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Index o f Volumes 72-83
Monthly Labor Review

January 1951 to December 1960




Bulletin No. 1335
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard W irti, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clagae,

Commiuioncr

Index of Volumes 72-83
Monthly Labor Review
January 1951 to D ecem ber 1960

Bulletin No. 1335
August 1962

UNITED STATES D EPARTM ENT OF LABOR
W . Willard Wirtz,

For
 sale by the Superintendent o f Documents,


Secretary

BUREAU OP LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D .C.

Price 40 cents




PREFACE

This publication is an index o f all parts of the Monthly Labor Review from
January 1951 through December 1960 excepting the statistical series appear­
ing in the department “ Current Labor Statistics” and the individual items
in The Labor Month in Review, the Chronology of Recent Labor Events, and
Developments in Industrial Relations. Two statistical supplements—to the
1959 and 1960 issues—were issued in this 10-year period, but these also are
not indexed.
The planning of this index—and much of the work entailed in compiling
it—was done by Irene B. Reedy, who is managing editor of the Review.
Previous bulletins in this series are No. 695 for volumes 1-11 (July 1915 to
December 1920), No. 696 for volumes 12-51 (January 1921 to December 1940),
and No. 1080 for volumes 52-71 (January 1941 to December 1950).




(m )




Contents
Articles and technical notes_________________________________________
Book reviews______________ - _____________________________________________________
Court decisions___________________________________________________________________
Government agency rulings_______________________________________________________




(V )

Page
1
31
40
53




Index of Volumes 72-83
M onthly Labor Review
January 1951 to December 1960

A R T IC L E S A N D T E C H N IC A L N O T E S
ABSENTEEISM (see also Employee behavior, foreign
countries) :
Sickness Absenteeism in the New York Telephone Co.
1955— July 798-800.
Sickness Absenteeism Under GM Corp. Group Insurance
Plan. 1952— Jan. 38-40.
Accident and sickness benefits. See under Collective bar­
gaining agreements— Employee-benefit plans.
Accident compensation or insurance. See Workmen’s
compensation.
Accident prevention. See Occupational safety.
Accident statistics. See Work injuries.
Age (see also Older workers; Productivity—Age and job
performance). Influence of Age on Saving and Spend­
ing Patterns. 1955—Nov. 1240-1244.
Agricultural implements. See Employment—Discrimina­
tion ; and under Wage chronologies.
Agriculture (see also Fair Labor Standards A ct; Income
and expenditures, consumer— Low income groups;
Labor force— West Coast; Labor standards and pro­
grams; Legislation, Federal— Migratory labor; Mi­
gration and migratory workers; and under Labor
force). Research on the Effects of Industrialization
in Rural Areas. 1958— Oct. 1121-1124.
Aircraft. See under Collective bargaining agreements;
Employment; Training; Wage chronologies; Wages
and hours.
Airlines.
See under Automation and technological
change ; Collective bargaining ; Manpower.
Alaska (see also specific subjects). Bibliography on
Labor Conditions, Labor Problems, Labor Economics.
1955—Dec. 1440, 1443-1444.
Aluminum. See under Wage chronologies.
American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial
Organizations. See Labor organizations; and under
Collective bargaining.
Apparel. See under Automation and technological
change; Wage chronologies; Wages and hours.
Appliances. See Prices, consumer— Automobiles.
Apprentices and learners. See Training.
Arbitration and mediation, United States (see also Indus­
trial relations; and under Collective bargaining
agreements) :
Arbitration:
Arbitration and Industrial Jurisprudence. 1958—
Aug. 866-867.
Code of Ethics and Procedure for Arbitrators. 1951—
Mar. 271-276.
Patterns and Problems in Labor Arbitration. 1959—
Nov. 1225-1227.
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service:
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Since 1947.
1958—Apr. 388-392.



( 1)

Arbitration and mediation, United States—Continued
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service—Continued
Report of Federal Mediation and Conciliation Serv­
ice, 1958. 1959—Apr. 408-410.
Grievances:
Arbitration o f Discharges and the Reinstated
W orker: Work Experience of Reinstated Em­
ployees. Considerations in Discharge cases.
1957— June 677-688.
Arbitration of Discipline Grievances. 1954—June
623-628.
Is the Arbitrator Management’s Friend in Discipline
Cases? 1959— Apr. 373-375.
Mediation. The Function of Mediation in Labor Rela­
tions. 1952—Mar. 275-278.
Transportation. Fifty Years of Labor Arbitration in
Cleveland Transit. 1960—May 464-471.
West Coast. The Use of Arbitration. 1959—May 543546.
Arbitration and mediation, territories. A Wage Award on
the Alaska Railroad. 1958— Sept. 965-973.
Atomic energy:
Labor Implications of Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy.
1957— Aug. 921-931.
Workmen’s Compensation and Radiation Hazards.
1957—Apr. 455-459.
Atomic Energy Commission (see also Atomic energy).
Labor and the Savannah River AEC P roject: Pt. I—
Manpower and W ages; Pt. II— Unionization and In­
dustrial Relations; Pt. I l l —Housing and Changes in
Population; Pt. IV— Community Facilities and Social
Changes. 1952— June 629-639, July 12-21, Aug. 150158, Sept. 269-278.
Atomic radiation. See under Occupational safety; Work­
men’s compensation.
Automation and technological change (see also Collective
bargaining agreements— Automation) :
Agriculture. Effects of Chemistry and Technology on
the Agricultural Labor Force. 1952— June 676677.
Airlines. Adjustment to an Automatic Airline Reser­
vation System. 1958— Sept. 1014-1016.
Apparel. Plant Level Adjustments to Technical
Change. 1953—Apr. 387-391.
Automobiles. Impact of Automation on Ford-UAW Re­
lationships. 1958— June 612-615.
Bakery. Adjustment to Automation in a Large Bakery.
1956— Sept. 1037-1040.
Electronic data processing:
Experiences With the Introduction of Office Automa­
tion. 1960—Apr. 376-380.

2
Automation and technological change— Continued
Electronic data processing—Continued
Office Automation in the Federal Government.
1960— Sept. 933-938.
The Reactions of Employees to Office Automation.
1960— Sept. 925-932.
Implications o f:
Impact of Technological Progress on Labor and Social
Policy. 1957—July 841-845.
Industrial and Economic Implications of Automation.
1955— May 539-523.
An Inquiry Into the Effects of Automation. 1956—
Jan. 7-14.
Integrating Automation Into Our Economy. 1955—
May 526-527.
Labor’s Aims in Adjusting to the New Technology:
Filling the Demand for Manpower. Economic
and Social Implications. 1959— Feb. 160-165.
A Review of Automatic Technology. 1955— June
637-644.
Social Implications of Technological Progress.
1956— Dec. 1415-1418.
A Theory of the Production and Service Processes.
1955—May 524-525.
Industrial relations. Automation: A New Dimension
to Old Problems. 1955— Feb. 165-169.
Insurance. Adjustments to Automation in Two Firms.
1956—Jan. 15-19.
Petroleum refining. Labor Adjustments for Changes in
Technology at an Oil Refinery. 1957— Sept. 10831087.
Radio and television sets. Adjustments to Automation
in Two Firms. 1956—Jan. 15-19.
Railroads. Maintenance of Way Employment: I—
Technological Displacement in Employment and
Possible Moderating Measures; II—Cyclical and
Seasonal Instability and Possible Remedial Meas­
ures. 1957— Oct. 1177-1182, Nov. 1315-1320.
Rubber. Wage-Rate Determination in an Automated
Rubber Plant. 1958— June 610-611.
Workers’ Health in an Era of Automation. 1956—July
819-823.
Automobile repair shops. See under Wages and hours.
Automobiles. See Collective bargaining agreements— Em­
ployee-benefit plans, Health and w elfare; Handi­
capped workers—Ford, etc.; Wages and hours—Motor
vehicles; and under Absenteeism; Automation and
technological change; Collective bargaining; Em­
ployment ; Prices, consumer; Unemployment benefit
plans, supplemental; Wage chronologies.
Automotive parts. See under Wages and hours.
BAKING INDUSTRY. See under Automation and tech­
nological change; Wages and hours.
Banks, labor:
Status in 1950. 1951— Apr. 413.
Status in 1951. 1952—Apr. 425-426.
Benefits and benefit plans. See Collective bargaining
agreements— Employee-benefit plans; Health, wel­
fare, and pension plans; Unemployment benefit plans,
supplemental; Wage chronologies; Wages and related
benefits; and specific industries under Wages and
hours.
Bibliographies:
A Bibliography on Labor in National Emergencies.
1951— Oct. 414-419.
Puerto Rico and territories. Bibliography on Labor
Conditions, Labor Problems, Labor Economics.
1955—Dec. 1440-1445.
Biologists. See Labor mobility— Chemists, etc.
Boiler-shop products. See Work injuries— Frequency and
severity rates.



Budgets:
BLS program. Standard Budgets and Comparisons of
Living Costs. 1959— Sept. 967, 970-972.
City worker’s fa m ily:
Changes in Estimating City Worker’s Family Budget.
1951— Feb. 193-194.
City Worker’s Family Budget for October 1951.
1952— May 520-522.
Estimating Equivalent Incomes or Budget Costs by
Family Type. 1960—Nov. 1197-1200.
Family Budget of City Worker, October 1950. 1951—
Feb. 152-155.
The Interim City Worker’s Family Budget. 1960—
Aug. 785-808.
Elderly couple:
Budget for an Elderly Couple; Estimated Cost, Oc­
tober 1950. 1951— Sept. 304-306.
Estimating a Budget for an Elderly Couple. 1951—
Sept. 309-310.
The BLS Interim Budget for a Retired Couple.
1960— Nov. 1141-1157.
Building. See Construction; Housing; Productivity—
Labor requirements.
Building trades. See under Wages and hours.
Bureau of Labor Statistics:
The Academician and the Bureau— Seventy Years Later.
1955—Jan. 43-44.
Biographical Sketches of Commissioners of the BLS.
1955—Jan. 49-50.
BLS Contributions to Statistical Work in Other Coun­
tries. 1955—Jan. 26-29.
The BLS Program—A Review and Some Suggestions.
1955— Jan. 31-33.
Carroll D. Wright and His Influence on the BLS.
1955— Jan. 3-10.
The Development of Index Numbers in the BLS.
1955— Jan. 20-25.
The Economic Analyst’s Desire for Certain Program
Expansion. 1955— Jan. 48.
An Evaluation of the Changing Character of the BLS
Program. 1955— Jan. 11-18.
How the CIO Evaluates the Bureau’s Work and Pro­
gram. 1955—Jan. 36-37.
A Labor Appraisal of BLS Functions in the Collective
Bargaining Field. 1955— Jan. 34-35.
Legislative Action and Its Reliance on BLS Assistance.
1955—Jan. 45.
The Limitations of Factfinding in Collective Bargain­
ing. 1955—Jan. 46-47.
The Private Research Agency and Its Need for BLS
Material. 1955— Jan. 41-42.
Programs and survey techniques. See BLS statistics
and' BLS program under specific subjects.
Some Management Opinions About BLS Data and Their
Uses. 1955—Jan. 38.
What Writers Feel About BLS and Want It To Do.
1955—Jan. 39-40.
CALLBACK PAY. See under Collective bargaining
agreements.
Candy. See under Wages and hours.
Canning and preserving. See Work injuries— Frequency
and severity rates.
Cement. See under Collective bargaining agreements.
Checkoff arrangements. See Collective bargaining agree­
ments—Union security,.
Chemicals, industrial. See under Employment; Wage
chronologies; Wages and hours.
Chemists and chemical engineers. See under Labor
m obility; Manpower.
Children. See Youth.
Clay products, structural. See under Wages and hours.
Clothing, work. See Wages and hours—Apparel.

Coats and suits, women’s. See Wages and hours—
Apparel.
Co-determination:
Bolivia. Worker Participation in the Bolivian Tin
Industry. 1955—Jan. 85.
West Germany:
Co-determination for Government Workers in West
Germany. 1955— Dec. 1470-1471.
Co-determination in Western Germany. 1951— Dec.
649-656.
Expansion of Co-determination in West German In­
dustry. 1953—Apr. 393-395.
Coffee. See Prices, consumer— Food.
Collective bargaining, United States (see also Arbitration
and mediation; Collective bargaining agreements;
Industrial relations; Labor-management disputes):
AFL-CIO merger. The Effects of the AFL-CIO Merger.
1956— Feb. 174-175.
Airlines. Mutual Strike Aid in the Airlines. 1960—
June 589-591.
Atomic energy. See that title.
Automobiles:
American Motors’ Approach to the Labor Contract.
1956—Apr. 421-424.
Bargaining Cooperation Among Auto Managements.
1960— June 592-594.
The 1958 Bargaining Programs for the Automobile
Workers. 1958— Mar. 270-274.
Bargaining obligation. The Employer’s Duty to Supply
Data for Collective Bargaining.
1952— Oct.
381-387.
Bargaining power:
The Monopolistic Power o f Labor Unions. 1956—
Feb. 161-163.
The Power of Organized Labor. 1956—Feb. 173.
BLS program:
How the CIO Evaluates the Bureau’s Work and
Program. 1955—Jan. 36-37.
A Labor Appraisal of BLS Functions in the Collective
Bargaining Field. 1955—Jan. 34-35.
The Limitations of Factfinding in Collective Bargain­
ing. 1955—Jan. 46-47.
Some Management Opinions About BLS Data and
Their Uses. 1955— Jan. 38.
Construction. Trends in Bargaining in the Northwest
Construction Industry. 1954— Nov. 1214-1219.
Decisionmaking Under Collective Bargaining. 1957—
Sept. 1059-1063.
Defense economy. See Defense mobilization and pol­
icies— Collective bargaining.
The Economic Climate of Collective Bargaining.
1960—Aug. 837-840.
Footwear. New England: Collective Bargaining and
Competitive Cost in the Shoe Industry. 1957—
Mar. 310-315.
Foreign trade:
Foreign Trade and Collective Bargaining. 1960—
July 693-699.
Union Views on Fair Labor Standards in Foreign
Trade. 1690— Oct. 1025-1030.
Government, Federal:
The Government’s Industrial Employees: II— Consul­
tation, Bargaining, and Wage Determination.
1954—Mar. 249-256.
Government’s Role in Wage Determination on Inland
Waterways. 1954—Mar. 257-262.
Health and welfare plans. Negotiation and Adminis­
tration of Health and Welfare Programs: Scope
and
Operation. Preparation for
Bargaining.
1957— May 576-581.
Labor peace:
Causes of Labor Peace Under Collective Bargaining.
1954— Feb. 170-173.
Factors in Successful Collective Bargaining. 1952—
Mar. 278-279.
642729 —
 62 

3
Collective bargaining, United States— Continued
Labor’s Public Responsibility: The Recognition of Na­
tional Economic Interests in Bargaining. Growth
of Social Consciousness in Internal Union Affairs.
1960— Jan. 18-25.
Labor Status and Collective Bargaining. 1956—June
647-653.
Management cooperation (see also Airlines, Automo­
biles, Steel, this section). An Appraisal of Man­
agement Cooperation. 1960—June 595-597.
Management’s Reserved Rights Under Collective Bar­
gaining : An Industry Official’s View. A Labor
Official’s View. 1956— Oct. 1168-1174.
New England. See Footwear, this section.
Productivity, worker-management cooperation. A New
Approach to Collective Bargaining. 1958—Mar.
282-283.
Public employees:
Collective Bargaining and Work Stoppages Involving
Teachers. 1953— May 475-479.
Implications for Collective Bargaining in Quasi-Pub­
lic Work. 1952— Mar. 257-262.
Trends in Labor Legislation for Public Employees.
1960—Bee. 1293-1296.
Steel. Company Cooperation in Basic Steel Bargaining.
1960—June 586-588.
Trends. Bargaining Trends in the Last Two Decades.
1956— Feb. 172.
Wages. Chamber o f Commerce Industrial Relations
Session, 1953: Wage Movements and Collective Bar­
gaining. 1954—Jau. 23-25.
Collective bargaining, foreign countries:
French Measures Favoring Collective Bargaining.
1955—Aug. 915-916.
The West German Wage Movement in 1954. 1955—
Mar. 311-314.
Collective bargaining agreements (see also Collective bar­
gaining ; Labor-management disputes; Wage chronol­
ogies) :
Accident and sickness benefits. See under Employeebenefit plans, this section.
Aircraft. Collective Bargaining and Agreements in the
Aircraft Industry. 1951—Dec. 664-668.
Arbitration Provisions in Collective Agreements, 1952.
1953—Mar. 261-266. (See also Grievances, this
section.)
Automation. Longshoring and Meatpacking Automa­
tion Settlements. 1959— Oct. 1108-1110.
Automobiles. The 1955 Ford and General Motors Union
Contracts. 1955— Aug. 875-881.
Benefit plans. See Employee-benefit plans, this section.
BLS statistics. The Collection and Analysis of Collec­
tive Bargaining Agreements. 1955— June 673-678.
Callback pay. Reporting and Call-Back Pay in Collec­
tive Bargaining Agreements. 1954—Dec. 13341340.
Cement. Labor-Management Relations in the Cement
Industry. 1951—Jan. 17-21.
Characteristics (see also Aircraft, this section) :
Characteristics of 12,000 Labor-Management Con­
tracts [1950]. 1951—July 31-35.
Characteristics of Major Union Contracts [January
1956]. 1956— July 805-811.
Collective Agreements in the Radio and Related Prod­
ucts Industry. 1952—Apr. 400-404.
Cleanup and clothes-change tim e:
Paid Time for Washup, Cleanup, and Clothes Change,
1952-53. 1954—Apr. 420-423.
Paid Time for Washup, Cleanup, and Clothes Change
in 1959. 1960—-Sept. 964r-969.
Coverage, extent o f :
Collective Bargaining Coverage in Factory Employ­
ment, 1958. 1960—Apr. 345-349.
Coverage of Collective Agreements in 17 Labor Mar­
kets, 1956-57. 1957— Oct. 1222-1223.

Collective bargaining agreements— Continued
Coverage, extent of— Continued
Extent of Collective Agreements in 17 Labor Markets,
1953-54. 1955— Jan. 64-68.
Extent of Unionization in Major Labor Markets, 195152. 1953—Jan. 26-29.
Death in family, leave. See Leave payments, this
section.
Deferred wages. See Wage adjustments, this section.
Disability benefits. See Employee-benefit plans, this
section.
Dismissal pay. See Severance pay, this section.
Dues checkoff arrangements. See Union security, this
section.
Employee-benefit plans (see also Military service and
Older workers, this section; Health, welfare, and
pension plans; Wage chronologies; and specific in­
dustries under Wages and hours) :
Accident and sickness benefits:
Accident and Sickness Benefits Under Collective
Bargaining, 1958. 1959— June 646-652.
Sickness Absenteeism Under GM Corp. Group In­
surance Plan. 1952—Jan. 38-40.
Health and w elfare:
Changes in Selected Health and Insurance Plans,
1954 to 1958. 1958—Nov. 1243-1249.
Extension of Health Benefits to Prior Pensioners.
1960— Aug. 841-843.
Health and Welfare Plans in the Automobile In­
dustry. 1951— Sept. 277-282.
Health and Welfare Plans in the Basic Steel In­
dustry. 1951— Oct. 447-451.
Health and Welfare Plans Negotiated in California,
1953. 195k— Jan. 11-12.
Hospital Benefits Under Collective Bargaining,
1959. 1960— Feb. 150-160.
Medical Benefits Under Collective Bargaining, 1959.
1960— July 710-717.
Surgical Benefits Under Collective Bargaining,
1959. 1960— June 598-604.
Health, welfare, and pensions:
Employee-Benefit Plans Under Collective Bargain­
ing, Mid-1950. 1951— Feb. 156-162.
Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans in Union
Contracts [1954]. 1955— Sept. 993-1000.
Mine workers. Four Years of Operation Under the
UMWA Welfare and Retirement Fund. 1952—
Jan. 37-38. Operations Under the UMWA
Welfare and Retirement Fund. 195k—Nov.
1232-1234.
Pensions:
Automobiles. Pension Plans Negotiated by the
UAW-CIO. 195k— Jan. 13-15.
Characteristics of Pension Plans [Winter 1957-58].
1958—Aug. 845-853.
Disability Retirement in Industrial Pension Plans.
1956—Aug. 919-921.
Early and Disability Retirement Under Collective
Bargaining, 1959. 1960—Nov. 1176-1183.
Electrical workers. Pension Plan of the AFL Elec­
trical Workers, 1954. 195k—Nov. 1234-1236.
Involuntary Retirement Provisions [1958]. 1959—
Aug. 855-860.
Labor views. Some Observations of Labor on Re­
tirement Security. 1951— Dec. 699-702.
Normal Retirement Provisions Under Collective
Bargaining [1959]. 1960— Oct. 1052-1061.
Pension Plans Under Collective Bargaining: Pt.
I—The Extent and Nature of Vested Rights in
Pension Plans and Their Relationship to the
Problems of Labor Mobility; Pt. II— Compul­
sory Retirement; Pt. I l l —Types and Amounts
of Benefits. 1953—Mar. 237-245, May 484-489,
July 714-722.
Vesting Provisions in Pension Plans [1958]. 1959—
July 743-750.



4
Collective bargaining agreements— Continued
Employee-benefit plans— Continued
Sick leave. Paid Sick Leave Provisions in Major
Union Contracts, 1959. 1960—Oct. 1061-1070.
Sickness benefits. See Employee-benefit plans—Acci­
dent and sickness benefits, this section.
Employment stabilization. See Guaranteed Employ­
ment, etc., this section.
Equal job opportunity. See Older workers, this section.
Equal Pay for Equal Work. 1952— Jan. 41^5.
Escalator clauses. See Expirations or reopenings and
Wage adjustments, this section.
*
Expirations or reopenings in major contracts in—
1951-55. 1951— June 680-691.
1955 (M ay-Dec.). 1955—Apr. 432-439.
1956. 1956— Jan. 20-30.
1957. 1957— Jan. 37-49.
1958. 1958—Jan. 30-44.
1959. 1958—Dec. 1349-1361.
1960. 1959—Dec. 1312-1323.
1961. 1960—Bee. 1257-1267.
Grievances (see also Arbitration etc., this section).
Grievance Procedures in Union Agreements, 195(>51. 1951—July 36-39.
Guaranteed Employment and Wages Under Collective
Agreements. 1952— May 555-559.
Health and welfare plans and programs. See Employeebenefit plans, this section.
H olidays:
Holiday Provisions in Union Agreements, 1950.
1951— Jan. 24-27.
Holiday Provisions in Union Agreements in 1952-53.
195k— Feb. 128-133.
Paid Holidays in Major Contracts, 1958. 1959—Jan.
26-32.
Hours of work (see also Premium pay and Shift differ­
entials, this section; and specific industries under
Wages and hours). Hours of Work and Overtime
Provisions in Union Contracts. 1958— Feb. 133141.
Insurance plans. See Employee-benefit plans, this
section.
Jury leave. See Leave payments, this section.
Layoffs (see also Older workers and Severance pay,
this section) :
Contract Clauses on Seniority as a Factor in Layoffs.
1955—July 766-771.
Layoff, Recall, and Work-Sharing Procedures: Pt.
I— Prevalence of Layoff and Work-Sharing Pro­
visions ; Forestalling and Minimizing Layoffs.
Pt. II— Union Participation in Layoff Proce­
dures ; Advance Notice of Layoffs. Pt. I l l —
Seniority and Bumping Practices. Pt. IV— Re­
call Procedures ; Work-Sharing. 1956—Dec.
1385-1393; 1957— Jan. 1-7, Feb. 177-185, Mar.
329-335.
Leave payments (see also Employee-benefit plans— Sick
leave, this section) :
Union Contract Provisions for Paid Jury Leave.
1955—May 545-547.
Union Contract Provisions for Paid Leave on Death
in Family. 1955—Mar. 322-325.
Maintenance of membership. See Union security, this
section.
Meatpacking. Collective Bargaining in the Meat-Pack­
ing Industry. 1951—Aug. 156-159.
Metal trades. Bargaining in the Metal Trades in the
Northwest. 1957— July 797-802.
Military service:
Employers’ Military-Leave Policies: Effect on Benefit
Plans, Fall 1950. 1951— Apr. 411-413.
Military-Service Payments in Union Agreements,
1953. 195k—July 771-776.
Nightwork. See Premium pay and Shift differentials,
this section.

Collective bargaining agreements— Continued
Older workers:
Employment and Age in Union Contracts. 1956—
Dec. 1403-1409.
Insurance and Pension Plans. 1957—Jan. 29-36.
Overtime pay. See Hours of work, Premium pay, and
Shift differentials, this section.
Pensions. See under Employee-benefit plans, this
section.
Premium pay (see also Shift differentials, this section) :
Premium Pay: An Analysis of Industrial Practices.
1951— Aug. 148-151.
Premium Pay for Weekend Work, 1952. 1958— Sept.
933-939.
Premium Pay for Weekend Work in Major Contracts
[1958]. 1959— Apr. 379-388.
Recall. See Layoffs, this section.
Reemployment. See Layoffs and Military service, this
section.
Reporting and Call-Back Pay in Collective Bargaining
Agreements. 1954—Dec. 1334-1340.
Rest periods:
Paid Rest-Period Provisions in Union Agreements,
1952- 53. 1954—May 531-535.
Paid Rest Periods in Major Union Contracts, 1959.
I960.— Sept. 958-963.
Retirement. See Employee-benefit plans, this section.
Safety equipment. Contract Allowances for Safety
Equipment and Work Clothing, 1959. 1960—Nov.
1189-1192.
Seniority:
Collectively Bargained Length-of-Service Benefits.
1951—Aug. 152-155.
Contract Clauses on Seniority as a Factor in Layoffs.
1955—July 766-771.
The Practice of Seniority in Southern Pulp Mills.
1955—July 757-765.
Severance pay (see also Layoffs, this section). Dis­
missal Pay Provisions in Major Bargaining Agree­
ments. 1957—June 707-712.
Shift differentials (see also Premium pay, this section) :
Shift Operations and Differentials in Union Con­
tracts, 1952. 1952—Nov. 495-498.
Shift Provisions in Major Union Contracts, 1958.
1959—Mar. 271-275.
Sick leave. See under Employee-benefit plans, this
section.
Steel:
The Basie Steel Companies and Steelworkers Agree­
ment. 1960— Feb. 161-163.
The Kaiser-Steelworkers Agreement. 1959—Dec.
1345-1346.
Union business. Company Pay for Time Off on Union
Business. 1959— Oct. 1075-1080.
Union security:
Checkoff Provisions in Major Union Contracts,
1958-59. 1960— Jan. 26-31.
Union Status Under Collective Agreements, 1950-51.
1951—Nov. 552-556.
Union-Status Provisions in Collective Agreements,
1952. 1958—Apr. 383-387.
Union Security Provisions in Agreements, 1954.
1955—June 649-658.
Union Security Provisions in Major Union Contracts,
1958-59. 1959—Dec. 1348-1356.
Vacations:
Paid Vacation Provisions in Collective Agreements,
1952. 1952—Aug. 162-167.
Paid Vacations in Major Union Contracts, 1957.
1958—July 744-751.
Wage adjustments (see also Expirations or reopen­
ings, this section; Revision, 1953 under Prices,
consumer—Consumer Price Index; Wages and
hours— Wage developments) :



5
Collective bargaining agreements— Continued
Wage adjustments—'Continued
Annual review :
IVage Escalation [in 1955]—Recent Developments.
1955—Mar. 315-318.
Deferred Wage Increases in 1957 and Wage Escala­
tor Clauses. 1957— Jan. 50-52.
Deferred Wage Increases in 1958 and Wage Escala­
tor Clauses. 1957—Dec. 1464-1467.
Deferred Increases [in 1959] and Escalator Clauses.
1958— Dec. 1362-1365.
Deferred Wage Increases [in 1960] and Escalator
Clauses. 1959— Dec. 1324-1328.
Deferred Wage Increases [in 1961] and Escalator
Clauses. 1960—Dec. 1268-1271.
Escalator Wage Adjustments Based on Price of
Product. 1951— July 48-49.
The Growth, Status, and Implications of Wage
Escalation. 1958— Feb. 126-129.
Washup time. See Cleanup and clothes-change time,
this section.
Welfare plans.
See Employee-benefit plans, this
section.
Work clothing. See Safety equipment, this section.
Worksharing. See Layoffs, this section.
Work Stoppage Provisions in Union Agreements.
1952—Mar. 272-275.
Communications. See Absenteeism; and under Wage
chronologies; Wages and hours.
Conciliation. See Arbitration and mediation.
Congress of Industrial Organizations. See Labor organ­
izations.
Construction (see also Homebuilders; Housing; and under
Employment) :
A ctivity:
Construction in the 1958 Economy. 1959—Jan. 1-7.
The Continuing Prosperity of the Construction In­
dustry. 1954— July 767-768.
Collective bargaining. Trends in Bargaining in the
Northwest Construction Industry. 1954— Nov.
1214-1219.
Controls. Liberalization of Controls in the Construc­
tion Industry. 1952—May 563.
Labor requirements:
Construction Labor on Public Housing in the South.
1952— Oct. 388-394.
Labor Requirements for Building Air Force Housing.
1952— Sept. 263-268.
Labor Requirements for Constructing Military Air­
fields. 1953— Feb. 130-135.
Suburban building. Building in Metropolitan Areas,
1954-56. 1957— June 689-696.
Consumer expenditures and income. See Income and
expenditures, consumer.
Consumer metal goods. See under Employment.
Consumer prices. See Prices, consumer.
Consumers’ cooperatives. See Cooperatives, consumers.
Conventions, meetings, etc. See International Labor Or­
ganization ; under Labor organizations; and topic of
convention, etc.
Cooperatives, consumers, United States:
Credit unions:
Operations of Credit Unions in 1950. 1951— Nov.
561-563.
Operations of Credit Unions in 1951. 1958— Feb.
155-158.
Housing. Cooperative Housing in the United States,
Mid-1950. 1951— Sept. 258-264.
Operations and developments:
Developments Among Consumers’ Cooperatives in
1950. 1951—May 545-549.
Operations of Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1950.
1951— Oct. 456-458.

6

Cooperatives, consumers, United States— Continued
Operations and developments— Continued
Developments in Cooperatives in 1951. 1952—Mar.
279-283.
Consumer Cooperatives, 1941 to 1951. 1953—Aug.
862-865.
Consumer Cooperatives in an Expanding Economy.
1957— May 591-595.
Cooperatives, international:
International Cooperative Congress, Copenhagen, 1951.
1952—Jan. 45-48.
International Cooperative Congress, Stockholm, 1957.
1958—Jan. 59-61.
Cooperatives, producers, Soviet Union. Producers’ Co­
operatives in the Soviet Union. 1957— Sept. 10641068.
Copper mining. See under Wage chronologies.
Cost of living. See Budgets; Income and expenditures,
consumer; Prices, consumer.
Council of Economic Advisers (see Economic conditions—
CEA and President’s reports). BLS program. The
Economic Analyst’s Desire for Certain Program Ex­
pansion. 1955—Jan. 48.
Credit unions. See Cooperatives, consumer.
Cutlery, hand tools, and general hardware. See under
Wages and hours.
DAIRY PRODUCTS. See Prices, consumer— Food.
Death benefits. See Collective bargaining agreements—
Employee-benefit plans.
Defense mobilization and policies (see also Labor organi­
zations— Conventions; Price controls; Wage con­
trols) :
Collective bargaining (see also Labor and labor prob­
lems, this section). Collective Bargaining in a De­
fense Economy. 1951— Feb. 140-142.
Employment in defense industries. See Employment—
Aircraft, Automobiles, Construction, Consumer
metal goods, Electronics, Ordnance, Shipbuilding
and repairing.
Hours of Work in Key Industries, December 1950.
1951— May 523-527.
Labor and labor problems (see also Manpower, this
section) :

The American Labor Movement in Past Emergencies.
1951— Oct. 430-432.
A Bibliography on Labor in National Emergencies.
1951— Oct. 414-419.
IRRA Discussion of Government-Labor Relations.
1952— Feb. 145-150.
Labor During National Emergencies. 1951— Oct.
383-419.
Labor-management disputes. Dispute Settlement and
Wage Stabilization in World War II. 1951—Feb.
136-140.
Legislation. Defense Production Act. Amendments of
1951. 1951— Sept. 299-301. Amendments of 1952.
1952— Aug. 191-192.
Manpower ( see also Reports and recommendations, this
section) :
Civilian Manpower Programs for National Mobiliza­
tion. 1954— Aug. 866-869.
Exemptions From State Labor Law in New York De­
fense Industries. 1951—Dec. 690-692.
Federal Policy on Retaining State Labor Standards.
1952— Jan. 36.
Government, Federal. Emergency Procedures for
Civil Service Personnel. 1951—Jan. 53.
Measures to Place Defense Orders in Surplus Man­
power Areas. 1952—Apr. 426-427.
ODM Manpower Policy Statement of August 1951.
1951— Sept. 298-299.
Military service. See Collective bargaining agree­
ments—Military service.



Defense mobilization and policies—Continued
Personnel administration. See Manpower—Adminis­
tration.
Reports and recommendations:
Changes in Administration of Defense Mobilization
Program. 1951—June 694-696.
Changes in Price-Wage Policy and Administration,
June 1951. 1951—-Aug. 164-166.
Defense Economy Recommendations of President and
CEA. 1951— Mar. 278-281.
Defense Mobilization Action, December 1950-January
1951. 1951—Mar. 281-282.
Defense Mobilization and Manpower Changes, August
1951. 1951— Oct. 429-430.
Defense Mobilizer. First quarterly report. 1951—
May 543-545. Third through eighth quarterly re­
ports. 1951— Nov. 558-559 ; 1952— Feb. 177, May
534, Aug. 186-187, Nov. 521-522; 1953— Feb. 159160.
Economic stabilization. Resignation Report of the
ESA Administrator. 1952— Jan. 55-56.
Midyear 1951 Economic Reports of the President,
CEA, and ODM. 1951— Sept. 296-298.
Shift operations in—
Metalworking Plants, January 1951. 1951—May
533-534.
Metalworking Industries, 1951. 1952—Dec. 615-619.
Wages. Trends in Wages in 1950. 1951— June 638-641.
Department of Labor, United States (see also specific
bureaus) :
An Introductory Note [to Department’s Older Worker
Program]. 1956— Dec. 1402.
Recommendations in Secretary of Labor’s 1950 Report.
1951—June 693-694.
Department of Labor, territories. See Legislation, ter­
ritories.
Depressed areas. See Agriculture; and under Labor
m obility; Unemployment.
Disability benefits. See Collective bargaining agree­
ments—Employee-benefit plans.
Discrimination. See Collective bargaining agreements—
Older workers; and under Employment.
Disease. See Occupational disease.
Dismissal pay. See Collective bargaining agreements—
Severance pay.
Displaced persons. See Immigration.
Dresses. See Wages and hours— Apparel.
Drugs, medicines, and cosmetics. See under Wages and
hours.
Drycleaning. See under Wages and hours.
Dual loyalty (see also Industrial relations— The Case,
etc.) :
Dual Allegiance at Swift & Co., Chicago. 1953—Dec.
1276-1277.
Dual Loyalty in Modern Society. 1953—Dec. 1273-1274.
Impact of Unions in Small Plants. 1956—July 787-792.
A Methodology in Studying Role Conflict. 1953—Dec.
1278-1279.
Mutual Emotional Acceptance by Union and Manage­
ment. 1953—Dec. 1274-1276.
A Theoretical Examination of the Concept of Dual
Loyalty. 1953—Dec. 1279-1280.
EARNINGS. See Wages and hours.
Economic conditions, United States (see also Defense
mobilization and policies; Economic grow th):
Business Cycles and the Labor Market. 1955—Mar.
288-292.
CEA and President’s reports:
Annual Economic Reports of the President and CEA,
Early 1952. 1952—Mar. 287-289.
Defense Economy Recommendations of President and
CEA. 1951— Mar. 278-281.

Economic conditions, United States— Continued
CEA and President’s reports— Continued
Economic Messages, December 1952-January 1953.
1953—Mar. 278-280.
The Economic Report of the President. 1959—Mar.
280-283.
Labor and Economic Policies in the President’s Mes­
sage. 1953—Apr. 392-393.
Midyear 1951 Economic Reports of the President,
CEA, and ODM. 1951— Sept. 296-298.
The Nation’s Economic Prospects, 1955. 1955—May
562-564.
Plans and Reports on Manpower, Labor Relations,
and Welfare. 1954—Mar. 267-271.
Construction. The Continuing Prosperity o f the Con­
struction Industry. 1954—July 767-768.
Indicators:
Overtime Hours as an Economic Indicator. 1956—
Sept. 1024-1028.
Three BLS Series as Business Cycle Turn Signals.
1959— Sept. 973-976.
Low-income groups. See under Income and expendi­
tures, consumer.
New England. Development and Prospects of the New
England Economy. 1951— Oct. 458-460.
Textiles:
Economic Problems and Wage Structure in Cotton
Textiles. 1952— Aug. 140-149.
New England Textiles and the Region’s Economy.
1957—May 588-590.
The Textile Situation in New England. 1953—Aug.
832-834.
Economic conditions, Puerto Rico. See Migration and
migratory workers, Puerto Rico.
Economic conditions, territories. See Labor force, terri­
tories.
Economic conditions, foreign countries:
Canada. The Labor Market and Economic Activity in
Canada. 1954—July 778-780.
Great Britain. Wages, Prices, and Economic Policy in
Great Britain, 1954-57. 1958—Mar. 260-264.
Israel. Recent Developments in Labor Conditions in
Israel. 1954— Oct. 1107-1112.
Economic growth, United States (see also Economic con­
ditions) :
Future Production and Employment in the United
States. 1952— Oct. 401-403.
National Output and Income, 1929-53. 1955— Feb. 207208.
Productivity and Economic Progress, 1900 to 1950.
1953—Apr. 391-392.
Prospects for the Nation’s Economic Growth in 1957.
1957—May 595-598.
Rise in National Product and Real Income, 1929-50.
1951—Dec. 694-695.
A Shorter Workweek as a Factor in Economic Growth.
1956— Feb. 157-160.
Views of Business and Labor on Maintaining National
Prosperity. 1953— Oct. 1072-1075.
West Coast. See under Labor force.
Economic growth, territories. H aw aii: Economic Forces
and Growth Prospects. 1955—Dec. 1409-1415.
Economic Report, Joint Congressional Committee (see
also Economic conditions—CEA and President’s re­
ports) :
An Inquiry Into the Effects o f Automation. 1956— Jan.
7-14.
A Program for Raising Substandard Levels of Living.
1956—Mar. 313-316.
Economic Report of the President. See Economic condi­
tions— CEA and President’s reports.
Education, United States (see also Handicapped workers;
Labor organizations—Educational activities; Train­
ing) :
Attainment. See Labor force—Educational attainment.



7
Education, United States— Continued
Developments in University Labor Education Programs.
1956— July 793-795.
Education Through White Collar Workshops. 1952—
May 508-510.
Industry Techniques for Employee Education. 1952—
Apr. 418-420.
Recent Trends in and Outlook for College Enrollments.
1956—Mar. 286-291.
The Shortage of Creative Manpower. 1954—May
507-510.
Education, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Technical Training in the United King­
dom. 1959— July 783.
Latin America. U.S. Firms as Employers in Latin
America. 1960—May 479-485.
Electrical equipment. See under Employment.
Electric lamps. See under Wages and hours.
Electric utilities. See under Wage chronologies; Wages
and hours.
Electronic data processing. See under Automation and
technological change.
Electronics. See under Employment; Labor mobility.
Electroplating, plating, and polishing. See under Wages
and hours.
Employee behavior, United States. Employee Attitudes
and Output. 1954—June 641-648.
Employee behavior, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Absence and Overtime in Relation to
Wage and Number of Dependents. 1958—Apr.
403-408.
Latin America. Problems in A Latin American Factory
Society. 1954— July 756-760.
Employee-benefit plans. See Health, welfare, and pen­
sion plans; Unemployment benefit plans, supple­
mental ; Wage chronologies; Wages and related
benefits; and under Collective bargaining agreements;
and specific industries under Wages and hours.
Employment, United States (see also Labor force; Labor
m obility; Labor turnover; Manpower) :
A ircraft:
Expansion of Employment in the Aircraft-Engine
Industry. 1952—Mar. 284-287.
Expansion of Employment in the Aircraft Industry.
1951—July 15-19.
Growth of Aircraft and Parts Industry, 1939 to 1954.
1954— Dec. 1320-1326.
New England: The Growth of the Aircraft Industry.
1.957—Mar. 316-320.
Apprentices. See Training—Employment, etc.
Automobiles. The Effects o f Mobilization on Automo­
bile Employment. 1952— Jan. 1-6.
BLS statistics:
Accuracy of BLS Current Estimates of Employment.
1955— Dec. 1473-1477.
The BLS Employment Series and Manufacturing Re­
porting Practices. 1957— Nov. 1367-1371.
Employment in Social Welfare and Related Organi­
zations. 1954— Oct. 1126-1129.
Machine Methods in Employment Statistics. 1955—
May 567-569.
Measurement of Employment in Water Transporta­
tion Industry. 1954— Oct. 1121-1126.
Measurement of Industrial Employment. 1953—
Sept. 968-973.
Period of Reference for BLS Employment Statistics.
1.95//—Aug. 890-891.
Chemicals, industrial. Employment Trends in the In­
dustrial Chemicals Industry. 1952— May 522-531.
Child-welfare workers. Status of Child-Welfare Work­
ers. 1951—Aug. 176.
Construction. Manpower Effects of the Defense Con­
struction Program. 1952—Mar. 267-270.
Consumer metal goods. Trends in Consumer MetalGoods Industries, 1939-50. 1951— Mar. 263-269.

8
Employment, United States—Continued
Defense. See in this section: A ircraft; Automobiles;
Construction ; Consumer metal goods ; Electronics;
Ordnance; Shipbuilding and repairing.
Depressed area. Employment Effects of a Plant Shut­
down in a Depressed Area. 1957— Sept. 1047-1052.
Discrimination:
Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. 1956—Jan.
31-33.
International Harvester’s Nondiscrimination Policy.
195k—Jan. 16-23.
Minority Groups Conference on Equal Employment
Opportunities. 1955— Sept. 1017-1019.
Minority Worker Hiring and Referral in San Fran­
cisco. 1958— Oct. 1131-1136.
Negroes in Apprenticeship, New York State. 1960—
Sept. 952-957.
Two State Reports on Job Discrimination. 1958—
Oct. 1125-1130.
Electrical equipment. Employment Outlook in the
Electrical Equipment Industry. 1952—Nov. 507510.
Electronics:
Electronics Employment and Labor Force. 1953—
Oct. 1049-1054.
Expansion in Electronics Employment. 1952—Feb.
151-155.
Engineers. Engineering Personnel Employed in Metal­
working Industries. 195k—May 526-530.
Full. American Productivity and Full Employment.
1952— Feb. 125-129.
Government, Federal:
Government Employment Trends, 1929 to 1956.
1957— July 811-815.
The Government’s Industrial Employees: I—Extent
of Employment, Status, Organization. 195k—
Jan. 1-6.
The Jobs of Federal White-Collar Workers. 1952—
Nov. 489-494.
Government, State and lo ca l:
Government Employment Trends, 1929 to 1956.
1957— July 811-815.
State and Local Governments, 1909 to 1948. 1951—
July 20-25.
Maritime industries. Earnings and Employment of
American Seamen in 1957. 1959— Jan. 36-40.
Metalworking. Metalworking Employment in Small
and Large Firms. 195k— Apr. 412-418.
Mining. Manpower Trends in the Mining Industries.
1951— Aug. 133-140.
Negroes {see also Discrimination, this section) :
Employment and Income of Negro Workers— 1940-52.
1953—June 596-601.
Negro Employment in Three Companies in the New
Orleans Area. 1955— Sept. 1020-1023.
New England ( see also Aircraft, this section). His­
torical Patterns and Recent Trends in Employment.
1957—Mar. 281-287.
Nonagricultural:
Changing Geography of American Industry. 195k—
July 739-743.
Changing Patterns of Industrial Employment, 191955. 1956—M&r. 279-285.
Review of Trends in Employment Since Korea.
195k—Oct. 1083-1089.
A Review of Employment Trends in 1954 and 1955.
1955— Oct. 1105-1111.
Nonproduction Workers in Factories, 1919-56. 1957—
Apr. 435-419.
Ordnance. Expansion in Ordnance Employment, 195052. 1952—Aug. 159-162.
Part-time (see also Students
d Women, this section).
Low Incomes and Underemployment in Agricul­
ture—Proposed Remedies. 1952— «mly 48-50.



Employment, United States— Continued
Railroads. See under Automation and technological
change.
Shipbuilding and repairing:
Defense Expansion in Shipyard Employment. 1951—
Sept. 283-287.
Employment Trend in Ship Construction and Re­
pairing. 1952— July 7-11.
Outlook for Employment in the Shipbuilding Indus­
try. 1953— Sept. 940-943.
Size of firm. See Metalworking, this section.
Statistics. The Role of Employment Data in DecisionMaking. 1955—Mar. 293-296.
Steel. Employment Outlook in the Iron and Steel In­
dustry. 1951— Oct. 451-454.
Students:
The Employment of Students, October 1959. 1960—
July 705-709.
Youth Employment and School Enrollment, 1953-55.
1956— Sept. 1062-1063.
Watches and cloeks. Employment Trends in the Watch
and Clock Industry. 1953— June 618-620.
West Coast (see also under Labor force). Shifts in
California’s Industrial and Employment Composi­
tion. 1959—May 509-517.
White-collar. White-Collar Employment and Income.
1956— Apr. 401-409.
W omen:
Changes in Women’s Occupations, 1940 to 1950.
195k— Nov. 1205-1209.
Earnings and Employment of Women Factory Work­
ers, April 1954. 1955— Oct. 1126-1132.
Employment and Characteristics of Women Engi­
neers. 1956—May 551-554.
Employment of college women who graduated in
June—
1955. IPod— Sept. 1057-1061.
1956. 1958—July 752-756.
1957. 1959—June 663-666.
Factory Employment of Women, 1950 to 1954. 195k—
Nov. 1210-1213.
Part-Time Jobs for W'omen in Nonmanufacturing
Industries. 1952— Jan. 40-41.
Worker’s place of work and residence (see also De­
pressed areas, this section). Employment and
Residence in Major Metropolitan Areas. 1957—
Aug. 932-937.
Employment, territories. Alaska: The U.S. Government
As an Employer. 1955— Dec. 1383-1387.
Employment, foreign countries (see also Foreign coun­
tries for Labor force and Older workers). Western
Europe. Employment and Unemployment in Coun­
tries of Western Europe. 195k— Sept. 983-987.
Employment Act of 1946 :
American Productivity and Full Employment. 1952—
Feb. 125-129.
Ideal and Working Concepts of the Employment Act.
1957— Feb. 161-164.
Labor’s Contribution Under the Employment A ct
1957— Feb. 164-165.
Employment Service, United States. Employment Serv­
ice Program of Worker Utilization. 1952—May 499504.
Engineers (see also Employment—Women; Manpower—
Chemists and chemical engineers and Research and
development; and under Employment). The Short­
age of Creative Manpower. 195k— May 507-510.
Equal job opportunity. See Collective bargaining agree­
ments— Older workers; Employment— Discrimination
and Negroes.
Equal pay for equal work (see also under Collective bar­
gaining agreements). National Conference on Equal
Pay for Equal Work. 1952—May 559-560.

9
Escalator adjustments. See Collective bargaining agree­
ments— Expirations or reopenings and Wage adjust­
ments ; Labor costs; Wage-price policy, foreign
countries; Wages and hours— Wage escalation.
European Coal and Steel Community. See European
economic integration.
European economic integration:
Assistance to Labor Surplus Areas in Europe. 1960—
June 569-576.
A Common Labor Market for Four Nordic Countries.
1954—Aug. 886.
European Coal-Steel Community and West German
Wage-Price Issues. 1956—Aug. 937.
Free Labor and the European Economic Community.
1958—Aug. 877-879.
Free Movement of Labor in the Benelux Countries.
1957—Apr. 473.
An Integrated Labor Market for West Europe. 1954—
Feb. 178-179.
Labor Activities of the European Coal and Steel Com­
munity. 1955—Apr. 448-449.
Labor organizations:
Organization of Common-Market Trade Unions.
1958—Apr. 411.
Trade Union Views on European Economic Integra­
tion. 1960—Apr. 365-369.
Labor Shortages in Belgian Mines. 1957— Jan. 71-72.
Wage-Price Developments in the European Coal and
Steel Community. 1955— Aug. 917.
Expenditures, consumers. See Income and expenditures,
consumer.
FAIR LABOR STANDARDS A CT:

Effects of statutory wage minimums. See Wages and
hours—Minimum wage.
A Minimum Wage for Farm Workers. 1960— July 677685.
Puerto Rico. See Wages and hours, Puerto Rico.
Two Decades of the Fair Labor Standards Act. 1958—
Oct. 1097-1106.
Farm labor. See Agriculture.
Federal Employees Compensation Act. Workmen’s Com­
pensation in the United States: III— Federal Legisla­
tion. 1953—June 602-608.
Fertilizers. See under Wages and hours.
Finances, consumer. See Income and expenditures, con­
sumer.
Firemen. See under Wages and hours.
Fishermen, Boston. See under Wages and hours.
Flour and cereal preparations. See under Wages and
hours.
Food. See under Prices, consumer.
Food services in plants. In-Plant Feeding Practices in
Factories. 1959—Aug. 894-898.
Footwear. See under Collective bargaining; Prices, con­
sumer ; Productivity; Wage chronologies; Wages and
hours.
Foreign competition. See Collective bargaining—Foreign
trade.
Forgings, iron and steel. See under Wages and hours.
Foundries. See Occupational disease; and under Pro­
ductivity ; Wages and hours.
Furniture. See under Wages and hours.
See Wage chronologies—Electric utili­
ties ; and under Wages and hours.
Government, Federal. See Automation and technological
change—Electronic data processing; Federal Em­
ployees Compensation A c t; Wage chronologies—
Federal classified employees; and under Defense
mobilization and policies— Manpower; Employment;
Unemployment; Wage determination; Wages and
hours.
GAS UTILITIES.




Government, State and local. See Legislation, State—
Public employees ; and under Employment.
Grain milling. See under Wages and hours.
Grievances. See under Arbitration and mediation; Col­
lective bargaining agreements.
Guaranteed employment and wage plans. See Collective
bargaining agreements— Guaranteed Employment,
etc.; Unemployment benefit plans, supplemental.
HANDICAPPED W ORKERS:

Development of Work Opportunity for the Handicapped.
1952— June 640-642.
The Ford Plan for Employing the Handicapped. 1953—
Dec. 1299-1301.
Industry’s Problems in Placing Older Handicapped
Workers. 1953— July 756-757.
Jobs for the Disabled: The Task Ahead. 1953— July
754-755.
Progress and Needs in Vocational Rehabilitation.
1955— Sept. 1019-1020.
Rehabilitation of Workers with Hand Injuries, Puerto
Rico. 1951—Aug. 182-183.
Safety in Employment of Physically Handicapped Per­
sons. 1954— Oct. 1117-1118.
Vocational Rehabilitation by Federal-State Agencies,
1952—Aug. 188.
Hawaii ( see also specific subjects). Bibliography on La­
bor Conditions, Labor Problems, Labor Economics.
1955—Dec. 1440,1444-1445.
Health (see also Occupational health). The Health
Needs of the United States. 1953—Mar. 275-278.
Health, welfare, and pension plans (see also Employeebenefit plans, Older workers, and Military service
under Collective bargaining agreements; Wage chro­
nologies; and specific industries under Wages and
hours) :
Administration and operation (see also Legislation, Fed­
eral— Welfare and pension plans; Labor-Manage­
ment Reporting and Disclosure Act) :
Codes of Ethical Practices of the Labor Movement.
1957—Mar. 350-353.
Findings From the Second Report of the McClellan
Committee. 1959— Sept. 983-991.
The Legislative Recommendations of the McClellan
Committee. 195S—May 518-520.
Senate Committee Report on Voluntary Medical-Care
Insurance. 1951— Nov. 578-581.
Senate Investigation of Welfare and Pension Plans.
1956—July 812-815.
Senate Report on Private Employee Welfare Plans.
1955—Apr. 424-427.
Costs of medical care. See Prices, consumer— Medical
care.
Coverage (see also New York, this section). Health,
Insurance, and Pension Plans in 17 Labor Markets.
1954—Nov. 1228-1232.
GE’s Experience with Comprehensive Health Insurance.
1958—June 621-625.
Investment of funds. Interests at Stake in the Invest­
ment of Pension Funds. 1959— July 751-756.
Labor’s Interests in Medical Care Plans. 1960—Feb.
145-147.
A Labor View of Health Insurance. 1958—June 626630.
Management’s Interests in Medical Care Plans. 1960—
Feb. 147-149.
Medical-Care Insurance for Industrial Workers.
1951— Sept. 251-257.
Methods o f Evaluating a Group Insurance Program.
1957— Oct. 1188-1190.
Negotiation and Administration of Health and Welfare
Programs. Scope and Operation. Preparation for
Bargaining. 1957—May 576-581.

Health, welfare, and pension plans— Continued
Continued
New Y ork :
Health and Welfare Plans in New York State, June
1954. 1955—Aug. 905-907.
Health Benefit Coverage of the New York Labor
Force. 1960— July 718-722.
Trends and Current Issues in Social Insurance. 1957—
Feb. 166-169.
West Coast. The Development of Health Insurance
Plans. 1959—May 572-578.
Heating apparatus. See under Wages and hours.
Hides and skins. See under Prices, wholesale.
Holidays, United States. See Wage chronologies; Wages
and related benefits; under Collective bargaining
agreements; and specific industries under Wages and
hours.
Holidays, foreign countries. See Legislation, foreign
countries— Soviet Union; Wages and related benefits,
foreign countries.
Homebuilders. Structure of the Residential Building In­
dustry, 1949. 1951— Oct. 454-456.
Hosiery. See under Wages and hours.
Hospitals. See Work injuries— Frequency and severity
rates.
Hotel service workers. See under Wages and hours.
Hours of work, United States (see also Collective bar­
gaining agreements— Premium pay and Shift dif­
ferentials; Shift operations; Wages and hours) :
Average weekly:
Hours and Earnings in Nonagricultural Industries.
1954—Apr. 427-431.
Hours of Work in Key Industries, December 1950.
1951—May 523-527.
Length of Workweek in Manufacturing, May 1953May 1954. 1954— Dec. 1311-1314.
Three BLS Series as Business Cycle Turn Signals.
1959— Sept. 973-976.
Man-Hour Trends in Industrial and Construction Ac­
tivity. 1954—Aug. 859-861.
Overtime Hours as an Economic Indicator. 1956—
Sept. 1024-1028.
Payroll hours. Composition of Payroll Hours in Man­
ufacturing, 1958. 1960—July 686-692.
Scheduled workweek:
Hours of Work and Overtime Provisions in Union
Contracts. 1958— Feb. 133-141.
Scheduled Workweeks and Shift Differentials in 17
Labor Markets. 1956—Nov. 1295-1299.
Workweeks, Overtime, and Shift Pay in 17 Labor
Markets, 1957-58. 1958—Dec. 1374-1380.
Shorter workweek:
Economic Aspects of Shorter Hours of Work. 1956—
Nov. 1274-1275.
History of Union Efforts to Reduce Working Hours.
1956—Nov. 1271-1273.
Proposals for Reducing the Workweek. 1956—Nov.
1266-1267.
Recent Progress Toward Reducing Hours of Work.
1956—Nov. 1263-1265.
A Shorter Workweek as a Factor in Economic
Growth. 1956— Feb. 157-160.
Workers’ Attitudes Toward Shorter Hours. 1956—
Nov. 1268-1270.
The Workweek in American Industry, 1850-1956.
1958— Jan. 23-29.
Hours of work, foreign countries (see also Legislation,
foreign countries— Soviet Union). Belgium. The
Shorter Workweek in Belgium. 1957—Jan. 73.
Housing, United States (see also Construction; Coopera­
tives, Homebuilders; and under Prices, consumer—
Consumer Price Index) :
Additions and alterations. Revised Estimates of Resi­
dential Additions and Alterations, 1945-56. 1957—
Aug. 973-975.



10
Housing, United States—Continued
BLS statistics:
Revised BLS Seasonal Index of Private Nonfarm
Housing Starts. 1956—Aug. 938-940.
Revision of BLS Housing Statistics. 1954—Nov.
1239-1243.
Characteristics (see also Expenditures, this section) :
Characteristics of New 1-Family Houses, 1954-56.
1957— May 572-575.
Housing Characteristics in 34 Large Cities. 1951—
Nov. 569-570.
Housing in Britain and America. I. Characteristics
and Ownership. 1960—May 449-459.
Housing Surveys in 75 Cities, 1950 and 1952. 1954—
July 744-750.
New Housing Characteristics in 1955 and Earlier
Years. 1956— July 796-804.
New Rental Housing Characteristics in Nine Areas.
1951—Dec. 657-663.
Regional Differences in Characteristics of New
Houses. 1952— Feb. 163-167.
Contractors’ Use of Home-Building Permits Issued.
1952— Jan. 21-22.
Demand:
Housing and Population in Metropolitan Areas.
1951—Jan. 22-23.
Housing Demand in the United States, 1957-65.
1958— Feb. 142-145.
Expenditures:
Evolution in the Worker’s Housing Since 1900.
1958—Aug. 854-861.
Housing in Britain and America. II. Volume and
Expenditures. 1960—June 561-568.
Financing:
Federal Loan Insurance and Housing Needs. 1959—
Apr. 40o—
407.
Financing of New Sales Housing in Metropolitan
Areas. 1952— Apr. 390-394.
New Home Financing in Washington Area, 1949-51.
1951— May 534-537.
New Housing—Trends in 1949-51: Purchasers’ In­
comes and New-Home Financing. Family In­
come and New Rental Housing. Features and
Costs of New 1-Family Houses. 1951— July 1-14.
Relaxation of Mortgage Credit Controls, 1952.
1952— July 52.
Supply and Use of Mortgage Funds, 1920-29 and
1947-56. 1957— Oct. 1211-1215.
Legislation. The Housing Act of 1954. 1954— Sept.
990-995.
Market forces. Current Forces in the Homebuilding
Market. 1955— Oct. 1112-1114.
Owners’ v. renters’ expenses. Monthly Cost of Own­
ing and Renting New Housing, 1949-50. 1954—
Aug. 851-858, Sept. 977-982.
Rehabilitation. Financial Hardship Cases Handled by
the Fight-Blight Fund. 1955—Aug. 882-888, Sept
1001-1007.
Savannah River project. Labor and the Savannah
River AEC Project. Pt. I l l — Housing and Changes
in Population. 1952—Aug. 150-158.
Suburbanization.
Building in Metropolitan Areas,
1954-56. 1957—June 689-696.
Units started, by State. New BLS Series on Housing
Starts in Selected States, 1954-56. 1957—Aug.
964-965.
Housing, foreign countries. Great Britain. Housing in
Britain and America. I. Characteristics and Owner­
ship. II. Volume and Expenditures. 1960—May 449459, June 561-568.
IMMIGRATION:
Integration of Displaced Persons Into U.S. Economic
Life. 1952—Dec. 611-614.

11
Immigration— Continued
Recommendations on Immigration Policy. 1958—Jan.
45-47.
Report of President's Commission on Immigration and
Naturalization. 1953—June 628-629.
Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field,
Senate Select Committee on. See Health, welfare,
and pension plans—Administration and operation;
Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act.
Incentive pay. See under Wages and hours.
Income and expenditures, consumer, United States :
Age. Influence of Age on Saving and Spending Pat­
terns, 1955—Nov. 1240-1244.
Families, city:
BLS statistics, 1950:
Consumer Expenditure Study, 1950: Field Methods
and Purposes. 1951— Jan. 56-59.
Selection of Cities for Consumer Expenditures
Survey, 1950. 1951—Apr. 430-436.
Survey of Consumer Expenditures in 1950. 1952—
Aug. 125-133.
Survey of Consumer Expenditures in 1950: In­
terpretation and Use of the Results. 1952—
Oct. 425-428.
BLS statistics, 1959. Consumer Expenditure Surveys
and Price Indexes. 1959— Sept. 967-970.
Boston. Profiles of Worker Family Living in Boston,
1875-1950. 1957—Mar. 271-280.
Estimating Equivalent Incomes or Budget Costs by
Family Type. 1960—Nov. 1197-1200.
Housing. Evolution in the Worker’s Housing Since
1900. 1958—Aug. 854-861.
Instalment credit. Use of Instalment Credit by CityWorker Families in 1918. 1957— June 712-716.
Memphis. Family Spending in Memphis, 1949.
1951— June 655-661.
Reduced income. Income Reverses and Family Ex­
penditures. 1956—Mar. 298-299.
Religious and charitable giving. City Families as
Givers [primarily 1950]. 1959—Dec. 1303-1311.
Standards and Levels of Living of City-Worker Fam­
ilies. 1956— Sept. 1015-1023.
Family Income Distribution in the United States.
1955— June 671-672.
Federal Reserve System surveys:
1951:
Consumer Finances Survey, Preliminary Findings.
1951— June 678-680.
Survey of Consumer Debt and Nonliquid Assets.
1952— Apr. 420-422.
1952. Consumer Spending and Saving Plans Survey.
1952— June 672-673.
1953. Consumer Finances Survey. 1953—July 729.
1954:
Consumer Finances Survey. 1954— June 660-661.
Financial Position of American Consumers. 1954—
Oct. 1119-1120.
Influence of Age on Saving and Spending Patterns.
1955— Nov. 1240-1244.
The Instability of Consumer Spending. 1952—Aug.
188-191.
Low income groups ( see also Taxation) :
Families, city. See Families, city— Standards, etc.,
this section.
Low Incomes and Underemployment in Agriculture—
Proposed Remedies. 1952— July 48-50.
A Program for Raising Substandard Levels of Living.
1956— Mar. 313-316.
Single persons. Single Consumers' Spending Patterns
in Three Periods. 1959—Feb. 142-150.
Income and expenditures, consumer, Panama City. Fam­
ily Income and Expenditures in Panama City, 1952.
1955—Feb. 204-207.
642729— i6 c— < -3
,2 —




Income, national:
Changes in Distribution of Income, 1913-48. 1953—
Jan. 50-52.
Family Income Distribution in the United States.
1955—June 671-672.
Index numbers. The Development of Index Numbers in
the BLS. 1955— Jan. 20-25.
Industrial relations, United States ( see also Arbitration
and mediation; Atomic Energy Commission; Collec­
tive bargaining; Labor-management disputes; Na­
tional Labor Relations A ct; National Labor Rela­
tions B o a r d ):
Automation (see specific industries under Automation
and technological change). A New Dimension to
Old Problems. 1955— Feb. 165-169.
Bargaining pow er:
The Hardening of Antagonisms in Labor Relations.
1959—Mar. 257-261.
Power and the Pattern of Union Government. 1958—
June 605-607.
The Union-Employer Power Relationship in Chemi­
cals. 1958— June 608-609.
Union Monopoly Power and Responsibility. 1958—
June 601-602.
The Case Approach to Industrial Relations: The Local
Industrial Plant Community. Labor-Management
Relations in Illini City. 1954—Apr. 380-390.
Developments:
American Labor in the Next Decade. 1952—July 1-6.
Coming Developments in Labor Relations. 1953—
June 609-611.
Management Views on Labor Relations: The Future
Course of Industrial Relations. Factors in In­
dustrial Relations Prospects. 1956—Apr. 410417.
Observations on the Changing Nature of American
Unions. 1957— Feb. 151-154.
Personnel Conference of the American Management
Association. 1953— Dec. 1302-1307.
Dual loyalty. See that title.
Employment Practices in Trenton, N.J., Manufacturing
Plants. 1955— Feb. 192-195.
Federal-State jurisdiction:
Federal and State Jurisdiction in Labor Relations.
1958—Jan. 47-50.
Federal-State Powers in Labor Relations: 1—Areas
of Federal and State Jurisdiction. 2—Judicial
Problems of Accommodation.
3—The Case for
Conforming State and Federal Law. 1956—Feb.
164-170.
The Gap Between State and Federal Jurisdiction
in Labor Relations. 1957— July 829-832.
Great Britain and America. Employers and Industrial
Relations in Britain and America. 1956—Nov.
1288-1291.
Human relations. Studies of Human Relations in the
Labor-Management Field. 1951— Oct. 432-434.
Labor philosophy:
Management’s Adoption o f New Labor Relations
Methods. 1957— Feb. 155-157.
Management's Attitudes Toward Employees and
Unions. 1957— Feb. 157-160.
A Positive Approach to Industrial Relations. 1959—
Apr. 376-378.
Maritime industries. Labor-Management Problems of
the American Merchant Marine. 1956—Apr. 440441.
New England: Labor-Management Relations. 1957—
Mar. 288-293.
Personnel. Papers From the Fall AMA Personnel Con­
ference: Some Problems of Change. Planning for
Tomorrow. 1959—Nov. 1228-1231.
Personnel philosophy. An Evaluation of Personnel
Philosophy. 1954— Feb. 153-155.

12
Industrial relations, United States—Continued
Plant relocation. Advance Planning for Plant Reloca­
tion. 1958—Apr. 376.
Railroad workers. Labor-Management Relations Under
the Railway Labor Act, 1934-57. 1958—Aug. 879881.
Review of, annual:
1950. 1951— Feb. 127-135.
1951. 1952— Feb. 130-139.
1952. 1953— Feb. 117-125.
1953. 195k— Feb. 121-127.
1954. 1955— Feb. 175-182.
1955. 1956— Feb. 150-155.
1956. 1951— Feb. 170-176.
1957. 1958—Jan. 6-13.
1958. 1959— Jan. 14-21.
1959. 1960— Jan. 10-17.
Review of, monthly. See Chronology of Recent Labor
Events; Developments in Industrial Relations;
Labor Month in Review, each issue.
Size of plant. The Effect of Plant Size on Industrial
Relations Practices. 1955—May 555-556.
Small plants. Impact of Unions in Small Plants.
1956— July 787-792.
University Research in Industrial Relations. 1953—
Feb. 136-138.
West Coast:
Association Bargaining. 1959—May 539-542.
The Lumber Industry. 1959—May 558-563.
Major Trends in Labor Relations. 1959— May 536538.
The Maritime Industry. 1959—May 552-557.
The Trucking Industry. 1959— May 547-551.
The Use of Arbitration. 1959—May 543-546.
Industrial relations, Puerto Rico. See Labor movement,
Puerto Rico.
Industrial relations, territories:
A laska: The Character of Industrial Relations. 1955—
Dec. 1401-1406.
H aw aii: Labor Relations: Pattern and Outlook. 1955—
Dec. 1431-1439.
Industrial relations, foreign countries (see also Co-deter­
mination; and Foreign countries for Collective bar­
gaining and Labor-management disputes) :
Australia. See France, this section.
Austria. The Wage-Price Agreements in Postwar
Austria. 195k— June 629-634.
Canada. Changes Affecting Labor in Canada During
1951. 1952—May 531-533.
France:
A New French Approach in Labor-Management Rela­
tions. 1956—May 555-556.
The Role of Unions in French and Australian In­
dustries. 1953— June 589-592.
Great B ritain:
Development of British Industrial Relations. 1951—
Jan. 27-29.
Employers and Industrial Relations in Britain and
America. 1956—Nov. 1288-1291.
Labor Relations in British Metalworking. 1955—
Apr. 403-409.
Greece. Recent Developments in Greek Labor Policy.
1955—Dec. 1471-1472.
India. In-Plant Role of Unions in Labor Relations in
India. 1956—Mar. 304-308.
Latin America. U.S. Firms as Employers in Latin
America. 1960— May 479-485.
Netherlands. Factors in Labor Peace in the Nether­
lands. 1958—Apr. 412-413.
Philippines. Effects of the Philippine Industrial Peace
Act. 195k—May 551.
Scandinavia. Labor-Management Relations in Scandi­
navia. 1951— May 528-532.
Soviet Union Policy Shift in Training of Industrial
Labor. 1953— June 616-618.



Industrial relations, foreign countries—Continued
Sweden:
Centralization of Bargaining in Sweden Since 1939.
1958—Nov. 1230-1235.
Consultation and Negotiation in Swedish Factories.
1960— Oct. 1039-1044.
Industrial research. See Manpower.
Inflation:
Conclusions on Inflation by the American Assembly.
1952—July 52-53.
The Instability o f Consumer Spending. 1952—Aug.
188-191.
Insurance carriers. See under Automation and tech­
nological change; Wages and hours.
International Labor Organization:
Chamber of Commerce Industrial Relations Session,
1953: An American Employer’s Appraisal of ILO.
195k—Jan. 26-27.
Coal mining. Fourth Session of the ILO Coal Mines
Committee. 1951— Sept. 306-308.
Proceedings of conferences:
34th. 1951— Aug. 159-163.
35th. 1952— Sept. 279-281.
38th. 1955—Aug. 894-899.
39th. 1956— Sept. 1047-1051.
42d. 1958— Sept. 988-990.
43d. 1959— Sept. 977-982.
Recollections on the Founding of the ILO. 1959— June
631-636.
Seamen and the International Labor Organization.
1958— Sept. 974-981.
United States Participation in the International Labor
Organization. 1957—Mar. 342-346.
JOB CHOICE. See Labor mobility.
Job evaluation. See under Wage determination.
KNITTED OUTERWEAR, PHILADELPHIA. See Wages
and hours—Apparel.
LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS, UNITED
STATES. West Coast L abor: Its Past and Its Pros­
pects. 1959—May 489-491.
Labor and industrial conditions, foreign countries:
American Activities in the International Labor Field.
1952—Apr. 422-425.
China:
The Control of Industrial Labor in Communist
China. 1953— Aug. 821-825.
Developments in Working Conditions in Communist
China Since 1952. 1955—Apr. 449.
Latin America. Manpower Problems and Prospects in
Latin America. 1960— Sept. 909-916.
Soviet Union. See under Legislation, foreign countries.
Labor chronology:
Important Events in American Labor History. 195k—
Apr. 403-411.
Monthly. See Chronology of Recent Labor Events, each
issue.
Labor costs, United States. BLS Earnings Series as Ap­
plied to Price Escalation. 1952— July 57-59.
Labor costs, foreign countries. Union Views on Fair La­
bor Standards in Foreign Trade. 1960— Oct. 10251030.
Labor courts, foreign countries. A New Labor Court Law
for Western Germany. 195k—May 548.
Labor force, United States (see also Employment; Labor
mobility; Labor turnover; Manpower; Unemploy­
ment) :
Accessions. New Hires as a Source of Factory Work­
ers, 1950-54. 1955— June 660-670.
Agriculture. Effects of Chemistry and Technology on
the Agricultural Labor Force. 1952—June 676-677.

13
Labor Force, United States— Continued
BLS statistics. New Seasonal Adjustment Factors for
Labor Force Components. 1960—Aug. 822-827.
Educational attainment:
Educational Attainment of Workers, 1959. 1960—
Feb. 113-122.
Education and Work of Young People in a Labor
Surplus Area. 1957—Dec. 1457-1463.
Forced labor. See under Labor force, foreign countries.
High school graduates. Employment of June 1959
High School Graduates, October 1959. 1960—May
500-506.
Immigrants. See Immigration.
Labor Force and Employment in 1959. 1960—May
491-500.
Marital and family characteristics:
Family Characteristics of Workers, 1959. 1960—
Aug. 828-836.
Marital Status of Workers, 1959. 1960—Mar. 257261.
Multiple jobholders:
Multiple Jobholding in the United States [July
1958]. 1959— July 769-771.
Multiple Jobholders in December 1959. 1960— Oct.
1045-1051.
Part-time workers. Growth and Characteristics of the
Part-Time Work Force. 1960—Nov. 1166-1175.
Problems. Current and Prospective Labor Force Prob­
lems. 1959—Jan. 22-25.
Projections:
AFL-CIO Meeting on Industrial and Labor Force
Changes by 1965. 1958—Mar. 287-290.
Labor Force Projections to 1975. 1957—Dec. 14431450.
Secondary labor force. Manpower Measures and the
Secondary Labor Force. 1958—July 731-736.
Skilled workers. Skilled Labor Force in the United
States, 1950. 1954—Aug. 874-876.
Social workers. Personnel and Agencies Serving Blind
People, 1955. 1957— July 821-828.
Students. Teen-Age Student Workers in an Ohio
County, 1940-49. 1954—July 776-778.
Technicians in the Labor Force of Russia and America.
1958— Jan. 1-5.
West Coast:
Economic Growth Patterns in Washington and
Oregon. 1959—May 502-508.
Farm L abor: Supply, Policies, and Practices. 1959—
May 518-523.
Inmigration and Its Effect on Labor Force Char­
acteristics. 1959—May 492-501.
Women workers (see also Secondary labor force, this
section) :
Expanding Occupational Opportunities for Women.
1958— Apr. 381-383.
Occupations and Salaries of Women Federal Em­
ployees. 1957—Aug. 955-959.
Trends in the Participation of Women in the Work­
ing Force. 1956—May 559-565. Comments on
the Analysis of Working Force Trends for
W omen: I—Basic Assumptions. II— Conclusions.
1956— May 568-567.
Women Workers—Employment Trends, 1900 to 1950.
1951— Jan. 52.
Work experience:
Education and Work of Young People in a Labor
Surplus Area. 1957— Dec. 1457-1463.
Employment Patterns of Insured Workers in New
York Industries. 1954— Sept. 996-997.
Part-Year and Full-Year Workers in the Labor Force.
1957— Aug. 960-964.
Work Experience of the Population in 1959. 1960—
Dec. 1272-1283.



Labor force, United States— Continued
Working life :
Changes in Working Life of Men, 1900 to 2000.
1955—Mar. 297-300.
Tables of Working Life for Women, 1950. 1956—
June 654-659, Aug. 901-907, Oct. 1152-1158.
Labor force, Puerto Rico. See Migration and migratory
workers, Puerto Rico.
Labor force, territories (see also Employment, territo­
ries) :
Alaska: The Economy and the Labor Force. 1955—
Dec. 1375-1382.
Hawaii: Characteristics o f the Labor Force. 1955—
Dec. 1416-1421.
Labor force, foreign countries (see also Foreign countries
for Employment; Older workers; Unemployment) :
Belgium. Labor Shortages in Belgian Mines. 1957—
Jan. 71-72.
Benelux countries. Free Movement of Labor in the
Benelux Countries. 1957—Apr. 473.
Forced labor. The Extent of Forced Labor in the
World. 1953— Sept. 944-951.
Germany. Population and Labor Market in the Fed­
eral Republic of Germany. 1957— Sept. 1097.
Israel. Manpower for Agriculture in Israel. 1954—
May 549.
Japan. Length of Work Life of Japanese Men, 1930
and 1955. 1958— Dec. 1366-1368.
Nordic countries. A Common Labor Market for Four
Nordic Countries. 1954—Aug. 886.
Soviet Union:
The Soviet Labor Force: Implications of New Data.
1958— Dec. 1393-1398.
Technicians in the Labor Force of Russia and Amer­
ica. 1958— Jan. 1-5.
Women Workers in the Soviet Union. 1955— Sept.
1008-1010.
Western Europe. An Integrated Labor Market for
West Europe. 1954— Feb. 178-179.
Labor-management disputes, United States (see also
Arbitration and mediation; National Labor Relations
A c t; National Labor Relations B oard; Railway Labor
Act) :
Federal intervention:
Dispute Settlement and Wage Stabilization in World
War II. 1951— Feb. 136-140.
Federal Seizures in Labor-Management Disputes.
1917-52. 1953— June 611-616.
National emergencies. A Long-Range Plan for Pre­
venting Bargaining Crises. 1959—Dec. 1347.
The Role of Law in Labor Disputes. 1954— Oct. 11131117.
Steel:
Background Statistics Bearing on the Steel Dispute.
1959— Oct. 1089-1107.
Remarks Upon Conclusion of Steel Board Testimony.
1959— Dec. 1330-1332.
The Steel Board’s Final Report on the 1959 Dispute.
1960— Mar. 262-269.
The Steel Board’s Report to the President. 1959—
Dec. 1333-1341.
The Supreme Court’s Ruling in the Injunction Ap­
peal. 1959—Dec. 1342-1344.
Strike benefit pact. Mutual Strike Aid in the Airlines.
1960— June 589-591.
Strikes:
Annual review of work stoppages in—
1950. 1951—May 514-522.
1951. 1952—May 511-519.
1952. 1953—May 504-512.
1953. 1954—May 501-506.
1954. 1955—May 538-545.
1955. 1956—May 521-526.
1956. 1957—May 565-571.

Labor-management disputes, United States— Continued
Strikes—Continued
Annual review of work stoppages in— Continued
1957. 1958—May 485-491.
1958. 1959—June 637-641.
1959. 1960—June 610-614.
International comparisons. Changing Patterns of
Industrial Conflict. 1960— Mar. 229-237.
The Relationship of Size of Firm and Strike Activity.
1957— Nov. 1330-1334.
State Ratios of Strike Idleness to Total Time Worked,
1952-54. 1955— July 796.
Teachers. Collective Bargaining and Work Stop­
pages Involving Teachers. 1953—May 475-479.
Textiles. History of Work Stoppages in Textile In­
dustries. 1953—Apr. 367-371.
Trends. Analysis of Strikes, 1927-49. 1951—
Jan. 1-7.
Union Strike Vote Practices and Proposed Controls.
1956— June 677-679.
Labor-management disputes, foreign countries:
The Bank Employee Strike in Argentina. 1959— Sept.
1005-1007.
International comparisons. Changing Patterns of In­
dustrial Conflict. 1960—Mar. 229-237.
Labor-management relations. See Industrial relations.
Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure A ct:
Findings From the Second Report of the McClellan
Committee. 1959— Sept. 983-991.
The Legislative Recommendations of the McClellan
Committee. 1958—May 518-520.
Presidential Recommendations for Labor Legislation,
1959. 1959—Mar. 278-279.
Proposed Legislation on Labor-Management Relations.
1958— Jan. 45-47.
Summary of the Labor-Management Reporting and Dis­
closure Act. 1959— Oct. 1110-1113.
Labor mobility, United States:
Chemists, physicists, and biologists. Occupational Mo­
bility of Chemists, Physicists, and Biologists.
1953—Oct. 1071-1072.
Depressed areas:
Labor Recruitment in a Depressed Rural Area.
1958— Oct. 1113-1120.
Worker Mobility in a Labor Surplus Area. 1957—
Dec. 1451-1456.
Electronic technicians:
Mobility of Electronic Technicians. 195If—Mar. 263266.
Worker Mobility in Three Skilled Occupations.
1955— July 772-775.
Factors. Long-Term Factors in Labor Mobility and
Unemployment. 1959—Aug. 876-881.
Foundry molders. Worker Mobility in Three Skilled
Occupations. 1955— July 772-775.
Job finding and choice. Job Finding and the Theory of
Job Choice. 1955— Oct. 1139-1144.
Job Tenure of American Workers. 1952— Sept. 257-262.
Mining area. Labor Supply for Manufacturing in a
Coal Area. 195k—Dec. 1327-1330.
Pension Plans Under Collective Bargaining: Pt. I— The
Extent and Nature of Vested Rights in Pension
Plans and Their Relationship to the Problems of
Labor Mobility. 1953—Mar. 237-245.
Secondary labor force. Manpower Measures and the
Secondary Labor Force. 1958—July 731-736.
Skill transferability. A Reexamination of “ Transferability of Skills’,—Part I. Part II. 1957— July
803-810, Aug. 938-948.
Tool and die makers :
Backgrounds and Career Choice of Tool and Die
Makers. 1953—Jan. 8-12.
The Mobility of Tool and Die Makers. 1952— Dec.
605-610.
Worker Mobility in Three Skilled Occupations.
1955— July 772-775.



14
Labor mobility, United States— Continued
Trenton, N.J. Employment Practices in Trenton, N.J.,
Manufacturing Plants. 1955— Feb. 192-195.
Unemployment and Job Mobility. 1960—Apr. 350-358.
Labor mobility, foreign countries. See European economic
integration.
Labor movement, United States (see also Labor organiza­
tions) :
American Labor in the Next Decade. 1952—July 1-6.
The Changing Nature of the Union. 1960—Aug. 843845.
Coming Developments in Labor Relations. 1953— June
609-611.
Contemporary Structural Changes in Organized Labor.
1957— Oct. 1186-1188.
Federation constitutions. Principles and Objectives in
U.S. Labor Federation Constitutions. 1955— July
787-789.
Labor Ideology and Practice in Europe and the U.S.
1958— Mar. 265-269.
National defense period. See Defense mobilization and
policies— Labor and labor problems.
National emergencies. A Bibliography on Labor in Na­
tional Emergencies. 1951— Oct. 414-419.
New Organizing by Unions During the 1950’s. 1960—
Sept. 922-924.
Observations on the Changing Nature of American
Unions. 1957— Feb. 151-154.
Perlman’s Theory of the Labor Movement. 1951— Feb.
121-126.
The Power Motivations of the American Labor Move­
ment. 1953—Mar. 258-260.
The Rebirth of the Labor Movement. 1956— Feb. 171.
Structural Changes in the American Labor Movement.
1957— Feb. 146-150.
Voluntarism in the American Labor Movement. 195k—
Sept. 967-971.
West Coast: Trade Union Characteristics, Membership,
and Influence. 1959— May 530-535.
Labor movement, Puerto Rico. Labor Unions and Labor
Relations. 1955— Dec. 1359-1362.
Labor movement, territories. See Industrial relations,
territories.
Labor movement, foreign countries (see also Labor or­
ganizations) :
Belgian Congo. Freedom of Association for Congo
Workers. 1957— Sept. 1096.
British West Indies. Trade Unionism in the British
West Indies. 1956—Dec. 1394-1400.
Europe. Labor Ideology and Practice in Europe and
the U.S. 1958—Mar. 265-269.
Finland. Labor Situation in Finland, 1949 to 1951.
1951— Aug. 144-147.
France. The Political Problems of the Free French
Labor Movement. 1953—Nov. 1162-1164.
Great Britain:
A Survey of British Trade Unions. 1959— Sept.
1008-1013.
Trade Unions’ Role in Great B ritain: Unions in the
Welfare State. Unions and Higher Productivity.
1956— Oct. 1175-1181..
International. The Course of Ideology in International
Labor. 1960— Oct. 1031-1038.
Latin America. Latin American Labor Unions. 1960—
June 615-622.
Philippines. Effects of the Philippine Industrial Peace
Act. 195k—May 551.
Viet-Nam:
The Labor Movement in the Communist Zone of VietNam. 1956—May 534-537.
Trade-Union Movement in Vietnam. 1951— Jan.
30-33.

Labor organizations, United States ( s.ee also Labor move­
ment) :
AFL-CIO Meeting on Industrial and Labor Force
Changes by 1965. 1958—Mar. 287-290.
AFL-CIO merger:
The Effects of the AFL-CIO Merger.
Feb.
174-175.
Founding convention. See Conventions—AFL-CIO,
this section.
Import of the AFL-CIO Merger for Management.
1956—Dec. 1427-1429.
Text of the AFL-CIO Merger Agreement. 1955—
Apr. 428-430.
Atomic energy. See that title.
Auto Workers. See Ethical practices, this section;
Management decisions— UAW.
Bargaining power. See under* Collective bargaining.
Communism:
Anti-Communist Provisions in Union Constitutions.
19 5If— Oct. 1097-1100.
Communism in Trade Unions. 1954— Feb. 139-141.
Conventions:
American Federation of Labor :
70th. 1951—Nov. 547-551.
71st. 1952—Nov. 499-501.
72d. 1953—Nov. 1165-1170.
73d. 1954—Nov. 1199-1204.
American Federation of Labor and Congress of In­
dustrial Organizations:
Founding. 1956— Feb. 141-149.
2d biennial. 1958— Feb. 146-152.
3d biennial. 1959—Nov. 1206-1210.
Automobile W orkers:
13th. 1951— June 648-651.
14th. 1953— May 496-501.
15th. 1955—May 52&-532.
16th. 1957— June 697-701.
Clothing Workers. 20th biennial. 1956—July 776779.
Communications W orkers:
7th, 1953—Aug. 830-832.
9th. 1955—Aug. 903-905.
10th. 1956—Aug. 916-919.
Congress of Industrial Organizations :
12th. 1951— Jan. 8-12.
13th. 1951—Dec. 669-671.
14th. 1953— Jan. 13-17.
15th. 1954— Jan. 7-10.
16th. 1955— Feb. 183-187.
Garment Workers. 29th. 1956—July 776-779.
Hosiery Workers. 40th. 1952—June 648-652.
Machinists:
23d. 1952— Dec. 639-641.
24th. 1956—Nov. 1292-1294.
Mine Workers, 41st. 1952—Dec. 641-643.
Steelworkers:
6th. 1952—July 22-24.
9th. 1958—Nov. 1264-1266.
10th. 1960—Dec. 1296-1300.
Teamsters. 17th. 1957—Nov. 1335-1338.
Textile Workers Union of Am erica:
7th. 1952— June 648-652.
9th. 1956—July 776-779.
Corrupt practices (see also Ethical practices, this sec­
tion; Health, welfare, and pension plans—Admin­
istration and operation; Labor-Management Re­
porting and Disclosure A ct). AFL-CIO Suspen­
sion Notice to Teamsters Union. 1957—Nov. 1338.
Democracy in unions. See Internal affairs, this section.
Educational activities (see also Education) :
CIO Training for Active and Effective Local Leader­
ship. 1952— Feb. 140-144.
IAM Training for Active Participation in Local
Lodges. 1952— June 653-657.



15
Labor organizations, United States— Continued
Educational activities— Continued
ILGWU Approach to Leadership Training. 1951—
Nov. 529-535.
Union Training Program of the AFL Paper Unions.
1952— Apr. 395-399.
Ethical practices:
AFL-CIO Ethical Practices Codes 5 and 6. 1957—
July 838-840.
Codes [1-4] of Ethical Practices of the Labor Move­
ment. 1957— Mar. 350-353.
UAW Public Review Board: First Annual Report.
1959—Mar. 284-287.
Finances. Financing of Union Activities. 1952— Oct.
373-380.
Government, Federal. The Government’s Industrial
Employees. I— Extent of Employment, Status, and
Organization. 1954— Jan. 1-6.
Internal affairs:
Decisionmaking Under Collective Bargaining. 1957—
Sept. 1059-1063.
Efforts at Democratic Union Participation. 1958—
Mar. 253-254.
Election and Tenure of International Union Officers.
1958—Nov. 1221-1229.
Factors in the Selection of Local Union Officers.
1953— July 752-753.
Historical Traits and Union Democracy. 1958— June
603-605.
Labor’s Public Responsibility: Growth of Social
Consciousness in Internal Union Affairs. 1960—
Jan. 22-25.
Power and the Pattern of Union Government. 1958—
June 605-607.
Requirements for Union Democracy. 1958—Mar.
255-257.
Research on the Attitudes of Trade-Union Members,
1953— June 592-595.
State Laws on Rights of Members in Internal Union
Affairs. 1958—Aug. 871-877.
Union Efforts Toward Greater Membership Partici­
pation. 1957— Oct. 1196-1199.
Union Monopoly Power and Responsibility. 1958—
June 601-602.
The Usefulness of the Law in Obtaining Union De­
mocracy. 1958—Mar. 258-259.
International affairs (see also Labor organizations, in­
ternational) :
American Activities in the International Labor Field.
1952— Apr. 422-425.
European Developments and American Foreign
Policy. 1953—Nov. 1160-1162.
The Foreign Policy Role of American Trade Unions,
1953— Nov. 1157-1160.
Latin American Labor Unions. 1960—June 615-622.
The Political Problems of the Free French Labor
Movement. 1953—Nov. 1162-1164.
Membership:
BLS statistics. Limitations of Union Membership
Data. 1955— Nov. 1265-1269.
Membership of American Trade Unions, 1956. 1957—
Oct. 1202-1210.
Structure and Membership of the Labor Movement
[1954]. 1955— Nov. 1231-1239.
Trends and Causes of Growth in Union Membership.
1954— Aug. 871-874.
Union Membership, 1958. 1960— Jan. 1-9.
West Coast. See under Labor movement.
National defense:
The American Labor Movement in Past Emergencies.
1951— Oct. 430-432.
American Trade-Unions in the Present Emergency.
1951— Oct. 409-413.
The Impact of Emergencies on Labor Organizations.
1951— Oct. 388-393.

Labor organizations, United States— Continued
No-raiding agreement:
First Year of AFL-CIO No-Raiding Agreement.
1955— Aug. 914.
19th Century Attempts at a Trade Union No-Raiding
Pact. 1955— Aug. 913-914.
Text of the AFL-CIO No-Raiding Agreement. 1954—
Jan. 38-40.
Text of the AFL-CIO Resolution on Interunion
Raids. 1958—Apr. 410.
Organizational campaign. The Failure of Communica­
tion in an Organizing Campaign. 1951— Oct. 12001201.
Retirement
adjustment.
Retirement-Conditioning
Training Under Union Sponsorship. 1951—July
846-848.
Social security. Some Observations of Labor on Retire­
ment Security. 1951—Dec. 699-702.
Steelworkers. A Steel Company’s View of the Local
Union. 1953— Oct. 1075-1077.
Strike controls:
Strike-Control Provisions in Union Constitutions.
1954— May 497-500.
Union Strike Vote Practices and Proposed •
Controls.
1956— June 677-679.
Teamsters (see also Corrupt practices, this section).
Structure and Policy in the Teamsters Union.
1951— Oct. 1183-1185.
Trusteeship Provisions in Union Constitutions. 1959—
Nov. 1191-1197.
Typographers. The International Typographical Un­
ion. 1952—May 493-498.
Labor organizations, foreign countries (see also Labor
movement) :
Canada. 1951 Conventions of Canadian Labor Federa­
tions. 1951— Dec. 692-694.
France. Activities of French Labor Unions in 1949-51.
1951— June 642-647.
Germany:
The Third West German Trade Union Congress.
1955— Jan. 87-88.
Unions in Democratic and Soviet Germany. 1953—
Jan. 1-7.
[West] German Bundestag Elections and Organized
Labor. 1958—Feb. 181-182.
Great Britain:
Finances of British Trade Unions. 1956— Aug. 934935.
Legislative Reforms for British Trade Unions.
1958—May 520-522.
The 1951 Meeting of the British TUC. 1951— Nov.
559-561.
Ninetieth Annual Meeting of British Trades Union
Congress. 1958—Nov. 1267-1268.
India. Social and Economic Proposals of India’s Lead­
ing Trade Union. 1955—Apr. 451.
Japan. Zenro—A New Anti-Communist Labor Center
in Japan. 1954— Aug. 883-884.
Malaya. Growth of Democratic Trade-Unions in the
Federation of Malaya. 1951— Sept. 274-276.
Netherlands. Council of Trade Union Federations in
the Netherlands. 1958— Feb. 180.
Soviet Union:
Eleventh Congress of Soviet Trade Unions. 1954—
Sept. 987-990.
Extension of Trade Union Functions in the Soviet
Union. 1958— Dec. 1390-1391.
Labor organizations, international:
European Union Research and Engineering Services.
1959—July 757-760.
Free Labor and the European Economic Community.
1958—Aug. 877-879.



16
Labor organizations, international— Continued
International Confederation of Free Trade Unions:
Congress, proceedings of—
2d. 1951— Sept. 265-269.
3d. 1953— Oct. 1055-1062.
4th. 1955—July 785-787.
Operations of the ICFTU During 1951-53. 1953—
Nov. 1191-1196.
Organization of Common-Market Trade Unions.
1958—Apr. 411.
Progress of the ICFTU in Underdeveloped Areas.
1951— Sept. 270-273.
International Labor Activities in Latin America.
1954— Deb. 179-180.
The International Trade Secretariats.
1953—Apr.
372-380.
The Textile Union Work Study Conference. 1959—
July 761-763.
Labor problems, United States. Labor Problems in a Na­
tional Emergency. 1951— Oct. 383-387.
Labor problems, foreign countries:
Australia’s Labor Problems and Policies, 1951. 1951—■
July 26-30.
Belgian Congo. Native Labor Problems in the Belgian
Congo, 1954—Aug. 884-885.
Labor standards and programs, United States (see also
Defense mobilization and policies—Manpower; De­
partment of Labor; Economic conditions— CEA and
President’s reports) :
The Farm Worker in America. 1959—Apr. 396-398.
National Conference on Labor Legislation:
1950. 1951—Jan. 45-49.
1951. 1952— Jan. 12-15.
1952. 1953— Jan. 18-22.
1954. 1954—Apr. 418-419.
Labor standards and programs, foreign countries. Bell
Mission Recommendations on Philippine Labor.
1951— Jan. 52.
Labor statistics, foreign countries:
BLS Contributions to Statistical Work in Other Coun­
tries. 1955— Jan. 26-29.
New Developments in European Labor Statistics.
1953—May 490-495.
Labor turnover:
BLS statistics:
Measurement of Labor Turnover. 1953—May 519522.
Twenty-Five Years of BLS Turnover Statistics.
1954—Aug. 887-890.
Layoffs and accessions. Three BLS Series as Business
Cycle Turn Signals. 1959— Sept. 973-976.
New England. See Textiles, this section.
New Hires as a Source of Factory Workers, 1950-54.
1955— June 666-670.
The Older W orker: Status in the Labor Market.
1951— Jan. 15-21.
Textiles. New England: Labor Turnover in Textile
Mills. 1951—Mar. 306-309.
Women. Labor Turnover of Women Factory Workers,
1950-55. 1955—Aug. 889-894.
Laundries, power. See under Wage chronologies; Wages
and hours.
Layoffs. See Labor turnover; and under Collective bar­
gaining agreements.
Leather tanning and finishing. See under Wages and
hours.
Legislation, United States, Federal:
Coal-mine inspection. Federal Law to Prevent Major
Coal-Mine Disasters, 1952. 1952—Nov. 505-507.
Defense Production A c t:
Amendments of 1951. 1951— Sept. 299-301.
Amendments of 1952. 1952—Aug. 191-192.
The Housing Act of 1954. 1954— Sept. 990-995.
Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act. See
that title.
Migration and migratory labor. Federal Law on Mi­
gratory Labor, 1951. 1951— Sept. 301-302.

Legislation, United States, Federal— Continued
Minimum wage. The Purposes and Results of U.S.
Minimum Wage Laws. 1960—Mar. 238-242.
National Labor Relations Act. Union Security Amend­
ments to the Taft-Hartley Act. 1951—Dec. 682.
Railroad workers. Railroad Retirement and Unemploy­
ment Insurance in 1953-54. 1955—May 560-561.
Review of labor laws enacted in—
1954. 1954— Oct. 1101-1107.
1956. 1956— Oct. 1159-1165.
Unemployment insurance. 1958 Congressional Action
to Improve UI Benefits. 1958—Nov. 1236-1242.
Veterans’ reemployment rights:
Additional Job Protection for Reservists and Guards­
men. 1960— Sept. 969-970.
Reemployment Rights Under Universal Military
Training Act. 1951—Aug. 183-184.
Welfare and pension plans. Provisions of the New
Welfare and Pension Plans Disclosure Act.
1958— Oct. 1146-1148.
Legislation, United States, State :
Annual review in—
1951. 1951—Dec. 682-686.
1952. 1952—Nov. 502-505.
1953. 1953—Nov. 1185-1190.
1954. 1954—Nov. 1220-1224.
1955. 1955—Dec. 1464-1469.
1956. 1957— Jan. 53-56.
1957. 1957—Dec. 1472-1475.
1958. 1958—Nov. 1268-1273.
1959. 1960— Jan. 45-49.
1960. 1960—Nov. 1184-1188.
Children:
Employment of Children Under 14 in New York
State. 1952— July 46-48.
State Minimum Ages for Farm Work During School
Hours. 1952— July 45.
Injunctions, State Court Injunctions in Labor-Man­
agement Disputes. 1951— July 59-61.
Minimum wage. Legislative Changes in State Mini­
mum-Wage Laws. 1951— Dec. 687-690.
Nightwork. Legal Restrictions on Night Work by
Women. 1951— Apr. 414-416.
Public employees. Trends in Labor Legislation for
Public Employees. 1960— Dec. 1293-1296.
Right to work. State Right-to-Work Legislative Ac­
tion in 1958. 1958— Dec. 1380-1381.
Temporary Disability Insurance— Experience Under
Existing Laws. 1956— June 680-683.
Unemployment insurance:
The New York State Unemployment Insurance
Amendments of 1951. 1951—Nov. 541-546.
Review (see also Annual review, this section) in—
1952. 1952—Dec. 623-625.
1953. 1954—Mar. 272-275.
1955. 1956—Jan. 34-40.
1957. 1957—Dec. 1476-1483.
1959. 1960— Jan. 50-51.
Unemployment Compensation Legislation by Collec­
tive Bargaining. 1952—May 505-507.
Union internal affairs. State Laws on Rights of Mem­
bers in Internal Union Affairs. 1958—Aug. 871877.
Union political contributions. Wisconsin Law Banning
Political Contributions by Unions. 1955—July 789.
Voting. State Legislation on Time Off From Work
for Voting. 1956— Oct. 1166-1167.
Welfare fund. Employee Welfare Fund Regulation in
the State of Washington. 1955— Oct. 1157.
Workmen’s compensation (see also Annual review, this
section) in—
1951. 1952—Jan. 17-20.
1955. 1955—Nov. 1245-1248.
1957. 1957— Oct. 1229-1232.
1959. 1959—Nov. 1232-1236.



17
Legislation, Puerto Rico. Labor Laws and Their En­
forcement. 1955— Dec. 1363-1367.
Legislation, territories:
Alaska: Labor Law and Its Administration. 1955—
Dec. 1395-1400.
Hawaii: Labor Legislation and Enforcement. 1955—
Dec. 1427-1430.
Legislation, foreign countries:
Belgian Congo. Freedom of Association for Congo
Workers. 1957— Sept. 1096.
France. French Measures Favoring Collective Bar­
gaining. 1955—Aug. 915-916.
Latin America:
Compulsory Union Dues Checkoff in Latin America.
1955—Aug. 916.
U.S. Firms as Employers in Latin America. 1960—
May 479-485.
Philippine Minimum Wage Law and Real Wages.
1955—Dec. 1472.
Soviet Union:
Criminal Penalties for Violations of Soviet Labor
Discipline. 1955—Aug. 900-902.
Elements of Soviet Labor Law. 1951—Mar. 257-262,
Apr. 385-390.
Extension of Trade Union Functions in the Soviet
Union. 1958—Dec. 1390-1391.
Hours of Work and Leave Provisions in the USSR.
1957— Sept. 1069-1073.
Hours of Work, Holidays, and Vacations in the Soviet
Union. 1955— Oct. 1144-1146.
Recent Trends in Soviet Labor Policy. 1956—July
767-775.
Revitalization of Production Conferences in the Soviet
Union. 1958—Dec. 1391-1392.
Seven-Hour Workday Decree in the Soviet Union.
1960—Jan. 44.
Liquor distilleries. See under Wages and hours.
Living Conditions in National Emergencies. 1951— Oct.
404-408.
Living levels and standards. See Income and expendi­
tures, consumer.
Longshoremen’s and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act.
Workmen’s Compensation in the United States. I l l —
Federal Legislation. 1953— June 602-608.
Longshoring. See Collective bargaining agreements—Au­
tomation ; and under Wage chronologies.
Lumber. See under Wages and hours.
See under Wages and hours.
Machine tool workers. See Manpower—Machine tools.
Management decisions:
Decisionmaking Under Collective Bargaining. 1957—
Sept. 1059-1063.
Labor Status and Collective Bargaining. 1956—June
647-653.
The UAW’s Influence on Automotive Management De­
cisions. 1955— Feb. 170-174.
Management rights. See Collective bargaining—Manage­
ment, etc.
Man-hours. See Hours of w ork ; Productivity.
Manpower, United States (see also Atomic Energy Com­
mission ; Construction— Labor requirements; Defense
mobilization and policies; Economic conditions— CEA
and President’s reports; Labor force) :
Administration:
Annual Conference of Society for Personnel Adminis­
tration. 1951— July 61-62.
Management Responsibility in Manpower Problems.
1952—May 560-561.
Airlines. Manpower Requirements in the Air Trans­
portation Industry. 1957—Nov. 1348-1350.
Atomic energy. See that title.
Chemists and chemical engineers. Manpower Resources
in Chemistry. 1953— Nov. 1196-1198.
MACHINERY.

18
Manpower, United States— Continued
Creative. The Shortage of Creative Manpower. 1954—
May 507-510.
Foundries. Foundry Skill Requirements and Training
Needs. 1957— Oct. 1224-1228.
Labor market expansion. Adjustments to Labor Short­
ages in an Expanding Industrial Area. 1956—
Feb. 182.
Machine tools. Manpower Requirements in the Ma­
chine-Tool Industry. 1951—Dec. 672-675.
Maritime industries. Manpower Problems in the
American Merchant Marine. 1951—Nov. 564-567.
Metalworking. The Interstate Conference on Labor
Statistics: A Survey of Training Needs for Skilled
Metal Trades Workers. 1958—Aug. 868-871.
M ilitary:
Military Manpower— Requirements and Supply, 195559. 1955— July 782-784.
Military Manpower Requirements and Supply, 195963. 1959—Aug. 861-867.
Mining, metal. Manpower Outlook in Metal Mining.
1952—Apr. 381-385.
Mobilization. See Defense mobilization and policies.
National Manpower Needs and Supply, 1952 and 1953.
1952—Mar. 263-266.
Policy. The Role of Government in Manpower Policy.
1958—Aug. 862-865.
Recruitment. A Closer Look at College Recruiting.
1958— Apr. 373-375.
Research:
Columbia University Project Analyzing Manpower
Waste. 1951— Oct. 435-436.
The Uses and Limits of Statistics in Manpower Re­
search. 1954—Aug. 862-865.
Research and development:
Manpower and Expenditures in Industrial Research.
1956—Mar. 274-278.
Shortages of Engineers and Scientists in Industrial
Research. 1955— Sept. 1011-1014.
Trucking. Manpower Problems in the Trucking Indus­
try. 1952— Jan. 29-31.
Manpower, foreign countries. See Labor force, foreign
countries.
Maritime industries. See International Labor Organiza­
tion ; and under Employment; Industrial relations ;
Manpower ; Wages and hours.
Meatpacking. See Dual loyalty; and under Collective
bargaining agreements ; Wage chronologies.
Medical care. See under Prices, consumer.
Men’s dress shirts and nightwear. See under Wages and
hours—Apparel.
Metal. See under Wages and hours.
Metalworking. See Defense mobilization and policies—
Shift operations; and under Manpower; Training.
Migration and migratory workers, United States {see
also under Legislation, Federal) :
Migration From Farms and Its Meaning. 1960— Feb.
136-140.
Migratory Labor in American Agriculture. 1951—June
691-693.
West Coast. See under Labor force.
Migration and migratory workers, Puerto R ic o :
Effect of Labor Costs and Migration on the Puerto
Rican Economy. 1953—June 625-627.
The Labor Force and Level of Living. 1955—Dee
1347-1353.
Migration to the Mainland. 1955—Dec. 1354-1358.
New Aspects of Puerto Rican Migration. 1960— Feb.
133-135.
Military personnel. See under Manpower; Wages and
hours.
Milk-dealer industry. See under Wages and hours.
Millinery. See under Wages and hours.



Minimum wage. See Fair Labor Standards A c t; Legisla­
tion, Federal and State; and under Wages and hours.
Mining. See Legislation, Federal—Coal-mining inspec­
tion ; Occupational safety— Hazardous occupations
order; Work injuries— Causes o f Roof-Fall Fatali­
ties, e tc.; and under Employment; Labor mobility;
Manpower; Wage chronologies.
Motor vehicles. See under Wages and hours.
NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS ACT (see also Na­
tional Labor Relations Board) :
Federal-State jurisdiction. See Industrial relations—
Federal-State jurisdiction.
Legislative recommendations:
Chamber of Commerce Industrial Relations Session,
1953: How To Change Taft-Hartley. 1954— Jam
25-26.
Plans and Reports on Manpower, Labor Relations,
and Welfare. 1954—Mar. 267-271.
Presidential Recommendations for Labor Legislation,
1959. 1959—Mar. 278-279.
Proposed Legislation on Labor-Management Rela­
tions. 1958— Jan. 45-47.
National emergency strikes. The Supreme Court’s
Ruling in the Injunction Appeal. 1959— Dec. 13421344.
Secondary Boycotts and the Supreme Court. 1951—
Oct. 461-464.
The Taft-Hartley Act—A Look Ahead. 1955— Oct.
1132-1139.
Union Security Under the Taft-Hartley Act. 1954—
Apr. 391-396.
National Labor Relations Board (see also National Labor
Relations Act) :
Annual report, year ending June 30—
1950. 1951— Mar. 276-278.
1952. 1953—Aug. 834-839.
1956. 1957— July 833-838.
Dues reimbursement. NLRB’s “Brown-Olds” Remedy
for Illegal Hiring Arrangements. 1959— Feb. 157159.
Informal Disposition of NLRB Cases. 1954— July 761764.
Judisdictional standards:
Revision of NLRB Jurisdictional Standards [July
1954]. 1954— Sept. 998-1000.
The Revised Jurisdictional Standards of NLRB [Oc­
tober 1954]. 1955— Jan. 57-63.
Revised Jurisdictional Standards of the NLRB [Oc­
tober 1958]. 1958—Nov. 1274.
New Organizing by Unions During the 1950’s. 1960—
Sept. 922-924.
Recent Developments in NLRB Policy. 1954—Jan.
36-38.
Nightwork. See under Legislation, State.
OCCUPATIONAL
DISEASE.
Pulmonary
Fibrosis
Among Illinois Ferrous Foundrymen. 1951—June
653-655.
Occupational health, United States:
Federal Action for Labor’s Health and Safety: The
Public Health Service Program of Occupational
Health. 1952—Mar. 253-256.
Occupational Health: Opportunities for Labor Health
Plans. 1954—Apr. 397-402.
Workers’ Health in an Era of Automation. 1956—July
819-823.
Occupational health, foreign countries. Soviet Union.
Occupational Health Services in the Soviet Union.
1959— Nov. 1218-1224.

19
Occupational safety ( see also Collective bargaining agree­
ments— Safety equipment; Occupational disease; Oc­
cupational health; Work injuries; Workmen’s com­
pensation) :
Atomic radiation:
Labor Implications of Peaceful Uses of Atomic En­
ergy. 1957—Aug. 921-931.
Safety Code for Atomic Radiation in New York In­
dustries. 1956—Jan. 62.
Conferences:
1953 Convention of Industrial Accident Agencies.
195k—Jan. 27-31.
Occupational Safety Conference—A Progress Report
and a Challenge. 1958—May 523-526.
President’s Conference on Industrial Safety, 1952.
1952—July 42-45.
President’s Conference on Occupational Safety, 1956.
1956—July 817-819.
Federal Action for Labor’s Health and Safety: The Bu­
reau of Labor Standards Program of Industrial
Safety. 1952—Mar. 249-252.
Handicapped persons. Safety in Employment of Physi­
cally Handicapped Persons. 195k— Oct. 1117-1118.
Hazardous occupations order:
Mining. 1951— Feb. 183.
Work on Paper Products Machines. 195k— Oct. 1129.
Management Interest in Accident Prevention. 1951—
June 651-653.
Progress and Problems in Industrial Safety. 1956—
Dec. 1438-1444.
Training. Use of Training in Reducing Industrial Ac­
cidents. 1951—Dec. 680-681.
Office-building and contract-cleaning services. See under
Wages and hours.
Oil-field workers. See under Wages and hours.
Older workers, United States:
Age and job performance. See under Productivity.
Conferences:
The Federal-State Conference on Problems of the
Aging. 1956— Sept. 1052-1055.
A National Conference on Retirement of Older Work­
ers. 1952—June 670-672.
Department of Labor’s older worker program. An In­
troductory Note. 1956—Dec. 1402.
Employment and Age in Union Contracts. 1956—Dec.
1403-1409.
Health, welfare, and pensions:
Insurance and Pension Plans. 1957— Jan. 29-36.
Pension and Insurance Costs o f Employing Older
Workers. 1958— Sept. 955-958.
Job Problems and Their Solution. 1957— Jan. 22-28.
The Older Worker and Hiring Practices. 1959— Nov.
1198-1205.
The Older Worker and Retirement Policies. 1960—
June 577-585.
Retirement and Employment Problems of the Older
Worker. 1951—Dec. 695-699.
Retirement-Conditioning Training Under Union Spon­
sorship. 1957— July 846-848.
Status in the Labor Market. 1957—Jan. 15-21.
Older workers, foreign countries:
Economic Activities of Older Workers. 1955—Aug. 916.
The Employment of Older Workers Abroad. 1960—
Mar. 270-274.
Ordnance. See under Employment.
PAINT AND YARNISH. See under Wages and hours.
Paper and allied products. See Occupational safety—
Hazardous occupations order; Work injuries— Fre­
quency and severity rates; and under Wages and
hours.
Paper products, converted. See under Wages and hours.
Parachutes. See under Wages and hours.
642729 -

62-




Pay periods. Length of Pay Periods in American Indus­
try. 1955— Feb. 188-192.
Pensions. See Health, welfare, and pension plans; Older
w orkers; Retirement; and under Collective bargain­
ing agreements— Employee-benefit plans.
Personnel administration. See Management decisions;
Manpower—Administration.
Personnel security. Industrial Personnel Security Re­
view Operations, 1955-56. 1957—Apr. 453-455.
Petroleum refining. See under Automation and tech­
nological change; Wage chronologies; Wages and
hours.
Photographic and blueprinting industry. See under
Wages and hours.
Physicists. See Labor mobility—Chemists, etc.
Plastics products. See under Wages and hours.
Policemen. See under Wages and hours.
Population, West Coast. See Labor force— West Coast.
Population, Puerto Rico. See Migration and migratory
workers, Puerto Rico.
Population, territories. See Economic growth, territories;
Labor force, territories.
Price controls (see also Defense mobilization and
policies) :
Federal regulation orders:
Nos. 1-90. 1951— Mar. 282-283, Apr. 409-411, May
542-543, June 663-664, July 57-59, Aug. 163-164,
Sept. 302-304, Oct. 428-429, Nov. 570-571, Dec.
706-707.
Nos. 91-134. 1952— Jan. 54, Feb. 178-179, Mar. 289290, Apr. 427-428, May 561-562.
Nos. 135-177 and Suspension of Some Price Controls.
1952— June 688-689, July 50-51, Aug. 192-194,
Sept. 300, Dec. 647-648.
Nos. 178-186 and Suspension o f Some Price Controls.
1953— Mar. 280-282.
Suspension of Wage-Price Controls, 1953. 1953—May
517-518.
Food, retail prices. Effect of Price Controls on Retail
Food Prices. 1951— Oct. 424-428.
Mortgage credit. Relaxation of Mortgage Credit Con­
trols, 1952. 1952—July 52.
Residential rent:
The Effects of Decontrol Actions on Residential
Rents. 195k— Feb. 134-138.
Residential Rent Increases in Nine Decontrolled
Areas. 1951— June 661-663.
Reviews:
Price Movements During a Year of Korean Hostilities.
1951—Aug. 141-143.
Price Movements in 2 Months Following GCPR.
1951— May 540-542.
A Review of Prices in a Year of Price Stabilization.
1952— Apr. 386-389.
Prices, consumer, United States:
Appliances. See Automobiles, this section.
Automobiles:
Automobile and New Appliance Purchases in Six
Cities, 1953-56. 1957—Mar. 336-341.
Automobile Prices in the Consumer Price Index.
1955— Nov. 1269-1273.
Consumer Price Index:
BLS statistics (see also Revision, 1953 and Revision
starting in 1959, this section) :
The British and the United States Consumer Price
Indexes. 1957— Apr. 475-483.
The Development of Index Numbers in the BLS.
1955— Jan. 20-25.
Recurring Dwelling Unit Surveys for the Consumer
Price Index. 1957—Dec. 1489-1491.
Commodities or services. See specific sul)jectst this
section.
Congressional Report on the Consumers’ Price Index.
1951—Nov. 581-584.

20
Prices, consumer, United States— Continued
Consumer Price Index—Continued
Items priced and their relative importance in—
January 1950. 1951—June 697-702.
December 1953. 1954—Aug. 891-896.
December 1954. 1955—Apr. 444-447.
December 1955. 1956—May 568-571.
December 1956. 1957—May 599-602.
December 1957. 1958—July 767-770.
December 1958. 1959—July 776-779.
Revision, 1953:
An Appraisal of Some New Features in the Revised
CPI. 1953— Feb. 174-175.
Correction of New Unit Bias in Rent Component of
CPI. 1951— Apr. 437-444.
Effects of Outlet Type and Location on Price.
1951— July 63-67.
An Evaluation of the Revised CPI as a Wage De­
flator. 1953—Feb. 169-172.
Interim Adjustment of Consumers’ Price Index.
1951— Apr. 421-429.
The Main Features of the Revised Consumer Price
Index. 1953— Feb. 162-165.
The New CPI and the Need for a Continued PriceResearch Program. 1953— Feb. 172-174.
The Revised C P I: Some Problems in Concept and
Theory. 1953—Feb. 165-169.
Taxes and the Consumers’ Price Index. 1953—
Jan. 53-57.
Wage Escalators and the Adjusted CPI. 1951—
May 509-513.
Revision starting in 1959:
Consumer Expenditure Surveys and Price Indexes.
1959— Sept. 967-970.
The Revised City Sample for the Consumer Price
Index. 1960— Oct. 1078-1083.
Trend behavior:
Behavior of the CPI in Periods of Business Re­
covery. 1959—June 642-645.
The Consumer Price Index in the Business Cycle.
1958— June 616-620.
Short-Run Differences Between the W PI and CPI.
1952— Jan. 59-61.
Trend Contrasts in Commodity Prices and Service
Rates. 1954— ALuy 516-521.
Food {see also under Price controls) :
Effects of Cut in Support Prices for Dairy Products,
April 1, 1954. 1954—Aug. 869-871.
A History of Coffee Prices in the United States, 18401954. 1954— July 765-767.
The Impact of Trading Stamps on Food Prices.
1959—Mar. 276-278.
Footwear. Prices and Average Factory Values. 1959—
Feb. 151-157.
Housing {see also BLS statistics and Revision, 1953
under Consumer Price Index, this section). Hous­
ing Costs in the Consumer Price Index. 1956—
Feb. 189-196; Apr. 442-446.
Intercity cost comparisons:
Living Costs in A laska: February 1951 Spot Survey.
1951—July 62.
Measuring Comparable Living Costs in Cities of Di­
verse Characteristics. 1956— Oct. 1187-1190.
International comparisons. See under Purchasing
power.
Medical Care in the Consumer Price Index, 1936-56.
1957— Sept. 1053-1058.
Trading stamps. See Food, this section.
Transportation in the BLS Consumer Price Index,
1935-55. 1956— Aug. 922-925,
Trends {see also specific commodities and services and
Consumer Price Index— Trend behavior, this sec­
tion) :
Analysis of the Price Situation at Mid-1957. 1957—
Aug. 949-954.



Prices, consumer, United States— Continued
Trends—C ontinued
Interrelationship of Prices, Wages, and Productivity,
1946-57. 1958— Jan. 14-22.
Korean hostility period. See Price controls.
Price Trends in the 1959 Economy and the Outlook.
1960— Feb. 123-132.
Recent Trends and the Outlook in the Price Situation.
1957—Jan. 8-14.
Prices, consumer, foreign countries {see also Purchasing
power) :
Consumer Price Index. Great Britain. The British
and the United States Consumer Price Indexes.
1957—Apr. 475-483.
Germany. Price Reductions in the German Soviet Zone.
1955—Apr. 450.
Prices, spot market. BLS statistics. The New Daily In­
dex of Spot Market Prices. 1952— Sept. 301-303.
Prices, wholesale {see also Price controls) :
Coffee A History of Coffee Prices in the United States,
1840-1954. 1954—July 765-767.
Economic sector indexes. New BLS Economic Sector
Indexes of Wholesale Prices. 1955—Dec. 1448-1453.
Footwear. Prices and Average Factory Values. 1959—
Feb. 151-157.
Hides and skins. Price Fluctuations for Hides and
Skins. 1958— Sept. 1010-1014.
Rail freight rates. Movements o f Rail Freight Rates
and Wholesale Prices, 1947-52. 1954— Sept. 10041005.
Steel. The Effect of ‘‘Extras” in the Measurement of
Steel Prices. 1956—Nov. 1300-1302.
Trends {see also specific commodities and Wholesale
Price Index—Trend behavior, this section) :
Analysis of the Price Situation at Mid-1957. 1957—
Aug. 949-954.
Interrelationship of Prices, Wages, and Productivity,
1946-57. 1958— Jan. 14-22.
Movements in Commodity Prices Since 1951. 1954—
Dec. 1315-1319.
Price Trends in the 1959 Economy and the Outlook.
1960—Feb. 123-132.
Recent Trends and the Outlook in the Price Situa­
tion. 1957— Jan. 8-14.
Wholesale Price Index:
BLS statistics:
A Description of the Revised Wholesale Price In­
dex. 1952— Feb. 180-187.
The Development of Index Numbers in the BLS.
1955—Jan. 20-25.
Commodities. See specific subjects, this section.
Trend behavior:
Short-Run Differences Between the W PI and CPI.
1952— Jan. 59-61.
Wholesale Price Movements in Three Recessions.
1958—Aug. 888-890.
Printing industry. See under Wage chronologies; Wages
and hours.
Processed waste. See Wages and hours—Minimum wage.
Productivity, United States {see also Construction—La­
bor requirements) :
Age and job performance:
Comparative Job Performance by Age. 1957—Dec.
1467-1471.
Comparative Job Performance of Office Workers by
Age. 1960— Jan. 39-43.
Measurement of Job Performance and Age. 1956—
Dec. 1410-1414.
BLS statistics:
Indexes of Output per Man-Hour and Unit Man-Hours
in Manufacturing. 1956— Jan. 63-68.
Relationships
Between
Productivity
Measures.
1954— May 552-557.

21
Productivity, United States— Continued
Economic growth. Productivity and Economic Prog­
ress, 1900 to 1950. 1953—Apr. 391-392.
Employee morale:
Employee Attitudes and Output. 195If— June 641648.
Supervision and Morale Factors in Productivity.
1951—May 564.
Footwear. Plant Level Productivity in French and
American Shoe Manufacturing. 1953—July 727729.
Foreign trade. See under Collective bargaining.
Foundries. Productivity Trends in Gray Iron Found­
ries, 1946-50. 1952—Apr. 404-406.
Full employment. American Productivity and Full Em­
ployment. 1952— Feb. 125-129.
Manufacturing. Output per Man-Hour in Manufactur­
ing, 1939-47 and 1947-53. 1956—Jan. 1-6.
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing. Output per
Man-Hour in 27 Industries? 1950. 1951— Oct. 422424.
Measures (see also BLS statistics, this section). Ap­
praisal of Productivity Measures at Washington
Conference. 1951—Mar. 313-316.
National defense:
Labor Utilization During National Emergencies.
1951— Oct. 399-403.
Maximum Utilization of Employed Manpower.
1951—Nov. 567-568.
Nonmanufacturing. Output per Man-Hour in Selected
Nonmanufacturing Industries. 1956— Feb. 177-181.
Soviet Union and U.S. Output Per Worker in American
and Soviet Industry. 1959— Sept. 992-994.
Steel. Output per Man-Hour in Basic Steel, 1939 to
1955.
1956—Nov. 1276-1280.
Textiles. See Productivity, foreign countries— Japan.
Wage-price relationships. Interrelationship of Prices,
Wages, and Productivity, 1946-57. 1958— Jan.
14-22.
Productivity, foreign countries:
Foreign trade. See under Collective bargaining.
France. Plant Level Productivity in French and Ameri­
can Shoe Manufacturing. 1953—July 727-729.
Great Britain. Trade Unions’ Role in Great B ritain:
Unions and Higher Productivity. 1956— Oct. 11791181.
Japan. Postwar Productivity Changes in Japanese Cot­
ton Spinning. 1960— July 700-704.
Latin America. Problems in a Latin American Factory
Society. 1954—July 756-760.
Soviet Union:
Output Per Worker in American and Soviet Industry.
1959— Sept. 992-994.
Postwar Growth in Soviet Labor Productivity.
1956— May 556-557.
Revitalization of Production Conferences in the Soviet
Union. 1958— Dec. 1391-1392.
Soviet Labor and the Question of Productivity.
1957— June 701-706.
Western Europe:
European Union Research and Engineering Services.
1959—July 757-760.
The Textile Union Work Study Conference. 1959—
July 761-763.
Professional occupations. See under Wages and hours.
Public assistance. Causes of Dependency Among Public
Assistance Recipients in New York. 1959—Mar. 262266.
Puerto Rico (see also specific subjects). Bibliography on
Labor Conditions, Labor Problems, Labor Economics.
1955—Dec. 1440-1443.
Pulp, paper, and paperboard. See Collective bargaining
agreements— Seniority; and under Wages and hours.



Purchasing pow er:
International comparisons:
Comparative Purchasing Power of Currencies and
National Products. 1955—Apr. 417-420.
F ood :
Food-Purchasing Power of Earnings in 12 Coun­
tries, 1951-52. 1952— June 658-661.
Work Time Required to Buy Food, 1937-50.
1951— Feb. 143-151.
Purchasing Power of Soviet Workers, 1953. 1953—
July 705-708.
Purchasing Power of Workers in the U.S.S.R. [1959].
1960—Apr. 359-364.
Techniques of Comparing Purchasing Power Among
Nations. 1951— Feb. 195-197.
Spendable earnings. See under Wages and hours.
RADIO AND RELATED PRODUCTS. See Collective
bargaining agreements— Characteristics; Employ­
ment— Electronics.
Radio and television broadcasting. See under Wages and
hours.
Radio, television, and related products. See under Auto­
mation and technological change; Wages and hours.
Railroad-car manufacture. See under Wages and hours.
Railroad freight rates. Movements of Rail Freight Rates
and Wholesale Prices, 1947-52. 1954— Sept. 10041005.
Railroad workers. See under Automation and techno­
logical change ; Industrial relations; Retirement;
Sickness and accident benefits; Unemployment in­
surance.
Railway Labor Act (see also Industrial relations—Rail­
road workers). Administrative Highlights, 1949-50.
1951—Apr. 416-419.
Recall. See Collective bargaining agreements— Layoffs.
Rehabilitation. See Handicapped workers; Workmen’s
compensation.
Research and development (see also under Manpower).
Manpower and Expenditures in Industrial Research.
1956—Mar. 274-278.
Retirement (see also Collective bargaining agreements—
Employee-benefit plans; Health, welfare, and pension
plans; Older workers) :
Disability Retirement in Industrial Pension Plans.
1956—Aug. 919-921.
The Pension Problem in the United States. 1953—Mar.
245-248.
Railroad workers:
Longevity of Railroad Annuitants. 1951—Apr. 420.
Railroad Retirement and Unemployment Insurance
in 1953-54. 1955—May 560-561.
Railroad Retirement Board Operations, 1956-57.
1958—May 527-529.
Twenty Years of Benefit Programs for Railroad
Workers. 1956—July 815-817.
Resources and Plealth Status o f OASI Beneficiaries.
1959—Aug. 882-887.
Some Observations of Labor on Retirement Security.
1951—Dec. 699-702.
Rubber. See under Automation and technological change;
Wage chronologies.
SAFETY. See Occupational safety.
Saving, consumer. See Income and expenditures, con­
sumer.
Sawmills. See Wages and hours—Lumber and Minimum
wage.
Scientists. See Manpower— Research and development.
Seamen. See Maritime industries.
Senate committees investigating administration of welfare
and pension plans. See Health, welfare, and pension
plans—Administration and operation.

22
Seniority. See under Collective bargaining agreements.
Shift differentials.
See Collective bargaining agree­
ments— Premium pay; and under Collective bargain­
ing agreements; Wages and hours.
Shift operations:
Shift Operations in Metalworking Plants, January 1951.
1951— May 533-534.
Shift Operations in the Metalworking Industries, 1951.
1952— Dec. 615-619.
Shipbuilding and repairing. See under Employment;
Wage chronologies.
Shoes. See Footwear under Collective bargaining; Wage
chronologies; Wages and hours.
Sickness and accident benefits (see also Collective bar­
gaining agreements— Employee-benefit plans; Health,
welfare, and pension plans; Wage chronologies; and
specific industries under Wages and hours) :
Railroad workers:
Railroad Retirement Board Operations, 1956-57.
1958— May 527-529.
Sickness and Unemployment Benefits for Railroad
Workers. 1955—Aug. 907-909.
Temporary Disability Insurance— Experience Under
Existing Laws. 1956— June 680-683.
Twenty Years of Benefit Programs for Railroad
Workers. 1956—July 815-817.
Unemployment Disability Insurance in California.
1959— May 564-571.
Skill transferability. See under Labor mobility.
Social and economic conditions, international. United
Nations Report on World Social Situation. 1952—
Oct. 400-401.
Social security, United States ( see also Older workers;
Public assistance; Retirement; Unemployment in­
surance) :
Plans and Reports on Manpower, Labor Relations, and
Welfare. 195Jf—Mar. 267-271.
Trends and Current Issues in Social Insurance. 1957—
Feb. 166-169.
Social security, foreign countries. Finland. Social Se­
curity in Finland. 1959—July 780-781.
Social welfare and related organizations. See Employ­
ment— BLS statistics.
Social workers. See Employment— Child-welfare work­
ers ; and under Wages and hours.
Steel. See Collective bargaining agreements— Employeebenefit plans, Health and w elfare; and under Em­
ployment ; Labor-management disputes; Prices,
wholesale; Productivity; Wage chronologies; Wages
and hours.
Sugar refining. See under Wages and hours.
Suits and coats, men’s and boys’. See Wages and hours—
Apparel.
TAXATION:
The Federal Income Tax and the Working Man. 1953—
Dec. 1285-1287.
Taxation of Low and Middle Incomes. 1953— Dec. 1288.
Taxes and the Consumers’ Price Index. 1953— Jan.
53-57.
Teachers. See Collective bargaining—Public employees;
and under Labor-management disputes— Strikes;
Wages and hours.
Technical occupations. See Wages and hours—Profes­
sional occupations.
Technological change. See Automation and technological
change.
Textiles. See Productivity, foreign countries—Japan;
and under Economic conditions ; Labor-management
disputes— Strikes; Labor turnover; Unemployment—
Depressed areas; Wage chronologies; Wages and
hours.
Tobacco. See under Wages and hours.
Tool and die makers. See under Labor m obility; Train­
ing.



Trade. See under Wages and hours.
Trading stamps. See Prices, consumer— Food.
Training, United States (see also Education; Handi­
capped workers; Labor organizations— Educational
activities) :
Accident reduction. Use of Training in Reducing In­
dustrial Accidents. 1951—Dec. 680-681.
Aircraft. Training in the Aircraft Industry. 1956—
Dec. 1435-1437.
Air transportation. Training Programs in Air Trans­
portation. 19 54—Aug. 882.
Employment Status of Former Apprentices in Early
1954. 195Jf— July 751-755.
Foremen. Developments in Foreman Training. 1952—
July 54-56.
Foundry Skill Requirements and Training Needs.
1957— Oct. 1224-1228.
Metalworking. The Interstate Conference on Labor
Statistics: A Survey of Training Needs for Skilled
Metal Trades Workers. 1958—Aug. 868-871.
Negroes in Apprenticeship, New York State. 1960—
Sept. 952-957.
Programs:
Industrial Personnel Seminar on Management Train­
ing Programs. 1951— May 554.
Trends in the Development of Apprentice-Training
Programs. 1955—May 564.
Test selection. Recent Trends in the Test Selection of
Apprentices. 1953— Oct. 1068-1070.
Tool and die makers. The Training of Tool and Die
Makers. 1953—Mar. 254-257.
Training, foreign countries. Great Britain. Technical
Training in the United Kingdom. 1959— July 783.
Training, international. An International Apprenticeship
Competition. 1955—Aug. 917.
Transit operating employees, local. See under Wages and
hours.
Transportation. See Training—Air transportation; and
under Arbitration and mediation; Prices, consumer;
Wage chronologies.
Truckdrivers and helpers. See under Wages and hours.
Trucking industry. See Manpower— Trucking.
UNDEREMPLOYMENT:

The Concept and Measurement of Underemployment.
1955— Mar. 283-287.
Low Incomes and Underemployment in Agriculture—
Proposed Remedies. 1952— July 48-50.
A Program for Raising Substandard Levels of Living.
1956— Mar. 313-316.
Unemployment, United States:
Characteristics of the Long-Term Unemployed. 1957—
Oct. 1233-1236.
Concepts. Uses of Unemployment Statistics in Eco­
nomic Policy. 1955— Mar. 279-282.
Depressed areas (see also Income reverses, etc., this
section) :
Chronic Labor Surplus Areas: Characteristics and
Trends. 1959—Nov. 1211-1217.
Education and Work of Young People in a Labor
Surplus Area. 1957—Dec. 1457-1463.
Employment Effects of a Plant Shutdown in a De­
pressed Area. 1957— Sept. 1047-1052.
Measures to Place Defense Orders in Surplus Man­
power Areas. 1952—Apr. 426-427.
New England: The Problem of Depressed Areas.
1957—Mar. 301-305.
Textiles (see also Economic conditions— Textiles).
Unemployment in New England Textile Com­
munities. 1955—June 645-648.
Unemployment insurance. The Role of UI in De­
pressed Areas. 1959—Mar. 245-248.
Government, Federal. Unemployment Experience of
Separated Federal Workers. 195If— June 659-660.

Unemployment, United States— Continued
Gross Change in Unemployment, 1957-59. 1960— Feb.
141-144.
Income Reverses and Family Expenditures. 1956—
Mar. 298-299.
Insured unemployed. See under Unemployment in­
surance.
Long-Term Factors in Labor Mobility and Unemploy­
ment. 1959—Aug. 876-881.
The Structure of Unemployment in Recent Years.
1956— Sept. 1029-1086, Oct. 1147-1151.
Unemployment and Job Mobility. 1960—Apr. 350-358.
Unemployment, foreign countries:
Great Britain. Experience with Development Areas in
Great Britain. 1957— May 557-564.
India. Unemployment Problems of “ Educated” Per­
sons in India. 1956—May 557-558.
Italy. Causes and Extent of Unemployment in Italy.
1954—Mar. 276-278.
Western Europe:
Assistance to Labor Surplus Areas in Europe. 1960—
June 569-576.
Employment and Unemployment in Countries of
Western Europe. 1954— Sept. 983-987.
Unemployment benefit plans, supplemental (see also Wage
chronologies) :
Adjustment to the Layoff Plan in Continental Can.
1956—Apr. 417-421.
Economics of the Guaranteed Wage. 1955— Feb. 159164.
Experience Under Three Guaranteed Wage Plans.
1954— July 769-770.
The 1955 Ford and General Motors Union Contracts.
1955— Aug. 875-881.
Legal Problems in Plans for Private Layoff Pay. 1956—
Aug. 895-900.
One View of the Effects of the Ford-GM Contracts.
1955— O #. 1115-1118.
Private Unemployment Pay Plans— Economic Effects.
1956— Mar. 300-303.
Some Problems of the Guaranteed Wage P lan : Indus­
trial Relations Aspects. Proposed Relationship
with Unemployment Insurance. 1954— Eeb. 141145.
Unemployment insurance, United States (see also Social
security; Unemployment benefit plans, supplemental;
and under Legislation, State) :
Coverage Exclusions from Unemployment Insurance.
1956—May 545-547.
Disability. See Sickness and accident benefits.
Employment Patterns of Insured Workers in New York
Industries. 1954— Sept. 996-997.
Government, Federal:
The Practical Aspects of Unemployment Insurance
for Federal Workers. 1958— Sept. 952-955.
Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees,
1955-56. 1956— Sept. 1056.
Insured unemployed:
Characteristics of the Insured Unemployed [February
1956]. 1956— June 660-663.
Characteristics of the Insured Unemployed, 1956.
1957—May 582-586.
Legislative action. 1958 Congressional Action to Im­
prove UI Benefits. 1958— Nov. 1236-1242.
Post-benefit exhaustion experience:
Experience of UI Claimants Exhausting Their Bene­
fit Rights. 1959—Mar. 267-270.
UI Claimants Exhausting Benefits During 1957-58.
1960—Mar. 243-248.
Present Status of Unemployment Insurance. 1956—
Mar. 292-297.
Problems in Unemployment Insurance. The Role of
UI in Depressed Areas. Policy Implications of UI
Financing. 1959—Mar. 245-251.



23
Unemployment insurance, United States— Continued
Railroad workers:
Railroad Retirement and Unemployment Insurance
in 1953-54. 1955—May 560-561.
Railroad Retirement Board Operations, 1956-57.
1958—May 527-529.
Sickness and Unemployment Benefits for Railroad
Workers. 1955—Aug. 907-909.
Twenty Years of Benefit Programs for Railroad
Workers. 1956—July 815-817.
Reduced income.
See Unemployment—Income Re­
verses, etc.
Unemployment insurance, territories. Hawaii. Unem­
ployment Insurance for Hawaiian Agricultural Work­
ers. 1957—May 586-588.
Unemployment insurance, foreign countries:
British Experience in Supplementing Duration of Un­
employment Benefits. 1960—Mar. 249-256.
ILO Study of Unemployment Insurance Plans, 1955.
1956— Jan. 40-47.
Union security, United States. See Legislation, Federal—
National Labor Relations A c t; National Labor Rela­
tions A ct; National Labor Relations Board—Dues
reimbursement; and under Collective bargaining
agreements.
Union security, foreign countries:
Compulsory Union Dues Checkoff in Latin America.
1955—Aug. 916.
Union-Security Safeguards in Foreign Countries.
1952— Aug. 134-139.
VACATIONS, UNITED STATES. See Wage chronolo­
gies; Wages and related benefits; under Collective
bargaining agreements; and specific industries under
Wages and hours.
Vacations, foreign countries. See Legislation, foreign
countries— Soviet Union; Wages and related benefits,
foreign countries.
Veterans’ reemployment rights. See under Legislation,
Federal.
Voting. See under Legislation, State.
WAGE CHRONOLOGIES (changes in wage rates and
related practices) :
Agricultural implements. International Harvester C o.:
1946-52. 1952—Aug. 167-175.
Supp. 1, 1952-53. 1958— Sept. 965-967.
Supp. 2, 1953-57. 1957—Aug. 966-972.
A ircraft:
Lockheed Aircraft Corp.:
1937-51. 1952— June 677-682.
Supp. 1, 1952-53. 1958— Oct. 1089-1092.
Supp. 2, 1953-54. 1954— Nov. 1236-1238.
Supp. 3, 1954-57. 1956—Nov. 1310-1312.
Supp. 4, 1958-59. 1959—Dec. 1363-1366.
Martin C o.:
1944-52. 1952—July 39-43.
Supp. 1, 1952-56. 1957— Jan. 67-70.
Supp. 2, 1957-59. 1959— Dec. 1367-1370.
North American Aviation:
1941-51. 1952— June 683-687.
Supp. 1, 1952-53. 1958—May 514-515.
Supp. 2, 1953-57. 1957—Apr. 460-465.
Aluminum. Aluminum Co. of America:
Supp. 1, 1950. 1951— July 56-57.
Supp. 2, 1952. 1958— Feb. 153-154.
Supp. 3, 1953. 1954—Aug. 880-881.
Supp. 4, 1954-57. 1958— June 634-642.
Apparel. Full-Fashioned Hosiery Manufacturers:
Supp. 1, 1949-51. 1951—Mar. 294-295.
Supp. 2, 1951-52. 1952— Oct. 408-410.

Wage chronologies— Continued
Automobiles:
Chrysler Corp.:
Supp. 1, 1950-51. 1951—Apr. 407-409.
Supp. 2,1952-53. 1953—Nov. 1201-1203.
Ford Motor C o.:
1941-50. 1951—Apr. 400-404.
Supp. 1, 1952-53. 195k—Jan. 56-57.
Supp. 2, 1953-55. 1955—Oct. 1152-1156.
Supp. 3, 1955-59. 1959—Aug. 899-904.
General Motors Corp.:
Supp. 1, 1950-51. 1951—Apr. 405^06.
Supp. 2, 1952-53. 1953—Aug. 845-847.
Supp. 3, 1953-55. 1955— Oct. 1147-1151.
Chemicals, industrial. American Viscose Corp.:
1945-51. 1952—Dec. 630-636.
Supp. 1, 1952-58. 1958—Nov. 1275-1277.
Communications:
American Telephone & Telegraph Co., Long Lines De­
partment, 1940-52. 1953—Aug. 851-862.
Western Union Telegraph:
1945-50. 1951—Feb. 174-183.
Supp. 1,1951. 1952—Mar. 297-300.
Supp. 2, 1952-53. 1953— Oct. 1085-1089.
Copper mining. Anaconda C o.:
1941-51. 1952— July 34-38.
Supp. 1, 1952-53. 195k— Sept. 1002-1003.
Supp. 2, 1954-58. 1959—Mar. 288-291.
Electric utilities:
Commonwealth Edison Co. of Chicago, 1945-52.
1953—Apr. 404-411.
Pacific Gas and Electric C o.:
1943-51. 1952— May 534-544.
Supp. 1, 1952. 1953— Aug. 848-850.
Supp. 2, 1953-59. 1960— Feb. 167-173.
Footwear:
International Shoe C o.:
1945-51. 1952— July 30-34.
Supp. 1, 1952. 1953—Apr. 402-403.
Supp. 2, 1953-57. 1958—July 765-766.
Massachusetts Shoe Manufacturing:
1945-51. 1952— Feb. 169-172.
Supp. 1, 1951-53. 1953— July 751-752.
Supp. 2, 1954-58. 1958—Aug. 886-887.
Supp. 3, 1959-60. 1960— July 727-728.
Gas utilities. See Electric utilities, this section.
Government. Federal Classification Act Employees:
1924-50. 1951—Mar. 296-309.
Supp. 1, 1951-52. 1952— Apr. 416-417.
Supp. 2, 1952-58. 1958—Dec. 1382-1389.
Laundries. New York City Laundries:
1945-53. 1953—Jan. 39-44.
Supp. 1, 1953-58. 1959— Sept. 1014-1018.
Longshoring:
North Atlantic Longshoring:
1934-51. 1951—Aug. 170-176.
Supp. 1, 1951-52. 1952— Oct. 410-412.
Supp. 2, 1952. 1953—Nov. 1207-1208.
Pacific Longshore Industry:
Supp. 1,1950. 1951—May 561-562.
Supp. 2, 1951-52. 1952—Nov. 525-527.
Supp. 3, 1953. 195k— Sept. 1000-1001.
Supp. 4, 1954-59. 1959—Nov. 1241-1247.
Meatpacking:
Armour & C o.:
Supp. 2, 1950-51. 1952— Jan. 56-57.
Supp. 3, 1951-52. 1953— Aug. 839-842.
Supp. 4, 1953-55. 1955— Nov. 1256-1258.
Supp. 5, 1956-58. 1958—Aug. 882-885.
Supp. 6, 1959-60. 1960—July 723-727.
Swift & C o.:
Supp. 2, 1950-51. 1952— Jan. 57-58.
Supp. 3,1951-52. 1953— Aug. 842-845.
Supp. 4, 1953-55. 1955—Nov. 1259-1261.
Supp. 5, 1956-58. 1958— Sept. 1005-1009.



24
Wage chronologies— Continued
M ining:
Anthracite Mining Industry:
1930-51. 1952—Nov. 528-534.
Supp. 1, 1952-54. 195k—Apr. 425-426.
Supp. 2, 1956. 1958—Feb. 178-179.
Supp. 3, 1958-59. 1959—July 774-775.
Bituminous Coal M ines:
Supp. 1, 1950-51. 1951—June 676-678.
Supp. 2, 1952. 1953— Sept. 961-962.
Supp. 3, 1952-56. 1956— Feb. 187-188.
Supp. 4, 1956-57. 1958— Feb. 176-177.
Supp. 5, 1959. 1959—July 772-773.
Petroleum refining. Sinclair Oil Companies:
1941-52. 1952— Nov. 535-544.
Supp. 1, 1953-56. 1057—-Feb. 194-198.
Printing:
Chicago Printing:
1939-50. 1951— July 49-56.
Supp. 1, 1951-53. 1953—Nov. 1203-1206.
New York City Printing:
1939-50. 1951— May 555-561.
Supp. 1, 1951-52. 1952—Dec. 637-638.
Supp. 2, 1952-58. 1960—Mar. 280-291.
San Francisco Printing, 1939-51. 1952— Sept. 289298.
Rubber. Big Four Rubber Companies, Akron and De­
troit plants:
1937-51. 1951— Oct. 438-446.
Supp. 1, 1952-55. 1956— Aug. 926-933.
Shipbuilding and repairing:
Bethlehem Atlantic Shipyards:
1941-51. 1951— Sept. 287-292.
Supp. 1, 1952-53. 1953— Sept. 963-965.
Supp. 2, 1954-55. 1956—Apr. 435-438.
Pacific Coast Shipbuilding:
1941-51. 1952—Mar. 300-305.
Supp. 1, 1952. 1953— May 512-513.
Supp. 2, 1953. 195k—Mar. 290-291.*
Supp. 3, 1954-58. 1959—Apr. 411-415.
Steel. United States Steel Corp.:
Supp. 3, 1950. 1951— May 563.
Supp. 4, 1951-52. 1953—Feb. 151-152.
Supp. 5, 1953. 1953— Oct. 1084.
Supp. 6, 1954-55. 1956—Mar. $17-319.
Supp. 7, 1956-57. 1957— Nov. 1361-1366.
Supp. 8, 1958-60. 1960— Oct. 1071-1077.
Textiles:
American Woolen C o.:
Supp. 1, 1950-52. 1952—Nov. 522-524.
Supp. 2, 1953-54. 1955—July 794-795.
Northern Cotton Textile Associations, Supp. 2, 195052. 1953— Feb. 148-150.
Transportation:
Carolina Coach Co., 1947-53. 195k— Feb. 161-167.
Missouri Pacific Transportation Co., 1945-53. 195k—
Mar. 278-290.
Pacific Greyhound Lines, 1945-53. 195k—Dec. 13401351.
Pennsylvania Greyhound Lines, Inc., 1945-52. 1953—
July 741-751.
Wage controls, United States (see also Defense mobiliza­
tion and policies) :
Federal regulation orders:
Nos. 1-10. 1951— Mar. 282-283, Apr. 409-411.
Adjustment No. 1. 1951—June 663-664.
Nos. 11-17. 1951— July 57-59, Sept. 302-304, Oct.
428-429, Dec. 706-707.
Nos. 18-21. 1952— Feb. 178-179, Apr. 427-428.
Suspension of Wage-Price Controls, 1953. 1953—
May 517-518.
Liberalization of Controls in the Construction Industry.
1952— May 563.
Report on Wage Stabilization by the Retiring WSB
Chairman. 1951—Nov. 556-558.

25
Wage controls, foreign countries (see also Wage-price
policy, foreign countries). Netherlands. Experience
With Wage Controls in the Netherlands. 1958— Sept.
982-987.
Wage determination, United States (see also Wage policy
and inflation) :
Government, Federal:
The Government’s Industrial Employees. II— Con­
sultation, Bargaining, and Wage Determination.
1954—Mar. 249-256.
Rate Setting by the Army-Air Force Wage Board.
1958— Oct. 1107-1112.
Government’s Role in Wage Determination on Inland
Waterways. 1954—Mar. 257-262.
Job Evaluation for Nonproduction Employees. 1958—
Apr. 369-372.
Wage Determination in a Nonunion Labor Market.
1957— Oct. 1193-1196.
Wage-Rate Determination in an Automated Rubber
Plant. 1958—June 610-611.
Wage determination, foreign countries. Great Britain.
Salary Determination for White-Collar Civil Servants
in Great Britain. 1960—Nov. 1158-1165.
Wage, minimum. See Wages and hours—Minimum wage.
Wage policy and inflation:
Economic Considerations in Wage Determination.
1959—Feb. 140-141.
The Influence of Bargained Wage Increases on Prices.
1959—Aug. 868-871.
Organized Labor and the Cost of Living. 1959—Feb.
137-139.
Policy Approaches to the Prevention of Wage Inflation.
1959— Feb. 129-131.
The Role of Labor in Postwar Inflation. 1959—Feb.
131-133.
Structural Determinants of Cost Inflation and Remedial
Measures. 1959—Aug. 872-875.
The Union’s Influence on W ages: The Inflationary Po­
tential of Wage-Fixing Arrangements. 1954— Feb.
148-151.
Wage Policy and Economic Activity. 1959— Feb. 134136.
Wage-price policy, foreign countries:
Australia. Suspension of Wage Escalation in Aus­
tralia. 1954—Feb. 177-178.
Austria:
New Austrian System of Wage and Price Control.
1959— July 781-782.
The Wage-Price Agreements in Postwar Austria.
1954— June 629-634.
France:
New Minimum Pay Standards for French Workers.
1955— Jan. 86.
Recent Wage Policy in France. 1954— June 656-658.
Great B ritain:
Disinflationary Policy and Wages in Great Britain.
1956— Mar. 269-273.
Trade Unions’ Role in Great B ritain: Unions in the
Welfare State. 1956— Oct. 1175-1178.
Wages, Prices, and Economic Policy in Great Britain,
1954-57. 1958—Mar. 260-264.
Mexico. Wage and Price Developments in Mexico.
1954—May 550.
Western Europe:
Wage Escalators in Marshall Plan Countries. 1952—
Jan. 7-11.
Wage Pressures and Inflation Controls in Western
Europe. 1956—June 664r-670.
Wage-Price Developments in the European Coal and
Steel Community. 1955—Aug. 917.
West Germany. European Coal-Steel Community and
West German Wage-Price Issues. 1956—Aug. 937.



Wages and hours, United States:
Aircraft. New England: The Growth of the Aircraft
Industry. 1957—Mav. 316-320.
Apparel:
Clothing, work. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in July 1953. 1954—Jan. 47-50.
Coats and suits, women’s. Hourly earnings and re­
lated practices in—
September 1951. 1952— Apr. 409-412.
February 1957. 1957—Nov. 1343-1347.
Dresses. Hourly earnings and related practices in—
August 1950. 1951—Mar. 290-292.
August 1952. 1953—May 515-517.
August 1955. 1956—M aj 537-542.
Knitted outerwear, Philadelphia. Annual earnings
in—
1951. 1953—Mar. 249-253.
1956. 1958—Apr. 392-397.
Men’s dress shirts and nightwear. Hourly earnings
and related practices in May 1954. 1955—Jan.
80-84.
Suits and coats, men’s and boys’. Hourly earnings
and related practices in—
March 1951. 1951— Nov. 573-575.
March 1958. 1958— Dec. 1369-1374.
Automobile repair shops. Hourly earnings and related
practices in—
April-June 1951. 1951— Nov. 572-573.
Mid-1953. 1954— Feb. 157-161.
April-August 1958. 1959— Jan. 41-45.
Automotive parts. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in—
March-April 1950. 1951—Jan. 37-39.
April 1957. 1958— Feb. 161-167.
Baking industry. Union scales and related practices
on—
July 1, 1950. 1951— Feb. 171-173.
July 1,1951. 1952—Jan. 25-28.
July 1,1952. 1953—Jan. 29-32.
Building trades. Union scales and related practices
on—
July 1, 1950. 1951— Jan.
. 42-45.
July 1,1951. 1952— Jan.
22-25.
July 1,1952. 1953— Jan. 32-35.
July 1,1953. 1953— Dec. 1311-1314.
. 319-322.
July 1,1954. 1955— Mar.
July 1,1955. 1956— Mar.
309-313.
July 1, 1956. 1957— Feb.
186-190.
July 1, 1957. 1958— Feb.
171-175.
July 1, 1958. 1959— Apr. 398-402.
July 1, 1959. 1960— Mar. 275-279.
Bureau of Labor Statistics:
BLS Historical Estimates of Earnings, Wages, and
Hours. 1955—July 801-806.
New Dimensions in BLS Wage Survey Work. 1959—
Oct. 1081-1084.
Studies of Occupational Wages and Supplementary
Benefits. 1954—Mar. 292-297.
Candy and other confectionery products :
Hourly earnings in April 1953. 1953— Oct. 1082-1083.
Hourly earnings and related practices in November
1951-April 1952. 1952— Oct. 413-414.
Chemicals, industrial. Hourly earnings and related
practices in—
October-November 1951. 1952— Sept. 285-289.
August 1955. 1956—June 671-677.
Cigarette manufacturing. Earnings in May 1960.
1960—Nov. 1193-1196.
Clay products, structural. Hourly earnings and related
practices in—
May 1954. 1955—Jan. 75-79.
April-June 1960. 1960—Dec. 1301-1307.

26
Wages and hours, United States—Continued
Collective agreement wage changes. See Wage develop­
ments, this section.
Communications workers. Hourly earnings in—
October 1949 and 1950. 1951— Sept. 293-296.
October 1951. 1953- -Jan. 36—
38.
October 1952. 1953- -Nov. 1198-1201.
October 1953. 1954- -Dec. 1331-1334.
October 1954. 1955- -Nov. 1253-1255.
October 1955. 1956- -Oct. 1184-1186.
October 1956. 1951- -Oct. 1237-1239.
October 195T. 1958- -Sept. 1000-1005.
October 1958. 1959— Sept. 995-999.
October 1959. 1960— Sept. 946-951.
Controls. See Wage controls.
Cutlery, hand tools, and general hardware. Hourly
earnings and related practices in October 1951-Jan­
uary 1952. 1952— Oct. 416-417.
Determination. See Wage determination; Wage policy
and inflation.
Developments. See Wage developments, this section.
Differentials. See Wage differentials, this section.
Dispersion. See Wage dispersion, this section.
Distribution. See Wage distribution, this section.
Drugs, medicines, and cosmetics. Hourly earnings in
May 1950. 1951—Jan. 50-51.
Drycleaning. Hourly earnings and related practices in
Mid-1955. 1956—Jan. 51-58.
Electric lamps. Hourly earnings in October 1954.
1955— Aug. 913.
Electric utilities. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in—
September 1950. 1951— June 665-668.
July 1952. 1953— Apr. 398-402.
September 1957. 1958— July 757-764.
Electroplating, plating, and polishing. Hourly earnings
and related practices in October 1951-January 1952.
1952— Oct. 414-415.
Fertilizers (see also Minimum wage, this section).
Hourly earnings and related practices in April 1956.
1956— Dec. 1430-1434.
Firemen. Salary changes in—
January 1950-51. 1952—Jan. 52-53.
January 1951-52. 1953— July 723-726.
January 1952-54. 1955—July 790-793.
January 1954-58. 1958— Oct. 1143-1146.
Fishermen, Boston. Annual earnings in 1951. 1952—
June 666-670.
Flour and cereal preparations. Hourly earnings in
May 1950. 1951— Feb. 163-164.
Footwear (see also Minimum wage, this section).
Hourly earnings and related practices in—
September 1950. 1951—Mar. 292-294.
August 1951. 1952— Feb. 172-174.
March 1953. 1954— Jan. 40-44.
April 1957. 1958—Mar. 274-281.
Forgings, iron and steel. Hourly earnings and related
practices in October 1951-January 1952. 1952—
July 26-27.
Formalization. See Wage Formalization, etc., this
section.
Foundries:
Ferrous. Hourly earnings and related practices in—
June 1951. 1951—Dec. 702-703.
Mid-1953. 1954—Jan. 45-47.
Gray iron. Hourly earnings and related practices in
April-June 1959. 1959— Nov. 1236-1240.
Nonferrous. Hourly earnings and related practices
in August 1951. 1952—Apr. 406-409.
Steel. Hourly earnings and related practices in De­
cember 1951. 1952—Aug. 178-181.
Furniture:
Household. Hourly earnings and related practices
in February and May 1954. 1955— Jan. 68-74.



Wages and hours, United States—Continued
Furniture— Continued
Wood (see also Minimum wage, this section).
Hourly earnings and related practices in—
October 1950. 1951—Apr. 398-400.
August 1951. 1952— Mar. 29A-297.
July 1952. 1952— Dec. 629-630.
April-May 1959. 1959—Dec. 1357-1362.
Gas utilities. Hourly earnings and related practices
in—
September 1950. 1951— June 668-672.
July 1952. 1953—Apr. 398-402.
September 1957. 1958— July 757-764.
Government, Federal:
Annual scales and salaries for Federal classified em­
ployees in—
1939-50. 1951—May 537-540.
1950- 51. 1952—May 545-547.
1951- 52. 1953— Sept. 958-960.
1939-54. 1955—Apr. 421-423.
1954- 56. 1951— July 816-820.
1955- 58. 1959— Feb. 169-172.
The Jobs of Federal White-Collar Workers. 1952—
Nov. 489-494.
Occupations and Salaries of Women Federal Em­
ployees. 1951— Aug. 955-959.
Grain milling. Hourly earnings and related practices
in October 1951-January 1952. 1952— July 27-28.
Heating apparatus. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in October 1951-January 1952. 1952—Oct.
417-418.
Historical series. See BLS statistics and Nongovern­
mental, etc., this section.
Hosiery (see also Minimum wage, this section).
Hourly earnings and related practices in—
October 1950. 1951—Apr. 396-398.
September 1951. 1952— Mar. 291-293.
November 1952. 1953— July 730-735.
April 1956. 1951— Jan. 57-61.
Hospital employees. Earnings and related practices in
1956- 57. 1951— Sept. 1074-1082.
Hotel service workers. Hourly earnings and related
practices in—
Mid-1955. 1956—Jan. 48-51.
March-June 1960. 1960—Dec. 1308-1312.
Hours. See Hours of w ork; and specific industries,
this section.
Incentive pay. Extent of Incentive Pay in Manufac­
turing. 1960—May 460-463.
Insurance carriers. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in September 1951-May 1952. 1952— Oct.
420-421.
Laundries, power:
Hourly earnings and related practices in—
April-June 1951. 1951—Nov. 575-577.
June 1952. 1952— Nov. 518-519.
Mid-1953. 1953—Dec. 1307-1309.
Mid-1955. 1956— Jan. 51-58.
Hourly earnings trend in July 1945-Mid-1953. 1954—
May 522-525.
Leather tanning and finishing. Hourly earnings and
related practices in—
May 1954. 1955— Feb. 199-204.
May 1959. 1959— Oct. 1114-1119.
Liquor distilleries. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in April 1952. 1952—Nov. 515-517.
Localities. See Hours of work; Wages and related
benefits; and in this section: Minimum wage—
Effects of $1 minimum; Shift differentials; Wage
differentials; Wage Formalization, etc.
Lumber:
Millwork. Hourly earnings and related practices in
September 1951-January 1952. 1952— Oct. 424.

27
Wages and hours, United States—Continued
Lumber— Continued
Sawmills:
Southern. Hourly earnings in April 1953. 1953—
Oct. 1077-1081.
West Coast. Hourly earnings and related practices
in—
February 1952. 1953—Mar. 272-275.
July 1959. 1960—Jan. 31-38.
Machinery:
Hourly earnings in—
January 1945-51. 1952— Jan. 48-49.
January 1951-53. 1953—Dec. 1309-1311.
December 1958-March 1959. 1959— Sept. 10001005.
Hourly earnings and related practices in—
January 1951. 1951— July 43-46.
October-December 1951. 1952—May 551-555.
October 1952-February 1953. 1953— July 735-740.
September 1953-February 1954. 1954—June 649656.
September 1954-February 1955. 1955— July 776781.
November 1955-February 1956. 1956—Aug. 908916.
October 1957-April 1958. 1958— Sept. 991-999.
December 1959-May 1960. 1960— Sept. 939-945.
Manufacturing workers. Earnings trends from Jan­
uary 1947 to June 1960. 1960—Aug. 809-821.
Manufacturing workers, women. Hourly earnings in
April 1954. 1955— Oct. 1126-1132.
Maritime industries. Daily earnings in spring 1957
and annual earnings in year ending June 30, 1957.
1959—Jan. 33-40.
M etal:
Business equipment. Hourly earnings in July 1951.
1952—Apr. 415-416.
Sheet-. Hourly earnings and related practices in
September 1951-January 1952. 1952—Aug. 176177.
Stamped and pressed. Hourly earnings and related
practices in October 1951-January 1952. 1952—
Aug. 177-178.
Military personnel. Monthly pay and allowances in
May 1952. 1952— July 28-30.
Milk-dealer industry. Hourly earnings and related
practices in October 1951-April 1952. 1952— Oct.
422-423.
Millinery. Hourly earnings and related practices in
March 1952. 1952— Oct. 419-420.
Minimum wage:
Agricultural workers. A Minimum Wage for Farm
Workers. 1960— July 677-685.
Effects of 75-cent minimum:
Economic Effects of the Minimum Wage. 1955—
Mar. 307-311.
Fertilizer. 1951— Jan. 33-37.
Furniture, wood. 1951— June 673-674.
Hosiery, men’s seamless. 1951—June 674-676.
Men’s dress shirts and nightwear. 1951—Aug.
166-170.
Effects of $1 minimum:
Earnings in Selected Low-Wage Manufacturing In­
dustries, June 1959. 1960—June 605-610.
Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage in Five Industries
[cigars, fertilizer, sawmills, seamless hosiery,
and wooden containers]. 1958—May 492-501.
Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage in Seven Areas.
1958—July 737-743.
Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage in Seven Indus­
tries [fertilizer, footwear, processed waste,
sawmills, seamless hosiery—men’s and chil­
dren’s, wooden containers, work shirts].
1951—Mar. 323-328, Apr. 441-446.



Wages and hours, United States— Continued
Minimum wage—Continued
Effects of $1 minimum— Continued
Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage in Six Areas,
1956-59. 1960— May 472-478.
Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage in Three Seasonal
Industries [fruit and vegetable canning and
freezing, raw cane sugar manufacturing, to­
bacco stemming and redrying]. 1951— Sept.
1087-1091.
Effects of the $1 Minimum W age: Men’s and Boys’
Shirt Industry. 1951— Nov. 1339-1343.
Oklahoma. The $1 Minimum Wage Impact on 15
Oklahoma Industries. 1951— Sept. 1092-1095.
Plant Adjustments to the $1 Minimum Wage.
1958— Oct. 1137-1142.
The Purposes and Results of U.S. Minimum Wage
Laws. 1960— Mar. 238-242.
Motor vehicles. Hourly earnings and related practices
in July 1957. 1951— Nov. 1321-1329.
New England (see also Aircraft, this section). Wages
and Personal Income. 1951—Mar. 294-300.
Nonagricultural industries. Hours and Earnings in
Nonagricultural Industries. 1954—Apr. 427-431.
Nongovernmental Historical Series on Earnings, Wages,
and Hours. 1955—Aug. 918-921.
Office-building and contract-cleaning services. Hourly
earnings and related practices in summer 1955.
1955—Dec. 1459-1464.
Office workers:
New York City. Salary trends and related practices,
1948-58. 1959— Jan. 8-13.
Women, 9 areas. Salary trends, 1949-54. 1954—
Sept. 972-976.
Oil-field workers. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in October-November 1951. 1952—June 664666.
Paint and varnish. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in—
March-May 1951. 1951— Oct. 436-438.
June 1952. 1952—Nov. 519-521.
Paper and allied products. Hourly earnings in May
1950. 1951— Mar. 288-290.
Paper products, converted. Hourly earnings in April
1953. 1953— Dec. 1314-1317.
Parachutes. Hourly earnings in December 1951.
1953— Feb. 155.
Petroleum refining. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in—
October-November 1951. 1952—June 661-663.
July 1959. 1960— Apr. 381-386.
Photographic and blueprinting industry. Hourly earn­
ings in April-May 1951. 1951—Dec. 703-704.
Plastics products. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in January-February 1960. 1960—Aug. 846852.
Policemen. Salary changes in—
January 1950-51. 1952— Jan. 52-53.
January 1951-52. 1953— July 723-726.
January 1952-54. 1955— July 790-793.
January 1954-58. 1958— Oct. 1143-1146.
Printing industry. Union scales and related practices
on—
July 1, 1950. 1951- -Feb. 167-170.
July 1, 1951. 1952- -Apr. 412-415.
July 1, 1952. 1953- -Feb. 141-145.
July 1,1953. 1954- -Jan. 53-56.
July 1, 1954. 1955- -Apr. 440-443.
July 1, 1955. 1956- -Apr. 428-432.
July 1, 1956. 1957- -Apr. 466-471.
July 1, 1957. 1958- -Apr. 398-402.
July 1, 1958. 1959- -June 658-662.
July 1, 1959. 1960- -May 486^90.
Processed waste. See Minimum wage, this section.

28
Wages and hours, United States—Continued
Professional occupations. Pay Levels for Professional
and Other White-Collar Occupations. 1960—Dec.
1284-1292.
Pulp, paper, and paperboard. Hourly earnings and
related practices in April 1952. 1952— Dec. 626-629.
Radio and television broadcasting. Weekly earnings in
October 1950. 1952—-Jan. 50-52.
Radio, television, and related products. Hourly earn­
ings and related practices in November 1951.
1952— July 24-26.
Railroad-car manufacture. Hourly earnings and re­
lated practices in January 1952. 1952—Aug. 181183.
Sawmills. See Minimum wage and under Lumber, this
section.
Shift differentials:
Scheduled Workweeks and Shift Differentials in 17
Labor Markets. 1956—Nov. 1295-1299.
Workweeks, Overtime, and Shift Pay in 17 Labor
Markets, 1957-58. 1958—Dec. 1374-1380.
Skill differentials. See Wage differentials, this section.
Social workers :
Annual salaries and related practices in 1950. 1951—
Apr. 391-395.
Personnel and Agencies Serving Blind People, 1955.
1957— July 821-828.
Status of Child-Welfare Workers. 1951—Aug. 176.
Spendable earnings:
The Calculation and Uses of the Net Spendable Earn­
ings Series. 1952—Mar. 306-309.
The Calculation and Uses of the Spendable Earnings
Series. 1959— Jan. 50-54.
Spendable Earnings of Factory Workers, 1939-54.
1955— Jan. 53-57.
Steel:
Basic. Hourly earnings and related practices in
January 1951. 1952— Feb. 158-163.
Fabricated structural:
Hourly earnings in September 1949 to May 1950.
1951—May 564-565.
Hourly earnings and related practices in March
1957. 1957— Dec. 1484-1488.
Sugar refining. Hourly earnings in July (cane sugar)
and November (beet sugar) 1950. 1951—July
46-47.
Teachers, city public school. Salary increases during—
1925-49. 1951—Mar. 286-288.
1949-51. 1952— Feb. 175-176.
1951-53. 1955— Feb. 195-198.
1953-55. 1956—Apr. 425-428.
1955-57. 1958—Apr. 384-387.
Technical occupations. See Professional occupations,
this section.
Textiles:
Cotton. Hourly earnings and related practices in—
March 1952. 1952—Aug. 145-149.
November 1954. 1955— May 533-537.
Dyeing and finishing. Hourly earnings and related
practices in April 1956. 1956— Nov. 1303-1309.
Synthetic fibers. Hourly earnings and related prac­
tices in__
March 1952. 1952— Sept. 281-285.
November 1954. 1955— June 659-663.
October 1958. 1959—June 653-658.
Woolen and worsted. Hourly earnings and related
practices in April-May 1952. 1952—Oct. 403-408.
Wool yarn and broad woven fabric mills. Hourly
earnings and related practices in September 1957.
1958— May 502-509.
Miscellaneous industries. Hourly earnings in Oc­
tober 1953. 1954—May 536-540.



Wages and hours, United States— Continued
Tobacco:
Cigarettes. Hourly earnings and related practices in
May 1960. 1960—Nov. 1193-1196.
Cigars. Hourly earnings and related practices in
April 1955. 1955—Dec. 1453-1459.
Products. Hourly earnings in May 1951. 1951—Dec.
705-706.
T rade:
Department and women’s ready-to-wear stores.
Hourly earnings and related practices in M ayJuly 1950. 1951—Feb. 165-167.
Retail. Hourly earnings in October 1956. 1958—Jan.
48-53.
Wholesale. Hourly earnings in June 1958. 1959—
Aug. 887-893.
Transit operating employees, local. Union scales and
related practices on—
October 1, 1950. 1951—Mar. 283-286.
October 1,1951. 1952—Mar. 293-296.
October 1, 1952. 1953—Apr. 395-398.
July 1, 1953. 1954— Jan. 50-53.
July 1, 1954. 1955— May 552-554.
July 1, 1955. 1956— Apr. 433-435.
July 1, 1956. 1957— Mar. 347-349.
July 1, 1957. 1958— Mar. 284-287.
July 1, 1958. 1959— Feb. 166-168.
July 1, 1959. 1960— Feb. 164-166.
Truckdrivers and helpers, city. Union scales and re­
lated practices on—
July 1, 1950. 1951— Jan. 40-42.
July 1, 1951. 1952— Feb. 167-169.
July 1, 1952. 1953— Feb. 145-148.
July 1, 1953. 1954— Feb. 168-170.
July 1, 1954. 1955— June 663-665.
July 1, 1955. 1956— May 542-544.
July 1,1956. 1957— Feb. 191-193.
July 1, 1957. 1958— Feb. 167-170.
July 1, 1958. 1959— Apr. 416-419.
July 1, 1959. 1960— Apr. 387-390.
Union influence on wages (see also Wage policy and
inflation).
Trade Unionism and Distributive
Shares. The Inflationary Potential of Wage-Firing
Arrangements. Union Impact on Wage Structure.
1954—Feb. 146-153.
Wage developments:
Major collective bargaining agreements:
January-March 1955. 1955— July 797.
January-June 1955. 1955— Oct. 1123-1125.
1955. 1956—May 527-533.
January-June 1956. 1956— Oct. 1182-1183.
1956. 1957—Apr. 447-452.
1957. 1958—Apr. 377-383.
1958. 1959—Apr. 389-395.
January-June 1959. 1959— Oct. 1085-1087.
Manufacturing [union and nonunion], 1959. 1960—
Sept. 917-921.
Wage differentials:
City Comparisons of Wage Levels and Skill Differ­
entials [January-June 1951]. 1952— June 643647.
Earnings and Wage Differentials in 17 Labor Mar­
kets, 1955-56. 1956— Sept. 1040-1046.
Earnings and Wage Differentials in 17 Labor Mar­
kets, 1956-57. 1957— Oct. 1216-1223.
Job Pay Differentials in Machinery Plants. 1954—
Apr. 373-379.
Job Pay Levels and Trends in 19 Labor Markets,
1957-58. 1958—Nov. 1249-1256.
Job Pay Levels, Differentials, and Trends in 20 Labor
Markets [1958-59]. 1959— Oct. 1120-1127.
Labor Market Factors and Skill Differentials in Wage
Rates. 1957— Oct. 1191-1193.

29
Wages and hours, United States—Continued
Wage differentials;—Continued
Occupational Wage Differentials in Major Labor
Markets, 1951-52. 1953—Mar. 266-267.
Occupational Wages in Early 1951, Five Major Cities.
1951— Nov. 536-540.
Occupational Wage Levels in 20 Labor Markets, Fall
1952— Spring 1953. 1953—Dec. 1281-1284.
Occupational Wage Relationships in Manufacturing,
1952-53. 1953—Nov. 1171-1178.
Occupational Wage Relationships in 17 Labor Mar­
kets, 1955-56. 1956—Dec. 1419-1426.
Wage Differences Among 40 Labor Markets [195152]. 1952—Dec. 620-623.
Wage Differences Among Labor Markets, 1953-54.
195k— Oct. 1090-1096.
Wages and Related Provisions in 17 Labor Markets,
1954- 55. 1955— Oqt. 1119-1123.
Wage Dispersion in Manufacturing Industries, 1950-55.
1956— July 780-786.
Wage distribution:
The Distribution of Factory Workers’ Earnings,
April 1954. 1955—Apr. 410-416.
Distribution of Factory Workers’ Earnings, May 1958.
1959— July 764-768.
Wage escalation. The Growth, Status, and Implications
of Wage Escalation. 1953— Feb. 126-129.
Wage Formalization in Major Labor Markets, 1951-52.
1953—Jan. 22-26.
Wage trends:
Area Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups,
1952-55. 1955—Nov. 1248-1252.
Interrelationship of Prices, Wages, and Productivity,
1946-57. 1958— Jan. 14-22.
Trends in Earnings of Factory Workers, 1947 to 1960.
1960— Aug. 809-821.
Trends in Wages in 1950. 1951— June 638-641.
Wage Movements—An Analysis of 1939-49 Experi­
ence. 1951— Jan. 13-16.
Wage Movements and Collective Bargaining. 195k—
Jan. 23-25.
West Coast: Trends in Wages, Earnings, and Per
Capita Income. 1959—May 524-529.
White-collar workers. International Comparisons of
White-Collar Working Conditions. 1957— Nov.
1351-1355.
Wooden containers. See Minimum wage, this section.
Work shirts. See Minimum wage, this section.
Wages and hours, Puerto R ic o :
Minimum Wages in Puerto Rico Under the FLSA.
1960—Apr. 370-375.
Wage Structure and Minimum Wages. 1955—Dec.
1368-1372.
Wages and hours, territories:
Alaska: Wages and Working Conditions. 1955—Dec.
1388-1394.
Hawaii: Working Conditions and Workers’ Wages.
1955— Dec. 1422-1426.
Wages and hours, foreign countries (see also Foreign
countries under Economic conditions and Wage-price
policy) :
India. Bombay Port Labor and Incentive Wages.
1956— Aug. 936.
Japan:
Earnings of Japanese Industrial Homeworkers, 195152. 195k—Feb. 181.
Wage Developments in Japan During the Occupation.
1952— Oct. 395-399.
Wages in Japanese Mining and Manufacturing.
1955— May 547-552.
Philippine Minimum Wage Law and Real Wages.
1955—Dec. 1472.
The West German Wage Movement in 1954. 1955—
Mar. 311-314.



Wages and related benefits, United States (see also Col­
lective bargaining agreements; Wage chronologies;
Wages and hours—Wage developments; and specific
industries under Wages and hours) :
Payroll hours. Composition of Payroll Hours in Manu­
facturing, 1958. 1960— July 686-692.
Related Wage Practices in Major Labor Markets, 195152. 1953—Mar. 268-272.
Supplementary wage provisions in 17 labor markets
in—
1954- 55. 1955— Oct. 1119-1123.
1955- 56. 1956—Nov. 1281-1287.
1956- 57. 1957— Nov. 1356-1360.
1957- 58. 1958—Nov. 1256-1263.
Supplementary Wage Provisions in Major Labor Mar­
kets, 1953-59. 1959— Oct. 1128-1131.
White-collar workers. International Comparisons of
White-Collar Working Conditions. 1957—Nov.
1351-1355.
Wages and related benefits, foreign countries (see also
Legislation, foreign countries) :
Canada. Paid Vacation Provisions in Canadian Laws.
1959—June 667-668.
India. Year-End Bonus Payments to Workers in India.
1957—Apr. 474.
Soviet Union. Hours of Work and Leave Provisions in
the U.S.S.R. 1957— Sept. 1069-1073.
Sweden. Fringe Benefits in Swedish Industry. 1955—
Apr. 452.
Western Europe. Paid Vacations for Workers in West­
ern Europe. 1955— Jan. 88-89.
White-collar workers. International Comparisons of
White-Collar Working Conditions. 1957—Nov.
1351-1355.
Warehousing operations. See Work injuries— Frequency
and severity rates.
Wartime economy. See Defense mobilization and policies.
Watches and clocks. See under Employment.
Waterfront Commission of New York Harbor. Reforms
in Labor Conditions in the Port of New York. 1955—
Sept. 1014-1016.
Water transportation industry. See Employment— BLS
statistics.
Welfare plans. See Collective bargaining agreements—
Employee-benefit plans; Health, welfare, and pension
plans; Wage chronologies.
Wholesale prices. See Prices, wholesale.
Wooden containers. See Wages and hours—Minimum
wage.
Worker education. See Education; Labor organizations—
Educational activities; Training.
Working life. See under Labor force.
Work injuries (see also Occupational safety) :
Causes of Roof-Fall Fatalities in Bituminous-Coal
Mines, 1950. 1951— Aug. 180-182.
Costs. Uninsured Costs of Industrial Accidents.
1951— June 633-637.
Frequency and severity rates:
Injury Rates in the Canning and Preserving Industry,
1952. 195k—May 540-544.
Injury Rates in the Fluid-Milk Industry, 1952.
1953—Dec. 1295-1299.
Injury-Rate Variations in the Boiler-Shop-Products
Industry. 1953—June 621-624.
Paperboard-Container-Industry Work-Injury Rates,
1938-50. 1951—Dec. 675-680.
Work Injuries in Warehousing Operations. 1952—
Feb. 156-158.
Work Injury Rates in Hospitals, 1953. 1956—June
684-687.
Frequency and severity rates, by type and industry
group:
Work Injuries in the United States in—
1950. 1952— Jan. 31-37.
1951. 1952—Nov. 510-515.

30
Work injuries— Continued
Frequency and severity rates—Continued
Work Injuries in the United States in—Continued
1952. 1954—Jan. 31-36.
1953. 1954—Nov. 1224-1227.
1954. 1956— Jan. 58-62.
1955. 1957— Jan. 62-66.
1956. 1958— Jan. 54-58.
1957. 1959— Jan. 46-49.
1958. 1960— Jan. 51-55.
Frequency rates, manufacturing industries:
Injury Rates in Manufacturing, 1949-50: A Graphic
Analysis. 1951— July 40-42.
Quarterly reports in—
1950. 1951— Feb. 184-188, May 549-553.
1951. 1951—Aug. 177-180; 1952—May 547-550,
June 673-676.
1952. 1952—Aug. 185-186, Dec. 644-647; 1953—
Feb. 138-141, May 501-504.
1953. 1953—Aug. 865-868; 1954— Feb. 173-176,
May 545-547.
1954. 1954—Aug. 877-879, Dec. 1352-1354; 1955—
Feb. 209-211, May 557-559.
1955. 1955—Aug. 910-912, Nov. 1262-1264; 1956—
Feb. 183-186, Apr. 548-551.
Number, by type and industry group:
1950, preliminary. 1951—Mur. 270-271.
1951, preliminary. 1952— Mar. 271-272.
1952, preliminary. 1953— Mar. 282-283.
1953, preliminary. 1954— Apr. 423-424.
1954, preliminary. 1955— Apr. 430-431.
1955, preliminary. 1956— Apr. 438-439.
1956, preliminary. 1957— Apr. 471-472.
1957, preliminary. 1958— Apr. 408-409.
1958, preliminary. 1959— Apr. 403-404.
1959, preliminary. 1960— Apr. 390-391.
Statistics. Revised Standards for Work-Injury Statis­
tics. 1955—May 565-567.
Workmen’s compensation, United States (see also Occupa­
tional disease; Work injuries— Costs; and under
Legislation, State) :
Atomic radiation:
Atomic Radiation and Workmen’s Compensation.
1958— June 632-634.
Workmen’s Compensation and Radiation Hazards.
1957—Apr. 455-459.




Workmen’s compensation, United States— Continued
Benefit Levels in Workmen’s Compensation. 1958—
July 723-730.
Confronting the Crisis in Workmen’s Compensation.
1959— Mar. 252-256.
Governmental Responsibility in Workmen’s Compensa­
tion Programs. 1958— June 631-632.
Workmen’s Compensation in the United States:
I— An Appraisal. 1953—Apr. 359-366.
II— Court Proceedings. 1953—May 480-483.
III— Federal Legislation. 1953— June 602-608.
IV— Occupational Diseases. 1953—July 709-713.
V— Medical Services. 1953—Aug. 826-829.
VI— Accident Prevention. 1953— Oct. 1063-1067.
V II— Problems of Administration. 1953—Nov. 11791184,
V III—
Rehabilitation. 1953—Dec. 1289-1294.
Workmen’s compensation, foreign countries:
Belgium. Workmen’s Compensation
in
Belgium.
1958— Feb. 153-160.
Canada. The Workmen’s Compensation Act of Ontario.
1954— June 635-640.
Great Britain. The British Industrial Injuries Insur­
ance System. 1954—May 511-515.
Works councils. See Co-determination; Industrial rela­
tions, foreign countries— Sweden.
Worksharing. See Collective bargaining agreements—
Layoffs; Hours of work— Shorter workweek.
Work shirts. See Wages and hours— Minimum wage.
Work stoppages. See Labor-management disputes—
Strikes.
YOUTH (see also Employment— Students; Labor force—
Students; Legislation, State— Children; Occupational
safety—Hazardous occupations order) :
Education and Work of Young People in a Labor Sur­
plus Area. 1957— Dec. 1457-1463.
Federal Programs Affecting Children and Youth.
1951—Nov. 577-578.
A National Policy on Youth Employment. 1952— Sept.
299.
White House Conference on Children and Youth, 1950.
1951— Feb. 188-190.

BOOK REVIEW S (listed by author of book)
Barkin, Solomon, Franklin G. Bishop, Sumner Shapiro.
Textile Workers’ Job Primer, Vol. I : A Trade Unionist’s
Guide for Handling Work Assignment and Production
Standard Problems. 1954— Feb. 195-197.
Bauer, Peter T. and Basil S. Yamey. The Economics of
Underdeveloped Countries. 1958—Mar. 303-305.
Becker, Esther R. Dictionary o f Personnel and Indus­
trial Relations. 1959— Feb. 191.
Becker, Joseph M. The Problem of Abuse in Unemploy­
ment Benefits. 1954—Apr. 445.
Belcher, David W. Wage and Salary Administration.
1955— Oct. 1176.
Bendix, Reinhard. Work and Authority in Industry:
Ideologies of Management in the Course of Industriali­
zation. 1956— Oct. 1204-1205.
------ and Seymour M. Lipset. Social Mobility in Indus­
trial Society. 1959— Sept. 1034-1035.
Benedict, Murray R. Farm Policies of the United States,
1790-1950: A Study of Their Origins and Development.
1958— Oct. 1104.
Bergson, Abram, ed. Soviet Economic Growth—Condi­
tions and Perspectives. 1953— Dec. 1332-1333.
Bernard, Harold W. Toward Better Personal Adjust­
ment. 1958—May 547.
Bernert, Eleanor H. America’s Children. 1958— Oct.
1164-1165.
Bernstein, Irving. Arbitration o f Wages. 1955—Jan.
105-106.
------ , Harold L. Enarson, R. W. Fleming, eds. Emer­
gency Disputes and National Policy. 1956—Apr.
461-462.
Bernstein, Martin and Daniel Creamer. Capital and Out­
put Trends in Manufacturing Industries, 1880-1948.
1954— Nov. 1259-1260.
Bezanson, Anne. Prices and Inflation During the Ameri­
can Revolution: Pennsylvania, 1770-1790. 1952— Mar.
319.
Bishop, Franklin G., Sumner Shapiro, Solomon Barkin.
Textile Workers’ Job Primer, Vol. I : A Trade Unionist’s
Guide for Handling Work Assignment and Production
Standard Problems. 1954— Feb. 195-197.
Blank, David M. and George J. Stigler. The Demand
and Supply of Scientific Personnel. 1957— Dec. 1504.
Blank, David M., Louis Winnick, Leo Grebler. Capital
Formation in Residential Real Estate— Trends and
Prospects. 1957—May 620.
Blum, Fred H. Toward a Democratic Work Process:
The Hormel Packinghouse Workers’ Experiment.
1954— Feb. 194-195.
Blumen, Isadore, Marvin Kogan, Philip J. McCarthy.
The Industrial Mobility of Labor as a Probability
Process. 1956— Jan. 87-88.
Boulding, Kenneth E. The Skills o f the Economist.
1958—Aug. 906.
------ and others. Segments of the Economy, 1956: A
Symposium. 1958—May 545-546.
Bowen, William G. The Wage-Price Issue—A Theoret­
ical Analysis. 1960— Oct. 1097-1098.
Bradley, Philip D., ed. The Public Stake in Union Power.
1960— Jan. 71-72.
Bradley, Philip D., Gerard D. Reilly, Roscoe Pound, Ed^
ward H. Chamberlin. Labor Unions and Public Policy.
1958—Oct. 1163.
Brainerd, Carol P. and Gladys L. Palmer. Labor Mo­
bility in Six Cities: A Report on the Survey of Pat­
terns and Factors in Labor Mobility, 1940-50. 1954—
Sept. 1021-1022.

Aaron, Benjamin and Robert E. Mathews, eds. The Em­
ployment Relation and the Law. 1958— June 655.
Abegglen, James C. and W. Lloyd Warner. Occupational
Mobility in American Business and Industry, 1928-1952.
1956— Feb. 214.
Abruzzi, Adam. Work, Workers, and Work Measurement.
1957— Apr. 498-499.
Ackerman, J. Emory and F. Ernest Johnson. The Church
as Employer, Money Raiser, and Investor. 1959—Dec.
1386.
Allan, W. Scott. Rehabilitation: A Community Challenge.
1958— Aug. 906.
Allen, G. C. Japan’s Economic Recovery. 1959— Jan. 7172.
Allen, Y. L. Power in Trade Unions: A Study of Their
Organization in Great Britain. 1954— Oct. 1142-1143.
------ Trade Union Leadership—Based on a Study of Ar­
thur Deakin. 1958—Apr. 427.
American Federation of Teachers, Commission on Educa­
tional Reconstruction. Organizing the Teaching Profes­
sion : The Story of the American Federation of
Teachers. 1956—Feb. 214-215.
Anderson, Jackson M. Industrial Recreation—A Guide
to Its Organization and Administration. 1955— Oct.
1177-1178.
Arensberg, Conrad M. and others, eds. Research in In­
dustrial Human Relations—A Critical Appraisal.
1957— Mar. 369.
Argyle, Michael. The Scientific Study of Social Behavior.
1958— Nov. 1294-1295.
Argyris, Chris. Executive Leadership: An Appraisal of
a Manager in Action. 1954—Aug. 914.
------ Personality and Organization: The Conflict Be­
tween System and the Individual. 1958—Nov. 12941295.
Arnow, Kathryn Smul. The Attack on the Cost of Living
Index. 1951— June 715-716.
Arthur D. Little, Inc. Diversification—An Opportunity
for the New England Textile Industry. 1956— Sept.
1078-1079.
Association of Teachers o f Preventive Medicine. Readings
in Medical Care. 1958—Dec. 1414-1415.
Avery, Robert S. Experiment in Management: Person­
nel Decentralization in the Tennessee Valley Author­
ity. 1955—Dec. 1496-1497.
Bach, G. L. Inflation— A Study in Economics, Ethics,
and Politics. 1958—Nov. 1293-1294.
Baker, Alton W. Personnel Management in Small Plants:
A Study of Small Manufacturing Establishments in
Ohio. 1956— Feb. 215-216.
Baker, Elizabeth Faulkner. Printers and Technology: A
History of the International Printing Pressmen and
Assistants’ Union. 1958— Feb. 196-197.
Bakke, E. Wight and others. Labor Mobility and Eco­
nomic Opportunity. 1954— Oct. 1144-1145.
Baldwin, George B. Beyond Nationalization: The Labor
Problems of British Coal. 1956—Mar. 337.
Barbash, Jack. The Practice of Unionism. 1957—Jan.
85-87.
------ Unions and Telephones: The Story of the Communi­
cations Workers of America. 1952— Dec. 659.
------ Universities and Unions in Workers’ Education.
1955—Nov. 1291-1292.
------ , ed. Unions and Union Leadership—Their Human
Meaning. I960—Feb. 188.
Barger, Harold. Distribution’s Place in the American
Economy Since 1869. 1956—June 703-704.
Barish, Norman N. and J. M. Juran. Case Studies in
Industrial Management. 1956— Oct. 1204-1205.



( 31)

32
Braun, Kurt. The Right to Organize and Its Limits:
A Comparison of Policies in the United States and
Selected European Countries. 1951— Jan. 67.
Bray, Douglas W. and Eli Ginzberg. The Uneducated.
1953— June 643-644.
Breckinridge, Elizabeth Llewellyn. Effective Use of Older
Workers. 1953— Oct. 1103.
Brennan, Charles W. Wage Administration: Plans,
Practices, and Principles. 1960—Jan. 72-73.
Bright, James R. Automation and Management. 1958—
July 786-787.
Bronson, Dorrance C. Concepts of Actuarial Soundness
in Pension Plans. 1958— July 787.
Bross, Irwin D. J. Design for Decision. 1954—May 569.
Brown, J. Douglas and Frederick Harbison. High-Talent
Manpower for Science and Industry: An Appraisal
of Policy at Home and Abroad. 1958—June 655-656.
Brown, Milon. Effective Supervision. 1957— Jan. 88.
Bruce, Robert V. 1877: Year of Violence. 1960— Aug.
869.
Burns, Arthur F. The Frontiers of Economic Knowledge.
1954— Aug. 912-913.
Burns, Eveline M. Social Security and Public Policy.
1956— Sept. 1077-1078.
Bursk, Edward C., ed. The Management Team. 1955—
June 694-695.
Calderwood, James D., Marshall A. Robinson, Herbert C.
Morton. An Introduction to Economic Reasoning.
1956— Sept. 1078.
Calhoon, Richard P. and C. A. Kirkpatrick. Influencing
Employee Behavior. 1956— Dec. 1459.
Cannell, Charles F. and Robert L. Kahn. The Dynamics
of Interviewing—Theory, Technique, and Cases. 1957—
Nov. 1386.
Caplow, Theodore, trans. and ed. The Causes of Wealth,
by Jean Fourastie. 1960—Dec. 1328-1329.
Carroll, Phil. Timestudy for Cost Control. 1955—June
694-695.
Cartter, Allan Murray. The Redistribution of Income
in Postwar Britain—A Study of the Effects of the
Central Government Fiscal Program in 1948-49. 1955—
Aug. 937.
------ Theory of Wages and Employment. 1959— Sept.
1032.
Case, Harry L. Personnel Policy in a Public Agency—
The TWA Experience. 1955—Dec. 1496-1497.
Casselman, Paul Hubert. Economics of Employment and
Unemployment. 1956—Apr. 464-465.
Cauley, Troy J. Agriculture in an Industrial Econom y:
The Agrarian Crisis. 1956—Nov. 1325.
Chalmers, W. Ellison, Ross Stagner, Milton Derber. The
Local Union-Management Relationship. 1960— Sept.
983-984.
Chamber o f Commerce of the United States. Economic
Policies for National Defense. 1951— July 78.
Chamberlain, Neil W. Collective Bargaining. 1951—
Oct. 475-476.
------ Labor. 1958— Sept. 1031-1032.
------ Social Responsibility and Strikes.
1954— July
795-796.
■-----Sourcebook on Labor. 1959— June 680.
------ , Frank C. Pierson, Theresa Wolfson, eds. A Decade
of Industrial Relations Research, 1946-56. 1958—July
786.
Chamberlain, Neil W. and Jane Metzger Schilling. The
Impact of Strikes— Their Social and Economic Costs.
1954—July 795-796.
Chamberlin, Edward Hastings. Towards a More Gen­
eral Theory of Value. 1958— Sept. 1032-1033.
------ , Philip D. Bradley, Gerard D. Reilly, Roscoe Pound.
Labor Unions and Public Policy. 1958— Oct. 1163.
Ching, Cyrus S. Review and Reflection—A Half-Century
of Labor Relations. 1954— Mar. 310.



Christie, Robert A. Empire in Wood—A History of the
Carpenters’ Union. 1956— Oct. 1205.
Clapp, Gordon R. The T V A : An Approach to the Devel­
opment of a Region. 1955—Apr. 466.
Clark, F. Le Gros and Agnes C. Dunne. Ageing in In­
dustry: An Inquiry, Based on Figures Derived from
Census Reports, Into the Problem of Ageing Under
the Conditions of Modern Industry. 1957— Mar.
371-372.
Clark, Harold F. and Harold S. Sloan. Classrooms in
the Factories: An Account of Educational Activities
Conducted by American Industry. 1958—July 788-789.
Clark, John Maurice. Economic Institutions and Human
Welfare. 1957— Nov. 1388.
Clegg, H. A. General Union: A Study of the National
Union of General and Municipal Workers. 1955—May
583.
------ and Allan Flanders, eds. The System of Industrial
Relations in Great Britain, Its History, Law, and In­
stitutions. 1955—May 583.
Cochran, Bert, ed. American Labor in Midpassage.
1959—Nov. 1263-1264.
Cochran, Howe P. Scientific Employee Benefit Planning:
Pensions, Profit Sharing, and Stock Bonuses. 1955—
June 692-693.
Cohen, R. Keif-. Nationalization in B ritain: The End of a
Dogma. 1959—May 589-590.
Cole, Arthur H. Business Enterprise in Its Social Set­
ting. 1960—Feb. 188-189.
Colean, Miles L. and Robinson Newcomb. Stabilizing
Construction: The Record and Potential. 1953—Apr.
424.
Coleman, James S., Seymour Martin Lipset, Martin A.
Trow. Union Dem ocracy: The Internal Politics of the
International Typographical Union. 1957—May 619620.
Coleman, John R. and Frederick Harbison. Goals and
Strategy of Collective Bargaining. 1951—Dec. 718-719.
Commerce Clearing House, Inc. 1960 Guidebook to Labor
Relations. 1960—June 639.
Commission on Human Resources and Advanced Train­
ing, Report of. America’s Resources of Specialized
Talent. Prepared by Dael Wolfe. 1955— Jan. 105.
Committee for Economic Development, Research and
Policy Committee. The European Common Market and
Its Meaning to the United States. 1960—Mar. 306-307.
Copeland, Melvin T. And Mark an Era: The Story o f
the Harvard Business School. 1959—Apr. 432.
Cordiner, Ralph J. New Frontiers for Professional
Managers. 1957— Oct. 1258.
Corson, John J. and John W. McConnell. Economic Needs
of Older People. 1956— May 589-590.
Couper, Walter J. and Roger Vaughan. Pension Plan­
ning—Experience and Trends. 1955—June 692-693.
Craig, Harold Farlow. Administering a Conversion to
Electronic Accounting—A Case Study o f a Large Of­
fice. 1956—Apr. 464.
Crane, Bertram R. and Roger M. Hoffman. Successful
Handling of Labor Grievances. 1956— May 587-588.
Creamer, Daniel. Personal Income During Business
Cycles. 1956— June 702-703.
------ and Martin Bernstein. Capital and Output Trends
in Manufacturing Industries, 1880-1948. 1954—Nov.
1259-1260.
Crook, G. Hamilton and Martin Heinstein. The Older
Worker in Industry: A Study of the Attitudes of Indus­
trial Workers Toward Aging and Retirement. 1959—
Mar. 307-308.
Cunningham, W. B. Compulsory Conciliation and Col­
lective Bargaining: The New Brunswick Experience.
1959— Aug. 919-920.
Darling, Sir Malcolm. All-India Rural Credit Survey.
1955— Oct. 1178.

33
Darley, John G. and Theda Hegenah. Vocational Inter­
est Measurement— Theory and Practice. 1956—July
838-839.
Davey, Harold W. Contemporary Collective Bargaining.
1951— Oct. 475-476.
------ Contemporary Collective Bargaining, 2d ed. 1960—
Apr. 407-408.
■-----, Howard S. Kaltenborn, Stanley H. Ruttenberg, eds.
New Dimensions in Collective Bargaining. 1959— Oct.
1146-1147.
David, Paul T. and Ross Pollock. Executives for Govern­
ment : Central Issues of Federal Personnel Administra­
tion. 1958—Feb. 198-199.
Davis, Hiram S. Productivity Accounting. 1955—Apr.
464.
Davis, Keith. Human Relations in Business. 1957— Oct.
1257.
Deham, Albert Mueller-. Human Relations and Power:
Socio-Political Analysis and Synthesis. 1958—Aug. 909.
Derber, Milton and Edwin Young, eds. Labor and the
New Deal. 1958— Apr. 428.
Derber, Milton, W, Ellison Chalmers, Ross Stagner. The
Local Union-Management Relationship. 1960— Sept.
983-984.
DeReamer, Russell. Modern Safety Practices. 1959—
Mar. 305.
Dewhurst, J. Frederic and associates. America’s Needs
and Resources—A New Survey. 1955— Sept. 1038-1039.
Dewitt, Nicholas. Soviet Professional Manpower, Its Ed­
ucation, Training, and Supply. 1956—June 700-701.
Diebold, John. Automation: Its Impact on Business and
Labor. 1960—Mar. 305-306.
Donahue, Wilma, ed. Housing the Aging. 1955—Mar.
341-342.
Dorfman, Robert and Peter O. Steiner. The Economic
Status of the Aged. 1957— July 862.
Dowd, Douglas F. Thorstein Veblen: A Critical Ap­
praisal. 1959—Aug. 920-921.
Drucker, Peter F. America’s Next Twenty Years. 1957—
July 862-863.
------ Landmarks of Tomorrow. 1959—Dec. 1385-1386.
Dubin, Robert. Working Union-Management Relations:
The Sociology of Industrial Relations. 1959—Aug. 921.
------ The World of Work : Industrial Society and Human
Relations. 1959—Jan. 69-70.
------ , Arthur M. Ross, Arthur Kornhauser. Industrial
Conflict. 1955—Mar. 340.
Duesenberry, James S. Business Cycles and Economic
Growth. 1958—Dec. 1413.
Duncan, Otis Dudley and Philip M. Hauser, eds. The
Study of Population—An Inventory and Appraisal.
1960— Feb. 190-191.
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34
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35
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36
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------A Policy for Skilled Manpower. 1955—June 691-692.
------ Proceedings of a Conference on the Utilization of
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------ Womanpower. 1957—Aug. 992-993.
------ Work in the Lives of Married W om en: Proceedings
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38
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39
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40
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------ No Major Depression in Our Lifetime. 1959— Mar.
305-306.

COURT DECISIONS
Fair Labor Standards Act

Court trial proceedings. McCrary C o.; Durkin v. (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1953— Oct. 1093.
Coverage:
Agriculture. Chapman Fruit Co. v. Durkin (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1954— Sept. 1007.
------ Maneja v. Waialua Agricultural Co. (U.S. Sup.
C t ). 1955—Aug. 925-926.
Airline catering employees. Sherry Corine Corp.;
Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1959— July 788.
Area of production. Budd dba J. T. Budd, Jr., and
Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S. Sup. C t ). 1956— June 691.
------ Lovvorn v. Miller (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954—
Nov. 1244.
------ Traders Compress Co.; Tobin v. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1952—Nov. 545.
Cafeteria employees. Hawkins v. E. I. du Pont de
Nemours & Co. (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1952— Jan. 62.
------ Tipton v. Bearl Sprott Co. (U.S. Dist. C t).
1951—Jan. 60.
Chain store auditors. Kroger Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S.
Ct. of A pp.). 1958—Jan. 65.
Construction and material supply. Alstate Construc­
tion Co.; Tobin v .; Alstate Construction Co. v.
Durkin (U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1952—
June 690-691; 1953—May 523.



Coverage—Continued
Construction and material supply. Chambers Con­
struction Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Oct. 1130-1131.
------ C. W. Vollmer & Co.; Mitchell v .; (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 1955—Aug. 926.
------ Deal & Co. v. Head (Ark. Sup. C t ). 1953—Jan.
58.
------ Empire Gas Engineering Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1958— Sept. 1019-1020.
------ Finnan v. Elmhurst Contracting Co. (N.Y. Sup.
C t). 1951— Feb. 198.
------ Hardiman v. Arthur A. Johnson Corp. (N.Y.
C ityC t.). 1951—July 68.
------ H. B. Zachry Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S. Sup. C t).
1960— June 627-628.
------ Johnson; Tobin v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1952—
Sept. 304.
------ Pennington-Winter C o.; Tobin v. (U.S. Dist. C t.;
U.S. Ct. of App.). 1952— Feb. 188; Sept. 304.
------ Preskitt dba Preskitt Construction C o.; Mitchell
v. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1960— Nov. 1202-1203.
------Ramey dba Hughes Construction C o.; Tobin v.
(U.S. Ct. of A pp.). 1953— Sept. 974.
------ Thomas v. Hempt Bros. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1953—
May 523.
Cooperatives. El Paso Valley Cotton Association;
Mitchell v. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1960— Jan. 50-60.

41
Coverage— Continued
Finance. Aetna Finance Co.; Mitchell v .; Aetna
Finance Co. v. Mitchell (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956—Nov. 1317 ; 1958—Jan. 65.
------ Household Finance Corp.; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 195k—Feb. 182.
------ Kentucky Finance Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 1959—June 672.
Foreign employment. Byrne v. Metcalfe Construc­
tion Co. (U.S. Disk Ct.). 1951—Nov. 588.
Forestry or lumbering. Anthony Williams Manu­
facturing Co.; Tobin v. (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1951—June 703; 1952—Aug. 195-196.
------ Promersberger; Tobin v. (U.S. Disk Ct.).
1952—June 690.
------ Raines; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957—
Jan. 76-77.
Government contractor. Durnil v. Dunn Construc­
tion Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951—Mar. 317.
------ General Electric Co. v. Porter (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
195k~ Feb. 182.
------ Patton v. Roane-Anderson Co. (U.S. Ct. of A pp.).
1952— Feb. 188.
Homeworker-members o f cooperative.
Whitaker
House Cooperative; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1960—May 510.
Homeworkers. Harwood v. Tobin (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1952— June 690.
Limousine drivers. Airlines Transportation; Tobin
v .; Airlines Transportation v. Tobin (U.S. Dist.
Ct.; U.S. Ct. of App.). 1952—Mar. 310; Oct. 429.
------ Mateo v. Auto Rental Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1957—Apr. 487.
Mining company bunk house employees. Anderson;
Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1955—Nov. 12791280.
Mining company hospital employees. Juarez v.
Kennecott Copper Cbrp. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1955—
Nov. 1280.
Motor carrier. Mason and Dixon Lines; Tobin v.
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1952— Mar. 310-311.
Nonprofessional engineering employees. Lublin, McGaughy & Associates; Mitchell v. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1959—Mar. 295.
Office building maintenance. Girard Properties;
Durkin v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953— Oct. 1093.
------ Union National B ank; Tobin v . ; Union National
Bank v. Durkin (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— -July 758; 195k—Jan. 58.
Printing. Casa Baldrick; Durkin v . ; Casa Baldrick v. Mitchell (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953—June 630; 195k— Sept. 1006-1007.
Public utility. Hayes; Tobin v. (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1952—Dec. 649.
------ Mercer Water Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. o f
App.). 195k—Mar. 298.
Puerto Rico public roads. Compania De Ingenieros Y
Contratistas; Mitchell v. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1959—
Dec. 1375.
------ Quilichini; Mitchell v. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1959—
Dec. 1375.
Religious corporation. Pilgrim Holiness Church
Corp.; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 195k—May
558.
Retail establishment. Arnold v. Ben Kanowsky
( U.S. Sup, Ct.). 1960—Apr. 396.
------ Bekins Van & Storage Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1957—May 607.
-------Celery City Printing Co.; Tobin v. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1952—Aug. 195.
Safety engineers. U.S. Cartridge Co. v. Powell
(U.S. Ct. of A pp.). 1951— Jan. 61.
Seafood industry. Blue Channel Corp.; Tobin v.
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1952—Oct. 429.



Coverage—Continued
Seafood industry. Donnely v. Mavar Shrimp and
Oyster Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951— Sept. 311.
Seamen. River Terminals C o.; Durkin v. ( U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1953— July 758.
Seasonal industry. Libby, McNeil & Libby v. Mitch­
ell (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1958— Sept. 1019.
Ship repair. Bodden v. McCormick Shipping Corp.
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951— July 58.
Telephone switchboard operators. Lambert; Tobin v.
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1952—Nov. 545; 1953— Feb. 176.
Truck drivers. Clougherty v. James Yernor Co.
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951— May 566.
------ Warren; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 195k—
Aug. 897.
Truck helpers. Stewart-Jordan Distributing Co. v.
Tobin (U.S. Ct. of App.). 195k—Apr. 432.
Truckers. Anthony Williams Manufacturing C o.;
Tobin v. (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951—
June 703; 1952—Aug. 195-196.
Vending machine services. Bogash v. Baltimore
Cigarette Service (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951— Nov.
585.
Warehouse employees. A. Mayol & Co., Sucsrs. de v.
Mitchell (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1960— Nov. 12031204.
------ Pidcock; Mitchell v. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1960—
Nov. 1204.
Watchmen. Billeaudeau v. Temple Associates (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 195k— Sept. 1006.
------ Famous Realty; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
195k—May 558.
------ Joyce Agency; Durkin v . ; Mitchell v. Joyce
Agency (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1953—
July 630; 195k—June 662.
-------Russell Co. v. McComb (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1951—May 560-567.
------ Van Klareren v. Killian-House Co. (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 195k—May 558.
Enforcement:
Back pay. Harrell v. S. D. Bell Dental Manufac­
turing Co. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1953—Apr. 412.
------ Pielet; Tobin v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951—
Apr. 445.
Coverage determination in subpena action. Banks &
Rumbaugh; Tobin v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Mar. 284.
Criminal course of conduct only one offense. Uni­
versal C. I. T. Credit Corp.; United States v. (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1953—Mar. 284.
Discharge after investigation. Equitable Beneficial
Life, Health, and Accident Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S.
Dist. Ct.). 1958—May 533-534.
False Information Act. Moore; United States v.
(U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1951—Jan. 61.
Informer’s privilege. Rom a; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1959—July 788.
Injunction restraining violations. Neely; Tobin v.
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951— Oct. 465.
------ Williams Feed and Transfer C o.; Tobin v. (U.S.
Dist. Ct.). 1952—Aug. 195.
Injunction violation. Pielet; Tobin v. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1951—Apr. 445.
------ Wheeland, In re (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1953—Jan.
58.
Investigations. Interstate Reclamation Bureau v.
Rogers (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1952— May 564-565.
------ Rogers v. Skinner (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Apr. 412.
Subpena enforcible. Fisher dba Fisher Pen Co.;
Durkin v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953— Sept. 974.
Wage reimbursement for unlawful discharge. Robert
DeMario Jewelry; Mitchell v. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1960—Mar. 295.

42
Overtime provisions:
Canning. Stinson; Mitchell v. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955—"Feb. 212.
Cleanup period. Steiner; Tobin v. ; Steiner v. Mitch­
ell (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct. of A pp.; U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1953—May 523; 195k— Oct. 1130; 1956—Apr. 451.
Firemen’s sleeping time. General Electric Co. v.
Porter (U.S. Ct. of App.). 195k— Feb. 182.
Good faith defense. Hardiman v. Arthur A. Johnson
Corp. (N.Y. City Ct.). 1951— July 68.
------ Northwest Airlines v. Jackson (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1951— Jan. 60-61.
Guaranteed wage contract. Beechwood Lumber C o.;
Tobin v. (U.S. Dist. C t ). 1952—Jan. 62-63.
------ Brandtjen & Kluge; Mitchell v. (U.S. Sup. Ct.,
certiorari denied). 1957— Feb. 203.
------ Feinberg; Mitchell v. (U.S. Sup. Ct., certiorari
denied). 1957— Feb. 203.
------ Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance
Co.; Mitchell v. (U.S. Sup. Ct., certiorari denied).
1957— Feb. 203.
------ Morristown Poultry Co.; Tobin v. (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1952—Apr. 429.
------ Shure v. Rubenstein Bros. Jewelry Co. (U.S.
Dist. Ct.). 1952— Sept. 304.
------ Wenatchee Air Service; Tobin t?. (U.S. Dist. C t L
1952— Sept. 304.
Knife sharpening. King Packing C o.; Mitchell v.
( U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1956— Apr. 451.
Lunch period. Culkin v. Martin Nebraska Co. (U.S.
Dist. C t ). 1951— Aug. 185-186.
------ Stock & Sons v. Thompson (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1952—Apr. 429-430.
------ U.S. Cartridge Co. v. Powell (U.S. C t o f App.).
1951— Jan. 61.
Overtime forbidden. Handler v. Thrasher (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1951— Oct. 465.
Traveltime. Gramiak v. Pittston Stevedoring Corp.
( U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1956— Oct. 1193.
National Labor Relations Act

Arbitration:
Steelworkers v. American Manufacturing Co. (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). I960—Aug. 853.
Steelworkers v. Enterprise Wheel and Car Corp.
(U.S. Sup. C t.). 1960—Aug. 853-854.
Steelworkers v. Warrior and Gulf Navigation Co.
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1960—Aug. 854-856.
Back pay aw ards:
NLRB v. Cashman Auto Co. (U.S. C t of App.).
1955— Sept. 1027.
NLRB v. Denna Artware (U.S. Sup. C t ). 1960—
Apr. 393-394.
NLRB v. Moss Planing Mill Co. (U.S. C t o f App.).
1953— Oct. 1095.
NLRB v. Moss Planing Mill Co. (U.S. C t of App.).
1955— Oct. 1161-1162.
NLRB v. Pugh & Barr (U.S. Ct. of A pp.). 195k—Jan.
58.
NLRB v. Royal Palm Ice Co. (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1953—Apr. 414.
NLRB v. Seven-Up Bottling Co. of Miami (U.S. Sup.
C t ). 1953—Mar. 284.
Textile Workers Union of America v. Bates Manu­
facturing Co. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1958— Apr. 415-416.
Bargaining obligations:
Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 195k—Aug. 898.
Brooks v. NLRB (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1955— Feb. 212213.
Fry Roofing Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1955—
Jan. 90-91.



Bargaining obligations—Continued
Howell Chevrolet Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Sup. C t ).
195k— Feb. 184.
J. I. Case Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1958—
May 530.
Lewis v. Cable (U.S. Dist. C t ) . 1952— Nov. 546-547.
Lion Oil Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1957—
Aug. 979.
Mine Workers v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1958—
Aug. 894-895.
Modine Manufacturing Co. v. Machinists (U.S. C t
of App.). 1955—Jan. 90.
NLRB v. American Insurance Co. (U.S. Sup. C t).
1952— July 63.
NLRB v. Bemis Bros. Bag Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Oct. 1094.
NLRB v. Boston Herald-Traveler Corp. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 195k—Apr. 434-435.
NLRB v. Bradley Washfountain Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1952— Jan. 63.
NLRB v. Braswell Motor Freight Lines (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 195k—Apr. 435-436.
NLRB v. Darlington Veneer Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1956— Oct. 1191-1192.
NLRB v. Globe Automatic Sprinkler Co. (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1952— Dec. 649.
NLRB v. Insurance Agents (U.S. Sup. C t ). 1960—
Apr. 392.
NLRB v. Ladies’ Garment Workers (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1960— May 508.
NLRB v. Lehigh Portland Cement Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1953— Oct. 1094.
NLRB v. National Shirt Shops of Florida (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 195k—July 782-783.
NLRB v. Otis Elevator Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
195k—Jan. 59.
NLRB v. Pacific Moulded Products Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1953—Dec. 1319.
NLRB v. Pecheur Lozenge Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
195k—Mar. 299-300.
NLRB v. Putnam Mills (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1952—
Aug. 197.
NLRB v. Reeder Motor Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953—June 631.
NLRB v. Truitt Manufacturing Co. (U.S. Ct. o f A pp.;
U.S. Sup. C t ).
1955— Oct. 1158; 1956—July
824-825.
NLRB v. Vulcan Forging Co. (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1951— June 704.
NLRB v . Vulcan Furniture Manufacturing Corp.
( U.S. Ct. of App.). 195k— Sept. 1008.
NLRB v. Whitin Machine Works (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955— Feb. 214.
NLRB v. Wooster Division, Borg-Warner Corp. (U.S.
C t o f A pp.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1956— Nov. 1313-1314;
1958— July 771.
Poole Foundry & Machine Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1952— Feb. 188.
Richfield Oil Corp. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1956— Apr. 448-449.
Texas Foundries v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 195k—
June 663.
United States Steel Corp. v. Nichols (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956—Apr. 448.
Wheatland Electric Cooperative v. NLRB (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 195k—Mar. 299.
Bargaining unit:
NLRB v. Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. and United Glass
and Ceramic Workers (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1959—
Nov. 1248-1249.
Westinghouse Electric Corp. (Elevator Division) v.
NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1956—Dec. 1445.

Breach of contract:
Association of Employees v. Westinghouse Corp.
( U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1952—Dec. 651.
Independent Petroleum Workers of New Jersey v.
Esso Standard Oil Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1956—
Sept. 1064.
Lewis v. Benedict Coal Corp.; Mine Workers v. Same
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1960—Apr. 392-393.
Retail Clerks, Locals 128 and 633 v. Lion Dry Goods
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1960— Feb. 176.
Street, Electric Railway Employes v. Greyhound
Corp. ( U.S. Ct. of App.). 1956—July 825.
Teamsters, Local 25 v. W. L. Mead (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1956—June 688.
Compliance regulations:
Financial reports. Plumbers and Pipefitters, Local
562 v. Leedom (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1557— Mar. 484.
Non-Communist affidavits. Electrical Workers (Ind.)
v. Herzog (U.S. Dist Ct.). 1953—Apr. 412.
------ Farmer v. Electrical Workers (Ind.) ; Same v.
Communications Association; Same v. Fur and
Leather Workers (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 195k—Feb. 184.
------ Fur and Leather Workers v. Farm er; Farmer v.
Fur and Leather Workers (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1954— Jan. 60; 1955—Apr. 453-454.
------ Goodman Manufacturing Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1956— Feb. 198.
------ Mine Workers v. Arkansas Oak Flooring Co.
( U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1956—July 824.
------ Mine Workers, District 50 v. N L R B ; NLRB v.
District 50, Mine Workers (U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1956—Dec. 1445; 1958— Apr. 414.
------ Nina Dye Works v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1952— Oct. 430.
------ NLRB v. Bowman Transportation (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956—Dec. 1445.
------ NLRB v. Coca-Cola Bottling Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1956— May 572.
------ NLRB v. Dant & Russell (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1952— June 691.
------ NLRB v. Lannom Manufacturing C o.; Meat
Cutters v. NLRB and Lannom Manufacturing Co.
(U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1955—Dec.
1481-1482; 1957— Feb. 200.
------ NLRB v. Louisville Container Corp. (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1954—Apr. 435.
------ NLRB v. Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1957— Feb. 200.
------ NLRB v. Vulcan Furniture Manufacturing Corp.
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954— Sept. 1008.
------ Retail Clerks, Local 128 v. Leedom (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1958—June 643.
------ United States v. Pezzati (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1958—
June 644.
------ United States v. Valenti (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1552— Dec. 650.
Concerted activity:
Boeing Airplane Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1954— Dec. 1355-1356.
Caterpillar Tractor Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1956—May 574.
Cavetti v. District Lodge 34, Lodge 805, Machinists
(Ohio Ct. of App.). 1956—Dec. 1448-1449.
Electrical Workers (IB E W ) v. NLRB: NLRB v.
Local 1229, Electrical Workers (IB E W ) (U.S. Ct.
of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1953—Feb. 176-177;
1954— Feb. 182.
Haggerty v. County of Kings (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Aug. 869.
Harnischfeger Corp. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Jan. 58.
Kansas Milling Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1951—Jan. 62-63.
Ladies’ Garment Workers v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of A pp.).
1956—July 826-827.



43
Concerted activity—Continued
Lion Oil Co. v. N L R B ; NLRB v. Lion Oil Co. (U.S.
Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1955—July 807;
1957— Mar. 354.
Morand Bros. Beverage Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1951— Sept. 314.
Morrison dba Kentucky Metal Products Co. v. Bridge
Workers (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1953— Nov. 1210.
Motor Coach Employees v. Wisconsin Board (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1951— May 567-568.
NLRB v. Avondale Mills (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1958—
Aug. 893-894.
NLRB v. Babcock & Wilcox Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955—July 808.
NLRB v. Buzza-Cardoza (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Sept. 975.
NLRB v. Cowles Publishing Co. (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1954— Sept. 1008-1009.
NLRB v. Ford Radio & Mica Corp. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1958— Nov. 1278.
NLRB v. Furriers Joint Council of New York (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1955— Sept. 1026-1027.
NLRB v. Longview Furniture Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Oct. 1094.
NLRB v. Mastro Plastics Corp.; Mastro Plastics
Corp. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1954— Sept. 1007-1008; 1956— May 573-574.
NLRB v. Monarch Machine Tool Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1954—Apr. 435.
NLRB v. Office Towel Supply Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Mar. 284-285.
NLRB v. Southern Silk Mills (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Mar. 300.
NLRB v. Wagner Iron Works (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955— May 570.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers, Local 86 v. Mis­
souri (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1960—Mar. 294-295.
Parodi Cigar Co. v. Gaeta (N.Y. Sup. Ct.). 1956—
Dec. 1448.
Teamsters, Local 695 v. Vogt (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957—
Aug. 977-978.
Coverage:
Benz v. Compania Naviera Hidalgo, S.A. (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 1957—June 718.
Friendly Society of Engravers and Sketchmakers v .
Calico Engraving Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957—
Feb. 201.
Gremio de Prensa de Puerto Rico v. Voice of Puerto
Rico (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1954—July 783.
NLRB v. Carpet Layers (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954—
Aug. 899.
Office Employees, Local 11 v. NLRB (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1957—July 849.
Definitions:
Indiana Metal Products Corp. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1953—June 630.
NLRB v. Cabat Carbon Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959—
Aug. 905-906.
Schultz v. NLRB and Gray, Intervenor; NLRB v.
Grand Union Co. and Gray, Intervenor (U.S. Ct.
of App). 1960— Dec. 1313-1314.
Discrimination:
Communications Workers v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1954—Dec. 1355.
Corcoran v. John F. Trommer (N.Y. Sup. C t ).
1952—Aug. 196.
Electrical Workers (Ind.), Local 1113 v. NLRB (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1955— Aug. 923.
Gaynor News Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Sup. C t). 1954—
Apr. 432-433.
Intermountain Equipment Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1957— Mar. 355.
Lion Oil Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957—
Aug. 979.
NLRB v. Adkins Transfer Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955—Dec. 1481.

44
Discrimination— Continued
NLRB v. Automobile Workers (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1952— Apr. 431-432.
NLRB v. Chautauqua Hardware Corp. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1954—Mar. 298.
NLRB v. Eclipse Lumber Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Jan. 59-60.
NLRB v. Huber & Huber Motor Express (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1955—Aug. 922-923.
NLRB v. Jamestown Veneer and Plywood Corp. (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1952—Apr. 431.
NLRB v. Local 1423, Carpenters (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1.957—Mar. 355.
NLRB v. Mountain Pacific Chapter of Associated
General Contractors (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1959—
Nov. 1249-1250.
NLRB v. Painters (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957—June
719.
NLRB v. Pecheur Lozenge Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Mar. 299-300.
NLRB v. Southeastern Pipe Line Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1954—May 559.
NLRB v. Teamsters (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954—Apr.
433-434.
NLRB v. Textile Machine Works (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Oct. 1131.
NLRB v. Wagner Iron Works (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955— May 570.
Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956—July 825-826.
Otten v. Baltimore & Ohio R.R. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Sept. 974-975.
Union Starch & Refining Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1951—Apr. 445-446.
Water Users’ Association v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953—Nov. 1209-1210.
Winter Garden Citrus Products Cooperative v. NLRB
(U.S. Ct. of App). 1957—Jan. 74.
Employer domination:
NLRB v. American Dredging Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1960—Mar. 292.
NLRB v. Polynesian Arts (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954—
Mar. 300.
NLRB v. Wemyss (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954—July
782.
Radio Officers’ Union of Commercial Telegraphers
Union v. N L R B ; NLRB v. Teamsters; Gaynor
News Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1954— Apr.
432-433.
Interference:
American Shuffleboard Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1951— Oct. 467.
Bonwit Teller v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1952—
Aug. 197.
Longshoremen and Warehousemen v. Juneau Corp.
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1952— Mar. 312.
Marshall Field & Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953—Jan. 59.
NLRB v. Clearwater Finishing Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— July 758.
NLRB v. England Bros. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Apr. 414.
NLRB v. Falls City Creamery Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Jan. 59.
NLRB v. F. W. Woolworth Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954—Aug. 899-900.
NLRB v. General Shoe Corp. (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1954— Jan. 59-60.
NLRB v. Hekman Furniture Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Dec. 1319.
NLRB v. Monsanto Chemical Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955— Oct. 1159-1160.
NLRB v. Protein Blenders (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Nov. 1244-1245.



Interference— Continued
NLRB v. Robert Bros. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1955—
Sept. 1026.
NLRB v. Rubber Workers (U.S. Ct. of A pp.). 1959—
Sept. 1020-1021.
NLRB v. Seamprufe (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1955—July
808
NLRB v. Stewart Oil Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Nov. 1211.
NLRB v. Syracuse Stamping Co. (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1954—Jan. 59.
NLRB v. W. T. Grant Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1 9 5 4 Mar. 298-299.
Steelworkers v. NLRB and Nutone; NLRB v. Steel­
workers and Nutone (U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 1957—Feb. 201; 1958—Aug. 893-894.
Wayside Press v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Nov. 1210-1211.
Job rights. Haefele v. Davis, et al., Officers of Local 1780,
Steelworkers (Pa. Sup. Ct.). 1953—May 524.
Jurisdiction, Federal-State courts:
Aetna Freight Lines v. Clayton (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1956—Mar. 321-322.
Almeida Bus Lines v. Curran (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1954— Apr. 434.
Automobile Workers v. Wisconsin Employment Rela­
tions Board and Kohler Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1956—Aug. 941-942.
Automobile Workers, Local 248 v. Wisconsin Employ­
ment Relations Board (Wis. Sup. Ct.). 1960—
Dec. 1316-1317.
Benton v. Painters, Local 333 (Calif. Sup. Ct.).
1956—Mar. 321.
Cain, Brogden & Cain v. Local 47, Teamsters (Tex.
Sup. Ct.). 1956—Apr. 449.
Cavetti v. District Lodge 34, Lodge 805, Machinists
(Ohio Ct. of App.). 1956—Dec. 1448-1449.
Clothing Workers v. Richmond Bros. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1955— June 679.
Construction Workers v. Laburnum (Va. Sup. Ct. of
App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1953— Oct. 1094; 1954—Aug.
897.
DeVeau v. Braisted (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1960—Aug.
856-857.
Dougherty v. Commonwealth of Virginia (Va. Sup.
Ct. of App.). 1958— Feb. 183-184.
Garmon v. Building Trades Council; San Diego Build­
ing Trades Council v. Garmon; Garmon v. San
Diego Building Trades Council; San Diego Build­
ing Trades Council v. Garmon (Calif. Sup. C t.;
U.S. Sup. C t.; Calif. Sup. C t.; U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1956— Mar. 320; 1957—May 603; 1958—Apr. 416;
1959— June 669-670.
General Electric Co. v. Local 205, Electrical Workers
(Ind.) (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957—Aug. 976.
Goodall-Sanford v. United Textile Workers of
America (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957— Aug. 976-977.
Grunwald-Marx v. Los Angeles Joint Board, Clothing
Workers (Calif. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Oct. 1133-1134.
Guss v. Utah Labor Relations Board and Steel­
workers; Guss, dba Photo Sound Products Manu­
facturing Co. v. Utah Labor Relations Board (Utah
Sup. Ct.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1956—Aug. 943-944;
1957— May 603.
Hodges Bedding Co. v. Pennsylvania Labor Relations
Board and Upholsterers (Pa. Sup. Ct.). 1957—
July 852.
Hotel Employees, Local 255 v. Leedom; Hotel Em­
ployees, Local 255 v. Sax Enterprises and Same v.
Levy dba Sherry Frontenac Hotel Stuyvesant Corp.
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Jan. 55; 1959—Mar. 292.
Machinists and Truax v. Gonzales (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1958— July 772-773.
McKenzie v. Machinists (Calif. Super. Ct.). 1957—
July 851.

45
Jurisdiction, Federal-State courts— Continued
Meat Cutters, Local 427 v. Fair lawn Meats (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1951—May 603.
Missouri, ex rel. Allai v. Thatch (Mo. Sup. Ct.).
1951— Jan. 64.
Montgomery Building & Construction Trades Council
v. Ledbetter Erection Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1953—
Feb. 176.
NLRB v. N.Y. State Labor Relations Board (U.S.
Dist. Ct.). 1952— Sept. 305.
Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board v. Friedberg
(Pa. Sup. Ct.). 1959—June 670-671.
Plumbers, Local 298 v. County of Door (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 1959—July 786-787.
Pucket Buick Co. v. Teamsters (111. Cir. Ct.).
1951—July 851-852.
Ross v. Ebert, Bricklayers Protective Union No. 8
(Wis. Sup. Ct.). 1951—July 850.
Russell v. Automobile W orkers; Automobile Workers
and Volk v. Russell (Ala. Sup. C t.; U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1953— June 630-631; 1958—July 772.
Sanders v. Birthright (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1959— Oct.
1133.
School District of Holland v. Grand Rapids Building
and Construction Trades Council; Johnson v.
Grand Rapids Building and Construction Trades
Council (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1956—Mar. 321; 1957—
Dec. 1493-1494.
Selles v. Local 174, Teamsters (Wash. Sup. Ct.).
1957—Nov. 1372-1373.
Steelworkers v. Fugua (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951— Sept.
1100.
Teamsters, Local 24 v. Oliver and A.C.E. Transporta­
tion Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Mar. 292-293.
Teamsters, Local 695 v. Vogt (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1951—
Aug. 977-978.
Textile Workers Union o f America v. Lincoln Mills
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957—Aug. 976.
Thayer Co. v. Binnall; NLRB v. Thayer Co. (Mass.
Sup. Jud. Ct.; U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951—Feb. 201;
1954— Aug. 898-899.
Utah Valley Hospital v. Industrial Commission (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1952— Dec. 650.
Weber v. Anheuser-Busch (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1955—
June 679-680.
Willard v. Huffman (N.C. Sup. Ct.). 1959—Sept.
1021- 1022.

Wisconsin Employment Relations Board v. Communi­
cations Workers (Wis. Cir. Ct.). 1952—Nov. 547.
Youngdahl and Clothing workers v. Rainfair (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1958— Feb. 183.
Jurdisdictional disputes:
Doll and Toy Workers v. Metal Polishers (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1960—May 509-510.
NLRB v. Local 1212, Electrical Workers (IB E W )
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1960— Feb. 175-176.
NLRB v. Plumbers and Pipefitters, Locals 420 and
428 (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957— June 720.
NLRB authority:
Electrical Workers (Ind.) v. Worthington Corp. (U.S.
Dist. Ct.). 1956—Apr. 449.
Freuhauf Trailer Co. v. Getren (Ga. Dist. Ct.). 1953—
June 631.
Machinists, Lodge 12, District 37 v. Cameron Iron
Works (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1958— Sept. 1018-1019.
Meade Electric Co. v. Hagberg (Ind. Ct. of App.).
1959— Sept. 1022-1023.
NLRB v. Dinion Coil Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Mar. 285.
NLRB v. Fant Milling Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959—
Aug. 906.
NLRB v. Kyne of Buffalo Section, Westinghouse
Engineers Association, Engineers and Scientists
( U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Feb. 173-174.
Williams v. Yellow Cab Co. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1952—
May 565-566.



NLRB jurisdictional standards: NLRB v. Stanislaus Im­
plement Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1955—Dec. 1479.
Order enforcement:
Boston Pressmen v. Potter Press (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1957— May 606.
Clothing Workers v. A. L. Kornman C o.; A. L. Kornman Co. v. Clothing Workers (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1958— Mar. 292; 1959— May 579-580.
Food Handlers, Local 425, Meat Cutters v. Pluss
Poultry (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1958— May 530-531.
NLRB v. Lannom Manufacturing Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1955— Dec. 1481-1482.
NLRB v. National Gas Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Oct. 1131-1132.
NLRB v. Stocker Manufacturing Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1951— Feb. 199-200.
NLRB v. Warren Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1956—Feb.
197-198.
Rawleigh Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1 9 5 1 Sept. 313.
Textile Workers Union of America v. Cone Mills
Corp. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1959— Jan. 57.
Picketing :
American Snuff Co. v. Steelworkers (Tenn. Ct. of
App.). 1951— Feb. 446-447.
Audubon Homes v. Spokane Building & Construc­
tion Trades Council (Wash. Sup. Ct.). 1956—
Nov. 1315.
Boyd v. Dodge (Ark. Sup. Ct.). 1951—Mar. 319.
Douds v. Local 50, Bakery and Confectionery Work­
ers ; NLRB v. Local 50, Bakery and Confectionery
Workers (U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955— Sept. 1027; 1957—Aug. 978.
Edwards v. Commonwealth of Virginia (Va. Sup. Ct.
of App.). 1951— Feb. 201.
Garner v. Teamsters (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 195It— Feb.
183.
General Iron Corp. v. Livingston (N.Y. Sup. Ct.).
1957—Dec. 1493.
Getreu v. Local 58, Hotel and Restaurant Employees
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1960—Mar. 293-294.
LeBus v. Locals 406, 406A, 406B, and 406C, Operating
Engineers (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1956—Dec. 1447-1448.
McLeod v. Local 89, Hotel and Restaurant Employees
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1960—Oct. 1084-1085.
NLRB v. Capital Service; Capital Service v. N L R B ;
Capital Service v. NLRB (Calif. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct.
of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1952—Aug. 197; 1953—
Apr. 413 ; 1954—July 781.
NLRB v. Local 182, Teamsters (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1960—Feb. 174.
NLRB v. Local 639, Teamsters (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1960— May 507-508.
Phillips v. Ladies’ Garment Workers (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1960—Mar. 293.
Pleasant Valley Packing Co. v. Talarico of Meat Cut­
ters, Local 1 (N.Y. Ct. of App.). 1958— Oct. 1150.
Quaker City Motor Parts Co. v. Interstate Motor
Freight System (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1957—Apr. 484485.
Teamsters, Local 795 v. Yellow Transit Freight Lines
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1960— Dec. 1313.
Wilson dba Royal Pheasant Restaurant v. Hacker
(N.Y. Sup. Ct.). 1951—Jan. 64.
Plant migration. Mount Hope Finishing Co. v. NLRB
( U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954—-June 663.
Procedural reouirements:
Machinists, Local 1424 v. NLRB (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1960—July 729-730.
Manhattan Construction Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1952— Oct. 430.
Marine Engineers Beneficial Association No. 13 v.
NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—May 524.
NLRB v. Atlanta Metallic Casket Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1953— Sept. 974.
NLRB v. Pennwoven (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1952—Mar.
311.

Protected activity:
Boeing Airplane Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1956— Sept. 1066.
Modern Motors v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1952—
Nov. 546.
NLRB v. Blue Bell (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1955—May
570-571.
NLRB v. Bretz Fuel Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954—
May 559.
NLRB v. Illinois Telephone Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1951— July 69.
NLRB v. Standard Coil Products (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955— Oct. 1160.
NLRB v. Wallick & Schwalm Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1952— Oct. 430.
Safeway Stores v. Retail Clerks Association (Calif.
Ct. of App.). 1951—Nov. 586.
Textile Workers Union of America v. NLRB (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1955—Dec. 1478.
Union Manufacturing Co. v. NLRB (Calif. Dist. Ct.
of App.). 1955—Mar. 328.
Reinstatement rights:
Black v. Cutter Laboratories (Calif. Sup. Ct.). 1955—
Apr. 454.
NLRB v. Coats & Clark (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957—
Apr. 485.
NLRB v. Crowley’s Milk Co. (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1954—Jan. 59.
NLRB v. Industrial Cotton Mills (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Feb. 184-185.
NLRB v. Kingston Cake Co. (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1953— Sept. 974.
NLRB v. Missouri Transit Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1958— Mar. 291-292.
NLRB v. Moss Planing Mill Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1955— Oct. 1161-1162.
NLRB v. National Die Casting Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Dec. 1318.
NLRB v. Thayer Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954—Aug.
898-899.
Parker v. Borock (N.Y. Ct. of App.). 1959—Apr.
421-422.
Representation elections:
Gloveworkers v. Clothing Workers (111. Dist. Ct.).
1959— Nov. 1249.
NLRB v. Bernhard-Altmann Texas Corp. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). I960— Sept. 973-974.
NLRB v. Efco Manufacturing (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1953—July 758.
NLRB v. Fresh’nd-Aire Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1955—
Dec. 1480.
NLRB v. Local 7, Teamsters (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1960—
Nov. 1201.
NLRB v. Whitinsville Spinning Ring Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1953—Jan. 58.
Union Manufacturing Co. v. NLRB (Calif. Dist. Ct.
of App.). 1955—Mar. 328.
■Whiting Corp. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Feb. 177.
Secondary boycott:
Hot cargo. Alpert v. Truck Drivers, Local 340,
Teamsters (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1958—June 645.
------ Carpenters, Local 1976 v. NLRB (U.S. Sup. C t ).
1958—Aug. 892-893.
------ General Drivers Union, Local 886 v. NLRB and
Local 850, Machinists v. N L R B ; Carpenters, Local
1976 v. NLRB and NLRB v. General Drivers Union,
Local 886 and Machinists, Local 850 v. NLRB (U.S.
Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957—July 849-850;
1958—Aug. 892-893.
------ Merchandise Warehouse Co. v. A.B.C. Freight
Forwarding Corp. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1958—Nov.
1278-1279.
Other. Alpert v. Local 379, Teamsters (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1960— Sept. 974-975.
------ Carpenters v. NLRB (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1951—
 Aug. 187-188.


46
Secondary boycott— Continued
Other. Carpenters, Local 131 v. Cisco Construction Co.
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1959— July 784-785.
------ Electrical Workers (IB E W ) v. NLRB (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1951—Aug. 187.
------ Electrical Workers (IU E ), Local 761 v. NLRB
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1960—July 731-732.
------ Franklin v. Associated Musicians of Greater
New York, Local 802 (N.Y. Sup. Ct.). 1953—Apr.
414.
------ Great Northern Ry. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1960—Feb. 177-178.
------ Holt v. Superior Court (Calif. Dist. Ct. of App.).
1951— Feb. 201.
------ New Broadcasting Co. v. Kehoe (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1951— Feb. 200-201.
------ NLRB v. Associated Musicians of Greater New
York, Local 802 (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1956— Jan.
70-71.
------ NLRB v. Business Machine and Office Appliance
Mechanics Conference Board, Local 459, Electrical
Workers (IU E) (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1956—Mar.
322.
------ NLRB v. Denver Building Trades Council (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1951—Aug. 186.
------ NLRB v. Local 294, Teamsters (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1960—Apr. 394-395.
------ NLRB v. Rice Milling Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1951— Aug. 186-187.
------ NLRB v. Rockaway News Supply Co. (U.S. Sup.
C t). 1953—May 525.
------ NLRB v. Teamsters, Local 135 (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1954— July 783.
------ Patton dba Laurel Branch Coal Co. v. Mine
W orkers; Mine Workers v. Patton dba Laurel
Branch Coal Co. (U.S. D ist Ct; U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953— Nov. 1211; 1954— June 662.
------ Piezonki (Stover Steel Service) v. NLRB (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1955— May 572.
------ Roy & Sons Co. v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1958— Apr. 414-415.
------ Sales Drivers, Helpers and Building Construc­
tion Drivers, Local 859 v. NLRB (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1956— Feb. 199-200.
------ Seafarers, Atlantic & Gulf District v. NLRB
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1959— Apr. 422.
------ Teamsters, Local 25 v. New York, New Haven
and Hartford R.R. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1956—Apr.
447.
Successor employer:
NLRB v. Armato (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—Feb. 177.
NLRB v. Birdsall-Stockdale Motor Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1954— Jan. 58-59.
NLRB v. Lunder Shoe Corp. dba Bruce Shoe Co.
(U.S. C t of App.). 1954—June 663-664.
NLRB v. New Madrid Manufacturing Co. (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1954— Dec. 1356-1357.
Suits by and against unions:
Adams v. Boilermarkers (U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1959—Mar. 294-295 ; 1959—May 580.
Association of Westinghouse Salaried Employees v.
Westinghouse Electric Corp. (U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1954— Apr. 436; 1955— June 679.
Burlesque Artists Association v. American Guild of
Variety Artists (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1959—Jan. 57.
Isbrandtsen Co. v. Longshoremen (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953—July 758.
Lewis Food Co. v. Los Angeles Meat and Provision
Drivers Union, Local 626 (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1958—
May 531-532.
Ludlow Manufacturing & Sales Co. v. Textile Work­
ers Union of America (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1952—Dec.
651.
McDaniel v. Textile Workers Union of America
(Tenn^Ct. of App.). 1952—Nov. 547.

47
Union fu n d s:
Arroyo v. United States (U.S. Ct. of A pp.; U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 1958— Sept. 1017; 1959— July 784.
Horn and McDonald of Steelworkers v. $1,950 (Pa.
Sup. Ct.). 1957— Oct. 1245.
United States v. Automobile Workers (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1957— May 604.
Ventimiglia v. United States (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1957—June 719-720.
Wilkins v. DeKoning and Local 138, Operating En­
gineers (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1957— Sept. 1099-1100.
Union security:
Closed shop. Lewis v. Quality Coal Corp. (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1959—Nov. 1250-1251.
------ NLRB v. Association of Heat & Frost Workers
( U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—Jan. 59.
------ NLRB v. George D. Auchter Co. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1954—Mar. 300.
------ Self v. Taylor (Ark. Sup. Ct.). 1951—Mar. 318319.
Hiring hall. NLRB v. Mountain Pacific Chapter of
Associated General Contractors (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1959—Nov. 1249-1250.
Right to work. Willard v. Huffman (N.C. Sup. Ct.).
1959— Sept. 1021-1022.
Miscellaneous. NLRB v. Revere Metal Art Co. and
Local 5, Automobile Workers (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1960— Oct. 1087-1089.
------ Schultz v. NLRB and Gray, Intervenor; NLRB
v. Grand Union Co. and Gray, Intervenor (U.S. Ct.
of App.). I960—Dec. 1313-1314.
Miscellaneous:
Fair employment practices. Whitfield v. Steelwork­
ers, Local 2708 (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1959—Apr.
422-423.
Fifth Amendment under NLRA. Knapp v. Schweit­
zer (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1958—Aug. 894.
Judicial interpretation. Item Co. v. New Orleans
Newspaper Guild (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1958— Sept
1018.
Lockout. Truck Drivers, Local 449, Teamsters v.
N LRB; NLRB v. Truck Drivers, Local 449 (U.S.
Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. C t ). 1956—May 574-575;
1957—June 717-718.
Make-work. NLRB v. American Newspaper Publish­
ers (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1953—May 524.
------ NLRB v. Gamble Enterprises (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1953—May 524.
Management rights. NLRB v. Teamsters (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1955—Nov. 1275.
National emergency strike. United States v. Amer­
ican Locomotive Co. and Steelworkers (U.S. D ist
C t ). 1953—Mar. 285.
------ United States v. Longshoremen (N.Y. Dist. C t).
1953—Dec. 1318.
------ United States v. Steelworkers (U.S. Ct. of App.;
U.S. Sup. C t ). 1959— Dec. 1342-1344, 1371-1372.
Union members’ rights. Mooney v. Bartenders Union,
Local 284 (Calif. Sup. Ct.). 1957— Oct. 1244.
Norris-La Guardia Act
Afran Transport Co. v. National Maritime Union (U.S.
Dist. Ct.). 1959—Mar. 293.
A. H. Bull Steamship Co. v. Seafarers (U.S. Dist. C t.;
U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957— Dec. 1494; 1958—Feb. 184.
Khedivial Line v. Seafarers (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1960—
July 730-731.
Marine Cooks and Stewards v. Panama Steamship Co.
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1960—June 625-626.
Nashoalook v. Downey (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951—Apr. 448.
New York Central R.R. v. Railroad Trainmen (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1956—Aug. 943.



Railroad Trainmen v. Central of Georgia Ry. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956—May 573.
United States v. Hamilton Glass Co. and Local 27, Paint­
ers and Paperhangers (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1957—Dec.
1492.
United States v. Switchmen (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951—Feb.
199.
Public Contracts Act

See also under Government Agency Rulings— Other
Agencies.
Capitol Coal Sales v. Mitchell (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1 9 6 0 May 510-511.
Continental Casualty C o.; United States v. (Pa. Dist. Ct.).
1951— Dec. 708.
Covington Mills v. D urkin; Covington Mills v. Mitchell
(U.S. Dist. Ct.; U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—May 523;
1955—June 682; 1956—Mar. 325.
Lovknit; Durkin v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1954— Mar. 298.
Lovknit; United States v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951—
Aug. 185.
Unexcelled Chemical Corp.; United States v. ; United
States v. Unexcelled Chemical Corp. (U.S. Dist. C t.;
U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1951—Dec. 708;
1952— July 60; 1953— May 523.
W inigar; United States v. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1958—
July 775-776.
Railway Labor Act

American Airlines v. Air Line Pilots (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1959— Feb. 175.
Baltimore & Ohio R.R. v. United Railroad Workers Divi­
sion of Transport Workers (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1960—
Jan. 58-59.
Bohannon v. Reading Co. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1959— Mar.
294.
California v. Taylor (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957— Sept. 1098.
Chicago River R.R. v. Railroad Trainmen (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956— May 572.
Clark v. Hein-Werner Corp. and Machinists (Wis. Sup.
Ct.). 1960—Jan. 58.
Conley v. Gibson (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1958—Jan. 64.
Felter v. Southern Pacific Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959—
July 787.
Locomotive Engineers v. Missouri-Kansas-Texas R.R.
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). 7000— Sept. 972-973.
Looper v. Georgia Southern & Florida Ry. (Ga. Sup. Ct.).
1957— Oct. 1244.
Machinists v. Street (Ga. Sup. Ct.). 1959—July 785.
McMullans v. Kansas, Oklahoma & Gulf Ry. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956—Apr. 447.
Oliphant v. Locomotive Firemen and Engineers (U.S.
Dist. Ct.; U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957— Dec. 1492; 1 9 5 9 Deb. 176.
Pennsylvania R.R. v. Day (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Sept.
1019.
Railroad Telegraphers v. Chicago & North Western Ry.
(U.S. Sup. Ct.). i960— June 623-625.
Railroad Trainmen v. Central of Georgia Ry. (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1956—May 573.
Railroad Trainmen v. Howard and St. Louis-San Fran­
cisco Ry. (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1952—Aug. 196-197.
Railway Employes’ Department, AFL v. Hanson (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1956—Aug. 941.
Rose v. Great Northern Ry. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1957— Sept.
1101.
Smith and Railway Conductors and Brakemen General
Committee of Adjustment for B & O R.R. v. B & O R.R.
and Railroad Trainmen (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1956—Dec.
1446-1447.
Taylor v. Fee (U.S. Ct. of App.) 1956—Aug. 942.
Union Pacific R.R. v. Price (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Sept.
1019.

48
Unemployment Compensation

Appeals:
Borg v. Appeal Board (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1955—June
682.
Buskin v. Appeal Board (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1955—
June 682.
McGee v. Timken Roller Bearing Co. (Ohio Ct. of
App.). 1955—Aug. 925.
Melia v. Appeal Board (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1955—Aug.
925.
Benefit recovery:
Cluckey v. Unemployment Compensation Board of
Review (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas). 1952—Nov.
547-548.
Finkbine v. Oxford Laundry (Ohio Ct. of Com.
Pleas). 1952— Bee. 652.
Langlois v. Rhode Island Department of Employment
Security (R.I. Super. Ct.). 1953— Feb. 178.
Maryland v. Rucker (Md. Ct. of App.). 1957—Mar.
357.
Parks v. Board of Review (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1953—June 633.
Steward, In re (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. D iv.). 1952—
July 63.
Turner v. Appeal Board (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1951—
Sept. 315.
Benefits, disqualification or eligibility f o r :
Availability for work (see also Family obligations
under Employment termination, this section).
Ashmore v. Delaware Unemployment Compensation
Commission (Del. Super. Ct.). 1952— July 63.
------ Bergsnev v. Employment Security Department
(Wash. Super. Ct.). 1952— Feb. 191.
------ Bourne, Claim of (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.).
1953— Aug. 869.
------ Brinkley v. Egan (Conn. Super. Ct.). 1953—
Apr. 415.
------ Campbell v. Globe-Wernicke Co. (Ohio Ct. of
Com. Pleas). 1952—Dec. 652.
------ Cornell v. Schroeder (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1952— Oct. 430-431.
------ Erie Resistor Corp. v. Unemployment Compensa­
tion Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1953—
Apr. 414-415.
------ Erion, In re (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. D iv.). 1955—
Aug. 925.
------ Fleiszig v. Board of Review (111. Sup. Ct.).
1952—May 567.
------ Henry Fisher Packing Co. v. Kentucky Unem­
ployment Insurance (Ky. Cir. Ct.). 1953— Jan. 60.
------ Honeycutt v. Appeal Board (Mich. Cir. Ct.).
1951— July 71.
------ Plowells v. Review Board of the Indiana Em­
ployment Security Division (Ind. Ct. of App.).
1952— Apr. 432.
------ Impson v. Board of Review, Bureau of Unem­
ployment Compensation, and Frigidaire Division,
General Motors Corp. (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1954— Feb. 187.
------ Kentucky Unemployment Insurance Commis­
sion v. Henry Fisher Packing Co. (Ky. Ct. of App.).
1953— Sept. 975.
------ Kornbauer v. State (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1952— June 692.
------ Lenz v. Administrator (Conn. Super. Ct.).
1951—Dec. 711.
------ Mathews v. Board of Review, Bureau of Un­
employment Compensation (Ohio Ct. of App.).
1953— May 526.
------ Mills v. Marquette Metal Products Co. (Ohio Ct.
of Com. Pleas). 1955—Mar. 330.
------ Nelson v. Van Horn Construction Co. (Ohio Ct.
of Com. Pleas). 1951—Nov. 588.



Benefits, disqualification or eligibility for— Continued
------ Ohio v. Blevins (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1952—May 567.
------ Pinto v. Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.).
1951— July 71.
------ Priddy, In re (N.C. Super. Ct.). 1955—Jan. 95.
------ Sapp, Claim of (Idaho Sup. Ct.). 1954—May
561.
------ Saxon v. Pyramid Rubber Co. (Ohio Ct. of Com.
Pleas). 1953—July 760-761.
------ Schornstein v. Unemployment Compensation
Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1952— Oct.
430.
------ Sledzianowski v. Board of Review (Pa. Super.
Ct.). 1951—Apr. 448.
------ Smith v. Cory (Neb. Dist. Ct.). 1951— Sept. 315.
------ Swenson v. Appeal Board (Mich. Cir. Ct.).
1952— July 63.
------ Tung-Sol Electric v. Board of Review (N.J.
Sup. Ct.). 1955— June 682.
------ Unemployment Compensation Commission v.
Tomko (Ya. Sup. Ct.). 1951— Sept. 314-315.
------ Unemployment Compensation Commission of
Virginia v. Dan River Mills (Ya. Sup. Ct. of App.).
1956—July 827.
------ Western Printing & Lithographing Co. v. Morgan
(Wis. Cir. Ct.). 1951— June 707.
------ Williams v. Unemployment Compensation Com­
mission (Del. Super. Ct.). 1952—Jan. 65.
Communist Party employment. In re Albertson; In
re Liability for Unemployment Insurance Contribu­
tions of the Communist Party, U.S.A., and the
Communist Party of New York State (N.Y. Sup.
Ct., App. Div.). 1959— Oct. 1135.
Employment termination. Family obligations. Alli­
son v. Board of Review of State Department o f
Labor (111. Cir. Ct.). 1952—Aug. 198.
-------------- Aufieri, In re (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. D iv.).
1951— June 707.
--------------Cudahy Packing Co. v. Iowa Employment
Security Commission (Iowa Dist. Ct.). 1953—
Jan. 60.
-------------- Fairfield Glove Co. v. Ruggles (Iowa Dist.
Ct.). 1953— Jan. 60.
--------------Haller, Claim of (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. D iv.).
1953— Mar. 287.
--------------Illinois Bell Telephone Co. v. Board of Re­
view of Department o f Labor (111. Sup. Ct.).
1952— Nov. 548.
---------------- Spotts v. Unemployment Compensation
Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1955— Jan. 95.
----------------Squires v. Unemployment Compensation
Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1953—Apr.
414-415.
-------------- Stone Manufacturing Co. v. Employment
Security Commission (S.C. Sup. Ct.). 1951—
June 707.
----------------Taylor v. Administrator of the Division of
Employment Security (La. Ct. o f App.). 1956—
Oct. 1193.
------ Health. Hoffer v. Board of Review ( Ohio Ct. of
Com. Pleas). 1955— Mar. 330.
-------------- Johnston v. Bureau of Unemployment Com­
pensation o f Ohio (Ohio Ct. o f App.). 1 9 5 2 Sept. 305.
----------------Krauss v. A & M Karagheusian (N.J.
Super. Ct., App. Div.). 1953—Apr. 415.
--------------Malloy v. Board of Review (Ohio Ct. of
Com. Pleas). 1952—May 567.
-------------- McComb v. Board of Review (Pa. Super.
Ct.). 1955—Oct. 1163.
-------------- Oman v. Bureau of Unemployment Com­
pensation (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas). 1953—June
632.

49
Benefits, disqualification or eligibility for— Continued
Employment termination. Health. Raffety v. Iowa
Employment Security Commission (Iowa Dist. C t.;
Iowa Sup. Ct.). 1955—Dec. 1482; 1956— July 827.
-------------- Saranac Machine Co. v. Michigan Employ­
ment Security Commission (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1955—
Sept. 1028.
-------------- Varney, dba Varney’s Laundry v. Bridges
and Riley (N.H. Super. Ct.). 1952—Nov. 548.
------ Retirement. Campbell Soup Co. v. Board of
Review (N.J. Super C t.; N.J. Sup. Ct.). 1953—Apr.
415 ; 1954— Feb. 187.
-------------- Warner Co. v. Unemployment Compensa­
tion Board of Review (Pa. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Oct.
1135.
------ Union security. Williams v. Unemployment
Compensation Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.).
1960—Dec. 1317-1318.
-------------- O’Donnell v. Board of Review (Pa. Super.
Ct.). 1953— Oct. 1095.
------ Working conditions. Blackhawk Laundry Co. v.
Iowa Employment Security Commission (Iowa
Dist. Ct.). 1954—Aug. 901.
-------------- Brown v. Unemployment Compensation
Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1952— Apr. 432.
-------------- Department of Industrial Relations v.
Mann (Ala. Ct. of App.). 1952—Jan. 65.
-------------- Evans v. Enoco Colliers (Ind. Ct. of App.).
1951— May 570.
-------------- Glen Alden Coal Co. v. Unemployment
Compensation Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.).
1952— Oct. 431.
-------------- Goldberg v. Administrator (Conn. Super.
Ct.). 1951—Dec. 711.
-------------- Redmond v. Harwood Screw Products, Inc.
(Ohio Ct. of Com Pleas). 1955—Mar. 330.
--------------Weaver v. United Woolen Co. (Ohio Ct. of
Com. Pleas). 1955— Dec. 1482-1483.
------ Miscellaneous. American Bridge Co. v. Review
Board (Ind. Ct. of App.). 1951—July 71.
--------------Anderson, In re (Wash. Sup. Ct.). 1951—
Nov. 588
-------------- Collopy v. DeVol (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1953— May 526.
--------------Dentici v. Industrial Commission (Wis.
Sup. Ct.). 1953— Sept. 975-976.
-------------- Fiol, In re (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. D iv .; N.Y.
Ct. of App.). 195)2— June 692-693; 1953—Aug. 870.
-------------- Hope Brick WT
orks v. Call (Ark. Sup. Ct.).
1953— July 761.
------------- Indiana ex rel. Standard Oil Co. v. Review
Board (Ind. Sup. Ct.). 1952—Jan. 65.
--------------Jackson v. Minneapolis-Honey well Regu­
lator Co. (Minn. Sup. Ct.). 1951—July 71.
--------------Lemons v. Clara Shop (Ky. Cir. Ct.).
1954— Dec. 1359.
-------------- McCarthy v. Iowa Employment Security
Commission (Iowa Dist. Ct.). 1955—Dec. 1482.
--------------Mauro v. Administrator (Conn. Sup. Ct.).
1955— Aug. 925.
--------------Myerson v. Board of Review (N.J. Super.
Ct.). 1957—June 721.
-------------- Yode v. Sherwin-Williams Co. (Ohio Ct.
of Com. Pleas). 1954—Aug. 901.
Fraudulent misrepresentation. Paulin v. Bureau of
Unemployment Compensation (Ohio Ct. of Com.
Pleas). 1953— Feb. 178.
------ People v. Feller (Newburgh, N.Y. City Ct.).
1953—Jan. 60.
Income. Capital asset. Day v. Robertson (Wash.
Super. Ct.). 1952—Feb. 191.
------ Damage sum. Edwards, In re (N.C. Super. Ct.).
1955— Feb. 215.



Benefits, disqualification or eligibility for—Continued
Income. Dismissal payments. Ackerson v. Western
Union Telegraph Co. (Minn. Sup. Ct.). 1951—
Aug. 189.
-------------- Bradshaw v. Employment Security Com­
mission (Calif. Dist. Ct. of App.). 1956— Feb. 201.
-------------- Schenley Distillers v. Review Board of In­
diana Employment Security Div. (Ind. Ct. of App.).
1953—Aug. 870.
------ Holiday pay. General Motors Corp. v. Michigan
Unemployment Compensation Commission (Mich.
Sup. Ct.). 1951—Dec. 711.
------ NLRB back pay award. National Labor Rela­
tions Board v. Gullet Gin Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1951— Mar. 319.
------ Profit sharing. Kerr v. Director (Mass. Sup.
Jud. Ct.). 1955— Mar. 330.
------ Retirement payment. Barclay v. Administrator
(Conn. Sup. Ct. of Errors). 1953— July 760.
-------------- Barkost v. State Unemployment Compen­
sation Commission (Oreg. Cir. Ct.). 1956—July
827.
--------------Dubois v. Maine Employment Security
Commission (Maine Sup. Jud. Ct.). 1955— Sept.
1028.
-------------- Kneeland v. Administrator (Conn. Super.
Ct.; Conn. Sup. C t ). 1951—Nov. 588; 1952—
July 63.
-------------- Moore v. Board of Review (Ohio Sup.
Ct.). 1957—Mar. 357.
-------------- Remillard v. Maine Employment Security
Commission (Maine Super. Ct.). 1955—Jan. 96.
------ Supplemental benefits. Posey v. Tichenor (Ohio
Sup. Ct.). 1959—Feb. 177-178.
-------------- United Steelworkers v. Doyle (Ohio Sup.
Ct.). 1959—Feb. 177-178.
------ Vacation pay. Butler v. Bakelite Co., Division
of Union Carbide Corp. (N.J. Sup. Ct.). 1960—
July 732.
------ ------ Campbell Soup Co. v. Board of Review,
Division of Employment Security (N.J. Super. Ct.).
1952— Sept. 306.
--------------Dresher, In re (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.).
1956— Feb. 201.
--------------Levy v. Todd Shipyards Corp. (N.Y. Sup.
Ct., App. Div.). 1952—June 692.
--------------Renown Stove Co. v. Unemployment Com­
pensation Commission (Mich. Sup. Ct.). 1951—
Mar. 319.
--------------Shand v. California Employment Security
Commission (Calif. Super. Ct.). 1952—Aug. 197198.
Labor dispute. Definition. Abbott Publishing Co. v.
Annunzio (111. Sup. Ct.). 1953— June 633.
----------------Alinada v. Administrator, Unemployment
Compensation Law (Conn. Super. Ct.). 1952—
Oct. 431.
------------- Alvarez v. Administrator (Conn. Sup. Ct. o f
Errors). 1953—Mar. 286.
-------------- Barber v. California Employment Stabili­
zation Commission (Calif. Super. Ct.). 1953— July
760.
-------------- Burleson v. Board of Review (Pa. Super.
Ct.). 1953— Oct. 1095.
------ ------ Byerly v. Unemployment Compensation
Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1952— Oct. 431.
-------------- Carper v. Administrator (Conn. Sup. Ct.
of Errors). 1953—June 633.
-------------- Chrysler Corp. v. California Employment
Stabilization (Calif. Dist. Ct. of App.). 1953—May
525-526.
--------------Crealey, In re (N.Y. Sup. Ct. App. Div.).
1952—Dec. 651.

Benefits, disqualification or eligibility for— Continued
Labor dispute. Definition. Davis v. Board of Review
(R.I. Super. Ct.). 1954— Feb. 187.
------------- Department of Industrial Relations v. Stone
(Ala. Ct. of App.). 1952— Mar. 313.
--------------Donegan Coal & Coke Co. v. Board of Re­
view (W. Va. Jud. Cir. Ct.). 1954—Dec. 1359.
-------------- Franklin County Coal Corp. v. Annunzio
(111. Super. Ct.). 1952—May 567.
-------------- Gentile v. Director of Division of Employ­
ment Security (Mass. Sup. Jud. Ct.). 1953—Mar.
286.
--------------Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. v. Depart­
ment of Labor and Industry (N.J. Super. Ct.).
1954—Apr. 437.
-------------- Gulf Atlantic Warehouse Co. v. Bennett
(Ala. Ct. of App.). 1951— Sept. 315.
------ ------ Jaycox v. Unemployment Compensation
Commission (Mont. Dist. Ct.). 1956— Feb. 201-202.
-------------- Jablonsky v. Unemployment Compensation
Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1951—June 707.
--------------Keinath v. Appeal Board of Michigan Em­
ployment Security Commission (Mich. Cir. Ct.).
1956—Oct. 1193.
— -------- Krygowski v. Appeal Board (Mich. Cir.
Ct.). 1955—Feb. 215.
-------------- Kudrowitz v. Board of Review (Fla. Cir.
C t ). 1951—Oct. 467-46S.
-------------- Little Rock Furniture Manufacturing Co. v.
Commissioner of Labor (Ark. Sup. C t). 1957—
June 720-721.
-------------- Lloyd Manufacturing Co. v. Appeal Board
of Michigan Employment Security Commission
(Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1952— Aug. 198.
---- --------- McCloud v. Board of Review (W. Ya. Cir.
C t). 1953—Dec. 1320.
--------------Marathon Electric Manufacturing Corp. v.
Industrial Commission (Wis. Sup. Ct.). 1955—
June 681-682.
-------------- Morris v. Board of Review (Pa. Super.
Ct.). 1951— Bee. 711.
-------------- Nelson v. Industrial Commission (Utah
Sup. C t). 1952—July 63 .
— -------- Producers Produce Co. v. Industrial Com­
mission (Mo. Ct. of App.). 1955— Sept. 1028.
-------------- Shell Oil Co. v. Cummins (111. Sup. Ct.).
1956—Feb. 201.
-------------- Stevenson, In re (N.C. Super. Ct. , N.C.
*
Sup. Ct.). 1953—May 526; July 760.
-------------- Texas Co. v. Texas Employment Commis­
sion (Tex. Ct. of Civ. App.). 1953—Dec. 1320.
-------------- Thomas v. California Employment Stabil­
ization Commission (Calif. D ist Ct.). 1951—Mar.
319.
-------------- T. R. Miller Mill Co. v. Johns (Ala. Cir. Ct.
of App.; Ala. Sup. Ct.). 1954—Apr. 437; 1955—
Jan. 95.
-------------- Urnick v. Board o f Review (W. Ya. Jud.
Cir. Ct.). 1954—Aug. 901.
-------------- Usher v. Department of Industrial Rela­
tions (Ala. Cir. C t.; Ala. Ct. of Ann.). 1951—Nov.
588 ; 1953—Feb. 177-178.
------ Location. Adams v. Review Board (Ind. Ct. of
App.). 1951—Aug. 189.
-------------- Bailey v. Employment Security Commis­
sion (Iowa Dist. Ct.). 1951—Dec. 711.
— --------Ford Motor Co. v. Abercrombie (Ga. Sup.
C t ). 1951— Apr. 448-449.
------ ------ Ford Motor Co. v. New Jersey Department
of Labor & Industry (N.J. Sup. C t). 1951— 448449.
--------------Ford Motor Co. v. Unemployment Compen­
sation Commission (Ya. Sup. Ct.). 1951— 448-449.
-------------- McGee v. Timken Roller Bearing Co. (Ohio
C t of Com. Pleas). 1956—Feb. 202.



50
Benefits, disqualification or eligibility for— Continued
Labor dispute. Location. Machcinsld, In re (N.Y.
Sup. Ct, App. Div.). 1951— Apr. 448-449.
-------------- Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph
Co. v. Sakrison (Ariz. Sup. Ct.). 1951— Mar. 319.
-------------- Neidlinger v. Board of Review (Pa. Super.
Ct.). 1952—Jan. 65.
--------------Nordling v. Ford Motor Co. (Minn. Sup.
Ct.). 1951—Apr. 448-449.
-------------- Olson v. Appeal Board of Michigan Em­
ployment Security Commission (Mich. Cir. Ct.).
1956— July 827-828.
--------------Park v. Michigan Employment Security
Commission (Mich. Sup. Ct.). 1959—June 671672.
------ Miscellaneous. Bixler v. Employment Security
Department (Wash. Super. C t ). 1955—Oct. 1163.
-------------- Bouvier v. Board of Review (W. Va. Jud.
Cir. Ct.). 1955— Feb. 215.
--------------Brulev v. Florida Industrial Commission
(Fla. Ct. of App.). 1.958—June 645-646.
-------------- Burch v. Ohio Bureau of Unemployment
Compensation (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas). 1952—
May 567.
--------------Carchia v. England and Keystone Manu­
facturing Co. (Mass. Dist. Municipal Ct.). 1953—
Dec. 1320.
-------------- Davis v. Hix (W . Ya. Sup. Ct. o f App.).
1955— Feb. 215.
------- ------ Greene v. Department of Industrial Rela­
tions (Ala. Ct. of App.). 1955—Aug. 925.
Misconduct. Albuquerque Bus Co. v. Miera (N. Mex.
Dist. Ct.). 1953— Aug. 869-870.
------ Arnold v. Appeal Board of Michigan Employ­
ment Security Commission (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1953—
Sept 976.
------ Cody v. Gibson (S.C. Ct. o f Com. Pleas).
1952— Mar. 313.
------ Free v. Circle Cab Co. (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1955—Dec. 1483.
------ General Motors Corp. v. Employment Security
Appeal Board (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1952—Mar. 313.
------ H. J. Heinz Co. v. Unemployment Compensa­
tion Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1953—Apr.
415.
------ Knowles v. Roberts (Ohio Ct. of App.). 1952—
Aug. 198.
------ Levin v. Unemployment Compensation Board of
Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1952—Apr. 432.
------ Long v. Industrial Commission, et al. (Wis. Cir.
C t). 1954— Sept. 1359.
------ Mandes v. Employment Security Agency (Idaho
Sup. Ct.). 1953— July 760.
------ McClain v. Unemployment Compensation Board
of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1952— Feb. 191.
------ Newell v . Stewart Hartshorn Co. (Mich. Cir.
C t ). 1955—Mar. 330.
------Parke, Davis & Co. v. Michigan Employment Se­
curity Commission and John Ross (Mich. Cir. Ct.).
1958— Mar. 293.
------ Riehl v. Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.).
1955— Oct. 1163.
------ State ex rel. Employment Security Commission
of North Carolina v. Smith (N.C. Sup. Ct.). 1952—
Apr. 432.
------ Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. v. Board of
Review, In re Griffin (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1951—O ct
468.
------ Yellow Cab Co. v. Unemployment Compensation
Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1952— Oct. 431.
Refusal of suitable work. Banks v. Board of Review
(Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas). 1952—May 567.
Misconduct. Barr v. Unemployment Compensation
Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1953—Apr. 415.

Benefits, disqualification or eligibility for— Continued
Misconduct. Berg, In re (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.).
1953— Mar. 287.
------ Birdie Miller Reeves v. Board of Review (Ohio
Ct. of Com. Pleas). 195k—Aug. 900.
------ Cornell v. Cordea (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1952—June 693.
------ Cory v. Mitton (Nev. Dist. Ct.). 1951— Oct. 468.
------ Crowe, Claim of (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.).
1952— Sept. 306.
------ DeBruyne, Claim of (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.).
1952—Jan. 65.
------ Eastern Gas and Fuel Associates v. Unemploy­
ment Compensation Board of Review (W . Va. Jud.
Cir. Ct.). 1953— Feb. 178.
------ Foscarinis, Claim of (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.).
195k—Dec. 1359.
------ Glen Alden Coal Co. v. Board of Review (Pa.
Super. Ct.). 1951—Oct. 468.
------ Industrial Commission of Colorado v. Brady
(Colo. Sup. Ct.). 195k— Feb. 187.
------ Krieger, Claim of (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.).
1952— Feb. 191.
------ Lehrman, In re (N.Y. Sup. C t, App. Div.).
1953— July 761.
------ Ludwigsen v. New Jersey Department o f Labor
(N.J. Sup. Ct.). 1953— July 761.
------ Martino, In re (Wash. Super. C t ). 1953— Sept.
976.
----- McRoberts v. Employment Security Department
(Wash. Super. Ct.). 1951— Oct. 468.
------ Mouldings Division of Thompson Industries v.
Review Board of Indiana Security Division (Ind.
Ct. of App.). 1952— Sept. 305-306.
------ Roukey v. Riley ( N.II. Sup. Ct.). 1951—Apr. 448.
------ Sargis v. Kunz (Calif. Super. Ct.). 1953—Mar.
286-287.
------ Spack, Claim of (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.).
1952— Dec. 651.
------ Tary v. Board of Review (Ohio Ct. o f App.).
1953— Aug. 870.
Self-incrimination. Ault v. Unemployment Com­
pensation Board of Review (Pa. Super. Ct.; Pa.
Sup. Ct.). 1959—May 580-581; 1960—Apr. 395-396.
------ Darin v. Unemployment Compensation Board of
Review (Pa. Sup. Ct.). 1960—Apr. 395-396.
------ Fino v. E.S.B. and Sun Ray Drug Co. (Md. Ct.
of App.). 1959—May 581-582.
------ Ostrofsky and Seif v. E.S.B. and Bethlehem
Steel Co. (Md. Ct. of App.). 1959—May 582.
Coverage:
Kepsis v. Board of Review (Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas).
1951—Nov. 588.
Krant, Claim of (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div.). 1952—
Sept. 306.
Lievense v. Michigan Unemployment Compensation
Commission (Mich. Sup. Ct.). 1953— Feb. 178.
Maniscalo v. Director (Mass. Sup. Jud. Ct.). 1951—
May 570.
Parks Cab Co. v. Annunzio (111. Sup. Ct.). 1952—
Nov. 548.
Plitcher v. Michigan Employment Security Commis­
sion (Mich. Cir. Ct.). 1956—Oct. 1192.
Race Tracks of Ohio, In re application o f (Ohio Ct.
of Com. Pleas). 1956— Oct. 1193.
Redwine v. Wilkes (Ga. Ct. of A pp.). 1951—May 570.
West Virginia v. C. H. Musselman Co. (W . Va. Sup.
Ct.). 1951— Sept. 315.
Employer contribution;
Call v. Luten (Ark. Sup. Ct.). 1952—Apr. 432.
Horsman Dolls v. Unemployment Compensation Com­
mission (N.J. Sup. Ct.). 1951— Sept. 315.
Rose v. Cummins, Director of Labor (111. Cir. Ct.).
195k—Apr. 437.



51
Employer contribution— Continued
Texas Employment Commission v. Todd Shipyards
Corp. (Tex. Ct. of Civ. App.). 1953— June 633.
Employer report not libel:
Breuner v. Bo-Craft Enterprises (N.Y. Sup. Ct.).
1957—Nov. 1375.
Coyne v. O’Connor (N.Y. Sup. Ct.). 1953—Aug. 869.
Experience rating:
Eversole v. Cummins (111. Cir. C t.). 1957—Nov. 1375.
Windsor Audit Co. v. Thornbrough, Commissioner of
Labor (Ark. Sup. Ct.). 1956—Oct. 1192-1193.
Qualifying wages. Turner v. Administrator, Unemploy­
ment Compensation Act (Conn. Super. Ct.). 1955—
Jan. 95.
Unemployment defined:
General Time Corp. v. Cummins (111. Cir. Ct.). 1957
— Mar. 357-358.
Golubski v. Unemployment Compensation Board of
Review (Pa. Super. Ct.). 1952— Dec. 651-652.
Sink v. Bureau of Unemployment Compensation
(Ohio Ct. of Com. Pleas). 1952— Sept. 305.
Todd Shipyards Corp v. Texas Employment Com­
mission (Tex. Ct. of Civ. App.). 1952—Mar. 313.
Veterans’ Reemployment Rights

[Under Selective Training and Service Act of
1940, Service Extension Act, and Universal
Military Training and Service Act]
Apprentice. Yentz v. Heinritz Sheet Metal Works (U.S.
Dist. Ct.). 1958—Apr. 417-418.
Discharge for cause. Fries v. Pennsylvania R.R. (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1952—June 692.
Federal court jurisdiction:
Christner v. Pondre Valley Cooperative Association
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1955—Nov. 1278-1279.
McKinney v. Missouri-Kansas-Texas Ry. (U.S. Ct. of
App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957—Mar. 358; 1958—July
773-775.
Fringe benefits:
Alvado v. General Motors Corp. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1956—Apr. 450-451.
Deovletian v. Detroit Gasket Manufacturing Co. (U.S.
Dist. Ct.).
1956— Feb. 202.
Foster v. General Motors Corp. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1952—Jan. 65-66.
Laches in damage claim. Wintuft Corp. v. Fuquea (U.S.
Ct. of App.). 1952— Feb. 190.
Layoff. Carr v. New York Shipbuilding Corp. (U.S. Dist.
C t). 1952— Nov. 547.
Leave of absence:
Angelovic v. Lehigh R.R. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951—
Mar. 320.
Mariant v. Araujo (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1959—July 787788.
Position, comparable:
Boone v. Fort Worth & Denver Ry. (U.S. Ct. o f App.).
1955— Oct. 1164.
Major v . Phillips-Jones Corp. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1952—Jan. 66.
Rix v. Turnbull-Novak (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1959—
Mar. 296.
Position competition. Jones v . Colby (U.S. D ist Ct.).
1956—Jan. 73.
Position held by employer relative. Hood v. Lawrence
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1955— Oct. 1164.
Promotion under bargaining contract. Cross v. Thompson
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 195k— Sept. 1010.
Sales representative held employee. Travis v. Schwartz
Manufacturing Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1955—Jan.
96-97.

Seniority:
Addison v. Tennessee Coal, Iron & R.R. Co. (U.S. Ct.
of App.). 1953—July 758.
Allison v. Pennsylvania R.R. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951—
June 707.
Bostian v. Seaboard Airline R.R. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954—June 665.
Bostick v. General Motors Corp. (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1958— Oct. 1151.
Branan v. New Jellico Coal Co. and Local 3295, Mine
Workers (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1954—Mar. 302.
Diehl v. Lehigh Valley R.R. (U.S. Ct of App.; U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1954—May 561; 1955—May 573.
Elliott v. Continental Air Lines (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1959— Aug. 908.
Ford Motor Co. v. Huffman (U.S. Ct. o f App.; U.S.
Sup. C t.). 1952—May 566-567 ; 1953— June 631.
Gregory v. Lousiville & Nashville R.R. (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1951— Apr. 448.
Little v. Pennsylvania R.R. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951—
June 706.
McKinney v. Missouri-Kansas-Texas Ry. (U.S. Ct. of
App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957—Mar. 358; 1958—July
773-775.
Mann v. Crowell-Collier Publishing Co. (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1956— Mar. 324-325. Mann v. Crowell-Collier
Publishing Co. and Springfield International Photo­
engravers, Local 29 (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957— Feb.
202.
Norris v. Robertshaw-Fulton Controls Co. (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1.957— May 606-607.
Poirrier v. Wagner Electric Corp. (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1954—Aug. 901.
Poore v. Louisville & Nashville R.R. (U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956—Nov. 1315-1317.
Rader v. Northwest Exterminating Co. (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1954— July 784-785.
United States ex rel. Milotsky v. Brown and Bigelow
Corp. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951— Sept. 314.
Wilson v. Illinois Central R.R. (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1957—Apr. 485-487.
Statutory rights:
Criss v. Louisville & Nashville R.R. (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1953— July 759-760.
Fessler v. Reading Co. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1956—Mar.
323-324.
Gray v. Fashion Park (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1958—Aug.
895.
Robertson v. Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac
R.R. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1960— Feb. 178.
Sanders v. Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific R.R.
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1951—Nov. 588.
Temporarily disabled veterans:
Abromowitz v. Erie R.R. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1956—
Aug. 944.
Boydston v. Texas & Pacific Ry. (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1956—Aug. 944-945.
Temporary work:
Dame v. C. A. Batson Co. (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1958—
Mar. 293-294.
Moe v. Eastern Air Lines (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1957—
Aug. 980-981.
Venzel v. United States Steel Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1954— Feb. 186-187.
Weinmann v. Colt’s Manufacturing Co. (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1951— June 706.
Union as defendant. Wilson v, Illinois Central R.R. (U.S.
Dist. Ct.). 1958— Feb. 186-187.
W ages:
Altgens v. Associated Press (U.S. Ct. of A pp.). 1951—
Aug. 189.
Borges v. Art Steel Co. (U.S. Dist. C t.; U.S. Ct. of
App.). 1956— Sept. 1066; 1957— Sept. 1101-1102.
Brown v. Denver Post (U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1957—Jan.
76.
Donner v. Levine (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1956— July 828.



52
Workmen’s Compensation

See also Civil Aeronautics Board rule under Other Agency
Rulings.
Allen v. United States (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1953— Sept
976.
Durkin v. McCrary Co. (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953— Oct.
1093.
Gasch v . Britton (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—June 632.
Hahn v. Ross Island Sand and Gravel Co. (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1959— Mar. 295-296.
Hastorf-Nettles v. Pillsbury (U.S. Ct. o f App.). 1953—
Aug. 871.
Pennsylvania R.R. v. O’Rourke (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1953—
May 525.
Voris v. Eikel (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—Aug. 870-871.
Western Boat Building Co. v. O’Leary (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1953—Jan. 60.
Miscellaneous

Bankruptcy A c t:
Back pay award. Nathanson v. NLRB (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 1953— Jan. 58.
Severance pay. McCloskey v. Division of Labor Law
Enforcement, California (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1953—
Mar. 285.
Union welfare fund. In re Embassy Restaurant;
United States v. Embassy Restaurant (U.S. Dist.
Ct; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1957— Oct. 1244; 1959—May
579.
------ In re Victory Apparel Manufacturing Corp.
(U.S. Dist. Ct.). 1957— Oct. 1243.
Clayton Act. United States v. Hamilton Glass Co. and
Local 27, Painters and Paperhangers (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1957—Dec. 1492.
Davis-Bacon A c t:
Binghamton Construction Co. v. United States (U.S.
Sup. Ct.). 1954— May 558-559.
Bushman Construction Co. v. United States (U.S.
Ct. of Claims). 1958—Oct. 1151-1152.
Poirier and McLane Corp. v. United States (U.S. C t
of Claims). 1954— July 781.
Eight-Hour L a w :
Employee rights. Deal & Co. v. Bolding (Ark. Sup.
Ct.). 1956— Feb. 200-201.
Foreign employment. Finnan v. Elmhurst Contract­
ing Co. (N.Y. Sup. Ct.). 1951— Feb. 198.
False Information Act. Wage and Hour Division juris­
diction. United States v. Moore (U.S. Ct. of App.).
1951— Jan. 61.
Hobbs Act. United States v. Green (U.S. Sup. Ct.).
1956—June 688.
Internal Revenue Code. Strike benefits tax status.
Kaiser v. United States; United States v. Kaiser (U.S.
Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Apr. 423-424;
1960— Sept. 971-972.
Mexican farm labor act. United States v, J. II. Morris
(U.S. Ct. of App.). 1958— May 532.
Portal-to-Portal Act (see also Overtime provisions under
Fair Labor Standards Act) :
United States v. Lovknit (U.S. Ct. of App.). 1951—
Aug. 185.
United States v. Unexcelled Chemical Corp. (U.S.
Dist. Ct.; U.S. Ct. of App.; U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1951—
Dec. 708; 1952—July 60; 1953—May 523.
Sherman Anti-Trust A ct:
New Broadcasting Co. v. Kehoe (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1951— Feb. 200-201.
Pevely Dairy Co. v. Local 603, Teamsters (U.S. Dist.
Ct.). 1959— Dec. 1375.
United States v. Hamilton Glass Co. and Local 27,
Painters and Paperhangers (U.S. Dist. C t ).
1957— Dec. 1492.
United States v. Milk Drivers and Dairy Employees
Union, Local 741, Teamsters (U.S. Dist. Ct.).
1957— Nov. 1374.

53
State la w s:
Labor relations. Apex Lumber Corp. (N.Y. Sup. Ct.).
1959—Jan. 56.
------ Barbers, Local 687 v. Pollino (N.J. Sup. Ct.).
1957—Jan. 75-76.
------ Bull Steamship Co. v. Hall (N.Y. Sup. C t ).
1957—Nov. 1374-1375.
------ Draper v. Clark Dairy (Conn. Sup. C t).
1951—Jan. 63-64.
------ Holland v. Edwards (N.Y. Sup. C t, App. Div.).
1953— Oct. 1003-1094.
------ Longshoremen v. Hogan (N.Y. Sup. Ct.).
1957— Jan. 74-75.
Labor relations. Machinists, Prairie Lodge 1538 v.

State laws—Continued
Machine Products Co. (Miss. Chancery C t ).
1957— Jan. 75.
Labor relations. Staub v. City of Baxley (U.S. Sup.
Ct.). 1958—Mar. 291.
Wages and hours. Albuquerque v. Burrell (N. Mex.
Sup. Ct.). 1958— Oct. 1152.
------ Day-Brite Lighting v. Missouri (U.S. Sup. C t ).
1952— May 564.
------ Jaramillo v. Albuquerque (N. Mex. Sup. Ct.).
1958— Nov. 1280-1281.
------ Kidd v. Ohio (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1959— Feb. 178.
------ Ullnes v. Ohio (U.S. Sup. Ct). 1959— Feb. 178.
Steel mills seizure. Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co. v.
Charles Sawyer (U.S. Sup. Ct.). 1952—July 60-63.

G O VER N M EN T AGENCY RULINGS
National Labor Relations Board
Back pay awards:
Climax Spinning Co. [and United Textile Workers of
America] (101 NLRB No. 185). 1953—Mar. 285.
Iron Workers [and Iron Workers, Local 595] (109
NLRB No. 12). 1954— Sept. 1010.
Moss Planing Mill Co. [and Woodworkers] (110
NLRB No. 155). 1955— Feb. 214.
Southern Silk Mills [and United Textile Workers of
America] (116 NLRB No. 96). 1956— Oct. 1191.
Bargaining obligations:
American Steel Foundries [and Guards Union (In d .)]
(112 NLRB No. 66). 1955— July 809.
Anderson Lithograph Co. and Local 22, Lithographers
(124 NLRB No. 117). 1959—Dec. 1374.
Atlanta Metallic Casket Co. [and Papermakers and
Paperworkers] (91 NLRB No. 188). 1951—Jan. 63.
Avco Manufacturing Corp. [and Automobile Workers,
Local 1010] (111 NLRB No. 118). 1955—May 571.
Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. [and United Optical &
Instrument Workers, Local 678] (108 NLRB No.
213). 1954— Sept. 1009— 1010.
Celanese Corp. of America [and Oil Workers] (95
NLRB No. 83). 1951— Oct. 466.
Cranston Print Works Co. [and Textile Workers
Union of America] (115 NLRB No. 89). 1956—May
576.
Electrical Workers (IB E W ) and Local 59 and Texlite
(119 NLRB No. 232). 1958—May 232.
Federal Telephone and Radio Co. [and Machinists]
(107 NLRB No. 146). 1954— Mar. 301.
Glen Raven Knitting Mills [and Hosiery Workers]
(115 NLRB No. 66). 1956— May 576.
Hughes Tool Co. [and Metal Workers (Ind.), Locals
1 and 2] (100 NLRB No. 39). 1952— Sept. 305.
International News Service Division of the Hearst
Corp. [and American Newspaper Guild] (113
NLRB No. 130). 1955—Nov. 1275-1276.
Jacobs Manufacturing Co. [and Agricultural Imple­
ment Workers] (94 NLRB No. 175). 1951—Aug.
189.
Lehigh Portland Cement Co. [and Cement Workers,
Local 167] (101 NLRB No. 110). 1953— Feb. 177.
Lion Oil Co. [and Oil Workers] (109 NLRB No. 106).
1954—Oct. 1133.
Longview Furniture Co. and Furniture Workers (100
NLRB No. 43) . 1952— Oct. 429.
Ludwig Baumann Co. [and Delivery and Warehouse
Employees, Local 804] (106 NLRB No. 135). 1953—
Nov. 1209.
McLean-Arkansas Lumber Co. [and Woodworkers,
Local S-298] (109 NLRB No. 157). 1954—Nov.
1246.



Bargaining obligations— Continued
Niles-Bement-Pond Co. [and Automobile Workers]
(97 NLRB No. 30). 1952— Feb. 189-190.
Personal Products Corp. [and Textile Workers and
Textile Workers, Local 1172] (108 NLRB No. 109).
1954— July 783-784.
Phelps Dodge Copper Products [and Electrical
Workers (IU E ), Local 441] (101 NLRB No. 103).
1953—Feb. 177.
Pine Industrial Relations Committee and Locals 6-7
and 6-122, Woodworkers (118 NLRB No. 142).
1957— Nov. 1373-1374.
Quaker State Oil Refining Corp. and Oil, Chemical
and Atomic Workers (121 NLRB No. 49). 1958—
Oct. 1149.
Reed and Prince Manufacturing Co. [and Steelwork­
ers] (96 NLRB No. 129). 1951—Dec. 710-711.
Richfield Oil Corp. [and Oil Workers] (110 NLRB
No. 54). 1954— Dec. 1358.
Roscoe Skipper [and Brewery Workers, Local 234]
(106 NLRB No. 209). 1953— Dec. 1319-1320.
Sears Roebuck & Co. [and Sears Roebuck Employees
Council, Local 1635 and Retail Clerks] (110 NLRB
No. 30). 1954— Dec. 1359.
Sexton Welding Co. and Local 105, Boilermakers (100
NLRB No. 57). 1952— Oct. 429.
Snively Groves [and Woodworkers] (109 NLRB No.
199). 1954— Nov. 1246.
Stanley Works [and Machinists, Lodge 1433] (108
NLRB No. 102). 1954— July 784.
Stover Rubber Co. and Local 629, Chemical Workers
(123 NLRB No. 152). 1959— Sept. 1023.
Studebaker Corp. [and Kovach] (110 NLRB No. 214).
1955— Feb. 231.
United Telephone Co. [and Electrical Workers, Local
843 (IB E W )] (112 NLRB No. 103). 1955—Aug.
924.
Vulcan Steel Tank Corp. [and Boilermakers, Local
592] (106 NLRB No. 222). 1954— Jan. 60.
Westinghouse Electric Corp. [and Association of
Westinghouse Salaried Employees] (113 NLRB No.
105). 1955— Nov. 1276.
Westinghouse Electric Supply Co. [and Westinghouse
Independent Salaried Unions] (96 NLRB No. 58).
1951—Dec. 711.
Whitin Machine Works [and Steelworkers] (108
NLRB No. 223). 1955— Feb. 214.
Wilkening Manufacturing Co. and Automobile Work­
ers, Local 416 (100 NLRB No. 197). 1952—Nov.
546.

54
Bargaining obligations— Continued
William D. Gibson Co. [and Die and Tool Makers,
Lodge 113, and Machinists, and Steelworkers and
Steelworkers, Local 3485] (110 NLRB No. 88).
1955— Jan. 91.
W. L. Mead [and Teamsters, Local 25] (113 NLRB
No. 109). 1955— Nov. 1274.
Bargaining u nit:
A. O. Smith Corp. [and Automobile Workers and
Machinists, District 0] (102 NLRB No. 96). 1953—
May 523.
American Potash & Chemical Corp. [and Operating
Engineers. Local 501, and Electrical Workers
(IB E W ), Local 477, and Machinists and Chemical
Workers] (107 NLRB No. 290). 195j —May 560.
Bethlehem Steel Co., Shipbuilding Division, Beau­
mont Yard and Plumbers and Pipefitters, Local 195
(108 NLRB No. 51). 1954— June 665.
Campbell Soup Co. [and Jones and Packinghouse
Workers, Local 80-A] (111 NLRB No. 36). 1955—
Apr. 455.
Clayton & Lambert Manufacturing Co. [and Machin­
ists, Lodge 681, District 27] (111 NLRB No. 91).
1955— Apr. 455.
General Motors Corp. Forge Plant [and Die Sinkers]
(114 NLRB No. 11). 1955— Dec. 1478-1479.
Goettl dba International Metal Products Co. [and
Steelworkers] (107 NLRB No. 23). 1954—Jan.
61-62.
Manufacturers’ Protective and Development Associ­
ation [and Molders and Foundry Workers] (95
NLRB No. 134). 1951— Oct. 466-467.
W. S. Tyler Co. [and Molders and Foundry Workers]
(93 NLRB No. 70). 1951— May 569-570.
Waterboro Manufacturing Corp. [and Ladies’ Gar­
ment Workers] (106 NLRB No. 241). 1954— Jan.
61.
Waterous Co. [and Machinists, District Lodge 77]
(92 NLRB No. 29). 1951—ten . 63.
Compliance regulations, non-Communist affidavits:
Cessna Aircraft Co. [and Tool and Die Makers, Local
252] (114 NLRB No. 181). 1956— Feb. 198-199.
Du-Wei Decorative Co. and Machinists (125 NLRB
No. 5). I960—Jan. 56.
Ford Motor Co. (Canton Forge Division) [and Boiler­
makers] (95 NLRB No. 121). 1951— Sept. 312.
Fur & Leather Workers, Local 214; Compliance status
of (106 NLRB No. 223). 1953—Dec. 1318.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers (In re Maurice E.
Travis) (111 NLRB No. 71). 1955—Apr. 453.
New Jersey Carpet Mills [and Textile Workers Union
of America] (92 NLRB No. 122). 1951— Feb. 198.
Northwest Magnesite Co. [and Steelworkers] (101
NLRB No. 28). 1953— Jan. 59.
Precision Scientific Co. [and Mine, Mill and Smelter
Workers, Local 758] (111 NLRB No. 88). 1955—
Apr. 453.
Retail Associates and Retail Clerks (120 NLRB No.
66). 1958— June 643.
Sunbeam Corp. [and Electrical Workers (In d .)] (98
NLRB No. 98). 1952—May 565.
Stewart-Warner Corp. and Kelliher (94 NLRB No.
85). 1951—July 70.
Whaley Coal Co. and Scott County Miners Union (124
NLRB No. 156). 1959—Dec. 1373-1374.
Concerted activity:
American Manufacturing Co. of Texas [and Steel­
workers] (98 NLRB No. 48). 1952— Apr. 430.
B. Y.D. Co. [and Ladies’ Garment Workers] (110
NLRB No. 206). 1955—Mar. 327-328.
Betts Cadillac Olds [and Machinists, Lodge 254] (96
NLRB No. 46). 1951—Nov. 588.
Boeing Airplane Co. [and Seattle Professional Engi­
neering Employees Association] (110 NLRB No.
22). 1954— Dec. 1357-1358.



Concerted activity— Continued
Borg-Warner Corp. [and Automobile Workers and
Automobile Workers, Local 979] (113 NLRB No.
120). 1955—Nov. 1274.
Davis Furniture Co. [and Carroll, Davis, & Freidewick, by Roland C. Davis] (94 NLRB No. 52).
1951—July 68-69.
de Cordova [and Finn] (91 NLRB No. 187). 1 9 5 1 ten . 61-62.
Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Co. [and Electrical
Workers (Ind.), Local 1229] (94 NLRB No. 227).
1951— Sept. 311-312.
Mackay Radio and Telegraph Co. [and Mazolo and
Robitzer and Breuer] (96 NLRB No. 106). 1951—
Dec. 709.
Marshall Field & Co. [and Retail Clerks, Local 1515]
(98 NLRB No. 11). 1952—Apr. 430-431.
Office Towel Supply Co. [and Jenifer] (97 NLRB No.
74). 1952— Feb. 189.
Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Co. [and Order o f
Repeatermen and Toll Testboardmen] (107 NLRB
No. 301). 1954—May 560.
Teamsters, Local 626 and Lewis Food Co. (115 NLRB
No. 136). 1956— June 690.
Terry Poultry Co. [and Meat Cutters, Local 442]
(109 NLRB No. 154). 1954— Nov. 1247.
Union Twist Drill Co. [and Steelworkers] (124 NLRB
No. 157). 1959—Dec. 1372.
Valley City Furniture Co. [and Furniture Workers,
Local 415] (110 NLRB No. 216). 1955—Mar. 329.
Discrimination:
Ace Handle Corp. and Arvil Purifoy (100 NLRB No.
230). 1952— Dec. 650.
Acme Mattress Co. [and Littleton] (91 NLRB No.
169). 1951— Jan. 62.
American Manufacturing Co. of Texas [and Steel­
workers] (98 NLRB No. 48). 1952—Apr. 430.
Associated General Contractors and Operating Engi­
neers (119 NLRB No. 133). 1958— Feb. 185-186.
Bickford Shoes [and Boot and Shoe Workers, Local
138; and Shoe Workers’ Association o f Milford,
Mass.] (109 NLRB No. 188). 1954— Nov. 1247.
Brodsky & Son [and Reiman] (114 NLRB No. 12S).
1956— Jan. 72.
Burns & Gillespie [and Meat Cutters] (101 NLRB
No. 187). 1953—Mar. 285.
Caterpillar Tractor Co. [and Machinists, District 55]
(113 NLRB No. 37). 1955— Oct. 1162.
Chisholm-Ryder Co. [and Cavicchia] (94 NLRB No.
76). 1951—July 70-71.
Clara-Val Packing Co. [and Cannery Warehousemen,
Local 679] (87 NLRB No. 120). 1951— Feb. 198.
Custom Underwear Manufacturing Co. [and Miller]
(108 NLRB No. 24). 1954—June 664.
Dinion Coil Co. [and Electrical Workers (IB E W )]
(96 NLRB No. 215). 1952—Jan. 64.
El Diaro Publishing Co. [and Serrano] (114 NLRB
No. 153). 1956— Jan. 72.
Electric Auto-Lite Co. [and Eck] (92 NLRB No.
171). 1951—Apr. 446.
Ferro Stamping and Manufacturing Co. [and Mi­
randa] (93 NLRB No. 252). 1951— June 705.
Food Machinery & Chemical Corp. [and Bauer] (99
NLRB No. 167). 1952— Sept. 305.
General Dynamics Corn, [and Pense] (111 NLRB No.
185). 1955—June 681.
Intermountain Equipment Co. [and Teamsters, Local
483] (114 NLRB No. 214). 1956—Mar. 323.
International Association of Heat & Frost Insulators
& Asbestos Workers, Local 7 [and Lennox, Eskola,
Kangas, Rosand and Seattle Construction Council
and its members] (92 NLRB No. 134). 1951— Feb.
198.
International Furniture Co. [and Upholsterers] (98
NLRB No. 100). 1952— June 691.

Discrimination— Continued
International Shoe Co. [and Rubber Workers, Local
198] (93 NLRB No. 159). 1951—May 569.
Iron Workers [and Dolen] (112 NLRB No. 137).
1955— Aug. 923.
J. W. Rylands Co. [and Bencbeck] (111 NLRB No.
211). 1955—June 681.
Kuner-Empson Co. [and Schmidt] (106 NLRB No.
116). 1953—Oct. 1095.
Lakeland Bus Lines and Gibson (124 NLRB No. 15).
1959—Oct. 1132-1133.
Lexington Electric Products Co. and Tino; Local 3,
Electrical Workers (IB E W ) and Same (124 NLRB
No. 191). 1960— Jan. 57.
Machinists, Lodge 1021 [and New Britain Machine
Co.] (116 NLRB No. 92). 1956—Oct. 1192.
Mathieson Chemical Corp. [and Plumbers and Pipe­
fitters, Local 152, and Carpenters, Local 1369, and
Electrical Workers, Local 425] (114 NLRB No. 85).
1956— Jan. 71.
Millwrights, Local 2481 [and Clem] (114 NLRB No.
101). 1956—Jan. 71-72.
Miranda Fuel Co. and Lopuch; Local 553, Teamsters
and Same (125 NLRB No. 53). 1960— Feb. 177.
Modern Linen and Laundry Service and Pedersen
(116 NLRB No. 284). 1957—Mar. 356.
Mrs. Baird’s Bakeries [and Teamsters, Local 47] (114
NLRB No. 83). 1956—Jan. 73.
National Automotive Fibres and Molton; Textile
Workers Union of America and Same (121 NLRB
No. 173). 1959—Jan. 55-56.
National Co. [and Electrical Workers (IU E )] (104
NLRB No. 94). 1953— July 759.
Painters and Paperhangers, Local 419 [and Cooney]
(114 NLRB No. 175). 1956— Feb. 199.
Pape Broadcasting Co. [and Thompson] (104 NLRB
No. 2). 1953— July 759.
Sals Cup Co. [and Pulp and Sulphite Workers] (114
NLRB No. 31). 1955— Dec. 1480-1481.
Slater dba Acme Equipment Co. and Millwrights,
Local 102, Carpenters (102 NLRB No. 19). 1953—
Apr. 413.
Spartan Aircraft Co. [and Machinists, Local 790]
(112 NLRB No. 156). 1955—Aug. 923.
Standard Brands [and Simone] (97 NLRB No. 102).
1952— Mar. 310-311.
Studebaker Corp. [and Elmer E. Kovach and Local 5,
Automobile Workers] (110 NLRB No. 214). 1955—
Feb. 213.
Sunset Minerals and Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers,
Local 18 (100 NLRB No. 241). 1952— Dec. 650.
Teamsters [and Boston] (94 NLRB No. 214).
1951— Sept. 313-314.
Technicolor Motion Picture Corp. [and Balthrope]
(115 NLRB No. 261). 1956— Sept. 1064.
Texas Consolidated Transportation Co. [and Gen­
eral Drivers and Helpers, Local 657] (101 NLRB
No. 174). 1953— Mar. 285.
Textile Machine Works [and Steelworkers] (96
NLRB No. 195). 1952—Jan. 64.
United Shoe Machinery Corp. [and Steelworkers] (96
NLRB No. 197). 1952— Jan. 63-64.
Wagner Electric Corp. [and Technical Engineers,
Local 23] (105 NLRB No. 3). 1953—Aug. 869.
Westinghouse Electric Corp. [and Scheuermann]
(96 NLRB No. 71). 1951—Dec. 710.
Whittenberg Construction Co. [and Machinists] (96
NLRB No. 9). 1951—Nov. 588.
Employer domination:
Alvo-Gravure Division of Publication Corp. and
Local 19, Mailers (124 NLRB No. 141). 1959—
Dec. 1373.
Ben Corson Manufacturing Co. [and Upholsterers,
Local 37] (112 NLRB No. 461). 1955—July 809810.



55
Employer domination—Continued
Stewart-Warner Corp. [and Kelliher] (94 NLRB No.
85). 1951—July 70.
Texas City Chemicals [and Oil, Chemical and Atomic
Workers and Advisory Council of Texas City
Chemicals] (112 NLRB No. 40). 1955— July 809.
Valentine Sugars [and Packinghouse Workers] (102
NLRB No. 38). 1953—Apr. 413.
Interference:
Allied Electric Products [and Electrical Workers
(IB E W )] (109 NLRB No. 177). 1955— Nov. 1248.
Belk’s Department Store [and Retail Clerks, Local
1604] (98 NLRB No. 46). 1952—May 565.
Ben Corson Manufacturing Co. [and Upholsterers,
Local 37] (112 NLRB No. 461). 1955—July 809810.
Bernhard-Altman Texas Corp. and Lovell; Ladies’
Garment Workers and Same (122 NLRB No. 142).
1959—Apr. 420-421.
Biltmore Manufacturing Co. [and Wright and Con­
ner and Hudson] (97 NLRB No. 128). 1952—Mar.
312.
Blue Flash Express [and Teamsters, Local 270] (109
NLRB No. 85). 1955— Oct. 1132.
Bonwit Teller [and Retail Clerks] (96 NLRB No.
73). 1951— Dec. 709.
Caterpillar Tractor Co. [and Machinists, District 55]
(113 NLRB No. 37). 1955— Oct. 1162.
Cayey Manufacturing Co. [and Confederacion Gen­
eral de Trabajadores de Puerto Rico] (100 NLRB
No. 83). 1952— Oct. 430.
Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. [and Patty] (98
NLRB No. 168). 1952—June 691-692.
Connor Foundry Co. [and Automobile Workers and
Connor Foundry Employees’ Union] (100 NLRB
No. 28). 1952— Sept. 305.
Coolidge Corp. [and Automobile Workers] (108
NLRB No. 1). 1955—June 664.
Dinion Coil Co. [and Electrical Workers (IB E W )]
(96 NLRB No. 215). 1952—Jan. 64.
George J. Meyer Manufacturing Co. [and Steel­
workers] (111 NLRB No. 154). 1955—May 572.
Goetz dba Federal Silk Mills [and Textile Workers
of America] (107 NLRB No. 177). 1955—Mar. 300.
Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. [and Retail Food
Clerks, Local 1500, and Food Handlers, Locals 400
and 489, and Food Store Employees, Local 342]
( 111 NLRB No. ] 06). 1955—May 571.
Gummed Products Co. [and Papermakers and Paperworkers] (112 NLRB No. 141). 1955—Aug. 924.
Higgins [and Boilermakers, Local 37] (106 NLRB
No. 145). 1953— Nov. 1209.
Hills Brass Co. [and Teamsters, Local 559] (114
NLRB No. 35). 1955—Dec. 1480.
Hudson Hoisery Co. [and Hosiery Workers] (109
NLRB No. 197). 1955— Nov. 1248.
Jandel Furs and W einstein; Fur Workers, Local 72
and Weinstein (100 NLRB No. 234). 1952— Dec.
650-651.
John L. Clemmey Co. and Steelworkers (118 NLRB
No. 77). 1957—Oct. 1243.
Johnson Transport Co. [and Teamsters, Locals 47,
565, 583, 657, 745] (106 NLRB No. 175). 1953—
Nov. 1211.
Kimble Glass Co. [and Electrical Workers (IU E )]
(113 NLRB No. 58). 1955— Oct. 1162-1163.
Livingston Shirt Corp. [and Clothing Workers] (107
NLRB No. 109). 1955—Feb. 185.
Machinists, Lodge 942 and Alloy Manufacturing Co.
(119 NLRB No. 38). 1958— Jan. 63.
Mall Tool Co. [and Automobile Workers, Local 286]
(112 NLRB No. 171). 1955— Sept. 1026.
Moksnes Manufacturing Co. [and Machinists] (106
NLRB No. 204). 1953—Dec. 1319.

56
Interference— Continued
National Furniture Manufacturing Co. [and Furni­
ture Workers, Local 312] (106 NLRB No. 228).
1954— Jan. 60.
Newport News Children’s Dress Co. [and Ladies’ Gar­
ment Workers] (91 NLRB No. 230). 1951— Jan. 62.
Nutone [and Steelworkers] (112 NLRB No. 143).
1955— Aug. 922.
Old King Cole [and Automobile Workers] (117 NLRB
No. 41). 1957— Apr. 485-486.
Onondaga Pottery Co. and Federation of Glass,
Ceramic and Silica Sand Workers (100 NLRB No.
188). 1952— Nov. 546.
Operating Engineers, Local 12 and Shepherd and
Shepherd dba Shepherd Machinery Co. (119 NLRB
No. 39). 1958—Jan. 63.
Peerless Plywood Co. [and Furniture Workers] (107
NLRB No. 106). 1954— Feb. 185.
Peoria Plastic Co. and Machinists (117 NLRB No.
77). 1.957— May 605.
Protein Blenders [and Teamsters, Local 238] (105
NLRB No. 137). 1953— Sept. 975.
Robinson Freight Lines [and Teamsters, Local 621]
(114 NLRB No. 162). 1956— Feb. 199.
Round Mountain Gold Dredging Corp. [and Operating
Engineers, Local 3] (92 NLRB No. 142). 1951—
Mar. 317.
Teamsters, Local 639 and Curtis Bros. (119 NLRB
No. 33). 1958— Jan. 62.
W. T. Grant Co. [and Retail Clerks] (104 NLRB No.
60). 1953—July 758.
Zeller Corp. [and Automobile Workers] (115 NLRB
No. 111). 1956— June 689.
Jurisdictional disputes:
Electrical Workers (IB E W ) and Franklin Broadcast­
ing Co. (126 NLRB No. 150). 1960—June 626-627.
Plumbers and Pipefitters, Local 428 and Riggers and
Machinery Movers, Local 161, Iron Workers (108
NLRB No. 50). 1954— June 664-665.
Slater dba Acme Equipment Co. and Millwrights,
Local 102, Carpenters (102 NLRB No. 19). 1953—
Apr. 413.
Teamsters, Local 107 and Safeway Stores (129 NLRB
No. 2). 1960—Dec. 1314-1315.
Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers and Acoustical Con­
tractors Association of Cleveland (119 NLRB No.
166). 1958— Mar. 292.
WT
ood, Wire and Metal Lathers, Local 173 arid Newark
& Essex Plastering Co. (121 NLRB No. 137).
1958—Dec. 1402.
NLRB authority:
Baxter Bros, [and Machinists, Lodge 87] (91 NLRB
No. 233). 1951— Jan. 63.
Disabled American Veterans [and Pulp and Sulphite
Workers] (112 NLRB No. 116). 1955—Aug. 924.
NLRB jurisdictional standards:
Automobile Workers, Local 1083 and Allied Inde­
pendent Unions (CUA) (107 NLRB No. 107).
1954—Mar. 301.
Bickford’s [and Bakery and Confectionery Workers]
(110 NLRB No. 252). 1955— Mar. 329.
Breeding Transfer Co. [and Teamsters, Local 21]
(110 NLRB No. 64). 1955—Jan. 91-92.
Brooks and Brooks dba Brooks Wood Products [and
Automobile Workers] (107 NLRB No. 71). 1954—
Feb. 186.
Browning and Rasco dba Cottage Bakers and Local
492, Teamsters (120 NLRB No. 99). 1958—July
773.
California Inland Broadcasting Co. [and Electrical
Workers (IB E W ), Local 202] (106 NLRB No. 218).
1953—Dec. 1320.
Cantera Providencia [and Cordero and Confederacion
General de Trabajadores de Puerto Rico] (111
NLRB No. 141). 1955—May 570.



NLRB jurisdictional standards— Continued
Carpenters [and] Dennehy Construction Co. ( I l l
NLRB No. 180). 1955— June 681.
Checker Cab Co. [and Employees Association of Yel­
low and Checker Cab. Co.] (110 NLRB No. 109).
1955—Jan. 94.
Coca-Cola Bottling Co. [and Teamsters, Local 583]
(110 NLRB No. 134). 1955—Jan. 94.
Daily Press [and Penninsula Independent Editorial
Workers Association] (110 NLRB No. 95). 1955—
Jan. 92-93.
Greenwich Gas Co. and Fuels [and Scott] (110 NLRB
No. 91). 1955—Jan. 92.
Hanford Broadcasting Co. [and Electrical Workers,
Local 202] (110 NLRB No. 208). 1955— Feb. 213214.
Hotel Association of St. Louis [and Operating Engi­
neers, Locals 2, 2A, 2B, 2C] (92 NLRB No. 215).
1951—Mar. 317-318.
Inter-County Rural Electric Cooperative Corp. [and
Electrical Workers (IB E W )] (106 NLRB No. 238).
1954—Jan. 60.
Jonesboro Grain Drying Cooperative [and Brewery
Workers] (110 NLRB No. 91). 1955—Jan. 92.
Knott and Hogue dba Hogue & Knott Supermarkets
[and Retail Clerks, Local 1529] (110 NLRB No.
68). 1955—Jan. 93.
Maytag Aircraft Corp. [and Teamsters, Local 968]
(110 NLRB No. 70). 1955—Jan. 93.
McKinney Avenue Realty Co. (City National Bank)
[and Operating Engineers, Local 707] (110 NLRB
No. 69). 1955—Jan. 93.
T. H. Rogers Lumber Co. and Carpenters, Local 986
(117 NLRB No. 230). 1957— Sept. 1098.
Silvers Sportswear [and Ladies’ Garment Workers,
Local 266, and Los Angeles Sportswear Joint
Council and Ladies’ Garment Workers and Gar­
ment Shipping and Receiving Clerks, Warehouse­
men, Drivers and Helpers, Local 994] (108 NLRB
No. 39). 1954—July 784.
Sky view Transportation Co. [and Teamsters, Local
643] (92 NLRB No. 251). 1951—Apr. 446.
Virgin Isles Hotel [and St. Thomas Labor Union]
(110 NLRB No. 65). 1955—Jan. 94.
Wilson and Wilson dba Wilson-Oldsmobile [and
Automobile Workers, Local 985] (110 NLRB No.
74). 1955—Jan. 94.
Picketing:
Automotive, Petroleum, and Allied Industries Em­
ployees, Local 618, Teamsters and Incorporated Oil
Co. (116 NLRB No. 271). 1957—Mar. 355.
Carter Manufacturing Co. and Lodge 24, Machinists
(120 NLRB No. 204). 1958— Sept. 1017-1018.
Electrical Workers (IU E), Local 761 and General
Electric Co. (123 NLRB No. 180). 1959— Aug. 906.
Ladies’ Garment Workers [and Gemsco] (111 NLRB
No. 11). 1955—Mar. 329-330.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers, Local 2781, Carpenters
and Everett Plywood and Door Corp. (107 NLRB
No. 120). 1954—Mar. 300-301.
Machinists, Lodge 942 and Alloy Manufacturing Co.
(119 NLRB No. 38). 1958— Jan. 63.
Operating Engineers, Local 12 and Shepherd and
Shepherd dba Shepherd Machinery Co. (119 NLRB
No. 39). 1958—Jan. 63.
Painters, Local 1730 [and Painting and Decorating
Contractors of America] (109 NLRB No. 166).
1954— Nov. 1245.
Patterson-Sargent Co. [and Gas, Coke and Chemical
Workers, Local 260] (115 NLRB No. 255). 1956—
Sept. 1065.
Retail Clerks, Local 1565 and Store No. 309, J. C.
Penney Co. (120 NLRB No. 189). 1958—Aug. 895.
Teamsters, Local 208 and Sierra Furniture Co. (125
NLRB No. 20). 1960— Feb. 174-175.

Picketing— Continued
Teamsters, Local 239 and Stan-Jay Auto Parts (127
NLRB No. 132). I960— Oct. 1085-1087.
Teamsters, Local 639 and Curtis Bros. (119 NLRB
No. 33). 1958—Jan. 62.
Procedural requirements:
Aiello Dairy Farms [and Congress of Industrial Or­
ganizations] (110 NLRB No. 205). 1955— Feb. 213.
Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. and Bakery and Con­
fectionery Workers of America (118 NLRB No.
138). 1957—Nov. 1372.
Knickerbocker Manufacturing Co. [and Clothing
Workers] (109 NLRB No. 169). 1954— Nov. 12451246.
Protected activity:
American Tool Works Co. and Steelworkers (116
NLRB No. 247). 1957— Feb. 202.
Electronics Equipment Co. [and Oenchansky] (94
NLRB No. 19). 1951— July 70.
Texas Co. [and Cody] (93 NLRB No. 239). 1951—
June 705.
Reinstatement rights:
B.V.D. Co. [and Ladies’ Garment Workers] (110
NLRB No. 206). 1955—Mar. 327-328.
Coats & Clark [and Textile Workers Union of Amer­
ica] (113 NLRB No. 29). 1955— Oct. 1160.
Ostrowski dba Philadelphia Woodwork Co. and Roy
A rcher; Carpenters, Local 359 and Carpenters,
Metropolitan District Council of Philadelphia and
Vicinity and Same (121 NLRB No. 201). 1959—
Jan. 56.
Roure-Dupont Manufacturing [and Peters and Mar­
tin] (93 NLRB No. 230). 1951—June 704-705.
Representation elections:
See 1958—Dec. 1399-1402 for cases illustrating revi­
sion and clarification of rules on when contracts bar
elections.
Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Norwood Plant
[and Machinists, Lodge 729] (111 NLRB No. 56).
1955— Apr. 456.
Am-O-Krame Co. [and Congress of Industrial Or­
ganizations] (92 NLRB No. 159). 1951— Mar. 318.
Appalachian Shale Products Co. and United Brick and
Clay Workers (121 NLRB No. 149). 1958—Dec.
1401-1402.
Associated Food Distributors [and Teamsters, Local
223] (109 NLRB No. 86). 1954—Oct. 1133-1134.
B & B Beer Distributing Co. and Brewery Workers
(124 NLRB No. 185). 1960— Jan. 56-57.
Centr-O-Cast & Engineering Co. and Local 985, Auto­
mobile Workers (100 NLRB No. 253). 1952—. ec.
D
649.
Coca-Cola Bottling Co. [and Furniture Workers] (97
NLRB No. 73). 1952— Feb. 190.
Comfort Slipper Corp. [and United Shoeworkers]
(112 NLRB No. 28). 1955—June 680.
Curtis Bros, [and Truck Drivers, Local 639] (114
NLRB No. 27). 1955—Dec. 1479-1480.
De Luxe Metal Furniture Co. and Sheet Metal Work­
ers (121 NLRB No. 135). 195S—Dec. 1400-1401.
Doak Aircraft Co. [and Stump and Machinists, Lodge
720] (107 NLRB No. 189). 1954—Apr. 436.
Du-Wei Decorative Co. and Machinists (125 NLRB
No. 5). 1960—Jan. 56.
Electric Auto-Lite Co. [and Automobile Workers]
(116 NLRB No. 100). 1956—Nov. 1313.
Ford Motor Co. (Canton Forge Division) [and Boiler­
makers] (95 NLRB No. 121). 1951— Sept. 312.
Frank Smith and Sons [and Meat Cutters] (112
NLRB No. 29). 1955—June 680.
General Extrusion Co. and Local 411, Metal Precision,
Electronics and Production Workers, N.I.U.C. (121
NLRB No. 147). 1958—Dec. 1402.
Globe Forge [and Electrical Workers (Ind.), Local
323, and Steelworkers] (115 NLRB No. 134).
1956— June 689.



57
Representative elections— Continued
Great Lake Industries and Local 67, Metal Polishers
(124 NLRB No. 50). 1959— Oct. 1132.
Hershey Chocolate Corp. and Local 464, American
Bakery and Confectionery Workers and Bakery
and Confectionery Workers of America (121 NLRB
No. 124). 1958— Dec. 1400.
International Harvester Co. [and Electrical Workers
(IU E) ] (95 NLRB No. 80). 1951— O ct 465-466.
John W. Thomas Co. [and Retail Clerks, Local 1086]
(111 NLRB No. 37). 1955—Mar. 329-330.
Ketchikan Pulp Co. [and Electrical Workers (IB E W ),
Local 1548 and Machinists, Lodge 1375, and Operat­
ing Engineers, Local 302, and Laborers, Local 1331,
and Hod Carriers] (115 NLRB No. 51). 1956—May
575.
Keystone Coat, Apron & Towel Supply Co. and Local
397, Teamsters (121 NLRB No. 125). 1958—Dec.
1399-1400.
Linde Air Products Co. [and Automobile Workers]
(107 NLRB No. 246). 1954—Apr. 436.
Ludlow Typograph Co. [and Electrical Workers
(IU E) and Engravers, Local 1] (108 NLRB No.
209). 1954— Sept. 1009.
Newton Investigation Bureau [and Watchmen] (93
NLRB No. 261). 1951—June 703.
Pacific Coast Association of Pulp and Paper Manu­
facturers and Lithographers, Locals 17, 22, 36, (121
NLRB No. 134). 1958— Dec. 1401.
Pearl and Werner dba National Torch Tip Co. [and
American Federation of Labor] (107 NLRB No.
269). 1954— May 559-560.
Peoria Plastic Co. and Machinists (117 NLRB No.
77). 1957— May 605.
Plumbing and Heating Contractors [and Plumbers
and Pipefitters, Local 500] (93 NLRB No. 176).
1951— May 568.
Plumbing Contractors Association [and Plumbers and
Pipefitters, Local 48] (93 NLRB No. 177). 1951—
May 568.
Potomac Electric Power Co. [and Electrical Workers
(IB E W )] (111 NLRB No. 92). 1955—Apr. 455.
Retail Associates and Retail Clerks (120 NLRB No.
66). 1958—June 643.
Rohm & Haas Co. [and Electrical Workers (IB E W )]
(108 NLRB No. 185). 1954—Aug. 900.
Spencer Kellogg & Sons [and Operating Engineers,
Local 68] (115 NLRB No. 128). 1956—June 690.
Teamsters, Local 404 and Machinists [and Brown
Equipment & Manufacturing Co.] (100 NLRB No.
135). 1952—Nov. 546.
Union Forging Co. [and Die Sinkers, Lodge 190]
(114 NLRB No. 190). 1956— Feb. 197.
United Transports [and Teamsters, Local 604] (107
NLRB No. 245). 1954—Apr. 436-437.
Western Electric Co. [and Communications Work­
ers] (94 NLRB No. 9). 1951—July 71.
Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. [and Woodworkers, Local
6-12] (93 NLRB No. 43). 1951— May 568-569.
William Penn Broadcasting Co. [and Electrical
Workers (IB E W )] (93 NLRB No. 201). 1951—
June 703-704.
Secondary boycott:
Hot cargo. Pilgrim Furniture Co. and Furniture
Workers (128 NLRB No. 92). 1960—Nov. 12011202 .
------ Reilly dba Reilly Cartage Co. [and Teamsters,
Local 200] (100 NLRB No. 233). .1955—-Mar. 327.
------ Teamsters, Locals 554 and 608 [and McAllister
Transfer] (110 NLRB No. 224). 1955—Mar. 326327.
------ Teamsters, Local 728 and Genuine Parts Co.
(119 NLRB No. 53). 1958—Jan. 63.

58
Secondary boycott—Continued
Other. Associated Musicians and Gotham Broad­
casting Corp. (110 NLRB No. 269). 1955—Mar.
327.
------ Boilermakers and Richfield Oil Corp. (95 NLRB
No. 160). 1951—Noy . 587.
------ Brewery and Beverage Drivers and Workers,
Local 67, Teamsters [and Rosenberg] (107 NLRB
No. 104). 1954— Feb. 186.
------ Carpenters, Local 1976 and Sand Door and Ply­
wood Co. (113 NLRB No. 123). 1955—Nov. 1277.
------ Chemical Workers, Local 36 and Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp. (126 NLRB No. 117). 1 9 6 0 May 508-509.
------ Electrical Workers (IB E W ), Local 313 and
Peter D. Furness Electric Co. (117 NLRB No. 60).
1957— May 604-605.
------ Electrical Workers (IU E) [and Royal Type­
writer Co.] ( I l l NLRB No. 57). 1955—Apr. 454.
------ Glaziers, Local 27, Painters and Paperhangers,
[and Joliet Contractors’ Association] (99 NLRB
No. 146). 1952— Sept. 304-305.
------ Marsh Foodliners [and Teamsters, Locals 135,
369] (114 NLRB No. 108). 1956— Jan. 70.
------ Meat Cutters, Local 88 [and Thomas and Stribling] (113 NLRB No. 31). 1955—Oct. 1158-1159.
------ Plumbers and Pipefitters [and Columbia-South­
ern Chemical Corp.] (110 NLRB No. 25). 1954—
Dec. 1357.
------ Plumbers and Pipefitters and Detroit Edison
Co. (123 NLRB No. 37). 1959—June 670.
------ Sailors’ Union [and Moore Dry Dock Co.] (92
NLRB No. 93). 1951— Feb. 200.
------ Seafarers and Superior Derrick Corp. (122
NLRB No. 6). 1959— Feb. 174-175.
------ Stover Steel Service [and Iron Workers, Local
16 and Baltimore Building and Construction Trades
Council] (108 NLRB No. 221). 1955—May 572.
------ Teamsters and B & S Motor Lines (116 NLRB
No. 117). 1956—Nov. 1314.
------ Teamsters and Crump (112 NLRB No. 49).
1955—July 807.
------ Truck Drivers and Helpers, Local 600, Team­
sters [and Osceola Foods] (107 NLRB No. 63).
1954— Feb. 186.
■
------ Union de Trabajadores de la Gonzalez Chemical
Industries and Gonzalez Chemical Industries (128
NLRB No. 116). 1960— Dec. 1315-1316.
Union security:
Closed shop. Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. [and
Kardell] (110 NLRB No. 146). 1955— Feb. 215.
------ International Association of Heat & Frost In­
sulators & Asbestos Workers, Local 7 [and Len­
nox, Eskola, Kangas, Rosand and Seattle Construc­
tion Council and its members] (92 NLRB No. 134).
1951— Feb. 198.
Hiring hall. American Pipe and Steel Corp. [and
Watson] (93 NLRB No. 11). 1951—Apr. 447.
------ Associated General Contractors a?id Hod Car­
riers (19 NLRB No. 126). 1958—June 643-644.
------ Boilermakers, Local 803 [and Forte and Harbor
Ship Maintenance Co.] (107 NLRB No. 212).
1954—Apr. 437.
------ Operating Engineers, Local 138 and Nassau and
Suffolk Contractors’ Association (123 NLRB No.
167). 1959— Sept. 1022-1023.
------ Plumbers and Pipefitters, Local 425 and Scalise
and Lummus Corp. (125 NLRB No. 107). 1960—
Mar. 292-293.
Union shop. Aluminum Workers, Local 135 and
Boness (112 NLRB No. 80). 1955—July 808-809.
------ Kress Dairy [and Milk & Ice Cream Drivers &
Dairy Employees, Local 937] (98 NLRB No. 63).
1952— May 565.



Union security— Continued
Miscellaneous. Bickford Shoes [and Boot and Shoe
Workers. Local 138 and Shoe Workers’ Association
of Milford, Mass.] (109 NLRB No. 188). 1954—
Nov. 1247.
------ Chesler Glass Co. [and Distributive, Processing
and Office Workers (In d.), District 65] (92 NLRB
No. 157). 1951— Mar. 318.
Miscellaneous:
Breach of contract. Marathon Electric Manufactur­
ing Corp. [and Electrical Workers (IU E ), Local
1113 and Electrical Workers (IB E W ), Local 1791]
(106 NLRB No. 199). 1953—Dec. 1319-1320.
Contempt hearings. Camp (96 NLRB No. 7). 1951—
Nov. 585-586.
Coverage. Malone Freight Lines [and Teamsters]
(106 NLRB No. 176). 1953— Nov. 1211.
Definitions. American Broadcasting Co. [and Broad­
cast Employees and Technicians] (100 NLRB No.
103). 1952— Oct. 430.
------ Grand Union Co. and Schultz (123 NLRB No.
191). 1959— Aug. 907.
Lockout. Buffalo Linen Supply Co. [and Teamsters,
Local 449] (109 NLRB No. 69). 1954— Oct. 1132.
------ Great Falls Employers’ Council and Retail
Clerks (123 NLRB No. 109). 1959—July 786.
Make-work. American Federation of Musicians,
Local 24 [and Gamble Enterprises] (92 NLRB No.
210). 1951— Apr. 447.
Management rights. Pacific Intermountain Express
Co. [and Beall] (107 NLRB No. 158). 1954—
Mar. 301-302.
Plant migration. California Footwear Co. [and Shoe
Workers, Local 122 and Trina Shoe Co.] (114
NLRB No. 117). m id — Jan. 69-70.
Successor employer. Symns Grocer Co. [and Team­
sters, Local 983] (103 NLRB No. 63 ; 109 NLRB No.
58). 1953— June 631; 1954— Oct, 1134.
Union funds. International Harvester Co. [and Elec­
trical Workers (IU E) ] (95 NLRB No. 80). 1951—
Oct. 465-466.
Union officer’s responsibility. Mine Workers, District
50 [and Tungsten Mining Corp.] (106 NLRB No.
153). 1953—Nov. 1210.
Other Agencies
Civil Aeronautics Board rule. Workmen’s compensation,
statute of limitations. Battista v. Continental Chart­
ers. 1953— Mar. 285-286.
Federal Aviation Act. Six Carrier Mutual Aid [Strike]
Pact (Civil Aeronautics Board). 1959—Aug. 907-908.
Federal Trade Commission Act. Union restriction of
subcontracting. In the matter of California Sportswear
& Dress Association (Federal Trade Commission).
1958— Apr. 416-417.
Interstate Commerce Act. Hot-cargo clause. Galveston
Truck Line Corp. v. ADA Motor Lines (Interstate Com­
merce Commission). 1958— Feb. 185.
New York State Labor Relations Act. “ Paper union.”
Helsid Realty Corp. and Local 21, Organized Building
and Factory Service Employees (N.Y. State Labor Re­
lations Board). 1959— Oct. 1134.
NLRB versus State board jurisdiction. Carpenters, Local
2840 and Scott-Taylor Co. (Wis. Employment Relations
Board). 1958—Nov. 1279-1280.
------ Raisch Motors (N.Y. State Labor Relations Board).
1955—May 572-573.
Public Contracts Act. Interpretation of stockpile rule.
In re R. E. Funsten Co. (U.S. Department of Labor).
1958— Nov. 1280.
Railway Labor Act. See Federal Aviation Act, this
section.
South Dakota “ right to work” law. Opinion of Attorney
General. 1958—Dec. 1403.
U . S . GOVERNMENT PRINTING O F F I C E : 1 962