View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

Preliminary Report (Revised)

F a m ily In co m e ,
E x p e n d itu re s ,
and S a vin g s in 1950

FROM THE SURVEY OF
CONSUMER EXPENDITURES IN 1950




June 1953
Bulletin No. 1097
(Revised)
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MARTIN P. DURKIN, Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R STATISTICS
E W A N CLAGUE, C o m m i s s i o n e r




Preliminary Report (Revised)

F a m ily Incom e,
E xp e n d itu re s,
and S a vin g s in 1950
From the Survey of
Consumer Expenditures in i950
This edition of the preliminary results of the
Survey of Consumer Expenditures in 1950 super­
sedes the earlier Bulletin of the same number.
The tables in the present edition are substantially
the same as those in the earlier edition. It
contains additional explanations which were
found to be necessary for the understanding and
use of the data.

June 1953

Bulletin No. 1097
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MARTIN P. DURKIN, Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R STATISTICS
E W A N C L AGUE, C o m m i s s i o n e r

 by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, W ashington 2 5 , D. C.
For sale


Price 3 5 cents

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
United States Departm ent of L abor,
Bureau of L abor Statistics,
Washington, D. C. June 1, 1953.
The S ecreta ry of L a b or:
I have the honor to transm it herew ith a p relim in a ry rep ort
containing the fir s t sum m arized resu lts o f the Survey of
C onsum er Expenditures in 1950. This survey was planned
and conducted by the B ureau’ s D ivision of P r ic e s and C ost
of Living, as part of the p rog ra m fo r the r e v is io n of the
Consum er P r ic e Index.
This bulletin is labeled “ p re lim in a ry ” becau se the data
a re taken fr o m the fir s t tabulations, unedited and gen erally
u n co rre cte d for the many e r r o r s that inevitably cre e p into
sum m ary tabulations of the m ass of detail on fam ily spend­
ing obtained in a survey like the Survey of C onsum er
Expenditures. B ecause this is the fir s t com preh ensive
survey of the expenditures of the urban population since
1934-36, the Bureau has decided that the resu lts should be
published in this p relim in a ry fo rm to make them available
now, rather than await the p rolon ged delay incident to an
intensive review .
The fir s t publication of these data appeared in the sum m er
of 1952 but was withdrawn fr o m distribu tion becau se of
inadequacies of explanation. While the tables in this second
edition are essen tially the sam e as those of the fir s t, the
explanation and interpretation have been expanded sub­
stantially.
EWAN CLAGUE, C o m m issio n e r.
Hon. M artin P. Durkin,
S ecretary of L abor.




FAMILY INCOME, EXPENDITURES AND SAVINGS IN 1950
The Data Obtained in the Survey

FOREWORD

The information on purchases of goods and
services, incomes, savings and deficits ob ­
tained in the 1950 C o n s u m e r Expenditure
Survey w a s recorded in considerable detail.
The B u r e a u ’s past experience in such studies
has shown that individuals interviewed on this
subject can reconstruct a complete picture of
their last y e a r ’s transactions as consumers,
only if they are asked detailed questions.
Further, decisions as to the items to be included
in the C o n s u m e r s ’ Price Index m u s t be based
on a refined b r e a k d o w n of expenditures. The
material obtained will m a k e possible a m u c h
needed statistical examination of concepts,
definitions, and methods of classification in
this field. I w a s the first large-scale investi­
t
gation of family expenditures in this country
to place virtually no restrictions on the types
of families interviewed.2 Hence, these are the
first survey data to offer a comprehensive
base for the statistical study of the factors
that influence expenditures. B y analysis, i
t
will be possible to select those groups and
classes m o s t clearly related in their m a n n e r
of spending.

The Survey of C o n s u m e r Expenditures for
19501 had as its primary purpose the collec­
tion of information on family purchases needed
for the revision of the weights in the B u r e a u ’
s
C o n s u m e r Price Index. A s in the case of the
earlier studies m a d e by the Bureau for the
purpose of selecting the items to be priced
and providing the weights for this index, the
data collected will m e e t m a n y needs besides
those which w ere its immediate occasion. The
needs for such surveys have multiplied greatly
in the past 20 years as economists, sociolo­
gists, experts in marketing research, and m a n y
other types of analysts have b e c o m e interested
in
the
relationships
between
level
of
living and general economic and social con­
ditions.
Although the uses of data on family expendi­
tures have increased greatly over time, the
central statistical problems have remained
the same: the selection of the population to be
sampled, the me t h o d of sampling, the m e a n s
to be used in obtaining the data, and the
classification of the families providing figures
with respect to income and consumption pat­
terns. W h e n the emphasis in the study of
family expenditure w a s on welfare, it w a s
particularly important to classify families into
groups believed to be homogeneous. Current
correlation studies likewise require classifi­
cation to define groups with relatively h o m o ­
geneous expenditure patterns. Today the major
interest centers in the identification of rela­
tions between expenditures, family character­
istics, and other variables, and the discovery
of those relationships which exhibit s o m e kind
of stability over time. F o r whatever purpose
used, the classification m u s t differentiate
families which are m u c h the s a m e in their
m a n n e r of living.*

Material Presented in this Bulletin
Tabulation of the large body of information
obtained on urban c o n s u m e r expenditures in
1950 have so far been limited to averages by
community, one for all families covered, and
one for the wag e earner and clerical worker
families, and to s o m e special analyses designed
for the purpose of estimating the effects of
buying for household inventories in 1950 after
the aggression in K o r e a on total c o n s u m e r
expenditures in that year, and to m a k e i
t
possible to estimate c o n s u m e r expenditures
as of 1952, as required for the revision of the
C o n s u m e r Price Index. The material presented
in this bulletin is limited for the m o s t part to
s u m m a r y data on current expenditures for
each city included in the sample. Limitations
of funds have m a d e i impossible to publish
t
the averages computed on expenditures for
the individual goods and services listed on the
schedule,
or to tabulate the information
obtained by income level.

* This survey was made by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as part
of an over-all program to revise the Consumer P rice Index which meas­
ures changes in prices of goods and serv ices commonly bought by
w age-earners’ and clerical-w orkers’ fam ilies in large citie s . In 1940
the index was revised to reflect changes in prices of items typ ical of
the family market basket of wage-earners and clerical-w orkers in the
years 1934-36. The need for another revision was recognized soon
after World War II and, in 1949, C ongress authorized a large sca le 3year program for modernization of the index. As of January 1950, an
interim adjustment of the index was made to reflect current consumer
spending patterns based on estimates drawn from postwar surveys con­
ducted in 7 cities. The results of the Survey of Consumer Expenditures
in 1950 have been used to bring up to date the weighting design and
the lis ts of items now being priced for the index. See BLS Bulletin No.
699—Changes in C ost of Living in Large C ities in the United States
1913-41, BLS Bulletin No. 1039—
Interim Adjustment of Consumers’
P rice Index, and The Consumer Price Index, a short Description of the
Index as Revised 1953.




-

There was one significant group omitted by design from the sur­
vey—the fam ilies which had existed for le ss than one year. Until many
sta tistica l problems of analysis have been solved for the fam ilies in
existe n ce for a year or more, the value of information on the newly
formed fam ilies is limited by lack o f adequate tools of study.

1

families with fluctuating incomes has not been
fully rationalized.
The data on family incomes since 1930
reveal the extent to which the income of
individual families varies over time. Since
family expenditures do not follow all of the
fluctuations in family income during a p a r ­
ticular period, income m a y not appear to have
a very close relationship to expenditures.
Nevertheless, the income of a current year
continues in favor as a m e a s u r e of economic
level because i can be obtained w h e n inter­
t
viewing families about their expenditures,
and because, despite difficulties in its use
as a m e a s u r e of economic status i is a
t
variable of considerable importance. None of
the techniques
designed
so far to obtain
information by the survey m e t h o d on income
status over a period of time, f r o m repre­
sentative samples of c o n s u m e r units, have
proved successful. Expenditures are probably
determined by s o m e average of income over
a period of a n u m b e r of years. Information on
the “ average i n c o m e ” that defines economic
level and on the m a n n e r in which con s u m e r s
respond to changes in income will m a k e a
great contribution to an understanding of the
functioning of the economy.
Classification by I n c o m e . There are two
questions of importance in the use of income
as the factor explaining consumption expendi­
tures: (1) the definition of income to be used,
and (2) the m a n n e r of classifying the families
by the income. Income is m a d e up of m a n y
types of receipts. T o the extent that the
character of family expenditures m a y be
explained by the regular source of income, the
best definition would eliminate transitory and
intermittant receipts. The determination of the
best income definition rests on further statis­
tical analysis. The studies of family expendi­
tures since 1935 have covered nearly all
income sources, and the income used for
classifying the family w a s the s u m of the items
reported. Other totals of receipts, such as
earnings, might prove superior for purposes
of analyzing income-expenditure relationships.
The nature of these surveys m a k e s a certain
degree of under-reporting on income almost
inevitable. Income f r o m such sources as
interest on savings accounts, odd jobs, occa­
sional gifts, and so forth tends to be forgotten
by a respondent. Income reported on a field
survey thus falls short of the total that would
appear on a complete income account. The
question is whether income as reported p r o ­
vides a m e a s u r e of income which is appropriate
for studying family expenditures.
T o the extent that the income forgotten in the
interview is a type which does not influence
the level of consumption expenditures, the
reported income m a y be better than the
accounting total. The analysis of family e x ­

Users of the city averages will discover that
there are considerable variations in expendi­
tures patterns f r o m city to city. S o m e of
these differences can be explained by differ­
ences in the family composition, occupation,
national origin, and income of the families
included in the city sample. The present
bulletin provides for each city average income ,
average
family
size, average n u m b e r of
earners per family, and a distribution by
income of s o m e data on race, and family
composition.
Further analyses of the data m u s t await
tabulations of the information collected by
income level and other salient characteristics.
Classification by Income Level
Definition of I n c o m e . The association b e ­
tween expenditures and income has received
m o r e attention in the past 25 years than any
other subject in the study of c o n s u m e r behavior.
The title of the recommendations of the Social
Science Research Council in 1929--*‘ o n s u m p ­
C
tion According to I n c o m e s - - A Suggested Plan
for an Inquiry into the E c o n o m i c and Social
Well-Being of the A m e r i c a n People” 3 illus­
trates the importance attached to the relation­
ship between consumption and income.
In all studies of family expenditures i has
t
been recognized that the economic level, size,
and age of the family influence the pattern of
c o n s u m e r expenditures. Accordingly, in c o m ­
parisons between two places or different t i m e s ,
the effect of these factors m u s t be held
constant. The fir st investigators of comparable
costs of living we r e m o s t impressed with the
need to hold the family composition constant.
M u c h w o r k was done to develop scales of
equivalence for families of different c o m p o s i ­
tion in order to eliminate the effect of family
composition f r o m expenditure pattern c o m ­
parison. The studies m a d e since the late 19th
Century have also tried to hold economic level
constant by classifying the families according
to current income. But until very recently
there w a s practically no critical evaluation of
annual income as a m e a s u r e of economic level
for classification of families. The reason was
that the first of these studies concentrated on
families which were defined to be in “ n o r m a l ”
circumstances. Families were surveyed only
w h e n the bread winner had a m i n i m u m a m o u n t
of employment. F o r families in “ n o r m a l ”
circumstances, the income for a particular
year can be a s s u m e d to represent m o r e
precisely the economic plane on which family
expenditures are m a d e . Use of income in a
single year to m e a s u r e the e conomic level of
o

Mimeographed report by a Special Committee o f the S ocial Re­
search C ouncil, secon d imprint, July 1934, distributed by Committee
on Government Statistics and Information Services, Washington, D.C.




2

All large-scale surveys of family expendi­
tures in this country have relied on interviews
for obtaining information on receipts and
disbursements. This m e t h o d assures a m o r e
representative sample than a “ diary” or
account-bookkeeping method, and a c o m p r e ­
hensive reporting on the goods and services
purchased during the survey period. The
survey based on the recall of income and
expenditures m a y not obtain an accurate a c ­
count of the economic transactions of the
family but the spending of the reporting
families in the survey period cannot be changed
by participation in the investigation. The
alternative procedure--account keeping by the
families included in the survey--affects the
sample to a considerable extent by the exclusion
of families unwilling to keep accounts, and
furthermore is subject to serious errors of
omission in the rec o r d s / There is also evi­
dence that the act of record keeping itself m a y
influence the family’s spending patterns.
The C o n s u m e r Expenditure Survey of 1950
used m a n y aids to m e m o r y in enumerating
and recording. Receipts and disbursements
can be classified into 5 groups for interviewing
purposes: (1) large receipts or disbursements
that are fixed in the m e m o r y by their i m ­
portance; (2) regularly recurring receipts or
disbursements of fixed amounts such as fixed
salaries or rents; (3) estimated expenditures
(e. g. hosiery, haircuts, g a s , and electricity)
often erroneous but tending to “ cancel out” in
averages for sufficiently large samples; (4)
items which can be estimated only for short
periods of time because of the great n u m b e r
of purchases that are m a d e over the course of
a year (e. g. specific foods); (5) receipts or
disbursements over a period of a year which
the respondent never knew, has forgotten, or
conceals (e. g. savings accounts, odd job
earnings, children’s allowances, component
parts of school expenses, and alcoholic beverages).
The treatment of particular types of income
or expenditures in one of these groups depends

on the internal and external checks which can
be m a d e with existing data.
The internal checks are of two kinds--con­
sistency between reports on different subjects ,
and arithmetic balance a m o n g entries. The
presence of children in a household implies
s o m e expenditures on toys, yet the n u m b e r of
families reporting expenditures on toys is
frequently less than the n u m b e r with children.
M o r e families report possession of a savings
account than report interest on savings as a
source of income.
The data in expenditures surveys at all
times and in m a n y countries have shown
a lack of balance, with average disbursements
nearly always exceeding average receipts
(See definitions, page--). This lack of balance
w a s interpreted as a tendency to exaggerate
expenditures. However, the development of
national income totals f r o m other sources
revealed the extent to which income data
obtained f r o m surveys m a y be underestimates.
This inference f r o m external checks led to
a change in the rules followed in judging the
acceptability of individual reports of expendi­
tures. In the surveys m a d e by the Bure a u in
1934-37, a report w a s rejected if the “ balanc­
ing difference,” as it is called, w a s m o r e than
5 percent of the larger of the two totals of
receipts and disbursement. In the 1941 surveys
and city surveys for the years 1945 to 1949 the
allowable discrepancy w a s increased to 10
percent.
In the
1950
survey
sizeable
discrepancies were considered clues to the
presence of errors in either incomes or
expenditures, or both, but no balancing differ­
ence w a s considered “ allowable” or “ disallowable” as such. The balancing error m a y
be predominantly in one part of the account
or it m a y be distributed throughout all parts.
The external checks of survey data depend
on the existence of statistics on income,
spending, and saving for broad population
groups. At present the national income statis­
tics and the excise tax records offer the m o s t
accurate checks of the expenditure survey data
that can be m a d e with information f r o m other
sources. Chec k s of survey data with national
income statistics have received the mo s t
attention.5 C h ecks with other data have been
used primarily in connection with the i m p r o v e ­
m e n t of interviewing methods and cannot be
applied systematically across the data until
the statistical methods required for such
comparisons have been developed.
Variation in Expenditures. The simple sur­
vey aggregates for each item, obtained by
multiplying the survey average by an estimated
total n u m b e r of families, are subject to large

4 Jerome C ornfield “ On Certain B ia ses in Samples of Human Pop­
ula tion s,M Journal of the American Statistical A ssociation, V ol. 37,
March 1943, pp. 63-68.

5 T hese ch eck s have been summarized by Selma F. Goldsmith in
an article entitled, “ Appraisal o f B asic Data for Constructing Income
Size Distributions,*’ National Bureau o f E conom ic R esearch, Studies
in Income and Wealth, V ol. 15, pp. 267-377.

penditures in relation to income and other
factors for the purpose of comparison f r o m
time to time or f r o m place to place requires
an equivalence in the relationships found in
different situations. If the surveys m a d e in
two different situations are subject to the s a m e
degree and kind of underreporting, then the
comparison m a y not be affected by the fact
that the income of the particular year w as
not fully reported.
Validity of the Data on Expenditures




3

difference between the average surplus and the
average deficit weighted by the relative n u m b e r
of families (called net saving by one definition)
is likely to be an underestimate of the true
average saving simply because of the extreme
variation in the a m o u n t saved. The families
that “ save” large amounts are a very small
proportion of the total population but the
amounts they withhold f r o m spending in a
given year f o r m a substantial part of the total
saving.

sampling errors because of the inherent vari­
ability in expenditures of families in a given
year. In the course of a year individual
families engage in m a n y transactions --pur­
chases of c o n s u m e r goods and services; p u r ­
chases and sales of assets of various kinds;
arrangements for credit of different types.
The n u m b e r of families involved in particular
transactions in a given year m a y be a relatively
small proportion of the total group. Only two
or three families out of one hundred buy a
home, stocks, bonds, or other real estate;
10 to 20 families in a hundred buy a car, a
heavy coat, or a large piece of furniture; a
great m a n y types of expenditures are m a d e
by less than half of the families. The average
expenditure is the product of (l)the fraction
of families buying times (2) the average
amount spent for the purchases. Both c o m ­
ponents of the average are subject to sampling
errors. The fraction of families buying is
subject to a relative sampling error (or
coefficient of variation) which is larger for the
smaller fractions. F o r a given total n u m b e r of
families interviewed, the average a m o u n t spent
by those buying a given item will have a
precision which depends on the n u m b e r report­
ing purchases and on the inherent variability
in the value of purchases of the particular item.
Thus, for two classes of expenditures having
the s a m e inherent variability, the coefficient
of variation due to sampling will be larger for
the class having the smaller relative frequency
of purchase.
M a n y purchases are so distributed a m o n g
families that m o r e sample averages will fall
below the “ true” average than above w h e n the
samples are of moderate size. Expenditure
surveys are usually based on “ two-stage”
samples--a sample of communities and a
sample of families within communities. In the
1950 survey, the samples of families within
cities varied f r o m less than 100 to above 600,
with m o s t below 200. The likelihood of sample
averages that are less than the “ true” aver­
ages in the samples of less than 200 varies
f r o m 50 to 65 percent. The variability of
expenditures for s o m e articles or services is
such that the survey average is likely to be an
underestimate in m o r e than half of the city
samples.
Certain groupings of disbursements also are
characterized by a high degree of variability.
E x a m p l e s are expenditures on all h o m e fur­
nishings and on medical care. Savings and
deficits are highly variable. The distribution
of families with a surplus by the a m o u n t of
surplus, and the distribution of families with
deficits by the a m o u n t of deficit, are both
skewed distributions with wide dispersion.
Surpluses and deficits range f r o m practically
zero to thousands of dollars but the variation
in surpluses is greater than in deficits. The




Estimation of C o n s u m e r Expenditures for the
Entire U r b a n Population
Estimates of population values f r o m sample
surveys of income, expenditures, and savings
present m a n y unsolved questions regarding the
evaluation of the data and m e t hods of projection.
The various estimates of total c o n s u m e r e x ­
penditures, income, and savings, based on
survey data, are at the present time seriously
dependent upon the “ highly subjective arts of
the economic statistician.” 6 E v e n surveys
designed as samples of the entire population
of consumers, such as the Survey of Spending
and Saving in W a r t i m e and the Survey of
C o n s u m e r Finances, present the estimator
with problems of adjusting the reported data
in various w a y s and filling in gaps and missing
information. Interviewing m ethods have not
yet been perfected to a stage of statistical
accuracy that warrants the assumption that
errors of observation are r a n d o m l y distributed
for every item. Adjustments of survey results
for various types of n o n - r a n d o m errors cannot
yet be guided by any standard, statistically
objective methodology. Correction of survey
errors depends in m a n y cases on extensive
analysis of the data, which could delay publi­
cation for years. A s noted above, the c o m ­
parison of survey totals with estimates f r o m
other sources have sh o w n that the survey total
usually underestimates income, savings, and
“ luxury” expenditures. The degree of such
underestimation in the 1950 survey will r emain
u n k n o w n in the absence of parallel surveys in
the rural s eg m e n t of the economy. The simple
survey totals for urban families, published m
the text of the article in the August 1952
Monthly Labor Review, as explained in that
article, had not been adjusted for underre­
porting or sampling errors. O n the basis of
analyses of earlier surveys, it m a y be in­
ferred that they underestimate the “ true
population” values.
Because of the wide interest in s u m m a r i e s
for all urban families, it is appropriate to
reprint here a large part of an article p u b ­
lished in the October 1952 Monthly Labor
® Richard Stone, “ S ocial Accounting, Aggregation and Invariance,**
Cahiers du Congres International de Comptabilite, P aris, 1948.

4

Here is h o w this w o rks in practice. In the
course of one or m o r e interviews with various
m e m b e r s of a family, the B u r e a u ’s e n u m e r a ­
tors, by diligent questioning, obtain what is
seemingly a complete 12-month record of the
family expenditures, income, and net change
in assets and liabilities. If this record were
in fact complete and error-free, the income
would be exactly equal to the s u m of expendi­
tures plus saving. F o r example, a family
might report that it had a total income of
$4,600; total expenditures of $4,500; and
saving (net increase in assets or decrease in
liabilities) of $100. Such precision is rarely
achieved in practice. Because the family is
unable or unwilling to account for all income,
expenditures, and saving, the record of the
family accounts usually is s o m e w h a t out of
balance. If the records of income, expenditures,
and saving, s e e m to be generally consistent and
in line, i.e., if the schedule m e t the test of
editing instructions with respect to internal
completeness and consistency of expenditures
with each other and with the reported m a n n e r
of living of the family, the record is used even
though expenditures plus savings reported on
the schedule do not exactly equal reported
income. The amou n t of the “ net balancing
difference*-* is entered as part of the record.
W h e n this net balancing difference is positive,
i m e a n s that reported income exceeds re ­
t
ported expenditures plus reported saving;
w h e n the net balancing difference is negative,
i m e a n s that the reported expenditures plus
t
saving exceeds income. A review of the indi­
vidual reports shows that the net balancing
difference is positive for s o m e families and
negative for others.
If these individual family net balancing dif­
ferences wer e randomly distributed--that is,
i , on the average, they about canceled out-f
they might still introduce no discrepancies
into the average or aggregate statistics. But
this is not the case. There is a general tend­
ency for the negative difference to p r e d o m i ­
nate. In other w o r d s ,families either understate
their incomes or overstate their expenditures
or saving; or the understatement in income is
larger than the understatement in expenditures
or savings. This resulting bias m u s t be taken
into account w h e n conclusions regarding the
income, expenditures, and savings relationship
are drawn.
I is clear, therefore, that this balancing
t
difference is a m e a s u r e of net reporting dis­
crepancy and does not indicate whether actual
family incomes, on the average, exceeded or
fell short of family outlays during the survey
year. The reporting discrepancy is s h own in
the tables in the Monthly Labor R e v i e w article
in the August 1952 issue and in this bulletin
as a “ balancing difference’’ to s h o w the extent
of the reporting gap.

Review, which describes the difficulties of
using the unadjusted sample averages to obtain
an average for all cities combined.
The E c o n o m i c Background in 1950
U r ban family income in 1950 reached near
record levels as a result of full e m p l o y m e n t
and high production throughout the year. The
outbreak of hostilities in K o r e a at mid-year,
coupled with high incomes and adequate sup­
plies of c o n s u m e r goods at high prices, re ­
sulted in the highest dollar expenditures by
urban families recorded up to that time. The
buying of c o n s u m e r durables reached a b normal
levels as c o n s u m e r s replenished their inven­
tories and anticipated their future needs,
following developments in Korea. Information
f r o m other sources indicates that there w a s a
substantial increase in savings in 1951 and
1952 w h e n c o m p a r e d with 1950.
Interrelationships of Reported Data
The expenditure data f r o m this survey appear
to be the m o s t comprehensive and reliable
ever collected by the B u r e a u in its long e x ­
perience in this field dating back to 1889.
In the revision of the CPI, the B u r e a u has
utilized only the expenditures and income data
of wage-earner and clerical families of two or
m o r e persons. This is because the index
m e a s u r e s the effect of price change on the
cost of living of these groups. Hence, the index
weights are not affected by s o m e of the report­
ing difficulties c o m m o n to such surveys with
respect to high-income families and independ­
ent business and professional worker families.
The inclusion of nonwage earners in the 1950
c o n s u m e r expenditure survey w a s to m a k e
available information for a variety of other
possible uses such as the preparation of c o n ­
s u m e r price indexes for other population
groups.
The collection procedures, as described in
the Monthly Labor R e v i e w of January 1951 and
in this bulletin, w e r e designed to obtain the
m o s t accurate possible information about e x ­
penditures and spending patterns ,including the
quantity and quality of the purchases,and their
frequency and source. Information on family
incomes w a s also needed, because enumeration
of detailed information on income is not only
an important stimulant to the recall of expend­
iture data, but also necessary for interpretation
of the data. Similarly, information w a s obtained
f r o m each family on net changes in assets and
liabilities (saving or dis-saving). These data
are especially important because they m a k e
possible reconstruction of the pattern of each
family’s accounts and reveal the extent to
which the reports of expenditures plus savings
are in balance with the reports of income.




5

saving effected by pension or trust funds which
were not handled by the families. Savings of
this kind are included in other (Department of
C o m m e r c e ) estimates of aggregate personal
saving.
Moreover, the definition and classification of
income and disbursements between the B L S and
other studies vary. In its effect on savings,the
m o s t important of these is in the B L S classifi­
cation of insurance (including Social Security
payments). In this study the B L S excluded
payments of insurance p r e m i u m s f r o m savings
(net change in assets and liabilities) because
of the fact that a large part of these p r e m i u m s
is insurance protection for the current year
and part represents payments toward operating
costs of the insurance companies. T o determine
that part which is available to the families for
future use, that is, which is actually savings,is
very difficult. Therefore, insurance payments
are shown separately in the survey s u m m a r y
to enable individual users to classify t h e m
according to the purposes for which the data
were being used. They are included a m o n g
total “ outlays.” In s o m e cities, the classifi­
cation of insurance payments as saving would
alone have changed the average f r o m negative
to positive savings. F o r example:
In N e w
York, on the average, a net decrease in assets
or increase in liabilities of $151 w a s reported;
the disbursements for insurance payments
were $218; in Chicago, a negative of $ 143 would
have been offset by insurance payments of $246.
In addition to these exclusions by definition,
the results of the survey under-report the
families with very high incomes. A s far as the
expenditure data are concerned, such under­
reporting presents no very serious difficulty,
but is m o r e important in its effect on the
reports of income, and still m o r e important
in its effects on reports of saving. I is well
t
k n o w n that a very large fraction of all personal
saving is done by the families in the top 5
percent, and m o r e especially the top 3 percent,
of the income pyramid.7 These families w ere
proportionately included in the sample visited
by the B u r e a u ’s enumerators, but the refusal
rates a m o n g t h e m are relatively high, since
they are found to be m o r e reluctant than the
average to disclose their finances to the e n u ­
merators. Moreover, these families, and par­
ticularly the independent business and profes­
sional persons a m o n g them, have m o r e c o m plex
financial affairs and therefore m o r e than
average difficulty in furnishing complete and
precise reports.
The under-representation and under-report­
ing of these groups lead to a serious d o w n w a r d
bias in the average reported saving.

B y the very nature of the survey, i is not
t
possible to say h o w m u c h of this net balancing
difference arises f r o m mis-reporting of any of
three categories:
expenditures, income, or
saving. Fo r m o s t cities the average net bal­
ancing difference is negative, which m e a n s the
reported figure of average expenditure plus
average saving exceeds the reported figure of
average income by the amou n t of the net
balancing difference. Discrepancies of this
kind have been noted with almost an historical
regularity. (There is a reference to this type
of discrepancy in England as early as 1790.)
Experience suggests that average family in­
c o m e is usually understated. O n the other hand,
the over-all expenditure data are m o r e accu­
rate than the income and savings data. It is,
therefore, quite incorrect to interpret the
entire difference between reported income and
expenditure as saving or dis- saving. The m o r e
likely explanation is that there has been s o m e
under-reporting of income and s o m e w h a t less
under-reporting of expenditures.F u r t h e r m o r e ,
there is reason to believe that saving, on the
average, is s o m e w h a t greater--or dis-saving
is s o m e w h a t less--than shown by the reports
of average net changes of assets and liabilities
in the survey.
C o m p a r i s o n With Other Sources
If the net balance difference is disregarded,
the survey shows that on the average there was
a slight decrease in assets or an increase in
liabilities. This leads to the question: H o w c a n
these results be interpreted in the light of re ­
ports f r o m other G o v e r n m e n t agencies which
indicate that on a national basis there w as a
positive increase in the volume of personal
saving during 1950? The extensive differences
in content, coverage, and m e t h o d between this
survey and other sources of data (e.g., the
Department of C o m m e r c e and the Federal R e ­
serve Board) do not permit a formal statistical
reconciliation at this time. It is useful, h o w ­
ever, to point to s o m e of these differences,
even though the separate effects of each cannot
possibly be estimated.
In the first place, there are differences in
coverage. The B u r e a u ’s 1950 Survey of C o n ­
s u m e r Expenditures w a s limited to cities; this
m e a n s that the results do not therefore reflect
the income, expenditures, or saving of the rural
population. Furthermore, the s u m m a r y results
published in the Monthly Labor R e v i e w in
August 1952 and in this bulletin relate only to
civilian families of two or m o r e persons which
existed as family groups during the entire year.
Therefore, they exclude the effect of income,
expenditures, and savings of single persons,
newly-formed families, and persons living in
military establishments or private institutions.
Similarly, they do not include income, or




7
Shares o f Upper-Income Groups in Income and Savings, by Simon
Kuznets. National Bureau o f E conom ic R esearch, Inc. O cca sion a l
Paper 35.

6

the Federal Income T a x information. The
income data f r o m the C o n s u m e r Purchases
Study, 1935-36, were combined by the N a ­
tional Resources C o m m i t t e e ( C o n s u m e r In­
c o m e s in the United States; Their Distribution
in 1935-36, Washington, D. C., 1938) with
data f r o m the income-tax returns in con­
structing the estimates of income distribution
in those years. The difficult problems of
m a k i n g such adjustments are n o w being
studied by income analysts.
“ The income bias has a serious aspect for
the analysis of expenditure data. Without a
valid estimate of the n u m b e r of families in
each income bracket, i is impossible to
t
obtain f r o m survey data estimates of the
aggregate expenditure for each category of
consumption for specific goods or services.
T o date, family expenditure studies have not
been found to be a good source of data for
estimates of aggregate expenditures,chiefly
because of the under-estimate of the n u m b e r
of families in the higher income brackets.
Since, however, estimates of aggregate e x ­
penditures are p r e p a r e d f r o m other sources,
the m a i n loss in expenditure analysis is
methodological. Without a m e a n s of deriving
a good estimate of aggregate expenditures
f r o m survey data, i is impossible to c o m ­
t
pare the survey results with aggregates
based on other data and thus appraise the
quality of reporting on expenditures . . .“ 9
The correction of survey results by using
data f r o m other statistical compilations has
certain limitations, arising mainly f r o m the
difficulties of defining groups of receipts and
disbursements 10 R e s earch in the field of
marketing and public opinion indicates that
i is possible to obtain significant information
t
on the characteristics of the families and
individuals unable or unwilling to participate
in a survey by analyzing the characteristics of
households during successive interviews at the
home. In 1946, the Bure a u investigated the
possibility of utilizing this type of statistical
analysis with the reports on income f r o m
families in three cities.11
O n the basis of studies of survey errors such
as those discussed above, i appears that sample
t
surveys of families and individual income are
likely to under-estimate income by at least
10 percent. The comparisons m a d e with the
Department of C o m m e r c e data in 1941 showed

Experience f r o m Previous Surveys
In 1936-40, the B u r e a u collaborated with the
National Resources C o m m i t t e e and other agen­
cies in developing procedures for estimating
reporting errors in such surveys. These a d ­
justment methods are discussed in “ C o n s u m e r
Incomes in the United States; Their Distribution
in 1935-36,” published by the committee. The
methods used included (1) splicing the data on
income f r o m tax statistics and the data on
income reported in the survey and (2) a c or­
rection of the expenditure data for over or
under-representation of families of different
types.
In 1941, the B u r e a u reported on a study of
the errors that result f r o m the methods of
interviewing housewives about their food c on­
sumption,3 At the request of the President
early in World W a r II, the Bureau, with the
Department of Agriculture, m a d e a survey of
family spending and savings in 1941. The
studies of survey errors m a d e i possible to
t
estimate their magnitudes. The Bure a u reached
the following conclusions as to biases in r e­
porting.
“ Biases in reporting i n c o m e . The pr o b ­
l em s of determining the best m e a s u r e of
income to associate with expenditure data
would beset the investigator even though the
basic data on individual reports wer e p e r ­
fectly accurate. The greatest difficulties
arise out of the two types of biases that
appear to be characteristic of reports on
income voluntarily given to representatives
of research agencies, whether government
or private. The first of these, which m a y be
called the refusal bias,results f r o m a higher
refusal rate in the highest (and perhaps also
the lowest) income brackets than a m o n g the
middle income groups. The second bias,
which m a y be n a m e d under-reporting, ap­
parently is based on the inability or unwill­
ingness on the part of m a n y families to give
a complete report on income.
“ The refusal bias is of serious conse­
quence in connection with a study having as
one of its purposes an estimate of the distri­
bution of c o n s u m e r units by the a m o u n t of
their incomes, At the present time, the
persistence of the bias is accepted as in­
evitable, although the magnitude of the effect
can doubtless be considerably reduced by
employing m o r e elaborate methods of a p ­
proaching the group of respondents d r a w n in
a sample. Since it does not appear possible
to eliminate the bias entirely, m ethods of
correction have c o m e into use. The chief
source of data used in such adjustments is

Q

“ Advances in the Techniques of Measuring and Estimating Con­
sumer E xpenditures,” by Dorothy S. Brady and Faith Williams. Journal
o f Farm E conom ics, V ol. XXVII, No. 2, May 1945. See a lso BLS Bul­
letin No. 822.
^ For the adjustment o f income and variations in the definition o f
items included in survey data and in the national income sta tistics,
see Bulletin No. 822.

Q

See “ On Certain B ia ses in Samples of Human P op u la tion s,’ 1 by
Jerome Cornfield. Reprinted from the Journal of the American S tatisti­
ca l A ssocia tion , March 1942, VoL 37 (pp. 63-68).

260292 0

-

53-2




** “ Family Incomes and the C ost o f Family B ud gets,” by Abner
Hurwitz, Monthly Labor R eview , February 1948 (p. 46).

7

that total m o n e y income w a s under-estimated
by 11 percent and w a g e and salary income by
10 percent in “ Family Spending and Saving in
Wartime* * ( B L S Bulletin No. 822). It is still not
possible to determine with precision what part
of this error is due to the loss of high-income
families f r o m the survey samples. A n e x a m i ­
nation of a considerable n u m b e r of studies
indicates that there m u s t be a significant
a m o u n t of under-reporting of inc o m e by f a m i ­
lies included in such surveys.121
*
3

places classified and arranged by city charac­
teristics such as size, climate, and income
level. This selection included all 13 of the
largest metropolitan areas and a representa­
tive sample of the other 3 city-size classes
mentioned above. Sixteen additional small
cities w e r e selected to improve the represen­
tation in the smallest-size class. Thirty-four
other cities which did not fall into this statis­
tical sample w e r e chosen either because they
w e r e important in themselves or to give a m o r e
complete geographic distribution of cities for
the total survey.
Six cities included in this
sample
were
surveyed in recent years
and therefore w e r e not included in the 1950
study.15

SCOPE OF THE SURVEY
The survey w a s conducted in 91 cities
throughout the United States. Data w e r e col­
lected during the first half of 1951; m o s t of the
interviews w e r e obtained during the m onths of
February, March, and April. A total of 15,180
dwellings w e r e visited. These dwellings con­
tained 16,353 families and single c o n s u m e r s
living alone. Complete and usable interviews
w e r e obtained f r o m 10,813 families and 1,677
single consumers.
About 4 percent of the
c o n s u m e r units did not m e e t the eligibility
requirements defined for the survey; 10 p e r ­
cent furnished incomplete or otherwise u n ­
usable information; 6 percent refused to be
interviewed; and 4 percent could not be found
at h o m e after repeated visits.

Selection of Sample Units
T he sample of c o n s u m e r units to be included
in the survey w a s d r a w n for (1) cities with
populations of 86,000 and over fro m listings of
addresses recorded in the B u r e a u of Labor
Statistics’ dwelling unit survey, and (2) cities
with populations under 86,000 f r o m list­
ings of addresses recorded in the 1950
Census.
T he B L S Dwelling Unit Surveys provided
m a s t e r listings of tenant and owner-occupied
dwellings representative of all dwellings in
each city.16 F o r the selection of dwellings to be
included in the Survey of C o n s u m e r Expendi­
tures, addresses w e r e arranged by type of
living quarters and by tenure and race of the
occupant. Rental dwellings w e r e then arrayed
by rent level, and owner-occupied units by
their location in the city. F o r s o m e cities,
w h e r e family size and income level of the
occupant w a s known, addresses w e r e arrayed
by these factors also.
W h e n Census listings w e r e used, addresses
w e r e arrayed by family size and by the income
level of the occupants. This w a s done for the
Bur e a u of Labor Statistics by the B u r e a u of the
Census so that the identities of the occupants
w e r e not revealed. The survey sample of
addresses w a s selected randomly f r o m these
arrayed listings, and all persons living at
these addresses w e r e included in the survey
if they m e t the definitional requirements of the
study. Military camps, posts or reservations,
and public or private institutions w e r e not
included in the listings.

SAMPLING
Selection of Cities
The 91 cities in which the survey w a s
conducted in 1951 w e r e selected to be repre­
sentative of all urban places in the United
States. Th e y included 11 areas with populations
of 1,000,000 or more, 18 with populations of
240,000 to 1,000,000, 29 cities with populations
of 30,500 to 240,000, and 33 cities with p o p u ­
lations below 30,500. T h e selection of cities w a s
based on three m a j o r considerations: (1) choice
of cities that would provide a good sample of the
total urban population, on which estimates of the
United States urban spending pattern could be
based; (2) selection of cities that would m a k e
possible reliable estimates of price index
expenditure weights for any city in the United
States; and (3) collection and publication of
expenditure data for certain individual cities
which are important marketing, industrial,
c o m m e r c i a l or institutional centers. T o m e e t
the first two considerations, 47 cities w e r e
selected by a statistical sampling design that
d r e w cities f r o m a complete listing of all urban

14
See Monthly Labor R eview , April 1 9 5 1 -S election o f C ities for
Consumer Expenditure Surveys, 1950. (Reprint Serial No. R .2060)
See Monthly Labor R eview , April 1949—Family Income and Ex­
penditures in 1947; or BLS Bulletin 1065—Family Incom e, Expendi­
tures, and Savings in 10 C ities; Monthly Labor R eview December 1 9 4 9 Consumer Spending: Denver, Detroit, and Houston, 1948; and Monthly
Labor R eview June 1951—Family Spending in Memphis, 1949.

12

“ Appraisal of B a sic Data A vailable for Constructing Income Size
Distributions,** by Selma Goldsmith. National Bureau of Econom ic R e­
search Studies in Income and Wealth, V ol. 13 (pp. 267-377).
13
Summary information for single consum ers w ill not be available
until the final survey report is prepared.




*6 See Monthly Labor R eview , January 1949—The Rent Index, Part
2: Methodology of Measurement.

8

Sample Size

resentative
cities.

The
n u m b e r of addresses selected for
each
city w a s
determined
on the basis
of city size, interview costs, and degree
of detailed information wanted for each
city.
Samples
for cities with populations of
1,000,000 and over ranged f r o m 625 addresses
in N e w Y o r k City to 375 in the smaller cities
of this group; for cities with populations of
240,000 to 1,000,000, 250 addresses w e r e
selected; samples for cities with populations
of 30,500 to 240,000, and for which detailed
information w a s desired, included 160 a d ­
dresses; and for smaller cities, 65 addresses
we r e selected. The families and single con­
s u m e r s living at these addresses w e r e r e p ­

W e ig h t
fa cto r

P o l t ijn n r o
M d * r - - -T
TPnfi+.nn^ M p s s * T rrT.rtrT.r.
r o rr
» r \ T1
Cl p v p ] qnd," C h in * , . t T . . t T .
D e t r n i t , Mi c h * r . TTT- T. TT.
/^-pgial < .Q C*^l if* * , r r , , r
a
N o r t h e r n New J e r s e y * ...........
New York, N.
Phi 1 ad el phi n Pq ,rTTTTrT.
Camden, M, .T*t r , , .T t _ T , t T
Pi ttshnrgh , Pa*. TT_____T.
5 + . T.mii<a, M o * r -#(.r f .rf1.5.
San F r a n c i s c o _ O a k la n d
_
C alif . * .........................
W a s h in g t o n , D. C . * . . . . . . .

C i t i e s w it h p o p . o f
2 4 0 ,0 0 0 t o 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0

2.9

.8
.8
1 .0
1 .7

1 .4
1 .5

M inne a p o l i s ——S t • P a u l
Mi n n * r _____r.TTT.T.T ..

1 .7
1 .3

0 .7
,7
.9

T.

1 .6
.7

N o r f o l k ___P o r t s m o u t h , V a .
Olpflh^, l\[Ph, - - r r t » » t r r » r P nr t.l *^nd, Oregon** T . . T . .

1 .1

Hr*! a a n s

P'pnvi i o n n o

J.*>.

R

T

, r.

FACTORS

C i t i e s w it h p o p . o f
3 0 ,5 0 0 t o 2 4 0 ,0 0 0

W e ig h t
fa cto r

K a n sa s C i t v , Mo*........
Toni svi 11 e, K y T ___ TT.tT.
Mi q mi, IHfl,.,,..,,.,___
Mi 1wankee, W i s T ......TT.

N o ^

.9
.7

.9

, . .r.

Sc.rantnn, P a * r T.T.......
i^a^h* 1 r
Ymingfitnunj flhi o * . T r . , . .

1 .4

.9
1.9

A l b u q u e r q u e , N. M e x .. . . .
B a k e r s f i e l d , C a l i f ..............
B a n g o r, M a in e .. . . . . . . . . .
B l o o m i n g t o n , 1 1 1 . . ........... ..
B u t t e , M o n t .. . . . . . . . . . . .
C a n ton , O h io * .. . . . . . . . . .
C h a r l e s t o n , S . C........
Chariestnn, W. V a * . .....
Charlotte, N. C . .........
Cumberland, M d . . ....... .
Des Moines, Iowa........
Evansvilie, I nd*. ..........
H unt i n g t o n — As h i a n d ,
—
W. V a * .........................
Jackson, M i s s . . . . . . . . . . .
T.ittle Rock, Ark........
T.ynchhnrg, V a * ____......
M a d is o n , W i s * . . . . . . . . . . .
Middletovm, Conn*T ......
Newark, O bio*T . . . . . . . . . .
Ogden, U t a h , T . T . T . . . . . . .
n v i a h nma. c i ty, n v i a T . . T T
Pboepi y , Api <., t . T r T T . . T .
7
pnptland
Mai ne. , _____ . . .
S a l t Lake C i t y , U t a h . . . .
■Ean . T o s e , c.ai i f * , t . , t . T .
E a 1 1 s , O , D a k r ______
Tnrsnn,
Ari <.
7_________________
Wichita, K n n s f . . , . . . . . . .
Wilmington, D e l rffTftT..
OimiY

* Included

in b asic

sample

o f 4-7 c i t i e s .

Detroit,

Mich.,

Washington,

D.

DEFINITIONS

C . , and Houston,

Tex.

W e ig h t
fa c to r
0 .4
.7
.6
.4
.8
.8
.7
1 .2
.7
.8
.8

.9
.6
.4
.7
.4
.8
.8
.5
.4
.6
.7
.8
.7
1 .0
.4
.5

.9
1.0

C i t i e s w it h p o p . o f
2 ,5 0 0 t o 3 0 ,5 0 0
An na, 1 1 1 * .
A n t i o c h , C a l i f . ..................
B a r r e , V t . ..............................
Camden, A r k * . .................. ..
C h e y e n n e , W y o .. . . . . . . . .
C o lu m b ia , T en n .............
C o o p e r s t o w n , N. Y......
D a l h a r t , T e x ...... .
D e m o p o li s , A l a . ........
E l k o , N ev ......... .
F a y e t t e v i l l e , N. C . . . . .
G a r r e t t , I n d * ........ .
G le n d a le , A r i z * . . . . . . . .
G rand F o r k s , N. D a k * . . .
G rand I s l a n d , N e b * . . * . .
G ra nd J u n c t i o n , C o l o . . .
G r in n e ll, I o w a . . . . . . . . .
L a c o n i a , N. H .* ............
L o d i , C a l i f * .................
M a d i l l , O k la * ........................
M i d d l e s b o r o , K y * ................
Nanty-Glo, P a . . . . . . . . . .
P e c o s , T e x . . . . ..............................
P u la s k i, V a * .. . . . . . . . . .
R a v e n n a , O h io * ..............................
R a w l in s , W yo*
R o s e b u r g , O r e g .. . . . . . . .
S a l i n a , K a n s .. . . . . . . . . .
S a n d p o in t, I d a h o * .. . . . .
S a n ta C ru z, C a l i f . . . . . .
S h a w n ee, O k la * ..............
S h e n a n d o a h , I o w a * .........
W a s h in g t o n , N. J ....................

wer e surveyed pri o r to

W e ig h t
fa cto r
0 .6
.7
.7
.9
.5
.7
.6
.6
.8
.5
.8
.6
.7
.6
.7
.8
.7
.7
.7
.8
.7
.7
.8
.7
.6
.6
.6
.8
.6
.7
.7
.8
.5

1950.

In the great majority of cases, the m e m b e r s
of a family are related by blood, marriage, or
adoption. Gro u p s of unrelated persons w h o
share both i ncome and expenses are seldom
found. In deciding the classification of con­
s u m e r units, related persons living in one
household w e r e considered as forming one
c o n s u m e r unit unless it w a s very clear that
s o m e of the group, such as m a r r i e d children
living with parents, kept their household
finances separately. N e v e r - m a r r i e d children
w e r e always considered as m e m b e r s of the
family: w h e n children pay a specified s u m for

C O N S U M E R UNIT: F A M I L I E S A N D S I N G L E
CONSUMERS
The **c o n s u m e r unit" m a y be either (1) a
family of two or m o r e persons dependent on a
c o m m o n or pooled income for their m a j o r
items of expense and usually living in the
s a m e household, or (2) a single c o n s u m e r --a
person w h o is financially independent of any
family group, living either in a separate h o use­
hold or as a r o o m e r in aprivatehome, lodging
house, or hotel.




of the

17
In the calculation of these weight factors, 3 citie s surveyed in
earlier years were dropped from the city sample. 3 other citie s sur­
veyed in 1947 and 1948 are included in the weighting diagram.

1 .1
1 .1
.9

9.6

total populations

A v e rage family incomes, expenditures and
savings figures for individual cities, w h e n c o m ­
bined with appropriate weights, will provide
estimated averages for all urban families in the
United States. Weight factors that m a y be used
for this purpose are given in the table below.
These weights are based on 1950 Census popula­
tion figur e s for urbanized place s repre sented by
each city included in the s a m p l e 17in accordance
with the design used in the selection of cities.

fl+.l
0 q * r T T T T T t T ---P irm in g h a m , A l a . . . . . . . . .
^1nf*-iTYnai'-i . n h ito * t . ,.., T
H a r t f n r d , C on n. . . . . . . . . .
H ou ston , T a x * .. . . . . . . . . .
i *^pqpo1 i a , Tndr r t T lr T

1 .2
1 .7
4 .7
1 .4
2 .8
4 .2
3 .3

the

City Weights

CITY WEIGHT

A r e a s w it h p o p . o f
1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 and o v e r

of

9

r o o m and board, even w h e n there is an apparent
separation of finances, they usually do not pay
the prevailing rate, and s o m e t i m e s they are
partly being supported by or are partly sup­
porting the family. Frequently they share the
family car, personal laundry, and other family
resources also.
T w o families or single c o n s u m e r s w h o lived
in one dwelling and shared household expenses
but did not pool inco m e w e r e separate c o n s u m e r
units. A family m e m b e r working a w a y f r o m
h o m e during the survey period, but w h o c on­
tributed with s o m e regularity to family support
and c a m e h o m e approximately once a m o n t h
or oftener, w a s treated as a m e m b e r of the
family, unless he w a s living in a military camp,
post, or reservation.
A child living a w a y at school w a s considered
a m e m b e r of the family if the parents provided
the m a j o r part of his support. Other persons
supported by contributions f r o m the family
i n come but not living in the household w e r e
considered as a separate c o n s u m e r unit.
CONSUMER

living in o w n e d h o m e s at the end of 1950, and
(2) renters, living in rented houses, flats, or
r o o m s at the end of 1950.
I ncome
Information relating to family i n come w a s
obtained in the survey primarily to provide a
basis for classifying families into economic
levels for summarization and analysis of family
expenditures. M o n e y income after p a y m e n t of
personal taxes is used for this purpose because
it m o s t nearly represents spendable income.
In order to obtain an accurate record of family
income after p a y m e n t of personal taxes, d e ­
tailed information on w a g e and salary income
before and after payroll deductions w a s ob ­
tained for each earner in the family. F a m i l y
i n come f r o m other sources w a s also recorded,
together with a record of tax p a y ments and
other deductions f r o m income.
M o n e y inco m e f r o m the following sources
w a s recorded in detail: w a g e s and salaries,
including tips and bonuses; income f r o m unin­
corporated businesses and professions; net
receipts f r o m rented properties; net receipts
f r o m r o o m e r s and boarders; interest and
dividends; receipts based on military service;
u n e m p l o y m e n t insurance; social security b e n e ­
fits; other public and private pensions and r e ­
tirement benefits; cash received as public or
private relief; periodic payments f r o m private
insurance annuities and trust funds; profits
f r o m the sale of stocks and bonds bought in
1950; contributions f r o m persons not in the
family; and such items as alimony, prizes,
and gambling gains.

UNITS ELIGIBLE F O R T H E
SURVEY

The survey w a s conducted during the spring
of 1951. Interviewers asked for income, e x ­
penditures, and savings data for the calendar
year 1950, and recorded this information for
the family as it existed during that year. In
m o s t cases, the m e m b e r ship of families did not
change during the year; but m a n y families
w e r e found to have had part-year family m e m ­
bers--that is, persons w h o joined or left the
family in 1950. Income and expenditures for
part-year family m e m b e r s w e r e recorded for
that portion of the year w h e n they w e r e in the
family, and these data w e r e combined with the
data for the rest of the family.
C o n s u m e r units that w e r e newly for m e d or
dissolved in 1950 w e r e not included in the
survey; for example, a newly m a r r i e d couple,
if both w e r e m e m b e r s of other families before
marriage. If both m e m b e r s w e r e single c on­
s u m e r s before marriage, a record for the full
year w a s taken for the wife and the husband
w a s treated as a part^year m e m b e r . N o record
w a s taken of the husband’s inc o m e or expendi­
tures before marriage.

Other M o n e y Receipts
Inheritances and occasional large gifts of
m o n e y f r o m persons outside the family and
net receipts f r o m settlements of fire and
accident policies w e r e recorded separately
in order to differentiate “ windfall” receipts
f r o m regular income. These receipts w e r e not
included with m o n e y income for family classi­
fication purposes. Receipts f r o m the settle­
m e n t of life or annuity policies and borrowing
w e r e considered as decreases in assets or
increases in liabilities.
N o record of gifts and inheritances in the
f o r m of real estate, securities, or other
property w a s m a d e unless such property had
been sold during the survey period. In that
case the a m o u n t received f r o m the sale w a s
recorded as a m o n e y gift or inheritance.

Family Size
Family size w a s based on the total n u m b e r
of w e e k s during which both full-and part-year
m e m b e r s belonged to the family; 52 we e k s of
family m e m b e r s h i p w a s considered equivalent
to 1 person, 26 w e e k s equivalent to 0.5 per sons,
etc.

SAVINGS A N D D E B T S
T h e survey did not attempt to obtain records
of total family assets and liabilities, but only
the net change in savings and debts that
occurred over the year. Families reported the

Tenure
Families w e r e classified into two tenure
groups for purposes of the survey;(1) owners,




10

am o u n t of change in debts o w e d to such agencies
as stores, banks, brokers, and insurance
companies; the a m o u n t of change in savings in
banks, postal savings accounts, stocks and
bonds, etc.; and p a y m e n t s of principal on
ow n e d h o m e s and other properties. The alge­
braic s u m of all these items w a s calculated
to give the net change in all assets and liabili­
ties during the year. P r e m i u m s paid on p e r ­
sonal insurance w e r e treated as a separate
item.

an interviewer. It w a s the practice to obtain as
m u c h information as possible f r o m the first
person interviewed, generally the h o m e m a k e r ,
and then revisit w h e n other family m e m b e r s are
at h o m e to obtain data on income, investments
and mortgages, and personal expenses, if the
h o m e m a k e r w a s unfamiliar with these.
Before field w o r k w a s started, training
conferences w e r e held for supervisors w h o
w e r e to conduct the surveys in the various
cities. T he training w a s designed to insure
that supervisors and interviewers would be
completely familiar with all phases of the sur­
vey, and that the collection m e t h o d s would be
uniform f r o m city to city. Technical m anuals
giving detailed instructions for collection and
editing of the data w e r e used in the training.
Special devices used in the training of the field
staff included a training guide for use by
supervisors in the training of interviewers,
workbooks containing examples of family situa­
tions designed to illustrate special sections of
the questionnaire, a sound film on interviewing,
and other visual aids.
Supervisors w e r e provided with a complete
set of these materials to use in^the training of
interviewers. Interviewers w e r e selected f r o m
a roster of applicants living in the survey
area w h o had been given a special interviewer
aptitude test by local E m p l o y m e n t Service
offices. After intensive training, interviewers
showing the greatest aptitude for the w o r k
w e r e further trained to edit the data. The
editing of schedules while collection w a s in
progress permitted an immediate revisit to the
family for clarification of questionable a n ­
swers and to obtain m o r e information for
incomplete reports. The general accuracy of
reported information w a s judged by comparing
reported total expenditures with the s u m of
total i ncome and change in savings and debts,
and by checking the internal consistency of the
scheduled data.
M a n n e r of tabulating the data. The data on
receipts and disbursements are presented as
averages based on the total n u m b e r of c o n s u m e r
units of a particular classification. The tables
in this bulletin give the averages for all con­
s u m e r families of two or m o r e per sons in each
city; and for all wage-earner and salaried
clerical families. The total account of receipts
and disbursements in the f o r m of averages
based on all units in a class balances, like the
account for an individual family, with an error
of approximation. The average balance of r e ­
ceipts and disbursements shown in the tables
s u m m a r i z e s the “ balance sheets’* for all the
units in a class. These “ balance sheets” con­
sist of the totals for the reported i n c o m e and
other receipts, expenditures and other outlays
and the changes in assets and liabilities. The
totals as s h own in the tables are the following:
1. Current consumption expenditures

EXPENDITURES FOR CURRENT
CONSUMPTION
Expenditures for family living w e r e reported
in detail under 15 m a j o r groups of goods and
services. The amounts recorded included the
total cost of items bought in 1950, whether or
not all p a y m e n t w a s m a d e during the year.
Financing charges and interest on installment
and other credit purchases, shipping and d e ­
livery charges, and sales and excise taxes
w e r e included as part of the expenditure for
the item to which they applied. Discounts and
trade-in allowances w e r e deducted f r o m the
gross price.
Details of expenditures during all of 1950
w e r e obtained for all goods and services
except foods. The questionnaire used in the
interview listed in great detail items of cloth­
ing, house furnishings and equipment, fuel,
utilities, housing, h o m e maintenance and r e ­
pair, automobile and local transportation, m e d ­
ical and personal care, reading, recreation and
education, and miscellaneous items. Space w a s
provided for recording the a m o u n t spent for
each purchase and for clothing, housefurnishings and s o m e other items, the price, the
n u m b e r bought, the m o n t h in which the p u r ­
chase w a s m a de, and the store n a m e w e r e also
recorded.
Experience in surveys of this type has s h own
that it is not possible to obtain by the interview
m e thod reliable reports on the amounts spent
on specific food items over periods longer than
a w e e k or two. Therefore, for the annual r e ­
port, only estimates of the total a m o u n t spent
in 1950 for food to be prepared at h o m e and
me a l s eaten a w a y f r o m h o m e w e r e obtained.
A supplementary schedule w a s used to obtain
a detailed record of food items purchased
during the w e e k preceding the interview, and
in m a n y cases, the family also furnished a
diary of their food expenditures for the follow­
ing week. These weekly food reports, combined
with price records and information about sea­
sonal purchase patterns, have been used to
estimate detailed food expenditures for the
year.
COLLECTION PROCEDURES
In m o s t cases, completion of an interview
required m o r e than one visit to the family by




11

T he two totals for the changes in assets and
liabilities, which s u m m a r i z e the specified two
columns of the individual reports, give s o m e
indication of the volume of financial trans­
actions that is involved in the course of a year.
T he net change in assets and liabilities,
recorded on line 39 or line 44 in tables 1, 2,
and 3, and line 16 or line 21 in table 4 is an
estimate of saving or dissaving, exclusive of
the saving that is included in insurance p a y ­
ments. This estimate is the cumulation of the
reports on the details of all transactions in­
volving the purchase or sale of assets, the
borrowing of m o n e y and the arrangements for
credit of various types.
A c c u r a c y of the data. The errors in report­
ing, discussed in the preface, m a y produce
systematic errors in the averages for s o m e
expenditures and for s o m e types of i ncome and
investment. F o r m o s t outlays the possible
biases are small c o m p a r e d with the r a n d o m
errors of sampling. Because of the great
variability in purchases during a year, the
sampling error in the average receipt or outlay
is often large c o m p a r e d with the average
a m o u n t of receipt or outlay. F u r t h e r m o r e in
small samples the sample averages for r e ­
ceipts or purchases that are m o s t variable
are m o r e likely to be underestimates than over­
estimates of the “ true** a v e r a g e s . E x p e n d i ­
tures for such categories as medical care, fur­
nishings, and education, income f r o m ^such
sources as interest and dividends, and the net
surplus or deficit are illustrations of the highly
variable total that has a relatively large s a m ­
pling error. T h e characteristic distribution of
the net surplus or deficit, as sh o w n in a n u m b e r
of surveys, has a substantial concentration in
small deficits or surpluses and a great spread
towards large deficits or surpluses. The stand­
ard deviation of this distribution is generally
m u c h larger than the average, as shown in table
B. Hence, if the average net surplus or deficit is
very small and the size of sample under 100, the
sampling error of the average can be larger than
the average.
In table B the s u m m a r y description of the
surplus or deficit distribution f r o m three sur­
veys sho w that the average net surplus or
deficit depends on the n u m b e r of families
reporting a surplus, a deficit or no change in
assets and liabilities and the average amounts
reported by these families. In this table,
insurance p r e m i u m s are counted as an increase
in assets; that is, surplus or deficit represents
the difference between income and c o n s u m e r
expenditures plus gifts and contributions. D e ­
spite the variations in date, locality and m e t h o d

2. Insurance
3. Gifts and contributions
4. M o n e y income m i n u s personal taxes
5. Other m o n e y receipts
6. Change in assets or liabilities
The last item, change in assets and liabilities,
is s hown on two lines to avoid the use of a
minus sign w h e n the change is negative. The
decrease in assets and/or increase in liabili­
ties, represents a net deficit and is sh o w n on
line 44 of tables 1, 2, and 3 and line 21 of table
4; the increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities, stands for a net surplus and is shown
on line 39 of tables 1, 2, and 3 and line 16 of
table 4. The totals sh o w n in the tables satisfy
the balancing equation-Consumption expendi­
tures
Income after taxes
Insurance

+
+

> = < Gifts and contributions
+

Other m o n e y r e ­
ceipts

Change in assets and
liabilities
+

^Balancing difference
Thus in Baltimore, Maryland, the account a p ­
pears f r o m table 1 as follows:

Income after
taxes $ 3.983

Other m o n e y
receipts 37

>

^Consumption
expenditures
Insurance
Gifts and con­
tributions
Change in a s ­
sets and lia­
bilities
Balancing dif^ ference
Total

Total $4,020

$3,919
203
141

-152
-91
$4,020

Table A presents the average account in
s o m e w h a t m o r e detail. H e r e the changes in
assets and liabilities are given in two c o m ­
ponent totals before “ netting** so that the
balancing equation (except for the balancing
difference) can be s h own as:
Receipts = Disbursements,
Income after
taxes
+

Other m o n e y
receipts

or«£

tC

on sumption expendi­
tures
+

Insurance
+

+

Decrease inassets and/or in­
crease in liabil­
ities




> = < Gifts and contributions
18

.

The frequency distributions of the most variable items are ex­
tremely J-shaped with the greatest frequency at some sm all amount,
often zero, and a long range of variation. For distributions of this type
it is known that averages from small samples tend to be le s s than the
“ true” average for the total population more often than greater.

Increase
in
assets
and/or decrease in
^ liabilitie s
12

are those w h o s e heads w e r e e m p loyed in 1950
in one of the following occupational classes:
clerical and kindred workers, sales workers,
operatives and kindred workers, service
workers, except domestics, and laborers,
including f a r m laborers w h o resided in cities.
Families w h o s e total 1950 family income after
p a y m e n t of personal taxes exceeded $10,000,
w e r e not included in this group.
Tables 1, 2, 3 and 4 .--Show average family
income, expenditures and savings for 91 cities
separately, and percentage distribution of
average expenditures for current consumption
goods and services. The averages are based
on all families included in the survey whether
or not they reported on a particular item. For
example, average expenditures for tobacco
w e r e calculated by dividing the total n u m b e r of
families in the survey into the total tobacco
expenditures reported by families.
These averages obscure the great diversity
of i n come and spending patterns a m o n g indi­
vidual families. The a m o u n t of m o n e y income
available for family living, and the w a y in
which this inco m e is allocated by individual
families to foods, housing, clothing and other
goods and services, varies considerably and
depends to a large degree on family income
level, family size, age and occupation of family
head, and on other family characteristics.
Eventually, averages for different types of
families will be available f r o m the survey
results.
Less information is given for cities in
which a very small n u m b e r of families reported
information in the survey. The sample size in
these cities does not permit the calculation of
reliable averages for m o r e detailed s u m ­
maries.
Tables 5, 6, and 7.--These tables show the
distributions of families by s o m e of the m o r e
important family characteristics; Table 5--by
income class; Table 6 --by family size; and
Table 7--by age and occupation of head, tenure
and race.
Distributions are sh o w n for the total n u m b e r
of families selected in the samples and for the
n u m b e r of families w h o reported complete and
usable information. All families selected in
the sample w e r e asked to report these charac­
teristics even though they did not furnish all
the information requested in the questionnaire,
and m o s t families cooperated to this extent.
C o m p a r i s o n of the distributions for the total
sample and for those reporting complete in­
formation, therefore, provides s o m e m e a n s of
evaluating the effect of non-reporting on the
survey results. F o r example, if for any city
a disproportionately larger n u m b e r of low in­
c o m e families failed to report, the averages
are probably s o m e w h a t too high.

of collecting the data, findings of these surveys
show a great similarity. The n u m b e r of units
reporting a surplus is generally greater than
the n u m b e r reporting a deficit, except in unusual
circumstances, such as the situation of the
farmers in the dust bowl of 1936. The average
surplus a m o n g families reporting a surplus
and the average deficit a m o n g families report­
ing a deficit tend to be roughly equal. Thus the
net surplus or deficit, as estimated by a sample
survey, depends critically on the percentage of
families in the sample reporting a net surplus
or a net deficit.
The percentages of units reporting a net
surplus or a net deficit are a cumulation of the
reports on m a n y specific transactions. A c ­
cordingly, the sampling variation in these
proportions can be estimated only f r o m the
range of variation a m o n g m a n y samples which
can be considered for this purpose as coming
f r o m the s a m e universe. A study of these
proportions as reported in all surveys since
1888 indicates that the range of apparent
sampling variation is very great w h e n the
sample size is below 50 and is even substantial
w h e n the samples include 100 families. These
ranges which are shown in Table C indicate
that the average net surplus or deficit for a
given survey group m a y be m o s t seriously
affected by the sampling variation in the p r o ­
portion of families or spending units, reporting
surpluses, deficits, and no change in assets or
liabilities during a year. T o use the survey
data as a basis for the study of savings or
dissavings would require a careful statistical
analysis of these apparently simple distribu­
tions.
The m a n y expenditures that have the s a m e
type of characteristic distributions as the net
surplus or the net deficit are similarly affected
either by the n u m b e r reporting any outlay or
the n u m b e r reporting a large outlay. In the
case of expenditures, or of an outlay for the
acquisition of specific assets, the statistical
analysis of the proportions reported in a s a m ­
ple survey is not, as in the case of the net sur­
plus or deficit, complicated by a dual character
in the source of the variability. The percentage
of families buying a refrigerator is a m u c h
simpler, m o r e direct estimate than the p e r ­
centage of families having a surplus on the
y e a r ’s income.
DESCRIPTION OF TABLES
The tabulations included in this report
contain s u m m a r y information for (1) all fa m i ­
lies, and (2) wage-earner and clerical-worker
families. S u m m a r i e s for single c o n s u m e r s
w e r e not available at the time of this printing.
W a g e - e a r n e r and clerical-worker families




13

TABLE A .--B A L A N C E SHEET OF AVERAGE RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS, ALL FAMILIES
Receipts

City

Money
income
before
personal
taxes1

Money
income2
after
taxes

Disbursements

Decrease
Other
in assets
money
and/or in­
receipts3 crease in
liabilities

Total

Balancing
difference

Total

Current
consump­
tion

Insurance

Gifts
'and
contribu­
tions

Increase
in assets
and/or de­
crease in
liabilities

Cities with populations of
1,000,000 and over
Baltimore, M d ...................
Boston, Mass....................
Chicago, 111....................
Cleveland, Ohio.................
Los Angeles, Calif.......... .
New York, N. Y ..................
Northern New Jersey Area........
Philadelphia— Camden, Pa........
Pittsburgh, Pa............... .
San Francisco— Oakland, Calif....
St..Louis, Mo ...................

$4,302
4,572
5,318
5,309
5,160
5,479
5,015
4,895
4,935
5,020
5,113

$3,983
4,200
5,080
4,876
4,745
4,852
4,614
4,506
4,583
4,584
4,546

$37
18
49
39
107
61
79
41
23
42
20

$852
866
1,974
1,275
1,669
1,449
1,102
689
836
1,235
965

$4,872
5,084
7,103
6,191
6,521
6,362
5,795
5,236
5,442
5,861
5,531

$-91
-318
-140
-118
-169
-337
-200
-177
-125
-138
-12

$4,963
5,402
7,243
6,308
6,690
6,699
5,995
5,413
5,567
5,999
5,543

$3,919
4,300
4,905
4,671
4,661
4,932
4,737
4,384
4,506
4,477
4,251

$203
176
246
243
209
218
236
194
222
213
206

$141
201
261
216
167
251
211
147
144
156
161

$700
725
1,831
1,178
1,653
1,298
811
688
695
1,153
925

Cities with populations of
240,000 to 1,000,000
Atlanta, Ga.................... .
Birmingham, Ala.................
Cincinnati, Ohio................
Hartford, Conn..................
Indianapolis, Ind...............
Kansas City, Mo .................
Louisville, Ky ................. .
Miami, Fla............. .........
Milwaukee, Mis............... .
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn......
New Orleans, La.................
Norfolk— Portsmouth, Va.........
Omaha, Nebr.....................
Portland, Oreg..................
Providence, R. I ................
Scranton, Pa....................
Seattle, Wash...................
Youngstown, Ohio................

4,138
3,436
4,884
5,159
4,618
4,709
4,068
4,853
5,332
4,983
3,555
3,800
4,418'
4,419
3,978
3,805
4,976
4,911

3,872
3,242
4,532
4,678
4,188
4,321
3,754
4,573
4,682
4,579
3,321
3,589
4,092
4,017
3,718
3,607
4,594
4,539

37
13
331
67
0
16
336
10
22
103
25
17
18
91
71
142
94
3

877
711
986
674
1,214
1,264
1,154
1,766
1,043
1,452
761
832
1,193
1,782
661
694
1,272
820

4,786
3,966
5,849
5,419
5,402
5,601
5,244
6,349
5,747
6,134
4,107
4,438
5,303
5,890
4,450
4,443
5,960
5,362

-129
-172
-95
-419
+15
+68
-60
-241
-63
-84
-174
-123
-118
-48
-303
-143
-140
-111

4,915
4,138
5,944
5,838
5,387
5,533
5,304
6,590
5,810
6,218
4,281
4,561
5,421
5,938
4,753
4,586
6,100
5,473

3,769
3,272
4,186
4,672
3,854
3,989
3,741
4,605
4,331
4,429
3,347
3,646
3,978
4,134
3,916
3,747
4,554
4,166

175
151
228
221
169
192
187
189
219
207
147
207
193
187
192
184
172
225

177
153
179
198
138
191
113
195
276
164
100
113
118
167
118
117
151
168

794
562
1,351
747
1,226
1,161
1,263
1,601
984
1,418
687
595
1,132
1,450
527
538
1,223
914

Cities with populations of 30,500
to 240,000
Albuquerque, N. Mex.............
Bakersfield, Calif..............
Bangor, Maine...................
Bloomington, 111................
Butte, Mont.....................
Canton, Ohio....................
Charleston, S. C ................
Charleston, W. V a ...............
Charlotte, N. C .................
Cumberland, Md.......... ........
Des Moines, Iowa............... .
Evansville, Ind.................
Huntington-Ashland, W. Va.......
Jackson, Miss...................
Little Rock, Ark................
Lynchburg, V a ...................
Madison, Wis....................
Middletown, Conn.......... .
Newark, Ohio....................
Ogden, Utah.....................
Oklahoma City, Okla.............
Phoenix, Ariz...................
Portland, Maine.................
Salt Lake City, Utah............
San Jose, Calif............... ..
Sioux Falls, S..Dak..............
Tucson, Ariz....................
Wichita, Kans...................
Wilmin£ton, Del.................

5,237
6,255
5,178
4,585
4,327
4,428
3,529
5,234
4,164
3,879
4,857
3,879
4,067
3,982
4,281
3,627
5,230
5,147
4,559
4,163
4,540
3,853
3,825
4,470
4,322
4,596
4,173
4,235
4,931

4,797
5,420
4,797
4,217
3,937
4,135
3,355
4,786
3,860
3,606
4,500
3,567
3,822
3,731
3,939
3,427
4,779
4,772
3,997
3,905
4,128
3,595
3,621
4,209
4,046
4,247
3,945
3,920
4,518

40
39
30
8
17
29
27
83
70
0
119
12
0
73
20
124
23
34
74
17
115
3
22
4
51
0
9
15

1,686
1,134
694
1,135
1,111
789
611
1,342
983
463
1,429
835
799
1,072
924
499
1,962
858
1,100
967
1,174
905
832
940
1,430
1,041
1,429
1,031
1,375

6,523
6,593
5,521
5,360
5,065
4,953
3,993
6,211
4,913
4,069
5,929
4,521
4,633
4,803
4,936
3,946
6,865
5,653
5,131
4,946
5,319
4,615
4,456
5,171
5,480
5,339
5,374
4,960
5,908

-111
-285
-119
-203
-251
-43
-74
+2
-67
-26
-130
-91
-111
-84
-39
-67
-117
-320
-262
-134
-273
-116
-99
-105
-68
-151
-134
-135
-274

6,634
6,878
5,640
5,563
5,316
4,996
4,067
6,209
4,980
4,095
6,059
4,612
4,744
4,887
4,975
4,013
6,982
5,973
5,393
5,080
5,592
4,731
4,555
5,276
5,548
5,490
5,508
5,095
6,182

4,732
4,955
4,222
3,881
4,015
3,917
3,303
4,345
3,637
3,303
4,316
3,474
3,740
3,647
3,670
3,340
4,487
4,728
3,831
3,966
4,237
3,565
3,643
4,039
4,123
4,259
4,020
3,720
4,580

199
240
229
283
163
154
196
257
192
257
179
163
189
124
162
196
256
298
132
230
181
138
216
177
165
147
151
167
239

158
137
124
186
105
146
98
217
174
144
154
117
141
137
195
177
151
157
214
157
172
109
117
192
166
155
254
208
170

1,545
1,546
1,065
1,213
1,033
779
470
1,390
977
391
1,410
858
674
979
948
300
2,088
790
1,216
727
1,002
919
579
868
1,094
929
1,083
1,000
1,193

Cities with populations of 2,500
to 30,500
Anna, 111.......................
Antioch, Calif..................
Barre, V t .......................
Camden, Ark.....................
Cheyenne, Wyo...................
Columbia, Term..................
Cooperstown, N. Y ...............
Dalhart, Tex....................
Demapolis, Ala..................
Elko, Nev.......................
Fayetteville, N. C ..............
Garrett, Ind....................
Glendale Ariz...................
Grand Forks, N. Dak.............
Grand Island, Nebr..............
Grand Junction, Colo............
Grinnell, Iowa...................
Laconia, N. H ...................
Ladi, Calif.....................
Madill, Okla....................
Middlesboro, Ky .................
Nanty— Glo, Pa..................

3,899
5,524
4,049
3,207
5,432
3,273
3,766
4,470
3,074
6,027
3,712
4,373
3,621
4,286
4,373
3,862
3,792
3,723
4,383
3,324
3,175
3,954

3,596
5,105
3,780
3,036
5,042
3,155
3,547
4,000
2,928
5,335
3,470
4,028
3,404
4,018
3,970
3,585
3,593
3,554
4,075
3,184
3,019
3,784

0
24
3
4
0
22
256
0
1
2
9
15
36
0
165
1W
2
1
38
379
0
26

974
2,011
542
853
1,206
1,065
985
1,851
455
1,419
801
874
996
1,528
1,394
t .356
<+oi
2,028
1,474
768
668
591

4,570
7,140
4,325
3,893
6,248
4,242
4,788
5,851
3,384
6,756
4,280
4,917
4,436
5,546
5,529
5,111
4,076
5,583
5,587
4,331
3,687
4,401

-232
+11
-281
-23
-49
-33
-89
-31
-50
-245
-52
-118
-19
-90
-155
-63
-151
-188
+8
-170
-81
-149

4,802
7,129
4,606
3,916
6,297
4,275
4,877
5,882
3,434
7,001
4,332
5,035
4,455
5,636
5,684
5,174
4,227
5,771
5,579
4,501
3,768
4,550

3,397
4,519
3,901
3,094
4,578
3,220
3,468
3,548
2,847
5,053
3,400
3,699
3,689
3,947
3,960
3,538
3,279
3,779
4,099
3,190
3,261
3,779

174
155
231
114
217
100
170
155
169
255
161
234
98
156
173
147
100
195
150
117
97
166

141
230
170
110
200
103
188
168
84
162
153
139
123
121
210
94
123
129
184
116
89
123

1,090
2,225
304
598
1,302
852
1,051
2,011
334
1,531
618
963
545
1,412
1,341
1,395
725
1,668
1,146
1,078
321
482

(*)

See footnotes at end of table.




14

TABLE A . — BALANCE SHEET OF AVERAGE RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS, ALL FAMILIES— Continued
Receipts
City

Cities with populations of 2,500
to 30,500— Continued
Pecos, Tex......................
Pulaski, V a .....................
Ravenna, Ohio............ .......
Rawlins, Wyo....... .............
Roseburg, Oreg..................
Saliva, Kans....................
Sandpoint, Idaho................
Santa Cruz, Calif...............
Shawnee, Okla...................
Shenandoah, Iowa................
Washington, N. J ...... ..........

Money
income
before
personal
taxes1

$4,081
3,663
4,172
5,033
4,949
3,888
3,379
3,923
3,227
4,243
4,337

Money
income2
after
taxes

$3,821
3,449
3,880
4,711
4,576
3,602
3,282
3,694
3,080
3,973
4,062

Disbursements

Decrease
in assets
other
and/or in­
money
receipts3 crease in
liabilities

$33
7
90
1
0
290
18
23
5
150
12

$998
744
1,443
1,002
1,445
818
1,443
949
1,010
1,771
911

Total

$4,852
4,200
5,413
5,714
6,021
4,710
4,743
4,666
4,095
5,894
4,985

Balancing
difference

$-37
-127
-216
-141
-128
-44
-103
-59
-44
-207
-217

Total

$4,889
4,327
5,629
5,855
6,149
4,754
4,846
4,725
4,139
6,101
5,202

Current
consump­
tion

$3,727
3,326
3,722
4,262
4,039
3,405
3,316
3,336
3,186
3,672
4,154

Insurance

Gifts
and
contribu­
tions

Increase
in assets
and/or de­
crease in
liabilities

$104
156
180
179
156
189
102
158
132
170
198

$136
122
78
189
204
107
89
105
87
144
114

$922
723
1,649
1,225
1,750
1,053
1,339
1,126
734
2,115
736

*Less than $0.50
1 Includes Federal and State income, poll, and personal property taxes.
2 Total money income from wages, salaries, self-employment, receipts from roomers and boarders, rents, interest, dividends, etc., less occupational ex­
pense .
3 Includes inheritances, large gifts, and lump-sum settlements from accident or health insurance policies, which were not considered current income.

260292 0

-

53-3




15

TABLE B . — VARIATION IN THE REPORTED SURPLUS OR DEFICIT IN THREE SAMPLE SURVEYS: PERCENTAGES OF FAMILIES REPORTING A
SURPLUS. A DEFICIT AND NO CHANGE IN ASSETS AND LIABILITIES AND THE AVERAGE AMOUNTS REPORTED IN SELECTED SAMPLE SURVEYS
IN 1935-36, 1949 AND 1950 1
Percent of units having—

Average amounts
Deficit
among those
reporting
a deficit

7
3

$364
405

$221
297

$179
129

423
503
325

Sample size

Survey and population group

A surplus

Consumer purchases study— 1935-36
Families in small cities in:
North Central Region....................
Pacific Region..........................
Families in villages in:
New England Region......................
Families (Negro) in:
Southeastern Villages...................
Families on farms in:
Pennsylvania-Ohio.......................
N. Dakota-Kansas........................

3,118
1,500

A deficit

Estimated
standard
deviation of
the surplus
and deficit
distri­
butions1
2

Surplus
among those
reporting
a surplus

No change

Net surplus
or deficit,
all families

65
59

28
38

743

55

39

6

201

267

13

972

40

37

23

54

64

-2

84

2,254
1,088

66
25

25
72

8
3

562
416

306
626

296
-352

636
737

Survey of consumer finances— 19493
All spending units................... .
Professional and semiprofessional.......
Managerial and self-employed............
Clerical and sales......................
Skilled and semiskilled.................
Unskilled and service...................
Farm operator...........................
Retired.................................

3,512
287
466
486
895
344
410
180

60
69
71
65
64
55
55
50

34
29
28
31
34
36
42
26

6
2
1
4
2
9
3
24

737
1,100
1,609
524
486
335
1,342
354

792
1,585
1,280
533
499
373
1,421
1,089

173
297
784
175
142
50
139
-106

1,054
1,765
1,998
723
681
493
1,931
972

Survey of eomsumer expenditures— 1950
All families:
Atlanta.................................
Chicago.................................
Los Angeles.............................

178
336
325

60
56
53

39
42
47

1
2

617
1,116
1,222

723
1,259
969

90
103
193

931
1,674
1,560

Wage-earner and salaried-clerical families:
Atlanta.................................
Chicago........... ......................
Los Angeles.............................

114
211
195

58
58
54

41
42
46

1

374
482
813

722
1,217
852

-80
-229
44

765
1,203
1,176

—

—
—

1 Surplus, in this table, is defined as a positive net change in assets and liabilities. Deficit is a negative net change in assets and liabilities. In­
surance premiums on life and endowment are counted as an increase in assets. In the Survey of Consumer Finances the surplus is called "saving" and the def­
icit "dissaving." Personal insurance is included in surplus.
2 The standard error of the mean for samples of varying sizes may be computed by standard formula. See Chapter XIV, Frederick Cecil Mills, Statistical
Methods, New York, Henry Holt and Company, Revised 1938.
"All spending units" include spending units for which occupation of head was not ascertained and those headed by housewives, students, unemployed per­
sons and farm laborers— none of which are included among the occupational groups. In deriving the average surplus, deficit and net dhange amounts for the
occupational groups, however, two of the distributions used include these spending units (headed by housewives, students, unemployed persons, etc.) with the
"retired" group. Averages computed from distributions that consistently excluded these spending units would not differ greatly frt>m the averages for occupa­
tional groups shown in this table.
Sources: Consumer Purchases Study. Changes in Assets and Liabilities, Urban, Village, Farm Series, Misc. Publ. 46-4, U.S. Department &f Agriculture, 1941.
Family Income and Expenditures, Urban and Village Series, Misc. Publ. 396, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 1940. Family Income and Expenditures, Farm
Series, Misc. Publ. 465, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 1941.
"1950 Survey of Consumer Finances, Part IV," Federal Reserve Bulletin, November 1950, Tables 1, 3, 4, 18.
"Survey of Consumer Expenditures in 1950." U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

TABLE C .— RANGE AMONG SAMPLES IN THE PERCENTAGE OF FAMILIES REPORTING A SURPLUS BY SIZE OF SAMPLE i
Range among samples in specified survey2 of percentage of units reporting a surplus, and number of
samples in each size class
Approximate size of sample

1901

1888.-90
Range

Samples

Range

1934-36

1917-19

Samples

0-49............................

0-100

34

_

_

50-99............................

40-87

10

—

—

100-149...........................

27-83

9

41

1

150-199...........................

33-83

8

31-88

200-299...........................

53-74

7

18-90

300 and over......................

48-73

3

6-80

Range

Samples

Range

1949

Samples

Range

19503

Samples

Range

Samples

_

_

_

_

_

_

18-70

44-92

42

51-74

7

—

—

28-50

21

63-83

23

53-78

14

—

—

27-55

19

8

58-81

13

51-69

12

50

1

35-45

6

5

66-80

9

52-65

9

69

1

29-38

3

19

60-76

5

46-71

18

55-71

5

—

42

—

1 Sources of data: Sixth, Seventh and Eighteenth Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Labor for 1888-90 and 1901; Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Bulletins
357 and 634-637 for 1917-19 and 1934-36; Federal Reserve Board Bulletin, November 1950, for 1949; Bureau of Labor Statistics tabulations from a report to be
published later for 1950.
2 In the 1888-90 and 1901 Studies the survey unit is a state. In the later studies the survey unit is a city except for the Federal Reserve Board Study
(1949) where it is total United States classified by occupational group.
3 Insurance premiums not counted as an increase in assets. Therefore the percentages are lower than in the other surveys.




16

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 1 . —Average Money Income, E x p e n d itu re s, and S a v in g s—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C l e r i c a l Worker F a m ilie s 2 in C i ti e s With P o p u la tio n s o f 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 and Over.
Boston,
Mass.

Baltimore,
Md.
Item

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Chicago,
111.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Cleveland,
Ohio

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Los Angeles,
Calif.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

New York,
N. Y.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Number of families..................................

262

175

222

116

336

211

268

183

325

195

388

Average family size3 ................................

3.2

3.3

3.5

3.5

3.2

3.3

3.3

3.1

3.1

3.2

3.2

3.2

$3,919

$3,838

$1,300

$1,301

$1,905

$1,575

$1,671

$1,173

$1,661

$1,152

$1,932

$1,218

Housing4 .................. .................... .

197

196

586

518

566

539

537

191

518

195

637

500

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.............

182

170

229

229

163

119

166

155

101

99

135

123

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

231

Household operation...............................

212

171

183

165

238

197

219

187

315

208

230

251

213

259

353

271

305

171
292

232

Housefurnishings and equipment: Total.............

355

339

298

219

Household textiles....... .......................

30

29

39

11

12

37

11

10

13

33

51

19

Furniture........................................

63

71

63

76

91

91

69

71

92

85

101

71

Floor coverings................ ................

11

18

20

19

23

23

11

32

31

29

30

22

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment............

85

91

79

81

79

75

93

92

120

122

55

57

Miscellaneous5........... .......................

38

39

12

12

6 115

12

55

51

66

70

58

50
1,155

Food................... ...........................

1,151

1,140

1,357

1,352

1,127

1,376

1,315

1,276

1,319

1,303

1,535

Alcoholic drinks........... .......................

78

81

61

66

97

91

87

92

59

65

101

97

Tobacco.......... ............ ...................

77

85

98

106

80

81

79

81-

61

68

82

82

Personal care................................ .

91

89

100

101

107

101

99

98

99

97

100

92

137

118

185

170

609

535

603

581

188

155

608

511

Women and girls: Total..... ....................

221

209

252

213

312

252

292

283

225

210

313

278

Outerwear................................... .

111

107

133

126

167

136

116

111

106

97

172

115

Underwear and nightwear....... ...............

27

26

31

33

31

32

10

12

31

31

36

36

Hosiery and footwear........................ .

53

51

57

58

60

58

66

67

50

17

67

69

Clothing: Total...... .............................

Hats, gloves, accessories..... ................
Men and boys: Total........ ....................

27

25

28

26

51

26

10

33

35

32

38

28

152

113

166

161

216

208

225

217

179

171

208

190

Outerwear......................... .

92

82

99

96

130

121

131

126

110

102

130

118

Underwear and nightwear............. .......

12

12

13

12

16

16

18

18

11

11

16

15

Hosiery and footwear.................. .......

28

28

33

33

12

13

16

18

38

39

36

36

Hats, gloves, accessories..... ................

20

21

21

23

28

28

27

25

17

16

26

21

Children under 2 years: Total...................

7

8

8

7

8

9

7

7

5

Clothing materials and services: Total..........

57

58

59

56

73

66

79

77

79

Medical care......................... .............

158

153

203

203

257

259

211

199

283

Recreation...... ... «.............................

191

193

199

203

215

230

259

265

225

Reading........ ............... ..................

38

35

12

14

12

38

11

39

36

Education.........................................

27

20

28

15

31

22

28

19

Automobile transportation.......... ...............

103

101

323

367

197

513

560

6

7

5

80

71

218

290

220

218

213

219

36

13

39

21

20

51

21

550

692

672

291

237
117

68

Other transportation....................... .

95

87

103

97

129

121

108

107

71

82

121

Miscellaneous7 .... ............... ................

19

12

60

76

61

16

51

51

62

68

73

12

Insurance............. ........ ....................

203

196

176

169

216

200

213

205

209

206

218

169

Gifts and .contributions................ .............

111

127

201

121

261

153

216

161

167

130

251

161

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Payments on principal and down payments on owned
homes............ ........................... .

136

129

161

108

300

155

355

281

516

323

225

151

Personal taxes*....................... .............

319

255

372

291

238

366

133

373

115

355

627

268

3,983

3,801

1,200

3,886

5,080

1,363

1,876

1,516

1,715

1,298

1,852

3,990

37

53

18

11

19

12

39

57

107

176

61

8

152

209

111

317

113

129

97

99

16

161

151

291

-91

-98

-318

-311

-110

-121

-118

-110

-169

-153

-337

-292

Money income9 ....................................
Other money receipts10............... ..............
Net decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




17

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 1 . —Average Money Income, E x p e n d itu re s, and S a v in g s—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 in C i ti e s W ith P o p u la tio n o f
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 a n d Over—C ontinued
Northern New
Jersey Area
Item
All
fami­
lies

PhiladelphiaCamden, Pa.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

San FranciscoOakland, Calif.

Pittsburgh,
Pa.

All
farm lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

St. Louis
Mo.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

185

Number of families..... ...........................................

374

233

277

176

303

199

226

137

287

Average family size3...... ..........................................

3.2

3.3

3.2

3.3

3.7

3.7

3.2

3.2

3.3

3.3

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total..................

$4,737

$4,502

$4,384

$4,200

$4,506

$4,107

$4,477

$4,426

$4,251

$3,783

Housing4.......................................................

551

497

494

437

528

450

548

521

455

401

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.............................

210

199

195

190

156

152

95

86

168

154

Household operation...............................................

237

158

223

179

190

132

209

197

199

140

Housefurnishings and equipment: Total...................... .......

325

320

269

284

284

270

314

303

289

280

Household textiles..............................................

47

48

37

37

37

34

36

40

36

33

Furniture.......................................................

111

109

72

86

73

78

78

66

63

69

Floor coverings.................................................

32

26

22

23

42

30

27

31

36

24

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment............................

85

84

88

92

89

92

112

110

99

104

Miscellaneous5 ..................................................

50

53

50

46

43

36

61

56

55

50

Food........... ...................................................

1,442

1,436

1,380

1,367

1,386

1,317

1,313

1,316

1,260

1,207

Alcoholic drinks..................................................

85

90

99

114

90

92

79

83

94

79

Tobacco...........................................................

84

89

92

103

86

88

69

76

64

65

Personal care.....................................................

102

99

104

103

99

94

98

99

96

90

Clothing: Total...................................................

565

514

539

499

559

495

494

479

471

413

Women and girls: Total..........................................

292

265

282

245

290

248

246

240

242

207

Outerwear.....................................................

157

136

153

121

158

130

128

109

123

102

Underwear and nightwear......................... ..............

36

34

37

36

37

34

31

34

30

26

Hosiery and footwear..................... .....................

67

68

61

61

58

53

54

61

56

50

Hats, gloves, accessories.....................................

32

27

31

27

37

31

33

36

33

29

Men and boys: Total.............................................

193

174

183

178

192

181

167

159

155

140
84

Outerwear.....................................................

120

107

114

109

115

105

103

93

96

Underwear and nightwear.......................................

16

15

14

14

15

14

14

14

12

11

Hosiery and footwear........................ ..................

37

35

34

35

38

39

34

34

32

31
14

Hats, gloves, accessories............................ .........

20

17

21

20

24

23

16

18

15

Children under 2 years: Total......... ..........................

9

9

9

9

8

8

8

7

6

7

Clothing materials and services: Total..........................

71

66

65

67

69

58

73

73

68

59

Medical care......................................................

246

216

225

206

211

196

269

266

206

185

Recreation............................................ ............'

242

230

205

206

209

205

207

206

196

173

Reading..................... ......................................

40

40

37

37

38

35

42

39

27

13

23

14

27

22

28

25

37
15

33

Education..........................................................
Automobile transportation .........................................

459

488

353

332

499

421

548

561

523

410

86

12

Other transportation..............................................

72

73

105

99

98

101

95

88

79

Miscellaneous7....................................................

50

40

41

30

46

37

78

74

90

62

Insurance....... ....................................................

236

206

194

185

222

193

213

209

206

180

Gifts and contributions.................. •
..........................

211

173

147

128

144

112

156

144

161

106

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities...............

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Payments of principal and down payments on owned homes............

258

245

106

101

218

136

273

319

319

198

Personal taxes®...... ...... ........................................
Money income9 ...................... ................... .............

401

354

389

336

352

294

436

346

567

302

4,614

4,302

4,506

4,168

4,583

4,115

4,584

4,402

4,546

3,880

Other money receipts10..............................................

79

85

41

13

23

25

42

16

20

31

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities...............

291

243

1

156

141

216

82

217

40

121

Balancing difference11..............................................

-200

-251

-177

-176

-125

-56

-138

-144

-12

-37

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




18

P re lim in a ry
TABLE l a . —P e rce n ta g e D i s tr i b u ti o n o f E x p e n d itu re s For C u rre n t Consum ption—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 i n C i ti e s w ith
P o p u la tio n s o f 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 and Over
Baltimore, Md.
Item

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0
12 6

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.............

Boston, Mass.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

1? 9

13.6

4.6

4.4

Household operation............... ................

5 .4

Housefurnishings and equipment: Total........... .

Percent of expenditures for current consumption......

Household textiles.......................... .
Furniture............................... ........

Chicago , 111.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

12.8

11.5

5.3

5.3

4.5

4.3

5.9

6.6

.8

.8

Cleveland, Ohio

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

11.8

11.5

3.3

3.3

3.8

4.9

5.7

6.0

.9

.9

Los Angeles,
Calif.

Hew York, N.Y.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

11.0

11.8

11.1

12.9

11.8

3.6

3.5

2.2

2.2

2.7

2.9

4.3

4.7

3.8

5.0

4.2

6.4

4.9

7.2

5.9

6.5

6.5

7.6

7.6

6.0

5.9

.9

.8

.9

.9

.9

.7

1.1

1.2
1.7

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

1.6

1.9

1.5

1.8

1.9

. 2.0

1.5

1.6

2.0

1.9

2.0

Floor coverings.................................

.4

.5

.5

.4

.5

.5

.9

.7

.7

.7

.6

.5

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment............

2.1

2.4

1.8

1.9

i.6

1.6

2.0

2.1

2.6

2.8

1.1

1.4

Miscellaneous5..................................

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

6 2.3

1.0

1.2

1.2

1.4

1.5

1.2

1.1

Food..............................................

29.3

29.8

31.5

31.5

29.2

30.1

28.1

28.5

28.3

29.3

31.1

34.2

Alcoholic drinks..................................

2.0

2.2

1.4

1.5

2.0

2.0

1.9

2.1

1.3

1.5

2.1

2.3

Tobacco......................................... .

2.0

2.2

2.3

2.5

1.6

1.8

1.7

1.9

1.3

1.5

1.7

1.9

Personal care............. ........................

2.3

2.3

2.3

2.3

2.2

2.3

2.1

2.2

2.1

2.2

2.0

2.2

Clothing: Total...................................

11.2

10.9

11.3

10.9

12.4

11.7

12.9

13.1

10.5

10.2

12.3

12.8

Women and girls: Total..........................

5.6

5.6

5.9

5.6

6.4

5.6

6.3

6.3

4.9

4.7

6.4

6.5

2.9

2.8

3.1

2.9

3.4

3.0

3.1

3.2

2.3

2.2

3.5

3.4

Outerwear.................................... .
Underwear and nightwear.......................

.7

.7

.8

.8

.7

.7

.9

.9

.7

.7

.7

.8

Hosiery and footwear..........................

1.3

1.4

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.1

1.1

1.4

1.6

Hats, gloves, accessories.................... .

.7

.7

.7

.6

1.0

.6

.9

.7

.8

.7

.8

.7

Men and boys: Total.............................

3.9

3.6

3.9

3.8

4.4

4.5

4.8

4.9

3.8

3.8

4.2

4.5

Outerwear........ ............................

2.3

2.1

2.3

2.2

2.6

2.7

2.8

2.8

2.3

2.2

2.6

2.8

Underwear and nightwear..... .................

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.4

.4

.3

.3

.3

.4

Hosiery and footwear....................... .

.8

.7

.8

.8

.9

.9

1.0

1.1

.8

.9

.8

.8

Hats, gloves, accessories.....................

.5

.5

.5

.5

.6

.6

.6

.6

.4

.4

.5

.5

Children under 2 years: Total.................. .

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.1

.2

.1

.1

.1

.1

Clothing materials and services: Total......... .

1.5

1.5

1.3

1.3

1.4

1.4

1.7

1.7

1.7

1.6

1.6

1.7

Medical care.............................. ........

4.0

4.0

4.7

4.7

5.2

5.7

4.5

4.4

6.1

5.6

5.9

5.2

Recreation.... .................. ................

5.0

5.0

4.6

4.7

5.0

5.0

5.5

5.9

4.8

4.9

4.9

5.1

Reading.................. ............ ............

1.0

.9

1.0

1.0

.9

.8

.9

.9

.8

.8

.9

.9

.7

.5

.7

.3

.6

.5

.6

.4

.5

.4

1.1

.6

10.3

10.4

7.5

8.6

10.1

11.2

12.0

12.3

14.8

15.1

6.0

5.6

Other transportation............................. .

2.4

2.3

2.4

2.3

2.6

2.6

2.3

2.4

1.6

1.9

2.5

2.7

Miscellaneous7...................... .............

1.3

1.1

1.4 ^

1.8

1.3

1.0

1.2

1.1

1.3

!.5

1.5

1.0

Education..................... ............... .
Automobile transportation..........................

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




19

P re lim in a ry
TABLE l a . —P e rc e n ta g e D i s tr i b u ti o n o f E x p e n d itu re s F o r C u rre n t Consumption—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 in C i ti e s W ith
P o p u la tio n s o f 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 and O v e r.—C ontinued
Northern
New Jersey
Area
Item
All
fami­
lies

PhiladelphiaCamden, Pa.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Pittsburgh,
Pa.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

San FranciscoOakland, Calif.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

St. Louis
Mo.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Percent of expenditures for current consumption.................
Housing4......................... .......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

11.6

11.0

11.3

10.4

11.7

11.0

12.3

11.8

10.7

10.6

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water................... .....
Household operation.......................................

4.4

4.4

4.5

4.5

3.5

3.7

2.1

1.9

4.0

4.1

5.0

3.5

5.1

4.3

4.2

3.2

4.7

4.5

4.7

3.7

Housefuraishings and equipment:.Total........................
Household textiles.......... .................... ........
Furniture........ ........ .............................

6.9

7.1

6.0

6.8

6.3

6.6

7.0

6.8

6.8

7.4

1.0

1.1

.9

.8

.8

.8

.9

.8

.9

2.3

2.4

.0
1.6

2.1

1.6

1.9

1.7

1.5

1,5

1.8

Floor coverings......................... ...... ..........
Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment..... ........ ......... .
Miscellaneous5..........................................

.7

.6

.5

.6

.9

.7

.6

.7

.8

.6

1.8

1.-8

2.0

2.1

2.0

2.3

2.5

2.4

2.4

2.8

Alcoholic drinks............... ...........................
Tobacco........... ....... ...............................
Personal care............................................
Clothing: Total..........................................
Women and girls: Total............. .....................
Outerwear.............. ............................. .
Underwear and nightwear......... ........ ............. ..
Hosiery and footwear......... ..........................
Hats, gloves, accessories............................. ..
Men and boys: Total......... ................ ...........
Outerwear............ ................................
Underwear and nightwear................................
Hosiery and footwear...................................
Hats, gloves, accessories......... ............... ...........
Children under 2 years: Total........ ....... ........... .
Clothing materials and services: Total.................. .....
Medical care......................................................
Recreation................................. ......................
Reading............. ........ ....................................
Education................. ........................... ............
Automobile transportation..................... ...................
Other transportation.......................................
Miscellaneous7...........................................

1.1

1.2

1.1

1.1

1.0

.9

1.4

1.3

1.3

1.3

30.4

31.9

31.5

32.5

30.8

32.1

29.4

29.7

29.5

31.9

1.8

2.0

2.3

2.7

2.0

2.2

1.8

1.9

2.2

2.1

1.8

2.0

2.1

2.5

1.9

2.1

1.5

1.7

1.5

1.7

2.2

2.2

2.4

2.5

2.2

2.3

2.2

2.2

2.3

2.4

11.9

11.4

12.3

11.9

12.4

12.1

11.0

10.8

11.1

10.9

6.2

5.9

6.4

5.9

6.4

6.1

5.4

5.4

5.7

5.4

3.3

3.0

3.5

2.9

3.5

3.2

2.8

2.5

2.9

2.6

.8

.8

.8

.9

.8

.8

.7

.8

.7

.7

1.4

1.5

1.4

1.5

1.3

1.3

1.2

1.4

1.3

1.3

.7

.6

.7

.6

.8

.8

.7

.8

.8

.8

4.0

3.8

4.2

4.2

4.3

4.4

3.8

3.6

3.7

3.7

2.5

2.3

2.6

2.7

2.6

2.6

2.3

2.0

2.2

2.2

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.8

.8

.8

.8

.8

.9

.8

.8

.8

.8

.4

.4

.5

.5

.6

.6

.4

.4

.4

.4

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.1

.2

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.6

1.5

1.4

1.6

1.6

1.6

• 1.6

5.2

4.8

5.1

4.9

4.7

4.8

6.0

6.0

4.8

4.9

5.1

5.1

4.7

4.9

4.6

5.0

4.6

4.7

4.6

4.6

.8

.9

.8

.9

.8

.8

1.0

.9

.9

.9

.6

.3

.5

.3

.6

.5

.6

.6

.4

.3

9.7

10.9

8.1

7.9

11.1

10.2

12.2

12.7

12.3

10.8

1.5

1.6

2.4

2.3

2.2

2.5

1.9

2.1

2.1

2.1

1.1

.9

.9

.7

1.0

.9

1.7

1.7

2.1

1.6

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




20

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 2 . —Average Money Income, E x p e n d itu re s and S a v in g s—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 i n C i ti e s w ith P o p u la tio n o f
24-0,000 to 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
Atlanta,
Ga.
Item

All
fami­
lies

Cincinnati,
Ohio

Birmingham,
Ala.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Hartford,
Conn.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Indianapolis,
Ind.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Kansas City,
Mo.
All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Number of families..................................

178

114

170

119

198

131

154

93

185

123

182

118

Average family size3 ............................. .

3.3

3.3

3.3

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.2

3.3

3.1

3.1

3.0

3.1
$3,797

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

$3,769

$3,598

$3,272

$3,296

$4,186

$3,779

$4,672

$4,319

$3,854

$3,678

$3,989

Housing*...................... ...................

410

356

305

286

458

390

540

477

404

371

517

461

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.............

146

147

129

129

143

126

222

214

179

170

140

130

Household operation.... ..................... .

206

177

159

136

210

128

228

163

176

137

196

145

Housefumishings and equipment: Total.............

246

240

243

271

254

255

270

232

246

231

294

280

Household textiles..................... ........

27

26

29

34

32

29

39

39

33

24

33

25

Furniture....... .......... ....................

53

62

52

56

73

75

64

61

62

66

80

80

Floor coverings............................ .

17

15

14

12

20

20

26

15

21

18

22

18

103

99

107

126

92

95

91

73

84

75

110

109

46

38

41

43

37

36

50

44

46

48

49

48

1,087

1,073

916

930

1,236

1,147

1,378

1,329

1,127

1,084

1,090

1,073
75

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment............
Miscellaneous3............. ........... .
Food.................. .............. ............
Alcoholic drinks............. ............ .......

52

52

50

60

95

88

89

89

70

78

69

Tobacco................................ ...........

71

78

72

75

71

74

89

98

78

86

68

74

Personal care................. ................ .

88

90

83

87

82

80

90

85

86

84

115

116

Clothing: Total................ ............... .

447

456

434

437

452

405

519

481

450

429

456

453

Women and girls: Total...................... .

209

222

203

205

228

197

270

240

210

193

230

227

Outerwear.....................................

101

108

101

99

109

97

141

122

108

102

116

115

Underwear and nightwear....... ........ ......

27

28

30

31

28

27

33

32

24

23

30

29

Hosiery and footwear........................ .

53

57

47

49

49

47

62

59

47

42

53

54

Hats, gloves, accessories............ ........

28

29

25

26

42

26

34

27

31

26

31

29

Men and boys: Total............... .............

150

150

155

159

160

151

180

177

166

167

149

151

Outerwear.............. ......................

88

86

90

90

96

88

110

105

97

96

92

87

Underwear and nightwear............ ..........

10

11

11

12

11

11

15

14

11

11

9

10

Hosiery and footwear................ .........

28

28

29

32

32

32

36

39

33

35

30

33

Hats, gloves, accessories........... .........

24

25

25

25

21

20

19

19

25

25

18

21

Children under 2 years: Total...................

8

7

7

7

4

3

8

5

8

10

5

4

Clothing materials and services: Total..........

80

77

69

66

60.

54

61

59

66

59

72

71

Medical care.......... ............ ..............

182

147

181

184

243

192

288

311

212

211

204

185

Recreation.............................. .........

184

185

118

111

216

185

183

168

173

155

151

155

Reading..... .................. ..................

34

32

26

26

37

32

38

37

39

38

34

32

Education.........................................

24

20

15

11

26

13

5*7

21

16

9

24

26

Automobile transportation................. .......

463

412

421

435

515

545

530

472

504

503

523

489

Other transportation.............. ...............

67

62

61

66

79

85

65

60

61

61

65

68

Miscellaneous7.... ...............................

62

71

59

52

69

34

86

82

33

31

43

35

Insurance.... .................... ..................

175

165

151

147

228

176

221

195

169

160

192

177

Gifts and .contributions.............................

177

176

153

144

179

130

198

121

138

102

191

127

0

0

365

0

73

0

12

0

0

0

Net increase in assets and/or decrease ia-liabilities

0

0

Payments on principal and down payments on owned
homes....... ............... ...................

247

185

83

94

275

232

125

115

264

194

348

370

Personal taxes0........................... .........

266

220

194

160

352

308

481

354

430

336

388

350

3,872

3,576

3,242

3,134

4,532

3,853

4,678

4,246

4,188

3,858

4,321

4,065

Other money receipts10........ ........... .........

37

22

13

18

331

114

67

81

0

0

16

24

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities

83

244

149

227

0

41

0

4

0

33

103

3

-129

-97

-172

-208

-95

-77

-419

-304

+15

-49

+68

-9

Money income9 .................................... .

Balancing difference11.... .........................
See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




21

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 2 . —Average Money Income, E x p e n d itu re s and S a v in g s—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 in C i ti e s w ith P o p u la tio n s
o f 24-0,000 to 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 —Continued
Louisville,
Ky.
Item

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

MinneapolisSt. Paul, Minn.

Milwaukee,
Wis.

Miami, Fla.
Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

New Orleans,
La.
All
fami­
lies

NorfolkPortsmouth, Va.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Number of families.......................... ........

197

146

140

83

179

111

169

104

161

102

176

141

Average family size3 ................................

3.3

3.3

3.1

3.1

3.2

3.2

3.3

3.3

3.4

3.4

3.6

3.7

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

$3,74-1

$3,589

$4,605

$4,145

$4,331

$4,063

$4,429

$4,029

$3,347

$3,267

$3,646

$3,588

Housing4 ..........................................

4-23

369

563

507

521

499

503

464

324

297

378

366

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.............

145

141

126

120

193

179

196

188

111

108

175

175

Household operation........ ......................

174

156

269

209

161

154

178

146

146

121

173

159

Housefurnishings and equipment: Total.............

230

228

329

301

276

245

302

271

200

186

247

249

Household textiles....... ............. ........

24

24

39

33

36

37

32

30

27

28

29

29

Furniture.......................................

68

65

88

69

75

64

63

63

38

29

69

66

Floor coverings............. ............... .

15

16

28

22

28

32

59

43

9

9

15

14

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment............

90

89

99

109

78

61

95

85

80

83

83

89

Miscellaneous 5..... ............................

33

34

75

68

59

51

53

50

46

37

51

51
1,045

Food............. ................................

1,160

1,144

1,245

1,165

1,206

1,178

1,190

1,141

1,136

1,125

1,048

Alcoholic drinks...... ...........................

68

65

89

89

126

131

94

86

46

50

66

60

Tobacco.................................. ........

67

75

90

87

80

78

70

77

79

82

72

73

89

88

113

110

88

86

94

84

82

88

89

88

Clothing: Total...................................

394

370

458

-401

504

463

491

404

394

406

424

418

Women and girls: Total..........................

Personal care..*...... ..... .....................

180

167

222

180

240

224

243

191

177

178

202

194

Outerwear.......................... ........ .

91

84

96

79

116

108

130

95

75

78

102

93

Underwear and nightwear.......................

24

23

33

29

35

33

30

26

30

30

26

28

Hosiery and footwear.... .....................

42

41

45

39

54

53

52

45

50

50

48

50

Hats, gloves, accessories.....................
Men and boys: Total..... .................... .

23

19

48

33

35

30

31

25

22

20

26

23

142

135

156

148

196

178

181

158

143

156

149

150

Outerwear........ ............................

87

81

91

83

123

109

110

92

78

86

91

92

Underwear and nightwear.............. ........

10

10

12

12

14

14

15

13

13

15

11

11

Hosiery and footwear..................... .

31

31

34

34

37

35

36

34

30

35

28

29

Hats, gloves, accessories.................. .

14

13

19

19

22

20

20

19

22

20

19

18

7

8

4

5

6

6

5

6

8

8

10

10

Children under 2 years: Total...................
Clothing materials and services: Total..........

65

60

76

68

62

55

62

49

66

64

63

64

Medical care....... ............ ..................

178

175

259

226

221

197

253

239

196

178

154

158

Recreation........................................

174

152

229

184

240

205

225

196

122

124

195

184

Reading..... ...>..................................

32

30

44

43

37

34

38

36

29'.

28

34

31

Education........ ...... .............

17

16

26

23

27

32

39

17

18

6

27

22

Automobile transportation................ ........

465

469

576

538

509

467

587

541

328

372

437

447

Other transportation.... ....................... .

65

72

87

77

90

81

75

76

98

63

77

80

Miscellaneous7 .... ...............................

60

39

102

65

52

34

94

63

38

33

50

33

Insurance...................... ....................

187

172

189

189

219

194

207

175

147

144

207

205

Gifts and .contributions.............................

113

93

195

155

276

168

164

135

100

85

113

104

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities

109

44

0

0

0

43

0

0

0

0

0

0

Payments on principal and down payments on owned
homes............... ...........................

367

287

449

389

337

162

367

436

173

121

110

121

Personal taxes8..... ...............................

314

266

280

235

650

409

404

316

234

142

211

186

Money income9............. .........................

3,754

3,531

4,573

4,042

4,682

4,377

4,579

4,091

3,321

3,000

3,589

3,536

Other money receipts10..............................

336

310

10

15

22

16

103

23

25

0

17

14

0

0

165

217

59

0

34

181

74

255

237

205

-60

-57

-241

-215

-63

-75

-84

-44

-174

-241

-123

-142

Net decrease, in assets and/or increase in liabilities
Balancing difference11..............................
See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




22

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 2 . —Average Money Incom e, E x p e n d itu re s and S av in g s—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C l e r ic a l
Worker F a m ilie s 2 i n C i ti e s W ith P o p u la tio n s o f 2 4 0 ,0 0 0 t o 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 —C o n tin u ed
Omaha
Nebr.
Item

Providence
R. I.

Portland
Oreg.

All
fami­
lies

Wageearner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wageearner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Seattle
Wash.

Scranton
Pa.

Wageearner
fami­
lies

Wageearner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Youngstown
Ohio

Wageearner
fami­
lies

WageAll
earner
fami­
- fami­
lies
lies

Number of families......... ............................

173

116

160

110

188

131

185

116

172

110

196

Average family size3 ....................................

3.4

3.4

3.2

3.4

3.3

3.3

3.5

3.7

3.1

3.2

3.6

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

$3,978

$3,827

$4,134

$4,097

$3,916

$3,762

$3,747

$3,746

$4,554

$4,426

$4,166

$3,978
428

149
3.5

Hous ing*........ ........................... .

395

345

465

421

386

376

381

341

415

389

443

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and w a ter.... ...... .

175

174

199

194

231

205

218

217

202

192

174

170

Household operation....... ................ ...........

163

149

203

170

156

130

123

100

215

179

152

130

Housefurnishings and equipment: Total..............

271

261

264

258

246

249

250

277

350

351

298

296

Household textiles........ ................... .

33

30

26

22

32

33

36

40

36

28

39

38

Furniture........ ...................................

72

65

54

49

53

60

56

60

68

86

56

56

Floor coverings.....................................

31

28

16

10

19

23

30

32

56

40

39

42

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment.............

97

96

108

114

97

92

89

103

123

137

111

107

Miscellaneous5 .............. ................ .......

38

42

60

63

45

41

39

42

67

60

53

53

1,253

1,252

1,133

1,144

1,313

1,293

1,244

1,291

1,264

1,264

1,181

1,142

Alcoholic drinks......................................

58

61

59

44

68

67

85

86

79

90

71

63

Tobacco.... ............................ ..............

65

69

64

69

92

96

62

68

80

80

73

71

Personal care.................... .....................

90

85

84

85

92

90

72

73

89

88

92

91

Clothing: T o tal.......................................

449

418

425

427

429

410

432

448

507

488

546

511

Women and girls: T o t a l .............................

206

192

209

202

214

204

228

236

251

244

263

238
117

F o o d .................. ........................... .

Outerwear.........................................

98

93

109

102

103

94

120

125

128

124

129

Underwear and nightwear................... .

28

28

27

27

31

31

30

32

33

33

35

33

Hosiery and footwear............ ................

48

47

47

49

58

58

53

55

55

54

59

58

Hats, gloves, accessories........... ............

32

24

26

24

22

21

25

24

35

33

40

30

M en and boys: T o tal ..................... ..........

178

163

148

156

150

143

156

164

178

162

208

204
123

Outerwear.........................................

102

90

85

89

85

77

91

95

104

93

126

Underwear and nightwear......... .............. .

13

13

10

10

13

12

13

15

13

12

14

15

Hosiery and footwear......................... .

35

36

32

33

35

37

32

36

40

38

40

41

Hats, gloves, accessories.......................

28

24

21

24

17

17

20

18

21

19

28

25

Children under 2 years: T o tal.... ......... ......

5

4

4

4

9

8

7

9

5

5

9

10

Clothing materials and services: Total........

60

59

64

65

56

55

41

39

73

77

66

59

Medical care....................... ..................

193

167

229

247

155

164

176

175

265

247

245

254

Recreation....... ......... ...........................

194

192

185

183

214

210

125

118

221

214

173

151

Reading.......................... ....................

29

28

36

36

36

37

36

34

38

35

35

35

Education............ ................. ...............

30

22

39

27

20

9

15

11

34

22

14

11

Automobile transportation.................. .........

473

464

620

685

358

324

395

402

622

635

557

516

Other transportation........................ ........

84

83

75

68

60

63

55

53

103

97

53

49

Miscellaneous7 .................. ......................

56

57

54

39

60

39

78

52

70

55

59

60

Insurance.......... .....................................

193

178

187

165

192

184

184

177

172

141

225

212

Gifts and .contributions........ .............. .........

118

109

167

121

118

99

117

101

151

136

168

139

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

94

0

Payments on principal and down payments on owned
homes ............................................ .

572

444

271

208

102

78

110

93

299

343

339

269

Personal taxes8 .........................................

326

271

402

342

260

246

198

200

382

330

372

303

Money income9 ......... ..................................

4,202

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities

4,092

3,845

4,017

4,065

3,718

3,515

3,607

3,625

4,594

4,392

4,539

Other money receipts10.................................

18

23

91

9

71

97

142

19

94

83

3

3

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities

61

112

332

219

134

89

156

208

49

88

0

29

Balancing difference1 1 .................... .............

-118

-134

-48

-90

-303

-344

-143

-172

-140

-140

-111

-95

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.

260292 0 - 5 3 - 4




23

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 2 a . —P e rce n ta g e D i s tr i b u ti o n o f E x p e n d itu re s f o r C u rren t Consum ption—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner
C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 I n C i ti e s W ith P o p u la tio n o f 24-0,000 t o 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
Atlanta, Ga.
Item
All
fami­
lies

Birmingham,
Ala.

Cincinnati,
Ohio

Hartford,
Conn.

Indianapolis,
Ind.

Kansas City,
Mo.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

A ll
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

A ll
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Percent of expenditures for current consumption......

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing4. ..............................................

10.9

9.9

9.3

8.7

10.9

10.3

11.6

11.0

10.5

10.1

13.0

12.1

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water...............

3.9

4.1

3.9

3.9

3.4

3.3

4.8

4.9

4.6

4.6

3.5

3.4

Household operation.................................. .

5.5

4.9

4.9

4.1

5.0

3.4

4.9

3.8

4.6

3.7

4.9

3.8

Housefum i s h i n g s and equipment: Total...............

6.5

6.6

7.4

8.2

6.1

6.7

5.8

5.4

6.4

6.3

7.4

7.4

Household textiles................................ .

.7

.7

.9

1.0

.8

.8

.8

.9

.9

.7

.8

.7

1.4

1.7

1.5

1.7

1.7

1.9

1.4

1.4

1.6

1.8

2.0

2.1

Furniture.................... .............*.......
Floor coverings............ ...... ...... ...... .

.5

.4

.4

.3

.5

.5

.6

.4

.5

.5

.6

.5

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment......... .

2.7

2.7

3.3

3.9

2.2

2.5

1.9

1.7

2.2

2.0

2.7

2.8

Miscellaneous9................. ................ ... .

1.2

1.1

1.3

1.3

.9

1.0

1.1

1.0

1.2

1.3

1.3

1.3

Food............... ...................................

28.8

29.8

28.0

28.2

29.5

30.5

29.5

30.8

29.2

29.5

27.3

28.3

Alcoholic drinks.................. ...................

1.4

1.4

1.5

1.8

2.3

2.3

1.9

2.1

1.8

2.1

1.7

2.0

Tobacco....... ........................................

1.9

2.2

2.2

2.3

1.7

2.0

1.9

2.3

2.0

2.3

1.7

1.9

Personal care....................................... .

2.3

2.5

2.5

2.6

2.0

2.1

1.9

2.0

2.2

2.3

2.9

3.1

11.9

12.7

13.3

13.3

10.8

10.7

11.1

11.1

11.7

11.7

11.4

11.9

Women and girls: Total.............................

5.6

6.2

6.2

6.2

5.5

5.2

5.7

5.5

5.5

5.3

5.8

6.0

Outerwear.........................................

2.7

3.0

3.1

3.0

2.6

2.6

3.0

2.9

2.8

2.8

3.0

3.0

Underwear and nightwear..........................

.7

.8

.9

.9

.7

.7

.7

.7

.6

.6

.7

.8

Hosiery and footwear............................ .

1.5

1.6

1.4

1.5

1.2

1.2

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.2

1.3

1.4

Clothing: Total.....................................

Hats, gloves, accessories.......... .............

.7

.8

.8

.8

1.0

.7

.7

.6

.8

.7

.8

.8

Men and boys: Total................................

4.0

4.2

4.8

4.9

3.8

4.0

3.9

4.1

4.3

4.5

3.7

4.0

Outerwear.........................................

2.3

2.3

2.4

2.8

2.7

2.2

2.4

2.4

2.5

2.6

2.6

2.2

Underwear and nightwear..........................

.3

.3

.3

.4

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.2

.3

Hosiery and footwear........... ................ .

.8

.8

.9

1.0

.8

.8

.8

.9

.8

.9

.8

.9

Hats, gloves, accessories.................. .

.6

.7

.8

.8

.5

.5

.4

.4

.6

.7

.5

.5

.2

.2

.2

.2

.1

.1

.2

.1

.2

.3

.1

.1

2.1

2.1

2.1

2.0

1.4

1.4

1.3

1.4

1.7

1.6

1.8

1.8

Medical care.... ...................................

4.8

4.1

5.5

5.6

5.8

5.1

6.2

7.2

5.5

5.8

5.1

4.9

Recreation........................ ...................

4.9

5.1

3.6

3.4

5.2

4.9

3.9

3.9

4.5

4.2

3.8

4.1

Children under 2 years: Total............ .
Clothing materials and services: Total...........

Reading....................... ....................... .

.9

.9

.8

.8

.9

.8

.8

.8

1.0

1.0

.9

.8

Education.............................................

.6

.6

.5

.3

.6

.3

1.2

.5

.4

.2

.6

.7

Automobile transportation...........................

12.3

11.5

12.9

13.2

12.3

14.5

11.3

10.9

13.1

13.7

13.1

12.9

Other transportation................................ .

1.8

1.7

1.9

2.0

1.9

2.2

1.4

1.4

1.6

1.7

1.6

1.8

Miscellaneous7 ........................................

1.6

2.0

1.8

1.6

1.6

.9

1.8

1.9

.9

.8

1.1

.9

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




24

Preliminary
TABLE 2a.— Percentage Distribution of Expenditures far Current Consumption— All Families1 aid Wage-Earner, Clerical-Worker Families2 in Cities With
Population of 240,000 to 1,000,000— Continued

Louisville, Ky.
Item

Miami , Fla.

MinneapolisSt. Paul, Minn

Milwaukee,
Wis.

Hew Orleans,
La.

NorfolkPortsmouth, Va.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

11.3

10.3

1 2 .2

1 2 .2

1 2 .0

12.3

11.4

11.5

9.7

9.1

10.4

10 .2

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.............

3.9

3.9

2.7

2.9

4.5

4.4

4.4

4.7

3.3

3.3

4.8

4.9

Household operation.......................... .

4.7

4.3

5.8

5.0

3.7

3.8

4.0

3.6

4.4

3.7

4.7

4.4

Housefumishings and equipment: Total......... .

6 ,1

6.4

7.1

7.3

6.4

6 .1

6 .8

6 .8

6 .0

5.7

6 .8

6.9

.6

.7

.9

.8

.8

.9

.7

.8

.8

.9

.8

.8

1 .8

1.9

1.9

1.7

1.7

1 .6

1.4

1 .6

1 .1

.9

1.9

1 .8

Percent of expenditures for current consumption.... .

Household textiles......... ............
Furniture............... ......... .............
Floor coverings.................................
Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment........... .
Miscellaneous9 ................................. .

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

.4

.4

.6

.5

.7

.8

1.3

1 .1

.3

.3

.4

.4

2.4

2.5

2 .1

2.7

1.9

1.5

2 .2

2 .1

2.4

2.5

2.3

2.5

.9

.9

1 .6

1 .6

1.3

1.3

1 .2

1 .2

1.4

1 .1

1.4

1.4

Food..............................................

31.0

31.9

27.1

2 8 .1

27.8

29.0

26.8

28.3

33.9

34.4

2 8 .8

29.2

Alcoholic drinks.... ..............................

1 .8

1 .8

1.9

2 .1

2.9

3.2

2 .1

2 .1

1.4

1.5

1 .8

1.7

Tobacco...... ................................ .

1 .8

2 .1

2 .0

2 .1

1 .8

1.9

1 .6

1.9

2.4

2.5

2 .0

2 .0

2.4

2.5

2.5

2.7

2 .0

2 .1

2 .1

2 .1

2.4

2.7

2.4

2.5

10.5

10.3

9.9

9.7

1 1 .6

11.4

1 1 .1

10 .0

1 1 .8

12.4

1 1 .6

1 1 .6

Women and girls: Total..........................

4.8

4.6

4.8

4.4

5.5

5.5

5.5

4.7

5.3

5.4

5.5

5mA

Outerwear.....................................

2.5

2.4

2 .1

1.9

2 .6

2.7'

2.9

2.4

2 .2

2.4

2 .8

2 .6

Underwear and nightwear............. .

.6
1.1
.6

.6

.7

.7

.8

.8

.7

.6

.9

.9

.7

•8

1 .1

1 .0

1 .0

1.3

1.3

1 .2

1 .1

1.5

1.5

1.3

1.4

.5

1 .0

.8

.8

.7

.7

.6

.7

.6

.7

•6

3.8

3.8

3.4

3.6

4.5

4.4

4.1

3.?

4.3

4.8

4.1

4.1

Personal care................ ............
Clothing: Total........... ...... ............... .

Hosiery and footwear...... ...................
Hats, gloves, accessories.....................
Men and boys: Total.........................
Outerwear................ ........

2.3

2.3

2 .0

2.0

2 .8

2.7

2.5

2.3

2.3

2 .6

2.5

2.5

Underwear and nightwear.... . .................

.3

.3

.2

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.4

.5

.3

•3

Hosiery and footwear..................... .

.8

.8

.8

.8

.9

.9

.8

.8

.9

1 .1

.8

a

Hats, gloves, accessories................ .

.4

.4

.4

.5

.5

.5

.5

.5

.7

.6

.5

.5

.3

.3
U8
4 .4
VI
.9
.6
12.5
2 .2
.9

Children under 2 years: Total....................

.2

.2

.1

.1

.2

.1

.1

.2

.2

.2

Clothing materials and services: Total..........

1.7

1.7

1 .6

1 .6

1.4

1.4

1.4

1 .2

2 .0

2 .0

1.7,

Medical care.......... ........

.......................... .

4.7

4.9

5.6

5.5

5.1

4.8

5.7

5.9

5.9

5.5

4.2

Recreation*............ ............... ......... .

A. 7

4.2

5.0

4 .4

5.1

5.1

4.9

3.6

3.8

5.4

Reading......................................... ..

.9

1 .0

1 .0

.8

.9

.6

.6

.8

.9
.4

.9

.5

.9
.9

.9

Education.. ............. ............. ............

.5

.2

.7

12.4

.8
.4
13.1

5.6
.5
.6

12.5

12.9

1 1 .8

11.5

13.3

13.4

9.8

11.4

1 2 .0

1.7

2 .0

1.9

2 .1

2 .0

1.7

1.9

2 .1

1.1

2*2

1 .2

.8

2 .1

1 .6

2.9
1.1

1.9

1 .6

1.9
1.6

1 .0

1.4

Automobile transportation......... .
Other

transportation ............................ .

Miscellaneous7.......................... .
See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




25

Preliminary
TABLE 2a.— Percentage Distribution of Expenditures for Current Consumption— All Families1 and Wage-Earner, Clerical-Worker Families2 in Cities with
Population of 240,000 to 1,000,000— Continued
Portland,
Oreg.

Omaha,
Nebr.
Item

Percent of expenditures for current consumption.....

Providence,
R. I.

Seattle,
Wash.

Scranton,
Pa.

Youngstown,
Ohio

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing4....... ...... ...................... .

9.9

9.0

11.3

10.3

9.9

1 0 .0

1 0 .2

9.1

9.1

8 .8

1 0 .6

10 .8

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.............

4.4

4.5

4.8

4.7

5.9

5.4

5.8

5.8

4.4

4.3

4.2

4.3

Household operation................ ..........

4.1

3.9

4.9

4.1

4.0

3.5

3.3

2.7

4.7

4.0

3.6

3.3

Housefurnishings and equipment: Total..............

6 .8

6 .8

6.4

6.3

6.3

6 .6

6.7

7.4

7.7

7.9

7.2

7.4

.8

.8

.6

.5

.8

.9

1 .0

1 .1

.8

.6

.9

.9

1 .8

1.7

1.3

1 .2

1.3

1.5

1 .6

1.5

1.9

1.4

1.4

Household textiles..................... .
Furniture.................... ..... .............

1 .6

.8

.7

.4

.2

.5

.6

.8

.9

1 .2

.9

.9

1 .1

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment.............

2.4

2.5

2 .6

2 .8

2 .6

2.4

2.4

2.7

2.7

3.1

2.7

2.6

Miscellaneous5 ..................................

1 .0

1 .1

1.5

1 .6

1 .1

1 .1

1 .0

1 .1

1.5

1.4

1.3

1.4

31.5

32.8

27.4

27.9

33.5

34.3

33.2

34.5

27.8

28.6

28.3

28.7

Floor coverings.............. .

Food................................ ..............
Alcoholic drinks................. .............. .

1.5

1 .6

1.4

1 .1

1.7

1 .8

2.3

2.3

1.7

2 .0

1.7

1 .6

Tobacco..................... ...........

1 .6

1 .8

1.5

1.7

2.3

2 .6

1.7

1 .8

1 .8

1 .8

1 .8

1 .8

Personal care.................................. .

2.3

2 .2

2 .0

2 .1

2.3

2.4

1.9

1.9

2 .0

2 .0

2 .2

2.3

1 1 .2

10.9

10.3

10.4

1 1 .0

IQ, 9

11.5

11.9

1 1 .1

1 1 .0

13.1

1 2 .8

Clothing: Total....................... .......... .
Women and girls: Total..........................

5.1

5.0

5.0

4.9

5.6

5.4

6 .0

6.3

5.5

5.5

6.3

6 .0

Outerwear.................... ................

2.4

2.5

2 .6

2.4

2.7

2.5

3.2

3.4

2 .8

2 .8

3.1

2.9

Hosiery and footwear.................. ........

1.3

.7

.7
1 .2

.7
1 .1

.7
1 .2

.8

.8

.8

.9

1.5

1.5

1.4

1.4

.7
1 .2

.7

.8

.8

1.3

1.4

1.5

Hats, gloves, accessories.....................

.8

.6

.6

.6

.6

.6

.6

.6

.8

.7

1 .0

.8

Men and boys: Total.............................

4.5

4.3

3.6

3.8

3.8

3.8

4.2

4.4

3.9

3.7

5.0

5.1
3.0

Outerwear..... ................................

2 .6

2.4

2 .1

2 .2

2 .2

2 .1

2.4

2.5

2 .2

2 .1

3.1

Underwear and nightwear.................... .

.3

.3

.2

.2

.3

.3

.4

.4

.3

.3

.3

Hosiery and footwear..........................

.9

1 .0

.8

.8

.9

1 .0

.9

1 .0

.9

.9

.9

Hats, gloves, accessories...... ...............

.7

.6

.5

.6

.4

.4

.5

.5

.5

.4

.7

.6

Children under 2 years: Total...................

.1

.1

.1

.1

Jt

.2

.2

.2

.1

.1

.2

.3
1.4

.4
1 .1

Clothing materials and services: Total..........

1.5

1.5

1 .6

1 .6

1.4

1.5

14

1 .0

1 .6 .

1 .7

1 .6

Medical care...... ......... ................... .

4.8

4.4

5.5

6 .0

4.0

4A

4.7

4.7

5.8

5.6

5.9

6.4

Recreation........... ......... ...................

4.9

5.0

4.5

4.5

.7

.9

.9

.8

.6

1.0

.7

3.2
.9
.3

4 .2
.8
.3

3 .8

.7

Automobile transportation.........................

11.9

15.0

16.7

10.7

13.7

Other transportation.......................... .

2.1

12.1
2.2

3.3
.9
.4
10.5

4.9

Education.........................................

5.6
1.0
.2
8.6

4 .9

Reading........................... ................

1 .8

1.7

1.7

1.5

1.4

Miscellaneous7................................... .

1*4

1.5

1.3

.9

5.5
.9
.5
9.2
1.5
1.5

1 .0

2.1

1.4

2.3
1.5

Sea footnotes at end of tables, p. 66*




26

.8

.8

.7

,5
14.4
2.2
1.2

13.4

1.3
1.4

.9
.3
12.9
1.2
1.5

p r e lim in a ry
TABUS 3 . —A verage Money Incom e, E x p e n d itu re s , and S a v in g s—A l l F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 i n C i t i e s w ith P o p u la tio n s o f
3 0 ,5 0 0 t o 2 4 0 ,0 0 0
A lb u q u e r q u e ,
N . M ex.
Ite m

A ll
fam ­
ilie s

B u t t e , M o n t.

W age
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

C h a r le s to n ,
S . C.

C a n to n , O h io

W age
earner
fa m i­
lie s

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

C h a r le s to n ,
W. V a .

W age
earn er
fa m i­
lie s

C h a r lo tte ,
N. C.

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

W age
earn er
fa m i­
lie s

H um ber o f f a m i l i e s ......................................................................................

105

54

101

72

134

105

135

86

123

78

126

85

A v e r a g e f a m i l y s i z e 3 .................................................................................

3 .5

3 .7

3 .4

3 .6

3 .2

3 .3

3 .8

4 .0

3 .3

3 .4

3 .3

3 .1

A v e r a g e e x p e n d i t u r e f o r c u r r e n t c o n s u m p t io n : T o t a l . . .

♦ 4 ,7 3 2

♦ 4 ,2 6 1

♦ 4 ,0 1 5

♦ 4 ,0 3 6

♦ 3 ,9 1 7

♦ 3 ,8 1 1

♦ 3 ,3 0 3

♦ 2 ,9 3 3

♦ 4 ,3 4 5

♦ 4 ,0 5 9

♦ 3 ,6 3 7

♦ 3 ,6 0 4

H o u s in g 4 .................. ......................................................................................

429

436

337

330

374

364

370

292

466

390

424

403

F u e l,

152

140

155

143

160

160

164

154

107

103

188

194

H o u s e h o ld o p e r a t i o n ..............................................................................

272

217

123

119

173

140

180

117

236

191

188

181

H o u s e f u r n i s h i n g s a n d e q u ip m e n t: T o t a l ............................

238

lig h t,

r e fr ig e r a tio n ,

a n d w a t e r .......................

5J23

385

215

204

284

287

245

231

379

361

237

H o u s e h o ld t e x t i l e s ...........................................................................

49

30

27

26

38

38

31

27

45

39

28

29

F u r n i t u r e .................................................. ...............................................

178

78

40

37

85

86

47

41

93

86

69

69

F l o o r c o v e r i n g s ...................................................................................
K itc h e n ,

c le a n in g ,

l a u n d r y E q u ip m e n t ...............................

38

28

26

15

34

38

11

10

36

22

11

8

147

149

81

83

83

81

109

111

138

151

94

99

M i s c e l l a n e o u s 9 ......................................................................................

111

100

41

43

44

44

47

42

67

63

35

33

F o o d ....................................................................................................................

1 ,2 9 0

1 ,2 4 1

1 ,3 1 0

1 ,3 3 0

1 ,1 4 2

1 ,1 2 1

1 ,0 0 9

937

1 ,1 9 8

1 ,1 6 3

1 ,0 5 3

1 ,0 7 2

A l c o h o l i c d r i n k s ................................................. .....................................

54

56

90

108

75

86

48

62

36

29

30

32

T o b a c c o ....................... .................................... .......................................

75

90

82

95

72

79

71

76

64

73

66

75

117

119

88

93

102

104

78

78

100

101

88

88

C l o t h i n g : T o t a l ...................................................................................... ..

509

460

509

529

467

462

374,

339

555

534

436

441

T o t a l .................................................................

225

186

272

277

233

222

165

147

257

240

199

199

105

84

139

138

120

113

79

67

130

123

102

98

U n d e r w e a r a n d n i g h t w e a r ..........................................

32

27

34

35

35

34

26

25

35

35

28

28

H o s i e r y a n d f o o t w e a r . . . . ........................................................

55

51

69

74

50

49

42

39

55

57

48

52

H a ts, g lo v e s ,

a c c e s s o r i e s ....................................................

33

24

30

30

28

26

18

16

37

25

21

21

Men a n d b o y s : T o t a l ........................................................................

193

184

179

191

164

170

147

135

206

202

157

161

O u t e r w e a r .............................................................................................

111

109

107

111

93

96

89

77

126

120

97

98

U n d e r w e a r a n d n i g h t w e a r ................................................

16

14

16

18

13

14

12

11

14

15

12

12

H o s i e r y a n d f o o t w e a r . . . .........................................................

42

40

37

41

35

38

29

29

40

42

30

31

H a ts, g lo v e s ,

a c c e s s o r i e s . . . ..............................................

24

21

19

21

23

22

17

18

26

25

18

20

C h i l d r e n u n d e r 2 y e a r s : T o t a l . . . .........................................

9

14

8

11

10

10

6

6

9

11

2

3

82

76

50

50

60

60

56

51

83

81

78

78

M e d i c a l c a r e ................................................................................................

248

235

207

208

200

209

128

105

261

241

194

207

R e c r e a t i o n ....................................................................................................

209

183

169

177

221

205

94

87

176

160

152

135

R e a d i n g . . . . . . ....................... ...................... ...............................................

41

35

41

41

31

30

24

21

40

39

33

32

E d u c a t i o n ......................................................................................................

37

24

25

29

15

14

24

16

34

17

37

31

646

526

570

567

524

474

411

344

537

532

410

370

P e r s o n a l c a r e .............................................................................................

Women a n d g i r l s :

O u t e r w e a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................. .................................. ..

C lo th in g m a te r ia ls and s e r v ic e s :

T o t a l .............

A u t o m o b ile t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ..........................................................
O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n . .....................................................

I

68

66

41

39

32

34

35

40

68

71

56

62

M i s c e l l a n e o u s 7 ..........................................................................................

62

48-

53

24

45

42

48

34

88

54

45

43

n

s

u

r

a

n

c

e

.

*

G i f t s a n d . c o n t r i b u t i o n s .................. • • • • . ..................................... . .

199

165

163

155

154

159

196

201

257

180

192

176

158

95

105

84

146

109

98

85

217

163

174

166

H et in c r e a s e in a s s e t s a n d /o r d e c r e a s e in l i a b i l i t i e s

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

48

5

0

62

P a y m e n t s o n p r i n c i p a l a n d dow n p a y m e n ts o n ow n ed
h o m e s , . . . ......................... ......................................................................

418

290

94

i2 i

310

368

73

79

277

70

222

180

440

281

390

234

293

281

174

M on ey i n c o m e 9 ................................................ ........................ ........................

4 ,7 9 7

4 ,2 2 5

3 ,9 3 7

3 ,7 7 3

4 ,1 3 5

3 ,9 7 6

3 ,3 5 5

141
3,04C L

448

363

304

250

4 ,7 8 6

4 ,3 6 1

3 ,8 6 0

3 ,8 0 5
103

O t h e r m o n ey r e c e i p t s 1 0 .................. ........................................................

40

29

17

19

29

18

27

7

83

40

70

N et d e c r e a s e i n a s s e t s a n d /o r in c r e a s e i n l i a b i l i t i e s

141

126

78

‘2 4 7

10

0

141

121

0

0

6

0

•11 1

-141

-251

-236

-43

-89

-74

-51

♦ 2

-6

-67

-100

B a l a n c i n g d i f f e r e n c e 1 1 ............................................................... ..
S e e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e s , p . 6 6 .




27

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 3 . —a v e ra g e Money Incom e, E x p e n d itu re s , and S av in g s—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and W age-Earner, C l e r i c a l .
Worker F a m ilie s 2 i n c i t i e s w ith p o p u la tio n o f 5 0 ,0 0 0 t o 2 4 0 ,0 0 0 -— ontinued
C

Ite m

A ll
f a m i­
lie s

H u n tin g to n A s h la n d ,
W. V a .

E v a n s v ille ,
In d .

D e s M o in e s ,
Io w a
Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
f a m i­
lie s

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

A n
fa m i­
n es

Jack son ,
M is s .

Wage
earner
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
f a m i­
lie s

L i t t l e R ock,
A rk.

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
f a m i­
lie s

M a d is o n ,
W is .

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

Wage
earner
f a m i­
lie s

All
f a m i­
lie s

Num ber o f f a m i l i e s .....................................................................................

84

60

127

93

120

79

142

87

94

60

n i

60

A v e r a g e f a m i l y s i z e 3 .................. ..............................................................

3 .4

3 .2

3 .4

3 .4

3 .6

3 .6

3 .4

3 .4

3 .1

3 .1

3 .3

3 .1

A v e r a g e e x p e n d i t u r e f o r c u r r e n t c o n s u m p t io n : T o t a l . . .

$ 4 ,3 1 6

$ 4 ,0 4 3

$ 3 ,4 7 4

$ 3 ,3 6 4

$ 3 ,7 4 0

$ 3 ,3 7 8

$ 3 ,6 4 7

$ 3 ,1 5 7

$ 3 ,6 7 0

$ 3 ,3 8 9

H o u s in g 4 ................................................................................... .....................

437

411

373

377

342

312

422

380

444

362

623

618

F u e l,

a n d w a t e r .................................

172

161

150

147

115

104

111

104

in

105

200

182

H o u s e h o l d o p e r a t i o n ................................. ............................................

185

160

133

n 4

158

116

211

168

186

153

197

165

H o u s e f u m i s h i n g s a n d e q u ip m e n t: T o t a l . . ............................

344

372

238

220

296

278

275

243

303

319

318

301

H o u s e h o l d t e x t i l e s . ................................................

35

30

25

22

36

34

31

31

32

29

36

33

F u r n i t u r e ..................................................................................................

78

100

49

46

67

70

70

49

‘7 2

91

66

78

F l o o r c o v e r i n g s ....................... ..................................... .....................

65

66

12

8

17

18

16

7

16

20

29

30

102

91

n 8

114

109

109

127

131

130

119

lig h t,

r e fr ig e r a tio n ,

K it c h e n , c le a n in g ,

l a u n d r y e q u ip m e n t ...............................

M i s c e l l a n e o u s 5 . ...................................................................................
F o o d ........................................................................... ...............................

104
62
1 ,1 9 8

n o

66

50

53

58

42

1 ,1 4 4

1 ,0 9 6

1 ,0 8 0

1 ,2 0 7

1 ,1 3 9

$ 4 ,4 8 7 $ 4 ,2 8 0

47

56

48

57

41

1,022

998

1 ,0 5 0

1 ,0 1 5

1 ,1 4 9

1 ,0 7 7

49

A l c o h o l i c d r i n k s . . . . ......................................................... .................

44

50

62

52

36

27

14

12

47

55

72

79

T o b a c c o . ..................... ...................................................... .............................

86

96

68

69

71

71

68

71

74

67

68

70

P e r s o n a l c a r e ............................................................ ...............................

97

91

85

81

82

75

100

92

84

82

89

87

C l o t h i n g : T o t a l ........................................................................................

506

472

356

335

467

397

473

410

444

427

467

417

T o t a l . . ............................................. ..............

232

213

166

158

231

190

240

207

215

207

240

202

O u t e r w e a r .............................................................................................

109

96

84

79

116

93

120

100

97

90

130

107

U n d e r w e a r a n d n i g h t w e a r ....................................

35

33

24

23

32

25

34

31

31

32

29

27

H o s i e r y a n d f o o t w e a r ..............................................................

55

53

41

40

50

46

59

53

59

59

51

46

Women a n d g i r l s :

33

31

17

16

33

26

27

23

Men a n d b o y s : T o t a l .........................................................................

201

188

131

122

166

148

156

136

H a ts, g lo v e s ,

a c c e s s o r i e s . . . ^ .................................... ..

28

26

30

22

146

146

153

148

O u t e r w e a r . .................. ................................................. .....................

121

U 4

79

70

97

81

93

79

86

84

90

83

U n d e r w e a r a n d n i g h t w e a r . . . ...................................................

14

13

8

8

13

n

11

11

11

11

11

11

H o s i e r y a n d f o o t w e a r . . . . . . . ............................... ..

40

37

30

30

33

32

32

29

31

32

30

29

H a ts, g lo v e s ,

a c c e s s o r i e s . . . . . . . ....................................

26

24

14

14

23

24

20

17

18

19

22

25

C h i l d r e n u n d e r 2 y e a r s : T o t a l ................................. ..............

3

3

6

6

8

7

9

6

6

T o t a l .........................

70

68

53

49

64

51

70

58

77

68

66

58

M e d i c a l c a r e ...............................................................................................

207

194

176

165

194

172

175

134

R e c r e a t i o n ............. • > . , « ........................................... .......................... ..

198

193

101

91

204

165

114

R e a d i n g ............. ........................ , ...........................................................

45

43

32

32

39

29

E d u c a t i o n . ............................................................................... ...................

53

33

27

22

16

10

A u t o m o b i l e t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ...............................................................

610

507

465

478

365

C lo t h in g m a t e r ia ls and s e r v i c e s :

6

336

8

9

164

146

268

245

86

102

90

143

137

26

22

32

28

40

38

50

14

14

10

34

18

493

342

502

434

655

702
75

O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n . .................................

73

76

55

52

64

55

50

54

57

62

78

M i s c e l l a n e o u s 7 ..........................................................................................

61

40

57

49

84

92

43

27

56

34

86

69

179

140

163

150

189

163

124

n 9

162

127

256

204

G i f t s a n d . c o n t r i b u t i o n s .........................................................................

154

130

U.7

101

141

n 6

99

N et in c r e a s e in a s s e t s a n d /o r d e c r e a s e i n l i a b i l i t i e s

0

0

0

0

P a y m e n ts o n p r i n c i p a l a n d dow n p a y m e n ts o n ow ned
h o m e s . .......................................................... ...............................................

438

169

228

159

357

298

312

241

M on ey i n c o m e 9 ................................................ .................................................

4 ,5 0 0

4 ,0 5 0

3 ,5 6 7

3 ,3 7 9

O t h e r m o n ey r e c e i p t s 1 0 ............................................................................

(*)

1

119

6

12

5

0

0

73

N et d e c r e a s e in a s s e t s a n d /o r in c r e a s e i n l i a b i l i t i e s

19

122

0

131

125

143

93

12

0

128

0

151

B a l a n c i n g d i f f e r e n c e 1 1 ............................................................................

-130

-136

-91

-99

-111

152

-84

-44

-39

0

-117

-52

P e r s o n a l t a x e s 2 . . . . . ......................................................................... ..

23

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e s , p . 6 6 .




28

137

66

195

122

151

0

0

0

24

0

126

213

187

130

142

252

102

946

245

166

251

196

342

213

451

35<5

3 ,8 2 2

3 ,3 5 7

3 ,7 3 1

3 ,2 8 6

3 ,9 3 9

3 ,4 6 8

4 ,7 7 9

4 ,1 9 4

42

124

0
996

186

Preliminary

one, E x p e n d i t u r e s ,

TABLE 3 . — A v e r a g e M oney I n c
W ork er F a m i l i e s 2 i n

and S e r in g a — A l l F a m ilie s 1 and W age-E arn er, C le r ic a l'C i t i e s v i t h P o p u l a t i o n o f 3 0 , 5 0 0 t o 2 4 0 , 0 0 0 — C o n t in u e d

O klahom a
C ity ,
______Q k la ._______
Ite m

A ll
f a m i­
lie s

Num ber o f f a m i l i e s ............................ ............................................ ..
A v e r a g e f a m i l y s i z e 3 ............................................................... ................
A v e r a g e e x p e n d i t u r e f o r c u r r e n t c o n s u m p t io n : T o t a l . . .
H o u s i n g * ....................... .................................................................................
F u e l,

lig h t,

r e fr ig e r a tio n ,

a n d w a t e r .................................

H o u s e h o ld o p e r a t i o n . . . . . . ...............................................................
H o u s e f u m i s h i n g s a n d e q u ip m e n t: T o t a l . . . . , .....................
H o u s e h o ld t e x t i l e s .................. .......................... .............................
F u r n i t u r e . . ........................................... ........................................... ..
F l o o r c o v e r i n g s . . . . . ............................ ............................... ..
K itc h e n , c le a n in g ,

l a u n d r y e q u ip m e n t ...............................

M i s c e l l a n e o u s 5 .....................................................................................
F o o d ............. ......................................................................................................
A l c o h o l i c d r i n k s .....................................................................................
T o b a c c o ................................................. .......................... .....................
P e r s o n a l c a r e .............................................................................................
C l o t h i n g : T o t a l ........................................................................................
Women a n d g i r l s :

T o t a l ....................... .........................................

O u t e r w e a r . ..........................................................................................
U n d e r w e a r a n d n i g h t w e a r .................. .......................................
H o s i e r y a n d f o o t w e a r ..................................................................
H a ts, g lo v e s ,

a c c e s s o r i e s ....................................................

Men a n d b o y s : T o t a l ................................................................. ..
O u t e r w e a r ...........................................................................................
U n d e r w e a r a n d n i g h t w e a r .................................
H o s i e r y a n d f o o t w e a r . . . .........................................................
H a ts, g lo v e s ,
C h ild r e n u n d e r

a c c e s s o r i e s . . . ..............................................

2

y e a r s ; T o t a l ....................... ........................

C lo t h in g m a t e r ia ls and s e r v i c e s :

T o t a l .........................

M e d i c a l c a r e .................. ...........................................................................

R e a d i n g . ........................................................................................................
E d u c a t i o n .......................................................................................................
A u t o m o b ile t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ...............................................................
O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ..................................... ..
M i s c e l l a n e o u s 7 .........................................................................................
I n s u r a n c e ..................... ......................................................................................
G i f t s an d . c o n t r i b u t i o n s .................................................... ...................
N et in c r e a s e in a s s e t s a n d /o r d e c r e a s e in l i a b i l i t i e s
P a y m e n ts a n p r i n c i p a l a n d dow n p a y m e n ts o n ow n ed
h o m e s ............................... ............................................................................
P e r s o n a l t a x e s 2 . . . . . ........................................... ....................................
M on ey in c o m e 9 . . . . . ..................... ................................................................
O th e r m o n ey r e c e i p t s 1 0 . ........................................................................
N et d e c r e a se in

a s s e t s a n d /o r in c r e a s e in l i a b i l i t i e s

B a l a n c i n g d i f f e r e n c e 1 1 . .........................................................................

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

P h o e n ix ,
A r ia .

An
f a m i­
lie s

An
fa m i­
lie s

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

An
f a m i­
lie s

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

San J o se ,
C a lif.

An
f a m i­
lie s

S io u x F a l l s ,
S . D ak.

W age
earner
f a m i­
lie s

An
f a m i­
lie s

Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

86
101
59
n7
109
72
110
108
65
n6
83
58
3.6
3.8
3.2
3.5
3.2
3.2
3.5
3.7
3.3
3.3
3.5
3.1
$4,237 $4,180 $3,565 $3,514 $3,643 $3,508 $4,039 $3,885 $4,123 $3,977 $4,259 $4,220
4n
358
410
377
404
391
447
395
366
402
372
478
103
167
157
126
122
n7
236
229
ns
n9
126
127
125
151
190
179
173
154
208
144
n6
155
137
222
268
323
296
395
384
291
235
249
304
307
317
382
34
34
30
30
27
27
31
46
33
25
26
29
58
90
93
74
n5
118
45
46
85
88
102
65
39
48
30
26
40
34
40
16
26
16
20
13
98
101
156
151
113
99
108
128
114
n9
105
113
60
56
50
50
41
46
47
59
65
68
39
66
1,237
1,141 1,188 1,073 1,056 1,144 1,178 1,063 1,066 1,196 1,246 i , 2 n
58
50
83
47
54
52
61
68
36
40
53
45
65
75
41
46
63
69
59
79
82
75
82
58
90
88
95
91
80
97
87
78
79
82
112
n2
419450
478
441
435
455
328
329
398
382
509
454
225
191
180
213
196
199
187
227
139
253
212
142
85
125
99
88
100
85
96
121
100
66
127
62
26
29
29
29
29
23
23
24
25
35
34
32
47
51
50
48
35
51
52
49
53
36
47
47
26
25
25
19
20
27
25
25
41
35
17
21
160
184
168
159
162
163
136
L36
150
149
176
157
96
96
96
93
80
109
97
78
77
84
102
91
13
14
13
15
13
13
13
n
13
12
13
13
35
38
32
34
40
39
31
32
33
34
33
32
20
13
15
19
22
23
24
21
13
12
28
22
8
9
6
8
10
7
8
5
7
5
7
7
70
64
55
68
57
50
73
44
45
78
48
75
214
208
215
194
206
170
217
154
225
235
194
185
108
247
249
254
251
157
151
195
179
166
134
in
35
33
42
43
33
43
39
31
36
25
20
39
16
19
23
19
n
50
32
16
41
23
19
15
640
655
603
624
642
568
520
589
347
306
527
711
38
35
56
51
53
52
50
79
76
45
57
52
74
91
85
47
93
56
57
58
46
41
47
85
165
147
130
172
173
181
148
138
in
216
147
177
166
155
127
80
186
164
88
192
U7
n7
109
172
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
14
0
0
0
264
412
4,128
17
172
-273

281
207
3,620
5

548
-264

239
258
3,595
115
0

-116

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e s , p . 6 6 .




Wage
earn er
f a m i­
lie s

S a l t L ak e

P o r tla n d ,
M a in e

29

170
197
3,266
26
257
-164

176
204
3,621

103
171
3,423

389
261
4,209

3

0

22

253

247
-65

72
-105

-99

397
249
4,065
28
126
-24

232
276
4,046

180
224
4,007

4

7

297
349
4,247
51

336
-68

148
-152

-151

n 2

250
305
3,932
70
320
-155

Preliminary
TABLE 3.— Average Money Income, Expenditures, and Savings— -All Families1 and Wage-Earner, Clerical-Vorker Families2 in Cities with Population of
30,500 to 240,000— Continued

W i c h i t a , K an s,
Item

W ilm in g t o n , D e l .

Wage
earner
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

Wage
earner
f a m i­
lie s

A ll
fa m i­
lie s

Number of families.... ..............................

130

93

127

89

Average family size3............... .................

3 .2

3 .3

3 .3

3 .2

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total.......

$ 3 ,7 2 0

$ 3 ,3 2 6

$ 4 ,5 8 0

$ 4 ,2 8 1

Housing*..........................................

441

391

478

450

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water................

104

93

227

209

Household operation............................... .

153

124

198

174

Housefurnishings and equipment: Total...... .........

282

266

356

360

Household textiles...............................

30

23

47

45

Furniture.......................................

72

72

92

98

Floor coverings.................................

34

22

44

48

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment..............

104

107

124

124

Miscellaneous5..................................

42

42

49

45

Food.............................................

1 ,0 4 8

992

1 ,3 0 5

1 ,2 4 7

Alcoholic drinks...................................

24

28

97

104

Tobacco..........................................

63

73

88

94

Personal care.................................... .

83

77

104

98

Clothing: Total...................................

412

371

569

506

Women and girls: Total...........................

186

171

294

257

Outerwear.................................... .

94

84

163

136

Underwear and nightwear........................

26

26

34

30

Hosiery and footwear..... ......................

44

42

68

67

Hats, gloves, accessories......................

22

19

29

24

Men and boys: Total.............. .............. .

164

144

190

169

Outerwear..................................... .

98

80

114

100

Underwear and nightwear..................... ....

12

10

16

14

Hosiery and footwear.............. .............

34

34

36

32
23

Hats, gloves, accessories...................... .

20

20

24

Children under 2 years: Total.................... .

5

6

7

8

Clothing materials and services: Total............ .

57

50

78

72

Medical cape.....................................

205

194

223

191

Recreation...................................... .

125

106

237

224

Reading..........................................

33

29

43

38

Education........................................

25

16

40

20

614

478

500

466

Automobile transportation......................... ,
Other transportation.............................. .

55

53

67

62

Miscellaneous7................................... .

53

35

48

38

Insurance.................. ....................... .

167

134

239

209

Gifts and contributions............................. .

208

124

170

128

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in liabilities...,

0

0

0

0

Payments of principal and down payments on owned homes,

117

107

520

239

Personal taxes8.................................... .

315

227

413

343

Money income9...................................... .

3 ,9 2 0

3 ,4 7 1

4 ,5 1 8

4 ,1 9 0

Other money receipts10.............................. .

9

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b l e s , p . 6 6 .




30

15

18

6

182

113

-135

Balancing difference11.............................. .

0

31

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in liabilities...

-107

-274

-297

Preliminary
TABLE 3a.— Percentage Distribution of Expenditures far Current Consumption— All Families1
Clerical-Worker Families2 in Cities With Population of 30,500 to 240,000.

Albuquerque
N. Mex.
Item

Percent of expenditures for current consumption......

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Charlotte,
N. C.

Charleston,
S. C.

Charleston,
W. Va.

Wage
All
earner
fami­
fami­
lies
lies

Wage
All
earner
fami­
fami­
lies
lies

All
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9.5
4.2

11.2
5.0

10.0
5.2

10.7
2.5

9.6
2.5

11.7
5.2

11.2
5.4

Butte, Mont.

Canton , Ohio

Wage
All
earner
fami­ fami­
lies
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0
9.6
4.1

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing4......................................

9.1

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water....... .

3.2

10.2
3.3

8.4
3.9

5.7

5.1

3.1

2.9

4.4

3.7

5.4

4.0

5.4

4.7

5.2

5.0

11.1

9.0

5.4

7.3
1.0

7.5
1.0

7.4
.9

7.8
.9

8.7
1.0

8.9
1.0

6.5
.8

6.6
.8
1.9

Household operation............................
Housefurnishings and equipment: Total....... .

100.0

and Wage-Earner,

8.2
3.5

Household textiles........ ............... .

1.0

.7

.7

5.1
.6

Furniture................. ...... ...........

3.8

1.8

1.0

1.0

2.2

2.3

1.4

1.4

2.1

2.1

1.9

Floor coverings..............................

.8

.7

.6

.4

.9

1.0

.3

.3

.8

.6

.3

.2

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment...........

3.1

3.5

2.1

2.0

2.1

2.1

3.3

3.8

3.2

3.7

2.6

2.8

2.4
27.3

2.3
29.2

1.0
32.6

1.1
32.9

1.1
29.2

1.1
29.3

1.5
30.6

1.4
31.9

1.6
27.6

1.5
28.7

.9
29.0

.9
29.8

Miscellaneous3.........................
Food..................................... .
Alcoholic drinks.................. ............

1.1

1.3

2.2

2.7

1.9

2.3

1.5

2.1

.8

.7

.8

.9

Tobacco..... ........... ................. .

1.6

2.0
2.2

2.4
2.3

1.8
2.6

2.1
2.7

2.1
2.4

2.6

1.8
2.5

1.8

2.1

2.7

1.5
2.3

2.4

2.4

12.7

13.1

11.9

12.2

11.3

11.6

12.8

13.2

12.0

12.2

Personal care..................................

2.5

2.1
2.8

Clothing: Total.................. .............

10.8

10.8

Women and girls: Total........................
Outerwear............................ .

4.8

4.4

6.8

6.9

6.0

5.8

5.0

5.0

5.9

5.9

5.5

5.5

2.2

2.0

3.5

3.5

3.1

2.9

2.4

2.3

3.0

3.0

2.8

2.6

Underwear and nightwear................ .....

.7

.6

.8

Hosiery and footwear................... .....

1.2
.7

1.2
.6

1.8
.7

.7

.7

4.1
2.3

4.3
2.5

4.5
2.7

4.7
2.7

4.1
2.3

Hats, gloves, accessories...................
Men and boys: Total...........................
Outerwear...... ..... ...................

.9
1.8

.9

.9

.8

.9

.8

.9

.8

.8

1.3

1.3
.7

1.3
.5

1.3
.5

1.2
.9

1.4
.6

1.3
.6

1.5
.6

4.5
2.5

4 .4

4.6
2.6

4.7
2.9

5.0
2.9

4.3

2.6

4.5
2.7

2.7

Underwear and nightwear....... .

.4

.3

.4

.4

.3

.4

.4

.4

.3

.4

.3

.3

Hosiery and footwear........ .......... ....

.9

1.0

.9

1.1

.9

1.0

.9

1.0

.9

1.1

.8

.9

Hats, gloves, accessories.............. .....

.5

.5

.5

.5

.6

.6

.5

.6

.6

.6

.5

.6

.2

.3

.2

.3

.3

.3

.2

.2

.2

.3

.1

.1
2.1

Children under 2 years: Total............ .

1.7

1.8

1.2

1.2

1.5

1.6

1.7

1.8

2.0

2.0

2.1

Medical care............................. .

5.2

‘ .5
5

5.2

5.2

5.1

5 .5

3.9

3.6

6.0

5.9

5.3

5.7

Recreation........................

4.4

4.3

4.2

4.4

5.6

5.4

2.8

3.0

4.0

3.9

4.2

3.7

Clothing materials and services: Total........

Reading........................ ...........

.9

.8

1.0

1.0

.8

.8

.7

.7

.9

1.0

.9

.9

Education................................ .....

.8

.6

.6

.7

.4

.4

.7

.5

.8

.4

1.0

.9

Automobile transportation............. ..........

13.6

12.4

14.2

14.0

13.4

12.4

12.4

11.7

12.4

13.1

11.3

10.3

Other transportation........... ................

1.4

1.5

1.0

1.0

.8

.9

1.1

1.4

1.5

1.8

1.5

1.7

Miscellaneous7........ .......... ............ .

1.3

1*1

1.3

.6

1.1

1.1

1.5

1.2

2.0 .

1.3

1.2

1.2

See f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b l e s , p . 6 6 .

260292 0 - 5 3 - 5




■Preliminary
TABLE 3a.— Percentage Distribution of Expenditures for Current Consultion— All Families1 and Wage-Earner, Clerical-Worker Families2 in Cities With
Population of 30,500 to 24-0,000— Continued

Des Moines,
Iowa
Item

Evansville,
Tnd.

HuntingtonAshland,
Jackson, Miss.
,
W. Va.
i

Little Rock,
Ark.

Madison, Wis.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing*......... ............................. ■ 10.2

10.2

10.7

11.2

9.1

9.2

11.6

12.0

12.1

10.7

13.9

14.4

Percent of expenditures for current consumption......

Wage
All
earner
fami­
fami­
lies
lies

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water............

4.0

4.0

4.3

4.4

3.1

3.1

3.0

3.3

3.0

3.1

4.5

4.3

Household operation............................

4.3

4.0

3.8

3.4

4.2

3.4

5.8

5.3

5.1

4.5

4.4

3.9

Housefurnishings and equipment: Total.......... .

7.9

9.1

6.9

6.5

7.9

.8.2

7.5

7.7

8.3

9.4

7.1

7.0

.8

.7

.7

.7

.9

1.0

.9

1.0

.9

.9

.8

.8

Furniture...................................

1.8

2.5

1.5

1.4

1.8

2.1

1.9

1.6

2.0

2.7

1.5

1.8

Floor coverings....................... ..... .

1.5

1.6

.3

.2

.5

.5

.4

.2

.4

.6

.6

.7

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment...........

2.4

2.7

2.9

2.7

3.2

3.4

3-.0

3.4

3.5

3.8

3.0

2.8

Household textiles............................

Miscellaneous5...............................

1.4

1.6

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.2

1.3

1.5

1.5

1.4

1.2

.9

Food...........................................

27.8

28.3

31.5

32.0

32.3

33.8

28.0

31.6

28.6

30.0

25.5

25.2

Alcoholic drinks............... ....... ........

1.0

1.2

1.8

1.5

1.0

.8

Tobacco..... ................... ............. .

2.0
2.2

2.4
2.2

2.0
2.4

2.1
2.4

1.9
2.2

2.1'
2.2

Clothing: Total................................

11.7

11.7

10.3

10.0

12.5

11.8

Women and girls: Total......... ..............

5.4

5.3

4.8

4.7

6.2

Outerwear.............................. .

Personal care............................. .

.4

.4

1.3

1.6

1.6

1.8

1.9

2.0
2.3

2.0
2.4

1.5
2.0

1.6

2.7

2.3
2.9

13.0

13.0

12.1

12.6

10.4

9.7

5.6

6.6

6.6

5.8

6.1

5.3

4.7
2.5

2.0

2.5

2.4

2.4

2.3

3.1

2.8

3.2

3.2

2.6

2.7

2.9

Underwear and nightwear.....................

.8

.8

.7

.7

.9

.7

.9

1.0

.8

.9

.6

.6

Hosiery and footwear........................

1.3

1.3

1.2

1.2

1.3

1.3

1.7

1.7

1.6

1.7

1.1

1.1

Hats, gloves, accessories...................
Men and boys: Total......................... .

.8

.8

.5

.5

.9

.8

.8

.7

.8

.8

.7

.5

4.6

4.6

3.8

3.6

4.4

4.4

4.3

4.3

4.0

4.3

3.4

3.5

Outerwear.......... .......................

2.8

2.8

2.3

2.1

2.6

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.4

2.5

2.0

1.9

Underwear and nightwear......... ............

.3

.3

.2

.2

.3

.3

.3

.4

.3

.3

.2

.3

Hosiery and footwear................. ......

.9

.9

.9

.9

.9

.9

.9

.9

.8

.9

.7

.7

Hats, gloves, accessories...................

.6

.6

.4

.4

.6

.7

.6

.5

.5

.6

.5

.6

.1

.1

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.3

.2

•2

.2

.2

Clothing materials and services: Total.........

1.6

1.7

1.5

1.5

1.7

1.6

1.9

1.8

2.1

2.0

1.5

1.3

Medical care..................................

4.8

4.8

5.1

4.9

5.2

5.1

4.8

4.3

4.4

4.3

6.0

5.7

Recreation.......................... ..........

4.6

4v8

2.9

2.7

5.5

4.9

3.1

2.7

2.8

2.7

3.2

3.2

Reading................... ................ .

1.0

1.1

.9

1.0

1.0

.9

.7

.7

.9

.8

.9

.9

Education.......................... ...........

1.2

.8

.8

.7

.4

.3

1.4

.4

.4

.3

.8

.4

Automobile transportation...... .................
.

14.2
1.7

12.5
1.9

13.4
1.6

14.2
1.5

9.8

9.9
1.6

13.5

10.8

1.4

1.7

13.7
1.5

12.8
1.8

14.6

1.7

1.7

16.5
1.8

1.4

1.0

1.6

1.5

2.2

2.7

1.2

.9

1.5

1.0

1.9

1.6

Children under 2'years: Total................. .

Other transportation......... ................ .
Miscellaneous7...... ..........
S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b l e s , p,. 6 6 .




32

Preliminary
TART.E 3a.— Percentage Distribution of Expenditures for Current Consumption— All Families1 and Wage-Earner}

Clerical-Worker Families2 in Cities With Population of 30,500 to 24-0,000— Continued
Okla]ioma
Ci ty,
0k La.
Item

Salt Lake
Ci1ty,
Ut£ih

Portland,
Maine

Phoenix,
Ariz.

Sioux Falls,
S. Dak.

San Jose,
Calif.

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing*..........................................

11.3

9.4

10.4

10.6

11.0

10.2

10.2

9.7

9.8

9.8

10.5

9.7

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.............

2.8

2.8

3.5

3.6

6.5

6.5

3.1

3.1

2.8

2.6

3.9

3.7

Household operation................ ...............

5.3
9.0

5.0
7.3

4.0
8.9

3.3
8.2

4.3
6.5

3.9

3.2
8.3

4.2
7.2

3.8

7.1

3.8
7.5

6.7

4.5
9.3

4.2
9.1

1.1
2.4

.8
2.0

.7
2.5

.7
1.8

.8
1.3

.8
1.3

.7
2.3

.7
2.4

.8
1.8

.7
1.5

.8
2.7

.7
2.8

1.0

.9

Percent of expenditures for current consumption.... .

Housefumishings and equipment: Total.............
Household textiles........ ...... ..............
Furniture.............. ................ .........
Floor coverings............. ........ ...........

.9

.4

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment........... .

3.1

2.7

.7
3.2

.4
3.4

.4
2.9

.6
3.2

2.4

1.2
2.8

.7
2.4

.6
2.5

3.7

.8
3.6

1.5
26.9

1.4
28.4

1.8
30.0

1.9
30.0

1.1
31.4

1.2
33.6

1.1
26.4

1.2
27.5

1.5
29.0

1.4
31.3

1.2
28.4

1.2
29.3

Miscellaneous5 ........... .................. .
Food.................................. .
Alcoholic drinks...............................
Tobacco...... .................. ..............

.8

1.0

1.5

1.3

1.4

1.7

1.7

2.1

1.1

1.5

1.3

1.2

1.8

2.0

1.6

1.7

2.2

2.3

1.0

1.2

1.5

1.6

1.6

1.8

Personal care.................................... .

2.7

2.7

2.2

2.2

2.2

2.3

2.4

2.5

2.2

2.2

2.1

2.1

Clothing: Total............. ......................

12.0

10.8

9.2

9.5

10.9

10.9

11.8

11.4

10.6

10.5

10.7

10.7

5.1
2.4

5.3

5.1

4.8

4.6

5.4

2.4

2.2

2.3

2.1

3.0

5.4
2.9

Women and girls: Total....................... ;..
Outerwear............................ .
Underwear and nightwear................ ......
Hosiery and footwear...................... .
Hats, gloves, accessories........... .
Men and boys: Total..................... .
Outerwear.............. ......................
Underwear and nightwear........................
Hosiery and footwear......... ........... .
Hats, gloves, accessories.....................
Children under 2 years: Total......... ..........

6.0

5.0

3.9

4.1

5.2

3.0

2.4

1.8

1.9

2.6

.8

.7

.6

.7

.7

.7

.9

.9

.7

.7

.6

.7

1.2

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.3

1.4

1.3

1.4

1.2

1.2

1.2

1.2

1.0

.8

.5

.5

.6

.6

.7

.6

.6

.6

.6

.6

4.1

3.7

3.9

3.9

4.1

4.3

4.5

4.3

3.9

4.1

3.8

3.8

2.4

2.1

2.2

2.2

2.3

2.3

2.7

2.5

2.3

2,4

2.3

2.2

.3
.8

.3
.8

.4
.9

.4
1.0

.3
.9

.4
.9

.3
1.0

.3
1.0

.4
.9

.3
1.0

.3
.7

.3
.8

.6

.5

.4

.3

.6

.7

.5

.5

.3

.4

.5

.5

.1

.2

.1

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

Clothing materials and services: Total..........

1.8

1.9

1.3

1.3

1.4

1.3

1.8

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.3

1.3

Medical care......................................

5.3

5.6

5.4

5.3

4.7

4.4

5.4

5.5

5.2

4.9

4.8

4.9

Recreation......... .............................

4.6

4.3

4.7

3.8

3.0

3.1

6.1

6 .4

3.7

3.6

.9

.9

.7

.6

1.2

1 .1

1.0

.6

.5

.4

Reading........ ..............................
Education....... ..............................

.5

6 .2

6.3

.8

.8

1.0

1 .1

.8

.8

.3

1.2

.8

.6

.4

.4

.5

15.8

14,6

15,2

1 2 .4

17.0

14.6

16.8

9.5

3.8

15.9

15.2

14.7

Other transportation.................. ..........

1 .2

1 .1

1.6

1.4

2 .2

2 .2

1.4

1 .4

.9

.9

1.2

1.2

Miscellaneous7 ........... ................ .

2 .0

1 .1

1*2

1.3

2.5

1 .6 _

1.4

1 .5

1.8

1*2

2.1

2.0

Automobile transportation.................. .

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




33

Preliminary
TABLE 3a.— Percentage Distribution of Expenditures for Current Consumption— All Families1 and Wage-Earner, Clerical-Worker Families2 in Cities with
Population of 30,500 to 240,000— Continued

Wichita,, Kans.
Item

Wilmington, Del.

All
families

Percent of expenditures for current consumption.,

Wage
earner
families

All
families

Wage
earner
families

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing4......................................

11.9

11.7

10.4

10.5

Fuel, light, refrigeration, and water.........

2.8

2.8

5.0

4.9

Household operation...... .............

4.1

3.7

4.3

4.1

Housefurnishings and equipment:

7.6

8.0

7.8

8.4

.8

.7

1.0

1.1

1.9

2.1

2.0

2.3

.9

.7

1.0

1.1

Kitchen, cleaning, laundry equipment.........

2.8

3.2

2.7

2.9

Miscellaneous9.............................

1.2

1.3

1.1

1.0

Food.........................................

28.1

29.8

28.5

29.1

.6

.8

2.1

2.4

1.7

2.2

1.9

2.2

Total....... .

Household textiles.............. .........
Furniture.............. ..............
Floor coverings....................... .

Alcoholic drinks........................ .....
Tobacco.................. ................

2.2

Clothing:

Total............................. .

Women and girls:

2.3

2.3

11.2

12.4

11.8

5.0

5.2

6.4

6.0

2.5

Total................. .

Outerwear..... ..........................

2.5

3.6

3.2

.7

.8

.7

.7

1.2

Underwear and nightwear.'.................
Hosiery and footwear..................

1.3

1.5

1.5

.6

Total.... ....................

.6

.6

.6

4.5

Hats, gloves, accessories................
Men and boys:

2.3

11.1

Personal care...... ..........................

4.3

4.1

3.9
2.3

2.8

2.4

2.5

Underwear and nightwear.... ..............,

.3

.3

.3

.3

Hosiery and footwear.... ..............

.9

1.0

.8

.8

Hats, gloves, accessories.... ........... .

.5

.6

.5

.5

.1

.2

.2

.2

1.5

1.5

1.7

1.7

Outerwear...... ......... .

Children under 2 years:

Total....... ......

Clothing materials and services:

Total.....

Medical care............. ................. .

5.5

5.8

4.9

4.5

Recreation...................................

3.4

3.2

5.2

5.2

Reading........................... .... ......

.9

.9

.9

.9

Education........... ........................

.7

.5

.9

.5

Automobile transportation....................

16.5

14.4

10.9

10.9

Other transportation.............. ..........

1.5

1.6

1.5

1.4

Miscellaneous7.............. ................

1.4

1.1

1.0

.9

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




34

Preliminary
TABLE 4.--Average Money Income, Expenditures, and Savings, and Percentage Distribution of Expenditures for Current Consumption-— All Families1 and
Wage-Earner, Clerical?Worker Families2 in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500
Antioch,
Calif.

Anna, 111.
Item
All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Bakersfield,
Calif.12

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Bangor.
Maine15

All
fami­
lies

Barre,
Vt.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Bloomington,
111?2

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

40

23

62

44

58

31

46

26

50

25

45

30

2.9

2.9.

3.5

3.3

3.0

3.1

3.5

3.6

3.4

3.6

3.2

3.3

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

$3,397

$2,913

$4,519

$4,397

$4,955

$4,429

$4,222

$3,479

$3,901

$3,772

Housing*, fuel, utilities, and household operation.

680

542

685

709

1,035

840

777

910;

736

831

Housefumishings and equipment.................. .

326

215

423

405

588

327

301

180

300

307

260

285

Food..................... ........................

886

826

1,353

1,312

1,172

1,167

1,219

1,094

1,222

1,278

1,225

1,183
116

Number of families................. .................
Average family size3...................... .........

1,027-

$3,881 $3,721
772

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco.......................

99

89

121

110

128

156

185

183

138

150

114

Personal care..... ................................

64

61

97

93

113

101

94

74

83

93

92

84

Clothing..... .....................................

336

293

491

445

510

575

499

402

410

412

427

350

Medical care...... ................................

189

127

266

236

249

194

189

129

171

186

248

273

Recreation, reading, and education.............. .

165

107

256

216

294

279

219

166

223

183

251

215

Transportation............ ........................

629

628

782

826

797

735

417

406

405

398

369

394

Miscellaneous7...........................

23

25

45

45

69

55

72

68

39

29

64

49

Insurance.... .......................................

174

171

155

144

240

244

229

166

231

179

283

258

Gifts and contributions.............................

141

106

230

187

137

95

124

100

170

141

186

171

116

114

214

0

412

0

371

0

0

0

78

0

447

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities.......................................
Payments of principal and down payments on owned
homes................... .............. ........

94

143

289

262

325

86

177

223

76

51

298

Personal taxes8...... ............................ .

303

184

419

379

835

386

381

199

269

245

368

298

Money income9.«........... .........................

3,596

3,254

5,105

4,698

5,420

4,495

4,797

3,513

3,780

3,727

4,217

3,946

Other money receipts1®,.............................

0

0

24

4

39

40

30

54

3

0

8

12

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in
liabilities...... .................................

0

0

0

17

0

179

0

51

238

62

0

20

Balancing difference11.......... .................. .

-232

-50

+11

-9

-285

-54

-119

-127

-281

-303

-203

-172

Percent of expenditures for current consumption......

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0 ! 100.0

100.0

Housing,* fuel, utilities, and household operation.

20.0

18.6

15.1

16.1

20.9

18.9

24.4

22.4

23.3

19.5

21.5

20.8

9.6

7.4

9.4

9.2

11.9

7.4

7.1

5.2

7.7

8.1

6.7

7.7

26.0

28.3

30.0

29.8

23.6

26.3

28.9

31.4

31.4

33.9

31.5

31.8

Housefumishings and equipment....... .
Food....... ......................... .........
Alcoholic drinks and tobacco........... ..........

2.9

3.1

2.7

2.5

2.6

3.5

4.4

5.2

3.5

3.9

2.9

3.1

Personal care................ ....................

1.9

2.1

2.1

2.1

2.3

2.3

2.2

2.1

2.1

2.5

2.4

2.3

Clothing............. ........................ .

9.9

10.0

10.9

10.1

10.3

13.0

11.8

11.6

10.5

10.9

11.0

9.4

Medical care,....... .............................

5.6

4.4

5.9

5.4

5.0

4.4

4.5

3.7

4.4

4.9

6.4

7.3

Recreation, reading, and educatidn.................

4.9

3.7

5.6

5.0

5.9

6.4

5.2

4.7

5.7

4.9

6.5

5.7

Transportation................................. .

18.5

21.5

17.3

18.8

16.1

16.6

9.8

11.7

10.4

10.6

9.5

10.6

Miscellaneous7..... ........................... .

.7

.9

1.0

1.0

1.4

1.2

1.7

2.0

1-0

.8

1.6

1.3

See footnotes at end of tables, p, 66.




35

Preliminary
TABLE 4.— Average Money Income, Expenditures, and Savings, and Percentage Distribution of Expenditures for Current Consumption— All Families1 and
Wage-Earner, Clerical-Worker Families2 in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500— Continued
Camden,
Ark.
Item

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Dalhart,
Tex.

Cumberland,
Md.

Cooperstown,
N.T.

Columbia
Tenn.

Cheyenne,
Wyo.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Wage
All
earner
fami­
fami­
lies
lies

Wage
All
earner
fami­
fami­
lies
lies

Number of families..................................

53

28

56

36

54

34

46

24

52

27

50

24

Average family size3............. ...................

3.3

3.3

3.5

3.6

3.7

3.6

3.0

3.2

3.5

3.6

3.2

3.4

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

$3,094

$2,797

$4,578

$4,417

|3,220

$2,978

$3,468

$3,337

$3,303

$3,210

Housing*, fuel, utilities, and household operation.

580

443

757

708

617

617

886

810

634

586

591

497

Housefurnishings and equipment.....................

303

301

343

270

255

261

157

177

231

240

259

272

Food............................... ..............

888

855

1,340

1,300

990

900

1,109

1,109

1,069

1,070

1,024

1,075

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco...... ................

60

57

144

131

68

78

114

113

106

126

86

83

Personal care............ ............. .

72

64

95

99

75

78

70

68

87

84

88

83

$3,548 $3,624

Clothing................................. .........

329

295

479

487

450

412

324

305

417

381

367

406

Medical care............... ............... .......

227

138

259

288

150

140

171

157

173

179

178

150

Recreation, reading, and education............... .

102

68

241

206

114

112

172

185

174

161

168

182

Transportation. ....................................

486

507

870

865

411

330

411

373

386

364

722

831

Miscellaneous7.......... .........................

47

69

50

63

90

50

54

40

26

19

65

45

Insurance....... ......... .

114

94

217

192

100

106

170

174

257

273

155

193

Gifts and contributions........ .

110

64

200

96

103

72

188

86

144

120

168

79

0

0

96

0

0

0

66

0

0

0

160

0

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities.......................................
Payments of principal and down payments on owned
hones................................. ..........

Other money receipts1?..............................

107

35

430

315

218

307

78

96

97

45

284

92

171

105

390

310

118

87

219

186

273

208

470

246

3,036

Personal taxes8....... ..............................

2,620

5,042

4,347

3,155

2,811

3,547

3,435

3,606

3,394

4,000

3,516

4

6

0

0

22

34

256

83

0

0

0

0

334

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in
liabilities.......................................

255

311

0

297

213

232

0

6

72

178

0

Balancing difference11...... ........................

-23

-18

-49

-61

-33

-79

-89

-73

-26

-31

-31

-46

Percent of expenditures for current consumption.....

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
13.8

Housing,* fuel, utilities, and household operation.

18.7

15.9

16.5

16.0

19.1

20.8

25.6

24.3

19.2

18.3

16.7

Housefurnishings and equipment....................

9.8

10.8

7.5

6.1

7.9

8.8

4.5

5.3

7.0

7.5

7.3

7.5

Food..............................................

28.8

30.6

29.3

29.5

30.7

30.2

32.0

33.2

32.4

33.3

28.9

29.7

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco....... .

1.9

2.0

3.1

3.0

2.1

2.6

3.3

3.41

3.2

3.9

2.5j

2.3

Personal care........ ............................

2.3

2.3

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.6

2.0

2.0

2.6

2.6

2.5

2.3

Clothing..................... .....................

10.7

10.5

10.5

11.0

14.0

13.8

9.4

9.1

12.6

11.9

10.3

11.2

Medical care..................................... .

7.4

4.9

5.6

6.5

4.7

4.7

4.9

4.7

5.2

5.6

5.0

4.1

Recreation, reading, and education.

3.2

2.4

5.3

4.7

3.5

3.7

4.9

5.6

5.3

5.0

4.7

5.0

15.7

18.1

19.0

19.6

12.7

11.1

11.8

11.2

11.7

11.3

20.3

22.9

1.5

2.5

1.1

1.4

3.0

1.7

1.6

1.2

.8

.6

1.8

1.2

Transportation......... ..... *....................
Miscellaneous7..... ...................... .......
See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




36

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 4 . —Average Money Incom e, E x p e n d itu re s, and S a v in g s, and P e rc e n ta g e D i s tr i b u ti o n o f E x p e n d itu re s f o r C u rre n t Consum ption—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and
W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 i n C i t i e s W ith P o p u la tio n s o f 2 ,5 0 0 t o 3 0 ,5 0 0 — C ontinued
Demopolis,
Ala.
Item
All
fami­
lies

Fayetteville,
N. C.

Elko, Nev.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Garrett,
Ind.
All
fami­
lies

Grand Forks,
N. Dak.

Glendale,
Ariz.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

AS

28

48

29

46

31

48

34

57

38

51

29

3 .8

3.6

3.3

3.1

3.7

3.5

3.2

3.2

3.8

3.7

3.4

3.5

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total... $2,847

$3,659

Number of families..................................
Average family size3.............................

J$2,384

$5,053

$4,813

$3,400

$3,108

$3,699

$3,678

$3,689

$3,526

$3,947

Housing4, fuel, utilities, and household operation.

500

386

956

897

765

724

684

707

541

508

898

763

Housefurnishings and equipment......................

210

127

337

323

266

210

296

310

288

264

282

257

Food............ .................... .........

875

793

1,406

1,418

958

913

1,086

1,095

1,176

1,153

1,131

1,083

134

146

159

182

97

106

92

89

131

134

137

139

76

72

101

95

100

94

84

75

85

84

96

93

Clothing..... ............................. .

397

350

523

489

456

429

431

395

336

313

462

463

Medical care...... ...... .....................

130

116

332

291

134

110

207

144

178

179

195

191

Recreation, reading, and education......... ......

142

121

316

264

180

141

224

203

157

117

263

241
393

..

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco.... .................
Personal care............ ....... ........ .

Transportation..... ...............................

314

228

824

798

406

349

549

602

749

733

439

Miscellaneous7........... ........................

69

45

99

56

38

32

46

58

48

41

44

36

Insurance............................ ...............

169

153

255

240

161

123

234

260

98

96

156

149

Gifts and contributions......... ....................

84

70

162

157

153

108

139

145

123

129

121

98

0

0

112

0

0

0

89

0

0

0

0

0

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities......... ...........................
Payments of principal and down payments on owned
homes..... ............ ......................

54

38

263

400

313

354

413

490

87

93

400

543

146

90.

692

369

242

155

345

346

217

149

268

221

Money income9.*......................... ............

2,928

2,526

5,335

4,643

3,470

3,132

4,028

3,972

3,404

3,291

4,018

3,753

Other money receipts ^ .......... .......... .........

1

0

2

0

9

0

15

21

36

33

0

0

Personal taxes8.......... .......... ..............

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in
liabilities.......................................

121

25

0

136

183

179

0

67

451

447

116

15

-50

-56

-245

-431

-52

-28

-118

-23

-19

+20

-90

-138

Percent of expenditures for current consumption......

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing,4 fuel, utilities, and household operation.

17.6

16.2

18.9

18.6

22.5

23.2

18.5

19.2

14.8

14.3

22.9

20.9

Housefurnishings and equipment....................

7.4

5.3

6.7

6.7

7.8

6 .S

8.0

8.4

7.8

7.5

7.1

7.0

Food..............................................

30 .7

33.3

27.8

29.5

28.2

29.4

29.3

29.8

31.8

32.6

28.7

29.6

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco........ .......

4.7

6.1

3.2

3.8

2.9

3.5

2.5

2.4

3.6

3.8

3.4

3.8

Personal care............... ......... .

2.7

3.0

2.0

2.0

2.9

3.0

2.3

2.0

2.3

2.4

2.4

2.5

Balancing difference11.......................... .

Clothing................. ......... ..........

14.0

14.7

10.4

10.2

13.4

13.8

11.7

10.8

9.1

8.9

11.7

12.7

Medical care.......................... ............

4.6

4.9

6.5

6.0

3.9

3.5

5.6

3.9

4.8

5.1

4.9

5.2

Recreation, reading, and education..............

4.9

5.1

6.3

5.5

5.3

4.5

6.1

5.5

4.3

3.4

6.7

11.0

9.5

16.3

16.5

12.0

11.3

14.8

16.4

20.2

20.8

11.1

2.4

1.9

1.9

1,2

1.1

1.0

1.2

1.6.

1.3

1.2

1.1

Transportation......... ..........................
Miscellaneous7. .......................... .

See footnotes at end

o f




'
tables, p« 66.

37

6.5
io
1.0

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 4 . —Average Money Income, E x p e n d itu re s, and S a v in g s, and P e rce n ta g e D i s tr i b u ti o n o f E x p e n d itu re s f o r C u rren t Consim ption—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and
W age-Earner, Clerical-^V forker F a m ilie s 2 i n C i ti e s w ith P o p u la tio n s o f 2 ,5 0 0 to 3 0 ,5 0 0 —C ontinued
Grand Junction,
Colo.

Grand Island
Nebr.
Item
All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Grinnell,
Iowa
All
fami­
lies

Lodi,
Calif.

Laconia
N. H.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Lynchburg
Va.12

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

62

41

47

19

44

21

40

22

44

26

44

33

3.3

3.5

2.8

3.5

3.6

3.7

3.1

3.1

3.1

3.2

3.4

3.7

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

$3,960

$3,552

$3,538

$3,343

$3,279

$3,222

$3,779

$3,512

$4,099

$3,885

$3,340

$3,492

Housing*, fuel, utilities, and household operation.

753

662

827

814

701

644

913

884

698

525

708

716

Housefumishings and equipment.............. .

250

189

245

189

210

221

263

224

387

343

190

219

1,154

1,159

1,003

973

967

960

l;098

1,061

1,131

1,125

1,010

1,074

132

131

85

100

80

101

107

110

100

109

151

178

91

86

69

70

61

62

65

67

89

84

78

81

Clothing..... .....................................

422

391

385

393

336

309

387

320

474 .

432

374

387
217

Number of families..................................
Average family size3........ ....................

Food......... ............ ..................
Alcoholic drinks and tobacco......... ......... .
Personal care....... ..........................

Medical care.......... .......................... .

198

168

220

174

126

132

182

206

218

203

213

Recreation, reading, and education................

156

151

214

196

171

161

213

188

194

165

133

141

Transportation......... .........................

711

578

428

367

563

559

512

423

757

857

447

437

93

37

62

67

64

73

39

51

42

36

42

Insurance......................... .................

Miscellaneous7........ ............................

173

166

147

200

100

124

195

160

150

109

196

211

Gifts and contributions......... ....................

210

107

94

69

123

46

129

111

184

167

177

167

0

0

39

0

244

229

0

0

0

0

0

0

29 ,

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities.......................................
Payments of principal and down payments on owned
584

148

286

137

92

79

503

850

556

361

53

54

Personal taxes8............ ....................... .

403

218

277

198

199

176

169

167

308

242

200

211

Money income9........................................

3,970

3,323

3,585

3,453

3,593

3,544

3,554

3,485

4,075

3,818

3,427

3,597

165

192

170

6

2

4

1

0

38

6

20

26

196

Other money rec&ipts1?....................... .
Net decrease in assets and/or increase in
liabilities.......................................

53

103

0

44

0

0

360

127

328

276

199

-155

-207

-63

-109

-151

-73

-188

-171

+8

-61

-67

-51

Percent of expenditures for current consumption......

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing,* fuel, utilities, and household operation.

20.5

Balancing difference11.............. .

19.0

18.7

23.3

24.4

21.4

20.0

24.2

25.2

17.0

13.5

21.2

Housefurnishings and equipment....................

6.3

5.3

6.9

5.7

6.4

6.9

7.0

6.3

9.4

8.8

5.7

6.3

Food......... ....................................

29.1

32.6

28.3

29.1

29.5

29.7

29.1

30.2

27.6

29.0

30.2

30.8

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco............ .........

3.3

3.7

2.4

3.0

2.4

3.1

2.8

3.1

2.5

2.8

4.5

5.1

Personal care............. ..............

2.3

2.4

2.0

2.1

1.9

1.9

1.7

1.9

2.2

2.2

2.3

2.3

10.7

11.0

10.9

11.7

10.2

9.6

10.3

9.1

11.6

11.1

11.2

11.1

Medical care.................................. .

5.0

4.7

6.2

5.2

3.8

4.1

4.8

5.9

5.3

5.2

6.4

6.2

Recreation, reading, and education..•••••••........

4.0

4.3

6.1

5.9

5.2

5.0

5.6

5.4

4.7

4.3

4.0

4.0

Transportation............... ....................

18.0

16.3

12.1

10.9

17.2

17.4

13.5

12.1

18.5

22.0

13.4

12.5

2.3

1.0

1.8

2.0

2.0

2.3

1.0

.8

1.2

1.1

1.1

1.2

Clothing.................. .......................

Miscellaneous7..... ............................. .
See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




38

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 4 . —Average Money Income, E x p e n d itu re s, and S a v in g s, and P e rce n ta g e D i s tr i b u ti o n o f E x p e n d itu re s f o r C u rren t Consumption—a l l F a m ilie s 1 and
W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 i n C i ti e s w ith P o p u la tio n o f 2 ,5 0 0 to 3 0 ,5 0 0 — C ontinued
Madill,
Okla.
Item

All
fami­
lies

Middlesbaro,
Ky.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Middletown,
Conn.12
All
fami­
lies

Newark,
Ohio12

Nanty-Glo,
Pa.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Ogden.
Utah1*

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Number of families.................. ................

46

26

52

34

50

31

47

35

46

32

54

44

Average family size3.................................

3.4

3.8

3.7

4.0

3.8

3.8

4.5

4.5

3.1

3.4

3.6

3.7

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

$3,190

$2,931

$3,261

$2,965

$4,728

$4,778

$3,779

$3,483

$3,831

$3,885

$3,966

$3,870

Housing*, fuel, utilities, and household operation.

558

453

631

501

905

791

531

482

668

674

739

730

Housefumishings and equipment....................

250

265

236

186

367

440

332

327

331

375

293

286

Food....................... ..................

894

945

1,049

1,034

1,438

1,513

1,280

1,231

1,037

1,061

1,014

972

76

57

92

101

164

168

89

88

144

128

97

100

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco......................
Personal care.................................. .

89

90

78

73

90

97

86

80

85

86

96

98

Clothing.... .................. .................

419

390

371

320

622

697

456

413

483

393

518

476

Medical care....... ...............................

150

162

177

154

210

208

167

153

165

185

228

222

Recreation, reading, and education................

164

118

161

128

326

313

195

161

249

238

246

218

Transportation. ........ ...........................

516

388

409

427

515

469

621

526

626

727

691

730

Miscellaneous7....... .............................

74

63

57

41

91

82

22

22

43

18

44

38

Insurance.......... ....................... ........

117

93

97

77

298

268

166

150

132

122

230

222

Gifts and contributions......... ....................

116

63

89

76

157

171

123

85

214

130

157

142

310

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

116

0

0

0

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities........ .............. ................
Payments of principal and down payments on owned
homes.... ...... ................................

130

62

149

192

305

445

39

31

410

247

93

92

Personal taxes8......... ...........................

140

115

156

113

375

398

170

142

562

221

258

240

Money income9.*............... ................... .

3,184

2,885

3,019

2,759

4,772

4,689

3,784

3,392

3,997

3,619

3,905

3,742

379

16

0

0

23

14

26

7

34

48

74

91

314

Other money receipts10.......................... .
Net decrease in assets and/or increase in

0

41

347

306

68

30

109

168

0

255

240

Balancing difference11................... ...........

-170

-145

-81

-53

-320

-484

-149

-151

-262

-215

-134

-87

Percent of expenditures for current consumption......

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
18.9

liabilities.......................................

Housing,* fuel, utilities, and household operation.

17.5

15.5

19.4

16.8

19.1

16.5

14.0

13.8

17.4

17.4

18.6

Housefumishings and equipment....... .............

7.8

9.0

7.2

6.3

7.8

9.2

8.8

9.4

8.6

9.6

7.4

7.4

Food......... .......... ..........................

28.1

32.2

32.2

34.8

30.4

31.6

33.9

35.3

27.1

27.3

25.6

25.1

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco...... ...........

2.4

2.0

2.8

3.4

3.5

3.6

2.4

2.6

3.8

3.3

2.5

2.6

Personal care............... .

2.8

3.1

2.4

2.5

1.9

2.0

2.3

2.3

2.2

2.2

2.4

2.5
12.3

13.1

13.4

11.4

10.8

13.2

14.6

12.1

11.9

12.6

10.1

13.1

Medical care...................... .

Clothing........... ...............................

4.7

5.5

5.4

5.2

4.4

4.4

4.4

4.4

4.3

4.8

5.7

5.7

Recreation, reading, and education.......... .

5.1

4.0

4.9

4.4

6.9

6.6

5.1

4.6

6.5

6.1

6.2

5.6

16.2

13.2

12.6

14.4

10.9

9.8

16.4

15.1 .

16.4

18.7

17.4

18.9

2.3

2.1

1.7

1.4

1.9

1.7

.6

.6

1.1

.5

1.1

1.0

Transportation............... .....................
Miscellaneous7..... . ............................
See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




39

Preliminary

TABLE 4 . —Average Money Income, E x p e n d itu re s, and S a v in g s, and P e rce n ta g e D i s tr i b u ti o n o f E x p e n d itu re s f o r C u rren t Consumption—A ll F a m ilie s 1 and
W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 i n C i t i e s w ith P o p u la tio n o f 2 ,5 0 0 t o 3 0 ,5 0 0 —C ontinued
Pecos,
Tex.
Item

All
fami­
lies

Ravenna,
Ohio

Pulaski,
Va.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Roseburg,
Oreg.

Rawlins,
Wyo.
Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Salina,
Kans.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

52

28

49

37

42

27

56

39

55

22

52

35

3.6

3.9

3.5

3.7

3.2

3.3

3.6

3.6

3.2

3.1

3.1

3.2

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

13,727

$3,436

$3,326

$3,116

$3,722

$3,746

$4,262

$4,295

$4,039

$3,894

$3,405

$3,410

Housing4, fuel, utilities, and household operation.
-

664

531

636

557

641

643

674

655

862

862

703

685

Housefurnishings and equipment........ ........ .

312

343

197

189

324

375

376

423

317

275

256

254

1,110

1,062

1,047

1,004

1,065

1,062

1,190

1,182

1,177

1,066

1,048

1,098
112

Number of families................. ............ .
Average family size3......................... ......

Food..................... ......................
Alcoholic drinks and tobacco......................

122

155

107

104

110

110

180

185

103

146

94

Personal care..... ...............................

98

101

65

59

90

93

94

91

82

77

80

86

Clothing........................................ .

432

424

375

373

466

455

422

397

419

399

303

309

Medical care............ ....................

174

126

178

140

177

143

173

174

228

178

144

132

Recreation, reading, and education............. .

181

162

166

161

225

231

261

268

228

234

201

178

Transportation....................................

566

501

509

496

597

611

807

838

562

629

524

517

68

31

46

33

27

23

85

82

61

28

52

39

Insurance............................................

104

86

156

130

180

146

179

178

156

158

189

165

Gifts and contributions........................... .

136

80

122

125

78

75

189

94

204

155

107

67

0

0

0

61

206'

49

223

0

305

0

235

0

Miscellaneous7...... .........................

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities.......................................
Payments of principal and down payments on owned
hemes. .................................... ......

Other money receipts1®......... ..................

197

90

96

81

582

702

382

379

475

163

169

186

260

209

214

203

292

281

322

328

373

322

286

229

3,821

Personal taxes8................................... .

3,170

3,449

3,364

3,880

3,720

4,711

4,332

4,576

4,113

3,602

3,430

33

0

7

2

90

0

1

1

0

0

290

17

118

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in
liabilities................ ......................

76

398

21

0

0

0

0

112

0

96

0

Balancing difference11..............................

-37

-34

-127

-66

-216

-296

-141

-122

-128

+2

-44

-77

Percent of expenditures for current consumption.....

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100-0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing,4 fuel, utilities, and household operation.

20.1

17.9

15.4

19.1

17-.9

17.2

17.2

15.8

15.2

21.3

22.1

20.7

Housefurnishings and equipment....................

8.4

10.0

5.9

6.1

8.7

10.0

8.8

9.8

7.8

7.1

7.5

7.4

Food..............................................

29.7

31.0

31.4

32.1

28.7

28.4

28.0

27.5

29.1

27.4

30.8

32.1
3.3

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco.... ..................

3.3

4.5

3.2

3.4

2.9

3.0

4.2

4.3

2.6

3.7

2.8

Personal care............................. .......

2.6

2.9

2.0

1.9

2.4

2.5

2.2

2.1

2.0

2.0

2.3

2.5

Clothing........................... ..............

11.6

12.3

11.3

12.0

12.5

12.1

9.9

9.2

10.4

10.2

8.9

9.1
3.9

Medical c

a

r

e

.

.

............

Recreation, reading, and education....... .
Transportation. .............. ....................
Miscellaneous7..... ..... .......................

4.7

3.7

5.4

4.5

4.8

3.8

4.1

4.1

5.6

4.6

4.2

4.9

4.7

5.0

5.2

6.0

6.1

6.1

6.3

5.7

6.0

5.9

5.3

15.1

14.6

15.3

15.8

16.1

16.3

18.9

19.6

14.0

16.2

15.4

15.2

1.8

.9

1.4

1.1

.7

.6

2.0

1.9

1.5

.7

1.5

1.1

See footnotes at end of tables, p, 66.




40

P re lim in a ry
TABLE 4 . —Average Money Incom e, E x p e n d itu re s, and S a v in g s, and P e rce n ta g e D i s tr i b u ti o n o f E x p e n d itu re s f o r C u rren t Consumption—a l l F a m ilie s 1 and
W age-Earner, C le ric a l-W o rk e r F a m ilie s 2 i n C i ti e s With P o p u la tio n s o f 2 ,5 0 0 t o 3 0 ,5 0 0 —Continued
Sandpoint,
Idaho
Item

Number of families................................ .

Santa Cruz,
Calif.

Wage
earner
Fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Shenandoah,
Iowa

Shawnee,
Okla.
Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Tucson.
Ariz.12

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Washington,
N.J.

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

Wage
earner
fami­
lies

All
fami­
lies

43

22

45

18

45

23

43

23

44

22

48

29

3.3

3.2

2.6

3.0

3.3

3.3

3.1

3.4

3.3

3.4

3.3

3.4

Average expenditure for current consumption: Total...

$3,316

$3,539

$3,336

$3,683

$3,186

$3,702

$3,672

$3,229

$4,020

$3,569

Housing*, fuel, utilities, and household operation.

608

631

646

728

553

574

804

674

810

637

906

783

Housefurnishings and equipment......... ...........

220

264

261

315

196

232

374

284

275

373

276

230

Food........ .....................................

1,016

1,039

1,061

1,182

859

977

980

936

1,132

1,118

1,313

1,315

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco.... .................

70

100

99

119

76

118

88

71

80

68

115

115

Personal care....... ........ ........... .........

55

54

67

73

71

78

84

80

82

73

97

84

Clothing...........................................

342

340

386

381

380

400

437

383

397

322

418

367

Medical care.......... .........................

110

120

241

253

135

164

193

166

309

279

297

285

Recreation, reading, and education................

189

193

151

199

126

129

262

160

193

155

229

217

Transportation. ..............................

617

731

383

383

739

998

419

444

661

505

463

437

89

67

41

50

51

32

31

31

81

39

40

26

Insurance............... ............................

102

101

158

206

132

150

170

132

151

107

198

188

Gifts and contributions.................... .........

89

52

105

73

87

94

144

69

254

115

114

87

0

0

177

0

0

0

344

218

0

0

0

123

Average family size3................. .

Miscellaneous7.... ...........................

$4,154 $3,859

Net increase in assets and/or decrease in
liabilities.......................................
Payments of principal and down payments on owned
69

94

404

503

288

36

850

252

391

519

318

174

Personal taxes8............................ ....... .

97

159

229

214

147

183

270

118

228

111

275

276

Money income9........................................

3,282

3,378

3,694

3,699

3,080

3,652

3,973

3,313

3,945

3,053

4,062

3,851

Other money receipts1.
0............. .................

18

30

23

28

5

5

150

158

0

0

12

19

homes....... ............................

Net decrease in assets and/or increase in
104

283

0

117

276

217

0

0

346

514

175

0

-103

-1

-59

-118

-44

-72

-207

-177

-134

-224

-217

-387

Percent of expenditures for current consumption.....

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Housing,* fuel, utilities, and household operation.

18.3

17.8

19.3

19.8

17.4

15.5

21.9

20.9

20.1

17.8

21.8

20.3

6.6

7.5

7.8

8.6

6.2

6.3

10.2

8.8

6.8

10.5

6.6

6.0

30.7

29.3

31.9

32.0

27.0

26.3

26.7

29.0

28.2

31.4

31.7

34.0

liabilities................. ......................
Balancing difference11........ .................. .

Housefurnishings and equipment................ .
Food............... ...........
Alcoholic drinks and tobacco......................

2.1

2.8

2.9

3.2

2.3

3.2

2.4

2.2

1.9

2.0

2.7

3.0

Personal care............ .........................

1.7

1.5

2.0

2.0

2.2

2.1

2.3

2.5

2.0

2.0

2.3

2.2

Clothing...... ....................................

10.3

9.6

11.6

10.3

11.9

10.8

11.9

11.9

9.9

9.0

10.1

9.5

Medical care.......... .......... .................

3.3

3.4

7.2

6.9

4.2

4.4

5.3

5.1

7.7

7.8

7.1

7.4

Recreation, reading, and education........ .

5.7

5.5

4.6

5.4

4.0

3.6

7.1

4.9

4.9

4.3

5.6

5.7

18.6

20.7

11.5

10.4

23.2

26.9

11.4

13.7

16.5

14.1

11.1

11.2

2.7

1.9

1.2

1.4

1.6

.9

.8

1.0

2.0

1.1

1.0

.7

Transportation....................... .............
Miscellaneous7............. ....................
See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




41

Preliminary

tabt. 5 . —Number o f F a m ilie s b y Income C la s s 9 i n A reas w ith P o p u la tio n s o f 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 and Over
f.
All families1 with annual money income of
City

Wage-earner and clerical/worker families2 with annual money income of
T
$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

1
1

18
12

52
37

79
60

39
36

16
15

12
9

6
5

5
0

228
175

302
222

0
0

9
8

39
32

59
49

39
29

15
15

11
9

4
4

4
0

180
146

20
1

419
336

0
0

11
8

43
35

73
59

48
46

35
33

19
16

16
14

6
0

251
211

13
9

20
0

337
268

2
1

5
3

24
18

56
48

59
55

30
27

24
23

8
8

4
0

212
183

24
23

20
14

15
0

382
325

4
4

11
8

27
25

62
57

55
50

28
25

16
15

11
11

3
0

217
195

29
26

24
23

30
23

55
0

507
388

0
0

16
13

50
45

87
77

55
46

33
28

19
17

9
8

11
0

280
234

59
53

43
36

18
18

17
11

26
0

448
374

1
1

8
7

31
27

78
71

68
64

38
34

21
20

9
9

5
0

259
233

55
53

52
45

30
29

10
7

15
10

6
0

329
277

0
0

6
4

41
34

58
50

37
36

38
34

16
15

3
3

1
0

200
176

96
89

61
57

39
37

21
20

22
18

12
11

18'
0

347
303

0
0

10
8

41
39

75
70

39
38

22
22

14
13

10
9

5
0

216
199

35
27

57
50

58
51

42
36

22
20

17
16

11
5

18
0

290
226

0
0

7
5

21
18

43
38

37
32

27
25

14
14

5
5

7
0

161
137

58
51

91
85

52
48

34
31

26
24

15
11

14
11

9
0

329
287

1
1

12
10

43
38

70
65

38
34

22
20

13
13

6
4

2
0

207
185

Under
$1,000

11,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

Baltimore, M d ....... .
Total sample..... ..............
Number reporting.............. .

7
4

38
27

65
46

100
75

55
50

33
29

21
17

14
11

7
3

241
0

364
262

Boston, Mass.
Total sample........ .......
Number reporting........ .......

9
5

26
24

51
38

79
61

59
47

20
19

17
13

9
9

13
6

19
0

^Chicago, 111.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

6
6

29
25

65
49

85
68

82
72

52
49

32
28

31
25

17
13

a
4

13
7

33
25

76
63

75
70

43
39

41
37

15
14

Los Angeles, Calif.
Total sample..... ..............
Number reporting...............

12
10

35
29

38
33

88
82

71
63

44
40

35
31

New York, N.Y.
Total sample...................
Number reporting................

a
7

42
35

77
69

117
102

72
61

53
42

Northern New Jersey Area
Total sample...................
Number reporting................

9
9

22
19

48
39

107
96

99
93

Philadelphia-Camden, Pa.
Total sample...................
Number reporting.

4
4

25
21

54
44

78
64

Pittsburgh, Pa.
Total sample...................
Number reporting..... ......... .

2
2

22
19

54
50

San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.
Total sample.... ............. ..
Number reporting...............

12
10

ia
11

St. Louis, Mo.
Total sample...................
Number reporting............... .

7
6

23
20

Cleveland, Ohio
Total sample.... .
Number reporting....... ........

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




No
report

Total

Under
$1,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

No
report

Total

Preliminary

TABLE 6.— Number of Families by Income

Class9 in Cities with Populations of 240,000 to 1,000,000

All families1 with annual money income of
City

Wage-earner and clerical-worker families2 with annual money income of

Under
$1,000

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

No
report

Atlanta, Ga.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

3
3

24
16

53
49

48
44

32
29

22
18

12
11

6
4

4
4

Birmingham, Ala.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

13
10

35
30

51
45

55
45

32
25

10
7

5
4

5
3

Cincinnati, Ohio
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

3
3

27
24

27
24

59
58

41
41

21
20

12
10

Hartford, Conn.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

5
4

8
7

28
23

49
40

37
30

32
22

Indianapolis, Ind.
Total sample....................
Number reporting..... ..........

3
3

18
17

53
48

52
48

33
29

Kansas City, Mo.
Total sample....... ............
Number reporting...............

4
4

17
13

47
37

55
52

Louisville, Ky.
Total sample....... .............
Number reporting...............

5
5

18
17

41
39

Miami, Fla.
Total sample............... .
Number reporting...... .........

2
1

8
7

Milwaukee, Wis.
Total sample...................
Number reporting..............

2
1

Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.
Total sample........ ...........
Number reporting...............

Total

Under
$1,000

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

No
report

22
0

226
178

0
0

13
10

40
36

33
30

20
18

12
12

6
5

5
3

3
o

132
114

6
1

10
0

222
170

2
2

19
18

41
36

48
39

26
20

5
3

2
1

1
0

7
0

151
119

11
9

10
9

6

0

217
198

1
1

13
13

21
19

44
43

33
33

15
14

3
3

5
5

3
0

138
131

19
12

14
9

10
7

17
0

219
154

1
0

3
3

18
; 13

38
30

27
22

19
15

9
6

5
4

4
0

124
93

18
14

12
12

9
9

5
5

11
0

214
185

1
1

9
9

39
35

42
39

22
20

11
9

5
5

5
5

1
0

135
123

33
32

17
15

15
14

12
11

5
4

0
0

205
182

0
0

6
4

30
21

49
47

22
22

11
10

10
10

4
4

0
0

132
118

65
65

34
34

22
22

9
8

4
4

3
3

6
0

207
197

2
2

14
13

32
30

54
54

28
28

14
14

3
3

2
2

2
0

151
146

24
23

46
43

30
29

15
14

11
11

8
7

6
5

12
0

162
140

0
0

5
5

15
14

26
25

22
21

9
9

6
6

3
3

1
0

87
83

8
6

16
13

60
58

49
47

34
30

17
17

6
5

4
2

15
0

211
179

0
0

2
1

10
7

44
42

35
33

20
18

10
10

1
0

7
0

129
111

3
2

12
10

37
28

50
46

30
27

32
31

13
13

6
6

6
6

5
0

194
169

0
0

6
5

23
17

37
34

21
21

21
20

5
5

2
2

0
0

115
104

New Orleans, La.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

8
6

38
32

55
49

39
34

28
21

11
6

10
8

3
2

5
3

16
0

213
161

0
0

24
20

42
40

30
26

14
11

4
2

2
2

1
1

3
0

120
102

Norfolk-Portsmouth, Va.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

8
5

18
16

61
53

54
47

38
32

14
11

9
8

4
3

1
1

12
0

219
176

1
1

10
10

49
44

50
44

27
26

9
9

5
5

2
2

2
0

155
141

Omaha, Nebr.
Total sample...................
Number reporting........ .......

4
4

12
10

34
28

52
50

41
37

20
19

23
19

9
5

4
1

7
0

206
173

2
2

4
4

27
22

44
42

27
25

13
13

9
6

3
2

4
0

133
.116

Portland, Oreg.
Total sample...................
Number reporting........... .

6
5

14
14

31
31

47
47

26
25

19
18

14
13

5
5

2
2

2
0

166
160

2
1

4
4

22
22

39
39

21
20

12
12

9
9

3
3

1
0

113
110

Providence, R. I.
Total sample....... ............
Number reporting...............

4
4

20
12

63
58

56
48

39
37

14
12

11
10

5
5

4
2

9
0

225
188

1
1

12
5

46
43

45
41

30
30

6
5

5
5

1
1

0
0

146
131

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




Total

Preliminary

TABLE 6.— Number of Families by Income Class9 in Cities with Populations of 240,000 to 1,000,000— Continued
All families1 with annual money income of
City

Wage-earner and clerical-worker families2 with annual money incane of
$1,000
to
$2,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

40
35

40
34

29
28

9
8

6
3

1
1

0
0

135
116

4
4

13
11

35
34

30’
29

17
15

16
16

2
1

0
0

117
110

7
6

24
19

52
47

44
40

24
21

12
10

7
5

2
0

173
149

Under
$1,000

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

No
report

13
12

22
17

53
45

52
43

40
38

19
17

11
8

5
4

1
1

4
0

220
185

2
1

8
6

Seattle, Wash.
Total sample...................
Number reporting........... .

1
1

14
13

22
20

46
44

45
43

25
22

24
23

3
2

4
4

5
0

189
172

0
0

Youngstown, Ohio
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

3
2

18
15

31
24

61
56

54
47

31
25

13
11

11
8

11
8

8
0

241
196

1
1

Scranton, Pa.
Total sample...... .............
Number reporting...... .........

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




Total

Under
$1,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

No
report

Total

Preliminary
TABLE 7.— Number of Families by Income Class9 in Cities with Populations of 30,500 to 240,000
All families1 with annual money income of
City.

Wage-earner and clerical- worker families2 with annual money income of

Under
$1,000

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

No
report

Albuquerque, N. Mex.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

3
3

9
7

21
16

30
24

20
17

19
17

15
12

7
4

6
5

4
0

134
105

Butte, Mont.
Total sample..... ..............
Number reporting...............

5
2

9
7

21
19

46
43

11
10

13
9

10
9

1
0

2
2

6
0

Canton, Ohio
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

4
3

8
7

18
18

44
42

33
30

20
19

10
9

6
4

3
2

Charleston, S. C.
Total sample....................
Number reporting...............

6
5

22
22

42
41

26
24

19
19

17
16

4
4

3
3

Charleston, W. Va.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

4
3

8
7

17
15

28
27

32
31

14
13

13
13

Charlotte, N. C.
Total sample....................
Number reporting...............

6
6

23
22

22
22

26
25

21
18

21
20

Des Moines, Iowa
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

3
1

8
5

23
18

28
21

23
17

Evansville, Ind.
Total sample...................
Number reporting................

4
4

19
19

36
34

39
34

Huntington-Ashland, W. Va.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

9
7

23
18

26
23

Jackson, Miss.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

5
4

25
24

Little Rock, Ark.
Total sample.............. .
Number reporting...............

1
0

Madison, Wis.
Total sample...................
Number reporting..... ..........

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

0
0

3
2

10
7

24
19

11
10

10
9

8
7

0

1
0

70
54

124
101

0
0

4
3

14
12

40
38

7
6

11
8

6
5

0
0

0
0

82
72

1
0

147
134

2
1

4
4

14
14

38
38

29
28

13
12

6
6

2
2

0
0

108
105

1
1

1
0

141
135

2
2

12
12

36
35

21
20

9
9

7
7

1
1

0
0

0
0

88
86

7
7

9
7

4
0

136
123

0
0

2
2

10
8

24
23

25
25

9
9

10
10

1
1

1
0

82
78

7
7

6
5

3
1

2
0

137
126

3
3

13
12

19
19

22
21

14
11

11
11

4
4

4
4

0
0

90
85

9
8

7
7

5
4

3
3

5
0

114
84

0
0

4
2

20
15

20
18

16
12

9
8

3
3

2
2

1
0

75
60

21
18

11
9

7
6

3
2

1
1

3
0

144
127

1
1

13
13

30
29

29
28

13
12

5
4

6
5

1
1

o
0

98
93

28
• 23

23
22

11
10

8
8

7
7

2
2

6
0

143
120

2
1

15
14

24
21

20
18

15
15

6
5

3
3

2
2

3
0

90
79

34
34

27
26

23
22

14
14

11
9

5
4

5
5

3
0

152
142

2
2

14
14

25
25

23
23

9
9

8
8

5
5

1
1

o
0

87
87

16
13

29
22

25
22

21
20

10
8

6
5

1
1

3
3

2
0

114
94

1
0

8
6

22
19

16
15

14
13

5
4

4
3

0
0

1
0

71
60

3
2

7
5

15
13

33
29

23
20

20
19

14
13

6
4

8
6

1
0

130
111

0
0

2
2

7
6

22
21

17
15

12
11

6
5

1
0

o
0

67
60

Oklahoma City, Okla.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

5
4

13
11

33
29

23
20

17
15

18
16

9
8

4
2

6
5

7
0

135
110

0
0

5
5

22
19

14
12

7
7

13
12

3
3

0
0

0
0

64
58

Phoenix, Ariz.
Total sample...................
Number reporting................

8
6

21
17

26
24

23
22

21
18

11
10

8
8

3
2

3
1

4
0

128
108

4
2

14
11

15
14

20
20

13
12

4
4

1
1

2
1

o
0

73
65

Portland, Maine
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

1
1

16
10

40
38

36
33

17
14

10
9

8
8

2
2

1
1

4
0

135
116

1
1

8
3

33
32

27
26

12
11

7
7

3
3

o
0

2
0

93
83

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




Total

Under
$1,000

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

3

No
report

Total

Preliminary
TABLE 7. — Number of Families by Income Class9 in Cities with Populations of 30,500 to 240,000— Continued
All families1 with annual money income of
City

Wage-earner and clerical-worker families2 with annual money income of

Under
$1,000

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

No
report

Total

Under
$1,000

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

No
report

Salt Lake City, Utah
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

3
2

9
5

21
IS

34
31

25
25

17
14

10
9

5
5

2
0

7
0

133
109

0
0

4
3

13
13

27
24

17
17

9
8

4
4

3
3

1
0

78
72

San Jose, Calif.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

9
8

11
5

18
15

34
28

22
20

14
11

12
10

3
3

1
1

6
0

130
101

1
1

5
2

12
10

23
21

13
12

8
6

8
7

0
0

2
0

72
59

Sioux Falls, S. Dak.
Total sample....................
Number reporting...............

4
3

6
4

27
23

37
32

29
25

18
16

10
9

6
3

3
2

3
0

143
117

3
3

5
3

17
16

31
28

22
19

9
9

6
6

3
2

1
0

97
86

Wichita, Kans.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

3
3

14
12

25
24

44
43

25
25

13
12

6
5

5
4

2
2

3
0

140
130

1
1

8
8

23
23

35
35

17
17

8
8

1
1

1
0

1
0

95
93

Wilmington, Del.
Total sample.................. .
Number reporting...............

5
3

5
5

18
17

45
38

23
22

17
16

16
15

7
7

4
4

8
0

148
127

2
2

3
3

13
12

35
29

18
18

13
12

10
10

3
3

3
0

100
89

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.

O*




Total

Preliminary
TABLE 8.— Number of Families by Income Class9 in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500
All families1 with annual money income of

Wage-earner and clerical- worker families2 with -annual money income of
$2,000
to
$3,000

0
0

4
2

12
7

63
62

0
0

0
0

1
0

60
58

0
0

3
3

4
0

60
46

3
3

2
1

5
0

3
3

2
2

2
2

3
2

1
1

2
2

13
13

8
8

5
5

15
15

5
5

4
4

17
14

16
13

10
8

13
13

11
10

16
14

4
4

10
9

5
5

Demopolis, Ala.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

7
5

19
18

Elko, Nev.
Total sanple....................
Number reporting.......... ......

0
0

Fayetteville, N. C.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................
Garrett, Ind.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

No
report

Anna, 111.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

3
2

6
4

16
11

14
13

8
5

3
2

2
1

2
1

2
1

2
0

58
40

Antioch, Calif.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

0
0

0
0

4
3

10
10

21
21

15
15

7
7

4
4

2
2

0
0

Bakersfield, Calif.12
Total sample..... ...............
Number reporting...... ..........

2
1

4
4

11
11

12
12

10
10

10
10

4
4

3
3

3
3

Bangor, Maine12
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

1
1

9
6

14
11

12
10

8
7

3
3

3
3

3
2

Barre, Vt.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

2
2

5
5

12
9

17
15

12*
12

3
3

1
0

Bloomington, 111.12
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

3
2

3
3

11
8

11
11

11
10

5
4

Camden, Ark.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

7
7

9
8

16
16

9
9

9
8

Cheyenne, Wyo.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

0
0

2
2

6
5

17
16

Columbia, Tenn.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

5
3

16
14

12
10

Cooperstown, N. Y.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

4
3

4
4

Cumberland, Md.12
Total sample....... .............
Number reporting................

0
0

Dalhart, Tex.
Total sanple....................
Number reporting................

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




8
8
o o o
*- «
.P s
£

$1,000
to
$2,000

Under
$1,000

£

City.

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

No
report

10
9

6
4

1
1

0
0

0
0

1
0

34
23

3
3

9
9

14
14

12
12

6
6

0
0

0
0

44
44

1
1

6
6

8
8

6
6

6
6

2
2

2
2

0
0

31
31

0
0

5
5

9
6

9
8

4
3

2
2

0
0

2
2

1
0

32
26

62
50

0
0

0
0

8
6

12
10

6
6

3
3

0
0

0
0

2
0

31
25

3
0

54
45

0
0

2
2

8
5

9
9

10
9

3
2

3
3

0
0

0
0

35
30

1
0

2
0

59
53

3
3

5
4

13
13

4
4

5
4

1
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

31
28

5
5

3
2

0
0

59
56

0
0

2
2

4
3

13
13

8
8

5
5

3
3

2
2

0
0

37
36

2
2

1
1

0
0

3
0

63
54

2
2

13
11

7
7

10
10

2
2

1
1

1
1

0
0

1
0

37
34

3
2

1
1

2
1

0
0

9
0

66
46

0
0

1
1

11
9

8
7

7
6

1
1

0
0

1
0

2
0

31
24

8
6

4
3

3
3

2
2

2
1

0
0

59
52

0
0

3
3

7
6

13
11

5
4

2
2

1
1

0
0

0
0

31
27

14
13

8
8

6
6

1
1

2
2

2
2

1
0

53
50

0
0

5
4

5
5

11
10

1
1

3
3

0
0

1
1

0
0

26
24

8
7

6
5

4
4

5
5

2
2

1
1

1
1

0
0

53
48

2
2

16
15

4
4

3
2

1
1

2
2

1
1

1
1

0
0

30
28

2
2

8
6

10
8

11
11

10
8

6
6

5
5

2
2

1
0

55
48

0
0

1
1

4
3

7
6

7
7

8
7

3
3
-

2
2

0
0

32
29

0
0

12
12

10
9

12
9

11
11

4
3

0
0

2
2

1
0

5
0

57
46

0
0

8
8

8
7

10
8

6
6

3
2

0
0

0
0

1
0

36
31

1
0

10
9

4
4

12
11

15
13

8
6

3
3

1
1

1
1

1
0

56
48

0
0

5
5

3
3

9
9

11

7
'5

2
2

0
0

0
0

37
34

Total

Under
$1,000

IP

Total

Preliminary
TABLE 8.— Number of Families by Income Class9 in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500— Continued
All families1 with annual money income of
City.

Wage-earner and-clerical worker families2 with annual money income of
$1,000
to
'$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

No
report

1
1

4
3

13
13

10
10

6
6

2
2

3
3

0
0

0
0

39
38

59
51

0
0

2
1

7
5

13
11

9
8

3
3

0
0

1
1

0
0

35
29

1
0

66
62

0
0

5
4

12
12

16
16

8
8

1
1

0
0

0
0

1
0

43
41

1
1

3
0

59
47

0
0

1
1

8
7

4
4

6
5

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

21
19

0
0

0
0

1
0

54
44

0
0

1
1

4
3

12
12

5
3

1
1

1
1

0
0

1
0

25
21

3
3

0
0

1
1

2
0

47
40

0
0

3
3

6
4

10
9

3
3

1
1

2
2

0
0

0
0

25
22

7
6

4
4

0
0

2
2

5
0

52
44

0
0

3
2

5
5

8
8

6
6

4
4

1
1

0
0

1
0

28
26

9
6

3
2

3
3

2
1

1
0

3
0

60
44

2
0

5
4

9
9

14
11

5
4

2
2

2
2

1
1

2
0

42
33

12
11

10
8

2
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
0

54
46

2
2

6
6

8
7

7
6

5
4

0
0

1
1

0
0

1
0

30
26

19
18

7
5

3
2

4
4

3
3

2
1

2
1

1
0

61
52

3
3

10
9

13
12

6
4

3
2

2
2

2
2

1
0

0
0

40
34

2

9
7

14
11

13
10

8
8

7
6

4
4

1
1

0
0

61
50

0
0

0
0

7
5

9
7

10
7

5
5

6
5

2
2

0
0

39
31

3
3

9
8

34
24

9
6

1
0

2
2

4
3

1
1

0
0

63
47

0
0

1
1

5
5

33
23

6
5

0
0

1
1

1
0

0
0

47
35

11,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

No
report

3

8
7

18
18

13
13

7
7

4
4

4
4

0
0

1
1

0
0

59
57

Grand Forks, N. Dak.
Total sample........... .........
Number reporting............ .

1
1

5

A

8
6

16
13

16
15

5
5

5
5

2
2

0
0

1
0

Grand Island, Nebr.
Total sample....................
Number reporting.-.'..............

1
1

7
6

17
17

21
20

10
10

3
3

0
0

3
2

3
3

A

7
6

16
13

9
9

10

3

7

5
5

0
0

4
3

Grinnell, Iowa
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

2
2

3
2

13
9

17
17

12
8

3
3

3
3

Laconia, N. H.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

1
1

7
7

10
7

14
13

6
6

3
2

Lodi, Calif.
Total sample....... ............ .
Number reporting................

3
3

5

A

7
7

10
10

9
8

Lynchburg, Va.12
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

3
1

8
7

11
11

17
13

Madill, Okla.
Total sample....................
Number reporting.............. .

7
6

8
8

11
9

Middlesboro, Ky.
Total sample....................
Number reporting.......... ......

5

A

15
14

Middletown, Conn.12
Total sample....................
Number reporting........ ........

1
1

A

Nanty-Glo, Pa.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

0
0

ii^ooo

Glendale, Ariz.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

Grand Junction, Colo.
Total sample....................
Number reporting................

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




4

Total

Under
$1,000

Total

Preliminary
TABLE 8.— Number of Families by Income Class9 in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500— Continued
All families1 with annual money income of
City

Wage-earner and clerical-worker families2 with annual money income of

Under
$1,000

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

$10,000
and
over

Newark, Ohio12
Total sample...................
Number reporxing...............

2
2

7
7

9
9

12
10

12
11

2
1

2
2

3
3

2
1

9
0

60
46

Ogden, Utah12
Total sample............... .
Number reporting...............

2
2

3
3

8
8

18
17

16
15

5
5

2
2

1
1

1
1

1
0

Pecos, Tex.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

0
0

6
5

17
16

11
11

9
9

7
7

3
1

1
1

2
2

Pulaski, Va.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

4
3

6

15

A

1A

13
10

11
10

4
4

4
4

0
0

Ravenna, Ohio
Total sample...................
Number reporting....... ........

6
3

A
3

10
9

10
9

10
10

2
1

4
3

Rawlins, Wyo.
Total sample...................
Number reporting................

1
1

3
3

5
4

13
12

19
18

10
9

Roseburg, Oreg.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

1
1

4

7

A

6

21
21

5
3

Salina, Kans.
Total sample...................
Number reporting..............

0
0

5
5

21
20

9
9

4

A

10
9

11
10

Santa Cruz, Calif.
Total sample...................
Number reporting................

A
A

10
9

Shawnee, Okla.
Total sample.... ...............
Number reporting...............

3
3

1A

Shenandoah, Iowa
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

$1,000
to
$2,000

$2,000
to
$3,000

$3,000
to
$4,000

$4,000
to
$5,000

$5,000
to
$6,000

$6,000
to
$7,500

0
0

3
3

7
7

10
9

11
10

1
1

1
1

1
1

2
0

36
32

57
54

1
1

3
3

6
6

17
17

11
11

4
4

1
1

1
1

0
0

44
44

1
0

57
52

0
0

3
3

12
12

4
4

4
4

5
5

0
0

0
0

0
0

28
28

1
0

2
0

60
49

2
2

4
3

14
13

9
6

8
8

3
3

2
2

0
0

0
0

42
37

4
4

0
0

9
0

59
42

0
0

3
3

7
6

7
7

7
7

2
1

3
2

1
1

0
0

30
27

4
4

3
3

2
2

0
0

60
56

0
0

3
3

2
2

11
11

13
12

8
8

2
2

1
1

0
0

40
39

11
11

3
3

2
2

4
4

3
0

61
55

0
0

0
0

.
1
0

13
13

4
3

5
5

1
1

0
0

3
0

27
22

11
11

3
2

4
4

0
0

1
1

0
0

54
52

0
0

3
3

13
13

8
8

7
7

1
1

3
3

0
0

0
0

35
35

11
7

9
7

2
2

2
1

3
3

1
0

4
0

57
43

1
1

3
3

9
8

7
5

4
3

0
0

2
1

1
1

1
0

28
22

9
8

12
11

2
2

5
5

2
2

1
1

4
3

0
0

49
45

1
1

1
1

5
4

8
7

2
2

1
1

2
2

0
0

0
0

20
18

12

10
8

17
13

4
4

3
2

2
1

3
2

0
0

0
0

56
45

1
1

4
3

6
5

10
8

2
2

3
2

0
0

2
2

0
0

28
23

10
5

6
5

8
7

10
8

7
7

1
1

7
6

2
2

2
2

0
0

53
43

5
3

3
3

7
6

7
5

5
5

0
0

0
0

1
1

0
0

28
23

Tucson, Ariz.12
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

2
1

9

8

9
7

11
10

8
8

4
4

3
3

1
1

3
2

4
0

54
44

1
0

6
5

6
5

7
7

4
4

1
1

0
0

0
0

1
0

26
22

Washington, N. J.
Total sample...................
Number reporting...............

3
1

8
A

11
8

20
17

14
10

4
4

2
2

1
1

1
1

2
0

66
48

0
0

5
3

5
3

15
13

8
7

2
2

0
0

1
1

0
0

36
29

Sandpoint, Idaho
Total sample............... .
Number reporting...............

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66,




No
report

Total

Under
$1,000

$ 7,500
to
$10,000

No
report

Total

Preliminary
TABLE 9.— Number of Families by Family Size3 in Cities with Populations of 1,000,000 and over
Wage-earner and clerical-worker families2 with equivalent full-year members

All families1 with equivalent full-year members
City

Less
2
than
to 3
2

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Less
than
2

2
to 3

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Baltimore, Md.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting................ ............................

28
12

119
88

94
67

74
59

33
27

11
8

3
0

2
1

0
0

13
0

377
262

19
7

68
55

63
48

45
37

24
20

8
7

0
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

228
175

Boston, Mass.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting............................................

27
2

98
73

81
60

55
45

36
21

18
16

2
1

4
3

1
1

23
0

345
222

8
1

57
48

46
38

36
31

22
15

12
11

1
1

3
2

0
0

0
0

185
147

Chicago, 111.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

16
8

163
129

113
86

69
56

43
37

15
14

4
3

3
2

1
1

29
0

456
336

10
6

92
76

75
58

38
35

27
24

9
9

1
1

2
1

1
1

0
0

255
211

Cleveland, Ohio
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting............................................

9
2

115
85

89
75

80
66

31
26

15
11

3
2

1
1

0
0

14
0

357
268

2
1

70
57

56
51

53
46

18
17

11
9

2
2

1
1

0
0

0
0

213
184

Los Angeles, Calif.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting............................................

25
8

160
136

102
86'

63
56

30
26

12
8

0
0

2
2

4
3

16
0

414
325

9
6

84
75

59
55

39
35

19
16

5
4

0
0

1
1

4
3

0
0

220
195

New York, N.Y.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

29
8

188
142

150
121

89
72

40
26

21
11

6
5

2
2

1
1

37
0

563
388

12
7

95
78

89
79

50
42

21
16

13
7

3
3

2
2

0
0

0
0

285
234

Northern New Jersey Area
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

19
4

151
125

125
112

103
88

29
23

18
14

6
4

4
3

4
1

13
0

472
374

5
2

83
74

81
77

60
53

15
13

8
7

5
4

3
3

1
0

0
0

261
235

14

3

121
109

95
71

62
53

24
22

13
11

7
6

0
0

2
2

18
0

356
277

4
1

68
64

56
46

44
39

15
13

9
8

5
4

0
0

1
1

2
0

204
176

Pittsburgh, Pa.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

8
5

92
77

95
86

84
74

46
40

17
15

7
6

1
0

0
0

14
0

364
303

2
2

56
51

57
53

59
53

24
24

11
11

6
5

1
0

0
0

0
0

216
199

San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

29
7

121
87

67
59

50
40

33
25

7
4

3
3

1
0

1
1

16
0

328
226

10
4

58
50

37
34

32
28

21
15

5
3

2
2

1
0

1
1

0
0

167
137

St. Louis Mo.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

15
8

119
101

100
86

46
42

28
24

18
16

5
5

2
2

3
3

7
0

343
287

8
5

70
59

68
63

29
28

18
15

12
10

4
4

1
1

1
1

0
0

211
186

Philadelphia - Camden, Pa.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting............................................

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66,




Preliminary
TABLE 10.— Number of Families by Family Size3 in Cities with Populations of Z A O , 0 0 0 to 1,000,000

Wage earner and clerical worker families2 with equivalent full-year members

All families1 with equivalent full-year members
City

Less
2
than
to 3
2

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Less
than
2

2
to 3

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Atlanta, Ga.
Total sample...... ..........................................
Number reporting............ ................................

11
1

75
57

77
63

•42
36

18
12

7
6

0
0

5
3

0
0

14
0

249
178

4
1

43
35

48
43

23
20

10
8

4
4

0
0

3
3

0
0

0
0

135
114

Birmingham, Ala.
Total sample.................... ........... ...............
Number reporting............................................

24
5

74
57

55
44

41
31

26
20

11
9

3
3

3
1

1
0

10
0

248
170

17
3

49
41

33
27

27
22

23
18

9
7

1
1

1
0

0
0

1
0

161
119

Cincinnati, Ohio
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

10
6

74
67

63
59

40
36

20
19

8
7

2
2

2
2

0
0

3
0

222
198

4
4

51
48

38
36

25
24

13
13

5
4

0
0

2
2

0
0

0
0

138
131

Hartford, Conn.
Total sample.... .................................... .......
Number reporting............................................

13
5

68
50

60
44

46
28

26
18

9
5

2
2

1
1

1
1

6
0

232
154

6
3

40
30

33
27

28
18

14
11

4
2

2
2

0
0

0
0

1
0

128
93

Indianapolis, Ind.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting........................ ............. .

11
5

91
74

62
53

30
28

12
12

8
7

4
4

2
2

0
0

11
0

231
185

8
4

57
51

37
33

19
18

8
8

6
5

2
2

2
2

0
0

0
0

139
123

Kansas City, Mo.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

7
1

103
91

46
43

27
26

15
12

7
7

1
1

1
1

0
0

6
0

213
182

6
1

63
55

30
30

16
15

10
9

6
6

1
1

1
1

0
0

0
0

133
118

Louisville, Ky.
Total sample............... ................................
Number reporting................................... .........

6
3

79
75

55
54

40
39

14
12

7
7

5
4

3
3

0
0

2
0

211
197

2
1

53
52

42
41

29
29

13
11

7
7

4
3

2
2

0
0

0
0

152
146

Miami, Fla.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

8
4

79
65

38
35

21
19

10
10

4
3

1
1

3
2

1
1

16
0

181
140

4
2

37
34

27
27

9
9

7
7

1
1

1
1

2
1

1
1

0
o.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

A
2

75
65

61
51

47
41

19
16

4
2

0
0

2
1

1
1

19
0

232
179

2
1

45
42

39
34

26
22

12
9

3
1

0
0

2
1

1
1

1
0

131
ill

Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.
Total sample........................................ .......
Number reporting............................................

15
6

81
67

35
32

38
33

22
20

8
7

2
2

2
2

0
0

18
0

221
169

7
2

48
41

23
22

20
18

12
12

7
6

2
2

1
1

0
0

0
0

120
104

New Orleans, La.
Total sample........ ........................................
Number reporting............................................

7
1

79
59

49
40

47
35

20
14

8
6

3
3

3
2

1
1

22
0

239
161

3
1

38
33

30
26

29
/ 25

12
9

5
5

2
2

2
1

0
0

0
0

121
102

Norfolk-Portsmouth, Va.
Total sample.......................... .....................
Number reporting............................................

11
5

72
57

54
42

45
37

20
17

10
8

4
3

4
4

3
3

17
0

240
176

3
2

51
44

37
33

34
32

15
15

8
7

2
2

4
4

2
2

0
0

156
141

Omaha, Nebr.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

6
A

67
53

52
45

47
40

23
21

7
5

6
5

0
0

0
0

5
0

213
173

5
3

38
32

41
37

28
24

13
13

6
4

4
3

0
0

0
0

0
0

135
116

Portland, Oreg.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting................. ........... ..............

2
2

63
60

48
46

23
22

17
17

9
9

4
4

0
0

0
0

4
0

170
160

0
0

43
40

30
30

17
17

12
12

7
7

4
4

0
0

0
0

0
0

113
110

Providence, R. I.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting.......... ..................................

11
5

82
64

67
58

30
23

25
23

9
9

5
5

0
0

1
1

3
0

233
188

8
5

50
42

45
41

20
20

15
14

5
5

4
4

0
0

0
0

0
0

147
131

Scranton, Pa.
Total sample...... ..........................................
Number reporting............................................

10
3

65
55

60
51

49
41

18
15

13
12

8
5

2
2

1
1

4
0

230
185

2
0

33
28

43
37

32
27

9
8

12
11

4
3

1
1

1
1

0
0

137
116

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66,




89
83

Preliminary
TABLE 10.— Number of Families by Family Size3 in Cities with Populations of 240,000 to 1,000,000— Continued

Wage earner and clerical worker families2 with equivalent full-year members

All families1 with equivalent full-year members
City

Less
2
than
to 3
2

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Less
than
2

2
to 3

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Seattle, Wash.
Total sample........ ........................................
Number reporting............................................

13
3

70
64

53
47

48
45

11
10

1
1

0
0

1
1

1
1

7
0

205
172

6
3

37
37

32
28

33
31

9
8

1
1

0
0

1
1

1
1

0
0

120
110

Youngstown, Ohio
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

15
2

77
59

68
60

48
38

23
17

12
11

7
5

1
1

3
3

5
0

259
196

9
1

47
41

59
52

37
31

14
10

9
9

5
4

0
0

0
1

1
0

181
149

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.

CJ1
CO




Preliminary
TABLE 11.— Number of Families by Family Size3 in Cities with Populations of 30,500 to 240,000

Wage earner and clerical worker families2 with equivalent full-year members

All families1 with equivalent full-year members
City

Less
2
than
to 3
2

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not .
reported

Total

Less
than
2

2
to 3

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Albuquerque, New Mexico
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

7
1

45
37

32
24

25
20

16
14

6
5

3
1

3
2

1
1

12
0

150
105

1
0

19
16

17
14

12
9

11
9

5
4

2
0

3
2

0
0

0
0

70
54

Butte, Mont.
Total sample......... ......................................
Number reporting.................. .......... ..............

4
0

40
31

30
26

30
27

12
9

5
5

2
2

2
1

0
0

8
0

133
101

1
0

22
17

23
21

21
21

9
8

3
3

1
1

2
1

0
0

0
0

82
72

Canton, Ohio
Total sample................................................
Number reporting......................... ............... .

9
4

49
46

39
37

34
31

12
10

6
3

1
1

0
0

2
2

2
0

154
134

3
3

35
35

28
27

28
27

7
7

4
3

1
1

0
0

2
2

0
0

108
105

Number reporting.......................... .................

3
3

37
36

38
36

27
26

13
12

11
10

6
6

3
3

3
3

4
0

145
135

3
3

22
22

23
22

15
14

8
8

6
6

5
5

3
3

3
3

0
0

88
86

Charleston, W. Va.
Total sample.......................... ......................
Number reporting...................... .....................

2
1

50
43

35
31

28
27

17
16

5
5

0
0

0
0

0
0

6
0

143
123

0
0

29
28

20
18

19
18

10
10

4
4

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

82
78

Charlotte, N. C.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

3
1

55
51

37
34

23
19

9
9

5
5

5
5

1
1

1
1

7
0

146
126

0
0

35
34

24
22

13
11

7
7

4
4

5
5

1
1

1
1

0
0

90
85

Des Moines, Iowa
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

8
0

45
31

26
19

20
17

15
11

4
4

2
2

0
0

0
0

14
0

134
84

4
0

27
23

22
18

11
10

10
6

1
1

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

77
60

Evansville, Ind.
Total sample..................... ..........................
Number reporting............................................

4
4

49
46

41
36

25
21

14
12

4
2

5
4

2
2

0
0

8
0

152
127

3
3

30
29 •

33
30

13
13

10
10

2
2

5
4

2
2

0
0

0
0

98
93

Huntington-Ashland, W. Va.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting...................... .....................

9
4

43
35

37
32

26
21

23
21

5
3

1
1

1
1

2
2

7
0

154
120

3
3

27
23

25
22

14
13

14
12

3
2

1
1

1
1

2
2

0
0

90
79

Jackson, Miss.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting.............................. .............

4
0

47
45

47
44

39
35

9
8

6
6

1
1

1
1

2
2

0
0

156
142

2
0

26
26

29
29

22
22

4
4

2
2

1
1

1
1

2
2

0
0

89
87

Little Rock, Ark.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

7
2

58
49

24
17

16
13

8
8

1
1

3
3

1
0

1
1

25
0

144
94

2
1

37
32

13
10

12
10

3
3

0
0

3
3

1
0

1
1

0
0

72
60

Madison Wis.
Total sample.............................. ..................
Number reporting............................................

4
2

52
47

32
23

28
24

8
8

4
4

3
3

0
0

0
0

5
0

136
111

1
1

26
25

21
15

15
15

2
2

1
1

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

60

Oklahoma City, Okla.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

9
3

64
48

31
27

20
19

11
9

1
1

2
2

1
0

1
1

12
0

152
110

4
1

27
23

15
14

10
9

8
8

1
1

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

67
58

Phoenix, Ariz.
Total sample......... ......................................
Number reporting.................................. ..........

7
5

49
41

29
26

25
22

9
5

6
4

4
4

0
0

1
1

7
0

137
108

2
2

23
20

19
18

16
15

5
3

3
2

4
4

0
0

1
1

0
0

73
65

Portland, Maine
Total sample................................................
Number reporting......................... ..................

6
2

47
42

35
30

20
18

17
14

2
2

8
5

1
1

2
2

9
0

147
116

2
1

28
26

24
22

15
14

13
11

1
1

7
5

1
1

2
2

0
0

93
83

Charleston, S. C.

CJ»
co

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66,




>1

Preliminary
TABLE 11.— Number of Families by Family Size3 in Cities with Populations of 30,500 to 240,000— Continued

All families1 with equivalent full-year members
City

Salt Lake City, Utah
Total sample............. ..................................
Number reporting...........................................

Less
2
than
to 3
2

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

Wage earner and clerical worker families2 with equivalent full-year members

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Less
than
2

2
to 3

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

5
2

42
34

32
25

31
26

10
8

10
9

2
2

1
1

3
2

6
0

142
109

4
2

23
22

19
17

19
17

5
4

6
6

1
1

1
1

2
2

0
0

80
72

San Jose, Calif.
Total sample...............................................
Number reporting...........................................

11
5

51
39

32
28

20
15

10
7

5
2

5
4

1
0

1
1

13
0

149
101

5
2

22
20

21
19

9
6

6
5

5
2

5
4

1
0

1
1

0
0

75
59

Sioux Falls, S. Dak.
Total sample...............................................
Number reporting...........................................

3
2

60
48

34
31

30
22

8
6

4
4

4
4

0
0

1
0

1
0

145
117

2
2

36
30

26
25

20
18

6
5

2
2

4
4

0
0

1
0

0
0

97
86

Wichita, Kans.
Total sample...............................................
Number reporting............. ..............................

5
1

56
52

38
36

27
25

12
10

4
4

0
0

1
1

1
1

3
0

147
130

4
1

32
31

31
31

18
17

9
9

2
2

0
0

1
1

1
1

0
0

98
93

Wilmington, Del.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting....... ....................................

12
3

58
47

31
26

35
33

12
12

3
2

1
1

2
0

3
3

8
0

165
127

2
1

40
35

26
22

21
20

6
6

2
2

1
1

1
0

2
2

0
0

101
89

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.

CJI




Preliminary
TABLE 12.— Number of Families by Family Size3 in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500

All families1 with equivalent full-year members
City

Less
2
than
to 3
2

3
to 4

Wage earner and clerical worker families2 with equivalent full-year members

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Less
than
2

2
to 3

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Anna, 111.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................ ...............

15
11

12
9

2
1

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

59
40

0
0

18
13

5
2

9
7

1
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

34
23

1
1

18
17

16
16

20
20

5
5

2
2

0
0

0
0

1
1

0
0

63
62

1
1

13
13

12
12

13
13

3
3

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

44
44

Bakersfield, Calif.12
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

3
2

26
25

19
19

8
8

3
2

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

61
58

0
0

11
11

14
14

4
4

0
0

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

31
31

Bangor, Maine12
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

0
0

17
11

14
13

17
14

9
8

1
0

2
0

0
0

0
0

1
0

61
46

0
0

6
5

7
7

13
10

4
4

0
0

2
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

32
26

Barre, Vt.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

1
0

24
19

15
11

12
10

7
7

3
2

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

63
50

1
0

9
6

9
7

8
7

3
3

1
1

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

32
25

Bloomington, 111.12
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

4
2

24
19

10
9

11
8

5
5

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

1
0

57
45

1
1

14
13

4
3

10
7

4
4

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

35
30

Camden, Ark.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

CJI

27
17

Antioch, Calif.
Total Sample................................................
Number reporting........................................ .

C
J1

2
1

1
1

20
17

20
17

8
8

8
8

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

59
53

1
1

5
4

16
14

5
5

4
4

0
7

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

31
28

Cheyenne, Wyo.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

2
2

18
16

15
15

13
12

6
6

3
3

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

59
56

2
2

10
9

10
10

8
8

3
3

2
2

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

37
36

Columbia, Tenn.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

4
1

20
15

14
13

16
14

7
6

2
2

1
1

0
0

2
2

1
0

67
54

0
0

10
9

6
6

13
12

5
4

2
2

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

37
34

Cooperstown, N.Y.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

3
1

28
22

15
9

16
10

4
3

0
0

1
1

1
0

0
0

1
0

69
46

2
0

11
9

8
6

8
6

3
2

0
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

33
24

Cumberland, Md.12
Total sample...................................... .........
Number reporting............................................

1
0

21
20

16
13

10
8

4
4

4
4

1
1

2
2

1
0

1
0

61
52

0
0

10
10

6
5

7
5

3
3

3
3

1
1

0
0

1
0

0
0

31
27

Dalhart, Tex.
Total sample............... ................................
Number reporting............................................

2
1

22
20

10
10

16
15

1
1

2
2

0
0

1
1

0
0

2
0

56
50

1
0

9
8

5
5

10
9

0
0

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
.
0

0
0

26
24

Demopolis, Ala.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................. ..............

4
1

15
13

11
11

9
8

11
11

5
3

0
0

0
0

1
1

1
0

57
48

1
1

8
7

6
6

5
5

8
8

2
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

30
28

Elko, Nev.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

2
1

17
14

14
13

17
16

3
2

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

1
0

56
48

1
1

10
9

7
7

11
10

2
1

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

32
29

Fayetteville, N.C.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

3
1

16
11

15
11

15
15

5
5

2
0

0
0

1
1

2
2

3
0

62
46

1
1

13
10

9
7

7
7

4
4

0
0

0
0

1
1

1
1

1
0

37
31

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




Preliminary
TABLE 12.— Number of Families by Family Size3 in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500— Continued

Wage earner and clerical worker families2 with equivalent full-year members

All families1 with equivalent full-year members
City

Less
2
than
to 3
2

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
repo'rted

Total

Less
than
2

2
to 3

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Garrett, Ind.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

7
0

23
21

14
13

11
10

4
1

2
2

0
0

1
1

0
0

1
0

63
48

6
0

13
13

11
11

7
6

3
1

2
2

0
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

43
34

Glendale, Ariz.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

2
2

14
14

18
17

7
7

10
10

5
4

1
1

0
0

2
2

0
0

59
57

1
1

10
10

11
11

6
6

7
7

3
2

0
0

0
0

1
1

0
0

39
38

Grand Forks, N. Dak.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

3
0

23
18

15
14

10
9

5
4

5
5

0
0

1
1

0
0

1
0

63
51

0
0

12
9

8
7

8
7

4
3

3
3

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

35
29

Grand Island, Nebr.
Total sample.............................................
Number reporting............................................

2
1

24
23

15
15

16
15

6
6

1
1

1
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

66
62

1
0

11
10

13
13

11
11

5
5

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

43
41

Grand Junction, Colo.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

4
2

27
24

14
11

9
5

2
1

3
3

1
1

0
0

1
0

4
0

65
47

0
0

7
6

7
7

3
2

1
1

2
2

1
1

0
0

0
0

1
0

22
19

Grinnell, Iowa
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

3
0

21
16

10
10

9
7

7
6

4
3

1
1

1
1

1
0

2
0

59
44

2
0

8
7

5
5

4
3

2
2

3
2

1
1

1
1

1
0

0
0

27
21

Laconia, N.H.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

0
0

17
16

16
12

9
9

2
1

2
2

0
0

1
0

0
0

11
0

58
40

0
0

10
9

8
7

4
4

1
1

1
1

0
0

1
0

0
0

0
0

25
22

Lodi, Calif.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

4
0

23
19

13
10

8
8

5
5

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

55
44

2
0

10
10

8
7

5
5

3
3

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

29
26

Lynchburg, Va.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting.............................................

5
3

23
16

14
10

6
4

9
7

2
2

1
1

0
0

1
1

3
0

64
44

2
1

15
12

10
8

2
1

9
7

2
2

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

42
33

Madill, Okla.
Total sample................................................
Number reporting............................................

1
1

20
16

18
16

3
2

8
7

2
2

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

54
46

0
0

12
9

7
7

1
1

6
5

2
2

2
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

30
26

Middlesboro, Ky.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting............................................

2
1

23
•17

13
12

7
7

9
8

2
2

2
2

1
1

2
2

0
0

61
52

1
1

15
11

7
6

4
4

6
5

2
2

2
2

1
1

2
2

0
0

40
34

Middletown, Conn.12
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting............................................

1
0

13
13

11
7

22
20

10
7

2
1

0
0

1
1

1
1

3
0

64
50

1
0

9
9

9
6

10
9

7
5

1
0

0
0

1
1

1
1

0
0

39
31

Nanty-Glo, Pa.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.......... ..................................

1
0

7
5

12
7

22
18

10
8

6
4

1
1

4
4

1
0

0
0

64
47

0
0

5
3

10
6

15
12

9
7

5
4

1
1

2
2

0
0

0
0

47
35

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




TABLE 12.— Number of Families by Family Size3 in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500— Continued

All families1 with equivalent full-year members
City

Less
2
than
to 3
2

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Preliminary

Wage earner and clerical worker families2 with equivalent full-year members

Not
reported

Total

Less
than
2

2
to 3

3
to 4

4
to 5

5
to 6

6
to 7

7
to 8

8
to 9

9 or
more

Not
reported

Total

Newark, Ohio12
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.................. ..........................

7
2

20
16

17
14

12
9

5
3

2
2

1
0

0
0

0
0

2
0

66
46

0
0

10
10

9
9

10
8

4
3

2
2

1
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

36
32

Ogden, Utah12
Total sample...................................... ...........
Number reporting.............................................

1
0

20
19

14
12

12
12

6
6

3
3

1
1

0
0

1
1

1 ■
0

59
54

0
0

16
16

9
9

8
8

6
6

3
3

1
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

44
44

Pecos, Tex.
Total sample................ ................................
Number reporting.............................................

1
1

16
14

11
11

12
11

10
10

5
5

0
0

2
0

0
0

3
0

60
52

1
1

4
4

6
6

8
8

6
6

3
3

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

28
28

Pulaski, Va.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting........................ ....................

3
0

16
11

18
14

16
16

7
6

3
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

63
49

0
0

9
8

12
10

12
12

6
5

3
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

42
37

Ravenna, Ohio
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

1
0

26
17

13
9

12
10

5
5

2
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

3
0

62
42

0
0

12
10

6
6

7
6

4
4

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

30
27

Rawlins, Wyo.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting................................. ...........

3
2

18
16

17
16

8
7

10
10

2
2

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
0

62 |
56

2
1

11
11

13
12

4
4

8
8

1
1

1
1

1
1

0
0

0
0

41
39

Roseburg, Oreg.
Total sample........... .....................................
Number reporting......................................... .

5
2

22
19

17
14

13
13

5
5

1
1

1
1

0
0

0
0

1
0

65
55

3
2

6
4

10
7

8
8

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

28
22

Salina, Kans.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting........................... ....... .........

6
5

18
17

12
12

13
13

2
2

2
2

1
1

0
0

1
0

0
0

55
52

3
3

10
10

8
8

9
9

2
2

2
2

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

35
35

Sandpoint, Idaho
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting........... .................................

4
0

24
18

13
9

9
8

7
5

1
1

1
1

1
1

0
0

1
0

61
43

1
0

9
8

11
8

4
4

2
1

0
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

28
22

Santa Cruz, Calif.
Total sample.................................................
Number reportins.............................................

3
2

25
25

9
8

8
7

4
3

1
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

3
0

53
45

0
0

7
7

7
6

5
4

1
1

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

20
18

Shawnee, Okla.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.................. ..........................

3
2

22
17

13
11

7
6

8
6

2
2

1
1

0
0

0
0

4
0

60
45

1
1

10
8

8
7

4
3

3
2

1
1

1
1

0
0

0
0

1
0

29
23

Shenandoah, Iowa
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

3
0

22
19

12
11

11
9

4
3

0
0

0
0

1
1

0
0

1
0

54
43

0
0

8
6

9
9

7
5

3
2

0
0

0
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

28
23

Tucson, Ariz.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

7
3

22
15

12
10

11
10

3
3

2
2

0
0

1
1

0
0

1
0

59
44

3
2

$

7
7'

4
3

2
2

1
1

o
0

p
1

o
0

o
0

26
22

Washington, N. J.
Total sample.................................................
Number reporting.............................................

6
0

22
13

23
18

13
11

5
5

0
0

2
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

72
48

2
0

11
8

7
7

3
3

0
0

1
0

1
1

0
0

0
0

38
29

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




6

13
10

-

Prelirainary
TABLE 13.— Number of Families by Age of Head, Race, Tenure, and Occupation of Head in Cities with Populations of 1,000,000 and Over
All families1
Tenure
on December 31,, 1950

Race

Age of head

Occupation of head

City
Under
25

25-34

35-49

50-64

Baltimore, Md.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

18
14

63
55

138
100

109
69

33
24

Boston, Mass.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

10
5

67
60

89
60

93
67

Chicago, 111.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

6
6

74
64

161
130

Cleveland, Ohio
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

9
7

81
71

Los Angeles, Calif.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

16
16

Northern New Jersey Area
Total sample...............................
Number reporting........... ................

65 and
No
over
report

No
report

Wageearner

196
139

162
123

6
0

178
132

56
46

23
19

53
38

38
25

16
2

0
0

109
73

188
149

5
0

140
115

46
34

21
15

36
25

43
33

16
0

2
2

0
0

151
120

260
216

8
0

209
180

49
36

40
32

66
55

42
32

13
1

35
29

2
1

1
0

183
138

153
130

1
0

170
144

45
42

29
27

43
33

33
20

17
2

353
301

17
12

12
12

0
0

219
191

158
134

5
0

165
150

56
49

41
34

75
60

41
32

4
0

5
0

415
347

32
26

1
1

0
0

188
158

254
216

6
0

214
192

54
49

31
27

77
68

52
38

20
0

52
37

9
0

455
346

46
37

6
5

0
0

131
85

372
303

4
0

217
181

69
56

47
36

85
66

58
49

31
0

106
88

41
35

2
0

273
231

51
46

0
0

5
0

203
168

126
109

0
0

171
151

35
30

24
18

55
48

33
30

11
0

118
103

98
86

45
38

1
0

321
281

26
22

0
0

0
0

188
159

159
144

0
0

184
169

40
38

32
31

36
29

43
36

12
0

66
60

122
107

93
77

43
38

0
0

286
249

40
36

2
2

1
0

167
144

162
143

0
0

161
147

53
44

33
29

49
41

28
24

5
2

59
51

115
100

72
48

32
20

4
0

261
201

18
17

11
8

0

144
105

142
121

4

0

130
111

34
29

35
28

51
35

34
23

0

Negro

Other

No
report

3
0

294
212

69
50

0
0

1
0

40
30

3
0

288
211

14
11

0
0

130
104

44
32

4
0

371
293

46
41

136
116

79
57

29
17

3
0

299
238

93
80

142
124

86
68

43
37

2
0

13
12

87
81

156
134

128
104

59
43

New York, N. Y.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

7
7

100
86

196
151

143
107

Philadelphia-Camden, Pa.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

9
8

65
60

106
86

Pittsburgh, Pa.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

12
12

73
64

St. Louis, Mo.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

5
5

San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.
Total sample.............................. .
Number reporting...........................

er

7

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66,




Managerial
and
Retired,13 No1*
selfetc.
report
employed

HomeRenters
owners

White

0

Sales +
clerical

Salaried
professional

6

Preliminary
TABLE 14.— Number of Families by Age of Head, Race, Tenure, and Occupation of Head in Cities with Populations of 240,000 to 1,000,000
All families1
Age of head

Tenure
on December 31 , 1950

Race

Occupation of head

City
Under
25

25-34

35-49

50-64

Atlanta, Ga.
Total sample...... .........................
Number reporting............. ..............

6
5

48
38

81
66

65
51

20
18

Birmingham, Ala.
Total sample........... ....................
Number reporting..;...................... .

13
12

51
40

82
64

55
37

Cincinnati, Ohio
Total sample.................. ...... .
Number reporting...........................

7
7

55
53

61
59

Hartford, Conn.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

8
5

44
35

Indianapolis, Ind.
Total sample....... ........................
Number reporting............................

6
6

Kansas City, Mo.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting.......... ................

65 and
No
over report

White

Negro

Other

No
report

HomeRenters
owners

6
0

157
118

67
60

0
0

2
0

115
95

20
17

1
0

135
97

87
73

0
0

0
0

64
56

28
23

2
0

193
174

24
24

0
0

83
60

56
36

27
18

1
0

208
147

11
7

51
49

75
67

53
43

26
20

3
0

179
154

5
3

44
42

81
73

49
42

25
22

1
0

14
13

46
44

73
71

57
55

17
14

Miami, Fla.
Total sample..................... .
Number reporting...........................

9
8

35
31

61
54

46
39

Milwaukee, Wis.
Total sample.................... ..........
Number reporting...........................

5
5

38
34

89
73

Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting............................

7
7

32
30

New Orleans, La.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting............................

16
16

Norfolk-Portsmouth, Va.
Total sample........ .......................
Number reporting........................

Managerial
and
Retired,13 No1*
selfetc.
report
employed

No
report

Wageeamer

Sales +
clerical

Salaried
professional

106
83

5
0

99
89

39
31

26
19

29
24

18
15

15
0

106
77

114
93

2
0

134
104

26
20

13
12

26
17

17
15

6
2

0
0

122
110

95
88

0
0

118
113

28
26

20
15

34
30

16
14

1
0

0
0

0
0

91
60

127
94

1
0

99
72

27
23

25
18

33
23

26
18

9
0

35
31

0
0

0
0

114
99

97
86

3
0

106
99

34
29

21
19

27
23

15
13

11
2

179
163

25
18

1
1

0
0

121
109

83
73

1
0

89
77

45
43

15
13

30
27

25
22

1
0

0
0

185
177

22
20

0
0

0
0

118
111

89
86

0
0

121
117

34
33

17
15

19
19

13
13

3
0

9
8

2
0

148
126

14
14

0
0

0
0

88
81

71
59

3
0

70
67

22
21

11
11

36
29

15
12

8
0

49
42

30
25

0
0

205
175

5
4

1
0

0
0

100
82

110
97

1
0

102
90

30
24

18
18

36
30

18
16

7
1

69
61

66
55

20
16

0
0

192
167

1
1

1
1

0
0

129
112

64
57

1
0

92
82

29
27

11
10

36
36

18
14

8
0

34
29

87
68

42
29

30
19

4
0

160
115

53
46

0
0

0
0

84
56

125
105

4
0

104
92

21
15

9
8

33
20

32
26

14
0

9
9

77
65

68
54

36
30

24
18

5
0

158
122

61
54

0
0

0
0

82
64

135
112

2
0

131
119

27
25

7
4

21
11

22
17

11
0

Omaha, Nebr.
Total sample.... ..........................
Number reporting....... ....................

11
9

35
28

77
65

63
53

20
18

0
0

195
164

10
9

0
0

1
0

138
116

68
57

0
0

97
87

37
30

10
7

44
36

15
13

3
0

Portland, Oreg.
Total sample........... ...................
Number reporting............................

4
4

40
40

71
65

28
28

23
23

0
0

161
155

4
4

1
1

0
0

107
103

59
57

0
0

77
76

38
36

12
12

24
22

14
14

1
0

Louisville, Ky.
Total sample............... ................
Number reporting....................... .

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




Preliminary
TABLE 14.— Number of Families by Age of Head, Race, Tenure, and Occupation of Head in Cities with Populations of 240,000 to 1,000,000— Continued
All families1
Age of head

Tenure
on December 31 , 1950

Race

Occupation of head

City
Under
25

25-34

35-49

50-64

65 and
No
over report

White

Negro

Other

No
report

Homeowners

Renters

No
report

Wageearner

Sales +
clerical

Salaried
professional

Managerial
and
Retired,13 No14
selfetc.
report
employed

Providence, R. I.
Total sample................................
Number reporting................. ...........

7
6

47
43

76
62

60
49

. 35
28

0
0

221
185

4
3

0
0

0
0

96
79

128
109

1
0

119
108

26
24

11
6

28
24

31
26

10
0

Scranton, Pa.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...... ............... .......

3
3

40
38

87
71

62
50

27
23

1
0

219
185

0
0

0
0

1
0

121
99

99
86

0
0

117
100

19
17

13
10

30
24

38
34

3
0

Seattle, Wash.
Total sample........................... .
Number reporting.... ................. .

5
3

51
48

69
65

43
38

20
18

1
0

178
161

9
9

2
2

0
0

132
122

57
50

0
0

92
88

29
26

20
20

25
23

19
15

4
0

Youngstown, Ohio
Total sample................................
Number reporting............................

4
3

49
42

85
76

71
51

31
24

1
0

222
178

19
18

0
0

0
0

145
116

94
80

2
0

152
134

27
21

11
9

27
19

14
11

10
2

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.

Oi
©




Preliminary

TABLE 15. — Number of Families by Age of Head, Race, Tenure, and Occupation of Head in Cities with Populations of 30,500 to 240,000
All families1
Age of head

City

Under
25

25-34

35-49

50-64

Albuquerque, N. Mex.
Total sample........................... .
Number reporting...........................

8
7

39
33

44
32

31
24

Butte, Mont.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

3
2

26
24

41
36

Canton, Ohio
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

3
3

41
39

Charleston, S. C.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

6
6

Charleston, W. Va.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting..................... .....

Tenure
December 31, 1950

Race

65 and
No
over report

White

Negro

Other

No
report

Homeowners

12
9

0
0

127
100

2
1

4
4

1
0

90
70

43
32

10
7

1
0

122
101

0
0

2
0

0
0

46
41

34
29

23
22

0
0

140
128

6
6

0
0

35
35

62
57

25
24

13
13

0
0

93
87

48
48

5
5

33
33

59
53

27
23

12
9

0
0

125
115

Charlotte, N. C.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

6
6

33
32

56
50

27
26

14
12

1
0

Des Moines, la.
Total sample.............................. .
Number reporting...........................

1
0

29
24

42
35

30
19

12
6

Evansville, Ind.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

9
9

27
25

46
41

38
31

Huntington-Ashland, W. Va.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

11
10

29
25

47
41

Jackson, Miss.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

8
8

35
35

Little Rock, Ark.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

4
4

Madison> Wis.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

Occupation of head

No
report

Wageearner

43
35

1
0

49
39

26
19

14
14

66
51

57
50

1
0

64
56

19
17

1
0

93
84

54
50

0
0

98
94

0
0

0
0

56'
53

85
82

0
0

11
8

0
0

0
0

68
60

68
63

104
92

35
34

0
0

0
0

63
55

0
0

113
83

1
1

0
0

0
0

24
21

0
0

134
117

10
10

0
0

37
31

19
13

0
0

138
115

5
5

59
53

35
33

15
13

0
0

100
92

31
25

48
40

22
18

9
7

0
0

13
12

32
30

48
41

25
19

12
9

Oklahoma City, Okla.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

3
3

25
24

54
43

26
23

Phoenix, Ariz.
Total sample................................
Number reporting...........................

7
5

29
23

49
41

Portland, Maine
Total sample...............................
Number reporting.............. ............

8
6

24
23

46
39

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.




Managerial
and
selfemployed

Retired,
etc.13

No1*
report

26
23

14
10

5
0

8
8

12
7

18
13

3
0

14
13

10
8

16
12

8
7

1
0

79
78

14
13

9
9

19
18

18
17

2
0

0
0

60
57

23
22

24
20

19
16

9
8

1
0

73
71

1
0

70
66

26
24

11
11

20
16

9
9

1
0

81
59

32
25

1
0

56
43

21
18

9
6

14
10

11
7

4
0

0
0

90
77

54
50

0
0

84
81

17
15

10
9

16
13

10
9

7
0

0
0

0
0

76
64

67
56

0
0

80
67

12
12

11
11

20
18

16
12

4
0

51
50

0
0

1
0

83
73

69
69

0
0

66
66

27
27

15
13

32
27

11
9

1
0

89
70

25
24

0
0

0
0

59
49

54
45

1
0

48
43

26
19

12
11

16
14

8
7

4
0

0
0

129
111

0
0

0
0

1
0

76
67

53
44

1
0

49
45

19
16

28
25

20
19

11
6

3
0

27
17

0
0

125
102

9
7

1
1

0
0

84
68

51
42

0
0

44
40

22
20

20
14

29
25

16
11

4
0

26
25

17
14

0
0

120
101

7
7

0
0

1
0

77
65

49
43

2
0

60
54

15
13

17
13

18
14

17
14

1
0

39
33

18
15

0
0

134
115

1
1

0
0

0
0

58
50

76
66

1
0

65
58

29
26

5
2

24
22

11
8

1
0

Renters

Sales +
clerical

Salaried
professional

TABLE 15.— Number of Families by Age of Head, Race, Tenure, and Occupation of Head in Cities with Populations of 30,500 to 24-0,000— Continued

Preliminary

All families1

City

Under
25

25-34

35-49

50-64

Salt Lake City, Utah
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

8
7

43
36

36
30

30
24

16
12

San Jose, Calif.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting................ ...........

3
3

30
27

45
34

29
22

Sioux Falls, S. Dak.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

8
8

30
25

43
39

Wichita, Kans.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

11
11

38
37

Wilmington, Del.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

10
10

34
30

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66.

o>

to




Tenure
December 31 , 1950

Race

Age of head

65 and
No
over report

No
report

HomeRenters
owners

No
report

Occupation of head

Wageearner

Sales +
clerical

Salaried
professional

Managerial
and
Retired,13 No1*
selfetc.
report
employed

White

Negro

0
0

131
107

2
2

0
0

0
0

88
72

45
37

0
0

55
52

25
22

16
15

22
14

11
6

4
0

22
15

1
0

127
99

3
2

0
0

0
0

82
65

44
36

4
0

63
54

12
8

9
5

20
18

21
16

5
0

48
36

14
9

0
0

137
113

0
0

6
4

0
0

89
70

54
47

0
0

72
65

26
22

5
3

28
21

8
5

4
1

54
50

22
20

15
12

0
0

134
125

6
5

0
0

0
0

89
82

50
48

1
0

76
75

19
18

11
10

24
20

9
7

1
0

56
49

33
27

14
11

1
0

127
110

20
17

0
0

1
0

93
79

55
48

0
0

80
73

22
17

8
8

26
23

8
6

4
0

Other

Preliminary
TABLE 16.— Number of Families by Age of Head, Race, Tenure, and Occupation of Head in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500

All families1
Age of head

Tenure
on December 31 , 1950

Race

Occupation of head

City
Under
25

25-34

35-49

50-64

65 and
No
over report

White

Negro

Other

No
report

Homeowners

Renters

No
report

Wageearner

Sales +
clerical

Salaried
professional

Managerial
and
Retired,13 No14
selfetc.
report
employed

Anna, 111.
Total sample............................... ‘
Number reporting.................... ......

1
0

7

23
18

10
5

17
12

0
0

58
40

0
0

0
0

0
0

31
18

27
22

0
0

32
22

3
2

6
4

9
6

8
6

G

5

Antioch, Calif.
Total sample........................... .
Number reporting...........................

6
6

21
21

18
18

13
13

5
4

0
0

63
62

0
0

0
0

0

Q

42
41

21
21

0
0

40
40

6
6

4
4

10
10

3
2

0
0

4
4

10
10

23
22

13
13

10
9

0
0

56
54

4
4

0
0

0
0

29
27

31
31

0
0

27
27

5
5

4
4

16
15

8
7

0
0

Bangor, Maine 12
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

0
0

12
12

23
15

17
14

8
5

0
0

59
46

0
0

0
0

1
0

35
27

24
19

1
0

25
20

8
7

6
6

10
8

8
5

3

Barre, Vt.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

0
0

10
9

21
17

22
19

7
5

2
0

60
50

0
0

0
0

2
0

34
28

27
22

1
0

30
24

1
1

5
5

16
14

7
6

3

Bloomington, 111.12
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

3
3

10
10

16
13

18
14

9
5

0
0

54
45

0
0

0
0

0
0

36
29

18
16

0
0

22
19

14
12

1
1

11
10

5
2

1
1

Camden, Ark.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

0
0

15
15

12
11

23
19

9
8

0
0

36
30

23
23

0
0

0
0

32
28

27
25

0
0

34
31

3
3

4
3

12
11

4
4

2
1

Cheyenne, Wyo.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

4
4

14
14

19
17

15
15

7
6

0
0

59
56

0
0

0
0

0
0

34
31

25
25

0
0

24
23

14
14

10
9

10
9

1
1

0
0

Columbia, Tenn.
Total samnle............................ .
Number reoortine...........................

4
4

15
14

17
13

21
19

6
4

0
0

44
38

18
15

1
1

0
0

35
32

28
22

0
0

34
31

4
4

4
4

11
9

7
6

3
0

Cooperstown, N. Y.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting............ ..............

4
4

10
5

17
12

20
17

13
8

2
0

65
46

0
0

1
0

0
0

47
35

18
11

1
0

22
17

9
7

5
3

17
13

10
6

3
0

Cumberland, Md12
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

1
1

10
10

20
15

20
18

8
8

0
0

5a
49

3
3

0
0

2
0

26
22

33
30

0
0

30
26

2
2

3
3

10
9

12
12

2
0

Dalhart, Tex.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

3
3

2
1

24
22

15
15

9
9

0
0

50
48

1
0

2
2

0
0

42
42

11
8

0
0

22
20

4
4

5
5

18
18

3
3

1
0

Demopolis, Ala.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

4
4

14
13

14
12

13
12

8
7

0
0

21
18

32
30

0
0

0
0

22
18

31
30

0
0

27
26

4
3

5
3

13
12

4
4

0
0

Elko. Nev.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

0
0

IS
17

22
18

8
6

7
7

0
0

51
45

4
3

0
0

0
0

31
28

24
20

0
0

31
28

2
2

7
6

9
9

4
3

2
0

Fayetteville, N. C.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

4
3

26
20

15
13

6
6

6
4

0
0

40
31

15
15

0
0

2
0

26
21

31
25

0
0

27
22

9
9

1
1

12
10

4
4

4
0

Bakersfield, Calif.12
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66,




0

0

0

Preliminary
TABLE 16.— Number of Families by Age of Head, Race, Tenure, and Occupation of Head in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500— Continued
All families1
Tenure
on December 31 , 1950

Race

Age of head

Occupation of head

City
Under
25

25-34

35-49

50-64

Garrett, Ind.
Total sample................................
Number reporting...........................

1
1

8
8

23
20

16
13

8
6

Glendale, Ariz.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

3
3

11
11

19
19

18
17

Grand Forks, N. Dak.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

1
1

10
9

24
22

Grand Island, Nebr.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

1
1

17
16

Grand Junction, Colo.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

2
2

Grinnell, Iowa
Total sample...............................
Number reporting............... ............

65 and
No
over report

White

Negro

Other

No
report

0
0

56
48

0
0

0
0

0
0

8
7

0
0

58
56

0
0

1
1

17
13

7
6

0
0

56
48

0
0

21
19

18
17

9
9

0
0

66
62

14
11

14
10

19
15

10
9

0
0

0
0

12
12

19
15

10
6

13
11

Laconia, N. H.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

1
1

17
16

17
11

7
7

Lodi, Calif.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

1
1

5
5

22
20

Lynchburg, Va.12
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

4
3

11
11

Madill, Okla.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting........... .......... ......

3
3

Middlesboro, Ky.
Total sample..... ............... ...........
Number reporting...........................

Homeowners

Managerial
and
Retired,13 No14
selfetc.
report
employed

Renters

No
report

Wageearner

Sales +
clerical

Salaried
professional

44
36

12
12

0
0

29
28

8
6

3
3

8
6

8
5

0
0

0
0

27
25

32
32

0
0

37
36

3
3

2
2

10
10

7
6

0
0

3
3

0
0

38
32

21
19

0
0

26
23

9
6

3
3

14
13

4
4

3
2

0
0

0
0

0
0

37 '
34

28
28

1
0

30
28

15
15

4
4

15
13

2
2

0
0

58
46

0
0

1
1

0
0

42
36

17
11

0
0

14
12

8
7

8
6

16
13

10
9

3
0

0
0

53
44

0
0

0
0

1
0

36
27

18
17

0
0

19
16

6
5

6
5

16
14

6
3

1
1

5
5

0
0

47
40

0
0

0
0

0
0

25
18

22
22

0
0

19
17

8
7

5
4

8
7

4
4

3
1

11
7

13
11

0
0

51
43

0
0

1
1

0
0

40
34

12
10

0
0

25
23

3
3

4
4

10
7

10
7

0
0

22
16

14
9

8
5

1
0

48
34

11
9

1
1

0
0

32
24

28
20

0
0

34
26

9
8

3
2

6
4

5
4

3
0

10
10

16
14

16
12

9
7

0
0

53
45

1
1

0
0

0
0

36
28

18
18

0
0

25
22

7
6

5
4

10
8

6
6

1
0

5
5

10
9

19
16

20
16

7
6

0
0

55
47

5
5

0
0

1
0

45
38

15
14

1
0

35
30

6
5

4
4

7
6

7
7

2
0

Middletown, Conn.12
Total sample...............................
Number reporting................ ........

2
1

13
10

26
24

17
14

2
1

1
0

59
50

0
0

0
0

2
0

27
20

33
30

1
0

33
28

7
4

4
4

13
12

3
2

1
0

Nanty-Glo, Pa.
Total sample...............................
Number reporting...........................

2
2

16
14

27
21

17
9

I
1

0
0

62
47

0
0

0
0

1
0

40
30

23
17

0
0

47
35

1
1

2
2

7
4

6
5

0
0

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66,




Preliminary

TABLE 16.— Number of Families by Age of Head, Race, Tenure, and Occupation of Head in Cities with Populations of 2,500 to 30,500— Continued
All families1
Age of head

Tenure
on December 31 , 1950

Race

Occupation of head

City
Under
25

25-34

Newark, Ohio12
Total sample....... .......................
Number reporting..........................

2
2

17
14

14
10

15
12

12
8

0
0

57
44

Ogden, Utah12
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

5
5

11
11

19
18

13
13

9
7

0
0

Pecos, Tex.
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

3
3

14
14

23
20

11
9

6
6

Pulaski, Va.
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

7
5

10
10

27
24

9
5

Ravenna, Ohio
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

0
0

15
14

17
11

Rawlins, Wyo.
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

0
0

16
16

Roseburg, Oreg.
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

5
5

Salina, Kans.
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

65 and
No
over report

Managerial
and
Retired,13 No1*
selfetc.
report
employed

Other

No
report

Homeowners

Renters

No
report

Wageearner

Sales +
clerical

Salaried
professional

2
2

0
0

1
0

38
32

20
14

2
0

33
28

5
5

1
1

8
6

7
6

6
0

55
52

1
1

1
1

0
0

34
31

23
23

0
0

33
33

11
11

1
1

7
6

5
3

0
0

0
0

53
48

4
4

0
0

0
0

28
25

29
27

0
0

23
23

6
6

4
3

20
17

3
3

1
0

7
5

0
0

57
48

3
1

0
0

0
0

28 '
22

30
27

2
0

36
32

6
5

3
3

11
6

3
2

1
1

18
12

9
5

0
0

56
40

2
2

0
0

1
0

44
31

13
11

2
0

23
20

8
7

2
1

13
11

6
3

7
0

30
27

10
10

4
3

0
0

58
54

2
2

0
0

0
0

33
31

27
25

0
0

40
39

2
2

3
3

13
11

2
1

0
0

16
14

18
17

12
11

9
8

1
0

61
55

0
0

0
0

0
0

36
33

25
22

0
0

21
16

6
6

7
7

20
19

7
7

0
0

4
4

15
15

17
16

12
11

6
6

0
0

53
51

1
1

0
0

0
0

31
29

23
23

0
0

21
21

14
14

3
3

8
6

8
8

0
0

Sandpoint, Idaho
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

1
1

12
11

17
10

13
10

13
11

1
0

56
43

0
0

0
0

1
0

42
32

13
11

2
0

18
14

10
8

4
3

13
9

11
9

1
0

Santa Cruz, Calif.
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

0
0

8
8

18
14

8
8

15
15

0
0

48
44

0
0

1
1

0
0

31 28

18
17

0
0

15
13

6
6

5
4

5
5

18
17

0
0

Shawnee, Okla.
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

0
0

17
16

15
11

14
11

10
7

0
0

52
42

3
2

1
1

0
0

32
24

24
21

0
0

22
18

8
7

9
7

7
4

9
8

1
1

Shenandoah, Iowa
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

1
0

15
15

14
11

13
10

10
7

0
0

53
43

0
0

0
0

0
0

31
25

22
18

0
0

21
18

8
6

3
3

12
10

7
5

2
1

Tucson, Ariz.12.............................
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

2
2

13
11

13
11

14
12

12
8

0
0

46
36

5
5

3
3

0
0

30
24

24
20

0
0

21
20

6
4

2
1

16
13

9
6

0
0

Washington, N.J.
Total sample..............................
Number reporting..........................

2
2

12
11

20
15

18
13

12
7

2
0

62
46

2
2

2
0

0
0

32
23

33
25

1
0

30
24

7
5

6
4

14
11

7
4

2
0

See footnotes at end of tables, p. 66,




35^9

50-64

White

Negro

Footnotes:
1. Families in all occupational groups. "Families" in this study include families of 2 or more persons and families consisting of one full year
member and one part year member.
2. Includes families with net incomes under $10,000 in which the occupation of the head was classified as clerical or sales, crafts, foreman,
operative, service (household workers excluded) or laborer.
3. Family size is based on equivalent persons, with 52 weeks of family membership considered equivalent to 1 person, 26 weeks equivalent to 0.5
person, etc.
4 . Includes contract rents for tenant-occupied dwellings and for lodging away from home, and current maintenance costs for home owners (interest
on mortgages, taxes, insurance, and expenses for repairs and replacements).
5. Includes china, glass, silverware, heating equipment, light bulbs, fans, clocks, lamps, pictures, sewing machines, baby carriages, bathinets,
playpens, etc., and other miscellaneous furnishings and equipment.
6. Average based on an aggregate expenditure which included $20,000 spent by one family for complete furnishings for house. The average without
this extreme expenditure would be $55.
7. Includes expenditures not included elsewhere, such as interest on personal loans, funeral expenses, money lost or stolen, allowances to
children at home or at school, which cannot be allocated, etc.
8. Includes Federal and State income, poll, and personal property taxes.
9. Total money income from wages, salaries, self-employment, receipts from roomers and boarders, rents, interest, dividends, etc., after payment
of personal taxes (Federal and State income, poll, and personal property) and occupational expenses.
10. Includes inheritances, large gifts, and lump-sum settlements from accident or health insurance policies, which were not considered current
income.
11. Represents the average net difference between reported money receipts and reported money disbursements (i.e. money income, other money
receipts, and net deficit, minus expenditures for current consumption, gifts and contributions, insurance, and net surplus).
12. Cities with populations of 30,500 to 50,000, included with this group because sample size was not large enough to yield reliable detail as was
done for other cities of 30,500 to 50,000 population.
13. Families whose funds were solely from public and private retirement plans, private insurance annuities and trust funds, veterans pensions,
dependency allotments, public social assistance and private relief, alimony, interest, dividends and/or from borrowing or withdrawals from
previous savings.
1 -. Families with the occupation of the head not reported or unemployed.
4
*

Less than $0.50




U .S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: O — 195 3

66