ta t in g th a t it a p ­
p lie d o n ly to s h ip s in th e h a r b o r a t th e t i m e it w a s o r d e r e d . N e g o ­
t i a t i o n s f o r th e S o u th A tl a n tic p o r t s r e s u m e d in M ia m i. D a v id S to w e
w a s in a t t e n d a n c e a t t h e s e ta lk s w h ic h c o n tin u e d t h r o u g h F e b r u a r y 6 .
S e e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .




61
24.

L o n g s h o r i n g D i s p u t e on th e A t l a n t i c a n d G u l f C o a s t s , 1 9 6 4 — 5 ---6
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n ' s A s s o c i a t i o n ( A F L —CIO)
v . s h i p p in g a n d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s — C o n ti n u e d

F e b r u a r y 2, 1 9 6 5 -------- T h e C o m m e r c e a n d I n d u s tr y A s s o c i a t i o n a p p e a le d to th e P r e s i d e n t
to in v o k e th e T a f t - H a r t l e y A c t a g a in . R a lp h C. G r o s s , e x e c u tiv e v i c e p r e s i d e n t of th e A s s o c i a t i o n , r e j e c t e d th e a r g u m e n t th a t th e a c t 's p r o ­
c e d u r e s h a d b e e n e x h a u s t e d , s ta t in g th a t e n t i r e l y n e w i s s u e s w e r e
n ow a t s t a k e .
F e b r u a r y 4 ------------------- In M o b ile , A la . , C i r c u i t C o u r t J u d g e W ill G. C a ffe y r u le d t h a t th e
l o c a l u n io n w a s le g a ll y o b l ig a te d to c a r r y o u t th e c o n t r a c t it h a d s ig n e d
w ith th e M o b ile S t e a m s h i p A s s o c i a t i o n , a n d o r d e r e d th e l o n g s h o r e m e n
to r e t u r n to t h e i r jo b s . O n F e b r u a r y 8 , fo llo w in g th e l o n g s h o r e m e n 's
f a i l u r e to r e t u r n to w o r k , J u d g e C a ffe y fin e d th e lo c a l $ 5 ,0 0 0 , a n d
s t a t e d th e p e n a l t y w o u ld b e i n c r e a s e d b y a n a d d iti o n a l $ 1 ,0 0 0 f o r e a c h
d a y th e w a lk o u t c o n tin u e d . O n F e b r u a r y 11, s o m e l o n g s h o r e m e n
beg an re p o rtin g fo r w ork.
IL A l o c a l 1814 in B r o o k ly n v o te d to r e t u r n to w o r k a s s o o n a s a g r e e ­
m e n t w a s r e a c h e d in th e P o r t of P h i l a d e l p h i a .
F e b r u a r y 5 ------------------ T h e N Y S A o n c e a g a in u r g e d th e P r e s i d e n t to a c t in o r d e r to g e t t r a d e
m o v i n g in t h o s e p o r t s w h e r e a g r e e m e n t s h a d b e e n r e a c h e d .
F e b r u a r y 9 ------------------- T h e N Y S A c h a r g e d th e IL A w ith v io la t io n of th e N a t io n a l L a b o r R e ­
la tio n s A c t b y t h e i r r e f u s a l to fu lf ill th e c o n t r a c t r a t i f i e d in J a n u a r y ;
s i m i l a r c h a r g e s w e r e f i le d in N ew O r l e a n s b y th e N ew O r l e a n s S t e a m ­
s h ip A s s o c i a t i o n .
A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s a r r i v e d in G a l v e s t o n w h e r e n e ­
g o t ia t io n s w e r e r e s u m e d th e fo llo w in g d ay .
F e b r u a r y 1 0 ----------------- P r e s i d e n t J o h n s o n a n n o u n c e d th e a p p o i n t m e n t of a t h r e e - m a n p a n e l to
m e e t in W a s h in g to n w ith c o m p a n y a n d u n io n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s f r o m
S o u th A tl a n t i c a n d W e s t G u lf p o r t s , a n d m a k e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s f o r
a f a i r a n d e q u ita b l e s e t t l e m e n t o f th e i s s u e s in d is p u te . P a n e l m e m ­
b e r s w e r e ; W. W i l l a r d W i r t z , S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r , c h a i r m a n ; J o h n T .
C o n n o r , S e c r e t a r y of C o m m e r c e ; a n d S e n a t o r W a y n e M o r s e of O r e g o n .
T h e p a n e l w a s to r e p o r t to th e P r e s i d e n t w h e t h e r its r e c o m m e n d a ­
tio n s h a d b e e n a c c e p t e d b y 1 2 m . (noon) o n F e b r u a r y 12. In a n n o u n c e ing th e p a n e l ' s a p p o i n t m e n t, th e P r e s i d e n t s t a t e d : " T h e i n j u r y to th e
e c o n o m y r e s u l t i n g f r o m th is s h u td o w n h a s r e a c h e d s t a g g e r i n g p r o ­
p o r t i o n s . C o n tin u a tio n of th is s t r i k e is t o ta lly u n j u s t i f i e d in th e
N o r th A tl a n tic a n d E a s t G ulf p o r t s w h e r e a g r e e m e n t h a s a l r e a d y
been re a c h e d ."
F e b r u a r y 1 1 ----------------- T h e p a n e l h e a r d r e p o r t s f r o m th e p a r t i e s on th e u n r e s o l v e d i s s u e s in
th e S o u th A tl a n t i c a n d W e s t G u lf p o r t s . T h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t of a m i n i ­
m u m g a n g s i z e w a s a k e y i s s u e in b o th a r e a s .




A 5 - d a y r e s t r a i n i n g o r d e r , r e q u e s t e d by th e N L R B , w a s s ig n e d in
N e w Y o r k b y F e d e r a l D i s t r i c t J u d g e S id n e y S u g a r m a n . A h e a r i n g on
th e e x t e n s i o n of th is o r d e r w a s s c h e d u l e d f o r F e b r u a r y 16. R e ­
s t r a i n i n g o r d e r s w e r e a l s o i s s u e d b y F e d e r a l J u d g e s in B a l t i m o r e
a n d N e w O r le a n s '.
F e d e r a l M e d i a t o r J o h n R. M u r r a y a n n o u n c e d th a t t e n t a t i v e s e t t l e ­
m e n t s h a d b e e n r e a c h e d w ith a ll lo c a ls in v o lv e d in th e s t r i k e in th e
P o r t of P h ila d e lp h ia.

62
24.

L o n g s h o r i n g D i s p u t e on th e A t l a n t i c a n d G u l f C o a s t s , 1 9 6 4 —6
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n ' s A s s o c i a t i o n ( A F L —CIO)
v . s h i p p in g a n d s t e v e d o r i n g c o m p a n i e s — C o n t i n u e d

F e b r u a r y 12, 1965 ___ T h e p a n e l p r e s e n t e d it s f in d in g s a n d r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s f o r s e t t l e m e n t
in th e S o u th A tl a n tic a n d W e s t G u lf p o r t s . E m p l o y e r r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s
f r o m b o th a r e a s a c c e p t e d th e p a n e l 's r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s ; h o w e v e r , th e y
w e r e t u r n e d d o w n by u n io n l e a d e r s . F o llo w in g th e r e j e c t i o n of th e
p a n e l 's p r o p o s a l s , m e d i a t i o n s e s s i o n s b y S e c r e t a r y o f L a b o r W ir tz c o n ­
ti n u e d u n til a b o u t 5 p . m .
IL A P r e s i d e n t G l e a s o n a n n o u n c e d a t th e c o n c l u s i o n of th e p a n e l 's
h e a r i n g s th a t l o n g s h o r e m e n w o u ld b e o r d e r e d to r e t u r n to w o r k a t
S a . m . th e fo llo w in g d a y in t h o s e p o r t s w h e r e a g r e e m e n t s h a d b e e n
r e a c h e d . H e s t a t e d , h o w e v e r , th a t th e IL A w o u ld n o t w o r k a n y d i ­
v e r t e d s h ip s o r c a r g o e s in t h e s e p o r t s .
F e b r u a r y 1 3 ___________ W o r k r e s u m e d in th e " c o n t r a c t - s e t t l e d " p o r t s .
F e b r u a r y 16

N e g o tia tio n s u n d e r th e d i r e c t i o n of A s s i s t a n t L a b o r S e c r e t a r y R e y n o ld s
w e r e r e s u m e d in G a l v e s t o n a n d c o n tin u e d th r o u g h M a r c h 6 .
F e d e r a l M e d i a t o r E . S. J a c k s o n c o n d u c t e d a b a r g a i n i n g s e s s i o n in
H a m p to n R o a d s , V a. , th e f i r s t s in c e a n i m p a s s e h a d b e e n r e a c h e d on
F e b r u a r y 9 o v e r th e t e r m i n o l o g y of tw o s e c t i o n s of th e c o n t r a c t .

F e b r u a r y 17

N e g o tia tio n s u n d e r th e d i r e c t i o n of D a v id S to w e w e r e r e s u m e d in
M i a m i . S to w e p a r t i c i p a t e d in t h e s e ta l k s th r o u g h F e b r u a r y 22, a s
w e ll a s f r o m F e b r u a r y 25 to M a r c h 3, a n d on M a r c h 5.

F e b r u a r y 1 8 ___________ L o n g s h o r e m e n in N o r f o l k a n d H a m p to n R o a d s , V a. , a p p r o v e d t h e i r
a g r e e m e n t a n d r e t u r n e d to w o r k on th e fo llo w in g d a y .

F e b r u a r y 2 7 ___________ N e g o t i a t o r s in G a l v e s t o n r e a c h e d a g r e e m e n t o n a 4 - y e a r c o n t r a c t f o r
l o n g s h o r e m e n in W e s t G u lf p o r t s w h ic h i n c l u d e d a m i n i m u m g an g
c l a u s e . A v o te on th is a g r e e m e n t w a s d e f e r r e d p e n d in g a s e t t l e ­
m e n t in th e S o u th A t l a n tic p o r t s . N e g o t i a t i o n s on a n a g r e e m e n t f o r
c l e r k a n d c h e c k e r s c o n tin u e d in G a l v e s t o n .
M a r c h 5 ________________ F e d e r a l M e d i a t o r W il lia m A . M c A l i s t e r a n n o u n c e d in M i a m i th a t a n
a g r e e m e n t f o r th e S o u th A tl a n t i c p o r t s h a d b e e n r e a c h e d , a n d t h a t a
v o te w a s s c h e d u l e d f o r 8 a . m . th e fo llo w in g d a y . T h is a g r e e m e n t
a l s o c o n ta i n e d a m i n i m u m g a n g - s i z e c l a u s e .
A g r e e m e n t w a s r e a c h e d in G a l v e s t o n on a n ew c o n t r a c t f o r c l e r k s
and ch eck ers.
M a r c h 6 ________________ L o n g s h o r e m e n in m o s t S o u th A tl a n t i c a n d W e s t G u lf p o r t s v o te d on
t h e i r a g r e e m e n t s a n d b e g a n r e t u r n i n g to w o r k .
M arch 8

A f t e r w o r k i n g o v e r th e w e e k e n d , l o n g s h o r e m e n in M i a m i a n d P o r t
E v e r g l a d e s , F l a . , r e f u s e d to a c c e p t th e n e w c o n t r a c t a n d w a lk e d off
th e ir jo b s.

M a r c h 12

L o n g s h o r e m e n in P o r t E v e r g l a d e s v o te d to r e t u r n to w o r k .

M a r c h 13

W o r k w a s r e s u m e d in M i a m i , fo llo w in g r a t i f i c a t i o n o f th e p r e v i o u s l y
re je c te d ag re e m e n t.

S e e f o o t n o t e s on n e x t p a g e .




63
F o o t n o te s
1 The New York Shipping Association is authorized to bargain for employer associations in the North Atlantic area with respect
to wages, hours, employer contributions to the welfare and pension funds, and the term of the agreement. Settlements on these
issues, generally referred to as the Master Contract, are then incorporated into local agreements in these ports.
Negotiations on
working conditions and other matters are conducted on the local level.
In the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast ports, there are several employer associations and groupings, with separate negotiations
being conducted in M iam i, Mobile, New Orleans, and Galveston.
Negotiations in these ports are influenced by the New York settle­
ment, but there is a general tendency to follow the New Orleans agreement on economic issues.
2 Reports were subsequently issued for the following ports: Baltimore, Boston, Charleston, Galveston, Houston, Jacksonville,
Mobile, New Orleans, and Philadelphia.
* The hiring of longshoremen in the Port of New York is supervised by the Waterfront Commission of New York Harbor, a
bistate regulatory agency created in 1953.
4 This marked the 24th time since 1947 that such action was deemed necessary, and the 6th time that Atlantic Coast longshore­
men were involved in a "national emergency" dispute.
^ This marked the 5th time that a longshore strike had occurred or been resumed after an 8 0 -day "coolin g-off" period.
6 The agreement provided for a 1 0 - cent-an-hour wage increase, retroactive to October 1, and additional increases of 10 cents
on October 1, 1965, and 8 cents on October 1, 1966, and 1967.
Three additional paid holidays, bringing the total to 12, and a
4th week of vacation for most workers with 12 years of service were provided.
The present 20-m an general cargo gang is to be reduced to 18 men on April 1 ,1 9 6 6 , and to 17 men on October 1, 1967.
Effective April 1, 1966, all employees with 700 hours' employment in the previous year are to be guaranteed 1 ,6 0 0 hours of work or
pay annually if they make themselves available for work.
Employer payments to the pension fund are to be increased to 47 cents per man-hour, from 23 cents, on October 1, 1965.
Pension
benefits were increased and a monthly benefit was established for widows of men with 25 years of service who die before retirement.







Appendix A

L a b o r M a n a g e m e n t R e l a t i o n s A c t, 1947, a s A m e n d e d
b y P u b l i c L a w 8 6 - 2 5 7 , 1959
N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c i e s
S e c . 206. W h e n e v e r in th e o p in io n of th e P r e s i d e n t of th e U n ite d S t a t e s , a t h r e a t ­
e n e d o r a c t u a l s t r i k e o r lo c k o u t a f f e c tin g an e n t i r e i n d u s t r y o r a s u b s t a n t i a l p a r t t h e r e o f
e n g a g e d in t r a d e , c o m m e r c e , t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , t r a n s m i s s i o n , o r c o m m u n i c a t i o n a m o n g th e
s e v e r a l S ta t e s o r w ith f o r e i g n n a ti o n s , o r e n g a g e d in th e p r o d u c t i o n of g o o d s fo r c o m m e r c e ,
w ill, if p e r m i t t e d to o c c u r o r to c o n tin u e , i m p e r i l th e n a ti o n a l h e a l t h o r s a f e ty , h e m a y
a p p o in t a b o a r d of i n q u i r y to i n q u i r e in to th e i s s u e s in v o lv e d in th e d is p u te a n d to m a k e a
w r i t t e n r e p o r t to h i m w it h in s u c h t i m e a s he s h a ll p r e s c r i b e . S u c h r e p o r t s h a ll in c lu d e a
s t a t e m e n t of th e f a c t s w ith r e s p e c t to th e d is p u te , in c lu d in g e a c h p a r t y ' s s t a t e m e n t of its
p o s i t i o n b u t s h a ll n o t c o n ta i n a n y r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s . T h e P r e s i d e n t s h a l l file a c o p y of s u c h
r e p o r t w ith th e S e r v i c e a n d s h a ll m a k e its c o n te n ts a v a i l a b l e to th e p u b lic .
S ec . 207. (a) A b o a r d of in q u i r y s h a l l b e c o m p o s e d of a c h a i r m a n a n d s u c h o th e r
m e m b e r s a s th e P r e s i d e n t s h a l l d e t e r m i n e , a n d s h a ll h a v e p o w e r to s it a n d a c t in a n y p la c e
w it h in th e U n ite d S ta te s a n d to c o n d u c t s u c h h e a r i n g s w i t h e r in p u b lic o r in p r i v a t e , a s it
m a y d e e m n e c e s s a r y o r p r o p e r , to a s c e r t a i n th e f a c t s w ith r e s p e c t to th e c a u s e s a n d c i r ­
c u m s t a n c e s of th e d is p u te .
(b) M e m b e r s of a b o a r d of i n q u i r y s h a ll r e c e i v e c o m p e n s a t i o n a t th e r a t e of $ 5 0 fo r
e a c h d a y a c t u a l l y s p e n t b y t h e m in th e w o r k of th e b o a r d , t o g e t h e r w ith n e c e s s a r y t r a v e l
and s u b siste n c e e x p en se s.
(c) F o r th e p u r p o s e of a n y h e a r i n g o r in q u i r y c o n d u c t e d b y a n y b o a r d a p p o in te d
u n d e r th is ti t l e , th e p r o v i s i o n s of s e c t i o n s 9 a n d 10 ( r e l a t i n g to th e a t t e n d a n c e of w i t n e s s e s
a n d th e p r o d u c t i o n of b o o k s , p a p e r s , a n d d o c u m e n t s ) of th e F e d e r a l T r a d e C o m m i s s i o n A c t
of S e p t e m b e r 16, 1914, a s a m e n d e d (U .S .C . 19, t i tle 15, s e c s . 49 a n d 50, a s a m e n d e d ) , a r e
h e r e b y m a d e a p p lic a b le to th e p o w e r s a n d d u t ie s of s u c h b o a r d ,
S ec . 208. (a) U p o n r e c e i v i n g a r e p o r t f r o m a b o a r d of i n q u i r y , th e P r e s i d e n t m a y
d i r e c t th e A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l to p e t i t i o n a n y d i s t r i c t c o u r t of th e U n ite d S ta t e s h a v in g j u r i s ­
d ic t io n of th e p a r t i e s to e n jo in s u c h s t r i k e o r lo c k o u t o r th e c o n tin u in g t h e r e o f , a n d if th e
c o u r t fin d s th a t s u c h t h r e a t e n e d o r a c t u a l s t r i k e o r lo c k o u t---(i) a f f e c ts a n e n t i r e i n d u s t r y o r a s u b s t a n t i a l p a r t t h e r e o f e n g a g e d in t r a d e , c o m ­
m e r c e , t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , t r a n s m i s s i o n , o r c o m m u n i c a t i o n a m o n g th e s e v e r a l S ta te s o r
w ith f o r e i g n n a ti o n s , o r e n g a g e d in th e p r o d u c t i o n of g o o d s fo r c o m m e r c e ; a n d
(ii) if p e r m i t t e d to o c c u r o r to c o n tin u e , w ill i m p e r i l th e n a t i o n a l h e a l t h o r s a f e ty ,
it s h a l l h a v e j u r i s d i c t i o n to e n jo in a n y s u c h s t r i k e o r lo c k o u t, o r th e c o n tin u in g
t h e r e o f , a n d to m a k e s u c h o th e r o r d e r s a s m a y b e a p p r o p r i a t e .
(b) In a n y c a s e , th e p r o v i s i o n s of th e A c t of M a r c h 23, 1932, e n t i t l e d " A n A c t to
a m e n d th e J u d i c i a l C od e a n d to d e fin e a n d l i m i t th e j u r i s d i c t i o n of c o u r t s s itt in g in e q u ity ,
a n d f o r o th e r p u r p o s e s , " s h a l l n o t be a p p lic a b le .
(c) T h e o r d e r o r o r d e r s of th e c o u r t s h a ll b e s u b j e c t to r e v i e w b y th e a p p r o p r i a t e
c i r c u i t c o u r t of a p p e a l s a n d b y th e S u p r e m e C o u r t u p o n w r i t of c e r t i o r a r i o r c e r t i f i c a t i o n a s
p r o v i d e d in s e c t i o n s 239 a n d 240 of th e J u d i c i a l C o d e , a s a m e n d e d ( U .S .C ., ti t l e 29, s e c s .
346 a n d 347).
S e c . 209. (a) W h e n e v e r a d i s t r i c t c o u r t h a s i s s u e d a n o r d e r u n d e r s e c t i o n 208 e n ­
jo in in g a c t s o r p r a c t i c e s w h ic h i m p e r i l o r t h r e a t e n to i m p e r i l th e n a ti o n a l h e a l t h o r s a f e ty ,
it s h a ll b e th e d u ty of th e p a r t i e s to th e l a b o r d is p u te g iv in g r i s e to s u c h o r d e r to m a k e e v e r y
e f f o r t to a d j u s t a n d s e t t l e t h e i r d i f f e r e n c e s , w ith th e a s s i s t a n c e of th e S e r v i c e c r e a t e d b y
th is A c t. N e i t h e r p a r t y s h a ll be u n d e r a n y d u ty to a c c e p t , in w h o le o r in p a r t , a n y p r o p o s a l
of s e t t l e m e n t m a d e b y th e S e r v i c e .




65

66

(b) U p o n th e i s s u a n c e of s u c h o r d e r , th e P r e s i d e n t s h a l l r e c o n v e n e th e b o a r d of
in q u i r y w h i c h h a s p r e v i o u s l y r e p o r t e d w it h r e s p e c t to th e d is p u te . A t th e en d of a 6 0 - d a y
p e r i o d ( u n le s s th e d is p u te h a s b e e n s e t t l e d b y t h a t ti m e ) , th e b o a r d of in q u i r y s h a l l r e p o r t
to th e P r e s i d e n t th e c u r r e n t p o s i t i o n of th e p a r t i e s a n d th e e f f o r t s w h i c h h a v e b e e n m a d e fo r
s e t t l e m e n t a n d s h a l l in c lu d e a s t a t e m e n t b y e a c h p a r t y of its p o s i t i o n a n d a s t a t e m e n t of th e
e m p l o y e r ’s " l a s t o ffe r" of s e t t l e m e n t . T h e P r e s i d e n t s h a ll m a k e s u c h r e p o r t a v a i l a b l e to
th e p u b lic . T h e N a tio n a l L a b o r R e l a t i o n s B o a r d , w it h in th e s u c c e e d i n g 15 d a y s , s h a ll ta k e
a s e c r e t b a l l o t of th e e m p l o y e e s of e a c h e m p l o y e r in v o lv e d in th e d is p u te on th e q u e s t i o n of
w h e t h e r th e y w i s h to a c c e p t th e f in a l o ffe r of s e t t l e m e n t m a d e b y t h e i r e m p l o y e r a s s t a t e d
b y h im a n d s h a l l c e r t i f y th e r e s u l t s t h e r e o f to th e A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l w it h in 5 d a y s t h e r e a f t e r .
S e c . Z10. U po n th e c e r t i f i c a t i o n of th e r e s u l t s of s u c h b a l l o t o r u p o n a s e t t l e m e n t
b e in g r e a c h e d , w h i c h e v e r h a p p e n s s o o n e r , th e A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l s h a l l m o v e th e c o u r t to d i s ­
c h a r g e th e in ju n c tio n , w h i c h m o t i o n s h a l l th e n b e g r a n t e d a n d th e in ju n c ti o n d i s c h a r g e d . W h e n
s u c h m o tio n is g r a n t e d , th e P r e s i d e n t s h a l l s u b m i t to th e C o n g r e s s a fu ll a n d c o m p r e h e n s i v e
r e p o r t of th e p r o c e e d i n g s , in c lu d in g th e fin d in g s of th e b o a r d of i n q u i r y a n d th e b a ll o t ta k e n
b y th e N a t io n a l L a b o r R e l a t i o n s B o a r d , t o g e t h e r w it h s u c h r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s a s h e m a y s e e
fit to m a k e f o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n a n d a p p r o p r i a t e a c tio n .




Appendix B

S e l e c t e d B i b l i o g r a p h y on N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y D is p u te s
B e r n s t e i n , I r v i n g , E n a r s o n , H. L ., a n d F l e m i n g , R. W ., e d s . E m e r g e n c y D i s p u t e s a n d N a tio n a l
P o l i c y . H a r p e r a n d B r o s . , N ew Y o r k , 1955.
B e r n s t e i n , I r v i n g , a n d L o v e l l, H. G. " A r e C o a l S t r i k e s N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c i e s ? " , I n d u s t r i a l a n d
L a b o r R e l a t i o n s R e v ie w , A p r i l 1953.
C ox , A r c h i b a l d . L a w a n d th e N a t io n a l L a b o r P o l i c y . I n s t itu te of I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s , U n iv .
of C a l i f o r n i a , L o s A n g e l e s , I9 6 0 .
C r a w f o r d , R o b e r t C. " G o v e r n m e n t I n t e r v e n t i o n in E m e r g e n c y L a b o r D is p u te s in A to m ic
E n e r g y , " L a b o r L a w J o u r n a l , J u n e 1959.
C u lle n , D o n a ld E . " T h e T a f t - H a r t l e y A c t in N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y D i s p u t e s , " I n d u s t r i a l a n d
L a b o r R e l a ti o n s R e v ie w , O c t o b e r 1953.
D is h m a n , R o b e r t B . " T h e P u b l i c I n t e r e s t in E m e r g e n c y L a b o r D i s p u t e s , " A m e r i c a n P o l i t i c a l
S c i e n c e R e v ie w , D e c e m b e r 1951.
D u n lo p , J o h n T . " T h e S e t t l e m e n t of E m e r g e n c y D i s p u t e s , " P r o c e e d i n g s of F if t h A n n u a l
M e e tin g , I n d u s t r i a l R e l a ti o n s R e s e a r c h A s s o c i a t i o n , 1953.
F l e m i n g , R o b b e n W. E m e r g e n c y S t r i k e s a n d N a t io n a l P o l i c y . U n i v e r s i t y o f I llin o is B u l le tin ,
v o l . 57, N o. 7 6 , U r b a n a , I l lin o is , I9 6 0 .
G a r r e t t , S y l v e s t e r . " T h e E m e r g e n c y D is p u te P r o v i s i o n s of th e T a f t - H a r t l e y A c t," P r o c e e d i n g s
of T h i r d A n n u a l M e e t i n g , I n d u s t r i a l R e l a ti o n s R e s e a r c h A s s o c i a t i o n , 1951.
H o r l a c h e r , J o h n P . "A P o l i t i c a l S c i e n c e V ie w of N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y D i s p u t e s , " A n n a ls of
th e A m e r i c a n A c a d e m y of P o l i t i c a l a n d S o c ia l S c i e n c e , J a n u a r y 1961.
I n d u s t r i a l R e l a ti o n s C o u n s e l o r s .
N e w Y o r k , 1961.

E m e r g e n c y D is p u te s :

A N a t io n a l L a b o r P o l i c y P r o b l e m ,

J o h n s o n , D a v id B . " D is p u t e S e t t l e m e n t in A to m ic E n e r g y P l a n t s , " I n d u s t r i a l a n d L a b o r
R e l a ti o n s R e v i e w , O c t o b e r 1959.
J o n e s , J a m e s E . , J r . " T h e N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y D is p u te s P r o v i s i o n s of th e T a f t - H a r t l e y
A c t: A V ie w f r o m a L e g i s l a t i v e D r a f t s m a n ' s D e s k , " W e s t e r n R e s e r v e L a w R e v ie w ,
O c t o b e r 1965.
K e n n e d y , T h o m a s . " T h e H a n d lin g of E m e r g e n c y D i s p u t e s , " P r o c e e d i n g s of S e c o n d A n n u a l
M e e t i n g , I n d u s t r i a l R e l a ti o n s R e s e a r c h A s s o c i a t i o n , 1949.
M cD erm o tt, T. J.
M a r c h 1958.

" T e n Y e a r s of th e N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y P r o c e d u r e s , " L a b o r L a w J o u r n a l ,

R h e m u s , C h a r l e s M. " T h e O p e r a t i o n of th e N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y P r o v i s i o n s of th e L a b o r
M a n a g e m e n t R e l a ti o n s A c t o f 1947, " Y a le L a w J o u r n a l , J u n e 1953.
R ohm an, M u rra y M.
J a n u a r y 1962.

" N a tio n a l E m e r g e n c y D is p u te s a n d S e i z u r e , " L a b o r L a w J o u r n a l ,

S lo v e n k o , R a lp h , ed. S y m p o s i u m on L a b o r R e l a t i o n s , C l a i t o r 's B o o k s t o r e , B a to n R o u g e , 1961.




67

68

T a y l o r , G e o r g e W. " T h e A d e q u a c y of T a f t - H a r t l e y in P u b l i c E m e r g e n c y D i s p u t e s , " A n n a ls
of th e A m e r i c a n A c a d e m y of P o l i t i c a l a n d S o c ia l S c i e n c e , J a n u a r y 1961.
T e l l e r , L u d w ig . " W h a t S h o u ld B e D o n e A b o u t E m e r g e n c y S t r i k e s ? , " L a b o r L a w J o u r n a l ,
J a n u a r y 1950.
U. S. S e n a t e , C o m m i t t e e on L a b o r a n d P u b l i c W e l f a r e , N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y L a b o r D i s p u t e s
A c t , S e n a t e R e p o r t 2 07 3, 82d C o n g r e s s , 2d S e s s i o n , 1952.
------, E m e r g e n c y D is p u te s S e t t l e m e n t , S ta ff R e p o r t to th e S u b c o m m i t t e e on L a b o r a n d L a b o r
M a n a g e m e n t R e l a t i o n s , 82d C o n g r e s s , 2d S e s s i o n , 1952.
W a r r e n , E d g a r L . " T h i r t y - s i x Y e a r s of N a t io n a l E m e r g e n c y S t r i k e s , " I n d u s t r i a l a n d L a b o r
R e l a ti o n s R e v i e w , O c t o b e r 1951.




I S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1966 0 - 2 1 3 - 1 0 2

R e c e n t W ork S to p p a g e S tu d ie s
A n a l y s i s of W o rk S to p p a g e s , 1964 (B L S B u l le tin 1460,

1965), p r i c e 40 c e n t s .

A n a l y s i s of W o rk S to p p a g e s , 1963 (B L S B u l le tin 1420,

1964), p r i c e 35 c e n t s .

A n a l y s i s of W o rk S to p p a g e s , 1962 (B L S B u l le tin 1381,

1963), p r i c e 40 c e n t s .

A n a l y s i s o f W o rk S to p p a g e s , 1961 (B L S B u l le tin 1339,

1962), p r i c e 35 c e n t s .

A n a l y s i s of W o rk S to p p a g e s , I9 6 0 (B L S B u l le tin 1302,

1961), p r i c e 30 c e n t s .

T h e D i m e n s i o n s of M a jo r W o rk S to p p a g e s , 1947—59 (B L S B u l le tin 1298, 1961), p r i c e 30 c e n t
A n a l y s i s of W o rk S to p p a g e s , 1959 (B L S B u l le tin 1278, I9 6 0 ), p r i c e 40 c e n t s .
W o rk S t o p p a g e s : F i f t y S ta te s a n d th e D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b ia , 1927—62
(B L S R e p o r t 256, 1963), f r e e .
W o rk S to p p a g e s :

G o v e r n m e n t E m p l o y e e s , 1942—61 (B L S R e p o r t 247, 1963), f r e e .

W o rk S to p p a g e s : M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a s , 1952—62 (B L S R e p o r t 236, 1963), f r e e .
W o rk S to p p a g e s :

M e a t P r o d u c t s I n d u s t r y , 1927—60 (B L S R e p o r t 214, 1962), f r e e .

W o rk S to p p a g e s : E l e c t r i c a l M a c h i n e r y , E q u ip m e n t, an d S u p p lie s I n d u s t r y , 1927—60
(B L S R e p o r t 213, 1962), f r e e .
W o rk S to p p a g e s :

C o n t r a c t C o n s t r u c t i o n I n d u s t r y , 1927—60 (B L S R e p o r t 207, 1962), f r e e

W o rk S to p p a g e s :

B a s i c S te e l I n d u s t r y , 1901—60 (B L S R e p o r t 206, 1961), f r e e .

W o rk S to p p a g e s :

W a te r T r a n s p o r t a t i o n I n d u s t r y , 1927—59 (B L S R e p o r t 176, 1961), f r e e .

W o rk S to p p a g e s :

A i r c r a f t an d P a r t s I n d u s t r y , 1927—59 (B L S R e p o r t 175, 1961), f r e e .

W o r k S to p p a g e s : M o to r V e h ic le s a n d M o to r V e h ic le E q u ip m e n t I n d u s t r y , 1927—58
(B L S R e p o r t 148, 1959), f r e e .

(For a listing of other industrial relations studies, write for

A D i r e c t o r y of B L S S tu d ie s in I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s , J u ly 1954—65)