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UNITED STATES D EPARTM EN T OF LABOR
Frances Perkins, S e c re ta ry
B U R E A U OF L A B O R ST A T IS T IC S
Isador Lubin, C o m m is s io n e r (on leave)
A . F. Hinrichs, A c t in g C o m m is s io n e r

*

M on ey D isbursem ents o f W a g e
Earners and Clerical W o rk e rs in
T h irteen Sm all Cities

1933-35

By
F A IT H M . W IL LIAM S
and
G E R T R U D E SC H M ID T WEISS
o f the Bureau o f Labor Statistics

B u lletin

691

U N IT E D ST A T E S
G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G OFFICE
W A S H IN G T O N : 1942

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, Washington, D . C.




Price 20 cents

U N IT E D STA TE S D E P A R T M E N T OF LABO R
F

P

ran ces

e r k in s,

Secretary

+
B U R E A U OF L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S

I

s

ua
A . F.

H

i

,

L

Commissioner
d b

n

,

OF

Herman B. Byer, Construction and
Public Employment
J. M . Cutts, Wholesale Prices
W . Duane Evans, Productivity and
Technological Developments
Swen Kjaer, Industrial Accidents
John J. Mahaney, Machine Tabula­
tion
Robert J. Myers, Wage and Hour
Statistics
ii




o i

o

Acting Commissioner
r
i

Donald H. Davenport, Chief, Employirient and Occupational Outlook
Branch
Henry J. Fitzgerald, Chief, Business
Management Branch
Hugh S. Hanna, Chief, Editorial and
Research
C H IE F S

(

n

n r
c

l
h

Ary ness Joy, Chief, Prices and Cost
of Living Branch
N . Arnold Tolies, Chief, Working
Conditions and Industrial Relations
Branch
Sidney W . Wilcox, Chief Statistician

D I V IS IO N S

Florence Peterson, Industrial Rela­
tions
Charles F. Sharkey, Labor Law In­
formation
Boris Stern, Labor Information Service
Stella Stewart, Retail Prices
Lewis E. Talbert, Employment Sta­
tistics
Em m ett H. Welch, Occupational Out­
look
Faith M . Williams, Cost of Living

e
s

CONTENTS
Introduction:
Page
Cities studied______________________________________________________________
Cost of living in small cities compared with large cities________________
Expenditure patterns in large and small cities__________________________
Scope of the study___________________________ i ____________________________
Income level and money disbursements:
Order of expenditure at different income levels_________________________
Planes of living determined by family size as well as income__________
Changes in assets and liabilities__________________________________________
Expenditures for specified goods:
Automobiles_______________________________________________________________
Housing:
New Hampshire cities_______________________________________________
Marquette, Modesto, Reno_________________________________________
Fuel, light, and refrigeration_____________________________________________
Food________________________________________________________________________
Clothing------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Recreation_________________________________________________________________
Tabular Summary______________________________________________________________
Appendix A .— Notes on Tabular Summary__________________________________
B. — Selection of families to be interviewed____________________
C. — Field procedure_____________________________________________
D . — Analytical procedure________________________________________

1
2
3
6
7
8
9
12
14
17
17
19
23
24
27
143
158
164
166

T e x t Tables
T able

1.— Distribution of expenditures, 10 small New Hampshire cities,
and 4 large New England cities, families with incomes of
$1,200-$1,500, 1 year during the period19 33 -3 6_____________
2. — Average family income and expenditures in the $500-$900
and $1,800-$2,100 income classes, and percentage increase
with income, New Hampshire cities with population 10,00020,000, 1 year during the period 1 9 3 3 -3 5 _____________________
3. — Percentage of families paying life-insurance premiums, and
average payments, 1 year during theperiod 19 3 3 -3 5______
4. — Percentage of families owning automobiles, selected cities, 1
year during the period 19 33-36_______________________________
5. — Average expenditure for automobile operation and main­
tenance, for those owning automobiles, 1 year during the
period 1 9 33 -3 5_________________________________________________
6. — Average expenditures by home owners for taxes on owned
homes and for interest on mortgages, 1 year during the
period 19 33 -3 5_________________________________________________
7. — Average expenditure for food per food-expenditure unit, by
economic level, New Hampshire small cities, 1 year during
the period 1 9 33 -3 5_____________________________________________




h i

4

7
11
13

14

15

19

CONTENTS

IV

P
T

a

a

. — b Average expenditure e per person per week for different types
l 8

of
food, by economic level, 1 year during the period 1933-35,
New Hampshire small cities__________________ _______________
9.— Average expenditure per family and average expenditure per
person for clothing, persons of different age groups, 1 year
during the period 1933-35, NewHampshire small cities____
10.— Percentage of families owning and purchasing radios, and aver­
age expenditure per radio purchased, 1 year during the
period 19 33 -3 5---------------------------------------------------------------------------

21

24

25

Charts

C

h

1.— Housing andr automobile expenditures as a percentage of total
a
t
expenditures, New England cities of different size, 1 9 3 3 -3 6 2.— Percentage of families in dwellings with inside flush toilet,
running hot water, electric lights, and gas or electricity for
cooking, 1 9 3 3 -3 6 ________________________________________________

5

16

Tables in T abular Summary
T

a b l e

1.— Distribution of families, by economic level and income level___
2.— Description of families studied, by economic level, 3 groups of
New Hampshire cities_________________________________________
Occupation of chief earner.
Family type.
Nativity of homemaker.
Composition of household.
Earnings and income.
2a.— Description of families studied— Marquette, Modesto, and

29

R eno_______________________________________________________
2b.— Distribution of families, by nativity of homemaker, 10 New
Hampshire cities separately_______________________________
3. — Expenditures for groups of items, by econom ic level, 3 groups
of New Hampshire cities__________________________________
3a.— Expenditures for groups of items— M arquette, M odesto, and
R eno_______________________________________________________
3b.— Expenditures for groups of items, 10 New Hampshire cities
separately_________________________________________________
4. — Disposition of m oney received during schedule year not used
for current expenditure, and funds made available for
fam ily use from sources other than fam ily income, by
econom ic level, 3 groups of New Hampshire cities__________
4a.— Disposition of m oney received during schedule year not used
for current expenditure, and funds made available for
fam ily use from sources other than family income— M ar­
quette, M odesto, and R en o_______________________________
5. — Description of families studied, by income level, 13 small
cities________________________________________________________
Occupation of chief earner.
Fam ily type.
N ativity of homemaker.

38




Composition of household.
Earnings and income.

32

40
41
44
45

46

52
54

g

CONTENTS

V
Page

T able

6.— Expenditures for groups of items, by income level, 13 small
cities________________________________________________________________
7. — Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home
during 1 week, by economic level, 10 New Hampshire cities
combined___________________________________________________________
8. — Annual food expenditures, by economic level, 3 groups of New
Hampshire cities___________________________________________________
8a.— Annual food expenditures— Marquette, Modesto, and Reno_
9. — Housing facilities, by economic level, 3 groups of New Hamp­
shire cities________________________________________________
9a.— Housing facilities— Marquette, Modesto, and Reno____________
10. — Housing expenditures, by economic level, 3 groups of New
Hampshire cities___________________________________________________
10a.— Housing expenditures— Marquette, Modesto, and Reno_____
11. — Fuel, light, and refrigeration expenditures, by economic level,
3 groups of New Hampshire cities______________________________
11a.— Fuel, light, and refrigeration expenditures— Marquette, M o­
desto, and Reno______________________________________________
12. — Household operation expenditures other than for fuel, light,
and refrigeration, by economic level, 3 groups of New
Hampshire cities________________________________________________
12a.— Household operation expenditures other than for fuel, light,
and refrigeration— Marquette, Modesto, and Reno________
13. — Transportation expenditures, by economic level, 3 groups of
New Hampshire cities__________________________________________
13a.— Transportation expenditures— Marquette, Modesto, and
Reno__________________________________________________________
14. — Personal care expenditures and medical care expenditures, by
economic level, 3 groups of New Hampshire cities___________
14a.— Personal care expenditures and medical care expenditures—
Marquette, Modesto, and Reno_____________________________
15. — Recreation expenditures, by economic level, 3 groups of New
Hampshire cities__________________________________________________
15a.— Recreation expenditures— Marquette, Modesto, and Reno___
16. — Formal education, vocation, community welfare, gifts and con­
tributions, and miscellaneous expenditures, by economic
level, 3 groups of New Hampshire cities______________________
16a.— Formal education, vocation, community welfare, gifts and
contributions, and miscellaneous expenditures— Marquette,
Modesto, and Reno____________________________________
17. — Clothing expenditures, by economic level, 10 New Hampshire
cities combined____________________________________________________
18. — Furnishings and equipment expenditures, by economic level,
10 New Hampshire cities combined___________________________




62

66
74
75
76
79
80
86
88
94

96
99
100
103
104
107
108
111

112

115
117
138




L etter o f Transm ittal

U

n it e d

S tates D
B

epartm en t

ureau

of

of

L abor,

L a b o r S t a t is t ic s,

Washington, D. C., June 20, 194-1.
The S e c r e t a r y

of

L

abor

:

I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on money dis­
bursements of wage earners and clerical workers in 13 small cities.
This study was made by Faith M . Williams and Gertrude Schmidt
Weiss of the Cost of Living Division of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
in cooperation with various State agencies.
A. F. H i n r i c h s , Acting Commissioner.
Hon. F r a n c e s P e r k i n s ,
Secretary of Labor.




V II




PR E FA C E

The Bureau of Labor Statistics conducted, from 1934 to 1936, a
study of the family incomes and money disbursements of wage
earners and clerical workers in 42 of the larger cities of the country.
The results of these studies have been published,1 and have been used
as the basis for a revision of the Bureau’s indexes of cost of living for
wage earners and clerical workers. In connection with this study, at
the request of certain State agencies, data were obtained from 13
cities so much smaller as to constitute an entirely different group.
The reports for these cities are included in this volume. Ten of these
thirteen small cities were in New Hampshire, where the survey was
made in cooperation with the New Hampshire Office of Minimum
Wage and the New Hampshire Emergency Relief Administration.
The study in Marquette, M ich., was undertaken at the request of
the University of Michigan School of Education and the Michigan
Emergency Relief Administration. The investigation in Reno, Nev.,
was made in cooperation with the Nevada Relief Administration, and
that in M odesto, Calif., in cooperation with the California Division of
Labor Statistics and Law Enforcement and the California Emergency
Relief Administration. The tabulations of all the data were carried
on with the aid of workers furnished by the Works Progress Adminis­
tration. The field work in New Hampshire was supervised by
Gertrude Schmidt Weiss, assisted by M ary Jean Bowman, Eileen
Leach, and Esther E. Nelson, all of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
staff, and C. Spencer Platt of the New Hampshire Minimum Wage
Office. In the other States, all the supervisory work was done by
members of the Bureau of Labor Statistics staff. The field work in
M arquette was supervised by Caroline Wilson under the general
direction of Frances R. Rice and Arthur Rayhawk, who were regional
directors of the field work in all Michigan cities. In M odesto the
field work was supervised by Margaret Allen under the general direc­
tion of Dorothea D. Kittridge and Georges M . Weber, regional direc­
tors of field work in all California cities. In Reno, the field work was
supervised by D orothy Terrill. Alice C. Hanson was in general charge
of the tabulations and M ary C. Ruark, assisted by Harry Winckel
and Ethel Cauman, was responsible for the final preparation of the
Tabular Summary in this report.

1 Williams, Faith M ., and Hansen, Alice C .: M oney Disbursements of Wage Earners and Clerical
Workers, 1934-36 U. S. Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulls. No. 636 through 641.




IX




Bulletin 7\[o. 691 o f the
U nited States Bureau o f Labor Statistics

M oney Disbursements o f W age Earners and Clerical
W ork ers in Thirteen Small Cities, 1933—
35

Introduction
Cities Studied
Thirteen small cities were included in this survey of employed
wage earners and clerical workers. The 10 New Hampshire cities
range in size from the industrial city of Nashua, to the small town of
Conway. The 3 largest of these, Nashua, Concord, and Berlin, all
had more than 20,000 inhabitants. Concord is the State capital, and
clerical workers were relatively numerous there. The average income
of the 99 Concord families surveyed was.$l,465— higher than that in the
other New Hampshire cities. The chief earner provided the largest
share of family funds, as there were few families with more than 1
worker. Nashua, a textile city in the extreme southern portion of
the State, near Lowell and Lawrence, Mass., provided numerous
opportunities for wives and grown children to work. As a result, a
little more than one-half of the families had 2 or more earners at some
time during the year, and average family income was nearly as high
as in Concord, $1,437. Berlin, farthest north of all these cities, is
largely devoted to paper making. It had the highest proportion of
families in which the wife was born in Canada, and most of these
women came from the French-speaking section of the country. Fami­
lies with more than 1 earner were few, and family income averaged
$1,133.
Five of the New Hampshire cities, Portsmouth, Keene, Dover,
Laconia, and Claremont, form the second group, each with close to
15,000 inhabitants. Portsmouth and D over are farthest east of all
the cities, Portsmouth being on the coast. Laconia is a resort center
near Lake Winnepesaukee, about the center of the State, while Clarem ont and Keene are not far from the Vermont border. Average in­
come per family in these 5 cities ranged from $1,396 for Portsmouth to
$1,163 for Claremont. In none of these 5 cities was the number of
earners per family so numerous as in Nashua, or so few as in Berlin,
1



2

M ONEY DISBURSEMENTS-----13 SMALL CITIES

The third group of New Hampshire cities includes Conway and
Littleton, both cities of fewer than 5,000 inhabitants and both in the
mountain and resort section of the State. Family income of employed
wage earners and clerical workers averaged $1,238 and $1,138,
respectively, in the two cities.
Marquette, a city of about 15,000, is on Lake Superior in the
northern peninsula of Michigan. Iron ore, from mines not far from
the city, is shipped from the docks in its harbor, and nearby stone
quarries also provide employment. Incomes of the families studied in
M arquette averaged $1,307.
M odesto, Calif., of about the same size as Marquette, is located in
the fruit-growing country of the Sacramento Valley, east of San Fran­
cisco. Average income of the group studied there was $1,472,
which was higher than in any other of the small cities except Reno.
Reno, Nev., with its population of about 20,000, is the largest city
in Nevada, a resort city and an important business center for the sur­
rounding farming and stock-raising country. Although Reno is
located in western Nevada, not far from M odesto, its climate is some­
what colder than that of M odesto. Wage-earner and clerical families
were in the most favorable economic position here of any of the small
cities studied, with an average income of $1,587, and smaller families.
Incomes among families of employed wage earners and clerical
workers were generally lower in these small cities than in the larger
communities nearby. Among the New Hampshire cities, average
income was less among the smallest of the cities than among those
next in size. In contrast with these New Hampshire averages, $1,190,
$1,279, and $1,345, for the three size-of-city groups, average incomes of
employed wage earners and clerical workers in larger New England
cities were as follows: Manchester, N. H., $1,405; Portland, Maine,
$1,505; Springfield, Mass., $1,566; and Boston, Mass., $1,571. (See
Bureau of Labor Statistics Bull. No. 637, vol. II.)
Incomes of small-city wage earners and clerical workers in Marquette
and M odesto also averaged less than in the nearby large cities included
in this study, D etroit (see B. L. S. Bull. No. 636), San Francisco,
Los Angeles, San Diego, and Sacramento (see B. L. S. Bull. No. 639).

Cost o f Living in Small Cities Compared W ith Large Cities
In considering data on income and expenditures from cities of
different size, one of the first questions that arises is whether costs of
living differ with size of city. From the limited data available, it
appears that living costs are somewhat lower in the smallest of these
communities than in the large cities nearby, but exceptions can be
found in every region of the country. M oreover, for the New England
States, in which are located 10 of the 13 small cities covered by this




INTRODUCTION*

3

report, it is very unlikely that the difference in living costs between
large and small cities would exceed 5 percent.
This conclusion is drawn from a series of surveys. The most
comprehensive recent survey of differences among cities in living
costs is one made by the Works Progress Administration in 1935.1 In
this investigation, an equivalent list of goods and services was priced
in each of 59 cities, giving cost estimates for the same standard of
living. None of these cities, however, is as small as the smallest of
the New Hampshire cities covered by this report, and those included
in the Works Progress Administration survey in the northeastern
section of the country are considerably larger. Ten cities of much
smaller size, among them Dover, N. H., were covered in a com­
parable study made by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in connection
with estimates of living costs in northern and southern cities.2
Variations in living costs among cities of the same size are so great
that it is difficult to generalize regarding the effect of size of city on
living costs. For example, in the 1935 study, living costs were 14
percent more in Sioux Falls, S. Dak., than in the larger city of
Wichita, Kans. Even closer, geographically, and hence more nearly
similar in climate, are the New England cities for which 1938 esti­
mates of living costs are available. Living costs in Dover, N. H., were
found to be 6 percent less than in Boston, Mass., but 2 percent more
than in Manchester, N. H., and 0.4 percent more than in Portland,
Maine.

Expenditure Patterns in Large and Small Cities
The income difference between large- and small-city wage-earner
and clerical families thus appears to be considerably greater than the
probable difference in living costs. W ith their lower incomes,
expenditures of all kinds averaged less in the small cities for the
wage-earner and clerical group. Small-city families seem to differ
from large-city families in their spending patterns, even when they
have the same amounts to spend. Apparently, in the small cities
the desire to live up to the standards of the income group next above
is less pressing than in the large cities, where the spread of incomes is
greater.
The small-city families characteristically devoted larger amounts
to insurance, investments, and other savings than did families of
similar status in larger cities. For example, small-city families with
incomes of $1,200 to $1,500 finished the year with an average net
surplus of $50. (See table 1.) Large-city families in the same
income class spent nearly all of their incomes for current living,
1Intercity Differences in Costs of Living, March 1935, 59 Cities, Works Progress Administration, Research
Monograph XII, 1937.
2 “ Differences in living costs in northern and southern Cities,” Monthly Labor Review, July 1939 (p. 22),
U. S. Department of Labor.




4

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES'

having an average net surplus of only $2. Some families in each
group failed to balance income with expenditures, while others had
substantial surpluses, but the picture for each group as a whole shows
small-city families spending less for current living than large-city
families.
T a b l e 1 .— D istrib u tio n o f ex p en d itu res, 1 0 sm all N e w H a m p sh ire c ities , and 4
large N e w E n g la n d cities, fa m ilie s with in com es o f $ 1 ,2 0 0 to $ 1 ,5 0 0 , 1 yea r d uring
the p eriod 1 9 8 3 - 3 6

Item

10 small New 4 large New
Hampshire New England
cities 1
cities 2

Total disbursements______ __________ _
_ ___ _ - Net change in assets and liabilities
- ____
__ _
______ _
Total expenditures______________ _______ ______________ ____ _______ _

$1,328
+50
1,278

$1, 368
•
+2
1, 366

Percentage distribution:
Total expenditures____ _____________________
_____ ___ _
_
F ood._____________________ ____ _____ ___
______ _
Clothing _____________________________ _______________________ _
Housing________ _
__
______
__
__
__
Fuel, light, and refrigeration_____ _ ________ _______ ______ ______

100.0
33.9
10.9
14. 5
11.2

100. 0
36.1
9.6
19. 2
9.6

Other household operation. ___
______ _______ __
Furnishings and equipment________________________________ _______
Transportation----------------------------------------------- -------------------- ------Personal care______________________________________________________
Medical care _ _________ _______ _ __________ _ __ _

3.8
3.1
6.4
2.0
4. 2

3.2
3.0
6.0
1.8
3.4

Recreation ________ ____________ __ _ _ _ _ _ __
______
Education_________________ _______ _ _____ ' _ ___ ______
Vocation__ _______ ________________________________ ______ _____
Community welfare. __________ ________ ____________ ______ _ i.
Gifts___ _ __
____________ _______ __________
_ _
Other items
____
_ _______
_____________
______ ____

5. 5
.3
.3
1.8
1.5
.6

5.0
!3
1.5
.9
.3

1 Nashua, Concord, Berlin, Portsmouth, Keene, Dover, Laconia, Claremont, Littleton, and Conway.
2 Boston and Springfield, Mass., Manchester, N. H., and Portland, Maine.

Housing expenditures provide one of the important differences
between small-city and large-city spending. For example, families
with incomes of $1,200 to $1,500 in the small New Hampshire cities
devoted 14.5 percent of their total current expenditure to housing, as
compared with the 19.2 percent spent for housing in the four large
New England cities included in Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulle­
tin No. 637, volume II. Housing expenditures, plus those for fuel,
light, and refrigeration, came to 25.7 percent in the small cities and
28.8 percent in the large cities. A comparison on the basis of total
cost of housing and household operation is more satisfactory as it takes
account of the larger proportion of large-city families that rented
their dwellings heated. A number of factors explain these differ­
ences; among them the tendency of small-city families to own their
homes free of mortgage thus decreasing their money expense for hous­
ing, the smaller amounts paid in taxes on owned homes, and the in­
complete equipment of many small-city homes as regards conveniences.
Other possible factors which this study does not cover are lower
land values and lower tax rates accompanied by fewer and less
expensive public services.




5

INTRODUCTION

In large and small cities alike, food took about one-third of the ex­
penditures of families in the $1,200 to $1,500 income class, and cloth­
ing about one-tenth. Food purchased and eaten away from home,
chiefly meals eaten out, was more important in the large cities, where
C ATI
HR
PERCENTAGE
DEVOTED
NEW

ENGLAND

TO

OF TO TAL

H O U S IN G

C IT IE S

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

AND

A U T O M O B IL E S

D IF F E R E N T S I Z E , 1 9 3 3 - 3 6

FAMILIES OF WAGE EARNERS AND CLERICAL WORKERS
WITH INCOMES OF $1200 TO $1500
0

5

1
0

PERCEN E
TAG
1
5
20

25

30

35

BOSTON, M
ASS

SPRINGFIELD, M
ASS

MANCHESTER, N H
.

PORTLAND, M .
E
N W H M IR CITIES
E A PSH E
1930 PO LATIO
PU
N
20,000 TO 50,000

10,000 TO 20,000

U D 10,000
N ER

H U I G I C U I G FUEL,
OSN, NLDN
L G T AND R F I E A I N
IH
ERGRTO

Y///77\ AUTOMOBILE PURCHASE
V ////X ANO OPERATION

UI E S AE DP RMN O
N D T T S EAT E T P
T
B R A O L B RS A IS IC
UEU F A O T T T S

working places are too far away for the wage earner to go home for
lunch.
In the New England group, transportation expenditures took 6.0
percent of the total spent by large-city families in the $1,200 to $1,500
income class and 6.4 percent for small-city families with similar money
incomes. In the small cities this sum was spent almost entirely on
the family automobile, but in many of the large cities, automobile­
owning families were few, and streetcars and busses took family
members to work, to school, and on shopping trips.




6

M ONEY DISBURSEMENTS-----13

SMALL CITIES

Medicine, doctor, and hospital bills, in spite of their unequal dis­
tribution among individual families, took 3 to 4 percent of the total
spent by families in the $1,200 to $1,500 income class, in large as well
as small cities. Small-city families might be expected to spend less
for moving pictures and other forms of commercial entertainment.
Total recreation expenditures, however, amounted to 5.5 percent of the
total spent by small-city families in this income class as compared
with 5.0 percent in the large cities.
Furnishings and equipment and personal care expenditures also
were similar in'the two groups of cities, the former about 3 percent
and the latter 2 percent of the total. The remaining small expendi­
ture categories, education, vocation, community welfare, gifts to per­
sons outside the family, and other items, came to a total of 4.5 percent
in small and 3.1 percent in large cities, for families in the $1,200 to
$1,500 income class.

Scope o f the Study
The data on money disbursements obtained in this study apply to
12 continuous months within the period 1933-35 for each family.
For Berlin, Dover, Keene, Nashua, and Portsmouth all data apply to
the year ending August 31, 1934. For the other five New Hampshire
cities, the year of the study was that ending November 30, 1934.
Data for Marquette, M odesto, and Reno apply to the year ending
February 28, 1935.
The families to be interviewed in the investigation were chosen at
random from the lists of employees furnished by employers also chosen
at random. (See appendix B for further details.)
Since the funds for the investigation were limited, the survey was
restricted to the income levels more representative of employed wage
earners and clerical workers.3 N o families on relief were included in
the investigation.

The group supplying the material on which this report is based
includes families of all types but not persons living alone. Because
of the limitation of funds, the Nation-wide survey of wage earners and
clerical workers was not enlarged to include a study of money dis­
bursements of persons living alone, either as lodgers or as householders.4
3 The importance of obtaining data on the consumer purchases of higher-salaried clerical workers, pro­
fessional workers, managers, and officials, and those in business for themselves was generally recognized at
the time when the study was begun, but the limited funds then available made it necessary to confine this
investigation to the groups for which the Bureau’s cost-of-living index is computed. Later, in 1936, the
Bureau of Labor Statistics undertook a study of consumer purchases which covers all economic groups, in
32 different cities. Funds were allotted to the project by the Works Progress Administration. At the same
time a coordinated study was undertaken by the Bureau of Home Economics in 66 farm counties, in 140
villages, and in 19 small cities. Both of these investigations were made in cooperation with the National
Resources Committee and the Central Statistical Board.
4 The study of the living of single individuals presents a separate and distinct problem which will be
covered by the Bureau at a later date. At the request of the Emergency Relief Board in Philadelphia, the
Bureau of Labor Statistics undertook a study of the incomes and money disbursements of employed wage
earners and clerical workers living as single individuals in that city in the year 1934-35. The results of that
investigation will be published in a subsequent report.




Income Level and Money Disbursements
Order o f Expenditure at Different Income Levels
The average amount spent for each of the major categories of con­
sumer expenditures was larger at each successive income level than at
the one preceding, but the pattern of the distribution changed mark­
edly with increases in income. For the small cities, these changes in
expenditure pattern are illustrated by the data for the 5 New Hamp­
shire cities in the 10,000-20,000 population group.
Families with incomes of $1,800 to $2,100 with an average income of
$2,004, as compared with the average of $766 for those in the $500 to
$900 class, spent nearly twice as much (84 percent more) for food.
Families were larger at the higher-income level, so that on a per per­
son basis, food expenditures were only 40 percent higher from the
low- to the high-income group. Expenditures for housing including
heat, light, and refrigeration, averaged $255 in the low- and $442 in the
high-income class. (See table 2.)
Clothing claimed a large share of the greater spending power of
families in the upper-income brackets. Average expenditures for
clothing increased from $64 in the low- to $229 in the high-income
class. Even on a per person basis, clothing expenditures were more
than double.
Larger sums spent for the purchase and operation of automobiles
also were characteristic of families in the higher-income class. The
average amount spent on the family automobile was $40 in the lowand $113 in the high-income class.
T a b l e 2 . — A verag e f a m i l y in co m e and exp en d itu res in the $ 5 0 0 - $ 9 0 0 and $ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0 in co m e classes, and percentage increase with in co m e, N e w H a m p sh ire cities
with p o p u la tio n 1 1 0 ,0 0 0 —2 0 ,0 0 0 , 1 yea r during the p eriod 1 9 8 3 —8 5

Income class
Item
$500$900
Average annual net income__

__ _ __ ______ ___ _____ ___ _______

Percentage
increase
from $500$900 to $1,800$1,800- $2,100 income
$2,100
class

$766

$2, 004

162

839

1,815

116

Furnishings and equipment________________________ ___________
Education._ _ _ _ _ - _
____ ___ _ _ _ _______ __________ _
Clothing. _ _ _ _ _ _
_
_.
_
___
___
Other household operation. .
__
_
_
_ ______
Automobile and motorcycle—purchase, operation, and maintenance...

15
2
64
31
40

76
8
229
88
113

407
300
258
184
182

Gifts and community welfare__ __ _______________
__
Personal care,
__
_ _ ___ _________ _ _ __
Recreation______ ___
__ _____________________________ _
Medical care____ _______ _ __ ______________ ._ _
______
Fuel, light, and refrigeration____________________________ _______

27
14
42
30
101

75
37
108
59
190

178
164
157
97
88

Food
______________
____________________ __ . __ _
Housing. _ _____ ______ ___ ______ __________
_ _________________
Vocation and other items__________________ _ ____
Other transportation________ _
_ ___
________

308
154
7
4

568
252
9
3

84
64
29
-2 5

Average total current expenditure_____________________ ____________

1 Portsmouth, Keene, Dover, Laconia, and Claremont.
2 0 0 9 8 2 ° — 4 1 ------- 2




7

8

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

Purchases of furnishings and equipment, although accounting for a
small share of the total, showed the largest proportionate advance
from low- to high-income levels. Families in the $1,800 to $2,100
income class spent five times as much for furniture, bedding, linen,
and electrical and other equipment as did those with incomes of $500
to $900. Education expenditures also ranked high in elasticity,
increasing fourfold over this income range.
Average expenditures for medical care were nearly twice as much in
the $1,800 to $2,100 as in the $500 to $900 income class. Personal
care and recreation expenditures showed somewhat greater propor­
tionate increases, averaging about two and one-half times as much in
the upper income class as in the lower.

Planes o f Living Determined by Family Sizie as Well as Income
In the wage-earner and clerical group in these small cities, as in the
42 large cities covered by this survey, average size of family tends to
increase with income. In other words, high family incomes in these
occupational groups often are the pooled earnings of several workers.
T o the extent that a higher income is used for the support of a larger
number of persons, it does not provide as high a scale of living as a
somewhat lower income used for the support of fewer persons. Since
one of the primary purposes of the investigation was to determine the
kind of living available to families at different economic levels, the
detailed analysis of expenditures has been based upon a classification
which takes into account not only the total amount of money available
for family living, but also the composition of the family for which it
is spent.
The process of classifying families according to their economic level
may be indicated from the case of two families, each spending $1,450
during the schedule year. The first family consisted of a man of
40 years working as a machine operator; his wife, 38; two sons, aged
15 and 6; and two daughters, aged 12 and 8. In addition, the family
was responsible during 6 months for the total support of the wife's
mother, who lived with them during half the year. This family is
regarded as consisting of six and one-half persons. The second family
consists of a man of 27, also a machine operator; his wife, 26; a daugh­
ter, 4; and an infant son, i}{ years old. This is a four-person family.
The first family spent $725 and the smaller family $780 for all items
other than food and clothing. There is not enough information at
present available on the influence of age or sex on these general types
o f expenditure to improve upon the assumption that equal expendi­
tures are incurred for each member of the family. The expenditure
per person in the first family was $112 as against $195 in the second




INCOME LEVEL AND MONEY DISBURSEMENTS

9

family for all items other than food and clothing. In the case of food’
studies of customary expenditures and of dietary needs have been
made in sufficient detail to allow for the creation of scales of expendi­
ture for each age, sex, and activity group in terms of the customary
expenditures of an adult male employed full time. The scale for food
adopted in this study indicates that the first family consists of the
equivalent of 5.5 adult males in the family for the full year. This
unit will subsequently be referred to in the present study as a “ foodexpenditure unit.” The second family consists of 2.9 food-expendi­
ture units. The first family spent $580 per year for food, or the
equivalent of $105 per food-expenditure unit. The second family
spent $500, which although a substantially smaller proportion of its
total income, amounted to $172 per food-expenditure unit.
Finally, in connection with clothing, it has been possible as a result
of this study to derive scales of customary expenditures related to sex,
age, and occupation. If the average expenditures of adult male wage
earners and lower-salaried clerical workers between the ages of 21 and
35, inclusive, are regarded as equivalent to one clothing-expenditure
unit, it has been found that the larger of the two families contains 4.0
clothing-expenditure units, while the smaller family contains 2.6. The
first family spent $145 for clothing and the smaller family $170. This
is an average per clothing-expenditure unit of $36 for the first family
and $65 for the second. The economic level of the first family has
been measured by the sum of these three types of unit expenditure,
i. e., $105 for food, $36 for clothing, and $112 for all other items— total
for the family, $253 per expenditure unit. The smaller family which,
it will be recalled, had an identical income to spend, has not been
classified with the larger family but rather with other families that
had a unit expenditure of more than $400, but less than $500. In
both cases, this means that these particular families are grouped, as
regards economic level, with families whose incomes may be quite
different. For example, a widow with one young child, earning $100
a month, would be grouped with the smaller of the two families, as
would also a very large family with an income of more than $3,000.

Changes in Assets and Liabilities5
In each of these groups of small cities, wage-earner and clerical
families, in the aggregate, spent less than the sum of their incomes for
current living. The average net surplus per family ranged from $79,
the amount reported for those in Marquette, to $19, for families in
5
F o r purposes of this study, changes in assets and liabilities are computed on the basis of changes which
occurred as the result of the transfer of property or funds. Changes in the market value of real estate or
personal property remaining in the hands of the families studied are not included in these figures. For a
more detailed explanation, see appendix A, notes on table 4.




10

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS-----13

SMALL CITIES

M odesto.6 Some of the families in each of the small-city groups did
not balance expenditures with income, but in none were there as many
as one-half in this circumstance. For example, in Marquette, 77
percent of the wage earners and clerical workers reported a net surplus
for the year. The proportions in this position were somewhat less in
the other cities, being smallest in Reno, where 54 percent reported a
net surplus.

In spite of the fact that aggregate incomes exceeded aggregate cur­
rent expenditures for these families, the funds that were free, in the
sense that they might readily be turned to other forms of investment,
were small. In the New IJampshire cities, and in Marquette, life
insurance and annuity premiums7took about one-half of the gross sur­
plus of the group; payments on owned home— both down payments
and mortgage reduction— took about one-tenth. In Modesto and
Reno, life-insurance premiums were relatively less and payments on
the owned home relatively more important. In these, as in the other
cities, however, these two together took a little more than one-half
of the group’s surplus funds. Payment of back debts, including in­
stallment debts, took about one-tenth to one-fifth. In only two
of the groups of cities was as much as one-third of the surplus funds
accumulated during the year available at the end of the period in
cash, in bank accounts, or for other forms of investment, while in the
other cities this sum represented an even smaller proportion of the
surplus.
In each small-city group, families paying life-insurance premiums
were more numerous than those reporting net surpluses for the year,
indicating that life-insurance policies often are kept up by families
that run into debt. The percentage of families paying for life insur­
ance varied among the cities, ranging from 64 percent in Reno to 96
percent in the New Hampshire cities in the 20,000-50,000 population
group. M oreover, life-insurance payments were important in the
aggregate because of the amounts paid out, as well as because of the
frequency of such payments in the group. Families that carried life
insurance paid premiums averaging from $66 to $98 in the six groups
of cities. (See table 3.)
# The figures just cited have been computed from the families’ own statements about changes in their
assets and liabilities and do not represent a balancing difference between reported incomes and reported
current expenditures. (See appendix A, pp. 145-146.) Most families were not able to present a statement
of total receipts and total disbursements which balanced exactly. No schedule was accepted for use from
a family which could not supply a statement of total receipts and total disbursements which balanced
within 5 percent.
7In a study among Federal employees carried on by the Bureau of Labor Statistics just prior to the initia­
tion of this investigation, the schedule provided for securing information on the type of insurance covered
by the premiums reported. It was found that very frequently informants were unable to provide the
information and the question was not included in the present schedule. It is, therefore, impossible to
estimate how much of the amount paid in life insurance premiums represents savings and how much was
paid for insurance protection during the schedule year.




11

INCOME LEVEL AND MONEY DISBURSEMENTS
T a b l e 3 . — P ercentage o f fa m ilie s p a yin g life-in su ra n ce p r em iu m s ,

and average

p a ym e n ts, 1 yea r during the p eriod 1 9 3 8 - 8 5

Percentage
of families
paying

Cities

Average payment
All
families

Families
paying

New Hampshire cities with 1930 population of—
20,000 to 50,0001 .. . _
___
__________________
10,000 to 20,000 *_______
___________________________
Under 10,0003______________________________ _____________

95. 7
83.3
83.8

$94.19
78.37
70.38

$98.47
94. 08
84. 03

Marquette, M ic h ___________________ _
Modesto, C alif________ _______
Reno, Nev
__ _____
_
_

86.5
78.8
63.8

72. 54
51. 85
53. 62

83.87
65. 79
84.10

_

_______ _______
__
___
__

i Nashua, Concord, and Berlin.
* Portsmouth, Keene, Dover, Laconia, and Claremont.
* Littleton and Conway.

On the deficit side of the ledger for these groups of families, with­
drawals from bank accounts and increases in debts, both on install­
ment contracts and of other types, were the chief sources of funds.
A t every income level, some families devoted a part of their current
income to payment of back debts or to provision for the future, as by
buying life insurance, saving, or making other investments. Others
went into debt or used savings accumulated previously. Families
in this position were found in all income classes. In the New Hamp­
shire cities with population of 10,000 to 20,000, for example, 36 per­
cent of the families in the $500 to $900 income class reported a net
surplus for the year, 53 percent had a net deficit, and the remainder
reported themselves in about the same financial position at the end
as at the beginning of the year. In the $1,800 to $2,100 income class,
families with net deficits were considerably fewer— 20 percent— while
77 percent had net surpluses. The balance of income and expenditures
at different income levels is shown, also, by the average net deficit of
$59 of families in the lowest income class, the change from net deficit
to net surplus in the higher income classes increasing to an average of
as much as $168 per family at the $1,800 to $2,100 level.




Expenditures for Specified Goods
Automobiles
Public transportation systems in small cities are generally much
less adequate to the needs of the citizens than the systems in large
cities. The population is, as a rule, less densely settled in the small
community and it is more difficult to provide efficient services at as
low a rate. For this reason, the proportion of small-city families
meeting the transportation problem by having their own cars was
larger, in general, than in the large cities in the same region. As in
the larger cities, a higher proportion of families in the western towns
had their own cars than families in cities of the same size in the eastern
part of the country.
In Conway and Littleton, 52 percent of the families studied had
cars; in the next larger New Hampshire cities, 47 percent; and in the
cities of 20,000 to 50,000 population, 42 percent. Boston, the
largest New England city covered in this survey, is in marked con­
trast, with only 14 percent of the families owning automobiles. (See
table 4.)
The contrast between large and small cities in the proportion of
families owning automobiles is shown also in the California group of
cities. California cities, in general, rank high in the proportion of
wage-earner and clerical families owning automobiles, but Modesto,
with 87 percent of the families reported as car owners, is outstanding
among them. Even in San Francisco, where busses and streetcars
provide more convenient transportation than in the smaller cities, 57
percent of the families studied had automobiles.

Marquette is an exception to the general rule regarding automobile
ownership in the small cities. Fifty-seven percent of the Marquette
wage-earner and clerical families owned their own cars, but even larger
proportions of the Detroit, Grand Rapids, and Lansing families had
automobiles. The stimulus of Detroit as a center of automobile pro­
duction is undoubtedly an important factor in the prevalence of auto­
mobiles in these southern Michigan cities. Difficulties of winter driv­
ing in the northern peninsula where Marquette is located may also
account for the smaller proportion of car-owning families there.
Automobile ownership is definitely related to the economic position
of the group of families studied. Because wage-earner and clerical
incomes tended to be somewhat lower in the small than in the large
cities, the relatively large proportions of families owning automobiles
12




EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

13

in the small cities are even more striking, when comparisons are limited
to families at the same economic level. (See table 4.)
T a b l e 4. — P ercentage o f fa m ilie s o w n in g a u tom obiles, selected cities, 1 year
during the period 1 9 3 3 - 8 6

Percentage of families
owning automobiles
Cities
All families

Families with
annual unit
expenditure
of $400 to $600

Small cities in New Hampshire (1930 population):
20.000 to 50,000 i____________
10.000 to 20,000 2 ___________________________
Under 10,000 3_____________________________

42.1
46.6
51.8

47.7
48.4
56.6

Larger New England cities:
Boston, Mass_________
Springfield, Mass_____
Manchester, N. H ____
Portland, Maine______

14.1
37.5
39.0
48.4

11.9
39.3
29.3
54.0

Marquette, Mich.

57.4

66.7

Larger cities in Michigan:
Detroit_____________
Grand Rapids_______
Lansing____________

68.7
75.3
69.7

73.0
79.7
77.1

Modesto, Calif.
Larger cities in California:
Los Angeles_________
San Francisco_______
San Diego___________
Sacramento_________
Reno, Nev__

83.3
81.1
56.7
78.4
67.3
77.2

78.7
54.7
78.8
71.2
80.0

i Nashua, Concord, and Berlin.
* Portsmouth, Keene, Dover, Laconia, and Claremont.
* Littleton and Conway.

Purchases of automobiles during the year of the study were reported
by 8 to 12 percent of the small-city groups in New Hampshire, by 8
percent of the Marquette families, by 17 percent in Reno, and by 21
percent in M odesto. In all of these cities purchases of second-hand
cars by this group far outnumbered purchases of new automobiles.
For families that had automobiles, the average cost of gasoline,
tires, and other expense for operation of these automobiles came to
well over $100 in each of the groups of cities except Marquette.
(See table 5.)
Forms of transportation other than the family automobile were
little used in cities so small as these. The average expenditure per
family for all rides by train or bus during the entire year ranged from
$8 in Berlin, Concord, and Nashua, to $3 in Conway and Littleton.




14

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS-— 13 SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 5.— Average expenditure for

automobile operation and maintenance, for
those owning automobiles, 1 year during the period 1933-85

All families

City

Economic level—Families
with annual unit expend­
iture of—
Under $400

$400 and over

New Hampshire cities (1930 population):
20,000 to 50,000 i______________________________________
10,000 to 20,000 2
______________________________________
Under 10,000 8________________________________________

$122
115
120

$93
88
87

$141
134
148

Marquette, Mich----------- ---------- -- ------------------------- _
Modesto, Calif ___ ------------- -- ------ -__ _ _
Reno, N e y ____ ___
---------------- —
--------------------

68
121
110

52
99
96

88
131
113

1 Nashua, Concord, and Berlin.
2 Portsmouth, Keene, Dover, Laconia, and Claremont.
8 Littleton and Conway.

Housing
N e w Hampshire Cities

Hom e ownership, like automobile ownership, tends to be more
prevalent among families in the small than among those in the large
cities included in this study. Among the small New Hampshire
cities, the proportion of owned homes ranged from 31 percent in
Nashua, Concord, and Berlin, to 47 percent in Littleton and Conway.
In Boston, only 20 percent of the wage-earner and clerical families
lived in owned houses; in Portland, Maine, 22 percent; and in M an­
chester, N. H., 27 percent.
The smaller proportion of total current expenditure taken by hous­
ing in the small cities is explained in part by the relatively large
number of home owners there. The current housing outlay of the
home owner is diminished by the fact that he has some investment
in his home, on which he might, theoretically, be considered to be
paying himself interest.8 Consequently, it is not surprising that the
actual current expenditure for housing in Conway and Littleton,
where 47 percent of the homes were owned, averaged only $144 per
fam ily for the year when all families are considered in computing the
average. In the five cities of the middle-sized group, where 37
percent were home owners, average housing expense was $186 and
in Berlin, Concord, and Nashua, where 31 percent of the families
were home owners, average housing expense was $197.
For example, the rental value of the owned homes included in this
study in Conway and Littleton, where almost half the families owned
their homes, averaged $232.36 for the year. Current expenditures
for taxes, interest on mortgages, repairs, and the like came to $104.65
per owned home, leaving a balance averaging $127.71, which m ay
8 The amounts devoted to outright purchase of homes, down payments, or to payment of principal of
mortgage were considered an investment for the purposes of this study, and do not appear as part of current
housing expense.




15

EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

properly be regarded as nonmoney income from the home owners’
return on his investment. When the total amount of this imputed
income to home owners is added to their current money outlay for
their homes and to the sums paid out as rent by the renting families,
we obtain an average value of housing of $204 per family for the
year, considerably more than the money outlay for housing of $144
per family. However, even this sum is less than the comparable
figure of $241 for the five New Hampshire cities next largest in size,
and $240 for Berlin, Concord, and Nashua. In Boston, where home
owners were comparatively few, average current expenditures of $319
are increased by only $27 by the addition of nonmoney income from
owned homes, to give a total of $346 as the average value of housing
for the group studied there.
Among home owners, the average expenditures for taxes for families
who made such payments were a little over $60 in the two groups of
larger New Hampshire cities, and $48 in Littleton and Conway.
Interest payments on mortgages were a second large expense for
home owners. M any home owners had no mortgages on their homes
but, for families that paid interest, the amounts were fairly large.
F or example, in the middle-sized group of New Hampshire cities,
19 percent of the families made interest payments during the year,
and, for these, the average was $74. (See table 6.)
T able

6 .—

Average expenditures by home owners for taxes on owned homes and
for interest on mortgages, 1 year during the period 193S-S5

City

Number
of fami­
lies

Families spending
for interest on
Percent­
mortgages
age of
Average
families expense
owning for taxes1
Average
Percent­ expense
homes
for inter­
age
est 2

New Hampshire cities (1930 population):
20,000 to 50*000 3______________________________
10,000 to 20,000 4______________________________
Under 10,000 8_______________________________

299
485
197

31.4
37.1
47.2

$61
62
48

15.4
18.6
23.9

$80
74
53

Marquette, Mich ________________________ _____
Modesto, Calif-__ ___ .
___ _______ _______
Reno, Nev-_ _
_
__ ________ __________

148
151
149

48.6
37.7
47.7

35
29
63

16.2
28.5
23.5

50
98
121

1 For home owners paying taxes.
2 For families paying interest.
3 Nashua, Concord, and Berlin.
4 Portsmouth, Keene, Dover, Laconia, and Claremont.
8 Littleton and Conway.

New Hampshire small-city families that rented houses paid aver­
ages of $18 and $19 a month in two of the groups of cities, and only $14
a month in Littleton and Conway. Unheated apartments were fre­
quently reported, and average rentals paid for these were $15 and $16
in the three groups of cities. In contrast, Boston families paid an




MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

16

SMALL CITIES

average of $30 a month for rented houses and $26 for unheated apart­
ments.
The higher Boston rents provided houses that were considerably
better equipped than those available to these small-city families.
Inside flush toilets, running hot water, electric lights, and gas or
electricity for cooking all were present in the following proportion of
homes: Boston 76 percent; New Hampshire cities of 20,000 to 50,000

PERCENTAGE
W IT H

OF

F A M IL IE S

S P E C IF IE D

IN D W E L L I N G S

F A C IL IT IE S

1 9 3 3 -3 6
FAMILIES OF WAGE EARNERS AND CLERICAL WORKERS
PERCENTAGE
0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

BOSTON, MASS.

SPR IN G FIELD , M A SS.

M A N C H ESTER , N .H .

P O R TLA N D , M E .

NEW HAMPSHIRE C ITIES
1930 POPULATION
2 0 . 0 0 0 TO 5 0 , 0 0 0

1 0 .0 0 0 TO 2 0 , 0 0 0

UNDER

1 0 ,0 0 0

UI E S AE DP RMN O L B R
N D T T S EAT E T F A O
T
B RA O L B RS A IS IC
UEU F A O T T T S

RUNNING WATER, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, FLUSH TOILET
AND GAS OR ELECTRICITY FOR COOKING

population, 30 percent; New Hampshire cities of 10,000 to 20,000
population, 36 percent; New Hampshire cities under 10,000, 4 percent.
(See chart 2.)
Even in the smallest of the New Hampshire cities, 8 out of 10 houses
had inside flush toilets, and electricity was quite generally used for
lighting. Bathrooms were reported in almost 8 out of 10 homes in the
two groups of cities with 10,000 or more inhabitants, and in two-thirds
of the Littleton and Conway homes. Running hot water was some­
what less common, and gas or electricity for cooking was reported by
39 percent of the homes in the larger cities, 46 percent in the 10,000 to




EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

17

20,000 population group, and only 5 percent in Littleton and Conway.
Especially in the smaller cities, these probably were electric stoves or
gas stoves using bottled gas.
In conclusion, small-city families in New Hampshire paid consid­
erably less for housing than did Boston families. Their homes were
less well provided with conveniences, especially hot running water
and gas or electric stoves, but such other advantages as fresh air and
open space surrounding their homes probably compensated to some
extent for city conveniences. A t any rate, the actual expenditures
for housing were considerably less in these New Hampshire cities than
in Boston, and part of the sum thus saved on housing was spent by
small-city families on automobiles, thus compensating for the lack of
public means of transportation available to large-city families.
M arquettte, Modesto, and Reno

The other three small cities also rank high in home ownership among
wage-earner and clerical families, especially when compared with such
large places as Detroit and San Francisco. In Marquette and Reno
almost one-half of the homes were owned; in Modesto nearly two-fifths.
Nearly all of the wage-earner and clerical homes in Marquette,
M odesto, and Reno were equipped with electric lights and inside
flush toilets. Bath-rooms and running hot water also were reported
by nearly all families, except in Marquette, where 83 percent had
bathrooms and 62 percent had running hot water. Gas or electricity
for cooking was less frequent, except in Modesto. Accordingly, the
families that had inside flush toilets, running hot water, electric lights,
and gas or electricity for cooking accounted for 43 percent in M ar­
quette, 87 percent in M odesto, and 54 percent in Reno.
Fuel, Light, and Refrigeration
The average cost of fuel for cooking and room heating in the New
Hampshire cities came to a little under $100. Fuel bills for apart­
ments averaged somewhat less than those for houses, and the amounts
differed slightly from one group of cities to another, but average costs
for all heating and cooking fuels were close to $100. For electricity,
average expenditures were a little under $30, and for ice, between $5
and $7 for the year.
Fuel expenditures were a little less in Marquette, chiefly because
of the kind of fuel used. M arquette usually has as severe winters
as most of the New Hampshire cities, according to average tempera­
ture reports of the United States Weather Bureau, but the use of
bituminous coal rather than anthracite and fuel oil made lower
fuel bills. The total for fuel, light, and refrigeration for Marquette
families that provided heat for their own homes came to $113 for the




18

M ONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

year. Electricity expense averaged $30 a year, and ice, which was
seldom purchased, averaged only $1 per family for this group. Hence,
average costs for all fuel used for cooking and house heating, for
dwellings in Marquette without heat furnished, were $82.
In Reno, where the climate is considerably milder, the average
expenditure of families in houses for all kinds of heating and cooking
fuels was $70. Average annual electricity bills for families in houses
came to $43. The larger proportion of families (29 percent) with
electric refrigerators is one explanation; probably other electrical
appliances were used more freely also, as average income was con­
siderably higher in Reno than in the other cities.
Fuel expenditures were so much less in Modesto, Calif., that the
average total for fuel, light, and refrigeration for houses was $97.
Electricity bills came to an average of $34, and ice for these families
averaged $11. Winters are usually warmer than in any of the other
small cities studied, and average expenditures for fuel for heating these
houses and for cooking were $51 for the year.
Anthracite, wood, and fuel oil were the heating fuels most frequently
used by New Hampshire small-city families. W ood was especially
popular in Littleton and Conway, where 75 percent of the families
who paid for their own fuel bought wood, and, in the average fuel bill
for the group as a whole, wood was the largest item, amounting to $34.
Anthracite was the only type of coal widely used. Fuel oil was pur­
chased by about one-half of the families in all the New Hampshire
cities that paid for their own fuel. N ot all of this oil was for furnace
burners, as oil more refined than the usual furnace oil was often
reported for use in stoves. The fact that purchases showed less
relative decrease during the summer months than did coal purchases,
also suggests that some of this fuel oil was used for cooking. Gas,
probably used for cooking, was reported by about two out of five of
the families in the two groups of larger cities, but by almost none in
Littleton and Conway.
Among Marquette families who paid for heat in houses and apart­
ments, bituminous coal was the fuel most often chosen, and in total
cost accounted for two-thirds of total expense for cooking and heating
fuels. W ood expenditures were relatively small, although two-thirds
of the families purchased some wood. Payments of gas bills were
reported by only one-third of these families, indicating that wood and
coal were the more usual cooking fuels.
In Reno, as in Marquette, bituminous coal was most important in
the group’s fuel bill, with wood a close second. Use of gas was
reported by about 3 out of 10 families. In Modesto the group, as a
whole, was somewhat higher in income than in Marquette or the New
Hampshire cities, and mild climate as well as the availability of gas
also affected the choice of fuels. Of the total expenditures for cooking




EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

19

and heating fuels, 71 percent was for gas, and 8 out of 10 families that
paid for their own fuel used gas. About one-third of the families
purchased some wood, but the average expenditure for wood by the
group as a whole was only one-sixth as much as the expenditure for gas.
Food
Average total food expenditures for these small-city groups ranged
from $392 per family in Littleton and Conway to $470 in Marquette.
The relationships between economic level, size of family, and total
expenditures for food are shown in table 7 for the New Hampshire
cities, for which data are presented by expenditure unit. When
families are classified in this way the average amount spent on food for
each food-expenditure u n it9 (roughly per person) is very similar from
one group of cities to another; that is, the average amount spent for
food was close to $130 per food-expenditure unit in each of the city
groups, for the families that spent for all goods and services from $300
to $400 each year per expenditure unit. Differences in average food
expenditures among city groups at the extremes of the distribution
result from variations among the cities in the proportions of families
in the very lowest and the highest economic levels covered.
T

able

7 .— A v era g e exp en d itu re f o r fo o d p er fo o d -ex p e n d itu r e u n it,1 by econom ic
level, N e w H a m p sh ire sm all cities, 1 yea r d uring the p eriod 1 9 8 3 - 8 5

Average annual expenditure for food per food-expenditure u n it1

City group

Economic level—Families with annual unit
expenditure of—

All
families

Under $300 $300 to $400 $400 to $500
New Hampshire cities (1930 population):
20,000 to 50,000 2_____________________
10,000 to 20,000 3_____________________
Under 10,000 4______________________

$132
138
125

$101
103
98

$131
129
129

$150
155
151

$500 and
over

$186
201
174

1 See appendix D for method of computing.
2 Nashua, Concord, and Berlin.
3 Portsmouth, Keene, Dover, Laconia, and Claremont.
4 Littleton and Conway.

Even in the smallest of these cities, Littleton and Conway, home
gardens were of only slight importance in reducing the family food
bill. The average value of all food produced at home during the
entire year, and of gifts of food and food received as pay was only
$8 per family. In the other New Hampshire cities, and in Marquette
and Reno, the value of such food was less. In Modesto, a center for
truck farming, with a climate well suited to gardening, the value of
home-produced and other food not purchased was $22 per family.
9 See appendix D for explanation of food-expenditure units.




20

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

Expenditure for each type of food increased with economic level.
Families in the highest economic group spent almost twice as much
per, person for food as did those in the lowest economic group. Ex­
penditures for meat, poultry, and fish a little more than doubled, and
those for vegetables and fruits increased about two and one-half
times. Expenditures for milk did not increase as rapidly with increase
in total food expenditure as they would have done had there been as
many children at the higher economic levels, as at the lower. Among
families with annual unit expenditures of $500 and more, one family
out of four had a child under 16 years. Among families with unit
expenditures of less than $500 the average was at least one child per
family and two children in every second family. Expenditures for
sugar and other sweets were twice as much in the highest as in the
lowest economic group, and those for miscellaneous foods, chief among
them coffee and tea, were a little more than doubled. On the other
hand, increases in expenditures for bread, flour, cereals, and baked
goods were only about one-third.
Nearly all of the money spent for food by these families was for
food eaten at home. Added together, the cost of all food purchased
and eaten away from home, whether meals at work, school, or on
vacation, or candy, drinks, and ice cream, amounted to from 2 to 3
percent of the family food bill in the New Hampshire groups; 4 percent
in M arquette; 5 percent in R eno; and 9 percent in M odesto. Since
such expenditures are characteristic of families at higher economic
levels, the larger proportion of the food money used in Reno and
M odesto for food away from home probably is due to the higher in­
comes and smaller families there.
In addition to the reports of 1 week’s food purchases and the esti­
mates of annual food expenditures, detailed records of actual food
consumption for 1 week were kept by 294 families in the New Ham p­
shire cities, 78 families in Reno, and 14 in Marquette. These have
been analyzed by the Bureau of Home Economics of the United
States Department of Agriculture along with reports from other
families in the wage-earner and clerical group to show the nutritional
adequacy of the diets.1 N o separate figures were computed on the
0
nutritional content of the diets in the small, as distinguished from
the large, cities in each region. In view of the relatively insignificant
value given the food grown for home use by these small-city families,
it appears that their nutritional status was not very different from
that of large-city white families of similar economic status.
Stiebeling, Hazel K., and Phipard, Esther F.: Diets of Families of Employed Wage Earners and Cler­
ical Workers in Cities. U. S. Department of Agriculture. Circular No. 507. Washington, January 1939.




21

EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS
T

able

8 .— A v era g e exp en d itu re per p e r s o n 1 p er w eek f o r different typ es o f fo o d , by
econ om ic level, 1 year during the p eriod 1 9 8 3 - 8 5

NEW HAM PSHIRE SM ALL CITIES
Average expenditure per person1in 1 week

Food group

All families

Economic level—Families with annual unit
expenditure of—
Under 300 $300 to $400 $400 to $500

$500 and
over

Total food....................................................

$2. 273

$1.740

$2.198

$2. 578

$3,264

Grain products and baked goods. ..............
Eggs------------------------------ ------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream..............................
Butter ............ .................................... ........
Other fats......................................................

.386
.143
.291
.179
.107

.342
.106
.242
.151
.080

.398
.136
.324
.180
.093

.397
.168
.302
.206
.121

.456
.212
.352
.214
.176

Meat, poultry, fish.......................................
Vegetables and fruits................................ .
Sugar and other sweets_____________ ____
Miscellaneous foods......... ............................

.552
.346
.098
.166

.395
.228
.077
.115

.501
.315
.085
.161

.680
.408
.107
.184

.842
.587
.152
.261

1
The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as the
appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.

In summarizing their findings Stiebeling and Phipard estimate
that there is little likelihood of a deficiency in protein in the diets of
employed workers and their families in the United States. M ost of
the diets in the North Atlantic area also furnished an adequate
supply of nicotinic acid. Deficiencies in the consumption of calcium
and Vitamins A, Bi, and C were numerous, however.
A new dietary goal and yardstick by which to measure progress was
announced on M ay 25, 1940, by the Committee on Foods and Nutrition
of the National Research Council (Dr. Russell M . Wilder of the
M ayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., chairman). This yardstick for
the average man at moderately heavy work is as follows:
Recommended daily allowances for specific nutrients for a 154-pound moderately
active man.1
Calories__________________
Protein___________________
Calcium__________________
Iron_____________________
Vitamin A2_______________
Thiamin (vitamin Bi)3____
Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)3.
Riboflavin_______________
Nicotinic acid____________

3, 000
____________ grams __
70
_____________ do____ 0. 80
________milligrams __
12
international units. _ 5, 000
________milligrams __
1. 8
_____________ do____
75
_____________ do____
2.7
18
_____________ do____

1 These are tentative allowances toward which to aim in planning practical dietaries. These allowances
can be met with a good diet of natural food. Such a diet would also provide other minerals and vitamins,
the requirements of which are less well known.
2 Requirements may be less than these amounts if provided as vitamin A, greater if chiefly as the pro­
vitamin carotene.
3 One milligram thiamin equals 333 international units; one milligram ascorbic acid equals 20 international
units; and 1 international unit of ascorbic acid equals 1 U. S. P. unit.




22

M ONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

Vitamin A is important in insuring good visual adaptation in semi­
darkness. An abundance of Vitamin B x (thiamin) promotes good
functioning of the digestive tract. Acute deficiencies result in a dis­
ease of the nervous system called beriberi. Diets without sufficient
provision of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) have been shown to result
in increased susceptibility to infection, and in restlessness and irrita­
bility in children. An acute deficiency in Vitamin C may produce
scurvy, but other symptoms are more common in this country. R ibo­
flavin is essential in the production of an enzyme involved in cell
respiration. Nicotinic acid is the pellagra-preventive factor.
A reconsideration of food records in light of this new yardstick leads
Stiebeling and Phipard to estimate that the diets of perhaps one-fifth
to one-fourth of the families of employed workers in North Atlantic
cities might well be classed as excellent. This proportion is higher
than the 11 percent indicated in the publication cited. The difference
is due chiefly to the fact that the allowances for vitamin A recommended
by the National Research Council's committee were lower than those
which the authors had used in their earlier work in classifying diets
as excellent, good, fair, and poor. In the early evaluation the diets
of only about one-fifth of the families spending $2.50 to $3.12 per
man per week for food met the vitamin A specifications then used for
an excellent diet. Using the new yardstick, 70 percent met the
specifications with reference to vitamin A.
Forty-two percent of the North Atlantic families who provided food
consumption records spent less than $2.50 per person per week; 28
percent spent more than $3.12. Of the remaining 30 percent, it is
estimated that the diets of as many as 8 out of 10 failed to provide
one or more nutrients in quantities as liberal as recommended by the
National Research Council's committee. The food supplies of some
families were short in but one respect. The food supply of others
failed to meet the specifications in a number of respects. While the
diets of only about 30 percent of these families fell short in vitamin A,
about half provided less calcium than is now recommended. About
this same proportion (though not necessarily the same families) had
diets that failed to meet the specifications with respect to vitamin C
and/or with respect to riboflavin.
N o one should assume that all families with diets falling short of
these desirable goals suffer from obvious nutritional deficiencies.
The figures mean, however, that the diets of many of these families
could be improved— the degree dependent upon the extent to which
the diets fall short of optimum. Food plays an important part in
determining the composition of tissues of the body and of the fluids
that bathe the cells, and, therefore, in affecting the “ internal environ­
m ent" in which life processes go on. This environment markedly




EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

23

affects physical and mental vitality. Insofar as immediate or long
term well-being can be improved through dietary betterment, a
person falls short of being truly well fed.
Stiebeling and Phipard found that “ The chances for better diets
increased with rising per capita expenditures for foods. This was
due chiefly to a more liberal use of milk, meat, eggs, leafy green
vegetables, and fruits, when more money was available. But the
quality of the food supply selected by families was by no means only
a matter of level of food expenditure. A t every expenditure level
above a certain minimum, some families succeeded in obtaining
good diets but others procured food only fair or poor, from the stand­
point of nutritive value.” 1
1

Deficiencies in the consumption of calcium and vitamins A, Bx,
and C are readily understood when the division of actual expenditure
is compared with recommendations for adequate nutrition at expend­
iture levels just above and just below tbe average prevailing in tbis
group.
The relationship between food consumption and health is now so
well established that it must be a matter of general concern that so
large a proportion of this relatively favored group was not using the
foods needed for a nutritionally satisfactory diet. There is abundant
clinical evidence that the vitamins and the minerals listed above are
needed for physical well-being. Part of the consumption deficiencies
just shown could easily be remedied by more widespread knowledge
of nutritional needs, but a considerable part is due to the inadequacy
of the incomes of many families to meet total family needs.
C lo th in g

Average expenditures of small-city families for clothing ranged
from $132 in the New Hampshire cities to $172 for Reno families.
Details on clothing expenditures for the New Hampshire cities com ­
bined are given in table 17 of the Tabular Summary. Details are
not available for publication for Marquette, Modesto, and Reno.
In the New Hampshire cities, nearly all of the clothing money was
spent for ready-made clothing, dry cleaning, and accessories. (See
table 9.) Expenditures for materials for home sewing averaged only
$3 per family. N ot included in this figure is the clothing received
as gifts from persons outside the family, which was valued at $5
per family.
W omen and girls 18 years of age or older spent an average of $46
each for their year's supply of clothing. For men and boys 18 years
u Stiebeling, Hazel K., and Phipard, Esther F.: Diets of Families of Employed Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in Cities. U. S. Department of Agriculture. Circular No. 607. Washington, January
1939, p. 100.
2 0 0 9 8 2 ° — 4 1 -------3




24

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

or older, the average was $38. Average expenditures for the clothing
of younger family members were considerably less.
T a b l e 9 .— A verag e ex pen d itu re p er f a m i ly and average expend iture p er p erson f o r
clothing , p erson s o f different age gro u p s , 1 yea r during the period 1 9 3 3 —3 5

NEW HAM PSHIRE SM ALL CITIES

All fam­
ilies

Item

Economic level—Families with
annual unit expenditure of—
Under
$300

Average expenditure per family for—
All clothing------------------------ ------------ --------------------------Ready-made clothing, dry cleaning, and accessories------Yard goods and findings------------ ------ --------------------------Paid help for sewing___________ ____
____ _______
Average value per family of clothing received as gifts. ______
Average expenditure per person for ready-made clothing, dry
cleaning, and accessories:
Men and boys 18 years oi age and over_______
Women and girls 18 years of age and over_______________
Boys 12 through 17 years of age-------------------------------------Girls 12 through 17 years of age_______ _________ . . . ..
Boys 6 through 11 years of age----------------------------------- -.
Girls 6 through 11 years of age----------- ------ -------------Boys 2 through 5 years of a g e --------------------------------------Girls 2 through 5 years of age__________________________
Infants under 2 years of a g e_____________________ ____

$300 to $400 to $500 and
$400
$500
over

$132
129
3
0)
5

$121
117
4
0)
5

$126
123
3
0)
6

38
46
33
37
24

27
28
25
27
18

21
17
12
11

16
12
10
6

$125
122
3
5

$157
154
3
0)
5

33
39
38
48
27

38
49
43
66
37

58
71
67
61
42

27
16
14
10

34
26
21
25

37
30
24
18

0)

1 Less than 50 cents.

Recreation
Tobacco purchases took an important part of the expenditure
classified under the heading of recreation in table 15 of the Tabular
Summary. T obacco expense averaged from $21 to $27 a family in
all of these small cities. Cigarettes accounted for a large share of
this sum. They were bought by one-half or more of the families in
each city group, with purchases of other types of tobacco less numer­
ous. Average expense for reading material, as newspapers, books, and
magazines, ranked next after tobacco in each of the New Hampshire
groups and in Marquette, and moving pictures and other commercial
entertainment, third. A larger proportion of families in Reno and
M odesto than of families in the other cities attended moving pictures
during the year, and total expense for commercial entertainment was
considerably more than in the other cities.
In the New Hampshire cities 7 out of 10 families owned radios, and
in the other small cities, 9 out of 10 families. The proportion pur­
chasing radios and the average expenditure per radio are shown in
table 10. Undoubtedly there was a wide range in the price paid for
radios, but averages as high as these suggest that a number of the
radios purchased were fairly expensive.




25

EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS
T

able

10.—

Percentage o f fa m ilie s o w n in g and p u rch a sin g ra d io s, and average
exp en d itu re p er radio p u rch ased , 1 yea r d u rin g the p eriod 1 9 3 8 - 8 5

City group

Percentage
of families
owning
radios

Percentage
of families
purchasing
radios

Average
expenditure
per radio
purchased

New Hampshire cities (1930 population):
20,000 to 60,000 i_________________
.. ______
10,000 to 20,000 2
______________________________________
Under 10,000 3________________________________________

71
69
70

8
10
15

$74
42
38

Marquette, Mich_________ _______ ___ ___ ____ _ __
Modesto, Calif_______________ _____ _ _ ___ _ _ . ____ _
Reno, Nev_______________________________ _____________

87
89
90

14
9
7

57
46
30

1 Nashua, Concord, and Berlin.
2 Portsmouth, Keene, Dover, Laconia, and Claremont.
3 Littleton and Conway.










Tabular Summary

27




T able

1.-—

D istr ib u tio n o f fa m i li e s , b y econ om ic level and in co m e level

NASHUA, N. H.

Economic level—
-Families spending per expenditure unit per year
o

o

o

o

o
i§

o

o o o o o
o
s i o ^ 11
i|
C y-f
O
i i i !
r-T - r-T
«9 ^m- m- »
m- m

3

22

31

19

14

6

2

1

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0
0
1

0
7
4

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

6
4
0
1
0
0

0
1
2

0
0

0
2
0
0
0
0

0
5
6

<

Families in survey. __ 100
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________ 0
$600-$900_________ 13
$900-$l,200_______ 22
$1,200-$1,500______
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,400-$2,700______
$2,700-$3,000______

o

O

©i

I

)0 to
*300

o

)0 to
5600 j

3
Income class

26
21
7
8
2
1

o s §1
^
C C- ©
S O
«« ;«e €■ m■

12
3
2
1
1
1

7
2
3
1
1
0
0

3
9
2
2
0
0

© g ©00 § n © 8
«■
©
&

2
3
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
1
0
1
0

0
0
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

CONCORD, N. H.
Families in survey.. _
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
$600-$900_________
$900-$l,200________
$1,200-$1,500______
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,400-$2,700______
$2,700-$3,000______
$3,000-$3,300______

99

4

11

19

21

11

12

10

7

1

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

2
7
21
23
19
20
4
1
0
2

1
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
3
2
2
1
2
0
0
0
0

0
2
10
6
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
2
6
5
3
3
2
0
0
0

0
0
0
2
2
5
2
0
0
0

0
0
1
5
4
2
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
1
4
3
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0
4
2
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

BERLIN , N. H.
9

39

24

12

11

3

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
2
5
2
0
0
0

1
9
22
6
0
1
0

0
5
12
5
0
2
0

0
2
5
1
1
3
0

0
3
3
2
1
1
1

0
0
0
1
0
2
0

0
0
0
1
0
0
0

0
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

96

7

15

24

28

10

5

4

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
21
26
27
11
10
0
0
1

0
6
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
5
6
3
1
0
0
0
0

0
5
11
5
3
0
0
0
0

0
5
6
11
3
3
0
0
0

0
0
1
3
2
4
0
0
0

0
0
1
3
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Families in survey... 100
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
1
$600-$900_________ 22
$900-$l,200________ 47
$1,200-$1,500______ 18
2
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
9
$2,100-$2,400______
1

KEENE, N. H.
Families in survey...
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
$600-$900_................
$900-$l,200________
$1,200-$1,500______
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,400-$2,700______
$2,700-$3,000______

DOVER, N. H.
Families in survey... 98
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
0
$600-$900_________ 16
$900-$l,200________ 30
$1,200-$1,500______ 27
$1,500-$1,800______ 15
6
$1,800-$2,100______
2
$2,100-$2,400______
1
$2,400-$2,700______
1
$2,700-$3,000______




1

23

17

31

20

2

2

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
4
9
5
3
1
0
1
0

0
3
5
4
4
1
0
0
0

0
8
8
10
2
2
0
0
1

0
1
8
7
4
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

29

30

M ONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES

T able

— D istrib u tio n o f fa m ilie s , b y econ om ic level and in com e level—

Continued

PORTSM OUTH, N. H.

Families in survey. _.
Annual net income
of—
$500-1600_________
$600-$900_________
$900-$l,200________
$1,200-$1,500______
$1,500-Sl,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,400-$2,700______
$2,700-$3,000______
$3,000-$3,300______
$3,300-$3,600______
$3,600-$3,900______

$100 to
$200
$200 to
| $300
| $300 to
$400
| $400 to
!
$500
| $500 to
| $600
| $600 to
| $700
I $700 to
| $800
I $800 to
| $900
1 $900 to
| $1,000
1 $1,000 to
| $1,100
$1,100 to
$1,200
$1,200 to
I $1,300
$1,300 to
$1,400 !
$1,400 to
$1,500
$1,500 to
$1,600
$1,600 to
$1,700
$1,700 to
$1,800

Income class

All families

-Families spending per expenditure unit per year
^Economic level—

93

3

23

17

22

12

5

3

3

3

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

2
7
27
26
12
12
3
2
0
1
0
1

0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
3
9
6
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
5
5
2
3
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
2
8
5
3
3
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
2
6
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

LACONIA, N. H.
Families in survey.
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
$600-$900_________
$900-$l,200________
$1,200-$1,500______
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,400-$2,700______
$2,700-$3,000______
$3,000-$3,300______

99

8

16

25

26

8

8

2

4

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0
21
25
24
15
9
3
0
1
1

0
5
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
2
9
3
1
1
0
0
0
0

0
9
6
4
3
2
0
0
1
0

0
4
6
7
7
1
1
0
0
0

0
0
1
4
1
2
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
5
2
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

CLAREM ON T, N. H.
Families in survey. __ 100
Annual net income
of—
2
$500-$600_________
$600-$900_________ 28
$900-$l,200________ 30
$1,200-$1,500______ 26
4
$1,500-$1,800______
7
$1,800-$2,100______
2
$2,100-$2,400______
1
$2,400-$2,700______

10

20

28

18

13

6

1

3

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
4
3
1
1
1
0
0

2
5
11
1
0
1
0
0

0
11
6
10
0
0
1
0

0
6
4
8
0
0
0
0

0
2
4
3
0
2
1
1

0
0
2
3
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
2
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

LITTLE TO N , N. H.
Families in survey...
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
$600-$900_________
$900-$l,200________
$1,200-$1,500______
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,400-$2,700______




98

7

21

23

28

11

2

3

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2
26
34
20
12
2
1
1

1
1
4
1
0
0
0
0

1
7
6
4
1
1
0
1

0
9
5
5
4
0
0
0

0
5
13
8
2
0
0
0

0
4
5
1
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0

0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

31

TABULAR SUMMARY

T a b l e 1 .— D istr ib u tio n o f fa m ilie s , b y econom ic level and in co m e level— Continued
CONW AY, N. H.

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit per year

Families in survey...
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
$600-$900_________
$900-$l,200_______
$1,200-SI,500______
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,500-$2,700______

€■
©

o

o

o
ON
C
O

m-

700 t
$800

■
<

o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
O C o ^ o »o
O
o«eC
O
C
M
«■
©

500 t
$600

o
E

100 t
$200

Income class

o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
+ *©
§
© ® £ s © ©O o ° © ® s ©
o
g
© ^
O 05 o ° ~ © ’“i §<N 5MC co _r ©
© _r
C
§
,-T«900
m- m
m- € ■ € ■
©
©

o
o
+ *©
©© © ©
© ^

m

«■
©

99

7

30

17

21

16

3

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

2
17
30
27
13
7
2
1

0
1
4
1
1
0
0
0

1
6
13
8
2
0
0
0

1
7
1
3
3
2
0
0

0
3
5
9
3
0
1
0

0
0
5
5
3
3
0
0

0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

M A R Q U E T T E , M IC H .

Families in survey__
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
$600-$900_________
$900-$1,200________
$1,200-$1,500______
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,400-$2,700______
$2,700-$3,000______
$3,000-$3,300______

148

20

38

29

29

13

10

5

0

1

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

1
22
44
39
24
11
3
2
0
2

0
9
7
4
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
8
14
10
4
1
0
0
0
0

0
3
9
11
5
1
0
0
0
0

0
2
9
10
3
5
0
0
0
0

0
0
3
2
3
1
2
0
0
2

0
0
2
1
4
2
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
1
3
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

M O D E S T O , C A L IF .

Families in survey. __ 151
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
1
$600-$900_________
7
$900-$1,200________ 41
$1,200-$1,500______ 35
$1,500-$1,800______ 28
$1,800-$2,100______ 28
$2,100-$2,400______
6
$2,400-$2,700______
3
$2,700-$3,000______
1
1
$3,000-$3,300______

1

15

33

36

24

14

9

8

4

3

3

0

1

0

0

0

0

0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
3
6
6
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
0
10
9
9
2
2
0
0
0

0
1
11
8
6
10
0
0
0
0

0
2
8
5
4
3
1
1
0
0

0
1
5
4
1
3
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
1
5
2
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
1
3
3
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
1
0
1
2
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

REN O , NEV.

Families in survey__
Annual net income
of—
$500-$600_________
$600-$900_________
$900-$1,200________
$1,200-$1,500______
$1,500-$1,800______
$1,800-$2,100______
$2,100-$2,400______
$2,400-$2,700______
$2,700-$3,000______
$3,000-$3,300______




149

0

15

21

27

18

26

15

18

3

4

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0
9
13
40
36
41
6
0
3
1

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
5
2
6
1
1
0
0
0
0

0
3
4
5
4
3
2
0
0
0

0
1
4
8
5
9
0
0
0
0

0
0
2
7
6
1
2
0
0
0

0
0
0
4
10
10
2
0
0
0

0
0
0
6
3
4
0
0
1
1

0
0
1
4
5
7
0
0
1
0

0
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
3
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

32

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 2 .— D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by econom ic level
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

D istrib u tio n by O ccu p a tio n o f C h ie f E a rn er
a n d by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey_________________ _______
Families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker. _ ___________ _____ _____
Skilled wage earner. ___________________
Semiskilled wage earner_________________
Unskilled wage earner...............................
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife___________________________
Man, wife, and 1 child__________________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children____________
Man, wife, and 5 or more children________
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6
persons)________________ . . . ____ _
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons)__________ _____________
Man, wife, and 1 adult.__ ______________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults______________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults__________
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man
and wife). _________________________
Adults (4 or more persons, not including
man and wife) _ ______________________
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons,
not including man and wife). . . . ____
Adult or adults and children (4 or more per­
sons, not including man and wife) ___ .

299

16

72

74

52

36

21

13

15

58
86
117
38

0
3
10
3

10
15
32
15

14
21
32
7

15
19
12
6

9
8
17
2

4
3
10
4

2
8
2
1

4
9
2
0

70
42
73
7

0
0
7
3

1
7
27
4

7
16
22
0

12
7
14
0

16
6
3
0

14
3
0
0

8
2
0
0

12
1
0
0

33

0

13

11

8

1

0

0

0

14
18
15
1

6
0
0
0

7
3
1
1

1
5
6
0

0
4
3
0

0
2
3
0

0
3
0
0

0
1
2
0

0
0
0
0

15

0

1

4

3

4

1

0

2

2

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

7

0

5

1

' 1

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

203
2
7
60
6
3
2
5
1
8

6
1
1
6
0
0
0
1
0
1

46
0
3
19
1
0
0
1
0
2

52
0
1
14
2
2
0
1
1
1

32
0
1
14
2
0
1
1
0
1

25
1
0
5
1
0
1
0
0
2

17
0
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
0

12
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

13
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

299
3.98

16
7.40

72
5.01

74
4.00

52
3. 54

36
2.88

21
2. 72

13
2.66

15
2.34

35
3
8
10

0
0
0
0

5
0
0
1

8
1
0
2

11
1
1
2

5
0
2
1

4
0
3
1

2
1
1
0

0
0
1
3

3.84
1. 30
2.54
3.43

7.40
4.46
2. 94
6.12

4.97
2.20
2. 77
4.34

3.87
1. 21
2.66
3. 50

3.26
.85
2.41
2.98

2.69
.46
2. 23
2. 51

2.44
.18
2.26
2.32

2.51
.17
2.34
2.35

2.20
.08
2.12
2.16

D istrib u tio n by N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker___
Number of families having homemaker born
in—
United States___ _____________________ ..
Italy....... . . . . ._ ______________________
Poland_________________________________
Canada (French) __ __________ ____ _____
Canada (not French). __________________
England. _________
____ ______ ______
Ireland_________ _______________ _____ _
Norway and Sweden. ._ ________________
Austria and Germany. _________________
Other__________________________________
C o m p o sitio n o f H o u seh o ld

Number of households
_______________ ..
Average number of persons in household.......
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers____________________
Boarders only___________________________
Lodgers only _ _________ _____________
Other persons________________ _________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total______________ ______ ______
Under 16 years of age_____ _____ _______
16 years of age and over________________
Expenditure units__________________
Average number of persons in household not
members of economic family_______ ______

.17 0
.06
.14
.30
.26
.32
.23
.15
1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of ag6; “ adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.




33

TABULAR SUMMARY
T a b l e 2 . — D e sc r ip tio n o f f a m ilie s stu died , by econ om ic level— Continued
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.—Continued

Item

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure
unit per year

All
fami­
lies

Un­
der
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

E a rn in g s a n d in c o m e

Familes in survey...........................................
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners----------------Net earnings from boarders and lodgers___
Other net rents____________________ _____
Interest and dividends_____________ _____
Pensions and insurance annuities_________
Gifts from persons outside economic family
Other sources of income_________________
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)_________________________
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or de­
crease in liabilities)____________________
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease in liabilities)____________________
Inheritance_____________________________
Average number of gainful workers per family.
Average amount of—
Net family income____ ____ ___________
Earnings of individuals.................. .
Chief earner_________ ____ ________
Subsidiary earners_____ ____ ______
Males: 16 years and over..................
Under 16 years____________
Females: 16 years and over________
Under 16 years__________
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers. .
Other net rents_______________________
Interest and dividends_________________
Pensions and insurance annuities_______
Gifts from persons outside economic
family______________________________
Other sources of income________________
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses). _ ____________________
Surplus per family having surplus (net in­
crease in assets and/or decrease in liabil­
ities) _________________________________
Deficit per family having deficit (net de­
crease in assets and/or increase in liabil­
ities)-------------- --------- -------------------------Net change in assets and liabilities for all
families in survey_____________________
Inheritance_____________________________
1 Less than $0.50.




299

16

72

74

52

36

21

13

15

97
43
29
27

7
0
4
1
1
0
0

21
5
6
7
3
2
4

26
9
8
5
3
5
3

16
13
4
5
2
2
1

12
6
4
4
2
5
1

7
6
2
0
1
3
0

3
3
1
3
0
1
0

5
1
0

0

4

1

3

1

1

1

0

i

11

50

53

34

28

15

8

1
1

83
0
1.42

5
0
1.50

21
0
1.42

21
0
1.49

14
0
1.33

7
0
1.44

6
0
1.42

4
0
1.31

5
0
1.40

1
2
19
9

2
1

0

0

$1,107 $1,112 $1,273 $1, 378 $1,498 $1, 538 $1. 742 $1,967
1,062 1.078 1, 227 1, 310 1,434 1, 476 i; 717 1,916
973 1, 039 1,139 1, 219 1, 316 1, 537 1, 588
946
215
105
171
116
188
160
180
328
989
934 1,071 1, 089 1,165 1, 254 1, 553 1, 516
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
i
72
142
221
269
156
222
164
400
0
0
0
i
0
0
0
0
0
!
0
6
19
44
18
50
38
16
6
10
14
1
26
11
8
6
0
4
2
1
5
0
32
2
0
'
(»)
i
19
10
4
5 C)
5
0
0
1
i
'

i

0
0

!

0

S

130

3
6

3
8

4
6

4
0

8
14

5
0

15

-5 6

0

234

185

0

-1

-1

-2

108

150

167

206

128

130

134

520

421

+74 +135
0
0

+47
0

-1 6
0

-5
0

)

101

111

116

5
)

+58
0

+43
0

+75
0

-0 )

-0 )
120

34

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS-----13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 2 .— D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s studied, by econ om ic level— Continued
PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ON T, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

D is tr ib u tio n by O ccu p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r
and by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey______________ _____ ____
Families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker........................... ................ .
Skilled wage earner____________ _____ ___
Semiskilled wage earner _____________
Unskilled wage earner-------- ------------------Number of families composed of—
Man and wife- - - ________________
Man, wife, and 1 child—
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children _____ ____
Man, wife, and 5 or more children . ___
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6
persons)__________ _____ ____ _
_ _
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons)_________ __ --------- -------- --------Man, wife, and 1 adultMan, wife, and 2 to 4 adults ___ ----Man, wife, and 5 o r more adults_________
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man
and wife)___ __ ___ __
Adults (4 or more persons, not including
man and wife)_ _ _ _ _ _
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons,
not including man and wife) . _ _
Adult or adults and children (4 or more
persons, not including man and wife)____

485

29

97

111

125

63

26

12

22

79
129
240
37

1
5
20
3

12
22
53
10

17
20
69
5

22
43
47
13

10
17
34
2

7
10
7
2

3
2
7
0

7
10
3
2

123
80
97
8

0
2
12
2

4
7
38
6

13
20
32
0

42
27
12
0

25
15
2
0

15
6
0
0

6
2
0
0

18
1
1
0

46

5

16

15

9

1

0

0

0

18
35
24
2

7
0
1
0

11
0
5
1

0
12
5
1

0
13
7
0

0
7
3
0

0
2
0
0

0
1
3
0

0
0
0
0

33

0

2

9

11

7

3

0

1

6

0

1

2

2

0

0

0

1

6

0

2

1

2

1

0

0

0

7

0

4

1

0

2

0

0

0

5

0

1

1

2

0

0

0

1

362
8
5
42
28
5
15
3
4
8

22
1
2
2
0
0
0
0
2
0

63
5
2
10
7
0
7
2
0
0

87
1
0
12
6
1
1
0
0
2

96
0
0
11
8
3
1
0
0
4

48
1
0
2
5
1
5
0
1
0

18
0
1
3
1
0
0
0
1
2

8
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0

20
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

485
3. 79

29
6.17

97
5.24

111
3. 84

125
3.17

63
2. 85

26
2. 56

12
2. 37

22
2. 38

70
13
19
40

5
0
2
3

18
2
2
8

15
2
5
14

20
4
8
9

7
4
1
4

3
0
0
1

0
0
0
0

2
1
1
1

3. 54
1.08
2. 46
3. 29

5. 93
2. 75
3.18
5. 39

4. 99
2. 20
2. 79
4. 52

3. 59
1.15
2. 44
3. 37

2. 86
.53
2. 33
2. 70

2. 55
.39
2.16
2.45

2.47
.27
2. 20
2. 39

2. 38
. 16
2.22
2. 31

2. 23
. 16
2. 07
2.10

..28

.28

.29

.28

.32

.32

.15

0

.16

D is tr ib u tio n by N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker___
Number of families having homemaker born
in—
United States.__ ____
_
. . . ___
Italy------- -------------- -------- ---------------Poland-. __ _
--_ ___________ --Canada (French) ___________ _______
Canada (not French)___ _ _________ __
England______________________________ Ireland____ _
------------. . .
Norway and Sweden ___________________
Austria and Germany___________________
Other__________________________________
C o m p o s itio n o f H o u seh o ld

Number of households. __ -----------------------Average number of persons in household___
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers------------------------------Boarders only_________________________ .
Lodgers o n ly __________________________
Other persons----------------- — ------------------Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total___
____________________
Under 16 years of age— ........................ .
16 years of age and over.......................... —
Expenditure units_____ ____ _
-----Average number of persons in household not
members of economic family_____________

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age; “ adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.




35

TABULAR SUMMARY
T able

2 .—

D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s studied, by econ om ic level—

Continued

PORTSM OU TH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND C LAREM ON T, N. H.—Continued

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Un­
der
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

E a r n in g s a n d I n c o m e

Families in survey_______________________
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners____ __ __ Net earnings from boarders and lodgers___
Other net rents__ ____ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Interest and dividends____________ __ Pensions and insurance annuities_______ Gifts from persons outside economic family.
Other sources of incom e_____ - - ______
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)___________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or de­
crease in liabilities) ___ _ __ _ ______
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease in liabilities)_________
_______
Inheritance_____ ____ _ ________________
Average number of gainful workers per
family.___ _____________________________

485

29

97

111

125

63

26

1
2

22

168
89
51
60
27
f>
8
26

13
5
3
1
1
4
4

39
18
11
10
1
12
3

45
17
9
13
7
13
6

36
32
13
12
7
18
5

18
11
7
8
5
8
6

6
3
1
2
2
2
1

6
1
0
5
3
0
0

5
2
7
9
1
1
1

26

0

5

7

5

6

2

0

1

291

15

57

68

79

42

15

7

8

172
0

12
0

36
0

42
0

40
0

16
0

11
0

0

4

11
0

1.43

1. 59

1.60

1.50

1.33

1.27

1.23

1.58

1.27

Average amount of—
Net family income........................................ $1, 279
Earnings of individuals.......................__
1,190
Chief earner...................................... . 1,050
Subsidiary earners____ ______ ________
140
Males: 16 years and o v e r ___________
1, 015
Under 16 years. . . . ____ _ _ _ 0)
Females: 16 years and over_________
175
Under 16 y e a r s . _ 0)
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers..
38
Other net rents.. _ __ _ . . . _
12
Interest and dividends __ _______ _____
8
Pensions and insurance annuities_____
18
Gifts from persons outside economic
family____ ___ . __ _ ___________
9
Other sources of in co m e .___ . . . _. ._
6
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)___ ____________________
2
Surplus per family having surplus (net
increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities)____ _
_ _ _ _ _ ___
148
Deficit per family having deficit (net de­
crease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
151
ties) ________ ___________________ ____
Net change in assets and liabilities for all
+35
families in survey___
.
_______
0
Inheritance_____ ______ _______________
1 Less than $0.50.




$949 $1,160 $1,166 $1, 265 $1,438 $1, 513 $1, 689 $1,925
856 1,088 1,108 1,153 1.324 1,450 1,529 1,822
758
941
963 1, 021 1, 219 1, 308 1, 223 1,634
98
147
145
132
105
142
306
188
789
924
922
969 1,164 1, 240 1, 252 1, 613
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
66
162
186
184
160
210
277
209
0 0)
0
0
0
0
0
0
48
46
28
46
43
27
1
13
12
6
6
13
22
1
0
30
3
1
5
12
5
5
28
53
2 0)
7
36
24
8
13]
1
12
24

8
5

9
5

11
2

6
13

22
1

0
0

1
7

0

2

2

1

6

1

0

2

124

118

119

171

186

115

147

302

123

94

190

334

350

+69 +100
0
0

-1 4
0

-2 6
0

-6 5
0

75

142

151

+33
0

+17
0

+16
0

36

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES'
T a b l e 2 . — D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died, by econ om ic level— Continued
LITT L E TO N AND CONW AY, N. H.
Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year

Item

All
fami­
lies Under $200
$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

D is tr ib u tio n b y O ccu p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r an d
b y F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey_________________ _____
Families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker__________________________
Skilled wage earner......................................
Semiskilled wage earner___________ ____
Unskilled wage earner___________ ________
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife___________________________
Man, wife, and 1 child___________________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children____________
Man, wife, and 5 or more children________
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6
persons)______________________________
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons)_________________________
Man, wife, and 1 adult__________________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults______________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults.-------------Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man
and wife)_____________________________
Adults (4 or more persons, not including
man and w ife )...____ _________________
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons,
not including man and wife)__________
Adult or adults and children (4 or more per­
sons, not including man and wife)----------D is tr ib u tio n

197

14

51

40

49

27

5

5

6

34
63
91
9

0
6
8
0

6
18
24
3

6
13
19
2

12
10
25
2

5
11
9
2

1
1
3
0

2
2
1
0

2
2
2
0

55

34
38
7

.0
0
3
4

2
4
24
3

11
10
6
0

17
12
5
0

13
6
0
0

1
2
0
0

5
0
0
0

6
0
0
0

20

2

9

7

1

1

0

0

0

9
13
4
0

5
0
0
0

3
2
3
0

1
2
0
0

0
6
1
0

0
2
0
0

0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

11

0

0

1

5

4

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

5

0

1

2

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

173
18
1
1
4

13
1
0
0
0

42
6
0
0
3

39
1
0
0
0

42
5
0
1
1

25
1
1
0
0

3
2
0
0
0

4
1
0
0
0

5
1
0
0
0

197
3.77

14
7.03

51
4.85

40
3. 58

49
2. 97

27
2.62

5
2.62

5
2. 25

6
2.19

22
2
8
13

1
0
0
0

5
0
0
0

3
1
1
1

8
1
5
9

4
0
1
2

0
0
0
0

1
0
0
0

0
0
1
1

3.62
1.27
2.35
3.30

6.94
4.27
2.67
6.01

4. 75
2. 26
2.49
4. 21

3.41
1.01
2. 40
3.15

2.74
.49
2. 25
2. 57

2.50
.30
2.20
2.42

2.62
.36
2. 26
2.50

2.20
.09
2.11
2.17

1.95
0
1. 95
1.97

.16

.08

.09

.18

.25

.17

0

.05

.25

by N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker----Number of families having homemaker born
in—
United States_________ _____ ________ ___
Canada (not French)... ............. ................. .
England____ ___________________________
Ireland.......................... ...................... - ........
Other......... .............................. .....................
C o m p o s itio n o f H o u seh o ld

Number of households____________________
Average number of persons in household____
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers____________ ____ —
Boarders o n ly .............................................
Lodgers only___________________________
Other persons________________ ___________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total___________________________
Under 16 years of age..... ........................ .
16 years of age and over______________
Expenditure units_______________________
Average number of persons in household not
members of economic family_____________

* “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age; “ adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.




37

TABULAR SUMMARY
T a b l e 2 . — D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by econ om ic level— Continued
LITTLE TO N AND CONWAY. N. H.—Continued

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per ex >endi
ture unit per year
Un­
der
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

E a rn in g s and I n c o m e

______________
Families in survey_______
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners____________
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers___
Other net rents_________ __ __________
Interest and dividends.__ __ _ _______
Pensions and insurance annuities _______
Gifts from persons outside economic family.
Other sources of income_____ _
_ _
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)..
__________
_______
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or de­
crease in liabilities)____
_________
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease in liabilities)_______ _____ ______
Inheritance_____ _________ _
___
Average number of gainful workers per
family__________________________________
Average amount of—
Net family income______________________
Earnings of individuals________________
Chief earner ... ____________________
Subsidiary earners___________________
Males: 16 years and o v e r ____________
Under 16 years_______________
Females: 16 years and over___________
Under 16 years___
______
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers. __
Other net rents______ _
_ ._
___________
Interest and dividends.
Pensions and insurance annuities_______
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_
_ _
_
_ ______
Other sources of income.. _ __________
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)________
_
_
Surplus per family having surplus (net in­
crease in assets and/or decrease in liabili­
ties)_ ______
_
___
___
Deficit per family having deficit (net de­
crease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
ties)______ _ _____
__
____
Net change in assets and liabilities for all
families in survey_____________________
Inheritance_____________________________
i Less than $0.60.




197

14

51

40

49

27

5

5

6

68
29
10
10
6
19
16

6
1
0
1
0
0
1

14
5
4
0
0
5
4

13
5
1
1
2
3
4

20
12
4
3
3
8
2

9
5
1
5
1
3
2

2
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
0
0
0
0
0
2

3
1
0
0
0
0
1
0

16

1

1

4

5

2

1

2

123

8

32

24

35

16

3

3

2

64
0

6
0

17
0

13
0

11
0

10
0

2
0

2
0

4
0

1.40

1.64

1.14

1.38

1.47

1.41

1.00

1.40

1.33

$1,190
1,140
1,031
109
1,004
2
134
0
23
4
3
10
4

9
3

134

$1,040 $1,059 $1,170 $1,193 $1, 288 $1, 333 $1, 660 $1, 796
1,029 1,031 1,115 1,114 1,230 1,357 1,596 1,741
1,005
986 1,141 1,257 1,296 1,295
967 1,002
24
64
113
128
89
100
300
446
1,013
965 1,008
889 1,113 1,287 1,296 1,258
6
0
0
0
9
0
0
0
10
225
66
107
108
70
300
483
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
24
8
19
22
0
33
0
35
2
0
4
10 (!)
0
0
0
1
1
23
0 (!)
0
0
0
0
11
5
0
0
28
0
0
0
3

1
103

4
1

9
13
4

(!)

104

167

3

2
7

0
0

0
99

0
20

1

24

35

0

131

168

35

203

284

484

168

- 5 -172
0
0

+54
0

7
3

171

117

98

92

168

+28
0

+17
0

+32
0

+71
0

+56
0

1

5

3
-

1
7

0

1

2
9

38

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES
T

able

2 a .—

Description of families studied

M A RQ U ETTE, MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.
All families
Item
[uette Modesto
D istrib u tio n b y O ccu p a tion o f C h ie f E a r n e r and by F a m ily T y p e

Reno

1

Families in survey...................... ................... ..............................................
Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker......... ............. ...... ........................... ........................... .
Skilled wage e a r n e r .------- --------- ------------ -------- -----------------------Semiskilled wage earner—...................... ................. ..................... .......
Unskilled wage earner........................... .............................................
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife....................................................................... .................
Man, wife, and 1 child----------- --------------- ----------------------------------Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children. -------------------------------------------------Man, wife, and 5 or more children---------------------------------------------Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6 persons)_______________
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or more persons)___________
Man, wife, and 1 adult_________________________________________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults____________________________________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults------------------------------------------------Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man and wife)______________
Adults (4 or more persons, not including man and wife)__________
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons, not including man and
wife)________________________________________________________
Adult or adults and children (4 or more persons, not including man
and wife)___________________________________________________

148

151

149

23
53
47
25

42
40
49
20

58
30
55
6

21
24
37
4
20
7
16
11
0
6
0

40
31
25
0
22
3
13
7
0
8
1

40
37
23
0
15
2
12
3
0
11
2

0

1

1

2

0

3

D istrib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker___________
Number of families having homemaker born in—
United States__________________________________
Italy__________________________________________
Germany and Austria__________________________
Russia_________________________________________
Canada (not French)----------------------------------------England_______________________________________
Ireland________________________________________
Sweden and Norway----------------------------------------Other--------------------- -----------------------------------------

0

0

2

119
0
4
1
6
1
0
6
11

144
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
4

120
14
2
1
1
1
2
1
5

151
3.42

149
3.30

18
1
5
16

17
0
3
4

3. 32
.87
2. 45
3.06

3.20
.87
2. 33
2. 95

.15

.13

C o m p o sitio n of H o u seh old

148
Number of households_____________________________________________
4.16
Average number of persons in household____________________________
Number of households with—
19
Boarders and lodgers----------------------------------------------------------------0
Boarders only-------------------------------------------------------------------------6
Lodgers only__________________________________________________
8
Other persons___________________________________________ ______
Average size of economic family in—
4.04
Persons, total_________________________________________________
1. 38
Under 16 years of age_______________________________________
2. 66
16 years of age and over__________________________________
3.59
Expenditure units_____________________________________________
Average number of persons in household not members of economic
.23
family__________________________________________________________
1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age; “ adults” are persons 16 years




of age and over.

39

TABULAR SUMMARY
T able

2a.— Description of fa m ilie s

stu died —

Continued

M ARQ U ETTE, M ICH.; M ODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.—Continued
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

Earnings and Incom e

Families in survey---------- ------ -------------------------------------------------------Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners_____________________ ____________
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers__________________________
Other net rents________________________________________________
Interest and dividends_________________________________________
Pensions and insurance annuities_____________ _____ ____________
Gifts from persons outside economic family______________________
Other sources of income________________________________________
Deductions from income (business losses and expenses)___________
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities)________
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities)________
Inheritance__________ ________ ______________________ _____ ____
Average number of gainful workers per family................................ .........
Average amount of—
Net family income............................................................... ......... ........
Earnings of individuals____ ________________________________
Chief earner------------ ------------ ----------------------------------------Subsidiary earner______________________________________
Males: 16 years and over_______________________________
Under 16 years-------- ------------ -----------------------------Females: 16 years and over_____________________________
Under 16 years________________________________
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers--------------------------------------Other net rents_____________ . . . ____ ___________________________
Interest and dividends---- ------ --------------------------- ------ ---------------Pensions and insurance annuities_______________________________
Gifts from persons outside economic family---------------------------------Other sources of income________________________________________
Deductions from income (business losses and expenses)----------------Surplus per family having surplus (net increase in assets and/or
decrease in liabilities)
Deficit per family having deficit (net decrease in assets and/or
increase in liabilities)------------------------------------------------------------Net change in assets and liabilities for all families in survey----------Inheritance------------- ------ ----------------- --------------------------------------i Less than $0.60.

200982°— 41-




-4

148

161

149

32
18
7
6
4
10
2
27
114
31
3
1.27

79
17
8
4
3
10
9
8
83
65
2
1.70

31
18
11
6
7
10
7
8
80
60
0
1.23

$1, 307
1, 288
1, 217
71
1,180
0)
108
0
14
6
6
3
2
1
12

$1,472
1,445
1,289
156
1, 266
1
178
0)
11
7
1
2
2
6
2

$1, 587
1, 542
1,428
114
1,417
0
125
0
19
9
3
9
3
3
1

168

172

218

243
+79
1

174
+19
2

196
+38
0

40

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES
T

able

3 . — E x p e n d itu r es f o r gro u p s o f item s , b y eco n o m ie level

10 NEW HAMPSHIRE CITIES SEPARATELY
Item

Nash­
ua

Con­ Berlin Ports­ Keene D over La­ Clare­ Little­ Con­
cord
mouth
conia mont
ton
way

D istrib u tio n by N a tiv ity o f
H om em aker

Families in survey_________
Number of families having
no homemaker...................
Number of families having
homemaker born in—
United States__________
Italy__________________
Germany and Austria___
Poland________________
Canada (not French)___
England_______________
Ireland________________
Norway and Sweden____
Canada (French).........
Other_________________




100

99

100

93

95

98

99

100

98

99

0

2

0

0

1

2

2

0

0

0

60
1
0
7
1
1
1
0
24
5

85
1
0
0
4
1
1
1
2
2

58
0
1
0
1
1
0
4
34
1

71
7
0
0
5
0
6
2
0
2

74
1
1
0
6
2
0
1
6
3

67
0
0
2
12
3
9
0
0
3

82
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
13
0

68
0
3
3
3
0
0
0
23
0

80
0
0
0
14
0
1
0
0
3

93
0
0
0
4
1
0
0
0
1

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

3 .—

41

Expenditures for groups of items, by economic level— Continued
NASHUA, CONCORD, AN D BERLIN, N. H.
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Un­
der
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

E x p en d itu r e s fo r G ro u p s o f I te m s

Families in survey___ ____ _
-- ------------Average family size:
Persons.-. ______ - ------------------------Expenditure units
....................
Food expenditure units-----------------------Clothing expenditure units___ ___

299

16

72

74

52

36

21

13

15

3.84
3.43
3.30
2.92

7.40
6.12
6.01
5.01

4.97
4.34
4. 21
3.64

3.87
3.50
3.33
2.95

3.26
2.98
2.86
2.58

2.69
2.51
2.42
2.16

2.44
2.32
2.19
2.05

2.51
2. 35
2.25
1.95

2.20
2.16
2.09
2.08

Average annual current expenditure for—
All items_____________________________ $1,289 $1,071 $1,079 $1,194 $1,314 $1,367 $1,442 $1,817 $2,006
444
436
496
437
428
394
474
401
469
Food_____________________________
142
120
144
131
134
153
194
228
130
Clothing__________________________
141
184
197
139
189
224
258
299
389
Housing ------ -----------------------------103
115
124
142
131
147
135
148
177
Fuel, light, and refrigeration-----------50
32
36
34
58
64
72
72
108
Other household operation--------- _..
52
41
25
33
39
38
Furnishings and equipment________
24
68
94
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
25
10
54
143
71
77
88
127
238
chase, operation, and maintenance1
5
10
20
Other transportation - _____ _ - - 8
6
10
10
9
23
22
25
26
26
28
27
27
38
Personal care______________________
15
53
36
46
74
59
61
59
139
Medical care____- _____ - ----------72
57
41
65
76
85
104
88
108
Recreation------ -------------------------- -5
4
2
9
3
5
27
0
Education----------------- ----------------5
3
2
2
4
4
2
4
13
Vocation____________________ _____
7
32
27
30
24
24
27
25
28
23
Community welfare_______________
Gifts and contributions to persons
21
4
8
24
31
40
11
44
67
outside the economic family____ 2
5
4
3
1
7
9
4
24
Other items __ _ _______ _
______
Percentage of total annual current expendi­
ture for—
All items__________________ _________ 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
33.8 46.3 41.1 36.6 32.6 28.8 27.8 26.1 23.4
Food__________________ _________
12.2 11.1 11.2 10.9 11.2
9.0 10.7 11.4
Clothing_________ _______________ 11.0
15.3
13.0 13.1 15.4 14.4 16.4 17.9 16.5 19.4
Housing__________________________
10.2
9.6 10.7 10.4 11.2 10.0 10.3
7.1
Fuel, light, and refrigeration----------9.7
Other household operation_________
3.0
3.3
4.4
3.9
2.8
5.0
4.0
5.4
4.7
3.2
2.3
3.1
3.3
Furnishings and equipment________
2.9
3.8
1.7
3.7
4.7
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
2.3
4.5
chase, operation, and maintenance. _
5.5
.9
5.8
6.4
8.8
7.9 11.9
.1
.5
Other transportation_____ _ _ ____
.6
.5
.8
.7
.7
1.1
.4
2.2
2.2
2.0
2.0
1.9
2.0
1.9
1.5
1.9
Personal care______________________
4.1
1.4
3.3
3.9
4.6
4.3
5.1
7.6
2.9
Medical care__________________
6.2
Recreation------ ---- ---------------------5.6
3.8
5.3
5.4
5.8
5.9
5.2
6.1
Education ________ . - _______ .4
.2
.2
1.5
0
.8
.4
.4
.3
.3
.2
.3
.2
.3
.2
.1
.5
.6
Vocation.-- . _________ _________
2.1
1.2
3.0
2.1
2.3
2.0
1.3
Community welfare____________ . .
2.5
1.6
Gifts and contributions to persons
2.3
2.2
3.3
outside the economic family______
1.6
.4
.9
1.8
3.0
.7
.4
.2
.3
.1
.7
.4
.3
1.2
Other item s______________ ________
.7




42

MONET DISBURSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 3 . — E x p e n d itu r es f o r g r o u p s o f item s, b y eco n o m ic level— Continued
PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ONT, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Un­
der
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

E x p e n d itu r e s f o r Q r o u p s o f item s

Families in survey------------------------------------Average family size:
Persons_______________________________
Expenditure units------------------ ------------Food expenditure units.. _________ ____
Clothing expenditure units________ ____

485

29

97

111

125

63

26

12

22

3.54
3.29
3.08
2.74

5. 93
5. 39
5.08
4. 36

4.99
4. 52
4. 22
3. 23

3. 59
3. 37
3.15
2.82

2.86
2.70
2.54
2.24

2. 55
2. 45
2.29
2.05

2. 47
2. 39
2.28
2.05

2. 38
2. 31
2.17
2.08

2.23
2.10
2.04
1.83

Average annual current expenditure for—
$1, 251
All items----------------- ---------------------426
Food_____________ _________ .. ..
133
Clothing--------------------------------------186
Housing__________________________
138
Fuel, light, and refrigeration_______
49
Other household operation. _ ___ .
41
Furnishings and equipment________
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
74
chase, operation, and maintenance. 5
Other transportation________ ______
25
Personal care_____
_________ ....
45
Medical care-------- ----------- --------72
Recreation._ -------------------- __ _ . . .
Education____________ _________
4
Vocation. ___________ _________ .
2
22
Community welfare_____
. ___ .
Gifts and contributions to persons
23
outside the economic family______
6
Other items_____________ _______
Percentage of total annual current expendi­
ture for—
All items------ ------------------------- . . . . 100.0
34.0
F ood... .
’. ------ . . . .
.. .10.6
. . -------------Clothing-------------14.9
Housing.
_ ----------------- --------. . .
11.0
Fuel, light, and refrigeration..
Other household operation______. . .
3.9
3.3
Furnishings and e q u i p m e n t ._____
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
5.9
chase, operation, and maintenance._
.4
Other transportation._ . . . _ -----2.0
Personal care_______ ________ _
..
3.6
Medical c a r e ______ _________ ___
Recreation
___________________
5.8
.3
Education___________ . ._. ------Vocation______________________ . . .
.2
1.8
Community welfare___ .
_______
Gifts and contributions to persons
1.8
outside the economic fam ily______
.5
Other items_________ ___________
1 Less than 0.05 percent.




$948 $1,143 $1,158 $1,196 $1. 342 $1, 572 $1, 822 $1, 916
414
464
407
393
417
483
617
405
111
127
126
132
126
185
180
182
132
164
178
180
200
268
212
270
82
125
127
149
152
148
161
197
37
41
38
49
62
58
53
106
14
26
40
67
36
41
73
75
28
3
20
23
50
1
1
18

26
4
26
40
60
4
1
20

52
4
23
46
64
5
2
23

70
4
22
44
68
3
2
20

76
6
26
48
91
4
4
22

129
6
32
58
81
12
3
24

207
12
38
67
123
0
5
38

328
4
35
61
125
4
2
36

5
9

13
2

18
5

20
10

38
5

33
3

35
1

76
10

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
43.7 40.6 35.1 32.9 31.1 30.7 33.9 21.2
11.7 11.1 10.9 10.5
9.8 11.8
9.9
9.5
13.9 14.4 15.4 15.0 14.9 17.0 11.6 14.1
8.7 10.9 11.0 12.5 11.0
9.7
8.8 10.3
3.3
3.9
3.6
4.1
4.3
3.9
2.9
5.5
2.3
3.43.0
1.5
5.0
2.6
4.0
3.9
3.0
.3
2.1
2.4
5.3
.1
.1
1.9
.5
.9

2.3
4.5
.3
.3
2.3
2.0
3.5 . 4.0
5.3
5.5
.3
.4
.1
.2
1.7
2.0

5.8
.3
1.8
3.7
5.7
.3
.2
1.7

5.7
.5
1.9
3.6
6.8
.3
.3
1.6

8.2
.4
2.0
3.7
5.2
.8
.2
1.5

11.4
.7
2.1
3.7
6.7
0
.3
2.1

17.1
.2
1.8
3.2
6.5
.2
.1
1.9

1.1
.2

1.7
.8

2.8
.4

2.1
.2

1.9
C)
1

4.0
.5

1.6
.4

43

TABULAR SUMMARY
T able

3.-— E x p en d itu res

f o r grou ps o f item s , b y econ om ic level —

Continued

LITTLE TO N AND CONWAY, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

E x p en d itu r e s fo r G ro u p s o f Item s

Families in survey--------- ------------------- -------Average family size:
Persons_____ _ __ ---------------- --------- -Expenditure units_____________ _______
Food expenditure units________________
Clothing expenditure units___________ .

197

14

51

40

49

27

5

5

6

3. 62
3. 30
3.13
2. 71

6. 94
6. 01
5. 89
4. 62

4. 75
4. 21
3. 93
3. 34

3. 41
3.15
2. 98
2. 59

2.74
2. 57
2. 41
2. 22

2. 50
2. 42
2. 30
2.00

2.62
2.50
2. 43
2.16

2.20
2.17
2.08
2.13

1.95
1. 97
1.98
1.99

Average annual current expenditure for—
All items---------- ------------------------------- $1,159 $1,015 $1, 037 $1, 083 $1,131 $1, 283 $1, 586 $1, 627 $1, 934
Food______
_________ _
_____
392
487
401
354
424
444
385
365
454
Clothing______________________
115
142
105
110
104
126
146
180
130
Housing____ ____ _
________
144
80
119
165
150
98
141
147
312
Fuel, light, and refrigeration____ ___
122
107
109
120
131
116
199
133
127
Other household operation.. . . .
44
41
39
33
45
49
58
87
78
Furnishings and equipment... . . . ..
51
37
30
36
59
70
53
172
170
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
chase, operation, and maintenance. _
90
4
15
82
149
68
288
124
399
Other transportation __ . . . ______ _
3
2
4
2
2
6
12 0)
1
Personal care. . . . .
________ _
23
19
21
22
23
27
35
31
23
Medical care. ___________________
52
44
15
47
72
136
57
68
24
Recreation.. ._ _ ___ ___ _________
63
43
62
51
59
86
89
123
78
Education___ ______ ____ _______ _
2
4
0
1
2
1
3
0
0
Vocation. ________________ _____ _
4
4
9
5
1
2
2
8
6
Community welfare.. _ _____ ____
20
12
21
29
20
17
25
18
21
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family___ _
20
6
9
1
C
35
104
15
35
11
14
Other ite m s_____________ _ ______
16
16
17
8
10
38
28
7
Percentage of total annual current expendi­
ture for—
All items__________________________
100.0
Food_______ ____ __________ ______
33.8
Clothing.
______________________
9.9
Housing____ _____________________
12.4
Fuel, light, and refrigeration________ 10.5
Other household operation_______ .
3.8
Furnishings and equipment________
4.4
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
chase, operation, and maintenance-_
7.8
Other transportation _ __
____
.3
Personal care_______ . . . _______ _
2.0
Medical care.
_ ._ ___________ .
4.5
Recreation. _ __________ . . . _____
5.4
Education
_ ...
________ _
.2
.4
Vocation.. . _______ _____ ___ _
Community welfare_______________
1.7
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family _
1.7
1.2
Other items. ________ .
.. ____




i Less than $0.50.

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
48.0 38.7 35.5 32.3 27.6 26.7 27.3 23.5
14.0 10.1 10.2
9.2
9.8
9.2 11.1
6.7
7.9 11. 5 13.6 14.6 11.7
6.2
8.7 16.1
10.5 10. 5 12.1 10.6 10.4
7.3 12.2
6.6
4.0
3.8
3.2
3.8
3.8
3.7
5.3
4.0
4.1 10.8
2.9
5.2
3.6
3.3
4.3
8.8
.4
.2
1.9
1.5
4.2
.1
.4
1.2

6.6
.2
2.0
4.5
4.9
.4
.5
1.6

4.2
.2
2.1
5.3
5.4
.2
.1
1.9

7.2
.5
1.9
3.9
5.5
.1
.2
2.2

11.6
.3
2.1
5.6
6.7
.3
.6
1.4

18.2
.8
2.2
4.3
5.6
0
.1
1.8

7.6
(2
)
1.9
8.3
7.6
0
.6
1.2

20.6
.1
1.2
1.2
4.0
0
.3
1.1

.6
1.7

.9
1.5

1.4
.7

1.7
.9

2.7
1.3

.7
2.4

2.2
1.7

5.4
.4

2 Less than 0.05 percent.

44

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 3a. — E x p e n d itu r es f o r gro u p s o f item s
M A RQ U ETTE , MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

E x p en d itu r e s fo r G ro u p s o f Item s

Families in survey.. _ _
_
_
_
Average family size:
Persons.
__
_ ______
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Expenditure units___ __ ______
____
_
Average annual current expenditure for—
All items_________
_
Clothing

_

_ _

_

____________

151

149

3.32
3.06

3.29
2.96

$1, 243
470
149
156
98
54
49

$1, 464
443
167
193
95
58
70

$1, 555
458
172
234
117
78
61

57
6
27
53
58
9
5
15
22
15

165
7
36
72
84
9
4
13
36
12

157
5
33
88
82
2
7
9
44
8

100.0
37.8
12.0
12.6
7.9
4.3
3.9

100.0
30.3
11.4
13. 2
6.5
4.0
4.8

100.0
29.5
11.1
15.0
7.5
5.0
3.9

4.5
.5
2.2
4.3
4.7
.7
.4
1.2
1.8
1.2

11.3
.5
2.4
4.9
5.7
.6
.3
.9
2.4
.8

10.1
3
2.1
5.7
5.3
.1
.5
.6
2.8
.5

____

_ __

_
_

__

_

_ _

_

Fuel, light, and refrigeration _
Other household operation_____
_ _
_ _
Furnishings and equipment_____ _________
____
____
Automobile and motorcycle—purchase, operation, and mainte­
nance.
___ _
_
_
_
__
Other transportation_
_
Personal care_______
___
_ _
_____
Medical care.. _____
_ _ _ _ _ -----_ _
_ __
Recreation.__
_
_ _
_
__ _
Education __ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _
Vocation ____ _ ___ __ _
__
Community welfare________________ _
-----------Gifts and contributions to persons outside of economic family. __
Other items____
____
________
_____________ _
Percentage of total annual current expenditure for—
All items _____ _ _______ _ _____
_____
_
__ ____ _ _ _ _ ___
F o o d ___ _ _ _
C lo th in g __
_
_ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Housing
__
__ ___
___
__
Fuel, light, and refrigeration
Other household operation____
Furnishings and equipment_______
Automobile and motorcycle—purchase, operation, and mainte­
nance
Other transportation. .
Personal care____ _
Medical care..
__
_ _ _
Recreation_
_
Education
_
_ _
Vocation ___
Community welfare.. .
Gifts and contributions to persons outside of economic family __
Other items. .
_ _
_
__ ___ ______ _




148
4.00
3. 59

♦

45

TABULAR SUMMARY
T a b l e 3b. — E x p e n d itu r es f o r gro u p s o f item s
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES SEPARATELY
Item

Nashua Con­
cord

Ports­
La­
Berlin mouth Keene Dover conia Clare­ Little­
mont
ton

Families in survey___ _____
100
99
100
93
95
98
99
98
100
Average family size:
Persons___ ___ _______
4.07
3.99
3. 43
3.78
3.38
3. 56
3. 50
3.47
3. 48
Expenditure units______
3.58
3.63
3.09
3. 47
3.15
3.31
3. 25
3.28
3. 21
3. 48
2. 93
Food expenditure units__
3. 51
3.24
2. 92
3.11
3. 07
3.09
3.03
Clothing expenditure units
2. 99
2. 58
2. 93
2. 58
3.17
2. 79
2. 65
2. 66
2. 76
Average total family income. $1, 437 $1, 465 $1,133 $1, 396 $1, 241 $1,292 $1, 305 $1,163 $1,138
Average annual current ex­
penditure for—
All items____ _. ______ $1, 357 $1, 394 $1,109 $1, 370 $1, 204 $1, 258 $1, 253 $1,167 $1,122
Food__________ _______
416
474
409
463
427
447
423
379
359
Clothing... __________
131
123
150
117
150
171
128
122
106
Housing________ _____
202
243
148
185
201
162
197
183
148
Fuel, light, and refriger­
ation________________
103
134
132
161
157
135
138
121
122
Other household opera­
tion_________________
54
51
53
60
37
46
46
50
47
Furnishings and equip­
ment________________
39
32
38
50
48
47
37
56
37
Automobile and motor­
cycle—purchase, oper­
ation, and maintenance113
46
59
55
91
67
77
75
86
other transportation___
9
5
3
8
6
5
6
3
3
Personal care__________
25
24
28
26
23
27
23
25
23
41
Medical care__________
54
55
49
35
50
52
46
49
Recreation._
______
72
68
78
75
67
69
75
72
65
Education____________
4
2
8
4
4
3
8
2
1
Vocation_________ ____
1
2
3
3
7
5
1
2
1
21
21
Community welfare___
18
33
23
23
30
23
24
Gifts and contributions
to persons outside the
19
21
18
economic family_ .
_
22
30
10
30
14
27
Other items_____
6
9
4
6
3
5
7
4
14
Percentage of total annual
current expenditure
for—
All items_______________
Food_________________
Clothing______________
Housing______________
Fuel, light, and refriger­
ation ___________
Other household opera­
tion ... _____________
Furnishings and equip­
ment ______ _______
Automobile and motor­
cycle—purchase, oper­
ation, and mainte­
nance_______________
Other transportation___
Personal care__________
Medical care__________
Recreation____ _ _____
Education____________
___
V ocation______
Community welfare.._
Gifts and contributions
to persons outside the
economic family____
Other items___ ________




100.0
34.1
12.6
14.9

100.0
30.6
9.4
17.4

9.7
3.9

Con­
way
99
3. 75
3. 40
3.24
2. 77
$1, 238

$1,195
424
124
139
123
37
46
95
4
23
54
62
2
7
16
26
13

100.0
37.5
11.1
13.4

100.0
34.6
10.9
13.5

100.0
34.0
9.7
16.7

100.0
35.5
11.9
12.9

100.0
33.8
10.2
15.7

100.0
32.5
10.4
15.7

100.0
32.0
9.4
13.2

100.0
35. 5
10.4
11.6

11.3

9.3

11.8

11.1

10.7

11.0

10.4

10.9

10.3

4.3

3.3

3.7

4.5

3.7

3.7

4.0

4.5

3.1

3.5

2.8

3.4

3.7

2.7

3.8

3.0

3.2

5.0

3.9

4.1
.6
2.1
4.0
5.5
.6
.2
2.2

8.1
.6
1.9
3.9
5.2
.3
.5
1.3

4.2
.5
2.1
4.4
6.1
.2
.1
3.0

6.6
.4
2.0
2.6
5.7
.2
.1
1.5

4.9
.4
2.1
3.4
5.6
.7
.2
1.7

5.3
.3
1.9
4.0
5.5
.3
.4
1.8

6.1
.5
1.8
4.2
6.0
.3
.1
1.8

6.4
.3
2.1
3.9
6.2
.1
.2
2.0

7.7
.3
2.0
4.4
5.8
.2
.1
2. 1

7.9
.3
1.9
4.5
5.2
.2
.6
1.3

1.6
.4

2.2
.2

.9
.5

2.2
.5

1.6
.7

1.7
.3

1.4
.4

2.3
.3

1.2
1.2

2.2
1.1

46

MONET DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES'

T a b l e 4. — D is p o s itio n o f m o n e y received d u rin g schedule yea r not used f o r current
ex p en d itu re, and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use fr o m sources other than fa m i l y
in co m e in schedule yea r, b y econ om ic level

NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.

Item

All
families

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500
and
over

D is p o s itio n o f M o n e y R eceiv ed D u r in g the S ch ed u le Y ea r N o t
U sed f o r C u rr e n t F a m ily E x p e n d itu r e

Families in survey__________________ ___________ _______
Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash:
On hand_______ _______ ____ __________ ____
In checking account.______ ______________ ____ _
In savings account________ _________ ____ ..
Investment in:
Improvements in own home _ . ________ ____
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages) _
Building and loan shares_______________________
Stocks and bonds . . . ----------------------- . . . __
Other property-----------------------------------------------Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance____ ________________ ______ _____
Annuities_________ __________________________
Increase in outstanding loans to others. ______ . . .
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and down pay­
ment on own home__________________ ____ _ . . . .
Payment on principal of other mortgages___________
Payment of debts to:
Banks------------------------------- ----------------------------Insurance companies---------------------------- --------Small-loan companies_______ _ _____________ _
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles_____________________________ _
Other goods _______
. . .
_ ...
. .
Individuals. __________ . . . ______ _ _ _ _ _
Other_______ _______ ______________________

299

88

74

52

85

5
1
52

1
0
4

0
0
7

1
0
9

3
1
32

16
6
8
1
2

5
1
0
0
1

4
1
2
0
0

2
3
1
0
1

5
1
5
1
0

286
3
2

85
0
0

71
0
0

48
0
1

82
3
1

31
10

11
5

9
3

5
0

6
2

1
1
1

0
0
0

1
0
1

0
0
0

0
1
0

5
13
3
29

0
4
2
15

2
3
0
5

0
1
0
2

3
5
1
7

Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities_________ _ $172.16 $148.82 $159. 76 $196. 42
Increase in assets.. . ____ __________________ _______ _ . 136. 27 123. 68 129.15 137.11
Increase in cash:
0
On hand . _
. . . ______. . . _____ ______ . . .
4.17
.32
15. 27
0
.06
0
In checking accoun t__ ______ ______ ______ _
0
In savings account . . .
_ _____________
_ . . 18.85
2.19
18.91
13. 77
Investment in:
4. 72
3.01
Improvements in own hom e.. . _____
8.08
1. 53
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages).
2. 93
.94
6. 37
2. 73
Building and loan shares_______ ___________ .
0
2. 56
3. 07
1. 59
Stocks and bonds________________ _______ _ . . .
0
.48
0
0
Other property___ __________ . ______
23. 22
0
6. 99
.91
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance_________________________________ 94.19
97.86
94.00
90.54
Annuities... _______ __________________ _____
.34
0
0
0
Increase in outstanding loans to o th e r s..___________
0
.98
0
5. 63
Decrease in liabilities____________________________ ___ 35. 89
25.14
30. 61
59. 31
Payment on principal of mortgages and down pay­
ment on own home__
_ I___________________
17.12
8. 61
16.02
52.05
1. 56
2.15
Payment on principal of other mortgages-...................
1. 73
0
Payment of debts to:
Banks______________________ _______________
0
.33
1. 35
0
Insurance companies___________ ______________
.19
0
0
0
Small-loan companies________________ _______
.09
0
.38
0
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles. _ _______________________ _
2. 95
0
4.90
0
Other goods__________ ________ _____ _______
3. 30
3. 59
1.70
4.24
Individuals_______________ ________ ___
_ _
1.12
1. 71
0
0
Other________ ________________ _______________
9. 23
9.08
4.53
3.02




$192. 35
155.02
4.99
.20
40. 49
5. 53
2.14
5. 37
1.68
0
93. 43
1.18
.01
37. 33
5. 53
1.74
0
.67
0
6.12
3. 82
2.17
17.28

47

TABULAR SUMMARY

T a b l e 4 .— D is p o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
ex p en d itu re, and f u n d s m ade available f o r fa m i ly use fr o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule yea r, by econ om ic level— Continued

NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN , N. H.—Continued

Item

All
families

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500
and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le fo r F a m ily U se F r o m S ou rces Other T h an
F a m ily I n c o m e in S ch ed u le Y e a r

Families in su rvey________
_________
___ _________
Number of families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash:
On hand._
__ . . _ _ __ _________________
In checking account _ _______ _________
In savings account____ . . .
_ . . . _____
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)____
Building and loan shares___ __ ___ _____ _ . . .
Stocks and bonds______ _ __ _ __________
Goods and chattels _____ _______ ________
Other property____ ________ ____________ ___
Insurance policies:
Surrender________________ _ _ _ ____ _______
Settlement_______
_________________________
Receipts from outstanding loans to others __ ______
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home. _ ________ ___
Increase in other mortgages.__
_________ _ _
Increase in debts:
Payable to b a n k s .---------------- _ __ -- ---------Payable to insurance companies
___ _ ____
Payable to small-loan companies._ ______ . . . _
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles______ _____ ____ _________ _
Other g oods____ _ _ ---------_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Payable to individuals_________________________
Other debts. _ --------------------------------------Inheritance______________________________________ ____

299

88

74

52

85

5
1
77

1
0
23

1
0
14

2
0
14

1
1
26

0
0
2
4
4

0
0
0
0
2

0
0
1
3
2

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
1
0

12
5
4

6
1
3

3
0
1

1
1
0

2
3
0

4
2

1
1

1
0

2
0

0
1

3
8
1

0
0
0

1
6
1

2
0
0

0
2
0

9
37
4
70
0

0
11
1
24
0

1
12
2
26
0

1
6
0
10
0

7
8
1
10
0

$84. 96 $121. 96
27.00
70. 62

$126.88
66. 79

Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities----- ------ $108. 71 $103. 29
Decrease in assets.__________________ _______
_._ 58. 72
70. 56
Reduction in cash:
4. 92
On hand_________ _______ _ ----------------1.58
In checking account _________________________
0
.38
In savings account
. ._ _ ______________
42.07
57.10
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages) _ __ _
0
0
Building and loan shares... ___ _ __ ________ _
0
0
Stocks and bonds
__ _____________ _______ _
1.39
0
Goods and chattels
---------- ---------- -- -------.21
0
Other property___
_ ______________ ________
.30
.57
Insurance policies:
6.27
7. 79
Surrender _. ------------- --------------------------- -- ___
2. 61
Settlement____ ____ _______
_. ___ ________
1.74
Reduction in outstanding loans to others___
_ ___
.57
1.78
Increase in liabilities----------- ------------------------------- 49. 99
32. 73
Increase in mortgages on own home--------- ----------8.13
3. 97
Increase in other mortgages_______ _ ----------------2.34
1.50
Increase in debts:
Payable to banks________ .. . ._. __ _ . __
.74
0
Payable to insurance companies
.__ ----------3.80
0
Payable to small-loan companies
_______ ____
.27
0
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
5. 25
Automobiles _
__
. ___
0
Other goods___________ ._ __ _______
_ . 10. 75
8. 36
Payable to individuals_________________________
1.30
.25
18. 65
Other debts------------------ ------------------------------17. 41
0
0
Inheritance______________________ _______ ___________




3.10
0 •
13. 78
0
0
2. 21
.62
.53

18. 56
0
44.03
0
0
0
0
0

1.61
1.34
49.95
0
0
2.96
.20
0

6. 57
0
.19
57.96
7. 57
0

7. 77
.26
0
51.34
29. 24
0

3. 51
7.22
0
60.09
0
6.68

1.53
8.20
1.08

2.09
0
0

0
6. 25
0

5.44
8.03
.53
25. 58
0

1.24
7. 34
0
11.43
0

12. 98
17. 67
3.85
12. 66
0

48

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 4 .— D is p o s itio n o f m o n e y received d u rin g schedule yea r not u sed f o r current
ex p e n d itu r e, and f u n d s m ade available f o r f a m i l y u se fr o m sources other than f a m i l y
in co m e in schedule yea r, hy econ om ic level— Continued

PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAR E M O N T, N. H.

All
families

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Under $300 to $400 to
$300
$400
$500

$500
and
over

D is p o s itio n o f M o n e y R eceiv ed D u r in g the S ch ed u le Y ea r N o t
U sed fo r C u rr e n t F a m ily E x p e n d itu r e

F amilies in survey__________ __________
__------- --------Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash:
On hand_____________ ___________ ____________
In checking account _____________
____
In savings account---------------------- -------------------Investment in:
Improvements in own home______________ ____ _
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages),.
Building and loan shares_______________________
Stocks and b o n d s _______
_ ___ _
Other property ______________
,, ______ ____
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance _______ _____ __________ . _ . . .
Annuities, . _____________ _______ ___________
Increase in outstanding loans to others ....... .............
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and down pay­
ment on own home___ _____________ ______ ,,
Payment on principal of other mortgages ___ _ ___
Payment of debts to:
Banks____________________
- -------------------Insurance companies____ ____________________
Small-loan companies___________ _____________
Firms selling on installment plan:
Autom obiles,____________________________
Other goods_______________________________
Individuals,, , ___________________ _ _______
Other____________________________
______ _

485

126

111

125

123

13
4
95

2
0
15

1
0
16

6
0
32

4
4
32

31
11
8
1
4

9
5
0
0
1

4
1
2
0
0

10
2
3
0
2

8
3
3
1
1

404
19
6

104
8
0

100
5
2

105
0
1

95
6
3

65
17

16
5

20
3

17
5

12
4

7
2
8

2
1
2

2
1
4

0
0
1

3
0
1

9
28
12
38

2
14
4
10

2
4
2
9

1
5
6
13

4
5
0
6

Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities, _ . ____ $176. 44 $143. 81 $155.85 $204. 77
Increase in assets_ ____ ________________ ____________ 145.28 117. 92 122.24 168. 76
_
Increase in cash:
On hand____ __________________ _________
1.68
.64
.02
3.45
In checking account _________________________
.91
0
0
0
In savings account______ _______ ____ __________ 32. 77
14. 49
18.83
53.27
Investment in—
Improvements in own home, _ _________________
8. 52
6. 95
11.47
8.83
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages).,
5.40
1.29
8. 34
4. 73
Building and loan shares______________ _______
1.78
0
.98
4. 21
Stocks and bonds_____________ , ________
.20
0
0
0
Other property________________ _____________ 10. 72
14. 95
0
16. 27
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
______
Life insurance _ _______ ____ _____
78. 37
69.12
84. 64
77. 41
Annuities... _________________________________
2. 93
3. 43
3. 93
0
Increase in outstanding loans to others______________
2.00
1.08
.59
0
Decrease in liabilities. _ ______________________________
31.16
25.89
33. 61
36. 01
Payment on principal of mortgages and down pay­
ment on own home_____ _____________ _______ _
13. 89
8.25
18.55
15. 87
Payment on principal of other mortgages . . . _____
2.60
1. 46
2.46
2.74
Payment of debts to—
Banks__________
. . . . . _________________
1.25
2.12
1.19
0
Insurance companies_____ _________ ________ _
.19
.52
.27
0
Small-loan companies________ ________. . . _____
1. 39
1. 59
3.08
.62
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles____ __ ______ ________ ____
2. 34
1. 89
1.05
1. 22
Other goods. _
_ _ _ . ______ . . .
2. 49
3. 92
1.03
1. 91
Individuals _ __
_ _ _________ _
1. 33
1.94
.65
2.63
Other______________ _________________________
5.68
4. 45
5.08
11.02




$199. 65
170.27
2.45
3.58
43.25
7.17
6. 77
1.86
.79
10. 43
83.16
4.49
6. 32
29.38
13.44
3. 75
1. 67
0
.46
5.09
2. 91
0
2.

49

TABULAR SUMMARY

T a b l e 4. — D is p o s itio n o f m o n e y recieved d u rin g schedule yea r not used f o r current
exp en d itu re , and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i l y use f r o m sources other than f a m i l y
in co m e in schedule ye a rf b y econ om ic level— Continued

PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ONT, N. H.—Continued

Item

All
families

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500
and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le f o r F a m ily U se F r o m S ou rces O ther
T h a n F a m ily I n c o m e in S chedule Y e a r

Families in survey._ _________ ___ ____ _____ ________
Number of families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash:
On h a n d _____________________________________
In checking account______ _____________________
In savings account_________ __________________
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)____
Building and loan shares_______ ________
Stocks and bonds. ________________ __________
Goods and chattels______________________ _____
Other property_______________ ________________
Insurance policies:
Surrender. . _ _______________________________
Settlement.__________________ ______________
Receipts from outstanding loans to others________ . _
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home________________
Increase in other mortgages________________________
Increase in debts:
Payable to banks___________ ___________ . ..
Payable to insurance companies__________ __ _
Payable to small-loan companies____________ . . .
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles.. ________ ________________ __
Other goods. _______________________ ______
Payable to individuals______________________ .
Other debts_ . . . __ ________________________
_
Inheritance.
_____ ___ ________________ __

485

126

111

125

123

22
6
123

5
0
20

7
0
17

4
1
42

6
5
44

1
1
4
10
3

0
0
0
1
2

0
0
1
6
1

1
0
1
1
0

0
1
2
3
0

34
14
7

16
5
1

14
3
0

0
2
3

4
4
3

7
2

3
1

3
0

1
1

0
0

11
16
14

3
6
4

2
4
6

2
2
2

4
4
2

16
72
29
112
0

2
18
8
41
0

3
19
7
32
0

2
15
9
23
0

9
20
5
16
0

Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities___________ $141.11 $123. 37 $139. 85 $136. 21
62. 33
74.06
____________Decrease in assets
____________________ __ 86.04
91.68
Reduction in cash:
4. 52
1.07
7.00
2.48
On hand___ _________ _____________________ .
1. 85
0
0
.23
In checking account___ ___ ________________
30. 26
26.68
68. 32
In savings account . . ________ ___________ __ _ 49.88
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)_____
.36
0
0
1. 39
Building and loan shares__________________ _ .
0
0
0
.51
2. 66
0
1. 56
Stocks and bonds____________ ______________ __
1. 21
3. 31
.04
Goods and chattels____________________________
1.14
.27
Other property_______ ______ _____ __ ____ _
_.
.23
.67
.22
0
Insurance policies:
26. 63
12. 67
20. 30
0
Surrender____________________________________
15.74
9. 55
8.81
7. 56
Settlement.___ _____________________________
.95
Reduction in outstanding loans to others____________
0
1.92
4.12
61.04
65. 79
44. 53
Increase in liabilities___________ _____ _____ ___________
55.07
Increase in mortgages on own home________________
12.98
11. 37
9.87
8. 52
1.43
Increase in other mortgages.. _____________________
0
1.72
.81
Increase in debts:
3. 53
1. 27
1. 66
Payable to banks_____________ _____________ _
2.83
4. 25
5. 35
Payable to insurance companies______ _____ ____
3. 54
2. 78
5.00
1. 85
Payable to small-loan companies __ _______ _____
3.19
2. 39
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles ________ ____________________
1. 59
2.28
2.17
4.80
6.20
6. 58
Other goods___________________ _____ _____
8. 33
8. 83
4.92
3.29
9.19
3. 49
Payable to individuals_________________________
28.40
8.71
Other debts. __ ______________________________ 18.13
25.18
0
0
0
0
Inheritance___________________________________ _______




$165. 48
115.47
7.91
7.07
72.16
0
2.03
.79
1.20
0
5.14
5.84
13.33
50.01
0
0
4. 71
1.96
3. 74
13. 02
11.85
3. 52
11. 21
0

50

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 4. — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y recieved d u rin g schedule yea r not used f o r current
ex p en d itu re , and f u n d s m ade available f o r f a m i l y use f r o m sources other than f a m i l y
in co m e in schedule y e a r , b y econ om ic level— Continued

L ITTLE TO N AND CONW AY, N. H.

Item

All
families

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Under $300 to $400 to
$300
$400
$500

$500
and
over

D is p o s itio n o f M o n e y R eceiv ed D u r in q the S chedu le Y e a r N o t
U sed fo r C u rren t F a m ily E x p en d itu r e

------------------------------ --------------Families in survey.
.
Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash:
On hand . _____________ _____ - -.- --------------In checking account
--------------------- -------In savings account____________ . ----------------- .
Investment in:
Improvements in own home .
_
_ _____ Other real estate (including real estate mortgages) __
Building and loan shares_______________________
Stocks and bonds.. ____________________ _____
Other property____ ___________________________
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance. _______
_ ________ _
...
Annuities.. __
. . . ------ -- . . . ------------ ----Increase in outstanding loans to others . ------------- .
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and down pay­
ment on own home. . . .
__________ . .
Payment on principal of other mortgages-----------------Payment of debts to:
Banks ___
___ . . . --------------------------Insurance companies __ ________ ______ ______
____
____________
Small-loan companies..
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles..
. . . . .. _______________ .
Other goods
_ ________ __________ .
Individuals . . . .
________________________ .
Other___ . ___________________
___ _______

197

65

40

49

43

14
3
28

2
0
6

1
1
6

6
1
7

5
1
9

20
2
0
2
6

4
1
0
0
3

4
0
0
1
1

7
0
0
1
0

5
1
0
0
2

165
2
4

53
0
1

31
0
1

42
1
1

39
1
1

28
7

11
4

7
2

3
1

7
0

2
0
1

0
0
0

1
0
1

1
0
0

0
0
0

2
13
3
21

0
3
1
10

1
0
0
5

1
6
2
3

0
4
0
3

Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities___________ $162. 64 $107.19 $134.87 $135. 70
76. 76 104. 64 112. 23
.
----------------- . 124. 70
Increase in assets.. _____
Increase in cash:
4.19
2. 93
1.86
4.16
On hand___________ . ---------------- ----------------1.30
0
4.24
In checking account
. . . _ ----------------------------.60
4.44
14.78
17.05
In savings account .
----------------------------------- 23. 72
Investment in:
9. 66
3.49
11.46
14.03
Improvements in own home_______________ ____
.29
0
0
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages) _.
.87
0
0
0
0
Building and loan shares. . _
_ ___
.89
0
2.94
1.20
Stocks and bonds___ ____ ____________________
8.56
0
.88
Other property________________________________ 12. 73
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
74.17
70. 38
58.10
65.58
Life insurance.. . __________ ________ ______
.47
0
0
.72
____________
Annuities_____________________
.49
.02
1. 83
.30
Increase in outstanding loans to others________ _____
30. 43
30.23
23.47
Decrease in liabilities _. . . _. .
. . . _____
. 37.94
Payment on principal of mortgages and down payment
12.26
9.76
14.78
7.09
on own hom e._______ ___________ ______ _ . _
1. 51
2. 36
1. 56
1.66
Payment on principal of other mortgages ______ ..
Payments of debts to—
.42
0
.74
1.18
B a n k s.._____________________________ ____ _
Insurance companies. _ _
.
. . . . _______
0
0
0
0
.46
0
2.26
0
Small-loan companies_______________________ _.
Firms selling on installment plan:
1.74
0
2.65
4.81
Automobiles____________ _________________
3. 44
2. 71
0
3.81
Other g o o d s___ _ __ ____ . . . ________
.59
.99
0
1. 05
Individuals... ________________________________
17. 52
14.61
7.80
4.31
Other..--------------------------------- -----------------------




$303.04
230. 09
8.92
1. 31
68.79
12.34
3.56
0
0
44. 57
89.08
1. 32
.20
72. 95
19. 61
0
0
0
0
0
7. 31
0
46.03

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

51

4. — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received d u rin g schedule yea r not used f o r current
ex p en d itu re , and fu n d s m ad e available f o r f a m i l y use f r o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule yea r, b y econ om ic level — Continued

a b l e

LITT L E TO N AND CONWAY, N. H.—Continued

Item

All
families

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500
and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le f o r F a m ily U se F r o m S ou rces Other T h a n
F a m ily I n c o m e in S ch ed u le Y e a r

Families in survey--------------------------------------------------------Number of families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash—
On hand______________________________________
In checking account _________________________
In savings account. . . . _______
_____________
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)____
Building and loan shares
______
______ . . .
Stocks and bonds. __ ___________ ______________
Goods and chattels _____________ ____ ________
Other property____ _________________________
Insurance policies:
Surrender______ . ________________ _______ _
Settlement... ________________________________
Receipts from outstanding loans to others___________
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home. _______________
Increase in other m ortgages........ ............................
Increase in debts—
Payable to banks. -----------------------------------------Payable to insurance companies ___ ____ ______
Payable to small-loan companies________________
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles________ ________ _____ _______
Other goods. __________ ________________
Payable to individuals_________________________
Other debts___________________ _____________
Inheritance.. ......... ........... ......................... .................

197

65

40

49

43

4
1
31

1
0
9

1
0
3

0
0
10

2
1
9

2
0
0
5
5

0
0
0
1
4

0
0
0
1
0

1
0
0
1
0

1
0
0
2
1

9
5
2

2
1
1

3
0
0

1
0
0

3
4
1

1
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

1
0

4
4
0

2
0
0

1
2
0

0
0
0

1
2
0

13
51
10
65
0

1
21
6
32
0

2
10
1
12
0

3
10
3
11
0

7
10
0
10
0

$78. 26
32.24

$64. 27
26.87

$79. 99
42.46

$347. 75
242. 79

4. 52
0
13. 81

1.41
0
14. 32

0
0
28. 71

10. 33
2. 63
34. 62

0
0
0
.05
3.23

0
0
0
2.12
0

8. 07
0
0
1.50
0

10.24
0
0
3. 47
5. 73

7.84
2. 70
.09
46. 02
0
0

9. 02
0
0
37. 40
0
0

4.18
0
0
37. 53
0
0

9.16
161. 40
5. 21
104. 96
21.01
0

3. 34
0
0

1. 92
4.28
0

2.18
5. 70
8. 37
26. 43
0

2. 77
11.81
1.42
15. 20
0

Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities_ ________ $134. 67
_
Decrease in assets.
____________ _______________ __ 79. 65
Reduction in cash:
On hand______________________________________
4. 03
In checking account
_. _____________________
.57
In savings account. . . . ______________ ____ ____
22.16
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)____
4.24
Building and loan shares_______________________
0
Stocks and bonds_____________________________
0
Goods and chattels
......................................... .
1. 58
Other property................... .....................................
2. 32
Insurance policies:
Surrender________ _ _______ __________________
7. 46
Settlement____________________________ _______ 36.12
Reduction in outstanding loans to others. ________
1.17
Increase in liabilities_______ __ _________ _____ ___ . . .
55. 02
Increase in mortgages on own h om e________________
4.59
Increase in other mortgages....... ........................ ...........
0
Increase in debts:
Payable to banks___________ ____ _____ ________
1.60
Payable to insurance companies________________
1.21
Payable to small-loan companies..... ................ ......
0
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles___________ ____ ______________
10.58
Other goods______________________ ________ 13.17
4. 41
Payable to individuals___________________ ____ _
19. 46
Other debts_____ _________________ ____ _____
Inheritance........................... ...... ..........................................
0




0
0
0
3. 37
11.77
5. 46
16. 93
0

.49
1.59
0
38. 77
27. 32
0
15.78
0

52
T

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES

4a.— D is p o s itio n o f m o n e y received d u rin g schedule yea r not used f o r cur­
rent ex p en d itu re , and f u n d s m ade available f o r f a m i l y use fr o m sources other than
f a m i l y in co m e in schedule yea r

able

M A R Q U E T T E , M IC H .; M ODESTO, CALIF.; A N D RENO, N EV.
All families
Item
Marquette

Modesto

148

151

149

26

1
0

3
5
24

4
5
15

1
0
1
3
1
1

1
0
2
0
1
2

18
4
3

Reno

D is p o s itio n o f M o n e y R eceiv ed D u r in g the S chedu le Y e a r N o t U sed fo r
C u rren t F a m ily E x p en d itu r e

Families in survey--------------------- ---------------------------- ------------- --------Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash—
On hand________________________ ____ _________________
In checking account____________________________________
In savings account.------- -----------------------------------------------Investment in—
Improvements in own home____________________________
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages)................
Building and loan shares___________ _____ _______________
Stocks and bonds______________________________________
Other property_________________________ ____ __________
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance_________________________________________
Annuities_____________________________ ____ ___________
Increase in outstanding loans to others_______________________
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and down payment on own
home_____________________________________________ ____
Payment on principal of other mortgages______ ______________
Payment of debts to—
Banks_________________________________________________
Insurance companies-------------- ------ -------------------------------Small-loan companies___________________________________
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles__________________ ____ _____ ____ ______
Other goods______________________________ ____ _____
Individuals____________________________________________
Other_________________________________________________
Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities.......... ................ .........
Increase in assets___________________________ ____ ______________
Increase in cash—
On hand______________________________________________
In checking account_______________ ____ ______ ____ _____
In savings account________________ _______ _____________
Investment in—
Improvements in own home____________________________
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages)________
Building and loan shares_______________ _____ ____ ____
Stocks and bonds_________ _____________________________
Other property________________________________________
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance_________________________________________
Annuities_____________________________________________
Increase in outstanding loans to others------------ --------------------Decrease in liabilities__________________________________________
Payment on principal of mortgages and down payment on own
home_____________________________________________ ____
Payment on principal of other mortgages____________________
Payment of debts to—
Banks__________________________ ______________________
Insurance companies___________________________________
Small-loan companies___________________________________
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles_______________________________________
Other goods________________ _______________________
Individuals____________________________________________
Other_____ ___________________________________________




2
1

128
44

119

95

16

39

30

6
1
0

1

1
0
0
1
0

6
0

2
0
0

0
0
1
0

4

4

4
7
25

7
32

5
19
9
23

$175.07
124. 77

$186. 78
104. 67

$180. 39
98.26

.16

32.67

0

1.99
4.91
17.70

.76
3. 32
12.90

5.70
.76

12.82
2.52

4.33
.78

.24
4.93

12.92
2.38
2.09
7.05
1.61

10
.2

72.54

2
1

0

.43
50. 30

51.85
1. 35
6 36
.
82.11

23.15
2.73

47. 43
1.38

6.2
0

0
0

.46

0

1.49
2.08
20. 39

53.62
1.61

0

82.13
45.72

3.23

0
0
.05
0

3. 65
8.17
2.93
15. 32

9.47
10.18
2.76
13.95

0
0

53

TABULAR SUMMARY

T

a

4a.—b D is p o s itio ln o f m o n e y received d u rin g schedule yea r not used f o r cur­
e
rent expen d itu re and fu n d s m ade available f o r fa m i ly use f r o m sources other than
f a m i l y in co m e in schedule yea r — Continued
M ARQ U ETTE, MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.—Continued
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le fo r F a m ily U se F r o m S ou rces Other T h a n F a m ily
I n c o m e in Schedu le Y ea r

Families in survey____________________ _____ ___ ___________________
Families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash—
On hand_______________ _______ _____ ________________
In checking account_______________________ ______ _____
In savings account_____________________________________
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)______________
Building and loan shares _____________________ ._ ._ ___
Stocks and bonds______ _________________________
___
Goods and chattels______ _____________________ _______
Other property____________ _____ ______________________
Insurance policies:
Surrender______________________________ _______ ______ _
Settlement________ ___________ ____ ____ _______ ________
Receipts from outstanding loans to others______ ____________
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home______________________ ___
Increase in other mortgages_________________________________
Increase in debts:
Payable to banks___________ ____________________ , _____
Payable to insurance companies___________ ________ ____
Payable to small-loan companies_________________________
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles__________ _ ___________ _____ _______
Other goods_______________ ________ _____________
Payable to individuals__________________________________
Other debts___________________________ ___ _____ _______
Inheritance____________________ - ___________________________
Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities _ . . .
_________
Decrease in assets________________
____ ____________________
Reduction in cash—
On hand_______________________________________________
In checking account______________ ____________________
In savings account.. . . . . ______________ . . . ________
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages). . . __________
Building and loan shares___ . __ . . . . ____
_______
Stocks and bonds. _ _ . . .
. _________ _____ _
Goods and chattels_____________________________________
Other property.. _________ ____________ ___________ . . .
Insurance policies:
Surrender_________ _____ ________ ____________ _______
Settlement__________________________ . . . ____________
Reduction in outstanding loans to others_______ ____ _________
Increase in liabilities_____ _____ __________ _______________ .. .
Increase in mortgages on own home . . . _ _________ ______ . ..
Increase in other mortgages___________________ ____ _____ . . .
Increase in debts:
Payable to banks__________ _____ __________ . . . ___ ____
Payable to insurance companies. . . . ______________ ____
Payable to small-loan companies________________________
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles________________ _____________________
Other goods_______ _ _____________ . . ________
Payable to individuals__________________________________
Other debts_________________ ___________ ___________
Inheritance___________ ___________________________ ___ ____ .




148

151

149

0
2
23

4
9
28

4
5
34

0
0
0
1
3

2
0
3
17
0

0
1
1
4
2

7
2
3

6
2
2

3
0
3

3
0

1
0

1
0

1
1
1

1
4
5

1
3
2

5
23
14
36
3

17
39
14
38
2

12
29
10
41
0

$96. 31
44. 67

$167. 78
85.69

$143.00
72. 75

0
1.02
32.08

3. 74
12. 43
39.03

3. 34
4.08
55.50

0
0
0
.02
.42

3. 31
0
5.63
10.19
0

0
.05
2.01
.40
1.14

6.81
1.08
4. 24
51.64
6. 45
0

4.87
5. 42
1.07
82.09
.67
0

2.40
0
3.83
70. 25
5.50
0

.86
.11
1.52

1.99
.84
3.30

.59
2.19
1.29

7.86
6.90
5. 27
22.67
1.41

28. 27
16.01
17.11
13.90
1.96

21.60
10.36
5. 97
22. 75
0

54

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T

able

5 . — Description of fam ilies studied, by income level
N A S H U A ,

C O N C O R D ,

A N D

B E R L IN ,

N .

H .

In c o m e le v e l— F a m ilie s w it h a rm n a l
n e t i n c o m e o f—
Ite m

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

$500
to
$ 90 0

$ 9 0 0 $ 1 ,2 0 0 $ 1 , 5 0 0 $ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0
to
to
to
to
and
$ 1 ,2 0 0 $ 1 ,5 0 0 $ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0 o v e r

Distribution by Occupation of Chief Earner and by Fam ily
T ype1
F a m ilie s in s u r v e y . . .
.
__
_____ _________ _________ ___ __
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s i n w h i c h c h ie f e a r n e r is —
C l e r i c a l w o r k e r ----------------------------------------- ------------------------S k i l l e d w a g e e a r n e r _______________________________________ _________________
S e m i s k i l l e d w a g e e a r n e r . ______________________________________________
U n s k i l l e d w a g e e a r n e r . . ____________________ _________ _________________
N u m b e r o f f a m i l e s c o m p o s e d o f—
M a n a n d w i f e . . . ____________________________________________________ .
M a n , w i f e , a n d 1 c h i l d ________________
____________
_ ________
M a n , w i f e , a n d 2 t o 4 c h i l d r e n . _ _ ------------ ------------------M a n , w i f e , a n d 5 o r m o r e c h i l d r e n _________________________________
M a n , w i f e , a n d c h i l d r e n a n d a d u l t s (4 t o 6 p e r s o n s ) _______
M a n , w i f e , a n d c h i l d r e n a n d a d u l t s (7 o r m o r e p e r s o n s ) . .
M a n , w i f e , a n d 1 a d u l t _________________________________ _________
...
M a n , w i f e , a n d 2 t o 4 a d u l t s . . . __________ ______________ _________
M a n , w i f e , a n d 5 o r m o r e a d u l t s _______________________
_________
A d u l t s ( 2 o r 3 p e r s o n s , n o t i n c l u d i n g m a n a n d w i f e ) _____
A d u l t s (4 o r m o r e p e r s o n s , n o t i n c l u d i n g m a n a n d w i f e ) . _
A d u l t o r a d u lt s a n d c h ild r e n (2 o r 3 p e rs o n s , n o t i n ­
c l u d i n g m a n a n d w i f e ) ___________
____________ _________________
A d u l t o r a d u lt s a n d c h ild r e n (4 o r m o r e p e rs o n s , n o t
i n c l u d i n g m a n a n d w i f e ) __________________________________ ___________

299

45

90

67

42

36

19

58
86
117
38

2
1
28
14

19
17
42
12

12
19
26
10

7
22
11
2

11
22
3
0

7
5
7
0

70
42
73
7
33
14
18
15
1
15
2

16
11
7
0
1
0
2
0
0
2
1

18
15
31
3
9
3
6
1
0
4
0

15
7
16
0
10
6
4
4
0
3
1

11
6
11
3
3
3
1
3
0
1
0

6
3
8
1
9
1
4
2
0
2
0

4
0
0
0
1
1
1
5
1
3
0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

2

2

1

7

4

.

Distribution by Nativity of Hom emaker
N u m b e r o f f a m i l i s h a v i n g n o h o m e m a k e r ____________________
___
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s h a v in g h o m e m a k e r b o rn in —
U n i t e d S t a t e s ________________________ _ ____________ _____________
_.
I t a l y ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P o l a n d _______ - ______________ _________________
_____________
. ..
C a n a d a ( F r e n c h ) _ . . . _______
.
_____ ___
...
__________
C a n a d a ( n o t F r e n c h ) _ . _____________ _________ ___ . . . _________
E n g la n d . . . . .
_____ ________
_____ . . .
__________________
_______
...
_______________
______________
Ir e la n d
_
.
.
N o rw a y an d Sw ed en
______________
__________ ____________________
__________
____________________________
A u s t r ia a n d G e r m a n y . . .
_
_________ ____________ _______________ ______________
O t h e r . . ____________

2

0

0

0

0

1

1

2 03
2
7
60
6
3
2
5
1
8

26
0
0
16
0
0
0
1
0
2

59
0
3
23
2
0
1
1
0
1

51
1
0
5
2
2
1
1
1
3

34
0
2
6
0
0
0
0
0
0

24
0
1
5
1
0
0
2
0
2

9
1
1
5
1
1
0
0
0
0

2 99
3 .9 8

45
3 .1 9

90
3 .9 0

67
4 .1 5

42
4. 52

36
3 . 77

19
4 .8 1

35
3
8
10

6
0
1
0

9
2
2
2

8
0
3
1

4
1
1
2

6
0
1
4

2
0
0
1

3 . 84
1. 30
2 .5 4
3 .4 3

3 . 05
.8 6
2 .1 9
2. 74

07
38
69
66

4 . 32
1 .7 8
2 . 54
3 . 78

3 . 63
1. 06
2 . 57
3 .4 0

4 . 66
.5 6
4 .1 0
4 . 51

.1 7

.1 6

.1 5

.1 5

.2 7

.1 7

Composition of Household
N u m b e r o f h o u s e h o ld s
. _ . _____ _
__
_______________
A v e r a g e n u m b e r o f p e r s o n s i n h o u s e h o ld ______ ____________ _________
N u m b e r o f h o u s e h o ld s w i t h —
B o a r d e r s a n d lo d g e r s
__________________ _ _ _____________ . . .
B o a r d e r s o n l y . . . _____
__________ _________ _________________________ _
L o d g e r s o n l y _________________
_________
_
_
O t h e r p e r s o n s ___________
. . . _ ------------------- ---------------A v e r a g e s i z e o f e c o n o m ic f a m i l y i n —
P e r s o n s , t o t a l _____
_
_
_
-----------------------. . .
U n d e r 16 y e a r s o f a g e . . . _______ ___________. . . ------------16 y e a r s o f a g e a n d o v e r _____________________ . . . -------------E x p e n d itu r e u n its . . .
--------------------- --- - - - A v e r a g e n u m b e r o f p e r s o n s i n h o u s e h o ld n o t m e m b e r s o f
e c o n o m ic f a m i l y _______________ . .
__
. . .
__________

3.
1.
2.
3.

72
46
26
23

.1 4

4.
1.
2.
3.

1 “ C h i l d r e n ” a r e d e f i n e d a s p e r s o n s u n d e r 16 y e a r s o f a g e ; “ a d u l t s ” a r e p e r s o n s 16 y e a r s o f a g e a n d o v e r .




TABULAR SUMMARY
T a b l e

55

5 . — Description of fam ilies studied , by income level— Continued
N A S H U A ,

C O N C O R D ,

A N D

B E R L IN ,

N .

H — C o n t in u e d

In c o m e le v e l— E a m ilie s w it h
a n n u a l n e t i n c o m e o f—
Ite m

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

$500
to
$900

$ 9 0 0 $ 1 ,2 0 0 $ 1 , 5 00 $ 1 , 8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0
to
to
to
to
and
$ 1 , 200 $ 1 , 5 00 $ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0 o v e r

Earnings and Income
F a m ilie s in s u r v e y ,
_________________________________________________
_____
N u m b e r of fa m ilie s h a v in g —
E a r n in g s o f s u b s id ia r y e a r n e r s ,
- - - - - - - _ __
N e t e a r n i n g s f r o m b o a r d e r s a n d l o d g e r s , __________
___ _
O t h e r n e t r e n t s _______________________ _
_
_ _ _ -------------In t e r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s
_
_
_ __
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
P e n s io n s a n d in s u r a n c e a n n u it i e s , , ,
_ _
_ _ _ _______
G i f t s f r o m p e r s o n s o u t s i d e e c o n o m ic f a m i l y , _ _
_____
O t h e r s o u rc e s o f in c o m e
_____ ___ _ _ _ __________
_ __.
D e d u c t i o n s f r o m i n c o m e ( b u s i n e s s lo s s e s a n d e x p e n s e s )
S u r p lu s (n e t in c r e a s e in a s s e ts a n d / o r d e c re a se in
l i a b i l i t i e s ) ________________ , _
_
__
_ _ _
D e f ic it (n e t d e c re a s e in a s s e ts a n d / o r in c r e a s e in
l i a b i l i t i e s ) _____________________________________________________________________
In h e r ita n c e ,
_____
,
_ _______________ _ .
A v e r a g e n u m b e r o f g a i n f u l w o r k e r s p e r f a m i l y ___________

A v e r a g e a m o u n t o f—
N e t f a m ily in c o m e ,
_
.
_
__ _
__________
_. ,
E a r n in g s o f in d iv id u a ls , ,_ _ _
._
_
__
__ _
C h ie f e a r n e r , _
_____ ____________ _______
________ _ .
S u b s i d i a r y e a r n e r s _____
__. .
_____
__ __
M a l e s : 16 y e a r s a n d o v e r , _ _
_
__ __
_
_
_______
U n d e r 16 y e a r s , _
_ _ ____________
F e m a l e s : 16 y e a r s a n d o v e r , _
_,
_
_____ _
U n d e r 16 y e a r s __________________________ ________
N e t e a r n i n g s f r o m b o a r d e r s a n d l o d g e r s __________
__
O th e r n e t r e n t s ._ _ __ _ __
_____________ _______________
In t e r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s
__
_______________ _
_____
P e n s io n s a n d in s u r a n c e a n n u it ie s
.
_______________
G i f t s f r o m p e r s o n s o u t s i d e e c o n o m ic f a m i l y _____
O t h e r s o u rc e s o f in c o m e
_
.
__
_ _____
D e d u c tio n s fro m
in c o m e
( b u s i n e s s lo s s e s a n d
e x p e n s e s ) ,. _ . _ _
_ ________________
_
________
S u r p lu s p e r f a m ily h a v in g s u r p lu s (n e t in c r e a s e in
a s s e ts a n d /o r d e c re a se in l i a b i l i t i e s ) , ,
. , , _______
D e f i c i t p e r f a m i l y h a v i n g d e f ic it (n e t d e c re a s e i n a s s e ts
a n d / o r i n c r e a s e i n l i a b i l i t i e s ) _____________ _ . . „ ___________
N e t change i n a s s e t s a n d l i a b i l i t i e s f o r a l l f a m i l i e s i n
______
s u r v e y _________
In h e r it a n c e ,..
. ________________
_________

1 L e s s t h a n $ 0 .5 0 .

200982

4 1 -------- 5




299

45

90

67

42

36

19

97
43
29
27
12
19
9
11

9
6
1
2
1
5
1
0

17
14
3
8
4
2
4
6

25
10
8
7
2
4
1
1

14
5
10
4
1
2
2
2

13
6
3
5
4
5
1
1

19
2
4
1
0
1
0
1

210

18

67

46

36

27

16

83
0
1 .4 2

25
0
1 .2 4

21
0
1 .2 1

20
0
1 .4 2

7
0
1. 38

6
0
1. 56

4
0
2 .6 3

Dol.

Dol.

Dol.

Dol.

Dol.

Dol.

1, 3 45
1, 2 9 5
1 ,1 2 6
169
1, 1 04
1
190
0
22
10
5
6
4
6

7 75
759
748
11
622
0)
137
0
7

1, 0 53
1, 0 2 0
962
58
938
2
80
0
22
2
8
7
1
2

1, 3 19
1, 263
1 ,1 4 8
115
1 ,0 9 6
0
167
0
24
10
2
5
6
9

1, 671
1, 6 0 5
1, 4 10
195
1, 4 19
0
186
0
19
30
2
7
4
7

1, 861
1, 7 65
1, 5 19
2 46
1, 533
0
2 32
0
36
9
9
15
9
19

3

0

9

3

1

1

152

76

78

166

245

383

0)
1
1
7
0)

0)
144

Dol.
2 , 465
2 ,4 0 0
1, 3 47
1, 0 5 3
1 ,5 5 1
0
8 49
0
33
26
7
0
0)
0

156

166

115

109

184

298

288

! + 63

-6 2
0

+ 31
0

+ 67
0

+ 111
0

+ 134
0

+ 258
0

i

0

56

MONEY D1SBUKSEMENTS----1 3 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e

5 .—

D e s c r ip tio n

P O R T S M O U T H ,

o f fa m ilie s

K E E N E ,

D O V E R ,

s tu d ie d

,

b y in c o m e

L A C O N IA ,

A N D

Continued

le v e l—

C L A R E M O N T ,

N . H .

In c o m e le v e l— F a m ilie s w it h a n n u a l
n e t i n c o m e o f—
A ll
fa m i­
lie s

Ite m

Distribution by Occupation of Chief Earner and by Family
T ype1

$50 0
to
$ 90 0

$ 90 0 $ 1 , 2 00 $ 1 , 5 00 $ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0
to
to
to
to
and
$ 1 , 200 $ 1 ,5 0 0 $ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0 o v e r

i

F a m ilie s in s u r v e y
_
1
N u m b e r o f lf a m ilie s i n w h i c h c h ie f e a r n e r is —
C le r ic a w o r k e r ,
_
_
_____
S k ille d w a g e e a r n e r , _
S e m is k ille d w a g e e a r n e r ,.
U n s k ille d w a g e e a rn e r
N u m b e r o f f a m i l i e s c o m p o s e d o f—
M a n an d w if e .,
_
M a n , w i f e , a n d 1 c h i l d _____
.
. . .
M a n , w if e , a n d 2 to 4 c h ild r e n
_
_
.
M a n , w if e , a n d 5 o r m o r e c h ild r e n
_
M a n , w i f e , a n d c h i l d r e n a n d a d u l t s (4 to 6 p e r s o n s )
..
M a n , w i f e , a n d c h i l d r e n a n d a d u l t s (7 o r m o r e p e r s o n s )
M a n , w ife , a n d 1 a
d
u
l
t
. __
M a n , w if e , a n d 2 to 4 a d u lt s
_
_ .
M a n , w if e , a n d 5 o r m o re a d u lts
.
A d u l t s (2 o r 3 p e r s o n s , n o t i n c l u d i n g m a n a n d w i f e ) _____
A d u l t s (4 o r m o r e p e r s o n s , n o t i n c l u d i n g m a n a n d w i f e )
A d u l t o r a d u l t s a n d c h i l d r e n (2 o r 3 p e r s o n s , n o t i n c l u d ­
in g m a n a n d w if e )
A d u l t o r a d u l t s a n d c h i l d r e n (4 o r m o r e p e r s o n s , n o t
in c lu d in g m a n a n d w i f e ) , ,.

485

97

137

130

57

44

20

79
129
240
37

10
21
61
5

18
33
73
13

15
42
64
9

11
10
32
4

18
17
6
3

7
6
4
3

123
80
97
8
46
18
35
24
2
33
6

33
18
18
2
5
2
0
2
0
15
1

38
24
35
0
14
1
10
4
0
7
0

34
22
23
5
13
2
18
4
0
5
1

6
9
11
1
8
6
3
4
0
4
2

10
7
9
0
3
4
3
4
1
0
1

2
0
1
0
3
3
1
6
1
2
1

6

1

3

0

2

0

0

7

0

1

3

1

2

0

Distribution by Nativity of Homemaker
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s h a v in g n o h o m e m a k e r
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s h a v in g h o m e m a k e r b o r n in —
U n i t e d S t a t e s ______
_
.
I t a l y ________________________________________________________________________________
P o la n d ,
_
C a n a d a (F re n c h ),
.
C a n a d a (n o t F r e n c h )
_
_ _
E n g la n d
.
.
Ir e la n d
N o r w a y a n d S w e d e n ..
A u s t r ia a n d G e r m a n y ,
O t h e r _________
.
,, .

5

1

3

0

0

0

1

3 62
8
5
42
28
5
15
3
4
8

69
2
2
15
4
0
2
0
1
1

101
2
1
7
12
2
4
1
3
1

105
2
1
9
5
1
4
2
0
1

42
2
1
5
1
2
3
0
0
1

37
0
0
2
4
0
0
0
0
1

8
0
0
4
2
0
2
0
0
3

4 85
3 . 79

97
3 . 24

137
3. 54

130
3 . 85

57
4 . 59

44
4. 0 8

20
4 . 73

70
13
19
40

13
1
6
10

15
3
3
14

22
4
7
7

16
4
2
6

2
0
0
2

2
1
1
1

3 . 54
1 .0 8
2. 46
3 .2 9

3 . 01
.8 4
2 .1 7
2. 77

3 .3 3
1 .0 7
2. 26
3 .1 0

3 . 56
1 .1 0
2. 46
3 .3 1

4 . 21
1 .4 9
2. 72
3 .9 1

4. 0 0
1. 14
2. 86
3 . 70

4 . 34
. 84
3 . 50
4. 32

.2 8

.2 6

.2 1

.3 5

.4 2

.1 7

.2 7

Composition of Household
N u m b e r o f h o u s e h o ld s ,
A v e r a g e n u m b e r o f p e r s o n s i n h o u s e h o ld ________
N u m b e r o f h o u s e h o ld s w i t h —
B o a r d e r s a n d lo d g e r s . _
B o a rd e rs o n ly . ,
_
Lo d g e rs o n ly ,.
O th e r p e r s o n s ..
A v e r a g e s i z e o f e c o n o m ic f a m i l y i n P e rso n s, to ta l
.
. - ...
U n d e r 16 y e a r s o f a g e
...
. . .
16 y e a r s o f a g e a n d o v e r . .
____ ..
E x p e n d it u r e u n it s
_
_ _
_
A v e r a g e n u m b e r o f p e r s o n s i n h o u s e h o ld n o t m e m b e r s o f
e c o n o m ic f a m i l y

!

!

1 “ C h i l d r e n ” a r e d e f i n e d a s p e r s o n s u n d e r 16 y e a r s o f a g e ; “ a d u l t s ” a r e p e r s o n s 16 y e a r s o f a g e a n d o v e r .




57

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

5 .— D e s c r i p t i o n o f f a m i l i e s s t u d i e d

P O R T S M O U T H ,

K E E N E ,

D O V E R ,

L A C O N IA ,

,

b y in c o m e le v e l

A N D

C L A R E M O N T ,

— Continued
N . H . — C o n t in u e d

I n c o i n e le v e i l — F a r n i l i e s v v i t h a n n u a l
n e t i n c o 'in e o f Ite m

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

$ 50 0
to
$ 90 0

$ 90 0 $ 1 , 2 00 $ 1 , 500 $ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0
to
to
to
to
and
$ 1 , 2 0 0 $ 1 , 500 $ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0 o v e r

Earnings and Income
_ _ _ ----------- --------F a m i l i e s i n s u r v e y _ _______ _________________
N u m b e r o f fa m ilie s h a v in g —
E a r n i n g s o f s u b s i d i a r y e a r n e r s . _ ________________________________
N e t e a r n i n g s f r o m b o a r d e r s a n d l o d g e r s ________________________
O t h e r n e t r e n t s ._ _ __________ . . . . . ----------------- . . .
In te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s .
_______________
_____
___________
P e n s i o n s a n d i n s u r a n c e a n n u i t i e s __________________________
__.
G i f t s f r o m p e r s o n s o u t s i d e e c o n o m ic i a m i l y _______________
O t h e r s o u rc e s o f in c o m e
...
. . . ____________
_
_______
D e d u c t i o n s f r o m i n c o m e ( b u s i n e s s lo s s e s a n d e x p e n s e s )
S u r p l u s (n e t in c r e a s e in a s s e t s a n d / o r d e c re a s e in l i a ­
b i l i t i e s ) __________________________________________________________ ____________
D e f i c i t (n e t d e c re a s e in a s s e t s a n d / o r in c r e a s e in l i a ­
b ilit ie s ) ...
_
- - - - - - - - - - - - ----I n h e r i t a n c e ____________ __________
. . . ____________
- --------A v e r a g e n u m b e r o f g a i n f u l w o r k e r s p e r f a m i l y . ________ .

A v e r a g e a m o u n t o f—
N e t f a m i l y i n c o m e _______________________________________________
E a r n i n g s o f i n d i v i d u a l s _____________________ _____ _
.
C h i e f e a r n e r _______ _________ ___________
________
S u b s i d i a r y e a r n e r s ______________
__________________________
M a l e s : 16 y e a r s a n d o v e r .
_____ _______ - _____ .
U n d e r 16 y e a r s ______________________ .
F e m a l e s : 16 y e a r s a n d o v e r
___________________
U n d e r 16 y e a r s _______
________________
N e t e a r n i n g s f r o m b o a r d e r s a n d l o d g e r s . _ _ ________
O t h e r n e t r e n t s _______________________ _______________________________
I n t e r e s t a n d d i v i d e n d s . ___________________________
________
P e n s i o n s a n d i n s u r a n c e a n n u i t i e s ________ __________
G i f t s f r o m p e r s o n s o u t s i d e e c o n o m ic f a m i l y . . .
. _
O t h e r s o u r c e s o f i n c o m e _______________________________________
D e d u c t i o n s f r o m i n c o m e ( b u s i n e s s lo s s e s a n d e x ­
p en ses)
_______________
S u r p l u s p e r f a m i l y h a v i n g s u r p lu s ( n e t in c r e a s e in a s ­
s e ts a n d /o r d e c re a se in lia b ilit ie s )
_____________________ _ .
D e f i c i t p e r f a m i l y h a v in g d e f ic it (n e t d e c re a s e in a s ­
s e t s a n d / o r in c r e a s e in l i a b i l i t i e s )
_
_ _ _ _ _ _ _
. N e t c h a n g e in a s s e ts a n d lia b ilit ie s fo r a ll f a m ilie s in
su rv e y .
_ _________________________________________________________________
In h e rita n c e
„_
._
..

1 L e s s t h a n $ 0 .5 0 .




485

97

137

130

57

44

20

168
89
51
60
27
58
26
26

19
18
6
9
1
15
1
3

51
17
12
12
5
18
9
8

40
29
14
13
10
12
5
7

29
20
4
14
3
8
6
4

15
3
9
8
4
4
3
2

14
2
6
4
4
1
2
2

291

35

82

83

41

34

16

172
0
1 .4 3

51
0
1. 22

48
0
1 .3 8

44
0
1 .3 5

16
0
1 .7 0

9
0
1 .5 2

4
0
225

Dot.

Dot.

Dot.

Dot.

Dot.

Dot.

1 ,2 7 9
1 ,1 9 0
1 ,0 5 0
140
1 ,0 1 5

766
723
6 99
24
5 80
0)
143
0
25
5
3
1
8
2

1 ,0 2 7
9 73
886
87
8 44
1
128

1 ,3 2 4
1, 241
1 .1 2 5
116
1 ,0 8 8
0)
153

2 ,0 0 4
1, 8 52
1 ,6 2 0
232
1 ,6 9 2

0)
24
9
3
7
8
6

0)
52
12
5
6
7
4

1 ,6 7 3
1 ,5 4 1
1, 3 33
208
1 ,3 0 2
1
238
0
71
6
9
16
21
11

0)
175
0)
38
12
8
18
9
6

0)
160
0
30
24
30
50
10
10

Dot.
2 ,4 7 7
2 ,1 5 7
1, 329
8 28
1, 515
0
642
0
29
52
31
187
1
24

2

1

3

3

2

2

4

148

96

97

138

140

263

3 60

178

106

152

150

177

294

- 5 9 1 + 21
0
o 1

+ 36
0

+ 59
0

+168
0

+ 229
0

151
+ 35
0

1

58

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 5 . — Description of families studied, by income level— Continued
L I T T L E T O N A N D C O N W A Y , N. H.
Income level— Families with annual
net income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$500
to
$900

$900. $1,200 $1,500 $1,800
to
to
to
and
$1, 200 $1, 500 $1,800 over

D istr ib u tio n b y O cc u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r a nd b y F a m ily
T ype1
Families in survey_____ _____ . . . ______ ___ . _ ______
Num ber of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker_____________ _______ ______ _____
Skilled wage earner___________ ___ _ _ _ ______________
Semiskilled wage earner____________ _________________
Unskilled wage earner___ _______________________ _
N um ber of families composed of—
M an and wife________ _______________________________
Man, wife, and 1 child . . . .. ____ ___ _ . ______
M an, wife, and 2 to 4 children____ ___ .
Man, wife, and 5 or more children_______________
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6 persons)___
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or more persons) _
Man, wife, and 1 adult______________ _______________
M an, wife, and 2 to 4 adults.__ _ _
__
_____ . _
M an, wife, and 5 or more adults___
__ ________ _
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man and wife) __
Adults (4 or more persons, not including man and w ife)_
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons, not includ­
ing man and wife) _ _ _ _____ _ _ ____
______
Adult or adults and children (4 or more persons, not in­
cluding man and w ife)_______ . _________ . . . ___

197

47

64

47

25

14

34
63
91
9

5
7
33
2

7
20
31
6

13
19
14
1

2
13
10
0

7
4
3
0

55
34
38
7
20
9
13
4
0
11
1

17
12
5
0
4
0
2
1
0
3
0

20
8
15
5
5
1
5
1
0
3
0

8
8
9
1
9
3
4
1
0
3
1

5
4
9
1
0
2
2
0
0
1
0

5
2
0
0
2
3
0
1
0
1
0

5

3

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Num ber of families having no homemaker____ ____________
Num ber of families having homemaker born in—
United States. _ ___________ __ ______________________
Canada (not French)_________________________________
England____ _________________________________________
Ireland..
__ .
_______ ____________________ . .
Other. _. _______________ . _ . ________ ______ __ .

0

0

0

0

0

0

173
18
1
1
4

39
6
0
0
2

56
6
1
1
0

42
4
0
0
1

24
1
0
0
0

12
1
0
0
1

197
3. 77

47
3.00

64
3. 81

47
4.10

25
4. 27

14
4.16

22
2
8
13

7
0
1
1

7
0
5
3

5
1
0
4

2
0
0
3

1
1
2
2

3. 62
1. 27
2. 35

2. 83
.67
2. 16
2.61

3. 63
1.39
2.24
3. 26

4. 03
1. 54
2. 49
3. 70

4. 14
1. 73
2.41
3. 76

3. 85
.95
2.90
3.68

16

17

18

.08

. 14

.38

C o m p o s itio n o f H o u se h o ld

Num ber of households__________ ____ . _
________
Average number of persons in household
_______________
N um ber of households with—
Boarders and lo d g e r s .____ . . . . ___________ ______
Boarders on ly____ ________________ ________ _______
Lodgers on ly___ . . . .
_ _________ . . . . . ._ _.
Other persons. _ . . _
. . . _________ __________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total__________________ _______________ ____
Under 16 years of age__________ . . . . _____ _____
16 years of age and over____
___
_____ .. .
Expenditure units____ ___ . _____
__________ _
Average number of persons in household not members of
economic fam ily_
_
... . . . ................ .......

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age; “ adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.




59

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T a b l e 5 . — Description of families studied, by income level— Continued
L I T T L E T O N A N D C O N W A Y , N. H .— Continued

Income level— Families with annual
net income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$500
to
$900

$900 $1, 200 $1,500 $1,800
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1, 800 over

E a r n in g s and In c o m e

Families in survey______________________ __ ____________
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners______________ ________
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers _____________
Other net rents__
___ . . . .
. . . . _ __________ _
Interest and dividends, , . . .
.
,,,
______
,,,
Pensions and insurance annuities____
Gifts from persons outside economic family_______ , - _
Other sources of incom e_______ ______________________
Deductions from income (business losses and expenses).
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or decrease in liabili­
ties)_______________________________________________
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
ties)____ _________________________________________
Inheritance ________ ___ _.
________________ ■
___
Average number of gainful workers per family____________

197

47

64

47

25

14

68
29
10
10
6
19
16
16

11
8
4
1
0
5
1
2

20
11
2
3
1
4
5
4

19
4
3
2
2
6
5
3

10
2
1
2
2
3
5
3

8
4
0
2
1
1
0
4

123

18

42

31

22

10

64
0
1.40

24
0
1.30

18
0
1.38

14
0
1.43

5
0
1.44

3
0
1.71

$762 $1,042 $1, 326 $1, 721
737 1,004 1,266 1,643
941 1,145 1,469
704
33
63
174
121
904 1,091 1,481
645
0
1
4
0
92
99
162
171
0
0
0
0
28
17
9
13
1
4
4
8
5
1
0)
0)
0
4
23
21
12
2
1
6
3
36
16
0)

$1,894
1,793
1,378
415
1, 525
7
261
0
78
0
23
4
4
0

Average amount of—
$1, 190
Net family incom e__________ , , , , , _____________
Earnings of individuals _______ _______ _____
1, 140
1,031
Chief ea rn er_________________________________
109
Subsidiary earners____________________________
Males: 16 years and over
_______ . 1,004
Under 16 years________________________
2
Females: 16 years and over,,.
______ . . .
134
Under 16 years_________ ________
0
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers. . ________
23
Other net rents____ _. _____ _
4
Interest and dividends__________ _______________
3
___ .
10
Pensions and insurance annuities.. .
Gifts from persons outside economic family________
4
Other sources of i n c o m e ..____ ._ . .
______
9
Deductions from income (business losses and ex­
penses)
.
_ _ . . . ____
3
Surplus per family having surplus (net increase in assets
and/or decrease in liabilities)
_ _ _ . ____
134
Deficit per family having deficit (net decrease in assets
and/or increase in liabilities)___________ _____
_
171
Net change in assets and liabilities for all families in
survey. __ ______. . . ________
. . .
____
+28
Inheritance ___ ________ _. ___________________
0
Less than $0.50.




2

4

2

5

8

57

92

154

179

284

157

139

132

171

649

-5 8
0

+21
0

+62
0

+123
0

+63
0

60

M O N EY DISBURSEM ENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 5 .— D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died, b y in co m e level— Conti
M A R Q U E T T E , M IC H .; M O D E S T O , C A L IF .; A N D R E N O , N E V .
Modesto

Marquette

Reno

Income level—Families with annual net income of—
Item
Un­ $1,200 $1, 500 Un­ $1,200 $1, 500 Un­ $1,200 $1,500
and
to
to
der
der
and
der
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 over $1, 200 $1, 500 over $1,200 $1, 500 over
D istr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r
a n d b y F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in s u r v e y _____ __ _ _- _ ____
Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical w orker-__ _
___
__
_ ___
Skilled wage earner _
- _ _- _ _.
Semiskilled wage earner_____ ___
Unskilled wage earner____ __ _ _ - ____
Number of families composed of—
M an and w i f e ___. ______________
Man, wife, and 1 child. _ __
_ _____
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children_________ . . .
Man, wife, and 5 or more children_________
M an, wife, and children, and adults (4 to 6
persons)_________________________________
M an, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons)
.
.
. . ____
Man, wife, and 1 adult_____ ____________
M an, wife, and 2 to 4 adults____ . . . _____
M an, wife, and 5 or more adults. . . . ___ __
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man
and w ife)_____ . . . _____
__________
Adults (4 or more persons, not including
man and w i f e ) . ___ _____________ _
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons,
not including man and wife)_________ . . .
Adult or adults and children (4 or more
persons, not including man and w ife)____

67

39

42

49

35

67

22

40

87

5
20
25
17

10
13
10
6

8
20
12
2

9
11
16
13

7
7
14
7

26
22
19
0

7
3
10
2

14
7
17
2

37
20
28
2

12
11
15
2

3
10
11
1

6
3
11
1

15
14
8
0

7
7
7
0

18
10
10
0

5
5
2
0

9
9
9
0

26
23
12
0

11

4

5

2

6

14

1

3

11

2
8
4
0

3
2
2
0

2
6
5
0

0
5
1
0

1
4
1
0

2
4
5
0

0
4
1
0

1
2
0
0

1
6
2
0
3

1

2

3

3

2

3

2

6

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

50
0
3
1
2
0
0
3
8

34
0
1
0
1
0
0
2
1

35
0
0
0
3
1
0
1
2

48
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0

33
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1

63
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

17
4
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

29
4
1
0
0
1
2
1
0

74
6
1
0
1
0
0
0
5

67
4.09

39
4.35

42
4.08

49
3.01

35
3.64

67
3.60

22
3.12

40
3.28

87
3.36

8
0
1
3

6
0
1
1

5
0
4
4

4
0
1
5

7
1
1
4

7
0
3
7

1
0
2
0

2
0
1
2

14
0
0
2

3. 98
1.45
2.53
3. 51

4. 21
1.51
2. 70
3. 72

3. 99
1.14
2. 85
3.60

2.98
.82
2.16
2. 72

3.50
1.07
2. 43
3.18

3.48
.81
2. 67
3.24

2. 98
.64
2. 34
2. 74

3. 24
.92
2. 32
2. 97

3. 23
.90
2. 33
3.00

. 15

.26

.32

.06

.19

.20

.15

.05

. 16

1

2

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker___
Number of families having homemaker born
in—
United States____ __
_
_
Italy______________________________________
Germany and Austria___________ . _____
R u s sia _______ . . . ____________ . . . ...
Canada (not French)___________ __ ______
E n s la n d ... . . . _________________
Ireland___________________________________
Sweden and N orw ay________ _ __ ______
Other_____________________________________
C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households_________ _____ _____
Average number of persons in household_____
Number of households with—
Boarders and lod g ers______ . . .
_____
Boarders o n l y ______________ . . .
Lodgers only______________________ ______
Other persons_____________________ _______
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total____________________________
Under 16 years of age . . .
_ .
______
16 years of age and over__________________
FiYpp.ndit.nrft units
Average number of persons in household not
members of economic fam ily. _ _____ _____

i “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age; “ adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.




61

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T

able

5*— Description of families studied, by income level— Continued

M A R Q U E T T E , M IC H .; M O D E S T O , C A L IF .; A N D R E N O , N E V .—Continued
Marquette

Modesto

Reno

Income level—Families with annual net income of—
Item
Un­
der

$1 , 2 0 0

$1,500

$1,500

to

$1,500

and
over

Un­
der

$1 , 2 0 0

to

$1 , 2 0 0

$1 , 2 0 0

$1,500

and
over

67

39

42

49

35

10

8

4

20

18

5

5

3

4
1
2

1
1
1

8
2

4

6

1

1

Un­
der

$1 , 2 0 0

$1,500

to

$1 , 2 0 0

$1,500

and
over

67

22

40

87

41

2

5

24

6

8

3

3

12

1
2
1

2
1
0

5

1
0
0

2

8

1

2

5
5

5

2

3

3
3

0

3

4
3

6
4

E a r n in g s a nd I n c o m e

Families in survey------------- ------------Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners____
Net earnings from boarders and
lodgers ____________ __________
Other net rents___________________
Interest and dividends____________
Pensions and insurance annuities - Gifts from persons outside economic family _ _ _ _ _ _ ______
Other sources of incom e___________
Deductions from income (business
losses and expenses)_____
_ __
Surplus (net increase in assets
and/or decrease in liab ilities)___
Deficit (net decrease in assets
and/or increase in liabilities) _. _ _
Inheritance __________ _ _
Average number of gainful workers
per fam ily___ _______________ _ _
Average amount of—
Net family income __ __________ __
Earnings of individuals _______
Chief earner___ __________ _
Subsidiary earners_____ __ __
Males: 16 years and over. __
Under 16 years___ __ _
Females: 16 years and over _. _
Under 16 years____ _
Net earnings from boarders and
lodgers_____ _______ _______
Other net rents_____________ ___
Interest and dividends__________
Pensions and insurance annui­
ties _____ _ ...................... .
Gifts from persons outside eco­
nom ic family _ _____________
Other sources of income ______ _
Deductions from income (busi­
ness losses and expenses)______
Surplus per family having surplus
(net increase in assets and/or
decrease in liabilities) __ _ _ __
Deficit per family having deficit
(net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease in liabilities) _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Net change in assets and liabilities
for all families in survey
__
Inheritance' __
_
_____
Less than $0.50.




4
1
0
0

1
2

0

9

5

13

2

2

4

46

35

33

19

22

42

11

15

54

20

2
0

9

29

12

24

2

1

1

0

10
0

21
0

29

1
1. 19

1. 25

1.40

1.42

1 .6 8

1. 72

1.09

1.15

1.31

$965 $1, 338
950
1,303
945
1,043
5
260
794
1,269

$ 1 , 860
1,802
1,618
184
1,645

$960 $1, 309 $1 , 862 $1 , 0 0 1 $1, 343 $1, 878
944 1,284
1, 842
1, 841
990 1,310
904 1,228
929 1,214
1,707
1, 587
134
255
40
56
61
96
854 1,196
1, 691
869 1,182
1,595

1

2

5

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

88

150

126

245

156

34

157

0

0

0

0
120
1

2

90

0

0

0

0

0

22

22

2

12

17

11

8

26

1

9
19

1

8

2

0

10
0

0

10
1

5

3

2

0

4

0

8

11

3

0
0

3

5
9

1

1

8

0
0

5
3

3
4

5
0

)

6
0)
2

3

2
2
100

165
+ 2 0

0

)

(0
6

33

0

1

4

152

281

91

143

234

4

0)

125

252

412

162

93

247

189

+123

+ 132
5

-6 1
4

+58

+58

-3 2

-3 8

3

0

0

0

0

4

1

0)

108

11

162

266
224
+91

0

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES

62
T

able

6.—

E x p e n d itu r es f o r grou p s o f item s, by in com e level

N A S H U A , C O N C O R D , A N D B E R L IN , N. H.
Income level—Families with annual net
income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$500 to $900 to $1,200
to
$900 $1,200
$1,500

$1,500
to
$1,800

$1,800
to
$2,100

$2,100
and
over

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f Ite m s

Families in survey------------------------------------ ----------Average family size:
Persons_____ __________ _______ ____________
Expenditure units- _ ___ _____________ _______
Food expenditure units_____________ _________
Clothing expenditure units____________________

299

45

90

67

42

36

19

3. 84
3. 43
3. 30
2.92

3.05
2. 74
2. 59
2. 27

3. 72
3. 23
3.10
2. 64

4.07
3. 66
3. 54
3.12

4. 32
3. 78
3. 66
3.19

3. 63
3.40
3.31
2. 92

4.66
4. 51
4. 37
4.48

I
$847 $1,034 $1, 252 $1, 559 $1, 740
309
379
524
511
436
69
107
133
173
183
155
169
223
281
187
93
109
142
154
168
28
36
46
67
80
28
36
29
51
58

$2,189
666
359
255
158
83
86

Average annual expenditure for—
A llite m s --- __ ___
_ _ - -------- ------ ---------- $1, 289
436
F ood -------- ------------- ----------------- -----------142
Clothing_______________ ____ _____________
197
- -------Housing _______ _ _ ------Fuel, light, and refrigeration----------------------131
Other household operation________ ___
50
41
Furnishings and equipm ent-------------Automobile and motorcycle—purchase, op­
71
eration, and maintenance_____________ _
8
Other transportation__________ _________ _
26
Personal care_______________ _. _ ------------53
Medical care---------------- -----------------------------72
Recreation.......... .............. .
.. .......... ............
5
Education- . ____________ ____ _________ 4
V oca tion --.
_ .
---------------------- --- - 27
Comm unity w e l f a r e ______ _____ ____
Gifts and contributions to persons outside
21
the economic fam ily----------- --------------------5
Other item s_________________________ _ , _
Percentage of total annual current expenditure for—
All item s__________________________ 1----------- 100.0
33.8
F ood . ___
_______ __________________
11.0
Clothing--------------------------------------- ------------15.3
Housing_____________ ________ ________ .
Fuel, light, and refrigera tion ..-_____ ___
10.2
3.9
Other household operation____ __ ---------3.2
Furnishings and equipment___ ___________
Autom obile and motorcycle—purchase, op­
5.5
eration, and maintenance.. _________ -.
Other transportation.-.
_ _________ __
.6
2.0
Personal c a r e _____ _.- _ _ -----------4.1
M edical care___ _______ _____
__ - __
5.6
Recreation______ ____
___ _ ___ ------------.4
Education------------------------------ ----------------.3
V ocation-------- ------- -----------------------------2.1
Com m unity w e lfa r e .----- ------------ ----------Gifts and contributions to persons outside
1.6
the economic fam ily...... ..................... ..........
.4
Other item s.- . __ ________ ______________




i Less than $0.50.

1
22

39
4
22
36
57
1
3
22

59
9
27
61
73
1
4
26

97
10
28
59
92
7
5
29

172
10
34
48
93
23
7
34

160
14
46
73
131
4
4
46

3
3

9
5

16
3

29
4

41
4

84
20

100.0
36.5
8.1
18.3
10.9
3.3
3.3

100.0
36.7
10.3
16.3
10.5
3.5
3.5

100.0
34.8
10.6
14.9
11.3
3.8
2.3

100.0
33.6
11.1
14.3
9.9
4.3
3.7

100.0
29.4
10. 5
16.1
9.6
4.6
2.9

100.0
30.4
16.4
11.7
7.2
3.8
3.9

1.3
.8
1.7
7.8
4.5
(2
)
.1
2.6

3.8
.4
2.1
3.5
5.5
.1
.3
2.1

4.7
.7
2.2
4.9
5.8
.1
.3
2.1

6.2
.6
1.8
3.8
5.9
.4
.3
1.9

9.9
.6
2.0
2.8
5.3
1.3
.4
2.0

7.3
.7
2.1
3.3
6.0
.2
.2
2.1

.4

.9
.5

1.3
.2

1.9
.3

2.4
.2

3.8
.9

11
7
14
66
38
0)

4
2 Less than 0.05 percent.

63

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

6.—

E x p e n d itu r es f o r grou p s o f ite m s , b y in co m e level —Continued

P O R T S M O U T H , K E E N E , D O V E R , L A C O N IA , A N D C L A R E M O N T , N. H.
Income level —Families with annual net
income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$1,200 $1,500 $1,800
$500 to $900 to
to
to
to
$900 $1,200 $1,500
$1,800 $2,100

$2,100
and
over

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f It e m s

Families in survey---------------------------------------------- _
Average family size:
Persons____ ___ __________________ ____ _______
Expenditure units—
.................. ................... .
Food expenditure u n it s ____ _ ______________
Clothing expenditure units____________________

485

97

137

130

57

44

20

3.54
3.29
3. 08
2.74

3.01
2.77
2. 58
2.23

3.33
3.10
2. 90
2. 60

3.56
3.31
3.11
2.71

4.21
3.91
3.69
3.33

4.00
3.70
3.53
3.11

4.34
4.32
4.06
3.93

$839 $1,014 $1,299 $1,619 $1,815
308
373
435
542
568
64
95
139
196
229
154
160
252
201
218
101
.116
146
190
171
51
31
38
54
88
15
32
40
76
64

$2,239
655
298
197
199
91
82

Average annual expenditure for—
All items_________ ________________________ — $1, 251
426
Food___________ __________________________
Clothing__________________________________
133
186
Housing______ ___________________________
138
Fuel, light, and refrigeration______________
Other household operation________________
49
Furnishings and equipm ent_______________
41
Automobile and motorcycle—purchase,
operation, and maintenance
. __
74
Other transportation.. ____ __________ _
5
25
Personal care. — _ - __ - - __ ___________
45
Medical care.................. ____________
72
Recreation.............. .
........................
4
E ducation.—...................... _
...
Vocation____ _____ _
___ . . .
2
22
Com m unity welfare__________________
_
Gifts and contributions to persons outside
23
the economic fam ily_____
_______
6
Other items___ __ . . .
.. . . . . . .. _
Percentage of total annual current expenditure for—
All items_______________________ . . .
_ . . . 100.0
F ood ...... .............................. ...................... —. 34.0
10.6
Clothing__________________________________
Housing___________________________________
14.9
11.0
Fuel, light, and refrigeration___________ . . .
Other household operation. ______ _______
3.9
3.3
Furnishings and equipment_______________
Automobile and m otorcycle—purchase,
operation, and maintenance_ .. . ____
5.9
.4
Other transportation______________________
2.0
Personal care_____________________ _______
3.6
Medical care____________________ _ ______
5.8
Recreation....................... ..................... . . . ....
E d u ca tio n _________________ ______________
.3
.2
Vocation___ ____ _______________
. ___
1.8
Com m unity welfare____
_______________
Gifts and contributions to persons outside
1.8
the economic fam ily_____ __________ . .
.5
Other ite m s .__________ _ . ______________




40
4
14
30
42
2
2
16

41
3
21
34
58
3
1
19

75
5
26
49
71
6
3
23

109
6
31
67
. 96
3
3
27

113
3
37
59
108
8
3
27

266
12
51
77
167
7
5
45

11
5

15
5

21
8

26
6

48
6

81
6

100.0
36.7
7.6
18.4
12.0
3.7
1.8

100.0
36.7
9.4
15.8
11.4
3.7
3. 2

100.0
33.4
10.7
15.5
11. 2
3.9
3. 1

100.0
33.4
12.1
13.5
10.6
3.3
4.0

100.0
31.3
12.6
13.9
10.5
4.8
4.2

100.0
29.2
13.3
8.8
8.9
4.1
3.7

4.8
.5
1.7
3.6
5.0
2

4.0
.3
2. 1
3.4
5.7

6.7
.4
1.9
4.1
5.9

11.9

.2

6.2
.2
2.0
3.3
6.0
.4

.2

.1
1.9

.2
1.7

.2

1.9

5.8
.4
2.0
3.8
5. 5
.5
.2
1.8

1.5

.2
2.0

1.3

1.5
.5

1.6

1.6
.4

2.6
.3

3.6
.3

.6

.3

.6

.5

2.3
3.4
7.5
.3

64

MONET DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES
T

able

6.—E x p e n d itu r es f o r

grou ps o f item s, hy in co m e level—Continued

L I T T L E T O N A N D C O N W A Y , N. H.
Income level— Families with annual net
income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$500 to
$900

$900
to
$1,200

$1,200
to
$1,500

$1,500
to
$1,800

$1,800
and
over

E x p e n d it u r e s fo r G r o u p s o f It e m s

Families in survey _ ______ _ _ _ _ _ _
______
Average family size:
Persons. _ ______
. . . _______ _ _ .
_____
Expenditure units_______ _________ ____________
Food expenditure units.
. . . ____ .
Clothing expenditure units____ __ ______ . _ _ _
Average annual expenditure for—
A ll items__
_ ...
.
____ __
___
Food__________________ ____________ _____
C lothin g..
___ _______________ ________
Housing. . . .
.
. . . _. .
_______
Fuel, light, and refrigeration. _ _ _ ________
Other household operation. ________________
Furnishings and equipment
_ . _________
Automobile and motorcycle—purchase, oper­
ation, and m aintenance.. _ _______ ___
Other transportation.
__ __ ________ ____
Personal care _ . . _ _ _ . . __ ________
M edical care.. _
_ . ____ _____ _
Recreation. .
. . . ____ - - - - - - _ . ._ _
Education. _._
..
Vocation _ _
_ _ ___
. . . ___ ____
Com m unity welfare.
Gifts and contributions to persons outside
the economic family__________________
Other items______________________________
Percentage of total annual current expenditure for—
A llite m s ... _
_ _ _______
___ ________
Food__________ ___ _______________________
Clothing___ __ .
_. _ ________________
Housing _ . _ .
_
____
Fuel, light, and refrigeration. . _ __
._
Other household operation__
Furnishings and equipment
...
_ .
Automobile and motorcycle—purchase, oper­
ation, and m aintenance.. . _ _________ _
Other transportation. _
___ _. _ ______
Personal care.
__ _
. . . _ _____
M edical care. . _
Recreation___ .
. _
. __________ _
Education.
.
_ _
.
__ _
Vocation___
_
. . .
______ _
Comm unity welfare.
. . _ ____
Gifts and contributions to persons outside
the economic family
_
_
___
Other items_____ _ ________________________




1 Less than $0.50.

197

47

64

47

25

14

3. 62
3. 30
3.13
2. 71

2.83
2.61
2.46
2.11

3.63
3. 26
3.10
2.61

4. 03
3.70
3.48
3. 07

4.14
3.76
3.62
3.09

3.85
3.68
3. 52
3. 36

$1, 159
392
115
144
122
44
51

$821
297
61
131
105
28
31

$1, 027
358
93
134
108
44
43

$1, 255
421
145
140
137
47
54

$1, 585
520
147
166
148
55
68

$1,820
536
240
206
153
65
115

90
3
23
52
63
2
4
20

36
1
15
34
40
1
15

64
4
21
52
56
1
4
17

102
5
26
56
63
3
6
20

192
2
28
69
99
6
8
27

173
4
37
62
114
4
9
41

10
16

15
13

16
14

39
11

49
12

100.0
36.2
7.4
16.0
12.8
3.4
3.8

100.0
34.8
9.0
13.0
10.5
4.3
4.2

100.0
33.5
11.6
11.2
10.9
3.7
4.3

100.0
32.8
9.3
10.5
9.3
3.5
4.3

100.0
29.4
13.2
11.3
8.4
3.6
6.3

6.2

8.1

12.1
.1
1.8
4.3
6.2

1.7

4.4
.1
1.8
4.1
4.9
.1
(2
)
1.8

.5
1.7

9.5
.2
2.0
3.4
6.3
.2
.5
2.3

1.7
1.2

1.2
2.0

2.5
.7

2.7
.7

0)

20
14
100.0
33.8
9.9
12.4
10.5
3.8
4.4
7.8
.3
2.0
4.5
5.4
.2
.4

.

.4

.4

2.0
5.1
5.5
.1
1.7

2.1
4.5
5.0
.2
.5
16

1.5
1.3

1.3
1.1

.4

* Less than 0.05 percent.

.4

65

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

6.— Expenditures for groups of items, by income level— Continued
M A R Q U E T T E , M IC H .; M O D E S T O , C A L IF .; A N D R E N O , N E V .
Marquette

M odesto

Reno

-families with annual net income of—
Income level—
Item
$500 $1,200 $1,500 $500 $1,200 $1,500 $500 $1,200 $1,500
to
to
to
and
to
and
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 over $1,200 $1,500 over $1,200 $1,500 over
E x p e n d it u r e s fo r G r o u p o f I t e m s

Families in survey. ___ __
Average family size:

- ____

Expenditure units_______ ____ __
Average annual current expenditure
for—
All item s_____________ ______ _
Food ____ __
--- - _
Clothing . __
- _ _ ___
Housing
.
------Household operation includ­
ing fuel, light, and refrigera­
tion ,— ___ — ,
Furnishings and equipm ent..
Transportation____ ____ __ .
Personal care---------------------M edical care.
___ _ . .
Recreation.. _ . . . . . . .
Education. .
....
V oca tion ..
....
. _ _ .
Com m unity welfare. .
Gifts and contributions_____
Other items______ ________

67
3.51

3.72

42

49

35

67

22

40

87

3. 60

2. 99
2. 72

3. 50
3.18

3. 48
3.25

2. 73

2. 97

3.00

$990 $1,382
344
432
112
148
142
232

$1, 780
499
198
258

$942 $1, 216 $1, 747 $1,077 $1, 296 $1, 840
392
454
608
344
435
520
104
140
228
119
143
216
114
182
200
170
159
229
119
37
39
19
39
37
9
2
11
10
10

Percentage of total annual current
expenditures for—
A ll item s_________________
___ 100.0
41.7
F ood ___ ______ ___________
C lo t h i n g ...___ ____________
11.0
12.1
Housing____________________
Household operation includ­
ing fuel, light, and refrigera­
12.6
tion .. . . . ___
3.9
Furnishings and equipm ent..
4.1
Transportation_____ ________
2.0
Personal care __ _____
4.1
Medical care. . _____
__
Recreation..
_ . . . . _.
3.9
Education. _. _ .
. . . .
1.0
.2
V ocation.. . . .
_ .
1.2
Comm unity welfare ____ _
Gifts and contributions _ . .
1.1
1.1
Other items___________ _____




39

157
28
52
28
61
58
8
3
16
24
5

200
88
113
39
70
90
11
11
22
37
30

110
44
121
26
31
62
3
1
11
18
17

145
59
123
27
64
77
8
2
11
33
10

189
94
235
48
107
105
14
7
15
51
10

148
33
75
19
42
46
1
•
7
5
14
2

174
38
118
32
58
74
3
8
11
46
8

216
79
205
38
113
95
2
7
10
51
9

100.0
37.3
11.5
15.0

100.0
34.9
13.1
11. 4

100.0
31.9
11.0
15.8

100.0
33.6
11.1
12.2

100.0
28.3
11.7
12. 5

100.0
34.8
11.3
14.4

100.0
31.3
10.7
16.8

100.0
28.1
11.1
14.5

12.9
2.3
4.3
2.3
5.0
4.8
.7
.2
1.3
2.0
.4

11.4
5.0
6.5
2. 2
4.0
5.2
.6
.6
1.3
2. 1
1. 7

10. 2
4.1
11.2
2.4
2.9
5.8
.3
.1
1.0
1. 7
1.6

11.2
4.5
9.5
2. 1
5.0
5.9
.7
.2
.8
2.5
.7

10.2
5.1
12.8
2. 6
5.8
5. 7
.8
.4
.8
2.8
.5

15.0
3.3
7.6
1.9
4.2
4.6
.1
.7
.5
1.4
.2

12.6
2.7
8.5
2. 3
4.2
5.4
.2
.6
.8
3.3
.6

12.1
4.4
11.5
2.1
6.3
5.3
.2
.4
.6
2.9
.5

66
T a b l e 7 .—

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES
F o o d u s e d at h o m e a n d p u r c h a s e d f o r c o n s u m p t i o n at h o m e d u r in g 1 w e e k
i n f a l l a n d w i n t e r q u a r te r s, h y e c o n o m i c level

10 N E W H A M P S H IR E C IT IE S
Econom ic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year—
All
families

Item

Under
$300

Number of families surveyed in fall and winter quarters_____
Average number of equivalent full-time persons 1 per family in
1 week_____________________________________________________
Average number of food expenditure units 2 per family in 1
week.
_____
...
-----------------

All
fam­
ilies

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

981

279

225

226

251

3.87

5.45

3.91

3.24

2.63

3.44

4.72

3.43

2.88

2.52

Number of families using in
1 week

Item
'

$300
to
$400

Average quantity purchased per
person 1 in 1 week

Economic level—Famiilies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

All
fam­
ilies

Economic level— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

F o o d U sed at H o m e and P u r ch a sed
f o r C o n s u m p tio n at H o m e in 1
W eek
N o.

Grain products, total_____________
Bread and other baked goods,
total________________________
Bread: W h ite________________
Graham, whole-wheat _
R y e __________________
Crackers_____________________
Plain rolls____________________
Sweet rolls___________________
Cookies___________________
Cakes________________________
Pies__________________________
Other________________________
Ready-to-eat cereals____________
Flour and other cereals, total___
Flour: W hite_________________
Graham_______________
Other_________________
Corn meal____________________
H om in y______________________
Cornstarch___________________
Rice_,
.
_________________
Rolled oats. _________________
Wheat cereal_______________
Tapioca
_________
Sago_______________________
Macaroni, spaghetti, noodles
Other grain products ____
Eggs--------------------------------------------M ilk, cheese, ice cream, total_____
M ilk: Fresh, whole—bottled___
loose______
skim m ed_________
b u t t e r m ilk a n d
other___________
Skimmed, dried_________
E v a p o ra te d and c o n ­
densed,- _____________
Cheese: American______________
Cottage....................... .
Other............ .................
Ice cream______________________

896
91
54
456
60
28
292
189
73
389
719
30
23
115
3
155
297
394
152
99

2 0 204
1
17
25
8
1
2
0 1
113
131
11
0
16
9
1
1
2
8
7
6
74
6
6 6
42
45
38
2
2
1
0 14
10
2

238
24
15

244
25

11
1
24
1
1
8
6
64
27

10
0

219

161
9

157
9

182
4

36

24

28

138
44
33

36
71
94
43
23

27
1
40

8
1

8
6
0
49
10
0

8
2

1
0

30
60

8

6
6

266

0
12
0
0
22
1

77

931

0
123
0

81
30
24
0
74

207

246

929

6

262
3

219

7

1

4

0

0
376
2

1

269
341
30
53

6
6

0

35
19

0
0

2

Lb.

Lb.

4.113

3.794

1.44
8

2.461
1.910
.066
.053
.150

.134

2.193
1.773
.059
.074
.115
.008
.007
.084
.042
.010
.021
.085
1.516
1.039
.020
.009
.029
0
.013
.071
. 143
.035
.013
0
.144
.434
4.697
4.301
.059
.006

2.566
2.027
.045
.037
.176
.016
.003
.105
.097
.029
.031
.079
1.839
1.269
.015
.044
.029
.005
.019
.078
. 177
.062
.009
0
.132
0
.537
6. 240
5.904
.040
0

.020

.008
.107
.081
.036
.030
.088
1.564
1.054
.014

.021
.033
.0 1
0
.017
.068
.164
.045

.012

0

.0 1 0
0

21
1

1

1
4

237
0
1

.560
5. 514
5.120
.035
.024

0

3

1

.004

2

1
6
6
82
1
0
9
1
1

0

0

0 0
0
.220 .258
48
1 2 .075 .047
0
.003
.004
.012 .013
15
.020 .010
25

Lb.

0
0
.197
.074
.004

.010
.011

Lb.

4. 426
2.590

2.020
.076
.032
.163
.023
.009
.118
.068
.052
.029
.078
1.390
.885
.014
.004
.048
0
.018
.056
.180
.046
.013
0
.126
0
.631
5.634
5.140
.012
.102

2.800
1.945
.098
.049
.185
.048
.018
.152
.166
.087
.052
. 117
1.509
.993

.002
.039
.029

0

.023
.061
. 178
.047

.012
0
.120
.005
.800
6.296
5.942

0

.008

.017

.002
0

.218
.094
.005

.165
.118
.007
.015
.039

0

.012
.034

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
2 The number of expenditure units per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the expenditure
units represented b y the equivalent full-time persons eating meals at home during the week to which the
data apply.




67

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

7. — Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1 week

in fall and winter quarters, by economic level— Continued
10

N E W H A M P S H IR E C IT IE S — Continued
Average expenditure per person 1 in 1 week
Econom ic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year

Item
fami­
lies

Under
$300
F o od

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

C e n ts

C e n ts

C en ts

C e n ts

U sed at H o m e and P u rch a sed f o r C o n s u m p tio n
at H o m e in 1 W e e k —Continued
7ents

T otal______________________________________
Grain products, total__________________
Bread and other baked goods, totaL
Bread: W hite_________________
Graham, whole wheat.
R ye____________________
Crackers_______________________
Plain rolls_____________________
Sweet rolls____________________
Cookies_______________________
Cakes_________________________
Pies___________________________
Other____________________
Ready-to-eat cereals_______ _______
Flour and other cereals, totaL
Flour: W hite_________ ...
Graham____ ___ _____
Other_____________
_
Corn m e a l...__ _______________
H om in y_______________________
Cornstarch____________________
R ice__________________________
Rolled oats___________________
Wheat cereal__________________
Tapioca_______________________
Sago__________________________
Macaroni, spaghetti, noodles.
Other grain products__________
M ilk, cheese, ice cream, total__________________
M ilk: Fresh, whole—bottled____________
loose_______ _______
skimmed___________ ____
buttermilk and other. ___
Skimmed, dried________
Evaporated and condensed...
Cheese: American. _____
...
__________
C o tta g e ..________
________ .
Other_____________________________
Ice cream__________________________________

227. 3
38.6
26.9
18.0
.7
.5
2.5
.3
.2
2.0
1.6
.5
.6
1. 6
10.1
5. 1
.1
.2
.2
(3)
.2
.6
1.3
.7
.2
0
1. 5
(3)
14.3
29. 1
24. 2
.1
(3)
(3
)
0
1.8
1.9
.1
.4
.6 1

174.0
34. 2
22.6
16.4
.7
.7
1.9
.1
.1
1.3
.9
.1
.4
1.5
10.1
5.4
.1
.1
.2
0
.2
.6
1.2
.5
.2
0
1.6
0
10.6
24. 2:
20.1
.2
(3)
0
0
2.0
1.2
.1
.3
-3

219.8
40.0
27.2
19.1
.5
.4
2.9
.2
(3
)
1.8
1.3
.4
.6
1.5
11.3
5.7
.1
.3
.2
(3)
.2
.6
1.5
.9
.2
0
1.6
0
13.6
32.4
27.7
.2
0
0
0
1.7
1.9
.1
.4
.4

257.8
39.7
29.3
19.6
.8
.4
2.7
.3
.2
2.4
1.5
.8
.6
1.4
9.0
4.3
,1
(3)
.3
0
.2
.5
1.3
.7
.2
0
1.4
0
16.8
30.2
24.6
.1
.2
.1
0
1.6
2.2
.1
.3
1.0

326.4
45.6
33.5
18.6
1.1
.5
3.3
.7
.3
3.3
3.4
1.2
1.1
2.0
10.1
4.8
(*)
.4
.2
0
.3
.6
1.3
.7
.2
0
1.5
.1
21.2
35.2
28.6
0
(»)
(3
)
0
1.4
3.2
.1
.5
1.4

i The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.




68
T

able

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES

7.— Food used at home and 'purchased for consumption at home during 1 week
in fall and winter quarters, by economic level— Continued
10

N E W H A M P S H IR E C IT IE S —Continued
N um ber of families using in
1 week

Item

All
fam­
ilies

Econom ic level—Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year—
U n­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

No.

No.

No.

All
fam­
ilies

$500
and
over

N o.

Average quantity purchased per
person 1 in 1 week

F o o d U se d at H o m e and P u r ch a s ed
f o r C o n s u m p ti o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k — Continued

Econom ic level— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year—

Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

948
237
21
697
79
37

267
36
11
215
20
9

222
39
3
166
17
6

216
56
6
151
19
7

243
106
1
165
23
15

1.102
.543
.057
.014
.262
.027
.013

0.916
.459
.023
.019
.261
.014
.005

1.048
.550
.039
.010
.224
.030
.014

1. 245
.623
.071
.020
.285
.027
.006

1.438
.641
.143
0
.290
.051
.036

198
331
315

55
68
115

35
78
72

39
78
67

69
107
61

.026
.087
.073

.020
.048
.067

.017
.087
.077

.027
.108
.078

.049
. 152
.076

2. 540

2.088

2.318

2.912

3. 464

.106
.103
.183
.222
.111
.028
. 100
.006
.012
.008
.049
.004
0
.054
.043
.010
.048
. 145
.044
.124
.234
.053
.041

.226
. 109
. 186
.250
.090
.090
.068
.006
.051
.008
.054
.008
0
.045
.040
.017
. I ll
. 177
.020
. 197
.216
.018
.074

. 127
.025
.056
.026
. 547
.012
.092
.032
.003
.046
.014
.058
.079
.025
. 183
.003
.403
.276
.065
.016
.037
.009

. 122
.011
.073
.016
. 727
!002
. 109
.038
0
.048
.013
.065
.243
.073
. 136
0
•
. 454
.281
.077
.009
.035
.052

N o.

___
B u t t e r ____________
Cream_______________
___
Other table fats_________ ______
Lard_______________ __________
Vegetable shortening_
_
Table or cooking oils___________
Mavonnaise and other salad
dressing __ _ - - -----Bacon, smoked______ —. Salt side of pork__ ______
Meat, poultry, fish, and other sea
Beef:
Presh: steak, porterhouse, sir­
loin____
top round___ __
other
roast, rib______ - ----chuck... - _ _
other___
boiling, chuck---- --------plate -.
other_______
C an n ed .-_ . -.
C orned.. — _
__
___ _
D ried_____
__ ____ Other_____________________ . Veal: Fresh, steak, chops_______
roast-- stew
...
_ Lam b: Fresh, chops
___ ___
roast- _______ __
stew.
__
_
Pork: Fresh, chops. ______
loin ro a s t.________
o th e r..- _
__
Smoked ham, slices. _
.
h a l f or
whole___
p icn ic.._
Pork sausage_______ _ __
Other pork ____________
Miscellaneous meats, total
Other fresh meat_____________
Bologna, frankfurters____ . _
Cooked: H am __________
_
Tongue_______
L iv e r ... _ _____ ___________
Other meat products_________
Poultry: Chicken, broiling. _
roast____
stew_______
Turkey____ _ __ _
Other_____________ .
Fish and other sea food, total___
Fish: Fresh___________ ______
Canned. _ ___
Cured________ _______
O ysters.._ ... _____ __________
Other sea food. _. _ __ __ _

181
130
383
169
89
42
147
8
45
17
53
35
0
53
49
25
96
79
41
268
216
46
88

23
25
125
58
21
8
57
3
20
5
18
9
0
6
19
12
11
12

47
39
70
41
20
3
26
1
6
3
13
5
0
13
10
3
26
24
12
59
46
12
12

86
40
81
40
18
17
20
3
11
6
11
11
0
20
7
5
45
26
6
84
38
4
30

.081
.063
.177
.174
.089
.043
.129
.007
.028
.006
.037
.004
0
.027
.042
.015
.040
.094
.027
. 117
.212
.054
.044

.026
.031
.158
.146
.052
.016
.147
.010
.031
.005
.030
.002
0
.007
.038

60
80
22
28

25
26
107
30
30
14
44
1
8
3
11
10
0
14
13
5
14
17
12
65
52
8
18

.009
.038
.015
.073
.201
.089
.046

.045
.052
.198
.123
.136
.066
.167
.004
.020
.005
.028
.004
0
.026
.049
.010
.033
.085
.038
.125
.209
.021
.021

69
10
126
54

13
2
23
11

15
2
28
16

22
4
33
14

19
2
42
13

7
293
101
2
128
34
28
86
27
52
5

1
100
27
0
38
11
6
28
5
14
1

2
81
18
1
36
10
3
14
4
10
3

1
54
28
1
27
6
12
14
7
14
1

3
58
28
0
27
7
7
30
11
14
0

428
182
41
77
41

101
51
14
11
7

114
43
10
14
14

104
44
9
27
5

109
44
8
25
15

.077
.010
.042
.016
. 555
.097
. 108
.033
.001
.042
.011
.027
.097
.026
.109
.004
.330
.227
.054
.014
.020
.015

.040
.004
.020
.009
. 589
.235
. 109
.041
0
.033
.007
.012
.056
.012
.079
.005
.235
. 168
.038
.016
.008
.005

.065
.008
.047
.017
. 373
0
.116
.017
.002
.050
.015
0
.073
.016
.078
.006
.343
.247
.057
.011
.015
.013

11

..021

Lb.

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.




69

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

7.— Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1 week
in fall and winter quarters, by economic level— Continued
10 N E W H A M P S H IR E C IT IE S — Continued
Average expenditure per person 1 in I week
Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year

Item
All fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

C en ts

C e n ts

C en ts

C e n ts

F o o d U sed at H o m e and P u rch a sed fo r C o n s u m p tio n
at H o m e in 1 W e e k —Continued
C e n ts

Fats, total. _ ------------- ---------- ------------------------Butter. _ _
____ ____
___
______
Cream. _ . . .
.
.
Other table f a t s _______ ______ _____
___ __ _
Lard.
_____________
Vegetable shortening________________________
Table or cooking oils
. . .
___ __
Mayonnaise and other salad dressing______ . . .
Bacon, s m o k e d ... _
__ _ ___ ____ ___ .
Salt side of pork. . .
.
___ __ ___ . . .
Meat, poultry, fish, and other sea food, total_______
Beef:
Fresh: Steak, porterhouse, sirloin___ ______
top rou n d .. _ __ _
__ __
other __ .
_ ----Roast, rib _ _
chuck - - - - - - - _ ____
other..
. ___ _
.
Boiling, chuck..
plate___________ _ . _____
other___ __ _
_
_ ____
Canned
.. . __________ _____
Corned
____________ _ _ _ - . ________
___________________________
Dried. _____
. _____ .Other __________________
Veal: Fresh, steak, chops _________________ __
roast __ ____
________
stew
_________ _____________
Lamb: Fresh, chops.
_ ____ _______
roast.. ______ _ _____ .
.
stew ..
_ _ _ ______ . .
Pork: Fresh, chops___ ___ _ __ __
_____
loin roast.
_ _____ ____ __ ____
other______ ___________________
Smoked ham, slices_______
___ _. __
half or whole
... ___ _
picnic ______________
Pork sausage____ _____ ___ _ _ ___
Other pork__________________________ ___
Miscellaneous meats, tota l.. ___
Other fresh meat.
____
_ _______
Bologna, frankfurters___ _ ________
Cooked: H a m ..
____ ____ _
Tongue_____________________
Liver
_
_
. . .
Other meat p ro d u c ts _____ __ _ _____
Poultry: Chicken, broiling.
__ _ _ .. .
roast. ___ ___ ____
stew. .
Turkey.
___ _____
__ __
Other___________________ _____
Fish and other sea food, total___ _____
Fish: Fresh.__ _
Canned
__
C ured-. _
Oysters. _ ____ __
Other sea food ________ _ _

28.6
17.9
1.7
.2
3.7
.4
.3
.8
2.4
1.2
55.2

23.1
15.1
.5
.3
3.7
.2
.1
.6
1.4
1.2
39.5

27.3
18.0
1.1
.2
3.2
.5
.3
.5
2.3
1.2
50.1

32.7
20.6
2.2
.3
3.9
.5
.2
.7
3.0
1.3
68.0

39.0
21.4
4.6
0
4.0
.9
.9
1.5
4.4
1.3
84.2

3.0
1.9
3.7
4.2
1.9
1.0
2. 2
.1
.4
.1
.7
.1
0
.7
.9
.2
1.1
2.0
.5
2.9
4.5
1.0
1.1
1. 5
.2
1. 0
.3
12.4
1.0
2. 1

.8
.9
3.0
3.4
1.0
.4
2.3
.2
.4
.1
.5
.1
0
.2
.8
.3
.3
.8
.2
1. 7
4.1
1.8
1.0
.8
.1
.5
.2
10.2
2.4
2. 1
.7
0
.5
.1
.3
1.4

1.6
1.7
4.0
2.8
2.8
1.5
3.0
.1
.3
.1
.6
.2
0
.6
1.0
.2
.8
1.7
.8
3.2
4.7
.4
.6
1.1
.1
1.1

4.1
3.2
4.0
5.3
2.5
.7
1.9
.1
.2
.1
.9
.1
0
1.2
1.0
.2
1.5
3.5
.6
3.1
5.0
1.0
.9
2.5
.4
1.3

9.0
3.3
4.5
6.8
2.0
2.2
1.2
.1
.7
.2
1.1
.3
0
1.4
.9
.3
3.0
3.5
.4
5.1
4.5
.3
2.0
2.4
.2
1.8

.8

(3
)

.7
.2
.8
2.6

.3

8.9
0
2.2
.5

.1
.8
.3

0
1.8

.6

.3

.3

3.5
.1
5.6
3.5
1.0

2.3
.1
3.4

2.6

2.2

.7

.2
.6

.2
.2

.3

.1

.3

5.9
4.0
1.0

.3

.5

14.9
.2
1.8
1.0
.1
1.0
.2
1.6
2.0
.7
6.3
(3
)
7.3
4.5
1.3

18.2
(*)

2.2
1.1
0
.1
.2
1.8
7.2
1.4
4.2
0
8.5
4.9
1.6

.2

.3

.2

.4
.3

1.0

1.1
.7

.2

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as the
appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.




70
T

able

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

7.— Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1 week
in fall and winter quarters, by economic level— Continued
10 N E W H A M P S H IR E C IT IE S —Continued
Number of families using in
1 week

Item

All

fam
ilies

F o o d U se d at H o m e a nd P u rch a sed
fo r C o n s u m p ti o n at H o m e in l
W e e k — Continued

N o.

Econom ic level—Famiilies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Average quantity purchased per
person 1 in 1 week

All
families

Lb.

Econom ic level— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
U n­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

6.466 4.882 5.772 7 .169 10.279
Vegetables and fruits, total_____ 869
2.110 1.920 1.830 1.907 3.145
251
203
187
228
Potatoes ------------------- - .003
36
3
7
15
.036
.036
.075
11
Sweetpotatoes, y a m s ___
.069
.343
.279
.369
Dried legumes and nuts, total
.343
.452
.001
.004 0
Dried corn___________________
4
2
6
1
1
0
0
459
152
115
92
.180
. 154
.206
.182
Beans: D r y ---------------------------100
.203
.044
.030
Canned, dried________
36
34
30
.049
148
48
.040
.074
.007
Baked, not canned __
17
2
2
6
.004
.004
.012
7
.014
16
.008
.005
4
3
2
.007
.003
7
Peas: Black-eyed___ __________
.020
Other____ _________ . . .
34
15
7
5
.008
.010
.007
.006
7
.008
12
.016
.005
.019
N uts: Shelled________________
69
14
12
31
.013
.037
73
16
.020
In shell______________ _
14
20
23
.007
.018
.034
.036
56
.059
Peanut b u t t e r ____ . __ ___
244
94
46
48
.060
.059
.053
.060
Other dried legumes and nuts
0
0
0
(4
)
(4
)
.015
Tomatoes: Fresh_ .
... ...
45
5
.005
.012
8
9
23
.010
.046
Canned_________ ._ 418
100
93
.116
118
107
.091
.125
.115
. 166
.025
.007
8
5
26
.016
Juice___________ ___
50
11
.011
.082
.002
2
.002
.002
14
8
2
2
Sauce, paste________
.003
.001
Green and leafy vegetables, total.543
.382
.441
.682
.905
B russels sprouts________
2
.002
7
0
1
.001 0
4
.001
.003
.219
.189
C a b b a g e_______ __
- ______
296
93
68
58
77
.182
.260
.295
1
Sauerkraut_______ _____ 6
4
.005
.005
18
7
.003
.004
.009
Collar ds__________ ____ ___ __
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.002 0
1
1
1
.001
Kale__________________________
3
0
.003 0
36
.058
41
54
86
.028
.042
Lettuce___________________ - _ 217
.070
.134
.062
Spinach: Fresh_____ ________
14
97
18
35
30
.027
.044
. 116
.106
12
Canned ____________
58
13
.020
.011
15
18
.018
.020
.041
12
2
2
2
Other leafy vegetables ______
6
.003 0
.003
0
.015
Asparagus: Fresh____ _______
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.008
Canned. _ . . . . _
4
4
6
27
13
.003
.007
.011
.017
2
Lima beans: F resh._
.001
5
0
2
1
.002 0
.001
.002
21
.005
2
Canned ____ __
3
6
10
.003
.012
.013
(4
)
Beans, snap (string): Fresh___
13
.009
36
7
9
7
.007
.007
.010
.014
C anned62
248
78
52
.048
.037
56
.045
.052
.072
B roccoli.
1
1
1
3
0
.001 0
.001
.002
.005
Peas: Fresh_____ __ _________
13
6
2
.002
1
4
.001
.002 0
.008
C an ned ._ __ _ __
292
73
72
57
90
.098
.069
.084
.113
.167
Peppers.
________
2
14
3
2
7
.002
.001
.001
.004
.004
Okra_____ __________
. -.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Yellow vegetables, total_____
.293
.219
.268
.337
.450
Carrots___ __ ________________
486
136
109
108
133
.172
.129
.142
.197
.283
Winter squash and pum pkin. _ 194
53
37
55
.121
49
.090
.126
. 140
.167
Other vegetables, total . _ _
.642
.475
.540
.783 1.010
Beets: Fresh___ _____________
•
22
76
18
17
19
.031
.051
.017
.016
.023
Canned__________ ____
22
87
27
18
.002
20
.014
.011
.013
.046
Cauliflower.................... ............
16
2
2
5
7
.007
.003
.004
.016
.011
Celery.
_
____________ ..
233
51
62
69
51
.070
.038
.062
.092
.129
Corn: On ear________________
0
.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Canned_______________
52
234
63
59
60
.059
.042
.044
.078
.099
Cucumber ____________ ___
0
3
0
0
3
0
0
.001
.001
(4)
1
Eggplant--------------------------------1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
162
Onions: M a tu re... ________ _ 628
173
.346
.285
133
160
.406
.310
.470
S p rin g ______________
1
3
1
1
.003
.002 0
0
.008
.002
P a rsn ip s____ _______________
14
5
1
7
1
.006
.003
.019 0
.006
Summer squash__________ .. .
13
2
2
5
4
.011
.003
.012
.026
.009
W hite turnips___ __________
7
2
2
3
.004
0
.005 0
.007 0
42
Yellow turnips, rutabaga_____
178
39
34
63
.090
.072
.041
.101
.214
12
Other vegetables_____________
3
1
1
7
.001 0
.002 0
.006
Pickles and olives________
Citrus fruits, total____________
.982
.449
. 867 1. 372 1. 935
104
21
22
23
Lem ons............................ ............
38
.027
.014
.020
.037
.054
Oranges_________ _______ ____
543
115
113
140
175
.808
.396
.740 1:078 1.550
Grapefruit: Fresh____________
118
12
17
41
48
.124
.030
.084
.238
.270
6
6
8
15
.023
Canned__________ i 35
.009
.023
.019
.061
1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
4 Less than 0.0005 pound.




71

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

7 .—

Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1 week
in fall and winter quarters, by economic level— Continued
10 N E W H A M P S H IR E C IT IE S — Continued
Average expenditure per person i in 1 week

Item
All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

F o o d U se d at H o m e a nd P u r ch a s ed fo r C o n s u m p tio n
at H o m e in 1 W e e k —Continued

C e n ts

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

C e n ts

C e n ts

C e n ts

C e n ts

Vegetables and fruits, total _________ __________
23.2
35.1
31.8
41.3
59.9
2.6
Potatoes _ ________________ ____________ ___
2.4
2.2
2.5
3.9
Sweetpotatoes, yams___________________ ___ __
.1
.1
.3
.4
(3
)
Dried legumes and nuts, total________ ________
4.4
3.3
4.6
4.5
6.3
Dried corn ___ ___________________________
0
0
(3)
0
(3
)
Beans: D ry ________________________________
1.5
1.4
1.6
1.5
1.7
Canned, dried_____________________
.6
.4
.6
.5
.9
Baked, not canned_________________
.1
.1
.1
.2
(3
)
Peas: Black-eyed........ ......................................
.1
.1
.2
(3
)
(3
)
Other. ______ _______________________
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
Nuts: Shelled. _ ________________________ _
.5
.1
.7
.5
1.2
.5
.2
In shell_______________ . . . . . _____
.4
.9
.9
Peanut butter_______ _____________________
1.0
1.1
1.0
.9
1.1
Other dried legumes and nuts______________
0
0
(3
)
0
(3
)
.2
Tomatoes: Fresh____ _________________________
.1
.1
.1
.6
Canned____ _______________________
1.3
.9
1.4
1.4
1.9
Juice.______________________________
.3
.2
.1
.1
.8
Sauce, paste.. . . . ______ _____ _
.1
(3
)
(3
)
<)
3
(3)
Green and leafy vegetables, total
_______ ____
4.7
3.0
3.9
5.8
8.7
Brussels sprouts______
______________
0
.1
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
Cabbage___________________________________
.7
.6
.6
.7
1.0
Sauerkraut
____________________________
.1
.1
.1
(3
)
.1Collards_________ _________ ____________
0
0
0
0
0
Kale_______________________________________
0
0
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
L e t tu c e ______ _________________ .. ___ .
.8
.4
.6
1.0
1.8
Spinach: Fresh___ . . . ________________
.5
.2
.4
1.0
.8
Canned____________________ ...
.2
.3
.3
.2
.6
Other leafy vegetables________ ____________
0
0
(3
)
.2
(3
)
Asparagus: Fresh_______________________ _
0
0
0
0
0
.2
.1
Canned. ______________________
.2
.1
.4
Lima beans: Fresh _______________________
0
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
Canned_________ ___________
.1
.2
.2
(3
)
(3
)
.1
Beans, snap (string): Fresh _______________
.1
.1
.1
.1
Canned. ____________
.6
.4
.6
.7
.8
Broccoli ________________________
____
0
.1
(3)
(3
)
(3
)
Peas: Fresh ____________ ______
_______
0
.1
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
Canned _______________________ ____
1.3
.9
1.2
1.5
2.3
Peppers. _____ __________________________
.1
.1
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
Okra. __________________ _____ __________
0
0
0
0
0
1.3
Yellow vegetables, total________________________
1.0
1.2
1.6
2.2
Carrots___ _ ______________ ______________
.9
.7
1.2
.8
1.6
Winter squash and pum pkin. ............. ..........
.4
.3
.4
.4
.6
..
Other vegetables, t o t a l.......... ....................
4.5
2.9
3.7
5.5
8.0
Beets: Fresh__________________________ __
.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
Canned____________ ________ ______
.2
.1
.2
.6
(3
)
Cauliflower.__
_____ _________ __________
.1
.2
.1
(3
)
(3
)
Celery_______ _____________________________
1.0
.5
.9
1.3
1.8
Corn: On ear. ____________________________
0
0
0
0
0
C a n n e d ____________________________
.7
.5
.5
.9
1.1
C ucum ber.------------------------------------------------0
0
(3
)
(3
)
(3)
Eggplant------------- ------- -------------------------------0
0
0
0
0
1. 5
1.1
1.5
Onions: M a t u r e . ____ ______ ___________
1.6
2.2
Spring_________ ______ ___________
0
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3)
Parsnips----------------------------------------------------.2
0
(3
)
(3)
(3
)
Summer squash________________ _________
.1
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3)
White turnips_____________ _____ _ _______
0
0
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
.4
.2
Yellow turnips, rutabaga_________________
.3
.4
.8
Other vegetables____ __________ ________
0
0
.1
(3
)
(3
)
Pickles and olives_________________________
.5
.4
.3
.5
1.2
6.4
Citrus fruits, total______ ______________________
3.0
5.7
8.8
12.8
.4
.2
.3
Lemons .........
............................... ..............
.6
.7
5.1
2.5
4.6
Oranges
...
________________ ______
6.6
10.1
.2
Grapefruit: Fresh_________________________
.5
1.4
.7
1.5
.2
1 1
Canned________
. ____ ___
.2 I
.5
-3
1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
2 0 0 9 8 2 ° — 41 --------6




72
T

able

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS— 13

SMALL CITIES

7 . — Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1 week

in fall and winter quarters, by economic level— Continued
10 N E W H A M P S H IR E C IT IE S — Continued
Number of families using in
1 week

Item
All
fam ­
ilies

Econom ic level—Famiilies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year

Average quantity purchased per
person 1 in 1 week

A ll

Econom ic level— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year

fam­
ilies
U n­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

U n­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

F o o d U sed at H o m e a nd P u r ch a s ed
f o r C o n s u m p ti o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued
Lb.
N o.
N o.
Lb.
Vegetables and fruits—Continued. N o .
N o.
N o.
Lb.
Lb.
Lb.
1.359 1.041 1.271 1.535 2.018
Other fruits, total____
.712
.588
.642
125
I ll
86’
Ill
.737 1.061
433
Apples: Fresh________ __
.002 0
.001
2
Canned______ _
_
3
0
1
0
0
0
.002 0
.021
1
.004
Apricots: Fresh________
.001
3
1
1
0
.003
.004
1
5
.001 0
.009
9
3
0
Canned____________
292
.281
.217
.260
Bananas.
_ ________ _ _
.385
.341
80
65
76
71
.017
.017
34
6
.014
.027
Berries: Fresh........... . _ _ _ _
15
6
7
.009
12
.009
.007
33
.004
.015
80
15
20
.014
Canned_____________
Cherries: Fresh____
_______
2
0
.001 0
1
1
0
0
0
(4
)
.002
.002
2
2
14
7
.001 0
.007
3
Canned____________
.043
16
.054
.028
.076
Grapes: F r e s h _______________
93
20
26
31
.105
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
C a n n e d ____
2
.002 0
6
4
.001
.002
Peaches: F r e s h _____ ________
0
0
0
.026
.029
.059
122
38
.043
28
23
33
.086
Canned. _ ______
2
.001 0
.002
3
1
.001 0
Pears: Fresh______
_ _ _ _
0
0
12
12
.011
.003
.023
.006
45
10
11
.022
Canned______ . __ _
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
.001
Pineapple: Fresh.. . . _____ _
(4)
39
2
.033
.016
.033
.043
87
23
23
.061
Canned___________
M elons. _ ___ __
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
.001 0
Plums: Fresh___ _
0
0
0
0
(4)
.002 0
5
.001
.003
13
1
4
3
.005
C a n n e d ... ___ . . .
21
4
.009
Other fruit_ __
_
_
7
4
6
.009
.004
.013
.011
C id e r ____ __
15
4
1
4
6
.013 0
.031 0
.034
.003
Grape ju ice.. . . .
. _____
11
3
3
5
0
.003
.004
.006 0
2
2
.004
.003
.004
1
5
Other fruit ju ices.__
10
.012
(4
)
6
.009
.008
.009
Dried: A pricots___________ __
26
8
7
5
.011
.011
0
.001 0
Peaches. _ _ _
1
1
0
0
0
0
(4)
191
49
.055
.092
Prunes ___ __
53
51
38
.073
.068
.093
.052
Raisins____ __
197
69
43
37
48
.046
.053
.046
.073
19
Dates. ___
58
13
15
.017
.010
.017
11
.020
.029
Figs----------------------------16
4
2
2
8
.002
.002
.002
.003
.009
6
2
0
0
4
.002 0
0
Other______ . . .
.008 •0
1.485 1. 213 1. 350 1. 609 2.154
Sugars and sweets, totals.-_ _
Sugars: W hite___
211
920
268
207
234
1.290 1.065 1. 155 1.403 1.867
Brown _
123
34
28
34
27
.047
.038
.041
.058
.064
162
Other sweets: C an d y.____
28
44
50
.054
.025
.044
40
.068
. 118
23
21
28
103
31
.015
.010
.012
.005
J ellies___
.040
46
42
.072
201
74
39
.076
.097
.073
Molasses, sirups
.062
.003
Other____ .
.003
.001
.002
.003
Miscellaneous, total. __
87
14
U
29
Gelatine_____ __
30
.010
.011
.004
.013
.011
114
22
30
25
37
Packaged dessert mixtures.
.018
.013
.020
.024
.023
.042
Tea _________ . _..
703
198
163
181
.064
161
.063
.081
.093
C o f f e e ._____ _ _
242
856
203
226
185
. 187
. 130
. 188
.204
.298
C ocoa___________
_ _
276
.036
116
75
39
46
.037
.031
.022
.023
Chocolate________
16
41
9
6
10
.006
.003
.006
.008
.013
Vinegar ___
Salt_____________
Baking powder, yeast, soda
Spices and extracts.
Catsups, sauces .
182
52
Tom ato soup________________ __
41
46
43
.069
.052
.055
.105
.080
Other soups____________________
103
26
27
22
28
.037
.021
.047
.041
.057
Cod-liver oil___
_ .....
80
26
29
14
11
.010
.003
.015
.003
.026
Proprietary foods_____ _______
22
71
15
17
.012
17
.008
.014
.018
.009
Other food s... ___ __________
16
7
4
2
.004
3
.005
.001
.004
.009
6
8
13
.040
.010
Soft drinks consumed at hom e—
31
4
.034
.099
.051
21
46
9
Other drinks consumed at home.
8
.045
.027
8
.020
.026
.138
_
Sales tax on food_________________ 1
1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
4 Less than 0.0005 pound.




73

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T

able

7.— Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1 week
in fall and winter quarters, by economic level— Continued
10 N E W H A M P S H IR E C IT IE S — Continued
Average expenditure per person 1 in 1 week
Econom ic level— Families spending per
expenditure unit per year

Item
All fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

C e n ts

C e n ts

C e n ts

C e n ts

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d fo r C o n s u m p tio n
at H o m e in 1 W e e k —Continued
Vegetables and fruits—Continued
Other fruits: total______________________________
Apples: Fresh. ______ ___________________ ____
Canned___ _____
_ .. ______
_____
Apricots: F re s h _ ........ . _ _
Canned________
__
__ _ _
Bananas___ __ ________
__ ____ ________
Berries: Fresh___________________________
Canned___________________ _____
Cherries: Fresh______________________________
Canned________ ________ __ _____
Grapes: Fresh_______________________________
Canned. _____
_____
_ ___
Peaches: Fresh._
____ _ _______ _ ___
C an ned .. _________
___ _ __ ___
Pears: Fresh.__ _ ___________ _____ _ ___
Canned___ _____________ _______ _
Pineapple: F r e s h ____ ______ _____ __ __
Canned____ _______ _ _________
M elons. ___ _____ _______ ______ _ __ _
Plums: Fresh___ __
_______________________
Canned______ _
______ ____ ____ __
Other fruit_____
______ _________________ _
Cider __ ______ _____
__ _ __
______
Grape juice___ _
_________________ _
_
Other fruit juice______
____________________
Dried: Apricots. _ . ._ __ ____________ _ _
Peaches _ _
__
_
____
P r u n e s ____ __ _ ___
___ _._ _ _
Raisins______ __ _
______ __
Dates_______________ _________
Figs__------------------------------------------------Other__________
______ __________
Sugars and sweets, total_______ ____ ____________
_______
Sugars: W h i t e . __________ _______
Brown __
. . .
Other sweets: C andy. __ _ ______
. _____
Jellies____
_________ ._ __ _
Molasses, sirups _
Other _ _________________ _____
Miscellaneous, total-________
_ _
Gelatine. _ _ _
_ ____
_ _____ ______
Packaged dessert mixtures
___ _ __ _____
Tea____________________________________________
Coffee_________ ____ ______________
_ _____
C o c o a ___________
_ ____ _______ _______
Chocolate____ ____________ __ ________
______
Vinegar____ _
___ _ ________
Salt____________________________________________
Baking powder, yeast, soda _ __________ __
______________ _
Spices and extracts.
__
_
Catsups, sauces____ ______________ _____
Tom ato soup_______
________ __________
_.
Other soups............... _ ______ . . . __________
Cod liver oil_________ __________ ______________
Proprietary foods____ __ ____ __ ____ _____ _
Other foods. __
___ _ _
___ ______
Soft drinks consumed at hom e.
_____ __ _
Other drinks consumed at home ________ _. _
Sales tax on food _

C e n ts

9.3
2.9
(3)
(3)
(3)
1.8
.2
.1
(3
)
(3)
.6
0
(3)
.6
(3
)
.2
(3)
.5
0
(3
)
(3
)
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
(*)
.9
.6
.3
.1
(3
)
9.8
7.1
.4

1.3
.3
.7
(3
)
16.6
.3
.4

3. 2
5. 2
.6
.2
.1
.4
.7
.5
.5
.9
.5
.5
.6
.2
.4
1.4

6.3
2.3
(3
)
(3)
(3)
1.3
.2
.1
0
(3)
.3
0
(3
)
.3
0
(3
)
0
.2
0
(3
)
0
.1
0
.1
(3
)
.1
(3)
.6
.5
.2
(3
)
0
7.7
5.8
.3
.7
.2
.7
(3
)
11.5
.3
.3
2.1
3.3
.6

.1
.1

8.8
2.7
0
(3)
0
1.8
.2
.1
(3)
0
.5
0
0
.4
(3)
.3
0
.5
0
0
(3)
(3)
.2
.1
(3
)
.1
0
1.0
.6
.2
.1
0
8.5
6.3
.3
.8
.2
.9
(3)
16.1
.2
.5
3.1
5.1
.7

.1
.1

.4

.5

.9

.7
.4
.3
.9

.4

.5
.7
.3
.1
.4
.1
.1
.8

.6

.9
.7
.1
.3
.9

10.7
3.0
0
0
.1
2.4
.3
.3
0
(3
)
.8
0
0
.8
0
.1
0
.6
0
0
(3)
.2
0
.2
(3
)
.2
0
.8
.5
.3
(3
)
.1
10.7
7.7
.4
1.7
.1
.8
(3)
18.4
.4
.5
4.2
5.9

14.3
4.5
0
(?)

.1
2.2
.2
.2
0
.1
1.3
0

(8
)

1.1

(3
)

.3

(*)

.9
0
0
.1
.1
.2
0
.2
.2
0
1.2
.7
.5
.2
0
15.2
10.4
.5
2.9
.6
.7
.1
26.1
.4
.7
5.0
8.7

.5

.5

.3
.2
.3
.5

.3
.2
.4

.6
.2

.7
.7
.5
1.2
.6
1.2

.9

.4

.1
.7
1.1

.3
.7
3.6

.4

.7
.9

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.




74

MONEY DISBURSEM EN TS---- 1 3
T a b l e

8 .—

SM ALL CITIES

A n n u a l f o o d e x p e n d i t u r e s , b y e c o n o m i c level

N A S H U A ,

C O N C O R D , A N D

B E R L IN ,

N . H .

E c o n o m ic le v e l— F a m ilie s s p e n d ­
in g p e r e x p e n d it u r e u n i t p e r
year
A ll
fa m ilie s

Ite m

U nder
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500
and
over

A n n u a l Food Expenditures

Families in survey-----------------------------------------------------------------Average number food expenditure units in 1 year____________
Number of families spending for—
Meals away from home:
A t w ork_____________________________________________
At school____________________________________________
On vacation_________________________________________
Board at school__________________________________________
Candy, ice cream, drinks, etc____________________________
Number of families reporting food received as gifts, or pro­
duced at home, or meals received as pay_________________

299
3 . 30

88
4 . 54

74
3 . 33

52
2 . 86

85
2 . 28

8
2
16
3
32

1
0
1
0
10

1
0
3
0
7

2
0
2
1
8

4
2
10
2
7

1 26

47

24

20

35

Average expenditure per family for all food __________________
Food prepared at home, total______________________ ___
Food bought and eaten away from home, total__________
Meals at w ork_______________________________________
Meals at school______________________________________
Other meals, not vacation _
_______________
Meals on vacation, _
____________
Board at school_______________
___________
Candy, ice cream, drinks, etc________________________
Average estimated value per family of gifts of food and homeproduced food and meals received as pay 1_________________

$ 4 3 5 . 57
4 2 7 . 88
7. 69
1 .0 7
. 18
1 .9 2
1 .2 6
1 .6 0
1 .6 6

$ 4 5 3 .1 7
4 5 0 . 61
2 . 56
1 .0 9
0
.2 5
.0 5
0
1 .1 7

$436. 82
4 3 4 . 50
2. 32
.3 4
0
.5 8
.1 5
0
1 .2 5

$ 4 2 7 .8 2
4 2 1 . 59
6. 23
.1 3
0
.9 2
2 . 58
1 .0 6
1 .5 4

$ 4 2 1 .1 3
4 0 2 . 55
1 8 .5 8
2 . 27
.6 4
5 .4 2
2 . 68
4 . 98
2 .5 9

4. 2 0

7 .5 0

.8 2

1 .0 9

5 .6 4

1 T h e a g g re g a te s o n w h ic h th e s e a v e ra g e s a re b a s e d d o n o t in c lu d e g ifts o f fo o d r e c e iv e d , fo o d p r o d u c e d a t
h o m e , a n d m e a l s r e c e i v e d a s p a y , r e p o r t e d b y 68 f a m i l i e s b u t f o r w h i c h t h e y c o u l d n o t e s t i m a t e t h e v a l u e .
P O R T S M O U T H ,

K E E N E ,

D O V E R , L A C O N IA , A N D

C L A R E M O N T ,

N . H .

E c o n o m ic le v e l— F a m ilie s s p e n d ­
in g p e r e x p e n d it u r e u n it p e r
year
Ite m

A ll
f a m ilie s
$ 50 0
and
over

U nder
$300

$ 30 0
to $400

$400
to $500

485
3 .0 8

126
4 .4 2

111
3 . 15

125
2 . 54

123
2 .2 3

25
8

7
2

2
1

6
4

10
1

25
4
94

3
1
27

3
0
23

5
0
19

14
3
25

A n n u al Food Expenditures
F a m i l i e s i n s u r v e y , , ___________
_
, , _________________________________
A v e r a g e n u m b e r fo o d e x p e n d i t u r e u n i t s i n 1 y e a r ____________ _ _
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s s p e n d in g fo r —
M e a ls a w a y fr o m h o m e :
A t w o r k _____ ___
. _ _______ ___
__________________
A t s c h o o l _______________________________________ ______________________________
O t h e r m e a l s , n o t v a c a t i o n _______________________________ ____________
O n v a c a t i o n __________
_______ _____________________________
B o a rd a t sch o o l
_____________________________________ _______________
C a n d y , i c e c r e a m , d r i n k s , e t c _______________________________ _______
N u m b e r o f f a m i l i e s r e p o r t i n g fo o d r e c e i v e d a s g i f t s , o r p r o d u c e d
a t h o m e , o r m e a l s r e c e i v e d a s p a y _______
___________ ______

278

86

71

63

58

A v e r a g e e x p e n d i t u r e p e r f a m i l y f o r a l l f o o d ______________________________ $ 4 2 5 . 78
F o o d p r e p a r e d a t h o m e , t o t a l ______________________________________________ 4 1 3 . 21
F o o d b o u g h t a n d e a t e n a w a y f r o m h o m e , t o t a l ____________ , , ,
1 2. 57
M e a l s a t w o r k ______________________________ ________________ ____________
2 . 55
M e a ls a t s c h o o l ,
,
__
_
_ _________
.1 7
O t h e r m e a l s , n o t v a c a t i o n _____
_______ _____ ,
________________
4 . 88
M e a ls o n v a c a t i o n , ,
____________
_
_______________________
.7 5
B o a r d a t s c h o o l ____________
___
____________ _________________
.8 2
C a n d y , ic e c r e a m , d r i n k s , e t c ____________ ________
_______________
3 . 40
A v e r a g e e s t im a t e d v a lu e p e r f a m i l y o f g if t s o f fo o d a n d h o m e p r o d u c e d fo o d a n d m e a l s r e c e i v e d a s p a y 1_____
5 .9 7

$ 4 5 2 .8 0
4 4 7 .1 9
5 .6 1
.6 4
.1 4
1 .6 2
. 11
.5 8
2 . 52

$ 4 0 6 .5 6
3 9 7 .1 3
9 . 43
.7 4
.0 7
5 . 48
.5 6
0
2 . 58

$393. 34
3 8 4 .4 8
8 .8 6
1 .9 4
.1 5
4 .1 5
.8 7
0
1 .7 5

$ 4 4 8 . 38
4 2 2 .1 2
2 6 . 26
6 . 76
.3 2
8 . 44
1 .4 6
2 . 64
6 . 64

7 .3 2

1 0 . 48

3 .6 6

2 .8 7

1 T h e a g g r e g a t e s o n w h i c h t h e s e a v e r a g e s a r e b a s e d d o n o t i n c l u d e g i f t s o f f o o d r e c e i v e d , fo o d p r o d u c e d a t
h o m e , a n d m e a l s r e c e i v e d a s p a y , r e p o r t e d b y 168 f a m i l i e s b u t f o r w h i c h t h e y c o u l d n o t e s t i m a t e t h e v a l u e .




75

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T a b l e

8 .—

Continued

A n n u a l f o o d e x p e n d i t u r e s , b y e c o n o m i c level —
L IT T L E T O N

A N D

C O N W A Y , N . H .

E c o n o m ic le v e l— F a m ilie s s p e n d ­
in g p e r e x p e n d it u r e u n i t p e r
year
A ll
fa m ilie s

Ite m

$500
and
over

U nder
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

197
3 .1 3

65
4 .3 5

40
2 . 98

49
2 .4 1

43
2 .2 4

7
1
10
7
1
23

1
0
3
0
0
6

4
0
2
3
0
5

1
0
3
1
0
1

1
1
2
3
1
11

A n n u a l Food Expenditures
F a m i l i e s i n s u r v e y _____
__________ _____
_
_______________ -A v e r a g e n u m b e r f o o d e x p e n d i t u r e u n i t s i n 1 y e a r __________________
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s s p e n d in g fo r—
M e a ls a w a y fr o m h o m e :
A t w o r k _________________________________________________________________________
A t s c h o o l- , -_____ _______
____________ - . _ - ________
O t h e r m e a l s , n o t v a c a t i o n ______ _________________ _______________
O n v a c a t i o n _______ ____________________________________________________
________________ ___________
B o a r d a t s c h o o l _____ _______________
C a n d y , ic e c r e a m , d r i n k s , e t c _____________________________ _____
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s r e p o r t in g fo o d r e c e iv e d a s g if t s , o r p ro d u c e d
a t h o m e , o r m e a ls r e c e iv e d a s p a y
__________

134

53

23

30

28

$ 3 9 1 . 18
A v e r a g e e x p e n d i t u r e p e r f a m i l y f o r a l l fo o d
.
__________________
3 8 4 . 66
- ________
F o o d p r e p a r e d a t h o m e , t o t a l __________
7. 15
F o o d b o u g h t a n d e a te n a w a y fro m h o m e , to t a l
_____
M e a l s a t w o r k _______ _ _ _
_____
_____________________
1 .6 8
M e a l s a t s c h o o l __________________________________________ ____________
. 12
O t h e r m e a ls , n o t v a c a t io n . _
___
. . .
2 .2 1
M e a l s o n v a c a t i o n ___________
- . . - _ . ___________________ ______
.8 0
B o a r d a t s c h o o l ______________
.9 6
C a n d y , ic e c r e a m , d r i n k s , e t c
„
1 .3 8
A v e r a g e e s t i m a t e d v a l u e p e r f a m i l y o f g i f t s o f fo o d a n d h o m e 7. 69
p r o d u c e d fo o d a n d m e a ls re c e iv e d a s p a y 1

$ 4 1 9 . 63
4 1 6 . 06
3 . 57
1 .4 5
0
1 .1 4
0
0
.9 8

$ 3 8 5 . 27
3 7 4 . 56
1 0 .7 1
4 .8 3
0
2 . 97
1 .8 4
0
1 .0 7

$ 3 6 4 . 63
3 5 9 . 88
4 .7 5
.3 0
0
3 .9 7
.1 2
0
.3 6

$ 3 8 6 . 78
3 7 4 . 82
1 1 .9 6
.6 7
.5 3
1 .1 0
1 .8 2
4 . 39
3 .4 5

8 .2 7

10. 71

7 .0 2

4 . 76

1 T h e a g g r e g a t e s o n w h i c h t h e s e a v e r a g e s a r e b a s e d d o n o t i n c l u d e g i f t s o f fo o d r e c e i v e d , fo o d p r o d u c e d
a t h o m e , a n d m e a l s r e c e i v e d a s p a y , r e p o r t e d b y 71 f a m i l i e s b u t f o r w h i c h t h e y c o u l d n o t e s t i m a t e t h e v a l u e

T a b l e
M A R Q U E T T E ,

8a.—

M IC H .;

A n n u a l fo o d ex p e n d itu r e s

M O D ES T O ,

C A L IF .;

A N D

R E N O , N E V .

A l l fa m ilie s

Item
Marquette

Modesto

Reno

A n n u a l F o o d E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey________ ___
.
_______________
Number of families spending for—
Meals away from home:
_____________________
At w ork_________
A t school__________________
_______
On vacation. . - _____ _. .
Board at school-. ___________
Candy, ice cream, drinks, e tc_________ ______
- .
_______
Number of families reporting food received as gifts, or produced at
home, or meals received as p a y ________ - - - - - - - Average expenditure per family for all food ___ ___
___ ____
Food prepared at home_______
___ ---- __ . ___
Food bought and eaten away from home, total-- ______________
Meals at w ork___________________________ ________________
Meals at school____ _
- ____ _
_
Other meals, not vacation - . _____________________
..
Meals on va ca tion ..- . . ________________ _____________ Board at school- - _______ - - ______ _________ ____ Candy, ice cream, drinks, e tc ..
______________
Average estimated value per family of gifts of food and home-pro­
duced food and meals received as pay (incomplete) 1_____________

151

148

8
0

1
1
1
38

i

149

35
22
25
2

19

49

35

2
13
0

77

105

53

$ 4 6 9 .7 3
4 5 1 .6 9
1 8 .0 4
2 .4 0
0
8 .9 8
1 .2 7
1 .7 8
3 . 61

$ 4 4 3 . 20
4 0 5 .0 6
3 8 .1 4
1 1 .8 7
4 . 23
9 .4 8
2 .7 9
1 .7 5
8 .0 2

$ 4 5 8 . 26
4 3 6 .4 0
2 1 .8 6
4 .3 0
.0 3
4 . 01
1 .3 0
0
12. 22

L 54

i 2 1. 76

2 12. 35

1 T h e a g g r e g a t e o n w h i c h t h e s e a v e r a g e s a r e b a s e d d o n o t i n c l u d e g i f t s o f fo o d r e c e i v e d , fo o d p r o d u c e d a t
h o m e , a n d m e a ls r e c e iv e d a s p a y , r e p o r t e d b y 22 f a m ilie s i n M a r q u e t t e a n d 1 f a m i l y i n M o d e s t o .
2 R e n o c o m p le t e .




76

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T

able

9. —

H o u s i n g f a c i l i t i e s , b y e c o n o m i c level

N A S H U A , C O N C O R D , A N D B E R L IN , N . H.
E c o n o m ic le v e l— F a m ilie s s p e n d ­
in g p e r e x p e n d it u r e u n i t p e r
year
A ll
fa m ilie s

Ite m

Under
$ 30 0

$ 3 0 0 to
$ 40 0

$ 40 0 t o
$ 50 0

$50 0
and
over

Housing Facilities in Dw elling Occupied at E n d of
Schedule Year
I.

F a m ilie s in s u r v e y w h o re n te d
s c h e d u l e y e a r __________________

p r in c ip a l h o m e a t e n d o f
_________

A v e r a g e m o n t h ly r e n t a l r a t e a t e n d o f s c h e d u le y e a r .
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s liv in g in —
1 - f a m i l y d e t a c h e d h o u s e ____________________________________________
1 - f a m i l y s e m i d e t a c h e d o r r o w h o u s e _____________ _______ _
2 - f a m i l y h o u s e _______________________ ___________ . . . _ _____________
M u l t i p l e d w e l l i n g ( 3 - f a m i l y o r m o r e ) __________________________
D w e l l i n g w i t h e l e v a t o r ________________________________ _________
D w e l l i n g w i t h j a n i t o r s e r v i c e ________________________________
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s h a v in g —
B a t h r o o m i n d w e l l i n g u n i t ____________________
__ _ . . . . . .
__
_______ . .
..
T o i l e t : I n s i d e f l u s h _______ ______ _______
O u t s i d e f l u s h ________________________________
. . . . _____
O t h e r t y p e . . --------------------------------------------------------S o le u s e o f t o i l e t b y h o u s e h o l d . . . ____________ __________________
W a t e r : In s id e d w e llin g . . .
________________________________ _
R u n n i n g ________
. . . _________________________________
H o t r u n n i n g _________________________________________
N o t ru n n in g
. . . . _ _ ---------------------O u t s id e d w e llin g o n l y . . _
_ ________________ .
S i n k ________________________
___________________________________________
E l e c t r i c l i g h t s ________________________________________________________________
G a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g _____ ____________________ . . . . .
R e f r i g e r a t o r : E l e c t r i c . . . _ _____________________________
________
O th e r m e c h a n ic a l..
..
_______________ . . .
I c e ____________________________________________________________
N o n e ..
-.
_____ ___ . __________ ________
...
H o t a i r , h o t w a t e r , o r s t e a m h e a t . _______
. . . .
T e l e p h o n e ________ _ __________ ________________
...
. . . _____
G a r a g e ____________
. . . _______
__________________ . . .
_____ . . .
G a r d e n s p a c e ..
_____ ___ __________ ________________ . . . . .
P l a y s p a c e _____________ _________
____________ ____________________________
E a c h o f t h e f o llo w in g i t e m s :
I n s id e flu s h t o ile t , r u n n in g h o t w a t e r , e le c t r ic
l i g h t , a n d g a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g _____ ___
..
I I . F a m ilie s in s u r v e y , w h o o w n e d p r in c ip a l h o m e a t e n d o f
s c h e d u le y e a r ___________________ ________
___________________ ________
N u m b e r o f fa m ilie s liv in g in —
1 - f a m i l y d e t a c h e d h o u s e _________________
______________
..
________________ . . . .
1 - fa m ily s e m id e t a c h e d o r r o w h o u s e
2 - f a m i l y h o u s e _______
...
__________________________
M u lt ip le d w e llin g (3 - f a m ily o r m o r e ) . . . .
...
_____
D w e llin g w it h e le v a to r
.
_____ ___________
D w e l l i n g w i t h j a n it o r s e r v ic e
__________
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s h a v in g —
B a t h r o o m in d w e llin g u n it
------- -T o i l e t : I n s i d e f l u s h ______
_____
O u t s i d e f l u s h _______
______
__
________
O t h e r t y p e _______________________________________________ _______
S o le u s e o f t o i l e t b y h o u s e h o l d . . . _____ ___ . ________________
W a t e r : I n s i d e d w e l l i n g ________________________ _______________________
R u n n i n g _______________________________
__________________
H o t r u n n i n g _________________________________________
N o t r u n n i n g ________________________ __________ _________
O u t s i d e d w e l l i n g o n l y _____________________________________
S i n k __________________________________ ________________________ __________________
E l e c t r i c l i g h t s _______________________________________ _____________________
G a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g ______________________________________
R e f r i g e r a t o r : E l e c t r i c ____________________________________________________
O t h e r m e c h a n i c a l _________________ _________________
I c e _______ ____________________________________________
N o n e . . . _____ __________________________________
H o t a i r , h o t w a t e r , o r s t e a m h e a t _________________ ____________
T e l e p h o n e __________________________________________________
________
G a r a g e _______ ________________________________________________________
G a r d e n s p a c e __________________ ________ _________________________________
P l a y s p a c e . . . _____ _________
__________________________________________
E a c h o f t h e f o llo w in g i t e m s :
In s id e flu s h t o ile t , r u n n in g h o t w a t e r , e le c t r ic
l i g h t , a n d g a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g _______________




201

53

50

34

64

$ 1 8 . 51

$ 13 . 94

$ 16 . 69

$ 1 9 . 83

$ 2 3 .0 3

31
13
76
81
0
14

5
1
17
30
0
0

7
2
23
18
0
5

11
5
12
6
0
2

8
5
24
27
0
7

155
199
1
1
199
2 00
199
125
1
1
201
201
81
23
0
148
30
73
51
43
43
86

34
52
1
0
53
52
51
24
1
1
53
53
11
1
0
37
15
9
4
8
7
31

36
49
0
1
48
50
50
27
0
0
50
50
14
6
0
36
8
16
6
6
12
21

28
34
0
0
34
34
34
19
0
0
34
34
18
3
0
26
5
14

15

57
64
0
0
64
64
64
55
0
0
64
64
38
13
0
49
2
34
32
23
15
19

9
6

9

55

3

10

8

34

98

35

24

18

21

68
1
29
0
0
0

25
1
9
0
0
0

18
0
6
0
0
0

11
0
7
0
0
0

14
0
7
0
0
0

81
94
1
3
97
97
95
75
2
1
98
96
37
11
0
57
30
57
47
52
63
77

25
33
0
2
35
35
34
20
1
0
35
34
5
2
0
18
15
18
10
14
26
31

21
22
1
1
24
23
22
20
1
1
24
24
8
2
0
14
8
12
7
13
14
21

14
18
0
0
17
18
18
16
0
0
18
18
9
0
0
14
4
11
15
12
11
10

21
21
0
0
21
21
21
19
0
0
21
20
15
7
0
11
3
16
15
13
12
15

35

4

8

9

14

77

TABULAE SUM M ARY
T

able

9. —

H o u s i n g f a c i l i t i e s , b y e c o n o m i c level —

Continued

P O R T S M O U T H , K E E N E , D O V E R , L A C O N IA , A N D C L A R E M O N T , N. H.
E c o n o m ic le v e l— F a m ilie s s p e n d ­
in g p e r e x p e n d it u r e u n i t p e r
year
Ite m

A ll
fa m ilie s !
Under
$30 0

$ 30 0 to
$ 40 0

$ 40 0 to
$ 50 0

$ 50 0
and
over

H ousing Facilities in Dw elling Occupied at E n d of
Schedule Year
I.

F a m ilie s in s u r v e y w h o r e n t e d p r in c ip a l h o m e a t e n d o f
. _ __
__ _ _______ _______ ___
s c h e d u le y e a r ______ _
A v e r a g e m o n t h l y r e n t a l r a t e a t e n d o f s c h e d u le y e a r _________

II.

N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s liv in g in —
1- f a m i l y d e t a c h e d h o u s e ________________
_ _ ____________________
1- f a m i l y s e m i d e t a c h e d o r r o w h o u s e . .
_ _ _ _ _ __________
2 - fa m ily h o u s e ._ _
__
_______ ___________ _ _____________ . . . _
M u l t i p l e d w e llin g (3 - f a m ily o r m o r e ) .
_____________ . .
D w e l l i n g w i t h e l e v a t o r ________ . . . _ _____________ _________
____________________
_
D w e l l i n g w i t h j a n i t o r s e r v i c e ____
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s h a v in g —
B a t h r o o m i n d w e l l i n g u n i t _____________
.
_
_______________
T o i l e t : I n s i d e f l u s h . . . ____________________
_____________________
O u ts id e f l u s h . ..
. __________________ _ _
_______________
O t h e r t y p e ____________
____________
________________________
S o le u s e o f t o i l e t b y h o u s e h o l d _________
_____
. . . _______
W a t e r : I n s i d e d w e l l i n g _________________
_ __ .
_ . __________
R u n n i n g __________
____________________
__________ ___
H o t r u n n i n g . . . _______ ___ , _ _
N o t ru n n in g
_
. . . _______
_____
_____
O u t s i d e d w e l l i n g o n l y ________
____________________ _
S i n k _____________ __________________________________________________ ____________
E l e c t r i c l i g h t s ______ _______________________________________________________
G a s o r e le c t r ic it y fo r c o o k in g .
_______
__________ .
R e f r i g e r a t o r : E l e c t r i c ________________ ________________________________
O th e r m e c h a n ic a l . . .
_
I c e ________________
__________________________________
N one.
_____________________
_ . ... ... .
H o t a i r , h o t w a t e r , o r s t e a m h e a t _________ ____________ . . . .
T e l e p h o n e _____________
..
_____ ___ ______
.
_______ . . .
____________________
_______________
G a ra g e . _
_.
________________ _____________
G a r d e n s p a c e _____________
______________________
_____
P la y sp ace
_ . . . __________
E a c h o f t h e f o llo w in g i t e m s :
In s id e f lu s h t o ile t , r u n n in g h o t w a t e r , e le c t r ic
l i g h t , a n d g a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g ____________
F a m ilie s in s u r v e y w h o o w n e d p r in c ip a l h o m e a t e n d o f
s c h e d u le y e a r _
_ _______
_____
__________ _
. __________
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s liv in g i n —
1 - f a m i l y d e t a c h e d h o u s e ____________
.
. . . . ... . _ . . . . .
1 - f a m i l y s e m i d e t a c h e d o r r o w h o u s e __________ . _______
2 - f a m i l y h o u s e ______________ ________ __________ ______________________
M u lt ip le d w e llin g ( 3 - f a m ily o r m o r e ) ..
_____________________
D w e l l i n g w i t h e l e v a t o r ____
.
. . . .
___ _
D w e l l i n g w i t h j a n it o r s e r v ic e . . . _
_ _ _____________
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s h a v in g —
B a t h r o o m i n d w e l l i n g u n i t ______________ _ _
. . . .
_________
T o ile t : In s id e f lu s h .
_______
_______________________
.
._
O u t s id e f lu s h .
_
______
____________________ ______ .
O t h e r t y p e . . . . _ . . . . _______________ . . .
_ __ _
S o le u s e o f t o i l e t b y h o u s e h o l d . .
W a t e r : In s id e d w e llin g .
. . . .
_ _
_
R u n n in g .
_____
_____ . . . .
. ...
R o t ru n n in g
_ ________ _______
N o t r u n n in g
_______
.
__
O u t s id e d w e llin g o n ly .
_____ . . . . . . .
S i n k . _ ________
__________________________________________ ______
E l e c t r i c l i g h t s ________________________________ __________________________
G a s o r e l e c t r i c it y fo r c o o k in g
_ _ _ ___________________
R e f r i g e r a t o r E l e c t r i c __________ ________________ . . . . . .
O t h e r m e c h a n i c a l _________________
I c e ____________________________________ . . _
N o n e _____ _____ . . . _________ .
H o t a i r , h o t w a t e r , o r s t e a m h e a t ..
_ _
_ _
__ _
T e l e p h o n e _________ _
. . . . . . _ . . . . __________ . . _____
G a r a g e _____
_____ ___
. . .
...
...
.
... .
G a r d e n s p a c e . __
_ ________
..
. . . . . . . . _____ ___
..
P l a y s p a c e __________________________________ _____________ _________________
E a c h o f t h e f o llo w in g i t e m s :
I n s id e f lu s h t o ile t , r u n n in g h o t w a t e r , e le c t r ic
l i g h t , a n d g a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g _______________




3 07

81

70

69

87

$ 1 7 .6 7

' $ 15. 89

$ 15 . 70

$ 17 . 99

$ 2 0 . 64

68
41
132
66
0
12

14
19
35
13
0
0

19
5
30
16
0
3

16
9
28
16
0
2

19
8
39
21
0
7

2 22
296
4
7
2 92
3 04
302
176
2
3
304
294
133
30
0
215
62
150
71
110
126
176

47
76
4
1
80
80
79
32
1
1
81
74
13
2
0
58
21
27
6
21
28
55

50
68
0
2
66
69
68
35
1
1
70
67
26
2
0
53
15
29
9
27
33
43

51
66
0
3
65
68
68
41
0
1
69
66
31
8
0
47
14
30
20
23
25
35

74
86
0
1
81
87
87
68
0
0
84
87
63
18
0
57
12
64
36

39
40

43

98

10

16

20

52

178

45

41

56

36

132
7
39
0
0
0

29
2
14
0
0
0

36
0

43
2
11
0
0
0

24
3
9
0
0
0

151
171
2

34
39
0
2
41
41
41
33

50

34

55

176
176
176
134
0
2
178
176
89
21
2
125
30
145
78
113
130
139

33
42
0
3
44
44
44
27
0
1
45
43
16
2
0
32
11
28
18
24
33
41

35
1
0
36
35
35
32
0
1
36
36
26
8

76

13

14

5

5
0
0
0

0
0
41
41
15
1
0
34
6
37
12
29
35
33

1
0

55
56
56
42
0
0
56
56
32
10
1
36
9
47
27
41
42

40

1
23
4
33
21
19
20
25

26

23

78

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T

able

9. —

H o u s i n g f a c i l i t i e s , b y e c o n o m i c level — Continued

L I T T L E T O N A N D C O N W A Y , N. H.

E c o n o m ic le v e l— F a m ilie s s p e n d ­
in g p e r e x p e n d it u r e u n it p e r
year
A ll
f a m ilie s

It e m

Under
$ 30 0

$300
t o $ 40 0

$ 40 0
t o $ 50 0

$ 50 0
and
over

Housing Facilities in Dw elling Occupied at E n d of
Schedule Year
I.

F a m ilie s in s u r v e y , w h o re n te d p r in c ip a l h o m e a t e n d o f
s c h e d u le y e a r . . _
_ ___
__________ ___
__________
A v e r a g e m o n t h ly r e n t a l r a t e a t e n d o f s c h e d u le y e a r . _ .

II.

100
_

N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s liv in g in —
1 - f a m i l y d e t a c h e d h o u s e _________________ ________________________
1 - f a m i l y s e m i d e t a c h e d o r r o w h o u s e _____________________________
2 - f a m i l y h o u s e . . _____ ____________________________________________________
M u l t i p l e d w e llin g (3 - f a m ily o r m o r e ) . . . .
________
D w e llin g w it h e le v a to r
_____ ______________
_
_______
D w e l l i n g w i t h j a n i t o r s e r v i c e ______________ _______________
N u m b e r o f f a m ilie s h a v in g —
B a t h r o o m i n d w e l l i n g u n i t ___________________________ __________
T o i l e t : I n s i d e f l u s h ____________________ _____________________________
O u t s id e flu s h . . .
_.
________ _______________
O t h e r t y p e ___________________________________________________
S o le u s e o f t o i l e t b y h o u s e h o l d __________ _ . _______________
W a t e r : I n s i d e d w e l l i n g . . ________ _______
________________
R u n n i n g ________________________________________________
H o t r u n n in g . ._
_
... _
_____
N o t r u n n i n g _____________________________________________
O u t s i d e d w e l l i n g o n l y _____
. . . ____________ . . .
S i n k _____________________
_________________ __________________________________
E l e c t r i c l i g h t s ________ _____________________ _____________________________
G a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g ___________ ________________________
R e f r ig e r a t o r : E le c t r ic
.
. . .
_
________ . . . _ .........
O t h e r m e c h a n i c a l . _____________
. ________
Ic e .
_______________ _____________________________________
N o n e ___________
. _ . . ____________ . . . _______
H o t a i r , h o t w a t e r , o r s t e a m h e a t _________________________________
T e le p h o n e
_____ ___
. . .
.
. ..
G a ra g e
__
. . .
________
_______ ___
_______
G a r d e n s p a c e . . _______
_____________ . . _ _ .
__________ . . .
_____ ___
_____________ _____
___________________
P la y sp ace
E a c h o f t h e f o llo w in g it e m s :
In s id e flu s h t o ile t , r u n n in g h o t w a t e r , e le c tr ic
l i g h t , a n d g a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g _____ _________
F a m ilie s in s u r v e y , w h o o w n e d p r in c ip a l h o m e a t e n d o f
s c h e d u le y e a r . . _ .
.
_
_______________________________ _____
N u m b e r o f fa m ilie s liv in g in —
1 - fa m ily d e t a c h e d h o u s e _ .
. ____________
____________
1 - fa m ily s e m id e t a c h e d o r r o w h o u s e
. . _____________
2 - f a m i l y h o u s e _____
. . . .
_
__________________
________ M u l t i p l e d w e llin g (3 - f a m ily o r m o r e ) .
.
D w e l l i n g w i t h e l e v a t o r . . . __________ ___
__________
_____
D w e l l i n g w i t h j a n i t o r s e r v i c e ________ . . _____ _________
N u m b e r o f fa m ilie s h a v in g —
B a t h r o o m i n d w e l l i n g u n i t ___________________ _______ _______________
T o i l e t : I n s i d e f l u s h _________________________________ ___________________
O u t s i d e f l u s h ___________
.
...
_______ . . .
_________
O th e r t y p e ..
__
_
____________________
. ...
S o le u s e o f t o i l e t b y h o u s e h o l d ----------------- -------------W a t e r : I n s i d e d w e l l i n g _________________________________________________
R u n n in g
____________________________ ______________
H o t r u n n i n g _____________________ ___________________
N o t r u n n i n g ______________ . . __________
__________
O u t s id e d w e llin g o n ly
. . .
_______ ___
...
S i n k _________________ ________ ____________________________ __________________
E l e c t r i c l i g h t s ________________________________ _____________________________
G a s o r e l e c t r i c it y fo r c o o k in g . .
._
__________
.
R e fr ig e r a t o r : E le c t r ic
..
. .
_____ ___
_____ ___
O th e r m e c h a n ic a l
.
. . .
_________
Ic e
_
_____
.
.
.
. . .
_____
N o n e .. .
_
. . . -------------- --------H o t a i r , h o t w a t e r , o r s t e a m h e a t _________________________________
T e l e p h o n e _____________________________ . . _________________________________
G a r a g e ________ _________________________________________________________________
G a r d e n s p a c e __
_________________________________
____________________
P la y sp a ce . . .
.
_
. . . ------- ---------------- -------------E a c h o f t h e f o llo w in g i t e m s :
In s id e f lu s h t o ile t , r u n n in g h o t w a t e r , e le c t r ic
l i g h t , a n d g a s o r e l e c t r i c i t y f o r c o o k i n g ----------------




31

23

26

20

$ 1 5 . 30

$ 1 2 . 75

$ 1 5 . 51

$17. 92

$ 1 5 .6 0

35
4
33
28
0
2

19
1
6
5
0
0

2
2
11
8
0
0

8
0
9
9
0
2

6
1
7
6
0
0

61
81
13
6
98
99
96
56
3
1
99
97
5
3
0
66
31
34
11
41
56
75

13
21
8
2
30
31
29
14
2
0
30
30
0
0
0
25
6
12
1
12
22
26

13
20
0
3
23
22
22
13
0
1
23
22
0
0
0
14
9
5
5
7
17
20

22
25
0
1
25
26
25
17
1
0
26
26
4
2
0
17
7
11
3
10
7
16

13
15
5
0
20
20
20
12
0
0
20
19
1
1
0
10
9
6
2
12
10
13

2

0

0

1

1

97

34

17

23

23

83
0
14
0
0
0

31
0
3
0
0
0

13
0
4
0
0
0

17
0
6
0
0
0

22
0
1
0
0
0

71
79
0
18
95
96
87
60
8
2
96
91

18
25
0
9
32
33
30
20
2
2

12
12
0
5
17
17
15
12
2
0
17
16
1

20
22
0
1
23
23
21
19
2
0
23
23
1

21
20
0
3
23
23
21
9
2
0
23

2

2

0
10

0
15
6
13

33

43

30
0
1
0
17
16
6

44

7

60
76
81

5
9
0

55
33

5

5

6

22
3
4
0
13

6

18
26

8
8
13

20

33

14

19

18
15
17
17
15

0

0

1

4

14
17

79

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T

able

9 a . — H o u sin g fa c ilitie s

M A R Q U E T T E , M IC H .; M O D E S T O , C A L IF .; A N D R E N O , N E V .
All families
Item
Marquette

Modesto

Reno

H o u s in g Fa cilities in D w e llin g O ccu p ied at E n d o f S ch edu le Y e a r

l. Families in survey, who rented principal home at end of schedule year
Average m onthly rental rate at end of schedule year_____________
Number of families living in—
1-family detached house________ ____________________ .. _ ...
1-family semidetached or row house_________ _______ _______
2-family house____ __ __ ___ __ __ ______ ___ ________ ___
Multiple dwelling (3-family or m ore)_________________________
Dwelling with elevator___ _______ _ . . _________
___
Dwelling with janitor service_ __ . _
_
______ . . . __ __
Number of families having—
Bathroom in dwelling unit__________ _____ . . . . _ __ _____
Toilet: Inside flu sh ._ ________
__ . . . - _ ______ ________
Outside flush__________________________________________
Other typ e___ ___________________________________ __ _
Sole use of toilet b y household___ _____ _ ______ _____ _____
Water: Inside dwelling______________ ___ _____ _ __________
Running. . . . . . . .
__ . . . . ________
_
Hot running________________________________ __
N ot running_________________________________
Outside dwelling only__________________________
Sink_____________________ _________________________
Electric lights . . . . . . _____ ____
_ __ __ ________
Gas or electricity for cooking___ _.
. ____ _________
Refrigerator: E lectric___ ______ ______ _______ _ _________
Other mechanical _
.. _ _______ . . . ____ ______
Ice________________ _.
______ ____ _____
. _
N one______
. . _______ _______
_______ .
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat_________ __
. . . _______ _
Telephone
...
. . . .
.
. _
Garage
________ _ _ . . . . . _ _______ - __
___________
Garden space___ __________
___ _____________ _ . _____ . . .
Plav space. _ ___________ ___ _____ ____
_ _ ._ _
__
Each of the following items: Inside flush toilet, running hot
water, electric light, and gas or electricity for cooking.
II. Families in survey who owned principal home at end of schedule year:
Number of families living in—
1-family detached house ______________________
. _
1-family semidetached or row house___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _
2-family house___________ _____ ________________________ ___
____ __ ___________ __
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)
Dwelling with elevator
_ ...
...
___ _ _ _ _ _ _
Dwelling with janitor service. _ _____ ___ __
____
Num ber of families having—
Bathroom in dwelling unit . ___ _______ . . . ___ __ . _______
Toilet: Inside flush__
_ ________ __ _. _ . . . __
_____
Outside flush _ ___
______ _____ _. __ _ . . .
Other typ e.. __________________ ______________________
Sole use of toilet b y household_____________ __________________
_________ _
___ ____________
Water: Inside dwelling.
Running. ___ _ ______________ __ ______________
Hot running ______ ____________________________
N ot running _ ____________ ___ _ __ ___ _ _____
Outside dwelling only _ _ _____________ __ . _ _ . . .
Sink_________________________________________________________ .
Electric lights_____ ___________________________________________
Gas or electricity for cooking.__ _________________ _ _________
Refrigerator: E le c t r ic ._____ _ _ ____ ________________ __ . . .
Other mechanical___________________ ___________
Ice only__________________________________
None
________________ ______________________
H ot air, hot water, or steam heat__ _____________________ ____
Telephone_____________ ________________ __
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.
Garage ______
_____ ___ _
_
_ _
Garden space_________________ ______ __________ ___________
Playspace___ _____________ _ __ __ _____
____
Each of the following items: Inside flush toilet, running hot
water, electric light, and gas or electricity for cooking..




75

90

76

$18. 86

$19. 35

$26. 78

30
2
33
10
0
2

75
4
4
7
0
2

51
5
2
18
1
67

59
72
2
0
70
73
73
45
0
0
73
74
42
10
0
11
54
45
36
28
43
62

90
90
0
0
88
90
90
85
0
87
90
90
85
13
1
69
8
5
23
79
82
84

76
75
0
1
76
76
75
73
0
0
76
76
41
24
0
51
1
42
25
52
72
72

34
73

82
61

41
73

69
0
4
0
0
0

58
3
0
0
0
0

72
0
1
0
2
0

64
71
2
0
73
72
72
47
1
0
72
73
37
9
0
14
50
52
50
58
65
73

60
58
4
1
61
61
61
54
0
59
61
61
55
21
2
34
4
9
28
59
60
58

73
72
0
1
73
73
73
73
0
0
73
73
42
19
0
49
5
39
65
68
73
73

29

50

39

80

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T

able

1 0 .-— H o u s in g exp en d itu res, b y econom ic level

N A S H U A , C O N C O R D , A N D B E R L IN , N . H.

Item

All
families

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
$500
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

299
3.84
3.98

88
5.41
5.44

74
3.87
4.00

52
3. 26
3. 54

85
2. 53
2. 71

44
0

16
0

11
0

7
0

10
0

97
0
38
32
0
0
46
3

36
0
8
9
0
0
17
1

23
0
12
8
0
0
12
1

17
0
7
9
0
0
9
1

21
0
11
6
0
0
8
0

205
10

53
1

53
1

35
4

64
4

0
9
3

0
1
0

0
2
0

0
2
1

0
4
2

$21.84
17.12
4. 72
0

$11. 62
8.61
3.01
0

$24.10
16.02
8.08
0

$53. 58
52. 05
1.53
0

$11.06
5.53
5. 53
0

47.01
19.85
0
12.13
2.19
0
0
12.26
.58
148. 88
148. 28
.60
1.39
0
.62
.77
5. 44

37. 94
18. 76
0
2.70
2.28
0
0
13.90
.30
102. 33
102. 31
.02
. 13
0
. 13
0
5. 25

45.98
17. 46
0
12.98
2. 72
0
0
12. 23
.59
138. 32
138.02
.30
. 14
0
. 14
0
5.57

40.44
19. 70
0
4.05
2. 88
0
0
11.79
2. 02
146. 20
145. 25
.95
1.88
0
1.43
.45
5.44

61.34
23. 14
0
26. 07
1.23
0
0
10.90
0
207.90
206. 65
1.25
3. 46
0
1.04
2. 42
5.53

16
62
86
77
58
94
4.61
4. 82

4
22
26
24
12
35
6. 07
6.15

6
12
20
19
17
21
4.79
5.04

0
8
19
15
10
17
3.49
3. 99

6
20
21
19
19
21
2. 91
3.06

43
$53. 09
37. 35
15. 74

16
$31.19
23. 63
7.56

10
$87.17
58.69
28.48

7
$55. 73
51. 06
4. 67

10
$53. 27
27. 79
25. 48

148. 25
63.01
0
37. 41
6.98
0
0
38.99
1.86

95. 40
47.18
0
6.80
5. 72
0
0
34.95
.75

156.14
60. 97
0
40. 55
9. 57
0
0
42.97
2.08

123. 69
60. 27
0
12. 39
8.80
0
0
36.06
6.17

248. 30
93.68
0
105. 52
5.00
0
0
44.10
0

H o u s in g E x p e n d itu r e s

I. All families in survey 1____________________________________
Average number of persons in economic family___________
Average number of persons in household______ _________
Num ber of families Investing in—
Principal hom e. ____________________________________
Vacation home— - ________________________________
Number of families having current expenditure for—
Owned principal home:
Taxes ____
. __________ ____
__________
Assessments.. . . . ______ —. _ . . . . . ________
Repairs and replacements ___ _ _ . . ________
Fire insurance on home
____________________ _
Liability insurance on h o m e .. ___________ ____
Ground rent. _____ . .
.
______ _______
Interest on mortgages ________ _____ _. ______
Refinancing charges . . . _____________ _____
_
Rented principal home:
Rent (gross rent less concessions). .. . . . _____ __
Repairs b v tenant. . ____
. . . . . _______
.
Secondary housing:
Owned vacation h o m e ___
. . . _____ _
___
Rent on vacation or trips. _ . . .
. . . _____ . . .
Rent at school___________________________________
Average amount invested during schedule year in owned—
Principal home, to ta l... . . . . . . . ______ _______ .. .
Paym t. on principal of mortgage and down paym t___
Improvements on hom e_____________________________
Vacation home _ . ___ _______________________________
Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total.. . . . ____ __________
Taxes __________________________ . _ _ _. _ ____
. . . ___________ ..
Assessments___ ________
Repairs and replacements________________________
Fire insurance on hom e__________________________
Liability insurance on home
_ _ _ _ . ...
Ground rent. _ . . . _____________ . . . _________
Interest on m ortgages__________________ ______
Refinancing charges. ___________ _______________
Rented principal home, total _ ______ ___________
Rent (gross rent less concessions). ______________
Repairs b y tenant______ _______________________
Secondary housing, total________________ _____ ______
Owned vacation hom e_________ ________________
Rent on vacation or trips...
___________ _. ..
Rent at school
______
...
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit
. ..
...
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms____
—. _______________
4 rooms . _____ _..
_____ __ ___
_
_ ____________
5 rooms_____________ ..
_____________________ . . .
6 rooms _ _________
7 rooms or m ore__________ _________________________
II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 m onths.
Average number of persons in economic family.
Average number of persons in household____________ ..
Number of families who invested during the schedule
year in owned principal home ____________
Average amount invested during schedule year, total
Paymt. on principal of mortgage and down p a ym t_
_
____
Improvements on hom e_____________________
Average current housing expenditures on owned principal
home, total______
_____________________________
Taxes_______
___________________ ___________
Assessments__________________________ _______ ___
Repairs and replacements_____________ _____________
Fire insurance on hom e__________________ ______ ..
Liability insurance on hom e____ _______________ . . . .
Ground rent____ ______ __________________ _______
Interest on mortgages____ _ ______ ____________ _
Refinancing charges___________ ___ ______ _____

1 The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table
(i. e. home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters with
heat not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom
no separate subgroup is shown.




81

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T able 10 . — Housing expenditures, by economic level— Continued
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.—Continued

Economic level— Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Item

All
families
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500
and
over

H o u s in g E x p e n d itu r e s —Continued

II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months—
Continued.
Average estimated annual rental value______
_____ - - - $286. 41
Average imputed income from equity in owned principal
hom e--- _______________ .- _______ _________
- 138.16
Average number of rooms in dwelling un it___________ .
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms..
_ _ ____ ________ ______ 4 rooms________ _ _
_____________ .
... - 5 rooms________ ____ ________
- ______ .
Grooms____ _____
____ __________________ _ 7 rooms or more .
. .. _ . _ - ________
III. Families who rented house for 12 months_________ Average number of persons in economic family_______ ___
Average number of persons in household___________

114.94

172.19

122. 23

5. 99

5. 85

6.19

5.94

6.05

0
9
20
28
37
50
3.27
3.44

0
4
8
12
11
7
4.00
4.16

0
2
2
7
10
11
3.88
4.07

0
1
5
5
6
17
3. 21
3.52

0
2
5
4
10
15
2. 55
2.57

$161.14 $166. 47 $224. 76
161.14 166. 47 222. 31
0
0
2. 45
13. 43
14.17
18. 53

$273. 61
269. 69
3. 92
22. 47

5. 58

5.28

5. 36

5. 71

5. 75

1
9
11
18
11

0
3
0
3
1

1
2
3
2
3

0
1
7
5
4

0
3
1
8
3

17
3.07
3.26

1
2. 26
2.10

3
5. 52
5. 52

2
4.20
4.20

11
2. 27
2. 58

$264. 29 $412. 62 $407. 89
264. 29 412. 62 407. 89
0
0
0
22. 02
34. 39
33.99

$426. 63
426. 63
0
35. 55

$412. 41
Average expenditure for rented principal home, total.
Rent (gross rent less concessions) ____ _____ _____ 412. 41
Repairs by tenant. . .
.
_.
..
__ . . .
0
34. 37
Average m onthly rental rate. .
__ - - - - - - ___ - _ .
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms.
.
4 rooms.
. . ___________
5 rooms.
_ _ _
.
. _
6 rooms.
_ __ __ ___ __ . . . . . . ____
7 rooms or more . _
V. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat
not included in rent. . . .
___ - - - - - . - _ _ - _.
Average number of persons in economic family___ _. ___
Average number of persons in household .
__________. _

4. 65

4.00

4.00

5. 50

4. 73

3
6
4
2
2

0
1
0
0
0

1
1
1
0
0

0
0
1
1
0

2
4
2
1
2

135
3. 69
3.77

44
5.29
5.28

37
3.42
3. 47

16
2. 96
3.02

38
2. 39
2. 62

$174. 24 $183. 61 $185.56
174.19 183. 02 184. 88
.05
.59
.68
14. 52
15. 25
15. 41

$234.00
232. 74
1.26
19. 43

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total..
$194. 97
Rent (gross rent less concessions) ___ _
____
194. 36
.61
Repairs b y tenant ._ _
_______ ___ _
16. 21
Average m onthly rental rate.. ___ _____ ______ _________
Average number of rooms in dwelling u n i t ___ - _______
Number of families living in dwellings with—
____ _ .
_________
Less than 4 rooms.
4 rooms - _ _ _
..
- ____ _____ _________
5 rooms.
. . . ___
- - _ ___ ___
6 rooms. . . ______ ________ . . .
_______ _
7 rooms or more. _______ ______________




$370. 53

145.16

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total ___ $217. 69
Rent (gross rent less concessions) - _______ 215. 68
Repairs b y tenant___ - _ - ___ ___
_____ 2.01
Average m onthly rental rate.
_ _______
18.04
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms. _____ ______ . . ____
4 rooms_________ ____ _______________ ______________
Grooms.
_ _
__ _ .
_____
6 room s.. ..
.
.
_ _____
__ __________
7 rooms or more____ - _____
- -- _______
IV . Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat
included in rent. . ...
.. . . . - .
- ___
Average number of persons in economic family_______
Average number of persons in household.. _____ _ . . . _

$240. 55 $271.08 $295. 88

4. 85

4. 73

4. 97

4. 88

4.87

12
37
51
29
6

4
13
18
9
0

4
7
14
10
2

0
6
6
4
0

4
11
13
6
4

82

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13
T

able

SMALL CITIES

10. — H ousing expenditures , by economic level— Continued

P O R T S M O U T H , K E E N E , D O V E R , L A C O N IA , A N D

C L A R E M O N T , N. H.
Econom ic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per year

Item

All
families

$500
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

485
3.54
3. 79

126
5.21
5.45

111
3. 59
3.84

125
2.86
3.17

123
2.46
2. 66

90
0

23
0

24
0

25
0

18
0

176
1
80
64
0
0
90
2

44
0
11
17
0
0
28
0

41
0
23
14
0
0
26
1

55
1
25
19
0
0
24
1

36
0
21
14
0
0
12
0

309
32

81
7

70
7

69
5

89
13

0
19
3

0
2
0

0
3
0

0
5
1

0
9
2

$22. 41
13.89
8. 52
0

$15. 20
8. 25
6.95
0

$30.02
18. 55
11.47
0

$24. 70
15.87
8. 83
0

$20. 61
13.44
7.17
0

49. 26
22. 66
.14
10.17
2.41
0
0
13.80
.08
135. 28
134. 21
1.07
1.10
0
.57
.53
5.71

35. 90
17. 75
0
3.40
2. 32
0
0
12. 43
0
120. 70
120. 22
.48
.43
0
.43
0
5.87

56. 62
23. 71
0
10.91
2. 82
0
0
19.01
.17
121. 38
119. 53
1.85
.50
0
.50
0
5. 73

55. 87
29. 06
.53
11.59
2.36
0
0
12.17
.16
122. 60
122. 26
.34
1.13
0
.39
.74
5.67

49. 56
20.24
0
15.00
2.18
0
0
12.14
0
176. 50
174. 76
1.74
2.29
0
.97
1.32
5. 57

32
60
125
131
137
180
3.65
3.95

3
15
34
40
34
46
5.35
5. 56

6
15
30
22
38
42
3.81
4.08

10
18
28
33
36
53
3.06
3.45

13
12
33
36
29
39
2. 32
2. 59

87
$64. 54
41.24
23. 30

22
$49. 44
24. 20
25.24

24
$79.83
49. 52
30.31

24
$62.14
41.20
20.94

17
$69.14
52.46
16.68

131. 70
60. 85
.37
27.40
5. 72
0
0
37.14
.22

98. 21
48. 63
0
9. 31
6. 36
0
0
33. 91
0

149. 65
62. 67
0
28.84
7.44
0
0
50.24
.46

131. 76
68.54
1.24
27. 34
5.56
0
0
28. 71
.37

151. 72
62.83
0
47.29
3. 32
0
0
38.28
0

H o u s i n g E x p e n d it u r e s

I. All families in survey 1 - . _____ _____________________ ..
Average number of persons in economic fam ily__________
Average number of persons in household____
_________
Number of families investing in—
Principal hom e-- ________________________________
Vacation home
_____ __
________ __
____
Num ber of families having current expenditure for—
Owned principal home:
Taxes____________________________________________
Assessments____ __
.. ..
- 1 - ------Repairs and replacements________________________
Fire insurance on hom e__________________________
Liability insurance on home- _ _______ __________
Ground rent__________________________________ Interest on mortgages___________ ___________ —
Refinancing charges_____________________________
Rented principal home:
Rent (gross rent less concessions). _ - --------------Repairs b y tenant ______ ____ — -- - ------------Secondary housing:
Owned vacation hom e____ _. _ - --------------------Rent on vacation or trips.. _.. ------------------------Rent at school- ____ ___ .. --------------------------- Average amount invested during schedule year in owned—
Principal home, total----------------------------------------------------Payment on principal of mortgage and down payment.
Improvements on hom e____ _____
- ---------- - Vacation home
_ - ------------------ -----------Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total---------------- -------------------Taxes ___ - __ ___________ -- ----------- ------Assessments__________________ _______________ Repairs and replacements- __ - ________ _____
Fire insurance on home---------------------------------------Liability insurance on home
. . .
Ground rent- - .
- - _______________ _____ Interest on mortgages________________ -Refinancing charges------------------------------------Rented principal home, total------------------------------ ------Rent (gross rent less concessions) - . _
___ ____
Repairs b y tenant- - ______________ - _________
Secondary housing, total____________________ _____ ..
Owned vacation home----- ___
_
Rent on vacation or trips___________________
Rent at school- - ___ - _ ______ ___ ____ - -_
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit________ ____
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms. _ _ - .
_ _____ ___________ . _
4 rooms __ _____ _________ . . . - _______ _______5 rooms -------- --- ------------- ----------------- . . . 6 rooms, _ _______ _________________________________
7 rooms or more
- - - - - _______________ ____
II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 m onths.. _
Average number of persons in economic family---------------Average number of persons in household. _ _ _
_____
Number of families who invested during the schedule
year in owned principal home
.. . . . . .
. . . ..
Average amount invested during schedule year, tota l____
Payment on principal of mortgage and down payment .
Improvements on hom e____________________________
Average current housing expenditures on owned principal
home, total _ . . ________ __ ____________ - ___ -.
Taxes________________________________________________
Assessments
_ . .
__________
_____
Repairs and replacements---------------- ----------------------Fire insurance on hom e________________ . . . ---------Liability insurance on home__________ _____________
Ground rent___
________________________ _____
Interest on mortgages________________________________
Refinancing charges------------- ------------------------------------

1 The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table
(i. e., home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters
with heat not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom
no separate subgroup is shown.




83

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

a b l e

10.— H ousing expenditures, by economic level— Continued

P O R T S M O U T H , K E E N E , D O V E R , L A C O N IA , A N D C L A R E M O N T , N. H .— Continued
Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Item

All
families
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500
and
over

H o u s i n g E x p e n d it u r e s —C ontinued

II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months—
Continued.
Average estimated annual rental value_____________
. $279. 90
Average imputed income from equity in owned principal
hom e--- ____ ____________ _______ ________________
148. 20
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_______ - - __.
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms ... ______________ ___
__ . . .
4 rooms______
______________________ ___ ______
5 room s,__
. _______________ _____ ___________ _
Groom s_______ _____ __________________ ______ __
7 rooms or more___ _ _ ______ _ . . ___________ _.
III. Families who rented house for 12 m o n t h s ____ __
___
Average number of persons in economic fam ily______
.
Average number of persons in household.. . _. __________

137. 42

198.01

141. 83

6. 36

6. 39

6. 52

6. 79

5.56

3
4
30
66
77
103
3. 86
4.14

1
i
5
18
21
31
5. 55
5. 78

0
0
7
12
23
24
3.46
3. 63

0
2
11
20
20
24
3.10
3.57

2
1
7
16
13
24
2.84
3. 09

$209. 73 $185. 55 $224.71
208. 89 182. 22 223. 08
.84
3. 33
1.63
17.41
15.18
18. 59

$290. 53
287.54
2.99
23. 96

5. 82

5. 93

5. 83

5. 21

6 25
.

3
19
20
22
39

0
9
7
7
8

0
5
6
5
8

2
5
4
2
11

1
0
3
8
12

27
3.05
3.22

2
5.82
5. 82

5
3.01
3.07

8
2. 75
2. 95

12
2.80
3.02

$343. 82 $243. 93 $325. 20
343. 82 243. 93 325. 05
0
0
.15
28. 65
20. 33
27. 09

$343. 42
341.68
1.74
28.47

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total
. . . $318. 70
Rent (gross rent less concessions).
______ ___ _ _ 317. 92
Repairs by tenant
. __ __ _ ____ . . . . . . . . . .
.78
Average m onthly rental rate__________________ ._ . . .
26. 49
Average number of rooms in dwelling u n it ... _ _________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 room s. ____ ________ _____ ______ _____
4 rooms . . . ____ . . .
__________ . _ ______ ._
5 rooms. ________ ________ ____________ . _. _ .
6 room s_____________________________________________
7 rooms or m ore. ________________ ________ ___ .
V. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat,
not included in rent. . .. . . .
Average number of persons in economic family
A verage number of persons in household
.

3.96
12
6
7
2
o I
170
3. 37
3,58

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total
$194.36
Rent (gross rent less concessions).
193. 23
Repairs b y tenant
..
. _______________ ________
1. 13
Average m onthly rental ra te.. ___________ _____________
16.13
A verage number of rooms in dwelling unit
____________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 room s. ________________________________
4 rooms__________ _______ _ _
_________ ________
Grooms_________ ______ ______
. . . . . . ________
6rooms______________________________________________
7 rooms or m ore. .
_______________________ ________




$293. 55

106. 08

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total_____ $226.42
Rent (gross rent less concessions).. _ ________ ______ 224. 31
Repairs b y tenant ..._ _ __ _____ _ ______ _____ _
2.11
18.69
Average m onthly rental rate-. __________________________
A verage number of rooms in dwelling unit. ___ __ __ . . .
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 room s. ____ _______ _____ _____________
4 rooms. . ____________ __________________ . . . ___
5 rooms _______ ___________________________ ______
6 rooms _________ . _ _____ _____ ______ _____
7 rooms or more_________________________________
IV. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat
included in rent.
_
____
_____
Average number of persons in economic family.
Average number of persons in household
__. ____ .

$204. 29 $287. 07 $329. 79

4.50

3. 60

4.00

4.00

1
0
0
1
0

3
1
1
0
0

3
2
3
0
0

5
3
3
1
0

46
4.92
5. 21

39
3.60
3. 9
.1

39
-2.45
2. 57

46
2. 40
2,30

$174. 96 $190.18 $183. 97
174. 22 189.35 183.90
.74
.83
.07
14. 52
15. 78
15. 35

$226. 10
223. 44
2. 66
18. 69

5.19

5. 37

5.08

5.03

5.24

13
31
67
38
21

1
5
21
14
5

3
9
16
4
7

5
9
10
10
5

4
8
20
10
4

84

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13
T

able

SMALL CITIES

1 0 . — Housing expenditures, by economic level— Continued
L IT T L E T O N A N D C O N W A Y , N . H.

Item

All
families

Economic level— Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
$500
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

65
5.23
5. 31

40
3.41
3.58

49
2.74
2.97

43
2.40
2. 51

14
0

9
0

8
0

8
0

36
0
13
15
0
0
19
1

16
0
7
5
0
0
.10
0

24
0
9
8
0
0
5
0

19
1
13
12
0
0
13
1

31
2

24
3

26
2

22
2

0
0
0

0
3
0

0
0
0

0
3
1

$13. 25
9. 76
3. 49
0

$26. 24
14. 78
11.46
0

$21.12
7. 09
14. 03
0

$31. 95
19. 61
12. 34
0

37. 86
18. 47
0
4.11
3. 89
0
0
10. 66
.73
72. 86
72. 39
.47
0
0
0
0
5. 72

38.28
19. 74
0
4.05
2. 75
0
0
11. 74
0
106. 94
105. 72
1.22
1. 67
0
1.67
0
5.58

49.47
28.17
0
12.78
2. 86
0
0
5.66
0
115. 51
115. 22
.29
0
0
0
0
5. 65

79.41
28. 91
.08
17. 86
6. 32
0
0
24.99
1.25
82. 98
82.58
.40
3.24
0
1.06
2.18
5.79

5
13
15
15
17
36
5. 62
5. 71

4
9
8
11
8
16
3. 81
4.15

3
5
15
13
13
24
2. 34
2. 69

3
9
13
8
10
17
3.18
3. 37

12
$45. 47
17. 62
28. 85

9
$65. 61
36. 95
28. 66

8
$43.12
14. 47
28. 65

6
$60.04
49. 61
10. 43

67. 29
32. 53
0
7.17
7.03
0
0
19. 25
1.31

95.74
49. 35
0
10.14
6. 89
0
0
29. 36
0

101.00
57. 52
0
26.08
5. 85
0
0
11. 55
0

197. 26
69. 51
.21
45.18
15. 99
0
0
63. 21
3.16

H o u s in g E x p e n d itu re s

197
I. All families in survey 1---------------------------- ------------------------Average number of persons in economic fam ily___ _._ _ _
3.62
Average number of persons in household_______________ .
3. 77
Number of families investing in—
39
Principal hom e_________
- ________ - - _____
Vacation hom e___ _ _ _ _ _ _
_____
_____ _
0
Num ber of families having current expenditure for—
Owned principal home:
97
Taxes________________ ___ _ ---------- ___ __ __ _
1
Assessments.- _ _ _ _ _ _ r ------ ------- _ _ _ _
42
Repairs and replacem ents____ ___ _____ __
40
Fire insurance on home ________
_______ __
0
Liability insurance on hom e___ _________________
0
Ground r e n t ___ ___ _ _ _______ _____ ______ _
47
Interest on mortgages____________________________
2
Refinancing charges____ _ . ___ _________ __
Rented principal home:
103
Rent (gross rent less concessions)------------------------9
Repairs b y ten a n t--. ___________ _________
Secondary housing:
Owned vacation home __ _ ___ _ _________ __
0
Rent on vacation or trip s-.- _ _ _ __________
6
1
Rent at school___ __ _______ ____ _
- _ _ ___
Average amount invested during schedule year in owned—
Principal home, total. _ _ _________________________ _. _ $21. 92
Payment on principal of mortgage and down paym ent_ 12. 26
9. 66
Improvements on h om e.. _ _ ____________
_______
0
__________
Vacation hom e.. __ ___________ ____ _
Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total___ __ __ ___ _______
49. 91
23.42
Taxes_________ _________________ ______________
.02
Assessments - _ _ _
_____ _______
Repairs and replacements_______ __________ ___
9. 26
3. 94
Fire insurance on hom e______ __ --_ ----------- __
Liability insurance on home
__ __ _ __ _.
0
Ground rent___________ ___
________ - _ ___
0
Interest on mortgages_______ _ __
------------- _ 12. 76
Refinancing charges.__
____ __
____________
.51
Rented principal home, total______ _ _ - -------- --92. 60
Rent (gross rent less con cession s)__ ______
92.04
.56
Repairs by tenant- _. ___ _ _ __ ___________ _
Secondary housing, total------ ------- ------- ---------------------1.05
0
Owned vacation hom e.
__ ____ _________ ___
Rent on vacation or trip s.. _ - __________ __
.57
Rent at school _____
_
_____ _ _ _
.48
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit____ __ ___
5. 69
Number of families living in dwellings with—
15
Less than 4 rooms_________ _____
____ ____
4 rooms. _ _____ ____ _____________
______________
36
5 rooms__________________ ____
_______________
51
6 r o o m s _________ __ _______
________________
47
48
7 rooms or more_____________ ______ ___ __________
II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months_
_
93
Average number of persons in economic family _ __. ____
4. 01
4.23
Average number of persons in household_________________
Num ber of families who invested during the schedule
year in owned principal hom e. _ . . _______ - ______ _
35
Average amount invested during schedule year, total____ $50. 99
Payment on principal of mortgage and down paym ent- 25. 98
Improvements on home- _ __ - - ___ __ _ ________ _ __ 25. 01
Average current housing expenditures on owned principal
home, total.
____ __
__ _ ____ _
________ 104. 65
Taxes____ _____
__________________________ _ 48. 63
.04
Assessments_______ _________________________________
19. 51
Repairs and replacements __________ _____ ________
8. 34
Fire insurance on hom e________________________
0
Liability insurance on home ________________________
0
Ground rent . . _- ______________ - ___ - _____
27. 04
Interest on mortgages. _ ______ _
_________
1.09
Refinancing charges_______ __ ____ ____________

1 The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table
(i. e., home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters
with heat not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom
no separate subgroup is shown.




85

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

10. — H ousing expenditures , by economic level— Continued
L I T T L E T O N A N D C O N W A Y , N. H — Continued
E c o n o m i c l e v e l — F a mi l i e s
spending per expenditure unit
per year

All
fami­
lies

Item

Under
$300

H o u s i n g E x p e n d itu r e s —

$300
to
$400

$500
and
over

$400
to
$500

Continued

II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months—
Continued.
Average estimated annual rental value_____________ ____ $232. 36
Average imputed income from equity in owned principal
127. 71
hom e--_

$167. 70 $244.10 $242. 95

$343. 32

100. 41

148. 37

141. 94

146.05

5. 84

5. 61

5. 81

6.12

5. 94

3
9
23
23
35
36
4.08
4. 25

2
4
11
8
11
17
5. 27
5.43

1
2
2
5
6
5
2.68
2.70

0
1
6
6
11
6
4. 26
4.49

0
2
4
4
7
8
2. 29
2.51

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total. _- _ $166. 54
Rent (gross rent less concessions).
______ ______ 165. 56
Repairs b y tenant _ _. __________
____
_ _ _
.98
13.80
Average m onthly rental rate_
_ ___
_________________

$170. 27
169. 53
.74
14.13

$95. 73 $283. 76
95. 73 281. 88
0
1.88
7. 98
23. 49

$114. 95
113.54
1.41
9.46

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_______________
Number of families living in dwelling with—
Less than 4 rooms-- ____
_______ . . - __ ____ ....
4 rooms, - __________
__________
______ _____
5 room s-_ ___ ___
_____________ - ___ ________
6 room s--- ____________________ ____________________
7 rooms or more. - - _
III. Families who rented house for 12 months
________ - Average number of persons in economic family. ____ _ .
Average number of persons in household
.. . _- __ .

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit. - .. __ _____
N um ber of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 r o o m s _____
4 rooms____ . _______ . ______ _______________ ..
___________
___________
5 room s-.- ______
6 rooms _ __
____ __ -. ..
____
___
___
7 rooms or more. . ___________ ____ ____ _______ .
IV . Families who ren^e d apartment for 12 months with heat
included in rent-- _
____ ____ _ ____ _ . ____
Average number of persons in economic family___ _ . .
Average number of persons in household
_____ ______

5. 44

5. 41

4.60

5.83

5. 75

2
8
8
8
10

1
5
2
4
5

1
1
2
1
0

0
1
1
2
2

0
1
3
1
3

6
2.10
2.10

0
0
0

1
3. 39
3. 39

1
2. 36
2.36

4
1.70
1.70

0 $271.03 $353. 79
0 271.03 353. 79
0
0
0
0
22. 59
29. 48

$204. 82
204. 82
0
17. 07

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total-- -- $240. 68
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_________________ __ _ 240. 68
0
Repairs b y tenant _ _ . ____ _____ __________ _____ _ _
Average m onthly rental rate- ________________________ _ 20.06
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_____________ _
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms___
____
-_____________
4 room s,- __________ ____ _________________ - _ . . .
5 rooms _____________ .. ______ _________________
6 room s..______ ___ ________________
___
7 rooms or more____ - - - - __________ - ______ . _.
V Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat
not included in rent____ ___ ___ ____ _____________ .
Average number of persons in economic fa m ily ___ ___
Average number of persons in household
_____________

4.17

0

4.00

3.00

4. .5
0

1
4
0
1
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
1
0
0
0

1
0
0
0
0

0
3
0
1
0

58
3.11
3.16

10
4. 79
4. 79

18
3. 25
3. 32

18
2. 77
2. 87

12
1.99
1.99

$181.64 $196. 03 $200. 20
179. 87 193. 33 200.04
1.77
2.70
.16
14. 99
16.11
16. 67

$147.13
146. 64
.49
12. 22

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total. .. - $184.73
Rent (gross rent less concessions). . _. _ ____ _. _ 183. 43
Repairs by tenant____ ______ ___ __
__ ___
1.30
Average monthly rental rate___________________________ . 15.28
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_______________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms___________ . . . ___
___________
4 r o o m s ______ _________________ . __ __ ________ .
5 rooms___ __
__________
______ ______ __
6rooms. _ . _______ _ _____ _____________ _______
7 roornsjor m ore___ __
__
_________ ______




4. 83

8

14
20
13
3

4.80

5. 00

4.89

4. 42

1
4
2
2
1

2
5
4
5
2

2
3
8

3
2
6
1
0

5

0

86

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS— 13
T able

SMALL CITIES

1 0 a . — Housing expenditures

M A RQ U ETTE , MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

Housing Expenditures

I. All families in survey 1_____________ __________________________
Average number of persons in economic family_________________
Average number of persons in household._______ ______________
Number of families investing in—
Principal home__________________________________________
Vacation home__________________________________________
Number of families having current expenditure for—
Owned principal home;
Taxes____________________________________________ _
Assessments_________________________________________
Repairs and replacements____________________________
Fire insurance on home_______________________________
Liability insurance on home__________________________
Ground rent_________________________________________
Interest on mortgages________________________________
Refinancing charges_____ ____ ________________________
Rented principal home:
Rent (gross rent less concessions)______________________
Repairs by tenant____________ _________________ _____
Secondary housing:
Owned vacation home________________________ ______ _
Rent on vacation or trips_____________________________
Rent at school_______________________________________
Average amount invested during schedule year in owned—
Principal home, total____________________________________
Payment on principal of mortgage and down payment._.
Improvements on home______________________________
Vacation home__________________________________________
Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total_____________________________
Taxes_______________________________________________
Assessments_________________________________________
Repairs and replacements____________________________
Fire insurance on home______________________________
Liability insurance on home. ________________________
Ground rent________________________________________
Interest on mortgages________________________________
Refinancing charges_______ __________________________
Rented principal home, total_______
__________________
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_____________________
Repairs by tenant___________________________________
Secondary housing, total_________________________________
Owned vacation home_______________________________
Rent on vacation or trips_____________________ _______
Rent at school________________________________ _____ _
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_______________________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms___ ____ ________________________ ________
4 rooms__________________________________________ _________
5 rooms_________________________________________ _____ ____
6 rooms___________________________________________________
7 rooms or more_________________________________________ _
II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months__________
Average number of persons in economic family___________________
Average number of persons in household________________________
Number of families who invested during the schedule year in owned
principal home______________________________________________

148
4.04
4.17

151
3. 32
3. 43

149
3.20
3.29

27
0

44
0

37
0

72
0
28
28
0
0
24
2

61
10
23
28
0
0
43
0

66
6
17
35
0
0
35
1

75
10

94
10

78
2

0
4
1

0
16
1

0
5
0

$36. 51
30. 81
5.70
0

$61. 44
47. 21
14. 23
0

$58.64
45. 72
12.92
0

39. 37
17.18
0
11.14
2. 56
0
0
8.15
.34
115. 77
115. 32
.45
1.03
0
.44
.59

51.43
11.86
1.87
5.99
3.94
0
0
27. 77
0
139.63
139. 22
.41
2. 30
0
1.41
.89

68. 84
27. 74
.54
6.41
5. 43
0
0
28. 49
.23
163. 50
163. 43
.07
1. 17
0
1.17
0

5.70

4.70

4. 72

7
26
34
44
37
72
4.07
4.16

25
36
52
32
6
57
3. 38
3.45

28
38
43
29

26

40

1
1

71
3. 23

35

$69.96
$129. 40
$117. 35
Average amount invested during schedule year, total_____________
90.24
Payment on principal of mortgage and down payment________
60.20
97. 02
9. 76
27.11
32. 38
Improvements on home____________________________________
Average current housing expenditures on owned principal home,
140. 25
79.84
127. 31
total___________________ ____________________________________
56.13
35. 02
30. 52
Taxes_____________________________________________________
1.14
0
4. 95
Assessments_______________________________________________
13. 46
22. 77
11. 62
Repairs and replacements__________________________________
5. 27
9. 73
11.14
Fire insurance on home____________________________________
0
0
0
Liability insurance on home________________________________
0
0
0
Ground rent______________________________________________
16. 07
70. 49
58. 38
Interest on mortgages______________________________________
. 71
0
0
Refinancing charges_______________________________________
1 The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table
(i. e. home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters
with heat not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year, for whom
no separate subgroup is shown.




87

TABULAR SUMMARY
T able

1 0 a . — H ousing expenditures— Continued

M ARQ U ETTE, MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.—Continued
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

H o u s in g E x p en d itu r e s —Continued

II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months—Continued.
Average estimated annual rental v a lu e ._____________ . . . . _
Average imputed income from equity in owned principal home...

$306. 07
226. 23

$284.11
156. 80

$400.14
259. 89

Average number of rooms in dwelling u n it _______ ____ ______ ___
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms_ ________ __________________________ _
_
4 rooms . . . . . . _________________ ____ ____________ _
5 rooms__________________ ____ ________________________
6 room s_____________ . _________ ___________________
7 rooms or more___ _ ____ _ ______ . . . ____________ .
III. Families who rented house for 12 months.. . . ________ ______
Average number of persons in economic family __ ________________
Average number of persons in household____ _ _______________ .

6. 36

5.07

5.20

2
5
11
23
31
29
4.38
4. 69

5
11
20
17
4
78
3.40
3.54

2
19
27
15
8
56
3. 37
3.41

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total_____________
Rent (gross rent less concessions)________________________ _.
Repairs by tenant. . ______ _______ _____________________
Average monthly rental rate______ _____ _________ ___ _______ ___

$223.92
222. 50
1.42
18.54

$235.53
234. 78
.75
19. 56

$301. 89
301.71
. 18
25.16

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_________ ____ _____ ___
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms_ ____________________________________ __
_
4 ro o m s_____________________ _____ __________________
______________ ___ _ __
5 rooms
6 room s_________________ ______ _ _____ _______________ _
_
_
7 rooms or more _j_________________________________________
IV. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat included in
rent. _____ ________________________________ . ._ ______
Average number of persons in economic family___________________
Average number of persons in household_________________________

5.76

4. 64

4.71

0
5
6
12
6

14
30
14

11
14
14
14

2

3

16
3.13
3.12

1
4.00
4.00

16
2.68

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total___________ ._
Rent (gross rent less concessions)___ ______ ________________
Repairs by tenant__________________________________________
Average monthly rental rate______ _____________________________

$282. 33
281. 64
.69
23.47

177. 50
177. 50
0
14.79

$308. 59
308. 59
0
25.72

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit____________ ______ ____
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms______________________ ______ ______ ____
4 rooms
___ ______________________ _______ ______ _____
5 rooms
_ _ _ _ _ _
6 room s______
__ _____________________________________
7 rooms or more. . _ ________ ______ _______________________

4. 35

2.00

3. 06

2
7
6

1

13

0

0
0
0
0

0
0

V. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat not included
in rent
__ _ _ . _ _ _ _ .
Average number of persons in economic fam ily__________________
Average number of persons in household__________________ _____

30
4.17
4.28

10
2.40
2. 44

4
3.00
2.98

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total__________ ..
Rent (gross rent less concessions) _________________ ____ ____
Repairs by tenant. ___________ ______ _____ _______________
Average monthly rental rate............ ................................. ...........

$204. 09
203. 61
.48
16.98

$183. 62
183. 62
0
15.30

$231. 75
231. 75
0
19. 31

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_______ ______________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 room s_ _ _____________ _________ ________
_
4 rooms_________________________ ___ ___ ___________________
5 rooms_________ ____ _______________________ _____________
6 rooms
............ ........... .............. ......... .......... .................
7 rooms or more-------- --------- ---------------------- ------------- ------

4. 72

3.40

3. 25

3
9

5
4

11

1

7
0

0
0

2
2
0
0
0

200982°— 41-




-7

1

18

2.58

2
1

88

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13
T able

SMALL CITIES

1 1 . — Fuel, light, and refrigeration expenditures, by economic level
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.

Item

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total
. - . . . _____________ _____
Winter __ _________________________
Spring---------------------------------------------Summer._ _ __ _ __ ______
______
Fall________________________________
Electricity________ ___________________
Winter
__ . _________ ________
Spring---------------------------------------------Summer
. . . . . ____
___
Fall_________________________________
Anthracite- _____ _ . . .
______ _ ____
Winter ___________________________
Spring___________ ________________
Summer________ ______ _______ _____
Fall_________________________________
Bituminous coal_________________________
Winter______________________________
Spring____________________ ________
Summer. . ..
_______ ._ ..
Fall_________________________________
C o k e ... _______ ____ ____ ______________
Briquets____________________________ . _.
W ood__________________________________
Winter______ ______ _________________
Spring____________ __________________
Summer _ ______________________ _.
Fall________________________________
Fuel oil_________________________________
Winter______________________ ______
Spring---------------------------------------------Summer___________ _______ . _ _ ._
Fall______________ ______ ___________
Gas____________________________________
Winter_____________________ ______
Spring______________________________
Sum mer.................... .............................
F a ll..:______________________________
Kerosene. _
______ _ . . . . . ___
Gasoline (not for auto)_________ ________
Ice_____________________________________
1Less than . 05 cent.




Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

j

F u e l, L ig h t, and R efrig era tion E x p en d itu r e s

All families in survey _________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity______________________________
Anthracite,
. . . . . . _____________ _ ___
Bituminous coal______________ - . . . ___ Coke _______ _____ ___________ _____
Briquets________________________________
Wood___________________________________
Fuel oil_________________________________
Gas_________ __ ___ __________________
_____ ______________________
Kerosene
____ ___
Gasoline (not for auto)..
...
Ice --- - --_____ __________ _ _______

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year

All fami­
lies

299

88

74

52

85

294
122
14
23
0
164
165
113
26
3
198

87
28
5
4
0
57
48
15
11
1
48

72
34
3
4
0
39
44
21
8
1
49

50
24
2
7
0
32
32
25
3
0
39

85
36
4
8
0
36
41
52
4
1
62

$131.07
41.24
23. 60
20. 55
45. 68
28.89
8.12
6.90
6.33
7.54
25. 86
8.76
2. 29
.75
14.06
2. 76
1. 42
. 15
.42
.77
5. 48
0
17. 58
5. 72
2. 43
1. 11
8. 32
31.73
11. 82
7. 27
3. 30
9. 34
10. 22
2. 22
2. 63
3.07
2. 30
1. 25
.08
7. 22

$112.86
39.55
21.00
16.41
35.90
26.47
7.61
6.32
5.70
6.84
18. 25
6.96
1.75
.56
8.98
2. 57
1.45
.25
0
.87
1. 58
0
23.12
8. 99
3. 67
1. 68
8. 78
31. 64
12. 38
7.19
3.18
8. 89
3. 76
.66
.91
1.47
.72
.84
. 13
4.50

$124.17
37.23
21.03
21.92
43.99
27.25
7.64
6.61
5.88
7.12
24.41
7. 55
1.86
1.40
13.60
3. 84
1. 68
. 15
1. 06
.95
3.09
0
19. 59
6. 62
1.99
1.15
9. 83
32. 56
11.61
7. 63
4. 25
9. 07
6.66
1.40
1. 69
2.13
1.44
.49
0)
6. 28

$146. 75
41.48
27.06
21.53
56.68
30.07
8.35
7.34
6.68
7. 70
28.86
8.21
1.09
0
19.56
1. 55
1.23
0
0
.32
9.99
0
16. 21
3. 71
3. 60
.51
8. 39
33. 92
10. 66
8.18
3.99
11.09
12. 62
2. 58
3. 35
3. 75
2.94
4. 77
0
8. 76

$145. 94
46. 29
26.39
22.70
50.56
32.11
8.91
7. 50
7.16
8.54
33.13
12.02
3.95
.83
16.33
2. 48
1. 30
. 13
.26
.79
8.80
0
10. 95
2. 77
.83
.85
6.50
29. 73
12.13
6. 47
2.17
8. 96
18.51
4.31
4. 78
5.12
4. 30
. 17
. 16
9. 90

89

TABULAR SUMMARY
T able

1 1 .— F u el , light, and refrigeration expenditures, hy economic level— Con.
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.—Continued

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

F u el, L ig h t, and R efrig era tio n E x p e n d itu r e s —Con.

II. Number of families in houses making payments
for heat separately from rent______________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity______________________________
Anthracite______________________________
Bituminous coal................................ ...........
Coke___________ ______________________
Briquets_________ ____________ ________
W ood__________________ _____________
Fuel oil________________________________
Gas____________ _______________________
Kerosene__________
________________
Gasoline (not for auto)_ ___ ____ _____
_
Ice___________________________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total____ _____ .. __________
Electricity_____________ ________
Anthracite _____ __ .
_________
Bituminous coal.._
_ ____________
Coke_________________________________
Briquets___ ____ ________ _____
W ood_________________________________
Fuel oil_______________________________ _
Gas________ ____________________________
Kerosene_____________________ _______
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________
Ice_____________________________________
III. Number of families in houses not making pay­
ments for heat separately from rent2 ____ _
IV. Number of families in apartments making pay­
ments for heat separately from rent 2__Number of families spending for—
Electricity. - __ _ __ _ _ ___ _
Anthracite________
_________ . . . __ _
Bituminous coal_________________________
Coke___________________________________
Briquets________________________________
Wood-.. __________ __________ ________
Fueloil. ___________ . . __________ _____
Gas____ ______________________________
_ __
.
Kerosene _____Gasoline (not for auto)_
_____
Ice.
____
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refriger­
ation, total. _ _____________
Electricity _________________ __ ____
Anthracite____________________ _____
Bituminous coal________________________
Coke_________________________________
Briquets - ___ _ - _______ ____ _ _______
Wood___________________________________
Fuel oil____ ______________ ____________
Gas____________________________________
Kerosene __ - _ ___________ ______
Gasoline (not for auto)______ ___ . _____
Ice_ . _____ ______ _________________
_
V. Number of families in apartments not making
payments for heat separately from rent______
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_______________________ . . . ___
Gas____________________________________
Ice________ - _____ ___________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and re­
frigeration, total___________________________
Electricity______________________________
Gas.____________________________________
Ice_____________________________________
All other fuel ___________________________

143

42

32

34

35

141
75
10
14
0
96
80
55
15
1
91

41
20
2
1
0
29
22
9
6
1
19

31
20
2
1
0
24
18
7
3
0
19

34
16
2
6
0
20
22
16
3
0
28

35
19
4
6
0
23
18
23
3
0
25

$151.44
31. 42
35. 28
4. 33
8.72
0
18. 60
33. 05
10. 50
2.19
.07
7. 28

$124. 60
28. 15
26. 66
3. 45
2. 65
0
23. 37
31.99
3.73
1. 28
.25
3. 07

$133. 49
29. 67
30. 35
6. 40
4. 24
0
19. 69
29. 43
6.61
. 15
0
6. 95

$173. 23
32. 74
36.50
2. 37
12. 76
0
15.07
42. 17
13. 94
7. 28
0
10. 40

$178. 92
35. 67
48. 96
5.39
16.17
0
15. 29
28.80
18. 82
.20
0
9. 62

1

0

0

0

1

135

44

37

16

38

131
45
3
6
0
66
77
45
1
1
2
95

43
11
2
1
0
27
22
8
4
0
29

35
13
1
2
0
16
23
1
1
5
1
26

15
7
0
1
0
10
8
7
0
0
8

38
14
0
2
0
13
24
19
2
1
32

$114.33
25. 68
18. 92
1.19
2. 88
0
16. 77
34. 31
7.41
.24
.09
6. 84

$102. 55
24. 89
9. 7
1
1.85
.63
0
23.30
32. 74
3. 42
.34
0
5. 67

$111.95
24.49
22. 58
2. 15
2.52
0
14. 81
35.02
4.49
.26
0)
5. 63

$103. 73
24.46
16. 23
0
5. 32
0
20.18
22.50
9.88
0
0
5.16

$134. 79
28, 29
27. 18
0
4.81
0
9. 68
40. 41
13. 82
.21
.32
10.07

17

1

3

2

1
1

8
7
7

1
1
1

4
3
2

1
1
1

2
2
3

$86. 77
33. 79
30.84
9. 6
1
12. 53

$160. 74
35. 76
23. 84
14. 30
86. 84

$75. 58
28. 91
35. 76
6. 98
3. 93

$70.03
29.64
12. 22
9.60
18. 57

$86.13
35. 70
33. 51
9.90
7.02

1 Less than 0.5 cent.
2 Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.




90

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 11.— Fuel, light, and refrigeration expenditures, by economic level— Con.
PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAR E M O N T, N. H.

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

1
$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

F u e l, L ig h t, and R efrig era tion E x p en d itu r e s

All families in survey______ .
._
Number of families spending for—
Electricity__________________________
Anthracite__________________ ___________
Bituminous coal_________________________
Coke______ _________________ --Briquets__________________ ____________
W ood__________________________________
Fueloil.------------ ----------------------------------Gas----- --------------------------------- ---------Kerosene--------- -- ------ ----------------------------Gasoline (not for auto)_____________ _____
Ice___ _______________________________ __

485

126

111

125

123

460
214
44
46
12
255
236
225
70
8
337

116
49
8
10
3
80
56
35
27
2
92

107
41
11
10
5
62
49
41
24
2
80

118
63
9
9
1
66
62
63
14
3
87

119
61
16
17
3
47
69
86
5
1
78

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total------ -------------------------Winter____________________
Spring_____________ __________
Summer_______________________
Fall______________________________
Electricity_____________________________
Winter_____________________________
Spring______________ ______________
Summer_________ ______ ________ . . .
Fall________________________________
Anthracite______________________________
Winter_____________________________
Spring---------------------------------------------Sum m er___________________________
Fall________________________________
Bituminous coal. ____ _________________
Winter____________________ _ ______
Spring_____________________
Summer
__
___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Fall_____
________________________
Coke__ _______ _ _ _ __ _________
Briquets. __ __ _________ _ __ _ ______
Wood_.. ____________ ___ ______ ______
Winter ______________ ________ . _
Spring________ ___________________
Summer_________ _ _________ _
Fall_________________________________
Fuel oil_________________________________
Winter_________________ ___ ____
Spring ____________________________
Summer________________________
Fall_________________________________
Gas __ _____
_ _ __ _. _____
_
Winter____ _________________ ______
Spring______________ ____________
Summer-______ _
_______ ____ _
Fall______________________________
_ __ _______ ___
Kerosene.. __ _____
Gasoline (not for auto)____ ______________
Ice____________________
_ ___ ___
_

$137. 62
44. 20
25. 47
22.11
45. 84
29. 20
8. 07
6.99
6.41
7. 73
27. 56
11.43
3. 05
1.38
11.70
5. 21
2.17
.50
. 17
.2. 37
5.91
.66
16. 69
5.37
2. 54
1 27
.
7. 51
30. 49
11.07
7.14
3. 46
8.82
12. 44
2.69
3.16
3.78
2. 81
2.16
.06
7.24

$115. 20
36.97
20. 41
18.11
39. 71
26.08
7. 29
6. 30
5. 65
6. 84
18.12
7. 55
1. 50
.14
8. 93
3.83
1.66
.05
0
2.12
3. 78
.89
20.09
6. 77
3. 22
1.28
8. 82
25. 32
9.14
5.69
3. 25
7. 24
7. 44
1.54
1. 96
2.32
1.62
3.-25
.06
6. 34

$127. 26
40. 25
21. 96
22. 32
42. 73
27. 74
7. 87
6. 41
5. 88
7. 58
16. 87
8. 23
.84
.80
7.00
4.31
1. 97
.24
.31
1. 79
4.66
.83
23. 33
7. 42
3.19
1. 72
11.00
28.15
10.23
6.47
3. 58
7. 87
10.15
2. 21
2. 52
3.20
2. 22
4.02
.16
7.04

$148. 40
47.94
29. 35
23. 64
47. 47
29. 29
8.05
7.06
6.44
7. 74
37. 97
14. 90
5.91
2.60
14. 56
3. 97
1.31
.51
.33
1. 82
4. 76
0)
15.46
4.93
2. 66
1.39
£48
35.08
13. 02
7. 86
3. 58
10. 62
13.49
2. 96
3. 32
4.08
3.13
1.06
.05
7. 27

$158. 91
51. 28
29. 83
24.45
53. 35
33. 62
9. 05
8.17
7. 64
8. 76
36. 29
14. 76
3. 72
1.93
15. 88
8. 71
3. 75
1.17
.07
3. 72
10.34
.92
8. 46
2. 52
1.15
.71
4.08
33. 21
11.80
8. 51
3. 42
9. 48
18. 59
4. 03
4. 81
5.50
4. 25
.48
0)
8.29

1Less than 0.5 cent.




TABULAR SUMMARY

91

T a b l e 11.— Fuel, light, and refrigeration expenditures, by economic level— Con.
PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ON T, N. H.—Con.

All fami­
lies

Item

F u el, L ig h t , and R efrig era tio n E x p e n itu r e s -

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

Con.

II. Number of families in houses making payments
for heat separately from rent. _
____
Number of families spending for—
Electricity___________________________
Anthracite _ _________ _ ____ _____
Bituminous coal_______________________
Coke_________________ _____________
Briquets_____________________________
Wood_______________________________
Fuel oil______________________________
Gas__________________________________
Kerosene___________ .. _____ .. ____
Gasoline (not for auto)________________
Ice_________________________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total..
________________
Electricity ________________________
Anthracite_______ - _________________
Bituminous coal_______________________
____
C oke._ -___ ____ ___________ .
Briquets_____________ ____ ____________
Wood___________________________________
Fuel oil._ _______ ___________________
Gas_____________________________________
Kerosene,-- _______ _ _______ ...
Gasoline (not for auto)
___________ ____
Ice ____
________________ __________

282

77

66

77

62

258
143
10
24
8
157
125
124
42
7
191

63
30
2
7
2
44
31
22
16
1
52

61
28
2
4
3
38
27
18
13
1
47

77
46
2
8
,1
47
39
40
12
4
56

57
39
4
5
2
28
28
44
1
1
36

$144. 60
28. 92
35. 53
7. 44
5. 39
.60
17. 23
29.13
11. 98
2. 04
.03
6.31

$110. 87
23. 43
20. 02
5.41
4. 42
.96
17. 22
23.14
7. 96
2. 77
.01
5. 53

$122. 49
25. 73
20. 89
6. 42
1. 64
.80
23.13
26. 65
7. 59
3. 43
(0
6. 21

$168. 68
31.68
48.12
5. 75
7.11
.01
18. 33
35.19
13.80
1.69
.08
6. 92

$180. 09
35. 73
54. 75
13. 16
8. 43
.68
9. 58
31. 68
19. 37
.07
.01
6. 63

0

0

46

39

39

46

46
16
3
4
1
35
23
11
9
1
38

39
13
2
8
1
26
22
18
13
2
28

33
15
1
0
0
16
25
19
2
1
29

46
19
4
12
1
19
33
31
2
0
31

$123. 24
30.41
14.63
1.47
2. 97
.81
26. 20
30. 24
5. 87
4.17
. 17
6. 30

$137. 42
30. 44
11.83
1.38
10.27
1.02
22. 94
35. 05
11.86
5. 29

$120.44
23. 96
24. 75
1.35
0
0
10. 58
43.10
9.23
.08
.03
7. 36

$153. 29
32. 77
21. 66
5. 56
16. 32
1.55
9. 32
39. 50
17.10
.95
0
8.56

III. Number of families in houses not making pay­
ments for heat separately from rent2 1
IV. Number of families in apartments making pay­
ments for heat separately from rent- -- ...
170
Number of families spending for—
Electricity. .. . . .
. . . ___. . . ______
164
Anthracite.
___ _ _ _
. ________ .
63
Bituminous coal_________ _ _ ___
10
Coke____ ___________________ __________
24
Briquets.__ _______________________ ____
3
Wood__________________ ___________ ____
96
F ueloil... ____________________ _______
103
Gas________________________
. . . ___
79
Kerosene___ _
26
Gasoline (not for auto) _ _ - - - - - - - 4
Ice
...
.- __ ______ _
____
126
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrig­ 1
eration, total___
_ _
.
____ $133. 97
Electricity. _ __ _______________________
29. 58
Anthracite___ . . . ___________ . . . . . . _
18. 21
Bitum inous coal____ ____ ____ ____ ____ __
2. 53
Coke___ . ________ _________________
7. 57
Briquets..- ............ ....................................
.87
Wood___________________________________
17. 30
Fuel oil_________________________________
36.80
Gas_____________________ -. . . .
______
11.05
Kerosene . . . ____ _______ .. __ . . . ..
2. 62
Gasoline (not for auto)____ _____ _________
. 15
Ice__________________________ _________ '
7.29
V. Number of families in apartments not making
payments for heat separately from rent..
26
Number of families spending for—
21
Electricity_____ _____ ____________
___
Gas_____________________________________
20
Ice... . . . . .
___
____ .. ___
I
19
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrig­
$74. 52
eration, total______________________________
28.62
Electricity______________________________
Gas_____________________________________
22.71
Ice____________ ______________________ .
8.51
14.68
All other fuel_______________ ___________

!
0 |

.44

6. 90

2

5 !

8

11

2
1
1

4
5
5

6

9
9
11

$83. 56
41.18
26.86
5.97
9. 55

$65. 76
20.19
28.60
8. 09

88
.8

1

5

3
$86. 27
37. 08
24. 53
3.84
20.82

1Less than 0.5 cent.
2 Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.




1

$68. 27
24. 00
17.94
12. 56
13. 77

92

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 11.— Fuel, light, and refrigeration expenditures, by economic level— Con.
L ITT L E TO N AND CONW AY, N. H.

All
families

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

F u e l, L ig h t, and R efrig era tion E x p en d itu r e s

All families in survey __. _______ __________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity______________________________
Anthracite . __________ _______________
Bituminous coal_________ _____ __________
Coke ___________________ _______ ___ Briquets________________________________
W ood___________________________________
Fuel oil_______________ _______ ___________
Gas_____________________________________
Kerosene __ - ___________ ______
Gasoline (not for auto)_____ ____________
Ice____________________________________

197

65

40

49

43

187
84
18
14
1
146
87
1
48
2
121

59
25
8
7
1
51
25
0
21
1
39

40
16
3
2
0
29
23
0
7
0
23

48
25
2
4
0
37
19
0
10
1
35

40
18
5
1
0
29
20
1
10
0
24

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrie$122. 46
eration, total. _
_____ _ _____ _______
Winter _________ _____ _____ ______
36. 77
S p rin g._______ _____ _______________
17. 04
Summer.
_ _______________________
20.23
48. 42
Fall_________________________________
26. 94
Electricity___ _________________________
Winter ________ ____________ _ . . .
7. 47
Spring _______
_______ _______
6. 43
5. 76
Summer___ ___________ ________ _ __
Fall_________________________________
7. 28
24.96
Anthracite. . . . ___________ ___________
9.02
Winter ______________ . . . ________
Spring------------- -----------------------------. 17
Summer
_____________ _____
3. 37
Fall_________________________________
12. 40
3. 40
Bituminous coa l...
_________________ 1.21
Winter _ _____________ ________ _ .
Spring---------------------------------------------. 14
.20
S um m er.__ __ _ _ _________ _
1.85
Fall_________________________________
2. 59
Coke_ ___________ _______ . . .
________
.06
Briquets ._ __________ _ ____________ ..
32. 69
W ood__________________ _____ __________
Winter _______________ __________
9. 61
Spring.. _______ ________________ _
2.85
2. 89
Summer_____ ______________ ____ . . .
17. 34
Fall_________________________________
24.18
Fuel oil____________ ____ ________________
7. 88
Winter ________ ___________________ _
6. 09
Spring___________ ________ _________
3. 22
Summer._ . . . _____________________
Fall_________________________________
6. 99
Gas_______________ ____ ________________
.20
.05
Winter_______________________
___
.05
Spring_________________ _ ________
.05
Summer. _________ ___________ .. .
.05
Fall_________________________________
1.96
Kerosene _ .. . _ _____________ . . . .
.01
Gasoline (not for auto)____ _____ ____ ____
5.47
Ice__________ ________ _______ ____ _______

$108. 55
34. 44
14. 29
17. 53
42.29
24. 79
6.91
5.96
5.29
6. 63
21.59
8. 53
0
2. 80
10. 26
3. 61
1.84
0
.42
1.35
3. 33
.17
30. 57
9.95
2. 69
2. 31
15. 62
17. 73
5. 22
4. 58
2.26
5. 67
0
0
0
0
0
2. 10
.04

$130.94
38.51
18.44
24.24
49. 75
26. 72
7. 57
6. 41
5. 58
7.16
24.87
11.45
.38
1. 61
11.43
2.83
.80
0
.32
1. 71
2.99
0
32.60
6. 63
2. 05
6.64
17.28
32. 44
10. 07
8. 03
5. 39
8. 95
0
0
0
0
0
3.29
0
5.20

$120. 43
33. 98
15. 98
25. 62
44.85
28. 52
7. 90
6. 65
6. 06
7.91
25.05
6.60
.19
8. 51
9. 75
1.41
.60
.20
0
.61
3. 39
0
33. 62
10. 64
3.07
2. 71
17.20
21.12
6. 59
4. 27
3. 38
6. 88
0
0
0
0
0
.81
.01
6.50

$138. 06
41.88
21.16
14. 49
60. 53
28. 60
7. 75
6.91
6.28
7.66
30. 04
10. 27
.22
0
19. 55
5.91
1. 33
.43
0
4.15
.23
0
34. 91
10. 68
3.58
.50
20.15
29. 69
11.31
8. 63
2. 47
7.28
1.00
.25
.25
.25
.25
1.83
0
5. 85




4. 62

TABULAR SUMMARY
T able

11.—

F u el,

93

light, and refrigeration expenditures, hy economic level— Con.

LITT L E TO N AND CONW AY, N. H.—Continued
Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
All
families

Item

- -

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

-

F u e l, L ig h t, and R efrig era tion E x p en d itu r e s — Con.

II. Number of families in houses making payments
for heat separately from rent________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity______________________________
Anthracite______________________________
Bituminous coal________________________
Coke__________________________________
Briquets________________________________
Wood__________________________________
Fuel oil_______________________________
Gas___________________________________
Kerosene_____________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)__________________
Ice__________________________________

129

53

21

30

25

115
58
15
8
0
96
48
1
31
3
73

45
19
5
5
0
37
16
0
16
1
29

18
9
3
0
0
13
11
0
3
0
10

27
14
2
3
0
24
9
0
5
1
16

25
16
5
0
0
22
12
1
7
1
18

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrig­
eration, total____________________________
Electricity____________________________
Anthracite_____________________________
Bituminous coal________________________
Coke- _________________________________
Briquets_______________________________
Wood__________________________________
Fuel oil________________________________
Gas____________________________________
Kerosene_______________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________
Ice_____________________________________

$124. 63
26. 47
28. 56
4. 00
2. 38
0
34. 32
22.00
.33
1.58
.02
4. 97

$103. 93
23. 32
20. 27
2. 40
3. 67
0
31.99
15. 93
0
2. 32
.04
3.99

$130. 68
25. 09
26.05
5.40
0
0
34. 37
33.74
0
.49
0
5. 54

$116.09
28.80
30. 24
2. 31
3. 77
0
31.48
14. 60
0
.79
.02
4. 08

$173. 79
31.50
46. 26
8. 25
0
0
42. 65
33.89
1.70
1.86
.07
7.61

III. Number of families in houses not making pay­
ments for heat separately from rent________
IV. Number of families in apartments making
payments for heat separately from rentNumber of families spending for—
Electricity__________________________
Anthracite __________________________
Bituminous coal_____________________
Coke_______________________________
Briquets_______________________________
W ood_________________________________
Fuel oil________________________________
Gas____________________________________
Kerosene______________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)_________________
Ice___________ _____
_________

0

0

0

0

0

58

10

18

18

12

57
27
2
5
1
45
39
0
15
0
43

10
7
2
2
1
10
9
0
5
0
10

18
6
0
2
0
15
11
0
5
0
12

18
11
0
1
0
14
12
0
1
0
16

11
3
0
0
0
6
7
0
4
0
5

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refriger­
ation, total________________________
$124. 23
Electricity________________________
i
27.38
Anthracite_______________________
!
20.30
Bituminous coal___________________
.61
Coke_____________________________
3. 36
Briquets_______________________________
. 19
W ood_________________________________
30. 44
Fuel oil________________________________
32. 76
Gas___________________________________
0
Kerosene_______________________________
2. 84
Gasoline (not for auto) . _________________
0
Ice_______ _
6. 35

$138. 20
32. 37
32. 88
3. 54
2. 28
1. 12
26. 35
30. 88
0
1 41
.
0
7. 37

$135. 78
28. 60
24.89
0
6. 63
0
32. 36
32. 12
0
6. 74
0
4. 44

$131. 26
28.08
17. 82
0
2. 95
0
39. 04
33. 18
0
.36
0
9. 83

$84. 78
20. 33
6. 68
0
0
0
18.08
34. 66
0
1. 89
0
3. 14

V. Number of families in apartments not making
payments for heat separately from rent
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_______ _____
i
Gas____________________
____
!
Ice
__ ___
________
j

6

0

1

,

4

5
o
4

0
0
0

1
0
1

1
0
1

3
0
2

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refriger­
ation, total_ _
_ _ _____
Electricity_______ _ _
_
Gas...
.
Ice___
_ __
_
_____
!
All other fuel__ ______

$65. 40
31.89
0
7. 89
25. 62

$49. 76
28.30
0
12.26
9.20

$73. 14
33. 98
0
5. 84
33. 32




!
!
1
1

o
0
o
0
0

$50. 08
27. 10
0
11.69 i
11.29 1

94

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 11a.— F u el , light, and refrigeration expenditures
M ARQ U ETTE, M ICH.; MODESTO, CALIF., AND RENO, NEV.
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

I. All families in survey______ ________________________________ ...
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_________________ _____________________________
Anthracite________ ______ ______ __ _____________________
Bituminous coal___ ______________________________________
Coke ________ _____ ____ ______ _____ ___
Briquets___ ___________ ________ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___
Wood_____________________________________________________
Fuel oil __ _ ________ ____________ __ ______ ___ _
Gas_ _ _ _ _ _
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _______ _______
K erosene.__ _
_ _ __ _ ___ __ _ _. ___
___ __
Gasoline (not for auto)__________________________ _________
Ice
_
_
_
______
_
__ __ _ ____

148

151

149

145
13
127
2
0
91
0
42
10
0
23

149
1
23
0
1
52
18
124
15
3
103

143
0
94
1
o
108
4
46
1
1
100

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total________
Electricity____________ ___________________________________
Anthracite_______________________________________ ______
Bituminous coal.. _ _ __ ______ _ _ __________________ _
Coke__ _ ___ _ ___ ___________ _ _______ ___________
Briquets______ __________ ___ _ ________ _______________
Wood_____________________________________________________
Fuel oi l . ______ ________ _____________
__ __
Gas___________ ____ _ ____________ ________ ______
Kerosene____
__ ____ _______ ______ _ ___
Gasoline (not for auto)_____________________________________
Ice _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

$99. 23
27. 96
3. 08
46.98
.82
0
12.63
0
5.91
.35
0
1.50

$95.12
32. 90
.23
3. 55
0
.22
5. 72
3.36
36.16
1.16
.38
11.44

$116.08
41.44
0
30.78
. 36
0
23.14
1. 28
9. 45
.01
.01
9.52

II. Number of families in houses making payments for heat separately
from rent _
__
____________
_ _ _ _ ____
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_________________________________________________
Anthracite-------------------------------------------------------------------------Bituminous coal.. _ _ _________________ ____________ __ ___
Coke
_______ _ ____________________ ____________
_ __
Briquets_________________________________________ __ ___ _
Wood
________________________________________
Fuel oil_________________________________________________ _
Gas __
__ __________________ ____ __ __
Kerosene. ___
__ __ ________ __________ _______ ___
Gasoline (not for auto)__________ _ _____________ __
Ice _
___
__
__
________ _ _ ___

103

138

128

102
9
88
2
0
69
0
42
7
0
15

138
1
20
0
1
47
18
111
12
3
92

127
0
91
1
0
100
4
36
1
1
87

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total____ __
Electricity __ ____ ___.
_ ___
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________
Anthracite.. _ ________ ____ _ __ _ _
____
Bituminous coal___
_________
__ _____
______
Coke
Briquets.. ______
_ _______
__. ___
. _ ___
Wood
___
______________________________________
Fuel oil
___
_
_ _ _ _ _ _ _
Gas_____________________________ ________________________
Kerosene _ _ _
_______
___ _
_ _
___
Gasoline (not for auto) _ _________ ______ _ ___ _______
Ice
_______________ _______ _______ ____ _____ ___

$113.19
29.65
3. 57
57.00
. 94
0
13. 97
0
6.16
.47
0
1.43

$97. 28
34.46
.25
3.56
0
.23
5. 97
3. 67
36.20
1.06
.42
11.46

$122. 93
43.45
0
35.06
. 42
0
24.94
1.49
8. 5
1
.01
.01
9.04




TABULAR SUMMARY

95

T a b l e 11a. — Fuel, light, and refrigeration expenditures— Continued
M A RQ U ETTE , M ICH.; MODESTO CALIF., AND RENO, NEV.—Continued
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto
III. Number of families in houses not making payments for heat sepa­
rately from rent______ _
__ ______
______
IV. Number of families in apartments making payments for heat sepa­
rately from rent_______
____________________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity________________________________________________
Anthracite________________________________________________
Bituminous coal___________________________________________
Coke_____________________________________________________
Briquets__________________________________________________
Wood_____________________________________________________
Fuel oil___________________________________________________
Gas_______________________________________________________
Kerosene_________________________________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)_____________________________________
Ice_- ____________
_______________________ ___________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total_______
Electricity________
___________________________________
Anthracite________________ ______ ___ ______ _________
Bituminous coal__________________________ _. ___________
Coke_____________________________________________________
Briquets__________________________________________________
Wood____________________________________________________
Fuel oil___________________________________________________
Gas_______________________________________ _______________
Kerosene_________________________________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)_______________________ ____________
Ice_- --------------- ----- -----------------------------------------------------V. Number of families in apartments not making payments for heat
separately from rent_________
______
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_____________ V ____ _____
_______
Gas_____________________________________________________
Ice_________________________ ______________________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total_______
Electricity_______ _____________________ ________________
Gas____________________________________ ________________
Ice_________________________________________ ____________
All other fuel________________________
_________________

11

0

0

29

10

4

29
3
27
0
0
20
0
4
2
0
4

8
0
1
0
0
2
0
10
2
0
9

3
0
1
0
0
4
0
2
0
0
3

$86. 22
26. 98
3. 33
37. 79
0
0
13.60
0
3. 52
.10
0
.90

$66.40
14. 32
0
2. 24
0
0
1.71
0
35. 42
2. 72
0
9. 95

$91. 38
21.00
0
1.75
0
0
49.38
0
4.50
0
0
14. 75

16

0

15

13
4
3

0
0
0

11
9
9

$38.32
24.27
8. 66
3.11
2.28

0
0
0
0
0

$64.30
29.50
20.00
12.07
2. 73

i Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.




Reno

96

M N Y D U SE E T
O E ISB R M N S--13 SM L C IE
A L IT S

T a b l e 1 2 . — Household operation expenditures other than for fuel, light, and refrig­
eration, by economic level
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.

Item

All
families

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

H o u seh old O p era tion E x p e n d itu r e s O ther T h a n fo r
F u e l, L ig h t, and R efrig era tion

Families in survey
_
_ - _
__ _____
Number of families spending for—
Water rent_.
_____
_ _ __ __ _
Telephone______
_____
_ _______
Domestic service: Full-tim e___ _
Part-time.
__ _ _ __ _.
Laundry out _ _ _____ _______
_ __
Postage, telegrams.____ _________ __
Moving, express, freight, drayage____
_____
Safe-deposit box ___
____ ____ _____
Insurance on furniture
__________ _ _____
Interest on debts______________ ________

299

88

74

52

85

97
98
13
20
54
267
38
5
63
13

34
14
3
5
8
75
12
0
15
3

22
13
1
3
6
65
15
0
9
2

17
24
4
3
11
43
2
2
15
1

24
47
5
9
29
84
9
3
24
7

Average expenditure per family for household oper­
ation other than fuel, light, and refrigeration,
total---------- --------------------------- ----------Water rent___________
__ _______
Telephone
_
_ _ _________________
Domestic service: Full-time. _
Part-time,. _ _____
Household paper____ ______
Bar soap. _
_ _ _ _ _
_ _____
Starch, bluing._ ___ _______________ _______
Soap flakes, powder._ ___ _ ____
_______ _
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc_.„ _
_
Matches______________________________
Laundry out________________________________
Stationery, pens, pencils, ink________
_______ _ _ __
Postage, telegrams. _____
Moving, express, freight, drayage____
_ _
Safe-deposit box
_
_____ _ _ _
__ _
Insurance on furniture __ __ _ _
_____________ . . . ___ __
Interest on debts _
Other items______ ____ ____________ _ __ _

$50.16
4. 82
9.02
4. 53
2.13
2. 90
2. 80
.74
5. 28
1.43
2.11
6.80
1. 33
2. 37
.91
. 05
1.87
1.06
.01

$35. 47
6. 01
3.88
1.35
.45
2.61
3 06
.
.82
5.68
1.48
2. 07
3. 07
.95
#1.68
.64
0
1.43
.29
0

$33. 69
5. 00
3.99
.09
1.57
2.71
2. 93
.79
5.00
1.41
2. 09
1.75
1.24
1. 99
1.93
0
1. 13
.06
.01

$58. 38
4.62
12. 36
9. 24
2. 70
3.81
2 50
.
.64
5.19
1. 38
1.88
7.68
1.22
2.10
.33
. 17
2. 43
. 10
.03

$74. 67
3. 55
16.66
8.82
4. 00
2. 82
2.61
.67
5.18
1.41
2.31
14. 52
1.86
3. 57
.66
.07
2. 64
3. 32
0




TABULAR SUMMARY

97

T a b l e 1 2 .— Household operation expenditures other than for fuel, light, and refrig­
eration, by economic level— Continued
PORTSMOUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ONT, N. H.
Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
families

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

H o u seh old O p era tion E x p en d itu r e s O ther T h a n for
F u e l, l i g h t , and R efrig era tion

Families in su rvey-________ ___ ____ _ _ ___
Number of families spending for—
Water rent_____________ __________________
_ _ _ _____- ____ __
Telephone_____ _____
Domestic service: Full-time
_______ - - Part-time ______ - __ __
Laundry out____ _ _ _ _ _
______
__ __
Postage, telegrams___ _____ _ ________ ___
Moving, express, freight, drayage______ ___ __
Safe-deposit box_
_ _____
_ _____ ___ _
Insurance on furniture_____ __ _ ___ _ _ ___
Interest on debts___
___
___ __ ___
Average expenditure per family for household opera­
tion other than fuel, light, and refrigeration, total.
Water rent_______
___ __________
Telephone_____ ________ _ _______ _____
Domestic service: Full-time___________ - _ Part-time--- _
_ ___ __
Household paper ____ - __ _ _____
_ _ __ _ _ _ _____
Bar soap____ ______
Starch, bluing______________________________
Soap flakes, powder. _. ____
___ __
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc ______
Matches_______ ______ _ _ _ _ ______ _
Laundry out __ ____ ______
___ ___
____
Stationery, pens, pencils, ink______
Postage, telegrams--- _ _________
__ _ __
Moving, express, freight, drayage___
_____
_ ____
Safe-deposit box.. ________
Insurance on furniture. ___
_
_ __
Interest on debts___
___ _ ____
Other items
____
____




485

126

111

125

123

174
149
16
30
100
452
49
36
112
37

43
24
6
4
13
112
9
2
24
9

41
21
5
6
16
105
10
8
18
1
1

53
47
3
10
29
116
11
12
34
5

37
57
2
10
42
119
19
14
36
12

$48.81
3.94
8. 65
2. 53
1.75
3.15
2. 78
.92
5.21
1.69
2.31
5.71
1.59
2. 88
.91
. 19
2. 06
2. 39
.15

$39.89
4.02
5. 27
3.20
.55
3. 22
3.06
.96
6.12
1.48
2. 71
2. 58
1.29
1. 88
.49
.04
1.51
1.43
.08

$38. 01
4.13
5. 61
1.97
1.12
3. 08
2. 64
.83
4.64
1.81
2. 20
3.45
1.44
2.42
.36
. 15
1.30
.72
.14

$49. 37
4. 27
9. 98
2.91
2.42
2.94
2. 59
.92
4.60
1.67
2.04
6. 20
1.39
3.06
1.00
.24
1.87
1.16
.11

$67. 10
3. 34
13. 50
1.95
2. 86
3. 36
2. 79
.95
5.43
1.81
2. 28
10. 46
2. 25
4. 14
1. 72
.35
3.49
6.14
.28

98

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS— 13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 12 .— Household operation expenditures other than fo r fuel, light, and refrigeration, by economic level— Continued
L IT T L E T O N

A N D

All
families

Item

H ou seh o ld

O p era tion E x p en d itu r e s O ther
F u e l, L ig h t, and R efrig era tion

C O N W A Y , N . H .

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

T h an for

Families in survey-.- . . . _______ _______
Number of families spending for—
Water rent________________________________
Telephone_________________________________ Domestic service: Full-time__________________
Part-time-. - _ _____ _____
Laundry out________________________________
Postage, telegrams ____________ ___ _____
Moving, express, freight, drayage_____________
Safe-deposit box_____________________________
Insurance on furniture_________________
Interest on debts______________________

197

65

40

49

43

76
55
10
14
33
190
41
6
53
9

26
8
3
3
6
63
14
1
15
4

15
13
1
2
6
39
5
1
8
2

18
17
2
7
6
47
10
1
14
2

17
17
4
2
15
41
12
3
16
1

Average expenditure per family for household opera­
tion other than fuel, light, and refrigeration, total.
Water rent. ___________ ___________________
Telephone_______ _________________ _______
Domestic service: Full-time. _
_ _ _____
Part-time_________________
Household paper__________________ ____
Bar soap_____ _______________ _______
Starch, bluing__________________________
Soap flakes, powder _ .
___ ______ ___ .
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc.. _ _
Matches____________________________________
Laundry out________________________________
Stationery, pens, pencils, ink___
___
Postage, telegrams____________ - - __________ .
Moving, express, freight, drayage____
. ___
Safe-deposit box_____________________________
Insurance on furniture __ - - - - - - - - - ------Interest on debts___ ____ __ .
- _____
Other items _ _________ _____ - -- ---------.

$43. 67
4. 69
6. 48
2.00
2. 68
2. 77
2.37
.61
4. 89
1. 06
2. 30
5. 21
1. 48
3.08
1. 25
. 11
2.04
.53
. 12

$34. 55
4. 53
2. 76
1.73
1.27
2.74
2.83
.74
5.10
1. 03
2.43
2.16
1. 26
2. 59
1.13
.03
1. 75
.42
.05

$40. 92
3.73
7.64
.75
1.45
2. 95
2. 73
.42
4.80
1.01
2.23
5. 91
1.30
3.18
.57
. 10
1. 61
.52
.02

$44. 98
4. 55
8. 33
.38
5.41
2.69
1. 77
.62
5.08
1.03
2.11
4. 26
1. 51
3.14
1. 66
.08
2.17
.16
.03

$58. 54
6.01
8. 91
5.40
2.85
2. 73
2.01
.58
4. 45
1.19
2. 38
10. 27
1. 96
3. 65
1.60
.29
2. 72
1.14
.40




TABULAR SUMMARY
T

a b l e

12a.—

99

H o u s e h o ld o p e r a t i o n e x p e n d i t u r e s o th e r t h a n f o r f u e l , l ig h t , a n d r e f r i g ­
e r a t io n

M A RQ U ETTE , MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto
H o u seh old O p era tion E x p en d itu r e s O ther T h an fo r F u e l, L ig h t, and
R efrig era tion

148




•

151

149

102
81
3
10
8
145
23
15
29
3

Families in survey________________________________________________
Number of families spending for—
Water rent___________________________________________________
Telephone____________________________________________________
Domestic service: Full-time____________________________________
Part-time___________________________________
Laundry out-----------------------------------------------------------------Postage, telegrams__________ _.. ------------------------------------------Moving, express, freight, drayage. ____________________________
Safe-deposit box-------------------------------------------------------------Insurance on furniture________
_____________________________
Interest on debts___________________________________ _________
Average expenditure per family for household operation other than fuel,
light, and refrigeration, total______ _____________________________
Water rent_______________________________________________
Telephone________________________________________________
Domestic service: Full-time____________________________________
Part-time___________________________________
Household paper______________________________________________
Bar soap_____________________________________________________
Starch, bluing------------------------------------------------------------------------Soap flakes, powder___________________________________________
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc_________________________
Matches_____________________________________________________
Laundry out__________________________________________________
Stationery, pens, pencils, ink__________________________________
Postage, telegrams____________________________________________
Moving, express, freight, drayage______________________________
Safe-deposit box_______________________________________________
Insurance on furniture________________________________________
Interest on debts______________________________________________
Other items__________________________________________________

Reno

54
48
6
16
36
144
17
11
32
10

90
117
1
5
82
141
13
20
21
6

$52.69
8.56
13.49
.98
3.17
4.50
3.89
.98
4.41
1.92
1.83
1.53
1.78
2.60
.82
.33
1.29
.43
.18

$58.15
8.33
7.97
2.32
3. 32
3.65
3.13
1.20
5.49
2.35
1.85
6.37
1.92
3.13
.57
.25
1.56
1.29
3.45

$78.47
19.40
15.75
.34
1.14
3.51
3.45
.70
4. 51
2.48
1.93
16.84
1.68
3.33
.96
.48
1.16
.58
.23

100

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 13. — Transportation expenditures , by economic level
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year—
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

T ra n sp o rta tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey.- _ ____________ ____ _____ _ _
Number of families spending for transportation __
Number of families owning automobiles _ ___
Number of automobiles owned:
Made: 1936_________________________________
1933-35______________________________
1930-32______________________________
1927-29______________________________
Before 1927___________________________
Originally purchased:
New______________________________ _____
___
Second-hand______ _______ ___
Number of families purchasing automobiles in year:
New.. _ _______________ _____ _____________
Second-hand____
___
_ _
___ __
Number of families purchasing motorcycles in year _
Number of families spending for transportation
other than automobile and motorcycle:
Trolley_____________________________________
________ _____
Local bus ______ ___ ____
Taxi_______ _______ ______ ___ ____ ____ _
____ _______
Bicycle __________________
Railroad.
_ ___ ____ _ ___ ______ _
___
Interurban bus. _______________ _____ _
___
Boat___ ______________________ ___________
Airplane___________ ______ ____________ __

299
218
126

88
46
22

74
52
27

52
43
24

85
77
53

0
8
37
58
19

0
0
3
10
9

0
2
4
17
4

0
0
8
12
3

0
6
22
19
3

52
70

8
14

9
18

11
12

24
26

4
19
0

0
3
0

2
2
0

0
4
0

2
10
0

19
47
35
2
27
28
7
3

14
10
2
1
3
1
0
0

1
17
8
0
6
4
0
1

1
6
11
1
6
5
3
0

3
14
14
0
12
18
4
2

Average expenditure for all transportation, total___
Automobiles and motorcycles—purchase, opera­
tion and maintenance
_ __ _ __ _____
Purchase of: Automobiles ___ ________
Motorcycles ___ _______
_
_
_____ _____
Gasoline.. ___
Fall_________________________________
Winter__ ______________ _ ___ ___
Spring_________ _
__ _._ _ ______
_ __ __ __ _
Summer______________
Oil_____________________________________
Tires _____
_ ___ ______________ .
Tubes ___ ______ _______ _____
__ .. .
Repairs and maintenance__________ _ __
Garage rent and parking.__ __________ ___
Licenses._
__ ._ ______
___ _ _ .. .
T ax es.______ ___ _ __ ___ _
____ .
Insurance..
.
______
Fines and damages .
______
Rent of automobile and/or motorcycle
Other automobile and motorcycle trans­
portation expense __
Other transportation_________________ ____ _
Trolley______ __ __ ___ __ _____________
Local bus_
__ _ _ ___ _______
_ _ ..
Taxi_____ _ _ _______ _______ _______
Bicycles___________________ _____ _______
_____
Railroad.. _______________ _____
Interurban bus__________________ _______
Boat____________________________________
Airplane. __ ___________________________
Other transportation expense __ ___ __ __

$79.01

$26.50

$60. 78

$87. 66

$143.93

71.31
19. 76
0
25. 35
6.10
3.97
6. 25
9. 03
2. 66
3. 24
.37
3.18
2. 63
6. 21
1.44
5. 80
0
.41

22. 59
1.19
0
10. 73
2.49
1.77
2. 58
3. 89
1.10
1.73
.17
1.07
.70
3.12
.59
1.69
0
.38

54.40
18.24
0
17. 33
3. 99
2. 47
4. 39
6. 48
2.18
2.06
.25
1.18
1.86
5.10
1.29
4.18
0
.67

77. 21
19. 96
0
28. 57
7. 29
4. 46
6. 62
10.20
3. 26
3.17
.40
3. 26
3. 69
7.24
1.56
5. 31
0
0

132. 90
40.17
0
45. 51
10. 95
7.28
11.44
15. 84
4. 34
5. 86
.65
7.05
4. 67
9. 74
2. 39
11.79
0
.46

.26
7. 70
.57
2. 53
1.06
.05
1.69
1.36
.26
.07
.1
1

.12
3.91
1.57
1.64
.23
. 12
.33
.02
0
0
0

.06
6. 38
.05
3. 65
.19
0
1.18
1.26
0
.05
0

.79
10.45
0)
1.27
3. 47
.09
4.06
1.32
.24
0
0

.27
11.03
.33
3.24
1.19
0
2.08
2.87
.75
.20
.37

1 Less than 0.5 cent.




TABULAR SUM M ARY

101

T a b l e 1 3 . — Transportation expenditures, by economic level— Continued
PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ONT, N. H.
Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

T ra n s p o rta tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey________________ ____________
Number of families spending for transportation. _.
Number of families owning automobiles ______ _
Number of automobiles owned:
Made: 1936_________________________________
1933-35_______________________________
1930-32_______________ _______________
1927-29_______________________________
Before 1927___________________________
Originally purchased:
New _ _____ _____ _ _______ ____ ____
Second-hand_____ . ______ . .. ________
Number of families purchasing automobiles in year:
New_____________ ___________________________
____ _______
Second-hand____ _ . .. __
Number of families purchasing motorcycles in year. .
Number of families spending for transportation
other than automobile and motorcycle:
Trolley________________________ ___________
Local bus______
____ . . . . _ _____
Taxi________________________ ______________
Bicycle___________________ ________________
Railroad.. _________________________________
Interurban b u s.____________________________
Boat_____________________________________
Airplane ___ __________ _ _ . . . ............... ..

485
378
226

126
108
38

111
77
53

125
90
66

123
103
69

0
16
64
117
34

0
0
9
19
9

0
1
8
33
12

0
1
17
40
9

0
14
30
25
4

80
151

13
24

11
43

20
47

36
37

9
35
0

0
5
0

0
9
0

1
10
0

8
11
0

7
62
26
4
50
53
8
1

1
16
4
1
11
12
2
1

1
10
6
0
9
14
0
0

4
17
4
1
9
10
3
0

1
19
12
2
21
17
3
0

Average expenditure for all transportation, total____
Automobiles and motorcycles—purchase, opera­
tion, and maintenance-_____________________
Purchase of: Automobiles________________
Motorcycles-------------- ----------Gasoline_________________ ______ ___
Fall___________________ ____ _________
Winter______________________________
Spring______________________________
Summer___________________ .. _____
Oil_____________________________________
Tires___________________________________
Tubes__________________________ _______
Repairs and maintenance..
_______ .
Garage rent and parking___
______ ___
Licenses.
______ ______ _____
- Taxes.. _ ___ . . . -------------------- -- --Insurance------ .. -------------------------------Fines and damages . . . ________ ___ ___ _
Rent of automobile and/or motorcycle_____
Other automobile and motorcycle transpor­
tation expense.
.....
_______
Other transportation. __ ________________ ___
Trolley_________________________________
Local bus . . . ___________
____.
Taxi____.
________________ _______
Bicycles.
. --------------------- ------ -- ------Railroad. _ _ _____
.
---------- ---Interurban bus__
.
----------- -B o a t .._________ ______ ________ ____ _
Airplane________ _____________________ .
Other transportation expense______ _____

$78. 24

$30.16

$56. 21

$75. 02

$150. 70

73.64
19. 89
0
25. 42
6.16
4. 34
6. 39
8. 53
3.01
3. 25
.29
4. 21
1.58
5. 36
2. 69
6. 64
.03
1.00

26. 59
3.02
0
11.17
2. 73
1.98
2. 85
3.61
1.38
2. 20
.09
1. 52
.53
2.11
2.18
1.83
0
.31

52.01
6. 41
0.
21. 17
5. 60
3.40
4. 85
7.32
2. 56
2.58
.39
4. 28
.46
4. 99
2. 44
4. 26
. 11
2. 30

70. 27
14. 63
0
27. 22
6. 40
4. 68
6. 73
9.41
3. 07
2. 57
.22
3.12
1.29
6. 95
2. 50
7. 56
0
.53

144. 77
54. 69
0
42. 02
9.95
7.25
11.06
13. 76
5. 01
5. 63
.49
8. 00
3. 96
7.41
3. 63
12. 78
.01
1.02

.27
4. 60
.06
1.66
.40
. 17
1.12
1.10
.06
0
.03

.25
3. 57
.01
1.56
. 15
.09
.60
.94
.09
0
. 13

.06
4. 20
.02
2. 09
.25
0
. 70
1.14
0
0
0

.61
4. 75
.09
2. 21
.52
.24
.70
.86
. 13
0
0

. 12
5. 93
. 13
.83
.65
.35
2. 48
1. 47
.02




0
0

102

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 13.— Transportation expenditures, by economic level— Continued
LITTLE TO N AND CONWAY, N. H.

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

T ra n sp o rta tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey______________________________
Number of families spending for transportation____
Number of families owning automobiles___________
Number of automobiles owned:
Made: 1936_________________________________
1933-35____________ __________________
1930-32__________ ____________________
1927-29________ _____ ________________
Before 1927____________________ _ __
Originally purchased:
New______ __________________ _______ _
Second-hand____
____ _____________ _
Number of families purchasing automobiles in year:
New__ ______ _
_ ___
___ _______ _
Second-hand_____ _______ _______ _ _ _ ___
Number of families purchasing motorcycles in year..Number of families spending for transportation other
than automobile and motorcycle:
Trolley______________
__________ _______ _
Local bus______ ______________ ___________
Taxi_______________________________________
Bicycle__________________ _ ____ _ _ _____
Railroad____ _ _____________ ___________
Interurban bus___ ______ __________________
Boat_____ ____ _______ _ _______ _________
Airplane________ ______ ____ _____ _______

197
157
102

65
45
25

40
36
22

49
35
24

43
41
31

0
9
37
49
12

0
0
8
14
4

0
0
4
13
6

0
2
11
11
2

0
7
14
11
0

29
78

6
20

2
21

9
17

12
20

3
21
0

0
7
0

0
2
0

1
3
0

2
9
0

1
3
12
0
25
6
2
1

0
1
6
0
4
1
0
0

0
0
1
0
6
2
0
0

0
1
3
0
8
2
2
0

1
1
2
0
7
1
0
1

Average expenditure for all transportation, total____
Automobiles and motorcycles—purchase, opera­
tion and maintenance___
_ _______
Purchase of: Automobiles_________ _
Motorcycles_____ _ _______
Gasoline________________________________
Fall_________________________________
W in te r___ _ ________
_ ______
Spring______________________________
Sum m er.____ _______ ___________
Oil_____________________________________
Tires____ _ _____________________ ______
Tubes _ ____
_
____________
Repairs and maintenance.
_ _ ______
Garage rent and parking. ______ _______
Licenses.. __ .
____
...
Taxes.
... . . . .
_
_________ _
Insurance ..
__ ______ _____ _ . . . . _
Fines and dam ages____ _______ _________
Rent of automobile and/or motorcycle_____
Other automobile and motorcycle trans­
portation expense.
_
__ . . . _____
Other transportation____ _________ ______
Trolley. _ ___________ __________________
Local bus_________________ . . . ________
Taxi________________ _______ _______ _
Bicycle_________________ . . . . . . ______
Railroad..
________________ __________
Interurban bus__________________________
Boat.. _
_. __ ______
______________
Airplane____ __________________________
Other transportation expense_____________

$93. 85

$55. 74

$46. 58

$88. 48

$201.48

90. 43
28. 26
0
30.16
7. 79
4. 86
7. 39
10.12
3. 38
4. 61
.34
4. 82
1.69
7. 58
1.42
6. 55
.06
1.49

53. 95
15. 21
0
19.31
5.16
2. 79
4. 82
6. 54
1.92
3. 66
.26
3.17
.21
5. 23
.81
2.59
0
1.58

44. 96
5. 28
0
17. 74
4.40
2. 21
4.40
6. 73
2. 46
1.50
.12
3. 74
1.52
6. 36
1.10
2. 31
0
2.83

82.06
17. 84
0
32.12
8. 98
4.67
7. 58
10. 89
2.79
4.08
.42
4. 74
2.08
7. 67
1.46
7. 95
0
.91

197. 37
81.22
0
55.87
13. 55
10.69
13.82
17.81
7.10
9.54
.59
8.42
3.65
12.17
2. 58
14. 88
.28
.76

.07
3. 42
.03
.10
.30
0
2. 72
.23
.01
.03
0

0
1.79
0
.13
.33
0
1.28
.05
0
0
0

0
1.62
0
0
.03
0
1.15
.44
0
0
0

0
6. 42
0
.15
.53
0
5.24
.44
.06
0
0

.31
4.11
.13
.09
.25
0
3.47
.04
0
.13
0




103

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T a b l e 13a. — Transportation expenditures
M ARQU ETTE, MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto
Families in survey_________________________________________________
Number of families spending for transportation______________________
Number of families owning automobiles_____________________________
Number of automobiles owned:
Made: 1936______________________________________________________
1933-35_______________ ______________________________________
1930-32_________ ________ ___________________
1927-29__________ ______ _________________________________________
Before 1927_____________________________________________________

Reno

148
118
85

151
151
132

149
132
115

0
4
17
39
24

0
9
31
70
32

0
16
29
64
13

29
55

37
105

55
67

Originally purchased:
New__________________________________________ _____ ______
Second-hand________________________________________ ______
Number of families purchasing automobiles in year:
New_____________________________________________ ____________
Second-hand__________________________________________________
Number of families purchasing motorcycles in year___________________
Number of families spending for transportation other than automobile
and motorcycle:
Trolley_______________________________________________________
Local b u s ...__________________________________________________
Taxi_______ ______ ___________________________________________
Bicycle____________ _____________ - ____________________________
Railroad--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Interurban bus________________________________________________
Boat__________________________________________________________
Airplane______________________________________________________

2
10
0

5
26
0

11
14
0

47
1
13
1
17
8
1
0

4
5
24
2
18
18
11
1

1
0
23
1
17
11
1
0

Average expenditure for all transportation, total_____________________
Automobiles and motorcycles—purchase, operation, and maintenance.
Purchase of: Automobiles___________________________________
Motorcycles___________ _____ __________________
Gasoline__________________________________________________
Fall___________________________________________________
W in ter..________ _____________________________________
Spring___ _____________________________________________
Summer___ ________ ___________________________________
Oil________ ________ _______________________________________
Tires___ T
_________________________________________________
Tubes____________________________________________________
Repairs and maintenance___________________________________
Garage rent and parking--------------- -------------------------------------Licenses and taxes-------------- --------- -------------------------------------Insurance_________________________________________________
Fines and damages_________________________________________
Rent of automobile and/or motorcycle_______________________
Other automobile and motorcycle transportation expense______
Other transportation___________________________________________
Trolley___________ ________________________________________
Local bus______ ____ _____________ _______ _________________
Taxi________ _______ ______________________________________
Bicycle____________________________________________________
Railroad__________________________________________________
Interurban bus____________________________________________
Boat______________________________________________________
Airplane__________________________________________________
Other transportation expense________________________________

$63. 36
57. 35
18. 53
0
21.02
4.40
3. 20
5.85
7. 57
2.23
2.68
.27
3. 21
.27
5.23
3.82
0
.03
.06
6.01
2.86
.04
.30
.03
2.10
.67
.01
0
0

$171. 53
165. 38
59.64
0
61.24
14. 75
14. 51
14. 75
17.23
6.32
6.68
.73
13. 72
.23
3.24
11.38
.40
1.44
.36
6.15
.12
.05
.87
.23
2.32
1.24
.26
.01
1.05

$162. 60
157.20
72.49
0
50. 93
13.06
11.86
12.19
13.82
5. 59
6.64
.71
8.10
.49
7.41
4.31
.03
.32
.18
5.40
0)
0
1.00
.24
1.90
1.28
.03
0
.95

1Less than 0,5 cent.

200982

41------- g




104

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 14 . — Personal care expenditures and medical care expenditures , by economic
level
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

P e r s o n a l C a re E x p en d itu r e s

Families in su rvey___ ______ ______________________ __
Number of families spending for personal care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts __
_ _ _ ______ ____ ________
Shaves by barber. __ _ ______________ ________
Shampoos___ ____ _ _____
_______ ______
Manicures____
__ _______________ _______
Permanent w aves________ _
_ ___
____
Other waves _
_ _ ____
___
Other personal care services _______
_____
Toilet articles and preparations:
___ ___ _ _ _ _ _ ___
Toilet soap_ ___ _
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes. _ ____
Cosmetic and toilet preparations _ _________
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles. _ _
Average expenditure per family for personal care, total __
Personal care services___________ _____ _ ________
H a ircu ts...________________________________
Shaves by barber. _ ___ _ _ _
_________
Shampoos___ _____ _
___
___ _____
Manicures __________
_____ _
________ _
Permanent waves _
_ _ ____
Other waves
_. . . . _____ ____
____
Other personal care services
__ _____
Toilet articles and preparations ______
___ _
Toilet soap . . .
__ _____ _ _ _
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes
____
Cosmetic and toilet preparations
______
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles_
_
Average expenditure per person for personal care, total___

299

88

74

52

85

284
15
11
2
119
60
2

82
1
2
0
25
9
2

73
5
0
0
30
10
0

49
2
1
1
23
5
0

80
7
8
1
41
36
0

287
274
221
172

87
76
61
45

70
70
54
43

49
47
38
29

81
81
68
55

$25. 73
14. 87
10. 55
.68
.20
.02
2. 26
1.14
.02
10. 86
3. 71
3. 67
2.17
1.31
6. 71

$22. 33
12. 06
10.12
0)
.02
0
1.37
.48
.07
10. 27
3. 97
3. 64
1.78
.88
4.13

$25. 99
14. 40
10. 57
.92
0
0
2.17
.74
0
11.59
3. 91
4.14
2. 00
1.54
6. 72

$24. 77
14. 22
9. 86
.48
.03
.01
2. 93
.91
0
10. 55
3. 64
3. 67
2.19
1.05
7. 59

$29. 59
18. 57
11.39
1.29
.68
.06
2.85
2. 30
0
11.02
3.31
3. 30
2.70
1.71
11.76

129
113
43
131
2
4
3
2
21
17
245
65
6
12

36
30
4
42
1
1
2
0
3
3
75
18
1
4

29
33
16
28
0
0
1
1
4
8
59
11
2
3

33
16
7
24
1
1
0
1
5
3
37
13
2
3

31
34
16
37
0
2
0
0
9
3
74
23
1
2

$52. 93

$32. 55

$46.19

$60. 82

$75. 02

6. 48
4. 83
9. 69
7. 42
.03
.67
.06
.50
4. 40
2. 76
8. 67
3. 28
.03
.82
3. 29
13. 81

7.07
3. 44
1.76
5. 48
.06
.05
.15
0
.76
1.28
6. 47
2. 32
.02
.66
3.03
6. 02

4. 96
4. 53
9.17
5. 96
0
0
.06
.62
3.14
4. 45
8. 71
2. 70
.04
1.05
.80
11.93

11.85
3. 43
6.08
8. 64
.08
.01
0
1.98
5. 32
2. 67
9. 89
4. 74
.09
.83
5. 21
18. 66

3. 88
7. 38
20. 54
9. 95
0
2.29
0
0
8.70
2.87
10.16
3.88
.01
.80
4. 56
29. 81

M e d ic a l C a re E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical care:
Services of—
General practitioner: Home ____
._ _______
Office___ ________ _ _ __
Specialist and other practitioner ___ _
_ _ _
Dentist
_ _
_ __
Clinic.
. ...
.. _____ ________
Nurse: In home: Private.
_
_ _
Visiting
_
_
In hospital...
_____ ______ _______ _.
Hospital: Private room_____ ____
__
__ _
Bed in ward..
__________________ ..
Medicine and drugs
_______ __________ __ _ _
Eyeglasses. .
__
r ____
.
______
Medical appliances . . ____
_______ ___ _
Accident and health insurance______
._ . _ _ _
Average expenditure per family for medical care, total___
Services of—
General practitioner: Home
Office____________________
Specialist and other practitioner.. ___________
Dentist. _________ .. . . __________________
C linic___________ _
_
_______ .
Nurse: In home: Private. _ __________________
Visiting_______________________
In hospital___ _________ _ ___ ________ _
Hospital: Private room________________________
Bed in ward_____________________ _
Medicine and drugs____ _ _______
___ _
Eyeglasses. _______________________ _____________
Medical appliances. _. ______ __________________
Accident and health insurance_________________ _
Other medical care___ ____________________________
Average expenditure per person for medical care, total___
Less than 0.5 cent.




105

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T

able

14.— Personal care expenditures and medical care expenditures, by economic
level— Continued
PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ON T, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

P e r s o n a l C a re E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey____________________________________
Number of families spending for personal care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts______
_______ ___________________
Shaves by barber______________________________
Shampoos___ ________________ ________ _____
Manicures___ _______________________ ______ _
Permanent waves. __________________________
Other waves. _____________________________ . . .
Other personal care services___________________
Toilet articles and preparations:
Toilet soap________ ____ _ ________ . . . ______
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes___
Cosmetic and toilet preparations________________
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles... -

485

126

111

125

123

455
42
30
2
159
123
4

120
5
0
0
31
20
0

104
6
7
0
39
21
0

113
11
10
0
38
33
2

118
20
13
2
51
49
2

466
445
365
286

123
116
96
72

100
104
82
63

121
108
88
66

122
117
99
85

Average expenditure per family for personal care, total____
Personal care services__________ . . .
. . . ________
Haircuts_________ _________________________
Shaves by barber_____________________________
Shampoos . . . _______________ _____________
Manicures______________________ ____ ____ . . .
Permanent waves_ ________________________
_
Other waves____ .
. . ____________________
Other personal care services__________________
Toilet articles and preparations________ _______ __
______________
____
Toilet soap____ . . . _.
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes. ___
Cosmetic and toilet preparations. . ____________
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles. ...
Average expenditure per person for'personal care, t o t a l___

$24. 75
13. 84
9. 55
.51
.41
.03
1.87
1.45
.02
10. 91
3. 92
3. 52
2. 43
1.04
7.00

$24.94
13. 89
11.49
.31
0
0
1.20
.89
0
11.05
4.19
3. 35
2. 29
1.22
4. 79

$22. 56
12. 50
9. 41
.21
.34
0
1.82
.72
0
10. 06
3. 93
3.13
2.15
.85
6. 28

$21. 54
11.67
7. 68
.44
.46
0
1.67
1.39
.03
9. 87
3. 72
3.14
2. 21
.80
7. 54

$29. 80
17. 23
9.61
1.07
.85
.10
2.80
2. 76
.04
12. 57
3. 82
4. 43
3.06
1.26
12.11

204
215
64
199
6
6
5
1
29
29
381
96
17
67

49
44
10
47
2
2
0
0
6
8
93
16
2
11

47
48
27
50
0
1
1
1
10
6
92
22
6
16

57
55
47
2
2
2
0
5
9
98
24
3
20

51
68
15
55
2
1
2
0
8
6
98
34
6
20

$45. 01

$36.11

$46. 31

$43. 65

$54. 37

6. 41
4. 61
6. 65
4. 64
.23
.61
.02
.03
1.97
2.29
8. 20
2. 73
.09
3.10
3. 43
12. 73

4. 68
2. 26
6. 30
3.60
.05
.66
0
0
2. 42
2. 35
5.42
2. 09
.02
1.62
4. 64
6. 93

5. 47
5. 02
10.14
4. 23
0
.56
.02
. 12
2. 50
1.98
8. 09
2. 77
.25
3. 31
1.85
12. 96

6.83
4. 39
4. 53
4. 67
. 11
.72
.07
0
1.08
2. 98
9.94
2. 47
.02
2. 59
3. 25
15. 27

8. 61
6. 86
6. 03
6. 03
.76
.49
.01
0
1.95
1.79
9. 39
3. 59
.09
4. 95
3. 82
22.10

M e d ic a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical care:
Services of—
General practitioner: H o m e .____________ ______
Office___ _________________
Specialist and other practitioner____________
._
D en tist____ _. . . . . . .
__________________
Clinic________________________________________
Nurse: In home: Private___________________ . . .
Visiting. _ . . .
_____________
In hospital.. . ______ ______________
Hospital: Private room_____ .
...
_____
Bed in ward_______________ ______ _
Medicine and drugs.................. . . . ___ _________ .
Eyeglasses_______________________
____
_____
Medical appliances.. . _____________ . __________
Accident and health insurance_________ __________
Average expenditure per family for medical care, to ta l_
_
Services of—
General practitioner: Home.. . . . ._ .
______
Office____________________
Specialist and other practitioner. ____
_ ...
Dentist. _____________________________________
Clinic________________ ..
______ _________
Nurse: In home: Private___ . . . . . . . . . . .
Visiting_______________ ____
Jn hospital_____________________________
Hospital: Private room. ______ . _ ______
Bed in ward____________ _
______
Medicine and drugs_______________________________
Eyeglasses. ________ _______
. . . ______ . . .
Medical appliances__ ____________ . . . ___________
Accident and health insurance .
______________
Other medical care. . . . „____ ________________
Average expenditure per person for medical care, total




12

10 6
T able

MONEY DISBURSEM EN TS---- 1 3

SM ALL CITIES

1 4 . — Personal care expenditures and medical care expenditures , by economic
level— Continued
LITTLE TO N AND CONWAY, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

P e r s o n a l Care E x p en d itu r e s

____ ___
_______
____ _
Families in survey.Number of families spending for personal care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts. . _ _ . . . . . .
. .
________
Shaves by barber.
___________ ____________
-----------Shampoos. _
_ ................. .
Manicures..
.. . _ -------------- _ _ _ -----Permanent waves___________ _______, ....... —
Other waves__________________________________
Other personal care services_____ _____ . . . .
Toilet articles and preparations:
Toilet soap_
_ __ . . . .
.
_
_____
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes_____ _
Cosmetic and toilet preparations_______________
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles____

197

65

40

49

43

188
13
8
0
74
53
1

62
5
1
0
16
9
0

38
1
2
0
14
9
0

47
1
0
0
21
18
0

41
6
5
0
23
17
1

191
179
154
94

63
56
51
30

40
37
27
22

48
46
36
22

40
40
40
20

Average expenditure per family for personal care, total___
Personal care services _. _ __ _______
. . . ______ _
Haircuts___________________ ________________
Shaves by barber ________ _______ ______
Shampoos------------- ------------------------- _. .
Manicures... _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ -------------- .
Permanent w aves___
________ _ -----------Other waves.. . . . ____ _ . ------- -----------Other personal care services. __ __________
Toilet articles and preparations ________ _._ _
Toilet soap..
....
_ .
. . . --------Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes____ ._
Cosmetic and toilet preparations _
......
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles___
Average expenditure per person for personal care, total___

$22. 76
12.85
9.28
.26
.21
0
2. 23
.83
.04
9.91
3. 26
3.69
2. 20
.76
6.28

$20. 25
11.40
9.47
.20
.02
0
1.42
.29
0
8.85
3.31
3.63
1.33
.58
3. 88

$21.72
12.12
8.05
.14
0
0
2.43
1.50
0
9.60
3. 08
3.75
2.14
.63
7.94

$27.85
15.63
9.32
.60
.90
0
3.43
1.21
.17
12. 22
3.29
3.93
3.84
1.16
11.61

108
108
30
80
3
4
1
3
10
16
178
52
16
22

41
37
9
24
1
2
0
1
2
3
57
16
4
5

20
20
7
18
1
1
0
0
3
6
37
12
2
6

26
26
7
20
0
0
1
0
2
4
45
9
5
5

21
25
7
18
1
1
0
2
3
3
39
15
5
6

$51.61

$39.91

$57.33

$44.51

$72.11

9.11
5. 73
5.78
5.32
.62
1.54
.07
.35
2.83
3.77
8.05
4.06
.08
1.99
2. 31
14.26

6.66
5.91
4. 37
5. 27
.19
.20
0
.54
2.17
.82
7.02
4.13
.06
1.31
1.26
7.64

8.42
5.90
8.77
5. 52
.71
2.82
0
0
4.63
3.83
8.92
3. 71
.07
3.88
.15
16.83

5.74
4.94
8.42
5.15
0
0
.28
0
1.94
5. 23
7. 08
2. 67
.11
1.33
1.62
16. 27

17.27
6.18
2.14
5.41
1.92
4.11
0
.79
3.18
6.51
9.92
5.86
.10
2.03
6. 69
30.07

$22. 57
13.06
10.43
.11
.04
0
2.01
.47
0
9.51
3.35
3.46 ,
1.92
.78
6. 63

M e d ic a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical care:
Services of—
General practitioner: Home___ _______ _____ _
Office________________ _ _
Specialist and other practitioner.. ___________ _
Dentist.. . _ ..
_ . _ _. _ ._ _ _________ _
Clinic_________ ________ _ _____ _____________
Nurse: In home: Private___
_______________
Visiting ________ _ ________
In hospital.
. . . ______ _______ ____
Hospital: Private room------ -------------------- --------Bed in ward______ _ ____________ ._
Medicine and drugs___ _________________________
Eyeglasses_______ _____ _________________________
Medical appliances________________ _ __ _______
Accident and health insurance__________ . . . ______ _
Average expenditure per family for medical care, total
Services of—
General practitioner: Home
____ .
Office.. _________ ______
Specialist and other practitioner____ _____ . . . ..
Dentist____ _. _____________________________
Clinic_____
.
_ ___ -__ . .. _______ _______
Nurse: In home: Private_________________ ___
Visiting______________________
In hospital. . ___ ______. . . . . . _____
Hospital: Private room_____
___ ___________
Bed in ward. ________ ____ ____ _ __
Medicine and drugs . _ ________ ________ ____ _ . . .
Eyeglasses. ________
_________ __ _ _______
Medical appliances. ___ . . . _ _
_ _____
Accident and health insurance __ _
_ _ _
Other medical care ______
_ _ _.
.... .
Average expenditure per person for medical care, total. __ .




107

TABULAR SUMMARY
T a b l e 14a .— Personal care expenditures and medical care expenditures
M ARQU ETTE, MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

P e r s o n a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey. __ _ ...................
...................... .
Number of families spending for personal care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts. . ___
____ _
_ _______ ______________________
Shaves by barber. ____________________ __________________
Shampoos___
_ ________ ’___................. .
__ __ _ _ ____ _
Manicures
________ _______________ _ _ __
_ ...
___ _____
_ __ __ . . .
Permanent waves. . . . . .
Other waves .
_______________ __ ____________ _____
______________________
Other personal care services___
Toilet articles and preparations:
Toilet soap__________________________ _________ _________
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes.
_________
Cosmetic and toilet preparations________ __ _
______
_ . . . .. .
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles___ _
Average expenditure per family for personal care, total.._ ____ __
Personal care services, total___ _ ___
____________________
Haircuts___. . .
__ __________ _________ __ ._ ______ .
Shaves by barber_ __ _ __ ___ __ ________ _________ ___
Shampoos__ ______ _ __ ______ __ _____ _ _ _ ______
Manicures_____ __ __ ___ _____ ______ ______________ _____
Permanent w aves_____ _ ________ ______
______
Other waves.
. . .
_
________ ________ ___ .
___ __ _
Other personal care services.. . ______ ____ ____
Toilet articles and preparations, total ______ __
_ _____
_.
____ ______ __ ______
Toilet soap__________ _______ _
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes. _ . ___________ _
Cosmetic and toilet preparations___________ ____ ______
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles . ______
Average expenditure per person for personal care, total _

148

151

149

138
11
6
3
60
22
2

144
11
19
3
97
72
1

143
7
9
1
65
50
0

239
135
136
133

149
148
142
143

148
112
122
82

$27. 37
12.28
8.86
.54
.29
.02
1.77
.75
.05
15.09
4. 51
4. 54
4.13
1.91
6. 82

$36.03
20.13
12.13
.51
.80
.02
2. 88
3. 78
.01
15. 90
3. 59
4. 38
2. 91
5.02
10. 85

$33. 78
17. 54
12. 36
.38
. 17
.02
2.13
2. 48
0
16.24
4.86
5.10
5.06
1.22
10. 27

65
59
16
83
0
0
0
3
14

60
48
24
80
2
6
1
10
28
1
132
28
10

33

46
77
10
94
4
1
3
5
20
1
129
32
16
27

$52. 77

$72. 21

$89. 96

8.12
4.18
4. 84
11.01
0
0
0
1.01
4.61
2.60
8. 33
2.05
.02
4. 49
1.51
13.19

6.24
19.12
1.26
8. 39
. 16
.16
.17
1.19
6.10
.76
15. 56
3.05
.27
4.06
5. 72
21. 75

10.63
6. 59
12. 76
16.03
. 19
.86
.07
6. 31
9.88
.52
13.93
3. 78
.08
7.80
.53
27. 34

M e d ic a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical care:
Services of—
General practitioner: Home_
_
. ___ __ ________________
Office_____________ _ __________ _____
Specialist and other practitioner__ ___
_ . _
Dentist _ ___
_
____
_____
Clinic . _
__
_ _ __
Nurse: In home: Private___ ______ _
__ _
_ ._
Visiting.
.
_
_ _
In hospital... .
____ _ . _
Hospital: Private room.
____
__
Bed in ward __ ___ _____ _ _ ___ . ______
Medicine and drugs. _ . ____
. . . __ _
_ _ ___ .._
Eye glasses
_ _ .___
____________ _
Medical appliances___________
________ _____ _____ ___
Accident and health insurance _
______ . . . .
Average expenditure per family for medical care, total
Services of—
General practitioner: Home __
__
____
_______
Office___________________________ _____
Specialist and other practitioner. _
_ ______ _____
Dentist. _ _ _
______
________
___ __ . . .
Clinic___
__
________________ _ ____
Nurse: In home: Private
___ _ ___ _ ___ __ _ .
____ .
Visiting.._ _______ ___
_______
__ _ _
_
___
In hospital. __ _ __ ______ . . . .
Hospital: Private room___
_________________ .__ _______
Bed in ward
____
_____ _____ __________ _
Medicine and drugs. .. . . . _. _ _____
_____________________
Eyeglasses. ____ _
..
. __ ____ _ _ _ _ ______ _
Medical appliances__________ . . . . _______
_____
______
Accident and health insurance... ____
_____ ___
Other medical care
___
_ ________
Average expenditure per person for medical care, total.
____________




7

129
20
10

33

108

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 15.-— Recreation expenditures, by economic level
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.
Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Item

All
families
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500
and
over

R ecrea tion E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey_____ - .. _ _________ - ___________
Number of families owning radios______________________
Number of families spending for—
Reading:
Newspapers, street_ ___________ __________
_
Newspapers, home delivery____ _______________
Magazines_________________ ________________ _
Books purchased (other than school texts). . . ___
Books borrowed from loan libraries___________ _
Tobacco:
Cigars__________ _______ - - ----------- ----------Cigarettes___ . .._
_ _ ------- ------ -- -------Pipe tobacco___ - ___. _ ___ ----------- -----_
Other tobacco_________
____ __________ _
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission) __ _ _ _____ _ ___ _
Movies (child admission)___ ____________ ______
Plays and concerts__
. _ ______ _____ _____
Spectator sports___
_ _ __ __ __________
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments-___ ___ ______ ____ ____
Sheet music, records, rolls.
_ _ _
Radio purchase----------- ---------------------------------Radio upkeep_________________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment____
Athletic equipment and supplies_______ _. _ _
Children’s play equipment_____________________
Pets (purchase and care)..
_ _
- _____ _
Recreational associations. __ .
_______
EntertainingIn home, except food and drinks.. ___ ___ ___
Out of home, except food and drinks.. ______ _

299
212

88
45

74
53

52
43

85
71

156
173
127
8
4

51
39
23
2
1

39
42
23
1
1

21
33
30
2
1

45
59
51
3
1

29
186
128
13

4
52
40
6

7
47
37
4

5
33
16
1

13
54
35
2

199
73
21
35

45
34
5
7

50
15
5
8

40
17
3
7

64
7
8
13

3
12
25
70
37
11
37
37
84

2
3
4
9
5
2
14
7
14

0
1
4
19
10
3
14
7
19

1
5
5
15
3
3
6
10
11

0
3
12
27
19
3
3
13
40

12
1

1
0

0
0

3
1

8
0

Average expenditure for recreation, total ________ _
Reading, total------ ------------------------------------------Newspapers, street_______ _ _____ _ ____
Newspapers, home delivery. _ _
.
_____ __
Magazines. . . . .
. _. _ _
_ __ _ _
Books purchased (other than school texts) __ . _ _
____
Books borrowed from loan libraries__
Tobacco, total. ___________________________________
Cigars___ ____ ___ _____ ____
_ _ _ __ .
_
________ .
Cigarettes_________ . _____
Pipe tobacco. ____ ____
.. _________
Other tobacco
. .. . . . . __________
Commercial entertainment, total __ ______
Movies (adult admission)
_____ ..
Fall__________
___
______ ____ ...
Winter________
...
__________
Spring_________________________________ _
Summer. _______ _____ ____. .. _____
Movies (child admission)___________________ .
Fall___________________________________
Winter _______ _____ _ _ _________
Spring-----------------------------------------------------Summer_______________________________
Plays and concerts__________________ _______
Spectator sports_____________________________
Recreational equipment, total ____________ __
Musical instruments____
_____
_____
Sheet music, records, rolls____________ ______
Radio purchase_______________________________
Radio upkeep_________________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment____
Athletic equipment and supplies________ _____
Children’s play equipment __________________
Pets (purchase and care)_______________________
Recreational associations ._ _ ______
__ _
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks._. __ _____ __
Out of home, except food and drinks _ __ ____
Other recreation._ . . . __ _ . _______ ____

$71. 55
14. 58
5. 67
6. 39
2. 37
. 10
.05
26. 96
.89
20. 53
4.94
.60
12. 69
10. 53
2. 73
2. 79
2. 57
2.44
1.43
.36
.36
.35
.36
. 27
.46
10.91
1.30
. 13
6.16
.99
.32
.22
.58
1.21
3. 75

$54. 28
10.89
5. 45
4.29
1.10
.02
.03
25.23
. 18
18. 61
5.54
.90
8. 58
5. 93
1.49
1.56
1.46
1.42
2. 33
.58
.59
.58
.58
. 11
.21
7.94
3.91
.18
2.40
.31
.05
.17
.71
.21
1.15

$65. 35
13. 53
5. 75
6.09
1.67
.01
.01
29. 52
.50
22. 54
5. 99
.49
10. 62
8. 80
2. 30
2. 33
2.16
2.01
1.07
.28
.27
.26
.26
.20
.55
6.91
0
.04
4.02
.99
. 27
.35
.95
.29
3.14

$75. 58
15. 52
4.74
7. 58
2.98
. 10
. 12
24. 81
1.23
20. 53
2. 95
. 10
14. 59
11.81
3. 01
3.07
2.90
2.83
2. 31
.60
.59
.56
.56
. 18
.29
12.22
.87
.16
7. 65
1.41
.26
.22
.41
1.24
4.41

$92. 42
18. 77
6. 38
8.11
3. 92
.28
.08
27. 88
1. 77
20. 78
4.63
.70
17. 62
16.03
4. 22
4. 30
3.88
3. 63
.29
.07
.07
.07
.08
.55
.75
16. 67
0
.13
10. 99
1.43
.70
.17
.23
3.02
6.49

.35
.02
2. 29

.11
0
.38

0
0
1.63

.81
. 14
3.08

.64
0
4. 35




109

TABULAR SUMMARY
T able

1 5 . — Recreation expenditures, by economic level— Continued

PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ONT, N. H.
Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Item

All
families

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500
and
over

R ecrea tion E xp en diture#

Families in survey. _ .. _______________ ____ .. ...
Number of families owning radios_____ _______________
Number of families spending for—
Reading:
Newspapers, street___
. . . . . . . . ____ _ .
Newspapers, home delivery____________________
Magazines___________________________ . . . ____
Books purchased (other than school texts)_______
Books borrowed from loan libraries_____________
Tobacco:
Cigars.
____ _ _
_ _ . . . _______
Cigarettes.. _ _ ._
..
. . . . . _____. ..
Pipe tobacco . .
_____ ______ .. ______
Other tobacco____________ __________________
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission)___. . . _______________
Movies (child admission)______________________
Plays and concerts_ . ________________
_
Spectator sports___ . __ . _________ _ ._ _. _
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments
_ _ _________ ___
Sheet music, records, rolls. . _______ _ ______
Radio purchase. ..
._
...
Radio upkeep_________________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment___
Athletic equipment and supplies_____
______
Children’s play equipment_______________ ____
Pets (purchase and care) . _________ _ . _ . ..
Recreational associations.. ______ .
_______
Entertaining—
In home, except food and drinks____________ ...
Out of home, except food and drinks________ .

485
337

126
81

111
77

125
89

123
90

255
290
220
20
14

65
79
37
2
2

55
62
40
5
2

69
71
63
5
6

66
78
80
8
4

61
267
171
22

12
76
47
1

9
63
37
2

15
63
42
9

25
65
45
10

350
99
49
76

78
47
9
17

70
22
9
14

99
19
13
15

103
11
18
30

12
36
47
104
67
25
63
72
149

1
8
12
26
14
4
14
11
30

4
12
12
18
17
8
19
14
27

2
6
11
36
11
6
15
20
45

5
10
12
24
25
7
15
27
47

12
7

1
0

2
1

3
0

6
6

Average expenditure for recreation, total . _________ . .
Reading, total____________________________________
_
.. __________________
Newspapers, street_ .
Newspapers, home delivery____ . ______ ..
Magazines.
. . . . . . . . . . . . _ ______
Books purchased (other than school texts).
Books borrowed from loan libraries ___
Tobacco, total .. . ________________
Cigars..
_ ______
. _____ ...
Cigarettes.. ______ ____ _____________ ___
Pipe tobacco______________________________
Other tobacco. ___ . ..
_______________ .
Commercial entertainment, total ._ _____________
Movies (adult admission)____ __________ ____
Fall___________________________________
.
.. ________ .
Winter__________ .
Spring__________________________________
Summer______ . _. . _____________ . . .
Movies (child admission)____________________
Fall___________________________________
Winter________________ _______________
Spring_________________________________
Summer _____________________________
Plays and concerts_________________________
Spectator sports___________________________
Recreational equipment, total_. ___________ . .
Musical instruments______ _______________
Sheet music, records, rolls. . . _____ ______
Radio purchase-.. . ________________________
Radio upkeep ... .. . .
..
_ _ .. ___
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment.
Athletic equipment and supplies
Children’s p la y equipment____
_____ . . .
Pets (purchase and care)_______________________
Recreational associations ______ _____________ .
EntertainingIn home, except food and drinks_________ .. ..
Out of home, except food and drinks. . . . ___
Other recreation ________ ______ ___________

$71. 99
16.10
6.07
7.44
2. 22
. 24
. 13
25. 74
1.43
19.46
4.10
. 75
12. 87
10.45
2. 70
2. 67
2. 65
2. 43
1.56
.40
.39
.39
.38
.33
.53
8. 62
.40
.37
4.07
.95
.28
.35
.96
1.24
3. 45

$57. 45
13.14
4. 59
7.03
1.43
.03
.06
23. 54
.47
18.13
4. S4
. 10
10.09
6. 24
1. 6
1
1. 56
1.57
1.50
3.41
.88
.85
.84
.84
. 14
.30
6. 82
.06
. 11
4. 98
.86
. 14
.09
.31
.27
1.78

$63.85
13.72
5.48
6. 35
1.62
.23
.04
22. 72
.86
17. 76
3. 55
.55
11.08
8.93
2. 23
2. 27
2. 27
2.16
1.48
.37
.37
.38
. 36
.39
.28
8. 10
.43
.74
3. 75
1.08
.24
.28
.94
.64
1.9 ;

$68.07
17.16
6.91
7.56
2.14
. 35
.20
22. 65
.93
17. 40
3. 17
1 15
.
11.97
10.46
2. 74
2.71
2.70
2.31
.75
.19
.19
. 19
.18
.23
.53
6. 93
.31
. 13
2.45
1.09
.17
. 16
1. 51
1. 11
1.02

$98.11
20.18
7. 26
8. 71
3. 63
.36
.22
33. 82
3. 43
24. 46
4. 77
1.16
18. 24
16.11
4. 22
4.13
4.04
3. 72
.58
. 14
. 15
. 15
.14
.57
.98
12. 65
.83
.55
5.07
.79
. 57
.88
1.07
2.89
5.92

.27
. 50
4.44

.01
0
2.07

.03
0)
6. 23

. 11
0
5. 23

.89
1.98
4.43

1 Less than 0.5 cent.




110

MONEY DISBUKSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 15.— Recreation expenditures, by economic level— Continued
L ITTLE TO N AND CONWAY, N. H.
Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Item

All
families

$500
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

197
138

65
43

40
25

49
38

43
32

137
69
119
10
2

44
21
35
2
6

29
13
28
3
1

34
18
29
1
0

30
17
27
4
1

30
114
90
16

n

31
35
6

5
22
23
2

8
28
19
5

10
33
13
3

137
46
13
37

40
23
4
10

28
14
1
6

32
3
3
7

31
6
5
14

0
10
30
45
32
11
36
25
61

0
4
8
10
11
2
15
6
11

0
3
7
12
6
2
10
5
12

0
2
7
11
6
3
7
9
14

0
1
8
12
9
4
4
5
24

5
3

0
0

1
0

1
2

3
1

$63. 33
11.88
6. 28
2. 63
2. 83
. 12
.02
26. 37
1.11
19. 02
5. 30
.94
10.89
8.40
2.12
2.09
2.09
2.10
1.57
.42
.41
.41
.33
.09
.83
9. 59
0
. 13
5. 72
1. 02
.23
.47
. 84
1. 18
1.99

$49. 22
10.02
5. 64
2. 77
1.60
.01
0
22. 99
.69
13. 41
',.31
1.58
8. 49
5. 56
1.36
1. 32
L 43
1.45
2. 50
.63
.63
.62
.62
.05
.38
5. 68
0
.09
3.80
.46
.20
. 11
.74
.28
.81

$59. 38
12. 22
5. 73
2. 24
4.05
.11
.09
24. 97
.95
17. 58
6. 21
.23
8. 92
6. 30
1.71
1.46
1.53
1.60
2. 36
.59
.59
.57
.61
.06
.20
9. 66
0
.26
5. 74
1.20
.26
.32
1.17
.71
2. 33

$62. 40
12.43
7.20
2.83
2. 35
.05
0
23.87
1.63
16. 21
4. 83
1.20
11.38
9. 95
2. 44
2. 54
2.37
2.60
.60
.15
.15
.15
.15
.08
.75
11.05
0
.06
6.70
.87
.13
.58
.97
1. 74
1.60

$89. 61
13. 76
6. 72
2. 52
4.12
.37
.03
35. 62
1.31
32.02
1.94
.35
16.04
12. 90
3.32
3.34
3.26
2. 98
.75
.22
.22
.22
.09
.22
2.17
13. 77
0
.16
7. 51
1. 87
.36
1.02
.51
2. 34
3.90

.22
.09
2.30

0
0
1.23

.18
0
1.10

.12
.32
1.63

.68
.06
5. 78

R ec r e a tio n E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey_________ __________ _____ ________
Number of families owning radios— ..................................
Number of families spending for—
Reading:
Newspapers, street . ________________________
Newspapers, home delivery____________________
Magazines____________________________________
Books purchased (other than school texts)______
Books borrowed from loan libraries_____________
Tobacco:
Cigars______________ _______________________
Cigarettes ___________________________________
Pipe tobacco_________________________ _____ ___
‘ Other tobacco_ ___________ _________________
_
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission)................... ...................
Movies (child admission)____ _______ __________
Plays and concerts____________________________
Spectator sports_. .................... .........................._.
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments________ __________________
Sheet music, records, rolls ____________________
Radio purchase_______________________________
Radio upkeep____ ____________ ____ . _____
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment ___
Athletic equipment and supplies.. _____________
Children's play equipment . . . ___
_______
Pets (purchase and care)____ . __________ . . .
Recreational associations___
_____ ___ _______ .
EntertainingIn home, except food and drinks_______________
Out of home, except food and drinks_________ _
Average expenditure for recreation, t o t a l..........................
Reading, total_____ _ __ ____________ _____ ___ ___
Newspapers, street ________
.................... .
Newspapers, home delivery_____ ________ ...
Magazines__________ _______ ______________ . . .
Books purchased (other than school texts)____ _
Books borrowed from loan libraries. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
___ __
Tobacco, total______________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Cigars. ______ _________ _ ________ ____ _._
Cigarettes ___________ __ ________________
Pipe tobacco_________________ ________ ______
Other tobacco __________ ___________ ________
Commercial entertainment, total . . . ______________
Movies (adult admission) _. _________ ______
Fall______________________________________
Winter _________________________________
Spring____________________________________
Summer _ _ _ _ ___ ____________ ___
Movies (child admission) __ ________________
Fall______________________________________
___
___ __________ _ _ _ _ _
Winter
Spring____________________________________
Summer.. ___ _____________________ _____
Plays and concerts__________ _____________
Spectator sports __________________________ _.
Recreational equipment, total....... ................. ... __
Musical instruments____ ___ _______ ________
Sheet music, records, rolls______ ________ _____
Radio purchase___ __ _____ __________________
Radio upkeep _____________________________ _
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment____
Athletic equipment and supplies. _ ___ _______
Children’s play equipment
________ _ ___
Pets (purchase and care).. ------- --------------------Recreational associations, _ ______________ _ _ ---Entertaining—
In home, except food and drinks______
_. ..
Out of home, except food and drinks____________
Other recreation..__ ___ _ . --------- ------------------------




TABULAR SUMMARY

111

T a b l e 15a.— Recreation expenditures
M ARQ U ETTE, MICH.; MODESTO, CALIF.; AND RENO, NEV.
All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

R ec r e a tio n E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey________________________________
Number of families owning radios__________________
Number of families spending for—
Reading;
Newspapers, street______________ _______
Newspapers, home delivery________________
Magazines________________________________
Books purchased (other than school texts) _ _.
Books borrowed from loan libraries__________
Tobacco:
Cigars____________________________________
Cigarettes___________ j____________________
Pipe tobacco______________________________
Other tobacco_____________________________
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission)__________________
Movies (child admission)__________________
Plays and concerts______ >
__________________
Spectator sports___________________________
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments_______________________
Sheet music, records, rolls__________________
Radio purchase___________________________
Radio upkeep_____________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment.
Athletic equipment and supplies_______
Children’s play equipment____________
Pets (purchase and care)___________________
Recreational associations_______________________
Entertaining—
In home, except food and drinks____________
Out of home, except food and drinks________

148
129

151
135

149
134

64
129
74
2
2

53
128
104
12
8

87
106
96
5
2

12
74
46
15

18
74
39
9

7
95
31
7

99
41
19
26

126
31
8
47

125
26
0
22

6
14
20
26
29
10
42
14
41

9
20
14
57
56
20
20
37
41

2
8
11
24
39
6
14
36
51

22
0

13
24

9
9

Average expenditure for recreation, total____________
Reading, total________________________________
Newspapers, street_______________ _________
Newspapers, home delivery________________
Magazines________________________________
Books purchased (other than school texts)___
Books borrowed from loan libraries_________
Tobacco, total________________________________
Cigars____________________________________
Cigarettes________________________________
Pipe tobacco______________________________
Other tobacco_____________________________
Commercial entertainment, total_______________
Movies (adult admission),,, ______________
Fall__________________________________
Winter_______________________________
Spring________________________________
Summer_____________________________
Movies (child admission)__________________
Fall__________________________________
Winter
_______________________
Spring________________________________
Summer______________________________
Plays and concerts _ ______________________
Spectator sports___________________________
Recreational equipment, total,,, ______________
Musical instruments______________________
Sheet music, records, rolls__________________
Radio purchase______ ___________________
Radio upkeep_____________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment
Athletic equipment and supplies___________
Children’s play equipment_________________
Pets (purchase and care)___________________
Recreational associations______________________
EntertainingIn home, except food and drinks____________
Out of home, except food and drinks_______
Other recreation__________
__

$54. 87
12. 05
1.83
7. 30
2. 89
.02
.01
20. 98
1. 41
15. 32
3. 09
1.16
7.50
5. 48
1. 34
1.36
1.31
1.47
1.21
.32
.30
.30
.29
.27
. 54
12.15
.71
.22
7. 72
.68
.46
.31
1.71
.34
. 19

$84. 34
15. 54
2. 05
8.10
4. 05
1. 27
.07
22. 57
2. 03
17. 33
2. 29
.92
21.66
17. 81
4. 53
4. 45
4.45
4.38
.96
.24
.24
.24
.24
. 16
2. 73
16. 58
4. 49
.41
4. 24
1.38
1. 24
1. 94
.72
2.16
2. 76

$77. 84
16.10
4. 06
7.08
4.01
.95
0
27.17
.81
23. 42
2.89
.05
18. 74
15.38
3. 96
3.97
3. 74
3.71
2.18
.55
.55
.55
.53
0
1.18
8.86
.80
.13
2.22
.80
.81
.28
.56
3.26
5.98

.28
.09
1.63

.57
2.76
1.90

.36
.50
.13




112

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 16.— Formal education, vocation, community welfare, gifts and contributions,

and miscellaneous expenditures, by economic level
NASHUA, CONCORD, AND BERLIN, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

F o rm a l E d u ca tio n E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey____________________ _______________
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home—________ ______________
Members at home________________________________

299

88

74

52

85

7
46

2
21

1
11

1
6

3
8

Average expenditure per family for formal education, totaL
For members away from home__________________
For members at home_____________________________

$4. 51
2. 07
2. 44

$4. 59
.10
4. 49

$1.94
.05
1.89

$3.15
1.10
2. 05

$7. 52
6. 46
1.06

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees______________________ _______
Professional association dues or fees....... .......... ..........
Technical literature_______________________________

64
18
2

19
2
0

13
6
0

10
2
0

22
8
2

Average expenditure per family for vocational items, totaL
Union dues or fees________________________________
Professional association dues or fees_________________
Technical literature_______________________________
Other items of vocational expense__________________

$3. 51
2. 73
.54
.24
0

$2.02
1.87
.15
0
0

$3. 79
3. 35
.44
0
0

$2. 34
1.93
.41
0
0

$5. 51
3. 57
1.11
.83
0

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations____________________________
Community chest and other organizations__________
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property_________

264
69
292

80
16
83

65
10
72

47
9
50

72
34
87

Average expenditure per family for community welfare,
total_______________________________________________
Religious organizations____________________________
Community chest and other organizations__________
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property_________

$26. 79
22. 05
.87
3.87

$28.14
23. 81
.46
3.87

$24. 74
20.41
.36
3. 97

$29. 54
24. 55
1.28
3. 71

$25. 50
20.12
1.48
3.90

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts-------------------------------Support of relatives________________________ _______
Support of other persons_____________ _____ ________

78
31
11

24
5
1

15
3
2

17
4
2

22
19
6

Average expenditure per family for contributions and gifts
to persons outside economic family, total______________
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts_____________________
Support of relatives________________ ____________
Support of other persons______________ ________ ____

$20. 93
12. 35
7. 54
1.04

$7. 47
6.04
1.41
.02

$10. 76
9. 30
.50
.96

$23. 63
13.17
9.93
.53

$42. 06
21.03
18. 56
2. 47

Number of families spending for—
Funerals_____________________________ ____ _______
Legal costs_______________________________________
Gardens_________________________________________
Losses___________________________________________

3
6
76
0

1
1
20
0

0
3
29
0

0
1
13
0

2
1
14
0

Average expenditure per family for miscellaneous items,
total_______________________________________________
Funerals_____________________________ ___________
Legal costs_______________________________________
Gardens__________________________________________
Losses___________________________________________
Other_____________________________ ____ __________

$5. 04
1.60
.61
1. 58
0
1. 25

$4. 43
.62
.25
1.83
0
1.73

$3.40
0
1.64
1. 63
0
.13

$1.56
0
.11
1.38
0
.07

$9.23
4. 98
.40
1.40
0
2.45

V oca tion E x p en d itu r e s

C o m m u n ity W e lfa r e E x p en d itu r e s

G ifts and C on trib u tion s

M is c e lla n eo u s E x p en d itu r e s




113

TABULAR SUMMARY

T a b l e 16.— Formal education, vocation, community welfare, gifts and contributions,

and miscellaneous expenditures, by economic level— Continued
PORTSM OUTH, KEENE, DOVER, LACONIA, AND CLAREM ON T, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

F o rm a l E d u ca tio n E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey. . _ __ __ _ ___ _ _ _____________
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home ____
_ _________ _
Members at home. _ ____ ____________
__ .
_

485

126

11
1

125

123

29
66

14
26

6
23

6
8

3
9

Average expenditure per family for formal education, total.
For members away from home___
____ . . . . .
For members at home_______ ______ _____ _____

$4. 04
1.40
2. 64

$3.51
1.43
2.08

$4. 68
. 10
4. 58

$3.16
2. 02
1.14

$4.90
1.92
2.98

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees____________
_ ________ _______
Professional association dues or fees. . . .
_____ _
Technical literature_______________________________

68
28
4

15
2
1

15
6
0

18
4
1

20
16
2

Average expenditure per family for vocational items, total
Union dues or fees___
_____ . _____ __ ____
Professional association dues or fees. _
__ _ _
Technical literature_______ _
_____ ___________
Other items of vocational expense.
______ ________

$2. 32
1.45
.71
.05
.11

$1. 30
1.02
.03
.01
.24

$2.01
1.23
.74
0
.04

$2. 42
1.54
.69
. 12
.07

$3. 55
2. 00
1.40
.07
.08

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations___ _____
_ . __ ______
Community chest and other organizations.. . . . . . .
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property.. . . . . . .

410
107
475

108
13
123

93
110

106
29
121

103
43
121

Average expenditure per family for community welfare,
total_______________________________________________
Religious organizations_______________ . . . . . .. .
Community chest and other organizations______ .. .
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property_________

$22. 35
17. 59
.77
3. 99

$19.94
15. 80
.28
3. 86

$22.94
18. 08
.63
4. 23

$20.05
15. 56
.65
3.84

$26.62
21.05
1.52
4.05

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts_________ ______ _____
Support of relatives. ______ . _________________
Support of other persons ____
......
_ ...

367
58
8

78
8
3

83
12
1

101

11
3

105
27
1

Average expenditure per family for contributions and
gifts to persons outside economic family, total _ ___
_
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts__
...
___
Support of relatives_______ . .
_____
___ .. .
Support of other persons . ..
. . . . . . . _____
.

$23. 24
14. 92
8. 01
.31

$11. 44
7. 73
3. 62
.09

$18. 21
10.55
7. 53
13

$19. 58
15. 88
3.09
.61

$43. 55
25.24
17. 91
.40

Number of families spending for—
Funerals___________________ ___________________
Legal costs_ . .
_
. . . ________ ________ ______
Gardens_________________________________________
Losses______ ___ _. _
_ ________
_________ .

6
2
153
2

0
0
39
1

1
0
46
1

2
1
40
0

3
1
28
0

Average expenditure per family for miscellaneous items,
total__________ _______________
_____________
Funerals_________________________________________
Legal costs. _. . . . _ _ . . . . ______ _ _ . . . .. _
Gardens______ . ____ .
________ . .. ._ . .
Losses_______ _ . ____ . . . ___________ ______ . . ..
Other____ . . . . . .

$5.83
1.39
.42
2.02
.02
1.98

$3. 56
0
0
1.71
.02
1.83

$4. 97
.64
0
1.89
.07
2. 37

$9.59
4.62
.44
1.89
0
2.64

$5.11
.20
1.21
2. 59
0
1. 11

V o ca tio n E x p en d itu r e s

C o m m u n ity W elfa re E x p en d itu r e s

22

G ifts and C o n trib u tion s

Miscellaneous E x p en d itu r e s




114

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 16.— F orm a l education, vocation, c o m m u n ity w elfare, gifts and con tributions,
and m iscellaneous expenditures, by econom ic level—

Continued

LITTLETON AND CONWAY, N. H.

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year—
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

F o rm a l E d u ca tio n E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey_________________ ________________
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home______
___ __________
Members at home ___ _ ___ _ _______ _ _____

197

65

40

49

43

1
13

0
9

0
1

0
2

1
1

Average expenditure per family for formal education, total
For members away from home___ ______
.
For members at home_______ ___
___ . .

$2.23
.12
2.11

$3. 55
0
3. 55

$2. 23
0
2. 23

$0. 74
0
.74

$1.93
.55
1. 38

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees.__ _ _
____ ___________
Professional association dues or fees____ ___________
Technical literature_______ ___________
_ ______

40
1
4

16
0
2

4
0
0

6
0
0

14
1
2

Average expenditure per family for vocational items, total.
Union dues or fees _ _ __
___ _____ ___________
Professional association dues or fees. _ _
_____
Technical literature. ___ _ _ _ ____- _
Other items of vocational expense
___ ___________

$3. 78
3. 75
0)
.02
.01

$4. 63
4. 60
0
.03
0

$1.17
1.17
0
0
0

$1.96
1.96
0
0
0

$6.99
6.91
.02
.03
.03

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations, .
_____ _____ _____ _
Community chest and other organizations. _ _ ___ __
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property_________

153
47
194

46
7
63

34
9
40

42
10
49

31
21
42

Average expenditure per family for community welfare,
total
_
__ _
_ _
_
Religious organizations,
__ . __ ______ ________
Community chest and other organizations__________
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property_________

$19. 95
15.12
.66
4.17

$15. 75
11. 64
.09
4. 02

$20. 97
16. 71
.58
3. 68

$24. 83
19. 71
.59
4. 53

$19. 82
13.71
1 68
.
4. 43

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts _ ________________
Support of relatives._ ._ _
__
___ ___________
Support of other persons. _ _ _ _ _ _ _________

146
21
4

40
3
2

33
4
0

36
5
0

37
9
2

Average expenditure per family for contributions and gifts
to persons outside economic family, total__________
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts
__ _ _
_ _.
Support of relatives. _ _ __ _
_ _
...
Support of other persons
__ _ _____ ____

$19.90
13.02
6. 77
.11

$8. 01
7.54
.43
.04

$14. 89
11. 22
3. 67
0

$18. 63
14. 29
4. 34
0

$44. 00
21. 55
22.00
.45

7
2
98
1

1
0
43
0

1
1
25
0

1
1
23
1

4
0
7
0

$13. 51
3. 43
.23
3. 69
.04
6.12

$16. 02
.35
0
4. 35
0
11.32

$7.98
2. 21
.38
4. 49
0
.90

$9.91
1.67
.62
2.83
. 14
4. 65

$18.90
11. 22
0
2. 90
0
4. 78

V oca tion E x p en d itu r e s

C o m m u n ity W elfa re E x p en d itu r e s

G ifts and C on trib u tion s

M is c e lla n eo u s E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Funerals
__
_ _ _ _ _ _
Legal costs_____________________ ________________
Gardens. __ _____________________________________
Losses
_ __ _ _ _______ ___________ _ _
Average expenditure per family for miscellaneous items,
total. ______
... _____
___ ________
Funerals___________________________________
Legal costs. __ ___
_ __
_____
__ ____
Gardens___________ _________ ____________ _ __
Losses_____ ____________________
_________ __
Other___ ___ ____________ ________________
_
1 Less than 0.5 cent.




TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

16a.

115

F orm a l ed u ca tio n , vocation, c o m m u n ity w elfare, gifts and contributions,
and m iscellan eou s expenditures
M A R Q U E T T E , M IC H .; M O D E S T O , C A L I F .; A N D

R EN O , N E V .

All families
Item
Marquette Modesto

Reno

F o rm a l E d u ca tio n E x p en d itu res

Families in survey________________________________________________
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home __ _____ . _ _ _______ _____ ____
Members at home____________ _ ____________

148

151

149

1
74

1
43

0
37

.

$10. 30
.93
9. 37

$9.19
.24
8.95

$2. 46
0
2.46

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees. _ . . . _ _ ______ _ _____ __________________
Professional association dues or fees_________ ___________ . . _ . _
Technical literature.. . . . . ________
______
.....

30
2
0

23
1
1

53
5
2

$4. 53
4. 39
. 13
0
.01

$3.83
3. 59
.10
.02
.12

$7.01
6. 76
.16
.09
0

121
131
3

61
' 42
102

65
43
126

$15.49
13.12
2.28
.09

$12.62
9. 73
.94
1.95

$9.49
6.05
.66
2.78

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts . __ _ _ _______________________
Support of relatives.. _
.
___
. . . ___ _
Support of other persons. _. _____ . . . _____ _________ ..

107
19
3

132
36
4

134
25
38

Average expenditure per family for contributions and gifts to persons
___ . . .
...
_____
outside economic family, total... . ____ .
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts. _______________________________
Support of relatives____ __
. _____________ ______ .. .
Support of other persons... ._ _______
___ ___________ __

$21. 59
13.70
7. 81
.08

$35. 89
19. 72
15. 98
19

$44. 42
24.30
18.48
1.64

3
1
76
3

9
2
19
4

3
2
24
2

$14. 65
8. 72
.32
2. 37
.36
2.88

$12.24
6. 39
.31
.99
1.12
3.43

$7. 81
3.74
. 15
.76
1.70
1.46

Average expenditure per family for formal educatiion, total.
For members away from home____________ _______________
For members at home______
______________ __________
V oca tion E x p en d itu r e s

Average expenditure per family for vocational items, total
Union dues or fees... . . . . . . ____ . . . .
_ ___
_ _ ___________________
Professional association dues or fees___
Technical literature____________________________________________
Other items of vocational expense.. _____ ____ . _ _______ . . .
C o m m u n ity W elfa re E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations ______________________________________
Community chest and other organizations___ ._
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property. ...
_____
!
Average expenditure per family for community welfare, total.. . . . ..
Religious organizations .
________________
________ . ....
Community chest and other organizations... . . . .
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property _ . ________ ___ _
G ifts and C on trib u tion s

M iscella n eo u s E xp en d itu res

Number of families spending for—
Funerals . _......
.....
........ ................. ........ .......
Legal costs
________________ _________________ .
Gardens .. ____ _______________ . ...
____
______
Family losses___
..._
_ ____
Average expenditure per family for miscellaneous items, total___
Funerals... . ..
____
____________ ______ . . .
____
Legal costs.._
._ . . . _____ .
_____ . . . . . . _ .
Gardens...
..... . . . . .
....
___ . . . . .
______
Family losses . . . . _______________ .. __ . . . .
. _ ____
Other_ . . . __________ __ ..
_
. . . ____________________ _ _







117

TABULAR SUM M ARY
T a b l e

17.—

C lothing ex pen d itu res, by econ om ic level
10 N E W

H A M P S H IR E

C IT IE S

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

Clothing E x p en d itu r e s

I. Number of families in survey________________ . - ________
Average number of clothing expenditure units per family.
Number of families spending for—
Ready-made clothing, dry cleaning, and accessories_____ _
Yard goods and findings_________ _____________________
Paid help for sewing___ _______________________________
Number of families reporting clothing received as gifts___ ..

981
2. 79

279
3. 83

225
2.82

226
2. 31

251
2.04

981
589
52
487

279
188
12
156

225
133
9
117

226
118
11
104

251
150
20
no

Average expenditure per family for clothing__________
$132.12 $120. 60 $125. 84 $125. 36 $156. 62
___ 128. 60
Ready-made clothing, dry cleaning, and accessories..
116. 73 122. 44 122.17 153. 07
3.24
3. 33
Yard goods and findings . . _____
. .
3. 74
3. 09
3.17
Paid help for sewing____ ____ _______________
____
.13
.16
.38
.19
.10
Average value per family of clothing received as gifts 1 ___
5.84
4.96
4. 73
4.55
4. 81
II. Number of families having men and boys 18 years of age and
over 2
_______ .. . . . . _ ______ _________ _
Number of men and boys 18 years of age and over 2
______ .
Average number of men and boys 18 years of age and over per
family having such men and boys 2
______________________
Number of families having boys 12 through 17 years of age 2. ..
Number of boys 12 through 17 years of age 2
______________
Average number of boys 12 through 17 years of age per family
having such boys 2
___ . . . ____________ __________ . . .
_
Number of families having boys 6 through 11 years of age 2 _
____ _______ _
Number of boys 6 through 11 years of age 2
Average number of boys 6 through 11 years of age per family
having such boys 2
___ .. ______ . _______ _____
Number of families having boys 2 through 5 years of age 2
___
Number of boys 2 through 5 years of age 2
___ _____________
Average number of boys 2 through 5 years of age per family
having such boys 2
___ ___________ _____ _______________
Number of families having women and girls 18 years of age
and over 2 ______ . . .
_ __________ . . .
________
Number of women and girls 18 years of age and over 2
_______
Average number of women and girls 18 years of age and over
per family having such women and girls 2. .. _. _
_____
Number of families having girls 12 through 17 years of age 2___
Number of girls 12 through 17 years of age 2_ ______ . . . _____
Average number of girls 12 through 17 years of age per family
having such girls 2 _______ ____ . . . _______ ______ .
Number of families having girls 6 through 11 years of age 2
___
Number of girls 6 through 11 years of age 2
______ . ___
Average number of girls 6 through 11 years of age per family
having such girls 2________________ ____ . . . _______
Number of families having girls 2 through 5 years of age 2
___ .
Number of girls 2 through 5 years of age 2._
Average number of girls 2 through 5 years of age per family
having such girls 2__________________ ____ _ __________
Number of families having infants under 2 years of age 3_
Number of infants under 2 years of age 3
__________
Average number of infants' under 2 years of age per family
having infants3__ .
._
.
. . . . .

1
2
3

936
1,086

268
330

218
259

211
235

239
262

1.16
162
210

1. 23
93
127

1.19
38
49

1.11
20
23

1.10
11
11

1. 30
197
240

1.37
102
136

1. 29
47
53

1. 15
29
30

1.00
19
21

1. 22
124
131

1.33
56
63

1.13
37
37

1.03
22
22

1.11
9
9

1.06

1.12

1.00

1. 00

1.00

967
1,185

276
363

•224
276

218
265

249
281

1. 23
158
200

1. 32
97
133

1.23
31
36

1.22
17
18

1.13
13
13

1 27
.
165
210

1. 37
91
130

1.16
40
45

1.06
22
23

1.00
12
12

1 27
.
139
170

1.43
85
105

1.12
32
41

1. 05
16
18

1.00
6
6

1.22
95
101

1. 24
47
50

1.28
26
29

1.12
10
10

1.00
12
12

1.06

1.06

1. 12

100
.

1.00

T h e a g g re g a te s o n w h i c h th e s e a v e ra g e s a re b a s e d d o n o t in c lu d e g ift s o f c lo t h in g r e p o r t e d r e c e iv e d b y
235 f a m i l i e s , b u t f o r w h i c h t h e y c o u l d n o t e s t i m a t e t h e v a l u e .
In c lu d e s o n ly p e rs o n s d e p e n d e n t o n f a m i l y f u n d s fo r 52 w e e k s .
I n f a n t s 1 to 2 y e a r s o f ag e a re in c lu d e d o n ly i f d e p e n d e n t o n f a m i l y f u n d s fo r 52 w e e k s ; th o s e u n d e r 1 y e a r
o f a g e a r e in c lu d e d r e g a r d le s s o f n u m b e r o f w e e k s d e p e n d e n t o n f a m i l y f u n d s .




118

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 1 7 . — Clothin g ex pen d itu res, by econom ic level— Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

III. Clothing, men and boys 18 years of age and over:3
Hats: Felt______________________
_________________
Straw .
_
_
__ _ ______ .
Caps: W o o l... _________________ _____ ______________
Other____________________ ___________ _____ ____
Overcoats__________________ ____________________ ____
Topcoats____________________ - ______________________
Raincoats___ _
___ _
____- - - - - - - - ____
Jackets: Heavy fabric-.- ______________________________
Leather_______________________________________
Other______________ __________ _____________
Sweaters: Heavy____________ ___________ ___________
Light________________________________________
Suits: Heavy wool____________ ____ ______ _________
Lightweight w ool- _ ___________________________
Cotton, linen. __ .
__ _____________ ___ . . .
Palm Beach-------- -------------------- -----------------------O th e r..-------------------------- --------- -----------------------Trousers: Wool------- ---------- -- -----------------------------------Cotton______________________________________
Other______________________________________
Overalls, coveralls - - - - - - - - - ____________
...
Shirts and blouses: Cotton, work________________________
Cotton and other, dress___ . ___ .
Wool_______________________________
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit_______________________
woven
_ .
.cotton and wool_____ . _ _________ ..
rayon and silk
_ ____ ____ ________
_
Undershirts, cotton___ __ __________________
cotton and wool .. _ . _____ _
_
rayon and s ilk ___ ________ _
Shorts, cotton.. ___________________
rayon and silk.
. _______
Drawers, cotton and wool. _
_____ ______
Pajamas and nightshirts. ________ ______ _
Shoes: Street____ ___ . . .
__ _________________ __ _
Work.
. _______
_ ______________________
Canvas..
_______
_________________ ...
Other__________________ _____ __________________
Boots: Rubber________ ___ ___________________
_____
Leather______________________ _
______
Arctics___ ______________ ____________________________
Rubbers.. ______ _____________________________________
Shoe: Repairs_________________________________________
Shines_____ _______ ____ _ ___ ___________ ______
Hose: Cotton, heavy. ____________ ___________________
dress_____ __________________ . . . ____
Rayon.
_________________________ ___________
Silk_____________________________________________
Wool_________________________________________
Gloves: Work, cotton . . . ___ ______________ ; _________
other _ -. _ _______________ _______ ____
Street, leather _ . ____________ _ . . . _______
other_______
____________ ___
Ties
______ ___________ .
Collars___________________ .. ________________________
Bathing suits, sun suits______________ _______________
Handkerchiefs____________________ __________________
Accessories.
.
_____ ___ . __ _
___ ____
Bathrobes________________________ ________ _ ______
Cleaning, repairing ____________ ______________________
Other___ ____________________ ________________________
2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




All
fami­
lies

N um ­
ber

317
118
304
90
108
52
37
140
44
25
158
167
202
162
8
1
4
426
229
47
335
574
577
58
324
131
195
20
233
102
29
301
21
69
239
780
416
32
27
85
24
130
462
391
92
496
470
162
87
169
337
80
196
68
468
20
50
353
73
19
399
19

E con om ic le v e l— F am ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

67
18
94
31
24
11
5
47
9
10
40
43
38
39
2
0
1
118
71
13
95
190
162
12
110
40
37
2
67
25
5
95
3
12
41
224
136
4
5
31
7
28
• 111
83
24
166
145
30
9
45
104
25
35
18
113

68
22
61
23
23
10
13
35

2
97
18
4
60

85
22
2
81

73
32
75
13
29
8
5
24
9
3
31
31
46
34
1
0
0
106
50
15
74
123
119
9
77
26
44
5
51
21
6
58
6
17
68
181
79
8
10
15
4
28
103
86
15
118
92
41
17
34
74
16
46
22
103
5
12
69
12
4
104

4

3

5

6

n

5
50
39
39
35
0
0
1
95
72
7
79
136
125
16
64
32
60
7
56
26
10
73
8
16
41
167
102
13
4
23
8
29
105
86
13
119
114
39
14
41
76
11
43
16
112
3

17

109
46
74
23
32
23
14
34
15
7
37
54
79
54
5
1
2
107
36
12
87
125
171
21
73
33
54
6
59
30
8
75
4
24
89
208
99
7
8
16
5
45
143
136
40
93
119
52
47
49
83
28
72
12
140
6
19
102

21
9
154
7

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

119

1 7 . — C lothin g exp en d itu res , by econ om ic level— Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item

All
fami­
lies

III. Clothing, men and boys, 18 years of age and
over:2
Total_____________________________________
Hats: Felt____________________ _____ _____
Straw___________
___________ _
Caps: W ool______________________________
Other_____________________________
Overcoats--------- ----------------------- --------- ----Topcoats. . _ ____________ - ----------Raincoats.. .
. . . ---------------------------Jackets: Heavy fabric____________________
Leather___________ __________ . . .
Other_____________ _____ ________
Sweaters: Heavy_________________________
Light__________________________
Suits: Heavy wool____________ _______ ___
Lightweight wool__________________
Cotton, linen______________________
Palm Beach_______________________
Other_____________________________
Trousers: Wool__________________ ______ _
Cotton_______________ _____ ___
Other__________________________
Overalls, coveralls________________________
Shirts and blouses: Cotton, work__________
Cotton and other, dress. .
Wool_________________
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit____________
woven___ ______
cotton and w o o l______
rayon and silk__________
Undershirts, cotton ________ _
cotton and w ool...
rayon and silk___
Shorts, cotton________________
rayon and silk________
Drawers, cotton and wool___ _
Pajamas and nightshirts______
Shoes: Street____________________________
Work__________________ _ ________
Canvas_______ . . ___________ . . .
Other____________________________
Boots: Rubber_______________ ______ _____
Leather.. ___________________ ____
Arctics_____ _____________________________
Rubbers_________________________________
Shoe: Repairs. _______________________
Shines. _____ ___________________
Hose: Cotton, heavy_____________ ____ ___
dress______________________
Rayon____________________________
Silk_______________________________
Wool______ _____ ____ ,..... ........... ......
Gloves: Work, cotton___________ _______ _
other___________ ______ ___
Street, leather..__________________
other__________ __________
Ties_____________________________________
Collars.. __________________ ______ ______
Bathing suits, sun suits..................................
Handkerchiefs___________________ _____
Accessories________
___________________
Bathrobes_______________________________
Cleaning, repairing_______________________

Other________________

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

0.32
.12
.33
.10
.10
.05
.03
.13
.04
.03
.15
.17
.19
.16
.01
(4
)
(4
)
.53
.31
.06
.60
1.42
1.51
.08
.68
.29
.40
.04
.68
.28
.06
.85
.05
.17
.39
1.05
.49
.03
.02
.08
.02
.13
.50

0.22
.05
.32
.11
.07
.03
.01
.14
.03
.04
.12
.15
.12
.12
.01
0
(4
)
.46
.31
.04
.54
1.44
1.12
.05
.67
.27
.24
.01
.51
.20
.03
.72
.03
.07
.19
.92
.50
.02
.02
.10
.02
.09
.36

0.27
.08
.29
.10
.09
.04
.05
.13
.04
.03
.20
.18
.15
,14
0
0
.01
.48
.40
.05
.53
1.29
1.27
.12
.54
.30
.46
.07
.76
.26
.07
.94
.06
.18
.25
.94
.50
.06
.02
.09
.03
.12
.47

0.34
.14
.36
.07
.13
.04
.02
.10
.04
.01
.14
.14
.19
.15
(4
)
0
0
.62
.29
.08
.66
1.49
1.55
.04
.73
.25
.41
.04
.70
.27
.07
.79
.06
.20
.49
1.06
.44
.04
.04
.06
.02
.12
.50

0.47
.20
.35
.11
.12
.09
.05
.14
.06
.02
.14
.22
.32
.23
.02
(4
)
.01
.58
.25
.06
.71
1.45
2.20
.13
.77
.33
.54
.06
.78
.39
.08
.97
.04
.27
.68
1.30
.52
.03
.03
.07
.02
.20
.69

3.92
3.65
1.17
.43
.52
1.56
.19
.20
.07
1.55
.07
.05
3.14

3.20
3.02
.52
.11
.36
1.43
.16
.12
.06
.96
.06
.01
2.28

4.36
4.04
1.17
.19
.52
1.65
.10
.17
.09
1.49
.04
.07
3.08

4.79
3.34
1.08
.27
.41
1.47
.12
.21
.10
1.43
.09
.06
3.34

.02!

.02!

.02

.02:

______________

1Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
* Less than 0.005 article.
2 0 0 9 8 2 ° — 41




9

Average expenditure per
person

All
families

m i.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

D o l.

D ol.

D o l.

D o l.

38.47 27.07 33.48 38.41 57.93
1.02 .63 .78 1.08 1.70
.21 .11 .15 .21 .39
.35 .32 .31 .39 .37
.09 .09 .10 .05 .12
2.05 1.28 1.61 2.69 2.88
.89 .54 .69 .45 1.92
.16 .05 .25 .11 .24
.59 .60 .59 .49 .69
.27 .18 .27 .24 .39
.12 .14 .15 .04 .13
.53 .37 .65 .58 .57
.35 .26 .35 .30 .51
4.76 2.64 3.70 4. 73 8.49
3.51 2.65 2.77 3. 51 5.34
.10 .16 0
.03 .17
.01 0
0
.05
0
.11 .08 .20 0
.17
1.81 1.38 1.52 2.17 2.34
.56 .53 .71 .55 .46
.16 .10 .13 .17 .25
.83 .65 .77 .92 1.05
1.21 1.13 1.10 1.29 1.36
1.96 1.28 1.56 1.92 3.24
.15 .09 .19 .09 .24
.73 .71 .58 .78 .86
.31 .28 .27 .29 .40
.49 .30 .51 .49 .73
.04 .01 .08 .04 .06
.25 .18 .27 .26 .33
.16 .08 .15 .18 .24
.03 .01 .03 .03 .04
.35 .28 .36 .34 .43
.02 .01 .03 .02 .02
.11 .04 .10 .14 .17
.50 .21 .30 .63 .95
3.96 3.13 3.34 4.14 5.46
1.49 1.39 1.60 1.32 1.67
.05 .02 .11 .06 .04
.06 .04 .04 .10 .07
.25 .30 .29 .23 .18
. 10 .07 .09 .07 .17
.35 .20 .32 .36 .57
.57 .42 .51 .55 .84
.81 .44 .80 .75 1.34
. 12 .03 .03 .08 .38
3.59
.87 .85 .92 .97 .78
4.34
.82 .71 .80 .77 1.04
2.06
.28 .12 .26 .27 .53
1.20
.15 .03 .07 .10 .41
.83
.25 .18 .20 .22 .42
1.73
.41 .38 .40 .33 .53
.38
.11 .07 .07 .09 .19
.33
.36 .19 .25 .37 .66
.04
.08 .06 .07 .11 .07
2.46
.83 .45 .65■ .71 1.58
.12
.02: .02! .01 .02: .03
.08
.12; .02I .14 .15 .21
4.11
.25 .16i .22! .25 .39
.06i .03i .07 .05i .11
.04
.09' .05i .03; .10i .20
1.04: .28i .79i .90i 2.36
.18 .06i .17 .13 .40

120

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS-----13
T

able

SMALL CITIES

1 7 .— C lothin g ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued

10 NEW H AM PSH IRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

IV. Clothing, boys 12 through 17 years of age:3
Hats: Felt__________________________ ___________ _______
Straw___________________________________________
Caps: Wool_____________
____________ _______________
Other----------------------------- ------------- —- ................ .
Overcoats----- -- . . . ------ ----------------- -----------------------------Topcoats............
................................ - --------- ---------------Raincoats ................................................................................
Jackets: Heavy fabric............................. .............. .................
Leather----------- --------- . ---------------- -------------------Other__........................- ..................... ....................
Sweaters: Heavy................................ . .............. . . . .............
Light ................................................. .....................
Suits: Heavy wool........................................... . . .....................
Lightweight wool.............................. ......... .............. .
Cotton, linen................................ ........... ........... .........
Palm B each ..... ............................................................
O ther......................... - ..................... ............ ..............
Trousers: Wool.................................................. ...... ........... .
Cotton............................................................ .........
O t h e r ....................... r............................................
Overalls, coveralls.------- ----------------------- ----------------------Shirts and blouses: Cotton, work_________ ______________
Cotton and other, dress_______________
Wool_____________________________ ..
.......... ...... ...
Underwear: Suits, cotton, k n it.......... ......
woven_______
__________ _
cotton and wool___________________
.
rayon and silk. _ ___________________
Undershirts, cotton. _ ______________________
cotton and wool______ ________ .
rayon and silk_________________
Shorts, cotton___________________ __________
rayon and silk______________ ______
Drawers, cotton and wool____ _ . . . _______
Pajamas and nightshirts______________ ____
Shoes: Street._____ ____________________________________
Work.____ ___ ______ ______ ____________ _____
Canvas................................. ......... ................... .. ..
Other----- ----------------------------------------------------------Boots: Rubber. .......................................................................
Leather............................................ ......... ...................
Arctics________________________________________ _______
Rubbers________ ________________ _____________________
Shoe: Repairs_____ ________________ ____________________
Shines________ ____ ____________________ _______
Hose: Cotton, heavy
-------------- ------------- -------------------dress____ ___________ ____________________
Rayon.............. ..............................................................
Silk........... ........... ............................... ..........................
Wool------------------- ---------------- ------- ---------------------Gloves: Work, cotton..... ............................... ..........................
other-------------------------- --------------------------Street, leather.----------------- --------------------------------other--------------- ------------- -----------------------Ties_________ ___________________________________ _
Collars....... ..............................................................................
Bathing suits* sun suits...........................................................
Handkerchiefs.......... ....................................... ........................
Accessories________________ ________ ________________ ___
Bathrobes.................................................................................
Cleaning, repairing..................................................................
Other.____________ ________________ _____ _____________
2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




All
fami­
lies

N um ­
ber

25
1
93
30
18
2
14
72
17
6
63
88
39
.44
1
0
1
112
62
20
47
35
147
10
59
36
28
5
71
15
3
81
3
9
39
183
22
70
20
18
13
17
87
57
1
107
93
20
7
48
20
16
40
52
112
1
29
50
9
4
27
4

E con om ic le v e l— F am ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

6
0
59
22
8
0
7
47
4
3
31
50
20
20
0
0
0
65
37
8
34
19
87
6
36
26
10
1
35
10
3
37
3
6
16
111
14
47
7
8
10
6
49
27
1
66
60
8
2
31
12
10
15
35
63
0
12
25
6
1
11
2

N um ­
ber
5

N um ­
ber

9
1
19
5
6
1
4
17
6
2
21
23
7
12
0
0
1
28
18
12
9
9
36
4
13
6
9
3
21
4
0
28
0
2
8
41
7
16
7
8
2
5
22
17
0
26
23
7
2
11
3
1
15
8
24
1
10
13
2
1
9
1

0
10
3
0
1
2
4
5
1
7
10
7
8
0
0
0
12
3
0
3
4
15
0
6
3
7
1
9
0
10
0
1
9
20
1
4
4
0
1
1
11
8
0
13
5
2
1
4
2
3
4
5
15
0
4
8
1
1
3
1

5
0
5
0
4
0
1
4
2
0
4
5
5
4
1
0
0
7
4
0
1
3
9
0
4
1
2
0
6
0
0
6
0
0
6
11
0
3
2
2
0
5
5
5
0
2
5
3
2
2
3
2
6
4
10
0
3
4
0
1
4
0

121

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T

able

17.—

C lothing ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level—

Continued

10 NEW HAMPSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item

IV. Clothing, boys 12 through 17 years of age:2
Total______________________ _______________
Hats: F e lt-.......... ______......... ......................
Straw_______ ____ ________________
Caps: Wool........................ ............................
Other........ ..................................... . __
Overcoats ______ ___________ _____________
Topcoats_______________ _____ ________ _ _
Raincoats__ _____________________________
Jackets: Heavy fabric__________________
Leather..........................................
Other. ................. ........................ _
Sweaters: Heavy___________ ___________
Light______________ ________ ___
Suits: Heavy wool_______________________
Lightweight wool_________ _________
Cotton, linen............ ........................ _
Palm Beach..................................... .
Other..... ...........................................
Trousers: W ool............................................ .
Cotton........ ...................................
Other___________ ______________
Overalls, coveralls______________ ______ ___
Shirts and blouses: Cotton, work__________
Cotton and other, dress..
Wool_________ ____ ____
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit......... .............
woven__________
cotton and wool________
rayon and silk..... ......... .
Undershirts, cotton________ _
cotton and w ool...
rayon and silk___
Shorts, cotton____________ ___
rayon and silk_______
Drawers, cotton and wool_____
Pajamas and nightshirts............
Shoes: Street.____ ___________ ____ _______
Work....................................................
Canvas___________________________
Other....................................... ......
Boots: Rubber......................... .................. _
Leather_____ _______ ______________
Arctics....................................... .......................
Rubbers................................... ...................
Shoe: Repairs___________ ____ __________
Shines.____ ___ _______ ____________
Hose: Cotton, heavy__________ __________
dress........................ ................
Rayon...............................................
S ilk ....................................... ..............
W ool____________ ____________ ____
Gloves: Work, cotton....................... .............
other.......................................
Street, leather....................... .............
other_____ _____ __________
Ties_____________ _______ _______ _________
Collars_________ _ _____ _____ __________
Bathing suits, sun suits............................. __.
Handkerchiefs........ ............................... .........
Accessories______________________________
Bathrobes....... ...............................................
Cleaning, repairing____________ _________
Other________ _____________ _____ ______

All
families

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

0.12
.01
.51
.16
.08
.01
.07
.35
.08
.02
.36
.56
.20
.21
.01
0
.01
.93
.48
.14
.35
.58
2. 50
.08
.60
.38
.29
.07
.95
.17
.04
1.19
.04
.09
.31
1.79
.19
.61
.15
.09
.06
.09
.51

0.05
0
.53
.19
.06
0
.06
.37
.04
.02
.30
.50
.16
.16
0
0
0
.85
.49
.11
.38
.49
2. 23
.09
.66
.46
.16
.04
.66
. 19
.06
.76
.06
.09
.18
1.61
.17
.67
.08
.08
.08
.05
.46

0.18
.03
.39
.14
.12
.01
.10
.34
.13
.04
.48
.66
.16
.25
0
0
.03
.90
.51
.32
.41
.60
2. 39
. 11
.47
.29
.47
.15
1.18
. 19
0
1. 55
0
.10
.30
1.91
.36
.62
.15
.15
.04
.12
.49

0. 20
0
.48
.11
0
.04
.07
.22
.20
.03
.39
.58
.34
.33
0
0
0
1.12
.21
0
.16
.92
3. 28
0
.46
.18
.70
.09
1.49
.07
0
2. 05
0
.07
.52
2. 05
.04
.23
.38
0
.04
.08
.71

0.48
0
.97
0
.35
0
.09
.38
. 16
0
.39
.72
.42
.37
.21
0
0
1.58
.79
0
.21
.84
4. 46
0
.75
.18
.17
0
2. 07
0
0
2. 67
0
0
1. 38
2. 78

4. 67
3.60
.55
.23
.62
.14
.08
.21
.31
1. 79
(4
)
.14
1. 86

4. 61
3.15
.30
.12
.67
.11
.08
.14
.31
1.16
0
.09
1.30

5. 68
5.08
.84
.22
.55
.10
.03
.31
.28
1. 90
.02
.21
2.25

4. 68
2. 08
.43
.68
.29
. 10
.14
.20
.30
2. 28
0
.19
3.06

.80
5. 23
2. 34
.62
1.00
.65
.27
.52
.49
7. 60
0
.32
4.12

.02

.01

.03

.04

.10

2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
5 Less than 0.5 cent.




0

.64
.39
.21
0
.48
.72

Average expenditure per
person

All
families

D o l.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over
D o l.

D o l.

D ol.

D o l.

32. 54 25. 45 38.23 43. 25 66.90
.26 . 10 .30 .57 1. 29
.01 0
.03 0
0
.40 .39 .30 .40 .87
.08 .09 .09 .06 0
.93 .76 1.43 0
2. 68
.10 0
.11 .66 0
.26 .17 .44 .27 .41
1. 31 1.34 1.41 .83 1. 53
.43 .15 .57 1.41 1. 06
.06 .02 . 12 . 14 0
.95 .70 1. 32 1. 08 1.95
.87 .64 1.14 1. 17 1.64
3. 07 2.14 2. 29 6.99 9.19
3. 11 2. 47 3. 22 5.00 6.04
0
.01 0
0
.10
0
0
0
0
0
0
.09 0
.37 0
2.16 1. 70 2. 35 2. 80 5.15
. 71 .70 .88 .27 1.05
0
.32 .20 .87 0
.33 .32 .45 .14 .12
.74 .61
.47 .37 .56
2.13 1. 74 2. 21 3.11 4.14
0
.10 .09 .18 0
.44 .43 .42 .40 .79
.19 .31
.32 .35 .29
.25 . 13 .40 .62 .12
.05 .04 .08 .05 0
.30 .18 .42 . 58 .70
.05 .05 .08 .03 0
0
0
.01 .02 0
.42 .21 .54 .95 1.24
0
0
.01 .02 0
.02 .02 .03 .03 0
.31 .16 .30 .47 1.68
4.97 4.09 5. 59 6.49 9.14
.44 .36 .92 .08 0
.55 .58 .62 .22 .66
.28 . 15 .43 .44 .75
.26
.26 .17 .60 0
.23 .27 .23 .15 0
.25 .14 .31 . 12 1.54
.53 .46 .53 .79 .79
. 64 .38 .87 1. 21 1.48
0
0
.01 0
(5
)
1.03 .98 1. 21 1. 34 . 18
.74 .66 1. 00 .44 1.22
.11 .07 .19 .10 .35
.08 .02 .08 .24 .43
.30 .31 .26 . 18 .63
.05 .05 .04 .02 .21
.05 .04 .02 .06 .20
.24 .15 .39 .25 .67
.20 .22 .16 .11 .42
.52 .28 .53 .91 2.42
.01 0
0
(5 0
)
.29 . 15 .46 .47 .85
.12 .08 .14 .20 .36
)
.02 .03 .02 (5 0
.07 .01 .11 .10 .41
.20 .06 .30 .31 1. 26
.03 .03 .01 .06 0

122

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13
T

able

SMALL CITIES

1 7 .— C lothing ex p en d itu res , hy econom ic level— Continued

10 NEW HAM PSH IRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

V.

Clothing, boys 6 through 11 years of age:3
Hats: Felt_____________________________________
Straw........................................... .....................
Caps: Wool___________________ _______ ________
Other____________ ______ _____ __________
Overcoats------------- ------------ ------------------------ -----Topcoats________________ _____ ___________ ____ _
Raincoats______________________________________
Jackets: Heavy fabric.. . ------ -----------------------------Leather--------- --------------------- ------ --------Other_____________________ _______ _____
Sweaters: Heavy________________ _____________
Light___________________ ___________
Play suits: Wool knit_______________ : __________
Cotton suede-------------- --------- ----------Other____________________ _________
Suits: Heavy wool--------------- --------- -------------------Lightweight wool________ _______ ________
Cotton, linen............................................ —
Palm B e a ch .................... ..............................
Other____________ _______ _____ ______ ____
Trousers: Wool___________________ _____________
Cotton________________ ____ _________
Other________________________________
Overalls, coveralls______________________________
Shirts and blouses: Cotton and other, except wool..
Wool________________________
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit__________ _______ _
woven________________
cotton and wool______________
rayon and silk____ ____ _______
Undershirts, cotton_________________
cotton and wool________
rayon and silk................ .
Shorts, cotton____________ _______ _
rayon and silk______ ________
Drawers, cotton and wool___________
Pajamas and nightshirts______ _____ _
Shoes: Street___________ _______________________
Canvas........................................ ...................
Other................. ............................................
Boots: Rubber........................................................
Leather_________ ____ _______ ___________
Arctics.........................................................................
Rubbers_________ ____ ________ _____ ____________
Shoe: Repairs. ............................. ................. ..........
Shines_____________ ________ _____________
Hose: Cotton, heavy.................................... ............
dress................................. ...............
R ayon.............. ......................... ......... ...........
Silk________ _______ _____________________
Wool________ _____ ________ - _____ ______
Gloves: Cotton_____________ _____ _______ _______
Leather................................................. .......
Other___________ ________ ______ _______ _
Ties------------- ------ ------------------------------- ---------- Collars________________________________________
Bathing suits, sun suits--------------- ---------------------Handkerchiefs__________________________________
Accessories_____________________________________
Bathrobes_____________________________________
Cleaning, repairing_____________________________
Other__________________________________________
2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




All
L lU
ies

um m

4
1
133
42
45
5
13
66
17
11
79
86
18
6
23
19
37
23
3
5
115
53
31
95
174
5
114
30
62
2
26
7
1
37
1
5
64
236
77
21
31
25
56
110
44
6
140
93
4
1
50
16
20
117
111
0
37
41
19
9
7
4

E con om ic le v e l— F am ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

1
0
66
21
25
2
2
32
5
6
32
44
4
2
6
7
18
10
0
2
61
27
14
51
96
2
60
15
32
0
13
3
0
23
0
1
14
136
39
10
19
14
17
55
13
1
82
49
0
0
25
7
8
69
60
0
12
20
8
1
1
3

1
1
27
14
7
2
4
17
8
2
21
21
6
3
12
6
5
7
1
2
23
16
8
26
35
2
19
9
11
1
10
1
1
10
1
1
21
49
23
8
. 7
3
19
26
14
4
26
25
2
1
11
5
5
23
24
0
10
8
6
0
2
1

1
0
25
3
6
0
2
14
0
2
17
14
3
1
2
3
5
2
1
1
19
5
3
10
27
0
17
3
12
0
1
2
0
2
0
2
20
30
7
1
_ 3
5
11
16
13
1
21
10
1
0
10
1
3
15
16
0
9
5
2
4
1
0

1
0
15
4
7
1
5
3
4
1
9
7
5
0
3
3
9
4
1
0
12
5
6
8
16
1
18
3
7
1
2
1
0
2
0
1
9
21
8
2
2
3
9
13
4
0
11
9
1
0
4
3
4
10
11
0
6
8
3
4
3
0

123

TABULAR SUM M AR Y
T a b l e 17.— C lothing exp en d itu res , b y econ om ic level- Continued
—
10 N EW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item

V. Clothing, boys 6 through 11 years of age:2
Total-- - - - - - - __
-_- _ - _-Hats: Felt-.- ___________ ______________
Straw_____________________________
Caps: Wool. _ ________________________ Other__________ ______ ____________
Overcoats.-- ____________________ _______
Topcoats-- - _ -. __________________ Raincoats. _ .
_ ___________________
Jackets: Heavy fabric_________ ____ ______
Leather___ _____________________
Other___________________________
Sweaters: Heavy. . ________ _____ ______
Light______ _________________
Play suits: Wool knit____________________
Cotton suede___________ ______
Other_ _____________________
_
Suits: Heavy wool___
__ ______________
Lightweight wool_________ _____ ___
Cotton, linen_____________________
Palm Beach___ ____________________
Other________________________ ____
Trousers: Wool_____ _____________________
Cotton_________________________
Other__________________________
Overalls, coveralls. _______ - - - - - - . _
Shirts and blouses: Cotton and other, except
wool____ _________
Wool_________________
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit____________
woven__________
cotton, and wool_______
rayon, and silk_________
Undershirts, cotton__________
cotton and w ool..
rayon and silk___
Shorts, cotton________________
rayon and silk _ . _ _. _
Drawers, cotton and wool.. ___
Pajamas and nightshirts______
Shoes: Street- ______ .
Canvas_____
Other.. . . . ______________________
Boots: Rubber___ ______ ______________
Leather.
______________________
Arctics.. .
_______________
Rubbers______ _____ ________________ __
Shoe: Repairs . _ _ _______________ ___
Shines.
_______________
_
Hose: Cotton, heavy_______________
dress .
___ _ _____
Rayon. __ . _______ __________ _
Silk___________________ ___________
Wool______________________________
Gloves: Cotton_______ _____ ___________
Leather____________ _______ _ _ _
Other _______ ____ _______ ______
Ties_____________________________________
Collars.. ______ ____________________
Bathing suits, sun suits________ ____ ______
Handkerchiefs. __
_________ . _
Accessories.
_
_ _________
Bathrobes.-.
__ __ _______ _
_____
Cleaning, repairing _
...
____
Other___ _ ______ ____________________

All
fami­
lies

N o.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over
N o.

N o.

0.02 0.02 0.02
.02
(4 0
)
.69 .54 .66
.25 .16 .39
.19 .19 .12
.02 .02 .04
.06 .01 .09
.29 .26 .32
.08 .04 .16
.05 .05 .03
.42 .26 .54
.53 .39 .57
.10 .04 .17
.05 .04 .10
.24 .08 .41
.09 .05 . 15
.17 .13 .11
.33 .19 .37
.02 0
.02
.06 .03 .12
97 .89 1.03
.49 .41 .70
.25 .10 .28
.75 .60 1.17
2. 61
.04
1.13
.31
.65
.02
.35
.06
.01
.40
.01
.03
.48
2. 58
.51
.18
.14
.11
.25
.57
4. 79
2.61
.13
.02
.73
.09
.11
.81
1.41
0
.18
1. 45
.04

All
families

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

0.05
0
1.13
.24
.23
0
.06
.49
0
.07
.64
.97
.11
.07
.43
. 14
. 19
.21
.04
.15
1.23
.43
.25
.63

24.08 17.58 26.78 36.53 41.83
.01 .01 .01 .02 .04
0.05
0
0
0) 0
(8 0
)
1.02
.41 .31 .40 .68 .73
. 46 .12 .06 .21 .14 .22
.35
.88 .70 .66 1. 47 1.74
.03
.07 .07 .10 0
.11
.25
. 12 .02 .09 .19 .74
.16
.87 .67 .97 1.81 .55
.20
.23 .10 .44 0
.88
.14 .12 .14 .27 . 15
.03
.77 .51 .99 1.23 1.28
.78
.65 .43 .61 1.34 1.19
.73
.34 .08 .49 .63 1. 22
.29
0
.05 .03 .11 .08 0
.57
.30 .08 .67 .49 .55
.16
.75 .45 1.15 1.03 1.31
.49 1.05 .83 .33 1.32 3. 92
1.30
.35 .14 .38 .28 1.70
. 14 .03 0
.02 .11 .16
0
.05 .03 .07 .17 0
.99 1.31 1.05 1. 46 2.02 1.63
.55 .41 .79 .75 .57
.61
.69
.31 .21 .33 .40 .71
.86
.50 .38 .78 .48 .58

D ol.

2.14 2.93 3. 67 3.41 1.64
.04 .06 0
.03
.05
.96 .96 1.58 2.08
.71
.26 .42 .23 .45
.21
.58 .55 1.08 .69
.45
0
.06 0
.05
.01
.24 . 65 .21 .46
.08
.04 .07 .17 .05
.03
0
.04 0
0
.01
. 11
.39 .53 .24 .34
0
.04 0
0
.01
.01 .04 .10 .10
.02
.39
. 15 .77 1.11 .1.05
2.17 2. 78 3.67 3. 21 4.88
.41
.47 .69 .32 .63
.09 .34 .31 .16
.26
.14 .17 . 14 . 11 .31
.11 .06 .17 .15
.29
.13 .39 .41 .43
.43
.49 .68 .52 .85
.49
.27
.01
4. 35 4. 61 8.03 3. 44 1.06
2.16 3.70 2.46 2. 93
.59
0
.15 .33 .58
.03
0
0
.07 0
(5
)
.49 .84 1.49 .89
.32
.07 .11 .03 .27
.05
.09
.08 . 14 .11 .21
.74 .70 1.14 1.08
.40
.92 1.81 2. 47 2.06
.21
0
0
0
0
0
.09 .33 .31 .29
.20
.80 1.00 1.57 6. 57 .08
.03
.01 0
.12 .20
.07
.03
.01

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
5Less than 0.5 cent.




Average expenditure per
person

D ol.

1.26
.03
.59
. 14
.35
0
.06
.01
0
. 11
0
(5
)
.11
4.00
.36
. 12
.34
.27
.20
.44
.11
(5
)
.91
.48
0
0
.23
.03
.08
.36
.13
0
.08
.05
.01
.01
.01
.01

D ol.

1.96
.05
.50
.26
.35
.04
.15
.02
.04
.13
.04
.02
.56
5.06
.58
.44
.29
.12
64
56
.37
.02
1.07
.81
.03
.01
.30
.05
.10
.35
.27
0
.25
.05
.04
0
.03
.02

D o l.

2.22
0
1.13
.25
.86
0
.05
. 11
0
.08
0
.04
.93
6.83
.33
.66
.24
.54
.86
.47
.84
.02
1.91
.67
.09
0
.74
.01
.08
.54
.33
0
.40
.08
.03
.27
.01
0

D ol.

2. 49
.03
1.43
.43
.78
.03
.10
.02
0
.09
0
.13
1.05
7. 27
.46
. 19
.26
.50
.77
.72
.24
0
.85
.65
.17
0
.31
.21
.16
.61
.36
0
.55
.36
.04
.40
.19
0

124

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS— 13
T able

17.—

SMALL CITIES

C lothing ex p en d itu res , hy econ om ic level—

Continued

10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

VI. Clothing, boys 2 through 5 years of age:2
Hats: Felt_____ _______________ ______ .. _____________
Straw____ . _ ______ ___________ __ ____________
Caps: Wool-. _________ ___________ __ _____________
Other. __ _________ _ _ ______________________
Overcoats____ _ _______
__________________________
Topcoats______
____ ____ __________________________
Raincoats_____________________________________________
Jackets: Heavy fabric_______ ____ _ __________________
Leather______________________________________ _
Other_________________________________________
Sweaters: Heavy-------------------------------------- -------------------Light____ ___________________________________
Play suits: Wool knit____ _____: ____________ . ______
Cotton suede.. _ __________ ___ _________ .
Other________ _____ ________________________
Suits: Heavy wool_____ ______________________________
Lightweight wool____________ ___ _ _ ________ _
Cotton, linen___ _ ________
_ __
________
Palm Beach ___________
____________________
____ _____________
Other_________ ___ ___ _
Trousers: W ool..
. . . _____________________ _______ .
Cotton----------------- -------------------------------------Other_______ _____
______ ____________
Overalls, coveralls
___ _ _ _ ______ ------- _ . __
Shirts and blouses: Cotton and other, except w ool..
Wool________________________________
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit_____________ _
_______
____
w o v e n ___ _____ ___
cotton and wool__ ____ ____ _ _____
rayon and silk. ____ _ ________ ___
Undershirts, cotton _ _ __
___________
cotton and wool .
__ ________
rayon and silk________ ____ _ _
Shorts, cotton___ _ __ __________
-----rayon and silk . ___ ___________
Drawers, cotton and wool___ _ __________
Pajamas and nightshirts______ ______ _ _ __
__ __
Shoes: Street_________ ____________ _ _________
Canvas ___ _
_ _ _______________________ _
Other___________ ________ _______
________
Boots: Rubber. ____ _______. . . _ _________ _ ___ _ __
Leather____________________________ ______ ______
Arctics.. _ . . . _______________ _ . _ . . . .. __ ______
Rubbers___ ________ ______ ____ _ _ _________________
Shoe: Repairs__________________ ___
. . . __________
Shines. _
__________________ _
... . ...
Hose: Cotton, heavy. _________ ._ ______
.
.
. .
dress________________ __________________
Rayon__ ____________ _
. . . _____
_
Silk_____________________________________________
Wool____________________________________________
Gloves: C o tto n .___ ________________________________
Leather___________________ ________ __ ______
Other.. ________ ______________________________
Ties___________________________________________________
Collars________ __________ ______ _______ _____ ________
Bathing suits, sun suits. _____________________________
Handkerchiefs____________ ._
_____
Accessories _ _______ _ _
___
___
_ _ . _
Bathrobes. _ ________ _ __________ _ _________ _______
Cleaning, repairing. ______ ______ ____ ____ ____
. ___
Other_______________ _______________________________
8Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




All
fami­
lies

N um ­
ber

3
3
44
18
21
4
1
8
3
1
32
43
50
22
23
5
18
38
3
9
6
10
3
62
15
2
67
25
26
2
8
3
0
5
0
1
47

131
23
12
12
3
51
36
2
2
59
71
8

1
24
4
7

50
5
0
22
14
3
7
8
1

E con om ic lev e l— F am ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

0
3
20
10
3
1
0
3
1
1
15
21
20
13
5
1
8
18
1
4
2
5
1
31
6
0
27
11
10
1
2
3
0
1
0
1
19
63
9
4

6
3
20
16
0
0
26
41
2
0
11
1
1
24
2
0
8
6
1
2
1
1

1
0
12
5
9
3
0
3
1
0
7
10
12
5
6
3
6
9
0
2
3
4
1
19
4
1
22
6
8
1
2
0
0
1
0
0
13
37
8

3
4

0
16
12
0
2
18
13
4
1
7
0
3
16
1
0
7
3
2
1
3
0

1
0
10
2
6
0
1
1
1
0
6
9
12
3
9
1
4
8
2
2
1
1
1
7
4
1
12
5
7
0
3
0
0
3
0
0
10
22
4
4

2
0
10
4

2
0
11
11
1
0
4
3
2
6
2
0
4
3
0
3
2
0

1
0
2
1
3
0
0
1
0
0
4
3
6
1
3
0
0
3
0
1
0
0
0
5
1
0
6
3
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
5
9
2
1
0
0
5
4
0
0
4
6
1
0
2
0
1
4
0
0
3
2
0
1
2
0

125

TABULAR SU M M AR Y
T a b l e 17.— Clothing exp en d itu res, b y econom ic level-—Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item

All
fami­
lies

N o.
VI. Clothing, boys 2 through 5 years of age: 2
Total
_________
Hats: Felt___ _
___ _ ________ ______ 0. 02
.02
Straw_ _________ ___ ___________
_
.40
Caps: Wool_____________________________
.17
Other______ ________________ _
. 16
Overcoats___________________________ ____
Topcoats.. _______ .
___ ________ .03
.01
Raincoats_____ __________________________
.06
Jackets: Heavy fabric____________________
.04
Leather_________________________
.11
Other___________________________
.29
Sweaters: Heavy________________________
Light_________________________ .38
.66
Play suits: Wool knit____________________
.45
Cotton suede_________________
Other____ _ _________________ .80
.07
Suits: Heavy wool_______________________
.19
Lightweight wool________ ____ _____
.90
Cotton, linen______________________
Palm Beach___________ ____ _____
.03
Other_________ ____________________ .16
.07
Trousers: Wool______________________
Cotton____ _______ ____ ____ ___
.13
Other..________________ .. ___ . .05
1.31
Overalls, coveralls_____________ .. ___
Shirts and blouses: Cotton and other, except
.35
wool________________
.03
Wool_________________
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit___: ________ 1.16
woven____ . . .60
cotton and wool _'_______ .63
rayon and silk_____ ____
.02
Undershirts, cotton___________
.14
cotton and wool . _ .07
rayon and silk... _ 0
Shorts, cotton_____ ___________ . 14
rayon and silk.. _____ 0
.02
Drawers, cotton and wool_____
Pajamas and nightshirts._____ .77
Shoes: Street____________________________ 2. 58
Canvas _ _ _ . . . _______________ _ .25
Other___________ _________ _ . . . .14
Boots: Rubber.. ________________ _____
.09
Leather______ ____________ _
.02
Arctics. _ __________ . . . . . . . . . . _
.41
______
.29
Rubbers______ ________ _ _
Shoe: Repairs
_____ ___________ __
Shines . . .
_______
__
Hose: Cotton, heavy_____________________ 3. 48
dress___ _________________ . 3.77
Rayon________________
_______
.38
Silk_______________________________
.03
W ool______________________________ .86
Gloves: Cotton______ _____ ______________
.05
Leather. . ______ ________ . . . .
.07
Other___________ _______________ .51
Ties_____________________________________ .10
Collars . . . __ _ _
__________
0
Bathing suits, sun suits___________________
.34
Handkerchiefs________________________ _.
.81
Accessories.. ._ _ ______ ______ .. _
Bathrobes__________ _________ _________
.05
Cleaning, repairing________ _____
Other_____ _______________ ________ .. _

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

All
families

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

0
.05
.38
.20
.05
.02
0
.06
.05
.24
.30
.35
.35
.44
.22
.04
.15
.56
.03
.14
.04
.15
.03
.96

0.03
0
.40
.12
.25
.07
0
.08
.03
0
.19
.34
1.00
.34
.62
.08
.22
.93
0
.10
.11
.18
.02
1.92

0.05
0
.50
.16
.29
0
.05
.04
.05
0
.29
.57
.73
.73
2.07
.18
.34
1.55
.10
.31
.11
.05
.16
.82

16.54 11.98 15.57 25.74 30.17
0.11
.01 0
.02 .03 .07
0
.01 .02 0
0
0
.20
.23 .21 .22 .34 .10
.13
.10 .11 .07 .11 .13
.31
.75 .28 1.09 1.20 1. 57
0
.06 .02 .20 0
0
0
.04 0
0
.21 0
.11
.16 .14 .16 .07 .52
0
.09 .03 .12 .25 0
0
.02 .05 0
0
0
.71
.36 .30 .23 .52 .87
.42 .34 .31 .87 .33
.31
1.33 1.41 .89 1.00 2. 69 3. 51
.31 .28 .22 .47 .53
.27
2. 57 .77 .15 .56 2.01 2.96
0
.15 .14 .20 .18 0
0
.46 .41 .60 .56 0
1.59
.71 .46 .68 1.31 1.11
0
.04 .03 0
.18 0
.11
.26 .13 .32 .50 .25
0
.07 .03 .09 .16 0
0
.09 . .08 .14 .04 0
0
.06 .08 .01 .09 0
2. 38 .72 .51 .88 .49 2.07

.35
0
.97
.42
.48
.02
.03
. 14
0
.03
0
.03
.48
2. 52
.22
.06
.10
.05
.33
.28

.31
.05
1.16
.52
.65
.05
. 12
0
0
.11
0
0
.78
2. 27
.29
.16
. 12
0
.49
.33

.46
.09
1.26
.58
.94
0
.49
0
0
.59
0
0
1.06
2.69
.23
.35
.08
0
.48
.23

2.70
3.22
.16
0
.59
.02
.03
.47
.11
0
.16
.56

4.54
3.15
.80
.10
.86
0
. 12
.59
.05
0
.72
.44

4. 27
4.39
.26
0
1.53
.26
.10
.38
.20
0
.22
1.47

.03

.01

.15

2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
5Less than 0.5 cent.




Average expenditure per
person

D ol.

.20
.20
.05
0
2. 27 .62
.32
2.19
.89
.38
0
.01
.04
.17
0
.02
0
0
0
.03
0
0
0
(5
)
2.06
.56
4.01 3.26
.21
.35
.11
.19
0
.13
0
.05
.54
.58
.40
.23
.01
(5
)
2. 67 .65
8. 62 .72
.53
.08
0
.01
1.07
.27
0
.02
. 13 .05
.69
.22
0
.01
0
0
.35
.15
2.46
.05
.01
.13
.05
.06
( 5)

D ol.

.19
0
.42
.22
.27
.01
.01
.04
0
.01
0
.01
.33
2.91
. 17
.06
.16
.10
.46
.21
0
0
.54
.59
.03
0
.18
.01
.02
.19
.01
0
.07
.03

D o l.

.15
.02
.71
.25
.28
.02
.04
0
0
.02
0
0
.50
2.82
.21
.15
.15
0
.60
.24
0
.01
.60
.59
.14
.02
.25
0
.08
.24
.01
0
.19
.02
.02
( 5)
.02 .02
.01 . 10
.01 0

D ol.

.34
.23
.79
.41
.80
0
.11
0
0
.13
0
0
.78
4.20
.24
.70
.09
0
.78
.19
.09
0
.94
.97
.07
0
.56
.13
.11
.25
.04
0
.20
.08
0
.17
.06
0

D ol.

.15
0
1.24
1.10
.59
0
.04
0
0
0
0
0
1.85
5.19
.38
.08
0
0
.79
.40
0
0
.96
1.64
.13
0
.32
0
.09
.25
0
0
.39
.18
0
.13
.2 5

0

126

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS— 13

SMALL CITIES

T a b l e 17.— C lothing ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level—

Continued

10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

All
fami­
lies

N um ­
ber

VII. Clothing, women and girls 18 years of age and over:3
Hats: Felt______________
_____ _
__________
Straw_______ __________________ ______________
Fabric____•_____________________________________
_
Caps and berets: W ool____________________________
...
Other___ ______________ ____________
Coats:Heavy, plain____________________________________
fur-trimmed______ _______________________
Fur_____________________________________________
Light, wool___ ______ _____ _
_______________
cotton_
_ ___________________________ ____
silk, rayon_______________________ _______
Raincoats_____________________________________________
Sweaters and jackets: Wool knit_____________ _________
Wool fabric____________ _________
Leather, leatherette_______________
Other_____________________ ___ _
Suits: Wool_____ ____ ________________________________
Silk, rayon.____ ______________ _____________ . . .
Other______________ ____ _______ _______________
Waists and middies: Silk, rayon._______ _______ __________
Cotton. ___________________ ______
Other____________________________
Skirts: W ool_______________________ ________________ _
Other__________________________________________
Dresses: Cotton, house_________________________________
street___________________ ______ _______
Silk, rayon__________________ _________________
Wool_________________________________________
Other_________________ ___________ _________
Aprons. ._ _______ ________ ______________ ____ ________
Coveralls___________________ _____ _ __________________
Knickers, breeches, shorts______________________________
Underwear: Slips, cotton_______ _____ ___ ____________
silk______________ ____ ______________
rayon__________ ____________________
Corsets, girdles_________ ____ ______________
Brassieres______________________ ________ _
Union suits and combinations:
Cotton______________ _
_________
_______________
W ool________________
Silk, rayon_______ ~
______________________
Underwaists, shirts______________ ________ _
Bloomers and panties:
Cotton_________________ _______________
Rayon___________________
___________
Silk_____________________________________
Nightgowns and sleeping pajamas:
Cotton, light.. _
. . . .
______
flannel...
_ _ .
----------------- *
Silk,rayon.
______ _____
Pajamas, lounging and beach: Cotton. .
_. ______ _
Silk, rayon________________
Other____________ ____ . . .
Bathrobes____________ _ __ . _________ ___________ _
Kimonos, negligees______
__ ___ _______ __________ ._
Hose: Silk_ _______________ ___________________ ._ _.
_
Rayon___________ . . . . __________________ _____
Cotton______________ ____ ______________________
W ool___________________________________________
3 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




E con om ic lev e l— F am ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

724
509
212
112
21
121
128
14
176
16
4
37
147
50
11
12
121
45
24
111
33
8
135
16
608
300
656
174
53
251
17
19
170
368
265
612
366

173
109
50
33
5
40
23
0
35
4
2
7
41
20
4
4
22
6
6
20
10
1
40
3
171
89
172
39
13
64
3
2
48
86
81
164
113

166
118
40
26
5
20
32
2
38
4
1
7
25
15
3
2
27
8
3
27
6
4
24
5
144
67
141
40
11
55
5
2
49
71
54
143
84

187
134
48
25
6
26
34
2
51
4
1
12
43
8
3
4
24
15
7
27
8
1
38
5
146
67
166
51
11
59
6
1
37
103
58
139
92

68
50
76
268

16
11
14
72

11
23
62

22

11
15
15
67

19
13
24
67

53
575
128

18
186
33

17
111
29

12
139
27

6
139
39

248
162
110
17
19
1
42
20
925
166
197
74

66
40
21
6
1
1
6

57
46
15

52
37
27

73
39
47
4
9
0
13

2

273
59
76

18

5

2

5

4
0

17

3
202
47
52

1

4

0
6
4
220
30
32

22

198
148
74
28
5
35
39
10
52
4
0
11
38
7
1
2
48
16
8
37
9
2
33
3
147
77
177
44
18
73
3
14
36
108
72
166
77

1
1

230
30
37
20

127

TABULAR SUMMARY
T a b l e 17.— C lothing expen ditu res, by econom ic level— Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item

VII. Clothing, women and girls 18 years of age
and over:2
Hats: Felt-------------- ----------------------- ----Straw----------- ------------------------------Fabric____________________________
Caps and berets: Wool----------------------------Other___________________
Coats: Heavy, plain----------- -------------- ___
fur-trimmed_______________
Fur______________________________
Light, wool-- - _____
__________
cotton______________________
silk, rayon__________________
Raincoats________ _____________________
Sweaters and jackets:
Wool knit- _______ _________________
Wool fabric_____ - _________________
Leather, leatherette
________________
Other - ----------- ---------------------------Suits: Wool _________ _________________
Silk, rayon . ________________ . . _
Other------------ ------------------------------Waists and middies:
Silk, rayon___________________________
Cotton______________________________
Other -------------- ---------------------------Skirts: Wool_____________________________
Other-__ ______________ ______ ____
Dresses: Cotton, house----------------------------street___________________
Silk, rayon. _____ __________ _
Wool___________________________
Other..- ______ ________________
Aprons- . _ _ __ - .
________________
Coveralls
_ _ ____Knickers, breeches, shorts- _______
- _
Underwear: Slips, cotton_________________
silk___
______ -- -rayon__________________
Corsets, girdles_______________
Brassieres____________________
Union suits and combinations:
Cotton___________________
Wool____________________
Silk, rayon_______________
Underwaists, shirts___________
Bloomers and panties: Cotton-Rayon
Silk____
Nightgowns and sleeping pa­
jamas:
Cotton, light_____________
flannel___________
Silk, rayon_______________
Pajamas, lounging and beach:
Cotton_______________________ ____ _
Silk, r a y o n __________ _________ ____
Other _______ ____________________
Bathrobes,- ____________________________
Kimonos, negligees_______________________
Hose: Silk_________ ________ _____________
Rayon____________ _______________
Cotton __
- _ _____
W ool______________________________

All
fami­
lies

N o.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

All
fami­
lies

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

D o l.

D ol.

D ol.

D ol.

D ol.

45.50 28. 21 39.18 49. 39 70.55
0.76 0.54 0.69 0.88 1.02 1.45 .78 1.14 1.73 2.36
.50 .32 .46 .56 .70
.95 .50 .78 1.13 1.53
.21 .15 .16 .22 .34
.33 .19 .18
34 .66
.12 .10 .14 .13 .14
.07 .05 .08 .06 .10
.01 .01 .01 .01 .03
.02 .01 .02 .02 .03
.10 .11 .07 .10 .13 1.70 1.61 1.11 1.69 2. 41
.11 .06 .12 .13 . 14 2. 77 1.40 2. 47 3. 99 3.70
.01 .01 .04 1.71 0
.01 0
1.11 .52 5. 61
.15 .10 .14 .19 .19 2.00 1.01 1.75 2.58 2. 94
.01 .01 .02 .02 .01
.12 .10 .11 .04 .21
.01 (4
.03 .07 .02 .02 0
(4 0
)
(4
)
)
.03 .02 .03 .05 .04
.10 .07 * .06 .11 .16
.14
.04
.01
.01
.10
.04
.02

.12
.05
.01
.01
.06
.02
.02

.09
.05
.01
.01
.10
.03
.01

.17 .19
.03 .03
.01 (4
)
.02 .01
.09 .18
.06 .06
.03 .03

.33 .24 .16
.09 .12 .11
.04 .05 .07
.03 .05 .01
1.29 .72 1.01
.35 . .09 .23
.14 .07 .08

.14 .07 .16 .14 .22
.24 .10 .23
.04 .04 .04 .05 .03
.04 .03 .05
.01 (4
.02 (4
.01
.01 (5
.03
)
)
)
.13 .12 .12 .15 . 14 .31 .27 .26
.02 .01 .02 .02 .02
.03 .02 .04
1.38 1.06 1.49 1.47 1.61 1.41 1.00 1.45
.49 .44 .44 .43 .66
.89 .62 .74
.91 .65 .84 1.00 1.22 5.08 2.97 4. 27
.17 . 11 .15 .24 .20
.94 .50 .72
.06 .05 .08 .04 .08
.40 . 18 .48
.61 .44 .59 .56 .88
.23 . 15 .21
.03 .02 .05 .04 .02
.03 .02 .06
.02 .01 .01 (4
.06
.03 (5
.01
)
)
.26 .23 .36 .23 .24
.19 .15 .24
.59 .36 .47 .71 .90
.75 .38 .54
.46 .41 .40 .42 .61
.42 .33 .36
.67 .54 .68 .63 .88 1.80 1.24 1.57
.81 .75 .81 .92 .79
.33 .27 .30
.13 . 12 . 16 . 11 .14
.11 .07 .09 .13 . 14
.15 .06 .17 .15 .24
.58 .46 .57 .65 .70
.11 . 13 .13 .10 .06
1.60 1.34 1.66 1.56 1.94
.34 .24 .28 .31 .55
.37
.24
.15
.02
.02
(4
)
.04
.02
6.02
1.03
.72
.15

.30
.19
.08

.37
.30
.09

.33
.22
.19

.50
.27
.27

.02 .02 .01 .01
.01 .04 .04
(4
)
0
0
(4 0
)
.02 .06 .03 .05
.01 .01 .02 .04
3. 52 5. 71 7.08 8.54
1.21 1.12 .58 1.11
.81 .85 .59 .61
.10 .15 .21 .18
2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
* Less than 0.5 cent.




Average expenditure per
person

.40 .55
.07 .06
.03 .03
.04 .02
.93 2. 65
.47 .69
.15 .26
.28
.04
(5
)
.37
.03
1.56
.89
6.00
1.40
.29
.24
.03
(5
)
.18
.90
.40
1.84
.39

.39
.05
.02
.37
.03
1.76
1.39
7. 75
1.29
.73
.35
.02
.10
.20
1.30
.63
2. 72
.38

.08
. 12
. 14
.27
.05
.84
.21

.06
.08
.06
.19
.05
.66
.12

.11 .06 . 12
.10 .14 .17
. 14 .15 .26
.25 .30 .34
.05 .04 .04
.72 1.00 1.04
. 15 .20 .39

.33
.23
.20

.24
.17
.09

.29
.27
. 12

.32
.21
.26

.49
.27
.36

.02 .02 .02 .01 .02
.04 (5)
.03 .04 .11
.01 0
0
0
(5
)
.14 .06 .19 .11 .23
.06 .02 .02 .06 .14
4.84 3. 25 4.06 5.60 6. 95
.54 .55 .62 .37 .61
. 18 . 19 . 19 . 17 . 17
.09 .05 .10 .13 .11

128

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

T

a

SMALL CITIES

1 7. —b C lothing ex p en d itu res e, b y econom ic level— Continued
l
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

VII. Clothing, women and girls 18 years of age and over 2
—Con.
Shoes: Street________________ - _____________
Dress____ ___ ____ _______________________ ___ _
Sport __ ____________________________
House slippers___ ________________________ ____
Shoe: Repairs__ _____ _________________________
Shines____________________________________
Rubbers
___________ _____ _____ ________
Arctics, gaiters_____ ___ ___________
________
Gloves: C otton_________________________________ _
Leather__________ _____________ __________
O ther______________________________ _______
Bathing suits, sun suits______ _______________
Handkerchiefs_____________________ _________ __
Furs
- -- ___________________________________
Mufflers, scarfs....... .............................. .......................
Handbags, purses_______ ____ _________ ____________
____________ _______ ________
Umbrellas
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc_____________________
Cleaning, repairing- _ ___________ ____________
________ - _____________ ________ ___
Other
VIII. Clothing, girls 12 through 17 years of age:2
Hats: Felt_________________________
_______________
Straw_____________________________ ____________
Fabric___ _________________________________
Caps and berets: Wool___ _____ ____ ______________
Other______________ ____ _____________
Coats: Heavy, plain _ . __________________________
fur-trimmed ......................... .............. .........
Fur________
__________________________
Light, wool- - __________ _____________________
cotton. __ _____ ____________ ________
silk, rayon.............. ...........................
Play suits: Wool knit
_____________________
Cotton suede____________ _____________ _____
Other
___________ ____ _______ ____ ___
Raincoats
- ___ _ __ - __________ _______
Sweaters and jackets: Wool knit_________ ________
Wool fabric_______________________
Leather, leatherette___________ .
O ther______ _________ __________
Suits: W ool-.
-- ___________ ___________________
Silk, r a y o n __
_____________________________
Other
.
_ _____________ ____________ _____
Waists and middies: Silk, rayon____________________ ____
Cotton___________________ ____ ____
Other________________________ _____
Skirts: Wool __ - ____________________________________
Other _ - ___________ ______ _____ ______________
Dresses: Cotton, house. _______________________ ________
street_____________________________
Silk, rayon ........................................ .... ................
Wool. ___________________ ______ _____ _______
Other_____ ________________ _____ ______ _____
A p ron s__ ____ ________________ __________________
Coveralls
_ .................... ............ ........... _ _ . __
Knickers, breeches, shorts - ______ ____ _________ ____

All
fami­
lies

N um ­
ber

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




E con om ic le v e l— Fam ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

881
361
252
293
374
25
364
294
250
249
134
69
274
0
104
342
69
383
337
23

263
100
66
76
89
8
85
90
59
42
32
14
73
0
21
74
18
101
54
4

69
48
23
78
19
41
13
0
30
2
0
6
2
8
26
58
27
12
6
19
3
9
25
26
4
69
9
42
80
88
41
11
7
1

31
19
14
49
14
24
5
0
13
1
0
2
2
5
11
32
17
7
2
6
2
4
12
16
1
38
3
23
57
46
21
5
2
0
0

7

198
78
66
76
93
6
85
65
66
42
27
18
66
0
26
74
19
86
63
6

196
88
52
63
87
3
98
47
53
72
39
17
60
0
27
88
13
92
96
3

16
15
5
15
3
10
5
0
6
1
0
1
0
0
9
11
3
3
3
6
1
3
6
7
1
15
4
10
12
21
8
5

13
9
3
7
2
4
1
0
6
0
0
1
0
2
3

4

1
5

224
95
68
78
105
8
96
92
72
93
36
20
75
0
30
106
19
104
124
10

1
6

9
5
1
7
0
3
2
0
5
0
0
2
0
1
3
7
3
1
1
3
0
1
3
2
0
8
1
3

7

4

8

4

1
0
4

0

1
4

1

2
8

14
7

1
0
0
1

7

5
0
1
0
1

129

TABULAR SUMMARY

T

a

1 7 . — b C lothing exp en d itu res , by econom ic level— Continued
l
e
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item

VII. Clothing, women and girls 18 years of. age
and over 2
—Continued.
Shoes: Street____________________________
Dress_____________________________
Sport_____________________________
House slippers___________________________
Shoe: Repairs____________________________
Shines_____________________________
Rubbers_____ ____ ___ ______ ____________
Arctics, gaiters________________________
Gloves: Cotton_________________ _____ ___
Leather__________________________
Other______________ ____ _______
Bathing suits, sun suits___________ _____
Handkerchiefs___________________________
Furs-__._____________________________ ___
Mufflers, scarfs________ ______ _______ ____
Handbags, purses_____________ _______ ___
Umbrellas_____________ ____ _____________
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc________________
Cleaning, repairing_______________________
Other___________________________________
VIII. Clothing, girls 12 through 17 years of age:2
Total______________________________________
Hats: Felt_______________________________
Straw_____________________________
Fabric________________ ______ ______
Caps and berets: Wool___________ ________
Other___________________
Coats: Heavy, plain______________________
fur-trimmed_______________
Fur______________________________
Light, wool__________ ______ ______
cotton______________________
silk, rayon__________________
Play suits: Wool knit______ ______ ________
Cotton suede................................
Other_________________________
Raincoats________________________________
Sweaters and jackets: Wool knit___________
Wool fabric_________
Leather, leatherette.
Other_______________
Suits: Wool______________________________
Silk, rayon________________________
Other_____________________________
Waists and middies: Silk, rayon___________
Cotton______________
Other________________
Skirts: Wool___________________________
Other____________________________
Dresses: Cotton, house_______ ______ _____
street________ ______ ____
Silk, rayon__________ ______ _____
Wool___________________________
Other________________ _____ _____
Aprons__________________________________
Coveralls________________________________
Knickers, breeches, shorts_________________

All
fami­
lies

N o.

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

All
fami­
lies

D ol.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un- $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

D ol.

D ol.

D ol.

D ol.

1.25 1.10 1.22 1.21 1. 52 4.08 3.13 3.74 4. 33 5.40
.42 .35
.43 .55 1.43 .99 1.27 1. 58 2 0
.0
.65 .52 .71 .58 .85
.28 .24 .32 .27 .30
.28 .23 .33
.23 . 15 .26 .24 .30
.52 .30 .57 .51 .74
.02
.01 .01 .05
.32 .24 .33 .39 .36
.32 . 40 .32 .41 .38
.26 .27 .25 .18 .33
.40 .36 .39 .28 .59
.24 . 19 .26 .22 .30
.17 .10 .16 .18 .25
.25 . 12 . 18 .34 .41
.43 .19 .28 .58 .75
.13 .09 .10 .16 .17
. 13 .07 .08 .20 .21
.06 .04 .06 .07 .08
.17 . 11 . 16 .20 .21
2. 23 1.58 2. 44 2. 21 2.90
. 18 . 12 .17 .19 .28
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10 .06 .10 . 11 . 14 .09 .03 .07 . 11 . 16
35 .22 .34 .41 .49
.42 .18 .34 .51 .71
06 .05 .07 .05 .07
. 15 . 11 . 18 . 13 .19
.21 . 12 .17 .27 .32
.73 .23 .60 . 74 1. 50
. 15 .04 .20 .02 .38
.40
.25
. 12
.55
.16
.20
.07
0
. 15
.01
0
.05
.01
.04
.15
.37
.21
.12
.03
.09
.02
.05
.22
.23
.02
.48
.06
.61
.95
.66
.29
.05
.06
.01
.05

.27
.16
.10
.47
. 19
. 18
.04
0
.09
(4
)
0
.01
.02
.04
.10
.26
. 19
.15
.02
.05
.02
.03
.12
.24
.01
.37
.04
.48
.95
.42
.23
.04
.02
0
0

.53
.42
. 16
.67
.08
.27
. 14
0
. 19
.03
0
.03
0
0
.25
.41
. 14
.07
.08
. 16
.02
. 12
.32
.29
.02
.55
. 12
.87
.76
.97
.26
. 15
.25
.05
.20

2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4Less than 0.005 article.
5Less than 0.5 cent.




N o.

Average expenditure per
person

.93
.50
.17
.55
. 13
.23
.07
0
.34
0
0
.06
0
. 10
.26
.67
.51
.07
0
.24
0
.07
.51
.07
. 12
.94
.06
1.21
1.12
1.62
.71
.03
0
0
.07

36. 55 27. 00 48.02 66. 36 60. 82
.54 .34 .79 1.33 .83
.68
.38 .23 .59 .90 .57
.35
. 13 .09 .19 .24 .17
.08
1.01
.33 .25 .54 .34 .45
.04 .03 .06 .04 0
0
.25 2. 36 1.91 3.50 3.15 2.79
. 18 .91 .45 2.17 1.09 1.87
0 0 0 0 0 0
.43 1.14 .71 1.40 2. 71 2. 64
.04 .04 .09 0
0
0
0 0 0 0 0 0
.4 4
.20 .09 . 12 .88 .56
0
.03 .04 0
0
0
.05
. 17 . 17 0
.33 .42
.24
.26 . 13 .47 .52 .75
.96
.71 .49 .71 1.68 1.68
.22
.40 .30 .30 1.19 .59
.22 .20 .36 . 13 .09
.08
.04 .01 . 15 0
. 10
.08
. 22 .91 .55 1.63 1.88 1 0
.2
0
0
.05 .05 .09 0
.09
.25 . 10 .60 .47 .46
.45
.27 . 14 .39 .80 .60
. 15
. 16 .17 . 19 .06 . 11
0
.03 .01 .06 . 12 0
.79
.96 .71 .99 2. 36 1.52
.08
.08 .06 . 15 .06 . 10
.40
. 57 .42 .85 1.19 .47
1.18 1.24 1.13 1.20 1. 56 2. 05
.88 2. 58 1.62 3.44 6. 84 4.08
.42 1. 11 .78 1.13 3.17 1. 56
0
.25 . 11 .59 .77 0
.09
.02
.02 .01 .08 0
0
.01 0
0
.06 0
.14
.0 8
.53 .40 .09

130

MONET DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 17.— C lothing ex p en d itu res , hy econom ic level— Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

All
fami­
lies

E con om ic le v el— F am ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

VIII. Clothing, girls 12 through 17 years of age 2
—Continued.
Underwear: Slips, cotton_______________________________
silk__________________________________
rayon________________ _ _______ __
Corsets, girdles- ______ _______ __ _ __ __ _
Brassieres.
- ___________ _____ _________
Union suits and combinations: Cotton. . . . _
Wool____ •
____
Silk, rayon___
Underwaists, shirts___________________ _____
Bloomers and panties: Cotton __ _______ .
Rayon____ . . . ______
Silk__________________
Nightgowns and sleeping pajamas:
Cotton, light___________________________
flannel-. _ __ _ _ _ __________
Silk, rayon_____________________________
Pajamas, lounging and beach: Cotton___________ ___ _
Silk, r a y o n ___ ___________
Other.- _________________
__ _________ ____ _ . . .
Bathrobes___ ___ ____ _ _
Kimonos, negligees________ _ _
. . . _____
__
_____________ _______ _
Hose: Silk____ ____________
Rayon. _ . . . ______ ___ __________ ______ . .
Cotton ____________________________________ _.
W ool. _. _ __________ ________ _______ . . . _______
Shoes: Street.. . . . . .
. . . ________ _. _______ _.
Dress__ . . .
. . . . . . ____________________
__ _.
Sport . _. . . . .
. . . ___ _ . . . _____
___
House slippers.. ___. . . . . . . ______ _____________ _
Shoe: Repairs.
________
_______ ___ _ _.
_____
Shines..
_____ .
_ ____________
...
Rubbers. . . . _____ _______ _ ________ .. _________
Arctics, gaiters - _______
. . . ___ _
_______ _
Gloves: Cotton __
_ . . . _.. _
______
_ _
Leather _ _ . . ._ _________
_ _ .
Other... ____________ _
____________ ______
Bathing suits, sun suits.
__________ _ _ _. . . . __
Handkerchiefs . . .
.
. _
_____
_____ .
Furs. . _
_
. . . ______ _
. . . ___
Mufflers, scarfs
_ _ ...
_____«....
Handbags, purses. .
_______ . . . ____
_ .
Umbrellas. _
. . .
______ _
_. _____
__ .
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc.
. . . ______
. . . ___ _____
Cleaning, repairing_________ _.
------ --------------------Other
.. ____ . __ ______ _ _________ _____ IX. Clothing, girls 6 through 11 years of age:2
Hats: Felt...
_______________________________________
Straw... _ _
______ _
_
Fabric___ ... _______ . . .
________ . __________ _
Caps and berets: Wool___ _ ..
. _ .. ---------- -------Other_______ _
_
... .
_____
Coats: Heavy, plain... __ _ . . . _
_____ _. __ ______
fur-trimmed___ ______ ._ _______ . . . .
Fur____________________________________________
Light, w ool..
.
____________ _ .. . .
cotton
_
. . . . .
silk, rayon_____ ________________________
2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




N um ­
ber

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

41
43
54
43
50
10
4
11
36
19
116
16

29
24
35
18
28
9
3
6
20
13
80
9

9
6
10
15
10
1
1
4
9
2
18
3

1
8
3
6
4
0
0
1
4
2
9
3

36
25
15
8
4
1
12
2
121
47
103
40
163
74
88
26
62
3
77
79
30
23
65
32
43
0
29
36
8
54
31
3

22
15
5
2
0
0
2
1
66
34
78
26
112
43
56
12
36
2
50
50
15
5
44
15
18
0
15
15
4
33
9
1

7
3
2
4
2
0
5
1
28
8
13
11
25
18
18
7
16
1
12
17
12
9
11
4
15
0
7
11
3
11
11
2

4
2
5
0
1
1
1
0
17
2
5
1
14
10
10
5
6
0
9
5
1
5
7
8
6
0
3
5
1
6
5
0

3
5
3
2
1
0
4
0
10
3
7
2
12
3
4
2
4
0
6
7
2
4
3
5
4
0
4
5
0
4
6
0

20
23
8
115
26
40
11
0
38
4
0

9
13
6
76
20
18
4
0
21
2
0

4
5
2
19
4
16
2
0
7
1
0

4
3
0
13
0
2
4
0
5
•o
0

3
2
0
7
2
4
1
0
5
1
0

2
5
6
4
8
0
0
0
3
2
9
1

TABULAR SUMMARY

131

T a b l e 17.— C lothing exp en d itu res , by econom ic level — Continued
10 NEW HAMPSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item

VIII. Clothing, girls 12 through 17 years of
age2
—Continued.
Underwear: Slips, cotton_________________
silk____________________
rayon__________________
Corsets, girdles_______________
Brassieres_________________ - ..
Union suits and combinations:
Cotton.. _ _______________
Wool______________________
Silk, rayon. _ _ _ ___ _
Underwaists, shirts___________
Bloomers and panties:
Cotton . . .
_ . . . ______
Rayon_____________________
Silk_______________________
Nightgowns and sleeping pa­
jamas:
Cotton, lig h t ____ _______
flannel-.. .. .
Silk, rayon_________________
Pajamas, lounging and beach: C o tt o n .____
Silk, rayon.
Other. . . .
Bathrobes. . . . ________ . . .
Kimonos, negligees.__ __ _______ _________
Hose: Silk___________ _______
_____
Rayon_____________ __ _____ _ .
C o t t o n .__ ___ _ . __ _ __ . . . _
Wool____ . . .
_ . . . . . . ______
Shoes: Street___ _ ___
_________
Dress _______
__ _
Sport.. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _ __ __
______ __ _ . . .
House slippers .. . _
Shoe: Repairs __
Shines _. _ _______ ______ ___
Rubbers. . _ _______ __
_
. . . ____
Arctics, gaiters____ _ __ ________ ._
Gloves: Cotton_____
______ _______
Leather.. _
_ ._ ___ ______
Other_____ _____. . . _____ _
_
Bathing suits, sun suits___________________
Handkerchiefs _
. ______ . . . _ ______
Furs________ _ _. _ ______ . . . _ . . .
Mufflers, scarfs... . . . _ _____. . . _ __ __
Handbags, purses. . . . . . _ . . . _ . . . . . .
Umbrellas_______________________________
Garters, belts, hairpins, e t c . _____ ___ _
Cleaning, repairing __ _ ___ ____ _____
Other. _ _
_____ . . . ___ ____
__
IX. Clothing, girls 6 through 11 years of age:2
Total _
_. _____ . . . ____
Hats: Felt___ . _. ._ . . .
___ . . . . . . .
Straw . . . ________ _____ _ ______
Fabric__________ _______ ____
Caps and berets: Wool___________________
Other_
_ .
_____ _
Coats: Heavy, plain___ . . . __ ___ _ . . .
fur-trimmed_______________
Fur__________________
________
Light, wool_______________________
cotton ... ______ _________
silk, r a y o n ..___ . __

All
fami­
lies

N o.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

All
fflmilies

D ol.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

D ol.

D ol.

D o l.

D ol.

0.46 0.50 0.59 0.13 0.25 0.28 0.28 0. 39 0.05 0.16
.50 .42 .42 1.06 .79
.50 .38 .48 1.09 .92
.56 .44 .77 .30 1.54
.44 .29 .69 .31 1.48
.34 .24 .52 .47 .68
.34 .19 .48 .92 .56
.93 .87 1.01 .43 1.93
.25 .22 .28 .11 .60
.10
.04
.16
.58

0
0
0
1.00

.08
.03
.10
.19

.10
.03
.05
.12

.06 0
0
.03 0
0
.27 .20 0
.29 .44 .30

.30 .30 .17 .27 .69
2.11 2.02 1.67 2.54 3. 57
.31 .17 .60 .49 .71

.09
.79
.14

.09
.66
.09

.04 .12 .23
.65 1.26 1.86
.23 .18 .36

.28
.19
.17
.05
.04
.02
.15
.01
2. 69
.69
.89
.21
4.19
1.46
1.69
.11
. 65
.04
.37
.55
.12
.16
.25
.38
.16
0
. 12
.13
.07
. 14
.32
.49

.25
.15
.08
.02
0
0
.03
.02
1.71
.62
.99
.21
3. 59
1.03
1.51
.06
. 51
.01
.33
.47
.09
.06
.22
.25
.07
0
.07
.07
.05
.09
.11
.49

.32
.21
.14
.05
.04
.01
.06
.02
4.63
1.85
3.84
.58
1.62
.55
.73
.13

.14
.03
.12
.47

.30
.17
.06
.02
0
0
.02
.03
3.28
1.77
4. 36
.59
1.58
.45
.72
.09

.06 0
.09 0
.37 .20
.76 .72

.37
.16
.17
.12
.14
0
.14
.02
6.00
1.14
2. 56
.74
1.18
.84
.69
.19

.37
.19
.45
0
.06
.06
.07
0
8.16
4.03
2.24
.07
1.75
.74
.87
.32

.28
.81
.33
.12
.08
0
.29
0
9.80
1.70
4.29
.69
3.16
.43
.68
.13

.42 .40 .36 .57 .59
.44 .44 .46 .29 .61
.20 .16 .44 .06 .18
.15 .05 .27 .48 .30
.39 .37 .34 .67 .30
.19 .14 .13 .47 .46
2.16 1.35 4.27 3. 55 2.74
0
0
0
0
0
.19 .14 .31 .19 .42
.22 .14 .35 .28 .61
.04 .04 .07 .07 0

.12 .07 .14
.11 .10 .10
.05 .06 .05
.77 .68 .73
.13 .17 .11
.26 .16 .43
.05 .03 .05
0
0
0
.21 .16 .27
.03 .02 .03
0
0
0

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




N o.

Average expenditure per
person

.26
.19
0
1.17
0
.17
.16
0
.23
0
0

21.38
.23
.11
.18
.11
0
.04
1.08
.37
.17
.06
.90 1.56
.42
.08
0
0
.42
.98
.08
.10
0
0

.32
.12
.25
.16
.13
0
.30
.02
3.82
.37
.67
.32
3. 79
2. 52
1.90
.17
.77
. 19
.34
.73
.30
.30
.22
.29
.36
0
.20
.24
.15
.23
.62
.91

.39
.23
.50
0
.07
.19
.27
0
5.85
1.49
.60
.05
5.97
3.15
2. 37
.32
.89
0
.57
.54
.03
.52
.54
1.22
.44
0
.15
.25
.07
. 18
. 62
0

.33
.75
.40
.16
.17
0
.83
0
5.20
1.18
.98
.19
8.98
.64
1.95
.12
1. 37
0
.60
.82
.14
.37
.22
.78
.16
0
.31
.33
0
.32
1.28
0

15. 74 26.63 34.24
.05 .19 .19
.08 .10 .20
.04 .05 0
.29 .39 .60
.06 .06 0
1.06 2. 56 1.64
.18 .46 1.55
0
0
0
.70 1.22 1.39
.05 .27 0
0
0
0

37.44
.26
.24
0
.73
.10
3.05
.69
0
2.41
.19
0

132

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 1 7 . — C lo th in g e x p e n d i t u r e s , b y e c o n o m ic level -—Continued
10 NEW HAM PSH IRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

IX . Clothing, girls 6 through 11 years of age 2
—Continued.
Play suits: Wool knit---------------------------------------------------Cotton suede_______________________________
__________________ ______
Other_________
_ _ ____________
_______
Raincoats_____________
Sweaters and jackets: Wool knit_______ . . .
________
_________ ____
Woolfabric__ ___
Leather, leatherette____________ __
Other.. _________ _______ _____ . . .
Suits: W o o l....____________________ _____ ____ _________
Silk, rayon________ _________________________ .
Other__________________________ _____ ________
Waists and middies: Silk, rayon_________ _______________
Cotton. ................. .......... . . . . ___
Other_______ _________ ._
___ _
Skirts: W ool___________________________________________
Other..... ............................... ...................... . . . _____
Dresses: Cotton________________________ ______
___
Silk, rayon_______ ________ _____________ _ _
W ool..______________ _________________________
Other.............................................. ___ _ ____
A pron s_______ ____________________________________ __
__
Coveralls __________ __________________ ________
Knickers, breeches, shorts. ---------- ----- -------------------Underwear: Slips, cotton.-------------- -------------------------silk---- ---------------- -----------------------------rayon------ ----------------------------------------Union suits and combinations: Cotton_______
W ool___ _
Silk, rayon___
_______ _ _
Underwaists, shirts.______ _
Bloomers and panties: C otton _____________
R ayon._ ________ __
Silk_________________
Nightgowns and sleeping pajamas:
Cotton, lig h t...________________________
flannel______________________ .
Silk, rayon_____ _____ ____________ _____
Pajamas, lounging and beach: Cotton___________________
Silk, rayon.. _______ _____
Other____ _____ ________ .
Bathrobes..............................
.........
......... .................
_______________
Kimonos, negligees________ __________
Hose: Silk_______________ _____________________________
Rayon._______ _____________ _________________
Cotton. _______ ________ _. __ __________ . . . . .
W ool__________________________ _______________
Shoes: Street and dress________________________________
Sport____ ____________ _________________
_____
____
House slippers________________ _______ _____ _
Shoe: Repairs__________ _______________________________
Shines__________________________ . . . . . . . . . . .
Rubbers... __________________
..
_. _ _.
. ... .
Arctics, gaiters_________________ _______ _
.. ___ _
Gloves: Cotton................... ........... ......... . . .
______ _
Leather____________ _________________________
Other..____ _______
___ ___________________
2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




All
fami­
lies

N um ­
ber

20
5
11
29
53
30
4
5
6
0
6
0
14
1
31
0
123
36
26
3
9
1
6
48
2

13
49
32
8
59
29
75
11
38
43
3
4
3
1
9
0
21
40
169
52
210
65
31
33
2

E con om ic le v e l— F am ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300
N um ­
ber

6
2
3
12
33
16
2
1
6
0
4
0
8
0
15
0
75
18
11
1
5
0
3
29
1
5
35
13
3
32
13
40
7
20
29
0
1
0
1
2

0
11
26
102
24
130
32
9
22

2

1
43
62
16
0

77

46

77

115
27

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber
5

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

2
6
11
10
9
0
3
0
0
2
0
4
0
9
0
24
6
9
1
2
1
1
10
1
3
9
10
3
16
13
17
4
5
6
1
2
2

0
4
0
3
9
38
14
45
15
9
4
0
14
32
8
0
17

6
1
0
4
7
5
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
5
0
15
8
5
1
1
0
2

4
0
5
2

6
0
8
1
13
0
8
5
2

0
1
0
2

0
4
2

19
9
23
13
9
4
1
15
15
2

1
10

3
0
2
2
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
9
4
1
0
1
0
0
5
0
0
3
3
2
3
2

5
0
5
3
0
1
0
0
1
0
3
3
10
5
12
5
4
3

0
5
6
1
1
4

TABULAR SUMMARY

133

T a b l e 17.-— Clothing ex p en d itu res , hy econom ic level — Continued
10 NEW HAMPSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item

IX. Clothing, girls 6 through 11 years of age2
—
Continued.
Play suits: Wool knit--------- -------- ------ -----Cotton suede................................
Other..... .................................... .
Raincoats__________ _____ ____ ___________
Sweaters and jackets:
Wool knit. ............................................
Wool fabric............. ........................... ......
Leather, leatherette................... ............ .
Other_____________________________ ____
Suits: Wool______________________________
Silk, rayon-------------------------- -------Other_____________________ ______
Waists and middies: Silk, rayon..... ........... .
Cotton.......... .............. .
Other.................... ........
Skirts: Wool.............. .................................... .
Other............................................. .
Dresses: Cotton....... .......................................
Silk, rayon................................ ......
W o o l.............................................. .
Other..............................................
Aprons___________________ _____ ______ _ _
Coveralls_____________ ____ ______________
Kniekers, breeches, shorts.............. ................
Underwear: Slips, cotton...............................
silk.___________ ________
rayon_______ ___________
Union suits and combinations:
Cotton________ ____________
Wool...........- ......... ............ .
Silk, rayon_________________
Underwaists, shirts___________
Bloomers and panties:
Cotton___________ _______ _
Rayon_______ _____ _____ _
Silk_____ ___________ ______
Nightgowns and sleeping paja­
mas:
Cotton, light____________ _.
flannel........................
Silk, rayon______________
Pajamas, lounging and beach:
C o tto n ............ .................... ...................
Silk, rayon______________ ________ ______
Other................ ............ ........................ .
Bathrobes................... ................................. .
Kimonos, negligees....... .................................
Hose: Silk.......... ..................... ........... .............
Rayon...................... ................... .........
Cotton._____ ___ _______ __________
Wool______________________________
Shoes: Street and dress___________________
Sport_____________________________
House slippers........ ...................... .................
Shoe: Repairs____________________________
Shines.......................................... ........
Rubbers............. ........................... .................
Arctics, gaiters___________________________
Gloves: Cotton____ ___________________
Leather..
. . . _________
_____
Other____________________________

All
families

N o.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

.33
.17
.02
.03
.03
0
.03
0
.13
(4
)
.19
0
2.08
.21
.15
.02
.07
.01
.07
.47
.04
.13

.30
.13
.02
.01
.05
0
.04
0
.10
0
.11
0
1.58
. 14
.09
.01
.05
0
.06
.45
.05
.08

.37
.29
0
.07
0
0
.04
0
.25
0
.34
0
2.31
.27
.25
.03
.09
.05
.06
.46
.02
.13

N o.

.39
.26
.03
.13
0
0
0
0
.04
.04
.30
0
3. 36
.37
.32
.08
.09
0
.15
.35
0
.52

All
fami­
lies

D ol.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

D ol.

D ol.

D o l.

D o l.

0.54 0.22 0.67 1. 65 1.30
.09 .07 .23 .04 0
.25 .01 1. 05 0
.28
.18 .09 .24 .26 .67

.41 .35
.32
0
.20 .14
.03 .04
.08
.03 .01
0
0
.10 .16
0
0
0
.11 .07
0
0
0
0
.25
.10 .05
0
.01 0
.21
.23 . 17
0
0
0
4.15 1. 93 1.26
.55
.46 .31
.37 .20
.10
0
.03 .01
.17
.02 .01
0
.01 0
0
.04 .02
. 19 . 17
.98
.02 .02
0
0
.08 .02

.48
.34
0
.09
0
0
.33
0
.22
0
.35
0
2.05
.51
.56
.08
.03
.03
.05
. 18
.01
.14

.53
.37
.05
.05
0
0
0
0
.05
.05
.33
0
3. 95
.99
.88
.09
.02
0
.15
.17
0
.30

.56
0
.06
0
0
0
0
0
.14
0
.23
0
4.89
.93
.50
0
.09
0
0
.47
0
0
.28
.50
.20
.29

.71
.34
.08
.84

.67 1.04 . 14 1.02
.21 .49 .64 .61
.25
.03 .23 0
.65 1.23 1.00 1.17

.35
.28
.06
.21

.33
. 15
.02
. 16

.54 .09
.39 .69
.14 0
.30 .28

.60
1.12
.13

.43 1.19 . 14 1.00
.83 1.29 2.02 1. 89
.12 .26 0
0

.15
.33
.05

.11
.23
.05

.33 .03 .25
.35 .64 .66
.09 0
0

.32 .27
.39 .35
.04 0
.03
.01
.01
.04
0
.48
.96
7. 39
1. 20
2.58
.56
.16

.02
0
.02
.02
0
.30
1.08
7.05
.81
2. 39
.48
.08

.23
.38
.09

.51 .85
.56 .45
.19 0

.07
.05
0
.08
0
.53
.80
7. 77
1.56
2. 82
.64
.21

0
.04
0
.08
0
1.22
.49
7. 79
2. 58
2.80
.72
.40

.41 .38 .33
.61 .52 .80
.14 .12 .21
.01 0
0
.60 .52 .68

.77
.79
.22
.05
.85

3 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
6Less than 0.5 cent.




N o.

0.11 0.05 0.16 0. 27 0.22
.05 .05 .05 .05 0
.10 .03 .20 0
.56
.14 .09 .25 .20 .18

Average expenditure per
person

.19 . 12
.28 .23
.02 0

.08
.03
0
.01
0
.01
.10
.08
0
0
.75
.12
1.08
.22
8.86 1.59
1. 30 .41
3.27 4. 37
.81
.94
.41
.10
. 19
.01
.40
.37
.56
.75
.07
.06
.08 (fi)
.63
.28

.01
0
.01
.05
0
.08
.23
1.42
.30
3. 78
.68
.05
. 18
(5)
.30
.56
.05
0
.22

.14
.28
.04
.10
.07
0
.09
0
.11
.19
1.74
.45
4. 59
.95
.13
.09
0
.38
1.05
.09
0
.33

.44 .68
.48 .46
.07 0
0
.05
0
.21
0
.34
.13
1.80
.88
6.24
1.49
.22
.34
.03
.66
1.15
.09
.02
.44

.08
0
0
.10
0
.24
.30
2.49
.49
6. 32
2.69
.23
.43
0
.49
.87
.02
.03
.38

134

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 17.— C lothing expen ditu res, by econom ic level— Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

All
iamilies

E con om ic le v e l— Fam ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

IX . Clothing, girls 6 through 11 years of age 2
—Continued.
Bathing suits, sun suits_________________________________
Handkerchiefs_________________________________________
Furs__________________________ _______ ________________
Mufflers, scarfs________________________________________
Handbags, purses _. _____ _______________________________
Umbrellas-------------------------- ----------------------------------------Garters, belts, hairpins, etc____________________________ ,
Cleaning, repairing_____________________________________
Other_________________________________________________
X . Clothing, girls 2 through 5 years of age:2
Hats: Felt_____________________________________________
Straw___________________________________________
Fabric__________________________________________
Caps and berets: Wool___________ _____________________
Other_________________________________
Coats: Heavy, plain____________________________________
fur-trimmed_____________________________
Fur____________________________________________
Light, wool_____________________________________
cotton___________________________________
silk, rayon_______________________________
Play suits: Wool knit__________________________________
Cotton suede_______________________________
Other______________________________________
Raincoats_____________________________________________
Sweaters and jackets: Wool knit________________________
Wool fabric_______________________
Leather, leatherette________________
Other____________________________
Suits: Wool___________________________________________
Silk, rayon______________________________________
Other___________________________________________
Waists and middies: Silk, rayon___ ____ ________________
Cotton____________________________
Other_____________________________
Skirts: W ool__________________________________________
Other__________________________________________
Dresses: Cotton_______________________________________
Silk, rayon____________________________________
Wool_________________________________________
Other________________________________________
Aprons________________________________________________
Coveralls_____________________ ____ ____________________
Knickers, breeches, shorts______________________________
Underwear: Slips, cotton_______________________________
silk__________________________________
rayon_______________________________
Union suits and combinations: Cotton_______
W ool________
Silk, rayon___
Underwaists, shirts_________________________
Bloomers and panties: Cotton______________
Rayon_______________
Silk_________________
Nightgowns and sleeping pajamas:
Cotton, light___________________________
flannel________ _____ _____ _____
Silk, rayon_____________________________
2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.




N um ­
ber

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

32
43
0
22
33
8
43
13
5

15
27
0
10
22
6
28
4
1

9
8
0
5
3
0
6
4
1

7
4
0
4
6
2
5
3
3

5
8
8
58
15
21
4
1
14
6
1
24
7
11
7
60
17
3
4
4
0
2
0
3
0
3
2
89
9
12
5
4
5
1
23
4
4
45
29
13
34
34
24
2

3
5
3
32
12
7
2
1
10
3
0
10
1
2
4
32
13
1
2
3
0
1
0
3
0
2
0
50
6
5
2
2
3
0
12
2
3
22
11
7
20
24
16
1

1
1
1
15
2
7
2
0
3
1
1
5
6
5
1
13
3
1
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
25
2
2
0
0
2
1
6
0
0
14
10
3
10
6
7
0

0
2
3
9
0
6
0
0
1
1
0
7
0
2
2
11
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
l
3
2
1
0
0
2
1
0
6
7
3
1
2
0
0

1
0
1
2
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
2
0
4
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
2
1
1
0
0
3
1
1
3
1
0
3
2
1
1

15
35
2

6
20
1

5
12
1

2
2
0

2
1
0

1
4
0
3
2
0
4
2
0

135

TABULAR SUMMARY
T a b l e 17.— C lothing ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average numberof articles
purchased per person

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

IX. Clothing, girls 6 through 11 years of age
N o. N o. N o. N o. N o.
Continued.
Bathing suits, sun suits___________________ 0.18 0.13 0.19 0.47 0.12
Handkerchiefs__________ ________________ 1.72 1.78 1.16 1.57 3.33
0
0
0
0
Purs________________ __________________ 0
.13 .09 . 16 .22 .23
Mufflers, scarfs____________ _______ _____
.22 .25 .06 .36 .21
Handbags, purses________________________
.04 .04 0
.09 0
Umbrellas____ _______________ ________
Cleaning, repairing._

_

___

__ __

X. Clothing, girls 2 through 5 years of age:2
Total
,
__________________
Hats: Felt_______________________________
Straw___________ ______ ______ _____
Fabric_______ _____________________
Caps and berets: Wool___________________
Other___________________
Coats: Heavy, plain______________________
fur-trimmed___ ___________
Fur______________________________
Light, wool__________ ______ ____
cotton______________________
silk, rayon________ ___ . . .
Play suits: Wool knit__________
______
Cotton suede.____ ____________
Other________________________
Raincoats_________ ____________________
Sweaters and jackets:
Wool knit____________________________
Wool fabric____________ _____________
Leather, leatherette___________________
Other________________________________
Suits: Wool_______________ _____________
Silk, rayon________________________
Other.. . . . . . . _______ _______ _
Waists and middlies:
Silk, r a y o n ________ _______ __________
Cotton________________ ______________
Other____________ . . . ______________
Skirts: Wool____ ________________________
Other_______________________ _____
Dresses: Cotton______ __________________
Silk, rayon..
____________ . . .
Wool___________________________
Other.. . . . __________ ________ _
Aprons_____________________ __________
Coveralls.___ _ . . . _________ ______
Knickers, breeches, shorts_________________
Underwear: Slips, cotton_____ *__________
_
silk____________________
rayon__________________
Union suits and combinations:
Cotton_____________________
W ool______________________
Silk, rayon_______________ _
Underwaists, shirts___________
Bloomers and panties:
Cotton_____________________
Rayon_____________________
Silk_______________________
Nightgowns and sleeping paja­
mas:
Cotton, light_______ ____ ___
flannel_____________
Silk, rayon...
_______ ._




All
families

D o t.

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

D ol.

D ol.

D o l.

D o l.

0.22 0.12 0.26 0.70 0.21
.09 .08 .11 .08 .17
0
0
0
0
0
.07 .04 .11 .14 .17
.05 .05 .03 .08 .09
.04 .05 0
.12 0
.07 .05 .09 .07 .21
.09 .01 .09 .40 .32
. 11 .11 .04 .34 0
12. 39 9. 65 13.92 20. 55 24.27
.03 .02 .04 0
.17
.04 .04 .02 .06 0
.04 .02 .01 .23 .16
.20 .15 .21 .43 .22
.06 .06 .05 0
.12
.58 .26 .83 1. 76 .95
. 17 .11 .41 0
0
.03 .05 0
0
0
.37 .44 .27 .30 0
.05 .04 .02 .13 .20
.01 0
.06 0
0
. 52- .22 .58 2.11 .59
.06 .06 .09 0
0
.15 .05 .23 .43 .65
.06 .08 .01 .08 0

.03 .03 .03
.06 .08 .02
.04 .03 .03
.44 .41 .37
.11 . 14 .07
.13 .09 .17
.02 .02 .05
.01 .01 0
.11 .14 .10
.03 .03 .02
.03
.01 0
.14 .10 .12
.08 .05 .22
.12 .05 .13
.05 .05 .02

0
.10
.16
.78
0
.31
0
0
.07
.07
0
.41
0
.20
.10

.10
0
.10
.53
.17
.10
0
0
0
.20
0
.33
0
1.10
0

.49 .38 .37
.10 .13 .08
.02 .01 .02
.05 .05 .08
.05 .04 0
0
0
0
.01 .01 .03

1.16
.06
0
0
0
0
0

1.17
.51 .40 .37
0
. 11 .15 .06
.10
.03 .01 .01
0
.05 .05 .08
.60
.08 .05 0
0
0
0
0
0
.03 .02 .06

1.09
.03
0
0
0
0
0

1.74
0
.74
0
1.19
0
0

0
0
0
.04
.11
1. 75
.05
.11
0
0
.06
.06
.34
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3.24
.08
.15
.11
.20
0
0
.34
.20
0

0
0
0
0
.01 .02
0
0
0
0
.03 .02
0
.03 0
3. 69 1.28 .91
.09 .09
0
.54
. 17 .06
.07 .04
1.40
.33
.01 (s)
.04 .05
0
0
.01 0
1.89
.10 .07
. 17 .02 .01
.21
.01 .01

0
0
0
0
0
2. 77
.11
.36
.06
.03
0
0
.15
.12
0

0
0
0
0
0
2. 62
0
.87
1.00
.07
0
0
.53
.02
.05

0
.04
0
.02
.03
1. 79
.08
.09
. 10
.04
. 10
.01
.31
.05
.04

0
.06
0
.02
0
1.45
.09
.05
.06
.02
. 14
0
.20
.04
.06

.67
.43
. 18
.56

.61
.27
.12
.53

0
0
0
.05
.12
1.38
.08
.25
0
0
.02
.03
.11
0
0

.65 .79 1.45
.58 1.07 .21
. 17 .67 0
.65 .13 1.63

.32
.30
.08
.13

.27
.16
.04
.11

.96 1.20 .43 .27 2. 33
.50 .49 .66 0
1.00
.04 .05 0
.21
0

.16
.11
.01

.18 .09 .06
.09 . 19 0
.01 0
0

.18
.41
.01
2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for
5 Less than 0.5 cent.
2 0 0 9 8 2 ° — 4 1 ------- 10

Average expenditure per
person

.17 .12 .22 .57
.29 .83 .24 .21
.01 .03 0
0
52 weeks

.09 .08
.24 .13
.01 (6
)

.32
.45
.11
.16

.39 1.04
.81 .21
.27 0
.04 .57
.39
.25
.21

.09 .14 .21
.51 .19 .26
.02 0
0

136

MONEY DI&BTJBSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES
T a b l e 1 7 . — C lothing ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level—Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

X . Clothing, girls 2 through 5 years of age 2
—Continued.
Pajamas, lounging and beach: Cotton____ _______ _____
Silk, rayon. _ .. . . . . . ___
Other__ ________ ___ __
Bathrobes____________________________________________
Kimonos, negligees__________ _____ _____ _____ __________
Hose: Silk_______ _______ ____ ____ __________ . . . . ._
R a y o n _________________________________________
Cotton__________________________________ ___ .
Wool_____ _ .. ____________
________
Shoes: Street and dress______ . . .
. .
. _ . ______ ..
Sport__ ________________ ___________
. . .
House slippers_______________________
. . . ______ ____
Shoe: Repairs_____________
__
. _ __ ______ _
Shines__________________ _______ ______ _____
Rubbers. .. _____________________________ ________ _
Arctics, gaiters______________________
_ _ . . . . . . _____
Gloves: Cotton. ....................................
. . .
___
Leather_____________________ ______ _ ___ _
___
Other.. ______ _____ ____ ___ ___________
Bathing suits, sun suits _______ _____________ . . . _ .. .
__
___ .
__
...
Handerchiefs________
Furs. _____ ________ ___________________________ _ ___
Mufflers, scarfs____________ _______________ ____ _ . . . .
Handbags, purses..................... ........ ...... ..... ....... ........
__
_______
.
______ . . . .
Umbrellas
.
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc________________ . ___ ______
Cleaning, repairing._ . . . _____________ . . .. . ___
Other •
________________________________________ ______
X I. Clothing, infants:3
Caps, hoods, bonnets_____________________________ . ..
Coats______ ___________________________________ ____
Sweaters, sacques____ ________________________ _____
__Sweater su its___ ____ _____ ______ ___________ Dresses, rompers______ ____ ___________ ___________ . .
Skirts, gertrudes
_____________ __________________ ..
Shirts, bands. ____________________________________ _ ..
Diapers____________ ______________ ____ ____ _________
Sleeping garments__________ ______ _____________________
Stockings
________
_____. _______________________
Bootees, shoes______ _______________________________
Layettes__________________________ ________________ .
Other _____________ ___ ______________________________

All
fami­
lies

N um ­
ber

5
0
0
7
0
19
24
121
40
148
38
17
8
0
37
55
4
3
56
23
5
0
6
13
2
21
3
2
46
28
40
28
48
29
69
61
43*
80
70
1
101

E con om ic lev e l— Fam ilies
spending per expenditure unit
per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

N um ­
ber

4
0
0
4
0
16
12
70
27
91
19
9
3
0
20
29
2
1
29
7
3
0
3
7
1
14
1
1
16
10
13
7
18
9
23
28
15
34
29
1
50

0
0
0
1
0
2
8
30
6
34
11
2
1
0
8
13
2
1
14
10
1
0
2
5
0
6
1
1

11
10
14
9
14
9
26
15
14
27
24
' 0
29

1
0
0
1
0
1
2
15
6
17
5
4
3
0
7
11
0
0
10
4
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
10
5
10
8
10

8
10
10
9
10
10
0
10

0
0
0
1
0
0
2
6
1
6
3
2
1
0
2
2
0
1
3
2
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
0

9
3
3
4
6
3
10
8
5
9
7
0
12

J Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
3 Infants 1 to 2 years of age are included only if dependent on family funds for 52 weeks; those under 1 year
of age are included regardless of number of weeks dependent on family funds.




137

TABULAR SUMMARY
T a b l e 17.— C lothing ex p en d itu res , b y econom ic level— Continued
10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES—Continued
Average number of articles
purchased per person

Item
All
fami­
lies

Economic
level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Average expenditure per
person

All
fami­
lies

Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over
X . Clothing, girls 2 through 5 years of age2
—
Continued.
Pajamas, lounging and beach:
Cotton. _ . . . _____
____
.. _
Silk___________________________________
Other__________________________________
Bathrobes..
. _____ ___________ . _.
Kimonos, negligees _____ ______________
Hose: Silk... ________ . . . ______________
Rayon
______ _ _ _ ___________
Cotton_____ ____
_ ____________
Wool______________________________
Shoes: Street and dress___________ ____ . . .
Sport___________________________ _
House slippers ...
________________
Shoe: Repairs___ _
_______ _____ _ .
Shines
_ ______ __ _____ _____
Rubbers___ _____________________ ____
Arctics, gaiters...
. ________ . . . .
Gloves: Cotton_
_
. _____ _____________
Leather____
_ ___________ _
Other. ..
. . . _________ . . ._
Bathing suits, sun suits___________________
_________
Handkerchiefs
_ . _. _. .
Furs____________________________________
Mufflers, scarfs___________________________
Handbags, purses.. .. _ _ .
_ _ __
Umbrellas_________________ ______ _____
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc_________ ______
Cleaning, repairing_______________________
Other______________________________ _____
XI. Clothing, infants:3
Total___
__
...
___ . . .
Caps, hoods, bonnets______ . ___________
Coats________________ . _
Sweaters, sacques...
_____
Sweater suits. ______ _ _____ _ _____
Dresses, rompers
._
________
Skirts, gertrudes
__ _ ________ . . . .
Shirts, ba n d s___
. ___________________
Diapers___
.
. ____________ _ __
Sleeping garments. __________________ .
Stockings . . . . _ _ _________________ _
Bootees, shoes __ . .. _ . _ ___ __________
Layettes...
.. . .
. _______________ _
Other_ . . . .
_
________

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400 $500
der to
to and
$300 $400 $500 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

D o l.

0.05
0
0
.04
0
.48
.74
4. 72
.79
1.97
.39
. 13
0
0
.25
.36
.05
.02
.44
.29
. 15
0
.04
.09
.02
0
0
0

0.07
0
0
.04
0
.68
.69
4. 22
.90
1.76
.37
. 11
0
0
.24
.31
.06
.01
.32
.30
. 13
0
.03
.09
.01
0
0
0

0
0
0
.02
0
.06
.53
4.58
.35
2. 37
.35
.05
0
0
.21
.34
.05
.02
.50
.28
.10
0
.05
. 12
0
0
0
0

0. 07
0
0
.03
0
.44
1.28
7.19
1.07
2.11
.49
.33
0
0
.41
.65
0
0
.90
.28
0
0
0
0
.08
0
0
0

0
0
0
.10
0
0
1.45
7.10
1.19
2. 45
.60
.30
0
0
.27
.33
0
. 10
.70
.41
1.20
0
. 17
.17
0
0
0
0

0. 03
0
0
.07
0
.09
.14
.97
.19
2. 71
.42
.07
.04
0
.19
.44
.02
.02
. 19
. 14
.01
0
.02
.01
.02
.06
.02
.02

1.05
.33
.88
.40
2. 31
1.07
2.73
9.14
1.29
4. 40
1.69
.01
.90

.55
.23
.47
. 19
1.64
.63
1.58
5. 21
.73
3. 20
1.16
.02
.45

10. 74 6. 34 10. 39 24. 83 18.22
.61 .27 .31 2.23 1.43
.83 2. 92 2.13
.78 .56 1.10 .95 .73
.46 .50 .33
.63 .36 .58 1.89 .81
1.08 2. 04 1.12
.71 .41 .73 1. 77 1.01
. 50 1.11 .47
2.19 5.48 2. 77 1.31 .83 1.16 3. 65 1.77
.47 .21 .37 .80 1.50
1.48 1. 75 1.37
3. 32 4. 71 4. 46 1.04 .53 1.07 1.78 2.50
8. 03 15. 05 23.24
.88 .41 .64 1.76 2. 66
.82 .42 .94 1.97 1.25
1. 57 3. 04 1.46
4. 85 8. 73 4. 65 .98 .70 .97 2. 01 1.34
1.93 3. 79 1. 57 1.39 .98 1.60 2. 90 1. 32
0
0
0
.20 .41 0
0
0
1.90 1.03 .26
.92 .25 .92 3.12 1.90

D o l.

D o l.

0.04
0
0
.05
0
. 12
. 13
.82
.20
2. 27
.38
.06
.01
0
.19
.35
.02
.01
. 13
.09
.01
0
.02
.01
.01
.07
(5
)
.03

D o l.

D o l.

0
0
0
. 13
0
.02
.09
1.06
. 12
3. 31
.44
.01
.02
0
.13
.53
.04
.05
. 19
.24
(5
)
0
.03
.02
0
.07
.02
.01

0. 04
0
0
.03
0
.09
.23
1.37
.30
3. 47
.52
.23
.19
0
.30
.80
0
0
.50
.17
0
0
0
0
‘.08
0
.08
0

0
0
0
.16
0
0
.37
1.83
.24
3. 92
.69
.16
. 16
0
.24
.47
0
.08
.39
.31
.02
0
.14
.03
0
.03
0
0

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
3 Infants 1 to 2 years of age are included only if dependent on family funds for 52 weeks; those under 1 year
of age are included regardless of number of weeks dependent on family funds.
5 Less than 0.5 cent.




T a b l e 18.— F u rn ish in gs and equ ip m en t ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level

00
00

10 NEW HAM PSHIRE CITIES

All
families

Item

Economic level—Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

279
34
$2. 91

Average number of articles purchased
per family

All
fam­
ilies

$300 to
$400

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

$400 to
$500

225
27
$1.55

$500 and
over

226
29
$1.66

251
30
$2. 31

Average expenditure per family

All
families

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
and
over

D ot.

D o t.

D o t.

D ot.

D o l.

42.83
11. 24
3. 03
1. 56
1.15
.43
.51
.23
.06
.26
.31
1.02
.13
. 12
.10
.32
.07

27.86
7. 05
2. 07
.67
.91
.25
.35
.21
.03
.19
.26
1.00
. 18
. 18
0
.03
0

39. 09
9. 21
1.84
2.18
.76
.15
1.16
.19
.08
.17
.53
.69
.09
.09
. 16
. 14
0

41.25
12. 52
4. 77
1.04
1.22
.73
.10
.28
.01
.21
.38
.98
.18
.03
.14
.51
.03

F u rn ish in g s and E q u ip m e n t E x p en d itu r e s
N o.

______
_____ ___
Total______ ___________ .
Furniture, total
___________ ____
___
________
Suites: Living room_____________ ________________
Bedroom__________________________________
Dining room_______________________________
Beds: Wood_________________ ___________________
Metal______________________________________
Cots, cribs: Wood____________ ___ ______
Metal_________________________________
Bedsprings ______________________________________
Davenports____________ ____ ______ ______________
Couches, daybeds. ______________________________
Dressers__________________________________________
Chiffoniers, chests_________________________________
Sideboards, buffets __________ ' ___________________
Desks. .. _________ ______ _____
________ .
Bookcases, bookshelves..
_____
. . . . .. _




33
19
20
21
27
22
7
23
10
36
1
1
11
6
14
2

4
3
3
6
7
7
1
7
2
10
4
3
0
1
0

9
6
5
3
10
5
3
2
4
5
2
3
2
3
0

12
4
5
6
3
5
1
6
3
10
4
1
1
5
1

8
6
7
6
7
5
2
8
1
11
1
4
3
5
1

N o.

0. 037
.019
.023
.024
.034
.023
.007
.031
.010
.036
.010
.010
.006
.014
.002

0. 022
.014
..014
.025
.029
.025
.004
.025
.007
.036
.011
.007
0
(2
)
0

0. 040
.027
.022
.013
.057
.022
.013
.022
.018
.022
.009
.013
.009
.013
0

0. 058
.018
.022
.031
.013
.022
.004
.031
.013
.040
.018
.004
.004
.027
.004

t). 032
.020
.036
.028
.036
.024
.008
.044
.004
.044
.004
.016
.012
.020
.004

64. 40
16. 68
3. 61
2. 46
1.72
.62
.47
.25
.14
.44
.11
1.37
.07
. 17
. 14
.63
.24

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES

Number of families spending

All
families

Under
$300

981
120
$2.16

Families in survey_____________________________________________________________
Number of families reporting receipt of gifts of furnishings and equipment - .................
Average value per family of furnishings and equipment received as gifts (incomplete) 1

Item

Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year

30
53
33
2
0
13
34

2
16
5
0
0
2
5

6
10
7
0
0
2
4

12
11
9
0
0
4
10

92
71
93
91
20
142
18
245
168
75
80
20
69
328
67
28
328
98
62

19
15
28
25
5
44
6
60
38
18
25
6
12
97
16
9
82
24
25

21
18
27
14
1
30
3
60
40
20
13
3
14
81
10
6
69
25
14

22
18
12
23
5
30
3
54
34
13
16
1
12
74
20
5
83
19
9

1 The aggregates on which these averages are based do not include the gifts of furnishings
and equipment reported received by 44 families but for which they could not estimate
the value.




10
16
12
2
0
5
15

6
71
56
24
26
10
31
76
21
8
94
30
14

.035
.123
.044
.002
0
.023

.007
.140
.032
0
0
.007

.036
.107
.027
0
0
.009

.057
.093
.4)53
0
0
.062

.044
.143
.064
.008
0
.020

3.561
3.650
3.869
. 104
.048
.320
.027
1.102
.935
. 116
. 134
.044
. 514
2. 565
.376
.062
1.488

3.294
3.513
3.760
.090
.054
.376
.043
.918
.688
.097
. 140
.025
.308
2. 634
.219
.082
1.269

3.644
3.738
3 1.400
.089
.013
.276
.013
1.040
.787
. 102
.089
.013
.502
2.840
.307
.080
1.413

3 . 734
3.668
3.438
.102
.040
.314
.013
1.173
.845
. 142
. 124
.031
.429
2.593
.509
.040
1.650

3.625
3.709
3.900
.135
.080
.303
.032
1.299
1.422
. 127
. 175
. 104
.829
2. 215
.494
.044
1.653

2 Less than 0.0005 article.
3 Expressed in square yards.

.20
.42
.66
.01
0
.03
. 62
9. 65
1.32
.83
.83
1.57
.05
.76
.08
1.07
.31
.24
. 12
.04
.09
.49
.06
.05
1.57
.05
. 12

.01
.38
.13
0
0
.02
. 18
7. 88
.53
.50
1.00
1.62
.03
.92
.11
.80
.21
.17
.11
.02
.05
.45
.04
.06
1.06
.04
16

.14
.25
.45
0
0
.02
. 12
8.70
.94
1.37
.99
.91
.02
.61
.03
1.03
.26
.27
.09
.02
.09
.49
.03
.05
1.31
.07
. 12

.33
.50
.68
0
0
.04
. 36
9. 49
1.92
.67
.49
1.37
.03
.63
.08
1.03
.31
.19
. 11
.01
.08
.51
.08
.03
1. 87
.03
.05

.35
.56
1.44
.04
0
.05
1.80
12. 68
2.00
.87
.81
2.29
.14
.83
.11
1. 44
.48
.32
.18
.13
.16
.50
.09
.05
2.10
.07
.11

H
3
>

W
d
t-1
>

SUMMARY

Tables, except kitchen_____________________________
Chairs: W ood____________________________________
Upholstered_______________________________
Benches, stools, footstools.-___. . . .. . _________
Tea carts, wheel trays _ . ______
_______
Stands, racks, costumers___________________________
Other _______________ _______ ____
. _
__
Textile furnishings, total _ ___ _ ___
Carpets, rugs. - ___________________________________
Linoleum, inlaid__________________________________
Felt-base floor coverings____ .. . _____ _ .. Mattresses
_
_ _ _
Pillows
_ _ _ ____ _______ . __
Blankets______ _________ ___ ___ .
__
Comforts, quilts___________ _____________________
Sheets
_
_ ________
_
_ _
Pillowcases . __
__ __ _ _ _ _
.
Bedspreads, couch covers__________________________
Tablecloths, napkins, doilies: Cotton. _____________
Linen_________
____
Towels: L inen_____ ________ __ ________ ____
Cotton, turkish_____ _ . _____ ________
Other cotton____
_____
_________
Table runners, dresser scarfs. __ __ _ ______
____
Curtains, draperies . . ______
.. ___ - _ _____
Dishcloths, cleaning cloths, etc_____________________
Other_____ . . . _______________________________

CO

C
O

T a b l e 1 8 . — F u rn ish in gs and equipm ent ex pen d itu res, by econ om ic level— Continued
O

10 NEW HAMPSHIRE CITIES—Continued

Item

Average number of articles purchased
per family

Economic level—Fam­
ilies spending per
expenditure unit per
year

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year

All
families

Un­
der
$300

$300
to
400

$400
to
500

$500
and
over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300
to
400

$400
to
500

$500
and
over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Average expenditure per family

All
famiilies

Economic level—Families spend­
ing per expenditure unit per
year

Under
$300

$300
to
400

$400
to
500

$500
and
over

D o l.

D o l.

D o l.

D o l.

1.09
.60
.08
.41
(4
)
(4
)
13. 87
.45
3.82
.60
7. 39
.14
.05
.01
.68
.22
.03
.46
.02
6. 22
.13
.01
.62
.02
0
.35
2.29
.15
.77
.04

0.88
.46
. 12
.27
.01
.02
11.76
1.00
5.11
1.11
3.37
.13
0
0
.65
.17
.07
0
. 15
6.60
. 15
.09
.61
.02
0
.29
2.29
.20
.40
.03

F u rn ish in g s and E q u ip m e n t E x p en d itu r e s —Continued.
N o.

____
Silverware, china, and glassware
China or porcelain, table
_ __ _ _
_ ___
Glassware ___________ _____________ _
_____
Tableware: Silver_____________________
______ _
Other____________________ _ _____J___
Other_______
__ ______ _____________ _______
Electrical equipment, total ______
.......... ................
_____________________ ________
Vacuum cleaners
Refrigerators (electric) __________________ _____ -Electric stoves, hotplates _ __________________ ____
Washing machines _______________ ______ _______
Irons ________________ __________________________
Ironers, mangles________________ ______ ________
Heaters, fans________ _____________________________
Light bulbs___ _____ _________ _ ___________ _ _ _
Lamps______ _____ ____ ___________________________
Toasters.-. _________
____________________ _____
Sewing machines (electric)- _ .................. ............
O ther_____ _______ ____________ ____________
Miscellaneous equipment, to ta l_____________ ____ ____
Mirrors, pictures, clocks, ornaments ______________
Carpet sweepers_________________ _____ ________ _
Brooms, brushes, mops____________ __ __ _ ____
Dustpans, pails, etc
_
___ __
____
Gas refrigerators
______ ,_ _____
Ice boxes
_____________
__ .
Stoves and ranges (not electric) ___________ ____
Canning equipment, cookers___________ _________
Pots, pans, cutlery
___________
____Tubs, boards, wringers __________ _______ _________




133
151
21
7
13

40
56
5
3
6

32
33
5
1
1

23
26
4
2
4

20
30
17
77
53
5
2
537
82
29
7
27

2
1
4
19
15
1
0
150
12
5
1
2

2
6
5
28
13
1
1
115
18
4
1
6

4
9
5
15
9
0
0
118
12
11
0
10

12
14
3
15
16
3
1
154
40
9
5
9

57
11
577
94
1
27
76
106
246
27

14
3
173
33
1
6
20
34
69
10

15
1
136
22
0
4
10
25
64
6

10
6
127
15
0
6
18
22
56
6

18
1
141
24
0
11
28
25
57
5

N o.

38
36
7
1
2
0.019
.030
.017
.075
.055
.005
.002
3.818
.099
.031
.007

0.004
.004
.011
.068
.061
.004
0
3. 620
.047
.014
.004

0.009
.022
.018
.120
.053
.004
.004
3.609
.093
.022
.004

0.018
.040
.027
.058
.049
0
0
3. 341
.071
.053
0

0.048
.056
.016
.060
.056
.012
.004
4. 653
.187
.036
.020

D o l.

1.06
.65
.12
.27
.01
.01
13.04
1.05
4. 35
.88
4. 54
.16
.18
.01
.72
.27
.04
.71
. 13
7.84
. 13
.03
.66
.04
(4
)
.42
3. 27
.28
.48
.03

0.68
.36
.14
. 15
.01
.02
6. 67
.16
.64
.42
3.74
.18
(4
)
0
.65
.11
.02
.55
.20
5.58
.05
.02
.70
.05
(4
)
.25
1.68
.55
.31
.03

1.62
1.17
. 15
.29
(4
)
.01
20.49
2. 61
8.28
1.44
3.92
.18
.64
.03
.89
.57
.05
1.76
.12
12. 93
.20
.01
.68
.08
0
.77
6. 79
.15
.50
.03

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13 SMALL CITIES

Number of families spending

Ironing boards, racks, baskets________
Sewing machines (not electric)_______
Baby carriages, gocarts______________
Trunks, hand baggage____1_________
Household tools, ladders, cans_______
Window shades, wire screens, awnings
Lawn mowers, garden equipment____
Repairs, cleaning-. ________________
Other______________________________
*

30
12
30
12
35
137
36
38
63

10
2
6
2
7
41
11
10
20

8
2
7
2
9
31
4
8
11

5
3
12
2
7
27
9
5
19

7
5
5
6
12
38
12
15
13

04
29
37
05
09
41
14
17
94

.05
.14
.37
.02
.07
.28
.10
.16
.75

.06
.70
.27
.02
.04
.29
.02
.12
.32

.03
.16
.57
.06
.15
.59
.08
.08
.80

.03
.21
.27
.10
.11
.49
.33
.33
1.85

Less than 0.5 cent.

TABULAR SUMMARY







Appendix A
Notes on Tabular Summary
General
Economic fam ily.— An “ economic fam ily” as defined for this study
consists of two or more persons living together and sharing their
economic resources. In most cases, the members of an economic
family are related by ties of blood, marriage, or adoption, but in some
cases, an unrelated member was found to share income and family
living. Persons related by blood, marriage, or adoption were not
treated as members of the economic family if they lived as boarders
and kept their funds separate from family funds, unless they gave a
complete record of their incomes and expenditures. Persons who
were members of the economic family for an entire year were not
necessarily members of the household for the year. A member sup­
ported by the family in school, college, or hospital for all or part of
the year, or a member working away from home for part of the year,
sharing his income with the family for that period and able to report
all his expenses for that period would be treated as a member of the
economic family but not of the household for the entire year. In
computing the number of persons who were part of the economic
family for a year, the number of weeks each member had shared his
incotne with the family was listed, the numbers summed, and the total
divided by 52. This procedure yielded the number of equivalent
persons who had made up the family for 1 year.
Household.— The household has been defined to include the members
of the economic family living together in one dwelling, plus roomers
and guests sleeping in the family dwelling, plus boarders and guests
eating with the family. The number of persons in the household was
computed by adding the number of weeks each member of the family
had been part of the fam ily’s housekeeping establishment, the number
of weeks each boarder, lodger, and guest had been with them, and
dividing the total by 52 in order to secure the number of equivalent
persons making up the household for 1 year.
Net fam ily income or net money income.— N et family income has
been defined to mean the sum of earnings (including net receipts from
boarders and lodgers), net rent, interest, dividends, gifts, pensions,
insurance annuities received during the schedule year, minus business
losses and expenses. The money value of income received in kind,




143

144

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13

SMALL CITIES

whether from services of the housewife, use of owned home, or from
other sources, has not been included in computing income in this
investigation. No funds received as a result of the depletion of
assets have been treated as income. Similarly, inheritances have
not been regarded as income.
Current expenditures.— Throughout the report the term “ current
expenditures” is used to mean expenditures for ultimate consumer
goods, including relatively durable consumption goods. Interest on
money borrowed for family use has been included in such expenditures,
but savings and investments have not. The time and funds available
for the investigation have not made possible the presentation of sep­
arate totals distinguishing expenditures for the more slowly consumed,
as distinguished from quickly consumed, goods. Indeed, the data on
depreciation rates for relatively durable consumer goods are so frag­
mentary that it would be extremely difficult to do so. Expenditures
for such durable goods as automobiles, mechanical refrigerators, and
other furnishings and equipment have been classified with expenditures
for food and carfare and other quickly consumed goods as “ current
expenditures,” while money spent for permanent improvements on
owned homes and other real estate or as payment on the principal
of mortgages has been classified as savings. The total cost of con­
sumer goods purchased on credit was included in current expenditures
and the amount of the obligations outstanding at the end of the year
was taken into account when computing changes in liabilities over
the 12-month period. M oney paid out for life-insurance premiums
has been classified as savings.
The total obligations incurred in the year covered by the schedule
for consumer goods purchased on credit was included in current
expenditures and the amount of the obligation outstanding at the
end of the year was taken into account when computing changes in
liabilities over the 12-month period. For example, the total amount
incurred for an item purchased on the installment plan (original price
plus carrying charges) is entered as the amount of the expenditure,
though the amount paid in the schedule year may be considerably
less than the total contracted for; and the total amount of rents, taxes,
etc., falling due in a year are entered as though paid, though they
have been paid in part or not at all. The unpaid balances owing at
the end of the schedule year on debts contracted during the schedule
year are entered as increases in debts on table 4. Amounts paid
during the schedule year on goods purchased on the installment plan
before the beginning of that year are treated as savings. (See “ Sur­
plus,” p. 145; “ Payment of debts to: Firms selling on installment
plan,” p. 149; and “ Increase in debts: Payable to firms selling on
installment plan,” p. 150.)




APPENDIX A

145

Expenditures as entered on tables are purchase price less trade-in
allowance, in cases where such trade-in allowances were made, for
example, automobile and furniture purchases.
Surplus or deficit.— Surplus or deficit represents the difference
between current income and current expenditures. Since the figures
on both these amounts as secured by the schedule method are subject
to an undetermined error of estimate (see “ Balancing difference,”
p. 146), the surplus and deficit data were obtained by asking in detail
changes in individual asset and liability items over the schedule year.
N et surplus or net deficit was computed as the net difference between
the funds received during the schedule year not used for current ex­
penditures and the funds made available for family use from sources
other than money income (table 4; see also p. 18 of schedule facsimile.1
)
It should be noticed that the emphasis is placed on net rather than
gross figures for changes in assets and liabilities. That is, for an
individual family, only net entries were made for an individual
transaction such as a trade of property involving a net payment of
$500. Thus, the net change item is more significant than the absolute
amount either of increase or decrease in assets or increase or decrease
in liabilities.
Surplus.— Surplus, savings, and investment are terms used to mean
net decrease in liabilities and/or increase in assets. This figure appears
as the net change in assets and liabilities (when the total increase in
assets and/or decrease in liabilities is greater than the total decrease
in assets and/or increase in liabilities.) M oney paid on the principal
of real estate mortgages or spent for permanent improvements to real
estate (such as the addition of a room to a house) has been treated
as an increase in assets and hence as investment, as has also money
spent for the purchase of stocks and bonds, building and loan shares,
and other forms of permanent assets. M oney used, for example, for
the payment of installment obligations for an automobile purchased
prior to the schedule year, is treated as decrease in liabilities and
hence as a part of savings. Thus, money used for decreasing the
liabilities of a preceding year, as well as that used to increase assets,
has been treated as savings.
Deficit.— Deficit or negative savings is the term used to mean net
increase in liabilities and/or net decrease in assets. This figure appears
as the net change in assets and liabilities (when the total decrease in
assets and/or increase in liabilities is greater than total increase in
assets and/or decrease in liabilities) and is shown in tables 2 and 5,
of the Tabular Summary. M oney received through the sale of
property, from the settlement or surrender of life-insurance or en­
dowment policies, and repayments by others of the loans made to

1The schedule facsimile may be found in Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulls. 636, 637, and 639 to 641
inclusive.




146

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

them have been treated as money resulting from decreases in assets
or changes in their form and thus may form part of deficits or negative
savings, but not of money income. Money borrowed either directly
or as book credit is a form of increase in liabilities and hence may
comprise a part of deficits or negative saving but is definitely not a
part of money income.
Inheritance.— M oney received by inheritance, essentially a windfall,
cannot be treated as income because it is nonrecurring, nor as invest­
ment, because it may be spent during the year, nor can it be regarded
as a decrease in assets in the same sense as withdrawal of savings or
sale of property. Inheritance has, therefore, been treated as an
independent item, forming a part of total receipts and coordinate with
but not a part of current income and net change in assets and liabilities.
It is shown in tables 2, 4, and 5. It includes only cash inheritances
received during the schedule year. Inheritances of property not sold
during the schedule year are not recorded.
Total money receipts.— The term “ total money receipts” has been
used to describe total money income plus deficits or net negative
savings wherever they occur, plus money received through inheritance.
This item is not shown as such in the Tabular Summary but it may
be computed by adding for any desired group of families the following
items: annual money income, net changes in assets and liabilities
where the sign of the net change is minus (—), and inheritance.
Total money disbursements.— The term “ total money disbursements”
has been used to describe total current expenditures plus surpluses
or net savings or investment wherever they occur. This item is not
shown as such in the Tabular Summary but it may be computed by
adding for any desired group of families the following items: annual
current expenditure and net change in assets and liabilities where the
sign of the net change is plus ( + ) .
Balancing difference.— The difference between total disbursements
and total receipts on any schedule was the balancing difference, and
represented discrepancies due to inability of families to recall to the
last penny every financial transaction of the year. No schedule was
accepted in which this difference was greater than 5 percent of the
larger figure.
Schedule year.— All data shown in the tables are for a 12-month
period unless otherwise specified. The data secured from each family
apply to the schedule year prior to the visit of the field investigator,
ending with any one of four specified quarters: the winter quarter
ending February 28, the spring quarter ending M ay 31, the summer
quarter ending August 31, and the fall quarter ending November 30.
Averages based on all families.— All averages unless otherwise speci­
fied in the table are computed by dividing the appropriate aggregate
by the total number of families in the group to which the aggregate




APPENDIX A

147

applies and not by the smaller number of families in that group actu­
ally making the expenditure for or having the indicated item. The
average expenditure per family purchasing a given item may be readily
computed by multiplying the average for all families in the group
by the number of families in the group to obtain the aggregate expendi­
ture and dividing this figure by the number of families purchasing.

S le ta .— See
as x

appendix A, page 157, for method of handling sales

tax.
N otes o n Individual Tables.
T a b l e 1. — D istr ib u tio n o f fa m ilie s , b y econ om ic level and in co m e level

Families have been classified by economic level according to the amount of
current expenditures per expenditure unit, a measure which takes into account
total family expenditure and family size and composition. The explanation of
this measure and its use will be found on page 166.
Families have been classified by income level according to the net family income,
i. e., total family income minus nonfamily losses and business expense.
T a b l e 2 . — D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s studied, by econ om ic level

(See also table 5 for the same data by income classification)
For tabulation the classification of occupations was made on the basis of the
Works Progress Administration occupational classification. See appendix B,
page 160.
The hom em aker is the person reporting herself responsible for the management
of the household, or in the case of two-generation families, the wife of the “ head
of the fam ily.”
H o u seh o ld and econom ic f a m i ly are defined on page 143. In this table, a person
in the household or economic family for less than a year is treated as the appro­
priate decimal equivalent of a person.
The equivalent number of persons in the household is computed by adding the
total number of weeks spent in the household by each member of the household,
and dividing the resulting aggregate by 52 (the number of weeks in a year).
Number of equivalent persons in other categories listed in the table are computed
in the same manner.
E a r n in g s. — Earnings include wages, salaries, tips, industrial bonuses, and com­
missions. Amounts deducted by employers for pensions, insurance, annuities,
etc., are included in earnings, and also entered in table 4 as payment of premiums
for insurance policies. If a worker, as for example, in the building trades, pays
a helper, the workers’ earnings are entered as net, i. e., the pay to the helper is
deducted.
N et earnings f r o m boarders and lodgers are gross payments for board and lodging
minus the calculated cost of food for boarders. The cost of boarders’ food is
computed by dividing each family’ s annual food expenditure by the number of
food-expenditure units for all the persons eating in the household; the resulting
food expenditure per food-expenditure unit is then multiplied by the number of
food-expenditure units for boarders.
Other net rents are gross rents received from tenants less current expenditures
paid out by the scheduled family in connection with the rented property.
P e n sio n s and in su ran ce a n n u ities include veterans’ pensions, pensions from
employers, compensation received under workmen’s compensation laws, unem-




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MONEY DISBURSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES

ployment benefits from trade-unions, etc., income from annuities purchased, and
benefits from sickness, accident, theft, and fire insurance.
G ifts include mone}^ received from persons not members of the economic family.
Such persons include persons members of the natural but not the economic family.
Other sources o f in co m e include net receipt from sale of home produce, winnings
from gambling, court settlements, payment for child support, rebates, and dividend
checks received on purchases bought through cooperative organizations, etc. In
those cases in which a worker away from home received a cash subsistence allow­
ance, the allowance was entered as other money income and the expenditures for
meals, lodging, etc., were included in the proper expenditure tables. This case
would be distinguished from that in which a salesman, for example, received an
allowance for mileage; in such a case the travel expenditure was considered business
expense and no entry was made either for expenditure or corresponding income
with the exception that net gains on such an account are entered as other money
income.
D ed u ctio n s f r o m in co m e (bu sin ess losses and expen ses) includes nonfamily losses,
i. e., net losses on rented property (current expenditures for property minus gross
rents received) and current expenditures on any unrented real estate other than
own home, etc., and net losses on traveling or subsistence allowance, and any
other business expenses.
Nonbusiness losses, i. e., family losses, are not deducted from income but are
treated as other family expenditures in table 16. For example, contents of a
purse lost, or bail forfeited which had been posted for a friend, are treated as
miscellaneous family expenditure.
S u rp lu s or deficit. — See page 145.
In h erita n ce. — See page 146.
The nu m ber o f gainful workers per fa m i l y is the total number of persons gainfully
employed at any time during the year. Each person is counted as one regardless
of the length of his employment. The definition differs from that of the “ gain­
fully occupied” as used by the census in that a person continuously unemployed
throughout the year is not counted as a gainful worker. On the other hand, a
person is so counted even if his earnings were occasional and he does not neces­
sarily regard himself as regularly in the labor market.
The c h ie f earner is the member with the largest money earnings.
T a b l e 3.— E x p e n d itu r es f o r grou ps o f item s , by econom ic level

(See table 6 for same data by income classification)
For the items included in each group of expenditures see table 8, Food; table 17,
Clothing; table 10, Housing; table 11, Fuel, light, and refrigeration; table 12,
Other household operation; table 18, Furnishings and equipment; table 13; Auto­
mobile and motorcycle purchase, operation, and maintenance, and other trans­
portation; table 14, Personal care, medical care; table 15, Recreation; table 16,
Education, vocation, community welfare, gifts and contributions to persons out­
side economic family, and other items.
Housing includes water, fuel, light, and refrigeration for families not making
payment for these items separately from rent.
(See tables 11 and 12.)
Percentages are based on rounded dollar averages.
T able

4.— D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during the schedule yea r not used f o r

current f a m i l y expenditure, and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use f r o m sources
other than f a m i ly in co m e, by econom ic level

In these tables only the cash or credit changes in assets or liabilities as shown
in transactions during the schedule year are entered. That is, purchase of a




APPENDIX A

149

share of stock is entered as “ Increase in assets: Investment in: Stocks and bonds,”
but increase in the value of a share owned but not sold during the year is not
recorded.
For each individual family only the net amount of the change in any individual
item, where the items correspond in the two tables, is entered on the schedule.
For instance, if a family deposits $200 in a savings account during the year and
withdraws $250, an entry of $50 is made under “ Decrease in assets: Reduction in
cash: In savings account,” and no entry is made under “ Increase in assets:
Increase in cash: In savings account.” The aggregate upon which the average
for the item “ Decrease in assets: Reduction in cash: In savings account,” in
table 4, is based is then the sum of the net reductions of savings account balances
of all families having net reductions in their savings account balances. Similarly
the aggregate upon which the average for the item “ Increase in assets: Increase
in cash: In savings account” is based is the sum of the net increase in savings
account balances of all families having net increases in their savings account
balances.
A transaction affecting two different items, such as the payment of a mortgage
and the receipt of a loan with which to make the payment, is generally not entered
as a single net amount, but the total amounts of both the payment and the loan
are entered separately.
It should be noted that not all items in the two sections of the table correspond.
Payments of premiums of insurance policies are listed under “ Average amount of
funds disposed in: Increase in assets.” The corresponding item, receipts in the
form of annuities, is not listed under “ Average amount of funds received from:
Decrease in assets,” but is entered in tables 2 and 5, under “ Receipts.”
Money
from the sale of goods and chattels is entered in table 4, but purchases of goods
and chattels are entered in the appropriate expenditure tables.
Money from
inheritances is entered in table 4, but contrasting payments by the family sched­
uled (bequests to nonmembers) are listed under current expenditures as “ Gifts
and contributions” (table 16).
In vestm en t i n : Im p ro v e m e n t in ow n hom e includes permanent improvements such
as the addition of a porch or room, or installation of wiring for electricity. Repairs
and replacements are not considered improvements, and are entered in table 10
as current housing expenditures.
In vestm en t i n : Other real estate including real estate m ortgages includes both
improvements made on and purchase of real estate other than owned home.
This item also includes purchase by the scheduled family of real estate mortgages.
P a y m e n t o f p rem iu m s f o r in su ran ce policies includes amounts deducted from
wages for company insurance; trade-union dues when these entitled the payer to
insurance benefits; payments to other organizations when they entitled the payer
to insurance benefits; payments for combined life and sickness and disability
insurance when the amounts assignable to sickness and disability insurance are
considered the smaller part of the total; “ burial insurance” and payments to burial
societies; and payments for life-insurance premiums for persons not members of
the economic family.
In crea se in outstanding loans to others includes increase in loans to any persons
not members of the economic family.
P a y m e n t o f debts to: F ir m s selling on installm ent plan includes only payments
for purchases made prior to the beginning of the schedule year. The entire
amounts due for goods purchased on installment during the schedule year are
entered in the appropriate expenditure tables.
P a y m e n t o f debts to: In d ivid u a ls includes payment of debts incurred prior to the
schedule year to tradesmen, physicians, landlords, and other persons.




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MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 13 SMALL CITIES

P a y m e n t o f debts to: Other includes payment of debts incurred prior to the
schedule year on charge accounts, taxes, assessments, etc.
Sale o f p r o p erty: G oods and chattels does not include articles “ traded in” on the
purchase. When, for instance, an allowance was made for the trade-in of an old
ice box in the purchase of a refrigerator, the amount of the allowance is not
entered in any of the tables and the expenditure shown for the refrigerator (in
table 18) is the price less the allowance. The same procedure was followed, for
automobiles, radios, and other items for which articles were “ traded in” for credit.
In crea se in liabilities includes debts incurred during the schedule year even
though these were later wiped out by bankruptcy proceedings.
In crea se in debts: P a y a b le to firm s selling on insta llm ent plan includes balances
due at the end of the schedule year on goods purchased on installment during the
schedule year. For example, if a family incurred a bill of $250 during the schedule
year for a suite of furniture purchased on the installment plan and paid install­
ments totaling $150 during the year, having a balance still owing of $100 at the
end of the schedule year, the following entries would appear: In table 18, current
expenditure for furniture suite, $250; in table 4, increase in debts payable to firms
selling on installment plan, $100.
In crea se in debts: P a y a b le to in divid u als includes unpaid debts incurred during
the schedule year to tradesmen, physicians, landlords, and other persons.
In crea se in debts: Other debts includes unpaid debts incurred during the schedule
year on charge accounts, taxes, assessments, etc.
In h erita n ce. — See page 146.

T a b l e 5. — D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y in co m e level

(See table 2 for same data by other classification)
Data presented in this table are the same as those in table 2, except that the
families have been classified by net family income level rather than by economic
level.
(See notes on table 2.)
T a b l e 6. — E x p en d itu res f o r groups o f item s , b y in co m e level

(See table 3 for same data by other classification)
Data presented in this table are the same as those in table 3, except that the
families have been classified by net family income level rather than by economic
level.
(See notes on table 3.)
T able

7. — F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r con su m p tion at hom e d uring

1 w eek,

b y econom ic level

In order to avoid overburdening the housewives who cooperated in the study
the details of food purchases were requested only for the week preceding the
agent’s visit. In most cities the field work extended over more than one season.
The differences between the averages secured in the several quarters in such in­
stances reflect not only seasonal differences in food purchases, but also accidental
differences in the economic level and the national backgrounds of the families in
the subsamples interviewed in the different quarters. It was therefore decided to
publish in full for each city only the estimates for that season in which data were
secured from the largest number of families.
The number of equivalent full-time persons shown in table 7 is obtained by
counting the total number of persons eating 21 meals at home during the week
as the appropriate decimal equivalent of a person. A lunch prepared at home
but carried and eaten away from home is included as a meal eaten at home.




APPENDIX A

151

For the method of obtaining the number of food-expenditure units, see appendix
D , page 166.
The quantities and expenditures entered in table 7 are for all food purchased
for use by the household at home or prepared at home to be taken out during the
week, including that for boarders, guests, and servants.
Data were obtained for each of the following items— “ number of families pur­
chasing/’ “ number of families using,” “ average quantity purchased,” “ average
quantity used” — as well as “ expenditure.” Since the quantities purchased and
quantities used in 1 week were in the great majority of cases identical, only data on
quantities purchased are presented in table 7. These figures may be compared
with the figures on expenditure. Likewise, for most, although not all of the
food items, the number of families purchasing and the number using was the
same. Because of limitation of printing space, only the figures for families
using are presented, they being needed to obtain a complete picture of food con­
sumption habits of the families studied.
If comparisons are made between expenditures for quantities of foods at dif­
ferent economic levels, it should be noted that the composition of the families
changes from one level to another. There are in general a larger proportion of
adults at the higher economic levels. Since human needs for and customary
consumption of various specific foods vary considerably for persons of different
age and sex and occupation, it becomes impossible to make a strict comparison
of food consumption with needs at the different economic levels. Thus the needs
for carbohydrates, protein, vitamins, etc., increase in differing ratios for different
sex-age groups; children’s need for milk is approximately twice as great as that for
adults, while the need of heat-producing foods (starches and sugars) of adults is
about twice as great as that of children. Children’ s meat consumption varies
from that of adults at a still different rate. In order to secure figures on quanti­
ties of and expenditures for individual foods purchased which would provide a
reasonably satisfactory basis for comparison and yet not present a misleading
appearance of refinement, data on family purchases of individual foods have
been converted to a per capita basis.
Expenditures or quantity per food-expenditure unit may be computed by
multiplying the average expenditure or quantity per person shown by the aver­
age number of persons per family and dividing the product by the average num­
ber of food-expenditure units per family. However, in interpreting such results,
the factor pointed out in the preceding paragraph must be considered, namely
that a single food relative scale cannot be correctly descriptive of needs of persons
of different sex and age for varying types of specific foods.
In considering quantities purchased it must be remembered that “ pounds”
are a measure of weight only, not of nutritional equivalence.
T a b l e 8 . — A n n u a l f o o d ex p en d itu res, b y econ om ic level

The figures for average annual expenditures for food exclude the computed
cost of food consumed by boarders.
For the method of obtaining the number of food-expenditure units see appendix
D , page 166.
M e a ls bought and eaten a w a y fr o m hom e include tips.
C a n d y, ice cream , d rin k s, etc., bought and eaten a w a y fr o m hom e includes ex­
penditure for all between-meal food and drink consumed away from home.

T a b l e 9. — H o u sin g fa c ilities, by econom ic level

The facilities described in this table apply to the dwelling occupied by the
family at the end of the schedule year, and which may or may not have been
2 0 0 9 8 2 ° — 41--------11




15 2

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS----1 3 SMALL CITIES

the family's dwelling unit during the entire schedule year.
No attempt was
made by the field agents to determine whether or not a facility met any defined
standard either as to quality or as to state of repair.
A verage m onthly rental rate is the rental rate for the house inhabited by the
family at the end of the schedule year. (Note that this rate is not necessarily
the same as that shown in table 10, Housing expenditures, which is the average
rate paid throughout the year.)
A detached house is free, standing with open space on all sides; a sem idetached
house has open space on three sides; a row house has open space on two sides;
a tw o -fa m ily house is one designed for occupancy by two families, one above
the other.
M u ltip le dw elling. — A building designed for occupancy by three or more families
has been classed as a multiple dwelling.
G arden sp ace is defined as space actually devoted to a garden or to a lawn on
the premises or belonging to the dwelling.
T

able

10.— H o u s in g ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level

The type and amount of expenditure by a family for housing necessarily vary
with type of tenure, dwelling, and manner of payment for heating. Separate
sections of the table are therefore presented for families who can be classified
into homogeneous groups with respect to housing expenditures. These are: II,
“ Home owners” ; III, “ House renters” ; IV , “ Apartment renters with heat included
in rent” ; V, “ Apartment renters with heat not included in rent.” Families whose
housing arrangements changed during the year are not shown separately, but
are included in section I, “ All families in survey.” Section I therefore includes
families shown in sections II, III, IV, and V, and families with the following
housing arrangements: Owning a principal home during part of the year and
renting a principal home during part of the year; having as a principal home a
house for a part of the year and an apartment for a part of the year; renting as
principal home an apartment with heat included in rent for a part of the year
and an apartment with heat not included in rent for a part of the year.
A vacation hom e is one which the family has for vacation purposes, and rents or
owns simultaneously with its principal home. Simultaneous rental or ownership
of a vacation home does not exclude families in sections II, III, IV, and V.
In vestm en t in hom e includes down payments, payment of principal on mortgages,
and permanent improvements (not repairs) on home.
In cases where the home owned and occupied by the family was a two-family
house, only that portion of the investment or expenditure which applied to the
owner’s own living quarters has been included under “ Average amount invested”
or “ Average current housing expenditure.”
The proportions used in making
this allocation were based on the comparative monthly rental values of the two
dwellings under consideration. The amount of housing expenditure allocated to
the rented portion of the house was deducted from the gross rent received from
the tenant to arrive at “ Other net rents” (tables 2, and 5). The amount of the
investment allocated to the rented portion of the house was entered as “ Invest­
ment in other real estate” (table 4).
T a xes. — Amounts due on “ taxes” or “ rent” are entered under these respective
headings even if unpaid at the end of the schedule year. The amounts unpaid
at the end of the schedule year are also entered in table 4 as “ Increase in debts:
Other debts.”
F ir e in su ran ce and lia bility in su ra n ce. — No attempt was made to prorate pay­
ments for previous or coming years. The total amount paid during the year was
considered current expenditure.




APPENDIX A

153

Rent .— The rent reported covered the use of such facilities as heat, light,
furniture, and water when these were provided by the landlord.
Families living in rented homes and subrenting portions as apartments were
scheduled provided there were separate meters for gas and electricity, that heat
costs could be estimated, and that not more than two families (including the
scheduled family) had dwellings there. In such cases only that amount of the
rent, operating expenditures, and expenditure for repairs which applied to the
portion of the house occupied by the scheduled family was entered. The remain­
ing expenditures for rent, operating, and repairs were deducted from the gross
rent received from the tenant to arrive at “ Other net rents” (tables 2 and 5).
The proportions used in allocating housing expenditure between the two families
were based on the comparative rental rates of the two dwellings.
No attempt was made to allocate the cost of space rented to roomers.
Concessions are defined as the money value of rent given free by the landlord
for a short time as an inducement to the family to rent the living quarters or to
offset the expense of moving.
Apartments are defined as dwellings in multiple dwellings or in two-family
houses designed for occupancy by two families, one above the other.
(See notes
on table 9, p. 152.) A dwelling consisting of rooms set apart for the use of the
scheduled family within a house originally designed for occupancy by one family
was also classed as an apartment.
Room s .— In the count of the number of rooms, dining rooms, living rooms,
bedrooms, libraries, sewing rooms, kitchens, kitchenettes, and enclosed porches
are included. Halls, closets, storerooms, pantries, open porches, laundries,
alcoves, rooms used for business purposes, dinettes, and bathrooms are not
included.
T

able

11.— Fuel , light, and refrigeration expenditures , by economic level

The type and amount of expenditure by a family for fuel, light, and refrigera­
tion necessarily vary with type of dwelling and manner of payment for heating.
Separate sections of the table are therefore presented for families whose expendi­
tures for fuel, light, and refrigeration may be considered homogeneous. Families
whose type of dwelling or arrangement for payment for heating changed during
the year are not shown separately but are in section I, “ All families in survey.”
Section I therefore includes families shown in sections II, III, IV, and V and
families with the following arrangements for type of dwelling or payment for
heating: Having a house part of the year and an apartment for part of the year;
having heat included in rent or ownership payments during part of the year and
not so included during part of the year; renting a home for part of the year and
owning a home for part of the year.
It should be noted that several items listed in this table might have been used
for purposes other than heating, cooking, lighting, and refrigeration. For in­
stance, electricity is used for radios, curling irons, etc.; gasoline is used for cleaning.
T a b l e 1 2 .— Household operation expenditures other than fo r fu e l , light, and refrig­

eration, by economic level
Water rent includes only water rent paid separately from rent for dwelling.
Telephone includes both subscription and pay-station costs.
Domestic service includes maid service, laundress, furnace man, etc.
Household paper includes toilet paper, wax paper, shelf paper, etc.
Stationery , pens , pencils , in k .— Expenditures for school supplies are entered in

table 16 under “ Formal education.”




MONEY DISBURSEMENTS— 1 3 SMALL CITIES

154

In su r a n ce on fu r n itu r e is generally paid for a 3-year period.
The entire expendi­
ture was entered without regard to the period covered.
In terest o n debts does not include interest paid on mortgages on home (table 10).
Other item s includes shoe polish, candles, clothespins, clotheslines, grass cutting,
snow shoveling, and tips to maids, janitors, elevator boys, and garbage collectors,
etc.
T

able

13.— T ra n sporta tion ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level

The expenditure shown for purchase of automobiles and motorcycles is the
purchase price less allowances for the trade-in of old cars and includes carrying
charges for installment purchases.
Garage rent and p a rk in g includes in some cities a special tax levied on private
garages for purposes of fire inspection.
R en t o f autom obile a n d /or m otorcycle includes expenditures for gasoline, oil, etc.,
for a vehicle not owned by the family. It usually covered payment to a neighbor
for rides to work in his car, or payment for gasoline and oil for operation of a
borrowed car.
Other transportation exp en se includes dues for membership in automobile clubs.
T

able

14.— P erso n a l care exp en d itu res and m edical care ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic
level

P erson a l care services. — A combination beauty or barber service charge was
prorated among the services supplied.
Other waves includes marcel, water, or finger wave.
Other p ersonal care services includes facial treatments, massage, etc.
Toilet soa p does not include laundry soap used for personal care.
T ooth p o w d er , tooth paste, m ou th washes does not include soda and salt used for
the cleaning of teeth.
C osm etics and toilet p reparation s includes paper handkerchiefs and sanitary
napkins as well as face powder, rouge, perfume, etc.
Under “ Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles” are included compacts
and mirrors.
M ed ic a l care. — Frequently families knew definitely the total expenditure
incurred for an illness but were not sure of the correct allocation among such
items as physicians’ services, hospital room, operating room charges, and medi­
cines. Whenever possible flat rate charges for such services as obstetrical care or
tonsillectomy were prorated among the services received. Where information
for such prorating could not be furnished, the entire charge was entered as expendi­
ture for general practitioner, specialist, or clinic, as the case might be. Therefore
expenditures for total medical care are probably more accurate than expenditures
for individual items of medical service.
S p ecia list and other practitioner includes heart specialists, pediatricians, eye, ear,
nose, and throat specialists, osteopaths, chiropractors, midwives, Christian Science
practitioners, etc.
M e d ic in e and drugs includes the cost of filling prescriptions, home remedies,
patent medicines, adhesive tape, bandage, etc. Cod-liver oil was classified as a
food.
(See table 7.)
E y eg la sse s includes the cost of examination when the examination was given by
the same person or firm from whom glasses were purchased.
M e d ic a l a p p lia n ces includes hot-water bottles, crutches, etc.
A ccid en t and health in su ra n ce. — When accident and health insurance premium
payments are included with payments for life insurance and the life insurance




APPENDIX A

155

portion is considered the greater, the expenditures are not entered in table 14
but in table 4 under “ Payment of premiums for insurance policies: Life insurance.”
Other m edical care includes expenditures for X -ra y, operating room, blood trans­
fusions, circumcision, etc.
T

able

15.— R ecreation expenditures, b y econom ic level

C a m era s, film s, and photographic equipm ent includes cost of films and developing.
Athletic eq u ipm en t and su p p lies does not include clothes for sports.

Expendi­
tures for sport clothes are entered in table 17.
P ets (purchase and care) includes dog licenses and food purchased especially
for pets.
E n te rta in in g : I n hom e, except f o o d and drinks, includes bridge prizes, etc.
Other recreation includes amusement park and dance hall admissions, 1-day
boat excursions, losses at cards, gambling and betting, cost of lottery tickets,
Christmas-tree decorations, expenditures for hobbies not elsewhere classified,
admission to fairs, spending money assigned to individual family members of
which no account could be given.
T a b l e 16.— F orm a l education, vocation, c o m m u n ity w elfare, gifts and con tribu tion s ,
and m iscellan eou s ex p en d itu res, b y econ om ic level
F orm a l education

Expenditures for m em bers a w a y fr o m hom e include tuition and school supplies
but not the cost of board and lodging or school uniforms for members attending
school away from home.
Expenditures for m em bers at hom e include tuition, books, stationery and sup­
plies, fees for music and dancing lessons, etc., paid for by the economic family.
V oca tion
U n io n dues or fe e s . — Payments to trade-unions with life insurance plans, where

dues and life insurance premium payments cannot be separated, are entered on
table 4 as “ Payments of premium for insurance policies: Life insurance.”
Other item s o f vocational exp en se include chauffeurs’ licenses, tools, fees to
employment offices, etc.
C o m m u n ity welfare
T a xes. — P o ll, in co m e, and personal p rop erty.

Does not include taxes on owned
home (see p. 152) or on other real estate (see p. 147), or sales tax (see p. 157), or in­
direct taxes, or automobile licenses and taxes.
G ifts and con tributions

This section includes, only gifts to persons not members of the economic family.
Gifts to organizations or institutions are not included, but are listed under
“ Community welfare.”
C h ristm a s, birthday, etc., gifts include money gifts, and purchase price of items
given to nonmembers of the economic family.
S u p p o r t o f relatives includes money sent to relatives whether living in the United
States or in foreign countries. It also includes contributions to the funeral
expense of a relative not a member of the economic family.
L o sse s includes only family or nonbusiness losses.
Examples of such losses
are payment of notes of personal friends endorsed by members of the economic
family; bail forfeited which had been posted for a friend; premiums paid during
the schedule year on insurance or annuities forfeited through failure to keep
policies up to date; accidental loss of cash; payments on items bought on the
installment plan and lost for nonpayment on installments, without recompense




156

M O N EY DISBURSEMENTS— 13

SMALL CITIES

for amounts paid. Business losses are deducted from family income, see page 148,
Other includes dues and contributions to political organizations, expenses for
marriage licenses, christenings, bail, fines not connected with traffic violations, etc.
T a b l e 17.— C lothing exp en d itu res, by econom ic level

All figures in table 17 with the exception of those in section I are based upon
data for persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks. Expenditures for
persons dependent on family funds for less than 52 weeks are not shown in the
sections for different sex and age groups but are included in the total shown in
section I. These expenditures have been excluded from the detailed sections for
the reason that clothing expenditures for a person dependent on family funds for
only part of the year would be unrepresentative, since the family might buy all
or none of the year’s clothing supply for that person during the period he was
dependent on family funds.
For computation of averages other than those presented in this table, for
example, “ average number of articles purchased per person purchasing” or
“ average expenditure per person purchasing” see appendix A— Notes on table 17,
Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletins Nos. 636, 637, and 639 to 641, inclusive.
Section I.— For method of computation of nu m ber o f clothing expend iture u n its
per f a m i l y see appendix D, page 168. This computation is based on all members
of the economic family, whether or not they were dependent on the family fund
for 52 weeks.
R e a d y -m a d e clothing , d ry clea n in g , and accessories includes all items listed in
sections III through X I for persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks plus
such expenditures for persons dependent on family funds for less than 52 weeks.
Y a rd goods and fin d in g s .— Findings include thread, needles, scissors, buttons, etc.
C lothing received as gifts includes neckties, stockings, etc., received as Chrsitmas
and birthday gifts from persons outside the economic family. It also includes
second-hand clothes given to the family.
Expense for uniforms, etc., for work are included in clothing expenditures (not
as vocational expense in table 16 nor as losses or business expense in tables 2 and 5).
Section II.— The figures in section II are based on data only for persons depend­
ent on the family funds for 52 weeks.
Sections III through X I .— In these sections the figures are based on data only
for persons dependent on the family funds for 52 weeks. Total for each sex and
age group does not include expenditures for yard goods and findings and paid
help for sewing. These are presented only in section I for all sex-age groups
combined.
B o y s : P l a y s u its .— Are heavy suits for children’s outdoor wear.
M e n and B o y s : S h o es, w o rk .— Are shoes for heavy work, not, for example, shoes
worn to work by a white-collar employee.
M e n and B o y s : S h o es, other .— Includes bedroom slippers.
M e n and B o y s : A c c e s s o r ie s .— Includes belts, suspenders, collar buttons, shoe­
strings, etc.
M e n and B o y s : O ther .— Includes jewelry and watches, and rental charges for
uniforms and aprons. In cases where rental and laundering charges for uniforms
and aprons could not be separated, the entire amount is entered here.
W o m e n and G irls: D resses, cotton, h ou se .— Are defined as cotton dresses bought
for housework.
W o m e n and G irls: A c c es s o r ie s .— Includes hairpins, hairnets, belts, sanitary
belts, dress ornaments, etc.
W o m e n and G irls: Other .— Includes jewelry and watches, and rental charges for
uniforms and aprons. In cases where rental and laundering charges for uniforms
and aprons could not be separated the entire amount is entered here.




157

APPENDIX A
T

able

1 8 .—

Furnishings and equipment expenditures, hy economic level

For the method of entry of expenditures for items bought on the installment
plan and with trade-in allowances see page 144.
For computation of averages other than those presented in this table, for
example, “ average number of articles purchased per family purchasing” or “aver­
age expenditure per family purchasing,” see Appendix A — Notes on table 18,
Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletins 636, 637, and 639 to 641, inclusive.
Textile furnishings: Other.— Includes paid help for making curtains, furniture
covers, etc., and yard goods used in making home furnishings.
Miscellaneous equipment: Other.— Includes paint and lumber for repair of house­
hold equipment, play pens for children, and typewriters.
Note that radios are not classed “ Furnishings and equipment” but as l' Recre­
1
ation,” table 15.

Sales Tax
California .—A State sales tax of 2% percent on all commodity sales
at retail was in effect throughout the schedule year in Modesto.
Services such as barbering, cleaning, dyeing, and shoe repairing were
exempt. Occasional sales between private persons, as sales of used
furniture, were exempt. All commodities sold by established retail
dealers, such as food, cigarettes, clothing, furniture, etc., were taxable.
The tax was levied on small sales as follows:
Sales of—
140 or less.
$0.15-$0.59
$0.60-$1.05
$1.06-$1.49
$1.50-$1.90
$1.91-$2.30
Etc.

A m o u n t o f tax

__ No tax.
10
20
30
40
50

Michigan .— A tax of 3 percent on “sales at retail” was in effect
from July 1, 1933, through the entire period of scheduling in Mar­
quette. The tax was levied on purchases of all gooods including sales
of electricity for light, heat, and power, natural and artificial gas, and
water. There was, however, no tax on municipally owned public
utilities (electricity, gas, and water). Newspapers were not taxable,
but the tax did apply to the sale of magazines. Services were not
taxable.
Nevada .— There was no general sales tax in effect during the period
of the investigation.
N ew Hampshire .— There was no general sales tax in effect during the
period of the investigation.
In the expenditure data for Marquette and Modesto presented in
this report, the sales tax is included as part of the expenditure item
on which it is paid.




Appendix B
Selection of Families to be Interviewed
The Method of Choosing the Sample
The method to be used in choosing the sample to be included in a
study of the families of employed wage earners and clerical workers
presents a serious problem in the absence of a recent census giving for
every family, at each address, the occupation of all the earners in the
family, and the relief status of the family in the last year. Since no
census data were available for use in this investigation, it was decided
to use employers’ current lists of employees as the basis for sampling
in all the cities where the study was carried on. The methods used
differed from city to city only insofar as the available data on the
names and addresses of employers, and the number of their employees
differed from city to city.
In order to provide for an adequate representation of establishments
of all types the number of employees in an organization was taken
into account in drawing the sample. Wherever possible a complete
list of the employers within the city area with the number of their
employees was secured, including industrial establishments, banks,
insurance companies, wholesale and retail distributors, hotels and
restaurants, transportation companies, public utilities, and Federal,
State, county, and city Governments. The names of the employers
with the numbers of their employees were arranged by industry, and
the numbers of employees were added in such a way as to secure
cumulative totals.
In cities where it was possible to obtain complete lists of employers,
the grand total of employees was divided by the number of families
planned for the survey in the given city, to obtain a sampling ratio.
This ratio was applied to the cumulative totals of employees on the
employer list (beginning with a number chosen at random) to secure
a new list of employer names, selected at random, and the number of
sample employee names to be drawn from the personnel lists of each
selected employer. In cities where complete lists of employers were
not available, separate sampling ratios were derived for each industrial
or trade group, following the same procedure for each group as out­
lined above for the city as a whole. This procedure was adopted to
prevent underrepresentation of a given industry or trade group due to
158




APPENDIX B

159

the fact that its list of employers was incomplete, and permitted a
reasonable distribution of the sample among the various lines of
business on the basis of 1930 census data adjusted to take account
of known changes in business conditions since 1930.
Since the employer lists did not give the information necessary to
determine whether employees were members of families, whether their
families had been on relief during the past year, and what was the
amount of the family income, at least five names listed directly after
the name of the “ sample employee” were drawn, to provide for sub­
stitutes in case the first employee whose name was drawn had no
family or his famliy was not eligible for the sample. (See p. 159 for
rules for determining eligibility.) If the name of the “ sample”
employee to be chosen from a given employer’s list was drawn too
near to the end of the list to secure the five or more substitute names
in the usual way, the quota of substitutes was completed by taking
the names at the beginning of the list of employees in the same
establishment.
The necessity for having a file of substitute names made it seem
advisable to limit the sampling to employers of five or more workers in
the smaller cities and 10 or more in the larger cities, since the time and
funds available for drawing the sample were limited, and visiting
employers for the purpose of drawing sample names was a very
time-consuming process.
Rules for Determining Eligibility of Families
After the sample names had been drawn in the manner outlined
above, field agents were sent to visit the families of all the employees
whose names were the first drawn for each number ascertained by
application of the sampling ratios. A schedule was obtained from
that family if it was willing and able to furnish the information and
met the requirements specified below. If the family failed to meet
any of the following specifications, or was fo;r some reason unwilling
to give the information, the family of the employee whose name had
occurred immediately next on the list of the same employer was
visited. If the family of the second employee proved ineligible, the
third was visited, and so on.
1. Contact through chief earner.—When families are selected by
names of individuals from lists of employees, multiple-earner families
would be overrepresented unless some measure was taken to prevent
it. A family with three earners on the lists of employees would have
approximately three chances 1 to be drawn in the sample as against
one chance for the family with one earner. Since families with sev­
eral earners are more likely to have higher incomes and less likely to
1 See Bureau of Labor Statistics Bull. No. 641, appendix G, p. 384, footnote 8.




160

MONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

have young children than are families with only one earner, such over­
exposure would have impaired the representativeness of the sample.
In order to prevent such overrepresentation in the cities studied,
two methods were employed, either of which reduced to equality the
chance of each family to be included in the final sample. In
Modesto and Reno, schedules were secured only from families in which
the name of the employee drawn from the lists of employees was the
name of the chief earner in the family, i. e., member earning the largest
amount of money during the year. If a visit to the family disclosed
that a name of a member other than that of the chief earner had been
drawn, the family was not scheduled. Since a family can have only
one chief earner, this procedure effectively equalized the chances of
inclusion in the sample for all families. By this method the number
of families with more than one earner in the sample was kept to a
number proportionate to the number of multiple-earner families in the
entire wage earner and lower-salaried clerical group. In the New
Hampshire cities and Marquette, the alternative procedure was used:
a family was scheduled regardless of whether the name drawn from
the employee list was that of the chief earner and an adjustment was
made in the course of tabulation of the data to correct for this possible
overrepresentation .2
2.
Occupation of chief earner.— In each family included in the survey,
the chief earner is either a wage earner or a lower-salaried clerical
worker. The classification of occupations according to economic
groups presented by A. M. Edwards 3 in an article based on census
data was used in determining whether a person of given occupation
should be considered a wage earner or a clerical worker. An exception
was made in that the chief earner might not be a foreman, overseer,
or domestic servant in private families, although these occupations
are treated as wage earners in the Edwards classification. As the
study progressed, the need for a more detailed classification of jobs
became^ urgent. When the Works Progress Administration issued a
manual giving more detailed specifications adapted from definitions
of the census of 1930, the new classifications4 were employed to
assist in the problem of determining whether a specific type of work
should properly be treated as part of the occupational group being
covered by this investigation. The investigation included families of
chief earners in the groups classified as office workers, salesmen, and
kindred workers; skilled and semiskilled workers in building and
2 See appendix D, p. 173.
3 A Socio-Economic Grouping of the Gainful Worker in the United States. Journal of the American
Statistical Association, 1933, vol. 28, pp. 377-387.
4 Works Progress Administration Circular No. 2: Occupational classification and code, July 1935; and
Works Progress Administration Circular No. 2A: Index of occupations (alphabetical arrangement), oc­
cupational classification and code, September 1935.




APPENDIX B

161

construction; skilled and semiskilled workers in manufacturing and
other industries; and unskilled laborers and domestic and personal
service workers (except in private families). In a few instances where
the chief earner was found to have pursued two occupations during
the year prior to the visit of the field investigator, one an occupation
classified as wage earner or clerical, and the other as a profession or
as the proprietor of owned business, it was ruled that the family was
to be included in the study unless the earnings from the profession
exceeded the earnings from the wage-earner or clerical occupation, or
unless the income from the owned business was more than one-half
the earnings from the wage-earner or clerical occupation, or the
expenses of the business could not be separated from the family
expenses.
3. Earnings of chief earner.— No family in which the chief earner
had not earned at least $300 during the schedule year was included.
The family of a chief earner classified as a clerical worker, who earned
$2,000 or over during the schedule year, or $200 or over during any
one month, was excluded. No upper limit was placed on the earnings
of wage earners, nor on total earnings of all members of the family
combined, i. e., on family income as such.
4. Occupation and income of subsidiary earners.— No restriction
was placed upon the occupation of subsidiary earners with one ex­
ception noted below. A family in which there was a subsidiary earner
who was, for example, a professional worker or domestic servant in a
private home was included provided the annual earnings of this worker
were less than those of the chief earner. Families were excluded if a
subsidiary earner was in business for himself and his business income
and expenditure were so intermingled with the family’s that it was
impossible to separate them (as for example, a family where the wife
carried on a small hair-dressing business in or adjacent to the family’s
living quarters and used for the business, gas and electricity recorded
on the same meters as those recording the gas and electricity used for
the operation of the household). Families in which a subsidiary
earner was in business for himself were included if the business income
and expenditure could be separated from that of the family and the
net income from the owned business was less than half of the chief
earner’s earnings.
If a subsidiary earner was a clerical worker and earned over $2,000
during the schedule year or over $200 during any one month, the fam­
ily was ineligible for inclusion in the sample.
5. Employment minimum.— In order to avoid the distortion of
spending which results from prolonged unemployment and unantici­
pated curtailment of employment the Study was limited to employed
wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers. Figures as to the
number of days of employment characteristic of wage earners and




162

M ONEY DISBURSEMENTS---- 13

SMALL CITIES

clerical workers not being available, it was necessary to set limits be­
low which a worker could not be regarded as having been employed for
the schedule year. Only those families were included in which one
wage earner or lower-salaried clerical worker within the economic fam­
ily had worked a minimum of 1,008 hours spread over a minimum of 36
weeks during the year. (This minimum was chosen to represent an
average employment of 3% days of 8 hours in each of 36 weeks.) Fami­
lies in which the chief earner was employed in distinctly seasonal indus­
tries as clothing manufacturing and building were scheduled if the chief
earner had employment for as much as 28 hours in each of 30 weeks.
These minima, however, are not to be regarded as criteria representing
adequate employment.
6. Definition of fam ily .— The Study was limited to private economic
families of two or more persons sharing their incomes and living
together, sharing the same table, eating not less than two meals a
day prepared at home for at least 11 months. In addition families
whose situation during the year just previous to the visit of the
Bureau’s investigator was difficult or impossible to analyze on a
statistical basis were excluded from the survey. Specific reasons for
such exclusion were as follows:
{a) The homemaker worked away from home both day and night
for more than 78 days in the year.
(ib) Families boarding for more than 1 month.
(c) Presence of more than the equivalent of two boarders and/or
lodgers, i. e., more than 104 boarder and/or lodger weeks (not includ­
ing related persons giving complete records of their incomes and
expenditures).
(d) Families having guests for more than the equivalent of 26 guest
weeks.5
(e) Families having another family or two unrelated dependent
persons over 21 years of age living with them and completely de­
pendent on them (unless the dependents were parents of the home­
maker, husband, or chief earner).
7. Families not on relief.—No families who received direct relief or
work relief during the schedule year were included.
8. Family income.— (a) No family was included which had an
annual family income less than $500 during the schedule year.
(6) No upper limit was placed upon family income as such but no
families were included who received more than one-fourth of their
incomes from interest, dividends, royalties, speculative gains, or rents
(not including net receipts from boarders and lodgers).
(c)
No family which received income from an owned business equal
to more than half of the chief earner’s earnings was scheduled.
5
Guests were defined as persons not entirely dependent on the family funds who received board and
lodging from the family without money payment but from whom it was impossible to secure data on income
and expenditures.




APPENDIX B

163

(d) No family which received gifts or income in kind of a value
«
equal to a fourth of its total money income was scheduled.
(e) No family which received rent in payment for services was
scheduled.
(f) No family which received 3 months or more free rent was
scheduled.
9.
Residence.— Families must have resided in the area of the
investigation for 9 months or more.




Appendix G
Field Procedure
Interview Method of Securing Data
The original data for this report came from families who estimated
and calculated their various expenditures, with the help of special
forms interpreted by trained field workers. The investigators were
provided with a schedule which called for the entry of data on income
and outgo in considerable detail, partly because the details themselves
are of value and partly because it is easier for informants to remember
the individual items of their family transactions than it is to provide
the investigator with summary figures. This method was used rather
than asking the families to keep records of disbursements at the time
disbursements were made, because the procedure followed makes
possible the inclusion of many families who would have been unwilling
or unable to keep regular household accounts. (For facsimile of
schedule used, see Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletins 636, 637, and
639 to 641.)
•
No schedule was accepted for summarization in the present study
unless the figures on total money receipts and total money disburse­
ments agreed at least within 5 percent of the larger figure. It is not to
be hoped that all the figures in each schedule were accurate to that
extent, but there is no reason to suppose any persistent bias in the
estimates has appeared in the course of the survey.
Check-Interviewing
At the beginning of the field work one out of every five schedules
submitted by each agent was checked by one of the supervisors in an
interview with the family having originally provided the schedule data.
The Washington office provided the field office with specific instruc­
tions concerning the methods of handling the check-interviews. The
schedules to be checked were chosen at radom. The name of the
agent making the first call was not known to the check-interviewer,
thus eliminating any possible personal bias. In returning to the
family for a check-interview, the investigator provided the informant,
usually the homemaker, with a brief summary of the family expendi­
tures and the balance of receipts and disursements, checked it with
her, and checked also the details of some section of the schedule,
selected at random.
164




APPENDIX C

165

Later in the course of the field work, when the check-interviews dis­
closed that certain agents were having difficulty in obtaining accurate
information, a larger proportion of the schedules collected by these
particular agents was checked. When the check showed that the
work of certain agents was very accurate, only 1 out of 10 schedules
was verified by a return interview. As the work progressed, relief
workers whose schedules had proven wholly reliable were advanced
to the position of check-interviewers.
Food Check Lists for 1 Week
Previous experience in collecting statistics on the details of annual
food expenditures has shown the difficulty of securing reliable estimates
of the year’s purchases. The schedule for this investigation was,
therefore, prepared with two sections dealing with food expenditures.
The first was in effect a check list providing in detail for the entry of
the quantities of foods purchased and used, and expenditures for foods
in the week immediately preceding the interview. The second section
was prepared to contain a summary of food expenditures during the
year. The section for entry of foods during 1 week (which listed over
194 foods) served two purposes. It secured from each family detailed
estimates of food purchases with as high a degree of accuracy as is
possible unless supervised records of purchases are obtained, and it
served to remind the homemaker of her customary expenditures, thus
making it easier to estimate the family’s total outlay for food in the
four quarters of the year covered by the schedule.




Appendix D
Analytical Procedure
Income Classification
Data on family composition, earnings and income, and group ex­
penditures are summarized by income levels at $300 intervals to pro­
vide a basis for comparison of the results from this investigation with
earlier studies.
Classification by Economic Level
The analysis of data on family expenditure is complicated by the
fact that, although, in general, the family spends as a unit, families
are not comparable units, because of variation in size and age com­
position. A family of two adults with an income of $1,200 is obvi­
ously on an economic plane considerably higher than a family of six
adults with the same income. Statistical analyses of the expenditures
of a sample of families chosen at random is further complicated by
the fact that in most cities the size of the family among wage earners
and clerical workers increases as income increases, as larger family
incomes are more apt to come from increases in the number of earners,
than from the higher wages of the husband.
To meet these difficulties as well as to take into account the fact
that* consumer demand varies with age, sex, and occupation, the
families were sorted according to economic level as measured by
amount spent per total-expenditure unit. To ascertain the eco­
nomic level of each family the first difficulty arose in the necessity of
taking into account the variations in consumer demand within each
family due to differences in family composition.
Expenditure Unit— Food Relatives
The problem was met in the present investigation by computing
separately for food, clothing, and for other items, the customary
expenditure of persons of different age, sex, and occupation. The
scale used in computing the relative expenditure for individuals for
food was based on data secured from the Bureau of Home Economics,
showing quantities of food estimated as actually consumed by persons
of different age, sex, and physical activity. These estimates were
based partly on the energy requirements of persons of different age,
sex, and occupation, and partly on data on actual food consumption
of families of urban wage earners and clerical workers. (To have
secured an adequate number of records of the actual food consumption
of individuals for this purpose would have required an expenditure
far beyond the resources of either of the Bureaus concerned.)
166




167

APPENDIX D

It was necessary to convert estimated quantities of food consumed
by persons of different age and sex into estimated food costs. This
was done by multiplying these quantities of food by retail food prices
to find the ratio which expenditures for women and boys of various
age groups bore to expenditures for full-time employed men aged
20 and over. The problem arose as to whether the prices used as
multipliers should be individual city prices or averages for the United
States. A test was conducted on a sample of 12 cities where the Study
was in process in the winter of 1935. For each of these cities, the
same quantities of food were multiplied by the respective retail food
prices for the given city. It was found that, despite the use of varying
prices from city to city, the relative expenditures for women and
children bore approximately the same ratio to those for employed
men in each city. It was therefore decided to use, for all 12 of these
cities, a scale of consumer expenditure for food based on United
States average prices in 1934. The same procedure was followed for
all other cities, with adjustment for changes in food prices as the
investigation advanced. The food expenditure scales were recalcu­
lated on the basis of average prices in the year ending May 31, 1935,
and on average prices in the calendar year 1935, and these food rela­
tives were used for schedules in cities where the field work was
completed later. Within a given city, where field work extended over
a considerable period, each schedule was coded with the food relatives
for the period most nearly corresponding to the schedule year.
T a b l e A . — Relative fo o d expen ditu res f o r p erson s o f different age, sex, and
occu p ation

1
Calculated on the basis of—

Age-sex-occupation group

,
M a le
Boys under 2 ____ - _
___ __ _ _________ __ _ __
Boys 2 and under 4__
____
_
____ __
Boys 4 and under 7._ __ _ _ ______ _ __
_ _______ ____ ___
Boys 7 and under 9____ __________
_ __ _______ _______ ___
Boys 9 and under 11____ ____________
______
Boys 11 and under 13___________ _
_______
Boys 13 and under 16 _ _ _
_ _
__ __
Boys 16 and under 2 0 _ _ _ _
__
_ _ __
_____
Men, 20 and over, unemployed and part-time employed. .. __. __
Men, 20 and over, full-time employed
...

Average
Average
Average
prices, cal­ prices, year prices, cal­
ending
endar year
endar year
May 31,
1934
1935
1935

0. 51
.54
.61
. 79
.86
.92
1.01
1.02
.90
1.00

0.48
.52
.59
. 77
.84
.91
1.00
1. 02
.90
1.00

0.48
. 51
.58
. 76
.84
.90
1.00
1.02
.89
1.00

.51
.54
.61
.79
.86
.92
.83
. 92

. 48
.52
. 59
. 77
.84
.91
. 83
.92

.48
.51
.58
. 76
.84
.90
.82
.92

F em a le

Girls under 2
_
____
Girls 2 and under 4 __ _.
. . . . ___ _
_______ _
Girls 4 and under 8_______ ' _
______________________ _ _ __
Girls 8 and under 11
_____________
__ ___ ______
__
Girls 11 and under 14__ ____________ __ _ __________________ ___
Girls 14 and under 20 _______________________________ _ _______
Women, 20 and over, moderately active
______ _
Women, 20 and over, active
_ _____ _

1 Based on estimated actual diets of urban wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers prepared by
the Bureau of Home Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture.
20 0 9 8 2°— 41-------12




MONEY DISBUKSEMENTS----13 SMALL CITIES

168

Expenditure Unit—Clothing Relatives
The data secured in the present investigation were used as the basis
for computing the scales of expenditure for clothing of persons of
different age, sex, and occupation. The average annual clothing
expenditures of white men wage earners and clerical workers, 21
through 35 years old, in all the large cities covered in the present
study were $56.68. This amount is regarded as unity (1.00) in
arriving at standard scales of expenditure for persons of other ages,
sex, or occupation. In the following table average clothing expendi­
tures of each class of persons are expressed as percentages of the
average clothing expenditures of this group of employed men.
T

able

B.—

R e la t iv e c lo th in g e x p e n d i t u r e s f o r p e r s o n s o f d iffe r e n t a g e, s e x , a n d
o c c u p a tio n 1

[1.00=($56.68), expenditure of male wage earners and clerical workers aged 21 and under 36 in large citiesl
Male
Age

Under 5,
and at
school

Under 2___ ________________
2 and under 6.......................
6 and under 9______________
9 and under 12_____________
12 and under 15_______ ______

.88
1.01

Clerical

Wage Under 5,
and at
earner
school

0.19
.34
.48
.53
.63

15 and under 18___________ _
18 and under 21____________
21 and under 24_____________
24 and under 27 ^____
27 and under 30__________

At
home

Female

30 and under 36 _
______
36 and under 4 2 ____________
42 and under 48_____________
48 and under 54______ ____
54 and under 60 _
___ _
60 and over __ _ __ ___

At
home

Clerical

Wage
earner

0.19
.38
.47
.56
.77
0.74
.80
.57 ■
.48
.46
.44
.43
.41
.39
.37
.35

1.02
1.14
1.14
1.13
1.10

1.02
1.13
1.07
1.00
.96

1.04
.94
.87
.80
.75
.65

.92
.87
.81
.75
.69
.60

1.01
1.28

0.94
1.05
1.04
1.02
1.00

1.08
1.60
1.66
1.64
1.62

1.08
1.63
1.60
1.46
1.36

.96
.88
.78
.68
.58
.40

1.58
1.48
1.35
1.18
1.03
.78

1.23
1.07
.94
.84
.76
.67

1 Data based on white families in 42 cities combined.

Since it was necessary to begin the coding and the tabulation of
the schedules before the field work was completed, the computations
of unit clothing expenditure 1 were at first made on the basis of pre­
liminary scales computed from the clothing-expenditure data in the
schedules available at the time for the given city or group of cities
within a region. After the field work had been terminated and the
tabulation completed for all 42 cities, the scales given in the foregoing
table were constructed on the basis of data for all these cities, all of
which had populations over 50,000.
It was desired that the scales should represent only those differences
in clothing expenditure which are due to the three factors (age, sex,
and occupation) which were being measured in the computation of the
scales. To compute the scales, after elimination of the influence of
i
By unit clothing expenditure is meant the annual amount spent for clothing per clothing-expenditure
unit.




APPENDIX D

169

the other variables of family income and family size in the computa­
tions, the following steps were taken.
(1) Cards representing each person in all the families studied in
cities with populations over 50,000 were sorted into cells such that all
persons classified in a given cell were from families with the same
income and of the same size; and the group of persons whose clothing
expenditure was being studied were of the same age, sex, and occu­
pation.
(2) The average clothing expenditure for all the persons in each
cell was then computed.
(3) These averages were then combined for each age-sex-occupation
group. In making this combination, each age-sex-occupation group
within each family-income family-size class was given the same weight.
These weights were determined by the number of persons in each
family-income family-size cell for all age-sex-occupation groups com­
bined. The resulting averages for each age-sex-occupation group are
the averages that would have been obtained if the distribution of
persons by family income and family size had been the same in each
age-sex-occupation group. The procedure followed in combining
averages by the use of constant weights is similar to the procedure of
a standard population frequently used by biologists in attempting to
compare rates while eliminating differences caused by differing dis­
tributions by sex, age, marital status, etc. (cf. Raymond Pearl,
Medical Biometry and Statistics, Philadelphia and London, 1930, ch.
IX, “ Standardized and corrected death rates/’ pp. 265-277).
(4) For each sex-occupation group there was now a series of
average clothing expenditures for each age. These results were
smoothed to eliminate minor irregulatities.
(5) Absolute clothing expenditures at each age were converted to
relatives by dividing the smoothed averages for each sex-occupation
group for each age by the smoothed average expenditure for employed
men aged 21 through 35.
The revised scales developed on this basis are still subject to the
limitations of the nature of the population sampled, but they represent
what seem to be the most definitive scales yet available showing effec­
tive demand for clothing among families of wage earners and clerical
workers.
The revised scales were used to recode and reclassify the schedules
for unit expenditure 2 in order to test the magnitude of the differences
2
By unit expenditure is meant total amount of family expenditure per expenditure unit. The unit
expenditure, which is used as synonymous with “ economic level” and with “ amount spent per expenditure
unit,” is the sum of the following three items:
1. Unit food expenditure, or total family food expenditure per food-expenditure unit;
2. Unit clothing expenditure, or total family clothing expenditure per clothing-expenditure unit;
3. Per capita “ other” expenditure, or total family expenditure for all items, save food and clothing,
per person in the economic family for 52 weeks.




170

MONEY DISBURSEM EN TS---- 1 3

SM ALL CITIES

in final results which would have been obtained had the revised scales
been used at the outset. The new distribution of families was not
substantially different from the distribution for which the preliminary
clothing scales were used. Since clothing expenditures represent a
fairly small proportion, ranging from one-eighth to one-tenth, of
family expenditures, it will be seen that even a fairly large revision in
the clothing expenditure scales would yield only a slight change in
total unit expenditure. The nature of the process will be clear from
the sample code sheet, p. 172. Consequently, the distribution of
families by economic level did not shift much with the introduction
of revised relative clothing-expenditure scales. Since, upon analysis,
the changes were not found to be important, in all tables in the
Tabular Summary and in the text, the distribution of families by
economic level remains as it was established by the coding based,
among other elements (see sample code sheet, p. 172), on the prelim­
inary relative clothing-expenditure scales.
The revised clothing scales did, however, produce a more pro­
nounced change in the item “ average number of clothing-expenditure
units per family, ” and correspondingly in the figure “ unit clothing
expenditure.” 3 The figure for “ average number of clothing-expendi­
ture units per fam ily/’ based on the revised scales, is therefore used
throughout in the Tabular Summary. Correspondingly the figure
“ average number of expenditure units” 4 per family, whenever it
appears in the Tabular Summary, is based, among other elements
including food and “ other” expenditure, upon unit clothing expendi­
ture computed from the revised relative clothing-expenditure scales.
The item “ average number of clothing-expenditure units” or “ aver­
age number of expenditure units” or both, occurs in tables 2, 3, 5,
and 6 of the Tabular Summary.
The change in “ average number of expenditure units” resulting
from use of the revised scales was much smaller than the change in
“ average number of clothing-expenditure units” for the reason dis­
cussed in a preceding paragraph on the small change in the distribu­
tion of cases according to unit expenditure. Nevertheless, the figure
on the revised basis appears in the Tabular Summary since it is
consistent with the revised figure for clothing expenditure units.
The latter figure is published rather than the preliminary figure
since it is believed, after extensive analysis and experimentation, that
it represents a better approximation, based on more complete data
and a more satisfactory summary technique, to a definitive answer to
the question: How does the clothing demand or customary clothing
3
This figure is not published in the Tabular Summary but the reader may compute it by dividing the
average total family clothing expenditure for any group by the average number of clothing-expenditure
units per family in that group.
* This figure is derived by dividing total family expenditure by total unit expenditure. The computation
of this latter figure was explained in footnote 2, p. 169. Also see sample code sheet, p. 172.




APPEN DIX D

171

need of one family of given composition compare with that of another
family of different composition? Lacking any absolute scale of
clothing need, any such scale of clothing expenditure can, at best, only
be an approximation. Nevertheless, the figures set forth on the basis
of the revised scales are presented as the result of considerable study
and experimentation as the most definitive yet available (granted the
assumptions that age, sex, and occupation do create real differences in
the social situation of individuals, which in turn affect their need to
make clothing expenditures as much or more to meet social custom as
for reasons of health). A further reason for presenting the revised
clothing expenditure unit figures is that the figures stand as such inde­
pendently of any other figures in the tables. That is, since the pre­
liminary figures were used simply as a means to classification of cases
and nowhere in the tabulations as an end product, the presentation of
revised figures for this one item in no way disturbs the usefulness of
the other items not affected by the revision.
Expenditure U n it— Other Items

Any attempt to compute customary expenditures on items other
than food and clothing for persons of different age, sex, and occupa­
tion in the wage-earner and clerical groups would have required
securing data on the expenditures for individuals in greater detail
than seemed practical. It was, therefore, decided to compute expen­
diture per adult male equivalent for “ other items” on the assumption
that in actual practice with a given income a family divides the use
of its goods, and its expenditures for all items other than food and
clothing, about equally among the members of the family.
Total Expenditure U nit

In finally computing the amount spent per total-expenditure unit
for a given family, three measures of family size were calculated, one
in terms of food-expenditure units (i. e., food relatives), another in
terms of clothing-expenditure units (i. e., clothing relatives,) and a
third in terms of equivalent full-time members of the economic family
(i. e., a relative of 1.00 for each member in the economic family
for 52 weeks). In computing each of these measures for an individual,
the length of time the individual was dependent on the family funds
was taken into account. This was done by multiplying the appropri­
ate relative by the decimal equivalent of a year during which the
person was dependent on family funds.
Expenditures by the given family for food were then divided by the
number of food-expenditure units in the economic family, expenditures
for clothing by the number of clothing-expenditure units in the eco­
nomic family, and expenditures for other items by the number of




172

MONEY DISBURSEM EN TS---- 1 3

SM ALL CITIES

equivalent full-time persons in the economic family. The number of
dollars spent per total-expenditure unit was secured by adding to­
gether the'three quotients and this sum was used as a measure of the
economic level of the family. The following sample code sheet shows
the method of coding for a specific family:
F ig u r e

A.

S a m p le code sheet

Persons

City: Marquette.

Age

Weeks in
economic
family

Occupation

Color: White.
Homemaker- ___
Husband________
c. Son (widower) _
_
d. Daughter________
e. Daughter_____ __
/. Granddaughter___

Schedule No. 135.

a.
b.

Year ending Feb. 28, 1935.

Persons in
economic
family
a __________
c
__
d
e
f - ----------------

Item
Expenditure units.
___ do
. - do
-___ do_
___ do_
Total

All
Do
Do
Do

Family expenditure_____________
Amount spent per expenditure unit
Total expenditure units____

Food
0.83

10
.0
10
.0
.46
.92
.54

4,75
$793.00
$166.95
X X X X

45
47
24
18
14
2

Clothing

At home - - - - - Clerical- _ - .
___ do_______ _
At school
___ do________
At home- - ___

Other

0. 78
.87
1.13
.64
.77
.38

1.00
1.00
1.00
.50
1.00
1.00

4. 57

5. 50

$168. 35 $1,044.15
$36.84
$189.85
xxxx
xxxx

52
52
52
26
52
52

Food, clothing
and other
xx xxx

xx xxx
xx xxx
x x x xx

xx xxx
xx xxx
xxx xx

$2,005. 50 (E)
$393.64 (U)
5.09 (E)-KU)

It should be noted that the computation of family size in terms of
expenditure units is based on estimates of customary relative expendi­
tures without regard to the adequacy of the goods consumed to meet
physical or psychological needs. These units are not adapted for use
in setting up or in revising ideal or normal budgets. That is, it is
impossible to use these units in calculating the family budget needed
if a child is to be added to the family without disturbing the level
which the family budget was originally prepared to meet, nor may
they be used to determine the subtraction possible if a budget com­
puted for a family of given size is to be applied to a family with one
less child, but without disturbing the standard which the budget was
calculated to purchase. Such additions or subtractions can properly
be made for the purpose indicated with these expenditure units only
if the standard by which the budget was originally computed was in
terms of these same units. Thus, if a budget for a family of given
size has been calculated on the basis of a given number of expenditure
units, using the relatives described in this study, along with some pre­
determined sum taken as meeting the needs of an adult man, the
budget may be increased to care for the addition of a person to the
family by use of this series of units. But if the original budget for,
let us say, a family of two adults and two children was calculated on




APPEN DIX D

173

some other basis, the increase of the total budget by the decimal
equivalent represented by an expenditure unit from this study cor­
responding to a child of specified age will not assure the continuance
at the same standard of living of the family when a third child is added.
The measures used in calculating size of family in expenditure units
in the present study are intended to represent customary behavior in
families where the addition of a child is not as a rule accompanied by
any addition to income, and the family must adapt its expenditures
to meet the new situation. In arriving at the scales used to measure
family size, no adjustments were included for possible differences in
the economy of purchasing for larger as compared with smaller families.
Adjustm ent for Contact W ith Families T hrough O ther Member
T han C hief Earner

In a substantial number of families included in the sample
were persons whose names had been drawn from employee lists
in the usual manner, but who proved to be subsidiary rather than chief
earners. This method of scheduling required that the resulting over­
representation of multiple-earner families be eliminated by a process
of adjustment during the course of tabulation. Throughout this re­
port, all data for the 10 New Hampshire cities and Marquette have
been adjusted in accordance with the procedure set forth in appendix
G of Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletins Nos. 636, 637, and 639 to
641, inclusive. In Modesto and Reno, since the ruling of contact
only through the chief earner was followed in scheduling, the data
could be tabulated without adjustment.




o