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Major Union Contracts
in the United States, 1961




Bulletin No. 1353
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

Major Union Contracts
in the United States, 1961

Bulletin N o. 1353
December 1962

UNITED STATES DEPARTM EN T O F LABO R
W . Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Docum ents, U .S. Governm ent Printing Office, W ashington 25 , D.C. -




Price 2 0 cents




Preface

The b a s ic c h a r a c t e r is tic s o f m a jo r c o lle c t iv e b a r ­
gaining a g re e m e n ts in the United States a re d e s c r ib e d in
this study, the se co n d o f its type to be p re p a re d by the
B ureau o f L a b o r S ta tistics.

The study is p r im a r ily a cen su s o f a ll a g re e m e n ts
in the United States c o v e r in g 1 ,000 o r m o r e w o r k e r s , in ­
cluding key r a ilr o a d and a irlin e situ a tion s.

A ll a g reem en ts studied, e x ce p t the r a ilr o a d and
a irlin e a g re e m e n ts, w e r e p art o f the Bureau*s file o f c u r ­
rent a g ree m e n ts m aintained fo r pu b lic and g ov ern m en ta l
u se under the p r o v is io n s o f the L a b o r-M a n a g e m e n t R e la ­
tions A ct o f 1947, as am ended.

T h is r e p o r t w as p re p a re d in the B u re a u f s D iv is io n
o f W ages and In du strial R e la tio n s.




From the October 1962 issue of the Monthly Labor Review with appendix tables.




iv

Contents
P a ge
Industry and o ccu p a tio n a l grou ps __________________________________
E m p lo y e r b a rgain in g unit ___________________________________________
Unions in v o lv e d _______________________________________________________
G eog ra p h ic d istrib u tio n ______________________________________________
D u ration _______________________________________________________________
W age p r o v is io n s _______________________________________________________
D e fe r r e d w age in c r e a s e s and wage reop en in gs ________________
C o s t -o f-liv in g re v ie w _______________

1
3
4
5
7
7
8
9

C h a rts:
1.
2.

D u ration o f m a jo r a g re e m e n ts, 1956 and 1961 ____________
M onthly p attern o f m a jo r a g re e m e n t e x p ira tio n s,
1952, 1956, and 1 9 6 1 ________________________________________

6
7

T a b le s:
1.

T ype o f e m p lo y e r bargain in g unit in m a jo r a g re e m e n ts,
by in d u stry, 1961 ___________________________________________
W ork er co v e r a g e o f m a jo r a g re e m e n ts, by
in d u stry , 1961 ______________________________________________
Union a ffilia tio n by w o rk e r co v e ra g e o f m a jo r
a g re e m e n ts, 1961 ___________________________________________
R egion a l and State d istrib u tio n o f m a jo r
a g re e m e n ts, 1961 ___________________________________________
D u ration o f m a jo r a g re e m e n ts, by in d u stry, 1 9 61 _________
W age adjustm en t and reop en in g p r o v is io n s , b y
d u ration o f m a jo r a g re e m e n ts, 1961 ______________________

10

A ppendix ______________________________________________________________

11

2.
3•
4.
5.
6.

2
3
4
5
8

T a b le s:
A -l.
A -2 .
A -3 .
A -4 .
A -5 .

N ational and in tern ation al unions sig n a to ry to m a jo r
a g re e m e n ts, by w o rk e r c o v e r a g e , 1 9 61______________
R egion a l and in d u stry d istrib u tio n o f m a jo r
a g re e m e n ts, 1961 ____________________________________
W age adjustm en t and reop en in g p r o v is io n s in
m a jo r a g re e m e n ts, b y in d u stry, 1961 _______________
F re q u e n cy o f c o s t - o f - liv in g re v ie w in m a jo r
a g re e m e n ts, b y in du stry, 1 9 6 1 ______________________
C alendar o f c o s t - o f - liv in g adjustm en t p r o v is io n s
in m a jo r a g re e m e n ts, 1961 __________________________




v

13
14
16
17
18




Major Union Contracts in the United States, 1961
ing the distribution of total union membership be­
tween these two industry categories.3 Three-fifths
(1,045) of the agreements applied to manufactur­
ing establishments covering approximately 4.4
million workers (table 1). Nonmanufacturing
industries accounted for 688 agreements covering
about 4 million workers.
Since nonmanufacturing employment greatly
exceeds that of manufacturing, the ratio of major
agreement coverage to total employment was sub­
stantially higher in manufacturing. Workers
covered by major agreements accounted for
slightly more than a fourth of total employment
in manufacturing, or almost twice the correspond­
ing ratio for nonmanufacturing. In both cate­
gories, the degree of collective bargaining con­
centration declined slightly from 1956 levels,
probably because of employment losses in major
industry sectors.
As might be expected, major agreement coverage
was high in such large, well-organized industries as
transportation equipment, railroads and airlines,
construction, other transportation, and primary
metals (tables 1 and 2). As related to total
industry employment,4 collective bargaining con­
centration appeared to be highest in transporta­
tion equipment, railroads and airlines, other
transportation, primary metals, and communica­
tions. Somewhat lower in the range were apparel,
mining, electrical machinery, rubber, utilities, and
construction. Trade and services industries had
the smallest proportion of employees under large
agreements.

total
coverage
distributed among an
estimated 150,000 contracts in 1961, collective
bargaining in the United States is highly decentral­
ized. Concentration of contract coverage is,
however, by no means negligible. Almost half of
the total coverage (8.3 million workers) is ac­
counted for by the 1,733 contracts which indi­
vidually cover 1,000 or more workers. Moreover,
these larger agreements predominate in the basic
industries which serve as pattern-setters in
American collective bargaining.
No central or State registry of all collective
bargaining agreements exists. For a number of
years, however, the Bureau of Labor Statistics
has been seeking agreements covering 1,000 or
more workers, and it is believed nearly all such
agreements have been accounted for.1 Such
agreements (hereafter referred to as major agree­
ments) provide the basis for the Bureau's agree­
ment provision studies and enable a periodic
analysis of their important characteristics. This
is the second such study to be prepared.2

W it h

Industry and Occupational Groups
Worker coverage under major agreements was
almost equally divided between manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries, roughly match-

i Although the Bureau does not collect railroad and airline agreements
(they are filed with the National Mediation Board, as required by the Rail*
*
way Labor Act), information for key bargaining situations in these industries
has been included in this study. Major changes for class I railroad employees
are usually negotiated on a national basis; the terms are thereafter incor­
porated into the agreements between the individual railroads and various
unions. For simplicity, the major railroad bargaining situations have been
classified by operating, nonoperating, and Railway Express employees and
the Pennsylvania Railroad-Transport Workers contract. Each of the four
situations has been treated as a single agreement.
* See “ Characteristics of Major Union Contracts,” Monthly Labor Review,
July 1956, pp. 805-611. In some details, the data in the two studies are not
comparable. For instance, the present study includes 12 major airline agree­
ments, while not one was covered in 1956, and a larger number of construction
agreements.




* See Directory of National and International Labor Unions in the United
States, 1961 (BLS Bulletin 1320,1962), p. 51; and “ Membership of American
Trade Unions, I960,” Monthly Labor Review, December 1961, p. 1307.
* Ratios between agreement coverage and employment by industry cannot
be computed with precision. Agreements are necessarily classified according
to the major products of the employer bargainmg unit as a whole, while em­
ployment data are compiled on an establishment basis.

l

2
T a b l e 1. T y p e

of

E m p l o y e r B a r g a in in g U n it

in

M a jo r A g r e e m e n t s ,

by

I n d u s t r y , 1961

[Workers in thousands!
Single eimployer

Multiemployer

Number studied
Industry

Multiplant

Single plant
Agreements

Workers

Agreements

Workers

Agreements

Workers

Agreements

Workers

All industries.......................................................................

1,733

8,308.0

490

1,021.9

624

3,415.6

619

3,870.5

Manufacturing...........................................................

1,045

4,351.3

441

917.3

392

2,469.4

212

964.7

67.5
360.5
25.8
81.2
456.2
26.1
33.2
125.9
70.8
102.0
49.2
126.2
66.9
110.3
627.6
140.8
310.9
421.0
1,074.4
53.5
21.9

13
26
5
13
1
2
7
29
3
36
9
17
4
14
57
13
63
48
62
14
5

26.3
45.9
7.9
20.4
1.0
2.4
8.3
46.0
3.5
58.2
23.6
24.6
6.2
18.3
97.5
28.7
116. S
133.2
207.1
34.2
8.1

7
32
6
12
8
5
3
19
4
17
6
11
6
19
51
29
39
52
54
10
2

41.2
97.2
15.6
32.3
27.4
8.5
6.9
45.8
5.7
43.8
25.6
96.7
26.0
62.7
514.5
82.0
184.6
278.7
852.9
19.3
2.4

60
1
6
44
6
9
9
27

217.5
2.4
28.5
427.8
15.2
18.0
34.1
61.6

Rubber products.................................................................
Leather and leather products.............................................
Stone, clay, and glass products.................................. ........
Primary metal industries....................................................
Fabricated metal products..................................................
Machinery (except electrical).............................................
Electrical machinery...........................................................
Transportation equipment.................................................
Instruments and related products___ ________________
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries...........................

20
118
12
31
53
13
19
57
34
53
15
29
19
41
113
52
106
105
120
24
11

1
9
8
5
10
4
5
4

5.0
34.8
29.3
15.6
30.1
10.0
9.2
14.4

4

11.4

Nonmanufacturing....................................................

688

3,956.7

49

104.7

232

946.3

407

2,905.8

Mining, crude petroleum, and natural gas production___
Transportation 1
..................................................................

18
115
16
80
79
13
106
37
53
170
1

237.8
681.1
869.6
501.3
195.1
25.2
289.9
171.2
177.7
805.1
2.9

3
17

4.2
38.2

4
9

5.2
35.9

10
20
13
75
66

23.6
67.6
64.1
495.1
154.1

14

18.7

2

2.5

33
2
10
2
1

92.2
4.2
37.8
4.9
2.9

5
78
3
1
4
13
59
35
41
168

210.1
575.3
805.5
1.0
5.1
25.2
179.1
167.0
137.4
800.2

Ordnance and accessories

_

Food and kindred products................................................
Tobacco manufactures........................................................
Textile mill products...........................................................
Apparel and other finished textile products......................
Lumber and wood products (except furniture).................
Furniture and fixtures.........................................................
Paper and allied products...................................................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries........................
Chemicals and allied products_______________________

Products of petroleum and coal

Railroads and airlines 2

Communications.................................................................
Utilities: Electric and gas...................................................
Wholesale trade_____________________________________
Retail trade..........................................................................
Hotels and restaurants_______________________________
Services................................................................................

Construction

Miscellaneous nonmanufacturing industries___
» Excludes railroads and airlines.
8 See text footnote 1.

N ote : Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal

totals.

Approximately nine-tenths of the major agree­
ments applied to bargaining units comprised
entirely, or almost entirely, of production or bluecollar workers as shown in the following tabulation:
Predominant worker group

Agreements

All worker groups_______________ 1, 733
Production employees (blue-collar)1
_____ 1, 528
Professional and technical employees----35
Clerical employees_____________________
64
Sales employees-----------------------------------72
Two groups or more combined 2________
20
Information not available______________
14

Workers
(thousands)

8, 308. 0
7, 550. 3
89.4
283.0
226.0
104.3
55.1

i Includes all types of production and nonclerical workers in manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries.
* Principally in the telephone industry—plant and traffic departments and
commercial departments.
N ote : Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




The agreements (171) applying predominantly
or exclusively to white-collar workers accounted
for only 7 percent of all major coverage.5
The 35 agreements covering professional and
technical employees were distributed mainly
among three nonmanufacturing industries (air­
lines, maritime, and services— television and
motion pictures) and five manufacturing industries
(ordnance, printing and publishing, electrical
machinery, transportation equipment, and in­
struments). With the exception of an industry­
wide agreement in the television industry and a•
•The Bureau estimates that white-collar workers comprise about 12 percent
of total union membership. See BLS Bulletin 1320, op. cit., p. 50; and
“ Membership of American Trade Unions, 1960,“ op. cit., pp. 1305-1306.

3

ments. Agreements applying to two plants or
more constituted the majority of single employer
agreements and covered over 75 percent of the
workers under such agreements. Multiplant bar­
gaining by Single employers was the leading form
of bargaining, measured by worker coverage, in

multiplant agreement in electrical machinery,
coverage under any of these agreements did not
exceed 3,500 workers.
The communications industry accounted for
the majority of the clerical agreements, and retail
trade for nearly all sales personnel agreements.

Employer Bargaining Unit
For the employer, the signer of more than 6
out of 10 major agreements was a single company
(table l ) .6 Their workers accounted for slightly
more than half the coverage of all major agree­

T able 2.

• An important distinction must be drawn between agreements and col­
lective bargaining situations which may produce or influence a number of
separate agreements. For example, the basic steel companies typically
signed separate multiplant agreements, although their major terms were
negotiated in a joint multiemployer bargaining session with the Steelworkers.

W orker C overage of M ajor A greements, by I ndustry, 1961
[Workers in thousands]

All industries........................................
Manufacturing_____ _______ —
Ordnance and accessories.....................
Food and kindred products_________
Tobacco manufactures.........................
Textile mill products............................
Apparel and other finished textile
products.............................................
Lumber and wood products (except
furniture)...........................................
Furniture and fixtures..........................
Paper and allied products...................
Printing, publishing, and allied indus­
tries....................................................
Chemicals and allied products_______
Products of petroleum and coal______
Rubber products___________________
Leather and leather products-----------Stone, clay, and glass products______
Primary metal industries.....................
Fabricated metal products--------------Machinery (except electrical)-----------Electrical machinery................... ........
Transportation equipment--------------Instruments and related products----Miscellaneous manufacturing indus­
tries....................................................
N onmanufacturing.....................
Mining,crude petroleum, and natural
gas production...................................
Transportation1
...................................
Railroads and airlines *
*........................
Communications..................................
Utilities: Electric and gas....................
Wholesale trade____________________
Retail trade...........................................
Hotels and restaurants--------------------Services.................................................
Construction.........................................
Miscellaneous nonmanufacturing in­
dustries_________________________
i Excludes railroads and airlines.
* See text footnote 1.




1,000-2,499
workers

2,500-4,999
workers

5,000-9,999
workers

Agree­ Work­
ers
ments

Industry

Agree­ Work­
ers
ments

Agree­ Work­
ments
ers

1,057

1,513.4

347

1,136.3

191

1,280.1

10,000-24,999
workers

25,000-49,999
workers

50,000-99,999
workers

100,000 workers
and over

Agree­ Work­
ments
ers

Agree­ Work­
ers
ments

Agree­ Work­
ers
ments

Agree­ Work­
ers
ments

103

1,458.2

970.1

202

659.2

89

596.5

56

777.4

10
74
9
23

15.1
102! 5
13.0
31.3

7
29
2
3

23.3
98.6
7.0
10.7

2
10
1
4

15.5
58.4
5.9
29.2

1
4

27.9

11

35.6

15

108.3

5

88.0

9
17
46

13.0
26.7
64.3

4
2
9

13.1
6.6
28.6

2

38.2
67.7
14.1
22.2
12! 7
44! 5
105.4
48.9
107)5
84)5
9o! 5
27)5

3
7
4
5
g
5
16
13
20
26
26
3

9.9
20.5
16.1
18.5
19)1
18 1
48.1
40.6
61.8
84)0
87)1
9.5

4
2
2
1
4
4
10
3
3
6
15
2

22.8
13.8
19.1
5.0
25.1
27.4
64.0
19.7
20.6
35.6
103! 9
16.5

3
1
2
9
2
4
9
13

55.5
10! 0
20.3
124.4
31.7
52.4
110 6
177! 0

413.8

9

1,892.5

8

4

253.8

5

826.0

1

50.0

1

125.0

1

125.6

3

576.0

33.0

27
44
9
19
g
30
74
34
77
62
62
19

7

268.4

10.0

19

613.8

13.7
51.0

1

19

681

9

13.1

1

2.8

1

543.3

145

477.2

102

683.6

47

680.8

14
61
7
29
56
10
64
18
36
81

20.2
86.8
11.5
40.3
82! 8
13)3
88.3
29)7
S *4
O
m i

1
24

4.7
77.9

20.0
115.0

64.6
56.6
6.9
87.9
23.0
26! 3
126.6

7.0
104.1
32.6
141.9
23.6
5.0
73.8
56.5
22.0
217.2

1
8

19
17
2
28
7
8
38

1
16
5
19
4
1
11
9
3
33

12
2

40.0
27.0
79.0
168.2

1

i

25.6

1

27.0

2

133.8

2
1
1

68.6
36.4
40.0

1

70.0

11

345.4

3

160.0

4

1,066.5

3
2

82.4
55.0

2

105.0

1

1
1
2

186.0
110.0
770.5

55.0

199.6
32.1

3
2
6
13

71.4

6.0

376

2

2.9

1

35.0

5

173.0

N ote: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totalSi

4
manufacturing industries as a whole; in metal­
working industries, it was by far the predominant
type. Among nonmanufacturing industries, mul­
tiplant bargaining was strong in communications
and utilities, where the larger companies have
widely scattered branches or stations.
Except for the railroad industry, multiemployer
bargaining mainly involved relatively small com­
panies, and the 619 major multiemployer agree­
ments in effect in 1961 may well have applied to
individual employers numbered in the tens of
thousands. The ratio of workers covered by such
agreements to total major agreement coverage—
47 percent—is substantially higher than the ratio
of all multiemployer bargaining to all collective
bargaining coverage. 'The traditional strongholds
of multiemployer bargaining, and also sources of a
large volume of coverage in 1961, are the food
and apparel industries, mining, railroads, other
transportation (chiefly maritime and trucking),
and construction. Multiemployer bargaining in
1961 was also predominant (among major situa­
tions) in lumber, furniture, printing and publish­
ing, leather, trade, hotels and restaurants, and
services. In nonmanufacturing as a whole, almost
three-fourths of all workers under major agree­
ments were covered by multiemployer agreements;
in manufacturing, one-fifth.

Multiemployer agreements are distributed by
worker coverage in the following tabulation:

Worker coverage

All size groups__________ _____
1,000 to 2,499 workers_________ _____
2,500 to 4,999 workers_________ _____
5,000 to 9,999 workers_________ _____
10,000 to 24,999 workers_______ _____
25,000 to 49,999 workers_______ _____
50,000 to 99,999 workers_______ _____
100,000 workers or more________ _____

3, 870. 5
488.4
419.6
649.5
597. 2
369.4
155. 0
1,191. 5

619
330
127
100
43
11
3
5

N ote : Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

About half of the 329 major agreements covering
5,000 workers or more were multiemployer agree­
ments, including 5 of the 9 largest in the country.

Unions Involved
Major agreement coverage was divided among
the principal trade union categories in the United
States roughly in proportion to total union mem­
bership,7as follows:

7 See “ Unaffiliated Local and Single-Employer Unions in the United States,
1961/’ Monthly Labor Review, September 1962, p. 976.

T able 3.

MuUiemployer
agreements
Workers
Number (thousands)
<

Percent of—
Major
agree­
ments Workers

80
13
6
1

AFL-CIO affiliates_______________________—
National unaffiliated unions_________________
Single firm or intrastate unaffiliated unions-Mixed union affiliation______________________

80
14
3
4

N ote : Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

U nion A ffiliation by W orker C overage of M ajor A greements, 1961
[Workers in thousands]
Agreements negotiated by-

Number studied

All size groups.............. .
1,000 to 2,499 workers.................
2,600 to 4,999 workers.................
6,000 to 9,999 workers.................
10,000 to 24,999 workers..............

95 n l tn id Q Qwnrlrprs
rW
Q
50 O Ot.n O Q Qwnrlrprs
O
QQ

100,000 workers or more.............
i See text footnote 7.




Agree­
ments

Single firm or
intrastate1

National1

Workers
Agree­
ments

A FL-CIO and
unaffiliated unions,
jointly

Unaffiliated unions

AFL-CIO affiliates
Worker coverage

Workers
Agree­
ments

Workers

Agree­
ments

Workers

Workers

Agree­
ments

1,733

8,308.0

1,391

6,601.7

224

1,146.8

99

261.9

19

297.7

1,057
347
191
103
19
7
9

1,513.4
1,136.3
1,280.1
1,458.2
613.8
413 8
1,892! 5

852
273
154
84
18
4
6

1,218.1
893.7
1,045.4
1,213.9
588.8
258.8
1,383.0

138
40
27
13
1
3
2

194.7
132.6
172.1
171.5
25.0
155.0
296.0

60
30
6
3

91.1
96.9
39.4
34.6

7
4
4
3

9.6
13.1
23.3
38.4

1

213.5

N ote: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

5

The Teamsters, the largest union in the country,
held 144 of the 224 major agreements negotiated
by national unaffiliated unions (table 3). The
expulsion of the Teamsters from the AFL-CIO
was responsible for the most significant change
since 1956 in the number of major agreements
negotiated by Federation affiliates. The number
of major agreements attributed to single firm
unaffiliated unions declined from 127 (453,300
workers) in 1956 to 99 (261,900 workers) in 1961;
affiliation with national unions was the chief
reason for this drop.
Sixteen national unions each represented
100,000 workers or more under major agreements.8
These 16 are listed in the following tabulation
in descending order of workers covered by major
agreements to which each union is the exclusive
signatory.9
Number of
agreement*

Automobile Workers_____________________________
Steelworkers_____________________________________
Teamsters (Ind.)_________________________________
Communications Workers________________________
Machinists____ ___________________________________
Carpenters____________________________________
Ladies’ Garment Workers____ ____________________
Electrical Workers, IB E W _______________________
Electrical Workers, IU E________________
Mine Workers (Ind.) (excluding District 50)______
Clothing Workers...............................................
Hod Carriers__________
Retail Clerks...............
Hotel & Restaurant Employees—......... ..........
Rubber Workers_________________________________
Meat Cutters____ ______

118
120
144
48
94
54
37
92
47
2
20
33
42
30
23
44

ciations. Although only slightly more than a
fifth of the 1,733 major agreements covered opera­
tions in more than one State or region, more than
half of total worker coverage was accounted for by
these agreements.
Most of those workers—
almost 4 million— were under interregional agree­
ments negotiated by multiplant corporations in
the steel, automobile, and rubber industries and
of the type characteristic of apparel, coal mining,
and transportation bargaining (table 4).
All States with the exception of North Dakota
and Wyoming had at least one intrastate agree­
ment covering 1,000 workers or more. New York
led with 186, followed by California (172), Illinois
(132), and Pennsylvania (110). Coverage was
highest (776,100 workers) in California, where the
large intrastate agreements were principally in
nonmanufacturing industries.
T able 4.

R egional and State D istribution of M ajor
A greements, 1961
[Workers in thousands]

Region and State

Agree­ Work­
ments ers

Region and State

South A tla n ticContinued
District of Co­
lumbia..............
Virginia-..............
West Virginia—
North Carolina__
South Carolina__
Georgia_________
Florida.................

United States..

1,733 8,308.0

Interregional agree­
ments i....................
New England....... ....
Intraregion8____
Maine..................
New Hampshire.
Vermont..............
Massachusetts___
Rhode Island___
Connecticut_____

296 3,965.0
107 291.6
40.3
8
9
18.7
7.0
4
2.4
2
44 118.0
3
4.6
37 100.8

Middle Atlantic_____
Intraregion8____
New York—
____New Jersey_____
Pennsylvania___

397 1,309.1
32 172.5
186 674.8
69 171.3
110 290.6

Geographic Distribution

East North Central..
Intraregion8____
Ohio.....................
Indiana_________
Illinois.................
Michigan.............
Wisconsin............

401 1,078.1
15
83.9
89 207.0
65.8
28
132 406.4
85 196.0
52 119.1

The interstate dispersion of collective bargaining
is emphasized by the many major agreements
which cover the farfiung multiplant operations
of large companies and of multiemployer asso-

West North CentralIn traregion 8
____
Minnesota.........
Iowa....................
Missouri..............
North Dakota.
South Dakota___
Nebraska.............
Kansas.................

83
7
31
9
28

200.3
32.5
74.2
20.3
57.1

1
3
4

2.6
6.4
7.3

South Atlantic...........
Intraregion8
____
Delaware.............
Maryland............

103
13
3
21

252.7
37.2
4.2
51.0

8 Coverage of agreements is not necessarily identical with union member­
ship. Nonmembers may be included within the bargaining unit represented
by a union.
* The coverage of all unions having major agreements will be listed in a
BLS report presenting this article with additional data.




East South Central__
Kentucky_______
Tennessee............
Alabama..............
Mississippi—___ _
West South Central—
Intraregion8____
Arkansas..........
Louisiana.............
Oklahoma-..........
Texas...................

Agree- Work*
ments ers

7
17
8
8
6
8
12

20.7
50.3
12.6
18.0
9.7
19.9*
29.2

34
9
14

62.0
14.8
24.2
20.3

10

1
49
5
3
15
2

24

2.8

114.6
19.3
4.6
34.8

Mountain...........
Intraregion 2
.
Montana___
Idaho...........
Wyoming—
Colorado___
New Mexico.
Arizona........
Utah............
Nevada____

38
2
4
2

53.0
78.2
2.9
9.2
4.2

11
1
5
8
5

19.1
1.3
18.3
12.7
10.6

Pacific................
Intraregion 8
.
Washington.
Oregon.........
California.—
Alaska.........
Hawaii_____

225

956.6
62.2
66.9
28.5
776.1
3.0
20.0

11

27
12
172
1
2

1 Each agreement covered 2 plants or more in different regions.
8 Each agreement covered 2 plants or more in different States in the same
region.
N ote: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

6

Chart 1.

Duration of M ajor Agreements, 1956 and 19611

EZH3

v>rxsXr\

1961
1956

Tftox&vi*
Percent of total

Percent o f total




» o a se a on i,/o o agreem ents covering
----------------------------------- 9

~ iw w w ,w w w

" W I R O I * in

I701

an d 1,424 agreem ents covering 8,168,300 w orkers in 1956

7

Duration
The trend to long-term agreements (2 years or
more), highlighted in the Bureau's 1956 study, was
accentuated during the next 5 years (chart 1).
In 1961, only 1 out of 8 major agreements, covering
a smaller proportion of workers, was negotiated
for a term of less than 2 years (table 5). The
prevalence of 2-year agreements also declined
somewhat. A duration in excess of 2 years
became, by 1961, the majority practice.
Significant increases in duration were noted in
the major manufacturing agreements in trans­
portation equipment, food, electrical machinery,
and primary metals (however, basic steel agree­
ments negotiated in 1962 returned to a 2-year
duration); in nonmanufacturing, lengthening of
terms was especially notable in transportation,
communications, and construction. An indefinite
duration (open end) continued in coal mining and
railroad agreements.
The increasing prevalence of long-term agree­
ments of varying lengths means that fewer major
agreements will expire each year and the industrial
mix of expiring agreements will change from year
to year. If the calendar of expirations 1 in 1961
0
is typical, the seasonal pattern of expirations is
also changing (chart 2). Although the 1961
pattern probably will not be duplicated in later
years, it appears that the traditional concentration
of bargaining in the spring, as exemplified by the
1952 pattern, no longer holds.

Chart 2.

M onthly Pattern of M ajo r Agreement Ex­
pirations, 1952, 1956, and 1961

Percent of Expirations

ings or combinations of these provisions were
specified in 7 out of 8 major agreements, as
follows:
Percent of—
Major
agree- Workmente
en

Wage Provisions
Implicit in the trend to long-term agreements is
the development of automatic wage adjustment
formulas or provisions for wage reopenings, or
both, to replace annual negotiations. Cost-ofliving review, deferred increases, and wage reopen-

» For the purpose of analysis, the expiration date is the formal termination
date established by the agreements. In general, it is the earliest date on
which termination of the contract could be effective, except for special provi­
sions for termination, such as disagreements arising out of reopening issues.
Many agreements provide for automatic renewal at the expiration date
unless notice of termination is given. The Labor Management Relations
Act of 1947, as amended, requires that a party to an agreement desiring to
terminate or modify it shall serve written notice upon the other party 60
days prior to the expiration date.




Deferred wage increase only....... ....................
Wage reopening only______________________
Cost-of-living review only_________________
Cost-of-living review and deferred wage
increase_________________________________
Deferred wage increase and wage reopeningCost-of-living review and wage reopening__
Wage reopening, cost-of-living review, and
deferred wage increase__________________

39. 3
17. 7
1. 8

27. 5
24. 1
1. 3

18. 6
7. 1
1. 3

24. 2
9. 1
.6

1. 8

3. 3

Deferred wage increase provisions were included
in two-thirds of the agreements, wage reopening
in over one-fourth, and cost-of-living review in
slightly less than a fourth (table 6). Nearly all
(95 percent) of the agreements with terms of 2
years or more had such wage adjustment provi­
sions, as compared with less than two-fifths of

8
those under 2 years. Multiple provisions were
most frequent in contracts of more than 3 years.

by far the more popular device. Among agree­
ments with terms of 3 years or more, the various
combinations of wage adjustment devices ranked
in the following order by number of agreements:

Deferred Wage Increases and Wage Reopenings.

Deferred wage increases are included in agree­
ments sometimes as an “ annual improvement
factor” or “ annual productivity increase.” 1 A
1
few of the agreements in 1961 made provision for
diversion of part of the deferred increases into
pension and health and welfare funds.1
2
Although a single deferred increase was the
common practice in agreements with terms of
less than 2 years, the longer termed agreements
with deferred increases tended toward annual or
multiple increases and frequently added or sub­
stituted a wage reopening clause. Although
deferred increases and escalation came into promi­
nence together (the General Motors—
UAW agree­
ment of 1948), the former had, by 1961, become

Deferred wage increase only_______________________
Deferred wage increase and cost-of-living review___
Wage reopening only____ ______
Deferred wage increase and wage reopening________
Deferred wage increase, cost-of-living review, and
wage reopening_________________________________
Cost-of-living review only________
Cost-of-living review and wage reopening__________

235
156
153
81
25
12
8

1 Approximately 2 percent o£ the deferred wage increase provisions limited
1
the increases to specific groups or occupations. The exclusions generally
represented small groups and, therefore, did not materially affect total worker
coverage.
J Similar clauses were incorporated in several automobile and farm equip­
*
ment agreements negotiated in late 1061 and, therefore, are not included in
this study.

T able 5.

D uration 1 op M ajor
[Workers in

Industry

Number
studied

Less than
1 year

Over 1 and
under 2 years

1 year

2 years

Over 2 and
under 3 years

Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers
ments
ments
ments
ments
ments
ments
All industries---------------------------------------------Manufacturing..........................................
Ordnance and accessories____________________
Food and kindred products.................................
Tobacco manufactures____ __________________
Textile mill products________ _______ ______ _
Apparel and other finished textile products____
Lumber and wood products (except furniture)..
Furniture and fixtures........ ........................ .......
Paper and allied products...................... ............
Printing, publishing, and allied industries____
Chemicals and allied products_______________
Products of petroleum and coal____. . . . _______
Rubber products___________________________
Leather and leather products________ ________
Stone, day, and glass products...........................
Primary metal industries^..................................
Fabricated metal products................................
Machinery (except electrical)________________
Electrical machine)

1,733 8,308.0
7
10.5
131
298.1
84
610 1,917.4
335.8
■
L
L
SSm---L
..... = s s s r —- .. —X.. 1 -I > ' ■ , ,BS iL r-s ,"
J
ssgsas=S££=5 &==£ CS5
SSS= 3 =
84
2.2
157.0
1,045 4,351.3
2
45
177.8
418 1,273.4

Instruments and related products................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries......................

20
118
12
31
53
13
19
57
34
53
15
29
19
41
113
52
106
105
120
24
11

67.5
360.5
25.8
81.2
456.2
26.1
33.2
125.9
70.8
102.0
49.2
126.2
66.9
110.3
627.6
140.8
310.9
421.0
1,074.4
53.5
21.9

N onmanufacturing..._______________________

688

3,956.7

Mining, crude petroleum, and natural gas production.
Transportation *........................................................... .
Railroads and airlines *____________ _____ _________
Communications________ ______ _________________
Utilities: Electric and gas______________ ___________
Wholesale trade__________________________________
Retail trade................................................... ...............
Hotels and restaurants................................................. .
Services............ ............................................................ .
Construction..................................................................
Miscellaneous nonmanufacturing industries.............. ,

18
115
16
80
79
13
106
37
53
170
1

237.8
681.1
869.6
501.3
195.1
25.2
289.9
171.2
177.7
805.1
2.9

1.1

i

1.1

5

1
10
1
1

3.5
37.2
1.1
9.0

1
24
1
4
3
4

1.0
38.6
1.0
6.4
8.8
4.1

2

3.3

1
2

2

1.1
3.1

4.2

8
20
2
1
1
2
9

30.3
228.9
20.4
27.3
52.5
16.3
6.9
80.2
51.3
41.8
31.1
88.3
52.2
58.9
34.3
27.4
47.9
108.9
227.2
24.7
17.1

866.0

2
4

5.8
20.7

2
3

9.0
12.0

4

7.1

5
2

10.8
2.7

1
1
1
54
15
22
11
20
1

4.0
2.5
1.0
495.9
33.5
158.9
20.3
80.9
1.1

4.8
1.7
23.9

12.3
4.0
5.7
6.6
16.2
4.6
4.9
2.7

4
8
2
2
2
3
1

26.0
28.5
14.0
13.7
2.6
7.7
1.1

141.1

47
4

7
64
10
10
11
8
5
29
24
25
8
18
15
24
21
15
31
34
40
11
8

1,043.1

148

3
1
4

39

158.0

192

644.1

54

177.1

2

2.7

9
11
7

30.4
58.6
16.1

19.4
15.6
7.4

11.9

8

38.4

3.9
140.9
6.4
35.6
107.1
5.4
130.3
27.9
58.7
125.1
2.9

7
7
2

2

3
25
1
7
39
2
46
7
20
41
1

2
1
11
1
3
20

4.2
1.5
42.2
2.0
9.2
75.7

*

* In classifying agreements by duration, a 1-month leeway was observed;
e. g., agreements with terms of 23 or 25 months were grouped with agreements




8.4

6.6
7.6
4.4
11.3
10.5

5
3
3
4
5
2
3
2

i

4
5
1
7
3

202

5.8
37.1
43.8
3.0
6.4
1.0
2.5
41.5

of 2 years' duration,
* Excludes railroads and airlines.

9

Provisions permitting one or more contract
reopening for wage negotiations were incorporated
in 484 contracts covering over 3 million workers.
In 3 out of 4 of these agreements, wage negotia­
tions were to take place either at a predetermined
date or after specified intervals. A few contracts,
however, permitted wage reopening at any time.
The remaining provisions tied possible wage
reopenings to unpredictable economic factors,
such as changes in the cost-of-living or in wages
or prices in the industry or area, or, less frequently,
in case of national emergency.

Cost-of-Living Review. Cost-of-living escalator
clauses, which provide for periodic review and
adjustment of wages dependent on the movement
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price
Index, are the more expendable of the wage ad­
justment provisions.

A greem ents, b y I ndustry,

After the Bureau’s 1956 study, escalator clauses
were added to basic steel contracts (and were
dropped in 1962 negotiations), major meatpacking
agreements (September 1956), and agreements of
General Electric, West Coast grocery chains,
New York retail bakeries, and Montgomery
Ward department stores. In 1956, the railroads
reinstated escalation, which had been discontinued
in 1954, but dropped it again in 1960.
In 1961, manufacturing agreements accounted
for nearly 80 percent of the escalator clauses and
a slightly higher proportion of the workers
covered. The relative importance of escalation,
as shown by the percentage of workers under
major agreements containing such clauses, was
highest in primary metals (90), transportation
equipment (82), ordnance (71), machinery—
except electrical (68), and fabricated metals (57).
In nonmanufacturing, escalator clauses were

1961

thousands]
3 years

Over 3 and
under 4 years

4 and under
5 years

5 years

Over 5 years

Indefinite
Industry

Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers Agree­ Workers
ments
ments
ments
ments
ments
ments
542

3,032.8

22

54.2

31

152.9

66

322.7

23

78.4

15

1,062.4

295

1,722.2

12

27.8

20

64.9

13

. 33.7

5

21.8

3

4.7

3
32

15.5
62.4

3
1

5.9
1.1

1

1.5

9
31
3
6
4
3
16
2

22.1
339.2
4.7
12.6
7.1
3.7
39.1
5.4

1
2

1.5
27.0

3

15.0

1

4.0

3
6
23
17
39
41
50
6
1

12.3
10.2
56.7
60.2
65.9
252.8
741.4
9.2
2.1

247

1,310.6

1
61

1.7
464.3

53
7
8
17
16
13
71

369.0
13.6
15.3
30.0
62.8
55.3
298.7

1

1.1

1

2.4

1

2.2

1

5.0

2

5.0

1

2.0

2
1
3

2.8
1.1
8.3

3
6
1
1

10

26.4

11

3.0

2

5.0

5
2

14.4
4.0

8 See text footnote 1.




1
3
2
2

4.1

3
4

6.8
7.5

88.0

53

289.0

10.5

1
2

1.6
2.5
1.0
1.5

21
7
5
15

37.8
33.0
14.1
197.6

1.3

2.0

8.4
8.8
3.2
3.1

1.2
2.3

1.0

1

1
1

1

1

3

4.0

1

1
1

1

1

2.5
3.0
17.0
20.0

1
1
1

3.0
1.2
9.5

18

56.6

12

1,057.7

8

19.7

4
3
4

208.5
17.9
825.5

1

5.8

5
2
3

23.8
6.6
6.6

All industries.
Manufacturing.
Ordnance and accessories.
Food and kindred products.
Tobacco manufactures.
Textile mill products.
Apparel and other finished textile products.
Lumber and wood products (except furniture).
Furniture and fixtures.
Paper and allied products.
Printing, publishing, and allied industries.
Chemicals and allied products.
Products of petroleum and coal.
Rubber products.
Leather and leather products.
Stone, clay, and glass products.
Primary metal industries.
Fabricated metal, products.
Machinery (except electrical).
Electrical machinery.
Transportation equipment.
Instruments and related products.
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.
N onmanufacturing.
Mining, crude petroleum, and natural gas production.
Transportation.*
Railroads and airlines.1
Communications.
Utilities: Electric and gas.
Wholesale trade.
Retail trade.
Hotels and restaurants.
Services.
Construction.
Miscellaneous nonmanu faeturing industries.

N ote: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal
totals.

10
T a b l e 6.

W a g e A d ju st m e n t

and

R e o p e n in g P r o v is io n s ,

by

D u r a t io n

of

M a jo r A g r e e m e n t s , 1961

[Workers in thousands]

Number with
provisions

Cost-of-living
review only

Deferred wage
increase only

Wage reopen­
ing only

Duration

Cost-of-living
Cost-of-living
review, de­
Cost-of-living Deferred wage
review and
ferred wage
increase and
review and
deferred wage
wage reopening wage reopening increase, and
increase
wage reopening

Agree­ Work­ Agree­ Work­ Agree­ Work­ Agree­ Work­ Agree­ Work­ Agree­ Work­ Agree­ Work­ Agree­ Work­
ments
ers
ments
ers
ments
ers
ments
ers
ments
ers
ments
ers
ments
ers
ments
ers
Total........................... 1,519 7.483.5
T ars than 1 yp.ar
1 yAnr
Over 1 and under 2 years...
2 years..................................
Over 2 and under 3 years__
3 years..................................
Over 3 and under 4 years__
4 years and under 5 years__
5 years..................................
Over 5 years.........................
Indp.finit.A (opfin end)

2
4.2
67.7
27
229.0
56
564 1,755.7
192 1.017.5
529 2.991.6
21
53.2
31
152.9
66
322.7
23
78.4
8
810.9

31

104.1

2
3
6
6
11
1

2.5
20.0
45.2
13.6
19.6
1.0

2

2.4

681 2,289.1
—
%2
10
23.6
34
124.9
331
978.6
68
195.6
203
820.5
30.0
11
10
36.8
8
49.5
3
6.5
2
21.2

307 1,999.4

323 2,010.9

r
14
7
117
12
128
1
7
15
2
3

1
8
70
88
116
7
6
20
7

iTo*
34.7
37.1
353.3
34.7
864.8
1.1
37.8
58.1
2.3
573.8

7.0
40.0
242.6
722.0
899.6
16.2
12.6
34.6
36.5

22

53.9

7
7
6

15.4
11.5
21.8

1
1

3.2
2.0

123

754.6

32

271.7
"

3
30
8
46
1
7
22
5
1

4.2
116.7
34.6
126.7
5.0
62.6
178.6
12.9
213.5

1
3
3
19

2.9
4.1
5.7
238.7

6

20.3

1

N ote: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

concentrated in transportation (principally local
and intercity bus transportation and trucking)
and retail trade.
Quarterly wage reviews, featured by automo­
bile agreements, were required by approximately
half of the escalator arrangements. Semiannual
and annual reviews were each provided for by
approximately a fourth. Semiannual review was
required mainly in food processing, primary met­
als other than steel, local and intercity trans­
portation, and retail trade; annual review, prin­
cipally in the basic steel agreements which were in
effect in 1961 and in the large areawide trucking
agreements.
The combined effect of differences in periodic­
ity and timing of escalator clauses was to spread




the impact of possible wage adjustments through­
out the year, as shown in the following tabulation:
Month in which adjustment was to be made *

All escalator agreements.............
January....................................
February_____________________________
March......................................
April----------------------------------------May.................
June..........................................
July______________
August_______________________________
September____________________________
October— -------November____________________________
December......... ..........

merits(thousands)

408
2, 410. 6
106 802.9
63
368.4
143
633. 1
60
656. 8
45
125.2
138 592. 1
101
783. 7
60 200. 3
138
611. 1
114
1, 194. 0
44
124.2
132
597.4

1
Not to be confused with month of the Consumer Price Index upon which
adjustment was based.

F iv e ta bles a re p re se n te d in this appendix to
p rov id e addition al data on a g re e m e n t c o v e r a g e by national
and in tern ation al un ions, in d u stry, and re g io n ; p re v a le n ce
o f w age adjustm en t p r o v is io n s and fre q u e n cy o f c o s t - o f livin g re v ie w , by in d u stry; and m onths o f c o s t - o f - liv in g
a dju stm en ts.




11




13
Table A-l.

National and International U n ions1 Signatory to M ajor Agreements,2 by W orker

300, 000 w o r k e r s and o v e r
A u to W o r k e r s (11.8)
C o m m u n ic a tio n s W o r k e r s (4 8)
M a c h in is ts (9 4)
S t e e lw o r k e r s (1 2 0 )
T e a m s t e r s (Ind. ) (1 4 4 )
2 0 0 .0 0 0 and u n d e r 3 0 0 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s
C a r p e n t e r s (5 4)
E l e c t r i c a l (IB E W ) (9 2)
E l e c t r i c a l (IU E ) (47)
G a r m e n t, L a d ie s (3 7)
M in e W o r k e r s (E x c lu d in g D is t. N o. 50) (Ind. ) (2)
1 0 0 . 0 0 0 and u n d e r 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 w o r k e r s
C loth in g (20)
H od C a r r i e r s (3 3)
H otel (3 0)
M ea t C u tte rs (4 4)
R e ta il C le r k s (42)
R u b b e r (2 3)
5 0 .0 0 0 and u n d e r 100, 000 w o r k e r s
B u ild in g S e r v i c e (1 9)
E n g in e e r s , O p e ra tin g (18)
L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c i a t i o n (14)
O il, C h e m ic a l and A t o m ic (31)
P a in t e r s (1 2)
S tr e e t , E l e c t r i c R a ilw a y (2 7)
T e le p h o n e U n ion s (Ind. ) (9)
T e x tile W o r k e r s (T W U A ) (24)
T r a n s p o r t W o r k e r s (6 )
25, 000 and u n d e r 50 , 000 w o r k e r s
A c t o r s (3)
B o ile r m a k e r s (1 4)
B r ic k la y e r s (1 1)
E l e c t r i c a l (U . E . ) ( I n d .) (9 )
F L U o r LIU (21)
G la s s B o tt le (1 1)
G la s s and C e r a m ic (7)
I n s u r a n c e W o r k e r s (3 )
Ir o n W o r k e r s (12)
L o n g s h o r e m e n and W a r e h o u s e m e n (Ind. ) (5)
M a r in e and S h ip b u ild in g (9 )
M a r itim e (4)
M in e W o r k e r s (D is t. N o. 50 ) (Ind. ) (2 0)
P a c k in g h o u s e (1 1)
P a p e r m a k e r s (17)
P lu m b in g (7)
R a ilw a y and S te a m s h ip C le r k s (1 )
R e t a il, W h o le s a le (1 7 )
S e a fa r e r s (4)
S h oe W o r k e r s , U n ited (5)
U tility (8 )
10, 000 and u n d e r 25, 000 w o r k e r s
A lu m in u m (4)
B o o k b in d e r s (11)
B r e w e r y (9)
C h e m ic a l (1 1 )
D is t ille r y (7)
G la s s , F lin t (7)
G r a in M ill e r s (6 )1
2

Coverage,

1961

10, 000 and u n d e r 25, 000 w o r k e r s — C on tin u ed
H a tte rs (3 )
In d u s tr ia l W o r k e r s , A llie d (1 2)
L a u n d ry (5)
L a u n d ry (Ind. ) (5)
L e a th e r G o o d s , P la s t i c (3)
L ith o g r a p h e r s (Ind. ) (4)
M a s t e r s , M a tes and P ilo t s (3)
M in e , M ill (Ind. ) (9)
M o ld e r s (6 )
P rin tin g P r e s s m e n ( 8 )
P u lp (9)
S a la r ie d U n ion s ( I n d .) (1)
S h eet M e ta l (5)
S hoe and B o o t (5)
T e le g r a p h e r s (1)
T e x t ile W o r k e r s (U T W A ) (9)
T o b a c c o (9)
T y p o g r a p h ic a l(6)
W o o d w o r k e r s (7)

5, 000 and u n d e r 10, 000 w o r k e r s
A ir L in e P ilo t s (5)
B a k e r y (Ind. ) (4)
B a k e r y , A m e r ic a n (4)
B r ic k and C la y (2)
C h ic a g o T r u c k D r iv e r s (Ind. ) (1)
C o m m u n ic a tio n s A s s o c ia t io n (Ind. ) (2)
E le v a t o r C o n s t r u c t o r s (1)
F u r n itu r e (4)
G a r m e n t, U n ited (2)
M a r in e E n g in e e r s (3)
M e c h a n ic s E d u c a tio n a l (4)
M u s ic ia n s ( 6 )
N e w s p a p e r G u ild (5)
N e w s p a p e r and M a il D e liv e r s ( I n d .) (2)
P a c k in g h o u s e W o r k e r s (Ind. ) (1)
P l a s t e r e r s (4)
P o t t e r s (3 )
T o y W o r k e r s (2)
U p h o ls t e r e r s (5)

U n d er 5, 000 w o r k e r s
A s s o c ia t e d U n ion s (I n d .) (1)
B r o a d c a s t E m p lo y e e s (1)
C e m e n t (1)
C ig a r M a k e r s (2)
E n g in e e r s , T e c h n ic a l (1)
G ra n ite C u tte r s (1)
G u a rd , P la n t (I n d .) (1)
J e w e lr y (1)
L a c e O p e r a tiv e s (I n d .) (1)
L a th e r s (2)
L e a th e r W o r k e r s (2)
O ffic e E m p lo y e s (2)
P a tte r n M a k e r s (1)
P h o t o -E n g r a v e r s (2 )
R o o fe r s (1)
S h oe and A llie d C r a ft s m e n ( I n d .) (1)
S tage ( 2 )
S ton e, U n ited (2 )
S tov e M o u n te r s (1)
U tility W o r k e r s o f N ew E n g la n d (Ind. ) (1)
W a tc h w o rk e r s (Ind. ) (2)

1 A ll u n ion s a r e a ffilia t e d w ith the A F L - C I O e x c e p t t h o s e fo llo w e d b y (I n d .) . F o r fu ll un ion id e n t ific a tio n and
a d d r e s s e s , s e e D i r e c t o r y o f N a tio n a l and In te rn a tio n a l L a b o r U nion s in the U n ited S ta te s , 1 9 6 1 , B L S B u lle tin 1320.
2 E x c lu d e d fr o m th is lis t in g a r e 72 a g r e e m e n ts c o v e r in g 1 m illio n w o r k e r s w h ic h in c lu d e m e m b e r s o f 2 o r
m o r e u n io n s , and 99 a g r e e m e n ts c o v e r in g 2 6 2 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d b y u n a ffilia te d s in g l e - e m p l o y e r o r in t r a ­
sta te u n io n s.
NOTE:

T h e n u m b e r o f a g r e e m e n ts is in d ic a t e d in p a r e n t h e s e s .




14
Table A-2.

Regional and Industry Distribution o f Major Agreements, 1961
J^W o^rkej^^in^thou^and^
R e g io n 1

N um ber
stu d ie d

E ast
Wcsst
N o rth
No:rth
tra
C en 1 l
C e n tr a l
A g r e e ­ W o rk ­ A g r e e ­ W o rk ­ A g r e e ­ W o rk ­ A g r e e ­ W ork ­ A g r e e ­ W ork ­ A g r e e ­ W ork ­
m e n ts
m e n ts
m e n ts
ers
m e n ts
m e n ts
ers
ers
m e n ts
ers
ers
ers

In d u stry

A l l in d u s tr ie s — ------------- -------M a n u fa ctu rin g

--------

O r d n a n ce and a c c e s s o r i e s - —
F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s —
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ----- ----T e x t ile m i l l p r o d u c t s - — —
A p p a r e l and o t h e r fin is h e d
t e x t ile p r o d u c t s ------------ - L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t fu r n itu r e )
------------F u r n it u r e and f i x t u r e s ------—
P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s —
P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , and
a llie d in d u s tr ie s
---------------C h e m ic a ls and a llie d
p r o d u c t s --------------------------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m
and c o a l ___ _____________ —___
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s -------------------L e a t h e r and le a t h e r
p r o d u c t s —------------------ ---------S to n e , c la y , and g la s s
p r o d u c t s — ---------------------- — P r i m a r y m e t a l in d u s tr ie s —
F a b r ic a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s —
M a c h in e r y (e x c e p t
e l e c t r i c a l ) — ------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y — ------ T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t —
I n s tr u m e n ts and r e la t e d
p r o d u c t s - — — ----------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu r in g
i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------------

In te r­
r e g io n a l 2

1. 733

8.308. 0

1 .0 4 5

4.351. 3

296

N ew
E nglan d

3 .9 6 5 .0

107

M id d le
A tla n tic

2 9 1 .6

397

1,309. 1

401

1.078. 1

83

200. 3

1 8 6 .4

253

653.. 6

278

650. 1

38

8 0 .8

3 .9
5 .4

3
24

1
23
_
1

3. 0
50. 2
1 .9

1
8
_
-

4 .0
16. 8
-

3

8 .0

172

2 .1 5 9 .7

76

5
5
8
2

1
24

1 3 .7
9 5 .9

-

-

-

-

2

2. 5

2
2
_
6

15. 6

9

3., 9
52. 2
..
3 4 .0

53

45 6. 2

15

2 7 8 .0

2

5. 5

25

1 4 9 .9

4

7. 3

13
19
57

26. 1
33. 2
1 2 5 .9

1
2
6

2. 3
4 .9
27. 6

1.0
10 . 6

1
4
12

2„ 0
8 .. 7
17.. 2

3
4
14

8. 5
5. 8
22. 3

-

-

1
6

4

5. 5

34

70. 8

3

5. 1

1

1. 1

14

3 9 .7

11

1 7 .9

1

1. 1

53

16

20
118
12
31

67.
360.
25.
81.

-

1 0 2 .0

4

1 2 .9

1

1. 7

15
29

49. 2
126. 2

2
6

19. 1
87. 6

-

-

6

19

6 6 .9

4

22.0

41
113
52

110. 3
6 2 7 .6
140. 8

18
23
15

106
105
120

3 1 0 .9
4 2 1 .0
1,074. 4

7
13
25

24

53. 5

-

11

2 1 .9

— -------

688

M in in g , c r u d e p e t r o le u m ,
and n a tu ra l g a s
p r o d u c t io n — --------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n 3 - ---------- ---------R a ilr o a d s and a i r l i n e s 4 — — C o m m u n ic a tio n s — -----------------------U t ilit ie s : E l e c t r i c and g a s —
W h o le s a le tr a d e
—
--------------R e ta il t r a d e -------------------------------------H o te ls and r e s ta u r a n ts -----------S e r v i c e s — ----------------- --------------------C o n s t r u c t i o n ------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m a n u ­
fa c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s —------ -------

18
115
16
80
79
13
106
37
53
170

N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g

1

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f ta b le .




23.. 8

10

20. 3

2

4 .0

9. 1

1
4

1. 5
9. 2

2
10

5 .4
1 4 .9

_
_

-

8

2 3 .7

3

12. 5

2

4 .0

1

3 .0

7 3 .0
420. 3
61. 2

1
3
4

1 .2
5 .0
8 .5

9
24
9

1 7 .9
4 1 .5
18. 1

11
42
14

14. 6
125. 2
25. 3

1
1
1

1 .9
2.0
1.0

93. 2
1 8 4 .5
754. 3

14
9
7

25. 5
30. 3
3 4 .9

21
30
23

3 7 .9
72 . 1
62. 2

52
39
31

1 3 7 .8
87. 2
9 ? .6

5
5
4

5 .9
1 3 .9
6 .8

-

2

2 .4

15

3 4 .9

2

3. 6

1

7 .0

1

2. 1

1

1

2

6

1 4 .7

2

2 .9

-

-

3.956. 7

124

1.805. 3

31

105. 3

144

655. 5

123

4 2 8 .0

45

1 1 9 .5

2 3 7 .8
681. 1
869. 6
501. 3
195. 1
25. 2
2 8 9 .9
171. 2
1 7 7 .7
805. 1

2
32
16
25
11

1 8 7 .4
330. 7
869. 6
223. 9
26. 7

1
5

1 . 2
18. 3

1
19

20.0
1 6 2 .9

4
15

5. 7
5 6 .0

1
3

7 .0
4. 2

2 .9

-

10
-

11
17

-

35. 3
-

6 5 .0
6 6 .7

.

-

-

1
4

9. 1
5. 4

_

4
1

_

15

_

16. 3
4. 3
-

50. 6

-

21
18
4
23
6
15
36
1

_

1 1 4 .0
61. 8
9. 6
62. 8
4 4 .9
58. 8
1 1 7 .9
2 .9

-

18
21
2
23
6
9
25

_

68. 1
43. 5
3. 1
6 6 .9
32. 8
29. 6
122. 4

_

-

2
4

20. 2
4 .9

1

10
4
5
15

1

.

18.
7.
6.
50.

0

2
3
1
8

15
Table A-2.

Regional and Industry Distribution o f Major Agreements, 1961— Continued
(W o r k e r s in th ou sa n d s)________
R e g io n 1

In d u stry

South
A tla n tic
A gree­
m e n ts

W ork ­
ers

E a St
So* ith
tra
C en 1 l
W ork ­
A gree­
m e n ts
ers

iSt
W€
So*ith
Cenitra l
W ork ­
A gree­
ers
m e n ts

P a c ific

M ou n tain
A gree­
m e n ts

W ork ­
ers

A gree­
m e n ts

W ork ­
ers

103

2 5 2 .7

34

62.0

49

114. 6

38

78 . 2

225

956. 6

65

146. 8

27

4 8 .4

31

6 5 .4

15

2 9 .0

90

331. 3

O r d n a n ce and a c c e s s o r i e s —
F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s —
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ---------T e x t ile m i l l p r o d u c t s -----------A p p a r e l and o t h e r fin is h e d
t e x t ile p r o d u c t s ------------------ L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) ---------- ----F u r n it u r e and f i x t u r e s ---------P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s - —
P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , and
a llie d in d u s tr ie s —-------------- C h e m ic a ls and a llie d
p r o d u c t s — — —— — — —
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m
and c o a l ■------ , -----------------------R u b b e r p r o d u c t s --------------------L e a th e r and le a t h e r
p rod u cts — —
— --------- ----S ton e, c la y , and g la s s
p r o d u c t s ————————————
P r i m a r y m e t a l in d u s tr ie s —
F a b r ic a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s —
M a c h in e r y (e x c e p t
e l e c t r i c a l ) ----------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y -----------T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t —
In s tr u m e n ts and r e la t e d
p r o d u c t s --------- — -----— —
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu r in g
in d u s tr ie s -----------------------------

2
5
8
11

9 .8
7 .0
19. 6
25. 2

4
2

6. 2
2. 1

1
1
-

3. 5
1.0
-

4
3
-

9 .9
3. 5
-

5
28
-

1 5 .9
1 2 8 .7
-

1

1.0

-

-

-

-

-

3

6. 5

1
4

1. 2
6 .7

1
4

1 .0
6 .4

1
5

1. 2
6 .7

1
-

2. 6
-

6
6
2

9 .5
10. 6
2 3 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

6. 1

11

21. 1

5

4

6. 2

-

-

-

-

2

2. 1

-

-

6
-

16 .8
-

1

3 .5

4
-

6. 6
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1 .8

1
5
2

1.8
6. 3
2. 2

4
2

5. 3
4. 6

1
-

2. 2
-

6
-

9. 5
-

4
5

10. 5
1 9 .9

2.0
13. 3
2 6 .7

2
2

3 .9
6. 1

2
1
8

3. 6
1 .4
21 . 2

-

-

3
3
14

5. 1
1 4 .7
69. 7

-

-

1

1.0

1

1 .7

-

2

1

1.0

-

-

-

-

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g --------

38

1 0 5 .9

7

18

49. 3

23

4 9 ,2

135

625. 3

M in in g , c r u d e p e t r o le u m ,
and n a tu ra l g a s
p r o d u c t i o n ------------------------- —
T r a n s p o r ta tio n 3---------------------R a ilr o a d s and a i r l i n e s 4— — C o m m u n ic a t io n s ----------------- —
U t ilit ie s : E l e c t r i c and g a s —
W h o le s a le tr a d e — —-------------R e t a il t r a d e — —------------------ —
H o te ls and r e s ta u r a n ts — — S e r v i c e s -------------------------- n
------,
C o n s t r u c tio n — ------------------ —
M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m a n u ­
fa c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s ------------

12
6
6
5
3
6

22. 8
28. 4
13. 6
10. 6
1 1 .9
1 8 .7

1
2
1
1
2

1
7
4
2
4

1. 3
24. 7
6 .6
2. 1
14. 6

6
1
2
2
4
8

11. 6
1 .0
3 .4
2.0
9 .2
22. 1

1
19
7
8
6
27
13
12
42

1 .7
58. 5
37. 6
2 7 .4
1 1 .5
7 5 .7
6 0 .9
17. 2
3 3 5 .0

A ll in d u s tr ie s ---------------------- —
M a n u fa c t u r in g --------------

2 •
3
6

12 .0

1 3 .6

2.0
2. 3
1. 8
1. 1
6 .5

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot e q u a l t o t a ls .

~

"

1 T h e S ta tes in c lu d e d in the r e g io n s u s e d in th is stud y a r e sh ow n in ta b le 4,
2 E a c h a g r e e m e n t c o v e r e d 2 p la n ts o r m o r e in d iffe r e n t r e g io n s .
3 E x c lu d e s r a ilr o a d s and a i r l i n e s .
4 S ee te x t fo o t n o t e 1.

3 .0

p . 7.

16
Table A-3.

W age Adjustment and Reopening Provisions in Major Agreements, by Industry, 1961
(W o r k e r s in th ou sa n d s)
A u to m a tic c o s t o f - l iv i n g r e v ie w

In d u stry
A g ree­
W ork ers
m e n ts

A gree­
m e n ts

W age r e o p e n in g

D e fe r r e d
w a g e in c r e a s e

Spe<:i f i c

C o n d itio n a l

A gree­
A g ree­
A gree­
W ork ers
W ork ers
W ork ers
m e n ts
m e n ts
m e n ts

W ork ers

A ll in d u s tr ie s ________________

1 ,7 3 3

8 ,3 0 8 .0

408

2 ,4 4 0 . 5

1,159

5 ,3 2 6 .2

366

2 ,3 8 8 .3

118

69 1. 2

M a n u fa c t u r in g _________

1, 045

4 , 3 5 1 .3

320

2 , O il. 1

684

3 ,0 8 7 .7

219

779. 5

70

323. 7

O rd n a n ce and a c c e s s o r i e s —
F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s __
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s _______
T e x t ile m i ll p r o d u c t s _______
A p p a r e l and o th e r fin is h e d
t e x t ile p r o d u c t s _____________
L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t fu r n itu r e ) _________ _
F u r n itu r e and f i x t u r e s _______
P a p e r' and a llie d p r o d u c t s __
P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , and
a llie d i n d u s t r i e s ____________
C h e m ic a ls and a llie d
p r o d u c t s _____________________
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m
and c o a l ______________________
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ______________
L e a th e r and le a t h e r
p r o d u c t s _____________________
S ton e, c la y , and g la s s
p r o d u c t s _____________________
P r i m a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s __
F a b r ic a t e d m e ta l p r o d u c t s __
M a c h in e r y (e x c e p t
e l e c t r i c a l ) ___________________
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y _______
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u i p m e n t __
In s tru m e n ts and r e la t e d
p r o d u c t s _____________________
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu r in g
in d u s tr ie s ___________________

20
118
12
31

6 7 .5
360. 5
25. 8
81. 2

10
26

48 . 1
83. 8
-

14
99
5
8

0
3
5
6

3
8
14

13. 3
1 6 .4
35. 6

13
1
3

28. 3
1 .4
10. 0

53

45 6. 2

.

.

8

26. 0

16

180. 6

28

224. 5

13
19
57

26. 1
33. 2
125. 9

2
6
-

5. 2
8. 7
-

10
12
24

20. 2
23. 2
53. 3

2
5
17

6. 3
8. 8
4 3 .9

34

70. 8

1

2. 2

31

66. 8

2

2. 5

53

102. 0

8

18. 3

23

47. 8

24

15
29

49 . 2
126. 2

2

5. 0

1
8

1. 0
15. 7

19

6 6 .9

_

_

13

41
113
52

110. 3
627. 6
140. 8

6
75
25

9 .5
564. 9
7 9 .9

106
105
120

310. 9
42 1. 0
1 ,0 7 4 . 4

46
28
74

24

53. 5

11

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g _____
M in in g , c r u d e p e t r o le u m ,
and n a tu ra l g a s
p r o d u c t i o n ___________________
T r a n s p o r t a t io n 1 ______________
2
R a ilr o a d s and a ir lin e s 3 ------C o m m u n ic a t io n s ______________
U t ilit ie s : E l e c t r i c and g a s __
W h o le s a le tra d e ______________
R e ta il t r a d e ___________________
H o te ls and r e s ta u r a n ts ______
S e r v ic e s _______________________
C o n s t r u c t i o n __________________
M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m a n u ­
fa c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s -------------

-

-

45.
308.
8.
20.

-

-

-

-

47 . 1

2

3. 8

6
20

10. 3
110. 1

1
2

2. 2
6. 0

55. 0

3

8. 5

4

16. 5

27
94
41

82. 2
602. 3
115. 8

6
13
4

7. 7
18. 8
8. 2

2
1

3 .4
3. 2

2 0 9 .9
7 1 .7
879. 2

77
70
96

248. 9
3 0 4 .9
991. 7

2C
37
16

37. 8
137. 9
74. 8

3
4
3

5. 0
4. 7
5. 5

7

20. 0

16

36. 3

2

8. 7

_

_

2 1 .9

4

4 .9

7

14. 6

1

2. 8

3

9. 3

688

3, 956. 7

88

4 2 9 .4

475

2 ,2 3 8 .5

147

1 ,6 0 8 .7

48

367. 6

18
115
16
80
79
13
106
37
53
170

237.
681.
869.
501.
195.
25.
289.
171.
177.
805.

6
47
1
1
24
4
4
1

15. 2
317. 3
3. 5
1. 1
5 9 .9
20. 0
5. 5
7. 0

13
95
4
12
25
11
96
32
37
149

19
1
2
3
5
1
10
7

265. 5
10. 8
9. 1
3. 5
7. 0
2. 0
47 . 3
22. 5

1

8
1
6
3
1
2
9
2
7
1

2 .9

.

-

-

1

28. 0
5 6 3 .6
241. 1
41 . 3
67. 0
22. 2
263. 8
158. 0
115. 0
735. 8
2 .9

22
L
51
24
2
10
11
9
16
•
•

1 N o n a d d itiv e .
A n u m b e r o f a g r e e m e n ts p r o v id e d f o r m o r e than 1 typ e o f w a g e a c t io n .
2 E x c lu d e s r a ilr o a d s and a i r l i n e s .
3 S ee te x t fo o tn o te 1.

NOTE: B eca u se of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.




127. 9
77 0. 5
356. 8
62. 5
6. 5
2 4 .9
74. 6
19. 2
1 6 5 .9
-

-

-

17
Table A-4.

Frequency o f Cost-of-Living Review in Major Agreements, by Industry, 1961
(W o r k e r s in th ou sa n d s)
F r e q u e n c y o f r e v ie w
S em ia n n u a lly

Q u a r te r ly

In d u stry

A gree­
m e n ts

W ork ers

A gree­
m e n ts

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------------

205

1, 296. 3

101

M a n u fa c t u r in g --------------------——

185

1. 243. 1

61

O r d n a n ce and a c c e s s o r i e s -------------F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s —--------- T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu r e s — ---------- ----T e x t ile m i l l p r o d u c t s ----------------------A p p a r e l and o t h e r fin is h e d
t e x t ile p r o d u c t s —--------------------------L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) ---------------------- —
F u r n itu r e and f i x t u r e s --------------------P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c t s -- -----------P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , and
a llie d in d u s tr ie s ---------------------------C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p r o d u c t s -----P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m and c o a l ----R u b b e r p r o d u c t s - ------------- -------L e a th e r and le a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------S ton e, c la y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s —
P r i m a r y m e t a l in d u s tr ie s -------------F a b r ic a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ------------M a c h in e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) --------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y ----------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t -------------In s tr u m e n ts and r e la t e d
p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu r in g
in d u s tr ie s —--------—--------------------- -----

10
3
-

48 . 1
7. 1
-

21
-

N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g

------------- —

M in in g , c r u d e p e t r o le u m , and
n a tu ra l g a s p r o d u c t i o n ----------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n 2--------------------------------R a ilr o a d s and a ir lin e s 3— ------------- C o m m u n ic a tio n s — — -------------- ------—
U t ilit ie s : E l e c t r i c and g a s ------------W h o le s a le t r a d e — ------------------------- —
R e ta il t r a d e --------------------------------------H o te ls and r e s ta u r a n ts — -----------—
S e r v ic e s — ----------- —----- ---------- — -----C o n s t r u c t i o n -------------- ------ ----------------M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g
i n d u s t r i e s ------------- ,--------------------------

1
m a d e in
2
3

A n n u a lly

W ork ers

331. 3

A gree­
m e n ts

O th er 1

W ork ers

A gree­
m e n ts

W ork ers

98

8 0 7 .0

4

5 .9

1 8 8 .5

71

5 7 5 .5

3

4 .0

7 4 .5
-

2
-

2. 2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

4. 2
-

1
1
-

4 .0
1. 5
-

1
2
-

1. 2
3 .0
-

-

-

1
7
2
2
11
10
33
26
67

2. 2
17. 1
5 .0
2 .8
1 3 .4
1 6 .4
176. 8
69. 7
856. 7

-

-

-

1. 3
3. 2
64. 1
2 6 .5
12. 5
-

1
2

-

1
2
19
7
8
-

6

19.0

1

1.0

4

4 .9

-

20

53. 2

40

12
-

3 6 .0
-

1
26

-

-

-

1
2
2
3
-

3. 5
4. 2
6.0
3. 5
-

-

2
45
8
5
1
5

3. 5
4 8 7 .4
37. 1
20 . 6
1.0
19. 5

1 4 2 .8

27

2 3 1 .6

1

1 .9

1. 2
8 9 .9

5
8

1 4 .0
189. 6
-

1

1 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
2
1
-

12 . 1
1 4 .0
2.0
-

1
11
1

1. 1
43. 6
7 .0

1. 0
3 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 a g r e e m e n ts s p e c if ie d m o n th ly a d ju s tm e n ts ; a n oth er v a r ie d the fr e q u e n c y o f a d ju s tm e n ts b y the n u m b e r
the p r e v io u s y e a r ; and the r e m a in in g a g r e e m e n t d id n ot in d ic a te fr e q u e n c y o f a d ju s tm e n ts .
E x c lu d e s r a ilr o a d s and a i r l i n e s .
S e e te x t fo o t n o t e 1.

NOTE:

B eca u se o f rounding,




sum s of individual item s m ay not equal tota ls.

18
Table A-5.

Calendar o f Cost-of-Living Adjustment Provisions in Major Agreements, 1961
(W o r k e r s in th o u s a n d s)

M onth o f a d ju s t m e n t 1

N u m b e r w ith
p r o v is io n s

F r e q u e n c y o f r e v ie w
Q u a r te r ly

A gree­
A g ree­
W ork ers
m e n ts
m e n ts

A n n u a lly

S e m ia n n u a lly

M on th ly

A g ree­
A g ree­
A g ree­
W ork ers
W ork ers
W ork ers
m e n ts
m e n ts
m e n ts

T o t a l ___________________________

408

2 ,4 4 0 .5

205

1, 2 9 6 . 3

J a n u a ry ________________________
F e b r u a r y ______________________
M a r c h -----A p r il
M ay ____________________________
J u n e ____________________________
Ju ly ____________________________
A u g u s t _________________________
S e p t e m b e r _____________________
O c t o b e r ________________________
N o v e m b e r -------------------------------D e c e m b e r _____________________

106
63
143
60
45
138
101
60
138
114
44
132

80 2. 9
3 6 8 .4
633. 1
6 5 6 .8
125. 2
592. 1
78 3. 7
200. 3
611. 1
1 ,1 9 4 .0
124. 2
5 9 7 .4

49
33
123
49
33
123
49
33
123
49
33
123

623.
100.
573.
623.
100.
57 3.
623.
100.
57 3.
623.
100.
573.

F r e q u e n c y not s p e c i f i e d 2 ___

2

3. 0

-

-

1
3
0
1
3
0
1
3
0
1
3
0

W ork ers

101

331. 3

98

807. 0

2

2 .9

49
24
10
7
9
2
49
24
10
7
9
2

1 5 4 .8
95. 8
29. 0
26. 0
21. 1
4 .8
154. 8
9 5 .8
29. 0
26. 0
21. 1
4 .8

6
4
8
2
1
11
1
1
3
56
5

22. 2
1 6 9 .5
2 8 .4
4 .9
1. 0
11. 5
3. 0
1 .4
6 .4
54 2. 1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9
2 .9

-

_

16. 8

• -

-

1 R e fe r s to m o n th in w h ic h a d ju stm e n t w a s to b e m a d e , not the m on th o f the C o n s u m e r P r i c e Index on w h ic h
a d ju stm e n t w a s b a s e d .
2 1 a g r e e m e n t v a r ie d the fr e q u e n c y b y the n u m b e r o f a d ju s tm e n ts m a d e in the p r e v io u s y e a r ; the o t h e r d id
n ot s p e c if y the fr e q u e n c y .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u a l t o ta ls .

☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1962 O - 669479