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Industry
Wage Survey

Communications,

1968

Bulletin 1662

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1970




JUL2 21970

DOCUMENT COLLET/m*




Industry
Wage Survey

Communications,

1968

BULLETIN 1662

U. S. D EP A R TM E N T O F LAB O R
G eorge P. Shultz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner
1970

y

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C . 20402 - Price 30 cents







Preface
This summary of data on employment and hourly rates of pay is based on annual
reports filed with the Federal Communications Commission by telephone carriers, the
Western Union Telegraph Co., and international telegraph carriers, as required by the
amended Communications Act of 1934. Under cooperative arrangements, the Bureau of
Labor Statistics tabulates and publishes the data as part of a continuing series.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’ s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations.
The analysis was prepared by Michael J. Tighe in the Division of Occupational Wage
Structures.
Other reports available from the Bureau’ s program of industry wage studies, as well as
the addresses of the Bureau’ s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.




iii

Contents
Page

Summary ....................................................................................................................................
Telephone carriers ...................................................................................................................

1
1

Employment and pay rates in December 1968 .............................................................

1

Trends in employment and pay rates .............................................................................
Western Union Telegraph Com pany.....................................................................................
International telegraph carriers..............................................................................................

3

4
6

Tables:
Percent distribution of employees in occupational groups by average hourly
rates, December 1968, for—
1. Telephone carriers..............................................................................................

7

2. Bell System telephone carriers ........................................................................
3. Non-Bell telephone carriers .............................................................................

8
9

Average hourly rates of employees in selected occupations by region,.December
1968, fo r 4. All and Bell System telephone carriers..........................................................

10

Percent distribution of employees in occupational groups by average hourly
rates, October 1968, for—
5. Western Union Telegraph Com pany...............................................................

11

6. International telegraph carriers........................................................................

12

Employment and average hourly rates of communication workers except
officials and managerial assistants, October 1947-December 1968 ...................

2

Chart:

Appendix. Scope and method o f survey




13

Industry Wage Survey—

Communications, 1968
Telephone Carriers

Summary
Basic pay rates1 of the 759,452 employees (excluding
officials

E m p lo y m e n t and Pay R ates in D ecem b er 1 9 6 8 . Basic

and managerial assistants) of the Nation’s

wage rates of the employees o f the telephone carriers in

principal communications carriers averaged $3.47 an

the study4 averaged $3.48 an hour in December 1968.
(See table 1.) Pay rates for individual workers ranged

hour in late 1968—6.8 percent higher than a year earlier.
This annual percent increase in wage levels was larger

considerably; the middle half of the workers earned
from $2.38 to $4.17 an hour. Some of the factors
contributing to this wide range of pay rates were the
variation in skills and responsibilities required in the
industry; differences in pay rates among carriers; and the

than the advance recorded in 1966-67 (3.8 percent) and
was the greatest since BLS began its series of annual
studies in 1947, except for 1957-58 (7.0 percent),
1951-52 (7.5 percent), and 1947-48 (7.3 percent).

widespread use o f pay systems which typically provided
rate ranges for workers in a given job and locality.

Telephone-carrier employees, 96 percent of the work­
ers covered by the study,2 averaged $3.48 an hour in
December 1968. Nonmessenger employees of the West­
ern Union Telegraph Co. averaged $3.37 an hour in
October1968 and employees of international telegraph
carriers, $4.11.

Wages and working conditions for a large majority of
the telephone carrier employees were determined under
provisions o f collective bargaining agreements, mostly
with the Communications Workers of America (CWA).

Between December 1967 and December 1968, aver­

Many carriers had separate agreements for individual

age pay rates o f telephone carrier employees increased

departments and, in some cases, for different areas. The

7.1 percent. Average wage rates of Western Union’ s
nonmessenger employees rose 5.1 percent, and those of

New York Telephone Co., for example, had individual
agreements for its plant, traffic, and commercial depart­

employees o f international telegraph carriers, 7.3 per­

ments in the New York City area and three other

cent during the October 1967-68 period.3

agreements for these departments in the rest of the

Employment in telephone carriers covered by the

State. Local schedules usually provided a range of rates
for specific jobs; proportionate differences between

study rose to 727,900 in December 1968 from 700,600
a year earlier. Between October 1967 and October 1968,

minimum and maximum rates varied by occupation.

total employment of Western Union remained virtually
Fifty-six percent o f the telephone workers studied

unchanged, and that o f the international telegraph
carriers increased by nearly 6 percent.

were women. Women constituted virtually all o f the
telephone operators, 92 percent o f the clerical employ­
ees, and 71 percent of the business office and sales
employees. On the other hand, virtually all construction,
installation, and maintenance workers and 75 percent of
the professional and semiprofessional employees were
men. Average hourly pay rates for numerically impor­
tant jobs largely staffed by women were $2.69 for
nonsupervisory clerical workers, and $2.46 for exper­
ienced switchboard operators. Among jobs typically

1 As explained in the appendix, pay data were computed by
dividing scheduled weekly compensation by scheduled weekly
hours. “Scheduled weekly compensation” for telephone carriers,
as defined by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC),
includes the basic weekly pay rate plus any regularly scheduled
supplementary compensation such as differentials for evening
and night tours and certain perquisites. It excludes pay for
overtime work and pay in excess o f weekday rates for Sunday
and holiday work. Scheduled weekly compensation of Western
Union and international telegraph carrier employees excludes
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays,
and late shifts.
Since 1947, annual studies have been made in cooperation
with the FCC. Information prior to 1961, for all carriers
included in the annual reports related to an October payroll
period. In 1961, the reference date for telephone carriers was
changed to December. See appendix for scope and method o f
survey.
2 The study covered nearly nine-tenths o f the estimated
844,000 employees of the Nation’s telephone communications
industry in December 1968 and almost all o f the employees in
the telegraph communications industry in October 1968.
3 For results of the previous survey, see Industry Wage
Survey: Communications, 196 7 (Bulletin 1615, 1968).




staffed by men, cable splicers averaged $3.70; central
office repairmen, $3.66; PBX and station installers,
$3.60; and linemen, $2.97.

4
The study o f telephone carriers was limited to those (52)
that had annual operating revenues exceeding $1 million and
engaged in interstate or foreign communications services by
means of their own facilities or through connections with those
o f another carrier under direct or indirect common control.
Approximately 6,350 officials and managerial assistants o f these
carriers were not included in the survey.

1




Regionally, average hourly earnings for all employees
Atlantic

region ($3.69),

the Pacific ($3.68),

New

England ($3.53), and the Great Lakes ($3.52). Averages
in the five remaining regions were below the national
level, and ranged from $3.36 in the Chesapeake region to
$2.99 in the Southeast. (See table 4.) The following
tabulation shows occupational average hourly rates of
pay as a percent of averages in the Southeast. It indicates

Average
weekly
rates

Average
hourly
rates

exceeded the national average of $3.48 in the Middle
Clerical employees, nonsuperv iso ry..................................
Experienced switchboard
operators..........................
Central office repairmen. . . .
PBX and Station installers. . .
Cable splicers..........................
Linem en..................................

82

86

76
86
80
82
97

83
87
80
82
96

that the interregional spread in average earnings varied
by occupation and, it was greater for experienced
switchboard operators than for nonsupervisory clerical

Trends in E m p lo ym en t and Pay Rates. Total employ­
ment of telephone carriers increased by 27,300 between

December 1967 and December 1968, continuing a
recent upward trend which started in 1962. Most of the

employees and ceiitral office repairmen.

rise during the 6-year period was in the Bell System.
Region

P a c ific ...................
Middle Atlantic. . .
New England . . . .
Great Lakes...........
Chesapeake...........
South Central. . . .
M ountain .............
North Central. . . .
S ou th east.............

Clerical
Experienced employees
switchboard
(non­
operators
supervisory)
128
127
124
120
118
117
114
112
100

112
112
107
109
101
101
103
97
100

PBX and
station
installers
118
119
112
112
103
115
115
121
100

Bell System companies employed 95 percent o f the

Whereas the recent employment increases were reflected
in nearly all major occupational categories, the declines
from 1957 (681,600 employees) to 1962 (596,300
employees) were largely the result of reductions in the
number of telephone operators as new and improved
equipment was installed.
The 1968 employment level was 32 percent higher
than the level recorded in 1947 (552,700), the date of
the Bureau’s initial study. The increase in employment
over the 21-year period was accompanied by an increase
in the percent o f men in the industry (from 33 percent
in 1947 to 44 percent in 1968), as the occupational
composition o f the industry changed substantially. As

telephone workers covered by the study and employed
92 percent or more o f the workers in each region. Bell

indicated below, the proportion of construction, in­

System companies, which usually covered an entire State
or group o f States, generally were much larger than

percent o f the work force in 1947 to 30 percent in

other companies. Twenty-two of the 25 Bell companies

declined.

stallation, and maintenance employees rose from 23
1968, while the proportion of telephone operators

employed more than 5,000 workers; 12 employed more
than 25,000; and the two largest each had more than
80,000 employees. The largest company of the 27
non-Bell firms, on the other hand, employed only about
5,200 workers and almost 60 percent of these companies
employed fewer than 500 workers. Average pay levels
for occupational groups studied separately were nearly
always higher for Bell than for non-Bell carriers. (See
tables 2 and 3.) In the numerically important occu­
pational categories shown below, average hourly pay
rates in non-Bell carriers ranged from 76 to 97 percent
of counterpart rates in Bell Systems. Because of longer
average scheduled workweeks, weekly rates o f non-Bell
clerical workers and switchboard operators show smaller
differences than do hourly rate comparisons. Scheduled
workweeks for craft workers averaged about the same in
both carrier groups.




Decernber
1967

Decernber
1968

552,700 681,600 700,600
100
100
100

727,900
100

October
1947
Total, all employees1
Number.................
Percent ................
Percent classified as:
Professional and
semiprofessional
employees. . . .
Clerical employees
Telephone operators...................
Construction, in­
stallation, and
maintenance
•employees . . .
All other employees.....................

October
1957

5
17

7
21

10
22

10
22

46

35

28

27

23

27

30

30

9

11

11

11

1Excludes officials and managerial assistants.

3

The average hourly rate of $3.48 in 1968 for all

Between 19517 and 1968, average rates for Bell

employees, except officials and managerial assistants,
was 176 percent higher than the average of $1.26 re­
corded in the 1947 study. An estimated 36 cents of the

System employees increased $1.89 an hour, compared
with $1.63 for employees of other companies. On a
percentage basis, however, the increases were 116

$2.22 increase during the 21 years can be attributed to
the shifts in the occupational composition of the indus­
try’s work force described above.5 The following tabula­
tion shows the increases in average hourly earnings be­
tween October 1947 and December 1968 for three

percent and 143 percent, respectively. The average for

important occupational groups:

advantage to 27 percent by December 1968.®

Occupational
group
Nonsupervisory clerical
employees.............
Experienced switchboard operators . .
Construction, installation, and main­
tenance workers . .

Octo­
ber
1947

Octo­
ber
1958

Decern- Percent
t)er
increase,
1968 19 4 7 -6 8

Bell System employees exceeded that of employees in
other companies by 43 percent in 1951, 32 percent in
1957, and 25 percent in 1967. The greater increase for
Bell workers in 1967-68, however, raised the Bell

Western Union Telegraph Co.
Straight-time rates of pay for the 22,787 nonmes­
senger employees9 of Western Union averaged $3.37 an

$1.13

$1.85

$2.69

138

hour in October 1968. (See table 5.) The 1,629 motor

.97

1.68

2.46

154

messengers averaged $2.42 and the 1,715 walking and
bicycle messengers, $1.63. Since October 1967, average

1.55

2.68

3.90

152

rates of pay rose by nearly 5 percent for nonmessenger
employees and motor messengers and 13 percent for
walking and bicycle messengers. These increases were

Employees of Bell System carriers averaged $3.52 in

largely the result o f general wage changes.

December 1968, up 7.3 percent over the previous year.

In all cities except New York, where contracts are

The average for employees of other telephone carriers

with the Communications Workers, wage rates for

was $2.77, an increase of 5.7 percent. Much of the

employees of Western Union are determined by labor-

7.3-percent increase in wage levels for Bell System

management contracts with the United Telegraph Work­

employees during the December 1967-68 period was due
to general wage adjustments provided in collective
bargaining agreements newly negotiated during 1968.

both unions early in June 1968 on 3-year contracts

Under terms of agreements reached in May 1968
between the Communications Workers of America
(CWA) and various companies of the Bell System, wage
increases of $4 to $12 a week were granted to plant
craftsmen and $4 to $8 a week to clerical employees and
telephone operators. The contracts also provided
deferred increases of $5.50 to $6 a week for plant
craftmen, and $3.50 to $4 a week for telephone
operators and clerical employees in both 1969 and 1970.
These agreements, ending the first nationwide telephone
strike since 1947, covered approximately 200,000 work­
ers. They also set a general pattern for 200,000 other
CWA workers at Bell and for another 200,000 workers
in other unions having agreements with Bell System
carriers.6

5 Weighting occupational averages for December 1968 by
occupational employment for October 1947 results in an average
of $3.12 instead of $3.48.
6 For further details on these agreements, see Current Wage
Developm ents, June 1, 1968, BLS Report 246, and later issues.

4




ers (UTW).10 The company reached settlement with
which provided for adjustments in wages and fringe
benefits. Effective June 1, 1968, all employees, except
walking and bicycle messengers, received wage increases
of 5 percent under UTW agreements and 4.5 percent
under CWA; walking and bicycle messengers having 24
months or more progression credit1 1 received a wage
increase of 6 cents an hour.12 Effective February 1,
1968, minimum rates of pay for walking and bicycle
messengers were increased from $ 1.40 to $ 1.60 an hour
in accordance with the amendments to the Fair Labor
Standards Act o f 1938.

7 Data for the Bell System and non-Bell companies as
reported to FCC in prior years are not comparable with those
reported since 1951.
8 For more information on employment and earnings trends
in Bell System carriers from 1945 to 1965, see “Employment
and Wage Trends in Bell System Companies,” M onthly Labor
Review, March 1967, p.p. 38-41.
9 Excludes approximately 300 officials and managerial as­
sistants.
10 Formerly called the Commercial Telegraphers’ Union.
^ “ Progression credit” relates to the seniority in a job
classification credited to an employee by the company.
12
For a more detailed account of these settlements, se
Current wage Developments, July 1, 1968, BLS Report 247.

Wage provisions in contracts with both the UTW and

Individual hourly

rates

o f the highest-paid

CWA include established rate ranges for all occupational

workers exceeded those o f the lowest-paid workers by

classifications covered by the contracts. Differences
between starting and maximum rates amount to more

presented in table 5.

than 75 cents an hour for some classifications. Advance­
ment from the starting rate through the various progres­
sion steps to the maximum rate is automatic for
employees meeting the requirements of the job after
specified periods of service. Established rates of pay for
nonmessenger employees and motor messengers varied
by location whereas nationwide rates applied to walking
and bicycle messengers.

$2 or more in most of the occupational categories
In some instances, however,

clusters o f workers had rates that fell within
comparatively narrow limits. For example, nearly 64
percent of the subscribers’ equipment maintainers were
paid between $3.75 and $4 an hour, and almost half of
the experienced telegraph operators (except Morse)
received from $2.75 to $3.
The 4.7-percent increase in average rates of pay for

Men were 55 percent of the company’s nonmessenger
employees in October 1968 and tended to be concen­
trated in different occupational categories than women.
For example, 67 percent of the clerical employees and
76 percent of the telegraph operators were women,
whereas men made up a large majority of the construc­
tion, installation, and maintenance workers, sales em­
ployees, and professional and semiprofessional em­
ployees. Average hourly rates of pay among jobs
predominatly staffed by men were $3.82 for traffic

nonmessenger employees between October 1967 and
October 1968 was lower than the increase recorded in
1966-67 (5.2 percent) and in 1965-66 (5.9 percent), but
exceeded the average annual increase of 4.1 percent
since 1960. Percent increases in averages during the
October 1967-68 period were not uniform among the
occupational categories studied. They amounted to 3
percent for telegraph operators, 5 percent for clerical
employees, and nearly 7 percent for construction,
installation, and maintenance employees.13

testing and regulating employees, $3.78 for subscribers’
equipment maintainers, and $3.71

for linemen and

cablemen. Nonsupervisory clerical workers (3,721
women and 1,249 men) averaged $2.93 and experienced
telegraph operators (except Morse), $2.59.
Western Union’s messengers, nearly all male, con­
stituted 13 percent of the company’ s work force in
October 1968. Walking and bicycle messengers averaged
$1.63 an hour and motor messengers, $2.42. Motor
messengers had work schedules which averaged 38.6
hours a week compared with 29.2 hours for walking and
bicycle messengers, many of whom were employed part
time.

Total employment in October 1968 (26,131) was
slightly lower than a year earlier (26,224). The decline
reflected a decrease of 166 in the number of messengers,
partly offset by an increase of 73 in the nonmessenger
group. Since the Bureau’s initial annual study in 1947,
employment (exclusive of officials and managerial as­
sistants) has declined from 53,107 to 26,131. As
indicated in the following tabulation, the occupational
13
Changes in average pay rates reflect not only general wage
increases, but also changes in hiring practices. Because of the
wide rate ranges that apply to most occupations, average rates
during periods of increased hiring are affected by a dispropor­
tionate number of workers paid at the minimum rate for the job.

October
1968
Total, all employees1
Number............................................................
Percent.............................................................
Percent of employees classified as:
Professional and semiprofessional
em p loy ees................................................
Messengers, motor..........................................
Telegraph office superintendents and managers
Clerical e m p lo y e e s.............................................
Telegraph operators ..........................................
Construction, installation, and maintenance
employees .....................................................
Messengers, walking and bicycle........................
Other .....................................................................

1967

131

100

5

19S7

26,224

100

5

1947

36,164

53,107

4
4
9

2

100

100

6

6

9
23
24

9
23
24

20
30

19
34

23
7
3

23
7
3

16
14
3

13
18
3

3

8

1Excludes officials and managerial assistants.




5

composition of the work force also has changed con­

Slightly more than four-fifths of all workers were

siderably during the past two decades. The proportion of
workers classified as telegraph operators, the largest
occupational group, fell from 34 percent in 1947 to 24

men, who were a majority o f the employment in nearly
all occupational categories. Most of the women were
employed as clerical workers or teletype-multiplex

percent in 1968. Walking and bicycle messengers made

operators.

up 18 percent o f the employees in 1947 but only 7
percent in 1968. On the other hand, the proportions of
construction, installation, and maintenance workers and

Pay rates in all o f the specific nonmessenger occupa­
tional categories shown in table 6 averaged more than $3

of clerical employees have increased during this period.

an hour. Engineers and engineering assistants, at $6.42
an hour, were the highest paid group; lowest rates were

International Telegraph Carriers

reported for clerical workers in the commercial depart­
ment, who averaged $3.14.

The 5,424 employees of the six international tele­

Average hourly rates for other numerically important

graph carriers covered by the study14 averaged $4.11 an
hour in October 1968. This average was 7.3 percent

jobs were $4.49 for radio operating technicians; $4.34

higher than the level of a year earlier.

for mechanics and maintenance technicians; $3.66 for
teletype-multiplex operators; and $3.53 for cable opera­
tors.

Pay rates of the 5,072 nonmessenger employees of
The 352 messengers, nearly all walking and bicycle,

The study included carriers engaged in nonvocal
international telegraph communications either by radio

averaged $1.74.

or by ocean cable. Although many of the occupational

the six carriers averaged $4.24 an hour in October 1968.

categories studied are common to both operations, some
are exclusive to one carrier group. For example, radio
14
The study covered international telegraph carriers whose operators and radio telegraph riggers were reported only
annual operating revenue is over $50,000. It excludes 77 officers
by radiotelegraph carriers; cable operators, on the other
and assistants and approximately 2,300 employees working
outside the. conterminous 48 States and District o f Columbia.
hand, were employed only in ocean-cable operations.

6




Table

1.

Telephone

C a rrie rs :1

Percent Distribution
Number o f employees

Occupational 'group
Total

A ll employees except o f f i c i a l s and
managerial assistants---------------------------------Part time--------------------------------------------------Full time-------------------------------------------------P rofessional and semiprofessional employees
Draftsmen-------------------------------------------------Others------------------------------------------------------Business o f f i c e and sales employees-----------Supervisors----------------------------------------------N onsupervisory employees— — —
—

—

C lerica l employees---------------------------------------Supervisors---------------------------------------------Nonsupervisory employees------------------------Commercial department------------------- -—
T ra ffic department------------------------------Plant department---------------------------------Accounting department-------------------------A ll other departments-------------------------Telephone operators--------------------------------------Chief operators---------------------------------------Service assistants and instructors--------Experienced switchboard operators----------Operators in training------------------------------Other switchboard employees--------------- --—
Construction, in sta lla tion , and maintenance
employees-----------------------------------------------------Foremen o f telephone craftsmen--------------Central o ff i c e craftsmen------------------------Test-board men and repeatermen---------Central o ffi c e repairmen-------------------Others-------------------------------------------------In sta lla tion and exchange repair
craftsmen------------------------------------------------PEX and sta tion in s ta lle rs ----------------Exchange repairmen-----------------------------Others--------------------------------------------------Line, cable, and conduit craftsmen--------Linemen------------------------------------------------Cable s p lice r s ------------------------------------Cable s p lic e r s ' helpers---------------------Laborers— -----------------------------------------------Building, supplies, and motor vehicle
employees---------------------------------------------------- Foremen-----------------------------------------------------Mechanics-------------------------------------------------Other building service employees-—------Other supplies and motor vehicle
employees— ------------------------------ ----- -----A ll employees not elsewhere c la s s ifie d —- —

Men

Women

of Employees in Occupational
Average
sched­
uled
weekly
hours

by

Average

Hourly

R a te s,2

D ecem ber 1968

Percent o f employees receiving—
Average
hourly Under
rates2 $1.60

727,897
27,267
700,630
72,873
2,948
69,925
57,534
11,328
46,206
158,612
11,788
146,824
28,786
21,627
41,301
33,071
22,039
195,775
9,770
14,512
123,558
45,875
2,060

319,982
1,974
318,008
55,018
555
54,463
16,772
5,673
11,099
12,479
2,565
9,914
675
41
6,453
1,339
1,406
118
21
50
29
10
8

407,915
25,293
382,622
17,855
2,393
15,462
40,762
5,655
35,107
146,133
9,223
136,910
28, 111
21,586
34,848
31,732
20,633
195,657
9,749
14,462
123,529
45,865
2,052

38.0
21.7
38.7
37.9
37.8
37.9
37.6
38.0
37.537.7
38.1
37.7
37.1
38.3
38.6
37.0
37.2
36.5
39.0
38.0
36.5
35.3
38.4

$3.48
2.30
3.51
6.10
2.77
6.24
3.68
5.35
3.27
2.81
4.35
2.69
2.52
2.74
2.78
2.61
2.80
2.49
3.96
3.06
2.46
2.04
2.88

218,594
30,622
72,732
16,013
53,211
3,508

217,210
30,596
71,457
15,967
52,011
3,479

1,384
26
1,275
46
1,200
29

39.9
39.8
39.8
39.8
39.9
39.9

3.90
5.59
3.70
3.90
3.66
3.34

79,140
38,208
18,276
22,656
36,085
12,538
19,575
2,437
1,535
15

79,067
38,198
18,246
22,623
36,075
12,536
19,573
2,435
1,531
15

73
10
30
33
10
2
2
2
4

39.9
39.9
39.9
39.9
39.9
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.8
(*)

3.69
3.60
3.97
3.63
3.36
2.97
3.70
2.44
3.42
( 4)

22,189
2,785
3,085
10,887

16,485
2,418
3,075
5,617

5,704
367
10
5,270

37.9
39.4
39.6
36.4

3.12
5.20
3.73
2.38

5,432
2,320

5,375
1,900

57
420

39.3
38.1

3.08
3.75

-

Groups

$1.60
and
under
$1.80

$1.80

$2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

$2.00

$2.25 $2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

over

6.1

4.0

4 .1

and

2.7

6.0

9.9

6.9

6.2

2.3

14.5

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X
-

X
-

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3.3
1.3
3-4
2.6
6.5
1.6
2.5
9.8
1.9
.4
.6
4.8
.5
2.0
.7
8.8
2.3
.1

3 .4
3.0
3 .4
2.9
7.5
1.7
2 .1
9.7
1.5
.4
.5
3.2
.4
2.2
.5
7.8
1.4

4 .0
1.9
4 .1
2.5
6 .1
1.6
1.0
7.2
.5
.4
.2
.6
.3
1.4
.4
6.5
1.1

-

-

74.1
3.4
77.1
22.2
58.9
13.2
3.2
32.7
.9
.7
.4
.5
.6
2.7
1.2
18.1
2.6
.1

-

-

-

( 3)

.6

-

-

.4

-

.6
11.7
.1
1.5

9 .1
13.4
4 .1
7.0
11.6
8.6
13.4
.2
.8
10.9
27.5
.8

7.3
14.0
.1
15.1
20.7
8.2
12.4
17.2
16.3
18.5
.3
3.2
16.0
34.8
2.6

1.7
7.4
1.5
8.9
2.6
10.5
10.4
5.3
10.8
7.2
16.6
8.9
13.0
10.2
5.3
11.5
17.9
5.0
.3
21.1

2 .1
2.7
2 .1
4.5
5.3
4.3
4.6
8.2
4.3
3.4
3.4
3.0
6.2
6.0
4.2
13.3
8.6
4.5
.1
5.8

2.3
2.7
2.3
4.5
5.9
4 .1
2.8
12.2
2.0
1.4
1.9
1.7
1.4
4.2
4.9
13.3
5.5
6.0
.1
1.8

2.7
3 .4
2.6
2.3
5.7
1.5
2.8
11.3
2.2
1.0
1.1
3.8
.8
3.7
1.1
11.0
5.3
.2
1.7

.4

.2

.4

2.9

6.6

6.6

-

-

-

.3
.1
.3
.9

2.3
.6
2.4
7.4

5.9
2.7
6.6
10.5

6.9
4 .1
7.5
11.5

5.5
.1
7.0
5.8
7.3
7.6

4 .4
.1
5.9
4.7
6.2
6.6

3.8
.3
5.6
4.7
5.8
5.3

4.9
.4
4.8
3.8
5 .1
5.2

12.4
.7
14.8
15.2
14.3
19.0

18.2
1.3
19.1
21.7
18.4
19.2

16.5
3 .1
18.5
24.4
17.7
4.3

4.4
5.8
7.3
10.0
6.9
1.2

13.2
88.2
1.6
2.2
1.5
1.2

.4
.6
.1
.3
1.3
1.9
.2
3.7
5.9

2.7
3.3
.9
3 .1
7.2
13.6
1.1
24.7
4.5
-

6.9
9.3
2.4
6.6
13.0
19.6
5.0
40.6
18.0
-

6.9
9.0
2.9
6.4
10.8
15.8
6.9
18.3
7.8

5.2
6.7
2.5
4.8
8.1
9.8
7.6
5.6
4.5
-

4.2
5.3
2.8
3.4
5.6
5.9
5.9
3.2
4.0
-

3 .4
3.8
3.8
2.5
4.0
3.7
4.7
1.5
3.0

6.7
4.5
4.0
12.6
5.0
6.1
4.9
.6
4.0

15.1
9.9
13.2
25.4
11.9
9.6
15.2
.2
5.7

24.4
23.3
30.2
21.7
17.1
9.7
24.3
.4
13.0

-

1.8
1.7
2.0
1.7
2.9
.1
4.9
.3
3 .6
-

.6
.3
1.6
.4
.5
.3
.4

-

21.7
22.3
33.8
11.1
12.4
3.8
18.8
.5
20.2
-

14.8
.7
3.0
22.2

12.6
1.9
5.3
17.9

9.3
2.6
6.9
11.3

6.3
2.4
7.5
3.5

6.3
2.5
7.7
2 .1

4 .1
2 .1
8.8
.4

13.8
11.9

11.6
7.6

10.1
3.9

13.3
5.3

15.7
5.4

9.9
6.0

-

-

.5
1.2

1.9
8.4

-

-

-

1.3
1.7
.7
1.5
1.1
1.4
8.6

-

( 3)

-

-

6.8
18.4
-

_

_

( 3)
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.2

_

-

.1

-

-

.1
.2

-

-

-

.4
.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

( 3)

_
.1

-

2.2

7.8

-

( 3)
• -

5.2

2 .1
13.1
1.6
15.8
.9
19.5
15.8
2.4
16.9
14.1
24.9
16.1
18.0
12.5
8.6
5.9
30.1
8.6
.7
42.0

-

-

9.2

1.8
19.2
1.0
16.7
.2
20.7
17.2
.7
18.5
16.4
25.6
21.6
15.0
13.8
16.8
2.6
15.8
22.4
4.7
18.0

-

-

12.1

.8
11.6
.4
9.5
.3
11.7
13.8
.4
14.9
18.7
11.8
14.7
14.0
14.8
15.9
.7
5.5
19.5
13.2
5.2

-

1.0
17.7
.3
5.8

10.6

-

.2
4 .1

.3
14.4

13.3
.4
.7
23.9

.8
1.6

2.9
3 .8

5.7
6.0

-

-

-

.

-

-

.1

-

-

5.8
-

4 .1
2.6
13.1
.1

4.8
2.8
24.6
.2

2.7
3 .7
13.2
-

2.3
6.7
6.2
-

9.4
71.5
2.5
-

7.7
7.4

3.8
6.4

1.7
7.8

2.5
6.3

.3
20.3

1 Covers 52 telephone ca rriers which have annual operating revenues exceeding $1,000,000. These carriers are engaged in in tersta te or foreign communication service using th eir own f a c i l i t i e s
or through connection using the f a c i l it i e s o f another carrier under d ire ct or in d irect common con trol.
2 See appendix fo r d e fin itio n o f hours and rates used in this b u lle tin .
3 Less than 0.05 percent.
4 In s u fficie n t data to warrant presentation o f information on rates and hours.
NOTE:

X indicates that these data were not collected . Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal 100.




Table

2.

Bell System

Telephone

C a rrie rs :1 Percent D istribution
Number of employees

Occupational group
Total

A ll employees except o f f i c i a l s and managerial
assistants----------------------------------------------------------------Part time-------------- ------------------------------------------------Full time---------------------------------------------------------------Professional and semiprofessional employees-----------Draftsmen---------------------------------------------------------------Others-------------------------------------------------------------------Business o f f i c e and sales employees------- ----------------Supervisors------------------------------------------------------------Nonsupervisory employees--------------------------------------C lerical employees----------------------------------------------------Supervisors-------------------------- -------------------------------Nonsupervisory employees------------ ------------------------Commercial department----------------------------------------T ra ffic department— ----------------- ---------------------Plant department------------------------------------------------Accounting department— - — ------------------------ -—
A ll other departments---------------------------------------Telephone operators---------------------------------------------------Chief operators-----------------------------------------------------Service assistants and in stru ctors---------------------Experienced switchboard operators-----------------------Operators in training-------------------------------------------Other switchboard employees---------------------------------Construction, in s ta lla tio n , and maintenance
employees------------------------------------------------------------------Foremen o f telephone craftsmen----------------------------Central o f f i c e craftsmen--------------------------------------Test-board men and repeatermen-------------------------Central o ffi c e repairmen-----------------------------------Others----------------------------------------------------------------In sta llation and exchange repair craftsmen--------PBX and station in s ta lle r s -------------------------------Exchange repairmen---------------------------------------------Others----------------------------------------- ---------------------Line, cable, and conduit craftsmen---------------------Linemen---------------------------------------------------------------Cable s p lice r s ---------------------------------------------------Cable s p lic e r s ' helpers------------------------------------Others----------------------------------------------------------------Laborers— -----------------------------------------------------------Building, supplies, and motor veh icle employees-----Foremen------------------------------------------------------------------Mechanics--------------------------------------------------------------Other building service employees------------------- -—
Other supplies and motor veh icle employees--------A ll employees not elsewhere c la s s ifie d --------------------

M
en

W en
om

of Em ployees in Occupational

Average
sched­
uled
weekly
hours

Average
hourly
ra tes2

691,505
25,651
665,854
69,722
2,780
66,942
55,814
10,977
44,837
151,809
11,424
140,385
27,300
20,982
39,828
31,630
20,645
185,352
9,358
13,818
115,449
44,705
2,022

302,132
1,753
300,379
52,317
466
51,851
16,349
5,451
10,898
11,733
2,417
9,316
632
23
6,242
1,210
1,209
69
19
46
1
3
-

389,373
23,898
365,475
17,405
2,314
15,091
39,465
5,526
33,939
140,076
9,007
131,069
26,668
20,959
33,586
30,420
19,436
185,283
9,339
13,772
115,448
44,702
2,022

38.0
21.3
38.6
37.8
37.7
37.8
37.6
38.0
37.5
37.6
38.0
37.6
37.0
38.2
38.5
36.9
37.1
36.3
39.0
37.9
36.3
35.1
38.4

$3.52
2.31
3.55
6.18
2.77
6.32
3.71
5.39
3.30
2.84
4.38
2.71
2.54
2.75
2.80
2.63
2.84
2.52
3.99
3.08
2.50
2.04
2.88

205,723
29,151
68,479
15,506
50,857
2,116
74,583
35,760
17,202
21,621
33,506
11,375
18,391
2,358
1,382
4
20,922
2,684
3,000
10,237
5,001
2,163

204,464
29,131
67,262
15,477
49,680
2,105
74,568
35,752
17,200
21,616
33,499
11,374
18,390
2,356
1,379
4
15,409
2,330
2,999
5,117
4,973
1,791

1,259
20
1,217
29
1,177
11
15
8
2
5
7
1
1
2
3

39.9
39.8
39.9
39.9
39.8
39.8
39.9
39.9
40.0
39.9
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.8
(* )
37.9
39.4
39.6
36.3
39.3
38.1

3.94
5.65
3.73
3.92
3.68
3.42
3.73
3.65
4.01
3.65
3.38
2.98
3.74
2.44
3.53
(* )
3.16
5.24
3.75
2.40
3.10
3.81

-

5,513
364
1
5,120
28
372

Groups

by Average

Hourly

R ates,2

Decem ber

1968

Percent o f employees receiving—
$1.60
and
under
$1.80

$1.80

$2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

$2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

over

10.5

12.4

and

2.1

5.8

9.6

9.4

6.2

3.9

3.9

5.3

7.1

6.4

2.4

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3.1
3.0
3.1
2.9
7.5
1.7
2.2
9.9
1.5
.5
.5
3.3
.4
2.4
.5
8.0
1.4

3.7
1.8
3.8
2.5
6.0
1.6
1.1
7.2
.6
.4
.2
.6
.3
1.4
.4
6.7
1.1

17.4
2.2
19.7
25.2
18.5
7.0
23.0
23.8
35.8
11.6
13.3
4.1
20.0
.5
22.4

.2

.5
11.6
.1
1.3

.2
.6

1.6
8.2

.7
.5
.6
1.0
-.5
.5
7.1

( 3)
.5
-

8.9
13.3
3.8
6.8
11.5
8.2
13.3
.1
.7
10.5
27.8
.7

6.8
13.5
14.6
20.6
7.7
11.9
16.7
16.0
18.2
.3
2.8
15.1
35.4
2.4

11.3
13.5
.1
14.6
18.6
11.2
14.2
13.8
14.4
16.0
.4
4.1
19.9
13.6
4 .9

.2

2.6

6.5

6.5

-

-

.1

2.0
.5
2.2
7.4
2.4
2.7
.6
3.1
7.0
13.7
.8
24.8
2.5

-

-

-

4.7
17.4
( 3)
( 3)
-

-

.1

-

.3

-

.1

-

-

-

-

-

.3
.9
1.3

( 3)
-

-

-

.1
-

2.8
4.5
-

1.1

7.4

-

-

-

2.1
.2
1.4

.8
11.8
.3
9.0

1.7
18.7
1.0
17.0
.1
21.2
17.5
.6
18.9
16.8
26.0
22.2
15.0
14.0
17.4
1.9
15.9
23.9
4.5
18.1

-

-

1.0
18.1
.3
5.4

.1
13.7
2.6
3.6

-

13.1
.3
.6
24.1
5.2
5.0

-

5.8
2.4
6.5
13.2
6.7
9.1
2.2
6.4
13.0
20.0
4 .8
41.4
17.9
-

15.1
.7
3.0
23.0
14.1
11.8

-

6.8
4.1
7.5
12.0
6.9
9.2
2.7
6.4
10.8
16.4
6.6
18.6
7.9
-

13.2
1.9
5.3
19.0
12.0
7.4

2.0
13.5
1.5
16.0
.7
19.7
16.3
2.3
17.4
14.7
25.5
16.6
18.6
12.8
8.9
5.7
30.7
9.2
.7
42.6

1.7
7.6
1.4
9.1
2.6
10.8
10.8
5.2
11.2
7.5
17.1
9.2
13.4
10.6
5.5
11.3
18.4
5.3
.3
21.5

1.9
2.7
1.9
4.5
5.3
4.3
4.7
8.1
4.4
3.5
3.5
3.0
6.4
6.3
4.4
13.5
8.8
4.7
.1
5.9

2.2
2.8
2.1
4.6
5.9
4.2
2.8
12.2
2.0
1.5
1.9
1.7
1.4
4.4
5.1
13.5
5.6
6.4
.1
1.7

2.2
3.3
2.2
2.3
5.7
1.5
2.9
11.1
2.2
1.0
1.2
3.9
.8
3.9
1.1
11.1
5.5
.2
1.4

2.9
1.2
2.9
2.6
6.5
1.6
2.6
9.9
2.0
.5
.6
4.9
.5
2.1
.7
8.9
2.3
.1
_
.4

5.6

4.2

3.0
.1
4.8
4.0
5.2
1.4
2.4
3.0
1.8
2.0
3.3
2.7
4.0
1.5
2.2

4.1
.1
3.8
3.2
4.2
.1
5.9
3.6
3.8
11.2
4.0
5.6
3.4
.6
4.2

12.6
.3
14.7
15.4
14.4
16.3
15.7
10.4
13.6
26.2
12.3
9.6
16.0
.2
6.3

19.0
.6
20.1
22.2
19.1
28.2
25.6
24.7
31.5
22.6
18.2
10.6
25.4
.4
14.4

-

7.1
5.9
7.5
5.8
5.2
6.7
2.5
4 .8
8.2
10.2
7.6
5.7
4 .1
-

9.5
2.5
7.0
11.9
9.9
4 .0

-

5.9
4.8
6.2
5.4
3.8
4.7
2.6
3.2
5.5
5.5
5.9
3.1
3.6
-

6.4
2.2
7.6
3.6
13.8
5.4

-

6.1
2.6
7.3
2.2
15.1
5.5

_

4.0
1.9
8.6
.4
10.0
6.1

-

_

4.1
2.3
12.8
.1
8.3
7.5

_

4.9
2.1
25.3
.1
4.1
6.4

_

_

_

_

.2

X indicates that these data were not collected . Because of rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal 100.




X
X

76.2
3.4
79.2
22.6
59.7
13.6
3.3
33.2
.9
.6
.3
.5
.6
2.8
1.2
18.7
2.6
_

.1

4.5
5.3
7.8
10.3
7.2
1.9
1.9
1.9
2.1
1.8
3.1
.1
5.2
.3
3.9

13.7
91.4
1.6
1.9
1.5
1.1
.4
.3
.8
.4
.4
.1
.2

2.4
6.3
6.4

9.9
73.5
2.5

_

6.2

_

2.8
3.5
13.6
-

_

1.8
8.0

2.6
6.5

1 Covers 25 B ell System telephone carriers which have annual operating revenues exceeding $1,000,000. These ca rriers are engaged in interstate or foreign communication servioe using th eir
own f a c i l i t i e s or through connection using the f a c i l it i e s o f another carrier under d ire ct or in d ire ct common con trol.
2 See appendix fo r d e fin itio n o f hours and rates used in this b u lletin .
3 Less than 0.05 percent.
* In su fficien t data to warrant presentation o f information on rates and hours.
NOTE:

15.0

_

.3
21.3

Table

3.

N o n -B e ll

Telephone

CPercent :' Distribution
a rrie rs

of

Em ployees

in Occupational

Groups

by

Occupational group

A ll employees except o f f i c i a l s and
managerial assistants----------------------------------Part time---------------------------------------------------Full time--------------------------- ------------ ---------P rofessional and semiprofessional employeesDraftsmen---------------------------------------------------Others-----------------— ------- ------------------------Business o f f i c e and sales employees-------——
Supervisors—------------------------—----------------Nonsupervisory employees--------------------------C lerica l em ployees---—--------------------------------Supervisors——— - —- — - ———------------Nonsupervisory employees— ---- ---- — ------Commercial department-------------- ——- —
T ra ffic department----------------- — ------Plant department—- —--- — -----------------Accounting department— — — —--------A ll other departments-------—------- ------Telephone operators---------------------------------------Chief operators—------------- -—---- -------------Service assistants and instructors— - —
Experienced switchboard operators-------- —
Operators in training— —-------—- —------Other switchboard employees-------------- -— Construction, in sta lla tion , and
maintenance employees-------------------- -------------Foremen o f telephone craftsmen—- —------ —
Central o ff i c e craftsmen------------— — —
Test-board men and repeatermen-----------Central o ffi c e repairmen-------------- ------Others—- —- ——----------------------------------In sta llation and exchange repair
craftsmen—--------------------------------------------PBX and sta tion in s ta lle rs ------------------Exchange repairmen-----------------------------Others--------------------------------------------------bine, cable, and conduit craftsmen---------Linemen------- -----------------------------------------Cable s p lice r s ----------------------- —-----------Cable s p lic e r s ' helpers-----------------------Others—--------------------------------------------- —
Laborers— ---- ---------- —------ ---------—--------Building, supplies, and motor vehicle
employees------------------------------------------------------Foremen-----------------------------------------------------Mechanics-------------------------------- ---------—-----Other building service employees-------------Other supplies and motor vehicle
employees------------------— ------------------------A ll employees not elsewhere cla s s ifie d ---------

Total

W
omen

Men

39,392
1,616
34,776
3,151
168
2,983
1,720
351
1,369
6,803
364
6,439
1,486
645
1,473
1,441
1,394
10,423
412
694
8,109
1,170
38

17,850
221
17,629
2,701
89
2,612
423
222
201
746
148
598
43
18
211
129
197
49
2
4

sched­
uled
weekly
hours

Average
hourly
rates2

7
8

18,542
1,395
17,147
450
79
371
1,297
129
1,168
6,057
216
5,841
1,443
627
1,262
1,312
1,197
10,374
410
690
8,081
1,163
30

39.6
28.3
40.1
39.9
39.4
40.0
39.6
40.0
39.5
39.7
40.0
39.7
39.3
39.8
39.8
39.7
39.8
39.5
40.0
40.3
39.4
39.3
37.4

$2.77
2.27
2.79
4.44
2.80
4.54
2.71
3.99
2.38
2.29
3.66
2.21
2.21
2.29
2.22
2.17
2.20
2.01
3.24
2.63
1.91
1.80
2.78

12,871
1,471
4,253
507
2,354
1,392

12,746
1,465
4,195
490
2,331
1,374

125
6
58
17
23
18

39.7
39.9
39.7
35.6
40.4
40.0

3.25
4.35
3.21
3.41
3.17
3.22

4,557
2,448
1,074
1,035
2,579
1,163
1,184
79
153
11

4,499
2,446
1,046
1,007
2,576
1,162
1,183
79
152
11

58
2

39.8
40.0
39.2
40.0
39.6
39.6
39.6
39.9
39.5
( 4)

3.11
2.93
3.39
3.28
2.92
2.88
3.08
2.26
2.42
( 4)

1,267
101
85
650

1,076
98
76
500

191
3
9
150

38.9
40.0
40.0
38.1

2.48
4.07
3.07
1.95

431
157

402
109

29
48

39.7
37.7

2.76
2.87

28

Average

Hourly

R ates/

Decem ber 1968

Percent o f employees receiving—

Number o f employees

28

28
3
1
1
-

1
-

$1.60 $1.80
Under and
$1.60 under
$1.80 $2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

over

15.6

12.5

6.5

4.2

5.0

3.4

and

1.9

5.6

7.6

7.8

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X
-

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

.1

-

.2
-

.3
-

-

14.3
.3
2.4
.2
8.4
-

1.2
13.1
.5
10.1
-

10.5
14.8
.5
15.6
22.3
6.8
14.6
15.1
14.0
35.6
-

.3
37.3
58.3
-

_

9.1

$2.00

12.6
12.7
.5
13.3
14.7
13.8
12.2
12.7
13.6
14.3
2.2
2.0
15.8
16.0
7.9

4.3

1.8
11.3
1.3
19.0
.9
23.6
23.8
1.9
25.0
24.0
25.7
26.7
27.9
21.1
23.8
1.0
11.4
28.1
9.7
13.2

2.5
8.9
2 .1
22.8
10.8
25.9
21.8
8.5
22.6
19.8
29.3
27.0
18.9
21.4
13.3
6.8
34.4
13.6
1.0
23.7

3.2
27.4
1.9
4.8
4.0
5.0
9.9
2.5
10.3
8.8
12.4
7.5
13.7
10.4
4.9
18.7
14.0
2.0
14.0
15.8

3.4
7 .1
3.2
10.3
6.6
11.3
4.6
4.1
4.7
3.4
3.4
2.7
4.9
8.5
1.9
9.5
16.7
.4
1.0
10.5

3.2
4.2
3 .1
1.9
4.0
1.3
2.9
8.0
2.7
2.0
2.2
1.2
3.0
4.7
1.6
16.3
7.3
.6

-

7.9

21.1

8.4
7.3
10.1
7.2
6.4

7.4
.5
8.6
6.3
7.8
10.8

5 .1
1.2
5.7
1.2
4.0
10.3

7.7
2.2
6.4
2.6
6.1
8.3

16.4
4.4
18.5
27.2
20.8
11.4

18.4
5.5
20.7
20.5
25.3
12.9

9.0
8.7
15.3
8.1
12.2
23.1

5.3
15.4
4.3
4.7
3.5
5.5

2.7
20.8
.3
1.2
.2
.2

2.1
16.7
.2

19.9
15.6
36.3
12.9
13.7
12.6
16.3

20.6

3.9
2.3
9.0
2.4
3.6
.4
7.3

.5

.1

6.0
41.6
18.3
11.1
28.5
2.5
2.0
-

5.0
2.9
6.7
8.3
6.1
10.5
2.8
1.3
.7
*

-

.5

4 .1

.2
.3
.1

2.6
3.0
2.6
2.3

7.5
.3
7.5
2.8
8.6
7.3

-

.5
.9
.2
.1
1.5
2.3
.2
8.9
1.3
-

5.3
8.9
1.1
1.2
6.5
6.9
3 .1
29.1
18.3
-

8.3
11.7
5.2
3.2
10.5
12.6
6.1
21.5
22.2
-

9.6
11.7
5.7
8.9
12.6
15.9
8.3
17.7
19.0
-

6.9
7.4
6.1
6.8
10.4
9.5
11.7
8.9
6.5
-

5.0
6 .1
2.7
4.7
6.4
5.5
7.2
3.8
8.5
-

10.6
13.8
5.0
8.9
7.7
9.8
5.7
6.3
7.2
-

.2

21.3

15.5

8.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

.3

_
1.3

-

-

5.6
4.2
5.7
2.2
4.0
1.8
2.3
9.9
1.9
1.2
.6
3 .8
.9
2.1
1.3
10.9
3.7
.8
-

-

9.8
-

-

1 8 .1

11.8
4.8
12.2
3.0
8.3
1.7
1.7
16.8
.9
1.3
.3
.8
1.1
.4
.5
9.2
1.2

12.2
3.0
12.7
2.6
6.8
1.5
.9
7.4
.5
.1
.9
1.4
.3
.2
.4
6.8
1.3

.1
.2
.2
.1
1.7
.6

-

-

-

-

28.9
4.2
30.3
8.2
33.0
1.8
1.8
16.8
1.0
1.6
1.9
.5
.3
1.2
1.2
4.9
2.4
1.0

-

-

-

-

-

3.3
2.0
4.7
1.1

6.2
5.0
4.7
2.0

4.8
6.9
3.5
2.6

5.0
6.9
16.5
.6

2.7
11.9
23.5
-

2.7
19.8

22.4
.5

7.9
4.5

7.0
6.4

11.8
20.4

9.7
14.0

6.7
10.2

13.0
3.2

7.9
3.2

23.7
3.8

8.8
4.5

.5
5.7

-

-

-

1 .0
-

.1
-

1.6
.6
.3
.4
.2

.5
-

.2
.2
.1

5.4
24.3
2.5
11.4
1.3
1.4
3 .8
.7
14.0
.5
2.3
2.2
2.5

.

-

.7

1.3
-

2.6
-

1 .0

1.7
15.8

1.8
17.8

-

-

5.9
10.0

1 .0

-

-

15.1
2.0
4.7
20.6

1 .0

9.8
4.2
10.1
2.2
7.7
.8
.5
6.6
.1
.1

-

8.2
24.6

-

10.4
3.0
10.8
2.6
8.0
1.2
.6
5 .8
.3
.3
.5
.3
.2
.2
.2
3 .6
1.2

-

5.9
35.5

-

9.9

5.5
2.4
5.7
2.0
6.0
.9
1.7
10.7
1.2
.4
2.2
1.1
.8
1.9
.6
8.5
3.5

2.2

9.9

-

-

-

1.8

-

-

.5
7.0

.7
5 .1

1.2
4.5

-

.3
.7
6.4

1 Covers 27 non-Bell telephone carriers which have annual operating revenues exceeding $1,000,000. These carriers are engaged in in tersta te or foreign communication service using th eir own
f a c i l it i e s or through connection using the f a c i l it i e s o f another ca rrie r under d ire ct or in d irect common con trol.
2 See appendix fo r d e fin itio n o f hours and rates used in this b u lletin .
Less than 0.05 percent.
4 In s u fficie n t data to warrant presentation o f information on rates and hours.

3

NOTE:

X indicates that these data were not collected . Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal 100.

(0



o

Tab le

4.

A l l1

and Bell System
United States3

Occupational group

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
rates

Telephone

New England
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
rates

C a rrie rs:

Average

Hourly

Middle Atlantic

Great Lakes

Number Average
hourly
of
workers rates

Number Average
of
hourly
workers rates

Rates2

of

Chesapeake
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
rates

Em ployees in
Southeast
Number
of
workers

Selected

Occupations by

North Central

Region,

South Central

Decem ber

Mountain

Average
hourly
rates

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
rates

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
rates

Number
of
Workers

23,778
749

$3.32
3.51

67,451
1,307

$3.14
3.43

28,739
611

418

2.43

1968
P acific

Average
hourly
rates

Number
of
workers

$3.35
3.66

110,767
3,025

Average
hourly
rates

A ll Carriers
A ll employees except
o f f i c i a ls and manager ia l assistants*--------Cable s p lice r s --------Cable s p lic e r s '
helpers------------------Central o ff i c e r e pairmen--------- ---- ---C lerica l (nonsuperv is o ry )------------------Exchange repairmen—
Experienced switchboard operators-----Linemen-------------------Mechanics, building
and motor vehicle
se rvice ---- — --------PBX and sta tion
in s ta lle rs -------------Test-board men and
repeatermen-------------

727,897
19,575

$3.48
3.70

51,492
1,317

$3.53 141,943
3.89
3,569

$3.69
4.02

123,071
3,483

$3.52
3.67

43,728
1,348

$3.36
3.69

95,357
3,497

$2.99
3.59

2,437

2.44

413

2.48

441

2.56

375

2.42

183

2.51

446

2.27

53,211

3.66

2,802

57

2.79

3.70

10,134

3.81

8,200

3.61

3,131

3.46

6,101

3.47

1,575

3.74

5,225

3.67

1,731

3.72

8,445

3.81

146,824
18,276

2.69
3.97

10,433
623

2.68
3.91

29,822
4,344

2.79
4.08

24,191
4,554

2.73
3.97

8,673
703

2.53
3.98

16,426
1,877

2.50
3.62

4,684
314

2.43
3.94

11,315
2,419

2.53
4.02

6,097
566

2.58
3.90

26,186
2,666

2.81
4.04

123,558
12,538

2.46
2.97

9,008
948

2.57
3.28

22,787
2,185

2.65
3.32

21,265
2,014

2.50
2.97

7,494
835

2.45
2.64

18,843
2,323

2.08
2.51

4,727
477

2.32
2.83

14,563
1,563

2.43
2.81

4,986
564

2.38
3.12

16,201
1,427

2.66
3.33

3,085

3.73

254

3.36

894

3.97

762

3.79

230

3.37

172

3.42

60

3.46

135

3.93

55

3.15

444

3.80

38,208

3.60

1,556

3.57

9,909

3.78

8,123

3.57

2,082

3.29

4,494

3.19

774

3.86

4,369

3.68

937

3.67

5,539

3.75

16,013

3.90

897

4.01

1,861

4.38

1,839

4.06

565

3.99

1,991

3.80

266

3.95

933

3.98

469

3.96

1,994

4.11

89,908
3,329

$3.03
3.63

23,604
749

$3.32
3.51

62,228
1,170

$3.18
3.48

28,739
611

$3.35
3.66

104,686
2,875

$3.72
3.73

-

-

-

-

$3.68
3.69

B ell System Carriers
A ll employers except
o f f i c i a ls and manager ia l assistants*--------Cable s p lice r s --------Cable s p lic e r s '
helpers--------- ------ —
Central o f f i c e r e pairmen------------------C lerica l (nonsuperv iso ry )------------------Exchange repairmen—
Experienced switchboard operators-----Linemen--------- — -----Mechanics, building
and motor vehicle
service—--------------PBX and station
in s ta lle rs -------------Test-board men and
repeatermen——------

691,505
18,391

$3.52
3.74

51,492
1,317

$3.53 140,858
3.89
3,525

$3.70
4.03

113,229
3,128

$3.58
3.70

40,903
1,254

$3.43
3.75

_

2,358

2,44

413

2.48

441

2.56

365

2.43

183

2.51

433

2.28

372

2.45

47

2.80

50,857

3.68

2,802

3.70

10,068

3.82

7,555

3.63

2,874

3.50

5,616

3.52

1,571

3.75

5,035

3.68

1,731

3.72

8,062

3.81

140,385
17,202

2.71
4.01

10,433
623

2.68
3.91

29,627
4,344

2.80
4.08

22,839
4,137

2.75
4.06

8,097
703

2.57
3.98

15,474
1,877

2.53
3.62

4,644
314

2.43
3.94

10,240
2,190

2.58
4.09

6,097
566

2.58
3.90

24,906
2,432

2.84
4.06

115,449
11,375

2.50
2.98

9,008
948

2.57
3.28

22,391
2,135

2.67
3.33

18,667
1,650

2.58
2.95

6,720
718

2.53
2.68

17,710
2,192

2.10
2.51

4,680
467

2.32
2.84

13,331
1,403

2.48
2.84

4,986
564

2.38
3.12

15,132
1,198

2.72
3.32

_

_

_

3,000

3.75

254

3.36

894

3.97

740

3.81

228

3.37

148

3.59

60

3.46

132

3.94

55

3.15

431

3.80

35,760

3.65

1,556

3.57

9,817

3.78

7,804

3.58

1,773

3.41

3,882

3.28

752

3.88

3,853

3.77

937

3.67

5,385

3.75

15,506

3.92

897

4.01

1,859

4.38

1,697

4.12

548

4.01

1,910

3.82

266

3.95

875

4.02

469

3.96

1,860

4.10

1 Covers telephone carriers which have annual operating revenues exceeding $1,000,000.
2 See appendix fo r d efin ition o f hours and rates used in this b u lle tin .
J Includes data fo r employees in Hawaii, Puerto R ico, and Virgin Islands; and long-lines employees o f the American Telephone and Telegraph Co. which are excluded from the regional tabulations.
Alaska had no carriers reporting to the Federal Communications Commission. (For scope o f survey, see appendix.)
* Includes employees in occupations in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: For purposes o f this study, the regions fo r which separate data are presented include: N England - Connecticut, Maine, Massachussetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont;
ew
Middle A tlantic - Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; Great Lakes - I l li n o is , Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin; Chesapeake - D is tr ic t o f Columbia, Maryland, V irginia, and West
V irginia; Southeast - Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, M ississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee; North Central - Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South
Dakota; South Central - Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas (except El Paso County); Mountain - Arizona, Colorado, Idaho (south o f the Salmon R iv er), Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas (El
Paso County), Utah, and kfyoming; and P a cific - C aliforn ia , Idaho (north o f Salmon R iver), Oregon, and Washington.




Table

5.

Western

Union Telegraph

Com pany:

Percent Distribution

of

E m p loyee s'

in

Occupational

Number o f employees
Occupational group
Total

A ll employees except o f f i c i a l s , managerial
assistants, and messengers--------------------------------------Professional and semiprofessional employees------Engineers and engirieering assistants-------------Others---------------------------------------------------------------Telegraph o ff i c e superintendents and managers---Sales employees--------- -—-------------------------------------C lerica l employees------------------------------------------------Supervisors------------------------------------------------------Nonsupervisory employees---------------------------------Commercial department---------------------------------T ra ffic department--------------------------------------A ll other departments---------------------------------Route aides------------------------------------------------------Telegraph operators----------------------------------------------T ra ffic managers, ch ie f operators,
supervisors and instructors--------------------------Experienced telegraph operators (except
morse operators)----------- —----------------------------- Commercial department---------------------------------T ra ffic department-------------------------------------Switching clerks----------------------------------------------Operators in training--------------------------------------Other operators------------------------------------------------Morse operators-------------------------------------------Telephone operators------------------------------------Construction, in s ta lla tio n , and maintenance
employees-------------------------------------------------------------T ra ffic testin g and regulating employees-------Construction, in s ta lla tion , and maintenance
employees--------- ---------------------------------------------Foremen— -----------------------------------------------------Subscribers' equipment maintainers—--------Linemen and cablemen-----------------------------------Others— --------------------------------------------------Laborers-----------------------------------------------------------Building service employees----------------------------------Mechanics----------------------------------------------------------Others---------------------------------------------------------------Messengers——------ — —------------------------------------—-------Full-tim e employees--------------------------- ------------------Part-time employees----------- —-------------------------------Walking and b icy c le messengers--------------- ------ ----Motor messengers----------------------------------------------------

22,787
1,261
462
799
2,373
281
5,978
918
4,970
2,961
464
1,545
90
6,383

Men

12,544
1,102
450
652
1,413
254
1,946
667
1,249
670
109
470
30
1,509

W
omen

Average
sched­
uled
weekly
hours

39.2
37.1
37.1
37.1
39.9
36.3
38.2
37.1
38.3
39.0
39.9
36.6
40.0
39.8

$3.37
6.23
6.21
6.24
3.24
4.75
3.14
4.42
2.93
2.85
2.64
3.20
2.17
2.70

-

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00 $4.25

$4.50

$4.75

$2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25 $4.50

$4.75

over

-

5.8
.1
.1
.4
5.5
5.1
5.4
8.2
3.8
31.1
15.1

10.8
4.4
11.7
.1
13.7
14.4
27.4
8.4
17.8
21.0

9.3
.4
.2
.5
12.4
14.7
.7
17.5
21.2
10.6
12.5
1.1
10.7

20.9
2.1
1.5
2.4
21.3
..4
25.0
7.7
28.6
30.7
48.9
18.4
36.7

12.1
3.8
1.7
5.0
25.2
1.8
13.1
14.4
13.1
11.3
3.7
19.5
10.6

7.3
5.4
1.7
7.5
15.8
10.0
7.5
9.3
7.4
5.9
1.3
11.9
_
3.1

5.9
2.5
2.6
2.4
9.4
13.2
5.6
4.6
5.9
6.0
7.2
_
.9

11.1
2.2
3.2
1.6
2.9
10.7
5.4
6.6
5.3
3.4
10.4
.4

4.3
2.0
2.4
1.8
1.3
14.2
2.3
6.9
1.4
1.1
2.5
_
.4

4.9

2.1

2.2

1.2

1.1

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

and

505

703

39.9

3.28

-

-

2,628
1,348
1,280
17
224
1,302
15
1,287

39.8
39.8
39.9
40.0
39.7
39.7
40.0
39.6

2.59
2.56
2.61
2.63
2.08
2.59
2.94
2.57

-

_
-

6,030
1,588

5,932
1,558

98
30

39.9
40.0

3.81
3.82

-

-

-

4,339
769
1,467
411
1,692
103
481
99
382
3,344
2,504
840
1,715
1,629

4,271
767
1,459
409
1,636
103
388
99
289
3,237
2,407
830
1,665
1,572

68
2
8
2
56

39.8
39.4
40.0
40.0
39.8
40.0
39.3
39.9
39.1
33.8
39.1
17.8
29.2
38.6

3.81
4.65
3.78
3.71
3.48
3.42
2.66
3.38
2.47
2.07
2.14
1.64
1.63
2.42

53.2

-

6.0
7.6
8.0

X

X

X

X

X

100.0
4.0

-

13.9
17.8
9.7
5.3
97.3
13.6
14.1

X

16.3

X indicates these data were not collected . Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal LO .
O




1.9
3.0
5.2
1.8
1.6
6.41.2
4 .9
.6
.1
1.6
_
.2

-

7.0

10.5

51.5

16.0

26.6
24.3
29.1
2.0
29.5
_
30.5

13.8
19.5
7.6
89.5
.7
7.4
6.0
7.5

44.5
38.2
51.2
5.3
48.4
66.0
47.7

1.1
.1
2.2
_
1.1
28.0
.1

.1

_
_
_

.4

3.7
1.7

6.6
2.6

10.0
7.7

8.8
8.1

10.5
13.0

34.0
50.6

11.9
11.5

4 .1

4.2
1.3
1.0
9.4
11.7
9.4
7.1
9.9
22.1

7.9
.3
1.5
6.3
17.4
8.7
1.9
1.0
2.1
.4

11.1
.3
8.9
20.7
15.5
2.9
8.1
36.4
.8
-

9.2
1.2
5.6
13.9
15.0
_
4.8
21.2
.5
_

9 .9

2.6
12.9
10.2
10.6
_
5.2
20.2
1.3

27.8
3.6
63.5
13.6
11.2
39.8
1.0
4.0
.3

12.1
27.0
5.0
16.5
10.3
13.6
1.2
6.1

5.3
16.4
.1
13.6
2.7
4.9
.2
1.0

.2
_
.5
18.4
61.3
77.2
16.3
X
X

33.5

X

X

X

X

45.4

X

_
-

X

.1

( 3)
_
_
_
_
_

.1

_
_
_

.9

9.0
75.3
76.4
74.6
4-.6
40.2
6.7
39.0
.8
.2
_
2.3
_
.7
3.6
_
_
_
_
_
_

2.6
1.0

7.3
2.8

3.2
13.5
.1
.7
1.9

9.1
35.1
1.2
3.4
5.6

.6
2.0
.3

.2
1.0

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

X

X

X

X

X

X

_

_
_

1.4
3.3
5.0
2.4
.7
3.2
1.4
5.9
.6
.1
_
1.6
_
.2

X

.7

1 Includes employees working in the conterminous 48 States and the D is trict o f Columbia; the company does not operate in Alaska or Hawaii.
2 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and la te s h ifts .
3 Less than 0.05 percent.
NOTE:

October

$2.25

803
430
373
2
76
123
35
88

93
107
97
10
50
57

R ates,2

$2.00

1,208

-

H ourly

$1.80

3,431
1,778
1,653
19
300
1,425
50
1,375

93

by Average

Percent o f employees receiving- Average
hourly $1.60
and
rates2
under
$1.80

10,243
159
12
147
960
27
4,032
251
3,721
2,291
355
1,075
60
4,874

-

Groups

X

X

X

X

X

-

_
-

-

_

X

-

_

X

-

-

-

-

_

1968

Table 6.

International Telegraph C a rrie rs :'

Percent Distribution

of Employees

in Occupational

Groups

Number o f employees
Occupational group

A ll employees except o ffic e r s and a s s is ta n ts ---—
A ll employees except o ffic e r s and assistants,
and messengers-— - - ™ - ™ - —
——
Professional and semiprofessional employees—— —
Engineers and engineering assistants— — — ——
Others—— ———— — ——
—--------- — ——
O ffice or sta tion superintendents and assistants—
Sales employees— — — —
— — -------------- -------C lerica l employees---------------------------------------------------Supervisors------—
—------------------—----------------Nonsupervisory c le r ic a l employees---- — ---- --------Operating department— — —--------- --------——
Commercial department—--------—----------------------Accounting department---------------- -------------------Engineering department-— —-------------------------A ll other departments-------------- — -----------------Operators------------------------------ -----------------------------------T ra ffic ch iefs, dispatchers, supervisors,
instructors, and assistants------------------------------Nonsupervisory operators— ---- —— — -------------Radio operators—— - ,............................. , —
Marine coastal sta tion operators—---------------Cable op era tors™ -™ ---—- - —- —
—- Teletype-m ultiplex operators— —— —— —
Telephone operators—
— --------- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
---A ll other operators-—— — —
Messengers-.... ........................................................ ......... .
Foot and b ic y c le —— — — — — — — — —
——
———
Motor---------------------------------------------------- __— -------Construction, in s ta lla tio n , maintenance, and other
technical employees-———— ————— —
—
Supervisors—---- --------------------------------------------------Mechanics and maintenance technicians—
——
Radio operating technicians—----------------------------Radiotelegraph riggers------------------------------- --------Radiotelegraph groundmen——
--------——— —
Others------- —-------------------------------------------------------Building service employees—
-----—
—
A ll employees not elsewhere c la s s ifie d —— — — -

Total

M
en

W en
om

sched­
uled
weekly
hours

Average
$1.60
hourly
and
rates2
under
$1.80

R ates,2

October 1968

$1.80

$2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00 $4.25

$4.50

$4.75

$2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

over

and

5,424

4,540

884

36.8

14.11

5.5

1.0

1.5

4.5

5.9

5.4

4 .6

5,2

5.8

7.6

8.4

13.9

4.3

26.3

4,191
548
212
336
39
277
1,048
153
895
504
29
212
15
135
1,111

881
24
1
23

37.3
37.3
37.2
37.4
37.6
36.3
37.3
36.9
37.3
37.5
37.6
37.3
37.1
36.9
37.5

4.24
6.15
6.42
5.99
7.09
5.06
3.58
5.33
3.39
3.59
3.14
3.18
3.62
3.33
3.85

( 3)
.1

.4

.9

1.5
3.2

4.9
.7
8.9

6.2
.2
.3
10.3
10.1

5.8
1.7
8.6

1.0
1.3
.9
2.2
.7
.2

3.6
3.1
8.6
4.0
2.3
1.2

9.9
7.4
11.7
11.9
8.7
11.4
5.8

11.2
4.6
19.5
18.2
15.2
10.7
6.8

9.5
6.9
10.2
11.0
19.6
11.1
8.1

5.0
.2
.5
2.7
7.6
.6
8.4
6.4
11.7
7.9
8.7
11.7
4.1

5.5
.7
1.1
4.0
7.0
.6
7.8
6.1
7.8
9.3
4.3
9.4
4.5

6.2
2.4
.9
3.3
3.0
8.6
3.0
9.2
7.2
4.7
14.5
8.7
7.8
4.1

8.1
4.2
2.3
5.3
7.0
11.5
.6
12.7
19.1
8.6
8.6
4.3
8.5
7.8

9.0
3.8
2.8
4.5
3.7
10.8
2.4
11.8
19.5
9.4
4.0
10.9
8.5
12.1

14.9
4.7
3.3
5.6
8.6
9.2
7.1
9.5
18.2
1.6
4.0
4.3
3.9
33.4

4.6
6.1
3.3
7.8
9.3
2.0
7.7
1.4
.2
1.6
2.8
2.2
1.6
3.4

28.1
77.6
86.9
72.1
100.0
49.2
11.4
78.1
4.0
.2
4.7
2.6
10.9
12.4
8.4

120
1,181
51
123
228
686
64
29
352
340
12

117
994
48
122
210
543
42
29
349
337
12

37.5
37.5 .
37.2
37.5
37.4
37.5
37.5
37.5
29.6
29.3
37.5

5.08
3.73
4.28
4.30
3.53
3.66
3.68
3.49
1.74
1.71
2.42

-

1.4
2.3
.9
.9
-

6.4
15.8
5.1
6.3
-

7.5
.4
11.2
15.6
3.4
4.5
2.4
66.7

9.0
15.8
7.6
7.8
44.8
.3
8.3

4.5
2.4
5.7
5.1
6.9
-

.8
4.8
8.9
7.0
4.2
1.6
-

.8
4.4
2.0
13.0
6.1
2.3
7.8
-

.8
8.6
4.1
12.7
9.0
6.3
3.4
-

10.8
35.7
96.1
13.0
28.9
37.8
39.1
24.1
-

21.7
1.5
13.8
.1
-

60.0
3.1
2.0
29.3
-

1,061
163
560
124
24
5
185
83
26

1,060
163
559
124
24
5
185
82
26

37.5
37.5
37.5
37.5
37.5
37.5
37.5
37.4
37.7

4.51
5.60
4.34
4.49
4.36
3.18
4.14
3.12
3.31

.7

2.4
.7
.8
12.5
9.2
7.2
19.2

4.8
7.3
4.8
2.2
6.0
19.2

7.2
9.6
8.9
5.9
12.0

6.2
8.0
2.4
60.0
8.1
31.3
11.5

6.4
.6
5.4
7.3
4.2
14.6
3.6
3.8

10.2
2.5
8.4
16.1
20.8
17.3
2.4
-

8.5
6.1
7.3
11.3
20.8
10.8
1.2

46.4
90.2
.6
41.9

7 .7

7 .7

Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal 100,




Hourly

5,072
572
213
359
39
301
1,689
169
1,520
611
128
428
46
307
1,301

-

24
641
16
625
107
99
216
31
172
190

-

3
187
3
1
18
143
22
3
3
1

-

1

1
-

.1
.2
.1
-

-

.1
.1
84.7
87.6
-

1 Covers employees o f international telegraph carriers who have annual operating revenues exceeding
conterminous 48 States and the D is tr ic t o f Columbia.
2 See appendix fo r d e fin itio n o f hours and rates used in this bulletin .
3 In su fficien t data to warrant presentation o f information on rates and hours.
NOTE:

by Average

Percent o f employees receiving—

.2
.3
9.7
9.1
25.0
1.2
-

6.0
7 .7

.4
-

-

.2
20.0
1.1
16.9
3.8

.9
20.0
.5
8.4
-

7 .7

5.0
12.9
15.4
7.5
14.7
15.6
17.2
7.0
.6
7.5
6.5
8.3
11.4
3.6
11.5

50,000; excludes employees working fo r international telegraph carriers outside the

3 3 .3

18.9
-

Appendix. Scope and Method of Survey
Data presented in this study are based on annual
reports filed with the Federal Communications Commis­

working outside the conterminous 48 States and the
District of Columbia, except telephone carrier em­

sion by communication carriers, as required by the
amended Communications Act of 1934. All carriers
engaged in interstate or foreign communications service
by means of their own facilities or through connection

ployees in Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands.
Alaska had no telephone carriers within scope of the
survey. All other employees, both full time and part
time, were included. Part-time employees are defined as

with the facilities of another carrier under direct or
indirect common control are subject to the full juris­
diction of the Commission. A large number of telephone
carriers engaged in interstate or foreign service only by
connection with the facilities of another unaffiliated
carrier are not subject to the full jurisdiction o f the

those regularly assigned shorter hours than a full-time
schedule.

Commission and are not required to file annual reports
of hours and earnings of employees.

tions, volume X, part 51, applying to telephone carriers,

Occupational groups for which separate data are
presented are defined in the FCC’s R u les and Regula­
and part 52, applying to telegraph companies. Copies of
this volume are on sale by the Superintendent of

Tabulations for telephone carriers relate to those

Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washing­

having annual operating revenues in excess of $1 million,
and subject to the full jurisdiction of the FCC. Included

ton, D.C., 20402, at $1.50 per subscription.

are 25 Bell System companies and 27 companies not
affiliated with the Bell System.

Hours and Rates
Tabulations for wire-telegraph and international tele­
graph carriers were confined to companies with annual

Average hourly rates presented in this bulletin were

revenues exceeding $50,000 and engaged in interstate or

computed by dividing total “ scheduled weekly compen­

foreign commerce. Western Union Telegraph Co. is the
only wire-telegraph company included. Six companies

sation” by total “ scheduled weekly hours.” Average
scheduled weekly hours were obtained by dividing the
total scheduled weekly hours by the number of em­
ployees.

engaged in nonvocal radio and/or cable communications
are included in the international telegraph tabulations.

Employees and Occupational Groups
Covered by the Study

The terms “ scheduled weekly hours” and “ scheduled
weekly compensation” for the three carrier groups
covered by the study are defined, according to the FCC’s

Officials and managerial assistants were not included

R u les and R egulations, as follows:

in the tabulations. Also excluded were employees
Telephone Carriers

5 1.12(b). “Scheduled weekly hours’’ means the number o f regular hours, excluding overtime hours,
in the duty tours which the employee is scheduled to work during the week in which December 31
occurs, whether or not excused because o f a holiday, vacation, leave o f absence, or other reason.
51.13(b). “Scheduled weekly compensation” means compensation to the employee at the rate of
pay in effect on December 31 for the “scheduled weekly hours.” It includes the basic weekly pay rate
plus any regularly scheduled supplementary compensation, such as differentials for evening and night
tours, equivalent value o f board and lodging for unlocated employees, equivalent value o f meals
furnished dining service employees, and equivalent value o f living quarters and maintenance furnished
managers o f agency offices. It excludes pay for overtime work and pay in excess o f weekday rates for
Sunday and holiday work.
Western Union Telegraph Company

52.21(b). “Scheduled weekly hours” are defined as an employee’s regular daily tour o f duty
multiplied by the number o f days, or fraction o f days, scheduled to be worked during a week.
52.22(b). “Scheduled weekly compensation” is defined as the wages scheduled to be paid for
scheduled weekly hours as defined in 52.21(b). This should include employee contributions for
old-age benefits, unemployment insurance and similar deductions, paid vacation and holiday hours,
the regularly scheduled weekly compensation for employees temporarily on leave due to disability or
sickness, and the scheduled weekly compensation o f both full- and part-time employees.




1 3

The company reports that “ scheduled weekly compensation” excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
International Telegraph Carriers

International telegraph carriers are instructed to report scheduled weekly hours and compensation for their
employees as defined above for the Western Union Telegraph Co., except that scheduled weekly compensation should
include regularly scheduled maintenance, travel, or other allowances.

Distribution of Workers by Earnings Classes
In the tables, workers are distributed according to the percentage having stipulated hourly rates of pay. Because of
rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.

14



Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports for industries included in the Bureau’s program of industry wage surveys since
January 1950 are listed below. Those for which a price is shown are available from the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or any of its regional sales offices.
Those for which a price is not shown may be obtained free as long as a supply is available, from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C., 20212, or from any of the regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I.

Occupational Wage Studies
Manufacturing

Basic Iron and Steel, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1602 (55 cents).
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1520 (30 cents).
*Canning and Freezing, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Cigar Manufacturing, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1581 (25 cents).
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1472 (20 cents).
Cotton and Man-Made Fiber Textiles, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1637 ($1).
Distilled Liquors, 1952.

Series 2, No. 88.

Fabricated Structural Steel, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1463 (30 cents).
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1531 (30 cents).
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1576 (25 cents).
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 (30 cents).
Footwear, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1634 (75 cents).
Hosiery, 1967.

BLS Bulletin 1562 (70 cents).

Industrial Chemicals, 1965.

BLS Bulletin 1529 (40 cents).

Iron and Steel Foundries, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1626 ($1).
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1618 (55 cents).
Machinery Manufacturing, 1966.
Meat Products, 1963.

BLS Bulletin 1563 (70 cents).

BLS Bulletin 1415 (75 cents).

Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1659 (65 cents).
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1594 (75 cents).
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1439 (35 cents).
Miscellaneous Textile, 1953. BLS Report 56.
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Parts, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1393 (45 cents).
Nonferrous Foundries, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1498 (40 cents).
Paints and Varnishes, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1524 (40 cents).
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1478 (70 cents).
Petroleum Refining, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1526 (30 cents).
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1424 (30 cents).
•Processed Waste, 1957. BLS Report 124.
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1608 (60 cents).
Radio, Television, and Related Products, 1951. Series 2 , No. 84.
Railroad Cars, 1952. Series 2, No. 86.
*Raw Sugar, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1519 (30 cents).
Structural Clay Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1459 (45 cents).
Synthetic Fibers, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1540 (30 cents).
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1965—66. BLS Bulletin 1527 (45 cents).
*Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957.

BLS Report 136.

* Studies of the effects o f the $1 minimum wage.



I.

Occupational Wage Studies— Continued
Manufacturing— Continued

West Coast Sawmilling, 1964.

BLS Bulletin 1455 (30 cents).

Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1965.
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1968.

BLS Bulletin 1508 (25 cents).

BLS Bulletin 1649 (45 cents).

Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1965.

BLS Bulletin 1496 (40 cents).

* Wooden Containers, 1957. BLS Report 126.
Wool Textiles, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1551 (45 cents).
Work Clothing, 1968.

BLS Bulletin 1624 (50 cents).

Nonmanufacturing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1452 (30 cents).
Banking, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1466 (30 cents).
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583 (50 cents).
Communications, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1615 (30 cents).
Contract Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1644 (55 cents).
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1566 (30 cents).
Department and Women’s Ready-to-Wear Stores, 1950. Series 2, No. 78.
Eating and Drinking Places, 1966—67. BLS Bulletin 1588 (40 cents).
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1614 (70 cents).
Hospitals, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1553 (70 cents).
Hotels and Motels, 1966—67. BLS Bulletin 1587 (40 cents).
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968.

BLS Bulletin 1645 (75 cents).

Life Insurance, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1569 (30 cents).
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1542 (35 cents).
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1967—68. BLS Bulletin 1638 (75 cents).

II.

Other Industry Wage Studies

Factory Workers’ Earnings— Distribution by Straight-Time Hourly Earnings, 1958. BLS Bulletin 1252 (40 cents).
Factory Workers’ Earnings— Selected Manufacturing Industries, 1959. BLS Bulletin 1275 (35 cents).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the South and North Central Regions, 1965.
BLS Bulletin 1552 (50 cents).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropolitan Areas of the South, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1533 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Trade, June 1966—
Retail Trade (Overall Summary). BLS Bulletin 1584 ($1).
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment Dealers.

BLS Bulletin 1584-1 (30 cents).

General Merchandise Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-2 (55 cents).
Food Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-3 (60 cents).
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations. BLS Bulletin 1584-4 (50 cents).
Apparel and Accessory Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-5 (55 cents).
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-6 (50 cents).
Miscellaneous Retail Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-7 (65 cents).

* Studies of the effects o f the $1 minimum wage.




* U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING O FF ICE : 1970 O - 386-870

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S R EG IO N A L O F F IC E S

R egion I
1603-B Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
P hone:

R egion II
341 Ninth Ave.
New York, N .Y . 10001
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

2 2 3 -6 7 6 2 (A rea C od e 6 1 7 )

R egion V
Region VI
219 South Dearborn St.
337 M ayflower Building
C hicago, 111. 60604
411 North Akard St.
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)
Dallas, Tex. 75201
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

* Regions VII and VIII w ill be serviced by Kansas City.
** Regions IX and X w ill be serviced by San Francisco.




R egion III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone:

5 9 7 -7 7 9 6 (A rea C od e 2 1 5 )

Regions VII and VIII
Federal O ffice Building
911 Walnut S t ., 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

R egion IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
P hone:

5 2 6 -5 4 1 8 (A rea C od e 4 0 4 )

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate A ve.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C.

20212

O F F I C IA L BUSINESS




POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U.S. DE P A R TM E N T OF LABOR

I

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