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doney Disbursements o f W age Earners and
Clerical W orkers in Five Cities in the
W e st N orth Central-M ountain
Region, 1934—36
By
FA ITH M. WILLIAMS and ALICE C. HANSON
o f the Bureau o f Labor Statistics

Bulletin

7N[o.

641

U N IT E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




U N IT E D

STATES D E P A R TM E N T

OF LABOR

Frances P erk in s , Secretary

♦

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
IS A D O R

L U B IN

C o m m issio n er

Sidney W. W ilcox

A. F. H inrichs

C h ie f S ta tistician

C h ie f E c o n o m ist
H

ugh

S. H a n n a

C h ief, E d itoria l and Research

STAFF

FO R

TH E
AND

STUDY

OF

C L E R IC A L

W EST

MONEY
WORKERS

NORTH

F

D IS B U R S E M E N T S
IN

F IV E

C IT I E S

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A I N

a it h

M.

W

OF

WAGE

IN

EARNERS

THE

R E G IO N

il l ia m s

C h ie f , Cost o f L iv in g D iv isio n

G ertrude Schmidt W eiss and A lice C. H anson
G eneral D irectors o f Field W ork

E dna D . H orner
Assistant D irector o f T a b u la tion
C IT Y

D IR E C T O R S

OF

F IE L D

WORK

A . D . H . K aplan , D en v er
T wila N eely , M in n eap olis-S t. P aul
L illian L unenburg , K an sa s C ity
Joseph B . B orus, St. L ou is
Paul B . T anner and G ordon Sears, Salt L ak e C ity
S U P E R V IS O R S

OF

T A B U L A T IO N

IN

THE

F IE L D

Joseph B. B ortjs, G ertrude Price , R obert T homas, and W ayman R egister




UNITED STATES D EPARTM EN T OF LABOR
Frances Perkins, Secretary
B U R E A U OF L A B O R ST A TIS TIC S
Isador Lubin, Commissioner

M oney Disbursements o f W age Earners and
Clerical W ork ers in Five Cities in the
W e st N orth Central-M ountain
Region, 1934—
36

By
FAITH M. WILLIAMS and ALICE C. HANSON
o f the Bureau o f Labor Statistics

Bulletin

7S[o.

641

U N IT E D ST A T E S
G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G OFFICE
W A S H IN G T O N : 1939

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, Washington, D . C.




Price 35 cents




CONTENTS
Page

P reface _________________________________________________________________
I ntroduction____________________________________________________________
P art I. W hite F amilies :
C hapter 1. Income Level and Money Disbursements_________________
Family income________________________________________________
Current expenditures of each city group as a whole_______________
Food________________________________________________________
Housing_____________________________________________________
Clothing____________________________________________________
Other items_________________________________________________
Distribution of expenditures at successive income levels___________
Variation in money disbursements___________________________
Income levels and planes of living________________________________
Size and composition of family______________________________
Planes of living determined by family size as well as income_
Equivalence between total expenditures and economic levels,_
Order of expenditures at different economic levels_________________
Expenditures at two economic levels_________________________
Changes in assets and liabilities__________________________________
C hapter 2. Expenditures for Specified Goods_________________________
Food____________________________________________________________
Annual food expenditures____________________________________
Food expenditures in 1 week in the spring quarter___________
Housing_________________________________________________________
Housing facilities____________________________________________
Housing expenditures_______________________________________
Home owners___________________________________________
Renters_________________________________________________
Vacation housing_______________________________________
Expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration____________
Expenditures for other items of household operation___
Furnishings and equipment______________________________________
Clothing_________________________________________________________
Variability of clothing expenditures__________________________
Total expenditure per family for clothing____________________
Clothing expenditures for men and boys_____________________
Low economic level_____________________________________
High economic level__________________________________
Clothing expenditures for women and girls_________________
Low economic level___________________________________
High economic level__________________________________
Occupational differences in the clothing expenditures of
adults____________________________________________________
Transportation________________________________________________
Recreation____________________________________________________
Medical care_____________________________________________________




in

ix
1
7
7
13
13
14
15
15
16
20
23
23
25
28
30
30
33
40
40
40
41
46
46
49
49
51
52
52
53
53
55
55
55
56
57
58
60
62
63
64
66
68
70

IV

C O N TE N TS

P art I. W hite F amilies— Continued.
Chapter 2. Expenditures for Specified Goods.—Continued.
Personal care__________________________________________________
Formal education______________________________________________
Vocation______________________________________________________
Gifts and contributions to individuals and to community welfare. _
Miscellaneous items___________________________________________
C hapter 3. Changing Living Standards in the Post-War Period___
Distribution of current expenditures in 1934-36 as compared
with those in 1917-19_______________________________________
P art II. N egro F amilies :
C hapter 1. Income Level and Money Disbursements______________
Family income________________________________________________
Composition of families___________________________________
Current expenditures of each city group as a whole_____________
Distribution of expenditures at successive income levels________
Size of families____________________________________________
Order of expenditures at different economic levels______________
Changes in assets and liabilities_____________,__________________
C hapter 2. Expenditures for Specified Goods______________________
Food__________________________________________________________
Annual food expenditures_________________________________
Food expenditures in 1 week in spring quarter_____________
Housing_______________________________________________________
Housing facilities_________________________________________
Housing expenditures_____________________________________
Home owners_________________________________________
Renters______________________________________________
Secondary housing____________________________________
Expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration________
Expenditures for other items of household operation____
Furnishings and equipment________________________________
Clothing__________________________________________________
Total expenditure per family for clothing______________
Clothing expenditures for men________________________
Clothing expenditures for women_____________________
Other groups of current expenditures______________________
Part III. T abular Summary__________________________________________
P art IV. A ppendixes :
A ppendix A. Notes on Tabular Summary__________________________
General_______________________________________________________
Economic family__________________________________________
Household________________________________________________
Net family income or net money income___________________
Current expenditures______________________________________
Surplus or deficit__________________________________________
Surplus___________________________________________________
Deficit____________________________________________________
Inheritance_______________________________________________
Total money receipts______________________________________
Total money disbursements_______________________________
Balancing difference_______________________________________
Schedule year_____________________________________________
Averages based on all families_____________________________




page
72
72
73
74
75
76
76
83
83
86
86
87
88
89
92
96
96
96
98
101
101
103
103
104
104
104
105
105
106
106
107
109
110
113
319
319
319
319
319
320
321
321
321
322
322
322
322
322
322

CONTENTS
P art IV. A ppendixes— Continued.
A ppendix A. Notes on Tabular Summary— Continued.
Notes on individual tables_____________________________________
Local conditions affecting the data_____________________________
Cost of living_____________________________________________
Employment______________________________________________
Sales tax_________________________________________________
A ppendix B. Scope of the Investigation___________________________
Geographic area covered in the West North Central-Mountain
region___:__________________________________________________
Scope of the Nation-wide study________________________________
A ppendix C. Period Covered by the Study________________________
Table A. Period to which data in schedules for cities in the West
North Central-Mountain region apply_______________________
A ppendix D. Selection of Families to be Interviewed_______________
Method of choosing the sample________________________________
Rules for determining eligibility of families_____________________
A ppendix E. Nativity of Homemakers in Families Studied_________
A ppendix F. Field Procedure_____________________________________
Interview method of securing data_____________________________
Figure B. Schedule facsimile_________
Check-interviewing____________________________________________
Food check lists for 1 week____________________________________
Weekly records of food consumption___________________________
A ppendix G. Analytical Procedure________________________________
Income classification__________________________________________
Classification by economic level________________________________
Expenditure unit— food relatives_______________________________
Table B. Relative food expenditures for persons of different
age, sex, and occupation________________________________
Expenditure unit— clothing relatives___________________________
Table C. Relative clothing expenditures for persons of differ­
ent age, sex, and occupation____________________________
Expenditure unit— other items_________________________________
Total expenditure unit________________________________________
Figure C. Sample code sheet______________________________
Adjustment for contact with families through other member than
chief earner_________________________________________________
Table D. Derivation of adjustment factors for earner groups_
Table E. Illustration of application of adjustment factors to
schedule data___________________________________________

V
p age
323
336
336
337
337
338
338
338
341
341
343
343
347
352
354
354
355
374
374
374
376
376
376
376
377
378
378
381
381
382
383
386
388

L ist o f T a b le s in P a r t I
Table

1.
2.
3.
4.

Family incomes______________________________________________
9
Items comprising family income______________________________
10
Sources of family income, at successive income levels_________
12
Average amount spent per expenditure unit, at successive income
levels______________________________________________________
27
5. Total family expenditure equivalents for families of three
different types, at given economic levels____________________
28
6 . Average amount spent per expenditure unit, at successive
economic levels_________________________________________________ 29
7. Family size and annual income, at two different economic
levels______________________________________________________
32




CONTENTS

VI

Page

Table

8. Expenditures in rank order, at two different economic levels__
33
9. Percentage of families having surplus and deficit and net change
37
in assets and liabilities, at successive economic levels________
10. Changes in assets and liabilities, at successive economic levels. _
38
11. Expenditures for food per food expenditure unit, at low and
high economic levels_____________________________________________
41
12. Per capita expenditures for food__________________________________
. 44
13. Proportion of families spending enough to purchase an adequate
diet at minimum cost, at successive economic levels__________
46
14. Average number of persons per room, at successive economic
levels______________________________________________________________
48
15. Housing facilities___________________________________________________
49
51
16. Housing expenditures______________________________________________
17. Expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration____________________
52
18. Expenditures for furnishings and equipment, at successive
economic levels___________________________________________________
54
19. Distribution of annual clothing expenditures for individuals in
families, at successive economic levels, men and boys________
57
20. Distribution of annual clothing expenditures for individuals
in families, at successive economic levels, women, girls, and
infants____________________________________________________________
61
21. Expenditures for automobile operation and maintenance, for
automobile owners, at successive economic levels_____________
67
22. Proportions of families owning and purchasing radios, and
amounts paid for radios, at successive economiclevels________
69
23. Expenditures for medical care, at successive economic le v e ls._
71
24. Percentage change in the cost of goods purchased by wage earners
and clerical workers from the time of the 1917-19 survey to the
77
time of the 1934-36 survey_____________________________________
25. Differences in incomes and current expenditures between the
groups studied in 1917-19 and 1934-36 in four cities_________
78
26. Distribution of current family expenditures in 1917-19 and
19 34-36___________________________________________________________
79
L is t o f F ig u r e s i n P a r t I

Figure 1. Sources of family income at successive income levels, St. Louis. _
2. Patterns of family expenditures at successive income levels,
Minneapolis-St. Paul_____________________________________________
3. Relative family expenditures at successive income levels,
Minneapolis-St. Paul_____________________________________________
4. Size of family at successive income levels, Salt Lake C ity_______
5. Distribution of family expenditures at two different economic
levels, Denver____________________________________________________
6. Food expenditures at successive economic levels, St. Louis_______
7. Proportion of families spending enough to purchase an adequate
diet at minimum cost at successive economic levels____________
8. Proportion of families having selected housing facilities at suc­
cessive economic levels, Kansas C ity ___________________________
9. Distribution of annual clothing expenditures for individuals in
families at successive economic levels___________________________
A. Estimated annual clothing expenditures by persons of different
age, sex, and occupation_________________________________________




13
18
19
24
31
43
45
50
59
65

C O N TE N TS

V II

List o f Tables in Part II
Page

Table 27. Family incomes____________________________________________________
28. Sources of family income__________________________________________
29. Average amount spent per expenditure unit at successive in­
come levels_______________________________________________________
30. Average amount spent per expenditure unit at successive eco­
nomic levels______________________________________________________
31. Expenditures in rank order at two differenteconomic levels_____
32. Percentage of families having surplus and deficit and net change
in assets and liabilities at successive economic levels_________
33. Changes in assets and liabilities at successive economic levels. _
34. Expenditures for food per food expenditure unit at low and high
economic levels__________________________________________________
35. Per capita expenditures for food__________________________________
36. Proportion of families spending enough to purchase an ade­
quate diet at minimum cost, at successive economic levels. _
37. Number of persons per room at successiveeconomic levels_____
38. Housing facilities___________________________________________________
39. Housing expenditures______________________________________________
40. Expenditures for furnishings and equipment at successive eco­
nomic levels______________________________________________________
41. Distribution of annual clothing expenditures for individuals in
families at successive economiclevels, men_____________________
42. Distribution of annual clothing expenditures for individuals in
families at successive economic levels, women_________________
43. Expenditures for recreation and transportation at two economic
levels________________________________________________________________

85
85
88
90
92
93
95
98
99
99
102
103
104
106
107
109
111

List o f Figures in Part II
Figure 10. Sources of family income at successive income levels, St. Louis. _
11. Size of family at successive income levels, Kansas C ity ________
12. Distribution of family expenditures at two different economic
levels, Kansas C ity _____________________________________________
13. Food expenditures at successive economic levels, St. Louis____
14. Proportion of families spending enough to purchase an ade­
quate diet at minimum cost at successive economic levels___
15. Distribution of annual clothing expenditures for individuals in
families at successive economic levels__________________________

84
89
91
97
100
108

List o f Tables in T abu lar Sum m ary
Table 1. Distribution of families by economic level and income level____
2. Description of families studied, by economic level______________
Occupation of chief earner.
Family type.
Nativity of homemaker.
Composition of household.
Earnings and income.

3. Expenditures for groups of items, by economic level_________
4. Disposition of money received during schedule year not used for
current expenditure and funds made available for family use
from sources other than family income in schedule year, by
economic l e v e l „ . „ ............................................. ................................ ...... 138




114
116

130

C O N TE N TS

V II I

Page

Table 5. Description of families studied, by income level__________________
Occupation of chief earner.
Family type.
Nativity of homemaker.
Composition of household.
Earnings and income.
6. Expenditures for groups of items, by income level_______________
7. Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home
during 1 week, by economic level_______________________________
8. Annual food expenditures, by economic level_____________________
9. Housing facilities, by economic level______________________________
10. Housing expenditures, by economic level__________________________
11. Fuel, light, and refrigeration expenditures, by economic level___
12. Household operation expenditures other than for fuel, light, and
refrigeration, by economic level_________________________________
13. Transportation expenditures, by economic level__________________
14. Personal care expenditures and medical care expenditures, by
economic level____________________________________________________
15. Recreation expenditures, by economic level_______________________
16. Formal education, vocation, community welfare, gifts and con­
tributions, and miscellaneous expenditures, by economic level.
17. Clothing expenditures, by economic level_________________________
18. Furnishings and equipment expenditures, by economic level____
19. Description of families studied at three economic levels_________
Composition of household.
Earnings and income.
20. Expenditures for groups of items, at three economic levels______
21. Distribution of families of types comparable with those studied
in 1917-19, by economic level and income level________________
22. Description of families of types comparable with those studied in
1917-19, by income level_________________________________________
Composition of household.
Earnings and income.
23. Expenditures of families of types comparable with those studied
in 1917-19 for groups of items, by income level________________
24A. Coefficients of variation of money disbursements, five cities____
24B. Coefficients of variation of money disbursements, by income
level, Minneapolis-St. Paul______________________________________
25. Expenditures for groups of items estimated from regression equa­
tion, Minneapolis-St. Paul_______________________________________
For each table except 24A, 24B, and 25, the data for Negro
families appear immediately following those for white families.
N

o t e .—




150

164
172
200
206
212
224
236
242
248
254
260
266
289
293

297
301
303

309
315
315
316

PREFACE

T h e present bulletin is one of a series which will present in detail
data on the actual living of the families of w age earners and clerical
workers in the larger cities |of the country.
tion is given in regard to

In this report in form a­

the incom es, the current expenditures,

the savings and deficits of 1,976 families in D en v er, K a n sas C ity ,
M in neapolis and St. P aul, St. L ouis, and Salt L ak e C ity .

Figures are

also shown on housing facilities, the am oun t and kind of food, clothing,
and housefurnishings purchased in the year of the S tu d y, and the
types of m edical care received.

T h e S tu d y was undertaken in 1 9 3 4 -

36 prim arily for the purpose of bringing u p -to -d a te the weights for
the cost of living indexes currently published b y the Bureau.

The

N a tio n -w id e stu dy covers 42 cities of m ore than 5 0 ,0 0 0 population
and it provides for the first tim e since 1919 a record of the changes
th at h ave occurred in the consum ption habits of the wage-earner and
clerical group in the interval.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics study of the money disbursements
of wage earners and clerical workers at the end of the W orld War
was made at a time when the consumption habits of American workers
were undergoing rapid changes. Silk stockings and other silk prod­
ucts had only recently come within range of the wage earner’s purse;
rayon fabrics were still new in consumer use; the automobile was the
luxury of a few workers; a large proportion of the wage earners were
living in houses without electric lights and modern plumbing.
Throughout the war, the Nation had been “ counting its calories”
and believing that if everyone had enough of the energy-producing
foods adequate nutrition would be achieved. Just about the end of
the war period, however, long years of laboratory research in nutrition
reached the stage where they could be used to state human require­
ments for minerals and vitamins, as well as for proteins and carbohy­
drates. This new information combined with certain economic factors
to effect striking changes in American food-consumption habits.
The data on consumer-purchasing habits in the wage-earner and
clerical groups in the West North Central and Mountain region
presented herewith show the goods now purchased by moderate
income families in the large cities in this area. They should be of
value to leaders of the labor movement, to business men interested




IX

X

PR EFACE

in planning production to fit demand, to civic leaders and to legislators,
as well as in serving the specific purpose for which they were gathered.
In Denver, the investigation was made in cooperation with the
Bureau of Business and Social Research of the University of Denver
and the Colorado Emergency Relief Administration. The St. Louis,
Kansas City, and Minneapolis-St. Paul studies were made in coopera­
tion with the Works Progress Administration, and that in Salt Lake
City in cooperation with the Utah Emergency Relief Administration.
The investigation was furthered by the assistance of many officials
in these organizations and from interested individuals and civic bodies
too numerous to be mentioned here by name. In addition two groups
must be recognized as having made the Study possible: The individual
workers who performed the field collection and office tabulation of the
data, often under unfavorable conditions, on a high plane of profes­
sional responsibility; and the housewives who laid aside their house­
hold tasks long enough to furnish answers to the detailed questions in
the schedules.
In the final analysis and preparation of this report, special contribu­
tions to problems of method were made by Jerome Cornfield, William
S. Shelton, and Samuel E. Cohen. M ary C. Ruark was responsible
for the final tabulations. Genevieve B. Wimsatt solved problems of
analysis and prepared portions of the text and appendixes. Olive T.
Kephart and Margaret Sawyer assisted in checking the table forms
and preparation of text and appendixes.
I sad or L

u b in ,

C o m m is sio n e r o j L a b or S ta tistics.

A p r il

1939.




Bulletin 7\[o. 641 of the
U nited States Bureau of Labor Statistics

M oney Disbursements o f W ag e Earners and Clerical
W ork ers in Five Cities in the W e st N orth
CentraLM ountain Region, 1934-36
Introduction
The data on actual family expenditures collected in the present
study portray the levels at which employed wage earners and clerical
workers are living at the present time in terms of their annual pur­
chases of goods and services. The results of this investigation must
be distinguished from those obtained by pricing a hypothetical budget
to secure the cost of a previously defined standard of living.1 The
investigators who participated in the present study were sent, not to
stores to price a predetermined list of goods and services, but to
families who were willing to give the desired facts regarding income
and expenditures. The differences shown between the figures on
average family expenditures in the different cities covered reflect
differences in the money incomes of the wage-earner and clerical groups
in those communities, in consumption habits, and in family size and
composition, as well as whatever differences there may be in price
level. They do not measure differences in living costs as between
communities.
Although the primary purpose of the present investigation was to
ascertain the actual level of living of workers’ families, some of the
data obtained do afford a basis for evaluating the adequacy of the
living of the families who cooperated in furnishing information for
the investigation. The goods currently purchased by the families
studied have not been compared in detail with the goods included by
different agencies in budgets estimating the amounts needed for
maintaining healthy family life.
* Such a study has recently been completed by the Works Progress Administration, Division of Social
Research, in cooperation with Retail Price Division of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In this survey prices
were obtained in 59 cities covering the cost of items in budgets at two levels. These budgets comprised
specific quantities of goods and services necessary for a maintenance level and an emergency level of living
for a four-person family of a manual worker. Results of this study are published in a report of the Works
Progress Administration entitled “ Intercity Differences in Costs of Living in March 1935 for 59 Cities”
by Margaret Loomis Stecker, Washington, D . C., July 1937.




1

2

W ES T

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

The terms “ level of living” and “ plane of living” have been used
to describe the actual economic status of the families studied. This
actual way of living is distinguished from their “ standard of living,”
the type of living which they regard as normal and proper, or from
a “ norm of living” established by a group or an agency as adequate
or suitable for certain purposes. The term “ standard of living” is
sometimes used to mean not only the manner of living regarded as
proper and suitable by the families themselves, but that recommended
by a group or an agency; it is further used to mean the way the
families actually are living. This triple usage has been found to be
confusing, and on that account the use of the term “ standard of living”
in this publication is restricted to its primary meaning as a standard.
“ Planes of living,” the subject of this report, have been distinguished
both from standards of the families themselves and from norms or
budgets set by agencies or groups.
The investigation was confined to the city limits in Denver, Salt
Lake City, Kansas City, M o., and Kansas City, Kans. In Minneapolis-St. Paul and St. Louis, it was found that such a large proportion
of the industrial population lived in the suburbs that the sample would
not be representative without the inclusion of four surrounding areas
for Minneapolis-St. Paul and ten surrounding areas for St. Louis.2
The data obtained from each family apply to twelve continuous
months within the period 1 9 3 4 -3 6 .3 The data for Denver and Salt
Lake City pertain principally to the year ending February 1935 and
those for Kansas City, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and St. Louis principally
to the year ending February 1936.
The families studied in this investigation were chosen to represent a
cross section of the families of employed wage earners and lowersalaried clerical workers employed in business and industry in each of
the five cities 4 studied in the West North Central and Mountain
region. In two of those cities, Kansas City and St. Louis, where the
relative importance of Negroes in the population is considerable,
Negro families were surveyed.
The families to be interviewed were chosen by a random sampling
method from the lists of employees on current personnel lists of em­
ployers also chosen at random.6 The limited funds available made it
necessary to confine this investigation to the income levels most
representative of employed wage earners and lower-salaried clerical
2See appendix B, p. 338.
3See appendix C, p. 341.
* Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kans., are treated as one city with the schedules obtained divided
between the two in the same proportion as were the total numbers of gainfully employed persons in the 1930
census. That is, 18 percent of the families scheduled lived in Kansas City, Kans., and 82 percent in Kansas
City, Mo. Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., were likewise considered as one city, with 63 percent of the
schedules taken from families in Minneapolis and 37 percent from those in St. Paul.
5 See appendix D, pp. 343-347.




3

IN T R O D U C T IO N

workers, the groups for w hich the B u reau ’s cost-o f-liv in g indexes are
co m p u ted .6

The

follow ing criteria were used in

the selection

of

fam ilies:

1. At least one wage earner or lower-salaried clerical worker who worked a
minimum of 1,008 hours in 36 weeks, or 28 hours in each of 30 weeks, if employed
in a distinctly seasonal industry such as the clothing and construction industries.
2. No income from direct relief or work relief at any time in the year covered
by the schedule.
3. A minimum annual income during the schedule year of $500, of which at
least $300 was earned by one person.
4. No clerical worker in the family who earned over $2,000 in the year covered by
the schedule or $200 in any one month of that year.
5. Not over 25 percent of total income from sources other than earnings (such
as rents, interest, or dividends). Net receipts from boarders and lodgers were
treated as earnings.
T h e group supplying the m aterial on w hich this report is based
includes families of all types except single-person fam ilies.7

Because

of lim itation of funds, the N a tion -w id e survey of wage earners and
clerical workers was n ot enlarged to include a stu dy of the m oney
disbursem ents of persons living alone, either as lodgers or as house­
holders.

But

the present stu dy in addition

to

covering families

containing a husband and wife, also covers incom plete fam ilies of
various types such as a w idow and her children.

In this respect it

differs from the in vestigation of fam ily expenditures conducted b y the
Bureau of L ab o r Statistics in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 in these five cities, which was
restricted to fam ilies havin g as a m in im u m “ a husband and wife and
at least one child, who is n ot a boarder or lo d g er.” 8

Since families

of two persons only constituted at least 24 percent of the fam ilies of
tw o or m ore persons in each of the five cities according to the 1930
census, it was decided n ot to restrict the present investigation in this
w ay.

In the present stu d y a large percentage of the fam ilies from

which data were obtained were of the types studied in the 1 9 1 7 -1 9
investigation.

F or D en v er this percentage is 4 6 ; for K a n sas C ity , 5 2 ;

in M in n ea p olis-S t. P au l, 5 6 ; in St. L ou is, 4 7 ; and in Salt L ak e C ity , 62.
T h e types of fam ilies contributing to the present report and n ot in­
cluded in the 1 9 1 7 -1 9 stu d y are as follow s: Fam ilies of m an and wife
8 The importance of obtaining data on the consumer purchases of higher-salaried clerical workers, pro­
fessional workers, managers and officials, and those in business for themselves was generally recognized.
Early in 1936 the Bureau of Labor Statistics undertook a Study of Consumer Purchases which covers all
income groups in 32 different cities. Funds were allotted to the project by the Works Progress Administra­
tion. At the same time a coordinated study was undertaken by the Bureau of Home Economics in 66 farm
counties, 140 villages and in 19 small cities. Both of these investigations were made in cooperation with the
National Resources Committee and the Central Statistical Board. For cities covered in both investigations,
see appendix B, p. 340.
7At the request of the Emergency Relief Board in Philadelphia, the Bureau of Labor Statistics undertook a
study of the incomes and money disbursements of employed wage earners and clerical workers living as
single individuals in that city in the year 1934-35. The results of that investigation will be published in a
subsequent report.
8L . S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Cost of Living in the United States. Bull,
No. 357, p. 2. 1924.




4

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C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

o n ly, m a n and wife and other persons over 16 years of age, and fam ilies
of adults n ot including a m arried couple.

In order to facilitate com ­

parison w ith the earlier stu d y , a special su m m ary of the incom e and
expenditure data from fam ilies of the ty p e studied for 1 9 1 7 -1 9 is
presented in this bulletin.

T h e fu ndam ental tabulations h ave been

m ade in such a w ay th a t it will be possible to stu d y separately the
details of the expenditures of fam ilies of given typ es, should occasion
arise.
I t should be noted th at the plan for the investigation did n ot
provide for holding constant size of fam ily at each incom e level.

In

any random sam ple of the population or of any occupational group,
size of fa m ily varies from incom e level to incom e level.

Since the

averages presented in this report are based upon the actual expenditures
of a random sam ple of fam ilies of the wage-earner and clerical groups,
these differences in size of fa m ily m u st be taken into account wherever
com parisons are m ade betw een the spending of fam ilies at different
incom e levels.







Part I.— W hite Families

5




Chapter 1
Income Level and M oney Disbursements
Fam ily Income
T h e occupations of the chief earners in the 1,767 white fam ilies
cooperating in the investigation varied as w idely as the types of
business

and

industry

which

characterize

the

cities

between

the

M ississippi and M issou ri R ivers and the R o c k y M o u n ta in s.

In each of the five cities, the families studied included persons
working in manufacturing industries, wholesale and retail trade,
transportation and communication, building construction, public
employment, hotels and restaurants, banking, insurance, and real
estate houses, garages and filling stations, laundries and other service
establishments, and places of amusement. No family in which the
chief earner was in domestic service was included, although a family
was eligible for scheduling if subsidiary earners were domestic servants.
Manufacturing industries employed the chief earner in almost half
of the families studied in St. Louis. The individual industrial groups
represented most frequently were the clothing industries, food and
allied industries, leather industries, and iron and steel industries. In
Kansas City and Minneapolis-St. Paul, manufacturing occupations
claimed approximately one-third of the chief earners. In Kansas
City, the individual industrial groups most frequently represented
were meat packing, other food and allied industries, and automobile
factories and repair shops; in Minneapolis-St. Paul, these positions
were held by the food and allied industries, iron and steel, and auto­
mobile manufacturing and repairing establishments, paper, printing
and allied industries, and the clothing industries. In Denver and
Salt Lake City, the proportions of the total sample drawn from manu­
facturing industries were smaller, with food and allied industries and
iron and steel constituting the largest individual manufacturing
groups.
Wholesale and retail trade furnished the second greatest volume of
employment after manufacturing, and accounted for one-fifth to onefourth of the chief earners in the samples in each of the five cities.
Occupations in the field of transportation and communication, such
as street and steam railways, auto-bus lines, and in telephone and
telegraph offices were followed by the next greatest number of chief
earners, about one-sixth of the total in each city. Other categories of
7
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------- 2




8

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C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

employment such as building construction, public employment,
hotels and restaurants, banking, insurance, and real estate bouses,
garages and filling stations, laundries and dry-cleaning establishments,
etc., each accounted for approximately one-twentieth or less of the
sample in each city.
All five cities are important distribution centers for the huge agri­
cultural areas in the W est North Central and Mountain States, and
the proportion of clerical workers drawn in the sample in these cities
is relatively high as compared with those drawn in most of the cities
covered in the other areas. In Denver and Salt Lake City, the chief
earner in the family was found to be a clerical worker in 48 percent of
the cases. In Kansas City and Minneapolis-St. Paul, in 34 percent
of the families studied, the chief earner was a clerical worker; in St.
Louis, in 29 percent. In the wage-earner group, families of semiskilled
workers were most numerous, with those of skilled workers next in
order, and those of unskilled workers least numerous.
In time of full employment, the proportion of wage earners would
have been somewhat larger. Other reports 1 have shown that wage
earners have suffered from irregularity of employment and low earn­
ings more than clerical workers in the period since 1929, and that
consequently more of them have been on relief. Since the present
study .excluded families below certain levels of employment and
income, and families having been on relief during the year prior to the
interview by the field worker, the proportion of clerical workers is
larger than it would have been had the Study been made in 1929.
The type of work secured by the family's chief earner was not by
any means the final factor in determining its income. The number of
earners in the family, their ability and skill, and the regularity with
which they found employment were almost equally important in
determining the total family income.2
Net money income per white family studied averaged about $1,550
in St. Louis and Minneapolis-St. Paul, $1,510 in Denver, $1,443 in
Kansas City, and $1,332 in Salt Lake City.3 T o ascertain whether
1For example, Urban Workers on Relief, vol. I, Works Progress Administration, Division of Social Re­
search, Research Monograph IV, 1936.
2An “ economic family” as defined for this study consists of two or more persons living together and sharing
their economic resources. In most cases, the members of an economic family were related by ties of blood,
marriage, or adoption but in some cases, an unrelated person was found to share income and family living.
Persons related by blood, marriage, or adoption were not treated as members of the economic family if
they lived in the household as boarders and kept their funds separate from family funds, unless they
gave a complete record of their incomes and expenditures. Persons who were members of the economic
family for an entire year were not necessarily members of the household for the year. A member sup­
ported by the family in school, college, or hospital for all or part of the year, or a member working away for
that period would be treated as a member of the economic family but not of the household for the entire
year. In computing the number of persons who were part of the economic family for a year, the number
of weeks each member had shared his income with the family was listed, the numbers summed, and the
total divided by 62. This procedure yielded the number of equivalent persons who had made up the family
for 1 year.
3Details on the family income when families are sorted by economic level are found in the Tabular Sum­
mary, table 2, and when families are sorted by income level, in the Tabular Summary, table 6.




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

9

these differences from city to city represented only the chance differ­
ences inherent in random sampling or whether they revealed actual
differences between income levels of all workers in the respective
cities, a statistical test4 was conducted. It was found that the differ­
ences among average incomes found in these five cities are statistically
significant. The relatively low average income of the group drawn in
the sample for Salt Lake City reflects the depression in business condi­
tions in this city in the year covered by the investigation.5
Among the groups studied in all five cities, the distribution of
families at the upper end of the income scale was scattered, and in each
city the middle point in the income distribution was below the figure
representing the arithmetic average (table 1).
When the families studied were arranged according to income, it was
found that half of those studied in Denver had incomes under $1,500;
in Kansas City half had incomes under $1,398; in Minneapolis and St.
Paul, under $1,448; in St. Louis, under $1,529; and in Salt Lake City,
under $1,273.
T

able

1 . — F a m i ly in com es am ong wage earners and low er-sa laried clerical workers
in 1 year d uring the period 1 9 3 4 - 8 6
W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

Denver

Kansas City MinneapolisSt. Paul

St. Louis

Salt Lake
City

Number of families in survey __ _ _ _

295

357

504

401

210

Net money income:
Arithmetic average __ ______ __
First quartile____________________
Median____ __ _ ____ __
Third quartile. ._
___ . . . _____

$1, 510
1,150
1,500
1,820

$1,443
1,092
1,398
1,733

$1,549
1,196
1,448
1,819

$1,552
1,219
1,529
1,831

$1,332
971
1, 273
1, 608

The range of money incomes was from $500,6 the lower limit set by
the plan of the investigation, in Kansas City and St. Louis, to $5,167 in
Minneapolis-St. Paul. The maximum incomes found in the groups
studied in the other cities were as follows: Denver, $3,000; Kansas
City, $4,472; Minneapolis-St. Paul, $5,167; St. Louis, $4,167; and
Salt Lake City, $3,535. In each city, these maximum family incomes
were reported by families in which several persons contributed to the
family purse. In Denver, the $3,000 family income was that of a
4R. A. Fisher’s method for the analysis of variance as exemplified in intraclass correlation (discussed on
pp. 226 and 227 of his Statistical Methods for Research Workers, 6th ed., London, 1936) was used to test
whether the mean incomes obtained in the several cities differed more than could be expected if successive
samples had been drawn at random from the same population.
5The percentage of families on relief furnishes another indication of business conditions in the five cities.
The proportion receiving relief at some time during the year included in the data was considerably higher
in Salt Lake City than in the other cities studied in this area. See p. 23, footnote 8.
6In Denver, Minneapolis-St. Paul, or Salt Lake City no incomes under $600 were discovered in the sam­
pling process among families meeting the employment requirements for the group to be included in the,
investigation and not having been on relief at any time during the year.




10

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C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

widow who was employed as a clerk-typist; her daughter, a secretarystenographer; and the daughter’s son, a boy in school. The Kansas
City family reporting a total annual income of $4,472 was composed
of a man 55 years old, his wife, their sons, and a daughter. The father
was an order clerk in a foods plant, the sons were a bus driver and a
truck driver, and the daughter an office clerk. In Minneapolis there
was found the family with the highest income in any of the cities
included in this bulletin, $5,167, that of a widow of 54 and her nine
children, five of whom were employed in clerical work. The family
with an income of $4,167 in St. Louis also had five earners. The
father, a man of 61, was a truck driver; two sons were skilled workers,
a typesetter and a carpenter; one daughter was a binder and another
a checker, while the mother and 3 younger children were not gainfully
employed. In Salt Lake City, the maximum income was reported by
a family with six members, all of them working at some time during
the year, a bookkeeper, a canvasser, two stenographers, a traffic clerk,
and a filing clerk.
As the plan for the investigation called for the exclusion from the
sample of any families receiving more than 25 percent of their incomes
from sources other than earnings, the largest single item in the in­
comes of the workers’ families studied was earnings. Average earn­
ings per family of all individuals contributing ranged from $1,290 in
Salt Lake City to $1,501 in Minneapolis-St. Paul (table 2). Average
net earnings from boarders and lodgers ranged from $6 in Salt Lake
City to $28 in St. Louis.
T able 2

.

— Ite m s c om p risin g f a m i l y in co m e am on g wage earners and low er-sa laried
clerical w orkers in 1 yea r during p erio d , 1934—
86
W H IT E FAMILIES

Item

Number of families in survey.

Denver

...

..

Average net money income, total_________
Average earnings from all individuals..
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers.
Total income from all other sources___
Rent, interest, and dividends-------Pensions and insurance annuities..
Gifts____
___ ___________________
Miscellaneous sources . . . ___ _____
Business losses and expenses (deduct) .

Kansas
City

Minne­
apolisSt. Paul

St. Louis

Salt Lake
City

295

357

504

401

20
1

$1, 510
1,457

$1, 443
1,407

$1, 549
1, 501

$1, 332
1, 290

42
13
17
4

24
5

32
9

$1, 552
1, 491
28
38
17

1
2

8
-1

2
1
1
1

5
3
-9

2
1
1
1
6
6

-5

6

36

1
0

8

9
13
4

7

6

-5

0)

i Less than $0.50.

Average income from all other sources ranged from $24 in Kansas
City to $42 in Denver, the chief other sources being rent, interest and
dividends, pensions, and insurance annuities. Gifts from persons out­
side the economic family (chiefly relatives) accounted for an average
per family of $4 in Denver to $13 in Salt Lake City. Business losses




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U K S E M E N T S

11

and expenses met during the year covered by the schedule but not
deductible from earnings specified for that year and deducted from the
total family income averaged $1 in Denver, $9 in Kansas City, $5 in
each of Minneapolis-St. Paul and St. Louis, and less than $0.50 in
Salt Lake City.
The relationship between family income and number of contribu­
tors to the family purse suggested by the foregoing family descriptions
is confirmed by other data from the investigation. Figures on the
average number of earners per family at each income level indicate
that, for the occupational groups covered in this investigation, larger
incomes are quite as likely to be the results of an increase in the
number of earners in the family as of higher earnings on the part of
the chief earner of the family. Earnings of the chief earner at the
lowest income level (i. e., families receiving from $500 to $900) were
on the average between $707 and $799 in the five cities. It will be
seen from table 3 following that the average earnings of the chief
earner as a proportion of total family income remained relatively
stable with a slightly decreasing trend, from the lowest income levels
to the $1,800 to $2,100 level. Thereafter, the proportion contributed
by the chief earner fell sharply below the approximately 90 percent
which they constituted in this income group, dropping below 70 per­
cent in the income group over $2,400. This decline was accounted for
by the sharp increase in earnings of supplementary earners among
families with larger incomes, as there was no noticeable change in the
proportion of total income coming from all sources other than earnings
at different income levels. In some cases, however, less than $900 of
family income was produced by a family in which two persons reported
employment at some time during the year; in fact, in all five cities
one out of every four or five families with incomes of less than $900
had several gainful workers. The proportion of families with more
than one earner does not increase markedly within the family income
range from $900 to $1,800 or $2,100. In general, one out of each
three or four such families has more than one earner. Within this
range, the family income depends upon the size of the individual
incomes. However, the opportunities for individual earnings of more
than $2,100 are so limited among wage earners7 that family incomes of
more than this amount depend primarily upon the presence of several
earners. Thus, in each city, at least three out of four of the families
that had incomes of more than $2,100 achieved this level because of
the presence of two or more earners in the family (see table 3).
7 It should be noted that families of clerical workers earning more than $2,000 were not included in the
sample (see appendix D, p. 349).




12

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

T a b l e 3 . — S o u rces o f f a m i l y in co m e am ong wage earners and low er-sa laried clerical
workers at successive in co m e levels in 1 yea r during the p eriod 1 9 8 4 - 8 6
W H IT E FAMILIES
Percentage of income from —
Average
Average number
Earnings
Number
net
of gainful
Earnings of sup­
of families money
workers
Other
of chief
plemen­
income 1 per fam­
souices 4
earner
tary
ily 2
earners 3

Income class

D enver

All families_________ ______ __
___
Families with annual net income of—
$600 « to $900_________________________
$900 to $1,200_________________________
$1,200 to $1,500_______________________
$1,500 to $1,800_______________________
$1,800 to $2,100_______________________
$2,100 to $2,400_______________________
$2,400 and over_______________ ______

295

$1, 510

2
1

793
1 061
,
1,331
1 626
,
1, 906
2, 219
2,709

65
59
57
72

1
2
9

1.29
1.24

1.20

1.32
1.42

1.11

89.0
90.4
93.3
93.0

88.6

93.3

8.3

2.7

6.6

3.0

5.5
5.7
10.5
3.0

1.2

1.3
.9
3.7

1.80
1.89

66.0
66.8

22.0
31.6

12.0
1.6

1.0

K an sas C it y

All families______ _ . _______________ _
Families with annual net income of—
$500 to $900__________________________
$900 to $1,200_________________________
$1,200 to $1,500_______________________
$1,500 to $1,800_______________________
$1,800 to $2,100_______________________
$2,100 to $2,400_______________________
$2,400 and over_________________ ____

357

$1,443

1.33

88.8

10.2

35
85
91
76
41
15
14

757
1,055
1,353
1, 656
1,919
2, 228
2, 690

1 20
.
1.23
1.32

93.4
95.4
92.2
88.3
91.9
73.4

68.0

2.9
3.9
8.7
10.3
6.5
23.0
31.0

1.10
1.66

1.93
1.78

3.7
.7
(«)

1.4

1.6

3.6

1.0

M inneapolis -S t . P au l

All families_________
. _______________
Families with annual net income of—
$600 « to $900_________________________
$900 to $1, 200________________________
$1,200 to $1,500_______________________
$1,500 to $1,800_______________________
$1,800 to $2,100_______________________
$2,100 to $2,400_______________________
$2,400 and over______
_ _____ __

504

$1, 549

1.40

87.5

10.7

1.8

27

824
1,064
1, 337
1, 651
1,908
2, 246
3,053

1.19
1.23
1.32
1. 35
1. 37
1.75
2.74

97.0
96.0
92.7
90.2
88.4
77.6
60.2

2.7
3.8

.3

9.4
16.4
39.0

1.6
2.2
6.0
.8

11
0
128

11
1
78
40
19

6.6
8.2

.2
.7

S t . L ouis

All families_______________ ________ ___
Families with annual net income of—
$500 to $900__________________________
$900 to $1,200_________________________
$1,200 to $1,500_______________________
$1,500 to $1,800_______________________
$1,800 to $2,100_______________________
$2,100 to $2,400_______________________
$2,400 and over_______________________

401

$1, 552

1.49

84.3

13.6

2.1

29
64
98

770
1,055
1,345
1, 632
1, 923
2,241
2, 870

1.31
1. 38
1. 38
1.47
1.45
1.93
2.47

94.4
89.9
89.0

8.4
9.2

2.0

3.6
1.7

86.4
74.6
62.1

35.4

2.5

10
0
6
6
27
17

86.1

12.1
11.6
22.8

1.8
1.8
2.0
2.6

Salt L a k e C it y

All families____
_
____ __________
Families with annual net income of—
$600 5 to $900________________ ____
$900 to $1,200_________________________
$1,200 to $1,500
__________
$1,500 to $1,800--________________
$1,800 to $2,100_______________________
$2,100 and over____________ _____ ____

20
1

$1, 332

1.32

89.9

7.4

2.7

35
54
53
34
25
9

793
1,037
1, 326
1,612
1,939
2,483

1.23
1.23
1.19
1.33
1.47
2. 53

93.3
93.9
92.1
93.4
90.2
60.2

4.5
4.1
3.8
5.3
7.4
35.6

4.1
1.3
2.4
4.2

2. 2
2.0

1 Net money income is defined in appendix A, p. 319.
2A gainful worker is defined as a person having had some gainful employment in business or industry or
domestic service at any time during the year. (Some families included persons in domestic service as
subsidiary earners.)
3 Including net earnings from boarders and lodgers.
< Less business losses and expenses met during the year covered by the schedule but not deductible from
the earnings of that year.
* No cases of families receiving less than $800 occurred in the sample.
•Income from other sources was $10 and business losses $22.




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

13

Fig.

SOURCES OF FAMILY INCOME AMONG WAGE EARNERS
AND LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
AT SUCCESSIVE INCOME LEVELS
ST. LOUIS, 1 9 3 5 - 1936
W
HITE FAM
ILIES
HUNDREDS OF D O L L A R S

INCOME CLASS
10

15

20

25

ALL FAMILIES

$600uJ"°« * 9 0 0
* 9 0 0 uS ei *1200.
S
*1200 „SS&.* 1500
*1500 u S.*I800
»e
$1800 u d r$2100
ne
$ 2 1 0 0 unoer$ 2 4 0 0

$2400 a o OVER
n
EARNINGS OF
| CHIEF EARNER
U. S . BUREAU OF LAB O R

INCOME FROM
OTHER SOURCES

S T A T IS T IC S

C u rre n t Expenditures o f Each C ity G roup as a W h o le 8
Food.

The data secured in all the cities covered by this investigation
show that in spite of the decline in food prices which occurred between
1925 and 1934, expenditures for food continue to hold the central place
in the spending pattern of moderate income families. (See Tabular
Summary, table 3.) In all the groups studied, it has been found
that the money spent for food accounts for a larger proportion of
total current expenditures than any other item.
8 Throughout the report the term “ current expenditures” is used to mean expenditures for ultimate
consumer goods, including relatively durable consumption goods. Interest on money borrowed for family
use has been included in such expenditures, but savings and investments have not. The time and funds
available for the investigation have not made possible the presentation of separate totals distinguishing
expenditures for the more slowly consumed, as distinguished from quickly consumed goods. Indeed, the
data on depreciation rates for relatively durable consumer goods are so fragmentary that it would be ex­
tremely difficult to do so. Expenditures for such durable goods as automobiles, mechanical refrigerators,
and other furnishings and equipment have been classified with expenditures for food and carfare and other
quickly consumed goods as “ current expenditures” while money spent for permanent improvements on
owned homes and other real estate or as payment on the principal of mortgages has been classified as savings.
The total cost of consumer goods purchased on credit was included in current expenditures and the amount
of the obligations outstanding at the end of the year was taken into account when computing changes in
liabilities over the 12-month period. See p. 320.




14

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

A m o n g the w hite fam ilies covered b y the S tu d y in each of the five
cities in the W e s t

N o rth C e n tra l-M o u n ta in

region, the proportion

spent for food was on the average 3 to 4 percent lower than th at found
am ong fam ilies w ith com parable incom es in N e w Y o r k .

O f the five

cities under consideration the percentage of total expenditures allotted
to food was highest in S t. L ou is, averaging 3 3 .9 , and low est in K a n sas
C ity where the percentage was 3 0 .4 .

W h e n the five cities covered

in this region are ranked according to total incom e and according to
total expenditure for food, they are found to be in exactly the sam e
order.

T h e relationship between the rank of the five cities as to rela­

tive food costs and their rank as to actual food expenditures is m u ch
less clear, and it w ould appear th at the am ou n t of incom e available
for fa m ily spending was the crucial factor in determ ining the level of
average fa m ily food expenditures.

Since expenses incurred in eating

m eals aw ay from h om e is an im p ortan t item in increasing the a m ou n t
spent for food, the larger percentage spent for food b y the S t. L ou is
fam ilies is perhaps due in part to the fact th at S t. L ou is ranks first
am ong the five cities in the proportion of fam ilies reporting m eals
purchased aw ay from hom e and in the percentage of total food ex­
penditures for m eals aw ay from hom e.

Housing.
C on sisten tly for the white fam ilies in all of the five cities expendi­
tures for housing com e n ext in im portance to food.

D u e to the v a r y ­

ing proportion of fam ilies having heat and light included in rental
p ay m en ts in the several cities accurate com parison of housing expendi­
tures can be m ade only after the expenditures for housing and for
fuel, ligh t, and refrigeration h ave been com bined.

W h e n this is done

the am azing sim ilarity of the proportion of the total allotted to this
typ e of expenditure appears.

F or D en v er, K a n sas C ity , S t. L ou is,

and Salt L ak e C ity the proportion is 22 percent and for M in n ea p olisSt. Paul, where clim ate requires larger expenditures for fuel, the per­
centage is 25.
T h e m a jo rity of the fam ilies of the white wage earners and clerical
workers studied in four of these five cities live in o n e-fam ily detached
houses, approxim ately tw o-thirds in D en v er, K a n sas C ity , and Salt
L ak e C ity , m ore than half in M in n eap olis and S t. Paul.
on the other h an d, less than one-third were so housed.

In St. L ou is,
O n e-fou rth of

the M in neapolis and S t. P aul and a little over th a t proportion of the
St. L ouis fam ilies lived in tw o -fam ily dwellings, as com pared w ith
only 2 percent of the group su rveyed in D en v er.

T h e proportion of

fam ilies living in apartm en t buildings housing three or m ore fam ilies
ranged from 31 percent in St. L ou is to 14 percent in M in n eap olis and
S t. P au l.
H o m es were owned b y approxim ately one quarter of the St. L ou is
fam ilies, m ore than one-third of the D en v er, K a n sa s C ity , and M in -




IN C O M E

LEVEL

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D IS B U R S E M E N T S

15

n eapolis-St. Paul fam ilies, and alm ost half the Salt L ak e C ity fam ilies.
D en v er led the other four cities in the proportion of fam ilies studied
who rented on e-fa m ily houses, w ith 44 percent.

K a n sas C ity , Salt

L ake C ity , and M in n ea p o lis-S t. Paul cam e n ext w ith 36, 34, and 28
percent, respectively.

In St. Lou is only 15 percent of the w hite fa m ­

ilies studied rented houses.

(For a discussion of the facilities available

to these fam ilies and the rentals paid see the sections on H ou sin g,
pp. 46 to 5 3.)
W h e n the rental value (i. e., the estim ated rent one would h ave had
to p ay at current m arket prices) of, the dwellings occupied b y h om e
owners is com pared w ith the actual am oun t of their current housing
expenditures, the form er is in all cases larger.

T h is difference has

been treated as the im pu ted incom e from the equity in the owned
hom e.

I t averaged between $117 and $188 per year for the hom e

owners in each city studied in this reg io n ; the low figure was in K a n sas
C ity and the high in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul.

Clothing.
C loth in g expenditures com e third in im portance in the total expend­
itures

of all

the groups studied.

F or D en v er, K a n sas C ity , and

M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul, the proportions are alm ost identical— 10.7, 10.2,
and 10.0 percent, respectively.

In St. Louis the proportion spent

for clothing is lower, 9.4 percent of total expenditures.

T h e corre­

sponding figure for Salt L ak e C ity w ith its larger families is 12.2
percent.

Other items.
In each of these five cities in this region sum s paid out for auto­
m obile and m otorcycle purchase, operation, and m aintenance consti­
tute

the fourth largest item

M in n eap olis,

and

St.

L ouis

of fa m ily
the

expenditure.

proportion

of

total

In

D en v er,

expenditures

allotted to autom obile transportation is abou t 8 percent, alm ost 10 in
K a n sas C ity , and abou t 6 in Salt L ak e C ity .
expenditures

is

p robably

for

recreational

A large part of these
purposes,

but

it

was

im possible to secure from the fam ilies surveyed any estim ate of the
distribution

of

transportation

expenditures

between

the

various

purposes th ey served.
T h e types of expenditure w hich are classified for purposes of this
stu d y under the heading of “ recreation” rank fifth in im portance of
total expenditures in all of the cities except Salt L ak e C ity and
K an sas C ity , where the fam ilies studied spent for m edical care and
furnishings

and

equipm ent,

respectively,

an

am oun t

constitute the fifth largest item of all expenditures.

sufficient

to

In the “ recrea­

tion ” group there h ave been included expenditures for am usem en t b y
fam ilies of all tastes, b u t expenditures for tobacco constituted the bulk
o f expenditures classed under this heading.




16

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B etw een 4 and 5 percent of total expenditures in each of the five
cities was devoted to m edical care.
w ent for personal care.

A b o u t 2 percent of all expenditures

E d u catio n , vocation , co m m u n ity w elfare,

and gifts and contributions to persons outside the fam ilies, and h ou se­
hold operation other than fuel, ligh t, and refrigeration m ad e up
the balance of average annual expenditures which totaled $ 1 ,4 4 5 in
D en v er, $1,421 in K a n sas C ity , $ 1 ,5 5 0 in M in neapolis, $ 1 ,5 2 5 in St.
Louis, and $ 1 ,3 3 9 in Salt L ak e C ity .

D istrib u tio n o f Expenditures at Successive Incom e Levels
A s incom es increase certain of the expenditure item s show the sam e
tendency to increase, rem ain constant, or decrease in each of the five
cities studied in

the W e s t

N o rth

C en tra l-M o u n ta in

region.

The

proportions of the total fam ily expenditure going for food, housing,
and fuel, light, and refrigeration decline, while those for clothing,
transportation, and vocation increase.

The

trend n oted in other

regions for the percentage of the total ou tlay spent for personal care
to rem ain constan t regardless of incom e is well defined in K a n sa s C ity
and Salt L ak e C ity , b u t there is a slight tendency for this percentage
to increase in St. Lou is and M in n ea p olis-S t. P au l, while the flu ctu a­
tions abou t 2 percent are irregular in D en v er.
T h e percentage allotted to other household operation increases w ith
a rise in incom e level in each of the cities b u t M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul
where there is no consistent trend.

In D en v er and K a n sas C ity ,

increases in incom e are follow ed b y larger percentage expenditures for
furnishings

and

equipm en t,

but

the

correlation

betw een

incom e

changes and the percentage of total expenditures for these item s in
the other three cities is negligible.
O f the two rem aining groups of expenditures for the personal needs
of the fam ily, the percentages given to recreation tend to increase as
higher incom e levels are achieved, b u t the m o v em en t is n o t consistent
through all of the incom e levels studied in each of the five cities.
M ed ica l care likewise tends to claim a larger proportion of total
expenditures as the fam ily incom e becom es larger.

I t does n o t always

v a ry directly w ith changes in incom e, how ever, being m ore dependent
on fam ily size and com position, and exposure to illness.
In sm all sam ples, the experience of individual fam ilies tends at
tim es to produce erratic m o v em en ts.

T h u s, for exam ple, the per­

centages of total expenditure given to recreation show ed a general
tendency to increase at higher incom e levels, bu t the m o v em en t was
n ot consistent through all the incom e levels studied in each of the 5
cities.

Sim ilar irregularity in the

m o v em en t of the percentage of

total expenditures going to furnishings and equipm ent, and contribu-




IN C O M E

LEVEL

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D IS B U R S E M E N T S

17

tions to community welfare were noted in many cities. At the highest
incomes, where the sample is smallest, there were irregularities even
in the movement of the percentage of total expenditures going for food
and housing.
T h e general pattern of expenditure emerges m ore clearly if the data
are portrayed w ithout regard to these fluctuations th at m a y be due
entirely to the fact th at only a sm all proportion of the workers in the
city could be surveyed.

T h e pattern is best revealed b y curves th at

cut through these accidental variations and th at approxim ate the
results w hich w ould probably have been obtained had it been possible
to obtain a schedule from every fam ily in the em ployed wage-earner
and clerical group.

Such an estim ate for M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul is

presented in figures 2 and 3.
T h e prim e im portance of food and housing in fa m ily spending is
clearly shown b y figure 2.

(See T abu lar Sum m ary, table 25 and notes

on this table in appendix A , p. 3 3 6 .)

I t also brings out the current

com petition between expenditures for clothing and for transporta­
tion.

W ith in the range of incom es studied, at all bu t the low est

income levels, average fam ily expenditures for transportation (includ­
ing expenditure for autom obile purchase and operation) are higher
than

those

for

clothing.

T h is

relatively

greater

im portance

of

transportation as com pared w ith clothing coincides w ith the findings
for the Pacific region in San F rancisco-O akland and for the E a st
N o rth Central region in D etro it.
in the N o rth A tla n tic region
and the South

It is in contrast w ith the situation

(N ew

Y ork

C ity

and P hiladelphia)

(B altim ore) where expenditures for transportation

were definitely below those for clothing.

E v id e n tly the lesser d ensity

of population in the W e s t, together w ith the large distances betw een
centers, has contributed to a m ore widespread use of the autom obile
in those areas both as a m eans of recreation and as a necessary m eans
of locom otion.
One of the m o st im p ortan t aspects of the data on expenditures at
different incom e levels is the variation in the relative change of ex­
penditures for com m odities and services of different types.

T h is can­

n ot be shown on the type of scale used in figure 2 which was designed to
em phasize the absolute im portance of the various item s.

In figure 3,

the same lines are plotted on a logarithm ic scale in order to show th at
expenditures for each group of item s increase at a different rate from
incom e level to incom e level.
T h e relative change for food and for
housing is sm all com pared w ith th at for clothing and transportation,
as well as for som e of the other less im p ortan t item s of

fa m ily

expenditure.

The difference between the shapes of the curves for clothing on one
hand, and those for food and for housing on the other indicates that
expenditures for clothing expand rapidly through all the income levels




18

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Fig. 2

PATTERNS OF FAMILY EXPENDITURES AT SUCCESSIVE
INCOME LEVELS AMONG WAGE EARNERS AND
LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
ANNUAL
EXPENDITURE

MINNEAPOLIS -S T PAUL, 1 9 3 4 -1 9 3 6
W ITE FAM
H
ILIES

ANNUAL INCOME IN DOLLARS
U S . B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T I S T IC S




ANNUAL
EXPENDITURE

( in Dollars)

( In Dollars )

IN C O M E

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M ONEY

19

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

Fig. 3

RELATIVE FAMILY EXPENDITURES AT SUCCESSIVE
INCOME LEVELS AMONG WAGE EARNERS AND
LOWER SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL, 1 9 3 4 -1 9 3 6
ANNUAL EXPENDITURE
(In D o lla rs )

WHITE FAMILIES

ANNUAL EXPENDITURE
I OOO

(In D o lla rs )

900
800
700
600
500
400

100

90
80
70
60
50

The slopes o f the lines show rne percent increase in expenditure corresponding to the percent increase in income.
A slope greater than that o f a 4 5 degree line represents a gain o f the specified kind o f expenditure relatively
greater than the gain in income-, o slope less than that o f a 4 5 degree line represents a gain relatively smaller.
U . S . B U R EA U O F LA B O R S T A T IS T IC S




20

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represented by this group. The relative increase is most pronounced
between the $1,200 income level and the $2,100 level.
T ran sportation and furnishings and equipm ent expenditures show
even greater elasticity than those for clothing up to the $ 1 ,2 0 0 incom e
level.

T h e rapid rise suggests th at few fam ilies at the low est incom e

levels studied can afford autom obiles or other than bare essentials of
household supplies, b u t th a t these item s are am ong the first to be
added when incom es perm it.
range

studied,

how ever,

A t higher levels w ithin

transportation

expenditures

the incom e
continue

as

elastic as those for clothing, in contrast to a rapid tapering off in
relative purchase of furnishings and equipm ent.

E v id e n tly , after

a few of the m ost essential item s of convenience and com fort have
been added to the housefurnishings and equipm ent, additional funds
are m ore likely to go for clothes or autom obiles, recreation, g ifts, or
miscellaneous item s.

Variation in money disbursements.
F or m a n y reasons of taste, h abit, or circum stances peculiar to a
given year or to a given fam ily situation, the expenditures of a particu­
lar fam ily for a certain item or group of item s m a y deviate considerably
from the average for a large group of fam ilies.

T h u s a fa m ily which

experienced a serious illness of the principal earner m igh t be obliged
to incur m edical and perhaps hospital expenses and possibly to defer
purchases of clothing and recreational item s and p aym en ts on back
d e b ts; a fa m ily w ith a gifted child m igh t m ak e considerable sacrifices
of clothing, transportation, and even food in order to provide special
lessons in the hope of an artistic career for the ch ild; the you n g
couple recently married will p robably spend m u ch m ore for furniture
and equipm ent than an older couple w ith the sam e in co m e; a fam ily
w ith dependent relatives m u st m ake larger contributions to persons
outside the econom ic fam ily than one whose relatives are m ore fortu ­
n ately situated.

In interpreting the average figures presented in this volume, it is
important to keep in mind some idea of the extent of these variations
from the average, and their magnitude for the different main categories
of expenditure.
B ecause of differences of fam ily incom e and size, as well as for the
reasons cited, the average expenditure of all fam ilies covered has only
a lim ited significance.

T h is is m ore true for certain categories of

expenditure, where purchases tend to be relatively infrequent and of
large m agnitu de when they do occur, than for other categories.

D a ta

presented in table 2 4 A of the T ab u lar S u m m ary show the extent to
which the expenditures of individual fam ilies vary from the average
in each city.




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

21

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

T h o u g h the m easures of v a r ia tio n 9 are n ot identical from city to
city for given categories of expenditure, th ey are sufficiently similar
to reveal distinct patterns of variation for different types of expendi­
tures.

T here is relatively less variation in food and housing ex­

penditures than in any other item of the fa m ily budget.

There is a

higher degree of variability in expenditures for housing in Salt L ake
C ity than in the other 4 com m unities, am ong the highest found in
any of the 42 cities in the N a tio n -w id e stu dy .

T h is is p robably due

in part to the lower average incom e and in part to the larger pro­
portion of fam ilies w ith m ore than two children in th at co m m u n ity ,
and the subsequent pressure upon fam ily resources.

T h e n ext group

of item s, personal care, clothing, recreation, and household operation
other than fuel, light, and refrigeration, are approxim ately twice as
variable

as those for food

and housing.

R ela tiv ely

the greatest

variability, three or m ore tim es as m u ch as for food expenditures,
occurs in expenditures for furnishings and equipm en t, transportation,
m edical care, gifts and contributions, and m iscellaneous item s.

The

variability in savings and in deficits for fam ilies ending the year in
such positions respectively ranks along w ith th at for transportation
and other item s in the third m o st variable group of expenditure item s.
T h e very listing of the above groups of item s suggests the probable
reasons for the striking differences in variability for certain categories.
F ood and housing, m a jo r item s in the fa m ily b udget, m u st be pur­
chased regularly b y all fam ilies and, w ithin the incom e and occupa­
tional range of this stu dy, extrem ely wide variations are n ot to be
expected.

A t the opposite extrem e, m a n y item s of furnishings and

equipm ent are purchased b y relatively few fam ilies in an y one year,
and such outlays wiien m ade in volve com paratively h ea v y expendi­
tures.

T h e great irregularity in transportation expenditures is due

in large part to

the m aterial differences in such expenditures of

fam ilies w ith and w ithou t autom obiles.

M ed ica l care expenditures

reflect differences in em ergency situations encountered during the
year b y individual fam ilies.
E v en at the sam e incom e level, it is hardly to be expected th at any
two fam ilies will spend their funds in exactly the sam e w ay.

The

significance of the various averages presented— the extent to which
fam ilies tend to conform to the average pattern— is shown b y incom e
levels for the city of M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul in table 2 4 B of the T ab u la r
S u m m a ry .1
0

F or alm ost every category of expenditure there is less

9The measure of variation used, the coefficient of variation, expresses the dispersion about the average
of the individual items which go to make up the average. The measure is in percentage terms, i. e., is
independent of the size of the average. For fuller statement, see appendix A , note on tables 24A and 24 B,
p. 335. In the textual discussion, the terms variation, measure of variation, degree of variation, variability,
etc., should be understood always to refer to coefficients of variation as set forth in tables 24A and 24B of
the Tabular Summary.
1 Measures of variation for families of separate types by income level were computed for families studied in
0
New York City (see B. L. S. Bulletin 637, vol. I, Tabular Summary, table 24). Funds were not available
for similar computations for other regions.




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variation in the expenditures of families in any given incom e class
than there is in the expenditures of the city group as a whole.
T here is a general tendency for the variation in expenditures to be
less at the high incom e levels than a t the lo w .1
1
true of clothing, furnishings, and deficits.

T h is is especially

I t is som ew hat less strik­

in gly true for m edical care and personal care.

On the other hand,

there is no clearly discernible direction of change in variation in ex­
penditures for food, housing, household operation,

transportation,

recreation, gifts and contributions, or surplus at higher in com e levels.
T hese tendencies agree, in general, w ith those found in cities in
other regions for which variations in expenditures b y incom e level
were com puted.

W h e n the findings for seven cities in six different

regions are com pared, it is found th at there was a significant decrease
in variability at higher incom e levels in expenditures for clothing, fur­
nishings and equipm ent, and m edical care.

F or other item s of expend­

iture and for surplus and deficit, no significant decline was found.
T h e higher relative variations in expenditures for several categories
at the lower incom e levels suggests the close pressure of these narrow
m argins of fa m ily incom e.

F or a low -incom e fam ily, an em ergency

or unusual expenditure for m edical care, furnishings, or autom obile
was apt to m ean a sharp corresponding trim m ing in the others, so
th at individual fam ilies studied spent anywhere from zero to rather
large am ounts for som e of these item s.

T heir incom es were n ot

large enough to perm it th em to allocate their resources regularly
from year to year in about the sam e proportions for these various
fam ily requirem ents, b u t rather th ey stretched their dollars as best
th ey m igh t.
F or the higher incom e fam ilies, on the contrary, the sm aller rela­
tive variability in several categories of expenditures indicates th at
it was possible for these fam ilies to work out a m ore consistent pattern
of expenditure.

Such drastic rearrangem ents in their budgets were

n ot required even should an em ergency expenditure arise.

T hey

were m ore nearly able to plan regular replacem ents of item s of cloth ­
ing and furnishings, to m ake regular as well as em ergency expenditures
for m edical care, and to plan definite expenditure for personal care.
T h e y were also less apt to find it necessary to incur deficits of w idely
differing am ounts.
1
1 In part, this is due to the fact that the income bands are proportionately wider at the lower levels.
Thus a $2,400 income is 13 percent higher than a $2,100 income, while a $1,200 income is 33 percent higher
than one of $900. It follows, even if variations in expenditures for clothing were exclusively due to differ­
ences in income, that in terms of percentages there would be less variation in clothing expenditures among
families with incomes of $2,100 to $2,400 than among those with incomes of $900 to $1,200.




IN C O M E

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23

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

Income Levels and Planes o f L ivin g

Size and composition of family .
Since the amount of the family income and the number of persons
in the family are almost equally important in determining the way
that income is spent, it becomes of crucial importance to understand
the family types which predominate at each income level among the
families studied.
The median size of family in these five cities as shown by the census
of 1930 was slightly under the median size of family for all cities in
the country, 4 .0 persons. The average size of the families studied in
each city sample in this region, while below the median size for urban
families in the country as a whole, was slightly above the median size
of family for that city as shown by the census. The comparable
figures are as follows: For Denver, an average of 3 .14 persons per
family for the sample as against a median as shown by the census of
3 .1 0 ; for Kansas City, 3 .3 7 against 3 .1 7 ; for Minneapolis-St. Paul,
3.51 against 3 .4 1 ; for St. Louis, 3.48 against 3 .2 7 ; and for Salt Lake
City, where the largest families found in this region occurred, 3.81
against 3 .6 8 .12
In four of the cities studied— D en v er, K a n sas C ity , M inneapolisSt.

Paul,

and

S t.

L ouis— approxim ately

one-half

studied had no children under 16 years of age.

of

the families

O f this group w ith ­

ou t you n g children approxim ately h alf were fam ilies consisting of
h usband and wife o n ly ; slightly over a fourth were fam ilies of husband,
wife, sons and daughters, or other fam ily m em bers over 16 years o ld ;
and a lm ost a fourth were econom ic fa m ilie s1 com posed of adults n ot
3
including a husband and wife.

T h is last group was m ade up of a

great variety of fa m ily ty p es; widows or widowers w ith children over
16 years old, or brothers and sisters uniting their econom ic resources,
were the m o st frequent.
T h e proportion of fam ilies in Salt L ak e C ity havin g children under
16 was m uch larger than for the other four cities, since out of a total
of 210 fam ilies only 73 reported no children under 16.

T hese 73

fam ilies were distributed am ong the fa m ily types listed above as
1 If the investigation had been extended to families on relief, the average size of family would have been
2
somewhat larger. In the period covered by the schedules secured in Denver, the number of families on the
relief rolls was at its height in February 1935. Figures from the records of the Division of Social Research,
Works Progress Administration show the number of white families including two or more persons on relief
in the city at that time to have been 11,200 or 16.2 percent of the number of such families in Denver in 1930.
The average size of these families on relief was 3.9 persons. During the period of the scheduling, the number
of families on relief in Kansas City reached a peak of 9,500 families in May 1935, which constituted 8.3 per­
cent of white families in Kansas City in 1930. The average size of these 9,500 families was 3.8. The maxi­
mum number of families on relief during the period of the investigation in Minneapolis-St. Paul occurred
in May 1935, when 15,000 or 8.8 percent of families living in Minneapolis-St. Paul in 1930 received such aid.
An average of 3.8 persons were in these needy families. During the same month, St. Louis experienced
its greatest relief load 19,600 families of an average size of 4.0 persons. This figure constituted 11.0 percent
of all families in St. Louis in 1930. Eight thousand four hundred families, averaging 4.2 persons per family,
were given relief in Salt Lake City in February 1935, or 19.8 percent of white families living there in 1930.
1 See footnote 2, p. 8.
3
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------ 3




24

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follow s: 35 were fam ilies of h usband and wife o n ly, 21 were fam ilies
including husband and wife, and sons and daughters, or other fam ily
m em bers over 16 years of age, and 17 were fam ilies of adults n ot
including m an and wife.
T h e very sm all fam ilies found at the low est incom e level am ong the
independent fam ilies covered in the present investigation com pared
w ith the large size of the fam ilies on the relief rolls em phasizes the
difficulty of supporting a fam ily w ith several children in a period
Fi g. 4

SIZE OF FAMILY AMONG WAGE EARNERS
AND LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
AT SUCCESSIVE INCOME LEVELS
SALT LAKE CITY, 1934-1935
W
HITE FAMILIES
INCOME CLASS

N U M B E R OF P E R S O N S
2_______________3

ALL FAMILIES

* 6 0 0 ^ * 9 0 0

* 9 0 0 u$Ser * 1 2 0 0

* 1200

A

*1500

* 1 5 0 0 UNDER * 1 8 0 0

$1800 UNDER $2100
*2100

a d OVER
n

^ 1

GAINFUL WORKERS

I

OTHER PERSONS 16 YEARS
OF AGE AND OVER

PERSONS UNDER
16 YEARS OF AGE

U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS________ _

when opportunities for em ploym en t are lim ited.

(See table 4 and

fig. 4 .)
In the higher incom e brackets, the groups studied were, in general,
m atu rin g fam ilies in which there were few you n g children, and an
increasing num ber of sons, daughters, or w ives who were able to enter
the labor m arket.

I t has already been indicated th at am ong fam ilies

of wage earners and clerical workers, increases in fam ily incom e are
largely dependent on the num ber of em ployable persons m aking up
the fam ily group.

W h e n the fam ilies studied are sorted b y fa m ily

incom e, the n um ber of persons over 16 years of age is found to be con­
siderably larger at the higher incom e levels than at the lower ones.
T a b le 5 of the T ab u la r Su m m ary shows, for each city covered in the




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

25

West North Central-Mountain region, the size of family at different
income levels and the trend toward increase in the number of persons
16 years of age and over with increases in income. The trend in the
number of children per family is less regular than the trend in the
number of other persons. In St. Louis the number of children per
family varies with increase in income. A maximum of slightly more
than one child is shown at the $1,500 to $1,800 group. In Denver
at each income group families averaged fewer than one child less
than 16 years old, while in Salt Lake City, with the exception of the
lowest income group, families at each income class averaged more
than one child, and in the $1,500 to $1,800 income class the number
of children averaged 1.74. In Minneapolis-St. Paul and in Kansas
City, the average number of children per family fluctuates with great
irregularity from one income class to another, but the average at
any one level never exceeds 1.33 in the former city, nor 1.20 in the
latter.
Planes o f livin g determ ined by fam ily size as well as incom e .
Preliminary study of the variations in the amounts and kinds of
goods purchased by families in different income classes emphasizes
the obvious fact that the plane at which a family lives is determined
quite as much by the number, age, sex, and occupation of the persons
dependent on family income as by the size of the income. Since
average size of family is larger at the higher income levels, it is im­
possible to assume that the plane of living of the families in successive
income classes is proportional to their incomes. An examination of the
types of families represented at each income level makes it evident
that in any one income class there are included families with very
different planes of living, the differences depending on the composi­
tion of the family to be supported with the given income.
For example, among the 504 families surveyed in Minneapolis and
St. Paul, there were 111 with incomes ranging from $1,500 to $1,800;
of these 23 were families of husband and wife only, 16 of husband and
wife and 1 child under 16 years of age, 14 including husband and wife
and 1 person 16 years of age or older; and 3 families of other types
including 2 or 3 persons, making a total of 56 families of not more than
3 persons living in relative comfort with incomes averaging about
$1,650. In the same income class there were 55 families of 4 or more
persons whose expenditures were definitely more restricted, depend­
ing on the number and the age of the persons in the family, and whose
plane of living was necessarily considerably lower than that of the
families with only 3 members.
Since one of the primary purposes of the investigation was to de­
termine the kind of living available to families at different economic
levels, the detailed analysis of expenditures has been based upon a
classification which takes into account not only the total amount of




26

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

money available for family living, but, also, the composition of the
family for which it is spent. The process of classifying families ac­
cording to their economic level may be indicated from the case of two
families, each spending $1,450 during the schedule year. The first
family consisted of a man of 40 working as a machine operator; his
wife, 38; two sons aged 15 and 6; and two daughters, aged 12 and 8.
In addition, the family was responsible during 6 months for the total
support of the wife’s mother, who lived with the family during half
the year. This family is regarded as consisting of 6 % full-time equiva­
lent persons in the family. The second family consists of a man of 27,
also a machine operator; his wife, 26; a daughter of 4 years and an
infant son 1% years old. This is a four-person family. The first
family spent $725 and the smaller family $780 for all items other than
food and clothing. There is not enough information at present avail­
able on the influence of age or sex on these general types of expenditure
to improve upon the assumption that equal expenditures are incurred
for each member of the family. The per capita expenditure per full­
time equivalent person in the first family was $112 as against $195
in the second family for all items other than food and clothing. In
the case of food, studies of customary expenditures and of dietary
needs have been made in sufficient detail to allow for the creation of
scales of expenditure for each age, sex, and activity group in terms of
the customary expenditures of an adult male employed full-time. The
scales adopted in this study indicate that the first family consisted of
the equivalent of 5.5 adult males in the family for the full year. This
unit will be subsequently referred to in the present study as a “ foodexpenditure unit.” The second family consisted of 2.9 food-expendi­
ture units. The first family spent $580 per year for food, or the equiva­
lent of $105 per food-expenditure unit. The second family spent
$500, a substantially smaller proportion of its total income, but which
amounted to $172 per food-expenditure unit. (See appendix G, pp.
376 and 377.)
Finally, in connection with clothing, it has been possible as a result
of this study to derive a scale of customary expenditures related to sex,
age, and occupation. If the average expenditures of adult male wage
earners and lower-salaried clerical workers between the ages of 21 and
35, inclusive, are regarded as equivalent to one clothing-expenditure
unit, it has been found that the larger of the two families contains
4.0 clothing-expenditure units while the smaller family contains 2.6.
The first family spent $145 for clothing and the smaller family, $170.
This was an average per clothing-expenditure unit of $36 for the first
family and $65 for the second. The economic level of the first family
has been measured by the sum of these three types of unit expenditure:
$105 for food, $36 for clothing, and $112 for all other items: total
for the family, $243 per expenditure unit. The smaller family, which




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

27

it will be recalled had an identical income to spend, has not been
classified with the larger family but rather with other families that
had expenditure per unit of more than $400 but less than $500. In
both cases, this means that these particular families are grouped as
regards economic level with families whose incomes may be quite
different. For example, a widow with one young child, earning $100
a month, would be grouped with the smaller of the two families, as
would also a very large family with an income of more than $3,000.
(See appendix G, pp. 376-381 and sample code sheet, p. 382.)
The relationship between expenditures and the size and composi­
tion of families at successive income levels will be seen more clearly
from table 4 which presents data by income level for the white fami­
lies covered in the investigation. The average family expenditure at
the highest income level shown for Minneapolis-St. Paul was more
than four times the average family expenditure at the lowest income
level, but the amount spent per expenditure unit at the highest income
level was not quite twice the amount at the lowest income level.
T

4 . — A v era g e a m ou n t spent per expen ditu re unit am ong wage earners and
low er-sa laried clerical w orkers at successive in com e levels in 1 yea r d uring the
period 1 9 3 4 —3 6
W H IT E FAMILIES

able

Income class

Num­
ber of
fam­
ilies

Average
size of
family
in expend­
iture
units

Average
total
expendi­
ture per
family

Average
amount
spent for
food per
food ex­
penditure
unit

Average
amount
spent for
clothing
per cloth­
ing ex­
penditure
unit

$140
148
159
178
182
182
232

$30
43
50
57

8
6
72
101

$135
203
219
284
323
387
474

$304
395
428
522
593
645
809

$123
131
145
164
178
172

$32
35
47
65
74
82

$156
184
227
293
367
328

$312
351
421
525
621
587

$31
40
46
57
64
75
76
106

$197
198
234
260
316
305
286
365
441

$372
384
441
490
556
569
538
632
710

Average
amount
spent for
other
items per
person

Average
amount
spent for
all items
per ex­
penditure
unit

D e n ve r

$600 to $900 i________
$900 to $1,200________
$1,200 to $1,500______
$1,500 to $1,800______
$1,800 to $
______
$2,100 to $2,400______
$2,400 and over_____

2.10
0

21
65
59
57
72

12
9

2.71
2. 74
3.07
2. 94
2.96
3. 26
2.90

$823
1,083
1,315
1,535
1, 755
2,103
2, 346
K ansas C ity

$500 to $900__________
$900 to $1,200________
$1,200 to $1,500______
$1,500 to $1,800______
______
$1,800 to $
$
and over----------

2,10
0

2,100

35
85
91
76
41
29

2.59
3. 00
3. 23
3.16
2.90
3.87

$808
1,052
1, 361
1,659
1,800
2, 272

M inneapolis -S t . P a u l

$600 to $900i________
$900 to $1,200________
$1,200 to $1,500______
$1,500 to $1,800______
$1,800 to $
______
$2,100 to $2,400______
$2,400 to $2,700______
$2,700 to $3,000______
$3,000 and o v e r .____

2,10
0

27

101
128
111
78
40

8
6
5

2. 34
2. 94
3.11
3. 32
3. 36
3. 75
4.27
4. 38
5. 77

$871
1,129
1,371
1,626
1,869
2,132
2, 298
2, 768
4,098

$143
142
158
170
175
184
175
176
184

1No cases of families receiving less than $600 occurred in the sample.




10
0

28
T

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

4. — A verag e a m o u n t sp en t p er exp en d itu re unit am on g wage earners and
low er-sa laried clerical w orkers at successive in co m e levels in 1 yea r d u rin g the
p eriod 1 9 8 4 ~ 8 6 — Continued

able

W H IT E F AM ILIES—Continued

Num­
ber of
fam­
ilies

Income class

Average
size of
family
in expend­
iture
units

Average
amount
spent for
food per
food ex­
penditure
unit

Average
amount
spent for
clothing
per cloth­
ing ex­
penditure
unit

Average
amount
spent for
other
items per
person

$131
147
169
174
189
190
213

Average
total
expendi­
ture per
family

$32
31
44
51
65
69
79

$140
178
238
247
304
333
329

$304
358
455
474
562
592
623

$38
46
51
62
79

$159
157
190
217
278

$308
325
374
415
510

Average
amount
spent for
all items
per ex­
penditure
unit

St . L ouis

29
64
98

$500 to $900__________
$900 to $1,200________
$1,200 to $1,500______
$1,500 to $14
800______
$1,800 to $
______
$2,100 to $2,400______
$2,400 and over _ . .

10
0
6
6

2,10
0

27
17

2.74
3.01
2. 95
3. 40
3. 27
3.72
4.30

$832
1,077
1, 341
, 610
1,837

1
2,20
2
2, 679

Salt L a k e

35
54
53
34
34

$500 to $900 i________
$900 to $1,200________
$1,200 to $1,500______
$1,500 to $1,800______
$1,800 and over----------

2.90
3. 32
3. 57
3.93
3. 79

$892
1,080
1, 334
1,632
1 934

C tty

$110
121
132
133
155

i No cases of families receiving less than $600 occurred in the sample.

Equivalence betw een total expenditures and econom ic levels .
In subsequent discussions in this bulletin, expenditures will be
analyzed by economic level. Econom ic levels among the white
families are distinguished in $100 intervals from annual expenditures
of $200 per expenditure unit to those of $1,000 and over. Since
most discussions of expenditures have been based upon differences
in expenditure at various income levels, it may be convenient to
translate the economic levels under discussion into equivalent total
annual expenditures for the two families described above. On the
basis of the scales used in this study, the first family is regarded as
consisting of 5.7 expenditure units, while the second family consists
of 3 .3 6 or approximately 3.4 expenditure units. The $250 economic
level for the first family implies total annual expenditures, then, of
$ 1 ,4 2 5 and the $650 level for the same family, total expenditures of
$ 3 ,7 0 5 .
The equivalence is shown in the following table:
T

able

5. —

T otal f a m i l y ex pen d itu re equivalents f o r fa m ilie s o f 8 d ifferent typ es at
given econ om ic levels
Economic level
Family of 5.7
(amount
spent per
expenditure
expenditure
units
unit)

1

$150
250
350
450
550
650

1
2

$855
1,425
1,995
2, 565
3,135
3,705

Family of 3.4
expenditure
units

Family of 1.9
expenditure
units

$510
850
1,190
1,530
1,870

$285
475
665
855
1,045
1, 235

2

2,210

3

6

Family consisted of a man, 40, working as a machine operator; his wife, 38; two sons, aged 15 and ; and
two daughters, aged
and .
Family consisted of man, 27, working as a machine operator; his wife, 26; a daughter 4 years old, and an
infant son 1 H years.
* Family consisted of man, 35, working as a machine operator, and his wife, 31.

12




8

IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

29

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

Table 6 presents the amount spent per expenditure unit at succes­
sive economic levels in the five cities studied in this area. It will be
seen that while average total expenditures approximately doubled
from the lowest to the highest expenditure levels in each city, the
amounts spent per expenditure unit for food, clothing, and “ other
items” respectively increased in much greater proportions.
T a b l e 6 .— A verage am ou n t sp en t per expenditure u n it am ong wage earners and
low er-salaried clerical workers at successive econ om ic levels in 1 yea r during the
p eriod 1 9 3 4 - 8 6
W H IT E FAM ILIES

Average

Amount spent per
expenditure unit

N um ­
size of
family
ber of
fam­ in expend­
ilies
iture
units

Average
total
expendi­
ture per
family

Average
amount
spent for
food per
food ex­
penditure
unit

Average
amount
spent for
clothing
per cloth­
ing ex­
penditure
unit

$107
141
155
181
204
239
242
302
255

$27
47
53
64
82
84

$92
107
132
150
173
195
207
218

Average
amount
spent for
other
items per
person

Average
amount
spent for
all items
per ex­
penditure
unit

D enveb

Under $300__________
$300 to $400__________
$400 to $500__________
$500 to $600__________
$600 to $700__________
$700 to $800__________
$800 to $900__________
$900 to $1,000________
$
and over____

1,0 0
0

25
67
52
54
36
28

11

9
13

4. 37
3. 47
3.15
.
2. 40
2. 09

26
6
2.10
1.93
2.10

$1,113

1,202

1,396
1,447
1,550
1,586
1,781
1,885
2,295

$120
160
235
298
358
434
515
546
742

$255
346
443
544
646
759
848
977
1,093

$15
29
40
52
69
70

$57
117
170
238
307
387
477
737

$164
253
341
440
548
650
786
1,057

$29
38
49
67
74

$109
173
231
298
370
442
509
628
703

$250
350
441
545
639
745
849
968
1,069

$69

111
162
20
2

$169
253
349
443
537
647
746
843
1,049

$72

$171
249
348
457
551
761

10
2
134
98

K an sas C ity

$10 $2 0
0 0

to
_________
$200 to $300 _
$300 to $400__________
$400 to $500__________
$500 to $600__________
$600 to $700___
$700 to $900__________
$900 and over________

6

39
92
73
50
43
31
23

6.12

4. 24
3. 50
2.99
. 87
2. 46
2.38
1. 99

2

$1,003
1,071
1,193
1,317
1,572
1,599
1,870
2,104

101
101

M inneapolis -S t . P a u l

Under $300__________
$300 to $400__________
$400 to $500__________
$500 to $600__________
$600 to $700__________
$700 to $800__________
$800 to $900__________
$900 to $1,000________
$
and over______

1,0 0
0

47
114
106

8
6
59
36
32

10

14

4. 75
3. 79
3. 23
2. 95
2. 78
. 61
2. 09
. 26

2
2
2.01

$1,189
1,326
1,425
1, 607
1,777
1,945
1,774
2,188
2,149

$111

136
161
183
194
216
242
249
251

8
6

95
84

111

St . L ouis

$10 to $2 0
0 0 __________

$200 to $300__________
$300 to $400__________
$400 to $500__________
$500 to $600__________
$600 to $700__________
$700 to $800__________
$800 to $900__________
$900 and over________

6

48
65
94
62
42
28
30
26

5. 39
4. 98
3. 73
3. 36
2. 78
2.48
2. 35
2.15

2.11

$912
1,261
1,303
i,490
1,492
1, 605
1,754
1,813
2, 214

$80
113
148
174
198
216

21
2
238
287

$15
24
33
45
52
56

6
6
76
10
0

282
369
453
519
663

S alt L a k e C ity

$10 to $2 0
0 0 __________

$200 to $300__________
$300 to $400__________
$400 to $500__________
$500 to $600__________
$600 and over________




8

46
55
50

2
2
29

5. 65
4. 57
3. 67
2. 96
2. 85
.

2 21

$966
1,138
1,278
1, 354
1,570
1,681

$76

10
0

125
151
162

210

$23
36
49
64
82

101

112

173
244
315
446

30

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

Order of Expenditures at Different Economic Levels

When the data from all the families studied had been sorted accord­
ing to economic level, as indicated by the number of dollars spent per
expenditure unit, it was found that certain tendencies in the distribu­
tion of expenditures among different types of goods and services are
much more striking with this classification than with the income classi­
fication, and that they are very similar from city to city. At the lower
spending levels there are a certain number of small families with
very low incomes, but more large families with incomes approaching
the median. Families of these two different types are much nearer
together as far as spending patterns are concerned than two families
with the same money income, one of husband and wife only, the other
including several children. There are striking declines in the pro­
portion of total expenditures going to food with rise in the economic
levels of the family, less rapid declines in expenditures for housing,
fuel, light, and refrigeration combined, and a slight rise in the percent­
age spent for clothing.
E xpenditures at tw o econom ic levels .
The difference in the average size of the families at low and high
spending levels, their average income and expenditures, is well illus­
trated by data from Denver, shown in figure 5. The families at the
lowest expenditure level shown averaged 4.84 persons, and devoted
38.9 percent of their total outlay to food, one quarter to housing, fuel,
light, and refrigeration, thus having only 36 percent left for clothing,
other items of household operation, transportation, recreation,
medical and personal care, and the other items which must be pur­
chased in an urban community. The families at the higher expend­
iture level averaged approximately 2% persons per family. They
spent almost two times as much for food per expenditure unit as the
larger families at the lower level, but their total outlay for food repre­
sented only 29.7 percent of their total expenditure. Their expendi­
tures for housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration amounted to $130 per
person as compared with $58 per person at the lowest level, but the
percentage of the total devoted to housing at the highest level was
only 21.3 percent. The families at the highest level thus had almost
50 percent of their total expenditures yet to plan after food, housing,
heat, light, and refrigeration had been paid for.
Expenditures having the lowest ranks, as education, vocation, and
other items, retain about the same relative importance among families
spending between $200 and $300 per expenditure unit per year as
among families spending between $600 and $700. The relatively
small expenditure for formal education at the upper expenditure level
is explained by the type of families found at this level in each of the
cities. These families averaged only slightly more than 2 persons.




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

31

Fig. 5.

DISTRIBUTION OF FAMILY EXPENDITURES OF WAGE
EARNERS AND LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
AT TWO DIFFERENT ECONOMIC LEVELS

DENVER, 1934- 1935
WHITE
ITEM

FAMILIES

PERCENT OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES

0

FOOD

HOUSING
INCLUDING FUEL,
LIG H T
AN D
R EFR IG ER ATIO N

CLOTHING

AUTOMOBILE

MEDICAL CARE

RECREATION

HOUSEHOLD
OPERATION
FURNISHINGS
a EQUIPMENT
TRANSPORTA­
TION O T H E R
THAN AU TO M OBILE

PERSONAL
CARE
COMMUNITY
W
ELFARE,GIFTS
C NTRIBUTIO
O
NS
EDUCATION,
VOCATION
AND MISC.
U S. BUREAU O F LA B O R S T A T IS T IC S




10

20

30

40

32

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

The number of persons under 16 years old averaged slightly under
% person per family and the number of persons gainfully employed
at some time during the year averaged about 1% persons per family.
Quite as striking as change in the distribution of expenditures from
the lowest to the highest economic level are the differences in the size
of the families at the two levels and their income and earnings. From
table 7 it is evident that a high plane of living results as much from
small size of family as from large income. If families at the lowest
economic level shown on the chart for Denver were to enjoy the same
consumer goods and services per expenditure unit as do the families
at the highest economic level they would have needed an income of
$3,151.
T

able

7 . — F a m ily size and annual in com e am on g wage earners and low er-salaried
clerical w orkers at two different econ om ic levels
W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit per year
$200 to $300

$600 to $700

City
Num­ Average
ber of
size of Annual
families family income

Denver----------------------------. .
Kansas City----------- __ _ __
Minneapolis-St. Paul... _ _
St. Louis., . . .
_ _ _
Salt Lake City_____________

i 25
39
24
7
48
46

4.84
4.71
5.36
5. 54
5.06

$1,084
1,117
1,242
1,287
1,146

Earn­
ings of
chief
earner

Num­ Average
ber of
size of Annual
families family income

$979
990
1,154
1,086
1,076

36
43
59
42
13

2.53
2.58
2.95
2. 63
2. 32

$1, 648
1, 625
1,672
1, 675
1,634

Earn­
ings of
chief
earner
$1,379
1, 387
1, 433
1,426
1,425

1Includes 1 family spending under $200 per expenditure unit per year.
2Includes 2 families spending under $200 per expenditure unit per year.
A comparison of the distribution of total family expenditures at low
and high economic levels 1 (table 8) shows the shift in consumer
4
demand from one of the lowest planes at which independent families
were found to the highest plane of living enjoyed by any considerable
number of the families of wage earners and clerical workers in each
of the five cities in the West North Central-Mountain region. One of
the greatest single shifts in the purchases of the white families in any
of the five cities occurs in Minneapolis-St. Paul in the proportion of
total funds spent for the purchase, operation, and upkeep of automo­
biles and motorcycles which rises four ranks to achieve fourth place,
its position in each city at the highest economic level. On the con­
trary, expenditures for transportation other than automobile de­
crease in rank in four cities and retain the same rank at both economic
levels in the fifth city. Expenditures for furnishings and equipment
undergo the second greatest change in relative rank from low to high
u Economic levels are defined by the amount of money spent per family per expenditure unit per year.
The amounts classified here as “low” are between $200 and $300 and as “high” between $600 and $700.




IN C O M E

LEVEL

A N I)

M ONEY

33

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

economic levels, for the region as a whole. In Kansas City and in
St. Louis such expenditures rise from ninth place to fifth and sixth
places, respectively; in Salt Lake City from tenth to eighth. In Den­
ver no change occurred in the rank of this item while in MinneapolisSt. Paul, furnishings and equipment expenditures dropped from
fourth to sixth place. Gifts and contributions increased in rank
from low to high level in each city.
The overwhelming absolute importance of food, housing, and
clothing needs at all economic levels within the range of the survey is
shown by the fact that expenditures for these items rank first, second,
and third, respectively, at the high as well as the low economic level
in each of the five cities.
T

able

8 . — E x p en d itu res o f wage earners and low er-salaried
rank order at two different econom ic levels

clerical workers in

W H IT E FAM ILIES, 1934-36
Minneapolis-St. Paul

Kansas
City

Denver

Salt Lake
City

Amount spent per expenditure unit per year

Group expenditure
$200
to
$3001
Number of families____ ____
_
F o o d ...____ __________________________
Housing, including fuel, light, and re­
frigeration_____ _____________________
Clothing________________________ _____
Other household operation. _ __ _____
Furnishings and equipment______ ____
Automobile transportation____________
Other transportation
_ .
___ __
Personal care____ _______ - ___
Medical care. _____ _
_______
R ecreation.-.___ _
.
. _
_
Education ___ _____________ _
_
Vocation_____________ _______
_
Community welfare______ _______ _ __
Gifts and contributions 4_ _ _________
Other items______________ _________ _

St. Louis

$600
to
$700

$200
to
$300

$600
to
$700

25
1

36
1

39
1

43
1

2
3
7
8
4
9
10
5
6
13
14
12
11
15

2
3
7
8
4
11
10
6
5
13
14
12
9
15

2
3
6
9
4
8
10
7
5
12
14
11
13
15

2
3
7
5
4
10
11
8
6
14
15
12
9
13

$200 $600
to
to
$3002 $700

$200
to
$300

$600
to
$700

47
1

59
1

48
1

42
1

46
1

29
1

2
3
6
4
8
9
10
7
5
13
14
11
12
15

2
3
8
6
4
9
10
7
5
13
15
12
11
14

2
3
7
9
6
5
10
8
4
14
15
11
13
12

2
3
8
6
4
9
12
7
5
15
14
11
10
13

2
3
5
10
7
9
8
4
6
13
14
11
12
15

2
3
6
s
4
12
9
5
7
14
13
10
11
15

$200 $600
to
to
$300 $700*

1 Includes 1 family spending less than $200 per expenditure unit per year.
2 Includes 2 families spending less than $200 per expenditure unit per year.
3 Includes 6 families spending $7C0 ? nd over per expenditure unit per year.
4 To persons outside the economic family.

Changes in Assets and Liabilities 1
5

The proportion of the white families studied in the West North
Central-Mountain region reporting net surpluses for the year of current
income over current expenditures varied from 52 percent in Salt Lake
City to 65 percent in Denver. Among those families which spent less
than their money incomes for current living, the average amount of
is For purposes of this study changes in assets and liabilities are computed on the basis of changes which
occurred as the result of the transfer of property or funds. Changes in the market value of real estate or
personal property remaining in the hands of the families studied are not included in these figures. For
more detailed explanation, see appen dix A, notes on tables 2, 4, and 5, pp. 324, 325, and 326.




34

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

surplus per family ranged from $133 in Salt Lake City to $191 in
Denver. (See table 9.) On the other hand, the proportion of
families studied who met part of their expenditures only by drawing
on assets accumulated prior to the year covered by the schedule or
by borrowing during the schedule year varied from 26 percent in
Denver to 45 percent for the families studied in Salt Lake City. The
average deficit per family in this situation was $152 in Salt Lake City
and $198 in Denver. The small proportion of families not reported
in either of the above categories reported incomes just balancing
current expenditure. When all families in each city are treated as a
unit, there is a small average net surplus ranging from $1 per family
in Salt Lake City to $73 in Denver. In other words, there were
aggregate surpluses large enough to outweigh the aggregate deficits,
with a resultant positive net change in assets and liabilities for all
families combined.1
6
In considering the relatively large proportion of families sustaining
deficits over the year covered by the Study, it is important to keep in
mind the financing of the occasional large expenditure which must
be made by every family, and the general level of income among wage
earners and clerical workers. Half the families studied in Denver had
incomes less than $1,500; in Kansas City the midpoint was reached
at $1,398; in Minneapolis-St. Paul at $1,448, in St. Louis at $1,529,
and in Salt Lake City at $1,273. The purchase of a new living room
suite, for example, by a family at any one of these income levels, or
of a new electric refrigerator, must inevitably be financed in part by
some means outside current income. It may be from past savings
which have been set aside for this purpose, or from current borrowing.
Using either method, the family will show a deficit of current expendi­
tures over current income in the particular year in which the extraor­
dinary occasional purchase is made. There are, in addition, the
extraordinary emergency expenditures which must be financed outside
current incom e; accidents, other illness, funerals, and weddings put a
strain on the family purse which must, in a majority of cases, be met
by deficit financing.
Under normal circumstances it might be expected that exceptional
outlays made in any one year by some families would balance accu­
mulations made by other families either in reducing the liabilities
incurred for the expenditures of previous years, or in anticipation of
later withdrawals from savings.
In studying the data on changes in the assets and liabilities of the
families covered in the present investigation it is important to keep
is The figures just cited have been computed from the families’ own statements about changes in their
assets and liabilities and do not represent a balancing difference between reported incomes and reported
current expenditures. (See appendix A, pp. 321, 322, and 325.) Most families were not able to present a
statement of total receipts and total disbursements which balanced exactly. No schedule was accepted for
use from a family which could not supply a statement of total receipts and total disbursements which
balanced within 5 percent.




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

35

in mind the setting of the period in which this survey was made.
There had been a period of 3 or 4 years of intense anxiety during which
there was no certainty as to what the future held in store. M ost
low and moderate income families had postponed, insofar as possible,
all expenditures for furniture and durable equipment. It would
appear that a number of them had managed even during the worst
days of the depression to conserve small amounts of their past savings
or their current income. B y 1934, and more particularly by 1935,
anxiety with reference to the future was somewhat relieved, especially
in the case of the group of families covered by this investigation.
Families without relatively steady employment and families on
relief at any time during the year prior to the interview by the field
agent were excluded from the survey. A t least one earner in every
family included in this study had had employment for the greater
part of the year and it is natural to find them buying with a certain
amount of optimism to make up for the enforced economies of the
immediate past.
When the families are classified by income, it appears that the
income level at which aggregate savings exceeded aggregate deficits
varied somewhat from city to city. (See Tabular Summary, table
5.) In Denver and St. Louis, among families with incomes below
$1,200, although some families were able to make savings, they were
more than outweighed by the larger amount of the deficits. Above
that income level in those cities, the surpluses outweighed the
deficits, with the net surplus for all families combined rising steadily
from lower to higher income levels. In Kansas City, the turning
point came at the $900 income level; in Minneapolis-St. Paul, not
until incomes averaged $1,500 or more; and in Salt Lake City, where
the average family size of the group is 10 percent larger than that
found in each of the other cities, not until they averaged $1,800,
though the group with incomes between $1,200 and $1,500 had a net
surplus. The general pattern is the same in all cities, however, with
large average net deficits at the lowest income levels decreasing pro­
gressively with increases in family income until the turning point is
reached, after which, at each successive income level, there is an
average surplus for all families, the surplus growing larger at the
higher income levels. In a few instances the pattern is slightly irreg­
ular, but such variations of the usual trend are accounted for in most
instances by a few families; on the one hand, those which faced
situations of sickness or other emergency making necessary unusually
heavy borrowing, and on the other hand, those which placed unusual
limitations on their current expenditures to meet special situations
such as the down payment on an owned home, or the sum necessary
to pay off debts accumulated in the previous years. Had it been
possible to include larger numbers of families in the sample, these
fluctuations in the general trend would probably not have occurred.




36

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

W h e n fam ilies are classified b y detailed econom ic level (see T abu lar
S u m m ary, table 2 ), the patterns are less regular.

In general, there

appears a tendency for the n et change in assets and liabilities to be
positive (an average surplus for all fam ilies) a t the lower econom ic
levels, and negative
econom ic levels.

(an average deficit for all fam ilies) at higher

I t is obviou s th at there are at every level individual

fam ilies w ith deficits and others w ith surpluses, b u t the average
result for all fam ilies reveals a pattern o f the general nature indicated
above.

W ith in this general trend there are, in individual cities, con­

siderable irregularities which are n o ta b ly decreased when the fam ilies
are grouped at three econom ic levels.
19.)

(See T ab u la r S u m m ary, table

I t will be seen from table 9 th at in four out of the five cities the

percentage of fam ilies com pleting the year w ith a n et deficit was
higher in the group spending $60 0 per expenditure unit than in the
group spending less than $ 400, and th at the am oun t of surplus per
fa m ily havin g a surplus as well as the am ou n t of deficit per fa m ily
h avin g deficit increased su bstan tially from low
levels.

to high econom ic

In three cities studied in this region the n et change for all

fam ilies at the highest econom ic level shown in table 9 was a deficit,
while in the two other cities it was a sm aller average surplus than
reported b y fam ilies at the n ext lower econom ic level.
T h e general reversal of the pattern of changes in assets and lia­
bilities when fam ilies are classified b y

econom ic level rather than

by incom e level is due in part to the very nature of the sort b y am oun t
spent for current expenditure per expenditure unit.

T h e fam ilies

at a given incom e level spending the largest am ounts for current
expenditure will correspondingly be the fam ilies w ith sm aller savings.
In general, the fam ilies h avin g the largest current expenditures per
expenditure unit are the fam ilies w ith larger incom es, and sm aller
num bers of children.

T here are, how ever, at the lower expenditure

levels families w ith incom es which are relatively large in term s of the
average for the entire group, w ith larger num bers of m em bers, a n d /or
earners, than those at the higher econom ic levels.

W h e n the fig­

ures on net changes in assets and liabilities are com puted in term s
of averages per expenditure unit, and of averages per worker, the trend
is som ew hat different.
T here is, how ever, a good deal of evidence to show th at the deficits
a t higher expenditure levels were to an im p ortan t degree due to the
borrow ing power and the confidence in incurring obligations of the
fam ilies classified at these levels, and to the rising tide of in stallm en t
bu y in g characteristic of years follow ing the depression of 1933.

D a ta

presented in table 10 show th at in each of the cities except Salt L ake
C ity increases in am ou n ts due on goods purchased on the in stallm en t
plan assum ed a larger proportion of the total increase in liabilities w ith




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

37

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

rise in the expenditure level of the fam ilies.

T h e increase w as m o st

striking in D en v er, where increases in sum s owed for goods purchased
on the in stallm en t plan am ounted to
liabilities at the low est level and

15 percent of increases in all

55 percent at the highest.

A com ­

parison of the average increases in liabilities for goods purchased on
the in stallm en t plan, w ith the decreases reported b y fam ilies having
a sm aller am oun t outstan ding on goods purchased b y this plan at
the end of the year than at the beginning shows in each one of these
cities (including Salt L ak e C ity ) th at total obligations incurred during
the year were considerably larger than those paid off.
T

9 . — Percentage o f fa m ilies o f wage earners and low er-salaried clerical workers
having su rp lu s and deficit and net change in assets and liabilities during the
schedule yea r at successive econom ic levels

able

W H IT E FAM ILIES
Percentage of
families having—
Num­
ber of
fam­
ilies

City and economic level

Average amount of—

Net change in assets and
liabilities for ail families
Net
sur­
plus

Net
deficit

Per ex­
Per
Per
family penditure gainful
unit
worker
Dollars
+73

Dollars
+25

Dollars
+57

Surplus
per
family
having
surplus

Deficit
per
family
having
deficit

Dollars
191

Dollars
198

295

65.4

26.4

92
106
97

63.0
67.9
64.9

27.2
23.6
28.9

+36
+93
+85

+10
+32
+39

+26
+75
+67

121
198
249

146
176
265

__

357

56.6

42.3

+29

+9

+22

170

158

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per year:
Under $400. _
______
$400 to $600___________
$600 and over_
__ . _

137
123
97

61.3
57.7
48.5

37.2
40.7
51.5

+51
+50
-2 6

+13
+17
-1 1

+38
+38
-2 0

135
194
198

85
153
237

Denver, all families_________
Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per year:
Under $400___________
$400 to $600___________
$600 and over. _______
Kansas City, all families

Minneapolis-St. Paul, all fam­
ilies
___ __ ___ _

504

59.3

39.1

+16

+5

+11

151

187

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per year:
Under $400___
____
$400 to $600___________
$600 and over___ __ __

161
192
151

66.5
60.4
50.3

32.3
37.0
49.0

+69
+36
-6 3

+17
+12
-2 ^

+50
+26
-4 5

156
140
161

108
133
294

St. Louis, all families.. _ ___

401

62.8

36.2

+35

+10

+23

164

189

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per year:
Under $400 ____________
$400 to $600___________
$600 and over. _____

119
156
126

64.7
67.3
55.6

33.6
32.1
43.7

+30
+57
+12

+7
+18
+5

+20
+35
+9

115
161
222

135
161
255

Salt Lake City, all families___

210

52.4

45.2

+1

+1

133

152

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per year:
Under $400___ .__ ___
$400 to $600___________
$600 and over
_ _

109
72
29

54.1
47.2
58.6

45.0
48.6
37.9

+ 0
+5
-6

+ 0
+4
-5

106
152
189

127
138
308

1 Less than $0.50.




+ 0

+0)
+2
-3

38

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

T a b l e 10 . — Changes in assets and liabilities during the schedule yea r a m ong fa m ilie s
o f wage earners and low er-salaried clerical workers at successive econ om ic levels
W H IT E FAM ILIES
Average increases in assets or
decreases in liabilities

Num­
ber
Aver­
of fam­ age in­
crease
ilies
in
assets 1

City and expenditure
level

Aver­
age de­
crease
in lia­
bilities1

Average decreases in assets or
increases in liabilities

Average de­
creases in
amounts due
on goods pur­
chased on the
installment
plan 1

Aver­
age de­
crease
in
assets 1

Aver­
age in­
crease
in total
liabil­
ities 1

Auto­ Other
mobiles goods

Average in­
creases in
amounts due
on goods pur­
chased on the
installment
plan 1
Auto­ Other
mobiles goods

Denver, all families-------------

295

$153

$67

$6

$8

$79

$67

$14

$9

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year:
Under $400_____________
$400 to $600____________
$600 and over__________

92
106
97

74
145
236

52
70
76

1
3
13

7
11
5

67
63
73

67
63
73

2
14
26

8
6
14

Kansas City, all families___

357

119

66

9

10

55

100

24

31

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year:
Under $400___________
$400 to $600____________
$600 and over__________

137
123
97

104
117
142

51
69
83

8
9
9

9
7
13

37
44
95

68
93
156

4
23
53

22
28
49

Minneapolis-St. Paul, all
families________________

504

115

59

8

9

66

93

13

23

161
192
151

96
114
137

70
52
58

4
6
14

11
7

23
56
124

75
74
134

6
9
27

19
15
40

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year:
Under $400______
_
$400 to $600____________
$600 and o v e r . _______

1
0

401

142

46

4

11

68

84

16

24

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year:
Under $400_____________
$400 to $600____________
$600 and over__________

119
156
126

113
139
172

29
51
55

2
5
5

7
12
13

38
52
116

73
80
100

4
14
30

19
25
26

Salt Lake City, all families-

210

97

58

3

8

58

96

12

22

Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year:
Under $400------ ------------$400 to $600____________
$600 and over__________

109
72
29

65
132
133

47
72
59

1
17

7
12
(2
)

42
77
69

70
121
129

1
22
26

20
28
16

St. Louis, all families_____

(2
)

1 Averages computed by dividing the total number of families in each city or expenditure level into the
aggregate increases or decreases of the families reporting such increases or decreases.
2 Less than $0.50.

A n analysis of the sources of nonincom e funds disbursed during
the year (T abu lar S u m m a ry , table 4 ) shows th at in all five cities
except D en v er average increases in borrow ing exceeded average w ith ­
drawals from assets.

In all the cities except D en v er, the average

w ithdraw als from savings were m uch less than the average borrow ing
at the low est econom ic le v e l; the difference varyin g from a low in
M in n ea p olis-S t.

Paul where average withdraw als from

savings at

the low est level were 69 percent less than average borrow ings, to a
high in Salt L ak e C ity where they were only 4 0 percent lower.




At

IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

39

the highest expenditure level shown there is m ore variation from city
to city in the ratio of withdraw als from assets to current borrow ing.
In St. Lou is use of assets was greater than borrowing (i. e., increase in
debt of all kinds) at this level, in D en v er equal, in M in n ea p olis-S t. P aul
alm ost equal, and in K a n sas C ity and Salt L ak e C ity considerably less.
T h e m o st frequent form of savings am ong the families in these
cities was the p ay m en t of life insurance prem ium s 1 which was re­
7
ported by 80 percent or m ore of the families in each city.

T h e average

am ou n t of such prem ium s per fam ily m aking paym en ts ranged from
$60 in Salt L ak e C ity to $111 in St. Louis.

In general the proportion

of families investing in life insurance and the average am oun t of
prem ium s paid increased w ith rise in economic level.

E x cep t in St.

Louis the second m o st frequently reported disposition of funds for
other than current expenses was pay m en t on principal of m ortgages
and down p ay m en t on owned hom es.

In St. Louis an increase in

cash in savings account took second place.
O n the other side of the balance sheet, the m o st frequently specified
sources of funds other than fa m ily incom e were n et increases in in­
stallm en t account obligations for goods other than autom obiles, and
“ other d e b ts,” which include grocers’ , d octors’ , and hospital bills, etc.
W ith d raw als from savings constituted the n ext m o st frequently used
source of funds for fam ilies in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul and St. Louis.
In Salt L ak e C ity loans from individuals were reported second, and
in K a n sa s C ity increases in installm ent obligation for autom obile
purchase.

In

D en v er withdrawals from

savings

and increases in

installm en t obligations for autom obile purchase ranked together as
the third m o st frequently used sources.
A com parison in each of the five cities of the n um ber of families
reporting the purchase of autom obile during the year covered b y the
schedule and the n um ber of families reporting an increase in install­
m en t obligations for the purchase of autom obiles shows th at in D en v er
tw o-thirds of the families purchasing autom obiles financed them by
in stallm en t contracts while abou t 50 percent did so in each of the
other four cities.

Since a large proportion of the cars were purchased

second-hand and cost approxim ately $200 it is probable th at a large
n um ber of fam ilies paid for their autom obiles within the period of the
schedule year.

In som e cases the fam ilies resorted to sm all loan

com panies b u t the figures as reported in this stu d y do n o t m ake
possible conclusions as to the proportion of fam ilies obtaining such
loans for the purpose of financing autom obiles.
17Ina study among Federal employees carried on by the Bureau of Labor Statistics just prior to the initia­
tion of this investigation, the schedule provided for securing information on the type of insurance covered by
the premiums reported. It was found that very frequently informants were unable to provide the informa­
tion and the question was not included in the present schedule. It is, therefore, impossible to estimate how
much of the amount paid in life insurance premiums represents savings and how much was paid for insurance
protection during the schedule year.
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------ 4




Chapter 2
Expenditures for Specified Goods
Food

Annual food expenditures.
In proportion to to ta l current expenditures the am oun ts spent for
food declined w ith rise in econom ic l e v e l 1 in each of the cities in the
W e s t N o r th C e n tra l-M o u n ta in region, though actual dollar expendi­
tures increased.

T h e actual dollar expenditures for food prepared at

h om e (including food for lunches prepared at h om e and carried to work
and to school) decreased slightly from low to the high econom ic levels,
where fam ilies were m u ch sm aller, in all five cities.

T h e percentage

decrease ranged from 5 percent in D en v er, where the average annual
expenditure per fam ily at the low est level was $4 3 0 , to 13 percent in
S t.

L ou is,

where

com parable

expenditure

was

$4 8 8 .

The

actual

dollar expenditures for food purchased and eaten aw ay from hom e
increased considerably from the low est econom ic level to the highest
in each of the five cities.

In K a n sas C ity the increase was tw o fo ld ;

in D e n v er, M in n ea p o lis-S t. P aul, and S t. L ou is, th reefold; and in
Salt L ak e C ity , fivefold.
O u t of each dollar spent for food at the low econom ic level, between
4 and 5 cents in each of the five cities except Salt L ak e C ity was used
to purchase m eals aw ay from h om e.
was so spent.

In Salt L ak e C ity abou t 2 cents

A t the high econom ic level 12 cents of each food dollar

spent in K a n sas C ity and Salt L ak e C ity was allotted to m eals b ou ght
and eaten aw ay from h o m e ; in D en v er, 14 cen ts; in M in n ea p olis-S t.
P au l, 16 cen ts; and in St. L ou is, 17 cents.

A t each level in all the

cities m eals purchased at work constituted the largest expenditure for
food b ou gh t and eaten aw ay from h om e.

In each city the am ounts

spent for m eals at w ork increased from the low est to the highest
econom ic levels at abou t the sam e rate as did the total expenditures for
all m eals b ou gh t and eaten aw ay from hom e.

P a y m en ts for board at

school, which were classified w ith expenditures for m eals aw ay from
h om e, were reported b y two fam ilies in D e n v er and two in M in n ea p olisSt. Paul, b y one fa m ily in K a n sas C ity , and one in St. L ou is, and b y
no fam ilies in Salt L ak e C ity .
1
In the Tabular Summary, table 8, details of annual food expenditures are shown by as many economic
levels as the number of cases in each city and the type of data for this table would allow. However, for
purposes of discussion in the text three comparable economic levels for all cities are used. They are: Low,
under $400; intermediate, $400 to $600; high, $600 and over.

40




E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

41

GOODS

T h e n um ber of food-expenditure units 2 per fa m ily is considerably
sm aller at the highest econom ic level in each city than at the low est.
T h is fa ct, com bined w ith the higher dollar expenditures per fa m ily at
the upper econom ic levels, results in diets considerably m ore varied
and higher in n utritive content as the econom ic level of the families
rises.

D iv id in g the total food expenditures b y the n um ber of food

expenditure units yields striking data on the difference in total food
consum ption betw een one econom ic level and another.
T

(See table 11.)

11 .-— E x p en d itu res f o r fo o d per fo o d expenditure unit per yea r a m ong wage
earners and low er-salaried clerical workers at low and high econom ic levels

able

W H IT E FAM ILIES, 1934-36
Economic level— Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
$600 to $700

$200 to $300
City
Number
of fami­
lies

Denver___________ _______ _______ - _______ .
Kaijsas City__ __ _____ _ __ ___ ________
Minneapolis-St. Paul____________ __ _______
St. Louis.
_ _ ________ ___ . . . ______ _
Salt Lake City____________ . . . _____ . .

2 25
39
3 47

48
46

Amount
spent for Number
food per
of fami­
food
lies
expendi­
ture unit1
$107
107
111
113
100

36
43
59
42
4 29

Percentage
increase
Amount
in amount
spent for
spent for
food per
food per
food
food ex­
penditure
expendi­
unit1
ture unit1
$204
195
194
216
210

90.7
82.2
74.8
91.2
110.0

1 Food-expenditure units are computed from scales based on the estimated cost of customary food con­
sumption during the period of the survey. (See appendix G, pp. 376-377.)
2Includes 1 family spending under $200 per expenditure unit.
3 Includes 2 families spending under $200 per expenditure unit.
4Includes 16 families spending $700 and over per expenditure unit.

Food expenditures in 1 wee\ in the spring quarter .
Data on 194 separate foods purchased and consumed during one
typical week in the spring quarter 3 in each of the cities in the West
North Central-Mountain region (Tabular Summary, table 7) confirm the
customary belief that not only is there a marked increase in the aver­
age expenditure for food per capita with rise in economic level, but
that the types and quantities of foods are distinctly different at the
various levels.4
2 Food-expenditure units are computed from scales based on the estimated cost of customary food con­
sumption during the period of the survey. (See appendix G, pp. 376-377.)
3 In order to avoid overburdening the housewives cooperating in the investigation, the schedule was not
planned with a view to obtaining estimates of the annual consumption of individual foods. The section
on the details of food purchases provided for a summary of annual food expenditures and for the details of
food purchases and consumption only during the week prior to the visit of the field agent. Since the figures
on average amounts purchased and consumed were in the great majority of cases identical, data on quantities
of foods purchased only are presented. Data on number of families using are presented to give a more
complete picture.
4 For food expenditure during one week the economic levels shown in the Tabular Summary are the same
for all of the cities. They are: Under $400, $400 to $600, and $600 and over.




42

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

For all of the cities in this region the per capita 6 expenditures and
quantities consumed of meats, poultry, and sea food increase markedly
with increases in the total amount spent per expenditure unit. Green
vegetables and fruits likewise increased in respect to average expendi­
ture and to quantity purchased from the lowest to the highest eco­
nomic levels.
Total quantities of flour and other cereals, including such foods as
corn meal, rice, macaroni, etc., varied irregularly with rise in eco­
nomic level.
T h e largest average expenditure per person for any individual item
of food was for m ilk.

A t the highest econom ic level this average

expenditure was 49 percent greater than at the low est level in D en v er,
45 percent in K an sas C ity , and 37 percent in St. L ou is.

In M in n e -

a polis-St. Paul and Salt L ake C ity the average expenditure for m ilk
was higher at the m iddle econom ic level than at the highest, which is
probably accounted for b y the very sm all num ber of children am ong
the fam ilies at the highest level.

Reference to table 19 of the T a b u la r

Su m m ary shows th at there was a m uch larger proportion of children
under 16 years of age at the low est econom ic level than at the highest,
and th at the proportion of children at the m iddle econom ic level lies in
between in this respect.

T h e percentage increase in per capita expend­

itures for m ilk from the low est econom ic level to the m iddle level was
44 in Salt L ake C ity , and 22 percent in M in neapolis.
T h e individual food item s accounting for the second and third
largest per

capita expenditures were

D en v er, M in n ea p olis-S t.

P aul, and

second and white bread third.

butter and white
Salt

all of these

bread.

In

C ity , b utter cam e

In the rem aining two cities, white

bread cam e second and b utter third.
b utter in

L ak e

cities increased

T h e average expenditure for
m an yfold

from

the low est

econom ic level to the highest.

In general, per capita expenditure for bread, as well as the average
quantity purchased per person, increased with rise in economic level.
Potatoes ranked fourth in the proportion of total food expenditures
devoted to any one item. Both the average expenditure per person
and the average quantity consumed increased with rise in economic
level.
5
Since human needs for and customary consumption of foods of different types vary considerably for
persons of different age and sex, it is impossible to compute any singlo measure of family size which will
be appropriate for comparing the consumption of specific foods from one family to another. Children’s
need for milk is approximately twice as great as that of adults, while the need of heat-producing foods
(starches and sugars) for adults is about twice as great as that of children. Children’s consumiition of meat
varies from that of adults at a still different rate. In order to secure figures on quantities of individual
foods purchased and on expenditures for individual foods which would provide a reasonably satisfactory
basis for comparison and yet not present a misleading appearance of refinement, data on family purchases
of individual foods have been converted to a per capita basis.




E X P E N D IT U R E S FO R

S P E C IF IE D

GOODS

43

FOOD EXPENDITURES OF WAGE EARNERS AND
LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
AT SUCCESSIVE ECONOMIC LEVELS
SPRING QUARTER
ST. LOUIS, 1 9 3 5 -1 9 3 6
WHITE FAMILIES

ITEM

o

20

GRAIN
PRODUCTS

M ILK, CHEESE
AND ICE CREAM

BUTTER, CREAM
AND OTHER FATS

MEAT, POULTRY,
SEAFOOD

VEGETABLES
AND FRUITS

SUGAR
AND SWEETS

MISCELLANEOUS

U. S. B U R E A U O F L A B O R




S T A T IS T IC S

EXPENDITURES PER CAPITA PER WEEK IN CENTS

40

60

80

100

44

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

T a b l e 12 . — P e r capita expenditures f o r fo o d am ong wage earners and low er-salaried
clerical w orkers
W H IT E F AM ILIES, 1934-36
Average per capita expenditure in 1 week in the
spring quarter in—
Item
Denver

Number of families furnishing data on food pur­
chased in spring quarter
_
____
Total expenditure for:
All foods_______________________________________
__
_ __ _____
Grain products _______ ___
Eggs________________
____ __________________
Milk, cheese, ice cream _ _ _____
_ __________
Butter and cream__
__
__
__ __ ___
Other fats _ ________ ________ ______ ____ __
Meat, poultry, fish, and other sea food
Vegetables and fruits
_
_ .
_ _ _
Sugars and sweets____________
______ ____
_
Miscellaneous foods_________ ___________ ______
Sales tax__________________________________ __

Kansas
City

Minneapolis-St.
Paul

Salt
Lake
City

St.
Louis

190

252

358

264

210

$2. 95
.44
. 15
.31
. 17
. 18
. 64
. 69
. 13
. 24

$2.40
.42
. 13
.33
. 10
. 18
.45
.51
.11
. 15
.02

$2. 54
.40
. 13
.36
.25
. 11
. 53
.49
.09
. 18

$2. 73
.44
. 13
.32
. 12
. 16
. 67
. 57
.08
.21
.03

$2.10
.32
. 12
.30
. 15
. 13
. 37
.47
. 10
. 14

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

Percentage
Total expenditure for:
All foods___ __ ____________________ _____ _____
Grain products____ _____ .. __ ___ _________
Eggs___ ___________
_ ____ __
________
Milk, cheese, ice cream. _ ____ ______________
Butter and cream___
____
_
_______
_
Other fats. _ ______ _________ _____ _ ________
Meat, poultry, fish, and other sea food
Vegetables and fruits. _
________ ______
Sugars and sweets
Miscellaneous foods___
____
__ __ _
Sales tax____________________ __ ____ ______ _ _

100.00

X

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

14.9
5.1
10.5
5.8
6.1
21. 7
23.4
4.4
8.1

17.5
5.4
13.8
4.2
7.5
18.8
21.2
4.6
6. 2
.8

15.8
5.1
14.2
9.8
4.3
20.9
19.3
3. 5
7.1

16.1
4.8
11. 7
4.4
5. 9
24. 5
20.9
2.9
7. 7
1.1

15. 2
5. 7
14.3
7.1
6. 2
17. 6
22.4
4. 8
6. 7

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

It is of considerable interest to estimate the probable adequacy of
food expenditures at the different economic levels. Such an estimate
furnishes a rough approximation to the probability of adequacy of the
diets purchased to meet the nutritional needs of the families studied.
For this purpose the size of each family was measured in adequatefood-cost units based on the United States Bureau of Home Econom­
ics’ adequate diet at minimum cost,6 and average food expenditures
per adequate-food-cost unit were also calculated for each family.
These expenditures were compared with the calculated cost of the
same diet for a man at moderate work, which was taken as a unit in
the adequate-food-cost scale. The prices used in this calculation
were the average prices collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics
for its food cost indexes. It is, of course, possible to shop with care
and buy at lower prices than these; a judicious selection of in-season
fruits and vegetables and fish will lower the cost. On the other hand,
to secure an adequate diet at the calculated cost requires extremely
careful planning and food consumption habits which follow nutri6
See Stiebeling, H. K ., and Ward, M . M .: Diets at Four Levels of Nutritive Content and Cost.
Department of Agriculture, Circular No. 296, Washington, 1933.




U. S.

EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

45

Fig. 7

PROPORTION OF FAMILIES SPENDING ENOUGH TO
PURCHASE AN ADEQUATE DIET AT MINIMUM COST
AT SUCCESSIVE ECONOMIC LEVELS

1934-1936
WHITE FAMILIES

DENVER

ECONOMIC L E V E L S
(A M O U N T S P E N T P E R
E XPEND ITUR E U N IT )

PERCENT

O

20

40

60

80

1 00

80

100

ALL FAMILIES
UNDER
$400
$600

$ 400

u 2£ $ 6 0 0
n>r
ad
n

OVER

ALL FAMILIES
UNDER

$400

$400

U N OER

$600

$600

ad
n

OVER

MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL
ALL FAMILIES
UNDER

$ 400

$ 4 0 0 ufiOER $600
$600

ao
n

OVER

ST. LOUIS
ALL FAMILIES
UNDER

$400

$400 u o $600
U%
$600

ao
n

OVER
0

20

SALT LAKE CITY
40

60

ALL FAMILIES
UNDER

$400

$400 o Sr $600
SI
$600

ao
n

OVER
N O T E - The A d eq u a te D ie t A t M in im u m C ost o f th e U n ite d S ta te s B u re a u o f H o m e
E co n o m ics Was U s e d a s th e B a s is f o r th e s e C om putations

U . S - B U R EA U OF LA B O R S T A T IS T IC S ____________________ __________ ________ ________________________________________________




46

W EST

NORTH

tional needs very closely.

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

T h e figures furnish, therefore, the basis

for an estim ate of the proportion of the fam ilies spending enough for
nutritionally adequate fo o d ; they do n ot, how ever, furnish inform ation
as to the proportion of fam ilies actually attaining adequate diets.
T a b le 13 shows th at the percentage spending enough to purchase
an adequate diet rose very rapidly w ith econom ic level.
T

13 . — P r o p o r tio n o f fa m ilie s o f wage earners and low er-salaried clerical
workers sp en d in g enough to purchase an adequate diet at m in im u m cost , at su c­
cessive econ om ic levels.

able

W H IT E F AM ILIES, 1934-36

Number of
families
studied

City and item

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year

Under $400 $400 to $600

$600 and
over

DENVER

295

92

106

97

83.1

Families in survey... _____________ . . . . . ___ _ . . .
Percentage spending enough per food expenditure unit
to purchase an adequate diet at minimum cost _____

57.6

91.5

97.9

K A N S A S C IT Y

351

137

123

97

56.9

Families in survey_____ _____ . . _______________
Percentage spending enough per food expenditure unit
to purchase an adequate diet at minimum cost______

24.8

64.2

92.8

M I N N E A P O L I S -S T . P A U L

504

161

192

151

76.5

Families in survey------------------- -----------------------------------Percentage spending enough per food expenditure unit
to purchase an adequate diet at minimum cost.. _ _

28.0

78.1

96.0

S T . L O U IS

401

SALT L A K E

119

156

126

76.8

Families in survey__ _____ __ ______
___ ___ _____
Percentage spending enough per food expenditure unit
to purchase an adequate diet at minimum cost . . . .

35.3

91.7

97.6

C IT Y

210

109

72

29

59.5

Families in survey.. . . . _____ _ _ _______________
Percentage spending enough per food expenditure unit
to purchase an adequate diet at minimum cost-------- .

33.0

83.3

100.0

1 Based on the adequate diet at minimum cost of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Home
Economics. The cost of this diet per adequate-food-cost-unit during the period of the investigation was
$111 in Denver, $125 in Kansas City, $124 in Minneapolis-St. Paul, $126 in St. Louis, and $113 in Salt Lake
City.

Housing

Housing facilities.
T h irty -six percent of the families studied in the W e s t N o rth C en ­
tra l-M o u n ta in region ow ned their hom es, the proportion ranging from
45 percent in Salt L ak e C ity to 28 percent in S t. L ou is.

T h e propor­

tion of fam ilies at the low level who owned hom es was slightly higher
than th at for the group as a w h o le ; the proportion at the high level was
a little lower th an th a t for the group.

W h e n differences in the propor­

tion of h om e owners at the different econom ic le v e ls 7 are considered,
the greatest difference is found in the M in n ea p olis-S t. P au l area, where
39 percent of the fam ilies at the low level and 28 percent at the high
level reported h om e ownership.

V e ry little or no difference appears

7
In the Tabular Summary details for housing are shown by as many economic levels as the number of
cases in each city and the type of data for this table would allow. However, for purposes of discussion in
the text three comparable levels for all cities are used. They are: Low, under $400; intermediate, $400 to
$600; high, $600 and over.




E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

for D en v er, K an sas C ity , and Salt L ake C ity .

47

GOODS

In S t. L ouis 31 per­

cent of the fam ilies at the low level and 25 percent at the high level
owned their hom es.
In all cities studied in this region, hom e owners and renters of
houses had m ore room s per fam ily than renters of apartm ents.

Except

in S t. L ou is, the h om e owners averaged close to 5% room s per fam ily
and renters of houses som ew h at better than 5 room s.

Fam ilies living

in apartm ents where h eat was n ot included in the m o n th ly rental
averaged close to 4 room s per fam ily, while those in apartm ents where
h eat was furnished b y the landlord and included in the rent averaged
som ething over 3 room s.

In general the largest hom es were reported

in M in n ea p olis-S t. P aul and the sm allest in St. L ouis.
A lth ou gh h om e owners and house renters also had, on the average,
larger families than did families living in m u ltip le-fa m ily dwellings,
their hom es were enough larger to m ake up for the larger size of their
fam ilies.

F or the purpose of calculating n um ber of persons per room ,

hallw ays, open porches, kitchenettes, dinettes, and baths were n ot
counted as room s.

In table 14 it is seen th at, in general, the num ber

of persons per room is greatest am ong renters of unheated apartm ents,
th at is, apartm ents in which heat was furnished b y the tenants, usu­
ally b y m eans of stoves.

W h en we com pare families living at the

higher econom ic levels w ith those at lower levels, there is observed a
pronounced dow nw ard trend in the num ber of persons per room .
T h is is due in large part to the smaller size of families at the higher
econom ic level.

I t was n ot until the level was reached where $400 or

m ore was spent per expenditure unit per year th at, w ith one excep­
tion, fam ilies in all categories in all cities in this region averaged
better than one room per person, the standard usually accepted in
the U n ited States as indicating the m in im u m of necessary space.
In table 10 of the T ab u la r S um m ary the table from w hich these figures
are com puted is available in a m ore detailed break-dow n by econom ic
level.
T h e increasing im portance of the autom obile in enabling the A m eri­
can worker to locate land and a house he can afford to b u y is indi­
cated b y the fact th at 70 percent or m ore of the h om e owners in
these five cities had garages, though this percentage dropped am ong
renters to 53 percent or less (table 15).

Among white families included in the investigation of the five
cities in this region, 34 percent or less of the home owners and 42
percent or less of the renters lived in dwellings without one or
more of the following facilities: Inside flush toilets, running hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity for cooking. Minneapolis-St.
Paul had the lowest percentage among owners, and Denver the low­
est percentage among renters without one or more of these modern
conveniences, 18 percent in the one case, and 16 in the other. In




48
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

14 . — A verage n u m ber o f p erson s per room a m ong wage earners and low ersalaried clerical w orkers at successive econom ic levels
W H IT E F AM ILIES, 1934-36
Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
City and item

All families
Under $400 $400 to $600

$600 and
over

DENVER

Number of families in survey_____________ _______ _
Average number of persons per room among—
Homeowners___ __ __ __
__ ___
__
Renters of houses_______ ________________________
Renters of heated apartments______ _______ _ _ ____
Renters of unheated apartments1_ _______________

295

92

106

97

0.57
0.63
0. 81

0.71
0.83
1.09

0.54
0. 59
0. 77

0. 44
0. 44
0. 74

K A N S A S C IT Y

Number of families in survey_________________________
Average number of persons per room among—
Home owners______ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _______
Renters of houses __ __________
___ __ ________
Renters of heated a p a r t m e n t s , . ___ ____
Renters of unheated apartments____ _____________

357

137

123

97

0.68
0. 75
0. 79
0.82

0.88
0.90
0. 91
1.02

0. 61
0.68
0.84
0.62

0.49
0.58
0. 67
0. 49

M IN N E A P O L IS -S T . P A U L

Number of families in survey_________________________
Average number of persons per room among—
___ __ ----------------------Homeowners_____
Renters of houses_________
__ __ ___ ---------------Renters of heated apartments___ ______________
Renters of unheated apartments ___ ____________

504

161

192

151

0. 67
0.70
0. 75
0.72

0.85
0.87
0.99
0. 87

0.62
0. 73
0.74
0. 71

0.51
0. 52
0. 63
0. 55

S T . L O U IS

Number of families in survey_________________________
Average number of persons per room among—
Home owners---------- ------------------------------------------___ _ _ __ ------------Renters of houses______
Renters of heated apartments _ _ _____________
Renters of unheated apartments___________ ______
SA LT L A K E

401

119

156

126

0. 83
0. 81
0. 85
0. 96

1.12
0.95
1.05
1.31

0. 77
0.85
1.03
0. 95

0. 60
0. 63

0. 71
0.64

C IT Y

Number of families in survey_____ _ _
____________
Average number of persons per room among—
Home o w n e r s . ___
__
_
------Renters of houses. ___________
__ ___ _
___
Renters of unheated apartments. _________ ______
Renters of unheated apartments1 ....... .......................

210

109

72

29

0.78
0. 77
0. 81

0.93
0. 91
0.94

0.68
0. 61
0.83

0. 44
0.40
0. 57

1Figures not presented because of small number of families in this classification.

three out of the five cities a higher proportion of renters than of
hom e owners lacked this com bination of housing facilities.

T h e pro­

portion of fam ilies whose hom es were equipped w ith specified facili­
ties, such as central h eat, running h ot w ater, telephones, and so forth
are show n in table 15 for both owners and renters in each of the five
cities.

I t will be observed th at a larger proportion of the hom e ow n­

ers had convenient plum bing arrangem ents, electric refrigerators, and
telephones, b u t th at renters relatively m ore frequently than owners
reported central heating and gas or electricity for cooking.

A con­

siderable proportion of renting families, and even som e hom e-ow nin g
fam ilies, shared the use of the toilet w ith other fam ilies and as m an y
as 10 percent of the renting fam ilies in K a n sa s C ity and S t. L ou is did
n o t h ave access at all to inside flush toilets.




E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

S P E C IF IE D

49

GOODS

In table 9 of the T ab u la r Su m m ary, the data on housing facilities
are presented in greater detail, including a break-dow n according to
econom ic level.

T h e item s whose use increased n o ta b ly from low to

high econom ic level were electric refrigerators, telephones, central
heating, and h o t running water.
T

able

15. — H o u sin g fa cilities o f wage earners and low er-salaried clerical
workers
W H IT E FAM ILIES, 1934-36

Item

Number of home owners i__________________________
Percentage of owners having—
______
__
_______ _
Central h e a t ._____
Gas or electricity for cooking___ ___ ________
Electric refrigerator____________________________ _
Running hot w a te r.____ __
___ _
______
Bathroom----- ---------------- ---------------------Inside flush toilet... ______
_ ___ __
Sole use of to ile t.___ ____________________ __
__
_ ___ __
____ Telephone______
Garage__________________________ _______ - ___
_________
Garden space______ ____________
Each of the following items: Inside flush toilets,
running hot water, electric lights, and gas or
electricity for cooking____
____ _ _
Number of renters2
___ . ________________ _ ___ _
Percentage of renters having—
Central heat________ _ ___ ______ _____
... Gas or electricity for cooking ___ ____ _____ _
Electric refrigerator______________________
___
Running hot water__ __________
_
Bathroom. . _ ________ _ __ . _ _ _ _______
Inside flush toilet___________________________ _
Sole use of toilet,________ __ ___ ___ _ ______ _
Telephone_________ ________________ _________ __
Garage.________ ________ _______
_________
Garden space___________________________________
Each of the following items: Inside flush toilets,
running hot water, electric lights, and gas or
----electricity for cooking _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Denver

Kansas
City

MinneapolisSt. Paul

St. Louis

Salt Lake
City

108

129

181

114

94

82.4
85.2
19.4
89.8
97.2
100.0
94.4
79.6
75.0
79.6

79.1
88.4
41.9
76.0
81.4
100.0
96.9
48.1
69.8
58.9

87.3
97.2
21.0
84.5
91.2
100.0
95.0
60.2
75.7
62.4

83.3
91.2
52.6
78.9
90.4
100.0
94.7
41.2
78.1
65.8

72.3
66.0
31.9
97.9
100.0
100.0
100.0
56.4
75.5
47.9

80.6

69.8

81.8

75.4

66.0

187

228

323

287

116

90.9
90.4
27.3
90.4
96.8
97.3
89.3
52.4
53.5
42.5

79.8
91.7
40.8
82.0
86.4
89.9
88.6
36.8
46.1
31.6

75.5
98.1
24.8
79.3
91.6
99.4
91.3
38.1
50.2
32.2

64.1
94.1
50.2
58.9
82.6
90.2
86.1
13.2
41.1
33.1

78.4
62.9
29.3
93.1
99.1
99.1
94.8
29.3
43.1
23.3

84.5

78.9

78.6

57.8

61.2

1Includes only those families owning principal home at the end of the schedule year.
2Includes only those families renting principal home at the end of the schedule year.

Housing expenditures.
W h e n fam ilies are classified according to econom ic level, the propor­
tion of total expenditures devoted to housing, fuel, light, and refrigera­
tion com bined shows a slightly declining trend from lower to higher
expenditure levels (see table 3, T ab u la r S u m m a ry ).

In part this trend

is a reflection of the smaller fam ilies found at the higher economic
levels, b u t it is also found when families of one size and type are isolated
and their housing expenditures followed from one incom e level to
another.

Home owners.— A m o n g hom e owners, average current expenditures
for housing only for all fam ilies in the cities included in this report
ranged from $145 in D en v er to $180 in St. L ou is (table 16).

Included

in the total of current housing expenditures for hom e owners are
taxes, assessm ents, repairs and replacem ents, fire and liability in­
surance on hom e, interest on m ortgages, and refinancing charges.




50

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

PROPORTION OF FAMILIES OF WAGE EARNERS AND
LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS HAVING
SELECTED HOUSING FACILITIES AT
SUCCESSIVE ECONOMIC LEVELS

KANSAS CITY, 1935-1936
W
HITE FAMILIES
PERCENT

0

20

40

60

80

100

INSIDE FLUSH TOILET,
RUNNING HOT WATER,
ELECTRIC LIGHTS AND
GAS OR ELECTRICITY
FOR COOKING

CENTRAL HEATING

TELEPH O N E

ECONOMIC

LEVEL

(A N N U A L A M O U N T S P E N T
P E R EXPE N D IT U R E U N IT )

UNDER

$400

$400

under

$600

$600

ano

OVER

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

In D en v er, K a n sa s C ity , and M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul the largest of these
item s was taxes, w ith interest on m ortgage com ing second and repairs
and replacem ents third.

In St. L ouis and Salt L ak e C ity interest on

m ortgage was largest w ith taxes second and repairs third.

In all of the

cities studied, there was a notable increase in am oun t devoted to
housing expenditure b y h om e-ow ning families at higher

economic

levels as com pared w ith those at lower levels, though the increase was
n o t proportionate to the increase in total am oun t spent per expendi­
ture unit for all item s.

T h e average am ount invested in their hom es

b y h om e owners m aking such investm ents during the year studied
ranged from $145 in St. Louis to $212 in D en ver.
housing has

been

treated

to

include

both

In v estm en t in

pay m en t

on

principal

of m ortgage and for perm anent im provem en ts to a hom e, such as
construction of an enclosed porch where there was no porch before.
Such in vestm en t showed a tendency to increase w ith econom ic level
in K a n sa s C ity , M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul, and St. L ou is, b u t no such trend
w as found in D en v er or Salt L ak e C ity .

Since the tim e of hom e

in v estm en t frequen tly coincides w ith the tim e when the growing fam ily
is at its largest, it is n ot surprising th at in those two cities the fam ilies




E X P E N D IT U R E S

EOR SP E C IF IE D

51

GOODS

at lower econom ic levels (which included m a n y o f the largest fam ilies)
were m aking in vestm ents in housing as large or larger than those of
the sm aller fam ilies at the higher econom ic levels.
T

able

16 . — H o u sin g expenditures am ong fa m ilies o f wage earners and low er-salaried
clerical workers in 1 year during the period 1 9 3 4 - 3 6
W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

Denver

Minne­
apolisSt. Paul

Kansas
City

St. Louis Salt Lake
City

H o m e ow ners

Number of families 1
___ _____ ___ __
___
_
Average current expenditure_ __ ______________ .
Average annual rental value. _______________ ____
Average imputed income from equity in owned
home________________ __________________ ______
Average amount invested during year in owned
home_____________ _________ _____________________

106
$146
$306

122
$158
$276

177
$175
$363

111
$180
$343

92
$172
$305

$161

$117

$188

$161

$133

$112

$104

$99

$65

$96

131
$21

128
$18

139
$24

55
$20

69
$17

47
$26

75
$25

77
$27

39
$29

35
$23

9

22
$15

105
$19

191
$20

10
$16

296
0

357
0

504
0

401
0

210
0

R en ter s o f h ou ses

Number of families 1
_______________________________
Average monthly rental rate paid___________ ______
R e n t e r s o f a p a r t m e n t s w ith h ea t in c lu d e d in ren t

Number of families 1
_____________ ________ ________
Average monthly rental rate paid___________________
R e n t e r s o f a p a r t m e n t s w it h h e c t n o t in c l u d e d i n r e n t

Number of families 1
------ ---------------- ----------------------Average monthly rental rate paid___ ______ _______

00

S e c o n d a r y h o u sin g

Number of families in survey__________
_______
Average expenditure for owned vacation home____ .
Number of families spending for rent on vacation or
trip-------------------------- -----------------------------------------Average expenditure for rent on vacation or trip per
family making such expenditure__________________
Number of families spending for rent at school

18

10

50

26

13

$21
3

$12
0

$16
1

$17
1

$15
0

1 Families changing type of tenure during year not included in this table.
All figures apply to all families
in the designated tenure groups.
2 Information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.

W h e n the price which h om e-ow ning families w ould h ave had to
p ay to rent their hom es at m arket prices (annual rental value) is co m ­
pared w ith the cash actually laid out for current housing expenditures,
there is a net difference of incom e in kind which m a y be called the
im pu ted incom e from equity in owned hom e.

T h is figure is show n in

table 16 to range from $117 in K a n sas C ity to $188 in M in n eap olis-S t.
P aul.

In table 10 of the T ab u la r Su m m ary it can be seen th at there is

little change in incom e from the in vestm ent in owned hom es within a
given city from low to high expenditure levels.

T h is situation is prob­

ably also connected w ith the tendency am ong the larger fam ilies which
predom inated at the lower econom ic levels to m eet their housing prob­
lem s b y buying rather than b y renting.

Renters.— R en ta l rates paid in these cities ranged from $15 to $29
per m o n th (table 16) depending on the city and the type of accom m o-




52

W EST

dation rented.

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

T here was a distinct tendency, as indicated in table 10

of the T ab u la r Su m m ary, for rental rates to increase w ith increase in
econom ic level.

Vacation housing .— N o n e of the fam ilies studied in any of the five
cities in this region owned a vacation hom e.

T en fam ilies in K a n sas

C ity incurred an average expenditure of $12 for rent paid on vacation s
or on trip s; and 13 fam ilies in Salt L ake, 50 in M in n ea p olis-S t. P aul,
and 26 in St. L ou is h ad average expenditures of $15, $16, and $17,
respectively.

The

highest

expenditure

reported

where 18 fam ilies spent an average of $ 21.

was

for

D en v er,

In all the cities studied

there was a sharp increase in the average am ount for all families
spent for rent on vacation trips w ith rise in econom ic level.

Expenditures far fu el , light, and refrigeration.— T h e severe winters
u sually experienced in the cities in the W e s t N o rth C en tra l-M o u n ta in
region are reflected in the inroads upon fa m ily finances required b y the
annual fuel bill.

A s is seen in table 17, expenditures were h eaviest in

w inter and fall, indicating th at b u t few of the fam ilies of workers h ave
sufficient reserve funds or storage facilities to la y in a coal su pply in the
sum m er tim e when they m ig h t take advan tage of lower prices.

Ex­

penditures for electricity, gas, and refrigeration largely account for the
fuel and ligh t bills in the spring and sum m er.
T

able

17 , — E x p en d itu res f o r f u e l , light, and refrigeration a m ong wage earners and
low er-salaried clerical workers in 1 yea r during the p eriod 1 9 3 4 - 8 6
W H IT E FAM ILIES

Denver

Item

Number of families in survey ___________________
Total expenditure for fuel, light, and refrigeration
for—
Year_ _ _ ___ __ __ __________ ___________
Winter__ __ _______ ____ _________________ __
Spring
__________________________________
S u m m e r_ _______ __ _____________ _____ __
Fall _________ ______ _________________ _______

Kansas
City

Minne­
apolisSt. Paul

295

351

504

401

210

$96
30
22
18
26

$101
33
18
19
31

$137
52
25
19
41

$102
30
19
23
30

$99
31
21
19
28

St. Louis Salt Lake
City

In table 11 of the T ab u la r Sum m ary, detailed in form ation is pre­
sented for expenditures on electricity, anthracite, bitum inous coal,
coke, briquets, w ood, fuel oil, gas, kerosene, gasoline n o t used for
autom obiles, and ice.

Since the actual am oun t paid for fuel, light,

and refrigeration depends to a large extent on whether a house or an
apartm ent is in volved , and on whether the rent paid the landlord in ­
cludes h eat, data are presented separately for families in four separate
categories, as well as in the form of averages for all fam ilies.

A s would

be expected, the largest paym en ts were m ade b y fam ilies who pur­
chased fuel to h eat houses; coal, electricity, and gas constituting the
largest item s.

T h e second largest p aym en ts were m ade b y fam ilies

who purchased fuel to h eat apartm ents, w ith the sam e three item s
taking the greatest expenditures.




53

EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

When families paying separately for heat are classified by amount
spent per expenditure unit (table 11 of the Tabular Summary) the dol­
lar expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration show a slight increase
from low to high levels. The fact that they do not increase more
sharply indicates the basic nature of the requirements for fuel and
light and the fact that as funds available for spending increase, a less
proportionate amount of the increase goes to these items. Expendi­
tures for gas usually showed the greatest increase from low to high
economic levels.
Expenditures fo r other items of household operation.— Items of
household operation other than fuel, light, and refrigeration include
water rent, telephone, domestic service, laundry sent out, laundry
soap and cleaning supplies, and other miscellaneous items. Expendi­
tures for these items, shown in table 12 of the Tabular Summary,
showed marked increase from low to high economic levels, with the
total expenditure approximately doubling in the cities in this region.
The items showing the greatest effect of change in economic level
were telephones, domestic service, laundry out, and insurance on
furniture.
F urn ishin gs and E quipm ent
T h e very high v a r ia b ility 8 of expenditures for housefurnishings and
equipm ent from fa m ily to fa m ily in a given year is show n b y figures
presented in tables 2 4 A and 2 4 B of the T ab u la r Su m m ary.

T h e varia­

bility of the total is, of course, greatly exceeded b y the variability of
expenditures for each item in this group.

T h e fa m ily w hich bou ght

a living room suite last year will perhaps m ake no im portant addition
to its stock of furniture this year, bu t will save either tow ard repay­
m en t of the debt incurred in the last y ear’s purchase or tow ard a fund
for a purchase the follow ing year.

O n account of this high variability,

average expenditures for specific item s of furniture and furnishings
for relatively sm all groups of fam ilies do n ot show significant trends,
and the figures on the details of furniture and equipm ent purchases
h ave been presented as regional averages rather than in term s of aver­
ages b y cities.
Expenditures for furnishings and equipm ent, which were greatest
for electrical appliances, furniture, carpets and rugs, curtains, bedding,
and m iscellaneous equipm ent, increased significantly w ith econom ic
level.9

A t the low est level $ 4 4 .5 8 was spent for this group of item s

whereas fam ilies at the highest econom ic level spent $ 9 7 .3 1 .
A t all econom ic levels the item s purchased b y the largest proportion
of

fam ilies

were

fu ndam entals

of

household

equipm ent,

8For further discussion of variability, see pp. 20 and 335.
9In the Tabular Summary details on expenditures are shown by as many economic levels as

broom s,

the number
of cases and the type of data would allow. In the case of expenditures for furnishings and equipment the
levels are: Low, under $400; intermediate, $400 to $600; high, $600 and over. (See Tabular Summary,
table 18.)




54

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

brushes, m ops, ligh t bulbs, cotton Turkish towels, curtains, draperies,
sheets, p ots, pans, cutlery, and pillow cases, w ith v ery little change
in rank order of item s betw een the different econom ic levels.
O f the various groups of item s com ing under the general head of
furnishings and equipm ent, furniture shows the largest increase in
average expenditure from low est to highest econom ic level, as indicated
in table 18.

W h e n the average expenditure for living room suites is

com puted for those fam ilies buying living room suites, 36 fam ilies
am ong the 618 fam ilies at the low est econom ic level averaged $ 7 1 ;
30 of the 649 fam ilies at the interm ediate level averaged $72, and 50
of the 500 fam ilies at the highest econom ic level averaged $97.
E xpenditures for carpets

and rugs were significantly larger for

fam ilies at the highest econom ic level, $ 7 .8 0 , as com pared w ith $ 4 .4 5
at the low est level.

W h e n these averages are converted to averages

per fa m ily buyin g carpets and rugs, 89 fam ilies at the low est level
averaged $31, whereas 98 families at the highest level averaged $ 40.
O n the other hand, average expenditures for a m ore strictly utilitarian
typ e of floor covering, felt-base floor covering, were sim ilar for fam ilies
at both the low est and highest level, $ 0 .5 3 and $ 0 .5 7 .

A verage ex­

penditures per fa m ily purchasing this type of floor covering were the
sam e at both levels, $8.
T

18 . — Expenditures for furnishings and equipment at successive economic
levels among wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers in 1 year during the
period, 1 9 8 4 -3 6 , in 5 cities combined

able

W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit
Item
Under $400 $400 to $600

Number of families in survey

_

_ ______ ______ _____ _

___

Total expenditure for:
Furnishings and equipment__________ ___ _
_ ________
___ _ _ ______ _______
_
Furniture_____________ _
Textile furnishings.. _____
__ _______
___
Silver, china, glassware___
_____
_ _
Electrical equipment
__
__
Miscellaneous equipment. ________ ___ ____ ____________

$600 and
over

618

649

500

$44. 58
10. 41

$58.85
13.83
13.58
1. 25
22. 00
8.19

$97. 31
28. 47
20. 31

11.21

.93
15.20
6.83

2.10

31. 61
14.82

Percentage
Total expenditure for:
Furnishings and equipment ____ ___________________ ________
___ ___
__ ________________________ _
Furniture..-___
Textile furnishings _ ___ __________________ ____ ______
Silver, china, and glassware. _ ___________ _________ __ _
Electrical equipment__
_ _ _______ _____
______
Miscellaneous equipment. ________________________________

100.0

100.0

2.1

2.1

23.4
25.1

34.1
15.3

23.5
23.1

37.4
13.9

100.0
29.3
20.9

2.2

32.4
15.2

A fte r electric ligh t bulbs, the m o st frequen tly purchased item s of
electrical equipm ent at the low est level were lam ps, purchased b y 47
fam ilies, and w ashing m achines purchased b y 45 fam ilies




A t the

55

EXPENDITURES EOR SPECIFIED GOODS

highest econom ic level 77 fam ilies ^purchased lam ps, 65 purchased
electric refrigerators, and 4 5 purchased irons.

T h e item requiring the

largest expenditure at all levels was electric refrigerators, w ith washing
m achines second, and vacu u m cleaners third.

Clothing

Variability of clothing expenditures.
C loth in g expenditures for any one individual v ary greatly from
year to year.

A n even greater variability exists betw een the clothing

expenditures of different individuals in an y one year.

T h is high

degree of variability results from such factors as the stock of clothing
left over from the previous year, the m o n ey incom e of the fa m ily and
the n um ber of persons w ithin the hom e whose needs m u st be supplied
from fa m ily funds, and such unusual situations as m a y require special
purchases.

Because of this high variability, it is difficult to secure

representative averages on the clothing expenditures of individuals
unless data are available from a large n um ber of persons.

F or this

reason average expenditures for individuals for specified articles of
clothing have been com puted for the region as a whole, and n o t for
separate cities.

(For m easure of variability of averages, see discussion,

p p . 2 0 -2 2 and T a b u la r S u m m a ry , tables 2 4 A and 2 4 B ; for average cloth ­
in g expenditures for detailed item s, see T a b u la r S u m m a ry , table 17.)

Total expenditure per family for clothing.
A m o n g the m a jo r item s of fam ily expenditures those for clothing
are the m o st elastic, w ithin the incom e ranges of fam ilies covered in
this

investigation .

W it h

increases

in

econom ic

resources

am ong

fam ilies of wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers m ore and
m ore of the fa m ily funds go toward wearing apparel.

In spite of

the fa ct th at the average num ber of units per fa m ily is 3 5 .9 percent
sm aller at the highest econom ic level than at the low est, average cloth ­
ing expenditures per fa m ily at the highest level are one and a half
tim es as large as those at the lo w est.1
0

T h e $183 average expenditure

per fa m ily at the highest econom ic level is the result n ot only of the
purchase of larger quantities of the sam e item s purchased b y fam ilies
at the low est level, b u t also of greater variety and better q uality of
goods.

T h e universality of the cu stom of b u yin g clothes ready to

wear is indicated b y the overw helm ing proportion of total clothing
expenditures going to the purchase of ready-m ad e clothing.

E x p en d i­

tures for yardgoods and findings used for sewing garm ents at h om e
1
0 For each of the tables showing details of expenditures as many economic levels have been shown as the
number of cases and type of data for each particular table would allow. Since clothing expenditures are
shown by sex and age groups as well as by economic level, only three such levels are presented for this table.
They are: Under $400, $400 to $600, and $600 and over. The age groups shown for each sex in the tabulation
of items of clothing purchased are: 18 years of age and over, 12 to 17 years, 6 to 11 years, 2 to 5 years. Pur­
chases for children under 2 years old are shown without regard to sex. (See Tabular Summary, table 17.)
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------ 5




56

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

averaged around $4 per fa m ily at each of the three econom ic levels
studied.

E xpenditures for paid help for sewing were reported b y

98 ou t of 1,767 fam ilies in this region.
A m ong fam ilies of w age earners and clerical workers the cu stom of
exchanging gifts o f clothing

at

C h ristm as

special occasions is quite extensive.

or b irth days

or other

Such gifts paid for from fa m ily

funds and exchanged w ithin the econom ic fa m ily were n o t recorded as
gifts, b u t sim p ly as clothing expenses of the fa m ily.

I f, how ever,

gifts were received from persons outside the fa m ily circle, an a tte m p t
was m ade to ascertain their value.

F ifty -n in e percent of the fam ilies

at the low est econom ic level, 59 percent a t the interm ediate level, and
53 percent at the highest econom ic level reported receiving such gifts.
T h e value of such gifts as reported averaged around $10 at each of the
econom ic levels, b u t as a large proportion of the fam ilies receiving
gifts could n ot estim ate the value of the item s received and such
values h ave n ot been included, the above figures do n o t give a com plete
account of this item .

Clothing expenditures for men and hoys.
T h e total clothing expenditures per person decreased from $50 for
m en and b oys 18 years and over through each age group to $14 for
b oy s aged 2 to 5 years.

W ith in each of these age groups the average

expenditure per person doubled approxim ately from the low est to the
highest econom ic le v e l.1
1

T h e consistent decrease in average expendi­

tures from the highest to the low est age group is m ain tained at each
of the three econom ic levels distinguished.
W h e n clothing expenditures of the m en and b oy s are sum m arized
according to expenditures for headwear, outerw ear and underwear,
footw ear, and m iscellaneous item s, expenditures for outerw ear, w hich
includes shirts as well as suits, trousers, overcoats, jack ets, sweaters
and sim ilar item s and for footw ear required from 75 to 85 percent of
the total spent b y each age group.

T h e percentage of total clothing

expenditures going to outerw ear rem ained relatively stable from one
econom ic level to another, b u t the proportion of the to ta l going to
footw ear declined as total clothing expenditure increased.

O n the

other han d, the group of m iscellaneous item s including ties, cleaning
and repairing required a decreasing proportion from the higher to
the lower age groups, b u t accounted for an increasing proportion w ith
rise in econom ic level within each age group.
1
1

See footnote 10, p. 55.




E X P E N D IT U R E S
T

able

FO R

S P E C IF IE D

57

GOODS

19.— Distribution of annual clothing expenditures for individuals in fam ilies
at successive economic levels
M E N A N D BOYS
[White families in five cities combined]
Percentage

Dollars

Sex and age group, and type of
clothing

All
families

Economic level—Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year
$600
and
over

Under
$400

Total_______ ______ _______
Boys 12 through 17:
Headwear___ _ __________ __
Outerwear _ _ _______ _________
Underwear
_ _
Footwear ___ _________ _ _ _ _
Miscellaneous it e m s .__
__
Total

_

___

____ _

Boys 6 through 11:
Headwear _______
__
____
Outerwear __ _ ____ _______ _
Underwear____ __ _________
Footwear _____ ______ ___ __
Miscellaneous items__________
Total____________ ______ _
Boys 2 through 5:
Headwear _ _ _ _ _ _
Outerwear_____________________
Underwear________ ________ _ _
Footwear____ __ _ ______ ___ _
Miscellaneous items______ _ _
Total_______ ________________

$400 to
$600

$2.49
25.83
3. 47
11. 07

6.66

$1. 51
17.40
2.47
8. 67
3. 64

$2. 45
26.35
3.24
10.91
6.38

$3.91
36.84
5.16
14.68
11. 22

49. 52

33.69

49.33

.97
16.88
2.31
10. 70
2. 46

.75
13. 38
1.90
9. 02
1. 38

1. 39

33. 32

Men and boys 18 years of age and
over:
Headwear____ ___
__
___
Outerwear _____ ___
____
Underwear__ _ _ _ _ _ __
Footwear
__
_____
_
Miscellaneous items __ _ ______

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year
$600
and
over

Under
$400

$400 to
$600

5.0
52.2
7.0
22.4
13.4

4. 5
51.7
7. 3
25. 7

5.0
53.4
6. 6

22.1
12.9

5.4
51.3
7. 2
20.5
15.6

71. 81

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1. 55
32. 21
4. 58
18. 02
6. 05

2.9
50.7
6.9
32.1
7.4

2.8

2.79
13. 21
4. 32

50.7
7. 2
34.1
5.2

3. 2
50.3
6.4
30.2
9.9

2.5
51. 6
7.3
28.9
9. 7

26.43

43. 77

62. 41

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

. 57
9.92
1. 72
9. 51

.80
12.16
2. 27

1.10

.43
8.65
1.45
8. 62
.78

1. 55

1 08
.
15.35
2. 27
14.42
2. 66

2. 5
43. 5
7. 5
41.7
4.8

2. 2
43.4
7. 3
43.2
3.9

2.9
44.3
8. 3
38.9
5.6

3.0
43. 0
6. 3
40. 3
7.4

22.82

19.93

27.46

35. 78

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.33
5. 55
1. 53
5. 76
.53

.31
4.44
1.15
5.10
.39

.34
6.60
1.89
6. 40
.71

.40

2.4
40. 5
11. 2
42.0
3.9

2.7
39.0

2.1

2. 69
7. 60
.99

44.8
3.4

41.4
11.9
40.2
4.4

1.9
43. 2
13.1
37.0
4.8

13. 70

11. 39

15. 94

20. 54

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

22. 06

10.68

8. 86

10.8

10.1

Low economic level.— A t the low est econom ic level the annual cloth ­
ing expenditures for m en and boys 18 years and over was $ 3 4 ; for
boys 12 through 17, $ 2 6 ; for b oys 6 through 11, $ 2 0 ; and for b oy s 2
through 5, $11.
Shoes were purchased b y a larger proportion of m en and b oy s in
each of the age groups than any other single article of clothing.

T his

proportion increased from 73 percent for the highest age group to 100
for each of the tw o you n gest age groups.

A similar trend was found

in the percentage of each clothing dollar devoted to shoes, where 11
cents was so spent b y m en 18 years of age and over and 30 cents b y
b oys 2 through 5.
1.5

M e n 18 years of age and over averaged about

pairs of street shoes per person, purchasing at an average price of

about $ 3 .5 3 per pair.




58

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Cotton shirts came next in importance as regards the proportion of
men and boys purchasing except for boys 2 through 5 years of age
whose cotton hose and overalls were next in importance after their
shoes. Items which are of relatively short durability as ties and cotton
hose were the third most frequently purchased items in the higher age
groups.
For men and boys 18 years and over, wool suits required the largest
proportion of each dollar spent for clothing. Even so, only 1 out of
every 6 men bought a heavy wool suit in the year covered by the
schedules and about the same proportion bought a lightweight wool
suit. In other words, each man purchased either a heavy or a light
wool suit about once in 3 years, at an average price of about $22 per
suit. Overcoats, the seventh most important item in respect to the
average expenditures of all the men and boys in this age group were
purchased by 1 out of 13 men or each man waited about 13 years to
buy a new overcoat. The average price paid for each of these coats
was about $16.
W ool suits formed the second largest expenditure of boys 12 to 17.
Only 1 out of 7 boys purchased a heavy wool suit, 1 out of 8 a light
wool suit and 1 out of 2 received a new pair of wool trousers. The
average price paid for a heavy wool suit was around $15, while a pair
of wool trousers cost about $2.50. Expenditures for heavy sweaters
by this group exceeded those by men 18 years and over.
Overalls and wool trouser expenditures both exceeded expenditures
for wool suits for boys 6 through 11, whereas for boys 2 through 5
overalls or coveralls and wool playsuits are the types of suits purchased.
Fifty-five percent of the men and boys aged 18 years and over used
cleaning and repairing services at an average expenditure per man
using such service of $2.65.
H ig h econ om ic level .— A t the highest economic level the annual
clothing expenditure for men and boys 18 years and over was $72;
for boys 12 through 17, $62; for boys 6 through 11, $36; and for boys
2 through 5, $21.
In this group, as in the group at the lowest economic level, shoes
were purchased by a larger percentage of men and boys in all four age
classes than any other single item of clothing. Eighty-six percent of the
men 18 years of age and over, 100 percent for each of the next two age
groups, and 86 percent for the youngest age group purchased shoesThe percentage of each dollar spent for clothing which was devoted
to the purchase of shoes rose from 9 cents for men 18 years of age and
over to 25 cents for boys 2 through 5. M en 18 years of age and over
averaged about 1.7 pairs of shoes per person purchasing at an average
price o f about $4.73 per pair.
Again, as at the lowest economic level, expenditures for wool
suits constituted the largest part of each clothing dollar spent for men




E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

GOODS

DISTRIBUTION OF ANNUAL CLOTHING
EXPENDITURES FOR INDIVID U A LS IN FA M ILIES
AT SUCC E S S IV E ECONOMIC L E V E L S
FIVE CITIES IN THE
WEST NORTH CENTRAL AND MOUNTAIN REGION
1 9 3 4 - 1936
WHITE FAMILIES
DOLLARS

o_________________ 10________________ 20________________ 30

U. S. B U R E A U O F L A B O R STATISTICS




59

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18 years of age and over. A bout 1 out of 3 men bought a heavy wool
suit and about the same proportion purchased a lightweight wool
suit, or to express it in another way each man purchased either a heavy
or a light wool suit about every year and a half, at an average price of
about $28.50 for a heavy suit and about $26 for a lightweight wool
suit. Overcoats, the fifth most important item in respect to expendi­
tures by men 18 years of age and over were purchased by 1 out of 7
men or each obtained a new overcoat about once every 7 years.
Nearly two-thirds of the men in this age group purchased felt hats at
an average price of $3.70.
For boys 12 through 17 years of age, in families at the highest
economic level, wool suits account for the second largest part of each
clothing dollar, with the result that separate wool trousers, which
formed an important item of the expenditures at the lowest economic
level, drop to eighth place in frequency of purchase at the highest level.
A t this economic level expenditures for overcoats rise to third place.
The frequency of purchase, however, indicated that only 1 boy out
of 5 had a new heavy wool suit, almost 1 out of 2 a lightweight wool
suit, but only 1 out of 4 a new overcoat.
For boys 6 to 11 years of age at this level, lightweight wool suits
become the second most important item of clothing expenditure, where
1 out of 3 purchased this item. Cotton shirts follow lightweight suits
as the next most important item of expenditure. Cotton suits and
play suits other than wool knit or cotton suede become the accepted
form of dress for boys 2 to 5 years of age as measured by the propor­
tion of each clothing dollar devoted to these items.
Eighty-six percent of the men and boys aged 18 years and over
availed themselves of cleaning and repairing services at an average
expenditure per man using such services of $6.
Clothing expenditures f o r women and girls.
Average clothing expenditures for women and girls were in general
similar to those for men and boys. However, in all age groups expendi­
tures at the intermediate and high economic levels for women and
girls exceeded those for men and boys.
Average expenditures decreased consistently with change in the
age level of the group. Expenditures for girls aged 2 through 5 years
were one-fourth as large as those of the women and girls 18 years of age
and over, a decrease from $54 to $13. As with the men and boys, this
decrease occurred consistently at all economic levels.
A su m m ary of the clothing expenditures of w om en and girls b y
ty p e of clothing purchased shows th at the distribution of clothing
expenditures betw een garm ents of different types is very sim ilar to
th at of m en and boys.

E xpenditures for outerw ear and footw ear

again accounted for abou t three-quarters of the total clothing expendi-




E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

61

GOODS

tures of each age group. While the expenditures for outerwear showed
the greatest percentage among the amounts spent by women 18 years
of age and over, girls 6 through 11 years spent the largest proportion for
footwear with 46 percent so allotted.
T

able

20 . — D istrib u tio n o f annual clothing expen ditu res fo r in d ivid u a ls in fa m ilie s
at successive econom ic levels
W O M E N , GIRLS, AND IN FAN TS
[White families in five cities, combinedj
Percentage

Dollars

Economic level—Fami­
Economic level—Fami­
lies spending per ex­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
penditure unit per
year
year
All famAll fam-

Sex and age group, and type of
clothing

Under
$400

Women and girls, 18 years and over:
Headwear __ ___ __ __ _ _ _
Outerwear—
___ __ ______ __
Underwear..
...
. _ _
Footwear.._ _______ . . . __ __
Miscellaneous items____________

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Under
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

$3.14
22.98
6. 43
16. 55
4.95

$1.72
13. 31
3.90
11.16
2.38

$3.12
22.99
6. 53
17.17
5.00

$5.15
36.55
9.79
23.28
8. 55

5.8
42.5
11.9
30.6
9.2

5.3
41.0
12.0
34.4
7.3

5.7
42.0
11.9
31.3
9.1

6.2
43.9
11.7
27.9
10.3

_

54.05

32.47

54.81

83.32

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Girls 12 through 17:
Headwear. __ _ _
_____
Outerwear ____ __
. . . __ _
Underwear.
__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Footwear. _ _ __
_____
Miscellaneous ite m s .____ _ __

1.46
15.15
4.12
14.41
2. 48

.94
11. 09
3.17
11.88
1.43

2. 06
19. 75
5.10
16.64
3.81

3. 32
29. 55
7.81
25. 41
5. 66

3.9
40.2
11.0
38.3
6.6

3.3
38.9

11.1

41.7
5.0

4.3
41.7
10.8
35.2
8.0

4.6
41.2
10.9
35.4
7.9

37. 62

28. 51

47. 36

71.75

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.58
7. 34
2. 43
9. 59
.97

.43
5. 01
1.75
8. 51
.66

.75
10. 91
3. 46
11.17
1.43

1.40
16. 50
4. 95
13.70
1.76

2.8
35. 1
11.6
45.9
4.6

2.6
30.6
10.7
52.1
4.0

2.7
39.3
12.5
40.3
5.2

3.7
43.0
12.9
35.8
4.6

Total____ _______

_

Total. _ ___ _____ _____ _____
Girls 6 through 11:
Headwear. __ _ _____
_ __ _
Outerwear—
Underwear.
Footwear_______ __________ _
Miscellaneous items.
_ _ __ _
Total ________ _

_

20.91

16. 36

27. 72

38. 31

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Girls 2 through 5:
Headwear.
_
_ .___ _ _
Outerwear.. _ _
______
Underwear.
Footwear_
_
_ ___
Miscellaneous items.

__

_

.37
4. 84
1.72
5. 75
.48

.30
3.18
1.17
4.58
.20

.56
7. 72
2. 58
7. 55
.95

.39
8. 29
3. 66
9.95
1. 37

2.8
36.8
13.1
43.7
3.6

3.2
33.7
12.4
48.6
2.1

2.9
39.9
13.3
39.0
4.9

1.6
35.0
15.5
42.1
5.8

Total_________________________

13.16

9. 43

19. 36

23.66

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Infants:
Headwear. __ _
___
Outerwear,.. _ _ __
_______
Underwear. _ ____ _
Footwear_____ ___
__ ______
Miscellaneous _
_
___

.38
2. 98
2.83
2. 42
.60

.27
2.26
1.75
2.00
.23

.42
3.18
2. 58
2.64
.77

.65
4.88
7. 26
3.19
1.40

4.1
32.4
30.7
26.3
6.5

4.1
34.8
26.9
30.7
3.5

4.4
33.2
26.9
27.5
8.0

3.7
28.1
41.7
18.4
8.1

Total_________________________

9.21

6. 51

9. 59

17. 38

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Expenditures for underwear accounted for about 12 percent of total
expenditures in each of the age groups and did not exhibit either a
distinct increase or decrease with rise in economic level. M is­
cellaneous expenditures representing less than 10 percent for each




62

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R E G IO N

age group increased markedly with rise in economic level. Expendi­
tures for headwear averaged about $4, or 6 percent of total expenditures
for women 18 years of age and over and decreased through each
age group to an average of 37 cents or 3 percent of total clothing
expenditures for girls 2 through 5 years of age.
L o w eco n om ic level .— A t the low econom ic level the annual clothing
expenditure for women and girls 18 years and over was $32; for girls
12 through 17, $29; for girls 6 through 11, $16; and for girls 2 through
5, $9.
Felt hats were purchased by a larger proportion of women and
girls 18 years and over than any other single article of clothing. In
the three lower age groups, however, the item purchased by the largest
proportion of persons was street shoes. (In the two lowest groups
this included dress shoes.) The proportion of persons purchasing
street shoes in these groups increased from 80 percent in the group
aged 12 through 17 to 100 percent in the two groups aged 6 through
11 and 2 through 5 (where “ dress” shoes were included). Street shoes
ranked third in the proportion of persons purchasing in the group
aged 18 years and over. When expenditures for shoes (including
street, dress, and sport) for all age groups are examined it is seen that
an increasing percentage of clothing expenditures is devoted to this
purpose as the age level decreases. Sixteen cents of the clothing
dollar was spent for shoes by women aged 18 years and over, and 36
cents by girls aged 2 through 5. Seventy-four percent of the women
and girls 18 years of age and over purchased street shoes, 31 percent
dress shoes, and 10 percent sport shoes, at average prices of $3, $3,
and $2, respectively.
Silk hose was the article second in importance for the groups 18
years and over and 12 through 17, with cotton hose taking the posi­
tion of second importance for the girls 6 through 11 and 2 through 5.
For women and girls 18 years of age and over silk hose ranked
second to shoes in the amount of average expenditure. W omen and
girls at the low level purchased on the average 6 pairs in the year
covered by the schedules, with 78 percent buying this article. Silk
and rayon dresses were third in respect to average expenditure.
About 4 out of 10 women purchased a silk or rayon dress and paid
on the average $5.19. Fur-trimmed coats, fourth in importance of
expenditure, were purchased by 2 women out of 25 at an average cost
of $21.44.
Silk hose followed shoes in importance of expenditure for the girls
aged 12 through 17. Nine cents of the clothing dollar went for this
purpose, with more than half the group making purchases. Silk and
rayon dresses were next in importance of expenditure. A little less
than 2 out of 5 girls in this group purchased such dresses at an average




E X P E N D IT U R E S

EO R S P E C IF IE D

GOODS

63

cost of $3.75 per dress. Heavy plain coats were bought by about 4
in 20 girls and cost on the average $10.05.
In the group of girls aged 6 through 11, cotton dresses followed shoes
as the item of largest expenditure. Such dresses were purchased by
3 out of 5 girls at an average cost of $0.87. Heavy plain coats, next
in importance, were purchased by about 1 in 4 girls. The average
amount paid for such a garment was $5.00.
H ig h econ om ic level .— A t the high economic level the annual clothing
expenditure for women and girls 18 years and over was $83; for girls
12 through 17, $72; for girls 6 through 11, $38; and for girls 2 through
5, $24.
In this group, as at the low level, shoes were purchased by a larger
percentage of girls in the three groups under 18 years of age than any
other single item of clothing. Silk hose was the item purchased by
the largest number of women and girls 18 years and over, with shoes
next in importance. The proportion purchasing shoes increased from
79 percent of the women and girls 18 years and over, to 100 percent
in the two youngest age groups. The percentage of each dollar spent
for clothing which was devoted to the purchase of shoes rose from 13
percent for women and girls 18 years of age and over to 26 percent
for girls 2 through 5. Seventy-nine percent of the women and girls
18 years of age and over purchased street shoes, 48 percent dress
shoes, and 24 percent sport shoes, at average prices of $4, $4, and
$3 a pair respectively.
Felt hats were third in respect to number of persons purchasing
in the group 18 years of age and over. Silk hose were second for the
girls 12 through 17; wool caps and berets, cotton dresses, and cotton
hose for girls 6 through 11; and cotton hose and arctics for girls 2
through 5.
For women and girls 18 years of age and over, silk hose ranked
next to shoes in the amount of average expenditure. The average
purchase was 13 pairs in the year covered by the schedules, with 9 out
of 10 women purchasing. Silk and rayon dresses were third in respect
to expenditure, as at the low level. About 2 out of 3 women pur­
chased a silk or rayon dress, paying on the average $7. Fur-trimmed
coats, fourth in importance, were purchased by 1 out of 7 women at
an average cost of $43.
For girls 12 through 17, silk hose followed shoes in importance of
expenditure at this level also. Ten cents of the clothing dollar went
for this purpose with three-fourths of the group making purchases.
H eavy plain coats were next in order of expenditure. About 1 out of
every 3 girls purchased such a coat at an average cost of $13. Silk
and rayon dresses were fourth in order. Three out of five girls bought
a silk or rayon dress and paid $5 on the average.




64

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R E G IO N

For girls 6 through 11, cotton dresses were second in rank of ex­
penditure, with about 2 out of 3 girls purchasing. The average
amount paid for a cotton dress was $1.15. The third item was wool
knit play suits costing on the average $9 a garment.
O ccupational differences in the clothing expenditures o f adults .
Expenditures for clothing by the adults included in the Study were
found to have been affected, to an important degree, by the occupa­
tion of the persons included in the Study, as well as by the economic
level of the family. An analysis of the relative effect of occupation
and social environment on clothing expenditures has been made for
all white persons studied in the 5 West North Central-Mountain
cities and 37 other cities combined. The total clothing expenditures
of men and women engaged in clerical work were contrasted with
the expenditures of those in manual work and those at home without
gainful employment, and of boys and girls at school, after elimination
of any effect upon those differences which might be due to differing
incomes or family composition (see appendix G, pp. 378 to 381).
Among the employed workers under 21, for both men and women,
differences between average expenditures for clothing by wage earners
and by clerical workers were negligible. A t older ages, however, for
both men and women, the expenditures of clerical workers were con­
sistently greater than those of wage earners. The differences varied
for men from 7 percent in the group aged 21 to 24 years to 15 percent
in the group aged 27 to 30. The greater expenditure by clerical
workers than wage earners for clothing was less pronounced for
women than for men up to the 27th year, but thereafter was much
more pronounced for women, reaching a maximum difference of 44
percent in the age group 42 to 48.
Average clothing expenditures of men and women at home without
gainful employment were substantially lower than those of employed
individuals. Among the men, expenditures of clerical workers ex­
ceeded those of men at home by 38 percent or more for the groups aged
15 to 21, and by 100 percent or more for the groups aged 21 to 60.
For women the comparable figures are somewhat less striking, 15 per­
cent for the group aged 15 to 18 and from 52 to 78 percent for the
groups from 18 to 60 years of age. The fact that it is more customary
for adult women to be at home without gainful employment than for
adult men, whereas most of the men found in this situation were in­
voluntarily at home because of unemployment, probably explains this
very low level of clothing expenditure for unemployed men at home.
Clothing expenditures for boys aged 15 to 21 at school were onefifth to one-fourth greater than those of unemployed boys at home of
the same age, but were in turn exceeded by 13 percent or more by
clothing expenditures of clerical workers in the same sex-age group.




E X P E N D IT U R E S FO R S P E C IF IE D

GOODS

65

ESTIMATED ANNUAL CLOTHING EXPENDITURES*
BY PERSONS OF DIFFERENT AGE, SEX, AND OCCUPATION
42 CITIES COMBINED
I.OO* $56.68

0

2

6

9

12

15

18

21

24

27

30

36

42

48

54

60

66

36

42

48

54

60

66

AGC

0

2

6

9

12

15

18

21

24

27

30
AGE

•a f t e r eliminating t h e e f f e c t o f d i f f e r e n c e s in f a m i l y
SIZE AND INCOME. BASED ON DATA FROM WHITE FAMILIES

). S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




66

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R E G IO N

Girls at school aged 15 to 18 spent 7 percent more than girls at home,
but girl clerical workers of that age spent 7 percent more than the
school girls. A t the next age level, 18 to 21, girl clerical workers spent
25 percent more than school girls, who in turn spent 22 percent more
than girls at home.
A t every age level, in comparable occupational categories, the wo­
men spent more for clothing than did men, the average expenditure for
women clerical workers aged 24 to 27 being 45 percent greater than
that for men clerical workers of the same age, and the differences in
the age group 36 to 42 for the same occupations being 57 percent.
Women wage earners aged 24 to 27 spent 46 percent more for clothing
than men wage earners of the same age and in the age group 36 to 42
the difference was 23 percent.
The relationships discussed in the foregoing paragraphs may be
seen graphically in figure A .1
2
T ran sportation

The annual cost of transportation by trolley, bus, automobile,
train, boat, or other means of conveyance ranged in the cities studied
from $112 in Salt Lake City to $169 in Kansas City. Expenditures
for automobile accounted for 69 percent of the total in St. Louis, 77
percent in Salt Lake City, 77 percent in Minneapolis-St. Paul, 82
percent in Denver, and 81 percent in Kansas City. Of the balance
going to all means of transportation other than automobile, the largest
portion went to trolley fares. The proportion of families using the
trolleys was similar in the three largest cities. In Minneapolis all
but 27 families out of 504 reported expenditure for this item. In
Salt Lake City 30 percent of the families reported no trolley expense
and in Denver, 29 percent. The relatively smaller size of these two
latter cities made it possible for families to live within walking dis­
tance of schools and places of work. Average expenditures for all
forms of transportation other than by automobile and trolley, in­
cluding local bus, taxi, bicycle, railroad, interurban bus, boat, or
airplane were relatively small in all the cities.
In each city studied in this region, expenditures for transportation
showed a sharp increase at the higher economic levels as compared
with the lower, more than doubling from low to high levels in each
city.1 The chief factor in this increased expenditure was the auto­
3
mobile. The average expenditures for all other forms of transporta­
tion were approximately the same at all economic levels.
1 The data on which the chart is based are shown in appendix G, table D, p. 386.
2
1 For each of the tables showing details of expenditure as many economic levels have been shown as the
3
number of cases in each city and the types of the data for each particular table would allow. (See Tabular
Summary, table 13.) For purposes of discussion of expenditures in the text, families have been grouped
at three levels: Low, under $400, intermediate* $400 to $600; high, $600 and over.




E X P E N D IT U R E S FO R S P E C IF IE D
T

GOODS

67

2 1 .— E x p en d itu res f o r autom obile operation and m ainten ance f o r autom obile
ow ners am ong wage earners and low er-salaried clerical w orkers at successive eco­
n o m ic levels in 1 yea r during the period 1 9 8 4 - 8 6

able

W H IT E FAM ILIES

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
City and Item

All families
Under $400 $400 to $600

$600 and
over

DEN
VER
Number of families in survey________________ _______
Percentage of families owning automobiles_________ __
Expenditure for automobile operation and maintenance:
Average amount per family owning automobile___
Percentage for—
Gasoline and oil__________ ___ _ __ _____ _
Garage rent and parking___ _ _______ ______
Other______________________________________

295
70.5

92
58.7

106
72.6

97
79.4

$119

$88

$117

$143

66.5
3.9
29.6

72.6
2.7
24.7

66.3
3.7
30.0

64.0
4.6
31.4

357
61.9

137
53.3

123
64.2

97
71.1

$120

$83

$126

$153

63.1
4.0
32.9

62.9
.7
36.4

63.0
3.6
33.4

63.1
.4
30.5

504
66.3

161
54.7

192
64.1

151
81.5

$112

$89

$102

$138

63.9
3.2
32.9

66.4
1.7
31.9

66.8
2.6
30.6

60.4
4.4
35.2

401
53.9

119
37.8

156
51.3

126
72. 2

$126

$87

$120

$150

57.9
3.0
39.1

57.2
3.8
39.0

57.3
2.4
40.3

58.4
3.2
38.4

210
59.0

109
54.1

72
58.3

79.3

KAN
SAS C Y
IT
Number of families in survey
____________ _________
Percentage of families owning automobiles_____ ____
Expenditure for automobile operation and mainte­
nance:
Average amount per family owning automobile___
Percentage for:
Gasoline and oil___________________
_____
Garage rent and parking____________________
Other.. _______________ _ _. . . . . . . _____
M N
IN EAPO
LIS-ST. PA L
U
Number of families in survey______ ______ . . . _____
Percentage of families owning automobiles___________
Expenditure for automobile operation and mainte­
nance:
Average amount per family owning automobile___
Percentage for:
Gasoline and oil___________ _______________
Garage rent and parking____________________
Other. _____________ ____ __________________
S T . L O U IS

Number of families in survey_ _____ . . . _____ ______
_
Percentage of families owning automobiles.__________
Expenditure for automobile operation and mainte­
nance:
Average amount per family owning automobile___
Percentage for:
Gasoline and oil_____________ _____ . . . ____
Garage rent and parking.. __________ ______
Other..____________________________________
S A L T L A K E C IT Y

Number of families in survey_________ ____ __________
Percentage of families owning automobiles__ _______ _
Expenditure for automobile operation and mainte­
nance:
Average amount per family owning automobile----Percentage for:
Gasoline and oil_________ . . . _____________
Garage rent and parking------------- -----------------Other______________ _______________________

29

$103

$92

$103

$130

69.8
1.2
9.0

72.5
1.0
26.5

70.1
.2
29.7

64.7
3.0
32.3

The sharp increase in expenditures for automobile at higher eco­
nomic levels is indicated in table 21. N ot only did the percentage of
families owning automobiles increase markedly but the amount spent
for operation and maintenance showed a substantial increase. A t the
high economic level in Denver, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Salt Lake
City, a larger proportion of funds spent for automobile operation and




68

W EST

NO RTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

maintenance went for garage rent and parking fees, repairs, insurance,
and tires and tubes than at the low level. At the low level a some­
what smaller proportion of funds devoted to operation and mainte­
nance was spent for items other than gasoline, oil, and garage, suggest­
ing that the families in that group may have made at least part of the
repairs on their automobiles themselves.
The proportion of families purchasing automobiles within the sched­
ule year (table 13 of the Tabular Summary) was naturally much
smaller than the proportion of families owning cars. Five percent or
less of the families in the respective cities in this region purchased new
cars during the schedule year, while second-hand cars were bought by
8 percent of the families studied in Denver, 17 percent in Kansas City,
13 percent in Minneapolis-St. Paul, 10 percent in St. Louis, and 7 per­
cent in Salt Lake City. It is of some interest to note that the propor­
tion of families buying automobiles in Denver and Salt Lake City, the
two cities studied as of the year ending February 1935, is lower than in
the three cities studied as of the year ending February 1936, when
business conditions throughout the country were in general better
than in the year previous.
Expenditures for automobiles, new and second-hand, averaged $34
per family in Denver, $63 in Kansas City, $47 in Minneapolis-St. Paul,
$46 in St. Louis, and $25 in Salt Lake City. These averages were com ­
puted by dividing the aggregate amount spent for automobiles by
the families studied in each city by the total number of those families.
These aggregates include amounts still due at the end of the year
covered by the schedule on automobiles purchased during the year.
As mentioned above (see p. 39) payments on automobiles purchased
in previous years are not treated as automobile expense in this report,
but as reduction of outstanding liabilities. (See appendix A, p. 326.)
Recreation

Average expenditures for recreational items ranged among families
studied in this region from $56 in Salt Lake City to $88 in St. Louis.
The largest proportion of this total in all the cities except Salt Lake
City went to tobacco (principally in the form of cigarettes), the
amounts per family averaging from $24.21 in Denver to $30.56 in St.
Louis. The second largest item of recreational expenditure in all
cities except Salt Lake City was movies, which ranged from $12.47 in
Minneapolis-St. Paul to $17.77 in St. Louis. In Salt Lake City this
order was reversed, $15.23 going for movies and $13.50 for tobacco.
The third largest expenditure was for newspapers delivered at home.
Expenditures for all types of reading matter combined exceeded total
expenditures for movies by 47 cents in Denver and 54 cents in Minne­
apolis-St. Paul. In Kansas City expenditures for reading matter
were $2.92 less than expenditures for movies and in St. Louis and Salt




E X P E N D IT U R E S

FOR SPECIFIED

L ake C ity , $ 1 .82 and $ 2 .43 less, respectively.

69

GOODS

R eadin g m atter pur­

chased b y workers' families in these five cities was confined alm ost
exclusively to newspapers and m agazines, w ith a very sm all am oun t
going for purchase or rental of books.

R ecreational equipm ent of

various sorts such as cam eras and film s, athletic supplies, radios, and
other m usical instrum ents accounted for average expenditures from
$ 9 .4 6 in Salt L ak e C ity to $ 1 3 .1 8 in D en v er.

(See T ab u la r S u m m ary,

table 15.)
T a b l e 2 2 .— P r o p o r tio n s o f fa m ilie s o f wage earners and low er salaried clerical
w orkers o w n in g and purchasin g ra d ios , and, am ounts pa id fo r radios at successive
econ om ic levels in 1 yea r during the period 1 9 3 4 -3 6 .

WHITE FAMILIES
Economic level— Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Item

All families
Under $400 $400 to $600

$600 and
over

DENVER

Number of families in survey___________ _____ ___ _
Percentage of families—
Owning r a d io s ...___ ___________ ______ _________
Purchasing radios_______________________ _______
Average amount paid for radio per family purchasing. _

295

92

106

97

69.2
9.8
$46

51.1
10.9
$44

74.5
6.6
$38

80.4
12.4
$53

K A N S A S C IT Y

Number of families in survey ________ ______ ____ _
Percentage of families—
Owning radios____ _______ ______ ______ _________
Purchasing radios_______________________________
Average amount paid for radio per family purchasing __

357

137

123

97

68.6

62.8
7.3
$31

67.5
11.4
$56

78.4
12.4
$50

10.1
$47

M IN N E A P O L IS -S T . P A U L

Number of families in survey___ _ ___________
__
Percentage of families—
Owning radios______ ___ _. __________________
Purchasing radios_____ _______ _____ _ _______ Average amount paid for radio per family purchasing. _

504

161

192

151

88.3
7.9
$44

83.2
4.3
$24

87.5
10.9
$43

94.7
7.9
$59

S T . L O U IS

Number of families in survey______________
__ ___
Percentage of families—
Owning radios._. . . .
.
___ . . . ________ . . .
Purchasing radios_________________________________
Average amount paid for radio per family purchasing, _
SA L T L A K E

401

119

156

126

87.8
9.0
$58

84.0
6.7
$50

89.7
9.0
$61

88.9

11.1
$60

C IT Y

Number of families in survey — __ _. ___________
Percentage of families—
Owning radios______ _______ _________ . ________
Purchasing radios_____ ____ __ __________ _ . . .
Average amount paid for radio per family purchasing, _

210

109

72

29

63.8
5.7
$46

•58.7
3.7
$25

68.1

72.4
10.3
$80

6.9
$43

W h e n fam ilies are classified b y am ou n t spent per expenditure u n it,1
4
total am ounts spent for recreation increased between 82 and 98 percent
from low to high econom ic level in four cities, b u t only 70 percent in
Salt L ak e C ity .

E xpenditures for recreational equipm ent, which in­

cluded radio purchase, doubled in K a n sas C ity and St. Louis, and
increased threefold in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul.
1 See footnote 13, p. 66.
4




In

D en v er

expendi-

70

W E ST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

tures for recreational equipm ent were only a fou rth larger at the high
level and in Salt L ak e C ity , three-fourths larger.

E xpenditu res for

radio purchase show ed the largest increase between low and high levels
in S alt L ak e C ity and M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul.
occurred in D en v er.

T h e sm allest increase

T a b le 22 shows proportions of fam ilies owning

and purchasing radios and the average am oun t paid at three levels in
the five cities.

T h e increase in expenditure for m ovies increased from

low to high level, ranging from 44 percent in D en v er to 116 percent in
K a n sa s C ity .
E xpenditures for tobacco increased b y 91 percent in D en v er, 76
percent in K a n sas C ity , 63 percent in M in n ea p olis-S t. P au l, 59 per­
cent in S t. L ou is, b u t only 28 percent in Salt L ak e C ity .

Expenditu res

for reading m a tter as a whole increased m oderately from low to high
econom ic level in all cities.

E xpenditu res for m agazines, how ever,

increased tw o to threefold in all cities.

M edical Care
A

consistent increase in the am oun t spent for m edical care per

fam ily from the low to the high econom ic l e v e l 1 occurred in each of
5
the five cities in this region.

T h is trend, com bined w ith the decreas­

ing size of fa m ily w ith rise in econom ic level, yielded considerably m ore
adequate care for the h ealth of each person in the fa m ily at the upper
level.

In every city except Salt L ak e C ity the actual average expendi­

ture per person for m edical care m ore than trebled from low to high
econom ic level.

T h e average expenditure at the high level was be­

tw een $35 and $ 43.
far below

E v e n at this level, the average expenditure w as

the figure of $76

estim ated b y

Sam uel B ra d b u ry

and

accepted b y the T ech n ical C o m m ittee on M e d ic a l C are as n eeded to
provide the fu ndam entals of good m edical care on a fee-for-service
b asis.1
6

(See T a b u la r S u m m a ry , table 14.)

M ed icin e and drugs were purchased b y a larger proportion of fam ilies
than any other form of m edical care at all econom ic levels, except the
low est econom ic level in D en v er.
In three cities, at the low est econom ic level the largest proportion of
expenditures for m edical services per fa m ily was d evoted to dental
care and this was the typ e of m edical service m o st frequen tly used.
W h ile at the highest econom ic level expenditures for dentists were
also reported b y m ore fam ilies than for any other typ e of service, it
was only in M in n ea p o lis-S t. Paul th a t expenditure for dental care
held first rank.

In other cities it was preceded b y am ounts spent for

specialists, private room s in hospitals, etc.

T h e services of general

practitioners were used b y about the sam e proportion of fam ilies at
the low est as at the highest econom ic levels, b u t the average expendi1 See footnote, p. 66.
8
1 Samuel Bradbury, Cost of Adequate Medical Care, pp. 52-53.
6
1937.




Chicago, University of Chicago Press,

E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R S P E C IF IE D

71

GOODS

tures per fa m ily for these services consistently increased w ith eco­
nom ic level.

In general, the fam ilies studied were m ore apt to go to

the offices of general practitioners for m edical assistance rather than
to call these doctors to their hom es, and the average expenditure per
fa m ily was slightly larger for the form er typ e of service.

B o th the

proportion of fam ilies using, and the average expenditure per fam ily
for specialists

and

practitioners

other

than

general practitioners,

increased w ith rise in econom ic level.
T

2 3 . — E x p en d itu res f o r m edical care am ong wage earners and low er-salaried
clerical w orkers at successive econom ic levels, in 1 yea r d uring the period 1 9 3 4 - 3 6

able

WHITE FAMILIES

City and economic level

Number of Number of
families in persons per
survey
family

Average
expendi­
ture per
person for
medical
care

Average
expendi­
ture per
family for
medical
care

DENVER

All families___________________________________________
Families spending per expenditure unit:
Under $400___ _ _ _____ ______ __________________
$400 to $600_______________________________________
$600 and over_
___ ______ _ ____________ ____

295

3.14

$23

$73

92
106
97

4.06
3.12
2. 29

13
21
43

53
66
98

357

3.37

18

59

45
92
73
50
43
54

5.03
3.84
3. 22
3. 07
2. 58
2. 29

8
11
14
23
30
42

41
43
45
71
76
95

504

3.51

20

69

47
114
106
86
59
92

5.36

34

3.52
3.13
2. 95
2.40

6
11
19
25
29
42

66
77
86
101

401

3.48

17

61

54

65
94
62
42
84

5.60
4.10
3.59
3.00
2. 63
2. 29

7
9
16
19
27
40

37
38
59
58
72
91

210

3.81

17

64

54
55

5. 27
4.05
3.13
2.34

11
15
21
35

57

K A N S A S C IT Y

All families___________________________________
_____
Families spending per expenditure unit:
Under $300__________ _____ __________
__________
$300 to $400________________________________________
$400 to $500_______________________________________
$500 to $600_______________________________________
$600 to $700________
____ _____________________
$700 and over______ _ __________________ _______
M IN N E A P O L IS -S T . P A U L

All families _
_
_________ _ __ __ _
Families spending per expenditure unit:
Under $ 3 0 0 --.____ ___________ _________ ______
$300 to $400_______________________________________
$400 to $500______ _______________________________
$600 to $600_______________________________________
$600 to $700_________________ ____________________
$700 and over____
________________ __________

4. 2 2

44

S T . L O U IS

All families_ ______
_
____________________
______
Families spending per expenditure unit:
Under $300____ ________________ _________ _______
$300 to $400—
. .
___________________ ______—
$400 to $500.
-- _ _____________
$500 to $600—
________________________
$600 to $700- _
___ _____ ___________
$700 and over________ ______ _______ __
____ ___
SA LT L A K E

C IT Y

All families
_
___ __________ __ ________
Families spending per expenditure unit:
Under $300-_
__
_
_____________ _________
$300 to $400—
__________________________________
$400 to $600__________________ ___________________
$600 and over___________
___ ________ _________

72
29

59

65
81

A t every econom ic level in each city the proportion of fam ilies re­
porting the use of the services of clinics is am azingly sm all, being
abou t 1 in 70 in D en v er, abou t 1 in 22 in K a n sa s C ity and St. L ouis, 1
in 30 in M in n ea p o lis-S t. P aul, and 1 in 23 in Salt L ak e C ity .
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39-------6




The

72

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

amount spent per family for the use of clinics seems not to be a func­
tion of economic level since there is no discernible trend of either
increase or decrease in amount with rise in economic level except
possibly in St. Louis where the amount tends to decrease.
W it h the exception of Salt L ak e C ity there is a distinct increase in
the expenditure per fa m ily for accident and h ealth insurance w ith
increase in econom ic level.

T h e average expenditure per fa m ily for

accident and h ealth insurance at the low est econom ic level was abou t
$3 in D en v er, abou t $4 in K a n sas C ity and Salt L ak e C ity , $3 in
M in n eap olis, and $2 in St. L ouis.

Personal Care
E xpenditu res

for

personal

care,

w hich

accounted

for

a bou t

2

percent of total expenditures at each econom ic l e v e l 17 in all five
cities, include expenditures for personal care services such as haircuts,
sh aves, sham poos, m anicures, and for toilet articles and preparations
as brushes and cosm etics.

In K a n sa s C ity and M in n ea p o lis-S t. Paul

expenditures increased 68 percent from the low to the high econom ic
level.

In Salt L ak e C ity the increase was 59 percent and in D e n v er

and St. L ou is a little less than 50 percent.

A t each level expenditures

were abou t equally divided betw een personal care services and toilet
articles and preparations.

(See T a b u la r S u m m a ry , table 14.)

H aircu ts were the m o st frequ en tly purchased ty p e of personal
care service, follow ed b y h air-w aving services of various kinds.

Of

each dollar spent for personal care services, haircuts accounted for
abou t 60 cents and betw een 14 and 22 cents were spent for perm an en t
w aves.

W h ile expenditures for these item s rem ained relatively con­

sta n t from econom ic level to econom ic level, the am oun ts spent for
sham poos increased m a n y fo ld from the low to the high econom ic
level in all the cities, and for shaves b y barbers, in all except K a n sa s
C ity .

Not only did as large a proportion of the families at the low economic
level as at the high economic level report expenditures for toilet soap,
tooth powder, tooth paste, brushes, and other toilet articles, but also
the average expenditure per family for such articles remained about
the same from economic level to economic level. In contrast to this
consistency, the expenditures per family for cosmetics and toilet
preparations doubled from the low to the high economic level in every
city except St. Louis, where the rate of increase was not quite so high.
Form al Education

If the investigation had been extended to cover all the goods and
services received without direct expense by the group studied, a large
1 See footnote 13, p. 66.
7




E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

73

GOODS

section of the schedule w ould h ave been devoted to the am oun t and
kinds of education provided b y the city and b y other agencies for
children and adults.

E lem en ta ry schools, high schools, and trade

schools, classes in m u seum s and libraries and in parks, free of im m e­
diate cost to those who take advan tage of th em , are to a greater or
less degree a regular part of life in all the five cities covered b y this
report.

T h e y are, of course, paid for b y the citizens, b u t no figures

h ave been secured in the present stu d y on the use of these educational
facilities b y the group covered, or the indirect cost to this group of
the c ity ’s educational sy stem .

(See T ab u la r S u m m a ry , table 16.)

D irect expenditures for form al ed u cation ; for textbooks, school
supplies, and tu ition , occupied an insignificant place in the expenditure
pattern of the fam ilies studied.

T h e y account for less than 1 percent

o f total expenditures in any one of the cities covered in this area.
D irect expenditures for form al education, a fu nction of a n um ber
o f persons of school age in the various fam ilies, show no positive
correlation w ith econom ic level.

In every city the bulk of all form al

education expenditures w as for m em bers living at h om e.

T h e average

per fa m ily for such expenditures ranged from $7 in St. Lou is to $10
in K a n sa s C ity , and included all such item s as books, pencils, paper,
and supplies.
T h e proportion of fam ilies reporting expenditures for m em bers
a w ay fro m h om e in school was 4 percent in D e n v er, 5 percent in K a n sa s
C ity , 1 percent in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul and S t. L ou is, and none in
S alt L ake C ity .

A verage expenditure for all fam ilies for tuition,

books, etc., for m em bers in school aw ay from h om e ranged from
5 cents in M in n eap olis to $ 2 .1 6 in D en v er, excepting Salt L ake
C it y where there were no such expenditures.

V o ca tion
E xpenditu res for union dues or fees, professional association dues
or fees, expenditures for technical literature, and similar item s have
been classified as “ vocation al expense.”

In general such expendi­

tures increased sharply from low to high econom ic lev el.1
8

O f such

expenditures the largest part w ent for union dues and fees, which
averaged abou t $4 per fam ily in each of D en v er, K a n sas C ity , and
S alt L ak e C ity , abou t $6 in M in n ea p olis-S t. P aul, and a bou t $7
in S t. L ou is, representing expenditures b y 17 to 29 percent of the
fam ilies in each city.

T h e am ounts spent for union dues and fees

increased fourfold from the low to the high econom ic level in D en v er
and

doubled,

approxim ately,

in K a n sas

C ity

and

St.

L ouis.

In

M in n ea p o lis-S t. Paul, expenditures increased abou t 50 percent, and
in Salt L ak e C ity abou t one-third.
1 See footnote 13, p. 66.
8




(See T ab u la r S u m m a ry , table 16.)

W EST

74

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

T h e n um ber of fam ilies m aking expenditures for professional dues
or fees was 19 in D en v er, 9 in K a n sas C ity , 15 in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul,
2 in S t. L ouis, and 9 in Salt L ake C ity .

G ifts

and

C o n trib u tio n s

to Individuals
W elfare

and

to

C o m m u n ity

A com parison of the average am ounts given directly b y these fa m i­
lies to individuals and their contributions to com m u n ity chests and
other welfare agencies em phasizes their close contact w ith individuals
in need, and the generosity of their response.

F or each of the five

cities except Salt L ak e C ity the am ounts contributed to religious
organizations, co m m u n ity chests, and paid in taxes were, in general,
less at com parable econom ic levels than were contributions to the
support of relatives and other persons outside the econom ic fa m ily.
T h e latter type of expenditures was n o t only greater b u t increased
m u ch m ore rapidly from the low to the high econom ic le v e l.1
9

On

the other h and, in Salt L ak e C ity , expenditures for co m m u n ity welfare
were consistently greater than contributions and gifts to persons
outside the econom ic fa m ily, except at the high econom ic level where
the dollar expenditures for the two were the sam e.

H ow ever, the

proportion ately greater increase in gifts to persons w ith rise in eco­
n om ic level was also characteristic of the S alt L ak e C ity fam ilies.

(See

T ab u la r S u m m a ry , table 16.)
In the other four cities the am oun t spent per fa m ily in gifts and
contributions to individuals varied from an average of $23 in St.
L ouis to $36 in D e n v er as com pared w ith contributions to welfare
agencies and taxes of $21 and $18 in these two cities.
In each of the cities, gifts to religious organizations constituted the
bulk of the contributions to co m m u n ity welfare.

T h e proportion

of fam ilies m aking such contributions remains relatively constan t
from econom ic level to econom ic level b u t the actual average expen­
diture tends to increase, though n o t in as great a proportion as do
total expenditures for com m u n ity welfare.

Salt L ak e C ity is again

n otable in th at the contributions to religious organizations at the
low est econom ic level were abou t the sam e as the am oun ts contributed
in each of the other four cities at the highest econom ic level.

In

th at city such contributions increased abou t 70 percent from the
low est to the highest econom ic level for both item s.
A m o u n ts paid in poll, incom e, and personal property taxes ranged
at the low level from 5 cents in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul to $ 1 .9 3 in
Salt L ak e C ity , and at the high level, from 68 cents in M in n ea p olisSt. Paul to $ 4 .1 4 in D en v er.

These variations reflect n o t only dif­

ferences in laws betw een the various States b u t also variations in
the strictness of collection.
1 See footnote 13, p. 66.
8




T axes on real estate and sales taxes

E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

GOODS

75

are n ot included in these averages which represent p aym en ts b y
abou t h alf the fam ilies studied in D en v er, K a n sa s C ity , and St. L ou is,
and abou t three-fourths of the fam ilies in Salt L ak e C ity .

In M in n e -

a polis-St. Paul the proportion of fam ilies payin g such taxes was abou t
one ou t of 13.

(For treatm en t of real estate taxes and sales tax, see

pp. 3 23, 3 29, and 3 3 7 .)
C h ristm as and birth day gifts constitute the m a jo r proportion of all
expenditures for persons outside

the econom ic fa m ily

at the low

econom ic level, b u t are abou t equal in size to contributions for sup­
port of relatives at the high econom ic level.

Expenditures of the

latter type increase from the low to the high econom ic level from three­
fold in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul to tw elvefold in St. L ouis.

M iscellaneous Item s
In general, expenditures for all m iscellaneous item s increase rapidly
from the low to the high econom ic level,2 bu t due to the sm all num bers
0
of fam ilies reporting expenditures for such item s great irregularities
in trend appear for the individual item s.

E xpenditu res ]for funerals

were reported b y no fam ilies in D en v er, three in St. L ou is, tw o each
in K a n sas C ity and Salt L ake C ity , and nine in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul,
and averaged betw een $100 and $500 per funeral.
gardens averaged $ 1 .5 0 or less per fa m ily.
table 16.)
2 See footnote 13, p. 66.
0




L egal costs and

(See T ab u la r Su m m ary,

Chapter 3
Changing Living Standards in the Post-W ar Period
D istrib u tio n o f C u rre n t E xpenditures in 1934-36 as Com pared
W it h T h o se in 1917-19
A

com parison of the percentage distribution of expenditures by

fam ilies studied in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 1 w ith th at by fam ilies of com parable
types studied in 1 9 3 4 -3 6 in cities in the W e s t N o rth C e n tra l-M o u n ta in
region sheds m uch light on the changes in the consum er purchases of
wage earners and clerical workers which h ave taken place betw een
these two periods.

A ll five cities covered in this region in 1 9 3 4 -3 6

were also studied in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 .2

W h e n figures on the distribution of

expenditures b y the groups studied at the end of the war period are
placed beside figures on the distribution of expenditures b y the fam ilies
covered in the present in vestigation , it is eviden t th at the m o st im ­
p ortan t differences which h ave occurred in the interval are the decrease
in the proportion of the to ta l o u tla y spent for clothing and the increase
in the percentage of expenditure for m iscellaneous item s.

In K a n sa s

C ity and M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul there was an increase in the percentage
of expenditures for housefurnishing goods and a decrease in the other
three cities.

In four of the five cities studied at the two periods, the

percentage of total expenditures which w ent for food was sm aller in
1 9 3 4 -3 6 than in the war period, and th at to housing larger in all five
cities.
A n im portant part of the reason for these differences in distribution
of expenditures is to be found in the price changes which h ave occurred
in the interval.

C o st of living indexes available for D e n v er, K a n sas

C ity , M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul, and St. L ou is 3 show th at in all of these
cities food costs at the tim e of the second stu dy were m u ch lower than
at the tim e of the first, and the cost of m iscellaneous item s w as very
m uch higher.

T h e cost of the other com pon ent parts of the fa m ily

budget had also changed considerably, the decrease in clothing being
m o st m arked in all four cities (see table 2 4 ).
T o secure goods which cost $ 1 ,5 0 0 at the tim e covered b y

the

1 9 1 7 -1 9 survey, it would h ave been necessary to spend at the tim e
1 Data for this study are published by the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Cost of
Living in the United States, Bull. No. 357. 1924. Data for Negro families in St. Louis are published in the
Monthly Labor Review for July 1919.
2 In the Tabular Summary, tables 21, 22, and 23 present income and expenditure data for 1934-36 for
families of the types studied in 1917-19. Data for Negroes in St. Louis are presented because Negroes were
studied in that city in 1918-1919.
3 Cost of living indexes are not available for Salt Lake City.

76




C H A N G IN G

L IV IN G

STA N D A R D S

IN

THE

P O ST -W A R

77

P E R IO D

covered b y the second survey $ 1 ,3 9 8 in M in n ea p olis-S t. Paul, where
the least difference in price level appears, b u t only $1,283 in K a n sas
C ity , where costs for the $ 1 ,2 0 0 to $ 1 ,5 0 0 group had declined m ore
than 14 percent.
F or a better com parison

betw een

the expenditures of the two

groups of fam ilies it is desirable to pu t them on a com m on basis b y
converting the dollar figures of the 1 9 1 7 -1 9 stu dy to values which
reflect the price levels which prevailed at the period covered b y the
survey in each city in 1 9 3 4 -3 6 .

F or exam ple, in D en v er food costs

were on the average 26.9 percent lower in the period of the second
survey than in the year ending N o v em b er 30, 1918.

In other words,

D en v er fam ilies were able to b u y for approxim ately $73 the sam e
foods for which they had paid $100 in the earlier period.

O n the

other hand, the average cost of m iscellaneous item s entering into the
fam ily budget was 2 3 .8 percent higher at the tim e of the second
survey in D en v er than at the tim e of the first, and it was necessary to
pay $ 1 2 3 .8 0 for the goods and services included in this category
which would h ave cost $100 in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 .

Since the price changes

which occurred betw een 1 9 1 7 -1 9 and 1 9 3 4 -3 6 in all the cities differed
greatly as betw een different types of consum ers’ goods, each typ e of
expenditure has been converted to the 1 9 3 4 -3 6 values w ith appro­
priate group index num bers calculated to show changes in costs to the
consum er of this type of goods betw een periods covered b y the two
studies.
T able 24.—

P ercentage change in the cost o f goods 'purchased b y wage earners and
clerical workers f r o m the tim e o f the 1 9 1 7 - 1 9 su rvey to the tim e o f the 1 9 8 4 - 8 6
su rvey 1
[White families]

City

Food

-2 6 .9
-2 6 .2
-1 5 .9
-2 1 .9

D enver___ _____ __ ______ ____________
Kansas City_______ ____ __ __ ------------Minneapolis-St. Paul_____
____
St. Louis _
_ _
_____

Clothing

-2 6 .1
-3 1 .1
-2 7 .5
-2 9 .7

HouseFuel and furnish­
light
ing goods

Rent

- 2 .7
-1 6 .2
- 8 .9
- 2 .2

-.3
- 1 .0
+23.6
+ 7 .8

Miscel­
laneous
+23.8
+19.6
+18.7
+24.8

- 8 .3
-2 6 .5
- 8 .3
- 7 .5

i The schedules taken in Denver cover the year ending Nov. 30, 1918; in Kansas City and St. Louis the
year ending Jan. 31, 1919: in Minneapolis-St. Paul, 22 were for the schedule year ending Sept. 30, 1918; 119
for the schedule year ending Oct. 31, 1918; and 100 for the schedule year ending Nov. 30,1918.

C om parin g
stu d y w ith

the d ata from

those from

the fam ilies covered in the

1 9 1 7 -1 9

fam ilies of similar com position studied in

1 9 3 4 -3 6 , one of the m o st striking facts is the generally higher level of
expenditure at the latter date as com pared w ith the form er.
K a n sa s C ity , the increase am ounted to m ore than 25 percent.

In

F rom

table 25, it is apparent th at when the figures on average expenditures
b y the w age earners and clerical workers studied in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 with
incom es from

$ 1 ,2 0 0

to

$ 1 ,5 0 0

have

been

converted

to

1 9 3 4 -3 6

dollars, the average for the fam ilies studied in 1 9 3 4 -3 6 is higher in




78

W ES T

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

all four cities than the average for the 1 9 1 7 -1 9 group on a com parable
basis.

T h e differences range from 13.8 percent in D en v er to 25.6

percent in K a n sas C ity .
These differences in expenditure are partly the result of differences
betw een the real incom es of the groups studied at the two periods.
In all four cities included in this discussion, the real incom es of the
groups covered in the second survey were larger than those studied in
the first.

T a b le 25 shows the differences which appear when the

incom es and expenditures of families with incom es from $ 1 ,2 0 0 to
$1,5 0 0 in the two surveys are converted to a com parable basis.
T

able

2 5 .— D ifferen ces in in co m es and current expen d itu res 1 between the groups
studied in 1 9 1 7 - 1 9 and 1 9 3 4 - 3 6 in 4 cities

[Wage earners and clerical workers with annual net incomes of $1,200 to $1,500, white families]

City

Income

Denver__________________________ _________________________ _______________ _____
Kansas City_____________________________ __________________ ________ ___________
Minneapolis-St. Paul___________ ________
_____ ____________ ________ ___________
St. Louis______ ______ __ _____________________________________ ___________________

Percent
+10.5
+18.0
+ 7 .1
+ 9 .9

Expendi­
ture
Percent
+13.8
+25.6
+14.4
+15.4

1 Both in terms of the 1934-36 price level.

In contrast w ith the situation found in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 when the fam ilies
w ith incom es betw een $ 1 ,2 0 0 and $ 1 ,5 0 0 studied in the four cities
reported n et savings in term s of 1 9 3 4 -3 6 dollars from $32 in D e n v er to
$61 in St. L ouis, fam ilies of com parable types as show n b y the present
investigation reported average net deficits of $8 in D en v er, $23 in
M in n ea p olis-S t. P aul, and $25 in K a n sas C ity .

A verage net savings of

$16 were reported in St. L ouis as contrasted w ith $61 in the earlier
stu dy.
A n analysis of the figures secured from the groups studied in D en v er
in the two periods will illustrate the typ e of changes in fam ily living
w hich h ave occurred in the interval betw een the investigations (see
table 2 6 ).

In the group studied in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 , fam ilies w ith incom es

betw een $ 1 ,2 0 0 and $ 1 ,5 0 0 expended $502, or 3 8 .2 percent, for food.
B ecau se of the decline in food prices, the sam e kinds and quantities of
food could h ave been purchased for $367 at the tim e of the second
investigation, b u t food h abits had changed to such an extent th at the
group studied in 1 9 3 4 -3 6 actually spent on the average $96 m ore than
this for food, $ 463, or 3 4.5 percent of their total current expenditures.
C lothin g prices also declined, and the average clothing expenditures of
the D en v er group studied in 1 9 3 4 -3 6 were $87 less than those of the
group studied in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 , b u t $32 less than the calculated 1 9 3 4 -3 6
cost of the clothing bou gh t in 1 9 1 7 -1 9 .

T h e cost of both housing and

fuel and light declined in the interval betw een the tw o surveys b u t the




C H A N G IN G

L IV IN G

S TA N D A R D S

IN

T H E

P O S T -W A R

P E R IO D

79

group studied in the second period is found to h ave spent 4 3 .2 percent
m ore for housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration com bined than the
calculated 1 9 3 4 -3 6 cost of similar group item s.

T h e cost of house-

furnishings declined between the two periods, b u t this group repre­
sented a larger percentage of the calculated total expenditures in
1 9 3 4 -3 6 .

Expenditures for m iscellaneous item s b y the 1 9 3 4 -3 6 group

were $12 greater than the calculated cost of the m iscellaneous item s
purchased b y the 1 9 1 7 -1 9 group, $355.

T h e percentage allotted to

m iscellaneous item s was less even though the expenditures for these
goods increased.
T

able

26. — D istrib u tio n o f current f a m i ly expen ditu res in 1 9 1 7 - 1 9 and 198J+-36

[Wage earners and clerical workers with annual net incomes of $1,200 to $1,500, white families]

Item

Families studied in 1917-19: 1
Number _____ _____________ ___

Denver

63

Kansas City

91

MinneapolisSt. Paul

101

St. Louis

87

Expenditures in 1917-19 dollars,2 Dollars Percent Dollars Percent Dollars Percent Dollars Percent
1,312
100.0
1,304
1,251
total_______ ____ ______ ______
100.0
1, 298
100.0
100.0
502
38.2
514
39.6
480
36.8
497
Food_______________________
39.7
176
14.1
Clothing ___ ___ _________
211
16.1
197
15. 2
204
15.6
18.4
19.5
242
Housing, fuel, and light- __
241
318
24.4
253
19.3
62
Furniture and furnishings.
72
4.7
5.5
61
56
4.3
5.0
274
Miscellaneous_____ ________
286
21.8
273
21.0
246
18.9
21.9
Expenditures in terms of 1934-36
1,154
100.0
1,110
100.0
1, 215
dollars,3 total_________ _______ 1,180
100.0
100.0
404
367
31.1
379
34.1
33.2
388
Food___________ . . . ___ __
33.6
13.2
12.2
Clothing
. __________ .
156
136
148
12.2
123
10.7
244
Housing, fuel, and light ___
236
20.0
223
20.1
319
26.3
21.2
66
52
57
Furniture and furnishings.__
5.6
45
4.1
4.3
4.9
342
355
29.5
292
Miscellaneous______________
327
30.1
24.0
29.6
Families studied in 1934-36 (types
comparable to those studied in
1917-19):
Number__________ ___

31

56

72

44

Expenditures in 1934-36 dollars.4 Dollars Percent Dollars Percent Dollars Percent Dollars Percent
1,394
1,332
total________________ ________
100.0
100.0
1, 390
100.0
1, 343
100.0
34. 5
474
463
34.0
471
509
38.2
Food__________ ________ __
33.9
124
114
9.2
138
9.9
118
8.5
8.6
Clothing. ___________ _____
Housing, fuel, and light 5___
338
25.2
294
21.1
358
25.8
287
21.5
3.8
74
5.3
74
55
4.1
Furniture and furnishings.. .
51
5.3
Miscellaneous____________ _
414
29.7
367
27.3
369
26.5
367
27.6
1 For dates to which data apply, see table 24, footnote 1, p. 77.
2 Data for 1917-19 based on figures published in Bureau of Labor Statistics Bull. 357, pp. 24, 37,44, and 58.
3 Data in terms of 1934-36 dollars were computed from original figures by means of percentage changes
in the cost of food, clothing, rent, fuel, and light, furniture and furnishings, and miscellaneous items from
the year of the earlier studies in each of the cities.
4 For detailed distribution of expenditures, see Tabular Summary, table 23.
5 Includes refrigeration.

A

com parison of the cost of the 1 9 1 7 -1 9 purchases in 1 9 3 4 -3 6

dollars, w ith the distribution of the actual purchases in 1 9 3 4 -3 6 , shows
a tendency toward larger purchases of food, sm aller purchases of
clothing, and larger current expenditures for housing, fuel, and light.
T h e decrease in proportion spent for clothing is very striking.

The

proportion of expenditures for both housefurnishing goods and m is­
cellaneous item s increased in two of the cities and decreased in the
other two.










Part II.— Negro Families

81




Chapter 1
Income Level and M oney Disbursements
F am ily Incom e

Schedules were obtained from Negro families in Kansas City, M o Kans., and in St. Louis, M o. These samples were chosen in the same
way as the samples for the white families in each city, and represent a
cross section of the families of employed Negro wage earners and
clerical workers in 1935-36.
The Negro families from whom data were secured cannot be re­
garded as representative of the total Negro population of wage
earners and clerical workers of each of the cities, since the Study did
not extend to families on relief. During the period of scheduling in
each of the two cities, the number of Negro families on relief reached
a peak in February 1935, when 3,500 Negro families in Kansas City
and 12,500 in St. Louis received such aid. A general idea of the pro­
portion of families excluded from the Study because of this factor
can be gained from a comparison of these figures with the number of
Negro families of two or more persons reported by the census of 1930
in each of these cities. The number of Negro families on relief in
February 1935 in Kansas City constituted 24.9 percent of the total
number of Negro families in Kansas City in 1930. The proportion on
relief in St. Louis in the high month was considerably higher, 62.0
percent of the number of Negro families in St. Louis in 1930.
Furthermore, it will be remembered that the plan of the Study
provided that no family be included which had an income of less than
$500, or in which no earner had been employed for a minimum of 36
weeks (see appendix D , pp. 347ff). These same criteria for inclusion
of Negro as of white families were followed, even though they resulted
in a Negro sample with incomes relatively higher than those of the
entire Negro population, in order that comparisons might be made
between the spending of comparable families of employed Negro and
employed white workers.
In the groups surveyed, family incomes 1 ranged from $540 to
$2,776 among the Kansas City Negro families, and from $607 to
$2,347 among the St. Louis families. The maximum income in the
Kansas City Negro group was achieved by a family having three fulli
Details of family income when families are classified by economic level are shown in the Tabular Sum­
mary, table 2, and when classified by income level, in the Tabular Summary, table 5.




83

84

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

time and one part-time earner. The husband was a janitor employed
by a railroad company, the son a presser with a cleaning company, a
daughter, a checker in a laundry, while another son was an elevator
operator in a hotel for half a year. The St. Louis Negro family with
the greatest income also had four earners, all of whom were the sons
of a widow who acted as the homemaker for the family. Tw o were
laborers in the building construction industry for half the year, one
Fig. 10.

SOURCES OF FAMILY INCOME AMONG WAGE EARNERS
AND LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
AT SUCCESSIVE INCOME LEVELS
ST. LOUIS, 1 9 3 5 - 1936
NEGRO FAM
ILIES
IN C O M E

CLASS

H U N D RED S OF D O LL A R S
0 ___________________ 5___________________ 10__________________ 15__________________ 2 0

ALL FAMILIES

$6 0 0 u c $900
io n
$ 900

UNDER

$1200

$1200

UNDER

$1500

$1500

UNDER

$1800

■

EARNINGS OF
CHIEF EARNER

K g

EARNINGS OF SUPPLEMENTARY EARNERS

P57I INCOME FROM
OTHER SOURCES

U S, BUREAU O F LABO R S T A T IS T IC S ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

was a plasterer for the sam e in dustry for 39 weeks, and the fou rth was
a porter w ith a retail grocery.
F a m ily incom es in the K a n sa s C ity and S t. L ouis groups averaged
abo u t $ 1 ,0 8 0 and $ 1 ,1 6 0 , respectively.

T o ascertain whether these

differences were inherent in random sam pling or w hether th ey re­
vealed actual differences betw een incom e levels of all workers in the
two cities, a statistical test 2 was conducted.

I t was found th at the

difference betw een these two averages is large enough to be considered
statistically

significant.

A

m u ch

greater

significance

was

found,

how ever, in the differences between the average incom es of the white
and N egro fam ilies w ithin the two cities.

M edian incomes were somewhat lower than the average in each of
these cities— that is, more than half of the families received incomes
less than the average for all families. This situation reflects the fact
that there were a few families with incomes much larger than those

2

R. A. Fisher’s method for the analysis of variance as exemplified in intraclass correlation (discussed on
pp. 226 and 227 of his Statistical Methods for Research Workers, 6th ed., London, 1936 (was used to test whether
the mean incomes obtained in the two cities differed more than could be expected if successive samples
had been drawn at random from the same population.




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

85

received by a great majority of the families studied. Table 27 shows
the average net money income, and the incomes below which onefourth, one-half, and three-fourths of the families fell.
T

able

2 7 . — F a m ily in com es am ong wage earners and low er-salaried clerical workers
in 1 year during the period 1 9 8 5 - 8 6
NEGRO FAM ILIES
Item

Number of families in survey

__

Kansas City

______ _

__________ _ __

_ __ ___

St. Louis

103

106

$1, 086
805
1, 019
1,296

Net money income:
Arithmetic average, _ __________ __________
___________ __ ____
__ _____
First quartile.
__ _ ____
_ ________ ___
Median
_ _
__ __ __
_ _
_____ __ _ _____
Third quartile _ _ _______ _________ ______ ______
_ _____________

$1, 162
909
1,114
1,371

As with white families, the chief source of family income was earn­
ings. The highest earnings reported for any one individual were
those of a Negro mechanic in public service in Kansas City of $2,080,
and by a Negro salesman, driver for a retail dairy in St. Louis of
$2,080.
T

able

2 8 . — Sou rces o f f a m i ly in co m e am ong wage earners and low er-salaried clerical
workers in 1 year during the period 1981+-86
NEGRO FAM ILIES

Income class

Num­
ber of
fami­
lies

Aver­
age net
money
income1

Average
number of
gainful
workers’
per
family 2

Percentage of income from—

Earnings
of chief
earner

Earnings
of supple­
mentary
earners 3

Other
sources4

K ansas C ity

All families----------------------------------------

103

$1, 086

1.42

87.7

11.4

0.9

Families with incomes of—
$500 to $600______________________
$600 to $900______________________
$900 to $1,200_____________________
$1,200 to $1,500___________________
$1,500 to $1,800___________________
$1,800 and over___
_ _ _ _ _ ___

6
25
40
21
6
5

562
751
1,034
1, 342
1, 573
2,172

1.00
1.28
1.42
1.52
1.67
1.80

97.5
97.1
90.5
85.9
76.9
70.3

2.1
2.8
9.1
14.2
23.2
21.3

.4
.1
.4
(5
)
(«)

8.4

St . L ouis

All families_________________________
Families with incomes of—
$600 7 to $900_____________________
$900 to $1,200_____________________
$1,200 to $1,500___________________
$1,500 and over _._
__ ________

106

$1,162

1.49

87.3

11.7

1.0

25
37
28
16

781
1, 029
1, 336
1, 762

1.28
1.57
1.50
1.63

93.7
87.6
86.6
83.0

4.8
11.6
11.5
16.9

1.5
.8
1.9
.1

1 Net family income is defined in appendix A, p. 319.
2 A gainful worker is defined as a person having had some gainful employment in business or industry at
any time during the year.
3 Including net earnings from boarders and lodgers.
4 Less business losses and expenses not deductible from earnings.
6
Income from other sources averaged $2, business losses and expenses not deductible from the earnings of
the current year $3.
6 Income from other sources averaged nothing and business losses and expenses not deductible from the
earnings of the current year $1.
7 No cases of families receiving less than $600 occurred in the sample.




86

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

The importance of earnings of supplementary earners in family
income was about the same for the Negro as for the white families
studied. From table 28 it is apparent that the percentage of total
income provided by earnings of the chief earner decreased with a rise
in total family income, while the percentage provided by supplemen­
tary earners increased markedly in all the income groups covered in
the two cities with one exception. Among Negro families with in­
comes of $1,800 and over in Kansas City, there was a slight drop in
the relative importance of the earnings of supplementary earners from
the preceding income level. The average number of persons reporting
employment at any time during the year 3 increased consistently from
low to high income levels, rising to 1.6 persons in St. Louis for the
$1,500 and over groups and 1.8 persons in Kansas City for families
with incomes over $1,800.
Com position o f fam ilies.
In Kansas City a little over half the Negro families studied were
composed of adults. In St. Louis the proportion was nearly twothirds. Nearly two-thirds of the adult families in Kansas City were
families of husband and wife only; in St. Louis the proportion was
slightly less than half.
C u rre n t E xpenditures o f Each C ity G rou p as a W h o le 4

As with the white families, the most important item of current ex­
penditure for the Negro families studied was food (see Tabular Sum­
mary, tables 3 and 6), which required in each of the two cities about
a third of total current expenditures. The average amount spent by
the N egro families for all items of current living was smaller than the
average amount spent for all items by the white families. Although
the Negro families studied were slightly smaller than the white fami­
lies in size, the percentage of the total spent for food was larger on
the average among the Negro group than among the white, as might
have been expected from the lower average total expenditures.
Housing, including fuel, light, and refrigeration, was the second largest
item of expenditure in each of the cities for N egro families as for white
families. Among the Negro families such expenditures accounted for
23.7 cents out of every dollar spent in Kansas City and 24.3 cents in
St. Louis.
Expenditures for clothing came next in importance in the disburse­
ments of these groups, accounting for 9.8 percent of the total in Kansas
City and 10.3 percent in St. Louis. The dollar figures are less than
the corresponding averages for white families, but the percentage
figures are very similar. While expenditures for recreation were the
next most important among Kansas City Negro families, furnishings
3
In the present investigation each person reported as having worked for pay at any time during the year
was counted as one gainful worker.
* Current expenditures are defined on p. 1 and 320 of this report.
-3




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

87

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

and equipment took fourth place among the expenditures of the St.
Louis families, each type of expenditure requiring about 5 cents out
of every dollar spent. In Kansas City medical care and expenditures
for transportation other than automobile, each accounted for 4.6 per­
cent of total expenditures, but in St. Louis automobile transportation
and other transportation accounted for 4.8 and 4.4 percent, respec­
tively. In each case the expenditure for auto transportation was
less than for white families. In each of the two cities personal care
expenditures accounted for about 2.3 percent of total expenditures,
a higher proportion than that among corresponding white families in
these cities.
D istrib u tio n o f E xpenditures at Successive Incom e L evels 5

For both the Negro families in Kansas City and in St. Louis as in­
comes increased, the percentage spent for food and housing (including
fuel, light, and refrigeration) declined. Percentages for clothing, fur­
nishings and equipment, transportation, and gifts to persons outside
the economic family, on the contrary, increased with a rise in income
level. The rise in percentages for clothing reflects the elasticity of
demand for this item which is characteristic of all the groups within
the income range covered in the investigation. Among the Kansas
City families the percentage spent for transportation increased four­
fold from the lowest income level to those having incomes of $1,500
and over. Among the St. Louis families such expenditures doubled
from the lowest to the highest income levels. Gifts and contributions
to individuals outside the family showed the most striking change
from low to high income levels, increasing sixteenfold in Kansas City
and fivefold in St. Louis.
F or the other groups of item s covered b y current fam ily expendi­
tures, no consistent trend from incom e level to incom e level appears,
largely because expenditures for these item s are n o t solely functions
of incom e b u t are prim arily affected b y the size and com position of
the fam ilies at the various incom e levels as well as b y the special cir­
cum stances of any given year.

In general, the percentages at each

incom e level spent for personal care fluctuate around the average for
all fam ilies of

2.4 in K a n sas C ity and 2.3 in St. L ouis.

Likew ise the

expenditures for com m u n ity welfare vary irregularly abou t the aver­
age for all fam ilies of

1.6 and 1.4, respectively.

A m o n g the N egro

fam ilies in K a n sa s C ity the relative expenditures for m edical care
tended to decrease while those for recreation increased.

C uriously

enough, how ever, in St. L ou is the tendency was for b oth types of
expenditures to decline w ith increase in incom e.

E xpenditures for

vocation and education were negligible at every level.
8 See Tabular Summary, table 6.
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------- 7




88

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

T a b l e 29 . — A v era g e a m ou n t sp en t p er expenditure u n it am on g w age earners and
low er-salaried clerical w orkers at successive in co m e levels f o r 1 ye a r d u rin g the
p eriod 1 9 S 5 —
S6
NEGR O FAM ILIES

Income level

Average
Num­
Average
size of
total ex­
ber of
family in
fami­
penditure
expenditure per family
lies
units

Average
Average
Average
amount
amount
Average
amount
spent for
spent for
amount
spent for all
food per clothing per spent for
food-ex­
clothing-ex­ other items items per
penditure penditure per person expenditure
unit
unit
unit

K a n sas C ity

$500 to $600.................
$600 to $900__________
$900 to $1,200________
$1,200 to $1,500______
$1,500 and over.

6
23
40
21
11

2.23
2. 57
3.46
2.96
3.35

$556
737
1,045
1,225
1,645

$109
113
113
146
152

$29
32
31
52
64

$112
141
156
214
269

$249
287
302
414
491

113
146
146
142

$26
37
57
61

147
160
235
245

$289
327
442
456

S t . L ouis

$600 to $9001________
$900 to $1,200________
$1,200 to $1,500______
$1,500 and over______
i

25
37
28
16

2.82
3.00
3.00
3. 90

814
981
1,326
1,777

No cases of families receiving less than $500 occurred in the sample.

From table 29 it is apparent that the economic level of the Negro
families studied, as determined from income and the size and composi­
tion of family combined, is similar in trend to that found for the
white families.
The amount of the family income and the number of persons in the
family are of almost equal importance in determining the way the in­
come is spent, and it is therefore important to understand the family
types which predominate at different income levels in the families
studied.

Size o f families.
The average number of persons per family was slightly smaller
among the Negro than among the white group in each of the two
cities studied. The average size of family among the Negro families
was 3.34 in Kansas City and 3.38 in St. Louis, which is larger than
the median size of family shown in the census of 1930 for all Negro
families of two persons or more of 2.66 in Kansas City and 2.89 in
St. Louis. Although the average size of Negro families on relief in
the peak month during the period of the investigation in St. Louis
was larger than for the families scheduled in that city, it was smaller
in Kansas City, a contrary trend to that noted for the white families.
The average size of the Negro families on relief during the period
under consideration was 3.2 in Kansas City, and 3.4 in St. Louis.
The average number of children under 16 years old in the Negro
families, as well as the average number of adults, is slightly smaller
than in the white families. The small average number of children




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

89

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

per family among families with incomes under $900 may reflect the
depression of families with large numbers of children at this income
level to relief status. The number of children per family is highly
variable from one income level to another; the highest average occurs
in St. Louis in the $1,500 and over income group, where there are on
the average 1.44 children per family. In Kansas City the average
size of family is 3.34 persons, both for the income groups under
$1,200 and for the groups above $1,200, but in St. Louis the corre­
sponding figures are 3.19 and 3.65.
Fig II.

SIZE OF FAMILY AMONG WAGE EARNERS
AND LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
AT SUCCESSIVE INCOME LEVELS
KANSAS CITY, 1 9 3 5 -1 9 3 6
NEGRO FAM
ILIES
INCOME CLASS

4

ALL FAMILIES

$600 w c* $900
io
$900 U O* $1200
N?
$1200 UNDER $15 0 0
$1500 uNo?ft$l800
$1800

u 8? $2IOO
n r

$2100 *n OVER
d
g a in f u l w o r k e r s

. S.

BUREAU OF LA B O R

OTHER PERSONS 16 YEARS EZZ3 PERSONS UNDER
OF AGE AND OVER
Y&A 16 YEARS OF AGE

S T A T IS T IC S

O rder o f E xpend itures at D ifferen t Econom ic L evels 6

Since the incomes and the number, age, sex, and occupation of the
persons dependent on the family funds of the Negro families studied
varied quite as much as did white families, the data secured from the
Negro families were also analyzed by economic level.7 The trends
noted for white families, i. e., increase in income and decrease in
family size, with rise in economic level, obtain for the Negro families
in both cities.
6 See Tabular Summary, table 3.
7 For a description of the methods of computing and the meaning of economic level, see pp. 25-29 and
376-382.




90

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

W ith a rise in economic level there appears in each city a striking
decline in the percentage of expenditure allotted to food and a decrease
in the percentage for housing (including fuel, light, and refrigeration).
In contrast to the trend noted when the families are classified ac­
cording to income level, the proportion of each dollar which is spent
for clothing remains almost constant with the progression from low
to high economic levels. The general tendency for the other groups
of items covered by current family expenditures is to increase with
improvement in the economic status of the family.
Interesting contrasts to the figures given in table 29 are presented
in table 30. The trends in the amounts spent per expenditure unit
when families are classified by economic level are remarkably different
for the same data when classified by income. The average expen­
diture for all items per expenditure unit increases fourfold from the
lowest to the highest economic level but only twofold from the lowest
to the highest income level.
T

30 . — A v era g e a m ou n t sp en t per expenditure u n it a m ong wage earners and
low er-salaried clerical w orkers at successive econom ic levels in 1 yea r d u rin g the
p eriod 1 9 3 4 —3 6
NEGRO FAMILIES

able

Amount spent per
expenditure unit

K

Under $200 ____ __
$200 to $300__________
$300 to $400__________
$400 to $500__________
$500 and over___

1
1
2
1

29

20
22

a n s a s

5.79
3.83
2.47
2.53

6
22
27

2.21

22
29

7.53
3.88
3. 08
2. 32
2.19

C

it y

$917
928
876
1,142
1,345

S

Under $200__________
$200 to $300__________
$300 to $400__________
$400 to $500__________
$500 and over .
_

Average
Average
Average
amount
amount
Average
amount
spent for
spent for
amount
spent for all
food per clothing per spent for
food ex­
clothing other items items per
penditure expenditure per person expenditure
unit
unit
unit

Average
Num­
Average
size of
ber of
total ex­
family in
fami­ expenditure penditure
per family
lies
units

t

. L

$74
95
136
153
189

$20
31
39
48
65

$64
117
179
249
352

$158
242
355
451
609

$69
109
131
154
198

$19
33
37
50
79

$57
115
175
242
384

$143
257
344
444

o u is

$1,078
998
1,061
1,030
1,463

668

A comparison of the rank order of the different group items of
expenditure at the lowest and at the highest economic levels among
the Negro families studied in Kansas City and in St. Louis, as shown
in table 31 reveals that about the same types of shifts in consumer
demand between the two levels occur for these families as for the
white families. The three items constituting the bulk of the ex­
penditures— food, clothing, and housing (including fuel, light, and
refrigeration)— do not change rank from the lowest to the highest level.
In comparing this table with the similar figures shown for white fam-




IN C O M E

LEVEL

AND

M ONEY

D IS B U E S E M E N T S

Fig. 12.

DISTRIBUTION OF FAMILY EXPENDITURES OF WAGE
EARNERS AND LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
AT TWO DIFFERENT ECONOMIC LEVELS
K A N S A S CITY, 1935- 1936
NEGRO
ITEM

U .S . B UREA U O F L A B O R




FAM ILIES

PERCENT OF TOTAL EXPENDITURE

S T A T IS T IC S

91

92

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

ilies, it should be remembered that variations in economic status are
greater for the white than for the Negro group. The highest economic
level at which any considerable number of white families were found
was that at which $600 to $700 was spent per expenditure unit, while
for the Negroes there were very few families spending more than
$500 to $600.
The greatest shift in rank order occurs in gifts and contributions
which moves from thirteenth to fourth place in Kansas City, and
from fourteenth to sixth place in St. Louis. Contrary to the rise in
rank of recreation expenditures of white families, such expenditures
show a slight drop among the Kansas City Negro families and a
striking one in St. Louis. Expenditures for furnishings and equip­
ment, and for automobile transportation move up from eleventh to
fifth and from thirteenth to fourth place, respectively, in St. Louis,
but show a contrary trend in Kansas City where they drop from
seventh to eighth and from sixth to tenth.
T

able

31. — Expenditures of wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers in
rank order at different economic levels
NEGRO FAM ILIES, 1935-36
Kansas City

Group expenditure item

Economic level— Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
$100 to
$200

Number of families____________ __ __ ___ ____________ ______
___ _______________ ______ _____ ___ _____ __
Food
Housing, including fuel, light, and refrigeration_____ _____
C lothing.________________________ _______ _______ ____ ____ _
Other household operation______________ ___ ________
__ _ _
Furnishings and equipment.. _ ________ _ __ __ __________
Transportation, auto__________ ___ ________________ _ ______
Transportation, other. __ ____________ ____ ____ __ _______ _
Personal care___ _____ ______ __ ______ __ ____ . ________
Medical care_______________ _____ _____________
_________
Recreation_________ _________ ____________ . . . . . _ _. _ _
Education ____________________ _______________ . __________
Vocation
_______ __ ____ __ ._ ___ _ . . . ___ ____ ___ __
Community welfare____ ____ ____ ___________ _____________ .
Gifts and contributions ____ ________ ________ _________
_.
Other items.______ ___________________________ _____ ________

St. Louis

$500 and
over

11
1
2
3
8
7
6
9
10
4
5
12
14
11
13
15

22
1
2
3
7
8
10
9
11
5
6
15
14
12
4
13

$100 to
$200
6
1
2
3
6
11
13
5
7
8
4
12
10
9
14
15

$500 and
over
29
1
2
3
9
5
4
8
11
7
10
14
13
12
6
15

Changes in Assets and Liabilities 8

Over 60 percent of the Negro families studied in Kansas City and
in St. Louis reported net surpluses for the year covered by the schedule.
B ut 36 percent of the families in Kansas City and 28 percent in St.
Louis were able to meet all the demands for family living only by
drawing on assets accumulated prior to the year covered by the sched1 See footnote 11, p. 33.




IN C O M E

LE V E L

AN D

M O N E Y

93

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

ule or b y borrowing during the schedule y e a r ; the average deficit per
fa m ily havin g a deficit was $79 in K a n sas C ity and $204 in S t. L o u is.9
(For a definition of surplus and deficit, see pp. 3 2 1 -3 2 2 .)

A sm all pro­

portion of the fam ilies in each city reported incom es ju st balancing
current expenditures,

W h e n all fam ilies in each sam ple are grouped

together there resulted a n et surplus of $50 in K a n sa s C ity and of $20
in St. L ouis.
T able 32.— Percentage of fam ilies of wage earners and lower-salaried clerical workers
having surplus and, deficit and net change in assets and liabilities during the
schedule year at successive economic levels, 1 9 3 5 -3 6
NEGRO FAM ILIES

City and economic level

Num­
ber of
fami­
lies

Percentage of
families hav­
ing—

Average amount of—

Net change
in assets and
liabilities for
all families

Surplus per
family hav­
ing surplus

Deficit per
family hav­
ing deficit

D o lla r s

Net
Net
surplus deficit

D o lla r s

D o lla r s

K A N S A S C IT Y , M O .- K A N S .

All families________________________
Families spending per expenditure
unit per year:
Under $300____________________
$300 to $400____________________
$400 and over____ _____ _____

103

61.2

35.9

+50

128

79

32
29
42

53.1
72.4
59.5

40.6
27.6
38.1

+2
+63
+77

88
100
178

111
33
75

106

70.8

28.3

+20

110

204

28
27
51

85.7
66.7
64.7

14.3
33.3
33.3

+73
-1 2
+1

124
70
121

236
177
210

S T . L O U IS . M O .

All families___________ _ ______ _
Families spending per expenditure
unit per year:
Under $300_____________________
$300 to $400____________________
$400 and over______
___ _____

The general pattern noted for white families of large average net
deficits at the lowest income level, decreasing progressively at higher
income levels until the turning point is reached, after which at each
successive income level there is an average surplus for all families,
is not so clear for Negro families. This difference is due in part to the
smaller number of cases, and hence the greater influence of a few
families having very large surpluses or deficits, and in part apparently
to a difference in the consumption habits of the two groups. Although
the two Negro groups had incomes lower both in actual dollars and in
relation to the persons dependent on them than the white groups
studied simultaneously in Kansas City and St. Louis, they showed a
smaller proportion of families increasing their liabilities during the
years and larger relative savings. In Kansas City there was an
9
The figures just cited have been computed from the families’ own statements about changes in their
assets and liabilities and do not represent a balancing difference between reported incomes and reported
current expenditures. (See appendix A, p. 322.) Most families were not able to present a statement of total
receipts and total disbursements which balanced exactly. No schedule was accepted for use from a family
which could not supply a statement of total receipts and total disbursements which balanced within 5
percent.




94

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

average net surplus at every income level. (See Tabular Summary,
table 5.) The size of this surplus increased at the higher income levels.
In St. Louis, however, an average net deficit was found at the lowest
and at the highest income levels distinguished for that city. The two
intermediate groups both showed average net surpluses. The deficit
at the highest income level was caused by unusually heavy indebted­
nesses incurred for doctors’ and grocers’ bills by a few families.
When families are classified by economic level (as shown in detail
in the Tabular Summary, table 2) even greater irregularities in trend
are found. Again the Negro families as exemplified by the samples
in Kansas City and in St. Louis do not follow the pattern found among
the white families, i. e., the general tendency for the net change in
assets and liabilities to be positive (an average surplus for all families)
at the lower economic levels, and negative (an average deficit for all
families) at higher economic levels. From table 32 it can be seen
that when all Negro families in Kansas City are grouped into three
economic levels there is, at each level, a net surplus which increases
in size with rise in economic level. In St. Louis when families are
similarly classified there is found to be an average surplus for all
families at the lowest level, an average deficit at the intermediate
level, and a very small surplus at the highest.
An analysis of the changes in assets and in liabilities, as shown in
table 33, reveals that the greater reductions in assets and increases
in liabilities tend to occur at the higher economic levels. This is due
to an important degree to the borrowing power of the families classified
at these levels and their confidence in incurring obligations and to the
rising tide of installment-buying characteristic of the years following
the depression of 1933. For families both in Kansas City and St.
Louis increases in amounts due on goods purchased on the installment
plan assume a larger proportion of the total increase in liabilities with
rise in the expenditure level of families. In Kansas City increases in
sums owed for goods purchased on the installment plan amount to 26
percent of increases in all liabilities at low income levels and 51 percent
at the highest. Comparable percentages for St. Louis Negro families
are 24 and 51. A comparison of the average increase in liabilities for
goods purchased on installment plan with decreases reported by fam­
ilies having smaller amounts outstanding at the end of the year than
at the beginning on goods purchased by this plan, shows that in both
cities total obligations incurred during the year were considerably
larger than those paid off.




IN C O M E

T

L E V E L

AN D

M O N E Y

95

D IS B U R S E M E N T S

33.— Changes in assets and liabilities among wage earners and lower-salaried
clerical workers during the schedule year at successive economic levels over the year
covered by the schedules, 1 9 8 5 -8 6

able

NEGRO FAM ILIES

City and economic level

Aver­
Num­
age
ber of increase
families
in
assets 1

Average de­
crease in
Aver­ amounts due on
age de­ goods purchased
on the install­
crease
ment plan 1
in total
liabil­
ities 1
Auto­ Other
mobiles goods

Aver­
age de­
crease
in
assets 1

Aver­
age
increase
in total
liabil­
ities 1

Average increase
in amounts due
on goods pur­
chased on the
installment
plan 1
Auto­ Other
mobiles goods

K A N S A S CITY, M O .-K A N S .

All families________________
Families spending per ex­
penditure unit per year:
Under $300____________
$300-$400_______________
$400 and over, _ _______

103

$83

$50

$3

$10

$29

$54

$4

$23

32
29
42

72
80
94

26
15
92

5
0
3

7
8
14

31
3
45

65
29
64

0
0
9

17
15
33

106

85

21

0

12

12

73

21

30

28
27
51

86
62
96

42
15
13

0
0
0

25
1
12

9
5
18

46
84
82

0
28
29

11
27
42

ST. LOUIS, M O.

All families________________
Families spending per expenditur unit per year:
Under $300------ ---------$300-$400_______________
$400 and over..______ __

1 Averages computed by dividing the total number of families at each expenditure level into the aggre­
gate increases or decreases of the families reporting such increases or decreases.




Chapter 2
Expenditures for Specified Goods
Food

A n n u a l fo o d expenditures.
Average food expenditures per family for the Negro families in
Kansas City and St. Louis declined consistently in relation to total cur­
rent expenditures with rise in economic level.1 The average actual
dollar expenditures per family increased in Kansas City and average
dollar expenditures per food expenditure unit increased considerably
from one economic level to another in both cities. Average dollar
expenditures per family for food prepared at home (including food for
lunches prepared at home and carried to work and to school) showed a
decrease from the low to the high level in both cities. The percentage
of decrease differs sharply between the two cities, being 4.1 percent in
Kansas City, where the average annual expenditure at the low level
was $346, and 15.8 percent in St. Louis, where the average annual
expenditure at the low level was $395.
Conversely, actual dollar expenditures for food bought and eaten
away from home increased considerably from the low to the high level
in both cities. In Kansas City expenditures for food bought and eaten
away from home increased 194 percent, and in St. Louis, 82 percent.
Of each dollar spent for food at the low economic level in both cities
between four and five cents was used to purchase meals away from
home. A t the high level the Negro families in Kansas City spent
about 13 cents of each food dollar for meals bought and eaten away
from home, while in St. Louis, 10 cents was used for this purpose.
Expenditures for meals at work increased from the low to the high
level more rapidly than did total expenditures for food away from
home. N o family in either city reported payment for board at school.
As in the case of the white families studied, the number of food
expenditure units2 per Negro family decreased markedly from the low
to the high economic level. When total food expenditures are divided
by the number of food expenditure units the result gives striking evi1 For each of the tables showing details of expenditures as many economic levels have been shown as the
number of cases in each city and the types of the data for each particular table would allow. For food
expenditures for Negro families in Kansas City and St. Louis the levels are as follows: Low, under $300;
intermediate, $300 to $400; high, $400 and over. See Tabular Summary, table 8.
2 Food expenditure units are computed from scales based on the estimated cost of customary food con­
sumption during the period of the survey. (See appendix G, p. 376.)

96




EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

97

Fig. 13.

FOOD EXPENDITURES OF WAGE EARNERS AND
LOWER-SALARIED CLERICAL WORKERS
AT SUCCESSIVE ECONOMIC LEVELS
SPRING QUARTER
ST. LOUIS, 1 9 3 5 -1 9 3 6
NEGRO FAMILIES

SUGAR
AND SW EETS

E C O N O M IC L E V E L
(ANNUAL AMOUNT SPENT
PER EXPENDITURE UNIT )
UNOER
$300
$400

M ISCELLANEOUS

U. S. B U R EA U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S




unocr

$300
$ 40 0
OVER

98

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

dence of the change in food consumption from one level to another.
(See table 34.)
T

34 . — Expenditures for food per food expenditure unit among wage earners
and lower-salaried clerical workers at low and high economic levels, 1935—
86

able

NEGRO FAM ILIES
Total expenditure per
food expenditure unit
City

Kansas City____________
_________ ___ __________ _
St. Louis
________________________ _____ _________

Number of
families in
survey

Low
economic
level

103
106

$86
94

High
economic
level
$171
178

Percentage
change

98.8
89.4

Food expenditures in 1 wee\ in spring qu arter.

Data on 194 separate foods purchased and consumed during one
typical week in the spring quarter 3in the two cities of the West North
Central-Mountain region where Negro families were studied show
that not only is there a marked increase in the average expenditure
for food per capita with rise in economic level among these families,
but also that the types and quantities of foods are different at the
various levels. The figures on the details of food purchases have
been summarized to show average purchases by families at three
different economic levels. The types of food purchased by the
Negro families in the two cities show striking similarities.
A comparison of the amounts spent for food per capita per week 4
by families at the three expenditure levels shows the total at the
highest expenditure level to be approximately twice that at the lowest
level. At both the low and high levels in the two cities these Negro
families devoted a smaller proportion of their total food expenditures
to grain and milk products, and a larger proportion to meat and
miscellaneous foods.
In part, the very small expenditure for milk products by the group
at the high economic level is due to the relatively small number
of children in this group. In part, however, it seems to be due to a
general tendency among the Negro families not to consume as much
milk as the white families. In the two groups spending from $400
to $600 per expenditure unit among the white families, the average
amount of milk purchased per capita per week was about 6 pounds
(converting condensed and evaporated to equivalent pounds of whole
milk) and among the Negro families spending $400 and over slightly
over 4 pounds on the same basis.
3 See footnote 3, p. 41, and Tabular Summary, table 7.
4 Expenditures for specific foods are presented per capita rather than per food expenditure unit, because
of differences in needs for, and customary consumption of, different foods. For example, children usually
drink more than twice as much milk as adults, but children’s food costs about half that of adults when the
children are less than 6 years old. See footnote 5, p. 42.




99

EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

T a b l e 35 . — Per capita expenditures for food among wage earners and lower-salaried

clerical workers
NEGRO FAM ILIES, 1935-36
Average per capita expend­
iture in 1 week in the
spring quarter in—

Item

Kansas City

St. Louis

Number of families furnishing data on food purchased in spring quarter.

6
8

106

Total expenditure for:
All foods__________________________________________________________

$2. 09

$2. 32

Grain products___________________________________________________
Eggs----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream___________________________________________
Butter and cream_________________________________________________
Other fats-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Meat, poultry, fish, and other sea food____________________________
Vegetables and fruits_____________________________________________
Sugars and sweets________________________________________________
Miscellaneous foods______________________________________________
Sales tax____: __________ ____ _______________________ ____ ________

.33
. 11
. 18
. 10
.26
.49
.37

.11

. 13

.01

.36
. 11

.22
. 11
.28
.59
.40
. 10
. 13

.02

Percentage
Total expenditure for:
All foods_____________________________

100.0

100.0

Grain products__________ .____________
Eggs--------------------------------------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream_______________
Butter and cream____________________
Other fats------------------------------------------Meat, poultry, fish, and other sea food
Vegetables and fruits_________________
Sugars and sweets____________________
Miscellaneous foods__________________
Sales tax_____________________________

15.8
5, 3
8.6
4.8
12.4
23.4
17.7
5.3
6.2
.5

15.5
4.7
9.5
4.7
12.1
25.5
17.2
4.3
5.6
.9

T

3 6 .— Proportion of fam ilies of wage earners and lower-salaried clerical
workers spending enough to purchase an adequate diet at m inim um cost, at suc­
cessive economic levels, 1985—
36

able

NEGRO FAMILIES

Economic level
'

Percentage of
families spend­
ing enough per
Number of adequate food
families
cost unit to
studied
purchase an
adequate diet
at minimum
cost i

K A N S A S C IT Y

All families
„ .
Families spending per expenditure unit per year:
Under $300
__ _____________________________
$300 to $400.._____ ___________________________________ ________ ________
.1 4 0 and over.
50
.
__ _ ___ ___________

103

37.9

32
29
42

0
34.5
69.0

106

46.2

28
27
51

10.7
29.6
74.5

S T . L O U IS

All families.
_ _ ___ __ .
Families spending per expenditure unit per year:
Under $300 ___
_
_ __________________________________________
$300 to $400 .................... .................................................. , . ..............................
$400 and over... . .................... ...................... .................... .............................

i Based on the adequate diet at minimum cost of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Home
Economics. The cost of this diet per adequate food cost unit in Kansas City was $125.48 and in St. Louis
$125.68 during the period of the investigation.




100

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

Fig. 14.

PROPORTION OF FAMILIES SPENDING ENOUGH TO
PURCHASE AN ADEQUATE DIET AT MINIMUM COST
AT SUCCESSIVE ECONOMIC LEVELS
1935-1936
NE6R0 FAMILIES
ECONOMIC L E V E L S
(AMOUNT SPENT PER
EXPENDITURE UNIT)

KANSAS CITY
PERCENT
0

20

40

0

20

40

60

80

100

80

100

ALL FAMILIES

UNDER

$4 0 0

$ 4 0 0 uno $600
m
$600

ad
n

OVER

ST. LOUIS
PERCENT

60

ALL FAMILIES

UNDER

$400

$400 UNDER $600
$600

AND

OVER
N O T E - The A d e q u a te D ie t A t M in im u m Cost o f th e U n ite d S ta te s B u re a u o f H o m e
E co n o m ics Was U s e d a s th e B a s is fo r th ese C om putations

U. S. B U R E A U O F

LABOR

STATISTICS

An estimate of the proportion of families at each of the three
economic levels spending enough to buy an adequate diet shows a
striking progression from the families at the low economic level to
those at the high. For Kansas City, the proportion rises from no
families at the low level, to 34.5 percent at the intermediate level
and 69.0 percent at the high level. In St. Louis, 10.7 percent of the
families at the low level, 29.6 percent at the intermediate level, and
74.5 percent at the high level spent enough to purchase an adequate
diet. For the purposes of this estimate the size of each family was
measured in adequate-food-cost units based on the United States
Bureau of Home Economics’ adequate diet at minimum cost,6 and
average food expenditures per adequate-food-cost unit were also
calculated for each family. These expenditures were compared with
the calculated cost of this same diet for a man at moderate work,
5
See Stiebeling, H. K ., and Ward, M . M .: Diets at Four Levels of Nutritive Content and Cost.
Department of Agriculture, Circular No. 296, Washington, 1933.




U. S.

EXPENDITURES FOR SPECIFIED GOODS

101

which was taken as a unit in the adequate-food-cost scale. The prices
used in this calculation were the average prices collected by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics for its food cost indexes. (See pp. 44-46
for discussion of the significance and limitations of this method.)
H ousing
H ousing facilities.

Home owners, who constituted 36 percent of the Negro families
studied in Kansas City and 14 percent in St. Louis, more frequently
lived in one-family dwellings and had larger homes than did renters.
The average number of rooms per home-owning family was slightly
more than five, while families who rented houses had about 5 rooms in
Kansas City but only 3.2 rooms in St. Louis. Families who rented
apartments with heat not included in rent lived in about 3.5 rooms in
St. Louis and nearly 4 in Kansas City. Apartments which included
heat in the rental payment averaged about two rooms in St. Louis
and three rooms in Kansas City.
From table 37 it is apparent that the number of persons per room is
greater among families living in multiple dwelling units than among
home owners and among renters of houses. A more striking fact
shown in this table is the consistent downward trend in the number
of persons per room with rise in economic level. In both cities
families spending less than $300 per expenditure unit for all items and
living in apartments where heat was not furnished were subject to
considerable crowding, but for each class of dwellings in both cities
the average number of persons per room was 1.15 or less when there was
$300 or more spent per expenditure unit. The relatively high stand­
ard of most of these families in regard to the minimum necessary space
is not to be taken as indicating the condition of all Negro families
in these two cities, since it must be remembered that the sample is a
cross section of only employed wage earners and clerical workers who
at no time during the schedule year had received relief.
As with the white families home owners surpassed renters in the
proportion of families having garden space. Sixty percent of the
home owners in Kansas City and 20 percent in St. Louis had in con­
nection with their homes space suitable for gardening, whereas the
corresponding figures for renters were 29 percent and 8 percent.
Only 21 of the 103 Negro families studied in Kansas City and 14 of
the 106 Negro families studied in St. Louis reported the presence of
garages in connection with their homes. In each city the larger pro­
portion of families having this facility were home owners.
Sixty-one percent of the renters and 54 percent of the home owners
among Negro families in Kansas City and 79 percent of the renters
and 67 percent of the home owners in St. Louis lived in dwellings with­
out one or all of the following facilities: Inside flush toilets, running




102

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

h ot w ater, electric lights, and gas or electricity for cooking.

F rom

table 38 which shows the percentage of fam ilies h avin g various facili­
ties as central heating, telephone, etc., it is apparent th at the hom e
owners lived in relatively m ore com fortable dwellings than did renters.
E v e n so, a lm ost a half of the h om e owners in K a n sas C ity and abou t
20 percent in St. L ouis did n o t h ave access to inside flush toilets.
T w e n ty -six percent of the renters and abou t 8 percent o f the h om e
owners in K a n sa s C ity shared the use of the toilet w ith other fam ilies,
as com pared w ith 32 percent o f the renters and 13 percent of the h om e
owners in St. Louis.
T able

37 .— Number of persons per room among wage earners and lower-salaried
clerical workers at successive economic levels
NEGR O FAM ILIES, 1935-36
Economic level— Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Item

All families
Under $300

KANSAS C
ITY
Home owners:
Number of families________________________________
Average number of persons per room____________ _
Renters of houses:
Number of fa m ilie s ___________________________ _
Average number of persons per room______________
Renters of heated apartments:
Number of families____________________ ________ _
Average number of persons per ro o m .____________
Renters of unheated apartments:
Number of families_____ _________________________
Average number of persons per room______________
ST. LOUIS
Home owners:
Number of families________________ _ _ . ________
Average number of persons per room___________
Renters of houses:
Number of families ---------------------------------------------Average number of persons per room.. ____ ___
Renters of heated apartments:
Number of families_________ _____ ___________ . . .
Average number of persons per room i____________
Renters of unheated apartments:
Number of families________ _____ __ _______ ____
Average number of persons per room_____ ____ _ _

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

37
0. 63

10
0.90

10
0. 59

17
0.49

30
0.70

12
0.95

8
0.58

10
0.50

12
1.00

0
0

5
1. 00

7
1.00

24
0.96

10
1. 30

6
0. 73

8
0.66

15
0. 67

5
0. 77

4
0. 75

6
0.53

16
1.11

4
1.69

5
1.15

7
0.74

5

0

0

5

70
0.99

19
1.53

18
0.96

33
0.69

1 Figures not presented because of small number of families in this classification.

In table 9 of the T a b u la r S um m ary the data on housing facilities
are presented in greater detail, including a break-dow n according to
econom ic level.




E X P E N D IT U R E S
T

able

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

103

GOODS

38.— Housing facilities of wage earners and lower salaried clerical workers
NEGRO FAM ILIES
Item

Kansas City

Number of families in survey who owned principal home at end of schedule
year_____ _____
_____ __
Percentage of owners having—
Central heat__________ _______________ ___________________ _______
__
_____________ ____________
Gas or electricity for cooking___ ______ _
Electric refrigerator______ —________________ _______ __________________
____________ _______ _
_ _ __ ____ ___ ___
Running hot water___ __
Bathroom_____________________________________________________________
Inside flush toilet_________ __ ___________ __ ______________ ________
Sole use of toilet. _____________ ________ _______________________ _____
Telephone—. .
________ _______ _________________ ______
______
Garage______ ________ _____ __________________________________________
Garden space..______________ ______ _______ ______ __________________
Each of the following items: Inside flush toilet, running hot water, elec­
tric lights, and gas or electricity for cooking_________ _____________
__
Number of families in survey who rented principal home at end of schedule
year____________________ ________ ______ _____________ __________ _____
Percentage of renters having—
Central heat_______ __________ _____ ______ _________ ___________ _____
Gas or electricity for cookiner__________ _______ __________________ _____
Electric refrigerator._____ ________________________ ___ __________ __
Running hot water__ __ ______ ____________________________ ______ ___
Bathroom____ ____ __________ __________ _ _____________ _______
Inside flush toilet___________ _______________________________ _ _______
Sole use of toilet________ ___ ______ ___ _______________________ ______
Telephone_______________________ _____ ____ __________ ____ __
______
Garage_____________________________________ __________________ ______
Garden space__________________________________________________________
Each of the following items: Inside flush toilet, running hot water, elec­
tric lights, and gas or electricity for cooking_________ _______________

St. Louis

37

15

59.5
70.3
18.9
48.6
51.4
51.4
91.9
62.2
40.5
59.5

33.3
60.0
26.7
40.0
66.7
80.0
86.7
53.3
46.7
20.0

45.9

33.3

66

91

28.8
63.6
12.1
47.0
69.7
69.7
74.2
15.2
9.1
28.8

24.2
59.3
15.4
26.4
60.4
73. 6
68.1
12.1
7. 7
7.7

39.4

20.9

H ousing expenditures.
I f the N egro fam ilies are classified according to econom ic level the
sam e trend n oted for w hite fam ilies, i. e., a decline in the proportion
of total expenditures devoted to housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration
com bined, w ith increase in econom ic level, appears.

T h is is partly

due to the relatively large percentage of expenditures going to this
group of item s at the low est econom ic level and the urgency of other
needs n ot m et at all, and partly to the sm aller size of the fam ilies at
the higher econom ic lev els.6

(F o r further details see table 10 in the

T ab u la r S u m m a ry .)

Home owners.— A m o n g N egro hom e owners, average current ex­
penditures for housing only are abou t $50 less than for white fam ilies
in K a n sas C ity and St. L ou is.

(See table 3 9 .)

O f the item s included

in total current housing expenditures, taxes, interest on m ortgages,
and repairs and replacem ents account for abou t 90 percent of the total
housing expenditures, which average $100 in K a n sas C ity and $123
in St. L ou is.

D u e to the sm all num ber of cases the trend in the cur­

rent housing expenditures w ith increase in econom ic level is extrem ely
irregular.
6
For each of the tables showing details of expenditure as many economic levels have been shown as the
number of cases and the type of data for each particular table would allow. In the analysis of expenditures
the Negro families have been classified at three levels according to the amount spent per expenditure unit as
follows: Low, under $300; intermediate, $300 to $400; high, $400 and over.
5 3 9 5 7 ° _ 3 9 -----------8




104

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

O n the average these N egro fam ilies were able to in vest abou t $54
in their own h om es in K a n sa s C ity and abou t $26 in S t. Louis.

A gain

no consistent trend w ith increase in econom ic level is discernible.
T

able

39 . — Housing expenditures among wage earners and lower-salaried clerical
workers in 1 year during the period 1 9 3 5 -3 6
NEGRO FAM ILIES
Item

Kansas City

St. Louis

H o m e o w n e r s f o r 1 2 m o n th s

Number of families_______________________________
__ __
Average current expenditure_______________________________________________
Average amount invested during year in owned home_____ ____________
Average annual rental value____ ______________________ _______ _ ________
Average imputed income from equity in owned home______________________

37
$100
$54
$197
$97

15
$123
$26
$298
$175

30
$13

16
$15

R en ter s o f h ou ses fo r 1 2 m o n th s

Number of families________________________________
____________ _____
Average monthly rental rate paid__________________________________________
R e n t e r s o f a p a r t m e n t s f o r 1 2 m o n t h s w i t h h ea t i n c l u d e d i n r e n t

Number of families_____ ____ ____
___ ______ __ _____ ______________
_
Average monthly rental rate paid--------------- -----------------------------------------------

12
$19

5

(9

R e n t e r s o f a p a r t m e n t s f o r 1 2 m o n t h s w i t h h ea t n o t i n c l u d e d i n r e n t

Number of families.______ __________
_____ _______
_ __ __ ______ __
Average monthly rental rate paid— ----- -------------------------------------------------------

24
$11

70
$15

103
1

106
1

$10

$6

S e c o n d a r y h o u sin g

Number of families in survey______________________________________________
Number of families spending for rent on vacation or trip___ ______ ________
Average expenditure for rent on vacation or trip per family making such ex­
penditure____ ________________ ___
___ ____
____ _________
________
i Figures not presented because of small number of families in this classification.

Renters.— E v e n for apartm ents w ith h eat included in rent the
average rental rate per m o n th was less than $ 20.

(See table 3 9 .)

In

general there is a tendency for the average m o n th ly rent paid to in­
crease w ith rise in econom ic lev el, w hich can be seen in table 10 of the
T a b u la r S u m m a ry .

Secondary housing.— L ike the white fam ilies studied in this region,
none of the N eg ro fam ilies studied owned a vacation h om e.

One

fa m ily each in K a n sas C ity and in S t. L ou is paid rent on a vacation
or a trip, w ith an average expenditure of $10 and $6, respectively.
One fam ily in St. L ou is paid rent of $240 for a child at school.

Expenditures jo r fu el , lightf and refrigeration.— Expenditu res for
fuel, ligh t, and refrigeration were h eaviest in winter and fall, with
p ractically no expenditures for coal in spring and sum m er.

In table

11 of the T a b u la r S u m m a ry detailed inform ation is presented on ex­
penditures for electricity, anthracite, bitum inous coal, coke, briquets,
w ood, fuel oil, gas, kerosene, gasoline n o t used for autom obiles, and
ice.

Since the actual a m ou n t paid for fuel, light, and refrigeration

depends to a large extent on whether a house or an apartm en t is in­
volv ed and on whether the rent paid the landlord includes heat, data
are presented separately for fam ilies in four separate categories as well
as in the form of averages for all fam ilies.




A

com parison of the

E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

105

GOODS

figures for K a n sas C ity and for S t. Lours reveals no distinct differences
betw een the spending h ab its of the tw o in regard to fuel, ligh t, and
refrigeration.

Expenditures fo r other items of household operation .— Item s of house­
hold operation other than fuel, ligh t, and refrigeration include water
rent, telephone, dom estic service, laundry sent out, laundry soap and
cleaning supplies, and other m iscellaneous item s.

Expenditures for

these item s as show n in table 12 of the T ab u la r S um m ary increased
m arkedly from low to high econom ic levels.

L au n dry sent ou t and

telephone expenditures increased m an y fo ld from

the low est to the

highest econom ic levels as did such expenditures b y white fam ilies.
O n ly one fa m ily at the highest economic level in K a n sas C ity h ad
expenditures for p art-tim e dom estic service and no fam ily had an
expenditure for fu ll-tim e dom estic service.

In S t. L ou is no fa m ily

reported an expenditure for dom estic service of any kind.

F u rn ishin gs and E quipm ent 7
E xpenditures for furnishings and equipm ent, w hich were greatest
for suites of furniture, electric refrigerators, ice boxes, stoves and
ranges, carpet and rugs, and m iscellaneous equipm ent, varied signifi­
cantly w ith econom ic lev el.8

A t the low est level $ 3 2 .9 8 was spent

for this group of item s, whereas fam ilies at the highest level spent
$ 6 3 .3 4 .
T h e goods purchased at different levels varied n ot only in kind b u t
in q u a n tity .

T h e articles purchased b y the largest proportion of

fam ilies at the low est econom ic level were fu ndam entals of household
equipm en t: broom s, brushes, and m ops, electric ligh t b ulbs, stoves
and ranges (other th an electric), tubs, boards and wringers, sheets,
blankets,

and

pillow cases.

F am ilies at the highest level b ou g h t

curtains and draperies relatively m ore frequen tly than did fam ilies at
the low est level.

T h e sam e was true for p ots, pans, and cu tlery ;

w indow shades, wire screens, and aw nings; upholstered chairs; electric
refrigerators; la m p s; felt-b ase floor coverings; and carpets and rugs.
O f the various groups of item s com ing under the general head of
furnishings and equipm en t, those for electrical equipm en t increased
m o st m ark ed ly from low to high econom ic levels, as indicated in
table 40 .
A fte r electric ligh t bulbs, the m o st frequen tly purchased item s of
electrical equipm en t at the low est econom ic level were irons, pur­
chased b y three fam ilies.
irons,

eight

fam ilies

A t the highest level nine fam ilies purchased

purchased

electric

refrigerators,

and

eight

fam ilies, lam p s.
7 Because of the high variability characteristic of expenditures for furnishings and equipment (see
pp. 20-22) figures on expenditures for specified items by the Negro families studied have been presented
in terms of averages for the two cities combined. See Tabular Summary, table 18.
8 See footnote 1, p. 96.




106
T

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

40 . — Expenditures for furnishings and equipment among wage earners and
lower-salaried clerical workers at successive economic levels in 1 year during the
period 1985—
86

able

NEGR O FAM ILIES IN KANSAS C IT Y AN D ST. LOUIS, C O M BIN ED
Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Item
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

Number of families in survey______________________________ _____ _

60

56

93

Total expenditure for:
Furnishings and equipment___________________________________
Furniture. ______________________________________________
Textile furnishings_____________________ __ ________ ___ __
Silver, china, and glassware______ _ _____________
__ __
Electrical equipment________________ ____________________
Miscellaneous equipment__________________________________

$32.98
10.73
6. 75
.20
4.78
10.52

$39. 36
10. 67
7.60
.08
12. 52
S. 49

$63. 34
21. 95
11. 75
.23
19. 35
10. 06

Percentage
Total expenditure for:
Furnishings and equipment_______ _____________________ ____
Furniture
_______- ______ ___________ __________
Textile furnishings ___ _ ___ ________________
______ ___
Silver, china, and glassware ________ ________ __________
Electrical equipment - __ _____________________ ____
Miscellaneous equipment_____________________ __________

100.0
32.5
20.5
.6
14.5
31.9

100.0
27.1
19.3
.2
31.8
21.6

100.0
34.6
18.6
.4
30.5
15.9

C lo t h in g 9

Total expenditure p er fam ily f o r clothing .
E xpenditu res for clothing b y N egro fam ilies in K a n sa s C ity and
S t. L ou is averaged $1 1 0 .

E xpenditu res for fam ilies at the low est

level averaged $ 99, declined to $91 for the interm ediate group and rose
to $128 for the highest econom ic le v e l.1
0

D ifferences in size of fa m ily

at these three different levels resulted in average clothing expenditures
per clothing expenditure unit at the three levels of $ 2 7 , $ 3 8 , and $ 61,
respectively.
T h a t the cu stom of b u yin g clothes rea d y -to-w ear extends to the
N egroes studied is indicated b y the overw helm ing proportion of to ta l
clothing expenditures going to purchase of rea d y -m a d e cloth in g, d ry
cleaning, and accessories.

E xpenditu res for yardgoods and findings

used for sewing garm ents at h om e averaged only $ 1 .5 6 per fa m ily at
the low est level, dropped to $ 1 .0 9 at the n ext level, and rose to $1.41
at the highest level.

A s was the case w ith w hite fam ilies, paid help

for sewing claim ed a v ery sm all su m from an y of the N eg ro fam ilies.
E xpenditu res for such services averaged 1 cent per fam ily a t the low est
econom ic level and 15 cents at the highest.
G ifts of clothing, if paid for from fa m ily funds and exchanged
w ithin the econom ic fa m ily, were n o t recorded as g ifts b u t sim p ly as
9
Because of the great variability in expenditures for clothing and the resulting difficulty in securing
reliable averages for expenditures for individuals (see p. 55) averages have been computed for Kansas City
and St. Louis, combined, and not for the two cities separately. See discussion of variability, pp. 20-22 and
Tabular Summary, table 17.
See footnote 1, p. 96.




E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R SP E C IF IE D

clothing expenses of the fa m ily.

GOODS

10 7

W h en , how ever, gifts were received

from persons outside the fa m ily circle, an a ttem p t was m ade to
ascertain their value.

F orty -th ree percent of the families at the

low est econom ic level, 36 percent of the fam ilies at the interm ediate
level, and 26 percent of the fam ilies at the highest econom ic level
reported receiving such gifts.

T h e value estim ated b y the families

of such gifts averaged $9 for all families at the low est level and $5 at
the highest level, b u t as one fa m ily could n ot estim ate the value of the
gifts received, the figures do n ot give a com plete account of this item .

Clothing expenditures f o r men.
T h e adu lt m en and boys aged 18 years and over in the N egro
families studied purchased clothing of an average value of $23 per
person at the low est econom ic level, $29 per person at the n ext level,
and $56 at the highest level.

T h e lim ited num ber of cases of b oys

aged less than 18 bars com parison of average clothing expenditure of
boys in lower age groups w ith those of older m en.
W h e n the clothing expenditures of N egro m en aged 18 years and
over are grouped according to general typ e of item

(see table 4 1)

expenditures for outerwear and footw ear are found to constitute 78
percent of the total for the group as a whole.

Expenditures for outer­

wear required the sam e proportion of total expenditures at both the
low est and the highest level, bu t the proportion spent for footw ear
declined sligh tly.

T h e proportions spent for headwear and for m is­

cellaneous item s show ed a sm all increase from
highest level.

the low est to the

T h e largest expense in the group of m iscellaneous item s

was for cleaning and repairing for which the average expenditure per
m an using such services was $ 2 .1 3 at the low est econom ic level and
$ 3.26 at the highest.
T

able

41.— Distribution of annual clothing expenditures f o r individuals in fam ilies
at successive economic levels
M E N A N D BOYS, 18 YEAR S OF AGE A N D OVER
[Negro families, Kansas City and St. Louis combined, 1935-36]
Percentage

Dollars

Sex and age group, and type of
clothing

All
fam­
ilies

Economic level—Fam­
ilies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year

Under
$300

$300 to
to
$400

All
fam­
ilies

Economic level— Fam­
ilies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year

Under
$300

$400
and
over

$300 to
to
$400

$400
and
over

Men and boys 18 years of age and
over:
Headwear___ _____ _ ______ ____
Outerwear. __ .......... ............... .
Underwear____________ _______
Footwear._____ ________ __
Miscellaneous items
. _

$2.15
21.73
2.68
8. 44
3. 65

$1.13
13.01
1.53
5.39
1.85

$1.48
15.73
2.45
6. 73
2. 47

$3.34
31.87
3.62
11.75
5.70

5.6
56.3
6.9
21.8
9.4

4.9
56.8
6.7
23.5
8.1

5.1
54.5
8.5
23.3
8.6

5.9
56. 7
6.4
20.9
10.1

Total_________________________

38. 65

22.91

28.86

56.28

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0




108

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

Fig. 15.

DISTRIBUTION OF ANNUAL CLOTHING
EXPENDITURES FOR INDIVIDUALS IN FAMILIES
AT SUCCESSIVE ECONOMIC LE V ELS
TWO CITIES IN THE
WEST NORTH CENTRAL AND MOUNTAIN REGION

1 9 3 5 - 1 93 6
NEGRO FAMILIES
ITEM

ECONOMIC

LEVEL

(A N N U A L A M O U N T S P E N T
P E R EXPE N D IT U R E U N IT )

%%%% U N D E R

$300

O S H $300

$400

■

U. S . B U R EA U O F L A B O R S T A T I S T IC S




I

$400

under

ANO OVER

E X P E N D IT U R E S

FO R

SP E C IF IE D

109

GOODS

Clothing expenditures f o r women.
C lothin g expenditures for w om en and girls averaged sligh tly less
th an those for m en at the low est level b u t were n o ta b ly larger a t
the interm ediate and highest levels.

T h e annual expenditures o f the

w om en and girls 18 years of age and over averaged $22 at the low est
econom ic level, $35 at the next, and $67 at the highest.

T h e lim ited

num ber of cases of girls aged less than 18 am ong the N egro fam ilies
studied precludes a proper com parison of expenditures am ong w om en
and girls of different age groups.
Classification of clothing expenditures b y typ e of article indicates
th at am ong N egro w om en and girls aged 18 years and over outerwear
and footw ear together accounted for 77 percent of their total clothing
expenditures

(table 4 2 ).

Outerwear

(coats, suits, dresses, blouses,

and sweaters) w as the largest item of expense w ith an annual average
of $17 for all N egro w om en covered b y the su rvey in these two cities.
F ootw ear

(including shoes, rubbers, and hosiery), representing an

average expenditure of $15, was second; underwear, w ith $5 , cam e
th ird ; m iscellaneous item s
an average of $3.

(including accessories), were fourth, w ith

H eadw ear, averaging $2, was the item representing

the sm allest group expenditure.

W h e n classified b y econom ic level,

footw ear expenditures, while increasing in dollars, claim ed a decreas­
ing proportion of total expenditures.

E xpenditures for outerw ear

which ranked second in percentage of total expenditures at the low est
level shifted to first place at the highest level.
T

able

42.—

Distribution of annual clothing expenditures for individuals in fam ilies
at successive economic levels
W O M E N AN D GIRLS, 18 YEAR S OF AGE AN D OVER
[Negro families, Kansas City and St. Louis combined, 1935-36]
Dollars

Sex and age group, and type of
clothing

All
fami­
lies

Percentage

Economic level—Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year

Under
$300

Women and girls, 18 years of age and
over:
Headwear_____________ _______
Outerwear____ ____________ ___
Underwear_________ __________
Footwear_________ ______ ____ __
Miscellaneous items____________
T otal........................................




$300 to
$400

$400
and
over

$2.00
16.87
4. 62
14. 68
2.99

$1.01
8.51
2.07
9.08
1.55

$1.64
14.27
3.81
12. 30
3.15

$3.36
27.71
8.02
22.55
5. 33

41.16

22.22

35.17

66.97

All
families

Economic level—Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year
$400
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

4.9
41.0
11.2
35.6
7.3

4.5
38.3
9.3
40.9
7.0

4.7
40.5
10.8
35.0
9.0

5.0
41.3
12.0
33.7
8.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

110

W EST

NO RTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

O th e r G roups o f C u rren t E xpenditures
A s n oted above, in spite of the increase in dollar expenditures for
recreation (see table 4 3 ) w ith rise in econom ic l e v e l /1 in general the
proportion of total

expenditures designated

classified under this category declines.

for the varied

item s

A t all econom ic levels in

each city expenditures for tobacco form ed the largest item of recrea­
tion expenditures, w ith newspapers second largest.

A dm ission s to

m o v ie houses accounted for the next largest item of am usem en t, b u t
th ey did n ot increase in proportion w ith rise in econom ic level due to
the sm aller num ber of persons per fam ily at the higher econom ic
levels.

In b oth cities a smaller percentage of fam ilies ow ned radios

at the high than at the low econom ic level where 72 percent of the
N egro fam ilies in K a n sa s C ity and 64 percent in S t. L ou is possessed
radios.

Likew ise the num ber of families purchasing radios decreased

w ith rise in econom ic level.

H ow ever the average price paid b y

fam ilies purchasing radios increased from $38 to $56 in K a n sas C ity
and from $28 to $66 in St. L ou is from low to high econom ic level.
I f it had been possible to segregate the am oun t of transportation
expense undertaken prim arily for recreational purposes, the pattern
of the expenditures would perhaps h ave assum ed a different appear­
ance, as the percentage of to ta l transportation expenditures spent for
autom obile

purchase,

operation,

and

care

increases

w ith

rise

in

econom ic level, although the percentage for other form s of trans­
portation declines.
tion

expenditures

A t all levels the proportion of total transporta­
d evoted

to

autom obiles is less

fam ilies at corresponding levels.
m obile

operation

per

rise in econom ic level.

fa m ily

than

for

w hite

T h e average expenditure for a u to­

owning

autom obiles

increased

w ith

O ver half of such expenditures w ent for

gasoline and oil, w ith no expenditures for garage rent and parking
at the low est econom ic level.

N o n e of the N egro fam ilies surveyed

in K a n sas C ity purchased a new car, b u t five bou gh t second-hand
cars at an average price of $ 2 04.

In S t. L ou is, at an average price of

$453, seven cars were purchased of which three were new and four
second-hand.

(See T a b u la r Su m m ary, table 13.)

A verage expenditure per person for personal care increased from
$4 in K a n sas C ity and $5 in St. L ouis at the low est econom ic level to
$12 at the highest in b oth cities.

(See T ab u la r S u m m ary, table 14 .)

In general the average expenditures per fa m ily for the various types
of personal care services and toilet preparations rem ained relatively
constan t w ith increase in econom ic level, as did the n um ber of fam ilies
reporting the purchase of such services and item s.

E xcep tion s to

this generalization occur in the case of expenditures for sh am poos and
“ other w a v e s.”
1
1

T h e n um ber of fam ilies reporting expenditures for

See footnote 1, p. 96, and Tabular Summary, table 15.




E X PE N D IT U R E S

FOR SPECIFIED

111

GOODS

these item s increased m arkedly from the low est to the highest eco­
nom ic level.
T

4 3 . — Expenditures for recreation and. transportation among wage earners
and lower-salaried clerical workers at two economic levels in 1 year during the
period 1 9 3 5 -3 6

able

NEGRO FAMILIES
Kansas City
Economic level—
Families spend­
ing per expendi­
ture unit per
year

Item

St. Louis
Economic level—
Families spend­
ing per expendi­
ture unit
per
year

Under
$300
Number of families studied_______________________

________

Recreation expenditures:
Average amount____ _______________
________________
Percentage for:
Tobacco____
_______________________________________
Movies____
. ______ _______
_____
___ __
.
Newspapers___ _______
___ __ ___ _______________
Other reading____________ ______ ___________ ________
Recreational equipment, e t c . . ___
____
Percentage of families owning radios_______________________
Percentage of families purchasing radios. _________ ______
Average amount paid for radio per family purchasing_____
Transportation expenditures:
Average amount____________________
_______ ________
Percentage for:
Automobile purchase, operation, and maintenance _ _
Other. _______ _________________ ________ _______ . . .
Percentage of families owning autos_____ __ ______
. . . ._
Average expenditure for automobile operation and main­
tenance by families owning automobiles. _______ _______
Percentage for:
Gasoline_
_
. . . ___ _________ _
_____ _____
Garage. .
__________________________ ____________
Other..
_ _ _________ __ _ . . . . ______ . . . _ _____

$400 and
over

32

42

Under
$300

$400 and
over

28

51

$36

$67

$32

$47

39.9
19.9
22.7
0.3
17.2
71.9
12. 5
$38

41.3
14.1
15.7

50.7
13.8
17.5

48.7
11.9

27.7
64.3
7.1
$56

17.2
64.3
7.1
$28

16.6
58.8
5.9

1.2

0.8

21.6
1.2
$66

$59

$112

$63

$141

35.6
64.4
18.8

51.3
48.7
31.0

30.3
69.7
17.9

61.2
38.8
25.5

$107

$117

$78

$165

59.2

63.4
0.9
35.7

71.1

61.4

28.9

28.0

0

40.8

0

10.6

E xpenditures for accident and health insurance, one of the item s
included under the heading of m edical care, were rem arkably larger
for the N egro than for the white fam ilies studied in this region.

F or

the N egroes, the average expenditure for all fam ilies was four tim es as
great as th at for the w hite fam ilies.

In K a n sas C ity , the average

am oun t spent b y the N egro fam ilies was $19 at the low level, $16 at
the interm ediate level, and $29 at the high level.

In St. L ou is, the

range was greater, rising from $11 at the low level to $29 at the high
level.
G ifts and contributions to religious organizations, co m m u n ity chest,
relatives, etc., all showed a m arked increase w ith rise in econom ic
level w ith the greatest change occurring for contribu tion s to the
support of relatives.

In K a n sas C ity abou t $3 per fa m ily w en t for

the support of relatives at the low level and abou t $46 at the high,
while in S t. L ou is the corresponding figures were $2 and $42.
poll, incom e, and personal-property




W h ile

tax paym en ts increased w ith

112

W EST

NO RTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

rise in econom ic level in K a n sas C ity , a decline was experienced in
S t. L ou is.

In the form er city the average for all fam ilies was $ 1 .0 5

and in the latter 36 cents.
E xpenditures for form al education, vocation , and other item s were
negligible except for p ay m en ts of union dues or fees.

In K a n sa s

C ity , where such p ay m en ts were correlated w ith changes in econom ic
level, the average p ay m en t per fa m ily was $ 1 .6 5 and in S t. L ou is,
where greater p ay m en ts were also m ade at the higher levels, the
average p ay m en t per fa m ily was $ 5 .3 4 .







Part III.— Tabular Summary

113

114

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

1 .— D istrib u tio n o f f a m ilie s , b y econ om ic level and in co m e level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES

$400 to $500

$500 to $600

$600 to $700

$700 to $800

$800 to $900

$900 to $1,000

$1,400 to $1,500 j

$300 to $400

$1,300 to $1,400

$200 to $300

1 $1,200 to $1,300

$100 to $200

Families in survey._ _____ . . . .
Annual net income of—
$500-$600____________________
$600-$900____________________
$900-$1,200__________________
$1,200-$1,500_________________
$1,500-$1,800_________________
$1,800-$2,100_________________
$2,100-$2,400_________________
$2,400-$2.700_________________
$2,700-$3,000_________________
$3,000-$3,300_________________

8

295

1

24

67

52

54

36

28

11

9

9

3

0

1

0

0
21
65
59
57
72
12
5
3
1

0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
7
10
4
3
0
0
0
0
0

0
9
23
21
6
7
1
0
0
0

0
3
12
14
10
11
2
0
0
0

0
1
14
8
13
14
2
2
0
0

0
0
4
7
12
10
2
0
0
1

0
0
1
3
9
12
2
0
1
0

0
0
1
1
2
6
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
6
0
1
1
0

0
0
0
1
1
5
1
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

All families

Income class

$1,100 to $1,200

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit per year

o
o
o
©

KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S —W H IT E F AM ILIES
Families in survey______
_____
Annual net income of—
$500-$600____________________
$600-$900____________________
$900-$l,200__________________
$1,200-$1,500_________________
$1,500-$1,800_________________
$1,800-$2,100_________________
$2,100-$2,400_________________
$2,400-$2,700_________________
$2,700-$3,000_________________
$3,000-$3,300_________________
$3,300-$3,600_________________
$3,600-$3,900_________________
$3,900-$4,200_________________
$4,200-$4,500_________________

357

6

39

92

73

50

43

17

14

10

7

4

2

0

0

3
32
85
91
76
41
15
11
2
0
0
0
0
1

1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
9
17
10
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

2
9
40
22
12
4
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
10
14
24
16
7
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
7
17
12
6
3
4
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
5
12
12
7
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
3
9
1
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
0
4
7
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
2
4
3
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
2
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K AN S.—NEGRO F AM ILIES
Families in survey._____________
Annual net income of—
$500-$600____________________
$600-$900____________________
$900-$1,200__________________
$1,200-$1,500_________________
$1,500-$! ,800_________________
$1,800-$2,100_________________
$2,100-$2,400_________________
$2,400-$2,700_________________
$2,700-$3,000_________________

103

li

21

29

20

10

7

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6
25
40
21

i

4
7
8
1
1
0
0
0
0

1
12
10
6
0
0
0
0
0

0
3
11
2
2
1
0
0
1

0
0
5
2
2
1
0
0
0

0
0
1
4
1
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
4
0
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

e
>

4
0
0
l

3
5
2
0
0
0
0
0

M INNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL, M I N N —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Families in survey.. _ _______
Annual net income of—
$500-$600____________________
$600-$900____________________
$900-$1,200__________________
$1,200-$1,500_________________
$1,500-$1,800_________________
$1,800-$2,100_________________
$2,100-$2,400_________________
$2,400-$2,700_________________
$2,700-$3,000_________________
$3,000-$3,300_________________
$3,300-$3,600_________________
$3,600-$3,900_________________
$3,900-$4,200_________________




504

2

45 114 106

86

59

36

32

10

11

3

0

0

0

0
27
101
128
111
78
40
8
6
0
1
3
1

0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
4
18
13
9
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
19
26
14
16
5
1
2
0
0
2
0

0
1
6
17
13
13
4
2
3
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
6
11
9
7
0
1
0
0
0
1

0
0
3
4
13
7
3
2
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
1
3
3
2
0
0
0
1
0
0

0
0
0
2
1
3
4
0
0
0
0
1
0

0
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
10
32
32
19
13
7
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
10
22
26
28
11
7
2
0
0
0
0
0

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

115

1 .— D istrib u tio n o f f a m ilie s , b y econ om ic level and in com e level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit per year
8
.©

Income class

§

i
o
-M

o

a

I

8
o
1

m

*
9
1
o

|

I
w
o

o

&

8

8

i

1

8

o

o

o

©

i
*9
©

8

1
«9
-

1

i

<■
&

i

I

I

i

©
&

o

I*9©

5*

Families in survey___ ____ _____

401 ’

6

48

65

94

62

42

28

30

13

6

5

0

1

1

Annual net income of—
$500-$600____________________
$600-$900____________________
$900-$l,200__________________
$1,200-$1,500_________________
$1,500-$1,800_________________
$1,800-$2,100_________________
$2,100-$2,400_________________
$2,400-$2,700_________________
$2,700-$3,000_________________
$3,000-13,300_________________
$3,300-$3,600_________________
$3,600-$3,900_________________
$3,900-84,200_________________

2
27
64
98
100
66
27
6
6
4
0
0
1

1
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
7
15
12
10
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
9
18
12
15
8
2
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
6
10
30
23
12
7
2
3
0
0
0
1

0
3
14
12
23
6
2
1
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
4
15
8
10
3
0
1
1
0
0
0

0
0
0
9
5
8
4
1
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
5
12
10
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
2
3
5
2
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
2
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

ST., LOUIS, M O .--N E G R O FAM ILIES
Families in survey........ .................

106

6

22

27

22

12

8

2

2

4

1

0

0

0

0

Annual net income of—
$500-$600____________________
$600-$900____________________
$900-$l,200__________________
$1,200-$1,500_________________
$1,500-81,800_________________
$1,800-82,100_________________
$2,100-82,400_________________

0
25
37
28
12
1
3

0
2
3
0
0
0
1

0
9
5
5
3
0
0

0
7
14
5
0
1
0

0
7
8
6
1
0
0

0
0
6
4
2
0
0

0
0
1
5
2
0
0

0
0
0
1
1
0
0

0
0
0
0
2
0
0

0
0
0
2
1
0
1

0
0
0
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0

0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

SALT LA K E C ITY , U TAH —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Families in s u r v e y .....................

210

8

46

55

50

22

13

8

6

0

2

0

Annual net income of—
$500-$600____________________
$600-8900____________________
$900-$l,200__________________
$1,200-81,500_________________
$1,500-81,800_________________
$1,800-82,100_________________
$2,100-82,400_________________
$2,400-82,700_________________
$2,700-83,000_________________
$3,000-83,300_________________
$3,300-83,600_________________

0
35
54
53
34
25
5
1
2
0
1

0
2
4
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
12
15
10
8
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
13
13
18
6
3
1
0
1
0
0

0
8
16
9
6
9
0
0
1
0
1

0
0
5
7
3
4
2
1
0
0
0

0
0
1
4
3
4
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
3
4
1
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
1
3
2
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0




0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

116

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

2 . — D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y eco n o m ic level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year

Item

All
fami­
lies

Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800 $900 $1,000
to
to
and
$900 $1,000 over

D is tr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f
E a rn er and by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey____________________
Number of families in which chief
earner is—
Clerical worker.................................
Skilled wage edrner______ _________
Semiskilled wage earner................. .
Unskilled wage earner. _____ _______
Number of families composed of—
Man and w i f e ........................ ............
Man, wife, and 1 child2____________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children2
_____
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2
._
Man, wife, and children and adults
(4 to 6 persons)2___________________
Man, wife, and children and adults
(7 or more persons)2. ___________
Man, wife, and 1 adult_____________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults____
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including
man and wife)_____ __________ . . .
Adults (4 or more persons, not in­
cluding man and wife)____________
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3
persons, not including man and
wife)_ _________________________
_
Adult or adults and children (4 or
more persons, not including man
and wife). _________________

295

25

67

52

54

36

28

11

9

13

141
61
70
23

8
3
12
2

25
16
17
9

29
4
13
6

29
13
10
2

19
10
4
3

15
6
7
0

5
3
3
0

4
4
1
0

7
2
3
1

90
55
55
2

1
1
13
1

5
11
19
1

3
15
11
0

19
15
9
0

13
9
1
0

21
1
2
0

8
2
0
0

9
0
0
0

11
1
0
0

21

6

8

6

1

0

0

0

0

0

3
32
10
0

2
0
1
0

1
9
4
0

0
10
3
0

0
3
2
0

0
6
0
0

0
2
0
0

0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
1
0
0

20

0

6

4

2

6

2

0

0

0

2

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

279
1
4
1
2
4
3

24
0
1
0
0
0
0

61
1
0
0
0
2
2

51
0
0
0
0
0
1

52
0
1
0
0
1
0

31
0
1
1
2
1
0

28
0
0
0
0
0
0

11
0
0
0
0
0
0

9
0
0
0
0
0
0

12
0
1
0
0
0
0

295

25

67

52

54

36

28

11

9

13

3.15

4.79

3.78

3.43

2.89

2. 55

2.20

2.16

1.94

2.12

3
19
2
4

0
1
0
0

0
5
0
2

1
3
1
0

2
2
0
1

0
5
1
0

0
0
0
1

0
1
0
0

0
1
0
0

0
1
0
0

3.14
.81
2. 33
2. 92

4. 84
2. 21
2. 63
4. 37

3. 77
1. 21
2.56
3. 47

3. 39
.90
2. 49
3.15

2.86
.69
2.17
2. 66

2. 53
.31
2. 22
2. 40

2.18
.14
2.04
2.09

2.18
. 12
2.06
2.10

2.00
0
2.00
1.93

2.15
.08
2.07
2.10

. 11

.08

. 10

. 14

.09

. 17

.04

.09

.11

.15

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no home­
maker . . . ______________________ _
Number of families having home­
maker born in—
United States________ ____ _________
Italy............ .............................................
Germany____ ______________________
Canada (not French)_______________
Ireland. ___________ ______________
Sweden........................... .......................
Other______________ _______________

•

C o m p o s itio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households...................... .
Average number of persons in house­
hold_____ ____ _____________________
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers.........................
Boarders only__________ _______ ____
Lodgers only_______________________
Other persons______________________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total_______________________
Under 16 years of age.____ _______
16 years of age and over___________
Expenditure units__________________
Average number of persons in house­
hold not members of economic family.

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types are included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of living in the United States,” B. L. S.
Bull. No. 357,1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

117

%.— D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s studied, b y econ om ic level— Continued
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$800 $900 $1,000
to
to
and
$900 $1,000 over

$700
to
$800

E a rn in g s and In c o m e

Families in survey____________________
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners---------Net earnings from boarders and
lodgers_____ __ _ . . . -------- --- . .
Other net rents. . . . -------------------Interest and dividends--------------Pensions and insurance annuities----Gifts from persons outside economic
family____________________________
Other sources of income------------ . . .
Deductions from income (business
losses and expenses)_________
. .
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or
decrease in liabilities)___ _ _____
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or
increase in liabilities)_
------------Inheritance________ ______ _______
Average number of gainful workers per
fam ily___ ____ __ . . . ----- ---------- ---

295

25

67

52

54

36

28

11

9

13

74

10

18

10

10

10

9

0

2

5

23
16
17
12

1
1
0
1

5
1
2
2

4
2
2
3

4
3
4
2

6
3
4
1

0
4
3
2

1
0
0
0

1
1
2
0

1
1
0
1

18
12

2
1

3
2

4
1

5
3

2
0

0
2

0
2

1
0

1
1
0

5

0

2

1

1

0

1

0

0

193

11

47

34

38

26

20

7

7

3

78
0

10
0

15
0

12
0

13
0

9
0

6
0

3
0

0
0

10
0

1.29

1.60

1. 31

1. 27

1.20

1.28

1.32

1.00

1.22

1.38

Average amount of—
Net family income------------ ------------ $1, 510 $1,084 $1,257 $1,459 $1, 552 $1, 648 $1,791 $1,747 $2,056 $2,067
Earnings of individuals----------------- 1,457 1,069 1,231 1,405 1,491 1,569 1,702 1,704 2,009 2,001
979 1,143 1, 320 1,417 1, 379 1, 550 1,704 1,802 1,706
Chief earner------------------------------ 1,344
74
152
113
88
85
90
190
Subsidiary earners....... ...............
0
207
295
Males: 16 years and over----------- 1,268
949 1.081 1, 271 1, 367 1, 211 1, 396 1,704 1,802 1, 565
Under 16 years__________ (3
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
)
124
Females: 16 years and over-----189
306
118
150
134
358
207
436
0
Under 16 years----------0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Net earnings from boarders and
12
12
9
24
13
0
8
lodgers------------ -----------------------8
18
6
9
7
44
11
6
9
13
Other net rents.
-----------------------1 (3
0
)
4
1 (3
3
11
Interest and dividends-----------------0
10
17
0
0
)
2
23
33
32
Pensions and insurance annuities. _
17
27
0
1
0
1
Gifts from persons outside eco­
4
4
3
2
10
3
0
11 (3
nomic family. _
0
)
9
2
0
8
1
8
8
25
0
46
Other sources of income----------------Deductions from income (business
-2
0 (3
-1
0 (3
0
0
losses and expenses)_________
0
(3
)
)
)
Surplus per family having surplus
(net increase in assets and/or de­
221
124
172
220
325
196
107
191
171
283
crease in liabilities)----- ---------- . . .
Deficit per family having deficit (net
decrease in assets and/or increase
164
166
165
422
198
170
131
188
0
366
in liabilities)___ . ----------. . . . . .
Net change in assets and liabilities
-2 1
+73
+58 +69 +116 +118 +197 H 6 +153 -217
for all families in survey. ------- .
—
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Inheritance..._______
. ----------3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




118

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

2 .— D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by econ om ic level— Continued
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S .—W H IT E FAM ILIES

o
o©
o o
TIr 1
——

Vb-VS-

$1,100 and
over

$900 to
$1,000

$800 to
$900

$700 to
$800

$600 to
$700

§8
CO

$500 to
$600

o

$400 to
$500

$200 to
$300

$100 to
$200

Item

All families

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year

D is tr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f
E a rn er an d b y F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in s u r v e y _____________
Number of families in which chief
earner is—
Clerical worker_______________ __ _
Skilled wage earner-----------------------Semiskilled wage earner, __ _______
Unskilled wage earner, _ ____________
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife--------------------------------Man, wife, and 1 child 2
-----------------Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2___
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2_
Man, wife, and children and adults
(4 to 6 persons) 2_________________
Man, wife, and children and adults
(7 or more persons)2____________
Man, wife, and 1 adult____________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults, ____
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults—
Adults (2 or 3 persons not including
man and wife)_____________ _____
Adults (4 or more persons not in­
cluding man and wife)_ ________
_
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3
persons not including man and
w ife),,, ________ ______________
Adult or adults and children (4 or
more persons not including man
and wife)___________________ _____

357

6

39

92

73

50

43

17

14

10

7

6

122
81
114
40

1
0
4
1

8
7
19
5

28
20
30
14

27
16
21
9

13
13
19
5

19
8
10
6

6
5
6
0

8
4
2
0

5
3
2
0

2
4
1
0

5
1
0
0

84
66
68
3

0
0
1
1

0
1
15
1

5
18
30
1

13
18
13
0

10
10
6
0

18
12
2
0

6
5
1
0

11
1
0
0

9
0
0
0

6
1
0
0

6
0
0
0

44

1

14

12

9

6

2

0

0'

0

0

0

5
39
14
0

3
0
0
0

1
1
2
0

1
12
5
0

0
12
4
0

0
7
2
0

0
4
0
0

0
2
0
0

0
1
1
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

26

0

0

7

3

7

5

3

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

2

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

333
7
4
4
2
2
5

6
0
0
0
0
0
0

36
1
0
1
0
0
1

83
3
1
1
2
1
1

65
3
2
1
0
0
2

47
0
1
1
0
0
1

42
0
0
0
0
1
0

17
0
0
0
0
0
0

14
0
0
0
0
0
0

10
0
0
0
0
0
0

7
0
0
0
0
0
0

6
0
0
0
0
0
0

6

39

92

73

50

43

17

14

10

7

6

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no home­
maker_________ ______ ________
Number of families having home­
maker born in—
United States____________________
Germany_________________________
Poland________________ ________ _
Russia. __________________________
Ireland____________________________
Sweden.. ______ __
_______. . . _
Other________ __________________
C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households________ . . . _
Average number of persons in house­
hold_______________________________
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers____ __________
Boarders only, ____________________
Lodgers only_______ _________ . . .
Other persons___________ ______
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total_____________________
Under 16 years of age......................
16 years of age and over____
...
Expenditure units_________________
Average number of persons in house­
hold not members of economic
family_______________ ____ __

357
3.54

7.41 4. 86 3. 93 3. 34 3. 34 2. 85 2. 95 2. 67 2.00 2. 06 2.05

48
4
4
19

1
0
0
0

5
0
2
1

3. 37
.97
2.40
3.11

7.10
4. 33
2. 77
6.12

4. 71
2. 08
2. 63
4. 24

.19

.32

. 14

8
1
0
4

9
2
1
2

9
1
0
4

9
0
1
1

2
0
0
3

3
0
0
2

0
0
0
1

1
0
0
1

1

0
0
0

3. 84 3.22 3.07 2.58 2.59 2. 36 2. 00 2. 06 2.00
1.33 .80 .62 .41 .41 .07
0 .06
0
2. 51 2. 42 2. 45 2.17 2.18 2.29 2.00 2. 00 2.00
3. 50 2.99 2. 87 2. 46 2.46 2. 28 1.99 1. 99 1. 98
. 11

.15

.29

.28

.37

.33

.04

.03

.08

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types are included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,” B. L. S.
Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




119

TABULAR SU M M A R Y
T

able

2 , — D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y econ om ic level— Continued

KANSAS CITY, M O-KANS.—WHITE FAMILIES—Continued

o
®o
oo
0 1
-^

$1,100 and
over

$900 to
$1,000

o
o®
OO
t'- OO
« -< s
ey

$800 to
$900

$600 to
$700

$500 to
$600

$400 to
$500

$300 to
$400

o
OQ
°o
<3 3
y-§ -

$200 to
$300

Item

All families

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year

E a rn in g s and In co m e

357
Families in survey.. ___ . _ ______
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners .. _ 105
Net earnings from boarders and
50
lodgers_____________ . _________
13
Other net rents___________ ______
14
Interest and dividends____________
17
Pensions and insurance annuities _ _
Gifts from persons outside economic
24
family__________________________
14
Other sources of income
Deductions from income (business
22
losses and expenses)_____________
Surplus (net increase in assets and/
202
or decrease in liabilities)_________
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/
151
or increase in liabilities) ________
3
Inheritance_______________________
Average number of gainful workers
per family_________________________ 1. 33

6

39

92

73

50

43

17

14

10

7

6

2

12

28

23

14

11

4

2

5

2

2

1
0
0
0

7
1
3
3

7
5
3
3

9
2
1
4

10
3
3
2

10
1
2
1

2
0
0
1

3
0
0
0

0
0
1
1

1
1
1
1

0
0
0
1

0
1

7
2

9
6

2
2

3
1

1
1

2
0

0
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0

0

9

7

0

2

3

0

0

0

0

3

21

60

39

32

24

9

10

2

2

0

3
0

18
0

30
0

33
1

17
1

19
0

8
0

4
0

8
0

5
1

6
0

1.33 1.38 1. 34 1.33 1. 30 1.28 1.24 1. 28 1. 50 1.43 1.33

D o l.
D o l. D o l. D o l. D o l. D o l. D o l. D o l. D o l. D o l. D o l. D o L
Average amount of—
Net family income_____________ ._ 1,440 1,018 1,117 1, 238 1, 361 1,611 1, 625 1, 768 2,023 1, 798 1,871 2, 038
Earnings of individuals_______ __ 1, 407
987 1,071 1, 238 1,324 1, 531 1,572 1, 722 1, 995 1, 796 1,847 1, 992
Chief earner__________________ 1, 281
945 990 1,157 1,210 1,416 1,387 1, 613 1, 750 1, 390 1,743 1, 662
42
Subsidiary earners_______
_— 126
81 114 115 185 109 245 406 104 330
81
Males: 16 years and over..
1,204
987 856 1,089 1,162 1,290 1,257 1, 582 1,855 1, 200 1, 742 1,664
Under 16 years.. _____ (3
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
)
Females: 16 years and over____
203
0 213 149 161 241 315 140 140 596 105 328
Under 16 years_____ (3
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
)
Net earnings from boarders and
21
lodgers...
____ . . . ____ . . .
28
17
22
19
17
35
6
0
8
0
50
Other net rents___ ____________
4
13
0
0 (3
3
12
3
3
0
0
0
)
Interest and dividends. _______
1
5
1
3
0
0 (3
1
0
0
(3
)
(3
)
)
Pensions and insurance annuities.
2
18
4
12 (3
35
11
0
16
1
50
0
)
Gifts from persons outside eco­
nomic family. _ ______ __ __
5
4
14
0
0
0
3
2
0
0
6
10
2
9
Other sources of income _ __ _ __
3
3
5
7
0
0
0
0
1
1
Deductions from income (busi­
ness losses and expenses) _____
-9
-4
0 -4
0
0 - 4 -2 1
0
0
0 -2 5
Surplus per family having surplus
(net increase in assets and/or de­
104 147 132 201 185 180 194 181 348 365
crease in liabilities)__________ . . .
170
0
Deficit per family having deficit
(net decrease in assets and/or in­
158
85
crease in liabilities)_____ _____ __
56 103 121 217 175 268 188 268 251 368
Net change in assets and liabilities
for all families in survey____ __ . +29 +10 +54 +52 +53 +45 +23 -2 4 +75 -145 -7 5 -368
4
0
0
0
1
10
0
0
0
0 114
0
_________
Inheritance____________

3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.

53957°—39-----9




120

W EST
T

able

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

2 .— Description of fam ilies studied, by economic level— C on tinu ed
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
All
fami­
lies

Item

$200
to
$300

$100
to
$200

$400
to
$500

$300
to
$400

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
and
over

D is tr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r
and by F a m ily

Type

i

Families in survey--------------------------------------Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker__________________________
Skilled wage earner---------------------------------Semiskilled wage earner_________________
Unskilled wage earner___________________
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife____________________________
Man, wife, and 1 child----------------------------Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children-----------------Man, wife, and 5 or more children_______
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6
persons)_______________________________
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons)__________________________
Man, wife, and 1 adult___________________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults_____________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults_________
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man
and wife)______________________________
Adults (4 or more persons, not including
man and wife)--------------------------------------Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 per­
sons, not including man and wife)_____
Adult or adults and children (4 or more
persons, not including man and wife). . .

103

11

21

29

20

10

7

5

4
4
25
70

0
0
4
7

1
0
4
16

1
0
8

1
0
5
14

0
1
7

1
1
2
3

0
1
1
3

37
15
8
5

0
0
2
4

3
3
4
1

0

9
7
0
0

7
0
0
0

4
1
0
0

4
1
0
0

11

3

6

1

0

1

0

0

2

2

0
0
0

0
9
0
0

0

15
1
0

0
0
0
0

0
2
0
0

0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0

20

10
3
2

3
1
0

2

5

0

1

3

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

2

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker. _
Number of families having homemaker born
in United States_________________________

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

103

11

21

29

20

10

7

5

103
3. 51

21

6.84

4. 27

29
2. 74

20
3.07

10
2.45

7
2. 71

5
2.44

1
0
1
1

1
0

2

4

1
0
1
1

1

0
3
0

0
0
1
1

0
0
3
0

1
0
1
0

3.34
.96
2. 38
3.06

6. 70
3. 97
2. 73
5. 79

4.18
1.71
2.47
3. 83

2. 66
.32
2. 34
2.47

2. 70
.35
2. 35
2. 53

2.40

2. 30
2. 30

2.29
. 14
2.15
2.17

.18

.13

.09

. 10

.37

.05

.44

C o m p o s itio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households_____________________
Average number of persons in household___
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers_____________________
Boarders only____________________________
Lodgers only-------------------------------------------Other persons____________________________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total__________________ ____ _____
Under 16 years of age---------------------------16 years of age and over________________
Expenditure units___________ _____ _____
Average number of persons in household not
members of economic family_____________

11

6

0
12

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




2

.10

2.

2
.’
2.11
.24

“ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.

T A BU LAR
T

able

121

SUM M ARY

2 . — D escrip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by econom ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES— Continued
Economic level— Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$100
to
$200

$200
to
$300

$400
to
$500

$300
to
$400

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
and
over

E a rn in g s and I n c o m e

Families in su rv ey....... ...................................
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners...................
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers...
Other net rents______________________ . . .
Interest and dividends___________________
Pensions and insurance annuities________
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_________________________________
Other sources of income__________________
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)_____________ ___________
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or de­
crease in liabilities)____________________
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease in liabilities)____ ____________ . .
Inheritance______________________________
Average number of gainful workers per
family________ _____ ________ ___________

103

11

21

29

20

10

7

5

36
14
3
2
2

5
1
0
1
0

7
1
2
1
1

7

7

3
0
0
0

4
0
0
1

5
1
0
0
0

3
3
1
0
0

2
1
0
0
0

2
6

0
0

0

1

0

3

0

1

1
0

0
2

0
0

7

0

3

0

2

1

0

1

63

5

12

21

11

7

5

2

37

6
0

7
0

8
0

8
0

3
0

2

0

0

3
0

1.42

1.64

1. 38

1. 28

1.50

1.50

1.43

1.40

$945
934
914
20
918
2
14
0

$907
893
848
45
778

1

$938 $1, 212 $1, 345 $1,471 $1, 492
932 1,170 1,340 1,290 1,492
850
987 1,136 1,088 1, 368
82
204
202
183
124
835 1,046 1,234 1,016 1, 370
0
0
0
0
0
122
97
106
274
124
0
0
0
0
0
4
41
8
6
43
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0

0

(*)

Average amount of—
Net family income_______________________ $1, 086
Earnings of individuals________________
1,061
Chief earner_________ ____ ______ ___
952
Subsidiary earners___________________
109
Males: 16 years and over___________ _
947
Under 16 years_____ _________
1
Females: 16 years and over------- ------- 113
Under 16 years-------------------0
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers .
15
Other net rents______ _________________
1
Interest and dividends_____________ . . .
(3
)
Pensions and insurance annuities.____
(3
)
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_______________________________
(3
)
Other sources of income_______ _
11
Deductions from income (business
losses and expenses)___ _______
. ..
-2
Surplus per family having surplus (net
increase in assets and/or decrease in lia­
bilities)________________________ ____ __
128
Deficit per family having deficit (net de­
crease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
79
ties) ___________________________________
Net changes in assets and liabilities for all
+50
families in survey______________________
0
Inheritance.. _____________________ _____
3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




4
111

0
5

7

0
4

0
0
0
0
144

4

(3
)

7

-3
65

0
0
0

100

1

4

0

-6
176

0

(3)
179

0
0

0
138

197

-8

138

52

161

33

72

51

98

94

+37

— 17
0

+63
0

+72
0

+110
0

+99
0

— 1

0

0

122

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

2 . — D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y econ om ic level— Continued
M IN N EAPO L IS-ST . PAUL, M I N N —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
i
per year
AH
fami-1
lies
Un­ $300 $400 $500 $600 $700 $800 $900 $1,000
der
to
to
to
to
to i to
to
and
$300 $400 $500 $600 $700 $800 $900 $1,000 over

Item

D istr ib u tio n

by

O c c u p a tio n

of

E a rn er and by F a m ily T y p e

C h ie f

1

Families in survey________ _________
Number of families in which chief
earner is—
Clerical worker_______________ ____
Skilled wage earner-------------------------Semiskilled wage earner _ ____ __
Unskilled wage earner. . . . _____
Number of families composed of—
Man and w ife ......................................
Man, wife, and 1 child 2
__ _______ _
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2-------Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2
__
Man, wife, and children and adults
(4 to 6 persons) 2____
_______
Man, wife, and children and adults
(7 or more persons) 2 _____ . . . . . .
Man, wife, and 1 adult.. . . . .
.
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults____
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults ___
Adults (2 or 3 persons not including
man and wife).. ________ ____ . . .
Adults (4 or more persons not includ­
ing man and wife)
_ _. ______
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3
persons not including man and
wife)_____ ________ __ _ _____ _
Adult or adults and children (4 or
more persons, not including man
and wife) _ . . .
___ __

504

47

114

106

86

59

36

32

10

14

172
126
139
67

10
6
20
11

32
31
37
14

30
29
26
21

37
20
18
11

22
15
19
3

17
9
6
4

16
8
6
2

3
3
3
1

5
5
4
0

113
91
118
6

0
2
20
3

3
19
44
3

9
26
31
0

21
19
14
0

20
17
6
0

15
5
3
0

26
2
0
0

8
1
0
0

11
0
0
0

57

16

19

15

2

2

2

1

0

0

8
47
27
0

4
1
0
0

4
7
9
0

0
10
5
0

0
11
8
0

0
7
4
0

0
9
0
0

0
2
0
0

0
0
1
0

0
0
0
0

24

0

4

6

8

1

2

1

0

2

7

0

0

2

2

2

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

1

2

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

425
7
4
2
4
3
2
24
1
32

43
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
2

99
1
0
0
1
1
0
4
0
8

82
1
0
2
1
0
1
8
0
11

70
2
1
0
0
1
1
6
1
4

50
1
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
5

31
1
2
0
0
0
0
2
0
0

29
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1

10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

11
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no home­
maker____ ___ _____
_ _ _____
Number of families having homemaker
born in—
United States.. . _________ _____
Germany.. __ . . . . ____ ____ _
Poland________ __ ________ _______
Russia _
_ _____ _____ _____ . . .
Canada (not French) _____
.. ...
England...
. ..
_ _ ._ . .
Ireland_____ __ _ _ _ _ _ _
Sweden__________
__ __ ._ ___
Canada (French).
. . . . . . __
Other___ __ .
_ ___ . . . _______
C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households_______
_____
Average number of persons in house­
hold________________________________
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers___ . . . ______
Boarders only._ _ . . . . . . ___ . . .
Lodgers only___ __ ______ ____
Other persons______________________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total__________
_________
Under 16 years of age_____________
16 years of age and over____ . __ _
Expenditure units ___ ____________
Average number of persons in house­
hold not members of economic family.

504

47

114

106

86

59

36

32

10

14

3. 68

5. 48

4.28

3. 68

3. 35

3. 26

2. 95

2. 35

2.42

2.34

77
4
17
51

6
0
1
4

13
0
2
6

14
0
5
12

11
0
6
9

13
2
2
10

7
1
1
4

8
1
0
4

2
0
0
1

3
0
0
1

3. 51
1.06
2. 45
3.23

5. 36
2. 62
2.74
4. 75

4. 22
1. 70
2. 52
3. 79

3. 52
1.08
2.44
3.23

3.13
.62
2. 51
2. 95

2. 95
.59
2. 36
2. 78

2. 74
.36
2. 38
2. 61

2.19
.10
2. 09
2. 09

2. 34
.10
2. 24
2.26

2.08
0
2.08
2. 01

.21

.18

.11

.20

.25

.35

.25

.20

.11

.29

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types are included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,” B. L. S.
Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




TA B U L AR
T

able 2 .—

SUM M ARY

123

D escrip tio n o f fa m ilie s studied, by econ om ic level— Continued

M IN N EAPO L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800 $900 $1,000
to
and
to
$900 $1,000 over

E a rn in g s and In co m e

Families in survey___ ____ __
__ __
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners______
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers_____ ______________________ __
Other net rents_____________________
Interest and dividends_____ _
Pensions and insurance annuities __ _
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_____________________ __ __
Other sources of income___ ________
Deductions from income (business
losses and expenses)_________ ____
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or
decrease in liabilities)______ _____
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or
increase in liabilities) ___ _ __ - _
Inheritance.-. _ _ _______- _____
Average number of gainful workers per
family___ ____ _______ _____________

504

47

114

106

86

59

36

32

10

14

154

13

34

30

27

19

13

11

3

4

89
30
79
19

6
3
10
0

15
8
9
4

18
5
18
5

13
4
15
1

16
4
11
5

7
4
6
0

9
2
5
2

2
0
2
0

3
0
3
2

47
19

5
1

13
4

11
3

7
3

5
4

2
1

3
0

0
2

1
1
2

57

5

11

10

14

7

3

3

2

299

36

71

65

51

33

16

19

3

5

197
5

11
0

41
2

39
0

32
0

25
2

20
0

13
1

7
0

9
0

1.40

1. 36

1. 39

1. 39

1.43

1. 42

1. 39

1. 34

1. 50

1.36

Average amount of—
Net family income___ _ ___ ___ __ $1, 549 $1, 242 $1, 388 $1, 454 $1, 625 $1, 672 $1, 862 $1, 735 $2,007 $2, 088
Earnings of individuals-_ _ 1, 501 1, 221 1,343 1, 406 1, 582 1, 592 1,825 1,686 1.983 1, 965
Chief earner___ __
1,356 1,154 1, 258 1,296 1,367 1,433 1, 631 1,473 1, 667 1, 699
Subsidiary earners______________
110
194
145
67
85
215
213
159
316
266
Males: 16 years and over________ 1, 336 1,158 1,244 1, 246 1, 371 1, 414 1, 631 1,428 1, 709 1, 592
Under 16 years____ _
0
0 (3
0
0
0
0
0
0
(3
)
)
164
94
160
Females: 16 years and over_ 63
211
194
258
274
178
373
1
0
Under 16 years_______
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
Net earnings from boarders and
24
14
lodgers________________
_ _
21
15
20
18
20
29
29
47
Other net rents _
_ _ _ _ _
6
5
4
8
4
5
14
8
0
0
2
2
Interest and dividends___ _______
3
2
3
8
3
2
2
12
Pensions and insurance annuities __
11
10
15
1
31
0
10
44
0
0
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_______ ____ ____ __
6
6
12
3
2
6
6
7
0
1
2
Other sources of income___
4
4
0
6
17
3
11
21
(3
)
Deductions from income (business
-2
-4
-2
-2
losses and expenses)_
_
-2
-1 9
-3
-5
-1 0
-2
Surplus per family having surplus
(net increase in assets and/or de­
122
111
151
107
181
164
170
218
205
crease in liabilities)___ _
216
Deficit per family having deficit (net
decrease in assets and/or increase
125
103
170
244
369
187
46
322
328
in liabilities)_______ _ _ . _______
193
Net change in assets and liabilities for
-7 4
all families in survey __ _ __ _ __ -6 0
-2 0 -168
+16
+71 +68 +37 +34
-4 7
2
0
0
5
0
2
0
0
Inheritance________ ________ - _
1
0
3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




124

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION
T

able

2 . — D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAM ILIES

$100 to
$200

$200 to
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

$700 to
$800

$800 to
$900

$900 to
$1,000

$1,000 to
$1,100

$1,100 and
over

Item

All families

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year

401

6

48

65

94

62

42

28

30

13

6

7

117
95
141
48

0
1
3
2

9
12
20
7

23
12
18
12

23
20
38
13

22
13
22
5

10
11
18
3

11
6
7
4
.

11
9
10
0

5
6
1
1

1
3
2
0

2
2
2
1

98
68
55
4

0
0
2
1

2
0
16
1

2
12
14
2

9
19
17
0

14
19
4
0

18
8
2
0

16
3
0
0

20
6
0
0

8
1
0
0

5
0
0
0

4
0
0
0

48

1

12

13

13

7

1

1

0

0

0

0

12
45
18
1

2
0
0
0

8
0
2
1

1
8
4
0

1
17
8
0

0
8
2
0

0
6
1
0

0
3
1
0

0
1
0
0

0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
1
0
0

30

0

0

3

4

5

6

4

3

2

1

2

9

0

3

1

3

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

5

0

0

2

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

0

3

3

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

361
4
10
1
1
1
3
17

5
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

39
1
0
0
0
1
0
6

57
1
2
0
1
0
0
3

87
1
1
0
0
0
1
3

58
0
3
0
0
0
0
1

38
0
1
1
0
0
0
2

25
0
2
0
0
0
0
1

30
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

10
0
1
0
0
0
2
0

6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

6
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

6

48

65

94

62

42

28

30

13

6

7

D is tr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ief
E a rn er and by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey__________________
Number of families in which chief
earner is—
Clerical worker___________________
Skilled wage earner-____ _______ _
Semiskilled wage earner________ __
Unskilled wage earner_____________
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife_____________________
Man, wife, and 1 child 2
___________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2___
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2
__
Man, wife, and children and adults
(4 to 6 persons)2________________
Man, wife, and children and adults
(7 or more persons)2____________
Man, wife, and 1 adult____________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults....... .
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults___
Adults (2 or 3 persons not includ­
ing man and wife)_____________
Adults (4 or more persons not in­
cluding man and wife) _________
Adult or adults and children (2 or
3 persons not including man and
wife)______________ __ _ _______
Adult or adults and children (4 or
more persons not including man
and wife), __ _
___________
D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no home­
maker________________
Number of families having home­
maker born in—
United States______ _________ _
Italy______________________________
Germany_______ _________ __
Poland____ __________________ __
R u s s ia .-____ __ ________________
England_____ ________ _______ _
Ireland____________________________
Other_______________ ____________
C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households__________ _ .
Average number of persons in house­
hold_____________________________
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers______________
Boarders only_______ _____________
Lodgers only__________ ___________
Other persons_____________________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total__________ ___________
Under 16 years of age____________
16 years of age and over.............. ..
Expenditure units___________________
Average number of persons in house­
hold not members of economic fam­
ily---------------------------------- ---------------

401
3.66

6.26 5.74 4.24 3.74 3.08 2.92 2.63 2. 61 2.37 2.42 2.52

64
3
5
14

1
0
0
0

9
0
0
2

3.48
.90
2.58
3.22

6.09
3.00
3.09
5. 39

5.54
2. 36
3.18
4.98

.20

.17

.22

8
1
1
1

13
1
1
5

6
1
0
1

11
0
1
2

2
0
0
0

2
0
0
0

1
0
1
1

4.10 3.59 3.00 2.63 2.45 2.26 2. 25
1. 36 .84 .62 .30 .14 .23 .08
2.74 2. 75 2. 38 2.33 2.31 2.03 2.17
3.73 3.36 2.78 2.48 2.35 2.15 2.17

2.00
0
2.00
1.95

2.14
0
2.14
2.13

.45

.41

.14

.16

.13

.31

5
0
0
0

.20

6
0
1
2

.37

.15

1‘ •Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types are included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,” B. L. S.
Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




TABULAR
T

able

125

SU M M A R Y

2 . — D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

$1,100 and
over

$1,000 to
$1,100

$900 to
$1,000

42

28

30

13

6

7

24

10

11

3

4

3

3

1
1
3
1

8
5
20
3

10
1
30
4

12
7
47
8

4
5
25
2

11
3
22
2

3
1
12
1

7
4
15
3

2
1
4
1

1
0
1
0

1
1
3
0

1
1

10
4

9
2

13
7

13
3

5
4

4
2

0
1

4
0

0
0

0
0

$800 to
$900

62

52

$700 to
$800

94

21

$600 to
$700

65

24

$500 to
$600

$300 to
$400

48

1

$400 to
$500

$200 to
$300

6

$100 to
$200

Item

All families

Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year

E a r n in g s and In c o m e

Families in survey ________________
401
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners
156
Net earnings from boarders and
lodgers__________ _____________
60
29
Other net rents-----------------------------182
Interest and dividends ________ .
Pensions and insurance annuities.. _
25
Gifts from persons outside economic
59
family__________________________
24
Other sources of income _________
Deductions from income (business
48
losses and expenses) _ ............. .......
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or
decrease in liabilities)________ . 252
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or
increase in liabilities)___ ____ __ 145
2
Inheritance---------------------------Average number of gainful workers
per family_________________________ 1.49
Average amount of—
Net family income...................... .......
Earnings of individuals_________
Chief earner___________________
Subsidiary earners
_________
Males: 16 years and o v e r ..___
Under 16 years________
Females: 16 years and over____
Under 16 years______
Net earnings from boarders and
lodgers____ __ _____________
Other net rents_____ ___ _______
Interest and dividends__________
Pensions and insurance annuities.
Gifts from persons outside eco­
nomic family__________________
Other sources of income_________
Deductions from income (business
losses and expenses)........... ........
Surplus per family having surplus
(net increase in assets and/or de­
crease in liabilities)_____________
Deficit per family having deficit
(net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease in liabilities).. . . . ______
Net change in assets and liabilities
for all families in survey_________
Inheritance_______________________
3

D oL

1, 552
1,491
1,308
183
1,268
(3
)
223
(3
)

0

2

12

7

6

7

4

1

1

2

33

40

66

39

27

18

14

4

4

3

2
0

15
0

23
1

28
o

22
1

15
0

9
0

16
0

9
0

2
0

4
0

1.00 1. 67 1.46 1.77 1.42 1.26 1.39 1.13 1.38 1. 50 1.57
D oL

D oL

D oL

D oL

D oL

D oL

D oL

D oL

D oL

D oL

D oL

958 1,287 1, 322 1,577 1,484 1,675 1,808 1, 729 1,905 2,091 2,519
850 1,225 1,271 1,517 1,442 1,582 1,782 1,627 1,835 2,047 2,500
850 1,086 1,145 1,223 1 277 1,426 1,562 1, 609 1,695 1,785 1,899
0 139 126 294 165 156 220
18 140 262 601
644 1,048 1,093 1,202 1,252 1, 358 1,600 1, 541 1,581 1,804 1,838
0
1
0
2 (3
0
0
0
0
0
0
)
206 175 176 315 190 224 182
86 254 243 662
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

28
9
8
8

56
17
4
20

29
9
5
13

30
2
6
8

21
8
7
9

14
13
5
8

57
6
14
2

17
4
6
2

40
23
26
10

21
8
4
5

41
0
6
0

15
12
6
0

7
6

11
(3
)

8
4

6
1

8
10

9
1

5
14

2
10

0
9

32
0

0
0

0
0

-5
164

0

-6

-2

-3

-8

-5

119

115

118

172

143

238

228

191

169

159

340

75

151

129

133

196

199

247

288

272

138

374

189
+35
3

-1 5

-6

00

-3

-1 4

+54 +34 +27 +81 +21 +82 +67 -6 5 -137 +60 -6 8
0
0
0
6
10
0
0
0
0
0
0

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




6

4
.

126

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION
T

able

2 .— D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y eco n o m ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—NEGRO FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$100
to
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
and
over

D is tr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r
and by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey . ___ _ __ __ . . _____
Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker _________ _ _ _
----Skilled wage earner------------... _ _ _
Semiskilled wage earner_________
__ _
Unskilled wage earner— ---------------Number of families composed of—
Man and wife____ _ ------------------- ----Man, wife, and 1 child 2
____ . - . . ______
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2_ ----- __ Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2 __ . _
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6
persons) 2 -------------------------------------Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons) 2 _ ---------------------------Man, wife, and 1 adult_____ . . . ____ __
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults___ . . .
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults_____ . . .
Adults (2 or 3 persons not including man
and wife)-------- -----------------------------------Adults (4 or more persons not including
man and wife)---- ---------------------------Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 per­
sons not including man and wife)______
Adult or adults, not man and wife, and
children (4 or more persons)___________

106

6

22

27

22

12

8

£

3
5
19
79

0
0
1
5

0
3
3
16

0
0
6
21

1
1
4
16

0
0
3
9

1
0
1
6

1
]
]
f

31
10
12
0

0
0
0
0

0
2
6
0

3
4
4
0

10
2
1
0

8
0
1
0

4
1
0
0

f
1
(
(

7

1

3

3

0

0

0

(

5
21
4
0

4
0
0
0

1
3
2
0

0
7
1
0

0
7
0
0

0
2
1
0

0
2
0
0

(
(
(
C

11

0

3

3

2

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

(

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

(

4

1

1

2

0

0

0

c

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of famlies having no homemaker.
Number of families having homemaker born
in United States____ ________ . . . ______

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

105

6

22

27

22

12

8

s

106
3.40

6
8. 39

22
4. 32

27
3.41

22
2. 54

12
2.41

8
2. 42

2 .1(

5
0
3
3

0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0

2
0
0
0

2
0
2
0

1
0
0
0

0
0
1
0

(
(
(

3. 38
.79
2.59
3.10

8. 39
3.81
4.58
7. 53

4.34
1.47
2.87
3.88

3. 35
.76
2.59
3.08

2.45
.16
2.29
2.32

2.50
.17
2.33
2.29

2.38
.13
2. 25
2.22

2.1]
.1]
2. 0(
2. 0 ‘

.06

.01

.07

.10

.08

.06

.0
c

C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households.------------------------------Average number of persons in household----Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers. -------------- . . . ____
Boarders only__________
.
Lodgers only____. . . . .
------------ - . . .
Other persons_____________ _____ . . . .
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total . . . . . . ___ __ . . . . . . . . Under 16 years of age _ ----------------------16 years of age and over___ __ _ _
Expenditure units.
_ . . . ___
Average number of persons in household not
members of economic fam ily_______ _ _

0

1

1 “ Children" are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults" are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types are included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States," B. L. S.
Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




TABULAR
T

able

127

SUM M ARY

2 .— D escrip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .—NEGR O FAM ILIES—Continued
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$100
to
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
and
over

E a rn in g s an d In co m e

Families in survey_________________________
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners____ _______
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers.__
Other net rents_________________ ______
Interest and dividends___________________
Pensions and insurance annuities________
Gifts from persons outside economic family
Other sources of income_________ _____ __
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)_____________ ____ __
_ _
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or de­
crease in liabilities). ____
_
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease in liabilities). . . _____ ________ __
Inheritance____ _______________________
Average number of gainful workers per
family______________________ _____ ___

106

6

22

27

22

12

8

9

43
8
5
11
7
9
4

2
0
0
1
1
0
0

11
0
1
1
0
3
0

9
2
2
3
2
2
1

7
4
1
3
3
2
0

7
1
0
1
0
2
1

3
1
1
0
0
0
1

4
0
0
2
1
0
1

11

2

1

1

3

1

2

1

75

6

18

18

17

10

3

3

30
2

0
0

4
0

9
1

4
1

2
0

5
0

6
0

1.49

1. 83

1. 50

1.44

1. 41

1. 67

1. 38

1.44

Average amount of—
Net family income.
_ _ ___ $1,162 $1,160 $1,067 $1,033 $1,086 $1, 244 $1,397 $1, 662
1,243 1,053 1, 013 1,049 1,236 1, 354 1, 634
Earnings of individuals_____
__ ___
1,145
946
886
970
949 1,124 1, 205 1, 399
Chief earner____ . . . . . . .
. _ 1, 014
131
Subsidiary earners _____ . . .
_____
297
83
127
100
112
149
235
1,003
1, 243
903
966 1,049 1,183 1, 392
849
Males: 16 years and over . . . ___
1
0
Under 16 years.. _ _ _ _ _ _ ..
0
6
0
0
0
0
141
0
Females: 16 years and over. __ ___ __
198
110
83
187
171
242
0
0
Under 16 years. ___ ____
0
0
0
0
(3
)
(3
)
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers..
5
0
0
2
11
13
8
0
6
0
Other net r e n t s ..___ ______ _ _ _
7
8
3
23
0
0
1
1
1 (3
Interest and dividends. ________ . . .
1
1
0
1
)
11
6
2
0
14
Pensions and insurance annuities_______
0
0
6
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_____ _______ __
6
0
6
6
11
10
0
0
3
0
0
Other sources of income_______________
0
1
18
22
(3
)
Deductions from income (business losses
-1 0
-8 6
-7
-3
and expenses).................. .......... .............
-1 7
-6
-1
(3
)
Surplus per family having surplus (net
increase in assets and/or decrease in
143
121
110
68
70
104
217
78
liabilities)___________________
. . . ___
Deficit per family having deficit (net de­
crease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
272
164
308
204
0
236
ties)____________
_. _____________
177
89
Net change in assets and liabilities for all
+74
+20
+68
-2 1
-1 2
+77
-179
families in survey
____ _______ _
+41
11
6
0
0
17
0
0
0
Inheritance-___ ______ ____ _
3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




128

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

2 .— D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y econ om ic level— Continued
SALT L A K E C IT Y , U TAH —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$200
to
$300

$100
to
$200

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
and
over

D istr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r
and by F a m ily T y p e i

Families in survey........................................... .
Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker------------------------------------------Skilled wage earner------------------------ -----------Semiskilled wage earner. _________________
Unskilled wage earner..__________________
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife--------------------------------------------Man, wife, and 1 child 2
___________________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2___________
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2_______
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6
persons)2 _______________________________
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons)2_______ __________________
Man, wife, and 1 adult...... ......................... .
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults_______________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults___________
Adults (2 or 3 persons not including man
and wife)-------------------------------- ---------------Adults (4 or more persons not including
man and wife)------------------ ---------------------Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons
not including man and wife)____ ________
Adult or adults and children (4 or more
persons not including man and wife)........

210

8

46

55

50

22

13

8

8

100
33
60
17

1
3
4
0

18
5
20
3

24
11
14
6

24
8
14
4

13
3
3
3

10
2
1
0

4
0
3
1

6
1
1
0

35
41
49
9

0
0
2
4

0
5
11
3

3
12
22
2

9
13
10
0

5
5
4
0

8
2
0
0

5
2
0
0

5
2
0
0

28

1

16

6

4

1

0

0

0

4
9
12
0

1
0
0
0

2
1
2
0

1
2
4
0

0
2
4
0

0
2
2
0

0
2
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

17

0

2

1

8

3

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

4

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

187
1
2
3
2
13

7
0
0
0
0
1

42
0
0
0
0
4

48
1
0
2
0
4

44
0
1
1
2
2

20
0
0
0
0
0

10
0
1
0
0
2

8
0
0
0
0
0

8
0
0
0
0
0

210
3.88

8
6.73

46
5.10

55
4. 08

50
3. 25

22
3.19

13
2. 56

8
2.24

8
2. 35

11
10
1
8

1
1
1
0

2
1
0
2

2
2
0
0

4
1
0
3

0
4
0
2

2
1
0
0

0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0

3. 81
1.31
2.50
3. 49

6.48
3.77
2. 71
5. 65

5.06
2. 06
3.00
4. 57

4.05
1.57
2. 48
3.67

3.18
.85
2. 33
2.96

3.01
.64
2. 37
2.85

2. 32
. 18
2.14
2. 20

2.33
.29
2.04
2.13

2.40
.28
2.12
2.29

.08

.24

.06

.05

.09

.15

.26

.04

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker-----Number of families having homemaker born
in—
United States_____________________________
Italy______________________________________
Germany_________________________________
England---------- ---------------- ------- -----------------Sweden_____________________ ____________
Other ________ _________________________
C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households_________ ____ ________
Average number of persons in household_____
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers______________________
Boarders only------------------------------------__
Lodgers only----------------------------------------------Other persons_____________________________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total._________________________ . .
Under 16 years of age____________________
16 years of age and over------- ------- -----------Expenditure units. ____________________ _
Average number of persons in household not
members of economic family ____________

0

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types are included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,” B. L. S.
Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




TABULAR
T

able

129

SU M M AR Y

— D escrip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y econ om ic level— Continued
SALT L AK E C IT Y , U T AH —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$100
to
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$500
to
$600

$400
to
$500

$600
to
$700

$800
and
over

$700
to
$800

E a rn in g s and In c o m e

Families in survey_______ _______ __
Number of families having—
E arnings of subsidiary earners. _ _.
Net earnings from boarders and
lodgers_________ _______________
Other net rents___________________
Interest and dividends____________
_
Pensions and insurance annuities_
Gifts from persons outside economic
family__________________________
Other sources of income. _________
Deductions from income (business
losses and expenses) __ ________ .
Surplus (net increase in assets and/
or decrease in liabilities)______ - Deficit (net decrease in assets and/
or increase in liabilities)-------------Inheritance ______________________
Average number of gainful workers
per family--------------------------------------

210

8

46

55

50

22

13

8

49

3

13

10

13

5

3

1

1

15
8
6
7

1
0
0
0

2
0
1
2

4
0
1
3

4
1
2
2

2
2
2
0

2
2
0
0

0
1
0
0

0
2
0
0

32
7

0
0

7
2

8
1

9
3

5
1

2
0

0
0

1
0
0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

110

4

27

28

21

13

10

5

2

95
0

4
0

19
0

26
0

26
0

9
0

2
0

3
0

6
0

1.32

1.42

1.39

1.31

1.31

1.30

1.27

1.18

1.18

Average amount of—
$1, 332
Net family income______ ______
1,290
Earnings of individuals ------------1,198
Chief earner___________________
92
Subsidiary earners------------------Males: 16 years and over______
1, 077
Under 16 years________
0
Females: 16 years and over
213
Under 16 years______
0
Net earnings from boarders and
lodgers________________________
6
Other net rents______________ ___
6
Interest and dividends__________
4
Pensions and insurance annuities.
9
Gifts from persons outside eco­
nomic family__________________
13
Other sources of income_________
4
Deductions from income (busi­
ness losses and expenses)........ . .
(3
)
Surplus per family having surplus
(net increase in assets and/or de­
133
crease in liabilities)________________
Deficit per family having deficit (net
decrease in assets and/or increase in
152
liabilities)______ ____ _____________
Net change in assets and liabilities for
all families in survey---------------------+1
0
Inheritance_______ _ _______ ______.
3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 323.




8

$976 $1,146 $1,249 $1,337 $1,604 $1,634 $1,620 $1,757
967 1,126 1,197 1, 301 1, 523 1, 567 1,606 1, 712
888 1,076 1,117 1,189 1,379 1,425 1, 550 1,596
112
79
80
144
50
142
56
116
891
906 1,056 1,048 1,289 1, 213 1,315 1,534
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
141
234
354
76
220
253
291
178
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
0
0
0

2
0
(3
)

8
0
11
21

3
23
3
0

19
16
0
0

0
14
0
0

0
41
0
0

12

7

7
1
5
8
7
8

33
19

35
0

0
0

4
0

-3

0

0

251

59

208

166

396

0
0

10
1

0

0

0

0

0

117

102

108

151

154

(3
)

75

99

155

142

127

260

+21
0

+19
0

-1 8
0

-1 0
0

+39
0

+153
0

-2 5 -245
0
0

130

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

T able 3. —

E x p en d itu res f o r grou p s o f item s , b y econ om ic level
D E N V E R , COLO.'—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit per year
All
fami­
lies

Item

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r
Item s

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
to
$900

$900 $1,000
to
and
$1,000 over

G roups of

Families in survey______ --Average family size:
Persons----------- ---------------Expenditure units----- ----Food expenditure units____
Clothing expenditure units.

295

25

67

52

54

36

28

11

9

13

3.14
2.92
2. 73
2.57

4.84
4. 37
4.05
3.64

3. 77
3.47
3. 26
2.98

3.39
3.15
2. 95
2.68

2.86
2.66
2.47
2. 34

2. 53
2.40
2.25
2.24

2.18
2.09
1.99
1.97

2.18
2.10
1. 94
1.87

2.00
1. 93
1.79
1.89

2.15
2.10
1. 95
2.08

Average annual current expenditure for—
All items-------------------------- $1,445 $1,113 $1, 202 $1,396 $1,447 $1, 550 $1, 586 $1, 781 $1,885 $2,295
461
F ood ... - -- _ - 457
460
475
469
433
460
446
541
497
Clothing------------------------154
184
139
143
150
165
190
100
253
203
Housing ---------------226
243
234
232
261
191
160
275
334
309
Fuel, light, and refrigeration ___------------- ------96
88
95
99
98
97
105
105
51
91
Other household operation_____ ____
___
62
62
31
52
67
70
72
66
72
100
Furnishings and equip49
34
23
52
28
56
80
105
ment____ _____ _
37
123
Automobile and motor­
cycle—purchase, opera­
tion, and maintenance
118
61
64
112
108
134
130
184
152
413
Other transportation------26
24
24
31
26
21
15
25
44
33
24
32
29
21
29
35
26
43
41
Personal care------------41
Medical care___ __ __ _
73
52
62
71
76
73
57
160
113
148
65
81
101
92
108
Recreation___ - ------------79
54
59
127
137
10
6
17
2
4
13
26
0
Education-------------6
2
1
2
Vocation... _
._ __
5
3
3
7
8
5
16
16
Community welfare. . ._
21
18
23
17
8
5
19
13
27
32
Gifts and contributions
to persons outside the
36
11
26
economic family _ __ . . .
16
41
43
56
32
53
148
2
3
0
0
6
2
Other items. _ ______
0
5
18
2
Percentage of total annual cur­
rent expenditure for—
100.0
All items_______ - . ----31.9
Food__________
... Clothing______
10.7
Housing________________
15.6
Fuel, light, and refrigera­
6.6
tion_ __
_
___ _ . . .
Other household opera­
4.3
---------------tion. _
Furnishings and equip­
3.4
ment----- ------------------Automobile and motor­
cycle-purchase, opera­
8.2
tion and maintenance._
1.8
Other transportation____
2.0
Personal care____________
5.1
Medical care----- ------------5.5
Recreation. _.
_ _ . _
.7
Education_________ _____
.3
Vocation________ . . . . . .
1.2
Community welfare.___
Gifts and contributions
to persons outside the
2.5
economic family----------.2
Other item s... -------------

100.0
38.9
9.0
17.2

100.0
32.8
10.3
17.5

100.0
30.9
10.4
16.2

100.0
29.7
11.9
15.0

100.0
30.0
10.4
16.5

m o
26.4
10.7
15.4

100.0
28.8
13.4
17.7

100.0
21.7
8.8
13.5

7.9

7.9

7.1

6.8

6.3

6.7

5.9

2.7

4.0

2.8

4.4

4.4

4.6

4.3

4.4

4.0

3.8

4.3

2.5

2.8

1.6

3.6

3.6

5.0

5.9

2.0

5.4

5.5
2.2
1.9
5.1
4.8
.4
.1
.7

5.3
2.0
2.0
4.3
4.9
1.1
.2
.4

8.0
1.7
2.1
4.4
4.6
1.9
.1
1.6

7.5
2.1
2.2
4.9
5.6
.4
.3
1.4

8.6
1.7
2.2
4.9
6.5
1.1
.2
1.2

8.2
1.3
1.6
4.6
5.8
.1
.4
1.1

10.4
.8
2.4
9.0
6.1
0
.4
.7

8.1
2.3
2.2
6.0
6.7
.3
.8
1.4

18.0
1.4
1.8
6.4
6.0
.1
.7
1.4

1.0
0

1.3
.2

1.9
0

2.8
.3

2.8
0

3.5
.4

1.8
.1

2.8
1.0

6.4
.1

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




100.0
38.3
11.6
13.3

TABULAR

T able 3.—

131

SUM M ARY

E x p en d itu res f o r grou ps o f item s , b y econ om ic level— Continued
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit
per year

Item

E x p en d itu r e s fo r

All
fami­
lies

$100
to
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$900

$900
and
over

G ro u p s o f Item s

Families in survey_________ ______
Average family size:
Persons. ___________________ _____
Expenditure units____ __________
Food expenditure units___________
Clothing expenditure u n its .._____

357

6

39

92

73

50

43

31

23

3.37
3.11
2.88
2.70

7.10
6.12
5. 69
4.95

4. 71
4.24
3.92
3. 49

3.84
3.50
3. 22
2.96

3. 22
2.99
2. 76
2.64

3.07
2.87
2. 66
2.49

2.58
2.46
2. 27
2.28

2.49
2.38
2.28
2.07

2.02
1.99
1.86
2.09

Average annual current expenditure
for—
All items_____________________
$1,421 $1,003 $1,071 $1,193 $1, 317 $1, 572 $1, 599 $1,870 $2,104
Food____________________________
433
523
419
424
414
442
473
405
460
Clothing________________________
145
72
100
117
137
171
159
209
211
Housing....... ...................... ..............
215
80
161
181
189
245
267
257
337
Fuel, light, and refrigeration____
101
95
88
99
103
120
66
108
107
Other household operation______
64
44
93
36
43
112
58
77
77
Furnishings and equipment_____
32
71
45
74
96
48
59
176
100
Automobile and motorcyclepurchase, operation, and main­
tenance___________ ____________
434
22
137
46
127
152
237
80
126
Other transportation___________
32
34
18
34
32
30
29
41
27
Personal care_____ ___ ______
14
42
29
24
32
20
28
33
40
Medical care.______
___ _ ...
42
59
93
41
43
45
71
76
96
Recreation_____________ _____
44
69
16
54
102
63
91
86
90
Education_________________ _
12
9
19
11
11
7
16
15
10
Vocation.................. .
__ ___
5
4
3
4
4
6
6
10
6
Community welfare______ __ _
14
18
7
15
17
18
18
35
19
Gifts and contributions to per­
sons outside the economic fam­
ily—
5
22
41
26
6
14
24
52
69
Other item s... . . . _________ . . .
2
5
22
1
1
11
3
7
1
Percentage of total annual current ex­
penditure for—
All items______________ . . . __ ._ _ 100.0
Food______________________ . . . _ 30.4
Clothing___ __________________
10.2
Housing----------------------------- __
15.1
Fuel, light, and refrigeration
_
7.1
Other household operation. . . . .
4.5
Furnishings and equipment_____
5.0
Automobile and motorcycle—
purchase, operation, and main­
tenance. . . _____________ ____
9.6
Other transportation. __ . . . . . .
2.3
Personal care___________ ________
2.0
Medical care____________________
4.2
Recreation. ____________________
4.9
Education.............. ...........................
.8
Vocation __ _______________ ____
.4
Community welfare........................
1.3
Gifts and contributions to per­
sons outside the economic fam­
ily—
1.8
.4
Other items.. . . . ._ . . . . _ . . .
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324,




100.0
52.1
7.2
8.0
8.8
3.5
4.5

100.0
39.1
9.3
15.0
8.9
4.1
3.0

100.0
35.6
9.8
15.2
8.3
3.6
4.0

100.0
31.5
10.4
14.4
8.2
4.4
4.5

100.0
29.2
10.9
15.6
6.6
4.9
4.7

100.0
27.6
9.9
16.7
6.7
4.8
6.3

100.0
25.3
11.2
13.8
6.4
6.0
5.1

100.0
19.2
10.0
16.0
3.2
4.4
8.4

2.2
1.8
1.4
4.2
1.6
.9
.4
.7

4.3
3.2
1.9
3.8
4.1
1.0
.3
1.3

6. 7
2.4
2.0
3.6
4.5
.9
.3
1.3

9.6
2.6
2.1
3.4
4.8
.5
.3
1.3

9.7
2.0
2.1
4.5
5.8
1.0
.4
1.1

7.9
2.6
2.0
4.7
5.4
.6
.4
1.1

12.7
1.4
2.1
5.1
4.8
.8
.5
1.9

20.7
1.4
2.0
4.4
4.8
.9
.3
.9

.5
2.2

.6
.1

1.2
.6

1.8
.2

1.4
.1

2.6
.7

2.8
.1

3.3
.1

132
T

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
able

3 .— E x p en d itu res f o r grou p s o f item s , by econom ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , MO -K A N S — NEGRO FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
Item

All families
$100 to
$200

$200 to
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

E x p en d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f Item s

Families in survey.— __________________
Average family size:
. . . ___ __ __________
Persons___ __
Expenditure units____________ ______
Food expenditure units________________
Clothing expenditure units____________
Average annual current expenditure for—
All items______
_________________
Food.______ ________________________
C lo th in g .._________________________
Housing_____________________________
Fuel, light, and refrigeration _______
Other household operation__________
Furnishings and equipment_____ . . .
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
chase, operation, and maintenance.
Other transportation. _____________
Personal c a re .____________. . . . ._ .
Medical care________________________
Recreation__________________________
Education__________________________
Vocation______ . . . __________ . . . . .
Community welfare___________ ______
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family_______
Other item s______ _______ __________
Percentage of total annual current ex­
penditure for—
All items____________ . ______________
Food________ ____ ___________ _____
Clothing__________________ __________
Housing________________ __________
Fuel, light, and refrigeration __ _____
Other household operation.. _ _____
Furnishings and equipment_________
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
chase, operation, and maintenance .
Other transportation________________
Personal care________________________
Medical care____ ______
__________
Recreation__________________________
Education__________________________
Vocation____________________________
Community welfare_______ _________
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family_______
Other items___ ____ _______ _______

103

11

21

29

20

22

3.34
3.06
2.87
2.60

6.70
5.79
5.34
4. 52

4.18
3.83
3.62
3.15

2.66
2.47
2.32
2.15

2.70
2.53
2.33
2. 33

2.32
2.21
2.12
1. 96

$1,043
356
102
141
106
42
38

$917
396
89
105
100
23
28

$928
344
97
141
101
33
33

$876
315
84
126
93
36
34

$1,142
357
113
175
110
44
33

$1,345
401
128
146
130
66
57

33
48
25
48
50
2
2
17

34
19
16
46
45
5
1
6

15
48
23
36
32
3
0
14

12
49
22
32
40
1
1
16

69
51
27
50
63
1
2
18

47
57
34
80
71
1
5
26

28
5

4
0

8
0

9
6

21
8

90
6

100.0
34.1
9.8
13.5
10.2
4.0
3.6

100.0
43.2
9.8
11.5
11.0
2.5
3.0

100.0
37.1
10.4
15.2
10.8
3.6
3.6

100.0
36.0
9.6
14.4
10.6
4.1
3.9

100.0
31.2
9.9
15.3
9.7
3.8
2.9

100.0
29.9
9.5
10.9
9.7
4.9
4.2

3.2
4.6
2.4
4.6
4.8
.2
.2
1.6

3.7
2.1
1.7
5.0
4.9
.5
.1
.6

1.6
5.2
2.5
3.9
3.4
.3
.0
1.5

1.4
5.6
2.5
3.6
4.6
.1
.1
1.8

6.0
4.5
2.4
4.4
5.5
.1
.2
1.6

3.5
4.2
2.5
5.9
5.3
.1
.4
1.9

2.7
.5

.4
0

.9
0

1.0

1.8

6.7
.4

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




.7

.7

TABULAR
T

able

SUM M ARY

133

3 .-^ E x p e n d it u r e s fo r grou p s o f item s , by eco n o m ic level— Continued
M IN N EAPO L IS-ST . PAUL, M I N N —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expenditure unit per year

Item

All
fam­
ilies

Under $300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to $700 to $800 to $900 to $1,000
$400
$500
$600
$700
$800
$900 $1,000 and
$300
over

E x p en d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f
Item s

Families in survey___________
Average family size:
Persons_____ _____________
Expenditure units-------------Food expenditure units____
Clothing expenditure units.

504

47

114

106

86

59

36

32

10

14

3. 51
3.23
2.98
2. 79

5.36
4. 75
4. 41
3. 87

4.22
3. 79
3.48
3.15

3. 52
3. 23
2.95
2. 77

3.13
2.95
2. 72
2. 63

2.95
2. 78
2. 59
2.49

2.74
2. 61
2. 43
2. 41

2.19
2.09
1.97
1.94

2.34
2.26
2.09
2. 36

2.08
2.01
1.91
1.85

Average annual current ex­
penditure for—
$1, 550 $1,189 $1,326 $1,425 $1, 607 $1,777 $1,945 $1,774 $2,188 $2,149
All items------------------474
489
475
Food________________ . . .
488
497
502
525
476
520
480
114
121
155
137
184
208
184
Clothing------------------------177
206
199
214
234
166
Housing____ ____________
246
270
282
275
283
310
343
Fuel, light, and refrigera­
128
130
124
tion____ ______________
137
143
143
146
149
159
139
Other household opera­
34
tion_____ ______________
58
42
56
67
75
61
102
71
67
Furnishings and equip­
54
59
59
116
ment _________________
71
45
87
105
170
123
Automobile and motor­
cycle—purchase, opera­
122
92
114
182
tion, and maintenance.85
160
230
33
289
287
44
Other transportation____
30
40
35
27
35
40
40
33
31
32
36
36
Personal care____________
20
23
28
37
47
30
43
34
44
66
86
109
114
Medical care_____________
69
77
100
77
64
112
Recreation..........................
72
42
55
71
89
132
97
113
4
Education_______ ________
9
10
10
6
8
17
9
1
0
6
4
6
6
6
5
9
9
Vocation________________
10
13
22
16
22
12
Community welfare_____
18
16
19
18
13
30
Gifts and contributions
to persons outside the
32
44
20
20
26
economic family. __ . . .
12
30
60
93
27
4
1
2
10
62
72
7
3
13
Other items______ ______
0)
Percentage of total annual
current expenditure for—
All items_____ ____________
Food_____________ ___
Clothing_____________. . .
Housing____ _____________
Fuel, light, and refrigera­
tion____ _______________
Other household opera­
tion______ _____________
Furnishings and equip­
ment. _ .____ __________
Automobile and motor­
cycle-purchase, opera­
tion, and maintenance..
Other transportation____
Personal care____________
Medical care_________ _ .
Recreation_______________
Education...____ _______
Vocation________________
Community welfare.__ . .
Gifts and contributions
to persons outside the
economic family......... .
Other items__________ __

100.0
31.4
10.0
15.9

100.0
41.2
9.6
14.0

100.0
35.7
9.1
16.1

100.0
33.4
9.6
16.4

100.0
30.9
11.0
16.8

100.0
28.3
10.4
15.9

8.9

12.1

9.7

9.1

8.9

3.7

2.8

3.2

3.9

4.2

4.6

3.8

4.1

4.1

7.8
2.3
1.9
4.5
4.6
.6
.4
1.2

2.8
2.3
1.7
2.8
3.5
.8
.3
1.1

6.4
2.3
1.7
3.3
4.1
.8
.5
1.2

1.7
.5

1.0
.2

1.5
.3

1Less than $0.50.
2Less than 0.05 percent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




100.0
26.9
10.7
14.1

100.0
26.8
10.4
16.0

100.0
23.8
9.1
14.2

100.0
22.3
9.6
16.0

8.2

7.7

7.0

7.3

6.5

4.2

3.7

3.4

3.1

4.7

3.7

4.9

6.0

5.9

7.8

5.7

6.5
2.5
2.0
4.6
4.5
.4
.4
1.1

7.1
2.5
2.0
4.8
4.4
.5
.3
1.2

9.0
2.3
2.0
4.8
5.0
1.0
.3
1.2

11.8
2.3
1.8
5.6
5.8
.5
.5
1.1

10.2
2.3
2.1
5.6
5.5
.2
.5
1.0

13.3
1.5
2.1
5.2
6.0
(a
)
.6
.5

13.4
1.4
2.0
3.6
5.2
0
.5
1.4

1.4
.1

1.6
.1

1.8
.7

1. 5
(2
)

2.5
.6

2.7
2.8

4.3
3.4

134

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

T able 3. —

E x p e n d itu r es f o r grou p s o f item s , by econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expenditure unit per year

Item

All
fami­
lies

$100
to
$200

$200
to
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
to
$800

$800
to
$900

$900
and
over

E x p en d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f
Item s

Families in survey....... .......... .
Average family size:
Persons____________________
Expenditure units.------------Food expenditure units.. _
Clothing expenditure units.

401

6

48

65

94

62

42

28

30

26

3.48
3. 22
3.00
2.83

6.09
5.39
5.10
4.05

5.54
4.98
4.67
4.19

4.10
3.73
3.47
3.17

3.59
3. 36
3.15
3.03

3.00
2.78
2.54
2. 52

2. 63
2.48
2.30
2.14

2.45
2. 35
2. 21
2.18

2.26
2.15
2.00
1.91

2.16
2.11
1.99
2.12

Average annual current ex­
penditure for—
All items---------------------------- $1, 525
518
F ood.._________ ______ _
Clothing__________ _____
144
Housing__________ _____ _
233
Fuel, light, and refrigera­
_ ...
102
tion____________
Other household operation
50
Furnishings and equip­
68
ment. __________ _____
Automobile and motor­
cycle—purchase, opera­
tion, and maintenance..
114
Other transportation _ . . .
52
Personal care_________ 28
Medical care______ . . . .
61
Recreation____________ 88
Education____________ .
7
Vocation________________
8
21
Community welfare_____
Gifts and contributions to
persons outside the eco­
23
nomic family.. ----- .
Other it e m s .___ _
8
Percentage of total annual
current expenditure for—
All items_________ ______ 100.0
Food_____________ . . . . .
33.9
Clothing___ __
.
9.4
Housing_________________
15.3
Fuel, light, and refrigera­
tion. __ ___ . . . .
___
6.7
Other household operation
3.3
Furnishings and equip­
ment. _ ______ _______
4.5
Automobile and motor­
cycle-purchase, opera­
tion, and maintenance...
7.5
_
Other transportation_ __
3.4
Personal care . . . _____
1.8
Medical care . . . ______
4.0
Recreation__________
5.8
Education _ _________
.5
Vocation. _. ___ _____
.5
Community welfare_____
1.4
Gifts and contributions to
persons outside the eco­
1.5
nomic family__________
.5
Other items_________ . . .

$912 $1, 261 $1, 303 $1,490 $1,492 $1, 605 $1, 754 $1,813 $2,214
515
502
410
528
549
496
489
477
571
82
124
145
139
118
150
156
163
211
182
199
108
207
234
256
312
276
363
80
23

107
40

104
37

104
48

99
42

108
59

100
62

96
66

97
81

42

36

57

58

72

78

81

84

141

0
42
19
32
60
0)
5
7

41
49
22
37
59
5
4
20

55
50
23
38
60
9
7
15

85
58
29
59
87
7
10
19

116
51
28
58
86
11
5
21

116
53
26
72
96
4
9
26

221
49
39
71
118
13
4
27

225
40
35
103
111
2
11
34

270
54
41
100
154
2
22
28

2
0

6
7

9
1

19
1

21
1

44
23

29
19

48
6

48
31

100.0
45.0
9.0
11.8

100.0
41.9
9.4
14.4

100.0
39.5
9.5
15.3

100.0
36.8
10.1
13.8

100.0
33.7
9.7
15.7

100.0
30.9
8.7
15.9

100.0
27.9
8.9
15.7

100.0
26.3
9.0
17.2

100.0
25.8
9.5
16.4

8.8
2.5

8.4
3.2

8.0
2.8

7.0
3.2

6.6
2.8

6.7
3.7

5.7
3.5

5.3
3.7

4.4
3.7

4.6

2.8

4.4

3.9

4.8

4.9

4.6

4.6

6.4

0
4.6
2.1
3.5
6.6
(2
)
.5
.8

3.3
3.9
1.7
2.9
4.7
.4
.3
1.6

4.2
3.9
1.8
2.9
4.6
.7
.5
1.1

5.7
3.9
1.9
4.0
5.8
.5
.7
1.3

7.8
3.4
1.9
3.9
5.8
.7
.3
1.4

7.2
3.3
1.6
4.5
6.0
.3
.6
1.6

12.6
2.8
2.2
4.1
6.7
.8
.2
1.5

12.4
2.2
1.9
5.7
6.1
.1
.6
1.9

12.1
2.4
1.8
4.5
7.0
.1
1.0
1.3

.2
0

.5
.6

.7
.1

1.3
.1

1.4
.1

2.7
1.4

1.7
1.1

2.7
.3

2.2
1.4

1 Less than $0.50.
J Less than 0.05 percent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




TABULAR
T

able

135

SU M M AR Y

3 . — Expenditures for groups of items , by economic level— C on tin u ed
ST. LOUIS, MO.—NEGRO FAMILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
All families

Item

$100 to
$200

$200 to
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 and
over

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f Ite m s

Families in survey______________________
Average family size:
Persons_______ _____ ___
__ __ __
Expenditure units____________ _ _ ___
Food expenditure units___ __
___ ___
Clothing expenditure units.. _________
Average annual current expenditure for—
All items______________________________
Food________________________________
Clothing------------------------------------------Housing_____________________________
Fuel, light, and refrigeration------------Other household operation____ __ _
Furnishings and equipment. _
_ ..
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
chase, operation, and maintenance.
Other transportation
---------------Personal care------------------------------------Medical care_______________ ______
Recreation----------- ------------------ . . . _
Education___ ________ ____ _______
Vocation____ _______ _ _ __________
Community welfare------ ------- -------Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family. _ . . .
Other items_____ _ ________ ______
Percentage of total annual current ex­
penditure for—
All items---------------------------------------------Food________________________________
Clothing------------------------------------------Housing__________________
Fuel, light, and refrigeration-------- _
Other household operation _ . . . _.
Furnishings and equipment. ______
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
chase, operation, and maintenance.
Other transportation _ _ _ _ _ _
Personal care____ ________
_ ___
_
Medical care.__ ___ _ ________ _
Recreation... _ . . . ___ _ _ _ _ _
Education _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ___
__ _
Vocation.
____ ___________
_ __
Community welfare. _ _ _ _ _ _ ___
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family.
Other item s___ _____________ ____

106

6

22

27

22

29

3. 38
3.10
2. 89
2. 65

8.39
7. 53
7.17
5. 86

4. 34
3.88
3. 64
3.12

3. 35
3. 08
2. 86
2.68

2.45
2. 32
2.17
2.06

2.35
2.19
2. 01
2.06

$1,153
383
119
183
97
37
58

$1, 078
492
109
196
104
27
4

$998
395
104
147
99
29
43

$1, 061
374
100
179
102
25
45

$1, 030
334
102
174
90
36
37

$1, 463
398
162
217
96
57
109

55
51
27
48
41
2
5
16

0
33
25
13
57
2
6
10

24
47
25
36
26
3
1
14

33
51
26
47
38
1
4
13

38
50
20
50
47
7
17

123
58
34
63
47
3
9
20

31

0
0

5
0

23
0

27
1

67
0

100.0
33.2
10.3
15.9
8.4
3.2
5.0

100.0
45.6
10.1
18.2
9.6
2.5
.4

100.0
39.6
10.4
14.8
9.9
2.9
4.3

100.0
35.2
9.4
16.9
9.6
2.4
4.2

100.0
32.5
9.9
16.9
8.7
3.5
3.6

100.0
27.2
11.1
14.8
6.6
3.9
7.5

4.8
4.4
2.3
4.2
3.6
.2
.4
1.4

0
3.1
2.3
1.2
5.3
.2
.6
.9

2.4
4.7
2.5
3.6
2.6
.3
.1
1.4

3.1
4.8
2. 5
4.4
3.6
.1
.4
1.2

3.6
4.9
1.9
4.9
4.6
(2
)
.7
1.7

8.4
3.9
2.3
4.3
3.2
.2
.6
1.4

0
0

.5
0

2.2
0

2.5
.1

4.6
0

0)

2.7
(2
)

1 Less than $0.50.
2 Less than 0.05 percent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.

53957

39-




10

C)
1

136
T

W EST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION
able

3 . — Expenditures for groups of items , by economic level— C on tinu ed
SALT L AK E C IT Y , U TAH —W H IT E FAM ILIES

All families

Economic level—
-Families spending per expenditure
unit per year
$100 to
$200

$200 to
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 and
over

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f I te m s

Families in survey._____ ___________
Average family size:
Persons___________________________
Expenditure units_________ _______
Food expenditure units____________
Clothing expenditure units________
Average annual current expenditure
for—
All items---------------------------------------Food____________________________
Clothing__________ ____________
Housing_______ _____ ______ ____
Fuel, light, and refrigeration_____
Other household operation_______
Furnishings and equipment_____
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
chase, operation, and mainte­
nance__________________________
Other transportation____________
Personal care____________________
Medical care____________________
Recreation--------------------- ------------Education.________ _____________
Vocation__________________ ____ _
Community welfare_____________
Gifts and contributions to per­
sons outside the economic fam­
ily—
Other items______________ _____ _
Percentage of total annual current ex­
penditure for—
All item s_______ ____ __ _________
F o o d ..._____ ___________________
Clothing________________________
Housing______________________ ._
Fuel, light, and refrigeration... __
Other household operation_______
Furnishings and equipment_____
Automobile and motorcycle—pur­
chase, operation, and mainte­
nance__________________________
Other transportation____ _______
Personal care.. . ____________ . . .
Medical care_______________ _____
Recreation______________________
Education_______________________
Vocation_______________
______
Community welfare_____________
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family___
Other items________ ____________

210

8

46

55

50

22

29

3.81
3.49
3.25
2.98

6.48
5.65
5.23
4.30

5.06
4.57
4.35
3.86

4.05
3.67
3.38
3.10

3.18
2.96
2.75
2.59

3.01
2.85
2.61
2. 43

2.34
2. 21
2.04
2.07

$1,339
423
163
202
99
58
56

$966
397
100
123
85
31
60

$1,138
434
139
163
91
46
26

$1,278
424
152
196
100
54
56

$1, 354
414
165
219
97
53
54

$1, 570
423
200
241
102
81
102

$1, 681
429
209
238
113
80
73

86
26
31
64
56
8
6
36

5
32
24
61
27
3
5
9

39
29
30
56
41
6
5
23

76
20
29
59
53
11
3
29

83
27
29
58
58
7
6
48

91
31
32
82
69
15
10
60

202
25
46
81
77
7
12
42

21
4

4
0

9
1

15
1

27
9

23
8

42
5

100.0
31.6
12.2
15.1
7.4
4.3
4.2

100.0
41.2
10.4
12.7
8.8
3.2
6.2

100.0
38.2
12.2
14.3
8.0
4.1
2.3

100.0
33.1
11.9
15.3
7.8
4.2
4.4

100.0
30.6
12.2
16.2
7.2
3.9
4.0

100.0
26.9
12.7
15.4
6.5
5.2
6.5

100.0
25.6
12.4
14.2
6.7
4.8
4.3

6.4
1.9
2.3
4.8
4.2
.6
.4
2.7

.5
3.3
2.5
6.3
2.8
.3
.5
.9

3.4
2.6
2.6
4.9
3.6
.5
.4
2.0

5.9
1.6
2.3
4.6
4.2
.9
.2
2.3

6.1
2.0
2.1
4.3
4.3
.5
.4
3.5

5.8
2.0
2.0
5.2
4.4
1.0
.6
3.8

12.0
1.5
2.7
4.8
4.6
.4
.7
2.5

1.6
.3

.4
0

.8
.1

1.2
.1

2.0
.7

1.5
.5

2.5
.3

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.







138
T

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION

4 .— D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received d u rin g schedule yea r not used f o r current
expen ditu re and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i l y u se f r o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule yea r, b y econ om ic level

able

D E N V E R , C O L O —W H IT E FAM ILIES

All fami­
lies

Item

Economi c le ve l— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

D isp o s itio n

o f M o n e y R e c e i v e d D u r i n g th e S c h e d u l e
U se d fo r C u rren t F a m ily E x p en d itu r e

Year

Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities---------------------Increase in assets___________ ____ ____ _______ _____________
Increase in cash—
On hand______ __
_
. . ___ ____________
In checking account____________________ _____ _________
In savings account____________ ______________________
Investment in—
Improvements in own home.. . ._ ______ __________ _
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages)______
Building and loan shares_____ ______ _________ ______
Stocks and bonds-------------------------------------- --------------------Other property.. _ __________ ____ ____________________
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance_______ _ . . . . . .
. . . . _ _______
Annuities_____ ______ ______ __ . . _______ ______
Increase in outstanding loans to others___
. . . ______ __
Decrease in liabilities_____________ _______
. ________ _
Payment on principal of mortgages and down payment on
own home____ . . . ____________________ _______ . . .
Payment on principal of other mortgages_______ __ _ . . .
Payment of debts to—
Banks________ _
. . . __________ _____ _________ ____
Insurance companies_________ ____________
______
Small-loan companies________________ _________________
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles--------------------- ------------- ---------------------------Other goods____________________ _____ _______________
Individuals____________________________________________
Other------------------------------- ------------------------------------------ -




$600 and
over

N ot

Families in survey____________________________________________
Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash—
On hand_____ __
_________
_______ __
____
_____ __ ____ _ _ _
In checking account. __ ________
In savings account--------- ------------------------------------- . . .
Investment in—
Improvements in own home.. . _____________ . . . . _
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages). . . . . .
Building and loan shares-----------------------------------------------Stocks and bonds-------------------------------------------------- ------Other property---------- ------------------------------------------------Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance_____ __
______ ________________
____
Annuities________ ______ _ ______ _________ ________
Increase in outstanding loans to others__________________
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and down payment on
own h o m e___ _____ . . . . ______ _
________
. _
Payment on principal of other mortgages_____ ___
Payment of debts to—
Banks. ___ . . .
_____ .
___ __ . . . . . . _. .
Insurance companies. _____ _ _ ____ . . . ______ . . .
Small-loan companies_______
___________ ________
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles.. .
_.
___ ______ _________ ______
Other goods..
____
_____ .
_______
. . ..
Individuals__________ ________________ _____________
Other_______ _________________ ________ ____ _________

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.

$400 to
$600

295

92

106

97

11
3
40

4
0
4

2
0
14

5
3
22

23
6
3
12
2

6
0
0
2
0

10
3
1
4
0

7
3
2
6
2

238
14
4

68
3
1

89
2
0

81
9
3

47
7

16
3

19
3

12
1

1
3
10

0
0
2

1
2
8

0
1
0

9
26
15
26

2
8
6
11

2
12
4
8

5
6
5
7

$219.12
152. 60

$126.19
73.93

$215. 30
144.99

$311. 45
235. 52

3.68
12.44
29. 23

1. 63
0
1.14

2. 36
0
9.22

7.07
37.84
77.74

12. 27
3.70
.99
7. 89
.32

10.53
0
0
3.23
0

22.68
5.94
.59
7. 37
0

2.54
4.76
2.35
12.89
.98

78.87
2.93
.28
66. 52

55.68
1. 61
.11
52.26

95.63
1.20
0
70. 31

82.55
6.06
.74
75.93

31.89
3. 38

30.05
2. 34

33.40
6.90

31.98
.52

.43
.17
2.83

0
0
.41

1.20
.29
7.53

0
.21
0

5.71
7.63
6.12
8.36

1.34
6.60
3.75
7.77

3.04
11.16
2.55
4.24

12.78
4. 75
12.26
13.43

TABULAR
T

139

SUM M ARY

4. — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received d uring schedule yea r not used f o r current
expen ditu re and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use f r o m sources other than fa m i l y
in co m e in schedule yea r, by econ om ic level— Continued

able

D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E F AM ILIES—Continued

Item

All fami­
lies

Econom ic le ve l— Fam ilies
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le f o r F a m i l y U s e F r o m S o u r c e s O th er
T h a n F a m ily I n c o m e in S c h ed u le Y e a r

Families in survey________
________ _ ___ ________ _____
Number of families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash—
On hand___ ___ _______ _______
_ _____________ ___
In checking account ____________
_ ___ ____
In savings account- ___ ____
___
__
____ _
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)_____ ______
Building and loan shares. _
___
_ _ _ _ _ _____ _
Stocks and bonds__
__ ____ _____
____ Goods and chattels. _ _ ____ _
_____
__ _
Other property _________ __ __ __ __ _ _ _ __ _ ______
Insurance policies:
Surrender_______ ________________ _____ ________ ______
Settlement____ _ _ _ ______ _______ _____ ____ ______
Receipts from outstanding loans to others___ ____________
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home__________ _________ __
Increase in other mortgages. _ _ . _ _ ___ ____ __
Increase in debts—
Payable to banks______ ______ ___ ______
____
Payable to insurance companies _ _ _ _ _ _____ _
Payable to small-loan companies. _
___
____
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles___ ____ ___ __
_ ________
Other goods. _ _____ ______ __ _ _ ______ __ ________
Payable to individuals. __ __ _ ___ __ _____________
_____
___ __ _ __ _________
Other debts___ _____
Inheritance_________ __ __ ______
_ _ _ _ _ _
__ __
Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities. _ _. ________
Decrease in assets_ __
_
_
_ _ ____
Reduction in cash—
On hand_____ _____ ______________
_ __________ __ _
In checking account____
_ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ ____ __
In savings account __
_ _
_ _______
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages).
__ __ __
Building and loan shares _ .
_ __ _______
Stocks and bonds___ ___
__
_
__
______
Goods and chattels
_____
____________ ___ _____
Other property
__ __ _ ___ ________
_ ________
Insurance policies:
Surrender__
__ ____ _______ _________ _ _ ________
Settlement_ _________ _____ _
_
____ . . . ______ __
Receipts from outstanding loans to others____ _______ _ _
Increase in liabilities___________ _
____ _______ _______ _
Increase in mortgages on own home___ _ ______
_____
Increase in other mortgages_____ __________ __ __ ______
Increase in debts—
Payable to banks._ _ ________ __ __ ________ _ ______
Payable to insurance companies. ______ _____ ____ ____
Payable to small-loan companies
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles______________________________ ________ _
Other goods.. _______________________________________
Payable to individuals____________________________ ____
Other debts__________________________________ _________
Inheritance______________ ___________________________ _____
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




295

92

106

97

13
6
22

3
0
4

6
1
7

4
5
11

3
0
10
2
2

0
0
1
0
1

2
0
4
0
1

1
o
5
2
0

11
2
7

6
0
2

3
2
2

2
0
3

1
1

1
0

0
1

0
0

9
15
14

2
6
6

3
3
6

4
6
2

22
42
12
43
0

4
15
6
17
0

7
12
5
14
0

11
15
1
12
0

$146. 45
79. 03

$89.92
23.18

$122. 49
59. 37

$226. 24
153. 46

7. 85
8.00
23.12

4.54
0
7.41

11.52
1. 42
26.93

6. 97
22. 79
33. 87

2. 97
0
18. 25
.44
. 15

0
0
.23
0
.04

2. 78
0
5. 75
0
.38

5.98
0
49.00
1.34
0

5.09
2.19
10. 97
67. 42
1.47
1.02

10.04
0
.92
66.74
4.73
0

2. 61
6.09
1.89
63.12
0
2.83

3.10
0
30.41
72.78
0
0

8. 52
9.97
4. 09

2. 71
16.53
5.44

14.81
4.58
4.69

7.16
9. 64
2.16

14.25
9.30
6. 94
11. 86
0

2.25
7.85
11.00
16.23
0

13.02
6.06
6.‘94
9.59
0

26. 33
14.22
3.09
10.18
0

140
T

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

4. — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and fu n d s m ade available fo r f a m i ly use f r o m sources other than fa m i ly
in co m e in schedule year, by econom ic level— Continued

able

KANSAS C ITY , MO -K A N S .— W H ITE FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
All
fami­
lies

Item

D isp o s itio n

of

M oney

S c h ed u le Y e a r N o t
E x p en d itu r e

R ec eiv e d

D u r in g

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
$400
$500
$600
$700

$700
and
over

th e

U sed fo r C u rren t F a m ily

Families in survey_____ _________
______
Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash—
On hand _________ _____ __
________
In checking account ______ _______
_
In savings account________ _______ _
Investment in—
Improvements in own home___________
Other real estate (including real estate
mortgages)
_______________________
Building and loan shares ____________
____ _____
Stocks and bonds________
Other property. _ ________ ______ ____
Payment of premiums for insurance poli­
cies:
Life insurance___________ _________
Annuities_____________________ ___ . . .
Increase in outstanding loans to others.
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and
down payment on own home. . . . ____
Payment on principal of other mortgages
Payment of debts to—
Banks______
____ _______________ .
Insurance companies
_________ _ __
Small-loan companies__________ _____
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles...______________________
Other goods __ . . . ___________
Individuals____ __________________ __
Other
__ _______ ___________ _____

357

45

92

73

50

43

54

8
9
65

1
0
2

0
0
16

2
2
12

0
3
8

2
2
10

3
2
17

17

3

5

2

3

1

3

7
1
5
3

0
0
2
1

2
0
2
0

2
1
0
0

2
0
0
2

1
0
1
0

0
0
0
0

328
28
14

42
1
0

86
7
5

67
2
1

44
5
3

42
4
1

47
9
4

67

6
0

19
2

14
0

8
0

9
0

11
1

2
1
1

0
0
2

0
0

0
0

3

3

1
0
0

2
2
1

0
5
1
4

5
12

6
5
4

4

3

2
6
1
2

1
5
2
1

3

3

3

5
3

10
17
38

12
16

Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabili­
ties____ __________________ . . __________ $184. 76
118. 76
Increase in assets. ________________________
Increase in cash—
1.25
On hand _ ________________ ________
In checking account___ _____ ________
3.80
17.83
In savings account_________________
Investment in—
Improvements in own home___________
7.60
Other real estate (including real estate
mortgages) _________________________
1.88
Building and loan shares
__________
.56
4. 35
Stocks and bonds_____________________
Other property________________________
.38
Payment of premiums for insurance poli­
cies:
1
Life insurance___________ _ ______ __
70. 73
5.19
Annuities_____________________________
Increase in outstanding loans to others___
5.19
66. 00
Decrease in liabilities______________________
Payment on principal of mortgages and
down payment on own home_____ ____
35.50
.93
Payment on principal of other mortgages..
Payment of debts to—
.66
Banks-------- -----------------------------------------.92
Insurance companies______ _____ _____
2.40
Small-loan companies................................
Firms selling on installment plan:
8. 55
Automobiles_________________________
9. 52
Other goods_________________________
4.09
Individuals___________ __________ ____
3. 43
Other_________________________________
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




5
1
2

$123. 04 $170. 88 $177.08 $198.94 $196.87 $247. 38
93. 70 109. 59 107. 04 131.01 130.42 150. 47
1.67
0
2.30

0
0
15.18

2.40
8.56
13.88

0
6.00
27.38

1.86
3. 21
19.92

13.89

10.96

8.90

2. 42

4.42

0
0
7.64
.47

2.44
0
3. 76
0

1.58
2.74
0
0

5.92
0
0
2.28

.85
0
20.07
0

67. 37
.36
0
29.34

68.06
3.41
5.78
61.29

67.51
1.42
.05
70.04

70.93
4.48
11.60
67.93

73.68
6.13
.28
66.45

79.90
17. 27
13. 42
96.91

11.33
0

32.42
2.13

38.80
0

37.28

43.00
0

48.78
2. 54

1.39
.03
.97

0
0
1.32

0
0
2.53

6.79

.58
0
0

2. 74
6.06
3.11

0
8.64
.67
6. 31

11.33
9.20
2.66
2.23

11.61
5.24
6.37
5.49

6.20
10.75
5.00
1.91

7.45
10.25
3.95
1.22

9.85
14.85
5.56
3.42

0
0
0

2.13
5. 41
30.12
2.22
0
0
0
0

TABULAR
T

SUM M ARY

141

4 . — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received d uring schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use f r o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule yea r, by econ om ic level— Continued

able

KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S .— W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Economic level— Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to $500 to $600 to
$500
$600
$700

$700
and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le fo r F a m i l y U s e F r o m
S o u r c e s O th er T h a n F a m i l y I n c o m e i n S c h e d ­
u le Y e a r

Families in survey____ ____________________
Number of families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash—
On hand___ . . . ___________________ __
In checking account___________________
In savings account- ___________ ____
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)-----------------------------------------------Building and loan shares. _ ____ ______
Stocks and bonds __ __ ___ ________ __
Goods and chattels. _______ __ _______
Other property________________________
Insurance policies:
Surrender_____
____ ______________
Settlement_________________________ __
Receipts from outstanding loans to others.
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home______
Increase in other mortgages______________
Increase in debts—
Payable to banks______ _ ____________
Payable to insurance companies. ___ __
Payable to small-loan companies____
Payable to firms selling on installment
plan:
Automobiles.. ____ ___________ . . .
Other goods. _ _ ________ _______
Payable to individuals___
____ ____
Other debts____ _____ ______________
Inheritance_______ _ __________ _____ . . .

357

45

92

73

50

43

54

16
11
35

3
0
5

3
2
5

5
1
7

1
1
3

1
2
6

3
5
9

0
3
4
12
5

0
0
2
3
0

0
1
0
5
2

0
0
0
1
0

0
0
0
1
0

0
0
0
2
0

0
2
2
0
3

19
4
7

4
0
2

5
3
0

4
1
1

2
0
0

1
0
1

3
0
3

6
1

1
0

2
0

1
0

0
1

0
0

2
0

10
16
18

0
1
3

5
6
4

0
2
5

3
1
2

2
2
1

0
4
3

38
139
25
101
3

2
14
3
19
0

7
36
5
25
0

7
27
4
19
1

5
16
2
11
1

4
23
5
10
0

13
23
6
17
1

Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
ties. __________ _____ ___________________ $155. 27
55. 02
__
Decrease in assets___ ____ ____ . . .
Reduction in cash—
5.91
On hand.. . ____ . . . ___
8. 34
In checking account. _______________ _
16.94
In savings account____ _ _ ________
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mort­
0
gages) —
2.12
Building and loan shares ___ _______
1.09
Stocks and bonds____ . . . . . . __ . . . _
1.69
Goods and chattels. __ . . . __________
2. 69
Other property________________ __ . . .
Insurance policies:
9. 57
Surrender.. ___________ __ _______ _
3.50
S e ttle m e n t..._____ ____
___ _______
3.17
Receipts from outstanding loans to others.
100. 25
Increase in liabilities______________________
2. 22
Increase in mortgages on own home______
Increase in other mortgages_________ _____
.27
Increase in debts—
2. 98
Payable to banks________ . . .
.
7. 22
Payable to insurance companies . ______
5. 40
Payable to small-loan companies. _
Payable to firms selling on installment
plan:
24.15
Automobiles____ . . . _______ _____
Other goods.. . . . __ . . . __ _ _ . . .
31.18
8. 92
Payable to individuals___ _______ _ __
17.91
Other debts. _______ _________________
3. 77
Inheritance_________________ _ . . . . . .
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




$75. 39 $118. 41 $124. 37 $154.08 $173. 98 $312. 66
64. 33 119. 48
33.49
28.19
40. 85
59.10
4.11
0
9. 62

9. 08
1. 52
13. 64

6.93
4.11
7.46

1.00
2.00
13.70

2. 32
30. 81
15. 57

8.06
20. 63
45. 54

0
0
3. 33
5. 31
0

0
2.05
0
1.96
.28

0
0
0
2.12
0

0
0
0
.40
0

0
0
0
.24
0

0
10. 52
4. 45
0
17.31

3. 71
0
2.11
47. 20
.41
0

4.17
8.15
0
77. 56
2. 23
0

3. 56
6. 85
2. 46
90. 88
2. 47
0

42.00
0
0
94. 98
0
1.92

0
1. 56
6.78

4.81
10. 45
3. 63

0
5. 55
9. 30

10.26
4. 66
6.91

2. 56
2. 56
1. 58

0
14. 75
3. 67

1.44
12. 78
2.06
22.17
0

5.95
26. 02
9. 85
14. 62
0

20.11
28. 42
7. 41
17. 62
.62

27. 65
26.48
5. 56
11. 54
10.00

21.38
39. 56
19. 65
22. 36
0

78. 51
56. 69
9. 66
22. 72
14. 81

1. 44
8. 23
0
0
13.95
4. 74
109. 65 193.18
0
7.18
0
0

142
T

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

4.— D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use f r o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule y e a r , by econ om ic level— Continued

able

KANSAS C IT Y , M O -K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES

All fami­
lies

Item

Econom ic le v e l— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

D isp o s itio n

o f M o n e y R e c e iv e d D u r i n g th e S c h e d u le
U se d fo r C u rren t F a m ily E x p e n d itu r e

Year

Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities________ ____
Increase in assets _
_ _ _ _ _________
Increase in cash—
__ ________________ __
On hand
_ _____
In checking account _
_
____
___ __
In savings account____________ __ _____ __ ____ _ __
Investment in:
Improvements in own home__ __ _ __ _____________
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages) _ __
Building and loan shares _ _________ __________ _ _____
Stocks and bonds______________ _ __ _ ___ _ ______ __
Other property._ _ _ _
____ __ _________ ___ __
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance__ __ _ __ _____ ___ __________________ __
Annuities____________
__ __
__ _____________ _____
Increase in outstanding loans to others_____________ __ __
Decrease in liabilities____ ________ _ _
_ _______
____
Payment on principal of mortgages and down payment
on own home____________ ________ ___________________
Payment on principal of other mortgages___________ __ __
Payment of debts to—
Banks
_
_ _________________________ _____ ___
Insurance companies______________ ____________ ________
Small-loan companies___________________________________
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles_________________ ____ ___________
___
Other goods. ______ _____ _ _______________ ____
Individuals. _ ___________ _______ __________________
Other__ ___________________ ________ __________________




$400 and
over

N ot

Families in survey____________ ___ ____ ____________________
Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash—
On hand___ _____ __ ________ ___________ ____ ______
In checking account___________ _ __ ______________ _ _
In savings account_____________________ __________
__
Investment in—
Improvements in own home_________ _
_____
__ _
Other real estate (including real estate mortgages)______
Building and loan shares_____________ ________________
Stocks and bonds__________________________ _________ Other property
_
__
_ _ ____ ______ __
Payment of premiums for insurance policies:
Life insurance__________ _____ ___________ ________ ___
______
Annuities__________________________ _ _
__ _ _
Increase in outstanding loans to others _ ____ ____
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and down payment on
own ho m e____ _____________ _____ __ ________ - - Payment on principal of other mortgages_____________ _ _
Payment of debts to—
__
Banks____ __ ____________________ ______- _____
Insurance companies__________________ ______ __ _____
Small-loan companies______ ______________ ___________
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles
_
____ _ _ _____
Other goods
_ _
_ _ ____ _______ _____ ____
Individuals
__
__ _ _ _ __ _ ______
- __
Other
_ _ _ _ ______ __________ ______ ____

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.

$300 to
$400

103

32

29

42

2
1
11

0
0
3

o

1
4

2
0
4

1

2
0
0
0
o

2
1
1
0
0

5
1
1
0
0

o
0

0
0

97
8
2

30
0

1

29
3
0

38
5
1

16
2

5
0

1
0

10
2

0
0
4

0
0
2

0
0
0

0
0
2

4
16
2
2

2
4
0
1

0
5
1
1

2
7
1
0

$133.10
$97. 95
__83._26 _ _ _ 72.10
_
_

$94. 67
79. 72

$186. 39
94.19

0
1.96
12.74

13. 56
0
5.88

2. 76

4. 37
1.99
.28

5. 53
. 55
9.00

0
0
9. 72

2.90
.81
. 12
0

1.09
0
0
0
0

0

60. 04
3. 54
.77
49. 84

60. 38
0
.91
25.85

31.14
2.74

11.96
0
0

0
0

0

2.24

1.75

2. 61
9.95
.69

0

.47

4.78
6. 67
.69

0
o
o
o

57. 83
4. 43
o

14.95

0
0

61.31
5. 61
1.19
92.20

o

64. 66
6. 71

o
0
0

4.17

3. 76

0

8.03
2.24
.92

0
o

2. 76
13. 76
. 14
0

TABULAR
T

143

SUM M ARY

4.— D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use f r o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule yea r, by econ om ic level— Continued

able

KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

All fami­
lies

Economi c le v e l— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a i l a b l e f o r F a m i l y U s e F r o m S o u r c e s O th e r T h a n
F a m i l y I n c o m e in S c h ed u le Y e a r

Families in survey___________________________________________
Number of families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash—
On hand____________ _ ____________ ____ ___________
In checking account___ __________ __________ ______ __
In savings account_________ __ _______________________
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)--------------Building and loan shares___ ___________________ ______
Stocks and bonds_____
__ _ ________ _____
_____
Goods and chattels. . . . __ __ __ . . . __ _ _ ........... .
Other property_________________________ _____________
Insurance policies:
Surrender_________ _ _______
. . . . . . ................
Settlement. _ _______ _______ __
__________________
Receipts from outstanding loans to others________________
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home_______________________
Increase in other mortgages.. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________ __
Increase in debts—
Payable to banks__________ __________________________
Payable to insurance companies._ __ ___ ______________
Payable to small-loan companies_______________________
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles________ _______ _______________________
Other goods________ ___________________ _________
Payable to individuals________
_____________ ________
Other debts. _____
___ ______________________________
Inheritance____ _______
___ _________________ ________
Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities______________
Decrease in assets. _ _ __ ______
_ ---------------------Reduction in cash—
On hand-------- -------- ------- ------------- ---------- -----In checking account.___ __
___ ------------------------------In savings account. .__ _ ------------------------------------------Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)-----------------Building and loan shares. __ ________
__ ---------------Stocks and bonds_____
_ . . ____ __
_ ---------------------Goods and chattels. _____ __ ___ _ -----------------------------Other property. _ __ . . . _ ___ ___ _ ___________ ____
Insurance policies:
Surrender__ ______ _._ ---------- --------------------------- _
Settlement- _ _ ___ _. _
---------------- ----------- --------Receipts from outstanding loans to others------- -----------------Increase in liabilities----------------------------------------------Increase in mortgages on own home------ ------- ----------------Increase in other mortgages......... ..................... .........................
Increase in debts—
Payable to banks------------------------------------------- ---------- -----Payable to insurance companies.----------------------- -----------Payable to small-loan companies ______________________
Payable to firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles_____
_ ________ _____________________
Other goods______ _____ _______
. -------------------------Payable to individuals_________________________________
Other debts___________________________ ________ _______
Inheritance_________________________________________________
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




103

32

29

42

2
1
4

2
1
1

0
0
0

0
0
3

0
0
1
0
1

0
0
0
0
1

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
0
0

4
2
0

3
1
0

1
0
0

0
1
0

2
1

2
1

0
0

0
0

0
0
4

0
0
2

0
0
2

0
0
0

3
41
4
33
0

0
11
1
16
0

0
12
0
8
0

3
18
3
9
0

$83.07
28. 60

$96. 09
31.17

$31.26
2.59

$108.93
44.64

.52
.97
3. 64

1.69
3.12
6. 25

0
0
0

0
0
4.17

0
0
14. 56
0
3. 54

0
0
0
0
11.41

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
35.71
0
0

1.53
3.84
0
54.47
3.69
1.54

2.58
6.12
0
64.92
11.88
4.96

2. 59
0
0
28.67
0
0

0
0
2.50

0
0
3.05

0
0
5.52

3.83
22. 99
3.13
16.79
0

0
17.06
3.12
24.85
0

0
15.05
0
8.10
0

0
4. 76
0
64.29
0
0
0
0
0
9. 40
32.98
5.28
16. 63
0

144
T

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION

4.— D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and f u n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use fr o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule yea r, b y econom ic level— Continued

able

M IN N EAPO LIS-ST. PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
$400
$500
$600
$700

$700
and
over

D isp o sitio n
of M on ey
R ec eiv e d
D u r i n g th e
S c h ed u le Y e a r N o t U s e d f o r C u r r e n t F a m i l y
E x p en d itu r e

Families in survey_________________________
Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash—
On h a n d __ _ __
_____ ___________
In checking account_____ _____________
In savings account____________________
Investment in:
Improvements in own hom e__________
Other real estate (including real estate
_ _ _
_______
mortgages)______
Building and loan shares_______ _ ____
Stocks and bonds..
... _
. ___
________ ______
Other property ___
Payment of premiums for insurance poli­
cies:
Life insurance. _ _ _ _ _ _ ___
Annuities_ _____ _________ _
_
Increase in outstanding loans to others___
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and
down payment on own h om e___
Payment on principal of other mortgages.
Payment of debts to—
Banks. _________________ ______
Insurance companies__ __
__ _
Small-loan companies. _ ___ _
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles
_____ _________
Other goods______ ______ _ _
Individuals_____
___ __
Other ^__ ___________________ _

504

47

114

106

86

59

92

26
4
51

0
0
0

6
1
5

5
0
13

4
0
11

4
0
7

7
3
15

33

3

10

9

7

1

3

8
1
1
9

0
0
0
1

2
0
0
1

1
0
0
2

2
0
0
1

0
0
0
2

3
1
1
2

445
34
9

40
2
0

101
12
3

92
6
0

76
6
2

53
1
1

83
7
3

77
3

5
1

24
0

22
0

11
0

4
0

11
2

1
3
10

0
0
2

0
1
3

0
0
3

1
0
0

0
1
0

0
1
2

21
64
20
73

0
6
1
9

4
20
7
24

3
14
3
11

4
8
2
14

2
4
3
6

8
12
4
9

Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabili­
ties.
----__ _ __ ___ _ __ ______
$174. 58
Increase in assets. ______ ___
______
115. 21
Increase in cash—
On hand . ________
_______________
4. 02
In checking account_______
______ _
.76
In savings account___,_ _ _______
13.28
Investment in:
Improvements in own home. _ __ _ . . .
11.23
Other real estate (including real estate
mortgages)_____ __
________ ___
5. 36
Building and loan shares___ . _______
.28
Stocks and bonds____________________
.40
Other property. __ ___________ ________
.25
Payment of premiums for insurance poli­
cies:
Life insurance. _____ ________ ____ __
73.86
Annuities___ . . . ____ __
3. 98
Increase in outstanding loans to others. __
1.79
Decrease in liabilities___ ________________
59. 37
Payment on principal of mortgages and
down payment on own h om e_____ . . .
24.98
Payment on principal of other mortgages.
.67
Payment of debts to—
Banks_______________ ________________
.31
Insurance companies__________________
.56
Small-loan companies. _ - _____________
1. 21
Firms selling on installment plan:
8.02
Automobiles___,__ __ __ ----------------Other goods_________________________
9.17
2. 87
Individuals_____ _ ___ ___ ___ __ .__
11.58
Other _______ __ __ _________ _______
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




$134. 43 $179. 51 $152. 01 $182. 42 $136. 13 $232. 33
78. 92 103. 68 101. 23 129. 32 109. 78 154. 49
2.88
0
16.80

4. 23
3. 86
22.83

12. 46

.36

15. 77

6.24
0
0
.03

0
0
0
1.03

14. 67
1. 52
2.17
.41

71. 67
3. 01
0
50.78

78.86
4. 30
2. 79
53.10

86.16
.86
1.69
26. 35

79.92
5. 79
3. 32
77. 84

37.74
0

28. 99
0

16.14
0

8. 39
0

26.00
2. 48

0
0
5. 97

0
.08
.77

0
0
1. 32

1.80
0
0

0
2.05
0

0
1.63
1.09

0
9.99
1.06
16.17

6.22
11.02
5. 23
14. 77

2.23
9.64
2. 08
6. 52

11.23
4. 41
1.74
17.78

3. 35
3. 73
1.86
6. 97

21.03
13.88
3. 48
8. 25

0
0
0

7. 72
.26
6.80

2.19
0
10.02

4. 13
0
20. 51

9.19

12.98

11. 39

0
0
0
. 18

4. 52
0
0
.03

2. 83
0
0
.12

68. 87
.68
0
55. 51

62. 94
6.16
2.27
75. 83

20.02
2.30

145

TABULAE SUMM ARY
T

4.— D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use f r o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule ye a r , by econ om ic level— Continued

able

M IN N EAPO LIS-ST. PAUL, M I N N —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Economic level— Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
$500
$400
$600
$700

$700
and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le fo r F a m i l y U se F r o m
Sou rces
O th er
Than
F a m ily
In com e
in
S ch ed u le Y e a r

Families in survey. ________________________
Number of families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash—
On hand _____ _ _________________
In checking account_______ ______
..
In savings account___________________
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)_______________________________
Building and loan shares_ ______ _
_
Stocks and bonds. _ __________ ______
Goods and chattels.
________________
Other property.______ ________ _ ._ __
Insurance policies:
Surrender_____________________________
Settlement____ . . . _____ _____ __ _. . .
Receipts from outstanding loans to others.
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home.
Increase in other mortgages________ . . . .
Increase in debts:
Payable to banks . . . __ _____ _ __
Payable to insurance companies._ . . .
Payable to small-loan companies . . .
Payable to firms selling on installment
plan:
Automobiles____ ______ . . . _____
Other goods______ . . . __ _______
Payable to individuals
__ . . .
Other debts_ ________ . . . _____
_
Inheritance
_____
___ ___

504

47

114

106

86

59

92

25
9
91

1
0
3

5
0
14

5
2
15

6
2
22

3
1
15

5
4
22

3
0
3
6
5

1
0
0
0
1

0
0
1
2
1

0
0
1
1
0

1
0
0
1
0

0
0
0
2
1

1
0
1
0
2

24
7
13

2
0
0

10
0
2

2
0
3

0
2
2

2
2
2

8
3
4

5
5

1
0

3
0

1
3

0
0

0
0

0
2

12
26
34

0
0
2

2
4
13

1
7
9

4
4
3

4
6
2

1
5
5

45
156
39
166
5

1
16
5
19
0

9
33
10
39
2

5
28
9
45
0

7
19
4
21
0

6
20
4
20
2

17
40
7
22
1

Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
ties________________ ________________ _ $158. 08
65. 53
Decrease in assets _____ ____ _ _ ___ . . .
Reduction in cash—
On hand _________ _ _ _ _ _ _
8.31
In checking account___ _______
__ . . .
5. 52
In savings account______
31. 63
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mort­
.32
gages)—
Building and loan shares______
._ ___
0
Stocks and bonds _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ ._
1.15
_____ ____
1.28
Goods and chattels____
.79
Other property. _ ___ ___ ___ __ ----Insurance policies:
6. 74
Surrender___ ____
__ _____ _
. . _.
Settlement________________
________
8. 05
Receipts from outstanding loans to others.
1.74
92. 55
______ _
_
Increase in liabilities. ___
2. 51
Increase in mortgages on own home.
Increase in other mortgages—. ___ __ _
3.05
Increase in debts—
2. 96
Payable to banks______ ___ _ _ .__ _
Payable to insurance companies . _ ___
8. 66
Payable to small-loan companies___
5. 51
Payable to firms selling on installment
plan:
13.17
Automobiles. ______ ____________
_
Other goods_______________ __
23.46
6. 79
Payable to individuals___________ __
Other debts___________ _________ _____
26. 44
1.19
Inheritance-_______ __
_. . . .
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




$63. 55 $111. 83 $114. 85 $148.17 $210. 07 $288. 21
80. 44
79.81 151. 80
29. 47
36. 03
5. 60
.96
0
1.16

8.07
0
8. 74

6. 32
2.59
21. 96

12. 94
1. 38
47.24

9. 32
1.36
35. 17

9.70
25.12
69. 85

1.06
0
0
0
1. 06

0
0
1. 75
.10
1.10

0
0
.42
1. 53

. 16
0
0
2. 67

0
0
0
4.04
.85

1. 09
0
3.64

1. 36

9. 27

2. 01

0

57. 95
4. 26

.44
82. 36
7.36

1.20
78. 82
2.16
5.46

3.27

1. 93
2. 82
7.27

.28
5.24
8. 23

6. 92
8. 72
3.40

7. 54
38.51
4. 36

2.17
5. 08
4. 07

.50
14.16
6. 81
28.95
0

8. 53
20. 30'
9. 34
24. 81
1. 97

8.04
16.90
5.75
26. 76
0

10. 74
12. 55
2. 25
23.15
0

18. 85
33.80
7. 37
19.83
5. 08

29. 94
43. 24
8. 68
32. 80
.80

0
0
0

0
0

0

0

0

0

0

12. 85
3.20
67. 73

0
0

0

1. 88

3.73 20. 06
20. 76 18. 78
1. 68
4. 58
130. 26 136. 41

0
0

0

10.43

146
T

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

4 . — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use fr o m sources other than f a m i ly
in com e in schedule yea r, by econ om ic level— Continued

able

ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

D isp o s itio n o f M o n e y
R ec eiv e d
D u r i n g th e
S ch ed u le Y e a r N o t U s e d F o r C u r r e n t F a m i l y
E x p en d itu r e

Families in survey_______________________ _ _
Number of families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash—
On hand_________ _______
_______
In checking account_____ _ ___
In savings account________ ___ __ ___
Investment in—
Improvements in own hom e___ ______
Other real estate (including real estate
mortgages)____________ ________
Building and loan shares. _____________
Stocks and bonds______________________
Other property________________________
Payment of premiums for insurance poli­
cies:
Life insurance___________ __ _ _ . . .
Annuities_____________ __
_____
• Increase in outstanding loans to others___
Decrease in liabilities:
Payment on principal of mortgages and
down payment on own home___
Payment on principal of other mortgages.
Payment of debts to—
Banks____ . . . ___________ ______ __
Insurance companies________
._
Small-loan companies_____
_ _ _ __
Firms selling on installment plan:
Automobiles______________ _ ______
_ ... .
Other goods____ ____ ______
Individuals________________ __ _ _ . . .
Other___________________________
___

401

54

65

94

62

42

84

7
1
49

0
0
3

0
0
5

3
0
8

1
0
7

3
0
7

0
1
19

19

1

1

3

5

4

5

4
2
1
1

1
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

1
1
1
0

1
0
0
0

1
1
0
1

385
21
12

52
2
0

61
3
1

90
9
3

57
4
4

42
0
1

83
3
3

37
7

6
2

4
0

12
1

5
1

3
2

7
1

1
3
16

0
1
3

1
0
2

0
0
8

0
0
2

0
1
1

0
1
0

9
45
18
18

1
4
2
2

0
6
2
5

2
13
7
5

3
9
1
3

1
7
3
2

2
6
3
1

Average amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease in liabili­
$187. 22
ties._____ _____________
________
141. 65
Increase in assets_____________________ _
Increase in cash—
1. 47
... . .
On hand______ __________
.75
In checking account________ . . .
22.12
In savings account_______ _ _ ______ __
Investment in—
4. 66
Improvements in own home____ __ . . .
Other real estate (including real estate
1.18
mortgages)______
___________ ___
.48
Building and loan shares.. _______ . . .
Stocks and bonds______ . . . ____ __
.30
.07
Other property____________ ________
Payment of premiums for insurance poli­
cies:
106.44
Life insurance._________ _
___
2.24
Annuities__________________ ._ _ _ . .
1.94
Increase in outstanding loans to others___
Decrease in liabilities.______ . . . . . . . . __
45.57
Payment on principal of mortgages and
16.18
down payment on own home_____ __
3.40
Payment on principal of other mortgages. .
Payment of debts to—
.06
Banks. __________ _ . __________ ____
Insurance companies.. ___________ . . .
.79
Small-loan companies________________
2.83
Firms selling on installment plan:
4.19
Automobiles_________________________
10.86
Other goods___ _______ __ . . . . . . .
4.28
Individuals.__ _ ______ ____ _____ __ . .
2.98
Other___________ ._ _______ ______. . .
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




$142. 67 $140.16 $198. 36 $176. 29 $245.19 $219. 05
110. 39 114. 69 144. 04 131. 48 177. 91 169. 48
0
0
.76

0
0
8. 38

3.09
0
12.39

.77

.65
0
10.49

6.19
0
63. 08

0
3. 57
45.70

4. 57

7. 77

6. 57

6.35

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

4.84
.97
1.94
0

2.86
0
0
0

.29
1. 57
0
.34

105. 03
2.25
0
32.28

103. 82
1.34
.38
25. 47

116. 96
5. 01
2.02
54. 32

98.54
2. 09
4.19
44.81

5.90
1.40

9.00
0

21.24
5.96

14. 21
2.90

9.19
4. 67

27.62
4.18

0
3.70
4.74

.38
0
1.91

0
0
4. 58

0
0
1.19

0
1.19
5.95

0
.79
0

4. 22
7.13
3.89
1. 30

0
6.62
2.54
5.02

4.19
11. 50
3.72
3.13

6.10
13. 07
1. 61
5. 73

10. 36
24.10
10.00
1. 82

2.91
7. 59
5.62
.86

1.85
.50
0
0
0

96.92 108.18
0
1.04
2.29
2.44
67. 28 49. 57

TABULAR
T

147

SU M M AR Y

4 . — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use f r o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule ye a r , by econ om ic level— Continued

able

ST. LOUIS, M O —W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued
Economic level— Families spending per
expenditure unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to $500 to
$400
$500
$600

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le F o r F a m ily U s e F r o m
S o u r c e s O th er T h a n F a m i l y I n c o m e in S c h e d ­
u le Y e a r

Families in survey________
_______ _
__
Number of families receiving funds from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash—
On hand______ __ _ _________
_____
In checking account___ _____________ _
In savings account_____________________
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate mortgages)-----------------------------------------------Building and loan shares____
_____
Stocks and bonds_________ ________ __
Goods and chattels.______ . . .
Other property______ _____ ______ . . .
Insurance policies:
Surrender_____ ____ ______
__ _ _ .
Settlement________________ _ . . . . . .
Receipts from outstanding loans to others.
Increase in liabilities:
Increase in mortgages on own home___ .
Increase in other mortgages ___________
Increase in debts—
Payable to banks.__ _______________ . .
Payable to insurance companies______
Payable to small-loan companies ___
Payable to firms selling on installment
plan:
Automobiles__________ ____________
Other goods __________ _ __________
Payable to individuals_____________
.
Other debts___________________________
Inheritance________________________________

401

54

65

94

62

42

84

8
5
63

1
0
3

1
1
5

3
1
11

2
0
14

0
1
9

1
2
21

0
0
6
12
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
4
0

0
0
0
2
0

0
0
0
2
0

0
0
2
1
0

0
0
4
3
0

35
6
8

6
1
2

6
1
1

8
0
0

9
0
1

3
1
0

3
3
4

5
1

1
0

1
0

1
0

0
1

0
0

2
0

0
25
37

0
4
4

0
8
6

0
8
14

0
1
4

0
0
3

0
4
6

30
103
22
132
2

3
13
6
24
0

2
18
4
21
1

6
26
3
30
0

5
18
5
16
1

3
11
0
13
0

11
17
4
28
0

Average amount of funds received from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
ties. _____ . . . . -------- ---------- ---------- --- $152.47
Decrease in assets________________________
68.18
Reduction in cash—
On hand______ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _._ __
1.83
In checking account.___ __________
2. 86
In savings account _________ _______ _
30.48
Sale of property :
Real estate (including real estate mort­
0
gages)----- 1----------------------------- -------_
___
0
Building and loan shares_ __
7. 62
Stocks and bonds. _
_____ __ ___
Goods and chattels__ ____ _______ _
.96
Other property________________________
0
Insurance policies:
12.01
Surrender___ ______ _________ ________
10.49
Settlement________ __________ ______ _
Receipts from outstanding loans to others _
1.93
84.29
Increase in liabilities______ _________ _ ___
Increase in mortgages on own home.
4. 70
Increase in other mortgages. _____ _ . . .
.23
Increase in debts—
0
Payable to banks----- ------------- -------6.74
Payable to insurance companies_____ _
Payable to small-loan companies_______
8. 30
Payable to firms selling on installment
plan:
Automobiles___________
______ __
15.78
23.83
Other goods_________________________
7.05
Payable to individuals_________
____
Other debts_____ ___________ _____ .__
17. 66
2.54
Inheritance_______________ ________ ____ _
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




$108. 25 $113.19 $117.49 $155. 73 $163. 33 $242.64
42. 75
33.75
36.00
76.85
90.84 129.51
1.39
0
4. 30

2. 31
3.08
11.48

1.79
3.19
17.40

3.06
0
51.33

0
1.19
46.01

1.78
7.08
53.60

0
0
0
3.77
0

0
0
0
.31
0

0
0
0
1.13
0

0
0
9.52
.02
0

0
0
31.62
.48
0

19. 65
15.74
1.67
65. 50
3. 70
0

9. 25
.78
3.08
79.44
10. 46
0

13. 31
0
0
81.49
3.19
0

21.14
0
.19
78.88
0
1.49

0
6. 61
2.50

0
20.37
9.02

0
6.27
12.64

0
.97
4.69

0
0
6.64

0
4.42
10.11

5.10
16.43
8. 65
22. 51
0

2. 26
21. 35
3. 35
12.63
6.46

10.56
23.34
1.68
23.81
0

18. 70
28.72
12. 77
11.54
9.68

25. 61
25.55
0
14.69
0

31.87
26.60
14.17
17. 56
0

0
0
0
0
0

6. 62
3. 76
27.48 25.59
0
5.60
72.49 113.13
0
8.40
0
0

148
T

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

4 . — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received d uring schedule yea r not used f o r current
expenditure and fu n d s m ade available f o r f a m i ly use fr o m sources other than f a m i l y
in co m e in schedule ye a r , by econom ic level— Continued

able

Item

St. Louis, M o —Negro fam­
ilies
Economic level —
Families spending
per
expenditure
All
unit per year
fami$300
$400
lies
Under
and
to
$300
$400
over

Salt Lake City, Utahi
—White families

All
fami­
lies

Economic level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

D i s p o s i ti o n o f M o n e y R ec eiv e d D u r ­
i n g th e S c h e d u l e Y e a r N o t U s e d f o r
C u rren t F a m ily E x p e n d itu r e

Families in survey________________
106
210
54
28
72
29
27
51
55
No. families disposing of funds in—
Increase in assets:
Increase in cash—
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
On hand____________________
3
0
1
1
1
1
2
In checking account................
0
0
0
0
11
1
18
In savings account__________
3
2
2
7
7
7
Investment in—
12
4
2
3
3
0
0
Improvements in own home..
0
0
Other real estate (including
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
real estate mortgages)______
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Building and loan shares____
2
1
0
1
0
0
Stocks and bonds____ ______
0
0
0
4
Other property______________
0
0
0
2
0
2
0
0
Payment of premiums for in­
surance policies:
180
41
26
102
27
48
55
Lifie insurance_______________
27
58
2
1
1
0
Annuities______ _______ __
3
0
4
0
7
Increase in outstanding loans to
4
2
2
others__________ _ __
0
0
0
0
0
0
Decrease in liabilities:
Pymt. on principal of mortga­
7
12
3
1
2
0
47
10
18
ges and down pymt. on home.Payment on principal of other
1
1
3
1
0
0
2
0
mortgages______ _____
___
0
Payment-of debts to—
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Banks__________
___ ___
1
3
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
Insurance companies___ ____
4
0
2
1
2
2
0
0
1
Small-loan companies______
Firms selling on installment
plan:
2
4
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
Automobiles_______
1
14
1
30
6
18
5
8
5
Other goods___ ____________
1
2
1
1
2
1
Individuals_________________
0
0
0
21
1
Other________________
4
3
13
3
3
0
0
Av. amount of funds disposed in—
Increase in assets and/or decrease
$105. 41 $127. 43 $76. 45 $108. 65 $154. 27 $112. 73 $112. 59 $202.34 $191.54
in liabilities____ ________
84.61 85.86 61.90 95.95
Increase in assets________________
96.75 59.64 70.88 129. 96 132. 57
Increase in cash—
1. 31
.40
.42
6.46
0
.89
1.06
On hand_________ __________
.37 13.24
0
.05
0
0
2.79
0
1.25
7.19
In checking account_________
.10
15. 61
.19 15.20
4.89 15.33 10. 37 49.13
In savings account________
11.50 15.66
Investment in—
6.42
9.04
0
9.28
3. 34 15.16
0
0
0
Improvements in own home—
Other real estate (including
0
0
13.68
0
0
39.89
0
0
0
real estate mortgages)___
0
0
0
0
0
0
Building and loan shares____
0
0
0
0
Stocks and bonds____
____
0
.25
0
.73
0
0
0
. 18
1.99
4. 21
0
0
Other property_____________
0
0
2.66
0
0
Payment of premiums for insur­
ance policies:
64.15 66.74 61.34 64.22
Life insurance.................. .........
50.77 38.47 49.64 51.83 73.23
0
Annuities___________________
3.46
3.19
.55
0
2.45
0
1.97
. 17
Increase in outstanding loans to
.94
3.39
others. _________
____ ______
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.37
57. 52 53.09 41. 71 72. 38 58.97
Decrease in liabilities____________
20.80 41.57 14.55 12.70
Pymt. on principal of mortga­
0
35. 61 40.11 29.36 36. 35 37.23
3.65
3.57 10.61
ges and down pymt. on home..
Payment on principal of other
0
1.82
2.01
0
3.81
0
3.09
0
mortgages_____________
.79
Payment of debts to—
0
0
0
0
.23
0
0
0
.67
Banks___ __ ________________
4. 36
0
.12
2. 35
0
0
0
1.49
0
Insurance companies____ ____
5.94
0
1.16
.30
1.17
0
Small-loan companies________
1.57
0
2.27
Firms selling on installment plan:
.32
0
0
0
0
2.58
.56 16.70
0
Automobiles________________
12.41 25.04
.63 11.72
7. 55
4.79
8.38 11.85
.48
Other goods_________________
.41
0
.22
0
.40
.53
0
.98
.19
Individuals____________________
7.02
1.20
2.80 16. 34
0
0
6.89
1.81
1.85
Other........................ ................. .
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




TABULAR
T

SU M M AR Y

149

.

4 — D isp o s itio n o f m o n e y received during schedule yea r not used f o r current
exp en d itu re and fu n d s m ade available f o r fa m i ly u se f r o m sources other than f a m i ly
in co m e in schedule yea rt b y econ om ic level— Continued

able

St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families—Continued

Item

All
fam­
ilies

Economic level—
Families spend­
ing per expendi­
ture unit per year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
and
over

Salt Lake City, Utah—White fami­
lies—Continued

All
fami­
lies

Economic level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

F u n d s M a d e A v a ila b le fo r F a m ily U se
From
S o u r c e s O th er
Than
F a m ily
I n c o m e in S c h ed u le Y e a r

Families in survey___________________
28
106
27
51
210
54
72
29
55
Number of families receiving funds
from—
Decrease in assets:
Reduction in cash—
On h a n d ..................... ...................
1
0
0
1
12
3
3
1
5
In checking account____________
0
0
0
4
0
2
2
0
0
1
1
In savings account______________
4
2
22
11
2
6
3
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate
mortgages)___________________
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
0
Building and loan shares_______
0
0
2
0
0
1
1
0
0
Stocks and bonds_______________
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
1
0
Goods and chattels_____________
1
0
0
1
2
0
0
1
1
Other property____________ . . .
0
0
0
0
7
0
5
2
0
Insurance policies:
2
11
Surrender____ _________________
3
0
1
5
1
2
3
Settlement____________________
1
0
0
1
2
3
1
0
0
Receipts from outstanding loans
0
0
to others________________________
1
1
6
1
0
5
0
Increase in liabilities:
0
Increase in mortgages on own home0
11
2
0
0
3
6
0
1
0
0
increase in other mortgages_______
1
1
0
0
1
0
Increase in debts—
Payable to banks______ ______
0
0
2
0
0
3
1
0
0
1
0
1
11
2
4
0
2
Payable to insurance companies .
3
1
1
4
Payable to small-loan companies.
2
4
18
7
5
2
Payable to firms selling on in­
stallment plan:
1
0
4
5
11
0
2
7
Automobiles__________________
2
8
45
11
72
16
31
Other goods__________________
26
17
8
2
3
0
1
23
3
11
1
Payable to individuals__________
8
19
7
6
51
13
Other debts__________ __________
6
15
16
7
2
1
0
Inheritance___________ __________
1
0
0
0
0
0
Average amount of funds received
from—
Decrease in assets and/or increase in
liabilities_________________________ $85.37 $54. 55 $88.72 $100. 50 $153. 38 $93. 60 $130.80 $197. 70 $197. 47
Decrease in assets__________________
57.81 29. 94 54. 37 76. 87 68. 87
12.19 8. 57 4.84 18.05
Reduction in cash—
On hand_______________________
.66 0
0
8.43
9.10
6. 64 11.09
3.96
1. 37
41.38
In checking account____________
0
15. 20
0
6
0
0
7. 33
0
In savings account______________
15. 53
9.25 22. 91 12.54 20.64
5.66 8. 57 1.48
6.27
Sale of property:
Real estate (including real estate
mortgages)___________________
0
0
0
0
4. 26
6.38
0
7. 65
0
.11
Building and loan shares_______
0
0
.59
0
0
3.96
0
0
Stocks and bonds____ ___________
0
0
0
0
3. 32
0
11.28
1.06
0
.55
.24 0
.24
Goods and chattels_____________
0
.49
0
0
.40
3. 86
1. 55 24.10
Other property__________ _______
0
0
0
0
0
0
Insurance policies:
1.80 0
3.36
3.12
4.36
2.81
.27
8.48
Surrender........ .......... ........... .........
1.96
.32
7.84
.85
.38
0
Settlement___ ______ ___________
3.77 0
0
0
Receipts from outstanding loans
.06 0
0
.12
2.94
0
10.35
.67
0
to others________________________
Increase in liabilities_____ __________
73.18 45.98 83.88 82.45
95.58 63. 66 76.43 120.83 128. 60
Increase in mortgages on own home0
0
0
0
14.58 11.14 11.61 25.30
0
1.42 0
2.94
3.25
0
0
23. 57
0
0
increase in other mortgages_______
Increase in debts—
.69
.85
Payable to banks----------------------0
0
0
0
1.37
0
0
8.83 12.48
0
6.10
1.29
3.88
Payable to insurance companies .
.31 0
1.23
.89 3.33
5.54
7. 77
1.16 16.12
Payable to small-loan companies .
2.71
3. 37
3. 51
Payable to firms selling on in­
stallment plan:
27.78 28.92
11.62
0
1. 57 22. 07 26.38
Automobiles_________________ 20.99 0
22. 04 14. 03 24.95 28.44 15. 53
29.69 10.88 26.80 41. 55
Other goods__________________
2.62
9. 66
2. 61 16. 45 13. 46
1.18
.49
Payable to individuals..................
1.23 0
22.09 25.97 14.46 20.20 34.03
4.49
Other debts____ _____ __________ 16.83 34. 21 22.12
11.48
0
0
0
0
0
7. 35
6.46 0
Inheritance________________ ______
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 324.




150

W EST

NORTH

T able 5. —

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by in co m e level
D EN V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Income level—-Families with annual net income of—
All
fami­
lies

Item

D istr ib u tio n

$600
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 over

b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r
and by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey_________________________
Number of families in which chief earner
is—
Clerical worker_____ _____ ________ ____
Skilled wage earner________________ ___
Semiskilled wage earner______________ __
Unskilled wage earner___ __ ___________
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife---------------------------------- . .
Man, wife, and 1 child _____________ ___
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children . ________
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2____ _
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to
6 persons) 2________ ____ ___________ __
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons) 2___ _____ _________
___
______ __
Man, wife, and 1 adult_______
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults____________ _
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults________
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man
and wife)_______________ . _________ _
Adults (4 or more persons, not including
man and wife)_______________ ______
Adult or adults, and children (2 or 3 per­
sons, not including man and wife) ___
Adult or adults, and children (4 or more
persons, not including man and wife) _ _.

2

295

65

59

57

72

12

9

141
61
70
23

4
3
10
4

25
11
18
11

32
7
16
4

28
16
12
1

38
23
10
1

8
0
2
2

6
1
2
0

90
55
55
2

6
2
5
0

21
14
12
0

12
13
10
1

20
12
11
0

24
14
15
1

4
0
1
0

3
0
1
0

21

1

2

7

5

3

3

0

3
32
10
0

2

21

0
2
0
0

1
7
1
0

0
8
3
0

1
4
3
0

1
6
1
0

0
2
1
0

0
3
1
0

20

4

7

4

1

4

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

3

1

0

0

0

1

0

1

2

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

279
1
4
1
2
4
3

21
0
0
0
0
0
0

58
0
2
0
0
2
3

56
1
0
0
0
2
0

55
0
1
0
1
0
0

68
0
1
1
1
0
0

12
0
0
0
0
0
0

9
0
0
0
0
0
0

295
3.15

21
3.00

65
3.00

59
3.31

57
3.13

72
3. 20

12
3.45

9
2.98

3
19
2
4

0
2
0
0

0
4
2
0

1
1
0
1

0
6
0
0

0
5
0
3

2
1
0
0

0
0
0
0

3.14
.81
2.33
2. 92

3.00
.82
2.18
2. 71

2.96
.73
2.23
2. 74

3.30
.87
2.43
3.07

3.15
.76
2.39
2.94

3.19
•&
6
2.23
2.96

3.39
.37
3.02
3.26

3. 00
.44
2. 56
2.90

.11

.09

.13

.04

.12

.10

.31

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker. _
Number of families having homemaker
born in—
United States... _ _____ __________ __ __
I t a ly -______ ____________________________
Germany__________
_ ______________ _
Canada (not French)______ _____________
Ireland_ __ . . . . . ---------------------------_
Sweden. _ _ _ _ ----------- -----------------------Other----- ------------- ----- -----------------------C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households______ ______ _____
Average number of persons in household___
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers______ ______________
Boarders only.................. . . . --------------------Lodgers only____
______ ______ ______
Other persons___ ____ _________ _____
__
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total------------- . . _. . . .
. . _
Under 16 years of age___ ______________
16 years of age and over______ __________
Expenditure units_______________________
Average number of persons in household
not members of economic family______ _

0

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types were included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,”
B. L. S. Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TABULAR

T able 5.—

151

SU M M AR Y

D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by in co m e level— Continued
D E N V E R , C O L O —W H IT E F AM ILIES— Continued

Income level—Families with annual net income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$600
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 over

E a rn in g s and In c o m e

Families in survey. __________________ ____
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners____ _______
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers.. .
Other net rents.. _____________ . . . ____
Interest and dividends____ ________ ______
Pensions and insurance annuities...... .........
Gifts from persons outside economic
family--------------------------------------------------Other sources of income__________________
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)__________________________
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or de­
crease in liabilities)_________
__ _ . . .
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease ii liabilities)____ . . . -----------------Inheritance________
________ _________
Average number of gainful workers per
family___________________________________
Average amount of—
Net family income............... ........................
Earnings of individuals. ______________
Chief earner_______ _________________
Subsidiary earners__________________
Males: 16 years and over_____________
Under 16 years.. _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Females: 16 years and over_______ __
Under 16 years_______ ._
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers.
Other net rents____ ______________ ____
Interest and dividends___ _________ . . .
Pensions and insurance annuities______
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_________ _______ . . . _____ __
Other sources of income_____________ _
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)
. . . .
. . . ___ __
•Surplus per family having surplus (net
increase in assets and/or decrease in lia­
bilities)______________ _______________
Deficit per family having deficit (net de­
crease in assets and/or increase in liabil­
ities)______________ __________________
Net change in assets and liabilities for all
families in survey._________ ___________
Inheritance. . . . _ ______________ _____
3

295

59

57

72

12

9

13
6
3
6
3

15
1
3
2
0

18
6
2
5
2

7
5
5
3
4

9
3
2
1
2

7
0
1
0
0

1
1

7
0

5
2

3
1

2
5

0
2

0
1

5

1

2

1

0

0

1

0

193

13

31

36

40

57

8

8

78
0

8
0

24
0

14
0

14
0

13
0

4
0

1
0

1.29

1.24

1.20

1.32

1.42

1.11

1.80

1.89

$793 $1,061 $1,331 $1,626 $1,906 $2,219
760 1,036 1,312 1,591 1,828 1,899
717
990 1,238 1,441 1, 778 1,465
43
46
74
150
50
434
517
890 1,109 1,441 1, 733 1,502
0
0
1
0
0
0
146
243
202
150
95
397
0
0
0
0
0
0
12
2
20
9
7
53
2
4
0
5
14
63
4
0
4
1
5
21
4
17
41
3
0
101

$2,709
2, 665
1,809
856
1,664
0
1,001
0
0
11
0
0

$1, 510
1, 457
1,344
113
1, 268
(3
)
189
0
12
9
4
17

Less than $0.50.




65

5
2
0
0
1

18
12

Notes on this table are in appendix A p. 326.

5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------- 11

21

74
23
16
17
12

4
8
-1
191

6
1
(8
)
65

2
0
-1
83

6
8
-2
127

4

5
7

0
83

0
33

0

0

—1

0

204

258

251

503

(8
)

198

159

148

268

175

246

189

493

+73
0

-2 0
0

-1 5
0

+14
0

+100
0

+160
0

+104
0

+392
0

152

W EST

T able 5.—

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y in co m e level— Continued
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Income level—Families with annual net income of—
All
fami­
lies

Item

D istr ib u tio n

by

O c c u p a tio n

and by F a m ily

of

$500
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 over

C h ie f E a r n e r

T ype

1
357

35

85

91

76

41

15

14

122
81
114
40

10
4
13
8

21
12
36
16

32
21
29
9

32
21
18
5

21
11
9
0

3
7
4
1

3

84
66
68
3

15
1
5
0

13
24
17
0

16
20
22
1

21
10
12
2

15
9
7
0

2
0
3
0

2
2
2
o

44

2

8

12

10

5

2

5

5
39
14
0

Families in survey. ---------------------------------Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker____ _________ Skilled wage earner______________________
Semiskilled wage earner----------- ------------Unskilled wage earner— _ . . . -------------Number of families composed of—
Man and wife___ . . . ---------------------------Man, wife, and 1 child 2
_______________ __
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2 ___ __
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to
_____ ___________
6 persons)2 _ _ . . .
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons)2__ _ . . . _
... ...
Man, wife, and 1 adult______
. . . ____
Man, wife and 2 to 4 adults.
__________
Man, wife and 5 or more adults. _________
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man
and wife) . ---------- - - - - - - - Adults (4 or more persons, not including
man and wife). ______ ___________ _____
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 per­
sons, not including man and wife)
_
_
Adult or adults and children (4 or more
persons,, not including man and wife)_
_

1
3
2
0

1
10
1
0

1
9
2
0

0
10
5
0

0
2
1
0

2
3
2
0

0
2
1
0

b

5
1

26

5

8

8

3

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

4

1

1

0

2

0

0

0

3

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

333
7
4
4
2
2
5

31
1
0
1
2
0
0

80
3
0
1
0
1
0

88
1
1
1
0
0
0

68
2
3
1
0
0
2

40
0
0
0
0
1
0

13
0
0
0
0
0
2

13
0
0
0
0
•0
1

357
3. 54

35
2.88

85
3.34

91
3.69

76
3. 55

41
3.40

15
4.86

14
4. 25

48
4
4
19

2
1
1
0

6
2
0
3

14
1
1
4

8
0
0
5

10
0
0
4

5
0
1
2

3
0
1
1

3.37
.97
2.40
3.11

2.82
.57
2. 25
2. 59

3.27
.99
2.29
3.00

3. 51
1.17
2.34
3.23

3.41
.91
2.50
3.16

3.08
.81
2.27
2.90

4.46
1.20
3. 26
4.14

3.78
1.00
2. 78
3.58

.19

.11

.08

.20

.16

.35

.42

.47

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker..
Number of families having homemaker
born in—
United States------ _ ------- ----------------G erm any._____________________ ______
Poland. ______ ___________ -- . . . ------Russia_____ __ ._ ______________ ________
Ireland.. ----- --- ---------------- ---------------Sweden_______ __ __________ . . ---------Other___ __________ _____ __ . -------------C o m p o s itio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households_____________________
Average number of persons in household___
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers_____________ _ . . .
Boarders only __ ------------- ------------------Lodgers only------- --------------------------- ----Other persons_______________ __________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total----------- ---------------------------Under 16 years of age__________________
16 years of age and over _ ____________
Expenditure units_________ _ . . . ---------Average number of persons in household not
members of economic family. ____________

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types were included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,”
B. L. S. Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TABULAR
T

able

153

SU M M AR Y

5 . — D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y in co m e level— Continued
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S .—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Income level—■Families with annual net income of—
Item

an
All
fami­
lies

$500
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400
to
to
to
to
and
to
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 over

E a r n in g s an d In c o m e

Families in survey________ ______________
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners___________
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers. __
Other net rents______ ___________ ________
Interest and dividends____ ______ ________
Pensions and insurance annuities________
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_________________________ _____
Other sources of income_____ _____ _______
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)____ __ _______ __ ___ __
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or
decrease in liabilities)_________ __ _ ___
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or in­
crease in liabilities)_ __
_
__
Inheritance________________ __ __ _ _ __
Average number of gainful workers per
family____________ ____ _________ ________

357

35

85

91

76

41

15

14

105
50
13
14
17

7
4
1
1
4

19
6
3
3
3

28
15
3
4
3

26
7
4
3
3

8
8
0
1
2

8
6
2
0
1

9
4
0
2
1

24
14

1
3

10
3

6
2

3
4

1
2

2
0

1
0

22

0

5

5

6

5

0

1

202

12

50

45

43

28

13

11

151
3

23
0

33
2

45
0

32
1

13
0

2
0

3
0

1. 33

1.20

1.23

1. 32

1.10

1. 66

1. 93

1. 78

$757 $1, 055 $1,353 $1, 656 $1, 919 $2, 228
721 1,040 1,344 1,618 1,854 2,108
707 1,007 1,247 1,462 1, 764 1, 636
14
33
97
156
90
472
886 1,172 1, 403 1, 691 1,843
511
1
0
0
0
0
0
152
210
171
215
163
265
2
0
0
0
0
0
8
21
15
34
8
41
1
1
0
2
10
15
1
1
0
(3)
(8
)
(3
)
21
4
3
8
28
20

$2, 690
2, 563
1, 830
733
1,895
0
668
0
100
0
13
26

Average amount of—
Net family income.__ ______________ _. $1,443
Earnings of individuals____ _______
1,407
Chief earner. ___ _________________ 1,281
Subsidiary earners___________________
126
Males: 16 years and over_____________ 1, 204
Under 16 years.. __ ______
(3
)
Females: 16 years and over ________
203
Under 16 years_____________
(3
)
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers.
21
4
Other net r e n t s ..____ __ ___________
Interest and dividends___ __
____ __
1
Pensions and insurance annuities______
11
Gifts from persons outside economic
family. __ ___ ________ __ ________
5
Other sources of income______ ______
3
Deductions from income (business losses
-9
and expenses)_______ ___ _________
Surplus per family having surplus (net in­
crease in assets and/or decrease in lia­
bilities) ____________ ______ ____ __ . . .
170
Deficit per family having deficit (net de­
crease in assets and/or increase in lia­
158
bilities) _____ ______ _______ . . . .
Net change in assets and liabilities for all
+29
families in survey_____________________
4
Inheritance.. ._ . . . ______ _ _
_ __
3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




2
4

3
1

0

-4

59

104

4
1
-2 2
161

3
9

3
3

-7

-3

183

247

44
0

2
0

0

-1 4

193

354

116

116

161

221

159

394

52

-5 6
0

+16
6

+ (3)
0

+10
11

+118
0

+115
0

+267
0

154

W EST

NORTH

T able 5. —

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

D escrip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y in co m e level

KANSAS C ITY , MO -K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES
Income level—Families with annual net
income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$900

$900
to
$1,200

$1,200
to
$1,500

$1,500
to
$1,800

$1,800
and
over

D istr ib u tio n by O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a rn e r
and by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey____________________ _. _
Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker_________________________ _
Skilled wage earner _______
__________
Semiskilled wage earner___ _______ __
Unskilled wage earner____ ____ ____
___
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife_____________________ ____ Man, wife, and 1 child________
____ Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children.__ . . .
Man, wife, and 5 or more children. -------Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to
6 persons). __________ . . . ______________
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons) _ . . . . _________ _________
Man, wife, and 1 adult. _________________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults_____________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults__________
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man
and wife)___________ _____________ ____
Adults (4 or more persons not including
man and wife).. . . __________________
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons
not including man and wife)__________ .
Adult or adults and children (4 or more
persons not including man and wife)------

103

6

25

40

21

6

5

4
4
25
70

1
0
0
5

1
0
4
20

1
0
10
29

1
1
8
11

0
1
2
3

0
2
1
2

37
15
8
5

3
0
1
0

13
3
2
1

11
7
4
3

8
2
1
0

1
1
0
1

1
2
0
0

11

0

1

7

2

0

1

2
15
1
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0

2
5
0
0

0

0
0
1
0

7

0
0

3

0
0

5

1

2

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

1

2

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker. .
Number of families having homemaker born
in United States________________ ________

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

103

6

25

40

21

6

5

103
3.51

6
2.69

25
2.89

40
3. 97

21
3.41

6
3.98

5
3.80

6
0
12
4

1
0
1
0

1
0
1
2

1
0
5
1

2
0
3
0

0
0
1
0

1
0
1
1

3.34
.96
2.38
3.06

2.46
.63
1.83
2.23

2. 79
.79
2.00
2.57

3.81
1. 33
2.48
3. 46

3.18
.62
2. 56
2.96

3. 66
1.17
2.49
3. 34

3. .J
O
3.36

.18

.25

.08

.17

.25

.33

.22

C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households------ -------- --------------Average number of persons in household___
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers____________
______
Boarders only...... ...............
. -------------Lodgers only_________________ __________
Other persons____________ ____ _____ ____
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total.------------------------ ------------Under 16 years of age----------------------------16 years of age and over... . . . . . ----- —
Expenditure units---------------- ------------------Average number of persons in household
not members of economic family__________

3.60

.eo

1“ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TA B U LA R

T able 5.-— D e sc r ip tio n

S U M M A R Y

155

o f fa m ilie s studied, b y in com e level —Continued

KANSAS CITY, MO.-KANS.—NEGRO FAMILIES—Continued
Income level— Families with annual net
income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$500
to
$600

$900
to
$1,200

$600
to
$900

$1,200
to
$1,500

$1,500
to
$1,800

$1,800
and
over

E a rn in g s and In co m e

Families in survey________________________ _
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners. ............. .......
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers___
Other net rents_____ __________________ .
Interest and dividends___________________
Pensions and insurance annuities. ________
Gifts from persons outside economic family.
Other sources of income__________ ________
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)________________________ Surplus (net increase in assets and/or
decrease in liabilities)___________________
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or
increase in liabilities)___ ______ . . . . .
_____ _______
Inheritance_____________
Average number of gainful workers per
family____________________________________

103

6

25

40

21

6

5

36
14
3
2
2
2
6

0
1
0
0
1
0
0

7
1
0
0
1
1
1

14
5
1
2
0
1
3

10
4
1
0
0
0
1

3
1
0
0
0
0
0

2
2
1
•0
0
0
1

7

0

1

3

2

1

0

63

4

15

21

16

5

2

37
0

2
0

7
0

19
0

5
0

1
0

3
0

1.42

1.00

1.28

1.42

1.52

1.67

1.80

$562
548
548
0
358
0
190
0
12
0
0
2

$751
746
729
17
664
0
82
0
4
0
0
1

$1,034
1,016
936
80
945
2
69
0
14
2
1
0

$1, 342
1, 327
1,153
174
1,153
0
174
0
16
(3
)
0
0

$1, 573
1, 522
1,209
313
1,251
0
271
0
52
0
0
0

$2,172
1,953
1,527
426
1,861
0
92
0
37
2
0
0

0
2

0
0

0
180

Average amount of—
Net family income______ . . . . . . _________ $1,086
1,061
Earnings of individuals_____________ .._
952
Chief earner_____
______ _______ __
109
Subsidiary earners----------------------------947
Males: 16 years and over------------------1
Under 16 years__________
.
113
Females: 16 years and over___________
0
Under 16 years--------------------15
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers..
1
Other net rents___ _____________ ____ __
Interest and dividends_____ ___________
(3
)
Pensions and insurance annuities---------(3
)
Gifts from persons outside economic
family_______________________________
(3
)
11
Other sources of income. _________
Deductions from income (business losses
-2
and expenses)_____ _ .. .
_____ _
Surplus per family having surplus (net
increase in assets and/or decrease in
128
liabilities) _________ __________
_______
Deficit per family having deficit (net
decrease in assets and/or increase in
79
liabilities)______ ____________
... ...
Net change in assets and liabilities for all
+50
families in survey______________________
0
Inheritance----------------------------- -----------------3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




0
0
0
50

00

1

-1
44

00

5

-4
90

-3

-1

184

191

0
659

16

48

97

97

133

27

+20

+15
0

+1
0

+122
0

+137
0

+248
0

0

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

156

T able 5. —

D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s studied, by in co m e level—Continued

M IN N EAPO L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E

FAM ILIES

Income level— Families with annual net income of—
All
fami­
lies

Item

D istr ib u tio n

by

O c c u p a tio n

of

E a rn er and by F a m ily T y p e

$600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000 over

C h ie f

1

Families in survey_________ __ _______
Number of families in which chief
earner is—
Clerical worker.__ ------------------------Skilled wage earner------------------------________
Semiskilled wage earner.
Unskilled wage earner______________
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife ________ _________
Man, wife, and 1 child 2____________
_____
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2
__
Man, wife, and children and adults
(4 to 6 persons) 2__________________
Man, wife, and children and adults
(7 or more persons) 2
____ . . . . __
Man, wife, and 1 adult... . . . _____
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults____
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including
man and wife). . ____________ . . .
Adults (4 or more persons, not includ­
ing man and wife)_____
______
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3
persons, not including man and
wife) ____________ _____ __________
Adult or adults and children (4 or
more persons, not including man
____ .
and w ife)______ _______

504

27

101

128

111

78

40

8

6

5

172
126
139
67

8
1
7
11

36
14
32
19

27
32
47
22

45
33
23
10

39
19
17
3

10
18
10
2

1
4
3
0

3
3
0
0

3
2
0
0

113
91
118
6

7
6
1
0

25
29
25
2

36
25
28
1

23
16
31
2

14
13
20
0

7
2
10
1

1
0
0
0

0
0
3
0

0
0
0
0

57

1

5

15

17

10

5

3

0

1

8
47
27
0

0
2
0
0

0
7
1
0

3
8
6
0

1
14
3
0

0
9
8
0

3
6
4
0

1
1
1
0

0
0
2
0

0
0
2
0

24

10

5

3

3

2

1

0

0

0

7

0

0

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

425
7
4
2
4
3
2
24
1
32

22
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
3

89
0
1
0
0
0
1
5
0
5

113
1
0
0
3
2
0
6
1
2

88
2
1
2
0
0
0
6
0
12

67
1
1
0
1
1
0
4
0
3

33
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
4

6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

3
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv it y o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no home­
maker_______ __ _______ _______ _
Number of families having homemaker
born in—
United States _ ____________ _ __
Germany___________________________
Poland _ _ _ ______ _ ___________
Bussia.. __________
__ _____ . . .
Canada (not French)____ __________
England. _ _______ _________ ._
Ireland... _____ _ _ . . . . ___ . . .
Sweden__________ _____ ______ . . .
Canada (French)____ _____ ________
Other
____ ___ _______________
C o m p o sitio n

o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households________________
Average number of persons in house­
hold__________________________ ____ _
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers . . _________
Boarders only . . . _______ ______
Lodgers only ________ ______
...
Other persons ______ _________ . . .
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total______ _____ ___________
Under 16 years of age______ __ . . .
16 years of age and over___________
Expenditure units.. _______. . . . _.
Average number of persons in house­
hold not members of economic family.

504

27

101

128

111

78

40

8

6

5

3.68

2.59

3. 35

3. 57

3. 76

3.86

4.34

5. 21

4.44

5. 76

77
4
17
51

0
0
2
1

12
0
2
9

18
2
6
12

17
2
2
11

18
0
4
10

9
0
0
6

2
0
1
0

0
0
0
1

1
0
0
1

3.51
1. 06
2.45
3. 23

2.53
.31
2.22
2.34

3.25
1. 07
2.18
2.94

3.42
1.03
2.39
3.11

3.65
1.27
2.38
3.32

3.60
1.06
2.54
3.36

4.01
1.26
2.75
3. 75

4.50
.62
3.88
4.27

4.50
1. 33
3.17
4. 38

5.58
.40
5.18
5. 77

.21

.06

.12

.21

.16

.31

.35

.75

0

.23

i

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types were included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,”
B. L. S. Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TA B U LA R

T able 5.—

157

S U M M A R Y

D escrip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by in co m e level— Continued

M IN N EAPO LIS-ST.

PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E

FAM ILIES—Continued

Income level—Families with annual net income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$600
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000 over

E a rn in g s and In co m e

Families in survey________ ___
Number of families having—
E arn in g s of su b sid ia ry
earners______ _ ______
Net earnings from boarders
and lodgers____________ _
Other net rents_____________
Interest and dividends_____
Pensions and insurance an­
nuities______________ _ _ _
Gifts from persons outside
economic family__________
Other sources of income_____
Deductions from income
(business losses and ex­
penses) ___________________
Surplus (net increase in as­
sets and/or decrease in lia­
bilities)___________________
Deficit (net decrease in as­
sets and/or increase in lia­
bilities)___________________
Inheritance_____ __ _________
Average number of gainful
workers per family_______ __

504

27

101

128

111

78

40

154

5

19

37

33

23

89
30
79

2
0
1

12
2
15

24
5
17

20
8
17

18
8
20

5

21

7

4

5

9
6
6

3
0
2

0
0
1

1
1
0

19

0

3

2

2

5

6

0

1

0

5
1

6
3

14
4

9
2

9
5

3
2

0
0

1
1

0
1

57

0

11

18

10

13

5

0

0

0

299

14

51

70

73

51

26

7

4

3

197
5

12
1

46
0

56
2

38
1

26
1

14
0

1
0

2
0

2
0

1.40

1.19

1.23

1.32.

1.35

1.37

1.75

2.38

2.33

3.0

$824 $1,064 $1, 337 $1,651 $1,908 $2, 246 $2,516 $2,852 $4,154
814 1,053 1,304 1, 610 1,833 2,074 2,440 2,804 4,052
799 1,022 1, 239 1,490 1,686 1,744 1, 718 1, 872 1,699
15
120
330
722
31
65
147
932 2. 353
513
946 1,199 1,505 1,707 1,867 1, 773 1,932 1,991
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
(3
)
301
0

107
0

101
4

105
0

126
0

207
0

667
0

7
0
(3
)

9
1
3

23
3
2

15
10
2

32
10
4

38
15
12

73
0
3

872
0

2,061
0

0
0

75
7
0

(3
)

0

1

1

7

14

85

0

20

0

3
(3
)

2

7
5

6
3

9
11

6
22

0
0

25
3

0
20

0

0

0

0

(3
)
-5

-8

-2

-5

-6

64

63

127

151

196

284

229

214

472

157

181

200

176

193

176

26

161

496

-3 6
3

-5 0
0

-1 8
2

+39
1

+64
3

+123
0

+197
0

+89
0

+85
0

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326,




6

47
19

Average amount of—
Net family income. _ _____ $1, 549
Earnings of individuals___ 1,501
1, 356
Chief earner.. ____ . . .
Subsidiary earners______
145
Males: 16 years and over. 1, 336
Under 16 years.
(3
)
Females: 16 years and
over___ _____
164
1
Under 16 years.
Net earnings from board­
ers and lodgers___ . . .
21
Other net rents___ ________
6
3
Interest and dividends___
Pensions and insurance
annuities. _ __ . . . ____
11
Gifts from persons outside
economic family_______
6
Other sources of income...
6
Deductions from income
(business losses and ex­
penses) _________________
-5
Surplus per family having
surplus (net increase in as­
sets and/or decrease in lia­
bilities)_____________ _ .
151
Deficit per family having
deficit (net decrease in as­
sets and/or increase in lia­
bilities)____ __ . . . __ _. _
187
Net change in assets and
liabilities for all families in
survey
. . . ...
_ __ +16
Inheritance_______________ __
1
3

8

158

W E S T

T able 5.—

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s studied, b y in co m e level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Income level— Families with annual net income of—

Item

All
fami­
lies

$500 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000 over

D is tr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f
E a rn er and by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey_______ __________
Number of families in which chief
earner is—
Clerical worker____ ______ ___ _
Skilled wage earner_________ ______
Semiskilled wage earner______ ___
Unskilled wage earner. ___
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife.. ___
_
Man, wife, and 1 child 2 ___ ______
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2____
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2
__
Man, wife, and children and adults
____
___
____
(4 to 6 persons)2
Man, wife, and children and adults
(7 or more persons)2 ____ ____ __
Man, wife, and 1 adult __
__ _ Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults ___ . . .
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults .
Adults, not man and wife (2 or 3
persons) ___ ___ . ___
_ _ _
Adults, not man and wife (4 or more
__ __
persons) __ _______
Adult or adults, not man and wife,
and children (2 or 3 persons) ______
Adult or adults, not man and wife,
and children (4 or more persons)___

401

29

64

98

100

66

27

6

6

5

117
95
141
48

5
2
11
11

13
10
27
14

23
18
47
10

32
24
38
6

31
20
10
5

9
12
5
1

2
3
0
1

0
6
0
0

2
0
3
0

98
68
55
4

10
4
6
1

16
12
9
0

26
22
14
0

20
17
16
2

20
9
8
1

5
3
2
0

0
1
0
0

0
0
0
0

1
0
0
0

48

0

6

5

15

12

6

2

2

0

12
45
18
1

0
1
0
0

1
8
2
0

3
14
1
0

4
15
6
0

1
5
3
1

2
0
1
0

0
1
1
0

0
0
4
0

1
1
0
0

30

3

5

9

3

4

3

1

0

2

9

1

2

1

0

0

5

0

0

0

5

2

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

1

2

1

2

2

0

0

0

0

3

0

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

361
4
10
1
1
1
3
17

23
2
2
0
0
0
0
2

57
2
0
0
0
1
0
3

90
0
3
0
1
0
1
2

91
0
3
0
0
0
1
4

60
0
2
1
0
0
0
3

25
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

5
0
0
0
0
0
1
0

6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

4
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no home­
maker
_____
_ ___ _ .
Number of families having home­
maker born in—
United States_____ _ __
_ _
Italy____ _ _ _ _ _
___ ___ _
Germany________ ____
__
___ _ ___
P olan d .___ _
Russia___________
___
England. __ ______
Ireland... ___ __ ____ _ _
Other___ __ ______ _
_____
C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households.. _ _
Average number of persons in house­
hold________________________________
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers___ _ ___ ___ _
Boarders only______ _ __
Lodgers only___ _ ________ _ ___
Other persons______
___ __
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total___
__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Under 16 years of age ________ __
16 years of age and over___________
Expenditure units. _ ______ _ _
Average number of persons in house­
hold not members of economic family.

401

29

64

98

100

66

27

6

6

5

3.66

3.07

3.43

3.36

3. 70

3.78

4.14

4.00

5. 56

4. 58

64
3
5
14

1
0
0
0

8
1
1
0

18
1
0
4

16
0
3
5

14
0
0
3

6
0
0
1

0
0
0
0

1
1
0
0

0
0
1
1

3.48
.90
2. 58
3.22

3.05
.95
2.10
2.74

3.30
.85
2.45
3. 01

3.20
.82
2.38
2.95

3.67
1.08
2. 59
3.40

3.53
.94
2. 59
3. 27

3.92
.74
3.18
3.72

4.00
.67
3.33
3. 80

5.20
.33
4.87
4.90

4.20
.60
3.60
4.18

.20

.03

.14

.18

.24

.30

.25

.39

.40

0

1“ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types were included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,” B. L. S.
Bull, No. 357.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TA B U LA R

T able 5. —

159

S U M M A R Y

D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by in com e level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Income level— Families with annual net income of—

Item

All
fami­
lies

$500
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000 over

E a r n in g s an d In c o m e

Families in survey____________
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earn­
ers_______ ____________
Net earnings from boarders
and lodgers_______________
Other net re n ts.______ __ .
Interest and dividends______
Pensions and insurance an­
nuities_________ . . . ___
Gifts from persons outside
economic family________
Other sources of income. . _
Deductions from income
(business losses and ex­
penses) ______________ . _
Surplus (net increase in
assets and/or decrease in
liabilities)___ ______
___
Deficit (net decrease in
assets and/or increase in
liabilities). . . ___________
Inheritance.. _ _______ . . . .
Average number of gainful
workers per family_______

29

64

98

100

66

27

156

7

23

32

39

23

60
29
182

0
5
8

10
4
26

14
6
45

15
5
46

12
4
33

401

6

5

16

5

6

5

6
4
14

0
0
3

2
0
4

1
1
3

25

1

4

5

7

3

1

3

1

0

59
24

6
2

12
2

16
3

10
6

14
7

1
2

0
1

0
1

0
0

48

1

4

12

16

12

0

1

1

1

252

12

37

62

66

43

4

5

4

145
2

15
0

26
0

35
0

34
2

23
0

8
0

2
0

1
0

1
0

1.49

1.31

1.38

1.38

1.47

1.45

1.93

2.00

2. 50

3.00

Average amount of—
Net family income__________ $1, 552
Earnings of individuals___ 1,491
Chief earner __________ 1, 308
Subsidiary earners. __
183
Males: 16 years and over. 1,268
Under 16 years. _.
(3
)
Females: 16 years and
over _
_ _
223
Under 16 years.
(3
)
Net earnings from board­
ers and lodgers________
28
9
Other net rents.
8
Interest and dividends _ _
Pensions and insurance
annuities._. _
__ . . .
8
Gifts from persons outside
economic family___ _____
7
6
Other sources of income___
Deductions from income
(business losses and ex­
-5
penses)___ __ _____ __
Surplus per family having
surplus (net increase in
assets and/or decrease in
164
liabilities)_____ _________
Deficit per family having
deficit (net decrease in
assets and/or increase in
189
liabilities).. _ _ . . . ___
Net change in assets and lia­
bilities for all families in
+35
survey-----------------------------3
Inheritance. ________ __ . .

19

$770 $1,055 $1, 345 $1, 632 $1, 923 $2, 241 $2, 488 $2, 786 $3, 429
742 1,014 1,299 1,575 1,839 2,141 2,375 2, 681 3, 329
727
948 1,197 1,405 1,661 1,672 1,799 1,786 1, 628
170
102
15
178
469
66
576
895 1,701
553
776 1,102 1,395 1,674 1,739 2,165 2, 365 2,072
0
0
0
0
0
(3
)
0
(3
)
(3
)
189
(3
)

238
0

197
0

180
0

165
0

402
0

210
0

316
0

1,257
0

0
11
2

23
7
3

22
11
6

27
5
7

46
7
14

41
21
9

0
0
21

84
0
11

21
17
68

2

5

6

12

2

8

88

9

0

8
5

4
1

7

7
6

13
12

(3
)
21

0
17

0
5

0
0

-1 0

0

-1 3

_ (3 )

-2

(3
)
-6

-7

-4

-6

61

80

141

166

262

184

245

182

346

152

158

204

176

198

350

170

32

219

-5 4
0

-1 8
0

10

+16

+50
10

+102
0

+25
0

+107
0

+147
0

+233
0

* Less than $0.50.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




6

160

W ES T

T able 5.—

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by in co m e level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .—N EGR O FAM ILIES
Income level—Families with annual net
income of—
All fami­
lies
$600 to
$900

D istr ib u tio n

by

O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r
F a m ily T y p e 1

and

$900 to
$1,200

$1,200 to $1,500 and
$1,500
over

by

Families in survey_________________________________
Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker__________________________________
Skilled wage earner____ _________________________
Semiskilled wage earner________________________
Unskilled wage earner___________________ _______
Number of families composed of—
___ __________________ Man and wife________
Man, wife, and 1 child 2
______
________________
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2_____ ___________
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2
___ _________
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6 persons)2
.
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or more per­
sons)2
____ __
. ---------------------------------------------Man, wife, and 1 adult_______________________ .
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults___ _ _______________
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults_________________
Adults (2 or 3 persons, not including man and
wife)___________ - . . . . . . . ---------------------------Adults (4 or more persons, not including man and
wife)_________ . . .
---------------------------------------Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons, not
including man and wife) _. ____________________
Adult or adults and children (4 or more persons,
not including man and wife)-------------------- ---------

106

25

37

28

16

3
5
19
79

0
0
2
23

0
2
8
27

2
2
8
16

1
1
1
13

31
10
12
0
7

7
2
1
0
2

13
4
4
0
2

7
2
5
0
3

4
2
2
0
0

5
21
4
0

1
5
0
0

3
8
0
0

0
6
3
0

1
2
1
0

11

6

2

1

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

1

0

1

2

D istr ib u tio n by N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker__________
Number of families having homemaker born in
United States... _ .
. . . ---------- --------

1

0

0

0

1

105

25

37

28

15

106
3.40

25
3.10

37
3. 30

28
3.35

16
4. 22

5
0
3
3

0
0
1
0

2
0
0
1

3
0
1
0

0
0
1
2

3.38
.79
2. 59
3.10

3.08
.55
2. 53
2.82

3. 26
.75
2.51
3.00

3. 27
.66
2. 61
3.00

4.31
1.44
2.87
3.90

.06

.02

.06

.10

.06

C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households----------------------- ------------------Average number of persons in household . . . . ____
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers____________ . . ._ _________
Boarders only____ _ - . . . . -------- --------------------Lodgers only.
_ .
-- ------------Other persons _ .
________________________
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, t o t a l .- - - ---------- ---------- -------------- --Under 16 years of age_
_ ___ __ . . . ---------- .
16 years of age and o v e r ...----- ---------------- . .
Expenditure units. _ ------------------------------------------Average number of persons in household not mem­
bers of economic family. . . . . .
......

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types were included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,”
B. L. S. Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TA B U LA R

T able 5. —

161

S U M M A R Y

D e sc r ip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y in co m e level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .—NEGRO F AM ILIES— Continued
Income level—Families with annual net
income of—
Item

All fami­
lies
$600 to
$900

$900 to
$1,200

$1,200 to $1,500 and
$1,500
over

E a rn in g s a n d In co m e

Families in survey_________________ _______________
Number of families having—
Earnings of subsidiary earners______ ____________
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers.......... . __
Other net rents__________
_____________________
Interest and dividends-------------------- ------------------Pensions and insurance annuities. . . .
....
Gifts from persons outside economic family.. .
Other sources of income__________________________
Deductions from income (business losses and expenses)______
_______________________________
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities)_______________________ . ___________
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or increase in
liabilities)_____________________________________
Inheritance_____________ ________________________
Average number of gainful workers per family_____
Average amount of—
Net family income_______________________________
Earnings of individuals_____________________ .
Chief earner_____ _________________ ________
Subsidiary earners..
_
Males: 16 years and over----------------- ------------Under 16 years. ________ _ _ . . . .
Females: 16 years and over_ _______ . . . . . .
_
Under 16 years_____________ _ . . . .
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers________
Other net rents.. ______________ ____ __ . . . .
Interest and dividends________________ _ ____
Pensions and insurance annuities______________
Gifts from persons outside economic family____
Other sources of income._____ _______ __ _______
Deductions from income (business losses and
expenses)______ _____________________________
Surplus per family having surplus (net increase in
assets and/or decrease in liabilities) ______ . . . .
Deficit per family having deficit (net decrease in
assets and/or increase in liabilities)
Net change in assets and liabilities for all families
in survey________________________ .
. . . . . .
. . . . . __________ . . . .
Inheritance____ _
3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 336.




106

25

37

28

16

43
8
5
11
7
9
4

7
1
1
3
1
1
0

17
2
2
3
4
3
1

12
4
0
2
2
4
3

7
1
2
3
0
1
0

11

2

2

5

2

75

16

29

20

10

30
2
1.49

8
0
1.28

8
0
1.67

8
1
1.50

6
1
1.63

$1,162
1,145
1,014
131
1,003
1
141
(3
)
5

$781
767
732
35
652
0
115
0
2

$1,029
1,016
902
114
852

$1, 336
1,301
1,157
144
1,182
(3
)
119
0
9
0
(3
)
3
13
13

$1, 762
1,761
1, 463
298
1, 585
0
176
0
(»)
21

6

8

1

1
1
4
0

6
6

3
-1 0

-2

4

160
(3
)
5
3
(*)

15
5
(3
)
-1 5

-3

2

0
1
0
-2 3

110

30

106

136

195

204

131

121

232

372

+20

-23
0

+57
0

+31
13

- 18
19

6

162

W E S T

T

able

5.—

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , by in co m e level— Continued
SALT LAK E CITY, U TAH —W H IT E FAMILIES

Item

All
fami­
lies

Income level— Families with annual net
income of—
$600
to
$900

$900
to
$1,200

$1,200
to
$1,500

$1,500
to
$1,800

$1,800
to
$2,100

$2,100
and
over

D is tr ib u tio n b y O c c u p a tio n o f C h ie f E a r n e r
and by F a m ily T y p e 1

Families in survey. _ _
___
___ _ _
Number of families in which chief earner is—
Clerical worker__________ ____ . . . . .
Skilled wage earner___________
_ _ ___
Semiskilled wage earner.______ _________
Unskilled wage earner___ ___ _
___ __
Number of families composed of—
Man and wife____
. . . _ . . . ______ __
Man, wife, and 1 child 2____ . . . ____ __ __
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 children 2 .
_____
Man, wife, and 5 or more children 2
______
Man, wife, and children and adults (4 to 6
persons)2 ______ _________________
.
Man, wife, and children and adults (7 or
more persons)2 ______ __ __________
Man, wife, and 1 adult.__ . . . _
__
Man, wife, and 2 to 4 adults.
_ ______
Man, wife, and 5 or more adults _ _ _______
Adults, (2 or 3 persons, not including man
andwife)... . . ---------__ ._ . . . .
Adults (4 or more persons, not including
man and wife). . . .
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Adult or adults and children (2 or 3 persons,
not including man and wife)__________
Adult or adults and children (4 or more
persons, not including man and wife)___

210

35

54

53

34

25

9

100
33
60
17

16
1
11
7

26
6
17
5

22
9
19
3

18
8
7
1

12
7
5
1

6
2
1
0

35
41
49
9

8
11
3
1

7
14
15
1

11
7
17
3

4
6
6
4

4
2
7
0

1
1
1
0

28

1

8

7

6

5

1

4
9
12
0

0
2
1
0

1
1
1
0

0
1
3
0

2
3
1
0

0
1
5
0

1
1
1
0

17

5

5

2

2

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

3

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

187
1
2
3
2
13

29
0
0
1
0
5

46
0
2
0
2
2

49
1
0
1
0
2

33
0
0
1
0
0

21
0
0
0
0
4

9
0
0
0
0
0

210
3. 88

35
1. 85

54
3. 67

53
4. 08

34
4. 34

25
3. 91

9
4. 62

11
10
1
8

4
1
0
1

1
1
1
1

4
4
0
3

1
2
0
1

1
1
0
0

0
1
0
2

3. 81
1. 31
2.50
3.49

3.18
.88
2. 30
2.90

3. 68
1. 29
2.39
3. 32

3. 94
1. 49
2. 45
3. 57

4. 32
1. 74
2. 58
3. 93

3. 86
1. 08
2. 78
3. 59

4. 46
1.04
3. 42
4. 36

.08

.13

.04

. 16

.05

.06

. 18

D istr ib u tio n b y N a tiv ity o f H o m e m a k e r

Number of families having no homemaker, __
Number of families having homemaker born
in—
United States
___
Italy.. _ ___ __
Germany.
_______
___ _ _ _
___
England.____ ____ __
__ . . . ____ __ _
Sweden
___ ______ __ . . .
___ ____
Other
____ __ ____ ___________ ____ __
C o m p o sitio n o f H o u se h o ld

Number of households____________________
Average number of persons in household____
Number of households with—
Boarders and lodgers
. . .
... . . .
Boarders only.. _ _
_______________ _
Lodgers o n ly ___ __ _ . _________ _ . . .
Other persons. _ _ _ ___________
____
Average size of economic family in—
Persons, total. _. _ ._ __ __ . . . .
Under 16 years of age . _
_ _________
16 years of age and over______ __ _ _ . . .
Expenditure units____ __
_ ___ __
Average number of persons in household not
members of economic family _ _ _________

1 “ Children” are defined as persons under 16 years of age. “ Adults” are persons 16 years of age and over.
2 Families of these types were included in the 1917-19 study, “ Cost of Living in the United States,”
B. L. S. Bull. No. 357, 1924.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TA B U LA R

T able 5.—

163

S U M M A R Y

D esc rip tio n o f fa m ilie s stu died , b y in co m e level-— Continued

SALT L AK E .CITY, U T A H —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

All
fami­
lies

Income level— Families with annual net
income of—
$600
to
$900

$900
to
$1,200

$1,200
to
$1,500

$1,500
to
$1,800

$1,800
to
$2,100

$2,100
and
over

E a rn in g s and In c o m e

Families in survey__________ ______________
Number of families having:
Earnings of subsidiary earners__________ _
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers___
Other net rents . _ __________ _______
Interest and dividends- ________ _____ __
Pensions and insurance annuities_______ _
Gifts from persons outside economic family.
Other sources of income
______ _______
Deductions from income (business losses
and expenses)_ ___________________ __
Surplus (net increase in assets and/or
decrease in liabilities)___ _________ . . .
Deficit (net decrease in assets and/or
increase in liabilities)__________
_
Inheritance_____________________ _______
Average number of gainful workers per
family_____ ____________ _______ . . . _____

210

35

54

53

34

25

9

49
15
8
6
7
32
7

7
3
0
0
1
8
1

11
2
1
1
2
7
2

7
5
1
1
3
11
3

9
3
3
1
1
2
0

7
1
2
2
0
2
0

8
1
1
1
0
2
1
0

1

0

0

1

0

0

110

12

22

34

19

16

7

95
0

22
0

30
0

19
0

14
0

8
0

2
0

1.32

1.23

1.23

1.19

1. 33

1.47

2.53

$793
763
740
23
506
0
257
0
13
0
0
2

$1,037
1,012
974
38
850
0
162
0
4
2
(3
)
6

$1,326
1,265
1, 221
44
1,141
0
124
0
6
11
26

$1,612
1,588
1,505
83
1,396
0
192
0
3
8
(3
)
2

$1,939
1,884
1,749
135
1,704
0
180
0
9
20
7
0

$2, 483
2,373
1, 494
879
1,343
0
1,030
0
5
5
13
0

15

8
5

10
3

11
0

19
0

41
46

0

0

0

0

0

37

85

85

146

272

331

158
-8 7
0

120
-3 2
0

133
+7
0

248
-2 0
0

139
+130
0

124
+230
0

Average amount of—
Net family income.
_. ----- ------------------ $1,332
1, 290
Earnings of individuals_______________
1,198
Chief earner-------------------- ---------------92
Subsidiary earners... .._ _ _ _ _ .
Males: 16 years and over___ _______
1,077
Under 16 years.
___________
0
Females: 16 years and over____ ____
213
Under 16 years. . .
_____
0
Net earnings from boarders and lodgers. _
6
Other net rents----------------------- --------------6
Interest and dividends _ . ___________
4
Pensions and insurance annuities. . . ___
9
Gifts from persons outside economic
family______
___
___ . . . _
13
4
Other sources of income. _____________
Deductions from income (business losses
_ (3 )
and expenses) _______ _______ ______
Surplus per family having surplus (net
increase in assets and/or decrease in lia­
133
bilities) ____________ ________ _____
Deficit per family having deficit (net
decrease in assets and/or increase in lia­
152
bilities)________________ ______________
Net change in assets and liabilities. ------+1
0
Inheritance____ _____________ ___________
3

Less than $0.50.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




(3
)

f
i

-1

164

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION
T

able

6 . — E x p e n d itu r es f o r grou p s o f item s , by in co m e level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Income level—
-Families with annual net income of—

Item

All
fami­
lies

$600
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 over

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r G ro u p s o f Item s

Families in survey______ ____ __ _ _ ___ _
Average family size—
Persons. . . . ---------------------------------- . .
Expenditure units.. ._ . ----------------Food expenditure units.
. ----------Clothing expenditure units----- ----------------

295

21

65

59

57

72

12

9

3.14
2.92
2. 73
2. 57

3.00
2.71
2. 52
2. 23

2.96
2.74
2. 55
2. 37

3.30
3.07
2.86
2.74

3.15
2.94
2.74
2. 64

3.19
2.96
2.80
2.50

3.39
3.26
3.08
3. 21

3.00
2.90
2. 72
2.91

$823 $1,083 $1,315 $1, 535 $1, 755 $2,103
353
378
455
489
510
560
66
103
136
151
215
232
151
169
225
243
269
285
70
78
93
105
113
106
26
42
62
82
56
104
19
42
28
67
50
89
94
152
43
111
189
295
13
23
28
31
33
38
33
57
84
61
89
106
32
64
84
73
95
123
1
3
4
5
17
66
2
0
4
3
8
4
21
7
13
14
25
25

$2,346
632
293
266
99
97
132
330
73
93
131
3
19
23

Average annual current expenditure for—
All items_________ __ ____ . . . ________ $1,445
461
Food______ . . . --------------- . . ------------154
Clothing_________________
________
226
Housing..
-------------------------- -------Fuel, light, and refrigeration___________
96
Other household operation. __ . . . __ _
62
Furnishings and equipment______ . . . .
49
Transportation____ . . . _______ ______
144
Personal care...
___ _____ ________
29
73
Medical care_____ ____ __ . . . . . ____
Recreation________________________ . . .
79
Education.__________________
_____
10
Vocation____________ ________________
5
Community welfare___________________
18
Gifts and contributions to persons out­
side the economic family... . . . . .
36
3
Other items... ___ _____ __________ _
Percentage of total annual current expendi­
ture for—
All items-------------------------------------------------Food____
______ __
. . . . . ____
Clothing... ____ ____
. . . ______ __ . .
Housing. ._ ----------------- ------- --------------Fuel, light, and refrigeration_ _______
_
Other household operation.__ _________
Furnishings and equipment . . . _______
Transportation____ _________ _______ .
Personal care______ _______ __ _______
Medical care___________ . . . _________
Recreation. _________
______ _
____
Education. ____ ____ __ . . . . . . ____
Vocation____ _________ _______
_____
Community welfare_____ ______ ______
Gifts and contributions to persons out­
side the economic family. _ __________
Other items____ ________ ___ . . . . .

5
4

25
0

17
1

35
2

53
7

67
3

155
0

100.0
31.9
10.7
15.6
6.6
4.3
3.4
10.0
2.0
5.1
5.5
.7
.3
1.2

100.0
42.9
8.0
18.4
8.5
3.2
2.3
5.2
1.6
4.0
3.9
.1
0
.8

100.0
34.9
9.5
15.6
7.2
3.9
2.6
8.7
2.1
5.6
5.9
.3
.2
1.2

100.0
34.7
10.3
17.1
7.1
4.2
3.2
8.4
2.1
4.3
5.6
.3
.2
1.1

100.0
31.8
9.8
15.8
6.9
4.0
4.4
9.9
2.0
5.5
5.5
.3
.3
1.4

100.0
29.1
12.2
15.4
6.4
4.7
2.8
10.8
1.9
5.1
5.4
1.0
.4
1.4

100.0
26.7
11.1
13.6
5.1
4.9
4.2
14.0
1.8
5.0
5.8
3.1
.2
1.2

100.0
26.9
12.5
11.3
4.2
4.2
5.6
14.1
3.1
4.0
5.6
.1
.8
1.0

2.5
.2

.6
.5

2.3
0

1.3
.1

2.3
.1

3.0
.4

3.2

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




.1

6.6

0

TA B U L A E

T

able

165

S U M M A EY

6. — E x p en d itu res f o r gro u p s o f item s , b y in co m e level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O -K A N S .—W H IT E FAMILIES
Income level— Families with annual net income of—
Item

All
fami­
lies

$500
to
$900

$900
to
$1,200

$1,200
to
$1,500

$1,500
to
$1,800

$1,800
to
$2,100

$2,100
and
over

E x p en d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f Item s

Families in survey______ __________________
Average family size—
Persons_______________________ ____ _____
Expenditure units________________________
Food expenditure units___________________
Clothing expenditure units____________ __

367

35

85

91

76

41

29

3.37
3.11
2.88
2.70

2.82
2.59
2.40
2. 23

3. 27
3.00
2.74
2. 58

3. 51
3. 23
2.99
2. 76

3. 41
3.16
2.94
2.77

3.08
2.90
2.69
2.58

4.13
3.87
3. 67
3.47

$808
295
72
138
67
33
19
76
16
30
32
3
2
11

$1, 052
358
91
189
84
39
48
103
22
39
46
6
2
10

$1, 361
433
131
199
104
57
74
146
26
65
70
11
4
16

$1, 659
481
179
231
110
79
97
221
34
67
75
12
6
24

$1,800
480
190
296
108
91
75
251
39
73
89
14
10
27

$2, 272
633
284
273
159
117
114
294
49
92
138
33
12
28

11
3

12
3

20
5

40
3

49
8

37
9

100.0
30.4
10.2
15.1
7.1
4.5
5.0
11.9
2.0
4.2
4.9
.8
.4
1.3

100.0
36.4
8.9
17.1
8.3
4.0
2.4
9.4
2.0
3.7
4.0
.4
.2
1.4

100.0
34.0
8.6
17.9
8.0
3.7
4.6
9.8
2.1
3.7
4.4
.6
.2
1.0

100.0
31.9
9.6
14.6
7.6
4.2
5.4
10.7
1.9
4.8
5.1
.8
.3
1.2

100.0
29.0
10.8
14.0
6.6
4.8
5.8
13.4
2.0
4.0
4. 5
.7
.4
1.4

100.0
26.7
10.6
16.5
6.0
5.0
4.2
13.9
2.2
4.0
4.9
.8
.6
1.5

100.0
27.9
12.5
12.0
7.0
5.2
5.0
12.9
2.2
4.0
6.1
1.5
.5
1.2

1.8
.4

1.4
.4

1.1
.3

1.5
.4

2.4
.2

2.7
.4

1.6
.4

Average annual current expenditure for—
All items________________________________
$1, 421
433
Food___ _________ _________________
145
Clothing________________
----215
Housing.______ _________ ______ ____
Fuel, light, and refrigeration... . . . ____
101
64
Other household operation____ . . . _ . . .
Furnishings and equipment.. _________
71
Transportation_________________________
169
29
Personal care_______________ __________
59
Medical care__________________________
69
Recreation___ _____________ __
. . __
12
Education__________________
. . . ____
5
Vocation_______________________________
18
Community welfare_____________ _______
Gifts and contributions to persons out­
side the economic family______________
26
5
Other items______________ ____ __
Percentage of total annual current expendi­
ture for—
All it e m s ._______________________________
Food___________________________________
Clothing______ __________ _ __________
Housing.____ __________________________
Fuel, light, and refrigeration-----------------Other household operation. _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Furnishings and equipment..
Transportation_______ _________________
Personal care____ __
.
Medical care___ _______ _______ ______
_ .
_____
Recreation___
Education_____ _______ _
_ _
_ _
Vocation___ _ ___ __ _
______ _____
Community welfare. ___ . _ _ ___ _
Gifts and contributions to persons out­
side the economic fam ily____ _ ___
Other items. _ _____ _________ _______
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




166

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

6. — E x p en d itu res f o r grou ps o f item s , b y in com e level— Continued
KANSAS C IT Y , MO -K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES
Income level—Families with annual net
income of—
Item

All
families
$500
to $600

$600
to $900

$900
to $1,200

$1,200
$1,500
to $1,500 and over

E tp e n d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f Item s

Families in survey_________ ____________
Average family size—
Persons_________ ___________ ___
Expenditure units____________________
Food expenditure units-----------------------Clothing expenditure units------ -------Average annual current expenditure for—
All items---------------------------------------------Food______ ___ ________ ____ _
Clothing____________________________
Housing___________________________
Fuel, light, and refrigeration________
Other household operation__________
Furnishings and equipment-___ __
Transportation---------------------------------Personal care_________ ___________
Medical c a r e .______________________
Recreation..
. ___ ______ __
Education _______ ______________
Vocation____________________________
Community welfare_________ _______
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family......... .
Other items__________________
.
Percentage of total annual current ex­
penditure for—
All items-------------------------- ----------- _
F ood _____________ . .
______ . . .
Clothing. _________________________
Housing.
____ __
Fuel, light, and refrigeration — . .
Other household operation____ _ _.
Furnishings and equipment____ _
Transportation. . . ________ ______
Personal care___ ___ ______ ___ . . .
Medical care. . . .
. . . ________ . . .
Recreation._______ __________ _ . . .
Education ______ _________ ______
Vocation _____ _____ _______
___
Community welfare _ _ . . . ______
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family. ______
Other item s.._ . . . ____ _______ . . .

103

6

25

40

21

11

3.34
3.06
2.87
2.60

2.46
2.23
2.10
1.82

2. 79
2. 57
2. 42
2.19

3.81
3. 46
3.20
2.91

3.18
2.96
2.80
2. 58

3.63
3.35
3.20
2. 89

$1,043
356
102
141
106
42
38
81
25
48
50
2
2
17

$556
229
52
76
77
29
5
16
9
24
26
1
0
9

$737
274
70
139
71
21
18
43
18
35
34
1
0
8

$1,045
362
90
142
114
43
45
81
24
56
51
2
1
16

$1, 225
410
134
146
128
63
47
86
33
55
46
2
6
24

$1, 645
486
184
164
136
53
59
194
39
51
105
2
2
32

28
5

3
0

5
0

9
9

41
4

136
2

100.0
34.1
9.8
13.5
10.2
4.0
3.6
7.8
2.4
4.6
4.8
.2
.2
1.6

100.0
41.1
9.4
13.7
13.9
5.2
.9
2.9
1.6
4.3
4.7
.2
0
1.6

100.0
37.2
9.5
18.9
9.7
2.8
2.4
5.9
2.4
4.7
4.6
.1
0
1.1

100.0
34.6
8.6
13.5
10.9
4.1
4.3
7.8
2.3
5.4
4.9
.2
.1
1.5

100.0
33.5
10.9
11.9
10.5
5.1
3.8
7.0
2.7
4.5
3.8
.2
.5
2.0

100.0
29.5
11.2
10.0
8.3
3.2
3.6
11.8
2.4
3.1
6.4
.1
.1
1.9

2.7
.5

.5
0

.7

.9
.9

3.3
.3

8.3
.1

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




0

TA B U LA R

T

able

167

S U M M A R Y

6. — E x p en d itu res f o r grou p s o f item s, b y in co m e level— Continued
M IN N E A P O L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Income level—Families with annual net income of—
All
fami­
lies

Item

$600
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 $2,700 $3,00
over

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r G r o u p o f Ite m s

Families in survey____________
Average family size—
__
Persons_______ _____ __
Expenditure u n its .____ __ _
Food expenditure units_____
Clothing expenditure units __

504

27

101

128

111

78

40

8

6

5

3. 51
3. 23
2.98
2.79

2. 53
2. 34
2.16
2.09

3. 26
2. 94
2.70
2.49

3. 42
3.11
2. 84
2. 64

3. 65
3.32
3. 04
2.82

3.60
3.36
3.12
2. 88

4. 01
3. 75
3. 59
3. 29

4. 50
4.27
4. 04
4.00

4. 33
4. 38
4.06
4. 47

5.58
5.77
5. 36
6.50

Average annual current ex­
penditure for—
All items __ ________ _______ $1, 550
488
Food_____________________
Clothing- _______ ________
155
Housing_________
__
246
Fuel, light, and refrigera­
tion_________ __ _
137
Other household operation.
58
Furnishings and equipment.
71
Transportation----- -----------157
Personal care.. . . .
30
69
Medical care. ___________
72
Recreation. _. . . . _ _
9
Education— _. _ _ _ _ _ _ _
__ ___
6
Vocation_______
Community welfare___ __
18
Gifts and contributions to
persons outside the eco­
27
nomic family___ __ __ _
7
Other items____ __ __ __.
Percentage of total annual cur­
rent expenditure for—
All items___________________ 100.0
31.4
Food____________________
Clothing_ _________ _____
_
10.0
Housing_____________ ___ 15.9
Fuel, light, and refrigera­
8.9
tion _____________ ______
3.7
Other household operation.
Furnishings and equip­
ment___________________
4.6
Transportation______ _ __ 10.1
1.9
Personal care.. _________
4.5
Medical care ___________
Recreation. . . _. ___ __
4.6
Education.._ _ . . . ._ _. .
.6
.4
Vocation_________________
1.2
Community welfare. _ __
Gifts and contributions to
persons outside the eco­
1.7
nomic family. __ ______
.5
Other items___ ___ ____

$871 $1,129 $1, 371 $1, 626 $1,869 $2,132 $2, 298 $2, 768 $4,098
384
709
308
450
516
546
659
713
988
121
162
65
99
185
248
303
651
476
194
227
218
250
281
281
273
425
366
96
26
23
48
15
29
33
1
1
10

105
36
50
95
19
43
44
5
4
10

130
48
74
127
24
64
60
5
6
15

143
66
66
177
33
75
77
7
6
18

162
72
88
227
37
86
97
13
6
26

175
87
82
242
39
88
118
22
12
24

175
123
129
196
53
74
114
23
12
33

153
108
197
166
69
172
139
30
15
28

246
117
182
483
110
221
188
23
20
50

12
10

14
3

14
6

27
3

41
2

52
3

80
1

74
3

129
324

100.0
35.4
7.5
22.3

100.0
34.0
8.8
19.3

100.0
32.8
8.8
16.5

100.0
31.8
10.0
15.4

100.0
29.3
9.9
15.0

100.0
31.0
11.7
13.2

100.0
30.9
13.2
11.9

100.0
25.8
17.2
15.4

100.0
24.2
15.9
8.9

11.1
3.0

9.3
3.2

9.5
3.5

8.8
4.0

8.7
3.8

8.2
4.1

7.6
5.4

5.5
3.9

6.0
2.8

2.6
5.5
1.7
3.3
3.8
.1
.1
1.1

4.4
8.4
1.7
3.8
3.9
.4
.4
.9

5.4
9.3
1.8
4.7
4.4
.4
.4
1.1

4.0
10.9
2.0
4.6
4.7
.4
.4
1.1

4.7
12.1
2.0
4.6
5.2
.7
.3
1.4

3.8
11.4
1.8
4.1
5.5
1.0
.6
1.1

5.6
8.5
2.3
3.2
5.0
1.0
.5
1.4

7.1
6.0
2.5
6.2
5.0
1.1
.5
1.0

4.4
11.8
2.7
5.4
4.6
.6
.5
1.2

1.4
1.1

1.2
.3

1.0
.4

1.7
.2

2.2
.1

2.4
.1

3.5
0)

2.7
.1

3.1
7.9

1 Less than 0.05 percent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.

5 3 9 5 7 °— 39-




12

168

W EST
T

able

.

6—

W ORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

E x p e n d itu r es f o r grou p s o f item s, by in co m e level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .—W H IT E F AM ILIES
Income level— Families with annual net income
of—

Item

All
fami­
lies

$500
to
$900

$900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,200 $1,500 $1,800 $2,100 $2,400 over

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s of Ite m s

Families in survey--------------------------------------Average family size—
Persons-------------- ------- -----------------------------Expenditure units_____ __________________
Food expenditure units_____ _______ __
Clothing expenditure units __________ . .

401

29

64

98

100

66

27

17

3.48
3. 22
3.00
2.83

3.05
2. 74
2.53
2. 33

3. 30
3.01
2.78
2. 63

3.20
2.95
2.75
2. 57

3.67
3. 40
3.17
2.98

3.53
3.27
3.04
2.89

3.92
3. 72
3.49
3.43

4.4?
4. 3
C

$832 $1, 077 $1, 341 $1, 610 $1, 837 $2, 202
409
331
466
553
576
662
82
75
112
152
189
236
146
191
208
264
273
266
72
94
97
107
109
114
34
21
38
53
66
88
22
48
71
69
67
130
76
146
167
249
49
287
24
13
19
30
35
45
34
19
46
64
92
82
54
42
76
91
103
157
4
1
7
5
17
4
4
1
7
9
9
16
10
5
22
18
29
43

$2, 671
88?
3ie
28?
131
81
10(
281
57
171
17f
?
3]
41

Average annual current expenditure for—
All items________________________________ $1, 525
518
Food___ ___________________ ________
144
Clothing___ __________________ ________
233
Housing-----------------------------------------------102
Fuel, light, and refrigeration___________
50
Other household operation______ ____ __
68
Furnishings and equipment.....................
166
Transportation______________________
28
Personal care........ .......................................
61
Medical care________________ _________ _
88
Recreation_____________________________
7
Education_____________________________
8
Vocation_______________________________
21
Community welfare___________________
Gifts and contributions to persons out­
23
side the economic family_____________
8
Other items_____ _____ ________________
Percentage of total annual current expendi­
ture for—
All items_________________ _____ ______ _ 100.0
33.9
Food ________________ _ __ _________
9.4
____ _______
Clothing____________
15.3
H o u s in g .____ _______________________
6.7
Fuel, light, and refrigeration________ _
3.3
Other household operation.._
. . . . __
4.5
Furnishings and equipment__________
10.9
Transportation___________________
...
1.8
Personal care________
____________
4.0
Medical care________________ ________
5.8
Recreation____ ________________________
.5
Education. _ _________ _____________
.5
Vocation______
. _ . . . _______ __ _.
1.4
Community welfare ____ ............. .
Gifts and contributions to persons out­
1.5
side the economic family____ ________
.5
Other items________________ _________
1 Less than $0.50.
2 Less than 0.05 percent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




4. ie

3.91

20
0)

28
5

19
2

18
1

23
9

42
30

31
5?

100.0
39.8
9.0
17.6
8.7
2.5
2.6
5.9
1.6
4.1
5.0

100.0
37.9
7.6
17.7
8.7
3.1
4.5
7.1
1.8
1.8
5.0
.4
.4
.9

100.0
34.8
8.4
15.5
7.3
2.8
5.3
10.9
1.8
3.4
5.7

100.0
31.3
10.3
14.4
5.9
3.6
3.6
13.6
1.9
5.0
5.6
.9

100.0
30.1
10.7
12.1
5.2
4.0
5.9
13.0
2.0
3.7
7.1
.2
.7
2.0

100. c
33.1
11.?
10.?
4.1
3.1
3.7
10. £
2. ]
6. 4
6.e

1.6

100.0
34.3
9.4
16.9
6.6
3.3
4.3
10.4
1.9
4.0
5.7
.3
.6
1.1

2.6

1.4

1.1

1.3

.1
.1
.6

2.4
(a
)

.5

.5
.5

.1

.1

.5

1.6
.5

1.9
1.4

2

1 ]
.’
1.?
1 .4

2.1

TABULAR
T

able

6.—

169

SU M M A R Y

E x p en d itu res fo r grou ps o f item s} b y in co m e level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O —NEGRO F AM ILIES
Income level— Families with annual net
income of—
Item

All
families

$600
to
$900

$900
to
$1,200

$1,200
to
$1,500

$1,500
and
over

E x p e n d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f Item s

Families in survey.________ ___________ __ __ . . . .
Average family size—
Persons.._____ ______ _________
____ _________
Expenditure u n i t s ..__ ____ ______ _______ ____
Food expenditure units._ ______________ ____ . . .
Clothing expenditure units. - __ ___ _ ________
Average annual current expenditure for—
All items ____ _________ ______ ________ ________
Food - ___ . . . __________ _____ _________ . . .
Clothing_____ . __ _____ ___ _______________
Housing__ __________________ _ ______________
Fuel, light, and refrigeration. _____
...
__
Other household operation. _____ ___ __ _____
Furnishings and equipment___________________
Transportation__ _________________ _ __ _. _.
___
Personal care______ ____________ ______
Medical care___ __________ . . ____________ ._
Recreation__ _ _. _ . _ _ _ __________ _____
Education_____ _ ____ __________________ _
Vocation__________ ______ _ ______ ______ .
Community welfare..__ ____________
______
Gifts and contributions to persons outside the
economic family___ ________
. . . . . . . . __
Other items _____ _ . _ _ ________
_____
Percentage of total annual current expenditure for—
All items .
____ ________ ____ __
Food______
____ _________________ _________
Clothing____________ . . . . __________ ____ .
Housing ______ _
__________ ______ ___ ____
Fuel, light, and refrigeration__________________
Other household operation. __ _______________
Furnishings and equipment__________ __ _ . . .
Transportation
________ _ _____ _______
Personal care_____ _____ _____ ____ _
____
Medical care_____ _______ __________ ______ . .
Recreation____ _____
__ _ __ _ ________ ___
Education______ __
. . .
. . . __
Vocation __ _____
____________ _ __ __ __
Community welfare.
____ _______ ________
Gifts and contributions to persons outside the
economic family ____________
. . _________
Other items. _ ______________ ______________ _
1 Less than $0.50.
Less than 0.05 percent.

2

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




106

25

37

28

16

3.38
3.10
2.89
2. 65

3.08
2.82
2. 65
2. 34

3. 26
3.00
2. 82
2. 58

3.27
3.00
2. 77
2. 64

4. 31
3.90
3. 63
3. 33

$1,153
383
119
183
97
37
58
106
27
48
41
2
5
16

$814
300
61
158
90
24
24
49
19
39
29
(i)
3
10

$981
365
96
165
92
26
37
58
22
47
41
1
6
15

$1,326
405
151
200
94
40
82
153
33
57
45
1
7
17

$1, 777
517
204
230
127
79
118
224
39
48
53
10
6
25

31

8
0

10

40
1

97
0

0)

0)

100.0
33.2
10.3
15.9
8.4
3.2
5.0
9. 2
2.3
4.2
3. 6
.2
.4
1. 4

100.0
36.9
7. 5
19. 5
11.1
2.9
3.0
6.0
2.3
4.7
3.5
(2
)
.4
1.2

100.0
37.2
9.7
16.9
9.4
2.7
3.7
5.9
2.3
4.8
4.2
.1
.6
1.5

100.0
30.5
11.4
15.1
7.1
3.0
6.2
11.6
2.5
4.3
3.4
.1
.5
1.3

100.0
29. 1
11. 5
12.9
7. 2
4.4
6. 7
12.6
2.2
2.7
3.0
.5
.3
1.4

2. 7
(2
)

1.0
0

1.0
(2
)

3.0
(2
)

5.5
0

170

W EST
T

able

6 .—

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

E x p en d itu res f o r grou ps o f item s, b y in co m e level— Continued
SALT L A K E C IT Y , U T A H — W H IT E FAM ILIES
Income level—Families with annual net income of—

Item

All fami­
lies

$500 to
$900

$900 to
$1,200

$1,200 to
$1,500

$1,500 to $1,800 and
$1,800
over

E x p en d itu r e s fo r G r o u p s o f Item s

210

35

54

53

34

34

3.81
3.49
3. 25
2. 98

3.18
2.90
2.66
2.50

3.68
3. 32
3.10
2. 83

3.94
3. 57
3.33
2.94

4.32
3.93
3.68
3.32

4.02
3. 79
3. 52
3.43

$1, 339
423
163
202
99
58
56
112
31
64
56
8
6
36

$892
292
94
152
76
35
43
57
22
47
42
3
0
14

$1,080
375
129
187
77
44
35
66
26
57
43
3
4
17

$1, 334
438
149
201
103
54
57
97
31
72
64
8
8
28

$1, 632
491
205
210
121
77
79
159
40
75
62
12
13
55

$1,934
546
270
271
129
89
81
214
43
67
70
18
9
85

21
4

10
5

16
1

20
4

25
8

37
5

100.0
31.6
12.2
15.1
7.4
4.3
4.2
8.3
2.3
4.8
4.2
.6
.4
2.7

100.0
32.8
10.5
17.0
8.5
3.9
4.8
6.4
2.5
5.3
4.7
.3
0
1.6

100.0
34.7
11.9
17.3
7.1
4.1
3.2
6.1
2.4
5.3
4.0
.3
.4
1.6

100.0
32.8
11.2
15.1
7.7
4.0
4.3
7.3
2.3
5.4
4.8
.6
.6
2.1

100.0
30.1
12.6
12.9
7.4
4.7
4.8
9.7
2.5
4.6
3.8
.7
.8
3.4

100.0
28.2
13.9
14.0
6.7
4.6
4.2
11.1
2.2
3.5
3.6
.9
.5
4.4

1.6
.3

1.1
.6

1.5
.1

1.5
.3

1.5
.5

1.9
.3

Families in survey-------— ---------------Average family size—
Persons..- - --- -- -------- --------------- Expenditure units___- -- ------------------Food expenditure units - - _
----Clothing expenditure units-----------------Average annual current expenditure for—
Allitems-_ ___
-- --Food— ___ - --------------------------------- Clothing.. -_- _ - ----------- - --- Housing---- --------------------------------------Fuel, light, and refrigeration—
----Other household operation.. _ _ _ ----Furnishings and equipment. ----- —
Transportation.._ —
—- . . . -Personal care... —
-- - -------- --- Medical care... _ - - - - — ------Recreation.
— ----------- --Education
— ----------------- --Vocation...
. .
—- ---------- - - Community welfare________________
Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family.
----Other items. — — ------------------------Percentage of total annual current expend­
iture for—
All items
.
---------------------Food.
-_ - ----------- ----- Clothing.-. ___ -_ ----------- ----------Housing--------- ------------------------- --Fuel, light, and refrigeration------ __
Other household operation. _ _
Furnishings and equipment—. __
Transportation. _ __ _ _ __ _ —
Personal care--------------Medical care
Recreation. ___
___ . . ------------Education
__ —
_
Vocation
_ ------____
Community welfare..
----------Gifts and contributions to persons
outside the economic family.. ----Other items.
___ _ _
—. _

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.







172
T

able

W EST

NO RTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

7 .— F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c o n su m p tion at hom e during 1
w eek in sp rin g quarter, by econom ic level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending
per expenditure unit per year

All fami­
lies

Item

Under $400 $400 to $600
Number of families surveyed in spring quarter____
Average number of equivalent full-time persons per
family in 1 week_____________________________________
Average number of food expenditure units 2 per family
in 1 week.
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
fo r
C o n s u m p t i o n at
H om e
in
1 W eek

Grain products, total
_ __
Bread and other baked goods,
total
. _____ _______
Bread: White______________
Gr a h a m, whol e
wheat____________
Rye-----------------------Crackers.. _ ______ __
—_
Plain rolls _. _______ _ —_
Sweet rolls___ __
________
Cookies
__________ —
Cakes____ ________ Pies_______ _______________
Other
_ __
Ready-to-eat cereals________
Flour and other cereals, total.
Flour: White______________
Graham
. _______
Other___
________
Corn m e a l.___ _______ . . .
Hominy___________________
Cornstarch.
_________ _
Rice______________________
Rolled oats----- ---------------Wheat cereal_______________
Tapioca____________________
Sago_______________________
Macaroni, spaghetti, noo­
dles—
Other grain products_______
Eggs----------------------------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream, total.
Milk: Fresh, whole—bottledloose___
skimmed_______
buttermilk and
other_________
Skimmed, dried_______
Evaporated and con­
densed_____________
Cheese: American___________
Cottage_____________
Other_______________
Icecream________________ . . .

2.99

N o.

N o.

N o.

2.13

3.42
Average quantity pur­
chased per person 1 in
1 week

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per fam­
ilies
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

$600 and
over

Lb.

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

Lb.

Lb.

2.04

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

All
fam­
ilies

$600
and
over

Lb.

2.53

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

4.902 4. 463 5.159 5. 334
165

54

57

54

72
36
83
20
46
46
40
37

13
13
25
4
7
10
7
7

28
12
32
10
17
19
14
16

31
11
26
6
22
17
19
14

294.8 2 2 7 . 0 311. 2 393.1
44.2 37.3 46.8 53.0

2.872 2.463 3.195 3.172
1.671 1.712 1.716 1.542

29.4 23.4 32. 7 35. 5
13.6 13.8 14.1 12.’ 6

.407 .264 .511 .521
.121 .109 .101 . 178
. 141 .058 . 197 .213
.043 .020 .060 .060
.112 .038 .140 .207
.076 .065 .087 .080
.075 .032 .078 . 146
. 174 .070 .292 .200
.052 .095 .013 .025
. 110 .094 .122 .123
1.920 1.906 1.842 2.039
1.192 1.122 1.269 1.212
.004 .008 0
0
.036 .041 .040 .025
.103 .128 .038 . 142
.022 .011 .019 .046
.025 .016 .032 .032
.095 . 106 .099 .071
. 136 .130 .151 .128
.090 .054 .065 .184
.017 .013 .015 .025
.002 0
.005 0

3.4 2.3 4.2 4.2
1.0
.9
.8 1.5
2.2 1.5 2.6 2.9
.6
.3
.8
.9
2.0
.6 2.3 4.2
1.9 1.3 2.2 2.6
2.3
.9 2.9 3.8
1.7
.7 2.6 2.3
5
. 7 1.1
.2
1.9 1.8 2.2 l! 9
12.9 12.1 11.9 15. 6
5.7 5.5 5.6 6^0
0
(3
)
0
(3
)
.3
.2
.4
.4
.5
.7
.2
.7
.2
.1
.1
.3
.2
.1
.3
.3
.9
.8
.9
.9
1.2 1.2 1.2 1.4
1.5
.8 1.3 2.9
.3
.3
.3
.4
0
.1 0
(3
)

.174
0
.965
5.832
4. 721
.061
0

2.1
0
14.7
30. 6
19.4
.9
0

2.4 1.5 2.3
0
0
0
12.6 15.0 18.0
25.0 32.8 37 9
15.3 22.4 22.8
1.7
.5
.2
0
0
0

77

30

26

21

106
2
8
23
9
21
50
54
51
14
1

40
2
2
16
2
-8
23
19
19
7
0

32
0
3
2
2
8
15
19
15
4
1

34
0
3
5
5
5
12
16
17
3
0

85
0
172

32
0
54

27
0
57

26
0
61

160
10
0

51
7
0

53
2
0

56
1
0

.198
0
.786
5. 352
4. 234
.364
0

7
1

1
1

2
0

4
0

.038
.012

.009 .023 .107
0
.029 0

.1
(3
)

(3
)
.1

.1
0

.3
0

87
92
25
7
39

31
34
5
3
8

31
32
9
3
13

25
26
11
1
18

.422
.135
.047
.004
.096

.377
.130
.028
.004
.059

.542
.145
.083
.004
.169

3.2
3.5
.6
.2
2.7

2.7
3.1
.3
.2
1.6

3.1
3.5
.8
.2
2.2

4.2
4.0
1.0
.2
5.2

.277
0
.669
4.687
3.401
.650
0

.109
0
.806
5.879
4.980
.213
0

.390
.134
.046
.004
.089

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
2 The number of expenditure units per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the expenditure units
represented by the equivalent full-time persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data
apply.
8 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TABULAR
T

able

173

SU M M A R Y

7.-— F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c on su m p tion at home d uring 1
week in sp rin g quarter , hy econom ic level— Continued
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n a t H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

_____
Fats, to ta l__ _______
Butter_________ __ _________
Cream_______ ________
__ __
Other table fats..______________
Lard___________________________
Vegetable shortening_____ . __
Table or cooking oils___ ___
Mayonnaise and other salad
dressing______ ___ _ _ ___
Bacon, smoked________
Salt side of p ork... ____ ______
Meat, poultry, fish and other sea
food, total______ __ ________
Beef:
Fresh: Steak, porterhouse, sirloin__________
top round . . .
other... _
Roast, rib____________
chuck..
__ __
other___ . .
Boiling, chuck__ ___
plate..
other.
. .
Canned— __________ ____ __
Corned___ __
_______ ______
Dried________________________
Other________________________
Veal: Fresh, steak, chops___ __
•
roast . . . ______ .
stew_____
Lamb: Fresh, chops. .
. . .
roast. . .
stew..
___ __
Pork: Fresh, chops. ._
loin roast ._ . .
other... _ . _
Smoked ham, slices.. _.
h a l f or
whole___
picnic____
Pork sausage.___ ___ .
Other pork ____ ____
Miscellaneous meats, total_____
Other fresh meat... . . .
Bologna, frankfurters __
Cooked: H a m . . _____ _______
Tongue_____________
L i v e r ...______ . . . _________
Other meat products. _ _ _
Poultry: Chicken, broiling_____
roast________
stew. _
_ _
Turkey.. ___________
Other_____ _________
Fish and other sea food, total. _
Fish: Fresh__________________
Canned____________ . .
C u re d .___________ . . .
Oysters._____________________
Other sea food_______________

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

161
56
31
95
46
14

44
9
14
39
14
7

53
20
9
30
15
2

64
27
8
26
17
5

92
106
3

26
33
1

32
36
2

34
37
0

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 1 in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person1 in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

Lb.

Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

1. 361 1. 035 1. 388 1. 897
.410 .277 .454 .586
. 154 .035 . 160 .355
.056 .033 .088 .057
.224 .236 .214 .217
.084 .061 .071 . 139
.040 .057 .022 .032
. 159
.227
.007

. 120
.212
.004

. 167 .217
. 196 .294
.016 0

2. 844 2. 279 2.918 3. 725
87
57
33
64
26
15
29
5
12
3
5
13
0
50
8
4
25
7
14
68
5
4
30

15
26
16
17
12
4
14
1
5
1
1
3
0
14
4
3
4
1
2
22
2
1
8

32
19
9
21
6
6
8
3
3
2
2
6
0
23
3
1
9
3
5
25
2
1
8

40
12
8
26
8
5
7
1
4
0
2
4
0
13
1
0
12
3
7
21
1
2
14

3
1
36
2

1
0
8
2

2
1
14
0

2
59
24
1
19
3
15
7
16
1
0

6
22
6
0
7
0
5
3
4
0
0

0
16
9
1
7
0
4
3
7
0
0

38
38
2
7
6

16
15
1
2
2

12
11
1
2
2

.019
.009
.077
.007
. 187
.011
21
.092
9
.036
0
.002
5
.042
3
.004
6
.092
1
.040
5
.093
1
.020
0 0
. 182
.081
10
12
.078
0
.005
3
.009
2
.009
0
0
14
0

.343 . 181 .354 .611
.207 .242 .210 .140
. 110 . 127 .083 ..114
.391 .263 .433 .560
.135 .138 . 107 .163
.087 .069 . 115 .084
. 127 . 163 .085 . 121
.022 .008 .049 .011
.048 .053 .044 .046
.005 .010 .001 0
.008 .004 .009 .012
.011 .006 .019 .008
0
0
0
0
. 118 .097 . 155 . 105
.048 .063 .052 .018
.021 .041 .011 0
.068 .024 .053 . 163
.045 .012 .055 .089
.057 .029 .071 .087
. 164 . 150 . 178 . 170
.034 .041 .041 .014
.011 .004 . 005 .031
.058 .036 .053 . 101
.016
0
.041
.016
. 146
0
.076
.029
0
.041
0
.079
.045
.039
0
0
. 136
.082
.036
.009
.005
.004

.037
.027
.088
0
. 184
0
.086
.049
.005
.044
0
.082
.048
. 121
0
0
. 148
.071
.052
.003
.011
.011

0
0
. 126
0
.266
.046
. 127
.033
0
.043
.017
. 127
.021
. 153
.082
0
.302
.092
. 183
0
.014
.013

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

35. 3 26. 5 35. 8 50. 4
13.8 9.4 15! 0 19! 9
3.0
.6 3.1 6.9
1.4 1.5 1.6 1.2
3.9 4.0 3.6 4.1
1.9 1.4 1.6 3.0
.9 1.4
.5
.8
3.3
7.0
.1

2.2
5.9
.1

3.5
6.5
.4

5.1
9.4
0

64. 2 48. 6 65. 6 89.5
9.4
5.0
2.0
8.4
2.4
1.6
1.9
.3
.6
.1
.2
.3
0
2.8
1.0
.2
1.6
1.0
.9
4.2
.8
.3
1.8

4.0 10.1 17.8
6.1 4.8 3.3
2.2 1.5 2.3
4.9 9.0 13.6
2.6 2.0 2.6
1.1 2.3 1.6
2.5 1.2 1.6
.1
.6
.2
.6
.6
.8
.2
.1 0
.1
.2
.3
.1
.5
.4
0
0
0
1.7 4.2 2.9
1.4
.9
.4
.3
.1 0
.5 1.4 3.8
.3 1.2 2.0
.4 1.1 1.6
3.8 4.5 4.7
.9 1.1
.3
.1
. 1 1.1
1.1 1.4 3.5

.5
.1
1.7
.1
4.7
.2
2.3
1.3
.1
.7
.1
2.4
1.0
2.0
.6
0
4.3
2.4
1.4
.1
.2
.2

.4
0
1.0
.3
3.6
0
2.1
.8
0
.7
0
2.2
1 .2

.9
0
0
4.0
2.5
1.2
.1
.1
.1

.9
.4
1.8
0
4.7
0
1.7
1.9
.3
.8
0
1.8
1.1
2.6
0
0
3.4
1.8
1.0
.1
.2
.3

0
0
2.9
0
6.3
.8
3.2
1.3
0
.7
.3
3.4
.6
3.2
2.5
0
5. 8
2.8
2.4
0
.4
.2

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




174
T

able

W EST

NO RTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

7 .— F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r con su m p tion at home d uring 1
week in sp rin g quarter, hy econom ic level— Continued
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 4 in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person4 in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
fo r C o n s u m p ti o n at H o m e in 1
W eek—

Continued

Potatoes. _ ______________ _____
Sweetpotatoes, yams_________
Dried legumes and nuts, total Dried corn_______________ .
Beans: Dry---------------------------Canned, dried_______
Baked, not canned___
Peas: Black-eyed------------------Other____ ______ . .
Nuts: Shelled________________
In shell____________
Peanut butter_______________
Other dried legumes and nuts..
Tomatoes: Fresh____________
Canned_______ . . .
Juice___________ . . .
Sauce, paste. ._
Green and leafy vegetables, total
_____
Brussels sprouts_______ •
Cabbage________________ . . .
Sauerkraut ____ . . . _______
. . . . . ____
Collards___
Kale_________________________
Lettuce _________ _____
Spinach: Fresh________
Canned.. . .
___
Other leafy vegetables____ __
Asparagus: Fresh_______ ___
Canned. ._ . . . .
Lima beans: Fresh___ _ _ __
Canned.________
Beans, snap (string): Fresh.__
Canned .
Broccoli____ __ ._
_______
Peas: Fresh_____ ____________
Canned.._ ___________
Peppers_____ _____
___ _
Okra___________
_ ________
Yellow vegetables, total.
Carrots. _ . _ _ _ _ _ _ . . .
Winter squash and pumpkin _
Other vegetables, total4
Beets: Fresh____ __ . . . ___
Canned_____
____
Cauliflower._ . . . __
_ __
Celery______
_____________
Corn: On ear. _
____
Canned... ________ __
Cucumber_____________ . . .
Eggplant. __ _ _ _ _ __ __
Onions: Mature.
_ ________
Spring______________
Parsnips.. _______________
Summer squash______________
White turnips___ . . . _ _ __
Yellow turnips, rutabaga____
Other vegetables______ ____
Pickles and olives_____ _ _
Citrus fruits, total______ _____
Lemons
. . . __ _____ __
Oranges___ ._ _ _______ _
Grapefruit: Fresh............... .
Canned__________

N o.

N o. N o.

166
18

56
8

55
5

0
29
15
0
1
0
15
11
36

0
13
5
0
1
0
2
4
14

0
7
6
0
0
0
5
4
13

84
69
29
8

14
27

34
18

9
2

4

2
56
17
0
0
159
44
18
1
57
9
13
16
24
34
0
19
80
9
0

0
19
8
0
0
46
17
5
0
18
3
7
3
10
6
0
3
24
4
0

1
21
4
0
0
56
16
8
0
17
3
4
6
5
18
0
10
28
2
0

103
2

30
1

34
0

8
14
14
32
0
78
21
0
71
27
3
0
7
7
8

4
4
4
10
0

1
5
2
12
0
30
9
0
25
12
0
0

59
135

22

4
0
27
7
2
0
1
1
1

77

20
39
15

5

1

9

2

2
1
21
48
23

2)

N o.

Lb.

9.897
2.472
.098
.215
0 0
9
.075
4
.043
0 0
0
.005
0 0
8
.021
3
.015
9
.056
0
36
.205
24
.229
11
.090
2
.009
1.600
1
.002
16
.280
5
.065
0 0
0 0
.293
57
11
.172
5
.057
1
.001
22
.199
3
.017
2
.037
7
.034
9
.077
10
.103
0 0
6
.061
28
.194
3
.008
0 0
.280
.273
39
1
.007
.658
3
.032
5
.024
8
.037
10
.063
0 0
26
.192
.031
8
0 0
. 163
19
8
.052
1
.011
0 0
.021
4
.023
4
.009
6
55
5

18
48
39
2

Lb.

7.758
2.362
.114
.193
0
.077
.040
0
.012
0
.002
.010
.052
0
.071
.206
.073
.006
1.316
0
.260
.082
0
0
.226
.175
.047
0
. 151
.013
.045
.012
.090
.046
0
.029
.127
.013
0
.216
.212
.004
.464
.037
.005
.024
.049
0
.131
.013
0
.147
.029
.020
0
.004
.004
.001

Lb.

9. 935
2.312
.093
.204
0
.055
.045
0
0
0
.019
.020
.065
0
.289
.220
.088
.011
1.734
.005
.317
.036
0
0
.317
.178
.064
0
. 162
.021
.038
.036
.055
.178
0
.099
.224
.004
0
.307
.307
0
.682
.005
.024
.022
.071
0
.214
.047
0
.173
.081
0
0
.022
.022
.001

Lb.

13. 596
2. 871
.077
.265
0
.096
.044
0
0
0
.056
.017
.052
0
.330
.283
.122
.012
1.929
0
.268
.073
0
0
.380
.160
.066
.004
.330
.018
.021
.068
.085
.107
0
.070
.274
.005
0
.356
.335
.021
.961
.057
.055
.078
.078
0
.271
.044
0
.178
.054
.007
0
.050
.057
.032

2. 216 1.314 2.337 3.634
.194 .159 .228 .213
1.356 .794 1.606 2.012
.651 .361 .486 1.373
.015 0
.017 .036

C t.

C t.

68.8 48.4
6.8 5^3
.6
.6
3.1 2.4
0
0
.7
.7
.4
.3
0
0
.1
(3
)
0
0
.7
.1
.3
.2
1.0 1.0
0
0
2.7
.8
2.0 1.6
1.0
.7
.2
.1
15. 5 11 4
0
(3
)
1.4 1.3
.4
.5
0
0
0
0
4.6 3.4
.9
.8
.6
.5
0
(3
)
1.9 1.3
.3
.2
.3
.4
.3
.1
.6
.6
1.1
.4
0
0
.6
.2
2.4 1.6
.1
.1
0
0
1.5 1.1
1.5 1.1
(3
)
(3)
6.8 4.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.4
.2
.7
.5
0
0
2.3 1.5
.4
.1
0
0
1.0
.9
.3
.2
.1
.1
0
0
.1 (3
)
.1 (3
)
.1 (3)
.9
.4
13.2 8.1
1.5 1.2
7.9 4.8
3.6 2.1
.2
0

C t.

C t.

74 6 97 2
8.0 8 !l
.5
.5
2.9 4.7
0
0
.4
1.0
.4
.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
.6 1.9
.4
.4
1.1 1.1
0
0
3.8 4.8
2.0 2.5
1.0 1.5
.2
.3
17.2 20 5
.1 o ‘
1.6 1.5
.3
.4
0
0
0
0
4.8 6.3
.9 1.2
.7
.8
0
.1
1.5 3.4
.4
.2
.3
.2
.4 * .6
.4
.8
2.0 1.0
0
0
.9
.8
2.8 3.1
.1
.1
0
0
1. 5 2 4
1.5 2.3
0
.1
7.4 10.4
(3
)

.2
.2
.8
0
2.6
.6
0
1.2
.5
0
0
.1
.1

(3
)

1.1
14.0
1.7
9.1
2.9
.3

.2

.4
1.0
.9
0
3.2
.6
0
1.0
.4
(3
)
0
.2
.3
.5
1.7
20.7
1.5
11.7
7.1
.4

4 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
4 Does not include quantity of pickles and olives.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TABULAR
T

able

175

SU M M AR Y

7 .— F o o d used at home and purchased f o r con su m p tion at home during 1
week in sp rin g quarter , hy econom ic level— Continued
D E N V E R , C O L O —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Average quantity purchased per person * m
1 week

using in 1 week

Economic
level—Families spending
per expendi­
All
All ture unit per
fam­
famvear
ilies
ilies
Un- $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Item

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Average expenditure
per person 1 in 1
week
Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
fo r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued
Other fruits, total. _ __

N o.

______

____
Canned
Apricots: Fresh.. __ _ ______
Canned
_ _
Bananas__ ________
. . ____
Berries: Fresh_____
_____
Canned____ . . .
Cherries: Fresh.
__ ______
Canned _ __
Grapes: Fresh._ . . .
Canned___ _____
_
Peaches: Fresh__ __ ________
Canned__ _______ _ _
Pears: Fresh__ ____________ ____
Canned. _ _____________
Pineapple: Fresh __ _ _______
Canned. _ __ ___
Melons__________ __ . ____
Plums: Fresh___
... _____
_____
Canned..
_
Other fruit_______
___ ____
Cider.. _ ........... __ ___ __ _
Grape juice _ ___
_____ _
Other fruit juices
_. _____
Dried: Apricots. __ _ ________
Peaches __________
Prunes.
__ _ __ __
Raisins_____ _____
D a te s .__ ______ _ _
Figs _ _ ___ ___
Other__ _____
____
Sugars and sweets, total
Sugars: White____ _ __
Brown_______ ____ ____
Other sweets: Candy.. _ __ ._
Jellies._ _.
Molasses, sirups. _
Other sweets _
Miscellaneous, total _.
Gelatine
__ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _
Packaged dessert mixtures. _ __
Tea. ._ __ _
Coffee ________ . . _ . _ _
_ ___
Cocoa_________
Chocolate____
Vinegar _____ __ . . . ________
Salt____________________________
Baking powder, yeast, soda
Spices and extracts _ _
Catsups, sauces____ __ __
Tomato soup . . _ . . . __ _ _
Other soups
_ _
_
Cod-liver oil __
Proprietary foods
Other foods____ _____________
Soft drinks consumed at home..
Other drinks consumed at
home___________ . _ _ _______
Sales tax on food___ ______ ______

N o.

Lb.

Lb.

1.825
.807
.013
.001
.022
.338
.059
.001
.002
.028
0
0
.004
. 151
0
.041
.021
.085
0
0
.012
.011
0
.012
.016
.027
.012
. 114
.032
.010
.006
0
1.642
1.241
.035
. 129
.070
. 167
0

1.423
.607
0
0
.005
.308
.003
0
0
.010
0
0
0
. 168
0
.046
0
.051
0
0
.007
0
0
.012
.019
.024
.012
.110
.037
0
.004
0
1. 473
1.108
.012
.089
.090
. 174
0

1. 658
.569
.027
0
.038
.405
.119
0
.005
.023
0
0
0
. 108
0
.035
.011
. 104
0
0
0
.019
0
0
.004
.022
.011
.104
.046
.005
.003
0
1.789
1.385
.055
. 167
.040
. 142
0

19
8
18
58
3
2

.034
.015
.024
.346
.038
.009

.025
.008
.016
. 273
.027
.009

.036
.021
.031
.365
.069
.010

11
9
2
4
2
2

9
3
4
3
0
4

.061
.043
.007
.031
.003
.040

.043
.037
.004
.002
.004
.018

.086
.062
.011
.068
.003
.010

2. 756 15.4
1.464
3.8
.2
.018
.004 (3
)
.030
.3
.306
2.3
.080
1.1
.005 (3
)
.001 (3
)
.066
.4
0
0
0
0
.014 (3
)
.179
2.0
0
0
.043
.5
.071
.2
.121
1.3
0
0
0
0
.036
.1
.021
.1
0
0
.2
.028
.028
.3
.4
.039
.014
.2
.135
1.3
.4
.007
.032
.2
.014
.1
0
0
1.745 13.3
1.286
7.3
.050
.3
. 147
3.1
.073
.8
.189
1.8
0
0
23.7
.046
1.2
.016
.5
.027
1.7
.448 10.2
.6
.018
.011
.2
.5
.7
1.2
.8
1.0
.8
.059
.6
.029
.007
.6
.036
.7
.2
0
.4
. 117

1

5

.136

. 149

.044

N o.

N o.

Lb.

93
3
1
11
77
20
2
2
13
0
0
1
52
0
16
6
38
0
1
3
5
0
5
7
12
6
40
18
6
3
0

34
1
0
2
24
1
2
0
4
0
0
0
24
0
8
0
7
0
1
2
0
0
3
2
4
4
13
10
0
1
0

31
1
0
6
30
9
0
1
3
0
0
0
14
0
4
1
17
0
0
0
3
0
0
1
4
1
14
7
1
1
0

28
1
1
3
23
10
0
1
6
0
0
1
14
0
4
5
14
0
0
1
2
0
2
4
4
1
13
1
5
1

147
22
64
30
46

53
6
22
14
19

52
7
21
8
15

42
9
21
8
12

54
29
57
168
29
8

16
9
19
53
16
4

19
12
20
57
10
2

27
18
9
8
3
8

7
6
3
1
1
2

11

5

Lb.

.235

C t.

1.8

C t.

C t.

C t.

12.1
3.4
0
0
.1
2.0
.1
0
0
.1
0
0
0
2.2
0
.6
0
.7
0
0
.1
0
0
.2
.3
.3
.2
1.3
.4
0
.1
0
11.1
6.6
.1
2.0
1.0
1.4
0
17.5
.7
.3
1.1
7.5
.5
.3
.3
.5
1.0
.7
.6
.5
.5
.2
.2
.3
.3

16.1
3.2
.4
0
.6
2.8
2.2
0
.1
.3
0
0
0
1.5
0
.5
.1
1.6
0
0
0
.3
0
0
.1
.3
.1
1.3
.5
.1
.1
0
14.7
8.3
.5
3.5
.6
1.8
0
25.9
1.2
.7
2.1
11.0
1.0
.2
.5
.9
1.6
.7
1.3
1.2
.9
.8
1.1
.1
.1

20.8
5.2
.3
(3
)
.4
2.4
1.4
.1
.1
.9
0
0
.2
2.4
0
.6
.5
1.8
0
0
.3
.2
0
.3
.4
.8
.2
1.5
.1
.5
.2
0
15. 2
7.4
.5
4.4
.7
2.2
0
31.9
2.2
.7
2.0
13. 7
.2
.2
1.0
.7
1.1
1.3
1.4
.9
.4
1.2
1.1
0
.8

2.0

.5

3.0

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
t he week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




176
T

W EST

able

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

7 .-— F o o d used at home and purchased fo r con su m p tion at hom e d uring 1
week in sp rin g quarter, by econom ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S.— W H ITE FAM ILIES

All fami­
lies

Item

Item

Food
fo r

$600 and
over

252

100

82

70

4.36

3.24

2.49

2. 78

2

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All ture unit per
fam­
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Under $400 $400 to $600

3. 48

Number of families surveyed in spring quarter_________
Average number of equivalent full-time persons 1 per
family in 1 week_____________________________________
Average number of food expenditure units per family in
1 week_______________________________________________
Number of families
using in 1 week

Economic level— Families spending
per expenditure unit per year

3.17

2.81

2.20

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 1 in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person1 in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e i n 1

W eek

___ ______
Total. __________ __
Grain products, total_____ _ _
Bread and other baked goods,
_______ __
total______
Bread: White______ ________
Graham, whole wheat.
Rye------------------------Crackers________ _ __ . . .
Plain rolls________________
Sweet rolls._ ___ __ .
Cookies.. _ __ . . . __ __
Cakes . . . ____________ _ _
...
Pies___ ____________
Other ___ __
___ _ _ _ _
Ready-to-eat cereals_______ _
Flour and other cereals, total _
Flour: W h ite ___
... ...
Graham . . . _
...
Other_________
______ __
Corn meal. . .
Hominy. . . . _
___ __ _.
Cornstarch____ ___ ______
Rice___ _______________ . . .
Rolled oats________________
Wheat cereal_________ __ .
Tapioca______ ____________
Sago_____________________
Macaroni, spaghetti, noo­
dles______________________
Other grain products______
Eggs----------------------------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream, total
Milk: Fresh, whole—bottled..
loose___
skimmed___
buttermilk and
other_____ __
Skimmed, dried.. __ __
Evaporated and con­
densed______________
Cheese: American..
___
Cottage_________ __
Other_______________
Ice cream. _________________

N o.

94
19
11
39
8
18
30
12
9

N o.

74
20
13
29
6
11
30
19
7

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

4. 974
231
55
34
89
25
45
84
47
22

N o.

N o.

5 .164

4. 540 5.176

240.5 192.1 260.8 328.3
42. 5 40. 6 41. 5 49.9

2. 946
2. 095
.202
. 130
. 166
.033
.044
. 130
.061
.068
. 017
. 155
1.873
1. 344
0
.021
. 107
.046
.009
.052
. 128
.050
(5
)
0

2. 867
2.192
. 128
.089
.174
.019
.043
.099
.033
.068
. 022
.148
2.149
1. 519
0
.018
. 144
.054
.011
.054
. 158
.060
.003
0

3. 050
2. Oil
.293
.209
. 174
.024
.038
. 154
.088
.048
.011
.125
1.365
.948
0
.008
.068
.042
.008
.049
.096
.038
0
0

2. 992
1.982
.250
.110
. 134
.083
.057
. 174
.091
.096
. 015
.218
1.966
1. 512
0
.049
.071
.030
.006
.054
.099
.045
0
0

30.1 27.9 30.9 34.8
18.7 19.2 17.7 19.0
1.9 1.2 2.8 2.5
1.4
.9 2.1 1.4
1.9 1.8 2.0 1.8
.4
.3
.3 1.0
1.0 1.0
.7 1.7
2.3 1.5 2.6 3.7
.8 2.0 2.6
1.5
.8
.9
.9
.5
.2
.2
.2
.3
2.4 2.1 2.2 3.7
10. 0 10.6 8.4 11.4
5.5 5.9 4.3 6.6
0
0
0
0
.1
.1
.1
.3
.4
.4
.5
.3
.2
.3
.3
.2
.1
.1
. 1 (3
)
.4
.4
.4
.4
1.1 1.2
.9
.9
.8
.9
.6 1.1
.1 0
0
(8
)
0
0
0
0

23
0
67

.100
0
1.046
6. 381
5. 439
.006
0

1.3 1.1 1.5 1.4
.1 0
0
(3
)
12.7 9.8 14.8 16.6
32. 9 27. 7 35. 7 41.4
23.0 19.5 25.2 28.2
.3
.5
.0
.1
.2
.1
.3 0

.066 .010 .088 .171
0
0
0
0

63
16
10
21
11
16
24
16
6

121

53

29

39

173
0
9
33
17
9
39
74
45
2
0

74
0
4
13
10
5
20
38
22
2
0

50
0
2
9
3
2
10
23
10
0
0

49
0
3
11
4
2
9
13
13
0
0

95
1
241

44
1
97

28
0
77

233
3
3

88
2
1

77
0
2

. 108 . 112 .108
.008 .016 0
.821 .652 .950
5. 640 5.109 6. 032
68 4. 697 4.193 5. 040
1
.080 . 158 0
0
. 118 .059 .291

11
0

2
0

3
0

6
0

107
95
53
20
48

56
34
15
8
13

25
31
21
9
21

26
30
17
3
14

.402
.091
.079
.019
.088

.504
.064
.048
.025
.048

.279
.104
.095
.020
.115

.338
. 140
.135
.005
. 147

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

.5
0

(3
)
0

1.0
0

1.1
0

3.2
2.2
1.0
.5
2.0

3.8
1.6
.5
.6
1.1

2.3
2.5
1.2
.6
2.6

3.3
3.6
1.6
.2
3.3

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as the
appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
The number of expenditure units per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the expenditure units
represented by the equivalent full-time persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data
apply.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
4 Less than 0.0005 pound.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326,

2




TABULAR
T

able

SUM M ARY

177

7 .— F o o d used at home and purchased f o r c on su m p tion at home d uring 1
week in sp rin g quarter, hy econom ic level — Continued
KANSAS C ITY , MO -K A N S .— W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 1in
1 week

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All
All ture unit per
fam­
fam­
year
ilies
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Item

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

Average expenditure
per person1 in 1
week
Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
fo r C o n su m p tio n at H o m e
W e e k — C ontinued

in

1

Butter-------- --------------------- ----Cream...
Other table fats-------- --- -------- --Lard... -------------- ------------Vegetable shortening___
Table or cooking oils
Mayonnaise and other salad
dressing______ . ---------------Bacon, smoked. . . .
_ ------Salt side of pork_______________
Meat, poultry, fish and other sea

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

178
54
78
161
54
10

56
6
48
71
21
2

64
17
21
51
13
4

58
31
9
39
20
4

103
161
19

37
57
10

36
57
6

30
47
3

Lb.

1. 278 1.123 1.333 1. 582
.252 .165 .303 .392
.089 .010 .100 .270
.156 .199 .137 .074
.332 .393 .297 .231
.084 .089 .056 .115
.016 .007 .024 .026
.111
.221
.017

.077
.162
.021

.138
.265
.013

.156
.304
.014

2.135 1. 733 2. 396 2. 737
Beef:
Fresh: Steak, porterhouse, sirloin._
... .
top round. . . .
other _ ____
Roast, rib. ____ _____
chuck.. . . . . . .
other . ______
Boiling, chuck_____ .
plate.. . ------other . . . _ .
Canned___
______
Corned.. _______ . . .
Dried. _______
. ---------Other. _________
___ _______
Veal: Fresh, steak, chops.
roast----------stew.. . . . . ------Lamb: Fresh, chops._
______
roast
----- ------stew____
Pork: Fresh, chops
loin roast.
... .
___
other. _
Smoked ham, slices. . . __
half or wholepicnic____
Pork sausage_______ . . .
Other pork.
_.
____
Miscellaneous meats, total___
Other fresh meat _
Bologna, frankfurters. .
Cooked: H a m . . ---------------Tongue
_ ___ __
Liver. _____
____ ______
Other meat products _____ __
Poultry: Chicken, broiling____
roast ____
stew . _
.
Turkey___ __ _
Other. __ ______ . . .
F ish and other sea food, total. _
Fish: Fresh_________________
Canned . . .
_
. . .
Cured . . . ____ _ . . .
Oysters
__
_ ________
Other sea food.. _ . . .
___

95
75
66
50
53
13
34
5
12
2
13
18
1
29
8
6
8
1
1
86
11
24
29
3
6
57
10

30
30
33
13
17
5
19
4
4
0
5
6
0
9
3
2
2
1
0
28
1
12
8
0
3
24
5

34
22
17
21
23
4
12
1
4
2
5
6
1
11
1
2
1
0
0
32
5
6
10
2
1
17
3

1
108
46
2
36
19
3
7
7
0
2

1
51
17
1
16
12
2
2
3
0
1

0
36
15
1
13
3
0
2
2
0
0

41
45
2
4
1

16
20
2
2
0

14
13
0
1
0l

.207
.163
.152
.172
.193
.048
.099
.011
.022
.002
.016
.010
.001
.043
.031
.014
.009
.003
.002
. 127
.039
.050
.044
.016
.012
.084
.022
.300
0
.001
21
. 178
14
.044
.002
0
7
.046
4
.029
1
.013
3
.036
2
.035
0 0
1
.006
. 153
11
.078
12
.061
.004
0
1
.004
.006
1

31
23
16
16
13
4
3
0
4
0
3
6
0
9
4
2
5
0
1
26
5
6
11
1
2
16
2

.135
. 120
. 172
.097
.128
.040
.107
.018
.017
0
.013
.009
0
.033
.021
.011
.004
.007
0
.086
.004
.055
.044
0
.020
.068
.017
.300
.002
.175
.044
.002
.040
.037
.013
.019
.032
0
.007
. 136
.063
.061
.008
.004
0

.228
.177
. 120
.228
.286
.075
.137
.008
.022
.006
.017
.009
.004
.039
.026
.019
.008
0
0
.168
.058
.043
.038
.038
(5
)
.095
.015
. 315
0
.197
.036
.002
.062
.018
0
.034
.036
0
0
. 147
.093
.052
0
.002:
0

.356
.249
. 153
.275
.215
.026
.023
0
.032
0
.020
.012
0
.072
.062
.011
.024
0
.009
. 169
.095
.051
.052
.022
.009
.107
.046
. 272
0
. 157
.056
0
.034
.025
.034
.080
.043
0
.014
.204
.092
.075
0
.008
.029

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t

28. 3 21.9 30.8 40. 5
8.1 5.2 9.6 13.0
2.1
.2 2.2 6.8
2.7 3.5 2.3 1.2
4.5 5.1 4.2 3.3
1.5 1.5 1.0 2.2
.1
.3
.5
.7
2.1
6.7
.3

1.2
4.7
.4

2.6
8.1
.3

3.3
9.8
.2

45. 2 33.5 51.6 64.0
5.0
4.1
2.6
3.3
3.2
1.0
1.6
.2
.3
(3
)
.4
.4
(3
)
1.1
.8
.2
.2
(3
)
(3
)
3.3
.9
1.1
1.4
.4
.2
1.7
.4
6.5
(3
)
3.5
1.5
.1
.9
.5
.3
.8
1.0
0
.2
2.6
1.4
1.0
(3
)
.1
.1

3.2 5.7
3.2 4.2
2.9 2.3
1.5 4.8
2.2 4.6
.7 1.7
1.5 2.5
.1
.2
.2
.3
0
.1
.3
.4
.3
.4
.1
0
.7 1.0
.4
.6
.1
.2
.1
.1
.1 0
0
0
2.1 4.5
.1 1.5
1.2
.8
1.2 1.2
0
.9
.4 (3
)
1.2 2. 1
.2
.3
5.9 6.8
0
(3
)
3.2 4.0
1.2 1.2
.1
.1
.8 1.1
.6
.4
.2 0
.3
.7
.8 1.0
0
0
.2 0
2.1 2.7
1.0 1.7
.9 1.0
.1 0
.1 (3
)
0
0

8.6
6.3
2.7
5.6
3.9
.5
.4
0
.4
0
.4
.5
0
2.0
1.9
.2
.7
0
.2
4.7
2.1
1.3
1.9
.6
.2
2.5
1.0
6 6
0
3.2
2.4
0
.7
.3
1.0
2.1
1.2
0
.4
4.1
1.8
1.4
0
.2
.7

1 The number of ecmivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
5 Less than 0.0005 pound.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326,




178
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

7 .— F o o d used at home and purchased f o r c on su m p tion at hom e d uring 1
week in sp rin g quarter, hy econom ic level— Continued
KANSAS CITY, M O .-K A N S.—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
fo r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k — Continued.

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Average quantity pur­
chased per person1 in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

Lb.

Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

Vegetables and fruits, total. _ _
8.783 7.127 9. 872 11. 244 50.9 37.3 55.6 76.0
Potatoes_________________ ______
66 2. 556 2.082 3.090 2.932
242 97 79
7.0 6.3 7.3 8.1
9
Sweetpotatoes, yams______ _ _
8
5
.067 .060 .060 .098
22
.2
.3
.3
.4
Dried legumes and nuts, total..
.304 .333 .293 .255
2.5 2.6 2.4 2.7
Dried corn_______ ______ . . .
1
0
0
0
0
.003 (3
1
0
0
.1
(5
)
)
12
Beans: D r y ______________ .
.180 .208 .169 . 126
79 40 27
1.0 1.2 1.0
.6
Canned, dried_____ _
9
4
5
.038 .041 .034 .034
.3
18
.2
.2
.2
Baked, not canned___
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
.0
0
.0
.0
Peas: Black-eyed
. . . _____
3
0
.011 .016 .011 0
0
.1 (3
3
.1
.0
)
Other__________________
0
0
.002 0
1
1
.008 0
.0
.1
.0
(3
)
4
Nuts: Shelled.._ . . . . . . ___
6
3
.010 .004 .013 .023
.1
13
.3
.4
.6
In shell_______
___
4
3
1
.009 .004 .004 .029
8
.2
.1 (3
.6
)
Peanut butter___ _________
8
.052 .056 .054 .040
46 23 15
.8
.7
.7
.6
(3)
Other dried legumes and nuts.
.002 .004 0
0
0
0
(3
)
Tomatoes: Fresh___ __________
22
7 17
.083 .025 .118 .175
46
1.2
.3 1.5 2.7
Canned_____________
23
.343 .354 .355 .298
2.4 2.4 2.5 2.1
109 48 38
Juice_____ _______
5 11
12
.051 .016 .082 .091
28
.1
.6 1.3
.5
Sauce, paste_________
4
2
2
.008 .007 .009 .008
8
.1
.1
.1
.1
Green and leafy vegetables, total.
1. 381 1.121 1.532 1.800 10.5 7.6 11.2 15.9
Brussels sprouts . . _________
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Cabbage____ ______________
20
.328 .303 .404 .274
91 44 27
.9 l.*2 1.0
1.0
Sauerkraut
. . . . . . . . . _.
6
7
.030 .017 .038 .050
.1
20
7
.2
.3
.3
Collards_____ ____ ______ . . .
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Kale_________________________
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Lettuce________
__________
57
.217 . 170 .239 .301
2.9 2.2 3.1 4.0
197 79 61
Spinach: Fresh
. . .
.072 .073 .056 .095
24 11
8
5
.4
.3
.2
.5
Canned________
10
.088 .059 .100 .140
.4
39 14 15
.7
.8 1.0
Other leafy vegetables. _______
2
0
.002 .003 0
2
0
0
0
0
(3
) (3
)
Asparagus: Fresh___ ______
26
59 15 18
.198 .104 .258 .344
1.2
.5 1.3 2.6
Canned. . _
1 2
0
001
3
.007
007 .023
.1 (3
.1
.2
)
Lima beans: Fresh.
_ _____
2
11 4 5
.023 .023 .034 .006
.2
.2
.3 (3
)
Canned _ _____
4
4
2
.016 .015 .017 .014
10
.1
.1
.1
.1
Beans, snap (string): Fresh.__
23
52 13 16
.113 .082 . 122 . 180
.6 1.3 2.1
1.1
Canned.
12
42 16 14
.083 .072 .097 .092
.5
.7
.8
.9
_______________
Broccoli
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Peas: F re sh ..____ __________
4
4
5
13
.028 .021 .024 .054
.2
.1
.3
.5
Canned.. _ _ ________
27
.162 . 162 .130 .209
83 33 23
1.6 1.5 1.2 2.2
Peppers______ ______________
5
6
8
.014 .016 .006 .018
19
.2
.1
.2
.5
Okra_________________ ______
0
0 0
0
0‘
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Yellow vegetables, total________
. 195 . 175 .207 .230
.9
.7 1.1 1.1
Carrots_________ __ . . . ___
24
.193 .170 .207 .230
93 35 34
.9
.7 1.1 1.1
Winter squash and pumpkin..
1
0
.002 .005 0
1
0
0
0
0
)
(3
) (3
Other vegetables, total4 ____
. 746 .594 .841 .988
6.2 4.4 6.9 9.2
Beets: Fresh.. __ . . . . . . ___
4
7
.034 .018 .030 .080
16
5
.2
.1
.2
.4
Canned__________ _____
14
5
4
5 .022 .013 .026 .036
.2
.1
.2
.3
Cauliflower_______ ._ ____
.034 .024 .029 .069
18
6
5
7
.4
.2
.3
.8
________
Celery___________
23
.094 .044 . 128 .166
67 16 28
.4 1.2 1.6
.9
_____________
Corn: On ear
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
Canned_______________
24
.194 .178 .252 .144
98 39 35
1.7 1.5 2.1 1.5
Cucumber___ __ _ _________
6
5
8
.025 .013 .022 .061
.2
.1
19
.2
.6
Eggplant____________________
1
1
0
.001 .002 0
0
0
0
0
(*) (3
)
Onions: M ature_____________
.202 .183 .214 .230
26
95 44 25
.8
.7
.9 1.1
Spring___ ___ ______
.082 .076 .076 .108
16
68 32 20
.6
.6
.5
.8
Parsnips
_ . . . __ ________
1
2
.003 .004 0
0
3
0
.006 (3
)
(3
)
(3
)
Summer squash_____ ________
.004 0
0
1
1
0
.001 0
0
0
(3
)
(3
)
White turnips_____ _______
1
4
6
1 .010 .007 .019 .006 (3
.1 (3
)
(3
)
)
Yellow turnips, rutabaga____
1
2
.004 .002 .011 0
1
0
0
(3
) (3
(3
)
)
Other vegetables___________
36 15
12
.4
9
.040 .030 .030 .082
.3
.3
.8
Pickles and olives. ____ . . .
.8 .5
.8 1.3
Citrus fruits, total________ _____
1.148 .761 1.372 1.769
6.7 4.3 8.1 10. 6
Lemons________ _______ ____
44 14 13
17
.080 .054 .082 .139
.8 .5
.8 1.3
Oranges_____________________
42
.744 .544 .854 1.076
129 43 44
4.3 3.0 5.0 6.5
Grapefruit: Fresh.__ . . . ____
56 16 20
20
.320 .163 .431 .543
1.6
.8 2.3 2.6
0
Canned__________
.005 .011
.2
3 1 1
1 .004 0
(3
)
<)
3
1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
4 Does not include
pickles and olives.
5 Less than 0.0005 pound.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TABULAR
T

able

179

SU M M AR Y

7 . — Food

used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1
week in spring quarter, hy economic level— Continued

KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level-—Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der
to
and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e in 1
W eek —

Continued

Other fruits, total __
Ajjples: Fresh____________ __ _
Canned- _________
_
Apricots: Fresh--------- ------------Canned
_ _
Bananas-- _ ___
Berries: Fresh__ _ _
Canned..
_
- _ _
Cherries: Fresh____ -Canned___ _ __ - __
Grapes: Fresh
---------------------Canned-- _
Peaches: Fresh______
Canned _ _
Pears: Fresh______ ________
Canned,-- __
Pineapple: Fresh _ _ - ___
Canned._
Melons____ __
Plums: Fresh _
__
_ __
Canned____
Other fruit__________________ _
Cider _ ______
__ ___________
Grape juice.. _
Other fruit juices
_______
Dried: Apricots.
___ ____
Peaches
Prunes____ ______ _ _
Raisins. ___ _ _
Dates______ _ _ _ ___
Figs____________________
Other___ __ _
_ ___
Sugars and sweets, total
_ _ _
Sugars: White
_ _ _ _
Brown ___ _ ____
Other sweets: Candy __ .
Jellies
Molasses, sirups._
Other sweets
Miscellaneous, total .
Gelatine. _
___
Packaged dessert m ixtures.___
T e a ...
_ _
________ _
Coffee._
_ _ _
_ _
_
_
Cocoa_______ _____ _______
Chocolate_____
.
__
_
V in e g a r...____ _
Salt______________
Baking powder, yeast, soda
____
Spices and extracts.
Catsups, sauces
_
. __ _
Tomato s o u p ____
_____ . . .
Other soups___
__________ _
Cod-liver oil____
________
Proprietary foods. ____________
Other foods ______
______
Soft drinks consumed at home__
Other drinks consumed at home
Sales tax on food... _ _ ________

N o.

N o.

122
6
0
13
115
60
5
1
18
0
0
1
56
0
12
5
37
0
0
6
11
0
5

.

No

N o.

4
19
11
68
7
4

.012
.028
.013
.322
.024
.004

.005
.027
.009
.234
.037
.002

.020
.020
.020
.376
.011
.004

.019
.046
.013
.459
.011
.009

8
4
4
1

.038
.026
.005
.004
.007
.053
.064

.017 .048 .077
.009 .041 .047
.004 .003 .008
.008 0
0
.Oil .002 .006
.015 .113 .054
.078 .035 .073

220
14
55
54
31

93
4
25
21
18

66
4
17
19
5

61
6
13
14
8

19
56
51
223
29

6
24
21
84
17
3

9
13
19
71
5
1

24
13
12
2
10
14
12

8
2
7

8
7

1
5
3
4

Lb.

2. 6C
0
.832
0
0
.032
.571
.400
0
0
.046
0
0
0
.203
0
.023
.080
.108
0
0
.010
.044
0
.029
.020
0
.017
. 136
.029
.003
.017
0
2.150
1.865
.040
.082
.060
.103
0

2
5
25
17
4
2
0

1
0
2
6
4

Lb.

1.913
.677
0
0
.043
.510
.195
.005
0
.041
0
0
0
.124
0
.026
.008
.097
0
0
.019
.030
0
.014
.041
.008
.015
.034
.022
0
.004
0
1. 654
1.440
.060
.060
.056
.034
.004

32
1
0
4
30
23
1
0
3
0
0
0
22
0
3
4
13
0
0
1
4
0
4
2
0
2
11
4
1
1
0

8

Lb.

1. 599
.864
.006
0
.010
.383
.077
.006
.008
.026
0
0
0
.097
0
.002
0
.021
0
0
.019
.009
0
0
.003
0
.002
.028
028
.010
0
0
1. 538
1.302
.014
.062
050
.110
0

38
4
0
6
42
19
3
0
7
0
0
1
14
0
6
1
19
0
0
3
5
0
1
4
2
2
6
2
0
1
0

8

L b .

1.901
.801
.003
0
.024
.459
. 177
.004
.004
.035
0
0
0
. 136
0
.014
.018
.061
0
0
.017
.022
0
.010
.018
.002
.009
.051
.027
.005
.004
0
1. 694
1.456
.033
.065
.054
.085
.001

52
1
0
3
43
18
1
1
8
0
0
0
20
0
3
0
5
0
0
2
2
0
0
2
0
1
8
11
3
0
0

3
5
4

c t.
12.6
3.2
(3
)
0
.2
2.5
2.3

(3
)
(3
)
.3
0
0
0
1.3
0
.2
.1
.8
0
0
.1
.2
0
.1
.2
(3)
.1
.5
.3
.1
.1
0
11.0
7.7
.3
1.4
1.0
.6

(3
)

15.1
.3
.8
.7
7.5
.4
.1
.6
.6
.6
.3
.4
.5
.4
.5

(3)

Ct.

.1

.8

1.9

1.3

Ct.
21.8
4.4
0
0
.3
3.6
5.4
0
0
.4
0
0
0
2.3
0
.3
.6

1.4
0
0
.1
.3
0
.4
.2
0
.2
1.4
.2
(3)
.3
0
14.4
9.9
.4
1.9
1.4
.8
0
22.7
.4
1.1
.9
11.6
.3
.1
1.0
.8
.4
.7
.8
.8

.7

.7

.2

.3
.1
.2
.2
.6

.2
.4

Ct.

8.3 13.6
3.1
2.8
0
.1
0
0
.4
.1
2.6
2.0
1.0 2.4
(3
)
(3
)
0
.1
.5
.2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.2
1.0
0
0
.3
(3
)
.1
0
1.2
.2
0
0
0
0
.1
.1
.3
.1
0
0
.1
0
.4
(3
)
.1
0
.1
(3
)
.4
.2
.2
.3
0
.1
.1
0
0
0
9.6 11.3
7.6
6.9
.5
.1
1.1
1.7
1.1
.8
.3
.7
.1
0
10.4 17.3
.1
.5
.8
.5
.5
1.0
9.2
4.9
.2
.5
.1
(3
)
.4
.5
.5
.6
.6
.6
.1
.3
.4
.3
.2
.6

1.4
0
.1
.5
1.1
2.8

0
.2
.9
.8

2.2

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




180
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

7 .— F o o d used at home and purchased f o r c on su m p tion at hom e d u rin g 1
w eek in sp rin g quarter , by econ om ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES

All fami­
lies

Item

Economic level— Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Under $300 $300 to $400

Number of families surveyed in spring quarter--------------Average number of equivalent full-time persons per
family in 1 week i----------- ------------------------ -------------------Average number of food expenditure units per family in

4.96

Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

$400 and
over

Average quantity pur­
chased per person in
1 week1

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

All
fam­
ilies

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

Lb.

Lb.

All
fam­
ilies

$400
and
over

Lb.

Average expenditure
per person in 1
week1
Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400
to and
der
$300 $400 over

Food Used a t

H o m e and P u rch a sed
fo r
C o n su m p tio n
at H o m e
in
1 W eek
N o.

Total _________________ _____Grain products, total___ _______
Bread and other baked goods,
total. ________ _____ _____
Bread: White___________ __
G r a h a m , whole
wheat________ ___
Rye______________ _
Crackers—____ ____________
Plain rolls____ ___________ __
Sweet rolls___________ _ ..
Cookies_______________ _
Cakes_____________ ____ __
Pies________________________
Other__________________ _ _
Ready-to-eat cereals________
Flour and other cereals, total _
Flour: White______________
Graham___________
Other_____ _ _______
Corn meal__
___________
Hominy___________________
Cornstarch. _________ __
R i c e .._________ __________
Rolled oats_______ _________
Wheat cereal______
Tapioca_____ _____________
Sago-----------------------------------Macaroni, spaghetti, noo­
dles____________ __
_
Othe r grain products_______
Eggs----------------- ------- ---------------Milk, cheese, ice cream, total___
Milk: Fresh, whole—bottled—
loose___
skimmed___ __
buttermilk and
other... ._ - .
Skimmed, dried_______
Evaporated and con­
densed______________
Cheese: American____ __ . _
Cottage___ __________
Other_____________ _
Icecream_____________ ______

N o.

N o.

Lb.

N o.

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

4.999 3. 781 4.252 6. 804
61

19

14

28

8
1
15
2
3
9
4
3

1
0
6
1
0
3
1
1

2
1
4
1
1
0
0
0

5
0
5
0
2
6
3
2

21

5

6

10

51
0
2
41
0
1
24
13
4
0
0

16
0
0
12
0
1
7
7
2
0
0

11
0
0
8
0
0
4
1
0
0
0

24
0
2
21
0
0
13
5
2
0
0

27
0
65

12
0
19

6
0
15

9
0
31

49
1
1

14
0
0

9
1
0

26
0
1

16
0

6
0

3
0

7
0

33
12
5
1
10

15
5
1
0
2

10
3
1
0
2

8
4
3
1
6

209.2 140.1 249. 7 274.9
33.3 24.7 33. 5 43. 6

1. 710 1.344 2.043 1. 989
1. 426 1.142 1. 617 1. 671

15.9 11.8 18. 5 19.9
12.8 9.8 14.6 15.6

.052
.022
. 127
.013
.013
.038
.002
.015
.002
.087
3.202
1. 981
0
.019
.672
0
.009
.261
. 104
.019
0
0

.013
0
.113
.020
0
.039
0
.017
0
.045
2. 392
1.442
0
0
.474
0
.010
.232
. 127
.018
0
0

.050
. 125
.201
.025
.025
0
0
0
0
. 160
2.049
1.228
0
0
.326
0
0
.251
.031
0
0
0

.099
0
. 108
0
.024
.055
.005
.021
.006
. 100
4. 715
2.980
0
.051
1.071
0
.012
.299
. 112
.031
0
0

.5
.5
.1
1.1
.2 0
1.0 0
1.2 1.0 1.7 1.2
.1
.2
.3 0
.2 0
.4
.4
.6
.5 0
1.1
.1 0
0
.2
.2 0
.1
.1
.1 0
.2
0
1.6
.7 2.6 2.2
15.8 12.2 12.4 21. 5
8.0 6.1 5.4 11.4
0
0
0
0
.2 0
0
.5
2.5 1.8 2.1 3.5
0
0
0
0
.1
.1 0
.1
2.1 1.6 2.4 2.7
.8
.9
.3
.9
.4
.4 0
.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

.137
0
.715
3. 319
2. 312
0
.029

.089
0
.522
2. 928
1. 994
0
0

.213
0
.695
3.138
2.024
0
0

.159
0
.954
3. 869
2. 826
0
.076

1.7 1.3 2.2 1.9
0
0
0
0
10.9 7.8 10.2 14.9
18.0 15.7 17.4 21.2
11.0 9.5 9.4 13.5
0
0
0
0
.1 0
0
.2

.506 .443 .486 .589
0
0
0
0
.345 .416 .518
.046 .033 .063
.015 .010 0
.004 0
0
.062 .032 .047

.179
.053
.029
.012
.105

1.4
0

1.2
0

1.1
0

1.8
0

2.8
1.0
.3
.1
1.3

3.1
.8
.2
0
.9

4.4
1.2
0
0
1.3

1.7
1.2
.7
.2
1.9

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as the
appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
2 The number of expenditure units per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the expenditure units
represented by the equivalent full-time persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data
apply.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TABULAR
T able

181

SU M M AR Y

7.— Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1

week in spring quarter, hy economic level— Continued

KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES—Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k — Continued

________
Fats, total. ___
Butter___ ____________________
Cream. . . . ___ _ _
Other table fats____ _
Lard_________________ __ ------Vegetable shortening___________
Table or cooking oils__ _ ______
Mayonnaise and other salad
dressing______________________
Bacon, smoked___ __ _ _
Salt side of pork
__ __ _______
Meat, poultry, fish and other sea

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
ilies
year
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Average quantity pur­
chased per person in
1 week 1

Average expenditure
per person in 1
week 1

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
fam­ expenditure
ilies unit per year
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

All
fam­
ilies

Un­
der
$300

Lb.

64
9
4
55
9
1

19
1
1
17
2
0

13
2
2
13
2
0

32
6
1
25
5
1

19
43
35

5
11
11

2
7
7

12
25
17

$300
to
$400

$400
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

1.631 1.232 1.519 2.164
.313 .237 .276 .422
.046 .020 .027 .087
.018 .010 .050 .012
.482 .373 .539 .585
.076 .050 .100 .096
.009 0
0
.024
.099
.290
.298

.061
.224
.257

.063
.226
.238

.162
.401
.375

2. 470 1.473 3. 471 3.223
Beef:
Fresh: Steak, porterhouse, sirloin__ __ _
top round. _ ___
other_________ _
Roast, rib_____________
chuck______ __
other.. _______
Boiling, chuck. ______
plate ________
other____
Canned____________ __________
Corned__________ ______
Dried____ __________ ______ _
Other___ ____________ _______
Veal: Fresh, steak, chops ___ _
roast_______ ___
stew__________
Lamb: Fresh, chops___________
roast___ ______
stew___ _________
Pork: Fresh, chops____ _____
loin roast_____ __
other_______ __ .__
Smoked ham, slices_____
half orwholepicnic____
Pork sausage. ___ ___
Other pork.. _________ .
Miscellaneous meats, total. _
Other fresh meat______ _______
Bologna, frankfurters_____ _
Cooked: Ham____ . . . ______
Tongue... __ _______
Liver________ _______ ______
Other meat products______ _
Poultry: Chicken, broiling _ _
roast ______
stew_______
T u rk ey... . . . ______
Other______ _ __ . . .
Fish and other sea food, total__
Fish: Fresh____________ ______
Canned___________ . . .
Cured_________________
Oysters______________________
Other sea food................. ..........

18
14
8
15
10
2
16
4
3
1
0
0
0
4
1
0
1
2
1
21
4
7
7
3
2
22
5

1
2
3
5
5
0
8
3
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
4
0
1
0
0
0
5
1

9
2
3
2
3
1
3
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
3
2
2
1
2
8
2

8
10
2
8
2
1
5
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
1
13
1
4
5
2
0
9
2

0
26
7
2
7
1
11
8
4
0
1

0
11
0
0
3
1
0
2
1
0
0

6
8
0
0
1
0
3
1
0
0
0

0
7
7
2
3
0
8
5
3
0
1

17
9
0
0
0

4
2
0
0
0

4
3
0
0
0

9
4
0
0
0

.182
.070
.061
.253
.148
.022
.195
.038
.038
.003
0
0
0
.031
.013
0
.009
.036
.004
.142
.074
.070
.027
.065
.043
.128
.054
. 231
0
. 146
.029
.019
.033
.004
.141
.108
.067
0
.018
. 199
. 153
.046
0
0
0

.030
.020
.046
.187
.116
0
.257
.071
.040
0
0
0
0
.050
0
0
.020
0
0
.061
0
.031
0
0
0
.061
.030
. 236
0
. 186
0
0
.040
.010
0
.030
.071
0
0
. 116
.091
.025
0
0
0

.539
.063
.100
.150
.251
.050
.150
.038
0
.017
0
0
0
.025
0
0
0
0
0
.117
.313
. 100
.038
. 100
.238
.314
.088
. 200
0
. 175
0
0
.025
0
. 163
.100
0
0
0
.317
.201
.116
0
0
0

.191
.132
.060
.380
.138
.036
.144
0
.054
0
0
0
0
.012
.036
0
0
.096
.012
.251
.048
. 102
.054
. 126
0
.120
.066
.279
0
. 122
.078
.052
.027
0
.299
.203
.096
0
.048
.240
.203
.037
0
0
0

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

36.3 25.5 32.3 51.1
9.6 6.9 8.5 13.4
.6 2.0
.9
.2
.3
.2 1.1
.2
7.3 5.3 8.0 9.4
1.3 1.0 1.2 1.8
.2 0
0
.4
1.9
8.5
6.3

1.1
6.1
4.7

.9 3.2
7.0 12.0
5.0 8.7

48.9 23.2 70.1 68. 7
4.2
1.8
1.2
3.8
2.5
.4
2.5
.5
.4
.1
0
0
0
.5
.2
0
.1
.5
.1
3.8
1.5
1.2
1.2
1.4
.8
2.6
.9
4.4
0
2.4
.9
.4
.6
.1
4.0
2.7
1.5
0
.4
3.7
2.9
.8
0
0
0

.8 11.9
.4 1.6
.9 1.9
2.4 2.5
2.0 4.0
0
1.3
3.2 2.0
.5
.9
.3 0
.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.4
.6
0
0
0
0
.3 0
0
0
0
0
1.5 3.4
6.7
0
. 5 1.4
1.4
0
0
2.1
4.4
0
1.1 6.6
.5 1.5
3.9 3.5
0
0
3.0 3.2
0
0
0
0
.3
.7
.2 0
,0
3.9
.7 2.8
1.3 0
0
0
0
0
1.9 5.9
1.6 3.8
.3 2.1
0
0
0
0
0
0

4.7
3.5
1.2
6.2
2.4
.5
1.8
0
.7
0
0
0
0
.3
.6
0
0
1.3
.2
6.6
.9
1.8
2.4
2.8
0
2.5
1.1
5.4
0
1.4
2.3
1.1
.6
0
8.8
4.9
2.4
0
1.1
4.6
3.9
.7
0
0
0

i The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as the
appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




182
T

able

W EST

7.—

NO RTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r con su m p tion at home during 1
week in sp rin g quarter, hy econ om ic level—Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES— Continued
Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

Economic
level—Fami­
Economic level—
lies spending
Families spending
per expenditure
All per expendi­
All
unit per year
fam­ ture unit per fam­
year
ilies
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
to
der
and
$300 $400 over
$300 $400 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued
Vegetables and fruits, total4 _ __
---Potatoes______ _
Sweetpotatoes, yams_______ ___
Dried legumes and nuts
___
Dried corn_____ _______ _ __
Beans: Dry____ _____ - _
Canned, dried.-Baked, not cannedPeas: Black-eyed._______ __
Other_________________
Nuts: Shelled__________ __
In shell______
_
Peanut butter _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Other dried legumes and nuts
Tomatoes: Fresh
Canned____ _____
Juice_______ ________
Sauce, paste________
Green and leafy vegetables, totalBrussels sprouts_________ _
Cabbage. ___ _____________
Sauerkraut. _ ____ _______
Collards______ _________
.
Kale _ _ ____
___ ______
Lettuce_____
____________
Spinach: Fresh _ _ _ _ _
Canned ___ __ __
Other leafy vegetables____ __
Asparagus: Fresh___ ___ _
Canned_____ ____
Lima beans: Fresh. _ _ _____
Canned. ______
Beans, snap (string): Fresh...
CannedBroccoli_______ ___ ___ _ .
Peas: Fresh______ . .
____
Canned____ __
_ ___
Peppers_____ ___ _______
Okra__________
__ ._ ___
Yellow vegetables, total _ _ __
______
Carrots___ _______
Winter squash and pumpkin.
Other vegetables, total4___ __
Beets: Fresh__________ ___
Canned___________ __
____
Cauliflower.__ __ __.
Celery ______ _____________
Corn: On e a r .___ ____
___
Canned _ __ .
_ _
Cucumber. __
_ ___
Eggplant-------------------------------Onions: Mature._
_ _ _ __
Spring. _ _____
___
Parsnips______________ _______
Summer squash_____________
White turnips________________
Yellow turnips, rutabaga. __ _
Other vegetables __________
Pickles and olives.
Citrus fruits, total _ __ _ _
Lemons
Oranges_______ __ _ _______
Grapefruit: Fresh.__ _______
Canned__________

N o.

N o.

N o.

Lb.

N o.

24
7

17

17
5

0
21
0
0
6
0
0
0
6

0
9
0
0
2
0
0
0
3

0
6
0
0
1
0
0
0
1

0
6
0
0
3
0
0
0
2

9
17
2
6

1
5
0
3

2
4
0
2

6
8
2
1

0
25
5
1
2
34
22
2
11
9
1
5
0
24
4
0
1
12
7
1

0
5
3
0
0
7
7
1
2
1
0
2
0
8
1
0
0
3
3
0

0
8
2
0
2
8
5
1
4
5
0
1
0
3
2
0
0
6
1
1

0
12
0
1
0
19
10
0
5
3
1
2
0
13
1
0
1
3
3
0

13
0

4
0

3
0

6
0

4
2
1
3
0
28
1
0
31
15
0
0
1
1

1
0
0
0
0
9
0
0
11
5
0
0
2
0
0

1
1
0
1
0
6
0
0
7
3
0
0
2
1
0

2
1
1
2
0
13
1
0
13
7
0
0
0
0
1

25
22

7
6

4
7

14
9

10
0

2

0

1
0

0

56

4

15
5

7

7. 277
2.354
.283
.229
0
. 159
0
0
.040
0
0
0
.030
0
.063
.225
.002
.039
1.506
0
.312
.032
.022
.018
.108
.339
.006
.175
.081
.004
.035
0
.242
.028
0
.009
.076
.010
.009
.099
.099
0
.751
.063
.011
.004
.013
0
.249
.002
0
.292
.065
0
0
.040
.009
.003

Lb.
5 .451

2. 038
.161
.269
0
.192
0
0
.030
0
0
0
.047
0
.010
.149
0
.028
.872
0
. 146
.041
0
0
.055
.262
0
.050
.010
0
.040
0
.201
0
0
0
.053
.014
0
.050
.050
0
.549
.020
0
0
0
0
.220
0
0
.222
.037
0
0
.050
0
0

Lb.

9. 330
2.907
.426
.326
0
.326
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.075
.313
0
.044
2.115
0
.489
.075
0
.100
.138
.326
.031
.376
.075
0
.050
0
.152
.080
0
0
. 169
.004
.050
. 175
.175
0
.978
.150
.031
0
.025
0
.298
0
0
.276
.048
0
0
.100
0
0

Lb.

8. 475
2. 465
.359
. 138
0
.042
0
0
.072
0
0
0
.024
0
.120
.272
.006
.049
1.968
0
.425
0
.060
0
.156
.437
0
.227
.168
.012
.021
0
.334
.036
0
.024
.060
.008
0
. 120
.120
0
.887
.072
.015
.012
.024
0
.260
.006
0
.383
.106
0
0
0
0
.009

.805 .473 1.019 1.098
.212 .134 .244 .290
.475 .272 .714 .601
.118 .067 .061 .207
0
0
0
0

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

37.1 26. 6 50. 3 45. 6
5.1 4.0 6.9 5.5
1.3
.7 2.6 1.4
1.8 2.1 2.2 1.4
0
0
0
0
1.1 1.2 2.2
.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.3 0
.3
.6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.4
.6 0
.4
0
0
0
0
.8
.1 1.0 1.5
1.7 1.2 2.4 2.0
0
0
.1
(3
)
.3
.3
.4
.4
9.4 5.9 13.4 12.4
0
0
0
0
1.2
.6 2.0 1.7
.2
.4
.5 0
.1 0
0
.3
.1 0
.4 0
1.6
.8 2.1 2.2
1.2
.8 1.4 1.7
0
.2 0
(3
)
.2 1.0 1.0
.7
.5
.1
.8
.8
.1 0
0
.2
.4
.3
.4
.3
0
0
0
0
2.1 1.7 1.5 2.8
.3 0
.4
1.1
0
0
0
0
.1 0
.2
0
.7
.6 1.6
.6
.2
.3
.2
.1
0
.3 0
(3
)
.4
.5
.9
.5
.4
.5
.9
.5
0
0
0
0
5.1 3.8 7.1 6.0
.1
.1
.1
.3
.1 0
.3
.1
.1 0
0
.1
.1 0
.2
.3
0
0
0
0
2.3 1.6 3.1 2.7
0
0
1
(3
)
0
0
0
0
1.4 1.1 1.6 1.6
.4
.7
.5
.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.2
.3
.4 0
.1 0
.4 0
0
.1
0
(3
)
.2
.3
.2
.3
5.3 2.9 6.5 7.6
1.9 1.2 2.0 2.8
1.4 4.1 3.6
2.7
.3
.7
.4 1.2
0
0
0
0

i The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21, meals he was counted as the
appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
4 Does not include quantity of pickles and olives.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




T A BU LAR

T able 7.—

SUM M ARY

18 3

F o o d used at hom e and purchased fo r con su m p tion at home d uring 1
w eek in sp rin g quarter, hy econom ic level—Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S —NEGRO FAM ILIES—Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
fo r C o n s u m p tio n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

Other fruits, total____ ___________
Apples: Fresh_______________ __
Canned...... ............ .........
Apricots: Fresh._______________
Canned______________
Bananas. ______________________
Berries: Fresh_________________
Canned_______________
Cherries: Fresh________________
Canned______________
Grapes: Fresh_________________
Canned_______________
Peaches: Fresh________________
Canned______________
Pears: Fresh_________________
Canned____ . . . ___ __
Pineapple: Fresh_________ ____
Canned____________
Melons_______ __ ________ __ _
Plums: Fresh . . . ____ _____ __
Canned_____________ _
Other fru it____________________
Cider________ ________________
Grape juice___________________
Other fruit juices______________
Dried: Apricots________________
Peaches________________
Prunes___________ __ .
Raisins_________ . . . _
Dates. _______ . . .
Figs------------------------------O th e r.________________
Sugars and sweets, total_____ __ _
Sugars: W h ite ________________
Brown______
. . . ___
Other sweets: Candy__________
Jellies. __ _ _ _ _ _
Molasses, sirups.
Other sweets____
Miscellaneous, total. _____ _ . . .
Gelatine___________ ____ _______
Packaged dessert mixtures___
Tea------------------------------------------Coffee___________ _______
Cocoa_________ _______________
Chocolate______________________
Vinegar_______ _____________ __
Salt____________________________
Baking powder, yeast, soda____
Spices and extracts_____________
Catsups, sauces______ ____ ____
Tomato soup____ __ _________
Other soups____ _______________
Cod-liver oil. ._ . . . ___________
Proprietary foods___ ________
Other foods____ . . . _ ________
Soft drinks consumed at home..
Other drinks consumed at home.
Sales tax on food.__ _____________

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All ture unit per
fam­
year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

24
1
0
0
16
17
3
0
0
0
0
0
6
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
5
2
0
1
0

9
1
0
0
4
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
0
0
0

7
0
0
0
2
4
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
0

62
2
9
6
15

19
1
3
1
7

16
0
3
0
4

1
6
8
51
6
0

1
1
4
15
2
0

0
3
1
14
2
0

1
2
2
1
0
6
6

0
0
2
0
0
3
1

1
0
0
0
0
1
2

N o.

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 1 in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

All
fam­
ilies

Lb.

0.921
.431
.011
0
0
. 192
. 158
.028
0
0
0
0
0
.036
0
0
.009
.003
0
0
0
.009
0
0
0
0
.002
.027
.011
0
.004
0
1.877
27 1. 646
.007
1
.034
3
5
.007
. 183
4
0

8
0
0
0
10
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0

0
2
3
22
2
0

Un­
der
$300

Lb.

0.852
.479
.025
0
0
, 111
. 121
.025
0
0
0
0
0
.021
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.020
0
0
0
0
0
.030
.020
0
0
0
1.381
1.079
.015
.035
0
.252
0

$300
to
$400

Lb.

0. 952
.501
0
0
0
.083
. 113
.094
0
0
0
0
0
.044
0
0
0
.017
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.075
0
0
.025
0
2. 797
2. 531
0
.078
0
.188
0

$400
and
over

Lb.

0.993
.341
0
0
0
.341
. 224
0
0
0
0
0
0
.051
0
0
.024
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.006
0
.006
0
0
0
2. 025
1.897
0
.011
.018
.099
0

0
.006 .013 0
.022 .008 .081 .012
.008 .011 .006 .006
.208 . 131 .276 .266
.016 .015 .025 .012
0
0
0
0

0
.003
2
.006
0 0
1 0
0
.004
2
.067
3
. 155

0
0
0
0
0
.103
.010

.017 0
.016
0
0
0
0
0
.012
0
.028 .042
.551 .138

C t.

5.8
2.0
.1
0
0
1.0
1.6
.3
0
0
0
0
0
.3
0
0
(3
)
(3
)
0
0
0
.1
0
0
0
0
(3
)
.2
.1
0
.1
0
11.1
9.0
(3
)
.6
.1
1.4
0
12.5
.1
.3
.3
5.5
.2
0
.2
.4
1.2
.8
(3
)
(3
)
.1
0
0
.1
.5
2.8
1.1

C t.
5 .2

C t.

C t.

6.9 6. 8
2.0 2.4 l! 9
.2 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.6
.4
19
1.2 1 4 2 3
.3
.9 o'
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.2
.5
.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.2 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
.3
.6 0
.2 0
.1
0
0
0
0
.4 0
0
0
0
8.3 16.1 12.4
5.8 13.7 10.6
.1 0
0
.7 1.2
.3
0
.4
0
1.7 1.2 1.1
0
0
0
7.9 18.2 15.8
.3 0
0
. 1 1.3
.1
.4
.1
.3
3.1 7.3 7.6
.2
.3
.1
0
0
0
.1
.3
.4
.1
.6
.3
1.0
.6 1.6
.5 2.1
.5
.1
.0 0
0
.3 0
.2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.3
0
0
.4
.6
.6
1.0 5.4 3.7
.4 1.6 1.6

i The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p . 3260 3 9 5 7 °— 39-------13




184

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

T able 7.— Food used at home and 'purchased for consumption at home during 1
week in spring quarter, hy economic level— C on tin u ed
M IN N EAPO L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES

All fami­
lies

Item

Number of families surveyed in spring quarter___ ____ __
Average number of equivalent full-time persons 1 per
family in 1 week
_____ __ ________________
Average number of food expenditure units 2per family in
1 week _ ______________ ______ ______ _______
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Under $400 $400 to $600

$600 and
over

358

114

140

104

3. 53

4.54

3.38

2. 63

3.03

3.83

2.87

2. 36

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All
All ture unit per
fam­
fam­
year
ilies
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week
Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Food
U s e d at H o m e
and P u r ch a sed f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e
in

1 W eek

____________________
Total
Grain products, total_____ ____
Bread and other baked goods,
total
_____
__
Bread: White______________
G ra h am , w hole
wheat. ___________
Rye --------------------Crackers. _ ________________
Plain rolls __ _____________
Sweet rolls_________________
Cookies____________________
Cakes ____________________
Pies __ ________
______
Other
__ ________ _______
Ready-to-eat cereals ----------Flour and other cereals, total._
Flour: White_____ ________
Graham____________
Other ____________
Corn meal.__ _ ............. .......
Hominy. _______ __________
Cornstarch________________
Rice____________ ________
Rolled oats _______________
Wheat cereal_______________
Tapioca _ _______________
Sago... ___________________
Macaroni, spaghetti, noodles.
Other grain products______
Eggs.---------------------------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream, total..
Milk: Fresh, whole—bottled..
loose___
skimmed . _
buttermilk and
other ______
Skimmed, dried_____ __
Evaporated and con­
densed. . . . ________
Cheese: American. ___________
Cottage.. __________
Other...........................
Icecream____________________

N o.

N o.

N o.

Lb.

N o.

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

6.027 6.186 5. 523 6.609
336 102 130

104

107
116
101
42
82
101
45
16

26
21
28
11
21
29
8
3

44
54
42
18
30
38
23
7

37
41
31
13
31
34
14
6

150

43

254.1 197.1 258.0 352.8
40.4 35.4 39. 6 51.0

3.384 2.995 3.390 4.116
2. 397 2. 343 2. 303 2. 665

27.4 21.1 28. 8 36.4
14.8 13.1 15.1 17.2

.361
.357
.198
.056
.168
.157
.070
.039
.045
.142
2.351
1.787
.018
.026
.015
0
.022
.092
.156
.119
.002
0
.114
0
1.175
6.562
5.976
0
0

2.5
2.4
1.5
1.0
1.6
2.0
.8
.2
.6
2.2
10.8
6.0
(3
)
.3
.1
(3
)
.2
.5
1.2
1.0
.1
0
1.4
0
13.4
35.8
27.9
.1
(3
)

2.0 2.6 3.4
1.2 3.0 3.4
.9 1.8 2.3
1.0
.9 1.0
.8 1.4 3.3
1.4 1.8 3.2
.3 1.1 1.4
.1
.2
.4
.3
.9
.8
1.9 2.2 2.6
12.4 8.6 12.0
7.6 4.2 6.2
0
.1
.1
.3
.4
.2
.1 (3
.1
)
0
0
(3
)'
.1
.2
.3
.5
.3
.8
1.4 1.1 1.2
.9
.9 1.5
.1
.1 (3
)
0
0
0
1.4 1.3 1.6
0
0
0
10.6 13.6 18.2
31.3 38.3 39. 6
25.1 30.6 28.5
.3 0
0
0
0
(3
)

60

47

"76 28 32
1
1
0
7
18
8
2
1
5
1
1
0
19
6
8
36 14
8
88 35 33
60 18 22
2
8
5
0
0
0
114 39 44
0
0
0
336 106 133

16
0
3
2
0
5
14
20
20
1
0
31
0
97

344 108 136
2
2
0
1
1
0

100
0
0

.268
.248
.140
.059
.083
.098
.039
.017
.035
.120
2. 523
2.011
.008
.049
.016
.003
.017
.063
.164
.070
.007
0
.115
0
1.180
6.910
6.418
.025
.002

.200
.125
.102
.066
.047
.073
.017
.007
.015
.108
3.083
2. 514
0
.053
.021
.008
.014
.070
.197
.065
.009
0
.132
0
1.093
6.045
5.588
.062
.004

.288
.320
.148
.054
.074
.090
.045
.016
.052
.122
2.011
1. 594
.010
.056
.010
0
.019
.038
.132
.046
.008
0
.098
0
.855
7.004
6. 526
0
0

15
1

3
1

7
0

5
0

.071
.002

.041 .094 .085
0
.005 0

.3
(3
)

.2
(3
)

.4
0

.4
0

68
175
44
30
91

29
55
15
6
22

26
72
11
11
36

13
48
18
13
33

.122
.131
.035
.016
.088

.135
.109
.033
.009
.059

1.1
3.3
.5
.5
2.1

1.2
2.5
.5
.2
1.3

1.1
3.6
.3
.4
1.9

1.0
4.1
.9
1.0
3.7

.126
.137
.023
.015
.083

.091
.161
.062
.032
.155

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
2 The number of expenditure units per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the expenditure units
represented by the equivalent full-time persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data
apply.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TA B U LA R

185

S U M M A R Y

T able 7.— Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1
week in spring quarter, by economic level— C on tin u ed
M IN N E A P O L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per fam­
year
ilies
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week
Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued
Fats, total----------------------------------Butter-------------------------------------Cream_________________________
Other table fats------------------------Lard----------------------------------------Vegetable shortening----------------Table or cooking oils___________
Mayonnaise and other salad
dressing_____________________
Bacon, smoked-------------------------Salt side of pork-----------------------Meat, poultry, fish and other sea
food, total-----------------------------Beef:
Fresh: Steak, porterhou se,
sirloin________
top round______
other---------------Roast, rib____________
chuck-------------other--------------Boiling, chuck-----------plate -------------other_________
Canned______________________
Corned______________________
Dried________________________
Other------------ ---------------------Veal: Fresh, steak, chops______
roast_____________
stew______________
Lamb: Fresh, chops___________
roast____________
stew____________
Pork: Fresh, chops------------------loin roast________
other-------------------Smoked ham, slices______
half or whole.
picnic_____
Pork sausage____________
Other pork______________
Miscellaneous meats, total. - ___
Other fresh meat____________
Bologna, frankfurters________
Cooked: Ham_______________
Tongue____________
Liver________________________
Other meat products________
Poultry: Chicken, broiling____
roast----------stew_______
Turkey______________
Other________________
Fish and other sea food, total.
Fish: Fresh_________________
Canned_______________
Cured_________________
Oysters______________________
Other sea food_______________
Vegetables and fruits, totali _____
Potatoes_______________________
Sweetpotatoes, yams___________

N o.

N o.

N o.

349 107 138
189 30 78
14 10
0
164 61 66
37 10 15
4
1
9
101
166
15

30
45
5

38
68
8

N o.

104
81
4
37
12
4
33
53
2

Lb.

1.383 1.053 1. 368 2.037
.613 .499 .634 .792
.240 .063 .236 .579
.020 .041 0
.018
.170 .170 .174 . 162
.058 .044 .055 .091
.016 .028 .002 .019
.113
.143
.010

.092
.105
.011

.108
.146
.013

. 162
.209
.005

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

35.8 26. 4 36. 7 52.9
20.0 16.0 20.9 26.2
4.9 1.3 4.9 11.8
.4
.4
.7 0
2.5 2.4 2.7 2.5
1.1
.8 1.0 1.8
.3
.5
.1
.6
2.0
4.4
.2

1.6
2.9
.2

2.0
4.8
.3

2.9
6.6
.1

2.394 1. 962 2. 343 3. 200
124
107
101
77
60
38
33
2
28
1
11
24
6
56
20
14
13
2
12
149
37
54
31
4
15
49
12

30
34
35
28
22
15
10
1
9
0
5
11
2
9
7
3
1
1
5
38
8
24
6
0
3
15
5

46
44
36
26
27
10
16
1
12
0
5
11
2
20
9
6
7
1
2
65
13
17
16
1
8
18
5

48
29
30
23
11
13
7
0
7
1
1
2
2
27
4
5
5
0
5
46
16
13
9
3
4
16
2

3
207
51
5
56
14
5
14
8
0
1

2
79
20
2
17
7
1
1
2
0
0

1
79
18
1
23
5
2
3
3
0
1

0
49
13
2
16
2
2
10
3
0
0

68
100
9
3
4

15
29
4
1
1

27
40
2
0
2

26
31
3
2
l

226
15

66

91

69
8

2

5

52.9 40.3 52.1 76. 9

. 160
. 153
. 154
.230
. 167
. 110
.067
.002
.040
.001
.009
.012
.012
.057
.062
.018
.011
.006
.018
. 153
.101
.084
.032
.021
.058
.043
.017
. 327
.007
.221
.040
.005
.043
.011
.016
.050
.027
0
(5
)
. 176
.083
.080
.007
.003
.003
8. 391
2. 368
.033

4.2 2.5
3.5 2.3
2.7 2.2
4.8 3.9
3.3 3.1
2.0 1.9
.9
.8
(3
)
(3)
.6
.6
0
(3
)
.2
.2
.4
.5
.3
.6
1.4
.6
1.4 1.1
.3
.1
.3 (3
)
.1
.1
.4
.5
4.1 2.4
2.3 1.3
1.7 2.1
1.0
.3
.6 0
1.2
.7
1.0
.8
.3
.3
7. 7 7.8
'.2
!3
4.7 4.7
1.3 1.5
.2
.2
1.0
.7
.3
.4
.5
.3
1.3
.2
.7
.6
0
0
0
(3
)
3. 7 2.5
1.7 1.0
1.7 1.3
.2
.2
(3
)
(3)
.1 (3
)
49.1 33.3
6.4 5.4
.2
.1

.099
.108
.134
.209
.164
.114
.046
.002
.034
0
.009
.012
.025
.025
.044
.007
.002
.006
.023
.094
.058
.110
.009
0
.042
.031
.017
367
.014
.242
.054
.009
.031
.017
.008
.008
.027
0
0
. 128
.051
.065
.009
.002
.001
7. 447
3.033
.010

.160
.176
. 144
.200
.190
.072
.105
.004
.050
0
.013
.016
.001
.051
.067
.025
.014
.008
.004
. 175
. 107
.058
.043
.003
.071
.037
.017
288
.004
.206
.028
(6
)
.044
.006
.018
.025
.023
0
(5
)
178
.085
.086
.004
0
.003
9.430
3.011
.027

.274
. 198
.206
.324
.133
.169
.040
0
.034
.005
.002
.005
.007
.128
.086
.027
.023
0
.035
.228
.173
.078
.058
.091
.066
.075
.018
315
o'

.208
.035
.004
.063
.005
.029
.071
.032
0
0
. 270
. 142
.099
.011
.011
.007
12. 773
4.381
.085

4.0
4.1
2.6
4.4
3.8
1.4
1.2
(3
)
.8

7.8
4.8
3.7
7.2
2.6
3.4
.6
0
.5
.1
.1
.2
.2
3.2
1.6
.5
.7
0
.7
6.1
4.0
1.6
1.6
2.4
1.4
1.7
.2
78

0
.3
.5
(3
)
1.2
1.5
.4
.4
.2
.1
4.6
2.3
1.3
1.4
.1
1.6
.9
.3
70
! i o'
4.7 4.6
.9 1.5
.2
(3
)
1.1 1.4
.1
.2
.5 1.2
.7 4.3
.6 1.1
0
0
0
(3
)
3.9 5.6
1.9 2.6
1.8 2.4
.1
.2
.2
0
.1
.2
50.6 75.6
6.5 8.0
.6
.2

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
* Less than 0.05 cent.
8 Less than 0.0005 pound.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




18 6
T

able

W ES T

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

7. — Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1
week in spring quarter, by economic level— C on tinu ed
M IN N EAPO LIS-ST. PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
fo r C o n s u m p ti o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

Vegetables and fruits, total— Con.
Dried legumes and nuts, total
Dried corn_______ ________
Beans: D r y -------------------------Canned, dried________
Baked, not canned___
Peas: Black-eyed.._ _ _ _ _ _ _
Other_______________
Nuts: Shelled_______________
In shell_______ . . . .
Peanut butter____
____
Other dried legumes and nuts.
Tomatoes: Fresh_____________
Canned______ _____
Juice _ __________
Sauce, paste_____
Green and leafy vegetables, total.
Brussels sprouts______ ______
Cabbage_____ . . . _
.._ ._
Sauerkraut_________ _______
Collards _ ______ ___________
.. . ..
Kale______ _______
Lettuce___ ______ __
______
Spinach: Fresh.___________ _
Canned_____
Other leafy vegetables_______
Asparagus: Fresh_____
Canned______ . . .
Lima beans: Fresh_________
Canned________
Beans, snap (string): Fresh.__
Canned.
Broccoli . . . _ _ __
... _
Peas: Fresh________. . . . . .
C a n n ed.___ _______ __
Peppers. _______
______
O kra______ ._ _ _ . . . ._ _
Yellow vegetables, total_____ _
Carrots. __________
___ __
Winter squash and pumpkin.
Other vegetables, total4 _____
Beets: Fresh ______ _____ . . .
Canned______________
Cauliflower__________ . . . _ _
Celery_______________________
Corn: On ear. ____________
Canned______________
Cucumber___________________
Eggplant------------------------------Onions: Mature. _______ . .
Spring___ __ ______
Parsnips___________________
Summer squash . . . . __ __
White turnips______________
Yellow turnips, rutabaga____
Other vegetables_____________
Pickles and olives___ ____ __
Citrus fruits, total. _ _ ___ __
Lemons
___________ _ _
Oranges____________________
Grapefruit: Fresh___________
Canned. _ ___ _

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

3
29
23
0
2
2
48
6
44

1
12
10
0
0
0
7
1
20

1
11
8
0
1
1
18
2
14

55
80
15
1

7
24
1
0

19
33
3
0

1
110
37
0
0
229
27
26
2
96
8
4
13
18
64
1
21
140
12
1

1
33
13
0
65
6
11
0
18
1
2
7
5
22
0
5
38
2
0

0
37
15
0
0
93
11
11
1
43
3
1
3
6
25
0
7
58
4
1

214
1

63
1

85
0

6
17
17
148
0
104
26
0
98
24
6
0
2
14
30

1
5
3
40
0
34
6
0
26
6
0
0
0
2
4

0
8
7
51
0
45
9
0
36
9
3
0
0
4
10

69
267
80
8

18 25
84 106
11 36
1
3

0

N o.

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

All
fam­
ilies

Lb.

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

155
.002
.066
.024
0
.004
.004
.014
.003
.037
.001
.069
.155
.012
0
1.071
0
.191
.069
0
0
.163
.054
.040
.004
.206
.009
.002
.007
.018
.074
0
.019
.211
.002
.002
.346
.346
0
.616
0
.025
.021
.130
0
.180
.024
0
.171
.024
.010
0
0
.016
.015

.205
.004
.061
.029
0
.002
.007
.053
.009
.040
0
.179
. 173
.093
.003
1.744
0
.351
.096
0
0
.279
.062
.022
.004
.360
.021
.002
.015
.048
. 114
.005
.071
.287
.007
0
.433
.433
0
. 165
.036
.013
.040
.274
0
.126
.045
0
.281
.030
.018
0
.007
.049
.046

.183 . 197
.002 .002
1
.073 .085
6
.034 .046
5
0 0
0
.002 0
1
.003 0
1
.019 .006
23
.004 .001
3
.046 .057
10
(* )
0
.074 .022
29
.137 .101
23
.026 ,003
11
1
0
( 5)
1.092 .769
.001 .002
6
.212 . 157
40
.069 .056
9
0
0 0
0
0
0
. 167 .111
71
.047 .033
10
.033 .033
4
.002 0
1
. 185 .074
35
4
.008 .001
.003 .005
1
.018 .030
3
.027 .023
7
.086 .082
17
1
.001 0
.036 .032
9
. 194 .129
44
.002 .001
6
.001 0
0
.339 . 285
66
.338 .282
0
.001 .003
.616 .430
5
.010 .006
4
.017 .013
.020 .008
7
.144 .087
57
0
0 0
.153 .142
25
11
.024 .013
0 0
0
.181 . 137
36
9
.020 .011
3
.008 0
0 0
0
2
.002 0
8
.019 .006
16
.018 .007

.

2.184 1.626 2. 515 2. 666
26
.061 .044 .055 .103
77 1.786 1.437 2.073 1.952
.324 .143 .378 .571
33
4 1 .013 .002 .009 .040

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week
Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
to and
der
$400 $600 over

C t.

2.4
( 3)

.4
.3
0

( 3)
( 3)

.8
.1
.8

( 3)

.9
1.2
.3

( 3)

9.8

( 3)

.8
.4
0
0
2.5
.3
.4
(3
)
1.6
.2
(3
)
.2
.3
.8
(3
)
.4
1.9
(3
)
(3
)
1. 8
1.8
(3
)
5.8
.1
.2
.2
1.5
0
1.5
.3
0
.8
.2
(3
)
0
(3
)
.1
.2
.7
9.4
.7
7.0
1.6
.1

C t.

1.9
( 3)

.5
.3
0
0
0
.2
( 3)

.9
0
.4
.8

C t.

1.9
( 3)

.4
.2
0

( 3)
( 3)

.6
.1
.6

(3 )

C t.

4.0
( 3)

.4
.3
0

( 3)

.1
2.3
.2
.7
0
2.2
1.6
.8

.8
1.4
.2
0
0
( 3)
6.3 9.9 16.3
0
0
( 3)
.6
.8 1.4
.4
.3
.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.6 2.5 4.2
.2
.4
.5
.3
.5
.2
0
(3
)
(3
)
.6 1.8 3.1
.4
.1
(3
)
.1 (3
)
(3
)
.2
.3
.1
.2
.3
.6
.6
.7 1.0
0
0
.1
.2
.3
.7
1.2 2.1 3.0
.2
(3
)
(3
)
0
0
(3
)
1.3 1.9 2 . 4
1.3 1.9 2 . 4
0
0
(3
)
3.6 5. 7 9.1
0
.3
(3
)
.2
.1
.1
.2
.4
.1
.9 1.4 2.8
0
0
0
1.3 1.8 1.4
.2
.6
.1
0
0
0
.8 1.1
.5
.1
.2
.3
0
.1
(3
)
0
0
0
.1
0
0
.2
(3
)
(3
)
.2
.6
.1
.4
.7 1.1
6.5 10.2 13.9
.5
.7 1.2
5.3 7.5 9.3
.7 1.9 3.0
.4
.1
(3
)

( 3)

1The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3Less than 0.05 cent.
4 Does not include quantity of pickles and olives.
5Less than 0.0005 pound.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p.326.




187

TABULAE SUMMABY
T

able

1 .— Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1
week in spring quarter, by economic level— C on tinu ed
M IN N E A P O L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
All
fam­ ture unit per fam­
year
ilies
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week
Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e i n 1
W e e k —Continued

Apples: Fresh_________________
Canned_______________
Apricots: Fresh--------- --------------Canned______________
Bananas_____________________
Berries: Fresh_________________
Canned __ ___ _. ._ .
Cherries: Fresh______ ______ __
Canned__________ __
Grapes: Fresh_________________
Canned __ _. ________
Peaches: Fresh_____ ___ - Canned______________
Pears: Fresh___________________
Canned_________
___
Pineapple: Fresh. ______
Canned.. . . . __ _.
Melons___ ______ . . . _ . ------Plums: Fresh______________ . . .
Canned_______ ______
Other fruit______
__ . _______
Cider_______ __________ . . _ . .
Grape juice._. ________________
Other fruit juices____________ .
Dried: Apricots___ ___________
Peaches. _ _ _ _ _ _
.. .
Prunes... _____ . . . . .
Raisins . . .
_.
___
D a te s___ ___
___
Figs____________________
Other___ _
.. ..
Sugars and sweets, total. . . . .
Sugars: White. _. . . . . .
____
Brown___ ____________
Other sweets: Candy___ __ __
Jellies.___ __
_
Molasses, sirups..
Other sweets _ _
Miscellaneous, total___ _________
Gelatine___ ___________________
Packaged dessert mixtures_____
T e a ____ _______ . . . . .
...
Coffee____ . . . ______ __ _. . . .
Cocoa____________
_____ . . .
Chocolate__________ _____ _____
Vinegar___
_ __ _______ _
Salt____________________________
Baking powder, yeast, soda__ _
Spices and extracts. _______ _ _
Catsups, sauces ______ ________
Tomato soup______ __________
Other soups____________________
Cod-liver oil..
. ________
Proprietary foods. _ ___________
Other foods____________________
Soft drinks consumed at home..
Other drinks consumed at home.
Sales tax on food___________ _____

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Lb.

Lb.

0. 971
.395
0
0
0.
.280
.058
0
0
.007
0
0
.005
.026
0
.006
.002
.024
0
0
.003
0
0
0
.004
.002
.004
.091
.044
.012
.008
0
1.476
1.250
.080
.049
.038
.059
0

1. 453
.535
0
0
.003
.454
.119
.002
0
.012
0
0
0
.035
0
.006
.015
.074
0
0
0
.013
0
0
.014
.015
.002
. Ill
.025
.017
.001
0
1.762
1.583
.068
.057
.032
.016
.006

4
25
12
71
8
7

.005
.028
.021
.292
.022
.010

.008
.015
.014
.231
.025
.008

.002
.028
.027
.300
.016
.010

27
12
0
3
4
12
16

.068
.040
.004
.007
.005
.060
.141

.060
.021
.004
.002
.003
.022
.031

.044
.046
.006
.010
.001
.066
.129

1. 846 10.9
.657
3.0
0
0
0
0
.004 (3
)
.585
2.8
. 162
1.5
0
(3
)
0
0
.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
(3
)
.050
.4
0
0
.1
.031
.015
.1
.080
.9
0
0
0
0
.014 (3
)
.022
.1
0
0
.001
(3
)
.1
.015
.2
.020
.004 (3
)
1.1
. 146
.3
.018
.2
.018
0
(3
)
.004 (3
)
1. 528
8.8
1.256
6.1
.051
.4
1.2
.109
.032
.6
.4
.046
.1
.034
17.9
.2
.007
.052
.7
1.2
.025
8.0
.394
.4
.026
.017
.3
.2
.6
.5
.3
.6
.9
.126
.5
.067
0
.3
.009
.4
.026
.2
.124
.5
2.1
.368

49
0
0
0
47
17
0
0
3
0
0
1
7
0
2
1
10
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
2
18
9
4
1
0

61
0
0
1
73
29
1
0
4
0
0
0
10
0
1
3
22
0
0
0
3
0
0
3
7
1
30
8
6
1
0

48
0
0
1
59
25
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
0
6
2
17
0
0
1
3
0
1
3
6
1
19
2
5
0
1

199
33
71
28
21

76
10
23
11
9

75
15
27
9
6

48
8
21
8
6

15
69
49
264
27
16

7
4
17 27
17 20
85 108
10
9
4
5

19
9
2
2
2
5
6

63
38
6
11
7
27
35

17
17
4
6
1
10
13

Lb.

1. 339
.504
0
0
.002
.411
. 103
.001
0
.007
0
0
.002
.035
0
.011
.010
.055
0
0
.004
.009
0
(5
)
.010
.011
.003
.110
.031
.015
.004
.001
1.594
1.376
.069
.065
.034
.040
.010

158
0
0
2
179
71
1
0
7
0
0
1
26
0
9
6
49
0
0
2
6
0
1
7
14
4
67
19
15
2
1

1
.....

Lb.

C t.

C t.

C t.

7.0
2.3
0
0
0
1.8
.7
0
0
.1
0
0
.1
.3
0
(3
)
(8)
.4
0
0
(3
)
0
0
0
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
.7
.4
.1
.1
0
8.0
5.6
.5
.9
.6
.4
0
11.8
.2
.3
.8
6.1
.3
.2
.3
.5
.4
.3
.3
.7
.3
.3
.1
.1
.2;
.4

11.9 16.7
3.2 4.0
0
0
0
0
.1
(3
)
3.1 4.0
1.7 2.5
0
(3
)
0
0
.2 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.4
.8
0
0
.5
(3
)
.1
.1
1.1 1.4
0
0
0
0
.1
0
.2
.1
0
0
.1
0
.1
.1
.3
.5
.1
(3
)
1.2 1.6
.2
.2
.2
.3
0
(3
)
.1
0
8.8 10.5
6.2 6.8
.5
.4
1.2 1.9
.6
.7
.2
.5
.1
.2
18.3 28.1
.2
.1
.8 1.4
1.5 1.4
8.5 11.0
.4
.5
.2
.4
.2
.2
.6
.8
.7
.4
.2
.4
.5 1.1
.6i 1.6
.9
.6
.5 0
.3
.7
.7
(8
)
.9
.6i
1.9' 5.6

C t.

-

i The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
5 Less than 0.0005 pound.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




188
T

able

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
7 . — F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c o n su m p tion at home d uring 1
week in sp rin g quarter , hy econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .—W H IT E FAM ILIES

1fami­
lies

Item

Item

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u rch a sed
fo r
C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e
in
1 W eek

__________ ___________
Total
Grain products, total__________
Bread and other baked goods,
total_______ ___________ _
Bread: White. ___ . . . . . .
G ra h am , w hole
wheat.
____ __
Rye________________
Crackers_________
Plain rolls ._ . . . ____ . . .
Sweet rolls _______________
Cookies________ _ _______
Cakes_______
______
_ .
Pies_____
___ ___________
Other__ _____
Ready-to-eat cereals
______
Flour and other cereals, total..
Flour: White __________ _
Graham __ __ __
Other
. . . ______
Corn meal.
. _______
Hominy____ _____
__ _
Cornstarch._ __ . . . ______
Rice. . __________ ________
Rolled oats______
._ __ . .
Wheat cereal__________ __
Tapioca__________ . . .
Sago_______________________
M a c a r o n i, s p a g h e tti,
noodles_________ ______
Other grain products______
Eggs----------------------------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream, total. .
Milk: Fresh, whole—bottled. _
loose___
skimmed_______
buttermilk and
other_________
Skimmed, dried_______
Evaporated and con­
densed______________
Cheese: American_________ _
Cottage____ _____ __
Other________ ______
Ice cream____________ . . . . . .

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Under $400 $400 to $600

$600 and
over

264

82

96

86

3.48

4.86

3.26

2. 43

3.01

Number of families surveyed in spring quarter_________
Average number of equivalent full-time persons 1 per
family in 1 week_____________________________________
Average number of food expenditure units 2 per family
in 1 week_____________________________________________
Number of families
using in 1 week

Economic level— Families spending
per expenditure unit per year

4.11

2.83

2.17

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person 1 in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

Lb.

Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

4.776 4.288 5.130 5.175

273.4 200.9 291. 2 385.1
44.2 35. 5 49.9 51. 5

3. 378 2. 957 3.676 3.732
2.209 2.124 2. 333 2.188

34.2 27.1 38.9 40.2
19.0 17.5 20.8 19.1

245

76

89

80

35
62
93
32
99
71
70
25

10
18
29
9
28
20
15
4

12
28
27
11
41
26
25
11

13
16
37
12
30
25
30
10

108

37

41

30

188
0
8
33
7
10
44
70
43
7
0

61
0
4
13
2
1
17
24
14
1
0

70
0
0
11
3
6
18
26
14
4
0

57
0
4
9
2
3
9
20
15
2
0

143
2
255

51
0
78

54
1
94

38
1
83

224
6
7

67
4
3

78
1
3

79
1
1

9
1

2
1

3
0

4
0

.101
.004

.054 .138 .138
.010 0
0

.8
(3
)

.1
(3
)

.6
0

2.2
0

167
92
27
40
70

55
35
9
12
19

63
31
8
11
27

49
26
10
17
24

.555
.088
.032
.023
.115

.489
.096
.026
.015
.063

4.3
2.2
.4
.9
2.2

3.8
2.2
.3
.6
1.2

4.8
1.9
.4
.6
2.6

4.5
2.4
.6
1.8
3.6

.139 .078
.209 .190
. 114 .092
.063 .042
.350 .260
.116 .084
. 101 .054
.038 .012
.039 .021
.102 .088
1.296 1. 243
.795 .778
0
0
.020 .020
.062 .065
.013 .009
.006 .003
.065 .073
.077 .077
.042 .028
.004 .001
0
0

.160 .221
.263 . 167
.096 .184
.050 .120
.406 .437
. 126 .161
. 118 . 165
.064 .047
.060 .042
.116 .108
1.338 1. 335
.792 .831
0
0
.051
0
.075 .036
.011 .022
.012 .005
.075 .034
.076 .079
.038 .077
.008 .002
0
0

.209 .189 .247 .193
.004 .005
.003 0
.806 .642 .816 1.103
5.154 4. 783 5.305 5.644
3.858 3. 382 4.073 4.443
.154 .259 .082 .062
.224 .389 .138 .041

.616
.073
.031
.018
.136

.589
.097
.046
.046
.182

1.3
.7
2.1 1.9
1.3 1.0
.9
.5
4.0 2.8
2.0 1.2
2.4 1.1
.5
.1
.7
.3
1.7 1.4
8.3 7.0
3.7 3.2
0
0
.2
.1
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1 (3
)
.4
.4
.7
.7
.6
.4
.1 (3
)
0
0

1.6
2.7
1.1
.8
4.8
2.2
3.1
.8
1.0
1.9
9.1
4.0
0
0
.3
.1
.1
.5
.7
.6
.2
0

2.0
1.8
2.2
1.6
4.9
3.2
3.7
.7
1.0
2 !l
9. 2
4.1
0
.5
.1
.1
(3
)
.2
.7
1.2
.1
0

2.1 1.9 2.5 2.1
.1 0
.1
.1
12.8 9.6 13.1 18.3
32. 6 27.6 33.8 40. 0
20.9 17.9 22.2 24.6
.5
.9
.3
.2
.4
.6
.4
.1

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
2 The number of expenditure units per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the expenditure units
represented by the equivalent full-time persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data
apply.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




189

TABULAR SUMM ARY
T

able

7 .— F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c o n su m p tion at home during 1
week in sp rin g quarter , by econom ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U sed at H o m e an d P u rch a sed
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —C ontinued

Fats, total_______________________
Butter_________________________
Cream_________________________
Other table fats________________
Lard___________________________
Vegetable shortening___________
Table or cooking oils___________
Mayonnaise and other salad
dressing______________________
Bacon, smoked________________
Salt side of pork_______________
Meat, poultry, fish and other sea
food, total___________________
Beef:
Fresh: Steak, porterhouse, sir­
loin__________
top round______
other___________
Roast, rib____________
chuck_________
other__________
Boiling, chuck_______
plate________
other_______
Canned______________________
Corned______________________
Dried________________________
Other________________________
Veal: Fresh, steak, chops______
roast_____________
stew______________
Lamb: Fresh, chops___________
roast____________
stew____________
Pork: Fresh, chops____________
loin roast_________
other_____________
Smoked ham, slices_____
hal f
or
whole_
_
picnic____
Pork sausage____________
Other pork______________
Miscellaneous meats, total_____
Other fresh meat____________
Bologna, frankfurters________
Cooked: Ham_______________
Tongue____________
Liver________________________
Other meat products_________
Poultry: Chicken, broiling____
roast_______
stew_______
Turkey______________
Other________________
Fish and other sea food, total,
Fish: Fresh_________________
Canned_______________
Cured_________________
Oysters______________________
Other sea food_______________

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

219
26
51
190
56
6

57
3
26
64
13
4

80
8
18
67
23
1

82
15
7
59
20
1

86
170
6

21
50
2

39
59
3

26
61
1

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

Lb.

Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

1.129 0.841 1.226 1.532
.287 .174 .327 .440
.054 .026 .045 .119
.085 .117 .077 .038
.262 .231 .269 .309
.089 .053 .101 .139
.009 .015 .004 .005
.090
.242
.011

.049
.166
.010

.137
.250
.016

.099
.376
.007

2.919 2.268 3.135 3.847

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

28.1 19.0 31.2 41. 0
10.2 5.9 12.0 15.8
1.3
.8 1.1 2.8
1.4 1.9 1.3
.7
3.8 3.2 3.8 4.7
1.7 1.0 1.9 2.6
.2
.4
.1
.1
1.8
7.4
.3

.9
4.7
.2

2.7 2.0
7.8 12.2
.5
.1

66.6 47. 2 70. 8 96.0

101
76
97
41
61
15
17
12
26
7
16
2
1
46
18
18
6
2
3
154
30
35
33

23
29
40
6
27
6
8
7
12
3
6
0
0
10
7
7
0
0
2
41
7
12
7

31
26
41
17
18
6
6
3
6
1
7
0
1
20
5
6
1
2
1
59
12
12
15

47
21
16
18
16
3
3
2
8
3
3
2
0
16
6
5
5
0
0
54
11
11
11

.216
.127
.208
.168
.218
.046
.064
.025
.054
.008
.036
.002
.004
.078
.065
.037
.007
.009
.004
.278
.127
.091
.032

.122 .188 .439
.123 .121 .146
.190 .284 .130
.058 .217 .306
.216 .211 .232
.046 .060 .025
.054 .093 .041
.036 .022 .008
.061 .043 .058
.010 .002 .011
.024 .050 .036
0
0
.007
.013 0
0
.039 .109 .108
.048 .072 .088
.039 .038 .030
0
.003 .025
.026 0
0
.005 .006 0
.183 .317 .399
.072 .182 .148
.075 .103 . 104
.016 .041 .050

6.2
3.4
3.9
4.0
4.0
1.0
1.1
.4
.8
.1
.8
(3
)
.1
2.0
1.2
.7
.2
.2
.1
7.5
2.7
1.7
1.3

3.5
3.0
3.5
1.2
4.0
.8
.9
.5
.8
.2
.5
0
0
1.0
.8
.7
0
0
.1
4.6
1.4
1.4
.5

13
5
58
11

4
4
16
5

3
0
19
4

6
1
23
2

3
166
47
1
43
14
10
12
11
0
2

0
60
11
0
14
4
3
3
4
0
0

2
64
17
1
8
7
4
4
0
0
1

1
42
19
0
21
3
3
5
7
0
1

76
76
3
4
3

27
23
2
0
1

21
28
1
2
1

28
25
0
2
1

.058
.027
.084
.021
.427
.011
.299
.044
.003
.044
.026
.040
.062
.041
0
.007
.248
.148
.093
.003
.003
.001

.049 .016 . 140
.056 0
.014
.065 .087 .117
.026 .020 .012
.324 .508 . 503
.014 .029
0
.249 .362 .301
.023 .054 .068
0
.010 0
.036 .026 .086
.016 .042 .019
.031 .038 .060
. .043 .058 .105
.038 0
.109
0
0
0
0
.005 .024
.219 .202 .372
.133 .110 .232
.083 .079 .132
.002 .006 0
0
.005 .006
.001 .002 .002

1.4
.5
1.8
.4
10. 5
.2
6.8
2.0
(2
)
1.1
.4
1.2
1.4
1.0
0
.2
4.8
2.9
1.6
.1
.1
.1

1.3
.4 2.9
1.0 0
.4
1.3 1.9 2.8
.4
.4
.2
7 4 12.1 14. 5
0
.3
.4
5.4 8.1 7.7
1.0 2.3 3.6
0
.1 0
.7
.6 2.4
.3
.4
.7
.7 1.4 1.7
.8 1.4 2.4
.8 0
2.8
0
0
0
0
.1
.7
4.1 4.1 6. 9
2.6 2.3 A 4
1.3 1.5 2.3
.1
.1 0
0
.2
.1
.1 (3
.1
)

5.4 12.5
3.3 4.3
5.4 2.5
4.6 8.3
3.8 4.2
1.5
.7
1.6
.8
.1
.3
.5 1. 2
.2
(3
)
1.1
.8
0
.2
. 2 0
2.6 3.0
1.3 1.6
.6
.7
.1
.8
.6 0
.1 0
8.6 11.4
3.6 3.7
1.8 2.0
2.0 1.7

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326,




190
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

7. — F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c o n su m p tion at hom e d uring 1
w eek in sp rin g quarter , hy econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 1 in
1 week

Economic
level—Fami­
Economic level—
lies spending
Families spending
per expenditure
All
All per expendi­
unit per year
fam­ ture unit per fam­
year
ilies
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
Un­ $400 $600
to
der to and
der
and
$400 $600 over
$400 $600 over

Average expenditure
per person4 in 1
week
Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a s e d
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Lb.

Potatoes-------- ------------------------ Sweetpotatoes, yams------------ -

252
37

81
8

91
14

80
15

Dried corn. _ ___ . . . ------Beans: Dry______
Canned, dried
------Baked, not canned----Peas: Black-eyed.-------. . . .
______________
Other
Nuts: Shelled_____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
In shell_____ . . . . Peanut butter-------- ------------

0
51
21
1
6
1
9
1
19

0
23
9
0
3
0
0
0
10

0
18
5
1
0
0
5
1
5

0
10
7
0
3
1
4
0
4

Tomatoes: Fresh *
----- -------Canned.. ------- . .
Juice.
. . . . . ..
Sauce, paste________
Green and leafy vegetables, total.
Brussels sprouts____ ______ _
Cabbage______ __ ._ ----------Sauerkraut
______ . . .
Collards_________ _________
Kale________________________
Lettuce... _ . . . ________ ___
Spinach: Fresh. _
Canned.. __
_
Other leafy vegetables_______
Asparagus: Fresh___
_
Canned__________
Lima beans: Fresh _____ __
Canned
_
Beans, snap (string): Fresh. . .
CannedBroccoli _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . . . __
Peas: Fresh_______ _________
Canned___ _ .
_ ...
Peppers_______________ ____
Okra... _________ ____ _____
Yellow vegetables, total________
Carrots____ _ _ _ _ _ _
Winter squash and pumpkin _
Other vegetables, total4
___
Beets: Fresh_________ ___ _
Canned___________ . .
Cauliflower. _ _ _____ _____
Celery_______________________
Corn: On ear________________
Canned. ______ ___
Cucumber_________ ______ _
Eggplant-------- ------------------Onions: Mature___ . . . ._
Spring______________
Parsnips.____ _________ __ _
Summer squash_______ ____
White turnips_______________
Yellow turnips, rutabaga. _. _
Other vegetables__________ _
Pickles and olives_____ _
Citrus fruits, total. _____ ______
Lemons________ _
_______
Oranges_____ _____ _______
Grapefruit: Fresh__________
Canned._ ________

48
136
17
22

11
37
4
11

16
57
2
10

21
42
11
1

1
124
56
0
1
204
117
30
5
27
32
13
22
71
46
1
18
123
17
0

0
45
17
0
0
61
49
10
1
7
4
4
3
23
11
0
5
33
6
0

0
45
19
0
1
77
35
11
3
10
13
3
10
23
16
1
7
46
5
0

1
34
20
0
0
66
33
9
1
10
15
6
9
25
19
0
6
44
6
0

146
1

49
0

50
0

47
1

36
12
40
120
4
132
28
3
150
50 2
0
13
13
21

12
5
9
33
2
33
11
1
48
20
0
0
4
5
8

13
6
13
41
1
51
9
1
58
14
2
0
3
5
8

11
1
18
46
1
48
8
1
44
16
0
0
6
3
5

10.156
2.453
.107
.170
0
.098
.040
.001
.010
0
.005
(6
)
.016
0
.111
.304
.041
.015
1.990
.001
.530
.106
0
.003
.324
.328
.042
.021
. 117
.040
.021
.026
.125
.069
.002
.032
.198
.005
0
.275
.274
.001
.960
.073
.016
.066
.171
.007
.203
.042
.005
.239
.073
.002
0
.018
.028
.017

58
180
69
6

18
59
17
0

16
62
22
3

24
59
30
3

1. 590
.122
.980
.468
.020

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

C t.

C t.

C t.

8.296 10.131 13.598 56.7 40.2 58.3
2. 270 2.359 2.940
6.6 6.0 6.5
.060 .112 .187
.4
.2
.3
. 191 . 142 . 174
1.5 1.5 1.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.120 .098 .057
.6
.7
.5
.046 .023 .055
.3
.3
.1
.003 0
0
0
(3
)
00
.008 0
.029
.1
.1 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.006 .014
0
.2 0
.2
.001 0
0
0
00
00
.017 .011 .019
.3
.4
.2
0
0
0
0
0
0
.070 .115 .182
.6 1.4
1.2
.220 .311 .453
2.3 1.6 2.2
.021 .002 .138
.4
.2 (3
)
.018 .018 .002
.2
.2
.2
1.514 2. 076 2. 619 12.6 8. 7 12.8
.005 00
0
0
0
0
.465 .583 .571
1.3 1.2 1.3
.084 .107 .144
.6
.5
.6
0
0
0
0
0
0
.010 0
0
0
00
00
.230 .369 .436
2.7 1.8 2.9
1.4 1.4 1.2
.356 .265 .366
.037 .028 .075
.4
.3
.4
.015 .037 .010
.1 00
.1
.070 . 166 .134
.5
.2
.6
.012 .047 .080
.7
.2
.7
.020 .010 .042
.2
.2
.1
.007 .045 .035
.2
.1
.4
.019 . 122 .179
1.3 1.0 1.2
.034 .056 .157
.7
.3
.5
0
.006 0
0
.1
•00
.021 .038 .043
.3
.2
.4
.138 . 182 .337
2.1 1.2 2.2
.006 .005 .005
.1
.1
.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
.236 .282 .335
1.3 1.1 1.4
.236 .282 .332
1.3 1.1 1.4
.003 00
0
0
0
0
.735 .971 1.371
7.7 4.9 8.7
.075 .061 .086
.3
.3
.3
.018 .022 0
.1
.1
.2
.034 .067 .127
.4
.7
.8
.118 .157 .292
.9 1.3
1.4
.1
.1 00
.011 .006 (5
)
.120 .232 .316
2.0 1.1 2.5
.039 .043 .048
.3
.3
.3
.004 .005 .007 00
00
00
.196 .259 .292
1.0
.8 1.2
.5
.4
.4
.069 .049 .117
.005 0
0
0
00
00
0
0
0
0
0
0
.013 .013 .038
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.028 .030 .026
.010 .022 .022
.2
.1
.3
.9
.2 1.2
1.201 1.401 2.616
8.7 6.1 8.2
.094 .092 .221
.9
.6
.7
.881 .876 1.323
6.1 4.8 5.8
.226 .397 1. 037
1.5
.7 1.4
0
.036 .035
.2 0
.3

C t.

84. 7
8.0
.6
1.8
0
.4
.4
0
.2
0
.6
0
.2
0
2.2
3.6
1.3
(3
)
19.2
.1
1.4
.9
0
0
3.6
1.8
.6
.1
.7
1.6
.5
.2
1.9
1.6
0
.4
3.6
.2
0
1.7
1.7
00
12.2
.4
0
1.4
2.5
00
3.0
.5
.1
1.1
.9
0
0
.3
.1
.3
1.6
14.2
1.5
9.1
3.3
.3

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3Less than 0.05 cent.
4 Does not include quantity
of pickles and olives.
5 Less than 0.0005 pound.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TABULAR

191

SUM M ARY

T a b l e 7 . — F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c o n su m p tion at hom e during 1
week in sp rin g quarter, hy econom ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O —W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued
Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

Economic
Economic level—
level— Fami­
lies spending
Families spending
per expendi­
per expenditure
All
All ture unit per
unit per year
fam­
fam­
year
ilies
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
Un­ $400 $600
to
der
and
der to and
$400 $600 over
$400 $600 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U sed at H o m e a n d P u rch a sed
fo r C o n s u m p tio n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

Other fruits, total__________ ____
Apples: Fresh_________________
Canned. __ ______
Apricots: Fresh____ _______ __
Canned_____________
Bananas________ ____ ____ __
Berries: Fresh.__ __________ __
Canned. _____
____
Cherries: Fresh__________ . . .
Canned____________
Grapes: Fresh_____ ________
Canned_________ __ __
Peaches: Fresh.._____
_ . ...
C a n n e d ...____ __ . . .
Pears: Fresh. _______ _______
Canned________________
Pineapple: Fresh______________
Canned_________
Melons_____ . . . ______________
Plums: Fresh________________
Canned_______________
Other fruit_______ . . . ________
Cider_____ ___ _____ ________
Grape juice_______________ _ _
Other fruit juices. ____________
Dried: Apricots_____ ________
Peaches________ _______
Prunes___________ _ . . .
R a isin s...____ ________
Dates. _ _______________
Figs-------- ---------- -----------Other__________________
Sugars and sweets, total
___ ___
Sugars: White______ . . . . . . __
Brown ________________
Other sweets: Candy. _____ _
Jellies. __________
Molasses, sirups..
Other sweets. __ _
Miscellaneous, total ____
____
Gelatine. ________ ___________
Packaged dessert mixtures___ __
Tea____________________________
Coffee____ __________ _________
Cocoa___________________ . . . _
Chocolate ____________ ________
Vinegar_______________ ______
Salt____________________________
Baking powder, yeast, soda___
Spices and extracts____________
Catsups, sauces_______________
Tomato soup_________________
Other soups____________________
Cod-liver oil______________ _____
Proprietary foods. ____ ________
Other foods_______ __ __ . . . __
Soft drinks consumed at home..
Other drinks consumed at home.
Sales tax on food___ _____________

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

.007 .004
.032 .016
.018 .012
. 354 .247
.014 .016
.00# 0

. 010
.038
.022
.425
.012
.010

7
9
2
0
3
14
20

.053
.029
.006
. 008
.006
.084
.610

. 052
.017
.010
.012
.004
.038
.516

89
6
19
32
10

78
7
17
25
10

16
64
50
247
20
8

6
16
17
76
13
1

4
23
19
92
5
4

33
17
13
6
7
22
46

12
2
4
3
2
1
8

14
6
7
3
2
7
18

78
4

Lb.

6
25
14
79
2
3

17
31
15

245
17
53
88
35

4

0
0
0

Lb.

2.342
1. 043
0
0
.013
.597
. 167
.004
.011
.042
0
0
.006
.169
.011
.022
.013
.088
0
0
.025
.010
0
0
.006
.026
.003
.080
.003
.003
0
0
1.132
. 940
.016
.070
.084
. 022
0

58
3
0
5
40
17
2
0
11
0
0
0
30
0
6
3
22
1
0
5
3
0
2
0
4
0
16
7
0
0
0

59
0
0
3
42
14
0
0
4
0
0
0
20
0
4
3
7
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
5
2
18

Lb.

1. 760
1.050
0
0
.009
.375
.089
0
0
.018
0
0
0
.052
0
.016
.025
.018
0
0
.003
.008
0
.001
0
.010
.003
.066
.017
0
0
0
1. 056
.831
.030
.062
.046
.087
0

63
0
0
3
54
19
1
3
9
0
0
1
32
1
5
2
21
0
0
2
2
0
1
3
8
2
16
6
1
0
0

180
3
0
11
136
50
3
3
24
0
0
1
82
1
15
8
50
1
0
8
7
0
4
3
17
4
50
17
1
0
0

2.140
1.048
.006
0
.017
.492
. 128
.003
.004
.039
0
0
.002
.138
.004
.022
.022
.061
.004
0
.021
.010
0
.002
.002
.016
.002
.083
.013
.001
0
0
1.191
. 980
.024
.069
.063
.055
0

.045
.011
.005
.010
.003
.003
.205

Lb.

C t.

581 13.8
4.5
1. 063
.024 (3
)
0
0
.2
.037
2.7
.561
1.7
. 144
.006 (3
)
0
.1
.4
.077
0
0
0
0
0
(3
)
1.4
.256
0
(3
)
.2
.035
.029
.2
.8
.103
.019 (3
)
0
0
.2
.049
.014
.1
0
0
.1
.010
0
(3
)
.014
.3
0
(3
)
.8
. 120
.020
.1
0
(3
)
0
0
0
0
1. 532
8.2
1. 322
5.3
.024
.2
.080
1.3
.063
1.0
.4
.043
0
0
21. 5
.010
.2
.052
1.0
.022
1.0
.452
8.0
.011
.2
.1
.010
.6
.5
.5
.2
.8
.071
.6
.4
.080
.005
.7
0
.3
.015
.2
.308
.8
5.4
1. 521
2.7

2.

C t.

C t.

C t.

9.1 15. 6 19.9
3.8 4.8 5.5
0
0
.1
0
0
0
.1
.1
.5
1.9 3.1 3.4
1.1 2.1 2.3
0
.1
(3
)
.2 0
0
.4
.1
.8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.1 0
.5 1.7 2.6
0
.1 0
.2
.4
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2 1.1 1.4
0
0
.1
0
0
0
.4
.2
(3
)
.1
.3
(3
)
0
0
0
0
.2
(3
)
0
.1 0
.2
.4
.3
0
(3
)
(3
)
.7
.8 1.0
.1 (3
.3
)
0
0
(3
)
0
0
0
0
0
0
6.9 8. 2 10. 5
4 .4
5.1 7.1
.2
.2
.1
1.0 1.3 1.6
.7 1.4 1.2
.6
.4
.3
0
0
0
12. 9 23. 0 39. 3
.2
.3
.3
.4 1.2 4.2
1.8 1. 0 1.4
5.4 9.5 10.7
.2
.1
.1
.2
0
.3
.7
.9
.3
.4 1. 0
.4
.5
.5
.5
.1
.1
.4
.3 1.2 1. 0
.5
.6
.6
.2 1.1
.1
.2 1.7
.2
.4
.5 0
.2 (3
.3
)
.3
2.8
(3
)
1.9 4.4 13.6
2.0 2.9 3.8

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during the
week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as the
appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




192
T

able

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
1 ,— F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c on su m p tion at hom e d u rin g 1
week in sp rin g quarter, hy econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—NEGRO FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending
per expenditure unit per year

All fami­
lies

Item

Under $300 $300 to $400
106

Item

F o o d U sed at H o m e and P u rch a sed
fo r C o n s u m p ti o n at H o m e in 1
W eek

Total____________________________
Grain products, total__________
Bread and other baked goods,
total_____________________
Bread: White_____________
Gr a h a m, whol e
wheat____________
Rye-----------------------Crackers__________________
Plain rolls_________________
Sweet rolls________________
Cookies___________________
Cakes_____________________
Pies_______________________
Other_____________________
Ready-to-eat cereals-------------Flour and other cereals, total..
Flour: White_____________
Graham___________
Other______________
Corn meal_________________
Hominy___________________
Cornstarch________________
Rice_______________________
Rolled oats________________
Wheat cereal______________
Tapioca___________________
Sago_______________________
Macaroni, spaghetti, noodles
Other grain products____
Eggs-------------------------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream, total.
Milk: Fresh, whole—bottled._
loose___
skimmed_______
buttermilk and
other_________
Skimmed, dried_______
Evaporated and con­
densed______________
Cheese: American___________
Cottage_____________
Other_______________
Ice cream____________________

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

28

27

51

3.14

5.01

3.19

2.09

2. 72

Number of families surveyed in spring quarter-------------Average number of equivalent full-time persons 1 per
family in 1 week_____________________________________
Average number of food expenditure units 2 per family
in 1 week____________________________________________
Number of families
using in 1 week

$400 and
over

4. 22

2. 74

1.90

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

All
fam­
ilies

Lb.

5
.441
1.665
1.241

Un­
der
$300

Lb.
4. 626
1 .2 4 7
1 .0 7 1

$300
to
$400

Lb.

47813

.464
.057

.340
.034

.006
.123

.003
.032

C t.

C t.

C t.

16.8 12.6
12.0 10.5
1.1

.3
.1
.5

23.6
15.6
1.6
.8
.7
.1
.8
.3
.1
0

.2

.1

.2

.525 1.169
0

2.8
0

1.7
0

2.7
0

4.4
0

.580
.090
0
.008 .009
.122 .243

3.7
1.3
0

2.7
.7
0
.1

3.6
1.5
0

5.1
2.0
0

.012

.0 5 7

.5 1 6

.159
.112
.103
.047
.152
.073
.037
0
.019
.092
4. 643
2.914
0
.047
1.062
.047
0
.244
.076
.042
0
0
.211
0
.998
4. 419
2.187
0
. 141

C t.

231.5 154.9 232.6 333.7
36.1 28.7 31.3 49.0

1.7
1.1
1.0
.5
1.9
.8
.8
0
.2
1.6
23.8
14.2
0
.3
3.9
.3
0
1.6
.7
.5
0
0
2.3
0
16.2
29.5
11.9
0
.4

.0 2 9

.727

Lb.

7. 020

1.575 2.285
1.095 1.583

.159
.113
.078
.0 1 4
.008
.011 .078
.0 1 8
.023
.0 3 0
.009
0
0
0
.011 . 0 0 5
.012
.062
.0 1 4
. 104
3.714 3 . 3 6 5 3.134
2. 228 1 . 9 4 6 1.837
0
0
0
.015 0
0
.836
.733
.7 2 7
.053
.105
.0 2 7
.001 0
.003
.2 9 6
.246
.169
.1 0 8
.083
.051
.0 3 2
.044
.067
0
.0 1 4
.006
0
0
0
.202 . 2 1 5 .169
0
0
0
.695
.4 3 0
.681
3.469 2 . 3 5 0 4.118
1.995 1 . 3 6 4 2. 788
0
0
0
.100
.0 6 1
.097
.104
.071
.077
.023
.074
.037
.027

$400
and
over

.521
.054

.6

.7
.3
.9
.5
.5
0

.2

.2

.2

.2

.5
0

.1

.2

.2 1.
1.0
18.3 15.9 15.2
10.3 8.3 8.7
0
0
0
.1 0
0
2.9 2.5 2.3
.4
.2
.3
0
.1
(3)
1.6 1.8 1.1
.7
.8
.5
.5
.6
.8
.2 0
.1
0
0
0
1.7 1.6 1.3
0
0
0
10.9 6.8 10.8
21.7 13.3 26.0
10.8 7.4 15.1
0
0
0

.2

2.7

.2

2.7

.2

5.5

1The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
2 The number of expenditure units per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the expenditure
units represented by the equivalent full-time persons eating meals at home during the week to which the
data apply.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




193

TABULAR SUMM ARY
T able

7 .— F o o d used at home and purchased f o r con su m p tion at home during 1
week in sp rin g quarter, by econom ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .—NEGRO FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

Average quantity pur­
chased per person * in
1 week

All
fam­
ilies

Average expenditure
per person1 in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
All
unit per year
fami­
lies
Un­ $300 $400
and
to
der
$300 $400 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

F o o d U s e d at H o m e a n d P m ch a sed
o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e i n 1
W e e k —Continued
Fats, total
_ ______ - _______
Butter____ ___________________
Cream_________________________
Other table fats ___ _________
Lard__. ___________ ________
Vegetable shortening______
Table or cooking oils___________
Mayonnaise and other salad
dressing._ ________ - ___
Bacon, smoked
___ ______
Salt side of pork- ____________
Meat, poultry, fish and other sea
food, total- __________ - ____
Beef:
Fresh: Steak, porterhouse, sirloin__________
top round ___
other_____ _____
Roast, rib_____ __ __ _
chuck__________
other_________
Boiling, chuck________
plate_________
other... _____
Canned___ . . _ _____ __
Corned___ ___________ ______
Dried-. ___________ ______ _
Other. _ ______ _____________
Veal: Fresh, steak, chops____
roast._ ______ _
stew____ __ __
Lamb: Fresh, chops. _ ________
roast________ _ .
stew. __________
Pork: Fresh, chops___________
loin roast_______
other____________
Smoked ham, slices.. .
h a l f or
whole..
picnic___
Pork sausage.
_____ _
Other pork.
_ __
Miscellaneous meats, total ___
Other fresh meat.._________
Bologna, frankfurters____ __
Cooked: Ham
____ ________
Tongue. _________
Liver.__ ________ ___________
Other meat products_________
Poultry: Chicken, broiling-------roast________
stew. _
Turkey_______________
Other. _____________
Fish and other sea food, total.__
Fish: Fresh__________________
Canned________________
Cured. . . . _____ _____
Oysters__________ _______ ___
Other sea food_______________

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

99
2
6
99
3
1

25
0
3
25
1
0

26
1
1
27
0
0

48
1
2
47
2
1

42
63
66

9
13
22

12
18
17

21
32
27

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

1. 738 1.244 1. 756 2. 374
.307 .194 .349 .422
.005 0
.006 .010
.021 .021 .012 .028
.650 .475 .625 .900
.015 .014 0
.028
.006 0
0
.019
.095
.322
.317

.053
.216
.271

.119
.317
.328

.132
.466
.369

2. 963 2.161 3. 245 3. 784

C t.

C t.

C t.

CL

38.4 25. 7 40. 3 53.1
10.9 6.8 12.3 14.9
.1 0
.2
.1
.4
.2
.3
.6
9.1 6.4 8.9 12.7
.3
.2 0
.6
.1 0
.4
0
1.8
9.4
6.3

.9
5.6
5.5

2.4 2.5
9.3 14.3
7.0 7.0

58.9 38.1 64.7 82. 5

29
17
14
21
6
0
16
1
15
0
0
0
0
20
5
3
4
3
2
54
8
12
9

7
1
3
3
1
0
6
0
6
0
0
0
0
4
2
1
1
1
2
10
3
4
3

4
6
4
7
2
0
7
0
4
0
0
0
0
4
2
1
0
1
0
14
3
3
2

18
10
7
11
3
0
3
1
5
0
0
0
0
12
1
1
3
1
0
30
2
5
4

.159
.071
.092
.185
.040
0
.095
.006
.101
0
0
0
0
.098
.048
.018
.022
.027
.012
.295
.065
.116
.046

.115
.007
.039
.053
.014
0
.114
0
.127
0
0
0
0
.075
.050
.014
.007
.021
.029
.171
.061
.135
.023

.085
.105
.140
.256
.058
0
.128
0
.087
0
0
0
0
.079
.081
.023
0
.023
0
.308
.116
.089
.012

.276
.128
.122
.300
.059
0
.042
.019
.078
0
0
0
0
.145
.019
.019
. 058
.037
0
.447
.028
.112
.103

3.4
1.8
1.5
3.5
.8
0
1.5
.1
1.3
0
0
0
0
2.3
.8
.3
.5
.6
.2
7.3
1.5
1.8
1.0

2.3
.2
.6
1.2
.3
0
1.6
0
1.5
0
0
0
0
1.8
.8
.2
.2
.5
.4
4.0
1.4
2.2
.5

1.7 6.2
2.6 3.3
2.3 2.1
5.2 5.1
.9 1.5
0
0
.7
2.1
.2
0
1.2 1.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2.0 3.4
1.6
.3
.3
.3
1.5
0
.7
.7
0
0
7.0 11.8
.7
2.6
1.4 1.5
.4 2.2

5
0
36
9

1
0
15
1

1
0
8
5

3
0
13
3

0
51
6
2
24
0
13
5
12
0
1

0
20
2
0
9
0
0
1
1
0
0

0
12
2
1
6
0
8
0
3
0
1

0
19
2
1
9
0
5
4
8
0
0

.036
0
.226
.029
.539
0
.376
.024
0
.139
0
0
.032
.021
0

45
11
0
0
1

9
3
0
0
1

13
3
0
0
0

23
5
0
0
0

.068
0
.173
.056
.458
0
.311
.018
.018
.111
0
.149
.056
.138
0
.012
.357
.304
.050
0
0
.003

.041
0
.108
. 116
.434
0
.273
.016
.035
.110
0
.378
0
.151
0
.047
.380
.345
.035
0
0
0

.131
0
.155
.045
.372
0
.256
.012
.028
.076
0
.161
.134
.282
0
0
.512
.456
.056
0
0
0

1.5
0
2.9
.7
8.0
0
5.6
.4
.3
1.7
0
3.8
1.6
3.6
0
.3
6.3
5.5
.8
0
0
(3
)

.9
0
3.4
.4
8.9
0
6.8
.3
0
1.8
0
0
.9
.6
0
0
3.3
2.6
.6
0
0

1.2 2.7
0
0
1.9 3.0
.6
1.3
7.8 7.3
0
0
4.7 4.8
.4
.6
.7
.5
2.0 1.4
0
0
9.1 4.7
3.9
0
3.8 7.3
0
0
1.0 0
6.6 10.4
5.8 9.2
.8 1.2
0
0
o 0
0 0

0

.223
.164
.052
0
0
.007

.1I

1
The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the num­
ber of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals
during the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was
counted as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

194
T

able

7 . — Food used at home and purchased for consumption at home during 1

week in spring quarter, by economic level— C on tinu ed
ST. LOUIS, M O —NEGRO FAM ILIES—Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U sed at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
fo r C o n s u m p tio n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

Vegetables and fruits, total4___ __
Potatoes... __
_____ _ -Sweetpotatoes, yam s..._______
Dried legumes and nuts, total _
Dried corn—
__ --_
Beans: D r y ------ --- ----- . . .
Canned, dried___ _ _
Baked, not canned___
Peas: Black-eyed. __ ---------Other.—
______
Nuts: Shelled— ----------- __
In shells_________ _ _
Peanut butter.
___ ______
Other dried legumes and nuts _
Tomatoes: Fresh___ __________
Canned._
._ -_
Juice_____
Sauce, paste... ___
Green and leafy vegetables, total
Brussels sprouts. _. . .
Cabbage.. _ _
. .
._ . . .
Sauerkraut.__
Collards_______________ ____
Kale___ . . . ________ _______
Lettuce . . .
. . ._
Spinach: Fresh.. ___ __ _ _ _
Canned. ________ .
Other leafy vegetables _____
Asparagus: Fresh____ ______
Canned. _______ __
Lima beans: Fresh_____ ____
Canned________
Beans, snap (string): Fresh...
Canned.
Broccoli_____________________
Peas: Fresh__________________
Canned________________
Peppers_____________________
Okra________________________
Yellow vegetables, total .
Carrots.. _______ ____ ______
Winter squash and pumpkin.
Other vegetables, total4
Beets: Fresh_________________
Canned_______________
Cauliflower__________ _______
Celery_______________________
Corn: On ear________________
Canned. _______
Cucumber _. ______ _______
Eggplant____________________
Onions: Mature_____________
Spring______________
Parsnips. ____________________
Summer squash______________
White turnips_______________
Yellow turnips, rutabaga____
Other vegetables_____________
Pickles and olives ____
Citrus fruits, total
.
___
Lemons____________________ _
Oranges_____________________
Grapefruit: Fresh------------------Canned__________

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 4 in
1 week

Average expenditure
per person1 in 1
week

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
All
unit per year
fam­
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der
to
and
$300 $400 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

Lb.

N o.

Lb.

5.061
1.076
.499
.292
0
.125
0
0
.135
0
.014
0
.018
0
0
.112
0
.046
1.368
0
.310
.033
0
.078
.059
.364
0
.221
0
0
.036
0
.178
0
0
.014
.057
.002
.016
.057
.057
0
.576
0
0
0
.014
0
.202
0
0
.285
.040
0
0
.014
.021
0

83
51

21
16

22
13

40
22

0
26
1
0
25
1
3
1
3

0
12
0
0
9
0
1
0
3

0
6
0
0
4
1
1
1
0

0
8
1
0
12
0
1
0
0

12
27
1
18

0
9
0
5

5
5
0
3

7
13
1
10

0
38
7
3
11
45
49
2
35
4
0
8
2
36
2
0
4
20
6
3

0
12
4
0
3
8
14
0
10
0
0
2
0
11
0
0
1
6
1
2

0
11
1
1
1
11
10
1
9
1
0
2
0
8
0
0
1
6
1
1

0
15
2
2
7
26
25
1
16
3
0
4
2
17
2
0
2
8
4
0

16
1

4
0

3
0

9
1

6
1
1
18
2
47
2
0
73
13
0
0
5
2
1

0
0
0
2
0
17
0
0
18
3
0
0
1
1
0

1
0
0
1
1
9
0
0
20
2
0
0
1
0
0

5
1
1
15
1
21
2
0
35
8
0
0
3
1
1

7. 253
1.260
.545
.301
0
. Ill
.012
0
.153
.006
.008
.003
.008
0
.075
.154
.008
.043
1.954
0
.374
.023
.022
.101
. 153
.441
.009
.305
.039
0
.048
.009
.248
.008
0
.030
.130
.005
.009
.088
.084
.004
.949
.021
.003
.009
.057
.012
.279
.003
0
.476
.034
0
0
.039
.015
.001

39
39
13
1

8
10
3
1

7
10
3
0

24
19
7
0

.702 .399
.217 .082
.314 .242
.171 .075
0
0

Lb.

Lb.

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

6. 619 10. 597 39.9 24.8 36. 5 64 0
3.5 2.4 3.6 4.9
1.087 1.640
.552 '. 600
1.8 1.5 2.1 2.0
. 181 .405
2. 2 2. 2 1. 5 2.9
0
0
0
0
0
0
.073 .122
.8
.8
.7
.8
0
.037
2
0
0
.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
.070 .244
1.0 1.0
.4 1.5
.023 0
0
.1 0
(3
)
.003 .002
.1
.2
.1
.1
.012 0
0
.2 0
(3
)
0
.1
0
.2 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
o
.128 . 131
.6 0
.7 1.3
.081 .268
1.4 1.1
.8 2.1
0
.025
.1 0
0
.2
.5
.020 .058
.4
.2
.7
7.1 11.1 17.0
1.857 2.794 11.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.4 1.3 1.7
.459 .389
1.
.010 .019
.2
.2
.1
.2
.1
.047 .030
.0
.1
.3
.5
.4
.023 .192
.1
.9
1.4
.5 1.3 2.6
.148 .281
1.7 1.3 1.1 2.8
.267 .684
.1 0
.023 .009
.2
.1
1.3
.360 .370
.7 1.6 1.8
.012 . 112
.1 0
.2
.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
.4
.2
.7
.4
.070 .047
0
.1 0
0
.028
.2
2.1 1.5 2.0 3.0
.250 .337
0
.1 0
.023
0
.2
0
0
0
0
0
0
.1
.2
.023 .056
.1
.5
1.3
.7 1.6 2.0
.154 .206
.002 .011
.1 (3
.4
)
(3
)
.2
.2
.3 0
.009 0
.035 . 171
.5
.2
.2 1.0
.5
.2
.2
.9
.035 .159
0
.012 (3
0
0
.1
)
6.3 3.9 4.7 11.3
.808 1. 549
.1 0
.012 .056
.1
.2
0
0
.009 (3
0
.1
)
.1 0
0
0
.3
.028
.4
.1
.1 1.2
.012 .150
.1 0
.020 .022
.2
.2
2.9 2.0 2.0 4.8
.215 .431
0
0
0
.1
.009 (3
)
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.9 1.2 1.9 2.9
.477 .726
.2
.2
.1
.014 .041
.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.2
.2
.1
.058 .056
.3
.1
0
.019
.1 0
.1
0
.002 (3
0
0
(3
)
)
.2 0
.3
.8
.615 1.171
4.4 2.5 3.7 7.7
1.7
.7 1.1 3.4
.169 .433
.341 .387
2.1 1.5 2.3 2.9
.3
.3 1.4
.105 .351
.6
0
0
0
0
0
0

i The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
4 Does not include quantity of pickles and olives.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TA B U LA R

T

able

7.—

195

S U M M A R Y

F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c on su m p tion at home d uring 1
week in sp rin g quarter , hy econ om ic level—Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—NEGRO FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
fo r C o n s u m p tio n at H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

Other fruits, total_____ _________
Apples: Fresh_________________
Canned_______________
Apricots: Fresh____________ _
Canned__________
Bananas_________ _____ _____ _
Berries: Fresh__ ________ _ .
Canned_____ _________
Cherries: Fresh________________
Canned______________
Grapes: F resh .............................
Canned........ ............ .......
Peaches: Fresh_______________
Canned______ _____
Pears: F r e s h ______ __________
Canned.................. ............
Pineapple: Fresh_____________
Canned.. ______ __
Melons_______ . . . __
Plums: Fresh__________
Canned___ . . . _ _
Other fruit______
Cider____________________ __
Grape juice. _. ______________
Other fruit juices__________
_
Dried: Apricots________________
Peaches___ __ . . .
Prunes____ _______
Raisins__________ _
Dates.. __ ___________
Figs------------------------------Other__________________
Suears and sweets, total
Sugars: White____
Brown_____ __
Other sweets: Candy_____ __
Jellies___________
Molasses, sirups. _
Other sweets _
Miscellaneous, total.
Gelatine_____ _____
Packaged dessert mixtures. _
Tea________ . . . . . .
Coffee.. . _____ __ _
Cocoa___________ _. .
Chocolate___________ _
Vinegar.. __________ _
Salt_____________
Baking powder, yeast, soda___ .
Spices and extracts_________
Catsups, sauces______________ _
Tomato soup . . . . ___
Other soup:*,____________________
Cod-liver oil___________________
Proprietary foods______________
Other foods..____ _____________
Soft drinks consumed at home..
Other drinks consumed at home
Sales tax on food___ ______

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All ture unit per
year
fam­
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 1in
1 week

All
fam­
ilies

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$300

Lb.

1.174
.614
0
0
0
.209
.073
.023
0
.004
0
0
.004
.073
0
.010
.036
.014
0
0
0
.006
0
0
0
.006
.042
.054
.003
0
0
.003
1. 653
1. 357
.006
.014
.091
. 185
0

Lb.

0. 636
.428
0
0
0
.093
.009
.009
0
0
0
0
0
.017
0
.009
.014
.007
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.007
.036
.007
0
0
0
1. 311
.962
0
.012
.060
.277
0

$300
to
$400

Lb.

1.255
.547
0
0
0
.314
.055
.032
0
0
0
0
0
.057
0
0
.093
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.058
.099
0
0
0
0
1. 518
1. 326
0
.012
. 122
.058
0

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week

All
fam­
ilies

$400
and
over

Lb.

1. 785
.914
0
0
0
.278
.171
.033
0
.012
0
0
.012
. 161
0
019
.019
.003
0
0
0
.018
0
0
0
.019
.075
.042
0
0
0
.009
2. 212
1.902
.019
.019
. 107
. 165
0

62
1
0
0
27
15
5
0
1
0
0
1
18
0
3
4
5
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
13
13
1
0
0
0

16
1
0
0
3
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
3
3
1
0
0
0

15
0
0
0
10
4
2
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
6
0
0
0
0

31
0
0
0
14
10
2
0
1
0
0
1
10
0
2
2
4
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
2
7
4
0
0
0
0

96
2
5
14
34

25
0
1
5
12

25
0
1
4
6

46
2
3
5
16

4
7
10
83
7
0

1
0
0
21
4
0

0
3
1
19
2
0

3
4
9
43
1
0

.005 .005 0
.010
.013 .020
.010 0
.003 .072
.024 0
.260 . 153 . 196 .453
.016 .024 .017 .004
0
0
0
0

4
5
9
1
2
14
10

1
2
4
0
1
2
1

2
1
3
0
1
3
2

1
2
2
1
0
9
7

.018 .005 .031 .026
.016 .017 .009 .019
.014 .020 0
.016
.001 0
0
.002
.008 .006 .023 0
.061 .016 .028 .148
.080 .027 . 105 . 130

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

C t.

3
2.6
0
0
0
1.1
1.0
.2
0
(3
)
0
0
(3
)
.8
0
.1
.1
.2
0
0
0
.1
0
0
0
.1
.5
.5
(3
)
0
0
(3
)
9.9
7.1
.1
.2
1.0
1. 5
0
13.4
.1
.2
.3
6.6
.2
0
.3
.6
1.4
.3
.2
.3
.2
.5
(3
)
.2
.8
1.2
2.3
7.

C t.

C t.

C t.

3. 5 7. 9 12 9
1.9 2.4 3 . 8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.4 1.7 1.6
.2
.8 2.2
.1
.3
.4
0
0
0
0
0
.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
.1
0
0
.2
.8 1.6
0
0
0
.1 0
.3
.1
.1
.2
.1 0
.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.3
0
0
.1
.6 1.1
. 2 1.1
.4*
.1 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.1
0
0
8.0 9.1 13. 5
5.1 6.9 10.0
.2
0
0
.4
.2
.1
.8 1.3 1. 1
1.9
.8 1.8
0
0
0
8.0 11.6 22. 6
.1
.0
.3
0
.3
.5
.1
0
.9
3.8 5.3 11.3
.4
.2 (3
)
0
0
0
.1
.4
.5
.4
.6
.8
1.0 1.5 1.9
.3
.8
.0
.1
.2
.4
.4
.1
.5
.2
.3
.1
.6
.8 0
0
0
.1
.3
.3 0
.3
.4 1.6
.4 1.4 2.2
1.5 2.3 3.3

i The number of equivalent full-time persons per family, in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




196
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

7 .— F o o d used at hom e and 'purchased f o r c on su m p tion at home d uring 1
w eek in sp rin g quarter , hy econ om ic level— Continued
SALT L AK E C IT Y , U T A H —W H IT E FAM ILIES

All fami­
lies

Item

Economic level—Families spending
per expenditure unit per year
Under $400 $400 to $600

Number of families surveyed in spring quarter-------------Average number of equivalent full-time persons per
family in week_____________________________________
Average number of food expenditure units per family
in week_____________________________________________

210

72

29

4.59

3.18

2. 37

3. 21

2

1

109

3.80

1

1

3.84

2.70

2.08

Number of families
using in week

Average quantity pur­
chased per person in
week

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
ilies
year
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

1

Item

Food
U sed at H o m e
and P u r ch a sed fo r C o n s u m p t i o n a t H o m e
in 1 W e e k

Total________ __
___ __ ______
Grain products, total
______
Bread and other baked goods,
total________ .
_____
Bread: White ___________
Gr a ha m, whol e
wheat____________
Rye________________
Crackers. _ ________________
Plain rolls.
_____ _______
Sweet rolls . . . ______ __ _
Cookies____________________
Cakes______________________
Pies _____ _________. . . _
Other...____ _____
_____
Ready-to-eat cereals _______
Flour and other cereals, total.
Flour: White___ _
Graham. _________
Other_____ __________
Corn meal____ ____________
Hominy___ _ _ __________
Cornstarch
____ ________
Rice.. _ __________________
Rolled o a t s . . . ___ ______ __
Wheat cereal_______ _______
Tapioca________ _________
Sago_______________ ______
Macaroni, spaghetti, noodles
Other grain products_______
Eggs-----------------------------------------Milk, cheese, ice cream, total._
Milk: Fresh, whole—bottled__
loose___
skimmed
buttermilk and
other _ _____
Skimmed, dried_______
Evaporated and con­
densed. .....................
Cheese: American___________
Cottage_____________
Other_______________
Icecream...........................

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

1

1

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

Lb.

$400
to
$600

Lb.

Lb.

6
6

50

23

Average expenditure
per person i in
week

1

All
fam­
ilies

$600
and
over

Lb.

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

6008
.

209.7 177.6 242.4 324.6
32.6 28.1 37.3 48.2

. 650 1. 305 2.126 2. 595
1. 046 .846 1. 292 1.684

16.3 12.4 21.3 29.8
8.4 6.5 10.7 15.4

4. 844 4. 574 5. 085
139

$600 and
over

1

.297 .20
9
0 .476 .404
1 1 .019 .027 .0 2 .017 2.6 1.6 (3) 3.9
0
.2 .3 4.3 .2
. 112 .104 .111 . 175
7
1.4 1.4 1.4 2.2
8 5 .021 .008 .033 .079 .4 .1 .6 1.8
8 8 .042 .036 .036 .111 1.2 1.1 .9 3.5
17
2 .044 .026 .094 .011 .8 .5 1.7 .5
.064 .058 .070 .086
16
1.2 .9 1.5 2.0
1 0 0 5 .0 2 0 0
1 0 0
.028 (3
)
.0 0
12
.003
.1 0 0 .3
.2
82 41 32
9
. 107 .096 . 132 .099
1.8 0 2.2 0
1.6
1.5
3.087 3.173 2.827 3.314 14.5 14.1 13.8 16.9
170 93 "5 7 ”" 6 2. 380 2 447 2.176 2. 566
.
2
8.4 8.5 7.8 9.1
4
2 2
.3
.2 0
.3
11 8 2 0 .076 . 110 .025 0
1 .063
.035 .033
.4
.4
.3
.4
10 6 4 0 .014 .080 .019 0
.011
.1 .1 .2 0
1 0 1 0 .0 2 0
0
.006 0
0 .1 0
(3
)
37 2 17
0
0 .022 .019 .037 0
.2 .2 .3 0
76 46 26
4
.088 .099 .088 .009 • .8
.8 .7 .1
81 46 28
7
.197 . 162 .265 .225
1.6 1.3 2.0 1.7
57 27 21
9
.063 .052 .052 . 186
.8 .6 .8 2.2
29 18
6 5
.4
.6
2 1 1 0 .022 .027 .005 .043 (3).3 0 (3) 0
10 63 25 12 .001 0 166 .005 0
0
. 159 .
. 114 .252
1.6 1.5 (3) 2.8
1.4
0 0 0 00 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
194 97 71
26
.681 .586 .848 .817 11.8 10.2 14.6 14.5
5.044 4. 430 6.039
63
5
58
17
33
34
38

27
3
32
4
17
15
17

27

19

181 "9 2 "6 2

1 1
3
1
1 1
0 0

158
126
45

83

6
6
2
2
21 12
23 11

0
2
0
0

50
43
16
9
9

27

6.186
4. 063 3.499 5.019 4.977

0 .012 .0 0
20
0 .046 .034 .086
0 .003 .005 0
00 0 0

25
17
7

0
3

.650
.165
.064
.016
.025

.624
.158
.058
.014
.018

.626
.181
.070
.024
.033

0
0
0
0

.920
.155
.077

0

.057

29.9 26.3 34.9 37.0
18.8 16.1 23.2 22.3
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

0
.1
0
(3
)
(3
)
0 0 0

0
0
0
0

5.1
3.6
.9

7.1
4.4

.1

4.9
3.4

4.9
3.8

.8 .9
.6 .5 .8 1.6
.8 .6 1.2 0
1.6

1The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of

persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted
as the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
The number of expenditure units per family in week is computed on the basis of the expenditure units
represented by the equivalent full-time persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data
apply.
* Less than 0.05 cent.

2

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326,




1

TABULAR

T able 7 .—

197

SU M M AR Y

F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r c on su m p tion at hom e during 1
week in sp rin g quarter , hy econ om ic level— Continued
SALT LAK E C ITY , U T A H —W H IT E

F AM ILIES—Continued

Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

Food
JJsed at H o m e
and
P ur­
c h a sed f o r C o n s u m p t i o n at H o m e
i n 1 W e e k —Continued

Fats, total_______________________
Butter_________________________
Cream_________________________
Other table fats________________
Lard___________________________
Vegetable shortening___________
Table or cooking oils___________
Mayonnaise and other salad
dressing______________________
Bacon, smoked________________
Salt side of pork_______________
Meat, poultry, fish, and other
sea food, total________________
Beef:
Fresh: Steak, porterhouse, sir­
loin__________
top round______
other___________
Roast, rib____________
chuck_________
other__________
Boiling, chuck________
plate_________
other_________
Canned______________________
Corned______________________
Dried________________________
Other________________________
Veal: Fresh, steak, chops______
roast_____________
stew______________
Lamb: Fresh, chops___________
roast___________
stew____________
Pork: Fresh, chops____________
loin roast________
other____________
Smoked ham, slices_____
half or
whole_
_
picnic____
Pork sausage___________
Other pork_____________
Miscellaneous meats, total_______
Other fresh meat______________
Bologna, frankfurters__________
Cooked: Ham_________________
Tongue______________
L iv e r _________________________
Other meat products__________
Poultry: Chicken, broiling______
roast_________
stew__________
Turkey________________
Other__________________
Fish and other sea food, total____
Fish: Fresh____________________
Canned_________________
Cured___________________
Oysters________________________
Other sea food_________________

Average quantity pur­
chased per person 1 in
1 week

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
ilies
year
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400
over

All
fam­
ilies

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

Lb.

$400
to
$600

Lb.

Lb.

0.983 0.910 1.019 1.370
.431 .389 .460 .639
.023 .014 .032 .057
.069 .090 .028 .050
.150 .138 .183 .123
.095 .097 .092 .086
.006 .004 .010 .009

26
28
117
68

7

112

.101
.093
.015

82
5

.089
.085
.004

.106
.080
.028

.167
.189
.050

1.822 1.591 2.004 2. 885
87
30
43
62
16

30
16
14
18
3
4
9
1

12

23
3
8

2
2

10

19

6
7
0

12

0
25
7
7

11

4
1

11
2

0
18
6
0
5

43

7
2

27
0
27

.245 .210 .274
.076 .055 .130
.125 .119 .134
.282 .254 .291
.056 .058 .041
.047 .050 .054
.074 .077 .074
.009 .008 .015
.021 .028 .011
.014 .020 .002
.030 .036 .021
.010 .005 .022
0
0
0
.042 .025 .073
.023 .014 .041
.022 .022 .010
.043 .031 .062
.045 .044 .034
.005 .002 0
.072 .052 .099
.032 .012 .087
.001 .002 0
.016 .014 .012
.018
.002
.046
0
.141
.001
.077
.017
.001
.033
.012
.032
.014
.028
0
0
.251
.091
.120
.019
.002
.019

All
fam­
ilies

$600
and
over

Lb.

Average expenditure
per person * in 1
week

.404
.050
.136
.455
.097
0
.050
0
0
.012
.012
0
0
.060
.033
.060
.067
.092
.043
.116
0
0
.044

.004 .021 .100
.003 .001 0
.038 .042 . 120
0
0
0
.143 . 140 .118
.003 0
0
.083 .076 .033
.015 .019 .022
0
.005 0
.033 .033 .025
.012 .004 .038
.029 .008 .134
.007 .007 .095
.011 .031 .137
0
0
0
0
0
0
.218 .267 .450
.082 .077 .209
.108 .136 .159
.010 .031 .046
.003 .001 0
.015 .022 .036

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

C t.

C t.

a .

C t.

28.0 25.1 30.1 41.0
14.4 12.8 15.6 21.4
.8
.5 1.1 1.8
1.6 2.0
.7 1.1
2.9 2.6 3.7 2.6
.7
1.7 1.8 1.9
.2
.1
.1
.1
3.3
2.9
.3

2.7
2.5
.1

3.7
2.7
.6

6.1
6.1
1.0

36.7 30.6 42.9 61.4
6.2 5.3
1.7 1.3
1.8 1.7
5.3 4.5
1.1 1.1
.9 1.0
1.1 1.1
.1
.1
.3
.4
.2
.2
.5
.6
.2
.2
0
0
.9
.5
.6
.4
.3
.4
1.0
.7
.9
.8
.1
.1
1.8 1.4
.8
.2
(3
)
(3
)
.5
.4
.4
(3
)
1.0
0
3.0
(3
)
1.4
.6
(3
)
.6
.4
.8
.4
.5
0
0
4.3
1.6
1.9
.3
(3
)
.5

7.0 10.1
2.9 1.3
1.9 2.9
6.2 7.9
.7 1.9
1.1 0
.8
1.2
.1 0
.2 0
.2
.1
.2
.4
.5 0
0
0
1.7 1.4
.8 1.0
.2
.6
1.5 1.3
.6 2.1
.6
0
2.4 2.9
2.1 0
0
0
.4 1.1

.1
.6
(3
)
(3
)
.7 1.0
0
0
2.8 3.4
0
.1
1.5 1.6
.5
.8
.1
0
.5
.7
.3
.1
.7
.2
.1
.2
.2
.6
0
0
0
0
3.6 4.9
1.4 1.5
1.6 2.1
.1
.6
.1 (3
)
.4
.7

2.5
0
3.0
0
3.1
0
.6
.8
0
.3
1.4
3.2
2.5
2.0
0
0
8.8
3.7
3.1
1.0
0
1.0

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




198
T

able

•W E S T

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

7. — F o o d used at hom e and purchased f o r con su m p tion at hom e d uring 1
week in sp rin g quarter, by econom ic level— Continued
SALT LAK E C IT Y , U TAH —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
quantity
Average expenditure
Number of families Average per personpur­
chased
i in
per person1 in 1
using in 1 week
1 week
week
Economic
Economic
level— Fami­
Economic level—
level— Families
lies spending
Families spending
spending per
Item
per expenditure
All per expendi­
All
All
expenditure
unit per year
fam­ ture unit per fam­
fam­ unit per year
year
ilies
ilies
ilies
Un­ $400 $60G
Un­ $400 $600
Un­ $400 $600
to
der to and
der
and
to and
der
$400 $600 over
$400 $600 over
$400 $600 over

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
fo r C o n s u m p t i o n a t H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

Lb.

C t.

C t.

C t.

C t.

Vegetables and fruits, total4__
8. 373 7 . 024 9.145 15.613 46.9 37.1 53.8 90. 2
197 103 68
26 2.386 2.127 2. 220 4.829
3.4 2.9 3.7 6.4
Potatoes ___ __ _
----------7
2
1
4
.2
.4
Sweetpotatoes, yams..
____
.018 .005 .031 .067
.1 (3
)
Dried legumes and nuts, total._
. 198 . 194 . 173 .303
2.7 2.0 2.6 6.2
Dried c o r n ..____ ___________
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
47 31 13
3
.103 .119 .067 .100
.7
.7
.6
.8
Beans: Dry---------------------------10
2
.1 (3
6
2
.4
Canned, dried
____
.008 .005 .003 .041
.1
)
0
0
0
Baked, not canned___
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
3
1
.004 .004 .006 0
.1
.1
.1 0
Peas: Black-eyed_____ ___
0
(3)
1
Other
____ ______ __
1
0
0
0
0
0
.001 .002 0
(3
)
24 12
.1 3.9
3
9
.016 .009 .003 . 110
.6
.3
Nuts: Shelled ______
___
2
2
5
1
.1 (3
.1
.3
________ . .
.003 .004 .005 .009
In shell
)
51 24 23
4
.062 .053 .089 .043
.9 1.6
.8
Peanut butter . . . ______ __
1.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Other dried legumes and nuts
0
0
19 10
Tomatoes: Fresh _ _ . . . . .
.3
.1
4
5
.024 .010 .029 .110
.3 1.5
Canned. . . .
101 57 31
1.9 2.0 1.6 1.8
13
.290 .314 .244 .266
33 13 14
6
1.1
.5
.8 6.2
Juice
___ __ . . . .
.110 .054 .078 .608
4
.1 (3
2
.4
1
1
.1
Sauce, paste_______
.004 .004 .003 .012
)
Green and leafy vegetables,
total _______________ ______
1.387 1.164 1.647 2.149 11.9 9.7 14.3 19.9
2
2
0
0
0
.002 .004 0
0
0
Brussels sprouts
________ .
(3
)
(3
)
67 34 24
Cabbage________________ . . .
9
.9
.7 1.1 1.4
.205 .166 .255 .323
16
9
2
.2
.1
.2
.1
Sauerkraut
_____ _____ . . .
5
.025 .021 .035 .016
0
0
0
Collards.___ . . .
._ . . .
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
K a l e ..___ _________ ____ __
0
0 0
0
0
168 81 58
29
.300 .255 .342 .486
3.1 2.5 3.6 5.3
Lettuce________________
Spinach: Fresh _______
73 34 28
11
.244 .206 .279 .409
1.5 1.1 1.9 3.1
26 12 10
4
.5
.3
C a n n ed .____ __ . . .
.8 1.0
.049 .026 .079 . 108
3
.1 0
0
0
0
Other leafy vegetables_______
3
0
.003 .005 0
(3
)
68 27 26
15
1.7 1.4 2.0 3.5
Asparagus: Fresh----------------. 186 .151 .202 .381
2
2
.2
.2 1.0
7
3
.011 .005 .013 .046
.1
Canned___ _______
.4 0
8
2
.1 0
Lima beans: Fresh___ _ . . .
6
0
.014 0
.048 0
1
.1
.1
.1 0
7
6
0
Canned... . . . .
.010 .014 .007 0
4
2
1
.1
.1
.1
.1
Beans, snap (string): Fresh.
1
.008 .005 .015 .009
Canned.
61 29 26
.8 1.4
.8
6
1.0
.100 .080 .148 .086
Broccoli. ___________ ______
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
11
Peas: Fresh____ . . . ____ . . .
2
.3
.3
.1 1.2
6
3
.027 .028 .010 .076
11
2.2 2.1 2.4 2.3
118 71 36
.202 .197 .214 .204
Canned____ _______
2
1
0
.1
Peppers_______ . ----------- --1
0
.005 ( 3)
.001 .001 0
( 3)
0
0
0
0
0
Okra_______________________ .
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
Yellow vegetables, total__
1.5 1.1 1.8 2.4
. 431 .335 . 555 . 717
1.5 1.1 1.8 2.4
Carrots_____ ____ __ . . . . . . .
136 64 53
19
.431 .335 .555 .717
0
0
0
0
Winter squash and pumpkin. _
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
5.4 4.2 5.8 12.1
Other vegetables, total4__ __ _
.649 .544 .686 1.292
.1
.1
.2 0
Beets: Fresh... . . . . .
____
7
4
0
.021 .020 .030 0
3
.4
2
.022 .013 .038 .042
.2
.1
.3
18 11
Canned__________ ._ .
5
21
.4
.2
6
.039 .020 .062 .100
.6 1.4
Cauliflower____ __________. . .
8
7
4
.4
.9
31 13 14
.5
.7
.058 .045 .082 .076
Celery------------- ------------------0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Corn: On ear______ . . . . . .
0
0
0
0 0
88
14
.149 .132 .155 .253
1.6 1.4 1.7 2.6
Canned
. . __ . . . .
47 27
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Cucumber_________ _____ __ .
0
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Eggplant -----------------------------.9
.8
94 58 23
13
. 186 .160 .186 .375
.7 2.0
Onions: Mature___________ .
.4
.4 1.2
.065 .059 .039 .190
.5
35 15 11
9
Spring. ____________
.2
.2 (3
2
.3
15 10
.040 .045 .014 .089
3
Parsnips_______________ . . .
)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
Summer squash . . . . . . . . . .
0
0
.1
.012 .012 0
.2
1
.1 0
4
.050
3
0
White turnips . ______ _____
.2
.1
.2
.044 .031 .050 .117
.4
4
3
13
6
Yellow turnips, rutabaga
.2
.1
0
.013 .007 .030 0
.5 0
9
3
6
Other vegetables-. . ______
.5
.3
.5 2.7
Pickles and olives
1.872 1.487 2. 222 3.521 11.1 8.7 13.4 20.3
Citrus fruits, total _ _. __ _____
1.8 1.4 2.3 2.6
113 55 40
18
.360 .305 .438 .499
Lemons. _ _______________ . . .
21 1.070 .900 1.241 1.740
7.3 6.1 8.8 11.5
166 88 57
Oranges------ ------------------------- . .
12
55 21 22
.420 .266 .519 1.217
1.7 1.0 2.1 5.2
Grapefruit: Fresh___________ . .
4
.022 .016 .024 .065
.3
.2
.2 1.0
6
5
15
Canned___ . . . .
1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of number of
persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
4 Does not include quantity of pickles and olives.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.




TABULAE
T

able

SU M M AR Y

199

7 .— F oo d used at hom e and purchased f o r c on su m p tion at home during
week in sp rin g quarter , by econ om ic level— Continued

1

SALT LAK E C IT Y , U TAH —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Number of families
using in 1 week

Item

F o o d U se d at H o m e a n d P u r c h a se d
f o r C o n s u m p t i o n a t H o m e in 1
W e e k —Continued

Other fruits, total_____________ _
Apples: Fresh_________________
Canned... __
_
Apricots: Fresh________ ______
Canned..
_____ _ _
B a n a n a s...______ _ ______
Berries: Fresh___ _____________
Canned_______________
Cherries: Fresh.______________
Canned___
Grapes: Fresh________________
Canned_______ ______
Peaches: Fresh.. _ _ ___ _____
Canned____ _ _ ___
Pears: Fresh___ _____ _________
Canned______ ___ ___ __
Pineapple: Fresh____ _
_
Canned. __________
Melons.. _____
____
Plums: Fresh___________ ____
Canned_________ _ _
Other fruit__________________ . .
Cider____ _____________ _______
Grape juice. __________ _____ .
Other fruit juices___ _________
Dried: Apricots_________ _ ___
Peaches. _
___
Prunes.
__ _
Raisins______ ________
Dates__________________
Figs------------------------------Other________ ____
...
Sugars and sweets, total. ____ __
Sugars: W hite.__ ____________
Brown_ __ _________
_
Other sweets: Candy__________
Jellies____ ______
Molasses, sirups..
Other sweets.. ._
Miscellaneous, total . . . .
. . . .
Gelatine_________ ______
Packaged dessert m ixtures.___
Tea____________________________
Coffee... __________ ________
Cocoa_____ ____________ ______
Chocolate__________
_______
Vinegar. _ ______________ _ _
Salt____
____________ _ _
Baking powder, yeast, soda . . .
Spices and extracts_________ __
Catsups, sauces_____ __________
Tomato soup__________________
Other soups_______ _______ _
Cod-liver oil___ _______________
Proprietary foods______________
Other foods ________ _____ __
Soft drinks consumed at home...
Other drinks consumed at home.
Sales tax on food __________

Economic
level— Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Average quantity pur­
chased per person i in
1 week

All
fam­
ilies

Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$400

Lb.

Lb.

$400
to
$600

Lb.

$600
and
over

Lb.

1.004
.251
0
0
.007
.339
.001
.006
(«)
.008
0
0
0
.033
0
.020
.001
. 129
0
0
.002
.004
0
.002
0
0
0
.068
.119
.009
.005
0
1. 358
1.087
.025
.076
.035
. 135
0

0.786
. 144
0
0
0
.264
0
.010
0
.004
0
0
0
.026
0
.024
0
.085
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.068
. 149
.008
.004
0
1. 264
.987
.032
.047
.025
.173
0

1. 257
! 331
0
0
.023
.468
.004
0
0
.013
0
0
0
.041
0
.014
0
. 196
0
0
.009
.003
0
.006
0
0
0
.068
.067
.003
.011
0
1. 504
1.210
.012
. 135
.065
.082
0

0
0
0
.454
0
0
.004
0
0
0
0
.058
0
.021
.011
.224
0
0
0
.033
0
0
0
0
0
.067
.076
.033
0
0
1. 547
1.401
.017
.090
0
.039
0

6
3
8
21
5
1

.020
.020
.020
. 142
.033
.006

.016
.019
.015
. 112
.033
.007

.031
.016
.026
. 166
.032
.001

.019
.042
.045
.274
.039
.017

5
10
2
1
0
0
2

.072
.052
.008
.002
.003
.014
.028

.041 . 148 .052
.041 .045 .144
.007 .005 .017
.003 0
0
.002 .006 0
.010 .027 0
.016 .040 .071

52
3
0
27
96
2
21
2
24
0
2
0
58
0
31
1
66
0
0
10
2
0
2
3
0
0
34
68
7
4
0

20
3
0
17
51
0
10
0
15
0
2
0
28
0
15
0
23
0
0
7
0
0
1
3
0
0
20
45
4
2
0

21
0
0
9
33
2
9
1
6
0
0
0
20
0
9
0
30
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
12
17
1
2
0

11
0
0
1
12
0
2
1
3
0
0
0
10
0
7
1
13
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
6
2
0
0

187
21
49
48
40

99
11
21
25
24

63
7
22
15
12

25
3
6
8
4

53
42
58
133
56
15

27
27
29
67
29
8

20
12
21
45
22
6

49
39
15
4
3
6
7

23
18
8
1
1
2
2

21
11
5
2
2
4
3

1. 739
'.7 5 8

Average expenditure
per person i in 1
week
Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

C t.

C t.

7.4 5 8
1. 3
'.7
0
0
0
0
.1 0
2.0 1.6
0
(3)
.1
.2
.1 0
.1 (3)
0
0
0
0
0
0
.4
.3
0
0
.2
.3
0
(3)
1.4
.9
0
0
0
0
0
(3)
0
(3)
0
0
0
(3
)
0
0
0
0
0
0
.6
.6
.9 1.1
.1
.1
. 1 (3
)
0
0
10. 2 9. 4
6.4 5.8
.3
.4
1.7 1.0
.6
.6
1.2 1.6
0
0
13. 6 10.8
.6
.5
.7
.6
1.0
.8
4.4 3.3
.6
.5
.2
.2
.1
.2
.6
.5
. 9 1. 2
.5
.3
.6
.5
.8
.5
.8
.6
.7
.7
.1
.1
.1 (3
)
.2
.1
.6
.3

C t.

C t.

9 3 12.6
l! 9 A0
0
0
0
0
.3 0
2.7 2.6
.1 0
0
0
0
.2
.2 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.4
.8
0
0
.2
.2
0
.2
2.0 2.5
0
0
0
0
.1 0
(3)

.3

0
0
.1 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.7
.7
.4
.6
.5
(3
)
.2 0
0
0
12. 2 9.8
7.2 7.7
.1
.2
3.2 1.5
1.0 0
.4
.7
0
0
16. 6 22. 5
.8
.9
.6 1.5
1.3 1.8
5.3 8.7
.7
.9
.6
(3
)
.1
.5
.6
.8
.6
.5
.7
.9
.8 1. 2
1.6
.8
.7
2.2
.8
.8
0
0
.1 0
.4 0
1.0
.9

1 The number of equivalent full-time persons per family in 1 week is computed on the basis of the number
of persons eating meals at home during the week to which the data apply. If a person ate 21 meals during
the week, he was counted as a full-time person for that week. If he ate less than 21 meals, he was counted as
the appropriate decimal equivalent full-time person.
3 Less than 0.05 cent.
5 Less than 0.0005 pound.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 326.
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------- 14




200

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

8 .— A n n u a l fo o d expenditures, by econom ic level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAMILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

E c o n o m i c level— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

A n n u a l F o o d E x p en d itu re s

Families in survey________
Average number of food expenditure units in 1 year_________ _
Number of families spending for—
Meals away from home:
At work____ ____ ____ ____________ _ _______
_______
At school
__ __ ____________________________
_____ _
On vacation_______________ ______________ ____________
Board at school________ _______ ___ ________ _ ________ _
Candy, ice cream, drinks, e tc _____________ ___________ _
Number of families reporting food received as gifts, or produced
at home, or meals received as pay__________________ ______

295
2.73

92
3.48

106
2. 71

97
2.06

108
20
30
2
48

21
8
6
0
14

38
7
7
2
13

49
5
17
0
21

55

22

17

16

Average annual expenditure per family for all food_______ _
Food prepared at home. _ _________ . _____ _
_____
Food bought and eaten away from home, total_____________
Meals at work_ _ ____ _________ _
____
___
Meals at school_______ _____ __
______ ______ ____ ____
Other meals, not vacation__________ ___________________
Meals on vacation.__ _ ______ _________ _______ ______
Board at school. _ _ ___________
____ ______________ __
Candy, ice cream, drinks, etc.. _________________________
Average estimated value per family of gifts of food and homeproduced food and meals received as pay (complete)________

$460.63
418. 65
41.98
25.32
1.91
7.80
1.86
1.17
3.92

$452.82
430. 26
22. 56
13. 41
3.08
3. 23
. 59
0
2. 25

$451. 51
417.03
34.48
20.61
1. 32
6.00
.95
3.24
2. 36

$477.99
409.41
68. 58
41.72
1.43
14.10
4.10
0
7. 23

3.85

2. 52

.88

1.97

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




TABULAR
T

able

201

SUM M ARY

8 . — A n n u a l fo o d ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—W H IT E FAMILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expend­
iture unit per year
Item

fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to $600 to
$600
$700

$700
and
over

A n n u a l F o o d E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey________ __ ___________
Average number of food expenditure units
in 1 year_________________________________
Number of families spending for—
Meals away from home:
At work_____ ______ _ _______ _____
At school_____ _________________________
On vacation,_______ _ _ _ _____ _________
Board at sc h o o l...______ ________________
Candy, ice cream, drinks, etc_____________
Number of families reporting food received
as gifts, or produced at home, or meals re­
ceived as pay_____________________ _____

357

45

92

73

50

43

54

2.88

4.16

3.22

2.76

2. 66

2. 27

2.09

144
34
23
1
98

9
4
1
0
9

40
10
4
0
20

27
9
3
1
28

22
5
3
0
13

20
4
7
0
12

26
2
5
0
16

61

8

17

11

3

9

13

$433.12 $424.15 $413. 77 $460. 50 $442.19
415. 74 396. 55 382.84 416. 31 394. 62

$444. 23
389.03

Average annual expenditure per family for
all food_________________________________ $433. 47
Food prepared at home, total _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 397. 56
Food bought and eaten away from home,
total_____ ________ _ _________ . -.
35.91
Meals at work.. __. _ _ ___ __ . . . _
24.85
Meals at school________ __ __ . .._ _ _
2.12
_
Other meals, not vacation___ _______
2. 45
Meals on vacation____ ___ ______ _ __
.86
Board at school._.
___________________
0)
Candy, ice cream, drinks, e t c _________
5.63
Average estimated value per family of gifts
of food and home-produced food and meals
received as pay (incomplete) 2____________
.37

17.38
9.47
2. 39
1.71
. 11
0
3.70

27.60
20. 92
1.49
1.32
.16
0
3. 71

30.93
22.56
2. 56
. 17
1.04
.03
4. 57

.45

.30

.63

44.19
26.92
3. 23
5.15
.51
0
8.38.21

47. 57
31.20
2. 75
2.98
2. 72
0
7. 92

55. 20
40. 47
.78
5.16
1.25
0
7. 54

.40

.23

1 Less than 0.5 cent.
2 The aggregates on which these averages are based do not include gifts of food received, food produced
at home, and meals received as pay, reported by 4 families but for which they could not estimate the value.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




202

W EST
T

able

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

8 . — A n n u a l fo o d ex p en d itu res, b y econom ic level— Continued
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAMILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

E con o m ic le v e l— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

A n n u a l F o o d E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey_________ ___ __ _ _ __ __ ____ _____
Average number of food expenditure units in 1 year__________
Number of families spending for—
Meals away from home:
At work. _ ______ ____ _____________ ____ _____ ______
At school. _ __ ______ _____ ____ ________________________
On vacation
__ ____________ ________________ _____
Board at school
_ ___________ ___ _________
_________ _
Candy, ice cream, drinks, etc _
_ ____ __ __________
Number of families reporting food received as gifts, or pro­
duced at home, or meals received as p a y ______ __ _______

103
2.87

32
4. 21

29
2. 32

42
2. 22

27
10
2
0
34

6
6
1
0
8

6
0
0
0
10

15
4
1
0
16

36

13

10

13

Average annual expenditure per family for all food_____ __ _
Food prepared at home _____________ _ _ ____ _____ _____
Food bought and eaten away from home, total ____ ______
Meals at work _ __
__ ______ _ __________ _ _
Meals at school-- __ _____ _
____ _
__ ____ __ _
Other meals, not vacation__ _______
_ ___ __ _______
Meals on vacation
_ __ ______
__ _____
______
Board at school _
______ ___________ _
__ _____
Candy, icecream, drinks, etc_ __ __
______ ____ ______
Average estimated value per family of gifts of food and homeproduced food and meals received as pay (incomplete) 2_-

$356.01
325.17
30.84
14.02
2.23
5. 73
. 18
0
8. 68

$362.19
345.73
16.46
6.68
4.54
2.02
. 16
0
3.06

$314. 56
293. 26
21.30
10. 50
0
4. 32
0
0
6.48

$379. 97
331. 54
48. 43
22.07
2. 01
9. 56
. 31
0
14.48

16.47

14.45

17.14

17. 55

2

The aggregates on which these averages are based do not include gifts of food received, food produced
at home, and meals received as pay reported by 1 family, but for which it could not estimate the value.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




TABULAR
T

able

203

SUM M ARY

8 .— A n n u a l fo o d exp en d itu res , by econ om ic level— Continued
M IN N E A P O L IS-ST . PAUL, M I N N —W H IT E FAMILIES
Economic level-—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

A n n u a l F o o d E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey------------------------ --------------Average number of food expenditure units
in 1 year_____________________ ____
Number of families spending for—
Meals away from home:
At work________________________________
At school____ __
________ ___________
On vacation. _ _ __ _ ----------------- ------Board at school____________________
Candy, ice cream, drinks, etc_______ _____
Number of families reporting food received
as gifts, or produced at home, or meals re­
ceived as p a y ___ _ - ------------------

504

47

114

106

86

59

92

2.98

4.41

3. 48

2. 95

2. 72

2.59

2.16

170
21
57
2
232

9
1
2
0
23

24
6
10
0
57

36
1
7
1
41

23
5
4
0
37

24
4
8
1
29

54
4
26
0
45

162

20

36

37

23

18

28

$488. 55 $473. 85 $474. 82 $496. 53 $502. 42
466. 57 447. 81 441. 82 465. 80 451.58

$500. 95
420. 98

Average annual expenditure per family for
all food------------- -------------- -------------- $487. 53
Food prepared at home __ __ ----------- _
446. 86
Food bought and eaten away from home,
total___ __
_____ ____ _ ___ _
40. 67
____ __
__
Meals at work .
20. 56
Meals at school--------- ---------------.94
4.03
Other meals, not vacation_________ _ _
Meals on vacation.__
__ . . . . . . _ _
1.56
Board at school________ _. _____ ______
.02
Candy, ice cream, drinks, e t c ______ . _ 13. 56
Average estimated value per family of gifts
of food and home-produced food and meals
. 10
received as pay (incomplete)2 ___________
.

21.98
7. 51
.20
1.07
.48
0
12. 72

26.04
9. 34
.48
2. 41
.91
0
12.90

33. 00
17. 44
.09
5. 34
.83
.09
9. 21

30. 73
17. 50
.82
1.53
1.07
0
9.81

50.84
24. 34
2.88
3. 36
1.57
.09
18. 60

79.97
45.16
1.67
8. 80
4.19
0
20.15

.16

.12

.14

.09

.03

.07

2 The aggregates on which these averages are based do not include gifts of food received, food produced
at home, and meals received as pay reported by 16 families, but for which they could not estimate the value.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




204

W EST
T

able

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

8 .— A n n u a l fo o d ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level-—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$500

$500
to
$600

$600
to
$700

$700
and
over

A n n u a l F o o d E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey___________ _____________
Average number of food expenditure units in
1 year. ----- ----------------------------------------------Number of families spending for—
Meals away from home:
At w o r k ..___ _________________________
At school_______________________________
On vacation________ _________________
Board at school________________________
Candy, ice cream, drinks, etc_____________
Number of families reporting food received
as gifts, or produced at home, or meals
received as pay___ __ _____________ ______

401

54

65

94

62

42

84

3.00

4. 71

3. 47

3.15

2.54

2.30

2.07

199
53
38
1
173

23
8
0
.0
20

31
10
0
0
22

47
20
9
0
45

30
6
7
1
31

18
5
4
0
17

50
4
18
0
38

122

15

16

31

23

12

25

$515. 25 $515. 25 $549. 05 $501. 69 $495. 66
488. 05 469. 87 489. 36 445.12 438. 01

$510.15
425.07

Average annual expenditure per family for
all food---------- --------------------------------------- $517.96
Food prepared at home___________________ 460. 35
Food bought and eaten away from home,
total ._ .
...
_______ __________
57. 61
Meals at work.. __________ . . . _______
36. 55
Meals at school ----._ -------------3. 82
Other meals, not vacation.. _
_______
2. 47
Meals on vacation _
_
__ _____
1.20
Board at school___ ________ _______. . .
.36
Candy, ice cream, drinks, etc__________
13.21
Average estimated value per family of gifts
of food and home-produced food and meals
received as pay (incomplete)2
_____
10.96

27. 20
19.23
1.91
1. 21
0
0
4.85

45. 38
32.11
5. 46
.32
0
0
7.49

59. 69
32. 52
7. 38
1.29
.67
0
17.83

56. 57
35. 58
1.96
2. 66
.63
2. 32
13.42

57. 65
35.31
2. 52
3. 40
2. 47
0
13.95

85.08
57.00
1. 79
5.68
3. 27
0
17. 34

7.47

10. 72

11.90

10. 64

12.95

11. 60

2 The aggregates on which these averages are based do not include gifts of food received, food produced at
home, and meals received as pay reported by 3 families, but for which they could not estimate the value.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




205

TABULAE SUMMARY
T

able

8 .— A n n u a l fo o d expenditures by econ om ic level— Continued
St. Louis, M o.--Negro families

Item

All
families

Economic level—Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

Salt Lake City, Utah—White families

All
fami­
lies

$400
and
over

E c o n o m ic
level—Families
spending per expenditure unit
per year

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

A n n u a l F o o d E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey________
Average number of food ex­
penditure units in 1 year.
Number of families spend­
ing for—
Meals away from home:
At w ork_____________
At school___ ________
On vacation. _ ________
Board at school______ . . .
Candy, ice cream, drinks,
etc____________________
Number of families report­
ing food received as gifts,
or produced at home, or
meals received as pay... _

106

28

27

51

210

54

55

72

29

2.89

4.40

2.86

2. 08

3. 25

4. 48

3. 38

2. 71

2.04

27
12
7
0

5
6
1
0

7
4
0
0

15
2
6
0

62
13
25
0

8
5
2
0

16
3
2
0

26
4
9
0

12
1
12
0

21

3

9

9

39

5

10

17

7

22

2

6

14

33

13

10

10

0

Average annual expenditure
per family for all food... $383.11 $415. 57 $373. 83 $370. 20
Food prepared at home... 353. 80 395. 04 350. 75 332. 78
Food bought and eaten
away from home, total.
37. 42
29.31
20. 53
23.08
Meals at w o r k ..___ _
14. 60
15. 96
9. 63
20.17
Meals at school________
4. 27
2. 52
2. 55
1.61
Other meals, not vaca­
tion______________
5.02
4.48
.68
7. 58
Meals on vacation_____
.07
0
2. 63
1.28
Board at school______ .
0
0
0
0
Candy,
ice
cream,
2. 08
drinks, etc... _____
4.50
5.28
5. 43
Average estimated value
per family of gifts of food
and home produced food
and meals received as pay
1. 30
8.19
9. 49
7.00
(incomplete) 2. . . _______

$423. 41 $428. 67 $423. 86 $416. 71 $429. 43
396. 62 418. 49 401. 09 384. 62 377. 20
26.79
17. 40
1.12

10.18
4. 47
1.29

22. 77
19. 66
.77

32. 09
20. 44
.67

52. 23
29.72
2. 56

3.60
2.18
0

3. 32
.19
0

.45
.33
0

4.02
3.08
0

9. 09
7.08
0

2. 49

.91

1. 56

3.88

3.78

2.36

3.12

1.29

3. 55

0

2 The aggregates on which the averages for St. Louis are based do not include gifts of food received, food
produced at home, and meals received as pay reported by 4 families, but for which they could not estimate
the value. This estimate is complete for Salt Lake City.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




206

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

T a b l e 9. — H o u sin g fa c ilitie s , b y econ om ic level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES

All fami­
lies

Item

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

H o u s i n g F a c ilitie s i n D w e l l i n g O c c u p ie d a t E n d o f S c h ed u le Y e a r

I. Families in survey, who rented principal home at end of
schedule year_________________________________ _ _______
Average monthly rental rate at end of schedule year

___ __

Number of families living in—
1-family detached house____________ ________ _____ __ __
1-family semidetached or row house___ ________ ________
2-family house_____________________________________ ____
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)_________ __ . _____
Dwelling with elevator. _____________ ____ ____________
Dwelling with janitor service___ _____________ _________
Number of families having—
Toilet: Inside flush__________ _______________ ________ _
Outside flush__________ _
______ _______ __
Other type____________ __ _________________ ______
Sole use of toilet "by household___ __ _________ _ _________
Water: Inside dwelling____ _____ ________ ________ ____
Running___________________
. . . _____ _____
Hot running_ __ ______ ______ ___
_
___
Not running_______
. . . . . . _____ __ _______
Outside dwelling only. _
. . . ___ __ ___ __
Sink____________________ _ _ __ . . . __________ ______
Electric lights___________________ ________ . . . . . ____
Gas or electricity for cooking. _______ ______
_____ __
Refrigerator: Electric... ____
__ . . ___ __ _____
Other mechanical.__ ____ _________________
Ice only. _____ _____ __________
__________
None_______________ ________ ____________
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat
_ _________
Telephone___ _________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _. _________ __
Garage_____ ___________________ _ . . . ___ . . . __________
Garden space___ ____ _________ . . .
._
________
Play space___________________
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water, electric lights, and
gas or electricity for cooking._ ______ __ __ ________
II. Families in survey, who owned principal home at end of
schedule year_______ ___ __ __
________
Number of families living in—
1-family detached house. _______ _______
__ ___________
1-family semidetached or row house____ ________ ______
2-family house______ ______ _ _ . _________ ____ _ . . .
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)
__ ___ __ ____ __
Dwelling with elevator___________________ ___ ___ ______
Dwelling with janitor service.._ ___________ ____ _____ __
Number of families having—
Bathroom _________________ ______ ________________
___
Toilet: Inside flush____________ ________ ______________
Outside flush_________________ _____ __________ _
Other type_________
_____ _
__ __________
Sole use of toilet by household__________ _________ ______
Water: Inside dwelling.____
___
____ _____ _______
Running________________________________ ____ __
Hot running_______ _________ __ __ __ ____
Not running________
__________________ _____
Outside dwelling only________ ________ ________
Sink______ __________________ ______ ___ _____ _________
Electric lights. _ _____________ _____ ______
_____ ___
Gas or electricity for cooking____________ ______ ________
Refrigerator: Electric________ _ ______ ________ . . . ._
Other mechanical.__ __________ ______ ____
Ice only_______________ ____
_____ ________
N o n e __________
_______ __ _____ _____
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat. . . . . _____ ________ __
Telephone. _ ________________________________ ____ _
Garage___
_______________________________ __________
Garden space ___________________________ ________________
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water, electric lights, and
gas or eleclricity for cooking---------------------------- . . . ._ .
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




187
_________
$22. 33

58
_______
$16. 93

67

62

$23.20

$26. 45

89
41
5
52
5
40

31
16
0
11
1
6

29
14
2
22
2
18

29
11
a
19
2
16

181
182
3
2
167
186
186
169
0
1
183
186
169
51
0
109
27
170
98
100
98
111

53
53
3
2
51
57
57
46
0
1
55
57
45
3
0
39
16
45
17
22
31
39

66
67
0
0
61
67
67
65
0
0
67
67
64
14
0
47
6
64
40
37
33
39

62
62
0
0
55
62
62
58
0
0
61
62
60
34
0
23
0
41
41
34
33

158

40

62

56
35

108

34

39

106
1
1
0
0
0

34
0
0
0
0
0

39
0
0
0
0
0

105
106
0
2
102
108
108
97
0
0
108
108
92
21
0
82
5
89
86
81
86

32
33
0
1
34
34
34
26
0
0
34
34
23
2
0

38
38
0
1
36
39
39
36
0
0
39
39
34
9
0
29
1
35
32
30
31

35
35
0
0
32
35
35
35
0
0
35
35
35
10
. 0
24
1
29
29
30
28

87

19

33

35

29
3
25
25
21
27

33
1
1
0
0
0

TABULAR
T

able

9. —

SU M M AR Y

207

H o u sin g fa c ilitie s , b y econom ic level— Continued

KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S.— W HITE FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

fami­
lies

Under
$300

Housing Facilities in Dwelling Occupied at
End of Schedule Year
I. Families in survey, who rented principal
228
home at end of schedule year.. ________
30
Average monthly rental rate at end of
$20. 42
schedule year________ _ ______
$16.03
Number of families living in—
1-family detached house________________
123
16
1-family semidetached or row house.
7
1
2-family house__________________________
23
5
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)___
75
8
Dwelling with elevator______ ________
0
0
68
Dwelling with janitor service.. ___ . . .
7
Number of families having—
197
21
Bathroom. .
.
. . -----------205
22
Toilet: Inside flush____ _______ ____ _
Outside flush _ . . . _______ . . .
0
0
23
8
Other type ________________ .
202
Sole use of toilet by household._____ __
26
224
Water: Inside dwelling__________ ____
29
Running_____________________
223
29
187
Hot running_ ____________
_
17
1
Not running.. . . . _____ . . .
0
4
Outside dwelling only. ______
1
Sink___ _____ _
___ . . . _______ ____
217
27
Electric lights_______ _ ___ ________ .
227
30
Gas or electricity for cooking __ _ . . . _
209
23
93
3
Refrigerator: Electric______________
1
Other mechanical________
0
133
Ice only _______________
27
1
None
_______
. . . __
0
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat_____ __
182
13
84
Telephone____ _
____ _____ __
___
7
105
Garage.__ _________ . . . . _ _________
9
72
Garden space______________ _________
12
142
21
Play space. __________________________
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity
for cooking. _ _____
180
16
II. Families in survey, who owned principal
129
15
home at end of schedule year.
_ ___
Number of families living in—
124
14
1-family detached house. ____ ______
2
1-family semidetached or row house.
1
1
0
2-family house _______
____ . . . .
2
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)___
0
0
Dwelling with elevator___ __ _ . . . ___
0
0
0
Dwelling with janitor service______ . . .
Number of families having—
105
5
Bathroom.
. . . _________ ________
106
4
Toilet: Inside flush_______
____ . . .
0
0
Outside flush----- ------------23
11
Other type . . . . . _____ __
__
125
15
Sole use of toilet by household__________
123
12
Water: Inside dwelling . . . _______ __ _
123
Running_____________________
12
4
98
Hot running. _
_________
0
0
Not running. _ __ _________
Outside dwelling only____ . . . _
6
3
122
Sink.. . . . _________ ________________
11
127
15
Electric lights_______ __
______ _ . . .
114
11
Gas or elecvricity for cooking.
______
54
4
Refrigerator: Electric.___________
___
0
0
Other mechanical_________
73
10
Ice only ------------------------2
1
None_______________ _____
102
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat_______
7
62
0
Telephone______________________________
90
11
Garage___ ___________ . ______________
76
9
Garden space____ ____________________
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity
90 !
3
for cooking_________________
_____
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327,




$300 to
$400

$400 to $500 to $600 to
$500
$700
$600

$700
and
over

59

42

34

27

36

$17. 56

$17. 75

$22. 40

$24. 28

$27.10

39
2
6
12
0
11

24
1
4
13
0
11

18
0
2
14
0
13

12
2
3
10
0
8

14
1
3
18
0
18

47
51
0
8
51
57
56
46
1
2
56
59
53
17
0
42
0

37
39
0
3
38
41
4.1
34
0
1
39
42
36
16
0
26
0
34
10
14
15
26

31
31
0
3
29
34
34
31
0
0
33
33
34
18
0
15
1
30
17
17
8
18

26
26
0
1
25
27
27
24
0
0
26
27
27
19
0
8
0
25
13
10
8
18

35
36
0
0
33
36
36
35
0
0
36
36
36
20
1
15
0
36
21
21
9
19

44

16
34
20
40

44

32

29

24

35

33

31

16

16

18

31
0
1
1
0
0

30
0
0
1
0
0

16
0
0
0
0
0

15
1
0
0
0
0

18
0
0
0
0
0

26
28
0
5
33
32
32
26
0
1
32
32
29
10
0
23
0
25
9
21
20

27
27
0
4
30
29
29
23
0
2
29
30
26
9
0
21
1
27
18
20
15

15
15
0
1
14
16
16
15
0
0
16
16
15
8
0
8
0
13
11
11
11

15
15
0
1
15
16
16
15
0
0
16
16
16
7
0
9
0
14
10
12 .
10

17
17
0
1
18
18
18
15
0
0
18
18
17
16
0

24

21

14

14

14

2

0
16
14
15
11

208

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

9 . — Housing facilities, by economic level— C on tin u ed
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

H o u s i n g F a c i l i t i e s i n D w e l l i n g O c c u p i e d at E n d o f S c h e d u l e Y e a r

I. Families in survey, who rented principal home at end of
schedule year_________ _____ . . ________________ ________

66

22

19

25

Average monthly rental rate at end of schedule year________

$13. 70

$11. 91

$12. 73

$16. 02

27
3
7
29
1
10

10
2
3
7
0
0

8
0
2
9
1
3

9
1
2
13
0
7

46
46
1
19
49
58
57
31
1
8
54
60
42
8
0
58
0
19
10
6
19
34

12
13
0
9
18
17
17
10
0
5
17
20
10
0
0
22
0
2
1
2
8
13

14
13
1
5
12
16
15
8
1
3
14
17
12
2
0
17
0
8
3
1
6
10

20
20
0
5
19
25
25
13
0
0
23
23
20
6
0
19
0
9
6
3
5
11
12

Number of families living in—
1-family detached house__________________________________
1-family semidetached or row house. _ __ _____________
2-family house_______ _ _____ ____
_ ___________ . .
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)--------------------------------Dwelling with elevator______ ______ ____
__ __ _ . . ___
Dwelling with janitor service_____ i ________ ___________
Number of families having—
_______ ____________
Bathroom______________ __________
Toilet: Inside flush-------------------------- . __________________
Outside flush--------------------------------------------------Other type________________ ____ __________________
Sole use of toilet by household.
______ _______________
Water: Inside dwelling-----------------------------------------------------Running_________ _ ___ .
______ ______ __
Hot running_______________________ __________
Not running-------------------- --------------------------------Outside dwelling only
___ __ ___ -------------------Sink_________ _ __ _____ - _ _______ _____ __ ________
Electric lights... -------- -----------------------------------------------Gas or electricity for cooking _ _ _ . ----------------- -----------Refrigerator: Electric_____ ___________
____ . . . ------------Other mechanical._________________________
Ice only----------- --- --------------------------------------None-----------------------------------------------------------Hot air, hot water, or steam heat ___
___
___ _______ . . . ________
_____________
Telephone____
Garage. _ ____ ________________________________________
. ...
. . ------------------Garden space___ __ ________
Play space. _____________ ________ _ . . . . ___________
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water, electric lights, and
gas or electricity for cooking________
____ . . . ------II. Families in survey, who owned principal home at end of
schedule year.. _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ ___ _ _____ ___ __
Number of families living in—
1-family detached house.__ .
___ __ _ -------- ------------1-family semidetached or row house. __ __ _ ________ __
2-family house___________ __________________
________
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)---------- ------------------Dwelling with elevator._.
___ ___. _ ____ __
___
Dwelling with janitor service___ _
_____ _________
Number of families having—
Bathroom_____ ________ ______ ________ _____ _ _______
Toilet: Inside flush____ . . . ________________ _____
____
Outside flu s h _________________________ ________
Other type_______________________ _________ . . .
Sole use of toilet by household-------------------- ------------------Water: Inside dwelling______ _____ . . . ---------------------Running______ ______________ ______ __ ______
Hot running.
____ _________________________
Not running---------------------------- ----------------------Outside dwelling only_ ___ _
.__ . . . ------------Sink_____
______ _______ __
. . . ._ . . ._ . . ___ __
Electric l i g h t s ..___
_. . . ----------- ---------- ------------------------------- ---------------------Gas or electricity for cooking—
Refrigerator: Electric. _ ___________ ___________ . . . . .
Other mechanical------------- ------------------------Ice only_____________________________________
None_________ _______________ ____________
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat---------------------------- ------Telephone_____________ . . . ._ . . . . . . . ------------------- - Garage. _ __________________________________ ___________
Garden space____ _______. . . ------- - —. ------------------Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water, electric lights, and
gas or electricity for cooking---------------------------------------Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327,




26

7

7

37

10

10

17

34
1
2
0
0
0

10
0
0
0
0
0

9
1
0
0
0
0

15
0
2
0
0
0

19
19
2
16
34
31
31
18
0
6
29
37
26
7
0
30
0
22
23
15
22

1
1
1
8
9
7
7
2
0
3
6
10
5
0
0
10
0
5
3
3
6

3
4
0
6
9
7
7
3
0
3
6
10
5
1
0
9
0
4
5
4
7

15
14
1
2
16
17
17
13
0
0
17
17
16
6
0
11
0
13
15
8
9

17

1

13
1

3

TABULAE
T

able

209

SUM M ARY

9 . — Housing facilities , by economic level— C on tin u ed

M IN N EAPO L IS-ST . PAUL, M I N N —W H IT E FAMILIES

All
minilies

H o u sin g

F a c ilitie s in D w e llin g O c c u p ie d
E n d o f S ch ed u le Y e a r

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500 to $600 to
$600
$700

$700
and
over

at

I. Families in survey, who rented principal
home at end of schedule year__________
323
Average monthly rental rate at end of
schedule year____________ _____________ $23.39
Number of families living in—
1-family detached house______ _____ _
128
1-family semidetached or row house. __
12
2-family bouse______ _________________
113
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)___
70
Dwelling with elevator_________________
1
Dwelling with janitor service __ ______
44
Number of families having—
Bathroom______________________________
296
Toilet: Inside flush.____ _______________
321
1
Outside flush _. ________ ______
Other type__________________ . . .
1
Sole use of toilet by household_________
295
Water: Inside dwelling_________________
323
Running. _______ _______ _____
323
Hot running________ ______
256
Not running _____ _________
0
Outside dwelling only .... . . . .
0
Sink____________________________________
316
Electric lights. ____________ _________
321
Gas or electricity for cooking
. . . ...
317
Refrigerator: Electric___ _______________
80
Other mechanical_________
5
Ice o n ly _________________
225
None __ . . . _ __________
13
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat_______
244
Telephone __ ________________ . . . ___
123
162
Garage_________________________________
104
Garden space.. _ ________ ______ _____
214
Play space_____________________________
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity
for cooking. ______ ____ _____________
254
II. Families in survey, who owned principal
home at end of schedule year___ ______
181
Number of families living in—
1-family detached house________________
163
2
1-family semidetached or row h o u s e ._
_
2-family house__________________________
16
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)___
0
Dwelling with elevator_____ _____ ______
0
Dwelling with janitor service..___
0
Number of families having—
165
Bathroom______ ___ . . ----------------174
Toilet: Inside flush. _ ________ _________
Outside flush
________________
0
Other type______________________
7
172
Sole use of toilet by household--------- --Water: Inside d w ellin g..______________
176
Running________________ _ __
173
Hot running_________ ____
153
Not running____ . . . _________
3
Outside dwelling only. ___ _____
5
Sink___ ____ _ . . . ______ ____________
176
Electric lights__________________________
178
Gas or electricity for cooking
________
176
Refrigerator: Electric_________ ________
38
Other mechanical_________
3
132
Ice only-------------- ----------8
None___________ __ ._ ___
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat. . . . __
158
109
Telephone.._ _____________ . . . _______
Garage_________________________________
137
Garden space___________________________
113
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity
for cooking__________________ ______
148
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year

29

69

65

52

43

65

$16.69

$21.27

$21. 58

$25.17

$25. 85

$27. 37

11
1
14
3
0
1

29
3
24
13
0
10

24
1
26
14
1
6

16
3
17
16
0
10

22
0
14
7
0
4

26
4
18
17
0
13

25
29
0
0
27
29
29
19
0
0
28
28
27
0
0
25
4
12
4
11
8
25

61
69
0
0
64
69
69
46
0
0
69
69
66
11
1
51
6
45
14
32
23
55

61
65
0
0
56
65
65
51
0
0
62
65
64
8
1
54
2
49
21
33
18
43

48
52
0
0
46
52
52
44
0
0
51
52
52
15
1
36
0
42
29
23
12
27

41
41
1
1
42
43
43
36
0
0
41
43
43
19
0
24
0
37
25
26
19
32

60
65
0
0
60
65
65
60
0
0
65
64
65
27
2
35
1
59
30
37
24
32

17

46

51

44

35

61

18

45

41

34

16

27

16
0
2
0
0
0

42
0
3
0
0
0

36
0
5
0
0
0

29
2
3
0
0
0

15
0
1
0
0
0

25
0
2
0
0
0

14
15
0
3
16
16
15
14
1
2
17
18
16
4
0
12
2
13
5
10
11

38
41
0
4
42
43
42
35
1
2
44
43
43
6
0
38
1
38
21
33
28

38
41
0
0
40
40
39
34
1
1
39
41
41
10
0
30
1
37
23
29
30

33
34
0
0
31
34
34
30
0
0
34
33
33
i
22
4
31
24
30
18

16
16
0
0
16
16
16
16
0
0
16
16
16
3
1
12
0
15
13
12
10

26
27
0
0
27
27
27
24
0
0
26
27
27
8
1
18
0
24
23
23
16

11

35

34

28

16

24

n

210

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

9 . — Housing facilities, by economic level— C on tin u ed
ST. LOUIS, M O —W H IT E FAM ILIES

All
fami­
lies

Item

H o u sin g

F a c ilitie s in D w e l l i n g O c c u p ie d
E n d o f S c h ed u le Y e a r

$700
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

32

50

62

49

30

64

$16. 20

$18. 46

$18. 45

$21. 46

$21. 98

$26. 67

6
2
13
11
0
0

4
7
20
19
0
2

9
4
24
25
0
3

9
1
15
24
1
4

7
2
10
11
0
1

6
2
20
36
0
10

22
26
4
2
27
32
32
12
0
0
32
32
27
4
0
26
2
14
4
9
13
29

38
44
4
2
39
50
50
23
0
0
50
50
47
19
0
31
0
26
7
16
13
38

47
53
6
3
51
62
62
31
0
0
61
62
57
30
2
30
0
32
7
20
17
39

41
44
1
4
43
49
49
28
0
0
49
49
49
24
2
23
0
32
10
21
23
38

28
30
0
0
28
30
30
23
0
0
30
29
26
21
0
7
2
21
8
15
9
22

61
62
2
0
59
64
64
52
0
0
64
64
64
46

at

I. Families in survey, who rented principal
287
home at end of schedule year_________ _ _.
Average monthly rental rate at end of
year----------------------------- -----------------------$20. 92
Number of families living in—
1-family detached house_______________
41
1-family semidetached or row h o u se___
18
102
2-family house____________ ______ __
_
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)____
126
1
Dwelling with elevator_________________
Dwelling with janitor service_____ ______
20
Number of families having—
Bathroom. _______ _ ________ _______
237
Toilet: Inside flush. ______ ______
___
259
17
Outside flush________ _________
Other type_____________________
11
247
Sole use of toilet by household____ ___
Water: Inside dwelling____ . . . ________
287
R unning____ . . ______ _
287
Hot running______ ____ _
169
Not running. ______ ________
0
Outside dwelling only___ _______
0
Sink__________________________ ____
286
Electric lights. ______ _________________
286
Gas or electricity for cooking____________
270
144
Refrigerator: Electric________________ _
5
Other mechanical_________
134
Ice only_____ ______________
4
None. _ ________ _______
184
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat____
Telephone___________________________
38
Garage____ ___ ______ _ _
118
Garden space _ __ . . . ______ __ _
95
Play space___________ . . . ___ __
208
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity
for cooking___ __ _____ ____
166
II. Families in survey, who owned principal
114
home at end of schedule year. . .
___
Number of families living in—
82
1-family detached house. . . ____ __ __
1-family semidetached or row house.._ _
9
2-family house.________ __________
_
23
0
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)___
Dwelling with elevator_______________
0
2
Dwelling with janitor service_______
Number of families having—
103
Bathroom______________________________
106
Toilet: Inside flush____________ ________
3
Outside flush___________________
5
Other type_____________________
108
Sole use of toilet by household__________
Water: Inside dwelling.. . . . __________
114
Running. . . ______________ _
113
Hot running________________
90
1
Not running__________ _______
0
Outside dwelling only. __________
Sink______ _____________ _____________
114
114
Electric lights____________ ___________
104
Gas or electricity for cooking____________
60
Refrigerator: Electric---------------------------1
Other mechanical____ . . .
52
Ice only__________________
1
None_________ ________
95
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat... _
47
Telephone_______ ____________ _______
Garage_________________________________
89
75
Garden space______ ________________
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity
86
for cooking_______ . . . .
------- --Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




Economic level-—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year

1

17
0
59
2
37
20
42

12

23

31

28

20

52

22

15

32

13

12

20

15

13
1
1

26
3
3
0
0
0

7
1
5
0
0
1

7
1
4
0
0
0

14
3
3
0
0
1

11
11
1
1
12
13
13
11
0
0
13
13
13
9
0
4
0
12
5
10
6

11
12
0
0
11
12
12
10
0
0
12
12

11

29
31
1
0
32
32
32
25
0
0
32
32
28
14
1
17
0
26
12
23
23

9

20
20
0
0
18
20
20
19
0
0
20
20
20
15
0
5
0
20
14
18
12

11

24

10

19

0
7
0
0
0

18
19
0

3
20
22
22
14
0
0
22
22
17
5
0
16
1
15
3
17
14

12

0
0

0
14
13
1
1
15
15
14
11
1
0
15
15
14
8

0
7
0
12
5
10

10

12

9
0
3
0

10
8
11

TA B U LA E

T

able

211

SU M M A R Y

9 . — H o u sin g fa c ilitie s , by econ om ic level—

Item

St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families
Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
All
unit per year
fami­
lies
Un­ $400 $300
and
der
to
$300 $400 over

Continued

Salt Lake City , Utah—White
families

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per year
Un­
der
$300

$400
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

H o u s i n g F a c ilitie s in D w e l l i n g O c c u p ie d at
E n d o f S c h ed u le Y e a r

I. Families in survey, who rented principal
91
home at end of schedule year______1___
23
23
45
116
30
30
40
16
Average monthly rental rate at end of
schedule year_________ _______________
$15.95 $14. 53 $14. 93 $17. 20 $18. 61 $15.16 $19.02 $18.89 $23. 62
Number of families living in—
1
1
1-family detached house________________
0
60
18
17
0
5
20
1-family semidetached or row house . . .
15
4
7
4
11
5
2
2
2
19
2-family house_______________ _________
43
14
10
7
1
2
2
2
32
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)___
5
8
19
38
9
7
6
16
Dwelling with elevator_________________
0
0
0
2
0
2
0
0
0
11
1
Dwelling with janitor service___________
7
25
2
3
8
9
6
Number of families having—
31
Bathroom___ ________ . . . ________ ___
55
11
115
13
39
30
30
16
35
67
15
115
29
Toilet: Inside flush_____________________
17
30
16
40
18
Outside f lu s h ..________________
4
8
1
6
1
0
0
0
2
4
6
Other type____________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
62
11
33
Sole use of toilet by household___ ______
18
28
110
29
38
15
22
44
89
Water: Inside dwelling____ __________
23
116
30
30
40
16
44
Running_____________________
23
90
23
116
16
30
30
40
24
3
16
Hot running------ ---------------108
5
28
27
37
16
0
0
0
Not running__________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
Outside dwelling o n ly .___ . . .
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sink________ ________ ________________
89
22
44
116
23
30
30
40
16
22
44
Electric lights... ______________________
87
21
113
29
15
30
39
54
12
Gas or electricity for cooking___________
33
73
9
9
13
20
31
14
9
3
10
34
1
4
Refrigerator: Electric____ _____________
15
6
2
Other mechanical_______ _
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
19
Ice only----------------------------76
22
35
48
14
12
13
9
1
1
32
None_____________________
0
14
8
9
1
0
22
14
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat_______
2
6
91
23
34
14
20
9
11
Telephone____
. . . _____ . . . ______
34
2
0
8
11
6
9
Garage______ . . . ____________________
1
7
6
50
8
22
0
10
10
Garden space. _ __________ __________
4
3
7
27
8
3
0
6
10
Play space_________________________ . . .
14
67
21
29
19
10
7
5
20
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, running hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity
9
19
31
12
19
3
14
for cooking. _. _ _________
2
71
II. Families in survey, who owned principal
4
6
94
24
25
32
13
home at end of schedule year__________
15
5
Number of families living in—
1
22
12
3
25
31
1-family detached house___ _____________
7
90
3
1
1
1
1
1-familys emidetached or row house_____
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
3
2
3
1
2-family house. _ _______________ _____
7
0
Multiple dwelling (3-family or more)___
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Dwelling with elevator_________________
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Dwelling with janitor service____ _ . . .
0
Number of families having—
94
2
4
32
13
24
25
10
4
Bathroom______________________________
12
2
5
94
32
13
24
25
5
Toilet: Inside flush... __ ___________ . .
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Outside flush.. _______ _______
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Other type_____________________
3
5
94
24
32
13
13
5
25
Sole use of toilet by household______ . _
4
6
94
24
25
32
13
15
5
Water: Inside dwelling_________________
94
4
6
24
25
32
13
Running_____ __
__________
15
5
1
92
3
23
25
31
13
Hot running___ __ ________
2
6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Not running . . . . .
_____ _
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Outside dwelling on ly .._ __
0
0
0
94
32
13
24
25
4
6
Sink__________ _______________________
15
5
4
94
24
32
6
25
13
15
5
Electric lights__________________________
62
1
7
22
12
5
21
9
3
Gas or electricity for cooking___
_____
3
30
4
3
8
13
6
1
0
Refrigerator: Electric___________________
2
0
0
0
1
1
0
Other mechanical
. ...
0
0
4
11
3
40
15
4
11
10
4
Ice only______
_________
22
11
3
0
2
0
6
0
0
None. .
___ _______
1
3
68
14
18
27
9
5
1
Hot air, hot water, or steam heat___ _ .
23
9
1
53
8
13
6
1
Telephone . . . _ _ _ _ _ _
___ _ _
8
4
23
1
71
17
20
11
2
7
Garage________________ _______________
1
1
45
9
11
19
6
3
1
Garden space_____ ____
______ . . . . .
Each of the following items:
Inside flush toilet, runnihg hot water,
electric lights, and gas or electricity
1,
1
22
21
12
3
62
7
5
cooking___ ________________________
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 327.




212

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

10 ,— H o u sin g ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic level
D E N V E R , C O L O —W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

H o u s in g E x p en d itu r e s

I. All families in survey 1
___ _________ _______________________
Average number of persons in economic family_____________
Average number of persons in household_________________ __
Number of families investing in: Principal home___________
Vacation home_________ __
Number of families having current expenditure for—
Owned principal home:
Taxes __ , _____________________________________________
Assessments. __
______ _______________________________
Repairs and replacements_____ ______ _________ ______
Fire insurance on home________
. . . . . . . . . ______
Liability insurance on home______ . . .
_______________
Ground rent_________________ . . .
_ . ________
Interest on mortgages_________________________ ______ _ _
Refinancing charges__________________ ________________
Rented principal home:
Rent (gross rent less concessions). ________
________
Repairs by tenant______ _______ ____ ___________ _______
Secondary housing:
Owned vacation home------------------------- --- ------------Rent on vacation or trips------------------------------ ------- --- ___
Rent at school______________________________
______
Average amount invested during schedule year in owned:
Principal home, total_____________________________________
Payment on principal of mortgage and down payment _ _
_____________ _______
Improvement on home___
Vacation home_______________ _________________________
Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total. . . ----------- --------------------------Taxes_____________________
____
.. ..
Assessments___________
.
_______________________
Repairs and replacements. __
. . . _ ____________ ______
Fire insurance on home-------- -------- ---------------------------Liability insurance on home . . . _ __ ________ _____ . . .
Ground ren t___________ _________ . . -------------------------Interest on mortgages------ ------- ------------------------------------Refinancing charges. . . _____ __
. . . -------- ------------Rented principal home, total
. . . . -------- --- ------------Rent (gross rent less concessions). _ _ __
_________
Repairs by tenant________________________________ ___
Secondary housing, total. ____ ___ ____________ ______
Owned vacation home---------------------------------------------------Rent on vacation or trips___________________ ________
Rent at school_______________ ______ ________ __________

295
3.14
3.15
58
0

92
4.06
4.05
18
0

106
3.12
3.15
23
0

97
2.29
2.29
17
0

103
51
45
55
0
0
54
6

33
13
11
13
0
0
19
1

38
21
19
23
0
0
20
2

32
17
15
19
0
0
15
3

189
7

58
1

68
4

63
2

0
18
3

0
3
1

0
5
2

0
10
0

$44.16
31.89
12.27
0

$40.58
30. 05
10. 53
0

$56.08
33.40
22. 68
0

$34.52
31.98
2.54
0

53.58
20.18
2. 37
8. 45
2.04
0
0
19.08
1.46
170.02
169. 80
.22
1.91
0
1.28
.63

42.54
16.04
1. 73
9. 73
1.16
0
0
13. 51
.37
125.41
125. 30
.11
.73
0
.24
.49

58.42
21.37
2.09
10.36
2.76
0
0
21.18
.66
178. 33
178. 01
.32
1.87
0
.55
1.32

58.73
22. 75
3.29
5.15
2.10
0
0
22.07
3.37
203. 28
203.04
.24
3.08
0
3.08
0

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_________ ____ _
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms. _ _____________________________________
4 rooms_____
___ _________ ________ ___________ ______
5 rooms __ __________________ __ ------------- ------------------6 rooms__________ ___ ___ __ _ __________________________
7 rooms or more_____________________________________ _____
II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months_____
Average number of persons in economic family_____________
Average number of persons in household___________________
Number of families who invested during the schedule year in
owned principal home__..............................................................

5.06

5.14

5. 27

4.75

43
62
80
66
44
106
3.18
3.19

9
26
22
19
16
34
3.98
3.98

14
17
31
26
18
38
3.24
3.26

20
19
27
21
10
34
2. 32
2.33

56

18

22

16

Average amount invested during schedule year, total________
Payment on principal of mortgage and down payment___
Improvements on home. _ _____________________ __________

$112. 24
78.09
34.15

$109. 82
81.32
28. 50

$155.12
91.86
63. 26

$66.72
59.46
7.26

1 The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table (i. e.,
home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters with heat
not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom no sep­
arate subgroup is shown.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.




TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

213

1 0 . — H o u sin g ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level— Continued
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

H o u s i n g E x p e n d i t u r e s —Continued

II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months—
Continued.
Average current housing expenditures on owned principal
home, total_____________________________________________
Taxes___ ________________________________ __ _ ___ __
Assessments._____ _______________ . . . . . . ____ _ .
Repairs and replacements___ ________ . . . . . . _____
...
Fire insurance on home_______ _________ ______________
Liability insurance on home______________________________
Ground rent_______ _____ ________ _____ _______ ________
Interest on mortgages___________________________ _______
Refinancing charges______________________________________
Average estimated annual rental v a lu e -----------------------------Average imputed income from equity in owned principal
home____________ _
_________ ________________________

$145.09
55.12
6.50
23.52
5.44
0
0
51.33
3.18
306.00

$115.09
43.41
4. 67
26. 32
3.12
0
0
36. 56
1.01
274.00

$161. 67
59. 61
5.84
28.90
7. 71
0
0
57.77
1.84
318.00

$156.52
61.79
9.06
14. 69
5. 22
0
0
58. 91
6. 85
325.00

161.00

159.00

156.00

169.00

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit______ _______ _
Number of families living in dwellings with:
Less than 4 rooms_________ ___________ _____________ __
4 rooms_________________ _________________________ ___
5 rooms__________________________________________________
6 rooms____________________________ j
.______________
___
7 rooms or more__________________________________________
III. Families who rented house for 12 months____ _________
Average number of persons in economic family______ __
__
Average number of persons in household____ _ ___________

5.64

5.62

6.03

5.24

5
17
35
31
18
131
3. 33
3. 34

1
7
9
11
6
47
4. 30
4.28

1
3
16
8
10
43
3.18
3.26

3
7
10
12
2
41
2. 37
2.35

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total______ _
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_______________ ________
Repairs by tenant_________________________ ____________
Average monthly rental rate.
____ ________
___________

$252. 45
251.94
.51
21.07

$199. 01
198.80
.21
16.67

$265.62
264. 84
.78
22.07

$299. 90
299.34
.56
25.06

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit____________ __ _
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms________________________________________
4 rooms__________________________________________________
5 rooms____________
--------------- ---------- --------6 rooms_______________
______ ____________ . . . . . ------7 rooms or more_____ ______________________________ . . . _
IV. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat in­
cluded in rent______________
______ ______ __________
Average number of persons in economic family _. . . . __ _ _
Average number of persons in household___________ _ _. . . .

5.34

5.17

5. 56

5.29

7
29
38
33
24

3
15
12
7
10

2
6
11
18
6

2
8
15
8
8

47
2. 58
2. 58

8
3.28
3.28

20
2.76
2. 75

19
2.10
2.10

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total ___ __
Rent (gross rent less concessions)............. ........... ............. . .
Repairs by tenant___ __________ __________ _________ _ .
Average monthly rental rate_____________ ____ __ _______ __

$317. 34
317. 34
0
26.44

$213.00
213.00
0
17. 75

$315. 55
315. 55
0
26.30

$363.16
363.16
0
30.26

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit... _ ____________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms______ _ ___________ . ___ __ ____ _
4 rooms_________ ________
._ . . . ________________ ____
5 rooms_______________ . . . .
_____________ _______ . . .
6 rooms______________________ . . .
-------------------------7 rooms or more.. . ______________________________________
V. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat not
included in rent2________________ _______________________

3.17

3.00

3. 55

2.84

32
11
3
0
1

6
2
0
0
0

11
6
2
0
1

15
3
1
0
0

9

3

4

2

2 Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.




WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

214
T

10. — H o u sin g exp en d itu res , by econ om ic level— Continued

able

KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .-W H I T E FAM ILIES

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level-—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to $500 to
$600
$500

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

H o u s in g E x p e n d itu r e s

I. All families in survey i _ _____ _ _____ _ 357
Average number of persons in economic
family___ __ ________________________ __
3.37
Average number of persons in household.__
3. 54
Number of families investing in:
77
Principal home __ _______ _____ ______
Vacation home___ _______ _______ _
0
Number of families having current expendi­
ture for—
Owned principal home:
128
Taxes______ __
_ ___________
Assessments ___ ___ __
___ ----13
Repairs and replacements_________ _
74
Fire insurance on home___ _____ __
62
____
0
Liability insurance on home..
0
Ground rent___________ _____ _______
Interest on mortgages______________
77
14
Refinancing charges---------------------------Rented principal home:
235
Rent (gross rent less concessions)-------8
Repairs by tenant ________ _______
Secondary housing:
0
Owned vacation home.________ .._ .
10
Rent on vacation or trips___________ _
0
Rent at school____________ _ _______
Average amount invested during schedule
year in owned:
$43.10
Principal home, total. ____________
Payment on principal of mortgage and
down payment. _ _
-------------35.50
7. 60
Improvement on home. ---------- ----- --0
Vacation home____ _____ _______
____
Average current expenditure for—
57.73
Owned principal home, total------------- _
20.24
Taxes_____ ____ __
. . . . . ----- --.55
Assessments. . . . ___ ____________ . . .
13.18
Repairs and replacements_______ .
3.60
Fire insurance on home._. . . ---------0
Liability insurance on hom e___
0
Ground rent____
_____ __
_ _.
18.44
Interest on mortgages_____ . . . -------1.72
Refinancing charges____ _______
__ .
Rented principal home, total. _. -------156. 50
Rent (gross rent less concessions) __ . _ 156.24
.26
Repairs by tenant
_ . __________ _
.34
Secondary housing, total ---------------------0
Owned vacation home___ _
._ __.
.34
Rent on vacation or trips_____
0
Rent at school________________________
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
4.72
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms.__ ___ ________
73
65
4 rooms.._ _ ._
. . __________ -.
106
5 rooms____ _ ________ __________ ____
6 rooms________________________
. __
79
34
7 rooms or more_______ ______________
II. Families who owned their principal home
122
for 12 months_____________ ________ __
Average number of persons in economic
3. 59
___ __________
family... ___ _______
3. 77
Average number of persons in household. _.
Number of families who invested during
the schedule year in owned principal
69
h o m e ..______
. . ____ __
Average amount invested during schedule
year, total____________________________ $104.43
Payment on principal of mortgage and
88.99
downpayment.. ------------------------------15.44
Improvements on home _ __ ___ _ .

45

92

73

50

43

54

5.03
5.20

3.84
3.93

3.22
3. 34

3.07
3.34

2.58
2.85

2.28
2.49

8
0

20
0

16
0

10
0

10
0

13
0

14
4
5
4
0
0
7
0

34
2
18
16
0
0
22
5

32
1
14
18
0
0
18
3

15
1
10
8
0
0
10
0

15
2
14
8
0
0
10
2

18
3
13
8
0
0
10
4

30
0

61
3

43
1

34
2

28
1

39
1

0
0
0

0
1
0

0
4
0

0
1
0

0
3
0

0
1
0

$25. 22

$43. 38

$47. 70

$39. 70

$47. 42

$51.00

11.33
13.89
0

32.42
10.96
0

38.80
8.90
0

37. 28
2.42
0

43.00
4.42
0

48.78
2. 22
0

23.15
12. 45
2.00
3.74
.81
0
0
4.15
0
125. 78
125. 78
0
0
0
0
0
4. 87

47.08
16.26
.34
8.31
3.04
0
0
17.41
1.72
133.71
133. 60
.11
.01
0
.01
0
4.63

67.00
25.71
.14
14. 52
4.33
0
0
20.60
1.70
121.76
121. 60
.16
.58
0
.58
0
4.89

57.96
21.07
(3
)
14.76
3. 86
0
0
18. 27
0
186. 61
186. 21
.40
.15
0
. 15
0

79.80
23.29
.60
22. 72
3. 81
0
0
26. 52
2.86
186.01
185. 66
.35
.99
0
.99
0

5.00

4.53

74. 45
22. 89
.74
18.50
5. 52
0
0
22.90
3.90
216. 54
215. 87
.67
.56
0
.56
0
4.42

5
12
15
9
4

21
17
24
24
6

11
17
20
16
9

12
5
15
10
8

9
6
14
14
0

15
8
18
6
7

15

31

30

16

15

15

5. 75
5.95

4.10
4.17

3.29
3.36

3.22
3.49

2.66
3.06

2.33
2.56

8

16

15

10

9

11

$75.66
33. 99
41.67

$78.18 $111.08 $124. 06 $129. 81 $127.89
65.02
13.16

94. 41
16. 67

116. 50
7.56

117.14
12.67

125. 22
2.67

1 The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table
(i. e., home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters
with heat not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom
no separate subgroup is shown.
3 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328,




215

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

10 . — H o u s in g ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic level-—Continued
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S —W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued

able

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to $500 to $600 to
$500
$600
$700

$700
and
over

H o u s i n g E x p e n d i t u r e s —Continued
II. Families who owned their principal home
for 12 months—Continued.
Average current housing expenditures on
$69.43 $129. 74 $161.87 $181.10 $212.54 $221.39
owned principal home, total__________ $158.40
45.69
57.16
37.34
61.73
65.84
66.77
72.66
Taxes____ _
__ ___ _________ . . . 5.99
1.62
1.02
.33
.01
1.73
2. 67
Assessments. __ . . . _____ __ ________
Repairs and replacements______________
36.53
11.23
24.17
35.33
46.11
59.99
56.11
Fire insurance on home _ _____ _________
8.78
2.43
7. 95
9.05
10. 27
10.20
12.06
Liability insurance on home____________
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ground rent____ ________ ____________
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
48.23
Interest on mortgages___________________
50.91
12.44
57.08
50.14
72.20
68. 62
2.68
Refinancing charges........ . _ _______ . . .
3.40
0
4.14
0
2.80
11.06
185. 00 238.00 290. 00 278.00 318.00 360.00
276. 00
Average estimated annual rental value___
Average imputed income from equity in
117. 00
116. 00 108. 00 128. 00
97. 00 106.00 139. 00
owned principal home.. _______________
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
5. 07
5.58
5. 57
5. 75
5. 33
5. 56
6. 07
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms_____ ____________ . . .
2
1
1
1
1
0
6
4
2
1
1
4 rooms________________________________
11
3
0
5 rooms____ ______________________ . . .
5
9
6
5
39
7
7
12
4
3
15
8
4
6 rooms______________________. . . ______
46
2
4
4
7 rooms or more_________________ ____
5
5
0
20
39
14
III. Families who rented house for 12 months.
128
17
25
18
15
Average number of persons in economic
2. 72
family____________________ ___________
5.11
3. 85
3. 25
3.19
2. 60
3.54
5.12
3. 95
3. 45
2.98
Average number of persons in household..
3. 73
3.63
2.86
Average expenditure for rented principal
$218.88 $166.88 $201.96 $187.94 $260. 25 $268.84 $277.10
home, total____ __
___ _____ __
Rent (gross rent less concessions)______
218. 70
166.88 201. 74 187.94 260.25 267. 77 277.10
Repairs by tenant________________ _ . _
.18
0
.22
0
0
1.07
0
18.24
13. 91
16.88
15. 66
21.69
22.31
23.09
Average monthly rental rate_____________
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
4. 99
5.12
4. 67
4.96
5. 56
4.78
5.27
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
1
1
Less than 4 rooms____________________ _
4
18
1
1
10
4 rooms___ ___________________ __ ____
2
25
3
4
6
7
3
5 rooms._________ __________ ________ __
8
48
6
7
15
6
6
2
6 rooms________________________ ______
25
5
4
4
3
7
2
12
1
1
7 rooms or more______ _____ _____ . __
4
4
0
IV. Families who rented apartment for 12
11
months with heat included in rent_____
75
6
12
10
16
20
Average number of persons in economic
2. 73
2. 07
3.18
family--------- . . . __ ___________________
3.83
3.27
2.79
2.20
2. 42
2. 82
4. 00
3. 09
3.34
2.16
Average number of persons in household. __
2.90
Average expenditure for rented principal
$304. 47 $281. 25 $251. 33 $282. 48 $290.37 $324.96 $356.45
home, to ta l._____ . . . . . .
281. 25 251. 33 282.48 289.12 324.96 354. 65
Rent (gross rent less concessions) _ _ _. 303. 72
.75
0
1. 80
0
0.,
1. 25
0
Repairs by tenant_______________ ______
23. 44
29. 55
25. 35
Average monthly rental rate __ ______ _
21.19
23. 54
24. 09
27. 08
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
3. 83
3. 67
3.73
3. 45
3. 56
3. 62
3. 20
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms___ ______________ . _
42
13
8
3
10
1
7
1
3
4 rooms______ ____ __________ _________
2
17
4
6
1
5 rooms_____ ___ __ _ _____________ _
3
2
10
1
1
3
0
6 rooms._____________________ ______
._
2
5
1
2
0
0
0
1
1
7 rooms or more_____ ________ ______ _
0
0
0
0
0
V. Families who rented apartment for 12
22
months with heat not included in rent..
1
7
5
0
3
6
Average number of persons in economic
3.38
family______ _______________________
__
4.32
2.00
3.50
2.60
0
2.67
3. 57
2. 00
Average number of persons in household . . .
4.59
3.83
2.72
2. 63
0
Average expenditure for rented principal
home, total______ _________ ____
. _ $183. 59 $168. 78 $158. 25 $171.60
0 $270. 00 $240.00
182. 98
168. 78 158.00i 169.20'
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_______
0 270.00 240. 00
Repairs by tenant__________ _ ________
.61
0
2.401
0
0
.25i
0
15. 25
14.06
22.50
Average monthly rental rate_________ _. _
13.17
14.10'
0'
20.00
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
4. 36
4. 71
4. 00
0
3. 50i
4.40'
5.33
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms______________________
4
2:
1
1
0'
0
0
4 rooms____________________________ .._
6
1
3
1
0
0
1
2!
2!
5 rooms________________________________
8
1
3
01
0
1
0
6 rooms__________ ____ ______ _____
3
1
1
01
0i
1
1
0'
0i
01
0i
7 rooms or more_____ ________ _____ . . .
0
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.
53957 °— 39-------15




216

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

10. — H o u s in g ex p en d itu res, b y econ om ic level—Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

H o u s in g e x p en d itu r e s

I. All families in survey 1----- ---------------------- ---------------------------Average number of persons in economic family...... .......... .......
Average number of persons in household-----------------------------Number of families investing in: Principal home___ ________
Vacation home____________
Number of families having current expenditure for—
Owned principal home:
Taxes___________________ _______ _____ ________________
Assessments----- ------------------— ------------------------- ----------Repairs and replacements------- --------------------------------------Fire insurance on home......... .............. .......... ......... ...........
Liability insurance on home..---------------------------------------Ground rent.................... ................................ ...........................
Interest on mortgages..... .......... ................. ........ .......... —
Refinancing charges___ ________________________________
Rented principal home:
Rent (gross rent less concessions)-------------- --------------------Repairs by tenant_______________________ ____ ________
Secondary housing:
Owned vacation home........................................... ..................
Rent on vacation or trips-------------------- --------------------------Rent at school -------------- ------- ------------- --------------------------Average amount invested during schedule year in owned—
Principal home, total— _________________________________
Payment on principal of mortgage and down payment—
Improvement on home. __________ ____________________
Vacation home. _ . . ___________________ ______ - ...............
Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total.......................... ...................
Taxes_____________________________________ ___________
Assessments------------------------------------------------------------------Repairs and replacements.......................... ............................
Fire insurance on home........................... ..................... ..........
Liability insurance on home— ............. — . . . --------------Ground rent__________ _________________________ ______
Interest on mortgages------ --- ----- ------- --------------------------Refinancing charges____________________________________
Rented principal home, total____ ____ ___________________
Rent (gross rent less concessions)-----------------------------------Repairs by tenant
----------------- --------------------------Secondary housing, total------- ------------------------------------------Owned vacation hom e-------------------------------------------------Rent on vacation or trips_______________________________
Rent at school__________________________________________
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit_____________
.
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms----- ------------------- --------------------------------4 rooms .. _________ ______ ____________ ____ ________
5 rooms......... .............................. ............... ...................................
6 rooms....... ..................... .............................................................
7 rooms or more__________________________________________
II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months___
Average number of persons in economic family_____________
Average number of persons in household____________________
Number of families who invested during the schedule year
in owned principal home___________________ ____ ________
Average amount invested during schedule year, total_____ _
Payment on principal of mortgage and down payment___
Improvements on home.____ ____________________________
Average current housing expenditures on owned principal
home, total_____________________ . . . ------------------------- _
Taxes________________________ __________ _________ _______
Assessments______________________________________________
Repairs and replacements________________________________
Fire insurance on home__________________________ . . . ___
Liability insurance on home—________ ___________________
Ground rent _____ ______________________________________
Interest on mortgages________________________ . . . _______
Refinancing charges____________________ ____ ___________

103
3.34
3. 61
19
0

32
5.05
5.15
5
0

29
2.66
2.74
3
0

42
2.50
2.78
11
0

36
3
12
13
0
0
17
2

9
0
3
4
0
0
4
2

10
0
1
3
0
0
3
0

17
3
8
6
0
0
10
0

66
6

22
1

19
1

25
3

0
1
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
1
0

$34. 04
31.14
2.90
0

$13.05
11.96
1.09
0

$6. 52
3.76
2.76
0

$69. 03
64.66
4.37
0

35.92
19.68
1.26
4.71
1.63
0
0
8.52
.12
104. 66
104.29
.37
. 10
0
.10
0
4. 73

30.11
17. 66
0
5.06
1.08
0
0
5.94
.37
98.54
98.25
.29
0
0
0
0
5.03

24.84
19.00
0
.96
.98
0
0
3.90
0
101.18
100. 66
.52
0
0
0
0
4.24

47.99
21.68
3.10
7.03
2.50
0
0
13.68
0
111. 73
111. 40
.33
.24
0
.24
0
4.83

20
29
22
19
13
37
3.28
3. 48

2
13
6
7
4
10
5.15
5.14

11
6
5
4
3
10
3.10
3.18

7
10
11
8
6
17
2.29
2.67

18
$54. 21
46.14
8. 07

5
$41. 76
38.26
3.50

3
$18. 90
10.90
8.00

10
$82.29
71.50
10.79

99.99
54.78
3. 51
13.11
4. 55
0
0
23. 72
.32

96.42
56.53
0
16.20
3.48
0
0
19. 01
1.20

72.09
55.12
0
2.80
2.85
0
0
11. 32
0

118. 55
53. 55
7. 65
17.37
6.18
0
0
33.80
0

1 The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table (i. e.,
home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters with
heat not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom no
separate subgroup is shown.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p.328.




TA B U L AR
T

able

10.—

217

SUM M ARY

H o u s in g ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level—

Continued

KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S.—NEGRO FAM ILIES— Continued

All fami­
lies

Item

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

H o u s in g e x p en d itu r e s—

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

Continued

II. Families who owned their principal home for 12 months—
Continued.
Average estimated annual rental value_____________________
Average imputed income from equity in owned principal
home________ _______________________________ _____ _____

$197.00

$146.00

$178.00

$238.00

97.00

50.00

106.00

119.00

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit__________ ______
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms_________________ ___________ ____ __
4 rooms.._______ __________________ _____________________
5 rooms______ ____________________ _______________ ____ __
6 rooms____ _____ _______ ___________ . . . __________ ____
7 rooms or more________________________ . . __ _ . . . ___
III. Families who rented house for 12 months___________ .
Average number of persons in economic family____
_ ...
Average number of persons in household____________________

5. 51

5.70

5.40

5. 47

1
11
6
11
8
30
3. 42
3. 62

0
4
1
2
3
12
4. 73
4.89

1
2
2
3
2
8
2.50
2. 67

0
5
3
6
3
10
2.59
2. 86

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total_______
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_________________________
Repairs by tenant________________________________________
Average monthly rental rate______________________________

$161. 26
160. 43
.83
13. 37

$161. 00
161. 00
0
13.42

$149. 63
147. 75
1. 88
12. 31

$170. 90
169. 90
1.00
14.16

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit__________________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms________________________________________
__
4 rooms______________________________________________
5 rooms_______________________ ________________________
Grooms_________________________________ ___________ _____
7 rooms or more_______________________________ _________
IV. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat
included in rent__________________________________________
Average number of persons in economic family. _. __ ______
Average number of persons in household____________ . . . _

5.20

5.17

4.62

5. 70

3
5
11
6
5

1
2
4
4
1

2
2
2
1
1

0
1
5
1
3

12
2. 67
2. 83

0
0
0

5
2.20
2.20

7
3.00
3.28

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total_____ __
Rent (gross rent less concessions)____________ _______ . . .
Repairs by tenant._______ ______________________________
Average monthly rental r a t e ...______ ____ . . . ._ ________

$225. 00
225. 00
0
18. 75

0
0
0
0

$177. 20
177. 20
0
14. 77

$259.14
259.14
0
21.60

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit___ ______________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms________________________________________
4 rooms_____ ________________ ____ ______
. _ . _____
5 rooms____________________________ ____________________
6 rooms________________________ __ _________ __________
7 rooms or more______________ _______ _____ ______ ______
V. Families who rented apartment for 12 months with heat
not included in rent.. . . . _________________ ___ ______
Average number of persons in economic family_____ _______
Average number of persons in household____ __ . . . . . . __

2. 83

0

2.20

3.28

8
2
2
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

5
0
0
0
0

3
2
2
0
0

24
3. 65
3.74

10
5. 33
5. 47

6
2.54
2.54

8
2. 38
2.49

Average expenditure for rented principal home, total_______
Rent (gross rent less concessions)______________ ____ _____
Repairs by tenant _. _______________________________ . . .
Average monthly rental rate________________________________

$135.10
134. 55
.55
11. 21

$122. 12
121. 20
.92
10.10

$141. 88
141.88
0
11. 82

$146. 25
145. 75
.50
12.15

Average number of rooms in dwelling unit__________________
Number of families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms__________________ ____ ________________
4 rooms__________________________________________________
5 rooms___________________________________________ _____
Grooms_________________________ ____ ______ _____ ______
7 rooms or more........ ................... ..................... ___.....................

3.88

4.20

3.50

3. 75

8
11
3
2
0

1
7
1
1
0

3
2
1
0
0

4
2
1
1
0

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.




218

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

10. — H o u s in g exp en d itu res , b y econ om ic level—Continued

able

M IN N EAPO LIS-ST. PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
$700
Under $300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
and
$300
$400
$500
$600
$700
over

H o u sin g E x p en d itu r e s

I. All families in survey 1_________________ .
Average number of persons in economic
family ___________________________
Average number of persons in household.. .
Number of families investing in:
Principal home.. ______________________
Vacation home_________________________
Number of families having current expend­
iture for—
Owned principal home:
Taxes______ _____________
_____
Assessments__________________________
Repairs and replacements____________
Fire insurance on home_______________
Liability insurance on home__________
Ground rent__________________________
Interest on mortgages------------------------Refinancing charges_______
______ __
Rented principal home:
Rent (gross rent less concessions)___ _
Repairs by tenant__________ . . . .
Secondary housing:
Owned vacation home. _____ ________
Rent on vacation or trips_________ . .
Rent at school________ _ _______ ____
Average amount invested during schedule
year in owned:
Principal home, total.. ________________
Payment on principal of mortgage and
down payment_______ _____________
Improvement on home_______________
Vacation home.. __________ ______ _
Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total_______ . . .
Taxes---------------- --------------------------Assessments _______
___ __
______
Repairs and replacements------------------Fire insurance on home____ _______ .
Liability insurance on home__________
Ground rent____ ___________________
Interest on mortgages-------------------------Refinancing charges___ _ __________
Rented principal home, total.. . . . ____
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_____
Repairs by tenant____________________
Secondary housing, total_____ ________
Owned vacation home____ _____ . .
Rent on vacation or trips____ ______
Rent at school________ ______________
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms_______ __________ .
4 rooms-------------------------------------------------5 rooms_________________________ ______
6 rooms_________________________________
7 rooms or more__________ _______ . . .
II. Families who owned their principal home
for 12 months._____ ___________________
Average number of perscns in economic
family_________ __ _____ _____ _______
Average number of persons in household.._
Number of families who invested during
the schedule year in owned principal
home____ ________ _________ _______
Average amount invested during schedule
year, total------------------------------------------Payment on principal of mortgage and
down payment_______ ______________
Improvements on home._______. . . ____

504

47

114

106

86

59

92

3. 51
3.68

5. 36
5. 48

4.22
4.28

3. 52
3.68

3.13
3.35

2. 95
3. 26

2.40
2.59

96
0

7
0

29
0

24
0

18
0

5
0

13
0

176
18
99
83
8
0
102
10

18
4
7
8
0
0
8
1

43
4
24
23
3
0
29
5

38
1
22
19
0
0
28
1

34
5
21
13
3
0
19
1

16
2
9
6
0
0
6
1

27
2
16
14
2
0
12
1

327
31

29
1

70
4

68
3

53
2

43
7

64
4

0
50
1

0
2
0

0
6
0

0
9
1

0
5
0

0
10
0

0
18
0

$36. 21

$29. 21

$50. 72

$40. 38

$28. 60

$8. 75

$41. 77

24. 98
11.23
0

20. 02
9.19
0

37. 74
12.98
0

28. 99
11.39
0

16.14
12. 46
0

8. 39
.36
0

26. 00
15. 77
0

63. 57
26. 50
1.23
15. 33
2. 99
.31
0
16.69
.52
180. 37
179.90
.47
1.60
0
1. 59
.01

42.60
21.58
.43
3. 26
2.63
0
0
14.49
.21
121. 57
121. 53
.04
1.49
0
1.49
0

60.50
25. 33
.70
10. 66
3.92
.20
0
18. 51
1.18
153. 06
152. 59
.47
.57
0
.57
0

68.95
27.12
.30
18. 01
2. 75
0
0
20.28
.49
163. 33
163.13
.20
1. 37
0
1. 32
.05

87. 34
35. 26
.73
24. 02
2. 86
.79
0
23. 27
.41
182. 23
182.10
. 13
.88
0
.88
0

53. 41
20. 08
5.79
17.24
1.74
0
0
8. 39
. 17
226. 60
224. 78
1. 82
2. 30
0
2. 30
0

56.24
25.70
.93
14. 87
3. 21
.71
0
10.60
. 22
232. 49
232. 03
.46
3. 45
0
3. 45
0

5.27

5. 53

5.24

5.03

5. 44

5.49

5. 16

59
97
122
132
94

3
8
11
17
8

11
26
25
31
21

14
24
33
19
16

9
15
18
25
19

7
8
17
14
13

15
16
18
26
17

177

18

45

38

33

16

27

3. 75
4. 02

5.54
5.84

4. 52
4.J03

3. 75
3. 97

3.04
3. 36

2.94
3. 64

2. 61
2. 91

7

29

24

18

5

12

$76.28 $124.03

$99. 81

$74. 53

72.00
27. 81

42.06
32. 47

95
$99.24
68.10
31.14

52.28
24.00

91.16
32. 87

$32. 24 $142. 34
30. 93
1.31

88. 60
53. 74

i
The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table
(i. e., home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters
with heat not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom
no separate subgroup is shown.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.




TABULAR
T

SUM M ARY

219

10.— H o u sin g exp en d itu res, b y econom ic level— Continued
M IN N EAPO LIS-ST. PAUL, M I N N —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

able

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
$700
Under $300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
and
$300
$400
$500
$600
$700
over

H o u s i n g E x p e n d i t u r e s — Continued
II. Families who owned their principal home
for 12 months—Continued.
Average current housing expenditures on
owned principal home, total__________ $174. 72 $105. 61 $153. 28 $172. 92 $219.19
74.54
56. 35
64.18
Taxes_______ __________________________
74. 51
88.20
3. 51
1.12
.83
1. 77
Assessments___________________________
1.90
40. 55
8.50
27.00
36. 63
61.59
Repairs and replacements---------- -------8. 22
6. 52
9. 92
7. 05
6.84
Fire insurance on home__________ - - - .88
.51
0
0
2. 06
Liability insurance on home___________
0
0
0
0
0
Ground rent___________________ _____
45. 54
32. 56
46.90
52. 52
57. 54
Interest on mortgages----------------------------3. 00
1. 48
.56
1.38
Refinancing charges____________ — — 1. 06
363. 00
297. 00 336.00 376. 00 393. 00
Average estimated annual rental value___
Average imputed income from equity in
188.00
191.00 183.00 203.00 174.00
owned principal hom e_________________
5.99
5. 76
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit6. 22
5.68
6.21
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
2
2
Less than 4 rooms______________________
2
8
0
5
14
5
0
4 rooms____ _________________ ________
1
37
2
10
11
5 rooms_______________________ ________
9
16
7
57
10
6 rooms______________________ _________
11
12
61
7
10
12
7 rooms or more_____________ ________
12
32
139
25
III. Families who rented house for 12months.
18
Average number of persons in economic
4.44
5.93
3. 71
3. 56
family_________ _____ ________ _________
3. 80
5. 96
4. 45
3. 81
3. 68
Average number of persons in household. _
3. 92
Average expenditure for rented principal
home, total__________________ _______ $291.13 $223. 65 $263.15 $271. 36 $307. 36
223. 50 262. 42 271.00 306. 75
Rent (gross rent less concessions)._
_ 289. 75
1.38
. 15
.73
.36
Repairs by tenant______________________
.61
21. 87
24.17
18. 62
22. 62
Average monthly rental rate______________
25.56
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit5.47
5. 58
5. 62
4. 96
5.44
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
8
0
1
4
Less than 4 rooms______________________
1
24
7
1
5
4 rooms___________________________ ___
3
5
5 rooms_____ _______ _____ ________ __
33
3
9
3
11
53
8
4
9
6 rooms _______________ _____________
8
7 rooms or more_____ _____ __________ _
21
0
2
3
IV. Families who rented apartment for 12
15
77
14
months with heat included in rent-— ___
18
1
Average number of persons in economic
3. 49
5. 00
2. 76
2. 87
2. 78
family_________ . ______________ ____ __
2. 78
4.35
3. 53
2. 82
2. 86
Average number of persons in household. _
Average expenditure for rented principal
$325. 46 $240. 00 $297. 51 $292. 07 $340.17
home, total______________ __________
240. 00 297. 51 292. 07 340.17
Rent (gross rent less concessions). ___ _ 325. 46
0
0
0
0
0
Repairs by tenant_____________________
27.12
24.79
24. 34
28. 35
Average monthly rental rate______________
20. 00
4. 06
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit3. 70
3. 00
3. 67
3. 50
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
39
7
7
7
Less than 4 rooms. _ ___________________
1
4
21
0
5
6
4 rooms_________________ _____ _________
2
2
2
0
11
5 rooms.— ________________ ___________
4
1
2
6 rooms.— ____________ _ _________ __
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
7 rooms or more____________ _________
V. Families who rented apartment for 12
105
15
22
26
15
months with heat not included in rent...
Average number of persons in economic
3. 34
4.49
3. 79
3.45
2. 92
family____________________________ ___
4. 52
3. 49
3. 80
3. 68
3.05
Average number of persons in household. .
Average expenditure for rented principal
home, total___________________________ $234. 28 $176. 67 $206. 36 $238. 02 $244. 77
176. 67 205. 00 237. 56 244. 77
233. 88
Rent (gross rent less concessions). ______
1.36
.46
0
.40
0
Repairs by tenant___ _ ________ ____
19.49
14. 72
17. 08
19.80
20. 40
Average monthly rental rate________ ___
4. 81
4.84
4. 67
4. 73
5. 00
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
4
Less than 4 rooms. _ ___________________
0
1
1
1
9
5
38
10
7
4 rooms_________________________________
4
8
10
40
6
5 rooms______________ ____ ______ _
17
2
3
3
3
6 rooms__________________
. . .
2
6
1
2
0
7 rooms or more ___ _ . _____
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.




$196. 95 $191. 61
74.04
87. 57
21. 34
3.18
63. 57
50. 66
6.44
10. 93
0
2.42
0
0
30. 94
36.11
.62
.74
373. 00 393. 00
176. 00
6.69

202.00
5. 96

0
0
2
6
8
22

2
3
3
7
12
30

3. 20
3. 42

2. 47
2.60

$329. 58 $326. 50
324. 82 325.10
4. 76
1. 40
27.18
27.09
5. 91
5. 40
0
3
7
7
5

2
5
6
14
3

11

18

2. 53
2. 50

2. 08
2.15

$312. 54 $372. 64
312. 54 372. 64
0
0
26.04
31. 05
3. 54
3.67
7
2
2
0
0

10
4
3
0
1

10

17

2. 78
3. 03

2. 30
2.53

$266. 30 $287. 41
266. 30 287. 41
0
0
22.19
23. 95
4. 80
5. 06
0
3
6
1
0

1
4
6
5
1

220

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

10. — H o u s in g ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level—Continued

able

ST. LOUIS, M O .—W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level-—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

H o u s in g E x p e n d itu r e s

I. All families in survey 1__________________
Average number of persons in economic
family____ _________________ ___________
Average number of persons in household , Number of families investing in:
Principal home. ______
Vacation home___ ___ _____________
Number of families having current expendi­
ture for—
Owned principal home:
Taxes., ________________ ____ ______
Assessments ________________ _______
Repairs and replacements
_________
Fire insurance on home
Liability insurance on home
Ground rent____________
Interest on mortgages
Refinancing charges
Rented principal home:
Rent (gross rent less concessions)
Repairs by tenant ___ _
Secondary housing:
Owned vacation home_____ _ _ _
Rent on vacation or trips_____________
Rent at school__________
Average amount invested during schedule
year in owned:
Principal home, total_____ __
Payment on principal of mortgage and
downpayment_____ __
Improvement on home____
Vacation home_____
Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total
Taxes „ _ _ ______
Assessments, __
Repairs and replacements_______
Fire insurance on home,.
Liability insurance on home ,
Ground rent____________
Interest on mortgages___
Refinancing charges._______
Rented principal home, total_________
Rent (gross rent less concessions)______
Repairs by tenant_________
Secondary housing, total _
Owned vacation home
Rent on vacation or trips
Rent at school,. __
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit, _
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms_____________
4 rooms______________________________
5 rooms______________________ _
6 rooms____ _______________ _ _
7 rooms or more___ _______ __ _
II. Families who owned their principal home
for 12 months_________________________
Average number of persons in economic
family______________ _______ . . . _
Average number of persons in household,
Number of families who invested during
the schedule year in owned principal
home_____ ______ _____ __ __ _ ___
Average amount invested during schedule
year, total ______ _ _ _
_ _ ___
Payment on principal of mortgage and
down payment_______________________
Improvements on home__________
, ,

401

54

65

94

62

42

84

3.48
3.66

5.60
5.80

4.10
4.24

3.59
3. 74

3.00
3.08

2.63
2.92

2.29
2. 56

52
0

7
0

4
0

15
0

10
0

5
0

11
0

115
10
73
45
1
0
69
10

23
2
16
10
0
0
16
3

15
0
6
3
0
0
7
2

32
4
22
11
0
0
19
1

13
2
7
7
0
0
7
0

12
0
7
6
0
0
7
1

20
2
15
8
1
0
13
3

290
13

32
0

50
1

64
5

49
3

30
0

65
4

0
26
1

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
4
0

0
4
1

0
4
0

0
14
0

$20.84

$7. 75

$9.77

$25. 81

$21. 98

$15. 76

$33. 97

16.18
4. 66
0

5.90
1. 85
0

9.00
.77
0

21.24
4. 57
0

14. 21
7.77
0

9.19
6. 57
0

27.62
6. 35
0

52.09
16.74
.57
12. 70
3. 04
. 11
0
17. 77
1.16
180. 00
170. 65
.35
1.31
0 3
1.1
. 18
4.09

59. 80
20. 71
.74
10. 07
3.65
0
0
23. 09
1. 54
114. 02
114. 02
0
0
0
0
0
4.19

28. 87
12. 31
0
6. 45
1. 31
0
0
7.42
1.38
170. 60
170. 45
.15
0
0
0
0
4.08

59. 44
19.13
1.11
17.02
2.75
0
0
19. 36
.07
147. 36
147. 21
.15
.35
0
.35
0
4.09

30. 77
11. 95
.48
2. 62
3.54
0
0
12.18
0
201. 52
200.10
1.42
1.47
0
.31
1.16
3.74

63. 26
20.62
0
14. 21
4. 71
0
0
22.29
1.43
191.11
191.11
0
1.40
0
1.40
0
4.48

67.07
16. 55
.63
21.11
3.12
. 54
0
22. 45
2. 67
244. 78
244. 43
.35
4. 06
0
4. 06
0
4.12

146
122
85
26
22

20
15
11
4
4

25
14
16
5
5

27
39
19
5
4

33
16
6
5
2

12
10
15
1
4

29
28
18
6
3

111

22

15

30

13

12

19

3.79
4. 05

5.91
6.10

4.19
4. 26

3.54
3.79

3. 34
3.58

2. 61
3.17

2. 49
2.80

50

7

4

14

10

5

10

$65. 31

$19. 03

$42. 33

48. 46
16.85

14.48
4. 55

39.00
3. 33

$69. 02 $104. 80
54.69
14. 33

67. 76
37.04

$55.17 $101. 29
32.17
23.00

73. 22
28. 07

1 The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table
(i. e., home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters
with heat not included in rent) and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom
no separate subgroup is shown.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.




TABULAR
T

able

221

SUM M ARY

10. — H o u sin g expenditures, by econ om ic level—Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued

Item
H o u s i n g E x p e n d i t u r e s —Continued
II. Families who owned their principal home
for 12 months—Continued.
Average current housing expenditures on
owned principal home, total ________
Taxes------ ------------------------------------------Assessments___________________________
Repairs and replacements--------------------Fire insurance on home___________ . . .
Liability insurance on home____________
Ground rent___ ______________________
Interest on mortgages----------------------------Refinancing charges________ ____ ______
Average estimated annual rental value-----Average imputed income from equity in
owned principal home---------------------------Average number of rooms in dwelling unit__
Number of families living in dwellings with:
Less than 4 rooms........ ............................ _
4 rooms.................. ..................... ...................
5 rooms----------------------------- ------- ------------6 rooms______ ________________________
7 rooms or more________________________
III. Families who rented house for 12 months.
Average number of persons in economic
family____________ _____________________
Average number of persons in household..
Average expenditure for rented principal
home, total. _________________ ____
Rent (gross rent less concessions)______
Repairs by tenant____ _ . . . ____ __ _
Average monthly rental rate______________
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit..
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms.......................... ..............
4 rooms_________________________________
5 rooms_________________________________
6 rooms_________________________________
7 rooms or more____ ____ ______________
IV. Families who rented apartment for 12
months with heat included in rent. . . .
Average number of persons in economic
family.. __ _______ ____ __ . . . _.
_ __
Average number of persons in household...
Average expenditure for rented principal
home, t o t a l . ____________ ____ _____
Rent (gross rent less concessions). . . . _
Repairs by tenant_____________ . . . . __
Average monthly rental rate______________
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit. _
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms______________________
4 rooms______ . . . . __________ _____
5 rooms_________________________________
6 rooms___________ ___________________
7 rooms or more........................ ...................
V. Families who rented apartment for 12
months with heat not included in rent..
Average number of persons in economic
fam ily... _____________ ____ ____
_ ...
Average number of persons in household- _.
Average expenditure for rented principal
home, total___________________________
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_______
Repairs by tenant_____________________
Average monthly rental rate______________
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit. _
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms........ ................... ............
4 rooms_________________________________
5 rooms.................. ........................... ............
fi rooms
_
7 rooms or more________________________

All
fami­
lies

$180. 38
59. 77
2. 05
41. 06
10.48
.40
0
63. 46
3.16
343.00

$146. 55 $125.11 $164. 22 $146. 79 $221. 40 $285. 75
72.24
50. 75
53.33
57.94
57.00
72.16
1. 82
0
2.31
0
2.79
3. 47
24. 68
27.93
12. 51
93. 32
35. 42
49. 75
8.96
5.68
12. 39
16.88
16.48
7.59
2. 37
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
56.53
32.17
78. 01
96. 43
59. 80
58.09
5.00
3. 81
6. 00
6. 21
0
0
277.00 325.00 331.00 339.00 424.00 404.00

161.00
4.86

130.00
4.64

200.00

167.00
5.00

192.00
4.54

203.00

5.00

5.08

118.00
4.84

18
32
29
17
15
55

6
5
5
3
3
6

1
4
6
2
2
11

1
11
10
5
3
13

4
3
2
3
1
8

3
2
3
1
3
9

3
7
3
3
3
8

3.47
3. 62

4.84
5.17

4.09
4. 25

3.42
3.49

3.58
3. 55

2.85
2.94

2.29
2.65

$238.18
237. 73
.45
19.84
4.45

$156.17 $220.36 $227.65 $273.88 $245.44 $297.44
156.17 220.36 227. 23 273.00 245.44 295.88
0
0
.42
.88
0
1. 56
18.27
22.75
13.50
18.85
20.11
25.12
4.00
5.27
4.25
4.00
4.38
4.67

16
17
12
4
6

2
2
2
0
0

39

0

6

7

7

1

18

2.49
2.58

0
0

3.18
3.16

3.00
3.02

2.29
2. 25

2.00
1.98

2.17
2.40

$337.34
337.34
0
28.68
3.03
30
5
4
0
0

$0
0
0
0

3
2
1
2
3

4
7
1
0
1

3
2
1
1
1

2
1
5
0
1

2
3
2
1
0

$290.33 $255. 05 $305. 86 $480.00 $389.33
290.33 255.05 305. 86 480.00 389.33
0
0
0
0
0
24.19
22.16
26. 62
40.00
32.88
0
3.00
2.57
2. 57
4.00
3.33
0
0
0
0
0

5
0
1
0
0

6
1
0
0
0

6
1
0
0
0

0
1
0
0
0

13
2
3
0
0

191

24

33

42

34

20

38

3.50
3. 66

5.60
5. 79

4.23
4.42

3. 78
3. 91

2.88
2. 95

2.58
2. 81

2.23
2.48

$237. 07
236.46
.61
19.69

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.




'

Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
$700
Under $300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
and
$400
$600
$300
$500
$700
over

3. 81
80
67
38
5
1

$203. 25 $209. 78 $215.37 $240.07 $266.89 $287. 74
203.25 209.48 215.15 237.69 266.89 287. 29
.45
.30
.22
2.38
0
0
17.02
17.33
21.92
24.05
17.71
20.10
4.05
3.74
3.88
3.76
3.53
4.00
11
7
4
1

1

16
8
8
1
o

15
20
7
0
0

20
10
3
1
0

7
6
7
0
0

11
16
9
2
0

222

W ES T

T

able

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

10. — H o u sin g exp en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued

Item

St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families
Economic level—
Families spend­
ing per expen­
All
diture unit per
fami­
year
lies
Un­ $300 $400
der
to
and
$300 $400 over

Salt Lake City, Utah—White
families

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Fam­
ilies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

H o u s in g E x p e n d itu r e s

I. All families in survey L __ _ _______ ___
210
54
55
106i
27
51
72
28
29
Av. No. of persons in economic family____
3.81 5.29 4.05 3.13 2.34
3.38 5.21 3.35 2.39
Average number of persons in household—_
3.88 5.34 4.08 3.24 2.41
3.40' 5.19 3.41 2.41
Number of families investing in—
Principal home_____ _ _ _ __ _ _ .
52
3
11
13
2
0
1
20
8
Vacation home____ __ ___ _ _
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
No. fam. having current expenditure for—
Owned principal home:
Taxes________________ ___________ ___
92
13
4
22
4
25
32
13
5
Assessments______________ _____ _____
1
2
2
10
2
1
4
2
0
Repairs and replacements____________
1
5
2
31
8
5
13
2
5
Fire insurance on home_______________
52
10
14
3
3
15
4
15
8
Liability insurance on home__________
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
Interest on mortgages________________
12
4
58
15
1
22
6
1
9
Refinancing charges___________ ______
2
15
3
1
0
1
9
1
0
Rented principal home:
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_____
32
118
30
23
45
16
40
91
23
Repairs by tenant....................................
1
8
3
0
1
1
3
1
0
Secondary housing:
Owned vacation home________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rent on vacation or trips___________ __
1
13
0
0
0
6
6
1
1
Rent at school_____ __________________ _____1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0 ____ 0
Average amount invested during schedule
year in owned:
$44.89 $49.15 $32. 70 $51. 51 $43. 65
Principal home, total_____________ _ _
$3. 65 $3. 57 $10. 61 $0
Payment on principal of mortgage
and down payment_________________
35.61 40.11 29. 36 36. 35 37.23
3. 65 3. 57 10. 61 0
Improvement on home_________ _ _ _
0
0
9.28 9.04 3. 34 15.16 6.42
0
0
Vacation home________________ ____ ____
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Average current expenditure for—
Owned principal home, total___________
17. 46 14. 27 24.95 15.25 76.69 53.92 71.79 95.13 82. 51
Taxes___________
________________
6. 52 9.25 6.70 4.93 28.74 22. 37 28.04 31.67 34. 61
Assessments. __
_ ________________
2.14 1.12
.06
.91 4.19 1. 30
.52 0
1.93
Repairs and replacements__________ __
8.92 8.42 6. 77 11.95 6.40
5. 26 2.80 5. 09 6.70
Fire insurance on home_______________
2. 83 2.63 3.24 2. 53 3.18
.62 1.12
1. 05 1.36
Liability insurance on home_______ _
0
.85
0
0
0
0
0
.41 0
Interest on mortgages____ __
3.46
.86 9.68 1.59 30. 38 16.97 28.78 39. 64 35. 36
Refinancing charges___ _______ _
3.68 2. 41 4.05 5.15 1. 66
.24 0
.93 0
Rented principal home, total___________ 162. 85 143. 29 153. 87 178.35 124. 06 101.96 123. 97 129. 56 151. 72
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_ ___ 162. 28 143. 29 153.87 177.17 123. 50 101. 60 123. 37 128.99 150. 93
Repairs by tenant___________________
.56
.36
.79
0
1.18
.60
.57
.57 0
Secondary housing, total_____________ __
1.22 3. 32
4. 71
.90
.11 0
2. 32
.21 0
Owned vacation home________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rent on vacation or trips_____________
0
.90
. 11 0
1.22 3. 32
.06
.21 0
_
Rent at school___ ______________ __
0
0
0
0
4. 71
0
0
2.26 0
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
4. 89 4.89 5.00 4.77 4.98
3. 60 3.79 3.59 3. 51
No. families living in dwellings with—
Less than 4 rooms_____ _______ ________
2
31
33
6
8
17
64
16
17
4 rooms.............. .............................. ..............
11
36
13
9
8
6
24
4
9
18
28
14
5 rooms___________ ____________________
20
4
0
6
80
10
4
6 rooms___................................. .....................
2
45
14
13
14
3
1
0
3
3
7 rooms or more____ _______ ___________
5
5
1
1
16
5
3
II. Families who owned their principal home
32
13
for 12 months.______ ____________ ____
4
6
92
22
25
15
5
Av. no. of persons in economic family.__
4.08 5. 39 4. 54 3.62 2. 22
3. 33 4.20 3.75 2.33
Average number of persons in household. __
4.17 5.47 4.58 3. 76 2. 29
3. 37 4.16 3.74 2.47
No. of families who invested during the
9
13
20 ____ 7
schedule year in owned principal home__
0
49
1
2
3
Av. amt. invested during schedule yr., total. $25. 77 $20. 00 $71. 64 $0
$95. 57 00.2 7 $71.95 $115.90 $83705
Payment on principal of mortgage and
74. 63 79.12 64.60 81.79 68.74
down payment..____ ________________
25.77 20.00 71. 64 0
20.94 21.15 7.35 34.11 14. 31
0
Improvements on home-------------- ------- 0
0
0
Average current housing expenditures on
owned principal home, total__________ 123. 38 79.93 168. 43 129.58 171.80 127.80 158. 33 214.03 168.18
Taxes........ .......... ... ................... ................... 46.09 51.80 45.24 41.91 64. 65 54. 03 62.09 71. 26 71.25
.50
4.89 2.74 2.00 9.43 2.91
3. 67 0
13. 00
Assessments------------------------------------------Repairs and replacements........ .......... ....... 37.19 15.70 34.38 56. 99 19.85 18. 57 14.89 20.88 14.28
7.63 4.19 9. 48
6. 21 6. 46 7.12 4.96 7.08
Fire insurance on home_________________
7.45
0
0
0
0
Liability insurance on home.......... . ___
2.881 0
o 1 7.201 0
i The total number of families surveyed includes those in each of the 4 subgroups shown in this table
(i. e., home owners, house renters, apartment renters with heat included in rent, and apartment renters with
heat not included in rent), and also families who changed their housing status during the year for whom no
separate subgroup is shown.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p.328.




TABULAR
T

SU M M AR Y

223

1 0 .— H o u sin g ex p en d itu res, b y econ om ic level— Continued

able

Item

St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families
Economic level—
Families spend­
ing per expen­
All
diture unit per
fami­
year
lies
Un­ $300 $400
der
to
and
$300 $400 over

Salt Lake City, Utah—White
families

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Fam­
ilies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

H o u s i n g E x p e n d i t u r e s —Continued
II. Families who owned their principal home
for 12 months—Continued.
Average current housing expenditures on
D o l.
D o t.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
owned principal home—Continued.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
Interest oh mortgages__________________ 24.43 4.80 65. 37 13. 50 67.81 40. 08 63. 32 89. 92 68.95
8. 39 5.92 8.91 11.58 3.71
Refinancing charges____________________
1.67 0
6. 25 0
Average estimated annual rental value____ 289.00 216.00 326.00 347.00 305. 00 250. 00 298.00 348.00 306.00
Average imputed income from equity in
owned principal home__________________ 175. 00 136.00 157. 00 218. 00 133. 00 122.00 140.00 134. 00 138.00
5. 38 5.16 5. 56 5. 56 5. 20
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit5.00 5.40 5. 00 4. 67
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
4
2
Less than 4 rooms________ ________ ____
2
1
1
1
0
1
0
2
10
2
3
1
3
2
4 rooms.............. ................................. ..........
0
3
40
8
16
5 rooms___________ ______ ________ _____
1
0
1
9
7
0
32
4
1
2
9
10
10
6 rooms____ ________ _____ _____ _______
1
3
4
1
8
1
2
1
3
2
0
7 rooms or more_____________________ __
21
69
16
5
7
23
19
III. Families who rented house for 12 months.
4
6
Average number of persons in economic
family_____________________ ____________
3. 57 5.50 3. 70 2. 37
3. 94 5.11 4. 01 3.00 2.46
3.54 5. 50 3. 68 2. 33
3. 95 5.17 3. 99 3. 02 2. 42
Average number of persons in household. _
D o t.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
Average expenditure for rented principal
D o l.
home, total. ________________________ 172. 94 149. 50 203.00 164. 86 196. 21 158. 74 215. 77 210. 56 227. 62
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_______ 172. 94 149. 50 203. 00 164. 86 194. 53 157.89 214.02 208. 65 223. 79
.85 1. 75 1.91 3.83
Repairs by tenant___ _ __ ________ _
0
0
0
0
1.68
Average monthly rental rate______________ 14. 66 12. 75 17.00 14.07 16. 65 13. 33 18. 34 17. 51 21. 04
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit.
3.19 3. 25 3. 20 3.14
5.15 4.98 5. 29 4. 95 6.06
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
Less than 4 rooms______________________
4
4
6
7
1
2
0
13
3
4 rooms ______ ________ _______________
12
7
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
5 rooms_____________ _______ _______ ___
30
9
8
10
3
0
0
0
0
6 rooms____ _
___ ____ ____________
4
5
1
0
0
13
3
0
0
7 rooms or more____ _________ ________
0
7
2
3
1
1
0
0
0
IV. Families who rented apartment for 12
months with heat included in rent______
5
35
5
8
16
25
0
6
0
Average number of persons in economic
2. 96 5.13 2. 82 2. 58 2. 36
fa m ily .__ _
_ __ ______ ___
2. 99 5.12 2.73 2. 61 2. 60
Average number of persons in household
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
Average expenditure for rented principal
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
home, total. __ ______ _
_
280. 33 269. 91 232. 56 275. 74 364. 99
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_____ __
280. 30 269. 91 232. 56 275. 66 364. 99
Repairs by tenant________________ _
.08 0
.03 0
0
Average monthly rental rate_________ ____
23. 38 22.60 19. 38 22. 80 30.90
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit .
3. 67 4.19 3. 70 3.14 4.59
Number of families living in dwellings
with:
1
11
Less than 4 rooms______________ _______
18
4
2
11
4 rooms____________________________ _
3
4
2
2
1
1
1
5
2
5 rooms____________________________
0
0
0
0
0
6 rooms_________ ___________ _ _ _
1
0
1
7 rooms or more____ ______________
0
0
V . Families who rented apartment for 12
months with heat not included in rent___
210
70
19
18
33
2
3
2
3
Average number of persons in economic
family___ _ __________ ________ _
3. 43 5. 41 3.16 2. 43
3. 46 5.40 3. 26 2. 46
Average number of persons in household___
Average expenditure for rented principal
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
D o l.
home, to ta l.___ ______
___ _
185. 40 179.68 174. 42 194. 68
Rent (gross rent less concessions)_______ 184. 54 179. 68 174. 42 192. 86
Repairs by tenant _ _________________
.86 0
1.82
0
Average monthly rental rate______________ 15. 39 14. 91 14. 36 16. 23
Average number of rooms in dwelling unit..
3. 51 3. 53 3. 39 3. 58
Number of families living in dwellings
with—
42
Less than 4 rooms___________________ __
13
10
19
4 rooms
18
2
8
8
8
3
0
5
5 rooms____________ ____________ ______
0
6 rooms_________________________________
0
0
0
2
1
1
0
7 rooms or more____ _______________ ___
2 Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 328.




224

W EST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION
T

able

11. — F u e l , light , and refrigeration ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R efr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d i t u r e s

I. All families in survey_______ _________ ____________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity__________________________
__
____ . . . . . .
Lignite. _______ __ _ ______________ . . . ________________
Bituminous coal._____ ____ ______________ . _ . . . . . . . .
Coke
___________________ . .
Briquets___________ ____________________________________
Wood____________________________________________________
F u e lo il__________________________________ ______________
Gas __ _ __________________ _______ _____ ___ ________
Kerosene. ____________________________________ _____ .
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________________________
Ice
_ _________________________________________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total._
Winter1________ _______________________ _______________
Spring1
_____. . . ______ ________________________________
Summer1
_________________________ _. ________________
Fall1___________________________________________________
Electricity------------------------------------------------------------------------Winter_____ ___________ ______. . . _______. . . __________
Spring___________________ _ . . . __________ ________ __
Summer.. _____________ _ _______ _______ __
____ .
Fall____________________________________________________
Lignite ____________ _____ . . . _____ ______ _ _______ . . .
Winter______ . . . ________ ______________
_ _ ___
Spring_______
______ ____
_____ _______ _
Summer____________________ ___ ______________
____
Fall____________________________________________________
Bituminous c o a l___ _
__
_
_ _______
W i n t e r ...____ ____ _____________________ ___ ______
Spring . . .
____________ ____________ _ . . .
__
Summer. _______ ______ _ . . . . . .
_____ _______ __
Fall____________________________________________________
Coke.............. .
__
__
._
__ _____________ .
Briquets______________
. __
_________ . . .
__ . . .
Wood____________________________________________________
Fuel o i l _________________________________________________
Winter______ __________
______ ______ ______ _____ __
_________
Spring_____ _ ______ ____ ____ __ ________
Summer_________ __ __ . . . ___ . . . ______ _________ _
Fall____________________________________________________
Gas___________ _______ ____________
_ _____ _____
Winter.____________ __ ________ __ _ _________ _ _
Spring___ _ _ _________
_______ __ _______ __
_
Summer_______ __ . . . ____ _ __ ______________
Fall____________________________________________________
Kerosene___ _______ . . . __ _ ...............
. . . . . . _____
Gasoline (not for auto)___
_ __________ _____
___ __
Ice__ ___ ______ ____ ________________ .
. __________
Winter_________________________________________________
Spring______________________________________
________
Summer___________________ __________________ ______
Fall____________________________________________________

295

92

106

97

263
186
45
1
0
69
3
236
8
15
187

85
71
13
0
0
31
0
68
6
3
66

94
62
15
0
0
17
1
88
1
6
73

84
53
17
1
0
21
2
80
1
6
48

$95. 52
29. 95
21.54
17. 62
26. 41
24. 85
6.40
6.12
6.02
6.31
30.64
12.78
5.99
1.94
9.93
6. 61
2. 97
1.02
.31
2.31
.04
0
.86
.47
.26
.06
.05
.10
24.37
7.01
5. 76
5.25
6. 35
.09
. 10
7.49
.34
2.42
3.88
.85

$92.64
28. 53
20.94
17. 63
25.54
23.48
6.08
5.82
5. 62
5.96
35. 88
14. 76
6.84
2.92
11.36
6.11
2.74
.84
.25
2.28
0
0
1.37
0
0
0
0
0
18.12
4. 57
4.51
4.41
4.63
.27
.02
7. 39
.13
2.60
4.10
.56

$98.43
30. 27
22.03
18.80
27. 33
26.18
6.80
6.40
6.28
6.70
29. 26
12.14
5. 33
1.94
9.85
6.24
2. 75
1.04
.25
2.20
o
0
.50
.08
.02
.02
.02
.02
27.19
7.88
6.41
5.74
7.16
.04
.17
8.77
.55
2.72
4.46
1.04

$95.11
30.94
21.59
16. 35
26.23
24.74
6. 27
6.12
6.12
6.23
27. 21
11.61
5.90
1.03
8. 67
7. 51
3.44
1.18
.42
2.47
. 11
0
.73
1.31
.75
.15
.13
.28
27. 25
8. 37
6. 25
5. 53
7.10
0)
.06
6.19
.30
1.93
3.04
.92

i Expenditures for coke, wood, kerosene, and gasoline (not for auto) included in this total.
8Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




TABULAR
T

able

225

SU M M AR Y

1 1 .— F u e l , light, and refrigeration ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic level— -Contd.
D EN VER , C O L O —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

All famines

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

F u e l , L i g h t , a n d R e j r i g e r a t i o n E x p e n d i t u r e s —Continued

II.

Number of families in houses making payments for heat
separately from rent______________________________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity-----------------------------------------------------------------------Lignite-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Bituminous coal---------------------------------------------------------------Coke____________________________________________________
Briquets_________________________________________________
Wood_____ ______________________________________________
Fuel oil__________________________________________________
Gas______________________________________________________
Kerosene________________________________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________________________
Ice________________________________________ ____ _________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total.
Electricity______________________________________________
Lignite__________________________________________________
Bituminous coal_________________________________________
Coke_______ ____________________________________________
Briquets________________________________ _______________
Wood___________________________________________________
Fuel oil_________________________________________________
Gas_____________________________________________________
Kerosene________________________________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)__________________________________
Ice______________________________________________________

233

79

81

73

231
178
43
1
0
62
3
211
7
13
168

77
66
13
0
0
28
0
63
5
2
61

81
60
15
0
0
15
1
76
1
6
64

73
52
15
1
0
19
2
72
1
5
43

$112.48
28.20
37. 76
8.10
.05
0
1.00
.60
27.97
. 11
.10
8. 59

$101. 34
25.05
39. 78
7.12
0
0
1.44
0
19.81
.26
.01
7.87

$118. 56
30.16
37. 38
8.18
0
0
.61
.12
31.54
.04
.24
10.29

$117.77
29.45
36.00
9.11
.15
0
.93
1. 75
32.87
.01
.07
7.43
2

III. Number of families in houses not making payments for
heat separately from rent3
______________________________
IV. Number of families in apartments making payments for
heat separately from rent3
______________________________
V. Number of families in apartments not making payments
for heat separately from rent_____________________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_______________________________________________
Gas_________________ __________________________________
Ice______________________________________________________

5

2

1

10

3

4

3

47

8

20

19

21
16
15

4
3
6

9
8
7

8
5
2

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total.
Electricity______________________________________________
Gas_____________________________________________________
Ice______________________________________________________
All other fuel____________________________________________

$21. 25
10.63
5. 97
3.25
1.40

$29.34
9. 75
6.37
4. 98
8. 24

$23. 70
12.03
7.94
3. 73
0

$15. 26
9.42
3. 76
2.00
.08

3Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




226
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

11 .— F u e l, light, and refrigeration ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level— Contd.
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
All
fami­
lies

Item

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

357

45

92

309
134
116
17
3
28
4
259
29
3
226

40
11
25
1
0
7
0
30
7
1
37

80
35
45
3
1
7
0
68
11
0
67

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
refrigeration, total__________________ - $101. 43
33. 64
Winter 4
______________________________
Spring 4__ _______ __ ________ _
18.28
___________________ _
18. 79
Summer4
F all4
_________________________________
30. 72
Electricity___
_ _ _ ____ __
25.54
6.77
Winter. _
_
S p rin g ...__
...
__ . . .
6.10
Summer.. __ __
__ __ _______
6.08
6. 59
Fall
_______________________________
Anthracite . . _____
__ __
_____
20.86
Winter __ ______
________ ____
9. 63
Spring _
___ _
_ ____ __
1. 70
Summer.. __ . . . ________ . . .
.86
8. 67
Fall
_______________________________
Bituminous coal ___
__
______
11.73
Winter
_____
_____ ___
5. 77
__
.95
Spring . _ ___ _________ _
Summer____ ________
_
_____ __
.48
4. 53
Fall__________________________________
2. 46
Coke
___________ . . . .
. . _____
Briquets____
. _______ ___ _ _
. 10
W o o d ___ _____________________________
.40
Fuel oil______ __
____ __ ______
.57
Winter _____ _____
____ _____
.
. 12
Spring__________ . . .
. ________
(2
)
Summer
_
. . . __ _
. 13
Fall
_______________________________
.32
26.19
Gas
____ . . . ____
..
...
W in te r________ ________ _______ _
9.43
5.59
Spring______ . .
__ _____ _
Sum m er.._______ . . .
_ _ ... ... .
4.29
Fall__________________________________
6.88
1.76
Kerosene _____________ __________ _ .
Gasoline (not for auto) _ _. _ __________
. 14
11.68
Ice _ __ . . . . ____
. ________ .
Winter x ________ _____ ___________ .
.38
Spring . _____ _______
___________
3.39
6. 44
Summer.. _____ _______
___________
Fall
______________________________
1.47

$93.83
31.11
17.70
19. 41
26.24
21.74
6.01
5.04
4.95
5. 74
10. 32
5.20
1.17
1.33
2. 62
19.91
10.11
1.16
.36
8.28
1.79
0
1.10
0
0
0
0
0
19.05
6.13
4.26
3.42
5.24
4.27
.48
15.17
.49
4.40
8.37
1.91

$700
and
over

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

73

50

43

54

64
38
20
3
1
6
3
52
10
1
54

41
17
7
4
0
3
1
37
0
1
25

38
16
10
2
1
0
34
0
0
20

46
17
9
4
0
2
0
38
1
o
23

$99.31 $108.13 $103.15 $106. 66
34.11
30.84
35.53
37.07
19.49
18.91
17.78
18. 51
19.41
20.47
17. 21
18.10
32.64
32.92
32.98
31.28
24. 26
25. 87
26. 56
27. 94
6.40
6. 77
7.14
7. 25
6.32
6. 36
5.80
6. 73
6.04
6. 38
5.83
6.80
6.74
6.23
6.68
7.16
18.17
28. 76
24. 51
23. 55
7.65
10. 81
13.86
12.27
1.68
1.63
1. 74
2.09
0
0
.80
1.40
11. 82
8.09
10.15
11.00
17. 85
9.41
3. 62
8.48
8. 54
4.10
4.34
1.69
1.46
1.15
. 24
.42
0
1.00
.31
.96
3. 54
1. 69
7.16
2. 76
1. 51
. 52
5.04
3.86
.06
0
.33
.08
.39
. 27
. 18
. 53
0
2.87
0
.03
0
.59
0
.03
0
.03
0
0
0
0
0
. 66
0
1. 59
0
0
21.78
24. 58
33.84
30.78
8.66
12.45
6.83
12.01
4.78
5.45
6.11
7. 56
4.24
4.13
5. 22
4.48
6. 34
8. 61
5.93
8.18
0
0
2. 73
2.22
0
. 24
.32
0
12.41
13.21
10.01
10.48
.32
.40
.43
.34
3.83
3.60
2.90
3.04
7. 29
6. 85
5.53
5.78
1.56
1. 66
1.32
1.26

$96. 88
34.90
17. 72
17.10
27.16
27.58
7.29
6.43
6.68
7.18
18.17
7.79
1.92
1.34
7.12
7.80
4.66
.83
0
2.31
3.69
0
.09
o
o
0
o
o
31.12
12.82
6.03
4.33
7.94
.47
0
7.96
.26
2.31
4.39
1.00

$400 to
$500

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R efr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d i t u r e s

I. All families in survey____________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_______
___ ______ _______
Anthracite ___________________________
Bituminous coal____ _ ____ _ _________
Wood
_______________________________
Fuel oil__ _____ __
__ _______ ___ -Gas
.
_______ ________
Ice

________________

_______ _______

3

2 Less than 0.5 cent.
4 Expenditures for coke, briquets, wood, kerosene, and gasoline (not for auto) included in this total.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




TABULAR
T

able

227

SU M M AR Y

11.-— F u e l , light, and refrigeration ex p en d itu res , hy econom ic level— Contd.
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S —W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to $600 to
$600
$700

$700
and
over

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R efr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

II. Number of families in houses making
payments for heat separately from rent___
243
31
69
52
32
27
Number of families spending for—
29
Electricity______________________________
237
51
32
27
66
Anthracite_____________________________
125
34
10
31
17
16
Bituminous coal________________________
102
20
41
17
6
10
15
Coke___________________________________
0
1
3
3
4
Briquets________________________________
1
3
0
1
1
0
25
Wood__________________________________
6
5
6
3
3
Fuel oil_________________________________
3
0
0
3
0
0
204
19
41
Gas____________________________________
27
56
31
Kerosene_______________________________
27
7
9
10
0
0
Gasoline (not for auto)_________ ________
3
1
1
1
0
0
154
24
Ice_____________________________________
39
14
48
16
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
refrigeration, total____________________ $126. 02 $103. 63 $112. 66 $128. 67 $144. 98 $138.17
Electricity______________________________ 30.16
23.98
27.89
28. 46
33.62
33.45
Anthracite---------------------------------------------28. 92
14.16
21.06
36. 97
36.82
39.03
Bituminous coal________________________
24.13
11.15
15. 38
21. 76
13. 51
5.23
2. 90
Coke___________________________________
2. 01
.73
0
7.88
2.81
Briquets________________________________
.15
0
.43
.08
0
.13
.47
1.11
.24
.54
Wood__________________________________
.84
.28
Fuel oil_________________________________
.87
4. 01
0
0
0
0
32.83
29.65
Gas____________________________________
19.56
24.35
48. 62
38.26
2. 44
Kerosene______________________________
6.20
3.16
3.00
0
0
Gasoline (not for auto)_________________
.22
.68
.33
.51
0
0
Ice_____________________________________
11.68
11.76
12.02
13.81
13. 75
10.14
III. Number of families in houses not making
payments for heat separately from rent3
..
13'
1
3
2
3
3
IV . Number of families in apartments mak­
ing payments for heat separately from rent.
26
7
9
6
0
3
Number of families spending for—
Electricity______________________________
25
7
9
5
0
3
Anthracite_____________________________
9
0
4
5
0
0
Bituminous coal________________________
12
5
4
2
0
0
2
1
1
Coke.____ _____________________________
0
0
0
Briquets________________________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
Wood__________________________________
1
3
2
0
0
0
Fuel oil_________________________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
Gas____________________________________
23
6
8
3
0
0
Kerosene_______________________________
1
0
1
0
0
Gasoline (not for auto)_________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
21
4
2
7
Ice_______ _____________________________
8
0
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
$95.39 $113.01 $108. 33
0
$182.11
refrigeration, total____________________ $114. 61
Electricity______________________________
26. 33
21.48
24.79
36. 97
27. 38
0
15.23
0
24.31
29.52
0
0
Anthracite_____________________________
15. 29
21.19
15. 58
10. 67
Bituminous coal________________________
0
0
6. 57
11. 54
0
0
0
30.00
Coke___________________________________
Briquets________________________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
93
2.16
Wood__________________________________
0
0
0
1.00
0
Fuel oil_________________________________
0
0
0
0
0
Gas____________________________________
32.29
23.42
27.03
27.95
82.14
0
1.28
0
3. 76
Kerosene_______________________________
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Gasoline (not for auto)__________________
16.69
15.60
16. 54
12. 81
Ice___ ______ __________________________
0
33.00
V . Number of families in apartments not
making payments for heat separately
75
6
12
16
from rent_______________________________
11
10
Number of families spending for—
42
3
4
8
6
8
Electricity______________________________
6
29
4
6
3
3
Gas____________________________________
41
5
8
7
3
9
Ice_____________________________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
$38.36 $23.97 $43. 42 $29.44 $28.19
refrigeration, total____________________ $30.78
Electricity_____________ _______________
13.67
8. 55
5.61
20.36
15.66
16.69
7.12
6.42
10.62
4.92
8.50
3.96
Gas___________ ________________________
19.19
11.98
7. 54
Ice______________ ________________ _____
10.05
13.44
5.28
3. 96
.64
0
0
All other fuel___________________________
0
0
3

Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




32
32
17
8
4
0
2
0
30
1
0
13
$142. 96
37. 58
30. 67
11.74
6.23
0
. 14
0
48. 77
.80
0
7.03
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
$99. 00
36. 00
0
45. 00
0
0
0
0
18.00
0
0
0

20
13
7
9
$27.01
12. 55
5.11
9. 35
0

228
T

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION

able

1 1 .— F u e l , light , and refrigeration ex p en d itu res, b y econ om ic level— Contd.
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S .—NEGR O FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R efr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

I. All families in survey.______________________________________
Number of families spending for—
Anthracite________________________________________________
Bituminous coal_________________________________________
Coke.
____ _____________________ _____________________
Briquets. ________________________________________________
Wood_____________ _______________________________________
Fuel oil........................................... ....................... ........................
Gas___
________________________________________________
Kerosene
___ ___________________________________
_
Gasoline (not for auto)_________________________________ _
Ice __
_________________________________________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total. .
Winter i_______ _______ __________________ ___________
Spring 1_____________________________________________
Summer 1_____________________________________________
Fall i_________________ __________________ ______________
Electricity________________________________________________
W in te r_________________________________________ _ _
Spring_______________________________________________
Summer________________________________________________
Fall______________ _________ __________________ ____
Anthracite_______________________________________________
Winter_________________________________________________
Spring__________________________________________________
Summer_________________________________________ _
Fall___________________________________________________
Bituminous coal.. __ ____________________________________
Winter. _______________________________________________
Spring________________________________________________
Summer ______________________________________ _
Fall______________________________________ _____ _______
Coke____________________________________________________
Briquets_____ __________________________________________
Wood_______ ___________________ ____ __________ ________
Fuel oil__________ _______ ________________________________
Winter_________________________________________________
Spring__________________________________________________
Summer___ ____________________________________________
Fall________ ___________ ___________________ ______ ____
Gas______________________________________________________
Winter. _______________________________________________
Spring__________________________________________________
Summer_____ ___________ _______________________ _
Fall..................................... .........................................................
Kerosene. _______________________________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________________________
Ice _. ___________________________________________________
Winter. _______________________________________________
Spring________________________________________________
Summer_______________________________________________
Fall____________________ ____________________ _____
i

103

32

29

42

88
46
46
1
0
30
0
61
18
3
93

30
12
21
0
0
17
0
15
7
1
32

22
11
13
1
0
6
0
13
6
1
27

36
23
12
0
0
7
0
33

$106. 38
38.80
18. 36
19. 42
29.80
19. 52

$100. 53
35. 51
17. 22
17. 71
30. 09
18.68
5. 56
4.09
3.90
5.13
19.13
9. 28
2. 70
1. 23
5.92
27. 94
14.16
1.99
.38
11.41
0
0
4.54
0
0
0
0
0
13. 65
4.00
3.05
2.94
3.66
1.74
.80
14.05
.45
4.07
7. 76
1.77

$92. 90
39. 31
15.16
16. 27
22.16
16. 61
4. 53
4.00
3. 72
4. 36
16.14
10. 78
1. 36
0
4. 00
21.93
13. 67
1.41
. 94
5.91
2. 55
0
.94
0
0
0
0
0
16.74
6. 69
3. 27
2.93
3.85
3.24
.87
13.88
.45
4.02
7. 67
1. 74

$120.17
40. 95
21. 46
22. 93
34.83
22.17
6. 40
5. 25
4. 92
5. 60
41. 81
19. 72
3. 66
2.43
16.00
9.88
5. 38
.80
. 15
3. 55
0
0
. 59
0
0
0
0
0
25.87
8.15
5. 92
5.06
6.74
1.69
. 24
17.92
.58
5.20
9.89
2. 25

5. 6 2

4. 54
4.26
5.10
27. 53
13. 96
2. 71
1. 37
9.49
18.88
10.44
1. 34
.44
6. 66
. 72
0
1.91
0
0
0
0
0
19.50
6.45
4.28
3.80
4. 97
2.14
.60
15.58
.50
4.52
8.60
1. 96

Expenditures for coke, wood, kerosene, and gasoline (not for auto) included in this total.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




6

1
34

TABULAR
T

able

229

SUM M ARY

1 1 .— F u e l , light, and refrigeration exp en d itu res , b y econom ic level— Contd.
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—N EGRO FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R e fr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d it u r e s

II. Number of families in houses making payments for heat
separately from rent______________________________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_________________________ _____ ______ ______
Anthracite__________________________ ____ _______________
Bituminous coal__________________________________________
Coke_____________________________________________________
Briquets______________________ _________ ________________
Wood______________ ____ ________________________________
Fuel oil______________ _____ _____________________________
Gas_____________ __________ _____________________________
Kerosene__________________ _________ ____________________
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________________________
Ice_________________________ ____ _______ _____ __________

64

22

18

24

62
38
28
0
0
18
0
43
9
2
56

21
9
13
0
0
11
0
12
2
0
22

17
10
10
0
0
5
0
10
4
1
17

24
19
5
0
0
2
0
21
3
1
17

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total - _
Electricity___________________________ ____ _____ ________
Anthracite.......................... .............................. ............................
Bituminous coal_________________________________________
Coke_____________________________________________________
Briquets_________________________________________________
Wood_______________ _______ ____________________________
Fuel oil__________________________________________________
Gas______________________________________________________
Kerosene_________________________________________________
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________________________
Ice_______________________________________________________

$125. 97
22.78
40. 03
20.12
0
0
2.06
0
23.17
2.04
. 55
15. 22

$107. 68
19. 79
23. 63
27.20
0
0
4. 82
0
16.82
.91
0
14. 51

$116. 33
21.17
24.41
30. 21
0
0
1.08
0
19.29
3.41
1.40
15. 36

$156. 42
26.70
66. 75
6.09
0
0
.27
0
31.91
2. 03
.44
22.23

III. Number of families in houses not making payments for
heat separately from rent___________________________________
IV. Number of families in apartments making payments for
heat separately from r e n t ____ __________ _______ ______
Number of families spending for—
Electricity____________________________ ____ _____________
Anthracite_______________________________________________
Bituminous coal_________________________________________
Coke____ ___________________ _____________ ________ _____
Briquets_________________________________________________
W ood.____ _____________________________ ____ ___________
Fuel oil____________________________ _____________________
Gas_____________________________________________ _____
Kerosene_____________________ ____ _________________ ____
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________________________
Ice_______________________________________________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light and refrigeration, total—
Electricity_______________________________________________
Anthracite_______________________________________________
Bituminous coal_________________________________________
Coke_____________ _________________ _____________________
Briquets________________________ ________________________
Wood..........................................................................................
Fuel oil________________ _________________________________
Gas______________________________________________________
Kerosene_____ ____ ______________________ __________ ____
Gasoline (not for auto)___________________________________
Ice________________________________ ____ _________________

0

0

0

0

27

10

6

11

22
7
18
1
0
12
0
14
9
1
26

9
3
8
0
0
6
0
3
5
1
10

5
1
3
1
0
1
0
3
2
0
5

8
3
7
0
0
5
0
8
2
0
11

$93.05
17.09
10.16
24. 32
2. 73
0
2.42
0
15.89
3. 37
.96
16.11

$84. 78
16.23
9. 21
29. 53
0
0
3. 96
0
6. 68
3. 55
2.60
13.02

$92. 63
16. 71
4. 75
15.40
12. 33
0
1.25
0
23.09
5.42
0
13. 68

$100. 83
18.10
14.00
24. 45
0
0
1. 67
0
20.29
2.08
0
20.24

V. Number of families in apartments not making payments
for heat separately from rent______________________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity______________________ ________________ _______
Gas............................................................................................ .
Ice........ ............ ..............................................................................

12

0

5

7

4
4
11

0
0
0

0
0
5

4
4
6

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, total—
Electricity.................................................................... ........... .
G a s ..----------------- ---------------------------- --------------------------------Ice_________________ ____ ________________________________
All other fuel............................................ ................. .................

$32.09
7. 63
8.14
16. 32
0

$8. 78
0
0
8.78
0

$48.74
13.09
13. 94
21. 71
0

Notes on this table are in appendix A , p. 329.




0~
0
0
0
0

230
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

1 1 .— F u e l , light, and refrigeration ex p en d itu res, b y econ om ic level— Contd.
M IN N E A P O L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level-—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R e fr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d it u r e s

I. All families in survey_______ ______ ______
Number of families spending for—
Electricity -----------------------------------------Anthracite- _ _________________________
Bituminous coal________________ _
--Coke................................................................
Briquets ___________________________ Wood ___ __ ____________ ____ _______
Fuel oil_______________________ _______
Gas_______________________ ____ _______
Kerosene.
____________ _________
Gasoline (not for auto) ------------------------Ice________________ ___________ ________

504

47

114

106

86

59

92

482
75
187
173
36
110
37
465
16
7
362

46
11
21
21
5
10
0
44
5
2
37

108
15
46
41
12
26
5
101
5
2
89

101
12
34
39
9
24
9
98
2
1
84

83
12
27
27
7
17
9
80
1
1
59

56
10
26
18
1
12
7
57
1
0
38

88
15
33
27
2
21
7
85
2
1
55

$142.64 $127. 74 $130. 50 $143. 34 $145. 82
57. 41
50.13
47. 88
49. 35
57.17
25. 34
23. 35
24.17
27.22
27. 75
17.95
17.46
19.49
21.77
19. 72
42. 43
36.31
38. 96
45.00
41.18
26.13
28.64
27.10
30.16
30. 48
7.13
7.47
7.30
8.06
8.06
7. 07
6. 30
6. 65
7. 21
7.40
5. 98
6. 22
6.78
7. 03
7.16
7. 32
6. 72
6.93
7.86
7. 86
14.44
9.19
8.17
9. 77
11.12
7. 52
4. 77
4. 65
4. 37
5. 05
2.16
1.05
1.25
1. 51
2.18
0
0
0
0
0
3. 37
2. 27
4.76
3.89
3.89
25. 52
25.46
20.26
23. 60
27.50
13.14
9.92
10. 91
14.60
13.90
2. 50
3.64
3.04
3.15
5. 06
0
0
2. 29
1.14
0
8. 74
7. 82
6.70
7. 25
8. 54
29. 35
22. 71
27. 70
27. 05
25. 40
4. 32
7.40
5.19
4. 27
1. 87
2.76
2.32
1.64
.94
1.05
0
4. 80
1.93
10.14
10. 29
0
1.09
2. 52
4. 77
8.01
0
.72
.20
.80
.75
0
0
0
.19
0
0
.64
1.56
4.38
1.53
26.64
25. 54
24.99
27. 39
27. 69
6.49
6. 27
6.35
7. 03
7.26
6.72
6.44
6.12
6.66
6. 73
6.72
6.40
6.17
6. 75
6. 82
6. 71
6. 43
6.35
6. 95
6. 88
.98
.37
.08
.01
(2
)
.04
.46
.08
.12
0
6. 87
9. 31
10. 57
9. 82
10. 41
.22
.30
.34
.34
.32
1.99
2. 70
3.06
2. 85
3. 02
3.80
5.14
5. 84
5. 42
5.74
.86
1.33
1.17
1.23
1.31

$139. 58
52. 55
26. 36
19.20
41.47
29. 93
8. 05
7. 27
6.94
7. 67
11.21
5.08
.87
0
5. 26
27. 48
14.15
5.14
.15
8.04
23.17
1.32
3.28
5. 56
3.05
.92
0
1.59
27.13
7. 42
6. 29
6.09
7. 33
.07
.01
10.42
.34
3. 02
5. 75
1.31

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and re$136. 64
frigeration, to ta l_____________ ______
51.44
Winter *___ ______________ _____ _____
25.44
Spring 4____________ ___________ _____
___________ _____ ______ 19.33
Summer 4
40. 43
Fall 4_________________________________
28. 46
Electricity
_______________________
7.63
-------------^----------------------Winter
6. 91
Spring ________________
___________
6. 60
Sum m er___________ _____ _
_
_
7.32
Fall__________________________________
10.15
Anthracite _ _
_____________________
5. 02
Winter_______________________________
1.37
Spring- ----- ------- -----------------------0
Summer
______ ___ ______ ______
3. 76
Fall__________________________________
Bituminous coal _
__ ------------- ----- . 24.66
Winter
_____ ___ __ ---------- _ 12. 68
3. 62
Spring. ___________________
______
Summer __________________ ________
.66
7.70
Fall__________________________________
25. 51
C o k e ________
- . _______
_3. 95
Briquets
_ __
_
_ __
________ __
2.00
Wood__________________________________
5. 39
Fuel oil________________________________
Winter____ _ _______
. -_ ----------3.08
Spring _________________ _____
.59
Summer
____ ____ __ _____ . . _
.03
Fall__________________________________
1.69
26. 38
Gas
______
__ ---------------------------Winter _____________________________
6.76
Spring ______________________________
6.44
Summer ________________
_______
6.44
Fall__________________________________
6. 74
.21
Kerosene_________ _
_________ __
Gasoline (not for auto)
__________
.16
Ice_____________________________________
9. 77
Winter.. _______ __ ________ . . . __
.31
Spring . . . __ . . . ______________. . .
2.83
Summer ____________ ____________
5.40
1.23
Fall__________________________________
2
4

Less than 0.5 cent.
Expenditures for coke, briquets, wood, kerosene, and gasoline (not for auto) included in this total.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




TABULAR
T

able

231

SU M M AR Y

1 1 .— F u e l , light , and refrigeration ex p en d itu res, b?/ econ om ic level— Contd.
M IN N E A P O L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Families spending per expenditure unit per year
$700
and
over

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

28

73

61

49

37

54

28
6
12
15
4
9
0
27
2
2
22

71
12
35
29
9
17
3
69
2
1
62

61
5
20
32
4
15
6
58
1
1
48

49
8
15
23
3
11
6
47
0
0
35

37
7
17
17
0
10
6
37
0
0
27

54
11
23
21
2
15
5
52
2
1
38

$157. 52 $151.18 $151. 77 $181. 76 $177. 60
30. 33
35. 45
31.61
29.28
33. 52
11.42
14. 05
10. 83
6.95
15. 39
24. 09
27. 75
32. 34
27.28
28. 68
25.91
41. 74
41.12
36.32
39.29
10.00
3.87
4.06
6. 30
0
1.24
3. 34
2. 53
1.57
1.48
0
2. 61
5.99
14. 71
15.29
30.24
29. 69
26. 54
33. 27
32.00
.35
.58
.01
0
0
.44
.07
.16
0
0
7. 01
10. 52
10. 08
10.58
11.95

$171. 95
34.20
15. 71
31.66
32.13
2. 25
5. 05
6. 33
32. 54
.11
.02
11.95

Under
$300

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R efr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d it u r e s

II. Number of families in houses making pay302
ments for heat separately from rent_____
Number of families spending for—
300
Electricity
_________________________
49
Anthracite _ __ __ ______ ____ _____ _
122
Bituminous coal _ ___ ________ ___
137
Coke____________ _ . . . ___
________
22
Briquets __ ___________________________
Wood__________________________________
77
Fuel oil_______ _____
_ ____________ _
26
Gas______________________________ _____
290
7
Kerosene___________________ __________
5
Gasoline (not for a u to )________________
232
Ice___________________
_______________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and refrigeration, to ta l___________ _____ _ $163. 83
32.11
Electricity_____________________________
12.14
Anthracite_____ _ _ _ ____ __ __ _ _ ___
Bituminous coal _ _____ ________ __
28. 86
35.29
C o k e ._____ _
__ ___ _
_______
4. 30
2. 54
Wood_________________________ *1______
7. 23
Fuel oil________________________________
Gas____________________________________
30. 48
.20
_________ ____
Kerosene. ________
Gasoline (not for auto) _ _ ______ . . .
. 15
10. 53
Ice___ _________
. . . ___ _____________
III. Number of families in houses not making
payments for heat separately from rent 3_ _
4
IV. Number of families in apartments making
121
payments for heat separately from rent..
Number of families spending for—
121
Electricity _ __________________________
24
Anthracite _______ __ . . . . ____ _
Bituminous coal____ __ ______ __ __ _
61
36
Coke___________________________________
14
Briquets.__
_ . . . _________ _ .
30
Wood__________________________________
11
Fueloil. ______________________________
Gas___ _______ _
_ ____ _ _
116
9
Kerosene_____ __________ __ _________
2
Gasoline (not for auto) __ ___ _ __ _
Ice___ _________________________ _______
86
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and re­
$135. 08
frigeration, total._ ______ _________
Electricity ._ _______________ _______
26.98
11.65
Anthracite. ____ __
___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Bituminous coal __ ____________ _____
30. 44
Coke_________ _______ ____ ____ _ _ _ 18.18
Briquets._
_ __ __________ _ ____
5. 73
2. 04
Wood__________________________________
Fuel o il._ _____
. . . ___ ________ ___
4. 40
Gas ____________ ________________ __
25.10
Kerosene __ _
______
____ __ __ __
.39
Gasoline (not for auto)
___ ______ . . .
.25
9. 92
I c e ____________________________________
V. Number of families in apartments not
making payments for heat separately
from rent...
_ ______ _______________
77
Number of families spending for:
Electricity
______ ________________
56
Gas____________________________________
55
41
I c e ______
_
______________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
refrigeration, total
___________________
Electricity _ ____________________________
Gas __________________________________
Ice ___ _______________________________
All other fuel___________________________

$37. 55
16. 82
13. 04
6. 76
.93

1

1

0

1

0

17

25

31

18

11

19

17

31

18

11
1
9
1
1

19
3
10

1
1
0
16

25
3
10
12
3
9
2
22

3

3

0
14

1
19

6

9

6

7

4

13

10

7

5
8

4
4




6

1
11
1
0
5

0
5
2
19
0
0
11

$131. 22 $121. 79 $132.12 $141. 06 $144. 37
24.88
24. 21
26. 96
26. 69
33. 27
14. 26
8. 57
8. 41
4.03
22.09
24. 84
21. 35
21. 86
37. 23
51.07
12. 54
21.30
27.87
17. 30
4.12
3. 97
1.30
10.15
9. 34
10.08
2. 46
2.13
3.18
1.11
.66
0
4. 60
1.15
3. 72
8. 37
22.78
23. 43
22.25
28. 36
27. 68
2.16
.07
.01
.48
.07
0
.80
0
.58
0
10.92
7.07
9.86
9. 30
9.67

$150.19
29.20
9. 60
43.11
20. 83
0
1. 58
8.94
25. 31
0
0
11.62

5

3

3

31
1
0
25

17
1
1
12

2

1

15

14

18

11

18

0
1
1

11
9
7

9
9
11

15
15
11

8
9
6

13
12
5

$24. 40
0
18. 00
6. 40
0

$31. 52
15. 55
10. 45
5. 05
.47

$34.13
13. 33
10. 76
10. 04
0

$46. 34
20. 06
16. 57
8. 44
1. 27

$40. 45
17. 48
13.20
5.96
3.81

$35. 37
17. 89
13.04
4.44
0

3 Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------- 16

1

232
T

able

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
11.— F u e l, lig h t , and refrigeration exp en d itu res, by econ om ic level— Contd.
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level-—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
All
fami­
lies

Item

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
$400
$500
$600
$700

$700
and
over

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R efr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d i t u r e s

I. All families in survey____________________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity______________________________
Anthracite_____________________________
Bituminous coal____ _______ _____ ____
Coke___________________________________
Briquets________________________________
Wood____ _____________________________
Fueloil____________ __________ _ _ __
Gas____________________________________
Kerosene--------------------------------------------Gasoline (not for auto)______ __
_
Ice_______ _____________ _ _ ______

401

54

65

94

62

42

84

378
19
326
40

53

60

88

41

79

52
3

56

3
82
9

57
3
47

33

56
9

7

5

0

1
0

46
5

202

36

78

28

13

26

$98. 99 $108.01
27.90
32. 95
18.01
20.14
23.81
22. 75
29.27
32.17
23. 73
32.25
6.10
8.15
5. 79
7.94
5.84
8.00
6.00
8.16
1.80
1.93
.85
.49

$97.63
28.10
18.11
22. 76
28.66
27.94
7.13
6. 80
6.87
7.14
4. 36
1.44
.70
.84
1.38
26. 81
11.44
1. 50
2. 84
11.03
4. 79

0

.34
35.23
15.45
2.09
1.30
16.39
2. 51

.38
37. 35
17.29
1.26
4.45
14.35
1.29

.31
35. 72
16.41
1. 77
2. 70
14.84
3. 27

.18
.40

.16

.26
.37
.15
.04

0

.20
0
0
.20

23.78
5.82
5.92
6.04

6.00

.99
.34
15. 32
.49
4.44
8.46
1.93

0

0
0
0
0
0

23.30
5. 69
5.74

6.02
5. 85

.11

.04
14.02
.45
4.06
7. 75
1.76

0
8
0

1

56

1
1

2

$103.80 $103. 66 $104.03
30. 71
31.22
31.08
19.56
17. 7 9
18.89
22.05
25.19
23.10
31.48
29.66
30.82
24.46
26.42
25. 60
6.34
6.58
6.65
5.95
6.59
6.24
5.86
6. 53
6.16
6.31
6.72
6. 55
.59
.66
.97
.21
.25
.56
0
.14
.03

0

0

52

40

0

8

8
0

84
3

2
1

43

5

57

1

1
2

0
1
0
2

7

0

2

1
0
0

0

0

.18
23.64
5.71

6.11

6.06
5. 76
.16
.08
14. 27
.46
4.14
7. 88
1.79

0

.48
.47
30.84
12.70

2.01

2. 48
13.65
6.32

0

.32

0
0
0
0
0

22.59
5.55
5.84
5.60
5.60
.64
.03
12.72
.41
3.69
7.02
1.60

wood, kerosene, and gasoline (not auto) included in this total.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




2

0
6
1

43
4
357

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
refrigeration, total---------------------------------- $102.29
W inter1
_____________
___ ___ ___ _ 30.19
Spring 1_________ ____________________
18. 63
Summer 1____________________________
23.30
30.17
F all1
_________________________________
Electricity___
__
___
_ _ _ ____
26. 53
Winter----------- --------------------------------6.82
Spring---------------------- -------------------6.49
Summer______________ ____________
6.47
6. 75
Fall__________________________________
1.78
Anthracite------- ------- --------------------------Winter_________________ - ___ __ _
.66
Spring______________________ _______
.18
Summer__________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
.25
.69
Fall__________________________________
Bituminous coal___ __ ___ _________ _ _ 33.02
Winter. _______
___________________
14.45
Spring________ _ _______ _______ __ _
1.91
Summer______ _ ________ ____ _____
2. 97
Fall__________________________________
13.69
Coke_________ _____ _________ ____ _
4.26
Briquets------ ------------------------------------0
Wood__________________________________
.23
.21
Fuel oil_______________ ____ ______ _____
Winter. _______
_ ___ ___ ________
.13
Spring_______________ _. ___ ___ ___
.01
Summer. _ __________________________
0
Fall__________________________________
.07
Gas____________________________________
23. 22
Winter______ __
_____________
5.70
Spring________________ _ ___ _______
5.88
Summer______________________________
5.89
5. 75
Fall__________________________________
Kerosene____________ ________________
.30
Gasoline (not for auto)------ ---------- __
.08
Ice__________
_____
________________
12. 66
.41
Winter_______________________________
3. 67
Spring_________________ ____________
6.99
Summer____________________ ________
1.59
Fall_____ ____________________________

1Expenditures for coke,

1

0
0

0
0

1.44
33.06
12.99
3. 65
4.42

12.00
9. 32

0

.29
.60
.60

0
0
0

22.24
5.37
5.74
5. 72
5.41

0
0
8. 32
.27
2.41
4.59
1.05

1
0

0

.19

0
0
0
0
0

23.28
5.90
5.79
5.81
5.78
.04

0
10. 22
.33
2.96
5.65
1.28

TABULAR, SUMM ARY
T

able

11.— F u e l ,

light , and refrigeration

233

exp en d itu res, by econ om ic level— Contd.

ST. LOUIS, M O .—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500 to $600 to
$600
$700

$700
and
over

F u e l , L ig h t, a n d R efr ig e r a tio n E x p e n d it u r e s

II. Number of families in houses making payments for heat separately from rent_____
Number of families spending for—
Electricity_________________ _________
Anthracite____ ___________
___ _
Bituminous coal _ _ ___ ________ _ _
Coke_________ _________ _ _ _ _ _ _
Briquets_____________________ __ _ _ __
Wood______ ________ __
Fuel oil____
_________________________
Gas__________
_______________________
Kerosene________ ________ _______ __ _
Gasoline (not for auto)____ __ ________
Ice______ _________________________ _

169

29

26

45

21

20

28

169
9
145
28
0
11
3
156
5
5
86

29
1
27
3
0
4
1
24
2
1
21

26
0
25
1
0
2
0
24
1
1
16

45
3
39
7
0
2
2
42
2
2
25

21
1
16
7
0
2
0
21
0
1
8

20
1
16
6
0
0
0
17
0
0
7

28
3
22
4
0
1
0
28
0
0
9

$103. 73 $119. 59 $116. 62 $119. 78 $118. 85
24.06
30.19
28. 26
29.63
33. 65
1.39
2. 87
1.10
2.03
0
44. 33
34. 34
33. 39
39. 60
35.90
4. 68
3. 23
6. 21
12. 36
13. 96
0
0
0
0
0
.34
. 16
. 19
. 12
0
.76
.78
0
0
0
22. 77
26. 57
25. 30
26. 25
23.83
.97
.18
.05
0
0
.64
.12
. 12
.16
0
14. 85
15.17
14. 71
12. 31
11. 04

$122.24
32.13
5.88
36. 37
9. 57
0
.11
0
28.41
0
0
9. 77

Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
refrigeration, total___ ______________ $116. 43
Electricity____________________________
29. 28
Anthracite____________
_______
2.12
Bituminous coal____________
37. 65
Coke. __ __ __ ___________ __
7. 72
Briquets------------------------ --- _
0
Wood_________________________________
. 15
.34
Fuel oil ___ ________________________
Gas______________ ____ ___________ _ _
25. 52
Kerosene. ___________________ __ ___ _
.20
Gasoline (not for auto)____________ _ _
. 19
I c e ... ________ ______ ___________ __ __ 13. 26

III. Number of families in houses not making
0
payments for heat separately from rent 3___
1
0
0
0
1
VI. Number of families in apartments making
24
34
42
191
33
payments for heat separately from rent..
20
Number of families spending for—
Electricity____ _____________________ _
188
32
34
23
41
20
2
2
Anthracite _ _ _ _________
10
0
0
1
24
Bituminous coal_______ __ ___ _ _
42
176
31
17
31
0
2
3
2
Coke________ _______ __ __
0
11
0
0
0
0
0
Briquets-----------------------------------------------0
5
8
5
5
1
Wood______ __
____ _ __ ____
31
1
0
0
0
0
1
Fuel oil_______________________________
33
21
40
18
Gas__________
______________________
181
31
1
1
1
Kerosene___________________________
7
3
0
0
Gasoline (not for auto)____________ _
0
0
0
0
0
21
17
21
21
6
100
Ice_____________________________________
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
refrigeration, total____ __________
$104. 61 $105. 45 $105. 92 $102. 53 $102.84 $105. 75
Electricity______________________ _____
24.50
32. 71
25.99
27. 34
25.48
27.40
Anthracite_____________________________
1. 92
0
1. 52
2.05
1. 87
0
37.00
34. 05
35.08
Bituminous coal____ ______________ _ _
35. 65
37. 62
38. 63
Coke_______ _________ __ __________
2. 08
0
.66
3. 61
5. 64
0
Briquets------------------------------------------0
0
0
0
0
0
.22
.37
.06
.42
Wood_____________________________
.34
.61
Fueloil_______________________________
.13
0
0
1. 25
0
0
24. 65
24.16
21. 98
24.12
25. 51
23.89
Gas_______ ____ ______________________
1.06
1.16
.43
.10
.29
0
Kerosene. ___________ __________________
0
0
0
0
0
Gasoline (not for auto)_________________
0
12. 65
15.72
13. 52
13. 47
6.43
13. 76
Ice__________________ _______ __________
V. Number of families in apartments not
making payments for heat separately
7
7
from rent_______ ___ ________ ________
39
0
6
1
Number of families spending for—
2
2
2
1
Electricity________________ _______ ____
20
0
2
2
2
19
0
1
Gas____________________________________
3
15
6
0
0
3
Ice...................................................................
Average expenditures for fuel, light, and
$25. 80 $31.80 $18.16 $45.00
0
refrigeration, total____________________ $33.11
8.00
5.86
2.50
27.00
Electricity_____ ______________________
11. 63
0
3.99
0
6.00
6.80
18.00
9. 75
Gas_____________________________ ______
0
11.80
15. 93
10. 30
0
Ice____________________ _____ _____ _____ 10. 50
3. 21
1.37
1. 23
0
0
0
All other fuel...................................... ..........
3 Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




0
38
38
5
31
4
0
7
0
38
1
0
14
$106. 21
29. 65
5. 32
32.05
3. 51
0
.35
0
23.94
.08
0
11.31

18
13
12
3
$41. 21
17.79
13. 93
8. 62
.87

234

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

T able 11.—

F u el, light, and refrigeration ex penditures, hy econom ic level— Contd.
St. Louis, M o.—Negro Fami­
lies

Item
All
families

Economic level—Fami­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per
year

Salt Lake City, Utah—White
families

All
fami­
lies

E conomic
1e v e 1
—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400
and
over

106

28

27

51

210

54

55

72

29

96
0
99
0
0
41
1
60
24
0
89

26
0
27
0
0
12
0
12
9
0
27

25
0
27
0
0
13
0
12
8
0
23

45
0
45
0
0
16
1
36
7
0
39

198
0
162
7
0
35
0
82
2
4
96

50
0
48
2
0
17
0
9
2
1
24

51
0
43
1
0
6
0
25
0
2
26

68
0
54
1
0
9
0
33
0
1
33

29
0
17
3
0
3
0
15
0
0
13

Under $300 to $400 to
$300
$400
$600

$600
and
over

Fuel, Light, and Refrigeration Ex­
penditures
I. All families in survey___ _____
Number of families spending
for—
Electricity
_________ _
Anthracite._ ___________
_
Bituminous coal__________
C o k e .___ ________________
Briquets__________________
Wood____________________
Fuel oil___________________
Gas___ ___________________
Kerosene_______ __________
Gasoline (not for auto)___
Ice_______________________

Average expenditures for fuel,
light, and refrigeration, total. $97. 38 $100. 36 $102.41 $93.08
27.12
35. 30 25. 62
Winter 5 _ _______ __ . . . 28. 47
_.
21.10
18.85 17. 92
Spring 5____ __
____ __ 19.00
21.59
19. 27 20. 96
Summer 5________________
20.70
28. 99 28.58
Fall s_____________________
29. 21
30. 55
17. 75 17.80
Electricity_________________
17. 68
17. 39
4. 52
4. 73
Winter.. ________ _______
4. 62
4. 62
Spring.. _________ ________
4.23
4. 33
4.23
4. 43
4.11
Summer. __
_______ _ _
4. 17
4.19
4.20
Fall______________________
4. 45
4. 68
4. 56
4. 55
Anthracite___ ____ _____
0
0
0
0
0
0
Winter_____
______ . . .
0
0
Spring_____ _________ . . .
0
0
0
0
0
Summer___ _________ _.
0
0
0
Fall______________________
0
0
0
0
42. 62
46.08
50. 72 36. 42
Bituminous coal— __ _____
Winter.. ________ ____ __
17.50
25. 29 14. 46
18. 02
___
Spring_________ ____
4. 90
6. 88
5.60
3. 43
2.19
2.60
3.26
2. 45
Summer _ ____ _______ _
Fall______________________
17. 64 16.08
17.10
18. 44
Coke_______________________
0
0
0
0
0
Briquets_________________ __
0
0
0
Wood______________________
2. 47
2.15
2.98
2. 38
Fuel oil____________________
.42
0
0
.86
.21
0
0
Winter____________ _______
.43
Spring____________________
0
0
0
0
.07
0
0
. 14
Summer...... ............ ............
Fall____________ __________
. 14
0
0
.29
12. 61
Gas___
. _____________ _ 15.70
13. 63 18.50
2. 69
3. 89
3. 62
4. 69
Winter. _ _______________
Spring____________________
3. 93
3. 27
3. 36
4. 60
3.22
Summer______________
3. 87
3. 23
4.58
Fall______________________
4.01
3. 43
3. 42
4. 63
1.62
Kerosene_________________ _
2. 98
1.44
.98
Gasoline (not for au to)_____
0
0
0
0
19.15
15.89 16.14
Ice_________________________
16.87
.62
.54
.52
Winter-. . . . _______
.51
4. 89
Spring_________________ __
5. 55
4. 61
4.68
9. 32
10. 57
8. 77
8.91
Summer_______ _______ . .
Fall______________________
2.12
2.41
2. 00
2.03
2
5

$98.87 $90.06 $100. 39 $98. 79 $112. 80
32. 01 32.98
31. 27 28.44
30. 95
21.19 18.23
21.92 21.25
25.23
18. 58 16. 79
18. 63 18. 62
21.86
27. 83 26.60
27. 83 25. 94
34. 76
34. 77 28.28
42. 92
35.13 36.09
7.81
9.30
9. 33
9. 61
11.29
6. 68
8. 36
8. 66
8.50
10. 49
8.12
6. 27
8. 38
8. 47
10. 20
8. 99
7. 52
8. 92
9. 35
10.94
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
45.11 50. 82
48.68 42. 02
35. 37
17. 58 18.03
19.81 18. 30
10. 71
9. 26
8. 51
9. 36
8.03
6. 73
4. 67
6. 94
3.22
3. 79
4. 22
14. 35 16. 59
15. 72 11.47
14. 71
1.17
1.30
.62
.01
4. 51
0
0
0
0
0
.50
.91
.33
.29
.56
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
12.06
4. 26
10.87 14. 53
22.68
3. 46
1.30
2. 73
4. 47
6. 34
2.82
.99
2.78
3. 39
4.88
2.60
.86
2. 90
2. 71
4.98
1.11
3.18
2. 46
3. 96
6. 48
.02
. 12
0
0
0
.01
.01
.04
0
(2
)
5.24
4. 36
5. 36
5.20
6. 76
.07
.07
.03
.16
.08
1. 27
1.02
1.20
1.02
2.47
3.15
2.64
3. 52
3.19
3. 34
.75
.63
.61
.91
.79

Less than 0.5 cent.
Expenditures for coke, wood, kerosene, and gasoline (not auto) included in these totals.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




TABULAR

T able 11.—

235

SUM M ARY

F u el, light, and refrigeration ex penditures, by econom ic level— Gontd.

Item

St. Louis, Mo.—Negro fami­
lies
Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
All
unit per year
families
Under $300 to $400
and
$300
$400
over

Fuel, Light, and Refrigeration Expend­
itures
II. Number of families in houses mak­
ing payments for heat separately
22
______________ _
from rent,.
7
6
Number of families spending for—
Electricity ___ ___ _ _ _ _ _
21
6
6
0
Anthracite__________ ________ _
0
0
22
Bituminous coal_________ _
6
7
0
Coke___ __
__________________
0
0
Briquets. ______________ ________
0
0
0
1
8
5
Wood__________________________
1
Fuel oil__________________ _____
0
0
1
5
Gas___ ________ __________ _
13
1
3
Kerosene. _______ _______
2
Gasoline (not for auto)_________
0
0
0
Ice_ __ __________ _ _________
_
18
6
5
Average expenditures for fuel, light
and refrigeration, total___ _____ $94.14 $73.84 $109.00
17. 76 12.54 18.84
Electricity_______ ______
Anthracite_________ _________ _
0
0
0
Bituminous coal_______ _ __
43.20 43.05 48.10
0
Coke_____________ _ _ ________
0
0
Briquets._ ___ _______ __ __
0
0
0
.99
Wood_____________ ___ __ __ _
.76
1.58
1.98
0
Fuel oil___________ ____________
0
G a s _ ____________ _ _ _ _
_
15. 36
3.44 21. 50
.27
.08
Kerosene. _______ ___ __ _______
.80
0
Gasoline (not for auto) _ _ ____ __
0
0
14.58 13. 25 18.90
Ice___ _______ _ ____________
III.
umber of families m houses not
making payments for heat sepa­
2
rately from rent3____ ___ ___ __
0
0
IV. Number of families in apartments
making payments for heat sepa­
77
21
rately from rent________________
21
Number of families spending for—
19
Electricity________
70
20
Anthracite____
_
__ __
0
0
0
21
Bituminous coal. _______
76
20
Coke _______ __ __
0
0
0
Briquets. ________ ______
0
0
0
11
8
33
W ood.. _ __________ __
0
0
0
Fuel oil__________ _
7
Gas
__ __
42
11
21
7
Kerosene____________ _ _
7
0
0
0
Gasoline (not for auto)
21
Ice. __ _
68
18
Average expenditures for fuel, light,
$103.15 $109.20 $100.52
and refrigeration, total ..
Electricity___ _ _
_ __
18. 03 19.01 17.44
Anthracite .............
0
0
0
Bituminous coal___________
46.01 47.10 51. 47
Coke ________ ___________
0
0
0
Briquets_________ __ _
0
0
0
2.61
3.37
Wood___ _______________ __ _
3.11
Fuel oil_______________________
0
0
0
15.92 15.65 11.37
Gas. ______________
_
1.84
3. 72
Kerosene____________ ______
2.17
0
0
Gasoline (not for auto)__ __ _ __
0
Ice___ _______. . . ______________ 17. 91 21.11 15.03
V. Number of families in apartments
not making payments for heat
35
0
0
separately from rent____________
Number of families spending for—
Electricity ______ __ __
Gas___ ____________________
Ice_______________ _____. _
Average expenditures for fuel, light,
and refrigeration, total.. .
Electricity________ ________ __
Gas______ ____ ________________
Ice_________ _____ ______________
All other fuel...................................

Salt Lake City, Utah—White fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Un­
der
$300

$300 to $400 to $600
and
$400
$600
over

9

157

45

42

52

18

9
0
9
0
0
2
1
7
0
0
7

154
0
144
7
0
30
0
55
1
1
79

43
0
44
2
0
14
0
5
1
1
19

41
0
41
1
0
5
0
18
0
0
23

52
0
48
1
0
9
0
22
0
0
28

18
0
11
3
0
2
0
10
0
0
9

$100.03 $113.55 $97.35
37. 03 30. 04
21. 07
0
0
0
55. 75 57. 39
40.06
0
1. 36 1. 55
0
0
0
.99
.78
.63
4.84
0
0
20.54
13.06 3. 59
.04
0
.01
.01
0
(2
)
12. 74
5. 71 3.74

$116.98
37. 97
0
61.74
.02
0
.43
0
10. 59
0
0
6. 23

$118. 57 $131. 61
43. 66
40. 06
0
0
54. 54
41.16
7. 26
.26
0
0
.89
.40
0
0
16.97
31.13
0
0
0
0
6. 34
7. 51

2

3

1

2

0

0

35

3 13

3

3

4

3

35

5

8

16

6

25
15
9

3

5

2
2

3
3

12
8
3

5
2
1

$39.83 $39. 76 $32. 68 $36.04
26.97 19.39 22.09 23.90
8.29 12.23
6. 39
8.16
4.15
2.32
3.25 4.18
1.32 3.96
.05
1.66

$59. 65
47.99
7.84
3. 82
0

31
0
35
0
0
14
0
24
7
0
29
$101.07
17.80
0
42.08
0
0
3.26
0
18.79
1.41
0
17. 73
5

3 Less than 0.5 cent.
8 Detailed information not presented because of small number of families in this classification.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




236
T able 1 2 . —

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

H ou seh o ld operation expenditures other than f o r fu e l, light, and refrigera­
tion, by econ om ic level

DENVER, COLO—WHITE FAMILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

Household Operation Expenditures Other Than for Fuel, Light,
and Refrigeration
Families in survey_________
_____ ____ ___________________
Number of families spending for—
Water rent_______________________________________________
Telephone________________ _
________________ _______
Domestic service: Full-time.,.. ___________________ ______
Part-tim e..___ ______________ _______
Laundry out_____________________________________________
Postage, telegrams___________ _____________________ ___
Moving, express, freight, drayage---------------------------- ------Safe-deposit box__________________________________________
Insurance on furniture____ _ _____ __ ________________
Interest on debts_________________________________________
Average expenditure per family for household operation other
than fuel, light, and refrigeration, total_________________
Water rent_______________________________ _________ _ .
Telephone________________________________________________
Domestic service: Full-time_______ _______________ ____ __
Part-time.. . . . ____________________ .
Household paper_______________ _____________ __________
Bar soap_______ __ . . . . _________ _____
________ _____
Starch, bluing_____________ ______________________ _____
__________ . . .
Soap flakes, powder___ _____ __________
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc _________ _______
_ _ __________ ___ ___ __ . . . ______
Matches___ __
Laundry out________
____
__________________________
Stationery, pens, pencils, in k ...
. . . . _______ . . . . . .
Postage, telegrams-------------------------------------------------- ---------Moving, express, freight, drayage_____ _______ ___________
Safe-deposit box._________ _______ _______________________
Insurance on furniture__________ ________________________
Interest on debts_____________________ ___________ ______
Other items____ ____ __________ ___________________ _____

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




295

92

106

97

112
179
2
21
124
265
23
27
82
30

36
42
0
4
21
81
6
3
10
7

41
71
2
6
40
95
7
11
29
13

35
66
0
11
63
89
10
13
43
10

$61.91
9.00
13.60
.54
2.36
3.10
2,96
1.08
4.66
1.37
2.09
11.41
1.90
3.04
.63
.38
.93
2. 66

$47.02
8. 62
8.93
0
2.49
3.04
3.50
1.31
4. 47
1.14
2.14
4. 67
1. 75
2.08
.73
.11
.27
1.77

$64.24
9. 55
15.60
1.50
1.14
3.11
2.80
1.14
5.66
1.25
1.97
8. 72
2. 03
2.98
.33
47
1.10
4.49
.40

$73.46
8. 76
15.86
0
3.55
3.15
2.62
.78
3.74
1.72
2.18
20. 75
1.88
4.01
.86
.55
1.36
1.51

.20

0

.18

TABULAR
T

able

SU M M AR Y

237

12 . — H o u seh o ld operation expenditures other than f o r fu e l, light, and refrigera­
tion, by econ om ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$700
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

357

45

92

73

50

43

54

239
137
8
27
159
335
66
14
87
51

30
6
0
1
14
38
5
0
5
6

66
22
1
3
23
88
17
2
19
14

50
26
0
7
29
69
7
4
18
8

32
28
3
6
25
49
10
4
16
7

29
21
0
3
29
38
10
1
10
8

32
34
4
7
39
53
17
3
19
8

Average expenditure per family for house­
hold operation other than fuel, light,
and refrigeration, total--------------- _ __ $64.23
7. 36
Water rent_____________________________
Telephone__________
. . . _____ __ _ _ 13.15
1. 32
Domestic service: Full-time..___ __ _
Part-time _ _________
2.17
Household paper_______________________
2. 58
Bar soap_______________________________
3.70
Starch, bluing__________ ______
___ __
1.14
Soap flakes, powder____________________
5. 43
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc__
1.81
Matches_____________________________ _
1.93
Laundry out_______________________ __
13. 74
Stationery, pens, pencils, i n k .____ ____
1. 32
2. 39
Postage, telegrams______________
____
Moving, express, freight, drayage______
1.00
Safe-deposit box________________________
.12
Insurance on furniture_________ _____
1. 53
Interest on debts.____ _________________
3.23
Other items____ _
______________ __
.31

$43.11
7. 30
4.91
0
.27
1.90
4.71
1.37
4.98
1.37
2.18
8. 66
1.22
1.32
.45
0
.52
1.49
.46

$43.12
7.48
7.34
. 15
.19
2.28
3. 66
1.40
5.10
1. 58
1.78
5. 21
.98
1.90
.86
.06
1.15
1.92
.08

$57.92
6. 89
12.35
0
4.18
2. 36
4. 21
.91
4.91
1.69
2.02
10. 65
1.25
2.14
.60
. 19
1. 66
1.64
.27

$77.18
7.13
20.32
.41
3. 31
3.03
3.72
1.46
6.00
2. 23
1.97
13. 83
1. 69
3. 21
.80
.25
2.42
5.24
.16

$77.17
7.90
16.54
0
1.31
2. 55
2.95
.85
6.79
1. 71
1.68
19. 56
1.11
2. 58
1. 63
.08
1.43
7.48
1.02

$104.02
7.63
21. 65
8.07
4.06
3. 57
2.83
.73
5.42
2.40
1.99
32.00
1.88
3.54
1.95
. 15
2.11
3.82
.22

$500 to $600 to
$600
$700

household Operation Expenditures Other Than
for Fuel, Light, and Refrigeration
Families in s u r v e y .____ ___ _____________
Number of families spending for—
Water rent________________________ _ _
Telephone___________________ _________
Domestic service: Full-time____________
Part-time____________
Laundry out_____ _____________________
Postage, telegrams.______ _____________
Moving, express, freight, drayage___ __
Safe-deposit box______ _
. . . _____
Insurance on furniture__________________
Interest on debts________________ ____

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




238
T

able

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
1 2 .— H o u seh o ld operation expenditures other than f o r fu e l, light , and refrigera­
tion , by econom ic level— Continued
KANSAS CITY, M O .-K A N S — NEGRO FAMILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

Household Operation Expenditures Other Than for Fuel, Light,
and Refrigeration
Families in survey___________________________________________
Number of families spending for—
Water rent___ _________ ___________________ ______ _
Telephone_______________________________________________
Domestic service: Full-time_____________ _______ _
Part-time____________ __ _____________
Laundry out____________
_______ _____ ___________ _
Postage, telegrams-----------------------------------------------------Moving, express, freight, drayage— _____________________
Safe-deposit box__________________________________________
Insurance on furniture______________- -----------------------------Interest on debts___________________________ _____________
Average expenditure per family for household operation other
than fuel, light, and refrigeration, total _____ ____
_
Water rent___ ________
___ _ _ ______ _______ _______
Telephone_____
__________________________________
Domestic service: Full-tim e.____ _________ ____ . . .
Part-time_______________ ____________
Household paper._ ___ _____ ______ ______ _ . ._ . . .
Bar soap___ . ______________ ____
_ __________________
Starch, bluing______ ___________________________________
Soap flakes, powder_________________________ ____________
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc____- ____
. . ._
Matches______ ________ _____________ . . . _______ ____
Laundry out___ __________ . . .
______ _____________
Stationery, pens, pencils, ink. _ . . . __ ________________
Postage, telegrams— _______ ___________ . . . ________
Moving, express, freight, drayage_____ __ _ . . . . ------------Safe-deposit box___ _______ _
____ _______ . . . ______
Insurance on furniture. _ _ . . . _ ___________ _______
Interest on debts___ _____ __ . ___
_____ ____ . . .
Other items.. . . . . ___ . . . _____ . . . _________
_______
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




103

32

29

42

55
30
0
1
39
93
11
0
4
4

16
4
0
0
12
28
2
0
1
2

14
7
0
0
7
27
5
0
2
1

25
19
0
1
20
38
4
0
1
1

$42.15
5.86
11. 35
0
.01
1.94
4.43
.78
2. 73
1.07
1.80
7. 41
.99
1.43
.47
0
.30
1. 53
.05

$29.43
4.80
3.93
0
0
1.92
4. 67
.79
2. 32
.69
1. 62
5.10
.98
1.00
.22
0
.22
1.05
.12

$36. 37
5. 37
9.80
0
0
1.63
4.43
.81
2.13
1.16
1.97
4. 78
.97
1.41
.46
0
.60
.82
.03

$55. 79
7.01
18.07
0
.03
2.16
4.24
.75
3.45
1. 30
1.82
10. 98
1.02
1.77
.67
0
.14
2.38
0

239

TABULAE SUM M AEY
T

able

1 2 .— H o u seh o ld operation expenditures other than f o r fu e l, light , and refrigera­
tio n , hy econom ic level— Continued
M IN N EAPO LIS-ST. PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item •

All
fami­
lies

Economic level-—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

Household Operation Expenditures Other Than
for Fuel, Light, and Refrigeration
504

47

114

106

86

59

92

277
224
14
39
115
490
71
31
120
82

26
9
2
0
3
44
2
1
7
6

62
35
1
4
13
109
17
8
26
24

58
43
2
10
23
102
15
4
16
15

47
48
6
7
22
86
14
5
26
15

36
38
2
7
19
59
9
2
16
11

48
51
1
11
35
90
14
11
29
11

Average expenditure per family for house­
hold operation other than fuel, light,
and refrigeration, total------------------------ $57. 87
4.13
Water ren t... -------------- -----------------------13. 67
Telephone______________________________
2.31
Domestic service: Full-time. -------------Part-time____________
2.03
3. 52
Household p a p e r ..____ __ . ---------------3. 65
Bar soap. _ . _____________ ______._
Starch, bluing_________________________
.96
Soap flakes, powder_ ___________ __
_
5.57
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc.
2.14
1.18
Matches____ . . ----------- -----------------7. 69
Laundry out------ ----------------------------- .
1.46
Stationery, pens, pencils, ink
. . ._ . .
2. 52
Postage, telegrams_____________
. ..
Moving, express, freight, drayage----------.99
. 21
Safe-deposit box.----------------------------------1.56
Insurance on furniture. — . . . . . . ____
2. 97
Interest on debts
. . . _ . __
1. 31
Other items.. . _______ . _ .
-

$34.15
3. 89
4. 72
1.36
0
3.01
4. 05
1.12
4. 55
1.94
1.17
1.36
1.21
1.74
.15
.06
.78
2.06
.98

$41. 70
3.64
8. 64
.06
.66
2.96
3.80
.84
5.10
1.63
1.13
3.00
1. 31
1.79
.88
.23
1. 33
3. 74
.96

$56. 33
4.17
12.31
3. 49
2.82
3.20
3. 72
1.01
5. 87
2.12
.96
7.19
1.30
2.14
.86
.11
.95
*3.09
1.02

$66. 77
4. 71
16. 27
5. 67
1.19
4.00
3.80
.98
6. 02
2. 30
.98
.7. 93
1.50
2.80
1.34
.20
1.69
3. 92
1.47

$75. 34
4. 78
21.52
2. 66
2.24
4. 34
3. 68
.87
5. 75
2.49
1.62
12. 50
1.81
2.78
1.36
.10
2.00
3.17
1.67

$72.14
3. 85
18. 56
.85
4.50
3. 85
3.00
1.01
5. 81
2.50
1.39
13. 97
1.68
3. 85
1.17
.44
2.53
1. 33
1. 85

Families in survey-------------------------------------Number of families spending for—
Water rent_____________________________
Telephone______________
___ _____
Domestic service: Full-time. __ ------------Part-time___ ________
Laundry out_______
____________ ____
Postage, telegrams _ ________ ____ . . .
Moving, express, freight, drayage_______
Safe-deposit box _ _________ ________
Insurance on furniture-------- . . . ------Interest on debts.__ ----------------------- . . .

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329.




240
T

able

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
1 2 ,— H o u seh o ld opera tion expenditures other than f o r f u e l, light, and refrigera­
tion , hy econom ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAMILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500 to $600 to
$600
$700

$700
and
over

Household Operation Expenditures Other Than
for Fuel, Light, and Refrigeration

Families in survey-----------------------------------Number of families spending for—
Water rent___________________________
Telephone—__________________________
Donlestic service: Full-time___________
Part-time___________
Laundry out_________________________
Postage, telegrams____________________
Moving, express, freight, drayage---------Safe-deposit box______________________
Insurance on furniture------------------------Interest on debts_____________________

401

54

65

94

62

42

84

126
102
6
27
72
376
52
33
38
70

22
8
1
1
4
49
7
1
3
14

15
14
0
2
9
60
2
3
6
8

34
19
2
3
21
87
11
3
8
23

17
12
0
4
9
58
11
6
6
6

15
15
1
4
7
42
8
8
4
5

23
34
2
13
22
80
13
12
11
14

Average expenditure per family for house­
hold operation other than fuel, light,
and refrigeration, total______________ $49.62
3. 51
Water rent___________________________
8.60
Telephone___________________________
1.53
Domestic service: Full-time___________
Part-time___________
1. 76
Household paper_____________________
3.04
3. 55
Bar soap_____________________________
Starch, bluing________________________
1.35
6. 36
Soap flakes, powder___________________
Cleaning powder, polish, steel wool, etc__
2.34
1.88
Matches_____________________________
6.69
Laundry out_________________________
1. 27
Stationery, pens, pencils, ink__________
1.85
Postage, telegrams____________________
1.01
Moving, express, freight, drayage______
.38
Safe-deposit box______________________
.74
Insurance on furniture___,_____________
3. 39
Interest on debts_____________________
.37
Other items__________________________

$38.32
4. 67
4.25
.65
.17
2.58
4.29
1.44
5. 75
2.01
2.39
1.96
1.14
1. 21
1.11
.08
.27
3.85
.50

$37.22
2.19
5.91
0
.43
2.61
3.86
1.42
5.76
2.01
1. 75
4.75
1.12
1.51
.26
.25
.52
2.47
.40

$48.05
4. 02
6.04
2.46
.48
3.18
3.59
1.48
6.25
2.07
1.99
6.88
1.14
1.63
.68
.14
.43
5.17
.42

$42.09
3.22
6.98
0
1.16
3.07
3. 36
1. 35
6.29
2.49
1.80
4.90
1.13
2.09
1.18
.43
.82
1.54
.28

$58. 53
3. 92
13. 55
4.29
3.38
3.53
3. 62
1. 36
5.90
2.17
1.86
5.03
1.10
1.98
1.88
.88
.53
3.33
.22

$69.34
3.23
15.08
1.98
4.89
3.23
2.92
1.08
7. 61
3.09
1.58
13.15
1.79
2. 53
1.34
.65
1.59
3.23
.37

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329,




241

TABULAR SUMM ARY
T

able

12.—

H o u seh o ld op era tion expenditures other than f o r fu e l, light, and refrigera­
tion, hy econ om ic level— Continued

St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families

Item

Ali
families

Salt Lake City, U tah White families

Economic l e v e l —
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

All
fami­
lies

$400
and
over

Economic level—F a m ilie s
spending per expenditure
unit per year

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Household Operation Expenditures
Other Than for Fuel, Light, and
Refrigeration
Families in survey_______________ _
Number of families spending for—
Water rent_____________ ____
Telephone____________ ______
Domestic service: Full-time___
Part-time___
Laundry out__________________
Postage, telegrams____________
Moving, express, freight, drayage—
Safe-deposit box_____ _ ___ ___
Insurance on furniture. _ _____
Interest on debts____
_____

106

28

27

51

210

54

55

72

29

18
21
0
0
29
76

5
4
0
0
2
16

4
1
0
0
7
21

9
16
0
0
20
39

107
87
4
12
89
181

30
12
0
0
10
42

26
21
0
4
24
46

36
35
4
5
33
66

15
19
0
3
22
27

17
2
4
5

5
1
2
2

2
0
0
1

10
1
2
2

28
25
37
22

8
2
8
6

7
7
8
6

7
8
14
4

6
8
7
6

$57. 61 $44.16 $53.86 $61. 39
5.66
4.85
5. 70
5.40
11.56
6.74 11.01 12.63
0
0
2.39
6.96
0
2.44
.89
.43
3. 52
3.27
3.86
2.99
4. 52
5. 21
4.04
5.58
.95
.85
1.13
.78
4. 53
5. 51
5. 02
3.88

$80.53
5.24
18.91
0
.77
2.40
2.40
.31
2. 75

Average expenditure per family
for household operation other
than fuel, light, and refrigera­
tion, total___________________ $37.12 $28.29 $25.31 $48. 25
Water rent________ ___________
1.57
1.71
.75
1.93
6.49
Telephone____________________
3.98
1.34 10.60
0
0
0
0
Domestic service: Full-time___
0
0
0
Part-time___
0
2. 45
2. 61
Household paper______________
2.30
2.56
4. 36
4.61
Bar soap_________
_________
5. 37
3.66
Starch, bluing_______________
1.04
.88
1.32
.98
4.54
Soap flakes, powder__________
4.30
4.17
4.24
Cleaning powder, polish, steel
wool, etc____________________
1.05
.70
1.05
1.24
1.64
Matches— ___ _ ___
1.50
1.50
1.79
2.24
Laundry out_ _____
_
___ __
9.97
4.50 17.10
Stationery, pens, pencils, ink___
.86
.79
.93
.87
1.31
Postage, telegrams..
_______
.95
1.72
1.30
Moving, express, freight, dray1.21
1.26
age—
1.90
.43
.09
.18
0
.10
Safe-deposit box_____________ _
Insurance on furniture_______
.26
.56
0
.23
.44
.42
.38
Interest on debts._ . . . . .
.49
0
.08
.01
Other items. .
. ...
.16
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 329*




2.35
1.47
11.62
1.92
2. 35

2.08
1.90
5.50
1.69
2.19

2. 51
1.51
10.07
1.67
2.07

2. 60
1.23
11.14
2.05
2. 41

1.93
1. 22
27.15
2. 47
3.02

.95
.31
1.20
2.01
.02

1.03
.09
.99
1.06
.04

.59
.27
.83
1.59
0

1.02
.26
1.11
.97
.05

1. 33
.87
2.60
7.16
0

242

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

13. — T ra n sp orta tion ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

Transportation Expenditures
Families in survey___________________ . . . ____ ______________
Number of families spending for transportation.._ . . . _____
Number of families owning automobiles____________________
Number of automobiles owned______ _____________________
Made: 1936______________________________________________
1933-35___________________________________________
1930-32____________________________________________
1927-29____________________________________________
Before 1927___________ _______ ______ _ _________
Originally purchased:
New____________________ ________________ _. _______ __
Second-hand. _______________________________ ______ __
Number of families purchasing automobiles in year:
New_____________ _____
_. __
__ ___________________
Second-hand . . . __ ______ _________
________ . . . . . .
Number of families purchasing motorcycles in year_________
Number of families spending for transportation other than
automobile and motorcycle:
Trolley..
_____ _____ ______ _________ _______________
Local bus_____ ___ _________ _____ ___________ _____
Taxi_____________________________________________________
Bicycle__________________________________________________
_. ----------------Railroad__________ _____________ ____ _
Interurban bus. _ ____________
______ __ . . . ___ . . .
Boat
_
_____ _______________
Airplane____ ________ _
. . . ______ _______ _ . . . . .

295
287
208
209
0
36
60
91
22

92
86
54
54
0
3
11
31
9

106
105
77
78
0
12
23
35
8

97
96
77
77
0
21
26
25
5

79
130

14
40

29
49

36
41

10
23
1

0
11
0

3
6
0

7
6
1

209
3
15
6
21
17
2
1

62
2
1
4
7
3
1
0

82
1
9
2
7
4
1
0

65
0
5
0
7
10
o
1

Average expenditure for all transportation, total........... ..........
Automobiles and motorcycles—purchase, operation and
maintenance . . . ______ . . . _____ ______ ____________
Purchase of: Automobiles___ ___ _______ ______________
Motorcycles . . . _____ _______ . . . ________
Gasoline___
________ _ _______ ________ _______ _
Fall__________________________________________________
Winter.. . ________
. . .
_ _______ . . . _____
Spring____ _ ___ _______ _______________ . . . _____
Summer____________
. . . _ . . . . . ______ _______
Oil__________________
__________________________
Tires. ________ _. . . _______ __________ . _______
Tubes
_ ___________________
_ ________________
________ __
Repairs and maintenance
_
...
Garage rent and parking___ __________ . . . . . . . ____
Licenses and taxes.. . _________ _ _ . . . . _. ______
Insurance _________________________ _____
__________
Fines and damages____ . . . __________
_______________
Rent of automobile and/or motorcycle. ________ ________
Other automobile and motorcycle transportation expense... ____________ . . . __ ____ _______________
Other transportation___ ______________________ ________
Trolley_________________________________________________
Local bus________ ____________________ _______________
Taxi. __
___ ________. . . . . . ________ _________ . . .
___ _
_
__________________________________
Bicycles
Railroad___ __ _
____ _____ ____
_____ . . .
. . . _.
Interurban bus. _______ _____ ___________ ____________
B oat.. _______________________________ _______________
Airplane________ __________ ______
. _______ . . . ._
Other transportation expense.______ ___________________

$143. 57

$87. 75

$137.19

$203. 46

117. 76
33. 50
.34
48. 71
11. 64
11.57
11.94
13.56
7. 08
4.16
.62
6. 98
3.26
6. 52
4. 46
1.59
.50

63. 69
12. 18
0
33.12
8.01
8.17
8.24
8.70
4. 31
2.69
.39
2.98
1.37
4. 83
.79
1.03
0

109. 93
25.16
0
48. 95
11.66
11.64
12. 43
13. 22
7. 24
5. 39
.77
6. 34
3. 11
6. 66
4. 46
1.02
.71

177.60
62.85
1.03
63.24
15.07
14. 72
14.90
18. 55
9. 52
4.20
.66
11.48
5.20
7. 97
7. 95
2. 76
.74

.04
25.81
21.41
.26
. 11
.38
2. 38
1.16
.07
.03
.01

0
24.06
19. 57
.83
.04
.99
1.67
.76
.20
0
0

.12
27.26
24.45
0)
.14
.19
1.41
1.05
.02
0
0

0
25. 86
19.84
0
.15
0
4.11
1.65
0
.09
.02

1 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




TABULAR SUMM ARY
T

able

243

13.— T ra n sp orta tion ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$700
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

357

45

92

73

50

43

54

356
221
229
4
51
73
80
21

45
20
21
0
0
4
12
5

91
53
54
0
8
17
23
16

73
48
49
0
8
17
20
4

50
31
32
1
7
13
9
2

43
26
28
1
7
8
11
1

54
43
45
2
21
14
5
3

60
169

5
16

7
47

6
43

12
20

10
18

20
25

16
60

0
8

0
14

1
15

1
10

3
3

11
10

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

304
6
81
1
30
19
1
0

37
1
12

79
2
20

41
0
16

0

0

1
2
0
0

7
9
1
0

67
1
11
1
6
0
0
0

39
0
7
0
3
1
0
0

41
2
15
0
9
3
0
0

$74.33 $108.70 $161. 51 $183.91 $166. 48

$348.96

Transportation Expenditures
Families in survey- _______________________
Number of families spending for transpor­
tation________________________________
Number of families owning automobiles..
Number of automobiles owned ________
Made: 1936___________________________
1933-35________________________
1930-32________________________
1927-29________________________
Before 1927____________________
Originally purchased:
New______
_ __ ___
____
Second-hand ______________________
Number of families purchasing automo­
biles in year:
New__ __
Second-hand . . _____ _______ _ _
Number of families purchasing motor­
cycles in year____________________ _
Number of families spending for trans­
portation other than automobile and
motorcycle:
Trolley_______________________________
Local bus_____ ___ ___ ___ __________
T a x i_____
______________ _______
Bicycle_______________
____________
Railroad______ _______ __________
___ _
Interurban b u s _____ ____ __
Boat _______________________ _____
Airplane. __
______
____ _
_ _

Average expenditure for all transporta­
tion, total,
_______ ____________ $168.98
Automobiles and motorcycles—pur­
chase, operation and maintenance. 136.89
62.62
Purchase of: Automobiles._ _
0
Motorcycles __ __
42.32
Gasoline. _ . . . . __
___ __
Fall______________________________
10. 60
9. 88
_
___
Winter_______ ______
Spring_________________________ -_
10. 69
11.15
Summer____ _ . _____________
Oil_________________________________
4. 50
2. 86
Tires_____________________ _______
.69
Tubes____ __
_ _ _ _ _______
6. 50
Repairs and maintenance__________
Garage rent and parking____________
3. 00
Licenses and taxes._ .
_____
8.94
Insurance
. . . ___ ____
______
1. 67
. 14
Fines and damages.
___ ______
Rent of automobile and/or motor­
cycle.
________________________
3. 60
Other automobile and motorcycle
.05
transportation expense___________
Other transportation.. . . . ___ . . . _
32. 09
Trolley_____________________________
27. 66
Local b u s ____
_______ ___ . . .
.30
Taxi_______________________________
2.16
.07
Bicycle__________________ . . . _ _
Railroad___________________________
1.35
.53
Interurban bus ___________________
.02
Boat_____ _____
_________________
0
Airplane__________ ________________
Other transportation expense_______
(0
1 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




0

4
4
0
0

42.69
11.89
0
15. 75
4.03
3. 69
3.95
4.08
1.43
1. 75
.33
2.93
0
3.89
.20
.12

79.86
29.27
0
29. 66
7. 51
6. 86
7. 43
7. 86
3. 27
1.48
.25
3. 75
.45
7.43
.71
.31

127.40
46. 58
0
45. 52
11.11
10. 52
11.75
12.14
4. 59
3. 62
.37
8.19
2.17
10.28
1.87
0

151. 66
70.72
0
47. 32
10.98
10.96
12. 70
12. 68
5. 00
2. 03
1.12
7. 25
3. 89
9. 42
2. 68
.17

125.90
43. 61
0
48. 29
12. 48
11.39
11.60
12. 82
4. 94
2. 82
2. 21
7. 36
4.12
7.55
1.88
.12

320.44
191. 09
0
72. 34
18. 82
17. 08
17. 84
18.60
8. 20
5. 93
.55
10. 48
9. 26
14. 57
3.15
.03

4.40

3. 28

4.21

1.82

3.00

4. 75

0
31. 64
28. 63
.19
2.59
0
.13

0
28.84
24.43
.02
2. 64
0
.91
.75
.09

0
34.11
30.95
1.20
.28
.36
1. 32

.24
32.25
27. 23
0
3. 75
0
1. 05

0
40. 58
38.13
0
1. 02

.09
28. 52
20.00
.18
2.95

.85
.53

3.87
1. 52

.05

0
0

.1 0
0
0
0

0
0

0

.2 2

0

0

0
0

0
0

0

0
0

0

0

244

W EST NORTH CENTRAL-M OUNTAIN REGION

T able 13.—

T ra n sp orta tion ex p en d itu res, by econ om ic level— Continued

KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .— NEGRO FAM ILIES

Item

Allfami-

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

Transportation Expenditures
Families in survey___________________________ __ ____________
Number of families spending for transportation____________
Number of families owning automobiles,._________ _______
Number of automobiles owned_______ _____________ _______
Made: 1936_______________________________________________
1933-35____________________________________________
1930-32____________________________________________
1927-29____________________________________________
Before 1927________________________________________
Originally purchased:
New___________ _________ _ ____________ ____ ______
Second-hand______________
___________________ ____
Number of families purchasing automobiles in year:
New________________ ______________ ____ ____ ___ ____ __
Second-hand__________ ________________ _____
_________
Number of families purchasing motorcycles—in year____ ___
Number of families spending for transportation other than
automobile and motorcycle:
Trolley___ ____ ____________________________
___________
Local bus____________________________________
_________
T a x i______________________________________________
___
Bicycle... ________
_ ______ ____
_ _ _ _ _ _ ...
___
Railroad____________ ______ ________ __ ________
__ __
Interurban bus ___ . . . _____ ____ _______ __ _______ _
Boat___
_ __
_____ ________ ___________ __________
__
Airplane___________ ______________________ _____ _

103
101
22
22
0
3
6
12
1

32
30
6
6
0
0
2
4
0

29
29
3
3
0
0
0
2
1

42
42
13
13
0
3
4
6
0

5
17

0
6

0
3

5
8

0
5
0

0
1
0

0
1
0

0
3
0

93
0
25
1
11
6
0
0

28
0
4
1
2
3
0
0

29
0
8
0
4
1
0
0

36
0
13
0
5
2
0
0

Average expenditure for all transportation, total_____ _____
Automobiles and motorcycles—purchase, operation, and
maintenance_____
__ ____________________ _____ __
Purchase of: Automobiles______ ______ _______ __ _ _ _
Motorcycles_____ _._ ___ _______ _
__
Gasoline____ ___ ____ _ _________ __________ _____
Fall__________________________________________________
Winter.. ____ ____
________ ____ _
___ __ ___
Spring_______ _ ___ _ _ ___ ._ ___ ______________
Summer. _ _ __
___ __
___ _ _________ _____
Oil___________ _______________________________________
_________ _____ _ ________________
Tires________ _
Tubes_________________________________________________
Repairs and maintenance .
____ ________
_ __ __
Garage rent and parking__________
_________ __ _ ..
_____ ___
Licenses and taxes_____ _ ______ _____
Insurance... __ . . . _ _ _ _ _ _ _. ___ _ _ ___ _______
__ _
. _
Fines and damages _ . . . . . . _____
Rent of automobile and/or motorcycle__________ _ _ ___
Other automobile and motorcycle transportation expense.
Other transportation_____________ _____________________
Trolley__________________________________ ___________
Local bus_______________________
___________________
Taxi______
_ __ . . . ____ __________
_______ _
Bicycle _
__ ______ __
___ __ _ _________ .
Railroad___ _ ______
_ ___________________ ______
Interurban bus ___ __ __ __ _ __ . . . ___ _____________
Boat___ ______ ____________ _________ . . . ______ ____
Airplane_____________________
_ ___
_ _
__ __
Other transportation expense._ __________
___________

$80.99

$59. 22

$60.83

$111.7

33.06
9.90
0
13.02
3.36
2.83
3. 21
3. 62
1.18
1.05
.19
2.95
.13
2. 56
.36
.01
1. 51
.20
47. 93
41.89
0
2.67
.15
2.47
.75
0
0
0

21.06
1.09
0
11.13
2. 76
2.78
2. 76
2.83
.80
1.31
.06
2. 58
0
2.00
0
0
2.00
.09
38.16
32.46
0
1.00
.47
2.12
2.11
0
0
0

11.54
3.45
0
3. 58
1.06
.78
.76
.98
.41
.86
.30
.47
0
.84
.17
.34
1.12
0
49.29
45.00
0
.95
0
3.24
.10
0
0
0

57.28
21.08
0
20.96
5.39
4. 30
5. 23
6.04
1.99
.99
.21
4. 95
.32
4.18
.76
0
1. 41
.43
54.43
46.93
0
5.13
0
2.21
.16
0
0
0

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




TABULAR
T

able

SUM M ARY

245

13, — T ra n sp o rta tio n ex p en d itu res , by eco n o m ic level— Continued
M IN N E A P O L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to
$400
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

T r a n sp o rta tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey________________________
Number of families spending for transpor­
tation. . ______ ______________ _______
Number of families owning automobiles___
Number of automobiles owned .
Made: 1936_____________________________
1933-35__________________________
1930-32__________________________
1927-29__________________________
Before 1927______________________
Originally purchased:
New__________ __ ___________ ______
Second-hand__________ _____ ____
Number of families purchasing automo­
biles in year:
New_________
. . ________ . .
. .
Second-hand_____________
Number of families purchasing motorcycles
in year.__ _________________
Number of families spending for transpor­
tation other than automobile and mo­
torcycle:
Trolley _ _________ _________ _______
________
Local bus______________ ____
Taxi __ . . . __ __________ __ ______
_______________ ________ _
Bicycle.
Railroad_______________________ __ _ _ _
Interurban bus_______________ . . . __ .
Boat___ __ _ ________________ ______
Airplane____________________
________

504

47

114

106

86

59

92

504
334
336
3
78
104
133
18

47
20
20
0
2
4
10
4

114
68
69
1
10
17
34
7

106
64
64
0
8
22
30
4

86
59
59
1
14
20
21
3

59
47
48
1
11
21
15
0

92
76
76
0
33
20
23
0

103
233

4
16

15
54

14
50

19
40

13
35

38
38

23
66

0
2

3
13

1
15

4
12

3
9

12
15

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

477
17
37
6
33
49
14
3

42
2
1
1
1
8
2
0

108
3
7
2
9
8
3
1

103
3
8
1
4
10
1
0

82
2
4
1
6
9
1
1

57
3
5
1
5
7
3
0

85
4
12
0
8
7
4
1

Average expenditure for all transporta­
tion, total_______________ ____________ $156.84
Automobiles and motorcycles—purchase,
operation, and maintenance ..
121. 52
Purchase of: Automobiles___
47. 44
Motorcycles_____ __ __
0
G asoline...___ _ . . . _ __ . . . __ . 42. 21
10.24
Fall________________________________
Winter_______________ ______
_
7. 97
Springs____________________________
10. 95
Summer______________________ _
13. 05
Oil___________________________________
5. 08
3.59
Tires. _ ____________
___ . . .
Tubes
_
________
_. ___ _____
.60
Repairs and maintenance________
9. 08
Garage rent and parking_____ . . . __
2. 39
5.54
Licenses and taxes___ __
______
Insurance________
____ __ _
___ _
3. 82
Fines and damages.
...
_____
.30
Rent of automobile and/or motor­
cycle_________________________ _ .
1.32
Other automobile and motorcycle
transportation expense__________ _
.15
Other transportation. . . . __ _ _
35. 32
Trolley_______________________________
32. 21
.50
Local bus____________ _________ ____
.21
Taxi________________________________
.19
Bicycle. __
_______
_______ _
1.28
Railroad_____________ ______ __
.77
Interurban bus______ _____ ______
.12
Boat______________
_____
_______
.02
Airplane___________ ___ _
___ _
.02
Other transportation expense___ . . .
i Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




$60.05 $114. 50 $127.31 $153.79 $200.13 $267.88
84. 82
27. 78
0
33.65
8.12
6. 27
8. 62
10. 64
3.94
3. 30
.57
5.46
.67
4.80
2.88
.22

92.31
28.82
0
37. 57
9. 29
7.11
9.92
11.25
4. 68
3.15
.48
7. 58
1.74
4.59
1.32
.29

114.09
46.44
0
41.00
9. 95
7.61
10.62
12. 82
4.48
3.84
.72
7.14
1.61
5.66
2.84
.20

159. 88
60.45
0
51.32
12. 55
10.23
12. 82
15. 72
6.10
5. 88
.79
16. 01
4.94
6.59
6.28
.02

228.38
108.08
0
66.06
15.78
12.58
17.31
20.39
8.26
4.17
.80
15. 89
5.00
8.06
8.83
.86

.47

1.55

2.09

.02

1. 25

1.82

0
27.19
23.26
1.27
.06
.13
.03
1.99
.45
0
0

0
29.68
27.78
.04
.15
.20
.97
.42
.12
0)
0

0
35.00
32.72
.53
.13
.05
.46
1.08
.03
0
0

.14
39. 70
36. 55
.43
.09
.34
1.91
.30
.01
.06
.01

.25
40. 25
37.02
.06
.19
.57
1.86
.48
.07
0
0

.55
39. 50
34.53
.96
.58
0
2.31
.85
.16
.03
.08

32.86
3.91
0
17. 58
4. 29
2. 88
4.79
5. 62
2. 35
.84
.09
2. 77
1.15
3.06
.64
0

246

W EST
T

able

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

13. — T ra n sp orta tion exp en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

$700
and
over

T r a n s p o rta tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey- _____________ __ _
Number of families spending for transportation___ _ ------------. _ ___ Number of families owning automobiles.
Number of automobiles owned _ _
Made: 1936___________________________
1933-35________________________
1930-32________________________
1927-29________________________
Before 1927____ _ _________ _
Originally purchased:
New____ _ ______
___ __
_ _
Second-hand___ __ _ ________ _
Number of families purchasing automo­
biles in year:
New_____
_________________
Second-hand _________________ ___ _
Number of families purchasing motorcycles in year _______
_____ __ __
Number of families spending for trans­
portation other than automobile
and motorcycle:
Trolley____ __
------------------------_________ __________
Local bus___
T a x i________ _ ____ _____ _________
Bicycle_______________________________
__
Railroad. _ _____ __ __ ___ _
Interurban b u s _______________ _ ___
Boat ----------------- -------------------------Airplane _______________________ _ _

401

54

65

94

62

42

84

400
216
220
6
38
78
76
22

53
16
16
0
0
6
7
3

65
29
30
0
2
9
12
7

94
45
47
0
5
16
22
4

62
35
35
1
5
16
11
2

42
28
28
1
4
10
9
4

84
63
64
4
22
21
15
2

88
132

3
13

11
19

10
37

11
24

16
12

37
27

19
39

0
3

0
7

0
13

4
5

1
2

14
9

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

331
56
14
6
20
21
10
2

45
6
0
1
2
2
0
0

58
5
1
0
1
0
0
0

79
15
4
4
6
6
1
0

53
6
1
1
3
7
2
0

36
5
4
0
3
5
1
1

60
19
4
0
5
1
6
1

$84.20 $105. 22 $143. 55 $166.43 $169. 00

$285. 07

Average expenditure for all transporta­
$165.17
tion, total _ ___________
______
Automobiles and motorcycles—pur­
chase, operation, and maintenance. 113. 64
Purchase of: Automobiles _ _______ 45. 88
Motorcycles___________
0
34. 86
Gasoline.
_
_ _ ___ __ __
8. 67
Fall______________________________
Winter. ___ _____ __ _________
8. 00
Spring____ _______ _________ . . .
8. 82
Summer______ _
_________
__
9. 37
Oil_________________________________
4. 33
Tires . . . ___ _ __
_ __ __ ______
3. 51
Tubes _ __________________________
.43
6. 63
Repairs and maintenance ___ __
2. 06
Garage rent and parking____ _
9. 33
Licenses and taxes __
_ _ __
2. 76
Insurance___ __
_____ __
Fines and damages. ______. . .
.27
Rent of automobile and/or motor­
cycle__________
_
3. 38
Other automobile and motorcycle
transportation expense_________
.20
Other transportation. _ __________
51. 53
Trolley______ _______ ___________
41.98
Local bus________ -_ __________
6. 88
Taxi________________________________
. 16
Bicycle.. . _______________ _____
.31
___ __
1.46
Railroad_________________
Interurban b u s... ___ __ _
____
.53
.18
Boat_____________________________ .
Airplane___ _______________ . . . _
.01
Other transportation expense.___
.02
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




35. 97
11.24
0
10. 66
2. 47
2. 25
2.88
3.06
1. 51
1.74
.08
2.25
.78
4. 41
.10
1.22

55. 05
15.08
0
21.91
5. 75
4. 97
5. 39
5. 80
2. 59
1.83
.27
3. 36
1.67
6. 64
.51
.05

85. 40
29. 40
0
27.88
7. 59
6. 77
6. 38
7.14
3. 38
2.14
.38
6.78
1.61
8. 23
1.14
.10

1.98

.96

4. 22

5. 61

3. 83

3. 34

0
48.23
41.80
5. 31
0
.28
.33
.51
0
0
0

.18
50.17
40. 98
9. 05
.01
0
.13
0
0
0
0

.14
58.15
47. 54
7. 37
.06
.91
1.44
.80
.03
0
0

.22
50. 66
41.67
3. 77
.04
.40
3.14
1.39
.09
0
.16

0
52. 82
43.32
5.54
.53
0
2.78
.35
.25
.05
0

.47
47. 32
36. 21
8. 62
.41
0
1.35
.10
.62
.01
0

115. 77 116.18
46. 33
27. 83
0
0
36. 74
46. 72
9. 06
10. 52
8.23
9. 38
9. 31 . 13.28
10.14
13. 54
4.27
5. 93
5. 46
4. 79
.61
.37
4.54
5. 26
1.35
3. 71
9. 60
11. 78
.77
5.94
.27
.02

237. 75
119.15
0
60. 97
14. 92
14.56
15. 44
16. 05
7. 77
5. 39
.75
14.03
3. 40
14. 41
7.91
. 16

TABULAR
T

able

247

SUM M ARY

13. — T ra n sp orta tion ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued
St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families

Item

All
families

Salt Lake City, Utah—White
families

Economic level—Fam­
ilies spending per
expenditure
unit
per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
and
over

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— F a m ilie s
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

T r a n s p o rta tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

106
Families in survey_____________
Number of families spending
104
for transportation__________
Number of families owning
21
automobiles........ ............ .......
Number of a u to m o b ile s
21
owned. _ _ ____ __________
2
Made: 1936________________
4
1933-36_____________
8
1930-32_____________
7
1927-29_____________
0
Before 1927_________
Originally purchased:
6
New____________________
Second-hand_____________
16
Number of families purchas­
ing automobiles in year:
3
New__________________ . . .
4
Second-hand__________ __
Number of families purchas0
ing motorcycles in year___
Number of families spending
for transportation other
than automobile and
motorcycle:
97
Trolley____________________
3
Local bus.......... ........... ........
24
Taxi_______________________
1
Bicycle____________________
14
Railroad___________________
1
Interurban bus.___________
0
Boat_______________ ______
0
Airplane___________ ______
Average expenditure for all
transportation, total.. . . . $106. 06
Automobiles and motor­
cycles—purchase, oper­
56.06
ation and maintenance..
29.91
Purchase o:: Automobiles.
0
Motorcycles.
13.89
Gasoline.._ _____________
3.40
Fall___________________
3.26
Winter________________
Spring_______________ _
3. 67
Summer_______________
3. 56
Oil______________________
2.02
.62
Tires________ _________
.04
T u b e s . _______________
Repairs and maintenance.
2. 72
2.16
Garage rent and parking..
Licenses and taxes.._____
3.07
Insurance_______________
.26
.35
Fines and damages______
Rent of automobile and/
or motorcycle____ _ . . .
.02
Other automobile and
motorcyle transporation expense__________
0
Other transportation... _
51.00
Trolley__________________
42.64
1. 44
Local bus._____ _______
Taxi_____________________
4.04
Bicycle__________________
.24
Railroad_________________
2.40
.24
Interurban bus__________
0
Boat_________ __________
0
Airplane________________
Other tra n sp o r ta tio n
0
expense . . . _
....

28

27

51

210

54

55

72

29

27

27

50

199

47

52

72

28

5

3

13

124

25

34

42

23

5
0
0
4
1
0

3
1
0
1
1
0

13
1
4
3
5
0

126
0
19
25
59
23

25
0
0
3
16
6

35
0
3
8
16
8

43
0
6
8
22
7

23
0
10
6
5
2

1
4

2

4
9

39
87

3
22

12
23

10
33

14
7

0
1

1
0

2
3

4
15

0
2

0
3

1
7

3
3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

25
0
9
0
4
0
0
0

25
1
6
1
3
0
0
0

47
2
9
0
7
1
0
0

148
2
40
0
11
19
3
0

34
1
8
0
3
4
0
0

37
1
13
0
1
2
2
0

58
0
13
0
5
10
0
0

19
0
6
0
2
3
1
0

$62. 68 $84. 42 $141. 28
18.99
5.00
0
9.16
2.29
2.29
2.29
2.29
.79
0
0
.99
0
2. 95
. 10
0
0
0
43.69
34. 24
0
4.59
0
4.86
0
0
0
0

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------- 17




33.23
28. 67
0
2.88
.72
.72
.72
.72
.33
0
0
0
0
1.26
0
0
.09
0
51.19
44. 62
2.31
2.36
.93
.97
0
0
0
0

86.40
44.23
0
22. 30
5.43
5.13
5.98
5.76
3.58
1.29
.09
5.12
4.48
4.10
.48
.73
0
0
54.88
46.20
1.77
4.63
0
1.79
.49
0
0
0

$111 58 $63.12 $95. 62 $113. 61 $227.03
85.94
25. 36
0
37. 51
8. 81
8. 51
9. 33
10.86
4.82
2.92
.30
5.01
.71
6. 65
1.69
.07

33.95
1. 29
0
20.08
5.10
4.62
4. 81
5. 55
2.98
1.58
.09
2.81
.29
4.02
.55
.13

75.87
9.78
0
43. 71
10.49
9.93
11.12
12.17
4.82
3. 44
.55
4.31
.67
6. 64
.76
0

85.71
25.42
0
37. 62
8.63
8.69
9. 38
10. 92
4. 68
3. 65
.22
5.61
.11
6. 64
1.45
.10

202.43
99.60
0
57. 93
12. 94
12.60
14.23
18.16
8. 62
2. 62
.42
8.96
3.07
11.58
6.16
0

.90

.13

1.19

.21

3.47

0
25. 64
19.36
. 14
.74
0
2. 33
2.33
.74
0

0
29.17
20.27
.04
.63
0
2.89
5.34
0
0

0
19. 75
14.09
.48
.79
0
.27
1. 34
2.78
0

0
27.90
24.09
0
.82
0
1.50
1.49
0
0

0
24.60
15. 96
0
.63
0
7. 25
.66
.10
0

0

0

0

0

1

o

248

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

T a b l e 14 .— P erso n a l care expenditures and m edical care exp en d itu res ,
b y econom ic level
D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAMILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

P er so n a l C are E x p en d itv r es

Families in survey____ __ _ _ _ ___________ ____ _______
Number of families spending for personal care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts___________ ___________________________________
Shaves by barber __. _ _ . . _ ___ ______
________
Shampoos--------------------------------------------------------------Manicures __
___ - ------------------ ---------___ _ ___
_ _____
____ _________
Permanent waves___ _ .
Other waves. _ _ _______________________ _________
Other personal care services _ . . . _____ _____ _
...
Toilet articles and preparations:
Toilet soap . . . .
____ __________ . . . . . . . ______
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes______________
Cosmetic and toilet preparations. _ ____________________
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles_________
Average expenditure per family for personal care, total . . .
Personal care services, total_____ ____________ _____ __
Haircuts_____
. ...
________
- ______ ____ _ _
Shaves by barber____ . . . __ . __ . . . ----------------------Shampoos ---------------. ----------- -------------------------- ------------------------------- ---------------Manicures.. .
Permanent waves. . . . . ________ ______ _________ . .
Other waves______________ _____ _________ . . ------------Other personal care services ______ _____ ______ ________
Toilet articles and preparations, total_____ _____
_______
Toilet soap___________ ____________________ . . - . . . . .
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes____ _
Cosmetic and toilet preparations, ____ _ _ _ ________
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles. _ _ _ _ _ _
Average expenditure per person for personal care, total _ ___

29.5

92

106

97

289
20
31
11
145
109
3

90
4
5
1
38
26
1

102
7
10
6
60
43
1

97
9
16
4
47
40
1

264
262
245
164

88
73
67
36

83
99
88
67

93
90
90
61

$29. 41
14.97
9. 21
.37
.56
.18
2.28
2. 30
.07
14. 44
3.94
3. 40
5. 45
1.65
9. 35

$22. 71
11.68
8.08
.17
.17
.01
1.47
1.75
.03
11.03
3.75
2.83
3. 55
.90
5.58

$30. 68
15. 40
9.88
.15
.37
.23
2.46
2.22
.09
15.28
4. 26
3. 75
5.41
1.86
9.80

$34. 37
17.64
9. 55
.80
1.16
.29
2. 85
2.90
.09
16. 73
3.76
3. 55
7. 28
2.14
15.02

109
101
67
177
4
3
2
8
42
7
187
76
37
73

39
28
12
53
1
1
0
1
9
1
37
18
8
17

41
43
19
65
1
1
1
5
15
3
84
28
18
28

29
30
36
59
2
1
1
2
18
3
66
30
11
28

$72. 51

$53. 08

$66. 36

$97. 63

6. 78
5. 98
14. 85
11.56
.20
.85
.14
.56
10. 57
1.08
9. 27
3. 78
.26
4.99
1.64
23. 05

7.00
4.16
9.26
8.89
.05
1.96
0
.38
6. 38
.48
7. 20
2. 46
.12
3.09
1.65
13. 04

7. 66
7.02
13.00
9.48
.38
.42
.35
.89
6.94
1.35
10.10
3.81
.45
3. 78
.73
21.20

5.63
6.59
22.16
16. 36
.14
.26
.04
.36
18. 51
1.37
10.31
4.98
.18
8.11
2. 63
42. 67

M e d ic a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical care:
Services of—
General practitioner: Home _____ _______ _ __ ___ _ _
Office________________ _________
Specialist and other practitioner _ _ . _ ______ _ _ _____
Dentist__________ ___________________________________
Clinic________________________________________ _________
Nurse: In home: Private... . . . ________ ______________
___________________
Visiting_____ __
In hospital. . . . . __ . . . __________ . _
Hospital: Private room_________
____________________
Bed in ward. . . . . . ________ __________
Medicine and drugs _. ______ . . . _ _____ _______ __
Eyeglasses______ _______________________________________
Medical appliances.__ .
._
________________ _______
Accident and health insurance____
. . ________________
Average expenditure per family for medical care, total.. . ._
Services of—
General practitioner: Home _.
___
__________ .
Office____________________________
Specialist and other practitioner_____ _ ______ ______
Dentist . . . _ _______ _________
_____ ______ _ _ . . .
Clinic.
___________________ __________________
Nurse: In home: Private____ ___________ _
______
Visiting. _ ____ _
________________
In hospital_____ ______ . . . _______ _________ __
Hospital: Private room_____ _ ______________________
Bed in ward.__ ’. .
------- ------------------------Medicine and drugs _______ ____ __
_____ _______ __
Eyeglasses_____________________________
______________
Medical appliances
. . . ______ __ . . . ____ _______ _ _
Accident and health insurance___ ________ _
___ . . .
Other medical care. _ ____________ ______________________
Average expenditure per person for medical care, total. . . . .
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




TABULAR
T

able

14.—

SUM M ARY

249

P erson a l care expenditures and m edical care ex p en d itu res, b y econom ic
level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .-'W H IT E FAM ILIES

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
$700
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

45

92

73

50

43

54

40
2
0
0
15
5
0

88
6
7
1
59
23
2

70
4
9
1
49
38
0

46
o
12
3
37
19
1

41
1
9
1
25
18
2

53
3
14
7
40
40
5

43

90

70

50

43

52

40
37

88
87

64
67

46
46

40
42

52
52

$400 to $500 to $600 to
$500
$600
$700

P er so n a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey_______________________
357
Number of families spending for personal
care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts_____________________________
338
Shaves by barber_____________ __
16
Shampoos____________________________
51
Manicures_____ ________ ___________
13
225
Permanent waves_______________
_ _
Other waves____ _________________
143
10
Other personal care services____ _ __
Toilet articles and preparations:
348
Toilet soap___ __
____ __________
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth
washes_____ _____ ______________
330
331
Cosmetic and toilet preparations, _ . _
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet
articles___ ___ ____ __
305
Average expenditure per family for per­
sonal care, total_________ ____________ $29.10
Personal care services, total _______ __ 13.98
Haircuts_________________ ____ _
8.14
. 13
Shaves by barber__________________
Shampoos.__
_______ __________ __
. 70
Manicures_________ ______ ____ __ . . .
.20
Permanent waves____________________
2.63
2. 04
Other waves._______ ________________
. 14
Other personal care services___ _____
Toilet articles and preparations, total___
15.12
4. 69
Toilet soap____________ _____________
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth
3. 42
washes____ _______ ____________
4.50
Cosmetic and toilet preparations . _ _
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet
articles_________ _________ ________
2.51
Average expenditure per person for per­
sonal care, total_______________ _ . . . __
8. 64

32

83

62

43

37

48

$19. 30
8.00
6. 66
.03
0
0
1.23
.08
0
11.30
4. 57

$23. 79
11.41
8. 06
.20
.29
.04
1.97
. 79
.06
12. 38
4. 65

$28. 50
13. 61
8.03
. 21
.39
.08
2. 88
2. 02
0
14. 89
4.81

$33.45
16.20
8. 59
0
1.20
.35
3. 37
2. 63
.06
17. 25
5. 26

$31. 91
15.60
8. 30
. 06
.95
.07
2. 75
2. 82
. 65
16.31
4. 62

$40.92
20. 47
9.12
. 14
1. 75
.81
3. 78
4. 65
. 22
20.45
4. 25

3.18
2.12

2. 86
2.92

3. 40
3.94

3. 98
5. 58

3. 56
5.00

3. 99
8. 56

1. 43

1.95

2. 74

2. 43

3.13

3. 65

3. 84

6.19

8. 86

10.88

12. 37

17.92

8
12
9
18
3
1
0
3
2
4
42
4
2
11

35
38
16
45
3
3
0
0
7
1
89
12
14
21

28
25
14
39
2
1
0
0
3
1
68
16
5
14

22
28
13
27
3
0
0
1
5
0
47
15
9
15

13
18
10
26
0
0
0
2
5
1
40
8
6
18

17
28
9
31
5
4
0
1
6
3
48
11
9
20

$41. 28

$43. 20

$45.00

$70.67

$76.44

$95.00

2. 43
3. 80
8.11
8. 49
.20
.02
0
1. 62
1.80
2.11
6. 55
.88
.04
1. 89

5. 21
7.25
5.14
5. 47
.22
.36
0
0
2.23
.07
9.81
1. 98
. 19
4. 67
.60

5. 73
4. 51
5. 86
8. 68
. 16
.01
0
0
.89
. 55
10.27
3.91
.05
4. 02
.36

15. 20
10. 97
5. 67
7. 74
.38
0
0
.20
5. 71
0
12. 32
4. 43
.22
7.18
.65

3.83
10.99
19. 72
10.12
0
0
0
1. 70
8.66
.41
10.90
2.00
.21
7. 26
.64

10.23
13. 97
10. 72
12.92
1.08
2.91
0
.39
6. 71
5. 05
20.02
3. 63
.63
5.86
.88

8. 21

11.26

13. 98

23. 00

29. 62

41.56

M e d ic a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical
care:
Services of—
General practitioner: Home__ ______
123
149
Office_____ ____
71
Specialist and other practitioner_____
Dentist____ __ __ __ ______ _ _
186
16
__ _
____ _______ _
Clinic______
9
Nurse: In home: Private
. . .
Visiting____________
0
In hospital.
______ ________
7
Hospital: Private room_______________
28
Bed in ward___
______ __
10
334
Medicine and drugs___ _. . . . ____ _
Eyeglasses.. ___ _____. . . __ ______ __
66
45
Medical appliances. ______ ____ ____
.
Accident and health insurance..
99
Average expenditure per family for medical
care, total
. . . ___________
. __ $59. 02
Services of:
General practitioner: Home________
6. 96
8. 24
Office
8. 34
Specialist and other practitioner __
Dentist______________ ____
_____ __ .
8. 51
.33
Clinic_____ __________ ______
. . . __
. 54
Nurse: In home: Private___ ____
Visiting. ___ . _ _ _
0
.50
In hospital
_____________
Hospital: Private room_____ ____ _
3. 84
1.21
Bed in ward .
11. 52
Medicine and drugs___________
. ...
Eyeglasses__________________________ _ _
2. 83
.22
Medical appliances___ _____ _________ _
A c c id e n t a n d h e a lt h in s u r a n c e
5. 21
.77
Other medical care_____________________
Average expenditure per person for medical
17. 52
care, total. _ ___________________________
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




3. 34

250
T able 14.—

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
P erso n a l care expen ditu res and m edical care ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic
level— Continued
KANSAS C IT Y , M O .-K A N S —NEGRO FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

P er so n a l C a re E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey..... ............................................. ........... ..............
Number of families spending for personal care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts------------------------------------------------------------------------Shaves by barber_________________________________ ______
Shampoos______________________________________________
Manicures_________________________________________ __ .
Permanent waves___________________ __ __________ ___
Other waves______________________________________
___
Other personal care services___ ________________________
Toilet articles and preparations:
Toilet soap_______________________
________ _____
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes____ __________
Cosmetic and toilet preparations_______________________
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles______
Average expenditure per family for personal care, total______
Personal care services, total______ ____________ ___________
Haircuts_______________________________________________
Shaves by barber________ __________________
. _
Shampoos_______________ _______ _____________________
Manicures_____ _________ ____________ _ __________
Permanent waves_____________ ___________ __________
Other waves____________________________________________
Other personal care services___ ______________ __________
Toilet articles and preparations, total_______________ _____
Toilet soap___ _________________________________________
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth washes---------------------Cosmetic and toilet preparations. _____________________
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet articles__________
Average expenditure per person for personal care, total..........

103

32

29

42

94
8
22
2
1
25
5

26
0
5
0
0
3
0

26
2
5
0
0
4
1

42
6
12
2
1
18
4

100
92
87
87

29
26
21
25

29
27
27
26

42
39
39
36

$24.96
12.94
7.88
.73
2.31
.04
.03
1. 62
.33
12. 02
4. 62
3. 55
1.98
1.87
7. 48

$20.53
10. 30
7.85*
0
2.27
0
0
.18
0
10.23
4. 20
3.82
1.11
1.10
4.07

$21. 71
10.07
6.87
.66
1.29
0
0
1.16
.09
11.64
4.55
3.29
2.11
1.69
8.15

$30. 56
16. 91
8.60
1.32
3.05
. 10
.07
3.03
.74
13. 65
4.98
3. 53
2. 56
2.58
12.23

41
38
6
25
6
0
0
0
1
0
97
14
8
53

13
11
2
7
4
0
0
0
0
0
30
4
4
15

7
11
1
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
27
0
2
14

21
16
3
10
2
0
0
0
1
0
40
10
2
24

$48. 22

$39.86

$32.13

$65. 69

6.50
4. 71
1.53
1.67
.05
0
0
0
.19
0
8. 75
2.18
.19
21.97
.48
14. 47

5.00
4.27
1.41
2.20
.09
0
0
0
0
0
6.08
1.98
.04
18.79
0
7. 91

1.24
3.83
.86
.66
0
0
0
0
0
0
7.94
0
.08
15.80
1.72
12.08

11. 26
5.65
2.10
1.98
.06
0
0
0
.46
0
11.30
3.84
.38
28. 66
0
26.28

M e d ic a l C a re E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical care:
Services of—
General practitioner: Hom e.. --------------------------------- . . .
Office_______________ . . . . ______
Specialist and other practitioner______ __ ______________
Dentist----------------------- ._ _____________ . ------------------Clinic ____________ ________ __________ ____________ . .
Nurse: In home: Private ___
..
______ . . . . . .
Visiting___ __________________________
In hospital_____________________ ______________
Hospital: Private room-------------------------------------------------Bed in ward___ . . . .
.
Medicine and drugs____ ______ ______ _. . . .
_______
Eyeglasses_______________ _________ . . . . . . ___________
Medical appliances. __ . _____ . . . _____
____________
Accident and health insurance------ -----------------------------------Average expenditure per family for medical care, total___ __
Services of—
General practitioner: Hom e.. -----------------------------------Office_____ ____ _ ____________
Specialist and other practitioner________________ ______
Dentist______ ____ _______ ________________ . . ---------Clinic____________ _______ _____________________ . . . . .
Nurse: In home: Private. _________
. ...
----------Visiting______________________________
In hospital___ . . . ------------------- ---------------------Hospital: Private room-------------- ---------------------------- . . .
Bed in ward_____ ___
_____________________
Medicine and drugs_____________ _________ _____________
Eyeglasses------------------ ----------------------- --------------------------Medical appliances______________________ ______________
Accident and health insurance--------- --------------- ---------- ------Other medical care_______________________________________
Average expenditure per person for medical care, total---------Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




251

TABULAR SUMM ARY
T

able

1 4 . — P erson a l care expen ditu res and m edical care ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic
level— Continued
M IN N EAPO LIS-ST. PAUL, M I N N —W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
$400
$700
$500
$600

$700
and
over

P e r so n a l C are E x p e n d itu r e s

504

47

114

106

86

59

92

490
19
79
19
275
226
10

43
2
0
1
15
11
0

111
1
4
1
63
40
2

104
2
12
3
58
44
0

85
2
15
6
45
46
2

57
3
20
2
41
35
1

90
9
28
6
53
50
5

493

45

109

104

85

59

91

471
459

Families in survey__________________________
Number of families spending for personal
care:
Personal care services:
.............................
T airents
T
Shaves by barber_____________________
Shampoos____________________________
Manicures____________________________
Permanent waves____________________
Other waves________________________ Other personal care services___ _______
Toilet articles and preparations:

43
39

102
103

100
96

82
81

57
54

87
86

Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet
436
Average expenditure per family for per­
sonal care, tota l--______________ ______ $29. 57
15. 59
9. 96
. 14
Shaves by barber ____________________
.70
Shampoos_________ __________________
. 17
Manicures
______________ - ______
2.24
Permanent waves____________________
2. 34
Other waves
_________ _____ - . 04
Other personal care services___ _______
13. 98
Toilet articles and preparations, total----4. 59
Toilet soap
_ _
- __ ________
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth
3. 52
washes __ ______ __ ________
Cosmetic and toilet preparations. _ . .
3. 76
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet
2.11
articles. _
________ ________ - ___
Average expenditure per person for per­
8. 42
sonal care, total_______________________

38

89

95

76

55

83

$19. 80
10.20
8.57
. 10
0
.01
. 82
.70
0
9.60
4. 44

$22. 77
11. 63
8. 82
.02
. 10
0)
1. 63
1.03
. 03
11.14
4.13

$28. 20
14. 69
10. 70
. 02
. 31
. 08
1.91
1. 67
0
13. 51
4. 47

$31. 86
16. 91
10. 40
. 07
. 78
. 37
2. 62
2. 61
.06
14. 95
4.95

$35. 57
19. 03
10. 28
. 40
1. 63
.24
2.99
3.47
.02
16. 54
5.10

$38. 59
20.93
10. 62
. 36
1. 58
. 35
3. 27
4. 61
. 14
17. 66
4. 70

2. 20
1.84

2.77
2. 68

3. 39
3.48

4.12
3. 63

4.41
4. 56

4.12
5.98

1.12

1. 56

2.17

2. 25

2.47

2. 86

3. 69

5.39

8. 01

10.16

12.13

16.04

12
14
8
29
2
2
1
0
5
1
39
8

47
55
19
78
2
1
0
0
5

7

30
47
23
58
2
0
0
1
13
5
77
29
10
28

25
41
15
40
2
5
0
2
8
3
52
19
14
19

31
48
23
62
4
0
0
2
10

100
29
17
33

37
57
22
69
5
1
0
0
11
7
98
26
11
36

$34.04

$44.41

$65.50

$76.90

$86.11

$101. 32

4.04
2. 77
3. 53
9.53
.55
.35
. 11
0
2.06
.43
5.04
2.02
.10
2.78
.73

5.28
4. 36
5.10
12.24
.07
.09
0
0
1.53
.87
7.54
3.32
. 16
3.47
.38

5.29
5. 66
12.90
15.02
1. 91
. 14
0
0
3.62
2.87
7.54
3. 05
.17
5. 62
1. 71

4.66
9. 03
14. 78
19. 88
.65
0
0
.16
6.90
1.06
9.09
4. 75
.30
4.15
1. 49

9. 36
11. 52
12. 88
15. 46
.07
2.10
0
2.28
5.27
3. 71
11.16
5.06
.24
4.83
2.17

8. 61
14.23
15. 53
18. 67
.40
0
3. 60
10.58
2.03
9.88
8. 25
.34
8.07
1.13

6.34

10. 52

18.59

24. 52

29.18

42.13

M e d ic a l C are E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical
care:
Services of—
182
General practitioner: Home__________
262
Office.............. .
110
Specialist and other practitioner______
336
Dentist __ _______________________ ____
17
Clinic
- _______________ - 9
Nurse: In home: P rivate.___________
1
Visiting________ __
5
In hospital _____ _________ 52
Hospital: Private room ____ _______
24
Bed in ward_________ ______
444
Medicine and drugs____________________
153
Eyeglasses__________ ________________ :
70
Medical appliances____ _ ________ 161
Accident and health insurance_______
Average expenditure per familyf or medical
$68. 67
care, total. __ __ ____ ___________ _
Services of:
6.15
General practitioner: Home____ _____
Office___________
7. 92
11. 06
Specialist and other practitioner______
15.42
Dentist___________ __________________
.66
Clinic___ ______________________ -.33
Nurse: In home: Private. _ _________
Visiting___ _________
. 01
.95
In hospital__________ _________
5.02
Hospital: Private room______ _________
1.82
Bed in ward_______________
8. 42
Medicine and drugs_________________ __
4. 49
Eyeglasses_______________ ______________
.22
Medical appliances _
__________ __
4. 97
Accident and health insurance__________
1.23
Other medical care. __ ________________
Average expenditure per person for medical
19. 55
care, total____ ______________________ . .
1 Less than 0.5 cent.




4

4

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.

4

78
42
14
38

0

252
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

REGION

14. — P erso n a l care expenditures and m edical care ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic
level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAMILIES

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
$700
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

54

65

94

62

42

84

51
2
0
1
26
6
0

64
5
2
0
23
10
0

88
5
10
1
54
24
0

60
4
6
1
40
28
0

42
2
1
18
15
0

82
9
16
3
55
46
0

54

64

93

61

42

83

48
49

55
56

80
88

59
57

37
38

83
78

P e r so n a l C a re E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey____________ __________ __
401
Number of families spending for personal
care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts________ ___ _____________ __
387
Shaves by barber___ _______________ _
27
Shampoos______________ _ __________
39
Manicures_________________ ______ ___
7
Permanent waves_____ ______________
216
129
Other waves__________________________
0
Other personal care services__________
Toilet articles and preparations:
Toilet soap _
_______
397
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth
362
washes. _______ _________ _
_
366
Cosmetic and toilet preparations
__
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet
articles__ ________ ____ _ _____ _
306
Average expenditure per family for per­
sonal care, total_________ ______ _ __ $28. 48
Personal care services, total____________
14. 44
Haircuts__________ ____
___________
8. 77
Shaves by barber_________ ________
.59
Shampoos_________ __ _ _ ______ __
.65
.04
Manicures_______________ ___________
Permanent waves_____ ______________
2.42
Other waves__________________________
1.97
Other personal care services___ ____
0
14.04
Toilet articles and preparations, total___
Toilet soap.
_____ ________ _______
4. 93
Tooth powder, tooth paste, mouth
washes_ __ _______ _ _ __ __ __
_
3.50
Cosmetic and toilet preparations_____
3. 73
Brushes, razor blades, and other toilet
1.88
articles._______ _ __ ________
__
Average expenditure per person for per­
8.17
sonal care, total____________ __ _______

5

37

50

74

46

32

67

$21. 71
10. 01
7. 81
.23
0
.01
1. 53
.43
0
11.70
5.40

$23.49
11.07
8. 37
.41
.07
0
1.40
.82
0
12. 42
4.84

$28. 76
14.00
8. 36
.48
.31
.01
2. 80
2.04
0
14. 76
4. 86

$27. 82
14. 66
9.06
.38
. 70
.07
2. 76
1.69
0
13.16
4. 63

$25. 94
13. 23
8. 74
. 17
. 79
.06
1. 79
1. 68
0
12. 71
4. 56

$38.16
20. 83
9. 93
1.44
1. 81
. 11
3. 41
4.13
0
17. 33
5.18

2.81
2.16

2.63
3. 05

3. 54
3. 99

3. 84
3. 58

3.09
3. 37

4. 52
5. 28

1.33

1.90

2. 37

1.11

1.69

2. 35

3.88

5.73

8. 01

9. 27

9. 86

16. 63

24
35
8
35
6
1
0
0

33
51
9
41

15
21
14
16
1
0
0
1

1
3

4

11

5
2
88
24

10
30
14
30
2
0
0
0
5

1
16

3

3

30

22

2
38
10
6
17

25
51
22
52
1
0
0
2
10
0
76
25
8
31

$36. 72

$38. 20

$58. 84

$58. 01

$72.06

$91.15

4. 54
5.16
3.85
5. 82
1.29
0
.05
0
.93
.70
9.14
3.44
.01
1.75
.04

4.15
4. 58
3. 69
7. 31
.98
. 14
0
0
.62
3.73
8.18
1.75
.02
2. 59
.46

4.42
8. 62
6. 43
11.15
. 19
. 13
0
.48
4. 08
. 66
14.12
2.87
. 12
4. 26
1.31

5. 77
11.87
8. 35
8. 21
. 15
0
0
0
4. 80
2.12
9. 43
3.12
.09
3. 25
.85

4. 67
7. 23
23.90
5. 99
. 21
0
0
.36
4. 74
1.59
10. 84
2. 25
.27
6.13
3. 88

3.16
15. 56
22. 89
17. 67
.06
0
0
. 60
5. 42
0
13. 58
4.04
.38
5. 86
1. 93

6. 56

9.31

16. 40

19. 34

27. 36

39.73

M e d ic a l C are E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for medical
care:
Services of—
125
General practitioner: H o m e ..____ _
216
Office______ ___
Specialist and other practitioner___ _
76
D e n tist...__ ______ __________ ____
199
_____ _
__ __
18
Clinic.- -_ _____
2
Nurse: In home: Private_____________
1
Visiting___ ________
In hospital____________ . . . _
4
Hospital: Private room. ________ .
26
Bed in w a r d .______ .
13
Medicine and drugs____ ______________
370
Eyeglasses_______ ________ ____________
95
22
Medical appliances____ _
_____ __ __
126
Accident and health insurance___ ____
Average expenditure per family for medical
care, total___ ______ ______________ _ $60. 51
Services of—
General practitioner: Home_______ _
4. 36
9. 31
Office________ -_
Specialist and other practitioner ____
11. 21
Dentist... ________ __ __ ___ _ __ __ 10.18
.43
Clinic__________ _______________ ____
.05
Nurse: In home: Private._ ______ __
Visiting__________
.01
In hospital_____________ __
.27
Hospital: Private room____ ____ __
3. 55
Bed in ward_______________
1. 35
Medicine and drugs____________ ______ _
11.30
2.98
Eyeglasses_____________ _ _____________
. 15
Medical appliances.. __________________
4.03
Accident and health insurance._________
1.33
Other medical care.- _______ _________
Average expenditure per person for medical
care, total_____ ____ ____ _________
_
17.41
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330.




18
28
9
25
5
0
1
0
1
2
52
13 '
1
10

61

3

1
0
1

55
12

4

253

TABULAR SUMM ARY
T

able

14,—

P erson a l care expenditures and m edical care ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic
level— Continued

Item

St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families
Economic
level—
Families
spend­
ing per expendi­
All
ture unit per year
families
$400
Under $300
and
to
$300
$400
over

Salt Lake City , Utah—White
families

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

P er so n a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

106
28
Families in survey_________________
27
51
No. fam. spending for personal care:
Personal care services:
Haircuts____
____ -- -103
27
26
50
Shaves by barber------------8
2
1
5
42
Shampoos. .
_
___ .
10
12
20
1
Manicures________________ 1
0
0
Permanent waves _ _______ - _
0
0
0
0
Other waves________________ 19
3
9
7
Other personal care services___
2
1
1
0
Toilet articles and preparations:
104
28
Toilet s o a p ._______ ________
27
49
Tooth powder, tooth paste,
21
mouth washes. _______ _ . .
90
23
46
Cosmetic and toilet preps____
78
18
41
19
Brushes, razor blades, and
other toilet articles...
.. .
46
11
21
14
Average expenditure per family for
personal care, total________ $26.86 $25. 24 $25. 60 $28.40
_
Personal care services, total_____ 15.10 13.09 14.60 16. 47
Haircuts________ . . .
_ __
7. 26
7.17
7.50
7.18
Shaves by barber----------.84
1.27
.58
1.87
4. 76
Shampoos.
___ _________
_
4.00
5.31
4.88
.01
Manicures... _________ _____
0
.03
0
0
Permanent waves_ _ . . . . . .
0
0
0
1.61
1.21
Other waves___________
.75
2.30
Other personal care services. __
.19
0
.24
.30
Toilet articles and preps., total. _ 11.76 12.15 11.00 11.93
Toilet soap _ .
.
5. 25
6.06
4.81
5.23
Tooth powder, tooth paste,
3.24
mouth washes_______ _____
3.64
2.84
3.23
C osmetic and toilet preps. _ _.
1. 27
2.02
2.92
2.26
Brushes, razor blades, and other
toilet articles_________
1.01
1.18
.91
.97
Average expenditure per person for
4.84
personal care, total. _____ ____
7.94
7. 64 11.88

210

54

55

72

29

199
9
7
3
121
72
5

53
2
2
0
33
15
1

51
2
0
0
32
18
1

66
3
3
3
36
23
1

29
2
2
0
20
16
2

206

54

55

68

29

180
185

46
44

40
49

68
63

26
29

118

28

28

41

21

$31. 48 $28. 77 $28. 57 $29. 90 $46.10
14.23 12. 65 13.10 13.15 22.08
8. 72
8. 26
8. 61
8.26 10.95
.24
.06
.15
.45
.21
.09
0
.08
.09
.29
0
0
.03
.10
0
3.12
2. 41
3. 01
3.05
5.20
1.87
1.18
1.66
4. 84
1.27
.16
.06
.02
. 18
.59
17. 25 16.12 15. 47 16. 75 24. 02
5. 34
5. 69
5.96
4. 46
4.97
4. 67
5.73

4. 36
4. 67

3.95
4.79

4. 73
5.13

6.48
11.00

1. 51

1.13

1.04

1.92

2.08

8. 26

5. 46

7. 05

9. 55

19.70

61
84
59
127
9
7
0
0
20
6
167
55
33
24

16
17
14
33
1
3
0
0
2
1
38
19
9
8

21
21
19
31
3
1
0
0
2
2
43
10
5
10

19
32
22
43
5
3
0
0
13
2
63
14
13
3

5
14
4
20
0
0
0
0
3
1
23
12
6
3

M e d ic a l C are E x p en d itu r e s

No. fam. spending for medical care:
Services of—
General practitioner: Home _ __
37
8
12
17
_
Office_
44
8
11
25
Specialist practitioner . . . .
4
1
3
0
Dentist . . .
_
_ _ . .
16
4
4
8
_______
5
2
2
Clinic..
1
Nurse: In home: Private _. _
0
0
0
0
Visiting __ .
0
0
0
0
In hospital ___ . . .
0
0
0
0
Hospital: Private room_______
2
0
1
1
Bed in ward___ . . .
1
1
0
0
Medicine and drugs . . .
___
85
25
20
40
Eyeglasses____________ _______
2
15
1
12
Medical appliances _ ___ __ _
1
4
0
3
Accident and health insurance. __
9
53
31
13
Average expenditure per family for
medical care, total. _ _ _ _ . $47. 87 $31.39 $47. 03 $57. 38
Services of—
General practitioner: Home__
3. 39
2.28
3. 75
3.28
6. 47
Office...,
.94 11.43
6.88
Specialist, practitioner_____ _
1.61
3.17
3.04
0
Dentist...
____ . . .
3. 41
3.46
3.44
3.30
.21
Clinic . .
.18
.19
.24
Nurse: In home: Private. _. .
0
0
0
0
Visiting___
0
0
0
0
In hospital. .
0
0
0
0
Hospital: Private room..
0
1.94
.16
.57
Bed in ward___ ._
.42
0
0
1.57
Medicine and drugs..
... . _
9.80
7. 44
9.58 11. 21
Eyeglasses____ __ ___ ______
1.62
2.69
.93
•36
Medical appliances. _________ _
0
.02
.04
.02
Accident and health insurance- 20. 46 10.88 14. 32 28.97
0
0
0
0
other medical care. _ ____ . . .
Average expenditure per person
for medical care, total___ ___ _ 14.17
6.03 14.03 24. 01
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 330,




$63. 63 $56.88 $58. 93 $65. 46 $80. 78
4.86
7.40
15.44
11.61
.48
.79
0
0
3. 79
.99
10. 52
4.36
.25
2.68
.46

3.04
7. 53
12.48
10.48
.64
.68
0
0
1.82
1.34
9.88
5.45
.20
3. 34
0

7. 27
4.10
18. 82
7.88
.30
.52
0
0
2. 05
1.36
8. 72
3.02
. 17
4.28
.44

5.24
9. 52
12.97
13.26
.70
1.39
0
0
5.45
.21
11.14
3. 25
.26
1.08
.99

2. 77
8.18
20. 65
16.67
0
0
0
0
6.68
1.58
13.58
7.66
.48
2.45
.08

16.70

10.79

14. 55

20.91

34.52

254

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

15 .— R ecreation ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level
D EN VER , COLO.—W H IT E FAMILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

R ec re a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey________ _____ ____________________________
Number of families owning radios____ ___ _____ _____________
Number of families spending for—
Reading:
Newspapers, street...................... ................................................
Newspapers, home delivery_______________ ____________
Magazines______ ______________________ ____________ ____
Books purchased (other than school texts)________________
Books borrowed from loan libraries.. ________ _______ ___
Tobacco:
Cigars___________ ______________________ ___________ ____
Cigarettes............................... ............................................ ..........
Pipe tobacco.............................. ..................................... ..............
Other tobacco____________ ______ ________________ _____ _
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission)............................. .................... .......
Movies (child admission)........................... .................... ..........
Plays and concerts______ _____ _____ ______ _______ _____
Spectator s p o r t s ................ .......... .......... .......................... .......
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments................. ...................................... ..........
Sheet music, records, rolls---------- ----------------- --------------------Radio purchase__________________________________________
Radio upkeep___________________________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment_____________
Athletic equipment and supplies_________________________
Children’s play equipment. _ __________________________
Pets (purchase and care). ___________________ _______ ___
Recreational associations. _ -------- ---------- ---------------------------Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks.......................................... .......
Out of home, except food and drinks-------- ------------------------Average expenditure for recreation, total____________________ _
Reading, total___ . . . . ____________________________________
Newspapers, street . . . ------------------------------- --------------------Newspapers, home delivery___ __________ ____ _______ _
Magazines------------------ ---------- ------------------------- -----------------Books purchased (other than school texts) ________________
Books borrowed from loan libraries__________ ______ _____
Tobacco, total. ._ . . . ___________________________ _____ _
Cigars------------------------------------------------------------------------------Cigarettes________________________ _____ _________________
Pipe tobacco_________________ _______ ________________ . .
Other tobacco_ ________________________________ ____ ___
_
Commercial entertainment, total________ ______ ___________
Movies (adult admission)....... ................. ................... ..........
Fall_______________________ ____________ ______ _____ _
Winter........ .................................................................. ..............
Spring__________ ______ _______ _________ ________ ____
Summer......................... ...................................... ............. .......
Movies (child admission)................................. ........... ..........
Fall............... .......... ................................................................Winter____ ____________________________ _______ _______
Spring_______________________________ _________________
Summer____________________________ ____ ______________
Plays and concerts_________ __________ ____ _________ ___
Spectator sports____________________ ________________ ____
Recreational equipment, total____ ______ ________ _____ ___
Musical instruments.......................... .....................................
Sheet music, records, rolls............... ....................................... .
Radio purchase________________________ _________________
Radio upkeep_____________________ __________________ ___
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment______________
Athletic equipment and supplies__________________ ______
Children’s play equipment________ _______ ________ _____
Pets (purchase and care)............ ............................................
Recreational associations..................................................... ..........
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks_________ ____ ____________
Out of home, except food and drinks............... ................. .........
Other recreation---------------------------------------- ---------- ------------Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331,




295
204

92
47

106
79

97
78

46
242
159
20
10

13
70
37
5
4

18
88
60
11
3

15
84
62
4
3

41
170
62
17

5
45
22
8

18
65
12
4

18
60
28
5

249
61
17
43

70
27
5
5

92
27
7
17

87
7
5
21

14
22
29
93
69
22
40
54
48

8
7
10
19
19
7
16
12
10

2
8
7
38
22
3
18
23
16

4
7
12
36
28
12
6
19
22

27
12

6
2

9
4

12
6

$79.16
15.32
1.44
10.02
2.96
.81
.09
24.21
2.23
19. 54
1.83
.61
15.93
13.43
3.40
3.43
3.33
3. 27
1.42
.36
.36
.36
.34
.18
.90
1>3.18
1.90
.28
4. 57
1.06
.75
.84
1.38
2.40
1.82

$57.41
12.07
.97
8. 77
1.71
.60
.02
16.69
.69
13.54
1.59
.87
12.19
9.66
2.43
2.44
2.40
2. 39
2.23
.58
.58
.56
.51
.18
.12
13. 66
4. 41
14
4.82
.66
.55
.27
1.64
1.17
.75

$73. 20
16.10
1.80
10.25
2.95
1.07
.03
23.74
2. 52
19.48
1.20
.54
16. 43
13.95
3. 56
3. 56
3.43
3.40
1.43
.36
.36
.36
.35
.19
.86
9.00
.24
.42
2.54
1.24
.54
.19
1.67
2.16
1.30

$106. 34
17. 55
1.49
10.95
4.16
.74
.21
31.85
3. 36
25. 28
2.76
.45
18.96
16.47
4.15
4.24
4.11
3.97
.64
.16
.16
.16
.16
.16
1.69
17. 31
1.33
.26
6.56
1.25
1.18
2.09
.83
3.81
3.40

.83
.91
6.96

.40
.35
1.30

.38
1.30
4.95

1.73
1.03
14.51

255

TABULAR SUM M ARY
T

able

15. — R ecreation exp en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S.— W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

R ec re a tio n

All
fami­
lies

Under
$300

$300 to $400 to $500 to $600 to
$400
$500
$600
$700

$700
and
over

E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey_________________________
Number of families owning radios__________
Number of familes spending for—
Reading:
Newspapers, street ----------------------------Newspapers, home delivery____________
Magazines______ . _ _ ____ _____________
Books purchased (other than school texts).
Books borrowed from loan libraries______
Tobacco:
Cigars---------------------------------------------------Cigarettes----------------------------- --------------Pipe tobacco.
. . . __________________
Other tobacco............... ............................
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission)..........................
Movies (child admission)......................... .
Plays and concerts_ ________ ________
_
Spectator sports................................. ........
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments___________________
Sheet music, records, rolls______________
Radio purchase-------------------------------------Radio upkeep _________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment___ _______ __________ ________
_
Athletic equipment and supplies_ _____
Children’s play equipment_____________
Pets (purchase and care) _ ____________
Recreational associations ________________
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks________
Out of home, except food and drinks____
Average expenditure for recreation, total_____
Reading, total---------------------- . . . . _^_
Newspapers, street . _______ __
Newspapers, home delivery -----------------Magazines.— __________ _____________
Books purchased (other than school
texts)... . . . . -------------- --- __
Books borrowed from loan libraries- . . .
Tobacco, total________ . . . .
._ ______
Cigars__________ _ _ _ . . . _____ ____ _
Cigarettes . . . _____
_ _ _________ _
Pipe tobacco ___________ ____________
Other tobacco_____________ ___________
Commercial entertainment, total_________
Movies (adult admission) _____ _
Fall__________________________________
Winter
_ _______ _ ___________
Spring_______ .._
________ ______
Summer_______________ _____________
Movies (child admission)________ ____ _
Fall__________________________________
Winter______________ .__........................
Spring_______________________________
Summer______________________________
Plays and concerts______
_________ __
Spectator sports________________________
Recreational equipment, total____________
Musical instruments _ ___ ____________
Sheet music, records, rolls______________
Radio purchase____
._ ............. .........
Radio upkeep ________ __ ____________
Cameras, films, and photographic equip­
ment___________________ ____
______
Athletic equipment and supplies. _______
Children’s play equipment____________
Pets (purchase and care) ______________
Recreational associations...............................
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks_________
Out of home, except food and drinks_____
Other recreation____ _____________________

357
245

45
30

92
56

73
48

50
35

43
33

54
43

18
339
154
25
8

2
42
13
1
0

3
85
27
8
2

4
70
26
3
0

3
48
25
5
2

3
41
31
2
2

3
53
32
6
2

38
205
101
21

4
16
17
6

7
48
32
8

8
48
24
4

4
30
9
1

7
27
9
1

8
36
10
1

301
100
25
66

28
20
2
5

76
33
8
15

61
24
2
11

45
12
4
11

41
6
1
8

50
5
8
16

14
22
36
82

1
1
4
10

5
9
6
17

3
4
8
17

2
3
6
12

3
3
5
12

0
2
7
14

77
30
71
63
49

4
2
8
6
7

20
7
24
13
15

19
4
14
13
7

11
3
14
8
5

14
5
6
10
3

9
9
5
13
12

34
20
$69. 26
11.87
.36
8.70
2.02

1
1
$40.74
9.64
.43
8. 34
.85

5
2
$54. 01
11.00
.31
8.35
1.20

5
3
$62. 57
11.07
.55
8.41
1.48

6
2
$91. 48
12.83
.32
9.06
2. 46

6
5
$85. 52
13.79
.20
9. 21
3.63

11
7
$94. 70
13.89
.31
9. 26
3.40

.76
.03
24.96
1.43
20. 33
2. 70
.50
16.08
12. 61
3. 21
3.23
3.07
3.10
2.18
.54
.55
.55
.54
.21
1.08
12.15
2.63
.18
4. 77
.83

.02
0
16.04
1.08
11. 02
3.32
.62
8.95
5. 65
1.38
1.46
1.39
1.42
2.91
.73
.73
.72
.73
.08
.31
5.14
.22
.02
2.74
.74

1.14
0)
19. 27
.47
15.11
3. 01
.68
11.55
7. 30
1.79
1.85
1.84
1.82
2. 91
.71
.75
.73
.72
. 12
1.22
8. 76
2. 36
.31
2.02
.53

.63
0
23. 51
1.14
17. 67
3. 92
.78
14. 90
11.58
3.06
2.94
2.82
2. 76
2. 69
.69
.66
.68
.66
.12
.51
10.68
1.64
.10
5.23
.95

.97
.02
31.84
2. 54
27. 47
1.63
.20
19.93
16. 27
4. 07
4.13
3.94
4.13
1.57
.38
.38
.42
.39
.33
1.76
18.14
5.10
.18
8.12
.91

.62
.13
27.68
1.57
24.10
1. 71
.30
20.92
17. 56
4. 59
4.68
4.12
4.17
2.08
.52
.52
.52
.52
.12
1.16
19. 71
7. 87
.29
3.78
.96

.82
.10
35. 55
2. 63
30. 94
1.80
. 18
23.96
21. 55
5.49
5. 44
5. 27
5. 35
.26
.06
.08
.06
.06
.56
1.59
14.19
0
.08
8.19
1.07

.46
.42
1.49
1.37
1.08

.17
.05
1.04
.16
.72

.41
.17
2.18
.78
.92

.46
.17
1.57
.56
.63

.60
.78
1.68
.77
.74

.74
.74
.97
4.36
.53

.44
.95
.82
2.64
3.04

.47
.34
2. 31

.02
.02
.21

.08
.08
2.35

.55
.28
.95

.58
.56
6.86

1.10
.80
.99

.80
.58
2. 69

1 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331,




Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

256
T

able

15. — R ecreation ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

R ec re a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey_________________ __ ____________________
Number of families owning radios________________ _________
Number of families spending for—
Reading:
Newspapers, street. . . . __________ ______________________
Newspapers, home delivery___________ ___________ ______
Magazines___________________________________ _______ ____
Books purchased (other than school texts)________________
Books borrowed from loan libraries............. ..................... .......
Tobacco:
Cigars___________________________________________ _______
Cigarettes______ ____ ____ _______________________________
Pipe tobacco___________ ______________ __________________
Other tobacco___________ __________ ________ ____________
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission)..........................................................
Movies (child admission)___ ________ ____________________
Plays and concerts______________ __________ _________
__
Spectator sports.__ __________ _____ _________________ . . .
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments______________ ____ _________________
Sheet music, records, rolls_____________ ____ _____________
Radio purchase... ______ ___________
___ __
_____ __
Radio u p k e e p ..________________________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment____________
Athletic equipment and supplies________ __ ._ ________ _
Children’s play equipment.__ ________________ _____
_
Pets (purchase and care)_________________________________
Recreational associations_ __ ______________________ __ __
_
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks______________________
Out of home, except food and drinks____________ . . .
Average expenditure for recreation, total____ ______
... . . .
Reading, total_________________________ ________________ __
Newspapers, street_____________ ____ . _
_____
Newspapers, home delivery___ __ _______ ____ __
___
Magazines_______ ________
Books purchased (other than school texts) ._ _____ _ ___
Books borrowed from loan libraries-.
___
______
Tobacco, total____ __________
Cigars_____
Cigarettes_______________ ______
__ _ _ _
Pipe tobacco ______________
Other tobacco____________ _____
__ _ __________ __ _
Commercial entertainment, total______ ____________________
Movies (adult admission)_______ _ __
_ _
Fall_____________
Winter____________ _______
Spring___ ______ ___________
_ ______
_______
Summer__________ ________
___
Movies (child admission)____________ ____ _________
Fall_______________ ___________ _______
W in te r ._______
Spring.......................................
Summer_____ _
Plays and concerts_____ _________ _______________________
Spectator sports_____________ ____ _____________
_ ______
Recreational equipment, total............. .................. ...... ..........
Musical instruments_____ ________ ______________________
Sheet music, records, rolls. _
_
_ _
Radio purchase.__
_
_
___
_____
Radio upkeep_________ _
...............
........
Cameras, films, and photographic equipment_______ _____
Athletic equipment and supplies . . _
_____
Children’s play equipment___________________________ __
Pets (purchase and care)_________________________________
Recreational associations.................
_ ______________ _
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks. __ _ ___________________
Out of home, except food and drinks_____ _________________
Other recreation... _________ ______________________________
1 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.




103
70

32
23

29
20

42
27

7
94
20
1
0

3
27
4
0
0

2
26
5
0
0

2
41
11
1
0

19
42
30
14

3
12
10
3

7
10
11
3

9
20
9
8

77
31
9
14

20
19
2
2

25
5
2
3

32
7
5
9

0
2
7
21
4
2
11
10
10

0
0
4
5
2
1
5
3
1

0
0
0
5
1
0
3
1
4

0
2
3
11
1
1
3
6
5

11
2
$50.14
10.11
.34
9.29
.48
(0
0
20. 97
2. 69
12. 92
3.15
2. 21
9.28
7.11
1.82
1.82
1.76
1.71
1. 45
.36
.35
.38
.36
.17
.55
5. 04
0
.07
3.12
.72
.11
.19
.55
.28
.58

1
0
$36. 40
8. 36
.76
7.48
.12
0
0
14. 52
1.02
9. 73
2.47
1.30
7. 55
3.99
1.02
1.02
.99
.96
3.26
.82
.80
.84
.80
.07
.23
5. 77
0
0
4. 77
.18
.08
.06
.48
.20
.03

1
0
$40. 28
10. 21
. 16
9.64
.41
0
0
18.11
2. 09
10.89
4. 32
.81
9. 34
7. 93
2. 06
2.07
1.94
1.86
.72
.18
.18
.18
.18
.12
.57
1. 72
0
0
0
.61
.07
0
.97
.07
.69

9
2
$67. 40
11. 39
.15
10. 42
.81
0. 01
0
27. 86
4. 37
16. 75
2.87
3. 87
10. 55
8. 91
2.26
2.25
2. 22
2.18
.58
.13
.13
.16
.16
.28
.78
6.75
0
. 17
4.02
1. 22
.12
.42
.31
.49
.94

.47
.14
3.55

.16
0
.01

.10
0
.11

.96
.33
8.62

257

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

15. — R ecreation ex p en d itu res , b y eco n o m ic level— Continued
M IN N EAPO L IS-ST . PAUL M I N N —W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to $500 to $600 to
$500
$600
$700

$700
and
over

R ec re a tio n E x p e n d it u r e s

Families in survey___
___________________
Number of families owning radios__________
Number of families spending for—
Reading:
Newspapers, street_____________________
Newspapers, home delivery______
___
Magazines_____________________________
Books purchased (other than school
texts)________________________________
Books borrowed from loan libraries.___
Tobacco:
Pipe tobacco___________________________
Other tobacco________________________ .
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission)______________
Movies (child admission)_______________
Plays and concerts_____________________
Spectator sports________________________
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments_________________ .
Sheet music, records, rolls______________
Radio purchase_________ _______
_____
Radio upkeep
_
________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equip­
ment __________ _____________________
Athletic equipment and supplies_______
Children’s play equipment. ___________
Pets (purchase and care)...................
Recreational associations_________________
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks_______
Out of home, except food and drinks____
Average expenditure for recreation, total____
Reading, total___ ________ _______________
Newspapers, street_____ _____
______
Newspapers, home delivery_____ ______
Magazines__________ __________________
Books purchased (other than school
texts)________ _________ ____________
Books borrowed from loan libraries_____
Tobacco, to ta l.____
__ _______________
Cigars_________
___ _________________
Cigarettes ________________ . . _______
Pipe tobacco__________________ _____ __
Other tobacco__________________________
Commercial entertainment, t o t a l._______
Movies (adult admission)______________
Fall__________________________________
Winter_______________________________
Spring_______________________________
Summer_______________ ______ _______
Movies (child admission)_______________
Fall__________________________________
Winter_______________________________
Spring_______________________________
Summer______________________________
Plays and concerts_____________________
Spectator sports________________________
Recreational equipment, total____________
Musical isntruments____ _________ ____
Sheet music, records, rolls.. ___________
Radio purchase________________________
Radio upkeep__ _ _ _________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equip­
ment_________________________________
A t,hip,tip. e q u i p m e n t , a n d s u p p l i e s

Children’s play equipment_____________
Pets (purchase and care)_______________
Recreational associations.____ ___________
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks________
Out of home, except food and drinks........
Other recreation_____ ____ _______________
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.




504
445

47
36

114
98

106
91

86
77

59
56

92
87

87
472
305

6
43
18

19
107
65

10
102
67

21
79
52

11
55
38

20
86
65

30
22

0
0

6
5

8
3

4
5

2
2

10
7

79
301
118
53

2
24
13
4

17
65
27
19

13
63
25
11

13
44
14
9

9
37
14
5

25
68
25
5

430
152
42
146

34
30
2
5

95
52
6
25

89
33
5
22

77
18
5
25

55
13
11
25

80
6
13
44

22
48
40
178

2
3
1
15

6
12
6
41

6
9
8
31

1
7
13
27

4
9
2
23

3
8
10
41

161
49
99
79
85

11
2
9
4
5

36
9
25
12
18

39
8
30
13
14

25
11
17
14
18

21
4
13
10
15

29
15
5
26
15

38
20
$72.30
13. 01
1.00
8.87
2.63

1
0
$42.01
9.06
.54
7. 35
1.17

7
3
$55. 31
11.25
.70
8.43
1. 93

6
2
$63.88
12.65
.51
9. 29
2. 73

$71. 01
13.05
1.44
8.92
2. 28

.33
.18
25.04
1.79
20. 32
1.75
1.18
14. 22
10. 61
2.78
2.92
2.56
2. 35
1. 86
.48
.48
.46
.44
.28
1.47
12.34
2.42
.22
3. 52
1.33

0
0
17. 73
.06
14.03
2.20
1.44
8. 86
5.68
1.39
1.58
1.41
1.30
2. 94
.75
.79
.74
.66
.04
.20
4.33
1.13
.07
.87
.88

.11
.08
22. 35
1.94
16. 65
1.94
1.82
10. 82
6.98
1.79
1.89
1.65
1.65
2.96
.76
.76
.74
.70
.16
.72
6.49
.93
. 18
1.10
1.37

.10
.02
21.83
1.02
18.22
1.67
.92
11.97
9. 61
2. 62
2. 69
2.20
2.10
1.81
.48
.48
.43
.42
.03
.52
12.36
3.06
.27
3.54
.98

.19
.22
20.33
1.13
16. 55
1.45
1.20
16.23
13.67
3.59
3. 70
3.32
3.06
1.13
.29
.32
.27
.25
.13
1.30
14.70
1.45
.24
6. 05
1.23

. 12
.35
30. 76
1.76
26.89
1.39
.72
19. 59
14.38
3.68
3.80
3. 57
3. 33
1.60
.39
.38
.41
.42
.72
2.89
12.74
4. 76
.31
2.87
1.33

1.28
.41
36.58
4.02
29. 83
1.91
.82
18.47
13. 56
3. 56
3.88
3. 37
2. 75
.80
.20
.20
.20
.20
.71
3.40
21.19
3.58
. 19
5.89
2.02

.92
1.15
1.38
1.40
1.85

.28
.02
.98
.10
.65

.62
.22
1.37
.70
.76

.94
.78
2.07
.72
1.58

.94
1. 52
1.59
1. 68
1.83

.92
.44
1.20
.91
3. 76

1.58
3. 44
.71
3.78
2. 93

.47
.27
5.10

.05
0
1.33

.25
.04:
3.35 1

.32
.10
3.07

.32
.64
3.91

.64
.38
6.58

1.14
.48
11.69

4
4

11
9
6
5
$89. 01 $109. 00
14. 56
16. 52
1. 61
1.34
9.02
9. 56
3.46
3.93

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

258
T

able

15. — Recreation exp en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O .-K A N S.—W H IT E FAMILIES

Item

All
fami­
lies

Economic level- -Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to $600 to
$700
$600

$700
and
over

R ec re a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey— ____________ ________
Number of families owning radios...................
Number of families spending for—
Reading:
Newspapers, street_________ ______ ____
Newspapers, home delivery_____________
Magazines_________________________ ___
Books purchased (other than school
texts)_________________________________
Books borrowed from loan libraries_____
Tobacco:
Cigars__________________________________
Cigarettes_____________________ ________
Pipe tobacco.......................... ......................
Other tobacco__________________________
Commercial entertainment:
Movies (adult admission)_______________
Movies (child admission)............................
Plays and concerts................................ .......
Spectator sports............... ..................... .......
Recreational equipment:
Musical instruments_________ _________
Sheet music, records, rolls__________
Radio purchase_______ _______ _______
Radio upkeep__________________________
Cameras, films, and photographic equip______ __ __ ___
ment___ ________
Athletic equipment and supplies______
Children’s play equipment____________
Pets (purchase and care)__________ __
Recreational associations____________
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks________
Out of home, except food and drinks___
Average expenditure for recreation, total____
Reading, total___ __________
___ ______
Newspapers, street____________
____
Newspapers, home delivery___________
Magazines___ ________
____________ _
Books purchased (other than school
texts)________ _______________________
Books borrowed from loan libraries_____
Tobacco, total____________________________
Cigars_________________________________
Cigarettes_________________ _____ ______
Pipe tobacco___ ________ _ _ ____________
Other tobacco________________________ __
Commercial entertainment, total_________
Movies (adult admission)_______________
Fall__________________________________
Winter__________________________ ___
Spring__________________________ ___
Summer_______________________
___
Movies (child admission)_______________
Fall__________________________________
Winter............... ................... ........ ........
Spring____ ____ ______________________
Summer______________________________
Plays and concerts_____________________
Spectator sports________________________
Recreational equipment, total____________
Musical instruments____________________
Sheet music, records, rolls______ _______
Radio purchase_________________________
Radio upkeep................................................
Cameras, films, and photographic equip­
ment____________________ _____ ______
Athletic equipment and supplies.............
Children’s play equipment:______ _____
Pets (purchase and care)............................
Recreational associations............................
Entertaining:
In home, except food and drinks...............
Out of home, except food and drinks.......
Other recreation............. ................................
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.




401
352

54
44

65
56

94
85

62
55

42
38

84
74

260
225
152

33
26
14

40
36
16

56
53
38

42
35
28

26
24
17

63
51
39

15
12

0
0

1
0

3
3

1
4

0
1

10
4

64
230
96
39

2
28
12
14

8
35
12
3

17
58
30
10

12
40
15
6

8
23
11
4

17
55
16
2

337
109
32
102

41
31
4
7

51
28
0
6

77
29
8
22

54
11
5
18

38
4
4
13

76
6
11
36

5
14
36
101

0
3
5
10

1
1
3
13

2
3
6
28

0
1
8
22

2
4
2
7

0
2
12
21

66
25
69
81
69

8
3
17
5
8

6
2
15
8
13

16
3
15
19
16

7
5
15
16
6

9
3
3
7
7

20
9
4
26
19

11
9
$87.84
15. 95
7.50
6. 72
1. 51

1
0
$59. 37
12.01
5.89
5.70
.42

1
0
$59. 50
13. 95
6.65
6.22
.99

3
0
$86. 61
15.03
6.65
7.00
1.19

2
2
$86.20
17.44
8.31
6. 77
2.22

.13
.09
30. 56
2.58
23.74
2. 82
1.42
20.16
16.04
4.10
4.03
3. 97
3.94
1.73
.44
.43
.43
.43
.45
1.94
11. 56
.72
.07
5.24
.89

0
0
23.95
.58
16. 71
3.20
3. 46
14. 21
11. 01
2.84
2.76
2. 67
2.74
2.61
.67
.64
.65
.65
.07
.52
7.86
0
.05
4.34
.25

.09
0
22.57
1.30
17.93
2.74
.60
13.90
10. 42
2. 57
2.68
2.63
2.54
3.06
.77
.77
.76
.76
0
.42
6.26
.23
.02
2.50
.51

.05
.14
29. 21
2. 21
22.37
2.77
1.86
20.24
16. 75
4.22
4.15
4.19
4.19
2.14
.54
.52
.54
.54
.27
1.08
10.87
.39
.05
5.01
1.12

.05
.09
34.04
3.15
27.99
2.03
.87
17. 75
15.14
3. 92
3.94
3. 67
3. 61
1.09
.28
.27
.27
.27
.26
1.26
14. 02
0
.03
6.26
1.20

0
.06
33.37
3. 67
23.26
5.49
.95
22.35
17.80
4. 56
4. 41
4.48
4.35
.55
.14
.14
. 14
. 13
1. 55
2. 45
10.23
5.60
.37
.44
.57

.47
.17
38. 52
4. 32
31.38
1.95
.87
29.43
22.60
5.88
5. 62
5. 56
5. 54
.78
.20
.20
.19
. 19
.83
5. 22
17. 71
0
.05
9. 86
1.30

.50
.53
1.23
2.38
2.25

.45
.10
1.63
1.04
1.04

.25
.25
1.65
.85
2.12

.46
.04
1.24
2.56
2.74

.43
.56
2.31
3.23
.51

.95
1.11
.26
.93
2.97

.59
1.26
.33
4.32
3. 51

.24
1.54
5.58

.06
0
.24

.15
0
.55

.05
0
8.47

.21
.26
1.97

1.36
3.83
5.31

.08
5.26
12.50

2
2
4
3
$96. 21 $126. 54
19.53
16.79
9.29
8. 05
7.28
6.97
2. 32
1. 71

259

TABULAR SUMMARY
T

able

1 5 . — R ecreation ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued

Item

R ec re a tio n

St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families
Economic level—
Families spending
per expenditure
All
unit per year
fami­
Un­ $300 $400
lies
to
der
and
$300 $400 over

Salt Lake City, Utah—White
families

All
fami­
lies

Economic level— F a m i­
lies spending per ex­
penditure unit per year
Un­
der
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

E x p en d itu r e s

Families in survey___ _____________________
28
27
51
210
54
55
106
72
29
134
Number of families owning r a d i o s . ______
67
18
19
29
35
21
30
49
Number of families spending for—
Reading:
24
3
8
Newspapers, street_____________ . . .
47
7
10
8
5
30
22
181
44
Newspapers, home delivery____________
47
63
27
40
8
10
116
Magazines_____________________________
17
3
3
11
18
28
50
20
Books purchased (other than school
21
3
0
2
8
texts)________________________ _______
3
0
3
8
3
1
0
2
Books borrowed from loan libraries. ___
0
0
0
0
0
Tobacco:
14
5
Cigars.____ ______ __
__________ ______
23
8
3
12
1
4
4
72
15
22
Cigarettes______________________________
48
10
11
25
27
10
21
2
15
4
7
4
Pipe tobacco___________________________
3
8
8
14
11
4
4
8
2
3
Other tobacco. . . __ ________ ________ __
3
1
Commercial entertainment:
56
11
197
48
52
Movies (adult admission)______________
17
28
70
27
62
28
12
Movies (child admission''_____ _________
20
10
7
3
20
2
1
4
19
2
1
1
2
12
4
Plays and concerts_______________ _____
11
27
3
7
3
12
1
7
5
Spectator sports. ______________________
Recreational equipment:
6
0
3
0
0
3
Musical instruments____ __ . . . _______
0
0
0
2
19
3
0
2
9
6
1
Sheet music, records, rolls______________
0
2
2
1
12
2
6
5
Radio purchase________________________
3
3
69
12
3
20
6
11
18
26
Radio upkeep__________________________
13
Cameras, films, and photographic equip6
22
53
0
0
0
17
ment______ _
0
8
2
19
5
2
1
1
9
0
3
Athletic equipment and supplies_______
42
14
8
14
5
1
10
2
Children’s play equipment_____________
16
2
45
13
9
2
5
13
12
7
Pets (purchase and care)_______________
4
4
9
1
20
0
8
8
4
Recreational associations____________ ____
Entertaining:
22
2
2
0
2
3
9
0
8
In home, except food and drinks________
6
1
0
1
0
2
3
1
0
Out of home, except food and drinks____
Average expenditure for recreation, total____ $40. 95 $32. 37 $38.04 $47. 21 $55.86 $39.14 $53.09 $61. 74 $77. 55
9.02 5.90 8.95 10. 76 12.80 10. 31 11. 26 14. 47 16.18
Reading, total____________________________
.62
4.58 2.73 4.02 5.89
.77
.84
.60
Newspapers, street_____________________
.73
4.09 2.92 4.90 4. 30
Newspapers, home delivery____________
8.57 8. 27 8. 26 8.58 9. 67
.29
.25
.45
2.94 1. 27 1.92 4.00 5.32
Magazines______________________________
.03
Books purchased (other than school
texts)_________________________________
.06 0
.49
. 15
.31
0
. 12
.86
.59
Books borrowed from loan libraries_____
0
0
.07 0)
0
0
0
.19 0
Tobacco, total______________________ ______ 20.08 16.43 18. 34 23.01 13.50 10. 22 15. 36 13. 37 16. 36
4.14 4. 38 1.90 5.19
.51
Cigars__________________________________
1.05
.56 1.08 2.94
12.17 8.89 10. 82 14.68 10. 79 7. 81 13.13 11.14 10.99
Cigarettes____ ______ _____ ____________
1.04
.57 1. 39
Pipe tobacco____ _________ ______ _____
1.80 1.76 1.45 2.01
.84 1. 74
.62 1. 33
Other tobacco___ _____ ________________
1.97 1.40 4.17 1.13
.31
.28
.69
6. 25 4.99 7. 66 6. 22 16. 52 12.88 13.09 18.49 24. 95
Commercial entertainment, total_________
4. 56 2. 08 5. 53 5. 43 12. 86 7.64 10.18 15.07 22.17
Movies (adult admission)_____ ____ ____
1.12
Fall__________________________________
3.22 1.98 2. 55 3. 71 5. 61
.50 1.37 1.33
Winter____ _ ________ ______________
1.16
.53 1.46 1.35
3.28 1.97 2.58 3.91 5. 48
Spring__________ ___ ______________
3. 21 1.87 2. 52 3.79 5.59
1.14
.57 1.36 1.35
Summer.. _____
. . . ________ _______
1.14
.48 1.34 1.40
3.15 1.82 2. 53 3.66 5.49
2. 37 4.11 2.64 1.29 1.23
Movies (child admission)_______________
1.26 2. 40 2.10
. 18
.31
. 53
Fall__________________________________
.60
.04
.60 1.03
.66
.34
.30
Winter________ . __________________
.31
.60
.53
.60 1.05
.34
.04
.66
.30
Spring___________ __ ______________
.32
.52
.60
.05
.59 1.02
.66
.33
.30
Summer___ ____ _____ ________ ______
.32
.60
.52
.58 1.01
.05
.66
.28
.33
.41
.21
Plays and concerts____ _________ ______
. 10
.01
. 13
.07
.09
.76
.79
.33
Spectator sports________________________
.02
.88 1.00
.30
.52
.20 1.37
.76
4. 51 4. 91 2. 94 5.13
9.46 4.04 11.22 10. 62 13. 34
Recreational equipment, total____________
Musical instruments___________________
0
0
0
1.68 0
4. 82 1.22 0
0
.05
Sheet music, records, rolls___ __________
.03 0
. 13 0
.24
.27
.41
.09
2. 62 2.03
Radio purchase_________________________
.83 3.89
2.64
.66 1.17 2.97 8. 30
Radio upkeep__________________________
.73
.20 1.03
.86
.98
.62
.92 1.11 1.42
Cameras, films, and photographic equip­
ment______ _____ ____ _____ _________
0
.68
0
0
0
.06
.97
.83
.91
.07
.27 0
.51
.34
Athletic equipment and supplies_______
.10 1.00
.40
0)
Children’s play equipment_____________
.70 1. 57
.94
.10
1. 52 1.30 1.50 2.08
.60
.84
Pets (purchase and care)............................
.36
.01
.28
1.21 1.01 1. 47 1.00 1. 62
.55 0
.04 1.12
.88
.19
Recreational associations........................
.79 1.13 1.69
Entertaining:
.19 0
In home, except food and drinks.......... .
0
.40
.78
.36
.26
.78 2. 52
.25 0
Out of home, except food and drinks____
0
.51
.18 0
.06
.37
.24
Other recreation___________________ ______
.10
.14
.06
1.74 1.14 1.05 2.51 2.27
.11
1 Less than 0.5 cent.




Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331,

2 6 0

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

T a b l e 16 .— F o rm a l education , vocation , c o m m u n ity w elfa re, gifts and con tribu tion s ,
and m iscellaneous ex p en d itu res ,

6/
1

econ om ic level

D E N V E R , COLO.—W H IT E FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

F o r m a l E d u c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey___ . __ ------------- ---------------------------------Number of families spending for—
Members away from home___ _
______________________ _
Members at home _ __ _ ______ _____ ____ __ ------------------

295

92

106

97

11
67

4
26

6
28

1
13

Average expenditure per family for formal education, total_____
For members away from home___ _____ __ ______________
For members at home______________________________________

$9. 51
2.16
7. 35

$4. 92
1. 26
3. 66

$15. 40
4. 81
10. 59

$7.40
. 12
7.28

51
19
6

14
5
1

18
5
3

19
9
2

$4.60
3. 58
.85
.13
.04

$2. 49
1.60
.86
.03
0

$3. 65
2.99
.37
.26
.03

$7. 62
6.12
1.37
.09
.04

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations. _ ______ . . . ______________ ____
Community chest and other organizations. . . . __ __ . . . . . .
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal p r o p e r t y . . . . ________

174
201
149

54
50
30

71
79
61

49
72
58

Average expenditure per family for community welfare, total___
Religious organizations. . . . __ _. . ________ _________
Community chest and other organizations________________ .
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property___________ ____

$18.07
10. 48
4. 32
3.27

$11. 52
7. 65
2.24
1.63

$21. 73
12. 43
5. 41
3. 89

$20. 28
11.03
5.11
4.14

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts_____________________________
Support of relatives___ _________ _________________________
Support of other persons______ _________________ ____ _____

233
61
20

64
11
2

88
25
6

81
25
12

Average expenditure per family for contributions and gifts to
persons outside economic family, total________ _____ _______
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts_____ ________ _____________
Support of relatives________________________________________
Support of other persons__________ ________ ____ __________

$36. 47
18. 38
15. 95
2.14

$14. 49
10.12
4. 01
.36

$33. 57
16. 75
16. 04
.78

$60. 49
28. 01
27.17
5.31

0
10
26
3

0
1
7
0

0
5
9
1

0
4
10
2

$2. 59
0
1.31
.38
.61
.29

$1.34
0
.71
.18
0
.45

$2.58
0
2.14
.22
.03
.19

$3. 77
0
.98
.74
1.82
.23

V o c a tio n E x p e n d it u r e s

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees------ --------------------------------------------------------Professional association dues or fees_____ _____________ ___ _
Technical literature___ ________ ___________
__ ___ _
Average expenditure per family for vocational items, total____
Union dues or fees______ ________ __ _ _ _______ _______
Professional association dues or fees.. _ . . . ___ ______ __
Technical literature
.
__ ________________ _____
Other items of vocational expense___________ ______________
C o m m u n ity W e lfa re E x p e n d itu r e s

G ifts a n d C o n tr ib u tio n s

M isc e lla n e o u s E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Funerals___________________________________________________
Legal costs_______
_ _ _______________ _____ _____________
Gardens___________________________________ ______________
Family losses__________ _______ ____________________________
Average expenditure per family for miscellaneous items, total_
_
Funerals___________________________________ _______ _______
Legal costs.. . _____________________________________________
Gardens... _______________ _____________ ______ ____ ______
Family losses______________________ _______ ________________
Other___________________________________________ __________
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.




TABULAR
T

able

261

SUM M ARY

16.-— F orm a l education, vocation , c o m m u n ity w elfa re, gifts and con tributions ,
and m iscellaneous ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level— Continued
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami
lies

$700
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

357

45

92

73

50

43

54

19
141

7
25

7
40

2
33

3
22

0
12

0
9

Average expenditure per family for formal
education, total______________________ _ $11. 57
1. 64
For members away from home___________
9. 93
For members at home______ ___________

$10. 40
1.85
8. 55

$10. 89
3. 46
7. 43

$7. 46
.37
7.09

$16.13
3.13
13.00

$9. 85
0
9. 85

$16. 40
0
16.40

$500 to $600 to
$600
$700

F o r m a l E d u c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey____________ _ ____ __
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home_____ ________
Members at home___ ____________________

V o c a tio n E x p e n d it u r e s

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees____ _______________ ___
Professional association dues or fees________
Technical literature____________ _______

67
9
4

5
0
0

17
3
0

13
2
2

7
1
1

10
0
1

15
3
0

Average expenditure per family for vocational items, total____ ______ ____ __
Union dues or fees______________________ .
Professional association dues or fees.. - __
Technical literature______ ____ _ . . _ ___
Other items of vocational expense.-. . . . .

$4. 89
4. 48
.35
.06
0

$3. 37
3. 37
0
0
0

$3. 59
3. 27
.32
0
0

$3. 66
2. 91
.60
. 15
0

$5. 51
5. 29
. 10
. 12
0

$6. 43
6. 30
0
. 13
0

$8. 20
7. 34
.86
0
0

C o m m u n it y W e lfa re E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations___ . . . _ . ___
Community chest and other organiza­
tions_________________________ . _ . . .
Taxes: Poll, income, and persona] property _

237

35

64

54

30

22

32

288
199

29
14

73
48

56
46

41
27

38
23

51
41

Average expenditure per family for com­
munity welfare, total___________________ $18. 02
Religious organizations_______________ ___ 11.67
3. 97
Community chest and other organizations. _
2. 38
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property.

$12. 68
9. 37
2. 21
1.10

$15. 41
10. 61
2. 92
1.88

$17. 42
10. 33
3. 42
3. 67

$18. 26
11.58
4. 45
2. 23

$17. 76
11.37
4. 36
2. 03

$27. 70
17. 51
7. 23
2. 96

G ifts a n d C o n tr ib u tio n s

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts___________
Support of relatives______ _______________
Support of other persons____________ ____

270
78
21

26
4
3

66
22
4

55
14
3

43
7
1

37
12
6

43
19
4

Average expenditure per family for contribu­
tions and gifts to persons outside eco­
nomic family, total___ _________________
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts._ _ _
Support of relatives____ _______ . . . . _
Support of other persons_________________

$26. 04
12. 68
12. 72
.64

$5. 72
4.18
.70
.84

$13. 65
7.19
6.15
.31

$23. 83
11. 55
11. 77
. 51

$21. 85
15. 60
5. 87
.38

$41. 33
16. 87
22.78
1.68

$58.17
24. 37
33.18
.62

Number of families spending for—
Funerals.. ____ _______ . . . _____ _______
Legal costs_________________ ____ . . .
Gardens____________ ______ _______ __ __
Family losses________ ___________ _______

2
5
24
9

0
1
5
1

2
1
7
3

0
1
5
1

0
1
2
1

0
1
0
2

0
0
5
1

Average expenditure per family for miscel­
laneous items, total____________________
Funerals_________________________________
Legal costs_______________________________
Gardens_________ _________________ __ __
Family losses____ __ . . _ ________________
Other____________________________________

$4. 59
1. 12
. 15
.29
1.50
1. 53

$4.11
0
.39
.50
1. 33
1.89

$7. 07
4. 35
. 11
. 14
1.82
.65

$3. 27
0
.30
.51
1. 37
1.09

$0.81
0
.06
. 12
.40
.23

$10. 69
0
.01
0
4. 27
6.41

$1. 20
0
0
.45
.09
.66

M isc e lla n e o u s E x p en d itu r e s

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.




262
T

able

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

16. — F orm a l ed ucation , vocation , c o m m u n ity w elfa re , gifts and con tribu tion s ,
and m iscella n eou s ex p en d itu res , & econom ic level— Continued
?/
KANSAS C ITY , M O .-K A N S .—NEGRO FAM ILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic
level — Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 and
over

F o r m a l E d u c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

103

32

29

42

4
25

1
16

1
3

2
6

$1. 78
.26
1. 52

$3. 62
.22
3.40

$0. 62
.02
.60

$1.17
.45
.72

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees_____________________________ ________ . . .
Professional association dues or fees____ ________ _________ .
Technical literature____________________ ______ ________ . ..

9
1
0

1
0
0

3
0
0

5
1
0

Average expenditure per family for vocational items, total____
Union dues or fees____ ___________________________ . . . ____
Professional association dues or fees____ __ __________ ______
Technical literature________________________________________
Other items of vocational expense___ ___ ________________

$1. 76
1.65
.11
0
0

$0.19
.19
0
0
0

$1.34
1.34
0
0
0

$3. 25
2.98
.27
0
0

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations__________________ _ ___________ __
Community chest and other organizations___ _____ . . . __ _
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property______________

93
61
30

27
17
4

27
17
9

39
27
17

Average expenditure per family for community welfare, total._
Religious organizations...____ ____________ ______________
Community chest and other organizations_____________ ____
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property_________ ____ __

$16.84
12. 77
3.02
1.05

$10. 96
9. 36
1.15
.45

$16.03
12. 30
2.74
.99

$21.88
15.69
4.64
1. 55

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts________________ __ . . . ___
Support of relatives________________________________________
Support of other persons____________________________________

62
24
7

16
5
2

15
6
0

31
13
5

Average expenditure per family for contributions and gifts
to persons outside economic family, total_________ ________
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts___________________________ _
Support of relatives________________ ________________
____
Support of other persons______ _______________ ___________

$28. 04
6. 72
20.64
.68

$6.78
3. 73
2.97
.08

$8.95
4.85
4.10
0

$57. 41
10.28
45. 51
1.62

2
0
3
3

0
0
2
0

1
0
0
2

1
0
1
1

$4. 55
1. 82
0
.06
1.70
.97

$0.14
0
0
.14
0
0

$5.58
.93
0
0
3. 62
1.03

$7.19
3.81
0
.04
1. 67
1. 67

Families in survey.____ ___ _______________________________ _
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home_________________________________
Members at home........ ................... .......... ............................ .
Average expenditure per family for formal education, total____
For members away from home_____________________________
For members at home______________________________________
V o c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

C o m m u n ity

W e lfa r e E x p e n d itu r e s

G ifts an d

C o n tr ib u tio n s

M is c e lla n e o u s E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Funerals___________________________________________________
Legal costs. ___________________________________________ _
Gardens_____ _______________ ________ __ ________________
Family losses________ _______ _____________________ ______
Average expenditure per family for miscellaneous items, total._
Funerals______ _____ ____________ ________ ________ _ . . .
Legal costs________ ____________ __________________
_
Gardens_____ _________________________ ___________________
Family losses_______ _______________________________________
Other___ _________ __ ____________ _ . . . _____ ____ _____
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.




TABULAR
T

able

263

SU M M AR Y

1 6 . — F o rm a l education, vocation, c o m m u n ity w elfare, gifts and con tribu tion s ,
and m iscellan eou s ex p en d itu res, by econom ic level— Continued
M IN N EAPO L IS-ST . PAUL, M IN N .—W H IT E FAM ILIES
Economic level— Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$700
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

504

47

114

106

86

59

92

3
213

1
32

0
66

0
47

0
27

2
18

0
23

$8. 79
.05
8. 74

$9. 96
.04
9. 92

$10.45
0
10.45

$5. 97
0
5. 97

$7. 52
0
7. 52

17.45
.39
17. 06

$5.04
0
5. 04

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees________
____________
Professional association dues or fees_____ _
Technical literature_______ ____ _________

147
15
8

11
2
0

39
2
1

31
2
1

17
2
0

17
2
2

32
5
4

Average expenditure per family for vocational
items, total--------------------------------------------Union dues or fees__________________ _____
Professional association dues or fees_______
Technical literature________
___________
Other items of vocational expense______ __

$6. 28
6. 08
. 13
.03
.04

$3. 90
3. 82
.08
0
0

$6.01
5.78
.08
.01
. 14

$6.03
5.97
.04
.01
.01

$4.75
4. 65
.06
0
.04

$6.33
5. 87
.42
.04
0

$9.56
9.23
.19
. 14
0

398
402
39

39
35
1

97
86
4

86
82
2

67
68
12

48
51
9

61
80
11

Average expenditure per family for com­
munity welfare, total___________________ $17. 51
14. 06
Religious organizations___ ____________ _
Community chest and other organizations_
3.17
.28
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property.

$12. 72
11.05
1.63
.04

$15. 59
12.96
2. 58
.05

$15. 59
13. 33
2. 21
.05

$18. 80
14.98
3. 52
.30

$21. 72
16. 77
4. 21
.74

$20. 66
15.22
4.80
.64

38
4
2

101
16
12

93
18
9

80
15
6

56
10
6

87
21
16

Average expenditure per family for contribu­
tions and gifts to persons outside economip. family, total
$12. 46 $19. 69 $20. 47
$26. 84
15.45
18. birthday, etc.,13. 07
Christmas,06
8. 03
gifts
___ _______
8.12
4. 28
4.35
6.27
Support of relatives_________________ ____
.66
.15
.35
.67
Support of other persons____________ ___

$25. 65
19.27
5. 61
.77

$32. 42
21.35
10. 46
.61

$47. 88
29.11
17. 55
1.22

$500 to $600 to
$600
$700

F o r m a l E d u c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey______________ _ _ _ _ _ _
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home----------------------Members at home_________________ ______
Average expenditure per family for formal
education, total______________________ _
For members away from home___________
For members at home____________________
V o c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

C o m m u n it y W e lfa r e E x p e n d itu r e ^

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations___________________
Community chest and other organizations_
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property.

G ifts a n d C o n tr ib u tio n s

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts___________
Support of relatives.____ ___ _____ _ __
Support of other persons_______ _______

455
84
51

M is c e lla n e o u s E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Funerals_____________________
_________
Legal costs_______________________________
Gardens. ________________________ _
Family losses_____ _____ _________________
Average expenditure per family for miscel­
laneous items, total_____________________
Funerals________________
_
___
Legal costs__ __________________ _ _ _ __
Gardens.
_______
____ _____
__
Family losses____ __ _________ _______ __
Other___ __ __ . . .
__ _______________
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.
5 3 9 5 7 °— 39------- 18




9
5
50
10

0
0
8
1

1
1
9
4

1
0
10
1

2
1
8
1

2
1
7
3

3
2
8
0

$7.10
5.18
.20
.32
.65
.75

$2.58
0
0
.28
.34
1. 96

$3. 87
.30
.22
.07
2.12
1.16

$1. 21
.31
0
.46
.04
.40

$1.57
.93
.12
.28
.23
.01

$13. 43
9. 25
.94
.69
.81
,7 4

$21. 33
20.87
.09
.29
0
.08

264
T

W EST

able

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

16.— F orm a l education, vocation, c o m m u n ity w elfare, gifts and con tributions,
and m iscellaneous expenditures, by econom ic level— Continued
ST. LOUIS, M O.—W H IT E FAMILIES
Economic level—Families spending per expendi­
ture unit per year
Item

All
fami­
lies

$700
and
over

Under
$300

$300 to
$400

$400 to
$500

$500 to
$600

$600 to
$700

401

54

65

94

62

42

84

6
89

1
18

2
20

0
24

2
10

1
10

0
7

$4. 62
.02
4. 60

$9. 49
.06
9.43

$6. 99
0
6.99

$10. 80
2. 74
8.06

$4.02
. 13
3. 89

$5.94
0
5.94

F o r m a l E d u c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey_________________________
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home____ _________
Members at h om e_______ _______________

Average expenditure per family for formal
education,
_______________total_______
$7.14
For members away from home____ _ _ _
.45
6. 69
For members at home-. ___ ____________
V o c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees________ ____________
Professional association dues or fees_______
Technical literature ____________ _____

118
2
3

12
0
0

17
1
0

33
0
1

15
0
0

13
0
1

28
1
1

Average expenditure per family for voca­
tional items, total,
________ _ __ _ __
Union dues or fees________________________
Professional association dues or fees_______
Technical literature _____________________
Other items of vocational expense_______

$8. 35
7. 46
.31
.03
. 55

$4.19
4.06
0
0
. 13

$6. 86
6.60
.18
0
.08

$10.11
8. 58
0
. 10
1. 43

$5.28
4. 94
0
0
.34

$8. 96
7.81
0
.05
1.10

$12. 23
10.74
1.35
.02
. 12

285
269
193

42
27
23

47
36
25

70
59
45

37
50
27

29
32
23

60
65
50

Average expenditure per family for com­
munity welfare, total______ _____ __
$21. 43
Religious organizations, ____ ____ _______
15.20
4. 79
Community chest and other organizations,
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property.
1. 44

$18.40
14. 66
2.82
.92

$14. 69
11. 39
2. 46
.84

$18. 59
14. 44
3.03
1.12

$20. 72
11.54
7. 98
1. 20

$26. 24
18.13
5. 99
2.12

$29. 90
20. 60
6. 87
2.43

282
75
25

27
5
4

34
5
2

67
17
4

45
14
5

33
13
3

76
21
7

Average expenditure per family for contribu­
tions and gifts to persons outside eco­
nomic family, total,. _ __________ _______ $23. 31
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts ,
__ __ 10.68
Support of relatives,, ___ ______________
11. 98
Support of other persons_______ _________
.65

$5.56
3. 56
1. 85
.15

$8.79
5. 95
2.02
.82

$19.18
7. 88
11.18
.12

$21. 25
9. 98
9. 91
1. 36

$44.15
16. 26
27. 43
.46

$41. 69
19. 76
20.91
1.02

3
5
14
10

1
0
2
1

0
1
1
0

0
0
6
2

0
0
3
1

1
2
1
0

1
2
1
6

$7.55
3. 71
.40
. 10
2.15
1.19

$6. 37
4. 63
0
.05
.22
1. 47

$0. 87
0
.62
.06
0
.19

$1.22
0
0
. 12
.46
.64

$0. 75
0
0
.22
.24
.29

$22. 54
12. 71
2. 67
.02
0
7.14

$18.12
8. 39
.09
.08
9. 45
. 11

C o m m u n it y W e lfa re E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Religious organizations, ___ ______ __
Community chest and other organizations,
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal property.

G ift s a n d C o n tr ib u tio n s

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts___________
Support of relatives, ________________ __
Support of other persons____ ____________

M is c e lla n e o u s E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Funerals_________________________________
Legal costs_______________________________
Gardens, ____ __________________________
Family losses________ ____________________
Average expenditure per family for miscel­
laneous items, total_____________________
Funerals_________________________________
Legal costs_______________________________
Gardens,_ __________ _________ _____ __ ,
Family losses____ ________________________
Other___ _____________________________ __
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.




TABULAE
T

able

265

SUM M ARY

16. — F orm a l ed ucation, vocation, co m m u n ity w elfare, gifts and con tributions ,
and m iscellan eou s exp en d itu res, by econom ic level—Continued
St. Louis, Mo.—Negro
families

Item
All
fami­
lies

Salt Lake City, Utah—White
families

Economic
level—
Families spending
per
expenditure
unit per year
Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
and
over

All
fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year

Under
$300

$300
to
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

F o r m a l E d u c a tio n E x p e n d itu r e s

Families in survey_____ ___ ___ . _
Number of families spending for—
Members away from home_______
Members at home ____ ____
__
Average expenditure per family for
formal education, total_________
For members away from home___
For members at home.__ __ . . .

106

28

27

51

210

54

55

72

29

1
12

0
7

0
2

1
3

0
56

0
18

0
15

0
13

0
10

$2. 08
.94
1.14

$3.03
0
3.03

$0.95
0
.95

$2.16
1.96
.20

$8.27
0
8.27

$5. 38 $10. 51
0
0
5.38 10. 51

$9. 33
0
9. 33

$6. 76
0
6.76

30
0
0

4
0
0

6
0
0

20
0
0

41
9
3

9
0
0

8
1
0

17
3
2

7
5
1

$5. 38
5. 34

$2. 04
2.04

$3. 91
3.91

$7. 98
7.90

$6.31
4. 82

$5.19
5.19

$3.39
3.29

0
0
.08

.69
.08
.72

V o c a tio n E x p e n d it u r e s

Number of families spending for—
Union dues or fees____ . . . _ . . .
Professional association dues or fees.
Technical literature_____________
Average expenditure per family for
vocational items, total__________
Union dues or fees_____ ________
Professional association dues or
fees____ ____ _____________ _____
Technical literature___ __ ______
Other items of vocational expense. .
C o m m u n ity

0
0
.04

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

.10
0
0

$7.29 $11. 52
5.36
5. 74
.47
.21
1.25

3.60
.08
2.10

W e lfa re E x p e n d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
22
92
Religious organizations______ ____
24
46
Community chest and other or­
ganizations. ________ ________
67
16
14
37
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal
13
3
property___ _______ ____ __ . .
3
7
Average expenditure per family for
community welfare, total. . . . . . $15. 79 $13.05 $12.96 $18. 79
9.88 11.16 16.12
Religious organizations.. _____ __ 13. 21
Community chest and other or­
2. 22
2. 75
ganizations. _____ ____________
2. 40
1.33
Taxes: Poll, income, and personal
.42
.36
.27
property______________ _______
.47

133

29

38

49

17

131

32

32

45

22

152

30

45

53 ___ 24

$36. 41 $20.77 $28.60 $51.87 $41. 98
31.79 17. 57 24. 84 46.08 36. 02
2. 38

1. 59

1.51

3. 28

3.23

2. 24

1.61

2. 25

2. 51.

2. 73

26
16
8

155
32
7

34
1
0

37
6
2

58
17
3

26
8
2

$3.81 $22.69 $49. 58
.99
5.33
1.80
2.46 20.19 42.45
.36
.70
1.80

$20. 78
14. 65
5. 66
.47

G ifts a n d C o n tr ib u tio n s

Number of families spending for—
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts___
40
Support of relatives______________
26
Support of other persons__________
13
Average expenditure per family for
contributions and gifts to persons
outside economic family, total.._ $30.64
3. 29
Christmas, birthday, etc., gifts___
26. 21
Support of relatives_____ . . . . . .
Support of other persons__________
1.14

4
4
2

10
6
3

$8.33 $14. 55 $26. 21 $42. 30
7. 05 10. 69 17. 32 29. 68
1.28
3. 78
8. 53 10.24
0
.08
.36
2. 38

M is c e lla n e o u s E x p en d itu r e s

Number of families spending for—
Funerals_____ __________________
Legal costs. ______________________
Gardens__________________________
Family losses_____________________
Average expenditure per family for
miscellaneous items, total_______
Funerals_________ _____ __________
Legal costs_______________________
Gardens__________________________
Family losses ___________________
Other____________________________

0
1
1
0
$0.19
0
.17
.02
0
0

0
0
0
0
$0
0
0
0
0
0

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 331.




0
0
0
0
$0
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
1
0

2
4
4
4

0
0
1
0

0
0
2
2

2
3
1
2

0
1
0
0

$0.40
0
.35
.05
0
0

$4.11
1.05
1.24
.06
.18
1.58

$0. 76
0
0
.02
0
.74

$0.93
0
0
.11
.30
.52

$8. 71
3. 06
1.84
.09
.30
3. 42

$4. 96
0
4. 41
0
0
.55

266

W EST

NORTH

T

17.—

able

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

C lothing ex p en d itu res , b y econom ic level

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—W H IT E FAMILIES

Item

All fami­
lies

Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year
Under
$400

$400 to
$600

$600 and
over

C lo th in g E x p e n d i t u r e s

I. Number of families in survey_____ ________ _______________
Average number of clothing expenditure units per family___
Number of families spending for—
Ready-made clothing, dry cleaning, and accessories_______
Yard goods and findings---------------------------------------------------Paid help for sewing______________________________________
Number of families reporting clothing received as gifts______

1,767
2.17

618
3. 37

649
2.66

500
2.16

1,767
1,036
98
1,011

618
378
12
363

649
395
40
385

500
263
46
263

Average expenditure per family for clothing------------------------Ready-made clothing, dry cleaning, and accessories _____
Yard goods and findings--------- ----------- ------------------------Paid help for sewing__________________ ________________
Average value per family of clothing received as gifts (incom­
plete)1------ ------------------------------------------------------- ------------

$150. 20
145. 84
4. 07
.29

$121. 48
117. 73
3. 66
.09

$151.96
147.29
4. 40
.27

$183.40
178. 70
4.14
.56

10. 26

10. 54

10. 55

9. 51

1,687
1,940

593
715

614
711

480
514

1.15
271
318

1. 21
171
212

1.16
82
87

1.07
18
19

1.17
305
354

1.24
199
241

1.06
86
93

1.06
20
20

1.16
206
227

1. 21
115
132

1.08
70
74

1.00
21
21

II. Number of families having men and boys 18 years of age
and over----------------- ------------- - ------------------------- Number of men and boys 18 years of age and over 2
_________
Average number of men and boys 18 years of age and over
per family having such men and boys 2
---------------------- . . .
Number of families having boys 12 through 17 years of age 2
_.
Number of boys 12 through 17 years of age 2------------------------Average number of boys 12 through 17 years of age per family
having such boys 2____ __________________________ ______
Number of families having boys 6 through 11 years of age 2 —
Number of boys 6 through 11 years of age 2. . . ______________
Average number of boys 6 through 11 years of age per family
having such boys 2______
- _________________________ Number of families having boys 2 through 5 years of age 2
___
Number of boys 2 through 5 years of age 2
______
____ ____
Average number of boys 2 through 5 years of age per family
having such boys 2___ ___ __ ------------------------------------Number of families having women and girls 18 years of age
and over2. . _
. ___
__ ______
___ __ __
Number of women and girls 18 years of age and over 2_ _.
Average number of women and girls 18 years of age and over
per family having such women and girls 2________________
Number of families having girls 12 through 17 years of age 2__
Number of girls 12 through 17 years of age 2
_________________
Average number of girls 12 through 17 years of age per family
having such girls 2. ____________________________________ _
Number of families having girls 6 through 11 years of age 2___
Number of girls 6 through 11 years of age 2. ________________
Average number of girls 6 through 11 years of age per family
having such girls 2
____ ___ ________________________ ___
Number of families having girls 2 through 5 years of age 2___
Number of girls 2 through 5 years of age 2 _________ _ ____
Average number of girls 2 through 5 years of age per family
having such girls 2 ______ ________ __ _ _ _ ________ _ _
Number of families having infants under 2 years of age 3____
Number of infants under 2 years of age 3. - ________________
Average number of infants under 2 years of age per family
having infants3___
_ ____ - _ _ _ ________ _ . . . . .

1.10

1.15

1.06

1.00

1,760
2,159

615
794

647
802

498
563

1.23
253
301

1.29
153
189

1.24
76
87

1.13
24
25

1.19
300
344

1.24
190
223

1.14
93
103

1.04
17
18

1.15
203
224

1.17
126
144

1.11
67
69

1.06
10
11

1.10
189
190

1.14
89
90

1.03
74
74

1.10
26
26

1.01

1.01

1.00

1.00

1 The aggregates on which these averages are based do not include gifts of clothing reported received by
21 families, but for which they could not estimate the value.
2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
3 Infants 1 to 2 years of age are included only if dependent on family funds for 52 weeks; those under 1
year of age are included regardless of number of weeks dependent on family fund

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




267

TABULAE SU M M AR Y
T

able

17. — Clothing ex p en d itu res , by econ om ic level— Continued

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

Persons purchasing

III. Clothing, men and boys 18 years
of age and over:2
Total______________________________
Hats: Felt_______________________
Straw_____________________
• Caps: Wool______________________
Other_____________________
Overcoats________________________
Topcoats._______________________ l
Raincoats________________________
Jackets: Heavy fabric___________
Leather_________________
Other___________________
Sweaters: Heavy________________
Light_________________
Suits: Heavy wool_______________
Lightweight wool_________
Cotton, linen______________
Palm Beach_______________
Other_____________________
Trousers: Wool__________________
Cotton________________
Other_________________
Overalls, coveralls_______________
Shirts: Cotton, work____________
Cotton and other, dress
Wool_____________________
Underwear:
Suits, cotton, knit_____________
woven___________
cotton and wool_________
rayon and silk___________
Undershirts, cotton____________
cotton and w ool...
rayon and silk____
Shorts, cotton__________________
rayon and silk__________
Drawers, cotton and wool______
Pajamas and night shirts_______
Shoes: Street____________________
Work_____________________
Canvas___________________
Other____________________
Boots: Rubber__________________
Leather__________________
Arctics__________________________
Rubbers_________________________
Shoe: Repairs___________________
Shines_____________________
Hose: Cotton, heavy_____________
dress______________
Rayon___________________
Silk_______________________
Wool______________________
Gloves: Work, cotton____________
other_____________
Street, leather___________
other____________
Ties_____________________________
Collars___________________________
Bathing suits, sun suits__________
Handkerchiefs___________________
Accessories_______________________
Bathrobes_______________________
Cleaning, repairing______________
Other____________________________

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam- ture unit per
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Item

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

906
464
397
204
231
112
68
239
115
79
146
177
419
479
38
29
17
429
566
148
680
814
1,299
93

253
111
136
70
56
26
19
91
32
33
45
58
119
121
9
5
6
153
199
48
285
325
420
24

344
173
148
74
100
49
29
96
41
23
65
65
155
173
13
10
5
155
208
53
242
284
491
41

309 0.52
180
.26
.26
113
60
.20
75
. 12
37
.06
.04
20
52
. 14
.06
42
.06
23
.08
36
54
. 10
.23
145
.25
185
.02
16
.02
14
6
.01
.30
121
.54
159
. 12
47
153
.97
205 1.41
388 2. 41
28
.08

462
202
236
48
656
184
70
810
42
122
549
1,545
626
50
89
65
31
94
380
1,130
212
567
793
674
324
186
629
143
474
55i
1,159i
42!
82:
851
213:
54
1, 369'

170
80
77
15
217
65
30
271
14
43
121
521
253
15
29
22
11
30
108
395
31
240
301
190
78
60
235
56
112
14
337
6
9
273
53
13
396

168
66
83
13
242
77
20
303
12
49
194
582
219
20
31
23
6
35
152
421
79
205
296
281
108
71
239
56
188
19
435
19
37
324
74
17
529

124
56
76
20
197
42
20
236
16
30
234
442
154
15
29
20
14
29
120
314
102
122
196
203
138
55
155
31
174
22
387
17
36
254
86
24
444




N o.

N o.

0. 37 0.53 0.70
. 16 .26 .39
.24 .26 .29
.19 .20 .23
.08 .14 . 15
.04 .07 .07
.03 .04 .04
. 16 .14 . 12
.04 .06 .08
.07 .07 .05
.06 .10 .07
.09 .10 . 12
. 17 .24 .30
.17 .22 .38
.02 .02 .04
.01 .02 .03
.01 .01 .01
.27 .29 .36
.48 .57 .60
. 10 .11 .17
1.08 .93 .89
1.34 1.40 1.53
1. 72 2.52 3.24
.07 .09 .09

3.01
4. 04
2. 90
1.07
.34
3.26
.60
.29
.04
2.53
.13
.05
4.62

3.19
3. 96
2. 02
.56
.25
3.10
.46
.20
.03
1.64
.04
.01
3.53

.03

.02

D o l.

D o l.

49.52 33.69
1.67 1.01
.47 .22
.26 .21
.09 .07
2.60 1.29
.99 .51
.15 .10
.52 .53
.36 .24
.18 .19
.21 .16
.20 .15
5.97 3.96
6. 07 3. 66
.17 .06
.19 .05
. 13 .06
1.05 .85
.89 .74
.26 .21
1.48 1.54
1.18 1.02
3. 08 1.98
.15 .10

.70 .59
.32 .31
.36 .25
.06 .04
.45 .31
. 14 . 12
.07 .06
.59 .42
.04 .02
. 10 .07
.64 .28
5. 01 3.78
1.45 1.42
.04 .03
. 11 .08
.13 .09
.08 .07
. 12 .09
.25 . 18
1.14 .97
.27 .05
.51 .48
3.02 2. 74
.76 .74
3. 86 4. 40
3.22 3.69
.69 .42
.87 2.06
.37 .17
. 14 .10
.33 .48
3. 33 3. 39
.59 . 54
.61 .78
.21 .19
.30 .41
.44 .23
.04 .02
.05 .05
2. 55 3. 73 1.40 .71
.04 .01
.19 . 17
.06 .10
.12 .02
.42 .27
4.90 5.74
. 12! .06
.021 .06
.15i .07
2. 88; 1.47
.25i .05
l

.61 .54 .62 .69
.26 .26 .22 .32
.30 .25 .28 .40
.06 .04 .06 .10
1. 35 1.01 1.46 1.87
.34 .29 .39 .32
.11 .11 .08 . 15
1.68 1.32 1.66 2. 22
.07 .05 .06 . 12
.21 . 17 .20 .24
.48 .24 .46 .83
1.23 1.07 1.24 1.44
.46 .49 .44 .45
.03 .02 .03 .03
.05 .04 .04 .06
.04 .03 .03 .06
.02 .02 .01 .03
.05 .04 .05 .06
.21 .16 .23 .25

2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.

N o.

Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over
D o l.

D o l.

9. 33 71.81
1.65 2.60
.44 .85
.27 .33
.09 .13
3.00 3. 86
1.18 1.40
.18 .IT
.57 .45
.38 .50
.15 .21
.25 .24
.20 .29
6.10 8.56
5.70 9. 92
.18 .32
.17 .40
.12 .23
1.05 1.32
.96 1. 01
.25 .34
1.42 1.50
1.18 1.41
3.12 4.55
.19 .16
.70
.26
.34
.06
.43
.15
.04
.56
.02
. 10
.58
4. 94
1. 37
.06
. 10
. 10
.04
. 12
.28
1.20
.24
.56
.71
.76
.30
.13
.60
.17
.45
.04
1.37
.06
.15
.43
. 10
.11
2.60
.30

.85
.40
.54
.10
.68
.17
.10
.87
.09
.13
1.23
6. 81
1.60
.05
. 17
.24
.16
. 16
.30
1.29
.60
.49
.87
.96
.76
.22
.64
.29
.72
.07
2.39
.04
.21
.64
.23
.31
5.22
.46

268

W EST
T

able

17.—

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

Clothing ex p en d itu res , hy econ om ic level— Continued

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued

Persons purchasing

Item

IV. Clothing, boys 12 through 17 years
of age:2
Total______________________________
Hats: Felt_______________________
Straw_____________________
Caps: Wool_____________________
Other_____________________
Overcoats_______________________
Topcoats________________________
Raincoats_______________________
Jackets: Heavy fabric-----------------Leather-------------------------Other__________________
Sweaters: Heavy________________
Light_________________
Play suits: Wool knit___________
Cotton suede________
Other________________
Suits: Heavy wool______________
Lightweight wool_________
Cotton, linen_____________
Palm Beach______________
Other_____________________
Trousers: Wool__________________
Cotton________________
Other_________________
Overalls, coveralls_______________
Shirts and blouses: Cotton, work.
Cotton and
other, dress.
Underwear:
Wool------------Suits, cotton, knit_____________
woven___________
cotton and wool_________
rayon and silk__________
Undershirts, cotton____________
cotton and wool...
rayon and silk____
Shorts, cotton_________________
rayon and silk_________
Drawers, cotton and wool_____
Pajamas and nightshirts_______
Shoes: Street____________________
Work____________________
Canvas__________________
Other____________________
Boots: Rubber__________________
Leather__________________
Arctics__________________________
Rubbers________________________
Shoe: Repairs___________________
Shines____________________
Hose: Cotton, heavy____________
dress_____________
Rayon____________________
Silk______________________
Wool_____________________
Gloves: Work, cotton___________
other____________
Street, leather__________
other____________
Ties____________________________
Collars_________________________
Bathing suits, sun suits_________
Handkerchiefs__________________
Accessories______________________
Bathrobes______________________
Cleaning, repairing_____________
Other___________________________

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

All
fam­
ilies

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

Economic
level-—Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year

All
fam­
ilies

Un­ $400 $600
to and
der
$400 $600 over
N o.

N o.

D o l.

0.05
0
.05
.01
.03
0
0
.16
.16
.21
.68
.58
0
0
.05
.21
.42
0
0
.11
.95
1.16
.21
.68
.58

33.32
.57
.01
.30
.09
1.33
.35
.12
.53
.69
.10
.76
.54
.02
.01
.02
2.61
2.61
.13
0
.09
1.89
1.15
.46
.84
.47

32
4
39
8
10
3
6
16
14
3
40
31
1
2
0
16
25
1
0
3
54
39
10
31
18

9 0.26 0.20 0.37
.02 (*)
.05
0
.43 .38 .53
8
.13 .14 .11
1
5
.10 .08 .11
.02 .02 .03
0
.04 .03 .07
0
3
. 19 . 19 .18
.12 .10 .16
3
3
.03 .02 .03
9
.38 .28 .54
9
.37 .33 .43
0
.01 (<)
.01
.01 0
.02
0
.02 .03 0
1
4
.17 .16 .20
.19 . 12 .29
8
.02 .03 .01
0
0
0 0
0
.02 0
2
.03
.72 .63 .90
11
.70 .56 .94
10
.20 .23 .14
3
.94 .94 .98
6
.69 .71 .66
4

144
9
47
17
25
0
91
25
2
102
0
14
37
189
29
77
7
6
9
12
25
131
0
66
115
27
7
16
42
4
48
20
95
0
24
66
22
3
47

62
6
12
2
10
1
43
15
0
54
1
5
26
83
9
23
11
4
6
2
16
57
1
15
61
24
3
5
12
1
35
14
54
1
16
35
13
2
50

17 2.45 2.17 2.91 3.47
4
.15 .10 .21 .37
4
.47 .50 .38 .47
2
.15 . 17 .08 .26
1
.26 .26 .30 .11
.01 0
.05 0
0
13 1.56 1. 26 2.10 2.37
.44 .38 .59 .47
3
.04 .02 0
2
.47
12 1.86 1.48 2.69 2. 32
.05 .32
1
.03 0
2
.19 .17 .20 .37
12
.36 .25 .49 1.11
19 2.11 1.87 2.46 3.26
2
.17 .17 .16 .16
8
.48 .50 .40 .63
2
.08 .04 .16 .16
.03 .03 .05 0
0
2
.05 .04 .07 .11
.05 .06 .02 .16
3
4
.15 .13 .18 .26
14
0
6 2.82 3.07 2.11 3.21
11 5.44 4.47 7. 63 6. 21
6 2.04 1.66 2.87 2. 47
.17 .16 .15 .32
1
.25 .24 .13 .89
3
2
.30 .31 .26 .26
1
.04 .03 .01 .21
14
.36 .27 .44 .89
5
.18 .13 .21 .58
14 1.54 1.17 2.28 2. 37
1
.02 0
.06 .11
8
.15 .12 .18 .42
10 2.90 2.22 3.94 5.74
6
0
.02 .01 .02 0
9

Economic
level-—Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year
Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

83 42
5
1
115 68
35 26
32 17
4
7
13
7
59 40
39 22
4
10
104 55
101 61
2
1
2
0
5
4
52 32
59 26
6
5
0
0
5
0
170 105
124 75
47 34
145 108
76 54
223
19
63
21
36
1
147
43
4
168
2
21
75
291
40
108
20
10
17
17
45
202
1
87
187
57
11
24
56
6
97
39
163
2
48
111
41
5
106

Average expenditure
per person

D o l.

D o l.

D o l.

26.43 43. 77 62.41
.39 .89 1.10
.04 0
(f)
i
.25 .40 .42
.11 .06 .03
.95 1. 68 3.96
.27 .60 0
.10 .22 0
.52 .54 .47
.45 .95 2. 21
.03 .11 .79
.45 1.20 2.22
.44 .64 1.26
.03 .01 0
0
.02 0
.02 0
.05
2. 38 2.96 3. 61
1.54 4.06 7.89
.16 .10 0
0
0
0
0
.32 .05
1.62 2. 53 2.07
.87 1.55 2 . 38
.51 .36 .41
.86 .84 .59
.46 .49 .45

2.03 1.64
.13 .08
.35 .37
.13 .15
.18 .17
.01 0
.45 .35
. 14 .12
.02 .01
.54 .41
.02 0
.06 .05
.41 .27
5. 93 4. 93
.42 .43
.41 .41
.15 .06
.04 .03
.18 .12
.11 .11
.15 .12
1.14 .99
.01 0
.51 .50
1.13 .89
.40 .32
.03 .03
.09 .08
.06 .06
.01 .01
.37 .25
.10 .05
.49 .34
(5
) 0
.20 .11
.21 .14
.09 .08
.07 .04
.84 .28
•02I .02

2.68 3.40
.20 .40
.26 .46
.05 .21
.19 .26
.02 0
.62 .88
.18 . 19
0
.29
.83 .58
.03 .24
.06 .16
.55 1.31
7.43 10. 21
.39 .47
.33 .74
.37 .13
.08 0
.27 .37
.07 .24
.22 .24
1.25 2.28
.02 0
.44 .88
1.65 1.47
.56 .59
.05 .08
.08 .32
.06 .13
.01 .03
.54 1.02
.13 .49
.78 .90
.01 .03
.30 .73
.30 .55
.08 . 23
.15 0
1.95 1.94
.01 0

2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
i Less than 0.005 article.
5 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




269

TA B U L A R S U M M A R Y
T

able

17. — C lothing ex pen d itu res, by econom ic level— Continued

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

Persons purchasing

Item

Clothing, boys 6 through 11 years
of age:2
Total______________________________
Hats: Felt-----------------------------------Straw_______________________
Caps: Wool---- ----------------------------Other_____________________
Overcoats________________________
Topcoats________________________
Raincoats________________________
Jackets: Heavy fabric____________
Leather_________________
Other___________________
Sweaters: Heavy________________
Light___ ______________
Play suits: Wool knit____________
Cotton suede_________
Other________________
Suits: Heavy wool_______________
Lightweight wool__________
Cotton, linen______________
Palm Beach_______________
Other_____________________
Trousers: Wool__________________
Cotton________________
Other_________________
Overalls, coveralls_______________
Shirts and blouses: Cotton and
other, ex­
cept wool. .
Underwear:
Wool-----------Suits, cotton, knit_____________
woven___________
cotton and wool_________
rayon and silk___________
Undershirts, cotton____________
cotton and wool______
rayon and silk________
Shorts, cotton_________________
rayon and silk_________
Drawers, cotton and w ool_____
Pajamas and nightshirts_______
Shoes: Street and dress__________
Canvas___________________
Other____________________
Boots: Rubber__________________
Leather__________________
Arctics________________
Rubbers_______________
Shoe: Repairs_________
Shines__________
Hose: Cotton, heavy__
dress___
Rayon__________
Silk_____________
Wool___________
Gloves: Cotton________
Leather_______
Other_________
Ties___________________
Collars________________
Bathing suits, sun suits.
Handkerchiefs_________
Accessories____________
Bathrobes_____________
Cleaning, repairing____
Other__________________

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam- ture unit ner
ilies
year
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
fam­ expenditure
ilies unit per year
Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

Average expenditure
per person

All
fam­
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit; per year
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

V.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

19
8
6
2
171 107
77 50
37 26
5
3
11
6
76 47
26 13
23 15
105 65
100 63
8
17
21 10
12
6
31 17
45 30
24 12
1
0
4
1
130 87
96 69
61 40
250 175

9
4
52
21
8
2
4
20
12
6
30
33
9
8
3
12
9
10
1
3
40
20
18
64

2 0.05 0.03 0.10 0.10
.02 .01 .04 0
0
.59 .51 .75 .90
12
.24 .22 .27 .35
6
.11 .11 .09 . 15
3
.01 .01 .02 0
0
.03 .03 .04 .05
1
.22 .20 .23 .45
9
.07 .05 .13 .05
1
.07 .06 .06 .10
2
.32 .29 .37 .55
10
.35 .32 .46 .20
4
.09 .07 .15 0
0
. 12 .08 .18 .25
3
.08 .06 .09 .35
3
2
.10 .08 .15 .10
.14 .14 .11 .30
6
2
.16 .08 .33 .25
0 (4
.01 0
) 0
.02 (4
.08 0
0
)
.59 .58 .68 .25
3
.47 .48 .38 .70
7
.24 .23 .27 .25
3
11 2. 00 1.98 2.14 1.60

278 196
12
6
137 92
59 37
42 30
1
0
62 40
18 10
2
0
71 43
0
0
12
7
96 51
354 241
105 73
27 14
26 17
67 39
50 28
61 34
179 127
1
1
168 115
178 126
33 21
2
1
39 20
65 43
80 50
91 53
129 83
3
2
36 19
102 64
37 23
1
9
55 27

66
6
43
17
10
1
14
7
1
21
0
4
38
93
26
10
6
21
21
21
39
0
44
41
11
1
16
20
25
29
38
1
13
30
12
7
21

16
0
2
5
2
0
8
1
1
7
0
1
7
20
6
3
3
7
1
6
13
0
9
11
1
0
3
2
5
9
8
0
4
8
2
1
7

2.72
.07
.93
.40
.28
.01
.54
.15
.01
.60
0
.07
.45
2.64
.42
.09
.07
.19
.14
.18

2.80
.12
1.18
.49
.26
.02
.49
.23
.03
.63
0
.11
.81
2.86
.30
.13
.06
.24
.23
.23

3.30
0
.25
.60
.25
0
1.30
.30
.10
1.20
0
.10
.60
3.15
.50
.15
.15
.35
.05
.35

3. 55 3.41 4.03
4.81 4. 89 4. 77
.59 .47 .82
.03 .02 .04
.31 .23 .45
.29 .27 .37
.26 .24 .31
.38 .31 .49
1.06 .85 1.42
.01 .01 .02
.11 .08 .16
1.93 1.65 2. 37

3.00
4.05
1.00
0
.50
.15
.30
.70
1.90
0
.20
3.30

.03

2.64
.06
.89
.35
.29
0
.51
.11
0
.53
0
.06
.31
2. 51
.41
.07
.07
.17
.12
.15

(4
)

.08

.05

D o t.

D o t.

D o t.

D o t.

22.82 19.93 27.46 35.78
.07 .03 .16 .14
.01 (5
.02 0
)
.36 .29 .46 .73
.13 .11 .16 .21
.47 .43 .42 1. 26
.07 .06 .10 0
.09 .06 .15 .15
.59 .50 .63 1.46
.29 .22 .52 . 19
.17 .17 .19 .13
.45 .36 .53 1.14
.34 .30 .48 .23
.16 .08 .42 0
.11 .07 .17 .32
.12 .04 .17 .89
.63 .46 1.00 .90
.87 .73 .83 2. 75
.26 .20 .44 .25
.01 0
.05 0
.05 .01 .17 0
.98 .96 1.19 .35
.59 .59 .54 .89
.39 .34 .45 .78
1.54 1.48 1.77 1.18
1.69
.05
.58
.25
.17
.01
.12
.06
.01
.15
0
.02
.35
5.33
.31
.10
.12
.55
.21
.16
.84
(5
)
.74
.91
.11
.01
.12
.07
.15
.16
.21
(5
)
.11
.12
.04
.05
. 19
(5
)

1.56
.03
.55
.21
.17
0
.11
.04
0
. 12
0
.02
.23
4. 95
.29
.07
.10
.46
.17
.13
.75
(5
)
.66
.87
.08
(5
)
.09
.06
.13
.12
.16
(5
)
.09
.09
.03
.01
.09
(5
)

1.86
.08
.73
.32
.18
.03
.09
.05
.01
.18
0
.03
.65
5.75
.33
.12
.11
.66
.32
.22
.84
0
.93
1.00
.17
.01
.22
.09
.19
.22
.28
(5
)
.14
.16
.08
.13
.26
0

2.48
0
.17
.43
.20
0
.30
.30
.10
.28
0
.02
.47
8.04
.39
.39
.29
.99
.07
.28
1. 87
0
.85
.99
.10
0
.16
.03
.24
.43
.44
0
.19
.20
.04
.08
1.01
0

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
* Less than 0.005 article.
6 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




270

W EST

NORTH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

T a b l e 17. — Clothing ex p en d itu res , b y econom ic level— Continued
W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

VI. Clothing, boys 2 through 5 years
of age:2
_______________________
Total
Hats: Felt----------------------------------Straw_____________________
Caps: Wool----------------- -------------Other_____________________
Overcoats________________________
Topcoats_______________ ________
Raincoats-------- --------------------------Jackets: Heavy fabric-----------------Leather_________________
Other —-------- ---------------Sweaters: Heavy------------------------Light -------- --------------Play suits: Wool knit-----------------Cotton suede_________
Other________________
Suits: Heavy wool----------------------Lightweight wool_________
Cotton, linen--------------------Palm Beach. ------------------Other............. ......... ...........
Trousers: Wool---------------------------Cotton________________
Other_________________
Overal s, coveralls_______________
Blouses: Cotton and other, except
wool----------------- ---------Wool__ _______ ________
Underwear:
Suits, cotton, knit_____________
woven__________
cotton and wool____ _____
rayon and silk_____ __ __
Undershirts, cotton___________
cotton and wool_
_
rayon and silk-----Shorts, cotton--------------------------rayon and silk__________
Drawers, cotton and wool--------Pajamas and nightshirts_______
Shoes: Street and dress__________
Canvas___________________
Other____________________
Boots: Rubber__________________
Leather________
_______
Arctics__________________________
Rubbers_________________ _______
Shoe: Repairs________ _____ _____
Shines_______________ ______
Hose: Cotton, heavy.....................
dress______________
Rayon____ _______________
Silk______ ________ _______
Wool____________ ________
Gloves: Cotton_____ _
________
Leather_________________
Other___________________
Ties_____ _______________________
Collars..... ........................... ..............
Bathing suits, sun suits__________
Handkerchiefs______________ _____
Accessories______________________
Bathrobes_______________________
Cleaning, repairing______________
Other______________ _____ _______

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All ture unit per
fam­
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Economic
level—Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

N o. N o.

7
5
71
32
32
8
0
12
5
1
32
48
45
37
34
12
20
39
4
10
16
19
10
134

4
1
42
22
16
5
0
6
5
1
14
24
26
20
10
5
10
13
4
7
9
12
5
80

3
4
23
8
13
2
0
5
0
0
13
17
14
14
14
6
7
19
0
2
6
7
5
43

36
2

25
2

8
0

89 49
27 16
33 18
7
5
12
5
9
5
3
2
10
4
0
0
9
0
58 25
223 132
13
7
16
8
6
3
5
3
19 11
12
2
28 22
1
0
95 55
138 81
29 17
6
2
8
2
20 12
22 13
46 23
23 17
0
0
39 18
14
8
4
3
7
1
16
6

32
6
11
2
6
3
0
3
0
5
25
73
5
4
3
1
7
4
5
0
32
45
8
3
5
4
8
15
4
0
15
5
0
5
7

N o.

N o.

N o.

0 0.04 0.04 0. 05
.02 .01 .05
0
.37 .36 .38
6
.15 .18 .11
2
14 .12 .18
3
.04 .04 .03
1
0
0
0 0
.05 .05 .07
1
.02 .04 0
0
.01 0
0 (4
)
.15 .11 .19
5
.24 .20 .26
7
.29 .30 .24
5
.41 .33 .53
3
.37 .24 .30
10
.06 .05 .08
1
.12 .11 .12
3
.65 .27 .86
7
.02 .04 0
0
.07 .08 .03
1
.11 .13 .08
1
.15 .18 .14
0
.08 .06 .15
0
11 1.93 1.85 2. 22

13.70 11.39 15.94 20.54
.02 .02 .03 0
.01 .01 .01 0
.22 .19 .23 .35
.08 .09 .07 .05
.45 .37 .57 .56
.10 .08 .13 .14
0
0
0
0
.08 .08 .10 .07
0
.08 .13 0
0
.01 .02 0
.19 .11 .30 .31
.21 .12 .30 .42
.56 .45 .65 .96
.34 .26 .45 .46
.40 .12 .56 1.64
.18 .09 .31 .29
.26 .21 .27 .50
.55 .19 .82 1.87
0
.03 .06 0
.14 .18 .07 .14
.15 .14 .14 .24
.14 .16 .13 0
.13 .12 .18 0
1.26 1.19 1.45 .99
.28
.01

8 1.02 .87 1.24 1.14
.32 .31 .24 .67
5
4
.37 .33 .39 .52
.06 .07 .05 0
0
.20 .12 .24 .57
1
.14 .09 .18 .29
1
.02 .02 0
.10
1
.15 .06 .14 .76
3
0
0
0
0 0
.21 0
4
.35 1.05
8
.57 .37 .84 .86
2.44 2.28 2. 72 2.48
18
1
.07 .06 .08 .05
.11 .08 .09 .38
4
0
.03 .02 .04 0
1
.02 .02 .01 .05
1
.09
09 . 11 .05
6
.05 .02 .05 .29
1
1
8 2.19 2.07 2.45 2.00
12 4.18 4.43 3.93 3. 48
4
.73 .73 .62 1.14
.12 .05 .18 .38
1
.14 .06 .26 .19
1
4
.11 .11 .07 .24
.11 .11 .12 .05
1
8
.24 .22 .22 .52
2
.20 .25 .12 .14
0
0 0
0
0
.36 .27 .53 .38
6
1
.37 .40 .35 .29
1
1
.03 .01 .07 .05

.57
.14
.20
.04
.05
.04
.01
.03
0
.05
.40
3.93
.06
.11
.04
.04
.11
.05
.09
(«)
.41
.73
.13
.03
.03
.02
.06
.09
.03
0
.12
.02
(«)
.07
. 10
.02

4

.49
.02

D o l.

0
0
.38
.10
.14
.05
0
.05
0
0
.24
.38
.33
.48
1.43
.05
.14
2.29
0
.14
.14
0
0
1.43

.61 .31 .33
.03 0
0

3
0

D o l.

D o l.

N o.

D o l.

.34 .17 .27
.02 0
0
.47
.14
.16
.04
.03
.05
(5
)
.02
0
0
.24
3.46
.04
.05
.04
.05
.11
.02
. 13
0
.40
.66
.12
.01
.01
.02
.06
.06
.04
0
.08
.03
.01
.01
.06
.02

.70
.10
.24
.03
.08
.03
0
.03
0
.10
.58
4.43
.09
.11
.05
.03
j13
.05
.05
0
.42
.86
.10
.03
.05
.01
.07
.08
.02
0
.18
.02
0
17
. 15
.01

.79
.35
.35
0
.06
.07
.05
.14
0
.18
.70
5.14
.03
.43
0
.06
.04
.30
.02
.03
.39
.69
.27
. 10
. 10
.07
.03
.32
.05
0
.18
.01
.01
.10
.22
0

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
* Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




TABULAR
T

able

17.—

271

SUM M ARY

Clothing ex p en d itu res , hy econ om ic level— Continued

W E ST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U T A IN REGION—W H IT E FAM ILIES—Continued

Persons purchasing

VII. Clothing, women and girls 18
years of age and over:2
Total
__ _________
Hats: Felt_______ __ ___________
Straw_____________________
Fabric______________ ___
Caps and berets: Wool___________
Other_________
Coats: Heavy, plain_________ __
fur trimmed______
Fur_________________
___
Light, wool_____ _______
cotton_______ ___
silk, rayon_____ __
Raincoats____________ __
___
Sweaters and jackets:
Wool knit_________________
__
Wool fabric __________________
Leather, leatherette______ . . .
Other______ ______ ___________
Suits: W o o l______________ _ ___
Silk, rayon________ ___ ___
Other________ _ _ _
Waists and middies: Silk, rayon. _
Cotton_____
O th e r.____
Skirts: Wool_____________________
Other. _______ ____ ______
Dresses: Cotton, house______ . . .
street_______ _
Silk, rayon_____________
Wool___ _____
____
Other______________ . . .
Aprons..
_ _ . . . ______ . . .
Coveralls. . . . ________ _ __ __
Knickers, breeches, shorts___ . . .
Underwear: Slips, cotton_
_ ___
silk.
. . . __
rayon_________
Corsets, girdles_____
Brassieres . . . ___ __
Union suits and com­
binations:
Cotton. ______
W ool.. _______ __
Silk, rayon. _____
Underwaists, shirts..
Bloomers and panties:
Cotton..
___ . . .
Rayon____________
Silk_______________
N ig h tg o w n s and
sleeping pajamas:
Cotton, lig h t.____
flannel____
Silk, rayon___ ____
Pajamas, lounging and beach:
Cotton_____ ____ __ _____ __
Silk, rayon_______ _
... _
Other______ . . . _____ _____ __
Bathrobes____________
________
Kimonos, negligees______________
Hose: Silk___ __ _ __ __________
Rayon___________________
Cotton___________________
Wool_____________________

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies

Economic
level—Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Item

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Un­ $400 $600
to and
der
$400 $600 over

No. No. No. No.

No.

1,693 727 533
847 224 324
520 148 196
89 25 40
9
3
3
169 67 66
223 69 78
70
9 30
244 64 95
70 22 25
12
5
1
54 12 18

433
299
176
24
3
36
76
31
85
23
6
24

0.81 0.56 6.83 1.13
.44 .30 .43 .65
.28 .20 .28 .38
.04 .03 .05 .05
.01
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
.08 .08 .08 .07
.10 .09 .10 .13
.03 .01 .04 .06
. 11 .08 .12 .15
.03 .03 .03 .04
.01 (4
.01 .01
)
.03 .02 .02 .04

216
89
24
22
237
61
52
239
103
26
187
38
1, 070
645
1,162
297
164
312
10
65
379
787
530
796
540

90
34
9
10
84
21
21
85
32
6
78
19
392
242
463
116
69
118
3
18
152
295
200
297
213

73
34
11
8
95
27
20
97
39
14
54
5
305
194
377
115
60
84
6
34
95
298
138
278
154

.12 .07 .15 .15
.04 .03 .04 .06
.01 .01 .01 .02
.01 .01 .01 .02
.11 .07 .11 .18
.03 .02 .03 .05
.03 .01 .03 .04
.15 .10 .14 .24
.06 .06 .05 .09
.01 .01 .01 .03
.09 .07 . 11 . 10
.02 .02 .02 .01
1.14 1.40 1.60 1.89
.59 .48 .62 .71
.96 .64 .99 1.37
. 17 .10 . 18 .25
. 12 .07 .13 .17
.40 .38 .42 .42
.01 (4
.02
)
(4
)
.05 .03 .04 .08
.36 .31 .39 .39
.77 .43 .80 1.20
.50 .46 .53 .52
.46 .35 .41 .69
.74 .57 .85 .82

84 67
43 42
92 117
50 48

63
25
100
29

72 31 25
774 273 302
206 43 85

16
199
78

426 118 171
252 90 94
408 93 153

137
68
162

62 14 26
73 20 23
2
6
1
115 24 43
77 12 33
1,830 622 700
278 125 98
250 103 103
38 14 11

22
30
3
48
32
508
55
44
13

214
110
309
127

53
21
4
4
58
13
11
57
32
6
55
14
373
209
322
66
35
110
1
13
132
194
192
221
173

No.

No.

No.

Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over
Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
5105 32. 47 54.81 83.32
1.71 .92 1.74 2. 78
.87 .46 .83 1. 52
.51 .31 .50 .80
.04 .02 .04 .05
.01 .01 .01 (5)
1.48 1.27 1.67 1.53
3.29 1.93 3.03 5.56
2. 34 .56 2.43 4. 72
1.50 .91 1.59 2. 21
.24 .21 .22 .30
.04 .01 .03 .09
.04 .02 .03 .07
.24
.09 '
.06
.06
1.56
.24
. 14
.27
.07
.03
.23
.03
1.73
1.36
5.83
1.15
.60
.24
.01
.07
.25
1.07
.45
1.27
.33

.13
.04
.04
.02
.83
.11
.06
.13
.06
.01
. 16
.03
1.39
.95
3. 32
.53
.31
.22
(6
)
.03
.19
.52
.38
.69
.20

.27
.09
.03
.09
1. 55
.20
. 16
.25
.06
.02
. 26
.05
1.70
1.41
5.70
1.14
.66
.23
.01
.05
.27
1.08
.47
1.25
.36

.35
. 14
.12
.07
2.61
.48
.22
.50
. 12
.07
. 27
.02
2.27
1.85
9.53
2.04
.93
.28
.02
. 17
.30
1.82
.52
2.12
.45

.30
.12
.53
.18

. 19
. 12
.38
.08

.16
.11
.25
.07

.18
.14
.37
.07

.25
.11
.59
.09

.10 .11 .07 .12
1. 39 1.22 1.55 1.43
.33 .16 .37 .50

.05
.59
.25

.04
.44
.12

.03
.66
.26

.08
.71
.40

.31
.19
.44

.19
. 15
.21

.33
.21
.42

.46
.22
.79

.25
. 12
.40
.17

.36
.19
.30

.24
.12
.31
.17

.26
.17
.19

.23
.12
.41
.17

.39
.21
.33

.49
.19
.40

.04 .03 .05 .04
.05 .03 .05 .09
.01
(4
)
(4
)
(4
)
.05 .03 .05 .09
.04 .02 .05 .07
9. 30 6.29 10. 00 12.54
.77 .92 .76 .58
.47 .54 .50 .34
.04 .04 .04 .04

.05 .03 .05 .07
.10 .04 .08 .22
.02
.01 (5
)
(5
)
.21 .08 .20 .40
.09 .03 .10 .17
6.88 4.30 7.19 10.07
.37 .40 .40 .28
. 12 .13 .13 .09
.02 .02 .03 .03

2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
5 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332,




272

W E S T

T able

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

1 7 . — C lothing expenditures, by econom ic level— Continued

W E S T N O R T H C E N T R A L -M O U N T A I N R E G IO N — W H I T E F A M I L I E S — Continued

Persons purchasing

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level— Fam i­
lies spending
per expendi­
All ture unit per
fam­
year
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies

U n­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Item

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

U n­ $400 $600
der
to
and
$400 $600 over

U n­ $400 $600
der
to
and
$400 $600 over

N o. N o. N o. N o .
1.49 1. 26 1.66 1.57
.64
.46
.64
.90
.12
.23
.25
.35
.42
.34
.49
.45

JDol. D ot. D ot. D ot.
4.79 3.60 5. 02 6.14
2. 37 1.44 2. 34 3.71
.57
.27
.60
.96
.39
.27
.40
.55
.74
. 54 . 78 . 96
.05
.02
.01
. 13
.08
.06
.09
. 11
. 17 . 12 .17
.24
.33
. 16 .35
. 55
.42
. 14 .47
.75
. 13 .05
. 14 .24
.11
.16
.18
.22
.22
.33
.34
.47
. 13 .09
.04
.33
.09
.05
.08
. 17
.81
.40
.88 1.28
.08
.05
.09
. 10
. 19 . 15 . 18 . 27
2.06
. 86 2.13 3. 64
. 26 . 13 . 18 . 54

V II. Clothing, women and girls 18
N o . N o. N o. N o.
years of age and over2 Continued.
—
Shoes: Street -------------------------------- 1, 656 590 622 444
858 244 345 269
Dress___ . . . ___ _ _ _ _ _ _
373 83 154 136
Sport____
___
___
House slippers.
___ __ _ __
686 208 274 204
1,163 370 450 343
Shoe: Repairs_____
__ ______
Shines_____
_ __
39
71 13 19
169 42 72
Rubbers. _
_____
_ _
_____
55
85
Arctics, gaiters----- --- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
268 87 96
Gloves: C otton.__ _______ __
_ _
698 179 284 235
Leather.__ _ _ _ _ __
447 72 194 181
Other______ _ _________ __
228 44 94
90
Bathing suits, sun suits______
39
105 32 34
Handkerchiefs_______________ __ _
734 235 276 223
Furs___ _ *___ _ ______________
1
14
5
8
_____________
Mufflers, scarfs____
65
167 38 64
Handbags, purses_______ ________
931 252 370 309
Umbrellas________ ______________
88 21 38
29
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc____ _
708 239 261 208
Cleaning, repairing.
1,157 284 465 408
Other__________ . . . . .
_______
V III. Clothing, girls 12 through 17
years of a g e :2
T o t a l . _________ ____ __ _.
___ ..I.
Hats: Felt____________ _______
129 65 46
18
Straw. __________ ________
64 29 26
9
Fabric-------- --------------------52 29 17
6
Caps and berets: W ool---------- -------75 38 29
8
Other____ ___
12
5
2
5
Coats: H eavy, plain._ _ _ . . .
71 36 26
9
fur trimmed______
22 15
4
3
Fur________________________
1
0
0
1
Light, wool___ __ _________
37
16 15
6
cotton. __ _________
12
4
2
6
silk, rayon_____ . . .
3
0
1
2
Play suits: W ool knit____________
11
1
7
3
Cotton suede__________
7
1
2
4
Other_____. . . . _ . . . .
8
6
1
1
Raincoats___ _________ __ __ _ _ _
21
10
6
5
Sweaters and jackets:
Wool knit_____ . _________ __ .
90 47 33
10
_________
Wool fabric. ______
37 15 17
5
Leather, leatherette-------------------25 10 12
3
Other__________ _______________
2
8
3
3
_____________
Suits: W ool_____
35 19 11
5
Silk, rayon--------------------------1
0
0
1
Other......... ..
....... .............
12
6
5
1
Waists and middies:
Silk, rayon______
________ __
39 22 13
4
Cotton ___________
48 23 21
4
1
Other. ------------ ----------------------------4
2
1
72 39 26
Skirts: W ool____ ____ _______ ______
7
4
Other_________ ______
11
1
6
Dresses: Cotton, house_____ __ __
72 48 17
7
street________ __
122 72 40
10
Silk, rayon___________
133 73 45
15
W ool_______ _ _ _ _ _
42 24 11
7
Other______
.
17
8
5
4
Aprons_____________________________
14 10
4
0
Coveralls__________ __ __ .
2
5
3
0
Knickers, breeches, s h o r ts ____
28
9 13
6

.04
.08
.09
.10
. 13 . 11 .12
. 15
.49
.26
.76
.53
.25
. 11 .29
:39
.13
.21
.06
.15
.04
.05
.04
.07
3.62 3.01 3. 77 4. 26
.02
.01 (4
.01
)
.09
.05
. 14
.09
.64
.40
.69
.90
.04
.03
.05
.05

.53
.39
.64 1.20
.21
.27
.32
.48
.24
.21
.36
.40
.21
.27
.36
.39
.03
.06
.09
.20
.24
. 19 .30
.40
.07
.08
. 12
.05
0
.04
0
(4
)
.12
.07
.24
.17
.04
.02
.07
.08
0
.01
.01
.08
.04
.01
.08
. 12
.03
.01
.05
.20
.03
.03
.03
.04
.05
.07
.07
.20
.28
.33
.43
.09
.13
.20
.05
.08
.14
.03
.01
.03
.12
. 10 . 13
0
0
(4
)
.03
.04
.06
.18
.25
.03
.30
.05
.62
.98
.69
.20
.10
. 11
.02
.14

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
Notes on this table are in appendix A , p. 332.




.44
.20
. 12
. 16
.20
.04
.04

. 15 .23
.20
.19
.39
.20
.01
.09
.04
.23
.41
.48
.02
. 11 .04
.65
.72
.55
.76 1.24 1.68
.57
.85 1.12
.16
.14
.64
.08
.09
.28
.09
.18 0
.01
.03 0
.05
.28
.29

37. 62
.70
.33
.24
.17
.02
2. 73
1.08
.01
1.05
.22
.05
. 18
.03
.06
. 11

28. 51
.43
.18
.19
. 13
.01
1.91
1.14
0
.55
. 11
0
.06
.01
.08
.07

47. 36
.96
.51
.31
.24
.04
3.79
.69
0
1. 82
.43
.01
.39
.03
.01
. 11

71. 75
1.86
.82
.33
.25
.06
5.28
2.05
.08
2. 08
.32
.52
.28
.20
.04
.43

.46
.61
.84
.31
.20
.49
.11
.42
.28
.04
.01
.03
.97
.90 1.04
0
,01 0
. 19 . 12 .38

.96
.46
1.04
.30
1.23
.08
.04

.18
.23
.34
.27
.13
.28
.45
.87
.04
.01
.09
.08
.62
.41
.90 1.30
.06
.03
. 12 .04
.54
.59
.64
.78
1. 42 1.13 1. 84 2.15
2. 78 2.14 3.46 5.24
.62
.48
.51 2.07
.32
. 19 .50
.70
.04
.06
. 12 0
.02
.01
.03 0
.18
.07
.27
.66

TABULAR
T

able

17.—

273

SU M M AR Y

C lothing ex p en d itu res , hy econ om ic level— Continued

W E ST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REG IO N —W H IT E F AM ILIES— Continued

Persons purchasing

Ite m

A verage n u m ber of
articles purchased
per person

A verage expenditure
per person

E conom ic
level— F a m i­
lies spending
per expendi­
A ll
ture u n it per
fam ­
year
ilies

E conom ic
level— F am ilies
spending per
expenditure
A ll
fam ­ un it per year
ilies

E con om ic
level— Fam ilies
spending per
expenditure
A ll
fam ­ un it per year
ilies

Un­
der
$400

U n ­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over
V I I I . C lothing, girls 12 through 17
years of age2 C ontinued.
—
N o . N o. N o. N o .
N o.
U nderw ear: Slips, cotton ______
65
39
17
9 0.45
silk ____________
.38
67
24
37
6
rayon _______ _
89
.63
53
29
7
C orsets, girdles_______
46
.2 2
28
13
5
B rassieres.. _ . _____
68
41
.7 8
20
7
U n ion suits and com binations:
C o t t o n ____
.2 2
31
20
4
7
W o o l________________
10
.0 8
7
2
1
Silk, r a y o n ____. . .
44
.40
20
6
18
U nderw aists, sh irts. _
44
.4 8
4
30
10
B loom ers and panties:
C otto n --------- -----------24
.3 0
14
7
3
Rayon. .
----------167 104
15 2.44
48
S ilk __________________
12
.1 0
4
7
1
N ig h tgow n s
and
'
sleeping pajam as:
C otton , lig h t .. . . .
.2 4
48
25
6
17
flannel___
.24
44
25
9
10
Silk, r a y o n _______
55
26
.27
25
4
P ajam as, lounging and beach:
C o t t o n ...
______________________
.06
4
13
8
1
Silk, rayon
_ ____________________
.05
11
8
3
0
.0 2
O th er__________ __________ _______
3
2
1
0
B a th r o b e s ..
_ . __ _
____ __ .
9
3
4
2
.03
.02
K im on os, negligees.
____ __
..
5
2
3
0
H ose: S i l k . . _______
_ __ . . .
.
186 107
60
19 6. 34
Rayon
_____ . _ . .
83
55
23
5 2.11
C o tto n ________
_.
. . .
128
87
35
6 3.09
W o o l__________________________
12
.10
6
5
1
Shoes: Street__________
249 152
22 1.83
75
D ress_____
.76
144
87
43
14
S p o r t ...
112
.54
57
44
11
.21
21
H ouse slippers . _ _______________
56
29
6
Shoe: Repairs
___
169 108
45
16
1
1
2
Shines
___
0
.12
R u b b e r s. _
...
__________
2
37
16
19
.24
Arctics, gaiters
21
67
39
7
G loves: C otton _
____
.36
83
48
28
7
Leather
________
28
8
17
3
.10
.21
O ther . . . . . . __________
49
11
20
18
B athing suits, sun suits . . .
_ ..
41
21
.18
15
5
H a n d k e rch ie fs._
______ __ . . .
98
54
33
11 3.13
F u rs_________ _____
_______________
1
1
0
0 ( 4)
. 15
M u fflers, scarfs__________
_____
38
13
16
9
122
.57
__________
H an d b ags, purses______
63
44
15
.0 2
5
2
U m b rella s___________ ___________
3
0
8
G arters, belts, hairpins, etc _ ___
77 41 28
Cleaning, repairing
___
....
111
42
21
48
Other _ _ . ___________
_________
I X . C loth in g, girls 6 through 11 years
of a g e :2
T o ta l
45
26
14
5
.15
H a ts: F e lt__________________________
.13
44
26
14
4
S t r a w ------------------------ .
22
2
.11
33
9
F a b r i c .. . _
. . . . . . _____
34
.37
113
66
13
C aps and berets: W o o l
_____
2
9
.06
O ther____________
18
7
.23
C oats: H e a v y , p la in . __________ __ _
79
53
23
3
10
4
.0 6
fur trim m e d ______
20
6
1
0
1
0
F u r _________
____________
(4
)
4
.0 7
L igh t, w o o l. . . .
. .
25
8 13
.03
cotton
_____
10
3
4
3
1
1 0
silk, rayo n __________
0 (4
)

2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
*

Less than 0.005 article.




4Less than 0.5 cent.

$400 $600
to
and
$600 over

N o. N o. N o.
0.38 0.47 0.92
.3 0
.5 6
.4 0
.5 4
.7 4
.96
.1 9
.2 2
.4 4
.76
.7 9
.9 2

Un­
der
$400

$400
to
$600

$600
and
over

Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
0.26 0.20 0.29 0.64
.42
.5 7
.2 8
.69
.45
.4 9
.90
.36
.22
.45
.17
.24
.22
.21
.2 4
.2 5

.21
.0 8
.2 9
.47

.2 0
.07
.56
.3 2

.4 0
.04
.6 8
.5 2

. 14
.06
.3 2
.15

.1 0
.06
.19
.15

.15
.06
.45
. 16

.44
.01
.88
. 14

.2 6
2.29
.0 4

.3 3
2.54
.2 5

.4 8
3.24
.0 8

.0 9
.7 9
.07

.07
.71
.0 4

. 11
.80
. 15

. 14
1.33
.0 4

.1 7
.2 0
.17

.32
.16
.4 9

.4 4
.80
.20

.19
.24
.27

.1 2
.1 8
.1 7

.25
.1 8
.47

.4 6
.9 1
.2 7

.06
.04
.06
.07
.01
.01
.07
.02
.03
.0 2
3. 63 2.70
.61
.54
.63
.6 0
.03
.03
4. 88 4. 21
2.03 1.71
1.05
.81
. 16
.11
.98
.86
. 01 (5)
. 12
.07
.2 8
.24
.20
.16
.13
.05
. 14
.08
.23
.10
.23
.16
.01
( 5)
. 10
.06
.40
.23
.03
.0 2
. 14
. 10
.8 2
.43
.0 6
.03

. 12
.05
.02
.12
.05
4. 57
.73
.71
.04
5. 20
2. 20
1. 53
. 23
.9 0
0
. 22
.31
.26
.27
.16
.42
.32
0
.17
.58
.04
. 20
1.24
. 15

.03
.06
.02
.0 2
.01
5. 05
1.75
3.07
. 10
1.69
.70
.46
.16

.14
.0 4
.05 0
.02 0
.05
.08
.03 0
7. 66 11.48
2.93 2.00
3.33 2. 32
. 11
.04
1.84 2.88
.75 1.20
.7 0
.68
.3 0
.2 8

.08
.22
.3 0
.05
.13
.08
2. 56
.01
.07
.42
.0 2

.2 2
.25
.43
.2 0
.24
.39
3. 77
0
.2 4
.75
.0 2

.13
.12
.11
.29
.03
.24
.03
0
.04
.01

(4
)

.08
.36
.52
. 12
.68
.24
5. 24
0
.4 0
1.12
0

.17
.28
.14
.2 2
. 13
.11
.40 1.11
.12
.11
.23
.1 7
.1 0
.2 2
.01 0
.2 2
.13
.0 4
.1 7

0

0

.0 8
0
0
.31
0
7 .32
.6 8
.5 7
.0 2
8 .84
3. 83
1.21
.2 3
2 .09
.05
.0 8
.49
.3 2
.25
. 54
.5 0
.41
0
.22
1.00
0
.2 0
2.2 2
0

20.91 16.36 27. 72 38. 31
.3 3
.13
.09
.19
.2 6
.11
.09
.15
.0 8
.08
.06
.10
.6 9
.23
.26
.18
.05
.0 4
.03
.01
1.31 1.20 1.56 1.28
.45
.17
.78 2. 06
.04 0
. 15 0
.47
.1 4 1.00 1 .62
.3 5
.0 4
.1 0
.2 0
.01 0
0
(5
)

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION

274
T

able

17.—

Clothing ex p en d itu res , b y econ om ic level— Continued

W EST NOR TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued

Persons purchasing

IX . Clothing, girls 6 through 11 years
of age2
—Continued.
Play suits: Woolknit— .............
Cotton suede_________
Other________________
Raincoats------------------------------------Sweaters and jackets:
Wool knit___ _________________
Wool fabric____________________
Leather, leatherette____________
Other____________ _________ ____
Suits: Wool______________________
Silk, rayon________________
Other______________ _____
Waists and middies:
Silk, rayon------------------------Cotton_______________________
Other-------- ---------------------------Skirts: Wool_____________________
O t h e r . _______________
Dresses: Cotton_____________
__
Silk, rayon___ ______
Wool___
_____ ____
O th e r_ ________ ______
_
Aprons__________________________
Coveralls_____ _ _________
Knickers, breeches, shorts ____ __
Underwear: Slips, cotton________
silk___________
rayon_____ __
Union suits^and com­
binations:
Cotton____ _____
Wool_____ ________
Silk, rayon______ _
Underwaists, shirts. .
Bloomers and panties:
Cotton___ ___________
Rayon. __ _________
Silk____ __________
Nightgowns
and
sleeping pajamas:
Cotton, light________
flannel______
Silk, rayon__________
Pajamas, lounging and beach:
Cotton______
. . . ________ _
Silk, rayon_____________________
Other.................. ....................... .
Bathrobes .................................... .
Kimonos, negligees....................... .
Hose: Silk-------------- --------------------Rayon.................... ...............
Cotton____________________
Wool_____________ ____ _
Shoes: Street and dress__________
Sport_____________________
House slippers. _ ________________
Shoe: Repairs. _ ________________
Shines_____________________
Rubbers............... ..............................
Arctics, gaiters________ ______ ____
Gloves: Cotton_________________
Leather_________________
Other___________________

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All ture unit per
fam­
year
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Item

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

N o.

N o.

30
15

9
4
5

N o.

16

8

N o.

N o.
5

3

io

3

1
2

0

26

72
27

46

18
14
3

8
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
2
0

8

1
0
2

8
4

1

5

3

0
2
1
2

7
28

3

4

80
29

41
17
4
4

7

4

2

1

1 15
2
1 0
2 1
1
15
1 0 1
2 1 133 75
2
1

1
0
6

30
9
5

0
16
8 6
1
0 4 6
59 32 22
22 13 9
1
22 9 1
68

4

5
3

13
9
3

1
2
2
0
5

0
2
3

42
19
18
27

23

39
30
47

1
2
1
0

8
2

14

6

60
140

38
83

20

2
1
2

20 1
0

42
63
27
15

1
1
2

14

1

24
37
9

6

6

0
4

1

45

7

17

2
1
14

7

4

1

9

0

52 30 16
117 74 37
250 160 77
26 17
7
344 223 103
74 46 23
50 27 19
145 94 44

2

36
81

66
2
0
6
8

1
20

1

3

1
5
4

2
1
1
1
0
6
6
13

2

18
5
4
7

0

13
29
24

3

45
40

39

24

5

8 1
0

7

2
2

0.10
.08
.03
.08

.23
.09
.03

No. N o . N o .
0.05 0.16 0.28
.04 .14 .17
.03 .03 0
.04 .13 .22

.22 .20
.04

.02

.15
.03

.56
.33
.17
.06
.06

Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over
D o t.

.30
.13
.05

.01 (4) 0
.01
.02 .02 .02
.11
.01 0
.01 (4)
.02
.01 .01 .02 0
.04
.03 .02 .05 0
.02
.17 .10 .33 .06
.12
0
(4
)
(4 0
)
(8
)
.05 .01 . 14 .11
.13
.01 0
.02
(4
) 0
2. 37 1.99 3.12 2.89 2. 26
.37 .26 .56 .67
.71
. 11 .10 .13 .22
.23
.10 .06 . 18 .06 .10
. 11
.04 .05 0
.01
.06 .04 .07 . 11
.05
.03 .02 .08 0
.02
.41 .28 .64 .67
. 16
. 12 .10 .18 0
.07
. 10

.08

. 13

. 11

.48
.26
.26
.45

.40

.20

.64
.28
.30
.42

.56
.94
.28
.78

.67 .70
1.91 1.57
.16 .10

2. 36

.67

.33
3. 61
.50

.21

.25
.43

.23

.29
. 12

.18
.24
.05

.29
.37

.08
.05

.05
.04

.10

.21
.07

.10
.24
.27
.06
.24

.09

.20

.22
.05

.01 0
.10 .10
.01 .03 0
.01 .12 0
.01

.06
(6
)
.09

0

.05
.27

0

.06

0
0
.20 .22
.06 0

1.73 3. 25 3. 31
.49 1.00 1.72
.20 .23 .51
.05 .18 .28
.01 0
.05
.04 .06 . 12
.01 .06 0
. 10 .26 .30
.06 .11 0
.05 .03 .08 .07

.38 .07
.64 1.13
.08 .20

. 11
.39
.50

. 13
.23
. 11

. 10
. 16
.04

.21

.28
. 11

.06
.04

.04

.09

.07

.03

.13
.28
.34

. 17
.39
. 17

.29

.39

.10 .11

.28

.22
. 12
. 11

.21

.20

.30

.02 .08
.01 0
.01

.01

.15

.01 0

.29

.86

.24
. 28

.09

.66
.33

.21

.09
.06
.07

0

.23 .20 .24 .56
.53 .45 .63 .94
1.25 1.08 1. 52 1. 68
.08 .08 .08 .14
5. 75 5.11 6. 68 8.46
.60 .52 .76 .72
. 11 .08 . 15 .17
. 68 . 70 . 67 . 47
. 01
0 . 01 o
1
.10 .08 . 12 .17
.25 .20 .31 .39
. 10 .09 . 13 .07
.06 .02 .09 .24
.13 .11 . 16 .26

2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
4 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




.86
.48
.25
.04
.39

.14
.39
.03

.34 .33
3.12 3.56
.34 .40 .33
.12 .20 .28

.24
.04

.31

.50
.05

.29

.20

.25
.06
.03

D o l.

.36
.25
. 14
. 12

2.86 2. 67
.36
.15

D o l.

.24
. 16
. 11
.09

.01 . 11
.01 0
.04 .02 .09 .06
0
(4
) 0
(4
)
.
.88 .81 .89 1 61
2.25 2 01 2.60 3.22
.
6. 35 5.90 7.12 7.50
.31

D o l.

0. 42 0.16 0.62 2. 52
.06 .03 .10 .21
.09 .07 . 16 0
•07 .03 .15 . 17

275

TABULAE SUMMARY
T

able

17. — C lothing ex p en d itu res , by econom ic level— Continued

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—W H IT E FAM ILIES— Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

IX . Clothing, girls 6 through 11 years
of age —Continued.
Bathing suits, sun suits_________
Handkerchiefs.. . ___ _. _______
Furs_____________________________
Mufflers, scarfs. _ _________ __ __
Handbags, purses________________
Umbrellas_____ _____________
__
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc __ .
Cleaning, repairing*
___ __
Other___ _
____ _________ ____
X . Clothing, girls 2 through 5 years of
age:2
Total________ ____ _____________ __
Hats: Felt__________________
Straw____________________
Fabric______ _____ . . . . . .
Caps and berets: Wool____ ______
Other.. . . .
Coats: Heavy, plain________ _ _
fur trimmed______
Fur_________________
Light, wool. . ____ ______
cotton______ _
__
silk, rayon______ __
Play suits: Wool knit____ ____ __
Cotton suede_________
Other ____ _
Raincoats_____ _________ _______
Sweaters and jackets:
Wool knit____ ______ _________
Wool fabric____________________
Leather, leatherette___________
Other._ _________ __ _________
Suits: Wool----------------- ---------Silk, rayon_______ . . . __
Other___ _________________
Waists and middies:
Silk, rayon_________________ __
Cotton ____________ ____
___
Other--------------------------- _ _ __
Skirts: W o o l ...-------------------------Other___ ____________ ___
Dresses: Cotton ________ _______
Silk, rayon. _____ _____
Wool___________________
O th e r..._____ _ __ ___
Aprons. _ _ _ ._ . . . . . . _______
Coveralls_______ _________
_ _
Knickers, breeches, shorts . . . . . .
Underwear: Slips, cotton... ____
silk _ _ _ _ _
rayon_________
Union suits and com­
binations:
Cotton___ _______
Wool_____________
Silk, rayon________
Underwaists, shirts
Bloomers and panties:
Cotton. _ . . . . .
Rayon.. __ _______
Silk_______ _______
N igh tgow n s and
sleeping pajamas:
Cotton, light______
flannel.._ .
Silk, rayon. ______

2

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $400 $600
der
to and
$400 $600 over

43
89
0
23
54
11
66
61

21
58
0
13
30
4
34
32

16
28
0
7
20
6
27
26

N o.
N o.
N o.
No. Dol. D o l . D o l . D o l .
6 0.15 0.10 0.20 0.44 0.14 0.07 0.24 0.31
3 1.97 1.83 2.46 1.00
.13 .10 .16 .25
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.07 .06 .07 .22
3
.05 .04 .05 .09
4
.20 .14 .24 .66
.08 .05 . 11 .25
1
.03 .02 .06 .06
.03 .01 .07 .03
5
.07 .05 . 12 . 12
3
. 17 . 12 .28 . 14
.02 0
.oi (6
)

18
8
11
55
9
28
4
0
24
6
1
24
15
12
5

11
5
4
31
6
17
3
0
10
5
0
12
6
2
1

7
2
6
20
3
9
1
0
12
1
1
9
9
10
3

0
.08 .08 . 12 0
1
.04 .03 .04 .09
1
.06 .03 . 12 .09
4
.30 .24 .39 .55
0
.08 .05 .17 0
2
. 13 .12 .13 . 18
0
.02 .02 .01 0
0 0
0
0
0
2
. 11 .07 .17 .18
0
.03 .03 .01 0
0 (4
.01 0
) 0
3
. 14 .10 .20 .27
0
. 12 .07 .25 0
0
.10 .03 .28 0
1
.02 .01 .04 .09

41
21
0
2
8
0
4

17
12
0
1
4
0
0

23
7
0
1
3
0
4

1
.20 . 12 .39
2
. 13 .10 . 16
0 0
0
0
0
.01 .01 .03
1
.04 .04 .04
0 0
0
0
.02 0
0
.06

0
3
1
2
3
105
33
19
6
5
32
2
13
3
3

0
2
1
1
1
56
16
8
5
3
18
2
7
1
1

0
1
0
0
2
42
16
11
1
1
13
0
4
2
2

0 0
0
0
0
0
.04 .05 .04 0
0 (4
.01 0
0
)
1
.01 .01 0
.09
.04 .01 .09 0
0
7 1.74 1. 25 2. 25 5.00
1
.21 . 15 .33 .09
0
. 13 .09 .23 0
0
.09 . 12 .04 0
1
.06 .05 .07 .09
1
. 19 . 10 .41 .09
0
.01 .01 0
0
2
. 13 . 12 . 10 .55
.02 .01 .04 0
0
0
.03 .02 .06 0

60
18
14
28

32
9
11
14

26
5
2
11

2
4
1
3

.68
.21
.23
.33

.48 1.13
. 17 .16
.30 .12
.20 .70

41
48
11

22
29
2

17
15
6

2
4
3

25
47
6

9
19
1

12
24
5

4
4
0

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

.09
.27
0
0
.09
0
0

13.16 9. 43 19. 36 23.66
.09 .09 . 12 0
.03 .03 .04 .07
.05 .02 . 13 .03
.17 .14 .21 .29
.03 .02 .06 0
.62 . 52 .82 .77
.20 .23 . 16 0
0
0
0
0
.43 .22 .74 1.18
.05 .06 .04 0
.02 0
.07 0
.38 .19 .62 1.26
.09 .07 . 14 0
. 16 .02 .49 0
.02 .01 .03 .09
.30 . 13 .69
.13 .07 .22
0
0
0
.05 .07 .01
.18 .16 .21
0
0
0
.07 0
.23

.12
.23
0
0
.27
0
0

0
.01
(5
)
.01
.01
1.34
.31
. 17
.08
.02
. 18
.01
.05
.01
.01

0
.01
(5
)
(5
)
(5
)
.77
.24
.10
. 11
.02
. 17
.01
.04
.01
(5
)

0
.01
0
0
.02
2.12
.48
.34
.04
.02
.22
0
.05
.02
.03

0
0
0
.14
0
3. 92
. 18
0
0
.02
. 11
0
. 14
0
0

.55
.91
.09
.73

.41
. 12
.08
.10

.30
.10
.11
.06

.64
.09
.03
.18

.29
.62
.06
. 18

.75
.99
.18

.58 1.03 1.09
.72 1.52 1.18
.03 .26 1.64

. 13
.21
.06

. 10
. 15
.02

.19
.35
.09

.27
.25
.36

.22
.39
.04

.11
.24
.01

. 12 .06
.28 .15
.03 (5
)

.32 1.09
.61 1.00
. 10 0

. 17 .68
.50 .63
.08 0

1Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
5 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




276

W E S T

T

able

N O R TH

C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN

R E G IO N

17. — C lothing ex pen d itu res, b y econ om ic level— Continued

W EST N O R T H C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN R EGION—W H IT E F AM ILIES— Continued

Persons purchasing

Item

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All ture unit per
year
fam­
ilies

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

All
fam­
ilies

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

4
6
2
1
0
0
9
3
2
1
25 16
48 30
143 83
13
7
224 144
24 14
24
7
30 17
0
0
10
0
40 16
26 12
4
7
27 13
20
3
17 10
0
0
5
1
24 10
2
0
34 22
25
7

2
1
0
4
1
8
14
52
3
69
5
12
12
0
6
16
13
3
9
16
7
0
4
12
2
9
13

0 0. 05 0. 05 0.06
.01 .01 .01
0
0
0 0
0
.04 .02 .06
2
.01 .01 . 01
0
.59 .53 .77
1
4 1.35 1.13 1. 72
8 4. 62 3. 40 6. 64
.22 . 21 .22
3
11 2.45 2.30 2. 77
.16 . 12 .09
5
5
. 13 .05 .20
1
0
4
.04 0
.09
8
. 18 . 11 .23
1
. 15 .09 .28
.04 .03 .04
0
5
. 16 . 10 . 19
1
. 13 .02 .36
0
.46 .33 .81
0
0
0 0
.03 .01 .07
0
2
.14 .08 .23
.03
0
.01 0
3
5

64
32
58
54
109
31
89
90
84
139
133
2

21
11
24
22
39
13
32
33
30
53
52
0

14
4
15
8
19
10
24
20
19
22
18
1

29
17
19
24
51
8
33
37
35
64
63
1

All
fam­
ilies

. 58
.20
.44
.36
2.17
.73
1. 78
7. 64
1. 21
4.13
1. 83
.01

.49
.20
.30
.36
2.00
.36
1.28
8.22
.92
3. 69
1. 61
.01

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year

Un­ $400 $600
to and
der
$400 $600 over

Un­ $400 $600
to and
der
$400 $600 over

Un­ $400 $600
der to and
$400 $600 over
X . Clothing, girls 2 through 5 years of
age 2 Continued.
—
Pajamas, lounging and beach:
Cotton. _ ------------- -------------------Silk____________________________
Other_____ ______________________
Bathrobes.
___ _ ............... .........
Kimonos, negligees
----------- --Hose: Silk.. _ _ . . . . . .
. . . -- Rayon.. --------------------------Cotton. . . . . -------- ---------Wool______________________
Shoes: Street and dress.
------S p o r t.--------------------------House slippers______
.
... Shoe: Repairs. _ _________ _____
Shines _ _______ ____ _____
Rubbers ____________. . .
------Arctics, gaiters--------------------Gloves: Cotton. _
-----------------------------------Leather.
_______
Other. ______
Bathing suits, sun suits _ . . .
Handkerchiefs- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Furs__________
_ _
_______
Mufflers, scarfs. _
__
---------Handbags, purses________________
___ __ _________
Umbrellas.
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc _ _ _
Cleaning, repairing. ___ ________
Other_
_
__________ __ _______
X I. Clothing, infants:3
____ ________ Total
Caps, hoods, bonnets. _
_____
Coats___ ________ __
___ __ -Sweaters, sacques ___ ----------- --- _
Sweater suits. _ _ _ _ _ _ -----Dresses, rompers
---------- ----Skirts, gertrudes _ _ _ ----- ---------- --Shirts, bands___ __
__ ___
Diapers____ __
___ _ ------- --Sleeping garments.
_ ___
Stockings___ ________ _ - - - - Bootees, shoes
______
___.
Layettes. ______
_ _ _ ----Other _ _____ ______ _____ __ _ _

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
unit per year

Average expenditure
per person

N o.

D o l.

D o l,

D o l.

D o l.

0
0
0
.18
0
.36
1.82
8.00
.45
2. 54
1. 09
.73

0.04
.01
0
.05
.01
. 15
.24
.89
.07
3. 80
. 21
.07
. 07
0
.04
.21
.05
.02
.07
.09
.02
0
.01
.03
.01
. 04
. 13
.01

0.04
.01
0
.02
(5
)
.12
.20
.63
.06
3.19
.17
.03
. 06
0
0
. 12
.03
.02
. 04
.01
.02
0
(5
)
.01
0
. 03
. 03
. 01

0.06
.01
0
.07
.02
. 19
.31
1. 32
.07
4. 93
. 13
. 13
. 11
0
.08
.28
. 11
.03
. 11
.21
.04
0
.04
.07
.02
. 03
. 28
. 01

0
0
0
. 18
0
. 18
.33
1. 52
. 17
4. 66
1.41
.27
. 05
0
.28
1.08
.05
0
.26
.27
0
0
0
.10
0
. 17
. 52
0

.36
.82
.18
0
.82
.09
0
0
0
.36
0

.54 1.00
. 18 .27
.51 .69
.35 .42
2. 15 2. 81
.92 1. 46
1.58 4. 08
9. 61 27. 69
1.11 2. 50
4.31 5. 12
1.95 2.23
.04
0

9. 21 6. 51 9. 59 17. 38
.38 .27 .42 .65
.45 .40 . 53 . 41
.44 .22 . 52 .93
.74 .66 .73 1. 02
1. 35 . 98 1.40 2. 52
.28 .09 .37 .71
.69 .43 .60 1. 83
1.14 .73 .92 3. 19
.72 .50 .69 1. 53
.79 .62 .82 1. 27
1. 63 1. 38 1.82 1. 92
.01 .01 0
.05
. 59 . 22 . 77 1. 35

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
3 Infants 1 to 2 years of age are included only if dependent on family funds for 52 weeks; those under 1
year of age are included regardless of the number of weeks dependent on family funds.
6 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




TA B U LA R

T

S U M M A R Y

277

17. — Clothing expen ditu res, b y econom ic level— Continued

able

W EST NOR TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—NEGRO FAM ILIES
Economic level—Families
spending per expenditure
unit per year.
Item

All
families
Under
$300

C lo th in g

$300
to
$400

$400
and
over

E x p en d itu r e s

I. Number of families in survey___ __ ___ _________________
Average number of clothing expenditure units per family___
Number of families spending for—
Ready-made clothing, dry cleaning, and accessories..
_
Yard goods and findings . ____________________ ______
Paid help for sewing._ . . . ______ ______ ________________
Number of families reporting clothing received as gifts______

209
2. 63

60
3.66

56
2. 41

93
2. 09

209
84
10
70

60
26
1
26

56
19
1
20

93
39
8
24

Average expenditure per family for clothing_____________
Ready-made clothing, dry cleaning, and accessories_______
Yard goods and findings________ ________________ _____
Paid help for sewing... _______ . . . _______ _______ . . .
Average value per family of clothing received as gifts (incom­
plete) 1
________________ _________________________ ___ __

$109. 91
108. 47
1.37
.07

$98. 97
97. 40
1.56
.01

$91.06
89. 96
1.09
.01

$128.31
126. 75
1.41
.15

6.94

9.19

7.40

5.20

203
239

56
77

54
60

93
102

1. 18
32
38

1.38
24
30

1.11
5
5

1.11
3
3

1.19
34
42

1.25
23
31

1.00
7
7

1.00
4
4

1.24
20
23

1.35
16
19

1.00
4
4

1.00
0
0

1.15

1.19

1.00

0

187
237

59
82

55
74

73
81

1.27
22
30

1.39
14
21

1.34
5
6

1.11
3
3

1.36
28
36

1. 50
20
27

1.20
4
4

1.00
4
5

1.28
14
18

1.35
8
11

1.00
2
2

1.25
4
5

1.28
17
17

1.38
11
11

1.00
6
6

1.25
0
0

1.00

1.00

1.00

0

II. Number of families having men and boys 18 years of age and
over2...-___ _ ______ ____ _________ . . . ___________
Number of men and boys 18 years of age and over 2 _______
Average number of men and boys 18 years of age and over per
family having such men and boys 2_ _ ____ . . . ____ ____ _
Number of families having boys 12 through 17 years of age 2_
Number of boys 12 through 17 years of age 2_. . . . _ __ . . .
Average number of boys 12 through 17 years of age per family
_______ ______
_
having such boys 2
__. ______ _
Number of families having boys 6 through 11 years of age 2
___
Number of boys 6 through 11 years of age 2___ ___________
Average number of boys 6 through 11 years of age per family
having such boys 2
___
__________________ _ __________
Number of families having boys 2 through 5 years of age 2___
Number of boys 2 through 5 years of age 2_ ._ _ ________
Average number of boys 2 through 5 years of age per family
having such boys 2 . . . ________ ___ _____________ _____
Number of families having women and girls 18 years of age
and over2. . _____________ ______ . . . _________________
Number of-women and girls 18 years of age and over 2___ __
Average number of women and girls 18 years of age and over
per family having such women and girls 2 __ . . . ______ _
Number of families having girls 12 through 17 years of age 2___
Number of girls 12 through 17 years of age 2
____
_________
Average number of girls 12 through 17 years of age per family
having such girls 2
_
___ _._ ______ _______
_____
Number of families having girls 6 through 11 years of age 2___
Number of girls 6 through 11 years of age 2
________________ _
Average number of girls 6 through 11 years of age per family
having such girls 2________ ____ _ _ _ . . . ._ -------------Number of families having girls 2 through 5 years of age 2 __ _
Number of girls 2 through 5 years of age 2
___________________
Average number of girls 2 through 5 years of age per family
___
having such girls 2 ____ _ _________ ______ ________
Number of families having infants under 2 years of age 3_ _ _
Number of infants under 2 years of age 3_ _____ ________ __
Average number of infants under 2 years of age per family
having infants 3_______ ___ ._ . ._ _ _._ ------------------------

1 The aggregates on which these averages are based do not include gifts of clothing reported received by 1
family, but for which it could not estimate the value.
2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
3 Infants lto 2 years of age are included only if dependent on family funds for 52 weeks; those under 1 year
of age are included regardless of number of weeks dependent on family funds.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




278

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T a b l e 17 .— Clothing expenditures , by economic level— C on tin u ed

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—NEGRO FAM ILIES— Continued

Persons purchasing

Item

III. Clothing, men and boys 18 years
of age and over:a
Hats: Felt----------------------------------Straw__________________ Caps: Wool___________
_____ __
Other_____________________
Overcoats___ ____ -- -- -- Topcoats.- -- ------- --- Raincoats------------------------------------Jackets: Heavy fabric— ---------Leather-------- ---------------O th e r---------------------------Sweaters: Heavy---------------- — —
Light_______ _______
Suits: Heavy wool----------------- -Lightweight wool.................
Cotton, linen--------------------Palm Beach----------------------Other----- ------- ------------------Trousers: Wool---------------------------Cotton---------------------- Other_________ _____
Overalls, coveralls-------------- --- Shirts: Cotton, work___________
Cotton and other, dress.
Wool-------------------------------Underwear:
Suits, cotton, knit----------woven____
cotton and wool----rayon and silk-------Undershirts, cotton--------cotton and
wool___ __
r ayon and
silk______
Shorts, cotton____ _______
rayon and silk___
Drawers, cotton and wool.
Pajamas and nightshirts..
Shoes: Street_________
________
Work____________________
Canvas______ __________
Other____________________
Boots: Rubber_________________
Leather__________________
Arctics___________________ -_.
Rubbers____________ ____ _____
Shoe: Repairs__________ _ _ _ _
Shines______________ _____
Hose: Cotton, heavy___________
dress______________
Rayon____________________
Silk____ __________________
Wool__________
________
Gloves:Work, cotton___ ________
other____ __ ._ . . .
Street, leather___________
other______________
Ties_____________________________
Collars____________ __________
Bathing suits, sun suits___________
Handkerchiefs__________________
Accessories____ _
___
Bathrobes___________ __________
Cleaning, repairing. _ _______ ____
Other______________ ______ ______
2

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi­
fam­ ture unit per
ilies
year
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

Economic
level—Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
expenditure
fam­ unit per year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

N o.

N o.

D o l.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

D o l.

D o l.

D o l.

20
7
22
7
7
2
0
3
4
2
10
5
9
12
0
0
0
15
13
0
23
31
36
2

14
12
17
5
7
3
2
4
4
0
2
2
8
9
0
0
0
14
13
1
22
26
23
1

38.65 22.91 28. 86 56.28
50 0.38 0.27 0.28 0. 52 1.18 .62 .72 1.88
.24 .09 .22 .35
30
.43 .13 .26 .76
33
.39 .32 .32 .48
.46 .34 .39 .60
11
. 12 .09 .13 .15
.08 .04 .11 .10
22
15 .09 .12 .22 3.19 1.44 2.89 4.68
6
.05 .02 .05 .06
.84 .31 1.24 1.00
3
.02 0
.03 .03
.07 0
.17 .70
16
.12 .04 .07 .22
.43 .16 .29 .72
5
.05 .05 .07 .05
.21 .18 .22 .23
4
.06 .05 0
.10
.08 .06
0 .15
21
.15 .14 .03 .24
.35 .28 .07 .57
5
.07 .10 .05 .07
.10 .15 .04 .11
36
.24 .12 .13 .40 6. 33 2.53 3.38 10.93
18
.18 .17 .15 .20 3.73 3.77 2. 45 4. 45
2
0
.02
.01 0
.06 0
. 15
0
2
.03
.01 0
0
.10 0
.22
0
1 (4
0
.01
.10 0
. 22
0
) 0
.34 .30 .33 .38
26
.99 .74 .94 1. 22
24
.39 .30 .38 .47
.59 .49 .51 .71
2
.02 0
.02 .03
.03 0
.03 .06
40
.95 .56 .87 1.30 1.50 .77 1.33 2.16
40 1.24 1.18 1.00 1. 42
.95 .88 .73 1.13
65 1.66 1.30 1.05 2.29 2.04 1. 21 1.40 3. 05
3
.05 .06 .03 .06
.04 .04 .04 .04

61
22
28
4
58

12
3
7
1
15

17
8
11
0
16

32
11
10
3
27

.58
.21
.27
.06
.84

.32 .52 .80
.08 .30 .25
.19 .38 .26
.10
.05 0
.57 .83 1.06

.66
.17
.28
.06
.27

.34 .55
.08 .20
.18 .32
.01 0
.16 .23

.96
.22
.32
.13
.38

22

7

8

7

.34

.26

.32

.16

:20

.10

7
65
8
27
45
155
75
1
7
4
0
5
24
121
29
64
90
80
34
3
87
13
30
5
69
5
2
73
5
5
150

1
16
2
11
4
46
19
0
0
2
0
1
5
33
4
24
36
18
5
2
25
2
4
0
15
0
0
20
1
0
34

0
18
0
9
11
37
18
0
2
1
0
2
1
33
6
21
23
17
3
0
23
1
5
0
14
1
0
17
0
1
35

6
.12 .02 0
.27
31
.99 .60 .95 1.31
6
. 14 .08 0
.27
7
.35 .36 .47 .27
30
.38 . 10 .32 .62
72
.93 .80 .80 1.11
38
.43 .28 .37 .57
1 (4
.01
0
) 0
.04 .0
5
.03 .07
1
.02 .02
02 .02
0 0
0
0
0
2
.02 .02 .03 .02
18
.10 .08 .02 .18
55
19
19 2.49 2.02 2.50 2.83
31 2.74 2.92 2.15 2.94
45 3.60 1. 51 .3.65 5.16
26
.80 .28 .18 1.55
1
.08
.06 .09 0
39 2. 45 1.99 1.68 3.24
10
.20 .08 .02 .39
21
. 16 .05 .08 .27
.02 0
5
.05
0
40 1.02 .48 .67 1.64
4
.09 0
.03 .20
2
.02 0
0
.04
36 2.93 2.04 2.20 4.03
4
4
.02 0
.02 .04
81
____ !_____ 1
_____

.04
.34
.05
. 17
.48
3. 71
1.08
.01
.09
.05
0
.04
. 14
.97
.35
.40
.50
.81
.27
.02
.65
.08
.21
.03
.48
.02
.03
.27
.03
.07
1.78
0

Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.

Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




N o.

84
49
72
23
36
11
5
23
13
6
33
12
53
39
2
2
1
55
50
3
85
97
124
6

.47

__

.20

.01 0
.18 .27
.02 0
.25 .22
.10 .46
2. 56 3.09
.67 .84
0
0
0
.10
.06 .04
0
0
.04 .03
.10 .02
.71 .79
.06 .27
.32 .41
.52 .45
.25 .62
.07 .07
.03 0
.38 .34
.04 .01
.06 .15
0
0
.22 .23
0
.01
0
0
. 15 .22:
.06 0
0
.04
.94: 1.47
0
10

4 Less than 0.005 article.

.08
.49
. 10
.08
.76
4.94
1.53
.02
.14
.05
0
.04
.23
1.26
.61
.46
.58
1.33
.54
.02
1.03
.14
.35
.08
.82
.05
.08
.38
.04
.14
2.59
0

279

TABULAR SUMM ARY
T

able

17. — Clothing expenditures, by economic level— C on tin u ed

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—NEGRO FAM ILIES—Continued

Item

IV. Clothing, boys 12 through 17 years of age:3
T o ta l________________ ___ ____________________ _______
___ ____
Hats: Felt_________________________ _________________________
Straw________ ____________________ _____ _____________
Caps: Wool____________________ ___ __________________ -- __
Other________ __ _______________ ________ ____________
Overcoats__________ __ ,_ __________ _________________ ____
Topcoats___________ _______________ ________ ____ _ _______
Raincoats___________ __ _________________ ________ ____ _____
Jackets: Heavy fabric___________ ______ __ _ _ ___ _________
Leather, _ ____ _______ _ _ _ _
_ __ __ __ ______
Other__________ ___ _____ _ _ ______ ___ ______
Sweaters: Heavy____ ______
_ ____ _ , _____
________ ____
Light_________ ___ ___ ___ __________ _______ __
Play suits: Wool knit____ ________ ___________
_______
_
Cotton suede,,- ______
______ __
,,
__ __
Other_________ _______
_____________ : _____ __
Suits: Heavy wool_____________ ____
_ ____ ____ __
__
Lightweight wool______ _ _______ _______
Cotton, linen____________
______ ________ _______ __
Palm Beach________ _ __ _______ ____ _ _________
Other__________________
____ _________ ___________
Trousers: Wool__________________ ,_ _________ _____
______
__
Cotton _____________________ ________ _
Other ___ ____ _______________ _______
__________
Overalls, coveralls_______________________ ______ ____ _________
Shirts and blouses: Cotton, work________ ___.________________
Cotton aaid other, dress_________
Wool _____________________________________
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit______________ , , , , ______ ____
woven________ _________ ____ ______
cotton and wool_______________ ______ _ _ _
rayon and s ilk __________ ________ _______
Undershirts, c o tto n ,__ _______________________ ,_
cotton and wool___ _____ ___________
rayon and silk, _____________________
Shorts, cotton,____ _________________ __ _________
rayon and silk__________ ________ ______ __
Drawers, cotton and wool_______________ _______
Pajamas and nightshirts_____ _ ________________
Shoes: Street______ . . . _______ . . . ___ ________ ______ _ __
W o r k ___________ _
_______________
Canvas_____ ____ __
___
_ _ _ _ _ __ _
Other______________________________ ________________ _
Boots: Rubber_____________ ___
_ _ _ . _ ___ __
________
Leather_________ ___ ___ _ __ _ _ . ___________ ____ _
Arctics______ _________ __ _____________________ ____________
Rubbers______ _ ____________ ___________ _______ _
_._ __
Shoe: Repairs__________ ___ ___ __
_
_ _
_
_
Shines___________ __ . . . ____ __
_________________
Hose: Cotton, heavy____________________________ ____
__ . . .
dress____
Rayon____ _______ _
___ _ ________ _
___ __. __
Silk_____________________________________________________
Wool____ ______ __ ______ _______ ______________________
Gloves: Work, cotton___ ________________________________ ___ _
other____________________________ _________ ___
Street, leather.. __ ___ ______________________________
other______________________________ __________
Ties____________
_
__
. . .
. . .
Collars_____ _
Bathing suits, sun suits_______ ______________________________
Handkerchiefs____ ___ _______________________________ . . . _
Accessories.__
_ ________________ _____ __________________ _
Bathrobes______ __ _ __ .................... . . . . _ ...................
Cleaning, repairing_____________ __________________________ __
Other................................................................................... .....................
2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
6 Less than 0.5 cent.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.

0 3 9 0 7 °— 39------- 19




Average
Number of number of
Average
persons
articles
expenditure
purchasing purchased per person
per person

N um ber

N um ber

8
1
16
6
6
0
1
3
3
2
10
9
0
0
0
7
10
0
0
0
13
10
6
15
12
25
2
9
2
3
0
8
3
0
9
0
2
6
35
4
3
3
1
2
0
1
20
0
17
15
7
1
1
2
1
2
2
13
0
0
4
1
0
8

0. 21
.03
. 42
. 18
. 16
0
.03
.08
.08
.05
. 32
. 26
0
0
0
. 18
.26
0
0
0
.53
.29
.21
.58
.87
2.16
. 10
.50
. 13
. 18
0
.45
. 18
0
.55
0
. 13
.29
1.92
. 13
. 16
. 10
.03
.05
0
.03
3.42
2.26
1. 37
.08
.05
.08
.03
.05
.05
1.13
0
0
.82
0

D o lla r s

24. 95
. 41
.03
. 30
. 12
2.23
0
.02
. 21
. 24
.06
. 41
.29
0
0
0
2.38
3. 70
0
0
0
1.12
.50
. 37
. 51
.47
1. 55
.06
.43
. 15
. 15
0
.11
.05
0
.13
0
.03
. 21
4. 40
. 26
.09
.22
.04
. 17
0
.02
.84
0
.59
. 38
.24
.01
.02
.03
(*>
.05
.06
. 27
0
0
.06
.02
0
.94
0

280

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T a b l e 17. — Clothing expenditures , hy economic level— C on tinu ed

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN R EGION—NEGRO FAM ILIES—Continued

Item

V. Clothing, boys 6 through 11 years of age: ‘
Total____________________________________________________________
Hats: Felt______ __
_ ______ __ _ ___ __________ ______ ___
Straw______ ___
________ _ __ ___________________
Caps: Wool___
__________ _______ __ ____ _ _ __
Other ________
_ _ _ _ _ __________ ________ __ _ ___
Overcoats_________ ____ _________ _ ______________ _______ _
Topcoats___________________ .____ ____ _ _______ __ _ _______
________ _____ __
Raincoats_____ __ ____ _________
Jackets: Heavy fabric __
___ _____ _______ _______
_
Leather______ _______
_____ _
_ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _
O th e r ...____ ____
____ _ _
Sweaters: Heavy. ____ _____ __ __ _ . . . . . . . ___ _________
Light__ _______ __
_ __ __. __ __ _ _______ __ _
Play suits: Wool knit.. ________
____ _ _____ __
Cotton suede______________ _
_______ _______
Other_____ __________ ________
_
_______
_
Suits: Heavy wool_________ ________ _______
_ _ _____
Lightweight w ool___ _____________ _
_ _ ___
Cotton, linen_____________ _ ______
__
_
__ _
Palm Beach____ ______
__
_ _ ____
O th e r.___ _________ _______ ______ _____ ____ ______ _
Trousers: Wool_______ ______ ____
______ _
__ _
C o tto n .___ _____ ______
__
____
________
Other___ __ ______ ______ __ ________ _ _ _ _
Overalls, coveralls_ _______ ___________ ___ ____ __ _ _ _
_
Shirts and blouses: Cotton and other, except wool____ __
Wool_________________________ _ _
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit_
_
_____ __________
w o v e n .___ _ _ _____________ ___
cotton and wool_____________ _____
rayon and silk____ _
_ _________
Undershirts, cotton______ ___________
__ ___ ___
cotton and wool.________ . . .
rayon and silk.. __________ ______ __ _
Shorts, cotton_________ ______ ___________
rayon and silk____ ________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Drawers, cotton and wool__________ _____ ______ __
Pajamas and nightshirts. _____ _
_ _________ __
Shoes: Street and dress________ ______
________ _______
_ __
_ _ _ _ __________
Canvas________ ________ _____
________
___ _____ ________
___ _____
Other___ __
Boots: Rubber. _ _ _
____ ____ _
. . .
__
. . .
Leather. ___ __ __ _____
_____
___ _____________
Arctics_______ __
__ __ ___ _ __ _
___ _ __ ___ __ _
Rubbers... __
__________ _________
___ _____ _______
Shoe: Repairs
___ __
__
Shines... _________ _ ._ __ ______
________
Hose: Cotton, heavy___ ___
__
___________________ __
dress_____________ _________ ______ _____
Rayon. _ _______ ______________
_______ ________ __ _
Silk____________________________________________________
Wool___________________________________________________
Gloves: Cotton
__ _ _ __
__ __
_ _
Leather. ___ ____ ______
_________ _______ __ _ _ _
Other___ ____________ ________ ______ __ . _________
Ties__
________ ______
___ ______ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Collars________ _______
___ _____ ______ _______ _ .
Bathing suits, sun suits
__ _____
_ _ __ _ _ _ ____ _ __
Handkerchiefs. __ _ __________
_____ __ __ ________ _ __
Accessories
Bathrobes___
__ ____
___ ___ ________ _________ __
Cleaning, repairing
Other
____
___
2Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




Average
Number of number of
Average
persons
articles
expenditure
purchasing purchased per person
per person

N um ber

N um ber

3
2
24
3
4
0
2
1
0
0
16
7
2
2
0
6
7
6
0
0
10
7
2
19
27
2
15
1
8
0
2
2
0
3
0
0
6
42
5
3
0
3
1
3
20
2
17
21
3
1
0
2
1
5
6
0
1
4
0
1
3

0.07
.05
. 76
. 10
. 10
0
.05
.02
0
0
.62
.24
. 10
.07
0
. 17
.21
.36
0
0
.45
.38
.07
1.33
2.50
. 12
.81
.05
.45
0
. 14
. 14
0
.21
0
0
.21
2. 55
. 14
. 10
0
.07
.02
.07
1.98
3. 67
.33
.05
0
.07
.02
. 12
.21
0
.02
.38
.02

D o lla rs

16. 53
.09
.03
.42
.02
.38
0
.05
.04
0
0
. 59
. 15
.08
. 12
0
1.40
1.52
. 34
0
0
.46
.37
. 12
.89
1.27
.03
.53
.02
.29
0
.06
.03
0
.07
0
0
.11
4. 62
.08
.16
0
. 16
.04
.05
. 64
.06
.38
.59
.05
.01
0
.02
.01
.03
.03
0
.02
.02
0
.02
.06
0

281

TABULAR SUMM ARY
T

able

17. — Clothing expenditures, by economic level— C on tin u ed

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN R EGION—N EGRO FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

VI. Clothing, boys 2 through 5 years of age:2
Total__ _ _ _ _ ___________________ _____________ _______ - Hats: Felt_____________________________________________________
Straw______ _____ __ ________________________________
Caps: Wool_______ _______ _________ _______________________
Other___ _____ ________
__ ____ ________ _________ __
Overcoats______ __________________ ___________________________
Topcoats __________________ ______________ ______ ____ ______
Raincoats.________ _ __________________________ _____ _____ Jackets: Heavy fabric_________ _________ __ ____________ _____
Leather__________ ______ _______ ___ __ __ __ __
Other_____ _________ _____ __ __________
__
Sweaters: H e a v y ____ ___ ________ ____ _ __ _ __ ___ _
Light ____________ __ __ _______ _
- ___ __
Play suits: Wool knit_______ _________ _____ __ __ - ____
Cotton suede_______ ____________________________ _
Other _
_ __________ ________ _____ _______
____ _ _ _____
___ _ ____________ Suits: Heavy wool
Light-weight wool __ _____________ ________ ________ _
______ ____ _
Cotton, linen ________________ _______
Palm Beach_________ _____________ _____ _____ _ ___ __
Other. __ ____ _______ _______ _______ __ _ ________ _
Trousers: W ool.. _ __________ _ ________ _________ _ __
Cotton ___ __________________________
_ ___ _
Other
_
__ ___ _____________ __
__
Overalls, coveralls__ _________________ ___ ______ __ _ ______
Blouses: Cotton and other, except w ool__ __ __ _______ _
Wool
.
_____________________________________
Underwear: Suits, cotton, knit
______
_____
__
woven________ ________________ - _cotton and wool__ ________________ ______ _
rayon and silk________ ______________
__
Undershirts, c o t t o n _______ _______ __________
cotton and wool_______ _____________
rayon and silk_____ ___ _______
_ __
Shorts, cotton___ __ ____________ __ ____________
rayon and silk, ___ __ __ __________
__
Drawers, cotton and w ool-___ _______ _____ _____
Pajamas and nightshirts. _________ _ . ________
__ __ _
Shoes: Street and dress
_
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________
Canvas __ __
____ __ ________________ _ _ _______ __
______________ ___ __
Other
_
_ _
_
Boots: Rubber
_ _ ____ __
_________ . . .
. . . _______
Leather __
___ _____________
_____________ __ ____
Arctics
_
_ ___
__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ ______
Rubbers__ __________ ________ _ __ ___ __
__ ____ _
Shoe: Repairs
_ ___________ _ __________ __ _ _ __ _________
Shines ____ ________ _____________ _ __ _______ _____
Hose: Cotton, heavy . .
_ ___________________ ___ ___ _____
dress _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
_______ __ _____ _____
Rayon _ ____ _____________________________ ______ __
Silk_____________________________________________________
Wool
______________ _______ _ __ ___________ ___
_ _
Gloves: Cotton
__
_
____ _________
Leather________ _
_
_ _ __
_ __ ____ _____ __
Other. _ _ ________ __ _ _ -__ _ ________
T ie s ... _. _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ __ __ ___ ___ ________________ __
Collars____________
__ __ _ __ _ _____________ ______ __ _
Bathing suits, sun suits __ _ __ _____________ __________ ____
Handkerchiefs. _ __ _________
_ _ ______ __ __ __________
Accessories
__ _ _ _
_ __ _____________ ______
Bathrobes _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _____________ __________________
Cleaning, repairing____ ___ ___ __________ _________ _______

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




Average
Number of number of
Average
persons
articles
expenditure
purchasing purchased per person
per person

N um ber

N um ber

0
0
10
4
2
3
0
1
0
1
6
5
4
5
5
3
5
2

0
4
1
0
0
16
4
0
8
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
19
1
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
8
14
0
1
0
3
0
4
1
0
4
0
0
2
3

0
0
.48
. 30
. 09
. 17
0
. 17
0
.04
. 35
. 22
. 26
.48
.83
. 13
. 22
. 13
0
. 22
. 04
0
0
1. 74
. 34
0
1. 09
. 65
. 13
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
. 83
2.17
. 04
0
0
0
0
0
2. 83
2. 17
0
. 13
0
. 13
0
. 17
. 09
0
. 26
0
.09

D o lla rs

12.84
o
o
. 25
. 08
! 24
’ 56
o
. 35
o
. 02
. 36
!n
. 18
. 27
.59
. 94
1, 04
. 10
0
.47
.09
0
0
1.02
. 13
o
.48
.34
.07
0
0
0
0
o
0
0
.38
3. 28
.09
0
0
0
0
o
. 13
0
. 42
. 34
0
.01
o
.04
o
. 04
. 01
0
. 04
0
o
. 20
. 17

282

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

17. — Clothing expenditures , hy economic level— C on tin u ed

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN R EGION—NEGRO F AM ILIES— Continued
Persons purchasing

Item

VII. Clothing, women and girls 18
years of age and over:2
Hats: Felt—. ----------- -----------------S tra w .-------------------- ----Fabric -----------------------------Caps and berets: W o o l......... .........
Other____ ______
Coats: Heavy, plain ____________
fur trimmed______
Fur______________________
Light, wool___________ .
cotton_____ . ___
silk, rayon_________
Raincoats___ __________ ________
Sweaters and jackets:
Wool k n it.-_____ __________
Wool fabric__________
— __
Leather, leatherette____________
Other__________________________
Suits: Wool______________________
Silk, rayon... . . . _____ __
Other______ ____________
Waists and middies:
Silk, rayon------ -----------------------Cotton_________________________
Other------ -------------------------Skirts: Wool __________
.
Other. _________
_______
_
Dresses: Cotton, house_ ________
street ___________
Silk, rayon___
W ool.. . . ------------------Other____ _____________
Aprons_____ ___________________
Coveralls________ _________
___
Knickers, breeches, shorts_______
Underwear: Slips, cotton. _______
silk___________
rayon..________
Corsets, girdles ____
Brassieres___________
Union suits and com­
binations:
Cotton____ __ . . .
Wool_____________
Silk, rayon________
Underwaists, shirts. Bloomers and panties:
Cotton— ________
Rayon_____ _______
Silk_______________
Nightgowns
and
sleeping pajamas:
Cotton, light____ .
flannel___
Silk, rayon________
Pajamas, lounging and beach:
Cotton_________________________
Silk, rayon_____________________
Other__________________________
Bathrobes... _ _________________
Kimonos, negligees________
___
Hose: Silk____________ __________
Rayon__________ ________
Cotton. __ ___________ _____
Wool____ ___________ ______

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
All per expendi
fam­ ture unit per
year
ilies
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
fam­ expenditure
ilies unit per year
Un­ $300 $400
der
to and
$300 $400 over

Economic
level— Families
spending per
All
fam­ expenditure
ilies unit per year
Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

N o.

No.

No.

N o.

B o l.

B o l.

B o l.

26
12
7
2
2
7
1
0
4
1
0
1

39
21
9
0
0
7
5
0
4
2
0
1

62
37
17
6
0
9
11
2
8
1
1
2

0.63 0.39 0.58 0. 91
.38 .18 .34 .62
.15 .10 . 12 .22
.04 .02 0
.10
.01 .02 0
0
.10 . 10 .09 . 11
.07 .01 .07 .14
.02
6
.01 0
.07 .05 .05 .10
.02 .01 .03 .01
0
.01
(4
) 0
.02 .01 .01 .02

15
8
0
1
26
5
3

2
2
0
0
6
2
1

3
4
0
0
11
1
0

10
2
0
1
9
2
2

.07 .02 .04 .15
.04 .02 .07 .02
0
0
0
0
0
.01
(4
) 0
. 11 .07 .15 . 11
.03 .05 .01 .02
.02
.01 .01 0

.10 .04
.08 .03
0
0
.01 0
1.84 1.07
.12 .12
.06 .04

9
10
1
7
2
120
63
113
22
16
25
0
2
56
82
50
35
21

3
3
0
2
2
33
10
23
4
5
9
0
1
16
18
16
3
4

3
2
0
1
0
33
20
32
7
6
7
0
0
22
20
14
8
4

3
5
1
4
0
54
33
58
11
5
9
0
1
18
44
20
24
13

. 04* .05 .04
.05 .04 .04
0
(4
) 0
.04 .02 .01
.01 .04 0
1.45 1.06 1.15
.71 . 55 .44
.76 .38 .61
.10 .05 .11
.10 .08 .09
.26 .28 . 19
0
0
0
.03 .02 0
.59 .39 .80
.71 .30 .47
.44 .34 .42
. 16 .04 .12
.18 .06 .11

.04
.07
.01
.07
0
2.11
1.11
1.28
. 16
. 12
.32
0
.06
.60
1. 34
.56
.31
.37

.07
.04
(5
)
.09
.01
1. 55
1.13
4. 75
.45
.42
. 17
0
.02
.37
.96
.37
.46
.08

.08
.03
0
.04
.02
1.00
.71
2. 47
.23
.32
.09
0
.01
.22
.42
.25
.08
.02

.05
.03
0
.03
0
1.18
.74
3. 47
.52
.54
.10
0
0
.52
.58
.38
.28
.04

.06
.06
.01
. 19
0
2. 45
1.91
8. 22
.61
.42
.32
0
.05
.39
1.87
.49
1.01
.20

44
12
19
10

8
5
2
5

15
3
7
2

21
4
10
3

.54
. 14
.24
.12

.78
.15
.41
. 12

.42
.08
.19
.05

.18
.10
.09
.05

.40
.06
.15
.04

.67
.09
.33
.06

11
77
23

3
21
3

6
26
3

2
30
17

. 11
1.04
.31

.12 .15 .07
.71 1.14 1.30
.07 .11 .74

.04
.50
.22

.04
.31
.05

.07
. 52
.06

.03
.68
.53

44
20
21

9
3
1

16
9
5

19
8
15

.35
.15
.19

.22
.05
.02

. 14
.05
.02

.26
.19
.13

.40
. 14
.62

0
1
0
12
9
201
24
29
5

0
0
0
2
0
55
10
12
3

0
1
0
2
2
61
8
10
1

0 0
0 (4
)
0 0
8
.05
.04
7
85 10.83
.82
6
7
.61
1
.08

.28
. 15
.10
.16

.57
.12
.22
.07

.35
.24
.15

.49
.16
.40

.27
. 12
.26

0
0
.01
0
0
0
.02 .03
.04
0
6. 85 9.38
1.07 .43
.74 .58
.17 .03

0
0
0
.10
.09
16.18
.92
.51
.02

0
(6
)
0
.15
.08
7. 51
.36
.18
.02

.05 .21
. 15 .06
0
0
.02
0
2. 40 2.11
.05 . 18
. 15
0

0
0
0
.01 0
0
0
0
0
.05 .05 .33
0
.07 .18
4. 30 6.11 12.05
.39 .18 .50
. 14 .20 .20
.04 .01 .01

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
6Less than 0.5 cent.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.




B o l.

41.16 22. 22 35.17 66. 97
1.13 .61 .94 1.84
.60 .24 .52 1.05
.25 . 15 . 18 .41
.02 .01 0
.06
0
(5
)
(5
) 0
1.60 1. 34 1. 47 1.98
2. 64 . 18 2. 53 5.24
.55 0
0
1.60
.96 .63 .71 1. 54
. 15 .04 .23 .20
.03 0
0
.08
.03 .02 .02 .04

127
70
33
8
2
23
17
2
16
4
1
4

283

TABULAR SUMM ARY
T

able

17. — Clothing expenditures , by economic level— C on tinu ed

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN R EGION—N EGRO FAM ILIES— Continued

Persons purchasing

VII. Clothing, women and girls 18
years of age and over2
—Continued.
Shoes: Street-------------------------------Dress_______________ _____
Sport--------------------------------House s l i p p e r s ---------------------Shoe: Repairs___________________
Shines_____________________
Rubbers_____________ ____________
Arctics, gaiters----------------------------Gloves: Cotton__________________
Leather--------------------------Other------- ----------------------Bathing suits, sun suits__________
Handkerchiefs. -------------------------Furs_____________________________
Mufflers, scarfs__________________
Handbags, purses________________
Umbrellas_______________________
Garters, belts, hairpins, etc______
Cleaning, repairing_____ ________
Other... _________________ . . . . I

Average expenditure
per person

Economic
level—Fami­
lies spending
per expendi­
All ture unit per
fam­
year
ilies

Economic
level— Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Economic
level—Families
spending per
expenditure
All
fam­ unit per year
ilies

Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

Item

Average number of
articles purchased
per person

Un­ $300 $400
to and
der
$300 $400 over

N o.

N o.

185
66
31
65
98
1
12
17
75
27
8
1
60
0
11
76
14
54
120

53
14
5
15
22
1
2
4
15
9
2
0
12
0
3
12
1
16
22

N o.

58
19
9
15
35
0
4
4
25
4
2
1
21
0
1
20
2
16
37

N o.

74
33
17
35
41
0
6
9
35
14
4
0
27
0
7
44
11
22
61

N o.




N o.

N o.

.05 .02 .05 .09
.07 .05 .05 .11
.45 .27 .40 .68
.13 .15 .05 .18
.03 .02 .03 .05
.01 0
(4
) 0
2.46 1. 51 1.85 3.96
0
0
0
0
.05 .05 .01 .09
.47 .18 .38 .84
.06 .01 .03 .15

2 Includes only persons dependent on family funds for 52 weeks.
4 Less than 0.005 article.
Notes on this table are in appendix A, p. 332.

N o.

1.27 1.05 1.18 1.58
.38 .23 .27 .62
.14 .06 .12 .25
.36 .22 .26 .60

Un­ $300 $400
der to and
$300 $400 over

D oL.

D o t.

D oL

4.15 2 .91 3.84
1.28 .75 .92
.35 .11 .21
.29 .12 .19
.38 . 20 . 52
.01 .03 0
.05 .03 .04
.10 .06 .08
.30 .13 .26
.19 .20 .07
.04 .01 .03
.01 0
.03
.16 .10 .13
0
0
0
.04 .02 .01
.55 . 15 .39
.10 .02 .04
.06 .04 .07
1.41 .86 1.02
.13 .02 1.10

D oL

5. 68
2.14
.72
.55
. 45
0
.09
.16
.51
.30
.06
0
.25
0
.08
1.11
.23
.08
2.34
.37

284

WEST NORTH CENTRAL-MOUNTAIN REGION
T

able

17.—

C lothing ex p en d itu res , b y econom ic level—

Continued

W EST N O R TH C E N T R A L -M O U N T A IN REGION—NEGRO FAM ILIES— Continued

Item

VIII. Clothing, girls 12 through 17 years of age: 2
Total____________________________________________
H a ts:_________________________________________
Straw.----------------------------------------------------Fabric___________________________________
Caps and berets: Wool-------------------------------------Other________________________
Coats: Heavy, plain___________________________
fur trimmed____________________
Fur____________________________________
Light, wool_____________________________
cotton___________________________
silk, rayon----------------------------------Play suits: Wool knit__________________________
Cotton suede_______________________
Other______________________________
Raincoats_____________________________________
Sweaters and jackets:
Wool knit___________________________________
Wool fabric____________ „____________________
Leather, leatherette_________________________
Other_______________________________________
Suits: Wool___________________________________
Silk, rayon______________________________
Other___________________________________
Waists and middies:
Silk, rayon__________________________________
Cotton______________________________________
Other_______________________________________
Skirts: Wool__________________________________
Other__________________________________
Dresses: Cotton, house------------------------------------street________________________
Silk, rayon___________________________
Wool_________________________________
Other________________________________
Aprons________________________________________
Coveralls______________________________________
Knickers, breeches, shorts_____________________
Underwear: Slips, cotton---------------------------------silk____