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79th Congress, 1st Session

H ouse D ocum ent, N o. 14 7A

Family Spending and Saving
in Wartime

Bulletin No. 822

PUBLISHED AS A PART OF THE STUDY OF FAMILY SPENDING AND
SAVING IN WARTIME, CONDUCTED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR
STATISTICS, IN COOPERATION WITH THE UNITED STATES
BUREAU OF HUMAN NUTRITION AND HOME ECONOMICS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Frances Perkins, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Isador Lubin,
Commissioner (on leave)

A. F. Hinrichs,
Acting Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, United States Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. G.
*
Price 35c







Letter o f Transmittal

U nited States D epartment o f *L abor,
B ureau of L abor Statistics,

Washington, D. C., April 2, 1945.
The Secretary

of

L abor :

I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on the income,
expenditures, and savings of a cross section of the Nation’s families
and single consumers, prepared by Alice C. Hanson, Jerome Cornfield,
and Lenore A. Epstein, o f the Bureau’s Cost of Living Division. The
data presented in this volume were obtained in the Survey o f Family
Spending and Saving in Wartime, conducted by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics in cooperation with the Bureau of Human Nutrition and
Home Economics o f the United States Department of Agriculture.
The Foreword describes the need for such a study, and gives the
organizations and persons who participated in the planning and
direction o f the various phases o f the survey.
A. F. H inrichs ,
Acting Commissioner.
Hon. F rances P erkins ,




Secretary of Labor.

iii




Foreword
This volume deals with the incomes, expenditures, and savings of a
cross section of the Nation’s families and civilian single persons during
1941 and the first quarter of 1942. The data presented were obtained
in the Survey of Spending and Saving in Wartime, conducted by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of Human Nutrition and
Home Economics of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The survey
was the first o f its kind since 1935-36 and is the only survey which has
been conducted in the United States for the primary purpose of pro­
viding national estimates of expenditures and savings by income class.
The need for facts on which to base decisions for the civilian economy
during wartime became especially urgent after the entrance o f the
United States into the war in December 1941. Policy decisions had to
be made regarding price and wage controls, rationing, food production
and distribution, taxation and other forms of war financing. Accord­
ingly, in the spring of 1942 the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the
Bureau o f Human Nutrition and Home Economics undertook con­
current studies o f the incomes, spending, and saving in urban and
rural areas, respectively.
Schedule forms and instructions were prepared jointly to insure
complete consistency of results. Representatives o f the Bureau of Labor
Statistics interviewed city families and single consumers in 62 cities,
and representatives of the Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Eco­
nomics visited farm and rural nonfarm families and single consumers
in 45 counties. Together, their reports cover a cross section of the
civilian population, exclusive of institutional and quasi-institutional
groups.
The year 1941 and the first 3 months o f 1942 saw rapid increases in
incomes and in price levels. Few wartime restrictions had been im­
posed ; shortages o f civilian goods had not yet developed to a significant
extent. From a long-range point o f view, therefore, data for these periods
provide a useful bench mark against which to measure the effect of
higher wartime incomes and scarcities of civilian goods on the pattern
of civilian consumption and saving. By comparison with the data for
1935-36, when the national income was very much lower, they throw
additional light on factors that influence the allocation of incomes
between expenditures and savings.
As a measure of the public welfare and the needs o f the population,
the survey data are also very valuable. Plans for the postwar economy
must take into account the situation in 1941 when the employment,
retail sales, and the national income reached a high level, but nearly
half the families and single persons in the Nation received less than
$1,500 annual money income. Analysis o f the spending o f these groups
highlights unmet needs for goods and services, the production o f which
could provide new outlets for American industry.
In addition to the Nation-wide estimates, detailed information on
income, expenditures, and savings by income classes is provided for




v

VI

Foreword

city families and single consumers. Correspondingly detailed informa­
tion for rural families is published in U. S. Department of Agriculture
Miscellaneous Publication No. 520: Rural Family Spending and Saving
in Wartime. A report on the details of food consumption and expendi­
tures in 1 week in the spring o f 1942 for all three areas— urban, rural
nonfarm, and rural farm— is presented in U. S. Department of Agri­
culture Miscellaneous Publication No. 550: Food Consumption in the
United States, Spring, 1942.
Preliminary summaries o f the data presented in this volume were
first published in the Monthly Labor Review for September and
October 1942 and reprinted with additional data as Bureau of Labor
Statistics Bulletins Nos. 723 and 724. Much of the detail published in
this volume has previously been released for the use of various war and
administrative agencies o f the Federal Government, including the
War Production Board, the Office of Price Administration, the Treas­
ury, and the War Food Administration. The detailed tables are pub­
lished in full in this report, in response to requests from many Govern­
ment agencies, labor groups, businessmen, and private research agencies.
The detailed reference tables in Part III constitute the direct findings
o f the survey. A statement on the scope and methods of the survey is
in Part I and a critical evaluation of the survey results is in Part II.
The combined data for all rural farm and all rural nonfarm families
which appear in Part III were prepared by the Bureau o f Human
Nutrition and Home Economics. The data for urban families and single
consumers were prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The
estimates for all families and single consumers (urban and rural com­
bined) represent the joint work of the two cooperating Bureaus. The
comparison o f the income data from this survey with independent esti­
mates from other sources and the critique of survey methods were
developed by Alice C. Hanson and Jerome Cornfield for the Depart­
ment o f Labor, in consultation with Dorothy S. Brady for the Depart­
ment o f Agriculture.
The study in urban communities was planned and conducted, under
the direction o f Faith M. Williams, by Alice C. Hanson, Jerome Corn­
field, and Lenore A. Epstein for the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the
Department of Labor. The rural survey was under the direction of
Day Monroe, Hazel K. Stiebeling, and Dorothy S. Brady for the Depart­
ment o f Agriculture. Gertrude S. Weiss directed the field work for the
Department o f Labor at the beginning o f the investigation; Lenore A.
Epstein directed the conclusion of the field work and the tabulation.
Many members of the staff of the Cost o f Living Division o f this Bureau
took part in the investigation. Special acknowledgment is made o f the
work o f Mary C. Ruark and Elizabeth H. Hyde in preparation o f the
materials for this volume.




Contents
P art I.—Scope

and

M ethod
Pag*

Sampling procedure:
Size and coverage of sample.................................................................................
Selection of urban sample:
Selection of cities.........................
Apportionment of interviews among selected cities...................................
Selection o f families within cities..............................................................

1
3
4

Selection o f rural sample:
Selection of counties..................................................
Distribution of interviews among counties...............................................
Selection of dwelling units within counties...............................................

7
7
8

Collection procedure:
Interview m e t h o d ............................................................................
Field organization...................................................................................................
Collection in cities...........................................................................
Collection in rural areas...............................................................................
Schedule form ........................................................................................................ *

8
9
9
11
11

Nature of the data obtained—Definitions:
Families and single consumers.............................
Urban, rural nonfarm, and rural farm................................................................
Income ......................................................................................................................
Money incom e..................................................................................................
E arnings....................................................................................................
Farm income ...........................................................................................
Net income from roomers and boarders...............................................
Property income .....................................................................................
Direct relief payments.............................................................................
Other money incom e............................
Nonmoney incom e...........................................................................................
Food ...............................................................................
Housing .....................................................................................................
Other nonmoney incom e........................................................................
Inheritances and g ift s .............................................................................................
Expenditures for current consumption..............................................................
Gifts and personal taxes...............................................................................
Changes in assets and liabilities............................................................................

11
12
13
13
13
14
14
15
15
15
15
16
16
16
17
17
18
19

Assets:
Investments in business..........................................................................
Owned home (nonfarm )...............
Owned home (fa r m )...............................................................................
In su rance...................................................................................................
Loans to others.......................................................................................
Other assets..........................................................................................

20
20
21
21
21
21




vii

1

viii

Contents
P art

I.— S c o p e

and

M ethod—

Continued

Nature of the data obtained— Definitions: —Continued.
Changes in assets and liabilities— Continued.
Liabilities:
Mortgages .................................................................................................
Installment balances...............................................................................

21
21

Refusals and substitutions.............................................................................................

22

Urban sample:
Effect of refusals on income distribution..................................................
Adjustment of income distribution..............................................................
Adjusted estimate of mean income for $10,000 and over class..............
Adjusted estimate o f expenditures for $10,000 and over class................

22
25
25
27

Rural sample...........................................................................

27

Population weights for national estimates..................................................................

28

Estimate of civilian population:
Total population, 1941 and first 3 months 1942...........................................
Equivalent persons not included in sample.................................................

28
29

Estimated distribution o f civilian noninstitutional population by type of
community ..........................................................................................................
Rural farm population...................................................................................
Nonfarm pop u la tion .......................................................................................
Deduction o f institutional population.......................................................
Adjustment of rural population estimates to conform to survey
definitions .....................................................................................................
Estimated number of full-period families and single consumers...................

30
30
30
31
31
31

Tables:
1.
2.
3.

— Distribution of total urban dwelling units, total cities over 2,500 popu­
lation, and sample cities, by 6 city-size classes.....................................
2
—Distribution of urban dwelling units, total cities, and sample cities,
by region; cities with populations of 100,000 to 500,000...................
3
— Cities included in sample, certain characteristics o f each, and number
of interviews assigned each......................................................................
4

’4.— Comparison of average monthly rent per block in sample and in
entire city, for each sample city over 50,000 population...................

5

5.

— Counties included in the rural sample, by region and State.............

7

6.

— Distribution of urban families and single consumers by money income
class, by size of city and rent levels, and refusal rate, 1941..........
23

7.

—Refusal rate and original and adjusted distribution of urban families
and single consumers, by money income class, 1941 and 1942 (first
3 months) ..................................................................................................... 24

8.

— Comparison of refusals, expected refusals, and substitutions, by money
income class, in urban sample of families and single consumers,
1941 .................................................................................................................
24

9.

— Comparison of average income above $10,000, calculated from Pareto
curve, with actual average reported from Federal income-tax
retu rn s.............................................................................................................
25

10.—Population weights: Estimated number of full-period families and
single consumers, by money income class




33

Contents
P art II.—Evaluation

of the

ix
Survey D ata
Page

Appraisal of data of the separate samples......................... .......................................

35

Internal consistency of urban sample data........................................................
Relationship between income and expenditure.........................................
Consistency among small subgroups with changed incomes..................
Consistency o f income distribution among subgroups by average rent
of b l o c k ........................................................................................................

35
35
36
38

Urban sample data compared with Census data..............................................
Age distribution o f urban population..........................................................
Characteristics of urban housing..............................................

38
38
39

Comparison o f combined, adjusted survey results with information from in­
dependent sou rces.................................... . . . . . . ; ....................................................
Population estimates from survey compared with OPA estimates............

39
40

Survey aggregates compared with external estimates:
Income data compared with Department of Commerce income pay­
ment series ..............................................
Benefits data compared with Social Security data...................................
Interest and dividends data compared with Internal Revenue data.. . .
Savings data compared with Securities and Exchange Commission data.

41
47
48
48

Critique o f survey methods...........................................................................................

49

Sample s i z e ..............................................................................................................
Chance of including very high income persons.........................................
Understatement o f dividends related to sample size and skewness........
Understatement o f income in other field surveys.......................................
Consumer Purchases Study, 1935-36....................................................
Minnesota Income Study, 1938-39..........................................................
Census wage and salary data..................................................................

50
50
51
52
52
53
53

Quota sampling ............................
Quotas and the effect of population change...............................................
Quotas and the number of single consumers...............................................
Methods to avoid fixed quotas......................................................................
Relative size of urban and rural samples..................................................
Sample allocations to yield minimum sampling variance with respect
to income .....................................................................................................
Standard deviations necessary........................................................................
Weighting in tabulation necessary................................................................

54
54
56
57
57
58
59'
59

“ Part-period” persons and military inductions..................................................

60

Tables:
11.

— Quarterly food expenditures of city families and single consumers,
by income change from 1941 to first quarter 1942, by money income
class ..........................................................................................
38

12.

—Age distribution, all urban areas, by sex, Bureau o f Lahor Statistics
sample and Bureau o f the Census............................................................
39

13.

— Comparison o f number of families and single consumers, year 1941,
estimated from survey and by OPA Division of Research.................. 40

14.

— Comparison of aggregate civilian income by source in 1941, as shown
by survey and by U. S. Department of Commerce..............................
43




Contents

X
P a r t I I .— E v a l u a t i o n

of th e

Su r v e y D a t a —

Continued

Tables— Continued.
15. — Comparison oi percent distribution by money income in 1941 of urban
and rural nonfarm families and single consumers, as shown by
survey sample and by sample adjusted for population change from
1940 to May 1942.......................................................................................
55
16.

— Standard deviation of family income in 1941 by rent classes and city
size and most efficient distribution of sample by such rent classes.. 58

P a r t I I I .— T a b u l a r S u m m a r y

Description of tables......................................................................................................

62

Computation of averages.....................................................................
Classification by incom e.........................................................................................
Classification by type of spending unit................................................................

62
63
64

List of tables....................................................................................................................

65

A p p e n d ix A

Estimates for 1935-36 adjusted for comparison with data from Survey of
Spending and Saving in Wartime............................................................................. 199
A p p e n d ix B — S c h e d u l e s

Spending and saving in wartime.................................................................................. 203
Farm income summary, 1941.......................................................................................... 218




Bulletin N o .

822

o f the

U nited States Bureau o f L abor Statistics

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
The Survey of Family Spending and Saving in Wartime was designed
to provide estimates of the distribution by income class o f the Nation’s
families and single persons and of their expenditures and savings when
classified by income group.

Part I.— SCOPE AND M ETHOD

Sampling Procedure
SIZE AND COVERAGE OF SAMPLE
The sample size was smaller than in any previous survey on which
national estimates have been based. The total number o f families and
single consumers surveyed was under 3,100. The sample was large
enough, however, to yield estimates for the United States as a whole
and for three separate types of community— urban, rural nonfarm, and
rural farm— but not for individual localities or separate geographical
regions. Three separate samples were drawn, covering about 1,300
families and single persons in cities, 1,000 in rural nonfarm areas, and
760 on farms, each planned as a representative cross section o f all fam­
ilies and single consumers living in the particular type o f community.
The method o f drawing the sample differed in several important
respects from that followed in earlier surveys o f family incomes and
expenditures. These changes were deliberately made, in accordance with
the latest developments in sampling theory, to insure greatest possible
efficiency and reliability in yielding national estimates. The coverage
of population, that is, the inclusion in the sample of all segments o f the
population (such as relief, foreign-born, broken families, single con­
sumers, occupational groups, and city-size classes) is more complete
than in any previous survey. The survey did not, however, cover the
inmates o f institutions, residents o f military camps and posts, or persons
in labor camps.
SELECTION OF URBAN SAMPLE
S election o f Cities

The sample o f urban families was selected from 62 cities1 scattered
throughout the country. For any stated number of families, the larger
1 Cities are urban places with population of 2,500 or more as designated b y the Bureau o f the Census.




l

2

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

the number o f communities covered, the smaller is the sampling error.
Thus, the only limit to the number of cities included in any sample is
supplied by considerations o f cost, since it is generally less expensive
to cover a fixed number of families in a smaller than in a larger number
o f cities. The cost factors associated with the present survey indicated
that the most efficient disposition o f available funds (solely from the
point o f view of minimum sampling error) would have involved taking
approximately 90 cities. That number of cities, however, would have
im plied an average of less than 15 families per city. Since the compen­
sation for interviewing this number of families would have been too low
to attract any large number of capable interviewers, the number of
cities was reduced to 62 to provide an average of approximately 20
families per city.
The cities were so selected as to give proper representation to (1)
each city-size group, (2) proximity to a metropolis (for cities under
50,000), (3) each region and State, (4) low-, medium-, and high-rent
cities, (5) cities o f differing racial composition.
A comparison o f the distribution of sample cities with that of the
total number o f cities and of dwelling units among 6 city-size classes
is shown in table 1. The distribution o f the sample cities among the
6 city-size classes was made in accordance with the standard sampling
formulas, that is, approximately in proportion to population, and had
the effect o f including all 14 cities with population in excess of 500,000
and a decreasing proportion of the smaller cities.
T

able

1.— Distribution o f Total Urban Dwelling

,

Units Total CitiesOver2 ,5 0 0 Population
and Sample Cities by 6 City-Size Classes

,

C ity size

Number of
occupied dwelling units,
A p ril 19401

N umber of cities
T o ta l1

Sample

A ll cities..................................................................................................

Millions
20.6

3,464

62

500,000 population and over................................................................
100,000-500,000 population...................................................................
50,000-100,000 population.....................................................................
25,000-50,000 population.............. .......................................................
10,000-25,000 population......................................................................
2,500-10,000 population............................................................. ..........

6.3
4.4
2.0
2.0
2.7
3.2

14
78
107
213
665
2,387

14
14
7
7
0
11

1 Source: 1940 Census of Population.

For the selection of the 14 sample cities in the size class of 100,000
to 500,000, and the 7 cities in the size class of 50,000 to 100,000, a threeway set o f controls based on the following factors was imposed: Region,
1930 median rent and rental value,2 percentage of families in 1930
which were Negro.
Each o f these controls had the effect of specifying the distribution
of the cities by the differing value of the control. A comparison of the
distribution by region of the total number of dwelling units in cities of
100,000 to 500,000 population and of the selected sample cities is shown
in table 2.
The distribution o f the sample communities by these regions was
obtained in the same fashion as the distribution of all 62 cities among
city-size classes, that is, approximately in proportion to total urban
2 A t th e tim e the sample was drawn, 1940 rent was not available for m ost o f the cities in the country.
Subsequent experiments have shown that the differences between stratifications based upon 1940 and 1930
rents are slight.




3

Part / . — Scope and M ethod

population in each. Similar distributions of cities and o f total popu­
lations within this city-size class were obtained by 1930 median rent
class and by percentage of population which was reported Negro in the
1930 Census. Fourteen cities were then selected completely at random
within the limits that they satisfied each o f these three criteria. After
having imposed these controls, random selection of communities seemed
less likely to bias the sample than a system of selecting “ typical” or
“ representative” cities.

T able 2.— Distribution of Urban Dwelling Units

, Total

Cities

, and

Sample Cities

,

by Region
[Cities with populations o f 100,000 to 500,000]

Region

Number of
occupied dwell­
ing units,
A p ril 19401

T otal1

Sample

A ll regions..............................................................................................

Thousands
4,400

78

14

11
14
14
10
8
6
7
8

1
2
3
2

New E ngland.........................................................................................
Middle A tlantic.....................................................................................
East N orth Central...............................................................................
West N orth Central and M ountain...................................................
South A tlantic.......................................................................................
East South Central...............................................................................
West South Central..............................................................................
Pacific......................................................................................................

423
666
879
689
286
351
543
559

Number of cities

1
2
2

1 Source: 1940 Census of Population.

For cities of 50,000 to 100,000 the procedure was identical with that
just described for selection o f cities from 100,000 to 500,000. For the
remaining 3 city-size classes the procedure, differed only to the extent
o f an additional control for the presence or absence o f the city within
a metropolitan area.
As a final control on all the cities with populations below 500,000,
a State control was imposed so that each State (or, for the smaller
States, each group o f States) received the exact number o f cities which
its urban population justified.

A p p ortion m en t o f In terview s A m on g S elected C ities

In determining the number of consumer units to be interviewed in
each city, the total number o f interviews was distributed among the
various region city-size groups on the basis of number o f occupied
dwelling units in each group in April 1940 as reported by the Census.
For the cities with population of 500,000 and over, the number of
interviews in each region so obtained was distributed among all the
cities in that region on the basis o f the number o f occupied dwelling
units in each city. For cities under 500,000, the number o f interviews
in each region city-size group was distributed on the basis o f the number
o f occupied dwelling units in the median-rent group o f cities from
which the selected city had been drawn. The cities included in the
sample, the number o f assignments in each, and certain identifying
characteristics are given in table 3.




4

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

,

,

T able 3.— Cities Included in Sample Certain Characteristics o f Each and Number of
Interviews Assigned Each

C ity

1930
1940
population
Percent of
(in thousands) Median rent
or rental
population
Negro
value

Number of
interviews

Akron, Ohio.............................................................
Allegan, Mich...........................................................
Asheville, N . C ........................................................
Baltimore, Md..........................................................
Bayonne, N. J..........................................................
Bennettsviile, S. C ..................................................
Binghamton, N. Y ..................................................
Boston, Mass............................................................
Brainerd, Minn........................................................

245
5
51
859
79
5
78
771
12

$30.25
14.24
23.54
24.17
35.65
14.59
31.81
35.22
13.83

3.9
1.0
27.4
17.9
2.9
43.3
.9
3.0
0

15
20
13
13
15
12
15
11
23

Buffalo, N. Y ............................. .............................
Bryan, Tex...............................................................
Cameron, Tex.................................. ........................
Chicago, 111...............................................................
Cleveland, O hio......................................................
Coalinga, C alif.........................................................
Coraopolis1, Pa........................................................
D aytona Beach, Fla...............................................
Detroit, Mich...........................................................

576
12
5
3,397
878
5
11
23
1,623

32.50
13.19
14.02
44.77
33.58
20.50
35.07
21.47
41.76

2.3
38.8
24.7
6.5
7.9
.1
8.1
30.0
6.9

9
13
22
55
14
15
19
23
25

East Orange, N. J....................................................
Eldorado, 111.............................................................
Elm hurst1 111...........................................................
,
Erie, P a.....................................................................
Flagstaff, Ariz..........................................................
Fresno, Calif............................................................
Highland Falls, N. Y ..............................................
Indianapolis, Ind....................................................

69
5
15
117
5
61
4
387

61.76
7.72
43.65
28.87
21.04
21.92
25.10
25.28

6.0
0
.1
1.0
3.4
1.6
9.8
12.1

16
20
15
20
16
19
20
16

Kansas C ity, Kans..................................................
Kansas C ity, Mo......................................................
Kenosha, Wis............................................................
Klamath Falls, Oreg...............................................
Lawrence, M ass......................................................
Los Angeles, Calif...................................................
Memphis, Tenn.......................................................
Michigan C ity, In d .................................................
Milwaukee, Wis........................................................

121
399
49
16
84
1,504
293
26
587

15.32
29.42
31.24
26.72
26.01
34.16
17.58
22.32
33.73

17.8
10.5
.4
.7
.2
3.0
43.2
2.5
1.3

23
17
20
12
17
29
21
21
10

Mobridge, S. D ak....................................................
New Orleans, La......................................................
Newport,1 K y ...........................................................
New York, N. Y ......................................................
Oklahoma C ity, Okla......................... ...................
Ogdensburg, N. Y ...................................................
Opelika, A la........................................................
Oradell,1N. J............................................................
Ottumwa, Iowa.......................................................

3
495
31
7,455
204
16
8
3
32

22.75
22.75
24.37
45.70
28.85
16.90
13.15
239.78
14.38

.1
30.8
3.9
4.5
7.4
0
46.4
2.0
1.6

15
16
12
119
16
19
21
19
22

Philadelphia, Pa......................................................
Piqua, O h io..............................................................
Pittsburgh, Pa.........................................................
Pittsfield, Mass........................................................
R oya l Oak,1 Mich....................................................
St. Louis, Mo............................................................
San Diego, Calif......................................................
San Francisco, Calif...................... .........................
Savannah, Ga— ...................................................

1,931
16
672
50
25
816
2C3
635
96

30.05
19.22
33.80
28.25
37.60
30.77
26.32
36.25
16.20

11.1
2.9
8.3
1.0
.1
11.0
1.8
.6
51.7

30
16
10
17
20
14
17
12
12

........................................
Scranton, Pa..............
Southington,1 C on n .................................. ...........
South Portland,1 Maine...................
..............
................
Spokane, Wash..............................
Toledo, O h io........ ...............................................
Washington, D . C ..................................................
Wichita Falls, Tex...................................................
Wiindpgton* D el......................................................
Worcester, Mass.....................................
....... .....

140
5
16
122
282
663
45
113
194

27.08
22.73
23.81
18.24
32.14
42.06
20.45
28.69
30.31

.6
4.6
0
.6
4.3
23.9
12.4
12.1
.7

19
9
18
15
16
10
17
20
25

1 Lies within a metropolitan area.
2 Median rent-rental value for Bergen County.

Selection o f Families W ithin Cities
The first step in selecting the families to be interviewed in each city
involved the selection of a sample of blocks. For each city with a popu­




5

Part I.— Scope and M ethod

lation above 50,000 the Bureau of the Census has computed the average
rent or rental value for each block in the city. For such cities, average
block rent in 1940 was used as the basis of stratification for selection of
blocks. In each such city the blocks were sorted into a series of rent
classes, corresponding to the number of interviews to be assigned, with
each rent class having the same number o f occupied dwelling units.3
Obviously, there were in most o f these rent-class groups different
numbers of blocks. From each rent-class group a block was selected
in such a way as to avoid a random error in favor of either high or low
rent blocks. For this purpose, the blocks within each rent group were
arranged in order by average rent from the lowest to the highest rent
within the rent-class group, and each group was subdivided into a
number of classes corresponding to the number of schedules desired for
the given city. The subclass to be sampled in each rent group was chosen
in such a way as to pick the subclass from a different level within each
rent group. Within the subclass, the block was chosen by use o f random
numbers, the probability of its selection being proportionate to the
number of dwelling units it contained in 1940.
A comparison of the average monthly rent per block for sample and
for entire city in each 4 of the cities over 50,000 is shown in table 4.
T able 4.— Comparison o f Average M onthly Rent per Block in Sample and in Entire

,

City for Each Sample City Over 5 0,00 0 Population

C ity

1940 average
Num ­ m onthly rent
ber of
blocks
in
Blocks Entire
sample
in
sample city1

Akron, Ohio.............................
Asheville, N. C ........................
Baltimore, M d.........................
Bayonne, N. J..........................
Binghamton, N. Y ..................
Boston, Mass............................

15
13
13
15
15
11

Buffalo, N. Y ...........................
Chicago, 111.............................,.
Cleveland, O h io......................
Detroit, Mich...........................
East Orange, N . J ...................
Erie, Pa.....................................

$27.78 $28.33
25.86 22.18
30.13 30.31
31.97 32.29
32.25 32.81
31.95 32.74

Memphis, Tenn.......................
Milwaukee, Wis.......................
New Orleans, La......................
New York, N. Y ......................
Oklahoma City, O kla.. * .......
Philadelphia, Pa.....................

21
10
16
119
16
30

29.05
33.52
28.45
35.28
58.46
26.68

30.91
34.47
28.93
35.88
52.69
27.49

Pittsburgh, Pa.........................
St. Louis, M o...........................
San Diego, Calif......................
San Francisco, Calif...............
Savannah, Ga..........................
Scranton, Pa............................

10
14
17
12
12
19

32.81
25.08
28.95
34.78
18.16
27.68

34.83
25.75
30.54
37.39
18.21
27.68

29.52
28.24
26.67
18.29
24.88
37.11

30.04
28.76
27.44
18.43
24.44
34.50

Spokane, Wash........................
Toledo, O h io............................
Washington, D . C ...................
Wilmington, D el.....................
Worcester, Mass.......................

15
16
10
20
25

24.91
28.53
53.43
36.39
32.70

23.95
29.46
53.00
37.75
32.83

9
55
14
25
16
20

Fresno, Calif............................
Indianapolis, Ind ....................
Kansas C ity, Mo.....................
Kansas C ity, Kans..................
Lawrence, Mass.......................
Los Angeles, Calif...................

City

1940 average
Num ­ m onthly rent
ber of
blocks
in
Blocks Entire
sample
in
city1
sample

19
16
17
23
17
29

$21.22 $21.95
32.50 33.26
21.67 21.96
44.40 43.87
25.09 25.18
29.91 31.22

1 Source: 1940 Census of Population.

For cities with population below 50,000 average block rent has'not
been computed by the Bureau of the Census, and a somewhat different
procedure was therefore necessary. For each such city in the sample a
detailed block map was obtained from the Census with the enumeration
districts outlined: the blocks on the map were numbered consecutively
within each enumeration district. Every nth block was then selected,
* In cities with populations above 500,000 only a third of the blocks, selected at random, were used in this
classification.
4 A t the tim e the sample o f blocks was being drawn, the Census tabulations o f average block rent in New
Y ork C ity had not yet been prepared. The procedure followed in that city involved treating each o f the
3,000 Census tracts in that city in the same fashion as blocks had been treated in other cities. T he number
o f occupied dwelling units in each tract in A p ril 1940 was known. Since average tract ren t was unknown,
however, the basis o f stratification was percentage o f rented units renting fo r less than $30 in 1934 as shown
b y the Real Property Inventory. A fter the sample tracts had all been drawn in the same manner as blocks
were drawn in other cities, one block was selected com pletely at random fo r each sampled tract.




5

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

the initial number being chosen at random. Since adjacent blocks were
given consecutive numbers, this procedure had the effect of scattering
the selected blocks throughout the city.
A ll cemeteries, golf courses, parks, and railroad yards were counted
on the possibility that a caretaker or watchman and his family might be
living there. When blocks were bordered on one side by a waterfront
the instructions indicated that boat houses or people living on the
wharves were also to be included in the block listings.
The last step in selecting the specific families to be interviewed in
the selected cities involved having the enumerator prepare a complete
listing o f the families and single consumers living in each of the
selected blocks. Each known family or single consumer was listed
as a separate unit. These listings were returned to the Washington
office o f the survey, where the selection o f the consumer units to be
interviewed was made. In the cities over 50,000 one consumer unit was
selected at random from each block listing; in each of the cities under
50,000 the listings for the sample blocks were put together to form
one continuous listing. Every nth family was selected from this con­
tinuous listing, with the initial number again chosen at random. In the
smaller towns some of the blocks thus furnished two or even three
families while others furnished none, in accordance with the density
o f population within the blocks.
Exactly 1,200 consumer units were assigned from such listings. On
occasion it was discovered that an assigned consumer unit actually
consisted of two or more independent economic units.'This happened
most typically when two groups of related persons living together and
listed as one family in the initial block listing were discovered on more
detailed investigation to keep their incomes and expenditures separate.
In such a case, despite the relationship, they are best considered sep­
arate economic units. In every such instance each of the independent
units was separately scheduled. Any procedure which involved taking
only one o f the economic families in such a multiple grouping would
have yielded a sample with fewer economic families living in multiple
groups than existed in the urban population. The procedure followed
in the present survey involved scheduling each of the separate economic
families composing the assigned family. The 1,200 original assignments
thus yielded almost 1,300 economic families of one or more than one
persons. In the most extreme case a single assignment yielded four
separate economic units.
The converse of this case should also be noted. In some few cases
two or more members of a single economic family were listed sep­
arately and one o f the members selected for scheduling. To have
scheduled in all cases the economic family of which the selected
individual was a member would have overweighted the sample with
such families. The procedure followed involved scheduling the entire
family if the selected member was the first in the listing of the mem­
bers, and drawing another family from the block if he was not.
When an assigned dwelling was vacant, or when it was impossible
to obtain, information from the family or single person at an assigned
address, a substitute address was selected at random in the Washington
office. In the case o f cities over 50,000 the substitute was drawn from
the same block; in smaller cities, it was drawn from the continuous
listing, within a range representing one-half o f n on either side of the
refusal. If two or more economic units were found in an assigned dwell­




7

Part / . — Scope and M ethod

ing unit in which only one had been listed, the procedure was to draw
4 substitute unless a schedule could be obtained from each economic
unit. At the end of the investigation, however, when a family had been
scheduled and there was an unlisted roomer or boarder from whom
it was impossible to obtain a schedule, another roomer or boarder was
drawn from the same block, or another block adjacent in the rent scale.
It was necessary to draw substitutes only rarely, since the refusal rate
was under 7 percent. The effect of these substitutions on the sample
is discussed in detail in the section on Refusals and Substitutions (p. 22).
SELECTION OF RURAL SAMPLE 5
Selection o f Counties
Forty-five counties were selected by stratified sampling to give rep­
resentation to all regions and to every economic group. The number
was determined in part by the range of variation in the controls used
and in part by administrative considerations.
The following controls were used in the selection of the 45 counties:
Rural population, 1940; average value of farm, 1940; principal type-offarming; State; and in Southern States, the percentage o f Negroes in
the rural population. The Northern and Western States combined and
the Southern States were sampled separately. Within each of these two
broad regions, 27 and 18 subclasses, respectively, were established and
one county chosen at random from each, subject to the requirement
that their distributions as to the several controls were in proportion to
the rural population represented. The list of counties, by region and
State, is given in table 5.
T able 5.— Counties Included in the Rural Sample, by Region and IState
Region and State

Counties studied

New England:
New H am pshire... Hillsborough.
Connecticut........... Fairfield.
Middle Atlantic:
New Y o r k ............... Oneida, Ontario.
New Jersey............. Ocean.
Pennsylvania......... Chester, Fayette.
East North Central:
Ohio......................... Lucas, Scioto.
Indiana.................... Cass.
Illinois..................... Champaign, Clark.
Michigan................. Lapeer, Roscommon.
Wisconsin................ Polk.
West North Central:
Minnesota............... Carver.
Iowa......................... Dickinson.
Missouri.................. Adair, Wright.
North D akota........ La Moure.
Kansas..................... McPherson.
Mountain:
Montana.................. Jefferson.
Colorado.................. Weld.
New Mexico............ Luna,

Region and State
Pacific:
Oregon...................
California..............
South Atlantic:
Maryland..............
Virginia.................
West Virginia........
North Carolina_
_
South Carolina. . .
Georgia..................
Florida...................
East South Central:
K entucky..............
Tennessee.............
Alabam a................
Mississippi............
West South Central:
Arkansas................
Louisiana..............
Oklahom a.............
Texas......... ............

Counties studied

Douglas.
Fresno, Kings.
Garrett.
Page.
McDowell.
Forsyth, Guilford.
Cherokee.
Catoosa, Greene.
Martin.
Rowan.
Warren.
Wilcox.
Scott.
Craighead.
Natchitoches.
Okfuskee.
Hunt, Lamar.

D istribution o f Interviews A m ong Counties
Within counties the dwelling was the sampling unit. It was estimated
that 1,700 dwelling units would yield the sample of 1,800 economic
families and single consumers required for the study. Since 43 percent
o f the occupied rural dwelling units in 1940 were in the Southern States,
5 For full discussion o f the sampling procedure in rural areas, see U. S. Department of Agriculture Mis­
cellaneous Publication No. 520, pp. 2-5.




8

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

733 dwelling units in the sample of 1,700 were assigned to the South
and 967 to the North and West. Within each region the dwelling units
to be included in the sample were allocated to the selected counties in
proportion to the total number of occupied dwelling units in the class
of counties represented. Inasmuch as the counties were drawn from
classes o f approximately equal population, the number of dwelling units
selected for the sample was approximately the same in every county
within each region. In the North and West about 36 dwelling units
were assigned to each county, in the South about 41. The sample for
each county was then subdivided among dwellings in villages and in
the open country.
Selection o f Dwelling Units W ithin Counties
It was considered advisable to keep the relative number of farm and
nonfarm dwellings in the sample for each county in the ratio found in
the group of counties represented. The number of farm and nonfarm
dwellings to be included in the sample was accordingly determined.
For use in the administration of field work, it was necessary to divide
the sample in each county into the group living in the open country
and the group living in villages and towns under 2,500 population. For
each county an estimate was made of the proportion of the rural non­
farm population living in the open country and applied to the quota
o f rural dwelling units to be included in the sample. This estimate was
made by deducting from the rural nonfarm population in 1940, the
population living in incorporated places with populations under 2,500
as reported by the Census, and estimates of population in unincorpo­
rated places.
For selection o f the open-country sample, the county was divided
into a number of areas, each including approximately the same number
o f dwellings outside of villages and towns. In each such area a mile
square was selected at random and the three or four dwellings nearest
the center o f the square included in the sample. The number of areas
outlined depended on the quota of dwelling units to be surveyed in the
Open country.
For selection of the village sample, all villages in the county were
classified in three to nine population groups and one village drawn at
random for each group. The county quota of village dwellings to be
included in the sample was distributed among the selected villages in
proportion to the population represented. The dwellings to be included
were selected by random numbers from complete listings or maps of all
the households in the village.
.W hen a dwelling selected for the open country sample was vacant,
the nearest house was substituted; when it was not possible to obtain
a schedule from a family occupying a dwelling, the house nearest the
center o f the square and not already included in the sample was sub­
stituted. In the case of a refusal in a village, a substitute was drawn
at random from the households in the village not already included.

Collection Procedure
INTERVIEW M ETHOD
Data were obtained by the interview method, with agents visiting a
family to obtain answers to the questions which appear on the schedule
form. This method has been used in all previous large-scale consump­




Part I.— Scope and M ethod

9

tions surveys in the United States and has proved to yield consistent
and reasonable results when returns are presented for a group of
families and/or single consumers, since errors of overestimate on the
part of some are generally compensated for hy underestimates on the
part of others.
The schedule form was sufficiently detailed to serve to recall to the
person interviewed many items that might otherwise have been for­
gotten. Furthermore, in recognition o f the fact that no one can recall
exact details over a period of a year, or even 3 months, a balancing
difference of 5.5 percent (9.5 percent for farm families) between re­
ceipts and disbursements was allowed. The necessity of a balance, within
such limits, insures the general accuracy of the results as regards infor­
mation on income, changes in assets and liabilities and expenditures,
and the corresponding data on quantities purchased. Unfortunately, no
similar check is possible in the case o f inventory data, which are there­
fore probably least reliable.
The account-book method of collection, which might appear to yield
more precise results, has been discarded for reasons of expense and
sample bias. Enough surveys have been made using family account books
to establish that they cannot be accepted as reliable unless the family
is visited frequently by a representative of the research agency con­
ducting the study. This is prohibitive in cost. The account book also
requires much more editorial and clerical time to summarize entries
for tabulation than does a schedule form where the agent makes entries
ready for tabulation. Secondly, the type of family willing to keep
accounts is likely to be one with superior managerial ability and un­
usual time and patience. Such families do not form a cross section of
consumers, and a sample composed exclusively of them would be seri­
ously biased.
In most cases completion of a schedule required more than one visit
by an agent. It was the practice to obtain as much information as pos­
sible from the first person interviewed, generally the homemaker in
families of two or more, and then to revisit when the husband was at
home to obtain data on income, investments, mortgages, and his per­
sonal expenses, if the wife was unfamiliar with these.
FIELD ORGANIZATION
Interviewing was done by part-time agents living in the area. This
procedure had several advantages. It permitted inclusion o f more areas
than otherwise would have been possible and reduced travel cost. It also
permitted planning time schedules for part-time work, which made
possible the employment of persons, generally married women, with
superior ability and training, who wanted part-time work. Uniformity
in the interpretation o f instructions and method of entering data was
obtained by extensive preliminary training, careful editing, and check
interviewing.
C ollection in Cities
In the case of the urban survey, there were no local offices. Field
agents operated from their own homes and sent completed schedules
directly to Washington. Before field work was started, regional training
conferences were held at which detailed instructions were given regard­
ing techniques o f interviewing, interpretation of every schedule item,
and method o f block listing. While at the conference, each agent pre­




IQ

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

pared one block list and took a schedule, which was carefully edited,
as soon as completed, by members of the Washington staff and errors
and omissions were explained in detail.6
During the period of collection, direct supervision of field workers
was carried on by mail from the Washington office, suplemented by
regular visits from traveling regional supervisors. In addition to the.
set of instructions issued at the conference, memoranda were sent out
periodically covering points which affected some or all agents. In
addition, specific criticisms and questions regarding individual agents’
schedules were sent by letter from the Washington office, with a copy
to her supervisor.
Although the field agents were instructed to balance schedules before
sending them to Washington, they were sometimes found out-of-balance
after editing in the Washington office. In such cases, or when other
questions were raised by the editors, the schedules were returned to
the agent for revisit to the family. Especially difficult schedules were
sometimes sent to the supervisor for reinterview.
When an address was assigned for interview, a letter was sent at the
same time from the Washington office to the occupants of that address,
explaining the purpose of the survey, requesting cooperation, and giving
the name of the agent who would call. A card, addressed to the agent,
was enclosed to allow the person to specify the most convenient time
for interview. If the card w as not mailed within a reasonable time, the
T
agent made a personal visit. If no member of the family was at home
on first call, the agent was required to revisit a second, and if necessary,
a third time. If it was learned that the occupants of a dwelling would
be away until after the period of interviewing, the Washington office
was notified and a substitute assigned. If a family was hesitant to supply
the information requested, the agent notified the Washington office
immediately, stating the reasons given. A second letter was then sent
from the Washington office, which attempted to answer the objections
raised, and again urged cooperation. In some instances the agent was
advised to call again after the occupants had received this letter; in
other instances, the regional supervisor visited in an effort to obtain the
schedule information. The response to such letters was surprisingly
good. Only when they failed were substitute addresses assigned.
When an agent was assigned an address occupied by persons known
personally to her either directly or through relatives or mutual friends,
the case was referred to the Washington office and the regional super­
visor or another agent in the city conducted the interview.
The original plan of the survey was to collect information relating
to 1941 during the first 3 months o f 1942, and information on the first
quarter o f 1942 during the second quarter. Funds for the survey were
approved so late, however, that it was not possible to start field work
until the first week in April. Schedules for the two periods were,
therefore, collected simultaneously. By taking the quarterly schedule
first and working backwards, the difficulty of obtaining information
for the more distant period was largely overcome. The details o f food
purchases and consumption were entered on a separate check list for
the 7 days preceding the date of interview.•
• When an agent had to be replaced during the course of field work, because o f resignation, the regional
supervisor hired and trained a new agent. H e generally stayed in the city until the agent had taken at
least one or tw o schedules in order to review her work carefully and explain difficulties without loss o f time.




Part L — Scope and M ethod

11

C ollection in Rural Areas
The collection procedure in rural areas differed in only a few respects
from the method used in cities. The main difference lay in the fact
that there was less centralization in the Washington office. In each
county five persons, in most cases residents of the county seat, were
selected to form the interviewing staff and one person was chosen to
serve as editor and supervisor. These persons were chosen by a member
of the Washington staff who gave the agents and editor intensive train­
ing in the techniques o f interviewing and methods of filling a complete
and acceptable schedule.
During the training period, the agents prepared the lists or maps of
the villages in the sample. The names and postal addresses of the
families to be interviewed both in the villages and in the open country
were ascertained, if possible, and letters sent to them explaining the
purpose of the survey and requesting their cooperation.
The agents returned schedules to the editor for review and for
assistance in the necessary calculations. When the editor regarded a
schedule as complete and satisfactory, it was sent to the Washington
office. If, upon review, additional information appeared necessary, it
was returned to the local editor.
SCHEDULE FORM
The main schedule was designed to obtain information on income,
expenditures, changes in assets and liabilities, and inventories of certain
household equipment items. The same form was used for the two sur­
vey periods. Hence, for the quarterly survey “ Year” or “ 1941” should
be read as “ First Quarter o f 1942.” The schedule used for villages was
practically identical with that used for collecting data in cities, except
for arrangement and for the addition o f questions on home production
of food and home preserving o f food. The farm schedule differed as
regards the questions on farm income and housing, and contained even
more questions than the village schedule on food production for family
use and preserving of food. The urban schedule, together with the
farm income schedule form, is reproduced in Appendix B (pp. 203-218).
In addition to the main schedule a check list was used to obtain de­
tailed information on food purchases and consumption during the
7 days preceding the date of interview. The form was identical for the
three types of community. (See U. S. Department o f Agriculture Mis­
cellaneous Publication No. 550, in which the food check list data for
city as well as rural families and single consumers are summarized.)

Nature o f the Data Obtained— Definitions
FAMILIES AND SINGLE CONSUMERS
The spending units defined for this study have been called the family
and the single consumer. The family is a group of persons dependent
on a common or pooled income for the major items of expense and
usually living in the same household. The single consumer is a person
who lives as an independent spending unit either in a separate house­
hold or as a roomer in a private home, lodging house, or hotel.
In the great majority o f cases, the members of a family are related
by blood, marriage, or adoption; groups of unrelated persons who share




12

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

both income and expenses are seldom found. In applying the definition
of a family, related persons living in one household were considered
as forming two or more spending units only when the separation of
finances appeared to be clearly defined. Even when children pay a
specified sum for room and board, they frequently receive without
charge many services financed by the family, such as use o f the family
car, the radio, personal laundry, and other sharing in general family
living. Hence, earning sons and daughters who lived with their parents
were not considered separate spending units unless their status in the
household could be strictly construed as that of a roomer. Elderly
parents with some income who live in the household of a son or daugh­
ter present a similar situation for interpretation. There may be a sep­
aration o f finances to a certain degree, but the household in such cases
usually provides services not made available to the unrelated roomer.
Accordingly, persons related to the family that formed the nucleus of
the household were generally considered as members of that family
except when there was a clear separation of income and expenditures,
in which case they were treated as single consumers.
Two families or single consumers that lived in one dwelling and
shared household expenses but did not pool incomes were considered
separate spending units. Such arrangements appear fairly frequently
in cities and in rural areas on farms operated as partnerships.
A family member working away from home during the survey period,
who contributed with some regularity to family support, and came
home approximately once a month or oftener, was treated as a member
o f the economic family, unless he was living in a military camp, post,
or reservation.
A child living away at school was considered a member of the family
if the parents provided the major part of his support. Other persons
supported from the family income but not living in the household were
considered as separate spending units.
A person was included in a given family if he had been a member of
the family for a week or more during the period covered by the survey.
One individual could, accordingly, be a part of more than one family
in the course of the survey period.
Since the study applied to expenditures during the year 1941 and
the first three months of 1942, it was necessary to distinguish the fam­
ilies and single consumers that were in existence during those periods
among the occupants o f the dwellings at the time of interview (April
through June 1942). Thus, a man and woman recently married might
have lived either as single consumers or as members o f other families
during 1941. The schedules recorded the income and expenditures of
the spending units as they were composed during the year 1941 and
during the first quarter of 1942. It may be noted here that households
sampled did not contain representatives of all of the spending units that
existed in the periods covered by the study: Men who lived as single
consumers during some part o f the period and subsequently went to
military training or labor camps, and families, all of whose members
had died or gone into institutions, could not be included in the survey.
URBAN, RU RAL NONFARM, AND RU RAL FARM
Families and single consumers were included in the urban sample
if they lived in cities, that is, in urban places with a population of 2,500




Part

J.— Scope

and M ethod

13

or more, as designated by the Bureau o f the Census. All others were clas­
sified as rural.
A ll families and single consumers that operated farms and received
some income from the sale of farm products were classified in the
group called rural farm. The definition of farm followed was that used
by the Census of Agriculture: the land, in one or more tracts, on which
some agricultural operations are performed by one person, either by
his labor alone or with the assistance of members of his household or
hired employees. A tract of less than 3 acres was not called a farm
unless its agricultural products customarily amounted in value to
$250 or more. Families or single consumers that lived on farms but
received no income from the sale o f farm products were classified in
the group called rural nonfarm, which was composed mainly of families
living in villages or in the open country but not on farms.
According to this rule of classification, farm managers and farm
laborers were included in the rural nonfarm group since they received
wages for employment on farms. Families that lived on farms but did
not market any farm products were also considered a part o f the rural
nonfarm group. On the other hand, families living in villages were
classified in the farm group, if they operated farms and received income
from the sale of farm products.
This mode o f classification was adopted on the assumption that
families dependent on profits from farming differ in their spending
from families that receive all of their money income from nonfarm
sources, or from wages for work on farms. In effect it separates farm
operators as an entrepreneurial group from all others living in rural
territory. The farm group, accordingly, may be considered more homo­
geneous than the rural nonfarm group with respect to the sources of
income and also, since most farm families live on their farms, with
respect to residence.
INCOME
In consumption studies which have as their objectives the explanation
o f the regularities in the relation between size o f income and its dis­
position, income must be precisely defined and recorded as accurately
as possible. In this study information was obtained on money income
and nonmoney income. Three totals were determined for each family
or single consumer, namely, money income, nonmoney income, and
total income (money plus nonmoney). The income of families consisted
of the combined incomes of all members from any source.
M oney In com e
The components of money income in this survey were specified on
the schedule form as follows: Wages; salaries; earnings from inde­
pendent business or profession; receipts from roomers and boarders;
interest and dividends; profits from enterprises owned but not operated;
net rent and royalties; unemployment-insurance benefits; Federal oldage and survivors insurance benefits; other retirement benefits and in­
dustrial pensions; income from annuities; regular contributions from
persons not in the fam ily; direct relief payments; other money income;
and losses. Certain o f these items require explanation.
Earnings
Wages and salaries included net receipts from employment, however
short the period worked. Amounts received from odd jobs and piece




14

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

work, casual earnings, tips, and bonuses were recorded in the totals for
wages and for salaries, but earnings from work relief were reported
separately. Wages and salaries included all sums withheld by the
employer for insurance and retirement funds, the old-age and survivors
insurance tax, and the unemployment-insurance tax. Net earnings were
determined by deducting from the total received the following items
of occupational expense: Dues to unions and professional associations,
including the cost o f technical publications; supplies, equipment, or
tools paid for by the employees; traveling expenses and the portion o f
automobile operation expenses attributable to the pursuit of the occu­
pation. Transportation to and from work was not considered an occu­
pational expense.
The net earnings from independent nonfarm business7 or professional
practice were reported as a single figure and no details on the gross
income and business expenditures were required. The respondents were
asked to report net earnings on a cash or accrual basis, but it is probable
that in most cases the amount reported represented withdrawals for
family living and for savings, investments, and payments on debts not
related to the business or profession. The net amounts reported included
the value o f goods from stock, brought home for family use. (These
goods were also entered as'purchases under the appropriate expenditure
categories.)
Farm income 8
Net money earnings from the operation of a farm were determined
from fairly detailed reports as to the difference between gross income
and farm operating expenditures, adjusted for the value o f the change
in livestock owned and crops stored. Gross income included the receipts
from the sales of and Government loans on farm products, Government
payments, and amounts received from the use of farm equipment on
other farms. In the case of share renters, only the operator’s share of
the sale was recorded.
Farm expenses were defined to include food expense for farm help,
automobile operation expense chargeable to business, depreciation of
farm buildings (calculated as 5 percent o f their present value), and
depreciation of machinery, including farm use of the automobile (cal­
culated at 15 percent o f its value at the beginning of the period). The
value of the change in livestock owned and in crops stored for sale
was an estimate supplied by the respondent.
The net income from farm operation was combined with nonfarm
entrepreneurial earnings in the tables showing income of all American
families and/or single consumers.
N et income from roomers and boarders
The agents were instructed to obtain information on gross receipts
from roomers and boarders. Net receipts were determined by deducting
an estimate o f food expense from the total amount reported. (The
agents’ entries o f annual and quarterly food expenditures included
amounts spent for boarders’ fo o d ;* a corresponding adjustment was
*
made in these figures.) No attempt was made to deduct the cost of
housing provided to lodgers.
In the urban survey, the cost o f boarders’ food was estimated on the
basis of information on the sex and age of family members, the number
7 Outside salesmen or insurance agents working on their own account or on a commission basis were con­
sidered self-employed.
* For detailed discussion, see U. S. Department of Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication No. 520, pp. 9-11.




Part / . — Scope and M ethod

J5

o f weeks they were at home, and the number of meals supplied to board­
ers and other nonfamily members of the household. When the com­
putation o f expense for boarders’ food by this method resulted in a
figure which was larger than the amount received from the boarders,
the net income from boarders was considered zero. (Family food
expense was reduced by a corresponding amount.)
For the rural samples, the estimates of boarders’ food expense were
obtained by applying an assumed cost to the total number of meals. In
the North and West 15 cents was used for nonfarm and 12 cents for
farm households; in the South the cost of meals was set at 10 cents for
nonfarm and 9 cents for farm households.
Property income
The item “ interest and dividends” was defined to include all amounts
received in that form from stocks, bonds, bank accounts, trust funds,
paid-up insurance policies, etc., which may be drawn in cash. It is
probable, however, that a number of respondents failed to mention
small amounts of interest on bank accounts that were not withdrawn.
Net profits from a business owned and managed by the family were
considered entrepreneurial earnings, but those from businesses owned
but not operated by the family were considered as a separate item of
income. Net losses in such instances were entered in the item designated
“ Losses.”
“ Net rents” represented gross rents from any property rented to others
by the family less expenses for current upkeep that were actually paid.
(Expenses incurred but not paid were not deducted; outlays for im­
provements or additions were considered an increase in assets.) If the
net figure represented a loss, it was entered in the item designated
“ Losses.”
Direct relief payments
In addition to the money received from public and private relief
agencies, the value o f food and cotton stamps received without payment
under the Stamp Plan of the Federal Surplus Commodity Corporation
was included under direct relief payments in money. The value of
vouchers given by relief agencies for the purchases of food or other
goods and services, money from relatives in the Civilian Conservation
Corps camps, mother’s pensions, old-age pensions, and aid to the blind
were also considered in this grouping.
Other money income
Workmen’s compensation benefits, prizes, rewards, and gambling
gains were included under “ other money income.” The instructions for
the field agents made clear that inheritances and occasional large gifts
were to be entered as money receipts other than income, and that
amounts received from the sale of assets, the settlement of life-insurance
policies, and borrowing were to be recorded in the statement of the
changes in family assets and liabilities. It was unlikely, therefore, that
the income, report would include any such items unidentified in the
miscellaneous item.
N onm oney In com e
Nonmoney income was defined as the value of food, housing, fuel,
ice, clothing, and household furnishings received without direct money
outlay. It comprised the value o f food produced for family use, the




16

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

value of fuel and ice furnished by the farm or of fuel gathered by the
family, the value o f occupancy of farm homes and of owned nonfarm
homes, and the value of goods o f the specified groups received as gift,
as pay, or as relief. The methods of evaluating the goods included in
nonmoney income depended on the amount o f detailed information
the respondent was asked to supply.9
Food
The value o f food grown at home by city families and single con­
sumers was estimated on the basis of local retail prices. The quantity
o f food produced on farms for family use was reported for poultry,
eggs, dairy products, meat, cereals, syrups, and honey. These items
were valued uniformly in all regions by using as prices estimates
of the average price paid in 1941 by farm families to neighbors and
local retail stores. For other products, vegetables, fruit, fish, and
game, the respondent was asked to give an estimate of the value of
the total quantity consumed or preserved and stored for future use
by the family. Similarly, the quantities o f milk, eggs, poultry, and
meat produced for home use by rural nonfarm families were re­
ported, and the prices used in determining values were estimates of
the average price in small communities over the country. The value o f
other foods was an estimate supplied by the family.
The food received from relief and welfare agencies was for the most
part reported in terms o f item and quantity and the value of such food
was computed by using a single set of prices for all regions. The reports
covered milk and lunches received free at school, and gift baskets from
private charities as well as foods obtained through the direct distribu­
tion o f surplus commodities.
The value o f food received as gift or pay was estimated by the
respondent as a summary total. Food as pay covered the meals received
by household servants, farm laborers, restaurant employees and instituitional employees as part of their remuneration, and any other food
obtained in payment for services.
Housing
The net value of occupancy of an owned home in cities and villages
was determined by deducting from the rental value (as estimated by
the fam ily) expenditures incurred for taxes, interest on mortgage,
insurance, repairs, etc., but not payments on principal which were
treated as an increase in assets. The value o f occupancy of a farm home
was set at 10 percent o f the present value of the dwelling for owners
and tenants alike.
The value o f housing received as gift, in payment for services, or as
relief was estimated by the respondent on the basis of the rent that
would be charged in the locality for similar living quarters. Rent as
pay was most commonly reported by household servants, resident
janitors, institutional employees, and farm laborers.
Other nonmoney income
The value o f fuel and ice furnished by the farm or gathered by the
family, and o f fuel, ice, clothing, and household furnishings received as
gift, as pay, or as relief, were in each case estimated by the respondent.
A considerable number of families and single consumers, especially
at the lower-income levels in cities, receive some medical care free at
9 For the convenience o f agents, information on income in kind was obtained in connection with the
appropriate expenditure section.




Part L — Scop'*, and Method

17

public clinics. Information was requested on whether free medical
care was received, but no attempt was made to evaluate such care, since
it was assumed the respondents could not do so, and it seemed unlikely
that many could describe the care received with sufficient accuracy to
have a money value placed on it. Other goods and services are, of
course, received without money expense, but less frequently than those
on which information was obtained and seldom as payment for services
or from a relief agency. Also, their value is likely to be slight. There­
fore, in order not to increase the interview time, no information was
requested on the value o f gifts of tobacco, books, magazines, toys, toilet
articles, and the like.
Thus, although nonmoney income as defined in this survey is not
completely comprehensive, it does include the major portion of such
income .10*It is considerably more inclusive than nonmoney income as
defined in the Consumer Purchases Study, especially in the case of
city families.11
INHERITANCES AND GIFTS
Some families and single consumers received money as gift or inheri­
tance from persons outside the economic family. Such receipts were
recorded separately in order to complete the account o f family spend­
ing during the periods o f survey, and at the same time to differentiate
“ windfall” gifts from relatively regular income. Thus, large gifts are
differentiated from small gifts and from contributions received more
or less regularly and considered a part o f money income.
No record of gifts and inheritances in the form of real estate, secur­
ities, or other property was made unless such property had been sold
during the survey period. In that case the transaction was recorded by
considering the amount received from the sale as a money gift or
inheritance. The proceeds of the sale would appear as family expendi­
tures, increases in assets, or decreases in liabilities.
EXPENDITURES FO R CURRENT CONSUMPTION
Expenditures for family living were reported in detail under 15
categories o f expense. Expenditure means the purchase price of a
commodity bought or the cost of a service received whether or not
payment was made during the period o f survey. A ll purchases of
durable goods made during the year, except payments on homes and
improvements on homes, were considered current expenditures.12
Financing charges and interest on installment and other credit pur­
chases, and shipping and delivery charges were considered part of the
expenditure. Discounts and trade-in allowances were deducted from
the gross price. Sales and excise taxes were included in the expenditure
for each article except in the case o f the details o f food expenditure.
Details of expenditures during the year 1941 and during the first
quarter o f 1942 were obtained for all consumption categories except
10 Except for owned homes, no attem pt was made to include as nonmoney income the value o f the use of
durable goods owned, such as automobiles, furniture, and household equipment. Nor was any value
imputed to the homemaker’s services.
J* In that study nonmoney income included the occupancy value o f owned homes and rent received as
pay, for all groups; the value of home produced food, for farm and village areas; and the value o f certain
other farm produced goods used b y farm families. In the estimates prepared b y the National Resources
Planning Board, the estimated value of direct relief in kind was also included.
12 I f an automobile was purchased partly for family use and partly for business use, only the portion o f the
expense for purchase chargeable to fam ily use was considered fam ily expense. T he remainder was con­
sidered an investment in business (an increase in assets).




J8

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

food. Experience in surveys of this type has shown that it is not possible
to elicit by the interview method reliable reports on the amounts spent
on specific foods over periods of several months or a year. Therefore,
for the annual and the quarterly reports, only estimates o f the total
amount spent for food at home and away from home were required.
A supplementary schedule was used to obtain the items o f food bought
and consumed during the week preceding the interview. The data
tabulated from these schedules on food expenditures are presented in
the U. S. Department of Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication No. 550.
The consumption categories used in classification were: Food (in­
cluding alcoholic beverages); housing; fuel, light, and refrigeration ; 13
household operation; furnishings and equipment; clothing; automo­
bile; other transportation; personal care; medical care; recreation;
tobacco; reading; education; and a miscellaneous group. The nature
o f the goods and services rather than the purpose for which they were
used governed the classification o f most items in these groups. Special
clothing for games and sports was included with clothing, and traveling
expense for vacations was included under automobile or other trans­
portation. Board and room for children away at school were classed
as expenditures for food and housing and not for education. Excep­
tions to this principle o f classification were made in the case o f school
books, radios, and musical instruments. School books were included
with education expenditures, and radios and musical instruments with
recreation expenditures.
The miscellaneous group included interest on debts incurred for
fam ily living; bank service charges, including safe deposit box; legal
expenses connected with household affairs; losses concerned directly
with the household, including amount of installments paid during
period on repossessed furniture; funeral expenses, including upkeep
and purchase o f cemetery lot; and expense for other items, such as
dues to political and to cooperative associations, marriage licenses,
flowers for the wedding o f a family member. For nonfarm families only,
the miscellaneous group included garden expenses for seeds and fer­
tilizer, and feed for chickens for family food supply.
Definitions o f specific items included in the various categories of
consumption are provided in the form of footnotes to the appropriate
tables, as needed.
GIFTS AND PERSONAL TAXES
Under contributions and gifts were reported donations to churches
and religious organizations, welfare agencies, war relief agencies, and
educational funds; contributions for the support o f relatives not mem­
bers o f the economic family; and amounts spent for gifts to friends
and relatives.
Personal taxes included Federal and State income taxes on individ­
uals, poll taxes, and, in the case o f nonfarm families, taxes on such
personal property as furnishings and jewelry. Personal property taxes
in the case of farm families were included with farm operating ex­
penditures because they apply largely to farm equipment. Other taxes,
such as sales and excise taxes, automobile and real-estate taxes, were
included as part o f family living expenditures under the commodities
13 Since apartment rents in cities frequently cover payment for fuel, light, an d /or refrigeration, expendi­
tures fo r these items have been com bined with those for housing in all tables showing the summary of
expenditures.




Part / . — Scope and M ethod

19

and services to which they apply. Taxes on business property were
deducted as an expense in estimating net income.
The personal tax figures include all taxes o f the types specified that
fell due during the survey period, whether or not they were paid.
(Unpaid taxes were also entered as an increase in liabilities.) Thus, the
Federal income tax figures for 1941 represent the total amounts due on
income received during 1940.
For purposes of the study, only a fourth o f the Federal tax on 1941
income was considered due on March 15. Any amount actually paid in
excess o f one-quarter was therefore entered as an increase in assets
(i.e., “ other assets” ) on the schedule covering the first 3 months of
1942. Thus, the* Federal income tax figures for the first quarter of 1942
represent only a fourth of the total amounts due on income received
during 1941.
CHANGES IN ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
During any given period of time the difference between the income
and other money receipts of a family and its outlays for current living,
gifts, and personal taxes is accounted for by changes in assets and
liabilities, except for allowable reporting errors.14 Each family or
single consumer included in the survey was asked to report on the
increases or decreases in each of its assets and liabilities that had taken
place during the year 1941 and during the first quarter o f 1942. With
the exception o f investments in the farm business, all changes recorded
resulted from money transactions, such as the purchases and sales of
property. Increases or decreases in the market value o f real estate,
securities, and other property held by the family were not considered.
Assets included bank accounts and money on hand; investments in
business and real estate; Government bonds and other securities; insur­
ance; improvements on owned homes or other real estate; loans made
to others; and social-security and unemployment-insurance taxes paid
by the employee. Liahilities included amounts payable on mortgages;
notes due to banks, insurance companies, and individuals; amounts
due to loan companies and credit associations; balances owing on in­
stallment purchases; charge accounts and other bills due; and rents
and taxes due. A complete list of the components of assets and liabilities
is found on page 15 of the schedule. (See Appendix B, p. 217.)
For each family or single consumer, the algebraic sum of all the
changes was calculated, giving the net change in all assets and liabilities
during the period. A positive net change, which appears when the total
increases in assets and total decreases in liabilities exceed the total
decreases in assets and increases in liabilities, was designated a net
surplus. A negative change in all assets and liabilities was called a
net deficit.
The scope and content o f the data on assets and liabilities will be
clarified by a consideration of a number of the specific items.
For some asset items, such as money in the bank and investments in
business, the net change during the period was recorded. For items
involving purchase and sale and loans made by the family, both in­
creases (purchases or increases in balances owing on loans made by the
14 D ue to the difficulty experienced b y respondents in accounting com pletely for receipts (i.e., income,
other m oney receipts, and funds m ade available through liquidation o f assets or through credit) and dis­
bursements (i.e., outlays for current consumption, gifts and taxes, and m oney used to increase assets or
decrease debts), a margin of tolerance was set up for discrepancies between the two. A schedule was con­
sidered acceptable if the difference was less than 5.5 percent (9.5 percent for farm families) o f receipts or
disbursements, whichever was the larger.




20

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

family) and decreases (sales or repayments on loans made by the
family) were recorded on the schedule used in cities. On the schedules
used in rural areas only the net change was reported for such items.
For example, if a family reported both purchase and sale o f real estate,
the difference between the price paid and the amount realized was
entered, either as an increase or a decrease in assets. This slight diver­
gence in schedule entries has no effect on the final net surplus or deficit
figures for urban and rural areas. In either case only the net change in
any type of transaction forms a component of the final net surplus or
net deficit. (For illustration o f the method of computing net surplus
or deficit, see Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin No. 638, pp. 171-174. )
The divergence in schedule entries should be considered, however,
when analyzing the detailed data presented in this volume on changes
in assets, especially if comparison is made with the corresponding data
for rural areas in U. S. Department of Agriculture Miscellaneous Pub­
lication No. 520. The data on such items for all American families and
single consumers are presented in the form of net changes, so that there
is no question of the comparability of the basic data for the three types
o f community.
Assets
Investments in business
For nonfarm families, the increase or decrease in the investment in
business operated or owned was a summary estimate supplied by the
respondent. Family funds used to add to plant equipment or inventory
were to be reported as an increase in the investment in business,
amounts received from the sale of part of the business assets or from
reducing inventories as a decrease in the investment. The relative num­
ber o f families reporting changes in the investment in business is prob­
ably underestimated by the sample, since the income from independent
business or professional practice is frequently reported merely as with­
drawals for family use.
For farm families, the net change in the business investment was
determined from a detailed statement covering farms or farm land,
buildings and other structures, machinery, livestock owned, and crops
stored. The following items appeared as increases: The purchase price
o f a farm or farm land bought to be included in the acreage operated;
expenditures for the construction of and improvements on buildings
or other structures; expenditures for a new dwelling; the net purchase
price of machinery and equipment bought; and the value of an increase
in livestock owned or in crops stored, not under Government loan. The
corresponding decreases were as follows: The entire price of a farm
or farm land sold if part of tract was operated by the family; depreci­
ation on buildings, exclusive o f the dwelling; depreciation on machinery
during 1941; the price o f machinery sold; and the value o f a decrease
in livestock owned or in crops stored.
Owned home (nonfarm)
The full net purchase price o f owned nonfarm homes was entered
as an increase in assets, and the full amount of mortgage given, if any
(less payments on principal made later in the period), was entered
as an increase in liabilities. The difference between the two entries
represented the down payment and payments on principal made during
the period. If a family built a home during the period, the amounts
paid out, as for the lot and the contractor, plus the amount o f the




Part I.— Scope and M ethod

21

mortgage given, was entered as the net purchase price. Receipts from
sale o f an owned nonfarm home were entered as a decrease in assets.
Owned home (farm)
The purchase or sale o f farm homes was recorded under investments
in business for farm families.
Insurance
The total amount paid for premiums on life insurance and endow­
ment policies and for the purchase o f annuities was treated as an
increase in assets. (For discussion of the logic of this classification see
Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin No. 638, p. 179.) Insurance pre­
miums included amounts withheld from wages or salaries for pensions
and retirement allowances, with the exception of Federal old-age and
survivors insurance which was recorded separately. That part of dues
to organizations and fraternal associations which represented life insur­
ance was included in this total. Industrial insurance was differentiated
from other types on the hasis o f frequency of payment, i.e., weekly
and all other.
The amount realized from cashing a policy before payments on it
were completed was recorded as a decrease in assets.
Amounts received from insurance company upon the maturity of an
endowment or life insurance policy or upon the death o f the insured
were entered as a decrease in assets unless the contract called for
payment as an annuity. Settlements of fire, tornado, hurricane, and
other insurance on property were also included in this total.
Loans to others
Additions to amounts due the family on loans and to the amounts
owing on notes or mortgages accepted as part payment for real estate
or other property sold were recorded as an increase in assets. Amounts
received in repayment o f loans made prior to the report period were
classified as a decrease in assets.
Other assets
On the schedule covering the first 3 months of 1942, the amount of
Federal income taxes paid in excess of one-fourth o f the total amount
payable on income received during 1941 is included in other assets.
Liabilities
Mortgages
When the principal of mortgages, and the principal due on land
contracts, mechanics’ liens, or other debts secured by liens on real
estate had been reduced by payments during the period, a net decrease
in this form o f liability was recorded. A net increase occurred when
the amount owed was greater at the end than at the beginning as a
result o f transactions during the period. The net changes in mortgages
were recorded separately for owned homes or farms and for other
real estate.
Installment balances
Payments made during the period on goods bought on the installment
plan prior to the beginning o f the period were recorded as decreases
in liabilities; balances due on goods purchased during the report period
were entered as increases in liabilities. In addition, the full purchase
price (less any trade-in allowances) o f goods purchased on installment
during the report period were entered in the appropriate expenditure




22

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

section; for example, expenditure for furnishings, automobile, or cloth­
ing. The data on installment balances on the rural schedules were
divided into four groups, those applying to business equipment, auto­
mobiles, household furnishings and equipment, and other consumer
goods. On the schedules used in cities, installment balances on pur­
chases o f business equipment were combined with those on goods other
than automobile and furnishings.

Refusals and Substitutions
The sample design, while not entirely free from errors, was one
which, if scrupulously followed in the conduct of the field work,
might have been expected to yield a cross-section picture reasonably
free o f bias and with sampling variances not large enough materially
to affect the estimated size distribution of income. In the actual
conduct of the field work, however, it soon became clear that not
all o f the families originally selected for inclusion could be covered.
Some refused to give the information; some could not be found. Every
effort was made to keep these cases to a minimum. If an enumerator
was unable to secure cooperation from a family, his regional supervisor
tried. If that was unsuccessful, special letters to the family were
written from Washington, each one tailored to meet the special objec­
tions o f the family. The final urban refusal rate was 7 percent. The
final rural refusal rate was 13 percent. These rates, especially the
urban, are low compared to the experience of other income surveys
where 15 percent appears normal.15 It is likely that the period in which
the survey was conducted, a few months after the outbreak of war,
was as important in keeping the rate low as were the efforts to avoid
refusals. If so, future income surveys may expect refusal rates above
7 percent, despite the most painstaking efforts to keep the rate down.
URBAN SAMPLE
E ffect o f Refusals on In com e Distribution
In order to study the influence of refusals and substitutions in cities,
the sample was divided into 10 groups containing roughly the same
number o f spending units. Six of the groups represented blocks with
different median rent and rental value ranges in cities of 50,000 or more
population; the remaining four pertained to cities with populations
below 50,000 with different median rent and rental value ranges.
Table 6 shows for 1941, by way of illustration, the distribution by
income o f the nonsubstitute families and single consumers and the
substitution rate in each of the 10 groups. In general, there is a
marked tendency for the refusal rate to be high in the groups living
in blocks with higher rent levels and with a larger proportion of the
families in the upper income levels.
To check on this it was necessary to estimate a refusal rate for each
o f the nine income levels such that, when weighted together by the
income distribution in any one o f the 10 groups, it would yield the
known refusal rate for that group.
15 See Study o f Consum er Purchases, C ity and Village Families, b y F . M. Williams and M. Parten, in
National Bureau o f Econom ic Research Studies in Incom e and Wealth, Incom e Size Distribution (New
York, 1943), Part II, ch. 12, p. 48; also Minnesota Resources Commission, Minnesota Incomes 1938-39,
vol. I, p . lxi.




23

Part I.— Scope and M ethod

T able 6.— Distribution o f Urban Families and Single Consumers b y M on ey Income

,

,

Class by Size o f City and Rent Levels arid Refusal Ratey 1941
Cities with population over 50,000

Money income class

Cities with population under
50,000

Percent of families1in blocks with 1940 average rents of—

Percent of families1in cities
with 1930 median rents o f —

$5.08 $18.70 $23.79 $28.45 $35.02 $44.50 $7.73 $14.38 $21.47 $26.72
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$18.69 $23.72 $28.41 $35.00 $44.50 $215.50 $14.24 $21.04 $25.10 $43.65
Under $500..............................
$500-11,000...............................
$1,000-$1,500............................
$l,500-$2,000............................
$2,000-$2,50Q............................
$2,500-$3,000............................
$3,000-$5,000............................
$5,000-$10,000..........................
$10,000 and o v e r .. . ...............

10.8
31.6
18.0
18.9
6.3
9.0
4.5
.9
0

7.7
16.2
18.8
13.7
15.4
11.1
14.5
1.7
.9

5.8
10.0
25.0
20.8
15.0
9.2
10.8
2.5
.9

4.5
12.6
12.6
17.1
17.1
15.3
18.1
2.7
0

1.8
7.4
11.0
12.9
17.4
22.0
23.0
3.7
1.8

4.2
10.1
11.8
10.9
14.3
14.3
21.0
10.9
2.5

24.8
20.3
13.3
17.7
8.8
2.7
11.5
.9
0

16.2
22.9
12.4
20.0
17.1
3.8
5.7
0
1.9

2.7
21.4
14.3
26.8
17.0
12.5
4.5
.8
0

5.4
5.4
8.9
12.5
20.5
16.1
18.7
8.9
3.6

T otal............................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

400.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Refusal rate............................

7.5

4.9

1.6

8.3

10.7

9.8

3.4

5.4

8.2

11.1

O riginal replies only; does not include substitutes or part-year families.

It is possible to estimate such a refusal rate by means of the following
argument:
1. Assume that there is a refusal rate for each income group which is the same for
all 10 areas. Denote this refusal rate for the ith income group b y 1-p*. The reply rate
for the ith income group will then be p^, W e wish to estimate for each income group.
2. Denote the number o f families originally contacted (whether or not they gave
information) in the ith income group in the jth area by n^.
3. The rate o f reply for the yth area we shall denote by R j. B y definition,
Rj =

Pi ni> /^ nij.
%

R j is known for each o f the 10 areas. Thus, for the first group f?i= .9 2 5 (table 6).

4. Denote the percentage o f persons replying in the/th area who fall in the ith income
group by X tj. This is also known. Thus A i 1 = .108. From the preceding definitions—
3Q/ ~ P i **#/ ? Pi ntj
%

5. Finally, b y use o f the equations in 3 and 4 we obtain the following equation
t P*

There are as many equations as areas, 10 altogether. In each o f them R j and
are
known and pi is unknown. Since there are 9 income groups there are nine unknown
values o f p t to be determined. T o simplify the problem further it was assumed that
Pi was the following function o f income:
p — 1/1 + a ( l -\-b log I + c I)

This simplified the problem by requiring the determination o f three
unknowns, a, h and c, rather than 10 .
I f there had been no discernible relation between group income and
refusal rate, the estimate of b and c would have been in the neighbor­
hood o f zero and the refusal rate at each income level equal to
■ -7—, i.e., unrelated to income. The estimates of refusal rates (after
=
small arbitrary adjustments to eliminate negative refusal rates at the
lowest income levels) for 1941 and the first quarter of 1942 are shown
in table 7, together with the original income distribution and the dis­
tribution as adjusted for refusals and substitutions.
The refusal rates rise from 1 percent at the under $500 level to
17 percent at the $5,000 to $10,000 level and to 35 percent at the over




24*

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 7.— Refusal Rate and Original and Adjusted Distribution of Urban Families and
Single Consumers, by M on ey Income Class, 1941 and 1942 (.First 8 Months)
1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income class

Esti­
mated
refusal
rate

Under $500......................................................
$500 and under $1,000....................................
$1,000 and under $1,500.................................
$1,500 and under $2,000.................................
$2,000 and under $2,500.................................
$2,500 and under $3,000.................................
$3,000 and under $5,000.................................
$5,000 and under $10,000...............................
$10,000 and over.............................................

1.0
1.1
4.5
6.3
8.2
9.5
12.3
17.0
35.0

1942 (first 3 months)

Original Adjusted
income
income
distribu­ distribu­
tion
tion
8.0
15.4
14.8
16.2
15.0
12.1
13.6
3.4
1.4

Esti­
mated
refusal
rate
1.0
.6
3.6
6.1
7.6
9.4
11.7
17.4
31.2

7.7
14.7
14.2
16.8
15.1
12.0
14.0
3.9
1.6

Original Adjusted
income
income
distribu­ distribu­
tion
tion
8.0
13.6
14.0
15.1
15.1
11.0
17.1
4.9
1.2

,

7.6
13.0
13.4
15.2
15.6
11.1
17.4
5.4
1.3

$10,000 level. Such a difference in rates cannot be disregarded. The
procedure initially used in this survey was to draw a substitute family
from the same block as that on which the refusing family lived. A com­
parison o f the distribution o f the substitutes by income with the esti­
mated distribution o f the refusing families and the expected distribu­
tion of the refusers if refusals were not associated with income is given
in table 8 .

,

,

T able 8.— Comparison o f Refusals, Expected Refusals and Substitutions by M on ey
Income Class, in Urban Sample o f Families and Single Consumers, 1941
Number of urban families and single consumers
Refusing
Under $500...............................................
$500 and under $1,000.............................
$1,000 and under $1,500..........................
$1,500 and under $2,000..........................
$2,000 and under $2,500..........................
$2,500 and under $3,000..........................
$3,000 and under $5,000..........................
$5,000 and under $10,000........................
$10,000 and over......................................

Expected to refuse1

Substituted

1
2
8
13
15
14
21
8
7

7
13
13
14
13
11
12
3
1

5
11
14
6
13
15
16
3
4

1 Computed b y applying the substitution rate for the entire urban sample to the number o f schedules
obtained in each income class.

It is clear from this comparison that while substitution in a given
block retrieves some o f the information lost by refusal, because the
substitutes are at a higher level than the rest of the sample, they are
nevertheless at a lower level than the families that originally refused.
It seems clear that any field survey of incomes will be faced with
the problem o f refusals, and that substitution of “ comparable” families
will not eliminate all of the error occasioned by it. Some estimating
technique, not necessarily -the same as that used here, is necessary to
avoid a serious downward bias. Essential to any such technique is
the collection o f some information on characteristics correlated with
income. For the rural sample, rent or rental value, occupation, and
size o f family were obtained; for the urban sample, all that was avail­
able was the average rent o f the block or city in which the refusing
family lived. A simple form, on which some items like the following
were recorded for all families, whether refusing or not, might well be
part o f any future field survey o f income.




25

Part I.— Scope and M ethod
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Family size.
Rent or rental value.
Race.
Age of head.
Occupation of head.
Is housewife employed outside home?
Ownership of automobile, year and model.

A djustm ent o f In com e Distribution
The sample income distribution for both survey periods was adjusted
to take account o f the refusals and substitutions by applying to the
distribution o f all schedules, exclusive of the substitutes, an adjustment
factor for the estimated rate o f reply at each money income level. The
original and adjusted distributions for all families and single consumers
combined are compared in table 7 for the two survey periods.
A corresponding adjustment was made in the distribution of families
and single consumers separately, based on the assumption that the
survey findings as to the proportion of familes and single consumers
in each money income class were correct.
The sample distribution o f spending units by total income was
adjusted for refusals and substitutions by means of a cross tabulation
by money and total income.
The adjusted distributions were used in every computation of aver­
ages for all urban families and single consumers presented in this
volume.
A djusted Estim ate o f M ean In com e f o r $10,00 0 and O ver Class
In view o f the relatively high substitution rate for the $10,000 and
over class, the original sample mean income for that class was assumed
to be inaccurate. The method selected for estimating the average income
that this group would have yielded in the absence o f substitutions was
to take a frequency curve with such constants that it would yield the
estimated number o f spending units in the income classes $5,000 to
$ 10,000 and $10,000 and over, and to compute from these constants
the average income for the $ 10,000 and over class.
The Pareto curve, which has been widely used for fitting the upper
ends of income distributions, appeared to be the most suitable curve
for this purpose. The following experiment is useful in indicating the
degree o f accuracy that this curve can yield. An estimate of the aver­
age income for all Federal income-tax returns reporting net incomes
o f $ 10,000 or more was calculated by fitting a curve to the number of
returns with incomes between $5,000 and $10,000 and $10,000 and over.
The average calculated from this curve is compared with the actual
average in table 9.
T

able

9.
—

Comparison o f Average Income Above $10,000, Calculated from Pareto Curve
with Actual Average Reported from Federal Incom e-Tax Returns

Year

Calculated
from
Pareto curve

Actual from
income-tax
returns

Year

Calculated
from
Pareto curve

Actual from
income-tax
returns

1929.................................
1930.................................
1931.................................
1932.................................
1933................................
1934.................................

$31,538
25,547
22,968
23,203
24,282
24,686

$32,656
26,199
23,889
24,345
25,550
23,121

1935...............................
1936...............................
1937...............................
1938...............................
1939...............................
1940...............................

$25,584
29,246
26,892
23,437
23,674
24,512

$23,784
25,058
24,140
22,699
22,656
22,846




26

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

Similar computation on Delaware income-tax returns yield the fol­
lowing comparison:
Calculated

1936
1937
1938

...........................................................$41,143
........................................................ 61,230
........................................................... 49,432

Actual

$40,451
48,778
56,212

In general, the errors in these estimates seem to be o f the same or
smaller magnitude than those made by more elaborate adjustments
such as those used by the National Resources Committee for the 1935-36
distributions.
T he estimate o f average income over $10,000 yielded by the Pareto
curve is o f the following form : 10,000

where b is calculated from

the frequencies in the two income groups in the following fashion:
log tti + n 2
u - i

_

” 2

g 10,000
and where n± is number of cases $5,000 to $10,000, and n 2 is the number
above $ 10,000 .
Inserting the two appropriate frequencies after adjustment for sub­
stitutions an average income o f $23,438 for 1941 was obtained for the
latter group, to replace the sample mean of $14,125. The average income
for all urban families and single consumers obtained after adjusting
for substitutions is $2,409, for 1941, as compared with the original
sample average o f $2,188, an increase o f more than 10 percent.
% Since the income received by families in the upper brackets is some­
what seasonal,16 and the Pareto curve had been proved a satisfactory
method o f estimate only for annual income, a different technique was
required to estimate the mean income of the class $10,000 and over
(at an annual rate) for the first quarter o f 1942.17
The method finally adopted was to apply to the original average for
the class the proportional adjustment represented by the difference
between the original sample mean and the estimated mean for the
$10,000 and over class in 1941. An average of $6,782 was obtained as
compared with the sample mean o f $4,086.
The mean income for familes of two or more in the $10,000 and
over class in both periods was estimated in the same manner. For 1941
the adjusted mean was $23,556 as compared with $14,196, for the 1942
quarterly period, $6,782 as compared with $4,086.
To estimate the amount of income of various types received by
urban families and single consumers at the $10,000 and over level, in
each survey period, the sample distribution of income by source for
that class was applied to the estimated average total money income.
16 Interest and dividend payments, which comprise an important share o f the income of families in the
$10,000 and over class, show the following quarterly variations (in millions of dollars):
First
Second
Third
Fourth
quarter
quarter
quarter
quarter
1939
...........................................................................
2,030
2,128
2,034
2,699
1940 .........................................................................................
2,076
2,239
2,115
2,745
1941
..........................................................................
2,111
2,382
2,220
2,940
Based on revised series, incom e paym ents (in Survey of Current Business, March 1943, p. 27).
17 The adjusted frequencies in the two classes ($5,000 to $10,000 and $10,000 and over) were such that the
Pareto curve yielded an average incom e considerably lower (at an annual rate) for the first 3 m onths o f 1942
than for 1941, although the original sample mean was higher and all independent sources point to a higher
average. Moreover, the incom e estimate for the first 3 m onths of 1942 yielded b y the Pareto curve provided
incom e aggregates for all classes com bined which were too low in comparison with the 1941 aggregates, as
judged b y the U. S. Departm ent o f Commerce series on Incom e Payments.




Part L — Scope and M ethod

27

These revisions in the income figures for the-urban $10,000 and over
class have been incorporated in the averages for all urban families and
single consumers in all tables presented in this volume. The income
averages presented for urban consumers in the $10,000 and over class
are unadjusted sample averages.
A djusted Estimate o f E xpenditures f o r $ 1 0 9
000 and O ver Class
To estimate expenditures for the $10,000 and over class to correspond
to the estimated mean income for that class, linear extrapolation was
used. Thus, the extrapolated averages are simple, weighted averages of
the expenditures at the $5,000 to $10,000 and the $10,000 and over
classes, with weights a function of the average incomes at these levels,
as follows:

Ys = Yi

(X2~X%)

+ Y2
(* 2 —* l)
(* 2 “ *l)
Y i and X\ represent the sample average expenditure and average income,
respectively, for the $5,000 to $10,000 class, Y 2 and x 2 the sample aver­
age expenditure and income for the $10,000 and over class, and Y 3 and
X3 the estimated average expenditure and income for that class.
In general, the extrapolation was not explicitly performed. Rather
in computing an all-income average to include the extrapolated figure,
the following weights were applied to the sample averages for the
$5,000 to $10,000 and the $10,000 and over classes:

JTi=/i+/s

( x 2 ~

X s )

(x 2 —x 1)
■

and
W2 = f 2

(x2—* 1) ’

when /1 represents the frequency (after adjustment) for the $5,000 to
$10,000 class and f 2 the frequency for the $10,000 and over class.
The expenditure figures presented in this volume for the urban
$10,000 and over class are not adjusted figures. The adjustment was
used only in the computation of the averages for all income classes
combined.
RURAL SAMPLE
The analysis of refusals and substitutions in the rural samples is de­
scribed in U. S. Department o f Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication
No. 520 (pp. 21 -2 2 ). It indicates that the rural nonfarm sample prob­
ably underestimates the proportion of spending units in the higherincome brackets, but that among the farm families surveyed, both the
substitutions and the refusals were above the average with respect to the
value o f farm land and buildings.
For rural nonfarm families, a revised income distribution was esti­
mated for 1941 by combining the distribution of reporting families and
single consumers with a distribution for the refusal group (estimated
from rent-level classes). For the first quarter of 1942, those in the
refusal group were allocated to the various classes in the same pro­
portions as appeared among the reporting spending units of the same
income level in 1941. In the adjusted distributions the relative number
of spending units in the classes above $2,000 is higher than among
reporting families and single consumers by 1.5 percentage points for




28

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

1941 and 1.3 percentage points for the first quarter o f 1942. When the
averages for each income class for 1941 are combined by using the
adjusted frequencies, the average money income is increased from
$1,311 to $1,346, average expenditures from $1,147 to $1,163, and the
average net surplus from $116 to $127.
In the tables published in the U. S. Department of Agriculture Mis­
cellaneous Publication No. 520, the sample averages for the rural non­
farm and farm are presented without adjustment for refusals and sub­
stitutions. These unadjusted all-income rural averages are shown in
the main body o f tables in Part III and elsewhere in the present report,
unless otherwise specified. The adjustment is incorporated, however, in
the averages for all American families and single consumers.

Population Weights for National Estimates
W hile each o f the samples (urban and rural) was random, the pro­
portion o f schedules taken in urban and rural areas was not in accord­
ance with the distribution of the population. Hence, the samples could
be combined to obtain estimates for the United States only by means
o f appropriate population weights.
In developing the population weights, adjustments were necessary,
first, to take account o f the exclusion from the sample of the institu­
tional population and o f persons living on military posts or reservations
(within the United States or outside its limits) at the time o f interview;
second, to make the Census population figures by type of community
(i.e., rural farm, rural nonfarm, and urban) correspond to the survey
definition o f farm and rural nonfarm; and finally, to convert the
estimates of persons to estimates of full-period families and single con­
sumers as defined in the survey.
ESTIMATE OF CIVILIAN POPULATION
Total P opulation9 1941 and First 3 M onths 1942
Since the survey data related to the calendar year 1941 and the first
3 months o f 1942, it was necessary to have population weights which
represented an average o f the population for each period. The following
averages wrere therefore obtained:
Population ( in thousands)
1941
1942 (first 3 months)

Total population (average for period)

133,903

134,769

Armed forces (equivalent persons not included in
sample) .............................................................................
Civilian popu lation ................................. ............................

2,763
131,140

3,208
131,561

The estimate o f 133,903,000 year-equivalent persons (i.e., counting
each person in the population during a full period as one equivalent
person) in 1941 was derived by averaging the Census population esti­
mate for each month during 194118 and then correcting for under­
enumeration o f children under 5 years.19
1 Census Release P-3, No. 29. Since m onthly estimates are given as o f the first o f the month, the estimates
8
for January 1, 1941, and January 1, 1942, were each given a weight o f 0.5.
1 Underenumeration of the population under 5 years has long been characteristic o f Census data. In the
9
National Resources Comm ittee’s Problems of a Changing Population, correction factors for this under-




Part

J.— Scope

29

and M ethod

The estimate o f 134,769,000 for the first quarter of 1942 was derived
by averaging the population estimates for J anuary 1,1942, and April 1,
1942. The latter figure was derived by applying the birth and death
rates for the 3-month period (as computed by the Census Vital Statistics
Division) to the January 1 figure and adding net immigration for the
quarter (as reported in the Survey of Current Business). The average
was corrected for underenumeration in the same manner as the 1941
average, on the assumption that gains in population are subject to the
same correction as the base figure.
Equivalent P ersons Not Included in Sample
The estimate o f 2,763,000 year-equivalent persons not included in the
1941 sample comprises 1,703,000 military year-equivalent persons and
1.060.000 civilian year-equivalents.
The former figure comprises the number of persons in the armed
forces on January 1, 1941, each counted as a year-equivalent person,
plus the year-equivalents in military life, computed from monthly
figures on inductions between January 1,1941, and May 15,1942. (The
latter date was selected as the mid-point o f the period during which
schedule collection was in process.)
The estimate o f 1,060,000 civilian year-equivalents not included in
the 1941 sample was derived in the following manner: The number of
inductees between January 1,1941, and May 15,1942, were first divided
between military year-equivalents (given above) and civilian yearequivalents on the basis of the month of induction. From the survey
data, an estimate was made o f the number of inductees that lived as
part o f a family group prior to induction. They are represented in the
sample, either as part-year persons in full-year families or as full-year
persons if they were inducted after December 3 1 ,1941.20 It was assumed
that the remaining inductees lived as single consumers prior to induc­
tion and were therefore not included in the sample. The 1,060,000 is
estimated to comprise 732,000 men who were civilians throughout 1941,
and 328,000 civilian year-equivalents o f men single consumers inducted
into service during 1941.
The estimate of 3,208,000 year-equivalent persons not included in the
sample for the first quarter o f 1942 was derived by the same method.
The total represents 2,714,000 military year-equivalent persons and
494.000 civilian year-equivalent persons, of which 238,000 were esti­
mated to have been civilians during the entire quarter.
Footnote 19—Continued
enumeration to be applied to the 1930 population under 5 are estimated to be 1.05 for white and 1.13 for
N egro. Shryock of Census indicates that the factors for 1942 w ill not be less.
T he enumerated (April 1) 1940 population under 5 and the 1940 population under 5 corrected b y applying
these factors, b y area and color, is as follows (in thousands):___________________________________________
Enumerated

Corrected for underenumeration

Total
Urban....................................................
Rural nonfarm ....................................
Rural farm ...........................................

White

Nonwhite

Total

White

Nonwhite

5,007
2,523
3,012

4.526
2,288
2/.06

481
235
605

5,296
2,668
3,210

4,752
2,402
2,526

544
266
684

(The totals of the enumerated population under 5 are final Census figures, b u t the distribution b y color
within each area was estimated on the basis of the preliminary 5-percent Census cross-tabulation, Release
P-5, No. 9, which was all that was available at the tim e these estimates were prepared.)
These corrections involve increasing the figure for total (April 1) 1940 population b y 1.004800, for the rural
farm 1940 population b y 1.006553, and for the rural nonfarm b y 1.005365.
These factors were applied to the average of the 1941 m onthly figures, since these were based directly
on the 1940 enumeration.
80 In alm ost all cases it was possible to obtain information on the income and expenditures o f a former
member o f an economic fam ily from present members.




30

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

ESTIM ATED DISTRIBUTION OF CIVILIAN NONINSTITUTIONAL POPULATION B Y T Y PE OF COMMUNITY
Estimates o f the distribution of the population among rural farm,
rural nonfarm, and urban areas for periods other than Census enumer­
ation dates involve a number o f problems, since the only estimates made
regularly are for the farm population. The estimated distribution of
the total civilian population, following Census definition o f the farm
population, is as follow s:
Civilian population (in thousands)
1941
1942 (first 3 months)

Rural farm community..................................... 29,127
Rural nonfarm community............................. 26,024
Urban community.............................................. 75,989

28,669
25,615
77,277

131,140

131,561

Total

Rural Farm Population
The estimate of 29,127,000 year-equivalent persons in the rural farm
population during 1941 was based on an estimate by the Bureau o f
Agricultural Economics for January 1, 1941 (corrected for under­
enumeration o f children under 5 ), and adjusted (on the basis of Bureau
o f Agricultural Economics estimates for 1941 and the first 6 months of
1942) to take account o f net natural increase, arrivals from nonfarm
areas, departures to nonfarm areas, and departures to the armed forces.
One-half of the net natural increase figures and of the estimated arrivals
from nonfarm areas were used to obtain full-year equivalents, on the
assumption that they were distributed uniformly throughout 1941. In
the case of departures to nonfarm areas, it was assumed that about
three-fourths were individuals or families that would have been in­
cluded in the nonfarm sample, since the collection did not take place
until the second quarter of 1942. Some would have been included in the
farm sample, because o f the large number o f individuals that migrated
from families which could have been drawn in the sample.
Estimates of the military and civilian year-equivalents not included
because of induction into the armed forces were made in the same
manner as for the total population.
The estimate o f 28,669,000 equivalent persons in the farm population
during the first quarter o f 1942 was derived by the method used to
estimate the 1941 farm population.
Non farm Population
The estimates o f 26,024,000 and 25,615,000 year-equivalent persons
in rural nonfarm areas in 1941 and the first quarter of 1942, respectively,
were derived on the assumption that the rural nonfarm population
during each period bore the same relation to the farm population as
shown by the 1940 Census. Thus, the 1940 rural nonfarm population
(corrected for underenumeration o f children under 5 years) was multi­
plied by the ratio o f the estimated farm population for each period to
the 1940 farm population (corrected for underenumeration).
The urban population estimates were derived by subtracting the esti­
mated rural farm and rural nonfarm populations from the United States
total for each period.



31

Part I.— Scope and M ethod

D eduction o f Institutional Population
Since the survey sample did not cover institutional residents, it was
necessary to deduct the institutional population for each type of com­
munity in deriving the final population weights.
Census information on institutional residents is available only for
persons 14 years and older. Assuming no change in that population
since 194021 and assuming that the institutional population under
14 years22 was distributed among types o f community in the same
proportion as the institutional population 14 and over, the following
totals were derived:
Institutional population
( in thousands)

Rural farm c o m m u n ity ................. ...............
Rural nonfarm community................................................................
Urban community.....................................................................

149
613
541

Total ......................................................................................... 1,303

The civilian noninstitutional population was thus estimated as
follow s:
Civilian noninstitutional population (in thousands)
1941
1942 (first 3 months)

Rural farm community..................................... 28,978
Rural nonfarm community............................... 25,411
Urban community..................
75,448

28,520
25,002
76,736

129,837

130,258

Total

Adjustm ent o f Rural Population Estimates to C on form to
Survey Definitions
In the Survey o f Family Spending and Saving in Wartime only that
part o f the population living on farms which is included in the farm
operator’s family is treated as farm.23 The farm sample indicates that
88.4 percent o f all persons living on farms in 1941 were members of
operators’ families. The corresponding percentage for the first quarter
of 1942 was 88.5 percent. By transferring 11.6 percent of the 1941 farm
population and 11.5 percent of the farm population in the first quarter
o f 1942 to the respective rural nonfarm groups, the following population
estimates (conforming to the survey definition) are obtained:
Civilicm noninstitutional population (in thousands)
1941
1942 (first 3 months)

Rural farm community........ ........................... 25,617
Rural nonfarm community............................ 28,772

25,240
28,282

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF FULL-PERIOD FAMILIES
AND SINGLE CONSUMERS
A spending unit, that is, a person living independently or a group
of two or more persons that shared their income and expenditures, was
the unit for collection in the Survey of Family Spending and Saving in
Wartime. It was therefore necessary to convert the population weights
to a spending-unit basis.
21 Census Release P-3, No. 32: rural farm , 134,000; rural nonfarm, 554,000; urban, 489,000.
22 Unpublished estimate of 126,000 b y D r. Paul C. Glick of the Census Bureau.
22 The definition o f farm follows that used b y the Census o f Agriculture. See p. 13.




32

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

Schedules were collected from part-period as well as full-period
families and single consumers.24 Part-period schedules were obtained
under a number of different circumstances: For example, when a couple
was married during one of the survey periods, a schedule was taken
covering the period since marriage, an additional schedule was taken
for the man and woman separately for the preceding period covered
by the survey, provided each lived independently; when a young person
who had been at school, supported by his family, obtained employment
and became independent during the survey period; when a couple was
divorced.25
Since the m ajor interest in the data from the Survey o f Family
Spending and Saving in Wartime relates to patterns of expenditure
and savings at different income levels, and since part-period spending
units cannot appropriately be classified by annual or quarterly income
classes together with full-period families and single consumers, it was
necessary to adjust the estimates o f the civilian noninstitutional popu­
lation to represent the population in full-period spending units. This
was done by applying to the previous population estimates the ratio of
the number o f equivalent full-period persons26 iri full-period spending
units to the total number of equivalent full-period persons in each of
the three samples, as follows:
1941:
Rural farm com m unity.. . .
Rural nonfarm community
Urban community..............
Total ...............................
1942 (first 3 m onths):
Rural farm community. •. •,
Rural nonfarm community.
Urban com m unity.............. .

Civilian noninstitutional population (in thousands)
In full-period spending units
Total
Proportion
Number

. . . . 25,617
. . . . 28,772
. . . . 75,448

0.99980
0.99201
0.98242

129,837

128,276

25,240
28,282
76,736

0.99967
0.99972
0.99684

25,232
28,274
76,494

130,258

Total

25,612
28,542
74,122

130,000

The population estimates were converted to estimates o f full-period
families and single consumers by dividing the estimated population in
full-period spending units by the average size of spending units (in
equivalent persons as shown by the three samples) .27 The final estimates
o f the number o f full-period families and single consumers (in thou­
sands) were as follows:
1941

Rural farm community......................................... 6,355
Rural nonfarm community................................. 8,469
Urban community................................................. 24,463
Total

39,287

1942 ( first 3 months)

6,340
8,516
25,583
40,439

24 The number o f schedules obtained from part-period spending units compares as follows with the num­
ber obtained from full-period families and single consumers:
Number o f spending units in sample —
1941
194^ (first 3 months)
Full period Part period Full period Part period
Urban com m unity................................................
1,220
79
1,266
12
Rural nonfarm com m unity................................
981
36
997
3
Rural farm com m unity.......................................
762
1
752
2
The larger number o f part-period schedules for 1941 refleets, of course, the longer period covered.
25 In order to avoid overrepresentation o f families in which a divorce occurred, instructions were to take
from the man a schedule covering only the period since divorce, to take f rom the woman a schedule covering
herself since divorce and herself and her husband prior to divorce.
28 Full-period families sometimes included persons that were members of the fam ily for only part o f the
survey period.
2 See table 2, Part III, p. 70.
7




33

Part I.— Scope and M ethod

These population estimates were distributed among income classes
for all spending units and between families and single consumers in
each income class, on the basis of the sample proportions.
Following is the detailed table o f population weights by income class
which should be used if the reader wishes to make additional combina­
tions of the detailed data presented in this volume and in Miscellaneous
Publication No. 520 of the United States Department o f Agriculture.
T able 10.— P opulation W eights : Estim ated N um ber o f Full-Period Fam ilies and
Single C<msumerst b y M on ey Incom e Class
[In thousands]
1941

1942 (first 3 months)

Money income class
United
' States

Urban

All income classes,

39,287

24,463

Negative incom es.

117

0

0

}

6,047

1,884

2,011

}

3,596
3,474
4,109
8,306 { 3,694 }
1 2,936
4,139
3,425
1,115
954
449
391

Rural
nonfarm

Rural
farm

United
States

Urban

Rural
nonfarm

Rural
farm

Families and single consumers combined

Under $250...........
$250 to $500...........
$500 to $750............
$750 to $1,000.........
$1,000 to $1,500...
$1,500 to $2,000...
$2,000 to $2,500...,
$2,500 to $3,000...,
$3,000 to $5,000.*..,
$5,000 to $10,0001.
$10,000 and o v e r1.

}

7,147
6,195
5,772

6,355

8,469

40,439

117

/
l
/
1,950 \
1,795
987
1,134
481
86
25

955
1,197
871
730
926
676
542

25,5S3

1,203

0
1,944

}

6,355.

}

5,936
3,326
5,693
3,428
3,889
5,575
/ 3,991
8,389 1 2,840 }
5,294
4,451
1,559
1,381
333
435

233
75
33

8,516

6,340

17

1,186

2,239 /
\
1,599 /
\
1,642
1,223
1,103
582
85
26

1,310
862
573
438
623
463
455

6,095

261
93
76

Families of 2 or more persons
34,003

20,419

7,471

6,113

34,773

21,207

7,471

Negative incom es.

101

0

0

101

1,101

0

8

1,093

Under $250.............
$250 to $500............
$500 to $750............
$750 to $1,000.........
$1,000 to $1,500....
$1,500 to $2,000....
$2,000 to $2,500...,
$2,500 to $ 3 ,0 0 0 .,
$3,000 to $5,000...
$5,000 to $10,0001.
$10,000 and o v e r1.

l 4,171
/
\
1 5,512
5,307
5,373

750

}

4,474

770

1

4,517
4,671
5,016
7,773 /
1
5,235
1,551
'435

1,643 /
\
1,374 /
\
1,532
1,173
1,067
563
85
26

1,225
836
556
422
623
463
455
261
85
76

A ll income classes

}

2,237
2,703
3,735
/ 3,472
7,928 \ 2,816 }
)
3,384
4,070
954
1,115
368
426

1,420 /
\
1,724 /
\
1,678
979
1,106
453
86
25

871
1,130
846
705
926
659
534
233
75
33

2,165
2,516
3,380
3,576
2,675 }
4,411
1,381
333

Single consumers
A ll income classes,

5,284

4,044

998

242

5,686

4,376

1,045

245

Negative incom es.

16

0

0

18

102

0

9

93

1

1,876

1,134

J

1,881

596 f
1

85
26

1,635

1,359

84
67
25
25
0
17

1,174

}

591 /
1
/
226 l
117
8

}

1,419
1,022
559

1,161
912
509
415
165 }
40
0
0

225 1
1
110
50

17
16
0
0

Under $ 2 5 0 ........
$250 to $500............
$500 to $750............
$750 to $1,000.........
$1,000 to $1,500....
$1,500 to $2,000....
$2,000 to $2,500....
$2,500 to $3,000....
$3,000 to $5,000....
$5,000 to $10,000...
$10,000 and o v e r ...




888
399
}

f
378 \
69
0
23

771
374
222
120 }
41
0
23

28
28
0
0

8
0
0
0

/
616 1
59
8
0

36

0

19
0
0

0
8
0

34
T

able

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
10.— P o p u l a t i o n

W e i g h t s : Estim ated N um ber o f Full-Period Fam ilies and
Single Consumerst by M on ey Incom e Class— Continued

1 The following population weights should be used in place of those shown above in weighting all averages
except those for sources of income to obtain “ all incomes” averages. For an explanation o f them and their
source, see p. 27.
Estimated number (in thousands)
1941 (12 months)
Rural
nonfarm

United
States
Families and single
consumers:
$5,000 to $10,000.............
$10,000 and over.............
Families o f 2 or more:
$5,000-$10,000..................
$10,000 and over.............
Single consumers..................

Urban

655
909

494
851

86
25

685
856

524
798

86
25

1942 (first 3 months)
Rural
farm

United
States

Urban

Rural
nonfarm

Rural
farm

75
33

1,197
797

1,019
695

85
26

93
76

75
33

1,189
797

1,019
695

85
26

85
76

No cllange

For sources of income and percentage of families reporting various items the weights in the b od y'of the
table should be used.




Part II.— EVALUATION OF T H E SURVEY D A T A
The sample of families chosen for interview in this study was designed
to give every family and single consumer in the Nation an equal chance
of being included in the survey. For a variety of reasons, it is rarely
possible to carry out such a design without larger errors than would
have been predicted by the theory o f probability. In this particular
survey, unusual difficulties were encountered in planning the sample.
The basic data on the distribution of the civilian population by region,
size of city, and marital status applied to the spring of 1940, and by the
spring o f 1942 a migration o f major proportions had taken place and
a large number o f men had been inducted into the armed forces.
Any evaluation of the sample actually selected is handicapped by
the fact that there are still no figures which describe the population of
this country in the spring o f 1942 in the detail which the statistician
really needs for this purpose. It is necessary to rely on a number of
approximations in comparing the characteristics of the sample with
those o f the total population.
As regards the accuracy o f reporting income, expenditures, and sav­
ings, there are other difficulties in the way of satisfactory evaluation.
Our statistics on total income payments to individuals, total consumer
expenditures, and total savings by individuals are all estimates, built up
from detailed figures from a variety of sources, with differing degrees of
reliability.
Appraisal o f the data depends on an extensive analysis of the sample
with respect to internal consistency, the effect of refusals and substitu­
tions, and the omission from the sample o f persons who were members
of the civilian population during the survey period but were unavail­
able for interview at the date o f field work, principally military per­
sonnel inducted prior to the spring of 1942. After adjustments for sub­
stitutions and for military inductions are made, it is also possible to
compare the survey results with similar information from independent
sources. Although it has not been possible to make exhaustive analyses
of all these points, some evidence bearing on the extent to which the
sample results satisfy the requirements intended may be considered
here.

Appraisal o f Data o f the Separate Samples
In analyzing the data for internal consistency, it is most satisfactory
to inspect separately the three independent samples, the urban and
the two rural samples.
INTERNAL CONSISTENCY OF URBAN SAMPLE DATA
The usefulness o f the present sample for urban communities may be
tested by the consistency o f the results obtained, particularly when the
sample is broken into small subgroups.1
Relationship betw een In com e and E xpenditure
The best-known o f these tests, confirmed by over a century o f surveys
o f family incomes and expenditures, is the relationship between income
1 This device o f testing the stability o f a sample b y testing the consistency o f subgroups is one which has
found special application in the field o f industrial testing and quality control. (See Shewhart, Walter A .:
Statistical M ethod from the Viewpoint o f Quality Control, Washington, 1939, pp. 33-30.)




35

36

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

and expenditure for different groups of commodities and services.
Chart 1, which shows average expenditure in cities during 1941 at
different income levels, for food, clothing, and savings, presents an
example o f this consistency. The smoothness of the change from income
level to income level is all that could be asked from a sample o f any size.
CHART I

EXPENDITURE FOR FOOD, CLOTHING, AND SAVINGS
BY INCOME CLASS, 1941
EXPENDITURE

CITY FAMILIES, UNSMOOTHED AVERAGES

IN DOLLARS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

e x p e n d it u r e
IN DOLLARS

IN THOUSANDS OF OOLLARS

The behavior of these curves when based upon too small a sample for
the purpose at hand is exceedingly irregular, as may be confirmed by
inspection o f some o f the samples for individual cities in the Consumer
Purchases Study, the Study o f Money Disbursements of Wage Earners
and Clerical Workers, or the 1917-19 Cost-of-Living Study.2
C onsistency A m on g Small Subgroups with Changed Incom es
A more striking illustration o f the consistency o f the urban data when
broken into small subgroups is afforded by classifying families not only
by income but also by whether they had recently experienced an
increase or a decrease in income. In absence of data, it has frequently
2 Similar consistency in the two rural samples is attested both b y the regularity in the variation in the
pattern o f expenditures among rural farm and nonfarm families and single consumers classified b y 1941
income and b y the stability in the consumption patterns shown b y this study and b y the Consumer Pur­
chases Study. (See U. S. Department of Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication No. 520, pp. 16-18, for further
discussion of this point.)




37

Part II.— Evaluation o f the Survey Data

been assumed that when a family moves from one income bracket to
another it adopts the consumption habits of the families in the new
income bracket. The classification of families by both present income
qnd whether income has increased or decreased indicates that this

CHARTS

DISTRIBUTION BY 1941 INCOME OF CONSUMER UNITS
LIVING IN BLOCKS WITH HIGHEST AND LOWEST
AVERAGE RENTS
CITIES 50,000 AND OVER

1000
1000

AND UNDER

2000

2000

3000

AND UNDER

PERCENT

AND UNDER

3000

5000

INCOME CLASS IN DOLLARS

assumption is subject to some error, at least over relatively short-time
periods. Food expenditures in 1942 are shown separately in table 11
for families having income decreases and those having income increases
o f 5 percent or more between 1941 and the first quarter o f 1942. The
table indicates that present consumption is influenced not only by
present but by past income. Although the difference in food expendi­
tures between the 2 subgroups does not average more than $27 at any
income level below $5,000, the present sample is sufficiently large to
detect it at every income level.




38
T

able

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
11.— Quarterly Food Expenditures o f C ity Fam ilies and Single Consum ers, by
Incom e Change from 1941 to F irst Quarter 194®, by M on ey Incom e Class 1
C ity families and single
consumers whose 1942
m oney incomes were —

Annual m oney income
class1

Under $500..........................
$500 and under $1,000.........
$1,000 and under $1,500___
$1,500 and under $2,000___

Lower
than in
1941 b y
5 percent
or more

Higher
than in
1941 b y
5 percent
or more

$ 57
101
125
146

$ 37
74
100
134

C ity families and single
consumers whose 1942
m oney incomes were —
Annual m oney income
class1

$2,000 and
$2,500 and
$3,000 and
$5,000 and

under $2,500___
under $3,000___
under $5,000___
under $10,000...

Lower
than in
1941 b y
5 percent
or more

Higher
than in
1941 b y
5 percent
or m ore

$182
204
261
415

$165
197
242
316

1 Annual rate based on first quarter of 1942.

Consistency o f In com e D istribution am ong Subgroups
by A verage R en t o f B lock
A third example o f consistency within subgroups o f the sample is the
income distribution of city families and single persons by the average
rent in A pril 1940 o f the block in which they lived. As explained in the
section on Sampling Procedure in Part I (p. 3) average block rent
in April 1940 as reported by the Bureau o f Census was one of the bases
used in selecting the sample o f families in cities of over 50,000 popu­
lation. Chart 2 shows income distributions separately for families living
in the lowest sixth o f the rent blocks and in the highest sixth. The chart
is useful not merely in showing that average block rent is related to the
income distribution o f the families living there. It demonstrates that a
sample o f the present size can be broken into small subgroups and still
show consistent differences. Anyone who works with the sample data
cannot but be impressed with the large number of examples o f this sort.
URBAN SAMPLE D A TA COMPARED W ITH CENSUS DATA
There are certain points at which checks can he made with estimates
based on information obtained by other agencies. Although many checks
can be made only for urban and rural data in combination, there are
a number o f characteristics of families and single consumers with
respect to which the separate samples3 can be compared with com­
parable data collected by the Census and other Government agencies.
A ge D istribution o f Urban Population
The age distribution o f the individuals in the survey sample is com­
pared in table 12 with that o f all urban persons in April 1940 as shown
by the Bureau o f the Census. In general the distributions check well.
There are several sources of disagreement, however, which should be
remembered in any detailed comparison of the distributions.
1. The sample applies to a period 2 years after that o f the Census.
This means, first, that the sample age distributions will apply to a some­
what older population than those of the Census (since the average age
of the population of the United States is rising) and, secondly, will
exclude males in the armed forces at the time o f scheduling but in
civilian life at the time o f the Census.
2. It is known that every Census has under-enumerated children less
than 5 years old. Such an under-enumeration is considerably less likely
8 For comparisons o f rural sample data with data from other sources, see U. S. Department o f Agriculture
Miscellaneous Publication No. 520, pp. 18-20.




39

Part II.— Evaluation o f the Survey Data

in the present survey since special expenses for such children, as for
clothing, are called for on the schedule form.
Insofar as the ability of the agents in the present survey was above
that of the average Census enumerator (of whom there were approxi­
mately 115,000), these errors o f enumeration would be expected to be
less frequent.
An independent estimate of the distribution of the urhan population
by age and sex in April 1942, with the military and institutional popu­
lation subtracted, in general shows even closer agreement with the
sample distribution.
T

able

12.— A ge D istribution, A ll Urban A reas, b y S ex, Bureau o f Labor Statistics
Sam ple and Bureau o f the Census
Male

Female

Age
Sample
1942

Census
1940

Sample
1942

Census
1940

14 years or less........................................................................
15-24 years...............................................................................
25-34 years...............................................................................
35-44 years...............................................................................
45-54 years............................................ . . ..............................
55-64 years..............................................................................
65 years and over...................................................................

23.0
16.9
15.7
14.8
12.9
9.3
7.3

22.2
17.4
17.1
15.4
13.2
8.5
6.2

22.3
17.5
15.9
16.3
12.8
8.6
6.7

20.8
18.2
17.8
15.3
12.4
8.2
6.3

T otal..............................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Characteristics o f Urban Housing
Certain characteristics o f housing in cities o f over 50,000 population,
as estimated by the sample and as shown by the 1940 Census, are com­
pared below:
Percentage o f dwelling units—
1942
Owner occupied...................................................31.6
Having 1.5 or fewer personsper room ........... 93.0
Occupied by whites........................................... 91.7
Mortgaged (owned homes o n ly ).................... 51.1

mo

31.6
94.6
90.8
56.1

Because o f the 2-year difference in the period to which they refer
and the fact that an “ occupied dwelling unit,” as defined by the Census,
is not the same as the dwelling of an “ economic family,” as defined in
this study, perfect agreement was not to be expected. Nevertheless, the
general agreement is close.

Comparison o f Combined, Adjusted Survey Results
with Information from Independent Sources
Another way of appraising the survey data is by comparing informa­
tion from independent sources with the national totals built up from
the survey on the basis o f the three combined samples, after adjust­
ments for refusals and substitutions (discussed in Part I, p. 22) and
for inductions o f civilian single men into the armed forces between
January 1,1941, and the date o f interview. In some cases the agreement
is close. In the instances where there are differences, it is not possible
to say at once that the discrepancy is the result o f an error. A scrutiny
o f the methods o f arriving at the two sets o f figures is in order, to
determine just how far correspondence can be reasonably expected.
Thereafter, consideration is given to the possibility that one or both o f
the sets of figures are in error.



40

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

POPULATION ESTIMATES FROM SURVEY COMPARED
W IT H O PA ESTIMATES
Without the adjustment for military inductions, the survey results
applied to Census figures yield an estimate of 34,003,000 full-period
families o f two or more persons in the civilian population in 1941 and
5.284.000 full-period single consumers. (See Part I, p. 31, for method
o f estimation.) Corresponding figures for the first quarter o f 1942 are
34.773.000 families and 5,666,000 single consumers. When the adjust­
ment is made for induction into military service o f persons who were
civilians throughout the survey period the total for civilian single con­
sumers rises to 6,016,000 for 1941 and 5,904,000 for the first quarter
o f 1942.
Taking the finding of the survey, namely 3.62 persons in 1941, as the
average size o f families o f two or more persons, these estimates account
for the total civilian noninstitutional population as estimated by the
Census. Thus, in 1941 there were estimated to be 122,992,000 persons
who were members o f the 34,003,000 families of two or more. In addi­
tion there were 5,284,000 civilian single consumers represented in the
sample, another 732,000 men single consumers who departed for the
armed services between the end o f December 1941 and the time o f
interview, and 1,889,000 civilian year-equivalent persons who were
civilian consumers part o f the year.4This comprises a total of 130,897,000
equivalent civilian persons in 1941, or the total civilian noninstitutional
population.
The number of families estimated on the basis of this survey is higher
and o f single consumers lower than the numbers estimated by the Divi­
sion o f Research o f the Office o f Price Administration,5 as shown in
table 13.
T able 13.— Comparison o f Num ber o f Fam ilies and'Single Consumers, Year 1941 f
Estimated from Survey and by O P A D ivision o f Research1
Spending units

Persons

Source and type of spending unit

Survey:3
A ll spending units (total year-equivalent) . . . .
Full-year spending units:
A ll.....................................................................
Fam ilies............................................................
Single consum ers............................................
Part-year spending units (year-equivalent)4. ..
OPA Division of Research:6
A ll spending units (annual average)..................
Families.......................................................... .
Single consum ers............................................

Per­
cent

Number (in
thousands)

Per­
cent

130,897

Number (in
thousands)

Average
number of
persons per
spending
unit

100.0

40,019
34,003
*6,016

100.0
85.0
15.0

129,008
122,992
*6,016
61,889

98.6
94.0
4.6
1.4

3.22
3.62
1.00

41,550
33,000
8,550

100.0
79.4
20.6

130,100
121,550
8,550

100.0
93.4
6.6

3.13
3.68
1.00

1 B oth survey and OPA figures pertain to all civilian consumers except those living in institutions.
2 For survey definitions o f fam ily and single consumer see P art I, p. 11.
8 Includes 732 thousand men inducted into m ilitary service who were civilians throughout 1941.
4 Expressed as full-year equivalents, i.e., 12 man-months=1 person. Separate figures for families and
single consumers not com puted because o f conceptual difficulties of equating ‘ ‘part-year” families o f varying
size into ‘ ‘equivalent full-year” families.
6 Includes 328 thousand civilian year equivalents of men single consumers inducted into m ilitary service
during 1941.
6 For the OPA figures the following definitions are given: Families are defined as economic units o f two
or m ore persons sharing a com m on or pooled income and living under a com m on roof. Single consumers
are defined as men or women maintaining independent living quarters or living as lodgers or servants in
private homes, room ing houses, or hotels. The term spending unit is used to cover both groups. Estimates
are on a calendar year basis (i.e., average for the year).
4 328,000 year-equivalents for single men who were inducted during the year and 1,561,000 yearequivalents for families and single persons who existed as separate spending units only part o f the year.
8 O PA, D ivision o f Research, Consumer Incom e and Demand Branch: Civilian Spending and Saving
1941 and 1942, multilithed, March 1, 1943.




Part II.— Evaluation of the Survey Data

41

A special tabulation o f the data for cities indicates that about 27
percent o f the year-equivalent persons in part-year spending units were
single consumers. If this ratio is assumed to be applicable to rural areas
also and applies to the estimate o f 1,561,000 civilian year-equivalents
in part-year units, the estimated total number of year-equivalent single
consumers in 1941 is increased by 421,000 to 6,437,000. This total is still
far below the OPA estimate, however.
The OPA in making its population estimates used the Census Bureau
quarterly estimates o f total population for 1941. The distribution o f the
population among urban, rural nonfarm, and rural farm areas (used in
preparing the estimates o f families and single consumers) was based
in part on the 1940 Census data and in part on the Bureau o f Agricul­
tural Economics quarterly estimates, with some adjustment. The civilian
noninstitutional population was obtained by subtracting from the total
the estimated average number o f persons in military service and in the
institutional population.
The number o f single consumers in 1940 in each type o f area was
estimated by the OPA from the Population Census by taking the total
number o f nonrelatives 14 years and over, deducting the military and
institutional inmates and the number of nonrelatives 14 and over in
sub-families, assuming the latter to be equal to the number o f non­
relatives classified by Census as “ married, spouse present,” less the
number o f institutional residents 14 and over that were so classified.
Census figures on the number of one-person occupied dwelling units
were added to obtain the total number o f single consumers in urban,
rural farm, and rural nonfarm areas in 1940. The ratio o f single con­
sumers to total population in each area in 1940 was applied to the
estimated total population for 1941 to obtain the estimated number
o f single consumers in that year.
The OPA estimate of the number o f single consumers may be some­
what too high because (in the absence o f more information) of the
inclusion as single consumers o f (1) members of sub-families other than
married persons living with their spouses (such as widows with children,
and children 14 years and over living in sub-families with their parents)
and (2) members of certain quasi-household groups which are institu­
tional in character (such as nuns and priests in convents and monas­
teries). However, the over-estimate due to these factors is partially
offset by the omission from the single-consumer group o f 1-person fami­
lies who occupied dwelling units with one or more unrelated persons,
as single men or women who maintained homes with 1 or more servants
or lodgers. It is probable, therefore, that the larger part o f the difference
between the OPA and the survey estimates is due to the sampling design
of the Survey of Spending and Saving in Wartime (discussed below ).
SURVEY AGGREGATES COMPARED W ITH
EXTERNAL ESTIMATES
In com e Data C om pared with D epartm ent o f C om m erce
In com e Paym ent Series
The findings o f the present survey may be compared with estimates
of the aggregate income o f the Nation flowing into the hands of individ­
uals. The average income reported as received by the families and single
consumers in the survey was “ blown up” to a national aggregate by
multiplying the average by the estimated total number o f families and




42

Fam ily Spending and Saving in Wartime

single consumers in the Nation. To this figure was added the estimated
income o f “ part-year” consumers and military inductees who lived as
civilian single consumers part or all o f 1941. T o the.extent that the
sample data are free from errors introduced by biases or incorrect
reporting, and that a reasonably correct figure was obtained for the
Nation’s total number o f families and single consumers, the resulting
estimate of aggregate income should approximate estimates of aggregate
income payments to individuals derived from other types of data.
The Department o f Commerce estimates, which represent a sum­
mation o f all payments made to individuals by business enterprises of
all sorts (including incorporated and unincorported private enterprises,
government units, and nonprofit organizations) are based, for the most
part, on data collected from the enterprise making payment. The data
from the present survey approach the same end result through a differ­
ent source, namely information direct from the final income recipients
as to amounts they actually received. These receipts comprise the same
transactions as payments by enterprises to individuals, as measured by
the Department o f Commerce.
The problems of estimating total income payments originating in
all types o f enterprise (for most of which good data are available, while
for others information is less adequate) are, o f course, great. The De­
partment o f Commerce points out the many assumptions which must
be made and the limitations in the source data. The more nearly the
Commerce estimates are perfected and the more nearly field surveys
can avoid biases due to sampling, inadequate reporting, and faulty
blow-up procedures, the more closely the two sets o f results should
converge.
Accordingly, it seems useful to compare the two sets of estimates,
with some consideration o f the probable or possible reasons for impor­
tant differences.
In table 14 is presented a comparison of aggregate income by source
as shown by the Department of Commerce and by the Survey of Spend­
ing and Saving in Wartime. Adjustments for comparability are indi­
cated in footnotes to the table. The comparison shows an over-all dis­
crepancy o f about 10 billion dollars, or about 11 percent. The greatest
absolute difference occurs in the very large figure for wages and salaries,
though percentage-wise, the greatest differences are in dividends and
interest and in nonagricultural entrepreneurial income.
The fact that the wage and salary figure from the survey is lower
than that from Commerce is disappointing in that it would be expected
that people would report their wage and salary figures better than
other types of ificome. Furthermore, it would be expected that the field
survey would have an adequate coverage of wage and salary workers
since they form the bulk o f the total population. However, the records
of wage and salary payments relied on by the Department of Com­
merce are among the most complete of the figures they use.
There are several possible explanations for a lower wage and salary
figure from the survey. It is likely that some of the respondents in the
field survey reported “ take-home” pay, that is, net earnings after deduc­
tions made by employers for various benefits and social-security funds,
rather than gross pay. It is also probable that the survey underestimated
the number o f single consumers in the Nation. In the figures shown in
table 14, appropriate amounts have been added to the survey aggre-




43

Part II.— Evaluation o f the Survey Data

gates to compensate for the estimated million men lost to the survey
figures by reasons o f military induction. If it is assumed that another
million or even 2 million single consumers might have existed in the
total population in 1941, the survey aggregate would be increased
somewhat, perhaps from one-half to 1.3 billion dollars, but this still
would not be enough to close the gap between the two figures.
The wage and salary figures from the survey are exclusive of occu­
pational expense, whereas the Commerce* figures exclude the major
portion o f earnings from odd jobs. These two omissions may compensate
to a great extent. Precise information is not available from the survey
as to the amounts deducted as occupational expense. A special tabu­
lation o f the 1941 survey data for cities indicates that occupational
expenses comprised approximately 1.33 percent of earnings after such
deductions. If this percent is assumed to be applicable to wage and
salary earnings in rural areas and is applied to the estimated aggregate
o f 53,976 million dollars shown in table 14, total wages and salaries
would be increased to 54,694 million dollars, or 91.0 percent of the
corresponding Commerce aggregate as shown.
T

able

14.— Comparison o f Aggregate Civilian Incom e by Source in 1941 , as Shown by
Survey and by U . S . Department o f Commerce

Item

Survey of
spending and
saving in
wartime1

U. S.
Department Survey figures
of
as a percent of
Com m erce2
Commerce
figures
Millions of dollars

Total m oney incom e........ ............................................................

77,270

87,075

Wages and salaries including work relief...................................
Agricultural entrepreneurial incom e..........................................
Nonagricultural entrepreneurial incom e...................................
Net rents..........................................................................................
Dividends and interest.................................................................
Social security benefits and other labor incom e......................
Direct and other relief..................................................................

53,976
4,996
12,083
2,315
1,813
1,365
722

60,102
5,054 •
9,253
2,641
7,567
1,580
878

88.7
89.8
98.9
130.6
87.7
24.0
86.4
82.2

1 The survey aggregates conform to the general definitions followed in the survey, with a few adjustments
required for com parability with the nearest available Commerce figures. The components o f the survey
aggregate for each source of income as presented in this table are as follows:
Wages and salaries, including work relief.—Net m oney earnings o f employed wage and salary workers
including earnings from work relief, commissions, tips, bonuses, earnings from od d jobs. Includes amounts
deducted b y employers for paym ent of Federal old-age and survivors insurance and for unemploymentinsurance tax, health or life insurance, organization dues, pensions, annuities, etc. Excludes value o f pay
in kind as room and board. Also excludes occupational expenses as for tools, union dues, traveling expenses
not reimbursed b y employer, differing in this respect from the Commerce figures. Includes 1,207 million
dollars net earnings of salesmen on commission and agents working on own account transferred from entre­
preneurial incom e to the wage and salary class for com parability with Commerce figures.
Entrepreneurial income.—Includes net profits from a business owned but not managed b y the fam ily;
salary or net profits drawn from a business owned and operated b y a member of the fam ily including value
of food, clothing, etc., brought home b y the owner of a store for fam ily use; net income o f independent
professional practitioners as doctors and lawyers. Excludes net income from roomers and boarders.
Excludes value o f food produced and consumed on the farm.
N et rents.—Received from property rented to others b y the family.
Interest and dividends.—Received from stocks, bonds, bank accounts, trust funds, etc. Includes divi­
dends from paid-up insurance policies, but not dividends applied to reduce insurance premiums nor divi­
dends left to accumulate with insurance companies. Excludes income from annuities and regular (e.g.,
m onthly or quarterly) payments in settlement of insurance policies as well as lump-sum settlements of
insurance policies.
Social-security benefits and other labor income.—Includes unemployment-insurance benefits, Federal
old-age and survivors insurance benefits, retirement benefits received from the Railroad Retirement Board,
Federal civil service and State and municipal retirement systems, pensions from employers and veterans*
pensions; does not include old-age pensions paid b y States to needy persons nor workmen’s compensation
benefits.
Direct and other relief.—Includes cash amounts received from public and private relief agencies, the
value o f blue stamps used for food purchases and of brown stamps used for purchases o f cotton clothing
and textiles, the value of vouchers for food or other purchases given by relief agencies, income from mothers’
pensions, old-age assistance, aid to the blind, contributions sent to the fam ily from members in C CC camps.
The survey aggregates do not include gifts o f m oney either in the form o f large or unusual gifts or in the
form of contributions for support from persons outside the family, income received b y persons in institu­
tions, benefits from sickness and accident insurance, workmen’s compensation, alim ony, net gains from
gambling, ihoney found or received as a prize. T hey also exclude al 1income in kind (food grown for home




44

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

There may be some duplication between the wages and salaries paid
in the “ miscellaneous” industry classification of Commerce, a portion
o f which is a residual figure, and wages and salaries calculated on the
basis o f specific reports from other industries. In the Department of
Commerce forthcoming revision of its national income estimates,
these duplications will be eliminated, with a possible net downward
revision o f the wage and salary figure. The present guess as to the
amount of such downward revision is in the neighborhood o f
billion
dollars, a negligible portion of the discrepancy between the two esti­
mates. There may also be some upward bias in the Bureau of Agricul­
tural Economics estimates of agricultural employment which form the
basis o f the Commerce agricultural wage figure, although bias may
equally well be in the opposite direction. The Commerce totals for
pay rolls in covered employment agree almost exactly for 1941 (as well
as for the years since 1939) with aggregate estimates built by an inde­
pendent method from tax data by the Bureau o f Old Age and Survivors
Insurance o f the Social Security Board.
The survey aggregate for agricultural entrepreneurial income (i.e.,
net income o f farm operators) checks closely with the Commerce
figures. The latter are in turn derived from estimates of the Bureau
o f Agricultural Economics. The aggregate derived from the survey is a
product o f the average net farm income per farm operator family and
the estimated number o f farm operator families in 1941. The informa­
tion obtained on the survey schedules relating to the composition of
farm income was more detailed than in the case o f any other type
o f income. Furthermore, the definition o f net farm income used in
the survey corresponds closely to the definition used by the Bureau
Footnotes to table 14—Continued
use, occupancy value o f owned homes, clothing, furnishings, etc., received as gifts, pay, or relief) with
the specific exceptions noted under Entrepreneurial income and Direct and other relief.
T he survey aggregates presented here include not only the data for ’ ’full-year” families and single persons
b u t also forep a rt-yea r” persons. T hey also include an adjustment fo r 1,060,000 civilian year-equivalents
o f m en departing for military service. T he aggregate income o f part-period families and single consumers
covered in the survey was estimated by# applying to the national aggregate fo r full-period families the
ratio o f the sample aggregate for part-period families to the adjusted sample aggregate for full-period fam­
ilies. T h e average incom e o f the civilian year-equivalents o f men inducted for military service was assumed
to be the same as that o f urban single consumers covered in the sample; this average was multiplied b y the
estimated 1,060,000 civilian year-equivalents lost to the sample because o f inductions.
•Department o f Commerce figures were taken from the Incom e Paym ents series (in the March 1943
S urvey o f Current Business), adjusted to exclude income in kind and in other ways to conform so far as
possible with the definitions followed in the Spending and Saving survey. T he com ponents of the Com­
merce aggregates as presented in this table are as follows:
Wages ana salaries, including work relief .—Money wages paid b y the com m odity producing industries
including agricultural wages, mining, manufacturing and contract construction, b y the distributive in­
dustries including transportation, electric light and power, and manufactured gas, b y the service industries
including finance, service proper, communications, b y miscellaneous industries, m oney wages paid b y
Governm ent including project pay-rolls o f C C C , N Y A , and WPA. Includes commissions paid to salesmen
and agents. Includes 724 m illion dollars em ployee contributions to social-security funds. Excludes 742
m illion dollars nonmoney incom e in the form o f wages in kind to agricultural workers, food to water and
transportation employees, food and some room for employees of restaurants, hotels and professional organi­
sations (such as hospitals, schools), room and board for domestic servants. Excludes 1,326 m illion dollars
noncivilian incom e m the form of military pay roils. Excludes most earnings from odd jobs and earnings
from illegal pursuits.
Entrepreneurial incom e.—Includes net income o f farm operators, independent professional practitioners
and o f entrepreneurs in all other lines o f activity. Excludes 1,191 m illion dollars value of food raised and
consumed o n the farm. Does not include net income from roomers and boarders.
N et rents.—N et rents on rented property. Also includes royalties.
Interest and dividends.—Interest and dividends estimated as received b y individuals and unincorporated
enterprise. This figure w’as estimated with suggestions from the National Incom e Unit at the Department o f
Commerce in an attem pt to rem ove from the Commerce figures the effects o f treating banks, insurance
companies, and nonprofit institutions as aggregates of individuals and of the treatment whereby only longerterm interest is assumed to flow to individuals.
Social-security benefits and other labor income.—Includes disbursements under the unemploym entcompensation and old-age insurance provisions o f the Social Security and Railroad Retirement A cts; also
includes pensions paid to retired workers b y private industries and governmental agencies, and Federal
pensions to war veterans. Excludes 299 m illion dollars -workmen's compensation payments.
D irect and other relief.—Includes the value o f surplus food stamps, paym ents to recipients o f old-age
assistance, aid to dependent children, aid to the blind, subsistence payments certified b y the FSA as well as
obligations incurred for general relief. Excludes private direct relief except b y class I railroads. Excludes
234 million dollars relief m kind.




Part II.— Evaluation o f the Survey Data

45

of Agricultural Economics in their estimates of aggregate income
from farming. Accordingly, the agreement between the survey results
and the estimates of the aggregate developed from other sources should
be better for entrepreneurial income from agriculture than for income
of other source types. The small discrepancy in the two totals may
be assigned to sampling error, error in the estimate of the total number
of farm operator families, and certain differences in the concept of
net farm income.6
For nonagricultural entrepreneurial income, on the other hand, the
difference between the two sets of figures is large. This is not altogether
surprising in view o f the peculiarly great difficulties in computing
such figures because o f basic limitations of the data. Small owneroperated enterprises frequently have only sketchy records, and it is
often difficult to disentangle the family from the business finances. The
Department o f Commerce now makes its estimates for nonagricultural
entrepreneurial income in most industries, other than professional serv­
ice, as follows: Total noncorporate sales for an industry are estimated
from Census reports, supplemented by other sources, by subtracting cor­
porate sales from gross sales of the industry (used for interpolation
and extrapolation). To that figure is applied the profit ratio (percent
of net income to gross income) obtained from Bureau o f Internal
Revenue data compiled from income-tax returns filed by noncorporate
enterprises in that industry. The strong incentive to show heavy deduc­
tions for business costs in filing tax returns and the difficulty of check­
ing tax returns by small enterprises with incomplete records suggests
that the profit ratio derived from such Bureau of Internal Revenue
data may be considerably lower than would be figured were there no
tax incentive. Under-reporting o f receipts to the Bureau o f Internal
Revenue on the other hand would impart the same bias to the estimate.
There is also the possibility that small entrepreneurs who file tax
returns may have considerably different characteristics than those
who do not file. Net income of professional persons is based on sam­
ple data collected in special surveys.
In the field survey, the net receipts from an unincorporated non­
agricultural business or enterprise were sought on the basis of actual
gross receipts less operating costs. In the many instances, however,
where the respondent did not have sufficiently exact records to fur­
nish this information, agents were instructed to ascertain the amounts
usually withdrawn from the business for living expenses by the week
or by the month, and the appropriate yearly amount was computed
on that basis. It hardly seems likely that such enterprises in the aggre­
gate withdrew more for family living than the net business income
in as prosperous a year as 1941, but it is possible that this was the case.
Since the Commerce figures on entrepreneurial income do not include
net income from roomers and boarders, this figure has been eliminated
from the survey estimates for the purposes of table 14. One item
which tends to increase the survey figures over those o f Commerce
is that the survey figure includes the money value of food, clothing
or other items brought home by the owner o f a store for family use,
whereas Commerce figures do not. (It is not possible to compute this
item for the survey separately in order to subtract it. It iS probably not o f great magnitude, but it is not negligible). *
* U. S. Departm ent o f Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication N o , 520, Rural Family Spending and
Saving in Wartime, p. 18.




46

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

Again in the Commerce figures for this item, there is some duplica­
tion between the entrepreneurial income computed separately for
specific industries and the residual figures found in the “ miscellaneous”
industry category. Elimination of such duplication would further
increase the discrepancy between the two estimates.
The low level o f the Bureau of Labor Statistics survey figures for
interest and dividends (discussed below ), plus the high level o f the
survey figures for entrepreneurial income suggest the possibility that
some o f the families surveyed might have confused the figures from
these sources. A family conducting a small enterprise and not keeping
detailed records, might fail to specify certain amounts of interest or
dividends received, and think o f them only as a part of the gross income
of the enterprise. This would cause some overstatement of the net
entrepreneurial income.
• In general, it seems that the validity o f a comparison with Commerce
figures is more doubtful for entrepreneurial income than for any other
type o f income. The conceptual differences may be so great that the
two sets of figures cannot be expected to coincide.
Though the figures on net rents and royalties from the survey and
from Commerce are fairly close in absolute amounts, there is a dif­
ference greater than 10 percent. Again this difference is not at all
surprising in view o f the difficulties of estimating these figures. In the
Commerce figures net rent is the predominating component. In the
survey, data on royalties were not obtained separately. Survey net rents
were computed on the basis o f actual gross rents from property rented
to others minus actual operating costs such as taxes, insurance, inter­
est, and repairs. The Commerce net rent figures are based on original
estimates for 1929 from the 1930 Census o f Occupations and other
industrial censuses for agricultural rents, residential rents, and business
rents. Gross rents reported received by corporations, reported in the
Bureau of Internal Revenue’s Statistics o f Income, have been deducted
from total gross rents to estimate gross rents received by individuals.
As almost no data were available on operating costs of rented prop­
erties, an estimated percentage, based on opinions of experts in the
field o f housing and real estate, has been deducted from the gross
rent figures by Commerce to estimate the net rent. The original 1929
figures of the Department o f Commerce have been carried forward since
that date by a ratio based on receipt o f rents shown in the individual
income-tax returns reported by the Bureau of Internal Revenue.
It is in the field o f dividends and interest that the major percentage­
wise difference occurs between the Commerce estimates and the survey
estimates. The published Commerce figures from this source are not,
however, comparable to the survey figures because of the Commerce
treatment o f banks, insurance companies, and nonprofit organizations
as “ aggregates of individuals.” Property income going to these kinds
o f organizations is included in the income flows to individuals along
with other property returns that are realized directly by individuals.
A further assumption in effect makes short-term interest an inter­
business expense; it restricts individual’s interest receipts to long-term
interest payments less interest payments to corporations on Govern­
ment bond holdings. It is apparent that a larger area is encompassed
in these estimates than is desired for comparison with survey findings.



47

Part / / . — Evaluation o f the Survey Data

In an earlier attempt at a comparison o f the sort under consideration
here, certain compensatory adjustments;were made.7
In an attempt to avoid as many of these difficulties as possible and
arrive at the best possible comparison o f the Commerce and the survey
figures, the Commerce figure for net interest and dividends paid to indi­
viduals was computed on a revised basis.8
The survey aggregate for interest and dividends is less than a
fourth o f the appropriately adjusted Commerce figure. The Commerce
aggregate may be too high in that it still includes defaulted interest
other than that defaulted by railroads, but it tends to be somewhat low
in its estimates of amounts o f interest paid by individuals to banks
and on consumer loans (which must be taken into account in computing
a final net flow of interest to individuals). It seems likely, however,
that there was a large amount o f understatement for these sources of
income in the field survey.9 Many persons would tend to forget amounts
of interest accumulated but not collected on savings accounts, for
instance. The schedule form used called for “ interest and dividends
from stocks, honds, bank accounts, trust funds, insurance companies,
etc.,” as a single item; it is possible that larger amounts might have
been reported had each of these, as well as other sources of interest,
been given separate treatment.
Commerce figures on net rents and on interest and dividends include
payments to persons in military service and institutional residents,
which were excluded from the population covered by the survey. No
attempt has been made to estimate the size of such payments. While
they are probably not large, they certainly contribute to the difference
between the survey and the Commerce estimates.
That the survey aggregates are lower with respect to social security
benefits and other labor income, as well as relief benefits is in line
with the experience o f other field surveys and suggests some lack
o f knowledge on the part of recipients of the exact source of the bene­
fits received, and some reluctance to admit receipts of such benefits.
In summary, the survey aggregates are under the comparable Com­
merce national income figures by an over-all total of about 11 percent.
For consideration of whether the differences come within the realm of
possible sampling error, see pages 50 ff.
Benefits Data C om pared with Social Security Data
Figures on social-security benefits reported received by families
surveyed may be compared on an aggregate basis with the known pay­
ments o f those types by the Social Security Board or by State unem­
ployment-insurance systems. Following is the comparison for 1941:
Social Security Board
Survey of Spending and and State unemploymentSaving in Wartime
insurance payments
(Millions o / dollars)

Benefits received from Federal old-age and
survivors insurance ...............................................
Benefits received from unemployment insurance..
T o t a l ................................................

253.8
137.9
391.7

93.9
344.3
438.2

7 See National Resources Committee, Consumer Incomes in the U. S., Washington, 1938, p. 35, footnote 5,
where it was assumed that in 1935-36 half o f the interest and dividends received b y savings banks. building
and loan associations, life insurance companies, and similar associations o f individuals were paid out to
individuals. I t was assumed that such institutions received about a fourth o f all dividends and interest
payments. In Who Does Pay the Taxes? (Social Research, 1942, Supplement IV ), Helen Tarasov estimated
that such institutions received about 38.5 percent of total dividend and interest payments.
8 Details o f the revised com putation will be furnished b y the Bureau o f Labor Statistics on request.
• Understatement o f interest and dividends was also noted in the Minnesota Incom e Study, when field
inquiries were checked against income-tax returns. For further discussion o f the reporting problem and
the sampling problem, see p. 53.




48

Fam ily Spending and Saving in Wartime

The amounts paid out in Federal old-age and survivors benefits or
in State unemployment benefits are known on the basis of administra­
tive records, not subject to the hazards of statistical estimation. The
survey returns are considerably too high for old-age insurance and
too low for unemployment insurance, though for the two combined
the survey falls short of the totals shown by Social Security figures by
only some 10 percent.101It is possible that some recipients wrongly
reported receipt o f State grants to needy aged persons or private
insurance annuities as Federal old-age and survivors insurance, par­
tially explaining the high survey figure.
The understatement by the survey o f unemployment-insurance bene­
fits is partly explained by the fact that the period of compensation is
often of very short duration. Employment conditions improved steadily
from the beginning o f 1941 to the spring of 1942, when field work was
undertaken. Many persons might have forgotten by that time unem­
ployment benefits received for a few weeks early in 1941; others may
have been reluctant to report such receipts at a time when they were
employed at good wages.
In terest and Dividends Data Com pared with Internal R even u e Data
The survey aggregates of 1,813 million dollars interest and dividends
compares with a total of at least 4,500 million dollars11 listed as received
from those sources on individual (excluding fiduciary) income tax
returns for 1941 filed with the Bureau o f Internal Revenue. The Bureau
o f Internal Revenue figure is below the national total to the extent
that it omits tax exempt interest, interest and dividends received by
persons not filing returns,12 and to the extent that persons filing may
understate the amount of such income actually received. Even though
this difference* is not as large as the one obtained by comparison with
the Commerce aggregates, it is in the same direction, and serves to
confirm the impression given by that comparison— that the field survey
has failed to account for a significant portion of total interest and
dividends received.
Savings Data Com pared with Securities and
E xchange Com m ission Data
The upward trend in individual savings from 1941 to the first quarter
o f 1942 shown in the svirvey data is confirmed by national data on
savings analyzed by the Securities and Exchange Commission. In aggre­
gate amount of net savings by individuals, the survey figures are some­
what lower than those of the Securities and Exchange Commission. The
survey savings total, including “ part-year” families and an estimate for
single consumers entering military service was 8,688 m illion dollars in
1941. This compares with a comparable savings figure of the Securities
and Exchange Commission (derived by including payments on prin­
cipal o f mortgage and employee contributions to government insurance
funds, but excluding purchases of automobiles and other durable
goods) o f around 12.5 billion dollars. The low level o f the survey
figure is in the same direction as the understatement of income when
measured against Commerce figures.
10 Understatement of unemployment-insurance benefits was also found in the Minnesota Incom e Study.
114,333 m illion dollars interest and dividends were reported on form 1040 (filed principally b y persons with
incomes over $3,000) and 305 million dollars dividends, interest, rents, annuities, and royalties (not separable)
reported on short form 1040A (filed exclusively b y persons with incomes below $3,000).
** A special tally of the schedules showed that 45 percent o f the interest and dividends reported received
by families in the field survey was received b y families not paying an income tax. If the Bureau o f Internal
Revenue figure is stepped-up in the same proportion, the difference between the survey aggregate and the
Bureau of Internal Revenue aggregate becomes at least 6,370 million dollars.




Part II.— Evaluation of the Survey Data

49

The difference between the survey and the Securities and Exchange
Commission figures is considerably greater when a comparison is made
o f the components o f savings. For an item like insurance which is
reported by a great majority o f the families the check is quite goodL
For items such as savings in cash, and investments in stocks and bonds,
however, there are considerable differences.
The sources o f information utilized by the Securities and Exchange
Commission in estimating savings are similar to those used by the
Commerce Department in the income field. They are the financial sta­
tistics o f the Nation derived from bank records, reports of the Federal
Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Govern­
ment financial reports and similar financial sources, as well as the
Commission’s own files.
The survey figures, on the other hand, represent the calculations o f
single consumers and families as to the net change in their assets and
liabilities during the survey period. For 1941 this would mean the net
amounts by which their cash and other reserves and also their obli­
gations had increased or decreased between the beginning and the end
of the year. For the first quarter o f 1942, the computation was for
the status on March 31 as compared with January 1. This computation
by the family, represents one o f the most difficult types o f informa­
tion requested and is only incidental to a complete reconciliation
o f all income and all out-go o f family funds. The entries are “ net” so
far as possible for each item. Thus, for example, amounts shown as
payments on installment purchases will not tally with trade figures
on total amounts o f installment sales. The survey figures for this item
compare installment balances owing at the end of the period with
the amount owed at the beginning of the period. Because o f the
complexities o f the “ net” computations, and the reluctance o f some
families to discuss their savings, complete agreement between survey
figures and ones from financial trade sources for individual components
o f savings is hardly to be expected.
Furthermore, since a large part of the Nation’s aggregate savings
is made by relatively high-income families, any slight under-represen­
tation in the sample of such families would make the survey savings
aggregate low. Likewise, in a small sample, if these high-income fam­
ilies actually surveyed happened to have slightly lower savings than
the true average for their income class,13 the effect on the sample
results would be large.

Critique o f Survey Methods
The comparisons of the findings of the survey with independent esti­
mates, outlined in the preceding section, leave the conclusion that the
sample results understate income, particularly wages and salaries and
interest and dividends. The survey also underestimates the number
o f single consumers and correspondingly overstates the number of
families o f two or more. The question o f how a correction for the
understatment o f aggregate income and o f number o f single consumers
would affect the distribution by size of income o f families and single
consumers as estimated by the survey is not easily answered. No attempt
18 I t should b e noted, however, that the savings figure for all-income classes com bined incorporates the
revision o f the savings figure for the $10,000 and over class made to correspond with the mean incom e for
that class estimated from the Pareto curve, to correct for refusals and substitutions (See Part 1, section on
Refusals and Substitutions, p. 22.)




50

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

is made to do so here. In the pages which follow, there is a specific
search for the sources of error in the Study of Spending and Saving
in Wartime and consideration of the extent to which they can be
avoided in future surveys and to which they are limitations which
all field surveys must share.
SAMPLE SIZE
The most novel feature of the sample design for the Study of Spend­
ing and Saving in Wartime was the sample size, 1,300 families for the
urban sample, and about 1,700 for the rural. Any investigation of
understatement o f income in the field results must consider the pos­
sibility that it can be accounted for in large part by the smallness
o f the sample.
Any precise attempt to investigate the question on the basis o f sample
data alone would involve the use of a mathematical test of significance.
For such a test an estimate o f the sampling error of the sample estimate
is necessary. Because the sample design was a moderately complicated
one, using a considerable amount both of stratification and cluster
sampling, such an estimate is not easily computed. The sampling of
clusters* i.e., cities and counties, serves to increase the sampling error
o f the final estimate over that which would have been obtained from
a sample of the same size hut in which no cluster sampling was in­
volved. The stratification of the clusters and of families within clusters,
on the other hand, serves to decrease the error. It is impossible to strike
a balance between these two opposing forces without extensive compu­
tations. In addition, a larger proportion o f rural than urban population
was covered. Had the proportions been the same, with 1,300 families
still being covered in urban areas, total sample size would have been
in the neighborhood of 2,200, rather than 3,000. Thus, on the basis
o f this factor alone, the sampling error is equivalent to that of a random
unstratified sample not o f 3,000 units, but of some number between
2,200 and 3,000.
A final difficulty with the computation of an exact test of significance
is that the sample results include two types of adjustments for refusals,
one in the income distribution and one in the estimate o f average in­
come in the income class $10,000 and over. Since the estimates involved
in these two adjustments are based on sample data alone, the sampling
error to which they are subject could presumably be computed. It is
likely, however, that this source of error is small in comparison with
possible errors in the assumptions upon which the adjustments are
based. In view of these difficulties, it is not to be expected that much
light would be cast upon the effect of sample size by the use of any
significance test.
Chance o f Including V ery High Incom e Persons
The distribution of incomes is a highly skewed distribution, much
more skewed than the distributions ordinarily considered in statistical
theory. Thus, in 1941, only 4,753 persons reported net incomes of
$100,000 or over, but had an aggregate net income of almost i y 2 billion
dollars.14 The chance of not including any of them in the sample was
about 9 to 1, so that it was likely that the sample would under-estimate
aggregate national income b y at least i y 2 billion dollars or 1.9 percent
1 See Statistics o f Incom e over $100,000, U. S. Treasury release, December 27, 1943.
4




51

Part II.— Evaluation o f the Survey Data

o f aggregate income as reported by the survey. On the other hand, if
one individual with an income of $100,000 had been included the
sample estimate of aggregate national income would have been in­
creased by 2 billion dollars. It is thus clear that the skewness o f the
income distribution is another source o f error when estimates o f aggre­
gate national income are made from small samples.
Understatem ent o f Dividends Related to Sample S h e and Skewness
O f all the components of national income, dividends is the most
highly skewed15 and it is the component where the difference between
survey and Commerce figures are greatest, as shown in the preceding
section, page 43. Can this under-estimate be explained by the com­
pounding o f a small sample and a skew parent population? The only
certain way o f answering this question is by inspecting the sampling
distribution of means drawn from such a population. It is known, of
course, that for sufficiently large samples the means are normally dis­
tributed, no matter what the form of the population.16 The question
to be settled for this discussion is whether the survey sample was large
enough.
To answer this question the following experiment was undertaken.
Shown below is an assumed distribution of individuals by dividend
receipts. The distribution corresponds to the actual distribution of
dividend receipts in Wisconsin in 1929, except that it considers a popu­
lation in Which only 10 discreet values of dividend payments occur.
The moments of this distribution are approximately equal to the
moments of the actual 1929 dividend distribution. W e may rephrase
the question in the above paragraph then to depend on the sampling
distribution o f means drawn from the highly skewed parent population.
The assumed distribution of individuals, by size o f dividend receipts,
is as follows:
Dividend receipts of—

0

.......................

$123 .........................
$951 .........................
$2,339 .......................
$4,927 .......................
$9,326 .......................
$17,874 .....................
$34,077 .....................
$71,354 .....................
$150,000 ....................
$460,000 . . . . . . . . . . .
Average of distribution

Percent of
persons having

83.022
14.154
1.506
.635
.329
.170
.102
.048
.0105
.0105
.0035

Percent of
total dividends

0
11
9
9
10
10
12
10
10
10
10
$159

The estimated distribution of means of samples of 1,280 cases, drawn
from estimated population, is shown below.17
1 Wisconsin Individual Incom e Tax Statistics.
5
16 Subject, of course, to the condition that the parent population have a finite variance. See Wilks, S. S.:
Mathematical Statistics, Princeton University, 1943, pp. 81-82.
1 The distribution was estimated b y the combinatorial method:
7
(1) The distribution of means of samples of 2 was obtained b y com puting the probability o f each o f the
121 possible combinations.
(2) A grouping of these 121 back to 10 discreet values with corresponding probabilities was obtained from
this distribution of means of samples of 2. The moments of the set of 10 values are approximately equal
to the moments of the set of 121.
(3) Steps 1 and 2 were repeated to give a set of 10 discreet values representing the distribution o f means
of samples of 4.
(4) The process was repeated until 121 discreet values for samples o f 1,280 were obtained.
(5) The 121 values were adjusted to yield the 4 moments that would be expected, on the basis o f the
moment o f the parent population.




52

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
Percent o f samples

Value o f sample average dividend payment:
with means in interval
Under $25 ......................................................................................................... 1
$25 and under $ 5 0 ........................................................................................... 3
$50 and under $ 7 5 ........................................................................................... 4
$75 and under $1 0 0 ....................................................................................... 18
$100 and under $125 ..................................................................................... 21
$125 and under $1 5 0 .................................................................................... 14
$150 and under $ 1 75..................................................................................... 12
$175 and under $200 ..................................................................................... 7
$200 and under $225 ......................... .......................................................... 6
$225 and under $250 ..................................................................................... 4
$250 and under $300 ..........: ......................................................................... 4
$300 and under $350 ....................................................................................... 2
$350 and under $400 .......................................................................................
1
$400 and under $500 ....................................................................................... 1
$500 and o v e r .......... ........................................................................................ 2

There are several points to be noted:
(1) The sampling distribution is still skewed although nowhere
nearly as markedly as the parent distribution. Approximately 65
percent o f the sample means fall below the true mean. There is thus a
2 to 1 chance o f underestimating the mean in a sample of this size.
(2) Only 3 percent of the values fall below 22 percent of the popu­
lation mean. Thus, it is very unlikely that the discrepancy in the esti­
mate for dividends can be attributed to sample size alone.18
W e may conclude from this test that the sampling distribution of
means, even for dividends, is only moderately skewed and that the dis­
crepancies found are much larger than could be expected for a sample
o f 1,300, even from a population as skewed as that of dividend pay­
ments.
Understatem ent o f In com e in O ther Field Surveys
There are other and probably more convincing grounds, however, for
doubting that the apparent understatement o f income in the survey
results is occasioned by the small size of the sample. The Survey of
Spending and Saving in Wartime is not the first field survey which
failed to account for all known segments of the national income. There
are other field surveys which have had the same general experience
and in which such failure cannot be explained on the grounds of
sample size.
Consumer Purchases Study9 1935-36
The first field survey that we shall consider here is the Consumer
Purchases Study, by far the largest and most systematic attempt to
obtain data on total consumer incomes ever made in this country. The
period covered was 1935-36, the number of families 300,000. Since cer­
tain important groups in the population were excluded from the field
work, no simple estimate o f national income could be made on the basis
of sample results alone. In attempting to provide an accurate estimate
the National Resources Committee soon discovered that the sample
results failed to account for the estimated total volume o f national
income, and that for particular components the field results were wide
of the Commerce figures. An attempt to supplement the deficiencies
of the field results was made by recomputing the upper end o f the
income distribution on the basis of data afforded by income-tax returns.
18 This calculation disregards the fact that the probability is less than 0.03 because dividends were selected
for this test for the reason that they had the largest discrepancy.




Part II.— Evaluation of the Survey Data

53

This adjustment19 was based upon two assumptions: (1) That the
sample results provided an accurate estimate of the number and distri­
bution o f families with incomes below $7,500; (2) that the number and
distribution of families with incomes above $7,500 was incorrect because
o f inability to maintain randomness in the selection of such families.
The effect o f the adjustment was to add 5.5 billion dollars20 to the
aggregate estimated from the sample, all at income levels above $7,500.
Two conclusions are apparent immediately. First, the adjustment was
o f about the same order o f magnitude (in view o f the size of national
income in 1935-36) as that necessary to bring the aggregate estimated
from the present study into agreement with the present estimates of the
Department o f Commerce. Secondly, the comparatively low survey
figure for the Study o f Consumer Purchases cannot be attributed to
small sample size.
Minnesota Income Study, 1938-39
As a second example we may take the Minnesota Income Study. This
survey, which was designed to provide detailed estimates o f the dis­
tribution o f Minnesota families and single individuals by size of income
in the 12 months, October 1938 through September 1939, covered
16,528 families and single individuals, carefully selected to provide a '
representative cross section for the entire State. The sample size pre­
sents problems only when many cross classifications o f the sample are
planned. The few simple over-all estimates here discussed may be
considered as virtually free from sampling error. The aggregate income
o f Minnesota families estimated from the field survey was 1,182 million
dollars for the period October 1938-September 1939, as compared with
the Commerce estimate for the State o f 1,320 million dollars for
1938 and 1,384 for 1939, a discrepancy o f almost 14 percent. Even more
to the point, however, is the fact that the field survey estimated that
55 thousand families and single consumers in Minnesota had received
12 million dollars worth o f dividends, while State income-tax returns
for 1938 showed that 12 thousand returns reported the receipt o f almost
25 million dollars worth o f dividends, an underestimate o f 50 percent
in aggregate amount, if the income-tax returns are assumed to provide
a complete coverage o f dividend payments in the State.
Census wage and salary data
In the 1940 population census, every person 14 years of age or over
(except in institutions) was asked to report his wage and salary earn­
ings in 1939. Aggregate earnings o f 43.2 billion dollars were reported,
according to the Census Bureau. This is about 3.5 percent below
the Commerce estimate o f 44.8 billion dollars adjusted to exclude
income in kind.
The estimate o f aggregate national wage and salary earnings reported
in the census was made on the basis o f the distributions for individuals
included in the 5 percent sample. The estimated total o f 43.2 billion
National Resources C om m ittee: Consumer Incom e in the United States, 1938, pp. 80-87.
30 Estimate based on table 2, p. 191, The Use of Incom e Tax Data in the National Resources Committee
Estimate o f the Distribution o f Incom e b y Size, b y E nid Baird and Selma Fine, in National Bureau o f
E conom ic Research, Studies in Incom e and Wealth, Vol. I l l (New Y ork 1939), and on table 3, p . 18, o f the
National Resources Comm ittee report, Consumer Incom es in the United States (Washington, 1938). This
is a minimum estimate since it reflects only the increase in aggregate incom e occasioned b y shifting 116,000
families of 2 or more to the $7,500 to $10,000 class and 217,000 more to the $10,000 and over class. I t does not
reflect the increase resulting from raising the average incomes o f the 138,000 families already in those two
classes, nor amounts added for single consumers. E ven after these adjustments, the National Resources
Committee aggregates were still about 3 billion dollars below the then current estimates o f national income
of the Department o f Commerce (see p. 35 o f the N .R .C . report.)




54

Fam ily Spending and Saving in Wartime

dollars is made up o f the following components for persons 14 years old
and over, classified by their status in March 1940:21
Persons
Estimated aggregate earnings (in billions of dollars)
Total
Reported
not reporting

All persons except in institutions)................
Wage or salary workers (except emergency)
On public emergency w ork.............................
Other persons in the lahor force..........
Not in the labor force (except in institutions)

43.16
39.23
1.03
1.82
1.08

41.83
38.51
1.01
1.57
.74

1.33
.73
.02
.25
.33

QUOTA SAMPLING
There are some features of the sample design of the Survey of Spend­
ing and Saving which may have resulted in some unnecessary errors.
It is accordingly appropriate to consider the effects of the sample design
used and alternatives that could have been employed. In general, the
problem centers around the assignment o f quotas o f schedules to be
obtained to cities and to blocks within cities.
After the sample o f 62 cities had been drawn, it was necessary to
adopt some plan for determining the number o f families to be inter­
viewed in each city. Similarly, after having selected the blocks within
a city it was necessary to adopt some plan for allocating the number
o f interviews to each block. The same problem arose in allocating
rural interviews to each o f the 45 counties and of allocating the inter­
views within each county to the unincorporated community and open
country components within it. Finally, a decision was required on the
allocation of the total number o f interviews in the entire survey between
the urban and rural segments.
The problem o f assigning quotas to each o f the cities covered will be
considered first, since the principles which apply there apply in the
other cases as well.
Quotas and the E ffect o f Population Change
The procedure followed in the present survey was to assign to each
city a quota which was proportionate to the number of dwelling units
in the stratum o f cities from which that city was drawn. The number
o f dwelling units used was that shown by the Census Bureau for
April 1940. Insofar as population had changed from the time of the
census to the time the survey was conducted, and such population
changes were correlated with levels o f income, the procedure would
result in biased estimates. The term “ biased estimate” is used here in
the sampling sense,*i.e., an estimate made from a sample drawn by
a set o f rules, such that the average o f estimates computed from all
possible samples drawn according to that set of rules would not equal
the average o f the parent population from which, the samples were
drawn.
The bias resulting from this procedure was one o f under-representing
war production centers with marked increases in population. The direc­
21 A n aggregate was com puted for each category of persons in the labor force and not in the labor force in
March 1940, as shown in tables 1,2, and 3 o f the report on individual wage or salary income, cross-classified
b y sex, receipt or nonreceipt of other incom e in 1939, and, for wage or salary workers, b y whether o r n ot a
full year was worked. I n com puting these aggregates, the mean incom e o f persons in each closed-end wage
or salary interval was assumed to be equal to the m id-point o f the interval, except that $1,250 was used for
the interval $1,000-$1,999 for persons not in the labor force. For the terminal interval $5,000 and over for
persons in the labor force, a mean of $9,000 was used. This is based on an analysis o f income-tax returns of
persons reporting$5,000or more o f wage or salary income in 1936. For the interval $2,000 and over for persons
not in the la b or force, $2,500 was used. I t was assumed that the mean incom e o f persons in each category
who failed to report their wage or salary income, was the same as that o f persons who reported.




55

Part / / . — Evaluation o f the Survey Data

tion o f the error is clear; it resulted in an understatement of income,
particularly wage and salary income. It is not as easy, however, to
determine the magnitude o f the error. For that purpose the following
experiment has been undertaken. For each city covered in the urban
sample an estimate o f change in the number of families from April 1940
to March 1942 has been computed from the registrations in March 1942
for sugar ration books in the county or metropolitan area in which the
city was located.22 There are, o f course, some minor errors in this pro­
cedure. It is likely that the population increase was larger in the
periphery o f most cities than it was in the city proper. Thus, in Mobile
the bulk o f the growth has been in suburbs like Chickasaw and not
the city proper; in San Diego in suburbs like Linda Vista; in Baltimore,
in suburbs like Three Riyers. Similarly, the number o f families may
not have changed in the same ratios as the number of persons. In par­
ticular, enumerations o f 1943 population made by the Census Bureau
for certain war production centers in California show dissimilar rates
o f change for population and dwelling units.
Similarly, in die rural sample, the assignment o f quotas between
unincorporated communities and open country was based on rough
estimates o f population in the two groups obtained from commercial
directories.23 In this case, both the lack o f precision in the basic figures
and the possibility o f population change may have resulted in some
minor hiases.
T

able

15.— Comparison o f Percent Distribution b y M on ey Incom e in 1941 o f Urban and
Rural Nonfarm Fam ilies and Single Consumers, as Shown by Survey Sample
and by Sam ple Adjusted fo r Population Change from 1940 to M a y 1942
Percent of families and single consumers
Urban
Money income class

Rural nonfarm

Survey
sample1

Adjusted
sample taking
account o f
population
change,
1940-May 1942

Under $500................................................................
$500-$l,000.................................................................
$1,000-11,500..............................................................
$1,500-$2,000.............................................................
$2,000-$2,500.............................................................
$2,500-$3,000........................................... ...............
$3,000-$5,000..............................................................
$5,000-$10,000............................................................
$10,000 and o v er.......................................................

8.0
15.4
14.8
16.2
15.0
12.1
13.6
3.5
1.4

7.9
15.4
14.7
16.2
15.1
12.2
13.6
3.5
1.4

Total...............................................................

100.0

100.0

Survey
sample1

}
1
\
1

Adjusted
sample taking
account of
population
change,
1940-May 1942

23.6
23.8
21.8
12.0
12.2

23.5
23.6
21.7
12.1
12 3

6.6

6.8

100.0

100.0

1Not adjusted for refusals or substitutions.

The quotas for cities and for other nonfarm areas actually used in
the field work were increased or decreased in accordance with the
estimated change in the number of families and the sample income dis­
tribution for them stepped up or down to the new number o f families.
32 The tabulation o f the registration for these ration books was not available until several months after
this survey was completed.
23 Since the tim e of drawing the sample, official Census estimates o f the population o f m ost unincorporated
communities with 1940 populations of 500 or more have been made available, although the figures m ust be
considered approximate because o f uncertainty as to the exact geographical boundaries o f these com ­
munities.




56

F amity Spending and Saving in Wartime

The revised income distributions so derived were then summed. This
new sum may be considered an estimate of the distribution that would
have been obtained had the quotas actually used taken account of
population change between the Census date and the period of the
survey. Table 15 presents comparisons of the actual and adjusted
percent distribution, by income group, for the urban and rural nonfarm
samples. The urban differences are clearly of a trivial nature and are
without any question smaller than those that would have been obtained
if a second random sample had been drawn using the unadjusted quotas.
The adjustment for the rural nonfarm distribution shows a somewhat
larger but still unimportant difference.
Quotas and the N um ber o f Single Consum ers
There is another aspect o f the quota system which may have resulted
in some error, the assignment of quotas within cities and counties.
In each city the quota assigned to a block was based on the number of
dwelling units in that block in 1940. This meant that blocks with no
dwelling units in 1940 were excluded from the sample and that those
in which additional war housing had been erected were under-repre­
sented. This procedure probably contributed to an under-representation
of single consumers. Blocks reported by the Census of Housing as
having no dwelling units in 1940 were presumably those in the center
of business districts or in outlying undeveloped parts of the city. The
Census does not count Y.M.C.A.’s or hotels for transients as “ dwelling
units,” though it does count apartment hotels and resident hotels as
such. Hence, the exclusion o f blocks with no “ dwelling units” may have
cut out some downtown hotels and Y.M.C.A.’s where single consumers
would have been found. The outlying blocks which contained no
“ dwelling units” in 1940 may during 1941 have been the site of newly
developed war housing or trailer camps, as well as new private dwell­
ings. The two former types of housing, in particular, might be expected
to have housed a heavy proportion of single consumers, principally
men war workers.
Furthermore, there was a systematic difference between the Census
definition o f dwelling units upon which the quotas were based, and
the economic family, used as the final sampling unit in the Study of
Spending and Saving. Unrelated boarders and lodgers were in general
treated as separate economic families in the present survey, whereas
they were not treated as dwelling units by the Census. Census usage
involves treating a boarding or lodging house as one “ dwelling unit.”
Quotas based on this definition of dwelling units thus tended to give
typical boarding or lodging house blocks a smaller chance to come into
the sample than would have been the case had there existed a count
of the number of economic families or single consumers by blocks. A
calculation o f the actual proportions sampled as calculated from the
block lists used in 5 cities showed that the fixed quota method o f the
sample design resulted in a serious under-estimate of the lodger group.
These figures are given below:
Average proportion included in sample
Lodgers in blocks containing
private households

Households

Asheville, N. C......... ............................... 0.00084
Cleveland, Ohio .............
00052
Detroit, Mich. .......................................... 00056
Kansas City, Kans....................................... 00064
Memphis, Tenn............................................00024




0.00079
.00048
.00048
.00054
.00022

Part II.— Evaluation of the Survey Data

57

A large part of the difference between the estimates of the number
o f single persons and families based on this survey and those developed
from Census data may accordingly be ascribed to the two features of
the sample design, the quota allocation of schedules discussed above
and the omission from the sample of blocks with no dwelling units.
M ethods to Avoid F ixed Quotas
It seems likely that the errors resulting from a fixed quota system
would be larger in a survey conducted now than they were in the
Survey of Spending and Saving, and that a survey conducted in, say,
1950, might be subject to serious biases if it used quotas based on 1940
population data. Methods of sampling which avoid the bias resulting
from the use o f fixed quotas based upon noncurrent population data
have been available for some time .24 These methods have not been
generally used, however, because they avoid the bias only at the expense
o f a large increase in sampling variance. Recently, however, methods
have been developed which avoid this bias and at the same time avoid
a large increase in sampling variance.25
Briefly, they involve assigning to each city, block or county, not a
quota, but a sampling ratio. In the computation of the sampling ratio,
noncurrent information on population may be used. If there has been
no population change, the sampling ratios assigned will give the same
allocations as the fixed quotas; if there has been a change, the alloca­
tions will reflect the changes and thus will result in an unbiased esti­
mate. And finally, as long as there is any correlation between new and
old population figures, the use of old population figures will usually
yield a smaller variance than that yielded by a sample drawn without
the use of any population figures, new or old. The use of this method
o f unbiased ratios should permit future surveys to avoid whatever errors
occurred in the Spending and Saving Survey on this account.
Relative Size o f Urban and Rural Samples
Another aspect o f the quota system which is partly a matter of sample
design and partly a matter o f basic purpose deserves mention. It was
noted in the discussion of sample size that the rural sample was larger,
both absolutely and relatively, than the urban sample. The larger rural
sample was taken so that separate income distributions could be shown
for farm and rural nonfarm families. From the point of view of obtain­
ing over-all national estimates, without separate figures for different
population groups, such a procedure is inefficient (in the sampling
sense). A smaller sampling error in the national estimates would have
been obtained from a sample o f 3,000 families, if the sample size for
each o f the components had been proportionate to the number o f
families in it. Such a procedure would have yielded about 485 farm
families, 645 rural nonfarm families, and 1,870 urban families. This
distribution of families might not have been large enough to provide
accurate income distributions separately for farm and nonfarm families.
It would have provided more accurate national estimates, however, and
would have, in addition, permitted more detailed break-downs of non­
farm income by source than the present sample permits.
2 Neyman, J .: On the Two Different Aspects of the Representative Method, Journal o f R oyal Statistical
4
Society, 1934.
2 Hansen, M., and Hurwitz, W.: Theory of Sampling from Finite Populations, Annals o f Mathematical
8
Statistics, December 1943.




58

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

Sample Allocations to Yield M inim um Sampling Variance
with R espect to In com e
This point suggests a more general consideration, however. A pro­
portionate sampling of each of the three segments would yield a
national estimate with a smaller sampling variance than the method
actually used. There are other allocations, however, which will yield
even smaller sampling variances than that yielded by the proportionate
allocation. Thus, if we wish an allocation which yields an estimate o f
total national income with minimum sampling variance, the sampling
ratio in each of the three segments should be not a constant, but pro­
portionate to the standard deviation o f incomes in each of the three
segments.26 The three standard deviations o f income estimated from
the 1941 samples are $2,470, urban; $1,320, rural nonfarm; and $1,768,
farm.
Assuming that the 1941 populations of these segments are known, the
most efficient allocations become 2,190 families for urban, 400 for rural
nonfarm, and 410 for farm. On this basis, the standard error of the
estimated national income is reduced 3 percent, an increase that could
otherwise have been achieved only by increasing the sample size by 175.
The same principle can be applied to the within segment sampling.
Thus, for cities over 50,000 a stratification of families by the average
rent in 1940 o f the block in which they lived was used. Table 16 shows
for six block rent groups the estimated standard deviation of family
income within each group, the number of families actually interviewed
in each group, and the most efficient allocation. The same information
for cities with population under 50,000, grouped by the median 1930
rent o f the city in which they lived, is also given in this table. Had the
most efficient allocations ‘been used in both these cases, the standard
error o f the estimated average urban income would have been reduced
to 8.2 percent. This is not an inconsiderable gain in precision, and could
have been achieved, using the proportionate allocations only by in­
creasing the number o f families interviewed from 1,220 to 1,450.
T

able

16.— Standard Deviation of Fam ily Income in 1941 by Rent Classes and City Size
and M ost Efficient Distribution of Sample by Such Rent Classes

Standard
deviation
of income

Rent classes

Number of
cases in
sample

Distribution
necessary to
yield minimum
sample
variance

Cities with population of over 50,0001
Blocks with 1940 average rents of —
$5,08-118.69.......................................................................
$18.70-123.72.....................................................................
$23 79-$28.41.....................................................................
$28.45-$35.00.....................................................................
$35 02-$44.50.....................................................................
$44 50-$215.50...................................................................

$960
$1,880
$1,880
$2,050
$2,920
$3,300

120
123
122
121
122
132

56
112
111
120
172
211

117
111
122
126

56
80
83
215

Cities with population of under 50,000
Cities with 1930 median rents of —
$7 73-$14.24......................................................................
$14 38-$21.04.....................................................................
$21 47-$25 10.....................................................................
$26.72-$43.65.....................................................................

$990
$1,480
$1,400
$3,520

1 Proportionate allocation of cases in sample. Excludes 9 cases for which block rent could not be deter­
mined.
28J. Neyman, op. cit.




Part II.— Evaluation o f the Survey Data

59

Standard Deviations Necessary
In applying this procedure in a particular field survey, one would
of course be faced with the difficulty of not knowing the standard
deviations in each stratum. Any estimates o f it made on the hasis of
knowledge gained from previous field surveys or from partial infor­
mation obtained from early returns in the survey being conducted will
not yield the allocation corresponding to a minimum variance estimate,
although it will usually result in decreases in error over that yielded
by constant sampling ratios.27 On that score, it might not be possible
in actual practice to obtain decreases in error o f the amounts estimated
in the above paragraph. This factor might be balanced, however, by
the fact that in actual application a finer stratification would be used
than was used in table 16.
An additional drawback follows from the fact that the most efficient
allocation for estimating aggregate national income may not be the
most efficient for estimating some other characteristic, say, average wage
and salary income, or aggregate income received by those with incomes
above $5,000. There is no simple answer to this point since the concept
“ most efficient” can apply only to a single narrowly defined objective
and lacks meaning when applied to groups o f objectives which are
mutually inconsistent. Nevertheless, common sense compromises are
possible ,28 and for the purposes o f the discussion the aggregate national
income may be used as the criterion.
W eighting in Tabulation Necessary
The most serious drawback to designing a sample on the basis o f
minimum variance allocations, however, is that they require weighting
in the tabulation procedure. For questionnaires containing many
entries, such as the income and expenditure schedule used in the
present survey, such weighting would constitute an important part of
the over-all cost. The Survey of Spending and Saving in Wartime was
designed as an additive sample because o f the important savings in
cost realized when weighting is avoided. Despite the design, however,
the estimates o f average incomes, expenditures, and savings presented
for all families were obtained by weighting. It was necessary to weight
down the rural sample because its size was not proportionate to total
rural population and to reweight each income group because of the
effect o f substitutions. The experience of-th e Spending and Saving
Survey suggests that some type o f weighting cannot be avoided; addi­
tions to the weighting scheme nevertheless always involve considerable
increases in cost.29
The above computations are intended to be suggestive, not definitive.
They do suggest that the systematic application of the principles of
minimum variance allocations in future field surveys would result in
important decreases in sampling error for at least a few over-all aggre­
37 Sukhatme, P. V .: Contribution to the Theory of the Representative Method, in Journal of R oyal Sta­
tistical Society, Supplement, Vol. II, 1935, N o. 2.
28 Snedecor and King: Recent Developm ents in Sampling for Agricultural Statistics, in Journal o f the
American Statistical Association, March 1942.
29 When the results o f surveys are tabulated b y machine, weighting o f frequency counts is a simple pro­
cedure. The weight for each card is punched in predesignated columns, and when the cards are run through
the tabulator, the machine is wired to add in these columns, each resulting total then being a properly
weighted frequency. The on ly added costs in this procedure are the coding and punching o f one additional
item for each fam ily and the balancing o f the final tables. This simple procedure can be applied to the
com putation o f averages on ly b y means of an intermediate step, the use o f a m ultiplying punch. This
does involve a considerable increase in costs.




50

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

gates which must be estimated correctly if the size distribution o f
income is to be estimated.
“ PA R T-PE R IO D ” PERSONS AND M ILITARY INDUCTIONS
In a field survey involving people, where the data pertain to some
earlier period than the actual date of interview, there is always the
problem of accounting for people who have moved, died, or changed
their status between the survey and the interview period.
For persons who died or who entered the armed forces, information
was obtained from the remaining members of their families in those
cases where they had lived as family members. For persons who changed
marital status or economic family status, information was obtained in
some instances for the full period broken into the two periods o f
separate status. In other instances, data were collected only for the
period o f one relevant status. The net effect was to give each such status
the proper chance of inclusion in the sample.
For persons who were not members of families (i.e., who would have
been “ single consumers” as defined by this survey) who died or entered
the armed forces between the first month covered by the survey
(January 1941) and the time of the interview, there was no way of
obtaining information in the spring o f 1942 concerning their incomes
and expenditures in an earlier period. Such people were therefore lost
to the survey. The number entering the armed forces, however, has
been estimated as the equivalent of a million persons. (See Part I,
Population Weights for National Estimates, p. 28.
It is not desirable to include the data for persons or families changing
status during the year (the so-called “ part-period” families or single
consumers and the military inductees) in the survey averages for the
full year 1941 or for the full first quarter of 1942, since it cannot be
assumed that their incomes and expenditures for a part of the period
would have continued at the same rate for the full period. Hence, the
data for them are not included in the detailed tables of this report.
In any comparison of survey aggregates with estimates of total civilian
income or expenditures, however, such as in the preceding section
(p. 41), it is appropriate to add the aggregates for the part-period
civilian people. This has been done in table 14 (p. 43). Likewise that
table includes adjustment for the million civilian-year-equivalent jnen
inducted into the armed services prior to the date the Purvey inter­
viewers were in the field.
In estimating an income distribution from the survey, the withdrawal
o f the civilian-year-equivalent of 1 million single men to military service
is worthy o f consideration. In order to make an adjustment for this
factor a special hand tabulation was made of the income distribution
o f the single men living in cities covered by the survey. The number
of men living as single consumers on farms covered by the survey was
negligible and in rural nonfarm areas was very small, not sufficient to
warrant such a special tabulation. It is probable that incomes o f rural
nonfarm men single consumers were not far different from urban.
Hence, for purposes of a rough correction, it was assumed that all
o f the million year-equivalent men single consumers withdrawn to m ili­
tary service by the date of the field interviews were distributed by
income in 1941 and had the same sources of income as did the urban
civilian men single consumers who could actually he interviewed in




Part II.— Evaluation of the Survey Data

61

1942. This assumption forms the basis of the aggregates added in
table 14 to correct for military inductions.
If it is assumed that these inductees had incomes during their period
of civilian life comparable to that of the urban men civilian single con­
sumers actually surveyed, the effect upon the survey size distribution of
income is negligible.




Part III.— TABU LAR SUM M ARY

Description o f Tables
Tables 1 through 17 provide data by income class and type of com­
munity for all (full-period) families and single consumers in the
civilian, ,noninstitutional population. Tables 18-38 relate exclusively
to urban areas.
Tables on a nation-wide basis are presented for the summary of
receipts and disbursements, sources o f income, expenditures for major
categories of consumption, for selected items o f expenditure, and for
selected asset and liability change items. With few exceptions, tables
on a national basis provide dollar figures only. Time limitations pre­
vented preparation o f national estimates for all details and for per­
centages of families reporting income from or expense for specified
items. Tables for urban families and single consumers include con­
siderably more detail. Corresponding information for rural nonfarm
and rural farm families and single consumers is published in Rural
Family Spending and Saving in Wartime (U. S. Department o f Agri­
culture Miscellaneous Publication No. 520). United States averages for
any item may be obtained by weighting together the data, as described
below.
In any small sample, especially when the data are subdivided by
classes, such as income groups or commodity breaks, some irregularities
in the data are to be expected. For example, it is obvious that medical
expenditures depend on sickness in the family. It is largely a matter o f
chance whether severe illness strikes a family with $1,500 or $2,000
o f income. In a small sample the average expenditure for medical care
will therefore be higher for families of $1,500 than for families of
$2,000, if, among the families selected, those with $1,500 happen to have
had extraordinary illness while those with $2,000 did not. If, however,
throughout the rest of the sample one finds that medical expenditures
rise with income, it is almost certain that, had a sufficiently large num­
ber o f cases been covered, expenditures even for so variable an expense
as medical care would have shown, on the average, a steady climb from
low- to high-income levels. Various statistical procedures may be used
for estimating from the sample data the more regular results which
might have been yielded by wider coverage.1 Funds available for
analysis in the present survey, however, precluded the making of any
such adjustments, and all income-class averages presented are those
yielded directly by the original reports. For certain purposes, research
workers may wish to apply their own smoothing to the sample data
presented here.
COMPUTATION OF AVERAGES 1
2
Averages, except as indicated below, were based on all full-period
families a n d/or single consumers in the income class, whether or not
they reported the particular item. United States averages by income
level were obtained by weighting the averages for the three samples
1 C f. U. S. Bureau o f Labor Statistics Bulletins Nos. 636, 637, 639, 640, or 641, Tabular Summary, table
25 and notes on that table in Appendix A of those bulletins.
2 Figures in tables which present the detailed data d o n ot necessarily add to the rounded totals
shown in the sum mary tables.

62




Part I II .—Tabular Summary

63

with the appropriate population estimates, as shown in Part I .8 In the
few instances that averages were prepared for reporting families, e.g.,
average net surplus for families an d/or single consumers having a
surplus, the weights for combining the sample figures were adjusted
to represent the number reporting the item.
A special set o f weights was required for computing national averages
for the detailed clothing data. The average number of men, boys,
women, girls, and infants per family was computed for each income
level, for the three samples, for each survey period. These averages
were applied to the weights representing full-period families and single
consumers to obtain appropriate weights for combining the clothing
data for five separate sex-age groups.
In the case o f the summary tables 3 to 5, the United States all-income
averages were built up from averages by income class, including the
income classes $5,000 to $10,000 and $10,000 and over, and thus incor­
porate adjustments for substitutions in both the urban and the rural
nonfarm samples.* The all-income averages shown in these tables for
4
rural nonfarm families, however, were based directly on the rural non­
farm sample, without adjustment for refusals and substitutions, as given
in the U. S. Department o f Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication No.
520. Hence, a weighted combination of the all-income averages for the
three types of community differs slightly from the United States all­
income averages presented.
In all other United States tables the all-income averages are weighted
combinations o f the all-income averages for the three types o f com­
munity. Thus, they incorporate the adjustments for substitutions in the
urban but not in the rural nonfarm sample. The bias is small, however,
both because the adjustment required for refusals and substitutions in
rural nonfarm communities was relatively slight and because a rela­
tively small proportion o f all families and single consumers (less than
22 percent) lived in rural nonfarm areas. It was impossible, within the
time available, to prepare United States all-income averages for the
detailed data according to the method used for summary data, since
the tabulations o f detailed data for rural areas were available by income
class only up to $3,000-$5,000.
CLASSIFICATION B Y INCOME 5
Money income was regarded as more generally useful as the basis of
classification than .the total o f money and nonmoney income. All data
are, therefore, presented by money income class.
The summary data on the major consumption categories, gifts, taxes,
and savings are also presented by total income for the two survey
8 Table 10, p , 33. For derivation of population weights, see p. 28; for adjustments for refusals and sub­
stitutions, see p. 22.
4 Data collected from rural families with negative incomes (not shown separately) are also incorporated
in the United States all-income averages. Families and single consumers with negative incomes represented
the following proportions of the total number sampled in the 2 periods:
1941
1942 {first S months)
0.3
3.0
United States............... ....................................................................................
Urban......................... ................................................... ...................................
0.1
0.2
Rural nonfarm .................................................................................................
0
0.2
R ural farm .........................................................................................................
1.8
18.7
The very sm all number o f spending units with negative incomes in cities were grouped with families and
single consumers having incomes of 0 to $500. The spending hSbits of farm families with negative incomes,
especially during a quarter, differ so widely from the spending habits o f families with incomes of 0 to $500
that it seemed unwise to com bine the tw o groups.
For definition of m oney and nonmoney income, see Part I, p. 13.

5




54

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

periods in the case o f the urban sample and for 1941 in the case o f the
United States averages. For urban areas, data on sources o f income are
also presented by total as well as money income classes. Other tabula­
tions were made only for classes defined by money income.
For tables showing United States data, $500 income intervals are used
up to $2 ,000 . A $500 interval was maintained up to $3,000 in tabulation
o f the urban data, but only to $2,000 in rural tabulations. For incomes
over $2 ,000 , two income classes are shown on the United States tables,
namely, $2,000 to $3,000 and $3,000 to $5,000.
In the tables for urban areas, sample data for the $5,000 to $10,000
and the $10,000 and over classes are also shown, solely for the conven­
ience o f the reader in computing averages for all-incomes combined.
The averages for these classes are based on a small number o f cases and
are therefore quite irregular and subject to a wide margin o f error. They
should be considered as statements of sample results only, and not as
estimates o f actual expenditures by the entire group o f families in those
income groups.6
In presenting data for the first 3 months o f 1942, the income intervals
used represent the annual rate of income, based on the reports o f income
received during the first quarter. Thus, for example, data for families
that received between $125 and $250 during the first quarter are shown
under the heading $500 and under $1,000. The average amounts shown
for each income class, however, are those reported for the quarter.
CLASSIFICATION B Y TYPE OF SPENDING UNIT
The tables presented apply to families and single consumers that
constituted separate spending units throughout the year 1941 and/or
throughout the first 3 months o f 1942. Data for spending units that were
in existence for less than a full survey period have been omitted from
the tables for that period, although they were used in the estimates of
aggregate national income and outlays.
Since this survey was designed primarily to provide over-all estimates
by income class, the great majority of the tables present data for
families and single consumers combined. However, to provide some
information on the variations in consumption associated with the size
o f the spending unit, a few tabulations were made for families and
single consumers separately, and, for urban areas, for families o f differ­
ent size, also. The summary o f receipts and disbursements, sources of
income, and expenditures for the 14 major categories o f consumption
are presented for families and single consumers separately.
Data on expenditures for housing in cities are shown for renters and
owners separately. Rent and annual and quarterly expenditures are
shown for city families and single consumers classified by living arrange­
ments, i.e., whether or not they had housekeeping facilities.
Detailed information on clothing purchases is provided on a perperson basis, for five sex-age groups: men, boys under 16, women, girls
under 16, and infants under 2 years o f age.
6 For weights to be used in com putation o f all-inoome averages, see P art I, p . 33.




Part 111.— Tabular Summary

65

List o f Tables
Page

Table 1. Distribution o f all families and single consumers by annual money
income and type o f community, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)..

68

Table 1A. Distribution o f families and single consumers by family size, annual
money income class, and type of community, 1941 (12 m onths).. .....................

69

Table 2. Average family size, by type of community and annual money income
class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths). ..............................................

70

Table 3. Source of income, money and nonmoney, all families and single con­
sumers, by annual money income class and type of community, 1941 (12
months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)................... . . . ................................................

71

Table 4. Summary of money income and outlay, all families and single consum­
ers, by annual money income class and type of community, 1941 (12 months)
and 1942 (first 3 m onths)..................... ............ *......................................................

73

Table 5. Major categories of consumption: Average money expense and aver­
age value of selected goods and services, by annual money income class and
type of community, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths):
Families and single consumers...............................................................................
Families of 2 or more persons..............................................................................
Single consumers ...................................................................................................

75
76
77

Table 6. Food and alcoholic beverages: Average annual expenditure and aver­
age value o f food received without money expense, families and single con­
sumers, by annual money income class and type of community, 1941 (12
months) ............................................................................. . ...............
*.......... .

78

Table 7. Housing: Average annual expenditure and average value o f housing
received without money expense, families and single consumers, by annual
money incomef class and type of community, 1941 (12 m onths)......................

78

Table 8. Fuel, light and refrigeration: Average annual expenditure, families
and single consumers, by annual money income class and type of community,
1941 (12 m onths)........................................................................................................

79

Table 9. Household furnishings and equipment: Average expenditures for
major categories and for radios and phonographs, families and single con­
sumers, by annual money income class and type of community, 1941 (12
months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)........................... .............................. .............

79

Table 10. Clothing purchases: Average expenditures for major types o f cloth­
ing, and average expenditures and quantity purchased for selected items, all
families and single consumers, by annual money income class and type of
community, 1941 (12 m onths):
Men and boys, 16 years of age and over..................... ...................... ...............
Boys, 2 to 16 years o f age........................... .................................. .........................
Women and girls, 16 years of age and o v e r................................... ..................
Girls, 2 to 16 years o f age.......................................................................................
Children under 2 years of age.................................................................................

80
81
82
83
84

Table 10A. Clothing purchases: Average expenditures for major types of
clothing, 5 sex-age groups, all families and single consumers, by type o f com­
munity, 1942 (first 3 m onths)..............................................................................

85

Table 11. Automobile and other travel and transportation: Percentage report­
ing and average expenditures for selected items, families and single consumers,
by annual money income class and type of community, 1941 (12 months) and
1942 (first 3 m onths)........................................................ .........................................

86

Table 12. Personal taxes, gifts, community welfare, and religion: Average
annual expenditures, families and single consumers, by annual money in­
come class and type of community, 1941 (12 m onths).......................................

87

Table 13. Net change in assets and liabilities: All families and single consum­
ers, by type o f community and annual money income elass, 1941 (12 months)
and 1942 (first 3 m onths)...........................................................................................

88




66

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
Page

Table 14. Distribution o f all families and single consumers, by annual total
income class and type o f community, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3
months; urban o n ly )...................................................................................................

91

Table 15. Average family size, by annual total income class and type o f com­
munity, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 months; urban o n ly )..................

91

Table 16. Summary of average money and nonmoney income and outlay,
families and single consumers, by type of community and annual total income
class, 1941 (12 m onths).............................................................................................

92

Table 17. Major categories of consumption: Average expenditures, all families
and single consumers, by type of community and annual total income class,
1941 ( 12 m onths)............................................................................................

93

Table 18. Sources o f income: Percentage reporting and average amount re­
ceived, by annual money income class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3
m onths):
All urban families and single consumers..........................................................
Urban families of 2 or more persons,..................................................................
Urban single consumers.......................................................
Urban 2-person families..........................................................................................
Urban 3-person families.................................. ........................................................
Urban 4-person families...........................................................................................
Urban families of 5 or more persons....................................................................

94
95
96
97
98
99
100

Table 19. Summary of average money income and outlay, by annual money
income class:
Urban families and/or single consumers— 1941 (12 m onths)
................
Urban families and/or single consumers— 1942 (first 3 m onths)................
Urban families o f 4 sizes— 1941 (12 months) ....................................................
Urban families o f 4 sizes— 1942 (first 3m onths)................................................

102
103
104
105

Table 20. Major categories of consumption: Percentage reporting expendi­
tures and receipt in kind of selected goods and services, average amount
spent and average value, by annual money income class, 1941 (12 months)
and 1942 (first 3 m onths):
All urban families and single consumers............................................................
Urban families o f 2 or more persons....................................................................
Urban single consumers.........................................................................................
Urban 2-person families.......................................................................................
Urban 3-person families..........................................
Urban 4-person families.......................................................................................
Urban families o f 5 or more persons....................................................................

106
108
110
112
114
116
118

Table 21. Food and alcoholic beverages: Percentage reporting expenditure
and receipt o f food in kind, average amount spent, and average value, urban
families and single consumers, by annual money income class, 1941 (12
months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths).......................................................................... 120
Table 21A. Food and alcoholic beverages: Percentage reporting expenditure
and receipt of food in kind, average amount spent, and average value, urban
families and single consumers, by annual money income class and living
arrangements, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)............................... 121
Table 22. Housing: Percentage reporting tenure, and selected expenditures
and average amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual
money income class and tenure, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths). 123
Table 23. Fuel, light, and refrigeration: Percentage reporting expenditures
and average amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual
money income class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths).................... 125
Table 24. Household operation: Percentage reporting expenditures and aver­
age amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual income
class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)............................................. 126




Part III,— Tabular Summary

67

Table 25. Household furnishings and equipment: Percentage reporting, aver­
age number o f articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban families
and single consumers, by annual money income class:
1941 (12 m onths)....................................................................................................
1942 (first 3 m onths)....................................................

127
133

Table 26. Clothing: Average number of persons per family, by sex-age
groups, percentage reporting, and average amount spent, urban families and
single consumers, by annual money income class, 1941 (12 months) and
1942 (first 3 m onths)................................................................................................... 139
Table 27. Clothing purchases: Percentage purchasing, average number of
articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban families and single
consumers, by annual money income class:
1941 (12 months)—
Men and boys, 16 years 6f age and over..................................... ..............
Boys, 2 to 16 years of age.............................................................................
Women and girls, 16 years of age and over.................................................
Girls, 2 to 16 years of age...............................................................................
Children under 2 years of age......................................................................

140
144
148
152
157

1942 (first 3 months)—
Men and boys, 16 years of age and over......................................................
Boys, 2 to 16 years of a g e .. '. ..........................................................................
Women and girls, 16 years of age and over...............................................
Girls, 2 to 16 years o f age..............................................................................
Children under 2 years of age.......................................................................

159
163
166
171
175

Table 28. Automobile and other travel and transportation: Percentage report­
ing expenditures and average amount spent, families and single consumers,
by annual money income class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths).. 178
Table 29. Automobile: Percentage owning, purchasing, driving specified
mileage, and reporting business use, urban families and single consumers,
by annual money income class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths).. 180
Table 30. Personal care: Percentage reporting expenditures and average
amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual money income
class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)............................................... 181
Table 31. Medical care: Percentage reporting expenditures and average
amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual money income
class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)............................................... 182
Table 32. Recreation: Percentage reporting expenditures and average amount
spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual money income class,
1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 months) ............................................ . . . . 184
Table 33. Tobacco, reading, and education: Percentage reporting expendi­
tures and average amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by
annual money income class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths). . . . 185
Table 34. Personal taxes, gifts, community welfare, and religion: Percentage
reporting expenditures and average amount spent, urban families and single
consumers, by annual money income class, 1941 (12. months) and 1942
(first 3 m onths).......................................................... .................................. .
186
Table 35. Net change in assets and liabilities: Percentage reporting and aver­
age amount, urban* families and single consumers, by annual money income
class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)............................................... 187
Table 36. Sources of income: Percentage reporting and average amount re­
ceived, urban families and single consumers, by annual total income class,
1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)...................................................... . 194
Table 37. Summary of average money and nonmoney income and outlay,
urban families and single consumers, by annual total income class, 1941
(12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)........ ......................................................... 195
Table 38. M ajor categories of consumption: Percentage reporting expend!
tures and receipt in kind of selected goods and services, average amounl
spent and average value, urban families and single consumers, by annual
total income class, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 m onths)...................... 196




68

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 1.— Distribution o f all fam ilies and single consumers by annual m oney incom e
and type o f com m unity

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income o f —

Type of community

A ll
in­ Nega­
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000
comes tive Under to
to
to
to
to
to
and
in­
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 over
come
Number (in thousands)

A ll types Of com m unity:
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or more persons.......
Single consum ers.............................
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or more persons.......
Single consumers.............................
Rural nonfarm:
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or m ore persons........
Rural farm :
Families and single consum ers.. . .
Families of 2 or more persons........

39,28'
34,003
5,284
24,463
20,419
4,044

117 6.C47 7,147 6,195 5,772
101 4,171 5,512 5,307 5,373
16 1,876 1,635
888
399

6,355
6,113

1,884 3,596 3,474 4,109 3,694 2,936 3,425 1,345
750 2,237 2,703 3,735 3,472 2,816 3,384 1,322
1,134 1,359
771
374
222
120
41
23

C)
1
0
0

0 2,011
0 1,420

8,469
7,471

4,139 1,564
4,070 1,541
23
. 69

8,306
7,928
378

1,950 1,795
1,724 1,678

117 2,152 1,601
101 2,001 1,551

987
979

481
453

111
111

676
659

926
926

1,134
1,106
542
534

233
233

108
108

21.1
23.3
7.2

10.5
12.0
1.3

4.0
4.5
.4

14.0
16.6
1.0

5.5
6.5

Percent

A1 types oi com m unity.
1A
f

a h

Families and single consumers___
Families of 2 or more persons........
Single consum ers.............................
Urb&n*
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or more persons........
Single consumers.............................
Rural nonfarm:
Families and single consum ers.. . .
Families of 2 or more persons........
Rural farm :
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or more persons.......

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

0.3
.3
.3

18.2
16.2
30.9

15.8
15.6
16.8

14.7
15.8
7.6

7.7
3.7
28,0

0
0
0

15.4
12.3
35.5

14.7
10.9
33.6

14.2
13.2
19.1

16.8
18.3
9.2

15.1
17.0
5.5

12.0
13.8
3.0

.6

100.0
100.0

0
0

23.7
19.0

23.0
23.1

21.2
22.4

11.7
13.1

13.4
14.8

5.7
6.1

1.3
1.5

100.0
100.0

1.8
1.7

33.9
32.7

25.2
25.4

14.6
15.1

10.6
10.8

8.5
8.7

3.7
3.8

1.7
1.8

1942 (first 3 m onths)2
Number (in thousands)
A ll types of com m unity:
Families and single consumers----Families of 2 or more persons.......
Single consum ers.............................
Urban:
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or m ore persons.......
Single consum ers.............................
Rural nonfarm:
Families and single consum ers.. . .
Families of 2 or more persons.......
Rural farm :
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or m ore persons....... 1
2

40,439 1,203 6,355 5,936 5,693 5,575
34,773 1,101 4,474 4,517 4,671 5,016
102 1,881 1,419 1,022
5,666
559
25,583
21,207
4,376

5,294 1,994
5,235 1,986
59
8

1,944 3,326 3,428 3,889 3,991 2,840 4,451 1,714
770 2,165 2,516 3,380 3,576 2,675 4,411 1,714
1,174 1,161
912
509
415
165
40
0

0
0
(0

17 2,239
8 1,643

8,516
7,471

8,389
7,773
616

1,599 1,642 1,223
1,374 1,532 1,173

6,340 1,186 2,172 1,011
978
6,095 1,093 2,061

582
563

111
111

463
463

623
623

1,103
1,067
455
455

261
261

169
161

20 .7
22 .4
.9

13.1
15.0

4.9
5.7
.2

Percent
All types of com m unity:
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or more persons.......
Single consum ers.............................
Urban:
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or more persons.......
Single consum ers.............................
Rural nonfarm:
Families and single consumers—
Families of 2 or m ore persons.......
Rural farm :
Families and single consumers___
Families of 2 or more persons.......

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.0
3.2
1.8

14.7
13.0
25.0

14.1
13.4
18.0

13.8
14.4
9.9

7.6
3.6
26.8

0
0
0)

15.7
12.9
33.2

13.0
10.2
26.5

13.4
11.9
20.9

15.2
15.9
11.6

1.0

1
0

15.6
16.9
9.5

11.1
12.6
3.8

17.4
20.8
.9

6.7
8.1

0

100.0
100.0

.2
.1

26.3
22.0

18.8
18.4

19.3
20.5

14.4
15.7

12.9
14.3

6.8
7.5

1.3
1.5

100.0
100.0

18.7
17.9

34.3
33.8

15.9
16.1

9.8
10.2

7.3
7.6

7.2
7.5

4.1
4.3

2.7
2.6

1 In urban communities families with negative incomes comprised 1.02 per cent in 1941 and 1.99 per cent
in 1942, of the total number of families with incomes below $500. They are not shown separately here Decause
they are com bined in all subsequent tables.
2 For 1942, annual income classes represent the annual rate of income based on the income received in
the first 3 m onths of 1942. This applies to all subsequent tables.




69

Part III.— Tabular Summary

Table 1A.— Distribution o f fam ilies and single consumers by fa m ily size, annual m oney
income class, and type o f com m unity

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income class o f —
Size o f fam ily

A ll
income
classes

Under
$500

$500
to
$1,000

$1,000
to
$1,500

$1,500
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
and
over

A ll families and single consumers
A ll families............................................................

39,287

6,047

7,147

6,195

5,772

8,306

Single consumers......... ................................
Families of —
2 members..............................................
3 m embers.............................................
4 m embers..............................................
5 m embers..............................................
6 m embers..............................................
7 or m ore m em bers...............................

5,284

1,877

1,634

889

399

377

92

10,827
8,551
6,597
3,767
1,911
2,350

1,976
764
572
304
214
340

1,967
1,284
880
571
307
504

1,958
1,199
984
576
287
302

1,582
1,669
763
650
380
329

2,144
2,180
2,012
925
364
304

1,162
1,424
1,378
733
351
563

5,703

Urban families and single consumers
All families:
Single consum ers..........................................
Families of—
2 members..............................................
3 members..............................................
4 members..............................................
5 members..............................................
6 members..............................................
7 or m ore m em bers...............................

24,463

1,884

3,596

3,474

4,109

6,630

4,043

1,134

1,358

772

374

341

4,770
64

6,898
5,544
3,932
2,052
996
998

558
58
38
58
19
19

1,033
593
230
172
115
95

1,294
637
405
232
77
57

1,203
1,265
477
457
187
146

1,803
1,783
1,602
581
300
220

1,007
1,208
1,180
552
298
461

Rural nonfarm families and single consumers
All families............................................................

8,469

2,011

1,950

1,795

987

1,134

Single consumers..........................................
Families of—
2 members................................ .............
3 members..............................................
4 members..............................................
5 members..............................................
6 members..............................................
7 or more m em bers...............................

999

592

226

117

8

28

592
28

2,430
1,743
1,319
899
539
540

765
296
157
70
61
70

578
335
326
151
117
217

529
420
285
235
176
33

220
296
152
110
110
91

208
255
293
227
47
76

130
141
106
106
28
53

Farm families and single consumers
A ll families:
Single consumers..........................................
Families of—
2 members..............................................
3 members..............................................
4 members.......................: .....................
5 members..............................................
6 members..............................................
7 or m ore m em bers...............................




6,355

2,152

1,601

926

676

542

242

151

50

0

17

8

341
0

1,499
1,264
1,346
816
376
812

653
410
377
176
134
251

356
356
324
248
75
192

135
142
294
109
34
212

159
108
134
83
83
92

133
142
117
117
17
8

25
75
92
75
25
49

70

Fam ily Spending and Saving in W artim e

T able 2.— Average fa m ily size,1 by type o f com m unity and annual m oney income class

1941 (12 months)

T yp e of com m unity and
consumer group

A ll types of com m unity:
Families and single consum ers...
Families of 2 or more persons___
Urban:
Families and single consum ers...
Families of 2 or more persons___
Rural nonfarm:
Families and single consum ers...
Families o f 2 or more persons___
Rural farm :
Families and single consum ers...
Families of 2 or more persons-----

Annual m oney income class of—

A ll
in-

$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
class- Under $500 $1,000 to
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

3.27
3.62

2.65
3.39

3.05
3.65

3.14
3.51

3.45
3.63

3.04
3.44

1.65
2.64

2.35
3.17

2.59
3.05

3.18
3.39

3.36
3.67

2.42
3.02

3.52
3.84

3.39
3.56

3.97
4.01

4.03
4.15

3.74
3.94

4.04
4.13

4.74
4.74

4.30
4.39

3. 43
3.55

3.74
3.80

4.38
4.38

4.29
4.47

3.67
3.71

4.43
4.43

4.41
4.62

3.87
3.94

3.88
4.06

3.82
3.82

2.50
2.50

3.52
3.56

4.54
4.54

4.33
4.33

4.25
4.25

3.33
3.52

3.72
3.74

4.32
4.34

4.65
4.65

3.70
3.72

4.40
4.40

4.93
4.93

3.16
3.30

3.59
3.70

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll types of com m unity:
Families and single consum ers...
Families of 2 or more persons___
Urban:
Families and single consum ers...
Families of 2 or more persons___
Rural nonfarm:
Families and single consum ers...
Families of 2 or m ore persons___
Rural farm :
Families and single consum ers...
Families of 2 or m ore persons —

3.22
3.59

2.76
3.50

2.88
3.47

3.06
3.51

3.11
3.35

3.00
3.41

1.69
2.75

2.28
2.97

2.58
3.15

2.85
3.13

3.31
3.65

2.49
3.03

3.44
3.84

3.62
3.81

3.52
3.63

3.98
4.08

3.78
3.88

3.73
3.73

3.00
3 .0 0 ‘

3.98
4.10

4.00
4.16

3.97
4.07

4.22
4.22

4.24
4.24

4.07
4.07

3.87
3.87

3.64
3.90

4.00
4.00

3.08
3.33

3.31
3.45

1 Family size is based on equivalent persons; i. e., 52 weeks (1941) or 13 weeks (1942) of fam ily membership
is considered the equivalent o f 1 person for the survey period. Thus, a person who was a fam ily m ember
in 1941 for 26 weeks is counted as 0.5 person, for 16 weeks as 0.3 person, etc.




71

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T able 3 .— Source o f income, m oney and nonm oney, all fam ilies and single consumers,
by annual m oney income class and type o f community

1941 (12 months)

Item

B y type
B y annual m oney income class
A ll
of com m unity
families
and/or
single
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
Ur­ Rural Rural Under to
con­
to
to
to
to
nonsumers1 ban1 farm 1 farm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
A ll families and single consumers

Total m oney plus nonmoney income.

$2,213 $2,578 $1,539 $1,655

$548

$992 $1,458 $1,938 $2,659 $3,981

Earnings..........................................
Wage and salary earnings2. ..
Entrepreneurial earnings5—
Net incomefromroomers, boarders
Interest, dividends, profits, rents.
Incom e from benefits, annuities..
Gifts from persons not in fam ily..

$1,974 $£,409 $1,311 $1,134
1,756 2,143 1,139 1,046
942
257
1,292 1,683
460
197
789
464
14
9
29
22
37
66
135
105
49
40
16
42
12
11
19
16
29
9
16
18
14
9
21
26

$290
182
118
64
5
20
23
16
40
6

$737 $1,242 $1,736 $2,446 $3,731
556 1,072 1,589 2,288 3,489
402
841 1,295 1,874 2,693
796
294
414
154
231
24
35
34
29
14
42
49
88
131
38
32
30
52
36
54
12
15
21
13
23
1
11
9
1
45
29
15
10
15
10

Business loss (not deducted
N onrelief..........................................
R elief................... ...........................

6
239
239
(7)

8
169
167
2

3
228
225
3

3
521
521
(7)

2
258
252
6

1
255
249
6

2
216
245
1

4
202
201
1

12
213
213
0

1
250
250
0

Families of 2 or more persons
$2,850 $1,641 $1,696

$608 $1,029 $1,477 $1,951 $2,667 $3,974

Total m oney plus nonmoney income.

$2,387

Money incom e................................
Earnings25.............................. ........
Net incomefromroomers, boarders
Interest, dividends, profits, rents.
Incom e from benefits, annuities..
Gifts from persons not in family.
Direct relief paym ents..................
Other m oney incom e4. ..................
Business loss (not deducted
above)5..........................................
N onm oney incom e in kind5................
N onrelief..........................................
R elief................................................

$2,131 $2,672 $1,403 $1,163
1,930 2,427 1,243 1,071
14
10
22
28
39
58
114
90
36
16
46
39
11
11
17
14
29
9
16
18
10
15
30
23

$299
208
4
17
13
12
42
4

3
533
533

1
309
303
6

5
256
254
2

6
178
175
3

3
238
235
3

0

$737 $1,247 $1,742 $2,450 $3,722
567 1,091 1,602 2,317 3,489
25
36
24
31
12
66
124
36
30
37
28
49
29
50
38.
10
24
14
15
16
1
10
52
13
1
11
15
15
29
11
1
292
284
8

2
230
229
1

4
209
208
1

12
217
217
0

1
252
252
0

Single consumers
Total money plus nonmoney income.

$1,062 $1,161

$772

$637

$413

$852 $1,342 $1,827 $2,512

0

M oney incom e........................................
Earnings25.......................................
Net incomefromroomers, boarders
Interest, dividends, profits, rents.
Incom e from benefits, annuities..
Gifts from persons not in fam ily.
D irect relief paym ents..................
Other m oney income4....................
Business loss (not deducted
above)5..........................................
N onm oney incom e in kind5................
N onrelief..........................................
Relief ..............................................

$926 $1,035
709
626
29
26
190
169
63
61
31
28
20
18
5
6

$624
366
16
123
70
20
27
10

$389
329
0
10
30
10
13
0

$270
124
6
27
47
27
36
8

$725 $1,208 $1,702 $2,370
944 1,412 L,691
506
22
93
7
6
555
78
243
67
22
72
69
67
20
6
48
37
0
0
22
0
12
5
4
1

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

10
126
123
3

8
148
148
(7
)

3
248
248
0

5
143
137
6

See footnotes on p. 72.




10
136
134
2

0
127
127
0

0
134
134
0

0
125
125
0

4
142
142
0

0
0
0
0

72

Fam ily Spending and Saving in W artim e

T able 3.— Source o f income, m oney and nonm oney, all fam ilies and single consumers,
by annual m oney income class and type o f community— Continued
1942 (first 3 m onths)

Item

B y type
A ll
B y annual m oney incomes class
o f com m unity
families
and/or
single
Ur­ Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
con­
non­
to
to
to
to
to
sumers1 ban1 farm1 farm1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
A ll families and single consumers

Total money plus nonmoney income.

1571

$679

$396

$358

$124

$231

$359

$479

$650

$987

Money incom e.......................................
Earnings28.......................................
Netincomefromroomers, boarders
Interest, dividends, profits, rents.
Incom efrom benefits, annuities..
Gifts from persons not in fam ily.
D irect relief paym ents..................
Other m oney income1*
4
*....................
Business loss (not deducted
above)8..........................................
N onm oney income in kind67
.................
N onrelief..........................................
B elief................................................

$517
462
6
25
11

$346
295
4
20
12
4
9
3

$253
227
2
9
5
3
3
4

$67
37
1
5
8
4
12
1

$184
121
5
13
17
10
15
3

$311
267
6
10
14
7
3
5

$435
393
7
12
14
3
2
4

$605
558
8
23
9
4

4

$637
573
8
28
13
7
4
5

$928
872
11
26
6
4
1
8

1
54
54

1
42
42

1
50
49
1

(9

1
57
55
2

(9

1
48
48

$
44

5
5

(9

(9

105
105

(9

47
46
1

(9

(9

(9

4

1
45
45
0

(9

59
59
0

Families of 2 or more persons
T otal m oney plus nonmoney income.

$619

$758

$424

$367

$136

$233

$362

$478

$658

$982

M oney incom e........................................
Earnings28.......................................
Netincomefromroomers, boarders
Interest, dividends, profits, rents.
Incom efrom benefits, annuities..
Gifts from persons not in fam ily.

$561
509
5
23
11
5
5
4

$712
651
6
29
13
6
4
4

$372
324
3
20
11
4
8
3

$261
236
2
9
5
2
3
4

$67
42
1
5
4
4
11
2

$183
125
3
9
17
9
17
3

$311
270
4
8
15
7
5
3

$433
397
8
8
12
3
2
4

$610
566
8
18
10
5

$921
876
2
25
6
4
1
7

1
58
58

1
46
46

1
52
51
1

(9

2
69
68
1

(9

1
51
51

1
45
45

1
48
48

(9

(9

(9

Direct relief payments...............

Other m oney income4....................
Business loss (not deducted
above)8...................... ...................
N onm oney income in kind6................
N onrelief..........................................
R elief...............................................

(9

(9

106
106
(9

50
49
1

(9

(9

(9

4

61
61

Single consumers
Total m oney plus nonmoney income.

$266

$293

$189

$98

$97

$209

$341

$464

$592

0

M oney incom e........................................
Earnings28.......................................
Netincomefromroomers, boarders
Interest, dividends, profits, rents.
Incom efrom benefits, annuities..
Gifts from persons not in fam ily
D irect relief paym ents..................
Other m oney income4...................
Business loss (not deducted
above)8..........................................
N onm oney income in kind6.................
N onrelief..........................................
R elief................................................

$237
174
7
26
14
8
6
4

$266
201
8
28
14
9
5
3

$156
93
6
20
15
5
10
8

$51
27

$181
108
10
24
17
13
7
2

$310
251
14
17
11
11
0

(9

$63
29
1
5
12
5
12
1

9

$430
363
1
37
21
7
0
1

$584
467
16
88
11
2
0
5

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

2
29
29

2
27
26
1

1
33
33

0
47
47
0

2
34
33
1

(9

3
31
31
0

0
34
34
0

5
8
8
0

0
0
' 0
0

(9

(9

(9
(9

15
7
2

28
28
0

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of 15,000 and over, not shown separately.
3 Includes work-relief wages from the Work Projects Administration and the National Y outh Adminis­
tration.
8 Includes earnings from owner-operated business and independent professional practice.
4 Includes alim ony, m oney found or received as prizes and rewards, and net gains from gambling.
8 Actual money losses which are met from the fam ily income or b y an increase in the fam ily’s liabilities.
Includes net losses from operation o f any independent business; and net losses when expense on property
was in excess o f income, such as taxes and insurance on em pty rental property.
0 Includes the value o f food, housing, fuel and ice, household furnishings and equipment, and clothing
received b y the fam ily without direct expense.
7 Less than 10.50.




73

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T able 4 .— Sum m ary o f m oney incom e and outlay, all fam ilies and single consumers,
by annual m oney income class and typ e o f com m unity

1941 (12 months)
A ll
famItem

B y type
of com m unity

B y annual m oney income class

and
./° r
single Ur­ Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
con­ ban1 non­ farm1
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
fa rm 1
sum­
ers1
A ll families and single consumers

Receipts:
Money incom e...............................
$1,974 $2,409 $1,311 $1,134
Inheritances and other money
receipts.......................................
$22
$14
$19
$25
N et deficit.....................................
0
0
0
0
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current
consum ption.............................
$1,666 $2,060 $1,147 $823
Gifts and contributions..............
$55
$41
$88 $112
Personal tax paym ents...............
$37
$4
$26
$11
Net surplus....................................
$218 $233 $116 $294
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting................... .
32
32
33
38
Average amount for those reporting $274 $299 $209 $296
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting..............
62
64
57
61
Average amount for those reporting $503 $516 $327 $669

$290
$13
$88

$737 $1,242 $1,736 $2,446 $3,731
$11
$17

$12
0

$12
0

$25
0

$23
0

$374
$16
(2
)
0

$740 $1,173 $1,566 $2,214 $3,088
$95 $176
$43
$65
$28
$29
$3
$3
$11
$1
0
$43 $123 $156 $483

44
$241

37
$210

36
$198

31
$211

30
$402

18
$395

35
$58

54
$112

62
$194

68
$275

69
$400

82
$678

Families of 2 or more persons
Receipts:
Money incom e......................... .
$2,131 $2,672 $1,403 $1,163
Inheritances and other m oney
receipts.......................................
$15
$24
$26
$17
N et deficit......................................
0
0
0
0
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current
consum ption.............................
$1,801 $2,290 $1,232 $841
$41
$53
Gifts and contributions..............
$88 $113
$42
$12
$4
Personal tax paym ents...............
$29
Net surplus....................................
$242 $260 $127 $310
Net deficit:
32
Percentage reporting................... .
33
33
38
Average amount for those reporting $285 $312 $211 $289
Net surplus:
65
Percentage reporting..............
57
61
63
Average amount for those reporting $538 $556 $342 $686

$299
$17
$86

$737 $1,247 $1,742 $2,450 $3,722
$12
$31

$11
0

$12
0

$27
0

$23
0

$387
$13
$1
0

$764 $1,189 $1,580 $2,234 $3,104
$21
$37
$56
$89 $165
$1
$2
$2
$9
$29
0
$40 $115 $147 $479

48
$223

40
$230

37
$204

32
$221

30
$410

18
$395

34
$66

$52
$118

61
$191

68
$272

70
$391

82
$675

Single consumers
Receipts:
Money incom e...............................
Inheritances and other m oney
receipts.......................................
N et deficit......................................
Disbursements:
M oney expenditures for current
consum ption..............................
Gifts and contributions..............
Personal tax paym ents...............
N et surplus....................................
N et deficit:
Percentage reporting...................
Average amount for those reporting
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting..............
Average amount for those reporting *
9

$926 $1,035

$624

$389

$270

$7
0

$7
0

$6
0

$8
$36

$3
$88

$786
$87
$8
$52

$882
$95
$9
$57

$494
$66
$4
$55

$388
$39
(2
)
0

29
$258

29
$261

28
$184

56
$229

57
$233

53
$205

$725 $1,208 $1,702 $2,370
$10
0

0
0

$341
$23
(2
)
0

$662 $1,071 $1,377 $1,720
$50
$83 $191 $219
$12
$46
$1
$11
$32
$61 $141 $366

0
0
0
0

41
$433

35
$297

26
$112

31
$258

21
$435

24
$176

0
0

57
$245

38
$40

61
$101

69
$205

74
$312

71
$575

0
0

0
0

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes o f $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
9 Less than $0.50.




0

0
0

$17
0

74

Fam ily Spending and Saving in W artim e

T able 4.— Sum m ary o f m oney income and outlay, all fam ilies and single consumers,
by annual m oney income class and type o f community—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll
B y type
B y annual m oney income class
fam ­
of com m unity
ilies
and
/o r
single Ur Rural
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
con­
non­ Rural Under to
to
to
to
to
sum­ ban1 fa rm 1 farm1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
ers1
A ll families and single consumers
Receipts:
Money incom e....................................
Inheritances and other m oney
receipts.............................................
Net deficit...........................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current
consum ption...................................
Gifts and contributions....................
Personal tax paym ents.....................
Net surplus.........................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.........................
Average amount for those reporting
N et surplus:
Percentage reporting.........................
Average amount for those reporting

$517

$637

$346

$253

$67

$184

$311

$435

$605

$928

$13
0

$18
0

$4
0

$4
0

$1
$43

$2
$16

$1
0

$20
0

$3
0

$2
0

$410
$19
$14
$81

$512
$25
$20
$95

$273
$10
$6
$60

$191
$7
$3
$55

$106
$3
$1
0

$196
$5
$1
0

$289
$10
$2
$10

$380
$12
$3
$59

$511
$21
$10
$73

$715
$36
$23
$160

31
$135

28
$127

27
$78

53
$187

52
$89

37
$94

30
$92

24
$67

21
$147

17
$191

63
$197

68
$189

59
$138

45
$351

28
$18

49
$37

68
$57

74
$102

78
$132

83
$231

Families of 2 or m ore persons
Receipts:
M oney incom e....................................
Inheritances and other m oney
receipts.............................................
N et deficit...........................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current
consum ption...................................
Gifts and contributions....................
Personal tax paym ents.....................
Net surplus.........................................
N et deficit:
Percentage reporting.........................
Average amount for those reporting
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting.........................
Average amount for those reporting

$561

$712

$372

$261

$67

$183

$311

$433

$610

$921

$14
0

$22
0

$2
0

$4
0

$1
$50

$3
$20

$2
0

$19
0

$3
0

$2
0

$444
$19
$16
$95

$572
$26
$23
$114

$292
$10
$6
$66

$195
$7
$3
$60

$118
$3
0
0

$202
$4
0
0

$295
$7
$1
$11

$385
$11
$3
$56

$518
$17
$9
$72

$716
$34
$23
$165

32
$138

28
$129

26
$80

53
$190

59
$92

40
$93

32
$86

25
$68

22
$140

16
$189

64
$217

70
$213

61
$144

45
$354

23
$18

48
$38

66
$58

74
$99

78
$132

84
$232

Single consumers
Receipts:
Money incom e....................................
Inheritances and other money
receipts.............................................
Net deficit...........................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current
consum ption...................................
Gifts and contributions....................
Personal tax paym ents.....................
N et surplus.........................................
N et deficit:
Percentage reporting.........................
Average amount for those reporting
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting.........................
Average amount for those reporting

$237

$266

$156

$51

$63

$181

$310

$430

$584

0

$3
0

(1
2
)
0

$17
0

(2
)
$36

$1
$22

0
$3

0
0

$30
0

0
0

0
0

$209
$19
$7
$6

$235
$22
$8
$3

$126
$12
$4
$31

$82
$5
(2
)
0

$86
$2
$1
0

$172
$10
$1
0

$269
$25
$7
$9

$327
$27
10
$92

$435
$59
$28
$65

0
0
0
0

29
$110

27
$118

27
$63

72
$132

37
$79

25
$95

23
$125

18
$61

17
$256

0
0

58
$56

61
$45

52
$92

28
$214

41
$18

56
$36

75
$52

78
$60

83
$129

0
0

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes o f $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
2 Less than $0.50.




75

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary
T able 5.— M ajor

categories of consumption : Average m oney expense and average
value o f selected goods and services, by annual m oney incom e class and typ e o f com­
m unity

Families and single consumers

Item

B y type
B y annual m oney income class
A ll fam­
o f com m unity
ilies and
single
con­
Ur­ Rural Rural Under, $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
sumers1 ban1 non­ farm 1 $500
farm 1
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
1941 (12 months)

A ll items: Total value..........................
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ............................
F ood: Total2...........................................
Money expense...............................
Received m k in d ............................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total8
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ............................
Household operation: Money expense
Furnishings and equipment: T o t a l...
Money expense..............................
Received m k in d ............................
Clothing: T otal......................................
Money expense...............................
Received m k in d ............................
Autom obile: M oney expense..............
Other transportation: Money expense
Personal care: Money expense............
Medical care: M oney expense.............
Recreation: Money expense................
T obacco: M oney expense.....................
Reading: Money expense.....................
Education: M oney expense.................
Other: Money expense4........................

$1,905 $2,229 $1,375 $1,344
823
1,666 2,060 1,147
521
169
239
228
$612
516
96
404
290
114
85
98
93
5
229
205
24
171
34
36
84
69
35
16
15
17

$663
637
26
496
385
111
109
109
104
5
274
247
27
198
49
45
96
91
43
21
19
16

$477
361
116
268
179
89
50
83
79
4
156
137
19
140
14
24
67
34
24
10
10
18

$589
250
339
232
74
158
34
72
66
6
153
135
18
103
6
20
60
26
17
7
8
17

$632
374
258

$995 $1,389 $1,768 $2,427 $3,338
740 1,173 1,566 2,214 3,088
202
255
216
213
250

$302
144
158
147
63
84
16
18
14
4
57
45
12
21
5
8
27
12
9
3
2
5

$412
272
140
228
135
93
30
40
37
3
104
85
19
56
12
16
40
19
18
7
5
8

$500
402
98
313
221
92
46
73
68
5
158
137
21
100
20
26
63
33
27
12
4
14

$599
521
78
391
295
96
67
91
87
4
208
184
24
141
27
34
86
50
37
17
7
13

$742
693
49
522
394
128
92
142
135
7
201
248
43
47
102
85
47
22
18
26

$947
894
53
650
494
156
158
207
201
6
445
410
35
359
55
70
152
144
65
29
33
24

262
29

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll items: Total value..........................
Money expense..............................
Received m k in d ...........................

$464
410
54

$554
512
42

$323
273
50

$296
191
105

$163
106
57

$243
196
47

$337
289
48

$424
380
44

$556
511
45

$774
715
59

Food: Total2...........................................
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ...... .....................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total3
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ...........................
Household operation: Money expense.
Furnishings and equipment: T o ta l...
Money expense................................
Received in k in d ............................
Clothing: T otal......................................
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ...........................
A utom obile: Money expense..............
Other transportation: Money expense.
Personal care: M oney expense............
Medical care: M oney expense.............
Recreation: Money expense................
T obacco: M oney expense.....................
Reading: Money expense.....................
Eeducation: Money expense...............
Other: Money expense4........................

$153
136
17
107
76
31
21
21
19
2
54
50
4
30
8
9
23
16
9
4
4
5

$172
166
6
130
101
29
28
25
23
2
67
62
5
34
11
11
28
2t
11
6
5
5

$117
98
19
72
45
27
12
14
13
1
32
29
3
25
4
6
16
7
6
3
3
6

$126
66
60
61
19
42
8
15
14
1
29
27
2
20
2
5
14
5
4
2
2
3

$73
43
30
43
18
25
5
4
4
5
13
11
2
7
1
2
9
1
2
1
(5
)
2

$95
76
19
63
40
23
8
7
6
1
23
19
4
12
4
4
12
4
4
2
1
4

$122
105
17
81
59
22
11
17
13
4
35
30
5
20
6
6
15
7
7
3
1
6

$147
133
14
101
77
24
16
18
16
2
46
42
4
25
8
9
23
12
9
4
2
4

$181
173
8
131
100
31
23
25
23
2
64
60
4
37
10
11
30
17
11
6
5
5

$237
228
9
164
122
42
34
40
39
1
104
97
7
56
13
16
39
34
16
7
8
6

See footnotes at end of table.




76

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 5.— M ajor

categories of consumption : Average m oney expense and average
value o f selected goods and services, by annual m oney incom e class and typ e o f com m it
nity — Continued

Families of 2 or more persons
B y type
of com m unity
Item

All fam­
ilies1

B y annual m oney incom e class

Rural Rural
Ur­
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
ban1 non­ farm 1 $500
farm1
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
1941 (12 months)

A ll items: Total value..........................
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ............................
F ood : Total*...........................................
M oney expense...............................
Received m k in d ............................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total*
Money expense...............................
R eceived m k in d ...........................
Household operation: Money expense.
Furnishings and equipment: T ota l.. .
M oney expense...............................
Received in k in d ...........................
Clothing: T otal......................................
M oney expense...............................
Received m k in d ............................
Autom obile: M oney expense...............
Other transportation: Money expense.
Personal care: Money expense............
Medical care: Money expense.............
Recreation: Money expense.................
T obacco: Money expense.....................
Reading: Money expense.....................
Education: Money expense.................
Other: Money expense4........................

$2,057 $2,468 $1,470 $1,374
1,801 2,290 1,232
841
256
178
238
533
$660
556
104
430
310
120
88
111
105
6
251
225
26
187
36
39
91
74
37
18
17
18

$729
706
23
542
423
119
120
128
122
6
308
278
30
223
53
50
107
101
48
23
18
18

$513
389
124
279
190
89
54
89
85
4
170
149
21
152
15
25
71
36
26
11
11
18

$601
254
347
236
75
161
35
73
67
6
158
139
19
104
7
20
62
27
17
8
9
17

$696 $1,056 $1,419 $1,789 $2,451 $3,356
387
764 1,189 1,580 2,234 3,104
309
292
230
209
217
252
$352
149
203
146
57
89
16
21
16
5
65
53
12
25
4
8
30
8
10
3
2
6

$447
282
•165
234
131
103
29
47
43
4
109
89
20
66
10
17
43
16
16
7
5
10

$524
416
108
316
222
94
44
79
73
6
161
139
22
100
18
25
63
.31
28
11
5
14

$613
530
83
396
300
96
63
97
92
5
213
188
25
138
26
34
87
48
37
17
7
13

$752
701
51
525
397
128
91
147
139
8
296
266
30
249
42
48
103
85
48
22
18
25

$950
896
54
653
496
157
157
208
202
6
450
415
35
364
54
70
153
145
65
30
34
23

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll items: Total value..........................
Money expense...............................
Received m k in d ...........................

$502
444
58

$344
292
52

$301
195
106

$187
118
69

$252
202
50

$346
295
51

$430
385
45

$566
518
48

$777
716
61

F ood : Total*...........................................
M oney expense...............................
R eceived in k in d ...........................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total*
M oney expense...............................
Received m k in d ............................
Household operation: Money expense.
Furnishings and equipment: T ota l. . .
M oney expense...............................
R eceived m k in d ............................
Clothing: T otal......................................
M oney expense...............................
Received m k in d ...........................
A utom obile: Money expense..............
Other transportation: Money expense.
Personal care: Money expense............
Medical care: Money expense.............
Recreation: M oney expense................
Tobacco: M oney expense....................
Reading: M oney expense.....................
Education: Money expense.................
Other: M oney expense4........................

$190 $125
$165
147
105
185
20
18
5
144
114
76
81
111
48
33
28
33
22
13
31
28
23
15
21
26
14
2
2
1
76
60
34
70
55
31
6
3
5
33
39
27
12
4
8
13
10
6
32 26
17
17 j
8
24
12
9
6
6!i
5
3
5
6
l
51
5

$128
67
61
62
20
42
8
15
14
1
30
28
2
21
2
5
14
5
4
2
2
3

$84
46
38
45
17
28
5
5
5
(5
)
15
12
3
8
1
3
11
2
3
1
1
3

$101
80
21
65
40
25
8
6
6
(5)
23
19
4
14
3
4
12
4
4
2
1
5

$127
109
18
82
59
23
10
19
14
5
35
30
5
23
5
6
15
6
7
3
1
7

$151
137
14
104
79
25
15
20
18
2
46
42
4
25
8
9
23
11
9
4
2
3

$186
177
9
133
100
33
22
26
24
2
65
61
4
38
10
11
32
17
11
5
5
5

$239
229
10
166
123
43
34
39
38
1
105
98
7
55
13
16
39
34
16
7
8
6

See footnotes at end of table.




$618
572
46

I

'

i

Part III.— Tabular Summary

77

T able 5.— M ajor

categories of consumption : Average m oney expense and average
value o f selected goods and services, by annual m oney income class and type o f commu­
nity —Continued

Single consumers

Item

B y type
B y annual m oney income class
of com m unity
A ll
single
con­
sumers1 Ur­ Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000
to
to
to
to
ban1 non­ farm 1 $500
farm 1
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
1941 (12 months)

A ll items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in k ind........................................

$922 $1,008
882
786
126
136

$642
494
148

$636
388
248

$484
341
143

$789 $1,205 $1,502 $1,862
662 1,071 1,377 1,720
142
127
134
125

F ood: Total1*
2.......................................................
Money expense............................................
Received m kind ........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total*.......
Money expense........... ...............................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T otal...............
Money expense........................................
Received in kind ........................................
Clothing: T ota l.................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense4....................................

$306
258
48
235
160
75
48
23
21
2
92
81
11
62
24
17
39
37
18
10
3
8

$333
292
41
259
187
72
55
18
17
1
103
91
12
64
29
19
42
44
21
11
4
6

$209
153
56
163
82
81
27
33
30
3
58
50
8
52
9
9
31
16
9
5
2
19

$268
133
135
135
41
94
22
51
40
11
43
35
8
67
1
7
17
7
7
4
0
7

$191
133
58
148
75
73
18
9
7
2
38
28
10
11
8
7
21
19
6
3
2
3

$297
240
57
207
149
58
36
16
14
2
83
73
10
23
21
15
29
26
24
8
2
2

$238
209
29

$262
235
27

$159
126
33

$129
82
47

$120
86
34

$79
69
10
62
45
17
12
7
6
1
23
22
1
12
7
5
11
8
5
3
1
3

$87
78
9
67
52
15
14
6
5
1
28
26
2
12
9
5
12
10
5
3
1
3

$52
40
12
44
24
20
6
9
9
(5
)
15
14
1
10
4
2
8
3
2
2
1
1

$58
36
22
37
12
25
6
8
8
(5
)
*
4
4
(5
)
4
1
2
2
2
3
1
0
1

$48
35
13
39
20
19
4
2
2
(5
)
9
7
2
3
2
2
6
1
2
1
0
1

$358
319
39
299
217
82
58
39
36
3
139
129
10
98
33
28
57
44
21
12
3
16

$424 $540
405
528
19
12
316
436
221
324
112
95
114
110
27
58
25
58
2
0
142 ' 178
133
160
9
18
166
220
43
56
26
25
87
65
82
87
37
23
20
21
8
8
10
32

$200
172
28

$300
269
31

$361
327
34

$443
435
8

$71
62
9
55
39
16
9
9
7
2
19
18
1
5
7
4
10
4
4
2
0
1

$99
90
9
78
58
20
16
6
5
1
32
31
1
8
12
8
17
11
6
4
2
1

$108
95
13
68
52
16
21
4
3
1
46
42
4
26
11
9
22
19
8
6
0
13

$132
130
2
111
106
5
27
7
7
0
52
51
1
30
15
8
12
26

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
apaivaH in Unrl
F ood: Total?.......................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received m k ind ........................................
Housing, fuel, light and refrig.: Total*.........
Money expense...........................................
Received m kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T ota l...............
Money expense...........................................
Received in k ind ........................................
Clothing: T o ta l.................................................
Money expense............................................
Received m kind........................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense4....................................

9
7
1

6

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
2 Includes expenditures for alcoholic beverages.
* Includes expenditures for all housing, including fam ily homes, vacation homes, and lodging o f fam ily
members while traveling or on vacation, or at school. For the farm home, expenditures include only those
for insurance and for repairs paid for b y the fam ily; all other expenditures for the farm home were con­
sidered farm business expenditures. For urban and rural nonfarm families, expenditures for fam ily home
include those for rent and repairs on rented homes, and for taxes, insurance, repairs and replacements,
special assessments, interest on mortgage, and refinancing charges for owned homes.
4 Includes interest on debts incurred for fam ily living; bank service charges, including safe-deposit box;
legal expenses connected with household affairs; losses concerned directly with the household, including
amount o f installments paid during period on repossessed furniture; funeral expenses, including upkeep
and purchase o f cemetery lot;- and expense for other items, such as dues to political and to cooperative
associations, marriage licenses, and flowers for the wedding o f a fam ily member. For urban and rural
nonfarm families only, includes garden expenses for seeds and fertilizer, and feed for chickens for family
food supply.
8 Less than $0.50.




78

Family 'Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 6.— F ood

and alcoholic b e v e r a g e s : Average annual expenditure and average
value o f food received without m oney expense, fam ilies and single consumers, by annu­
al m oney incom e class and type o f com m unity

1941 (12 months)

Item

A ll
B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
fam­
com m unity
ilies
and
single
con­ Urban1 Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
non­
to
to
to
to
to
sum­
farm 1 farm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
ers1

Average expenditure for—
Meals served at home2....... $404.53 $482.53 $309.57 $224.64 $124.02 $222.22 $321.67 $435.07 $556.25 $664.67
Board for nonhousekeeping
families8.............................
13.84 17.70 12.27
9.08 19.62 21.48 12.23 12.56
1.08
9.46
Food away from home4. .. .
7.23 23.58 45.84 53.84 100.94 164.70
75.26 105.14 31.51 18.52
Beer5......................................
4.25
4.23
10.87 15.25
2.14
7.09 12.43 12.15 29.27
2.81
Whisky, gin, rum, etc.5. . . .
9.84 14.19
2.10
2.24
3.06
.99
6.19
4.68
9.92 23.43
2.21
Wines5....................................
1.56
.49
.53
.11
.76
.48
1.59
1.59
2.17
Average value of—
77.43
5.13 95.45 331.72 129.62 114.39 81.38 63.27 36.29 39.75
Home-grown fo o d ...............
Food received as pay6. .......
11.27 13.41 11.21
3.13 15.30 16.16 10.21 10.38
8.54
9.58
6.07
Food received as gifts7.......
6.23
4.15
9.62
7.03
7.08
6.08
4.37
3.79
3.64
1.21
Food received as relief.......
1.14
2.52
2.10
3.84
.46
.70
0
.43
0
1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes o f $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
a Includes cost o f food prepared at home but eaten away from home and value o f food brought home b y
the proprietor o f a food store. Includes value o f food bought with orange and blue stamps b y relief families
and food received on grocery vouchers. Does not include value o f surplus commodities received through
direct distribution. Does not include the cost o f boarders’ food.
8 Includes board in household where person lives or elsewhere. Excludes restaurant meals and board
for children away at school.
4 Includes meals at work, lunches at school, meals while traveling or while on vacation, board at school,
restaurant meals for fam ily and guests, ice cream, candy, and soft drinks.
5 There can be little doubt that the volume o f expenditures on alcoholic beverages has been seriously
underreported, possibly b y as m uch as two-thirds.
6 Includes meals received b y household servants, farm laborers, restaurant employees, and institutional
employees as part o f their remuneration, and any other food obtained in paym ent for services.
7 value of food received as g ift was estimated as the price the fam ily would have paid at the m ost likely
place of purchase. Includes the value o f meals received b y the fam ily as guests if they are in excess o f the
number of meals furnished to guests who were not members o f the household.

T able 7.— H ousing : Average annual expenditure and average value o f housing received
without m oney expense, fa m ilies and single consumers, by annual m oney incom e
class and type o f com m unity

1941 (12 months)

Item

A ll
B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
fam ­
com m unity
ilies
and
single
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
con­ Urban1 Rural Rural Under
non­
to
to
to
to
to
sum­
farm 1 farm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
ers1

Average expenditure for—
Fam ily home1
2................... $190.46 $268.38 $94.47 $18.42 $35.40 $85.74 $145.06 $190.72 $267.14 $322.63
11.97 15.99
.69
1.36
Other housing3.................
7.06
3.05
3.98
4.25 13.22 29.92
Average value of4
—
Farm and owned non­
92.69 94.25 64.76 123.91 51.97 62.20 73.41 78.64 112.34 149.58
farm home5....................
R ent received as pay,
13.16 14.39 17.96
2.01 17.39 18.67 11.40 11.87 10.95
gift, or relief..................
3.02
1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes o f $5,000 and over, not shown separately*
2 Includes, for farm families whether owning or renting the fam ily home, only expense for repairs, replace­
ments, and insurance; for urban and rural nonfarm owning families includes expense fo r interest on mort­
gage, refinancing charges, taxes, special assessments, repairs, replacements, and insurance; and, for urban
and rural nonfarm renting families, rent, minus concessions, plus any repairs paid for b y the fam ily.
8 Includes expense for lodging while traveling or on vacation, and for room at school; also m oney expense
for owned or rented vacation home.
4The difference between these figures and those shown in table 5 for value o f housing, fuel, light, and
refrigeration represents the value of fuel and ice furnished b y the farm, gathered b y the fam ily, or received
as pay, gift, or relief.
5 The value o f occupancy of a farm home was set at 10 percent o f the present value o f the dwelling for
owners and tenants alike. The net value o f occupancy of owned urban and rural nonfarm homes was
determined b y deducting from the rental value the expenditures for taxes and special assessments, interest
and refinancing charges on the mortgage, insurance, and repair.




79

Part H I.— Tabular Summary
T ab le 8.— F u el ,

lig h t , and r e f r ig e r a t io n : Average annual expenditure, fam ilies
and single consumers, by annual m oney income class and type o f com m unity

1941 (12 months)

Item

Coal:
Bitum inous......................
Anthracite.......... .............
Fuel o i l ....................................
Kerosene, gasoline1
2.................
Coke, briquets.......................
Wood, kindling, cobs3............
E lectricity................................
Gas4...........................................
I ce ..............................................
R ent of freezer locker.............

All
B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
com m unity
fam ­
ilies
and
single
con­ Urban1 Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
non­
to
to
to
to
to
sum­
farm1 farm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
ers1

$13.72 $14.35 $14.43 $10.32
9.85 12.18
7.19
4.43
8.26 10.18
6.85
2.75
6.33
4.18
2.76
6.78
2.52
3.56
1.05
.51
3.43
2.46
6.42
3.15
27.38 30.62 24.65 18.53
14.85 21.04
6.40
2.31
2.98
2.49
3.22
3.08
.81
.71
.79
1.24

$6.20
2.35
.56
4.02
.15
3.98
5.91
1.79
1.61
.88

$9.30 $12.36 $15.24 $17.05 $19.66
8.15 12.50 15.48 17.04
3.57
2.34
4.83
9.49 18.22
9.81
5.42
3.35
4.67
5.54
2.04
.54
.99
1.90
6.33
3.46
4.83
2.33
3.89
4.17
1.76
13.41 21.96 31.13 38.23 47.56
9.90 15.23 21.78 26.18
5.03
3.24
3.94
3.83
1.88
2.58
.42
.93
.30
.34
.16

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes o f $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
2 Includes range oil.
3 Includes sawdust, charcoal, and prestologs.
4 Includes tank gas and carbide.

T able 9.— H ousehold

furnishings and equipment : Average expenditures fo r m ajor
categories and fo r radios and phonographs, fam ilies and single consumers,
by annual m oney income class and type o f com m unity

1941 (12 months)

Item

B y type of
All
B y annual m oney income class
com m unity
fam­
ilies
and
single
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
con­ Urban1 Rural Rural Under
to
to
to
non­ farm 1 $500
to
to
sum­
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
farm1
ers1

Furnishings and equipment:
Total........................... $92.90 $104.55 $79.11 $66.41 $13.69 $36.68 $67.69 $86.65 $135.62 $200.49
Kitchen equipm ent......... $25.91 $26.38 $26.42 $23.42
2.82
3.94
4.58
2.91
Cleaning equipm ent.......
4.55
Laundry equipm ent.......
4.83
5.66
4.96
Glass, china, and silver­
1.35
2.35
2.12
ware.................................
2.14
Household linens, bed­
15.40 17.53 12.18 11.48
ding.................................
F loor covering..................
8.99 10.23
7.58
6.11
18.53 22.91 13.38
8.54
Furniture..........................
MipoolIanA
rm ...............
13.02 15.72
8.14
8.86
R adio and radio-phonograph
6.00
6.79
4.65
3.99
purchase...............................
.15
.09
.01
Phonograph purchase............
.11

$4.58 $11.72 $21.14 $29.19 $37.38 $49.00
.53
1.23
3.61
2.26
6.72
7.48
5.95
.73
8.01
2.97
4.77
6.88
.20

.76

1.74

2.22

2.91

5.00

2.98
1.02
1.44
2.20

6.11
3.59
6.90
3.36

10.34
5.27
14.99
7.19

13.64
7.37
14.02
10.67

19.89
16.43
28.62
16.78

37.07
20.75
45.87
27.31

2.32
.01

3.11
.01

3.81
.07

5.53
.06

8.03
.24

13.53
.36

1942 (first 3 months)
Furnishings and equipment:
Total...............................
Kitchen equipment.........
Cleaning equipment.......
Uaundrv equipment.......
Glass, china, silverware..
Household linens,
beddin g.........................
Floor covering..................
Furniture............. .........
Miscellaneous3..................

$19.31 $22.54 $13.47 $14.07
$4.69
.65
1.48
.41

$4.87
.77
1.61
.54

$3.86
.45
1.06
.20

$5.05
.42
1.50
.17

3.44
2.32
3.66
2.66

4.49
2.77
4.17
3.32

1.66
1.52
2.97
1.75

'

1.58
1.60
2.51
1.24

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
2 Includes lamps, mirrors, baby carriages, hand baggage, window shades, screens, lawn mowers, household
tools, stepladders, insurance on furnishings, and repairs and cleaning o f furnishings.




80

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b le 10.— C lothin g

p u rch ases : Average expenditures fo r major types o f clothing,
and average expenditures and quantity purchased fo r selected item s, all fa m ilies and sin­
gle consumers, by annual m oney income class and type o f com m unity

1941 (12 months)

Item

A ll
B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
fam­
com m unity
ilies
and
single
con­ Urban1 Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
non­
to
to
to
to
to
sum­
fa rm 1 fa rm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
ers1

M e n a n d B o y s 16 Years o f A g e

Average expenditure per man

Total expense......................................... $68.30 $85.60 $46.52 $40.06 $20.29 $33.45 $48.92 $61.78 $80.84 $107.62
Headwear............................................... $2.86
Hats; Felt...........................................
2.14
Coats, jackets, sweaters.......................
8.38
Overcoats............................................
2.87
Suits, trousers, overalls........................ 22.36
Suits: H eavy w ool.............................
8.17
Light w ool...............................
6.25
Trousers, slacks: W ool......................
2.05
Cotton, linen.......
1.32
2.10
Overalls, coveralls.............................
Shirts:......................................................
5.90
C otton, w ork......................................
2.02
Cotton, other......................................
3.47
Underwear, nightwear, robes..............
4.34
Union suits: Cotton, knit................
.67
Undershirts: C otton..........................
.84
Shorts: Cotton, knit.........................
.55
H ose.........................................................
2.85
Cotton, dress......................................
1.20
C otton, heavy....................................
.76
Footwear...............................................
10.97
Shoes: T otal.......................................
8.15
Work—Leather sole............... 2.69
Other—Leather, leather sole 4.65
Shoeshines, repairs............................
1.45
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other acces­
sories. ...............................................
5.41
Gloves: C otton ...................................
.68
Handkerchiefs....................................
.48
T ies......................................................
1.45
Jewelry, watches—Purchase and
repair..................... ........................
1.64
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing...............
4.65
Other clothing expense........................
.58

$3.33 $2.19 $2.19 $1.20 $1.87 $2.15 $2.53
2.54 1.58 1.53
.90 1.32 1.52 1.94
11.02 4.76 4.38 2.02 3.22 5.94 7.36
4.01 1.32 1.10
.50
.80 1.89 2.49
28.51 14.85 12.03 5.50 9.80 14.99 19.95
10.94 5.07 3.26
.79 2.48 4.91 6.98
8.73 3.11 2.20
.75 2.08 3.19 5.81
2.55 1.61 1.02
.53
.93 1.45 1.85
1.30 1.51 1.19
.70 1.26 1.37 1.49
1.52 2.30 3.58 2.14 2.04 2.32 2.54
6.92 4.63 4.22 2.47 3.34 4.38 5.54
1.82 2.12 2.52 1.61 1.79 1.85 2.06
4.61 2.18 1.43
.76 1.35 2.21 2.99
5.12 3.33 3.08 1.65 2.39 3.52 3.87
.49
.83 1.01
.73
.72
.59
.71
1.06
.58
.48
.21
70
.37
.84
.65
.45
.36
.14
.49
.27
.57
3.37 2.25 1.95 1.04 1.68 2.42 2.75
1.49
.89
.35
.66
.96 1.00
.71
.78
.63
.84
.50
.67
.92
.57
12.72 8.64 8.25 4.91 6.82 8.94 10.83
9.41 6.65 5.99 3.78 5.38 6.76 8.14
2.57 2.62 3.09 1.93 2.28 2.55 2.96
5.94 3.36 2.21 1.33 2.50 3.49 4.36
.69
.24
2.08
.38
.43
.87 1.23

$3.20
2.47
9.57
3.97
25.56
10.11
6.42
2.75
1.49
2.19
6.86
2.27
4.14
5.37
.66
1.01
.64
3.55
1.39
.93
13.30
9.88
3.16
5.72
1.99

$4.47
3.32
14.26
4.43
34.81
14.75
11.09
2.66
1.49
1.62
8.99
2.25
5.99
6.76
.67
1.26
.93
4.32
2.18
.91
15.51
11.12
2.90
7.28
2.51

7.13
.66
.61
2.05

3.13
.66
.33
.75

2.71
.74
.24
.41

.95
.34
.13
.14

2.71
.62
.21
.38

3.81
.63
.36
.77

5.22
1.03
.38
1.16

6.87
.82
.59
1.87

8.59
.57
.83
2.78

2.40
6.62
.86

.51
2.50
.24

.58
1.10
.15

.12
.47
.08

1.01
1.47
.15

1.15
2.44
.33

1.38
3.41
.32

2.01
5.64
.92

2.57
8.72
1.19

Average number o f articles purchased per man
Headwear:
H ats: Felt............................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters:
Overcoats............................................
Suits, trousers, overalls:
Suits: H eavy w ool.............................
Light w ool...............................
Trousers, slacks: W ool......................
Cotton, linen.......
Overalls, coveralls, r.........................
Shirts:
Cotton, w ork......................................
Cotton, other.................. ...................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Union suits: Cotton, knit.................
Undershirts: C otton ..........................
Shorts: Cotton, k n it .........................
H ose: Cotton, dress..............................
Cotton, h ea vy............................
Footwear:
Shoes: T ota l.......................................
Work—Leather sole..............
Other—Leather, leather sole
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other acces­
sories:
Gloves: C otton ...................................
Handkerchiefs....................................
T ies.......................................................

0.58

0.62

0.51

0.53

0.39

0.47

0.48

0.55

0.64

.11

.14

.06

.06

.03

.05

.08

.11

.15

.15

.24
.22
.43
.64
1.28

.30
.28
.50
.58
.78

.18
.14
.38
.78
1.51

.12
.11
.26
.66
2.51

.03
.06
.16
.43
1.59

.11
.09
.26
.72
1.46

.18
.13
.34
.70
1.43

.24
.22
.45
.73
1.52

.27
.24
.57
.69
1.19

.43
.35
.52
.60
.82

1.85
2.05

1.46
2.59

2.08
1.47

2.76
1.04

1.88
.59

1.95
1.00

1.84
1.54

1.97
1.90

1.93
2.49

1.67
3.40

.63
2.14
1.29
4.60
3.73

.45
2.59
1.51
5.35
3.61

.80
1.65
1.10
3.97
3.22

.97
1.34
.86
3.04
4.60

.76
.66
.38
1.84
3.02

.76
1.13
.70
3.50
3.20

.65
1.96
1.25
4.75
3.52

.58
2.20
1.49
3.88
4.64

.56
2.67
1.48
5.37
4.22

.62'
3.06
1.92
7.19
3.95

1.89
.69
.95

2.00
.60
1.14

1.74
.74
.78

1.72
.92
.56

1.25
.67
.38

1.58
.72
.63

1.74
.68
.80

1.92
.73
.94

2.20
.75
1.19

2.19
.63
1.33

2.82
3.82
1.64

2.54
4.44
2.24

2.84
3.33
.98

3.60
2.49
.54

1.47
1.55
.21

2.79
2.42
.60

2.97
3.70
1.04

4.62
3.75
1.54

3.23
4.86
2.36

1.98
5.26
2.83

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.




0.78

81

Part I II.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 10.—C lo th in g pu r c h a se s : Average expenditures fo r major types ofclothing, and
average expenditures and quantity purchased fo r selected item s, all fa m ilies and single
consumers, by annual m oney incom e class and type o f com m unity—Continued

1941 (12 m onths)— Continued

Item

B y type of
A ll
B y annual m oney income class
com m unity
fam ­
ilies
and
single
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
Rural
con­ Urban1 non­ Rural Under to
to
to
to
to
fa rm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
sum­
fa rm 1
ers1
Average expenditure per b oy

B o y s 2 t o 16 Y e a r s o f A g e
Total expense......................................... $30.26 $38.70 $24.62 $20.29 $11.13 $17.52 $26.56 $29.16 $41.50 $51.98
Headwear............................................... $0.67
4.57
O a t s , jackets, sweaters.......................
.61
Overcoats............................................
.79
Snow and ski suits............................
.93
Jackets: Wool.*....................................
1.07
Sweaters: W ool...................................
7.89
Suits, trousers, overalls........................
1.28,
Suits: H eavy w ool.............................
.91
Light w ool...............................
Cotton, linen..........................
.58
.66
Slack suits: C otton ...........................
1.22
Trousers, slacks: W ool...............—
Cotton, linen.......
.89
Overalls, coveralls!...........................
1.77
2.18
Shirts, blouses:......................................
Cotton, other than work..................
1.37
Underwear, nightwear, robes..............
2.58
.61
Union suits: Cotton, k n it................
.34
Undershirts: C otton .........................
.63
Pajamas, nightshirts........................
.36
Shorts: Cotton, k n it.........................
1.68
H ose.........................................................
1.02
Cotton, dress......................................
Cotton, heavy....................................
.54
8.21
Footwear.................................................
6.75
Shoes: T otal.......................................
1.37
Work—Leather sole..............
Other—Leather, leather sole 4.22
Other—Leather, rubber sole
.56
.50
Shoeshines, repairs............................
1.05
Accessories..............................................
.79
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing...............
.64
Other clothing expense...... .................

$0.68 $0.63 $0.70 $0.46 $0.53 io.oi $0.64 $0.90
6.15 3.73 2.50 1.33 2.01 4.29 4.37 6.25
.10
.05
.08
.43
.54 1.34
1.12
.17
.81
.11
.18 1.07
.96
.29
.58
1.18
.46
.92 1.07 1.09
.30
.72
.97 1.05
.69
.89
.90
.35
.93 1.31
.63
1.39
9.46 6.98 5.90 3.33 5.22 6.84 7.58 10.62
.82 2.39
.13
.67 1.01
.95
.54
1.86
.23
.73
.54
.54
.23
.98 1.43
1.31
.59
.84
.16
.71
.30
.43
.44
.80
.52
.62
.99
.23
.72
.43
.46
.74
.20
1.40 1.87
.60
.88
.89
.65
1.71
.84
.89
.40
.54
.88
.83
.68
1.04
1.20 2.22 2.39 1.75 2.10 1.66 1.87 1.59
2.45 2.00 1.86 1.07 1.54 1.95 2.00 2.75
.46
.76 1.26 1.40 2.06
.87
1.79 1.11
.91 1.29 2.28 2.55 3.62
3.39 1.96 1.71
.56
.64
.72
.56
.63
.69
.71
.51
.28
.30
.07
.16
.46
.22
.19
.49
.03
.54
.69
.17
.93
.26
.38
.97
.25
.38
.48
.10
.15
.26
.23
.49
.50 1.01 1.55 1.71 2.31
2.22 1.28 1.08
.29
.57 1.07 1.08 1.51
.87
.66
1.30
.43
.66
.46
.18
.39
.31
.34
.77
10.68 6.53 5.32 3.12 5.02 7.23 8.38 11.41
8.81 5.36 4.31 2.72 4.31 8.11 6.69 9.31
.91 1.12 1.35 1.31 1.39
1.53 1.06 1.37
5.87 3.18 2.20 1.37 2.51 3.90 4.38 6.17
.39
.32
.49
.88
.13
.40
.29
.80
.27
.44
.92
.06
.18
.15
.27
.81
.90
.95 1.62
.70
.46
.18
.74
1.40
.34
.49 1.02
.02
.08
.09
.31
1.42
.57
.21
.49 1.00
.36
.50
.39
.85

$0.70
9.31
.96
2.03
1.81
2.08
13.27
2.42
2.18
.58
1.70
2.00
1.39
1.93
3.51
2.39
4.58
.46
.69
1.44
.65
3.17
1.62
1.10
12.84
10.34
1.83
6.80
.89
1.05
2.07
1.53
1.00

Average number of articles purchased per boy
Coats, jackets, sweaters:
Overcoats............................................
Snow and ski suits............................
Jackets: W ool.....................................
Sweaters: W ool..................................
Suits, trousers, overalls:
Suits: H eavy w ool.............................
Light w ool...............................
Cotton, linen..........................
Slack suits: C otton ...........................
Trousers, slacks: W ool......................
Cotton, linen.......
Overalls, coveralls.............................
Shirts, blouses: Cotton, other than
w ork.................................................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Union suits: Cotton, knit................
Undershirts: C otton .........................
Pajamas, nightshirts........................
Shorts: Cotton, knit.............. ..........
Hose: Cotton, dress..............................
Cotton, h eavy............................
Footwear:
Shoes: Total........................................
Work—Leather sole..............
Other—Leather, leather sole
Other—Leather, rubber sole

0.07
.12
.21
.59

0.12
.17
.19
.73

0.03
.10
!25
.52

0.02
.06
.21
.40

0.02
.02
.13
.29

0.02
.04
.14
.41

0.06
.16
.23
.54

0.08
.17
.26
.64

0.14
.12
.22
.70

0.10
.21
.33
1.01

.12
.13
.41
.37
.48
.58
1.97

.17
.18
.57
.38
.65
.60
1.26

.09
.07
.36
.46
.35
.61
2.53

.06
.08
.16
.27
.29
.52
2.73

.02
.04
.13
.17
.10
.32
2.18

.07
.06
.37
.25
.26
.46
2.42

.08
.12
.58
.35
.38
.64
1.89

.09
.15
.43
.33
.63
.60
2.16

.22
.19
.69
.58
.75
.62
1.61

.26
.19
.19
.78

.78
1.82

1.68

2.10

1.45

1.13

.70

1.09

1.54

1.87

2.41

2.75

.93
1.17
.62
1.30
5.48
2.59

.76
1.61
.95
1.73
6.70
3.47

1.06
.82
.36
1.04
4.81
1.66

1.13
.72
.28
.76
3.89
1.89

.99
.29
.04
.30
1.91
1.21

.91
.64
.22
.59
3.67
2.10

.91
1.04
.57
1.03
6.53
2.32

.94
1.06
.77
1.70
6.25
2.21

1.00
1.78
.96
1.89
7.12
3.15

.80
2.41
1.27
2.16
8.43
4.67

2.82
.57
1.69
.22

3.40
.60
2.22
.27

2.49
.49
1.36
.19

2.07
.61
1.02
.14

1.49
.47
.73
.10

2.14
.52
1.20
.17

2.86
.68
1.65
.19

3.01
.58
1.93
.18

3.70
.61
2.38
.29

3.65
.70
2.18
.33

1Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.




.68

82

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 10.— C lothing

purchases : Average expenditures for major types o f clothing, and
average expenditures and quantity purchased fo r selected items , all families and sin­
gle consumers, by annual m oney income class and type o f community — Continued

1941 (12 months)— Continued

Item

All
B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
fam­
com m unity
ilies
and
single
con­ Urban1 Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
non­
to
to
to
to
to
sum­
fa rm 1 fa rm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
ers1
Average expenditure per woman

W o m e n a n d G ir ls 16 Y e a r s o f
A g e a n d O v er

Total expense......................................... $79.45 $101.61 $50.12 $38.74 $18.89 $32.38 $54.77 $66.28 $96.17 $140.15
Headwear............................................... $4.04
2.46
Hats: F elt...........................................
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc..................... 16.03
5.05
Coats: F u r..........................................
3.03
H eavy, with fu r....................
2.71
H eavy, no fu r........................
3.29
Light w ool..............................
Dresses, suits, aprons........................... 20.04
1.92
Dresses: W ool....................................
8.44
Rayon, silk .........................
2.37
Cotton, street.....................
1.22
Cotton, house............... .
1,56
Suits: Wool, no fu r ............................
9.04
Underwear, nightwear, rob es..............
1.93
Slips: Rayon, s ilk ..............................
2.00
Corsets, girdles..................................
.98
Bloomers, panties: R ayon, silk.......
8.00
H osiery...................................................
4.90
Hose: Silk....... ....................................
.70
R a y on ......................................
N ylon........................................
1.71
.30
Cotton, including lisle..........
Anklets, socks: Cotton.................
.37
Footwear................................................. 10.92
Shoes: T otal........................................ 9.40
Leather, leather sole.............
7.83
Shoeshines, repairs............................
.67
4.70
Accessories........... ..................................
Handbags, purses..............................
1.35
H om e sewing............................. . ..........
2.46
Upkeep—Cleaning, p ressing.. . .........
3.53
.69
Other clothing expense........................

$5.32 $2.27 $1.79 $1.05 $1.48 $2.52 $3.11 $4.70
3.30 1.29 1.01
.63
.85 1.47 1.81 2.90
21.47 8.33 6.64 2.77 5.58 9.98 11.99 21.62
.92 2.33 2.53 6.45
7.64 1.23
.75
.05
.92
.29 1.00 1.31 2.38 5.14
4.30 1.17
3.01 2.29 2.18
.76 1.35 2.48 2.72 3.19
4.11 2.31 1.66 1.19 1.43 2.55 2.80 4.46
25.73 12.37 9.76 4.17 7.36 12.99 15.99 22.58
2.63
.74
.88
.27
.58
.89 1.69 2.04
11.01 5.08 3.65 1.71 3.07 5.77 6.80 9.96
2.93 1.62 1.34
.78 1.04 1.66 1.89 2.66
1.17 1.28 1.32
.68
.75 1.06 1.37 1.44
.12
2.10
.66
.78
.40
.79
.98 1.67
11.08 6.79 4.75 2.26 3.95 6.51 8.08 10.93
2.36 1.46 1.04
.45
.85 1.44 1.78 2.54
.83
.35
.66 1.55 1.60 2.49
2.51 1.50
1.14
.83
.61
.30
.51
.77
.97 1.23
10.18 5.26 3.81 2.10 4.10 6.33 7.73 10.60
6.29 3.15 2.26 1.04 2.54 3.91 4.86 7.03
.40
.90
.46
.53
.28
.38
.83
.92
.52 1.25 1.37 1.95
2.36
.14
.95
.38
.30
.52
.34
.34
.23
.31
.26
.20
.38
.37
.33
.18
.27
.30
.39
.48
12.92 8.40 7.08 4.30 6.09 8.89 10.17 13.15
11.05 7.35 6.20 3.86 5.42 7.62 8.62 11.27
9.17 6.09 5.32 3.44 4.63 6.31 7.25 9.57
.92
.36
.20
.13
.23
.51
.64
.86
6.42 2.38 1.59
.59 1.15 2.83 3.89 5.34
.44
.66
.16
.36
.73 1.01 1.55
1.86
2.55 2.26 2.38 1.27 1.81 2.43 1.97 2.54
.82
.36
.76 1.93 2.89 3.95
4.93 1.80
.12
.02
.10
.36
1.01
.26
.46
.76

$6.88
4.27
34.54
17.78
5.13
3.06
4.72
33.49
3.04
14.10
3.51
1.54
2.53
14.79
3.20
3.58
1.39
13.93
8.04
.95
4.08
.28
.53
16.38
14.00
11.87
1.12
7.89
2.49
3.37
7,56
1.32

Average number o f articles purchased per woman
Headwear:
H ats: F elt............................................
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc.:
Coats: F u r...... .......... ........................
H eavy, with fu r....... ............
H eavy, no f u r .......................
Light w ool..............................
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc.:
Dresses: W ool.....................................
R ayon, silk .........................
Cotton, street.....................
Cotton, house.....................
Suits: Wool, no fu r ............................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Slips: Rayon, s ilk ..............................
Corsets, girdles..................................
Bloomers, panties: Rayon, s ilk ----Hosiery:
Hose: Silk...........................................
R a y on ......................................
N ylon ........................................
Cotton, including lisle..........
Anklets, socks: C otton.....................
Footwear:
Shoes: T otal........... .........................
Leather, leather sole.............
Accessories: Handbags, purses...........

0.81

1.00

0.54

0.48

0.34

0.44

0.63

0.79

1.05

1.28

.04
.08
.14
.21

.05
.10
.13
.24

.02
.04
.14
.18

.01
.04
.15
.15

(2
)
.02
.08
.12

.02
.04
.10
.12

.02
.04
.16
.18

.02
.07
.15
.21

.05
.13
.16
.26

.10
.11
.13
.27

.22
1.33
.86
.87
.09

.28
1.56
.90
.75
.11

.13
1.06
.79
1.04
.05

.11
.89
.78
1.08
.05

.06
.50
.54
.63
.01

.10
.76
.66
.68
.03

.13
1.13
.78
.90
.05

.22
1.32
.86
1.10
.07

.24
1.70
.97
.98
.11

.37
2.05
1.11
.96
.16

1.31
.58
2.05

1.48
.70
2.23

1.18
.45
1.97

.91
.31
1.52

.47
.14
.89

.79
.27
1.38

1.23
.50
2.03

1.38
.54
2.26

1.72
.77
2.62

1.91
.99
2.61

5.51
1.01
1.19
.90
1.91

7.05
1.23
1.63
.62
1.89

3.57
.81
.69
.91
2.06

2.57
.51
.27
1.87
1.79

1.33
.77
.10
1.36
1.14

3.21
.77
.37
1.15
1.64

4.78
.94
.88
.99
1.75

5.66
1.13
.99
.77
2.08

7.95
1.36
1.35
.55
2.30

8.52
1.02
2.73
.57
2.47

2.38
1.91
.64

2.53
2.03
.79

2.17
1.72
.44

2.10
1.72
.34

1.45
1.24
.16

1.82
1.48
.30

2.23
1.77
.48

2.41
1.94
.68

2.68
2.19
.83

3.14
2.53
1.07

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
* Less than 0.005 article.




83

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 10.—C l o th in g pu r c h a se s : Average expenditures fo r m ajor types o f clothing, and
average expenditures and quantity purchased fo r selected item s, all fam ilies arid sin­
gle consumers, by annual m oney incom e class and type o f com m unity—Continued

1941 (12 months)— Continued

Item

B y type of
All
B y annual m oney incom e class
fam­
com m unity
ilies
and
single
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
Rural
con­ Urban1 non­ Rural Under to
to
to
to
to
fa rm 1 $500 $l,O0O $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
sum­
fa rm 1
ers1
Average expenditure per girl

G irls 2 t o 16 Y ea r s o f A g e

Total expense......................................... $35.76 $48.25 $24.90 $20.30 $10.10 $15.46 $25.20 $31.48 $44.29 $65.15
Headwear................................................ $1.02
.47
Hats: Felt............................................
7.85
Coats, sweaters, furs, e tc.....................
.52
Coats: H eavy, with fu r....................
2.33
H eavy, no fu r........................
1.43
Light w ool..............................
1.50
Snow or ski suits, leggings...............
1.09
Sweaters: W ool...................................
8.26
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc...................
.53
Dresses: W ool.....................................
1.49
R ayon, silk.........................
2.82
Cotton, street.....................
.86
Skirts: W ool........................................
.59
Play and sun suits.............................
Underwear, nightwear, robes..............
3.88
.46
Slips: C otton......................................
.62
Bloomers, panties: C otton..............
Rayon, silk ----.50
H osiery.................................................... 2.22
1.42
Anklets, socks: C otton .....................
Footwear.................................................
8.28
6.98
Shoes: T otal........................................
Leather, leather sole.............
5.66
Leather, rubber sole.............
.96
.54
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes..
.51
Shoeshines, repairs............................
1.11
Accessories..............................................
.27
Gloves: W ool.......................................
Hom e sew ing.. ....................................
1.48
Yard goods: C otton ..........................
.91
1.15
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing...............
.51
Other clothing expense........................

$1.45 $0.61 $0.54 $0.30 $0.34 $0.76 $0.88 $1.30
.65
.09
.29
.32
.72
.22
.18
.08
11.21 4.76 3.89 1.83 2.67 5.21 6.94 10.06
.12
.49
.03
.67
.21
.57
.07
.88
.82 1.37 2.03 3.23
.51
3.27 1.49 1.18
.44
.95
.92 1.40
.65
.36
2.20
.62
.72
.23
.46 1.05 1.64 2.58
2.05 1.11
.72
.45
.71 1.09 1.22
1.42
.38
.77
11.26 5.84 4.37 1.67 2.86 5.65 7.18 9.75
.12
.46
.33
.48
.14
.84
.26
(*)
.29
.46
.77 1.33 1.67
2.10
.86
.84
.90 1.23 2.71 2.37 3.68
3.60 2.42 1.56
.05
.31
.91 1.07
.14
.49
.36
1.28
.05
.09
.66
.13
.27
.48
.44
.87
4.86 3.26 2.40 1.14 1.81 2.97 3.61 4.95
.53
.20
.25
.46
.30
.37
.55
.41
.80
.42
.60
.31
.57
.66
.48
.67
.60
.42
.20
.43
.28
.60 • .43
.37
.68 1.29 1.90 2.14 2.83
2.92 1.52 1.45
.45
.83 1.22 1.38 1.77
.88
1.84 1.07
10.73 6.22 5.18 3.14 4.82 6.11 7.68 10.52
8.85 5.49 4.54 2.90 4.41 5.24 6.53 8.66
7.34 4.29 3.50 2.45 3.25 4.07 5.39 7.27
.95
.80
.95
.89
.86
.36
1.09
.83
.51
.12
.69
.23
.57
.41
.38
.68
.10
.24
.32
.14
.11
.81
.15
.85
.31
.55 1.08 1.61
.49
.13
1.60
.69
.03
.17
.27
.11
.38
.39
.08
.18
1.39 1.47 1.68 1.15 1.23 1.55 1.27 1.74
.82
.84
.92
.97 1.07
.72 1.00 1.21
.02
.32
.17
.43 1.03
.06
1.98 . .38
.50
.18
.27
.13
.04
.07
.85
.15

$2.12
.95
15.35
.34
4.75
3.11
2.94
2.45
16.53
.98
2.79
4.95
1.78
1.42
6.52
.57
.74
.82
3.96
2.67
13.23
10.96
8.51
1.84
1.05
.75
1.88
.62
2.27
.91
2.14
1.15

Average number o f articles purchased per girl
Headwear:
Hats, felt.............................................
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc;:
Coats: H eavy, with fu r....................
H eavy, no fu r .............'.........
Light w ool..............................
Snow or ski suits, leggings...............
Sweaters: W ool...................................
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc.:
Dresses: W o o l...................................
R ayon, silk.........................
Cotton, street.....................
Skirts: W ool............................................
Play and sun suits.............................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Slips: C otton ......................................
Bloomers, panties: C otton...............
R ayon, silk ___
Hosiery: Anklets, socks: C otton ........
Footwear:
Shoes: T otal........................................
Leather, leather sole.............
Leather, rubber sole.............
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes..
Accessories: Gloves: W ool....................
H om e sewing:
Yard goods: Cotton (y d .)................

0.29

0.40

0.17

0.16

0.07

0.11

0.23

0.26

0.43

0.49

.04
.22
.19
.22
.65

.06
.26
.25
.28
.77

.03
.18
.12
.20
.51

.01
.17
.14
.13
.52

.01
.11
.13
.06
.35

.02
.14
.08
.10
.37

.04
.18
.19
.16
.51

.07
.20
.14
.29
.61

.06
.28
.19
.35
.77

.03
.38
.37
.33
1.19

.12
.46
2.13
.35
.56

.18
.53
2.34
.48
.77

.07
.39
2.23
.25
.52

.06
.38
1.57
.18
.16

(2
)
.16
1.27
.04
.05

.06
.25
1.39
.09
.18

.10
.36
2.45
.18
.44

.11
.50
2.07
.41
.61

.11
.59
2.64
.49
.80

.25
.72
3.02
.64
1.14

.86
2.66
1.64
8.00

.93
2.55
1.72
9.61

.89
3.19
1.61
6.81

.67
2.30
1.48
5.77

.53
1.58
.87
3.53

.58
2.28
1.16
5.77

.87
2.92
1.77
7.71

1.05
2.81
1.35
8.55

.97
3.18
1.96
9.45

1.02
3.09
2.49
12.83

2.86
2.23
.43
.32
.36

3.26
2.58
.45
.36
.48

2.61
1.99
.41
.25
.30

2.28
1.71
.41
.31
.18

1.65
1.36
.21
.11
.06

2.38
1.68
.53
.18
.14

2.68
2.05
.44
.35
.31

2.96 3.38
2.42 2.68
.42
.41
.36 * .39
.40
.52

3.62
2.71
.55
.54
.70

3.84

2.23

4.72

6.39

5.29

5.42

4.25

3.49

2.95

2.43

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
3 Less tha*i 0.005 article.
s Less than $0.005.




84

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 10.— C lothing purchases : Average expenditures fo r major types o f clothing^ and
average expenditures and quantity purchased fo r selected items, all fam ilies and
single consumers, by annual money income class and type o f community — Continued
1941 (12 months)— Continued

Item

All
B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
fam­
com m unity
ilies
and
single
con­ Urban1 Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
non­
to
to
to
to
to
sum­
fa rm 1 fa rm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
ers1
Average expenditure per child

C h ild r e n U n d er 2 Y ea r s o f A g e

Total expense......................................... $13.21 $15.47 $10.69 $9.00 $6.33 $6.07 $10.50 $14.28 $18.51 $22.15
Ready-to-wear....................................... $12.30 $14.66 $9.74 $7.84 $5.54 $4.97 $9.68 $13.62 $17.30 $21.50
Caps, hoods, bonnets........................
.41
.29
.30
.23
.31
.34
.53
.37
.45
.48
.45
.60
.10
.15
.23
.23
.19
C oats....................................................
.84
.96
.32
Snow suits, sweater suits, leggings.
1.13
.70
.49 1.12 1.46 1.56
1.26 1.11
.36
1.44
.70
Sweaters, sacques...............................
.64
.53
.51
.60 1.26
.66
.31
.27
.71
1.42
1.52 1.45 1.02
Dresses, rom pers...............................
.57 1.49 1.63 2.53
.86
1.19
Shirts, vests, bands...........................
.69
.55
.37
.74
.68
.76
.38
.74
.91
1.14
1.09
.95
.73
Diapers: C otton .................................
1.27
.61 1.06 1.07 1.11
.66
1.65
.93
.53
Sleeping garments.............................
.77
.57
.37
.18
.83 1.08
.48
1.47
.75
.50
.59
.30
.33
.59
.62
Stockings, socks.................................
.66
1.69
.71
Bootees, shoes....................................
1.93
2.36 1.53 1.05
.84
.91 1.28 2.26 2.78
3.58
.32
2.54
.49
.34
.72 1.41 2.15
Layettes...............................................
1.76
.87
4.75
.75
H om e sewing..........................................
.85
.75
.79 1.08
.87 1.14
.59 1.12
.57
.02 0
.02
Upkeep—Cleaning.................................
.06
.06
.08
.07
.09
.07
.08
Average number o f articles purchased per child
Ready-to-wear:
Caps, hoods, bonnets........................
Coats....................................................
Snow suits, sweater suits, leggings.
Sweaters, sacques..............................
Dresses, rom pers...............................
Shirts, vests, bands...........................
Diapers: C otton .................................
Sleeping garm ents.............................
Stockings, socks (pr.)........................
Bootees, shoes (p r.)...........................
Layettes...............................................

0.59
.14
.34
.66
1.83
2.09
8.03
1.08
3.61
1.42
.12

0.52
.18
.34
.65
1.65
2.03
8.49
1.19
3.69
1.44
.14

0.66
.10
.39
.70
2.26
2.42
7.50
.98
3.17
1.47
.08

0.71
.07
.29
.63
1.83
1.83
7.18
.82
3.97
1.30
.10

0.81
.05
.27
.54
1.94
1.86
8.30
.83
2.52
1.22
.06

0.51
.09
.28
.44
1.25
1.30
5.77
.40
2.69
.94
.07

0.44
.05
.43
.50
2.06
2.17
7.96
1.06
3.96
1.47
.09

0.68
.27
.32
.67
1.88
2.65
9.39
1.17
3.31
1.31
.16

0.69
.25
.41
1.05
2.51
2.43
7.20
1.43
4.32
2.05
.12

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.




0.50
.15
.28
.49
1.15
2.48
4.67
1.55
4.83
1.52
.15

Part 111• Tabular Summary
—

85

T a b l e 10A .— C l o t h in g p u r c h a s e s : Average expenditures1fo r m ajor types o f clothing,
5 sex-age groups, all fam ilies and single consumers, by type o f com m unity

1942 (first 3 months)

Item

A ll fam­ B y type o f com m unity A ll fam­ B y type o f com m unity
ilies and
ilies and
single
Rural Rural single
Rural
con­
con­
Rural
Urban
non­
non­
sumers
farm sumers Urban
farm
farm
farm
Men and boys 16 years of age
and over

B oys 2 t o 16 years o f age

Total expense........................................

$17.40

$22.98

$9.83

$7.87

$6.50

$9.05

$4.45

$3.70

Headwear..............................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters......................
Suits, trousers, overalls......................
Shirts......................................................
Underwear, nightwear, robes.............
H osiery..................................................
Footwear...............................................
Accessories.............................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing..............
Other....... ..............................................

$0.64
1.93
6.66
1.28
.82
.70
2.77
1.21
1.24
.15

$0.79
2.69
8.79
1.60
1.06
.89
3.47
1.64
1.82
.23

$0.40
.95
3.66
.91
.49
.45
1.88
.57
.50
.02

$0.41
.57
3.16
.67
.43
.37
1.51
.54
.19
.02

$0.12
.83
2.04
.43
.36
.40
2.00
.11
.14
.07

$0.16
1.37
2.65
.56
.54
.54
2.71
.17
.26.
.09

$0.08
.43
1.49
.30
.23
.29
1.49
.07
.04
.03

$0.08
.21
1.42
.31
.14
.24
1.17
.04
.02
.07

Women and girls 16 years of age
and over

Girls 2 to 16 years o f age

T otal expense........................................

$19.72

$25.41

$11.60

$8.46

$8.31

Headwear..............................................
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc....................
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc..................
Underwear, nightwear, robes.............
H osiery..................................................
Footwear................................................
Accessories.............................................
H ome sewing........................................
Upkeep"—
Cleaning, pressing..............
Other......................................................

$1.06
2.78
5.75
2.13
2.39
2.91
.90
.74
.96
.10

$1.44
3.46
7.43
2.79
3.15
3.63
1.22
.76
1.37
.16

$046
1.91
3.42
1.16
1.31
1.82
.42
.72
.37
.01

$0.38
1.29
2.33
.84
.91
1.56
.27
.70
.17
.01

$0~33
1.52
2.00
.73
.62
2.20
.19
.45
.25
.02

Children under 2 years of age

Total expense.......

15.04

$6.43

$2.96

$3.02

Ready-to-wear----H ome sew in g.. . . .
Upkeep—Cleaning

$4.58
.43

$5.87
.52
.04

$2.70
.23
.03

$2.63
.38

.01

1 Averages based on number of persons in the designated sex-age group.




$11.73
$0.55~
2.44
2.83
1.00
.84
2.80
.29
.52
.43
.03

$5.25

$3.79

$0 12
.65
1.32
.51
.41
1.77
.07
.31
.09
0

$0.07
.36
.82
.34
.35
1.31
.07
.44
.03
0

86

Fam ily Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 11.— A utomobile

and other travel and transportation : Percentage
reporting and average expenditures fo r selected items , fam ilies and single con sumersj by annual m oney income class and type o f community

Item

B y type of
All
B y annual m oney incom e class
com m unity
fam­
ilies
and
single
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
Rural
con­ Urban1 non­ Rural U nd er
to
to
to
to
to
farm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
sum­
farm1
ers1
1941 (12 months)

Automobile:
Percentage of families
reporting—
Automobile pur22.8

7.9

15.4

19.5

21.1

30.4

58.4

54.5

61.6

69.4

25.4

44.2

58.1

60.4

74.7

28.73
21.74
6.99

40.28
31.60
8.68

12.81
7.22
5.59

5.53
3.15
2.38

5.12
3.06
2.06

11.59
8.93
2.66

20.21
16.26
3.95

26.55
20.58
5.97

41.62
32.24
9.38

22.4

22.0

23.3

Automobile owner-

38.2

84.3
Business use of
51.2
14.5
26.7
19.1
24.8
19.6
24.0
14.9
18.7
. autom obile.............
21.6
Average expenditure per
fam ily for—
Automobile: T o t a l... $169.94 $197.90 $139.70 $102.64 $20.73 $56.08 $100.06 $140.56 $249.00 $359.75
9.01 25.10 36.98 57.88 125.09 168.79
Automobile purchase2 77.58 90.72 61.67 48.20
Autom obile opera­
78.03 54.44 11.72 30.98 63.08 82.68 123.91 190.96
92.36 107.18
tion ..........................
Other travel and transporta­
tion:
Total average expendi­
ture .................................
Local...........................
Inter urban.................

53.40
44.05
9.35

1942-(first 3 months)
Autom obile:
Percentage o f families
reporting—
Autom obile pur-

2.1

1.4

3.2

3.3

56.1

52.3

59.2

67.2

Autom obile owner-

Average expenditure per
fam ily for—
Automobile: T ota l... $30.07 $34.20 $25.04 $20.13
3.26
4.93
3.65
4.38
Automobile purchase2
Automobile opera­
tion ..........................
25.69 29.27 21.78 16.48
1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes o f $5,030 and over, not shown separately.
2 Net amount spent for purchase of automobiles. The net purchase price is derived b y deducting trade-in
allowance from the gross purchase price. The gross price covers the gross contract price, plus Federal
excise tax and sales tax, and includes financing charges other than insurance.




87

Part I II.— Tabular Summary

T able 12.— P ersonal ta xe s , gifts, community welfare , and religion : Average
annual expenditures, fam ilies and single consumers , by annual money income class
and type o f community

1941 (12 months)

Item

B y type of
A ll
B y annual m oney income class
com m unity
fam ­
ilies
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
Rural
single
to
to
to
to
con­ Urban1 non­ Rural U n d er
sum­
farm 1 farm 1 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
ers1

to

P e r s o n a l T a x es
Federal incom e ta x................. $21.26 $30.73
3.13
State incom e tax.....................
2.27
.65
P oll taxes..................................
.68
Personal property tax1...........
2*
2.11
1.67
G ift s a n d C o n tr ib u t io n s
Gifts*.........................................
Support o f relatives45............
.
*
Donations to otherss..............
C om m unity Chest, etc.8.......
Religious organizations7........
R ed Cross, USO8.....................
Other, including foreign
relief9..................................

$8.08
.92
.76
1.39

$2.36
.77
.72
.35

$0.06
0
.30
.13

$0.04
.13
.40
.45

$1.74
.13
.61
.57

$1.27
.60
.52
.84

$6.65 $20.93
2.14
4.89
1.21
1.08
1.44
2.23

33.10
20.04
2.04
3.92
24.22
2.81

42.01
26.61
2.55
5.79
28.42
3.72

20.26
11.76
1.40
1.10
18.59
1.43

16.52
5.81
.91
.49
15.56
1.16

5.80
3.00
1.17
.02
5.67
.27

11.03
5.75
.61
.33
9.35
.57

19.26
6.78
1.00
.93
14.39
1.02

25.90
14.45
1.02
1.49
20.50
1.55

32.16
27.84
1.88
3.16
27.00
2.62

63.03
48.72
3.93
8.71
46.92
3.74

2.36

3.39

.56

.82

.08

.18

.11

.58

.78

1.44

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
2 Does not include automobile tax. For farm families, includes on ly personal property taxes on some
household goods when reported separately from those on farm equipment. For m ost farm families it is
impossible to separate taxes on household goods from those on farm equipment.
* Includes Christmas and all other gifts, as distinguished from charity, given to persons not members of
the economic fam ily or household employees. G ifts from one member o f the economic fam ily to another
are included as expenditures for the specific item given, such as clothing or furniture; gifts to household
employees are considered as expenditures for household help.
4 Includes on ly relatives who are not m embers o f the economic fam ily.
5 Individuals who are neither relatives nor members o f the economic family. Does not include contribu­
tions to refugees or contributions m ade through organized charities.
8 Includes com m unity gifts, such as financial aid for building a library. Does not include donations to
religious organizations or agencies related to the war effort.
7 Includes contributions to church and Sunday school, contributions to the building o f churches, and
dues and other paym ents to religious organizations.
8 Includes all contributions to American welfare agencies, directly connected with the war.
9 Includes contributions such as those to scholarship, memorial, and alumni funds. Also includes con­
tributions to foreign refugees and to foreign welfare agencies.




88

F amily Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 13.— N et change

in assets and liabilities : A ll families and single consumers,
by type o f community and annual money income class

Item

B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
A ll famcom m unity
iliesand
single
conRural Rural Und6r $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
sumers1 Urban1 nonto
to
to
to
to
farm 1 $500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
farm1
1941 (12 months)

A s s e ts
Percentage of families and
single consumers reporting—
Net increase in investm ent in business...
Net decrease in investm ent in business...
Paym ents for U. S.
Governm ent bonds
and war stam ps....
Premium payments for
life insurance and
annuities................

13.4

5.3

4.6

56.3

16.2

12.9

14.3

9.3

11.0

14.9

7.1

.7

.6

40.2

18.2

10.6

4.9

4.3

2.6

1.8

16.6

19,0

14.9

9.8

2.7

7.2

14.7

17.4

23.1

35.5

66.8

74.1

58.4

50.1

30.0

47.6

70.0

79.3

85.6

88.5

Net change in all assets2___ $295.69 $323.99 $153.60 $376.12 -$49.99 $15.18 $137.46 $230.42 $257.81 $592.35
Average amount o f —
N et change inbank balances and m oney on
hand........................... -1 3.3 0 -9 .5 9 -1 5.7 8 -2 4.2 5 -61.69 -3 0.2 0 -2 8.2 0 -12.57 -6 3.2 8
14.09
N et increase in invest­
ments in business9. ..
111.84 69.46 33.67 379.13
31.73 38.52 86.90 76.33 77.34 170.59
N et decrease in invest­
ments in business3. ..
20.39 13.10
.94 74.40
19.20 20.09 11.40
9.78 25.21 36.20
Purchase price o f non­
farm homes........
o
2.25 40.96 73.96 90.42 211.16
78.47 113.92 34.96
5.17
Paym ents for im prove­
ments o n owned non­
0
farm homes3...............
17.16 16.73 31.29
1.63
4.47 16.13
4.44 30.26 31.66
Paym ents for im prove­
m ents on owned farm
homes4........................
o
0
17.74
2.87
.97
1.43
1.96
4.27
1.91
1.98
Purchase price o f real
e s t a t e o t h e r th a n
hom es.........................
.26
2.35
19.90 17.79 23.96 22.60
7.25 20.92 36.04 61.51
A m ount received from
sale o f such real estate
3.16
9.22 14.18
15.21 18.56 14.56
12.08
7.82 19.24 37.04
P a y m e n ts fo r U . S.
G ov ern m en t bonds
and war stam ps........
35.62 42.53 32.24 13.51
4.33 10.87 11.16 35.44 27.87 81.69
Premium payments for
life insurance and an­
nuities3.......................
7.82 17.46 38.39 59.64 97.45 144.76
79.76 104.05 46.58 30.48
Net change in all other
assets6.........................
14.47 -8 .9 3 - 2 66 - 1 3 82 -1 2.1 0
-1 .0 3
.76 -1 7.8 2
4.25 -5 1 .8 5
1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage o f families and
single consumers report­
ing —
Net increase in invest­
m ent in business___
Net decrease in invest­
m ent in business----P a y m e n ts fo r U. S.
G ov ern m en t b on d s
and war stam ps........
Premium payments for
life insurance and an­
nuities........................
See footnotes at end of table.




8.6

1.4

2.1

46.1

12.9

9.4

6.4

5.5

4.4

6.4

8.1

.5

.4

48.9

19.2

8.1

4.9

4.1

2.9

2.7

40.2

49.0

29.1

19.7

8.4

18.7

32.9

47.7

59.6

65.3

58.5

67.4

50.2

33.6

30.2

38.8

58.2

66.1

74.3

81.8

g9

Part H I .— Tabular Summary

Table 13.— Net change in assets and l ia b il it ie s :

A ll families and single consumers,
by type o f community and annual money income class— Continued

Item

B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
A llfam com m unity
iliesanc
single
conRural
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
sumers1 Urban1 non­ Rural TTnd©r
to
to
to
to
to
farm1 farm 1 $500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
1942 (first 3 months)—Continued

A s s e ts
Net change in all assets3___

$94.87 $104.64 $52.71 $112.04

$35.92 $11.98 $23.40 $65.82 $71.25 $194.52

N et change in bank balances and m oney on
hand............................ -3 8.2 5 -5 1.0 0 -18.83 -1 2.9 5 -3 0.9 5 -27.73 -1 6.2 9 27.49
N et increase in investments in business3. ..
41.29 24.11 10.50 151.98
8.32 17.66 12.51 52.16
N et decrease in invest­
m ent in business3___
12.75
3.04
19.22
4.74
3.80
2.81
.47 68.41
Purchase price of nonfarm hom es................
0
9.04 11.92
.26
5.89 13.89
3.37
7.14
Paym ents for improve­
ments on owned nonfarm homes4 .............
0
2.11
3.17
4.31
.76
1.37
1.41
.70
Paym ents for improve­
ments on owned farm
o
0
homes4........................
.42
.35
.10
2.26
.31
.24
Purchase price of real
e s ta te o th e r th a n
hom es.................... .
17.59 23.22
2.52 15.12
.07 10.61
.40
1.56
A m ount received from
sale of such real estate
1.84
.60
.86
0
1.16
2.90
1.11
3.33
P a y m e n t s fo r U . S.
G ov ern m en t b on d s
and war sta m p s........
9.45 13.30 17.62 23.24
42.53 55.76 24.67 13.12
Premium payments for
life insurance and an­
nuities5........................
3.91
16.17 20.49 10.64
6.17
3.10
8.50 12.89
Prepaid taxes7...............
1.34
.90
16.43 18.37 16.83
8.05
2.57
3.05
Net change in all other
-7 .3 1 -8 .7 5 -1 0.3 9 -1 .0 9
assets6..........................
.46
.50 -2 .1 9
1.10

25.27 -10.59
10.11

71.31

6.86

20.88

0

29.00

7.45
.15
9.52
.26

4.31
0
22.06
0

32.86

42.36

18.97
12.72

36.04
28.36

11.86 -7 .4 5

1941 (12 months)
isle*o i i i n e s
Percentage o f families and
single consumers report­
in g —
Decrease in mortgage
on owned nonfarm
homes..........................
Decrease in mortgage
on farm s.....................

Net change in all liabilities
Average amount of —
Net change in debts due
b a n k s , s m a ll lo a n
companies, etc.8........
Net change in charge
accounts and bills9 ..
Net change in install­
m ent purchases:
Farm eq u ip m en t..
Automobiles, fur­
nishings, and
other....................
Mortgages on owned
nonfarm homes:1
0
N et increase...........
N et decrease...........
Mortgages on farms:
N et increase...........
N et decrease...........
Net change in all other
liabilities11..................

12.4

11.1

0

2.0

5.7

9.3

11.1

21.2

25.2

0

0

17.8

3.5

3.3

2.5

2.9

2.4

2.6

$77.83 $90.81 $37.34 $81.87

$37.86 $32.15 $94.15 $106.92 $102.07 $109.66

19.39

20.62

11.92

24.64

21.45

14.41

22.15

28.59

8.84

26.18

12.62

15.52

5.69

10.71

6.18

8.55

13.84

13.93

15.19

9.24

0

13.91

5.21

4.55

- .5 6

- .4 4

.19

7.37

48.42

48. O
S

2.25

0

22.40

27.43

20.70

5.29

3.74

11.32

18.07

9.94

56.85
39.06

82.27
53.71

26.08
26.04

0
0

2.97
1.56

1.59
5.41

23.74
11.53

44.84
20.03

76.46 148.41
59.22 97.78

104.69
87.25

6.17
6.33

4.87
6.34

33.57
6.25

33.17
16.14

14.05
11.98

,03 -1 .3 9

1.12

13.06

10.12 -1 6.0 4

16.93
14.11

See footnotes at end of table.




16.1

2.9

0
0

.56 -1 .3 2

0
0
-1 .0 1

9.88

19.04
34.84

90

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 13.— N et change in

assets and liabilities : A ll families and single consumers,
by type o f community and annual money income class— Continued

Item

B y type of
B y annual m oney income class
com m unity
A1 fu n .
1
iliesand
Rural
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
single
con- Urban1 non- Rural* Under
to
to
to
to
to
farmI4 $500
27
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
farm 1
sumers1
1942 (first 3 months)

iinrc/Hi iiFS
Percentage of families and
single consumers report­
in g —
Decrease in mortgage
on owned nonfarm
hom es.........................
Decrease in mortgage
on farm s.....................
Net, change in all liabil­
ities .................................
Average amount of —
Net change in debts due
b a n k s, s m a ll lo a n
companies, etc.8........
N et change in charge ac­
counts and bills9 1
I---0
N et change in install­
m ent purchases:
Farm equipm ent..
Automobiles, fur­
nishings, and
other.........
Mortgages on owned
nonfarm homes:1
®
Net increase...........
N et decrease...........
Mortgage on farm s:
N et increase...........
Net decrease...........
Net change in all other
liabilities11..................

11.8

15.6

1.1

0

9.1
o

o

2.2
7.3

$13.87 $10.11 -$6.86 $56.84

5.8

6.4

13.6

18.3

21.1

1.1

1.0

.9

1.1

.9

1.1

$6.43 -$1.04

$34.31

# $7.09 $27.78 $12.89

6.96

5.40

1.09

21.14

8.52

11.65

7.68

3.92

.81

14.78

8.00

6.88

7.71

12.88

6.95

6.98

4.50

6.81

12.24

7.02

0

0

4.77

-1 .8 1

.12

.58

2.32

- .3 2

-.4 5

1.76

- .5 9

-1 .5 4

.07
.65

5.68
1.56

4.20
2.85

.54
16.63

6.24
14.32

25.97
17.48

27.88
15.31

.12
1.89

0
1.42

.37
.64

29.60
1.33

0
1.97

0
2.62

7.24

3.63

7.87

2.19 -7 .9 3

13.68

28.79

.75

-9 .0 6 -1 1.0 2
7.94
9.67

11.92
12.51

4.37
2.40

0
0

6.98

9.44

-8 .6 3 1.91
8.35
0
0
- .5 9

0
0

-3 .1 4 -10.87 -1 7.4 0 -2 1 .7 0

I Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
8 Includes net changes in assets between the beginning and end o f the report period resulting from actual
m oney transactions, not those due to appreciation or depreciation in the value o f property where no sale
has occurred, with one exception—investments in business for farm families has as a component net inven­
tory change on the fam ily farm.
* See p. 20.
4 Includes structural additions and improvements (not repairs or replacements) to the fam ily dwelling.
A n example of an improvement is the installation of a furnace in a home previously without central heating.
* Premiums paid or payable on life-insurance policies and on annuities. Includes amounts for life insur­
ance deducted from earnings or paid as part o f dues to organizations. Includes deductions from earnings
for retirement funds, except those for Federal old-age and survivors’ insurance.
•Includes building and loan association shares, tax savings notes, other bonds and stocks, other per­
sonal property sold, surrender or settlement of insurance policies, loans to others made b y families, social
security old-age insurance tax, unemployment insurance tax (when paid b y employee), and all other assets
not classified elsewhere.
7 See p. 21.
8 Includes notes due to insurance companies, credit unions, and individuals.
9 Includes net change in unpaid taxes and rents.
10 The net increase in mortgage represents the difference between purchase price and the sum o f the
down paym ent plus payments on principal made within the period, that is, tne net amount o f unpaid
mortgage outstanding at end of period; this item also includes any net increases in mortgage on homes
purchased prior to the period.
II Includes mortgages on real estate other than own home, and all other liabilities not elsewhere classified.




91

Part I II.— Tabular Summary

T able 14.— Distribution o f all families and single consumersy by annual total income
class and type o f community, 1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 months; urban only)

T yp e of com m unity

Annual total income class
All fam­
ilies and
single' Nega­
con­
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
sumers tive in­ $500 $1,000 $1,500
come
$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 over
1941 (12 months)

A ll types:
N um ber................ .
39,287
100.0
Percent............................
Urban:
N u m b er........................... 24,463
Percent............................ . 100.0
Rural nonfarm:
8,469
N um ber...........................
Percent.............................
100.0
Rural farm :
6,355
N um ber...........................
Percent.............................
100.0

0.1

50

2,999
7.6

7,007
17.8

6,729
17.2

6,433
16.4

4,851
12.3

3,860
9.8

5,488
14.0

1,870
4.8

0
0

1,223
5.0

3,327
13.6

3,547
14.5

4,061
16.6

3,425
14.0

2,936
12.0

4,403
18.0

1,541
6.3

0
0

1,151
13.6

2,036
24. r

1,830
21.6

1,280
15.1

867
10.2

541
6.4

610
7.2

154
1.8

625
9.8

1,644
25.8

1,352
21.3

1,092
17.2

559
8.8

383
6.0

475
7.5

175
2.8

3,914
15.3

2,865
11.2

5,168
20.2

2,021
7.9

50
0.8

1942 (first 3 months)
Urban:
N um ber...........................
Percent............................

25,583
100.0

(l)
0

1,151
4.5

3,377
13.2

3,275
12.8

3,812
14.9

1 In urban communities, families with negative incomes com prised 3.3 percent in 1942, o f the total number
o f families with incomes below $500

T able 15.— Average fam ily size,1 by annual total income class and type o f community
1941 (12 months) and 1942 (first 3 months; urban only)
Annual total income o f -

A ll
familiAR

T yp e of com m unity

and
single Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
con­
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
sumers $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

All typ es.................................

3.27

2.15

2.80

a. 06

3.53

3.40

3.57

3.72

4.50

4.09

U rban......................................
Rural nonfarm ......................
Rural farm .............................

3.04
3.36
4.03

1.60
2.11
3.28

2.20
3.09
3.64

2.58
3.31
3.97

3.04
3.90
4.89

3.13
4.09
3.97

3.37
4.05
4.40

3.66
3.74
4.26

4.53
4.40
4.27

4.19
2.50
4.16

3.31

3.56

4.34

4.76

1942 (first 3 months)
Urban......................................

3.00

1.37

2.22

2.53

2.75

3.06

1 Family size is based on equivalent persons; i.e., 52 weeks (1941) or 13 weeks (1942) o f fam ily membership
is considered the equivalent of 1 person for the survey period. Thus, a person who was a fam ily member in
1941 for 26 weeks is counted as 0.5 person, for 16 weeks as 0.3 person, etc.




92
T

able

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
16.— Summary of average money and nonmoney income and outlay, families and
single consumers, by type of community and annual total income class

1941 (12 months)

Item

Receipts:
Incom e: T otal.................................
M oney.......................................
Received in k in d ....................
Inheritances and other m oney re­
ceipts.............................................
Net deficit........................................
Disbursements:
Expenditures for current con­
sum ption: Total value..............
Money expense........................
Received in kind.....................
Gifts and contributions................
Personal tax paym ents.................
Net surplus.....................................
Percentage reporting net deficit.........
Percentage reporting net surplus.......

B y type of
B y annual total income class
A ll fam­
com m unity
ilies and
single
con­
Ur­ Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
to
to
to
to
sumers1 ban1 non­ farm1 $500
to
farm1
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000

$2,213 $2,578 $1,539 $1,655
1,974 2,409 1,311 1,134
521
239
169
228
19
0
1,905
1,666
239
88
26
218
33
62

14
0

22
0

$357
227
130

25
0

8
127

2,229 1,375 1,344
2,060 1,147
823
521
169
228
112
41
55
37
4
11
294
116
233

482
352
130
11
<>
*
0

32
64

32
57

38
61

47
27

$747 $1,245 $1,746 $2,459 $3,684
546 1,021 1,513 2,221 3,376
201
224
233
238
308
11
54

12
0

14
0

21
0

791 1,209 1,656 2,234 3,146
590
985 1,423 1,996 2,838
201
224
233
238
308
22
36
59
85
154
1
3
3
9
26
0
15
46
153
399
39
47

39
58

34
65

30
70

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
2 Less than $0.50.




26
0

21
79

93

Part I II.— Tabular Summary
T able 17.— M ajor

catego ries of con su m ption : Average expenditures, all families
and single consumers, by type o f community and annual total income class

1941 (12 months)
A llfam -

B y type of
com m unity

B y annual total income class

iliAA a n rl

Item

A ll items: Total value......... ................
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ...........................
Food: Total value1*
2................................
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ............................
Housing, fuel, light, andrefrigeration:
Total valued........................................
Money expen se...............................
Received m k in d ...........................
Household operation: Money expense
Furnishings and equipm ent: Total
value....................................................
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ...........................
Clothing: Total value...........................
Money expense...............................
Received in k in d ...........................
Autom obile: M oney expense..............
Other transportation: Money expense
Personal care: M oney expense............
Medical care: M oney expense.............
Recreation: Money expense................
Tobacco: Money expense.....................
Reading: Money expense....................
Education: Money expense.................
Other: Money expense4........................

single
con­
Ur­ Rural Rural Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
sumers1 ban1 non­ farm 1 $500
farm1
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
$1,905 $2,229 $1,375 $1,344
823
1,666 2,060 1,147
521
239
228
169

$482
352
130

$791 $1,209 $1,656 $2,234 $3,146
590
985 1,423 1,996 2,838
224
201
233
238
308

$612
516
96

$663
637
26

$477
361
116

$589
250
339

$210
140
70

$338
225
113

$466
352
114

$590
471
119

$703
627
76

$913
837
76

404
290
114
85

496
385
111
109

268
179
89
50

232
74
158
34

126
77
49
15

186
115
71
25

269
183
86
37

359
273
86
54

482
355
127
86

644
457
187
143

98
93
5
229
205
24
171
34
36
84
69
35
16
15
17

109
104
5
274
247
27
198
49
45
96
91
43
21
19
16

83
79
4
156
137
19
140
14
24
67
34
24
10
10
18

72
66
6
153
135
18
103
6
20
60
26
17
7
8
17

16
14
2
42
33
9
12
5
7
26
6
8
3
3
3

25
22
3
79
65
14
39
10
12
32
17
14
5
3
6

58
53
5
135
116
19
75
18
23
52
28
24
9
3
12

85
80
5
194
171
23
129
26
31
74
45
34
15
6
14

126
119
7
263
235
28
220
36
43
101
73
43
21
14
23

199
191
8
411
374
37
323
52
63
135
127
59
28
27
22

1 Includes families with negative incomes and incomes of $5,000 and over, not shown separately.
2 Includes expenditures for alcoholic beverages.
8 Includes expenditures for all housing, including fam ily homes, vacation homes, and lodging o f family
members while traveling or on vacation, or at school. For the farm home, expenditures include on ly those
for insurance and for repairs paid for b y the fam ily; all other expenditures for the farm home were con­
sidered farm business expenditures. For urban and rural nonfarm families, expenditures for fam ily home
include those for rent and repairs on rented homes, and for taxes, insurance, repairs and replacements,
special assessments, interest on mortgage, and refinancing charges for owned homes.
4 Includes interest on debts incurred for fam ily living; bank service charges, including safe-deposit box;
legal expenses connected with household affairs; losses concerned directly with the household, including
amount of installments paid during period on repossessed furniture; funeral expenses including upkeep
and purchase o f cemetery lot; and expense for other items, such as dues to political and to cooperative
associations, marriage licenses, and flowers for the wedding of a fam ily member. For urban and rural
nonfarm families only, includes garden expenses for seeds and fertilizer, and feed for chickens for family
food supply.




94*

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 18.— S ources

of in co m e : Percentage reporting and average amount receivedt by

annual money income class

All urban families and single consumers
|

_

-

~

Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 to
$2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

Percentage reporting m oney income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief...............................................
Relief1...................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
Net incom e from roomers and boarders.
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts..
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney incom e2 ...........................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

48.0
10.2
18.4
3.1
18.4

66.0
12.8
17.0
11.2
17.0

81.7
5.6
15.0
13.9
16.7

88.9
1.5
16.7
14.6
16.2

83.6
0
18.0
14.2
22.4

89.9
2.0
16.9
12.8
20.3

86.1
2.4
24.1
13.3
27.7

76.2
4.8
38.1
7.1
35.7

64.7
0
52.9
0
52.9

16.3
19.4
12.2
5.1

15.4
18.1
10.1
.5

10.0
3.9
7.2
2.2

7.1
2.0
9.1
4.0

4.4
0
9.8
3.3

7.4
.7
7.4
6.1

2.4
0
9.0
2.4

2.4
2.4
11.9
4.8

0
0
11.8
11.8

90.8
17.3

86.2
14.4

87.3
2.8

87.9
.5

90.7
0

91.9
0

96.4
0

88.1
0

94.1
0

Average amount of income: T ota l.................

$465

$875 $1,380 $1,879 $2,389 $2,932 $3,949 $6,457 $14,582

Money incom e...................................................
Earnings......................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief.......................................
R elief1.........................................'.
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders.
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Incom e from benefits and annuities.. . .
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income3...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
N onm oney income in kind5............................
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

$310
162

$735 $1,247 $1,752 $2,238 $2,743 $3,735 $6,208 $14,125
500 1,049 1,598 2,042 2,630 3,521
5,778 11,224

115
20
27
3
24
50

3S~
e

25
39
9
2
155
146
9

3?
c;
i?
(•»
140
130
10

1
1

909 1,399 1,771 2,271 2,865
27
5
2
8
(6)
113
191
271
354
654
22
49
37
29
33
43
41
114
58
113
58
39
46
15
31
31
10
9
2
133
132
1

16
11
13
3
127
125
2

15
0
11
19
151
151
0

10
2
11
5
189
189
0

12
0
26
1
214
214
0

3,948
20
1,810
25
178
27
1
1
207
9
249
249 .
0

5,346
0
5,878
0
2,528
280
0
0
200
107
457
457
0

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting money income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief...............................................
Relief1...................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
Net income from roomers and boarders.
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income3...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
N onrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

48.5
3.0
10.9
3.0
12.9

49.4
9.9
13.4
8.7
20.9

84.2
3.4
13.6
9.6
11.9

89.0
1.6
10.5
10.5
12.6

84.4
0
17.7
15.1
17.7

80.7
0
24.3
10.0
27:1

88.0
.5
19.4
13.9
22.2

88.7
3.2
29.0
9.7
40.3

60.0
0
53.3
6.7
60.0

15.8
19.8
6.9
4.0

18.6
18.6
9.9
.6

9.0
2.3
7.3
3.4

4.7

4.7
.5
6.2
1.6

5.0
.7
5.7
.7

3.2
0
6.5
1.4

1.6
0
3.2
3.2

0
0
13.3
0

81.2
15.8

64.6
8.1

65.0
1.7

6§.9

71.3
0

72.9
0

75.5
0

75.8
0

93.4
0

Average amount of income: T ota l.................

$115

$214

$351

$469

$590

$723

$982 $1,693 $4,213

Money incom e...................................................
Earnings......................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief.......................................
Relief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders.
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Incom e from benefits and annuities. . . .
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income3...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Nonm oney incom e in kind5............................
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

$74
38

$183
102

$314
269

$437
392

$552
503

$685
632

$930 $1,613 $4,086
881
1,519 3,618

301
3
5:
1!
5
13

75
12
15
6
17
19

241
5
23
8
9
11

356
4
32
9
11
16

435
0
68
10
17
15

502
0
130
8
33
3

743
(6
)
138
11
22
6

1,192
2
325
5
91
3

2,122
0
1,496
10
386
67

6
12
1
2
41
38
3

15
20
4
(6
)
31
30
1

10
3
5
1
37
37
(6
)

4
2
3
(6)
32
32
(6
)

4
(6
)
4
1
38
38
0

3
1
6
1
38
38
0

5
0
5
(6
)
52
52
0

5
0
2
12
80
80
0

0
0
6
0
126
126
0

See footnotes at end of table.




1.0

4.2
.5

1.0

95

Part III.— Tabular Summary
T able 18.— Sources

of income : Percentage reporting and average amount received, by

annual m oney income class— Continued

Urban families of 2 or more persons
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

Percentage reporting m oney income:
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief..............................................
R elief1......... .........................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
Net incom e from roomers and boarders.
Interest, dividends, profits and rents___
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney incom e3. .............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

Under. $500 $1,0001 $1,500) $2,000» $2,500> $3,000i $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000i $1,500•$2,000 to
' $2,500' $3,000' $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)
64.1
12.8
20.5
5.1
15.4

67.5
18.8
19.7
9.4
14.5

83.6
6 4
17,1
13.6
16.4

89.4
1.7
17.8
15.6
14.4

10.3
25.6
15.4
5.1

16.2
24.8
15.4
0

11.4
4.3
8.6
2.9

7.2
2.2
7.8
4.4

97.4
20.5

89.7
19.7

89.3
3.6

88.3
0.1

84.3
0
19.2
15.1
20.3
4.1 .
0
10.5
3.5
91.9
0

90.8
2.1
16.9
13.4
19.7

86.6
2.4
23.8
13.4
27.4

76.2
4.8
38.1
7.1
35.7

68.8
0
56.2
0
50.0

7.7
.7
7.7
5.6

2.4
0
9.1
2.4

2.4
2.4
11.9
4.8

0
0
12.5
6.2

92.2
0

96.3
0

88.1
0

93.8
0

Average amount o f income: T otal................

$515

$889 $1,389 $1,885 $2,393 $2,936 $3,940 $6,457 $14,684

Money incom e............................................
Earnings...............................................
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief................................
Relief1.....................................
Entrepreneurial earnings3.........
Net income from roomers and
boarders............................................
Interest, dividends, profits, and
rents...................................................
Income from benefits and annuities.
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily ............*.................................
Direct relief paym ents......................
Other m oney income3........................
Losses in business (not deducted
above)4..............................................
Nonmoney incom e in kind5............................
„ N onrelief..............................................
R elief....................................................

$323
216

$736 $1,257 $1,756 $2,240 $2,745 $3,726 $6,208 $14,196
492 1,075 1,614 2,081 2,649 3,511
5,778 11,925

Percentage reporting m oney income:
Wago and salary earnings:
Nonrelief...............................................
Relief1...................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
Net income from roomers and boarders.
Interest, dividends, profits, and rents. . .
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income3......................... *...
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

159
25
32

366
80
46

924 1,404
29
8
202
122

1,792 2,292 2,871
2
0
5
352:
289
638
1
23
3!
. 33

3,948
20
1,810

5,680
0
6,245

5

13

33

40

25

0

20
25

32
61

33
57

23
41

85
41

40
15

114
• 31

178
27

1,816
250

11
46
4

26
92
20

37
13
12

17
12
13

11
0
11

10
2
11

12
0
26

1
1
207

0
0
213

4
192
181
11

0
153
138
15

3
132
131
1

4
129
127
2

20
153
153
0

5
191
191
0

1
214
214
0

9
249
249
0

8
488
488
0

57.5
2.5
17.5
2.5
17.5

50.9
13.4
13.4
7.1
17.0

85.4
3.8
16.2
8.5
11.5

89.2
1.8
11.4
11.4
10.8

84.3
0
19.2
16.3
16.9

81.1
0
25.8
9.8
25.8

87.8
.5
19.6
14.0
22.0

88.7
3.2
29.0
9.7
40.3

6.00
0
53.3
6.7
60.0

15.0
25.0
10.0
7.5

17.9
24.1
13.4
0

9.2
3.1
8.5
3.8

4.2
1.2
3.6
.6

4.7
.6
5.8
1.7

5.3
.8
6.1
0

3.3
0
6.5
1.4

1.6
0
3.2
3.2

0
0
13.3
0

95.0
25.0

69.7
12.5

72.3
2.3

68.1
1.2

74.2
0

74.2
0

76.1
0

75.8
0

93.4
0

1942 (first 3 months)

Average amount of income: T otal.................

$129

$220

$350

$469

$o96

$729

$974 $1,693 $4,212

Money incom e............................................
Earnings...............................................
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief................................
Relief1.....................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from room ers and
boarders............................................
Interest, dividends, profits, and
rents......... *.......................................
Incom e from benefits and annuities.
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily ................................................
Direct relief paym ents......................
Other m oney income3........................
Losses in business (not deducted
above)4...............................................
Nonm oney income in kind:5....................
NonreJief...............................................
R elief.....................................................

$74
44

$187
102

$312
272

$437
396

$556
510

$687
642

$921 $1,613 $4,086
882 1,519 3,617

33
3
8

73
15
14

243
4
25

358
4
34

437
0
73

504
0
138

743
(«)
139

(6
)

4

5

10

9

8

<)
•

5

10

5
4

13
24

5
14

6
16

15
15

23
3

23
6

91
3

386
67

7
14
1

14
25
5

9
5
3

4
3
3

4
(6
)
4

4
1
6

5
0
5

5
0
2

0
0
6

1
55
51
4

0
33
31
2

1
38
38
(6
)

1
32
32
(6)

1
40
40
0

0
42
42
0

(c)
53
53
0

12
80
80
0

0
126
126
0

See footnotes at end of table.




1,192
2
325

2,122
0
1,495

96

Fam ily Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 18.— Sources

of income : Percentage reporting and average amount receivedf by

annual m oney income class—Continued

Urban single consumers7
Annual m oney income of—
Item

Percentage reporting m oney incom e:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief....................................................
Relief1........................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2..............................
N et income from roomers and boarders___
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts........
Gifts from persons not in economic family.
D irect relief paym ents...................................
Other m oney income8.....................................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4..
Percentage reporting incom e in kind:5
N onrelief...........................................................
R elief.................................................................

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500
to
to
to
to
to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
1941 (12 months)
37.3
8.5
16.9
1.7
20.3
20.3
15.2
10.2
5.1

63.4
2.8
12.7
14.1
21.1
14.1
7.0
1.4
1.4

75.0
2.5
7.5
15.0
17.5
5.0
2.5
2.5
0

83.3
0
5.6
5.6
33.3
5.6
0
22.2
0

72.7
0
0
0
54.5
9.1
0
0
0

66.7
0
16.7
0
33.3
0
0
0
16.7

86.4
15.2

80.3
5.6

80.0
0

83.3
0

72.7
0

83.4
0

Average amount of income: T ota l......................

$433

Money incom e.........................................................
Earnings............................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief.............................................
R elief1.................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2......................
N et incom e from roomers and boarders___
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts........
Incom e from benefits and annuities...........
G ifts from persons not in economic fam ily.
D irect relief paym ents................. ..............
Other money income3.....................................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4..
N onm oney income in kind5..................................
N onrelief...........................................................
R elief.................................................................

~$302
127

$731
511

86
17
24
2
27
66
34
34
13
1
131
122
9

422
18
71
25
64
62
43
26
(6)
(6
)
118
118
(6
)

$849 $1,340 $1,814

$2,300 $2,816

$1,208 $1,697 $2,183 $2,688
1,430 1,435 2,189
953
855
19
79
103
83
57
12
(6)
(6
)
0
132
132
0

1,347
0
83
7
218
23
6
0
13
0
117
117
0

1,435
0
0
0
548
118
82
0
0
0
118
118
0

1,772
0
417
0
504
0
0
0
0
5
128
128
0

1942 (first 3 months)

Percentage reporting money income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief....................................................
R elief1.........................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.............................
N et incom e from roomers and boarders___
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts........
G ifts from persons not in economic family.
D irect relief paym ents............................... *.
Other m oney income3.....................................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4..
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
N onrelief...........................................................
R elief........................... .....................................

42.6
3.3
6.6
3.3
9.8
16.4
16.4
4.9
1.6

46.7
3.3
13.3
11.7
28.3
20.0
8.3
3.3
1.7

80.9
2.1
6.4
12.8
12.8
8.5
0
4.3
2.1

88.0
0
4.0
4.0
24.0
8.0
0
8.0
0

85.0
0
5.0
5.0
25.0
5.0
0
10.0
0

75.0
0
0
12.5
50.0
0
0
0
12.5

72.1
9.8

55.0
0

44.7
0

52.0
0

30.0
0

50.0
0

Average amount of income: T ota l......................

$104

$203

$345

$465

$567

$649

Money incom e.........................................................
Earnings............................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief.............................................
R elief1..................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2......................
Net incom e from roomers and boarders___
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts........
Incom e from benefits and annuities...........
Gifts from persons not in economic family.
D irect relief paym ents...................................
Other m oney income8.....................................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4. .
N onm oney incom e in kind5..................................
N onrelief............................................................
R elief.................................................................

$72
34

$177
103

$312
259

$433
366

$548
453

$664
480

29
3
2
1
5
17
5
11
1
2
32
30
2

79
6
18
9
24
14
16
9
2
(6
)
26
26
0

236
5
18
15
18
3
12
0
8
3
33
33
0

348
0
18
1
39
23
3
0
1
0
32
32
0

422
0
31
20
49
16
3
0
7
0
19
19
0

480
0
0
6
197
0
0
0
0
19
* -1 5
*—15
0

See footnotes at end of table.




Part I II .— Tabular Summary
T able 18.— Sources

97

of income : Percentage reporting and average amount received, by

annuxil m oney income class— Continued

Urban 2-person families
Annual money income o f —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
1500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

Percentage reporting m oney income:
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief...............................................
Relief1...................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
D irect relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income3......... ..................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

65.5
13.8
20.7
6.9
17.2

64.8
9.3
22.2
7.4
18.5

83.6
6.0
9.0
14.9
22.4

89.7
0
10.3
17.2
10.3

81.5
0
16.9
15.4
26.2

92.0
0
8.0
12.0
24.0

87.5
0
17.5
12.5
27.5

66.7
0
50.0
0
50.0

(9
)
(9)
(9)
(9
)
(9
)

13.8
24.1
20.7
6.9

11.1
16.7
18.5
0

11.9
4.5
6.0
1.5

6.9
0
6.9
5.2

3.1
0
7.7
6.2

8.0
0
4.0
0

0
0
12.5
2.5

0
0
0
0

(9
)
(9
)
?)
(9
)

96.6
13.8

88.9
3.7

88.1
1.5

81.0
0

90.8
0

84.0
0

92.5
0

100.0
0

(9
)
(9
)

Average amount of income: T otal.................

$531

$882 $1,397 $1,895 $2,326 $2,907 $3,764 $5,821

(9
)

Money incom e...................................................
Earnings............................................... .
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief.......................................
Relief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2. : .............
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Incom e from benefits and annuities----Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................... ............................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income3...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Nonmoney income in kind:5
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

$322
213

$725 $1,233 $1,749 $2,212 $2,704 $3,581
469 1,017 1,537 1,997 2,618 3,306

$5,629
5,135

(9
)
(9
)

2,955
0
2,180
0
494
0

(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)

0
0
66
1
183
183
0

0
0
0
0
192
192
0

(9
)
(9
)
)
(9
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(•)

164
23
26
6
26
29

381
36
52
9
40
87

919 1,413 1,726 2,429 2,838
40
0
0
0
0
58
189
124
271
468
21
30
10
75
33
50
150
156
14
58
74
1
109
70
33

14
34
5
5
209
205
4

27
63
30
0
157
154
3

46
7
9
(6
)
164
163
1

13
0
9
8
146
146
0

9
0
4
51
114
114
0

14
0
3
0
203
203
0

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting m oney income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief..............................................
Relief1...................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income3.................... .......
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

55.6
0
22.2
3.7
14.8

50.9
10.5
10.5
7.0
21.1

89.3
1.8
7.1
10.7
16.1

87.3
1.4
7.0
9.9
5.6

76.2
0
19.0
12.7
15.9

81.1
0
29.7
13.5
34.2

87.8
0
14.3
14.3
12.2

75.0
0
25.0
0
62.5

(9
)
<)
9
(9
)
(9
)
<)
9

22.2
22.2
11.1
11.1

17.5
15.8
12.3
0

10.7
0
3.6
5.4

2.8
0
0
1.4

6.3
0
3.2
3.2

8.1
0
8.1
0

0
0
10.2
0

0
0
0
12.0

(9
)
<)
9
(9
)
(9
)

71.9
5.3

64.3
0

70.4
0

68.3
0

64.9
0

63.3
0

74.5
0

(9
)
(9
)

92.6
25.9

*

Average amount of income: T o ta l.................

$124

$225

$362

$469

$599

$738

$949 $1,679

(9)

Money incom e...................................................
E arnings......................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief.......................................
Relief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Incom e from benefits and annuities___
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
D irect relief paym ents........ ..................
Other m oney income3...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Nonmoney income in kind:5...........................
N onrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

$74
45

$187
99

$308
266

$437
391

$561
494

$694
628

$898 $1,616
863 1,448

(9
)
(9
)

34
0
11
(«)
4
3

78
14
7
4
18
27

254
5
7
6
5
21

363
5
23
9
3
30

408
0
86
8
21
30

486
0
142
13
40
0

752
0
111
12
9
4

1,060
0
388
0
256
0

(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)

11
12
]
2
50
46
4

17
16
6
0
38
37
1

10
0
1
1
54
54
0

5
0
0
1
32
32
0

6
0
2
(6)
38
38
0

3
0
10
0
44
44
0

0
0
10
0
51
51
0

0
0
0
88
63
63
0

(9
)
(9)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)

See footnotes at end of table.




98

Family Spending and Saving in W a rtim e

T able 18.— Sources

of income : Percentage reporting and average amount received, by

annual m oney income class— Continued

Urban 3-person families
Annual m oney income of —
Item

$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 and
over
1941 (12 months)

Percentage reporting m oney incom e:
Wage and salary earnings:
0
Nonrelief...............................................
0
Relief i ...................................................
33.3
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
0
Net income from roomers and boarders..
33.3
Interest, dividends, profits, and rents...
Gifts from persons not in economic
0
fa m ily.......................................................
33.3
D irect relief paym ents.............................
0
Other m oney income8...............................
0
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief...................................................... 100.0
0
R elief............................................................

77.4
16.1
12.9
12.9
12.9

75.8
6.1
30.3
15.2
9.1

91.8
1.6
18.0
14.8
16.4

84.6
0
25.6
17.9
15.4

94.0
2.0
12.0
16.0
14.0

88.1
0
19.0
7.1
30.0

66.7
0
50.0
25.0
33.3

100.0
0
33.3
0
33.3

19.4
25.8
9.7
0

21.2
3.0
12.1
6.1

4.9
1.6
8.2
4.9

2.6
0
10.3
2.6

8.0
0
8.0
8.0

2.4
0
7.1
4.8

8.3
8.3
8.3
8.3

0
0
0
33.3

87.1
25.8

93.9
0

95.0
0

84.6
0

90.0
0

97.6
0

83.3
0

66.6
0

Average amount of income: T ota l.................

$457

$944 $1,380 $1,860 $2,450 $2,948 $3,979 $7,226 $13,501

Money incom e....................................................
Earnings......................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief........................................
Relief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and rents...
Incom e from benefits and annuities___
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily.......................................................
D irect relief paym ents..............................
Other m oney income*................................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Nonm oney incom e in kind5.............................
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

$262
155

$777 $1,265 $1,743 $2,276 $2,740 $3,749 $6,977 $13,306
538 1,046 1,654 2,158 2,636 3,560 6,084 11,707

0
0
155
0
8
0

445
77
16
11
35
43

836 1,477 1,792 2,427 3,051
10
3
0
1
0
200
174
366
509
208
30
29
41
28
14
15
29
54
31
125
10
34
79
23
16

0
99
0
0
195
195
0

33
106
11
0
167
147
20

61
2
23
2
115
115
0

7
8
10
3
117
117
0

1
0
18
1
174
174
0

9
0
9
8
208
208
0

3,217
0
2,867
86
211
0

8,432
0
3,275
0
1,642
0

6
0
22
1
230
230
0

4
2
609
19
249
249
0

0
0
0
43
195
195
0

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting money income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief...............................................
R elief1....................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
N et incom e from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and rents ..
!
Gifts from persons not in economic
!
fa m ily .......................................................
D irect relief paym ents..............................
Other m oney income8...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
.Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

83.3
0
0
0
33.3

51.9
7.4
14.8
7.4
18.5

83.3
6.7
23.3
0
6.7

92.2
0
17.6
15.7
21.6

89.4
0
19.1
23.4
19.1

84.2
0
18.4
2.6
21.1

90.5
0
15.9
11.1
19.0

73.3
0
33.3
20.0
46.7

(9)

0
50.0
0
0

11.1
22.2
7.4
0

10.0
3.3
20.0
3.3

7.8
0
9.8
0

6.4
2.1
10.6
0

2.6
0
2.6
0

4.8
0
3.2
1.6

0
0
0
6.7

(9)
(9)

100.0
0

63.0
14.8

76.7
0

58.8
0

80.9
0

79.0
0

82.6
0

80.0
0

(9
)
<)
9

Average amount of incom e: T otal.................

$141

$227

$343

$468

$598

$714

$981

$1,771

(9
)

M oney incom e....................................................
Earnings......................................................
Wages and salary earnings:
Nonrelief........................................
R elief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and rents...
Incom e from benefits and annuities___
G ifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily.......................................................
D irect relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income8...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Nonm oney income in kind5.............................
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

$76
. 37

$200
124

$317
273

$432
386

$555
510

$682
653

$923 $1,687
867
1,540

(9)

37
0
0
0
10
2

83
10
31
4
14
14

244
(6)
29
0
7
11

352
0
34
16
13
7

444
0
66
15
10
2

545
0
108
1
19
7

756
0
111
9
32
5

1,037
0
503
11
133
6

0
27
0
0
65
65

* 12
29
3
0
27
. 26

14
1
11
(«)
26
26

3
0
7
0
36
36

7
2
9
0
43
43

(6
)
0
2
0
32
32

9
0
2
1
58
58

0
0
0
3
84
84

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

See footnotes at end of table.




(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9)

(9
)
(9)

(9
)
(9
)
(9)

(9
)
(9
)
(9)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9)
(9
)
o
(9)

Part H I .— Tabular Summary
T able

18.—S ources

99

of in c o m e :

Percentage reporting and average amount received, by
annual m oney income class—Continued

Urban 4-person families
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

Percentage reporting money income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief...............................................
Relief1....................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and rents...
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily.......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income*................................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief.......................................................
R elief............................................................

(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
C>

33.3
41.7
8.3
0
25.0

85.7
9.5
23.8
9.5
19.0

87.0
4.3
30.4
8.7
17.4

88.4
0
16.3
18.6
20.9

86.5
2.7
21.6
10.8
21.6

79.5
0
29.5
9.1
31.8

66.7
0
33.3
0
22.2

33.3
0
66.7
0
33.3

(9
)
(°)
(9
)
(9
)

25.0
58.3
.7
0

0
9.5
4:8
4.8

13.0
4.3
4.3
0

7.0
0
14.0
2.3

5.4
0
5.4
8.1

2.3
0
6.8
2.3

0
0
33.3
11.1

0
0
0
0

(9
)
(9
)

83.3
41.7

85.8
4.8

87.0
0

95.3
0

97.3 100.0
0
0

77.8
0

100.0
0

Average amount o f incom e: T otal.................

0)

$801 $1,411 $1,959 $2,452 $2,948 $4,010 $6,227 $13,878

Money incom e....................................................
Earnings............................................. .—
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief.....................
Relief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Incom e from benefits and annuities----Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily.......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income*...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Nonmoney income in kind5............................
Nonrelief.................. ....................................
R elief...........................................................

<)
9
(9
)

$697 $1,318 $1,806 $2,257 $2,789 $3,784 $5,988 $14,081
383 1,172 1,666 2,086 2,734 3,609 5,624 8,443

(9
)
(9
)
(9
)
<9
)
(9)
(9>

147
234
2
0
41
39

(9
)
(9
)
(9)
(9)
<
9)
(9)
(9)

19
187
28
0
104
86
18

901 1,278 1,862 2,214 2,615
0
2
45
14
0
374
994
226
224
518
15
14
52
27
33
29
24
117
65
21
12
36
12
.8
36
0
62
12
13
93
92
1

65
4
3
0
153
153
0

30
0
7
(«)
195
195
0

3
0
13
7
159
159
0

4
0
4
1
226
226
0

3,912
0
1,712
0
107
124

3,333
0
5,110
0
5,638
0

0
0
0
0
0
149
0
16
239 8-203
239 8-203
0
0

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting m oney income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief...............................................
Relief1...................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
N et income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and rents...
G ifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income*...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................
Average amount o f incom e: T otal.................
Money incom e....................................................
Earnings......................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief........................................
Relief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and rents...
Incom e from benefits and annuities___
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily.......................................................
D irect relief paym ents..............................
Other m oney income*...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Nonmoney income in kind5.............................
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




(9
)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

33.3
26.7
13.3
6.7
13.3

75.0
4.1
25.0
12.5
8.3

88.9
0
11.1
5.6
5.6

93.8
0
15.6
12.5
18.8

72.7
0
30.3
12.1
27.3

83.0
1.9
26.4
7.5
32.1

94.4
0
27.8
11.1
33.3

60.0
0
40.0
20.0
40.0

(9)
(9)
(9
)
(9)

33.3
60.0
20.0
0

8.3
8.3
4.1
4.1

5.6
0
0
0

3.1
0
6.2
0

6.1
0
6.1
0

3.8
0
9.4
3.8

0
0
5.6
0

0
0
20.0
0

(9)
(9
)

66.7
26.7

87.5
4.1

77.8
0

75.0
0

75.7
0

71.7
0

77.8
0

80:0
0

(9)

$205

$355

$471

$598

$745

$994 $1,750 $3,642

(9)
(9)

$170
60

$327
282

$445
428

$556
529

$691
651

$951 $1,647 $3,644
900 1,564 2,759

(9)
<9
)
(9)
(9
)
<
9)
(9
)

37
21
2
8
5
23

217
6
59
13
5
9

374
0
54
7
2
0

490
0
39
3
6
15

479
0
172
5
17
3

697
(6)
203
4
25
10

1,153
0
411
9
63
5

1,928
0
831
30
852
0

(9
)
(!)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9
)
(9)

15
51
8
0
35
28
7

6
13
1
2
28
27
1

8
0
0
0
26
26

1
0
2

9
0
6

0
0
6

42
42

54
54

5
0
7
(*>
43
43

103
103

0

0

0

0

0

0
0
3
0
8—2
8—2
0

0

0

0

100

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 18.— Sources

of income : Percentage reporting and average amount received,
by annual m oney income class— Continued

Urban families of 5 or more persons
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
and
1500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
$5,000 $10,000 over

to

to

1941 (12 months)
Percentage reporting m oney income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief............................................... 100.0 80.0
20.0 35.0
Relief1...................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
0
30.0
Net income from roomers and boarders..
0
15.0
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
0
0
Gifts from persons not in economic
0
20.0
fa m ily ......................................................
25.0
0
D irect relief paym ents.............................
0
15.0
Other m oney income8...............................
0
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
0
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
Nonrelief...................................................... 100.0 100.0
60.0 40.0
R elief............................................................

94.7
5.3
15.8
10.5
5.3

86.8
2.6
21.1
18.4
15.8

84.0
0
20.0
4.0
12.0

90.0
3.3
26.7
13.3
23.3

92.1
10.5
28.9
26.3
18.4

93.3
13.3
26.7
0
40.0

75.0
0
62.5
0
50.0

5.3
0
15.8
0

7.9
5.3
10.5
5.3

4.0
0
12.0
0

10.0
3.3
13.3
3.3

5.3
0
10.5
0

0
0
6.7
0

0
0
25.0
0

89.5
15.8

89.4 100.0
2.6
0

96.6
0

94.7
0

93.3
0

100.0
0

Average amount of income: T ota l.................

$488

$880 $1,375 $1,864 $2,375 $2,927 $4,002 $6,235 $13,028

Money incom e...................................................
Earnings......................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief.......................................
Relief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Incom e from benefits and annuities___
G ifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
D irect relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income8...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
N onm oney income in kind5............................
Nonrelief......................................................
R e lie f...........................................................

$320
299

$733 $1,273 $1,761 $2,233 $2,733 $3,789 $5,955 $12,279
548 1,229 1,637 2,172 2,593 3,559 5,884 11,143

See footnote at end of table.




234
65
0
0
0
21

332 1,122 1,350 1,847 2,050 3,003
112
0
22
27
8
8
104
521
99
260
325
548
10
22
35
87
13
36
0
21
6
11
55
57
40
6
3
5
33
14

0
0
0
0
168
104
64

16
91
3
0
147
112
35

5
0
4
0
102
93
9

10
45
33
1
103
96
7

2
0
25
0
142
142
0

17
9
20
2
194
194
0

40
0
13
0
213
213
0

4,951
57
876
0
68
0

4,938
0
6,205
0
710
0

0
0
3
0
280
280
0

0
0
426
0
749
749
0

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary
T able

18.—So u r c e s

101

o f in c o m e : Percentage reporting and average amount received,
by annual m oney income class—Continued

Urban families of 5 or more persons—Continued
Annual m oney income of—
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 to
$2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage reporting m oney income:
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief...............................................
40.0
Relief1...................................................
20.0
Entrepreneurial earnings1
2............. .........
20.0
Net income from roomers and boarders..
0
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
0
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
0
Direct relief paym ents.............................
0
Other m oney incom e3...............................
20.0
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
0
Percentage reporting incom e in kind:5
Nonrelief...................................................... 100.0
60.0
R elief............................................................

1942 (first 3 months)
69.2
23.1
23.1
7.7
0

90.0
5.0
20.0
10.0
10.0

88.5
7.7
11.5
11.5
7.7

83.3
0
23.3
16.7
13.3

87.5
0
25.0
12.5
20.8

89.8
0
22.4
24.5
24.5

100.0
9.5
28.6
4.8
33.3

57.1
0
71.4
0
71.4

15.4
23.1
23.1
0

5.0
5.0
10.0
0

0
7.7
3.8
0

0
0
3.3
3.3

4.2
4.2
8.3
0

4.1
0
4.1
0

4.8
0
4.8
0

0
0
14.3
0

76.9
23.1

70.0
10.0

73.1
7.7

86.7
0

79.2
0

85.7
0

71.5
0

100.0
0

Average amount of incom e: T otal.................

$133

$213

$341

$470

$587

$712 $1,012 $1,595 $3,777

Money incom e........ ...........................................
Earnings......................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief........................................
Relief1............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Incom e from benefits and annuities___
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily .......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney incom e8...............................
9
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Nonmoney incom e in kind5............................
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

$64
45

$187
123

$308
278

$438
406

$547
519

$673
633

15
22
8
0
0
15

72
23
28
2
0
19

242
7
29
2
4
8

345
12
49
4
3
3

429
0
90
8
13
8

500
0
133
18
10
1

765
0
136
18
23
6

100
4
1,388
(6*
)
23
1

1,677
0
1,714
0
167
0

0
0
4
0
69
60
9

8
30
5
0
26
20
6

1
13
2
0
33
31
2

0
18
4
0
32
27
5

0
0
2
3
40
40
0

2
3
6
0
39
39
0

4
0
1
0
59
59
0

15
0
2
0
62
62
0

0
0
11
0
208
208
0

$953 $1,533 $3,569
1,492 3,391
901

1 Includes work-relief wages from the Work Projects Administration and the National Youth Adminis­
tration.
2 Includes earnings from owner-operated business and independent professional practice.
9 Includes alimony, m oney found or received as prizes and rewards, and net gains from gambling.
4 Actual m oney losses which are m et from the fam ily income or b y an increase in the fa m ily’s liabilities.
Includes net losses from operation of any independent business; and net losses when expense on property
was in excess o f income, such as taxes and insurance on em pty rental property.
5 Includes the value o f food, housing, fuel and ice, household furnishings and equipment, and clothing,
received b y the fam ily without direct expense.
6 Less than $0.50.
’ Averages not shown for single consumers with incomes o f $3,000 or m ore because o f the small number in
the sample.
Incom e in Kind is negative when current money expense for owned home exceeds the rental value of
the home.
9 Averages n ot shown because of the small number in the sample.

8




102
T

able

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
19.— Sum m ary o f average m oney income and outlay, by annual m oney income class
Urban families and/or single consumers— 1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income o f—
Item

$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 j $1,000 to
$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000
over

$io,poo

A ll families and single Consumers
.Receipts:
Money incom e............................................
Inheritances and other money receip ts..
N et deficit...................................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current
consum ption............................................
G ifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
N et surplus..................................................
N et deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting___
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting-----

$310
$4
$130

$735 $1,247 $1,752 $2,238 $2,743 $3,735 $6,208 $14,125
$12
$5
0
$90
$5
$37
$8
$4
0
$29
$19
0
0
0
0
0

$425
$21
(2
)
0

$>44 $1,243 $1,639 $2,099 $2,555 $3,224 $4,717 $8,510
$43
$29
$84 $109 $176
$68
$293
$938
$3
$3
$11
$28
$88
$768
$1
$11
0
0
$59
$85 $104 $339 $1,085 $4,186

33
$441

35
$185

42
$221

34
$196

35
$367

29
$476

20
$396

39
$36

51
$71

57
$129

65
$194

64
$330

71
$341

79
81
88
$528 $1,376 $4,824

19
$153

12
$605

Families o f 2 or more persons
R eceipts:
Money incom e............................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net deficit....................................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current
consum ption............................................
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus..................................................
N et deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting___
N et surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those rep ortin g .. . .

$323
$7
$143

$736 $1,257 $1,756 $2,240 $2,745 $3,726 $6,208 $14,196
$12
$5
$40
$9
$4
0
$1
$96
0
$57
$35
0
0
0
0
0

$457
$15
$1
0

$781 $1,288 $1,662 $2,137 $2,572 $3,234 $4,717 $8,731
$32
$55
$17
$77 $102 $169
$293
$870
$2
$10
$8
$1
$1
$28
$88
$814
0
0
$45
$63
$96 $335 $1,085 $4,111

33
$478

39
$223

44
$212

36
$208

37
$370

28
$500

21
$396

41
$40

47
$66

54
$108

64
$185

63
$313

72
$330

79
81
87
$526 $1,376 $4,784

19
$153

’ 12
$605

Single consumers1
Receipts:
M oney incom e.'..........................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net deficit....................................................
Disbursem ents:
M oney expenditures for current
consum ption............................................
G ifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
N et surplus................................... ..............
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting___
N et surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those rep ortin g.. . .

$302
$2
$122

$731 $1,208 $1,697 $2,183 $2,693
12
0
$15
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

$407
$24
(2
)
0

$685 $1,095 $1,411 $1,471 $2,121
$83 $198 $191 $264
$49
$12
$12
$29
$1
$56
$40 $100 $429 $284
$17

32
$416

$28
$98

$32
$263

$22
$435

$9
$129

50
$149

37
$33

58
$77

67
$186

72
$272

82
$539

50
$716

1Averages not shown for single consumers with incomes of $3,000 or more because of the small number in
the sample.
2 Less than $0.50.




103

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary
T

able

19.— Sum m ary o f average m oney income and outlay, by annual m oney income
class—Continued
Urban families and/or single consumers— 1942 (first 3 months)
Annual m oney income of—
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
and
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 to
$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
A ll families and single consumers

Receipts:
Money in co m e ...........................................
Inheritances and other money receipts..
Net deficit....................................................
Disbursements:
M oney expenditures for current
consum ption...........................................
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus.................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting___
N et surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting. . . .

$74
(2
)
$37

$183
(2
)
$30

$314
$2
$7

$437
$23
0

$552
$4
0

$685
$2
0

$930 $1,613 $4,086
$2
0
$486
0
0
0

$105
$2
$1
0

$207
$6
$1
0

$310
$12
$2
0

$398
$13
$4
$47

$494
$18
$10
$40

$599
$26
$13
$57

$753 $1,195 $1,984
$230
$54
$38
$325
$24
$83
$290 $1,792
$127

42
$103

39
$104

34
$99

27
$57

24
$124

23
$189

18
$196

18
$454

39
$16

45
$25

64
$43

72
$88

75
$94

76
$131

81
$199

82
93
$451 $1,940

7
$275

Families o f 2 or more persons
Receipts:
Money incom e............................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net d eficit.. . : ...........................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current
consum ption............................................
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus..................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average am ount for those reporting___
Net surplus.
Percentage reporting.................................
Average am ount for those reporting.. . ,

$74
0
$48

$187
$1
$41

$312
$3
$10

$437
$27
0

$556
$4
0

$687
$2
0

$921 $1,613 $4,086
$2
0
$486
0
0
0

$122
$2
(2
)
0

$225
$4
0

$322
$7
$1
0

$406
$11
$3
$46

$506
$16
$8
$33

$597
$20
$12
$64

$752 $1,195 .1,984
$36
$54
$230
$24
$83
$325
$130
$290 $1,792

50
$105

46
$107

38
$92

28
$57

26
$126

22
$169

17
$196

18
$454

27
$16

41
$22

60
$42

71
$88

73
$90

77
$131

82
$199

82
93
$451 $1,940

(2)

7
$275

Single consumers l
Receipts:
Money incom e............................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net deficit....................................................
Disbursements :
Money expenditures for current
c o n s u m p t i o n .....................................................
G i f t s a n d c o n t r i b u t i o n s ..................................
P e r s o n a l t a x p a y m e n t s ....................................
N e t s u r p lu s
........................................................

$72
(2
)
$29

$177
(2)
$9

$312
0
0

$433
0
0

$548
0
0

$664
0
$54

$98
$2
$1
0

$177
$10
$1
0

$275
$25
$7
$3

$335
$29
$11
$55

$387
$36
$28
$101

$575
$122
$23
0

361
$101

27
$92

23
$134

20
$61

10
$63

37
$387

46
$16

52
$30

74
$47

76
$8

90
$119

62
$146

Net deficit:
P e r c e n ta g e r e p o r t i n g

Average amount for those reporting___
Net surplus:
P e r c e n ta g e r e p o r t i n g ........................................

Average amount for those reporting___

1Averages not shown for single consumers w ith incomes of $3,000 or m ore because of the small number
in the sample.
2 Less than $0.50.




104
T

able

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
19.— Sum m ary o f average m oney income and outlay, by annual m oney income cla ssContinued
Urban families of 4 sizes— 1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income o f—
Item
Under
$500

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 !$10,000
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
$10,000 over
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 :
2-person families

Receipts:
Money incom e..................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net deficit..................................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current con­
sum ption................................................
G ifts and contributions..........................
Personal tax paym ents...........................
Net surplus................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting...............................
Average amount for those rep ortin g ...
N et surplus:
Percentage reporting...............................
Average amount for those rep ortin g ...

$322
(l)
$139

$725 $1,233 $1,749 $2,212 $2,704 $3,581 $5,629
$10
0
0
$1
$9
$4
$18
0
0
0
$32
0
0
$38

C)
2
(2)
<
2)

$443
$19
$1
0

$735 $1,265 $1,609 $2,032 $2,371 $2,914 $3,224
$85 $241
$154
$24
$90
$99
$35
$9
$1 ' $1
$14
$32
$151
$4
0
0
$87 $248 $406 $1,993
$66

C
2)
(2
)
(2)
(2
)

34.5
$460

33.3
$209

47.8
$207

34.5
$190

36.9
$395

28.0
$250

12.5
$378

0
0

<)
2
(2)

44.8
$44

51.9
$73

49.3
$124

65.5
$200

63.1
$370

72.0
$442

87.5 100.0
$518 $1,993

(2)
(2
)

3-person families
Receipts:
Money incom e...........................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts.
Net deficit..................................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current con­
sum ption................................................
Gifts and contributions..........................
Personal tax paym ents...........................
Net surplus................................................
N et deficit:
Percentage reporting...............................
Average amount for those rep ortin g ...
N et surplus:
Percentage reporting...............................
Average amount for those rep ortin g ...

$262
0
$517

$777 $1,265 $1,743 $2,276 $2,740 $3,749 $ 6,977 $13,306
0
0
$60
$5
0
0
$1
0
$65
0
0
0
0
$38
0
0

.

$801
$2
0
0

$828 $1,283 $1,612 $2,141 $2,411 $3,221 $5,273 $6,274
$14
$42
$41
$69 $125 $140
$343
$515
$1
$2
$13
$45
$7
$129
$350
$1
0
0
$79
$67 $202 $377 $1,231 $6,192

.
.

66.7 .41.9
$788 $242

45.5
$199

29.5
$165

35.9
$344

22.0
$290

16.7
$690

.

33.3
$25

54.5
$97

70.5
$181

64.1
$297

78.0
$340

83.3
83.3 100.0
$591 $ 1,538 $ 6,192

.
.

54.8
$65

16.7
$302

0
0

4-person families
Receipts:
Money incom e................................
•
Inheritances and other m oney receipts. •
Net deficit.................................................. •
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current con­
sum ption................................................ •
G ifts and contributions..........................
Personal tax paym ents....................... •
Net surplus................................................
N et deficit:
Percentage reporting............................... •
Average amount for those rep ortin g..!
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting............................. . •
Average amount for those reporting..

(2)
(2)
(2)

$697 $1,318 $1,806 $2,257 $2,789 $3,784 $5,988 $14,081
0
$20
$15
$26
$58
$1
0
0
0
0
$103
$43
0
0
0
0

(2
)
(2
)
(2)
<>
*

$801 $1,377 $1,783 $2,214 $2,734 $3,212 $4,727 $9,197
$20
$4
$37
$67 $117 $178
$359
$569
$4
$1
$26
$64
$11
$426
(l)
0)
0
0
$19
$65
$5 $408
$868 $4,289

(2)
(2)

41.7
$262

42.9
$264

43.5
$180

34.9
$366

27.0
$759

22.7
$230

22.2
$171

33.3
$600

(2
)
(2
)

33.3
$20

57.1
$122

56.5
$172

65.1
$396

73.0
$285

77.3
77.8
$596 $1,165

66.7
$6,734

Families o f 5 or more persons
Receipts:
Money incom e...........................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts.
Net deficit.......................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current con­
sum ption................................................
Gifts and contributions..........................
Personal tax paym ents........... ................
Net su rp lu s...............................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting...............................
Average amount for those reporting. . .
N et surplus:
Percentage reporting...............................
Average amount for those rep ortin g...

.

$320 $733 $1,273 $1,761 $2,233 $2,733 $3,789 $ 5,955 $12,279
0
0
$50|
$10
$52
0
$7
0
0
$83i
$5:
$12
0
$11
$95
0
0
0

.

$364:
$8!
0)i
0l

$822: $1,278 $1,745 $2,281 $2,812 $3,611 $4,862 $9,381
$12!
$19
$27
$52
$60 $114
$270
$479
$1
$4
$1
$1
$6
$9
$44
$594
0l
0i
$21
0
0 $129
$736 $2,051

.

20.C
l
$39I

50.C 31.6i 42.1 40.0
1
$207r $195• $187r $354

.

20.C 30.01 68.4t
1
$72!
$67r
$15i

57.91 60.0
$173! $217

1 Less than $0.50.
3 Averages not shown because of the small num ber in the sample.




40.0
$630

31.6
$371

60.0
$262

68.4
73.3
87.5
$360 $1,028 $2,431

26.7
$69

12.5
$609

105

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

T able 19.— Sum m ary o f average m oney income and outlay, by annual money income class—
Continued
Urban families of 4 sizes— 1942 (first 3 months)
Annual m oney income of—
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
2-person families

Receipts:
Money incom e............................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net deficit....................................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current consum ption..................................................
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus..................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting......
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those rep orting.. . .

$74
0
$32

$187
f1
)
$25

$308
$6
$2

$437
$11
0

$561
$1
0

$694
$1
0

$898 $1,616
$2
0
0
0

©
C)
2
(*)

$102
$2
C)
1
0

$207
$4
C)
1
0

$302
$9
1
0

$387
$14
$4
$42

$489
$21
$13
$42

$582
$33
$14
$66

$666 $1,077
$58
$47
$100
$44
$156
$357

(2
)
)
(2
)
(2
)

55.6
$66

43.9
$80

35.7
$106

23.9
$49

30.2
$105

24.3
$133

12.2
$292

25.0
$569

(2
)
(2
)

25.9
$20

38.6
$26

64.3
$55

74.6
$72

69.8
$106

75.7
$130

87.8
$219

75.0
$666

(2
)
(2
)

3-person families
Receipts:
Money incom e.............................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net deficit....................................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current consum ption..................................................
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus..................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting___
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those rep orting.. . .

$76
0
$62

$200
$1
$56

$317
0)
$7

$432
$72
0

$555
$15
0

$682
0
0

$923 $1,687
0
$2
0
0

(2
)
(2)
(2
)

$138
$1
0
0

$257
$5
0)
0

$322
$8
V)
0

$416
$11
$2
$79

$470
$13
$8
$68

$570
$21
$19
$79

$712 $1,126
$40
$41
$24
$122
$159
$294

(2
)
(J
2
)
<)
2

33.3
$199

44.4
$150

40.0
$62

33.3
$60

10.6
$82

15.8
$278

12.7
$308

20.0
$569

(2
)
<)
2

50.0
$9

51.9
$21

56.7
$32

66.7
$148

89.4
$86

81.6
$151

87.3
$227

80.0
$510

(fi)
(2)

4-person families
Receipts:
Money incom e............................................
Inheritances and other money receipts..
Net deficit....................................................
Disbursements:
Money expenditures for current con­
sum ption ..................................................
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus..................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting................................
Average amount for those reporting___
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those rep ortin g.. . .

(2
)
)
(2
)

$170
0
$71

$327
0
$24

$445
0
0

$556
0
0

$691
0
0

$951
0
0

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

$240
$5
0
0

$350
$4
«
0

$438
$6
$2
$3

$544
$10
$1
$14

$627
$11
$6
$60

$777 $1,081 $1,938
$33
$75
$283
$100
$17
$332
$136
$392 $1,108

(2
)
(2)

46.7
$159

41.7
$97

33.3
$85

31.2
$122

18.2
$221

20.8
$78

5.6
$246

(2
)
(2
)

40.0
$7

58.3
$28

66.7
$46

68.8
$76

81.8
$123

77.4
$196

94.4
80.0
$429 $1,453

$1,647 $3,644
0
0
0
0

20.0
$275

Families o f 5 or more persons
Receipts:
Money incom e.............................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net deficit....................................................
Disbursements:
Money ..expenditures for current con­
sum ption..................................................
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus..................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting----Net surplus:
Percentage rep orting...............................
Average amount for those reporting—

$64
0
$105

$187
0
$46

$308
C)
1
$23

$438
$1
0

$547
0
$20

$673
(1
)
0

$953 $1,533 $3,569
$2
0
0
0
0
0

$171
$1
0
0

$230
$2
0
0

$333
$4
$1
0

$414
$6
$25

$561
$17
$2
0

$626
$11
$6
$41

$866 $1,316 $2,286
$24
$42
$116
$290
$34
$11
$175
$58
$888

40.0
$265

61.5
$85

40.0
$97

26.9
$41

36.7
$187

33.3
$88

24.5
$182

23.8
$380

0
0

20.0
$5

30.8
$21

55.0
$29

73.1
$49

60.0
$81

66.7
$106

75.5
$136

76.2
$348

100.0
$888

C
1)

1 Less than $0.50.
„
.
.
,
2 Averages n ot shown beoause of the small num ber m the sample.




106

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 20.— M ajor

categories of consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney income class

All urban families and single consumers
PE R C E N T A G E R E P O R T IN G
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

F ood :1
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
63.3 46.3 34.4 30.8 26.2 29.1 24.7

100.0
16.7

100.0
41.2

98.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
61.2 50.0 41.2 40.4 51.9 56.8 59.0
91.8 94.7 99.4 99.5 100.0 99.3 100.0

100.0
59.5
100.0

100.0
94.1
100.0

95.8
27.1

97.6
21.4

100.0
23.5

95.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
75.5 72.3 71.7 73.7 73.7 81.8 81.3
11.2 20.2 42.2 51.5 72.7 69.6 81.9
56.1 72.3 83.3 76.3 79.8 89.2 86.7
96.9 98.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
78.6 83.0 96.7 98.5 96.7 98.0 98.8
54.1 79.3 93.9 96.5 98.9 99.3 99.4
48.0 61.2 71.7 76.3 80.3 82.5 89.8
52.0 75.5 90.6 97.0 97.8 98.0 99.4
9.2 21.3 23.3 27.3 37.7 43.9 47.0
17.3 17.0 25.6 29.3 42.1 39.9 42.8

100.0
76.2
88.1
97.6
100.0
100.0
100.0
88.1
100.0
61.9
54.8

100.0
82.4
94.1
94.1
100.0
100.0
100.0
82.4
100.0
64.7
94.1

Furnishings and equipment:
58.2
29.6
Clothing:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation* Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
R e a d in g * M o n e y expense.................................
E d u c a t io n * M o n e y expense........................... .
Other: Money expense8...................................

71.3
21.3

82.8
20.6

92.9
26.8

95.1
16.9

95.9
27.7

1942 (first 3 months)
F o o d :1
‘ Money expense............................................
R e c e iv e d in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration: 2
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense............................................
R e c e iv e d in k i n d .................................................

Clothing:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8...................................

See footnotes on p. 119.




98.0
51.5

99.4 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
32.0 26.0 18.3 15.6 12.1 13.9

100.0
14.5

100.0
26.7

88.1
58.4
93.1

97.7
40.7
96.5

99.5 99.5
34.5 31.4
97.2 100.0

99.5 99.3
46.8 50.0
99.0 100.0

99.5
50.9
99.5

100.0
64.5
100.0

100.0
93.4
100.0

33.7
5.9

47.1
12.8

63.3
7.9

74.0
5.7

84.3
5.6

88.7
14.5

93.3
0

80.2
48.5
12.9
37.6
94.1
64.4
41.6
49.5
48.5
8.9
11.9 ;
i

89.5 96.0 98.4 99.0 98.6 98.6
38.4 37.9 35.1 36.5 30.7 37.5
18.0 35.0 47.6 58.9 69.3 73.6
61.0 75.7 71.2 77.6 80.0 83.3
97.7 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
72.1 84.7 90.6 91.7 92.9 92.6
61.6 91.0 93.2 95.8 97.1 98.6
57.0 71.8 73.3 80.2 78.6 86.6
74 4 87.0 97.4 97.4 95.7 99.5
18.6 18.6 15.2 26.0 33.6 41.7
10.5 23.2 17.8 25.0 20.0 36.1

100.0
37.1
95.2
90.3
100.0
95.2
100.0
91.9
100.0
50.0
35.5

100.0
33.3
86.7
93.3
100.0
93.3
100.0
86.7
93.3
80.0
86.7

66.0
13.1

77.9
7.1

107

Part II I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 20.— M ajor c ateg o r ies of c o n s u m p t io n : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and servicesy average amount spent and average
valuet by annual m oney income class—Continued

All urban families and single consumers— Continued
A VE R AG E E X P E N D IT U R E A N D A V E R A G E VALUE
Annual money income of
Item

$1,000i $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under, $500
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500' $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

All items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................

$580
425
155

$884 $1,3/6 $1,766 $2,250 $2,744 $3,437 $4,966 $8,967
744 1,243 1,639 2,099 2,555 3,223 4,717 8,510
189
140
133
151
214
249
. 457
127

Food: Total1.......................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received m kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T otal...............
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: T otal.................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind.................................... ...
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
‘Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense’ ....................................

$227
170
57
185
104
81
20
12
8
4
43
30
13
16
8
8
25
21
7
4
3
1

$336
295
41
255
177
78
32
24
22
2
90
71
19
31
16
17
30
19
19
8
4
3

$464
437
27
357
277
80
48
65
59
6
158
138
20
79
29
28
58
35
31
13
2
9

$581
561
20
420
343
77
74
78
74
4
212
186
26
117
32
36
85
54
40
19
6
12

$667
656
11
521
412
109
85
116
110
6
252
227
25
234
36
44
110
78
48
21
16
22

$848
829
19
583
454
129
106
166
159
7
340
306
34
268
64
54
90
104
51
26
18
26

$967 $1,337 $1,946
949
1,330
1,895
51
18
7
889
677
1,751
525
696 1,420
152
193
331
863
163
262
215
317
208
202
314
208
3
7
6
465
706 1,184
663
1,112
428
43
72
37
495 1,000
348
64
138
336
74
106
181
244
382
153
155
297
603
71
91
108
31
51
82
33
89
164
21
36
67

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll item s: Total value......................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
F ood: Total1.......................................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T otal...............
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: T otal..................................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8....................................

See footnotes on p. 119.




$146 • $238
105
207
31
41
$59
45
14
50
27
23
5
2
2
(4
)
11
7
4
3
1
2
7
1
2
1
(4)
2

$88
81
7
70
51
19
9
6
5
1
20
16
4
8
5
4
13
4
4
2
, 1
4

$347
310
37

$430
398
32

$532
494
38

$637
599
38

$802 $1,275 $2,110
750
1,984
1,195
52
80
126

$119
111
8
89
72
17
12
18
12
6
38
32
6
13
8
7
16
9
8
3
1
6

$145
139
6
107
88
19
17
16
14
2
49
44
5
20
9
9
25
13
10
5
2
3

$172
169
3
135
106
29
22
26
25
1
61
56
5
28
10
11
25
17
12
5
4
4

$202
200
2
144
116
28
28
26
22
4
75
71
4
47
13
12
42
20
11
7
6
4

$243
239
4
169
130
39
36
40
39
1
110
102
8
58
15
17
39
37
17
7
8
6

$341
334
7
236
171
65
63
87
85
2
171
165
6
121
31
26
64
68
24
13
20
10

$481
477
4
489
375
114
246
57
57
0
292
284
8
133
38
53
86
128
18
26
50
13

108

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 20.— M ajor

categories op consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney income class— Continued

Urban families of 2 or more persons
P E R C E N T A G E R E PO R T IN G
Annual money income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

F ood :1
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration: 2
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
A utom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense3....................................

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
74.4 47.0 34.3 31.1 26.7 29.6 24.4

100.0
16.7

100.0
43.8

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
23.1 54.7 45.7 41.1 53.5 57.7 59.1
97.4 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

100.0
59.5
100.0

100.0
93.8
100.0

96.3
27.4

97.6
21.4

100.0
25.0

97.4 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
79.5 77.8 72.8 75.6 73.9 81.7 81.1
17.9 24.8 47.1 52.2 74.4 70.4 82.9
48.7 66.7 84.3 76.1 80.8 89.4 86.6
97.4 99.1 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
87.2 83.8 98.6 98.9 96.5 98.6 98.8
48.7 76.1 94.3 96.7 99.4 99.3 99.4
61.5 65.0 75.0 77.8 83.1 83.8 89.6
56.4 76.1 92.1 98.3 97.7 99.3 99.4
17.9 30.8 26.4 28.3 39.0 45.1 47.6
15.4 20.5 25.0 27.2 42.4 40.1 42.1

100.0
76.2
88.1
97.6
100.0
100.0
100.0
88.1
100.0
61.9
54.8

100.0
81.2
93.8
93.8
100.0
100.0
100.0
87.5
100.0
68.8
93.8

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
67.5 34.8 26.9 18.1 15.1 12.1 14.0

100.0
14.5

100.0
26.7

92.5 100.0
72.5 43.8
100.0 100.0

100.0
64.5
100.0

100.0
93.4
100.0

76.9
43.6

88.9
26.5

94.3
22.1

97.8
29.4

98.3
18.0

98.6
28.9

1942 (first 3 months)
F o o d :1
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration: 2
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense......................... ...
Education: Money expense.................... . . .
Other: Money expense8...............................

See footnotes on p. 119.




98.5 100.0 99.4 100.0 99.5
37.7 32.5 50.0 50.0 51.8
99.2 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

40.0
5.0

58.9
14.3

85.0
5.6

88.7
14.5

93.3
0

75.0
62.5
22.5
25.0
95.0
70.0
42.5
60.0
52.5
22.5
12.5

90.2 95.4 98.2 98.8 98.5 99.1
45.5 46.9 37.3 39.0 32.6 37.9
23.2 44.6 48.8 61.0 69.7 73.8
57.1 71.5 72.9 78.5 80.3 83.6
97.3 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
77.7 85.4 92.2 93.0 93.9 93.0
58.9 92.3 94.0 97.1 97.0 98.6
63.4 75.4 76.5 82.6 81.1 86.4
76.8 87.7 98.2 98.8 95.5 100.0
26.8 23.1 17.5 27.9 34.8 42.1
12.5 23.1 17.5 24.4 18.2 36.0

100.0
37.1
95.2
90.3
100.0
95.2
100.0
91.9
100.0
50.0
35.5

100.0
33.3
86.7
93.3
100.0
93.3
100.0
86.7
93.3
80.0
86.7

73.8
9.2

73.5
13.9

80.2
6.4

80.3
7.6

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

109

T able 2 0 .~ M ajor

categories of consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney income class—Continued

Urban families of 2 or more persons— Continued
A V E R A G E E X P E N D IT U R E A N D A V E R A G E VALUE
Annual money income o f —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

A ll item s: Total value......................................
Money expense............................................
Received In kind........................................

$649
457
192

Food: Total1.......................................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense............................................
Received In kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T otal...............
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: T otal................................. -...............
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Autom obile: M oney expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense.........
Personal care: Money expense.......................
Medical care: Money exp en se........................
Recreation: Money expense.. .........................
Tobacco: Money expense....... . .......................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense3....................................

$255 "$358
183
324
72
34
219
278
123
185
96
93
20
31
16
34
9
30
7
4
43
91
26
69
17
22
23
39
5
12
8
17
33
29
9
14
9
15
6
7
1
5
2
4

$934 $1,420 $1,791 $2,290 $2,763 $3,448 $4,966 $9,219
781 1,288 1,662 2,137 2,572 3,234 4,717 8,731
153
132
129
153
191
214
249
488
$492
468
24
369
290
79
44
74
67
7
161
139
22
78
27
27
58
32
34
13
2
9

$596
575
21
430
354
76
70
85
80
5
218
191
27
112
31
36
85
51
40
19
6
12

$677
666
11
528
418
110
84
122
116
6
259
233
26
239
36
45
113
78
49
21
16
23

$858
839
19
588
458
130
104
171
163
g
344
310
34
264
62
55
90
105
52
26
18
26

$967 $1,337 $1,997
949
1,330
1,943
7
54
18
889
678
1,790
526
696 1,433
152
193
357
162
262
890
217
208
332
210
202
329
7
3
6
469
706 1,220
432
663
1,146
37
43
74
353
495
996
62
138
356
74
106
188
154
244
399
155
297
633
71
108
97
32
51
82
89
34
174
20
36
65

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................

$177
122
55

F ood: Total1.......................................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T otal...............
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: T ota l.................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
T obacco: Money expense................ ................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8....................................

$68
49
19
61
31
30
5
4
4
(<)
14
8
6
4
1
3
7
1
3
1
1
4

See footnotes on p. 119.




$258
225
33
--$95
90
5
78
56
22
9
5
5
(4
)
22
16
6
10
4
4
14
4
4
2
2
5

$360
322
38

$438
406
32

$546
506
40

$639
597
42

$124
117
7
91
75
16
11
22
14
8
39
32
7
16
7
7
16
7
8
3
1
8

$150
145
5
112
92
20
16
18
16
2
49
44
5
19
9
9
25
12
10
5
2
2

$176
173
3
139
108
31
22
28
27
1
63
58
5
29
10
11
27
16
12
5
4
4

$207
205
2
145
114
31
26
27
22
5
74
70
4
47
12
12
43
20
11
6
6
3

—

$805 $1,275 $2,110
752
1,195
1,984
53
80
126
—

$244
240
4
171
131
40
36
40
39
1
111
103
8
57
15
17
39
37
17
7
8
6

$341
334
7
236
171
65
63
87
85
2
171
165
6
121
31
26
64
68
24
13
20
10

$481
477
4
489
375
114
246
57
57
0
292
284
8
133
38
53
86
128
18
26
50
13

110

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 20.-—M ajor

categories of consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind of. selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney incom e class— Continued

Urban single consumers
PE R C E N T A G E R E P O R T IN G
Annual m oney income of—
Item
Under
$500

$500
to
$1,000

$1,000
to
$1,500

$1,500
to’
$2,000

$2,000
to
$2,500

$2,500
to
$3,000

1941 (12 months)
F ood :1
Money expense......................................
Received in kind.....................................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense........................................................
Received in kind....................................................
Household operation: Monev expense.......................
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense........................................................
Received in kind....................................................
Clothing:
Money expense........................................................
Received m kind.....................................................
Autom obile: Money expense..............................
Other transportation: Money expense.......................
Personal care: Money expense....................................
Medical care: Money expense.............................
Recreation: Money expense...........................
Tobacco: Money expense...................................
Reading: Money expense.....................................
Education: Money expense.................................
Other* Money expense8.................................................

100.0
55.9

100.0
45.1

100.0
35.0

100.0
27.8

100.0
18.2

100.0
16.7

100;o
52.5
88.1

100.0
42.2
85.9

100.0
25.0
97.5

100.0
27.8
94.4

100.0
27.3
100.0

100.0
33 4
83.3

47.5
20.3

45.1
12.7

42.5
15.0

44.4
0

45.5
0

33.3
0

96.6
72.9
6.8
61.0
96.6
72.9
57.6
39.0
49.2
3.4
18.6

100.0
63.4
12.7
81.7
98.6
78.9
84.5
57.7
74.6
5.6
11.3

100.0
67.5
25.0
80.0
100.0
90.0
92.5
60.0
85.0
12.5
27.5

100.0
55.6
44.4
77.8
100.0
94.4
94.4
61.1
83.3
16.7
50.0

100.0
72.7
45.5
63.6
100.0
100.0
90.9
36.4
100.0
18.2
36.4

100.0
83.3
50.0
83.3
100.0
83.3
100.0
50.0
66.7
16.7
33.3

1942 (first 3 months)
F ood :1
Money expense..............................................................
Received m kind..........................................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense..............................................................
Received m kind..........................................................
Household operation: Money expense............................
Furnishings and equipment:
M oney expense................................. ........................
Received m kind ..........................................................
Clothing: Money expense..................................................
Received in kind..........................................................
Autom obiles: Money expense...........................................
Other transportation: Money expense............................
Personal care: Money expense..........................................
Medical care: Money expense............................................
Recreation: Money expense...............................................
Tobacco: Money expense..................................
Reading: Money expense...................................................
Education: Money expense...............................................
Other: Money expense8...................................................... i
!

See footnotes on p. 11J.




96.7
41.0

98.3
26.7

100.0
23.4

100.0
20.0

100.0
20.0

100.0
12.5

85.2
49.2
88.5

93.4
35.0
90.0

97.9
25.5
91.5

96.0
24.0
100.0

100.0
20.0
90.0

100.0
50 rO
100.0

29.5
6.6
83.6
39.3
6.6
45.9
93.4
60.7
41.0
42.6
45.9
0
11.5

25.0
10.0
88.3
25.0
8.3
68>.3
98.3
61.7
66.7
45.0
70.0
3.3
6.7

34.0
4.3
97.9
12.8
8.5
87.2
100.0
83.0
87.2
61.7
85.1
6.4
23.4

20.0
8.0
100.0
20.0
40.0
60.0
100.0
80.0
88.0
52.0
92.0
0
20.0

20.0
0
100.0
15.0
40.0
70.0
100.0
80.0
85.0
60.0
85.0
10.0
30.0

37.5
0
100.0
0
62.5
75.0
100.0
75.0
100.0
37.5
100.0
12.5
50.0

111

Part I II.— Tabular Summary
T able 20.— M ajor

categories op consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
valuef by annual m oney income class—Continued

Urban single consumers— Continued
A VE R AG E E X P E N D IT U R E A N D A V E R A G E VALUE
Annual m oney income of—
Item
Under
$500

$500
to
$1,000

$1,000
to
$1,500

$1,500
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$2,500

$2,500
to
$3,000

1941 (12 months)
A ll items: Total value........................................................
Money expense..............................................................
Received in k in d ..........................................................

$539
407
132

$803
685
118

$1,227
1,095
132

$1,528
1,411
117

$1,589
1,471
118

$2,249
2,121
128

Food: Total1.........................................................................
Money expense..............................................................
Received in kind..........................................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total3.........................
Money expense..............................................................
Received in kin d ..........................................................
Household operation: Money expense............................
Furnishings and equipment: T ota l.................................
Money expense.................... ........................................
Received in kind .........................................................
Clothing: T o ta l....................................................................
Money expense.............................................................
Received in kind..........................................................
A utom obile: Money expense.............................................
Other transportation: Money expense............................
Personal care: Money expense..........................................
Medical care: Money expense...........................................
Recreation: Money expense...............................................
T obacco: Money expense...................................................
Reading: Money expense................ ..................................
Education: Money expense...............................................
Other: Money expense*......................................................

$210
162
48
163
92
72
20
9
8
1
43
32
11
11
10
9
20
28
6
4
4
1

$301
248
53
217
164
53
38
11
10
1
85
74
11
17
22
16
30
28
26
9
2
1

$369
332
37
316
234
82
62
33
30
3
147
137
10
85
35
30
58
45
22
13
2
10

$433
418
15
323
230
93
118
22
22
0
145
136
9
159
46
27
90
86
39
21
9
10

$506
494
12
409
317
92
86
28
28
0
144
130
14
145
36
26
61
88
23
27
5
5

$621
609
12
458
370
88
135
55
55
0
237
209
28
350
108
24
77
96
27
17
17
27

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll items: Total value........................................................
Money expense..............................................................
Received in kind.........................................................

$130
98
32

$203
177
26

$308
275
33

$367
335
32

$406
387
19

$560
575
—15

Food: Total1.........................................................................
Money expense.............................................................
Received in kind ..........................................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.........................
Money expense..............................................................
Received m kind ..........................................................
Household operation: Money expense............................
Furnishings and equipment: T ota l.................................
Money expense..............................................................
Received in kind..........................................................
Clothing: T ota l....................................................................
Money expense..............................................................
Received in kind..........................................................
Autom obile: Money expense.............................................
Other transportation: Money expense............................
Personal care: Money expense..........................................
Medical care: Money expense...........................................
Recreation: Money expense...............................................
Tobacco: Money expense...................................................
Reading: Money expense...................................................
Education: Money expense...............................................
Other: Money expense*......................................................

$53
42
11
42
24
18
5
1
1
(4
)
10
7
3
3
2
2
7
1
2
1
0
1

$73
64
9
56
42
14
10
8
6
2
18
17
1
4
7
4
11
4
5
2
(4
)
1

$104
94
10
82
61
21
17
7
6
1
33
32
1
5
12
8
15
12
6
4
2
1

$109
97
12
70
55
15
20
4
3
1
47
43
4
26
12
9
22
20
9
6
0
13

$137
135
2
102
87
15
19
1
1
0
42
40
2
25
15
8
11
28
11
5
1
1

$116
115
1
135
151
-1 6
50
25
25
0
88
88
0
42
18
8
17
23
6
12
2
18

See footnotes on p. 119.




112

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 20.— M ajor

categories of consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and servicest average amount spent and average
valuef by annual m oney income class— Continued

Urban 2-person families
PE R C E N T A G E R E P O R T IN G
Annual m oney income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

F ood 1
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Received in kind........................................
72.4 37.0 32.8 29.3 21.5 32.0
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense............................................ 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
75.9 57.5 50.7 39.7 49.2 52.0
Received in kind....... ' ..............................
96.6 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense...........................................
79.3 87.0 94.0 98.3 96.9 96.0
Received in kind........................................
48.3 22.2 26.9 32.8 20.0 36.0
Clothing:
Money expense............................................
96.6 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Received in kind........................................
79.3 70.4 70.2 67.2 67.7 68.0
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
20.7 25.9 41.8 53.4 70.8 68.0
Other transportation: Money expense..........
55.2 68.5 89.6 81.0 78.5 88.0
Personal care: Money expense........................
96.6 98.1 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Medical care: Money expense.........................
89.7 87.0 100.0 100.0 95.4 100.0
Recreation: Money expense............................. 44.8 63.0 92.5 94.8 98.5 100.0
Tobacco: Money expense................................. i 62.1 70.4 70.1 77.6 81.5 84.0
Reading: Money expense.................................
58.6 81.5 95.5 100.0 100.0 100.0
Education: Money expense.............................
4.6 • 4.0
3.4
9.3
4.5
6.9
Other: Money expense*....................................
20.7 22.2 28.4 27.6 49.2 44.0

100.0
25.0

100.0
33.3

(*)
(5)

100.0
42.5
100.0

100.0
16.7
100.0

(
(
(

90.0
30.0

100.0
33.3

(f)

100.0
80.0
92.5
87.5
100.0
97.5
97.5
80.0
100.0
10.0
45.0

100.0
83.3
100.0
83.3
100.0
100.0
100.0
83.3
100.0
16.7
66.7

<
8)
(5
)

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
66.7 29.8 21.4 18.3 11.1 13.5 16.3

100.0
12.5

(
(

92.6 100.0 94.8 100.0 100.0 97.3 100.0
70.4 49.1 37.5 33.8 46.1 48.6 30.6
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

100.0
62.5
100.0

5
5
5

(

(
(

)

5

)

)
)

5
5

)
)

5
5

)
)

( 5
( 6)

)
)

(5)
<
5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5
)

1942 (first 3 months)
Food1
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment :
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing:
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense*....................................

See footnotes on p. 119.




62.5
5.4

(5)

44.4
7.4

57.9
15.8

79.6
4.1

75.0
12.5

(
(

5
5

66.7
63.0
18.5
29.6
92.6
74.1
48.1
66.7
55.6
3.7
18.5

87.7 93.0 97.2 100.0 97.3 98.0
43.9 33.9 39.4 31.7 21.6 30.6
22.8 37.5 45.1 68.3 67.6 83.7
59.6 83.9 77.5 77.8 83.8 87.8
96.5 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
80.7 80.4 91.5 95.2 94.6 93.9
45.6 89.3 88.7 95.2 91.9 93.9
64.9 75.0 83.1 77.8 81.1 79.6
82.5 92.9 100.0 100.0 91.9 100.0
3.2
3.6
1.4
0
40.8
8.8
19.3 21.4 15.5 22.2 21.6 40.8

100.0
25.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
75.0
100.0
0
62.5

(
(
(

5
5
5

66.2
21.1

74.6
11.1

70.3
8.1

)
)
)
)

(5
)
(5
)
(
(
(
(
(
(

5
5
5
5
5
s

)
)
)
)
)
)

113

Part I II.— Tabular Summary

T a b le 20.—M ajor categ o r ies of c o n s u m p t io n : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney income class—Continued

Urban 2-person families— Continued
A V E R A G E E X P E N D IT U R E A N D A VE R AG E VALUE
Annual money income of —
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

A ll item s: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................

$652
443
209

Food: Total1.......................................................
$239
Money expense...........................................
167
Received in kind........................................
72
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2. ----232
Money expense.. ......................................
124
Received in kind ........................................
108
Household operation: Money expense..........
22
Furnishings and equipment: T otal...............
19
Money expense...........................................
9
Received in kind........................................
10
Clothing: T otal.................................................
41
Money expense:.........................................
22
Received in kind........................................
19
Automobile: Money expense...........................
30
Other transportation: Money expense..........
6
Personal care: Money expense........................
8
Medical care: Money expense.........................
27
Recreation: Money expense............................ i
10
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
10
Reading: Money expense.................................
6
Education: Money expense.............................
(4)
Other: Money expense8....................................
2

$892 $1,429 $1,755 $2,146 $2,574 $3,097 $3,416
735 1,265 1,609 2,032 2,371 2,914 3,224
164
192
146
114
203
183
157
$319
294
25
300
185
115
32
25
23
2
70
55
15
38
13
15
30
14
16
9
7
4

$454
432
22
406
297
109
48
78
68
10
143
120
23
85
28
26
74
31
31
14
(4>
11

$517
497
20
458
361
97
87
86
79
7
200
178
22
134
33
38
74
51
38
21
1
17

$600
593
7
521
435
86
85
125
122
3
202
184
18
260
37
45
114
71
48
23
1
14

$723
696
27
560
412
148
129
215
207
8
277
257
20
264
61
60
81
113
49
26
(4)
16

$849
834
15
660
530
130
176
171
164
7
397
366
31
333
42
72
142
136
66
35
3
15

(5
)
(6
)
(5
)

$673
669
4
855
696
159
155
172
165
7
454
432
22
610
29
78
115
144
56
67
4
4

(5
)
O
(5)
<
5)
<
5)
(5)
(5)
(5
)
(5
)
(*)
(6)
<)
5
(6)
(5)
(5)
(5
)
(«)
(5)
(5
)
(5
)
(5
)
<
6)

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................

$152
102
50

$245
207
38

Food: Total1.......................................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense............................................
Received in k in d ........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T otal...............
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: T otal.................................................
Money expense......................1...................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8....................................

$59
37
22
53
32
21
4
2
2
(4)
12
5
7
2
2
2
4
1
3
1
(4)
7

$86
80
6
81
53
28
10
4
3
1
15
12
3
7
4
4
18
4
4
3
2
3

See footnotes on p. 119.




$356
302
54

$419
387
32

$527
489
38

$626
582
44

$717 $1,140
666 1,077
51
63

(5>
(5
)
(8)

$108 $129
100
126
3
8
115
98
78
93
20
22
10
18
31
18
13 15
3
18 •
36
48
44
28
4
8
17
19
10
7
7
8
15
26
9
9
8 ' 11
3
5
2
(4)
1
7

$155
152
3
141
113
28
25
30
27
3
48
44
4
37
9
11
35
17
11
6
(4)
2

$185
183
2
150
115
35
25
29
26
3
62
58
4
58
11
11
46
22
11
7
0
9

$207
201
6
157
122
35
37
42
42
0
98
88
10
48
14
18
38
27
18
9
1
3

$219
219
0
214
155
59
57
125
123
2
107
105
2
173
69
63
37
23
12
21
0
20

(5
)
(s)
(5)
(5)
(5
)
(*)
(5
)
(5
)
(5)
(5
)
(5
)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)

114

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 20.— M ajor

categories of consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind oj selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney income class— Continued

Urban 3-person families
PE RC E N T AG E R E PO R T IN G
Annual m oney income o f —
Item
Under
$500

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

F ood:1
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration2
Money expense...........................................
Received in k in d ........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
A utom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense............. : .........
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense*....................................

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0 48.4 33.3 32.8 20.5 26.0 28.6

100.0
16.7

100.0
33.3

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0 25.8 42.4 42.6 61.5 52.0 71.4
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

100.0
66.7
100.0

100.0
66.6
100.0

66.7
33.3

90.3
29.0

93.9
15.2

96.7 100.0 100.0
21.3 10.3 32.0

97.6
23.8

100.0
16.7

100.0
0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0 80.6 75.8 81.9 64.1 82.0
33.3 22.6 57.6 57.4 79.5 68.0
33.3 67.7 75.8 72.1 82.1 86.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
66.7 77.4 93.9 100.0 100.0 98.0
33.3 93.5 97.0 96.7 100.0 100.0
66.7 58.1 78.8 78.7 79.5 76.0
100.0 71.0 93.9 98.4 100.0 100.0
0
38.7 36.4 23.0 46.2 40.0
0
25.8 21.2 23.0 28.2 38.0

100.0
81.0
85.7
85.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
95.2
97.6
35.7
42.9

100.0
75.0
83.3
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
83.3
100.0
66.7
91.7

100.0
66.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
0
100.0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
66.7 37.0 30.0
9.8 12.8 10.5 15.9

100.0
6.7

(»)
(«)

83.3 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 98.5
83.3 33.3 30.0 31.4 53.2 50.0 63.5
100.0 100.0 96.7 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

100.0
60.0
100.0

(5)
(*)
h

82.5
3.2

100.0
20.0

96.3
3.3 98.1 97.9 100.0 98.4
37.0 53.3 31.4 38.3 36.8 38.1
29.6 56.7 56.9 59.6 65.8 77.8
55.6 53.3 68.6 78.7 68.4 82.5
96.3 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
74.1 83.3 90.2 91.5 94.7 92.1
74.1 96.7 98.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
59.3 76.7 64.7 83.0 73.7 88.9
81.5 86.7 96.1 97.9 100.0 100.0
37.0 20.0 27.4 23.4 31.6 38.1
3.7 33.3 13.7 19.1 15.8 36.5

100.0
40.0
93.3
73.3
100.0
93.3
100.0
86.7
100.0
53.3
60.0

(*)
(*)
(*)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5
)

1942 (first 3 months)
Food:1
Money expense............................... ...........
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense..........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense............................
Other: Money expense*....................................

See footnotes on p. 119,




0
0
100.0
66.7
33.3
16.7
100.0
66.7
16.7
33.3
66.7
66.7
0

55.6
7.4

80.0
10.0

76.5
9.8

76.6
6.4

73.7
5.3

(5)

(5
)
(5)
(5
)
(6)

115

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 20.—M ajor c a te g o r ie s of c o n s u m p tio n : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney income class—Continued

Urban 3-person families— Continued
A VE R AG E E X P E N D IT U R E A N D A VE R AG E VALUE
Annual money income of —
Item
Under
•cnn

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

A ll items: Total value......................................
Money expense............................................
Received in k in d ........................................

$996
801
195

$995 $1,398 $1,729 $2,315 $2,619 $3,451 $5,522 $6,469
6,274
5,273
828 1,283 1,612 2,141 2,411 3,221
195
174
230
249
117
208
167
115

F ood: Total1.......................................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense..........................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T ota l...............
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: T o t a l.................................................
Money expense............................................
‘ Received in k in d ........................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense............................
T obacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8....................................

$417
365
52
331
203
128
14
8
7
1
46
32
14
17
1
8
133
5
8
8
0
0

$368
319
49
273
184
89
27
64
55
9
106
86
20
54
16
18
23
20
15
7
2
2

$499
461
38
336
282
54
46
62
60
2
177
156
21
74
22
27
49
40
39
13
4
10

$562
540
22
395
325
70
61
87
84
3
206
184
= 22
127
31
36
90
57
43
19
4
11

$629
620
9
540
399
141
77
151
144
7
272
255
17
255
32
47
131
77
42
22
21
19

$770
760
10
591
438
153
105
178
169
9
295
259
36
282
48
49
97
106
41
27
13
17

$934 $1,198 TU529
1,504
1,183
918
25
15
16
1,022
1,160
671
860 1,000
503
162
160
168
613
149
497
233
164
271
233
151
267
0
13
4
536
754
416
526
695
374
10
42
59
696
330
389
137
196
63
202
137
66
514
391
155
514
167
451
136
180
85
64
66
31
0
22
78
135
32
58

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll items: Total value............. .........................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................

$203
138
65

$284
257
27

$348
322
26

$452
416
36

$513
470
43

$602
570
32

$770 $1,210
1,126
712
84
58

<
5)

F ood: Total1.......................................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kin d........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind ........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings’ and equipment: T ota l...............
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: T ota l..................................................
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense--------Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
T obacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8....................................

$78
74
4
74
18
56
3
0
0
0
17
12
5
7
(4
)
2
19
(4
)
1
1
1
0

$110
105
5
82
65
17
9
9
9
(4
)
23
18
5
23
3
4
9
4
5
2
1
(4
)

$122
114
8
83
73
10
13
18
17
1
37
30
7
18
5
7
21
7
8
3
(4)
6

$159
151
8
112
91
21
15
15
13
2
51
46
5
21
7
9
28
17
10
5
2
1

$155
154
1
139
103
36
19
26
25
1
64
59
5
23
9
11
25
15
12
6
2
7

$192
190
2
139
113
26
25
15
15
(4
)
74
70
4
39
10
12
58
18
10
6
3
1

$226
222
4
170
123
47
35
38
37
1
99
93
6
64
14
17
36
39
16
7
6
3

$287
286
1
302
228
74
1
99
97
2
153
146
7
100
21
27
70
75
30
19
12
14

(5)
(*)
ill
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5
)
®
(5
)
(!)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5
)
(5
)
(®)
(*)
(5)
(5
)
(5)
(5
)

See footnotes on p. 119.




(5)

116

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 20.— M ajor

categories of consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney incom e class— Continued

Urban 4-person families
PE R C E N T A G E R E PO R T IN G
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 to
$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

F ood :1
Money expense............................................
Received in'kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration :2
Money exp en se..........................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8....... ............................

(5)
(5
)

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
41.7 19.0 30.4 32.6 24.3 20.5

100.0
11.1

100.0
66.7

(*)
(«)
<)
5

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
16.7 38.1 43.4 53.5 56.8 72.7
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

100.0
66.7
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

97.7 100.0
25.6 24.3

97.7
25.0

100.0
22.2

100.0
0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
91.7 71.4 73.9 79.1 86.5
8.3 47.6 56.5 83.7 78.4
75.0 81.0 87.0 81.4 94.6
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
83.3 100.0 95.7 95.3 100.0
66.7 95.2 100.0 100.0 100.0
41.7 81.0 69.6 83.7 89.2
75.3 95.2 95.7 93.0 100.0
41.7 47.6 52.2 58.1 59.5
16.7 19.0 34.8 34.9 43.2

100.0
81.8
90.9
84.1
100.0
97.7
100.0
90.9
100.0
70.5
34.1

100.0
66.7
88.9
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
88.9
100.0
66.7
44.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
66.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
66.7
100.0

(5)
(5)

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
40.0 29.2 27.8 12.5
6.1
7.5

100.0
27.8

100.0
40.0

(5)
(5
)
(5
)

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
40.0 41.6 33.3 50.0 51.5 49.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

100.0
72.2
100.0

100.0
80.0
100.0

92.5
7.5

88.9
11.1

100.0
0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
60.0 70.8 33.3 40.6 33.3 39.6
13.3 | 41.7 61.1 59.4 78.8 73.6
66.7 66.7 72.2 84.4 81.8 77.4
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
73.3 91.7 100.0 93.8 93.. 9 94.3
66.7 95.8 94.4 96.9 97.0 100.0
53.3 79.2 66.7 93.8 81.8 86.8
66.7 91.7 94.4 100.0 97.0 100.0
46.7 50.0 27.8 40.6 54.5 64.2
6.7 25.0 33.3 37.5 24.2 28.3

100.0
38.9
94.4
88.9
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
61.1
27.8

100.0
20.0
80.0
80.0
100.0
80.0
100.0
100.0
80.0
80.0
80.0

(5)
(5)
(5)
(5
)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5
)
(5)
(5
)
(5
)

83.3
25.0

90.5
19.0

95.7
30.4

1942 (first 3 months)
Food:1
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing:
Money expense............................................
Received in kind........................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8....................................

See footnotes on p. 119.




(5)
(5
)
(5
)
(5)
(*)
(5
)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5;

60.0
13.3

87.5
12.5

77.8
5.6

87.5
0

93.9
9.1

117

Part III.— Tabular Summary
T able 20.— M ajor

categories of consumption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind of selected goods and servicesf average amount spent and average
value, by annual money income class— Continued

Urban 4-person families— Continued
A V E R A G E E X P E N D IT U R E A N D A V E R A G E VALUE
Annual money income o f —
Item
Under
$500

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

All items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................

(*)
8

F ood: Total1.......................................................
(5)
Money expense...........................................
( 5)
Received in kind........................................
( 5)
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
(5)
Money expense...........................................
(*)
Received in kind........................................
(5)
Household operation: Money expense..........
(5
)
Furnishings and equipment: T otal..............
(5
)
Money expense...........................................
(5)
Received in kind........................................
(5)
Clothing: T ota l.................................................
( 5)
Money expense...........................................
(5)
(5)
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
( 5)
0)
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................ I (*)
Medical care: Money expense......................... 1 <)
5
Recreation: Money expense............................
(*)
Tobacco: Money expense...............................
<*)
Reading: Money expense................................
(5)
Education: Money expense ......................................
(5)
Other: Money expense3................................................
(3)

$905 $1,470 $1,936 $2,409 $2,893 $3,438 $4,966 $8,994
801 1,377 1,783 2,214 2,734 3,212 4,727 9,197
159
104
153
195
239 —203
93
226
$419
398
21
276
219
57
24
9
8
1
85
60
25
6
9
17
28
9
9
7
2
5

$531
526
5
350
305
45
46
99
85
14
187
158
29
67
26
33
45
31
38
12
3
2

$658
637
21
449
365
84
86
98
91
7
263
222
41
78
23
34
119
47
37
21
12
11

$725
710
15
534
401
133
92
106
97
9
297
259
38
254
33
43
106
89
54
19
37
20

$935
925
10
621
512
115
108
145
142
3
352
321
31
224
86
59
90
107
53
27
29
51

$907 $1,349 $2,583
898
1,348 2,532
1
9
51
700
837 1,370
630
531
1,786
169
207 -4 1 6
163
139
744
234
189
237
231
177
237
12
3
0
1,265
497
677
649 1,103
461
162
36
28
627 1,081
358
74
154
56
203
79
98
160
244
248
880
157
345
121
62
62
52
35
74
57
59
75
22
79
45

1942 (first 3 months)
A l l it e m s : T o t a l v a l u e ..................................................

O i $275
O | 240
35
(*) !

$378
350
28

$464
438
26

$586
544
42

$681
627
54

$820 $1,184 $1,936
777 1,081
1,938
43
103
-2

F ood: Total1.......................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipm ent: T otal..............
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: T ota l.................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense............................
T obacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense3....................................

(5)
(•)

$140
137
3
98
82
16
11
15
15
(4)
50
41
9
•14
7
7
12
6
7
4
5
2

$165
159
6
111
94
17
14
25
25
(4)
46
43
3
21
10
8
23
14
8
5
4
10

$192
191
1
144
107
37
21
35
35
0
77
73
4
32
11
12
21
18
13
5
1
4

$224
222
2
144
111
33
30
37
23
14
74
69
5
56
14
13
32
21
12
6
16
2

$237
236
1
179
147
32
35
45
44
1
117
108
9
52
14
18
45
40
16
7
10
5

Money expense .........................................................
Received m k in d ........................................

See footnotes on p. 119.




(5
)
(*)
(•)
(5)
(*)
(5)
(*)
(5)
(5
)
(5
)
(•)
(5
)
(5)
(5)
(5
)
(5
)
(5)
(5)
(•)
(5
)

$101
94
7
71
57
14
8
4
3
1
31
18
13
3
4
5
5
8
4
2
1
28

$ 348
$548
332
540
16
8
211
417
131
429
80
-1 2
64
145
41
52
40
52
1
0
167
249
161
247
2
6
105
108
27
69
27
48
59
46
69 • 156
24
23
10
21
26
43
3
14

118

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a ble 20.— M ajor

catego ries of consum ption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and servicesy average amount spent and average
value, by annual money income class— Continued

Urban families of 5 or more persons
PE RC E N T AG E R E PO R T IN G
Annual money income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

Food:1
Money expense....................................
Received in kind ................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense....................................
Received m kind ................................
Household operation: Money expen se..
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense.. .............................
Received in kind.*..............................
Clothing:
Money expense....................................
Received in kind ................................
A utom obile: Money expense...................
Other transportation: Money expen se..
Personal care: Money expense................
Medical care: Money expense..................
Recreation: Money expense.....................
Tobacco: Money expense.........................
Reading: Money expense.........................
Education: Money expense......................
Other: Money expense3.............................

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
80.0 75.0 57.9 31.6 40.0 40.0 23.7

100.0
13.3

100.0
37.5

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
80.0 70.0 42.1 42.2 52.0 70.0 47.3
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

100.0
66.7
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

96.7 100.0
23.3 31.6

93.3
20.0

100.0
25.0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
80.0 85.0 78.9 78.9 96.0 86.7 81.5
35.0 47.4 39.5 60.0 66.7 60.5
0
40.0 55.0 84.2 68.4 84.0 90.0 89.5
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
80.0 85.0 100.0 97.4 96.0 96.7 100.0
80.0 90.0 94.7 97.4 100.0 96.7 100.0
60.0 75.0 78.9 81.6 92.0 90.0 92.1
20.0 70.0 73.7 97.4 96.0 96.7 100.0
80.0 70.0 63.2 55.3 84.0 70.0 73.7
0
10.0 26.3 28.9 60.0 36.7 47.4

100.0
80.0
86.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
93.3
100.0
73.3
26.7

100.0
75.0
87.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
75.0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0 46.2 35.0 26.9 30.0 20.8 16.3

100.0
9.5

100.0
0

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 93.9
20.0 46.2 45.0 30.8 53.3 50.0 53.1
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

100.0
61.9
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

87.8
8.2

85.7
14.3

85.7
0

100.0 92.3 95.0 100.0 96.7 95.8 100.0
60.0 53.8 45.0 46.2 53.3 41.7 42.9
40.0 23.1 50.0 34.6 50.0 66.7 59.2
0
38.5 70.0 69.2 73.3 91.7 87.8
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
60.0 76.9 95.0 92.3 90.0 91.7 91.8
: 60.0 76.9 90.0 100.0 96.7 100.0 100.0
| 60.0 76.9 70.0 88.5 80.0 91.7 89.8
: 20.0 53.8 70.0 100.0 96.7 91.7 100.0
! 60.0 61.5 50.0 34.6 73.3 66.7 61.2
7.7 10.0 19.2 23.3
8.3 38.8
1 0

100.0
38.1
95.2
100.0
100.0
90.5
100.0
95.2
100.0
57.1
14.3

100.0
28.6
85.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
71.4
100.0
100.0
100.0

80.0
20.0

95.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
35.0 21.1 36.8 12.0

l O O .o
l O O .o

100.0

1942 (first 3 months)
F ood :1
Money expense....................................
Received m kind.................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration2
Money expense....................................
Received m kind.................................
Household operation: Money expense..
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense....................................
Received in kind................................
Clothing:
m
Money expense....................................
Received in kind ....................................
A utom obile: Money expense...................
Other transportation: Money expense. .
Personal care: Money expense................
Medical care: Money expense..................
Recreation: Money expense....... ...........
Tobacco: Money expense.........................
Reading: Money expense.........................
Education: Money expense......................
Other: Money expense3.............................

See footnotes on p. 119.




60.0
0

69.2
23.1

80.0
15.0

80.8
7.7

90.0
3.3

87.5
8.3

119

Part H I.— Tabular Summary
T able 20.— M ajor

catego ries of con su m ption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, by annual m oney income class— Continued

Urban families of 5 or more persons— Continued
A V E R AG E E XP E N D IT U R E A N D AVE R AG E VALUE
Annual money income o f —
Item

$1,000i $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under, $500
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
1941 (12 months)

All items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind ........................................

$532
364
168

Food: Total1.......................................................
$279
Money expense...........................................
168
Received In k in d ........................................
111
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total1*
2.......
106
Money expense...........................................
58
Received in k in d ........................................
48
21
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T otal..............
13
Money expense...........................................
13
Received In k in d ........................................
(4
)
Clothing: T o ta l.................................................
57
Money expense...........................................
48
Received in k in d ......................................
9
0
Autom obile: Money expense.......................
Other transportation: Money expense........ 1
6;
12
Personal care: Money expense......................
17
Medical care: Money expense.........................
7
Recreation: Money expense..........................
9
T ob a cco: M oney expense..............................
2
Reading: Money expense................................
3
Education: Money expense............................
0
Other: Money expense8....................................

$969 $1,380 $1,848 $2,423 $3,006 $3,824 $5,142 $10,130
822 1,278 1,745 2,281 2,812 3,611
4,862 9,381
102
749
142
147
194
103
213
280
$409
368
41
225
165
60
37
26
23
3
128
85
43
37
7
20
39
11
17
5
5
3

$569
539
30
315
260
55
27
58
57
1
171
155
16
71
34
28
31
21
33
7
6
9

$732
713
19
428
382
46
47
71
68
3
236
201
35
77
32
37
71
43
42
14
11
7

$866 $1,020 $1,197 $1,708 $2,218
852
982 1,165
1,702 2,145
14
32
73
6
38
515
560
679
828 2,105
1,489
604
435
463 . 541
616
80
97
224
138
84
77
975
188
175
349
96
155
239
241
344
87
144
239
235
2
9
4
5
11
320
474
569
786
1,585
281
426
530
738 1,530
39
55
48
39
48
502
286
973
135
328
46
56
136
68
125
196
44
56
80
97
452
89
98
157.
177
94
626
75
157
205
100
57
75
74
81
32
94
22
26
18
299
13
27
50
140
12
56
15
26
41

1942 (first 3 months)
All items: Total value......................................
Money expense....... ...................................
Received in k in d ........................................
Food: Total1.......................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind ........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrig.: Total2.......
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind ........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: T otal..............
Money expense........................................... !
Received in kind ........................................
Clothing: T ota l............................................... 1
Money expense........................................... I
Received in kind........................................
Autom obile: Money expense.........................
Other transportation: Money expense........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense............ .•
............ I
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense8....................................

$240
171
69

$256
230
26

$366
333
33

$446
414
32

$601
561
40

$665
626
39

$925
866
59

$98
65
33
63
31
32
6
22
22
0
20
16
4
15
0
4
5
2
3
1
1
0

$105
101
4
63
51
12
7
9
8
1
33
24
9
3
1
4
20
4
4
1
1
1

$145
132
13
81
64
17
8
12
12
(4
)
36
33
3
15
8
6
16
7
7
2
1
22

$181
176
5
107
91
16
16
15
15
(4
)
50
39
11
11
9
10
19
10
11
4
1
2

$232
225
7
132
109
23
21
23
23
(4
)
78
68
10
19
12
12
18
13
13
4
19
5

$243
239
4
145
117
28
25
29
28
1
98
92
6
29
14
14
29
17
12
5
4
1

$312
305
7
173
131
42
37
35
33
2
134
126
8
60
20
17
40
42
19
6
17
13

$1,378 $2,494
1,316 2,286
62
208
$418
412
6
217
170
47
42
102
100
2
212
205
7
128
27
25
72
64
26
8
29
8

$543
543
0
556
359
197
315
56
56
0
386
375
11
166
20
65
134
124
16
35
70
8

1 Includes expenditures for alcoholic beverages.
2 Includes expenditures for all housing, including fam ily homes, vacation homes, and lodging of fam ily
members while traveling or on vacation, or at school. For the farm home, expenditures include on ly those
for insurance and for repairs paid for b y the fam ily; all other expenditures for the farm home were consid­
ered farm business expenditures. For urban and rural nonfarm families, expenditures for fam ily home
include those for rent and repairs on rented home, and for taxes, insurance, repairs and replacements,
special assessments, interest on mortgage, and refinancing charges for owned homes.
8 Includes interest on debts incurred for fam ily living; bank service charges, including safe-deposit box;
legal expenses connected with household affairs; losses concerned directly with the household, including
amount of installments paid during period on repossessed furniture; funeral expenses, including upkeep
and purchase of cemetery lot; and expense for other items, such as dues to political and to cooperative
associations, marriage licenses, and flowers for the wedding of a fam ily member. Includes garden expenses
for seeds and fertilizer, and feed for chickens for fam ily food supply.
4 Less than $0.50.
5 Averages n ot shown because of the small number in the sample.




Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

1 2 0

T able 21.-—F ood

and alcoholic beverages : Percentage reporting expenditure and
receipt of food in kind , average amount spent, and average value, urban families and
single consumers, by annual money income class
Annual m oney income of—
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
U nder $500
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 j $2,500 $3,000 $5,000

$5,000
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

1941 (12 months)
Percentage reporting expenditure for—
Food away from home8.........
Alcoholic drinks:4
Whiskey, gin, rum, e tc ...

80.6
13.3
32.7

79.8
14.9
47.9

87.2
11.1
70.6

93.4
6.6
68.2

95.6
4.9
84.7

96.6
3.4
89.2

98.2
1.8
92.2

100.0
0
92.9

100.0
0
100.0

15.3
3.1
2.0

19.1
11.2
3.7

27.8
16.7
5.6

37.9
20.2
5.1

45.4
24.6
7.7

39.2
33.1
14.9

51.8
40.4
10.8

45.2
52.4
9.5

41.2
76.5
52.9

63.3
18.4
23.5
33.7
8.2

46.3
16.0
16.0
18.6
6.4

34.4
15.0
6.7
13.9
1.7

30.8
10.6
7.6
15.7
.5

26.2
9.8
6.0
11.5
0

29.1
12.2
8.1
11.5
0

24.7
12.7
6.6
9.0
0

16.7
4.8
2.4
9.5
0

41.2
35.3
0
11.8
0

Percentage reporting food

Received from relief a gen cy..

Average m oney expense: T o t a l.. $170.14 $295.32 $437.41 $560.84 $655.71 $829.48 $948.97 $1,330.47 $1,894.68
929.07 1,200.47
127.90 221.94 328.67 460.19 512.65 669.98 698.17
8.19
0
0
22.28 29.25 29.37 16.59 15.54 10.31
523.01
328.92
13.09 33.78 62.27 60.89 102.19 121.91 179.99
Food away from home8.........
171.20
72.48
6.87 10.35 17.10 23.17 25.33 27.28 62.62
Alcoholic drinks:4..................
47.07
23.77
8.93 14.11 14.89 12.49 33.69
6.32
5.78
B eer...................................
124.84
24.65
7.15
9.15 12.28 26.44
7.24
3.32
.91
Whiskey, gin, rum, etc...
22.59
1.29
2.51
2.49
.76
1.02
1.82
.71
.18
Wines.................................
50.78
7.23
57.42 40.88 27.00 20.06 10.75 18.64 17.91
Value of food received in k in d ...
30.45
2.16
4.76
2.96
2.26
7.47
2.87
5.91
4.88
Raised for own use ..............
0
3.10
9.77 11.40
5.87
28.90 25.17 12.61 11.79
Received as pay®....................
2.72
4.11
3.55
20.33
4.79
1.87
17.51
7.26
6.11
Received as gift®.....................
0
0
0
0
0
.81
.61
5.10
3.57
Received from relief a gen cy..
1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting expenditure
for—
Food at home1........................
Board8......................................
Food away from home8.........
Alcoholic drinks:4
B eer...................................
Whisky, gin, rum, e tc.. . .
Wines.................................
Percentage reporting food
received in kind.........................
Raised for own use................
Received as pay5....................
Received as gift®.....................
Received from relief agency.

85.1
7.9
26.7

84.3
11.6
36.0

80.2
14.7
66.1

90.6
8.9
61.8

92.2
5.7
69.3

94.3
6.4
83.6

97.2
1.4
84.3

100.0
1.6
90.3

100.0
0
100.0

11.9
4.0
2 0

14.0
9.9
2.3

24 9
13.0
2.8

33.0
13.1
2.6

42.2
20.3
5.7

34.3
27.1
11.4

43.5
25.5
10.2

53.2
40.3
12.9

53.3
66.7
40.0

51.5
10.9
23.8
23.8
7.9

32.0
14.0
11.0
10.5
3.5

26.0
7.3
9.6
11.3
1.1

18.3
13.1
5.8
9.9
1.0

15.6
5.2
2.6
8.9
0

12.1
2.9
5.0
4.3
0

13.9
2.8
6.0
6.0
0

14.5
4.8
3.2
6.5
0

26.7
26.7
0
0
0

Average m oney expense: T o t a l.. $44.55 $80.87 $110.69 $138.73 $168.66 $199.67 $238.97
35.60 64.79 79.36 110.44 133.00 150.29 185.98
Food at home1........................
1.13
6.40
5.73
7.04
7.02 10.26
4.02
Board2.....................................
3.62
6.06 17.10 16.80 22.91 34.18 39.05
Food away from home8.........
7.02
3.00
5.09
8.16 12.81
3.97
1.31
Alcoholic drinks:4..................
7.31
4.12
3.29
1.79
3.29
1.45
.98
B eer.......................... .........
2.60
3.80
4.55
1.36
2.08
1.28
Whisky, gin, rum, etc.. . .
.28
.30
.95
.10
.52
1.07
.19
.05
W ines.................................
2.95
2.32
4.24
6.33
14.33
6.79
8.38
Value o f food received in k in d ...
1.29
.30
.56
.36
1.40
1.05
.57
Raised for own u s e ..............
1.72
2.80
5.32
4.21
8.80
1.08
4.17
Received as pay5....................
1.31
.30
1.32
1.51
1.29
1.08
Received as g ift® ...................
2.98
0
0
1.15
.25
.26
.26
0
Received from relief agency..

See footnotes on pp. 121-122.




$333.54
239.28
.41
73.17
20.68
11.26
7.71
1.71
6.89
.79
2.10
4.00
0

$477.33
316.40
0
112.87
48.06
9.10
30.16
8.80
4.18
4.18
0
0
0

Part I II.— Tabular Summary

12 1

T a b l e 21A.— F ood an d alco ho lic b e v e r a g e s : Percentage reporting expenditure and
receipt of food in kind, average amount spent, and average value, urban families ami
single consumers, by annual money income class and living arrangements
Annual m oney income of—
Item

U nder
$500

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000

to

$5,000
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

100.0

0
0

100.0
0

0

0
0

1941 (12 months)
Percentage reporting expendi­
ture for—
Food at hom e:1
Nonhousekeeping...........
Board:1
2
*
Housekeeping..................
Food away from hom e:8
Housekeeping..................
Nonhousekeeping...........
Alcoholic drinks:*
Housekeeping..................
N onhousekeepi n g...........
Percentage reporting food
received in kind:
Home-grown:
Nonhousekeeping...........
Received as pay:8
Housekeeping..................
Nonhousekeeping...........
Received as gift:6
Housekeeping..................
N onhousekeeping...........
Received as relief:
Housekeeping..................
Nonhousekeeping...........

79
9 .4

100.0
29.6

100.0
15.6

100.0
30.3

100.0
27.8

799.4
30.0

100.0
20.0

0
48.1

.7
60.0

.7
57.6

1.1
61.1

1.7
60.0

.7
80.0

0
100.0

18.3
70.4

39.9
73.3

67.3
84.8

64.4
88.9

82.7
100.0

88.8
100.0

90.8
100.0

92.9
0

100 0
0

15^3
23.1

19.6
44.4

32.7
51.5

45.0
55.6

57.2
30.0

59.0
75.0

66.3
100.0

69.0
0

88.2
0

25.0
0

21.0
0

18.4
0

11.7
0

10.4
0

12.5
0

12.9
0

4 8
0

35 3
0

21.1
29.6

11.2
31.1

4.1
18.2

5.6
27.8

5.8
10.0

8.3
0

6.7
0

2 4
0

0
0

35.2
29.6

16.8
24.4

13.6
15.2

15.6
16.7

12.1
0

11.8
0

9.2
0

9.5
0

11 8
0

9.7
3.8

8.4
0

2.0
0

0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

.6

33.3

0
0

Total value of food:
Housekeeping.......................... $224.12 $334.37 $471.38 $589.31 $670.29 $858.14 $966.66 $1,337.70 $1,945.46
Nonhousekeeping................... 236.91 341.99 433.46 448.56 600.18 569.00 979.02
0
0
Average money expense:
Housekeeping.................. $178.50 $307.31 $447.95 $573.00 $659.49
Nonhousekeeping........... 148.83 257.19 390.58 411.57 590.18
Food at hom e:1
Housekeeping.................. 168:46 283.66 385.24 500.78 538.35
Nonhousekeeping...........
21.23 25.83 76.69 34.88 67.98
Board:2
Housekeeping..................
0
1.14
.35
1.00
4.69
Nonhousekeeping...........
80.87 118.56 158.64 172.48 203.34
Food away from hom e:8
Housekeeping..................
7.96 15.78 49.84 51.04 92.62
Nonhousekeeping...........
26.58 91.00 117.64 170.09 267.64
Alcoholic drinks:4
Housekeeping..................
6.73 12.52 20.18 23.83
2.08
Nonhousekeeping...........
20.15 21.80 37.61 34.12 51.22
Value of food received in kind:
Housekeeping..................
45.62 27.06 23.43 16.31 10.80
Nonhousekeeping...........
88.08 84.80 42.88 36.99 10.00
Home-grown:
Housekeeping..................
8 04
6.41
9.14
3 16
2 29
Nonhousekeeping...........
0
0
0
0
0
Received as pay:5
Housekeeping..................
19.70 10.22
7.56
7.61
5.63
Nonhousekeeping...........
53.10 72.68 35.12 34.45 10.00
Received as gift:6
Housekeeping..................
5 73
12.27
5.74
4 87
2.88
Nonhousekeeping...........
31.29 12.12
0
7.76
2.54
Received as relief:
Housekeeping..................
0
4 70
.99
5.61
67
Nonhousekeeping...........
3.69
0
0
0
0

$838.98 $948.41 $1,330.47 $1,894.68
0
569.00 979.02
0
690.79 711.00
75.00
.90

929.07
0

1,200.17
0

1.44
0
264.00 453.13

0
0

0
0

120.98 176.70
148.60 358.69

328.92
0

523.01
0

25 77 60.71
81.40 166.30

72.48
0

171.50
0

19 16
0

18.25
0

7.23
0

50.78
0

4.89
0

3 02
0

2 26
0

30.45
0

10.04
0

11.61
0

3.10
0

4 23
0

3.62
0

1.87
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0
20.33
0
0
0

1 Includes cost of food prepared at home but eaten away from home and value o f food brought home
b y the proprietor o f a food store.
2 Includes board in household where person lives or elsewhere. Excludes restaurant meals and board
for children away at school.
2 Includes meals at work, lunches at school, meals while traveling or while on vacation, board at school,
and restaurant meals for fam ily and guests; and expense for food bought to be used with meals carried
from home. Includes foods such as candy, ice cream, and soft drinks.




Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

1 2 2

T able 21 A.— F ood

and alcoholic b e v e r a g e s : Percentage reporting expenditure and
receipt of food in kind, average amount spent, and average value, urban families and
single consumers, by annual money income class and living arrangements— Continued

Annual money income of
Item

Under
$500

S500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000
to
to
to
to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500

$2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
and
$3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting expenditure
for—
Food at hom e:1
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Board:2
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Food away from hom e:8
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Alcoholic drinks:4
Housekeeping....................
Nonhousekeeping.................
Percentage reporting food received
in kind:
H om egrow n:
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Received as p a y:5
'
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Received as gift:67
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Received as relief:
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Total value of food:
Housekeeping.................................
Nonhousekeeping..........................
Average m oney expense:
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Food at hom e:1
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping.................
Board:2
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Food away from home:8
Housekeeping............., ..........
Nonhousekeeping...................
Alcoholic drinks:4
8
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Value of food received in kind:
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
H om egrow n:
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Received as p a y :5
Ho usekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Received as gift:6
Housekeeping.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................
Received as relief:
Housekeepi ng.........................
Nonhousekeeping...................

100.0
40.0

100.0
15.6

100.0
10.3

100.0
21.7

100.0
16.7

8
98.5
25.0

899.1
0

100.0
0

0
32.0

0
62.5

2.2
61.5

1.2
65.2

0
61.1

1.5
87.5

0
75.0

1.6
0

0
0

18.4
52.0

31.4
56.3

62.3
79.5

61.3
65.2

67.2
88.9

83.3
87.5

84.0
100.0

90.3
0

100.0
0

6.6
44.0

17.9
25.0

29.7
43.6

38.7
43.5

52.3
44.4

47.7
75.0

56.6
75.0

66.1
0

86.7
0

15.8
0

12.1
0

9.4
0

2.4
4.3

5.7
0

3.0
0

2.8
0

4.8
0

26.7
0

21.1
32.0

9.3
18.8

7.2
17.9

4.8
13.0

2.9
0

4.5
12.5

5.7
25.0

3.2
0

0
0

26.3
16.0

10.7
9.4

12.3
7.7

10.1
8.7

9.2
5.6

4.5
0

6.1
0

6.5
0

0
0

10.5
0

4.3
0

1.4
0

1.2
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

100.0
0

$59.22 $87.31 $120.48 $148.52 $174.38 $204.36 $243.72 $340.43 $481.51
57.87 89.14 114.06 119.83 144.65 162.57 215.02
0
0
$16.70 $82.53 $113 ~89 $143.11 $171.18 $202.10 $239.62 $333.54 $477.33
38.00 73,56 99.39 106.73 144.10 159.44 203.77
0
0
44.29
9.17

76.98
11.45

99.04 123.43 146.42 158.89 189.49 239.28 316.40
3.19
0
0
0
9.75 15.52
8.28

0
16.26

0
37.74

.73
46.65

.30
50.94

0
61.07

1.44
99.40

2.00
8.55

3.63
16.65

11.16
35.42

15.34
27.49

19.13
59.42

34.27 37.84
32.72 103.12

.41
4.02

1.92
7.72

2.96
7.57

4.04
12.78

5.63
20.42

7.50
19.04

12.99
39.50

20.68
0

48.06
0

12.52
19.87

4.78
15.58

6.59
14.67

5.41
13.10

3.20
.55

2.26
3.13

4.10
11.25

6.89
0

4.18
0

1.86
0

1.29
0

1.65
0

.38
1.98

.61

.32
0

.79
0

4.18
0

6.01
17.31

2.26
12.52

3.04
13.37

3.34
10.57

1.20
0

1.63
3.13

2.64
11.25

2.10
0

0
0

3.12
.93
2.56 * 3.06

1.57
1.30

1.39
.55

1.39
.55

.31
0

1.10
0

4.00
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

1.53
0

.30
0

.30

.33
0

0

0

0
61.15

.41
0

73.17 112.87
0
0

.36
0

0
0

4 Includes all expense for alcoholic drinks whether consumed at home or away from home, also includes
tax. There can be little doubt that the volume of expenditures for alcoholic beverages has been seriously
underreported, possibly b y as m uch as two-thirds.
* Includes meals received b y household servants, restaurant employees, and institutional employees
as part of their remuneration, and any other food obtained in paym ent for services.
6 value of food received as gift was estimated at the price the fam ily would have paid at the m ost likely
place of purchase. Includes the value of meals received b y the fam ily as guests, if such meals are in excess
of the number furnished to guests o f the household.
7 1 housekeeping fam ily ate all meals away from home.
8 2 housekeeping families ate all meals away from home.




123

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T able 22.— H o u sin g : Percentage reporting tenure, and selected expenditures and average
amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual money income class and
tenure

1941 (12 months)

Annual money income o f —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000
$10,000 over

F u ll-p e r io d h o m e o tv n ers
Percentage of families and single
consumers owning homes for en­
tire period.......................................
Percentage of owners reporting expenditures for —
Repair and replacements.........
Interest on mortgage.................

25.5

23.4

26.7

26.8

37.7

45.3

51.8

54.8

82.4

52.0
12.0
44.0

40.9
29.5
36.4

45.8
47.9
50.0

50.9
37.7
41.5

49.3
68.1
63.8

56.7
80.6
58.2

61.6
57.0
54.7

69.6
47.8
69.6

92.9
50.0
92.9

Average expense for all housing:
$69.51 $79.12 $163.81 $141.13 $238.92 $273.83 $283.16 $390.73 $1,214.42
Average expense for owned
hom e: T o t a l ........................... $68.91
$8.34
Interest on m ortgage.........
$0.58
Current ta x es.. .7 ............... $34.29
Special assessments............
$0.21
Repairs and replacements. $19.49
Insurance.............................
$4.53
O ther.....................................
$6.47
Housing and lodging expense
while traveling, on vacation,
or at school...........................
$0.60
Net m oney value o f occupancy of
owned home1................................... $167.42

$78.82 $157.13 $137.32 $223.64
$8.93 $46.96 $32.12 $66.39
0
0
$0.10
$1.18
$46.00 $58.21 $58.29 $79.14
$0.36 $3.69 $1.42 $1.41
$19.94 $38.28 $36.93 $64.31
$3.59 $8.34 $7.50 $10.79
0
$1.55 $1.06 $0.42
$0.30

$251.95
$103.77
$5.03
$85.40
$0.83
$45.74
$10.06
$1.12

$250.40 $337.56 $1,057.74
$74.83 $75.36 $159.40
0
$0.67 $2.20
$105.13 $146.08 $439.34
$0.32 $1.02
$0.35
$58.39 $92.53 $414.04
$42.61
$10.46 $19.36
$2.00
$0.60 $1.01

$3.81 $15.28 $21.88 $32.76 $53.17

$156.68

$190.66 $242.05 $231.61 $242.47 $252.46 $282.07 $340.71

$274.04

$6.68

R en ters
Percentage of families and single
consumers renting homes for en­
tire period.......................................
Percentage of full-period renters re­
porting expenditure for repairs on

43.9

55.8

61.7

63.1

53.6

47.3

42.8

40.5

11.8

' 4.7

4.8

6.3

14.4

13.3

17.1

15.5

17.6

0

Average expense o f full-period rent­
ers for all housing.......................... $113.00 $172.66 $238.13 $286.76 $352.94 $401.64 $499.22 $695.82
R ent o f hom e.............................. $112.87 $171.47 $235.15 $279.05 $341.60 $389.31 $466.81 $638.53
Repairs on rented hom e...........
$0.13 $0.28 $0.29 $3.09 $1.96 $2.22 $4.85 $4.76
H ousing and lodging expense
while traveling, on vacation,
or at school..............................
0
$0.91 $2.69 $4.62 $9.38 $10.11 $27.56 $52.53
Renters with housekeeping facil­
ities:
Percentage of full-period renters
76.6
87.2
58.1
71.4
92.9
90.8
95.8 100.0
Average rent and repairs......... $108.66 $177.33 $253.02 $294.15 $346.42 $405.06 $472.05 $643.30
Renters without housekeeping fa­
cilities:
Percentageoffull-periodrenters
41.9
4.2
23.4
9.2
7.1
28.6
12.8
0
Average rent and repairs......... $119.03 $157.81 $177.96 $200.34 $315.22 $215.58 $462.87
0
Families and single consumers re­
ceiving free rent for one or more
m onths:
Percentage o f all families and
single consumers.....................
26.5
7.2
3.4
5.6
4.9
1.2
2.4
18.6
Average value of rent received
as pay, gift, or relief.............. $121.70 $138.75 $146.40 $183.73 $180.94 $293.70 $197.50 $280.00
Percentage o f all free rent that
28.5
48.2
84.4
19.4
55.1 100.0 100.0
75.4
represented p a y .....................

$750.00
$750.00
0
0
100.00
$750.00
0
0

0

0

1 Computed b y deducting from the rental value the cash expenditures for taxes and special assessments
interest and refinancing charges on mortgage, insurance, and repairs.




124

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 22.—H o u s in g : Percentage reporting tenure, and selected expenditures and average
amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual money income class and
tenure—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)

Annual money income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

F u ll-p e r io d h o m e o w n e r s
Percentage of families and single consum­
ers owning homes for entire period.......
Percentage of owners reporting expendi­
tures for —
Repairs and replacements....................
Interest on mortgage.............................
Insurance.................................................
Average expense for all housing: T otal—
Average expense for owned home:
T otal.............................................................
Interest on m ortgage......................
Refinancing charges........................
Current taxes...................................
Special assessments........................
Repair and replacements...............
Insurance..........................................
Other.................................................
Housing and lodging expense while
traveling, on vacation, or at school..
N et m oney value of occupancy of owned
home1............................................................

30.7

30.2

21.5

26.7

41.1

42.8

48.1

61.3

86.7

9.7
9.7
9.7

28.8
25.0
21.2

39.5
31.6
31.6

19.6
51.0
25.5

29.1
54.4
22.8

28.3
63.3
25.0

23.1
55.8
30.8

26.3
52.6
31.6

30.8
46.2
30.8

$9.72 $24.59 $49.09 $31.82 $55!72 $67.28 $58.70 $86.06 $278.98
$9.72 $24.54 $48.67 $31.12 $54.09
$0.67 $1.70 $7.68 $11.93 $18.02
0
$0.11 0
0
0
$6.86 $13.17 $27.26 $11.73 $22.49
$0.61 $0.17 $1.28 $0.16
0
$0.85 $6.90 $9.18 $3.65 $10.78
$0.30 $2.16 $2.39 $2.23 $1.82
$1:99 $0.19 $0.82
$1.04 0
0

$0.05 $0.42 $0.70 $1.63

$59.84 $53.94 $76.97 $244.62
$20.55 $20.55 $25.88 $42.92
0
0
$0.38 $0.12
$24.49 $22.47 $32.54 $130.64
$0.67 $0.03 $0.18
0
$11.24 $6.24 $14.21 $41.10
$2.81 $4.18 $4.03 $4.73
$0.08 $0.09 $0.01 $25.23
$7.44

$4.76

$9.09 $34.36

$42.49 $47.96 $58.70 $63.59 $62.33 $58.10 $77.18 $86.80 $117.30

R e n te r s
Percentage of families and single consum­
ers renting homes for entire period........
Percentage of full-period renters reporting
expenditure for repairs on hom e.............

45.5

60.5

69.5

70.2

54.7

52.8

49.5

35.5

13.3

2.2

1.0

4.1

3.7

3.8

1.4

7.5

9.1

50.0

Average expense of full-period renters for
all housing................................................... $28.78 $43.55 $58.81 $71.72 $83.12 $98.71 $118.24 $148.75 $230.25
R ent o f hom e..........................................
Repairs on rented hom e........................
Housing and lodging expense while
traveling, on vacation, or at school..
Renters with housekeeping facilities:
Percentage of full-period renters.........
Average rent and repairs......................
Renters without housekeeping facilities:
Percent of full-period renters..............
Average rent and repairs......................
Families and single consumers receiving
free rent for one or more months:
Percentage of all families and single
consumers.............................................
Average value of rent received as pay,
gift, or relief.........................................
Percentage o f all free rent that repre­
sented p a y ............................................

$27.80 $43.53 $58.21 $71.04 $81.52 $97.53 $115.73 $132.41 $202.50
$0.11 $0.02 $0.16 $0.27 $0.45 $0.09 $1.33 $1.27 $5.25
$0.87

0

$0.44 $0.41 $1.15

$1.09

$1.18 $15.07 $22.50

90.5
58.7 75.0 73.2 83.6 82.9
96.3 100.0 100.0
$25.25 $44.48 $63.33 $74.01 $85.61 $100.34 $118.28 $133.68 $207.75
41.3 25.0 26.8 16.4 17.1
9.5
3.7
$31.70 $41.52 $44.85 $57.56 $64.40 $71.63 $85.60

22.8

7.3

1.6

4.2

1.6

0
0

43.7

71.9

15.0

39.3

3.6

63.0

1.4

0

$37.15 $46.87 $53.23 $100.00 $81.26 $73.00 $70.00 $132.00
75.4

8.7

0

0
0

42.9

100.0

0

1 Computed b y deducting from the rental value the cash expenditures for taxes and special assessments,
interest and refinancing charges on mortgage, insurance, and repairs.




125

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 23.—F u e l , lig h t , a n d r e f r ig e r a t io n : Percentage reporting expenditures and
average amount spentf urban families and single consumers, by annual money income

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Percentage of families reporting expendi­
ture for fuel, light, and refrigeration..
Coal:
B itum inous..........................................
Anthracite............................................
Coke..............................................................
B riquets.......................................................
Wood1............................................................
Fuel o il.........................................................
Kerosene and gasoline2................. ............
E lectricity...................................................
Gas*..............................................................
Ice ..............................................................
B ent o f freezer locker................................

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

71.4
■ .
..-

75.0

25.5
7.1
0
1.0
32.7
4.1
40.8
40.8
17.3
18.4
0

28.2
10.1
.5
1.6
21.8
8.0
30.3
58.0
36.2
27.7
0

97.6 100.0
96.6
95.8
91.3
90.9
81.1
= == = = = = = = = = = = =
,■
■
■■
■
■
1r =
-!■ ' -24.4
17.2
2.2
1.1
15.6
9.4
16.7
72.2
55.6
28.3
0

30.8
22.2
3.0
2.0
15.7
13.6
14.6
87.9
67.7
20.7
0

32.7
20.8
6.0
1.1
7.1
12.0
10.9
89.6
79.8
15.3
0

20.9
27.7
6.8
2.0
9.5
15.5
10.8
96.6
85.8
12.2
0

26.5
21.1
7.8
1.2
12.7
18.7
4.2
93.4
78.9
7.8
1.8

26.2
14.3
9.5
0
4.8
19.0
2.4
97.6
83.3
2.4
0

29.4
17.6
11.8
5.9
5.9
35.3
0
100.0
100.0
11.8
5.9

Average expenditure for fuel, light, and
refrigeration............................................. $30.34 $46.34 $71.35 $102.65 $108.43 $118.63 $139.56 $171.32 $290.91
■ ■■: ..- — •= =
■
— -■
Coal:
Bitum inous.......................................... $8.14 $8.15 $10.60 $14.51 $18.77 $11.36 $18.90 $21.58 $37.28
Anthracite............................................
3.60 3.42 9.31 13.66 14.07 20.36 16.27 16.88 17.18
6.53 14.71 16.91
4.74
1.52
2.31
C oke.............................................................. 0
.22 1.06
.73
.47
0
.06
.37
.76
.28
Briquets.......................................................
.34
.11
.94
1.74
.35
1.18
1.31
2.75
Wood1............................................................ 4.64 3.75 3.43
8.15 10.98 18.47 20.19 43.95
F u e lo il.........................................................
.28 3.40 5.25 10.94
2.02
0
3.01
1.06
4.72
1.69
Kerosene and gasoline2.............................
3.30 3.94 2.30
E lectricity...................... ............................ 6.51 12.18 21.06 31.33 34.55 39.27 45.35 59.06 74.81
Gas8...............................................................
2.83 7.73 13.88 18.63 24.63 24.95 28.62 35.95 89.77
8.65
.58
1.66
2.89
2.65
3.83
.93 3.21 4.18
.21
.71
0
0
0
0
0
B ent of freezer locker................................
0
0

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage of families reporting expendi­
ture for fuel, light, and refrigeration...
C o a l:#
B itum inous..........................................
A nthracite............................................
C oke..............................................................
Briquets.......................................................
Wood1............................................................
F u e lo il.........................................................
Kerosene and gasoline2.............................
E lectricity...................................................
Gas8...............................................................
B ent o f freezer locker................................

—

76.7

67.3

19.8
5.0
1.0
0
30.7
2.0
35.6
36.6
17.8
3.0
0

—

25.6
9.3
.6
1.7
16.3
6.4
29.7
61.6
37.2
8.7
0

89.1
90.0
94.9
86.4
72.9
===== = == = = = == = =
—
—
20.9
11.9
1.1
1.7
11.9
6.2
17.5
62.1
47.5
6.8
.6

23.6
13.1
2.1
1.6
8.4
13.1
13.1
81.7
61.2
9.4
0

19.3
17.2
3.1
1.6
3.6
12.0
9.4
87.0
71.9
7.3
.5

20.0
15.7
5.7
0
3.6
12.9
11.4
87.9
82.9
3.6
.7

18.5
15.7
5.1
.9
5.6
16.7
6.0
94.0
79.6
3.7
.5

100.0

100.0
=== = =

27.4
12.9
3.2
0
6.5
22.6
3.2
98.4
85.5
1.6
0

20.0
6.7
13.3
0
6.7
33.3
0
100.0
100.0
13.3
0

Average expenditure for fuel, light, and
refrigeration............................................. $8.80 $15.92 $18.79 $27.91 $35.32 $33.26 $42.33 $57.52 $100.16
Coal:
Bitum inous.......................................... $2.69 $3.48 $3.94
.53 1.38 2.76
Anthracite............................................
.37
.03
.03
C oke..............................................................
.22
.26
0
B riqu ets......................................................
.59
1.89 1.53
W ood1....................... ...................................
.52 1.41 1.64
F u e lo il.........................................................
.75 1.18 1.06
Kerosene and gasoline2..............................
1.53 3.57 4.89
E lectricity...................................................
.84 2.81 2.94
Gas8...............................................................
.02
.35
.27
.03
0
0
B ent o f freezer locker................................
1 Includes kindling, cobs, sawdust, charcoal, and prestologs.
2 Includes range oil and gasoline, both for fuel or fight.
8 Includes tank gas and carbide.




$4.97
3.98
.50
.13
.70
3.90
1.37
7.21
4.78
.37
0

$6.48
5.97
.71
.20
.37
3.72
1.50
8.79
7.09
.46
.03

$5.37
4.81
1.63
0
.14
4.26
.98
8.80
7.02
.18
.07

$5.90 $11.21 $18.95
5.86
5.72
.95
1.57
.90
9.13
.19
0
0
.42
.76
.67
7.53 15.57 17.27
.90
.95
0
11.33 13.75 20.04
8.34
8.49 31.45
.22
.22
1.70
.02
0
0

126

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 24.—H o useh o ld o p e r a t io n : Percentage reporting expenditures and average
amount spent, urban families and single consumers, by annual money income class

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage of families reporting expenditure for household operation...................

91.8

94.7

99.4

99.5 100.0

99.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

Paid household help1....................................
Water ren t.......................................................
Telephone........................................................
Laundry sent o u t..........................................
Laundry soap.................................................
Stationery, postage, telegrams1
2..................
Moving, express, freight, etc.3.....................
Other household expense4............................

3.1
33.7
8.2
21.4
78.6
66.3
6.1
38.8

5.3
36.2
15.4
27.1
77.1
72.3
13.3
50.0

10.6
35.0
36.1
40.0
86.7
86.1
17.8
50.6

20.2
49.0
40.9
36.4
91.4
92.9
21.2
63.1

22.3
58.1
63.5
45.9
96.6
95.3
20.9
64.9

38.6
67.5
81.9
59.6
97.0
95.8
16.3
70.5

54.8
69.0
85.7
57.1
100.0
97.6
21.8
71.4

100.0
94.1
100.0
94.1
94.1
100.0
23.5
94.1

23.5
54.1
53.6
39.9
95.6
94.5
24.0
67.2

Average expenditure for household opera­
tion ................................................................ $20.12 $32.50 $48.19 $74.05 $84.59 $105.57 $162.91 $261.92 $862.63
Paid household help1....................................
Water ren t.......................................................
Telephone........................................................
Laundry sent o u t..........................................
Laundry soap.................................................
Stationery, postage, telegrams2..................
Moving, express, freight, etc.3.....................
Other household expense4............................

$0.29 83.69 $4.76 $16.15
3.88 5.14 4.66 7.82
2.21 3.60 7.89 10.83
5.44 8.08 13.25 13.99
4.05 5.61 8.30 10.60
2.39 3.16 4.07 5.49
.43 1.57 1.48 3.54
1.43 1.65 3.78 5.63

$14.50 $19.95 $ 45.10 $111.23 $509.25
8.80
8.97 11.69 11.10 39.31
15.46 22.97 30.13 40.31 81.31
18.52 23.33 40.68 50.51 139.69
10.79 12.36 13.21 17.18 22.05
6.72 10.14 14.11 40.05
6.54
3.09
3.37
2.79
9.00
5.25
6.89
7.90
9.17 12.23 21.97

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage of families reporting expendi­
ture for household operation...................
Paid household help1....................................
Water ren t.......................................................
Telephone........................................................
Laundry sent o u t..........................................
Laundry soap.................................................
Stationery, postage, telegrams2..................
Moving, express, freight, etc.3.....................
Other household expense4............................

93.1

r

30.7
5.0
26.7
79.2
66.3
6.9
46.5

96.5

97.2 100.0

99.0

100.0

99.5

100.0

100.0

4.7
40.1
22.1
26.2
83.1
68.0
6.4
43.6

8.5
29.4
27.7
39. Q
80.8
78.5
4.5
46.3

12.0
35.1
40.8
41.4
89.5
86.4
6.3
62.3

17.7
46.4
55.2
37.5
92.2
86.5
6.8
63.0

19.3
46.4
54.3
47.9
92.1
86.4
4.3
55.7

27.3
50.0
75.0
56.9
95.8
92.6
5.1
69.9

45.2
64.5
85.5
54.8
96.8
95.2
8.1
64.5

80.0
86.7
100.0
100.0
86.7
100.0
26.7
93.3

Average expenditure for household opera­
tion ................................................................ $4.98 $9.29 $12.47 $16.94 $21.70 $27.51 $35.88 $62.92 $246.43
Paid household help1....................................
Water ren t.......................................................
Telephone........................................................
Laundry sent o u t ..........................................
Laundry soap.................................................
Stationery, postage, telegrams2..................
Moving, express, freight, etc.3.....................
Other household expense4............................

0
$1.25 $1.68 $2.87 $3.57
$1.00 1.45 1.09 1.43 2.29
.24 1.43 1.87 2.97 4.56
1.48 1.67 3.60 4.22 4.40
.96 1.49 1.96 2.48 2.65
.72 1.24 1.34 1.61
.65
.22
.27
.16
.67
.55
.49
.61
.81 1.36 2.07

$7.05
2.12
5.34
6.15
3.08
1.85
.39
1.53

$8.13 $23.53 $148.47
2.48
4.18 12.42
7.20 10.79 22.10
9.56 11.63 34.22
3.07
5.05 11.04
2.01
3.74 10.23
1.07
.78
1.18
3.22
2.36
6.77

1 Includes household help such as general worker, cook, waitress, chauffeur, gardener, and ch ild ’s nurse.
Does not include paid help for sewing or a nurse hired primarily for nursing a sick member of the household,
even though she m ay assist with housework.
3 Includes greeting cards, twine, and writing supplies for household use, such as pens, pencils, and ink.
3 Includes messenger service that m ay have been incurred for the transportation of family goods.
4 Includes miscellaneous household expenses such as for garbage and ash disposal, steel wool, scouring
pads, household disinfectants, ammonia, starch, bluing, bleaches, floor wax, furniture and metal polishes,
mousetraps, flypaper, candles, rent of post-office box, rental of furnishings and equipment, fresh flowers,
household paper, and cleaning solvents for household use.




127

Part I II.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 25.—H ouseho ld f u r n is h in g s an d e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting, average
number of articles purchased and average expenditures, urban families and single
consumers, by annual money income class

1941 (12 months)
Annual money income of—
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500
$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of families and single consumers reporting purchase

Furnishings and equipment: T ota l.........
Kitchen equipment:
Tables.........................................................
Cabinets.....................................................
Chairs, stools.............................................
Refrigerators: Electric.............................
Gas....................................
Kerosene..........................
Ice..................... ................
Other................................
Stoves: E lectric........................................
G as...............................................
Kerosene, gasoline.....................
Coal, w ood..................................
Heating plates..........................................
Pressure cookers, canning equipm ent..
Pots, pans: A lum inum ...........................
Enam el.................................
Other....................................
Kitchen crockery and glassware...........
Electric toasters........................................
Other small electric equipment1...........
Other small equipment2.........................
Other large equipment3..........................
Cleaning equipment:
Vacuum cleaners: Electric......................
Hand.........................
Carpet sweepers........................................
Brooms, brushes, mops, dishmops.......
Dustpans, pails, cans..............................
Floor waxers, etc.4....................................
Laundry equipment:
Washing machines: E lectric..................
Kerosene, gasoline.
H an d ......................
Ironing machines.....................................
Irons: Electric..................... ..................
Kerosene, gasoline........................
Flatirons...................................... .
Washtubs, boards, wringers, boilers—
Ironing boards, pads, covers..................
Clothes baskets, rods, pins, etc.............
Glass, china, silverware:
Tableware: Glass......................................
China, porcelain.................
Flatware: Sterling or silver plate..........
Steel, plastic, e tc......................
Hollow ware: Sterling or silver plate...
Wooden, etc......................
Babies’ bottles, etc.5................................
Household linens, bedding, curtains, etc.:
Kitchen towels..........................................
Hand towels: Linen.................................
Cotton...............................
Other.................................
Bath towels...............................................
Bath mats, etc.6........................................
Washcloths, dishcloths, pot holders7. ..
Tablecloths: Linen...................................
C otton.................................
Oilcloth, other...................
Napkins: Linen........................................
C otton......................................
Other........................................
Table runners, doilies, bridge sets........
Pads, shower curtains, etc.8...................
Sheets.........................................................
Pillowcases.................................................
See footnotes on p. 138.




58.2

71.3

82.8

92.9

95.1

95.9

95.8

97.6

100.0

1.0
0
0
1.0
0
0
2.0
0
0
1.0
1.0
1.0
0
1.0
3.1
5.1
2.0
3.1
0
1.0
0
0

1.6
3.7
2.1
2.1
0
0
3.2
.5
0
2.1
1.6
3.7
0
0
5.3
6.9
.5
3.2
1.1
0
2.1
1.6

5.0
2.8
4.4
6.1
1.1
0
3.9
.6
.6
6.1
2.8
2.2
0
1.7
11.7
7.8
3.9
8.3
2.2
2.2
7.2
1.1

3.0
1.0
4.5
8.6
0
0
1.0
0
1.5
5.1
0
.5
.5
0
9.6
9.6
5.1
10.6
5.6
3.5
7.6
1.5

6.6
3.8
4.9
10.4
1.1
0
0
0
2.2
4.9
1.1
0
.5
1.6
10.9
8.7
6.6
13.7
4.4
4.9
10.4
.5

4.7
2.0
6.1
15.5
.7
0
.7
0
3.4
7.4
0
0
0
.7
14.9
11.5
4.7
11.5
5.4
4.1
10.1
.7

10.2
4.8
11.4
12.7
1.2
0
.6
0
6.6
5.4
.6
0
1.8
1.2
20.5
11.4
4.2
21.7
9.6
10.2
10.2
3.0

4.8
4.8
4.8
14.3
0
0
0
0
4.8
2.4
0
0
0
0
19.0
4.8
7.1
11.9
23.8
9.5
16.7
0

5.9
0
11.8
5.9
5.9
0
0
0
0
5.9
0
0
0
0
29.4
17.6
17.6
23.5
5.9
11.8
11.8
0

0
0

0
0
0
23.5
4.1
0

.5
30.3
4.3
1.1

1.7
0
1.7
44.4
10.0
5.0

5.6
.5
2.0
53.5
14.6
6.1

6.6
.5
2.7
51.4
12.0
4.9

14.2
.7
5.4
56.8
20.9
13.5

10.8
.6
6.0
63.9
19.3
13.9

16.7
0
7.1
52.4
21.4
11.9

17.6
0
5.9
58.8
23.5
5.9

0
0
0
0
4.1
0
0
6.1
1.0
6.1

3.2
0
0
0
4.8
0
.5
5.9
3.7
11.2

3.3
0
0
0
7.2
0
0
6.1
4.4
13.3

5.1
0
0
1.0
8.1
0
0‘
9.1
14.6
26.8

7.7
0
0
0
4.9
0
0
3.3
13.7
21.9

6.8
0
0
2.0
9.5
0
0
6.1
15.5
31.8

6.6
0
0
1.8
10.8
0
0
8.4
21.1
26.5

7.1
0
0
0
16.7
0
0
2.4
19.0
26.2

0
5.9
0
11.8
35.3
0
0
5.9
17.6
17.6

1.0
1.0
0
0
1.0
0
2.0

5.3
5.9
1.1
1.1
1.1
0
2.7

8.9
10.6
2.8
1.7
0
0
*3.3

15.7
16.2
3.0
2.0
2.0
.5
9.1

15.8
11.5
3.3
.5
1.1
0
6.0

25.7
15.5
4.7
3.4
2.7
.7
3.4

25.3
19.3
7.2
3.6
1.8
0
4.8

21.4
21.4
4.8
4.8
2.4
0
2.4

23.5
17.6
5.9
0
0
0
11.8

4.1
0
6.1
0
7.1
1.0
6.1
0
0
6.1
0
1.0
0
0
1.0
6.1
7.1

5.3
1.6
6.9
1.1
10.6
1.1
10.1
0
4.3
8.0
0
1.1
0
1.1
1.1
12.8
9.0

17.2
2.2
9.4
0
23.3
3.9
20.6
1.1
8.3
6.7
0
.6
2.2
1.1
2.8
20.0
17.2

24.7
4.5
7.6
2.0
34.8
5.1
32.8
3.0
8.6
13.6
0
1.0
1.0
4.0
4.5
33.8
26.3

14.2
2.7
8.7
2.2
33.3
4.4
30.6
3.3
6.6
12.6
0
1.1
.5
3.3
3.8
35.5
26.2

27.7
2.0
18.2
0
33.1
9.5
42.6
9.5
11.5
13.5
2.0
1.4
4.1
2.7
8.1
45.3
34.5

32.5
6.6
14.5
1.2
42.2
16.3
44.0
10.2
16.3
13.9
3.0
2.4
5.4
6.0
13.3
50.0
37.3

33.3
9.5
9.5
2.4
31.0
4.8
28.6
9.5
11.9
9.5
4.8
2.4
0
7.1
9.5
40.5
33.3

58.8
11.8
5.9
5.9
23.5
11.8
52.9
23.5
11.8
5.9
17.6
0
0
5.9
23.5
35.3
52.9

128

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 25.—H ouseh o ld fu r n is h in g s and e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting, average
number of articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban families and single
consumers, by annual money income class—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of—
Item

Under *f<J° $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
S
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$50° j 81,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of families and single consumers reporting
purchase—C on .

Household linens, bedding, etc.—Con.
Bedspreads: C otton.................................
Rayon, e tc..........................
Afghans, couch covers: W ool.................
Cotton, etc___
Blankets, etc.: 50 percent or more w ool.
Less than 50 percent
w ool.............................
Cotton, etc.....................
Pillows........................................................
Mattresses: Innerspring..........................
Other.....................................
Draperies, curtains..................................
Slip covers.................................................
Yard goods for curtains: C otton ...........
Linen.............
Rayon, s ilk ..
W ool...............
Yarn............................................................
Findings, trimm ings...............................
Paid help for sewing................................
Floor coverings.............................................
W ool.................. : .......................................
Grass, fiber, e tc........................................
Cotton, rayon............................................
Linoleum, inlaid......................................
Felt-base floor coverings.....................
Rubber, etc.9.............................................
Furniture:
Suites: Living room .................................
Dining room ................................
Bedroom ......................................
Beds: W ood......................... .....................
Metal...............................................
Cots, cribs: Wood and metal10...............
Bedsprings.................................................
Davenports, settees.................................
D ay beds, couches...................................
Dressers, chests........................................
Sideboards, buffets..................................
Desks..........................................................
Bookcases, bookshelves...........................
Tables: Large11.........................................
Small12.........................................
Chairs: Upholstered1 ..............................
8
Other1 ..........................................
4
Benches, stools, hassocks15.....................
Porch and garden furniture16................
Miscellaneous:..............................................
Electric-light bulbs..................... ...........
Heating stove: Electric...........................
Gas..................................
Kerosene.........................
Coal, w ood .....................
Heaters, portable.....................................
Electric fans..............................................
Sewing machines: Electric.....................
Other.........................
C locks.........................................................
Lamps17......................................................
Mirrors, pictures, vases, etc.18................
B aby carriages, strollers.........................
Hand baggage, trunks19..........................
Window shades, screens, etc.20...............
Lawn mowers, garden equipment21___
Household tools, hardware22..................
Stepladders, play pens, etc.28................
Insurance on furnishings........................
Repairs, cleaning......................................
See footnotes on p. 138.




6.1
0
0
0
2.0

7.4
.5
0
0
2.7

11.7
1.7
1.7
1.7
10.6

12.1
2.0
.5
1.0
10.1

16.4
4.4
.5
1.1
12.0

16.2
4.1
2.0
2.0
10.8

19.3
4.2
3.0
1.2
22.3

14.3
2.4
0
0
26.2

17.6
0
5.9
0
5.9

3.1
2.0
0
2.0
4.1
4.1
0
7.1
0
0
0
1.0
1.0
0
8.2
1.0
1.0
0
4.1
3.1
0

4.3
3.7
.5
1.1
2.1
11.2
1.1
6.4
.5
1.1
0
0
4.3
.5
11.2
2.7
.5

6.7
6.7
1.7
5.6
5.0
16.1
3.3
6.7
0
0
0
2.2
2.8
.6
22.8
6.1
17
! 1.1
4.3
8.9
4.3
8.3
2.2
.5

9.1
4.0
2.5
8.1
2.0
26.8
4.0
15.7
0
.5
.5
6.1
4.5
.5
28.8
12.1
1.5
3.0
10.6
11.1
1.0

6.0
6.6
3.3
10.4
3.8
32.2
7.1
13.7
1.1
1.6
0
4.9
12.0
1.1
34.4
16.4
2.7
6.0
13.7
4.9
2.2

12.8
2.0
4.7
12.2
5.4
33.8
8.1
22.3
2.0
2.0
0
6.8
8.1
.7
39.9
20.9
4.7
4.7
11.5
10.8
.7

6.6
6.0
3.0
19.3
6.0
47.6
15.1
20.5
1.8
1.8
0
4.2
7.2
1.8
44.6
23.5
4.8
7.8
17.5
7.8
2.4

7.1
2.4
4.8
7.1
4.8
33.3
7.1
9.5
0
2.4
0
4.8
4.8
0
38.1
31.0
4.8
2.4
7.1
4.8
0

0
0
11.8
17.6
0
47.1
11.8
17.6
0
0
0
0
5.9
5.9
29.4
5.9
5.9
5.9
17.6
5.9
0

4.5
.5
2.0
2.5
2.0
4.5
3.5
2.5
1.5
3.0
.5
.5
1.5
.5
6.6
3.0
3.5
2.0
5.1
80.3
68.2
0
.5
2.5
2.0
.5
4.0
0
1.5
5.6
14.1
16.2
6.1
3.0
15.2
4.5
7.1
3.0
15.7
7.1

6.6
2.2
4.4
2.7j
1.6!
3.8;
6.0
2.2
2.7
4.9
.5
2.7
1.1
3.3
6.0
4.9
3.8
.5
5.5
82.0
57.7
1.1
3.3
3.8
1.1
.5
2.2
2.7
0
7.7
14.8
10.9
3.3
3.3
18.1
9.8
9.3
5.5
18.6
15.3

6.8
5.4
8.8
4.7
2.7
3.4
7.4
2.0
.7
6.1
0
2.7
1.4
2.0
8.1
5.4
4.7
.7
6.1
84.5
73.0
.7
2.7
1.4
.7
.7
1.4
.7
1.4
12.8
10.1
12.2
.7
7.4
25.7
8.1
7.4
6.8
23.0
16.2

7.2
2.4
7.2
2.4
9.0
7.1
10.2
4.8
4.2
2.4
0
2.4
12.0
7.1
2.4
1.8
1.8
7.1
6.0
9.5
0
.6
4.8
2.4
0
4.8
0
1.8
12 0
4.8
6.0 • 11.9
6.0
4.8
2.4
2.4
11.9
7.8
81.0
85.5
62.0
61.9
0
0
0
1.8
.6
0
0
.6
0
.6
7.2
2.4
14.3
4.8
0
.6
17.5
9.5
16.9
11.9
16.9
4.8
0
4.2
14.3
9.6
22.3
23.8
11.9
14.5
7.1
12.7
2.4
9.6
26.2
33.1
33.3
25.9

0
5.9
5.9
11.8
0
17.6
5.9
0
0
0
0
11.8
0
5.9
5.9
11.8
11.8
0
23.5
94.1
70.6
0
0
0
0
0
0
5.9
0
11.8
17.6
17.6
5.9
5.9
35.3
29.4
23.5
17.6
52.9
70.6

1.1

0
2.7
1.0
.5!
1.0
2.7;
1 . 0;
1.1'
2.0,
3.2!
1.0
1.1
1.0
2.1
0
0
0
.5
1.0
2.1
1.0
1.1
0
0
0
l.l
0
.5
0
2.1
1.0
1.1
3.1
1.6
0
1.1
0
0
29.6 43.1
19.4 32.4
0
.5
0
0
3.0
1.1
4.1
1.1
0
1.1
1.0
0
0
0
0
.5
6.1
3.2
1.0
2.7
4.1
2.7
0
1.6
0
1.6
3.1
5.3
2.0
3.2
1.0
3.7
0
1.6
4.1
4.3
1.0
3.2

6.1
1.1
4.4
4.4
2 2
2.8
2.2
1.1
2.2
1.1
0
1.7
.6
1.1
3.3
4.4
2.8
0
1.1
66.7
53.3
.6
1.1
1.1
2.8
0
1.1
0
1.1
11.7
6.1
7.2
1.7
3.9
10.6
4.4
8.9
1.1
11.1
11.7

129

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 25.—H o useh o ld f u r n is h in g s a n d e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting , average
number o f articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban families and single
consumersy by annual money income class—Continued

1941 (12 months)— Continued
Annual m oney income of—
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average number of articles purchased per 100 families
and single consumers

Kitchen equipment:
Tables.........................................................
Cabinets.....................................................
Chairs, stools.............................................
Refrigerators: Electric.............................
Gas....................................
Ice.....................................
Other................................
Stoves: E lectric........................................
G as................................................
Kerosene, gasoline......................
Coal, w ood..................................
Heating plates..........................................
Pressure cookers, canning equipm ent..
Pots, pans: A lum inum ...........................
E nam el.................................
Other.....................................
Electric toasters........................................
Other small electric equipment1...........
Cleaning equipment:
Vacuum cleaners: Electric......................
H and.........................
Carpet sweepers........................................
Laundry equipm ent:
Washing machines: E lectric...................
Kerosene, gasoline.
Ironing machines.....................................
Irons: E lectric...........................................
Flatirons........................................
Household linens, bedding, curtains, etc.:
Hand towels: C otton...............................
Bath tow els...............................................
Tablecloths: Linen..................................
C otton.................................
Sheets..........................................................
Pillowcases.................................................
Bedspreads: C otton .................................
Rayon, etc..........................
Afghans, couch covers: W ool.................
Cotton, etc —
Blankets, etc.: 50 percent or more wool.
Less than 50 percent
w oo l.............................
Cotton, etc.....................
Pillows........................................................
Mattresses: Innerspring..........................
Other.....................................
Floor coverings:
W ool........................................ ...................
Grass, fiber, e tc........................................
Cotton, rayon...........................................
Linoleum, inlaid, (sq. y d .).....................
Felt-base floor coverings (sq. y d .)........
Furniture:
Suites: Living room .................................
Dining room ................................
B edroom .......................................
Beds: W ood...............................................
M etal...............................................
Cots, cribs: Wood and metal10..............
Bedsprings.................................................
Davenports, settees.................................
D a y beds, couches...................................
Dressers, chests........................................
Sideboards, buffets..................................

.

See footnotes on p. 138




1
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
4
6
3
0
1

2
5
7
2
0
3
0
0
2
2
4
0
0
6
14
1
1
0

5
3
16
6
1
4
1
1
6
3
2
0
2
36
23
11
2
2

0
0
0

0
0
0

2
0
2

0
0
0
4
0

3
0
0
5
1

27
22
0
0
17
26
6
0
0
0
3

3
1
17
9
0
1
0
2
5
0
(24)
(24)

0
28
20
21
6
4

7
4
17
10
1
0
0
2
5
1
0
1
2
21
19
13
4
5

5
2
24
16
1
1
0
3
7
0
0
0
1
28
27
7
5
4

10
5
40
13
1
1
0
7
5
1
0
2
1
64
22
14
10
10

5
5
24
14
0
0
0
5
2
0
0
0
0
31
5
10
24
10

6
0
29
6
6
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
0
35
29
40
6
12

7

(24)

(24)

2

3

14
1
5

11
1
6

17
0
7

18
0
6

3
0
0
7
0

5
0
1
8
0

8
0
0
5
0

7
0
2
10
0

7
0
2
11
0

7
0
0
19
0

0
6
12
35
0

48
61
0
9
55
44
11
(*)
0
0
4

51
173
2
13
83
82
17
2
2
2
16

49
223
6
14
161
149
21
3
1
23

67
238
5
12
165
176
31
6
1
1
19

160
327
12
22
243
235
24
5
5
2
18

111
355
17
28
280
264
30
8
5
2
42

114
286
14
36
260
314
31
2
0
0
64

71
224
24
24
135
329
18
0
6
0
6

6
6
0
2
4

7
8
3
1
2

9
13
3
8
5

16
11
7
8
3

12
16
7
12
4

27
5
11
13
6

13
13
6
27
7

26
5
7
10
5

0
0
12
35
0

1
2
0
21
8

4
1
1
31
35

7
2
1
84
104

14
2
6
101
71

20
6
8
104
25

50
5
11
151
78

69
7
15
101
49

31
7
2
38
38

6
6
12
100
94

0
1
1
1
2
1
1
0
0
1
1

3
1
3
1
3
1
2
0
1
3
1

6
1
4
4
2
3
2
1
2
1
0

4

7
2
4
3
2
4
6
2
3
5
1

7
5
9
7
3
3
7
2
1
7
0

7
7
10
15
5
2
16
2
2
8
1

2
2
7
5
2
0
7
2
7
10
0

0
6
6
12
0
18
6
0
0
0
0

6

(24)

(24)

2
2
2
4
4
2
2
4
(24)

130

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 25.—H ouseh o ld f u r n is h in g s an d e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting, average
number o f articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban families and single
consumers , by annual money income class—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual money income of—
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average number of articles purchased per 100 families and single
consumers—Con.

Furniture—Continued.
Desks..........................................................
Bookcases, bookshelves..........................
Tables: Large11.........................................
Small12.........................................
Chairs: Upholstered13..............................
Other14.........................................
Miscellaneous: •
Electric-light bulbs..................................
Heating stove: E lectric...........................
Gas..................................
Kerosene.........................
Coal, w ood.....................
Heaters, portable.....................................
Electric fans.............................. .............
Sewing machines: E lectric.....................
Other.........................
C locks........................................................
Lamps17......................................................
B aby carriages, strollers.........................

96
0
0
4
5
0
1
0
0
7
1
0

0
1
1
2
2

2
1
1
3
4
6

(24)
2
(24)
8
4
7

3
1
4
10
6
4

3
1
3
8
10
5

5
6
3
19
6
11

2
o
0
10
14
5

18
o
6
12
12
29

190
3i
0
1;!
1
1!
0
^
oi
l|i
3!
2'
2s

0
0
0
0
21
5;i1

411
l
l

496
0
(24)
2
2

469
1
3
4
1

741

(24)

(24)

657
0
2
1
1
1

636
0
0
0
0
0
9
£
14
0
12
14
0

1,312
0
0
o
o
0
A
u
6
0
18
65
6

2

i

3
0
0
1
12
11
2

4
0
2
6
19
6

2
3
0
8
16
3

3
1
1
1
1
1
13
10

g

5
1
18
28
4

Average expenditure per fam ily or single consumer
Furnishings and equipment: T ota l.........

$8.25. $22.35 $58.86 $74.02 $110.35 $159.03 $207.76 $201.57 $314.05

Kitchen equipm ent.....................................
Tables.........................................................
C abinets....................................................
Chairs, stools............................................
Refrigerators: Electric.............................
G as....................................
Ice.....................................
Other................................
Stoves: E lectric........................................
G as...............................................
Kerosene, gasoline.....................
Coal, w ood..................................
Heating plates..........................................
Pressure cookers, canning equip...........
Pots, pans: A lum inum ...........................
E nam el.................................
Other.....................................
Kitchen crockery and glassware...........
Electric toasters......................................
Other small electric equipment1...........
Other small equipment2.........................
Other large equipment3...........................
Cleaning equipm ent....................................
Vacuum cleaners: E lectric......................
H and.........................
Carpet sweepers........................................
Brooms, brushes, mops, dishmops.......
Dustpans, pails, cans..............................
Floor waxers, etc.4....................................
Laundry equipm ent....................................
Washing machines: E lectric...................
Kerosene, gasoline.
Ironing machines.....................................
Irons: E lectric...........................................
Flatirons........................................
Washtubs, boards, wringers, boilers_
_
Ironing boards, pads, covers..................
Clothes baskets, rods, pins, etc . . .........
Glass, china, silverware:
Tableware: Glass......................................
China, porcelain.................
Flatware: Sterling or silver plate.........
Steel, plastic, etc...................

$1.40 1 S5.75S15.66 S2L06 $28.18 $42.65 $48.85 $44.19 $58.96
.03 !
.05,
.58
.85
.86
1.04
1.90
.98
.78
1 .26 j
.36
.12
0
.59
.22
1.10
.86
0
1 .05
.78
0
.46
.93
.91
2.20
1.14
.80
1.02 2.15 6.86 12.39 14.88 23.64 20.79 23.90 12.64
0
.97 0
0
.71
1.01
1.92
0
22.24
.46
.30
.05
.19
0
.79
.47
0
0
.01
.03 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.38 1.27
0
2.46
5.20
7.55 10.48
0
.47 2.06 5.11
.05
3.64
7.17
4.72
.69 12.94
.73
.09
.65 0
.65
.12
0
0
0
.91
.04
.81 1.10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.01
0
.01
0
.13
0
0
.01 0
.08 0
.12
.16
.17
0
0
.40
.49
.05
.01
.83
.57
2.62
1.06
3.26
.12
.12
.28
.03
.15
.17
.18
.11
.12
.01
.22
.09
.01
.63
.09
.67
.20
1.19
.04
.21
.02
.17
.21
.35
.70
.83
1.96
!
.02
.07
.54
0
.27
.48
.97
2.51
.97
.31
.02 0
.23
.80
.30
1.04
1.14
1.71
.01
.10
.24
0
.17
.37
.30
.29 • .35
.43
0
.46
.43
.09
.36
1.30
0
0
.42 1.95 3.14
.19
5.51
8.60
7.74 10.70 15.37
0
.98 2.46
0
3.96
6.64
5.31
8.28 11.88
0
0
0
.05
.06
.02
.08
0
0
.01
.05
0
.06
.15
.24
.27
.39
.26
.36
.17
.66
.35
1.03
1.08
1.29
1.28
2.13
.03
.02
.11
.13
.13
.26
.31
.37
.81
.02 v .15
.09
0
.18
.30
.54
.38
.29
.21 1.40 3.00 4.39
6.18
6.88
8.18
8.74 10.51
1.11 2.35 2.82
0
5.46
4.44
5.22
6.44
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.04
0
0
0
.51
0
1.08
0
1.51
7.76
.14
.10
.33
.57
.28
.63
.64
1.64
2.34
.01 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.08
.12
.08
.11
.06
.25
.04
.31
.03
.02
.04
.08
.17
.22
.20
.24
.26
.29
.02
.01
.20
.13
.18
.40
.24
.24
.05
.68 1.41 2.22
.04
2.14
2.77
5.06
7.47
4.69
.02
.03
.11
.36
.34
.41
.75
.58
1.10
(25)
.14
.31
.98
.78
1.39
1.86
5.33
2.22
• !
42
0
.84!
.59
.66
.66
1.70
.71
1.18
0
.01 [
.12 | .08
.03
.69
.08
.07
0

See footnotes on p. 138.




131

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T ab le 25.4^ H o useh o ld f u r n is h in g s an d e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting , average
number o f articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban families and single
consumers, by annual money income class—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual money income of—
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 to
$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average expenditure per fam ily or single consumer—Con.

Glass, china, silverware—Con.
Hollow ware: Sterling or silver p late... $0.02 $0.06 0
$0.03
(25)
Wooden, etc......................
0
0
0
(25)
.02 $0.03
Babies’ bottles, etc.5................................
.18
Household linens, bedding, curtains, etc. 2.00 3.52 8.80 12.63
Kitchen tow els..........................................
.03
.04
.31
.31
H and towels: Linen................................
.02
.02
0
.07
C otton...............................
.03
.10
.11
.11
Other................................. 0
.02
.01 0
Bath tcw els......... .....................................
.82
.06
.16 . .53
(25)
Bath mats, etc.®........................................
.03
.08
.08
Washcloths, dishcloths, pot holders7. ..
.02
.12
.36
.04
Tablecloths: Linen..................................
0
.04
.10
0
C otton.................................
.12
0
.06
.16
Oilcloth, other...................
.04
.10
.06
.08
Napkins: L inen........................................
0
0
0
0
(25)
(25)
C o tto n ......................................
.01
.01
O th e r........................................
0
.02
0
.01
Table runners, doilies, bridge sets........ 0
.03
.01
.14
Pads, shower curtains, etc.8. .................
.03
.01
.08
.16
Sheets.........................................................
.21
.63 1.02 2.00
Pillowcases.................................................
.14
.06
.33
.64
Bedspreads: C otton .................................
.18
.37
.48
.55
Rayon, e tc .........................
0
.03
.07
.14
Afghans, couch covers: W ool.................
0
.02
0
.17
Cotton, e tc___
0
0
.07
.03
Blankets, e tc.: 50 percent or more w ool.
.16
.92 1.19
.16
Less than 50 percent
w ool.............................
.38
.26
.57
.11
Cotton, etc.....................
.05
.08
.33
.10
Pillow s........................................................
.01
0
.08
.09
Mattresses: Innerspring.........................
.38
.26 1.76 1.65
O ther.....................................
.20
.23
.55
.19
Draperies, curtains..................................
.25
.35
.74 1.89
Slip covers.................................................
0
.15
.20
.28
Yard goods for curtains: C otton...........
.13
.48
.11
.11
L inen.............
0
.01 0
0
Silk, ra y on ...
0
.02 0
.03
W ool............... 0
.02
0
0
Y a rn ............................................................
.09
.05 0
.16
(25)
Findings, trim m ings...............................
.03
.04
.10
(25)
Paid help for sewing................................
.05
0
.06
Floor coverings.............................................
.65 1.49 3.96 6.47
W ool..........................................................
.33
.55 1.92 3.99
Grass, fiber, e tc.......................................
.02
.05
.24
.29
Cotton, r a y o n ........................................
0
.01
.06
.25
Linoleum, inlaid.....................................
.15
.67 1.12
.51
Felt-base floor coverings.........................
.15
.34
.96
.76
R ubber, etc.9.............................................
0
.03
.11
.06
Furniture......................................................
1.31 6.92 16.96 11.87
Suites: Living room ................................. 0
3.39 6.64 3.85
Dining room ................................
.37
.40
.86
.20
B edroom .......................................
.21 1.73 5.70 1.76
Beds: W o o d .............................................
.02
.61
.08
.36
M etal...............................................
.20
.23
.39
.21
Cots, cribs: Wood and metal10...............
.05
.02
.22
.71
Bedspring#.................................................
.02
.13
.18
.55
Davenports, settees.................................
0
0
.56 1.30
Daybeds, couches....................................
0
.24
.30
.24
Dressers, chests........................................
.01
.20
.03
.46
Sideboards, buffets..................................
.02 0
.15
.10
Desks..........................................................
0
0
.04
.46
Bookcases, bookshelves..........................
0
.01
.22
.02
(25)
Tables: Large11.........................................
0
.03
.06
Small12.........................................
0
.11
.13
.55
Chairs: Upholstered13..... ......................
.13
.20
.60
.58
Other14.........................................
.15
.10
.17
.35
Benches, stools, hassocks15..................... 1 o
.03 0
.07
Porch and garden furniture16................
0
0
.32
.03
See footnotes on p. 138.




.06
.31
2.10
.72
.91
.24
.05
.03
1.26

$0.12
.06
.05
22.47
.48
.03
.36
0
1.09
.21
.35
.57
.28
.16
.12
.02
.02
.07
.27
2.97
.86
1.08
.24
.27
.15
1.12

$0.62
0
.06
38.13
.64
.15
.28
.02
1.82
.42
.46
.55
.57
.21
.06
.02
.10
.12
.53
3.78
1.13
1.38
.57
.37
.02
3.17

$0.12
0
.04
34.04
.67
.50
.32
.12
1.60
.29
.40
.83
.41
.39
.45
.08
0
.18
.50
3.94
1.46
1.36
.07
0
0
3.82

.43
.15
.14
2.75
.45
2.73
.81
.58
.03
.13
0
.31
.16
.03
11.23
7.61
.31
.28
2.62
.31
.10
24.51
7.69
2.04
5.30
.42
.14
.48
.95
1.34
.86
.80
.03
.71
.15
.53
.86
1.14
.55
.01
.51

.89
.14
.36
3.72
1.03
3.15
1.05
.84
.03
.12
0
.26
.15
.01
22.03
17.64
.21
.32
2.50
1.33
.03
35.81
7.82
6.21
10.04
1.69
.44
.39
1.28
.86
.27
1.74
0
.61
.45
.27
.86
1.49
.66
.01
.72

.55
.27
.11
7.15
1.01
8.20
2.95
.95
.09
.13
0
.16
.11
.08
22.36
18.40
.43
.26
2.36
.68
.23
49.14
10.18
6.42
13.02
3.55
1.10
.23
2.85
1.90
.63
1.66
.06
.97
.42
1.14
1.95
1.33
.92
.06
.75

1.76
.10
.18
3.08
.48
8.01
1.83
.43
0
.20
0
.26
.32
0
16.22
11.19
.76
.19
1.34
2.74
0
37.27
.86
1.52
15.95
1.93
.48
0
.83
.58
1.44
4.37
0
.24
0
0
.41
3.90
1.95
.36
2.45

$0.21
0
.12
16.53
.19
.05
.14
.05
.81
.14
.27
.14
.16
.19
0
.01
(25)

0
0
$0.19
65.34
2.60
1.18
.24
.12
2.65
.24
1.09
6.47
.56
.06
.79
0
0
1.88
1.55
5.20
3.04
.76
0
.74
.88
0
0
.76
7.18
0
20.76
3.24
1.65
0
0
0
0
.02
1.68
14.90
8.35
2.06
.70
3.65
.14
0
50.69
0
16.18
11.76
3.82
0
1.59
.18
0
0
0
0
1.94
0
.65
2.35
5.12
1.00
0
6.10

132

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b le 25.— H ousehold

furnish ing s and e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting, average
number of articles purchased, and average expenditures , urban families and single
consumers, by annual money income class— Continued

1941 (12 months)— Continued
Annual money income of—
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 |$3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to | to
to
to
to
and
81,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $ ,
; $5,000 $10,000 over

Under! *“ °
1500

30 0
0

Average expenditure per family or single consumer—Con.
Miscellaneous............................................... $2.45 S2.17 $7.12 $9.24 $16.07 •$17.82 $28.30 $42.94 $93.59
Electric-light bulbs..................................
.31
.76
.89
.86
1.35
1.55
1.74
4.05
.14;
(25)
Heating stoves: E lectric.........................
0
.60
.25 0
.03
0
0
0
Gas.................................
0
1.43
1.42
0
.43
.27
1.51
0
0
1.37
.21
.71
2.03
.73
Kerosene.......................
.33
.48
0
0
Coal, wood...................
.72
.74
.15
.44
.24
.03
0
.25
0
.02
.02
Heaters, portable.....................................
0
.04 0
.03
.05
0
0
Electric fans..............................................
.03 0
.03
.57
.06
.17
.08
.14
0
Sewing machines: Electric.....................
2.21
.20
0
Q
0
2.94
0
4.85 19.81
Other.........................
.10
0
.03
.33
.15
0
.06
0
0
C locks.........................................................
.82
.16
.08
.06
.25
.25
.75
1.59
.74
Lamps17......................................................
.07
.37 1.09
1.09
.87
.08
2.20
1.87
3.84
Mirrors, pictures, vases, etc.18................
.25
.89
.76
.84
.21
.05
.28
9.67
.86
.50
Baby carriages, strollers.........................
0
.04
.77
.11
.16
.44
0
1.47
Hand baggage, trunks13..........................
0
.10
.50
.25
.13
.30
1.40
.75
1.29
Window shades, screens, etc.20...............
.01
.12
.54
.67
2.37
3.02
1.61
5.96 12.40
.02
.32
Lawn mowers, garden equipment21___
.92
.25
.66
.38
1.06
5.82
.06
(35)
Household tools, hardware22..................
.71
.10
.33
.15
.38
1.35
.19
5.58
.42
0
.19
.39
.93
Stepladders, play pens, etc.23................
.06
.66
.05
.94
.21
.60 1.13
1.80
Insurance on furnishings.......................
2.59 11.31
.38
1.18
3.75
Repairs, cleaning......................................
.02
.62
.29
.95
1.30
7.32 32.69
4.35
4.45
See footnotes on p. 138.




133

Part I II.— Tabular Summary
T able 25.— H ousehold

furnish ing s and e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting, average
number of articles purchased, and average expenditures , wr&an families and single
consumers, 6jy annual money income class— Continued

1942 (first 3 months)
Annual money income of—
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
to
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of families and single consumers reporting purchase

Furnishings and equipment: T ota l.........
Kitchen equipment:
Tables........................................................
Cabinets....................................................
Chairs, stools............................................
Refrigerators: Electric............................
Gas....................................
Kerosene............ ............
Ice.....................................
Other....... .........................
Stoves: E lectric........................................
G a s...............................................
Kerosene, gasoline.....................
Coal, wood..................................
Heating plates..........................................
Pressure cookers, canning equipm ent..
Pots, pans: A lum inum ...........................
E nam el................................
Other....................................
Kitchen crockery and glassware...........
Electric toasters........................................
Other small electric equipment1...........
Other small equipment2.........................
Other large equipment3..........................
Cleaning equipment:
Vacuum cleaners: E lectric......................
H and.........................
Carpet sweepers.......................................
Brooms, brushes, mops, dishmops.......
Dustpans, pails, cans..............................
Floor waxers, etc.4....................................
Laundry equipment:
Washing machines: E lectric..................
Kerosene, gasoline.
H a n d ......................
Ironing, machines....................................
Irons: E lectric..........................................
Kerosene, gasoline.......................
Flatirons........................................
_
Washtubs, boards, wringers, boilers_
Ironing boards, pads, covers..................
Clothes baskets, rods, pins, etc.............
Glass, china, silverware:
Tableware: Glass.....................................
China, porcelain.................
Flatware: Sterling qr silver plate..........
Steel, plastic, etc....................
H ollow ware: Sterling or silver p late...
Wooden, etc......................
Babies’ bottles, etc.5................................
Household linens, bedding, curtains, etc.:
Kitchen towels..........................................
Hand towels: Linen.................................
C otton...............................
Other.................................
Bath tow els...............................................
Bath mats, etc.®........................................
Washcloths, dishcloths, pot holders7. ..
Tablecloths: Linen..................................
C otton.................................
Oilcloth, other...................
Napkins: Linen........................................
C otton......................................
Other........................................
Table runners, doilies, bridge sets........
Pads, shower curtains, etc.8...................
Sheets........................................................
Pillowcases.................................................
See footnotes on p. 138.




84.3

88.7

93.3

.9

0
0
0
1.4
2.1
0
0
0
.7
5.0
7.1
3.6
10.0
1.4
2.1
8.6
0

.9
4.2
0
0
.5
0
0
1.9
0
.5
0
0
5.1
6.0
2.3
9.3
1.4
.9
5.1
.5

1.6
3.2
3.2
0
0
0
0
0
0
3.2
0
0
3.2
1.6
6.5
3.2
3.2
8.1
4.8
3.2
4.8
0

0
0
0
6.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6.7
13.3
0
20.0
0
6.7
0
0

2.1
0
1.0
24.5
7.8
3.6

.7
0
1.4
23.6
9.3
6.4

2.8
0
0
25.9
9.7
6.9

1.6
0
1.6
29.0
11.3
9.7

0
0
0
26.7
6.7
13.3

1.0
0
0
0
3.1
0
0
2.1
4.7
6.3

2.1
0
0
0
3.1
0
0
1.6
4.7
8.3

2.1
0
0
0
2.1
0
0
1.4
2.1
6.4

2.8
0
0.
.9
1.9
0
0
.5
6.9
12.5

4.8
0
0
0
6.5
0
0
0
8.1
21.0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
20.0

3.4
5.1
.6
.6
.6
.6
6.2

7.3
5.8
.5
.5
.5
0
4.2

4.7
4.7
1.0
1.6
.5
0
4.7

10.7
6.4
2.1
2.1
.7
1.4
2.1

9.3
5.6
2.8
1.4
1.4
0
3.2

6.5
8.1
0
0
0
0
0

6.7
6.7
6.7
6.7
0
0
6.7

2.8
.6
2.8
.6
5.6
1.1
8.5
0
2.8
2.8
0
0
1.1
0
.6
11.9
6.2

8.4
1.0
4.2
0
7.9
1.6
11.5
1.6
2.1
2.6
0
.5
1.0
2.6
1.6
11.0
4.2

7.8
• 1.6
7.8
1.0
10.4
2.6
12.0
1.0
4.7
4.7
1.0
1.0
.5
1.0
3.6
12.5
7.8

7.1
.7
6.4
0
9.3
0
17.9
0
5.0
2.9
0
.7
.7
2.1
3.6
15.0
7.9

8.8
1.9
2.3
.5
11.6
1.9
13.9
1.9
4.2
2.8
.9
0
1.4
1.9
2.3
15.7
10.2 1

14.5
1.6
9.7
0
16.1
6.5
21.0
3.2
8.1
6.5
1.6
0
6.5
4.8
8.1
16.1
14.5

20.0
0
0
0
33.3
0
20.0
0
0
0
6.7
0
0
0
0
20.0
33.3

33.7

47.1

63.3

66.0

74.0

77.9

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.0
0
3.0
0
0
0
0
0
0

.6
.6
1.2
.6
0
0
0
0
0
1.2
.6
1.2
.6
0
1.2
4.7
3.5
0
.6
0
1.7
0

1.1
.6
.6
1.1
0
0
.6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2.8
6.2
3.4
6.8
1.1
1.1
2.3
0

1.0
1.0
.5
2.1
0
0
0
0
.5
0
1.0
.5
0
0
4.2
2.6
2.6
4.7
.5
1.0
4.7
0

1.0
1.0
2.1
.5
1.0
0
0
0
.5
1.6
0
0
0
0
4.7
3.6
1.6
4.2
2.6
2.1
5.2
.5

.7
.7
.7
.7
.7

0
0
0
12.9
1.0
1.0

0
0
0
11.6
2.9
.6

1.1
0
0
18.6
4.5
.6

1.6
0
0
23.6
4.2
2.1

1.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5.0

.6
0
0
0
1.7
0
0
1.7
1.2
6.4

1.1
0
.6
.6
4.0
0
0
4.5
2.3
6.2

1.0
1.0
0
0
0
0
0

3.5
3.5
0
0
0
.6
1.7

1.0
0
4.0
0
1.0
0
5.9
0
0.
0
0
0
0
0
0
3.0
4.0

4.1
.6
2.3
.6
2.9
.6
5.8
0
0
2.3
0
0
.6
.6
0
5.2
2.9

0

134

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

25.—H ousehold furnishings and equipment : Percentage reporting, average
number o f articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single
consumers, by annual m oney income class—Continued

T able

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of—
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000
$10,000 over
Percentage of families and single consumers reporting
purchase—Con.
Household linens, bedding, etc.—Con.
Bedspreads: C otton.................................
Rayon, e tc.........................
Afghans, couch covers: W ool.................
Cotton, etc —
Blankets, etc.: 50 percent or more w ool.
Less than 50 percent
w ool.............................
Cotton, etc.....................
Pillows........................................................
Mattresses: Innerspring..........................
Other.....................................
Draperies, curtains..................................
Slip covers.................................................
Yard goods for curtains: C otton ...........
Linen.............
Rayon, s il k ..
W ool...............
Yarn............................................................
Findings, trim m ings...............................
Paid help for sewing................................
Floor coverings.............................................
W ool............................................................
Grass, fiber, e tc........................................
Cotton, rayon............................................
Linoleum, inlaid......................................
Felt-base floor coverings.........................
Rubber, etc.9.............................................
Furniture:
Suites: Living room .................................
Dining room ................................
B edroom .......................................
Beds: W ood...............................................
M etal...............................................
Cots, cribs: Wood, metal10......................
Bedsprings.................................................
Davenports, settees.................................
D ay beds, couches...................................
Dressers, chests........................................
Sideboards, buffets..................................
Desks............................................' ............
Bookcases, bookshelves...........................
Tables: Large11..........................................
Small12..........................................
Chairs: Upholstered18..............................
Other14..........................................
Benches, stools, hassocks15.....................
Porch and garden furniture16................
Miscellaneous:
Electric-light bulbs..................................
Heating stoves: Electric.........................
Gas.................................
Kerosene.......................
Coal, wood...................
Heaters, portable......................................
Electric fans..............................................
Sewing machines: E lectric.....................
Other.........................
C locks.........................................................
Lamps17......................................................
Mirrors, pictures, vases, etc.18................
B aby carriages, strollers.........................
Hand baggage, trunks19..........................
Window shades, screens, etc20................
Lawn mowers, garden equipment31___
Household tools, hardware22..................
Stepladders, play pens, etc.23................
Insurance on furnishings........................
Repairs, cleaning......................................
See footnotes on p. 138.




1.0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0

1.7
.6

4.5
.6
0
0
.6

2.1
.5
0
0
1.6

4.2
.5
0
0
1.6

5.0
1.4
0
0
5.0

6.9
1.4
0
0
3.2

4.8
1.6
0
0
4.8

33.3
0
0
0
6.7

1.0
2.0
0
0
0
2.0
0
0
0
0
0
1.0
1.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

.6
1.2
0
.6
1.2
3.5
0
2.3
0
0
0
.6
1.7
0 i
4.7
0
0
0
2.3
2.3
0

.6
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.7
7.3
.6
5.1
0
0
.6
.6
1.1
-6 i
6.8 |
1.7
.6 !
2.3
1.7
2.8
.6

.5
1.0
2,1
2.6
2.1
8.9
1.0
5.2
.5
1.6
0
2.1
4.2

.5
3.7
2.6
0

1.0
1.6
.5
1.0
2.6
9.9
2.1
6.2
0
.5
0
3.6
6.8
.5
9.9
5.2
0
2.6
1.6
3.6
0

2.9
2.1
1.4
4.3
2.1
10.7
2.9
7.1
0
1.4
0
5.0
1.4
0
7.9
2.1
2.1
.7
2.9
2.1
.7

1.4
1.9
.9
2.3
.9
15.3
2.3
6.5
0
.9
0
1.9
5.6
0
14.8
6.5
.5
1.4
4.2
3.2
1.4

4.8
4.8
3.2
9.7
0
17.7
6.5
11.3
4.8
1.6
0
1.6
6.5
3.2
14.5
12.9
1.6
0
1.6
4.8
0

0
0
0
6.7
0
6.7
6.7
0
0
0
0
0
6.7
0
20.0
13.3
0
6.7
0
0
0

.6

.6
0
1.1
1.1
2.3
2.3
1.1
0
.6
.6
0
0
0
.6
.6
1.7
1.1
0
0

.5
.5
.5
1.0
1.0
2.6
2.6
0
.5
.5
0
.5
1.6
.5
2.1
2.1
2.6
0
0

2.1
.5
1.6
.5
.5
2.1
1.6
0
1.0
2.6
0
0
1.0
0
1.0
.5
3.1
.5
.5

.7
.7
.7
1.4
.7
.7
4.3
.7
.7
1.4
0
.7
.7
0
1.4
1.4
2.1
0
0

2.3
0
0
1.4
.9
.5
.5
0
.9
.9
0
0
0
0
2.8
1.4
1.4
.5
0

3.2
1.6
1.6
0
1.6
0
3.2
1.6
1.6
6.5
1.6
0
3.2
3.2
3.2
1.6
1.6
1.6
3.2

0
0
0
0
0
6.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6.7
0
0
0
0
6.7

18.6 22.9 30.9
0
1.1
0
0
0
.5
0
0
0
1.2 i
.5
.6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.0
2.3
5.1
3.7
.6
.6
2.1
1.7
4.7
.6
1.1
0
.6 \ 1.1
.5
2.3 ! 5.6
4.7
.6 i 1.1
1.6
2.3 ! 1.7 ! 4.2
1.7
.5
1.1
1.7 j o .l : 4.7
2.3
i

33.9
1.0
0
0
0
1.0
0
.5
0
2.6
3.1
1.6
1.0
.5
5.2
3.6
2.6
3.1
6.2
3.6

37.9
0
0
.7
0
0
0
0
.7
6.4
6.4
4.3
.7
3.6
6.4
5.7
2.1 ;
.7
6 .4 !
6.4

38.4
.5
0
.5
0
.5
0
.9
0
2.8
5.1
5.6
1.4
.9
9.3
4.2
6.9
2.3
6.5 i
j

54.8
1.6
0
0
0
1.6
0
0
0
4.8
6.5
4.8
3.2
1.6
8.1
3.2
6.5
4.8
19.4
19.4

40.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6.7
0
0
13.3
0
6.7
6.7
20.0
6.7
6.7
6.7
20.0
26.7

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.0
0
1.0
1.0
0
12.9
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2.0
1.0
2.0
0
1.0
4.0

0
0

.6
0
0
0
.6
.6
1.2
0
0
0
0
.6
.6 !
1.2
0
0

o

8.4
2.1
o

4
.0

1 31

31

1 ' 74

135

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

25.—H ousehold furnishings and equipment : Percentage reporting, average
number o f articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single
consumers, by annual m oney income class—Continued

T able

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual money income of—
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average number of articles purchased per 100 families
and single consumers
Kitchen equipment:
Tables...... .................................................
Cabinets.....................................................
Chairs, stools.............................................
Refrigerators: Electric.............................
Gas....................................
Ice......................................
Stoves: E lectric........................................
G as................................................
Kerosene, gasoline......................
Coal, w ood...................................
Heating plates..........................................
Pressure cookers, canning equipm ent..
Pots, pans: A lum inum ...........................
E nam el.................................
Other.....................................
Electric toasters........................................
Other small electric equipment1...........
Cleaning equipment:
Vacuum cleaners: Electric......................
Carpet sweepers........................................
Laundry equipment:
Washing machines: E lectric..................
H an d ......................
Ironing machines......................................
Irons: Electric...........................................
Household linens, bedding, curtains, e tc.:
Kitchen towels..........................................
Hand towels: Linen.................................
C otton...............................
Other.................................
Bath towels................................................
Tablecloths: Linen...................................
C otton.................................
Sheets..........................................................
Pillowcases.................................................
Bedspreads: C otton .................................
Rayon, e tc..........................
Blankets, etc.: 50 percent or more w ool.
Less than 50 percent
w ool..............................
Cotton, etc.....................
Pillows........................................................
Mattresses: Innerspring..........................
Other.....................................
Floor coverings:
W ool...........................................................
Grass, fiber, e tc.........................................
Cotton, rayon............................................
Furniture:
Suites: Living room .................................
D in in groom ................................
B edroom .......................................
Beds: W ood...............................................
M etal..... .........................................
Cots, cribs: Wood, metal10......................
Bedsprings.................................................
Davenports, settees.................................
Daybeds, couches....................................
Dressers, chests........................................
Sideboards, buffets................ .................
Desks..........................................................
Bookcases, bookshelves...........................
See footnotes on p. 138.




0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
3
0
0
0

1
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
2
9
5
1
0

3
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
10
3
1
1

(24)

(24)

0
1

1

2
0
0
0
0
11
8
4
3
2

1
1
1
1
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
1
10
15
7
1
2

0
0

0
0

1
0

2
0

2
1

1
1

3
0

2
2

0
0

1
0
0
0

1
0
0
2

1
1
1
4

1
0
0
3

2
0
0
3

2
0
0
2

3
0
1
2

5
0
0
6

0
0
0
0

8
0
28
0
1
0
0
8
10
1
0
0

22
2
14
1
12
0
0
20
13
2
1
0

17
2
8
2
24
0
3
35
21
5
1
1

39
2
16
0
51
2
5
47
18
2

46
12
47
5
46
1
9
42
47
6

(24)

(24)

70
12
18
3
94
2
7
72
52
12
2
4

126
3
105
0
140
3
13
152
97
6
3
8

200
0
0
0
280
0
0
107
200
47
0
13

1
7
0
0
0

1
4
0
1
1

1
2
2
1
2

0
0
0

0
0
0

2
4
5

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0

1
0
1
1
2
2
1
0
1
1
0
0
0

1
1
1
2
0
0

(24)

0
0
9
5
5
(24)

1
1
4
(24)

1
0

0
0
8
18
8
1
1

2
3
6
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
6
2
17
23
3
5
3

0
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
47
0
0
7

1
0
4
4
0
(24)

0
2
0
(24)

3

2

46
2
42
0
65
0
6
64
38
6
1
7

(24)

2
3
1
1
4

4
4
3
4
2

2
3
2
3
1

6
11
6
11
0

0
0
0
7
0

11
0
3

3
4
1

8
(24)

24
2
0

27
0
13

(24)

2

(24)

(24)

1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
0
1
1

3
2
2
0
2
0
3
2
2
6
2
0
3

0
0
0
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

3
4
3
3
4
0
(24)

(24)

1
1
3
3
0
(24)
(24)

0
(24)

2

2
1
(24)

2
2
0
1
3
0
0
1

1
2
0
0
1
1
(24)
(24)

0
1
1
0
0
0

136

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 25.— H ousehold

furnish ing s and e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting , average
number o f articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban families and single
consumers, by annual money income class— Continued

1942 (first 3 months)— Continued
Annual m oney income of—
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average number of articles purchased per 100 families
and single consumers—Con.

Tables: Large11..........................................
Small12.........................................
Chairs: Upholstered18..............................
Other14..........................................
Miscellaneous:
Heating stoves: Electric.........................
Gas.................................
Kerosene.......................
Coal, wood...................
Heaters, portable.....................................
Sewing machines: Electric.....................
Other.........................
C locks.........................................................
Lamps1 ......................................................
7
Baby carriages, strollers.........................

0
1
0
2

0
1
1
3

3

1
4
3
4

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
1
1

1
0
0
1
0
0
0
5
1
2

0
1
0
1
0
0
1
4
2
0

1
1
2

0
2
5

0
1
1
3

1
0
0
0
1
(24)
0
3
4
1

0
0
1
0
0
0
1
6
8
1

(24)

0
3

3
5

2

2

4

8

(24)

2

0
(24)
0
(2 )
4
1
0
3
7
1

7
0
0
0

0
0
0
2
0
0
5
11
3

0
0
0
0
0
7
0
0
13
7

Average expenditure per fam ily or single consumer
$2.19 $5.07 $12.06 $13.91 $24.70 $22.43 $38.65 $85.06 $56.52
--.r-: 1 i :
— . =-rr— —
.i
■
■"
:
— ....
Kitchen equipm ent..................................... $0.01 $1.48 $2.32 $3.80 $4.92 $5.11 $10.55 $7.28 $12.15
0
.02
.13
.27
.16
.09
Tables.........................................................
.14
.30
0
0
.04
.02
.07
.15
0
.04
Cabinets....................................................
.25
0
0
.03
.01
.02
.15
.02
.23
Chairs, stools.............................................
.26
0
0
.52
Refrigerators: Electric.............................
.98 1.75 2.45
.29
6.85
0
10.00
0
0
0
0
1.33
1.21
Gas....................................
0
0
0
0
0
.03 0
0
0
Ice.....................................
.16
0
0
0
0
0
0
.94
.67
Stoves: E lectric........................................
.46
0
0
0
0
.03 0
Gas...............................................
2.22
.88
1.81
4.22
0
0
.22 0
0
0
Kerosene, gasoline.....................
.08
0
0
0
0
.10
.06 0
0
Coal, w ood..................................
0
.74
0
0
.01 0
0
0
0
Heating plates..........................................
0
0
.44
0
.01 0
0
0
0
Pressure cookers, canning equipm ent..
.18
0
.24
0
0
.01
.09
.34
.10
.07
Pots, pans: A lum inum ...........................
.07
.42
.23
(2S)
.03
.05
.02
Enam el.................................
.06
.12
.11
.14
.48
.01
.04
.04
Other.................................... ' 0
.02
.08
.14
.08
0
0
0
.04
.03
Kitchen crockery and glassware...........
.07
.14
.17
.13
1.20
(25)
0
.01
.02
Electric toasters........................................
.16
.05
.06
.39
0
0
0
.02
Other small electric equipment1...........
.04
.03
.30
.08
.06
.24
(25)
0
.01
Other small equipment2.........................
.04
.08
.06
.05
.08
0
0
0
0
0
Other large equipment3...........................
.02
0
.01
0
0
Cleaning equipment....................................
.07
.12
.46
.86
.66
.76
1.57
1.88
.90
0
0
.30
Vacuum cleaners: Electric......................
.33
1.10
.61
.26
1.27
0
0
0
Carpet sweepers........................................
0
0
.03
0
.06
.06
0
.10
.13
.22
Broom s, brushes, mops, dishmops.......
.07
.22
.33
.30
.24
.50
(25)
Dustpans, pails, cans..............................
.02
.03
.02
.05
.09
.07
.09
.13
(25)
(25)
(25)
Floor waxers, etc.4....................................
.01
.03
.11
.07
.16
.27
Laundry equipment....................................
.93
.15 1.30
.69
1.66
2.11
2.66
.04
7.18
• Washing machines: E lectric..................
.92
.04
.84
1.34
.38
1.91
2.11
6.46
0
(25)
H a n d ......................
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ironing machines...................................... 0
0
.20 0
0
0
.28
0
0
Irons: Electric...........................................
0
.21
.06
.13
.22
.14
.11
.52
0
Washtubs, boards, wringers, boilers_
_
0
.01
.02
.04
.01
.06
0
0
C
25)
Ironing boards, pads, covers.................. 0
.02
.05
.04
.03
.06
.03
.09
0
Clothes baskets, rods, pins, e tc.............
.01
.02
.02
.03
.10
.04
.02
.04
.11
Glass, china, silverware..............................
.12
.01
.34
.22
.55
1.23
.62
1.34
.98
(25)
Tableware, glass.......................................
.02
.06
.13
.05
.07
.16
.09
.11
China, porcelain..................
.01
.09
.89
.05
.16
.33
.06
.11
.17
(25)
Flatware: Sterling or silver plate.......... 0
0
.21
.25
.32
0
.08
.98
(25)
Steel, plastic, etc.................... 0
0
.01
.01
.04
.02
0
.19
Hollow ware: Sterling or silver plate...
0
0
.01
.01
.03
.02
0
.35
0
(25)
(25)
Wooden, etc......................
0
0
0
.02
0
0
0
(25)
Babies’ bottles, etc.5................................
0
.05
.05
.06
.02
.05
0
.07
Household linens, bedding, curtains, etc.:
.59
4.12
.97 2.06 3.01
6.22 20.16 17.01
5.35
Kitchen towels..........................................
.01
.03
.30
.04
.07
.33
.08
.09
.13
Hand towels: Linen.................................
0
.01
.01
.01
.04
.04
0
.05
.07
C otton............................... 1 .03
.03
.01
.10
.03
.03
.12
.31
0
(25)
Other................................. ! 0
.01
.50
0
0
<*> 0
(2 )
5

Furnishings and equipment: T otal.........

.

See footnotes on p. 138,




137

Part II I .— Tabular Summary

25.—H ousehold furnishings and equipment : Percentage reporting, average
number o f articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single
consumers, by annual m oney income class—Continued

T able

1942 (first 3 months)— Continued
Annual m oney income of—
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,C O $5,000 $10,000 over
O
Average expenditure per family or single consumer—Con.

Household linens, bedding, etc.—Con.
(25) $0.03 $0.09 $0.12
Bath towels...............................................
.01
.01
.02
0
Bath mats, etc.6........................................
.02
.04
.04
Washcloths, dishcloths, pot holders7. .. $0.02
0
- .02
0
0
Tablecloths, Linen...................................
0
.05
.09
C otton................................. 0
.01
0
.02
.02
Oilcloth, other...................
0
0
0
0
Napkins: L inen........................................
.01
0
0
0
C otton ......................................
(25)
(25)
.01
0
Other........................................
(25)
0
0
.03
Table runners, doilies, bridge sets........
(25)
.01
0
0
Pads, shower curtains, etc.8...................
.10
.26
.47
.56
Sheets.........................................................
.05
.03
.05
.08
Pillowcases.................................................
.10
.03
.13
.16
Bedspreads: C otton.................................
.01
.01
0
.04
R ayon, e tc.........................
0
.16
.06
Blankets, etc.: 50 percent or more w ool. 0
Less than 50 percent
.01
.03
.12
.06
w ool.............................
.05
.02
.12
.02
Cotton, etc.....................
0
.02
.05
0
Pillows........................................................
.10
.11
.76
Mattresses: Innerspring.......................... 0
.10
.12
.11
0
Other.....................................
.41
.41
.06
.11
Draperies, curtains..................................
0
0
.02
.07
Slip covers.................................................
0
.04
.12
.13
Yarn goods for curtains: C otton...........
(25)
0
0
0
Linen.............
0
0
0
.02
Silk, ra yon ...
.03 0
0
0
W ool...............
(25)
.01
.02
.01
Yarn............................................... ............
(25)
.02
.03
.01
Findings, trim m ings...............................
0
0
.06 0
Paid help for sewing................................
.43
0
.78 1.09
Floor coverings.............................................
0
0
.39
.46
W ool................................. ..........................
0
0
.02 0
Grass, fiber, e tc........................................
.01
0
0
.07
Cotton, rayon............................................
.01
.38
0
.12
Linoleum, inlaid......................................
.24
0
.42
.15
Felt-base floor coverings.............. ..........
0
.03 0
0
Rubber, etc.9.............................................
.74 3.01 2.52
.35
Furniture.......................................................
.03
.52
0
.41
Suites: Living room .................................
0
.04
0
0
Dining room ................................
.52
0
0
,84
B edroom .......................................
.03
.07
.08
Beds: W ood................................................ 0
.09
0
0
.14
Metal...............................................
0
.32
0
.16
Cots, cribs: Wood, metal1 ......................
®
.24
0
0
.07
Bedsprings.................................................
0
0
.17 0
Davenports, settees.................................
.20
.52
.04
0
D ay beds, couches...................................
.01
0
.23
.03
Dressers, chests........................................
0
0
0
0
Sideboards, buffets..................................
0
.15
0
0
Desks..........................................................
0
0
.17
0
Bookcases, bookshelves...........................
.02
0
.03
0
Tables: Large11..........................................
(25)
.02
.19
.22
Small12..........................................
.40
0
.02
.28
Chairs: Upholstered1 ..............................
8
.15
.09
.02
.06
Other14..........................................
0
0
.04 0
Benches, stools, hassocks15.....................
0
0
0
Porch and garden furniture16................. 0
See footnotes on p. 138.




$0.18
.05
.07
.04
.11
.03
.03
.01

$0.27
0
.10
0
.12
.06
0
.01

(25)

(25)

.01
.14
.57
.15
.18
.03
.14

.02
.09
.84
.14
.25
.14
.42

.07
.02
.01
.29
.30
.80
.11
.40

.14
.05
.05
.93
.20
.63
.09
.18

0

0
.03

.17
0

0
.06
.06
(25)

3.66
2.69
0
.23
.50
.24
0
6.34
2.10
.48
2.13
.16
.04
.21
.13
0
.28
.42
0
0
.06
0
.08
.02
.14
.02
.07

.16
.01
0
2.17
1.46
.24
.01
.34
.11
.01
3.68
.17
.13
1.11
.06
.07
.11
.67
.04
.03
.16
0
.09
.09
0
.04
.61
.30
0
0

$0.38
.03
.09
.16
.13
.02
.03
0
.01
.02
.09
.95
.20
.53
.14
.31
.06
.06
.04
.66
.03
1.26
.42
.26
0
.04
0
.04
.05
0
5.58
3.95
(25)

.47
.81
.30
.05
6.22
3.67
0
0
.20
.21
.17
.03
0
.63
.35
0
0
0
0
.21
.62
.11
.02
0

$1.25
.20
.15
.18
.29
.05
.03
0
.04
.08
.23
1.42
.42
.26
.13
1.34

$2.20
0
.18
0
0
0
.60
0
0
0
0
1.58
.98
2.46
0
3.00

0
.18
0
.32
0
.15
1.67
3.86
0
0
2.00
2.26
2.00
.65
0
1.08
0
1.02
0
.32
0
0
0
2.82
.04
.19
.56 / o
2.06
15.24
1.73
13.73
0
.13
.33
0
0
.10
0
1.28
0
0
1.60
18.49
0
10.65
0
.97
0
1.21
0
0
0
.08
.40
0
0
.28
0
1.08
0
.53
0
.58
0
.19
0
0
0
.20
.87
1.16
0
.49
0
.17
0
.58
0
.02
.33
.30

138

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 25.— H ousehold

fu r n ish in g s and e q u ip m e n t : Percentage reporting , average
number of articles purchased, and average expenditures, urban families and single
consumers, by annual m oney income class— Continued

1942 (first 3 months)— Continued
Annual m oney income of—
Item

$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average expenditure per fam ily or single consumer—Con.

Miscellaneous................................................
Electric-light bulbs..................................
Heating stoves: Electric..........................
Gas.................................
Kerosene.......................
Coal, wood...................
Heaters, portable......................................
Sewing machines: Electric.....................
Other.........................
C locks.........................................................
Lamps17......................................................
Mirrors, pictures, vases, etc.18................
B aby carriages, strollers.........................
Hand baggage, trunks19..........................
Window shades, screens, etc.20...............
Lawn mowers, garden equipment21___
Household tools, hardware22..................
Stepladders, play pens, etc.28................
Insurance on furnishings........................
Repairs, cleaning......................................

$0.23 $1.06 $1.79 $1.72
.22
.24
.12
.08
0
.14 0
0
0
0
0
.03
0
0
0
0
0
.02
.29
.27
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.03
0
0
0
.05
.11
.11
(25)
.07
0
.14
.01
.09
0
.04
.04
0
.08 0
.01
.01
0
.02
.05
.06
.16
.08
(25)
.02
.08
.06
(25)
.04
.13
.28
0
.01
.04
.34
.01
.19
.07
.27
.09
.05
.24
.31

$2.79
.32
.07
0
0
0
.03
.39
0
.07
.10
.02
.09
.03
.72
.23
.12
.06
.37
.17

$2.63
.24
0
0
.12
0
0
0
.04
.18
.31
.08
.43
.06
.27
.41
.06
.01
.22
.20

$4.62 $13.85 $21.42
.40
.52
.68
0
.07
.45
0
0
0
.32
0
0
0
0
0
(25)
.60
0
.54
0
6.33
0
0
0
.11
.15
0
.30
.93
1.08
.34
.15
0
.64
.33
.38
.15
.93
.18
.83
.41
2.64
.16
2.40
.26
.10
.35
1.00
.03
.10
.11
.41
2.30
3.05
.48
3.19
6.49

1 Includes glass coffee makers with electric bases, electric roasters, percolators, waffle irons, grills, mixers,
juicers, whippers, and fireless cookers other than stoves.
2 Includes such articles as kitchen cutlery, metal measuring cups, ladles, dish scrapers, egg beaters, fruit
juicers, can openers, strainers, food scales, cake coolers, pastry boards and rolling pins, canister sets, bread
or cake boxes, and dishpans and dish racks.
8 Includes such articles as fireless cookers (nonelectric) and ice-cream freezers.
4 Includes other articles purchased as part of the household cleaning equipment and not classified else­
where, such as insecticide sprayers.
5 Includes other household glassware, china, and silverware not classified elsewhere.
6 Includes toilet-seat covers.
7 Includes dust cloths, chamois skins, and oil-silk food protectors.
8 Includes such articles as mattress covers, pillow protectors, com fort covers, rubber sheets, rubber
bath mats, and oilcloth for shelves.
9 Includes fur rugs and nonskid under-rug cushions of rubber or felt.
1 Includes bassinets and baskets for infants.
0
1 Excludes kitchen tables.
1
1 Excludes kitchen tables; includes tea wagons, card tables, and other small tables.
2
1 Includes only chairs with springs.
8
1 Includes all other chairs except those for kitchen, garden, or porch; excludes chairs purchased as part
4
of a suite.
1 Excludes kitchen stools and porch and yard benches.
5
1 Includes gliders, hammocks, porch chairs, and garden benches.
6
1 Includes lamps and lamp shades bought separately or as a unit; also accessories, such as reflectors,
7
generators, and mantles.
1 Includes household ornaments, candlesticks, cigarette trays and boxes, and artificial flowers used for
8
household decoration.
1 Includes brief cases.
9
2 Includes Venetian blinds, awnings, storm window’s, and ventilators.
0
2 Includes garden hose, sprayers for lawns, and garden tools; also sundials and bird baths.
1
2 Includes paint brushes, firearms for protection, flashlights, lanterns, fire screens, tongs, andirons,
2
pokers, coal buckets, and coal shovels.
2 Includes all other miscellaneous items not elsewhere included, such as waste baskets, coat racks, um­
8
brella stands, babies’ bathinettes, record cabinets, folding screens, bathroom scales, typewriters, metal
file cases, book ends, thermos jugs, lunch kits, house thermometers, garment and shoe bags, clothes hangers,
shoetrees, and flags and pennants.
2 Less than 0.5 article
4
2 Less than $0,005.
5




139

Part III.— Tabular Summary

26.—C lothing: Average number o f persons per fa m ily , by sex-age groups,
percentage reporting, and average amount spentf urban fam ilies and single consumers,
6?/ annual m oney income class

T able

1941 (12 months)
Annual money income of—
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
$600 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 and
over

to

Average number of persons per fam ily:1
Men and boys:
16 years of age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Women and girls:
16 years o f age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..................*____
Children under 2 years of age..............
Percentage of persons having expenditures
for clothing:1*
2
Men and boys:
16 years of age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Women and girls:
16 years of age and over...............
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Children under 2 years of age..............
Average expenditure per person:2
Men and boys:
16 years of age and ov er.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Women and girls:
16 years of age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Children under 2 years of age..............
Average expenditure per fam ily:8
Men and boys:
16 years of age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Women and girls:
16 years of age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Children under 2 years of age..............

to

0.51
.11

0.76
.26

0.87
.32

1.03
.36

1.11
.31

1.31
.39

1.50
.28

1.69
.52

1.47
.47

.85
.10
.05

1.00
.26
.10

1.02
.30
.11

1.23
.40
.16

1.19
.40
.13

1.34
.43
.08

1.45
.31
.11

1.71
.45
.02

1.71
.65
.12

84.0
90.9
89.2
100.0
100.0

96.5 99.4
83.7 100.0

to

98.5 98.0
95.7 100.0

93.6 98,9 99.2
85.4 100.0 100.0
83.3 94.7 90.6

99.5
98.6
95.8

99.5
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

97.0
98.4
91.7

100.0
96.2
94.4

98.6
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

$19.61 $36.98 $58.31 $66.89 $76.21 $ 87.55 $111.30 $157.16 $241.29
5.39 14.86 31.51 30.20 35.63 50.94 55.02 56.67 84.87
20.74 34.27 65.95 71.98 91.24 106.95 148.85 182.97 351.84
5.03 12.18 29.05 35.31 44.90 47.41 71.47 75.13 153.85
7.13 4.35 10.16 14.23 18.94 18.14 23.14 11.25 40.48
9.94 28.13 51.31 68.99 85.11 117.04 170.40 274.41 354.84
.60 3.95 9.98 10.84 11.29 19.61 15.25 29.69 39:94
17.71 35.02 67.39 89.14 109.26 146.64 217.13 325.21 613.6S
.51 3.12 8.71 14.35 18.23 20.50 23.40 33.99 99.57
4.76
.42 1.07 2.30 2.48
2.51
1.47
.27
.36

1942 (first 3 months)
Average number of persons per fam ily:1
Men and boys:
16 years o f age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Women and girls:
16 years o f age and o v er.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Children under 2 years of age.. .........
Percentage of persons having expenditures
for clothing:2
Men and boys:
16 years of age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Women and girls:
16 years of age and ov er.................
2 to 16 years o f age..........................
Children under 2 years of age..............
Average expenditure per person:2
Men and boys:
16 years o f age and o v er.................
2 to 16 years o f age..........................
Women and girls:
16 years o f age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Children under 2 years of age..............
Average expenditure per fam ily:8
Men and boys:
16 years of age and ov er.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Women and girls:
16 years of age and over.................
2 to 16 years of age..........................
Children Under 2 years of age..............

0.55
.12

0.70
.23

0.85
.26

1.00
.29

1.06
.34

1.15
.34

1.41
.35

1.76
.39

1.53
.53

.85
.13
.04

1.01
.24
.09

1.02
.32
.12

1.14
.29
.10

1.15
.41
.12

1.34
.38
.14

1.44
.40
.09

1.81
.37
.10

1.87
.80
.27

62.5
75.0

76.9
77.5

82.0
82.6

91.6
87.5

93.1
84.8

90.1
85.1

93.4
94.7

93.6
95.8

100.0
100.0

73.3
61.5
75.0

81.0
75.6
80.0

92.8
93.0
90.5

92.7
87.5
70.0

92.8
85.9
79.2

93.1
88.7
85.0

95.2
97.7
100.0

95.5
100.0
83.3

96.4
91.7
75.0

$3.16 $7.98 $12.43 $18.00 $20.51 $24.50 $31.41 $35.60 $56.77
8.91 12.68 11.88 21.02
3.45 3.10 6.08 7.88 8.50
5.53 8.31 16.92 18.55 22.82
3.45 .4.28 5.86 5.50 9.93
3.63 2.60 4.29 3.90 5.09

25.52
12.17
9.48

32.77
13.72
10.83

48.14
26.16
14.72

81.80
38.86
6.73

1.79
.41

5.66 10.23 18.26 21.98
.72 1.68 2.31 2.89

28.26
3.06

44.73
4.46

62.56
4.60

87.04
11.22

4.73
.44
.14

8.48 17.52 21.17 26.27
1.03 1.89 1.61 4.04
.64
.23
.41
.51

34.27
4.66
1.35

47.86
5.46
1.00

86.96 152.70
9.72 31.12
1.42
1.79

1 Includes only persons who were in the fam ily during the entire survey period. The sum of these averages
differs slightly from the average fam ily size given in table 2, since the latter includes part-period persons on
an equivalent basis.
2 Based on persons in each class who were fam ily members during the entire survey period.
* Includes expense for persons in the fam ily at any time during the survey period.




140

Family Spending and Saving in W artime

T able 27.— C lothing

p u rch ases : Percentage 'purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban families and single consumers, by annual
money income class1

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000
to
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500
i

M e n and boys 16 years o f age
and over
Clothing...........................................................
Hats, caps.......................................................
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw, street....................................
Straw, w ork.....................................
Caps: Wool..................................................
Cotton, e tc......................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters...............................
Overcoats.....................................................
Topcoats......................................................
Raincoats.....................................................
Snow and ski suits, leggings....................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, etc..................................
Sweaters: Wool............................................
Cotton, etc................................
Suits, trousers, overalls................................
Suits: H eavy w ool.....................................
Light wool........................................
Tropical worsted.............................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, etc.......................................
Slack suits: R ay on ....................................
Cotton*...................................
Other......................................
Shorts...........................................................
Trousers, slacks: Wool...............................
Cotton, linen...............
Rayon, etc....................
Overalls, coveralls......................................
S h irts...............................................................
C otton, work..............................................
Cotton, other..............................................
R ayon, silk .................................................
W ool..............................................................
O ther............................................................
Special sportswear3........................................
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton......................
W ool..........................
Other........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
Union suits: Cotton, knit.........................
Cotton, w oven....................
Wool and cotton..................
R ayon, silk..........................
Undershirts: C otton..................................
Wool and cotton .................
R ayon, silk .........................
Shorts: Cotton, k n it.................................
C otton, w oven.............................
Wool and cotton...........................
R ayon, silk ...................................
Athletic supporters....................................
Pajamas, nightshirts.................................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool............
Rayon, etc..
H ose.................................................................
Cotton, dress...............................................
Cotton, heavy.............................................
R ayon, silk..................................................
W ool..............................................................
Footwear..........................................................
Shoes:
Work: Leather sole.................................
R ubber sole.................................
Other: Leather, leather sole*................
Leather, rubber sole8................
Fabric, leather sole8..................
Fabric, rubber sole8................ !
See footnotes on p. 177.




2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
and
3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage of men purchasing
84.0

96.5

99.4

98.5

98.0

99.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

32.0
24.0
0
2.0
4.0
10.0
20.0
2.0
2.0

55.2
39.2
18.9
3.5
7.0
7.7
37.1
6.3
4.9
2.1
0
9.8
3.5
5.6
14.7
2.1
66.4
12.6
12.6
3.5
.7
.7
.7
7.0
0

56.8
40.6
14.8
2.6
11.0
9.0
53.5
14.2
7.1
5.2
.6
15.5
6.5
3.2
24.5
5.8
75.5
18.1
12.3
4.5
4.5
.6
4.5
7.7
.6
0
24.5
26.5
1.3
28.4
76.8
36.1
56.1
1.9
4.5
1.9
7.1
1.9
4.5
.6
80.0
18.1
5.2
9.7

60.1
49.3
8.9
2.5
12.3
8.4
53.2
13.3
11.3
3.0

63.8
53.3
15.6
5.0
11.1
7.5
54.8
11.1
4.0
7.0
0
13.6
9.5
3.5
27.6
3.5
81.9
30.7
17.1
5.5
1.5

62.4
54.1
7.7
2.1
10.3
9.8
60.8
18.6
12.9
3.1

60.6
53.5
23.9
4.2
5.6
2.8
71.8
26.8
11.3
12.7
0
16.9
11.3
5.6
38.0
2.8
87.3
38.0
43.7
9.9
5.6
0
5.6
11.3
0
0
31.0
16.9
2.8
18.3
91.5
32.4
77.5
5.6
5.6
1.4
26.8
7.0
11.3
8.5
90.1
14.1
7.0
8.5
0
63.4
1.4
2.8
40.8
29.6
0
2.8
8.5
33.8
1.4
91.5
53.5
28.2
43.7
0
14.1
97.2

75.0
70.8
41.9
8.3
0
0
62.5
16.7
33.3
16.7
4.2
20.8
20.8
6
29.2
4.2
91.7
45.8
58.3
25.0
4.2
8.3
12.5
29.2
0
0
41.7
12.5
4.2
0
75.0
12.5
66.7
4.2
4.2
0
25.0
12.5
12.5
0
83.3
0
0
0
0
54.2
4.2
8.3
20.8
41.7
0
0
8.3
54.2
0
4.2
83.3
58.3
12.5
37.5
25.0
100.0

0
0

4.0
2.0
0
10.0
4.0
62.0
2.0
12.0
0
4.0

0

2.0
8.0
2.0

0

8.0
12.0
2.0
28.0
56.0
32.0
32.0

0

18.2
21.7
2.8
26.6
64.3
35.7
41.3
4.2
4.2

0

10.8
7.9
4.9
23.6
3.0
80.8
22.7
24.1

1.0

.5
0
3.4
7.9
.5
0
28.6
28.1
.5
36.5
82.7
42.4
61.1
3.9
7.4

0

6.5
8.5
.5

0

2.1
40.7
6.2
1.5
91.7
52.6
41.2
26.3
1.5
15.5
94.3

69.9
59.8
21.5
3.7
10.2
10.2
67.9
14.2
17.5
8.5
.8
16.7
11.0
4.9
33.7
5.3
89.0
39.4
31.7
5.7
2.8
0.4
6.1
10.6
1.2
0.4
29.7
24.4
2.0
22.8
89.8
38.2
75.6
.4
6.5
3.3
17.1
4.9
12.6
1.2
91.9
13.8
6.5
11.0
.8
61.0
5.3
.8
39.0
26.8
3.7
1.2
2.8
45.5
4.5
1.6
90.6
56.1
25.6
28.0
1.6
11.8
97.6

1.0

16.5
7.7
3.6
28.9
7.2
86.6
26.3
26.3
6.2
1.5
2.1
4.6
8.2
1.5

0

35.1
24.2
2.6
32.0
88.7
45.9
71.6
2.1
5.7
3.6
18.6
2.1
12.9
4.1
91.7
12.9
5.2
8.8
0
63.4
7.7
1.5
28.4
39.7
4.6

56.0
20.0
38.0
4.0
0
4.0
66.0

4.2
2.1
2.1
0
63.6
21.7
8.4
4.2
1.4
23.8
1.4
.7
12.6
12.6
1.4
1.4
0
11.9
.7
.7
71.3
42.7
24.5
12.6
0
4.9
86.7

47.1
4.5
.6
32.3
19.4
5.2
0
1.3
20.0
.6
1.3
78.7
41.9
28.4
21.3
0
11.0
94.2

2.5
29.6
2.5
0
85.2
46.3
43.3
24.7
0
10.3
92.6

30.7
26.6
2.0
22.1
83.4
43.7
63.3
4.0
3.5
3.0
9.0
2.5
5.0
1.5
87.9
►13.6
7.0
11.6
.5
53.3
3.5
1.5
33.7
25.1
3.5
.5
2.0
25.1
2.5
1.5
86.9
45.7
32.7
29.6
1.5
11.6
91.5

28.0
6.0

37.8
7.0

39.4
9.7

41.4
6.9

34.7
5.5

42.8
5.7

34.1
5.3

38.0
2.8

8.3
0

28.0
2.0
2.0
2.0

48.3
4.2
2.1
.7

60.0
6.5
1.3
1.9

65.5
6.9
2.5
1.5

65.3
3.5

68.0
7.7
3.1
4.1

70.3
6.9
0.8
2.8

74.6
4.2
0
4.2

79.2
20.8
0
4.2

0

0
4.0
2.0

0
0

2.0
44.0
22.0
4.0
8.0
0
14.0

0

0
6.0
8.0
0

0

0
4.0
0

0

0

0

1.0

8.4
2.5
5.4
.5
83.7
14.8
6.9
8.9
.5
53.7
2.5
.5
32.0
25.6
2.0

0

1.0

1.5

1.0

0

0

141

Part II I .— Tabular Summary
T able

27.*— lothing purchases: Percentage purchasing, average number of articles
C
and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumersx
—Continued
1941 (12 months)—Continued

purchased,

Annual money income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
and
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

M e n a n d b o y s 16 y e a r s o f a g e

Percentage of men purchasing—Con.

Footwear—Con.

Felt...............................................

Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
' W ool...............................................

6.0
2.0
2.0
0
2.0
12.0
30.0
44.0
20.0
0
4.0
2.0
28.0
14.0

0

Yard goods: C otton ...................................
Wool, e tc...............................
Yarn: W ool..................................................
Findings.......................................................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing.......................
Other clothing expense4...............................

10.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0

0
0
0
0

0
22.0

0

9.1
3.5
1.4
0
3.5
8.4
37.1
56.6
23.1
0
7.0
2.8
24.5
25.2
.7
15.4
8.4
.7
3.5
1.4

9.7
2.6
4.5
1.3
6.5
17.4
43.2
72.3
22.6
3.2
15.5
3.9
38.1
43.2
1.9
34.8
13.5
1.9
1.9
1.3

.7

.6

0

0

2.8
0
42.0
1.4

0
0
0

.6
61.3
3.2

15.3
5.9
2.5
.5
7.4
21.2
46.8
75.9
20.2
6.4
17.2
3.4
39.4
52.2
2.5
32.0
9.9
2.5
6.9
2.0

0
0

.5
3.4
2.5
67.5
1.5

14.1
4.5
1.5
0
3.5
18.6
51.8
77.4
21.1
5.0
17.6
3.0
36.2
54.8

1.0

37.7
9.5
2.0
4.0
2.0
.5
.5

1.0
1.0

.5
76.9j1
4.5i!

14.9
3.1
1.5
1.5
7.7
27.8
51.5
77.3
11.3
11.9
26.3
.5
43.8
63.9
2.6
51.0
12.4
5.2
3.1

1.0
0
1.0

.5
.5
.5
78.3!1
5.2

19.5
6.11
1.6
0
9.8
30.9
54.9
82.1
16.7
5.3
25.2
1.2
46.7
62.2
2.0
40.6
13.8
3.3
2.8
1.2
0
.8
0

0

.8
83.3
3.3

11.3
4.2
1.4
0
1.4
12.5
0
0
1.4
0
18.3
16.7
46.5
66.7
87.3
70.8
8.5
8.3
9.9
12.5
33.8
20.8
0
4.2
46.5
29.2
64.8
58.3
1.4
8.3
42.3 . 33.3
15.5
12.5
1.4
0
5.6
4.2
0
1.4
0
0
1.4
0
0
0
1.4
0
2.8
4.2
81.7
87.5
4.2
0

Average number of articles purchased b y men
Hats, caps:
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw, street....................................
Straw, w ork.....................................
Caps: Wool..................................................
Cotton, e t c ......................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters:
Overcoats.....................................................
Topcoats............................... ......................
R aincoats.....................................................
Snow and ski suits, leggings....................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, etc..................................
Sweaters: Wool...........................................
Cotton, etc................................
Suits, trousers, overalls:
Suits: H eavy w ool.....................................
Light wool.......................................
Tropical worsted............................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, etc.......................................
Slack suits: R a y on ....................................
C otton....................................
Other......................................
Shorts...........................................................
Trousers, slacks: Wool...............................
Cotton, linen...............
Rayon, etc....................
Overalls, coveralls......................................
Shirts:
Cotton, work...............................................
Cotton, other..............................................
Rayon, silk ..................................................
W ool..............................................................
Other............................................................
Special sportswear:2
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
W ool..........................
O ther........................
See footnotes on p. 177.




0.28

0

.02
.04
.14

0.43
.21
.03
.08
.13

0.50
.16
.03
.12
.17

0.57
.09
.02
.15
.24

0.63
.16
.06
.15
.18

0.62
.09
.02
.15
.19

0.77
.24
.04
.17
.31

0.68
.25
.06
.07
.04

.06
.06
.02

.14
.07
.05

.13
.11
.03

.11
.04
.07

.19
.13
.04
.01
.16
.08
.05
.39
.14

.15
.17
.09
.01
.20
.12
.07
.43
.07

.28
.11
.13

.28
.31
.08
.02
.02
.06
.10
.02

.02
.02
0
0

0

0

0

0
.10
.03
.08
.20
.02

0
.12
.04
.02
.12

.16
.06
.08
.28
.08

.12
.08
.05
.28
.03

.14
.10
.05
.36
.05

.13
.12
.03
.02
.01
.01
.18

.06
.02

.21
.14
.05
.08
.01
.06
.14
.01

.26
.26
.01
.01

.23
.18
.06
.02

1.17
.50
.08

0
0

.17
.33
.17
.04
.21
.25

0
.20
.11
.06
.58
.04
.45
.62
.13
.06

0
.54
.17

.12
.26
.02
.74

.27
.56
.04
.62

.39
.67
.02
.74

.45
.66
.01
1.09

.61
.66
.03
.77

.53
.60
.05
1,17

.46
.37
.06
.03
(5)
.07
.19
.01
(5)
.53
.57
.02
.59

1.04
.98
.12

1.07
1.17
.10
.06
0

1.23
1.85
.02
.07
.04

1.54
2.01
.08
.12
.02

1.75
2.30
.10
.05
.10

1.79
2.78
.03
.09
.10

1.53
3.67
.09
.11
.05

1.48
4.63
.15
.06
.01

.58
5.33
.08
.12
0

.03
.02
.02

0

.02
.05
.01

.05
.12
.01

.03
.05
.03

.04
.13
.05

.05
.13
.01

.07
.13
.08

.37
12
o' "

0
.06
0
.02
.18
.04
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0

0

0
.05
.15
.02

.08
.12
.01
0

0

0

.07
.25

.87
.87
.46
.04
.08
.25
.83

.61
.34
.03
.59

0
0
1.00
.25
.04
0

0
0
0

142

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 27.—C lo th in g p u rc h ases : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

Under S500 SI,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 1 to
SI ,000 SI ,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

M e n a n d b o y s 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — Con.
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Union suits: Cotton, knit....................... .
Cotton, w oven...................
Wool and cotton................
Rayon, silk.........................
Undershirts: C otton................................
Wool and cotton ...............
Rayon, silk ........................ .
Shorts: Cotton, knit................................
Cotton, w oven............................
Wool and cotton......................... .
Rayon, silk..................................
Athletic supporters.................................. .
Pajamas, nightshirts...............................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool.......... .
R ayon, etc. .
Hose:
Cotton, dress.............................................
Cotton, heavy........................................... .
Rayon, s ilk ................................................
N ylon.......................................................... .
W ool............................................................
Footwear:
Shoes: T ota l.............................................. .
Work: Leather sole...............................
Rubber sole...............................
Other: Leather, leather sole*..............
Leather, rubber sole8...............
Fabric, leather sole8................
Fabric, rubber sole8.................
House slippers..........................................
B oots: R u b ber..........................................
Leather......................................
Felt............................................. .
A rctics........................................................
R ubbers.....................................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories:
Gloves: C otton.........................................
W ool............................................. .
Leather........................................
Other............................................
Handkerchiefs.......................................... .
Ties.............................................................
Collars........................................................ .
H om e sewing:
Yard goods: Cotton (y d .).......................
Wool, etc. (y d .).................. ..

Average number of articles purchased b y men—Con.
0.50
.12
.10
0
.68
0
0
.34
.34
0
0
0
.10
0
0

0.54
.22
.08
.02
1.07
.10
.01
.64
.56
.02
.03
0
.16
.01
.01

0.48
.13
.22
0
2.19
.17
.02
1.24
1.16
.19
0
.03
.37
.01
.01

0.42
.17
.20
.01
2.42
.07
.01
1.55
1.27
.05
0
.02
.49
.02
0

0.45
.25
.25
.02
2.56
.12
.07
1.65
1.29
.12
.03
.06
.47
.02
.04

0.42
.18
.23
0
3.10
.23
.07
1.39
1.81
.12
.03
.04
.76
.06
.02

0.50
.19
.29
.02
3.30
.17
.03
1.97
1.50
.09
.05
.05
.92
.04
.02

0.68
.23
.23
0
3.48
.06
.15
2.17
1.87
0
.15
.13
.79
.01
0

0
0
0
0
4.00
.25
.75
2.50
2.75
0
0
.08
1.37
0
.04

1.28
2.88
.74
0
.06

3.80
1.76
1.09
0
.52

5.71
3.05
2.68
0
.39

3.64
4.85
2.67
0
.41

5.18
3.79
3.72
.04
.47

5.82
4.62
2.07
.16
.71

7.77
3.87
2.25
.09
.44

6.17
3.37
3.55
0
.68

5.37
.71
2.79
0
.96

' .82 1.54
.32
.56
.08
.08
.34
.81
.02
.05
.04
.03
.02 . .01
.06
.10
.02
.03
.04
.01
0
0
.02
.03
.10
.08

1.79
.57
.16
.94
.08
.01
.03
.11
.03
.05
.01
.07
.21

1.90
.62
.11
1.01
.11
.04
.01
.15
.07
.03
.01
.07
.22

1.99
.61
.11
1.18
.05
.02
.02
.15
.06
.02
0
.04
.20

2.39
.80
.10
1.24
.16
.04
.05
.16
.03
.02
.02
.08
.30

2.21
.58
.09
1.39
.10
.02
.03
.22
.07
.02
0
.11
.33

2.75
.96
.04
1.63
.08
0
.04
.11
.01
.01
0
.01
.25

2.16
.08
0
1.67
.29
0
.12
.08
0
.12
0
0
.25

1.52
.05
.30
.19
4.08
1.45
.08

4.97
.09
.36
.46
4.05
1.87
.15

3.48
.06
.25
.20
4.48
2.03
.02

2.77
.14
.42
.01
5.08
3.06
.06

1.81
.06
.37
.06
5.50
3.02
.11

.75
.11
.37
.72
7.35
4.38
.03

.17
.21
.25

.17

.09
.04

.72
0
.04
.02
1.94
.46
0

1.83
0
.15
.24
2.45
.89
.01

.12
0

.30
0

.14
0

0

.15
0

.04
0

.14
0

0
4.50
3.33
.83
0
0

Average expenditure per man
Clothing: T otal...........................

. $19.61 $36.98 $58.56 $66.89 $76.69 $87.55 $111.93 $157.16 $238.79

Hats, ca p s...................................
Hats: Felt................................
Straw, street................
Straw, w ork.................
Caps: W ool..............................
Cotton, e tc ...................
Coats, jackets, sweaters...........
Overcoats.................................
Topcoats..................................
Raincoats.................................
Snow and ski suits, leggings.
Jackets: W ool..........................
Leather.....................
Cotton, etc...............
Sweaters: W ool........................
Cotton, etc............
Suits, trousers, overalls............
Suits: H eavy w ool.................
Light wool....................
Tropical worsted........
Cotton, linen...............
Rayon, etc.....................

. $0.86 $2.03 S2.43 $2.56 $3.29
.73 1.46 1.76 2.04 2.49
.42
.22
,39
.41
. 0
.02
.03
.04
.03
.11
.06
.05
.15
.15
.16
.12
.06
.06
.12
.09
. 2.02 3.95 8.06 8.51 7.84
.80 1.28 3.17 3.17 3.24
.92 1.66 2.63
.45
.90
. 0
.17
.22
.28
.44
. 0
0
.08 0
0
.24
.57 1.12
.61
.88
.12
.29
.56
.90
.78
. 0
.17
.22
.19
.19
.36
.53
.83 1.20
.88
.02
.12
.05
.09
.05
. 5.05 10.69 17.84 21.68 24.84
.40 3.16 6.51 7.82 11.26
. 1.70 2.80 4.03 7.29 5.26
. 0
. 73
.99
.27 1.13
.12
.11
.02
.57
.21
. 0
.10
.05 0
0

See footnotes on p. 177.




$2.97
2.42
.22
.05
.18
.10
11.93
5.43
2.96
.19
.03
.98
.77
.16
1.22
.19
26.24
8.78
8.15
1.86
.11
.39

$4.49
3.34
.73
.06
.19
.17
14.97
4.64
4.72
.91
.05
1.59
1.08
.26
1.59
.13
36.19
15.62
11.68
1.43
.52
.03

$4.28 $8.73
3.24
6.57
.75
1.85
.16
.31
.07
0
.06
0
22.67 32.56
11.59
7.79
3.61 14.42
1.71
1.50
0
.35
1.94
1.68
1.15
3.92
.31
0
2.23
2.78
.12
.13
51.77 106.29
16.68 39.91
22.66 35.15
3.23 10.83
.89
.58
0
1.58

143

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.—C loth in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

_____________________ 1941 (12 months)—Continued

__________________

Annual m oney income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 to
$2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

M e n a n d b o y s 16 y e a r s o f a g e
Average expenditure per man—Con.
a n d o v e r —Con.
Suits, trousers, overalls—Con.
Slack suits: R ay on .................................... $0.07 $0.02 $0.33 $0.19 $0.45 $0.27 $0.39 $0.56
C otton....................................
.42
.60
.60
.55
.71
.78
1.63
.48
Other......................................
.02
.02
.06 0
.07
.14
.15
0
Shorts...........................................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.03
Trousers, slacks: W ool..............................
3.50
2.72
.51 1.02 1.79 1.90 2.90
2.61
Cotton, linen...............
1.01
1.28
1.44
.48 1.13 1.40 1.37 1.34
Rayon, etc....................
.02
.14
.11
.06
.14
.10
.08
.09
Overalls, coveralls......................................
.91 1.54 2.02 1.70
2.09
1.30
1.47
1.03
Shirts...............................................................
9.32 12.62
7.13
2.67 3.14 4.56 5.57 6.44
Cotton, work...............................................
2.17
2.74
2.13
1.05 1.08 1.40 1.70 2.06
Cotton, other..............................................
8.92
6.52
4.47
1.47 1.77 2.80 3.34 3.99
Rayon, s ilk .................................................. 0
.17
.06
.14
..07
.16
.26
.61
W ool......... ....................................................
.26
.12
.23
.36
.31
0
.32
Other............................................................
.04
.19
.10
.03
.03
.15 0
.11
Special sportswear2........................................
.14
.10
.13
.55
.64
.18
.86
.28
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
.12
.07
.03
.03
.05
.17
0
.08
W ool..........................
.10
.10
.12
.40
.11
.41
.45
0
O ther........................
.01
.10 0
.01
.09
.08
.07
.28
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
7.02
7.42
1.41 2.09 3.90 4.05 4.79
6.18
Union suits: Cotton, k n it........................
.52
.43
.55
.40
.58
.88
.55
.51
Cotton, w oven....................
.14
.25
.16
.29
.23
.26
.37
.16
Wool and cotton..................
.52
.15
.10
.37
.55
.65
.69
.61
Rayon, s ilk ..........................
.03 0
0
.01
.03
.04
0
0
U ndershir ts : C otton..................................
1.22
.36
1.36
1.58
.24
.81
.96
.95
Wool and cotton.................. 0
.02
.20
.03
.09
.04
.06
.15
Rayon, s ilk ..........................
.01
.01
.01
.03
.02
0
.03
.08
Shorts: Cotton, k n it.................................
.12
.60
.23
.53
.60
.66
.93
.95
Cotton, w oven.............................
.12
.39
.17
.50
.78
.65
1.00
.48
Wool and cotton...........................
.12
.04
.13
0
.06
.13
.15
0
Rayon, s ilk ...................................
.02 0
.02
.02
0
0
.03
.08
Athletic supporters....................................
.05
.03
.10
0
.03
0
.07
.08
Pajamas, nightshirts......................... .
.62
.33
.80
.14
1.79
.77
1.31
1.71
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool............
.02
.02
.11
.16
.35
0
.27
.06
Rayon, etc..
.02
.03 0
.05
0
0
.08
.06
H ose.................. ..............................................
1.07 1.63 2.72 2.94 3.38
4.96
3.81
4.46
Cotton, dress..............................................
.36
.79 1.16 1.00 1.35
1.50
1.93
2.38
Cotton, heavy.............................................
.40
.60
.35
.99
1.07
.89
1.04
.79
Rayon, s ilk .................................................
.74
1.62
.26
.27
.71
.71
.99
.85
N ylon ...........................................................
0
0
0
.04
0
.01
.06
0
W ool..............................................................
.22
.22
.05
.24
.24
.49
.37
.28
Footwear.......................................................... 4.28 7.02 9.89 11.19 12.46 14.13 15.83 19.71
Shoes: T ota l................................................ 3.03 5.79 7.47 8.44 8.97 10.86 11.39 15.93
Work: Leather sole.................................
1.14 1.79 2.27 2.74 2.54
4.75
3.51
2.75
Rubber sole................................
.20
.25
.43
.40
.39
.15
.28
.34
Other: Leather, leather sole8................
1.40 3.49 4.47 4.80 5.73
5.89
7.68 10.64
Leather, rubber sole8................
.10
.21
.42
.18
.19
.79
.42
.30
Fabric, leather sole8..................
.10
.07
.08
.07
.17
.16
.13
0
Fabric, rubber sole8..................
.06
.03
.02
.04
.09
.04
.11
.07
House slippers.....................................
.08
.11
.17
.32
.26
.29
.49
.28
Boots: R u b ber........................................
.12
.05
.10
.22
.15
.08
.25
.28
Leather....... ................................
.14
.38
.28
.14
.25
.17
.08
.15
Felt...............................................
0
0
.01 0
.05
.04
0
0
A rctics......................................................
.21
.05
.10
.05
,20
.22
.32
.03
R ubbers...................................................
.14
.09
.33
.42
.46
.26
.46
.28
Shoeshines, repairs.................................
.72 ,1.29 1.52 2.41
.55
2.03
2.81
2.74
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
1.06 3.63 5.08 5.86 6.40
8.34
8.99 18.28
Gloves: C otton...........................................
.22
.50
.36 1.09
.95
.44
.61
.56
W ool.................... ........................
.12
0
0
.05
.08
.15
.09
.18
Leather..........................................
.22
.04
.45
.45
1.01
.45
.82
.78
Other.............................................
.06
.07
.15
.02
.13
.13
(#
)
(•)
Handkerchiefs............................................
.24
.17
.45
.43
.59
1.20
.60
.88
Ties...............................................................
.59 1.17 1.44 1.70
.39
2.27
2.99
4.59
Collars..........................................................
.01
.02
0
.01
.09
.04
.01
.03
Belts, garters, suspenders.........................
.10
.11
.41
.36
.57
.79
.80
.84
Jewelry, watches........................................
.12 1.88 2.09 1.55 1.83
2.96
2.70
9.56
Other accessories........................................
.02
.02
.01
.20
.07
.11
.10
.35
H om e sewing................................ ..................
.02
.07
.08
.13
.23
.31
.21
.08
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
.02
.02
.05
.04
.04
.03
.02
.05
Wool, e tc...............................
0
0
0
0
.11
0
0
0
Yarn: W ool..................................................
.01
0
.02 0
.01
.09
.01
.05
Other...............................................
0
0
0
.02
.01
.01
0
0
Findings......................................................
.01 0
0
.01
.02
.03
.01
0
Paid help for sewing..................................
0
.04
0
.07
.10
.03
.15
.05
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing.......................
1.07 2.58 3.58 4.15 6.39
5.53
9.36 14.06
Other clothing expense4 ...............................
.02
0
.28
.32
.07
.35
.43
.58
See footnotes on p. 177,




$2.35
5.30
0
0
8.92
1.46
.21
0
15.97
1.63
13.68
.29
.37
0
1.21
.46
.75
0
9.71
0
0
0
0
2.41
.12
.82
1.08
1.63
0
0
.08
3.15
0
.42
5.04
2.75
.20
1.23
0
.86
22.79
14.66
.50
0
12.68
1.27
0
.21
,01
0
1.75
0
0
.47
5.90
12.61
.09
.39
.79
0
1.35
5.58
.33
1.04
3.04
0
.62
0
0
0
0
0
.62
23 26
0

144

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

a b l e 27.— C l o t h i n g p u r c h a s e s : Percentage purchasing, average number of articles
purchased, and average exoenditurest urban families and single consumers1 Continued
—

T

1941 (12 months)— Continued
Annual m oney income of
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage o f boys purchasing

B o y s 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e
C lothing..........................................................

90.9

83.7 100.0

95.7 100.0

100.0

100,0

100.0

100.0

Hats, caps.......................................................
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw, street....................................
Straw, w ork.....................................
Caps: Wool............................................. *..
Cotton, e tc.......................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters...............................
Overcoats.....................................................
Topcoats......................................................
Raincoats.....................................................
Snow and ski suits, leggings....................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, etc...................................
Sweaters: Wool............................................
Cotton, etc................................
Suits, trousers, overalls................................
Suits: Heavy w ool.....................................
Light wool........................................
Tropical worsted............................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, etc.......................................
Slack suits: R a y on ....................................
C otton....................................
Other......................................
C hild’s sun suits, shorts...........................
Trousers, slacks: Wool...............................
Cotton, linen...............
Rayon, etc....................
Overalls, coveralls......................................
Shirts, blouses................................................
Cotton, work...............................................
Cotton, other..............................................
R ayon, silk ..................................................

45.5
0
0
9.1
0
45.5
63.6
0
0
0
0
9.1
0
9.1
27.3
27.3
90.9
0
0
0
18.2
0
0
27.3
0
0
0
27.3
0
54.5
18.2
0
18.2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
54.5
36.4
9.1
0
0
9.1
0
0
9.1
0
9.1
0
0
0
0
0
0
81.8
54.5
27.3
0
0
0
90.9

36.7 48.2
10.2 19.6
0
3.6
8.2
3.6
14.3 17.9
12.2 17.9
32.7 66.1
2.0 10.7
2.0
1.8
2 .0
3.6
6.1 21.4
2.0 10.7
0
7.1
4.1
7.1
24.5 37.5
8.2 25.0
67.3 92.9
6.1
7.1
4.1 17.9
0
0
12.2 30.4
0
3.6
0
1.8
2.0 16.1
0
1.8
4.1 12.5
16.3 21.4
16.3 30.4
2.0
1.8
49.0 37.5
49.0 58.9
14.3 14.3
42.9 50.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4.1 21.4
4.1 14.3
0
7.1
0
0
61.2 82.1
22.4 30.4
8.2 10.7
0
12.5
0
0
30.6 32.1
0
1.8
0
0
0
1.8
28.6 28.6
8.2 12.5
2.0
5.4
0
0
0
0
14.3 35.7
0
5.4
0
0
69.4 94.6
51.0 71.4
26.5 33.9
2.0
1.8
0
0
0
1.8
79.6 100.0

39.4
5.6
1.4
0
31.0
14.1
67.6
11.3
1.4
4.2
19.7
19.7
4.2
5.6
42.2
5.6
84.5
7.0
14.1
0
16.9
0
1.4
19.7
0
16.9
32.4
25.3
0
52.1
54.9
11.3
49.3
1.4
2.8
0
12.7
2.8
7.0
2.8
77.4
28.2
4.2
11.3
1.4
31.0
0
1.4
1.4
29.6
12.7
1.4
0
0
46 5
1.4
1.4
85.9
57.7
26.8
1.4
1.4
8.4
92.9

42.9
17.9
3.6
0
30.4
3.6
71.4
7.1
7.1
5.4
16.1
14.3
8.9
7.1
39.3
8.9
92.9
21.4
10.7
3.6
26.8
3.6
5.4
19.6
0
17.9
28.6
21.4
5.4
48.2
60.7
10.7
57.1
0
0
0
21.4
8.9
5.4
7.1
82.1
16.1
12.5
10.7
0
44.6
3.6
0
1.8
39.3
14.3
7.1
0
0
39.3
3.6
5.4
80.4
60.7
26.8
5.4
0
1.8
98.2

64.9
22.8
1.8
0
49.1
12.3
78.9
28.1
10.5
12.3
5.3
19.3
7.0
10.5
50.9
10.5
100.0
19.3
21.1
0
10.5
0
3.5
28.1
3.5
10.5
54.4
21.1
1.8
36.8
84.2
22.8
77.2
1.8
5.3
0
28.1
12.3
12.3
3.5
96.5
35.1
1.8
15.8
0
47.4
0
0
1.8
29.8
22.8
1.8
0
3.5
49.1
5.3
7.0
93.0
63.2
35.1
5.3
0
3.5
100.0

58.7
10.9
0
0
39.1
19.6
91.3
10.9
2.2
6.5
23.9
32.6
15.2
17.4
67.4
13.0
95.7
17.4
17.4
0
13.0
2.2
8.7
26.1
4.3
19.6
39.1
41.3
6.5
43.5
87.0
15.2
73.9
8.7
8.7
0
45.7
10.9
19.6
17.4
93.5
15.2
4.3
8.7
0
54.3
6.5
0
6.5
43.5
21.7
6.5
0
2.2
56.5
6.5
0
95.7
65.2
37.0
2.2
0
6.5
100.0

45.5
13.6
0
4.5
36.4
4.5
86.4
9.1
4.5
4.5
27.3
22.7
0
4.5
63.6
18.2
100.0
13.6
13.6
4.5
13.6
0
4.5
9.1
0
13.6
50.0
31.8
0
45.5
72.7
27.3
50.0
0
9.1
0
22.7
13.6
9.1
4.5
100.0
182
0
0
0
59.1
4.5
0
0
54.5
22.7
0
0
9.1
45.5
4.5
0
95.5
31.8
59.1
9.1
0
18.2
100.0

50.0
0
0
0
50.0
0
75.0
12.5
0
25.0
12.5
25.0
25.0
0
62.5
0
100.0
25.0
25.0
12.5
25.0
0
12.5
0
0
37.5
25.0
50.0
0
37.5
75.0
25.0
50.0
12.5
12.5
0
75.0
37.5
12.5
25.0
100.0
25.0
0
0
0
37.5
12.5
0
0
50.0
25.0
0
0
0
62.5
12.5
0
100.0
75.0
37.5
0
0
12.5
100.0

45.5
0
45.5
0
9.1
9.1

20.4
2.0
55.1
8.2
0
8.2

32.1
7.1
69.6
14.3
0
10.7

14.1
7.0
67.6
14.1
2.8
11.3

16.1
5.4
73.2
19.6
5.4
10.7

17.5
3.5
82.5
14.0
3.5
29.8

28.3
2.2
67.4
26.1
2.2
19.6

18.2
4.5
86.4
9.1
0
9.1

12.5
0
75.0
12.5
0
75.0

O ther............................................................
Special sportswear2.......................................
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
W ool..........................
O ther........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
Union suits: Cotton, kn it........................
Cotton, w oven....................
Wool and cotton..................
Rayon, silk ..........................
Undershirts: C otton..................................
Wool and cotton .................
Rayon, silk ..........................
Under waist s.................................................
Shorts: Cotton, k n it.................................
Cotton, w oven.............................
Wool and cotton...........................
Rayon, silk...................................
Athletic supporters....................................
Pajamas, nightshirts.................................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool............
Rayon, etc.
H ose................................................................
Cotton, dress...............................................
Cotton, heavy— ............................. ........
Rayon, silk ................... ..............................
N y lo n ............. ............. ............... ..............
W ool............................................................
Footw ear............. ..........................................
Shoes:
W ork: Leather sole.................................
R ubber sole.................................
Other: Leather, leather sole*................
Leather, rubber sole*.................
Fabric, leather sole*..................
Fabric, rubber sole*..................
See footnotes on p. 177.




Part

III.— Tabular

145

Summary

T a b l e 27.—C lo th in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
$5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage o f boys purchasing—Con.

B o y s 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.
Footwear—Con.
House slippers............................................
B oots: R ubber............................................
Leather.........................................
Felt.................................................
A rctics.........................................................
R ubbers.......................................................
Shoeshines, repairs....... *
...........................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
Gloves: C otton...........................................
Wool...............................................
Leather..........................................
Other.............................................
Handkerchiefs............................................
Ties...............................................................
Collars..........................................................
Belts, garters, suspenders.........................
Jewelry, watches........................................
Other accessories........................................
Hom e sewing..................................................
Yard goods: C otton...................................
Wool, etc...............................
Yarn: W ool..................................................
Other................................................
Findings......................................................
Paid help for sewing............................ .
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
Other clothing expense4...............................

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
27.3
18.2
0
0
0
9.1
0
0
0
0
0
27.3
18.2
0
0
0
9.1
0
0
0

4.1
2.0
0
0
10.2
4.1
20.4
32.7
16.3
2.0
4.1
0
10.2
14.3
0
8.2
0
0
14.3
12.2
0
0
0
10.2
0
6.1
0

10.7
8.9
3.6
0
17.9
8.9
17.9
53.6
10.7
19.6
10.7
0
26.8
23.2
1.8
21.4
0
1.8
17.9
8.9
0
8.9
0
12.5
1.8
19.6
0

12.7
8.4
4.2
0
28.2
15.5
21.1
45.1
9.9
25.3
9.9
1.4
12.7
14.1
0
16.9
4.2
2.8
16.9
11.3
0
0
0
7.0
0
28.2
0

12.5
12.5
0
0
23.2
17.9
35.7
62.5
14.3
23.2
21.4
0
25.0
30.4
0
25.0
5.4
0
1.8
1.8
0
0
0
1.8
0
42.9
8.9

21.1
1.8
3.5
0
19.3
42.1
42.1
82.5
26.3
35.1
19.3
0
26.3
43.9
0
33.3
10.5
3.5
5.3
1.8
0
3.5
0
0
0
59.6
1.8

26.1
10.9
2.2
0
23.9
23.9
39.1
78.3
2.2
41.3
8.7
0
23.9
30.4
0
32.6
13.0
2.2
6.5
6.5
0
0
0
0
2.2
54.3
8.7

4.5
0
4.5
0
9.1
31.8
9.1
68.2
4.5
31.8
27.3
0
27.3
22.7
0
18.2
9.1
0
4.5
0
0
4.5
0
0
0
45.5
0

25.0
0
12.5
0
25.0
37.5
37.5
62.5
0
12.5
12.5
0
25.0
37.5
0
37.5
0
0
12.5
0
0
12.5
0
0
0
87.5
0

Average number of articles purchased b y boys
Hats, caps:
Hats: F e l t .................................
Straw, s tr e e t..................
Straw, w o r k ...................
Caps: W o o l................................
Cotton, e t c .....................
Coats, jackets, sweaters:
Overcoats.....................................
Topcoats......................................
Raincoats....................................
Snow and ski suits, leggings...
Jackets: W ool..............................
Leather........................
Cotton, etc..................
Sweaters: Wool..........................
Cotton, etc................
Suits, trousers, overalls:
Suits: H eavy w ool.....................
Light wool.......................
Tropical worsted............
Cotton, linen..................
R ayon, etc.......................
Slack suits: R a y on ....................
C otton....................
Other......................
Child’s sun suits, shorts...........
Trousers, slacks: Wool..............
Cotton, linen
Rayon, etc...
Overalls, coveralls.....................
Shirts, blouses:
Cotton, work..............................
Cotton, other..............................
R ayon, silk .................................
W ool.............................................
Special sportswear:2
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ___
W ool..........
Other........
See footnotes on p, 177,




.45

0.10
0
.08
.14
.20

0.23
.04
.04
.23
.25

.18

.02
.02
.02
.06
.02

.11
.02
.04
.23
.14
.07
.07
.70
.52

0
0
.09
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
.04
.35
.16

.09
.36
.27

0

0

.36
.05

.60
.18

.11
.01
.04
.21
.23
.04
.08
.72
.13

.07
.07
.05
.16
.14
.09
.11
.62
.11

.30
.11
.12
.05
.21
.07
.11
.79
.40

.11
.02
.07
.24
.33
.15
.26
1.09
.24

.07
.21

.25
.14
.04
.87
.04
.07
.30

0.18
.04

0.25
.02

0

0

.09
.18

.06
.06

0
0
0

.44
.18

0.15
0
0
.39
.26

0.06
.01
0

0

0
1.72

.55
.57
.34
.09
1.14

.07
.68
.07
.28
1.14
.42
.04
.95

.22
.02
.13
.76
.09
.74
.76
.80
.09
1.39

0
0

.49
1.33
0
0

.48
1.75
0
0

.41
1.89
.01
.08

.20
1.79
0
0

.91
3.07
.05
.14

0
0
0

0
0

.14
.07

.08
.06
.08

.09
.04
.07

.16
.14
.05

.08

.27
0

0
0
0
.36
0
.91
0
.73

.04
0

.56

.32

.12
.18
.18
.02
1.47

0
0

0
.01
.32
0

0
.55
.73
.56

0

0
0
0
1.25
0
.12
0
.25
.38
.38
.25

0
.05
1.14
.68

0
1.00
0

.14
.14
.05
.18

.38
.25
.12
.62

0

.96
.05
.04
.36
.02
.54
.43
.68
.02
1.09

.53

.45
0
0

.09
.05
.05
.27
.23

.30
.17

.21
.28
0

0.14
0
.05
.36
.05

0

0

.27
1.23
.59
0
.95

.25
0
0
1.75
.62
2.38
0
.75

.48
3.20
.17
.20

1.05
2.09
0
.18

1.50
1.88
.50
.25

.17
.20
.20

.09
.14
.05

.75
.12
.25

.05
.27
0

146

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b le 27.— C lothing p u rc h a se s : Percentage purchasingf average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of
Item

Boys 2 to 16 years o f age— Con.
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Union suits: Cotton, k n it........................
Cotton, w oven.....................
Wool and cotton..................
Rayon, silk...........................
Undershirts: C otton..................................
Wool and cotton .................
Rayon, silk ..........................
Under waists.................................................
Shorts: Cotton, knit..................................
Cotton, w oven..............................
Wool and cotton...........................
Athletic supporters....................................
Pajamas, nightshirts.................................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool............
Rayon, etc..
Hose:
Cotton, dress...............................................
Cotton, heavy.............................................
Rayon, s ilk ..................................................
N ylon............................................................
W ool..............................................................
Footwear..........................................................
Shoes:
Work: Leather sole.................................
Rubber sole.................................
Other: Leather, Leather sole*...............
Leather, rubber sole*.................
Fabric, leather sole*..................
Fabric, rubber sole*..................
House slippers............................................
Boots: R u b ber............................................
Leather............................................
Arctics..........................................................
R ubbers.......................................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories:
Gloves: C otton...........................................
W ool...............................................
Leather..........................................
Other.............................................
Handkerchiefs............................................
T ie s...............................................................
Collars..........................................................
Hom e sewing:
Yard goods: Cotton (yd .).........................

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 to
$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average number o f articles purchased b y boys—Con.
$0.82 $0.49 $0.75 $0.79 $0.57
.10
.23
.16
.18
.39
0
0
.32
.31
.59
0
0
0
.04 0
.71 1.23 1.06 2.11
.18
0
0
.04 0
.07
0
0
0
.01 0
.11
.06
.11
.18 0
.73 1.16 2.00 1.95
0
.44
.16
.48
.18
.95
0
.12
.09
.04
.18
0
0
0
0
0
0
.39
.77 1.04
.79
0
.05
.01
0
.04
0
0
.01
0
.05

$1.18
.04
.47
0
1.88
0
0
.05
1.77
.81
.04
.07
1.18
.05
.07

$0.65
.09
.22
0
2.76
.28
0
.43
2.35
.98
.28
.02
1.46
.07
0

$0.64
0
0
0
2.14
.18
0
0
1.95
.95
0
.09
.91
.05
0

$0.88
0
0
0
2.25
.75
0
0
3.25
1.75
0
0
1.50
.12
0

3.65
2.24
.08
0
0
2.16

7.43
2.84
.18
0
.02
3.45

6.82
2.49
.17
.11
.24
3.33

6.09
3.50
.23
0
.11
3.27

8.61
3.91
.37
0
.11
4.55

9.50
5.80
.26
0
.20
3.83

2.14
6.59
.41
0
1.27
4.19

6.75
4.25
0
0
.75
2.95

.35
.02
.82 1.55
0
1 .16
1
.09;! 0
.09
.08
.04
0
.02
0
0
0
.10
0
.04
0

.82
.12
2.14
.23
0
.14
.12
.09
.04
.18
.09

.45
.13
2.37
.21
.03
.14
.31
.08
.04
.31
.17

.57
.14
1.96
.39
.05
.16
.14
.12
0
.23
.18

.58
.07
3.07
.28
.04
.51
.23
.02
.05
.19
.42

.85
.02
2.39
.33
.04
.20
.26
.13
.02
.24
.24

.68
.09
3.10
.23
0
.09
.05
0
.05
.09
.32

.75
0
1.50
.50
0
.20
.25
0
.12
.25
.50

.37
.02
.06

.20
.34
.12

.34
.23
.25

0
1.95
1.20
0

.40
.53
.25

.02
.83
.09

0
2.42
2.05
0

.05
.55
.36

.71
.31

0
2.43
.75
.02

.11
.49
.11
.01
1.28
.30
0

0
2.54
.87
0

0
1.82
.64
0

.38
.12
0
4.50
1.25
0

.49

.14

.85

.04

.25

.41

0

0

1.18
.73
0
0
0
1.45
.45

0

.18
0
0
0

0
.45

0
0

0
.731

0

Average expenditure per boy
Clothing: T ota l..............................................

$5.39 $14.86 $31.91 $30.20 $35.63 $50.94 $55.02 $56.67 $84.87

Hats, cap s....................................................... $0.19 $0.31 $0.60 $0.50 $0.72 $1.14
Hats: Felt....................................................
.13
.08
.31
.41
.43
0
Straw, street....................................
.02
.01
.03
0
.05
0
Straw, w ork.....................................
.03
.01 0
0
.01
0
Caps: W ool..................................................
.24
.33
.60
.17
.08
0
Cotton, e tc......................................
.02
.07
.09
.08
.08
.18
Coats, jackets, sweaters...............................
8.26
.78 1.61 5.49 4.77 4.98
Overcoats.....................................................
.72
.89
2.69
.16
.87
0
Topcoats......................................................
.12
.21
.01
.29 • .97
0
Raincoats.....................................................
.10
.13
.51
0
.08
.16
Snow’ and ski suits, leggings....................
.41 1.72 1.27 1.06
.43
0
Jackets: W ool..............................................
.03
.65
1.07
.06
.98
.73
Leather........................................
.21
0
.25
.49
.41
0
Cotton, etc..................................
.24
.16
.08
.14
.16
.39
Sweaters: Wool...........................................
.92 1.13
.33
.58 1.25
1.59
Cotton, etc................................
.12
.15
.45
.23
.09 * .20
Suits, trousers, overalls................................
1.30 4.05 8.27 7.38 8.96 11.78
Suits: H eavy w ool.....................................
0
.84 1.84
.67 2.48
2.44
Light wool........................................
0
.07
.57
2.57
.98 1.29
Tropical worsted............................
0
0
0
0
0
.13
Cotton, linen...................................
.47
.65 1.15
.71 1.17
.28
Rayon, etc.......................................
.02
0
.06
0
0
0
See footnotes on p. 177.




$0.65
.18
0
0
.36
.11
10.17
1.15
.45
.16
2.27
2.01
1.07
.66
2.21
.19
13:66
2.58
2.16
0
.69
.04

$0.66
.32
0
.03
.26
.05
8.72
1.18
.41
.27
2.33
1.11
0
.41
2.40
.61
13.78
3.14
2.18
.23
.25
0

$1.32
0
0
0
1.32
0
12.59
2.25
0
1.00
.94
2.38
2.46
0
3.56
0
19.45
3.62
1.81
.88
1.37
0

147

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.— C lo th in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued_____________________
Annual m oney income o f —
$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average expenditure per boy—Con.

B o y s 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.
Suits, trousers, overalls—Con.

Trousers, slacks:
W ool...........................................................
Cotton, linen...........................................

$0.11 $0.02 $0.11 . $0.16
0
0
.64
.67
1.09
.55
$0.23 $0.24
.04 0
0
.08
0
0
.32
.22
.31
.43
0
.18
0
.19
0
.60
.13
0
.13

W o o l ......................................... .................
w

W ool..........................
Other........................

Union suits: Cotton, knit.........................
Cotton, w oven....................
Wool and cotton..................
R ayon, silk ..........................
Undershirts: C otton..................................
Wool and cotton .................
R ayon, s ilk ..........................
Under waists.................................................
Shorts: Cotton, k n it..................................
Cotton, w oven.............................
Wool and cotton...........................
Athletic supporters....................................
Pajamas, nightshirts.................................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool............
Rayon, etc..
H ose..................................................................
Cotton, dress...............................................
Cotton, heavy.............................................
R ayon, s ilk ..................................................
N ylon ............................................................
W ool..............................................................
Footwear..........................................................
Shoes: T o ta l................................................
W ork: Leather sole.................................
R ubber sole.................................
Other: Leather, leather sole3................
Leather, rubber sole3....................
Fabric; leather sole3......................
Fabric, rubber sole3......................
House s li p p e r s ..........................................
B oots: R u b b er............................................
Leather............................................
A rctics..........................................................
R u b bers.......................................................
Shoeshines, repairs....................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
Gloves: C otton...........................................
W ool...............................................
Leather..........................................
Other.............................................
H andkerchiefs............................................
T ies...............................................................
Collars.............................................'............
Belts, garters, suspenders.........................
Jewelry, watches.................................. .
Other accessories........................................
H om e sewing..................................................
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
Y arn: W ool..................................................
Findings.......................................................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
Other clothing expense4................................

See footnotes on p. 177.




0
0
0
0
0
0
.53
.33
.11
0
0
.02
0
0
.05
0
.02
0
0
0
0
0
.22
.12
.10
0
0
0
2.04
2.04
.63
0
1.21
0
.12
.08
0
0
0
0
0
0
.07
.05
0
0
0
.02
0
0
0
0
0
.13
.11
0
.02
0
0
0

.48
.21
.02
1.36
1.21
.25
.96
0
0
.02
.02
0
0
1.30
.46
.14
0
0
.17
0
0
0
.19
.04
.02
0
.28
0
0
.99
.52
.43
.04
0
0
4.90
4.48
.73
.01
3.36
.26
0
.12
.02
.05
0
.15
.03
.17
.28
.08
.01
.04
0
.04
.08
0
.03
0
0
.15
.10
0
.05
0
.04
0

1.03
.92
.05
1.11
1.80
.29
1.51
0
0
.27
.11
.16
0
2.82
.50
.21
.31
0
.30
.02
0
.03
.23
.20
.04
0
.80
.18
0
1.78
1.17
.56
.04
0
.01
8.79
7.60
1.62
.13
5.24
.49
0
.12
.12
.15
.10
.28
.09
.45
1.10
.07
.18
.12
0
.18
.29
.01
.25
0
(«)
.45
.09
.20
.09
.07
.54
0

1.56 1.34
.82
.89
.21
0
1.35 1.06
1.74 1.72
.21
.29
1.36 1.51
.03 0
.06 0
.19
.38
.09
.08
.09
.06
.20
.05
2.79 3.09
.32
.53
.32
.06
.30
.33
.04 0
.42
.29
.05
0
.01 0
.03
.01
.42
.45
.12
.23
.10
.04
0
0
.70
.93
.03
.03
.11
.01
1.90 1.96
1.16 1.18
.54
.71
.04
.06
.02 0
.12
.03
9.00 10.47
7.28 8.58
.90 1.44
.48
.21
5.21 5.14
.63 1.20
.14
.08
.18
.25
.12
.16
.26
.14
.11 0
.40
.62
.20
.18
.91
.51
.96 1.42
.10
.11
.21
.29
.25
.11
0
(6)
.15
.08
.33
.11
0
0
.12
.13
.12
.25
.02 0
.01
.28
.01
.26
0
0
.02
(6
)
0
0
.69
.88
1.04
0

2.84
.63
.16
1.12
3.57
.70
2.71
.03
.13
.60
.31
.20
.09
4.33
.85
.01
.49
0
.61
0
0
.01
.48
.26
.05
.15
1.19
.16
.07
2.94
1.96
.84
.08
0
.06
14.22
11.56
1.65
.21
8.27
.82
.12
.49
.23
.03
.14
.35
.49
1:42
2.09
.14
.32
.21
0
.17
.66
0
.28
.29
.02
.33
.05
.28
0
0
1.57
.11

$0.33
1.64
.14
.43

$0.27
.82
0
.25

$1.00
0
0
2.44

2.20
1.60
.20
1.55
3.81
.50
2.77
.20
.34
.81
.17
.45
.19
4.73
.34
.05
.19
0
.78
.12
0
.12
.69
.31
.24
.01
1.55
.33
0
3.64
2.10
1.37
.09
0
.08
13.55
11.05
2.21
.06
7.54
.91
.07
.26
.25
.32
.08
.44
.30
1.11
2.04
.01
.61
.10
0
.16
.33
0
.31
.50
.02
.10
.09
0
0
.01
1.85
.11

4.59
.94
0
1.11
3.28
1.10
2.00
0
.18
.53
.12
.23
.18
4.21
.62
0
0
0
.61
.12
0
0
.61
.33
0
.18
1.27
.47
0
3.13
.57 ..
1.78
.21
0
.57
15.56
14.33
1.69
.27
10.69
1.43
0
.25
.05
0
.27
.17
.40
.34
2.54
.02
.36
.61
0
.17
.40
0
.26
.72
0
.25
0
.25
0
0
4.01
0

2.64
4.97
0
.72
6.04
1.88
2.56
.85
.75
1.84
.82
.74
.28
7.90
.58
0
0
0
1.92
.26
0
0
2.09
.44
0
0
2.30
.31
0
3.24
1.54
1.25
0
0
.45
20.57
15.36
4.12
0
6.55
2.04
0
2.65
.46
0
.64
.70
1.09
2.32
2.84
0
.74
.38
0
.53
.78
0
.41
0
0
.09
0
.09
0
0
8.99
0

148

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 27.— C l o t h i n g p u r c h a s e s : Percentage 'purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1 Continued
—

1941 (12 months)— Continued
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

W o m e n a n d girls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
and over
C lothin g.................................... . ...................
Hats, caps, berets..........................................
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw.................................................
Fabric, etc........................................
Caps, berets: W ool.....................................
Cotton, e tc.........................
Head scarfs, etc.7........................................
Cbats, sweaters, furs, etc..............................
Coats: F ur...................................................
H eavy, with fu r............................
Heavy, no fur8...............................
Light wool8.....................................
Cotton, linen8.................................
Rayon, silk8....................................
Raincoats.....................................................
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, etc...................................
Sweaters: Wool...........................................
Cotton, etc................................
Fur scarfs, etc.............................................
Dresses, suits, aprons, e tc...........................
Dresses: W ool.............................................
Rayon, s ilk .................................
Linen............................................
Cotton, street.............................
Cotton, house.............................
Cotton, un iform s......................
Suits: Wool, with fu r.................................
Wool, no fu r ....................................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, silk......................................
Skirts: Wool................................................
Cotton, e tc.....................................
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
Rayon, silk .................................
Wool, etc......................................
Play and sun suits, shorts........................
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ............................
C otton...........................
Other..............................
Special sportswear9 ......................................
C otton..........................................................
W ool........................................ / ....................
Other............................................................
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
Slips: C otton...............................................
Rayon, s ilk ......................................
Corsets, girdles...........................................
Brassieres.....................................................
Union suits, combinations: C otton ........
Rayon, silk.
Wool and
cotton .. . .
Under waists, shirts: C otton .....................
Rayon, silk.............
Wool and c o tto n ...
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
Rayon, s ilk ...............
Wool and cotton . . . .
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk........
Cotton flannel..
Cotton, oth er.. .
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool........
Rayon,
silk .......
Cotton,
lin e n ...

See footnotes on p. 177.




Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of women purchasing
89.2

93.6

98.9

99.2

99.5

97.0

100.0

98.6

100.0

46.3
32.9
18.3
3.7
1.2
1.2
4.9
26.8
0
3.7
3.7
11.0
0
1.2
0
0
1.2
0
0
8.5
1.2
0
58.5
8.5
37.8
0
20.7
14.6
1.2
0
0
0
0
3.7
1.2
2.4
2.4
0

53.2
38.3
25.5
4.3
3.2
1.1
9.6
36.7
3.2
5.9
8.0
13.3
.5
.5
.5
.5
2.7
0
1.1
13.8
4.3
0
64.4
10.1
38.8
0
26.6
18.1
5.3
0
2.1
1.1
.5
9.0
2.7
6.9
10.1
0
1.1
7.4
2.7
4.8
0
2.1
0
1.1
1.1
68.1
16.0
31.4
17.0
14.9
9.6
1.6

76.6
53.8
39.7
6.5
4.9
3.8
12.5
52.7
3.3
5.4
15.8
21.2
0
0
3.8
.5
4.9
.5
2.7
17.9
3.8
0
82.1
9.2
60.3
1.1
34.8
26.1
3.8
.5
5.4
1.1
.5
13.6
3.8
10.3
16.8
1 1
7.1
12.5
6.0
7.1
1.6
8.2
1.1
3.8
3.8
83.2
12.0
48.9
37.5
31.0
5.4
2.7

78.6
64.2
36.2
8.2
7.0
2.1
17.7
58.0
3.3
7.8
14.0
18.9
.4
.8
3.3
0
6.6
0
.4
30.5
2.1
0
87.2
17.7
67.1
2.9
37.0
30.5
2.9
.4
7.0
1.6
.4
14.8
5.8
14.4
19.3
1.2
8.6
17.3
6.2
10.7
1.2
9.1
2.5
4.5
2.9
93.4
19.3
58.8
39.1
34.6
4.5
2.5

83.4
66.8
43.3
12.4
4.1
1.8
18.0
65.0
4.1
9.7
13.4
29.0
.9
.5
5.1
1.4
4.6
0
1.8
26.7
3.2
1.4
91.7
18.0
69.6
2.3
42.4
31.8
3.2
1.8
11.5
2.3
2.8
13.8
6.9
10.6
24.4
.9
10.1
15.7
7.4
9.2
.9
12.0
2.8
3.2
6.5
93.1
13.8
61.3
45.2
39.2
3.7
2.8

84.8
75.3
46.5
11.1
1.5
3.5
14.6
64.6
7.1
18.7
13.1
24.2
1.5
.5
2.5
.5
5.1
.5
.5
27.8
5.6
0
90.9
18.2
71.8
3.5
38.4
33.8
1.5
1.5
9.6
0

88.7
75.2
48.7
14.3
5.5
2.9
17.6
64.3
12.2
10.5
11.8
26.9
.8
.8
5.5
2.1
8.0
0
.8
30.3
3.4
.8
93.7
26.1
77.3
8.0
46.2
29.8
4.2
2.5
15.5
5.9
2.9
21.0
5.9
13.9
32.4
1.3
16.0
19.7
13.9
12.6
2.5
15.5
2.1
6.7
7.6
94.1
19.7
58.4
60.1
46.2
6.7
2.5

88.9
70.8
56.9
12.5
4.2
0
16.7
72.2
8.3
9.7
22.2
34.7
0
1.4
4.2
1.4
9.7
1.4
1.4
34.7
1.4
1.4
90.3
23.6
73.6
5.6
44.4
23.6
2.8
2.8
25.0
2.8
1.4
26.4
4.2
16.7
30.6

89.7
79.3
69.0
10.3
3.4
0
17.2
69.0
3.4
13.8
24.1
37.9
0
0
13.8
3.4
13.8
0
0
13.8
13.8
0
89.7
41.4
75.9
20.7
51.7
20.7
0
10.3
31.0
3.4
20.7
6.9
20.7
41.4

9.7
13.9
6.9
9.7
2.8
25.0
9.7
6.9
8.3
97.2
19.4
69.4
72.2
45.8
6.9
2.8

10.3
17.2
20.7
34.5
6.9
41.4
17.2
10.3
13.8
93.1
20.7
58.6
51.7
55.2
3.4
3.4

1.1
3.7
1.6
1.1
11.2
29.8
.5
8.5
8.5
11.2
1.6

0
7.1
2.7
2.7
12.0
46.2
2.2
18.5
6.0
19.0
2.7

.4
4.5
7.8
2.5
8.2
54.3
3.7
23.9
13.6
18.5
4.1

.5
1.4
4.1
.0
7.8
53.0
2.3
27.6
11.1
18.9
6.0

2.0
3.0
4.5

.4
2.9
4.2
2.5
9.2
51.7
5.9
34.9
13.0
24.4
5.0

1.4
1.4
4.2
0
12.5
51.4
0
41.7
9.7
23.6
12.5

0
0
0
0
0
62.1
3.4
58.6
17.2
10.3
17.2

3.7 ! 2.2
|
3.7
10.3

6.2

6.0

9.1

9.2

12.5

27.6

16.9

12.0

12.6

14.3

22.2

6.9

0

4.9
0
1.2

0

1.2
1.2
0
0
52.4
14.6
18.3
19.5
11.0
4.9
2.4
2.4

0

1.2
0
2.4
26.8
1.2
8.5
6.1
1.2
1.2
0
3.7

1.0

20.2
3.5
14.1
19.2
1.5
8.1
19.7
7.1
11.1
1.5
13.1
4.5
4.5
4.5
90.4
16.2
64.1
56.6
42.9
2.5
3.0

1.0

10.1
58.6
4.0
32.3
10.6
19.2
3.5

0

0

0

Part III.— Tabular Summary

149

T a b l e 27.—C lothin g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of women purchasing—Con.

W o m e n a n d g ir ls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — Con.
H osiery.............
Hose: S ilk ...,
Rayon.
Cotton, including lisle..................
Wool..................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton .............................
W ool.................................
Rayon, e tc......................
Footwear..........................................................
Shoes: Leather, leather sole10*
..................
Leather, rubber sole10..................
Fabric, leather sole10.....................
Fabric, rubber sole10................
House slippers......................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes.........
R ubbers................ .................................
Shoeshines, repairs....................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
Gloves: C otton...........................................
Rayon, s ilk ...................................
Leather, fu r..................................
Wool...............................................
Handbags, purses......................................
Handkerchiefs............................................
Umbrellas....................................................
Jewelry, watches........................................
Other accessories11......................................
H ome sewing..................................................
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
Linen.....................................
Rayon, silk...........................
W ool......................................
Yarn: W ool..................................................
Other................................................
Findings...................... .............................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
Other clothing expense4................................

72.3
32.9
24.4
7.3
15.9
0
14.6
0
0
69.5
62.2
1.2
7.3
0
7.3
4.9
4.9
15.9
25.6
9.8
4.9
1.2
0
9.8
8.5
6.1
4.9
1.2
28.0
13.4
1.2
6.1
2.4
1.2
0
9.8
3.7
28.0
0

83.5
50.5
20.7
13.3
16.5
1.1
21.3
.5
1.1
79.8
68.6
11.7
7.4
3.7
15.4
9.0
3.2
23.9
43.1
9.6
5.9
4.8
5.9
20.7
16.0
3.2
3.7
2.7
33.0
22.9
1.1
8.5
2.7
.5
.5
18.1
5.3
32.4
1.6

90.2
58.2
17.4
25.0
12.0
.5
26.6
1.6
1.1
93.5
85.9
11.4
15.2
4.3
27.2
10.9
8.7
37.0
65.8
22.8
8.2
10.9
6.5
38.6
22.3
9.8
10.9
3.3
40.2
23.9
.5
13.6
4.3
3.3
2.2
17.9
7.6
57.1
4.9

92.6
64.6
15.2
23.0
12.3
1.2
38.3
1.2
.4
95.1
89.3
10.7
20.2
4.9
30.5
17.7
9.9
38.3
71.2
28.0
11.1
15.6
7.0
49.4
25.9
10.3
11.1
4.1
34.2
18.9
1.2
10.3
7.0
3.7
1.2
16.0
5.8
64.6
3.7

92.6
65.9
18.0
25.8
12.0
0
32.3
.5
.9
97.7
92.6
12.4
20.7
4.6
28.6
11.1
8.3
41.5
78.3
31.3
11.5
14.7
7.4
50.7
28.1
9.2
13.8
5.1
37.3
23.0
.9
14.7
4.1
3.7
.5
20.7
4.6
71.9
5.5

94.4
71.2
12.1
29.3
7.6
.5
30.8

1.0

.5
94.9
88.9
8.6
16.2
6.6
35.4
19.2
9.6
49.5
75.8
38.4
9.6
22.7
8.1
55.6
24.7
8.6
14.6
10.1
32.3
22.7

1.0

12.1
4.5
5.6

1.0

16.7
3.5
71.7
3.5

92.9
66.0
5.9
41.6
8.4 •

0

32.8
.8
.8
97.9
92.0
14.3
21.0
9.2
29.8
17.6
16.0
48.7
81.9
41.2
16.4
28.2
9.2
60.5
29.8
15.1
18.1
12.6
39.1
24.4
.4
10.9
8.4
5.9
2.1
16.0
5.5
84.0
5.0

95.8
62.5
5.6
43.0
9.7
0
27.8
5.6

0

95.8
94.4
11.1
26.4
4.2
29.2
15.3
18.1
47.2
81.9
30.6
16.7
37.5
11.1
63.9
12.5
12.5
13.9
6.9
37.5
15.3

0

15.3
11.1
6.9
1.4
13.9
11.1
87.5
6.9

96.6
55.2
13.8
48.3
10.3
0
31.0
3.4
0
93.1
75.9
13.8
27.6
24.1
31.0
13.8
6.9
55.2
86.2
24.1
10.3
41.4
10.3
58.6
10.3
27.6
31.0
20.7
34.5
10.3
3.4
.6.9
6.9
3.4
0
13.8
17.2
100.0
6.9

Average number of articles purchased b y women
Hats, caps, berets:
Hats: F elt............................
Straw.........................
Fabric, etc................
Caps, berets: W ool.............
Cotton, e t c ..
Head scarfs, etc.7................
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc.:
Coats: F u r......................
Heavy, with fu r—
Heavy, no fur8.......
Light wool8.............
Cotton, linen8.........
Rayon, silk8............
R aincoats.............................
Snow or ski suits, leggings.
Jackets: W ool......................
Leather.................
Cotton, etc...........
Sweaters: W ool....................
Cotton, etc........
Fur scarfs, etc.....................
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc.:
Dresses: W ool......................
Rayon, s ilk ..........
Linen....................
Cotton, street —
Cotton, house___
Cotton, uniforms
See footnotes on p. 177.




0.39
.18
.04
.01
.01
.05

0.43
.27
.06
.04
.02
.17

0.73
.43
.08
.05
.04
.18

0.89
.46
.12
.10
.02
.25

0.96
.52
.14
.05
.02
.24

1.26
.56
.15
.02
.05
.25

1.36
.66
.16
.07
.04
.29

1.49
.82
.15
.06
0
.28

2.03
.96
.10
.21
0
.38

.03
.06
.08
.13
.01
.01
.01
.01
.03

.03
.05
.16
.21

.03
.08
.14
.19
(5)
.01
.03

.04
.10
.13
.30
.01
(5
)
.05
.01
.05

.07
.19
.13
.24
.02
.01
.03
.01
.08
.01
.01
.52
.08

.12
.12
.12
.27
.01
.01
.05
.02
.09

.08
.10
.25
.37

.03
.14
.28
.52

0
.05
.05
.13
0
.01
0
0
.01
0
0

.01
.04
.01
.05
.01
.03
.27
.06

0
.01
.23
.05

.10
.01
0

0

0

0
.10
.55

.07
0

0
(5)
.50
.03

0
.13
.65

0
.41
.32
.04

0

.64
.41
.16

0

.14
1.25
.02
.73
.69
.14

.25
1.38
.04
.86
.89
.10

.02
.49
.03
.01
.25
1.59
.03
.93
.81
.09

0
.23
1.89
.05
.92
.90
.04

0
.01
.04
.01
.10
.01
.01
.93
.01

0
.01
.73
.06
(5
)
.40
2.09
.12
1.13
.90
.14

0
0
.14
.03
.14
0
0
.48
.48

0

0

.45
2.29
.26
1.26
.91
.21

1.00
2.99
.38
1.59
.62
0

150

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 27.—C lo th in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under i $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 1 to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

W o m e n a n d g irls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — Con.
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc.—Con.
Suits: Wool, with fu r.................................
Wool, no fu r ....................................
Cotton, linen.................................,.
Rayon, silk ......................................
Skirts: Wool................................ ................
Cotton, e tc.....................................
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
Rayon, s ilk .................................
Wool, etc......................................
Play and sun suits, shorts........................
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ............................
C otton ...........................
O ther..............................
Special sportswear:9
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
W ool..........................
Other........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Slips: C otton...............................................
Rayon, s ilk ......................................
Corsets, girdles...........................................
Brassieres.....................................................
Union suits, combinations: C otton ........
Rayon, silk.
Wool and
cotton___
Underwaists, shirts: C otton ....................
Rayon, silk ............
Wool and co tto n ...
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
Rayon, silk ..............
Wool and cotton ___
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk ........
Cotton, flannel..
Cotton, other. . .
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool----Rayon, silk
Cotton,
linen. . . .
Hosiery:
Hose: S ilk....................................................j
R ay on ...............................................
N y lon ................................................!
Cotton, including lisle.................. !
W ool.................................................. i
Anklets, socks: C otton ............................. I
W ool................................. j
Rayon, e tc......................
Footwear:
|
Shoes: T ota l................................................1
Leather, leather sole10.................. i
Leather, rubber sole10...................
Fabric, leather sole10.....................
Fabric, rubber sole10.....................
House slippers............................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes.........
R ubbers.......................................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories:
Gloves: C otton...........................................
Rayon, s ilk ...................................
Leather, fu r..................................
W ool...............................................
Handbags, purses...................................... j
Handkerchiefs............................................ !
Umbrellas.....................................................i
Hom e sewing:
j
Yard goods: Cotton (y d .)......................... i!
Linen (y d .)...........................
Rayon, silk (y d .)................
Wool (y d .)............................. ;
See footnotes on p. 177.




Average number of articles purchased b y women—Con.
0.01
.07
.01
.01
.16
.07
.17
.27
.01
.09
.30
.07
.10
.02

(5
)
0.08
.02
(s)
.24
.08
.24
.36
.01
.11
.47
.09
.12
.01

0.02
.12
.02
.04
.20
.07
.18
.51
.01
.13
.46
.08
.12
.01

0.02
.10
0
.01
.36
.05
.27
.31
.03
.10
.56
.08
.14
.03

0.03
.16
.07
.03
.40
.08
.37
.67
.02
.27
.61
.16
.17
.04

0.03
.26
.03
.01
.53
.04
.39
.74
0
.14
.57
.12
.14
.03

0.10
.34
0
.03
.72
.07
.52
1.24
0
.31
.52
.38
.69
.07

.01
.01

.01
.04
.04

.02
.04
.03

.03
.03
.06

.05
.05
.05

.02
.07
.08

.11
.08
.08

.28
.21
.14

.18
.43
.21
.28
.12
.05

.30
.69
.23
.40
.23
.04

.27
1.23
.55
.84
.12
.07

.38
1.45
.56
.87
.10
.08

.32
1.62
.69
1.08
.20
.09

.51
1.77
.94
1.24
.08
.12

.60
1.92
1.05
1.42
.19
.09

.67
2.46
1.14
1.46
.21
.07

.45
2.07
1.21
1.76
.17
.14

.04

.02
.10
.04
.02
.32
1.07
.01
.13
.15
.21
.02
.04

0

.01
.13
.26
.05
.35
2.30
.10
.45
.22
.36
.05
.07

.01
.05
.14

.05
.11
.19
.02
.42
2.91
.08
.60
.19
.47
.04
.09

.01
.08
.27
.06
.37
2.63
.21
.74
.20
.59
.06
.10

.03
.04
.21

0
0
0
0
0
3.03
.10
1.45
.28
.17
.24
.41

0

0
0
0
0

.02
.02
.01
.14
.03
.10
.12

.04
.01
.04
.02
0
0

0
.01
.17
.03
.06

.11
0
.01
0

0
.01

0
0

0
.04
0
.05
.87
.02
.13
.07
.01
.01
0

0

.17
.08
.07
.36
2.03
.04
.35
.10
.37
.03
.03

0
.29
2.37
.13
.49
.21
.39
.06
.06

0
.65
2.62
0
.96
.19
.53
.11
.12

.04

.04

.11

.19

.12

.16

.20

.28

.07

1.41
1.23
.18
.60
0
.76
0
0

3.81
.97
.61
.77
.02
1.43
.01
.05

6. C
O
1.08
1.35
.68
.01
1.40
.07
.05

6.49
1.35
1.07
.52
.04
2.18
.02
.01

8.46
1.85
1.35
.66
0
2.22
.02
.02

9.12
1.24
1.34
.32
.01
1.94
.02
.03

9.29
1.01
3.00
.49
0
2.40
.03
.03

9.14
.60
3.78
2.64
0
1.69
.11
0

7.0C
1.10
4.00
.45
0
.14
.14
0

1.11 1.56
1.26
1.01
.01!
.15
.10
.09
.05
0
.06:
.15
.05!!
.09
.07 !
-04

2.22
1.77
.17
.23
.05
.30
.11
.09

2.46
1.99
.13
.27
.07
.41
.18
.10

2.60
2.08
.17
.29
.06
.39
.12
.09

2.73
2.31
.13
.22
.07
.42
.19
.10

3.17
2.57
.20
.26
.14
.41
.18
.18

3.09
2.47
.14
.44
.04
.37
.15
.18

4.30
2.90
.41
.65
.34
.34
.17
.14

.11
.57
.06

.13
.06
.06
.06
.29
1.62
.03

.27
.10
.15
.07
.56
2.12
.10

.40
.15
.18
.08
.76
2.70
.11

.45
.17
.18
.08
.84
3.18
.09

.63
.16
.27
.09
.91
3.17
.09

.69
.24
.36
.10
1.13
3.37
.16

.51
.29
.54
.12
1.17
1.40
.12

.59
.14
.79
.24
1.52
1.24
.31

1.16
.04
.24
0

1.91
.02
.48
.16

0
0
0
0

2.19
.04
.75
.19

0

2.26
.06
.77
.20

2.44
.02
.84
.33

1.42
0
.25
.24

.59
.14
.76
.24

.15!!
.06
.01
0

.05
0
0

151

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.— C lo th in g p u rc h ases : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Average expenditure per woman
W o m e n a n d g irls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — Con.
Clothing: T ota l.............................................. $21.05 $34.27 $65.95 $71.98 $91.39 $106.95 $149.67 $182.97 $351.84
Hats, caps, berets.......................................... $1.50 $1.52 $3.25 $3.50 $4.60
.89 1.91 2.08 2.72
.98
Hats: Felt....................................................
.99 1.36
.46 1.00
.34
Straw........................... ........ ...........
.22
.31
.07
.19
.14
Fabric, etc........................................
.06
.06
.02
.04
.01
Caps, berets: W ool.....................................
.02
.02
.03
.01
Cotton, etc.........................
.01
.12
.13
.02
.07
.09
Head scarfs, etc.7........................................
3.10 7.36 12.76 13.40 19.08
Coats, sweaters, furs, e tc.............................
1.93 3.62 3.42 5.33
0
Coats: F u r...................................................
H eavy, with fu r............................
.65 1.81 2.00 2.80 3.71
.35 1.20 2.45 2.65 2.68
H eavy, no fur8...............................
1.80 1.54 3.29 2.79 4.72
Light wool8.....................................
.02
.17
.06 0
0
Cotton, linen8.................................
.04
.02 0
.06
.06
Rayon, silk8....................................
.22
.39
.23
.03
0
Raincoats.....................................................
.05 0
.07
.06
0
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
.21
.29
.23
.02
.10
Jackets: W ool..............................................
.05 0
0
0
0
Leather.........................................
.04
.01
.07
.03
0
Cotton, etc...................................
.52
.22
.68 1.12 1.25
Sweaters: W ool............................................
.04
.03
.10
.06
Cotton, etc................................
(6
)
0
.41
0
0
0
Fur scarfs, etc.................................. '.........
5.00 7.29 15.54 17.07 21.08
Dresses, suits, aprons, e tc...........................
.57
.89 1.02 1.98 2.12
Dresses: W ool..............................................
2.69 3.01 7.59 7.32 8.64
Rayon, s ilk .................................
.12
.12
.10
0
0
Linen............................................
1.00 1.09 1.71 1.99 2.44
Cotton, street.............................
.79 1.13 1.12
.47
.35
Cotton, house.............................
.29
.29
.25
.33
.13
Cotton, uniform s......................
.50
.02
.03
0
0
Suits: Wool, with fu r.................................
.30 1.31 1.14 1.99
0
Wool, no fu r ....................................
.08
.13
.06
.03
0
Cotton, linen...................................
.02
.31
.05
.03
0
Rayon, silk......................................
.63
.50
.68
.46
.06
Skirts: Wool................................................
.19
.21
.19
.04
.03
Cotton, e tc .....................................
.12
.29
.27
.25
.05
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
.62 1.06
.19
.51
.04
Rayon, silk .................................
.02
.01
.03
0
0
Wool, etc.....................................
.22
.02
.28
0
.23
Play and sun suits, shorts........................
.27
.24
.13
.06
.08
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
.40
.12
.31
.35
0
Overalls, slacks: R a y o n ............................
.32
.32
.30
.02
.11
C otton...........................
.04
.06
0
.10
0
Other.............................
.29
.41
.05
.36
.08
Special sportswear9........................................
.06
.03
.08
.05 0
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
.03
.20
.14
.11
0
W ool.........................
.10
.21
.05
0
.13
Other........................
2.25 3.56 7.13 8.52 9.94
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
.31
.24
.25
.46
.16
Slips: C otton ...............................................
.78 1.53 1.95 2.43
.39
Rayon, silk ........................... *
..........
.54 1.85 1.69 2.23
.67
Corsets, girdles...........................................
.62
.59
.88
.14
.27
Brassieres.................... . ..............................
.17
.10
.19
.08
.08
Union suits, com binations: C otton ........
Rayon, silk.
.05
.06
.07
.07
.05
Wool and
.01
.04
cotton . . .
.05 0
.06
.02
.03
.04
0
.07
Underwaists, shirts: C otton ....................
.02
.11
.01
.03
.08
Rayon, silk.............
.03 0
0
.02
Wool and c o tto n ...
(6)
.21
.13
.16
.11
.03
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
.81
.98 1.10
.38
Rayon, silk...............
.27
.03
.04
.06
.01
Wool and cotton ___
(6)
.92
.73
.62
.22
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk ........
.18
.25
.12
.29
.17
Cotton flannel..
.05
.40
.47
.19
.38
.01
Cotton, other.. .
.23
.09
.16
.07
.06
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool........
Rayon,
.10
.10
.22
.21
0
silk.......
Cotton,
.34
.15
.26
.51
.06
lin e n ...

See footnotes on p. 177.




$5.30
3.44
1.41
.26
.01
.02
.16
27.32
9.44
8.40
2.73
4.52
.14
.02
.20
.10
.33
.05
.02
1.28
.09
0
24.57
2.00
11.93
.37
2.79
1.47
.07
.59
1.51
0
.27
1.09
.12
.38
.62
.06
.23
.35
.37
.26
.09
.50
.19
.15
.16
11.90
.55
2.71
2.77
.95
.04
.14

$7.35
4.62
1.93
.45
.08
.08
.19
38.53
21.28
5.57
2.86
4.85
.07
.08
.37
.19
.49
0
.02
1.88
.11
.76
35.15
3.31
14.91
.65
3.68
1.47
.31
.98
2.62
.41
.43
1.35
.21
.45
1.62
.04
.81
.42
.80
.49
.19
.61
.04
.27
.30
15.36
.82
3.28
3.70
1.36
.15
.11

.07
.05
.06
.01
.18
1.34
.05
1.11
.23
.51
.17

(6)
.04
.14
.04
.21
1.43
.10
1.73
.31
.74
.26

.50
1.64
0
2.26
.35
.82
1.08

0
0
0
0
0
3.69
.08
5.60
.68
.60
2.98

.58

.42

.81

3.94

.38

.52

.97

.18

$9.50 $23.12
5.29 15.17
3.00
6.93
.47
.45
.21
.08
0
0
.66
.36
40.04 48.24
14.35
6.26
4.97 11.17
7.74 12.46
8.13 11.83
0
0
.07
0
.14
1.24
.06
.39
.60
1.36
.11
0
.08
0
2.74
2.50
.01
1.03
1.04
0
46.96 121.67
5.38 14.77
18.45 48.07
1.43
3.69
5.53 13.65
1.63
2.85
.85
0
1.04
5.97
5.73 12.12
.18
0
.28
.68
2.28
5.48
.34
.15
.62
1.00
1.75
4.55
0
0
.35
1.31
.38
.80
2.53
.58
.25
3.23
.10
.52
1.40
4.32
2.31
.51
.91
.43
1.10
.46
21.74 38.35
1.20
1.44
4.99
6.10
4.82
8.59
1.56
3.54
.24
.22
.17
.71
.14
.02
.17
0

152

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 27.—C lo thin g p u rc h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 to
$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average expenditure per woman—Con.

W o m e n a n d girls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — Con.
H osiery............................................................
Hose: Silk....................................................
R ayon...............................................
N ylon ................................................
Cotton, including lisle..................
W ool..................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton .............................
W ool.................................
Rayon, e tc ......................
Shoes: T otal................................................
Leather, leather sole10..................
Leather, rubber sole1 0 .................
Fabric, leather sole10.....................
Fabric, rubber sole10.....................
House slippers............................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes..........
R ubbers.......................................................
Shoeshines, repairs....................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
R ayon, silk ...................................
Leather, fu r..................................
W ool...............................................
Handbags, purses......................................
Handkerchiefs............................................
Umbrellas.................................... •
...............
Jewelry, watches........................................
......................................
Other accessories11
Hom e sewing..................................................
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
Linen.....................................
Rayon, silk...........................
W ool.......................................
Yarn: Wool..................................................
Other.................................................
Findings......................................................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
Other clothing expense4................................

$2.32 $4.94 $7.89 $8.72 $11.51 $11.01 $14.99 $17.14 $15.77
7.60
8.70
9.48
1.18 3.00 4.84 5.57 7.70
8.11
.52
.63 1.01 1.24
.65
.84
.99
.46
1.37
2.01
.25
.89 1.95 1.51 1.89
4.49
5.74
5.31
.20
.19
.13
.09
.25
.30
.26
.26
.96
0
.02
.01
.02 0
0
.01
0
0
.23
.41
.52
.11
.23
.41
.44
.44
.61
0
.01
.01
.01
.01
.02
.03
.06
.07
0
.01
0
.01
.01
.01
0
(«)
(6)
4.44 5.93 9.78 10.75 12.85 13.61 16.84 19.38 35.87
4.01 5.28 8.32 9.05 11.22 11.38 14.31 16.84 30.72
3.75 4.54 6.87 7.63 9.39
9.90 12.19 14.12 21.76
.43
.70
.05
1.95
0
.37
.46
.38
.88
.90
.21
1.14
1.76
.27
.87 1.14
.96
6.28
0
.10
.12
.09
.14
.73
.08
.28
.08
.10
.70
.19
.41
.47
.49
.65
1.05
.61
.42
.15
.26
.41
.45
.07
.24
.36
.75
.21
.21
.03
.11
.07
.11
.11
.11
.27
.70
.77
1.10
.19
.28
.76
1.25
1.18
3.08
9.70 35.75
.76 1.35 3.79 4.37 4.91
5.84
8.55
.12
.09
.36
.44
.33
.73
.54
1.04
.58
.04
.14
.15
.15
.04
.12
.27
.34
.14
.32
.34
.65
.90
.05
.14
.41
1.46
2.49
.10
0
.05
.07
.07
.12
.08
.26
.47
.42
.91 1.18 1.41
1.91
9.12
.17
2.73
3.86
.32
.05
.13
.31
.60
.27
.29
.18
.46
.20
.30
.11
.06
.17
.18
.24
1.09
.18
.36 1.66 1.68 1.80
2.73
2.53 19.85
.16
1.81
.12
.10
.06
.06
.02
.31
.19
.18
.95
2.42
3.30
.75 1.20 2.49 1.71 2.46
5.89
7.01
.53
.44
.69
.77
.76
.85
1.14
.26
.43
.02
.02
.01
.03
.01
.01
.05
0
.14
.70
.52
.75
1.52
.23
.37
.69
.27
.74
.20
.35
.62
1.10
.10
.26
.18
.45
.18
.42
.16
.14
.04
.01
.07
.16
.25
.21
.01
.01
.01
0
.02
.03
0
.33
.03
.15
.29
.30
.32
.15
.20
.25
.07
.28
.20
.49
.14
1.53
.04
.11
.28
.38
4.76
8.12
.94 2.79 3.48 4.06
4.17
8.58 21.27
.88
.10
0
.17
.49
.31
2.64
.17
.87
.47
Percentage o f girls purchasing

G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e
Clothing..........................................................

100.0

Hats, caps, berets..........................................
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw.................................................
Fabric, etc........................................
Caps, berets: W o o l....................................
Cotton, e tc .........................
Head scarfs, etc.7........................................
Coats, sweaters, furs, e tc.............................
Coats: F u r...................................................
H eavy, with fu r............................
H eavy, no fur8. ............................
Light wool8.....................................
Cotton, linen8.................................
Rayon, silk8....................................
R aincoats.....................................................
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, e tc..................................
Sweaters: W ool...........................................
Cotton, etc................................
Fur scarfs, etc.............................................

40.0
0
0
0
30.0
10.0
0
60.0
0
0
0
20.0
0
0
0
10.0
10.0
0
0
20.0
10.0
0

See footnotes on p. 177.




85.4 100.0 100.0

98.6

98.4

96.2

100.0

100.0

35.4
14.6
4.2
0
20.8
2.1
0
39.6
0
2.1
10.4
2.1
2.1
0
2.1
0
2.1
0
2.1
25.0
6.2 1
0

67.6
40.5
18.9
4.1
18.9
1.4
17.6
81.1
1.4
9.5
27.0
18.9
0
0
12.2
31.1
9.5
1.4
1.4
45.9
5.4
0

70.3
39.1
20.3
6.2
26.6
4.7
14.1
84.4
0
4.7
31.2
23.4
0
0
17.2
37.5
9.4
0
0
56.2
4.7
0

82.7
44.2
38.5
9.6
32.7
7.7
25.0
86.2
0
1.9
40.4
40.4
1.9
0
17.3
40.4
7.7
0
17.3
67.3
9.6
0

63.2
47.4
15.8
10.5
15.8
0
5.3
89.5
5.3
0
47.4
42.1
0
0
15.8
21.1
21.1
0
0
63.2
5.3
0

81.8
45.5
36.4
0
18.2
0
9.1
91.0
0
9.1
45.5
63.6
9.1
0
27.3
27.3
27.3
18.2
9.1
45.5
0
0

61.1
25.9
13.0
7.4
16.7
13.0
9.3
64.8
0
5.6
13.0
25.9
0
0
5.6
20.4
7.4
0
5.6
33.3
7.4
0

53.8
29.5
24.4
6.4
15.4
6.4
19.2
75.6
0
7.7
23.1
17.9
1.3
0
12.8
30.8
1.3
2.6
3.8
32.1
5.1
2.6

153

P art III.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.— C loth in g p u rc h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchasedy and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

\
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
to
to I to
to
to
to
and
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,0001$2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of girls purchasing—Con.

Dresses, suits, aprons, e tc......................
Dresses: W ool.............................................
Rayon, silk .................................
L inen............................................
Cotton, street........................... .
*
Cotton, house.............................
Cotton, uniforms.............. ........
Suits: Wool, with fu r .................................
Wool, no fu r .....................................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, silk......................................
Skirts: W ool.................................................
Cotton, e t c .....................................
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
Rayon, silk .................................
Wool, etc......................................
Play and sun suits, shorts........................
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
Overalls, slacks: R a y o n ............................
C otton ...........................
Other.............................
Special sportswear9........................................
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton......................
W ool.........................
Other........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
Slips: C otton ...............................................
Rayon, silk ......................................
Corsets, girdles...........................................
Brassieres...............................................
Union suits, com binations: C otton........
Rayon, silk
Wool and
cotton----Underwaists, shirts: C otton....................
Rayon, silk.............
Wool and cotton .. .
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
Rayon, silk...............
Wool and cotton ----Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk ........
Cotton, flannel..
Cotton, o th e r ...
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool........
Rayon,
silk.......
Cotton,
lin e n ...
H osiery............................................................
Hose: S ilk.................................................. .
R ayon ...............................................
N y lon ................................................
Cotton, including lisle..................
W ool..................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton .............................
W ool................................
Rayon, e tc......................
Footwear..........................................................
Shoes: Leather, leather sole10..................
Leather, rubber sole10...................
Fabric, leather sole10.....................
Fabric, rubber sole10.....................
House slippers............................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes..........
R ubbers.......................................................
Shoeshines, repairs....................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
Gloves: C otton...........................................
Rayon, s ilk ...................................
Leather, fu r..................................
W ool...............................................
Handbags, purses......................................

See footnotes on p. 177.




50.0
0
0
0
30.0
20.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
70.0
40.0
20.0
0
0
0
0

47.9
4.2
12.5
0
22.9
2.1
0
0
2.1
2.1
0
4.2
0
4.2
0
0
6.2
2.1
0
10.4
0
2.1
0
2.1
0
56.2
12.5
8.3
0
2.1
4.2
0

81.5
11.1
22.2
0
74.1
1.9
0
3.7
0
1.9
0
13.0
3.7
25.9
0
0
24.1
0
0
20.4
0
14.8
9.3
3.7
1.9
85.2
31.5
16.7
0
5.6
5.6
0

83.4 85.1
9.5
7.7
25.6 28.4
1.4
2.6
55.1 77.0
1.4
6.4
0
0
0
0
6.8
3.8
0
1.4
0
0
23.1 28.4
2.6
2.7
14.1 33.8
14.1 12.2
6.4
2.7
34.6 39.2
2.6
2.7
9.5
5.1
14.1 27.0
0
1.4
14.1 23.0
7.7 12.2
6.4
4.1
2.6 . 6.8
89.7 90.5
32.1 27.0
15.4 29.7
0
2.7
2.6
5.4
14.1 10.8
0
1.4

92.2
9.4
35.9
1.6
60.9
1.6
0
1.6
1.6
0
0
37.5
4.7
32.8
20.3
1.6
32.8
6.2
1.6
21.9
0
21.9
12.5
4.7
6.2
93.8
39.1
23.4
4.7
9.4
7.8
1.6

86.5
23.1
42.3
1.9
73.1
5.8
1.9
0
11.5
1.9
1.9
42.3
13.5
51.9
28.8
0
48.1
5.8
13.5
25.0
1.9
51.9
11.5
32.7
11.5
94.2
30.8
44.2
11.5
11.5
5.8
0

48.2
31.6
52.6
5.3
63.2
5.3
0
0
15.8
5.3
0
47.4
5.3
10.5
21.1
0
26.3
0
15.8
5.3
5.3
31.6
10.5
15.8
5.3
73.7
36.8
15.8
0
0
5.3
5.3

91.0
27.3
36.4
0
45.5
0
0
0
18.2
0
0
45.5
27.3
45.5
0
0
45.5
18.2
18.2
9.1
0
45.5
18.2
18.2
9.1
91.0
45.5
18.2
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
10.0
30.0
0
0
0
0
0

0
10.4
4.2
2.1
22.9
29.2
4.2
0
4.2
12.5
0

9.3
22.2
5.6
5.6
48.1
31.5
3.7
9.3
13.0
14.8
0

3.8
25.6
2.6
9.0
43.6
26.9
10.3
14.1
17.9
16.7
3.8

1.4
24.3
2.7
6.8
43.2
37.8
6.8
20.3
16.2
20.3
6.8

1.6
34.4
7.8
4.7
•46.9
31.2
6.2
14.1
20.3
25.0
3.1

0
28.8
7.7
7.7
50.0
44.2
7.7
13.5
25.0
32.7
5.8

0
5.3
15.8
0
21.1
47.4
0
5.3
10.5
31.6
0

18.2
36.4
0
0
45.5
36.4
0
0
27.3
27.3
27.3

0

0

1.9

0
90.0
0
10.0
0
10.0
0
80.0
0
0
80.0
80.0
0
10.0
0
0
0
0
0
20.0
0
0
0
0
0

2.1
7.4
77.1 98.1
6.2
3.7
2.1
3.7
0
3.7
22.9 16.7
0
0
66.7 88.9
0
0
4.2
9.3
77.1 100.0
64.6 81.5
22.9 25.9
4.2
5.6
1.9
8.3
12.5 16.7
10.4 24.1
4.2
1.9
10.4 25.9
22.9 40.7
2.1
3.7
0
0
0
0
8.3 27.8
6.2
9.3

0

0

0

0

0

0

10.3
94.9
7.7
3.8
1.3
23.1
2.6
87.2
6.4
2.6
98.7
87.2
25.6
1.3
6.4
16.7
34.6
14.1
33.3
48.7
12.8
1.3
2.6
35.9
14.1

10.8
94.6
10.8
5.4
0
17.6
2.7
86.5
8.1
5.4
94.6
89.2
25.7
8.1
9.5
23.0
35.1
4.1
31.1
67.6
14.9
2.7
2.7
35.1
23.0

10.9
93.8
10.9
6.2
1.6
28.1
0
81.2
1.6
3.1
96.9
92.2
20.3
6.2
15.6
17.2
40.6
18.8
32.8
65.6
17.2
1.6
14.1
42.2
28.1

11.5
94.2
17.3
3.8
1.9
13.5
0
92.3
13.5
1.9
96.2
92.3
38.5
9.6
23.1
26.9
61.5
7.7
30.8
73.1
13.5
3.8
9.6
46.2
32.7

10.5
89.5
36.8
10.5
0
10.5
0
73.7
10.5
5.3
94.7
84.2
42.1
0
10.5
15.8
31.6
10.5
15.8
52.6
10.5
0
0
26.3
15.8

0
100.0
27.3
0
0
0
9.1
100.0
18.2
0
91.0
91.0
9.1
9.1
27.3
9.1
36.4
36.4
54.5
54.5
0
0
27.3
27.3
27.3

154

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 27.—C lo th in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number of articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage o f girls purchasing—Con.

G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.
Gloves, handkerchiefs, etc.—Con.
Handkerchiefs............................................
Umbrellas....................................................
Jewelry, watches........................................
Other accessories11....................................
Hom e sewing..................................................
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
Linen.....................................
Rayon, silk...........................
W ool.......................................
Y arn: W ool..................................................
Other.................................................
Findings.......................................................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
Other clothing expense4................................

20.0
0
0
0
50.0
50.0
0
0
0
0
0
30.0
0
0
0

14.6
0
0
2.1
31.2
27.1
0
4.2
0
0
0
20.8
2.1
4.2
2.1

9.3
1.9
5.6
1.9
38.9
35.2
1.9
3.7
1.9
3.7
0
14.8
1.9
25.9
1.9

10.3
11.5
3.8
1.3
41.0
32.1
1.3
5.1
3.8
2.6
0
9.0
1.3
29.5
1.3

25.7
0
6.8
2.7
39.2
32.4
0
13.5
10.8
10.8
0
16.2
1.4
48.6 .
1.4

21.9
4.7
6.2
9.4
40.6
29.7
3.1
4.7
3.1
9.4
0
10.9
3.1
46.9
1.6

17.3
1.9
9.6
5.8
44.2
25.0
1.9
11.5
7.7
7.7
0
17.3
11.5
59.6
0

0
5.3
21.1
15.8
31.6
15.8
0
5.3
0
10.5
0
0
5.3
47.4
5.3

9.1
18.2
18.2
9.1
18.2
18.2
0
0
9.1
0
0
9.1
0
91.0
18.2

Average number of articles purchased b y girls
Hats, caps, berets:
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw.................................................
Fabric, etc........................................
Caps, berets: W ool.....................................
Cotton, etc..........................
Head scarfs, etc.7........................................
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc.:
Coats: F u r...................................................
Heavy, with fu r............................
Heavy, no fur8...............................
Light wool8.....................................
Cotton, linen8.................................
Raincoats.....................................................
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, etc....... ..........................
Sweaters: W ool...........................................
Cotton, etc................................
Fur scarfs, etc.............................................
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc.:
Dresses: W ool.............................................
Rayon, silk .................................
Linen............................................
Cotton, street.............................
Cotton, house.............................
Cotton, uniforms.......................
Suits: Wool, with fu r.................................
Wool, no fu r ....................................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, silk .......................................
Skirts: W ool................................................
Cotton, e tc.....................................
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
Rayon, s ilk .................................
Wool, etc......................................
Play and sun suits, shorts........................
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ............................
C otton...........................
Other.............................
Special sportswear:9
Bathing suits, etc: C otton........................
W ool...........................
Other..........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Slips: C otton...............................................
Rayon, s ilk ......................................
Corsets, girdles...........................................
Brassieres.....................................................

See footnotes on p. 177.




0
0
0
0.30
.10
0

0.12
.04
0
.21
.02
0

0.30
.15
.07
.19
.11
.17

0.34
.26
.06
.18
.06
.24

0
0
0

0

0

0

.02
.10
.02
.02
.02

.20
0
0
.10
.10
0
0

0
.06
.20
.07

0
.02
0
.02
.31
.17

.20
.10
0

0

.06
.13
.26

0

.60
.40

.73
.06

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0

0
0
0

.04
0
.15
0
0
.15
.04
0
.12
0

.83
.08

0
0
1.84
.11
0

.17
.42
.09
0
0

0

.47
.47

0
.16
.21
.21

0
3.20
.02
0
.04
0
.02
0
.19
.06
.39
0
0
.48
0
0
.24
0

.12
.66
.03
2.31
.05
0
.03
.02
0
0
.56
.06
.62
.38
.02
.72
.16
.03
.33
0

.29
.75
.06
2.98
.12
.04
0
.13
.02
.04
.71
.17
1.35
.44
0
1.17
.12
.17
.37
.02

.42
.95
.05
2.16
.05
0
0
.21
.21
0
1.11
.16
.47
.68
0
.47
0
.21
.05
.05

.64
1.09
0
2.46
0
0
0
.18
0
0
1.27
.27
1.91
0
0
1.82
.55
.27
.18
0

.07
.04
.02

.06
.06
.03

.11
.04
.05

.16
.05
.05

.12
.33
.12

.11
.16
.05

.27
.36
.09

1.08
.44

.81
.76
.03
.11

1.12
.52
.06
.22

.87
1.35
.15
.46

.46
.15

.80
.35

0

0
.04

.12
.31
.09
.01
.01
.70
.07

0

0
.09
.45
.64
.09
.27
.27
.27
.18
.09
1.27
0
0

0

0

.05
.04
.40
.40
.02
.17
.42
.08

0

0

0

0
.05
.33
.23

0.73
.36
0
.27
0
.18

.11
.54
.07
2.54
.07
0
0
.07
.01
0
.43
.03
.72
.20
.05
.78
.08
.14
.35
.01

.02
.70
.30

0
0

0

0.53
.16
.11
.16
0
.16

0

.19
.32

0

.02
.04
0

0.54
.38
.12
.48
.13
.27

.12
.46
.04
2.32
.36
0
0
.04
0
0
.44
.03
.24
.23
.09
.87
.09
.06
.18
0

0

0

.01
.09
.27
.19

0.44
.23
.06
.30
.03
.27

.19
1.29
.10
0

.06
.50
.11

.04
.14

0
0
0

.08
.23
.18
.01
.13
.31
.01
.03
.04
.65
.10
.03

0.50
.20
.04
.23
.01
.31

.15

.06

1.26
.53

1.45
.64

0
0

0
0

155

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.— C lothin g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.

Average number of articles purchased by girls—Con.

Underwear, nightwear, robes—Con.
Union suits, combinations: C otton ........
Rayon, silk
Wool and
cotton----Underwaists, shirts: C otton ....................
Rayon, silk.......
Wool and co tto n ...
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
Rayon, silk ...............
Wool and cotton . . . .
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk ........
Cotton, flannel..
Cotton, other. . .
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool........
Rayon,
silk-----Cotton,
Linen----Hosiery:
Hose: S ilk ...................................................
R ayon ...............................................
N y lon ................................................
Cotton, including lisle..................
W ool..................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton .............................
W ool.................................
Rayon, e tc......................
Footwear:
Shoes: T ota l................................................
Leather, leather sole10..................
Leather, rubber sole10..................
Fabric, leather sole10....................
Fabric, rubber sole10.....................
House slippers............................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes.........
R ubbers.............................................. ; —
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories:
Gloves: C otton...........................................
Rayon, s ilk ...................................
Leather, fu r..................................
W ool...............................................
Handbags, purses......................................
Handkerchiefs............................................
Umbrellas....................................................
H om e sewing:
Yard goods: C otton (y d .).........................
Linen (y d .) ..........................
Rayon, silk (y d .)................
Wool (y d .).............................

0
0

0.06
0

0.09
0

0.36
0

0.27
.04

0.22
.06

0.27
0

0.32
.16

0
0

0
0
0
0

0

.17
.69
.15
.30
2.81
1.69
.13
.19
.22
.28
0

.09
1.03
.06
.33
2.72
1.32
.35
.32
.35
.32
.04

.04
.89
.15
.16
2.89
1.78
.20
.34
.20
.38
.07

.05
1.66
.30
.12
2.91
1.38
.23
.20
.33
.50
.03

0

0

.92
.31
.19
2.94
2.63
.21
.19
.50
.63
.08

0
1.26
2.37
0
.05
.26
.58
0

.64
1.73
0
0
2.55
3.27
0
0
.64
.73
.27

0

0

0

0

0

0

.40
1.00
0
0
0
0
0

.33
.12
.04
1.27
.87
.19
0
.04
.31
0

0

0

.02

.21
.42

0

.02

.07

.12

.11

.12

.12

.11

0
.10

.40
.08

.10
0
2.60
0
0

.23
.40
.03
1.50
.13
9.00
.10
.18

.80
.36

0
1.06
0
6.40
0
.31

.15
.13
.24
1.96
0
9.22
0
.61

.86
.14
9.58
.24
.41

.70
.30
.05
1.70
0
9.55
.06
.14

.90
1.38
.02
.58
0
14.02
.40
.12

1.05
.42
0
.63
0
12.63
2.84
.32

1.45
0
0
0
.27
10.55
1.27
0

1.00
.90
0
.10
0
0
0
0

2.26
1.60
.50
.04
.12
.12
.12
.04

2.88
2.33
.44
.09
.02
.19
.26
.02

3.20
2.72
.38
.01
.09
.17
.37
.13

3.52
2.84
.45
.12
.11
.24
.35
.04

3.29
2.53
.47
.09
.20
.17
.42
.19

3.81
2.75
.63
.12
.31
.29
.63
.08

3.27
2.32
.79
0
.16
.16
.32
.11

4.72
4.00
.18
.09
.45
.18
.45
.36

.04

.13
.01
.03
.46
.15
1.21
.12

.18
.03
.03
.51
.27
4.00
0

.16
.03
.14
.56
.36
1.77
.05

.23
.04
.10
.77
.44
1.48
.04

1.83
.05
.10
.06

3.68

1.78
.05
.28
.12

2.00
.08
.38
.19

0

.02

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
.90

0
3.00
0
0

0

0
0

.12
.06
2.15
0

.33
.11
.61
.02

2.85
0
.08
0

2.04
.07
.04

0

0

0

.54
.24

.11
0
0

0

0
0
.55
.91
.64
.91
.18

.26
.26
0
.05
.26
0
.16

.91
0
.0

0

.09

Average expenditure per girl
Clothing: T otal..............................................

$5.03 $12.18 $29.05 $35.50 $44.90 $47.41 $71.47 $75.13 $153.85

Hats, caps, berets.......................................... ” $0J9 $0.24 $ 1.00 $1.08 $1.38
.74
.43
.48
.08
0
Hats: F elt....................................................
.25
.16
.31
.02
Straw.................................................
0
.08
.06
.06
0
0
Fabric, etc........................................
.16
.14
.12
.13
.15
Caps, berets: W ool.....................................
.01
.04
.02
.06
.04
Cotton, etc.........................
.10
.14
.11
0
0
Head scarfs, etc.7.......................................
1.32 1.67 6.62 8.50 9.94
Coats, sweaters, furs, e tc.............................
.22
0
0
0
0
Coats: F u r...................................................
.93
.75 1.19
.23
0
H eavy, with fu r............................
.65 1.17 2.68 2 89
Heavy, no fur8...............................
0
.17 1.30 1.27 1.19
.79
Light wool8.....................................
.04 0
.02 0
Cotton, linen8................................. 0
.35
.29
.26
.04
Raincoats..................................................... 0
1.67 1.82 2.27
.15 0
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
.22
.51
.04
.05
.10
Jackets: W ool..............................................
.04
.13
0
0
Leather......................................... 0
.14
.03
.05
.01
Cotton, etc................................... 0

See footnotes on p. 177.




$1.53
.77
.33
.07
.25
.01
.10
11.83
0
.43
4.34
1.95
0
.60
3.05
.24
0
0

$2.36
1.05
.58
.13
.34
.11
.15
17.10
0
.38
5.05
3.63
.06
.76
3.37
.38

0

.61

$1.82
.97
.28
.26
.15

0

.16
20.06
1.00
0
6.74
4.16
0
1.02
1.16
2.33

0

0

$3.94
2.40
.91
0
.36

0

.27
34.52
0
4.09
8.32
10.36
1.09
1.45
2.45
1.63
1.55
.18

156

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

27.—C lothing purchases: Percentage purchasing, average number of articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

T able

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under
$500

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
to
$l,000j $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Average expenditure
G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — C on.
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc.—Con.
Sweaters: Wool............................................ $0.20 $0.35 $0.77 $1.22 $1.21
.17
.16
.13
.04
.08
Cotton, etc................................
0
0
0
.06 0
Fur scarfs, etc.............................................
.59 1.64 7.15 8.16 9.68
Dresses, suits, aprons, e tc............................
.95
.37
.46
0
.08
Dresses: W ool.............................................
0
.31
.77 1.51 1.47
Rayon, silk ..................................
.12
0
0
.04
0
Linen............................................
.60 3.83 2.76 3.73
.34
Cotton, street.............................
.02
.12
.03
.25
.51
Cotton, house.............................
0
0
0
0
0
Cotton, uniforms.......................
0
0
.20 0
Suits: Wool, with fu r ................................. 0
.23
.51
.04 0
Wool, no fu r ..................................... 0
.04
.09 0
.04
Cotton, linen...................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rayon, silk......................................
0
.35 1.09 1.09
.08
Skirts: Wool................................................
0
.03
.04
0
.08
Cotton, e tc.....................................
.12
.30
.20
.57
0
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
0
0
.29
.22
0
Rayon, silk .................................
0
.14
0
.07
0
Wool, etc......................................
.30
.64
0
.11
.66
Play and sun suits, shorts........................
.02
.01
.02 0
0
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
.12
0
0
0
.18
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ............................
.20
.12
.25
.43
0
C otton...........................
0
0
0
0
.07
Other.............................
.22
.40
.05
0
.36
Special sportswear9........................................
.20
0
0
.16
.16
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
.05
.04
0
.16
.06
W ool..........................
.02
0
.04
0
.14
Other........................
.59 1.36 2.94 3.90 4.50
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
.21
.33
.45
.23
.38
Slips: C otton...............................................
Rayon, silk......................................
.15
.11
.26
.38
.66
0
.02
0
0
0
Corsets, girdles...........................................
.10
.01
.03
.06
Brassieres..................................................... 0
0
.20
.13
.04
.07
Union suits, combinations: C otton ........
0
.04
Rayon, silk . 0
0
0
Wool and
.07
.01
cotton ---0
0
.08
.09
.16
Underwaists, shirts: C otton..................... 0
.28
.26
.02
.03
.05
Rayon, silk.............
0
.04
.02
.13
0
.06
Wool and cotton .. .
.08
.70
.25
.57
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
.04
.46
.22
.42
.45
Rayon, silk ..............
.17
.58
.05
Wool and cotton . . . .
0
.05
.16
.07
0
.29
.42
0
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk ........
.28
.30
Cotton, flannel
0
.02
.18
.26
Cotton, other. . . 0
.25
.24
.26
.38
0
.12
0
0
.14
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool.........
0
Rayon, silk | o
0
.06 0
Cotton,
.13
.20
0
linen___
.06
.27
.42 1.45 2.35 2.28 3.08
H osiery......................................................
Hose: Silk..............................................
0
.13
.62
.16
.16
.10
.20
R ayon..........................................
.02
.07
.08
.12
0
N y lo n ..........................................
0
0
.04
.21
Cotton, including lisle.............
.02
.23
.36
.38
0
0
0
.04
.04
W ool.............................................
Anklets, socks: C otton ........................
.33 1.00 1.55 1.46 1.85
0
0
0
.09
W ool............................
.08
0
.04
.09
Rayon, e tc........... ......
.04
.07
Footwear....................................................
1.43 4.73 6.62 8.57 10.62
Shoes: T otal..........................................
1.43 4.29 5.67 7.18 8.76
Leather, leather sole10.............
1.35 3.16 4.67 6.15 7.32
Leather, rubber sole10.............
.95
.92
.84 1.12
0
.02
.05
.06
Fabric, leather sole10...............
.18
.08
.02
0
.17
.14
.13
Fabric, rubber sole10................
0
.10
.13
House slippers......................................
.17
.25
.42
0
.63
.14
.63
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes. . .
0
.03
.02
.14
.04
R u b bers.................................................
0
.45
.94
.17
.38
Shoeshines, repairs...............................
.04
.24
.35 1.17 1.75
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
0
Gloves: C otton......................................
.03
.12
.08
(6
)
0
0
Rayon, silk .............................
0
.01
.02
0
0
0
.04
.06
Leather, fu r.............................
0
.33
.06
.16
.38
Wool....... ..................................

See footnotes on p. 177.




per girl—Con.
$1.17
.05
0
9.73
.57
2.01
.09
3.41
.06
0
.03
.18
0
0
1.18
.07
.47
.48
.04
.58
.09
.03
.44
0
.48
.22
.15
.11
5.16
.72
.50
.05
.11
.13
.02
.06
.51
.12
.05
.80
.48
.09
.24
.38
.56
.08
0
.26
2.93
.43
.17
.05
.37
0
1.84
.02
.05
11.27
9.09
7.69
.92
.18
.30
.22
.80
.20
.96
1.77
.17
.02
.21
.43

$2.71
.15
0
17.96
1.08
3.04
.11
5.20
.75
.09
0
.54
.06
.08
2.00
.32
1.47
.66
0
1.55
.04
.41
.49
.07
1.40
.30
.91
.19
6.79
.51
1.44
.40
.18
.15
0
0

$3.34
.31
0
21.13
1.75
3.46
.26
4.97
.06
0
0
2.42
.63
0
3.67
.42
.35
1.46
0
.97
0
.32
.18
.21
.80
.31
.33
.16
6.40
1.30
1.15
0
0
.32
.20
0

.30
.08
.12
.70
.87
.10
.22
.53
.66
.17
0
.36
4.49
.68
.35
.03
.20
0
2.95
.25
.03
14.63
11.98
9.14
2.09
.35
.40
.36
1.28
.07
.94
2.14
.20
.03
.15
.73

.12
.20
0
.53
.97
0
.07
.40
.88
0
0
.26
4.03
.81
.29
0
.32
0
2.21
.31
.09
12.82
11.04
7.62
2.92
0
.50
.25
1.00
.12
.41
3.87
.08
0
0
.42

$3.40
0
0
39.06
4.45
9.68
0
8.38
0
0
0
2.68
0
0
4.45
.70
2.75
0
0
4.11
.32
1.27
.27
0
3.00
.82
1.91
.27
14.71
1.75
1.32
0
0
0
0
2.55
2.33
0
0
1.70
1.89
0
0
.82
1.36
.99
0
0
5.31
1.31
0
0
0
.20
3.15
.65
0
28.91
22.81
20.76
.45
.95
.65
.65
1.09
.52
3.84
5.59
0
0
1.09
1.00

157

Part H I.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.— C lo th in g p u rc h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —

Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500
$3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average expenditure per girl—Con.

G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.
Gloves, handkerchiefs, etc.—Con.
Handkerch
Umbrellas...........................
Jewelry, watches...............
Other accessories11............
Home sewing.........................
Yard goods: C o tt o n ... ..
Linen...........
Rayon, silk ..
W ool.............
Yarn: Wool..........................
Findings...............................
Paid help for sewing..........
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing.
Other clothing expense4........

.
.

0
$0.03 $0.06 $0.11 $0.20
.21
.04
$0.04
.14
.07
0
.03
.15 0
0
0
0
.03
.36i
.77
0
.01
.01
(6)
(6)
.45
.74 1.16
.90 2.16
.39
1.01
.56
.76
.56i
0
.01 0
0
.02
0
.35
.04
.04
.07
0
0
.10
.36
.06
0
0
.02
.06
.28
.12
.14
.06
.07
.04
0
.02
.02
.19
.06
0
.03
.57 1.20
.58
0
.19
.03
.06
.01

$0.31
.18
.05
.26
.14
1.53
.64
.04
.19
.12
.36
.12
.06
1.09
.09

$0.41
.12
.01
.42
.07
2.19
.89
.04
.22
.35
.08
.18
.43
2.41
0

$0.23
0
.04
2.84
.26
1.95
1.29
0
.13
0
.37
0
.16
2.04
.21

$1.55
.32
.18
.54
.91
.53
.35
0
0
.09
0
.09
0
16.05
2.23

100.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
100.0
0
0
0
100.0
100.0
0
100.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

100.0
0
0
50.0
50.0
50.0
0
50.0
0
50.0
0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
0
50.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Percentage of children purchasing
C h ild re n u n d e r 2 y e a r s o f a g e
Ready-to-vrear..........................................
Caps, hoods, bonnets...........................
Coats12...................................................
Snow suits, sweater suits, leggings...
Sweaters, sacques.................................
Dresses, rompers18................................
P lay and sun suits14.............................
Slips, gertrudes.....................................
Shirts, vests, bands.............................
Diapers, cotton .....................................
Pants, cotton.........................................
Sleeping garments................................
Robes, wrappers...................................
Stockings, socks....................................
Bootees, shoes........................................
Home sewing.........................
Yard goods: Diaper cloth.
Other cotton
W ool.............
Rayon, silk ..
Linen............
Yarn: W ool.........................
Other.......................
Findings.............................
Paid help for sewing........
Upkeep—Cleaning...............

100.0
80.0
20.0
40.0
20.0
40.0
0
20.0
40.0
40.0
0
40.0
20.0
60.0
80.0
0
0
80.0
20.0
60.0
0
0
0
0
0
20.0
0
0

83.3
22.2
11.1
16.7
22.2
22.2
0
11.1
33.3
27.8
11.1
22.2
0
61.1
38.9
5.6
11.1
50.0
16.7
38.9
0
5.6
0
5.6
0
22.2
0
5.6

94.7
21.1
5.3
42.1
15.8
52.6
21.1
15.8
47.4
52.6
31.6
36.8
10.5
73.7
63.2
15.8
15.8
26.3
15.8
5.3
0
0
0
5.3
0
0
0
5.3

90.6
25.8
22.6
29.0
25.8
41.9
12.9
12.9
54.8
29.0
32.3
38.7
9.7
54.8
58.1
12.9
29.0
22.6
6.5
3.2
6.5
3.2
0
3.2
0
9.7
0
6.5

95.8
33.3
16.7
33.3
37.5
50.0
25.0
20.8
54.2
37.5
25.0
41.7
8.3
62.5
70.8
16.7
25.0
25.0
16.7
20.8
4.2
0
0
0
0
8.3
0
8.3

91.7
25.0
25.0
41.7
41.7
58.3
16.7
25.0
58.3
50.0
50.0
25.0
25.0
83.3
66.7
0
25.0
50.0
0
25.0
8.3
0
0
8.3
0
25.0
8.3
8.3

94.4
33.3
16.7
27.8
27.8
33.3
22.2
5.6
44.4
38.9
50.0
44.4
0
55.6
55.6
16.7
22.2
11.1
5.6
0
5.6
5.6
0
5.6
0
0
0
5.6

Average number of articles purchased b y children
Ready-to-wear:
Caps, hoods, bonnets.....................
Coats12........................................; —
Snow suits, sweater suits, leggings.
Sweaters, sacques.............................
Dresses, rompers1 ............................
8
Play and sun suits14.........................
Slips, gertrudes.................................
Shirts, vests, bands..........................
Diapers, co tto n .................................
Pants, cotton.....................................
Sleeping garments............................
Robes, wrappers.......... ..................
Stockings, socks................................
Bootees, shoes....................................
Layettes..............................................
Yard goods: Diaper cloth (y d .).........
Other cotton (yd .).........
Wool (yd.).......................
Rayon, silk (y d .)...........
Linen (yd .)......................

See footnotes on p. 177.




1.40
.20
.40
.80
2.00
0
1.20
1.00
14.40
0
1.60
.80
3.00
1.60
0
2.40
5.40
0
0
0

0.28
.11
.17
.28
.67
0
.11
1.11
4.67
.39
.28
0
2.17
.44
.06
.83
3.11
0
.22
0

0.21
.05
.42
.42
1.84
.74
.26
1.89
8.32
2.16
1.11
.37
3.53
1.42
.16
1.16
0
0
0
0

0.58
.26
.29
.55
1.71
.52
.48
2.90
9.87
1.84
1.23
.13
3.23
1.23
.13
0
.16
.06
.03
0

0.83
.21
.42
1.00
2.04
.71
.75
2.00
7.83
4.25
1.38
.08
4.08
2.13
.17
1.46
1.71
.04
0
0

0.58
.33
.50
1.00
3.00
.50
.58
2.50
4.25
3.83
1.00
.25
4.75
2.08
0
0
.33
.17
0
0

0.44
.17
.28
.50
1.06
1.28
.33
2.11
4.06
4.72
1.50
0
4.50
1.44
.17
.28
0
.28
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
25.00
0
0
0
3.00
1.00
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
.50
1.50
1.00
0
1.50
0
36.00
0
2.50
.50
6.00
1.50
.50
0
0
0
0
0

158

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

a b l e 27.— C l o t h i n g p u r c h a s e s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1— Continued

T

1941 (12 months)— Continued
Annual money income of —
Item
Under
$500

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average expenditure per child

C h ild re n u n d e r 2 y ea rs o f a g e — Con.
Clothing: T otal..............................................

$7 13 $4.35 $10.16 $14.11 $18.94 $18.14 $23.14 $11.25 $40.48

Ready-to-w ear................................................
Caps, hoods, bonnets................................
Coats12..........................................................
Snow suits, sweater suits, leggings.........
Sweaters, sacques.......................................
Dresses, rompers13.....................................
Play and sun suits14..................................
Slips, gertrudes..........................................
Shirts, vests, bands...................................
Diapers, cotton..........................................
Pants, cotton..............................................
Sleeping garments......................................
Robes, wrappers.........................................
Stockings, socks.........................................
Bootees, shoes.............................................
Layettes.......................................................
Bibs, etc.18...................................................
Home sewing..................................................
Yard goods: Diaper cloth.........................
Other cotton ........................
W ool......................................
Rayon, silk...........................
Linen.....................................
Yarn, w ool......................... .........................
Yarn, other.................................................
Findings......................................................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning.........................................

$6.14 $3.32 $9.81 $13.54 $17.66 $16.95 $22.60 $11.25 $39.48
.32
.55
.55
.11
.47
0
0
.53
.47
.40
.54
.21
.16 1.10
0
0
.38
1.33
1.80
1.50
2.50
.40
.25 1.08 1.45 1.40
0
.72
.44 1.37
0
1.50
.19
.43
1.11
.18
1.22
0
.80
.29 1.53 1.50 2.14
.75
3.38
.30
0
0
.55
1.35
0
0
.46
.68
.30
.05
.12
.24
.32
.33
0
.75
.38
.31
.62
.83
.76
.85
1.10
0
0
.14
.92
5.00
4.50
.50 1.19 1.10
1.76
1.24
1.38
0
.65
.50
.82
.45
0
0
.08
1.11
.50
.92 1.10
1.52
.14
.65
0
3.75
.48
.13
.11
0
0
.99
.50 0
.18
.15
.65
.82
.32
.24
.59
1.68
.75
1.74
.48
3.72
2.00
3.03
5.25
.83
.71 1.19 2.38 2.80
0
0
17.50
0
5.56
.17 1.04 1.13 3.66
.24
3.50
0
.17
.18
.18
.25
.07
.11
.49 1.20
0
.32
1.16
.46
1.00
.99 1.00
0
.20
.17
.43
.06
0
0
.14
.23
1.00
.06
.34
0
0
.62
.05
.55
.78
.33
0
0
0
.12
.28
0
0
.08
0
0
0
.03 0
.06
0
.11 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.05 0
.33
.06
0
0
.04
.06
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.10
.10
0
0
0
.01
.07 0
.08
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.08
.03
0
0
0
.03
.08
.03
.08
.08

See footnotes on p. 177.




159

Part III.— Tabular Summary

27.—C lothing purchases: Percentage purchasing, average number of articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

T able

1942 (first 3 months)
Annual m oney income of —
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of m en purchasing

M e n a n d b o y s 16 y e a r s o f a g e
and over
C lothing..........................................................
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw, street...................................
Straw, w ork.....................................
Cotton, e tc .......................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters............. .................

62.5

76.9

82.0

91.6

93.1

90.1

93.4

93.6

100.0

7.1
5.4
0
0
1.8
0
8.9
0
0

15.7
9.1
1.7
1.7
.8
3.3
9.1
1.7

16.0
10.0
2.7
0
1.3
2.7
16.0

19.6
14.8
1.1
.5
2.1
1.6
20.1
3.2
1.6
2.1

21.7
17.2

iiH

2877
24.1
.7
.7
1.7
3.6
25.1
7.9

20T2

3L8
27.3

0

0
2.5
1.5
2.5
4.4
2.0
40.9
8.4
11.3

0

Leather.........................................
Cotton, etc...................................
Cotton, etc................................
Suita, trousers, overalls................................
Light w ool... i .................................
Tropical worsted............................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, etc.......................................
Slack suite: R a y on ....................................
C otton....................................
Other......................................
Shorts...........................................................
Trousers, slacks: W ool...............................
Cotton, linen...............
Rayon, etc....................
Overalls, coveralls......................................
Shirts................................................................
Cotton, work...............................................
Cotton, other..............................................
Rayon, s ilk ................................1................
W ool..............................................................
Other............................................................
Special sportswear3........................................
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
W ool..........................
O ther........................
Underwear, nightwear, rob es......................
Union suits: Cotton, k n it........................
Cotton, w oven............... ...
Wool and cotton..................
Rayon, s ilk ..........................
Undershirts: C otton..................................
Wool and cotton .................
Rayon, silk ..........................
Shorts: Cotton, Knit.................................
Cotton, w oven.............................
Wool and cotton...........................
Rayon, silk ...................................
Athletic supporters....................................
Pajamas, nightshirts.............. ..................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool............
Rayon, etc..
H ose.................................................................
Cotton, dress...............................................
Cotton, heavy.............................................
Rayon, s ilk ..................................................
N ylon............................................................
W ool..............................................................
Footwear........................... .............................
Shoes:
W^rk* Trather sole___ TTT___................
Rubber sole.................................

See footnotes on p. 177;




0
1.8
0
1.8
0
5.4
28.6
0
1.8
0

0

0
0
0
0
0
7.1
7.1
0
14.3
23.2
10.7
12.5
0
0
0

0
0

0
0
12.5
7.1
1.8
1.8
0
1.8
0
0

1.8
0
0
0
0

0
0

0
37.5
7.1
26.8
1.8
0
1.8
26.8
7.1
0

0

.7
1.3
0
0
6.0
2.5
.7
0
.8 . 1.3
4.0
4.1
2.0
.8
25.6 38.7
2.0
3.3
8.0
.8
0
.8
.7
.8
0
0
0
.8
3.3
2.5
.7
0
0
0
9.3
7.4
4.0
4.1
0
0
12.4 20.7
26.4 31.3
11.6 14.0
15.7 22.0
0
.8
0
1.7
0
0
1.3
0
.7
0
.7
0
0
0
29.3
23.1
7.3
5.8
6.0
1.7
0
1.7
1.3
0
11.6 10.0
.7
0
0
0
4.1)
4.1
8.7
5.8
.7
.8
0
0
0
0

5.8
1.6
1.6
4.8
1.1
36.0
4.2
5.3
.5

0

1.0

0
2.5
3.4
15.8
2.5
2.0

1.0

1.0

.5

0
1.1
1.1

0

0

0

.5
10.1
9.0
1.1
11.6
39.7
15.3
29.1
.5
1.1
.5
.5

0

0

.5

.5
9.4
7.9
0

13.8
38.4
18.7
22.2
1.5
1.5

1.0

.5

0

0

.5

.3
.3
8.3
4.3

8.7
8.1
.6
10.6
37.3
14.9
26.1
1.9
1.2

0
0
0

2.7
51.3

2.6
57.7

2.0
58.6

11.6
1.7

12.0
4.7

12.2
2.6

16.3
3.4

9.9
1.9

4.1
0

0

41.3
27.3
9.9
7.4

0

0

4.7
0
0
46.7
24.0
19.3
7.3

0

57.7
29.1
24.9
12.2

51.2
25.1
19.7
13.3

0
0

0

0
0

1.0

0

17.4
.9
0

2.8

.3

0
1.0

0

18.2
4.5

6.4
0
1.8
9.2
0
54.1
4.6
23.9

0

.9

0

.9
.9

1.0
0

0
0
0
0

9.1

15.6
4.6

22.7
4.5

13.8
43.1
18.3
30.3
1.8
1.8

6.9

9.1
4.5
63.6
13.6
36.4

0
0

10.2
39.6
13.5
28.7
1.3
.7

0

0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0

1.7
1.3
.3
0
37.6
3.3
1.7
2.0
0
23.1
1.3
0
12.9
11.9
2.0
.3

4.5

0

0

0

0
0

26.6
4.6
7.3
.9
0

0
0

.8
43.8

0

33.0
4.4
.5
2.5
0
15.3
3.0
1.5
11.3
9.4
1.5
.5
.5
5.9

1.3
3.6
2.0
3.3
5.0
.3
44.2
13.2
15.2
2.0

0
32.3
3.1
1.2
2.5
0
14.9
1.2
.6
7.5
9.9
1.2
0
.6
6.8
1.2
.6
46.0
23.0
17.4
11.8
.6
3.7
57.8

0
37.6
3.7
3.7
4.2
0
16.4
2.1
.5
8.5
12.2
.5
1.1
.5
5.3

6.0

0

3.1
1.2
1.2
8.7
.6
45.3
8.7
14.3
2.5
1.2
.6
0
.6

0

0

.5

12.4
0
1.2
1.9
3.1
18.6
3.7
4.3
1.9

0

0
0

0
0
37.6
2.8
1.8
.9
0

21.1
2.8
0
16.5
8.3
2.8
0
0

6.4
.9

0
0

36.4
0

40.9

0
0
0

9.1
4.5
4.5

0

31.8
0
0
0
0
31.8
0
0
18.2
9.1
0

0

4.5
13.6

0

0
0

53.8
32.3
13.9
14.2
.3
2.3
66.6

57.8
33.0
14.7
15.6

54.5
22.7
9.1
22.7

4.6
71.6

9.1
72.7

12.9
3.0

18.3
4.6

0
4.5

0

0

160

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 27.— C l o t h i n g p u r c h a s e s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1 Continued
—

1942 (first 3 months)— Continued
Annual money income o f —
Item

$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

M e n a n d b o y s 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — C on.
Footwear—Con.
Shoes—Con.
Leather, rubber sole*................
House slippers............................................
Felt..................................................
Arctics..........................................................
R ubbers.......................................................
Shoeshines, repairs....................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
Wool...............................................
Other.............................................

Other accessories........................................
H om e sewing..................................................
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
Yarn: Wool..................................................
Other.................................................
Findings.......................................................
Paid help for sewing.................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
Other clothing expense4................................

Percentage of m en purchasing—Con.

3.6
1.8
0
1.8
1.8
0
0
0
1.8
1.8
19.6
21.4
7.1
0
1.8
1.8
7.1
3 6
0
5 4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8.9
1.8

12.4
1.7
0
o
3.3
0
0
o
.8
3.3
23.1
24.0
11 6
0
3.3
2.5
4.1
5.0
0
0
3.3
0
1.7
8
0
0
0
1 7
0
32.2
.8

19.3
2.7
.7
.7
.7
.7
2.0
o
13
4.7
20.7
46.0
16.0
13
6.7
2.0
10.0
20.7
0
10.7
2.0
.7
.7
0
0
0
0
o
.7
36.7
3.3

27.5
1 l
.5
.5
1.1
1.6
0
.5
3.2
4.8
24.9
40.2
10.1
2.1
3.2
2.1
13.8
20.1
5
6.3
3.7
2.1
1.6
0
.5
0
0
0
.5
45.5
3.7

24.1
30.4
2.0
1.2
0
1.2
0
o
3.4
2.5
.5
.6
.5
.6
0
o
.5
.6
4.4 • 8.1
26.1
31.1
40.4
39.8
12.3
8.7
1.2
1.0
4.4
4.3
2.5
.6
10.3
12.4
19.2
21.1
0
1.5
8.4
9.3
1.9
1.5
1.2
1.0
1.0
1.9
0
.5
0
0
1.9
.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
55.7
54.7
5.5
3.7

38.3
1.3
.7
.7
2.3
1.0
1.0
o
1.0
5.6
37.0
42.9
7.6
1.7
4.6
0
14.5
23.4
.3
10.2
3.0
1.0
1.3
.3
.6
0
0
0
1.3
61.1
4.0

36.7
1.8
o
.9
2.8
o
0
o
2.8
5.5
32.1
45.0
6.4
.9
5.5
.9
12.8
23.9
.9
11.9
3.7
0
.9
0
0
.9
0
0
0
62.4
3.7

45.5
9.1
4.5
9.1
0
o
o
0
0
0
50.0
45.5
0
4.5
0
0
13.6
31.8
0
4.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
81.8
13.6

Average number of articles purchased b y men
Hats, caps:
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw, street....................................
Straw, w ork.....................................
Caps: Wool.............................. ...................
Cotton, e tc.......................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters:
Overcoats.....................................................
Topcoats......................................................
R aincoats.....................................................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, etc...................................
Sweaters: W ool...........................................
Cotton, etc................................
Suits, trousers, overalls:
Suits: H eavy w ool.....................................
Light w ool.......................................
Tropical worsted............................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, etc.......................................
Slack suits: R a y on ....................................
C otton....................................
Other......................................
Shorts...........................................................
Trousers, slacks: W o o l.. ........................
Cotton, linen...............
Rayon, etc....................
Overalls, coveralls......................................
Shirts:
Cotton, w ork...............................................
Cotton, other..............................................
Rayon, silk ..................................................
W ool..............................................................
Other............................................................
Specialsportswear :2
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
W ool..........................
See footnotes on p. 177.




0.05
0
0
.02
0

0.09
.02
.02
.01
.02

0
0
0

0.10
.03
0
.01
.05

0
0

.02
.02

0

.02

0
.05
0

.03
.01
.01
.01

.02
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
.01
.03
0
0
.07
.09

0

.02
.08
0
.01

0
.10
.06

0
.18

.01
.01
.01
0
0

.29
.43

0
0
0

0

0
0

0
0

0
.01
.12
.15
.28

0
0

0
0

0
.02
.10

0.27
0
0
.09
0
.05
0
0
0
0
0
.09
.05

0
.15
.17
.03

0
0
0

.14
.36

.05
.30
0
.01
0
.01
.01

.01
0
0

.09
.11
.01
.19

0
.38
.44
.03
.02
.01

0

.01
0
0

.26
.68
.01
.02
.01

0
0
0
.01
.01

0
0
0
0
0

.15
.12
.01
.19

.32

.26
.34
.01
.02

.05
.07
.01
.06

.08
.14
.02
.01
.01

.13
.07

.18
.20

.08
.06
.01
.04
.02
.03
.07

.11
.12
.01

0

.18

0.21
.01
0
.03
0

.04
.04
.02
.03
.01
.01
.09
.01

0
.05
.03

0.25
.01
.01
.02
.05

.02
.02
.01
.03
.01
.03
.04
.03

0

0
0

0.13
0
.01
.04
.05

.04
.06

.01
.01
.06
.01
.02
.04
.02

.01
.04
.01

0.18
.01 .
0
.03
.06

.03
.02
.02
.06
.02
.02
.06
.01

0

0
.02

0.15
.01
.01
.02
.03

0
0
0
0
.09

0
0

0
0

.19

.28
.10
0.
.29

0
0

.31
.69
.02
.01

.50
.78
.03
.02

.11
.07
0

.25
.64
.04
.02
0

0

0

0

0
0

.40
.18

.02

0
1.45
0
0
0

0
0

.14
.05

161

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.—C lo th in g p u r c h a s e s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased,, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued

Annual money income of —
Item

M e n a n d b o y s 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — Con.
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Union suits: Cotton, kn it.........................
Cotton, w oven....................
Wool and cotton..................
Rayon, silk..........................
Undershirts: C otton..................................
Wool and cotton .................
Rayon, s ilk ..........................
Shorts: Cotton, k n it..................................
Cotton, w oven.............................
Wool and cotton...........................
Rayon, s ilk ...................................
Athletic supporters....................................
Pajamas, nightshirts.................................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool.............
Rayon, e tc..
Hose:
Cotton, dress...............................................
Cotton, heavy.............................................
Rayon, s ilk ..................................................
N ylon............................................................
W ool..............................................................
Footwear:
Shoes: T o ta l................................................
Work: Leather sole.................................
R ubber sole.................................
Other: Leather, leather sole*................
Leather, rubber sole*................
Fabric, leather sole*..................
Fabric, rubber sole*..................
House slippers........................................
Boots: R u b b er........................................
Leather........................................
Felt.............................................
Arctics..........................................................
R ubbers.......................................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories:
Gloves: C otton...........................................
W ool..........................................
Leather..........................................
Other...........................................
Handkerchiefs............................................
Ties.................................... ,
Collars.........................................................
H om e sewing:
Yard goods: Cotton (y d .).........................
Wool, etc. (y d .)....................

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average number of articles purchased b y men—Con.
0.16
.04
.04
0
.04
0
0
.04
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0.13
.03
.04
0
.30
0
0
.12
.11
.02
0
0
.05
0
0

0.13
.10
0
.04
.24
.01
0
.08
.21
.01
0
0
.05
0
0

0.08
.07
.07
0
.55
.05
.01
.27
.35
.01
.02
.01
.08
0
0

0.12
(5
)
.06
0
.39
.08
.04
.30
.26
.04
0
0
.10
0
0

0.09
.02
.06
0
.44
.02
.02
.26
.29
.02
0
.02
.09
.01
.01

0.08
.04
.05
0
.78
.05
0
.40
.43
.05
0
0
.12
0
0

0.05
.04
.02
0
.65
.09
0
.55
.25
.07
0
0
.09
.01
0

0
0
0
0
1.09
0
0
.55
.36
0
0
.05
.36
0
0

.25
.70
.04

1.38
.34
.45
0
.11

1.13
.91
.51
0
.13

1.46
1.49
.54
0
.07

1.16
1.05
.81
.01
.06

.91
1.10
.70
.07
.13

1.84
.88
.84
0
.04

2.37
1.03
.81
0
.14

.68
.32
1.18
0
.32

.31
.13
.02
.14
.02

.46
.13
.05
.23
.03
.01
.01
.01
.01
.05

.51
.14
.03
.31
.01
.01
.01
.01
.02

.52
.11
.02
.36
.02
.01

.68
.14
.04
.46
.02
.01
.01
.02
.01
.01

.74
.20
.07
.44
.02

.01
.03
.05

.50
.18
.03
.27
.02
0
0
.03
(5
)
(5
)
0
<>
•
.04

.80
.02
.07
.11
.97
.40
.01

1.07
.01
.16
.07
.67
.42
.08

.02

0

0
.04
.15
.07
0
.04
.02
0
.02
.02
0
0
0

0
0
.04
0
0
0

.02
.02

0
.01
.03

.01
.05

.44

.12

.78
.01
.13
.03
.58
.45

0

0
.02
.02
.16
.04

.05
.07
.20
.10

0

0

0

0

0
0

0

.10

0
0

.02

0

0
.02
.01
.01
0

0

.97
0
.05
.64
.09
.05
.14

0
.01
.03
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0

.01
.09

.02
.06

.04
.06

.93
.01
.04
.01
.99
.45

.31
.02
.05

.05
0
0
1.09
1.00
0
0
0

0

.96
.59
.01

.53
.01
.17
.04
1.47
.50
.11

0
0

.01
.02

0
0

0

0

Average expenditure per man
Clothing: T otal..............................................

$3.16 $7.98 $12.43 $18.23 $20.51 $24.50 $31.72 $35.60 $55.91

Hats, caps....................................................... $0.13 $0.33 $0.43 $0.64 $0.86
Hats: Felt.................................................... ► .11
.34
.77
.25
.58
Straw, street....................................
.02
.03
.05
.05
0
Straw, w ork...................................
.01 0
0
(#) 0
Caps: W ool..................................................
.02
.04
.02
.03
(#)
Cotton, e tc ......................................
.02
.02
.02
.01
0
Coats, jackets, sweaters...............................
.84 2.31 1.97
.63
.17
Overcoats..................................................... 0
.68
.85
.31 0
.52
Topcoats......................................................
.13
.39
0
0
Raincoats.....................................................
.09
.08
.15
0
0
Jackets: W ool..............................................
.04
.44
.10
.29
.18
Leather......................................... 0
.22
.19
.10
0
Cotton, etc...................................
.10
.03
.04
.03
.07
Sweaters: W ool............................................ 0
.15
.17
.17
.16
Cotton, etc................................
.02
.06
.10
.03
.03
1.02 2.31 4.29 4.66 8.13
Suits, trousers, overalls................................
.72 1.43 2.64
Suits: H eavy w ool.....................................
.92
0
Light w ool........................................
.35
.24 1.89 1.57 3.55
Tropical worsted............................. 0
.29
.15 0
.07
.02
Cotton, linen...................................
0
.07 0
.03
Rayon, etc...................................... 0
0
0
0
0
See footnotes on p. 177;




$0.73
.55
0
.04
.11
.03
3.22
1.29
1.05
.14
.27
.10
.05
.31
.01
10.02
3.60
4.44
.51
.20
.07

$1.13
1.03
.03
.02
.02
.03
4.72
2.43
1.39
.13
.24
.14
.15
.24
0
12.55
5.31
5.37
.67
0
.09

$0.87
.80
.02
0
.05
0
4.28
1.47
1.79
.09
.44
0
.07
.42
0
13.57
1.59
9.33
0
.38
0

$1.76
1.67
0
0
.09
0
2.79
2.27
0
0
0
0
0
.36
.16
26.74
6.59
15.52
0
0
0

162

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 27.—C lothin g pu rc h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
U n der
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
JO U
JU
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

M e n a n d b o y s 16 y e a r s o f a g e
Average expenditure per man—Con.
a n d o v e r — Con.
Suits, trousers, overalls—Con.
0
0
0
$0.03 0
$0.08 0
Slack suits: R a y on ....................................
C otton....................................
.12 $0.26
0
.05 $0.06 $0.06 $0.05
.01
0
0
.11 0
0
Other......................................
0
.02
.03
.01
0
0
0
0
Shorts...........................................................
.50
.70
.46
.40
.45
.63
Trousers, slacks: W ool............................... $0.19
.22
.12
.30
.25
Cotton, linen...............
.20
.35
.16
.06 0
.03
Rayon, etc....................
0
0
0
0
.41
.26
.30
.58
.36
.59
.37
Overalls, coveralls......................................
1.72
.43
1.70
.94
.99 1.74 1.52
Shirts................................................................
.32
.21
.37
.48
.33
.40
.35
Cotton, work...............................................
.86
1.24
.22
.53
.67 1.28
1.11
Cotton, other..............................................
.09
.04
.02
.13
0
.03 0
Rayon, silk ..................................................
.02
.06
.07
.15
0
.03 0
W ool..............................................................
.02
.01
0
0
0
0
0
O ther............................................................
.02
.01
.06
.01
0
0
0
Special sportswear2........................................
.05
0
0
0
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
0
0
0
.02
.01
.01
0
.01
W ool..........................
0
0
.21 j
1.17
.97 1.01
1.37
.49
.78
Underwear, nightwear, rob es......................
.12
.14 !
.16
.06
.13
.06
Union suits: Cotton, k n it........................
.10
.04
.02
.05
Cotton, w oven....................
.04
.27
.07
(#
)
.16
.14
.16
Wool and cotton ..................
.03
.07
.06 0
.07 0
Rayon, s ilk ..........................
0
0
0
0
0
.20
.34
.07
.17
.01
.11
.23
Undershirts: C otton...................................
.02
.03
Wool and cotton ..................
0
.01
.11
.03
0
.01
.02
.01
0
Rayon, s ilk ..........................
0
0
0
.12
.17
.19
.03
.13
Shorts: Cotton, k n it.................................
.01
.05
.12
.10
Cotton, w oven.............................
.14
.20
0
.04
.08
.02
.01
.09
.03
Wool and cotton...........................
.01
0
(«)
.02
.02
Rayon, silk ...................................
0
0
0
0
<
*>
.01
0
0
0
0
Athletic supporters....................................
( 6)
(#)
.17
0
.08
.14
.23
Pajamas, nightshirts.................................
.09
.17
.12
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool.............
0
0
0
0
0
.06
.03
0
Rayon, etc..
0
0
0
0
0
.89
.79
1.04
.23
.61
.88
.56
H ose.................................................................
.05
.34
.24
.53
.33
.26
.39
Cotton, dress...............................................
.21
.17
.30
.24
.26
Cotton, heavy.............................................
.16
.08
.20
.01
.13
.23
R ayon, silk ..................................................
.27
.11
.17
.01
.02
0
0
0
0
N ylon ............................................................ 0
.09
.03
.01
.05
.03
.04
.04
W ool..............................................................
4.40
3.36
.69 ! 1.54 2.42 2.94 3.29
Footwear..........................................................
2.61
3.46
.43 ! 1.19 1.84 2.20 2.69
Shoes: T ota l................................................
.51
.74
.93
W ork: Leather sole.................................
.21
.56
.48
.58
.10
.10
.14
0
.15
.13
.05
R ubber sole.................................
2.45
Other: Leather, leather sole8................
.15
.54 1.13 1.45 1.53
1.85
.10
.09
Leather, rubber sole3................
.06
.04
.08
.04
.04
.01
.04
0
0
.02 0
.06
Fabric, leather sole3..................
0
.01
.01
.01 0
Fabric, rubber sole8.............
.03 0
.04
.01
.02
.02
.05
.06
.05
House slippers............................................
.01
.04
0
0
.02
.01
.07
Boots: R u b b er............................................
.03
0
.17 0
.04
.07
Leather............................................ 0
0
0
0
0
.02 0
Felt................................................... 0
.01
.02
.04
.04
.02
.04
.08
A rctics..........................................................
.13
.09
.06
.02;
.05
.07
.06
R ubbers.......................................................
.50
.43
.23
.28 ^.48
.66
.18
Shoeshines, repairs........................... . —
1.30
2.28
.60
.97 ^ .26 1.11
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
.14
.23
.11
.02:
.13
.27
.25
.23
Gloves: C otton...........................................
.01
! 0
.01
.02
.01
.03
0
W ool...............................................
.20
.13
.02
.14
.08
.06
.07
Leather..........................................
.01
.01
0
.02
.03
.03
.06
Other.............................................
.10
.02
.05
.12
.17
.02
.07
H andkerchiefs............................................
.32
.34
.55
.02
.31
.33
.06
T ies...............................................................
.01
0
0
0
0
.02
i o
Collars..........................................................
.09
.13
.07
.04
.04 1 0
.08
Belts, garters, suspenders.........................
.30
.10
1.14
0
.41
.11 1.37
Jewelry, watches........................................
0
.02
.01
.03
0
.03
Other accessories........................................
(«)
.01
.05
.05
0
.02
.07
H om e sewing..................................................
;
03
0
0
0
0
.03 0
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
(«)
0
0
.02
0
0
.06 0
Wool, e t c ...............................
0
0
0
0
.02
.05
0
Yarn: W ool..................................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
Findings......................................................
(6)
0
.01
0
.03
.01 0
0
Paid help for sewing..................................
2.23
.54
.94 1.30 1.63
.11
1 87
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
.19
.01 !
.44
.27
.03
.08
Other clothing expense4................................
.13
1

See footnotes on p. 177.




$0.03
.03
0
0
1.32
.23
0
.66
2.53
.79
1.60
.04
.10
0
0
0
0
1.34
.04
.12
.03
0
.29
.06
0
.30
.10
.12
0
0
.21
.07
0
1.55
.73
.25
.40
0
.17
4.94
4.03
.92
.34
2.64
.11
0
.02
.06
0
0
0
.17
.10
.58
3.41
.17
.01
.22
.03
.25
.57
.04
.17
1.95
0
.01
0
0
.01
0
0
2.84
' .26

0
$1.02
0
0
2.70
.91
0
0
3.27
0
3.27
0
0
0
.27
.14
.13
1.92
0
0
0
0
.58
0
0
.34
.14
0
0
.04
.82
0
0
1.35
.45
.09
.54
0
.27
8.41
6.47
0
.11
5.58
.47
.07
.24
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.94
1.44
0
.05
0
0
.30
1.00
0
.09
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7.21
.75

163

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.— C lo th in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purckasedj and average expendituresf urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of boys purchasing

B o y s 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e
C lothing..........................................................

75.0

77.5

82.6

87.5

84.8

85.1

94.7

95.8

100.0

Hats, Caps......................................................
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw, street....................................
Straw, w ork.....................................
Caps: W ool..................................................
Cotton, e t c .......................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters...............................
Overcoats.....................................................
Topcoats......................................................
Raincoats......... ............. ............................
Snow and ski suits, leggings....................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, e tc ..................................
Sweaters: Wool............................................
Cotton, etc................................
Suits, trousers, overalls................................
Suits: H eavy w ool.....................................
Light wool........................................
Tropical worsted............................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, etc.......................................
Slack suits: R a y on ....................................
C otton....................................
Other......................................
Child’s sun suits, shorts...........................
Trousers, slacks: Wool...............................
Cotton, linen...............
Rayon, etc....................
Overalls, coveralls........................... ..........
Shirts, blouses................................................
Cotton, work...............................................
Cotton, other..............................................
Rayon, silk ..................................................
W ool..............................................................
Other............................................................
Special sportswear2........................................
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
W ool..........................
Other........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
Union suits: Cotton, k n it........................
Cotton, w oven....................
Wool and cotton..................
Rayon, silk ..........................
Undershirts: C otton..................................
Wool and cotton .................
Rayon, silk ..........................
Underwaists................................................
Shorts: Cotton, k n it........ .........................
Cotton, w oven.............................
Wool and cotton...........................
Rayon, silk...................................
Athletic supporters....................................
Pajamas, nightshirts..........................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: Wool............
Rayon, etc..
H ose.................................................................
Cotton, dress...............................................
Cotton, heavy.............................................
R ayon, silk ..................................................
N ylon............................................................

8.3
0
0
0
0
8.3
8.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8.3
41.7
0
0
0
0
0
0 ’
0
0
0
8.3
16.7
0
33.3
33.3
16.7
16.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8.3
0
0
0
0
8.3
0
0
0
0
8.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
33.3
0
25.0
8.3
0
0
58.3

15.0
0
5.0
0
5.0
5.0
10.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5.0
5.0
35.0
0
0
0
5.0
0
0
0
0
0
5.0
12.5
0
20.0
20.0
7.5
15.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
12.5
0
0
0
10.0
0
0
0
7.5
5.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
40.0
27.5
7.5
2.5
0
2.5
62.5

23.9
6.5
2.2
0
6.5
10.9
34.8
0
6.5
0
2.2
0
2.2
4.3
8.7
15.2
47.8
2.2
0
0 ’
6.5
0
2.2
2.2
0
0
13.0
13.0
0
23.9
23.9
4.3
19.6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
37.0
6.5
10.9
2.2
0
4.3
4.3
0
0
8.7
2.2
4.3
0
0
2.2
0
0
47.8
32.6
15.2
0
0
2.2
63.0

14.3 15.2
4.5
3.6
0
0
0
0
5.4
7.6
4.5
5.4
30.4 27.3
3.6 , 1.5
3.0
3.6
1.5
1.8
3.6
6.1
5.4
6.1
6.1
0
3.0
3.6
9.1
12.5
1.5
1.8
53.6 47.0
4.5
5.4
7.6
7.1
0
0
12.5
7.6
0
0
0
0
1.5
1.8
0
0
3.0
0
16.1 15.2
6.1
3.6
0
0
21.4 13.6
23.2 27.3
6.1
1.8
21.4 24.2
1.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
30.3 31.8
3.6
6.1
0
5.4
0
0
0
1.8
14.3
9.1
0
1.5
0
0
0
0
15.2
0
4.5
5.4
1.5
1.8
0
0
0
0
8.9
7.6
0
0
0
1.8
62.5 45.5
37.5 28.8
33.9 13.6
0
0
0
0
0
0
69.6 71.2

6.4
2.1
0
0
2.1
2.1
31.9
2.1
4.3
0
*0
10.6
0
2.1
12.8
4.3
46.8
4.3
2.1
0
2.1
0
0
4.3
0
0
19.1
6.4
2.1
14.9
34.0
8.5
23.4
0
2.1
2.1
0
0
0
0
19.1
10.6
0
2.1
0
4.3
0
0
0
4.3
2.1
0
0
0
4.3
0
0
51.1
31.9
17.0
2.1
0
2.1
72.3

18.6
6.7
0
0
9.3
4.0
29.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
5.3
0
5.3
16.0
1.3
56.0
2.7
14.7
0
6.7
0
0
1.3
0
0
21.3
9.3
1.3
9.3
42.7
10.7
33.3
0
0
0
2.7
1.3
0
1.3
36.0
4.0
2.7
2.7
0
18.7
0
0
0
14.7
8.0
0
0
0
6.7
0
0
65.3
45.3
21.3
1.3
0
1.3
76.0

8.3
4.2
0
0
4.2
0
20.8
0
0
0
0
4.2
4.2
0
8.3
8.3
58.3
4.2
4.2
0
8.3
0
0
8.3
0
0
16.7
12.5
0
25.0
37.5
8.3
29.2
0
0
0
4.2
4.2
0
0
29.2
4.2
4.2
0
0
12.5
0
0
0
12.5
4.2
0
0
0
12.5
0
0
37.5
8.3
29.2
0
0
0
70.8

12.5
0
0
0
0
12.5
50.0
12.5
0
12.5
0
37.5
0
0
12.5
0
62.5
12.5
12.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
37.5
25.0
0
0
50.0
0
50.0
0
0
0
12.5
0
0
12.5
62.5
0
0
0
0
12.5
0
0
12.5
25.0
0
0
0
0
25.0
12.5
0
75.0
37.5
37.5
0
0
0
87.5

16.7
16.7
16.7
0
0
0

10.0
0
42.5
5.0
0
0

15.2
0
43.5
6.5
0
2.2

10.7
1.8
46.4
5.4
1.8
1.8

17.0
2.1
48.9
6.4
0
0

13.3
0
56.0
6.7
2.7
5.3

12.5
0
41.7
8.3
0
16.7

0
12.5
62.5
12.5
0
37.5

Footwear....... ...............................
Shoes:
Work: Leather sole.................
R ubber sole.................
Other: Leather, leather sole8.
Leather, rubber sole3
Fabric, leather sole8. .
Fabric, rubber sole8..

See footnotes on p. 177.




a

6.1
6.1
39.4
9.1
3.0
4.5

164

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

a b l e 27.— C l o t h i n g p u r c h a s e s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1 Continued
—

T

1942 (first 3 months)— Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

B o y s 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.
Footwear—Con.
House slippers............................................
B oots: R u b ber............................................
Leather............................................
Felt...................................................
Arctics..........................................................
R ubbers.......................................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
Gloves: C otton...........................................
W ool...............................................
Leather.................... ’. ...................
Other.................... -........................
Handkerchiefs............................................
Ties...............................................................
Collars..........................................................
Belts, garters, suspenders.........................
Jewelry, watches........................................
Other accessories........................................
Home sewing..................................................
Yard goods: C otton...................................
Wool, e tc ...............................
Yarn: Wool..................................................
Other.................................................
Findings......................................................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
Other clothing expense4................................

Under
$500

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage of boys purchasing—Con.

0
0
0
0
0
0
8.3:
8.3

0
0
0
0
0
8.3
0
0
0

0
8 3
8.3

0
0
0
0
0

8.3
0

0
0
0
0
0
0

12.5
10.0
7.5

0
0
0

2.5
2.5

0
2.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5 0
0

0
0
0
0
6.5
2 2
6.5
26.1
8.7
6.5

0
0
0
6.5
0
2.2
2.2

0

8.7
4.3

0
0
0
4.3
0
10.9
0

3 6
1.8
3.6

1.5
4.5

1.8
10.7
14.3
14.3
1.8
1.8
3.6

4.5
4.5
21.2
13.6

0

0
3.0
0
0

3.6
5.4
0
5.4

3.0
9.1
1.5
6.1

0

0
0
3.6
0
0
1.8
0
0
1.8
19.6

0

0
0

0
0

1.5
1.5

0
0
0
0
0
22 7
0

0
0
0
0
4.3
4.3
19.1
19.1
8.5
6.4

0
0

2.1
6.4

1.3

0
0
0

4.0
5.3
18.7
22.7

0

9.3
2.7

0

4.0
8.0

0
4.3
0
0

0
9.3
0
0

4.3
2.1

4.0
4.0
0

0
2.1
0
0
0

17.0
2.1

0
0
1.3
0
24.0
0

0
4.2
0

0
0

4.2
12.5
33.3

0
8.3
0
0

0
8.3

0

8.3
4.2
4.2

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
16.7
0

0
0
0
0
0
12.5
12.5
25.0

0
0
0
0
0
0
12.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
37.5
0

12.5

Average number of articles purchased b y boys
Hats, caps:
Hats: Felt....................................................
Straw, street....................................
Caps: W ool..................................................
Cotton, e tc .......................................
Coats, jackets, sweaters:
Overcoats.....................................................
Topcoats........................... ^.........................
R aincoats.....................................................
Snow and ski suits, leggings....................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, e tc..................................
Sweaters: Wool...........................................
Cotton, etc................................
Suits, trousers, overalls:
Suits: Heavy w ool.....................................
Light w ool.......................................
Cotton, linen...................................
Rayon, etc.......................................
Slack suits: R a y on ....................................
C otton....................................
Child’s sun suits, shorts...........................
Trousers, slacks: Wool...............................
Cotton, linen...............
Rayon, etc..... .............
Overalls, coveralls......................................
Shirts, blouses:
Cotton, work...............................................
Cotton, other..............................................
Rayon, silk ..................................................
W ool..............................................................
Other............................................................
Special sportswear:5
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
Other........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Union suits: Cotton, knit.........................
Cotton, w oven....................
Wool and cotton..................
Rayon, silk ..........................
Undershirts: C otton..................................
Wool and cotton .................

See footnotes on p. 177.




0
0
0

0
.05
.05
.05

.08
0
0
0
0
0
0

0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0

0.04
0
.05
.05

0

02
07
.11
.17

.06
.03

.04
.16
.05

.02
.03
02
.06
.06
.06
.03
.09
.03

.05
.07
.21

.07
.02
0

0.05

0

0

0
.11
0

.67

0 •
0
.08
0
0
0
0
.05
.12
0
.25

.50

.34

.10
.15

.07
33

.04
.43

.14
.44
.05

0

0
0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

.02

.02
.07

0

0
0

0

.09
.04

.02
.04

0
0
.13
0

.02
.15
.06

.02
.20
.07

0

0

0

.02
.05
.20
.11

0

0

0
0
0

0

0
0

0
0

0
0

.13
.15
.02

0

.09
.09

0

.02
.46

0

0

.01
.01
.01
05

0

.08
.17
.01
.03
.16
.09

0
0

.04
0

.03
0
.28
.21
.01
.21

.17
.49

.20
.75

0

.04
.04

0
0
0

0

.05
.01

0

14
0
0
0

.19

.08
.07
.07

0
0
24
.03

.04
0
06

0

.56
0

0.04

0
.33
0
.04

0
0
0

08
.04

0

.08
.21
.04
.04
.42

0
0

.12

0

.28
.13
.02
.28

0

.05
.09

0

.04
.02
.02
0
0

0

0
.15
.13

0

.12

.17
0

0.07

02
.02

.27

.58
.17

.08
.25

0
0
0

0.02

0

.05
.08
.08

.04
.04
.02
.03
.05

0

.05
.05

.08
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0.04
.02
.07
.11

.12
.12

0
.12
0
0.38
0
.12
0
.12
.12

0
0
0
0
0

.17
.17

0

.25

.21
.71

0
0
0

0

0
.25

.12
.08
0

0

.62
.2

0
0
0
1.00
0
0
0

.12

0

0
0
0

25

0

0
0

0

.75

0

165

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.—C lo th in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchmedy and average expenditurest urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
to
and
1500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
5,000 $10,000 over

B o y s 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.
Underwear, nightwear, robes—Con.
Underwaists.................................................
Shorts: Cotton, k n it.................................
Cotton, w oven..............................
Wool and cotton ...........................
Pajamas, nightshirts.................................
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool............
Rayon, e tc..
Hose:
Cotton, dress...............................................
Cotton, heavy.............................................
Rayon, s ilk ..................................................
W ool..............................................................
Footwear:
Shoes:
Work: Leather sole.................................
R ubber sole.................................
Other: Leather, leather sole8................
Leather, rubber sole3................
Fabric, leather sole.8................
Fabric, rubber sole8..................
House slippers............................................
B oots: R u b ber............................................
Leather............................................
Arctics..........................................................
R u b bers.............................................. ........
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories:
Gloves: C otton...........................................
W ool...............................................
Leather..........................................
Handkerchiefs............................................
Ties...............................................................
Collars..........................................................
H om e sewing:
Yard goods: Cotton (y d .).........................

Average number of articles purchased b y boys—Con.

to

0
0
0
0
0
0
.58
.17
0
.17
.17
.33
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

.04

.17

0

1.70
1.11
0
0

1.97
.84
0
0

1.06
.47
.02
.04

2.16
1.64
.04
.03

.67
1.62
0
0

1.88
1.50
0
0

.22

.11
.02
.68
.07
.02
.02
.04
.02
.04
.02
.11

.54
.09
0
.02

.07
.02

.02
.02
.04
.54
.09

.17
.07
0
0
.13

.08
0

0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0
.08

0
0

1.20
.59

.08

0

0
0

0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

.02

0

.42
.08

0

0

0
0

0

.10
0

0

0:38
1.12
0
0
.50
.12
0

0
0

1.10
.22
.20
.38

0
.39
.14
.07
.16

.30
.02
.09
.02

.15
.05
0
0
0
0

0

0

0

0
.17

to

.36
.26
.03
.14

.06
.06
.53
.11
.03
.05
.02
.05
0

.09

0

0

0
0
0
0
0
.04
.04

.03

.11
.04

0
0

.09

0

0
.12
.62
.12

.58
.12
0

0
.17
0
.04
0
.04

.09
.03
.28
.17

.6
0
0
0
0
.12

0
0

0

0
.12

.08
0
0
0

*0
.09

.33
0

.79
.07
,.03
.05
.02
0
0
.04
.05

.06
.09
0

.17

.15
0

0
.09
.12
.02

0

0

.17
.02
.57
.09

.42
.08

.48
.23

.06

.05
.05

0

0

.09
.02

.24

0
0
0
0

0

0

.08

Average expenditure per b oy
Clothing: T ota l..........................

$3.45 $3.10 $6.08 $7.88 $8.50

$8.91 $12.36 $11.88 $21.02

Hats, cap s...................................
Hats: F e lt ..............................
Straw, street.............
Caps: W ool.............................
Cotton, e tc ................. .
Coats, jackets, sweaters..........
Overcoats.................................
Topcoats..................................
Raincoats......................... —
Snow and ski suits, leggings.
Jackets: W ool..........................
Leather....................
Cotton, etc..............
Sweaters: W ool.......................
Cotton, etc............
Suits, trousers, overalls............
Suits: H eavy w ool.................
Light wool...................
Cotton, linen..............
Rayon, etc...................
Slack suits: R a y on ................
C otton................
Child's sun suits, shorts.......
Trousers, slacks.....................
W ool......................................
Cotton, linen.......................
Rayon, e tc ...........................
Overalls, coveralls.................
Shirts, blouses...........................
Cotton, w ork..........................
Cotton, other............... . ........
Rayon, s ilk .............................
W ool.........................................
Other........................................

$0.02 $0.08 $0.22 $0.10 $0.24
.04
.07
0
0
.11
0
.01 0
0
.03
.04
.05
.04
0
.07
.02
.12
.02
.01
.03
.04
.20
.99 1.12 1.79
.23
0
0
0
.23
.24
.14
0
0
.31
.04
0
.15
0
0
.27
0
0
.18
.17
.34
0
0
.15
0
.30
0
0
.01 0
.03
0
0
.13
.05
*.21
.24
0
.18
.15
.02
.04
.09
.05
.19
1.13
.64 1.56 2.17 2.13
0
.56
0
.30
.43
0
0
.23
.65
0
.41
0
.04
.08
.19
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.07 0
.03
0
.04
.06
0
0
.07
0
0
0
.50
.61
.39
.46
.63
.21
.54
.50
.31
.17
.22
.29
.07
.13
.15
0
0
0
0
0
.30
.21
.50
.24
.63
.39
.49
.30
.25
.17
.03
.03
.11
.16
.05
.22
.14
.12
.36
.36
.02
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

$0.06
.04
0
.01
.01
1.82
.32
.65
0
0
.51
0
.06
.25
.03
2.56
1.13
.26
.04
0
0
.08
0
.77
.59
.14
.04
.28
.74
.15
.48
0
.08
.03

See footnotes on p. 177,




$0.23
.11
0
.10
.02
1.48
.03
.07
.05
.29
.36
0
.22
.43
.03
4.14
.41
2.00
.19
0
0
.05
0
1.22
.82
.35
.05
.27
.85
.17
.68
0
0
0

$0.25
.05
0
.20
0
1.10
0
0
0
0
.50
.31
0
.19
.10
3.95
.96
.75
.81
0
0
.37
0
.82
.53
.29
0
.24
.71
.18
.53
0
0
0

$0.12
0
0
0
.12
3.43
.94
0
.50
0
1.74
0
0
.25
0
6.38
2.25
1.87
0
0
0
0
0
2.26
1.69
.57
0
0
1.29
0
1.29
0
0
0

166

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 27.— C lo th in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fa m ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Average expenditure per b oy—Con.

B o y s 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.

Special sportswear8........................................
0
0
0
0
0
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
0
0
0
0
0
O ther........................
0
0
0
0
0
Underwear, nightwear, rob es...................... $0.16 $0.09 $0.43 $0.60 $0.48
Union suits: Cotton, kn it.........................
.12
0
0
.05
.08
Cotton, w oven.....................
.07 0
0
0
.11
Wool and cotton..................
0
0
0
(6 0
)
Rayon, silk ...........................
.02 0
0
0
0
.12
Undershirts: C otton..................................
.04
.06
.08
.03
Wool and cotton .................
.02
0
.04 0
0
Under waists................................................. 0
0
0
0
0
Shorts: Cotton, kn it............................ .
.12
.04
.09
0
.06
Cotton, w oven..............................
.04
.01
.08
.01
.05
Wool and cotton...........................
.02
.01
0
0
.04
Pajamas, nightshirts.................................
.14
.02
0
0
.13
Bathrobes, lounging robes: W ool............
0
0
0
0
0
Rayon, etc
.06 0
0
0
0
H ose.................................................................
.12
.31
.55
.59
.28
Cotton, dress...............................................
0
.29
.37
.17
.17
Cotton, heavy.............................................
.22
.04
.13
.08
.26
Rayon, silk ..................................................
0
0
.04
.05 0
.02
0
0
.01 0
W ool..............................................................
Footwear..........................................................
1.51 1.55 1.96 2.58 2.51
1.45 1.43 1.77 2.07 2.08
Shoes: T otal................................................
W ork: Leather sole.................................
.23
.38
.17
.18
.58
R ubber sole.................................
.03
.34 0
0
.14
Other: Leather, leather sole3................
.88 1.16 1.01 1.46 1.35
Leather, rubber sole3................
.13
0
.09
.33
.16
Fabric, leather sole3..................
0
0
.04
0
.05
Fabric, rubber sole8..................
0
0
.02
.03
.04
House slippers............................................
0
0
0
.02
.01
.02
Boots: R u b ber............................................
0
0
0
.09
Leather............................................ 0
0
0
.16 0
.02
A rctics..........................................................
0
0
.11
.05
0
0
.11
.05
R ubbers.......................................................
(•)
.12
.23
.06
.18
Shoeshines, repairs....................................
.08
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories..
.03
.09
.08
.16
.16
G loves: C otton...........................................
0
.01
.01 0
.06
0
.01
.02
.01
.04
Wool...............................................
Leather.................................... ... 0
0
0
.03 0
Handkerchiefs............................................
0
.01
.07
(«) 0
.01
.02
.05
..08
.04
T ie s...............................................................
0
0
0
0
0
Collars..........................................................
.02
Belts, garters, suspenders.........................
0
.02
.01
(«)
0
0
Jewelry, watches........................................
0
.01 0
0
0
0
0
Other accessories........................................
0
H om e sewing..................................................
.02 0
.06 0
.12
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
.06 0
.06 0
(«)
0
Y arn: Wool..................................................
0
.02 0
0
0
0
0
Findings......................................................
.06 0
Paid help for sewing..................... „...........
0
0
0
(6) 0
.02
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
.07
.19
.06
.18
0
0
Other clothing expense4................................ 0
0
0

0
0
0
$0.31
.15
0
.03
0
.03
0
0
.02
.01
0
.07
0
0
.39
.27
.08
.01
.63
2.59
2.30
.42
.06
1.72
.10
0
0
0
0
0
.07
.05
.17
.11
.03
.02
0
.01
.02
.06
.03
0
0
.05
.01
.04
0
0
.26
.02

$0.12
.08
.04
.64
.04
.05
.07
0
.15
0
0
.12
.09
0
.12
0
0
.82
.47
.33
.01
.01
3.48
3.05
.45
0
2.28
.22
.05
.05
.04
0
0
.08
.07
.24
.24
0
.07
.02
.02
.07
0
.06
0
0
.07
.06
0
.01
0
.29
0

$0.12
.12
0
.63
.19
.03
0
0
.12
0
0
.08
.03
0
.18
0
0
.52
.14
.38
0
0
3.66
3.29
.75
0
1.87
.49
0
.18
0
.10
0
.11
0
.16
.61
0
.07
0
0
.06
0
.02
.42
.04
0
0
0
0
0
.33
0

$0.31
0
.31
2.09
0
0
0
0
.11
0
.11
.26
0
0
.80
.81
0
.82
.47
.35
0
0
4.81
4.53
0
.56
2.49
.51
0
.97
0
0
0
0
.19
.09
.18
0
.12
0
0
0
0
.06
0
0
*0
0
0
0
0
1.59
0

Percentage of women purchasing

W o m e n a n d g ir ls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
and over
C lothing..........................................................

73.3

81.0

92.8

92.7

92.8

93.1

95.2

95.5

96.4

Hats, caps, berets..........................................
H ats: F elt....................................................
Straw.................................................
Fabric, etc........................................
Caps, berets: W ool.....................................
Cotton, etc..........................
Head scarfs, etc.7........................................

25.6
8.1
9.3
1.2
1.2
1.2
5.8

22.4
10.9
7.5
1.1
.6
0
4.0

32.0
16.0
12.7
5.5
1.7
.6
5.5

39.6
22.6
10.6
2.3
2.3
.5
5.1

42.3
20.0
15.9
2.7
4.1
.9
9.1

43.9
24.6
16.6
4.3
2.7
1.1
3.7

43.5
29.4
12.9
4.8
2.6
.3
2.3

60.4
33.3
18.0
5.4
2.7
.9
6.3

60.7
42.9
28.6
3.6
0
0
0

See footnotes on p. 177.




Part I II.— Tabular Summary

167

T a b l e 27.— C l o th in g p u b c h a s e s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
to
1500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

W o m e n a n d g irls 16 y e a r s o f a g e

Percentage of women purchasing—Con.

Coats, sweaters, furs, etc..............................
Coats: F u r...................................................
H eavy, with fu r ............................
Heavy, no fur8 ..............................
Light wool8 ....................................
Cotton, linen8 ................................
R ayon, silk8 ...................................
R aincoats.....................................................
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
Jackets: W ool..............................................
Leather.........................................
Cotton, etc...................................
Sweaters: W ool.................................... .......
Cotton, etc................................
Fur scarfs, etc.............................................
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc............................
Dresses: W ool.............................................
Rayon, silk ..................................
Linen............................................
Cotton, street.............................
Cotton, house.............................
Cotton, uniforms.......................
Suits: Wool, with fu r .................................
Wool, no f u r ....................................
Cotton, linen...................................
R ayon, silk......................................
Skirts: W ool.................................................
Cotton, etc.....................................
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
R ayon, silk .................................
Wool, etc......................................
Play and sun suits, shorts........................
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ............................
C otton ...........................
Other.............................
Special sportswear9........................................
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton......................
W ool..........................
O ther........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
Slips: C otton...............................................
Rayon, silk ......................................
Corsets, girdles...........................................
Brassieres.................................... ...............
Union suits, com binations: C otton.........
Rayon, silk.
Wool and
cotton.......
Underwaists, shirts: Cotton......................
Rayon, silk .............
Wool and c o t t o n .. .
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
Rayon, silk ...............
Wool and cotton ___
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk........
Cotton, flannel..
Cotton, other.. . .
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool........
Rayon, silk.
Cotton,
linen........
H osiery............................................................
Hose: Silk....................................................
R ay on ...............................................
N ylon ...................... .........................
Cotton, including lisle..................
Wool.................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton .............................
W ool.................................
Rayon, e tc......................

See footnotes on d. 177.




8.1
0
0
2.3
2.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3.5
1.2
0
16.3
0
8.1
0
7.0
2.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
25.6
4.7
7.0
2.3
5.8
1.2
1.2

10.9
0
0
1.7
2.9
0
0
.6
0
.6
0
1.1
2.9
2.3
0
40.2
2.3
18.4
0
9.8
8.6
1.1
0
1.7
0
.6
1.7
1.7
2.9
2.9
0
0
2.9
1.1
1.7
.6
0
0
0
0
31.6
3.4
8.0
4.6
7.5
2.3
.6

18.2
.6
1.7
2.2
6.1
0
0
0
.6
1.1
0
.6
7.7
0
0
44.8
2.2
24.3
0
13.8
7.2
2.2
0
3.9
.6
.6
3.9
0
4.4
7.7
0
0
4.4
0
.6
.6
0
0
0
0
48.1
7.2
19.9
13.8
16.0
1.1
0

17.1
0
.5
2.8
5.5
0
0
0
0
.5
.5
0
8.3
1.4
0
57.1
3.7
31.3
0
8.3
13.4
1.4
0
5.5
0
.9
4.6
.9
2.3
6.9
0
0
6.9
2.8
2.3
.9
.5
0
0
.5
49.8
6.5
21.7
13.8
13.4
1.8
.9

22.3
.9
2.3
1.8
8.2
.5
0
.5
.5
.5
0
0
10.0
0
0
52.7
3.2
30.5
1.4
9.5
10.5
1.4
0
5.0
.9
.5
5.9
.5
4.1
8.2
0
.5
4.1
.9
2.3
0
0
0
0
0
52.3
6.4
20.0
20.0
15.0
1.4
.5

19.3
0
1.1
1.6
7.0
0
0
.5
0
4.3
0
0
8.6
0
0
61.0
3.7
32.1
.5
8.0
11.2
.5
.5
4.8
.5
1.6
9.1
1.6
2.7
18.7
.5
1.1
6.4
1.6
.5
.5
0
0
0
0
55.6
5.3
23.0
20.3
15.5
.5
1.6

26.5
1.0
3.2
2.6
8.7
0
0
.6
1.0
1.0
0
.3
13.5
.3
0
62.9
7.4
32.9
.6
11.6
10.6
1.0
0
7.4
0
0
5.2
1.6
4.5
8.7
.6
0
7.7
2.3
1.6
1.6
1.0
.3
.3
.3
59.4
9.4
26.8
23.5
21.9
.6
1.0

32.4
0
3.6
5.4
18.0
.9
0
.9
0
0
0
2.7
11.7
.9
.9
65.8
7.2
36.9
2.7
6.3
9.0
2.7
.9
10.8
1.8
5.4
9.0
.9
8.1
19.8
.9
0
5.4
4.5
4.5
0
1.8
1.8
0
0
65.8
11.7
34.2
31.5
20.7
.9
0

21.4
0
0
0
10.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
3.6
7.1
0
0
75.0
14.3
53.6
14.3
17.9
7.1
0
3.6
7.1
0
0
14.3
3.6
7.1
17.9
0
7.1
0
3.6
3.6
0
7.1
3.6
3.6
0
67.9
0
35.7
39.3
21.4
0
0

2.3
0
0
0
1.2
11.6
0
1.2
5.8
0
0
0

0
1.7
1.7
0
2.9
10.9
.6
1.1
4.0
1.1
1.1
0

.6
0
1.1
.6
6.1
21.0
.6
5.5
3.9
5.0
0
.6

0
1.8
1.8
.5
4.6
20.7
.9
4.1
3.7
3.7
0
1.4

.5
.9
.5

0
1.3
1.3
.3
4.5
21.0
1.6
5.8
3.2
6.5
2.3
1.9

0
0

0
2.3
19.1
.5
7.3
2.3
4.1
1.8
0

.5
.5
1.6
0
3.2
23.5
1.6
8.6
2.1
2.7
.5
1.1

.9
.9
6.3
25.2
2.7
8.1
4.5
2.7
1.8
, 2.7

0
0
0
0
7.1
21.4
0
7.1
0
0
3.6
0

0
50.0
15.1
19.8
3.5
14.0
0
10.5
0
0

0
59.8
28.7
19.0
4.6
13.2
0
13.2
0
.6

2.2
75.1
42.0
19.9
16.6
8.8
0
14.9
0
0

1.8
73.3
39.2
15.2
19.4
4.1
.5
14.3
.5
0

1.8
79.5
40.9
12.3
30.0
8.6
0
17.3
.9
0

3.7
74.9
41.7
11.2
24.6
7.5
0
15.5
1.1
.5

2.3
81.6
50.0
6.1
30.3
4.8
.6
13.2
.3
.6

3.6
83.8
36.9
9.9
44.1
11.7
0
14.4
2.7
.9

0
85.7
39.3
0
50.0
7.1
0
14.3
0
0

168

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b le 27.— C loth in g p u r c h a s e s : Percentage purchasing, average number of articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Item

W o m e n a n d girls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — Con.
Footwear........................................................ .
Shoes: Leather, leather sole10................
Leather, rubber sole10................
Fabric, leather sole10..................
Fabric, rubber sole10..................
House slippers..........................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes........
R u b bers.....................................................
Shoeshines, repairs..................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories. .
Gloves: C otton...........................................
Rayon, silk ...................................
Leather, fur................................
Wool.
Handbags, purses.
Handkerchiefs___
Umbrellas..
Jewelry, watches................
Other accessories1 ..............
1
.
H om e sewing..........................
Yard goods: C otton ...........
L inen.............
Rayon, s ilk ...
W ool................
Yarn: W ool..........................
Other.........................
Findings...............................
Paid help for sewing............
.
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing.
Other clothing expense4........

Percentage of women purchasing—Con.
37.2
20 9
8.1
1.2
0
4.7
2.3
0
16.3
10.5
2.3
0
1.2
0
2.3
3.5
0
1.2
2.3
17.4
7.0
0
3.5
0
0
0
12.8
3.5
23.3i
1.2 I

43.1
33.9
4.6
1.1
0
2.9
2.3
0
13.2
16.1
3.4
2.3
1.1
0
8.0
3.4
.6 1
1.7
1.7
17.2
9.2
0
2.3
0
0
2 3
5.7
1.1
22.4 !
.6 !

61.3
44.8
3.9
3.3
1.7
5.0
2.2
3.9
22.7
34.8
8.8
3.9
3.9
3.3
17.7
5.0
3.3
6.6
2.8
17.1
8.8
0
5.0
.6
0
.6
7.2
.6
36.5
1.1

59.4
46.1
3.2
3.7
.9
4.6
3.7
3.2
16.1
29.5
10.1
2.8
1.8
.5
19.8
4.6
.9
2.8
.5
15.2
7.8
.9
3.7
1.8
1.4
.5
7.8
1.4
39.6
2.3

57.7
35.5
5.9
5.5
0
5.0
6.4
2.3
21.4
34.1
10.5
4.5
5.5
.5
21.4
4.5
1.4
5.0
1.8
20.5
12.3
.5
5.5
1.4
3.2
0
10.0
1.4
48.2
2.3

64.7
43.3
4.8
10.7
1.1
5.9
4.8
2.7
23.0
39.6
14.4
3.2
4.8
3.2
24.6
7.0
2.7
1.6
5.9
22.5
13.4
0
6.4
2.7
2,7
.5
8.6
1.6
47.6
1.1

68.4
51.6
4.2
7.7
0
4.2
3.9
4.8
25.8
41.3
14.5
4.5
6.5
2.3
21.9
6.1
4.5
5.8
2.9
19.7
11.3
1.3
5.8
1.9
4.5
.3
8.1
.6
53.5
1.9

71.2
54.1
4.5
11.7
1.8
3.6
1.8
0
28.8
45.0
13.5
7.2
9.9
2.7
24.3
5.4
3.6
9.9
5.4
21.6
8.1
0
10.8
1.8
.9
.9
7.2
4.5
63.1
1.8

78.6
67.9
7.1
3.6
7.1
3.6
3.6
0
28.6
42.9
7.1
0
10.7
0
32 1
7.1
0
7.1
3.6
14 3
3.6
0
7.1
0
3.6
0
3 6
7.1
92 9
10.7

Average number o f articles purchased b y women
Hats, caps, berets:
Hats: F elt...............................
Straw............................
Fabric, etc....................
Caps, berets: W ool.................
Cotton, e tc ___
Head scarfs, etc.7....................
Coats, sweaters, furs, e tc.:
Coats: F u r...............................
Heavy, with fu r........
Heavy, no fur8...........
Light wool8.................
Cotton, linen8.............
Raincoats.................................
Snow or ski suits, leggings...
Jackets: W ool..........................
Leather....................
Cotton, etc..............
Sweaters: W ool........................
Cotton, e tc .............
Fur scarfs, etc.........................
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc.:
Dresses: W ool.........................
Rayon, silk .............
Linen........................
Cotton, street.........
Cotton, house.........
Cotton, uniforms ..
Suits: Wool, with fu r ............
Wool, no fu r ................
Cotton, linen...............
R ayon, silk..................
Skirts: W ool.............................
Cotton, e t c .................
Blouses: Cotton, linen..........
R ayon, silk .............
Wool, etc..................
Play and sun suits, s h orts...
Aprons, sm ocks......................
Overalls, stacks: R a y on ........
C otton.......
Other.........

See footnotes on p. 177.




.

0.08
.09
.01
.01
.01
.06

0.12 0.17! 0.24
.13 !
.07 !
.11
.01 ;
.06
.03
.02
.01
.02
0
.01
(5
)
.04
.09
.07

.
.

0
0

0
0
.02
.02

.
.
.
.
.
.

0
0
0
0
0
0
.03
.01

.

0

.01
.02
.02
.06 i
0
0
1
.01 0
1
0
| .01 !
.01 ;
.or ;
O'
o
.01 I .01
.09
.04
.02 0
0
0

!
,09|
• 0
1
.08!
.02
. 0
o
i
. 0
!
. 0
i
. o
0
;
o
;
. 0
0
. 0
0
.01
i 0
i 0

0

0
(5)
.03
.05

.02
.03

0

.02 1
o
!
.01
.03:
.02
.03
.03
0
0
.05
.01
.02
.01

0

.10
.02
0

0
0

0

.06
.09
0
0

0

0
0
.07

0
.01
.01

.05
.01
(5
)
.06
(5)
.05
.11

.06

0
.10
.03
.03
.01

(5)
.06
.01
.03
0

0.35
.14
.05
.04
(5
)
.04

0

0

.01
.02
.07

.01
.03
.03
.12
.01
.01
.01

0
.05
0
0

0.47
.19
.06
.05
.03
.07

0.54
.29
.04
0
0
0

0

0
0
0

.04
.05
.18
.01
.01

0

.01
0

0
0
0
.03
.20
.01
.01

.09
.56
.01
.19
.20
.03

.10
.65
.03
.10
.31
.05
.01
.13
.01
.05
.12
.02
.10
.29
.02

0
.06
.50
.01
.13
'.20
.01
.01
.05
.01
.02
.12
.02
.04
.26
.01
.01
.13
.02
.01
.01

0
.07
0
0
.06
.02
.07
.13
.01
0

0
.17
.03
.02
.02

.17
.05
.05
0

0
0

.11

0
0
0

(5)
.22
.01

.12
0
0

.03
.44
.02
.15
.16
.02

.01
.06
.02
.04
.10

0

0.28
.18
.04
.03
.01
.05 :

.14

.11
.21
.02
0

.04
.01
.01
.04

.01
.02
.02
.08
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)

0
0

.05
.39

.24
.10
.08
0

(5)
(5)

0

0
.16
.16
,02|;

0

0
o
o

.04
.33

.03
.22
0

0.21
.15
.03
.04
.01
.11

.04

.11
0
0
.21

1.11

.14
.18
.18
0
.04
.07
0

0

.21
.04
.11
.32

0
.07
0
0

.04
.04

169

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.— C lo th in g p u r c h a se s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchasedy and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
fenA
fO U $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500
U
$3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

W o m en and girls 16 years o f age
and over— Con.
Special sportswear:*
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
W ool..........................
Other........................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
Slips: C otton...............................................
Rayon, silk ......................................
Corsets, girdles...........................................
Brassieres.....................................................
Union suits, com binations: C otton........
Rayon, silk.
Wool and
cotton—
Underwaists, shirts: C otton ....................
Rayon, s i l k ...........
Wool and cotton ..
Bloomers, panties: C otton......... ...........
Rayon, silk ...............
Wool and c o t t o n .. . .
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk ........
Cotton, flannel..
Cotton, other___
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool.......
Rayon, silk.
Cotton, linen
Hosiery:
Hose: S ilk ..................................................
R ayon .............................................
N y lon ..............................................
Cotton, including lisle................
Wool................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton ...........................
W ool...............................
Rayon, etc.....................
Footwear:
Shoes: T o ta l..............................................
Leather, leather sole10...............
Leather, rubber sole10................
Fabric, leather sole10..................
Fabric, rubber sole10..................
House slippers..........................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes........
R ubbers......................................................
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories:
Gloves: C otton.........................................
Rayon, s ilk .................. ...........
Leather, fu r................................
W ool.............................................

Average number of articles purchased b y women—Con.
0
0
0
.10
.14
.02
.08
.01
.02
.03
0
0
0

.05
.13
.05
.12
.07
.02

.06
.26
.01
.01
.06
.01
.01

0
.01
.07

0

0

0
.39
0
.02

.05
.02
0

.04

.69
.61
.03
.04
.01
.05
.03
.03

.61
.48
.06
.07

.88
.74
.05
.09

.07
.06
.02

.73
.56
.05
.11
.01
.05
.05
.02

.98
.77
.05
.14
.02
.04
.02

1.39
1.21
.07
.04
.07
.07
.04
0

.11
.03
.02
(5
)
.21
.19
.01

.11
.05
.06
(5
)
.21
.34
.01

.18
.03
.05
.04
.29
.34
.02

.16
.05
.07
.02
.25
.30
.06

.18
.07
.10
.03
.25
.34
.04

.44
.01
.12
.06

.75
.02
.21
.04

.78

.65
.05
.28
.07

.75

.60

.72

0

0
.08

0

.14
0
0

.67
.58
.04
.03
.02
.05
.02
.04

.56
0

.11
.68
0

1.46
0
1.50
.14
0
.43
0
0

.07
.18
.01

.16

0
0
0
0

1.80
.25
1.77
.62
0
.50
.06
.05

0

0

.05
.02
.13
.82
.05
.10
.07
.03
.03
.03
.04

0
0

2.41
.20
.86
.13
.01
.53
(5
)
.02

.02
.21
0

0
.05
.51
.01
.09
.03
.06
.02

0

.09
.04
.04
.03
.19
.23
.03

0

0

0
0

.68
.50
.39

1.74
.34
.66
.14
0
.53
.01
.03

.04
.03
.01

.01

.02

.15
.66
.03
.12
.03
.04
.01
.01
.04

.03
.03
.01
.11
.57
.04
.08
.05
.11
.03
.02
.02

0

1.54
.35
.75
.23
0
.60
.02
0

0

0

0

0

.04

1.34
.55
.43
.08
.01
.49
(5
)
0

.03
.02

.02

.01
.01
.04

.25
.64
.42
.43
.03

0
0

1.39
.64
.39
.17
0
.44
0
0

0

0

.03
.03
.02

.15
.49
.32
.43
.01
.02

.09
.36
.25
.26
.01
.03

0.02
0
0

.01
.02

.46
.39
.05
.02

.33
.24
.08
.01

(5)
(5)
(5)

.01
.02
.87
.36
.16
.29

.23
0
0

.05
.03
(5)
.09
.57
.01
.07
.05
.05

.03
.02
.15
.61
.01
.07
.05
.08

0
0
0
.10
.31
.22
.27
.03
(5
)

0

0

0
0

0
0
0

.10
.35
.15
.29
.04
.03

0

0

.34
.57
.05
.28

(8)

.01
.04
.04

0
0
0
0

0
0
.14
.36
.17
.38
.02

0

.01
.21

u a u u u a g s, y uxse».....................

Handkerchiefs..........................
Umbrellas..................................
H om e sewing:
Yard goods: Cotton (y d .).......
Linen (y d .).........
Rayon, silk (yd.)
Wool (y d .)...........

0
0
0

0
0
0

.18
0

0

0

0
.21
.07

0

.04
.04
.05

0

0

0
0

.14
0
.14
0
.39
.64
0
.04
0

.37
.05

.64
0

Average expenditure per woman
C lothing: T o ta l....................

$5.53 $8.31 $10.92 $18.45 $22.81 $25.28 $32.77 $48.58 $81.80

Hats, caps, berets................
Hats: F elt........................
Straw..................... .
Fabric, etc..............
Caps, berets: W ool..........
Cotton, etc.
Head scarfs, etc.7 ............
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc.:.
Coats: F u r........................
Heavy, with f u r . .
Heavy, no fur8___
Light wool8..........
Cotton, linen8.......

$0.43 $0.49 $0.90 $1.00 $1.26
.14
.53
.26
.38
.59
.20
.30
.23
.37
.49
.02 ..01
.09
.11
.08
.03
.03
.03
(6
)
(6
)
.02 0
.02
(6
)
(6
)
.02
.02
.03
.03
.05
.85 2.35 2.02 4.18
.77
0
0
.07 0
.73
0
0
.47
.96
.28
.13
.60
.26
.58
.44
.82 1.55
.40
.56
.90
0
0
0
.02
0

See footnotes on p. 177.




$1.54
.85
*.50
.12
.03
.01
.03
2.68
0
.46
.31
1.41
0

$1.75
1.12
.42
.14
.05
(6
)
.02
5.69
.70
1.81
.70
1.69
0

$2.50
1.36
.84
.14
.04
.01
.11
8.21
0
1.64
1.21
4.14
.08

$5.42
3.34
1.72
.36
0
0
0
3.60
0
0
0
2.90
0

170

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 27.— C lothing

purch ases : Percentage purchasing, average number of articles
purchased, and average expenditures , urban families and single consumers1 Continued
—

1942 (first 3 months)— Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

W o m e n a n d g irls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
Average expenditure per woman—Con.
a n d o v e r — Con.
Coats, sweaters, furs, etc.—Con.
Raincoats.....................................................
0
*0.01 0
0
(6
) $0.03 $0.05 $0.07
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
0
0
$0.05 0
$0.09
0
.07
0
Jackets: W ool..............................................
0
.02
.04 $0.02
.22
.04
.08
0
Leather.........................................
0
0
0
.04 0
0
0
0
Cotton, etc...................................
0
.02
.02 0
0
.01
0
.08
Sweaters: Wool........................................... $0.10
.22
.09
.23
.25
.35
.62
.57
Cotton, etc................................
.01
.02 0
.03 0
0
.01
.01
Fur scarfs, etc.............................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.36
Dresses, suits, aprons...................................
.63 2.25 4.36 5.39 5.80
7.57
8.26 14.90
Dresses: W ool.............................................
0
.22
.07
.33
.33
.28
.76
1.24
Rayon, s ilk .................................
.37
.94 2.02 2.27 2.85
3.56
3.84
5.80
Linen............................................
0
0
0
0
.04
.05
.02
.17
Cotton, street.............................
.21
.27
.47
.35
.41
.48
.64
.27
Cotton, house.............................
.04
.23
.13
.32
.22
.37
.38
.50
Cotton, uniform s.......................
0
.02
.16
.04
.01
.07
.08
.19
Suits: Wool, with fu r .................................
0
0
0
0
0
.04
0
.20
Wool, no fu r ....................................
0
.72 1.11 1.00
.28
1.17
1.36
3.C8
Cotton, linen..................................
0
0
.04 0
.07
.05
0
.22
Rayon, silk ......................................
0
.03
.09
.10
(«)
0
.31!
.88
Skirts: Wool................................................
0
.10
.12
.17
.26
.33
.52
.24
Cotton, etc.....................................
0
.04 0
(«)
.04
.07
.04
.11
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
0
.10
.05
.07
.08
.05
.20
.15
Rayon, silk .................................
0
.22
.07
.19
.29
.51
.26
.84
Wool, etc......................................
0
0
0
0
0
.01
.02
.03
Play and sun suits, shorts........................ 0
0
0
0
.01
.01
0
0
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
.01
.02 ..04
.08
.04
.08
.10
.12
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ............................
0
.06 0
.18
.03
.10
.14
.31
C otton ...........................
0
.02
.05
.08
.09
.04
.05
.17
Other.............................
0
.02
.01
.06 0
.06
.17
.06
Special sportswear9........................................ 0
0
0
.01 0
0
.13
.06
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton ......................
0
0
0
0
0
0
.06
.06
W ool..........................
0
0
0
0
0
0
.03
0
Other........................
0
0
0
.01 0
0
. 04
0
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
.62
.79 2.10 1.97 2.47
2.92
3.78
5.06
Slips: C otton...............................................
.14
.12
.05
.12
.11
.11
.32
.17
Rayon, silk ......................................
.12;
.14
.49
.47
.45
.58
.83
1.09
Corsets, girdles...........................................
.03;
.17
.47
.92
.45
.77
1.23
1.90
Brassieres....................................................
.03,
.22
.07
.30
.19
.29
.46
.40
Union suits, combination: C otton...........
.01 * .04
.03
.02
.04
.01
.01
.03
Rayon, s il k ..
. ;
.01 0
.02
.01
.05
.01
0
i
Wool and
cotton........
.02 0
.07
.01
.11! 0
0
0
Under waists, shirts: C otton....................
o
;
.02 0
.02
.01
(«)
.02
0
Rayon, silk............
0
.01
.01
.02
.01
.03
.02
.03
Wool and cotton . . .
0
0
(«)
(°)
0
.01
(*) 0
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
.01
.0 3
.06
.02
.05
.08
.05
.07
Rayon, s ilk ...............
.07
.08
.26
.26
.26
.35
.31
.45
Wool and cotton ___
0
.01
.02
.01
.01
.02
.04
(6
)
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk.........
.02
.12
.03
.13
.22
.18
.24
.17
Cotton, flannel..
.06
.09
.05
.06
.04
.05
.05
.09
Cotton, other----- 0
1 .01
.08
.06
.04
.08
.16
.03
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool.........
0
.04 0
0
.09
.03
.12
.08
Rayon, silk 0
0
.06
.05 0
.03
.06
.14
Cotton,
linen___
0
0
.09
.03
.10
.05
.14
.09
H osiery............................................................
.93 1.39 2.43 2.43 3.33
3.28
4.27
5.66
Hose: S ilk ....................................................
.33
.72 1.26 1.21 1.54
1.76
2.44
1.81
R ayon ...............................................
.39
.23
.41
.40
.29
.27
.18
.26
N y lo n ................................................
.07
.23
.63
.69 1.22
1.07
3.12
1.46
Cotton, including lisle..................
.10
.14
.06
.03
.13
.06
.06
.30
W ool..................................................
0
0
0
.01
0
0
(# 0
)
Anklets, socks: C otton .............................
.04
.06
.07
.10
.14
.11
.11
.13
W ool.................................
0
0
0
.01
.03
(°)
(°)
(•)
Rayon, etc.......................
0
.01 0
0
0
.01
.02
.01
Footwear........................................................
1.31 1.67 2.66 2.95 3.11
3.60
4.66
5.30
Shoes: T o t a l...............................................
1.04 1.52 1.26 2.67 2.71
3.14
4.86
4.18
Leather, leather sole10.................
.76 ! 1.36 1.99 2.41 2.36
2.49
3.60
4.00
Leather, rubber sole10..................
.22
.13
.11
.09
.20
.17
.18
.19
Fabric, leather sole10....................
.06
.03
.11
.16
.42
.18
.62
.40
Fabric, rubber sole10....................
0
0
.05
.01 0
.03
0
.05
House slippers............................................
.02
.08
.04
.08
.07
.07
.07
.05
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes..........
.06
.07
.03
.05
.13
.11
.09
.04
R u b bers.....................................................
0
0
.04
.15
.03
.03
0
.06
Shoeshines, repairs....................................
.12
.22
.10
.14
.17
.25
.26
.35

0
1

See footnotes on p. 177.




0
0
0
0
$0.09
.61
0
0
35.29
3.97
19.17
1.45
.92
.32
0
3.21
2.54
0
0
1.61
.25
.18
.86
0
.38
0
.22
.21
0
.52
.45
.07
0
8.02
0
2.02
3.21
1.03
0
0
0
0
0
0
.30
.75
0
.46
0
0
.25
0
0
4.73
1.74
0
2.77
.08
0
.14
0
0
11.10
10.44
9.58
.32
.36
.18
.14
.09
0
.43

171

Part H I .— Tabular Summary

T a b l e 27.— C l o th in g p u r c h a s e s : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumer1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual money income o f —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 to
$2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

W o m e n a n d g irls 16 y e a r s o f a g e
a n d o v e r — Con.

Average expenditure per woman—Con.

Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories.. $0.14 $0.23 $0.97 $1.20 $0.88
Gloves: C otton............................................
.11
.02
.10
.02
.09
Rayon, s ilk ..................................
.02
.04
.02
.04
0
Leather, fu r..................................
.14
.01
.06
.07
.03
W ool...............................................
.02
0
0
(8
)
(6
)
Handbags, purses......................................
.29
.41
.04
.10
.37
Handkerchiefs............................................
.01
.03
.03
.05
.03
.02
Umbrellas....................................................
.03
0
.05
(#
)
.12
Jewelry, watches........................................
.01
.36
.04
.55
Other accessories11............................. ......
.01
.02
.03
.03
(«)
Hom e sewing..................................................
.32
.47
.58
.35
.45
Yard goods: C otton ...................................
.21
.15
.27
.13
.13
L inen.....................................
.04
.01
0
0
0
Rayon, silk...........................
.14
.07
.15
.11
.05
W ool....................................... 0
.09
.03
0
.01
Yarn: W ool..................................................
.02
0
0
.04
0
Other................................................. 0
.04
.01
.01 0
Findings......................................................
.02
.04
.03
.05
.06
Paid help for sewing..................................
.04
.06
.03
.05
.08
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing........................
.32
.32
.69
.98 1.18
Other clothing expenses4..................... ........
.01
.03
.03
.03 ___ &

$1.56
.17
.03
.10
.03
.74
.03
.06
.32
.08
.99
.35
0
.28
.17
.12
(«)
.05
.02
1.12
.02

$1.42
.15
.06
.18
.02
.60
.05
.09
.24
.03
.94
.29
.03
.29
.10
.12
(6)
.09
.02
1.74
.13

$1.93
.22
.08
.25
.03
.84
.03
.07
.33
.08
2.23
.35
0
1.34
.05
.01
.06
.14
.28
2.74
.03

$4.21
.27
0
.36
0
2.19
.41
0
.89
.09
1.21
.01
0
.35
0
.36
0
.01
.48
6.14
1.56

Percentage of girls purchasing
G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e
C lothin g.................................................

61.5

75.6

93.0

87.5

85.9

88.7

97.7

100.0

91.7

Hats, caps, berets.................................
Hats: F elt...........................................
Straw........................................
Fabric, etc...............................
Caps, berets: W ool............................
Cotton, etc.................
Head scarfs, etc.7..............................
Coats, sweaters, furs, e tc....................
Coats: F u r..........................................
H eavy, with fu r...................
H eavy, no fur8......................
Light wool8............................
Cotton, linen8........................
R ayon, silk8...........................
R aincoats............................................
Snow or ski suits, leggings..............
Jackets: W ool.....................................
Leather................................
Cotton, etc..........................
Sweaters: W ool..................................
Cotton, etc.......................
Fur scarfs, etc....................................
Dresses, suits, aprons, e tc..................
Dresses: W o o l....................................
Rayon, silk ........................
L inen..................................
Cotton, street....................
Cotton, house....................
Cotton, uniform ................
Suits: Wool, with fu r........................
Wool, no fu r...........................
Cotton, linen.........................
Rayon, silk .............................
Skirts: W ool............ ...........................
Cotton, e tc............................
Blouses: Cotton, linen.....................
Rayon, s ilk ........................
Wool, etc.............................
Play and sun suits, shorts...............
Aprons, sm ocks.................................
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ..................
C otton..................
Other....................

7.7
7.7
0
0
0
0
0
23.1
0
0
0
15.4
7.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7.7
0
0
0
7.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

14.6
4.9
0
0
7.3
4.9
0
19.5
0
0
2.4
0
0
0
2.4
2.4
0
0
0
7.3
7.3
0
26.8
0
4.9
0
12.2
2.4
0
0
0
0
0
2.4
0
2.4
2.4
0
0
0
0
0

12.3
1.8
5.3
1.8
1.8
0
1.8
19.3
1.8
0
0
5.3
0
0
0
1.8
0
0
0
7.0
7.0
0
43.9
5.3
15.8
0
26.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
3.5
0
5.3
3.5
0
0
0
0
3.5
0

19.6
16.1
0
0
3.6
1.8
5.4
17.9
0
3.6
3.6
5.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.8
3.6
0
0
32.1
1.8
7.1
0
19.6
0
0
0
1.8
0
0
1.8
1.8
1.8
0
0
1.8
1.8
1.8
0
0

41.0
15.4
7.7
3.8
5.1
1.3
15.4
29.5
0
0
6.4
14.1
1.3
0
1.3
1.3
0
0
1.3
6.4
3.8
0
39.7
2.6
12.8
0
17.9
1.3
0
0
6.4
1.3
0
9.0
1.3
6.4
5.7
0
0
2.6
0
3.8
0

39.6
20.8
13.2
0
0
0
7.5
37.7
0
1.9
1.9
15.1
0
0
0
1.9
0
0
0
20.8
0
0
54.7
0
13.2
0
20.8
0
0
1.9
7.5
3.8
0
3.8
3.8
5.7
17.0
0
1.9
0
0
1.9
3.8

39.5
18.6
10.5
1.2
7.0
2.3
2.3
34.9
0
1.2
5.8
16.3
0
0
1.2
2.3
1.2
0
0
14.0
5.8
0
57.0
0
30.2
1.2
17.4
0
0
0
5.8
0
0
8.1
2.3
2.3
7.0
0
0
0
1.2
0
0

52.2
26.1
8.7
13.0
8.7
0
4.3
47.8
0
0
4.3
21.7
0
0
0
4.3
8.7
0
4.3
21.7
0
0
73.9
13.0
21.7
0
30.4
0
0
0
4.3
4.3
4.3
17.4
0
26.1
8.7
0
4.3
0
4.3
4.3
0

50.0
25.0
16.7
0
16.7
0
0
50.0
0
8.3
25.0
0
0
0
33.3
0
0
0
0
16.7
8.3
0
66.7
25.0
25.0
0
25.0
8.3
0
0
16.7
0
0
8.3
0
8.3
16.7
0
8.3
8.3
0
8.3
0

See footnotes on p. 177.




0

172

i'amily Spending and Saving in W artime

27.—C lothing purchases: Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

T able

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 j $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
to ! to 1 and
1
1500 $1,000 $1,500 to
$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 i over
Percentage of girls purchasing—Con.

G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e — Con.
Special sportswear9................
Bathing suits, etc.: C otton .
W ool..
O th er..
Underwear, nightwear, robes
Slips: C otton.......................
Rayon, s ilk ...............
Corsets, girdles....................
Union suits, com binations: C o tt o n ..
Rayon, silk.
Wool and
cotton ___
Underwaists, shirts: C otton ...............
Rayon, silk.............
Wool and c o tto n ...
Bloomers, panties: C otton...................
Rayon, s ilk ...........
Wool and c o t t o n ..
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, s ilk ........
Cotton, flannel..
Cotton, other. . .
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool.........
Rayon, silk
Cotton,
lin en .. . .
Hosiery:
Hose: S ilk.............................................
R ay on ...............................................
N ylon ................................................
Cotton, including lisle...................
W ool..................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton .............................
W ool.................................
Rayon, e tc......................
Footwear..........................................................
Shoes: Leather, leather sole10..................
Leather, rubber sole10...................
Fabric, leather sole10.....................
Fabric, rubber sole10.....................
House slippers............................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes..........
R u b bers.......................................................
Shoeshines, repairs......................... ........
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories...
G loves: C otton...........................................
R ayon, s ilk ...................................
Leather, fu r..................................
W ool...............................................
Handbags, purses,
Handkerchiefs___
Umbrellas........................... .
Jewelry, watches................
Other accessories11..............
H om e sewing...........................
Yard goods: C otton ...........
Linen.............
Rayon, s ilk ...
W ool...............
Y arn: Wool...........................
Other.........................
Findings...............................
Paid help for sewing..........
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing
Other clothing expense4........

0
0
0
0
23.1
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
24.4
2.4
2.4
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
47.4
10.5
5 3
0
1.8
1.8
0

0
0
0
0
37.5
3.6
7.1
0
0
1.8
0

0
0
0
0
51.3
6.4
6.4
0
1.3
1.3
0

0
0
0
0
43.4
7.5
15.1
1.9
0
1.9
0

0
0
0
0
54.7
8.1
17.4
2.3
4.7
1.2
0

0
0
0
0
60.9
17.4
17.4
4.3
4.3
0
0

8.3
0
8.3
0
41.7
16.7
0
0
0
0
8.3

0
7.7
0
0
15.4
7.7
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
2.4
2.4
0
12.2
7.3
0
2.4
0
0
0
0

0
5.3
0
1.8
19.3
17.5
1.8
0
0
0
1.8
0

0
12.5
3.6
0
25.0
12.5
0
1.8
1.8
1.8
0
0

0
10.3
1.3
0
23.1
16.7
0
1.3
2.6
1.3
0
0

1.9
0
1.9
3.8
5.7
5.7
7.5
5.7
1.9
7.5
0
0

1.2
5.8
2.3
0
16.3
19.8
3.5
2.3
3.5
7.0
0
0

0
8.7
0
0
30.4
21.7
0
4.3
8.7
26.1
4.3
0

0
8.3
0
0
16.7
8.3
0
8.3
8.3
8.3
0
0

0
46.2
0
0
0
7.7
0
30.8
0
7.7
46.2
30.8
15.4
0
7.7
0
0
0
7.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7.7
7.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

2.4
63.4
4.9
0
0
7.3
0
53.7
0
2.4
56.1
41.5
9.8
0
2.4
2.4
0
0
12.2
9.8
0
0
0
2.4
0
4.9
0
0
0
19.5
17.1
2.4
2.4
0
0
0
4.9
0
0
0

0
75.4
3.5
0
0
14.0
0
57.9
3.5
3.5
66.7
61.4
10.5
1.8
0
1.8
3.5
1.8
17.5
3.5
1.8
0
0
1.8
0
0
0
0
0
15.8
12.3
0
1.8
1.8
0
0
8.8
1.8
7.0
0

0
66.1
5.4
0
0
5.4
0
55.4
0
5.4
58.9
42.9
3.6
0
5.4
0
7.1
1.8
10.7
10.7
3.6
0
0
1.8
1.8
0
0
1.8
3.6
7.1
5.4
0
1.8
0
1.8
0
0
1.8
14.3
1.8

0
65.4
6.4
2.6
0
6.4
0
57.7
1.3
0
66.7
53.8
6.4
3.8
0
2.6
2.6
0
17.9
26.9
2.6
6.4
0
1.3
17.9
3.8
1.3
1.3
3.8
24.4
15.4
0
5.1
2.6
2.6
1.3
10.3
1.3
21.8
2.6

0
75.5
13.2
5.7
1.9
11.3
0
66.0
1.9
0
71.7
60.4
15.1
0
0
1.9
7.5
0
17.0
20.8
9.4
3.8
0
3.8
7.5
1.8
0
0
3.8
32.1
18.9
0
9.4
3.8
7.5
1.8
5.7
1.8
35.8
5.7

3.5
79.1
17.4
4.7
0
10.5
0
60.5
0
4.7
73.3
61.6
11.6
0
0
2.3
3.5
2.3
22.1
20.9
3.5
3.5
0
5.8
9.3
0
0
1.2
4.7
29.1
24.4
0
4.7
1.2
1.2
0
10.5
1.2
33.7
1.2

0
82.6
8.7
4.3
0
13.0
0
52.2
13.0
4.3
91.3
78.3
17.4
4.3
0
0
13.0
0
17.4
52.2
8.7
4.3
4.3
21.7
21.7
8.7
0
8.7
4.3
21.7
13.0
0
0
0
4.3
0
4.3
8.7
30.4
8.7

0
83.3
25.0
0
0
16.7
8.3
41.7
16.7
0
75.0
66.7
16.7
8.3
0
8.3
8.3
8.3
25.0
16.7
0
8.3
0
0
0
0
0
0
16.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
75.0
0

Average number of articles purchased b y girls
Hats, caps, berets:
H ats: F elt..........................
Straw.......................
Fabric, etc..............
Caps, berets: W ool...........
Cotton, etc.
Head scarfs, etc.7..............
See footnotes on p. 177




0.08
0
0
0
0
0

0.05
0
0
.07
.05
0

0.04
.05
.02
.02
0
.04

0.16
0
0
.04
.02
.07

0.15
.08
.04
.06
0
.18

0.23
.13
0
0
0
.08

0.21
.10
.01
.07
.02
.02

0.26
.09
.13
.04
0
.04

0.25
.25
0
.17
0
0

173

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary
T able

27.—C lothing purchases: Percentage purchasing, average number o f article*
and average expenditurest urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued
1942 (first 3 months)—Continued

purchased,

Annual money income of —
Item

Under
$500

G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e —Con.

Average number of articles purchased b y girls—Con.

Coats, raincoats, furs, etc.:
Coats: F u r...................................................
0
Heavy, with fur............................
0
H eavy, no fur8...............................
0
Light wool8.....................................
.15
Cotton, linen8................................
.08
Raincoats....................................................
0
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
0
Jackets: W ool........... ..................................
0
Cotton, e tc..................................
0
Sweaters: Wool.................... .......................
0
Cotton, etc................................
0
Dresses, suits, aprons, etc.:
Dresses: W ool.............................................
0
Rayon, s ilk .................................
0
Linen...........................................
0
Cotton, street.............................
.08
Cotton, house.............................
0
Suits: Wool, with fu r................................
0
Wool, no fu r ....................................
0
Cotton, linen..................................
0
Rayon, silk......................................
0
Skirts: W ool................................................
0
Cotton, e tc..................................... *0
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
0
Rayon, s ilk .................................
0
Play and sun suits, shorts......................
0
Aprons, sm ocks......................................
0
1
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ....................
)
C otton ................
»
O ther....................
Special sportswear:9
J
Bathing suits, etc.: W ool................
Underwear, nightwear, robes:
0
Slips: C otton...........................................
Rayon, s ilk ....................................
0
0
Corsets, girdles...........................................
0
Brassieres....................................................
0
Union suits, com binations: C otton.........
Rayon, silk .. 0
Wool and
cotton.......
0
.23
Underwaists, shirts: C otton....................
Rayon, silk ............. * 0
Wool and c o tto n ...
0
.46
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
Rayon, s ilk ...............
.08
Wool and cotton ----0
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, s ilk ........
0
Cotton flannel... 0
Cotton, oth er. . .
0
Robes, negligees^ housecoats: W ool........
Cotton,
lin e n ...
Hosiery:
Hose: S ilk....................................................
R ayon...............................................
N y lon ................................................
Cotton, including lisle..................
W ool..................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton .............................
W ool.................................
Rayon, etc......................
Footwear:
Shoes: T otal................................................
Leather, leather sole10..................
Leather, rubber sole10...................
Fabric, leather sole10.....................
Fabric, rubber sole10.....................
House slippers............................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes.........
R ubbers......................................................
See footnotes on p . 177.




$500 $1,000 $1,500 1$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to 1 to
to
to
to
to
and
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 j $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

0

0
0
.02
0
0
.02
.02
0
0
.07
.07

0.02
0
0
.05
0
0
.02
0
0
.11
.09

.07
0
.20
.02
0
0
0
0

.04
.04
.05

0

.02

.27

.04
.02
.02
0

0
.02
.02

0

.08

0

0
0
0

.40
.02
.08
.04
.02
.04
.08
.21
.02
0
0
.02
.04
0

0

0

0

0

.20
.10

.12
.02
.56
.44
.04

.54
.22
0
.02
0
0

0

.17

0
.04
.04
.04

.02

.03
.06
0

0

0

0

0

0

.12

0

.14

0
0

0
0

0
0

.15

.61
0
1.93
.09
.07

.32
0
2.50
0
.23

.23
0
2.88
.01
0

.54
.31
.15

.68
.51
.15

.95
.79
.14
.02

.68
.59
.04

.82
.72
.06
.04

.69
0

0

0
.02
.02

.08
0
t)

0
.05

0
.04
.04
.02

0
.07
.02

0
.03
.03
.01

0
2.41
.04
0
.92
.75
.17
0
0
.02
.08
0

0

.19
0
0
.08
0

.43
.13
.09
.04
.04

.25
.17
.17
:i7
0
.17
0
.08

.61
.35
.04
.09
0
0

0

.56
.53
.10
.02
.05
.08

.26
0
0
1.78
.57
0
.09
.13
.43

0

0

.04

.60
.20

.33
0
0
0
0
.25

0

0

.32
.19
.06
.45

0

.20
0
1.71
0
.02

.38
0

.04
.04
.04
.17

0

.03
.17
.09

0

.50
.17
, 0

.03

0

.17
.03

.61

0

0

.04
.06
.09
.13
.21
.06
.02
.08

.25
.25
0

0

.12
.28
.02
.12
.03

.06

.25
.08

.17
.52
0

.01
0
0

0

.86
.37

.71
.55
0

0
0

0
0
0

0

.06
.12
.02
.06
.08

.08
.25
0
0
.33

.04
.09
.04
.30

0
0

.04
.28
.04

0
0

0
0

0

0

0

0

0
0
0

0

0
0
0

.29
.09

0

0

.03
.01

.05

0
0

.09
.21
.04

0

.02
.04

.38
.02
.38

0
.04
.22

0

0

0

0

.17
.06

.21

.15
.12

0
0
0
0

.02

0
0
0

0

.10
.01
.08
.08

0
0

0
.28

0

0

.05
.12

.01
.02
.01

0

0

0

0

0
0

.04

0
0

.23
.09

0

.01
.06
.16

.02

.06
.01
0

.02
.02
.02

0

0
0

0

0
.39
.01

.02

.11
.05

.02
.02
.15

0

0
0

.05

0

.03
.15
0

0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

.01
.06
.04

.02
.07

.04

.02
.02

0
.02
.04

0

0

.01
.01

0

.47

0
.05
.14

.02

0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0

.06
.18

0
0

0

.33
0
0
.58
.25
0
.17
.25
.08
0
0

.22
.09

0

0

.28
0
2.37
0
.08

.87
0
4.35
.35
.35

.42
0
0
1.00
.25
1.92
.50
0

1.10
.98
.12
0
0
.02
.03
.02

1.21
1.00
. 17
.04
0
0
.13
0

1.25
.83
.25
.17
0
.08
0
.08

174

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

27.—C lothing purchases: Percentage 'purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fa m ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

T able

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
$500
$1,000| $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e —Con.

Average number of articles purchased b y girls—Con.

Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories:
G loves: C otton...........................................
Rayon, s ilk ...................... •...........
Leather, fu r..................................
W ool...............................................
Handbags, purses......................................
Handkerchiefs............................................
Umbrellas....................................................
H om e sewing:
Y ard goods: Cotton (y d .).........................
Linen (y d .)...........................
Rayon, silk (y d .).................
Wool ( y d . ) . . . . ......................

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
.02
0
.12
0
.31

0
0
0

.84
.07
0
0

0.02
0
0
.02
0
0
0

0.04
0
0
.02
.05
0
0

0.03
.06
0
.01
.17
.27
.01

0.09
.04
0
.04
.08
.06
0

0.03
.03
0
.07
.09
0
0

0.13
.04
.04
.26
.39
1.30
0

0

.54

1.05
0
.04
0

.91

1.02
0
.43
-.04

1.31
0
.31
.03

.17

0

0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
.07
.02

.21
.06

.08
0
0
0
0
0

Average expenditure per girl
Clothing: T o t a l.............................................

$3.45 $4.28 $5.86 $5.50 $9.93 $12.17 $13.72 $26.16 $38.86

Hats, caps, berets.......................................... $0.15 $0.15 $0.14 $0.33 $0.56
Hats: F elt....................................................
.03
.27
.31
.15
.08
Straw.................................................
.06 0
0
0
.11
Fabric, etc........................................
0
0
.01 0
.04
.02
Caps, berets: W ool.....................................
.02
.02
0
.04
.01
Cotton, etc.........................
0
.03 0 '
(•)
Head scarfs, etc.7........................................
.02
.03
0
0
.08
.92
Coats, raincoats, furs, etc............................
.97
.77 1.75
1.67
Coats: F u r...................................................
0
.14 0
0
0
H eavy, with fu r............................
0
0
0
.09 0
H eavy, no fur8...............................
0
.56 0
.29
.44
Light wool8.....................................
1.52 0
.30 1.01
.51
Cotton, linen8.................................
0
0
0
.15 0
R aincoats..................................................... 0
.06 0
0
.05
.12
Snow or ski suits, leggings.......................
0
.10 0
.03
Jackets: W ool..............................................
0
0
0
0
0
Cotton, etc................................... 0
0
0
.04
.06
.12
Sweaters: Wool...........................................
0
.17
.05
.13
Cotton, etc................................
.05 0
0
.06
.03
Dresses, suits, aprons, e tc............................
.48 1.38
.95 2.61
.05
Dresses: W ool.............................................
.21
0
0
.04
.06
Rayon, silk .................................
.14
.42
0
.28
.50
L inen............................................
0
0
0
0
0
Cotton, street.............................
.21
.43
.50
.05
.53
Cotton, house.............................
0
.03 0
0
.01
Suits: Wool, with fu r.................................
0
0
0
0
0
Wool, no fu r....................................
0
0
.09
0
.95
Cotton, linen................................... 0
0
0
0
.04
Rayon, silk......................................
0
0
0
0
0
Skirts: W ool................................................
.01
.06
.07
.30
0
.02
Cotton, e tc.....................................
0
0
.01
0
Blouses: Cotton, linen..............................
.02
.02
.09
0
.07
Rayon, s ilk .......................... .......
.02
0
.06 0
.09
.02 0
Play and sun suits, shorts........................ 0
0
0
Aprons, sm ocks..........................................
.01
0
0
.01
0
Overalls, slacks: R a y on ............................
0
.03 0
0
0
C otton ...........................
0
0
.03 0
.04
0
0
O ther.............................
0
0
0
Special sportswear:9
Bathing suits, etc.: W ool..........................
0
0
0
0
0
.50
Underwear, nightwear, robes......................
.73
.38
.69
.23
Slips: C otton...............................................
.01
.13
.05
0
.06
Rayon, s ilk ......................................
.02
.04
.16
0
.10
Corsets, girdles...........................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
.01 0
Brassieres..................................................... 0
.01
.02
0
.03
Union suits, com binations: C otton ........ 0
.01
Rayon, silk. 0
0
0
0
0
Wool and
0
0
0
cotton ----0
0
.07
.08
Under waists, shirts: C otton.....................
.09
.03
.07
.02 0
Rayon, silk............. 0
.01
.01
.01 0
Wool and c o tto n ...
0
0
0
.12
Bloomers, panties: C otton.......................
.14
.12
.16
.23
Rayon, s ilk ..............
.02
.05
.08
.17
.11
.02 0
Wool and cotton ----0
0
0
See footnotes on p . 177.




$0.68
.42
.21
0
0
0
.05
2.16
0
.28
.28
.96
0
0
.24
0
0
.40
0
2.83
0
.47
0
.66
0
.19
.77
.06
0
.09
.04
.07
.27
.03
0
0
.06
.12
0
.84
.05
.19
.06
0
.02
0

$0.57
.35
.12
.01
.07
.01
.01
2.94
0
.23
.65
1.42
0
.03
.21
.01
0
.32
.0 7
2.92
0
1.12
.06
.65
0
0
.58
0
0
.28
.05
.05
.12
0
0
.01
0
0

$1.14
.46
.34
.24
.06
0
.04
4.61
0
0
.65
1.94
0
0
.39
.87
.13
.63
0
7.31
.48
1.63
0
1.38
0
0
1.26
.17
.56
.37
0
.75
.35
.17
0
.06
.13
0

$1.88
1.17
.50
0
.21
<y
0
10.76
0
4.17
4.37
0
0
1.50
0
0
0
.56
.16
11.50
2.44
2.50
0
1.58
.42
0
2.58
0
0
.33
0
.49
.33
.58
.25
0
.50
0

0
1.21
.06
.28
.02
.05
.02
0

0
2.88
.26
.70
.17
.11
0
0

.16
3.04
.56
0
0
0
.0
.19

.03
.05
.03

.03
0
.01
.03
.03
.05
.12

0
.16
.19
.05

0

0
.33

.10
0
0

0
0
.42
.25

.43
.33
0

0

175

Part I I I — Tabular Summary

T able 27.— C lothing purchases : Percentage purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under
to
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
1500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

G irls 2 t o 16 y e a r s o f a g e—Con.

Average expenditure per girl—Con.

Underwear, nightwear, robes—Con.
Nightgowns, pajamas: Rayon, silk ----Cotton flannel..
Cotton, o th e r ..
Robes, negligees, housecoats: W ool.......
Cotton,
lin en ...
H osiery..........................................................
Hose: S ilk..................................................
R ayon .............................................
N ylon ..............................................
Cotton, including lisle.................
W ool.................................................
Anklets, socks: C otton ...........................
W ool...............................
Rayon, e tc ....................
Footwear........................................................
Shoes: T o ta l..............................................
Leather, leather sole10.................
Leather, rubber sole10.................
Fabric, leather sole10...................
Fabric, rubber sole10...................
House slippers..........................................
Overshoes, rubber boots, galoshes........
R ubbers.....................................................
Shoeshines, repairs........................... .
Gloves, handkerchiefs, other accessories.
Gloves: C otton.........................................
Rayon, s ilk .................................
Leather, fu r................................
W ool.............................................
Handbags, purses....................................
Handkerchiefs..........................................
Umbrellas..................................................
Jewelry, watches......................................
Other accessories11....................................
H om e sewing.................................................
Yard goods: C otton .................................
L inen...................................
Rayon, silk.........................
W ool.....................................
Yarn: Wool.............................................
Other..............................................
Findings....................................................
Paid help for sewing................................
Upkeep—Cleaning, pressing......................
Other clothing expense4...............................

0
0
0
0
0
$0.17
0
0
0
.04
0
.09
0
.04
1.13
1.07
.61
.41
0
.05
0
0
0
.06
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.05
.05
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

$0.02 $0.02
$0.02 0
.02
.06
0
0
.01
0
.03
0
0
0
$0.04 0
.05
.41
.09

0

0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0

0
.26
0
.01
1.52
1.43
1.10
.23
0
.10
.03
0
0
.06
.03
0
0
0
.02
0
.01
0
0
0
.39
.33
.02
.01
0
0
0
.03
0
0
0

.31
.02
.01
2.01
1.82
1.52
.27
.03
0
.01
.01
.02
.15
.02
.01
0
0
.01
0
0
0
0
0
.24
.11
0
.04
.02
0
0
.03
.04
.07
0

.71
.11
.01
0

.10

.10

.05

0
.61
.06

.54
.10

.05
0

0
.41
0
.04
1.71
1.54
1.36
.09
0
.09
0
.09
.01
.07
.05
.02
0
0
.01
.01
0
0
(*)
.01
.18
.11
0
.02
0
.04
0
0
.01
.15
.02

.53
.01
0
2.39
2.08
1.84
.17
.07
0
.03
.05
0
.23
.28
.02
.06
0
.01
.15
.02
.01
(8
)
.01
.63
.20
0
.10
.11
.06
.07
.06
.01
.29
.02

$0.09
.01
.15
0

$0.04
.05
.08
0

$0.08
.13
.48
.09

$0.50
.62
.17
0

0
1.16
.29
.03
.03
.16
0
.58
.02
0
3.11
2.76
2.36
.40
0
0
.01
.18
0
.16
.24
.05
.02
0
.01
.05
.01
0
0
.10
.77
.34
0
.28
.03
.07
.01
.02
.02
.36
.02

.10
1.03
.34
.07
0
.08
0
.51
0
.03
3.27
2.88
2.53
.35
0
0
.04
.05
.02
.28
.46
.03
.03
0
.05
.10
0
0
.10
.15
.83
.48
0
.17
.06
.01
0
.07
.04
.47
.01

0
1.69
.24
.05
0
.18
0
.94
.18
.10
5.19
4.56
3.69
.76
.11
0
0
.36
0
.27
1.54
.12
.03
.04
.21
.44
.05
0
.61
.04
.98
.32
0
0
0
.07
0
.02
.57
.52
.30

0
1.46
.36
0
0
.29
.12
.44
.25
0
6.63
5.70
3.95
.83
.92
0
.12
.21
.10
.50
0.51
0
.08
0
0
0
0
0
0
.43
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2.92
0

83.3
16.7
16.7
16.7
0
16.7
16.7
16.7
16.7
16.7
33.3
0
0
83.3
66.7
16.7
33.3

75.0
0
0
0
25.0
25.0
25.0
0
56.0
0
50.0
25.0
0
25.0
50.0
0
25.0

Percentage of children purchasing
C h ild re n u n d e r 2 y e a r s o f a g e
R eady-to-w ear..........................................
Caps, hoods, bonnets...........................
Coats12................ .......................; ..........
Snow suits, sweater suits, leggings...
Sweaters, sacques.................................
Dresses, rompers18. . ...........................
Play and sun suits14.............................
Slips, gertrudes....................................
Shirts, vests, bands.............................
Diapers, cotton .....................................
Pants, cotton.........................................
Sleeping garments................................
Robes, wrappers...................................
Stockings, socks....................................
Bootees, shoes........................................
Layettes.................................................
Bibs, etc.15..............................................
See footnotes on p . 177.




75.0
50.0
0
25.0
50.0
75.0
25.0
0
0
0
0
25.0
0
50.0
50.0
0
0

80.0
33.3
0
0
13.3
33.3
6.7
6.7
13.3
13.3
13.3
6.7
6.7
40.0
40.0
0
6.7

90.5
23.8
4.8
0
19.0
28.6
9.5
9.5
23.8
19.0
4.8
19.0
9.5
38.1
47.6
9.5
4.8

70.0
15.0
5.0
10.0
0
30.0
5.0
10.0
30.0
15.0
15.0
10.0
5.0
40.0
50.0
0
10.0

79.2
20.8
0
16.7
8.3
16.7
8.3
0
29.2
20.8
16.7
12.5
0
41.7
41.7
4.2
4.2

85.0
15.0
10.0
15.0
20.0
30.0
5.0
10.0
25.0
25.0
35.0
15.0
15.0
60.0
60.0
15.0
15.0

100.0
15.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
45.0
10.0
l(h0
15.0
25.0
20.0
10.0
0
45.0 .
45.0
10.0
10.0

176

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 27.—C lothing purchases : Percentage purcashing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

$3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500
to
to
over
to
to
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage o f children purchasing—Con.

Children tinder 2 years o f a g e

Con.

Yard goods: Diaper cloth.........................
Other cotton ........................
W ool......................................
Rayon, silk...........................
Linen.....................................
Yarn: Wool..................................................
Other................................................
Findings......................................................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning........................................

25.0
0
25.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

40.6
13.3
26.7
0
0
0
6.7
0
6.7
0
6.71

23.8
4.8
9.5
0
0
0
14.3
0
4.8
0
0

10.0
5.0
5.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5.0
5.0

8.3
0
4.2
4.2
0
0
0
0
4.2
0
4.2

15.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
0
0
0
0
0
10.0

30.0
0
25.0
10.0
5.0
0
15.0
0
20.0
0
5.0

16.7
16.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
33.3

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Average number of articles purchased b y children
Ready-to-wear:
Caps, hoods, bonnets................................
Coats12..........................................................
Snow suits, sweater suits, leggings.........
Sweaters, sacques......................................
Dresses, rompers12......................................
P lay and sun suits14..................................
Slips, gertrudes..........................................
Shirts7vests, bands...................................
Diapers, cotton ..........................................
Pants, cotton..............................................
Sleeping garments.....................................
Robes, wrappers........................................
Stockings, socks (p r.)................................
Bootees, shoes (p r.)....................................
Layettes.......................................................
Yard goods: Diaper cloth (y d .)..................
Other cotton (y d .)..................
Wool (y d .)................................
Rayon, silk (y d .)....................
Linen ( y d . ) . . . . . . ....................

0.50
0
.25
1.00
4.00
.75
0
0
0
0
.75
0
1.50
.50
0
0
3.50
0
0
0

0.40
0
0
.07
.60
.13
.07
.40
2.00
.53
.07
.07
1.07
.40
0
.80
1.93
0
0
0

0.33
.05
0
.29
.52
.19
.24
.67
4.29
.05
.48
.19
1.48
.71
.0 5

.48
.33
0
0
0

0.15
.05
.10
0
.65
.10
.20
.75
3.55
.20
.15
.10
1.35
.65
0
0
1.10
0
0
0

0.33
0
.17
.13
.29
.08
0
1.17
6.50
1.12
.71
0
1.42
.46
.04
0
.13
0
0
0

0.35
.10
.20
.30
.80
.10
.35
1.25
5.60
3.80
.65
.40
2.05
1.05

0.15
.25
.30
.40
1.00
.30
.15
1.05
4.25
.80
.40
0
1.25
.65
.10
0
.90
.05
0
0

.0 5

.60
.25
.50
.15
0

0.17
.17
.33
0
.17
.33
.17
.33
2.00
.83
0
0
2.33
1.00

0
0
0

3.33
0
0
0
0

.50
.50
1.00
0
2.50
0
2.00
1.00
0
1.00
.50
0
0
0
0
0
0

.5 0

Average expenditure per child
Clothing: T otal..............................................

$3.63 $2.60 $4.29 $3.90 $5.09

$9.48 $10.83 $14.72

$6.73

Ready-to-w ear...............................................
C a p s , h o o d s , bonnets. ..
....
Coats12..........................................................
Snow suits, sweater suits, leggings.........
. Sweaters, sacques......................................
Dresses, rompers15.....................................
Play and sun suits14..................................
Slips, gertrudes..........................................
Shirts, vests, bands...................................
Diapers, cotton ..........................................
Pants, cotton..............................................
Sleeping garments.....................................
Robes, wrappers........................................
Stockings, socks.........................................
Bootees, shoes.............................................
Layettes.......................................................
Bibs, etc.15......... .........................................
Home sewing..................................................
Yard goods: Diaper cloth .........................
Other cotton ........................
W ool........................ .............
Rayon, silk ...........................
L inen.....................................
Yarn: W ool.................................................
Other................................................
Findings......................................................
Paid help for sewing..................................
Upkeep—Cleaning........................................

$2.98 $1.96 $3.91 $3.23 $4.86
.13
.18
.19
.16
.17
0
0
.17 0
.19
.40
.19 0
.35
0
.12
.36 0
.31
.15
.60
.25
1.04
.38
.37
.10
.12
.06
.09
.15
.04 0
0
.04
.07
.23
.57
0
.19
.11
.34
.86
.22
0
.45
.22
.12
.05
.01
0
.21
.09
.04
.38
.28
.04 0
0
.07
.08
.14
.18
.28
.15
.27
.42
.99
.89
.57
:67
.63
0
0
.74 0
.02
.02
.02
0
.01
.62
.66
.65
.15
.38
.30 0
0
.13
.07
.06
.44
.15
.65
.06
0
0
0
0
.08
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.03
.24 0
0
•0
0
0
0
.02
.01
0
.01 0
.21 0
0
0
0
0
.02 0
.01
.08

$9.17
.26
.36
.76
.43
1.03
.15
.35
.54
1.13
.68
.50
.21
.43
1.14
1.13
.07
.27
.14
.06
.06
.01
0
0
0
0
0
.04

$9.63 $13.03
.07
.10
.92
.58
1.26
1.33
.60
0
.10
1.13
.30
.23
.06
.08
.47
.25
.74
.25
.30
.25
0
.43
0
0
.22
1.72
1.22
2.09
1.75
4.17
.14
1.90
1.19
1.23
0
1.23
.20
0
0
.36
0
.05
0
0
.52
0
0
0
0
.06
0
0
.46
.01

$6.73
0
0
0
.50
.62
1.00
0
1.23
0
.44
1.00
0
.50
1.36
0
.08
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

See footnotes on p. 177.




Part I II• Tabular Summary
—

177

27.— C lothing purchases: Percentage 'purchasing, average number o f articles
purchased, and average expenditures, urban fam ilies and single consumers1
—Continued

T able

1 The data in this table relate to the persons in each class who were family members during the entire
survey period. The percentages reporting purchases of specific articles, and all averages, are based on such
persons, exclusive of the few who reported an unitemized total expense for clothing.
The following table shows the cases in which unitemized totals were reported:

•Period and sex-age group

1941 [12 m onths):
fen and boys, 16 years of age and over.
Boys 2 to 16 years of age................................
Women and girls, 16 years of age and over,
Girls 2 to 16 years of age................................
Children under 2 years of age..................... .
1942 (first 3 m onths):
Men and boys, 16 years of age and over—
Boys 2 to 16 years of age.............................. .
Women and girls, 16 years of age and over,

Income class

f $1,000-11,500.......
I $2,000-12,500.......
1 $3,000-$5,000.......
[$10,000 and o v e r ..
$1,000-11,500.......
fUnder $500...........
{ $2,000-$2,500.......
I $3,000-$5,000.......
$l,500-$2,000.......
$l,500-$2,000.......
f $l,500-$2,000.......
\ $3,000-$5,000.......
[$10,000 and o v e r ..
$3,000-$5,000.......
( $1,500-$2,000.......
I $2,000-$2,500.......
$2,500-$3,000.......
[ $5,000-$10,000....

Percent
reporting
unitemized
total

Average for
all persons
having clothing
expense

0.6
2.0

$58.31
76.21
111.30
241.29
31.51
20.74
91.24
148.85
35.31
14.23

1.2
4.0

1.8
1.2

.5

.8
1.3
3.1

1.0

.3
4.3
1.3
.5
.5
.5
.9

18.00
31.41
56.77
12.68
18.55
22.82
25.52
48.14

3 Includes garments bought for special sports and not com m only worn on other occasions, such as bathing
suits, baseball and football uniforms, hunting outfits, tennis shorts, golf knickers, and riding habits. Ex­
cludes any type of footwear.
3 Includes shoes for participation in games and sports, such as golf shoes with cleats, football and baseball
shoes, bathing shoes, etc.
4 Includes any clothing expenditures not elsewhere classified, such as for purchase or rental of masquerade
costumes, rental of evening clothes, rental o f coveralls or other uniforms, storage charges, insurance pre­
miums on clothing and jewelry, etc.
5 Less than 0.005 article.
8 Less than $0,005.
7 Includes snoods.
8 Includes capes.
8 Includes garments bought for special sports and not com m only worn on other occasions, such as bathing
suits, beach outfits, riding habits, breeches, jodhpurs, gym suits, skating costumes, tennis dresses, etc.
1 Includes all shoes for dress, street and sports wear, such as cleated golf shoes, gym shoes, bathing shoes,
0
and shoes for ballet or tap dancing, etc.
1 Includes belts, garters, garter belts, sanitary belts, dress shields, sanitary aprons, sunglasses, ear muffs,
1
collars, dickeys, scarfs, bathing caps, .veils, hair nets, hair ornaments (ribbons, barrettes, tuck-combs, etc.)
key cases, artificial flowers for personal wear, and any other accessories not elsewhere classified.
1 Includes baby buntings, capes, and other outdoor wraps.
3
1 Includes toddler suits worn b y little boys.
8
1 Includes overalls.
4
1 Includes mittens, muffs, garters, rayon and rubber pants, paper and rubber diapers, diaper-wash
8
services, and any other expenditures not elsewhere classified.




178

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 28.— A utomobile1

and other travel and transportation : Percentage
reporting expenditures and average amount spent, fam ilies and single urban consumers,
by annual m oney income d o ss

1941 (12 months)
Annual money income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage reporting expenditures

Automobile purchase2...............................
Autom obile operation...............................
Gasoline................................................
O il................................ .........................
Tires*....................................................
Tubes*...................................................
Repairs, replacement service4..........
Garage rent, parking..........................
Licenses and taxes..................... ........
Fines and damages.............................
Insurances............................................
T olls......................................................
Accessories...........................................
Other5....................................................
Other travel and transportation.............
Local:
Bus, trolley, train, ferry b oa t...
T a xi............... ........ .......................
Rent of automobile, including
shared expense5...................
Other travel:
R ailroad...................................
Inter urban bus.......................
Othei7.......................................
Purchase and upkeep:
M otorcycle...............................
B icyclef..'.................................
Boat, airplane, other vehicle.

8.2
11.2
11.2
11.2
2.0
4.1
5.1
1.0
9.2
0
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
56.1

6.9
20.2
20.2
18.6
8.0
5.3
14.9
2.7
19.1
.5
3.2
1.1
.5
2.1
72.3

14.4
42.2
42.2
40.6
21.1
11.7
25.6
8.9
40.6
4.4
11.7
4.4
3.9
1.1
83.3

17.2
51.5
51.0
46.0
24.7
11.1
36.4
11.1
50.0
4.0
19.7
8.6
5.1
5.1
76.3

27.3
72.7
72.7
70.5
26.8
15.8
50.3
17.5
70.5
3.3
37.7
12.6
10.4
3.8
79.8

32.4
69.6
69.6
68.2
27.7
18.9
46.6
23.6
68.2
4.7
40.5
21.6
5.4
5.4
89.2

34.9
81.9
81.3
81.3
36.1
24.1
63.3
33.1
79.5
13.3
55.4
28.3
16.9
7.2
86.7

33.3
88.1
88.1
83.3
38.1
23.8
73.8
40.5
85.7
14.3
76.2
38.1
19.0
21.4
97.6

52.9
94.1
94.1
88.2
35.3
23.5
82.4
64.7
94.1
23.5
88.2
35.3
11.8
23.5
94.1

41.8
6.1

59.0
8.5

72.8
11.1

63.1
13.6

68.9
18.6

83.1
17.6

77.1
22.9

88.1
26.2

76.5
52.9

5.1

8.0

8.9

11.1

8.2

6.1

10.8

7.1

0

15.3
8.2
1.0

8.0
8.0
2.1

15.6
12.8
2.2

14.6
8.1
3.0

15.3
8.7
1.6

18.9
10.1
1.4

28.9
8.4
4.2

28.6
4.8
7.1

47.1
17.6
11.8

0
0
0

0
1.6
0

0
3.3
1.1

0
4.0
0

0
9.8
1.1

0
12.2
0

0
10.8
1.8

0
21.4
4.8

0
23.5
11.8

Average exp<mdituri3 per farnily or fsingle consumer
A utomobile—Total.................................... $16.16 $30.62 $79.33 $116.65 $233.58 $267.51 $348.48 $495.13 $999.56
Autom obile purchase2........................
7.58 14.83 27.97 47.74 117.81 136.23 156.28 201.92 445.97
Automobile operation........................
8.58 15.79 51.36 68.91 115.77 131.28 192.20 293.21 553.59
Gasoline........................................
4.43 7.94 27.04 33.62 59.48 67.02 95.44 144.89 249.35
O il..................................................
.96
.68 3.47
3.32
5.99
9.72 13.15 15.19
6.78
Tires*.............................................
.31 1.24 5.33
6.16
7.13
6.76
9.00 17.20 24.64
Tubes*...........................................
.07
.34
.78
.73
.63
1.29
.84
.98
2.78
Repairs, replacement service4. ..
.79 2.40 4.71
9.73 16.44 14.39 23.13 34.74 94.06
Garage rent, parking..................
.22
.37 2.22
2.82
3.72
6.89 10.52 16.62 33.21
Licenses and taxes.......................
.83 2.06 4.04
8.60
5.67
9.14 11.62 13.80 19.62
Fines and damages......................
0
.62
.25
.55
.60
5.21 . 8.25
(9
)
6.87
Insurance......................................
.79 . .67 2.68
4.91 11.12 14.24 19.35 33.20 66.22
T olls...............................................
.01
.06
.25
.40
.58
3.21
2.46
2.24 33.10
Accessories....................................
.10
.03
.21
.49
1.40
1.60
5.77
2.38
6.46
Other5.............................................
.07 0
.01
.81
.13
.42
1.33
2.51
2.09
Other travel and transportation.............
7.79 16.07 28.96 32.04 36.09 63.99 64.02 137.63 335.50
Local......................................................
5.36 13.02 24.20 25.45 29.20 48.48 51.81 86.83 67.00
Bus, trolley, train, ferry b oa t...
4.29 11.32 22.08 19.90 24.93 40.58 43.82 61.64 55.69
T a xi................................................
.34
.83
.51
2.06
1.44
3.72 18.64 11.31
2.05
Rent of automobile, including
shared expense5........................
.73
.87 1.61
3.49
2.83
5.85
4.27
6.55
0
Other travel.........................................
2.43 3.00 4.46
6.44
5.27 13.59
9.82 37.28 51.03
R ailroad........................................
1.63 1.72 2.48
4.75
4.18
4.30
7.48 28.58 40.76
Inter urban bus............................
.75
.60 1.41
.96
.76
2.51
.57
.66
5.53
Other7............................................
.05
.73
.68
.57
.33
6.78
1.77
8.04
4.74
Purchase and upkeep........................
0
.30
.05
1.62
.15
1.92
2.39 13.52 217.47
M otorcycle....................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bicycle*.......................................... 0
.05
.21
.15
1.45
1.92
1.50
1.08
2.41
Boat, airplane, other vehicle_
_
0
0
.09
0
.17
0
1.31 12.02 215.06
1 Includes expenditures for automobiles used solely or partly for fam ily living. Expenditures for auto­
mobiles used entirely for business are excluded. In the case of automobiles used partly for business, the
fam ily was asked to estimate the proportion of automobile expense chargeable to business. This proportion
was used to allocate expenditures to fam ily and business use of car.
. 2 Net amount spent for purchase of automobiles. The net purohase price is derived b y deducting tradein allowance from the gross purchase price. The gross price covers the gross contract price, plus Federal
excise tax and sales tax, and includes financing charges other than insurance.




179

Part III.— Tabular Summary
T able 28.— A utomobile1

transportation :

Percentage
reporting expenditures and average amount spent, urban fam ilies and single consumers,
by annual m oney income class— Continued
and

other travel

and

1942 (first 3 months)
Annual money income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
and
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000
$2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over
Percentage reporting expenditures

Automobile purchase2......................................
Automobile operation......................................
Gasoline.......................................................
O il.................................................................
Tires8............................................................
Tubes8..........................................................
Repairs, replacement service4..................
Garage rent, parking................................
Licenses and taxes.....................................
Fines and damages....................................
Insurance....................................................
T olls.............................................................
Accessories...................................................
Other5...........................................................
Other travel and transportation...................
Local:
Bus, trolley, train, ferryboat...........
T a xi................................. .....................
Rent of automobile, including shared
expense6.............................................
Other travel:
R ailroad...............................................
. Interurban bus....................................
Other7....................................................
Purchase and upkeep:
M otorcycle...........................................
Bicycle8.................................... ...........
Boat, airplane, other vehicle............

0
12.9
11.9
6.9

0
37.6

.6
.6
61.0

0.6
35.0
35.0
28.8
2.3
.6
18.1
4.5
30.5
.6
5.6
2.3
2.3
1.1
75.7

31.7
4.0

55.2
4.1

66.1
10.7

1.0

0
2.0
3.0
10.9

0
1.0
0
1.0

0.6
18.0
18.0
12.8
3.5
0
7.6
2.3
16.9

0

2.9

0

0

2.6
71.2

1.0

17.2
4.7
2.1
2.6
77.6

3.6
68.6
67.1
61.4
7.1
1.4
34.3
24.3
60.7
1.4
25.0
6.4
5.0
2.9
80.0

2.3
73.6
72.2
67.1
5.1
.9
41.2
23.6
70.8
1.9
26.4
12.5
2.8
4.6
83.3

9.7
95.2
95.2
91.9
6.5
3.2
54.8
35.5
93.5
17.7
45.2
22.6
4.8
12.9
90.3

0
86.7
86.7
86.7
13.3
0
86.7
53.3
86.7
0
53.3
6.7
6.7
13.3
93.3

63.4
11.0

68.7
12.5

72.9
15.0

76.9
14.8

87.1
21.0

73.3
33.3

47.6
44.0
36.6
2.6
2.1
17.8
11.0
43.5
2.6
9.9
2.6

0.5
58.9
57.3
49.0
2.1

1.0

27.1
13.0
54.7

1.0

3.0

3.5

3.4

7.3

6.2

8.6

5.6

0

0

2.0
2.0

4.7
2.3
1.2

9.6
7.9
1.7

5.2
5.8

1.0

8.9
6.8
1.6

12.1
7.9
1.4

10.2
4.6
1.4

14.5
12.9
0

26.7
13.3
6.7

.6
2.9

0

0

0

0

0

1.6
4.8

0
0
0
0

0

2.3
0

2.6

0

6.2
0

7.1
0

8.3
.9

0

0

20.0
6.7

Average expenditure per fam ily or single consumer
Automobile—T otal........................................... $3.13 $7.70 $13.17 $19.60 $28.42 $46.51 $58.50 $121.21 $133.12
0
Automobile purchase2...............................
0
1.30 9.17 9.49 40.52
1.89 1.45 0
Autom obile operation...............................
3.13 5.81 11.72 19.60 27.12 37.34 49.01 80.69 133.12
Gasoline................................................
.68 1.94 4.73 7.14 10.85 15.51 18.92 50.53 51.68
.52
3.96
O il..........................................................
.86
2.90
.05
.25
.87 1.41 1.97
Tires8.....................................................
.54
.21
.83 1.00
1.47
.06
.45
.23
.91
0
Tubes8...................................................
0
0
.07
.06
.08
.07
.01
.03
.40
Repairs, replacement service4..........
9.60 20.74
.85 1.60 3.34 2.95 3.84 7.69
.22
Garage rent, parking.........................
.83 1.07 2.08 1.87
6.13
.43
.11
3.91
Licenses and taxes..............................
1.15 1.73 3.34 4.93 6.71 7.61 9.56 15.21 17.41
0
Fines and damages.............................
1.49
0
0
.15
.16
.11
.01
.15
Insurance........................................... .
.48
.87 1.59 4.03 4.80 6.67 12.89 26.70
.33
T olls......................................................
.02
1.89
3.33
0
0
.46
.65
.07
.06
.10
.34
Accessories...........................................
.30
.33
.03
.16
.03
.15
(9
)
Other5....................................................
1.60
.04
.96
0
0
.04
.27
.17
.01
Other travel and transportation....................
1.40 4.81 8.09 9.35 10.42 12.68 15.43 31.02 38.16
Local.............................................................
1.28 3.37 6.05 7.68 7.88 9.87 12.76 19.59 15.27
Bus, trolley, train, ferryboat...........
.69 3.05 5.28 6.29 6.44 8.44 11.25 19.01 12.54
2.73
T a xi.......................................................
.08
.30 *.29
.50
.57
.67
.58
.18
Rent of automobile, including shared
0
.84
.41
.24
.94
.86
0
.47 1.10
expense6............................................
.12 1.03 1.81 1.61 1.98 2.71 2.00
3.98 16.82
Other travel................................................
3.27 15.37
.11
.78
R ailroad...............................................
.95 1.07 1.23 1.81 1.52
.92
.2b
.40
Interurban bus....................................
.01
.62
.41
.83
.71
.53
Other7....................................................
.22
.53
0
.05
.24
.13
.07
.08
0
6.07
.10
.67
7.45
.41
.06
.56
Purchase and upkeep................................ 0
.23
0
0
0
6.53
0
0
.38 0
0
M otorcycle...........................................
.64
.92
4.07
.10
0
.23
.06
.56
.03
Bicycle8.................................................
2.00
0
0
.03
0
0
0
0
Boat, airplane, other vehicle............
0
5 Net amounts spent. Does not include trade-in allowances.
4 Includes expense for washing and lubricating car; battery service; antifreeze; new parts; repairs to motor,
body, tires, and tubes; fees for car inspection.
5 Includes amounts spent for automobile association dues and road maps.
6 Expenditures for rented automobile and for use of automobile owned b y others and shared b y family.
Includes expenditures for sole use of a car borrowed for less than one-fourth o f the report period.
7 Includes expense for interurban travel b y boat and airplane.
8 Purchase and operation expenditures for owned bicycles used m ainly for transportation. Expense for
bicycles used chiefly for recreation was entered as an expense for recreation.
9 Less than $0,005.




180

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

29.—A utomobile : Percentage owning, purchasing, driving specified mileagef
and reporting business usey urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual m oney
income class

T able

1941 (12 m onths)
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage of families owning autom obiles..
Percentage o f automobiles owned, b y year

12.2

20.7

42.2

51.5

72.7

69.6

81.3

88.1

94.1

N ot specified...............................................
1942................................................................
1941................................................................
1940................................................................
1939................................................................
1938................................................................
1937................................................................
1936................................................................
1935................................................................
1934 or earlier..............................................
Percentage of automobiles owned that were
purchased —
N ew...............................................................
Second hand...............................................
Percentage driving —
Mileage not specified.................................
Less than 1,000 m iles.................................
1,000 to 2,000 m iles.....................................
2,000 to 3,000 m iles.....................................
3,000 to 4,000 m iles.....................................
4,000 to 5,000 m iles.....................................
5,000 to 6,000 m iles.....................................
6,000 to 8,000 m iles.....................................
8,000 to 10,000 m iles...................................
10,000 miles and over.................................
Percentage reporting business use.................

0
0
16.7
0
0
0
8.3
0
0
75.0

0
0
5.1
7.7
0
5.1
7.7
5.1
15.4
53.9

1.3
0
1.3
2.6
10.5
7.9
17.1
17.1
5.3
36.9

0
1.0
8.0
6.0
8.0
7.0
22.0
16.0
5.0
27.0

2.3
0
13.5
14.3
11.3
11.3
14.3
18.0
5.3
9.7

1.9
2.9
18.5
5.8
20.4
8.7
12.6
11.7
7.8
9.7

0
3.7
28.9
14.1
14.8
5.2
17.0
6.7
1.5
8.1

5.4
0
27.1
21.6
10.8
16.2
5.4
5.4
0
8.1

0
6.2
43.8
43.8
0
0
0
6.2
0
0

25.0
75.0

28.2
71.8

22.4
77.6

30.3
69.7

43.8
56.2

43.6
56.4

61.9
38.1

65.7
34.3

87.5
12.5

16.7
16.7
25.0
8.3
8.3
0
0
8.3
0
16.7
9.1

15.0
15.0
7.5
15.0
17.5
5.0
12.5
2.5
2.5
7.5
15.0

3.9
9.1
9.1
11.7
11.7
9.1
9.1
10.4
2.6
23.3
17.1

11.8
2.0
5.9
9.8
11.8
8.8
8.8
13.7
9.8
17.6
11.5

3.0
3.0
3.8
4.5
4.5
8.3
15.0
11.3
12.0
34.6
13.5

7.8
2.9
5.9
2.0
9.8
3.9
9.8
12.7
10.8
34.4
15.5

2.2
0
4.4
4.4
5.9
3.7
8.1
.7
0
52.6
19.1

5.4
0
0
0
2.7
8.1
5.4
5.4
18.9
54.1
18.9

0
0
0
0
6.2
0
0
0
0
93.8
18.8

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage of families owning autom obiles..
Percentage o f automobiles owned, b y year
m odel!
N ot specified...............................................
1942................................................................
1941................................................................
1940................................................................
1939................................................................
1938................................................................
1937................................................................
1936................................................................
1935................................................................
1934 or earlier..............................................
Percentage of automobiles owned that were
purchased —
N ew ...............................................................
Second hand................................................
Percentage driving —
Mileage not specified.................................
Less than 250 miles...............................‘. ..
250 to 500 miles............................................
500 to 750 m iles............................................
750 to 1,000 m iles........................................
1,000 to 1,250 m iles.....................................
1,250 to 1,500 m iles.....................................
1,500 to 2,000 m iles.....................................
2,000 to 2,500 m iles.....................................
2,500 miles and over...................................
Percentage reporting business use.................




13.9

20.3

37.3

49.2

60.4

70.0

73.6

95.2

86.7

0
0
7.1
0
7.1
7.1
21.5
7.1
7.1
43.0

0
0
5.9
2.9
0
8.8
11.8
5.9
8.8
55.9

1.5
1.5
1.5
9.1
3.0
6.1
15.2
19.7
10.6
31.8

1.1
0
6.4
6.4
12.8
7.4
21.2
18.1
4.3
22.3

.9
2.6
13.8
8.6
12.9
8.6
15.5
21.6
3.4
12.1

2.0
1.0
18.4
14.3
14.3
4.1
17.3
10.2
5.1
13.3

.6
3.2
24.8
10.2
17.9
8.3
15.9
8.9
3.2
7.0

1.7
6.8
32.2
15.2
5.1
10.2
11.8
8.5
1.7
6.8

0
7.7
38.5
46.1
7.7
0
0
0
0
0

38.5
61.5

38.2
61.8

16.1
83.9

32.6
67.4

40.0
60.0

42.1
57.9

56.1
43.9

62.1
37.9

84.6
15.4

28.6
14.3
28.6
0
14.3
7.1 h
0
7.1
0
0
20.0

17.1
17.1
14.3
17.1
11.4
5.8
0
2.9
2.9
11.4
5.9

13.6
9.1
7.6
18.1
6.1
10.6
3.0
9.1
7.6
15.2
12.1

16.0
11.8
10.6
7.4
7.4
12.8
5.3
10.6
3.2
14.9
8.4

9.2
6.7
5.0
9.2
8.4
17.7
5.9
8.4
10.1
19.4
11.9

8.2
1.0
7.1
6.1
7.1
8.2
6.1
9.2
14.3
32.7
11.5

6.9
1.3
4.4
8.8
2.5
10.7
5.0
11.9
10.1
38.4
17.5

5.1
1.7
5.1
5.1
3.4
13.5
3.4
11.9
13.5
37.3
20.3

0
0
0
7.7
0
0
0
0
0
92.3
7.7

181

Part I II.— Tabular Summary
T able 30.— P ersonal

care : Percentage reporting expenditures and average amount
spent, urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual m oney incom e class

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
$500
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage reporting expenditure for per­
sonal care........................................................
Services1.......................................................
Toilet articles and preparations:
Toilet soaps..........................................
Tooth paste, powder, e tc..................
Shaving soap and cream...................
Cold cream, powder, nail polish,
perfum e.............................................
Brushes, combs, razors, files, etc—
Other2....................................................

96.9
61.2

98.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
79.3 97.2 98.5 98.9 99.3 98.8

100.0
97.6

100.0
100.0

77.6
40.8
26.5

83.0
70.7
41.0

88.9
84.4
58.3

93.9
90.4
69.7

97.3
95.1
74.3

94.6
91.9
77.0

97.0
95.2
84.9

100.0
97.6
83.3

94.1
88.2
82.4

35.7
31.6
20.4

52.7
52.1
28.2

65.0
66.1
36.1

76.3
76.8
51.0

88.5
73.2
44.3

89.2
76.4
52.7

89.8
87.3
53.6

95.2
81.0
54.8

76.5
88.2
64.7

Average expenditure for personal care: Total $8.48 $16.61 $27.94 $35.51 $43.83 $53.61 $74.10 $105.96 $181.30
Services1..............................................................
Toilet articles and preparations.....................
Toilet soaps.................................................
Tooth paste, powder, e tc .........................
Shaving soap and cream ...........................
Cold cream, powder, nail polish, per­
fum e..........................................................
Brushes, combs, razors, files, etc............
Other2 ..........................................................

$3.75 $8.20 $15.69 $19.11 $24.73 $32.10 $44.60 $ 66.40 $121.50
4.73 8.41 12.25 16.40 19.10 21.51 29.50 39.56 ' 59.80
1.62 2.60 3.61 4.85 5.54 5.78 6.66
7.54
7.49
.90 1.84 2.77 3.38 3.92 4.06 5.74
7.83 14.43
.23 ’ .73 1.02 1.42 1.58 1.99 2.62
3.80
4.98
8.05
3.70
2.73

11.12
6.31
2.96

22.86
5.31
4.73

94.1
56.4

97.7 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
72.7 93.2 97.4 99.0 97.9 98.6

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

75.2
40.6
22.8

84.3
58.7
32.6

83.6
79.7
46.3

91.6
77.0
55.0

95.3
88.0
62.5

92.9
88.6
65.0

97.2
93.1
70.8

96.8
88.7
75.8

93.3
86.7
73.3

30.7
26.7
15.8

38.4
32.6
20.3

54.8
52.5
35.6

60.2
56.0
34.6

66.7
55.7
43.7

76.4
55.0
47.9

76.4
60.6
44.4

80.6
64.5
61.3

86.7
93.3
53.3

.84
.56
.58

1.61
1.03
.60

2.40
1.57
.88

3.38
1.67
1.70

4.48
2.07
1.51

5.11
2.32
2.25

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting expenditure for per­
sonal care.........................................................
Services1.......................................................
Toilet articles and preparations:
Toilet soaps..........................................
Tooth paste, powder, e tc ..................
Shaving soap and cream...................
Cold cream, powder, nail polish, per­
fum e...................................................
Brushes, com bs, razors, files, etc—
Other2....................................................

Average expenditure for personal care: Total $2.41 $4.39 $7.49 $8.88 $11.13 $12.18 $17.06 $25.90 $52.76
Services1.............................................................. $1.23 $2.30 $4.04 $4.68 $6.46 $6.62 $10.29 $14.82 $31.72
Toilet articles and preparations.......... .........
1.18 2.09 3.45 4.20 4.67 5.56 6.77 11.08 21.04
.41
Toilet soaps.................................................
.68 1.00 1.16 1.30 1.41 1.60
2.73
2.38
.22
Tooth paste, powder, e tc.................. .......
.44
.93 1.00 1.40
1.61
.68
.88
4.27
.34
Shaving soap and cream ...........................
.07
.41
.51
.59
.17
.26
.85
1.12
Cold cream, powder, nail polish, perfume
.21
.42
.70
.99 1.02 1.37 1.67
2.85
8.92
.14
Brushes, combs, razors, files, etc............
.22
.51
.45
.50
.64
.73
1.88
2.84
.13
.30
.51
.63
.16
.38
1.51
1.16
Other2..........................................................
.78
1 Includes expenditures for services rendered at barber shops and beauty shops. Also includes turkish
baths, massage, and other treatments prim arily for personal appearance.
2 Includes cleansing tissues, powder puffs, compacts, hand and pocket toilet mirrors, curling irons, hair
dryers, hairpins, and sanitary supplies.




182

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

31.—M edical care : Percentage reporting expenditures and average amount
spent, urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual m oney income class

T able

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income of Item

$2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage reporting expenditure for
medical care...............................................
Physician, specialist, surgeon1...........
E ye care (excluding eyeglasses).........
Dental care (including X-ray b y dentist)......................................................
Other practitioner2...............................
Clinic care..............................................
H ospital care8........................................
Other X -ray examination and/or
treatment4...........................................
Private nurse.........................................
Visiting nurse........................................
Eyeglasses5 ............................................
Medicines and d ru gs*..........................
Medical appliances and supplies7.......
Prepayment for medical care8...........
Other medical care9 .............................
Health and accident insurance pre­
miums paid10....................................

78.6
33.7
3.1

83.0
38.3
4.3

96.7
50.6
6.7

98.5
72.2
9.1

96.7
67.2
16.4

98.0
64*9
20.3

98.8
78.2
21.1

100.0
76.2
28.6

100.0
88.2
47.1

17.3
2.0
5.1
2.0

20.2
3.2
3.7
8.0

45.0
4.4
5.0
9.4

49.0
6.0
4.5
20.7

58.5
10.9
2.2
20.8

62.8
8.1
2.7
17.6

60.8
16.9
4.8
19.3

71.4
26.2
7.1
14.3

76.5
23.5
0
23.5

2.0
0
1.0
14.3
62.2
5.1
3.1
0

1.6
.5
0
12.2
66.5
11.2
6.4
4.3

5.0
.6
0
20.0
79.4
17.2
10.0
1.1

8.1
1.5
1.0
25.8
82.8
23.2
15.2
5.0

8.2
.5
.5
33.3
84.7
26.8
24.6
1.1

8.1
.7
0
39.2
81.1
27.0
25.0
3.4

7.2
4.8
0
43.4
89.2
31.3
32.5
4.2

9.5
4.8
0
45.2
83.3
31.0
28.6
4.8

17.6
17.6
5.9
64.7
94.1
35.3
35.3
5.9

19.4

12.8

21.7

19.7

30.1

30.4

34.9

28.6

11.8

Average expenditure for medical care:
T otal........................................................... $25.12 $29.69 $57.91 $85.09 $110.17 $89.88 $153.07 $244.44 $381.70
Physician, specialist, surgeon1.................. $10.44 $8.09 $17.26 $26.83 $31.46 $23.42 $40.40 $87.29 $99.65
Eye care (excluding eyeglasses)................
6.50
2.59
2.09
9.00
.34
.31 1.72
5.04
.78
Dental care (including X-ray b y dentist). 1.75 2.86 9.96 12.97 15.73 19.83 28.34 45.70 143.65
Other practitioner2......................................
2.00
5.53 12.60 14.53
.63
.52 2.28
3.99
.35
Clinic care.....................................................
.94
2.37
0
.34
1.91
.27
.18
.39 2.85
Hospital care8...............................•
...............
8.83 18.03 12.17 14.76
.88 4.94 4.36 12.55 15.37
Other X -ray examination and/or treat­
.12
ment4..........................................................
1.69
1.64
.64 2.30
1.25
.18
1.55
7.06
2.51
.59
.17
4.35 19.03
Private nurse................................................
0
.03 1.11 1.22
Visiting nurse...............................................
0
0
0
.25 0
0
.08
4.24
.05
6.02
2.14 1.51 3.44 4.53
6.60
9.35 14.45 15.72
Eyeglasses5....................................................
4.53 6.44 11.74 11.02 14.24 10.86 22.32 35.62 31.44
Medicine and drugs6....................................
2.32
Medical appliances and supplies7.............
2.64
3.91
.23 1.21 1.10 1.65
1.08
1.18
7.09
.62 1.16 2.04
6.34
4.60
7.59
8.80
Prepayment for medical care8...................
.39
1.12
.59
Other medical care9.....................................
0
.84
.03 1.16
.17
1.31
7.35
Health and accident insurance premiums
6.32
7.83 11.39 10.30
2.56
paid10..........................................................
3.08 2.13 4.48 2.86

1942 (first 3 months)
’ercentage reporting expenditure for
medical care...............................................
Physician, specialist, surgeon1...........
Eye care (excluding eyeglasses).........
Dental care (including X -ray b y den­
tist) ......................................................
Other practitioner2...............................
Clinic ca re..............................................
Hospital care8........................................
Other X -ray examination and/or
treatment4 .........................................
Private nurse.........................................
Visiting nurse........................................
Eyeglasses5 ............................................
Medicines and drugs6 ..........................
Medical appliances and supplies.7 . . .
Prepayment for medical care8...........
Other medical care9 .................... .........
Health and accident insurance pre­
miums paid10....................................
See footnotes at end of table.




64.4
17.8
2.0

72.1
18.6
2.3

’ 84.7
31.1
2.8

90.6
47.1
4.7

91.7
49.0
5.2

92.9
50.7
7.9

92.6
44.9
4.6

95.2
58.1
11.3

93.3
73.3
6.7

5.9
1.0
2.0
2.0

8.1
1.2
4.1
1.7

18.6
4.5
4.0
6.8

28.3
2.1
3.1
3.7

23.4
6.2
2.1
4.7

30.0
7.1
2.1
7.1

31.9
6.0
2.8
6.5

41.9
11.3
1.6
4.8

66.7
0
0
6.7

1.0
0
0
5.0
51.5
3.0
4.0
1.0

1.2
.6
.6
4.7
62.2
4.7
4.1
.6

1.7
0
0
6.2
66.7
13.6
9.6
.6

2.1
.5
.5
13.6
72.8
11.5
16.8
1.0

4.7
.5
0
13.0
73.4
15.6
25.0
2.6

5.7
.7
0
10.7
76.4
18.6
24.3
2.1

1.9
2.3
0
14.8
74.5
20.4
27.3
.9

6.5
3.2
3.2
24.2
74.2
27.4
27.4
1.6

6.7
0
0
0
80.0
33.3
20.0
20.0

14.9

10.5

20.3

18.3

26.6

22.9

28.7

27.4

20.0

183

Part I I I .— Tabular Summary

31.—M edical care : Percentage reporting expenditures and average amount
spenty urban fam ilies and single consumersf by annual m oney income class

T able

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

Average expenditure for medical care:
T otal...........................................................

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 to
$2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

$7.01 $13.05 $15.71 $24.94 $25.08 $41.50 $39.11 $63.54 $86.31

Physician, specialist, surgeon1.................. $1.86 $2.85 $5.42 $8.17
E ye care (excluding eyeglasses)................
.42
.12
.03
.23
Dental care (including X -ray b y dentist)
.31 1.03 1.90 5.69
Other practitioner**
2
1......................................
.09
.13
.10
.37
Clinic care.....................................................
.02 1.25
.42
.09
Hospital care8...............................................
1.68 1.60 1.70 1.42
Other X -ray examination and/or treat­
ment4..........................................................
.87
.05
.08
.25
Private nurse................................................
0
.98 0
.73
Visiting nurse...............................................
0
.03 0
.03
Eyeglasses5....................................................
*
.27
.33
.46 1.98
Medicines and drugs8..................................
1.79 2.81 3.10 4.23
Medical appliances and supplies7.............
.01
.24
.14
.23
Prepayment for medical care8...................
.21
.13
.37
.79
Other m edical care9.....................................
.01
.01
.06
.08
Health and accident insurance premiums
paid10..........................................................
.50 1.47
.64
.93

$7.89 $11.29
2.14
.55
4.25
6.38
.72
1.50
.30
1.30
1.76
6.90

$9.76 $18.54 $22.67
.82
.41
.33
7.49 11.93 30.73
0
3.20
.79
0
.38
.35
5.22
5.39
5.13

.43
.15
0
1.70
3.98
.26
1.35
.23

1.44
.32
0
1.73
4.44
.44
1.23
.15

.19
2.16
0
2.32
5.00
1.33
1.68
.05

1.29
.56
.94
2.98
7.67
1.17
2.37
.32

1.20
0
0
0
8.11
3.51
2.08
10.43

1.51

2.24

2.36

5.98

2.12

1 Includes costs of medical care, prenatal and postnatal care, and delivery.
2 Includes expenditures for all nonmedical practitioners, such as chiropractors, osteopaths, naturopaths,
chiropodists, and midwives; also includes Christian Science and other faith healers.
• Includes expense for hospital room or bed, operating or delivery room, laboratory tests, medicines,
dressings, etc.
4 Includes on ly expense for X -ray or fluoroscopic examination not a part of a hospitalized illness.
5 Includes optometrist fees which cannot be separated from cost of eyeglasses.
• Includes cost of prescriptions. Excludes cod-liver oil and other vitamin and mineral preparations and
such foods as malted m ilk and other special dried m ilk products, which are included in table 21.
7 Includes expenditures for such items as bandages, syringes, trusses, crutches, wheel chairs, artificial
limbs, and repair o f artificial limbs.
8 Includes amounts spent b y the fam ily for group hospitalization and/or group medical care.
• Includes expenditures not properly belonging in any o f the above classifications.
10
Includes the annual paym ent for premiums on insurance which provides specified cash benefits in the
case o f accident and sickness alone.

Footnotes to T able 32 (p. 184)
1 Includes fees for attendance at lectures, plays, concerts, baseball and football games, dances, races, etc.
2 Includes athletic fees paid at school or college, which include fees for gymnasium, archery, or other
games; hunting licenses, rental fees for boats or riding horses, purchase price of boats and horses (bought
during survey period) used prim arily for recreation; and expenses connected with the upkeep and mainte­
nance of boats and horses used prim arily for recreation.
5 Gross price minus trade-in allowance.
4 Includes medical care and license fees.
5 Includes expense for bridge prizes, favors, and decorations other than flowers.
8 Includes membership in YM CA, lodges, and golf clubs.
7 Includes net gambling losses, losses at cards and betting, lottery tickets, expense for Christmas trees
and Christmas-tree ornaments, for hobbies (such as stamp collections), for sightseeing airplane or bus
rides, etc.
8 Less than $0,005.




184
T able

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

32.— R ecreation :

Percentage reporting expenditures and average amount spentf
urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual m oney income class

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
1500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage reporting expenditure for rec­
reation..........................................................

54.1

79.3

93.9

96.5

98.9

99.3

99.4

100.0

100.0

Paid admissions to m ovies..........................
Other paid admissions1.................................
Games and sports equipment2....................
Radio and radio phonograph purchase?...
Radio tubes, batteries, repairs....................
Phonographs...................................................
Musical instruments.....................................
Sheet music, phonograph records..............
Cameras, films, photo supplies..................
Children’s toys, play equipm ent...............
Pets (purchase and care)4.............................
Entertaining in and out of home5..............
Dues to social and recreational clubs6.......
Other7...............................................................

36.7
5.1
5.1
10.2
4.0
0
0
1.0
4.0
3.0
0
2.0
11.2
2.0

66.5
18.1
17.6
10.6
7.5
0
0
2.6
9.6
9.6
6.4
10.1
12.2
3.7

82.8
21.1
23.9
11.1
15.0
.6
4.4
6.7
16.7
21.7
15.6
15.0
22.8
6.1

91.4
36.4
39.4
16.7
17.2
.5
2.0
5.1
25.8
30.3
17.2
28.8
31.8
8.1

91.8
42.6
53.0
14.8
19.1
.5
2.2
8.7
31.7
26.8
18.6
27.9
42.1
12.6

96.6
47.3
51.4
14.9
23.0
2.0
3.4
17.6
37.8
29.1
21.6
30.4
37.2
12.8

97.6
63.3
61.4
24.7
20.5
1.8
4.2
21.1
44.6
17.5
33.7
49.4
53.6
13.3

95.2
73.8
71.4
16.7
26.2
2.4
7.1
26.2
54.8
28.6
33.3
47.6
61.9
16.7

100.0
82.4
88.2
17.6
41.2
0
11.8
.29.4
52.9
41.2
52.9
58.8
76.5
29.4

Average expenditure for recreation, to ta l. $20.68 $19.37 $34.53 $54.02 $78.23 $104.46 $154.84 $296.58 $603.32
Paid admission to m ovies............................
Other paid admissions1.................................
Games and sports equipment2....................
R adio and radio phonograph purchase5. ..
Radio, tubes, batteries, repairs..................
Phonographs...................................................
Musical instruments.....................................
Sheet music, phonograph records..............
Cameras, films, photo supplies...................
Children’s toys, play equipm ent...............
Pets (purchase and care)4.............................
Entertaining in and out of home5..............
Dues to social and recreational clubs*.......
Other7............................ .................................

$3.31 $7.15 $14.00 $20.68 $24.88 $36.71 $49.52 $57.02 $71.23
5.05 11.79 25.80 66.84
.33 1.34 2.23 3.36 5.60
3.54 1.67 3.04 5.26 9.73 12.53 25.39 42.56 131.43
1.61 2.48 3.06 5.71 6.36 10.80 11.78 13.99 20.76
1.12
4.59
2.55
.77
.57
1.51
.22
.55
.25
.39
.29
0
.43
.11
0
.05
0
.08
6.49
3.10 29.38 10.76
.84
.63 5.66
0
0
6.32 13.42
1.59
.59
2.74
.48
.14
.29
.15
2.40
6.00 18.49 39.50
.54 1.26 2.54
.28
.28
3.73
2.59 12.05 15.00
.41 1.47 3.22 3.07
.11
4.15
6.86 12.36 21.29
0
.63 1.91 1.64 3.16
.43
.85 3.55 6.83 7.65 11.14 21.51 39.89 99.10
4.89
.47
8.18 31.45 86.89
.88 1.52 2.70 4.37
4.43 22.51
3.47
3.44
10.23 3.29 1.45 1.63 3.74

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting expenditure for rec­
reation..........................................................
Paid admission to m ovies............................
Other paid admissions1.................................
Games and sports equipment2....................
Radio and radio phonograph purchase5. ..
Radio tubes, batteries, repairs....................
Phonographs...................................................
Musical instruments.....................................
Sheet music, phonograph records..............
Cameras, films, photo supplies..................
Children’s toys, play equipm ent...............
Pets (purchase and care)4.............................
Entertaining in and out of home5..............
Dues to social and recreational clubs6.......
Other7...............................................................

41.6

61.6

91.0

93.2

95.8

97.1

98.6

100.0

100.0

26.7
4.0

49.4
9.3
6.4
2.9
4.7

80.2
16.4
14.1
2.8
9.0
1.1
.6
5.1
7.3
10.7
9.0
10.7
15.3
4.0

83.2
20.8
26.7
2.1
8.9

87.0
18.2
29.2
3.1
12.5
.5

85.7
25.0
27.9
3.6
11.4
.7

96.8
56.5
50.0
8.1
9.7

100.0
66.7
86.7

3.7
12.6
12.6
16.8
15.2
20.9
2.1

6.2
17.2
13.0
16.1
23.4
28.1
4.2

8.6
13.6
12.9
16.4
25.0
31.4
3.6

92.6
32.9
33.3
6.9
11.6
.5
1.4
14.8
19.9
10.6
25.9
33.3
38.4
6.9

19.4
21.0
9.7
25.8
40.3
50.0
9.7

26.7
53.3
33.3
40.0
40.0
66.7
13.3

1.0

0
3.0

0
0
1.0
3.0

0

6.0
2.0
6.0

1.0

0
0

1.2
2.9
4.1
4.1
8.1
10.5
1.7

0
1.0

1.0

0

0
0

0

33.3

0
0

Average expenditure for recreation, tota l.. $1.19 $4.08 $8.72 $12.97 $17.32 $19.86 $37.06 $67.94 $128.08
Paid admissions to m ovies..........................
Other paid admissions1................................
Games and sports equipment2....................
Radio and radio phonograph purchase5. ..
Radio tubes, batteries, repairs....................
Phonographs...................................................
Musical instruments.....................................
Sheet music, phonograph records..............
Cameras, films, photo supplies..................
Children’s toys, play equipm ent...............
Pets (purchase and care)4.............................
Entertaining in and out of home5..............
Dues to social and recreational clubs6—
Other7...............................................................

See footnotes on preceding page.




$0.59 $1.84 $ 3.84 $5.35 $6.51
.74 1.23
.02
.20
.48
.49 1.97 1.89
.28
.01
.42
.58
.58 1.30
0
.50
.23
.27
.07
.17
.03
0
.09 0
0
.36
.13
0
0
(8
)
.14
.23
.11
.03
.05
.52
.30
.04
.03
.18
.34
.35
0
.03
.17
.92
.47
.31
.06
.27
.01
.34
.56 1.88 1.81
.50 1.37
.56
.08
.29
.20
.40
.01
.39 1.16

$8.20 $11.85 $15.08 $18.93
7.52 14.58
1.00
2.30
5.52
2.37
8.37 37.32
1.C3
0
3.57
5.35
.29
.45
1.37
.51
.02
0
0
.08
.04
0
0
0
1.74
2.07
.31
.48
.55
1.46
1.95
5.10
.64
.32
.27
1.82
3.52
.71
1.58
5.98
2.12
8.52 19.33
5.06
2.21
3.09 10.46 21.18
4.87
1.20
.40
.25

185

Part III.— Tabular Summary

33.—T obacco, reading , and education : Percentage reporting expenditures
and average amount spent, urban fam ilies and single consumersy by annual m oney
income class

T able

1941 (12 months)

Annual m oney income of —
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Item

Percentage reporting expenditure for —
T obacco........................................................
Cigarettes.............................................
Cigars

48.0
10.2
6.1

61.2
34.0
6.4

71.7
52.2
11.1

76.3
62.1
14.1

80.3
66.7
12.0

82.5
64.9
20.3

89.8
75.9
22.9

88.1
81.0
28.5

82.4
70.6
35.3

P ip e................................................
A ll other........................................
Smokers* supplies1.............................
Reading........................................................
Education....................................................

20.-4
18.4
5.1
52.0
9.2

22.3
11.7
5.9
75.5
21.3

23.3
6.7
6.1
90.6
23.3

22.2
5.6
7.6
97.0
27.3

21.3
3.8
7.1
97.8
37.7

23.6
6.1
10.1
98.0
43.9

25.9
1.2
15.7
99.4
47.0

35.7
4.8
11.9
100.0
61.9

5.9
0
0
100.0
64.7

Average expenditure for —
Tobacco: T otal...........................................
Cigarettes.............................................
P ip e................................................
A llo th e r ........................................
Smokers* supplies1.............................
Reading: T otal...........................................
Newspapers:
D a ily .............................................
Weekly...........................................
Magazines (subscriptions and single
copies)...............................................
Books (not school books)1.................
2*
B ook rentals and library fees8..........
Education: T otal.......................................
Tuition fees4........................................
Special lessons (tuition)5*
...................
Books, supplies and miscellaneous
expense..............................................

$7.13 $19.32 $31.46 $40.08 $47.79 $51.33 $71.06 $108.33 $90.99
2.60 14.25 25.41 33.44 41.56 42.28 58.96 85.73 52.43
.42 2.04 2.99 3.56 5.42 8.09 16.51 36.80
1.25
1.76
1.45
.07
4.31

2.98 3.17 2.48 2.12 2.54 3.45
.06
.72 1.02
.40
.85
1.47
.50
.12
.15
.20
.15
.24
8.04 12.56 19.17 21.36 25.54 31.45

5.59
.24
.26
51.35

1.76
0
0
82.13

3.51
.23

6.08
.37

9.72 12.37 14.35 16.06 18.40
.53 1.48 1.73 1.63 2.06

22.18
1.69

26.31
3.22

.57
0
0
2.56
2.04
0

1.27
.28
.04
3.69
1.41
.10

1.83
.35
.13
2.29
.31
.37

3.26 3.97 5.44 7.17
1.83
.78 2.01 2.98
.84
.23
.40
.53
6.04 15.57 17.88 33.36
3.04 9.28 9.74 17.29
.93 1.50 3.85 8.30

.52

2.18

1.61

2.07

4.79

4.29

7.77

23.93

24.24

13.13 33.44
10.63 18.28
3.72
.88
88.79 164.06
54.63 102.76
10.23 37.06

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage of reporting expenditure for —
T ob a cco.......................................................
Cigarettes.............................................
Cigars...................................................
Tobacco:
P ip e................................................
A ll other........................................
Smokers* supplies1.............................
Reading........................................................
Education....................................................
Average expenditure for —
Tobacco: T otal...........................................
Cigarettes.............................................
Cigars....................................................
Tobacco:
P ip e................................................
A ll other........................................
Smokers* supplies1.............................
Reading: T otal...........................................
D a ily ..............................................
Weekly...........................................
Magazines (subscriptions and single
copies)...............................................
B ooks (not school books)2.................
Book rentals and library fees8..........
Education: T otal.......................................
Tuition fees4........................................
Special lessons (tuition)5...................
Books, supplies, and miscellaneous
expense..............................................

49.5
13.9
4.0

57.0
27.3
5.2

71.8
55.4
7.9

73.3
57.1
11.5

80.2
65.1
16.7

78.6
63.6
16.4

86.6
75.0
16.2

91.9
83.9
32.3

86.7
66.7
33.3

21.8
15.8
1.0
48.5
8.9

20.9
10.5
5.2
74.4
18.6

21.5
9.6
5.6
87.0
18.6

20.4
4.7
7.3
97.4
15.2

20.8
6.2
3.1
97.4
26.0

20.0
3.6
5.7
95.7
33.6

22.2
2.3
5.1
99.5
41.7

27.4
1.6
9.7
100.0
50.0

20.0
0
6.7
93.3
80.0

$2.03 $4.39 $7.51 $9.93 $11.86 $11.11 $17.17 $24.43 $18.18
1.16 3.13 6.22 8.28 9.85 9.06 14.81 19.69 11.49
3.56
.66 1.18 1.42 1.42
5.11
.19
.23
.15
.42
.29
.01
1.36

.73
.30
.04
2.24

.71
.30
.05
3.33

.69
.25
.05
4.96

.52
.29
.02
5.35

.40
.16
.07
6.76

.80
.10
.04
7.16

1.01
.03
.14
12.94

1.41
0
.17
26.46

.97
.10

1.72
.04

2.44
.22

3.13
.32

3.53
.51

3.74
.46

4.41
.47

5.75
.57

6.86
.70

.27
.02
0 *
.21
0
.02

.43
.04
.01
1.02
.64
.02

.49
.15
.03
1.44
1.09
0

.87
.59
.05
1.87
1.03
.11

1.07
.12
.12
3.80
2.00
.76

1.45
.94
.17
5.52
2.98
1.07

1.71
.39
.18
8.11
3.85
1.78

4.35
2.03
.24
20.00
13.63
2.33

8.20
10.56
.14
50.48
31.43
10.30

.19

.36

.35

.73

1.04

1.47

2.48

4.04

8.75

1 Includes pipes, pipe cleaners, cigarette holders, tobacco pouches, humidors, cigarette lighters and cases,
cigarette paper, ash trays, etc.
2 Does not include expense for technical books used in connection with work or picture books for young
children.
* Includes postage paid on books borrowed from State or other libraries.
4 Includes fees charged for courses in special lessons which are part of the school program, such as labora­
tory fees charged b y high schools or colleges for courses m chemistry or other sciences.
* Includes fees for such lessons as music, language, dancing, public speaking, art, knitting, and swimming;
also tuition for religious instruction that is separate from church dues.




136
T

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

34.— P e r s o n a l t a x e s , g i f t s , c o m m u n i t y w e l f a r e , a n d r e l i g i o n : Percentage
reporting expenditures and average amount spent, urban families and single consumers,
by annual money income class

able

_________________________________ 1941 (12 months)__________________________________
Annual m oney income of —
Item

$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000 to
to
to
to
and
to
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage reporting expenditure for —
Personal taxes.............................................
78.6 100.0
9.2 16.5 27.8 28.3 44.3 46.6 64.5
Federal income taxes.........................
94.1
71.4
9.6 16.9 16.2 44.6
2.0
1.1 12.2
State income taxes..............................
47.1
0
2.1
23.8
2.8
6.1 18.0 14.2 27.1
Poll taxes..............................................
29.4
9.5
4.1
7.4 10.0 10.1 19.1 19.6 21.1
Personal property taxes on furnish70.6
ings, jewelry, e tc.............................
35.7
8.0
4.1
6.7 11.1 19.1 10.8 16.9
Gifts, com m unity welfare, religion........
67.3 81.9 95.0 99.0 98.9 99.3 100.0 100.0 100.0
Gifts1.....................................................
92.9 100.0
40.8 55.9 77.8 88.9 89.1 92.6 97.0
52.9
Contributions to support relatives1*
2.
38.1
5.1
8.5 12.2 13.6 20.2 23.6 27.7
19.0
35.3
Donations to other individuals.......
6.7 11.1 12.0 10.8 12.0
5.1
4.8
Com m unity chest and other welfare
88.2
agencies.............................................
69.0
4.1 16.5 37.2 47.0 56.3 64.9 74.1
88.2
Religious organizations and missions 43.9 55.9 63.9 70.7 69.4 78.4 80.1
81.0
88.2
R ed Cross, USO8.................................
69.0
13.3 31.9 57.8 65.2 74.3 81.8 81.9
Other, including foreign relief4........
3.2
38.1
58.8
4.4
8.6 14.8 12.8 16.9
2.0
Average expenditure for —
Personal taxes: T otal.......................... $0.35 $0.71 $3.46 $3.07 $11.28 $10.99 $28.36 $87.89 $767.98
Federal income taxes..........................
.01 2.66 1.50 6.08 6.71 21.05 70.04 690.25
.09
State income taxes..............................
5.40 46.60
.59 2.45 2.44 4.22
.13
0
.18
P oll taxes..............................................
1.07
.34
.90 1.28 1.26
.33
.14
.11
.38
Personal property taxes on furnishings, jewelry, e tc.............................
.56 1.83 12.12 30.06
.29
.64 1.85
.15
.38
Gifts, com m unity welfare, religion:
T otal.......................................................... 20.59 29.24 43.48 68.19 84.24 108.74 176.50 293.25 938.43
Gifts1.....................................................
8.11 11.98 17.86 28.07 28.82 35.02 60.06 124.69 371.67
Contributions to support relatives2. 4.63 7.77 9.26 16.88 26.31 34.01 51.65 78.63 118.24
Donations to other individuals.......
.86 1.61 2.22 3.99 14.41 17.76
2.33
.43 1.34
Com m unity chest and other welfare
agencies..............................................
.04
.37 1.18 1.68 2.99 3.77 9.66 11.77 80.21
Religious organizations and missions 5.05 8.03 12.63 18.76 21.62 30.08 45.99 52.67 216.43
Red Cross, USO8.................................
.22
6.50 55.62
.46 1.03 1.41 2.21 2.90 3.62
Other, including foreign relief4........
.74 1.53
.21
.68
4.58 78.50
.53
.20
.18

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting expenditure for —
95.2
Personal taxes.............................................
6.9
93.3
8.1 22.0 31.9 51.6 62.1 78.2
Federal income taxes..........................
2.0
4.1 15.8 26.2 44.8 55.0 74.1
93.5
93.3
State income taxes..............................
29.0
40.0
2.0
4.0
6.3 14.1 17.1 25.5
2.3
Poll taxes..............................................
1.2
8.9
7.1
6.0
8.1
2.0
4.5
4.7
6.7
Personal property taxes on furnish­
ings, jewelry, e tc.............................
5.0
3.0
2.9
4.6
14.5
33.3
2.8
4.7
7.8
Gifts, com m unity welfare, religion........
52.5 67.4 87.3 86.4 88.0 94.3 95.4 100.0 100.0
Gifts1.....................................................
10.9 20.3 36.7 43.5 49.5 56.4 62.0
75.8
86.7
Contributions to support relatives2.
22.6
20.0
3.0
7.6 16.4 13.6 15.6 18.6 24.5
Donations to other individuals.......
9.4 10.0
17.7
8.8
26.7
3.0
4.1
7.3
6.3
Com m unity chest and other welfare
5.2
agencies.............................................
1.0
9.0 19.4 18.7 17.9 35.2
35.5
46.7
Religious organizations and missions 39.6 48.3 61.6 59.7 60.9 67.9 74.5
71.0
73.3
8.9 21.5 36.7 48.7 47.4 52.9 51.4
64.5
73.3
R ed Cross, USO8.................................
Other, including foreign relief4........
6.2
27.4
40.0
1.0
3.4
8.9
8.6
6.0
4.1
Average expenditure for —
Personal taxes: Total................................. $0.88 $0.52 $2.44 $3.67 $9.70 $12.61 $24.20 $83.07 $325.49
.24 1.91 2.90 6.93 9.07 19.65 71.30 280.32
Federal income taxes 5 *
.......................
.33
.42 1.65 2.95 3.93 10.06 41.35
.21
State income taxes..............................
.28
.08
.62
.12
.13
P oll taxes................. '............................
.19
.34
.24
.03
.03
.35
Personal property taxes on furnish­
ings, jewelry, e tc.............................
1.09
.13
.16
.35
.27
3.69
.31
.17
.78
Gifts, com m unity welfare, religion........
1.88 6.13 11.98 13.18 18.17 25.80 37.61 53.52 230.49
.99 2.87 3.24 3.38 6.36 8.21 16.54 42.91
G ifts1.....................................................
.47
Contributions to support relatives2.
.10 2?!28 4.09 4.28 7.04 10.58 13.48 11.76 10.30
.02
Donations to other individuals.......
.40
.59
1.23 63.13
.20
.15
.38 1.04
Com m unity chest and other welfare
.62 2.00
.09
.38
3.13
8.08
agencies.............................................
0
.18
.51
Religious organizations and missions 1.14 2.00 3.83 3.85 5.42 6.28 10.67 15.08 66.12
.49 1.01 1.25 1.45 2.05
4.59 18.40
R ed Cross, USO8.................................
.11
.51
.12
Other, including foreign relief4........
1.19 21.55
.04
.06
.14
.13
.16
.11
1 Includes expense for gifts to friends and relatives, not members of the economic fam ily or household
employees.
2 Includes contributions made generally with some regularity for living expenses of relatives not members
of the economic fam ily.
8 Includes contributions to agencies arising out of the war.
?
4 Includes contributions such as scholarship, memorial, or alumni funds. Also includes contributions to
foreign welfare agencies such as Bundles for Britain, Russian War Relief Society, etc.
5 Includes on ly one-fourth of payments due in 1942 on income received in 1941. Amounts paid in excess
of one-fourth were entered as increase in assets.




187

Part 111.— Tabular Summary
T able 35.— N et

change in assets and l i a b i l i t i e s : Percentage reporting and average
amount, urban families and single consumers, by annual money income class

1941 (12 months)
Annual m oney income of —
Item

A s sets
Net change in assets:
Increase................
M oney:
In savings accounts:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
In checking account:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
On hand:1
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Investments:
In business:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Building and loan association
shares:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Owned home:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Other real estate:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
U. S. Government bonds and
stamps:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Tax savings notes: Purchased..
Other bonds and stocks:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Other personal property: Sold.
Improvements:
On owned home2..................
On other real estate8............
Insurance policies:4
Premium paid:
Weekly.............................
Other...............................
Surrendered...........................
Settled5...................................
Loans made b y fam ily:8
Secured b y mortgage:
Balance owing to fa m ily...
Repayments made to family
Other:2
Balance owing to fa m ily...
Repayments made to
fa m ily............... ..........
Other:
Social security tax: Paid8..
Unemployment insurance tax:
P aid .................................
Other:*
Net increase......... ..........
Net decrease...................

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
Under
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500
$3,000 $5,000

$5,000
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

Percentage reporting net change in assets
51.0
26.5

72.9
19.7

92.8
34.4

97.0
29.8

97.8
30.6

98.6
36.5

99.4
35.5

100.0
23.8

100.0
52.9

4.1
13.3

4.8
8.0

5.6
14.4

14.1
16.7

20.8
17.5

20.3
25.0

27.7
13.9

31.0
16.7

29.4
23.5

0
5.1

2.1
2.1

2.8
2.2

3.5
1.5

3.3
2.2

3.4
2.7

9.6
6.0

21.4
4.8

35.3
17.6

13.3
2.0

10.6
5.9

11.1
5.6

6.6
4.0

11.5
5.5

6.1
4.1

5.4
6.6

9.5
7.1

0
17.6

0
1.0

.5
.5

3.9
0

1.5
1.0

7.1
0

6.8
2.0

10.8
1.2

21.4
0

17.6
0

.5

.5
.5

2.0
.7

1.8
.6

4.8
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0

2.0
0

1.6
0

3.3
0

3.5
.5

2.2
0

4.1
0

5.4
0

4.8
2.4

5.9
0

0
1.0

.5
2.7

1.1
1.1

1.0
1.5

2.2
1.6

4.1
.7

3.6
2.4

4.8
2.4

0
0

0
0
0

6.4
0
0

15.0
0
0

17.7
0
0

21.3
0
0

23.0
0
0

35.5
.6
.6

28.6
0
0

41.2
Q
5.9

0
0
3.1

1.1
0
1.6

1.1
1.1
7.2

.5
0
3.0

.5
0
3.3

.7
.7
3.4

3.6
1.2
4.8

4.8
0
0

17.6
11.8
0

3.1
1.0

4.3
2.1

3.3
1.1

1.5
2.5

8.2
2.7

6.1
4.7

8.4
3.0

7.1
4.8

17.6
11.8

18.4
18.4
2.0
1.0

32.4
16.0
.5
0

42.2
45.0
1.1
2.2

43.4
65.2
4.0
1.0

48.6
63.9
1.6
2.2

50.7
71.6
1.4
0

53.6
71.7
2.4
2.4

31.0
83.3
0
0

11.8
76.5
0
0

0
0

0

1.1
1.7

.5
0

.5
1.1

0
0

0
0

0
0

1.0

0

5.9

.6

.5

0

.6
.6

2.2

3.0

0

2.0

1.8

2.4

3.1

.5

1.1

2.0

1.6

1.4

2.4

0

5.9

7.1

35.6

58.9

65.7

64.5

70.9

66.9

69.0

29.4

0

2.7

5.0

6.6

7.7

13.5

11.4

9.5

0

1.0
0

2.1
.5

2.2
.6

2.5
2.0

5.5
.5

3.4
0

3.6
0

0
0

0
0

Average amount o f net change in assets
Net change in assets:
Increase................................
Decrease...............................
Money:
In savings accounts:
Net increase..................
Net decrease.................
In checking account:
Net increase..................
Net decrease.................
On hand:1
Net increase..................
Net decrease.................
See footnotes at end of table.




$55.55 $50.11 $160.66 $290.71 $328.38 $462.31 $779.61 $1,407.00 $5,410.84
148.30
890.47
160.29 58.20 111.37 120.34 180.75 226.64 319.82
$14.14 $8.51 $16.19 $22.31 $39.85 $45.54 $78.61
90.28 20.87 36.72 67.72 92.72 132.46 86.00

$130.12
96.30

$60.42
311.25

3.06
4.29

4.17
13.11

8.35
.87

3.96
7.38

9.65
4.73

29.12
14.17

164.86
• 2.00

1,243.79
211.02

10.19 4.62
1.28 14.95

6.95
13.13

14.97
3.31

8.26
14.75

6.19
2.67

5.84
15.08

23.69
13.69

0
64.12

0
18.64

188

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

35.—N et change in assets and liabilities : Percentage reporting and average
amount, urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual m oney income class—Continued

T able

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual money income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000
$1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000

$5,000
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

Average amount of net change in assets—Con.
A s s e ts
Investments:
In business:
0
$0.15 $8.96 $4.61 $25.80 $23.72 $82.21 $148.19 $1,326.47
Net increase.........................
0
0
49.49 41.69
3.48
0
0
Net decrease........................ $5.83 1.99
Building and loan association
shares:
0
0
0
.85
2.11
.04
2.89
32.95
0
Purchased............................
0
0
8.33
0
4.10
5.41 62.65
0
0
Sold.......................................
Owned home:
9.54 2.28 42.86 97.09 74.04 118.92 248.70
339.29
670.59
Purchased............................
0
0
23.74
0
0
0
0
0
17.26
Sold.......................................
Other real estate:
.05
9.72
0
5.18
3.43 69.98 38.69
59.52
0
Purchased............................
9.57 25.96
8.73 44.76
19.05
0
S old ....................................... 27.04 8.40 14.17
U. S. Government bonds and
stamps:
0
7.67 14.47 47.52 22.53 22.25 58.80
121.42
420.07
Purchased............................
0
0
0
0
0
0
24.10
0
0
Sold.......................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
.60
0
29.41
Tax savings notes: Purchased..
Other bonds and stocks:
1.12
0
2.22
2.27
.85
9.29
.37
33.33
597.35
Purchased............................
0
0
0
0
4.86
3.04
5.12
0
68.79
Sold.......................................
4.32
.75
.45 10.92
3.91
8.75
3.07
0
0
Other personal property: Sold.
Im provem ents:
1.42 26.99 17.40 28.84
4.26 3.07
2.36
9.52
143.27
On owned home2..................
.72
.16 1.06
9.51
6.72 16.34 14.13
2.93
4.00
On other real estate8............
Insurance policies:4
Premium paid:
4.10 8.81 20.08 22.31 30.21 37.05 53.75
44.66
13.65
Weekly.............................
5.90 6.47 20.74 39.08 62.59 69.31 93.63
261.23
887.11
Other...............................
.35
2.66
3.04
3.48
1.55
0
5.61 12.34
0
Surrendered...........................
2.49
2.03 17.25
5.61 0
0
7.93
0
0
Settled5...................................
Loans made b y fam ily:8
Secured b y mortgage:
0
0
2.33
.59
0
5.46
3.25
0
0
Balance owing to fa m ily...
Repayments made to
0
5.27
0
3.26
.90
0
1.45
0
0
fam ily................................
Other:7
1.29
1.89
0
.81 0
2.47
4.07
4.76
1.76
Balance owing to fa m ily...
Repayments made to
8.20 1.60
1.29
.59
7.70
3.45
0
6.57
235.29
fa m ily...............................
Other:
.19 2.39
6.54 10.16 13.53 16.95 20.94
28.52
12.95
Social security tax: Paid8.........
Unemployment insurance tax:.
.20
.52
0
1.85
3.21
2.01
1.66
2.68
0
P a id .................................
Other:9
.65
.54
.75
.90
6.26
2.94
3.04
0
0
Net increase....................
0
.03
.31
0
0
1.38
1.31
0
0
Net decrease...................
L ia b ilitie s
Net change in liabilities:
Increase........................................
Decrease......................................
Mortgages:
On owned hom e:1
0
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Other real estate:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Debts due to —
Banks, insurance companies:1
1
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Small-loan companies:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Credit unions:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Individuals:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
See footnotes at end of table.




Percentage reporting net change in liabilities
22.4
12.2

37.8
21.3

1.0
3.1

51.1
31.7 1

52.5
40.4

59.0
53.6

57.4
53.4

49.4
55.4

47.6
35.7

41.2
52.9

0.5
6.9

2.2
10.6

3.0
10.1

2.2
21.3

5.4
27.0

4.8
25.9

2.4
16.7

11.8
35.3

0
0

0
1.6

.6
1.7

.5
2.0

.5
7.1

2.7
6.1

0
6.6

0
4.8

0
11.8

1.0
0

2.1
1.1

4.4
2.2

3.5
2.5

6.6
6.0

5.4
5.4

10.8
7.8

7.1
4.8

5.9
5.9

0
0

1.1
0

7.8
1.7

5.1
5.1

4.4
3.3

2.1
6.1

1.2
4.8

4.8
0

0
0

0
0

.5

1.1
.6

1.5
1.5

3.3
1.6

.7

0

0

1.2
.6

0
0

0
0

6.1
1.0

5.9
3.7

5.0
2.2

4.5
1.0

5.5
4.4

5.4
5.4

7.2
3.6

7.1
7.1

5.9
5.9

189

Part III.— Tabular Summary
T able 35.— N et

change in assets and liabilities : Percentage reporting and average
amount, urban fam ilies and single consu m es, by annual m oney income class—Continued

1941 (12 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income o f Item

L ia b ilitie s — Con.
Bills due:
R ent:
Unpaid in survey period1
5
Back rent paid15................
Taxes:
Unpaid in survey period14.
Back taxes paid15—
Charge accounts:
Net increase..............
Net decrease..............
Other:1
5
Net increase..............
Net decrease..............
Installment purchases:
A utom obile:1
7

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
Under $500
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
$5,000

$5,000
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

Percentage reporting net change in liabilities—Con.

1.0
0

3.2
.5

2.8
.6

0.5
.5

0.5

0

0.7
.7

0

0.6

0
2.4

0

4.1
0

2.1
1.1

2.8
3.3

3.5
2.5

2.2
1.1

4.7
1.4

3.0
1.8

4.8
2.4

0

1.0

14.4

0

10.1
2.0

10.9
2.7

8.1
3.4

14.5
3.6

7.1

2.0

5.9
0

5.9
5.9

7.1

1.0

11.2
1.1

13.9
3.3

14.1
2.5

16.9
3.3

10.8
4.7

8.4
3.0

9.5
4.8

11.8
5.9

survey p eriod.........
Back p a ym en ts.. . —
Furniture and household
equipment:

2.0
0

3.2
1.1

7.8
5.0

8.6
7.1

15.8
13.7

19.6
7.4

17.5
13.3

14.3
14.3

17.6
17.6

survey period.
Back paym ents.
Other:1
8

3.1
3.1

13.8
5.3

19.4
12.8

25.3
18.7

24.6
15.3

25.7
6.8

15.7
14.5

11.9
2.4

17.6
5.9

survey period.
Back paym ents.
A ll other:19
Net increase...............
Net decrease.............

3.1
2.0

5.3
2.7

6.1
1.7

6.6
5.6

7.1
2.7

12.2
8.1

4.8
6.0

2.4

1.0
0

1.1
0

1.7
.6

.5
.5

4.4
1.1

1.4
1.4

.6

4.8
0

0
5.9

0

0

0

0
11.8

0
5.9

Average amount o f net change in liabilities
Net change in liabilities:
Increase........................
Decrease......................

$30.59 $42.21 $107.23 $176.71 $218.58 $288.13 $366.11
5.17 21.31 39.42 65.29 155.76 156.34 244.93

Mortgages:
On owned hom e:10
$5.83 $0.81 $21.68 $60.16 $60.73 $97.32 $177.73
Net increase..............
1.48 6.65 11.82 18.66 71.73 65.14 103.05
Net decrease.............
Other real estate:
0
6.90
.63 41.60
0
8.36
0
Net increase..............
2.79
1.21
9.05 10.11 36.51
0
1.27
Net decrease..............
Debts due to —
Banks, insurance com panies:1
1
9.21 29.87
5.55 22.68 12.16
3.47 3.06
Net increase..............
9.49 14.23 24.23
1.87
0
2.37
.91
Net decrease.............
Small-loan companies:
4.54
.33 15.89 11.98
2.28
0
6.81
Net increase...............
3.03
7.02
.99
0
8.14 10.78
0
Net decrease..............
Credit unions:
4.99
.20
2.19
0
.23
.68
.78
Net increase..............
.80
.93
1.90
0
0
0
1.81
Net decrease..............
Individuals:
14.21 10.46
3.69
5.18 11.85 10.61 35.56
Net increase...............
.35 3.93
9.57
2.14
1.27
6.61 13.31
Net decrease..............
Bills due:
R ent:
.14
.40
1.64
.04
.60
.11
Unpaid in survey period12.
.68
.30
0
.43
0
.14
0
.17
Back rent paid18................
Taxes:
1.82
1.95
1.42
2.85
.53
.41 1.27
Unpaid in survey period1
4
.20
1.23
1.19
.14
0
.35
1.53
Back taxes paid15..............
Charge accounts:
9.92
5.11
.31 2.31
7.77
6.71
6.57
Net increase..................... .
1.69
1.00
4.63
0
.87
1.14 0
Net decrease.......................
Other:16......................................
5.63
2.21 6.11 11.84 14.05 13.74 15.30
Net increase.......................
1.54
3.83
5.57
.10 1.05
1.84
2.06
Net decrease......................
Installment purchases:
Autom obile:1
7
Balance due on purchase in
2.31 6.94 13.55 22.59 '57.69 55.15 62.50
survey p eriod........
0
.71
8.28 12.77 30.90 20.06 26.25
Back paym ents........
See footnotes at end of table.




$352.96 $$950.79
179.45
616.20

$117.95
49.07

$586.58
394.87

0
8.73

0
36.21

37.57
18.63

17.65
17.65

27.74
0

0
0
60.12
39.33

0
2.86

0
0
0
0
156.54
23.53

0
0

7.52
3.36

0

9.34

1.18
8.40

0

9.37

9.74
16.05

90.29
5.88

55.57
37.13

63.39
83.74

190

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T a b l e 35.— N e t c h a n g e i n a s s e t s a n d l i a b i l i t i e s : Percentage reporting and average
amount, urban families and single consumers t by annual money income class— Continued

1941 (12 months)— Continued
Item

Annual money income of —
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000

$5,000
to
$10,000

L ia b ilitie s — Con.
Average amount of net change in liabilities—Con.
Installment purchases—Con.
Furniture and household
equipment:
Balance due on purchase in
$13.12
survey period.................. $0.34 $7.96 $15.64 $20.64 $26.06 $30.92 $28.34
1.70 3.02
7.44 16.17 14.13
9.81 19.37
4.29
Back paym ents...................
Other:1
8
Balance due on purchase in
3.25
9.69 12.30
1.41 1.84
2.16
4.69
2.43
survey period..................
.40 1.59
1.65
3.09
1.42
4.84
0
4.87
Back paym ents...................
All other:1
9
.21
.45
.16
7.09
1.60
.03
2.38
11.86
Net increase................................
0
58
.68
0
0
.38
1.96
Net decrease................................ 0

$10,000
and
over

$35.16
2.82
0
24.32
0
9.41

1942 (first 3 months)
^ ss e t*
Net change in assets:
Increase.......................................
Decrease......................................
Money:
In savings accounts:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
In checking account:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
On hand:1
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Investments:
In business:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease............. . . . . . .
Building and loan association
shares:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Owned home:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Other real estate:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
U. S. Government bonds and
stamps:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Tax savings notes: Purchased..
Other bonds and stocks:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Other personal property: Sold.
Im provem ents:
On owned home2........................
On other real estate8..................
Insurance policies:4
Premium paid:
Weekly..................................
Other.....................................
Surrendered................................
Settled5........................................
Loans made b y fam ily:6
Secured b y mortgage:
Balance owing to fa m ily ...
Repayments made to
fa m ily ..........................
Other:7
Balance owing to fa m ily ...
Repayments made to
fa m ily ..........................
Other:
Social security tax: Paid8----Unemployment insurance tax:
Other:9
Net increase....................
Net decrease...................
See footnotes at end of table.




Percentage reporting net change in assets
58.4
38.6

69.2
29.1

2.3
34.5

95.3
21.5

96.4
31.2

97.1
25.0

99.5
30.6

100.0
33.9

100.0
53.3

3.0
16.8

3.5
14.0

5.6*
17.5

8.4
8.4

14.6
14.6

16.4
12.9

19.9
16.2

21.0
17.7

33.3
20.0

0
4.0

1.2
1.7

2.3
2.8

3.7
2.6

2.6
5.2

2.1
4.3

2.8
6.0

6.5
12.9

6.7
20.0

15.8
16.8

8.7
7.6

13.6
9.0

n .o
6.3

10.4
6.8

13.6
5.7

13.4
6.5

14.5
6.5

6.7
6.7

.6

1.0

1.0
1.0

.7
1.4

3.2
.9

' 3.2
0

6.7
0

.5

2.1
0

0

1.6
0

0

0

0
0

1.4
.5

1.6
0

0
6.7

0
0

0

0

0
0

0
0

0
.6

0

0
0

1.7
1.2

2.3
.6

0

0
0

.6
1.7

0
0

0
0

0
0

1.4
.7

1.9
0

3.2
1.6

19.2
0
0

37.3
.6
0

49.2
.5
0

55.7
0
0

69.3
0
0

67.1
.5
0

83.9
0

0

1.1
.6
2.3

.5
0
3.1

1.0

0
2.1

0

3.2

0
4.7

0

3.2
0
3.2

6.7
13.3

1.9

1.0

1.2
.6

0
0

0

1.6
1.6

4.3
1.4

3.7
1.9

4.8
4.8

6.7
6.7

24.8
16.8

26.7
16.9
0
.6

36.2
39.0
1.1
.6

41.9
44.0
.5

37.5
59.9

45.0
55.7
.7
.7

50.5
63.9
.5

• 37.1
69.4
0
0

6.7
60.0
0
0

8.9
0
0
0
0

1.0
0

1.0

2.0
0

.6

0

.5

0

0
.5

0

0

1.0
0

.7
.7

0

0

0

0

0
0
0
73.3

0
0

0

.6

0

0

0

.5

0

6.7

1.0

.6

.6

1.0

1.6

0

.5

0

0

0

.6

1.7

1.0

1.6

2.1

1.9

3.2

0

3.0

1.7

.6

1.0

1.6

2.9

1.4

1.6

10.9

29.7

63.8

65.4

64.1

60.7

69.0

75.8

1.0

2.3

0

3.0

2.9
.6

1.0

1.6
.6

0

0
26.7

10.9

6.4

14.4

16.1

0

15.7
0

28.6
o

37.9
.7

48.1

58.1

33.3

0

0

0

191

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T able 35.— N et change in assets and liabilities : Percentage reporting and average
amount, urban fam ilies and single consumers} by annual m oney income class—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

Under $500 $1,000
to
to
$500
$1,000 $1,500

$1,500
to
$2,000

$2,000 $2,500 $3,000
to
to
to
$2,500 $3,000 $5,000

$5,000
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

Average amount of net change in assets
A s s e t s — Con.
Net change in assets:
Increase....................................... $29.02 $55.64 $71.65 $62.94 $112.39 $129.74 $311.77 $720.76 $2,595.21
Decrease...................................... 68.46 60.07 67.99 50.52 54.93 98.77 122.52
292.89
995.37
Money:
In savings accounts:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
In checking account:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
On hand:1
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Investments:
In business:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Building and loan association
shares:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Owned home:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Other real estate:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
U. S. Governm ent bonds and
stamps:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Tax savings notes: Purchased..
Other bonds and stocks:
Purchased............................
Sold.......................................
Other personal property: Sold.
Improvements:
On owned home2........................
On other real estate8..................
Insurance policies:4
Premium paid:
W eekly..................................
Other....................................
Surrendered................................
Settled5........................................
Loans made b y fam ily:6
Secured b y mortgage:
Balance owing to fa m ily ...
Repayments made to
fa m ily ...............................
Other:7
Balance owing to fa m ily ...
Repayments made to
fa m ily................................
Other:
Social security tax: Paid8.........
Unemployment insurance tax:

$4.75 $5.84
23.52 32.37

$4.91
37.53

$4.62
34.79

$8.46 $11.56 $18.87
24.32 31.69 57.95

$48.95
214.46

$241.23
76.67

2.07
13.27

2.86
7.10

2.11
5.89

3.82
12.18

7.43
10.49

26.63
46.99

14.06
646.73

5.46
6.37

4.89
14.68

7.99
30.55

19.00
9.38

21.61
9.79

2.00
1.33

.14

1.60
.26

2.73
2.86

2.12
11.43

69.58
7.41

4.19
0

400.00
0

.11

1.02
2.35

12.12 . 3.06
3.07
4.17
4.34
6.62

0
8.73

0
0

0

0

1.55
0

0
0

10.90
4.24

.52
0

0
0

0
0

34.49
16.20

75.81
0

0
0

*

0
0

5.71
.46

24.38
0

227.37
8.75

300.00
0

28.31 ‘ 22.80
0
.49
0
0

45.88
0
0

42.38
10.42
0

121.92
0
0

881.40
0
0

.14
0
5.27

0
2.74
1.18

3.76
0
2.97

8.34
0
8.87

49.17
270.64
0

0
0

0

0

0
0

0
0

0

.37

0
0

10.47
7.56

0
0

8.72
1.54

0
0

0
0

16.45 18.32
0
0
0
0

22.39
.03
0

.34

.23

L ia b ilitie s
Net change in liabilities:
Increase........................................
Decrease......................................
Mortgages:
On owned hom e:1
0
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Other real estate:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
See footnotes at end of table.




.09
11.30
1.37

.45
0

2.40
.87

1.18
0

0
0

9.85
25.03

7.42
7.14

4.15
15.15

5.44
6.15

18.80
66.67

1.51
2.01
1.07
7.97

2.03
1.56
G
.58

3.74
5.64
1.89
.56

5.78
7.28
.15
0

5.03
14.97
.19
0

8.76
10.90
.95
.30

11.63
25.89
.81
0

13.33
53.73
0

1.33
72.76

0

0

.08

0

1.56

.11

1.83

.34

.17

1.26

.07

1.29

13.16

.71

.06

.73

.18

.49

1.85

2.87

.01
Other:2
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................

0
0
6.20

.04

.20

1.59
.03

.48

0
0
.66

.05
0

.10

2.81

0

.03
0
2.83

0
0

0

0
0

316.67

0

0

.02

0

0

.46

0

0

.37

.69

10.73

1.38

6.86

6.43

4.03

0
0

3.18

3.79

5.48

9.85

2.96

.06

1.59

.31

1.03

4.76

0

3.28
0

10.09
0

13.43
.43

27.84

80.40
0

228.16

0

0

Percentage reporting net change in liabilities
16.8
19.8

27.9
29.7

0
5.0

7.6

0
2.0

0.2
47.5

1.2

0

.6
.6

0

5.6

1.1

34.0
51.3

41.1
62.5

40.7
59.3

41.7
64.4

33.9
58.1

26.7
60.0

0
14.7

1.0
18.2

22.1

.7

1.4
22.7

24.2

1.6

0
40.0

0
3 .7

.5
4.7

.7
9.3

.9
4.6

1.6
3 .2

0
13.3

192

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 35.—N et change in assets and liabilities : Percentage reporting and average
amount, urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual m oney income class—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income o f —
Item

Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 .$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000

$5,000
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

Percentage reporting net change in liabilities—Con.
Lia b ilitie s — C on .
Debts due to:
Banks, insurance companies:1
1
Net increase.........................
Small-loan companies:
Net increase.........................
Credit unions:
Individuals:
Net decrease........................
Bills due:
R ent:
Unpaid in survey period12. .
Back rent paid13..................
Taxes:
Unpaid in survey period14. .
Back taxes paid15................
. Charge accounts:
Net increase.........................
Net decrease......................
Other:1
6
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
Installment purchases:
A utom obile:1
7
Balance due on purchase
in survey period..............
Back paym ents...................
Furniture and household
equipment:
Balance cj^ue on purchase
in survey period..............
Back paym ents...................
Other:1
8
Balance due on purchase
in survey period..............
Back paym ents..................
A ll other:1
9
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................

0
0
0
0
0
0

1.7
.6

0
2.8

2.1
2.6

2.6
7.3

1.4
7.1

4.2
8.3

8.1
6.5

0
13.3

1.2
.6

0
1.7

3.7
7.9

2.6
5.2

2.1
10.0

3.7
6.0

3.2
1.6

0
6.7

0
0

.6
.6

0

.6

2.1

1.6
2.6

.7
.7

.5
1.4

0
0

1.0

4.0
3.0

3.5
2.9

0
4.0

2.6
3.7

4.2
4.7

2.1
2.9

3.2
4.6

1.6
8.1

3.0
0

3.5
0

0
1.1

1.0
0

0

0

2.9
1.4

0

0

2.0
2.0

1.7
1.2

0
1.7

4.2
2.1

2.6

1.0

4.3
1.4

5.6
2.3

6.5
3.2

3.0

1.0

4.7
1.7

7^3

6.3
4.7

15.6
3.6

12.1
3.6

11.1
9.7

9.7
3.2

20.0

6.9

1.0

11.6
2.3

0
4.5

13.6
3.1

17.2
5.2

7.9
4 3

9.7
7.4

16.1
3.2

6.7
13.3

0
2.0

.6
4.1

0
10.2

0
10.5

.5
16.7

2.9
17.1

1.4
26.4

3.2
33.9

0
13.3

2.0
6.9

2.3
10.5

0
23.2

7.3
24.1

8.3
25.0

5.7
23.6

9.7
22.2

4.8
22.6

0
20.0

2.3
3.5

0
9.6

3.1
5.8

4.7
8.3

4.3
8.6

6.9
7.9

4.8
9.7

2.9
0

0
1.1

.5

2.1
.5

.7
.7

1.9
1.4

1.0

3.0

1.0

0

1.0

1.6

.5

0

13.3
6.7
0

0
6.7

0
0

0

6.7

1.6

0
6.7

$245.10
107.43

$67.07
259.25

$4.73 $30.89
20.04 12.19

$69.01
22.85

0
$51.52

Average amount of net change in liabilities
Net change in liabilities:
Increase........................................
Decrease......................................

$4.14 $33.54 $30.13 $22.97 $74.50 $39.47 $138.25
6.89 8.16 19.73 58.03 57.25 65.68 75.53

Mortgages:
On owned hom e:1
0
$10.14
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................ $1.19 1.98
Other real estate:
Net increase.........................
8.69
2.36
.17
Net decrease........................
Debts due to:
Banks, insurance companies:1
1
0
2.55
Net increase.........................
0
.09
Net decrease........................
Small-loan companies:
.42
0
Net increase.........................
0
.17
Net decrease........................
Credit unions:
0
.53
Net increase.........................
0
.06
Net decrease........................
Individuals:
1.63 1.29
Net increase.........................
.36 1.06
Net decrease........................

0
0

See footnotes at end of table.




0

$3.50
1.90 $21.08

0

0

$9.52
13.10

.14

12.26

18.61
2.07

4.73
4.83

37.54
2.74

43.95
2.01

0
10.26

2.87
.44

3.73
1.15

7.06
4.57

2.61
5.97

21.15
4.99

45.49
7.72

0
6.68

2.54
3.27
.77 ,.•3.33

1.98
1.96

2.28
1.76

7.41
4.63

3.06
.31

0
38.54

0

0
0

.11

.18
.81

1.86
.97

.64
.09

1.16
.75

5.17 1
1.15 !

.94
.89

2.47
6.84

2.16
4.25

4.75
3.25

5.05
10.38

0
0
21.24
10.00

193

Part III.— Tabular Summary

T able 35.—N et change in assets and liabilities : Percentage reporting and average
amount, urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual m oney income class—Continued

1942 (first 3 months)—Continued
Annual m oney income of —
Item

L ia b ilitie s —Con.

$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000
Under $500
to
to
to
to
to
to$500
$1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000

$5,000
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

Average amount of net change in liabilities—Con.

Bills due:
B ent:
Unpaid in survey period12. . $0.42 $0.95
Back rent paid18.................
0
0
Taxes:
Unpaid in survey period14. .
.25
.56
.54
Back taxes paid15.......... .
.08
Charge accounts:
.22 1.13
Net increase.........................
.22
Net decrease........................
.67
Other:1
6
1.00 4.09
Net increase.........................
Net decrease........................
.04
.24
Installment purchases:
Autom obile1
7
Balance due on purchase
in survey period.............. 0
1.16
Back p a ym en ts..................
.80 1.40
Furniture and household
equipment:
Balance due on purchase
in survey period..............
.07 1.38
Back paym ents..................
.90 1.86
Other:1
8
Balance due on purchase
in survey period..............
.54
.31
Back paym ents...................
.48
.38
All other:1
9
.01
Net increase................................
.34
Net decrease...............................
0
0

$0.33
.20

$0.34
0

.76
.28

1.42
1.17

3.73

$0.79
.74

0
$0.42

0
$0.40

0
0

$1.54
.46

2.02
.14

2.72
1.15

9.58
2.00

$32.50
0

1.82
1.55

6.81
1.22

3.51
1.86

6.64
4.83

8.35
3.11

0
11.67

2.67
1.44

6.64
.58

15.27
1.94

5.97
2.72

6.00
3.03

16.03
.87

13.33
92.74

.85
4.88

0
6.49

1.20
13.11

3.98
13.15

5.01
24.84

19.44
39.76

0
15.71

5.52
4.98

4.02
7.08
•%

6.33
7.87

4.39
8.19

8.10
8.87

18.46
11.06

0
16.91

2.09
1.81

.50
1.41

1.32
3.02

1.49
1.87

3.83
3.31

6.68
5.65

0
2.89

.10
.42

.11
.23

.53
.12

.17
.07

3.05
.53

0
1.31

0
2.33

121

0
0

1 Includes m oney in safe-deposit boxes.
2 Includes structural additions and improvements (not repairs or replacements) to the family dwelling.
An example of an improvement is the installation of a furnace in a home previously without central heating.
8 Includes structural additions and improvements in owned buildings or real estate other than the family
dwelling.
4 Premiums paid or payable on life-insurance policies and on annuities. Includes amounts for life insur­
ance deducted from earnings or paid as part of dues to organizations. Includes deductions from earnings
for retirement funds, except those for Federal old-age and survivors’ insurance.
5 Money received in settlement of life-insurance policies and insurance on property, including crops
and livestock. Does not include payments from pensions or annuities, or periodic payments from life,
health, accident, or unemployment insurance: such payments are considered income.
6 Includes only net increase or decrease in the principal of loans made to others. Interest paid to the
fam ily on such loans is considered income.
7 Includes loans secured other than b y mortgages, such as those secured b y personal notes or b y oral
agreement.
8 Amounts deducted from earnings for Federal old-age and survivors’ insurance.
9 Includes all assets not classified elsewhere.
1 Net change in the principal of mortgages and other debts secured b y liens on the owned home.
0
1 Net change in the principal of notes due to banks, insurance companies, and cooperative associations
1
(except credit companies) and secured other than b y liens on real estate. Does not include notes due finance
companies for purchases of notes due on the installment plan.
1 A m ount unpaid on rents owed b y fam ily and falling due during report period.
2
1 Am ount paid during report period on rents owed b y fam ily and falling due before beginning of report
8
period.
1 Am ount unpaid on taxes falling due during the fourth period.
4
1 Am ount paid during the fourth period on taxes falling due before beginning o f the report period.
5
1 Includes amount owed for medical, dental, and domestic services. Does not include balance due on
6
installment purchases.
1 Includes both business and family-living share of automobile purchase expense.
7
1 Includes items of fam ily living such as clothing, books, and musical instruments.
8
1 Includes all items not specified elsewhere, such as net increase in interest due in report period and
9
interest paid during the report period but due before the report period.




194

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 36.— Sources

of income : Percentage reporting and average amount receivedf
urban families qnd single consumers, by annual total income class

1941 (12 months)
Annual total income of —
Item

Under $500 $1,C00 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 to
$1,5C0 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 over

Percentage reporting money income:
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief.........................................
Relief1...........................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2......................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily ...................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other money income*...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
N onrelief.. -................................................
R elief........................................................
Average amount of income: T ota l.................

1
44 4
11.1
14.3
0
14.3

64.4
12.1
17.8
12.1
16.7

77.2
7.1
16.3
9.8
15.8

88.4
3.0
16.1
14.1
16.6

84.0
0
16.6
13.0
19.5

86.4
.7
19.7
17.7
22.4

87.0
2.8
21.4
13.5
26.5

77.4
3.8
37.7
7.5
39.6

68.8
0
50.0
0
56.2

17.5 12.1
27.0 i 17.2
12.7
9.2
1.7
4.8

14.1
6.5
7.6
1.1

7.5
2.0
12.1
3.5

4.7
.6
7.7
3.0

7.5
.7
6.8
6.1

3.7
0
9.3
3.7

1.9
1.9
13.2
3.8

0
0
6.2
12.5

85.7
22.2

85.1
12.6

87.5
6.5

87.9
.5

90.0
.6

91.8
0

97.2
0

90.6
0

93.7
0

$367

$752 $1,245 $1,753 $2,239 $2,737 $3,674 $6,290 $14,933

Money incom e................................................
$278 $632 $1,121 $1,633 $2,115 $2,538 $3,429 $6,064 $14,227
Earnings...................................................
129i 436
921 1,460 1,954 2,387 3,211 5,677 11,197
Wage and salary earnings:
Nonrelief......................................
330
96!
788 1,294 1,680 2,069 2,662 3,762 5,708
Relief1............................................
211
49
37
12
0
5
16
0
(#
)
Entrepreneurial earnings2................
12!
57!
96
154
274
318
544 1,899 5,489
Net income from roomers and boarders..
0!
16
26
30
43
37
32
21
0
Net interest, dividends, profits, and rents
39
44
70
28
94
123
183 2,640
Hi
Net income from roomers and boarders.. w 62
43|
61
61
39
16
21
31
298
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily.......................................................
22
26
40
16
15
14
1
12
0
Direct relief paym ents.............................
60
52;
23
9
4
2
(«)
0
0
Other m oney income*............................ i
12
8
5
18
14
22
5i
168
206
Losses in business (not deducted above)4I
3
2
{*)'■
2
2
26
2
7
114
Nonm oney income in kind5...................
!
120:
89;
124
120
124
199
245
226
706
Nonrelief.....................................
!
114!
7S
119
120
122
199
245
226
706
R elief..................................
11
6:
2
0
5
0
0
0
<>
•

1942 (first 3 months)
Percentage reporting money income:
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief.....................................
Relief1.................................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2........................
Net income from roomers and boarders.
Interest, dividends, profits, and ren ts...
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily.................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income*...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
Percentage reporting income in kind:5
N onrelief.............................................
R elief............................................................

46.7
3.3
6.7
1.7
6.7

50.9
10.3
14.9
6.9
17.7

75.1
3.0
13.0
8.3
15.4

90.5
1.6
9.0
11.1
12.7

82.1
.5
18.9
13.7
15.8

89.3
0
16.4
11.4
19.3

83.3
.4
22.6
14.7
26.2

87.8
2.7
27.0
9.5
40.5

64.7
0
52.9
5.9
58.8

15.0
20.0
8.3
5.0

16.0
20.6
6.9
1.7

11.2
4.7
10.1
3.0

7.9
.5
4.8
.5

5.3
1.1
5 3
1.1

4.3
0
6 4
.7

3.6
.4
6 7
1.2

1.4
0
2 7
4.1

0
0
11 8
0

68.3
15.0

65.1
9.7

63.9
4.1

65.1
0

71.0
1.1

72.8
0

79.0
0

79.7
0

94.1
0

Average amount of income: T otal.................

$81

$184

$313

$435

$558

$684

$932 $1,593

$4,035

Money incom e...................................................
Earnings......................................................
Wage and salary earnings:
N onrelief.......................................
Relief1.............................................
Entrepreneurial earnings2.................
Net income from roomers and boarders..
Interest,' dividends, profits, and ren ts. . .
Incom e from benefits and annuities......
Gifts from persons not in economic
fa m ily.......................................................
Direct relief paym ents.............................
Other m oney income*...............................
Losses in business (not deducted above)4
N onm oney income in kind5............................
Nonrelief......................................................
R elief............................................................

$63
30

$156
96

$287
225

$406
365

$527
475

$640
605

$870 $l,50i
810
1,420

$3,870
3,409

26
3
1
1
2
15

69
12
15
3
12
14

198
3
24
5
17
15

341
5
19
10
9
12

401
(6)
74
11
11
22

534
0
71
7
19
2

662
(«)
148
12
31

6

1,122
1
297
7
76
3

2 026
0
1,383
9
388
59

4
12
1
2

11
18
2
(#
)
28
26

13
8
6
2
26
25
1

6
1
3
<>
•
29
29
0

4
2
2
(•)
31
30
1

1
0
6
(«)
44
44
0

5
(6
)
6
(«)
62
62
0

4
0
2
11
92
92
0

0
0
5
0
165
165
0

is;i
161

•
See footnotes on following page.




1 2

2I

195

Part I I I .—-Tabular Summary
T able

37.— Sum m ary o f average m oney and nonm oney income and outlay, urban fam ilies
and single consumers, by annual total income class

1941 (12 months)
Annual total income of —
Item

Under $5C0 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,5C0 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,G O $5,000 $10,000 over
O

Receipts:
Incom e: T otal.............................................
M on ey...................... ............................
In k in d .................................................
Inheritances and other money receipts..
Net deficit...................................................
Disbursements:
Expenditures for current consumption:
T ota l.........................................................
M oney...................................................
In k in d ...................................... ..........
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus.................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting___
Net surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting. . . .

$367
278
89
5
147
512
423
89
13
0
0

$752 $1,245 $1,753 $2,239 $2,737 $3,674 $6,290 $14,933
632 1,121 1,633 2,115 2,538 3,429
6,064 14,227
120
124
120
199
226
706
124
245
96
5
16
0
5
6
25
15
2
0
0
0
0
0
45
0
783 1,222 1,705 2,079 2,579 3,260
663 1,098 1,585 1,955 2,380 3,015
124
120
120
124
199
245
82
94
157
41
66
25
10
1
3
3
10
25
0
273
0
9
85
88

5,011
4,785
226
284
78
929

8,752
8,046
70'6
977
806
4,658

21
$233

0
0

41
$375

31
$250

39
$178

39
$243

35
$262

29
$534

23
$410

32
$24

49
$67

59
$114

61
$169

64
$279

71
$345

100
77
79
$474 $1,234 $4,658

$558
527
31
7
0

$684
640
44
1
0

$932 $1,593 $4,035
870
1,501 3,870
62
92
165
2
0
429
0
0
0

1942 (first 3 months)*
5
4
2
1
Receipts:
Incom e: Total..................... .......................
M oney...................................................
In k in d .................................................
Inheritances and other m oney receipts..
Net deficit...................................................
Disbursements:
Expenditures for current consum ption..
M oney...................................................
In k in d .................................................
Gifts and contributions............................
Personal tax paym ents.............................
Net surplus.................................................
Net deficit:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting. . . .
N et surplus:
Percentage reporting.................................
Average amount for those reporting. . . .

$81
63
18
0
44

$184
156
28

$313
287
26

0

0

27

$435
406
29
22
0

119
101
18
2
1
0

202
174
28
4
(l)
0

325
299
26
13
2
0

407
378
29
12
3
37

506
475
31
17
9
36

601
557
44
23
11
59

775
713
62
33
21
113

1,201
1,109
92
51
70
279

2,143
1,978
165
224
313
1,574

50
$92

35
$90

38
$126

29
$70

25
$109

22
$143

18
$198

19
$393

$260

30
$9

46
$21

59
$37

70
$83

74
$85

77
$118

81
$184

81
88
$436 $1,818

22

12

1 Less than 10.50.

Footnotes to Table 36.
1 Includes work-relief wages from the Work Projects Administration and the National Youth Adminis­
tration.
2 Includes earnings from owner-operated business and independent professional practice.
* Includes alimony, m oney found or received as prizes and rewards, and net gains for gambling.
4 Includes actual m oney losses which are met from the fam ily income or b y an increase in the fam ily’s
liabilities. Includes net losses from operation of any independent business; net losses when expense on
property was in excess of income, such as taxes and insurance on em pty rental property.
5 Includes the value of food, housing, fuel and ice, household furnishings and equipment, and clothing,
received b y the fam ily without direct expense.
* Less than 10.50.




196

f amily Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 38.— M ajor

catego ries of con su m ption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services, average amount spent and average
value, urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual total income class

P E R C E N T A G E R E P O R T IN G

1941 (12 months)
Annual total income of —
Item

$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000
Under to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 and
over

F ood :1
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing:
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense3....................................

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
55.6 48.9 37.5 33.7 25.4 27.9 27.9

100.0
24.5

100.0
31.2

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
49.2 47.2 44.0 40.2 44.4 57.2 66.1
92.1 94.3 97.8 99.5 100.0 99.3 100.0

100.0
68.0
100.0

100.0
93.7
100.0

96.7
29.3

98.1
22.6

100.0
25.0

95.3 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
69.9 69.5 72.8 72.9 77.5 77.6 82.3
9.5 18.4 35.9 50.3 66.3 70.7 78.6
55.6 67.8 81.0 78.9 78.7 85.0 88.4
96.8 98.3 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
68.3 84.5 93.5 98.5 97.6 96.6 99.1
46.0 74.7 92.4 96.0 98.2 98.6 99.5
50.8 53.4 73.4 76.4 78.1 81.0 88.4
49.2 66.1 90.7 96.0 98.8 96.6 99.5
9.5 19.0 21.7 28.6 31.4 40.8 46.5
17.5 15.5 22.3 28.6 39.6 40.8 42.8

100.0
81.1
90.6
92.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
84.9
100.0
67.9
54.7

100.0
81.2
93.8
93.8
100.0
100.0
100.0
81.2
100.0
56.2
93.8

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
38.3 38.3 24.3 22.8 15.8 12.9 15.9

100.0
14.9

100.0
29.4

98.3 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
43.3 41.7 35.5 29.6 42.6 48.5 57.2
91.7 96.0 97.0 99.5 98.9 100.0 99.6

100.0
67.6
100.0

100.0
94.1
100.0

55.6
23.8

70.7
24.7

78.8
21.2

90.4
23.6

94.7
18.9

95.9
23.1

1942 (first 3 months)
F ood :1
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:2
Money expense................................ ..........
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment:
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing:
Money expense...........................................
Received in k in d .; ....................................
Autom obile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense3....................................
See footnotes at end of table.




28.3
8.3

48.0
9.7

84.1
6.0

90.5
16.2

94.1
0

83.4
36.7
13.3
35.0
91.7
56.7
36.7
58.3
38.3
6.7
13.3

93.1 96.4 98.9 98.4 99.3 98.8
40.0 39.6 38.1 36.3 30.7 36.5
16.0 31.4 42.9 55.8 69.3 72.6
56.0 71.6 76.2 73.2 78.6 83.7
97.1 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
72.0 84.6 88.4 91.1 91.4 92.9
55.4 87.6 93.6 93.7 99.3 97.2
53.1 66.3 74.6 76.8 82.1 84.1
67.4 87.6 95.2 97.4 97.1 98.8
16.6 20.1 14.3 25.3 29.3 40.1
10.9 21.9 18.0 22.1 24.3 31.3

100.0
40.5
90.5
86.5
100.0
94.6
100.0
90.5
100.0
48.6
35.1

100.0
35.3
88.2
94.1
100.0
94.1
100.0
88.2
94.1
76.5
88.2

58.6
9.5

70.4
12.2

71.6
6.3

77.9
8.6

197

Part III.— Tabular Summary
T a ble 38.— M ajor

catego ries of con su m ption : Percentage reporting expenditures
and receipt in kind o f selected goods and services} average amount spent and average
value, urban fam ilies and single consumers, by annual total income class— Continued

AVE R AG E E X PE N SE OR VALUE

1941 (12 months)
Annual total income of —
Item

$2,000 $2,500 $3.0C0 $5,000 $10,000
Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
$600 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,0C0 $5,000 $10,000 over

All items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................

$512
423
89:

$783: $1,222 $1,705 $2,079 $2,579 $3,260 $5,011 $8,752
663 1,098 1,585 1,955 2,380 3,015
4,785 8,046
120
120
124
199
124
245
226
706

Food: Total value1............................................
Money expense...........................................
Received m kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:
Total value1....................................................
2*
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: Total va lu e...
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: Total value.......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense............................
Tobacco: Money expense................................ 1
Reading: Money expense.................................j
Education: Money expense.............................j
Other: Money expense*.................................... 1

$209
179
30

$300
261
39

$436
405
31

$567
535
32

$648
637
11

161
117
44
18
9
6
3
38
26
12
11
6
8
28
7
7
4
4
2

226
162
64
30
19
17
2
76
61
15
30
14
14
23
22
16
7
3
3

311
241
70
41
52
47
5
138
120
18
59
27
26
50
33
29
11
2
7

407
347
60
61
79
75
4
205
181
24
116
33
34
77
53
39
18
5
11

472
389
83
83
96
91
5
233
208
25
205
31
40
101
7fi
48
22
7
18

$929
907
22

$1,378
1,365
13

$1,799
1,755
44

675
585
440
499
145
176
106 ' 150
153
205
197
145
8
8
433
311
279
394
32
39
239
323
61
58
52
67
107
135
140
87
46
66
24
30
20
29
30:
17

889
724
165
245
227
221
6
662
620
42
553
124
109
255
286
102
48
90
43

1,788
1,201
587
899
289
286
. 3
1,225
1,153
72
891
357
162
338
595
84
83
169
73

$761
747
14

1942 (first 3 months)
A ll items: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................

$119
101
18

$202
174
28

$325
299
26

$407
378
29

$506
475
31

$601
557
44

$775 $1,201 $2,143
713
1,109
1,978
62
92
165

Food: Total value1............................................
Money expense...........................................
Received m kind........................................
Housing, fuel, light, and refrigeration:
Total value2....................................................
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind.......................................
Household operation: Money expense..........
Furnishings and equipment: Total expense.
Money expense...........................................
Received in kind........................................
Clothing: Total value......................................
Money expense...........................................
Received m kind........................................
Automobile: Money expense...........................
Other transportation: Money expense..........
Personal care: Money expense........................
Medical care: Money expense.........................
Recreation: Money expense.............................
Tobacco: Money expense.................................
Reading: Money expense.................................
Education: Money expense.............................
Other: Money expense*....................................

$50
43
7

$80
70
10

$115
108
7

$139
132
7

$166
162
4

$194
192
2

$231
226
5

$323
319
4

$491
474
17

34
26
8
4
1
1
0
9
6
3
4
1
2
8
1
3
1
(4
)
1

61
46
15
7
3
3
(45
)
17
14
3
4
4
4
9
3
3
2
1
4

85
71
14
13
11
10
1
33
29
4
13
8
7
17
8
7
3
1
4

102
87
15
15
15
14
1
50
44
6
17
9
8
21
12
9
5
1
4

126
105
21
21
21
20
1
57
52
5
27
10
11
26
18
12
5
3
3

146
110
36
23
20
19
1
71
66
5
45
12
12
37
18
11
6
2
4

170
123
47
35
43
40
3
102
95
7
54
14
16
38
33
16
7
10
6

216
152
64
55
90
74
16
163
155
8
110
30
25
65
63
24
12
16
9

516
377
139
246
72
72
0
276
267
9
130
36
50
85
128
21
25
52
15

1 Includes expenditures for alcoholic beverages.
2 Includes expenditures for all housing, including family homes, vacation homes, and lodging of family
members while traveling or on vacation, or at school. For the farm home, expenditures include only those
for insurance and for repairs paid for b y the fam ily; all other expenditures for the farm home were con­
sidered farm business expenditures. For urban and rural nonfarm families, expenditures for fam ily home
include those for rent and repairs on rented home, and for taxes, insurance, repairs and replacements, special
assessments, interest on mortgage, and refinancing charges for owned homes.
5 Includes interest on debts incurred for fam ily living; bank service charges including safe-deposit box;
legal expenses connected with household affairs; losses concerned directly with the household, including
amount of installments paid during period on repossessed furniture; funeral expenses, including upkeep
and purchase of cemetery lot; and expense for other items, such as dues to political and to cooperative
associations, marriage licenses, and flowers for the wedding of a fam ily member. Includes garden expenses
for seeds and fertilizer, and feed for chickens for fam ily food supply.
* Less than $0.50.







APPEN D IX A

Estimates for 1 9 3 5 -3 6 Adjusted for Comparison with
Data from the Survey o f Spending and
Saving in Wartime
There is a great interest in the changes in incomes, expenditures, and
savings between the middle thirties, when the Nation was slowly recov­
ering from the depression, and 1941 and early 1942, when the American
economy was geared to a high level o f production.
The study most nearly comparable in scope to the Survey of Spend­
ing and Saving in Wartime was the Study of Consumer Purchases,
1935-36, conducted jointly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the
Bureau of Home Economics, in cooperation with the Works Progress
Administration and the National Resources Committee.1
There are certain important points of difference in the coverage of the
two surveys, however. The Consumer Purchases Study was originally
conceived as an inquiry into the differing effects of income, family type,
occupation, region, and degree of urbanization upon expenditure. This
led to a sample design suitable for that purpose, but with several impor­
tant drawbacks from the viewpoint of national estimates. No expendi­
ture data were obtained from families that had received relief at any
time during the year, that did not contain both a husband and a wife,
or in which either spouse was foreign-born. The choice of communities
surveyed in the Consumer Purchases Survey was likewise not the most
satisfactory for preparing national estimates. Thus, suburban areas
surrounding large metropolises, containing almost 17 million persons
in 1930, were virtually unrepresented. Only 7 cities with populations
over 100,000 were included, although such cities include about half the
urban population., No urban areas in the West South Central States,
containing almost 45 million city residents in 1930, were covered. The
rural nonfarm sample included families living in villages but not in
the open country.
Furthermore, direct comparisons between the data in this volume
and the estimates published by the National Resources Committee for
1935-36 are not entirely valid because of certain differences in the
definition o f income used as a basis for classification.
Most of the tables in this volume present data for families and single
consumers classified by money income in 1941 and early 1942; a few
tables are presented by total (money plus nonmoney) income. The
published data for 1935-36 are presented for families and single con­
sumers classified by total income. However, the “ total income” concept
of the present survey is more inclusive than that used in 1935-36. In the
earlier survey, only the following items, considered to be the most im­
portant nonmoney income sources, were added to money income:
Imputed income from owned homes (including a figure for rented
1 Reports from that survey for separate urban communities are found in U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Bulletins 642 through 649. Reports for separate rural communities and some small cities are found in a
parallel series of Miscellaneous Publications of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Reports combining
the urban and rural data into national totals were prepared b y the National Resources Committee (National
Resources Planning Board) and published in the following three volumes: Consumer Incomes in the United
States, 1938; Consumer Expenditures in the United States, 1939; Family Expenditures in the United States,
Statistical Tables and Appendixes, 1941.




199

200

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

farm homes estimated by a procedure comparable to that followed in
the present survey); rent received as pay; home-produced food in rural
areas and the value of certain other farm-produced goods used by farm
families, principally fuel. In the estimates of the National Resources
Committee the value o f direct relief in kind was also added. In the
present survey, “ total income” includes, in addition to the above-named
items, food received as gift or pay, home-produced food in urban areas,
rent received as gift, and the value of fuel, ice, clothing, and household
furnishings received as gift or pay.
In order to permit some comparison between the findings of the two
surveys, the following tables have been prepared by adjustment of the
1935-36 data to a money-income basis. In the case of urban families, the
adjustment was relatively minor, since it was necessary only to deduct
from income the occupancy value of owned homes. In the case of rural
families, it was necessary, in addition, to adjust for the value of homeproduced food and certain other receipts in kind.
Table 1 shows the estimated distribution of all civilian families and
single consumers in the United States by money income class in 1935-36.
Table 2 showT for 1935-36, by money income level, and for all income
s
levels combined, the expenditures and savings of the Nation’s families
and single consumers. Data for 1935-36 relating to single consumers
were much less adequate than those for families, and estimates were
made only on a national basis, not by type of community. Moreover,
the number of single consumers in the population at that time were
apparently overestimated, whereas they were underestimated in the
Survey of Spending and Saving in Wartime, as shown in Part II (p. 55)
of this volume. Hence, the most useful comparisons between the two
dates are for families of two or more persons. Table 3 gives the distri­
bution of families by money income in 1935-36 and by type of com­
munity. The last table provides a summary of the money expenditures
and savings of all families (all income classes combined) by type of
community for 1935-36.
The level of incomes, expenditures, and savings was, of course, much
higher in 1941 and early 1942 than in the mid-thirties, but the general
relationship between expenditures and income is in most respects very
similar. The 1935-36 study had previously confirmed the general rela­
tionship established in earlier, more limited surveys. The most striking
exception was the larger expenditures for durable goods at given income
levels in the later period (possibly reflecting heavy buying in anticipa­
tion of shortages) and relatively small expenditure for housing (prob­
ably because families whose incomes increase do not immediately move
to better quarters).




201

Appendix A .— Estimates for 1935-36

T able 1.— Distribution of Families and Single Consumers by M o n ey Income Class,
1 9 8 5 -3 6

Money income class

Total
number
(in thousands)

Percent of total

Under $500................................................................................................
$500—$1,000..............................................................................................
$1,000—$1,500...........................................................................................
$1,500—$2,000...........................................................................................
$2,000—$3,000...........................................................................................
$3,000—15,000...........................................................................................
$5,000 and over........................................................................................

9,747.4
11,184.6
7,721.9
4.518.7
3.818.8
1,565.3
901.6

24.7
28 3
19.6
11.4
9.7
4.0
2.3

A ll incom es......... .........................................................................

39,458.3

100.0

Median m oney incom e..........................................................................

$946

T able 2.— Average M on ey Income, Expenditures, and Savings of Families and Single
Consumers, by M on ey Income Class, 1 9 3 5 -8 6

Item

Families and single consumers with m oney incomes—
All
families
and
single Under $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,000 $5,000
to
to
to
con­
to
to
and
sumers $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $3,00 0 $5,000 over

Money incom e...................................................

$1,388

$289

Money expenditures for
current consum ption....................................

1,159

394

747

1,154

1,542

2,038

2,778

5,888

374
181

155
61

269
125

396
184

494
237

610
295

751
380

1,206
760

134
36
133
96
22
26
56
42
24
14
13
8

39
9
45
20
9
10
20
7
9
5
3
2

82
19
84
39
17
19
34
21
18
10
5
5

129
38
125
84
22
27
53
37
28
15
9
7

171
55
173
138
26
36
76
57
36
19
14
10

232
73
245
213
32
46
105
84
43
23
24
13

342
96
366
307
45
61
153
129
50
31
47
20

802
195
842
706
166
112
370
357
73
55
191
53

78
10
151 -1 15

31
-3 7

54
32

78
112

121
289

228
724

1,244
4,420

F ood ................. ...........................................
H ousing......................................................
Fuel, light, refrigeration, and
household operation1.............................
Furnishings and equipment...................
Clothing......................................................
Autom obile.................................................
Other transportation................................
Personal care..............................................
Medical care...............................................
Recreation...................................................
T ob a cco.......................................................
Reading.......................................................
Education...................................................
Other............................................................
Gifts and taxes1.................................................
Net savings or deficit(—) .................................
Not available separately.




$741

$1,240 $1,732 $2,448 $2,730 $11,552

202

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

T able 3.— Percentage Distribution of Families of 2 or M ore Persons by M o n ey Income
Class and Type of Community, 1 9 3 5 -3 6

Money income class

A ll
families

Urban
families

Rural
nonfarm
families

Rural
farm
families

Under $500..............................................................................
$500-11000................................................................................
$1000-$1500..............................................................................
$1500-$200Q..............................................................................
$2000-$3000..............................................................................
$3000-$5000............................................................................ 1
$5000 and over...................................................................... /

22.5
26.5
20.2
12.5
11.1
7.2

11.5
24.7
23.7
15.9
14.7

21.8
30.1
21.2
11.8
9.4
5.7

50.7
27.8
10.8
4.7
3.5
2.5

HI

3 .3/

. A ll incom es.. . ..............................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Median m oney income..........................................................

$1,025

$1,291

$968

$493

T able 4.— Average M o n ey Income, Expenditures, and Savings of A ll Families of 2 or
M ore Persons, by T ype of Community , 1 9 3 5 -3 6
(Source:

National Resources Planning Board, June 1941, Family Expenditures in the United States,
Selected Tables)

Items

A ll
families

Urban
families

Rural
nonfarm
families

Rural
farm
families

Money incom e........................................................................

$1,464

$1,785

$1,318

$786

Money expenditures for current consum ption................
F o o d ..................................................................................
H ousing............................................................................
Fuel, light, and refrigeration.......................................
Other household operation...........................................
Furnishings and equipm ent........................................
Clothing............................................................................
A utom obiles....................................................................
Other transportation.....................................................
Personal care...................................................................
Medical care.....................................................................
Recreation........................................................................
T ob a cco............................................................................
R eading............................................................................
Education........................................................................
Other.................................................................................

1,231
395
169
88
67
47
141
114
16
28
64
41
26
13
15
7

1,519
492
244
106
86
55
162
122
24
34
72
52
31
16
16
7

1,107
352
127
96
60
44
123
118
6
26
59
35
23
12
18
8

621
187
18
25
39
31
103
92
3
16
47
21
15
6
11
7

Gifts and contributions........................................................

45

54

44

23

Personal taxes.......................................................................

24

36

11

3

164

176

156

139

Net savings..............................................................................




S P E N D I N G

A N D

S A V I N G

I N

W A R T I M E

S c h e d u le Number

C o n fid e n tia l
The in fo r m a t io n r e q u e s te d in t h is s c h e d u le i s s t r i c t l y c o n f i d e n t i a l .
G iv in g i t
th e B u rea u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s an d w i l l n o t b e a v a i l a b l e f o r t a x a t io n p u r p o s e s .

A

is

v o lu n ta r y .

It

w ill

n ot be seen

excep t

b y sw orn a g e n ts o f

GENERAL INFORMATION AND CODES
1 2 . L i v i n g a r r a n g e m e n ts :

1 . A ssig n m e n t number

1

2 . A gent

Q

H o u s e k e e p in g , n o ro o m e rs o r b o a r d e r s

i n t e r v ie w

2

• 4 . C h e ck in t e r v i e w e r

J

{

4

P I B oom in g w it h b o a r d f u r n is h e d

3 . D a te o f

5 . D a te o f c h e c k in t e r v i e w

H o u s e k e e p in g w it h r oom ers o r b o a r d e r s
| R oom in g w it h o u t b o a r d

6 . C i t y an d S t a t e

I n t e r v ie w e r s s h o u ld n o t e n t e r c o d e s

7 . B l o c k number

1 3 . R e g io n

8 . M onths in t h i s c i t y d u r i n g 1941

14. C it y c o d e

9. R ace:

16.

fu r n is h e d

W h ite Q

1.

N egro Q

I*

11. L iv in g

4

2

O th er Q

3

1 7 . Money p lu s nonm oney in com e in 1941

No h usband Q

J

1 9 . F a m ily s i z e

No [ ]

5

No w i f e Q

1

No □

2 1 . Number o f e a r n e r s

2 2 . R e n t a l and r e n t a l v a lu e g ro u p s

6

23.

1940 in com e a s com p ared w it h 1941

2 4 . C .P . S .

2

Members o f e c o n o m ic f a m i l y
( a l l p e r s o n s s h a r in g f a m i l y in com e.
G iv e r e l a t i o n s h i p t o head. 1

Sex

C

v Ll j _ * L j U 1

d

No. o f w eeted u rin g 1941
Away
Age
In
Em­
from p lo y e d
home
home

Wage
earner

S e lfem p loy ed
$

$

i

E a r n in g s d u r in g
S a la r ie d

l

l

$

(

1941

$

3.

S.
6.
7.
8.
9.
*1 0 .
XX

Incom e fro m o t h e r w o r k .................
{ E d i t o r ) N et in com e fro m R . and B .......... ..

XX

1 3 . TOTAL..........................................................
14 .

(E d ito r)

T ota l

number e q u iv a llen t p e r s o its 16

td

av < r

;

under

16

XX

XX

m

n

T ota l
$

4'.

11.

1

V. P. A.
N. Y. A.

T ota l
n o n r e lie f

s

2 5 . W .E. e l i g i b i l i t y

2.

12.

a .

fa m ily c o m p o s itio n

6 FAMILY COMPOSITION AND MONEY EARNINGS DURING 1 1
.
91
b

a

£

(e q u iv a le n t p e r s o n s )

2 0 . O c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p

in owned home a t end o f 1941:

Yes □

15 . C i t y s i z e

1 8 . R e c e iv e d . r e l i e f d u r i n g y e a r
No Q

W ife n a t i v e - b o r n :
Yes Q

item s 13*25

M oney in com e in 1941

2

1 0 . H usband n a t i v e - b o r n :
Yes

in

O ccu p a t io n a l
expen se

Type o f w ork

$

C
ft

APPEN D IX B




B .L .S . 1337
U. S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S
W a s h in g t o n , D . C .

FAMILY INCOME

P.
b
T o ta l f o r year

S o u rce

1 . E a r n in g s ,

s e lf-e m p lo y e d

A g e n t*8
e n tr ie s

3 . E a r n in g s

4.
4.

( f r o m B 13 h* + i ) . . . .

F u e l,

fr o m W .P .A . and N .Y .A .( f r o m B 13 k ) ..........

S u b tota l

(1

ba n k a c c o u n t s ,
7. P r o fits
8 . R e n ts
9.

not

tru st

i n c lu d e d

1 0 . U nem ploym ent

bon d s,

o p e r a tio n

fro m p e r s o n s n o t

12) . . .

. ....

(N 2 7 ) . . .

O th e r t r a v e l and

In su ran ce B e n e fit s .

t r a n s porta t io n ( 0 -1 1 )
F u r n is h in g s and

p e n s io n s ...

Incom e

$

$

(K 1 6 ) .

F oo d (M 3 0 ) ....................

e q u i p m e n t (P * I I 1 3 6 )

Incom e fro m a n n u i t i e s . . . . * ......................................................

14.

(I

A u to m o b ile

in s u r a n c e b e n e f i t s ..........................................

1 2 . O th e r r e t ir e m e n t b e n e f i t s , i n d u s t r i a l

%

Money
p lu s
nonmoney
(e d ito r )

T o b a c c o ( L 6 ) . . ..........

l e s s e x p e n s e s ....................

l e s s e x p e n s e s ...................................

1 1 . F e d e r a l O ld A ge and S u r v iv o r s

1

O th e r
(e d ito r )

R e lie f
(e d ito r )

re­

M e d ica l c a r e

t h r u 8 ) ..................................................................

13.

Nounloney

E d i t o r 's
e n tr ie s
$

f

e

S u b t o t a l (1 + 2 ) . .

f u n d s , e t c .......................................
in B ,

fr o m p r o p e r t y ,

S u b tota l (6

from s t o c k s ,

lig h t,

|

H o u se h o ld

th r u 4 ) . . . . » ......................................................

I n t e r e s t and d i v i d e n d s

d

fr ig e r a t io n (J 2 0 ).

In com e fro m r o o m e rs and b o a r d e r s .......................................

5.

A gen t *s
e n tr i<

H o u sin g ( K > 2 9 ) ............. 4

( fr o m B 13 g ) ...........................

2 . E a r n in g s , w age an d s a l a r i e d

c

Motley
Ite m

E d i t o r 's
e n t r i ,—
-----------e s

t£

FAMILY EXPENDITURES

|

R e c r e a t i o n (Q 1 5 ) . . .

in e c o n o m ic f a m i l y ...............

1 5 . D i r e c t r e l i e f pay m en ts in c a s h ,F .S jC . stamps, v o u c h e r s

E d u c a t io n ( R

1 6 . O th e r m oney in c o m e ..........................................................................

R e a d in g ( S 6 ) ...............

17.

S u b to ta l

18. L osses
19.

G ifts ,

( 5 + 9 t h r u 1 6 ) ...........................................................

in b u s i n e s a

20. R e lie f

in com e

in k in d

D ir e c t

22.

C lo t h in g
O th e r

TOTAL MONEY PLUS NONMONEY INCOME ( 1 9 th r u 2 1 ) . .
to ta l

M

•

3
6 . P o s itiv e

c
n et change

y

$

t o Kj

P.

n e t c h a n g e in assets

9. P e rce n ta g e d if fe r e n c e

and l i a b i l i t i e s

( fr o m Y 5 1 )

(8 as a p e rce n ta g e o f 4 or 7 ) . . .

(X 7 ) . . ...............
th r u 1 8 ) .

a
Amount

in a s s e t s and l i a b i l i t i e ’s ( f r o m Y 5 1 )

(V 1 3 )

F MEMBERS OF HOUSEHOLD NOT I ECONOMIC FAMILY DURING 1 1
.
N
94
Ite m
1

(U 5 )..

(WW 1 1 ) ------

TOTAL ( 3

f a m i l y m oney in com e d u r i n g 1 9 4 0 ..

E 8ALANCE OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
.

2 . N e g a t iv e

( T 8 ) ..........

ta x es

P erson al care

( f r o m D 19 d ) ................................

2 1 . O th e r n on m on ey in com e ( f r o m D 19 e ) ................................

2 3 . E s tim a te d

com . w e l f a r e ?

r e lig io n

n o t d e d u c t e d a b o v e ...........................

T o t a l m oney in com e ( 1 7 minus 1 8 ) ...................................

9c + d )

S tatu s

b

C

d

No. m ea ls
No.
No.
p e r s o n s w eek s p e r w eek

F a m ily Spending and Saving in W artim e




C.

205

Appendix B.— Schedules

1 . T o t a l number o f rooms, ( e x c l u d i n g b a th ro o m s )_
2 . T o t a l number o f p e r s o n s o c c u p y in g t h e s e rooms ( i n ­
RENTED H M
O E

c l u d i n g f a m i l y , r o o m e rs , p a id h e l p , and o t h e r s ) ............
3.

(E d .)

4. If

2 . M on th ly r e n t a l r a t e ...................

l i v i n g q u a r t e r s w ere r e n t e d , d i d r e n t in c lu d e :

Tes

So

Tes

3 . R e n ta l c o n c e s s i o n s ..........* -------

So

4.
* □

lo Q

L ig h t

F u r n is h in g s

11 O

12D

60

Heat

1 3 0

2^Q

R e fr ig e r a tio n

«□

U

W ater

l5n

None ®f th e s e
fa c ilitie s

G arage

4 0

50
7 0

T o t a l r e n t ....................................

Refrigerator (Me cl

20

lO
3

1 . Number o f months o c c u p i e d . . .

P e r s o n s p e r room ^____________ _

5 . R e p a ir s p a id f o r by fa m ily
(S h e e t A ) . .
T o t a l e x p e n se (4 + 5 ) . .
OWNED H M
O E

HOUSING FACILITIES.

7 . Y ea r b u i l t ....................................................

5 . Number o f b a th room s in dw e1 l i n g ________________

8 . Number o f months owned........................

6 . Number o f p e rs o n s u s in g b a th ro o m s............. ............. _
_
7 . (E d .)

8 . R u n n in g w a te r in d w e l l i n g :

C o ld o n ly
None

P r i n c i p a l h e a t i n g m eth od :
C e n tra l fu rn ace

S T I Gas o r e l e c t r i c - s p a c e
h e a te rs
q{~"| O th er
10.

E le c t r ic
lQ

lig h t s

Ves

lQ

Gas o r e l e c t r i c i t y j
O th er

3 0

Hot and c o l d

lQ

1 0 . M onthly r e n t a l v a l u e .............................

1 1 . C o o k in g f u e l :

2 0

j D
2 0

9.

9 . Number o f months o c c u p ie d as ownei

P e r s o n s p e r b a th room _____________

None

fo r

m onths o c c u p i e d ......................................
1 2 . S t r u c t u r a l a d d i t io n s t o home d u r in g !
y e a r ( t o Y 1 7 ) (S h e e t A ) ..............

1 2 . T e le p h o n e in d w e llin g ]

,13. Down payment on owned h o m e (to Y 7 ) .
[14 . Amount p a id on p r i n c i p a l o f

1 0

Yes

m o rtg a g e d u r i n g .year ( t o Y 31 f ) . .

g|~)

No
[Expense f o r m onths owned:
1 3 . ( E d . ) C o m b in a tio n o f I
1 5 . I n t e r e s t o n m or tg a g e ..................................
modern f a c i l i t - - 1 6 . R e fi n a n c i n g c h a r g e s ....................................
lO
Yes
1 7 . T a xes p a y a b le in s c h e d u le y ea r

2 0

« n 10
,

1 1 . T o t a l r e n t a l v a lu e

e x c e p t b a ck t a x e s ......................................

No

[ l 8 . S p e c i a l a s s e s s m e n t s .................................. .
. R e p a ir s and r e p la c e r o e n ts (S h e e t A ) . .
. In su ra n ce, f i r e ,

| HOUSEHOLD OPERATION
#

t o r n a d o .......................

2 1 . O t h e r ..................................................................
No. o f

E xpen se

w eeks

[22 .

year

T o t a l f o r m on th sow n ed ( 15 th r u 2 1 )

fo r

lemployed

T o t a l f o r months o c c u p i e d .................
24

T o ta l fo r

f a m i l y ’ s home (6 * 2 3 ) .

PAID HOUSEHOLD HELP
P aid h o u s e h o ld h e l p ...................
, A p ro n s, u n if o r m s , g i f t s t o
pe id he l p . ......................................
T o ta l

(1 -

2
)..

OTHER HOUSEHOLD EXPENSE
. Water r e n t .................... .................... ...............................
. T e le p h o n e : N o . m as.
_ __
Per
, Laundry s e n t o u t*
N o. w k s ._ _____ Amt. $ ___

2 5 . V a c a t i o n home owned or r e n t e d ............ .
2 6 . L o d g in g w h ile t r a v e l i n g o r on v a o a t
2 7 . L o d g in g a t s c h o o l o r c o l l e g e ...............
28.

T o t a l (2 5 t h r u 2 7 ) ....................................

|29.

TOTAL HOUSING (2 4 b + c + 2 8 ) ..........
MONEY VALUE OF HOUSING RECEIVED
(w ith o u t d i r e c t money paym ent)

, Laundry s o a p am i o t h e r c le a n in g s u p p l i e s .
. S t a t i o n e r y , p o s t a g e , te le g r a m s ........................
. M ovin g , e x p r e s s , f r e i g h t , e t c ..........................
. O th e r ...................................................................................

3 0 . Net money v a lu e o f o c cu p a n c y o f f a m i l y ’ s
owned home ( 1 0 minus 2 3 ) ................................................
|31.

R e n ta l v a lu e o f h o u sin g

r e c e iv e d a s p a y .................

|32.

R e n ta l v a lu e o f h o u s in g

r e c e iv e d a s g i f t ..............

R e n ta l v a lu e o f h o u s in g

r e c e iv e d a s r e l i e f . . . .

.

T o t a l ( 6 th r u 1 0 ) ....................................................

33.

.

TOTAL ( 3 + 1 1 ) ............................................................

|34.




E ipen se
f o r y ea r

OTHER HOUSING

(3 )

TOTAL ( 3 0 t h r u 3 3 ) .................

............ ..................

V alue
fo r year 1

Quai t e r
Item

Expense
fo r
year

Jan, Feb. April, May Jul& Aug. Oct., Nov.
S e p t.
Dec.
Mar.
June

1.

B it u m in o u s :U n i t
P r ic e $

E xp

o ffic e

P r ic e !

2.

E ye c a r e

XXX

3.

D en ta l c a r e

Q ty

6.

P r ic e !

P r ic e !

Q ty

P r ic e !

(e x c lu d in g

1 . Number

E xp

U n it

*

E xp

8.

v is it s

at

at

eye

1 . N um ber r e c e i v i n g

Exp

U n it

5 . C oke:

s u r g e o n : .........................................................

hom e c a l l s

XXX
4.

s p e c ia lis t,

1.

xxx

Free
care

S

F a m ily Spending and Saving in W a rtim e

2.

P h y s ic ia n ,

2.

!

Q ty

Expense
fo r
year

Item

1 . C o a l:

c

b

a

c

b

S

g l a s s e s ) : ........... .......................................

eye care

( i n c l u d i n g X - r a y m a d e -b y d e n t i s t ) : .................
r e c e iv in g d e n ta l ca re

E xp

xxx

9 . W ood:
10.
11.

F uel

o il:

U n it

13.

E xp

U n it

Q ty

P r ic e !

E xp

g a s o lin e :

15. E le c t r ic it y :

2 . H o s p ita l

G as:

17.

Ice:

2.

or

at

at

p u b lic

days

S
S

v is it s a t !

c lin ic

v is it s

st

!

R ent

Q ty
E xp

l.A t

h o s p ita l

E xp

2 .A t

home

fre e z e r

lo c k e r

TOTAL EXPENSE..............................

2 1 . V a lu e

of

fu e l

gath ered

22.

of

fu e l

and

V a lu e

lig h t

XXX

XXX

XXX

f t i m i l y o r ir e c e i v e d asi g i f t

by

r e c e iv e d

fro m

]» y

r e l i e r a g . e n v y ...................

P a ck a ges

!

t r e a t m e n t : ..............................

days
days

at

at

!

!

! ____ ...................

1.

...

v is it s

at

!

»
r e c e iv in g

fra m e s a n d /o r

le n s e s

TOBACCO
Ite m

C ig a r s :

tr e a tm e n t

XXX
or

1 . Num ber
L

1. C ig a r e tte s :

or

xxx

U n it

of

h o s p it a l c a r e
!

7 . O th e r X - r a y e x a m in a t io n a n d /o r

P r ic e !

18.

at

3 . X - r a y e x a m in a t io n

E xp

2.

v is it s

1 . Num ber r e c e i v i n g

xxx

E xp

16.

20.

borne c a l l s

K erosen e &

14.

19.

o ffic e

1 . P r i v a t e m e d ic a l g ro u p c l i n i c

xxx

Q ty

P r ic e !

12.

1.
2.

]

xxx

E xpen se
fo r
year
1 . G rou p h o s p it a liz a t io n

p e r we

2 . G rou p m e d ic a l c a r e

N um ber p e r w e e k

!

!

P*r

P *f

P*f

P*r
........................

4 .

A ll

...

o t h e r .............. ............................................. ............................................................ .. • •• •
1 . N um ber o f

6.

TOTAL ( 1

th r u

5 ) .........................................................................................................................

16.

TOTAL ( 1

person s

th ru

206




K. MEDICAL CARE

J PUEL, LIGHT. AMD REFRIGERATION
.
a

covered .

1 5 ) .......................................................................................

A ppendix B.-—Schedules

207

M USUAL FOOD EXPENSES WRING E C Q A T R OF 19m
.
AH URE
b

a

c

E xpense f o r each q u a r t e r p e r week O

Item
Ja n .

Feb.

Mar.

Apr. May,

June

o r p er month G l
Nov.

T ota l fo r -

J u l y , Aug. Se >t.

O c t.

Dec.

%
........................

$ ........................

year

FOOD AT HOM FOR FAMILIES HOUSEKEEPING
E
1. G r o c e r y o r g e n e r a l s t o r e :
( e x c l u d i n g s o a p , m a tch e s, e t c . ) . . . .

$ ............... ..

$ ........................

...................

2. Meat and f i s h m a rk e t.................................
3 . D a ir y .....................................................................
4 . V e g e t a b le and f r u i t market o r wagon

7 . O th e r fo o d 'at home.............. ; .....................
8 . TOTAL: week o r month ( 1 th ru 7 ) . . . .

BOARD FOR NONHOUSEKEEPING FAMILIES

12. 3 m ea ls a d a y ............................. ....................
13. TOTAL: week o r m onth ( 1 0 th ru

1 2 ) ..

FOOD AW
AY FROM H E
OM
15. M eals at w o rk ............................... ............. ..
16. L u n ches at s c h o o l .........................................
17. M eals w h ile t r a v e l i n g o r
w h ile on v a c a t i o n ......................................
18. B oard at s c h o o l .............................................

...

O th e r m ea ls away:
19.
20.
21.
22.

B r e a k f a s t s ....................................................
L u n c h e s...........................................................
D in n e r s ............................................................
I c e c rea m , c a n d y ,

s o ft d rin k s ,

23. TOTAL: week o r month ( I S

e tc.

th ru 2 2 ) . .

ALCOHOLIC DRINKS

26 . W hiskey.........................................................
27 . O t h e r .............................................

.

.

...............

28* TOTAL: week o r month (2 5 th r u 2 7 ) . .

3 0 . TOTAL EXPENSE DURING 19 41

FOR FOirm AND A T r o tIOL1[C DRINKS

VALUE OF FOOD NOT PURCHASED

3 2 . R e c e iv e d as p a y .............................................
3 3 . R e c e iv e d as g i f t ............ ..............................
3 4 . R e c e iv e d

from r e l i e f

a g e n c y . . ............

3 5 . TOTAL: week o r month ( 3 1 th r u 3 4 ) . .
36- TJOTAL: q u a r t e r and y e a r ...........................




......
(5)

4* 14 ♦ 24 + 29 1 . .

...

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

208

P FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
.

AUTOMOBILES

H
.

P .-I

How many m o n th s .d u r in g y e a r d id y o u own:
1 a u to m o b ile ______ m os.

2

2 a u to m o b ile s ___

3

3 a u to m o b ile s

4

n o a u to m o b ile s __

m os.

FAMILY EQUIPMENT. ENO OE 19U

c

b

a

1

d

None R en ted Owned

Item

AUTOMOBILES OWNEO AT END OF 1941

e

f

If

tuned

Y ear

New

....

....

2 . R a d io s , No. owned

4.

4. R a d io -p h o n o g r a p h ...................

19

5 . C ar bo u g h t in 19 41 :

5. R e fr ig e r a t o r :

C r o s s p r i c e |$

E le c t r ic ..

6 . T r a d e - in a 1 Io w an e e . f o r u sed c a r

6.

7 . Net p r i c e

7.
I c e ..................................
8. K it c h e n s t o v e : G a s ............

8 . Term s:

( 5 minus 6 ).

2 □ in s t a llm e n t .

iQ C a s h .

9 - Number o f m ile s d r i v e n in 1941: _
Number o f m ile s p e r g a l .

E le c t r ic .

....

1 0 . P re ssu re cook er f o r c a n n in g .

.....

....

_____ m ile s

12. E le c . m i x e r ,ju i c e r . w h i p p e r

E xpense

No. o f
AUTOMOBILE OPERATION

9.

. . . . . _____________ m ile s

o f gaso lin e

O th er m e c h a n ic a l..

13 . W ashing m a ch in e:

P o w e r ..

14.

E d it o r ’ s
e n tr ie s

g a llo n s

O t h e r ..

10 . G a s o lin e :

J a n . . F e b . , Mar.

11.

A p r. M ay,June.

12 .

J u l . , A ug. .Sept.

. 1 8 . Sew in g m a ch in e: E l e c t r i c .

13 .

O c t ..N o v . .D e c .

. io ..

14.

. 1 6 . E l e c t r i c i r o n ...........................

O th e r . , . .

P.-1I FURNISHINGS ANQ EQUIPMENT PURCHASED. OUNING 1941

f o r y e a r .................

T o ta l

15 . O i l : ....................q t s .......................................
16 . T i r e s :

, K itchen Equipment: ....................................

17. Tu bes p u r c h a s e d .........................................
18 . R e p a ir s ,
19 . G arage

2 . T a b ............................................. N. . S - .
3 . C a b i n e t , .................................. S__

r e p la c e m e n ts , s e r v i c e . . .

r e n t , p a r k i n g .............................

4 . C h a ir , s t o o l ........................ N__ S_
5 . R e f r i g e r a t o r : E l e c t r i c . . N _ ^ S_

2 0 . L i c e n s e s , in c lu d in g r e g i s t r a t i o n
f e e and t a x e s .......... ..............................

6.

23. T o lls

in s u r a n c e ( a l l

(b r id g e ,

24. A cc e s s o rie s

fe rr y ,

(in c l.

ty p e s )

Gas.......... N:; s ;:

7.

2 1 . F i n e s , dairages p a id t o o t h e r s . . .
2 2 . A u to m o b ile

E xpen se
fo r year

Item

Number p u rc h a s e d :
1 0 New;
2 Q U s e d ...............

K e r o s e n e ..N

S_

8.

au to r a d io ) ..

Ice

9.

t u n n e l)...

O t h e r ..........N _ S _

,.N

1 0 . S t o v e : E l e c t r i c ................. .N _ S ^

2 5 . O th e r ( i n c l . a s s o c , d u e s ) ...............

11.

G a s................................N * ' S _

26.

T o t a l (1 4 th r u 2 5 ) .............................

12.

K erosen e .g a so lin e .N__ S _

27.

TOTAL ( 7 + 2 6 ) ......................................

13.
C o a l , w o o d ................N_ . S . .
1 4 . H e a tin g p l a t e s ................... _
15 . P ressu re cooker.crn nim i e q u ip m en t.

28 . P r o p o r t i o n o f a u to m o b ile e x p e n se c h a r g e a b le t o
_______ b u s i n e s s : ...........................p e r c e n t . ______________________ _

" 0 OTHER TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION
.

1 6 . P o t s , p a n s:

t r a in ,

f e r r y b o a t ..,

20. E le c t r ic

2 2 . Other s m a ll e q u ip m e n t .................
2 3 . O ther
24 .

OTHER TRAVEL le x c ln d in g b u s i n e s s t r a v e l )
6.

( i n c l u d i n g o i l m a n ) . ...............................

28 . B r o o m s .b r u s h e s ,m o p s ,d is h m o p s ..
29. D u stp a n s, p a i l s , c a n s ...................
3 0 . F l o o r w a x e r s , ‘e t c .............................

Number owned.........................................

3 1 . Laundry Equipment......................................
3 2 . W ashing m achine :E le c t r i c .N__ S_

1 0 . B o a t , a i r p l a n e , o t h e r v e h i c l e ...............................
TOTAL ( 4 th ru 1 0 ) .........................................................

12 . P r o p o r t i o n o f
v e h ic le Q




m o t o r c y c le 0

b ic y c le Q

e x p e n se c h a r g e a b le t o b u s in e s s

Hand..........N ~ s ]

2 7 . C a r p e t s w e e p e r ....................................

PURCHASE ANO UPKEEP OURING YEAR
8 . M o t o r c y c le :
Number owned.........................................

11.

la r g e e q u i p m e n t . . . ............

Cleaning Equipment: ..............................
2 5 . Vacuum c l e a n e r : E l e c t r i c N _
26.

I n t e r u r b a n b u s ...................................................................

7 . O th e r ( s p e c i f y v e h i c l e ) .............................................

9. B ic y c le :

t o a s t e r ............................... .

2 1 . O ther s m a ll e l e c t r i c equ ipm ent

T o t a l ( 1 th r u 3 ) ............................................................

5 . R a il r o a d

O th e r ............................

1 9 . K it ch e n c r o c k e r y & g l a s s w a r e ..,

2 . T a x i ...................................................................
3 . R ent o f a u t o m o b il e , i n c lu d in g sh a r e d e x p e n se
4.

E n am el..........................

18.

LOCAL— TO WORK, SCHOOL, STORES, , ETC.
1 . "Bus, t r o l l e y ,

A lu m in u m ... .............

1 7.

E xpense
f o r year

Item

o r o th e r
.............. %

(6)

33.

K erosen e, g a s o l in e .N _

34.

Hand..................................N _

209

Appendix B.—Schedules
P . ~ I I FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT PURCHASED DURING 1»»1
Item

E xpen se
f o r year

Item

35.

I r o n in g m a ch in e.............................N

36.

Irons.*

S

85 . F i n d i n g s ,

E l e c t r i c ........................................... .

37.

K e r o s e n e , g a s o l i n e ................... .

38.

F la t

tr im m in g s.................................

8 6 . P a id h e lp f o r s e w in g ...............................
87.

i r o n ...........................................

F loor C o v e r in g s : .........................................

8 8 . W o o l.....................................................................

3 9 . W ashtub, b o a r d , w r in g e r , b o i l e r ..........

89 . G r a s s ,

40.

f i b e r , e t c ..................... ................

I r o n in g

b o a rd , pads, c o v e r . . . . . . . . . .

90 . C o t t o n r a y o n ..................................................

4 1 . C lo t h e s

b a s k e t s , r o d s , p in s , e t c . . .

9 1 . L in o le u m ,

i n l a i d . . s q . y d s ....................

C l a s s , China, S ilv e r w a re: .........................

92 . F e l t - b a s e

f l o o r c o v e r in g s q .

42.

4 3 . T a b le w a r e :

93. R u b b e r, e t c ....................................................

C h in a , p o r c e l a i n .................

44.

94 . F u r n itu r e: ...................................... .....................

4 5 . F la tw a r e : S t e r l i n g ,
46.

or s i l v e r p l a t e . .

95 . S u i t e s :

L i v in g r o o m . . . .

96 .

D in in g r o o m . . . . . . N

97 .

S t e e l , p l a s t i c , e t c ...............

4 7 . H o llo w w a re :

Bedroom ........................ N ~ s ] ]

N _ S__

S t e r lin g , or s il v e r p l a t e ..

9 8 . B e d s:
99 .

M e ta l...............................N ~

b o t t l e s , e t c ...................................

100.

^ S_^

Wood................................. N

W ooden, e t c ............ .....................

48.
49 . B a b ie s '

C o ts; c r ib s :

*S ]
s

’ ]

Wood.................N

S

M e ta l.............. N

Household L in en s, Bedding, C urtains,

50 .

y d s ..

G la s s ...........................................

* S**
^S _

Other Text i l e s : ....................................................

102. B edspr i n g s ....................................N

5 1 . K it c h e n t o w e l s ..................................................

10 3. D a v e n p o r ts , s e t t e e s .............. N

S ^

5 2 . Hand t o w e l s : L in e n .........................................

10 4. D a y b e d s, c o u c h e s ................. .. .N

S ^

C o t t o n ......................................

1 0 5. D r e s s e r s , c h e s t s . . ................... N

S ^

54.
O th e r ...................................... ..
5 5 . Bath t o w e l s .........................................................

106. S i d e b o a r d s , b u f f e t s . . . . . . .N

S^

53.

10 7. D e sk s.......... ..................................... N ~ s ] ]
108. B o o k c a s e s , b o o k s h e l v e s . . . . N ^
10 9. T a b l e s : L a r g e .............................. N__ S ^

56 . B ath m a ts, e t c .................................................
5 7 . W a s h clo th s , d i s h c l o t h s ,

n o.
111. C h a ir s :
112.

p o t h o l d e r s .......................................................
58 . T a b le c lo th s :
59.

C o t t o n ....................................

60 .
6 1 . N a p k in s:

L in e n ......................................

113. B e n ch e s, s t o o l s ,

O ilc lo th , o t h e r . . . . . . .

62 .

C o t t o n .............................................

115. M iscella n eo u s: ................................................

O th e r .........................................

64 . T a b le r u n n e r s , d o i l i e s ,

h a s s o c k s ...................

11 4 . P o r c h and g a r d en f q g n i t u r e .................

L i n e n . . . .........................................

63.

s m a l l .............................n ; ;
U p h o ls t e r e d ................N _ S _
O th e r ............................. N " s "

11 6. E l e c t r i c

l i g h t b u l b s ...............................

11 7. H e a tin g s t o v e :

b r id g e s e t s .

E le c t r ic ..N

^

118.
119.

6 6 . S h e e t s .....................................................................
67 . P i l l o w c a s e s ........................................... .............

, G a s...............N [ S
K e r o s e n e ..N ^ S ^

120.

65 . P a d s , sh ow er c u r t a i n s , e t c ......................

C o a l,w o o d N ^ S ^

6 8 . B e d s p re a d s :

C o t t o n ......................................

12 1. H e a te r s , p o r t a b l e ......................................

69 .

R ay o n , e t c .............................

12 2. E l e c t r i c

71.

f a n s ................................................

12 3 . S ew in g m a ch in es:

E le c ....N

12 4.

7 0 . A fg h a n s , c o u c h c o v e r s :
W o o l..................................................

O t h e r ...N ^

^

12 5. C l o c k s ................................................................

C o t t o n , e t c .................................

7 2 . B la n k e t s , e t c . :

50% o r more w o o l . . .

1 2 6 . Lamps..................................................................

73 .

L e s s than 50% w o o l.

| 12 7. M ir r o r s , p i c t u r e s , v a s e s , e t c ..........

74 .

C o t t o n , e t c .................

XX

12 8. Baby c a r r i a g e s , s t r o l l e

7 5 . P i l l o w s ...................................................................

12 9. Hand b a g g a g e , t r u n k s . . . , ..........

76 . M a t t r e s s e s :

I n n e r s p r in g ..........................

77 .

O t h e r .........................................

13 0 . W in d o w .sh a d es, s c r e e n s , e t c . .
1 3 1 . Lawn mower, g a r d en equ ipm ent

7 8 . D r a p e r ie s , c u r t a in s ( s p e c i f y ) ...............
79 . S l i p c o v e r s .........................................................

13 2. H o u se h o ld t o o l s , h a r d w a r e ...
13 3. S t e p la d d e r s , p l a y p e n s , e t c

8 0 . Yard g o o d s f o r c u r t a i n s , e t c . :

13 4.

I n su r a n c e o n f u r n i s h i n g s . . . .

C o t t o n ....................................... y d .

13 5. Repa i r s , c l e q n / n g . .............

81.

L in e n .................................... . . y d .

13 6 .

82.

Rayon. s i l k ........................... yd.

83.

W o o l............................................yd.

J 3 7 . Money v a lu e o f fu r n is h in g s and e q u ip m en t:
R e c e iv e d a s p a^ dr g i f t ....................... $ _____

8 4 . Y a rn .....................................................................




13 8.

( 7)

TOTAL................. ................................

R e c e iv e d from t e l i e f a g e n c y . . . . . . . % ____

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

210

a READING

Q RECREATION
,
Expease
for year

Item

1 . N e w sp a p ers:

Number^............. P r i c e

D a i l y ......................... .......................

2.

Paid admissioas to movies:..............
A d u lt s :

Expease
fo r year

Item

W e e k ly ..........................................................

3 . M agaxines ( s u b s c r i p t i o n s and s i n g l e c o p i e s ) .
C h ild r e n : Number

____

P r ic e

4 . B ooks ( n o t s c h o o l b o o k s ) bou g h t d u r i n g y e a r .

O th e r p a id a d m is s io n s ( p l a y s , c o n c e r t s ,
fo r u m s , b a s e b a l l gam es, d a n c e s , e t c . ) . .

5 . B ook r e n t a l s and l i b r a r y f e e s , p u b l i c and
................................................ .
r e n t a l l i b r a r i e s .......... •

Games and s p o r t s e q u ip m e n t , s u p p l i e s ,
f e e s , and l i c e n s e s : ............................................

6.

TOTAL ( 1 th r u S ) .............................................................

T GIFTS, COWUHJTY WELFARE, RELIGION
.

H u n tin g $ _ ...........;

F i s h i n g $ ............................

Camping $ ............... :

T r a p p in g ( s p o r t ) $ ............... f

H ik in g $ .......... J

Expense
fo r year

Item
G i f t s (C h r is tm a s , b i r t h d a y , o t h e r ) t o
p e r s o n s n o t members o f e c o n o m ic f a m ily
( n o t c h a r i t y ) ..............................................................

R id in g $ ............: G o l f $ ............; ;

B a s e b a ll f .......................: T e n n is $ ...............................;
2.

S k a t e s , s l e d s , s k i s ! ............... i B o a ts $ _________ !

C o n t r ib u t io n s t o s u p p o r t r e l a t i v e s n o t
members o f e c o n o m ic f a m i l y ............................. .

C a r d s , c h e s s , o t h e r games $ ____________________ '•

3 . D o n a tio n s t o o t h e r

B i l l i a r d s , b o w lin g $ ............. ; O th e r $ .................. ;

4 . Community c h e s t and o t h e r w e l f a r e a g e n c i e s .

i n d i v i d u a l s .............................

5 . R e l i g i o u s o r g a n i s a t i o n s and m i s s i o n s ...............
T ota l ( a l l

ite m s 3 ) .......... ..................................................

R a d io and r a d io - p h o n o g r a p h :
. R a d io b a t t e r i e s ,

tu b e s ,

6 . Red C r o s s , U. S . 0 ..........................................................

P u r c h a s e ....................

7 . O th e r ,

r e p a i r s . . . . . ......................

8.

i n c lu d in g f o r e i g n r e l i e f . . . . ............

TOTAL (1 th ru 7 ) .............................................................

. P h o n o g r a p h . . . . .....................................................................

U DIRECT TAXES
.

, M u s ica l in s tr u m e n ts ( s p e c i f y ) .......................................

(Payable in schedule year, except back taxes)

. S h e e t m u s ic , p h o n o g ra p h r e c o r d s ..................................

::
...
t a x e s .................................................................

' 3. P o ll

4 . P e r s o n a l p r o p e r t y t a x e s on f u r n i s h i n g s ,
je w e lr y , e t c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

is.

S.

TOTAL: (1 th r u 1 4 ) .....................................................

V PERSONAL CARE
.

R EDUCATION
.
a

b

C

□1 _____£

Members
Item

E xpen se f o r

atten d ­

T u it io n
fe e s

ing

1.

N u r s e ry s c h o o l , k i n d e r -

2

E le m e n ta ry s c h o o l

3 . H ig h o r p r e p a r a t o r y s c h o o l .
4.

C u s in e s s o r t e c h n i c a l

$

... ... . . .

SERVICES

B ooks,
s u p p li

1 . W i fe :

H a ir c u t , sh am poo, w a v e s , m a n ic u r e s ,

t
2 . H usband:

— - — ...

H a ir c u t ,

3 . C h ild r e n under 1 5 :
4 . O th e r members o f
S.

th r u 5 ) ..................

s h a v e s , sh a m p oos, o t h e r . .
H a ir c u t

fa m ily :

,

o t h e r ................

H a ir c u t, o t h e r .,...

TOTAL (1 th r u 4 ) ..................

..............................

TOILET ARTICLES AND PREPARATIONS
5. T o ile t soa ps:

TOTAL ( 1

E xp en se
fo r year

Item

year

5 . C o l l e g e , g r a d u a te , o r
p r o f e s s i o n a l s c h o o l . ..........
6.

__________

c a k e s » * ...................

7 . T o o th p a s t e and p o w d e r , m outh w a sh , e t c .

9 . C o ld crea m , p ow d er, n a i l p o l i s h ,
8 . O th e r ( e x c l u d i n g b o a rd
and r e n t ) .................................

9.

TOTAL ( 6 t h r u 8 ) ..................




....

TOTAL (1 th r u 4 ) ...................................................

.................. ............ . . .

and p r e p a r a t i o n s . . . . . .

( 6 th ru 1 1 ) ................................................

12.

T o ta l,

13.

TOTAL (S + 1 2 ) .......................................................

(8)

...

p e r f u m e ....

1 0 . B ru sh es, c o n b s , r a s o r s , f i l e s , e t c
1 1 , O th e r t o i l e t a r t i c l e s

...

...........]

.

A ppendix B .— Schedules
W.

211

CLOTH I N(i PURCHASES DURING 1941
WOMAN OR GIRL

2 O

W i fe .

O th er fema lea ( o v e r 2 y e a r s ) .
a

b

Number

Item

1 . H ats, Caps, B e r e t s : ............

XX

3

ASe______ y e a r s

c

d

e

P r ic e

E xpense
fo r
year

No. on
band
end
1941

$ XX

$

4

No. o f weeks in e c o n o m ic f a m il y .

a

b

Number

Item

XX

c

d

P r ic e

E xpense
fo r
y ea r

e
No. on
band
end
1941

46. O v e r a lls , s la c k s :

2 . H ats: F e l t .....................

$

R a y o n .. . .

S

XX

3.

F e l t .....................

XX

47.

C o t t o n ...

XX

XX

48 .

O th e r ------

XX

5.

F a b r ic , e t c . . .

XX

49 . S p ecia l Sportsw ear: •• •
•

6 . C a p s , b e r e t s : W o o l ..
7.

6 . Head s c a r f s ,

XX

e t c ....

C o t t o n ...................
XX

XX

XX

H eavy, w it h f u r . . . .

51.

XX

XX

W o o l . . ...................

XX

XX

XX

XX

O th e r .....................

H eavy, n o f u r ............

13.

C o tto n ,

15.

R ay o n , s i l k ............ ..

53. XJndefw e s t , N i^htw cof,
XX

L i g h t - w o o l ...................

14.

l i n e n ............

XX

XX

55.

XX

g ir d le s ..

XX

57 . B r a s s i e r e s .................

XX

58 . U n ion s u i t s , com ­

le g g i n g s ........................

R ayon , s i l k . . . .

XX

60 .
XX

XX

59 .

L e a th e r. . .
C o tto n .e tc .

b i n a t i o n s : C o tto n

Wool I ..........

20 .

Wool and c o t t o n

C o t t o n ...................
62♦

XX
XX

24 . D r e s s e s , S u its , S k ir t s ,

W o o l.............................

27.

R ayon , s i l k ............

XX

Wool and c o t t o n

XX

64 . B lo o m e r s, p a n ts :
C o t t o n ...................

XX

65-

R ayon, s i l k . . . .

XX

66.

' XX

R ayon , s i l k ............

28.

‘ R ayon, s i l k . . . .

Wool and c o t t o n

XX

XX

25 . D r e s s e s : W o o l...............
26.

XX

63.

C o tto n .e tc .

23 . Fur s c a r f s , e t c ..........

B lou ses, A p ro n s: ...................

XX

6 1 . Underwa i s t s , s h ir ts :

21 . S w e a te r s : W o o l............
22 .

R ayon, s i l k

56 . C o r s e t s ,

17. Snow or s k i s u i t s ,

19 .

XX

XX

54 . S l i p s : C o t t o n ..........
XX

16. Ra i n c o a t s ........................

18. J a c k e t s :

XX

oth er s p e c ia l

52 .
li.
12.

XX

XX

9 . C o a ts, R aincoats , J ackets,

Sw eaters, F u r s : ......................

XX

5 0 . B a th in g s u i t s ,

C o tto n , e t c . . .

67. N ig h tg o w n s, pajamas:
XX

R ayon , s i l k . . . .

29.

L in e n ..........................

68-

C o tto n f l a n n e l .

XX

^0.

C o tto n , s t r e e t . . .

69 .

C o tto n ,

XX

31.

C o tto n , s t r e e t . . .

70* R o b e s , n e g l i g e e s ,

32.

C o tto n , ^ o u s e . . . .
C o t t o n , u n ifo r m s .

h o u s e c o a t s : W ool.

C o tto n , h o u s e ....

33.
34.

71.

W o o l, no f u r .

37.

C o t t o n , lin e n

XX

38.

R ayon , s i l k . .

XX

74 . H ose: S i l k ..........p r .
75.

XX
..X X ..

Ra y o n . . . . p r .
XX

76 .

N y l o n .. . . p r .
C o t t o n ,in c l.
1 is l e . . . . p r .

XX

78 .

W ool..........p r .

XX

XX

4 1 . B lo u s e s : C o t t o n ,
XX

42.

R ay on , s i l k . .
W o o l. e t c . . . .

79 . A n k le t s , s o c k s : . . .

XX

43.

XX

4 4 . P la y and su n s u i t s ,

C o t t o n .. . p r .

XX

4 5 . A p ro n s , s m o c k s............

XX

(9)

XX

Va a 1 . . . . . p r .
81 .

s h o r t s .............................




*

...

77.

3 9 . S k i r t s : W o o l.................
C otton , e t c .

lin e n ..

73. H o s ie r y : .................................

36.

L in e n .................

C otton ,

XX

R ayon , s i l k . . . .

72.

XX

3 5 . S u i t s : W ool .with fu r .

40.

o t h e r ..

XX

R ayon ,
e t c ..........p r .

XX

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

212

H CLOTHMG PURCHASES DURING I9H
.
' W AN OR G RL— C o n tin u e d
OM
a

b

SECOND W AN OR GIRL
OM

c

d

Expense
fo r

•

Item

Number Price

year
8 2 . F o o tw e a r : ................................
83.
84.

S h o e s :T o t a l

XX

p r.

* XX

$

1 | [ W ife .

e
No. on

band
end

3 Age

4 N o. o f w eek s in e c o n o m ic f a m ily

c

d

Number

a

Price

Expense
fo r
year

XX

XX

b

e

I

1941

Item

XX

XX

No.

oa

band
end
1941

L e a t h e r , L .s o l e p r .

85.

1. H ats, Caps, B e r e t s : . . .

R ubber s o l e p r .

86 >

F a b r ic ,L .s o l e p r.

87.

2 |~j O th er fe m a le ( o v e r 2 y r s . ) .

XX

2. H a ts; F e l t .................
3.

St TAW............ ..

XX

5.

XX

XX

4r

R u bber s o l e p r .

8 8 « H ouse s l i p p e r s p r .

F e l t .................

F a b r ic , e t c .

XX

8 9 . O v e r sh o e s, rubber
b o o t s ,g a l o s h e s p r .

6 . Caps, b e r e t s :W o o l .

90* R u b b e rs ............... p r .

7.

91.

Shoe s h in e s ,
r e p a i r s ......................

XX

XX

8 . Head s c a r f s , e t c . .
XX

C o tto n , e t c . .

XX

XX
9 . C oa ts, R ain coa ts,

J a c k e ts , S w ea ters,Furs:

9 2 . G lo v e s , H a n d k erch iefs,

10* C oa ts: Fur ...............
11*
H eavy, w it h f u r .

9 3 . G lo v e s :

12.

XX
94.

R ay on ,

95.

L ea th er,

96.

s ilk .,.p r .

13.

XX

14.

C otton ,

W o o l......................p r .

15*

Rayon, s i l k ..........

XX

9 9 . U m b r e lla s ....................

18. J a c k e t s :

10 0. J e w e l f y , w a t c h e s ..

XX

XX

XX

10 1 . O th e r a c c e s s o r i e s .

XX

XX

XX

10 2 . Home Sew ing: ................... ....

XX

XX

XX

yd.

XX

XX

L i n e n ....................y d .

XX

XX

105.

R ay o n ,

10^

Vaa f

10 7 . Y a rn ;

i

s ilk ...y d .
i

-

i

O th e r .............

10 9. F i n d i n g s .- ....................

XX

XX

25. D r e s s e s :

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

1 1 1 . Upkeep: C le a n i n g ,
p r e s s in g .. . . . . . . . . . . . .

XX

XX

XX

etc.

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

W o o l....

26 .

W o o l...........................

27.

R a y on ,

s i l k ..........

28>

XX

XX

110* p a i d h e l p f o r
sew ing*

R a y on ,

s i l k ..........

L i n e n .........................

XX

XX

30 .

yy

114*

..........................................

XX

115.

TOTAL..........................

XX
XX

C o tto n , h o u s e ...

XX

C o t t o n , u n ifo r m s

XX

35 .

J1 3......................... ..

s t r e e t ..

C o tto n , h o u s e ...

34.

XX

s t r e e t ..

C o tto n ,

32.
33.

(S p e ci f y ) . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C o tto n ,

31.

112. O ther C loth in g Expense:

S u i t s ; W ool, w it h
f u r ................................

11 7. Money v a lu e o f c l o t h i n g r e c e i v e d
fro m r e l i e f a g e n c y .....................................

$

W ool, n o f u r ,
C o t t o n ,lin e n .

38.

.
*

36.
37.

116. Money v a l u e e t c l o t h i n g r e c e i v e d a s
g i f t o r o a y . ...................................................

R a y on ,

s ilk ..

.............

............. ...............

...

..X X ..

3 9 . S k i r t s :W o o l ...............
40>




C otton ,

24. D r e s s e s ,S u its ,S k ir t s ,
B lo u ses, A p ron s: .............

XX

XX

.X X ..

S w e a te r s : W o o l . . . .

29 .

XX

...

23 . Fur s c a r f s , ‘ e t c . . .

XX
XX

...............

C o tto n , e t c .

21 .

XX

yVl

.............

L e a t h e r ..........

22 .

W o o l...............

.............

W o o l....

1920.

103. Y a rd g o o d s ;
C o t t o n .......... ..

XX

lin e n ...

16. R a i n c o a t s . . . . . . . . .
17. Snow o r s k i s u i t s .

XX

98« H a n d k e r c h ie f s ..........

10 8.

L iiih t - w o o l . . . . . .

f u r ,.p r .

9 7 . H an d ba g s, p u r s e s . .

10 4.

H eavy, n o f u r . . .

C o t t o n ,e t c .

4 1 . B lo u s e s :

XX

C o tto n ,
XX

42.

(10)

R a y on , s i l k

XX

43.

W o o l, e t c . .

..X X ..

213

Appendix B .— Schedules
H CLOTHING PURCHASES DURING I «
.
9H
SECOND WOMAN OR G I R L
a

b

C

d
Expen se

Item

Number

P r ic e

fa r
year

—

Continued

e

a

b

c

d

e

No. on
E xp en se

hand

Item

end

Number

P r ic e

fo r

on

hand
en d

year

19 41

No.

1941

4 4 . P la y and sun s u i t s .

7 9 . A n k le t s , s o c k s :
C o t t o n .. . . . . . p r .

$

$

$

XX
XX

46 . O v e r a lls ,

s la c k s :

47.

C o t t o n ...

48-

81 .

O t h e r ____

R ay on , e t c .

pr.

...............

...

*’ x x "

8 2 . Footw ear.*............ ' . ................
XX

83 .

X X *

84.

XX

S h o e s: T o t a l ..........p r .
L e a th e r . L . s o l e . .p r .

85.

Rubber s o l e . . p r .

50* B a th in g s u i t s .

86.

'F a b r i c , L . s o l e . . p r .

O th er s p e c i a l

87 .

R ubber s o l e . . p r .

sp o rts c lo t h e s :

88* H ouse s i i p p e r s . , . p r .

49 . S p ecial S p ortsw ea r:. . . .

*xx*

vv

..X X ..

89 . O v e r s h o e s ,

XX

ru b ber

C o t t o n .. .

XX

51.

W ool..........

■ XX

XX

b o o t s , g a l o s h e s .p r .

$2.

O t h e r ------

XX

XX

9 0 . R u b b e rs......................p r .
91.

53 . Underwear, Nightwear,

R o b e s : ....................................

XX

Shoe s h in e s ,

............. ............. ............... . . .

r e p a ir s . . i f ? . .

..X X .
............... —

9 2 . G lov es, H andkerchiefs,

XX

......

..i f? .

XX
s ilk

XX

57 . B r a s s i e r e s ....................

9 3 . G lo v e s :

XX

g ir d le s ...

XX

55 .

R ayon,

56 . C o r s e t s ,

58* Union s u i t s ,
b in a tio n s ;
59 .
60.

C o t t o n ...................... p r .
94.
95.

C o tto n

R ayon,

63.

W ool...........................p r .
XX
XX
XX

100* J e w e lr y , w a t c h e s . . . .

XX
XX
-* * ■ *

s ilk

Wool and c o t t o n

R ayon,

jam a s: R ayon,

104.
105.

s ilk

C o tto n

fla n n e l.
o t h e r ..

R ayon , s i l k ..........y d .
Va a I ...................

72.

C o tto n , lin e n ..

109. F i n d i n g s . . . ............
110. P a id h e lp f o r
111. Upkeep:

sew in g

XX

( S p e c i f y ) ....................................
113..................................................

7 4 . H ose:

S i l k ..........p r .

75 .

R a y o n ....p r .

115.

XX

C o tto n , i n c l .
l i s l e . . .p r .
W o o l. . . . . p r .




XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

.............. . . .

1

lf*MaU

1• A
•

A 1• 4 L i AJi

o r p ay...................... ..

*

117. Money v a lu e o f 'c l o t h i n g r e c e iv e d from
r e l i e f a g e n c y ............................ ........................... *

(U)

..X X ,.
XX**
XX

TOTAL...............................

g ift
XX

......

114..................................................

XX

N y lo n . . . . p r .

XX

112. Other Clothing Expense:

XX

77.

XX

C le a n in g ,

XX

7 3 . H o s i e r y : ..................................

76.

.

O th e r .................

108.

XX

W ool........................
s ilk ....

XX

XX

XX

**xx”

h o u se co a ts:
R ay on ,

XX

W o o l . . . ....................y d .

_ Yarn?

70. R obes, n e g lig e e s ,

71.

XX

L in e n ........................ y d .

XX

106.

C o tto n ,

■v

C o t t o n ...................... y d .
XX
.............

6 7 . N ig h tg o w n s, p a .

68>

..X X ..

..X X ..

103. Y ard g o o d s :

s ilk

69.

..X X ..

101. O th e r a c c e s s o r i e s . . .
102. Home Sewing: ........................

C o t t o n ..........

78.

..X X ..

f u r ....p r .

XX

C o t t o n ...

Wool and c o t t o n

..X X ..

98. H a n d k e r c h ie f s .......

6 4 . B lo o m e r s , p a n t s :

66«

...

9 9 . U m b r e lia s ........................

R ay on ,

65>

...............

9 7 . H andbags, p u r s e s . . . .

6 1 . U n d e r w a is ts ,
s h ir t s :

—

s i l k ..........p r .

XX

s ilk

Wool and c o t t o n

62.

L e a th e r,

96.

corn.

R ayon ,

214

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
W
.

l Q

years.
b

Item

Number

H ats, C aps: ..........................

I.

CLOTHING PURCHASES DURING 19m

Husband.

XX

c

d

P r ic e

Expen se
fo r
year

* XX

1 ______ 1

4

No. o f w eeks in e c o n o m ic fa m il y

a

e
No. on
band
end
1941
XX

2. H a ts:

F e l t .....................

3.

S tra w ,

street.

XX

4.

Straw , w o r k .. .

XX

b

Item

Number

46. U n d e r s h ir ts :
C o t t o n ........................
47 .

R ayon,

d

e

P r ic e

Expense
fo r
year

No. on
band
end
1941

$

$

XX

Wool and c o t t o n . .

48.

C

XX

4 9 . U n d e r w a ists.................

5. C ap s: W ool......................

s i l k . , ____

XX

XX

50. U n d erdraw ers:
C o tto n , k n i t ..........

xx

51.

C o t t o n , w o v e n .. ..

XX

S. O v e r c o a t s ........................

52.

Wool and c o t t o n . .

XX

9-

5 3.

6.
7.

C o tto n ,

e t c ...

C o a ts,J a ck ets.S w ea ters: .

XX

T o p c o a t s ..........................

9

XX

Fayon ,

s i l k ............

XX

10. R a in c o a t s ........................

54. A t h l e t i c

s u p p o r te r s

XX

11.

Snow and sk i s u i t s ,
le g g i n g s ........................

S5. P a ja m a s .n ig h t s h ir t s

XX

12-

Ja ck ets:

L e a th e r ------

14.

S w e a te r s : W ool............

16.

57.

C o t t o n ,e t c .

15.

17.

56. B a th r o b e s , lo u n g in g
r o b e s : W ool...............

W ool..............

13.

C o t t o n ,e t c ,

S u its .T r o u s e r s ,O v era lls:
18.

60 . C o t t o n , h e a v y ., p r .

XX

61 .

59. C o t t o n , d r e s s . ,
XX

T r o p ic a l

21.
22.
23 .

XX
XX

O t h e r ..

C o tto n ,

32 .

S h ir ts ,

R ubber s o l e

p r.
p r.

XX

XX
XX

C otton , o th e r .
Rayon, s i l k . . .
O th e r .....................

38 .

XX
XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

78.

Shoe s h i n e s ,r e p a i r s

39.

W ool..........

XX

XX

O t h e r ....

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

..X X ..

..X X ..

..X X ..

XX

XX

XX

80 . G lo v e s :
XX

C o t t o n .......... p r .
81.

40>

4 2 . U nion s u i t s :
C o tto n , k n i t .. . .

77 . R u b b e r s ................. pr .
. G lov es. H andkerchiefs,
Other A c c e s s o r i e s : ..........

B a th in g s u i t s , o th e r
s p e c ia l sp orts
c lo t h e s ; C o t t o n ...

, Underwear, Nightwear,
F o b e s ; ....................................

F e l t ____ p r .

76 . A r c t i c s ................. p r .

W ool........................

36.

XX

L e a th e r , p r .

75.

XX

XX

S p ecial S p orts W e a r ;....

p r.

72. H ouse s l i p p e r s

w o r k ..

33.
34 .

F a b r ic
L ea th e r s o l e p r .

74.
XX

XX

73. B o o t s : R u b b e r ., p r .

b lo u s e s :

• 35 .

70.

XX

c o v e r a lls .

C o tto n ,

xx

s o le p r.

R ubber s o l e

XX

lin e n .

S h i r t s ; ......................................

XX
XX

L ea th e r

L ea th e r

71.

XX

Rayon, e t c . .

30- O v e r a l l s ,

XX

XX

Rubber s o l e p r .
O th e r :

69 .

27 . T r o u s e r s , s t a c k s :
W ool.....................
29.

68.

XX

26. C h i l d ’ s sun s u i t s ,
s h o r t s .............................

28.

p r.

67.

R a y o n ..
C o tto n .

25.

XX

65., S h oes: T o t a l . . . . p r .
6 6 . Work: L . s o l e . , p r .

Rayon, e t c . . .
S la c k s u i t s :

24.

XX

. **.
XX

p r.

. F ootw ea r: ...............................

Cot t o n ,l i n e n .

XX

pr.

63. W o ol........................

L ig h t -w o o l. . .

Rayon,

XX

p r.

s ilk ....

62 . N y lo n .....................

S u it s : H e a v y - w o o l...

19.
20 .

. H ose: .........................................

XX
XX

XX

R ayon, e t c .

XX

W ool...............p r .

82.

L e a t h e r ------ p r .

83.

O th e r ............

p r.

xx

84. H a n d k e r c h ie f s ............

XX
XX

86. C o l l a r s ..........................
XX

85. T i e s .................................

XX

43.

C o t t o n , w o v e n ...

87 . P e l t s , g a r t e r s ,
s u s p e n d e r s .................

44.

Wool and c o t t o n .

8 8 . J e w e lr y , w a t c h e s .. .

XX

45.

R ayon,

89. O th er a c c e s s o r i e s . .

XX

s i l k ..........




(12)

XX

XX

XX

215

Appendix B .— Schedules

MAN OR BOY —
a

b

Expense

Item

Number

XX
9 1 . Yard g o o d s : C o t t o n yd.
92.

W. CLOTHING PURCHASES DURING 1941
Continued
SECOND MAN OR BOY —
c
d
e
a
b

W o o l, e t c .

yd.

9 3 . Yarn :

XX
XX
XX

W o o l........................

94.

O th e r ......................

XX
XX

96 . P a id h e lp f o r s e w in g ..
9 7 . U p k e e p .'C le a n in g , p r e s s in g

P r ic e

$ XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

fo r
year
$

No. 01
band
end
1941

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

XX

XX

9 8 . Other C loth in g E xpense:

XX
XX

99 .
100.
101.

XX .
TOTAL................

XX

XX

1 0 2. Money v a lu e o f c l o t h i n g r e c e iv e d as
g i f t o r p a y ........................ ............
1 6 3 . Money v a lu e o f c l o t h i n g r e c e iv e d
fro m r e l i e f a g e n c y ....................................

4 No. o f w eeks

b

Item

Number

XX

1. H a ts, C a p s: .............. ..

4 Age______

E xpense
fo r
year

P r ic e

$

e

No. on
hand
end
1941

XX
XX

S tra w , s t r e e t . . .

4.

S tra w , w o r k .. . .

5 . C flp s ;

O v e r c o a t s .................................

$

XX

XX
XX

C o tto n , o t h e r ..

34.

R ayon , s i l k . . . .
W o o l.................* ...

3 7 . S p ecia l Sp orts W e a r :...
3 8 . B a th in g s u i t s , o th e r
s p e cia l sp orts
c lo th e s :
C o t t o n ....
39.

W ool............

40.

O th e r ..........

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX
XX

XX
XX

4 1 . Underwear, Nightwear ,
R o b es: ......................................
U nion s u i t s :
C o t t o n k n i t ............
C o tto n , w o v e n ....
W ool and c o t t o n . .

XX
XX
XX
XX

45.
R ay o n , s i l k ............
4 6 . U n d e r s h ir t s :
C o t t o n ........................

i

47.

W ool and c o t t o n . .

XX

48.

R ayon , s i l k ............
Ifnrlerwn ists.........

..XX

40.

XX

50 . U n d erdraw ers:
C o t t o n k n i t ............
51.

C o tto n ,

XX

w o v e n ...

Wool and c o t t o n . .

53.

XX
XX
XX

R ayon , s i l k ............

5 4 . A t h l e t i c s u p p o r t e r s ..

C otton , e t c . . . .

8.

* XX

No. on
hand
end
1941

W o o l........................

6.

33.
35.

52 .

F e l t ..........................

3.

XX

for
year

P r ic e

32 . S h ir t s ; b lo u s e s :
C o t t o n , w o r k .. .

44.

d

C

$ XX

3 1 . S h ir ta •....................................

43.

in e c o n o m ic f a m ily

a

Number

42.

$

e

d

c

E xpense
Item

S

SECOND MAN OR BOY
2 Q O th e r m l e ( o v e r 2 y r s . ) .

1 1 1 H usband.

2 . H a ts:

XX

Continued

XX
XX

XX

" x x "

5 6 . B a th r o b e s , lo u n g in g
robes:
W o o l.................
57 .

R ayon , e t c . .

9 . T o p c o a t s ....................................

58 . H o se: ...............................................

10. R a in c o a t s .................................
11 . Snow & s k i s u i t s ,
l e g g i n g s .................................

XX

5 9 . C o t t o n , d r e s s ..........p r .
.6 0 . C o t t o n , h e a v y ..........p r .

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

12 . J a c k e t s :

W o o l.................

62. N y lo n ................................. pr .

13.

L e a t h e r ..........

63. W o o l .................................... p r .

14.

C o tto n , e t c .

15 . S w e a te r s :
16.

C o t t o n ,e t c .

XX

W o o l .................
” xx”

17 . S u i t s , T r o u sers.O v era lls:
18 . S u i t s : H e a v y -w o o l..........
19.
20 .
21 .

C otton ,

22 .

R ayon , e t c ..........

24.

C o t t o n ...

25 .
O th e r ____
26 . C h ild 's sun s u it s , s h o rts
27 . T r o u s e r s . S l a c k s :

XX
XX
XX

Wool

28 .

C o tto n ,

lin e n .

29 .

R ayon , e t c .




...

Rubber s o l e

70.

........
--xx"

O th e r :
L ea th er
L e a th e r s o l e p r .

69 .

F a b r ic
L e a th er s o l e

p r.

Rubber s o l e

p r.

71.

7?.

House

pr.

s 1I p p e r s . . . . . . .

7 3 # B o o t s • Rubber
*74.
75.

XX
XX

XX

R ubber s o l e p r .

68.

lin e n ..

23 . S la c k s u i t s : R a y o n . . . .

65 . ’S h o e s :
T o t a l ..........p r .
6 6 . W ork:L eather s o le p r .
67.

L i g h t - w o o l ...........
T r o p i c a l w o r s te d

XX
. XX

64. F ootw ea r: ....................................

76 .

*•••.p r .
- L e a t h e r . . . .p r .
F e l t . . . . . ..p r -s
A r c t i c s ....................pr..

7 8 . Shoe s h i n e s , r e p a i r s .

>X

•

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

216

V CLOTHING PURCHASES DURING 1 1
L
94
second

MAN o r BOY —

c

b

a

CHILD UNDER 2 YEARS

Continued
d

e
No. on

E x p en se
dumber

Item

2 No. o f w eeks in e c o r lomic f a m il)
e

d

c

b

a

band

for

P r ic e

1 Age_______ m on th s.

Expense

end

year

No. on

Number

Item

1941

band

for

P r ic e

end

year

7 9 . G lo v es, H a n d kerchiefs.

$

XX

8 0 . G lo v e s : C o t t o n , p r .

R&&dy* to~Wesr ........................

XX

$ XX

Other A c c e s s o r i e s :....

1941

$

2. C a p s, h o o d s , b on n e ts

81.

W o o l ... p r.

82 .

L e a th e r p r .

83.

O t h e r ., p r .

XX

8 5 . T i e s .................................

XX

XX
XX

S . S w e a te r s , s a c q u e s . . .

8 6 . C o l l a r .............

$ XX

l e g g i n g s ...........

XX
XX

XX

87. B e lt s ,

3 . C o a t s ...............
4 . Snow, s w e a te r s u i t s ,

6. D r e s s e s , r o m p e r s . . . .

XX

7 . P l a y and su n s u i t s . .

g a rte rs,

XX

8. S l i p s , g e r t r u d e s . . . .

XX

8 9 . O th er a c c e s s o r i e s . .

XX
XX

XX
XX

1 2 * S l e e p in g g a r m e n ts* ♦
♦

9 1 . Yard g o o d s :

1 3 . R o b e s , w r a p p e r s ..........

W o o l, e t c .

..

XX

XX
XX;

C o t t o n ................. yd .
92.

XX

10 . D ia p e r s , c o t t o n ..........

XX

XX

XX

9 . S h i r t s , v e s t s , bands

11. P a n ts , c o t t o n ..............

XX .

s u s p e n d e r s ...................
8 8 . J e w e lr y , w a t c h e s .. .

yd.

14 . S t o c k i n g s ,s o c k s

XX

p r.

XX

15 . B o o t i e s , s h o e s . , p r .

...............

XX
XX

16. L a y e t t e .............................

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

94.

XX

XX

XX

XX

.XX

O th e r .................

9 7 . Upkeep:
C le a n i n g , p r e s s in g .
9 8 . Other C loth in g E xpense:
/C a a a ; f v\

TOTAL.............................

fro m r e l i e f a g e n c y .................................. $ ..........

30.

W W SUMMARY OF CLOTHING EXPENSE
. .

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

XX

O t h e r .................

28 . Upkeep:
29.

XX

XX

L in e n ...............................

27 . P a id h e lp f o r sew in g

1 0 3 . Money v a lu e o f c l o t h i n g r e c e iv e d

XX

XX

102e Money v a lu e ox c i o m i n g reccivea a*

XX
XX

XX

23 .
25.

101.

XX
XX

XX

O th er c o t t o n ...............

XX

XX

XX
XX

20.

XX
XX

XX .
XX

19 . Yd. g o o d s :

XX
XX

..........

100.

XX
XX

...............*«

XX

XX

17* B ib s , a t e *

9 6 . P a id h e lp f o r

XX

XX

C le a n i n g ...............

XX

TOTAL...............................
Money v a lu e o f c l o t h i n g r e c e iv e d
as g i f t ................................................................

E xpense
Item

31.

1 . Woman o r g i r l

(o v e r

2y e a r s ) ..................................

2 . Woman o r g i r l

(o v e r

2y e a r s ) ...................................

(o v e r

2y e a r s ) ...................................

(o v e r

2y e a r s ) ...................................

$

X OTHER FAMILY EXPENSE
.

.

4 . Woman o r g i r l

r e c e iv e d

.

3 . Woman o r g i r l

Money v a lu e o f c l o t h i n g

from r e l i e f a g e n c y ........................................

f o r y e ar

.

5 . Man o r b o y ( o v e r 2 y e a r s ) . . .

*

E xpense
Item

f o r y ea r

6 . Kfan o r b o y ( o v e r 2 y e a r s ) . . .

1. I n t e r e s t on d e b t s in c u r r e d f o r f a m ily l i v i n g
o th e r than m ortg age on owned home........................

j
_

7 . Man o r b o y ( o v e r 2 y e a r s ) ^ .

2. Bank s e r v i c e c h a r g e s ,

s a fe d e p o s it b o x ..............

..

8 . Man o r b o y ( o v e r 2 y e a r s ) . . .
9 . C h ild under 2 y e a r s ...................
10. C h ild under 2 y e a r s . .................
11.

T O T A L (1 th r u 1 0 ) ............




3. L e g a l e x p e n se ( n o t b u s i n e s s ) .....................................

_

4 . L o s s , o t h e r than b u s i n e s s l o s s ..................................

,,

5 . F u n e r a l, c e m e t e r y ,..............................................................

..

6. O th e r.........................................................................................

.

7.

(14)

TOTAL ( 1 th ru ................................................................

CHANGES IN ASSETS_________________________________
a

b

e

Net increase

Item
3 1 . M o rtg a g e s on owned home ( f r o m
32.

3 4 . A m ounts du e t o s m a ll

B u i l d i n g and L oan A s s o c i a t i o n s h a r e s :

f
Net decreas<e

H 1 4 ) ,.

M o rtg a g e s on o t h e r r e a l e s t a t e ...............

3 3 . N o te s d u e t o b a n k s ,

5.

IK LI AB I U T I E S

d

Net decrease

N et i n c r e a s e

Item

J[____________________________ CHANGES

*

A o

t

d c

39.

B ack t a x e s

to

lo a n c o m p a n ie s ..

i n d i ” id u a 1*r
XXX

XXX
XXX

(d u e b e f o r e

1 9 4 1 ) ....................
XXX

XXX

10
11.

U .S . G overnm ent bon d s and D e fe n s e S tam p s:

12,

S o l d ...............................................................

XXX
4 3 . P a ym en ts on in s t a llm e n t p u r c h a s e s
made p r i o r

XXX

to

19 41 :
XXX

XXX

1
5

44.

XXX

F u r n it u r e and h o u s e h o ld e q u ip m e n t .

XXX
XXX

’

XXX

, Im p rovem en ts o n owned home (fr o m H 1 2 )* *

4 6 . B a la n c e

du e on in s t a l l m e n t p u r c h a s e s

made in 1 9 4 1 :

XXX

XXX
19.

I n s u r a n c e prem iums p a id

(life ,

en dow XXX

47.

F u r n it u r e and h o u s e h o ld e q u ip m e n t .

22.
23.

S e t t l e d ...........................

XXX

XXX
XXX

XXX

A p p e n d ix B .— Schedules

36

in s u r a n c e

XXX

(15)
*

<n

TOTAL C31 th r u 4 9 ) ...................................

B a la n c e o w in g on lo a n s made b y f a m ily
XXX
XXX

2 5 . R ep aym en ts t o
h e fo re

1941•

S e c u r e d b y mor t g s g e •#••••

2 7 . S o c i a l S e c u r i t y Tax (O ld Age I n s u r a n c e ).
28.

S I . N et ch a n g e

in a s s e t s an d l i a b i l i t i e s

f a m il y on lo a n s made
XXX

XXX

Unem ploym ent In s u r a n c e Tax (w h en p a id
XXX

217




Y CHANGES I FAMILY ASSETS AND LIABILITIES DURING 1911
.
N
(Excluding changes due to increases or decreases in the value of property which has so t changed hands)

D(ff). FARM INCOME SUM MARY, 1941

218

B H E 361 (3-14-42)

Schedule number
e

Money Incom e from Farm ing

T otal for year

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Taxes, insur. on farm property.........
Interest and refinancing charges on farm
mtge., production loans..................
Cash rent for land and bldgs.............
Repairs on farm bldgs, (excl. fam ily
home) and fences..........................7.
Hired labor for farm work.................
Livestock purchased...........................
Feed, hay, straw........ ..........................
Seeds, plants, trees..............................
Fertilizer, lim e!....................................
Ginning, bagging, and ties................
Machine hire, contract work involving
equipment.........................................
. Spray material, containers................
. Tools, harness, repairs on m ach........
Gasoline, oil, tires, etc., for tractor,
truck, etc. (not auto).......................
Elec., irrigation charges, other..........
(Ed) Auto operating expense, farm
share...................................................
(Ed) Food expense, farm help...........
Total (22 thru 38)......................

Wheat, corn, other grains.........................
Vegetables, fru its.......................................
T ob a cco........................................................
C otton, cottonseed.....................................
D a iry products (m ilk, cream, butter-

6. P oultry (eggs, chickens, turkeys, ducks,
geese).........................................................
7. Livestock (cattle, hogs, sheep, w ool). . .
8. Forest products..........................................
9. Other products...........................................
# U .
S.
G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G

10. Governm ent paym ents.......................
11. Work using farm equipm en t.............
12.
T otal gross m oney incom e (1 thru
I D .................................................
13. Farm expense (from 39)........................
14. Net farm m oney incom e (12 minus 13)
Inventory Change: Livestock owned,

Incr.

Deer.

O F F IC E : 1945— 644551

Net adjusted m oney income
from farm (14-f-19)‘. ...........................
21. (Ed) Net fam ily incom e (m oney
and nonmoney) from farm (20-f-E
18e)....................................................




A m t.

Code

46. Value of farm machinery on hand Jan.
1, 1941.......................................................
47. Value of auto (farm share) bought be­
fore 1941.............................................
48.
Total (45 thru 4 7 ) . . . . ...............
49.
Depreciation: 15% of item 48..

Total for year

50.
51.
52.
53.
54.

T otal acres in farm(s) operated...................
Acres owned....................................................
Acres rented....................................................
Value of farm land and bldgs.....................$
Value o f buildings, excluding fam ily
dwelling.......................................................$
54a. (Owner) Deprec.: 5% of item 54.............. $
55. Value of fam ily’s dwelling.......................... $
56. Value of occupancy of dwelling (10% of
55)................................................................. $
Tenure
57. Tenure at end of 1941:
a. Full owner
b. Part owner

□
□

□
□

c. Tenant
d. Sharecropper

If tenant or sharecropper at end of 1941:
Yes

58. Share rent paid for 1941:
Item

LH
No
Proportion

LJ

b.

Tractor, Other Farm Machinery

15. Livestock ow n ed................................ $............... $...............
Purchases in 1941:
16. Crops stored for sale (not under
40. (Ed) Automobile (farm share).
Governm ent loan)..........................
41
......................................
. . . .XX___
17. D eprec.: a Mach, (from 49).............
42
......................................
b Bldgs, (from 54a)........... . . . .XX.. . .
43
......................................
18,
T otal (15 thru 17)...................
44.
Total (40 thru 44).
45.
10 iic t 1
on U
l*
Ull/lcaoc AI Ucvlt/ooc..................
20.

Size and Value of Farm and Bldgs.

Total for year

59. A ll work animals furnished b y landlord:
a. Yes

□

___b. No

Investm ent in Farm Business

□
Incr.

Deer.

(Ed) Mach, bought in ’41 (from 45). $.................. . . X X . . . .
..XX....
New buildings (specify)....................
..XX....
New fam ily dw elling...
.............
. .X X ....
Other improvem ents (not repairs)..
Farm (purc-ha-sed or s o ld ).................
Dow n paym ent $ ........................
65 Mach sold other (specify)
.........
Inventory change (from 1
9) .........
67* (Ed) T otal (60 thru 6 6 ) ....................
68. Net increase or decrease....................
60.
61
62
63
64

6
5

Family Spending and Saving in Wartime

M on ey received from sales o f
and Government loans on:

Farm Expense

f


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102