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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. N. DOAK, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

P A
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BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES'!
M
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S /................. l l O e

IV

F O R E IG N L A B O R LAW S SE R IE S

LABOR LEGISLATION
OF VENEZUELA

OCTOBER, 1931

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1931

For sal* by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C.




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Price 10 cents

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This translation of the labor laws of Venezuela was made under
the direction of Ethel Y . Larson, of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.




CONTENTS
Page

Introduction and summary_______________________________________
Text of labor legislation:
Labor law—
Law of July 23, 1928-------------------------- -----------------------------Regulatory decree of August 13, 1928_______________________
Labor bank law—
Law of June 30, 1928_____________________________________
Regulatory decree of March 22, 1930_______________________




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BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
NO. 549

WASHINGTON

October, 1931

LABOR LEGISLATION OP VENEZUELA
Introduction and Summary
This is the third of a series of bulletins to be published by the
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics on labor legislation in the
Latin American countries.
The labor laws of Venezuela have been compiled and translated
from the original texts obtained through the State Department from
the American consul general at Caracas and represent the available
labor laws in force at the time.
Labor Law
On July 23, 1928, Venezuela enacted a labor law dealing with
workmen’s compensation, wages, employment of women and children,
hours of labor; settlement of labor disputes, and employers’ and
workers’ organizations. The law covers all public or private enter­
prises and establishments, irrespective of their nature, which exist
at the present time in the Republic or which may be established in the
future, including mining and industrial enterprises, agricultural and
stock-raising undertakings, and mercantile establishments.
Workmen’s Compensation

Owners of enterprises not expressly exempted are required to pay
the wage earners, salaried employees, and apprentices in their employ
compensation for industrial accidents and occupational diseases aris­
ing out of and in the course of employment, irrespective of any fault
or negligence on the part of the workers, employees, or apprentices.
Although the following are exempt from the provisions of this law
as regards workmen’s compensation, they are to be governed by the
provisions of the general law or of special laws pertaining thereto:
(1) Workers employed in enterprises or establishments having a
daily average of fewer than 25 wage earners, salaried employees,
or apprentices; (2) when there is fraud on the part of the enter­
prise or of the laborers, employees, or apprentices; (3) persons who




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2

LABOR LEGISLATION OF VE N E ZU E LA

perform occasional work distinct from that of the enterprise; (4)
home workers; (5) members of the family of the owner of the
enterprise who work exclusively for him and live under his roof;
(6) emplovees receiving more than 600 bolivares1 a month; (7) sea­
men and fishermen; (8) laborers, employees, or apprentices in agri­
cultural or stock-raising enterprises; (9) laborers engaged in wood­
cutting enterprises or in the extraction of natural forest products;
and (10) workmen, employees, or apprentices employed in enter­
prises the occupational hazards of which are covered by special
legislation.
The compensation scale is based upon the earnings of the injured
employee at the time of the accident. Industrial accidents and occu­
pational diseases are compensable when they cause death or disability
either permanent or temporary.
Death.—When the accident or disease causes death, the employer
must pay to the relatives of the deceased an amount equal to two
years’ wages. In no case, however, may this compensation exceed
15,000 bolivares, regardless of the amount of the wage. In addition
the employer is required to pay the funeral expenses, not to exceed,
however, 300 bolivares.
Pemnanent total disability.—A workman who is permanently and
totally disabled as the result of an industrial accident or occupational
disease is entitled to compensation equivalent to two years’ wages.
This amount shall never exceed 15,000 bolivares regardless of the
amount of the wage.
Permanent 'partial disability.—In cases of permanent partial dis­
ability resulting from an industrial accident or occupational disease
the worker shall be entitled to compensation to be fixed in accordance
with his wages and the loss of earning capacity caused by the acci­
dent. This compensation shall not exceed the amount of one year’s
wages, nor 10,000 bolivares, regardless of the amount of the wage.
Temporary total disability.—For temporary total disability em­
ployers are required to pay the workers their regular wasres during
their disability, provided that it does not last longer than six months.
Temporary partial disability.—In cases of temporary partial dis­
ability the worker shall be entitled to compensation to be fixed in
accordance with his wages, the loss of earning capacity, and the
duration of the disability. The compensation shall not exceed an
amount equivalent to six months’ wages.
Medical and p harmaceutical attention.—In addition to the com­
pensation benefits described above^ employers are required to furnish
medical, surgical, and pharmaceutical attention to workers who suffer
from an occupational disease or an industrial accident. These ex­
penses may not be deducted from the compensation payments.
Wages

The fixing of wages shall be arranged between employers and work­
ers without any interference. Wages shall be paid in legal currency
either daily or weekly at the latest, unless an agreement has been
1 1 bolivar at par=19.3 cents.




INTRODUCTION AND SU M M A R Y

3

made for longer periods. No other form of payment is permitted.
In no ease may wages be paid in places of recreation, taverns,
saloons, or grocery stores.
Employment of Women and Children

No children under 14 years of age shall be allowed to work in
industrial establishments or mining enterprises. The working day of
minors over 14 and under 18 years of age shall not exceed 6 hours
and shall be divided into periods of three hours with an interval of
at least an hour, during which they may leave the place of employ­
ment to eat or to rest.
Women and minors may be employed only between 6 a. m. and 6
p. m. Young persons between 14 and 18 may not be employed in
mines? foundries, or in work in which their lives are endangered or
in which their normal physical development is hindered or retarded.*
Women are prohibited from working underground in mines.
Women and young persons shall not be employed in industries
injurious to their morals or good habits and in no instance in the
retailing of liquors.
Pregnant women shall not be allowed to perform physical work
which requires considerable effort, or which might hinder the normal
development of the unborn child. During the period of lactation
woman employees shall have two additional rest periods of half an
hour each, during which they may nurse their children, but this time
shall not be deducted from their pay.
Hours o f Labor and o f Rest

No wage earner or salaried employee shall work longer than nine
hours a day in the enterprises or establishments subject to this law.
Work which requires longer time shall be performed by employees
or workmen other than those who have worked for nine hours.
Every agreement which provides for a longer workday is void.
These provisions of the law shall not prevent workers who are
employed by the job or by the piece from devoting more than nine
hours daily to the work assigned to them, if they so desire, but they
shall not be required to perform in one day work which normally
requires more than nine hours’ work to complete.
The hours of labor underground in mines shall be governed as
follows: The working day shall not exceed eight hours and shall be
divided into three shifts of 8 hours each, or 4 shifts of 6 hours
each, according to circumstances. The hours for shifts to begin and
stop shall be fixed by the regulations governing mining enterprises.
A sufficient number of miners, foremen, and superintendents shall be
employed in each shift.
No work of
1* 1 1 1 1
1
A
>rmed by the enterprises or
establishments
Sunday, New Year’s Day,
Holy Thursday, Good Friday, the days specified by law as national
holidays, and those which, upon the date this law takes effect, have
been declared holidays by the States or municipalities within their
respective territorial jurisdiction. The Federal Executive shall de­




4

LABOR LEGISLATION OF VEN EZU ELA

termine the industries which shall be exempt from this provision
because of public interest or for technical reasons peculiar to the
industry.
Sanitation, Ventilation, etc.

Owners of enterprises covered by the provisions of this law must
keep their buildings and premises absolutely clean and well venti­
lated and must adopt the measures necessary to prevent accidents
to their employees.
Settlement of Labor Disputes

The governors of the States and of the Federal District or the
Federal Territories shall act as arbitrators to settle differences as
regards working days, maximum length thereof, workmen’s com­
pensation, and wages, provided such disputes are voluntarily sub­
mitted to them by the employers and workers and when a shutdown
of one or more industries is anticipated.
The decision of the arbitrator may be appealed by either of the
parties to the Minister of Interior ^Relations, whose decision shall
be final. I f the parties fail to agree to submit the question to
arbitration, either one has a right to appeal to the courts.
Employers5 and Workers’ Organizations

The Venezuelan labor law provides that organizations of em­
ployers and workers shall not affiliate with foreign organizations
nor shall they send delegates to international congresses without
the previous consent of the Federal Executive. Violation of this
regulation entails the dissolution of the offending association and
the imposition of fines of from 100 to 1,000 bolivares on their direc­
tors. The same penalty will be imposed upon associations spreading
communistic propaganda or upon those which engage in any move­
ment against public order or good conduct.
Labor Bank Law
The original law and its regulatory decree, providing for the
organization of a labor bank in Venezuela, were enacted on June
30, 1928, but a new regulatory decree was issued by the President
of the Republic on March 22, 1930, to supersede the former decree.
The labor bank will operate in connection with the Farmers’ and
Stockmen’s Bank but with a separate capital of 6,000,000 bolivares.
Its head office will be at Maracay, the capital of the State of Aragua.
An administrative board of three members will have charge of all
the bank’s business, the main purpose of the bank being to enable
workers to acquire their own homes.
First-mortgage loans will be made on city property to be used
for homes, the amount of each loan to be not less than 500 nor more
than 15,000 bolivares in Caracas and proportional amounts of prop­
erty values in other places. Loans will bear 5 per cent interest and
have an annual amortization of 3 per cent.
The bank will also erect or buy houses to be sold on easy terms
to workers.



TEXT OF LEGISLATION
LABOR LAW
LAW OF JULY 23, 1928
Chapter 1.—General provisions
Article 1. Labor can freely enter into contracts in Venezuela. No one can
be forcibly required to work against his will. Violation of legal labor con­
tracts or stopping work under certain circumstances gives only the right to
compensation for damages.
Art. 2. Labor must be performed under conditions (1) that permit the work­
er’s normal physical development; (2) that allow him sufficient leisure time for
rest, education, and proper recreation; (3) that afford sufficient protection to
the life and health of the workers against accidents and occupational diseases;
and (4) that protect women and minors against influences inimical to morals
and good habits.
Art. 3. The fundamental rights established in the two preceding articles shall
be exercised in accordance with the terms and conditions established in this
law and in the regulations which the Federal Executive shall issue for that
purpose.
Art. 4. The Federal Executive, through the Ministry of the Interior, is
charged with the enforcement of the legal provisions and regulations concern­
ing labor. In the Ministry of the Interior there shall be created a special
service for all matters relating to labor, or one of the existing services may be
utilized for this purpose.
Special inspection services may also be created to enforce compliance with
the legal provisions and regulations respecting labor, or special agents, with
temporary status, may be appointed for this purpose.
Art. 5. Neither the States nor the municipalities may enact laws, ordinances,
or provisions of any kind respecting labor; and the governors of the States,
the Territories, and the Federal District, the civil heads of districts and mu­
nicipalities, and all the officials of the States and municipalities are required
to comply with the orders which may be transmitted to them by the Federal
Executive through the Ministry of the Interior, and to render whatever services
may be recommended for the better enforcement of the present law.
Art. 6. All enterprises, operations, or establishments of any kind, public or
private, now existing or that may be established in the territory of the Re­
public, such as mining and industrial enterprises, agricultural and stock-raising enterprises, and mercantile establishments are subject to the provisions
of the present law, except such provisions as are herein declared to be
applicable only to certain industries.
Chapter 2.—Legal working days and maximum length of the working day
Art. 7. All days of the year, with the exception of legal holidays, are law­
ful working days. For the purpose of this law the holidays are: Sunday,
New Year’s Day, Holy Thursday, and Good Friday; those specified by law as
national holidays; and all days which, upon the date this law takes effect,
have been declared holidays by the States or municipalities within their respec­
tive territorial jurisdiction.
Art. 8. No work of any kind shall be performed on holidays in the enter­
prises, operations, and establishments covered by this law. There are excepted
from this provision enterprises, operations, or establishments within which, by
reason of the public interest or for technical reasons pertaining to the particu­
lar industry, it may be necessary to continue work during all or part of the
66554°—31------2




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LABOR LEGISLATION OF V E N EZU ELA

holidays, and these shall be determined by the Federal Executive in the regu­
lations under this law or by special orders.
Until the Federal Executive issues such regulations the provisions and
practices now existing shall be applicable.
Art. 9. All hours of the day and night are legal working hours, but no worker
or employee may work longer than nine hours in any one day in the enterprises,
operations, and establishments covered by this law.
Work requiring longer time shall be performed by additional workers or
employees, other than those who work the 9-hour day.
Every agreement which provides for a longer working day shall be null and
void.
The provisions of this article shall not prevent workers employed on piece­
work or by the job from working more than nine hours daily if they so desire,
but they shall not be required to perform in one day work which normally
requires more than nine hours to complete.
Working hours underground in mines shall be regulated by the following
article.
Art. 10. In mines the working hours underground shall not exceed eight.
Underground work in mines shall be divided into three shifts of eight hours
each or into four shifts of six hours each, according to circumstances, and the
hours for shifts to begin and stop shall be fixed by the regulations governing
mining enterprises. A sufficient number of miners, foremen, and superintend­
ents shall be employed on each shift.
A rt. 11. The working hours of women and children shall be governed by the

provisions in chapter 3 of this law pertaining thereto.
Chapter 3.—Woman and child labor
Art. 12. Children under 14 years of age of either sex are absolutely prohib­
ited from working in any industrial or mining enterprise, operation, or estab­
lishment. Other minors under 21 years shall be permitted to perform such
work.
Art. 13. The workday for minors between 14 and 18 years of age shall not
exceed six hours a day, divided into periods of three hours each, and these
periods shall be separated by an interval of not less than one hour, during
which the minors may leave the building or work place to rest or to eat.
Art. 14. The working hours of women and of the minors referred to in the
preceding article shall be between 6 a. m. and 6 p. m.
Art. 15. The employment of persons under 18 years of age, even though
they are over 14 years, is prohibited in mines, in foundries, or in work which
subjects them to risk of life or risk of poisoning, or in any work which is
beyond their strength or which may hinder or retard their normal physical
development.

The employment of women underground in mines is also prohibited.

Art. 16. It is prohibited to employ women and minors on work in enter­

prises that may injure their morals or good habits, and under any circumstances
in shops retailing liquor.
Art. IT. It is prohibited to employ pregnant women in work which, because
it requires considerable physical strength or because of other conditions, may
cause abortion or hinder the normal development of the unborn child.
Art. 18. During the lactation period, women shall be entitled to two daily

rest periods, of half an hour each, in which to nurse their children. This time
shall not be deducted from their wages.
Chapter 4.—Occupational hazards
A rt. 19! Owners of enterprises who are not expressly exempted by the fol­
lowing article shall be required to pay to workers, employees, or apprentices
employed by such enterprises the compensation provided in this chapter for
accidents and occupational diseases arising out of and in the course of the
employment, regardless of any fault (slight or serious) or negligence on the
part of the enterprise, or on the part of the workers, employees, or apprentices.
Art. 20. The following industrial accidents and occupational diseases are

expressly excepted from the provisions of this chapter, but are governed by the
provisions of the general laws or of special laws pertaining thereto: (1) Those
to workers employed in enterprises or establishments having a daily average




T E X T OF LEGISLATION

7

of fewer than 25 wage earners, salaried employees, or apprentices; (2) when
there is fraud on the part of the enterprises or of the workers, employees,
or apprentices; (3) those to persons who perform casual work distinct from
that of the enterprise; (4) to home workers; (5) to members of the family of
the owner of the enterprise who work exclusively for him and live under his
roof; (6) to employees receiving more than 600 bolivares a month; (7) to sea­
men and fishermen; (8) to workers, employees, or apprentices in agricultural
or stock-raising enterprises; the term “ agricultural or stock-raising enter­
prises” includes also all enterprises which engage in the preparation of the
products of agriculture or stock raising for the market, provided such opera­
tions are carried on where such products are raised or by the farmers or stock
raisers in another place; (9) those to workers engaged in woodcutting enter­
prises or in the extraction of natural products of the forest; and (10) to
workers, employees, or apprentices employed in enterprises whose occupational
hazards are covered by special legislation.
Art. 21. The results of accidents or occupational diseases which entitle one
to compensation in accordance with this law are classified thus: (1) Death;
(2) permanent total disability; (3) temporary total disability; (4) perma­
nent partial disability; (5) temporary partial disability.
Physical defects caused by an accident or occupational disease which do not
prevent the worker, employee, or apprentice from performing, with equal effi­
ciency, the same class of work which he was capable of performing before the
accident occurred or the disease was contracted, shall not be considered
disabilities.
Art. 22. In case an accident or disease causes death, the relatives of the
deceased specified in the following article shall be entitled to compensation
equal to two years* wages. This compensation may in no case exceed 15,000
bolivares regardless of the amount of the wage.
Art. 23. The following relatives of the deceased shall be entitled to claim the
compensation referred to in the preceding article: (1) Legitimate children and
illegitimate children whose parentage is lawfully proved, and who are under
18 years of age; (2) unmarried daughters over 18 years of age, either legiti­
mate or illegitimate whose parentage is lawfully proved; (3) sons over 18
years of age who because of permanent physical defects are unable to earn a
living; (4) the widow, until she remarries; and (5) the father and mother,
if they were dependent on the deceased at the time of his death.
None of the persons specified above have a preferential right. In case the
compensation is applied for simultaneously or successively by two or more
of the said persons, the compensation is to be distributed among them equally.
The owner of an enterprise is exempted from all liability by payment of the
compensation to those relatives of the deceased who shall have made their
claim within three months following his death. At the expiration of this
time other relatives of the deceased shall have only a right of action for their
share against the relatives who received the compensation.
Art. 24. The right of action for compensation for industrial accidents or
occupational diseases terminates at the end of one year from the date of the
accident or the beginning of the occupational disease.
Art. 25. If an accident or occupational disease causes permanent total dis­
ability for work, the injured worker shall be entitled to compensation equivalent
to two years’ wages. This compensation shall in no case exceed 15,000 bolivares,
regardless of the amount of the wage.
If an accident or occupational disease causes temporary total disability, the
injured worker shall be entitled to compensation equal to his wages for the
days during which he was incapacitated. This compensation shall in no instance
exceed the wages for six months.
Art. 26. If an accident or occupational disease causes permanent partial dis­
ability, the injured worker shall be entitled to compensation, in the fixing of
which there shall be taken into consideration his wage and the reduction in his
earning capacity due to the accident. In no instance shall this compensation
exceed one year’s wages or the amount of 10,000 bolivares, regardless of the
amount of his wage.
If the disease or accident causes temporary partial disability, the injured
worker shall be entitled to compensation, in the fixing of which there shall be
taken into consideration his wages, his reduced earning capacity due to the
accident, and the duration of the disability. In no instance shall this compensa­
tion exceed his full wages for six months.




8

LABOR LEGISLATION OF V E N EZU ELA

Art. 27. The wage which shall serve as the base in calculating the compen­
sation which must be paid in accordance with the preceding articles shall be
the wage rate which the worker would have been entitled to receive on the day
when the accident occurred or the disease was contracted.
The periods of time fixed in said articles shall be counted by calendar days,
including the holidays provided for in this law.
A r t . 28. A worker who is injured as the result of an industrial accident or
who contracts an occupational disease must, if he is able, notify the owner of
the enterprise, or his local representative or office, or the manager or person in
charge of the work where it occurred, within 24 hours thereafter. If he fails to
do this within the period stipulated, the enterprise will be exempt from liability
as regards medical, surgical, and pharmaceutical attention. In this case, in
fixing the compensation provided for in the preceding articles there shall be
taken into consideration the kind, degree, and duration of the disability had
the medical, surgical, and pharmaceutical attention been promptly given.
Art. 29. The Federal Executive, in regulating this law or by special pro­
visions, shall establish rules for determining the kinds and degrees of disabili­
ties caused by accidents and occupational diseases and the proper compensation,
within the limits provided for in this chapter. Until the said regulations are
issued, experts shall make such decisions in accordance with the rules of
medical science.
Art. 30. Workers who suffer industrial accidents or occupational diseases
shall also be entitled to the medical, surgical, and pharmaceutical attention
which is necessary as a consequence of such accidents or diseases.
In case of death, the owner of the enterprise which is liable is required to
pay the funeral expenses, which shall be according to the station of the
deceased and in conformity with local customs. In no instance shall these
expenses exceed 300 bolivares.
The funeral expenses and the costs of medical, surgical, and pharmaceutical
attention can not be deducted from the compensation which must be paid in
conformity with the preceding articles.
A rt. 31. When enterprises liable for accidents or occupational diseases have
hospitals, clinics, or similar establishments which have been declared by the
Bureau of National Health to be adequate to provide the medical, surgical,
and pharmaceutical attention referred to in the preceding article, said enter­
prises shall have the right to give said attention in their own establishments
and the injured workers may not seek to have such attention rendered
elsewhere.
Art. 32. If workers who have suffered accidents or occupational diseases
refuse repeatedly to submit to the directions, regimen, and treatment pre­
scribed by the attending physicians, the enterprise shall be exempt from
liability as regards the medical, surgical, and pharmaceutical attention.
In this case the compensation provided for in the preceding articles shall
be calculated, taking into account the kind, degree, and duration of the dis­
ability had they complied with such directions, regimen, and treatment.
Art. 33. Diseases not of an occupational origin, but which are contracted
by reason of residence in the places where the work is carried on and which
are endemic in said places, such as malaria, hookworm disease, etc., shall not
entitle those suffering therefrom to compensation, but only to medical, surgical,
and pharmaceutical attention in the hospitals, clinics, or establishments re­
ferred to in article 31, where there are such establishments.
Art. 34. By “ occupational diseases and poisoning” shall be understood those
produced by substances which shall be determined by the Federal Executive
in regulating this law, when they have been contracted by workers, employees,
or apprentices who work in industries in which said substances are manu­
factured or used.
Chapter 5.— Buildings and work places
Art. 35. Buildings and premises of the enterprises, operations, or establish­
ments to which this law refers, shall be kept in a perfect state of cleanliness,
ventilation, and sanitation, in accordance with the regulations of the public
health officers.
Art. 36. The owners of the said enterprises, operations, or establishments in
which machinery or apparatus is operated which may involve danger or
risk of injury, are required to adopt all necessary measures to prevent
accidents to the workers or employees.




TEXT OF LEGISLATION

9

Chapter 6.— Fixing of wages and salaries, and relations between owners or

managers and employees or workers
Art. 37. Wages and salaries shall be freely agreed upon between the owners
or employers and the employees or workers.
The time during which the work is to be performed may also be freely
determined, under the limitation specified in article 1679 of the Civil Code.
Art. 38. When the workers of an enterprise decide to strike, they may not
prevent the enterprise from engaging other workers.
Art. 39. Violence, threats, and other unlawful acts, the object of which is

to interfere with the liberty to work, or to compel a person to stop or to
resume work, shall be punished in accordance with the Penal Code.
Art. 40. Employers or managers may close their factories or establish­
ments, discharging all or part of their employees or workers, in order to
maintain their demands when they can not reach an agreement with their
employees concerning wages, length of the workday, and other conditions of
work, except when such action may have been prohibited by the labor
contracts entered into with the workers.
Art. 41. Governors of the States and of the Federal District or the Federal
territories shall serve as arbitrators in settling differences regarding working
days, maximum length thereof, occupational hazards, and the fixing of wages
and salaries, providing that in each case said questions have been voluntarily
submitted by the owners or managers as well as by the employees or workers,
and that said questions have caused or may cause the closing or the paralyzation of one or several industries.
The decisions of said arbitrators may be appealed by either of the parties to
the Minister of the Interior. The decision of this official shall be final.
If both parties do not agree to submit the question to arbitration, either one
has the right to appeal to the courts.
Art. 42. Associations which employers or workers may form as employers
or workers shall not afliliate with foreign associations or parties, nor shall they
send delegates to them. Neither shall they be represented in international
congresses or boards without the previous consent of the Federal Executive.
Violation of this provision shall result in the dissolution, through administra­
tive proceedings, of the offending association, and fines of from 100 to 1,000
bolivares to the directors thereof who participated in the violation, without
prejudice to the penalties prescribed by article 132 of the Penal Code, when
such are applicable.
The same dissolution proceedings shall take place in the case of an associa­
tion which attempts to spread communistic propaganda, or any other movement
contrary to public order or good conduct, without prejudice to any penalties
they may incur under applicable legal provisions.
Art. 43. Wages shall be paid strictly in cash, daily or not later than once a
week, if longer intervals have not been agreed upon. Payments shall never be
made in places of recreation, taverns, saloons, stores, or retail grocery stores.
Payment of workers with vouchers or in other than legal currency is abso­
lutely forbidden.
Art. 44. Stipulations which directly or indirectly require workers, employees,
or apprentices to work longer hours per day than those permitted in chapter 2,
or which require them to work on holidays in establishments not expressly
exempted, shall be void and without effect. Those which provide for compensa­
tion less than the amounts specified in chapter 4, and in general those which
have the purpose of modifying directly or indirectly the provisions of chapters
2, 3, and 4 of this law, to the prejudice of the workers, employees,' or appren­
tices, are also null and void.
Art. 45. The law of workshops and public establishments of June 26, 1917,
and all other provisions contrary to this law are repealed.
REGULATORY DECREE OF AUGUST 13, 1928
Chapter 1.— Preliminary provisions
A r t i c l e 1. By “ employer” is understood the individual or corporate owner
of the enterprise, operation, or establishment where the work is carried on.
Art. 2. By “ worker ” is understood one who regularly performs manual
work outside of his home for another for remuneration, whether he uses his
hands alone or uses tools, apparatus, or machines. Those who, although not




10

LABOR LEGISLATION OF V E N EZU ELA

actually performing the work, prepare or supervise the work of other work­
men, such as watchmen, foremen, timekeepers, overseers, and similar em­
ployees, are also to be considered workers.
Art. 3. By “ apprentice” is understood one who, though not having the
necessary knowledge, works under the conditions indicated in the preceding
article and acquires such knowledge through the work itself and for this
reason does not receive any remuneration or receives less than that which is
usually paid for the kind of work he performs.
A r t . 4. By “ employee ” is understood one who has charge of the administra­
tion and management of an enterprise, operation, or establishment; one who
assists in such administration and management, such as cashiers, secretaries,
accountants, and similar employees; and also one who, without actually per­
forming the said work himself, supervises or prepares the work of employees.
A rt. 5. By “ wage ” is understood the daily remuneration which workers and
apprentices receive, and by “ salary ” that received by employees, whether said
remuneration is paid by the hour, by the piece, or by the job.
In determining salaries and wages there shall be considered, in addition to
the part received in money, the amount represented by other compensation
which employees and workers receive, such as maintenance, lodging, laundry,
and similar services.
In determining salaries and wages which are paid by the piece or by the job,
there shall be calculated the remuneration for the piecework or jobs which the
worker or employee usually performs in 9 hours of continuous work.
In no instance shall the daily wage be considered as less than 2 bolivares, even
in the case of apprentices who receive no remuneration or workers who receive
less pay.
Chapter 2.—Regulations for determining disabilities and the compensation

therefor
Art. 6. For the purposes of article 25 of the labor law, the following shall be
considered as permanent total disabilities: (1) The total loss of both arms or
both legs, or of Qne arm and one leg, or the loss of the essential parts thereof,
the hand and the foot being considered as essential parts; (2) the total loss
of the right arm above the elbow joint; (3) the total and permanent loss of
movement equivalent to complete mutilation of the extremities indicated in
the two preceding numbers; (4) the loss of both eyes, understanding by this
either the destruction of the organ or the total loss of vision; (5) the loss of
one eye with a diminution by more than one-half of the vision of the other;
(6) incurable mental derangement; (7) organic or functional injury to the
brain, or to the respiratory and circulatory systems, due directly and imme­
diately to the mechanical action of the accident, and which is reported to be
incurable; (8) all injuries similar to those mentioned above which cause similar
disability.
A rt. 7. The permanent partial disabilities specified below shall be compensated
with an amount equivalent to the number of days’ wages fixed for each one, but
in no case may said compensation exceed the maximum number of bolivares

indicated for each disability.
Disability

Loss of left arm above elbow joint___ ___________________
Loss of either forearm up to elbow joint ___________ ___
Loss of a hand— -------------------------------------- ---------- ----------Total loss of a thumb - ------- __ __ ----Total loss of any other finger
------------ -------- -------Total loss of thumb and another finger of the same h an d ____
Total loss of thumb and two other fingers of the same hand___
Total loss of thumb and three other fingers of the same hand_
Total loss of thumb and all other fingers of the same hand___
Total loss of two fingers of the same hand, other than the
thumb —
—
------— ----------------- ------Total loss of three fingers of the same hand, other than the
th u m b -------- ------------------- ----Total loss of four fingers of the same hand, other than the
thumb
-------- — - — ----------------------------Loss of two phalanges of any finger----------------------- -------


Maximum
Days’
amount
wages (bolivares)

300
270
200
100
50
130
150
170
195

8,100
7, 300
5,400
2,700
1,350
3,400
4,000
4, 600
5,300

90

2,500

120

3,300

150
30

4,000
800

TEXT OF LEGISLATION

11
Days*
wages

Disability

Maximum
amount
(bolivares)

Loss of one phalanx of any finger other than the thumb-------- 20
540
Loss of the first phalanx of the thumb-------------------------------- 50
1,350
Loss of one or two phalanges of more than one finger simultan­
eously :
For the first phalanx_________________________________ 20
540
For each of the other phalanges_______________________ 10
270
Complete loss of leg_______________________________________ 250
6, 800
Loss of leg from the ankle to the knee_______________________ 200
5,400
Loss of foot up to the ankle_____________________________ 150
4,100
Loss of any toe of the foot_______________________________ 30
800
Loss of two or more toes of the foot simultaneously:
For the first toe_________________________ ______________ 30
800
For each of the other toes_____________________________ 15
400
Loss of vision in one eye_________________________________ 250
6, 800
Loss of hearing in one ear only___________________________ 60
1, 600
Loss of hearing in both ears_____________________________ 200
5,400
When two or more of* the disabilities specified in this article occur simul­
taneously, the following rules shall apply:
1. If the concurrent disabilities constitute one of the cases specified in article
6, the disability shall be considered permanent total and therefore subject to
the compensation established in article 25 of the labor law.
2. If the concurrent disabilities are not provided for in the preceding rule,
the compensation which must be paid shall be equivalent to the sum of the
compensation fixed for each one of the disabilities which may have occurred,
but the total amount thereof shall not in any case exceed one year’s wages nor
the amount of 10,000 bolivares, regardless of the amount of the wage.
Art. 8. Compensation for disabilities not provided for in the schedule in the
preceding article shall be determined by experts in conformity with the pro­
visions of the labor law and this regulation and the rules of medical science.
C h a p te r

3.—Occupational diseases

Art. 9. The following shall be considered occupational diseases and poison­
ings, provided they have been contracted by employees, workers, or apprentices,
who, at the time of contracting the disease or within the six months prior
thereto, had worked in the industries which are specified for each disease:

(1) Anthrax contracted in industries which use wool, hair, bristles, hides,
and skins.
(2) Poisoning by (a) lead; (&) mercury; (c) phosphorus; (d) arsenic; (e)
wood alcohol; ( f ) nitro and amido derivatives of benzene, such as dinitrobenzol,
anilin, and others; (g ) nitrous fumes; (h) tetrachlormethane or any other
substance used as or in conjunction with a solvent for acetate of cellulose, and
also the sequelae of these poisons, contracted in industries which produce or use
such substances or their derivatives.
(3) Chrome ulceration and its sequelae, contracted in industries which pro­
duce or use chromic acid, bichromate of ammonium, potassium, or sodium, or
their preparations or derivatives.
(4) Dermatitis contracted by working with woods such as jabillo and others.
(5) Epitheliomatous cancer and ulceration of the skin or of the cornea of the
eye, contracted in industries which produce, extract, or use pitch, tar, asphalt,
mineral oil, petroleum, paraffin, and all other compounds, products, or residue
of any of said substances.
(6) Glanders, contracted in industries which involve the care or use of
equine animals or of the carcasses or offal thereof.
(7) Cataracts of glass workers, contracted in the manufacture of glass and
all other industries which involve exposure to the glare of molten glass.
(8) Compressed-air illness, in industries which use compressed air.
(9) Miners’ diseases, such as (a) miner’s nystagmus; (&) subcutaneous cellu­
litis of the hand; (c) subcutaneous cellulitis of the knee; (d) acute inflam­
mation of the membrane of the elbow; and (e) synovitis of the wrist joint.




12

LABOR LEGISLATION" OF VEN E ZU E LA

LABOR BANK LAW
LAW OF JUNE 30, 1928
Article 1. A Labor Bank is hereby established with the object of assisting
needy workers in the purchase of inexpensive and sanitary homes.
The bank shall have its headquarters in the city of Maracay, with branches
in the places designated in the regulation.
Art. 2. Native Venezuelan workers who live by their own work as artisans,
and who because of their qualifications, knowledge, and experience may be
classed as skilled in their trades, shall be entitled to the benefits granted by
this law. Furthermore they must be of good character and must not possess
a house or sufficient means to buy one.
Art. 3. The bank shall have legal personality and its own capital separate
from that of the National Treasury, and its income and expenses shall not be
included in the national budget. It shall be administered by officers whose
number and duties shall be determined by the regulation as to the bank and
who shall be appointed by the Federal Executive. The bank may also act as
an auxiliary of the Farmers’ and Stockmen’s Bank if the Federal Executive
deems it desirable.
Art. 4. The life of the bank shall be 30 years, which may be extended by a
special law to that effect passed at the expiration of such time.
Art. 5. The capital of the bank shall be 6,000,000 bolivares, which shall be
contributed by the nation, the latter to receive interest thereon at the rate of
2y2 per cent per annum, paid semiannually.
This capital may be increased by further grants from the nation, as author­
ized by the budget law. The new grants shall bear the same interest.
The Venezuelan nation shall have preference over any other creditor of th^
bank as regards the houses and the mortgage loans thereon to which article 6
refers; and when the total capital of the bank is not invested in said mort­
gages and houses, it shall have the same rights over its other property, claims,
and stocks.
Art. 6. The Labor Bank may invest the capital it receives from the nation
only in the following objects:
1. In loans to needy workers for the sole purpose of buying urban dwellings,
secured by special first mortgages on said houses.

2. In the construction and purchase of urban dwellings to be sold to needy
workers on the installment plan, the unpaid balance being secured by a special
first mortgage on the said house.
Art. 7. The bank may not issue bank notes nor bearer notes nor any other
certificates of indebtedness.
Art. 8. The nation may object to any attachment on property of the bank,
even though such property be other than the houses or mortgages referred to
in article 6, if all the capital contributed by the nation should not be invested
in houses and loans.
Art. 9. Loans made by the bank in accordance with paragraph 1 of article

6 and the part of the price still owing and payable in installments, to which
paragraph 2 of said article refers, shall be redeemable through fixed payments
made monthly, every three months, every six months, or at other periods.
These payments shall include the interest due and an amount for the amortiza­
tion of the capital. The debtor shall pay interest only on the balance of the
capital or price that he owes in each period, and that part of the fixed amount
representing the reduction of the interest shall increase the amount applied to
the amortization of the capital.
Art. 10. The Federal Executive is empowered to establish in the regulation
to which article 17 refers the rules by which, taking market conditions into
consideration, shall be determined the amount of interest that is to be paid on
the sums loaned and on the balance of the sales price in case of installment
sales. This interest, however, shall never be more than 5 per cent per annum
and the amount for the amortization can not be more than 3 per cent per
annum of the original amount of the loan or the original balance on the price.
The interested party may, however, make larger amortization payments when
he so desires.
Art. 11. The Federal Executive shall likewise regulate everything concerning
the security which the workers requesting loans must give. Such loans, which
shall not be granted more than once to any worker, shall never exceed 15,000




TEXT OF LEGISLATION

13

bolivares when it is for the purchase of a house in Caracas. As regards the
other towns of the Republic, the Federal Executive shall fix the proper pro­
portion for the loans in accordance with urban property values in each locality.
The same conditions shall be observed when the bank acquires or builds houses
for sale on the installment plan to workers, but in such cases the value of the
lot shall be considered as part of the amount to which the worker has a right
under this law.
Art. 12. The bank shall always hear requests for a loan or purchase, and
grant them when it has the funds and the houses asked for are available,
provided all the requirements of this law and its regulation are met. The
right of workers who are married or widowed and have minor children under
their care to preference over married workers without children shall be
recognized. The latter shall have preference over unmarried workers.
Art. 13. A worker who obtains a house on the installment plan or the money
to purchase it may not encumber the property with a second mortgage nor
lawfully transfer his rights to another person until he has settled his account
with the Labor Bank, unless the assignee likewise meets the requirements
of this law.
Art* 14. The Federal Executive may direct that the Labor Bank shall have
a savings department for workers; and the sums deposited shall draw interest
from the time of deposit at the same rate as that set by the bank for its loans.
The Federal Executive is also empowered to establish, when he deems it
opportune and in the manner he believes most suitable, an insurance fund on
behalf of the workers and an old-age retirement fund.
Art. 15. The bank shall make semiannually a balance sheet of its opera­
tions in order to determine the net profits, after subtracting the general ex­
penses, including costs of administration and interest on the capital contributed
by the nation. The said profits shall be invested in the folio wing- manner:
One-half to form a reserve fund, and the remaining one-half for the operations
permitted by article 6.
Art. 16. In case of liquidation of the bank, its obligations shall be paid in
the following order: 1. The capital contributed by the nation, plus interest;
2. All other obligations incurred, in the order established by law.
Art. 17. The Federal Executive shall regulate the present law.
REGULATORY DECREE OF MARCH 22, 1930
Chapter 1.— Officers

1. The Labor Bank shall operate as an auxiliary of the Farmers* and
Stockmen’s Bank, but its capital shall be kept separate from the capital of that
bank and shall be invested solely in the operations permitted by article 6 of
the labor bank law.
The direction and administration of the institution shall be in charge o f :
1. An administrative board consisting of a managing director, an assistant
director and treasurer, and a corresponding secretary.
The duties of the managing director and of the corresponding secretary shall
be performed by the persons who occupy such positions on the administrative
board of the Farmers* and Stockmen’s Bank. The duties of the assistant man­
ager and treasurer shall be performed by another person than the one filling
such position in the Farmers* and Stockmen’s Bank. This official shall be
concerned only with the business of the Labor Bank.
2. The personnel of the bank shall include also the following officials:
(a) A legal adviser. This position shall be filled by the person holding such
position in the Farmers’ and Stockmen’s Bank.
(b) A manager.
(c) By the following subordinate employees: A bookkeeper; a clerk.
These positions shall be filled by persons other than those doing similar work
in the Farmers’ and Stockmen’s Bank. Those filling them shall be concerned
only with the business of the Labor Bank.
The assistant director and treasurer and the manager shall be freely ap­
pointed and removed by the Federal Executive. The other subordinate em­
ployees shall be proposed by the administrative board to the Department of
Public Works (Ministerio de Fomento) who, if it approves the selection made,
shall authorize the appointment of the proposed employee.
A r t ic l e




14

LABOR LEGISLATION' OP V E N EZU ELA

The Federal Executive shall create any new positions which may be necessary
or abolish any of the existing ones when he deems it expedient, and shall fix
the remuneration of the assistant director and treasurer, of the manager, and
of the other employees of the bank.
Art. 2. The bank, with the approval of the Department of Public Works,
shall also have one or several lawyers for examining the titles to the real
estate offered as security and the expert appraisers deemed necessary by the
administrative board for appraising the said property.
These employees shall not receive salaries, but shall be paid special fees for
each piece of work intrusted to them, such fees to be paid to the bank by the
applicants for the loans.
Section 1.—Administrative board
A rt. 3. The administrative board shall manage the business of the bank, ana
shall have authority for all acts which may be required in its administration
and ordinary management, and especially the following duties:
(a) To direct and supervise the course of the bank’s business.
(&) To decide on all acts, contracts, and business the bank may execute in
accordance with the law and this regulation, and order them carried out
through the director or other members of the board whom it may designate.
(c) To audit and approve or disapprove all balance sheets and accounts of
the bank.
(d) To propose to the Department of Public Works the appointment and re­
moval of the subordinate employees referred to in article 1 and the lawyers,
appraisers, and inspectors mentioned in article 2.
A r t . 4. The administrative board shall meet each week, its entire member­
ship to be present. Its decisions shall be by agreement of at least two members.
The deliberations and resolutions of the board must be recorded in the minutes
and signed by all the members.
Art. 5. The board must present to the Department of Public Works:
1. A monthly report of all the operations of the bank.
2. A general semiannual balance sheet of the business of the bank, together
with the determination and distribution of the profits.

3. Annually, a detailed report of the condition of the bank, indicating the
changes or improvements which in its judgment should be made.
This balance sheet shall contain the assets, including the inventory, and
the liabilities for the preceding year; and shall clearly indicate the capital
actually on hand, showing the exact profits made and losses experienced and
fixing the actual or presumed value of the different items. Uncollectible credits
shall not be included in this balance sheet.
Art. 6. The managing director shall execute the decisions of the administra­
tive board in each case, and for this purpose he is empowered:

(a) To execute in the name of the bank all acts, contracts, and business
approved by the administrative board, to act and sign for the bank, and to repre­
sent it and bind it in all acts and documents to which the bank is a party or
which are executed on its behalf, by virtue of any of the said transactions and
to receive all the securities which must be delivered to the bank by reason
thereof.
(b) To act, without restrictions of any kind, as full legal representative of
the bank, both judicially and extrajudicially, before any court, magistrate,
officials, or authorities, with unlimited powers to act as arbitrator in legal
or other cases; to agree, disagree, and compromise in the name of the bank
both in and out of court; to initiate and prosecute all suits, proceedings, and
appeals, either as plaintiff or defendant, all trials and proceedings, whether
civil and commercial, criminal or administrative, in which the bank is interested.
(c) To appoint special or general attorneys, giving them all or some of the
powers granted to him, and to revoke powers granted in the name of the bank.
A r t . 7. The managing director shall also have the following duties:
1. To preside over the meetings of the administrative board.
2. To oversee all the services of the bank.
3. To make any observations and suggestions which he deems proper for the
better progress, administration, and prosperity of the institution and to have
carried out the measures he may deem conducive to this end.
4. To report the correspondence received by the institution and that issued
by it.




TEXT OP LEGISLATION

15

Art. 8. The duties of the assistant manager and treasurer are:
(a) To substitute for the managing director or the corresponding secretary
when he is temporarily absent.
(&) To take care of, personally or through subordinate employees, the bank’s
money and securities, receive money, and make payments or investments in
accordance with the decisions of the administrative board, without prejudice
to the right of the managing director to receive cash or securities belonging
to the bank on executing contracts relating thereto.
(c) To sign, receive, ana indorse checks and bills of exchange in the name
of the bank.
(d) To inspect the accounts of the bank and give the manager the necessary
instructions for properly keeping such accounts.
(e) To present to the administrative board on the last day of each month
a detailed statement of the existing securities.
(f ) To keep track carefully of the status of the maturity of the obligations
contracted in favor of the institution, to see that they are collected promptly,
and to report to the administrative board when debtors are delinquent.
(g) To prepare or have prepared and to sign the correspondence of the bank
relating to the activities of the fund.
Art. 9. The duties of the corresponding secretary are:

(a) To receive from the manager the report of all matters which are to
be decided by the administrative board, to study them, and to present them to
the board with any pertinent information.
(&) To have carried out, through the manager, any work the administrative
board may order.
(c) To prepare personally or through subordinate employees and to sign
the correspondence sent out by the bank, with the exception of that specified
in letter {g) of the preceding article.
(d) To receive the correspondence of the bank, acquainting himself there­
with and showing it to the managing director and the assistant director and
treasurer, and routing it through the proper channels.
(e) To see that all the subordinate employees perform their duties efficiently
and to report to the administrative board any irregularities that occur.
Section 2.—Legal adviser
Art. 10. The duties of the legal adviser are:

(а) To act as legal representative of the bank, with the powers indicated by
the managing director in the special or general power of attorney conferred
upon him.
(б) To submit in writing to the administrative board legal advice on matters
submitted to him.
(c) To pass upon the validity and sufficiency of the titles to real estate which
is offered to the bank as security and of other documents which, according to
the case, must accompany the applications without prejudice to the right of
the administrative board to appoint lawyers other than those referred to in
article 2 to render such opinion when the legal adviser has an excess of work
in his office.
When the opinion is rendered by the legal adviser, he shall not receive special
remuneration for this service.
Section 8.—Manager
Art. 11. The manager of the Labor Bank shall perform the following duties:

(a)
Prepare a draft of the report and the information on each matter which
the corresponding secretary has to submit to the administrative board. The
reports must be presented in writing and contain all the data that may help
to'enlighten the judgment of the board, without prejudice to the oral explana­
tions that must be given when requested by the latter.
(&) Prepare drafts of the correspondence to be sent out by the bank and
submit them to the corresponding secretary for his approval and signature.
(e)
Distribute the work to the subordinate employees, see that each one
performs his duties, report on their conduct to the administrative board, and
request their discharge when necessary.
(d) Keep the books of the bank personally or through the employees under
his direction, carrying out the instructions given him by the assistant manager
and treasurer.



16

LABOR LEGISLATION OF V E N EZU ELA

(e)
Draw up drafts of the general balance sheets of the business of the bank,
and plans for determination and distribution of the profits which the adminis­
trative board must submit to the Department of Public Works.
Section

—Subordinate employees

A r t . 12. The subordinate employees shall perform the work given them by
the manager and comply with the orders of the members of the administrative
board, given to them either directly or through the manager.

Section 5.—Expert appraisers
13. The expert appraisers shall have the following duties:
{a) To visit the property offered to the bank as security, and to verify
personally the correctness or incorrectness of each and every item of the
data which should be contained in the application for a loan.
(b) To make a detailed report to the administrative board upon the result
of the inspection referred to in the preceding paragraph.
(c) To inform the administrative board as to the value, in their opinion,
of the property which is offered as security, explaining the grounds on which
they base said valuation.
Experts who fail to make the personal inspection referred to in paragraph
(a) of this article and those who give the administrative board false informa­
tion on the points to which paragraph (b) refers shall be subject to the penal­
ties provided in the Penal Code.
A rt.

C h a p te r

2.—Operations of the bank

A r t . 14. In accordance with the provisions of the labor bank law the opera­
tions which this bank may carry on are:
1. Loans to needy workers for the sole purpose of buying urban dwellings
and which shall be secured by special first mortgages on such houses.
2. Construction and purchase of urban dwellings to be sold in the manner
specified in the following paragraph.
3. Sale on the installment plan of dwellings to needy workers, the unpaid
balance of the purchase price being covered by a special first mortgage on the
said house.

Section 1.—Special rules on amortizable mortgage loam
A r t . 15. The conditions under which these loans shall be made are as
follows:
(a) The bank shall not make a loan for less than 500 bolivares nor for more
than 15,000 bolivares if it is for the purchase of houses in Caracas. The
administrative board of the bank, taking into account the different values of
urban property in the other cities of the Republic, shall draw up a table of
the proportional amounts which shall serve as the maximum for the princi­
pal of the loan or for the price of houses in each locality. The said table,
upon approval by the Department of Public Works, shall be published in the
Gaceta Oficial of the United States of Venezuela.
(b) The loans shall be amortizable by means of fixed periodical payments.
These payments shall include the interest and an amount for the amortization
of the capital. The borrower shall pay interest only on the balance owing in
each period, and that part of the fixed payment representing the reduction of
the interest shall be added to the amount applied to the amortization of the
capital. These payments shall be made monthly.
(c ) The rate of interest shall be 5 per cent per annum and the amount for
amortization shall be 3 per cent per annum of the original principal of. the
loan. The Federal Executive can fix, by special decree, the rate of interest
and the amount for amortization at less than those specified.
The borrowers may make total or partial payments on the capital within the
time stipulated, if they so desire. In cases of payment in full the borrowers
shall not be required to pay any sum for unearned interest.
(d) In the contracts it shall be stipulated expressly that on failure to pay
six consecutive payments which are due, the bank shall have the right to con­
sider all the others due and to proceed by judicial process to collect the bal­




TEX T OF LEGISLATION

17

ance of the capital due and the interest up to that date. This shall be
without prejudice to the right of the bank to proceed by judicial process to
collect any payment due, even though it be only one.
( e ) The bank shall have the right to visit and inspect the property to make
sure that the borrowers live therein.
(f) The persons who can obtain the loans referred to in this section shall
be limited to those to whom article 2 of the labor bank law refers, and mar­
ried or widowed workers with children in their care shall have preference over
married workers without children and the latter over unmarried workers.
Art. 16. The procedure for the granting of loans of this class shall be as
follows:
( a)
The interested party must present to the bank an application for the
loan. This application shall contain:
Personal information about the petitioner, such as his full name, age, ad­
dress, and occupation, and the circumstances which entitle him to be included
among the persons who may obtain loans in accordance with article 2 of the
labor bank law.
The amount of the loan he desires.
A description of the property which is to serve as security.
This description shall contain the following data:
1. The city where the property is located, specifying the municipality, dis­
trict, and State in which it is located, or the parish and department if it is
located in the Federal District; the lot number of the real estate, the street
where it is located, giving its official name, and the names of the street cor­
ners ; and the boundaries of the property on the four sides.
2. A statement as to whether the foundation of the house is suitable, the total
area of the house, and all details of its size and construction.
(&)
The following documents must be attached to the application to which
paragraph (a) refers:
1. Documents which prove the circumstances referred to in paragraph (f) of
article 15 of this regulation.
2. A plat of the property, if any exists.
3. A certificate by the assistant recorder of the district where the property
is located, listing the encumbrances placed on the property during the past 10
years and specifying those which have been canceled and those still in force,
even if they were earlier, and also whether there is any prohibition in force
against its transfer or encumbrance.
4. A document sufficient to prove that the owner of the property to be
purchased by the petitioner is satisfied with the offers and the stipulations
contained in the application, especially that which refers to the security for
the loan.
(c) The application and the required papers having been presented, the
administrative board shall fix the amount the petitioner should deposit for the
expense of examining the titles and documents and of appraising the property.
(d) The amount referred to in the preceding paragraph having been fixed,
the application and accompanying documents shall be given to the bank’s
lawyer in order that he may report on the sufficiency and validity of the
titles and documents presented.
(e ) If the lawyer named reports that the titles and documents are insuffi­
cient or have defects which can be corrected, a copy of the report shall be
given to the applicant so that he may perfect the titles or correct the defects.
If the defects can not be corrected the application shall be denied; but if
the applicant requests it, the administrative board shall submit the titles and
documents to the attorney general of the nation and to the legal adviser of the
Department of Public Works who, together or individually, shall render a
decision which shall be considered final. In case there is a difference of
opinion the majority shall decide. The attorney general and the legal adviser
shall not receive any fees for their services.
( f ) If the lawyer or lawyers report that the titles are valid and sufficient
and that the applicant meets the conditions required by the law, or if those
originally presented have been perfected and corrected, the administrative
board shall appoint one of the expert appraisers of the bank to go to the
property and verify personally the correctness or incorrectness of the data in
the application, render a report on the result of this inspection, and submit a
detailed statement of the price he believes the property to be worth.
The administrative board may reject the statement and order a new appraisal
to be made, to be paid for by the interested party if it is made at his request



18

LABOR LEGISLATION” OF ’VENEZUELA

(g) After considering the report referred to in the preceding paragraph, the
administrative board, in view of the application, the accompanying documents,
and the reports of the lawyer or lawyers, the expert appraiser, and the corre­
sponding secretary, shall decide whether or not the loan should be made.
(h) If the board decides that the loan should be granted, the necessary
documents shall be given to the bank’s legal adviser so that he may draw up
the particular instrument with all the conditions and forms required, and with
the certainty necessary to make effective the security of the mortgage on the
property to be purchased with the loan, in accordance with article 6 of the
labor bank law.
(i) The instrument shall be executed on the part of the bank by the manag­
ing director, the latter complying with all the necessary formalities and
requirements for its registration.
Section 2.—Construction and purchase of urban houses
Art. 17. When the administrative board deems the construction and purchase
of new houses, to be sold in the manner indicated in section 3 of this chapter,
proper, it shall notify the Federal Executive who shall regulate this operation
of the bank.

Section S.—Sale of dwelling houses on installment plan toith mortgage security
for balance due
Art. 18. The conditions of these sales shall be as follows:

(a) The bank may not sell any person more than one house, even though
the price be less than 15,000 bolivares.
(b) The sales shall be on the installment plan and the purchaser must pay
in cash, at the time the instrument therefor is executed, an amount equal to
the monthly payment referred to in the following paragraph.
(c) The part of the cost that the purchaser still owes shall be amortizable by
means of fixed monthly payments, under the conditions specified in paragraph
(b) of article 15.
(d) The interest and the amount for amortization shall be as specified in
paragraph (c) of article 15 and the debtors shall have the right to make the
payments in advance, as specified in said paragraph.
(e) Contracts shall expressly stipulate that on failure to pay six consecutive
payments the bank shall have the right specified in paragraph (d) of article 15.
(f) The balance of the cost shall be secured by a special first mortgage on
the property sold.
(g) The right to buy the houses referred to in this section is limited to those
persons specified in article 2 of the labor bank law.
Art. 19. The procedure for these sales shall be as follows:
(a) A person who desires to buy one of the houses from the bank shall present
an application which must state:
1. His full name, age, civil status, address, and the circumstances which
prove that the applicant is included among the persons who may purchase
houses from the bank in accordance with article 2 of the bank law.
2. The exact address of the house he wishes to buy, designating it by its
house number, the street, using its official name, the names of the street
corners, and the boundaries on all four sides.
(b) To the application must be attached the proof of the conditions referred
to in paragraph 1 of the preceding section.
(c ) The documents referred to in the preceding paragraph shall be trans­
mitted to the legal adviser of the bank so that he may report if they substantiate
sufficiently the circumstances of which they treat. The administrative board,
moreover, shall order such investigations as it believes necessary to be made by
the employees of the bank.
(d) It having been proved to the satisfaction of the administrative board that
the applicant is included in the class of persons who may purchase houses
from the bank, it shall proceed to execute the sales contract with the formalities
and conditions specified in the preceding article.
C hapter

3.— Bookkeeping, balance sheets, and reserve fund

Art. 20. From the first day of next July [1930] the books of the bank shall
be kept in accordance with the provisions of the organic law of the National




TEXT OF LEGISLATION*

19

Treasury and with the regulations, instructions, and standards prescribed by
the General Secretary of the Treasury for this purpose with the approval of the
Federal Executive.
Up to said date the books of the bank shall continue to be kept in accordance
with the Commercial Code.
Documents which because of their nature must be kept in the bank and which
are sent to the examiners* division (sala de examen) shall be returned by the
latter within the period of 30 days.
Art. 21. On the 30th of June of each year, a general balance sheet of all the
operations of the bank shall be made and also a summary of the situation as
to assets and liabilities during the past six months, and on the 31st of December
of each year a balance sheet, an inventory, and a summary statement of the
situation as to assets and liabilities of the bank during the past year shall be
made.
Art. 22. Fifty per cent of the net profits shall be set aside each year to form
a reserve fund to cover any losses that may be disclosed by the general balance
sheets and to cover the obligations of the bank.
Art. 23. The reserve fund may be invested only in loans secured by first
mortgages on urban buildings whose value is at least twice that of the loan,
plus interest for the entire term and collection expenses, conservatively esti­
mated. The buildings on which these loans are made must be located in
Caracas, or in one of the capitals of the States of the Union.
C h a p te r

4.—Complementary provisions

Art. 24. There must not exist among the members of the administrative board,
the manager, the consulting attorneys, or the appraisers any blood relationship
in a direct line, nor in a collateral line up to the fourth degree inclusive, nor
relationship by marriage in a direct line, nor in a collateral line up to the
second degree, inclusive.
Art. 25. The members of the administrative board and the manager may not
legally conclude any kind of contract with the institution.

Art. 26. The members of the administrative board shall be considered, in
accordance with article 68 of the organic law of the National Treasury, as
employees of the Treasury and shall be subject to the requirements of the
said law as regards the bonds which they must give and as regards their
responsibility.
Art. 27. The Department of Public Works shall, whenever it deems necessary,
send a person whom it may designate therefor to examine and check the books
of accounts and other documents of the bank.
Art. 28. The Labor Bank shall have whatever branches the Federal Executive,
when he deems it desirable, may specify.
A r t . 29. The regulation of the labor bank law of June 30, 1928, is hereby
repealed.







LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
The following is a list of all bulletins of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, published since
July, 1912, except that in the case of bulletins giving the results of periodic surveys of the
bureau only the latest bulletin on any one subject is here listed.
A complete list of the reports and bulletins issued prior to July, 1912, as well as the bulle­
tins published since that date, wHl be furnished on application. Bulletins marked thus (*)
are out of print.
Conciliation and arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).
♦No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York.
[1913.]
♦No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade on its
inquiry into industrial agreements. £1913.]
No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
♦No. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City.
[1914.]
♦No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry
of New York City. [1914.]
♦No, 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite-coal industry. [1916.]
♦No. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry. [1916.]
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
No. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
No. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287. National War Labor B oard: History of its formation, activities, etc.
[1921.]
♦No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement o f railway labor disputes. [1922.]
No. 341. Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of New York City. [1923.]
No. 402. Collective bargaining by actors. [1920.]
No. 468. Trade agreements, 1927.
No. 481. Joint industrial control in the book and job printing industry. [1928.]
Cooperation.
No. 313. Consumers* cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies (credit unions) in America and in foreign
countries. [1922.]
No. 437. Cooperative movement in the United States in 1925 (other than agri­
cultural.)
♦No. 531. Consumers’, credit, and productive cooperative societies, 1929.
Employment and unemployment.
♦No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices in the
United States. [1913.]
♦No. 172. Unemployment in New York City, N. Y. [1915.]
♦No. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment indus­
tries. [1915.]
•No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
♦No. 196. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis,
Minn., January 19 and 20, 1916.
♦No. 202. Proceedings of the conference of Employment Managers’ Association of
Boston, Mass., held May 10, 1916.
♦No. 206. The British system of labor exchanges. [1916.]
♦No. 227. Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa.,
April 2 and 3, 1917.
♦No. 235. Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
•No. 241. Public employment offices in the United States. [1918.]
♦No. 247. Proceedings o f Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y., May
9-11, 1918.
•No. 310. Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes.
[1922.]
No. 409. Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.
No. 520. Social and economic character of unemployment in Philadelphia, April,
1929.




(I)

Employment and unemployment— Continued.
No. 542. Report of the Advisory Committee on Employment Statistics. [1930.]
No. 544. Unemployment-benefit plans in the United States and unemployment
insurance in foreign countries.
Foreign labor laws.
•No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European
countries. [1914.]
No. 494. Labor legislation of Uruguay. [1929.]
No. 510. Labor legislation of Argentina. [1930.]
No. 529. Workmen’s compensation legislation of Latin American countries. [1930.]
Housing.
♦No. 158. Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign
countries. [1914.]
No. 263. Housing by employers in the United States. [1920.]
No. 295. Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
No. 545. Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in [1921 to]
1930.
Industrial accidents and hygiene.
♦No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary
ware factories. [1912.]
No. 120. Hygiene of painters’ trade. [1913.]
♦No. 127. Danger to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods of protection.
[1913.]
♦No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead. [1914.]
♦No. 157. Industrial accident statistics. [1915.]
♦No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914.]
♦No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
No. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use cf
lead in the painting of buildings. [1916.]
♦No. 201. Report of the committee on statistics and compensation insurance costs of
the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions. [1916.]
♦No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.]
♦No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives.
[1917.]
No. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
No. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts).
[1918.]
♦No. 234. The safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
No. 236. Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
♦No. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health, o f Muni­
tions Workers’ Committee. [1919.]
♦No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
No. 276. Standardization of industrial accident statistics. [1920.]
♦No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates.
[1921.]
•No. 291. Carbon monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
No. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
No. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 19101919.
No. 306. Occupation hazards and diagnostic signs: A guide to impairments to bo
looked for in hazardous occupations. [1922.]
No. 392. Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]
No. 405. Phosphorus necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and in the prepara­
tion of phosphorus. [1926.]
No. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
No. 428. Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at
Washington, D. C., July 14-16, 1926.
No. 460. A new test for industrial lead poisoning. [1928.]
No. 466. Settlement for accidents to American seamen. [1928.]
No. 488. Deaths from lead poisoning, 1925-1927.
No. 490. Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States to the end of 1927.
No. 507. Causes of death, by occupation. [1929.]




(II)

Industrial relations and labor conditions.
No. 237. Industrial unrest in Great Britain. [1917.]
No. 340. Chinese migrations, with special reference to labor conditions. [1923.]
No. 349. Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.]
No. 861. Labor relations in the Fairmont (W. Ya.) bituminous coal field. [1924.]
No. 380. Postwar labor conditions in Germany. [1925.]
No. 383. Works council movement in Germany. [1925.]
No. 384. Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920-1924.
No. 399. Labor relations in the lace and lace-curtain industries in the United
States. [1925.]
No. 534. Labor conditions in the Territory of Hawaii, 1929-1930.
Labor laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to labor).
No. 211. Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. [1917.]
No. 229. Wage payment legislation in the United States. [1917.]
No. 285. Minimum wage laws of the United States: Construction and operation
[1921.]
No. 321. Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
No. 322. Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
No. 343. Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]
No. 370. Labor laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating thereto.
[1925.]
No. 408. Laws relating to payment of wages. [1926.]
No. 528. Labor legislation, 1929.
No. 548. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1929-1930.
Proceedings of annual conventions of the Association of Governmental Officials in Industry
of the United States and Canada. (Name changed in 1928 from Association of Governmental
Labor Officials of the United States and Canada.)
♦No. 266. Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920.
No. 307. Eighth, New Orleans, La., May 2-6, 1921.
♦No. 323. Ninth, Harrisburg, Pa., May 22-26, 1922.
♦No. 352. Tenth, Richmond, Va., May 1-4, 1923.
♦No. 389. Eleventh, Chicago, 111., M’ay 19-23, 1924.
♦No. 411. Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925.
♦No. 429. Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926.
♦No. 455. Fourteenth, Paterson, N. J., May 31 to June 3, 1927.
♦No. 480. Fifteenth, New Orleans, La., May 21-24, 1928.
No. 508. Sixteenth, Toronto, Canada, June 4-7, 1929.
No. 530. Seventeenth, Louisville, Ky., May 20-23, 1930.
Proceedings of annual meetings of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions.
No. 210. Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916.
No. 248. Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25, 1917.
No. 264. Fifth, Madison, Wis., September 24-27, 1918.
♦No. 273. Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 1919.
No. 281. Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920.
No. 304. Eighth, Chicago, 111., September 19-23, 1921.
No. 333. Ninth, Baltimore, Md., October 9-13, 1922.
♦No. 359. Tenth, St. Paul, Minn., September. 24-26, 1923.
No. 385. Eleventh, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924.
No. 395. Index to proceedings, 1914-1924.
No. 406. Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 17-20, 1925.
No. 432. Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.
♦No. 456. Fourteenth, Atlanta, Ga., September 27-29, 1927.
No. 485. B'ifteenth, Paterson, N. J., September 11-14, 1928.
No. 511. Sixteenth, Buffalo, N. Y., October 8-11, 1929.
No. 536. Seventeenth, Wilmington, Del., September 22-26, 1930.
Proceedings of annual meetings of the International Association of Public Employment Services*
No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20, 1913; second, Indianapolis, Sep­
tember 24 and 25, 1914; third, Detroit, July 1 and 2, 1915.
♦No. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N. Y., July 20 and 21, 1916.
No. 311. Ninth, Buffalo, N. Y., September 7-9, 1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D. C., September 11-13, 1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto, Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924.
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N. Y., September 15-17, 1925.




(m )

Proceeding's of annual meetings of the International Association of Public Employment
Services.— Continued.
No. 478. Fifteenth, Detroit, Mich., October 25-28, 1927.
No. 501. Sixteenth, Cleveland, Ohio, September 18-21, 1928.
No. 538. Seventeenth, Philadelphia, September 24-27, 1929, and eighteenth,
Toronto, Canada, September 9-12, 1930.
Productivity of labor.
No. 326. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
No. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper boxboard industry. [1926.]
♦No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.]
No. 474. Productivity of labor in merchant blast furnaces. [1928.]
No. 475. Productivity of labor in newspaper printing. [1929.]
Retail prices and cost of living.
•No. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer. [1913.]
♦No. 130. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer. [1913.]
♦No. 164. Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
No. 170. Foreign food prices as affected by the war. [1915.]
No. 357. Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
No. 369. The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. [1925.]
No. 495. Retail prices, 1890 to 1928.
Safety codes.
♦No. 331. Code of lighting: Factories, mills, and other work places.
No. 336. Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
No. 350. Rules for governing the approval of headlighting devices for motor
vehicles.
♦No. 351.. Safety code for the construction, care, and use of ladders.
No. 375. Safety code for laundry machinery and operations.
♦No. 382. Code of lighting school buildings.
No. 410. Safety code for paper and pulp mills.
♦No. 430. Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.
No. 433. Safety codes for the prevention of dust explosions.
No. 447. Safety code for rubber mills and calenders.
No. 451. Safety code for forging and hot-metal stamping.
No. 463. Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus— first revision.
No. 509. Textile safety code.
No. 512. Code for identification o f gas-mask canisters.
No. 519. Safety code for woodworking plants, as revised, 1930.
No. 527. Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels.
Vocational and workers* education.
♦No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment.
[1915.]
♦No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va. [1915.]
♦No. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, Minn. [1917.]
No. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States.
[1920.]
No. 459. Apprenticeship in building construction. [1928.]
Wages and hours of labor.
♦No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in
the dress and waist industry of New York City. [1914.]
♦No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry.
[1914.]
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to
1913.
No. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam railroad
cars, 1907 to 1913.
♦No. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907
to 1914.
No. 204. Street-railway employment in the United States. [1917.]
No. 218. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1915,
with a glossary of occupations.
No. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture indus­
tries, 1915.




(IV)

Wages and hours of labor— Continued.
No. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
No. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry, 1920.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
No. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
No. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines, 1924.
No. 407. Labor costs of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper boxboard industry. [1926.]
♦No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and
1924.
No. 476. Union scales of wages and hours of labor: Supplement to Bulletin 457.
No. 484. Wages and hours of labor of common street laborers, 1928.
No. 497. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States, 1928.
No. 498. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1910 to 1928.
No. 499. History of wages in the United States from colonial times to 1928.
No. 502. Wages and hours of labor in the motor-vehicle industry, 1928.
No. 503. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, 1911 to 1928.
No. 504. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industries, 1907
to 1928.
No. 513. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1929.
No. 514. Pennsylvania Railroad wage data. From report of Joint Fact Finding
Committee in wage negotiations in 1927.
No. 516. Hours and earnings in bituminous coal mining, 1929.
No. 522. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1929.
No. 523. Hours and earnings in the manufacture of airplanes and aircraft engines,
1929.
No. 525. Wages and hours of labor in the Portland cement industry, 1929.
No. 526. Wages and hours of labor in the furniture industry, 1910 to 1929.
No. 532. Wages and hours of labor in the cigarette manufacturing industry, 1930.
No. 533. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing,
1910 to 1930.
No. 535. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry,
1929.
No. 537. Wages and hours of labor in the dyeing and finishing o f textiles, 1930.
No. 539. Wages and hours of labor in cotton-goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1930.
No. 540. Union scales of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1930.
No. 546. Wages and hours in rayon and other synthetic manufacturing, 1930.
No. 547. Wages and hours in cane-sugar refining industry, 1930.
Welfare work.
♦No. 123. Employers* welfare work. [1913.]
No. 222. Welfare work in British munitions factories. [1917.]
♦No. 250. Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United
States. [1919.]
No. 458. Health and recreation activities in industrial establishments, 1926.
Wholesale prices.
♦No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign coun­
tries. [1921.]
No. 453. Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, 1923 to July, 1927.
No. 543. Wholesale prices, 1930.
Women and children in industry.
♦No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration o f employment of wage-earning women In
selected industries in the District of Columbia. [1913.]
♦No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.]
No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]
♦No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee. [1913.]
♦No. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile
establishments and garment factories. [1914.]
♦No. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries.
[1915.]
♦No. 175. Summary of the report on condition of woman and child wage earners in
the United States. [1915.]




(▼
)

Women and children in industry— Continued.
♦No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determinations in Oregon. [1915.]
•No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women.
[1915.]
♦No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of
Boston, Mass. [1916.]
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.]
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
♦No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of
industrial employment of women and children. [1918.]
♦No. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war.
[1917.]
No. 253. Women in the lead industries. [1919.]
No. 467. Minimum wage legislation in various countries. [1928.]
Workmen’s insurance and compensation (including laws relating thereto).
♦No. 101. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
♦No. 102. British national insurance act, 1911.
No. 103. Sickness and accident insurance law in Switzerland. [1912.]
No. 107. Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
♦No. 155. Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]♦No. 212. Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by the Interna­
tional Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions,
Washington, D. C., December 5-9, 1916.
♦No. 243. Workmen’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign
countries, 1917 and 1918.
No. 301. Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration.
[1922.]
No. 312. National health insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1921.
No. 379. Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of
January 1, 1925.
No. 477. Public-service retirement systems, United States and Europe. [1929.]
No. 496. Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada as
of January, 1929. (With text of legislation enacted in 1927 and 1928.)
No. 529. Workmen’s compensation legislation of the Latin American countries.
[1930.]
Miscellaneous series.
♦No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor
Statistics up to May 1, 1915.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
No. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
No. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
No. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washington,
D. C. [1921.]
No. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization.
[1922.]
No. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics. [1923.]
No. 342. International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and
problems. [1923.]
No. 346. Humanity in government. [1923.]
No. 372. Convict labor in 1923.
No. 386. Cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
No. 398. Growth o f legal-aid work in the United States. [1926.]
No. 401. Family allowances in foreign countries. [1926.]
No. 461. Labor organizations in Chile. [1928.]
No. 462. Park recreation areas in the United States. [1928.]
♦No. 465. Beneficial activities of American trade-unions. [1928.]
No. 479. Activities and functions of a State department of labor. [1928.]
No. 483. Conditions in the shoe industry in Haverhill, Mass., 1928.
♦No. 489. Care of aged persons in, the United States. [1929.]
No. 505. Directory of homes for the aged in the United States. [1929.]
No. 506. Handbook o f American trade-unions: 1929 edition.
No. 518. Personnel research agencies: 1930 edition.
No. 541. Handbook of labor statistics: 1931 edition.




(VI)