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Injuries to
Warehouse Workers
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
April 1986
Bulletin 2257




A 5, 3:
?
Injuries to
Warehouse Workers
U.S. Department of Labor
William E. Brock, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner
April 1986
Bulletin 2257

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402







Preface

This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of
Labor Statistics’ survey of warehouse workers who were
injured on the job in September 1984. The findings of
this survey will assist the Occupational Safety and
Health Administration (osha) in developing safety
standards, compliance strategy, and training programs
for reducing work-related injuries.
The survey was conducted by the bls Office of Oc­
cupational Safety and Health Statistics, in cooperation
with the following State agencies:

New Mexico Occupational Health and Safety
Bureau
North Carolina Department of Commerce, In­
dustrial Commission
Industrial Commission of Ohio, Division of Safety
and Hygiene
Oregon Workers’ Compensation Department,
Research and Statistics Section
Tennessee Department of Labor, Division of Labor
Standards, Research Section
Texas Industrial Accident Board and Department
of Health
Utah Industrial Commission, Statistics Division
Vermont Department of Labor and Industry
Virginia Department of Labor and Industry, Divi­
sion of Research and Statistics
Washington Department of Labor and Industries,
Industrial Insurance Division, Data Analysis Sec­
tion
Wisconsin Department of Industry, Labor, and
Human Relations, Workers’ Compensation Divi­
sion
Wyoming Department of Labor and Statistics,
Research and Statistics Section .
The following offices of the Occupational Safety and
Health Administration of the U.S. Department of
Labor contributed to the planning and development of
the survey: Compliance, Standards Development,
Statistical Studies and Analysis, Regulatory Analysis,
and Training. The Office of Safety Research of the Na­
tional Institute for Occupational Safety and Health also
contributed. The analysis of the survey findings and the
computer tabulations were prepared by Maryrose ClineBuso. Helen McDonald directed the survey.
A list of other Work Injury Reports published since
1978 appears at the end of this bulletin.
Material in this publication is in the public domain
and, with appropriate credit, may be reproduced
without permission.

Alaska Department of Labor, Workers’ Compen­
sation Division
Industrial Commission of Arizona, Division of Ad­
m inistrative M anagem ent, Research and
Statistics
California Department of Industrial Relations,
Division of Labor Statistics and Research
Colorado Department of Labor and Employment,
Division of Labor/Statistics
Delaware Department of Labor, Division of In­
dustrial Affairs, OSH Statistics Section
Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Rela­
tions, OSH Research Section
Indiana Department of Labor, Survey Operations
Iowa Bureau of Labor, Research and Statistics
Kentucky Labor Cabinet, Occupational Safety and
Health Program
Maine Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor
Standards
Maryland Department of Licensing and Regula­
tion, Division of Labor and Industry, Research
and Statistics Unit
Michigan Department of Labor, MIOSHA Infor­
mation Section
Missouri Department of Labor and Industrial Rela­
tions, Division of Workers’ Compensation,
Statistical Section
Nebraska Workmen’s Compensation Court,
Statistics Section




iii




Contents

Page

Introduction................................................................................................................................

1

Survey results...............................................................................................................................

1

Limitations of the d a ta ........................................................................................................................5
Charts:
1. Industry distribution of injured warehouse workers, September 1984 .....................
2. Length of service with employer and length of service
in warehouse jobs of injured workers, September 1984 ......................................
3. Hours worked prior to accident of injured warehouse workers, September 1984 . . .
4. Activity of warehouse worker at time of accident, September 1984...........................

3
4
5

Tables:
Injuries to warehouse workers, selected States, September 1984:
1. Industry and number of employees.............................................................................
2. Occupation...................................................................................................................
3. Age and sex of worker..................................................................................................
4. Length of service.........................................................................................................
5. Length of time in shift before accidentoccurred.........................................................
6. Personal protective equipment worn or u s e d .............................................................
7. Safety training ..............................................................................................................
8. Activity of worker at time of accident.........................................................................
9. Manual materials handling..........................................................................................
10. Location of worker at time of accident.......................................................................
11. Events leading to accident............................................................................................
12. Type of accident...........................................................................................................
13. Source of injury...........................................................................................................
14. Nature of injury...........................................................................................................
15. Part of body affected....................................................................................................
16. Estimated days away from w o rk .................................................................................
17. Length of hospitalization required...............................................................................
18. Conditions or factors contributing to accident...........................................................
19. Accident prevention......................................................................................................

7
7
8
8
8
9
9
10
11
12
12
13
14
15
16
17
17
18
18

Appendixes:
A. Survey explanatory note....................................................................................................
B. Participating State agencies..............................................................................................
C. Survey questionnaire ...................................................................

19
21
22




2




Injuries to Warehouse Workers

or filler; and warehouse manager or supervisor. Thirtytwo percent were classified under the general title of
warehouse worker.

Introduction

According to a 1981 analysis of job risk by occupa­
tion, workers in warehouse occupations are at a higher
than average risk of injury.1 At the request of the Oc­
cupational Safety and Health Administration, the
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducted a survey of in­
jured warehouse workers in 1984 to obtain more infor­
mation on the actions and hazards associated with their
work-related injuries. Workers were asked to describe
the activity, location, and material movement equip­
ment used at the time of their accident. As a measure of
the severity of the injuries, information was obtained on
the nature of the injury and the part of body affected,
the number of days lost from work, and the amount of
hospitalization required. Workers indicated the per­
sonal protective equipment they were wearing or using
at the time of their accident, the extent of safety training
received for the job they were doing when injured, and
their experience in warehouse work. They were also ask­
ed about worksite conditions or other factors they felt
contributed to the accident and how similar accidents
could be prevented in the future. The survey results
represent 2,700 warehouse workers who were injured on
the job in September 1984 in 26 States.

Nearly
three-fourths of the workers studied were under 35 years
of age; one-half of these were 25 to 34 years old (table
3). Nine out of ten injured warehouse workers were
men.
Fifty-seven percent of the injured workers had work­
ed for their employers at least 1 year at the time of their
accidents; 24 percent had 5 or more years of service
(table 4). Industry experience was even greater. Seventynine percent of all warehouse workers surveyed had
worked 1 or more years in warehousing jobs, and more
than one-half of these workers indicated that they had
over 5 years of experience (chart 2).

A g e a n d sex o f w o rk e r a n d w o rk experience.

Injured workers were asked to
provide information about when their accidents occur­
red during the workday. Relatively few accidents hap­
pened during the first hour; the largest proportion oc­
curred during the second to fourth hours of the shift
(chart 3).

L en g th o f tim e in sh ift.

Three out of every five
injured workers were not wearing or using any type of
personal protective equipment when injured (table 6).
Twenty-three percent were wearing gloves, and a similar
proportion, steel-toed safety shoes or boots. Hard hats
or some form of protective eyewear were each worn by 5
percent of the workers.
P erso n a l p r o te c tiv e eq u ip m en t.

Survey results

Injured
warehouse workers were largely concentrated in the
wholesale and retail trade industries (table 1). Fortyseven percent of the injured worked for wholesale trade
establishments, most frequently grocery, automotive
parts, machinery, and construction material distributors
(chart 1). Retail trade firms, mostly food stores,
employed 21 percent of the workers and manufacturers,
15 percent. The transportation and public utilities in­
dustry accounted for 8 percent of those injured.
Most of the workers reported job titles which
reflected specific job duties (table 2). Order selectors,
pullers, or pickers was the job title of 24 percent of the
injured; 11 percent were forklift operators. Other fre­
quently cited occupations were: Shipping or receiving
clerk; loader, unloader, or checker; Stocker, stock clerk,
I n d u s tr y

c la s s ific a tio n

and

o c c u p a tio n .

Safety training for the job being done at
the time of injury was reported by 54 percent of the
workers (table 7). The safety subjects most frequently
covered were: Training in housekeeping practices, such
as keeping aisles and floors free of trash and clutter;
how to lift properly; how to operate forklifts safely;
when and where to use personal protective equipment;
and how to safely operate powered equipment, most
commonly powered pallet jacks and cranes.
S a fe ty training.

1
N o r m a n R o o t a n d D e b o r a h S e b a stia n ,“ B L S D e v e lo p s M easu re o f
J o b R isk b y O c c u p a tio n , ” M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w , O cto b er 1981, p p .
26-3 0 .




1

Safety training took the form of on-the-job training
for nearly one-third of the workers. Printed materials
containing safety information were distributed to slight­
ly more than one-fifth, and one-fifth received their
training in more formal safety meetings.

Chart 1. Industry distribution of injured warehouse workers, September 1984

Thirteen percent of the injured workers were
operating mechanized lifting/handling equipment at the
time of their accidents, most frequently forklifts and
powered pallet jacks. Working with (although not
operating) lifting/handling equipment was indicated by
25 percent, including workers manually loading or
unloading forklifts or using handtrucks.

Three-tenths of the workers noted that their com­
panies had labor-management committees which met on
safety issues, a nearly equal proportion said their com­
panies had no such committee, and the remaining twofifths did not know whether such a committee
existed.
A c tiv ity o f w o rk er a t tim e o f a ccid en t a n d e q u ip m e n t
used. The flow of goods into and out of a warehouse

Increased mechanization
and sophisticated material handling equipment do not
totally eliminate the need for manual materials handling
in warehousing. Nearly two-thirds of the injured
warehouse workers were manually lifting, carrying, or
handling materials at the time of their injury (table 9).
When asked if they could have used lifting/handling
equipment, such as forklifts, handtrucks, and dollies, to
perform their tasks, 9 out of 10 said no, and 7 out of 10
explained that the material had to be moved by hand at
some stage. Some who were working with lifting/handl­
ing equipment still had to manually place the goods on
the forklifts or dollies. Close to 1 in 5 said the work
space was not adequate in which to use the equipment.
Ten percent indicated they could have used lif­
ting/handling equipment but most felt, prior to their ac­
cidents, that it was unnecessary or too much trouble to
use.

forms a common pattern of activities in most
warehouses. Goods coming into the warehouse are
unloaded from vehicles, inventoried, and placed into
storage. The process of warehousing incoming goods
may occur at the same time that goods are prepared for
leaving the warehouse. Activities involved when goods
are moved out of the warehouse include getting the mer­
chandise removed from storage, readied for shipping,
and loaded onto vehicles for transport away from the
warehouse. Almost three-tenths of the injuries occurred
to workers while they were loading or unloading a vehi­
cle (table. 8). Moving stock to or from storage ranked
next in frequency, along with selecting (picking) items,
and stacking or placing stock (chart 4). All but 6 percent
of the injured workers reported that the type of work
being performed at the time of accident was the same as
they performed during the course of a normal workday
(table 8).




M a n u a l m a teria ls handling.

2

Chart 2. Length of service with employer and length of service in warehouse jobs
of injured warehouse workers, September 1984
Percent
Percent

Less than
1 month

1 to 6
months

6 months
to 1 year

5 years
or more

For example, a warehouse worker might suffer a muscle
sprain or strain while just lifting a box. Another worker
lifting a box may injure a muscle because the contents of
the box shifted suddenly. In both cases, the type of acci­
dent could be overexertion, but, in the second situation,
the accident was affected by the preceding event—the
box’s contents shifting. This bulletin attempts to iden­
tify both the events leading to the accident (table 11),
the type of accident (table 12), and the relationship
between these two.
Overall, 38 percent of the workers were injured by
overexertion, mostly while manually lifting or handling
materials. For the majority of these workers, nothing
unusual preceded their accidents (text table 1). Their in­
juries were usually the result of a single act of lifting,
carrying, or wielding objects. However, a few workers
noted losing their balance or their grip on objects, or
that materials had shifted.
Twenty-six percent were struck by falling, flying, or
swinging objects. Nearly one-half of these accidents in­
volved preceding events; the unexpected movement of
work materials accounted for the largest proportion.
Falls from elevations accounted for 6 percent of the
accidents. One-third of these falls occurred after the
surface beneath the worker, such as a stack of piled
materials, shifted or broke. This included a worker who

More than onehalf of the workers were injured while in the storage
area of the warehouse (table 10). However, injuries also
occurred in other warehouse areas where the primary
function was the loading and unloading of materials
rather than storage. Fourteen percent of the accidents
took place on a loading dock, while 15 percent were in
trucks, usually at the loading dock.
Sixty-eight percent of the workers were injured while
working at ground (floor) level. Workers must also
climb ladders to obtain products, walk up stairs to an
upper storage area, and sometimes climb shelves, racks,
or piled materials to reach stock. A total of 7 percent of
the workers were on these elevated surfaces at the time
of their accidents. Being in or on a vehicle was cited by
23 percent.
Unfamiliarity with the worksite did not seem to be a
problem among the injured workers. Only 4 percent in­
dicated that they were working in a location different
from their normal worksite (table 8).
L o c a tio n o f w o rk e r a t tim e o f acciden t.

Information on the type of ac­
cident describes a single event which produces a
worker’s injury. However, accidents are not always the
result of a single, isolated event. Some are the result of
an unusual or unexpected event preceding the accident.

D escrip tio n o f acciden t.




1 to 5
years

3

Chart 3. Hours worked prior to accident of injured warehouse workers, September 1984
Percent

Percent

than
2

Hours

Type of accident
Over­
exertion

Struck by

Fall from
elevation

Other

Total.......................................

100

100

100

100

No preceding event......................
Working surface shifted, slipped,
or broke .....................................
Worker lost balance, slipped, or
tripped........................................
Worker lost grip on object holding
onto or working with..................
Work materials shifted, slipped, or
broke..........................................

92

54

36

58

0

1

33

3

2

3

27

28

1

10

0

3

5

32

3

8

o f in ju ry. Information on the nature of
workers’ injuries, days away from work, and
hospitalization helps to determine the severity of
workers’ injuries. Muscle sprains and strains, the most
common injury, were sustained by 55 percent of the
workers (table 14). Bruises were next in frequency,
along with cuts, lacerations, and punctures, accounting
for 21 and 18 percent, respectively. Thirteen percent
suffered fractures.
More than two-fifths of the workers experienced in­
juries to the trunks of their bodies, particularly their
backs (table 15). Less frequently, injuries were to the
lower extremities, specifically the foot, and to the upper
extremities, usually the fingers.
Seventy-seven percent of the injured workers lost
days away from work as a result of their injuries (table
16).2The average lost-time case resulted in 16 days away
from work, which is close to the national average of 17
for all lost-workday injury cases.3 Slightly less than oneS e v e rity

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A for
the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

said the floor of the trailer he was working in caved in
and another who fell when the ladder he was standing
on shifted.
Most of the remaining types of accidents involved
workers striking against objects or falling to the same
level because they lost their grip on objects or slipped or
tripped and lost their balance.
Finally, the source of injury identifies the object or
substance which produced the injury. Nearly 70 dif­
ferent sources of injury were given; the most common
(29 percent) were boxes, barrels, or containers (table



remember

13). Other frequent sources included metal items, such
as structural metal, pipes, fittings, or fasteners, 11 per­
cent; vehicles, usually forklifts or powered pallet jacks,
11 percent; and working surfaces, 10 percent.

Text table 1. Percent distribution of type of accident by preceding
events: Injuries to warehouse workers, selected States,
September 1984

Preceding event

or
more

2 S ee a p p en d ix A fo r d iffe r e n c e s in rep o rtin g req u irem en ts a m o n g
th e S tates in c lu d ed in th is stu d y .
3 O c c u p a tio n a l In ju r ie s a n d Illn e s se s in th e U n ite d S ta te s b y In ­
d u stry , 1983, B u lletin 2236 (B ureau o f L ab or S tatistics, 1985), table 6.

4

Chart 4. Activity of warehouse worker at time of accident, September 1984
Percent

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

Loading/unloading truck, trailer,
railcar, or other vehicle
Moving stock to or from
storage area
Selecting or picking items
Stacking or placing stock
Repairing, adjusting, cleaning,
or maintaining equipment
or machinery
Packing or wrapping items
for shipping
Doing cleanup work
Inspecting or labeling stock,
or doing inventory
Other

tenth of the workers were hospitalized overnight, with
an average hospital stay of 5 nights (table 17).

5 also felt that safer work procedures on their part
might prevent accidents and nearly 1 in 6 workers felt
that making the work area safer would help.
When asked if their employers had taken action after
the accident to prevent a similar accident from occurr­
ing to others, 43 percent did not know of any actions
taken, in some instances because they had not yet
returned to work. Another 41 percent indicated that no
actions were taken. The remaining 16 percent noted
preventative actions by their employers. A number of
workers who had suffered overexertion injuries said
that their employer explained proper manual lifting
methods to them, and in some cases, to their co-workers
as well. For virtually all of these injured workers, this
was a refresher of previous training. Several of the
workers noted that equipment involved in the accident
was repaired afterwards. Some acknowledged the hiring
of additional help while others noted that safety
meetings were held.

C o n d itio n s o r f a c to r s co n trib u tin g to th e acciden t.

Forty-six percent of the injured workers indicated that
conditions at the worksite contributed to their accidents
(table 18). Twenty-two percent considered a limited
work area or space responsible, at least in part, for their
accidents. Other contributing conditions, each accoun­
ting for 7 or 8 percent, were slippery floor surfaces, clut­
tered work areas, and tools or equipment in bad condi­
tion or not working properly.
An even larger proportion of workers, almost 3 out of
4, felt that more general factors also contributed. Work­
ing too fast or working in an awkward position each
were indicated by 1 out of 4 workers. About 1 out of 6
blamed lifting, carrying, or handling an object that was
too heavy, while slightly fewer (1 out of 7) noted that
working under stress was a factor. Nearly 1 out of 10
cited working when tired or fatigued, and a similar pro­
portion gave their carelessness as a possible cause of
their accidents.

Limitations of the data

The data in this bulletin represent the population of
injured warehouse workers reported in the 26
cooperating States during the reference period of
September 1984. However, the user should note the
following limitations: States participating in data collec­
tion may not be representative of the country as a

Three in four injured workers
felt their type of accident could have been prevented
(table 19). Having more help to do the job was indicated
by 1 in 4 workers, and 1 in 5 claimed that having more
time to perform the task might have helped. About 1 in
P re v e n ta tiv e m easures.




5

Incidence rates of the injuries studied were not
generated, nor can they be inferred from the data,
because information on hours of work for the survey
period is not available. See appendix A for the scope
and methodology of the survey.

whole; government and coal and metallic and
nonmetallic mining are not included; reporting re­
quirements for workers’ compensation reports, the
basis for selecting injuries for study, vary among States;
and the reference period is not intended to represent the
entire year.




6




Table 1. Industry and number of employees: Injuries to
warehouse workers, selected States, September
1984
Industry and number of people employed
Total, 2,700 injured workers.........................................................

Percent

100

Industry
Agriculture, forestry, and fishing.........................................................
Mining 1 ........................................................... .....................................
Construction.........................................................................................
Manufacturing ......................................................................................
Transportation and public utilities ......................................................
Wholesale trade...................................................................................
Wholesale trade—durable g oods.................................................
Wholesale trade—nondurable goods...........................................

1
(2)
2
15

Retail trade...........................................................................................
Building materials and garden supplies.......................................
General merchandise stores........................................................
Food stores...................................................................................
Automotive dealers and service stations....................................
Apparel and accessory stores......................................................
Furniture and home furnishings stores........................................
Eating and drinking places...........................................................
Miscellaneous retail.......................................................................

21
2
4
7
1

Finance, insurance, and real estate ...................................................
Services................................................................................................
Other industries, not elsewhere classified.........................................

8

47
22
25

(*)

3
0

3
4

1

Number of people employed in worker’s company
I to 10 employees ..............................................................................
I I or more employees.........................................................................

18
82

1 Limited to oil and gas extraction.
2 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Dash indicates no data were reported. Due to rounding, percent­
ages may not add to 100. See appendix A for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Industry obtained from State workers’ compensation reports;
number of employees obtained from survey questionnaires.

Table 2. Occupation: Injuries to warehouse workers, selected
States, September 1984
Occupation

Percent

Total, 2,700 injured workers.........................................................

100

Cleanup person or maintenance person............................................
Forklift operator ...................................................................................
Loader, unioader, or checker..............................................................
Order selector, puller, or picker..........................................................
Shipping or receiving clerk, shipper, or packer.................................
Stocker, stock clerk, or fille r...............................................................
Warehouse manager or supervisor....................................................
O th e r....................................................................................................
Warehouse worker, uns........................................................................

1
11
6
24
7
5
5
8
32

uns. = unspecified.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

7




Table 3. Age and sex of worker: Injuries to warehouse
workers, selected States, September 1984
Age and sex

Percent

Total, 2,700 injured workers

100

Age
16-19 years .......
20-24 years .......
25-34 years .......
35-44 years .......
45-54 years .......
55-64 years .......
65 years or more

8
28
38
15
8
3

(’)
Sex

Men ...
Women

90
10

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation reports.

Table 4. Length of service: Injuries to warehouse workers,
selected States, September 1984
Length of service

Percent

Total, 2,700 injured workers.........................................................

100

Length of service with employer
Less than 1 m onth...............................................................................
1 to 6 months ......................................................................................
6 months to 1 year...............................................................................
1 to 5 years..........................................................................................
5 years or m ore ...................................................................................

5
24
14
33
24

Length of service in warehouse jobs
Less than 1 m onth...............................................................................
1 to 6 months ......................................................................................
6 months to 1 year...............................................................................
1 to 5 years..........................................................................................
5 years or m ore...................................................................................

2
10
9
37
42

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

Table 5. Length of time in shift before accident occurred:
Injuries to warehouse workers, selected States,
September 1984
Length of time in shift before accident occurred

Percent
100

1 to 2 hours ....................................................................................... .

7
16
29
21
16
8
2

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

8




Table 6. Personal protective equipment worn or used: Injuries
to warehouse workers, selected States, September
1984
Personal protective equipment

Percent

Total, 2,700 injured workers.........................................................
Hard h a t................................................................................................
Gloves..................................................................................................
Steel-toed safety shoes or steel-toed boots .....................................
Safety glasses, goggles, or other eye protection .............................
Safety belt tied off with lanyard..........................................................
Seat b e lt...............................................................................................
O th e r....................................................................................................
Not wearing or using protective equipment.......................................

0
5
23
22
5
1
2
61

' Because more than one response is possible, the sum of the percentages
may not add to 100. Percentages are based on the total number of persons
who answered the question.
NOTE: Dash indicates no data were reported. See appendix A for the
scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

Table 7. Safety training: Injuries to warehouse workers,
selected States, September 1984
Percent

Safety training
Safety training for job being done when injured

O

Total, 2,700 injured workers
Forklift operator training course..................................................
How to operate other power equipment....................................
Proper manual lifting methods.....................................................
When and where to use personal protective equipment...........
Importance of keeping floor and aisles free of trash and
other objects .............................................................................
Provided written safe-job procedures for the job doing when
injured.........................................................................................
Other safety training.....................................................................
Never received safety training for job being done when injured

23
13
28
16
29
4
3
46

Source of safety training
Total, 2,700 injured workers........................
Printed materials.......................................
Films..........................................................
On-the-job training....................................
Safety meetings............................'............
O th e r.........................................................
Never received safety training for the job

0
22
18
32
20
1
48

Whether worker’s company had a labor-management
committee to meet on safety issues
Total, 2,700 injured workers..................................................

100
32
30
38

N o ............
Yes ..........
Don’t know1

1 Because more than one response is possible, the sum of the percentages
may not add to 100. Percentages are based on the total number of persons
who answered the question.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

9




Table 8. Activity of worker at time of accident: Injuries to
warehouse workers, selected States, September
1984
Activity

Percent

Activity of worker at time of accident
100

Total, 2,700 injured workers
Loading/unloading truck, trailer, railcar, or other vehicle
Moving stock to or from storage area..............................
Stacking or placing sto ck..................................................
Selecting or picking ite m s.................................................
Packing or wrapping items for shipping...........................
Inspecting or labeling stock, or doing inventory.............
Doing cleanup work ..........................................................
Repairing, adjusting, cleaning, or maintaining equipment
or machinery....................................................................
O th e r..................................................................................

28
19
14
18
4

2
4
5
6

Lifting/handling equipment worker was working with or
operating
Total, 2,700 injured workers....................................................
Workers operating lifting/handling equipment at time of accident....
F orklift............ ...............................................................................
Powered pallet ja c k .......................................................................
Manual cart, handtruck, or d o lly...................................................
Shrink wrap or other wrapping machine ......................................
Platform on forklift or crane to lift worker....................................
Conveyor........................................................................................
Crane..............................................................................................
O th e r..............................................................................................
Workers working with lifting/handling equipment at time of acci­
dent (i.e., unloading cartons from forklift, pushing handcart, etc.) .
F orklift............................................................................................
Powered pallet ja c k .......................................................................
Manual cart, handtruck, or d o lly...................................................
Shrink wrap or other wrapping machine ......................................
Platform on forklift or crane to lift worker....................................
Conveyor........................................................................................
Crane..............................................................................................
O th e r..............................................................................................
Workers not operating or working with lifting/handling
equipment at time of accident....................................

100
13
7
4

0
0
0

1

1

25
6
5
10
1
1

2
1

61

Whether location, equipment, or type of work were different
in any way from worker’s normal Work
Total, 2,700 injured workers.........................................................
Yes—using different equipment ...
Yes—working at different location
Yes—doing different type of work
N o .................................................. 1
2

0
1
4
6
90

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
2 Because more than one response is possible, the sum of the percentages
may not add to 100. Percentages are based on the total number of persons
who answered the question.
NOTE: Dash indicates no data were reported. Due to rounding, percent­
ages may not add to 100. See appendix A for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

10




Table 9. Manual materials handling: Injuries to warehouse
workers, selected States, September 1984
Manual materials handling

Percent

Manual materials handling at time of accident
Total, 2,700 injured workers...........................................

100

Workers manually handling materials..................................
Workers not manually handling materials...........................

64
36

Whether worker could have used lifting/handling equipment
to lift, carry, or move objects
Total, 1,720 injured w o rk e r.......................................................

100

No--there was not enough space to use i t ......................................
No--the material had to be moved by hand ....................................
No-other reason ...............................................................................
Yes .....................................................................................................

18
70

1
10

If yes: Type of equipment worker could have used1
Total, 180 injured workers.....................................................

(2
)
62
7
24

F orklift.......................................
Powered pallet ja c k ..................
Manual cart, handtruck, or dolly
Conveyor...................................
Crane.........................................
O th e r.........................................

11
4

Why worker wasn’t using this equipment1
Total, 180 injured workers

(2)

Did not think it was necessary.......................
In bad condition or not working properly.......
Too much trouble to u s e ................................
Did not know how to operate.........................
Not authorized to use that type of equipment
O th e r................................................................ 1
2

40
8
18
4
34

1 Due to the small number of responses, the sampling errors for these
estimates are generally higher than those of other survey estimates. See
note on data reliability in appendix A.
2 Because more than one response is possible, the sum of the percent­
ages may not add to 100. Percentages are based on the total number of per­
sons who answered the question.
NOTE: Dash indicates no data were reported. Due to rounding, percent­
ages may not add to 100. See appendix A for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

11




Table 10. Location of worker at time of accident: Injuries to
warehouse workers, selected States, September
1984
Location

Percent

100

Total, 2,700 injured workers
Worksite location
Inside truck, trailer, or railcar......................
Temporary storage area of warehouse.....
Long-term storage area of warehouse......
Loading dock............................................... .
Other area of warehouse...........................
Outdoor location (other than loading dock)
O th e r............................................................

15
21
30
14
10
8

3

Elevation at worksite
At ground or floor level...................................
On piled or stacked materials.........................
On a ladder......................................................
On s ta irs ..........................................................
On a shelf or ra c k ...........................................
In or on a vehicle............................................
O th e r................................................................

68

2
2

O

3
23
3

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

Table 11. Events leading to accident: Injuries to warehouse
workers, selected States, September 1984
Events leading to accident

Percent

Total, 2,700 injured workers.........................................................

100

No preceding events............................................................................
Working surface shifted, moved, or broke.........................................
Work materials shifted, slipped, or broke ..........................................
Worker lost balance, slipped, or tripped............................................
Worker lost grip on object holding onto or working w ith ..................

68
4
13
11
4

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

12




Table 12. Type of accident: Injuries to warehouse workers,
selected States, September 1984
Type of accident

Percent

100

Total, 2,700 injured workers

8

Struck against..........................
Struck against, uns.............
Stationary object................
Moving object.....................
Struck b y ...................................
Struck by, uns.....................
Falling object......................
Flying object.......................
Struck by, n.e.c...................

0

7
1
26
1
14
1

11
6

Fall from elevation....................
Fall from elevation, uns......
From scaffolds, etc.............
From ladders......................
From piled materials .........
From vehicles.....................
On stairs .............................
Into shafts, etc....................
Fall to lower level, n.e.c.....
Fall on same level....................
Fall on same level, uns......
Fall to the walkway, etc......
Fall onto or against objects
Fall on same level, n.e.c. ...

O
0

1
1

2

0
0
0

3
6
4
1
1
7

Caught in, under, between................
Caught in, under, between, uns...
Inrunning or meshing objects......
Moving and stationary objects....
Two or more moving objects......
Caught in, under, between, n.e.c.
Rubbed or abraded............................
Vibrating objects..........................
Foreign matter in eyes................
Bodily reaction...................................

1
1
3

0

1

2

0

2
3

Overexertion............................................................
Overexertion, uns...............................................
Lifting objects....................................................
Pulling or pushing objects ...............................
Wielding or throwing objects............................
Overexertion, n.e.c.............................................
Contact with electric current..................................
Contact with temperature extremes.......................
Hot objects or substances..............................
Contact with radiations, caustics, etc.....................
By absorption....................................................
Contact with radiations, caustics, etc., n.e.c. ..
Explosions ...............................................................
Accident type, n.e.c..................................................
Nonclassifiable........................................................ 1

38

2
28
4
•3

O
0
0

1
1

0
0
0

2

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
n.e.c. = not elsewhere classified.
uns. = unspecified.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation reports.

13




Table 13. Source of injury: Injuries to warehouse workers,
selected States, September 1984
Source of injury

Percent
100

Total, 2,700 injured workers

0

Animals, insects, etc...................
Bodily motion .............................
Boilers, pressure vessels..........
Boxes, barrels, containers.........
Buildings and structures ...........
Ceramic ite m s............................
Chemicals, chemical compounds
Conveyors...................................
Electric apparatus.......................
Food products.............................
Furniture, fixtures, etc..................
Glass items, n.e.c........................

3

f)

29
2

(’)

1
1

1
2
5

1

Handtools, not powered .............................
Hammer ................................................
K n ife ......................................................
Pliers......................................................
Shovel...................................................
Handtools, not powered, n.e.c.............
Handtools, powered...................................
Heating equipment (nonelectric), n.e.c.......
Hoisting apparatus..................... .................
Ladders...................................... .................
Liquids, n.e.c................................ ................
Machines .................................... ................
Machines, uns........................................
Agitators, m ixers..................................
Drilling, boring ......................................
Saws.....................................................
Screening, separating ..........................
Machines, n.e.c.....................................
Mechanical power transmission apparatus

3

0

2

O
0

1

0
0
0
( 1)

0
0
( 1)

0
0
11

Metal item s.......................................
Metal items, uns.........................
Automobile parts.......................
Structural m etal................... .....
Pipe and fittings................... ....
Metal parts (execpt automobile)
Metal fasteners.........................
Metal binders ............................
Metal chips, splinters, particles
Metal items, n.e.c.......................
Mineral items, nonmetallic, n.e.c.....
Paper and pulp ................................
Particles (unidentified).....................
Plastic items, n.e.c............................
Pumps and prime movers ..............
Soaps, detergents, etc., n.e.c..........

1
1
1

2
1

2

(')

1
3

O

1
1
1

0
0

Vehicles ........................................................
Vehicles, uns..........................................
Aircraft....................................................
Highway vehicles, powered..................
Plant or industrial vehicles ...................
Dollies or other nonpowered vehicles
Forklifts or other powered carriers....
Powered towing vehicles...................
Rail vehicles..........................................
Vehicles, n.e.c........................................
Wood ite m s..................................................
Lumber...................................................
Skids, pallets.........................................
Wood items, n.e.c..................................

11

(')
O

1
9
2
7

0
(')
(’)

8

2
6

O
10

Working surfaces..............
Working surfaces, uns.
F lo o r............................
Ground ........................

2
5
1

See footnotes at end of table.

14




Table 13. Source of injury: Injuries to warehouse workers,
selected States, September 1984—Continued
Source of injury

Percent

Ramos...........................................................................................
Runways, platforms................................... ....................................
Stairs, steps...............................................

0
(’)

Street, road ............................... ...................

(')

Working surfaces, n.e.c..................................................................
Rubber products..................................................................................
Miscellaneous, n.e.c......................................................
Nonclassifiable.....................................................................................

0
0

0
0

4

’ Less than 0.5 percent.
n.e.c. = not elsewhere classified.
uns. = unspecified.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation reports.

Table 14. Nature of injury: Injuries to warehouse workers,
selected States, September 1984
Nature of injury

Percent
0

Bruise or contusion.............................................................................
Muscle sprain or strain, torn ligaments, or pulled m uscle................
Dislocation............................................................................................
Object in eye(s) ...................................................................................
Concussion...........................................................................................

13
18
21
55
4
4
1
1
4

’ Because more than one response is possible, the sum of the percentages
may not add to 100. Percentages are based on the total number of persons
who answered the question.
NOTE: See appendix A for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

1
5




Table 15. Part of body affected: Injuries to warehouse
workers, selected States, September 1984
Part of body

Percent
100

Total, 2,700 injured workers
Head....................
Head, uns......
B rain.............
Ear(s).............
Eye(s)...........
Face .............
Head, multiple
Head, n.e.c. ...

5
1

0
0

3

1

0
0
2

Neck

22

Upper extremities ...................
Upper extremities, uns......
Arm(s)................................
Arm(s), uns......................
Upper arm(s) ..................
Elbow(s) .........................
Forearm (s) .....................
Arm(s), m ultiple.............
Arm(s), n.e.c....................
Wrist(s)..............................
Hand(s) .............................
Finger(s)............................
Upper extremities, multiple

0

4

1

(’)

1

2

0
0

4
3

10

1
41

T ru n k....................
Trunk, uns.......
Abdomen .......
Back ..............
Chest.............
Hip(s).............
Shoulder(s)....
Trunk, multiple

0

5
28
3

1
3
1
24
7
1
1
4
1

Lower extremities....................
Leg(s).................................
Leg(s), uns.......................
Thigh(s) ...........................
Knee(s)............................
Lower leg(s)....................
Leg(s), multiple...............
Ankle(s)..............................
Foot or feet .......................
Toe(s)................................
Lower extremities, multiple

<
’>

5
9
3

O

Multiple parts........................................................... ;...........................
Nonclassifiable.....................................................................................

5
(1
)

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
n.e.c. = not elsewhere classified.
uns. = unspecified.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation reports.

16




Table 16. Estimated days away from work: Injuries to
warehouse workers, selected States,
September 1984
Days away from work

Percent

Total, 2,700 injured workers.........................................................

100

No days away from work ....................................................................
1 to 5 d a ys...........................................................................................
6 to 10 d a ys.........................................................................................
11 to 15 days....................................... ^ ............................................
16 to 20 days.......................................................................................
21 to 25 days.......................................................................................
26 to 30 days.......................................................................................
31 to 40 days.......................................................................................
41 to 60 days.......................................................................................
More than 60 da ys..............................................................................
Lost-time cases for which days away from work were not
estimated ...........................................................................................

23
27
12
8
6
4
4
4
1
3
8
Mean

Mean days away from work per lost-workday c a s e ..........................

16

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

Table 17. Length of hospitalization required: Injuries to
warehouse workers, selected States,
September 1984
Length of hospitalization

Percent

Total, 2,700 injured workers.........................................................

100

No hospitalization required..................................................................
1 n ig h t..................................................................................................
2 nights................................................................................................
3 nights................................................................................................
4 nights................................................................................................
5 nights................................................................................................
6 nights or m ore ..................................................................................
Hospitalized cases for which length of hospitalization was not
estimated ...........................................................................................

91
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
Mean

Mean length (nights) of hospitalization per hospitalized c a s e .........

5

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

17




Table 18. Conditions or factors contributing to the accident:
Injuries to warehouse workers, selected States,
September 1984
Conditions or factors workers felt contributed to accident

Percent

Worksite conditions

0

Total, 2,700 injured workers
Slippery floor surface............................................................
Working in a limited area or space.......................................
Poor lighting ..........................................................................
Lifting/handling equipment lacked safety features...............
Cluttered work area...............................................................
Structure was broken or in bad condition.............................
Tools or equipment in bad condition or not working properly
O ther....................................................................................

7
22
3

No conditions at worksite led to accident

54

1
8

4
8

7

Other contributing factors
Total, 2,700 injured workers.......................................................

(’)

9
6

Working when tired or fatigued .........................................
Co-worker’s activity...........................................................
Worker had previous physical condition which contributed
to accident......................................................................
Working too fa s t................................................................
Working when under stress ..............................................
Was careless in what you were doing...............................
Lifting, carrying, or moving an object that was too heavy ..
In an awkward position......................................................
Not given proper training or instructions for jo b ...............
Safety rules were not enforced.........................................
O ther.................................................................................

2
25
15
8

17
25
2
4
7

No other factors contributed to accident

27

1 Because more than one response is possible, the sum of the percentages
may not add to 100. Percentages are based on the total number of persons
who answered the question.
NOTE: See appendix A for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

Table 19. Accident prevention: Injuries to warehouse workers,
selected States, September 1984
Accident prevention

Percent

Actions, methods, or procedures that worker feels would
have prevented accident

(’)

Total, 2,700 injured workers
Making area safer before working ...............................
More or better safety training......................................
Using protective equipment .........................................
Using safer work procedures on workers’ p a rt............
Having company enforce safe work practices .............
More help to do job .....................................................
Providing more or better safety features on equipment
Using lifting/handling equipment..................................
More time to do job .....................................................
O ther...........................................................................
Do not think it could have been prevented.................

16
9
5
19
8

24
5
5
21

13
24

Employer action(s) taken to prevent accident from happening
to others
Total, 2,700 injured workers

100

No action(s) taken by employer.....................................
Action(s) was taken by employer....................................
Worker did not know if action(s) was taken by employer

41
16
43

1 Because more than one response is possible, the sum of the percentages
may not add to 100. Percentages are based on the total number of persons
who answered the question.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100. See appendix A
for the scope of the survey.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaires.

18

Appendix A. Survey Explanatory Note

tion, the worker’s age, sex, and part of body injured,
the source of injury, type of accident, and occupation
were classified based on information furnished by the
employer in the workers’ compensation report. Acci­
dent descriptions from the questionnaire were coded by
BLS to reflect any events which may have preceded
workers’ accidents, and to identify equipment
operators. Job titles provided on the questionnaire were
coded by b l s to develop a more complete description of
workers’ occupations.

Scope of survey

The survey was designed to develop information on
injuries to workers employed in selected warehouse oc­
cupations in the private sector. The injuries studied oc­
curred during the month of September 1984. Included
were workers in occupations identified as “ warehouse
workers, not elsewhere classified” according to the 1970
Bureau of Census classification of occupations. Other
Census occupations which were included in the study
were shipping and receiving clerks; stock clerks and
storekeepers; forklift and tow motor operators; freight
and material handlers; and stock handlers provided that
one of two criteria were met: (1) the department in
which the worker was working was warehouse, or (2)
the industry according to the Standard Industrial
Classification system was Public Warehousing (S I C 442)
or Wholesale Trade (sic’s 50 and 51). Injury cases were
excluded from the survey if they involved on-the-road
vehicle accidents, assaults, or fatalities.
The survey covered the 26 States shown in appendix
B. To identify cases within the scope of the survey, staff
of the participating State agencies reviewed Employer’s
Reports of Injuries required by State workers’ compen­
sation laws. Of the 2,700 reports meeting the critera, a
systematic random sample of 1 out of 3.5 reports was
selected, and a questionnaire was mailed to each injured
worker in the sample; cooperation was voluntary. Dur­
ing the survey period, 424 survey questionnaires were
returned and found to be within the scope of the survey,
resulting in a response rate of 55 percent.
Although the data were aggregated for all par­
ticipating States, it should be noted that the workers’
compensation cases selected for study reflect differences
in reporting requirements. Workers’ compensation
cases involving medical treatment, regardless of lost
time, are reported in the following States: Hawaii, In­
diana, Maine, Nebraska, North Carolina, Texas, Utah,
Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming. The remaining
participating States require reports for cases involving
the following number of days away from work: 1
day—Alaska, California, and Ohio; 2 days—Kentucky;
3 days—Missouri; 4 days—Colorado, Delaware, Iowa,
Maryland, Oregon, and Wisconsin; 7 days—Michigan;
and 8 days—Arizona, New Mexico, Tennessee, and
Virginia. Although participating States provided a
broad geographic and industrial mix, they were not
selected statistically to represent the country as a whole.
Information on the employer’s industry classifica­




Weighting and estimation procedures

A weighting procedure was used to make the sample
of injured workers account for all in-scope injured
workers in the 26 participating States. For this survey,
an original weight of 3.5, which is the inverse of the pro­
bability of selection, was applied to each sample
member’s response.
Forty-five percent of the workers selected to par­
ticipate in the survey did not return the questionnaire.
These are referred to as unit nonrespondents. A
weighting-class nonresponse adjustment procedure was
used to reduce the bias due to nonresponse in the
estimates. In this procedure, the sample is partitioned
into cells, and a unit nonresponse adjustment factor is
calculated within each cell. This procedure is based on
the assumption that, within each cell, the response
distribution of the unit nonrespondents would be the
same as the response distribution of the respondents.
To determine the set of cells for unit nonresponse ad­
justment, a comparison of the following characteristics
was made between respondents and nonrespondents:
Age, sex, nature of injury, part of body affected,
source, type of accident, and industry. The greatest dif­
ference between respondents and nonrespondents was in
the type of accident distribution. Further, it was deter­
mined that the survey responses varied by type of acci­
dent. Therefore, a type of accident partition (overexer­
tion cases and other types of accidents) was used to ad­
just for unit nonresponse.
In addition to workers not returning the question­
naire, a small number responded to the survey but did
not answer all of the questions. These are referred to as
item nonrespondents. To account for this type of
nonresponse, it was assumed that the response distribu­
tion of the item nonrespondents would be the same as
the response distribution of the item respondents.
For each question, a final weight for each respondent
19

ject to sampling and nonsampling errors. Sampling
errors occur because observations are made on a sam­
ple, not on the entire universe. Estimates based on the
different possible samples of the same size and sample
design could differ. The standard errors, which are a
measure of the sampling error in the estimates, are
calculated as part of the survey’s estimation process and
are available upon request.*
Nonsampling errors in the estimates can be attributed
to many sources, e.g., inability to obtain information
about all cases in the sample, mistakes in recording or
coding the data, definitional difficulties, etc. To
minimize the nonsampling errors in the estimates, the
completed questionnaires are edited and apparent in­
consistencies are checked.

was calculated as the original weight times an adjust­
ment factor for unit and item nonresponse.
The estimate of the total number of in-scope injured
workers for each question is equal to the sum of the
final weights of the respondents.
The estimate of the percent of workers giving a par­
ticular answer to a question is the sum of the final
weights of the respondents giving a particular answer
divided by the estimate of the total number of in-scope
injured workers.
Estimates of mean lost workdays and nights of
hospitalization do not include cases in which workers in­
dicated lost time or hospitalization but failed to provide
numerical estimates of the amount of time.
Reliability

All estimates derived from a sample survey are sub­




20

Appendix B. Participating State Agencies




21

Appendix C. Survey Questionnaire




Bureau of Labor Statistics
Work Injury Report-Warehouse Workers
T h e in fo r m a tio n c o lle c te d on th is fo rm b y th e Bu re au o f
L a b o r S ta tis tic s a n d th e S ta te A g en cies c o o p e ra tin g in its
s ta tis tic a l p ro g ra m w ill be h e ld in c o n fid e n c e a n d w ill be
used fo r s ta tis tic a l pu rp o s e s o n ly .

Survey
Code

2

8

^

U.S. Department of Labor

T h is r e p o r t is a u th o r iz e d b y la w 2 9 U .S .C . 2.
Y o u r v o lu n ta r y c o o p e ra tio n is n e e d e d to m ake
th e re s u lts o f th is su rv e y co m p re h e n s iv e ,
a c cu ra te , a n d tim e ly .

^, , i i i i 1i i

2.

-

O B JEC TS:

(C h e c k th e one a n s w e r c lo s e s t to w h a t y o u w ere d o in g )
□

J LL

~ \

IF Y O U W E R E M A N U A L L Y L I F T I N G , C A R R Y IN G . O R M O V IN G

A . W h a t w ere y o u d o in g a t th e tim e o f y o u r ac c id e n t?
1.

I o r it i A p p ro v e d
O .M .B . N o. 1 2 2 0 (KM 7
A p p r o v a l I x , jr.-s 9 . 3 0 /8 6

L o a d in g /u n lo a d *n g tr u c k , tra c e r, ra ilc a r, or o th e r ve h ic le
G.

L J M o v in g s to c k Ib o x e s , b a rre ls, c o n ta in e rs , e tc .) to o r f r o m storage

D escribe th e o b je c t y o u w ere liftin g , c a rry in g , o r m o v in g . ( F u r e x a m p le :
Case o f c a n n e d goods, b o x o f p a tte r g o od s, e tc .)

area
•3.

□

S ta c k in g o r p la c in g s to c k

4

Q

5.

CD P a c k in g o r w ra p p in g ite m s fo r s h ip p in g

6.

□

S e le c tin g o r p ic k in g ite m s
In s p e c tin g o r la b e lin g s to c k , o r d o in g in v e n to ry

7.

CD D o in g c h a n u p w o r k (s w e e p in g flo o rs , d u m p in g t ia : h , e tc l

8.

CJ R e p a irin g , a d ju s tin g , c le a n in g , o r m a in ta in in g e q u ip m e n t or

9

TJ O th e r

H.

C o u ld y o u ha ve use d liftin g /h a n d lin g e q u ip m e n t (such as a d o lly , f o r k l i f t ,
e tc .) f o r th is w o rk ? 'C h e c k o n e I

m a c h in e ry

1.

(D e s c rib e ) _________________________ ___ __________________

2

□

n

N o - n o t e n o u g h space to use it

(Check, o n e .)

n

o - m a te r ia l h a d to be m o v e d b y h a n d

□

No

4

B . W h ic h be s t de scrib es w h e re y o u w ere w h p n y o u r a c c id e n t o c c u rre d I 8
7
6
5
4
3
2
.9
1.

.

3.

□

Ves

o th e r reason

( E x p la in ) _____________________________________

LD In sid e tr u c k , tr a ile r , o r ra ilc a r

2.

□

T e m p o ra ry sto ra ge (s tag ing ) area o l w a reh ou se

3.

O

L o n g te rm s to ra ge area o l w areh ou se

4.

O

L o a d in y d o c k

I f yes:
a.

( D e s c rib e / ___________________________

5.

□

O th e i area o f w a re h o u s e

6.

□

O u td o o r lo c a tio n (o th e r th a n lo a d in g d o c k )

7.

L I O th e r

W h a t ty p e o t e q u ip m e n t c o u ld y o u have used?
(C he ck a ll th a t a p p ly .)
1.

CD P o w e re d p a lle t ja c k

3.

C. W ere y o u at g ro u n d o r flo o r leve l a t th e tim e of y o u r a ccid e n t?

□

2.

(D e s c rib e ) _______________________________________________

F o r k lif t

L J M anual c a rt, h a n d tr u c k , or d o lly

(C h e c k o n e .)

4.

□

C onveyor

1.

5.

□

C rane

6.

0

O th e r:

□

Yes

2.

L 3 N o —o n p ile d or s ta c k e d m a te ria ls

3.

O

4.

□

( D e s c r ib e ) ____________________________

N o —o n lad de r
b

N o - o n s ta irs

W h y w e r e n 't y o u u sin g it? (C h e ck a ll th a t a p p ly .)

LJ D id n o t t h in k it was necessary

5.

L ] N o —o n s h e lf o r ra c k

1.

6.

□

N o —in o r o n v e h ic le

2.

L ] In b a d c o n d itio n o r n o t w o r k in g p r o p e rly

7.

D

N o -o th e r:

3.
5.

accident? (C h e c k o n e .)
1. □

CD D id n o t k n o w h o w to o p e ra te
O

N o t a u th o r iz e d to use th a t ty p e o f e q u ip m e n t

6.

D. W ha t e q u ip m e n t w e re yo u operatin g o r using a t th e tim e o f y o u r

LD Too m u c h tr o u b le to use

4.

(D e s c rib e ) __________________________________________

□

O th e r:

( D e scrib e )

F o r k lift

2.

D

P o w e re d p a lle t ja c k

3.

O

M an ua l c a rt, h a n d tr u c k , o r d o lly

4.

CD S h rin k w ra p o r o th e r w ra p p in g m a c h in e

5.

CD P la tfo rm o n f o r k l i f t o r cran e to l i f t w o r k e r :

6.

D

C onveyor

7.

□

C rane

8.

□

O th e r:

9.

□

N o t o p e ra tin g o r u s in g a n y e q u ip m e n t

C O N T IN U E W IT H I, B E LO W .

fD e s c rib e )

(D e s c rib e ) _______________________________________________

I.

E. Was th e lo catio n , e q u ip m e n t or ty p e o i w o rk d iffe re n t in an y w ay fro m

W ere th e re a n y c o n d itio n s a t th e w o r k s ite w h ic h y o u fe e l c o n tr ib u te d
t o y o u r a cc id e n t? (C h e c k a ll th a t a p p ly .)

y o u r n o rm al w o rk? (C h e c k a ll th a t a p p ly .)

1. Q

S lip p e r y f lo o r su rfa c e

( D e s c r ib e ) _____________________________

1.

O

Yes—u sin g d iff e r e n t e q u ip m e n t

2.

□

Yes—w o r k in g a t d iff e r e n t lo c a tio n

2. LD W o r k in g in a lim ite d area o r space

Yes—d o in g d iffe r e n t ty p e o f w o r k

3. O

No

4.

CD L ift in g / h a n d lin g e q u ip m e n t la c k e d sa fe ty fe a tu re s (such as ro ll

5.

D

C lu tte r e d w o r k area (tra s h ly in g o n flo o r , e tc .)

(B e as s p e c ific as p o ssible . F o r e x a m p le : S p ra in e d ba c k lif t in g case o f

6.

□

S tru c tu r e was b r o k e n o r in bad c o n d itio n

m e rc h a n d is e th a t b ro k e , s tr u c k b y b o x th a t fe ll o f f d o lly , fo o t ru n o ve r b y

7.

CD T o o ls o r e q u ip m e n t in b a d c o n d itio n o r n o t w o r k in g p ro p e rly

f o r k l i f t th a t w as a c c id e n ta lly a c tiv a te d , e tc .)

8.

□

9.

CD N o c o n d itio n s a t w o r k s ite c o n tr ib u te d to in ju r y

3.

D

4. □

P o or lig h tin g
ba r, o ve rh e a d g u a rd , b a c k u p w a rn in g , e tc .).

F.

( E x p la in ) _________

Describe th e events leading to y o u r accid en t

J.

O th e r:

(D e s c rib e )____

W ere th e re a n y o th e r fa c to rs w h ic h y o u fe e l c o n tr ib u te d to y o u r a c cid e n t?
(C h e ck a l l th a t a p p ly .)
2.

C W o rk in g w h e n tir e d o r fa tig u e d
D
C C o -w o rk e r's a c t iv ity : ( E x p la in )
D

3.

□

1.

4.

P re vio u s p h y s ic a l c o n d itio n :

______________________________ .—

( E x p la in )

CD W o rk in g to o fa st

5.

CD W o rk in g u n d e r stress

6.

C Was
D

7.

D

L ift in g , c a rry in g , o r m o v in g an o b je c t th a t w as to o heavy

8.

□

I n an a w k w a rd p o s itio n

careless in w h a t y o u w ere d o in g

9 . C N o t g ive n p ro p e r tr a in in g o r in s tr u c tio n s fo r jo b
D
10. C S a fe ty ru le s were n o t e n fo rc e d
D
11. C O th e r: ( D e s c r ib e ) ________________________________________
D
12.

D

N o o th e r fa c to rs c o n tr ib u te d to in ju r y

IF Y O U W E R E M A N U A L L Y L I F T I N G . C A R R Y IN G .
O R M O V IN G O B JE C T S . C O M P L E T E G A N D H ;

CONTINUE ON REVERSE SIDE.

I F N O T , G O T O I.

B L S 9 8 i (A u g u s t 19 8 4 )

22

R. W hat typ e o f p ro tectiv e eq u ip m en t were you w e a rin g or u s in g a t th e

K. W hat were yo u r injuries? (C h e c k a ll th a t a p p ly .)

D

1.

tim e o f y o u r accident? (C h eck a ll th a t a p p ly .)

F r a c tu r e ( s ) - In d ic a te area(s) b ro k e n (leg, r ib , an k le , etc.)

2.

□

3.
4.

C Bruises, c o n tu s io n s
D
C M uscle sp ra in o r s tra in ,
D

5.

D D is lo c a tio n

6.

C
D

1 . CD H a rd h a t
D G loves

C uts, lac e ra tio n s , o r p u n c tu re s

2.

3. D
to r n lig a m e n ts , o r p u lle d m uscle

H ernia

7.

D O b je c t in eye(s)

C
D

B ra in con c u s s io n

D

O th e r:

glasses, goggles,

or

o th e r eye p r o te c tio n

CD N o t w ea rin g o r usin g p ro te c tiv e e q u ip m e n t

8.

(D e s c rib e ) ____________________________________________
S. W h a t safety train ing ( i f a n y ) d id y o u receive fo r this job? (C h e ck a ll th a t

D id y o u r in ju ry cause y o u to lose tim e fro m w o rk b ey o n d the day of

a p p ly .)

injury?
□

D S a fe ty belt tied o f f w ith lanyard

6. C Seat belt
D
7 C O th e r: ( D e s c r ib e ) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------D

8.

1.

C S a fe ty
D

5.

9.
L.

S te e l-to e d safety shoes o r ste e l-to e d b o o ts

4.

No

2. □

1. CD F o r k l i f t o p e ra to r tr a in in g course

Yes

2.

□

3.

C P ro p e r
D

H o w to o p e ra te o th e r p o w e re d e q u ip m e n t. (D e scrib e

4.

CD W hen a n d w h e re to use p r o te c tiv e e q u ip m e n t, (h a rd h a t, safety

5.

CD Im p o rta n c e of kee p in g flo o r a n d aisles free o f trash and o th e r
objects

e q u ip m e n t ) ______________________________________________________
If y « :
a.

H o w lo n g w ere y o u (o r d o y o u e x p e c t to be) o u t o f w o rk ?

shoes, sa fe ty b e lt a n d la n y a rd , etc,)

(N O T E : D o n o t c o u n t th e day o f th e in ju ry , (toys on light d u ty
w o rk , n o rm al days o ff, o r holidays.)

6. C P ro v id e d w r itt e n safe job p ro ce d u re s fo r jo b
D
7. C O th e r sa fe ty tr a in in g : (D e scrib e)
D
8. C N ever rece ive d sa fe ty tra in in g fo r th is jo b
D

__________________________ W o rk d a y s

b.

H ave y o u re tu rn e d to w o rk ?

m an ua l lif t in g m e th o d s

(C heck o n e .)

1. C N o —still o f f because o f injury
D
2. C Yes—re tu rn e d t o re g u la r jo b duties
D
3. C Y e s - r e tu r n e d to r e s tric te d a c t iv ity
D
4. C O th e r: (E x p la in )
D

d o in g w he n in ju re d

T . I f yo u d id receive safety train ing fo r this job, h o w was it given? (C heck
a ll th a t a p p ly .)

4.
5.
M.

C No
D

2.

□

D O th e r: (D e s c rib e )__________________________ 1____________________

2.
3.

D id y o u r in ju ry require y o u to be h o spitalized o vernight o r longer?
1.

C P rin te d m a te ria ls (po sters,
D
C F ilm s
D
C O n -th e -jo b tr a in in g
D
C S a fe ty m eetings
D

1.
( lig h t d u ty )

6. C
D

b o o k le ts , etc.)

N ever rece ive d sa fe ty tr a in in g fo r th is

job

Yes
U . Does yo u r co m p an y have a labor-m anagem ent c o m m itte e th a t meets on
safety issues? (C h eck o n e .)

If yes:
a.

1.

C
D

No

2.

C
D

Yes

3.

C
D

D o n 't

know

H o w lon g w ere y o u (o r d o y o u e x p e c t to be) in th e h o s p ita l?
V . H o w many people are c u rre n tly e m p lo ye d in the establishm ent w here
you w o rk? (C h e ck on e.)
1.

N.

H o w lo n g had y o u been w o rk in g du rin g y o u r s h ift b efo re y o u r accident

□

Less

2. C 1 to
D
3.

□

2 to

4.

C
D

4

to

th a n 1 h o u r

2 hours
4 h o u rs

1 to 10 e m p lo ye e s

C
D

11 o r m o re em p lo yee s

W.

occurred? (C h e c k on e .)
1.

□

2.

N ig h ts

H o w do y o u th in k yo u r accid en t co u ld have been prevented? (C heck
a ll th a t a p p ly .)

C 6 to 8 h o u rs
D
6. C 8 hours or more
D
7. C D o n 't re m e m b e r
D
5.

1. C M a k in g area safer b e fo re w o r k in g
D
2. C M o re o r b e tte r sa fe ty tr a in in g
D
3. C U sin g p r o te c tiv e e q u ip m e n t: (D e scrib e) 4
D
7
6
5

6 hours

4.
O.

5.

W ha t was y o u r jo b title a t th e tim e o f y o u r accident?
(B e s p e c ific :

6.

F o r k lif t o p e ra to r, p ic k e r, s e le c to r, o rd e r p u lle r, cle a n u p

7.

p e rson , la b o re r, c h e c k e r, e tc .)

C U sing safer w o r k p ro ce d u re s o n y o u r p a rt
D
C H avin g c o m p a n y e n fo rc e safe work pra ctices
D
C M o re h e lp to d o jo b
D
C P ro v id in g m o re o r b e tte r sa fe ty fe a tu re s o n e q u ip m e n t
D
w a rn in g , ove rhe ad gu ard , ro ll ba r, e tc .):

8.
9.
P.

10.

H o w lo n g had y o u w o rk ed at th is jo b b efo re y o u r accident occurred?

11.

(C h eck o n e .)

1. C Less th a n 1 m o n th
D
2. C
D 1 to 6 m o n th s
3. C 6 months to 1 year
D

4.
5.

C 1
D
C 5
D




C U sing Iiftin g /h a n d lin g e q u ip m e n t
D
C M o re tim e to d o jo b
D
C O th e r: (D e scrib e ) ________________________
D
C D o n o t th in k it c o u ld ha ve been p re v e n te d
D

to 5 years
years o r m o re

X.

D id y o u r em p lo y e r tak e an y action(s) a fte r y o u r accident to prevent
this typ e o f accid en t fro m happening to others? ( C he ck on e.)
1.

a ll w a reh ou se jo b s y o u have ha d.) (C h e c k o n e .)

□

No

2.

GL O verall, h o w long had y o u been e m p lo ye d in warehouse jobs? ( In d u d e

C
D
C
D

Yes: ( D e scrib e )

3.
1.

□

Less th a n 1 m o n th

4.

□

2.

C 1 to 6 m o n th s
D
C 6 months to 1 year
D

5.

C 5
D

3.

(b a c k u p

(D e scrib e ) ____________

1 to 5 years
years o r m o re

23

D o n 't k n o w

'___________________________________________

Work Injury Reports
The following reports may be purchased from the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service
(NTIS), 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161. Cost $9.95 for paper copy, $5.95 for fiche. Add $3 for handling fee.
• Survey of Ladder Accidents Resulting in Injuries
n t i s Accession No. PB83 207985 (1978)
• Survey of Welding and Cutting Accidents Resulting in Injuries
n t i s Accession No. PB83 208017 (1978)
• Survey of Scaffold. Accidents Resulting in Injuries
n t i s Accession No. PB83 208009 (1978)
• Survey of Power Saw Accidents Resulting in Injuries
n t i s Accession No. PB83 207993 (1978)
• Accidents Involving Eye Injuries
NTIS Accession No. PB83 182535 (1980)
• Accidents Involving Face Injuries
n t i s Accession No. PB8° 183335 (1980)
• Accidents Involving Head Injuries
n t i s Accession No. PB83 183343 (1980)
• Accidents Involving Foot Injuries
NTIS Accession No. PB83 182527 (1981)
• Injuries Related to Servicing Equipment
. NTIS Accession No. PB83 182543 (1981)
• Back Injuries Associated with Lifting
n t i s Accession No. PB83 183285 (1982)
• Work-Related Hand Injuries and Upper Extremity Amputations
n t i s Accession No. PB83 183319 (1982)

The following report is available from the Office of Occupational Safety and Health Statistics, U.S. Department of
Labor, Room 4014, 601 D Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20212.
• Injuries in Oil and Gas Drilling and Services
Bulletin 2179 (1983)

Reports which may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, D.C. 20402:
• Injuries Resulting From Falls From Elevations
Bulletin 2195 (1984), $1.75.
• Injuries in the Logging Industry
Bulletin 2203 (1984), $1.75.
• Injuries Resulting From Falls on Stairs
Bulletin 2214 (1984), $1.75.
• Injuries to Construction Laborers
Bulletin 2252(1986), $1.75.
• Injuries to Warehouse Workers
Bulletin 2257 (1986), $1.75.




24

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