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REVIEW OF OCCUPATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS

\\\^

EMPLOYMENT OF SCIENTIFIC,
PROFESSIONAL, AND
TECHNICAL PERSONNEL
IN STATE GOVERNMENTS
JANUARY 1964

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF L A B O R STATISTICS




L
,

REVIEW OF OCCUPATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS

Employment Of Scientific,
Professional, and
Technical Personnel
in State Governments
January 1964

Bulletin No. 1557
1967

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, W ashington, D.C., 20402 - Price 25 cents







PREFACE

T h i s r e p o r t p r e s e n t s t h e m a j o r f i n d i n g s of a s u r v e y of s c i ­
e n tif ic , p r o f e s s i o n a l , an d t e c h n i c a l e m p lo y m e n t in S ta te g o v ­
e r n m e n t a g e n c i e s in J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 . T h e B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s ­
t i c s of t h e U .S . D e p a r t m e n t of L a b o r m a d e s i m i l a r s u r v e y s in
1959 a n d 1 9 6 2 . T h e S t a t e g o v e r n m e n t s u r v e y s e r i e s w a s o r i g ­
i n a l l y d e v e l o p e d u n d e r t h e s p o n s o r s h i p of t h e N a t i o n a l S c i e n c e
F o u n d a tio n w h ic h p u b lis h e d th e f i r s t r e p o r t . S u b s e q u e n tly it
w a s e s t a b l i s h e d a s a r e g u l a r p r o g r a m of t h e B u r e a u of L a b o r
S tatistic s.
T he 1964 r e p o r t w a s p r e p a r e d by A r t h u r Ja ffe w ith th e a s ­
s i s t a n c e of J a c k G o l o m b u n d e r t h e s u p e r v i s i o n of W i l l i a m L .
C o p e l a n d a n d M i c h a e l D. W e r t h e i m e r . T h e s t u d y w a s c o n d u c t e d
u n d e r th e g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n of R o b e r t B. S t e f f e s , C h i e f of t h e
B u r e a u ’s D i v i s i o n o f O c c u p a t i o n a l E m p l o y m e n t S t a t i s t i c s a n d
H a r o l d G o l d s t e i n , A s s i s t a n t C o m m i s s i o n e r of M a n p o w e r a n d
E m p lo y m e n t S ta tis tic s .
T h e B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s w i s h e s t o e x p r e s s i t s a p ­
p r e c i a t i o n to th e m a n y S tate g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c i e s a n d i n d i­
v id u a ls w h o se c o o p e ra tio n m a d e th is s u rv e y p o s s ib le ; and e s p e c i a l l y t o C o r a E . T a y l o r , w h o h e a d e d t h e D i v i s i o n of O c c u ­
p a tio n a l E m p lo y m e n t S ta t i s t i c s w hen th e s u r v e y w a s in itia te d .

-111-







CONTENTS
S E C T IO N
1.
2.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Page

I n t r o d u c t i o n ..............................................................................................................................................................
S c o p e of t h e S t u d y .........................................................................................................................................
E m p l o y m e n t of S c i e n t i f i c , P r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d T e c h n i c a l P e r s o n n e l ............................
E n g i n e e r s .................................................................................................................................................................
S c i e n t i s t s .................................................................................................................................................................
S o c i a l W o r k e r s .......................................................................................................................................................
S e l e c t e d H e a l t h - R e l a t e d P r o f e s s i o n s .....................................................................................................
T e c h n i c i a n s .............................................................................................................................................................
S c i e n t i f i c , P r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d T e c h n i c a l P e r s o n n e l E n g a g e d i n R e s e a r c h ....................

1
1
1
2
3
3
3
3
4

A PPE N D IX TA BLES
TABLE
1.

2.

3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

O c c u p a t i o n a l D i s t r i b u t i o n of T o t a l N u m b e r of S c i e n t i f i c , P r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d
T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l E m p lo y e d by S tate G o v e r n m e n ts , an d N u m b e r
E n g a g e d i n R e s e a r c h , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 ...............................................................................................
S c ie n tis ts , E n g in e e r s , S o cial W o r k e r s , S e le c te d H e a lth - R e la t e d P r o f e s s i o n a l s ,
and T e c h n ic ia n s E m p lo y e d by S tate G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c ie s , by S ta te ,
J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 ....................................................................................................................................................
E n g i n e e r s , b y T y p e of A g e n c y , O c c u p a t i o n , a n d S t a t e , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 ............................
S c i e n t i s t s in A l l A g e n c i e s , b y O c c u p a t i o n a n d S t a t e , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 ................................
S c i e n t i s t s , b y T y p e of A g e n c y a n d O c c u p a t i o n , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 ..............................................
S o c i a l W o r k e r s , b y T y p e of A g e n c y , O c c u p a t i o n , a n d S t a t e , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 ..............
S e le c te d H e a lth P r o f e s s i o n s in A ll A g e n c ie s , by O c c u p a tio n an d S ta te ,
J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 ....................................................................................................................................................
T e c h n i c i a n s in A ll A g e n c i e s , b y O c c u p a t i o n a n d S t a t e , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 .........................
T e c h n i c i a n s b y T y p e of A g e n c y a n d O c c u p a t i o n , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 ...........................................
S c ie n tis ts , E n g in e e r s , S o cial W o r k e r s , S e le c te d H e a lth - R e la te d P r o f e s s i o n a l s ,
a n d T e c h n i c i a n s P r i m a r i l y E n g a g e d in R e s e a r c h , b y S t a t e , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4 . . .
T r a n s m i t t a l L e t t e r .............................................................................................................................................
Q u e s t i o n n a i r e (B L S F o r m 2 6 4 5 ) .............................................................................................................

-v -

8
10
12
14
15
17
19
21
22
24
25




SEC TION 1. IN T R O D U C T IO N
D u rin g r e c e n t y e a r s S tate g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c ie s h av e b e e n
a m o n g t h e f a s t e s t g r o w i n g a c t i v i t i e s in t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s . T h i s
g ro w th h a s c r e a t e d r a p id l y m o u n tin g n e e d s at th e S tate g o v e r n ­
m e n t le v e l fo r h ig h ly sk ille d and p ro fe ssio n a lly tr a in e d p e r son n e l . T o K e e p a b r e a s t of t h i s g r o w t h t h e B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a ­
t i s t i c s c o n d u c t s s u r v e y s c o v e r i n g t h e e m p l o y m e n t of s c i e n t i f i c ,
t e c h n i c a l , a n d p r o f e s s i o n a l p e r s o n n e l in S t a t e g o v e r n m e n t
a g e n c i e s . 1 T h e l a t e s t s u r v e y w a s c o n d u c t e d in t h e e a r l y m o n t h s
of 1 9 6 4 t o o b t a i n o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t i n f o r m a t i o n a s of
J a n u a r y of t h a t y e a r . T h i s s u r v e y , l i k e t h o s e w h i c h p r e c e d e d
i t , i s p a r t of a b r o a d p r o g r a m c o n d u c t e d b y t h e B u r e a u of
L a b o r S ta ti s tic s to d ev e lo p o c c u p atio n al e m p lo y m e n t s t a t i s t i c s
c o v e rin g sc ie n tific , p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l em p lo y m e n t
a c r o s s a b r o a d s p e c t r u m of t h e t o t a l A m e r i c a n e c o n o m y . ^

o th e r S tate a g e n c ie s su c h a s le g is la tiv e b o d ie s , ju d ic ia l t r i ­
b u n a ls , and b o a r d s and c o m m is s i o n s w ith r e g u la to r y and
lic e n s in g fu n c tio n s w e r e e x c lu d e d f r o m th e s u r v e y b e c a u s e th e y
do n o t e m p lo y s c ie n tif ic an d te c h n ic a l p e r so n n e l. F o r the sa k e
of b r e v i t y , t h e c o v e r a g e of t h e s t u d y w i l l b e r e f e r r e d t o s i m p l y
as "nonschool e m p lo y m e n t.”
Q u e s t i o n n a i r e s w e r e m a i l e d d i r e c t l y t o s o m e 1 ,8 5 0 S t a t e
g o v ern m e n t ag e n cies. V irtu ally all resp o n d e d . E ac h r e s p o n ­
d e n t w a s r e q u e s t e d t o p r o v i d e i n f o r m a t i o n , b y o c c u p a t i o n , on
t h e t o t a l n u m b e r of p e r s o n s e m p l o y e d a n d t h e n u m b e r p r i m a ­
r i l y e n g a g e d in r e s e a r c h . A v a r i e t y of s p e c i f i c o c c u p a t i o n s
w e r e c o v e r e d w i t h i n e a c h of f i v e b r o a d o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e ­
g o r i e s - - e n g i n e e r s , s c i e n t i s t i s , s o c i a l w o r k e r s, h e a l t h - r e l a t e d
p ro fe s s io n a ls , and te c h n ic ia n s.

S c o p e of t h e S t u d y
C h a n g e s in e m p lo y m e n t by o c c u p a tio n b e tw e e n th e p r e s e n t
s u r v e y a n d th e p r e c e d i n g s u r v e y s a r e d if fic u lt to a s s e s b e ­
c a u s e of c h a n g e s i n p e r s o n n e l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n a n d d i f f e r e n c e s
i n t h e i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of d e f i n i t i o n s b y r e s p o n d e n t s . I n a d d i t i o n ,
c h a n g e s in d e f in itio n s f o r v a r i o u s o c c u p a tio n s an d th e i n t r o ­
d u c t i o n of n e w o c c u p a t i o n s i n t h e 1 9 6 4 s u r v e y , n o d o u b t , h a v e
c h a n g e d t h e r e p o r t i n g p a t t e r n s of m a n y r e s p o n d e n t s .

T h e 1964 s u r v e y c o v e r e d m o s t S tate g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c i e s
w i t h i n e a c h of t h e 50 S t a t e s . E x c l u d e d f r o m t h e s u r v e y w e r e
S t a t e e d u c a t i o n a l i n s t i t u t i o n s , s i n c e t h e y a r e c o v e r e d in s t u d i e s
c o n d u c t e d b y t h e O f f i c e o f E d u c a t i o n o f t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t of
H e a l t h , E d u c a t i o n , a n d W e l f a r e a n d b y th e N a t i o n a l S c i e n c e
F o u n d a tio n . S p e c ia l s c h o o ls , su c h a s sc h o o ls f o r th e m e n ta l ly
r e t a r d e d , s c h o o l s f o r t h e d e a f a n d t h e b li n d , a n d i n d u s t r i a l
s c h o o l s , a s w e l l a s a d m i n i s t r a t i v e p e r s o n n e l in S t a t e D e p a r t ­
m e n t s of E d u c a t i o n w e r e i n c l u d e d in t h e s u r v e y s i n c e t h e y a r e
n o t c o v e r e d b y o t h e r s tu d ie s . A ls o e x c lu d e d w e r e p e r so n n e l in
a g r ic u ltu r a l e x p e r im e n t sta tio n s, a g r ic u ltu r a l e x te n sio n s e r ­
v i c e s , a n d h o s p i t a l s a f f ilia te d w ith S tate u n i v e r s i t i e s . C e r t a i n

E m p l o y m e n t of S c i e n t i f i c ,

In e a r l y 1 9 6 4 , t h e r e w e r e 1 5 6 ,8 0 0 p e r s o n s e m p l o y e d b y t h e
50 S t a t e g o v e r n m e n t s w o r k i n g a s e n g i n e e r s , s c i e n t i s t s , s o c i a l

R e p o r t on a 1959 S u r v e y , N S F 6 0 - 6 2 ; S c i e n t i f i c a n d T e c h n i c a l
P e r s o n n e l in I n d u s tr y - I 9 6 0 . N SF 6 1 -7 5 ; S cie n tific and T e c h ­
n ic a l P e r s o n n e l in In d u s tr y - 1 9 6 1 , N SF 6 3 -3 2 ; E m p lo y m e n t
of S c i e n t i f i c a n d T e c h n i c a l P e r s o n n e l i n I n d u s t r y - 1 9 6 2 , B u l ­
l e t i n N o . 1418 ( B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s ) . F o r t h c o m i n g b u l ­
le tin s w ill c o v e r s i m i l a r e m p lo y m e n t d a ta fo r 1 9 63-1964 and
r e v i s e d d a t a f o r 1961 a n d 1 9 6 2 . E m p l o y m e n t i n t h e A t o m i c
E n e r g y F i e l d - A I960 O c c u p a tio n a l S u r v e y , BLS B u lletin
N o . 12 9 7 a n d r e p o r t s u n d e r t h e s a m e t i t l e f o r 1961 a n d 1962
( o b ta in a b le f r o m th e A to m ic E n e r g y C o m m is s i o n ) .

^ E m p l o y m e n t of S c i e n t i f i c a n d T e c h n i c a l P e r s o n n e l i n S t a t e
G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c i e s - - R e p o r t on a 1959 S u r v e y . N S F 6 1 - 1 7
( N a t i o n a l S c i e n c e F o u n d a t i o n ) ; E m p l o y m e n t of S c i e n t i f i c a n d
T e c h n i c a l P e r s o n n e l in S tate G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c i e s - - 1 9 6 2 ,
B u l l e t i n N o . 1 4 1 2 ( B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s ) .
^ S c ie n c e a n d E n g i n e e r i n g in A m e r i c a n I n d u s tr y - F i n a l R e ­
p o r t o n a 1 9 5 3 - 1 9 5 4 S u r v e y , N S F 5 6 - 1 5; S c i e n c e a n d E n g i n e e r ­
i n g i n A m e r i c a n I n d u s t r y - R e p o r t on a 1956 S u r v e y , N S F 5 9 50; S c i e n t i f i c a n d T e c h n i c a L P e r s o n n e l i n A m e r i c a n I n d u s t r y 


P r o f e s s i o n a l , and T e c h n i c a l

-1 -

Personnel

Chart 1.
D I S T R I B U T I O N OF SCIENTIFIC, PROFESSI ONAL, AND T E C H N I C A L
PERSONNEL IN S T A T E GOVERNMENT S - J A N U A R Y 1964

w o rk e rs , se lec ted h e a lth -re la te d p r o fe s s io n a ls , and te c h n i­
c i a n s . (See a p p e n d i x t a b l e 1.) T h e s e h i g h l y s k i l l e d S t a t e e m ­
p l o y e e s r e p r e s e n t e d 13 p e r c e n t of a l l S t a t e g o v e r n m e n t n o n ­
s c h o o l e m p l o y m e n t . A d i s t r i b u t i o n of t h e s e p e r s o n s a m o n g t h e
f i v e m a j o r o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s i s s h o w n i n C h a r t 1.
C a lif o r n ia and N ew Y o rk , w h ic h r e s p e c t i v e l y h a v e th e h ig h ­
e s t S ta te g o v e r n m e n t e m p l o y m e n t t o t a l s , s i g n i f i c a n t l y e x ­
c e e d e d a l l o t h e r S t a t e s in t h e t o t a l n u m b e r of p e r s o n n e l e m ­
p l o y e d in t h e s u r v e y e d p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s
a n d r a n k e d a m o n g t h e to p t h r e e i n e a c h of t h e f i v e m a j o r o c ­
c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p i n g s . T h e s e t w o S t a t e s - - h a v i n g 18 p e r c e n t of
t o t a l S ta te g o v e r n m e n t n o n s c h o o l e m p l o y m e n t - - e m p l o y e d 20
p e r c e n t of t h e t o t a l s c i e n t i f i c , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d t e c h n i c a l
p e r s o n n e l em p lo y ed by a ll S tate g o v e r n m e n ts .

T H O U S A N D S OF E M P L O Y E E S

70

W yo m in g , A la s k a , V e r m o n t, U ta h , a n d H a w a ii r a n k e d a s th e
S t a t e s w it h t h e h i g h e s t r a t i o s ( 2 1 - 2 5 p e r c e n t ) o f s c i e n t i f i c , p r o ­
f e s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l p e r s o n n e l to to ta l S tate g o v e r n m e n t
n o n sc h o o l e m p lo y m e n t. T he S ta te s h av in g th e lo w e s t r a t i o s
(6 -8 p e r c e n t) w e r e W e st V ir g in ia , S o u th D a k o ta , O k la h o m a ,
I n d ia n a , N o rth C a r o lin a , an d N ew M e x ic o . (See a p p e n d ix
t a b l e 2.)
M a n y f a c t o r s i n f l u e n c e t h e e m p l o y m e n t of s c i e n t i f i c , p r o ­
f e s s i o n a l , a n d t e c h n i c a l p e r s o n n e l in i n d i v i d u a l S t a t e s . A m o n g
t h e m o r e i m p o r t a n t f a c t o r s a r e t h e f o l l o w i n g : t h e a m o u n t of
m o n e y m a d e a v a i l a b l e a n d t h e t y p e s of s e r v i c e u n d e r t a k e n b y
th e S tate a g e n c i e s ; w h e th e r th e s e r v i c e s a n d p r o j e c t s a r e
c a r r i e d o ut d i r e c t l y b y t h e S t a t e o r a r e c o n t r a c t e d t o c o n s u l t ­
i n g a n d o t h e r f i r m s . O t h e r f a c t o r s a f f e c t i n g t h e e m p l o y m e n t of
su c h p e r s o n n e l in clu d e n a t u r a l r e s o u r c e s , m a j o r i n d u s t r i e s ,
a n d th e e x te n t to w h cih lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t u n its a s s u m e r e s p o n ­
Occupation

Technicians

P e rc e n t of Total
S c ie n t i f i c ,
Professional,
and T e c h n ic a l
E m p lo ym e n t
38.4




eciea
H ealth
O ccu p a tio n s

23.1

22.0

sib ility for m a jo r p r o je c ts .

Engineers

SEC T IO N 2. E N G I N E E R S
10.6

5.9

S tate a g e n c i e s e m p lo y e d 3 4 ,5 0 0 e n g i n e e r s in J a n u r a y 1964.
( S e e a p p e n d i x t a b l e 3.) A p p r o x i m a t e l y 2 5 , 7 0 0 of t h e s e e n g i n e e r s
(7 4 p e r c e n t ) w e r e c i v i l e n g i n e e r s e m p l o y e d i n S t a t e h i g h w a y

d e p a r t m e n t s . T h e r e w e r e 1,2 0 0 s a n i t a r y e n g i n e e r s , m o s t of
w h o m w e r e e m p lo y e d b y S tate h e a lth d e p a r t m e n t s . A lm o s t a
t h i r d of t h e e n g i n e e r s ( 1 1 ,0 0 0 ) w e r e e m p l o y e d in t h e F a r W e s t
S t a t e s w h e r e C a l i f o r n i a v a s t l y e x c e e d e d a l l o t h e r S t a t e s in
t h i s o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p . E m p l o y m e n t of e n g i n e e r s i n t h e N o r t h ­
e a s t , M i d d l e W e s t , a n d S o u t h e r n g r o u p i n g s of S t a t e s w a s d i s ­
tr ib u te d m o r e eq u a lly .

S E C T I O N 3. S C I E N T I S T S
T h e r e w e r e 1 6 ,7 0 0 s c i e n t i s t s e m p l o y e d i n a v a r i e t y of
s c i e n t i f i c o c c u p a t i o n s . (S e e a p p e n d i x t a b l e 4.) O n e h a l f (8 ,3 0 0 )
w e r e l i f e s c i e n t i s t s - - s c i e n t i s t s w o r k i n g in t h e a g r i c u l t u r a l ,
b io lo g ic a l, and b io m e d ic a l field s. A g ric u ltu ra l and b io lo g ica l
s c e i n e t i s t s w e r e c o n c e n t r a t e d in S t a t e a g r i c u l t u r a l a n d c o n ­
s e r v a t i o n a g e n c i e s w h e r e 94 p e r c e n t of t h e s e s c i e n t i s t s w e r e
e m p l o y e d . M o s t b i o m e d i c a l s c i e n t i s t s (95 p e r c e n t ) w e r e i n
S t a t e h e a l t h a n d w e l f a r e a g e n c i e s . (S e e a p p e n d i x t a b l e 5.)
T h e r e m a i n i n g h a l f of S t a t e g o v e r n m e n t s * s c i e n t i f i c p e r s o n n e l c o n s i s t e d of 2 ,6 0 0 p h y s i c a l s c i e n t i s t s ( c h e m i s t s , g e o l o ­
g i s t s , g e o p h y s i c i s t s , a n d o t h e r p h y s i c a l s c i e n t i s t s ) , 2 ,5 0 0
p s y c h o l o g i s t s , 2 ,0 0 0 m a t h e m a t i c i a n s a n d s t a t i s t i c i a n s , a n d
1 ,4 0 0 s o c i a l s c i e n t i s t s ( e c o n o m i s t s , s o c i o l o g i s t s , a n t h r o p o l o ­
g is ts , and o th e r so c ia l s c ie n tis ts ). A m ong th ese sc ien tific p e r ­
s o n n e l , p s y c h o l o g i s t s p r e d o m i n a t e d in m e n t a l h e a l t h a g e n c i e s
a n d e c o n o m i s t s i n s u c h a g e n c i e s a s D e p a r t m e n t s of R e v e n u e ,
C o m m e r c e , a n d L a b o r w h i c h c o l l e c t i v e l y d o m i n a t e t h e “M i s ­
c e l l a n e o u s ” c l a s s i f i c a t i o n of a g e n c i e s .

S E C T I O N 4. SOCIAL WORKERS
A b out 9 ,2 0 0 s o c i a l w o r k e r s w e r e e m p lo y e d by S tate g o v e r n ­
m e n t a g e n c i e s . (S e e a p p e n d i x t a b l e 6.) T h e 4 , 0 0 0 p s y c h i a t r i c
an d m e d i c a l s o c ia l w o r k e r s w e r e e m p lo y e d p r i m a r i l y in State
m e n ta l in s titu tio n s . S o cial w o rk e rs , not c la s s ifie d a s p s y c h i­
a t r i c o r m e d i c a l ( 5 ,2 0 0 ) , w e r e e n g a g e d p r i n c i p a l l y i n w e l f a r e
a c t i v i t i e s . N e w Y o r k a n d C a l i f o r n i a S ta te a g e n c i e s e m p l o y e d




21 p e r c e n t of a l l s o c i a l w o r k e r s a m o n g t h e 50 S t a t e s , a s o m e ­
w h a t h i g h e r p r o p o r t i o n t h a n t h e s e tw o S t a t e s h a d of n o n s c h o o l
g o v e r n m e n t e m p lo y m e n t in a l l S ta te s .

S E C T I O N 5. S E L E C T E D H E A L T H - R E L A T E D P R O F E S S IO N S
S t a t e g o v e r n m e n t s e m p l o y e d 3 6 ,2 0 0 h e a l t h - r e l a t e d p r o f e s ­
s i o n a l w o r k e r s , i n c l u d i n g 2 1 , 6 0 0 p r o f e s s i o n a l n u r s e s , 4 ,4 0 0
p h y s i c i a n s , 3 , 8 0 0 p s y c h i a t r i s t s , 3 ,4 0 0 s a n i t a r i a n s , 1 ,1 0 0 v e t ­
e r i n a r i a n s , 1 ,0 0 0 d e n t i s t s , a n d 800 p u b l i c h e a l t h o f f i c e r s w i t h
M . D . * s . ( S e e a p p e n d i x t a b l e 7.) S t a t e a g e n c i e s d e a l i n g w i t h th e
p h y s i c a l a n d m e n t a l h e a l t h of t h e g e n e r a l p u b l i c w e r e th e p r i ­
m a r y e m p l o y e r s of t h e s e p e r s o n s . A s i g n i f i c a n t p r o p o r t i o n of
p h y s i c i a n s (12 p e r c e n t ) , d e n t i s t s (21 p e r c e n t ) , a n d n u r s e s (9
p e r c e n t) , and to a l e s s e r d e g r e e p s y c h i a t r i s t s ( 4 p e r c e n t) and
p u b lic
h e a l t h o f f i c e r s (2 p e r c e n t ) w e r e e m p l o y e d b y S ta te
w elfa re ag e n cies.
N ew Y o rk , P e n n s y lv a n ia , C a lif o r n ia , M a s s a c h u s e t ts , and
F l o r i d a , h a v i n g 31 p e r c e n t of t o t a l S t a t e g o v e r n m e n t n o n e d u c a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t , e m p l o y e d 43 p e r c e n t of t h e t o t a l r e p o r t e d
n u m b e r of p e r s o n s i n t h e s e s e l e c t e d h e a l t h - r e l a t e d p r o ­
fessio n s.

SEC TION 6. T E C H N I C I A N S
Of th e 60,200 t e c h n i c i a n s , h a lf w e r e e m p lo y e d a s e n g i n e e r ­
ing t e c h n ic ia n s an d a n o t h e r t h i r d w e r e d r a f t s m e n and s u r ­
v e y o r s who w e r e e m p lo y e d , p r e d o m i n a t e l y , by S tate highw ay
d e p a r t m e n t s . ( S e e a p p e n d i x t a b l e s 8 a n d 9.) A m o n g t h e r e m a i n ­
in g t e c h n i c i a n s , t h e r e w e r e 5 ,4 0 0 i n t h e v a r i o u s p h y s i c a l a n d
life s c ie n c e f i e l d s , an d 3,700 m e d i c a l an d d e n t a l te c h n i c i a n s .
M o r e t h a n h a l f t h e p h y s i c a l s c i e n c e t e c h n i c i a n s w o r k e d on
h ig h w ay and p u b lic w o rk s p r o j e c t s . S ig n ifican t p r o p o r ti o n s a ls o
w e r e e m p l o y e d i n a g r i c u l t u r a l a g e n c i e s (16 p e r c e n t ) a n d
p h y s i c a l h e a l t h a g e n c i e s (16 p e r c e n t ) . A g r i c u l t u r a l a n d b i o ­
l o g i c a l t e c h n i c i a n s w e r e c o n c e n t r a t e d i n t h e f i e l d s of a g r i c u l ­
tu r e and c o n s e r v a tio n alth o u g h b io lo g ic a l te c h n ic ia n s a ls o w e re

Chart 2.
DI S TR I B U TI O N OF SCIENTIFIC, PROFESSIONAL, AND T E C HNI C A L
PERSONNEL IN S T A T E GOVERNMENTS ENGAGED IN RESEARCH ACTIVI TI ES
JANUARY 1964
NUMBER
OCCUPATION

N U M B E R E N G A G E D IN R E S E A R C H AS A P E R C E N T

E N G A G E D IN

OF T O T A L E M P L O Y M E N T , BY O C C U P A T I O N

RESEARCH

T o ta l Sc ie n ti fi c,
Professional,

4,800

and T e c h n i c a l
Personnel

S c ie n t i s t s

f o u n d i n f a i r l y l a r g e n u m b e r s (26 p e r c e n t ) w o r k i n g in t h e h e a l t h
field . M ed ical and d en tal te c h n ic ia n s w e r e c o n c e n tra te d p r i n c i ­
p a lly in h e a lth a g e n c ie s .
S t a t e a g e n c i e s in th e S o u t h e r n R e g i o n e m p l o y e d o v e r 40
p e r c e n t of th e d r a f t s m e n , s u r v e y o r s , a n d e n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i ­
c i a n s b u t o n ly 25 p e r c e n t of t h e e n g i n e e r s a m o n g t h e 50 S t a t e s .
A s a r e s u l t , in t h e S o u t h e r n S t a t e s t h e r a t i o o f t e c h n i c i a n s to
t o t a l s c i e n t i s t s a n d e n g i n e e r s w a s s i g n i f i c a n t l y h i g h e r t h a n in
o t h e r m a j o r s e c t i o n s of t h e c o u n t r y . T h e a v e r a g e r a t i o f o r a l l
S ta te s , o th e r th a n S o u th e rn S ta te s , w a s 9 te c h n ic ia n s f o r e a c h
10 s c i e n t i s t s a n d e n g i n e e r s . I n t h e S o u t h t h i s r a t i o w a s 19
t e c h n i c i a n s f o r e a c h 10 s c i e n t i s t s a n d e n g i n e e r s . T h e r a t i o s
of t h e n u m b e r of t e c h n i c i a n s t o e a c h 10 s c i e n t i s t s a n d e n g i ­
n e e r s f o r o t h e r r e g i o n s of t h e c o u n t r y w e r e N o r t h e a s t , 8;
M i d d l e W e s t , 12; a n d F a r W e s t , 9.

2,9 00

SECTION 7. S C I E N T I F I C , P R O F E S S I O N A L , AND
T E C H N I C A L P ER SO N N EL ENGAGED IN RESEARCH
Technicians

Engineers

S e l e c te d H ea lth

900

700

200

O ccupations

Socia l W o r k e r s




100

O n l y t h r e e p e r c e n t (4 ,8 0 0 ) of t h e s c i e n t i f i c , p r o f e s s i o n a l ,
an d te c h n ic a l p e r s o n n e l e m p lo y e d by S tate g o v e r n m e n t
a g e n c i e s w e r e e n g a g e d in r e s e a r c h . A s i n d i c a t e d in C h a r t 2,
t h e b u l k of t h o s e w h o s e t i m e w a s d e v o t e d p r i m a r i l y t o r e s e a r c h
w e r e t h e 2 ,9 0 0 s c i e n t i s t s . R e s e a r c h w a s a s i g n i f i c a n t a c t i v i t y
a m o n g th e b i o l o g i s t s , b i o m e d i c a l s c i e n t i s t s , e c o n o m i s t s , g e o ­
l o g i s t s , a n d g e o p h y s i c i s t s - - b e t t e r t h a n a f o u r t h of t h e s e
s c i e n t i s t s w e r e w o r k i n g in r e s e a r c h o r i e n t e d a c t i v i t i e s . (S ee
a p p e n d i x t a b l e 10.)
O f t h e 900 t e c h n i c i a n s w o r k i n g on r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t s , 65
p e r c e n t w ere en g in ee rin g and b io lo g ic a l te c h n ic ia n s . An a d ­
d i t i o n a l 27 p e r c e n t w e r e p h y s i c a l s c i e n c e , m e d i c a l , a n d d e n t a l
t e c h n i c i a n s . A f a r g r e a t e r p e r c e n t a g e of a l l b i o l o g i c a l t e c h ­
n i c i a n s (12 p e r c e n t ) w e r e i n r e s e a r c h w o r k t h a n w e r e o t h e r
t y p e s of t e c h n i c i a n s .

T h e r e m a i n i n g 1 ,0 0 0 p r o f e s s i o n a l p e r s o n s e n g a g e d i n r e ­
s e a r c h c o n s i s t e d of 700 e n g i n e e r s (2 p e r c e n t of a l l S t a t e
e m p l o y e d e n g i n e e r s ) , 100 s o c i a l w o r k e r s (1 p e r c e n t of t h e
s o c i a l w o r k e r s o n S t a t e g o v e r n m e n t p a y r o l l s ) , a n d 200 i n t h e
s u r v e y e d h e a l t h o c c u p a t i o n s ( 0 .5 p e r c e n t of t h e t o t a l r e p o r t e d
a s e m p l o y e d in t h e s e s e l e c t e d h e a l t h o c c u p a t i o n s ) . H a l f t h e
e m p lo y e e s in th e h e a lth o c c u p a tio n s w e r e p s y c h i a t r i s t s .




C o p i e s of t h e r e p o r t i n g f o r m a n d i n ­
s t r u c t i o n s f o r t h e 1 9 6 4 S u r v e y of S c i e n t i f i c
an d T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l E m p lo y e d by
S tate G o v e r n m e n ts a r e r e p r o d u c e d fo llo w ­
in g th e l a s t a p p e n d ix ta b le .




APPENDIX

TABLES

M o s t of t h e t a b l e s i n c l u d e d i n t h i s a p p e n d i x p r e s e n t d a t a
f o r e a c h S ta te . H o w e v e r , c a u tio n is u r g e d in m a k in g S ta te - b y S t a t e c o m p a r i s o n s of e m p l o y m e n t w i t h o u t a c q u i r i n g a n i n t i m a t e
k n o w l e d g e of i n d i v i d u a l S t a t e p r o g r a m s , p r a c t i c e s , a n d c l a s s i ­
f ic a tio n s y s t e m s . F o r e x a m p l e , w id e d if f e r e n c e s e x i s t in the
t y p e s of p r o g r a m s u n d e r t a k e n b y S t a t e s i n a n y g i v e n y e a r , i n
p r a c t i c e s s u c h a s th e h ir in g of s c ie n t if i c a n d te c h n ic a l w o r k e r s
o r t h e u s e of o u t s i d e c o n s u l t i n g s e r v i c e s , a n d i n f u n c t i o n s
p e r f o r m e d by a g e n c i e s h av in g s i m i l a r n a m e s o r by p e r s o n n e l
h a v i n g t h e s a m e o c c u p a t i o n a l t i t l e s . A l t h o u g h S ta te t a b l e s a r e
p r e s e n t e d by r e g io n f o r th e r e a d e r ’ s c o n v e n ie n c e , s t a t i s t i c s
by r e g i o n a r e n o t lik e ly to be c o m p a r a b l e , fo r th e r e a s o n s
cited .

-6 -

T a b le t .
O c c u p a tio n a l D is trib u tio n of T o t a l N u m b e r of S c ie n t ific , P r o f e s s iu n a l,

a nd T e c h n ic a l P e r s o n n e l,

E m p lo y e d by S ta te G o v e rn m e n ts , and N u m b e r E n g a g e d in R e s e a rc h , la n u a r y 1 9 6 4
Engaged in
research

Total

Total

1

Engaged in
research

Occupation
Number

Percent

Number

156,830

Civil engineers...... .
Sanitary engineers....
Other engineers.... .

1 0 0 .0

4,816

34,537

2 2 .0

744

15.4

30,958
1,244
2,335

19.7

659
13
72

13.7
.3
1.5

16,686

Engineers...............

Number

Percent

1 0 .6

.8

1.5

2 ,8 6 6

.9

153

.7

336

.1

11

.2

Agricultural scientists.
Bio-medical scientists..
Other life scientists...

3,284
2,035
2,936

2 .1

126
557
829

2 .6
1 1 .6

Mathematicians••••••••••
Statisticians..........

341
1,619

1.0

30
259

5.4

Economis ts.............
Sociologists and anthro­
pologists ...••••.....
Other social scientists.
Clinical psychologists..
Social psychologists....
Other psychologists....

692

.4

218

.1

85
74
140
23
25

99

.3

2

(i/)

3,534
5,240

2.3
3.3

80
17

1.7
.4

36,153

23.1

187

3.9

819
3,795

.5
2.4

28
91

•6
1.9

4,443

2 .8

21

.4

1,019

.6

1 .8

2 .1

4.5

202

5.9

448

Public health officers
(M.D.)...............
Psychiatrists (M.D.)....
All other physicians (M.
D. and D.O.).........
Dentists (D.D.S. or D.D.
M.)..................
Professional nurses
(R.N.)...............
Veterinarians (D.V.M.)..
Sanitarians............

7.0

107

9,222

Selected health pro­
fessions ................

3.2

1,047

Percent

Medical social workers..
Psychiatric social work­
ers ........... .
Other social workers....

59.5

1,431

Number

Social workers............

1 0 0 .0

Chemis ts..............
Geologists and geophysicists...............
Other physical scien­
tists...............

Percent

Note:

495
1,978
147
372

1.3
1.9
#2

.3
1.3
.1
.2

17.2
.6

Technicians..............
Draftsmen..............
SurveyorsTrt............
Engineering technicians.
Physical science techni­
cians................
Agricultural technicians
Biological technicians..
Medical and dental tech­
nicians ..............
Other technicians......

1.5
2.9
.5
.5

Because of rounding of percentages, sums of individual parts may not equal totals or 100.0

1/ Less than 0.05.




-7 -

21,559
1,083
3,435

13.7
.7

60,232

3

.1

24
17
3

.5
.4

38.4

920

19.1

7,920
11,971
30,535

5.1
7.6
19.5

34
5
381

.7
7.9

1,539
1,988
1,842

123

2 .6

1.3

21

1 .2

217

.4
4.5

3,674
763

2.3
.5

126
13

2 .2

1.0 .

.1

.1

2 .6

.3

T a b le 2 .
S c ie n tis ts , E n g in e e r s , S o c ia l W o r k e r s , S e le c t e d H e a lth -R e la te d
E m p lo y e d by State

G o ve rn m e n t

P ro fe s s io n a ls , and T e c h n ic ia n s

A g e n c ie s , by S ta te , Ja n u a ry 1964

Total
All occupations
State
Number

Percent of
total
employment JV

Selected
Scientists

Engineers

Social workers

health-related

Technicians

professionals

Total.............

156,830

13.0

16,686

34,537

9,222

36,153

60,232

Northeast...............

36,605

11.5

3,616

7,996

2,818

13,374

8,801

Connecticut...........
Maine.................
Massachusetts.........
New Hampshire.........
New Jersey............
New York...............
Pennsylvania..........
Rhode Island..........
Vermont...............

2,611
1,177
5,618

1 1 .6

1 1 .8

3,671
12,781
7,954
1,179
946

2 1 .6

620
301
1,303
343
1,077
2,653
1,183
162
354

234
92
425
18
438
1,174
162
248
27

604

668

261
182
453
72
274
1,393
805
97
79

2,191
160
1,164
4,938
3,616
373
117

892
391
1,246
75
718
2,623
2,188
299
369

Middle West.............

34,015

11.7

4,159

7,244

2,357

6,338

13,917

822
348
191
283
728
320
267
115

1,556
624
321
427
942
543
859
229
182

343
93
156
162
400
175
174
105
23
215
24
487

1,403
441
340
431
821

1,787
632
1,936
1,137
1,572
1,683
1,309
533
270
2,016
107
935

Illinois..............
Indiana...............
Iowa..................
Kansas................
Michigan..............
Minnesota.............
Missouri..............
Nebraska..............
North Dakota..........
Ohio..................
South Dakota..........
Wisconsin..............

See footnote at end of table




5,911
2,138
2,944
2,440
4,463
3,409
3,004
1,165
635
4,363
476
3,067

12.9
14.2
1 2 .0

10.9
9.9
13.4

1 0 .6

8.3
16.3
14.3
1 2 .0

15.5
1 1 .1
1 0 .8

12.7
9.6
8 .1

15.8

88

488
93
416

666

150
745

211

688

395
183
72
978
102

484

T a b le 2 .
S c ie n t is t s , En gineers, S o c ia l W o r k e r s , S e le c te d
E m p lo y e d

by S ta te

H e a lt h -R e la t e d

P ro fe s s io n a ls , a nd

G o ve rn m e n t A g e n c i e s , b y S t a t e , J a n u a ry 1 9 6 4

-

T e c h n ic ia n s

C o n tin u e d

Total
All occupations
Selected

State
Number

South............... .

50,527

Percent of
total
employment I f

Scientists

Engineers

Social workers health-related
professionals

Technicians

13.2

4,679

8,308

2,240

10,964

24,336

17.3

736
194
77
777
654
702
493
448
251
776

39
58
45
471
96
107
219
257
117

120

12.4
15.4
13.2
15.1
6.4

195
145
56
649
301
273
147
279
249
370
281
191
301
454
608
180

278
394
1,352
828
228

128
51
251
161
115
39

460
327
159
1,953
280
398
851
1,206
534
545
447
640
793
991
1,203
177

2,150
655
395
2,601
1,381
1,595
2,217
1,014
1,217
986
630
902
1,777
3,893
2,397
526

Alabama...............
Arkansas...............
Delaware..............
Florida...... .........
Georgia...............
Kentucky........... .
Louisiana.............
Maryland..............
Mississippi...........
North Carolina........
Oklahoma............. .
South Carolina........
Tennessee.............
Texas..................
Virginia............. .
West Virginia.........

3,580
1,379
732
6,451
2,712
3,075
3,927
3,204
2,368
2,763
1,606
2,062
3,516
6,851
5,151
1,150

Far West.................

35,683

17.0

4,232

10,989

1,807

5,477

13,178

Alaska................
Arizona...............
California............
Colorado..............
Hawaii.................
Idaho..................
Montana...............
Nevada.................
New Mexico............
Oregon.................
Utah...................
Washington............
Wyoming................

974
1,216
17,812
1,780
1,295

22.5
12.7
18.6
12.9
20.9
19.4
19.8
17.4
8.5
15.9

178
168
1,651
185
185
157
115
99
156
538
275
445
80

346
132
6,297
490
259
113
379
236
188
782
353
1,156
258

36
41
731
80
162
25
33
26
65
103
137
275
93

72
91
2,883
256
383
307
125
65
138
569
81
404
103

342
784
6,250
769
306
598
691
223
568
659

1 ,2 0 0

1,343
649
1,115
2,651
1,514
3,133
1 ,0 0 1

1 1 .0

12.9
17.7
1 2 .6

14.1
1 1 .8

14.9
16.3
8.4
8 .2

2 1 .0

13.4
25.2

1/ Excluding employment in State educational institutions.




86

668

853
467

T a b le 3 .
E n g in e e r s ,

by T y p e

of A g e n c y ,

O c c u p a tie n , and S t a t e , Ja n u a ry 196 4

Highways and public works

All agencies
State
Total

Civil

Sanitary

Other

Total

Civil

Other
agencies

Health and welfare

Sanitary
and
other

Total

Sanitary

Civil
and
other

Total

Total..............

34,537

30,958

1,244

2,335

31,238

29,886

1,352

1,385

1,053

332

1,914

Northeast...............

7,996

6,731

362

903

6,958

6,481

477

334

295

39

704

Connecticut...........
Maine.................
Massachusetts.........
New Hampshire.........
New Jersey............
New York...... ........
Pennsylvania..........
Rhode Island..........
Vermont...............

620
301
1,303
343
1,077
2,653
1,183
162
354

588
282
1,214
325
983
2,127
914
151
147

11

21

7
5
40

3
5

17
15
46

8

10

28
146

66

t
*8

380
167
3
199

581
272
1,187
324
911
2,044
875
142
145

10

14
43

593
276
1,209
327
924
2,226
914
144
345

12

5
46

200

9
3

7
3

Middle West.............

7,244

6,466

358

420

6,431

6,170

261

375

2 91

79

438

Illinois..............
Indiana...............
Iowa..................
Kansas................
Michigan..............
Minnesota.............
Missouri..............
Nebraska..............
North Dakota..........
Ohio..................
South Dakota..........
Wisconsin.............

1,556
624
321
427
942
543
859
229
182

1,445
558
291
396
810
498
817
217
148
533
91
662

48
47

63
19

1,411
551
261
371
765
483
809

34
3

4
5
16
—
28

67
19

8

212

212

--

159
613
137
557

145
521
85
556

14
92
52

44
51
38
15
55
26
30
4
16
51

40
46

14

1,445
554
261
380
815
485
813




666

150
745

102
8

22

8

15
42
25
28
4
14
43
5
65

16
90
20

20

90
54
18

-10.

4
22

3
13
182
39
2

--

9
50
2

4

1

10

48
14
30

8

8

6
2

110

28
97

100

100

6

39

22

15
27
25
28
3
14
40
5
31

13
-2

—

2

123
317
169
9
6

22

1
2

32
72
32
16
13
7

11

2

1

7
149

1
2

8

T a b le
E n g in e e rs , by T y p e

of A g e n c y ,

All agencies

3 ..
O c c u p a tio n , and S t a t e , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4

Highways and public works

State
Total

Civil

South....................

8,308

7,507

Alabama...............
Arkansas..............
Delaware..............
Florida...............
Georgia...............
Kentucky..............
Louisiana.... .........
Maryland............ r.
Mississippi...........
North Carolina........
Oklahoma..............
South Carolina........
Tennessee.............
Texas.................
Virginia..............
West Virginia.........

736
194
77
777
654
702
493
448
251
776
278
394
1,352
828
228

704
147
70
702
616
675
417
383
243
677
73
232
359
1,246
748
215

10,989

10,254

346
132
6,297
490
259
113
379
236
188
782
353
1,156
258

332

Far West................
Alaska................
Arizona...............
California............
Colorado..............
Hawaii................
Idaho..................
Montana........... .
Nevada.................
New Mexico............
Oregon.......... « .....
.
Utah...................
Washington............
Wyoming...............




120

110

5,870
440
249
97
365
209
165
740
343
1,088
246

Sanitary
and
other

Civil
and
other

Total

305

132

305

24

17

7

8

12

11

1

2

5
53
13
19

2

Total

Civil

350

451

7,566

7,339

227

437

17
11

15
36
1

54
13
19

21

25

610

6

667
436
399
240
687
76
261
357
1,233
746
206

691
145
67
684
607
667
389
377
239
660
65
227
348
1,228
739
206

13
35

6

704
180
67
697

174

561

10,283

5
5
64

9
17
363
40

309
109
6,016
436
203
103
367

- -

37
5
41
11
10
21

39
59
7

10

9
5
4
4
7
29
5
20

7

8

76
28
3
58
36
36
14
67
21

1
11
10

23
16
13
5
48
5

210

165
722
341
1,059
243

-1 1 -

Total

7

- -

13
3

25

—

21

47

34
9
5
7
—

14
37
5
47
13
14
27
67
54
4

9,896

387

308
104
5,686
432

125
16

1

11

202

96
359
191
165
716
340
1,054
243

22
1

27
11

Other
agencies

Health and welfare

Other

Sanitary

- C o n tin u e d

66

Sanitary

- -

14

3
14
19
14
43

36
5

1

12

- -

22

25

13
12
2

6

11

2

10

4

21

42
31
3

6

10

39
41

28
13

2

2

52
28
18

239

157

82

467

1

5

5
330
4

6

5
5
64

1

7

6

8

6

19

4

- -

6

8

17

1

6

5

26
3

61

10

6

9
5
4
4
7
16
5

2

20

3

1
2
- -

1
1

32
17
156
38
45
4
6
22

15
43

1

6

6

71
12

T a b le 4
S c i e n t i s t s in A ll A g e n c ie s , by O c c u p a tio n

and S ta te , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 4

All
scientists

Chemists

Geolo­
gists
and
geo­
physi­
cists

16,686

1,431

1,047

3,284

2,035

2,936

341

1,619

692

202

2,497

602

Northeast...............

3,616

328

105

550

694

323

131

417

209

59

719

81

Connecticut...........
Maine............... ..
Massachusetts.........
New Hampshire.........
New Jersey............
New York..............
Pennsylvania..........
Rhode Island..........
Vermont...............

261
182
453
72
274
1,393
805
97
79

23
13
49
9
13
108
98
7

3
9

43
44
17
27
14

53
7

15
47
32

2

24
7
3
4

1

10

3
4

—
—
—
32
36
—

8

2

47
19
19
3
69
143
92
18
7

Middle West.............

4,159

89

376

822
348
191
283
728
320
267
115

8

64

4

20

State

Total... ........

Illinois..............
Indiana...............
Iowa..................
Kansas....... .........
Michigan...............
Minnesota..............
Missouri...............
Nebraska..............
North Dakota..........
Ohio..................
South Dakota..........
Wisconsin.............




—
—

Agri­
cultural
scien­
tists

Bio­
medical
scien­
tists

112

Bio­
logical
scien­
tists

2

22

55

120

22

247

—

12

44
389
53
23

8

26

11

35
116
34
13
9

368

304

553

529

649

82

73
8

13
44
87
26
19
13

15
71
51
4
28

65
32
16

221

11

113
84
72

44
19
19
67
45
18

76
46
29
23
169

6

21

2

88

11

31
1

30

1

5
75
—
60

8

488
93
416

16
16
15

8

10

40
5
41

-12.

Mathema­
ticians

4
2

—
24
95
1
1

Statis­
ticians

Econo­
mists

17
5

2

1

123

41

849

278

5

15
—
7
--

197
50
64
63
95
65
28

16
123

6

115
47

22

10

13

2

21

2

13

32
55
36
5

46
30
19
74
48
67

6

3
~
34
—
8

50
12

1

—

11

3
4

4
--

41
15

2

2

2

2

68

20

10

6

Other
scien­
tists

1

—

6

1

1

Psycholo­
gists

40
27
215
5
55
198
158
17
4

11

22

Soci­
ologists
and
anthro­
pologists

21

18
165
5
78

2

1

12

19
50
6

3
7
1
8

33

T a b le 4.
S c ie n tis ts

State

All
scientists Chemists

in All A g e n c ie s ,
Geolo­
gists
and
geo­
physi­
cists

Agri­
cultural
scien­
tists

by

O c c u p a tio n

Bio­
medical
scien­
tists

Bio­
logical
scien­
tists

South....................

4,679

469

300

1,328

543

769

Alabama........... .
Arkansas..............
Delaware..............
Florida................
Georgia...............
Kentucky..............
Louisiana..............
Maryland..............
Mississippi...........
North Carolina........
Oklahoma............. .
South Carolina........
Tennessee.............
Texas..................
Virginia............ ..
West Virginia.........

195
145
56
649
301
273
147
279
249
370
281
191
301
454
608
180

13
16
3
89
24
23

21

29
73
4
123
83

46
5

12

25
30
59
25

Far West..... ...........

4,232

Alaska................
Arizona...............
California............
Colorado..............
Hawaii................
Idaho..................
Montana............. .
Nevada............ ....
New Mexico............
Oregon................
Utah...................
Washington............
Wyoming...............

178
168
1,651
185
185
157
115
99
156
538
275
445
80




13
5
14

12

43
9
173

a nd S ta te , J a n u a ry 1 964 -• C o n t in u e d
Mathema­
ticians

Statis­
ticians

Econo­
mists

Soci­
Psycholo­
ologists
gists
and
anthro­
pologists

439

106

14

1
2

..
..

13
—

15
5
5
55
28
46
18
31
29
48
28
13
29
40
32
17
387

68

**
•.
3
3
—
5

20
11

7
__
..
.
__

70

2

1

5
4

..

1

__

5

1
2

1

57
—
41
26

22

60
149
73
116
80
35
78
278
60

67
65
56
9

29
39
18
31
50
25
33
61
93
64
23

266

338

853

269

1,195

53

6

22

24
—
108
56
69
63
23

9

89
105
431
49
33
26
47
35
16
105
151
94
14

4

19

1

12

12

150
9

4

162
7
44

1

12

1

19
7

5
4
3

12

8

10

22

23

1

12

2

49

1

10

22
10

11

78
29

28
23
9
25
37
43

11

11

4
179
7

6

1

7

11

10

144

10

2

5
9

5
32

21

22

15
18
4

24
15
14

1

12

133
15
2
1
6

9

20

30
266
23
156
15

11

25
10

31
5

-

13'

6

—
2
6

17
—
4
3
6

12
8

3
5

7
3

13

2

1

7
32
4

133

2

86

12

66

510

14
..
..
9
_

73
53
31

6

Other
scien­
tists

12

42
3
4
254

20

--

26
42
52
7
30
33
23
29
59
59
16

88

419

__
1

31
16
10
2

30
1
1
11

13
4
4
110

5
12

/,C\

3

8

28
4

7
4
9
4
18
3

228
19
18
24
3
7
9
36
18
36
4

64
l

l
15
4
3

13
9

T a b le

5.

S c ie n t is t s , by T y p e of A g e n c y and O c c u p a t io n ,

Ja n u a ry 1 96 4

All
agencies

Highway
and

Health
and

Agriculture
and

public works

welfare

conservation

All scientists...........

16,686

1,268

6,223

7,108

2,087

Total physical scientists..................

2,585

773

625

916

271

1,431

254

555

475

147

1,047

502

15

433

97

107

17

55

8

27

Total life scientists...

8,255

50

2,157

5,920

128

Agricultural scien­
tists................
Bio-medical scientists
Biological scientists.

3,284
2,035
2,936

33
11

87
1,933
137

3,120
91
2,709

44
5
79

Mathematicians.........
Statisticians..........

341
1,619

108
224

36
605

17
155

180
635

Total social scientists.

1,389

113

485

99

692

692

105

10

66

511

Occupation

Chemists.............
Geologists and geophysicists...........
Other physical scientists................

6

Other
agencies

Economists...........
Sociologists and
Anthropologists......
Other social scien­
tists ................

202

“—
■

133

23

46

495

8

342

10

135

Total psychologists....

2,497

—

2,315

1

181

1,978
147
372

__

1,945
142
228

__

33
5
143

Clinical.............
Social...............
Other psychologists..•




--

-1 4 -

—
1

T a b le 6 .
S o c ia l W o rk e rs , b y T y p e of A g e n c y , O c c u p a t i o n , and S ta te , Jan ua ry 1 9 6 4
All agencies

Health

State
Total

Medical

Medical

Psychi­
atric

Other

Total

6 c psychi­

Other

9,222

448

3,534

5,240

3,807

3,571

Northeast...............

2,818

173

1,072

1,573

1,125

1 ,1 1 0

234
92
425
18
438
1,174
162
248
27

10

7
29
—
48
44
14
19

42
31
222

182
54
174

41
43
239

41
32
239

8

10

8

8

125
496

133
514

133
510

—
4

122

122

—

23

23

2

23
3

265
634
26
206
22

2

2

2,357

64

953

1,340

1 ,0 1 0

926

343
93
156
162
400
175
174
105
23
215
24
487

28

251
61
44
84
181
79
62
38

64
30

Middle West.............
Illinois..............
Indiana...............
Iowa......... ....... ..
Kansas................
Michigan..............
Minnesota.............
Missouri..............
Nebraska..............
North Dakota..........
Ohio...................
South Dakota..........
Wisconsin.............




2
1

5
8

7
8

3
-2

--

122

10

74
6

63

Total

atric

Total..............

Connecticut...........
Maine..................
Massachusetts....... ..
New Hampshire.........
New Jersey............
New York..............
Pennsylvania..........
Rhode Island..........
Vermont...............

111

73
211

89
104
64
13
139
18
424

255
61
65
74
182
79
117
43

253
61
43
74
182
79
65
39

10

10

53

53

6

6

65

61

-1 5 -

Other
agencies

Welfare

Medical
& psychi­
atric

Other

Total

236

5,077

375

4,702

338

15

1,557

133

1,424

136

192
49
180

11

181
43
169

1

_
11
—
—

10

6
11

_

6

10

--

225
25

39
30
14
19
3

84

1,338

90

1,248

9

2

88

26

32
91

2

_
....

88

15
7
7
4

62
30
89
73

222

634
20

—

__
22
—

—
—

52
4
—
—
_
4

218
96
56
62
13
162
18
414

2

2

23
2

183
604

83
26

6

20

206
22

211

89
52
60
13
139
18
412

—

_
1

_
_
8

T a b le 6.
S o c ia l W o rk e rs ,

by Typ e

of A g e n c y , O c c u p a t io n ,

Total

Medical

722

South................... .

2,240

102

A1
................
Arkansas................
Delaware.............. .
Florida............ .
Georgia....... .........

39
58
45
471
96
107
219
257
117

6

Maryland...............

Psychi­
atric

2

4

_

25
13
4
94

7
15
13
29

54
119
78

2

6

2

S ta te , la n u a ry 1 9 6 4

Other

Total

1,416

834

8

30
15

43
37
377
87
38
87
150
109
63

Medical
& psychi­
atric

8

764

74

841

108

28
----

21

--32
------

8

911

838

2
6

Far West.................

1,807

109

787

36
41
731
80
162
25
33
26
65
103
137
275
93

2

6

28

8

8

1

19
566
38

21

20

20

576
46
43
14
3

576
46
37
14
3

12

10

2

18
3
19
76
—

4
3
17
26
--

14
—




21

9

11

30
16
60
77
118
191
79

1

2

4

6

2

3
23
16
74
4

3
3
10
10

16-

2

733

------

22

3
7
14
-14

_

17
5

86
12

---

3

23
17
36
61
108
59
16

88

188
52
56
23

34
124

5
--

188
52
56
15

6

10

95

2

South Carolina.........
Tennessee........... .
IpyflRtT1,..............
VIrginla f..............
West Virginia..........

8

4
41
34
370
73
30
73
148
59
56

-5
--—
23
3

44

4
43
35
376
74
30
78
148
59
56
109
15
190
53
56
15

69
127
107

122

65

4

26
13
7

8

43

1,297

1,341

128
51
251
161
115
39

‘
Alaska.................
Arizona.......... ......
Cfll1 fornia.............
Col orado......... .
Hawaii.................
Idaho.............. .
Montana,, T.............
NevadaTT...............
.........
New Mex-f ro,
Oregon.................
Utah...................
Washington............ .
Wyoming, , - - T ......................................

Total

63

19
34
33
61
109
55
16

4

Other

771

4
6

Medical
& psychi­
atric

Total

86

2

Other
agencies

Other

69
141
109
9
29
17
36
61
108
59
24

86
12

- Continued

Welfare

Health

All agencies

State

and

6

—
--

2

50
--

154
34
107
11

30
14
47
79
94
199
23

2
1
6
1

2
1

1
2
2

58
13

-—
8

--49
1

-—

128

28

—

21

--

122

1

34
107

12

11

30
14
46
77
92
141
10

-—
21

24
—
70

T a b le 7.
S e le c te d H e a lth P rofe ssion s in A ll A g e n c ie s , b y O c c u p a tio n and S t a t e , Jan ua ry 1 9 6 4

All health
professions

Public
health
officers

Total.............

36,153

819

3,795

4,443

1,019

21,559

1,083

3,435

Northeast...............

13,374

173

1,958

1,582

300

8,533

175

653

604

10

49

386
138
1,501
126
681
2,938
2,465

82

5
24

13
4
31
3
35
128
76
9

2

211

State

Connecticut...........
Maine..................
Massachusetts.........
New Hampshire.........
New Jersey.............
New York..............
Pennsylvania..........
Rhode Island..........
Vermont...............

2,191
160
1,164
4,938
3,616
373
117

Middle West.............

6,338
1,403
441
340
431
821

Illinois..............
Indiana...............
Iowa...................
Kansas................
Michigan............. .
Minnesota.............
Missouri...............
Nebraska..............
North Dakota..........
Ohio...................
South Dakota..........
Wisconsin.............




688

395
183
72
978

Psychiatrists

Physicians,
all other

Dentists

Professional
nurses
Veterinarians
(R.N.)

Sanitarians

11

122

80
40
1

1,155
276
39

62
28
279
16
239
386
506
56

1

12

10

1

77

2

56
204
169
44
14

89

634

949

222

3,789

153

502

31

87
25
54
42
126
23
42
29

282
93
27
99
80
69
58
34
16
143
15
33

42
23

908
247
186
233
456
463
238
107
29
542
69
311

20

33
52
53
36
84
72
31
4
9
79

1

0

3
6

14
15
4
1

8

290
7

1

10

9

149

102

1

2

484

4

45

-1 7 -

6

9
27
22
20
8

4
39
1
21

221

6

22

10

56

1
20

47
84
3

1
11
6

34
24
2
. .

3
17

6

8

6

27

43

T a b le
S e le c t e d

State

All health
professions

H ea lth P r o fe s s io n s

Public
health

in A ll A g e n c ie s , b y O c c u p a tio n

Psychiatrists

officers

South....................

10,964

401

Alabama................
Arkansas...............
Delaware...............
Florida................
Georgia................
Kentucky...............
Louisiana..............
Maryland...............
Mississippi............
North Carolina.........
Oklahoma...............
South Carolina.........
Tennessee..............
Texas..................
Virginia...............
West Virginia..........

460
327
159
1,953
280
398
851
1,206
534
545
447
640
793
991
1,203
177

26
13
4
98

25
29
15
82
14
28
35

Far West.................

5,477
72
91
2,883
256
383
307
125
65
138
569
81
404
103

Physicians,
all other

660

Alaska.................
Arizona................
California.............
Colorado...............
Hawaii........... ......
Idaho..................
Montana................
Nevada.................
New Mexico.............
Oregon.................
Utah...................
Washington.............
Wyoming................




7.

1 ,1 2 0

5
38
26

and

Dentists

S tate , J a n u a ry 1 9 6 4 - -

Professional
nurses
(R.N.)

6,232

305

1,927

10

26

140
44
14
417

13
47
19
27
24
123
63
5

75
113
85
83
27
79
33
52
70
162
124
46

31
51
18

156

543

792

178

5
7
62
3

3

2

.. _

6

9
541
35

1
2

34
43
31
—

15
26
39
16
53

8

5
3
4
13
25
6
10

5

111

4
12

48
12
21
10
22

5
38
9
8
20

21

3
113
5
5

2

17

2

5
3
4
87
9
26
3

12

2

8

53

5
5
18

12

2

64

16

12

2

343
24
28

6

18-

Sanitarians

319

228
193
87
1,141
149
208
445
766
330
296
251
364
480
558
638
98

102

Veterinarians

C o n tin u e d

6
1

65
7
5
16
31
3
49
35
15
6

22
21

226
150
125
36
85
148
154

15

86

22

3

252
7

3,005

450

353

50
53
1,624
156
186
109
48
32
77
346
33
235
56

•• w

12

5
168
20
20

146
38
5

8

32
13
115
26
17
8

2

31

20

20

2

13
11

17
40
14

T a b le

8.

T e c h n ic ia n s in A ll A g e n c i e s , b y O c c u p a t io n

State

Total
technicians

Draftsmen

Surveyors

and S t a t e , Jan ua ry 1 9 6 4

Physical
Agricul­
tural
Engineering science
technicians technicians technicians

Biological
technicians

Medical
and dental
technicians

Other
technicians

Total..............

60,232

7,920

11,971

30,535

1,539

1,988

1,842

3,674

763

Northeast...............

8,801

927

1,616

4,210

227

250

203

1,138

230

Connecticut...........
Maine.................
Massachusetts.........
New Hampshire.........
New Jersey............
New York..............
Pennsylvania..........
Rhode Island..........
Vermont...............

892
391
1,246
75
718
2,623
2,188
299
369

157
29

358
209
621
30
333
799
1,441
147
272

6

46
26
54
5
29
67

12

96
310
152
28
36

250
60
172
3
104
794
133
65
35

24
135

10

- . .

Middle West.............

13,917

2,887

2,611

1,787
632
1,936
1,137
1,572
1,683
1,309
533
270
2,016
107
935

335
81
554
63
241
687

331
90
316

Illinois..............
Indiana...............
Iowa...................
Kansas................
Michigan..............
Minnesota.............
Missouri..............
Nebraska..............
North Dakota..........
Ohio...................
South Dakota..........
Wisconsin.............




111
8

122

55
52
595
19
83

—

306
383
230
296
36
326
45
252

10

- -

--

13

4

61
27
205
16
94
279
398
49
9

6,266

555

413

305

718

162

801
323
883
904
649
475
839
79
136
834
7
336

57
24
17
72
166
3
76
59
31

44

101

96
98
33
55
148
49
4
25
9
115
26
60

22

19

27
55
12

28
81
8

1
—

49

4
24

—

35
20

25
78
31
3

91
14
19
1

3
14

1

2

54

53

. .

122

7

2

9
4
1
10

158
46
--

16
7
9
18
7
4
2

3
38
10

26

T a b le 8.
T e c h n ic ia n s

in A ll A g e n c ie s , by O c c u p a t io n

and S ta te , Ja n u a ry 1 9 6 4 - -

Physical
Agricul­
Engineering
science
tural
Surveyors
technicians technicians technicians

Total
technicians

Draftsmen

24,336

2,473

4,586

14,476

509

343

Alabama...............
Arkansas..............
Delaware..............
Florida...............
Georgia...............
Kentucky...............
Louisiana.............
Maryland..............
Mississippi...........
North Carolina........
Oklahoma..............
South Carolina...... ..
Tennessee.............
Texas......... ........
Virginia..............
West Virginia..........

2,150
655
395
2,601
1,381
1,595
2,217
1,014
1,217
986
630
902
1,777
3,893
2,397
526

93
31
28
189
152
104
278
154
97
40
134
48
113
512
464
36

1,504
251
69
248
190

458
308
231
1,806
919

22
21
11

14
24

61
14
4
3
26
36
--

46
18
13

Far West....... .........

13,178

Alaska................
Arizona...............
California............
Colorado..............
Hawaii................
Idaho...... ...........
Montana.......... .
Nevada................
New Mexico............
Oregon................
Utah............. .....
Washington........ .
Wyoming...............

342
784
6,250
769
306
598
691
223
568
659

State

South...................




7
24
23
19
7
9
5
13

21

10

24
41
395
78

28
9

32

21

2

5,583

248

982

766

603

205

139
270
2,792
466
126
289
488
116
160
34

45
5
32

MM
9
561

5

2

86

74
80
470
19

5
5
58
17

33
334
1,240
62
43
162

86

24
67
36
154

6

41
70
757
83
79
48
117
34
95
53
91
79

47
20

17
5
58
63
58

3,158

853
467

1

11
__

____

1,633

668

166

43
—
26

96
368
203
83
309
464
50

40
263
367
316
240
52

1,215

6

1 ,1 1 2

1,246
589
1,048
729
89
545
1,470
2,581
1,073
272

6

Other
technicians

52
14
__
—
55
5
26
14
55

122

—

568

Medical
and dental
technicians

24
160
29
67
160
29
17
82

517
112

Biological
technicians

C ontinued

88

314
301

-2 0 -

2
2

32
3
240

—

2

—
—

10

15
123
2
12

1

11

10

8

22

34

340
34
32
34

52
7
16
85
31
98
5

11

12

..
—
17
—
50
3

16
17
72
11
12

7

8

1

8

7
5
10

7
16
13
46
8

T a b le
T e c h n ic ia n s

Occupation

All technicians.........
Draftsmen.............
Surveyors..............
Engineering technicians
Physicall science technicians...............
Agricultural technicians...............
Biological technicians.
Medical and dental technicians.... ...........
Other technicians......




All
agencies

9.

b y T y p e of A g e n c y

and

O c c u p a tio n , J a n u a r y

1964

Health
and

public works

Agriculture

welfare

Highway
and

conservation

and

Other
agencies

60,232

50,127

4,693

4,247

1,165

7,920
11,971
30,535

7,501
11,710
29,885

36
190

208
227
180

175
32
280

1,539

894

309

248

88

1,988
1,842

10

—

52
486

1,916
1,334

22

3,674
763

—
127

3,526
92

103
31

45
513

2

21-

10

T a b le 1 0 .
S c ie n t is t s , E n g in e e r s ,
P r im a r ily

S o cia l W o r k e r s ,

S e le c t e d

H e a lt h -R e la t e d

E n g a g e d in R e s e a r c h , by State , la n u a r y

All occu­
pations

Scien­
tists

Total........ ......

4,816

Northeast.......... . *..

1,308

819

Connecticut...........
Maine.................
Massachusetts.........
New Hampshire.........
New Jersey............
New York..............
Pennsylvania..........
Rhode Island..........
Vermont...............

63
45
65
23
93
831
168
16
4

36
44
26
18
49
552
78

Middle West.............

1,310

Illinois..............
Indiana...............
Iowa..................
Kansas................
Michigan..............
Minnesota.............
Missouri..............
Nebraska..............
North Dakota..........
Ohio..................
South Dakota..........
Wisconsin.............

454
16
17
205
230
79
77




20
22

107
25
58

2 ,8 6 6

Engi­
neers

Social
workers

1964

Number engaged in research as percent o1
total number in occupation

Number engaged in research

State

P ro f e s s io n a ls , and T e c h n ic ia n s

Selected
health
related
profess­
ionals

Tech­
nicians

All occu­
pations

Scien­
tists

neers

Engi­

Selected
Social
health
workers related
profess­
ionals

744

99

187

920

3.1

17.2

2 .2

1 .1

109

28

111

241

3.6

2 2 .6

1.4

1 .0

2

8

2.4
3.8

2.7

--.5
—
3.2

1 .0

1 .0

1 .8

1.4
.4

13.8
24.2
5.7
25.0
17.9
39.6
9.7
12.4
5.1

2.5
—

—
-—

—
—
—
0 .2

17
—

—

—

1

—

5

2

21

11

1 .2

—

6

—
14

5
23

12

112

—

—
—

87
—
—
—

3.4
2.5
6.5

790

254

54

12

200

3.9

19.0

3.5

2.3

242
14
16
115
119
49
67
15
16
70

56
—
—
89
55

50
—
—
—
—
—
—
4
—
—

6

100

2

—

7.7
.7

3.6
—
—

14.6
—

—
—
—

—

—

29.4
4.0
8.4
40.6
16.3
15.3
25.1
13.0
18.2
14.3
21.5
11.3

—
68

9
4

12

4

20

47

12

4
1

3
26
5
3

—

1

—
—

81
—
—

2 .1

1
1

—
2

.6

1

8.4
5.2
2.3

55
18
4
—
3
11
—

1

22.

7

2 .6

1.7
3.5
2.5
5.3
1.9

.4
—
.6
2 .6
.8

2 0 .8

5.8
2 .2

.5
.4
1 .6

3.9
3.3
.4

—

—
—
—
—
3.8
—
—
—

0.5
.8

.3
—

—
.1

Tech­
nicians

1.5
2.7
.9
.3
.9
6.7
3.2
4.3
3.7
-—
1

o4

.4
.5
—
—

5.6
—

.1

3.5

—
.5
—
—
—

1 .1

.1
.1

.3
—
1 .1

.5

—

—

.2

.7

T a b le 1 0 .
W o r k e r s , S e le c te d

S c ie n t is t s , En gineers, S o c ia l
P rim a rily

Engaged

in

R e s e a rc h ,

All occu­
pations

SOUth ....................

1,170

Alabama................
Arkansas...............
Delaware...............
Florida................
Georgia................
Kentucky...............
Louisiana..............
Maryland...............
Mississippi............
North Carolina.........
Oklahoma...............
South Carolina.........
Tennessee..............
Texas..................
Virginia...............
West Virginia..........

23
41
7
251
40
54
189
37
29
27
57
19
84
131
141
40

Far West.... .
Alaska......... .
Arizona................
California.............
Colorado...............
Hawaii.................
Idaho.............. .
Montana................
Nevada........ .
New Mexico.............
Oregon...... .
Utah___ ...............
Washington.............
Wyoming................




1,028

Scien­
tists

Engi­
neers

614
22

1

28
5
116

9

11

12

32

359

__
—
—

....

__

1

10

103

1

8
22

17
33

16
17
14
22

34
19
69
111

76
33

643

6

9
3
23
—
2
10

14

—
—

—

—
—
—
—
3
5
5
-32

8

4

....

1

—

—

498
54
108
26
31

364
25
19
4
14

6

9.9
22.9
24.4
12.5
18.3

120

2.9

15.2

2 .0

1

1.3

4.5
6.5

2

2

1 .2

6 .1

1 .2
1 .0

5.6
5.9

20

20

100

19
135

77

10

10

10

5
46

—
—

83

8

6

9
36

1 .8

1 .0

22
2

1

3

59

—
—
—

1 2 .1

2 .8

2 2 .0

3.0
8.3

13.5
10.3
2.5

1.7
5.1
10.4
.9
.5
—
—

21

2 .2

15
—
—

2.3
.3

1 2 .2

1 .8

1 2 .8

8

1 .0

3

2 .2

3

12

3.8
1.3
4.3

15.4

1

7

2.5
3.1

1 .0

-23

__
—
—

2 .0

17.3
12.5

.2

—
.9
.9
—
-—
—
-—
—
—

0.7

0.3

1.5

__
—
«.5
.4
.5

....

.1

.4
—
—
-—
.4
.5
.4
-0 .6

__

.6

.3
4.0
.6

1.4
6 .2
.9

.5
.2

-.6
.1

1.9
1 .1

0.9
.3

.8

1

—

0»2

1 .2

6 .6

4.8

1

—
—
—
—

.1

3.5
.9
2.4
1.9
2.7
3.5

3.9
1.5

4.4
10.9

5

—

—
—

1 .0

137
9

_

11

1

11.3
19.3
8.9
17.9

1.9

4.6
1.3
2.7
1.7
2.4
6.7
1.3
3.6
.4
19.2
—
.5
.7
1.7
,4

—

12

2

.6

3.0

6

1

5

—
—

13.1

2

2

13

107
25
27

2.3

1

—
—
—
-—
—
—
—

13

C o n tin u e d

eng£iged in re search as percent of
to :al number in occupation
Selected
All occu­ Scien­
Engi­
Social
Tech­
health
pations
tists
workers related
neers
nicians
profess­
ionals

4

2

1

1

220

Tech­
nicians

4

21

20

1

-

1lumber

Selected
Social
health
workers related
profess­
ionals

161

P ro fe s s io n a ls , and T e c h n i c ia n s

by S t a t e , J a n u a ry 1 96 4

Numbe r engaged in resea::ch

State

H e a lt h -R e la t e d

.7
1.3

.8
.8

.1

—
—

.8

19.3
3.5

—
—
—
~
-2.5

__
—
—

2 .2

.2

1 .2

—

1 .2

.4

.7

1.4




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
W

a s h in g t o n

,

D.C. 20210

In reply please
refer to No. 341

Gentlemen:
The Bureau of Labor Statistics is conducting a survey to provide
data on the 1964 employment of scientific and technical personnel
by the 50 State governments.
The findings of this survey, together with similar studies of
other segments of our economy, will be used in assessing the
countryTs present and future needs for scientists, engineers,
technicians, and other selected specialists, and in formulat­
ing policies and programs to strengthen our resources of such
personnel.
We hope the results will also be useful to State
governments in evaluating their own scientific manpower needs
and policies.
Two labeled questionnaires are enclosed for your use.
Please
return one in the enclosed envelope, which requires no postage,
and retain the other for your files.
We would greatly appreciate your careful attention to the following
1. It is important that we receive your reply even if
your organization does not employ scientists, engi­
neers, technicians, or any of the other specialists
indicated on the questionnaire.
2. Where precise information is not available, please
make estimates.
We shall be extremely grateful for your very early response-within the next few days, if possible.
If you have any ques­
tions regarding coverage or the interpretation of the question­
naire, please call Mr. Jack Golomb of our Washington staff
(Area Code 202, 961-2465) or write to me.
Sincerely yours

Enclosures

~24~




Budgat Bureau No. 44-R1181.1
Approval axpires Juno 30, 1965

B I S. No. 2645 (R«vi««d Juno 1, 1964)

A SURVEY OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL PERSONNEL
EMPLOYED BY STATE GOVERNMENTS

1964
Conducted by the
U.S. DEPARTMENT O F LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Data should apply, if possible, to the pay period which in­
cludes January 12, 1964.

All information supplied on this form will be used for statis­
tical purposes only and will not be published in a manner which
will disclose information concerning individual agencies without
their permission.
If you employ ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, SOCIAL WORKERS,
persons in any of the SELECTED HEALTH PROFESSIONS listed
under item 5.00 on page 2, or TECHNICIANS, please complete
the entire questionnaire, supplying as much information as possi­
ble. Reasonable estimates will be satisfactory if precise data are
not available. PLEASE N O TE.— Even if you do not have em­
ployees in these occupational categories, please complete this
page.
IDENTIFICATION

If additional copies of the questionnaire would be helpful,
they may be obtained upon request.
Mail completed questionnaire to:
COMMISSIONER OF LABOR STATISTICS
U.S. DEPARTMENT O F LABOR
__________________Washington, D. C. 20210_______________
REPORTING UNIT

REPORTING UNIT
(See definition 1)

~i
This questionnaire should cover the REPORTING
identified at left, unless a special letter is
enclosed asking you to omit certain subdivisions.

UNIT

Please complete and return one copy of this
report in the enclosed envelope. The extra copy
is for your files.

J

L
(C h an ge address if incorrect)

Terms in HEAVY CAPITALS are defined on Pages 3, 4, and 5.

Please read definitions carefully.
January 1964

1. Total employment, by major occupational group:
1.00 Enter the TOTAL NUMBER OF PAID EMPLOYEES of the REPORTING UNIT— definition 2; include both full- and
part-time employees .................................................................................................................................................................. .....................................
2.00 ENGINEERS—Enter here and on line 2.00, column 2, page 2— (definition 3) ............................................................. .....................................
3.00 SCIENTISTS—Enter here and on line 3.00, column 2, page 2— (definition 6) ............................................................. .....................................
4.00 SOCIAL WORKERS— Enter here and on line 4.00, column 5, page 2— (definition 18) ............................................ .....................................
5.00 SELECTED HEALTH PROFESSIONS— Enter here and on line 5.00, column 5, page 2— (definition 19) ....................... .....................................
6.00 TECHNICIANS (exclude skilled craftsmen)— Enter here and on line 6.00, column 5, page 2— (definition 21) . . . ---------------------------7.00 All other employees (line 1.00 minus lines 2.00, 3.00, 4.00, 5.00, and 6.00) ......................................................... .....................................

IF YOU EMPLOY ANY SCIENTISTS, ENGINEERS, TECHNICIANS, SOCIAL WORKERS, OR PERSONS IN SELECTED HEALTH PROFESSIONS (ENTRIES
ON LINES 2.00, 3.00, 4.00, 5.00 AND 6.00), PI.EASE COMPLETE THE REMAINDER OF THIS FORM. COMPLETE ONLY THIS PAGE IF
ENTRIES ON LINES 2.00, 3.00, 4.00, 5.00 AND 6.00 ARE ALL ZERO.

Person to be contacted if questions arise concerning this report:
Name._________ ________________________________________ Telephone No..
T itle __________ ___ __________________________________________________

-2 5 -




TERM IN HEAVY CAPITALS ARE DEFINED. PLEASE READ DEFINITIONS CAREFULLY
S
2. OCCUPATION AN D FUNCTION.
RESEARCH in January 1964.

Please enter below the total number of employees in each listed occupation and the number primarily engaged in

OCCUPATION

TOTAL

OCCUPATION

TOTAL

(A person working in a combination of the (Entries on lines
listed occupations—such as a biochemist;— 2.00 and 3 00
should be counted in the occupation with should be the
which his work is most closely associated. same as the cor­
Count each employee in only one occupation.) responding entries
on page 1.)

Employed
primarily in
RESEARCHdefinition 22

(A person working in a combination of the (Entries on lines
listed occupations—such as a worker doing 4.00, 3.00 and
both drafting and surveying — should be 6.00 should be
counted in the occupation with which his the same as the
corresponding
work is most closely associated. Count each
entries on
employee in only one occupation.)
page 1.)

2.00

(2)

Total ENGINEERS— definition 3 ..

(3)

(5)

(4)

4.00

Total SOCIAL WORKERS—
definition 18 .........................

Other social workers—
(s e e d e fin itio n 18) .............
Total SELECTED HEALTH PROFES­
SIONS — d efin itio n IQ

5.01

Public health officers (M .D.)
Psychiatrists (M .D .) .............

5.03

Total SCIENTISTS— definition 6 ..

3.10

4.09

5.02

3.00

Medical— (see definition 18) .
Psychiatric— (see definition
18) ......................................

5.00

(exclude sanitarians—
see line 5.07)— definition 5.

SANITARY

4.01
4.02

2.02

Physicians, all other (M.D.
and D .O .) .........................

5.04

Dentists (D.D.S. or D.D.M.)

Total PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS—

3.12,

Geologists and geophysicists.

3.19

Other physical scientists

3.20

Total LIFE SCIENTISTS—

3.21

AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS—
d efin itio n 0 .......................

3.22

BIO-MEDICAL SCIENTISTS—
d efin itio n 1 0 ...................

5.05

3.29

BIOLOGICAL SCIENTISTS
except AGRICULTURAL and
BIO-MEDICAL — definition

11
3.30

Professional Nurses (R .N .).

5.06

Veterinarians (D.V.M .) . . . .

5.07

SANITARIANS — definition

6.00

Total M ATHEM ATICIANS and
S T A TIS TIC IA N S .......................

20 .

Total TECHNICIANS— definition
21
...................................

Am
A 02

S urveyors

Engineering technicians
(except draftsmen and

6.04

Physical science technicians
(working in chemistry,
geology, physics, etc.) . . . .

6.05

Agricultural technicians . . . .

6 06

P jn ln g i^ l

6.07

Medical and dental technicians
(include serology techni­
cians, encephalographers,
e tc )
..........................

6.09

3.40

STATISTICIANS—

Total SOCIAL SCIENTISTS—
(except psychologists and so­
cial workers—see lines 3.50
and 4.00)—definition 14 . . .

^ 4l

3.43

SOCIOLOGISTS—

3.49

Other social scientists—
( please specify)

Other TECHNICIANS

s u rv e y o rs )

A n th ro p o lo g is ts
ECONOMISTS—

definition 15 .
definition 16

Total PSYCHOLOGISTS—
(include practitioners) —
d e fin itio n

17

.............

definition 13

3.42

3.50

. . . .

M ATHEM ATICIANS—

12
3.32

definition
......................................

D ra fts m e n

6.03

3.31

^h n iriarK . . .

................

3.51

Clinical— (see definition 17)

3.52

Social— (see definition 17)

3.59

RESEARCH-

PLEASE DO NOT LEAVE BLANKS.
ENTER “ O " WHERE APPLICABLE.

.EAVE BLANKS.
PLEASE DO NOT 1
ENTER “ O ” WHEItE APPLICABLE.
m

Employed
primarily in
definition 22

Other psychologists— (see
definition 17) ......... ..

26 -

(61




7.00

Please list major organizational divisions or sections of the REPORTING UNIT and give the total number of paid employees in each.
Total number of
paid employees

Name of sub-unit

January 1964

NOTE: We would appreciate receiving copies of pamphlets or other printed material describing the work performed by scientific and
technical personnel in the REPORTING UNIT.

D E F IN IT IO N S
1. REPORTING UNIT— The State government agency or other State unit identified on the front page of this ques­
tionnaire. Include all the subdivisions and organizational units within that State agency, except for the exclusions specifi­
cally listed in this definition. Exclude State universities and colleges, agricultural experiment stations, agricultural extension
services, and hospitals affiliated with State universities. However, include all other State agencies which are located at State
colleges and universities.
2. TOTAL NUMBER OF PAID EMPLOYEES— All permanent and temporary employees paid by the reporting unit,
except for the exclusions specifically listed in this definition. Include employees on State payrolls who work with local and
county agencies. All classified, unclassified, and contract employees, exempt employees, laborers, and others paid directly
by the reporting unit should be included. Consultants and practitioners (medical doctors, nurses, etc.), whether paid by
project, fee, or other basis, should be included only if they were employed full time during the reporting period or if it
is known that their part-time employment by the reporting unit was their primary employment. Exclude unpaid personnel,
part-time consultants primarily employed elsewhere, and personnel on the payroll of contracting firms.
3. ENGINEERS— Count as engineers all persons actually engaged in chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical, metallurgi­
cal and all other types o f professional engineering work at a level which requires knowledge o f engineering equivalent
at least to that acquired through completion of a 4-year college course with a major in one of these fields, regardless of
whether they hold a college degree in the field. Include engineers in research, planning, inspection, administration, tech­
nical writing, and other positions which require them to use the indicated level of knowledge in their work. Exclude per­
sonnel trained in engineering but now employed in positions not requiring the use of such training. Include architectural
engineers but exclude architects. Also exclude stationary engineers. Draftsmen and engineering aides should be counted in
the TECHNICIANS category.
4. CIVIL ENGINEERS— Count as civil engineers all personnel engaged in architectural, construction, highway, and all
other civil engineering specialties, except sanitary engineering, which is reported separately. Include city planners if their
work is essentially engineering (per definition 3, above).
5. SANITARY ENGINEERS— Count as sanitary engineers those engineers who conceive, design, appraise, direct, and
manage engineering works and projects developed, as a whole or in part, for the protection and promotion o f the public
health, particularly as it relates to the improvement of man’s environment. Also, count those engineers who investigate and
correct engineering works and other projects that are capable of injury to the public health by being or becoming faulty
in conception, design, direction, or management. Examples o f areas of work are water supply, treatment, and distribution;
collection, treatment, and disposal of community wastes; control of water and atmospheric pollution; milk and food sani­
tation; housing and institutional sanitation; and prevention o f radiation exposure. Do not include sanitarians; they are to
be reported on line 5.07.
6. SCIENTISTS— Count as scientists all persons actually engaged in scientific work at a level which requires a knowl­
edge of physical, mathematical, statistical, biological, agricultural, social, economic, political, psychological or other sciences
equivalent at least to that acquired through completion o f a 4-year college course with a major in these fields, regardless
of whether they hold a degree in the field. Include scientists in research, planning, inspection, administration, technical
service, technical writing, technical drawing and exhibit design, data collection, and all other positions which require them

-27




to use the indicated level of scientific knowledge in their work. Exclude personnel trained in these science fields but now
employed in positions not requiring the use of such training. Medical doctors, dentists, veterinarians, and SANITARIANS
should be counted in SELECTED HEALTH PROFESSIONS; see definition 19. (See definitions 7 to 17 for specific cate­
gories o f scientists.)
7. PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS— Count as physical scientists all chemists, physicists, metallurgists, geologists, geophysicists,
and all other physical and earth scientists.
8. LIFE SCIENTISTS— Count as life scientists all personnel actually engaged in scientific work requiring a knowledge
of agricultural, medical, or biological sciences. (See definitions 9, 10, and 11 for specific categories of life scientists.)
9. AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS— Count as agricultural scientists all scientists who spend the greatest amount of their
time in understanding and improving agricultural productivity. These scientists work in such fields as agronomy, animal
husbandry, dairy technology, food technology, forestry, horticulture, farm or range management, and soil culture. Veteri­
narians should be reported in SELECTED HEALTH PROFESSIONS (see definition 19).
10. BIO-MEDICAL SCIENTISTS— Count as bio-medical scientists those persons engaged in such biological sciences as
anatomy, bacteriology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology. Exclude physicians, dentists, public health
specialists, pharmacists, and other health personnel. They should be counted in SELECTED HEALTH PROFESSIONS (see
definition 1 9). Exclude plant pathologists and plant physiologists. They should be counted in BIOLOGICAL SCIENTISTS
(see definition 1 1).
11. BIOLOGICAL SCIENTISTS except AGRICULTURAL and BIO-MEDICAL — Count in this category all biological
scientists who are not counted as either agricultural or bio-medical scientists. Include botanists, ecologists, entomologists,
plant pathologists, plant physiologists, zoologists, etc.
12. M ATHEM ATICIANS— Count as mathematicians only those persons whose position requires knowledge o f mathe­
matics equivalent at least to that acquired through a 4-year college course with a major in mathematics and who spend the
greatest amount of their time in the development and application of mathematical techniques. Include actuaries and mathe­
matical analysts. Include statisticians and computer programmers only if they specialize in mathematical techniques. Statis­
ticians engaged primarily in the application of statistical techniques should be included in the STATISTICIANS category.
Exclude accountants.
13. STATISTICIANS— Count as statisticians all persons other than those reported as mathematicians, who are primar­
ily engaged in the recurrent application of statistical techniques which involve the use of mathematical-statistical theory
equivalent to that taught at the college level, regardless of type of college degree held. Statistical techniques include the
design o f surveys or experiments as well as the collection, organization, interpretation, or analysis of numerical data. Such
data may represent either complete enumeration or statistical samples. Persons covered in the framework of this definition may
be employed in social science fields such as economics, political science, demography, or psychology; in engineering fields;
or in physical or life science fields, such as biology, agriculture, pharamcology, or medicine. Do not include statisticians
who are engaged solely in the development of mathematical theory associated with the general application of statistical
techniques— these persons should be reported in M ATHEM ATICIANS. Exclude accountants.
14. SOCIAL SCIENTISTS— Count as social scientists all persons actually engaged in social scientific work at a level
which requires a knowledge of social, economic, political, or cultural sciences equivalent at least to that acquired through
completion of a 4-year college course with a major in one of these fields, regardless of whether they hold a college degree.
Include anthropologists, archivists, criminologists, demographers, economists, historians, penologists, political scientists, so­
ciologists, etc. Include those engaged in research,* planning, administration, technical service, technical writing, and all
other positions which require them to use the indicated level of knowledge in their work. Exclude psychologists (see
lines 3.50, 3.51, 3.52 and 3.59) and social workers (see lines 4.00, 4.01, 4.02, 4.09).
15. ECONOMISTS— Count as economists those social scientists who analyze, forecast, or interpret economic condi­
tions and trends. Their work will normally include the study of economic factors and their interrelationships. Examples
of such factors are: employment, taxes, revenues, and wage rates. Exclude accountants.
16. SOCIOLOGISTS— Count as sociologists those social scientists who study the groups which man forms— families,
tribes, communities, villages, and states, and a great variety of social, religious, professional, business, and other organiza­
tions which have arisen out of living together. Sociologists study the behaviour of these groups, trace their origin and
growth, and analyze the influence of group activities on individual members. They may specialize in certain areas o f study
such as intergroup relations, the effects of urban living, or social organization.
17. PSYCHOLOGISTS— Count as psychologists all persons concerned with the investigation, application, or establish­
ment of principles of human behavior. Clinical psychologists . . . Count as clinical psychologists those psychologists who
interview patients, give diagnostic tests, and provide individual and group psychotherapy to maladjusted or disturbed
people. Their research functions are concerned with psychotherapy, personality development, and adjustment. These peo­
ple generally work in mental hospitals or clinics; Social psychologists . . . Count in this category the psychologists em­
ployed in the study of the social forces of groups, cultures, and society that affect individual behavior. Psychologists, all
other . . . Include in this category such groups as the comparative (anim al), counseling, developmental, educational, ex­
perimental, industrial, and physiological psychologists.
18. SOCIAL WORKERS— Count in this category all persons actually working as social workers who either have a
master’s degree in social work (M .S.W .) or are working at a level requiring knowledge equivalent to that which would
be acquired in obtaining the M.S.W . degree. Medical social workers are those providing administration, supervision, and
services in hospitals and their outpatient departments, clinics, and health programs; and those administering and providing
staff consultation and conducting research with respect to medical and public health social work programs. Psychiatric

-28-




social workers are those providing administration, supervision and services in mental hospitals, clinics, mental health dem­
onstration programs, community mental health centers, and mental retardation services and those administering, consult­
ing, and providing staff assistance and conducting research with respect to psychiatric social work and mental health pro­
grams. Social workers, all other are those engaged in the provision of social services (excluding medical and psychiatric)
in important related agencies such as welfare, education and correction.
19. SELECTED HEALTH PROFESSIONS— Include in this category physicians, dentists, psychiatrists, registered nurses,
veterinarians, public health officers, and sanitarians, whether engaged in practice, research, or other activities. Exclude
school nurses, practical nurses, auxiliary nursing workers, nursing aides, orderlies and attendants. Please note definition 2,
TO TA L NUMBER OF PAID EMPLOYEES, regarding exclusion of certain part-time employees.
20. SANITARIANS— Count as sanitarians persons concerned with health and sanitation standards and regulations and
other environmental health programs. Include those persons who plan and supervise the administration of sanitation laws
and regulations, develop and conduct sanitation tests, and inspect and investigate sanitation conditions and facilities. Do
not include sanitary engineers; they are to be reported on line 2.02.
21. TECHNICIANS— Count as technicians all persons actually engaged in technical work at a level which requires
knowledge of engineering, mathematical, medical, dental, biological or other natural sciences comparable to the knowledge
acquired through technical institutes, junior colleges, or other formal post-high school training less extensive than 4-year
college training, or through equivalent on-the-job training or experience. Some typical job titles are: draftsmen, survey­
ors, engineering aides, laboratory technicians, and assistants, serology technicians, conservationist aides, electronic techni­
cians, X-ray technicians, and museum technicians. Computer programmers who meet the above definition of technician
should be reported on line 6.09 "other technicians.” Exclude personnel whose positions require knowledge or training
consistent with definitions for scientists, engineers, and mathematicians. Exclude skilled workers and craftsmen such as
electricians, machinists, plumbers, and radio and T.V . repairmen.
22. RESEARCH— Enter in columns 3 and 6 on page 2 the number of persons included in columns 1 and 4 who
spend the greatest amount of their time performing or supervising basic, and applied investigation in order to advance
knowledge in the natural and social sciences, engineering, or the health professions. Include those persons primarily en­
gaged in technical development activities concerned with solving nonroutine problems encountered in applying research
findings or other general scientific knowledge to specific projects or processes. Exclude persons who spend the greatest
amount o f their time in quality control, routine testing, routine gathering of statistics, or other nontechnical activities or
technical services. Include those social scientists who spend the greatest amount of their time in analyzing and testing
data.

-2 9 ☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1967 O - 266-837