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injuries Related to
Serwicing Equipment
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
October 1981
Bulletin 2115

!
i

i




Injuries Related t©
SdrwBeing Equipm ent
U.S. Department of Labor
Raymond J. Donovan, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner
October 1981
Bulletin 2115




For sale l>y the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government F rin tin g Office
Washington, D.C.. 20402 - Price $2.50




Pr@ @
ffa©

This report summarizes the results of a survey of
workers injured while servicing equipment. The find­
ings of this survey, which was conducted by the Bu­
reau of Labor Statistics during 1980, will assist the Oc­
cupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
in developing safety standards, compliance strategy, and
training programs for reducing work-related injuries.
The survey was conducted by the Bureau’s Office of
Occupational Safety and Health Statistics, William
Mead, Acting Assistant Commissioner, in cooperation
with 25 States: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colora­
do, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky,
Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri,
Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.
The BLS regional offices coordinated State operations.
The Offices of Compliance, Standards Development,
Statistical Studies Coordination and Analysis, and
Training of OSHA and the Office of Safety Research
of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health contributed to the planning and development of
the survey. Lyn Pearson developed the computer pro­




grams, and Helen McDonald planned the survey and
prepared the report under the direction of Herbert
Schaffer.
The user should exercise caution in extrapolating sur­
vey data to population estimates because of limitations
of the survey design. States participating in data col­
lection may not represent the country as a whole; re­
porting requirements for workers’ compensation re­
ports, which are the source for selecting injuries for
study, vary among States; and the 4-month collection
period is not intended to represent the entire year. How­
ever, the data represent injured workers in the States
surveyed during the period studied and are, therefore,
valid for identifying injury patterns on a relative basis.
For analytical purposes, the incidence of injuries in­
curred while servicing equipment cannot be generated
or inferred from the data because information on expo­
sure is not currently available.
Material in this publication is in the public domain
and may, with appropriate credit, be reproduced with­
out permission.

ii

C O B ltteG U tS

Page

Summary of survey results.................................................................................................................

1

Tables:
Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected States, August-November 1980:
1. Industry distribution...............................................................................................................
2. Nature of injury........................................................................................................................
3. Part of body injured
.......................................................................................................
4. Type of accident....................................................................................
5. Source of injury........................................................................................................................
6. Age of worker............................................................................................................................
7. Sex of worker............................................................................................................................
8. Occupational distribution.......................................................................................................
9. Activity at time of accident.....................................................................................................
10. Type of power ............................................................................................. ............................
11. Extent of power shutdown.....................................................................................................
12. Lockout procedures and instruction.....................................................................................
13. Work information....................................................................................................................
14. Estimated lost workdays.........................................................................................................

3
4
5
5
6
7
7
8
10
11
12
13
15
16

Appendixes:
A. Survey explanatory note........................................................................................................... 17
B. Participating State agencies...................................................................................................... 18
C. Survey questionnaire ................................................................................................................ 19




iv

Summary ©f Survey ^©sults

7 percent of the injuries, accounted for 11 percent of
the fractures. The percentage of cuts was roughly pro­
portionate to the overall percentage of injuries in each
industry.
Nearly nine-tenths of the injuries resulted from con­
tact with moving machine parts. Industrial equipment
associated with the injury varied widely; printing
presses, conveyors, and packaging machines were the
more prevalent types, each accounting for about onetenth. Other sources of injuries included electrical ap­
paratus, saws, agitators, and slicers. Workers’ descrip­
tions of the equipment indicated that rollers were a
common hazard with many types of machinery. Onehalf of the workers indicated that no emergency shutoff
was within their reach at the time of the accident.
Five percent of the injuries were caused by contact
with electrical current. Such injuries usually occurred
while doing electrical repairs or installations. Occasion­
ally, workers performing other activities, such as clean­
ing, received shocks because of faulty or exposed wiring.
Workers described the type of service work they
were performing at the time of injury and how famil­
iar the work was to them. The tasks that led to the
greatest number of injuries were unjamming and clean­
ing activities, each accounting for about 30 percent of

The survey of workers injured while servicing equip­
ment showed that most injuries were caused by contact
with moving machine parts because of failure to turn
off the equipment. Injuries occurring to workers who
turned off equipment were most frequently caused by
accidental reactivation. The survey covered workers
who were injured while cleaning, repairing, unjamming,
or performing similar nonoperating tasks on industrial
equipment and electrical and piping systems.1
The injuries studied occurred to workers in almost
every industry group, although 74 percent were in man­
ufacturing. The four industries showing the higher pro­
portions of injuries were food and kindred products, 15
percent; paper and allied products, 7 percent; printing
and publishing, 7 percent; and fabricated metal prod­
ucts, 6 percent.
About as many injuries occurred in establishments
with 100 or more employees as in smaller firms. Onefifth of the injured workers were employed in firms
with 500 or more workers. Slightly more than one-half
of the injured workers reported that their establishments
had a safety officer. About one-fourth of the workers
indicated that no safety officers were employed where
they worked, while a like proportion did not know.
The predominant occupational class of workers in­
jured was machine operatives, who accounted for close
to one-half of those included in the survey. Craft work­
ers followed, representing slightly more than one-third.
The injuries were widely dispersed within these two
occupational classes. Mechanics and repairers repre­
sented 10 percent and printing press operators, 7
percent.
Six hundred and eighty-six respondents reported that
their injuries resulted in lost workdays. Nearly one-half
of the estimates of time lost exceeded 15 workdays.
Moreover, the average was 24 workdays for those work­
ers who lost time.
Three out of four injuries were to the hands and
fingers. Although cuts were the most common injury,
accounting for 1 out of 3 cases, fractures and contu­
sions each occurred in 1 out of 7 cases and amputations
in 1 out of 10 cases. As text table 1 shows, amputations
and fractures occurred most frequently in the food and
kindred products industry, which recorded the largest
proportion of injuries. The printing industry, which had
1

Text table 1. Nature of injury by industry, selected States,
August-November 1980
(Percents)

Industry

Cuts

Frac­
Other
tures

Total .................................

1

100

100

100

100

100

100

Food and kindred products....
Paper and allied products ......
Printing and publishing...........
Fabricated metal products .....
Machinery, except electrical ...
Electric and electronic
equipment.............................
Lumber and wood products ....
Rubber and miscellaneous
plastics products..................
Stone, clay, and glass
products...............................
Wholesale trade—nondurable
goods ...................................
Other industries ......................

See appendix A for types of injuries included in the survey.




All Amp­ Con­
injuri­ uta­
tu­
es
tions sions

15
7
7
6
5

21
2
6
9
7

15
12
10
4
4

18
7
6
5
6

12
8
11
7
4

11
5
6
4
3

4
4

5
5

3
2

3
6

6
3

5
1

4

6

5

4

3

4

4

1

8

3

3

4

4
40

3
36

2
37

5
35

4
38

3
53

About one-half of the workers who turned off the
power were injured by accidental reactivation of equip­
ment, most frequently by a co-worker who was unaware
that the equipment was being serviced. More than onefifth of the workers who turned the power off were
injured by residual energy when either the moving parts
continued to coast or the machinery moved when a
jam-up was cleared. Most of the remaining injuries to
workers who had turned off the power were the result
of faulty power switches or valves which did not work
properly.
Among those who were injured after turning off the
power were nearly one-fifth who took additional steps
such as disconnecting the main power source, breaking
the circuit, or tagging2 equipment. The extra precau­
tionary measures were sometimes carried out for reasons
other than safety. For example, in cases involving pipe
systems, draining the system after closing the valve was
simply a necessary step to accomplish the service work.
Only two workers had attempted to fully lock out3 the
equipment to prevent accidental reactivation or contact
with electricity. These lockouts, however, were ap­
parently not tested before servicing the equipment. In
one case, the lockout had been done on the wrong
power line and in the other, a second power line had
been spliced into the wiring beyond the point of
lockout.
The workers surveyed generally indicated little ex­
perience or training in lockout procedures. About twothirds noted that they had never done a lockout and a
nearly equal proportion had received no training on
lockout procedures. Those most likely to have experi­
ence in lockouts were electricians and mechanics. Only
one-fourth of the workers were aware of any policy
their employers had for performing lockouts. About
two-fifths did not know of any policy and one-third re­
ported there was no lockout policy.

the accidents. Twelve percent occurred while making
adjustments to the equipment. Maintenance and repair
work was involved in 13 percent of the injuries and
set-up work, 7 percent. Less frequent activities were
electrical work, installing, inspecting, and testing
equipment.
Workers’ lack of experience or familiarity with the
job did not appear to be a contributing factor in most
cases. Eighty-four percent of the respondents had done
the task before on the same or similar equipment. The
vast majority of the workers performed this type of
work daily or weekly, and most had more than 1 year’s
experience.
Nearly 8 out of 10 workers surveyed failed to turn
off the equipment before performing the service work
that resulted in injury. It should be noted that some
machines were equipped with activating controls, such
as foot pedals or jog buttons, in addition to on/off
switches. Sixty-one respondents commented that their
accidents were caused by accidental activation of these
auxiliary controls.
The reasons most frequently given for not turning
off the equipment were that workers thought it was
unnecessary at the time or that the task could not be
done with the power off. The latter explanation, how­
ever, often reflected the difficulty rather than the im­
possibility of doing the work with the equipment shut
down. For example, many workers injured while clean­
ing rollers remarked that wiping across rotating rolls
was the most efficient way to do the job. One out of
eight workers claimed that the company did not require
the equipment to be turned off for the activity per­
formed at the time of injury. Pressure to keep produc­
tion on schedule was mentioned by 1 out of 5 workers,
some of whom noted that deactivating a machine, such
as a conveyor, would shut down an entire production
system. In addition, 1 out of 10 reported that they did
not realize the power was on. Comments by these work­
ers often reflected lack of knowledge about such fea­
tures as automatic cycling systems or multiple power
sources.




2Tagging refers to the attachment of tags on equipment’s power
sources to advise co-workers not to turn on power.
3Lockout was defined as “disconnecting or shutting down and
locking equipment controls in off position.”

2




Table 1. Industry distribution: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected
States, August-November 1980
Industry

Workers

Percent

Total ..............................................................................................

833

100

Agriculture, forestry, and fishing.........................................................
Agricultural production—crops.....................................................
Agricultural services.....................................................................

12
7
1
4

1
1
(1
)
0

Mining 2 ................................................................................................
Oil and gas extraction...................................................................

1
1

(')
0

Construction........................................................................................
General building contractors........................................................

35
4
8
23

0

Special trade contractors .............................................................

Tobacco manufactures.................................................................
Textile mill products.....................................................................
Apparel and other textile products...............................................
Furniture and fixtures....................................................................

Ruhher and miscellaneous plastics products .............................
Leather and leather products ......................................................

Fabricated metal products............................................................
Machinery, except electrical.........................................................

Transportation and public utilities ......................................................

Wholesale trade—durable goods .................................................

Building materials and garden supplies.......................................
Food stores...................................................................................
Fating and drinking places...........................................................

3

1
3

499
125
4
21
6
30
18
58
62
22
6
37
17
33
18
46
40
33
16
10
17

60
15
(’)
3
1
4
2
7
7
3
1
4
2
4
2
6
5
4
2
1
2

19
3
2
1
13

2
(')
0
0
2

57
25
32

7
3
4

31
2
3
6
1
16
3
8
1
3
1
2
1

See footnotes at end of table.

4

4
0
0
1
0
2
0
1
(’)
o
o
0
0

Table 1. Continued— Industry distribution: Injuries related to servicing equipment,
selected States, August-November 1980
Industry

Workers

Percent

Auto repair, services, and garages.............................................
Miscellaneous repair services......................................................
Amusement and recreation services ...........................................
Health services .............................................................................
Legal services...............................................................................
Educational services ....................................................................
Social services..............................................................................
Membership organizations............................................................
Miscellaneous services................................................................

43
3
9
1
1
9
6
1
6
3
1
3

5
(')
1
0
0
1
1
(1
)
1
(1
)
0
0

Other industries, not elsewhere classified .........................................

8

1

Services...............................................................................................
Personal services .........................................................................

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
2 Limited to oil and gas extraction.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of

injuries included in the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation
reports.

Table 2. Nature of injury: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected States,
August-November 1980
Workers

Nature of injury
Total ..............................................................................................

Cut, laceration, puncture—open wound.............................................
Fracture ..............................................................................................

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of




Percent

833

100

87
52
10
1
114
293
4
21
120
1
10
9
62
1
48

10
6
1
(’)
14
35
(')
3
14
0
1
1
7
0
6

injuries included in the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation
reports.

4




Table 3. Part of body injured: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected
States, August-November 1980
Workers

Part of body

Percent

Total ..............................................................................................

833

100

Head....................................................................................................
N e ck....................................................................................................

14
1
727
2
44
17
3
1
17
3
3
15
140
487
39
9
20
42
19
9
10
1

2
O
87
(’)
5
2
(')
o
2
O
(’)
2
17
58
5
1
2
5
2
1
1
(')

Upper extremities, unspecified.....................................................
Arm(s)............................................................................................
Arm(s), unspecified................................................................
Upper arm ...............................................................................
Elbow......................................................................................
Forearm...................................................................................
Arm, multiple ..........................................................................
Arm, not elsewhere classified...............................................
W rist..............................................................................................
Hand..............................................................................................
Finger............................................................................................
Upper extremities, multiple................................. .........................
T ru n k....................................................................................................
Lower extremities ................................................................................
Multiple parts.......................................................................................
Body system, unspecified.............................................................

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of

injuries included in the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation
reports.

Table 4. Type of accident: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected States,
August-November 1980
Type of accident

Workers

Total ..............................................................................................

833

Struck against................................................ ....................................
Struck against, unspecified ..........................................................
Stationary object...........................................................................
Moving object................................................................................
Struck b y ..............................................................................................
Struck by, unspecified...................................................................
Falling object.................................................................................
Flying object................................................................................
Struck by, not elsewhere classified ............................................
Fall from elevation...............................................................................
Fall on same level...............................................................................
Caught in, under, between.................................................................
Caught in, under, between, unspecified ......................................
Inrunning or meshing objects.......................................................
Moving and stationary object.......................................................
Two or more moving objects.......................................................
Caught in, under, between, not elsewhere classified.................
Contact with electric current...............................................................
Contact with temperature extremes...................................................
Contact with radiations, caustics, e t c ................................................
By inhalation..................................................................................
By absorption................................................................................
Nonclassifiable....................................................................................

65
1
13
51
84
3
7
7
67
2
2
594
88
202
107
76
121
47
22
12
1
11
5

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of

Percent
100
8
0
2
6
10
(’)
1
1
8
(1
)
0
71
11
24
13
9
15
6
3
1
O
1
1

injuries included in the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation
reports.

5

Table 5. Source of injury: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected States,
August-November 1980
Source of injury

Workers

Percent

Total ..............................................................................................

833

100

Boilers, pressure vessels....................................................................

5
2
11
3
65
45
4
3
1
5
643
30
26
6
15
11
5
18
3
15
63
4
22
44
78
38
30
3
27
6
3
196
9
13
1
2
5
1
1
2
8
4

1
(’)
1

Coal and petroleum products .............................................................
Conveyors............................................................................................
Electric apparatus...............................................................................

Liquids not elsewhere classified........................................................
Machines .............................................................................................
Machines, unspecified..................................................................
Agricultural machines, not elsewhere classified.........................
Casting forging, welding .............................................................
Highway construction...................................................................
Packaging, wrapping ....................................................................

Printing..........................................................................................
Rolls " ...........................................................................................
Saws..............................................................................................
Screening, separating ..................................................................

Weaving knitting, spinning...........................................................
Machines, not elsewhere classified .............................................
Mechanical power transmission apparatus........................................
Metal item s..........................................................................................
Mineral items, nonmetallic, not elsewhere classified ........................
Pumps and prime movers ..................................................................
Steam...................................................................................................
Vehicles...............................................................................................
Wood ite m s.......................-..................................................................
Working surfaces................................................................................
Miscellaneous, not elsewhere classified ............................................
Nonclassifiable....................................................................................

8
5

o
o

ft

1
77
4
3
1
2
1
1
2
0
2
8
(1
)
3
5
9
5
4
0
3
1
ft
24
1
2
ft
{')
1
0
(1
)

ft

ft

1

injuries included in the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation
reports.

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of




ft

6




Tab!© 6. Age of worker: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected States,
August-Movember 1980
Age

Workers

Percent

Total ...........

833

100

16—19 years.....
20—24 years.....
25—34 years.....
35—44 years.....
45—54 years.....
55—64 years.....
65 years or more
Not available.....

68
177
233
142
120
59
5
29

8
21
28
17
14
7
1
3

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of
injuries included in the survey.

SOURCE: State workers' compensation
reports,

Table 7. Sex of worker: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected States,
August-Movember 1980
Sex

Workers

Percent

Total ..............................................................................................

833

100

Men ......................................................................................................
Women.................................................................................................

649
184

78
22

SOURCE: State workers’ compensation reports.

7

Table 8. Occupational distribution: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected
States, August-Wovember 1980
Occupation

Workers

Percent

Total ..............................................................................................

833

100

Professional, technical, and kindred workers....................................

12

1

Managers and administrators, excluding farm ...................................

13

2

Clerical and kindred workers .............................................................

19

2

Craft and kindred workers..................................................................
Bakers...........................................................................................
Boilermakers .................................................................................
Bookbinders .................................................................................
Bulldozer operators ......................................................................
Cabinetmakers ..............................................................................
Carpenters....................................................................................
Compositors and typesetters.......................................................
Electricians...................................................................................
Electrician apprentices.................................................................
Electric power line and cable installers and repairers ...............
Excavating, grading, and road machine operators,
excluding bulldozers..................................................................
Blue-collar worker supervisors, not elsewhere classified...........
Forge and hammer operators......................................................
Glaziers.........................................................................................
Inspectors, sealers, and graders, log and lumber.......................
Inspectors, not elsewhere classified............................................
Job and die setters, metal ...........................................................
Machinists.....................................................................................
Machinist apprentices ..................................................................
Mechanics and repairers .............................................................
Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration................................
Aircraft mechanics.....................................................................
Farm implement mechanics......................................................
Heavy equipment mechanics ....................................................
Loom fixers.................................................................................
Office machine repairers............................................................
Miscellaneous mechanics and repairers...................................
Mechanics and repairers, not specified....................................
Millers; grain, flour, fe e d ..............................................................
Millwrights.....................................................................................
Molders, metal ..............................................................................
Opticians, lens grinders, polishers..............................................
Plumbers and pipefitters..............................................................
Power station operators ..............................................................
Printing press operators ..............................................................
Printing press apprentices............................................................
Rollers and finishers, metal .........................................................
Sheetmetal workers and tinsmiths..............................................
Stationary engineers ....................................................................
Structural metal workers..............................................................

281
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
27
1
3

34
0
O
0
0
(’)
(1
)
0
3
0
0

Tool and die makers....................................................................
Specified craft apprentices, not elsewhere classified .......k
........
Craft and kindred workers, not elsewhere classified..................

2
35
1
1
1
1
6
13
2
83
4
1
1
38
1
4
18
16
2
5
3
1
5
1
59
2
1
2
4
1
1
6
1
2

Operatives, excluding transport..........................................................
Asbestos and insulation workers.................................................
Assemblers...................................................................................
Bottling and canning operatives..................................................
Checkers, examiners, inspectors; manufacturing ......................
Cutting operatives, not elsewhere classified ..............................
Drywall installers and lathers.......................................................
Filers, polishers, sanders, buffers ...............................................
Furnace tenders, smelters, and pourers; m etal.........................
Graders and sorters, manufacturing ............................................
Laundry and dry cleaning operatives, not elsewhere classified ..
Meat cutters and butchers, excluding manufacturing.................
Meat cutters and butchers, manufacturing .................................
Mine operatives, not elsewhere classified ..................................
Mixing operatives..........................................................................

373
2
15
6
4
6
1
5
1
1
2
1
2
1
3

See footnotes at end of table.




8

0
4
0
0
0
0
1
2
(1
)
10
0
0
0
5
0
0
2
2
0
1
0
0
1
(')
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
45
0
2
1
0
1
0
1
(’)
0
0
0
0
0
0




Table 8. Continued—Occupational distribution: Injuries related to servicing
equipment, selected States, August-November 1980
Occupation

Workers

Oilers and greasers, excluding auto .............................
Packers and wrappers, excluding retail.........................
Painters, manufactured articles .....................................
Photographic process workers ......................................
Drill press operatives .....................................................
Grinding machine operatives .........................................
Lathe and milling machine operatives...........................
Precision machine operatives, not elsewhere classified
Punch and stamping press operatives ..........................
Riveters and fasteners...................................................
Sawyers ..........................................................................
Sewers and stitchers .....................................................
Shoemaking machine operatives ..................................
Solderers ........................................................................
Furnace tenders and stokers, excluding metal ............
Carding, lapping, combing operative.............................
Knitters, loopers, toppers ...............................................
Spinners, twisters, winders.............................................
Weavers..........................................................................
Textile operatives, not elsewhere classified .................
Welders and flame cutters............................................
Winding operatives, not elsewhere classified................
Machine operatives, miscellaneous specified...............
Machine operatives, not specified.................................
Miscellaneous operatives...............................................
Operatives, not specified.................................................

1

31
2
1

3
4
4
2
10
1
8

Percent

0

4
0
0
(')
( 1)

(’)
0
1

0

6
5
1
1

1
1
1

2
2
6

5
123
30
53
19

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
15
4
6
2

Transport equipment operatives

10

1

Laborers, excluding fa rm ...............................................
Construction laborers, excluding carpenter helpers
Freight, material handlers........................................
Garbage collectors................................... ...............
Gardeners and groundskeepers, excluding farm ....
Stock handlers.........................................................
Vehicle and equipment cleaners............................
Warehouse laborers, not elsewhere classified.......
Miscellaneous laborers............................................
Laborers, not specified............................................

94
5
8

11
1
1

1

3
2
12
2

(’)
0
0
1

0

1

19

Service workers, excluding private household

4
3

8

Farm laborers and farm laborer supervisors

37
24

2

Nonclassifiable
injuries included in the survey.
SOURCE: State workers’ compensation
reports.

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of

9

Table 9. Activity at time of accident: Injuries related to servicing equipment,
selected States, August-November 1980
Workers

Item

Percent

Which of the following best describes what you were doing
when the accident occurred?
Total ..............................................................................................

833

100

Unjamming object(s) from equipment................................................
Cleaning equipment ............................................................................
Repairing equipment...........................................................................
Performing maintenance (oiling, etc.) ................................................
Installing equipment ............................................................................
Adjusting equipment............................................................................
Doing set-up work ..............................................................................
Performing electrical w ork..................................................................
Inspecting equipment..........................................................................
Testing material or equipment............................................................
Other activity.......................................................................................

250
245
77
34
13
99
57
29
15
12
2

30
29
9
4
2
12
7
3
2
1
0

Total ..............................................................................................

802

100

N o ........................................................................................................
Yes ......................................................................................................

517
285

64
36

798

100

81
672
45

10
84
6

Total ..............................................................................................

814

100

Less than 2 minutes ...........................................................................
2 to 15 minutes ...................................................................................
15 minutes to 1 hour ..........................................................................
1 to 8 hours ........................................................................................
More than 8 hours...............................................................................
Don’t kn o w ..........................................................................................

328
253
124
63
4
42

40
•31
15
8
0
5

Total ..............................................................................................

768

100

Daily.....................................................................................................
About once a w eek.............................................................................
About once a month ...........................................................................
About once a year...............................................................................
First time you did this type of work ...................................................

429
110
106
42
81

56
14
14
5
11

Total ..............................................................................................

833

100

Injured by machine parts that were in motion...................................
Injured by contact with electrical current...........................................
Injured by chemicals, hot liquids, or other hazardous material........
Injured by falling machine p a rts.........................................................
O th e r...................................................................................................

735
45
29
10
14

88
5
3
1
2

Was the task due to a breakdown during operation?

Had you done this type of task before?

N o ........................................................................................................
Yes—on same or similar equipment..................................................
Yes—but on different equipment .......................................................
How long would this task have taken to complete if you had
not been injured?

Estimate how often you do this type of task.

How did your injury occur?

1 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of
injuries included in the survey. Because incom­




plete questionnaires were used, the total
number of responses may vary by question.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaire.

10




Table 10. Type of power: Injuries related to servicing equipment, selected States,
August-November 1980
Item

Workers

Percent

Indicate all of the equipment’s power sources.
Total 1

828
751

Electric..............................
Hydraulic............. ..............
Pneumatic (air)..................
Pressurized (as in pipeline)
Steam ................................
Gravity...............................
Spring a ctio n .....................
Gas or diesel engine.........
Don’t know power source .

(’)
91
14
19
4

112

155
32
16
5

2
1

25
27

3
3
3

Total ..........................

622

100

120 v o lts ..........................
More than 120 vo lts.........
Don't know voltage.........

76
283
263

45
42

Total ...........................

474

100

Single phase ................... .
Multiphase........................
Don’t know type of power

61
190
223

13
40
47

T o ta l..............................................................................................

819

100

N o .........................................................................................................
Y e s .......................................................................................................
Don’t kn o w ..........................................................................................

411
380
28

50
46
3

779

0

596
54
92
43

77
7

21

If electric:
Indicate voltage.

12

Indicate type of power.

Was there an emergency shutoff within your reach at the time
of the accident?

What kind of warning system, if any, did the equipment have
to indicate it was activated or about to be activated?
Total 1
None..................................................................
Bells, alarms, or other audible warning system
Lights or other visual warning system.............
Don’t kn o w ........................................................
1 Because more than one response is pos­
sible, the sum of the responses and percent­
ages may not equal the total. Percentages are
calculated by dividing each response by the
total number of persons who answered the
question.

11

12
6

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of
injuries included in the survey. Because incom­
plete questionnaires were used, the total
number of responses may vary by question.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaire.

Table 11. Extent of power shutdown: Injuries related to servicing equipment,
selected States, August-November 1980
Item

Workers

Percent

Was the equipment turned off before doing the task?
Total ..............................................................................................

833

100

No 1 ......................................................................................................
Yes ......................................................................................................

653
180

78
22

T ota l2 3
............................................................................................

592

(2
)

Felt it would slow down production or take too lo n g ........................
Not required by company procedures...............................................
Didn’t know how to .............................................................................
Didn’t think it was necessary..............................................................
Could not do task with equipment o f f ...............................................
Did not realize power was o n .............................................................
Other reason.......................................................................................

112
69
8
209
209
62
61

19
12
1
35
35
10
10

T o ta l.........................................................................................

176

100

You accidentally turned equipment or system back on ..............
Co-worker accidentally turned equipment or system back o n .....
Co-worker turned equipment or system back on, not knowing
you were working on i t ...............................................................
Equipment or material moved when jam-up was cleared...........
Parts were still in motion (coasting)..............................................
Other reason ..................................................................................

20
15

11
9

56
9
30
46

32
5
17
26

If equipment was not turned off, indicate reason(s).

If equipment was turned off:
a. Indicate what happened at the time of the injury.

b. Were any additional steps taken to shut down equipment
before the accident?
T o ta l2 3.....................................................................................

160

No—felt it would slow down production or take too long...........
No—not required by company procedures ..................................
No—didn’t have supplies or tools to do this ...............................
No—didn’t think it was necessary................................................
No—other reason ..........................................................................
No—reason not given ...................................................................
Disconnected main pow er.............................................................
Tagged equipment power, valves, e t c ..........................................
Locked out equipment power, valves, e tc ....................................
Removed fu s e ................................................................................
Disconnected electrical line or broke circuits..............................
Removed section of pipe...............................................................
Drained pressure or hazardous materials from system...............
Installed blank flange ....................................................................
Restrained parts that could move, fall, or slide with blocks,
chains, clamps, etc.......................................................................
O ther...............................................................................................

8
23
4
49
20
37
14
6
2

5
14
2
31
13
23
9
4
1

-

-

5
2
9
1

3
1
6
1

4
4

2
2

tional steps to shut down equipment and 127
who took no further action.
NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were
reported. Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of
injuries included in the survey. Because incom­
plete questionnaires were used, the total
number of responses may vary by question.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaire.

1 Of these, 61 reported accidental activation
of auxiliary controls (e.g., foot pedals) and 19
reported using jog or inch controls.
2 Because more than one response is pos­
sible, the sum of the responses and percent­
ages may not equal the total. Percentages are
calculated by dividing each response by the
total number of persons who answered the
question.
3 Includes 33 respondents who took addi­




f)

12




Table 12. Lockout procedures and instruction: Injuries related to servicing
equipment, selected States, August-November 1980
Workers

Item

Percent

Have you ever padlocked power controls or valves in “off”
position before servicing or repairing equipment?
Total 1............................................................................................

655

0

N o ........................................................................................................
Yes—on equipment involved in accident...........................................
Yes—on other equipment ..................................................................
Yes—at another place of w ork...........................................................

383
101
112
47
45

58
15
17
7
7

694

100

246
273
175

35
39
25

T otal.........................................................................................

264

100

No ...................................................................................................
Y e s ..................................................................................................

43
221

16
84

259

O

2
34
11
6
17
19
172
26

1
13
4
2
7
7
66
10

T ota l.........................................................................................

262

100

2 minutes or le s s ...........................................................................
2 to 15 minutes..............................................................................
15 minutes to one hour.................................................................
One hour or m ore..........................................................................
Don’t know.....................................................................................

225
22
6
9

86
8
2
3

T ota l.........................................................................................

264

100

No ...................................................................................................
Yes—by foreman or other supervisor...........................................
Yes—by safety o ffice r...................................................................
Don’t know.....................................................................................

183
60
2
19

69
23
1
7

Are the equipment controls designed for padlocking main
power source or valve in “off” position?

N o ........................................................................................................
Yes ......................................................................................................

If equipment controls are designed for a lockout:
a. Are the lockout controls within reaching distance
or within sight of this equipment?

b. Would the lockout procedure for the equipment involved
in the accident require any of the following?

A written permit..............................................................................
Supervisor’s authorization or participation....................................
Protective equipment (such as gloves).........................................
Special tools other than locks (such as ladder, blocks, etc.)......
Special skills (such as strength, electrical knowledge, etc.)........
Help from co-workers....................................................................
None of the above.........................................................................
Don’t know.....................................................................................
c. How long would it take to lock out this equipment?

d. Would the lockout and restart be supervised?

See footnotes at end of table.

13

Table 12. Continued— Lockout procedures and instruction: Injuries related to
servicing equipment, selected States, August-November 1980
Workers

Item

Percent

What type of policy, if any, does your employer have for
locking out equipment before doing service or repair work?
Total ..............................................................................................

653

100

Single lockout requirement covering all equipment...........................
Specific lockout requirements for each type of equipment..............
No policy..............................................................................................
Don't k n o w ..........................................................................................

64
107
210
272

10
16
32
42

Total 1............................................................................................

554

0)

Provided printed instructions..............................................................
Lockout procedures posted on equipment........................................
Given instructions as part of on-the-job training...............................
Given formal training at meetings, etc ...............................................
O th e r....................................................................................................
No instructions on lockout provided..................................................

25
37
176
28
7
340

5
7
32
5
1
61

Total 1 ......................................................................................

183

(')

When to lock out ...........................................................................
Where to place locks on equipment.............................................
Tagging in addition to locking o u t................................................
Restraining parts that could move, fall, or slide with blocks,
chains, clamps, e tc .....................................................................
Clearing the area of personnel.....................................................
Testing lockout to be sure power is o ff........................................
Procedures for storing keys and removing lo cks.........................
Controlling access to locks and ke ys...........................................
Lockout procedures covering change in work s h ifts ...................
Group lockouts...............................................................................

160
91
48

87
50
26

30
16
52
32
25
21
18

16
9
28
17
14
11
10

Were you provided any instructions on how to do a lockout
of equipment power before servicing?

if lockout instructions were provided:
a. What did they include?

b. When were the lockout instructions given to you?
Total 1 ......................................................................................

186

After the accident ..........................................................................
One to six months before the accident........................................
Six months to a year before the accident....................................
Upon hiring .............. ......................................................................
Over a year a g o .............................................................................

15
36
28
84
60

1 Because more than one response is pos­
sible, the sum of the responses and percent­
ages may not equal the total. Percentages are
calculated by dividing each response by the
total number of persons who answered the
question.
NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were




o
8
19
15
45
32

reported. Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of
injuries included in the survey. Because incom­
plete questionnaires were used, the total
number of responses may vary by question.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaire.

14




Table 18. Work information: Injuries related! to servicing equipment, selected
States, August=W©v®mber 1S®0
Item

Workers

Percent

W hat are y o u r regular jo b duties?

T o ta l1............................................................................................

814

(1
)

Operating equipment...........................................................................
Unjamming equipment........................................................................
Making minor adjustments to equipment...........................................
Set-up w o rk .........................................................................................
Servicing equipment or systems ........................................................
Electrical w ork.....................................................................................
Plumbing or pipefitting w ork................................................................
Supervising other workers..................................................................
O th e r....................................................................................................

532
294
330
296
220
87
61
136
109

65
36
41
36
27
11
7
17
13

T o ta l..............................................................................................

801

100

Less than 6 m onths............................................................................
6 months to a year..............................................................................
1 to 3 years.........................................................................................
3 to 5 years.........................................................................................
5 years or m ore...................................................................................

174
132
202
104
189

22
16
25
13
24

Total ..............................................................................................

768

100

N o .........................................................................................................
Y e s .......................................................................................................

659
109

86
14

Total ..............................................................................................

794

100

1 to 19 .................................................................................................
20 to 4 9 ...............................................................................................
50 to 99 ...............................................................................................
100 to 499 ...........................................................................................
500 or more ........................................................................................

159
123
120
234
158

20
15
15
29
20

Total ..............................................................................................

791

100

N o ........................................................................................................
Y e s .......................................................................................................
Don’t kn o w ..........................................................................................

206
401
184

26
51
23

H ow long haw© you had fh©s© jo b duties at the place where
you w ork?

A re you paid on an incentive basis (piecew ork, production
bonus, o r p ro fit sharing)?

H ow m any people are em ployed at the place w here you
w ork?

Does the place w here you w o rk have a safe ty o ffic e r or
s a fe ty representative?

NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of
injuries included in the survey. Because incom­
plete questionnaires were used, the total
number of responses may vary by question.
SOURCE: Survey questionnaire.

1 Because more than one response is pos­
sible, the sum of the responses and percent­
ages may not equal the total. Percentages are
calculated by dividing each response by the
total number of persons who answered the
question.

15

Table 14. Estimated! Host workdays: Injuries related to servicing equipment,
selected States, August-November 1980
Item

Workers

Percent

How many workdays did you (or do you expect to) lose due
to your injury? (MOTE: Do not count the day of injury,
normal days off, or holidays.)
Total ..............................................................................................

793

100

No time lo s t.........................................................................................
1 to 5 workdays lo s t...........................................................................
6 to 10 workdays lo s t.........................................................................
11 to 15 workdays lo s t.......................................................................
16 to 20 workdays lo s t.......................................................................
21 to 25 workdays lo s t.......................................................................
26 to 30 workdays lo s t.......................................................................
31 to 40 workdays lo s t.......................................................................
41 to 60 workdays lo s t.......................................................................
More than 60 workdays lo s t..............................................................

107
132
95
75
47
47
60
49
54
41

13
17
12
9
6
6
8
6
7
5

Number of workdays lost not estimated ............................................

86

11

Average days lost per lost workday ca se ............................
NOTE: Due to rounding, percentages may
not add to 100. See appendix A for types of
injuries included in the survey. Because incom-




24

plete questionnaires were used, the total
number of responses may vary by question,
SOURCE: Survey questionnaire.

16

Appsfnidlfre A" Surwey
Explsmiatoiry M@t®

others limit reporting to cases involving lost time
ranging from 1 to 8 days.
In addition, no attempt was made to estimate all in­
juries related to equipment servicing for the occupa­
tions studied. Although participating States provided a
broad geographical and industrial mix, they were not
selected statistically to represent the country as a whole.
Moreover, the survey period was terminated when re­
sponses exceeded 750 cases.
Characteristics of the injury and the person injured
were classified and tabulated for all in-scope respond­
ents based on information furnished by the employer in
the workers’ compensation report.
Questionnaires returned by the injured worker were
reviewed for completeness and reliability. Respondents
experienced difficulty in answering questions relating
to lockout, which was defined as “disconnecting or
shutting down and locking equipment controls in off
position.” For example, responses to question III.H,
which asked about job tasks requiring a lockout, were
considered unreliable because respondents apparently
failed to relate their tasks with lockout requirements.
Therefore, these responses were not tabulated. Diffi­
culty was also experienced in Section I I among some
respondents who reported that the power was off when
an activating control, other than an on/off switch, had
not been depressed. All usable responses of incomplete
questionnaires were used in the tabulations. No attempt
was made to adjust the data for nonresponses.
Numerical values shown in the tables were actual
counts while percentages were rounded to the nearest
whole number.

The survey was designed to develop information on
workers injured while servicing equipment. The scope
of the survey was limited to contact with machinery
and electrical or piping systems which were energized
or contained hazardous materials. Injuries involving
portable equipment or tools, such as lawnmowers, pow­
ered handtools, and noncommercial meat slicers, were
excluded. Servicing activities included were: Unjam­
ming, cleaning, repairing, maintenance, electrical work,
set-up work, installing, adjusting, inspecting, or testing.
The scope of the survey covered injured workers in all
occupations in all industries except coal and metallic
and nonmetallic mining. Cases were excluded from the
survey if the injury resulted in a fatality or if more than
120 days had elapsed between the time of the injury
and the beginning of the survey.
To identify equipment-servicing cases within the
scope of the survey, participating State agency staff re­
viewed employers’ reports of injuries required by State
workers’ compensation laws and mailed questionnaires
to injured workers selected for the study. They re­
quested cooperation on a voluntary basis. During the
survey period, August- November 1980, 25 State agen­
cies reviewed about 500,000 injury reports, of which
1,285 were within the scope of the survey. Sixty-five
percent of the workers selected as within the scope of
the study responded to the mail questionnaire.
Although data were aggregated for 25 States, it
should be noted that the workers’ compensation cases
selected for study reflect differences in State reporting
requirements. For example, some participating States
require reporting of workers’ compensation cases in­
volving medical treatment regardless of lost time, while




17

Appendix B: Partidpatimig
State Agencies

Arizona Industrial Commission
Arkansas Department of Labor
California Department of Industrial Relations
Colorado Department of Labor and Employment
Delaware Department of Labor
Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations
Idaho Industrial Commission
Indiana Division of Labor
Iowa Bureau of Labor
Kentucky Department of Labor
Maine Department of Manpower Affairs
Maryland Department of Licensing and Regulation
Massachusetts Department of Labor and Industries
Michigan Department of Labor




Missouri Department of Labor and Industrial
Relations
Montana Department of Labor and Industry
Nebraska Workmen’s Compensation Court
New Jersey Department of Labor and Industry
Ohio Industrial Commission
Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry
Tennessee Department of Labor
Utah Industrial Commission
Virginia Department of Labor and Industry
Washington Department of Labor and Industries
Wisconsin Department of Industry, Labor and
Human Relations

18

Appendix & Survey Questionnaire
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Work Injury Report
Injuries Related to Servicing Equipment
T h e in fo rm a tio n c o lle c te d on this fo rm b y the Bureau

U.S. Department of Labor

T h is re p o rt is a u th o riz e d b y ta w 2 9 U.S.C. 2.

F o rm A p p ro v e d

o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s and th e S ta te Agencies c o o p e ra tin g

Y o u r vo lu n ta ry ' c o o p e ra tio n is n e e d e d to m a ke

O .M .B . N o. 4 4 R -1 6 1 4

in its s ta tis tic a l pro g ra m w ill be held in c o n fid e n c e and

the

w ill be used fo r s ta tis tic a l purposes o n ly .

accurate, a n d tim e ly .

re su lts

of

th is

survey

com prehensive,

D ate o f
Case N u m b e r
!.

A c c id e n t

A c t iv ity A t T im e O f A c c id e n t

A . W h ic h o f th e fo llo w in g best describes w h a t y o u w ere d o in g w h e n the
a c c id e n t o ccurred? (C heck one.)
1. □ U n ja m m in g o b je c t(s ) fro m e q u ip m e n t
2.
C leaning e q u ip m e n t
3.
R e p a irin g e q u ip m e n t
4.
P e rfo rm in g m aintenance (o ilin g , etc.)
5.
In s ta llin g e q u ip m e n t
6. □ A d ju s tin g e q u ip m e n t
7.
D o in g set up w o rk
8. □ P e rfo rm in g e le ctrica l w o rk
9.
I nspecting e q u ip m e n t
T e stin g m a te ria l or e q u ip m e n t
11. D O th e r a c tiv ity : (D escribe)____________________________________

D. H o w long w o u ld th is task have ta ke n
in ju re d ? (C heck one.)
1.
Less th a n 2 m in u te s
2.
' □
2 t o 15 m in u te s
3.
15 m in u te s to
hour

CD
CD

CD
CD
CD
CD
CD
CD
1 0. CD

ED
CD
CD

CD
CD
CD

1 t o 8 h o u rs
M ore th a n 8 h ours
D o n ’t k n o w

ED
CD

CD
CD
CD
CD
CD
CD

F. H o w d id y o u r in ju ry occur? (C heck one.)
1.
In ju re d b y m achine parts th a t w ere in m o tio n
2.
In ju re d b y c o n ta c t w ith e le c tric a l c u rre n t
3.
In ju re d b y chem icals, h o t liq u id s o r o th e r hazardous m a te ria l
4.
In ju re d b y m achine parts th a t w ere n o t in m o tio n
5.
In ju re d b y fa llin g m achine parts
6.
O th e r: ( E x p la in ) _____________________________________________

C. Had yo u d one th is ty p e o f task before?
1. □ N o
Yes—
same
s im ila r e q u ip m e n t
3.
Yes—b u t on d iffe re n t e q u ip m e n t

on

4.
5.
6.

E. E stim a te h o w o fte n y o u d o th is ty p e o f task. (C heck one.)
1.
D a ily
4.
A b o u t once a year
2.
A b o u t once a w eek
5.
F irs t tim e y o u d id th is
3.
A b o u t once a m o n th
ty p e o f w o rk

B. Was th e task due to a b re a k d o w n d u rin g o p e ra tio n ?
1.
□ No
2. □ Yes

2 . CD
CD

1

t o co m p le te if y o u had n o t been

or

I I . E q u ip m e n t In v o lv e d In A c c id e n t
N O T E : " E q u ip m e n t" refers to a ll ty p e s o f m a c h in e ry , p ip in g o r e le ctrica l systems.
A.

D escribe th e m a chine o r e q u ip m e n t in vo lve d in y o u r in ju ry . (F o r e xa m p le : m etal lath e , d r ill press, p rin tin g m a c h in e ry , com pressor, b o ile r, c o n v e y o r,
p ip e lin e , earth m o vin g e q u ip m e n t, etc.)

CD

3. In d ic a te all o f th e e q u ip m e n t's p o w e r sources. (C heck a ll th a t a p p ly .)
1.
E le c tric : Check voltage
—
a. □ 120 v o lts
Check ty p e o f p o w e r —
a.
Single phase
2. CD H y d ra u lic
3. CD P ne u m a tic (a ir)
4. CD Pressurized (as in p ip e lin e )
5. CD Steam
6.
G ra v ity
7.
S p rin g a c tio n
8.
Gas o r diesel engine
9.
D o n 't k n o w p o w e r source

CD

CD
CD

b.
b.

ED
ED

M o re th a n 120 v o lts
M u ltip h a se

D o n 't k n o w voltage
D o n 't k n o w ty p e o f p o w e r

CD
CD
ED
ED

C.
1.

Was th e re an srnergency s h u to ff w ith in y o u r reach a t th e tim e o f th e accident?
CD N o
2. CD Yes
3. CD D o n 't kn o w

ED

ED

ED

CD

D. W h a t k in d o f w a rn in g system , if a n y , d id th e e q u ip m e n t have to in d ic a te it was a ctiva te d o r a b o u t t o be activa te d ? (C heck a ll th a t a p p ly .)
1.
None
2.
Bells, alarm s o r o th e r a u d ib le w a rn in g system
3.
L ig h ts o r o th e r visual w a rn in g system
4.
D o n 't k n o w
E. Was th e e q u ip m e n t tu rn e d o f f b e fo re d o in g th e task described above? (See yes o r n o b e lo w .)
□

No

I f no, check reason (s) w h y it was n o t tu rn e d o ff.
(C heck a ll th a t a p p ly .)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

ED F e lt i t w o u ld slo w do w n p ro d u c tio n o r
□
ta k e to o long
ED N o t re q u ire d b y com p a n y procedures
□
ED
□ D id n 't k n o w h o w to
CD D id n 't th in k i t was necessary
□
ED C o u ld n o t do task w ith e q u ip m e n t o f f
□
C
a l D id n o t realize p o w e r was on
ED O th e r reason: (E x p la in ) _______________
□

2. □

Yes

I f yes, in d ic a te w h a t happened a t th e tim e o f th e in ju ry . (C heck one.)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

6.

ED Y o u a cc id e n ta lly tu rn e d e q u ip m e n t o r system back on
ED C o -w o rk e r a c c id e n ta lly tu rn e d e q u ip m e n t o r system back on
ED C o -w o rk e r tu rn e d e q u ip m e n t o r system back on, n o t k n o w in g y o u w ere
w o rk in g on it
ED E q u ip m e n t o r m a te ria l m oved w h e n ja m -u p was cleared
ED
ED O th e r reason: (E x p la in ) ______________________________________________
Pa rts w e re s till in m o t io n (c o a s t in g )

b. W ere any a d d itio n a l steps ta ke n t o s
1.
a.

□

2.
3.
4.
5.

CD

ED
CD
CD
ED

d o w n e q u ip m e n t b e fo re th e accident?
2.

C heck reason(s) w h y .
1.

CONTINUE WITH SECTION III. ON
REVERSE SIDE

No

a.

F e lt i t w o u ld slo w d o w n
p ro d u c tio n o r ta ke
to o long
N o t re q u ire d b y c o m ­
p a n y procedures
D id n 't have supplies
o r to o ls t o do th is
D id n 't th in k i t
necessary
O th e r reason:
(D escribe)

w as

ED Yes
C heck a c tio n (s ) taken.
1. ED D isconnected m a in p o w e r
2. ED Tagged e q u ip m e n t p o w e r, valves,
etc.
3. ED L o cke d o u t e q u ip m e n t pow er,
valves, etc.
4. CD Rem oved fuse
5. CD D isconnected e le c tric a l lin e o r
b ro k e c irc u its
6. ED R em oved section o f p ipe
7. CD D rained pressure o r hazardous
m ate ria ls fro m system
8. CD In sta lle d b la n k flange
9. ED R estrained p a rts th a t c o u ld m ove,

10. □

CONTINUE WITH SECTION
III. ON REVERSE SIDE
B L S 9 9 (J u ly 1980)




19

fa ll, o r slide w ith blocks,
chains, clam ps, etc.
O th e r: (D e s c rib e )_______________

CONTINUE WITH SECTION III.
ON REVERSE SIDE

III.

Lockout Procedures
N O T E : The following questions ask about "lockout" which means disconnecting or shutting down and locking equipment controls in " o f f ' position
before doing ssrvico or repair w ork.
H.

A . A r e th e e q u ip m e n t c o n tro ls designed fo r p a d lo c k in g m a in p o w e r
so u rce o r valve in " o f f " p o s itio n (re fe rre d t o as a " lo c k o u t" ) ?
1.

O

No

2. CD Yes

3. D

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

C. Have y o u ever p a d lo c k e d p o w e r c o n tro ls o r valves in " o f f " p o s itio n
b e fo re se rv ic in g o r re p a irin g e q u ip m e n t (called a " lo c k o u t" ) ?
□
0
□
□
D

No
Yes—on e q u ip m e n t in v o lv e d in accid e n t
Y es—o n o th e r e q u ip m e n t
Yes —a t a n o th e r place o f w o rk
D o n 't k n o w

I.

D. W o u ld th e lo c k o u t p ro c e d u re fo r th e e q u ip m e n t in v o lv e d in the
a c c id e n t re q u ire a n y o f th e fo llo w in g ? / C heck a ll th a t a p p ly .)
1 . 0 a w r itte n p e rm it
2. D S u p e rv is o r's a u th o riz a tio n o r p a rtic ip a tio n
3. O P ro te c tiv e e q u ip m e n t (such as gloves)
4. O S pecial to o ls o th e r th a n lo cks (such as ladder, blo cks, etc.)
5. O Special s k ills (such as s tre n g th , e le ctrica l know le d g e , etc.)
6. O H e lp fr o m co -w o rk e rs
7. □ N o n e o f th e above
8. O D o n 't k n o w

C None
D
C D o n 't
D

6.

know

CD N o in s tru c tio n s on lo c k o u t p ro v id e d —C ontinue w ith Section

IV.

I f lo c k o u t in s tru c tio n s w e re p ro v id e d :
a.

th e lo c k o u t and re s ta rt be supervised?
No
Yes—be fo re m a n o r o th e r supervisor
Yes—by safety o ffic e r
D o n 't k n o w

________________

W ere y o u p ro vid e d any in s tru c tio n s on h o w t o d o a lo c k o u t o f e q u ip ­
m e n t p o w e r b e fo re servicing? (C heck a ll th a t a p p ly i)
1. C P rovided p rin te d in s tru c tio n s
D
2. C3 L o c k o u t procedures p osted on e q u ip m e n t
3. C G iven in s tru c tio n s as p a rt of o n -th e -jo b tra in in g
D
4. C G iven fo rm a l tra in in g a t m eetings, etc.
D
5. □ O th e r: (D e s c rib e )___________________________________________

J.

E. H o w lo n g w o u ld i t ta k e t o lo c k o u t th is e q u ip m e n t? (C heck one.)
1. C3 2 m in u te s o r less
4. Q One h o u r o r m o re
2. □ 2 t o 15 m in u te s
5. C D o n 't k n o w
D
3. D 15 m in u te s t o one h o u r
F. W o u ld
1. □
2. □
3. C
D
4. C
D

D C learing jam -ups
C R e p a irin g e q u ip m e n t
D
C C leaning e q u ip m e n t
D
C P e rfo rm in g m a intenance (o ilin g , etc.)
D
C D o in g set up w o rk
D
C O th e r tasks re q u irin g lo c k o u t: (D escribe)
D

7.
8.

D o n 't k n o w

B. A r e th e lo c k o u t c o n tro ls w ith in reaching distance o r w ith in s ig h t o f
th is e q u ip m e n t?
1. □ N o
2. □ Yes
3. O D o n 't k n o w w here lo c k o u t c o n tro ls are

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

C heck w h ic h jo b tasks, i f a n y, re q u ire a lo c k o u t o f th e e q u ip m e n t.
(C heck a ll th a t a p p ly .)

W h a t d id th e y inclu d e ? (C heck a ll t h a t a p p ly .)
1. C W hen t o lo c k o u t
D
2. □ Where to place lo cks o n e q u ip m e n t
3. CD Tagging in a d d itio n to lo c k in g o u t
4. CD R estraining p a rts th a t c o u ld m ove, fa ll o r slide w ith blocks,
chains, clam ps, etc.
5. CD C learing th e area o f personnel
6. C T e stin g lo c k o u t t o be sure p o w e r is o ff
D
7. CD Procedures f o r s to rin g keys and re m o vin g locks
8. O C o n tro llin g access t o locks and keys
9. CD L o c k o u t p rocedures cove rin g change in w o rk s h ifts
10. D G ro u p lo c k o u ts

b. W hen w ere th e lo c k o u t in s tru c tio n s given t o yo u ? (C heck a ll
th a t a p p ly .)
1. O A fte r th e a c c id e n t
2. CD One t o six m o n th s b e fo re th e a ccid e n t
3. CD S ix m o n th s to a ye a r b e fo re th e accid e n t
4. C U pon hiring
D
5. C Over a year ago
D

G. W h a t ty p e o f p o lic y , i f a n y , does y o u r e m p lo y e r have fo r lo c k in g o u t
e q u ip m e n t b e fo re d o in g service o r re p a ir w o rk ? (C heck one.)
1. C S in g le lo c k o u t re q u ire m e n t co ve rin g ail e q u ip m e n t
D
2. O S p e c ific lo c k o u t re q u ire m e n ts fo r each ty p e o f e q u ip m e n t
3 . □ N o p o lic y
4 . C D o n 't k n o w
D

*V. Work Information
A. W h a t are y o u r regular jo b duties? (C heck a ll th a t a p p ly .)
8. □ S u pervising o th e r
1. C O p e ra tin g e q u ip m e n t
D
2. C U n ja m m in g e q u ip m e n t
D
w o rk e rs
3 . C M a k in g m in o r a d ju s t­
D
9. □ O th e r: (D escribe)
m e n ts t o e q u ip m e n t
4. C S e t up work
D
5. C S e rv ic in g e q u ip m e n t o r
D
system s
6. C E lectrical work
D
7. □
Plumbing or pipe-

C. H o w m a n y w o rk d a y s d id y o u (o r d o y o u e x p e c t to ) lose d u e t o y o u r
in ju ry ?
D o n o t c o u n t th e da y o f in ju ry , n o rm a l days o f f o r
holid a ys.)
___________ w o rk d a y s

(NOTE:

D. A re y o u paid on an in c e n tiv e basis (p ie c e w o rk , p ro d u c tio n b o n u s, o r
p r o f it sharing)?
1. □ N o
2. □ Yes
E. H o w m any p eople are e m p lo y e d a t th e place w h e re y o u w o rk ?

fittin g work

1. □
2. □
3. □

B. H o w lo n g have y o u had these jo b d u tie s a t th e place w h e re y o u w o rk ?

1 to 19
20 t o 49
50 t o 99

4. □
5. □

100 t o 4 9 9
5 0 0 o r m o re

(C h e ck one.)
1. C Less th a n 6 m o n th s
D
2. C 6 m o n th s t o a ye a r
D
3. □ 1 t o 3 years

4.
5.

C 3 to 5 years
D
C 5 years o r m o re
D

F. Does th e place w h e re y o u w o rk have a sa fe ty o ffic e r o r safety
representative?
1.
No
2.
Yes
3.
D o n 't k n o w

D

O

O

V . Describe the events leading to your accident.

V I.

D o you feal that a lockout procedure should be followed for the task you were performing when injured?




20

*

(Explain.)

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1981 -356-810/994*.

Bureau of Labor Statistics
Regional Offices

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761

Region IV
1371 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30367
Phone: (404) 881-4418

Region V
Region IS
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 944-3121

Region ll§
3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154




9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: (312) 353-1880

Region Vi
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 767-6971

Regions VIS and V8IS
911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678