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EM YM T
PLO EN
and EARNINGS
i

If - :

DIVISION OF MANPOWER AND EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS
Seymour L. Wolfbein, Chief
CONTENTS

Page

Article
T h e D e c lin in g S h a r e o f N o n f a r m

FACTORY JOBS DECLINING AS A

J o b s in F a c t o r ie s ,

1 9 4 6 -5 7 .................................................................................... ............................

PERCENTAGE O N N R EM
F O FA M
PLOYM
ENT. . .

iii

Charts
The a r tic le beginning on page i i i
points out that o f the

131 manufactur­

ing industries for which
employment

fig u re s,

only

Employees in Nonagricultural Establishments, by Industry
D ivision......... ...........................................................................................................
Hirings and Layoffs in Manufacturing Industries, 1957-58..• ••••

xv

35

BLS publishes
31 provided

Employment Highlights-August 1958...................................................

xvi

job opportunities at a rate fa ster than
the rate

for

t o ta l

nonfarm

a c tiv ity

STATISTICAL TABLES

during the years following World War I I .
Twelve industries
nonfarm

had

employment

proportions

approximately

of
un­

changed during th is period, and the re­
maining 88 recorded declining shares o f
nonfarm job s.

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Documents» U. S. Government Print­
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Single copies vary in price« This
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A-Employment
A- 1: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division (August 1958).......... ....................
A- 2 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division and selected groups (August 1958)......... ...
A- 3 • Production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group (August 1958)................ .................
A- A ' Index of employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division (August 1958)...........•••••....
A- 5! Index of production workers in manufacturing, by major
industry group (August 1958).................... .....
A- 6s Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division, seasonally adjusted (August 1958)...........
A- 7: Production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group, seasonally ad justed (August 1958)......... ••••••
A- 8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry (July 1958).............. .
A- 9s Employees in private and Government shipyards, by
region (July 1958)........ ..................... .
A-lOs Federal military personnel (July 1 9 5 8 ) . . . . . 1
A-lls Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division and State (July 1958).....................
A-12s Employees in nonagricultural establishments for selected
areas, by industry division (July 1958).............. .

Continued next page

1
2
3
U
U

5
5
6
12
2
13
16

EM YM T
PLO EN
and EARNINGS

/ w^
^ LSsfcJ
\ ^res

m

The n ational employment f ig u r e s shown
in t h i s

CONTENTS - Continued

report have been adjusted to

f i r s t quarter 1957

benchmark levels*

Page

B-Labor Turnover
B-ls labor turnover rates in manufacturing (July 1958)......... 27
B-2: Labor turnover rates, by industry (July 1958)....... ...... 28
B-3: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing for selected
States and areas (June 1958)......... ••••••..... .........32

C-Hours and Earnings

EXPLANATORY NOTES
A

b r i e f outline o f the concepts* meth­

odology, and sources used i n preparing
data shown i n t h i s p u b lic a tio n appears
in the Annual Supplement Is s u e . S in g le
copies o f the Explanatory Notes may be
obtained from the U. S . Department
Labor,

Bureau, o f

D iv is io n o f

Labor

Manpower and

of

C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manu­
facturing, by major industry group (August 1958).••••••••
C-2: Gross average weekly hours and average overtime hours of
production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group (August 1958)..................................
C-3: Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours in industrial and
construction activities (August 1958)............... .
C-4: Indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls in industrial and
construction activities (August 1958).................
C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory
workers, by industry (June 1958).......................
C-6: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable, of
production or construction workers in selected industry
divisions, in current and 1947-49 dollars (June 1958)....
C-7: Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding overtime, of
production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group (June 1958)...... ....................... ......
C-8: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manu­
facturing, by State and selected areas (June 1958)......

S ta tistic s,
Employment

S t a t i s t i c s , Washington 25» D. C .

See

page 55.




L i s t o f—
U. S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR'S
BLS REGIONAL OFFICES
Page 56
COOPERATING STATE AGENCIES
I n sid e back cover

Prepared under the supervision of Jeanette G. Siegel

36
37
38
38
39
48
49
50

T h e

D e c lin in g

S h a r e

o f

N o n f a r m

J o b s

in

F a c t o r ie s ,

1 9 4 6 - 5 7

Rudolph C. Mendelssohn
Of t h e

131 m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s

for

o f them.
Some o f t h e s e i n d u s t r i e s , h o w e v e r ,
r e g i s t e r e d a c t u a l l o s s e s i n e m p lo y m e n t a s

w h ic h em p loym en t f i g u r e s a r e p u b l i s h e d i n Em­
p l o y m e n t a n d E a r n i n g s , o n l y 31 p r o v i d e d i n ­

w e ll.1

c r e a s e d j o b o p p o r t u n i t i e s f o r wage and s a l a r i e d
w orkers
d u r i n g th e y e a r s f o l l o w i n g W o rld
War I I a t a r a t e f a s t e r t h a n t h e t o t a l n o n ­

le v e l

farm

a c tiv ity

rate.

In

12 i n d u s t r i e s ,

th e

T h e se d i v e r g e n t p a t t e r n s m erge, a t th e
o f c o m b in e d m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s ,

i n t o a t r e n d w h ic h shows t h a t f a c t o r y e m p lo y ­
ment h a s d e c l i n e d a s a p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n f a r m
wage a n d s a l a r i e d e m p lo y m e n t ( c h a r t 1 ) .
A l t h o u g h t h i s d e c l i n e h a s been c o m p a r a t i v e l y

Chart |
.

Manufacturing, 1946-57

m o d e s t — a b o u t 6 p e r c e n t from 1946 to 1957 — i t
c o n t i n u e s a t r e n d w h ic h b egan a t l e a s t a s e a r l y

Percent o Nonfarm Employment
f

as th e

end o f W o r ld War I

b u t w h i c h w as i n ­

t e r r u p t e d by W orld War I I . 2
Among t h e 31 i n d u s t r i e s

w h ich h a v e a d ­

van ced in postw ar jo b s h a r e s ,

o n l y 9 e m p lo y e d

0 . 5 p e r c e n t o r more o f t o t a l n o n fa r m w o r k e r s
i n 1957 and j u s t 5 o f t h e s e show c o m p a r a t i v e l y
sharp in c re a s e s .
Among t h e 5 i n d u s t r i e s
s h o w in g th e s h a r p e s t r i s e in p e r c e n t a g e o f
n o n fa r m e m p lo y m e n t ( t a b l e 2) w e re f a b r i c a t e d
s t r u c t u r a l m e ta l p r o d u c t s , c o m m u n ic a tio n
e q u i p m e n t , and m i s c e l l a n e o u s m a c h i n e r y p a r t s
i n d u s t r i e s ; i n th e l a t t e r tw o, j o b s h a r e s
were a f f e c t e d by d e f e n s e e f f o r t s i n 1 9 5 3 .
In
t h e a i r c r a f t and p a r t s i n d u s t r y , th e p e r c e n t a g e

Where d i r e c t i o n was i n d o u b t, c l a s s i f i c a t i o n
o f r e l a t i v e e m p lo y m e n t t r e n d s i n t o t h e t h r e e
c a t e g o r i e s was d e t e r m i n e d m a i n l y by f i t t i n g
l e a s t s q u a r e s l i n e s to the a v a i l a b l e a n n u a l
a v e ra g e f i g u r e s , r e l a t e d to t o t a l n o n a g r i c u l t u r a l e m p lo y m e n t .
D a ta were a v a i l a b l e b a c k
to 1947 f o r th e g r e a t b u l k o f i n d u s t r i e s ,
some e x t e n d e d b a c k i n t o 1 9 4 6 ; f o r a b o u t 30
i n d u s t r i e s , h o w e v e r , i n f o r m a t i o n was a t h an d
o n l y f o r t h e p e r i o d 1951 f o r w a r d ,

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OFLABOR S A I T C
TTSIS

o

For th e b a c k g r o u n d w h ic h i s e xa m in e d m ore
c l o s e l y i n th e p r e s e n t a r t i c l e , s e e A m e r ic a * s
C h a n g i n g J o b S o u r c e s ( i n Employment and E a r n ­
i n g s , November 1 9 5 7 ) . The 6 - p e r c e n t d r o p f r o m
1946 t o 1957 i s computed fro m t r e n d l i n e d a t a
r a t h e r th a n the a c t u a l p e r c e n t a g e s f o r th e 2
y e a r s ; t h e l a t t e r w o u l d sh o w an 8 - p e r c e n t
d e c lin e .
The r a t e o f d e c l i n e s i n c e 1 946 h a s
been 0. 2 p e r c e n t a g e p o i n t s p e r y e a r .

proportions of nonfarm employment remained
approximately unchanged during this period.
Eighty-eight industries recorded declining
shares of nonfarm jobs, many of them persist­
ently, despite a rise in employment in most




iii

Table 1: Annual average employment in major manufacturing industry groups
as a percent of total nonagricultural employment, 1946-57

Major industry group

TOTAL NONAGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT...

1957

1956

1955

1954

1953

1952

1951

1950

1949

1948

1947

1946

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

MANUFACTURING...................

32. 2

32. 7

33.1

33.0

34.7

33.8

34. 0

33.5

32.7

34.5

35.2

35.0

Production workers..............

24.8

25.5

26. 1

26.0

27.8

27.2

27.8

27.6

26.7

28.6

29.5

29. 3

Nonproduction workers...........

7.4

7.2

7.0

7.0

6.9

6.6

6.2

5.9

6.0

5.9

5.7

5.7

Relatively Stable Job Shares......

2.7

2.7

2.8

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.7

2.8

2.8

2.7

2.7

2.7

1.65

1.64

1.65

1.66

1.59

1.59

1.60

1.65

1.69

1.64

1.64

1.60

1.09

1.10

1.10

1.10

1.07

1.04

1.08

1.08

1 05
.

1.06

1.07

1.08

Printing, publishing, and allied
Paper and allied products.......
Declining Job Shares....... .....

15.5

16.1

16.5

16.4

17.2

17.3

18. 1

18.5

Lumber and wood products........

1.26

Textile-mill products...........

1 93
.

2.04

2 15
.

2.21

2. 39

2.48

2.69

2.89

Leather and leather products......

.71

.73

.76

.76

.78

.79

.80

.88

Tobacco manufactures...........

.18

.19

.20

.21

.21

.22

.22

1.42

1.49

1.45

1.55

1.63

1.77

18.2

19.0

19.4

(1)

1.83

1.94

(1)

2.82

3.08

3.07

3. 15

.89

.92

.94

.98

.23

.25

.26

.27

(1)

1.80

1.70

Pood and kindred products.......

2.89

2. 99

3.07

3.16

3.14

3.21

3.27

3.40

3.50

3.47

3.55

3.69

Rubber products................

.51

.52

.54

.51

.56

.55

.56

.55

.53

.58

.62

.63

Primary metal industries........

2.51

2.54

2.57

2.44

2.68

2.55

2.78

2.68

2.52

2.80

2.83

(1)

Stone, clay, and glass products....

1.06

1.09

1.09

1.06

1.09

1.09

1.16

1.15

1.11

1.16

1.16

1.14

.78

(1)

Furniture and fixtures..........

.72

.73

.74

.71

.75

.75

.76

.82

.74

.79

Products of petroleum and coal...

.48

.49

.51

.52

.52

.53

.53

.53

.55

.56

.55

.54

2.30

2.34

2.41

2.42

2.48

2.48

2.51

2.65

2.66

2.63

2.60

2. 72

.94

.97

.97

.96

1.00

.95

.98

1.01

.98

1.05

1.07

(1)

13. 1

(1)

Apparel and other finished textile
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries..
Fluctuating Job Shares...........

14.0

Instruments and related products...

13. 9

13.8

13.8

14.8

12.2

11. 7

12.8

.61

(1)

3.44

3.52

3.35

1.96

2.11

2.00

1.53

1.57

1.60

1.63

2.83

2.79

2.86

2. 93

3.03

2.24

2. 17

2.01

2.18

2.25

(1)

.16

.07

.06

.06

.06

.62

.55

.55

.58

3.44

3.45

3.39

3.03

3.02

2.46

2.24

2.13

1.96

1 77
.

1.63

1.62

1.59

1.58

1.52

3.66

3.58

3.93

3.51

3. 19

2.16

2.21

2. 17

2.29

2.16

.26

.28

.34

.47

.37

.65

.64

.66

.67

Machinery (except electrical)....

3.33

Electrical machinery............

2.35

3.34

3. 18

3.21

2.32

2.24

2.24

1.62

1.61

1.62

Transportation equipment........

3.60

3.52

Fabricated metal products.......

2. 17

Comparable data are not available.
NOTE: Data may not add because of rounding.




13.2

.64

.65

Ordnance and accessories........

13.9

iv

.07

T able 2:
M a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u stries with more than 0.5 p e r c e n t of
n o nf a r m w o r k e r s in 1957 having c o m p a r a t i v e l y sharply
i n c r e a s i n g shar e s of n o n f a r m e m p l oyment
since 1947

1957 1956 1955 1954 1953 1952 1951 1950 1949 1948 1947

Industry

0.62 0.58

CD
iO
•
o

Fabricated structural
m e t a l p r o d u c t s .......
Communication equip­
ment«
Miscellaneous machin­
ery p a r t s .............
A i r c r a f t and p a r t s .....
Industrial organic
c h e m i c a l s . .............

0.57 0.55 0.52 0.51 0.47 0.47 0.49 0.48
.98

.86

.78

.65

.71

. 77

.51 .50 .53 .52
.55 .54
1.65 1.56 1.48 1.58 1.57 1.37

.49
.98

.41
.63

.38
.61

.42
.54

.45
.55

.59

.56

.51

.50

.53

.52

1. 11 1.08 1.03 1.01 1. 12

.62

.62

.62

.62

.64

o f n o n fa r m e m p lo y m e n t a l m o s t t r i p l e d b e tw e e n
1947 and 1957 r i s i n g fro m 0 . 6 t o 1 . 7 p e r c e n t .
F i n a l l y , i n d u s t r i a l o r g a n ic c h e m ic a ls reache d

p l a n t and e q u i p m e n t , a g i v e n v o lu m e o f man­
power i n p u t i n c r e a s e d o u t p u t , l e a d i n g t o a d ­
d i t i o n a l re q u ire m e n ts f o r w orkers in c l e r i c a l ,

a p o s t w a r p e a k i n p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n f a r m em­
p lo y m e n t i n 1953 and th e n l e v e l e d o f f i n l a t e r

p r o f e s s i o n a l , s a l e s , and o t h e r r e l a t e d n o n ­
p ro d u c tio n a c t i v i t i e s as w e ll a s j u s t i f y i n g

years.

t h e f u r t h e r e x p a n s i o n o f r e s e a r c h and d e v e l o p ­
ment s t a f f s .
I n c r e a s e d d em and , o f c o u r s e ,

Changes in jo b o p p o r t u n it ie s a ls o o c c u rre d
fo r c a t e g o r ie s o f f a c t o r y w orkers ( c h a r t 1 ).
S i n c e W orld War I I , th e p r o p o r t i o n o f n o n fa r m

h a s b e e n a m ore d i r e c t c o n t r i b u t o r t o t h e
r e l a t i v e g r o w th i n n o n p r o d u c t i o n f o r c e s , where
p r o d u c t i v i t y g a i n s am ong c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s ,

w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d by f a c t o r i e s

f o r e xa m p le ,

in n o n p ro d u c tio n

a c t i v i t i e s i n c r e a s e d fr o m 5 . 7 p e r c e n t i n 1946
to 7 .4 p e r c e n t i n 1957, whereas the p r o p o r t io n
of p ro d u ct io n -w o rk e r jo b s d e c lin e d r a t h e r
s h a r p l y — from
w orkers in

2 9 .3

percent

1946 to 2 4 . 8

of a l l

have

n o t b ee n a s p r o n o u n c e d a s

in d i r e c t p ro d u c tio n .

Patterns Within Manufacturing

no n farm
Three

i n 1957.

d iffe re n t

p attern s

of

in d u s try

group jo b s h a r e s a re e v id e n t in the d e c l i n i n g
T h i s d i s p a r i t y b etw een p r o d u c t i o n - w o r k e r
a n d n o n p r o d u c t i o n - w o r k e r t r e n d s c a n be a t ­

p r o p o r t i o n o f n o n f a r m e m p lo y m e n t f o r m an u ­
f a c t u r i n g ( t a b l e 1 and c h a r t 2 ) .
One g e n e r a l

t r i b u t e d to s e v e r a l f a c t o r s .
B etw een 1946
and 1 9 5 7 , m a n u f a c t u r e r s i n v e s t e d h e a v i l y i n
new p l a n t a n d e q u i p m e n t a n d i n w i d e s p r e a d
r e s e a r c h an d d e v e l o p m e n t a c t i v i t i e s .
These
a c t i o n s e x p a n d e d th e n o n p r o d u c t io n w ork
f o r c e , c r e a t i n g a nee d f o r e m p lo y e e s s u c h a s
e n g i n e e r s , s c i e n t i s t s , and t e c h n i c i a n s .
Th e

p a t t e r n , i n c l u d i n g o n l y two i n d u s t r y g r o u p s —
p r i n t i n g an d p u b l i s h i n g and p a p e r a n d a l l i e d
p r o d u c t s — shows r e l a t i v e l y

A second c l e a r l y
clu d e s

w ork o f t h e s e e m p lo y e e s r e s u l t e d i n a p a r t i a l
fee d b ack a c tio n :
T h r o u g h m o re e f f i c i e n t




little

change

in

jo b sh a re s over the p erio d.

c lin in g
These

v

d is c e rn ib le

12 m a j o r i n d u s t r y
p ercen tages

in d u s trie s ,

of

p attern

in ­

g ro u p s s h o w in g d e ­
n o n fa rm e m p lo y m e n t.

q u ite v a r ie d

in c h a r a c t e r ,

r a n g e fro m th e p r o d u c e r s *

h a rd -good s

in d u s trie s

a p e rs is te n t

m ovem ent o f t h e

p ercen tage

of

o f lu m b e r and p r i m a r y m e t a l s to t h e co n s u m e r

n o n fa r m e m p lo y m e n t i n one d i r e c t i o n .

Rather

n o n d u r a b l e s o f a p p a r e l and t o b a c c o .

the

at

tendency

outset,
th is

w a v e -lik e ,

fa llin g

r i s i n g to a peak around

in g a g a in .

C a t2
hr .
Three General Patterns of Nonfarm Job Shares Within
Manufacturing Formed by Combining Industry Groups
With Similar Trends, 1947-57
P rce o Nonfarm Employment
e nt f

is

S ix

cate go ry

fa ctu re s

o f the i n d u s t r i e s
are

and a r e

in

d u ra b le

more o r

the

1953 and f a l l ­

le s s

in c lu d e d
goods

in

manu­

d efense

con­

n ected ; i . e . , ordnance, t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip ­
m e n t, e l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , a n d t h e f a b r i ­
c a te d m e tal p ro d u c ts in d u s try .

Industries With Stable Shares of
Nonfarm Employment
T h e two i n d u s t r y
tiv e ly

sta b le

s a la rie d

g r o u p s s h o w in g c o m p a r a ­

p e r c e n t a g e s o f n o n fa r m wage and

e m p lo y m e n t— p r i n t i n g ,

an d a l l i e d

in d u s trie s

p u b lis h in g ,

and p a p e r and a l l i e d

p r o d u c t s — have m a in ta in e d t h e i r s h a r e s o f jo b
o p p o rtu n itie s

m a in ly

because o f

th e

g r o w th i n n o n p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r f o r c e s

ra p id

(ta b le

3

and c h a r t 3 ) .
W ith in
a llie d

A third general pattern consists of
seven major industry groups which do not have

Industry
group
Printing, p u b l i s h ­
ing, and allied
i n d u s t r i e s ......

Paper and allied
products




p rin tin g ,
group,

p u b lis h in g ,

th e s t a b i l i t y

and

of jo b

s h a r e s i s a r e s u l t o f a b a l a n c i n g o f some
m ix e d t r e n d s o f r e l a t i v e em plo ym ent among th e

Note See Tobte 1
:
.

Table 3:

th e

in d u s trie s

e i g h t component i n d u s t r i e s .
Most s i g n i f i c a n t
o f th e s e i s a m oderate i n c r e a s e i n th e s h a r e
o f n o n fa r m e m p loy m en t s c o r e d by t h e n e w s p a p e r

Employment in the printing and paper industry groups,
annual average, 1947 and 1957

All
Production N o n production
Year employees
workers
workers
(In thousands)

N o nproduction
workers as
percent of total

1947
1957

711
858

478
553

233
305

33
36

1947
1957

465
566

406
459

59
107

13
19

i n d u s t r y — l a r g e s t among th e e i g h t

in d u s trie s

from

o th e r

form s

of

p a ck a g in g

m a te ria l

i n th e p r i n t i n g g r o u p — where s u b s t a n t i a l i n ­
c r e a s e s in c i r c u l a t i o n have c a l l e d f o r g r e a t e r
a p p l i c a t i o n o f manpower.
The r i s i n g t r e n d i n
th e n e w s p a p e r i n d u s t r y was o f f s e t m a i n l y by

to

paper.

Industries With Declining Shares of
Nonfarm Employment
The 12 i n d u s t r y g r o u p s s h o w in g d e c l i n i n g
p e r c e n t a g e s o f n o n fa r m w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d a

Chart 3
.

Job Shares Relatively Unchanged Over the Period
1947-57
Percent o Nonfarm Employment
f
2.0 MAGNIFIED SCALE
^

t o t a l o f 8 . 4 m i l l i o n w o r k e r s i n 1947; by 1 957,
t h i s t o t a l h ad d r o p p e d to 8 . 1 m i l l i o n — d e s p i t e
an e x p a n d i n g e c o n o m y .
H o w e v e r , th e 3 0 0 , 0 0 0
d e c l i n e i n a c t u a l e m p l o y m e n t was n o t d i s ­

Printing, Publishing,
and Allied Industries

tr ib u t e d e v e n ly th ro u g h o u t th e se in d u s t r y
groups.
I n f a c t , f o u r o f them— t e x t i l e - m i l 1
p r o d u c t s , l u m b e r a n d wood p r o d u c t s ( e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e ) , l e a t h e r and l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s , and

1.5

Paper and
J Allied Products

t o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s — showed a t o t a l d e c r e a s e

1.
0

o f more t h a n 5 5 0 , 0 0 0 w o r k e r s .
I n two o t h e r
g r o u p s — f o o d an d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s and r u b b e r
p r o d u c t s — the

0.5

tia lly
fin a l

0

I

I

I

»

s ta b le
c la s s

of

l e v e l o f e m p loy m en t was e s s e n ­
over

the

p o stw ar

in d u s try

p e rio d .

A

g ro u p s s h o w in g de­

c l i n i n g p e r c e n t a g e s o f n o n fa rm employment i n ­
c l u d e s s i x i n d u s t r i e s w h i c h show e m p lo y m e n t

»

1947 ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ 1957
48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56
UNITEDOF LABOR STATISTICS OF LABOR
STATESDEPARTMENT
BUREAU

r i s i n g , b u t a t l e s s th a n the r a t e f o r a l l
n o n fa r m a c t i v i t y .
T h e se a re p rim a ry m e ta ls ;

c o n s i s t e n t jo b s h a re lo s s e s in the p e r i o d i c a l s
a n d t h e c o m m e r c i a l p r i n t i n g i n d u s t r i e s . One o f
t h e s m a l l e r i n d u s t r i e s i n the g r o u p — l i t h o g r a ­

sto n e , c l a y , and g l a s s p r o d u c t s ; f u r n i t u r e
and f i x t u r e s ; p r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m and c o a l ;
a p p a r e l and o t h e r f i n i s h e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s ;
and m i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s .

p h i n g , where w i d e r u se o f o f f s e t p r i n t i n g h a s
op e n e d new o p p o r t u n i t i e s — r e c o r d e d a f a i r l y
p e r s i s t e n t in c r e a s e in jo b s h a r e s .

D e c lin in g

A ctu al

E m ploym ent

F o r e a ch o f the f o u r g ro u p s in w h ic h
a c t u a l t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t f e l l
( c h a r t 4)^ t h e
d r o p s te m s m a i n l y from a d e c l i n e i n p r o d u c t i o n

S e v e r a l f a c t o r s a cco u n t f o r the s t a b i l i t y
o f j o b s h a r e s i n th e p a p e r i n d u s t r y .
A lth o u g h
p r o d u c t i o n i n t h i s i n d u s t r y g r o u p s o a r e d by
a l m o s t t w o - t h i r d s i n t h e p o s t w a r d e c a d e , em­

workers

(ta b le 4 );

w orkers

in c re a s e d

p lo y m e n t h a s a d v a n ce d o n ly a b o u t o n e - t h i r d
o w i n g t o u s e o f m o re e f f i c i e n t e q u i p m e n t .

lu m b e r , t e x t i l e s , a n d l e a t h e r , w h i l e , a p a r t
fro m a s h a r p r i s e i n 1 9 5 7 , th e number r e m a in e d

Labor

a b o u t t h e same i n t o b a c c o .

re q u ire m e n ts ,

la rg e ly

fix e d

by

th e

c h a r a c t e r and s i z e o f f a c i l i t i e s , a c c o u n t f o r
a r e l a t i v e l y sm a ll p ro p o rtio n of t o t a l c o s ts .

em p loym en t o f n o n p r o d u c t i o n
by

about

10

p ercent

in

C o n s e q u e n t l y , t h e i n d u s t r y may m o d i f y t h e
p r i c e o f g o o d s s o l d t o m a i n t a i n dem and a n d

T h e d e c l i n e i n th e p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n fa rm
em p loym en t i n t h e t e x t i l e g r o u p r e f l e c t s down­
t r e n d s among a l l n i n e i n d u s t r i e s f o r m i n g t h e

meet i t s f i x e d c h a r g e s d u r i n g s h o r t - r u n b u s i ­
ness f lu c t u a t io n s .
The l o n g - r u n r e l a t i v e

group.
Th e m o s t s i g n i f i c a n t l o s s o c c u r r e d i n
th e y a r n and t h r e a d a n d b r o a d w o v e n f a b r i c

s t a b i l i t y o f n o n fa r m e m p lo y m e n t i n t h e p a p e r
i n d u s t r y g r o w s o u t o f i n c r e a s e d demand f r o m
r i s i n g in c o m e s, l a r g e r p o p u la t i o n , and s h i f t s

m i l l s w h e re t h e s h a r e o f n o n f a r m e m p lo y m e n t
f e l l by a b o u t 50 p e r c e n t d u r i n g t h e p e r i o d b u t
where more t h a n h a l f t h e t e x t i l e w o r k e r s a r e




v ii

Both Job Shares and Actual Employment Falling

Pe c n o Nonfarm Employment
ret f

1947-57

s t i l l e m p lo y ed .
The la c k o f in c r e a s e d c o n ­
s u m p tio n o f t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s p r o p o r t io n a t e
w ith

p o p u la tio n

s trid e s

in

grow th,

c o u p le d w ith

o u tp u t p e r m an -h o u r,

great

la rg e ly

ac­

co u n te d f o r th e g ro u p d e c l i n e .
The d ro p in
p er c a p i t a co n su m p tio n o f t e x t i l e s a l s o r e ­
fle c ts

c h a n g i n g modes o f l i v i n g .

T h e d e c l i n i n g p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n fa r m em­
p lo y m e n t i n t h e lu m b e r and wood p r o d u c t s i n ­
d u stry a ls o r e f le c t s

s i m i l a r movements among

m ost o f i t s com ponent i n d u s t r i e s .
The u s e o f
wood i n home c o n s t r u c t i o n h a s b e e n r e d u c e d
o w in g t o t h e s u b s t i t u t i o n o f l e s s c o s t l y com­
p e t i n g m a t e r i a l s a n d t o s t r u c t u r a l and s t y l e
c h a n g e s w h i c h r e s t r i c t t h e n e e d f o r w oo d .
S i m i l a r l y , u s e o f wood a s a p a c k a g i n g a n d
c r a t in g m a te ria l has d e c lin e d .
Th e m i l l w o r k ,
p l y w o o d , a n d p r e f a b r i c a t e d s t r u c t u r a l wood
products

segm ent o f

s c o r e d an i n c r e a s e
fic ie n t

the

in d u s try ,

how ever,

i n a c t u a l e m p lo y m e n t s u f ­

to m a in t a in an a p p r o x im a t e ly

s ta b le

p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n fa r m em ploym ent.
Among t h e

UNITEDFLABORSTATISTICS
STATES DEPARTMENTOF LABOR
BUREAU O

Table 4:

to b a cco m a n u fa ctu res

group,

o n ly the c i g a r e t t e in d u s t r y r e g i s t e r e d a r i s e
i n em ploym ent l e v e l s , and t h i s was s u f f i c i e n t
to m a in t a in

a sta b le

share

of

n o n farm

jo b

Empl o y m e n t in the lumber, textile, leather, and tobacco groups,
annual avera e, 1947 and 1957

Industry

All
Production Nonp r o d u c t i o n
workers
workers
Year employees
(In thousands)

Lumber and wood
p r o d u c t s ...........
Textile-mill
p r o d u c t s ...........
Leather and leather
p r o d u c t s * •••••••••
Tobacco manufact u r e s ...........




Nonproduction
workers as a
percent of total

1947
1957

842
655

781
588

61
67

7
10

1947
1957

1, 335
1,005

1,252
913

83
92

6
9

1947
1957

409
370

372
329

37
41

9
11

1947
1957

118
94

110
84

8
10

7
12

viii

o p p o rtu n itie s

in

the

in d u s try .

co n su m p tio n has in c r e a s e d

Actual Em ployment Stable

C ig a re tte

s i n c e W o r ld War I I ,

w it h c o n s e q u e n t i n c r e a s e s i n work f o r c e r e ­
q u i r e m e n t s . Th e r e m a i n i n g i n d u s t r i e s — c i g a r s ,

T h e l e v e l o f th e wage and s a l a r i e d work
f o r c e i n two m a j o r i n d u s t r y g r o u p s — f o o d and
k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s and r u b b e r p r o d u c t s — was e s ­
s e n t i a l l y s t a b l e between 1947 and 1957 a n d s o
th e p e r c e n t a g e o f nonfarm j o b s in t h e s e i n ­

t o b a c c o and s n u f f , s t e m m in g a n d r e d r y i n g — l o s t
g r o u n d i n b o th a c t u a l and r e l a t i v e em plo ym ent.
Today* s c i g a r s m o k e r d e m a n d s — a b o u t t h e same

Chart 5
.

p e r c a p i t a a s i n 1 9 4 7 — a r e met by f e w e r w o r k ­
e r s because o f m e ch a n iza tio n .
C o n s u m p t io n o f
p ip e t o b a c c o and s n u f f h a s been
s t e a d ily f o r s e v e r a l decades.

Job Shares Falling but Actual Employment
Generally Stable, 1947-57

d e c lin in g

Percent o Nonfarm Employment
f

S i x o u t o f 10 w o r k e r s i n t h e l e a t h e r and
l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s i n d u s t r y g ro u p a r e in the
f o o t w e a r se g m e n t w here th e number o f s h o e s
produced

by e a c h

p r o d u c tio n

w orker has

c r e a s e d b e tw e e n 1 9 4 7 and 1 9 5 7 .
t h e t r e n d t o w a r d m ore l e i s u r e
creased

in ­

In a d d itio n ,
tim e h a s i n ­

th e c o n s u m p t i o n o f n o n l e a t h e r c a s u a l

fo o tw e ar such as p la y s h o e s , e t c .
The f o o t ­
wear i n d u s t r y , t o g e t h e r w i t h th e much s m a l l e r
t a n n i n g i n d u s t r y — a d v e r s e l y a f f e c t e d by i n ­
c r e a s i n g u s e o f p l a s t i c s , s y n t h e t i c s , and
o th e r n o n le a th e r m a t e r ia ls used in shoes,
l u g g a g e , h a n d b a g s , g l o v e s , b e l t s , and a l l i e d
i t e m s — s u s t a i n e d l o w e r e d e m p lo y m e n t l e v e l s
o v e r th e p e r i o d and a c c o u n t e d f o r th e d r o p i n
t h e l e a t h e r and l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s grou ps* p e r ­

UNITEDFLABORSTATISTICS
STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU O

c e n t a g e o f n o n fa r m e m p lo y m e n t. T h e j o b s h a r e s
i n most o f the r e m a in in g s m a l l e r i n d u s t r i e s

d u s t r i e s d e c l i n e d , though, o f c o u r s e , n o t a s
s e v e r e l y a s i n th e g r o u p s w i t h l a r g e e m p lo y ­
m en t d r o p s .
( C h a r t 5 and t a b l e 5 ) .
T h is

were e i t h e r m a i n t a i n e d o r f e l l s l i g h t l y .

Table 5: Employment in the food and rubber groups
annual average, 1947 and 1957
Industry

All
Production No n p r o d u c t i o n
workers
Year employees
workers
In t h o u s a n d s )

Food and kindred
p r o d u c t s ...........

Rubber p r o d u c t s .....

479523 0 - 58 - 2




Nonproduction
workers as a
percent of total

1947
1957

1,545
1,510

1,209
1,066

336
444

22
29

1947
1957

270
265

220
206

50
59

19
22

ix

s ta b ilit y
creased
o ffse t

in

e m p lo y m e n t

fo rce

of

re fle c te d

n o n p ro d u c tio n

an

s u b s ta n tia lly

in ­

a ls

w orkers,

in

th e

num ber

of

is t e r e d

p ro­

d u c tio n w orkers.

an

s lig h tly

by d e c l i n e s

th e l a r g e s t

group w ith n e a r ly h a l f
le s s

in c re a s e

b le to in c r e a s e d

s u b s t a n t ia l in d u s try

reg­
o n ly

T h is

occurred

in v e stm e n ts

in

d e s p ite

i n new p l a n t

Job Shares Falling Slightly While Actual
Employment Is Rising, 1947-57

One s e g m e n t — meat p r o d u c t s — w i t h o n e - f i f t h o f
g ro u p 's

fo rce

employment i n meat and b a k e r y

p r o d u c t s , t h e tw o l a r g e s t i n d u s t r i e s o f t h e
g r o u p , c o u n t e r b a l a n c e d by d e c l i n e s e l s e w h e r e .
the

the w o r k e r s ,
w ork

t h a n th e p r o p o r t i o n a t e r i s e

n o n f a r m e m p lo y m e n t .
Th e s t a b i l i t y o f the work f o r c e in th e
f o o d and k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s g r o u p i s a t t r i b u t a ­

in

i n t h e p r i m a r y m et­

w orkers

in

1957— re g is te re d

Percent o Nonfarm Employment
f

a

s l i g h t i n c r e a s e i n p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n fa r m j o b s
o v e r m ost o f th e p e r i o d o w in g p r i m a r i l y td
a d d i t i o n s to t h e p r o d u c t i o n w ork f o r c e .
Prom
1947 t o 1 9 5 6 , t h e p r o d u c t i o n o f meat p r o d u c t s
in cre a se d
p e rio d ,

by a b o u t o n e - t h i r d .

the

p la n ts

fe ll

average

O v e r t h e same

w ork w e ek i n

from 4 4 .3

to 4 1 . 6

m e a tp a c k in g

hours.

A part

f r o m t h e b e v e r a g e i n d u s t r y , w i t h a c t u a l em­
p lo y m e n t l e v e l s a p p r o x im a t e ly s t a b l e o ver the
p e rio d

o w ing to g r e a t e r c o n s u m p tio n

of s o ft

d r i n k s , th e r e m a i n i n g fo o d i n d u s t r i e s d e c l i n e d
in

actu al

in te re st

e m p lo y m e n t.
i n b u lk y

D im in is h e d consum er

in e x p e n siv e g r a in

products

a n d i n c r e a s e d o u t p u t p e r m a n -h o u r i n t h e d a i r y
p r o d u c t s and c o n f e c t i o n e r y

in d u s trie s c o n tr ib ­

u ted

jo b

to

la t te r

th e

d e c lin e

of

sh ares

in

the

in d u s trie s .

In c re a s in g

A c tu a l

E m p lo y m e n t i n

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

E m ploym ent

s ix

other

m a jo r

BUREAU OF LABOR SA I T C
TT S I S

in d u s try

gro u p s in c r e a s e d i n the p o stw a r y e a r s .
These
are:
p rim a ry m e ta ls ; s t o n e , c l a y , and g l a s s ;

and e q u i p m e n t , and im p r o v e d t e c h n o l o g y w h i c h
b o o ste d o u tp u t p e r m an -h o u r.
An a c t u a l d e ­

f u r n i t u r e ; p e t r o le u m and c o a l ; a p p a r e l and
o t h e r f i n i s h e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s ; and m i s c e l ­
la n e o u s m a n u fa c t u rin g i n d u s t r i e s .
A lth o u g h

c l i n e i n t h e w ork f o r c e , h o w e v e r , was r e c o r d e d
f o r the i r o n and s t e e l f o u n d r i e s i n d u s t r y ,
t h e s e c o n d l a r g e s t co m p o n en t w i t h a b o u t o n e -

t h e i n c r e a s e s w ere p r o p o r t i o n a t e l y l e s s t h a n
f o r t o t a l n o n a g r i c u l t u r a l e m p lo y m e n t , t h e d e ­

s i x t h o f t h e g r o u p e m p lo y m e n t i n 1 9 5 7 , w h e re
s i g n i f i c a n t m e c h a n ic a l, m a t e r ia l s h a n d lin g ,

c l i n e s i n p e r c e n t a g e s o f n o n f a r m e m p lo y m e n t
were s m a l l ( c h a r t 6 ) , a c o n s e q u e n c e o f d i v e r ­
gent in c re a s e s

in

and p r o d u c t io n i n n o v a t io n s o c c u r r e d .
The
work f o r c e i n p r im a r y r e f i n i n g o f n o n f e r r o u s

e m p lo y m e n t among many i n ­

d u s t r i e s w i t h in each group.
I n th e p r i m a r y m e t a l s

in d u s trie s ,

d i v e r g e n t t r e n d s w e re n o t e d .
naces, s t e e l w o r k s , and r o l l i n g




m e t a l s , on t h e o t h e r h a n d , e x p a n d e d o v e r t h e
p e r i o d r e l a t i v e l y more t h a n n o n fa r m e m p loy m en t
o w i n g m a i n l y t o t h e s o a r i n g demand f o r aluminum

several

The b la s t f u r ­
m il ls in d u stry ,

in

new a p p l i c a t i o n s

other m a te ria ls.

x

and a s a s u b s t i t u t e

for

T a b le 6 :
E m ploym ent i n p r im a r y m e t a ls ; s t o n e , c l a y , and g l a s s ;
f u r n i t u r e ; p e tr o le u m ; a p p a r e l; and m is c e l l a n e o u s ,
a n n u a l a v e r a g e , 1947 and 1957

Industry

All
Production Nonproduction
Year employees
workers
workers
(In thousands)

Primary metal
industries. .
Stone, clay, and
glass products.
Furniture and
f i x t u r e s ...........
Products of petro­
leum and c o a l .....
Apparel and other
finished textile
p r o d u c t s ......
Miscellaneous m a n u ­
facturing indus­
t r i e s ...............

Nonproduction
workers as a
percent of total

1947
1957

1,231
1,310

1,002

157
228

13
17

1947
1957

505
553

442
456

63
97

12

1947
1957

340
376

300
314

40
62

12

1947
1957

239
250

184
168

55
82

23
33

1947
1957

1,132
1, 199

1,030
1,065

102

9

134

11

1947
1957

463
490

395
391

c la y ,

S e v e n o f th e n i n e i n d u s t r i e s i n t h e s t o n e ,
and g l a s s p r o d u c t s g ro u p showed a d e ­

c lin e

1,074

18

16

68

15

99

20

i n s h a r e o f n o n fa rm j o b s o v e r t h e p e r i o d

s u b s t it u t e fo r m a t e ria ls p re v io u s ly pro cessed
by c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e r s a t t h e b u i l d i n g s i t e .

1947-57.
An i m p o r t a n t d i v e r g e n c e o c c u r r e d i n
c o n c r e t e , g y p s u m , a n d p l a s t e r p r o d u c t s , now

In th e f u r n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s gro u p ,
a c t u a l em plo ym ent e x p a n d e d i n 3 o f t h e 4 com­

th e l a r g e s t in d u s t r y in the g ro u p , w ith ab out
o n e - f i f t h o f th e w o rk e rs i n 1957.
In t h is

ponent in d u s t r i e s , but li m i t e d d a ta in d ic a t e
t h a t t h i s may h a v e e x c e e d e d t h e r a t e o f n o n ­

i n d u s t r y , t h e r e was a n i n c r e a s e i n j o b s h a r e s
when t h e w o rk f o r c e e x p a n d e d by a b o u t h a l f i n

f a r m e m p lo y m e n t g r o w t h o n l y
s io n a l f u r n it u r e in d u stry .

t h e p o s t w a r y e a r s , o w in g l a r g e l y t o t h e s w i f t
acce p tan ce of p re p ro c e s s in g or f a b r i c a t i n g of
c o n c r e t e , gypsum, and p l a s t e r p r o d u c t s .
Gypsum
and p l a s t e r w a llb o a r d , f o r e x a m p le , have

P o u r - f i f t h s o f t h e 2 5 0 , 000 e m p lo y e e s i n
t h e p e t r o l e u m and c o a l p r o d u c t s g r o u p were i n

g a in e d

w id e

acceptance




as

in

the

p ro fe s­

t h e p e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g i n d u s t r y i n 1 9 5 7 , and
d ev e lo p m e n ts i n o th e r i n d u s t r i e s o f th e group

a p re fa b ric a te d

xi

had l i t t l e

in flu e n c e

on t h e

t o t a l m ovem en t.

An i n c r e a s e

of

2 7 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s

in

the

was e n t i r e l y

f i g u r e s i s to c o n s i d e r them a g a i n s t t h e b a c k ­
g r o u n d o f t h e i n c r e a s e i n t o t a l n o n f a r m em­

group

among n o n p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s .

p lo y m e n t o f 8 . 7 m i l l i o n w o r k e r s :

One i n e v e r y

9 a d d e d n o n f a r m w o r k e r s was a n o n p r o d u c t i o n
jo b s

The d e c l i n e i n th e p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n farm
i n th e a p p a r e l and o t h e r f i n i s h e d t e x t i l e

products

group

is

a consequence

of f a llin g

Chart 7
.

t r e n d s among 7 o f th e 9 c o m p on en t i n d u s t r i e s ,
re fle c tin g

ch a n g in g consum er t a s t e s .

cent y e a rs,

m an u factu re

s u c h a s m e n 's t a i l o r e d
and m i l l i n e r y

of

fo rm al

c lo th in g ,

h a s shown l i t t l e

w hereas o u tp u t o f s p o r t s

w o rker i n the 7 in d u s t r y gro u p s.

Fluctuating Job Shares, 1947-57

In r e ­
c lo th in g

fu r

Percent o Nonform Employment
f

goods,

o r no i n c r e a s e

and w o rk c l o t h i n g ,

w om en's g a r m e n t s , and p a r t i c u l a r l y
o u te rg a rm en ts, has in c r e a s e d .

The d e c l i n i n g s h a r e

c h ild re n 's

o f jo b s in

the m is ­

c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s group r e ­
fle c ts

lo s s e s

in d u strie s.
in d u s t r y w ith
ever,

i n 4 o f th e 6 l a r g e s t com ponent
The f a b r i c a t e d p l a s t i c s
its

met a r i s i n g

th ro u gh

products

many new c o m m o d i t i e s ,

a r e la tiv e ly

dem and

fo r

m ore t h a n

p a n s i o n o f t h e work f o r c e .

its

how­

o u tp u t

average

ex­

Sharp d e c lin e s in

a c t u a l em p lo y m en t were r e c o r d e d f o r t h e j e w ­
e l r y , s i l v e r w a r e , and p l a t e d w a r e i n d u s t r y ,
and t h e " o t h e r m i s c e l l a n e o u s " c a t e g o r y .

Industries With Fluctuating Shares of
Nonfarm Employment
In

1947,

5 .7

m illio n

wage a n d s a l a r i e d

w o r k e r s w ere i n 7 i n d u s t r i e s w here th e p e r ­
c e n t a g e o f n o n f a r m e m p lo y m e n t f l u c t u a t e d i n

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
bureau of labor statistics

th e p o stw a r p e r io d ( c h a r t 7 ) .
By 1 9 5 3 , em­
p lo y m e n t had r e a c h e d a p ea k o f 7 . 4 m i l l i o n ,
su b se q u e n tly

fa llin g

s lig h tly

to 7 .3

m illio n

in 1957.
In 1947, w o rk e rs in t h i s c a te g o ry
c o n s t i t u t e d 1 3 .1 p e r c e n t o f t o t a l n o n fa r m em­

T h e p o s t w a r p a t t e r n s o f r e l a t i v e e m p lo y ­
ment t r a c e d by e a c h o f th e s e v e n i n d u s t r y com­

p lo y m e n t; i n 1957, th e y a c c o u n t e d f o r 1 4 .0
p e r c e n t o f th e t o t a l .
I n c o n t r a s t , t h e number

p o n e n ts o f th e e l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e ry
show a g e n e r a l l y s i m i l a r t e n d e n c y t o

o f n o n p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s r o s e s h a r p l y and
p e r s i s t e n t l y a lm o st e v e ry y e a r .
C o n sid e re d

p e a k s h a r e s o f n o n fa rm j o b s i n o r a r o u n d 1953,
s u g g e s t i n g t h a t component i n d u s t r i e s su c h a s
c o m m u n i c a t i o n s e q u i p m e n t , e l e c t r i c a l equipm ent

as a group,
n e a rly

n o n p r o d u c t i o n - w o r k e r e m p lo y m e n t

d o u b le d in

these

in d u s trie s

from 1 .1

f o r v e h i c l e s , and e l e c t r i c a l g e n e r a t in g ,
t r a n s m i s s i o n , d i s t r i b u t i o n , and i n d u s t r i a l

m i l l i o n i n 1947 t o 2 m i l l i o n w o r k e r s i n 19 5 7 ,
co m p a re d w i t h a r i s e o f o n l y o n e - f i f t h i n a l l
n o n fa r m j o b s .
A more r e v e a l i n g v i e w o f t h e s e




group
reach

ap p aratu s

c o n trib u te d h e a v ily

defense e f f o r t .

xii

to the K o re a n

Table 7: E m p loyment in instruments and related products, machinery (except
electrical), electrical machinery, chemicals and allied products,
transportation equipment, fabricated metal products, and ordnance,
annual average, 1947 and 1957
All
Production Nonproduction
workers
workers
Year employees

Industry

(In thousands)
Instruments and
related products.

1947
1957

207
226

1947
1957

1,529
1,738

1947
1957

Fabricated metal
p r o d u c t s ............
Ordnance and
a c c e s s o r i e s ..... .

317
482

21

1,256

918
1,223

706
858

212

365

23
30

694
845

525
545

169
300

24
36

1,275
1,878

1,048
1,384

227
494

18
26

977
1,132

822
893

155
239

21

1947
1957

Transpor t a t i o n
e q u i p m e n t ...........

33

1947
1957

Chemicals and allied
p r o d u c t s ............

22

1947
1957

Electrical machinery.

58
112

1947
1957

Mac h i n e r y (except
electrical ).........

show s

205
338

27
129

23
77

4
52

15
40

1,212

Th e m a c h i n e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) g r o u p
a much l e s s s h a r p l y p e a k e d p o s t w a r

pattern ,

how ever,

and

Nonproduction
workers as a
percent of total

the

n in e

com ponent

28

16

a p o s t w a r h i g h i n 19 5 3 , a c c o m p a n y in g expanded
d efe nse a c t i v i t i e s .
The c o n s t r u c t i o n and

fo llo w in g

m in in g m a c h in e ry i n d u s t r y re a c h e d i t s peak
i n p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n f a r m e m p lo y m e n t i n 1 9 5 6 ,
o w in g t o t h e c o n t i n u e d p o s t w a r c o n s t r u c t i o n
boom a n d h e a v y i n v e s t m e n t s i n i m p r o v e d a n d
new m i n i n g e q u i p m e n t . T h r e e o t h e r i n d u s t r i e s —
e n g i n e s a n d t u r b i n e s , o f f i c e an d s t o r e ma­
c h i n e s , and m i s c e l l a n e o u s m a c h i n e r y p a r t s —
re a ch e d peak jo b s h a r e s i n 1957.
A p a r t fro m
t h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s i n y e a r o f p eak j o b s h a r e s ,

t h e e n d o f W o r l d War I I ; p r o b a b l y m a i n l y
t o f i l l g a p s c r e a t e d by w a r t im e r e s t r i c t i o n s .
One i n d u s t r y , m e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h i n e r y , r e a c h e d

t h e i n d u s t r i e s w e re s i m i l a r i n l a c k o f p e r ­
s i s t e n t m ovem ent o f r e l a t i v e e m p lo y m e n t i n
any one d i r e c t i o n .

i n d u s t r i e s i n t h i s i n s t a n c e show a l e s s
u n i f o r m p o s t w a r r e l a t i v e e m p lo y m e n t p i c t u r e .
F o u r co m p o n e n ts, a g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h in e ry
and t r a c t o r s , s p e c i a l - i n d u s t r y m a c h in e r y ,
g e n e r a l i n d u s t r i a l m a c h in e r y , and s e r v i c e in d u s t r y and h o u s e h o ld m a c h in e s , re a c h e d
p o s t w a r p e a k s i n p e r c e n t a g e o f n o n f a r m em­
p lo y m e n t i n

1 o f th e




firs t

3 years

xiii

I m p o r t a n t and s h a r p d i v e r g e n c e s fr o m th e
o v e ra ll

group

p a tte rn are

a u t o m o b i l e and a i r c r a f t

d is p la y e d

by t h e

i n d u s t r i e s — 2 o f th e

5 com ponent i n d u s t r i e s o f

the t r a n s p o r t a t io n

e q u ip m e n t i n d u s t r y

Th e a u t o m o b i l e

d u s tr y a c h ie v e d

group.

its

la rg e st

in ­

postw ar sh a re of

d u s t r ie s p r io r to , r a t h e r th an d u r in g or
fo llo w in g , peak K o rean d e fe n se e f f o r t s ,
su g g e stin g l i t t l e d efe nse -co n ne cte d a c t i v i t y
f o r i n d u s t r i e s m a n u fa c t u r in g ite m s su ch a s
so a p , p a in t s , v e g e t a b le and a n im a l o i l s ,
and f e r t i l i z e r s .

The

in d u s try .
The i n d u s t r y h ad r u s h e d p e a c e t i m e
p r o d u c t io n o f c a r s f o r the c i v i l i a n m arket

and i n o r g a n i c ; o w in g c o n s i d e r a b l y to i n c r e a s e d
output o f n u c le a r p ro d u c ts , these in d u s t r ie s

u s i n g p r e w a r p r o d u c t i o n e q u i p m e n t . The 2 - p e r ­
c e n t s h a r e o f n o n fa r m s j o b s was a g a i n approached

have

i n 1953 a s a c o n s e q u e n c e o f e x p a n d i n g d e f e n s e

W o r ld War I I .

e ffo rts,

grow th

b u t by 1 9 5 7 ,

t h e s h a r e o f employment

how ever,

c h e m ic a l

tw o

o rg a n ic

s in c e

th e end o f

how ever,

M a in ly ,

in d u s tria l

th e

o f non farm e m p lo y ­

some r e g u l a r i t y

in

in

in d u s tr ie s ,

grow n a s a p e r c e n t

ment w i t h

is

in

the c h e m ic a l
in d u s tr ia l

group,

m a jo r e m p lo y m e n t

e m p lo y m e n t a s e a r l y a s 1946 when n e a r l y 2
p e r c e n t o f a l l n o n f a r m w o r k e r s w e re i n t h a t

e m p lo y m e n t

c h e m ic a ls

ste m s

from

A utomobile employment as percent of n o nfarm work force
1957

1956

1955

1954

1953

1952

1951

1950

1949

1948

1947

1946

1.51

1.67

1.81

1.60

1.87

1.64

1.78

1.85

1.75

1.78

1.79

1.88

in a u to m o b ile p r o d u c t io n had f a l l e n to 1 .5
p e r c e n t o f t o t a l n o n fa rm e m p lo y m e n t.
The
s h a r e o f j o b s i n t h e a i r c r a f t i n d u s t r y , on
the o t h e r hand, n e a r l y t r i p l e d from 0 .6 p e r ­
c e n t i n 1 9 4 7 t o 1 . 7 p e r c e n t i n 19 5 7 by p e r ­
s i s t e n t and s t e a d y a d v a n c e s , e x c e e d in g the
sh a re f o r a u to m o b ile s
the l a t t e r y e a r.

fo r

the f i r s t

tim e

th e p o p u la r it y o f p l a s t i c s ,
deterge n t m a te ria ls,
and s o f o r t h .

of

in

s y n th e tic fib e r s ,

new e m u l s i o n s f o r p a i n t s

F i v e o f the s e v e n com ponent i n d u s t r i e s
i n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s show

e ith e r
d e sp ite

a d e c lin e

o r no c h a n g e i n

an i n c r e a s e

fo r

th e

jo b s h a re s

group.

T h e two

T h e o v e r a l l p a t t e r n shown by t h e f a b r i ­
ca te d m etal p ro d u c ts group i s a l s o a c o n se ­

e x c e p t i o n s — l a b o r a t o r y , s c i e n t i f i c , and e n g i ­
n e e r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s i n d u s t r y and t h e m e c h a n ­

q u e n c e o f m ix e d a nd d i v e r g e n t t r e n d s am ong
su b o rd in a te in d u s t r ie s .
The most n o te w o rth y

i c a l m e a s u r i n g an d c o n t r o l l i n g i n s t r u m e n t s
i n d u s t r y — show s h a r p i n c r e a s e s i n j o b s h a r e s

o f these tre n d s appear in f a b r i c a t e d s t r u c t u r a l
p r o d u c t s a n d m e t a l s t a m p i n g i n d u s t r i e s w here
p a t t e r n s o f i n c r e a s i n g e m p lo y m en t h ave e x ­

a v a ila b le ).
These in d u s t r ie s are c lo s e ly
t i e d t o d e v e lo p m e n t s i n th e a i r c r a f t i n d u s t r y ,

c e e d e d t h e n o n fa r m r a t e .

s u p p l y i n g n a v i g a t i o n a l and o t h e r a e r o n a u t i c a l
in s tru m e n ts used i n th e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a i r ­

T h e p e r c e n t o f n o n f a r m e m p lo y m e n t was
h ig h e r in m ost o f th e c h e m ic a l g ro u p i n -

c r a f t , as w e ll as
t r o n ic s in d u s try .




s i n c e 1951

xiv

( t h e f i r s t y e a r f o r w h ic h d a t a a r e

to

the

b u rg e o n in g e l e c ­

EMPLOYEES IN NONAGRICULTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS
BY MDUS1RY DIVISION

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B U R EA U O F LAB O R S T A T IS T IC S




J U L Y 1958; P R E L I M I N A R Y

Em
ploym Highlights
ent
A U G U S T 1958
lfonfarm employment continued to show node it gains
3*0,000 to a level of 50.5
million. Most of this month's rise reflected the nor­
mal seasonal pickup which follow» the July vacation
period, but there were some better-than-seasonal in­
creases in durable goods manufacturing.

Wonmanufacturlng Jobs Rise Seasonally

In August 1958, rising by

Employment changes in the nonmanufacturing indus­
tries were mainly seasonal.
The largest increase
(5*1,000) was in contract construction, which has gone
up about seasonally since spring. The largest decline
(¡12,000) was in State and local government, accounted
for by the usual July-to-August decline In the educa­
tion sector.

Since April, there has been a pickup of about
jobs in the nonfarm economy after allowance
for normal seasonal variations. During the previous 9
months, job totals had dropped by 2.* million*

500,000

Factory Workweek Rises to 39«* Hours

Factory hours of work had declined sharply last
fall and winter, from *0.0 hours in August to 38*3
hours in April, a postwar low. Since then, hours of
work have Increased by about one hour to 39** hours.
Weekly overtime work declined from 2.* to 1.5 hours
frcm August 1957 to April 1958• By August of this
year overtime work was up to 2.2 hours.

Hours of vork in manufacturing industries rose
seasonally by 0*2 hours to 39»* 1b August, but were
0*6 hours below August 1957*
Average hourly earnings
declined from $2.13 to $2.12 over the month; average
weekly earnings, however, remained approximately
steady at $83.53 *

Weekly Earnings Unchanged in August

Average weekly earnings remained approximately
steady at $83.53, because a dip In average hourly
earnings was offset by an Increase in hours of work.
Average hourly earnings in total manufacturing de­
clined from $2.13 to $2.12 over tbs month, because
of the usual August Increase in the number of lower
paid seasonal workers in tobacco and food processing.

Manufacturing Employment Continues Slow Improvement

Factory employment rose by 300,000 to 15*5 Bil­
lion in August, continuing the Improvement which began
in June.
The primary metals industries— steel works,
nonferrous mills and smelters, and foundries and
forges— were up more than seasonally over the month.
There were also sizable job gains in the manufacture
of communication equipment and a contraseasonal em­
ployment rise In farm machinery plants.
Job totals continued to
tion equipment Industry as
changing over to new model
employment in August was at
19*6.

August Employment Down 2 Million Over Year

Nonfarm employment in August was almost 2 million
lower than a year ago. Manufacturing, particularly of
durable goods, accounted for most of the overthe-year decline.
The transportation equipment,
machinery, primary metals, and fabricated metals in­
dustries accounted for a loss of more than 1 million
jobs over the year.

fall in the transporta­
automobile plants were
production.
Automobile
the lowest level since

Among the nonmanufacturing industries, there were
sharp declines over the year in transportation, con­
struction, mining, and trade.
Only State and local
governments reported significant job gains over the
year.

Increases of 100,000 jobs in the food processing
Industry and 53,000 In the apparel industry were pri­
marily seasonal. Job changes in the remaining sectors
of manufacturing were also mainly seasonal.




xvi

1

H isto rical Employment Data

Table A-l: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division
(In

TOTAL

26,829

1,12*

1,230

1,021

27,088
24,125
25.569

Y e a r and m o n t h

Mining

Contract
con­
struction

953

thousands)

Manufac­
turing

Transpor­
Finance,
Wholesale
t a t i o n and
insurance,
and r e t a i l
public
and real
trade
utilitie s
estate

Service
and
miscel­
laneous

Govern­
ment

A nnual average:

1919••••••••••••

1920..........
192 1
192 2
......
1923..........
192*...........
192 5

28,128

920

1,203

27,770
28,505
29,539
29.691
29,710

1,092
1,080

192 9
193 0
193 1
193 2
193 3
193*..........
1935..........
193 6
193 7
193 8

31,041
29,143
26,383
23,377
23,466
25,699
26,792

1,078
1,000
86*

30,718

1,006

193 9
19*0..........
19*1..........
19*2 ..........
19*3..........
19**..........
19*5..........
19*6..........
19*7..........
19*8..........

30,311

192 6

192 7

192 8

28,802

28,902
32,058

36,220
39,779
42,106
41,534
40,037
41,287
43,462
44,448

1,176
1,105

1,0*1

722

1,145

882

8*5

916

918
889
916
885

2,165
2,333

14,178
14,967

2,634

16,334
17,238
15,995

716

Data

for

the

2

most

479523 0 - 5 8 - 3




10,078
10,780

2,169

49,726
49,949
50,413

NOTE:

1,150

982

76

50,541

9,253

1,982

852

50.477
49,777

50,202

1,055

9*3

917

1958: January...
February..
March....
April....
May.....
June.....
July.....
August....

10,534
9,401
8,021
6,797
7,258
8,346
8,907
9,653

10,606

883
826

9*7
983

828
818
802

49,690

8,986
10,155
9,523
9,786
9,997
9,839
9,786

12,974
15,051
17,381
17,111
15,302
14,461
15,290
15,321

52.477

52,610

10,534
10,534
8,132

1,112

1,294
1,790
2,170
1,567
1,094
1,132

1957: August....
September.
October...
November..
December..

52.570
52.316

1,497
1,372
1,214
970

937

807
809

52.692

1,608
1,606

888

51,766
52,162

50,056

1,185
1,229
1,321
1,446
1,555

809
862
912

43.315
44,738
47,347
48,303

48,431

1,012

735
87*

19*9..........
195 0
195 1
195 2
195 3
195*..........
195 5
195 6
195 7

49,681

848

852
777
777

1,661

2,603
2,622

2,593
2,759

16,104

16,563

2,808

16,903
16,782

3,057

16,949

2,929

3,018
2,956

16,903
16,783

2.805
2,612

16,561
16,302

2,387
2,173
2,316
2,493

15,865

7*7
733
711
717

2,685
2.806

707
712

2,888

15,172

2,942

15,489

793

788

recent

months

are

15,593
15,355

15,104
15,023

15,206

preliminary.

3,711
3,998
3,459
3,505
3,882
3,806
3,824
3,940
3,891
3,822

4,664

4,623
4,754
5,084

5,494
5,626
5,810
6,033
6,165
6,137

3,907
3,675
3,243
2,804
2,659
2,736
2,771
2,956
3,114
2,840

6,401
6,064
5,531
4,907
4,999
5,552
5,698

2,912
3,013
3,248
3,433
3,619
3,798
3,872
4,023
4,122
4,141

6,612

3,949
3,977
4,166
4,185
4,221
4,009
4,062
4 ,l6 l
4,151

9,513
9,645
10,012

6,076
6,543
6,453

1,050
1,110
1,097
1,079
1,123
1,163
1,166
1,235
1,295
1,360
1,431
1,398
1,333
1,270
1,225
1,247

1,262

1,313
1,355
1,347

2,054

2,142

2,187
2,268
2,431
2,516
2,591
2,755
2,871
2,962
3,127

3,084
2,913

2,682
2,614
2,784
2,883
3,060
3,233
3,196

2,671
2,603
2,531
2,542

2,611
2.723
2,802
2,848
2,917
2,996

3,066
3,149
3,264
3,225
3,167
3,298
3,477

3,662

3.749
3,876

1,399
1,436
1,480
1,469
1,435
1,409
1,428
1,619
1,672
1,741

3,321
3,477
3,705
3,857
3,919
3,934
4,011
4,474

10,527
10,520
10,846

1,765
1,824
1,892
1,967
2,038
2,122
2,219

4,972
5,077
5,264
5,411
5,538
5,664
5,916

11,221

2,308

6,160

2,348

6,336

7.626

2,394

7,399
7,625
7.723
7,759

6,940
7 ,4 l6
7,333
7,189

7,260

7,522

8,602
9,196
9,519

10,281

11,302

4,783
4,925

4,210
4,201

11,236
11,349

2,366

6,404
6,412

4,152
4,114
4,094

11,387

2,361

6,406

3,985
3,944
3,910
3,883
3,874
3,904

11,140
10,948
10,939
10,940

3,908
3,904

11,557

12,076

2,360

6,367

3,995
4,202
4.660
5,483

6,080
6,043
5,944
5,595
5,474
5,650
5,856

6,026
6,389
6,609
6,645
6,751
6,914
7,277

2,353

6,318

8,067

2, 344

6,241
6,240

7.749
7,789

2,343
2,348

10,961

2,356
2,370

11,035

2,391

10,986
11,008

2,410
2,410

6,267

7,822

6,384
6,455
6,488

7,850
7,870
7,866

6,470
6,449

7.661
7.627

C u rre n t Employment Data

2

Table A -2 ; Em ployees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and selected groups
(In thousands)
Industry division and group

A u g u st

J u ly

1958

A u g u st

A u g u st

1958

1957

1958

net cha:nie from:
J u ly

A u g u st

1957

TOTAL...............................................................................

50, 5*n

50,202

52,477

+339

-1,936

M INING .................................................................................

712

707

828

+5

-116

91.x
X87A
111.7

180.0
112.1

114.1
229.1

+ .1
+7.*
-.*

Nonmetallic mining and quarrying..............

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION..............................................
MANUFACTURING...................................................................
DURABLE Û 00DS......................................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS .............................................................

91.0

117.3

- 23.O
-* 1.7
- 5 .6

2,942

2,888

3,057

+5*

-115

15, 1*89

15,172

16,949

+317

- 1,*60

8,584
6,905

8,502

9,821
7,128

402
+235

-1,237
-223

6,670

Durable Goods
Lumber and wood products (except furniture)..

Primary metal industries.......................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment)....

129.1
61
16.9
358.2
528.9
1.074.5

126.1
643-7
345.9
520.2
1,061 .1

130.2
678.5
380.4
560.4
1,310.1

+3.0
+3.2
+12.3
+8.7
+13.*

-1.1
-31.6
-22.2
- 3I .5
-235.6

1.125.5
1,705-2
1.232.5
1 , 856.7
339-8
501.3

+16.2
+5-5
+30.6
-38.3
+6.5
+20.5

- U 3 .2
-2*7.7
- I 25.7
- 368.1
- 26.5
-33.9

1,649.6
102.6
1,003-6
1,217.4
565.3

+100,0
+19.8
+31.6
+52.9
+9.8
+3.0
+4.7
-.6
+5.1

-1* .8
-3.*
- 52.8

1,012.3
1,457-5
1 , 106.8
1.488.6
313.3
1*67.4

996.1
1,452.0
1,076.2
1,526.9

1,634.8
99.2
950.8
1,173.1
547.0
847.4
812.8
239-3
238.2
361.9

1,534.8
79-4
919-2
1,120.2

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ........ ..............

3,904

3,908

4,210

-*

-306

TRANSPORTATION....................................................................
COMMUNICATION......................................................................
OTHER PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ..................................................

2,522

2,527
769

613

612

2,773
824

613

-5
0
+1

- 25I
-55
0

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.........................................

11,008

10,986

11,236

+22

-228

+12
+10
+6.2
-1.0
+.5
-8 .2
+12.2

-81
-1*7
-33.9
+26.2
- 51.9
-2.8
- 8*.9

Instruments and related p r o ducts....... ......
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.......

306.8
446.9

Nondurable Goods

Apparel and other finished textile products..
Printing, publishing,

and allied industries..

WHOLESALE TRADE............................................................. ..
RETAIL TRADE...................... ..................................................

769

3,003
8,005
1,337-2
1,589.7
755-0
552.9
3,769.9

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.




537.2

844.4
808.1
239-9
233-1
353-8

2,991
7,995
1,331.0
1.590.7
754.5
561.1
3.757.7

850.9
844.8
252.9
264.9
376.0

48.1

3,084
8,152
1 ,371.1
1,563.5

806.9

555-7
3,8 54.8

1

-**.3

- 18.3
- 3 .5
-32.0
-13.6
-26.7
- l* .l

3

C u r r e n t E m p lo y m e n t D a ta

Tab le A -2 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and selected groups-Continued
(In thousands)
Industry division and group

August
1938

July
1958

August
1957

August 1958

n e t chant! e from :

July
1950

Aï $ f

FINANCE, INSURANCE, A D REAL ESTATE.........
N

2,410

2,410

2,39*

0

+16

SERVICE A D M
N ISCELLANEOUS.................

6,449

6,470

6,*o*

-21

+45

G V M T..............................
O ERN EN

7,627

7,661

7,399

-3*

+226

2,200
5,427

2,192

2,212
5,187

-*2

FEDERAL....................................................................................
STATE AND LOCAL...................................................................

5,469

48

-12

+240

NQTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

Table A-3: Production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group
(In thousands)

Durable

J«ly
1958

A ugust

1957

A ugust

1958

net change from:
A ugust

1957

11,681

11,373

13,020

+308

-1,339

6,355
5,326

6,281
5,092

7,489
5,531

+7*
+23*

-1,134

1
1
0

DURABLE GOODS ......................................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS................................................................

1958

s

M
ANUFACTURING...........................

A ugust

II

Major industry group

goods

Lumber and wood products (except furniture)....
Furniture and f i x tures.............................
Stone, clay, and glass p r o d u c t s ..................
Primary metal i n d u s t r i e s ..........................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment) ......

68.8
582.8
299*4
433.4

67.5
578.7

77.2

612.1

+1.3
+4.1
+13.3
+10.6
+13.2

-8 .*
-29.3
-19.2
-29.3
-213.9
-105.I
-220.2
-122.1
-330.8
-22.7
-32.8

-6.0
-*.0
-52 .O
-38.7
-17.2
-5.1
-33.9
-12.0
-2*.7
-II.9

865.6

422.8
852.4

318.6
462.7
-1,079-5

779.5
995.5
738.1
1,021.3
203.3
367.6

763.7
992.7
710.2
1,062.7
195.8
348.4

884.6
1,215-7

400.4

+15.8
+2.8
+27.9
-*1.*
+7.5
+19.2

1,188.2
88.7
860.2

Miscellaneous m a n ufacturing industries..........

286.1

1,085.4

1,194.2
92-7

+102.8
+19.1

547.1
537-8
169.5
204.4
335-2

+50.5
+U.1
+3.*
+5.1
- .6
+*.5
+7.2

860.2

1,352-1

226.0

Nondurable Goods

Apparel and other finished textile products....
Paper and allied products. .. ......................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries....

1,042.9
439.4
542.0
503.9
157.5
179.7
323.3

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.




69.6
829.6
992.4
428.3
538.6

498.8

158.1
175.2
316.1

912.2
1,081.6
456.6

+30.6

4

E m p lo y m e n t In d e x e s

Table A -4 : Index of em ployees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division
( 1947 - 49 ° 0 0 )
1
A ugust

115,5

114.8

1X5.3

120.0

74.6
137.2
101.6
105.6
97.0

75.6
X33-3
101.8
106.4

117.0
120.3

96.0
116.8
119.8

139.6
131.8
134.8

TOTAL........................................................

1958

1
1

JuJLjr

1958

75.1
139.8
103.7
106.6
100.4
95.9

Industry division

115.7
139.6
132.2
135.4
116.x

95-9
117.3
119.4
XX6.5
138.5
132.6
139.0
115.7
150.6

87.3
145.2
113.5
122.0
103.6
103.4
119.4
123.6
117.9
138.7
130.9
130.7
117.2
137.5

A ugust

115.8

116.5
143.9

145.0

96.6

1957

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

Table A -5: Index of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group
(1947-49= 100)
Major industry group

MANUFACTURING...................................

A ugust

1958

J u ly

Ju n e

1958

A ugust

1958

1957

9*.*

91.9

92.3

105.3

95.2
93.5

94.1
89.4

88.9

112.2
97.1

30*A
79.0
101*2
99.5
84.1

300.0
78.5
96.8
97.2
82.8

300.0
78.3
83.5

104.9

100.1

98.1

99.2
89.2
111.8
106.0
102.6

113.6

Durable Goods

Furniture said fixtures................................

Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,

87-6

U5 . 3
99.8
104.6

87.3
110.9
103.9
101.0

96.8

91.6

100.4
84.2
70.4
100.2

91.7
66.2
67.9
95.3

97-2
95-9

93.4

339.7
82.9
108.0
106.4

106.9
134.3
132.2
II6.5
105.3

Nondurable Goods

Apparel and other finished textile pr o d u c t s .......

109.6
112.8

98.8

84.9
88.4
89.3
MOTE: D a t a for t h e 2 m o s t r e c e n t m o n t h s are p r e l i m i n a r y .




106.8

1X2.1
97.8
84.9
85.9
87.4

87.8

66.2
68.7
95.5
108.1
112.6

98.0

84.9
86.4
86.8

100.9
88.0
74.6
103.9
114.1
113.8
105.4
91.4
100.2
92.6

5

S e a s o n a lly A d ju s t e d E m p lo y m e n t D a ta

Table A -6 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division, seasonally adjusted

Industry division

Index ( 1947 - 49= 1 00 )
August July
June August
1958

TO T A L ...............................................................................

1958

1958

1957

215.5

115-3

115.0

I5.0
15- 2
128. 2 128.2
102. 6 102.3
106.8 106.3

133-3

74- 4

128. 2
102.8
107.0
97-9
95-2

118. 7
120.3
118.2
131-5

131.1
140. 2
127.7
15^5

August

Number (in tho u s a n d s )
July
August
June

1958

1958

1958

1957

119.9

50,529

50, 431

50, 315

52, 451

86.5

I05
2, 699

2, 699

I 13

15, 354

15, 319

820
2, 805
l6, 826

112. 7
122. 5
101.2
97- 1
91- 1
102. 7
95- 3
95- 5
118. 2 118.0 121. 2
120.4 120. 6 123. 6
11I.4 117.1 120.3
136.9 137. 1 136.7
13!. 6 130.6 130.2
139.6 139.2 135-9
116.7 116.3 118.3
151.0 150. 6 144.8

8, 619

in

2, 222

8, 601
6,718
3,878
11,123
3,006
8, 117
2,363
6,438
7, 900
2, 203

5 , 1 13

5 , 691

6, 135

3,874
11,171
3,003
8,168
2,314

6,411
1 , 935

2, 698
! 5 , 275
8,556
6, 719
3,888
11,105
3>oio
8,095
2,367
6, 392
7, 877

2, 195
5, 682

9, 863

6,963
4 , 119

11,402
3,084
8,318
2,359
6, 312
7,694

2,234
5, 460

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

Table A-7: Production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group, seasonally adjusted
Major industry group

I ndex ( 1947 - 49= 100 )
August July
June August
1958

MANUFACTURING.......................................
DURABLE GOODS..........................................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS..................................................................

93-5
95-8
go. 8

1958

3-2
95-6
9

1958

1957

9 2.8

104.4

95-1

112. 9

Number (in thousands)
August
July
August
June
1958

1958

1958

11,562

n,532

11,484

12,913

1957

94-5

5 , 169

5, 149

6,383

6,344
5, 1 °
4

1,534
5,319

304-4 300.0 300.0 339-7
76.0
77-0 75-6 79-7
102. 9 100.9 100 . 2 10g. 7
98.6 98. 2 95-4 105-3
84.5 83.6 83-5 105.4

69
561

68
558
296

11
588

870

68
568
298
421
861

101.2 101.2 99-7 114.8
89.9 88. 7 ' 88.3 10g. 7
117. 6 114.9 112. 9 137-1
99 -8 103.9 106.0 132. 2
106. 2 103. 1 103. 1 118.0
97-4 96.3 94-7 105.8

7 88
1,022

788
1,008

1,021
206

87.4
8g. 1
88.4
76.7
75-7 75-7
71 . 1 7 0.0
68. 7
9 8. 2
99-8 99-4
10g. 1 107.8 108.1
113.8 113. 2 112. 6
100.3 99- 7
99. 5

90.4

90.3

6,393

Durable Goods
Lumber and wood products (except furniture)....
Furniture and fixtures............................
Primary metal indust r i es..........................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipm e n t ) ......

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries .........

304

42
9

415

89
5
71
1

34
2
458

1, 085

894
1,247
878

1,352

30
7

1,063
200
366

1,004
123
1,084
200
360

1,046
81
869
1,023

1,035
80
856
1,039

1,055
80
840
1,035

1,058
84
9 21
1, 061

7

5
3

136

229
402

Nondurable Goods

Textile-mill p r o d u c t s .............. .
Apparel and other finished textile products....
Paper and allied p r o d u c t s .........................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries....
Products of petroleum and coal ...................

83-3

89.4
87.6

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.




83-3

88.4
88.2

83-9

86.4
87.4

8g-4
79-5
75-4
101. 9
113. 6

115.0
107.0
8g.8
101.1
90.7

4
37
57
4
512
155

182

31I

432
54
4
509
155

180

319

433
541

508
156
176
316

455
553
56
4

167
206
328

Industry Em ploym ent
Table A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry
(In thousands)
All employees
Industry

Production or construction workers XJ

Ju n e

J u ly

Ju n e

J u ly

1958

1958

1957

I958

1958

1957

TOTAL...................................................................

50,202

50,413

52,229

-

-

—

MINING..................................................................

707

717

824

J u ly

91.0
30.3
28.1
12.1

30.4
28.2
13.3

ANTHRACITE MINING.....................

19.5

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING...............

METAL MINING..........................

J u ly

558

9.7

35.8
27.8

30.8

17.6

17.u

28.8

I90.I

223.1

158.7

169.2

201.2

304.4

303.2

339.4

213.I

211.4

247.8

191.2

I9O .4

202.8

II5.7

114.8

128.6

112.1

111.8

115.5

95.1

94.8

98.3

73.9
25.5

16.7

I9.2

I80.0

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION...........................
Petroleum and natural-gas production
(except contract services)...........

NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING.....

NONBUILDING CONSTRUCTION...................................

2,888
658
319.7
338.5

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION..........................................

674

76.1.
4
25.8
22.9
10.8

II5 .I
41.0
33.5

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION....................................

569

2,230

92.9

2,806

3,046

647

22.8

678

311.I
335.8

2,159

2,508
584
294.5
289.4

304.7
372.8

2,368

1,924

2,432
573

285.6
287.4

1,859

97.4
14.1

2,671

606
280.6
325.8

2,065

SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS............
Electrical w o r k .........................
Other special-trade contractors......

808.0

789.4

952.5

712.6

695.5

851.6

1,421.5

GENERAL CONTRACTORS...................

1,369.8
299.6

1,415.9

1,210.9
255.7

1,163.9
243.3

1,213.1
259.8
I79.7
I60.I

313.4
198.6
175.9
733.6

180.4
166.9
722.9

316.0
194.9
198.2
706.8

181.2

140.2
633.8

163.5
132.5

624.6

613.5

MANUFACTURING....................................................

15,172

15,206

16,702

11,373

11,415

12,784

DURABLE GOODS.............................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS......................................................

8,502
6,670

8,564
6,642

9,775
6,927

6,281

6,350

5,092

7,445
5,339

5,065

D u r a b le G ood s

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES...............

Sawmills and planing m i l l s ..............
Millwork, plywood, and prefabricated
structural wood p r o ducts ...............
Wooden conta i n e r s............. ...........

125.4

130.0

67.5

68.3

76.2

643.7
99.0

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)...........................

126.1

643.3

679.4
99.7
341.7

578.7

578.3
93.8

612.9

321.0

100.2
318.4

294.1

290.9

313.7

127.7

127.O

131.8

107.1

106.9

110.8

44.5

51.5
See f o o t n o t e at e n d o f table.




NOTE

45.6
52.I

48.8
57.4

D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h a r e p r e l i m i n a r y .

92.6

40.3
44.6

41.3
45.4

93.0

44.5

50.9

7

In d u stry E m p lo y m e n t

Table A -8 : Employees in nonagr¡cultural establishments,
by industry-Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )

July

All employees
June

July

July

1958

Industry

1958

1957

1958

Production workers X/
June
July

1958

1957

Durable Goods — Continued
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...................
Office, public-building, and profes­
sional furniture.........................
Partitions, shelving, lockers, and
f i x t u r e s ....................................
Screens, blinds, and miscellaneous

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........
Flat glass...................................
Glass and glassware, pressed or blown...
Glass products made of purchased glass. .
Cement, h y d r a u l i c..........................

345.9
248.8

346.4
246.5

261.6

41.6

42.3

33.5

372.0

286.1

286.8
210.4

310.3
224.9

48.2

32.5

32.9

38.1

34.3

38.6

24.7

25.2

28.9

22.0

23.3

23.6

17.0

18.3

18.4

520.2
28.8

513.4

422.8
24.8

97.3

542.6
33.5

95.9
15.4
43.2
73.0
41.9

416.5
23.9

445.8
29.5

12.5
35.7
63.3
35.7
88.4
15.9

14.8
23.5
72.5
41.3
94.4

15.6

27.7

211.9

96.8
17.6

82.2

80.8

81.8

110.8

47.7
115.7

19.2

86.7

Pottery and related products .............
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products..

12.7
35.2
65.5
35.8
90.7
16.I

87.1

99.2

59.8

60.3

71.4

1,061.1

1,070.5

1,306.5

852.4

859.3

1,077.7

517.1

523.9

42.6
75.2
42.1
113.2

18.7

18.4

30.3

82.6

16.6

Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES.................
Blast furnaces, steel works, and
rolling m i l l s ..............................

189.6

230.2

647.7

419.5

158.8

424.6
159.8

541.5

53.7

53.9

67.9

40.9

41.0

52.9

11.2

10.9

13.1

8.0

7.7

9.7

103.4
53.4
134.1

102.9
54.5
134.8

114.5

42.5
103.9

43.6

78.3

88.4

68.9

104.3

56.3
130.5

996.1
60.7
121.5

1,004.4
59.9
124.8

1,115.3

763.7
52.9
93.6

772.6
52.3
96.7

874.7
55.1
107.5

106.1

107.0
301.6
202.0

108.8
328.2

80.2

81.4
218.9
161.4
32.2

244.5
192.5

188.2
Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous m e t a l s .........................
Secondary smelting and refining of
nonferrous m e t a l s .........................
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
nonferrous m e t a l s .........................
Nonferrous foundries.......................
Miscellaneous primary metal industries..

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT)...................... ........
Tin cans and other t i n ware...............
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware.......
Heating apparatus (except electric) and
Fabricated structural metal products....
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving..
Lighting f i x tures..........................

304.0
198.4
41.3

50.0

42.5

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)...........

1,452.0

1,471.9

S e e f o o t n o t e at e n d o f table.




119.0
212.0
154.3

213.2
123.6
162.2
241.4

236.7

49.6

1,732.0
94.3
145.4
154.8

116.5

137.2

136.9

57.7
134.4

114.1

89.1

63.0

50.1

Miscellaneous fabricated metal products.

Engines and t u r bines......................
Agricultural m a chinery and tractors.....
Co n s t ruction and mining m a c h i n e r y .......
Metalworking m a c h i n e r y....................
Special-Industry machinery (except
metalworking m a c h i n e r y ) ..................
General industrial m a c h i n e r y .............
Office and store machines and devices...
Service-industry and household machines.
Miscellaneous machinery p a r t s ............

164.2

90.0
136.0
118.7
218.1
156.8
217.8
124.2
165.7
244.6

78.8

220.9
157.6
31.1
39.3

39.7

198.4

83.0
38.8

46.7

88.1

90.0

106.6

992.7
56.3
94.5
79.9

1,014.1

1,242.5

58.1

66.0
103.0

290.9

152.0

180.2
256.9

103.6
132.0
82.2
117.0

105.8
136.2
83.1

137.2
184.9

287.4

175.2

NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .

94.5
79.8
157.6

120.7
178.3

110.3

219.6
124.8

166.0
97.3
135.6
219.9

8

In d u stry E m p lo y m e n t

Table A -8 : Employees ¡n nonagricultural establishments,
by mdustry-Continued
(In thousands)
All employees
Industry

J u ly 1958

Production workers

Ju n e
1958

J u ly 1957

1 ,0 7 9 .9

1 ,2 1 7 .7

3 6 2 .4

J u ly
1958

4 l6 .2
3 9 .4

Jun e
1958

1
/
J u ly
1957

Durable Goods— Continued
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY.................................................

1, 076.2

E lectrical generating, transmission,
distribution, and industrial apparatus.
Electrical appl i a n c e s ................... . .

3 5 9 .6
3 2 .1

31.8

23.0
58.2

2 4 .4

Electric lam p s ..............................
Communication e q u i p m e n t ...................

2 4 .7
5 3 5 .0
4 3 .6

2 5 .5
5 3 2 .3
4 5 .4

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT..................................... .

1 ,5 2 6 .9
5 7 8 .9
7 4 9 .2
4 5 3 .2
1 5 1 .4
1 7 .9
1 2 6 .7
1 4 2 .2
1 2 4 .7

1 ,5 4 7 .8
5 9 2 .9
7 5 1 .2
4 5 4 .2
1 5 1 .7

1 ,8 7 1 .7
7 5 1 .1

1 2 6 .5
1 4 6 .9

710.2

18.8

127.6

Railroad e q u i p m e n t .........................
Other transportation equip m e n t ...........

17.5
47.8
8.8

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS....................

306.8

308.6

Laboratory, scientific, and engineering
instruments................................
Mechanical measuring and controlling

5 7 .7

5 6 .9

81.3
13.6

1 9 .3
4 7 .8
9 .0

7 2 .4

30.1
582.5
50.0

886.0

2 3 7 .7

282.0
29.6

4 3 .5

2 0 .7
5 6 .4

3 3 9 .4

27.1

8 4 5 .6

2 3 5 .0
2 3 .3
1 7 .1
4 3 .7

1 4 3 .8

Aircraft propellers and p a r t s ...........
Other aircraft parts and e q u i p m e n t.....
Ship and boat building and repairing....

58.1

7 1 6 .4

3 3 9 .7

3 9 4 .8

20.9
30.8

1 ,0 6 2 .7
4 3 3 .2
4 7 0 .4

287.8
87.8
11.8
83.O

5 3 9 .1

182.1
21.0
150.1

22.8
18.5

21.6
32.6

1, 083.8
4 4 3 .5
4 7 6 .2

291.6
8 8 .7

12.8
83. I

26.0
36.1

1 ,3 6 4 .0
5 9 6 .3
5 7 4 .2
3 4 8 .2

112.2
1 4 .4
9 9 .4

128.0

7 4 .8
9 .7

1 1 9 .1
1 0 4 .3
1 4 .8
3 3 .1
6 .9

1 2 3 .9
1 0 7 .5
1 6 .4
3 3 .0
7 .2

3 3 4 .2

1 9 5 .8

1 9 9 .1

221.1

1 2 9 .3

20.8

1 1 0 .5
1 7 .5
5 7 .6
7 .9

30.6

3 1 .2

3 7 .1

82.2

90.6

1 3 .7

1 3 .3

5 3 .4
8 .9

5 4 .1
9 .2

61.8
10.2

4 1 .0

4 1 .3

27.2
18.2

2 8 .5

6 4 .8

4 1 .6
2 4 .5
7 0 .7

26.9
17.8

6 4 .9

Optical instruments and lenses...........
Surgical, medical, and dental

66.8

3 8 .4

3 8 .3
2 0 .9

4 7 3 .6
4 3 .4
1 7 .3
8 8 .4
3 1 .9
5 8 .5

3 4 8 .4
3 2 .9

3 5 4 .5
3 3 .4
1 2 .9
7 0 .7

23.1
25.2

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING IN D U S T R IE S ...

Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware....
Musical instruments and pa r t s ............
Toys and sporting goods...................
Pens, pencils, other office supplies....
Costume jewelry, buttons, n o t i o n s .......
Fabricated plastics p r oducts .............
Other manufacturing industries...........

4 4 6 .9
4 2 .7
1 5 .7

83.2

3 0 .3
5 4 .8

80.8

23.6
26.1

452.8
43.1
1 5 .7
8 4 .9
3 1 .5

56.0
80.0

19.8

26.2

12.8
69.2
21.8
4 3 .3

61.8
106.6

88.9

1 3 9 .4

1 4 1 .6

1 4 5 .2

1 ,5 3 4 .8
3 0 7 .7
1 0 7 .4
2 5 7 .2

1 ,4 8 4 .3

1 ,5 7 2 .3
3 2 7 .7
1 1 4 .2

22.8
4 4 .5

61.0
109.2

19.0

4 4 .0

20.5

373.8
33.6
14.3
73.6
23.9
4 6 .6

68.0
113.8

Nondurable Goods
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.....................................

Meat produc t s . . .......................... .

116.6

Bakery pro d u c t s .............................
Sug a r...................... .................
Confectionery and related p r o d u c t s ......
B e v e r a g e s ....................................

2 8 7 .4
2 7 .3

306.8
107.2
210.1
1 1 5 .3
2 8 7 .4

26.7

261.8
113.9
290.6
2 7 .5
6 9 .9




68.3
220.8

216.8

225.2

1 4 2 .1
See f o o t n o t e at e n d o f table.

1, 085.4

1 4 2 .7

1 4 1 .5

7 1 .3

NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .

2 4 4 .5
7 3 .3
2 2 1 .5

82.1
166.9

2 1 .9
5 5 .3
1 2 1 .4
9 8 .5

1 ,0 3 8 .7
2 4 3 .1
7 3 .0

176.8
81.0
1 6 7 .5
2 1 .4

58.0

1 1 9 .5
9 8 .4

1, 118.2
260.2
7 7 .5

227.8
7 8 .3

172.8
2 2 .4

56.2

1 2 5 .9
9 7 .1

9

In d u stry E m p lo y m e n t

Table A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry-Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )

Industry

July
1958

All employees
June

_ 1958

Production workers XJ
July

Julv

1958

1957

June

1958

July

1957

Nondurable Goods— Con t i n u e d
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES....................................
Cigarettes................................
Ci gars.....................................
Tobacco and snu f f...... .................
Tobacco stemming and r edrying.........

TEXTILE—
MILL PRODUCTS..................................
Scouring and combing plants............
Yarn and thread m i l l s ...................
Broad-woven fabric m i l l s ...............
Narrow fabrics and smallwares.........
Knitting m i l l s ...........................
Dyeing and finishing textiles .........
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings..
Hats (except cloth and mill i n e r y ) .....
Miscellaneous textile goods............

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS.........................................................
Men's and boys' suits and coats.......
Men's and boys' 'furnishings and work
c l o thing.................................
Women's outerwear........................
Women's, children's under garments....
Mi llinery...... ................. .
Children's o u t e r w e a r....................
Fur goods.................................
Miscellaneous apparel and accessories.
Other fabricated textile p r o d u c t s .....

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.........
Pulp, paper, and paperboard mills.
Paperboard containers and boxes...
Other paper and allied products...

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES..........................
Newspapers................ .
Periodi cals...........................
Books.................. ..............
Commercial printing...................
Lithographing.........................
Greeting cards........................
Bookbinding and related industries....
Miscellaneous publishing and printing
services..................

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.
Industrial inorganic chemicals
Industrial organic chemicals.
Drugs and medicines.........
Soap, cleaning and polishing prepara­
tions...................
Paints, pigments, and fillers.
Gum and wood chemicals....
Fertili zers..............
Vegetable and animal oils and fats.
Miscellaneous chemicals...
S e e f o o t n o t e at en d o f table.
479523 0 - 58 - 4




79.4
36.3
27.7
6.4
9.0

80.I
36.5
28.7
6.5
8.4

81.I
34.2
30.I
6.3
10.5

919.2
5.5
104.4
391.7

930.6
5.4
IO6.9
394.3

987.4
5.6
II3 .I
422.1
28.4

26.8

204.5

82.9
41.6

10.3
51.5

26.9
208.7
83.8

42.2
10.4
52.O

312.O
329.8
II3.4
16.5
75.1
IO .9
57.8
126.4

11.1

55.6
II9.7

537.2

542.0

265.O

267.9

145.8
126.4

844.4
315.8
59.4
54.3

147.2

8.2

993.6
95.1

3IO .4
319.2
IO9.9

75-3
IO .7
53.7
II 9.7

829.6

6.2

5.4

992.4
94.1

306.6

13.8
75.4

5.4
6.7

7I .5
29.6

33.8
9.3
41.8

1,155.7
II3.8

15.8

26.1

70.2
3I .5
27.I

49.3
10.3
58.9

213.5
86.2

1,122.5

325.4
IO6.7

31.4

839.7
4.9
98.5
366.7
23.3
I88.5
72.4
34.I
9.3
42.0

1,120.2
IO6.3

107.4

69.6

559.8
274.9

126.9

152.3
132.6

847.2

851.7

5.0
96.O
364.3

23.2

184.5

71.7

279.6

288.7
94.7
13.8

66.6
8.3

48.0

98.6

283.2
282.5
97.6

11.8
66.8
8.5
49.3

28.4
5.3
895.9
5.1
104.2

1,022.8
101.6

395.1

24.7
I93.I
75.3
40.6
9.1
48.7

284.8

290.4
100.4
14.2

66.8
8.3

51.8

98.8

104.5

428.3
215.2
115.8

433.4

451.1

97.3

97.5

218.8
117.1

225.7

122.1

IO3.3

538.6

541.0

546.4

314.1
59.8
55.3
223.O
66.4

155.7

157.5

154.2

176.0

44.4

19.4
45.6

175.2
49.0
14.8
34.6

14.7

180.4
50.2
13.9

67.O

66.6

68.1

51.5

51.0

52.1

808.I
101.2
307.3
IO 3.5

809.0
101.7
305.8
102.9

840.7

498.8
65.8
189.2

500.1
66.9
186.8

536.9
72.8
209.6

48.9
73.5
7.9

48.5
72.3
7.7
33.7

50.0

218.1
65.0
20.6
44.2

30.3

35.2

100.3

316.9
60.I
54.0

219.5
65.2
20.5

36.1
100.3

109.0

325.6

100.5

24.5
33.3

77.1
8.7

30.6
36.9

102.3

NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .

57.2

29.6
44.1
6.5

21.0
22.9
62.5

24.6
33.1

49.3

34.8

57.4

29.5
43.4

24.4
34.8

36.4

57.7

30.7

6.3

47.3
7.4

23.4
62.3

24.8
64.9

24.1

21.7

10

In d u stry E m p lo y m e n t

Table A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by ¡ndustry-Contmued
(In thousands)
Production or nonsupervisory workers 1/

All employees
Industry

J u ly
1958

Ju n e
1958

J u ly
1957

J u ly
1958

Ju n e
1958

J u ly
1957

Nondurable Goods — Continued
PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL....................

251.8

158.1

2 0 0 .5

1 2 2 .4

1 5 7 .9
1 2 1 .7

1 6 9 .4
1 2 8 .7

4 6 .5

5 1 .3

3 5 .7

36.2

4 0 .7

RUBBER PRODUCTS........................................................

Tires and inner t u bes .............. .

2 3 3 .5

2 5 9 .9

1 7 5 .2

1 7 5 .8

2 0 .5

2 1 .5

1 5 .9
8 8 .3

1 6 .3

2 3 9 .9
1 9 3 .7

2 3 9 .1

4 6 .2

Petroleum r e f i n i n g.......................
Coke, other petroleum and coal

2 3 3 .1
9 6 .7

20.1

192.6

96.8

110.6

1 1 6 .3
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS.........................

Leather: tanned, curried, and finished.
Industrial leather belting and packing.
Boot and shoe cut stock and findings..
L u g g a g e ...................................
Handbags and small leather goods ......
Gloves and miscellaneous leather goods.

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U TI LI TI ES ......
TRANSPORTATION.........................................................

Interstate railr o a d s .......................
Local railways and bus lines.............

Bus lines, except local ..................
Air transportation (common carrier)....
Pipe-line transportation (except

COMMUNICATION............................................................

T e l e p h o n e........ ..........................
T e l e g r a p h ...................................
OTHER PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ........................................

Gas and electric u t ilities................
Electric light and power utilities.....
Gas u t i l i t i e s ..............................
Electric light and gas utilities
combined...................................
Local utilities, not elsewhere
classified.................................

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE...............

116.2

127.8

3 5 3 .8
3 6 .3
3 .7

3 5 3 .3
3 7 .8
3 .6

3 6 6 .4
4 0 .3
4 .4

2 3 8 .7
1 4 .7

2 3 7 .2
1 4 .8
2 7 .3
1 4 .5

2 4 3 .7

18.1

27.6
1 4 .7

18.1

18.9

15.6
26.8
16.7

71.0

3 1 6 .1

32.2
2.8
16.2
215.3
12.2
2 4 .4
1 3 .0

71.2
88.3

3 1 4 .3
3 3 .6
2 .7

16.2
213.0
1 2 .4

23.6
12.8

200.0
8 3 .9

16.8
9 9 .3

3 2 6 .5

36.0
3 .4

16.8
2 1 9 .3
1 3 .1
2 3 .1
1 4 .8

3 ,9 0 8

3 ,9 0 4

4 ,1 9 4

_

_

2 ,5 2 7
9 5 8 .2
8 3 7 .5
9 5 .5
7 8 9 .4
6 8 3 .5
4 3 .2
1 4 3 .2

2 ,5 2 7
9 5 7 .1

2 ,7 5 8
1, 138.6
1 ,0 0 7 .9

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

836.5

9 5 .9
7 9 0 .4
6 8 3 .4
4 2 .8
1 4 3 .3

103.6
811.3
7 0 4 .8
4 4 .4
1 4 7 .0

26.6

26.5

769
7 2 9 .8
3 8 .5

772
7 3 2 .7
3 8 .5

8 24

612
588.8
261.9

605
5 8 1 .9
260.0

612
588.8

1 5 5 .0

1 5 2 .3

1 7 1 .9
2 3 .5

10,986

2 7 .5

_

_

_
_

_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

781.6

_

_

_

4 1 .9

-

-

-

151.8

54 8
5 2 7 .2
2 2 7 .1
1 4 1 .6

541
5 2 0 .4
2 2 4 .9
1 3 3 .9

551
5 2 9 .9
2 3 1 .4
1 3 9 .2

169.6

172.6

1 5 8 .5

156.6

1 5 9 .3

23.2

23.6

21.1

2 0 .7

1 1 ,0 3 5

2 6 4 .4

1 1 ,2 2 9

-

-

21.2
-

full-service and limited-

Groceries, food specialties, beer,
wines, and liquors.......................
Electrical goods, machinery, hardware,
and plumbing equipment..................
Other full-service and limited-

See f o o t n o t e at e n d o f table.




2,980

3 ,0 7 4

2,600

2 ,5 9 3

2 ,7 0 3

1 ,7 3 0 .2
1 2 6 .3

1 ,7 7 4 .8
1 2 4 .9

1, 520.6

1 ,5 1 4 .7

1 ,5 7 5 .1

300.0

2 9 7 .4

4 3 6 .2

4 3 5 .9

8 7 2 .9
1 ,2 5 4 .3

Wholesalers,

2 ,9 9 1
1 ,7 3 6 .5
1 2 7 .4

WHOLESALE TRADE.......................................................

1 ,2 4 9 .8

870.6

1 1 0 .7

109.6

3 0 2 .9

269.1

267.1

2 7 2 .9

4 5 9 .1

3 7 8 .6

3 7 8 .4

4 0 5 .4

887.9
1 ,2 9 9 .0

NOTE: D a t a for t h e c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .

762.2
1 ,0 7 9 .6

7 5 9 .6
1 ,0 7 7 .9

110.0

786.8
1, 127.6

11

In d u stry E m p lo y m e n t

Table A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry-Continued

Industry

(In thousands)
All employees
July
June
1958
1958
_

July
1957

_

Nonsupervisory workers X/
June
July
1958
1957

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE— Continued
RETAIL TRADE..........................................................

General merchandise stores...........
Department stores and general mail­
order houses........................
Other general merchandise stores....

Grocery, meat, and vegetable markets.
Dairy-product stores and dealers....
Other food and liquor stores........
Automotive and accessories dealers....
Other retail trade......... ..........
Other retail trade (except eating and
drinking places).....................
Drug stores.... .............. .......

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE

Banks and trust companies............
Security dealers and exchanges.......
Insurance carriers and agents........
Other finance agencies and real estate..

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS.............................

Personal services:
Laundries............................
Cleaning and dyeing plants..........
Motion pictures.......................

GOVERNMENT...........................................................
FEDERAL^7. ............................................ .................

7,995
1,331.0

8,055
1 ,361.0

8,155
1,365.4

859.4
471.6
1,590.7
1,138.7
234.2

876.7
484.3
1,594.1
1,140.1
233.2

476.8
1,569.5
1,095.5
245.4

217.8

220.8

754.5
3,757.7

755.7
591.8
3,752.0

564.8
3,846.9

_
384.8
353.5

385.6
351.9

391.1
359.2

561.1

2,410

621.1
85.2

904.2
7.99.0

6,470

606.3
318.1
167.6
193.9

Other............ ........... .........

796.3

6,488
538.1

318.1

173.4

192.6

2,396
612.7
85.3

881.6
816.2

627.1
170.8
207.2

2,184
2 ,156:8
966.5
535.9
654.4
22.3
4.8

2,219
2 ,192.0
1,023.4
521.4
647.2

5,682

5,192
l,346.0
3,846.3

2,221.7
3,246.9

2,483.2
3,198.5

808.3
455.3

207.7
201.5
668.1
511.8
-

350.1
334.1

1,481.1
1 ,070.5

206.1
204.5

668.9
541.9
_

2,049.6
350.5
332.5

1 ,265.8
821.0

444.8
1,461.9
1 ,027.6

216.9
217.4
723.4
517.2
_

2,117.7
357.4
341.9

_
_
_
*
-

_
_
“

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

334.0

2,192
2,164.6
968.7
538.9
657.0

1,466.7
4,215.0

792.4

442.3
1,479.6
1,070.4

6,427

7,411

5,469
1,440.9
4,027.7

1 ,263.6

2 ,056.0

7,866

4.7

Local.... .............................

615 .O
83.8
895.6

228.6
808.5

7,661

22.2
STATE AND LOCAL...................................................

2,391

888.6

1 ,234.7

-

_

.

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

22.3

4.6

2 ,085.3

3,107.0

_

_

_

_
-

_

_

-

_
-

_

*

-

X I For mining and manufacturing, data refer to production and related workers; for contract construction, to

construction workers; and for all other industries, to nonsupervisory workers.
2/ Data are prepared by the U. S. Civil Service Commission and relate to civilian employment only,
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




Shipyard Employment
Military Personnel Table

12
A -9 : Employees in private and Government
shipyards, by region
(In thousands)
July

June

1958

1958

1957

ALL REGIONS.................................................................................................

220.2

222.7

228.2

PRIVATE YARDS............................................................................................
NAVY YARDS..................................................................................................

124.7
95-5

127.6
95.1

129.3
98.9

100.7
57.7
43.0

100.2
57.4
42.8

98.5
53.8
44.7

35.6

36.0
17.2

36.9
17.9

Region

NORTH ATLANTIC..............................................

SOUTH ATLANTIC..............................................

July

INLAND:

27.0

32.8

^9.5
15.7
33.8

50.5
17.0
33.5

50.5
15.3
35.2

4.8

4.7

4.1

GREAT LAKES:

19.0

4.5

PACIFIC......................................................

18.8

25.8

GULF:

16.9
18.7

4.2

4.8

U The North Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Connecticut,
Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and
Vermont.
The South Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Florida,
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
The Gulf region includes all yards bordering on the Gulf of Mexico in the following States: Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas.
The Pacific region includes all yards in California, Oregon, and Washington.
The Great Lakes region includes all yards bordering on the Great Lakes in the following States: Illinois,
Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
The Inland region includes all other yards.
— / Data include Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

Table A-10: Federal military personnel
(In thousands)
Branch
TOTAL V .....................................................
Air Force..................................................
Marine Corps........................ ......................

July

1958
2,637
898.6
871.6
644.7
190.9
30.7

•i/ Data refer to forces both in continental United States and abroad.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
SOURCE: U. S. Department of Defense and U. S. Department of Treasury.




June

July

1958

1957

2,631

2,839

898.9
871.2

1,001.3

189.5

200.7
30.5

641.0
30.1

920.8
685.5

13

S ta te E m p lo y m e n t

Table A -11: Employees in nonagricgltural establishments,
by industry division and State
(In thousands

State
Al ab ama. ..........
Ari zon a..........
Arkansas.... .
Cai iforni a.......
Colorado.........
Connecticut......
Delaware.........
Di stri et of Columbi
Florida..........
Georgi a..........
Idaho............
Illinois.........
Indi ana..........
Iowa.............

July
1956
712.2

Ju n e

1958

1958

12.3
15.7

13.8

506.9
(3)
937.5

1,118.0

501.4

509.7
1.092.8
963.1
153.5
3,tô7-7
1.415.9
641.8

(3)
4.8
3.7
27.9
10.3
3.2

4.8
3.8
28.4
10.3
3.2

558.2
643.5
795.0

16.9
34.4
42.0

17.2
35.5
*1.5

147.3

M aryland.........
M assachusett......
Mi chi g...........

542.0
615.0
759.0
271.6
858.2
1,784.4
2,082.8

Minnesot a........
Mississippi........
Mi ssouri.........
Montana..........
Nebrask a.........
Nevada...........
New Hampshire.....

906.3
362.3
1.261.2
171.5
348.4
90.3
185.5

New Jersey 4/....
New Mexico.......
New York.........
North Carolina....
North Dakota.....
Ohio.............
Oklahoma.........
Oregon...........

149.9

288.2

6.6

34.9
14.4
a!

.6
2.6
(2)

15.8
6.5
34.7
14.5

Contract construction
J u ly

1957
15.7
16.8
7.2
38.2

il!

15.7

(2)
8.1

(2)
8.2

.6

2.6

(1)
(2)

5.1
*•7
29.7

10.0

3.2

18.9
41.7

47.7

.6
2.6
(2)

Jus

J u ly

1958

1958

1957

*0.3
28.2
19.0
292.8
33.1
53.0
13.3

40.2
27.0
18.4
287.6
32.5
51.4
13.1

43.4
22.3
21.7
266.4
35.5
57.0
11.9

17.2

201.5
72.9
35.0

17.1
117.4
52.4
12.7
218.8
78.1
39.2

40.7

36.8

61.7

72.7
15.3
72.5
89.9
115.2

J u ly

17.8
(3)
55.*
12.5
208.7
75.0
37.1
38.7
31.7
62.2
14.4
64.1
85.8
94.2

878.2
1,844.1
2.334.0

13.7

14.1

16.8

897
361
1,267
169.6
351.8
86.7
184.5

933-9
363.3
1.293.0
176.9
35^
92.0

17.8
4.4
7.3
9.2
2.4
2.7

16.6
4.3
7.5
9.2
2.4
2.8
.2

21.9
4.4
8.3
11.4
2.3
4.2
.3

61.9
17.7

1.871.2
219.1
5.983.3
1,059-0
121.9
2.897.1
555-1

1.869.3
218.7
5,990.6
1.062.5
120.9
2.907.5
560.4

1.981.1

6,198.2
1,078.5

3.7
15.2
10.7
3.4

4.6
18.7
12.0
3.9

3.162.9
576.7

20.5
43.6

3.7
15.3
10.7
3.5
2.2
20.7
44.8

91 .7
20.9
270 .9
54.6
12.4
153.2
35.3

476.8
3.588.3
270.7
522.4
13^.2

477.5
3.607.4
271.1
523.9
133.7
837.0
2.456.4

495.2
3.809.9
283.4
532.5
133.0
856.8
2,486.8

(2)

1.1
70.1
(2)

1.4
87.6

2.6

2.6

233.9

243.5
108.8
995-8
816.4
504.9
1,175-2
95-9

Rhode Island.....
South Carolina...
South Dakota.....
Tennessee........
Texas............

,(3)
2.450.1

Utah..... .......
Vermont..........
Vi rgini a.........
Washington.......
West Virginia ¿/...
Wisconsin........
Wyoming..........

236.0
106.1
986.6
792.3
461.7
1,137-U
91.5

101 .7

988.6
787.6
461.4
1.123.4
90.3

188.8

211.6

123.8

See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




June

736.9
265.7
333.1
4.494.7
476.3
903.0
151.2

537-9
611.1
757-4
273.0
855-6
1,775-8
2,064.6

Pennsylvania....

1957

July

717.9
277.8
333-7
4.438.6
466.4
869.8
147.1

3,273-1
1,306.9
635.0

Maine.............

J u ly

276.7
332.4
4.456.2
473.2
854.4

939-8
1^7-9
3.294.6
1,312.9
635.3

Kansas. ...........
Kentucky.........
Loui si ana........

Mining

TOTAL

.2

2.2

1.1

69.3
1.3

(2)

1.3

(3)
125.I

7.8
125.7

13.6
1.1

13.7

17.7
1.9

18.3

66.0

3.7
8.3

1.1
2.0

67.2
3.6
8.0

1.6

22.8
51.3

(2)

1.3
2.7
8.4
137.7
15.7
1.4
18.8
1.9

82.6

4.3
9.1

116.4

54.2

12.0

31.0

13.6

61.9
83.5
94.0

66.6

59.7
18.3
67.0

10.0

19.3
7.0
9.3

14.2
19.9
7.2

13.8

87.0
21.0

261.7
5^.7
11.7
143.3
35.4

38.8

67.1
16.9
68.7
15.1
21.4
8.2

10.5
107.1
17.8
282.6
58.8
14.7
175.7
35.5

26.4
187.9
19.8
28.3

24.6
185.2
19.0

J 3)
166.0

42.2
164.4

44.8
174.5

16.1
6.1
70.1
47.3
27.5
61.6
7.3

15.*
5.6
68.7
45.5
26.8
59.9
7.1

17.6

10.6

28.1
10.8

25.8
196.1
20.0
27.2
11.6

5.6
75.9
46.9
31.6

64.3
8.7

H

S tate E m p lo y m e n t

Table A-11: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State-Continued

Manufacturing
State

(In thousands)
Transportation and
public utilities

Wholesale and retail trade

July
1958

June
1958

July
1957

July
1959..

June
1958

July
1951__

July
1958

June
1958

225.6
38.9
87.O
1,177.2
72.8
364.1
56.2

226.I
39-6
86.6
1,158.2
70.8
379-6
56.3

243.5
4i.0
86.9
1,259.*
73-2
421.1
61.5

49.4
21.8
27.4
3*9-9
44.1
*5-9
10.0

49.6
21.9
27.3
346.2
43.4
45.9
10.1

50.9
21.9
28.8
370.7
46.1
46.2
10.8

I5I.3
70.1
78.1
1,007.7
120.7
157.9
29.O

16.7
(3)
302.5
26.3
1,085.9
521.2
159.5

16.8
157.^
302.3
25.2
1,09^-3
521.9
159.*•
*

16.7
153.3
324.0
27.4
1,245.5
605.1
165.7

27.9
(3)
68.6
14.9
286.4
90.0
52.6

27.8
90.5
69.1
l4.8
285.9
90.4
52.3

29.1
91.6
73.O
15.7
307.7
101.4
54.8

87.6
(3)
213.I
36.2
701.3
284.7
174.1

87.4
326.9
213.6
36.1
706.5
285.8
17^.2

731.1
298.8
175.5

55.3
53.2
84.6
19.7
71.6
138.3

54.6
53.7
84.8
19.7
71.4
114.6
139-*

61.3
59-7
88.4
21.0
78.5
121.1
152.5

136.7
143.8
183.2
5*-9
187.9
376.4
*27.9

136.8
143.6
183.9
54.2
189.0
381.7
*35-7

136.6
141.8
191.6
57.I
186.6
386.3
472.1

228.9
86.4

228.8
86.2
313.3
42.0
95.9
18.6
34.8

230.3
87.7
318.5
1*3-7
96.2
19-1
35.I

July
1957

151.8
153.3
70.1
67.0
78.8
79.2
1,000.4 1,013.0
118.5
123.5
160.2
152.8
28.7
29.O
90.3
321.5
221.1

37 A

115-2
152.3
137.O
101.4
251.6
620.6
790.0

116.2
152.8
137.2
102.1
251.8
63I.O
796.4

131.0
169.5
146.6
111.8
272.I
677.3
988.3

213.6
107.6
366.4
21.3
56.2
4.7
78.3

204.5
IO6.3
365.3
20.6
56.2
4.6
78.9

232.4
106.6
391.8
22.3
58.7
5-6
82.1

85.3
23.9
122.3
20.1
37.3
8.8
10.1

85.0
23.9
121.5
20.0
37.0
8.7
10.1

91.8
26.2
126.5
22.3
4o.o

9.3
10.5

42.4
95.9
18.8
35.2

731.5
22.3
1,708.8
442.2
6.8
1,121.8
80.6

735-2
22.4
1,711.0
443.3
6.7
1,126.3
80.8

813.9
20.7
1,888.1
456.1
6.8
1,324.6
86.2

148.2
19.8
*95.6
60.2
12.7
201.3
47.4

1* 9.7

19.7
*96.7
60.4
12.6
2OI.7
47.I

158.0
20.4
515.2
62.7
I3.9
226.2
50.1

366.0
*9.3
1,352.8
225.1
38.3
622.8
138.3

140.0
1,3*0-2
105.5
217.2
12.6
(3)
456.4

139.*
1,348.2
106.8
217.3
12.5
281.7
1*58.3

148.3
1,504.2
115.9
226.2
12.4
294.0
488.8

*5.1
278.9
14.2
24.1
9.7
(3)
221.0

44.8
282.0
14.3
24.5
9.7
5*.l
219.7

49.2
311.7
15-*
26.2
10.2
58.9
229.6

105.2
715.6
50.9
106.1
39.8
(3)
681.8

104.4
723.5
51.8
106.4
39-6
188.7
679.7

111.8
736.O
52.2
107.0
39.5
195-3
679.1

36.5
32.8
247.6
221.3
116.9
426.3
6.4

34.2
32.6
247.0
217.*
*
116.0
1H3.5
6.3

38.8
36.1
256.5
238.6
128.6
466.0
7.1

22.4
8.0
84.5
62.7
44.7
74.6
12.5

22.2
7.9
84.0
62.1
44.8
74.4
12.4

22.5
8.4
91.9
67.1
52.7
78.9
13.*

55.5
21.1
23I.9
I79.7
86.8
255.9
20.8

55.3
20.8
232.2
178.7
87.4
256.3
20.3

57-2
21.1
228.0
184.5
91.*
259.2
21.2

See f o o t n o t e s at en d o f table.
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .




113.9

311.3

373-2
365.*
48.5
47.3
1,370.1 1,373.6
224.5
224.8
38.2
38.3
645.0
623.7
144.6
139.7

15

S ta te E m p lo y m e n t

Tab le A - ll: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents,
by industry division and State-Continued
(In thousands)
State

Finance, insurance,
and real estate

July
1958

June
1958

Service and miscellaneous

July
1957

June
July
.1258. „ ...1258

Government

July
1957

July
1958

June
1958

July
_ 1957

28.0
11.5
11.1
222.7
22.2
5I.5
5.5

27.8
IO.7
IO.9
222.2
21.8
49.I
5.5

69.O
35.*
39.9
603.7
67.7
94.1
16.5

69.I
35.*
10.1
*
602.0
66.2
93.9
16.5

68.8
33.0
38.8
601.2
66.1
92.3
16.0

136.3
55.1
63.3
767.3
98.2
87.9
16.8

139.*
56.7
65.I
788.6
98.4
87.9
16.9

133.5
53.0
59.6
723.6
94.4
84.5
16.5

24.5
(3)
40.3
5.1
181.8
51.2
29.0

24.3
63.4
5.1
181.0
50.9
28.9

24.9
61.3
39.9
5.0
I82.4
5I.7
29.I

73.9
(3)
97.8
19.8
421. C
IO9.8
73.2

73.9
171.O
98.3
19.7
421.4
111.5
74.4

72.O
168.8
98.1
19.7
420.2
III.3
73.6

258.5
(3)
155.O
31.4
360.0
164.6
106.5

254.O
184.3
157.4
31.2
375.6
169.1
108.I

259.6
170.7
149.5
30.9
352.4
159.5
100.8

21.0
23.O
29.8
8.4
40.8
99.*
77.3

20.7
22.7
29.7
8.4
40.6
98.6
76.7

20.9
22.0
29.7
8.5
1*0.5
97.8
77.1

60.9
73.6
90.8
30.2
IO9.O
243.4
244.5

61.2
73.7
90.7
28.7
108.1
241.9
246.2

59.I
72.4
93.2
31.0
IO3.2
241.9
250.4

93.2
99.1
127.8
43.4
128.0
236.3
278.6

94.6
102.0
I29.5
44.3
132.8
233.I
28O.3

93.6
97.8
125.1
42.9
122.2
229.8
26I.7

46.4
11.3
64,4
6.1
21.0
2.6
6.6

46.0
11.2
64.1
6.0
21.0
2.6
6.6

45.7
64.4
5.9
20.8
2.6
6.3

II6.5
38.9
I59.9
24.3
47.4
28.4
24.0

118.8
38.8
161.3
24.0
1*8.5
25.6
23.1

114.3
39-*
157.7
23.6
16.9
*
26.5
23.6

135.8
72.I
163.0
33-9
68.2
17.I
21.0

I38.I
72.4
I67.4
34.0
7I.5
I6.8
2I.5

130.4
71.1
I57.I
32.6
68.0
16.5
20.4

89.5
8.4
469.9
35.6
5.3
108.8
22.8

88.2
8.6
466.4
35.5
5.3
107.6
22.7

87.4
7.3
469.9
34.6
5.2
109.4
22.5

229.0
28.3
915.2
100.3
16.7
324.0
66.1

225.5
28.O
903.6
100.5
16.8
325.1
66.6

228.0
27.0
907.2
101.9
16.4
320.8
67.3

211.6
54.9
759-*
137.6
27.7
344.8
121.0

214.6
55.2
770.2
l4o.l

27.5
359.2
123.3

208.9
52.4
749.6
135.7
26.9
338.4
119.2

18.3
145.8
12.9
16.6
5*3
(3)
119.0

18.0
144.5
12.7
16.7
5.3
32.1
118.6

18.4
145.0
13.O
16.0
5.*
32.5
115*3

57.*
440.4
30.4
43.4
18.7
(3)
312.1

57-5
441.0
29.8
43.6
18.1
93.8
310.7

59.0
*35.7
30.7

83.3
407.2
37.0
85.4
35.1
(3)
368.7

87.7
412.9
36.7
86.0
35.*
136.6
379.3

81.3
393.6
36.2
84.1
33.3
129.1
358.9

10.0
3.6
43.2
3**7
12.6
44.0
2.4

District of Columbia 6/...

27.9
11.3
IO.9
220.9
22.1
5O.9
5.5

10.0
3.5
42.9
34.2
12.7
43.7
2.4

9.9
3.5

27.9
17.9
117.2
95.9
18.2
*
134.0
13.6

27.7
14.2
117.3
9**7
46.6
130.4
13.5

27.8
17.5
112.7
94.4

54.0
15.7
17*.*
148.8
58.9
137.3

55.*
16.1
178.2
153.O
57.9
141.6
20.3

54.0
15.5
168.6

4o.l

11.0

43.4

34.2
12.8
43.6
2.4

44.5

18.2
93.8
302.9

48.0

128.8
l4.4

20.2

148.8

57.2
130.1
19.6

l/ Mining combined with construction. 2/ Mining combined with service. 3/ Bbt available. 4/ Transportation
and public utilities and total revised; not strictly comparable with previously published data* £/ Construction
and total revised; not strictly comparable with previously published data. 6/ Federal employment in Maryland
and Virginia portions of Washington, D.C., Metropolitan area included in data for District of Columbia.
BOSS: Data for the current month are preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on Inside back cover.




16

A r e a E m p lo y m e n t

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division

Area and industry division

ALABAMA
Birmingham
Total...............
Mining..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade...............
Finance.............
Service.............
Government..........
Mobile
Total...............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade...............
Finance.............
Service 1/...........
Government..........
ARIZONA
Phoenix
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........
Tucson
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........
ARKANSAS
Little RockN. Little Rock
Total.............. .
Contract construction
Manufacturing...... .
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.............. .
Finance.............
Service 4/..........
Government..........
CALIFORNIA
Fresno
Manufacturing.......

July
1958

June
1958

1957

Area and industry division
X1 3 Angeles-Lon« Beach
O

203.8
7.9
14.9

62.3
16.4

205.8

213.5

16.6

12.9
70.6
17.0

9.2
14.3
63.3

46.2
12.2
23 .O
I9 .I

46.5
12.1
22.8
19*2

90.6

90.8

10.8

49.5
12.2
22.9
17.6

Mining................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance...............

5.5

5-3

I7.9
10.8

17.9

10.8

19.1

19.2

94.4
5.9
21.7
11.5
I9 .I
4.2
10.0
22.1

4.3
10.1
23.1

4.3
10.0
23.5

138.4

.3
13.5
23.4
10.6
39.9
7.7

I39.I
.3
I2.9
23.9
IO .5
40.0
7.6

24.9

25.7

132.2
.3
11.2
24.1
IO .5
38.2
7.2
I6.9
23.8

57.5
2.4
5.7
8.0
5.1
14.2
2.1
9.O
11.0

58.O

56.I

18.1

75.0
7.2
13.3
7.5
18.0
5.1
10.6
13.4

12.4

18.2

2.4

5.5

6.0
5.3
14.2
2.0
9.1
11.5

2.4
5.0
9.6
5 .I
I3.3
2.0
8.3
10.4

II .9

73.3
6.1
12.5
7.8

18.2

Mining................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....

2,126.9

2,127.7
14.6
122.3

14.8

123.7
693.O
134.1
477.3
II5.9

691.0
132.5

475.0
114.7
315.O

262.4

142.4
.6

142.5
.5

10.9

10.5

20.3
11.7
27.2
5.5
12.6
53.6

21.0
11.4

July
1957

2 ,166.6
15.7
107.9
763.8
144.2

478.1

113.6
3IO .9
232.4

136.9

.6
10.0

16.7

12.6

San BernardinoRivers ide-Ontario

26.6

5.5
12.7
54.3

27.5
5.5
12.3
51.7

30.2

29.I

32.1

220.0
.2
13.8
65.7
12.0
46.7
10.3

218.9

226.0

I3.7
64.6
11.6
46.3
10.3

.2
I2.9
72.6
12.4
46.7
10.0

44.7

Finance...............
Service...............

*5.5

44.4

San Diego
Mining................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance...............
Service...............

26.6

.2

26.5

26.6

933.1
1.8
54.4
184.3
IO6.4
213.6
65.7
122.0
184.9

950.7

143.3
.1
12.1
*5.5
9.0

141.9
.1

San Frameisco-Oakland
Contract construction...
Manufact uring.........
Trans, and pub. util....

934.3
1.6
55.9
I85.Ö
IO6.8
214.9
66.4

122.5
180.2

2.0

58.I
I97.4
112.3

2I5 .I
67.O
I2I .9
176.9

San Jose
151.3

13.1

Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....

13.9

Finance.............
Service...............
Government............

5.0
10.7

June
1958

315.9

Government............
74.9
7.0
I3.5
7.5
I8 .I
5.0
IO .7
13.3

July
1958

253.8

Sacramento

See f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f table.
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .




In t h o u s a n d s )

July

.1
12.6
53.9
9.0

28.8

6.1

19.2

21.6

28.9
6.0
19.6

22.1

10.5
51.2

9.1

26.1

5.9

18.0
19.0

17

A r e a E m p lo ym e n t

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued

A r e a and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

CALIFORNIA— Cont inued
Stockton
Manufac turing.....
COLORADO
Denver
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport
T o ta l........................................
Contract construction 1 /
Manufacturing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade........................................
Finance....................................
Service....................................
Government.............................

Hartford
T o ta l........................................
Contract construction 1 /
Manufac t ur ing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade........................................
Finance...................................
Service....................................
Government.............................

New Britain
T o ta l........................................
Contract construction l /
Manufac t ur ing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade...............................
Finance...................................
Service...................................
Government.............................

New Haven
T o ta l........................................
Contract construction
Manufacturing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade........................................
Finance...................................
Service...................................
Government.............................

(in th u s a n d s )

July

June

July
1958

1958

12.1

1957

12.6

11.3

276.4
3.1

40.0
42.5

269.0
2.9
17.9
49.1
28.3
73.4
16.5
38.4
42.5

111.0

113.9

125.0

274.3

2.9
18.5
50.0

28.8
74.8
16.8

20.1

49.2

30.1

76.5
16.5
38.9
42.0

61.4

6.0

6.0

7.4
71.4

18.9

19.0

19.8

9.2
8.3

9.4
8.4

9.5

7.0
58.9
2.8

6.8

2.8




2.8

8.0

19.9

19.7

1Ô.8

36.2
1.7

37.5
1.7

5.5

5.8

2.7
2.4

2.7
2.4

5.9
.7
2.7
2.5

119.0
8.9
39.7

120.4

125.8

Stamford
Total.................
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............
Waterbury
Total.................
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............

DELAWARE
Wilmington
Total...............
Contract construction,
Manufacturing...... .
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service 1/.........
Government.........

July
1958

51.9
4.3

June

1958
52.6

"7ÜIT
1957

54.8

3.0
10.7
1.9
7.9
4.0

4.3
20.4
3.0
10.9
1.9
7.9
4.1

5.0
21.2

59.6
2.5
33.9
2.7
9.6
1.5
4.4
5.1

61.9
2.4
35.8
2.7
9.9
1.4
4.5
5.2

63.7
2.5
38.4
2.7
9.5
1.4
4.3
5.0

125.5

125.6

129.8
9.7
58.3
9.7
22.9
4.8

20.1

11.1

53.2

10.9
53.6

4.9
14.0

22.5
4.9
14.0

8.1
22.6

8.1

3.2
11.3
1.9
8.2

3.8

13.0

11.6

11.4

659.8
38.9
26.9
44.0
134.1
34.3
104.4
277.2

654.3
37.9

661.1
39.1

43.8
133.9
34.1
104.0
273.4

45.3
136.4
34.9
100.5
277.7

FLORIDA
Jacksonville
Total........ ......
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service l/......... .
Government..........

129.1
9.3
18.1
14.0
39.0

129.7
9.3
19.0
13.7
38.8
11.9
16.9

132.0

Miami
Total...............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..

276.4
24.7
35.5
35.9

277.8

275.2
26.3
33.9

11.6

213.0

40.9

204.7
11.7
71.3
8.7
42.0

203.6
11.8

70.7
8.6

30.6
21.1

21.0
2.1

.8

12.8

23.5
7.0
17.6
9.6

30.2
21.2

22.0
2.1

.8

8.8

40.6
12.7
24.0
7.0
17.9
9.5

See f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f table.
NOTE: D a t a for t h e c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .
479523 0 - 5 8 - 5

6.1

A r e a and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

12.4
82.4
8.5
40.7
29.4
20.9

42.5
1.8

26.7

2.1

9.2
45.8
13.2
23.6

6.9

17.6

9.4

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Washington
Total..............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade..............
Finance............
Service X / .........
Government.........

12.1

17.0
19.8

27.2

20.2

23.6

36.5
36.0

27.2

10.4
20.2

14.7
39.5
11.5
16.5
19.5

35.*

18

A r e a E m p lo y m e n t

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, b y industry d¡vision-Continued
In t h o u s a n d s )

Area said industry division
FLORIDA—Cont inued
Miami— Continued
Trade.................................
Finance.............................
Service 1/..........
Government......................
Tampa-St. Petersburg
T o ta l.................................
Contract construction
Manufacturing................
Trans, and pub. u t i l .
Trade.................................
Finance........................
Service I/ ......................
Government......................

GEORGIA
Atlanta
T otal.................................
Contract construction
Manufacturing................
Trans, and pub. u t i l .
Trade.................................
Finance.............................
Service
......................
Government......................
Savannah
T o ta l.................................
Contract construction
Manufacturing................
Trans, and pub. u t i l .
Trade.................................
Finance.............................
Service l / ......................
Government......................

July

1.958

June

1958

July

1957 _
_

Area sind industry division
Peoria

80.0
16.2

55.1

29.2

170.8

18.8

31.6
13.1
5*.0
8.7
23.2
21.6

90.1

25.*
46.2
44.2

53.8
3.7
14.6
5.9
12.8
2.1
7-8
6.9

June

July

1958

1958

1957

81.4
I5.8
55.5

Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .

86.5
4.4
33.7
6.4

163.4

79.7
I6 .O
54.8
31.3

Finance...................................
Service 1/.............
Government.............................

Contract con stru ction ...

26.9

171.4
lS.9
31.6
I3 .O
53.8
8.6
23.1
22.4

19.*
29*2
12.8

52.2

8.2
22.6
I9 .I

Rockford
T o ta l........................................
Contract construction l/
Manufacturing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Finance...................................
Service...................................
Government.............................

337.8
23.1
76.4
32.4

July

32.6

346.8
20.1
85.9
34.6

90.1

91.5

337.1
22.1

76.2

24.9
47.4
42.4

2^.2
46.4
44.5

54.2
3.7
14.7
6.0
13.1
2.1
7.7
6.9

55.0
3.5

100.7
5.2
45.3

21.0

3.7
9.5
7.9

87.5
4.1
34.4
6.4
20.7
3.7
9.7
8.5

69.6

70.5

75.4

4.5
36.O
2.7
12.8
2.6

7.0

4.1

Mining......................................
Contract construction.. .
Manufacturing................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Finance...................................
Service 2/ .............

ILLINOIS
Chicago
T otal........................................
Mining......................................
Contract con stru ction ...
Manufacturing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade........................................
Finance...................................
Service...................................
Government.............................

,442.8
3-9
131.3
871.5

6.0
13.6
2.1
7.8
6.9

206.6
519.5

147.4
332.8

229.8

23.4
2.1
2.1
2.8
6.9
1.4
3.2
*•9

23.I
1.8
2.1
2.8
6.9
1.4
3.2

4.9

2,457.1
3.8

128.7

879.7
207.3
522.4
146.5
332.7

236.0

65.1

71.8

2.7

64.4
1.7
3.1
25.3
4.5
14.5
2.2
13.1

1.7
3.1
25.7
4.5
14.7
2.2

13.2

1.8
3.9

30.9

4.8

15.4

2.2
12.8

Fort Wayne
Contract con struction ...
Manufacturing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .

3 /.............................

Indianapolis
Contract construction.. .
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Finance................................. ..
Service j / .............................

2,617.2
3.7
141.4
1,007.3
223.4
540.0
148.8
327.5
225.I

See f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f table.
NOTE: D a t a for t h e c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .




2.6
7.1
4.3

36.6

15.1

Service

23.3
2.0
2.1
2.8
6.9
1.4
3.2
4.9

13.O

4.6
*1.9
2.8
12.8
2.7
7.0
3.8

4.3

INDIANA
Evansville

72.5
2.9
29-6
6.8

72.5
2.9
29.6
6.9
16.9
3.9
12.3

79.5
3.4
34.8
7.6
17.6
3.9

278.4
14.6
9**3
20.6
65.5

278.7
13.7
94.4

292.0

64.8

66.1

69.9
2.9

70.6
3.0
30.7
4.3
14.9

81.3
3.4
39.5
4.7

14.2

3.6
14.1

16.9
IDAHO
Boise
T o ta l........................................
Contract con stru ction ...
Manufacturing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade........................................
Finance...................................
Service 1/.............
Government.............................

6.8
22.1
3.7
9.8
7.9

3.9
12.4

18.6

20.8

65.3
18.4

12.2

14.4
IO7.2
22.9
65.9
I8.3
63.3

South Bend
Contract construction.. .
Manufac turing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Finance....................................
Service 3 / .............................

30.4

4.2
14.8
3.5
14.1

16.0

19

A r e a E m p lo y m e n t

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued
July
1958

(In th u s a n d s )

IOWA
Des Moines
Total.................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service 1/............
Government............

June
1958

July
1957

June
1958

Government............

279-1
7.3
16.3
45.4
45.8
73-4
14.7
43.3
32.9

280.2
7.4
16.9
45.7
45.9
73.6
14.8
43.0
32.9

291.6
7.8
19.4
51.0
47.6
74.8
14.8
43.4
32.8

8.1

8.1

8.4

26.4
1.2
13-2
-9
5.3
-7
3-8
1.3

26.1
1.2
12*9
•9
5.2
.7
3.8
1.4

28.2
1.3
14.7
1.0
5.4
.7
3.8
1.3

52.7
4.4
12.0
6.4
14.7
3.4
8.0
3.8

52.1
3-8
12.2
6.4
14.7
3.4
7.8
3.8

54.4
4.1
13.2
6.6
15.O
3.5
8.2
3.8

584.3
-9
38.1
187.5
54.5
120.2
31.3
72.8
79.0

588.9
.9
37.7
188.5
54.0
122.2
31.1
72.4
82.1

605.2
.9
44.3
207.4
59.0
120.4
31.1
69-3
72.8

988.0
50.5
261.5
69.5
240.8
72.7
158.8
134.2

997.2
48.8
265.5
70.0
247.3
71.7
161.2
132.7

1,017.2
52.8
286.1
74.9
244.4
72.6
155.8
130.6

Area and industry division

July
1957

New Orleans
98.5
5.2
22.2
7.8
26.3
10.9
13.7
12.6

98.9
5.0
22.5
7.8
26.4
10.9
13.9
12.7

101.1
5.6
24.5
7.8
26.6
u.o
13.7
12.2

KANSAS
Topeka
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction...
Manufacturi ng.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government........ .

47.4
.2
4.7
5.9
6.7
9-*
2.6
6.0
12.0

48.0
.2
4.7
5*8
6.8
9.5
2.6
6.0
12.5

51.1
.2
6.4
6.1
7.2
10.0
2.6
5.9
12.9

Wichita
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............

126.1
1.8
8*6
51.7
7.0
25.2
5.0
14.8
12.2

128.0
1.7
8.8
53.5
7.0
25.I
5.0
14.8
12.3

137.2
1.9
7.7
62.8
7.5
26.2
5.1
14.2
11.9

Mining................
Contract construction...
Manufactur ing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance...............

MAINE
Lewiston
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance...............
Service l/............

Portland
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance...............
Service l/............
Government............

MARYLAND
Baltimore

KENTUCKY
Louisville
Total..............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade..............
Finance............
Service 1/.........
Government.........

231.5
13.9
80.3
21.5
55.0
10.8
26.6
23.6

234.8
13.4
82.7
21.4
5*.5
10.9
27.6
24.3

250.8
14.5
94.4
23.7
56.5
10.7
26.4
24.4

LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge
Total...............
Mining..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade...............
Finance.............
Service.............
Government..........

73.3
.4
11.8
18.4
4.3
15.4
2.8
7.0
13.2

73.3
.4
11.9
18.6
4.3
15.3
2.8
6.9
13.1

72.2
.4
11.3
19.9
4.3
15.2
2.8
7.0
11.5

See f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f table.
NOTE: D a t a for t h e c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .




July
1958

Shreveport
Manufacturing.........

A r e a and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Service...............
Government............

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....

20

A r e a E m p lo y m e n t

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued
(In th u s a n d s )

A r e a and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

July

June

July

1958

1958

1957

A r e a and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

July

June

July

1956

1958

1957

New Bedford
Total..................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..................
Government.............
Other nonmanufacturing

Spr i ngfield-Holyoke
Total..................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..................
Finance................
Service 1 / ............
Government............

Worcester
Total...................
Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service 1 / .............
Government.............

MICHIGAN
Detroit
Total...................
Mining..................
Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government.............

Flint
Manufacturing.

Grand Rapids
Manufacturing

42.8
23.1
2.6

7.5

3.1
6.5

46.5
1.1
24.6
2.4
8.0
3.7
6.7

43.2
22.9
2.6
7.8
3.1
6.8

42.7
22.8

2.5
7.8
3.1

6.5

49.4

46.5
1.1
24.8
2.4
8.0
3.6
6.6

155.5
7.1

157.2
6.9

7.9
32.6
7.7
17.8
17.3

1.5
27.2
2.4
8.2

3.6
6.5

7.8
33.5
7.5
17.9

65.1

96.4
3.4
40.1
5.8
18.4
5.2
11.5
12.0

51.3

7.9

70.1

8.6
33.7
7.4
17.9
17.2

16.9

1,072.2 1,085.1
.8
.8
50.6
49.4
411.9
414.3
74.1
73.3
238.1
232.5
47.6
47.5
134.8
139.3
120.8
121.5

105.0
4.5
46.5
5.9
19.9
5.2
11.6
U.4

48.0

Lansing
Manufac t ur ing

20.5

20.6

23.9

Muskegon
Manufacturing

22.8

22.7

24.4

20.4

20.5

24.4

40.8
2.8
8.1
6.0
10.9
2.0
6.7
4.4

41.0
3.0
8.0
10.9
2.0
6.7
4.4

45.4
3.7
9.9
7.5
11.4
1.9
6.7
4.3

494.0

495.1

MINNESOTA
Duluth
Total.................
Contract construction
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.................
Finance..............
Service X,/...........
Government...........

6.0

Minneapolis-St. Paul
T o tal.................
Contract construction
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.................
Finance..............
Service
...........
Government...........

MISSISSIPPI
Jackson
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

29.7
136.5
49.7
122.3
33.3

122.6
33.0

509.3
29.9
148.9
51.4
126.9
33.1

59.8

62.7

56.9

28.2

135.2

49.6

62.7

63.8

57.5
.8
4.7
10.3
4.6

57.3
.8
4.4
10.2
4.6
15.5
3.7
7.5
10.9

56.6

358.0
.7
20.7
95.8
41.4
93.1
24.9
43.8
37.6

368.8

15.6
3.7
7.5
10.6

1,257.2
.8

65.2

554.7
79.5
254.8
48.6
140.4
113.2

59.*

See f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f table.
NOTE: D a t a for t h e c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .




41.7

162.8

66.7

100.7
4.0
42.9
6.0
19.1
5.1
U.6
12.0

40.5

Saginaw
Manufacturing

MASSACHUSETTS— Continued
Fall River
Total..................
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..................
Government............
Other nonmanufacturing

59.9

MISSOURI
Kansas City
Total.................
M ining ...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util.
T rade.................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

(*)
(*)
w

»
4)
»
(4)
w
w

62.1

.8
4.3
10.4
4.6

15.2

3.6
7.5
10.3

.7
21.3
101.5
46.5

96.0

23.8
43.4
35.6

21

A re a Employment

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued
( In t h o u s a n d s )
A r e a and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

MI SSOURI — Cont inued
S t. Louis
T o ta l......................................
Mining....................................
Contract construction..
Manufac turing....................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . .
Trade......................................
Finance.................................
Service.................................
Government........... ...............

MN N
O TA A
Great F a lls
T o ta l.................................
Contract construction,
Manufac turing.................
Trans, and pub. u t i l .,
Trade.................................
Service 5/.........
Government......................

N
EBRASKA
Omaha 6 /
T o ta l........................................
Contract c on stru ction ...
Manufacturing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade........................................
Finance....................................
Service 1 / .............................
Government.............................

NE A A
VD
Reno
T o ta l........................................
Contract con struction .. .
Manufacturing l / ................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade........................................
Finance....................................
Service....................................
Government.............................

N W HAM
E
PSHIRE
Manchester
T o ta l........................................
Contract con stru ction ...
Manufacturing......................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade........................................
Finance....................................
Service...............................
Government.............................

July

June

July

1958

1958

1957




155.8
37.1
85.7
67.O

N W JERSEY
E
Newark-Jersey City
T o ta l.................................
Mining...............................
Contract construction,
Manufacturing................
Trans, and pub. u t i l .
Trade.................................
Finance.............................
Service.............................
Government...................... .

20.9
2.3
3.1
2.5
6.5
4.1
2.4

Paterson £ /
T o ta l................................. .
Mining...............................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.................
Trans, and pub. u t i l .,
Trade.................................
Finance.............................
Service.............................
Government......................

July

1958

jJ

697.6

2.4
37.8

255.4

62.9
147.6
37.1
86.4
68.0

20.6
2.2
2.2
6.6

2.5

145.4
6.5
37.8
13.0
21.0

15.5

29.4
2.8
1.8

3.2
7.3

1.2
8.8

4.3

2.4
37.0
251.4
62.4
149.4
36.7
86.9
69.0

729.0
1.9
40.3
274.4
66.8

6.5
4.4
2.5

4.4

31.0
20.8

695.2

20.2
2.0
2.6
2.2

2.7

147.0
6.4
31.0
20.6

152.5
9.2

37.7
13.0

22.1

16.3

28.4
2.7
1.7
3.2
7.2
1.2
8.1

4.3

32.6

22.9
38.8
13.0

20.7
15.4

28.2
2.3

1.8

3.4
7.1
1.1

8.4
4.1

17.1
2.7

40.1
1.9
17.2
2.7

41.3
2.3
18.2

4.6
3.1

4.8
3.1

4.6
3.1

39.8
2.0
8.1
2.2

See f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f table.
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h
479523 0 - 58 - 6

A r e a and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

8.2
2.2

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

2.8
8.1
2.2

Perth Amboy j /
T o ta l................................. .
Mining............................... .
Contract construction,
Manufacturing.................
Trane, and pub. u t i l ..
Trade................................. .
Finance............................. .
Service............................. .
Government...................... .

Trenton
T o ta l.................................
Mining...............................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.................
Trans. and pub. u t i l .
Trade.................................
Finance.............................
Service............................. .
Government......................

NWM
S
EXICO
Albuquerque
T o ta l.................................
Contract construction
Manufacturing................
Trans, and pub. u t i l .
Trade.................................
Finance.............................
Service 1/ ......................
Government......................

785.9

.2
31.0

314.7
77.3
143.3
51.4
93.8
74.2

June

July

1958

1957

788.4

839.3

.2

27.9
317.0
78.0

145.6
50.6

93.4
75.7

.2

35.1
352.4
85.3
151.8

49.3
92.4
72.8

385.3

383.5

410.4

28.2
I63.O
24.3

25.7
162.6

28.2
188.4
24.0

1.2

70.0

12.4
44.3
41.9

148.8
.8

6.2
74.6
8.4
23.1

1.2

23.8

70.9
12.3
44.4
42.6

149.3
.7
5.5
75.6
8.3
23.3

12.3
20.8

2.6
12.2
21.1

95.0

95.7

2.6

.1

.1

2.7
34.6

2.7
35.1

16.7
3.6
12.9
18.3

3.5
13.1
18.1

71.6

71.1

6.1

6.1
17.0

1.8

71.6
12.6

43.6
40.2

161.3

.8

8.5
83.1
9.1
23.9
2.6

11.7

21.6

102.0
.1

4.1
39.7
6.7
17.1
3.5
13.3
17.5

65.5
5.5

6.3

6.2
12.8

10.8

5.3
17.9
4.3
9.8

5.3
17.7
4.2
9.7
15.2

5.5
16.6
3.7
9.1
14.3

13.0

15.0




22
le A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued
.....
July
.3-228

June
.

July

1958

1957

usands) _
Area and industry division

July

1958

New York-Northeastern
New Jersey— Continued

203.4
7.2
64.6
15-9
41.8
7-7
23.7
42.6

213.4
9.0
73.7

203.5
7.2
64.7
15.9
41.9
7.7
23.5
42.6

17.0
41.5
7.7

23.8

Finance..................
Government..............

76.8

81.1

4.1
42.1
4.1
14.2
2.1
6.2
8.2

3.0
38.6
4.0
13.6
2.2
6.5
8.8

(4)

U)
W
w
w

14.9
47.3
42.8

W

457.3
25.0
199.9
38 .1
89.5

85.2

30.4
14.4

30.3
14.1

6.2

14.9
48.9
40.8

6.2
10.0

9.8

361.3
25.7

101.6
22.2

81.7
14.8
54.2

61.1

5,421.9
5.6
235>
1,570.3
475.2

35.6
18.4
6.7
10.5

357.6
24.9
100.9
21.9
80.7
14.8

362.5

51.8
62.6

832
622

Finance..................
Service..................

375.5
603.9
398.2

,584
2
112
921
337
838
376
596
400

212.9
10.8
100.9
9.6
39.8
8.1
23.6
20.0

224,
11,
112,
10
40,
7
23
19«

143.1
7.7
51.7

153.
95911,
32,
6,
1715.

2.2
120.8
852.5
327.4

820.2

Rochester

Finance..................
Service l / ..............
Government..............
Syracuse
Tot a l ....................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Service 1 / ........... .

11.0

31.5
7.2

18.1

15.9
Utica-Rome
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

97.8
3.5
38.1
*•9
16.5
3.6
10.3

106 ,
5.
45.
5.
16 ,
3.
9<
20,

50.1

5,437.4
5.5
223.7
1,573.5
476.8

30.1
106.8
22.1
82.3

Finance..................
Service
..............

21.0

13.7
57.4

5,592.9
6.3
235.9
1,717.2
494.1

)le.
month

628.0

3,500.6

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

413.3
20.9
167.4
34.8

(*)

W

468.0
848.4

New York City 7/

40.8
M i ning ...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

76.4
3.0
38.4
3*9
13.5
2.3
6.4
8.9

1 ,191.2

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

Westchester County 7 /
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance..................

210.1

21.4
53.4
13.5
48.5
10.3
37.6
25.4

204,
19.
5*.
14,
46,
10,
35
24,

23

A r e a E m p lo y m e n t

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued

Area and industry division

June
1958

July
1958

J In^th

July
1957

9-5
29.7
6.7

95.2
7.8
23.3
9.7
29.7
6.7

96.7
8.9
23.4
9.8

1 1 .1

1 1 .1

6.9

6.9

7.0

42.3

42.1

42.9

7.7

22.8

Service 1/ ..............

Area and industry division

July
1958

June
1958

July
1957

143.5
7.4
9.9
14.8
11.5

143.1
7.5
9.6
14.8
U.4
36.7
8.4

146.4
7.6

18.6

18.5

OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma City

NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte
Total....................
Contract construction...
Trans, and pub. util....

usands)

30.1

Mining...................
Contract construction...
Trans. and pub. ut i l ....

6.4

36.6

11.1

Government..............

8.4
I8.5
36.4

10.0
16.3
11.7
38.0

8.4

36.2

35.9

123.8

123.7

129.2

11.9

13.1

8.0
27.0

12.0
8.0
26.9

13.3
31.3

13.3
31.2

6.0
17.2

6.0

Greensboro-High Point
Tulsa
Mining...................
Contract construction...

Winston-Salem
Manufacturing...........

34.8

35.0

33.9

NORTH DAKOTA
Fargo

Trans, and pub. util....

23.3
3.1

2.2
2.2

2.2

2.3

3.2
3.1

Contract construction...

22.6

7.9
1.5
3.3
3.1

22.9
2.6
2.2

2.4

8.0
1.6

2.4
7.9

1.6

3.1
3.0

Trans. and pub. ut il....

Government..............

Trans, and pub. util....

48.7

47.3

59.7

C inc innat i

145.5

1*5.5

161.5

Cleveland
Manufacturing...........

255.6

255.3

308.5

Columbus
Manufacturing...........

61.0

63.4

73.1

256.3
14.7

28.9
60.9

13.3
35.5
37.4

31.3
65 .O
13.4
34.7
35.1

170.8
.8
8.9
89.8

173.5

178.8

11.5

11.5

15.0
58.0
29 .I
61.3
13.4
35.2
36.4

91.9

Canton

8.6

248.5
14.1
58.4

248.4
Contract construction...

Akron

80.5

17.4
8.9

31.1
6.3
17.7

OREGON
Portland

OH TO

80.0

9.0

8 .1
30.6
13.8

62.1

PENNSYLVANIA
Allentown-BethlehemEaston
Mining...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance..................
Service..................
Government..............
Erie
Manufacturing...........

.8
8.8
92.1

.4
9.2

96.6

28.5

4.1

12.7
29.3
4.1

16.6
11.1

16.3
10.2

34.2

34.1

39.*

138.5
.4
9.7

139.9
.4

142.6
.4

28.1

4.2
16.5
11.0

Harrisburg '
Dayton
Manufacturing...........

82.0

83.7

93.5

Toledo

50.2

61.7

51.3

Youngstown

89.1
See

footnotes

NOTE:

Data

for

at e n d
the

of

90.1

113.6

table.

current month




are

preliminary.

Mining...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance..................
Service..................

31.0

13.1
24.9
5.8
14.8

38.8

10.2
31.5
13.1
25.4
5.7

15.0
38.6

8 .1

35.4

15.0
25.0
5.7
14.4

38.6

24

A r e a E m p lo y m e n t

Tab le A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued

Area and industry division
PENNSYLVANIA — C ont inued
Lancaster
Manufacturing...........

July

June

195B

I958

(In th usands)
Area and industry division
1957

July

Greenville
Manuf ac tur ing...........
-

44.$

42.5

43.3

1 .437 .*
2 .0
6O .7
5I2.3
112.2
302.4
75.9
17Q.5

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade .....................
Service..................
Government..............
Reading
Manufacturing...........
Scranton
Manufacturing...........

1,443.6

2.0
79 .I
513 .O

111.4

305.8

75.4

185.0
171.9

172.4
Pittsburgh
T o tal ....................

1 ,490.5
2.0
83 .O
555.5
120.7
307 .I
76 .O
I78 .O

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

York
Manufacturing...........
BHODE ISLAND
Providence
Total ....................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade....................
Finance..................
Service l / ..............
Government..............
SOUTH CAROLINA
Charleston
Total....................
Contract construction...
Manufac t ur ing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade....................
Finance..................
Service } J ..............

I957

29 .I

29 .I

29.7

24.0
1.7
5.2

23.8
1.6

24.5

5.1

5.3

2.2

2.2

3.8

1.6

7.5
1.7
3.8

Finance..................
Service 1/ ..............
Government...............

2.0

2.0

9O .5
.1

90.0
.1

1.8
2.2
8.0
1.6

3.5

2.0

168.2

TENNESSEE
Chattanooga

776.0

770 .7

15.8
40.6
284.6

62.7
161.1
3 O .9

16.0

42.2

285.7
62.7
162.5

838.5
I 6.6
44.1
339.7
70.7
164.2

99-3
75.7

30.7
99.3
76.9

30.5

46.4

45.9

49.6

98.3
74.4

28.7

28.3

31.5

36.2

36.8

38.3

40.0

41.0

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util— .
Finance..................
Service..................
Government..............
Knoxville
Mining...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

3.4
40.3
5.5

1 7.7

4.7
9.4
9.4
105.3

2 .1
2.5
39.4
7.4

.1

3.4
39.9
5.5
I7 .7
4.8
9.4
9-3

3.8
43.5
5.6
I8.5
4.8
9.5

107.2
2 .1

113 .1
2.2

4.6

5.9
41.8
7.7
24.5
3.1

39 .O

3.1
12.3
15.4

7.4
23.4
3.1
12.3
15.4

184.1
.3

184.9
.3

39.7

40.6

15.7

15.9

26.3
28.8

8.8
26.5
28.6

136.2

136.4

23.2

94.7

9 .1

41.9

Finance..................
Service..................
Government..............
Memphis

264.0

263.8
17.5

16.8

113.1

12.6

48.4
12.5

28.1

31.6

114.0
12.7
49.3
12.3

277.2

17.7

124.3

27.6
31.3

13.7
49.6
12.7
28.4

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans. and pub. ut il....
Finance..................
Service..................

30.8

11.6

53.1
8.7

11.2

53.1

12.0
I6.0

I9I .5
.3
I O .5
45.7
I7 .O
54.9

8.6

25.9

28.8

Nashville

54.4
4.0
9.2
5.3
12.4

54.5
4.0
9.3
5.3
12.4

2.2

2 .1

12.5
2.1

5.3
I 6 .I

I6.4

5.4
I 6 .O

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h




July

1958

7.6

W ilkes -Barre— Hazleton
Manufacturing....... ...

June

I958

SOUTH DAKOTA
Sioux Falls

Philadelphia
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

July

are pr el im in a r y.

54.7
3.2
9.8
5.5
5.2

Contract construction...
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.............
Service..................
Government......... .

.3
7.1
37.5

.3
6.9
37.3

11.6
31.8

12.0
31.8

20.7
18.1

9.1
20.7
18.3

9.2

136.8
.3

6.8
38.6
12.5
31.2
9*2

20.6
17.8




25
Je A-12: Employees ¡n nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued
July

1958

June

1958

(In th
July

1957

dsJ---------------------------Area and industry division

July

1258„.

Ju î:
j a i

Richmond

83.9
51.2
87.3
21.2

83.8
51.2
87.4
21.3

90.0
58.4

M i n i n g ....................
Contract c o n s t r u c t i o n . ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............
Trans, and pub. util....
F i n a n c e ...................

93.2

164.5
.2
12.9
38.8
15.1
42.6
14.0
19.5
21.4

165

335.8
17.8
109.3
30.4
73.9
18.7
40.9
44.8

339
17

13

39
16
kl

13
19

20

21.3
W ASHINGTON
Seattle

125.9
5.8
8.6
19*9
13.4
35.5
7.8
16.3
18.6

125.2
5.8
8.2
1 9 -b

13.1
35.6
7.8
l6.4
18.9

127.1
7.6
9.3
19.6
13.4
35.5
7.6
16.2
17.9

Contract co n s t r u c t i o n . ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............
Trans, and pub. util....
F i n a n c e ...................
Service 1/ ................
Gove r n m e n t ................

112
30
76
19
39

^3

Spokane
Contract c o n s t r u c t i o n . ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............
Trans, and pub. util....

17.8
k .l

1.5
4.9
3.5
3.9

11.1
6.0
.6
1.9
1.2
1.6

17.5
4.1
1.5
4.8
3.3
3.8

10.9
5.9
.6
1.8
1.2
1.6

17.9
4.3
1.6
*•9
3.2
3.9

12.6
7.5
.6
1.8
1.2
1.6

Service l/........... .
Go v e r n m e n t ................

74.7
5.6
12.6
8.4
21.2
4.1
12.0
10.8

79«
5.
15921.
k,

12.
10.

Tacoma
Contract c o n s t r u c t i o n . ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g............
Trans, and pub. util....
F i n a n c e ...................
Service j/ ................
Govern m e n t ................

74.5
4.8
15.8
6.7
16.9
3.0
8.9
18.4

78.
5«
18 .

71 7*
3 .

9*
18 .

W E S T VIRGINIA
Charleston

158.6
.2
14.3
l4.4
16.7
43.7
6.3
19.0
44.0
>le.
month

158.3
.2
14.2
13.9
16.4
43.6
6.3
19.1
44.6

160.3
.2
14.6
15.3
17.7
42.4
6.2
18.8
*5.1

are pr e l i m i n a r y .

Contract construction..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........
Trans, and pub. util...

86.5
7.1
4.8
24.5
9.2
18.8
3.1
9 -h

9.8

93.
95.

26 .
10 .
19.

3*
99-

26

A re a Employment

Tab le A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued

Area and industry division
W E S T V I R G I N I A — C o ntinued
H u n t i n gton-Ashland
T o t a l ...................
M i n i n g ..................
Contract construction.
Manufact u r i n g ..........
Trans, and pub. util..
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e .................
S e r v i c e .................
Go v e r n m e n t .............
W h e e l i n g - S t e u b e n ville
T o t a l . ..................
M i n i n g ..................
Contract construction.
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..........
Trans, and pub. util..
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e .................
S e r v i c e .................
G o v e r n m e n t .............
WISCONSIN
Milw a u k e e
T o t a l ...................
Contract construction.
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..........

July

June

1958

1953

61 .8
1.1
2.4
20.5
5 .I
14.9
2.7
7-b

7.9

(Ì)
r

62.2
1.1
2.3

20.6
5.3
15.1

2.6

7.4
7.9

16.1

2.5
7.3
7.6

20.7

7.6

Ì)

11.0

00

7.7

177.7

70 .5
1.1
3.4
24.5
8.1

113.2

\h )

22.6

1957

105.5
5.1
4.7
47.0
19.5
3.1

^ 37.8

In th usands)
July
Area and industry division

439.5

22.2
I77.9

5.6

6.9

49.8

M i l w a u k e e — Cont inued
Trans, and pub. util..
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e ................
Service x J .............
Go v e r n m e n t .............

Rac ine
T o t a l ...................
Contract construction.
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........
Trans, and pub. util..
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e ................
Service j / .............
G o v e r n m e n t .............

June

1958

1958

29.3

92.6

21.4
54.0
1*0.3

40.2
1 .9
I 9.I
1 .9
7.6
1.0
5 .O
3.7

29.4
93.5
21.3
54.1

41.1

4i.4

1.9
20.0
1.9

7.6
1.0
5.2

3.8

9.0

3.1
11.0
7.3

463.1
24.8
199.0

W Y OMING
Casper
M i n i n g ..................
Contract construction.
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........
Trans, and pub. util.,
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e ................
S e r v i c e ................

l/ Includes mining.
2/ Includes government.
3/ Includes mining and government.
5/ Not available.
5/ Includes mining and finance.
§ Revised series; not strictly comparable with previously published data.
/
7/ Subarea of Hew York-Northeastern New Jersey.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back cover.




July

3.3
1 .5
I .9

1.7
4.2
.5

2.6

3.2
1.5

1.8
1.7
4.2
.5

2.6

Table B -l: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing
(Per 100 employees)
Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

1 9 5 1 ..................
I
..................

5 .2
4 .4

4 .5

4 .6

4 .5

1 9 5 3 ..................
1 9 5 4 ..................

4 .4

3 .9
4 .2

3 .9
4 .4

4 .5
3 .7

2 .8

3 .3

2 .5
3 .2

3 .3
3 .2

3 .1
2 .8

3 .1
2 .8

3 .5
3 .3
2 .8

2 .5

2 .2

2 .4

2.5

June

May

Y e ar

Total

952

1 9 5 5 ..................
I
..................

956

1 9 5 7 ..................
I
.....

958

2 .8

3 .6

4 .3
2 .4

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

4 .3
5 .6
4 .0

4 .4

3 .9
4 .0

4 ,2
4 .4

4 .5
5 .9

5 .1

4 .1

4 .3

3 .5

2 .7
3 .8

2 .9
3 .4

3 .3

4 .3
4 .2

3 .4
3 .0

3 .3
3 .2

3 .9
3 .8

3.0

Annual
average

accessions

4 .9
4 .9

3 .9
4 .1

Dec.

4 .5
3 .8
3 .2

3 .4
4 .4

5
3
3
4

.2
.3
.6
.1

4«1

4 .2

3 .3
3 .0

3 .3

2 .9

2 .2

5 .1

4 .7
4 .2

4 .3

2 .7
3 .3

3 .0

4 .4

3 .3
2 .1

4 .4

2 .5
2 .5
2 .3
1 .7

3 .9
3 .0
3 .7
3 .4
2 .9

3 .2

Total separations

95I ..................
952.....

4 .1

3 .8

4 .1

4 .0

1 9 5 3 ..................
1 9 5 4 .....

3 .8

3 .9
3 .6

3 .7
4 .1

4 .3

3 .5

1 9 5 5 ..................
.....
I

2 .9
3 .6

2 .5
3 .6

3 .7
3 .0

1 9 5 7 ..................
I
.....

3 .3
5 .0

3 .0

I
I

956

958

3 .9

3 .5
3 .3
4 .2

4 .6
4 .1
4 .3
3 .8
3 .1
3 .4
3 .3
4 .1

4 .8

4 .3

4 .4

3 .9
4 .4

3 .9
4 .2

5 .0

5 .3
4 .6

4 .3

4 .8

4 .9
5 .2

3 .3
3 .2

3.1
3.2
3.4
3.0
2.9

3 .1
3 .4

3 .5
4 .0

3 .9
4 .4

3 .2

3 .9
4 .0

4 .4

3 .1
3 .0

3 .7
3 .4
3 .6

3 .1

4 .4

3 .5
4 .2

3 .5
3 .4
4 .0

3 .3

3 .0

3 .0

3 .5

3 .1

3 .0

4 .4

3 .5
4 .0

4.0

3 .8

3 .5
3 .6

3 .1

2 .5

1 .9

1 .4

2 .4

4 .5

3 .3

2.8

4 .1
4 .3
3 .5
3 .3

3.0

Quits
I
I

95I ..................
952..................

1 9 5 3 ..................
1 9 5 4 ..................
1 9 5 5 ..................
I
..................

956

1 9 5 7 ..................
I

958..................

I
I

95I ..................
952..................

2.1

2.1

1 .9

1 .9

2.1
1.1
1.0

2.2
1.0
1.0

1 .4

1 .3

2.2

2.8
2.2

2 .5

2 .7

1 .3
1 .4

2 .5

2.0
1.0

2 .7

2.5

2 .4

2 .7

1.0

2.2
2.6
1.1

2 .5

2 .9
1 .4

1 .5

1 .5

1 .5

1.6

1 .4

1 .3

1 .5
a .4

2.2
2.2

1.1

1.6

1.6

2.2
1.1

2.8
2.1
1.2
1.8

2.1

1 .7
1 .3

1.3

0 .3
.4

0 .4
.4

.4

.4

3 .5
3 .1

1.8
2.8
2.6
2.2

1.2

.8

1 .3

1 .5
1 .3

•7

1 .3

.7

.7

0 .3

0 .4

0 .4

0 .4

0.3

0 .4

.3
.4

.3
.4

.3
.4

.3
.4

.3
.4

•3
.4

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.3
.3

.3
.3

.3

•3

•3

•3

•3

.3
.3

.8

.8

I

.9

1 .5

1.0

1 .7

1.1

2 .3
2 .3

1.1
1.0

1.1
1.6
1.6

.9

.7

1 .4

0 .3
.4

0.3
.3

1 .4

.8

.9

Discharges

1 9 5 3 ..................
I
..................

954

1 9 5 5 ..................
I
..................

0 .3
.3

0 .3
.3
.4

.3

.2
.2

.2
.2

.2
.2

.3

.3

.3

.3
.3

.2

.2

.3

.2

.2
.2

I

958..................

.2

.2

.2

.2

.1

.2

95I ..................
952..................

1.0

Q .8

1.0

1 .4

1 .3

0.8
1.1
.8

1.2
1.1
1.0

1.0
1.1

.3
.4
•3
.3

.2

.2

1 .5

1.2
1.1

1.6
1.2

2 .5
1 .7
1 .4

1 .9

1.2

.5

.3

.2

.3
.3

.2

.2

I
I

0 .3

.2
.2
.2
.2

956

1 9 5 7 ..................

.2

.2

•3

.2

.2

.2

Layoffs

1 9 5 3 ..................
I
..................

954

1 9 5 5 ..................
I
..................

956

1 9 5 7 ..................
I

958.................

I
I

95I ..................
952..................

.8
2.2
1.1
1.8

.9

2.8

1.5
1.7
1.5
3.8

2 .3
1 .3

1 .3
.9
2 .4

1.2

1 .9

1.6

1 .4

1.1
1.6
2.4

954

1 9 5 5 ..................
I
..................

956

1957
I

.....

958.....
NOTE:

Data

•9
1 .7

1 .3

1.2

1 .3

1 .3

1.2
1.1

1 .3

1.8

1 .3
1 .7

1.2
1.6

1 .4
3 .2

1.5
3.0

0.6

0 .5

0.5

0 .4

0 .4

0 .4

0 .4

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3

.3
.3

1 .5

.4
.4

.4
.4

.3
.3

.2
.2
.2
.2

.3

.2
.3
•3
the

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2

.3

.2

.2

current month




are

.2
.2
.2

1 .5
1 .7

1.1

1 .4

1 .7

.7

.7

1.8
1.6
1.2

2 .3

1.0

1 .3

1.8

1 .3
2 .3

I
2 .7

1 .4

1 .5

2 .7

1 .7

0 .4

0 .4

0 .4

0 .3

0.5

1 .4

including military

•3

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2

.2

.2

preliminary.

1 .3
.7

1.8

1 .4

2.9

0 .7

for

1 .4

1.0

Miscellaneous,

1 9 5 3 ..................
I
..................

1 .3

2.2
1.1
1.6

.2
.2
.3

.3
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2

.3
.3

.2
.2
.2
.2

.3
.3

.1
.2
.2
.2

.3

.3

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

.2

.2

.3

28

Labor Turnover

Table B-2: Labor turnover rates, by industry
(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
rates

Industry

J u ly

1958

Ju n e

Separation rates
Total
J u ly

Ju n e

Quits
J u ly

Discharges

Ju n e

1958 1958 1958 I958 1958
3.0
0.8
3.8
0.8
2.9

MANUFACTURING............................

3.2

DURABLE GOODS..................................................
NONDURABLE G00 DS.1/ .......................................

3-4
3.0

4.0
3-5

3-3
2.4

3-2
2.4

1.0

2.2

3-2

2.0

2.7

5.0
7-3
4.9

6.5

3.4

12.8

5.8

3.0

4.0

J u ly

1958

Ju n e

1958

Layoffs
J u ly

Ju n e

1958 1958
1.8 1.8

Misc., incl.
m ilitary
J u ly

Ju n e

0.2

0.2

1958

1958

0.2

0.2

.7
•9

.2
.2

.1
.2

2.2
1.0

2.1
1.2

.2
.2

.2

0.7

0.7

0.1

0.1

1.1

1.7

0.1

0.2

1.7
2.3
1.7

1.6

2.4
1.5

.4
.3
.4

•3

.2

.4

1.1
.2
1.2

1,6

3.6

3.7
5.2
3.6

2.4
1.5

.2
.2
.2

.2
.1
.2

4.7

2.3

2.5

1.3

1.2

•3

•3

•5

.8

•3

.2

4.4
4.4
4.4

4.0
4.0
4.2

2.9
2.9
2.7

3.2
3.7

1.2
I .3
.8

1.0
1.1

.2
.2
.2

.2

I .3
I .3
I .5

1.9
2.1
1.2

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

3-9
5-5
3-6
3-7

3.7
4.2

2.8
3 .I

2.6

.6
.6

.6
.6

.1
.1
.1
.2

1.9

1.3
3.2

.2
.1
.2
.2
.1

.2

1.6
2.8

1.6
2.1
1.1

.1

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1

•7

•3

Durable Goods

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)..............................
Logging camps and contractors............
Sawmills and planing m i l l s ...............
Millwork, plywood, and prefabricated
structural wood p r o d u c t s ................

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..................
Other furniture and fixtures .............

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........
Glass and glass products..................
Cement, h y d r a u l i c ..........................
Structural clay p r o d u c t s ..................
Pottery and related pr o d u c t s .............

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES................
Blast furnaces, steel works, and
rolling m i l l s ..............................
Iron and steel foundries..................
Malleable-iron foundries................
Steel fou n d r i e s........ ..................
Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals:
Primary smelting and refining of
copper, lead, and zin c .................
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
nonferrous metals:
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
copp e r .....................................
Other primary metal industries:
Iron and steel forgings..................

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT)..............................
Cutlery, hand tools, and h a r dware.......
Cutlery and edge tools ...................

Heating apparatus (except electric)
and plumbers' supplies....... ...........
Sanitary ware and p l u m b e r s ’ supplies...
Oil burners, nonelectric heating and
cooking apparatus, not elsewhere
c l a s s i f i e d................................
Fabricated structural metal products....
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving..
See

footnotes

NOTE:

Data

for




at

end

the

of

2.0

4.5
2.3

2.5
2.9
3.9

3.2
1.7
2.3
4.0

2.9

3-7

2.6

2.9
2.9
3-2
1.7
3.0

4.2
3 .I
3.4
3-6
2.4

1.6

2.8

month

.7

.4

.1

2.2

.3

.2
.1
.1

.3
.9
•7

.8
.6

2-3

.3

.3

.1

.1

1.9

1.6

.3

•3

2.8
2.3
2.1
3.2
2.0

2.1
2.6
2.7
I .3
3 .O

.2
.5
.6
•5
.3

.2
.4
.5
.5
.3

(2)
.1
.1
.1
.1

(2)
.1
.1
.1
.1

2.3
1.5

1.5

2.4
1.3

1.3

1.9

.6
2.3

.3
.2
.1
.2
.3

.3
.2
.2
.2
.3

2.0

2.0

3.4

.3

.6

.2

.1

1.2

2.3

•3

.5

1.9
5-3

2.1
5.5

1.0
4.4

1.6
2.5

.2
.8

.2
.4

(2)
•3

(2)
.2

•5
2.9

1.0
1.6

•3
•5

.3
.2

3.8

4.8

5.3

3.9

•3

.4

.1

.1

4.6

3-2

•3

.2

3.7
2.3
1.72.6
2.4

4.3
3.8
2.0
2.5
4.5

3.3
2.3
2.2
I .9
2.6

3.2
4.2
1.8
1.8
5.4

.8
.7
.9
.6
.7

.6
.5
.7
.6
.4

.2
.2
•3
.1
.1

.2
.2
.3
.1
.2

2.0
1.2
.8

.9
1.5

2.2
3-2
.6
.8
4.4

.2
.2
.1
.2
.3

.2
.4
.2
.2
•5

3.0
1.9

3 .I
1.9

3.5
3.3

2.1
2.1

.8
.7

.7
.4

.3
.2

•3
.2

2.1
2.1

•9
1.2

.4
•3

.2
.2

3.7
4.1
3-9

3.8
4.0
5.4

3.7
2.4
5.7

2.1
2.4
4.9

.8
.8
.8

.8

•3

•3
.2
.1

•7
1.3
3.9

•3

.2
.2

2.0
1.2

•5

.7
.5

.2
.2

.2

table.

current

2.2

•3

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

1.9

4.5

1.8

.4

29

Labor T urn o ve r

Table B-2: Labor turnover rates,
by industry-Continued
(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
Total
rates

Industry

Ju ly

June

1958 1958

Ju ly
19*58

Separation rates
Quits

Discharges

June

Ju ly
1958

June
I 95Ö

3 .2
4 .6
4 .2

0 .5
.3

0.6
.6

1958

Ju ly
1958

June
1958

Layoffs
Ju ly
1958

June
1958

M i s c . , incl,
military
J u ly
1958

June
1958

Durable Go o d s - Continued

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)...........
Engines and t u r b i n e s ......................
Agricultural m a c h inery and t r a ctors.....

Machine t o o l s . . . . « ........................
Metalworking machinery (except machine
tools )........ .............................
Sp ecial-industry machinery (except

2 .3
3.2
2 .9

2.6
1.8
1.6
1.5

2.8
1.6
2.2

3.1
3.4
5.3
3.1
2.4
2.4
1.5
3 .3

2.1

2.6
4 .2

2.1
1.8
2.9

2.1
2.0
5.9
2.3

.6

4 .0
3.0

.5
.3
.3

.7
.5
.4
.3

2 .9
6 .7

.3
.4

.4
.4

.5
.5
.4
.9
.4

.4

2.6

Telephone,

0 .3
.4

.2
.2

.3
.3

.3
.3

.2

.2

5 .7

.3

.4

.1
.1
( 2)
.1
.2

.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

1.4
1.4
.5

1 .5

.2

.8

.1

.6

1.4
3.2
2 .5

4 .0
3.0

2.5
2 .7
1.9
3.6
3.2

2.9

3.4

2.5

2.8

.8

2.2
2.8

2.7
4.0

2.3

2.2

2 .9
2 .5

.7
.9

1.0

.7

5 .7

2.4

2 .5

1.2

.8

2 .1

2 .7

3.6

4 .9

4 .1

4 .5
4 .3
3 .1
3 .3
2.5
1.4
4 .1
1 2 .4

6 .0
9-5

4 .4
4 .8

2.5
2.3
(3)
4 .4
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
1 .7

2.4
2 .7
4 .6
3.0
1 0 .4

1.9

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
.9

2.2
(3)

2.1
1.1

.7
(3)

Radios, phonographs, television sets,

2 .3
1.4

0.2
.2
.2
.2

2.2

4 .7

Electrical generating, transmission,
distribution, and industrial apparatus.

1.0

2.3
3.5
3.2
1.7
3.2
2 .3

1.4
5.2

.4

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY.....................

3.5
1.3

.1
.1

4 .2

Office and store machines and devices...
Service-industry and household machines.

1.8

.1
.1

3 .0
2.9
3 .2
3 .4

2.2
1.1

0.1 0.1
.1 .1
.1 .1
.1 .1
.1 .1
.1
( 2)

.3

.2

.3
.3

2,6
2.1

1.6
1.1
2 .5
2 .4

.4
.3

.3
.3

.1

1.4

1.6

.1

.2

.1
.1

.1
.2

1.0 1.1

1.3

1.9

.2
.1

.2
.2

1.2

.2

.2

.9

.1

.2

.2

•5

.1

.1

1.6

1.9

.2

.2

.8

.7

.2

.2

3 .6

2 .9

.3

.3

.3
.4
.9

.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

8.6 3 . 8
1.6 1 . 4
1.6 1.2
1.4
1.8

4 .9

3 .1

•3
•5

.3

.7

.6
.6

telegraph, and related

.9

.2

Electrical appliances, lamps, and

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.................

?.

0

3-7

2.0
1.8
Aircraft engines and p a r t s ..............
Other aircraft parts and e q u i pment .....
Ship and boat building and repairing....
Railroad e q u i p m e n t .........................
Railroad and street cars.................
Other transportation equipment...........

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS........

2 .5
(3)
3.9
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
4 .3

2.1

Photographic app a r a t u s.............. .....
Watches and c l o c k s .........................
Professional and scientific instruments.

2.2

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES...

4 .0

(3)
2 .3

6.1
1.2
I 3.O
4 .9
2.3
1.4

2.6

8.8
3.5

16.2

2.0
2.8

2.6
2.4

3.7
2 .3

4.6

2.6
2.1

2.2

3.0

2.0

2.8

3 .1
2 .3
4 .0

4 .4
4 .1
4 .5
3 .7

2 .7
2 .5
2.5

(3)

Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware....

2.6

4 .5

3 .4

#7
’4
.

.8
.8
.5
(3)

1.2

.6
.8

1.0
.9

1.0
.5
.6
1.0
1.6
.2
.3

\
q
.7
.4

.8
.9

1.0
.9

(3)
.3
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

.2

.1

.3
.4
( 2)
( 2)

.1
.1

(3)
( 2)

.1

.1
.1
.1
.1

.2
.1

.2
.1

(3)

3 .8

2.8 1.6
8.1
(3)
8.0
(3)
2.8
(3)
(3)
.5

L5.3
.9

1.2 1.1
(3)
1.7
1.4

.5
2.5

•9

.9

1.1
1.2 2.0

.1
.1
.2
(3)

.1

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

.1

.2
(3)

.2
.1
.2
.2

.6
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
.3

.6
.4
.7

.1

.2
.2
.3

.2
.2
.3

Nondurable Goods

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...............

.8




are

preliminary.

.2
.1

2.8

.4
.7
1.3

1.2

•3
•3

(3)

2 .7

(3)

.6

(3)

Beverages:

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d of ta bl e.
NOTE: D a t a for the cu rr en t m o n t h

.8

2.9
3 .1
.2 .5
2 .3

.5
.7

•3

.2
.2

1.5
1.7
1.5

1.6
2.2

.4

1.0

1.5
.5

.1

(3)

1.9

.2
.2
.1
.2
(3)

.2
.2
.1
.1
.2

30

Labor T u rn o ve r

Table B-2: Labor turnover rates,
by industry-Continued
(Per 100 employees)

Industry

Separation rates
Total
Ju ly

1958

1958

*^>H

Total
accession
rates
July J u n e

1.6
1.2
2.0
1.4

1.4
.8
2.2
1.3

2 .2
1.0
4 .1
1.5

3 .7
3A
3.6
3.4
4 .5
3.9
2 .7
3 .3
(3)
3 .1
(3)

3 .3
3 .1
3.0
2.6
5.4
3 .9
1.7
3 .5
4 .1
2.2
3 .5

2.8
2 .8
2 .7
2.6
2.8
2 .5
2.3
(3)
2.6
(3)

2 .7
3 .0
2.4
2.2
2.0
1.7
2 .7
2 .8

4 .0
3.2

3.9
4 .6

2.9
2.1

3 .9

3.6

2.9
2.2
3 .0

Quits

Discharges

Layoffs

M i s c . , incl#
military

1958

June
I 958

Ju ly
1958

June
I 958

Ju ly
I 958

June

1958

Ju ly
1958

June
1958

1.3
.8
2 .1
.8

1.1
.8
1.5
.7

.7
.5
1.1
.3

0 .1
.1
.1
.1

0 .1
.1
.1
.2

1.0
(2 )
2.4
.4

0 .3
.1
.7
(2)

0 .1
.1
.1
.4

0 .1
.1
.1
.2

2 .7
2.6
2 .8

1.3
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.3

.2
.1
.2
.3
.2
.2
.1
.2
(3)
.2
(3)

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
.1

1.1
1.1

1.3
1.4
(3)
.9
(3)

1.1
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.3
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.3
.6
.6

1.2
1.1
1.3
1.2
1.4
.8
.5
.4
.3
1.8
1.8

.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
(3)
.3
(3)

.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
(2 )
.1
.2
.3

2 .2T

1.7
1.1

1.4
.9

.1
.1

.2
.1

1.0

.5

1.3
1.2

.1
.3

.1
.1

2 .6

2 .5

1.9

1.4

.2

.2

.6

.8

.1

.1

3 .5
2.9
4 .1

1.9
1.1
2 .5

2 .0
1.2
2 .4

.8
.5
1.0

.7
.5
.9

.2
.1
.3

.2
.1
.2

.8
.3
1.0

1.0
.4
1.0

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

1.5
1.1
.9
.3
1.2
1.6

2.4
1.9
1.8
2.5
2.9
3.0

I .3
1.2
1.0
.8
1.3
1.2

1.7
1.9
1.8
1.3
1.6
1.1

.5
.4
.3
.2
.6
.6

.5

.3
.3
.7
.6

.1
.1
(2 )
(2 )
.1
.1

.1
.1
.1
(2)
.1
.1

.6
.4
.5
.3
.6
.4

1.0
1.1
1.3
.8
.7
.2

.1
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL..........

.7
.4

1 .7
1.3

1.1
.9

1.1
.8

.3
.2

.2
.2

(2 )
(2)

.1
(2)

.4
.3

.6
.3

.3
.3

.2
.3

RUBBER PRODUCTS..........................

3 .5
1.9
2.2
5.2

3.9
2 .1
2 .5
5.6

1.7
.7
1.9
2.5

1.6
1.2
2.3
1.9

.6
.3
1.2
.7

.5
.3
1.3
.6

.1
(2)
.1
.2

.1
.1
.2
.1

.8
.2
.5
1.3

.8
.7
.7
.9

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.1
.2
.2

3 .9
2 .5
4 .1

4 .0

2.7

3.4
1.7
3 .7

2 .8
2 .3
2 .8

1 .7
.6
1.9

1.4
.6
1.6

.3
.2
.3

.2
.2
.2

1.2
.6
1 .3

1.0
1.2
.9

.2
.4
.2

.2
.4
.2

()0
10

J u ly

19*58

Nondurable Goods— Continued
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES............ ........
C i g a r s .......................................

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS....................
Yarn and thread m i l l s . . ...................
Cotton, silk, synthetic fi b e r ...........

Full-fashioned h o s i e r y ...................

Dyeing and finishing t e xtiles............
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings....

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS................................

3.7

3 .0

1.5

Men's and boys' furnishings and work

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...............
Pulp, paper, and paperboard m i l l s .......
Paperboard containers and b o x e s .........

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...........
Industrial organic chemicals.............

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............
Leather: tanned, curried,

and finished..

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .
NOTE: D a t a for th e c u r r e n t m o n t h




are

4 .2

preliminary.

.4

.9
.7
1.9

1.0
1.0
.7
(3)
1.2
(3)

31

Labor Turnover

T a b le B -2: Labor turnover rates,
b y Industry-Continued
(Per 100 employees)

Industry

Separation rates
Total
accession
M isc., in cl.
Total
Quits
Discharges
Layoffs
rates
m ilitary
July June July June July June
July June July June July June
I 958 I 958 1958 1958 I 958 1958
I 958 1958 I 958 1958 I 958 1958

NOHMAHUFACTURING

METAL MINING.............................

2 .2
3A
(3 )
l.l

2 .9
2 .7
2 .1
1 .4

ANTHRACITE MINING........................

1.0

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING...................

8.0

4 .2
4.5
4.3
5 .4

1.5
.2
(3)

.1

1.7
1.6

1.3

3-9

3 .6

.6

.2

1.2

1.2

1.5

2 .7

.3

(3 )
(3 )

(3)
(3)

1.5

1 .7

1.6

(3)
(3)

COMMUNICATION:

J Data

J
2/
3/
4/

1.2

3 .4
1.3
(3)

0 .2
(2)
(3 )

3 .3

3 .3

( 2)

.1

( 2)

1.0

2.2

.2

.2

( 2)
( 2)

(3 )
(3 )

.1

( 2)

( 2)

.3

( 2)

1 .1

(3 )
(3)

.6

.2

for the printing, publishing, arid allied industries group are excluded.
Less than 0.0 5 .
Not available.
Data relate to domestic employees except messengers.




0 .4
.6
.5

3-5

O.5
.8
(3)
.4

0 .2
(2 )
.2

1 .2
.3
(3 )
5 .7

1 .3
.2

2 .3
3 -8

1.9

.2
.6

(3)
(3)

.2

.1
.3

S ta te a n d A r e a L a b o r T u r n o v e r
Table B -3: Labor turnover rates in m anufacturing
for selected States and areas
(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
rates

State and area

June
1956

Separations rates
Total

May June

Quits

May June

Di scharges

May June

Layoffs

Misc., incl.
military

May June

May June

May

1958 1958 1958 1958 19^8 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958

ALABAMA l/ .............................

4.7

3.5

3*6

3.9

1.0

0.8

0.2

0.2

2-3

2.8

0.1

0.1

ARIZONA...............................

5.1

5.1

4.6
5.7

4.3
3.7

4.3
3.8

1-9

2.0

1.6
1.8

.4
-3

.2
.2

1-9
1.3

2.3
1-7

.1
.1

.2
.1

5.3

4.9

4.2

k.9

1.8

1.8

.4

-5

1.9

2.5

.1

.1

4.8
6.2
7.6

3.9
5.3
4.5

3.9
4.4
3.3

k.2
k.6

1.4
1-3
1.6

1-3
1.1
1-3

-5
.4
-3

.4
-3
-3

1.8
1.2

2.4
3-1
-7

.1
.1
.1

.1
.1
.1

3.0

2.1
2.1
2.1
1.1
2.1
1.8

2.7
2.8
2.2
2.1
3.0
2.3

.8
.6
.6
.4
-9
.6

.1

.1

.1
.1
.1

.1
.2
.2
.1
.2
.1

1-9
1-3
1.2
1.8
1.3

2.3
3-1
1.0
2.2
2.3
2.4

.2

2.0
3.0
3.6
3.4

.8
.6
.6
-5
1.0
.6

.2
.3
.1
.3

.2
.2
.2
-3
.2
.3

2.6

5.2

2.6
1-3

3.1
2.0

2.2
2.1

-7
-5

-5
.4

.2
.1

.2
.1

2.0
1.2

1-3
1.4

.2
.2

.2
.2

Washington...............................

4.2

3.5

2.6

3.1

2.0

1.8

-3

.2

-3

1.0

(2)

.1

FLORIDA...............................

7.1

5.7

8.0

6.7

2.2

2.2

.6

.6

5.1

3-8

.1

.1

6.2

3.5

2.7

3.6

1.1

1.3

-3

.4

1.2

1.8

.1

.1

IDAHO 3/.................................. 11.3 12.2

k.6

5.0

2.8

2.4

.4

-5

1.2

1.8

.2

.2

INDIANA 1/ .............................
Indianapolis k j ..........................

3.9
2.9

3A
2.1

2.9

3.0
3.0

.6
.6

.6
.6

.1
.1

.1

3.1

.2

I .9
2.0

2.0
1.8

•3

.4

.3
.4

KANSAS 5/.................................
Wichita 6 / ...............................

6.2

3.0
2.0

5.*
3.4

3.3

k.O

1.3
1.4

1.2
1.4

.3
.3

.2

3.7

.2

3-7
1.5

1.8
2.2

.1
.1

.1
.1

KENTUCKY..................................

^.5

4.9

2.3

3.7

-7

.8

.1

.1

1.4

2.7

.1

.1

MAINE.................................

9.1

4.8

3.3

3.3

1.5

1.2

•5

.2

l.l

1.7

.2

.1

ARKANSAS:

CALIFORNIA:
Los Angeles-Long Beach 'U ...............

CONNECTICUT............................
Hartford.................................
New Britain..............................
New Haven................................

2.8
2.9
1.9

2.8

2.7
DELAWARE..................................

2.5

3A

k .l

.1

2.7

1.6

.2

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:

GEORGIA:

See last page for footnotes.
NOTE: D a t a for the cu rr en t m o nt h




are pr el im in ar y.

S ta te a n d A r e a L a b o r T u r n o v e r

33

Table B-3: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing
for selected States and areas-Continued
(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
rates

State and area

Separation rates
Total

ûui ts

Di scharges

May Ju n e
1958 1958

Misc., incl.
military
May
May Ju n e
1958 1958
1958

Layoffs

May
3,958 1958
3.4
3.2
3.3
2.9

Ju n e

0.7
•7

0.8
.6

0.2
.2

0.2
.2

2.1
1.8

2.3
2.3

0.1
.1

0.1
.2

3.4

4.0

1.3

1.2

.2

.2

1.8

2.5

.1

.2

3.9

2.9

3.7

1.2

1.1

.2

.2

1.3

2.2

.2

.2

3.5

3.8

4.2

5-2

2.3

2.9

•5

.5

1.4

1.6

.1

.1

NEW HAMPSHIRE.............................

5.6

5.1

3.7

3.8

1.7

1.4

.2

.2

1.4

2.0

.2

.2

NEW MEXICO 7/.............................

5-3
5.1

4.9

4.2
4.1

4.8
3.2

1.8
2.2

1.3

.3
.3

.3
.4

2.0

3.1
1.4

.1
.1

.1
.2

4.6
1.4
1.5
3.6
6.3
4.1
5.6

3.5
1.9

3.8

4.5
2.4
1.7
4.4
2.7
2.5

.8
.6

.8
.6

.2
.2

•7
•5

•9
.5

3.3
1.7
•5
3.7

Ju n e

3-9
3.3

May
1958
3.2
2.5

MINNESOTA:
.....................
Minneapolis-St. Paul

4.7

3.4

MISSOURI..................................

h-5

NEVADA.....................................

Ju n e

1958
MARYLAND..................................

NEW YORK..................................

Elmira............ ......................

6.0

1.1
2.8

2.8
1.3
3.2

2.2
2.8

6.1

2.1

2.2

.6

.6
1.1
.8
.6

.9

4.7
3.9

.6
1.2

.7

2.7
3.5

3.1

2.5
3.1

2.7
3.0

1.1

1.3

7.6

6.0

3.3

3.6

5.6
6.9
5.0

4.8
5-3

3.7
5.7

4.2

6.8

3.9

5.0
1.7

2.9

3.2
3.2

2.2

NORTH DAKOTA..............................

OKLAHOMA..................................

York City............................

2.2

2.4

.6

1.2

1.3
.9

5.1
3.0
4.5
1.3
1.9

New

1958

.2
.1
.1
.1
.2
.2

.4

May Ju n e
1958 1958

.2

2.6

(2 )

1.9
.3
2.4

.2
.1
.1
.2

.4

.1
.1
.1
.2

.1
.2
.1

1.0
1.1

.2

.2

.9

1.6

1.8

6.2
2.2

1.4
1.5
i.a

5.3

3.8

4.9

7.7

2.9

2.3
4.3

2.7
7.2

5.6

7.8

3.4

2.7
4.0
4.4
NORTH CAROLINA............................

RHODE ISLAND..............................
SOOTH CAROLINA 8/

.........................

SOUTH DAKOTA..............................
Se e la st p a g e for footnotes.
NOTE: Da t a for the cu rr en t m o n t h




2.7

are preliminary.

.8

1.3

1.5

.3

.8
1.8
2.0

1.1

3.5
2.3

.2
.1

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1

1.1

1.2
1.3
3.7
.9

.3

*.7
1.5

.2
.2
.1
.1
.2

1.8
1.1

.3

.3

1.3

1.4
1.5

.1
.1

.1
.1

.1

.1

2.1

1.8

.2

.1

1.5
1.5

.3
.3

.4

.2

.2

2.3
4.2
•9

.1

.2

1.9
3-5
.5

.4
(2 )

.2
.1
.1

1.2

1.2

.1

.1

2.2

3.3

.2

.3

3.2
10.4

1.2
1.8

1.1

.3
.5

.2

1.0

.3

4.6

8.4

.2

1.5

.3

.1
.2

3.3

1.3

1.5

.2

.2

1.7

1.5

.2

.1

1.0

.4

1.8

34

S ta te a n d A r e a L a b o r T u r n o v e r

T a b le B -3 : Labor turnover rates in m anufacturing
for selected States and areas-Continued
(Per 100 employees)

State and area

Total
accession
rates

Separation rates
Total

Quits

Discharges

Layoffs

Misc., incl.
military

June May June May June May June May June May June May
1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958

VERMONT...............................

4.3

3.2

2.8

3.9

1.1

1.0

0.2

0.2

1.3

2.5

0.2

0.2

WASHINGTON l/..........................

5.6

4.0

3.1

4.1

1.4

1.2

.2

.1

1.3

2.4

.2

.2

WEST VIRGINIA..........................

3.3
1.3
3.6

3.0
.7
3.9

2.0
1.1
1-3

2.9
2.0
1-3

.5
.2
.3

•5
.2
•3

.1

.1

(2)

(2)

1-3
•7
.9

2.2
1-7
•9

.1
.2
.1

.1
.1
.1

1/ Excludes canning and preserving.
2/ Less than 0.05.
3/ Excludes canning and preserving, and sugar.
4/ Excludes canning and preserving, and newspapers.
5/ Excludes instruments and related products.
S/ Excludes paper and allied products, products of petroleum and coal, and instruments and related products.
7/ Excludes furniture and fixtures.
B/ Excludes tobacco stemming and redrying.
NOTE: Data for the current month axe preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back cover.







36

C u r r e n t H o u rs a n d E a r n in g s

T a b le C -1: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in m anufacturing,
by major industry group
Average weekly earnings
Major

industry

group

A ug.

1958

Ju ly -

1958

Average weekly hours

J u ly

1957

Aug.
1958

Aug.

1958

Aug.

1957

Average

A ug.

1958

hourly earnings

J u ly

1958

A ug.

1957

MANUFACTURING...........................

$83.53

$ 83.50

$ 82.80

39.4

39.2

40.0

$2.12

$2.13

$2.07

DURABLE GOODS.................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS..........................................

9O .52
75-46

89.83

89.O6
74.26

39.7
39.1

39.4
38.9

40.3
39.5

2.28

75.47

1.93

2.28
I .94

2.21
1.88

$99-94: £101.18

$93.83

40.3

40.8

40.1

$2.48

$2.48

$2.34

74.82

75.62

38.2

40.0
38.4

41.1
40.7
40.8
39.3

1.90
1.78
2.11
2.68

1.88
1.78
2.11
2.67

1.84

71.63

41.0
39.4
40.5

39.8

69.06

40.0
39.4
39.3
39.6
39.7
39.2

40.9
40.5
40.2
40.1
40.0
40.0

2.29

2.28
2.38

97*04
84.00
72 .OO

40.2
39.5
39.7
39.8
39.6
39.3

2.21

2.52
2.20

77.71
56.83
58.65

40.8
38.5
39.O

41.0
39.6
38.5

40.9
38.4
39.1

36.8

Durable Goods
O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s .....................
L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r ni t u r e ).......................................
F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ........................
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s .....................
Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, ma c h i n e r y , and t r a n s p o r t a ­
t i o n e q u i p m e n t ) ................................

I n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ..........
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries..

77 .9O
7O.I3

85.1*6
84.40
IO2.38 102.53

92.O6
9^.01

85.36
IOO .69
87.52
72 .3I

84.05
99.82

91.20

89.98

93.77
84.50
99.79
87.34

93.15

72.13

82.81

38.8

1.76
2.06

2.54

2.15
2.53

2.15

2.20
2 .3O
2.06

1.84

1.84

2.10
I .80

1.97
I.6I
I.5I

2.00
I .67
I .50

I .90
1.48
I .50

42.5

I.5I
2.13

I .50
2.12

I .50
2.06

38.6

2.60

2.59
2.33
2.76
2.35
1.55

2.51

38.1

2.33
2.74
2.35
I .56

2.38

2.42

Nondurable Goods

8O .38
61.99

82.00
66.13

54.96
89.46

53.40

88.62

55.20
87.55

36.4
42.0

35.6
41.8

98.54

97.38

96.89

37.9
40.6
40.4
39.4
36.9

37.6
40.7
4l.O
39.2
37.3

58.89
A p p a r e l and other fin i s h e d text i l e
p r o d u c t s ..........................................
Printing, publishing, and allied
i n d u s t r i e s .......................................
C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ..............
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l ............
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s .................................

NOTE:

Data

for the




2

most

recent months

57.75

94.6O 94.83
IIO.7O 113.16
92.12
92.59
57.56

57.82

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

92.25
IO 9.21
92.84

58.67

41.0
40.6
40.9

2.25

2.69
2.27
1.54

O v e rtim e H ours

37

Table C -2 : Gross a v e ra g e w eekly hours and a v e ra g e overtime hours
o! production workers in manufacturing, by major industry group
A ug ust
M a jo r in d u s t r y g ro u p

G ro se

MANUFACTURING............. ..... ...............................
DURABLE GOODS............................................................. ..
NONDURABLE GOODS..................................................... ....
Durable

I95Ô
O v e r­
tim e

O v e r­
time

Ju n e
G ro ss

195»
O v e r­
tim e

A u g u st
G ro ss

—

2.2

39-2

1.9

39.2

1.9

40.0

39-7
39*1_

2.0

39.*
38.9

1.7

39-6
38.7

2.1

1.7

40.3

40.8
39.8

2.1

38.8

1.8
2.8

195Î
O v e r­
tim e

2.4
2.3

2 *5=,-..

Goods
_

-

-

-

and f i x t u r e s .........................................................

F a b r ic a t e d mettal p r o d u c t s

195«

39-4

_
F u r n it u r e

J u ly
G ro se

-

40.0
38.4

2.9

1.3

40.7
40.5

1.6

38.8

2.9
1.7

40.3
38.3

1.3

2.8

40.1
41.1
40.7
40.8
39.3

1.6
3.2

2.6
3.3

1.8

(e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,

-

-

-

40.0
39.4
39.3
39-6
39-7
39-2

2.0
1.5

1.2
1.6
1.2
1.8

40.9
40.5
40.2
40.1
40.0
40.0

2.9
2.3

3.2

1.9

40.9
38.4
39.1

3.8

42.5

40.0
39.6
39.6
39.8
39.8
39*5

2.0
1.6
1.2

40.7
39.7
38.4
35.0
41.8
37-6
41.1
41.0
39.X

3.1

1.5
1.4
1.9

2.1
2.0
1.7
2.4

Nondurable Goode
.
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.




-

41.0
39-6
38.5
35.6
41.8
37.6
40.7
41.0
39.2
37.3

3.2
1.7
1.9

1.0

4.0

2.2
2.0
1.8

2.4
1.3

36.6

1.8

.8

2.2
2.0
1.6

2.4
.9

1.1
2.2

38.6

1.4
4.5
3.1

38.1

3.2
1.5

36.8
41.0
40.6
40.9

2.2
1.8

In d e x e s o f M a n -H o u r s a n d P a y ro lls

38

Tab le C -3 : Indexes of a ggre ga te w ee kly man-hours
in industrial and construction activities!/
( 1947- 49=100 )

August
1958

Activity

July

June

August

1958

1958

1957

97.1

94.0

93.9

108.9

68*0

66.8

68.7

83.4

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............................

138.0

132.2

128.1

145.5

MANUFACTURING....................................

93.2

90.3

90.6

105.4

DURABLE GOODS.....................................
NONDURABLE GOODS.................................

93.9
92.4

92.2
88.0

93.7
87.0

112.4
97.0

300.1
78.2

298.I

300.9
76.7
92.1
94.9
81.1

335.1
82.3
107.4
107.0

109.0
105.2
100.1
88.5

98.3
86.7
110.6
107.7
101.9
90.9

115.2
106.2

89.1

84.7

105.2
107.2
96.2

106.4
107.6

M IN IN G ...........................................

Durable Goods

Lumber and wood products (except furniture)......
Furniture and fixtures...............................

Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
Machinery (except electrical)......................

97.7
99.4

75.4

91.9
95.7

81.5

80.5

99.6
84.9
114.1

97.1
84.4

101.6

103.7
93.6

104.5

134.7
135.6
II6.6

103.8

Nondu rable Goods

Apparel and other finished textile products......
Paper and allied products...........................

97.0
84.7
70.7
100.7
108.4

Chemicals and allied p r o ducts......................

108.4
96.8
84.3

Leather and leather produ c t s ........................

89.1
87.9

68.4
67.3
94.1

69.1
68.0

92.4

106.0
114.1

111.5

97.2

104.5

84.8

94.1

85.8
86.3

85.9

86.3
86.9

X I For mining and manufacturing, data refer to production and related workers.
relate to construction workers.
NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

97.8
88.4
75.1

91.2
105.2

For contract construction, data

Table C-4: Indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls
in industrial and construction activities!/
(1947- 4 9 = 1 0 0 )

1958

M INING ...........................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............................

-

MANUFACTURING....................................

149.0

XI

See f o o t n o t e 1, ta b l e C-3.
NOTE: D a t a for the 2 m o s t r e c e n t m o n t h s are p r elim i n a r y .




June

102.5

August

ti

Activity

106.2

128.5

222.8

213.3

237.4

145.0

144.9

164.6

1958

August
1957

39

In d u stry H o u rs a n d E a rn in g s

Table C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry
Average weekly earnings
JulyJulyJune
1958
1950
1957

Industry
H I H I MG.................................

METAL MINING..........................

$100.33

$ 101.89 $104.19

96.00
104.43

Copper mining............. ».........
Lead and zinc mining................

90.27

ANTHRACITE MINING....... .............

81.43

88.04

Average weeklsr hours
July- June
July
1958
1958 1957

Average hourl*y earnintís
July
June
July
1958 1957
1958

39.5

39.8

40.7

$ 2.54

$2.56

$ 2.56

38.4
36.9
37.3
40.2

37.9
36.4

40.6

2.44
2 .7O
2.37

39.8

40.0
40.3

2.50
2.83

2.47

40.9

85.97

100.28
109.61
98.OO
87.85

2.19

2.16

2.18

8O .96

81.72

31.2

3O .9

32.3

2.61

2.62

2.53

36.3

2.98

3 .O2

3.09

92.48

98.28
85.56

36.1

2.42

2.68
2.45

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING...............

99.83

IO6 .3O

112.17

33.5

35.2

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION:
Petroleum and natural-gas production
(except contract services).........

IIO .70

110.57

110.00

4i.o

40.8

41.2

2.70

2.71

2.67

NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING.....

91.94

91.49

90.70

44.2

44.2

44.9

2.08

2 .O7

2.02

COHTRACT CONSTRUCTI0H .... .............

111.53

110.11

109.15

37.3

37.2

37.9

2.99

2.96

2.88

NONBUILD 1N6 CONSTRUCTION.............................

109.76
105.98
113.94

108.67
103.25

110.77
107.01

114.05

40.7
41.3
40.2

41.8
43.5
40.3

2.71
2.56
2.87

2.67
2.50
2.85

2.46

114.57

40.5
41.4
39.7

III .80

110.77

IO8.56

36.3

36.2

36.8

3 .O8

3 .O6

2.95

GENERAL CONTRACTORS.................

103.89

103.46

102.03

36.2

36.3

36.7

2.87

2.85

2.78

SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS...........

115.16

36.3
37.9
35.3
38.3
35.5

36.1
37.8
35.2
38.5
35.1

3.21
3.28
3 .O8

3 .I9

107.71
136.68
109.51

112.98
116.80
IO5.95
132.83
108.60

36.8

3.07
3.09
3.01

3.56

3.24
3 .O6
3.55

Other special-trade contractors....

116.52
124.31
108.72
136.35
111.12

36.2

3 .I3

3.12

3.00

MANUFACTURING..........................

83.50

83.10

82.39

39.2

39.2

39.8

2.13

2.12

2.07

89.83

89.89

88.00

39.4
38.9

39.6
38.7

40.0

74.47

39.4

2.28
I .94

2.27
I .94

2.20
I .89

Highway and street construction....

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION....................................

Painting and decorating............

DURABLE GOODS...............................................
NONDURABLE GOODS.........................................

122.47

37.8
35.2
39.3

2.65

2.83

3.38

75.47

75.08

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES............. .

IOI.I8

100.94

93.60

40.8

40.7

40.0

2.48

2.48

2.34

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)............................
Sawmills and planing mills...........
Sawmills and planing mills, general...

74.82
74.03
74.82

76.Il
l

71.89
70.23
70.82
49.13
85.74

39.8
39.8
39.8
41.3
39.0

40.5
40.5
40.6
41.8
39.3

1.88
38.8 ■ 1.86
1.88
38.7
40.6
I .23
36.8
2.36

1.88

1.82
I.8I

76.19

40.6
4i.o
40.3
40.0
40.5
39.7

40.6
41.0
41.0
40.3
40.6
40.1

40.1
41.3

Durable Goods

50.80

74.52
75.52
51 .OC

92.04
MillWork, plywood, and prefabricated
structural wood products............
Plywood..............................
Wooden containers. ....................
Wooden boxes, other than cigar......
NOTE:

Data

for the

current month




91.96

79.17

79.58
79.13

79.54
78.59
58.OO

59.13
63.12

are preliminary.

81.18

58.03
58.46

63.36

77.64
72.95
57.60
58.58
6I.9I

39.5

38.6

40.0
40.4
40.2

1.84

1.86
1.22

1.83

1.21

2.34

2.33

1.96

I .90

I .95
1.94

1.93

1.95
1.45
1.46
1.59

1.44
1.44

1.98
1.58

1.88
1.89

1.44
1.45
I .54

40

In d u stry H o u r s a n d E a r n in g s

T a b le C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings
JulyJune
July

Industry

1958

Ayerage weekly hours
July
July
June

Average hourly earnings
July
July
June

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

I958

$ 69.06
65.23

$ 68.38

38.8
38.7

38.8
38.6

39.3
39.2

$1.78
I .69

$1.78
I .69

$1.74

65.07

58.O5
69.19
8O.I6

58.05
68.63

58.21
68.22

38.7
36.9
40.6

39.6
37.9
40.5

I .50
1.85
I .96

I .50

76.95

38.7
37.4
40.9

1.86
1.97

1.47
1.80
1.90

77.61
63.52

78.59
63.92

39.0
40.2

82.06

78.01
63.18
86.33

36.8

39.8
40.5
39.6

I .99
I .58
2.23

2.01
I.6I

82.51

39.1
39.7
37.0

2.23

1.96
1.56
2.18

86.80

86.85

84.96

39.1

39.3

39.7

2.22

2.21

2.14

70.45

71.15

68.63

39.8

40.2

39.9

1.77

I .77

1.72

84.40

84.63

103.32

82.82
112.28

4o.o

108.58

40.3
36.9
40.0
40.9
38.4

40.4
40.1
40.2
40.4
39.8
39.3
37.8
40.6
41.6
40.0
40.6
39.0
36.3
43.5
43.8
40.2

2.11
2.88
2.16
2.17
2.13
1.81
2.34
1.91
1.75
1.92
1.94
2.33
2.03
2.01
I .95
1.81

2.10
2 .8O
2.16
2 .I7

2.05
2.80
2.11

39.8
39.2

2.21
2 .3I
2.22

2.21

2.67

2.61

2.53

2.72

I958

1957

Durable Goods — Continued

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES.................

$ 69.06

H o usehold f u r n i t ure .................... .
Wood household furniture, except
u p h o l s t e r e d ............................
Wood household furniture, upholstered.
Mattresses and b e d s p r i n g s .............
Office, public-building, and profes­
sional f u r n i t u r e........... ............
W ood office f u r niture..................
Metal office f u r niture.................
Partitions, shelving, lockers, and
f i x tures......................... ........
Screens, blinds, and miscellaneous

65.40

STONE, CLAY AND GLASS PRODUCTS........
Plat g l a s s ................................
Glass and glassware, pressed or blown.
Glass c o n t a i n e r s ........................
Pressed or blown gla s s .................
Glass products made of purchased glass.
Cement, h y d r a u l i c ........................
B rick and hollow t i l e ..................

84.24

79.98

86.40
88.75
81.79
69.72

86.37
80.30
70.23
94.30
76.59

73.15

92.11
76.17
72.80

85.05

76.82
83.25

77.18
76.24
Pottery and related p r o d u c t s ...........
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products.

77.39

71.40

70.04
88.84

88.20

86.58
72.94

85.97

Cut-stone and stone p r o d u c t s ...........
Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral

85.94
74.26
87.74

84.82
86.46
81.59

68.78
83.16
76.33
71.55

76.80
76.33

85.02

71.87
84.39
81.47

71.56

38.1

40.3
40.1
41.8
40.2
39.3
36.5
34.5
44.2
44.4
40.3

40.4
40.3
41.6
40.1
39.6
37.0
35.0
44.1
44.3
40.8

38.9

41.4

2.13
I .83

2.28
I .89
1.75
1.93
I .94

2.25

2.04

2.00
I .94
1.62

86.86
89.69
89.91
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES..............
Blast furnaces, steel works, and
rolling m i l l s ...........................
Blast furnaces, steel works, and
rolling mills, except electrometal­
lurgical p r o d u c t s .....................
Electrometallurgical p r o d u c t s ........

87.89
90.42
87.97

85.79

40.4
37.0

39.7
37.4
4l.l
36.5

102.53

99.96

100.44

38.4

38.3

39.7

III .05

106.60

107.17

37.9

37.8

39.4

2.93

2.82

111.43

IO6.97

107.56
92.28
88.31
85.63
83.85

37.8
39.6
37.0

39-4

2.94

39.6

36.9

37.9
36.7

39.1

39.0
40.7

2.52
2 .3I
2.26

2.83

39.1

95.24

37.9
40.2
37.3
37.0
37.7
37.8

101.30
86.16
83.62

98.60
85.IO
83.03

85.57

37.7
39.0
39.8
37.7
38.8

88.98
89.84

37.6

36.2

2.43

2.35

2.20
2.41

2.49
2 .3O

1.66

2.14

2.05
1.75
2.20
1.88
1.72
1.92

1.88
2.18
I .98
1.94

1.86
1.78
2.15
2.27
2.17
2.37

2.73

2.36

2.25
2.28

2.42

2.23
2.19
2.15
2.34

NOTE:

Data

for




the

current

month

84.83
92.23

86.41

98.80

96.96

95.58

40.0

39.9

40.5

2.47

2.43

2.36

90.91
108.78

89.10
108.80

91.13
101.66

39.7
39.7

39.6
4o.o

40.5
40.5

2.29

2.25

2.74

2.72

2.25
2.51

88.22

M a l l e a ble-iron fou n d r i e s ..............
Steel f o u n d r i e s.........................
Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous m e t a l s .......................
P r i m a r y smelting and refining of
copper, lead, and zinc ...............
P ri m a r y refining of aluminum .........
Secondary smelting and refining of

86.37

85.44

40.1

39.8

40.3

2.20

2 .I7

2.12

88.81

are pr e l i m i n a r y .

2.25
2.44

41

In d u stry H o u r s o n d E a r n in g s

T a b le C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings
J ul y
June
July-

Average weekly hours
July
July
June

I 958

1958

1957

1958

$99.75

$101.09

$94.24

99.38

Industry

98.17

IOI. 9I
9I .34
102.05

106.04
93.6O
101.14
101.46
99.45
102.83

Average hourly earnings
July
duly
June

I958

I958

1957

1958

39.9

4o.6

40.1

$2.50

$2.49

$2.35

95-18

40.4

40.4

40.5

2.46

2.43

2.35

93.69
91.77
IOO .69
105.52
94.56
104.67

39-5
39-2
39-4
38.3
39-6
41.5

41.1
40.0
39.2

39.7
39.9
40.6
40.9
39.9
41.7

2.58

2.58

2.36
2.30

90.80
89.13
106.68 101.76
85.67 84.19

40.0
42.7
39.O
39.5

39.3
39.1
38.4
39.7

40.7
43.3
39.9
39.9
38.5
40.4

2.28
2 .5 I
2.16
I .92
2 .I7
2.22

1957

Durable Goods — Continued
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES— Continued
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of

Miscellaneous p r imary metal industries.

101.88
98.60
110.81

W e l d e d and heavy- r i v e t e d p i p e ...... .

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
ORDNANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTA­
TION EQUIPMENT)......................

91.20
107.18
84.24
75.84

H a r d w a r e ...................................
Heating apparatus (except electric)

83.76
86.58

;
.

75.46

73.42

83.71

80.47

88.93

88.48

38.6
39.O

38.0

40.1
39.4

40.0

42.5

2.33
2.59

2.66

2.49
2.67

2.34
2.58
2.67
2.48

2.48

2.58

2.61

2.37
2.51

2.27

2.19

2.51
2.18

2.11

2.35

2.18

1.84
2.09

2.20

2.21
2 .3I

2.10
2.21

1.93

2.24

2.19

85.58
88.85

87.07

91.48

38.9

85.53

38.8

39.4
39.6

39.O
38.7

84.24
94.77

84.89
93.56

80.55

39.0
40.5

39.3
40.5

39.I
41.8

2.16

2.34

2.16
2 .3I

2.06

93.63

95.71

94.02

95-37

40.9

40.7

42.2

2.34

2 .3I

2.26

90.45

88.75
94.71
97.47

90.67

40.2

2.38

93.03

2.23
2.35
2.36
2.32
I .89
2.43

82.92

2.12

2.05
2.11
2.21

2.02

82.68

41.4
41.6
41.6
40.0
41.4
40.2
39.7
39.6
41.4

2.25
2.38

93.50

39.8
40.3
41.3
40.1
39.5
40.3
39.3
39.3
38.9

2.19

94.96
96.39

Sanitary ware and plumbers' supplies..
Oil burners, n onelectric heating and
cooking apparatus, not elsewhere
c l a s s i f i e d...............................
Fabricated structural metal products...
Structural steel and ornamental metal
w o r k ......................................
Metal doors, sash, frames, molding,

2.56

2.48
2.37

2.42
2.35
2.19

81.90

92.35

39.9
40.5

2.29

2.24

2.22
2.28

85.97
104.66

103.58

42.2

91.01

86.33
84.32

84.98

94.71
90.45

86.52

42.2
38.4
37.6
38.5

42.8
40.3
41.3
41.2

2.39
2.29
2.14

2.26

82.01

38.3
37.7
39.4

93.77
99.57

94.25

93-61

39.6
40.1

40.7
40.4

2.38
2.54

2.30

98.98

39.4
39.2

2.38

102.26

2.55

2.45

107.86

Metal stamping, coating, and engraving.
V i t r e o u s-enameled p r o d u c t s .............
Stamped and pressed metal products....
Lighting f i x t u r e s.........................
Fabricated wire p r o d u c t s .................
Miscellaneous fabricated metal products
Metal shipping barrels, drums, kegs,

94.85
89.20
72.86
92.86
80.19
81.18
89.01

109.21

114.70

39.8

40.3

42.8

2 .7I

2.71

2.68

99.60

93.85

39.0

4o.o
40.2
39.7

39.6
39.8
39.3

2.48
2.44

2.49
2.42
2.53

2.37
2.28
2.33

40.6

40.3
40.5

2.33

2.36

2.33
2.34

2.22
2.27

40.2
41.3

2.37
2.35

2.34
2.34

2.27
2.26

79.76
97.44
'82.35

87.64
108.03

Bolts, nuts, washers, and r i v e t s ......

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)..........
Engines and turbines.....................
Steam engines, turbines, and water
Diesel and other internal-combustion
engines, not elsewhere classified....
Agricultural machinery and tractors....

91.54

96.72

74.66
97.93
80.57

40.3
42.2
40.1

39.4
39.0
39.3

for

the

current




month

91.57

40.9

94.60
90.09

89.47
91.94

39.6
38.9

93.14

90.79

89.07

Construction and mining machi n e r y ......
Construction and mining machinery,
except for oil f i e l d s ..................

Data

40.2

88.69

91.25
93-34

39.3
37.9

104.70

Agricultural machinery (except

NOTE:

90.74

are

98.09

97.28
100.44

92.27
91.80

preliminary.

38.5
38.8
37.9

2.32
I .89
2.43
2 .O9
2.23

2.56

2.13

2.23
1.76
2.31
2.05
2.15

2.10

42

In d u stry H o u r s a n d E a r n in g s

Table C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by ¡ndustry-Continued
Average weekly earnings
July
June
July

Industry

1958

1958

1957

Average weekly hours
July
June
July

Average hourly earnings
July
June
July

I958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

Durable G o ods— Continued
M ACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL) — Continued
Metalworking m a c h i n e r y .................. $99.33
87.82
Machine t o o l s ...........................
Metalworking machinery (except
97.52
machine tools)........................
I O 6. I 3
Machine-tool accessories...........
Special-industry machinery (except
metalworking m a c h i n e r y ) ...............
88.82
Food-products m a c hi n e r y ...............
94.48
Textile m a c h i n e r y ......................
74.80
Paper-industries m a c h i n e r y ............
89.78
Printing-trades machinery and equipment 96.38
General industrial m a c h i n e r y ..........
91.73
Pumps, air and gas compressors.......
90.23
Conveyors and conveying equipment....
92.58
Blowers, exhaust and ventilating fans
90.05
92.98
Industrial trucks, tractors, etc.....
Mechanical power-transmission
e q u i p m e n t ..................... .........
90.32
Mechanical stokers and industrial
furnaces and o v e n s ....................
90.25
Office and store machines and devices.
93.77
Computing machines and cash registers 104.04
77.42
T y p e w r i t e r s ......... ....................
Service-industry and household machine
90.74
95.20
Domestic laundry e q uipment...........
Commercial laundry, dry-cleaning, and
82.01
pressing m a c h i n e s .....................
87.01
Sewing m a c h i n e s .........................
Refrigerators and air-conditioning
91.20
u n i t s . ...................................
90.78
Miscellaneous machinery p a r t s .........
91.41
Fabricated pipe, fittings, and valves
86.48
Ball and roller bearings..............
92.17
Machine shops (job and r e p a i r ).......
Electrical generating, transmission,
distribution, and industrial apparatus
Wiring devices and supplies ........
Carbon and graphite products
(e l e c t r i c a l ).........................
Electrical indicating, measuring, and
recording inst r u ments ............ .
Motors, generators, and motorgenerator s e t s .........................
Power and distribution transformers..
Switchgear, switchboard, and
industrial c o n t r o l s ...................
Electrical welding apparatus .........
Electrical a p p l i a n ces.............. .
Insulated wire and cable................
Electrical equipment for vehicles.....
Electric l a m p s ............ ......... .
Communication e q u i p m e n t . ................
Radios, phonographs, television sets,
and e q u i p m e n t ..........................
Radio t u b e s ..............................
Telephone, telegraph, and related
e q u i p m e n t ...............................
Data

for

the




current

month

are

$ 106.00

38.8
36.9

39.4
37.4

42.4
41.0

$2.56

97.17

2.38

$2.59
2.40

$2.50
2.37

95.23
IIO.7 O

100.26
I I 3. I O

38.7
39.9

38.4
40.7

41.6
43.5

2.52
2.66

2.48
2.72

2.41

88.26

89.82

39.4

2.26
2.31
2.00

2.24

2.18

2.30
1.96

40.0
39-4
40.5
39-3

41.2
41.0
40.6
43.4
41.1
40.8
40.7
41.4
40.2
40.2

2.23
1.91
2.14
2.39
2.27

2.28

94.95

97.70

89.91
91.57

88.04

90.85

39.3
40.9
37.4
39.9
39.5
39.2
39.4
38.I
40.2
39.4

91.18

92.92

38.6

38.8

9I.O3

90.74

93.38
74.28

88.31
97.69
92.90

91.20

91.43
77.55

92.88

98.23

92.62
89.54

40.6
37-9
39.6
40.2

39.7

2.41

2.36

2.33

2.20
2.36
2.19
2.26

40.4

2.34

2.35

2.30

38.9
39-9
40.4
39-6
39.8
39.6

39.8
39.9
40.8
38.5
39.5
40.0

2.32
2.35
2.55
I .98

2.34
2.34
2.53

2.28
2.38

2.38

2.24
2.43
1.93
2.19
2.24

42.0
40.3

2 .I3
2.26

2.26

2.15

2.06

2.28
2 .3I
2.32
2 .3O
2 .3I

2.28
2.32
2.30
2.30

2.20
2.26

2.34

2.23
2.25
2.27

90.74

86.51
89.60

86.22
87.24

86.52
90.27

38.5
38.5

4o.l

91.20

86.24

4o.o
39-8
39-3
40.4

39.2
40.5
40.0
39.8
41.0

102.21
79.60

94.25

89.38
99.14

74.31

38.6

2.29

2.23
2.43
2.34

2.43
2.24

38.9
39.9
40.8
39 .I
39.8
40.0

93.37

2.25
2.44
2.34

2.60

2.22

2.01
2.28

2.28

2.24

89.24
94.54

93.07

4o.o
39.3
39.4
37.6
39.9

84.50

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY.... ....... .....

NOTE:

$102.05
89.76

85.14

81.39

39.3

39-6

39.7

2.15

2.15

2.05

89.44
77.77

77.03

88.70

39.4
38.5

39-5
38.7

40.5
39.3

2.27

78.17

2.02

2.26
2.02

2.19

85.41

85.63

84.77

39.0

39.I

39.8

2 .I9

2.19

2.13

85.32

85.57

81.81

39.5

39.8

40.3

2.16

2.15

2.03

95.28

94.88
92.5O

94.48

39.7
39.9

39-7
39-7

40.9
40.9

2.40

94.07

2.31

2.39
2.33

2.30

39.6
38.3

39-8

38.4

2.33
2.33

2.25
2.31

2.07

2.09
2.29
2.04
2.07

92.17

92.66

88.47
83.22
86.31

87.48

92.34

90.39

89.27

91.53

89.20
89.55

38.8

92.73
89.47
82.40
87.36

84.67

42.1

89.31

85.58

38.2
38.8
39.3

38.6

39.8

41.2
39.7
38.9
41.3
38.9
39.2
39.1

92.70
91.71
82.08
74.48
75.85

38.0

37.8
41.8
39.0

2.34

2 .3I
2 .I9
2.05

2.29
2.04

2.18

1.96

2.31

2.11

2.05

2.20

79.15
81.35

78.74
82.39

80.99

81.60

73.73

74.86

67.86

39.7
38.4

40.0
39-4

39.6
37.7

2.04
I .92

2.04
1.90

1.80

91.49

93.06

85.91

39.1

1 39.6

38.7

2.34

2.35

2.22

preliminary.

75.24

1.90
1.94

1.90

4
3

In d u stry H o u r s a n d E a r n in g s

Tab le C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings
Industry

Average weekly hours

Average hourly earnings
J u ly
Ju n e
July

J u ly

Ju n e

J u ly

J u ly

Ju n e

J u ly

1958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

I958

1958

I957

$ 85.63

$ 83.20
92.40

$ 80.60

87.86
66.59

$ 2.13
2 .3I

92.48

40.0
40.0
40.1
40.4

40.3

93.32

40.2
39-9
40.2
40.2

1.82
2.36

$ 2.08
2 .3I
1.77
2 .3I

$ 2.00
2.23
I .69
2.25

99.79

99.5O

95.44
94.96

39.6
38.9

39.8

39-6

39.1

38.6

2.52
2 .5I

2 .5O
2 .5I

2.41
2.46

98.69
87.60
85.27
102 .*7
102.36
103.53

87.20
87.13
102.16
102.06
IO3.38

38.7

2.55
2 .I9

2.55

2 .5O
2.12
2.07

96.29

96.78

99.30
96.80

Durable Goods — Continued

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY— Continued
Primary batteries (dry and w e t ) . ......
X-ray and non-radio electronic tubes..

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT...............

92.17
73.16
94.87
97.64

Motor vehicles, bodies, parts, and
access o r i e s .........................

70.98

98.14

99.20

96.50

39.4
39-4
4i.l

38.6

79.37

37.8

87.16

84.21

39.7

39.8

40.1

2.20

2.19

2.10

101.81

103.48

95.04

40.4

40.9

40.1

2.52

2.53

2.37

86.24
91.^3

86.51
85.85

85.OI

39.2
41.0

39.5
39.2

40.1
40.3

2.20

2.19
2.19

2.12

78.40

78.78

70.86

40.4
38.3
40.4

74.47

71.82

69.66

40.0
37.7
40.4
39.4

38.2

40.0
39-9
40.7
38.7

1.95
1.85

97.36

74.00
67.83
94.02

I .96

70.12
98.17

Aircraft propellers and p a r t s.........
Other aircraft parts and equipment....
Ship and boat building and repairing...
Ship building and r e p a i r ing ............

38.9
40.0
41.1
40.7
40.5
40.7
40.3
41.2
39.5
39.3
40.5
37.2
39.7
35.9
39.8

1.85
I .70
2 .3I

72.13

73.08

80.88
66.52

72.22
81.16
80.47
66.86

39.2
39.8
39.9
39.3
38.7
38.9

39.5
40.4
40.8
39.4
38.5
39 .I

39.5
39-9
39-7
40.4
36.4
38.3

38.8
39 .I
38.O

38.2
38.6

37.8
40.5
39.3

39.0
39.2
39.5
38.9
40.7
39.3

41.0
40.7
41.0
42.4
42.9
42.3
43.2

40.7
40.6
41.0
41.3
42.8
42.5
42.6

93-77
103.41
99.65
102.94
76.23
98.32
IO5.59

95.11
102.59

84.80

80.11

94.94
93.13
95.88

Laboratory,

104.41
94.78
82.39

99.63
79.59
101.05

95.30
78.62

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS.......

99.43

102.56
100.30

87.34

78.98
98.21

40.0
40.8

40.5

40.3
40.6
39.9
41.2
39.7
39.9
38.5
37.1
39.4

36.1

scientific, and engineer-

4o.o
38.7
40.4
39.8
40.8
40.8
41.9

40.5
40.5
40.4
40.1
40.7
39-8
39 .I

2.09

2.53
2.54
2.55
2.35
2 .5I
2 .5I

2.18
2.12
2 .5 I

2.35
2.34
2.36
2.35
2.37
2.39
2.46
I .97

2.65

2.52
2.54
2.36
2.49
2.45
2.53
I .95
2.64

2.68

2.61

2.63

2.64

2.52
2.52

2.08

2.07

2.03

2.58
I .98

2.52

Mechanical measuring and controlling

Surgical, medical, and dental

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..
Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware...
Jewelry and findings....................
Musical instruments and p ar t s ...........
Toys and sporting good s ...............
Games, toys, dolis, and c h i l d r e n ’
s
v e h i c l e s .................................
Sporting and athletic g o ods............
Pens, pencils, other office supplies...
Costume jewelry, buttons, not i o n s......
Fabricated plastics p r o d u cts............

72.44
69.43
80.57

64.41

71.16

64.22

63.50
78.98
75.85

74.74

64.74
70.95
68.73
65.35
79.37
75.85

85.84

71.50

71.42
67.49

81.20
73.53
63.58

61.50
67.94

65.86
64.35

80.10

75.05

39-2
39-0
41.5
39-5

2.23

1.86

2.13

2.43
I .89

2.41

1.84

1.82

1.85
1.85

2.05
2.09
I .71

2.06
2.09
1.71

2.01
2.02
1.66

1.66
1.82
1.69
1.68

1.66
1.81
1.74
1.68

I .61
1.76
1.68
1.65

1.95
1.93

1.95
1.93

1.93
I .90

2.00

2.01

I .91
2.14
2.33

1.74

1.88

1.77

1.80
1.81

1.79
I .70

Nondurable Goods

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS..............

Dairy p r o ducts ............................

82.00
91.58
101.68
97.52
84.08
84.60

89.42
NOTE:

Data

for

the c u r r e n t




month

are p r e l i m i n a r y

81.81

90.54
100.45
94.58

83.03

84.58
86.48

79.27
87,31
95.76

91.10
80.85
80.66
86.29

41.5
40.8
41.1
41.6
43.7
43.6

43.8

2.25
2.48
2 .3O
I .96

2.00
2.07

2.23
2.45
2.29
I .94
1.99

2.03

2.19
I .85
I .85

1.97

44

In d u stry H o u r s a n d E a r n in g s

Table C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings
July
June
July

Industry

I958

1957

$ 63.58

$64.17
54.77
67.32

1958

Average weekly hours
July
June July

I958

1958

1957

Average hourly earnings
J uly
June
July

1958

1958

1957

$ 1.66
I .75
I .72

$1.55
I .63
I .53
I .94

Nondurable Goods— Continued
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS— Continued
$63.27
57 .O9
65.93
9O .98
94.47

Canning and p r e s e r v i n g ...................
Sea food, canned and cured........... .
Canned fruits, vegetables, and soups..
Flour and other grain-mill products...

51.10
66.22

89.73
92.98
83.40
79.98
8I .81
73 .I6
9O.O7
97.9O
84.87

86.10
80.98
82.82

Bread and other bakery prod u c t s.......
Biscuit, crackers, and p r e t z e l s .......
S u g a r ....................................

90.50

Beet s u g a r ................................

100.89
82.40

73.53

39.3
41.3
4l.l
45.9

38.O
41.1
42.3
44.1

41.5
42.2

62.16

39.6
41.6
37.9
37.4

55.15

38.3

39.7
42.0
37.6
37.8
38.4

39.6
43.4
36.2
37.9
38.3

57.90

38.5
42.4
37 .O

87.78

96.78
79.79
64.22

71.12
118.08

88.03
80.12

84.36
79.32

94.12
77.57

86.02
77.61

97.71
74.09

95.37
74.49

66.13

<
66.30
80.64

63.76

79.87

51.92
62.83

51.51
63.13

47.78

Distilled, rectified, and blended
l i q u o r s ..................................
Miscellaneous food p r oducts.............
Corn sirup, sugar, oil, and starch....

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...................

57.45
TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS...................

57.75
67.84

51.80
51.52
50.77

57.98
57.98

67.68
51.66
51.38
51.26

55.06

55.68
54.20
58.45

66.72
60.61

53.30
67.30
60.76

56.41

59.82
54.14

54.38
55.27

81.16

69.47
53.10
53.10
54.85

56.26
54.77
59.98
53.86

66.56
61.51

53.94
54.10
58.37

50.49
52.13
50.12

54.75
55.94
59.29
54.51
48.60
51.29
48.11

57.23
51 .IO

Knitting m i l l s . . . ............. ...........

59.13
50.78

65.27

69.39

50.86
65.60

64.55
76.92

68.81

64.87

*75.24

72.07
68.76

58.83

53.85

Dyeing and finishing te x t i l e s ...........
Dyeing and finishing textiles (except
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings...
Wool carpets, rugs, and carpet yarn...
Hats (except cloth and mill i n e r y ) ......
NOTE:

Data

for




the

current

month

are

68.63

60.39

preliminary.

69.18

60.42

41.4
33-6
44.0
44.7
44.3
45.3
41.0

41.4
43.3
40.8

81.99
77.49
78.94
71.97

61.62
93.15
72.54
112.74

64.55
95.35

38.3

29.2

38.5
44.2
44.7
44.6
40.6
40.7
40.2
41.7
42.2
41.2
39.8
39.6
41.1
43.1
41.0

86.72
89.49

67.26
62.92
96.46
71.88
Malt l i q u o r s .......................... - .. 117.91

66.86

39.3
34.6
40.7
44.6
45.2
45.8
40.9

52.08
47.95

52.11
47.19
59.14

59.01

41.0

40.4
41.9
43.3
40.0
39.8

38.6

36.8

38.4
42.3
36.9
36.7

35.5
38.9
38.5

38.4
37.9

39.1

38.4
41.7
39.I
37.5

36.6
38.2

36.1

38.2

37.8
41.8
39.2
37.5

36.8
38.5

40.9

41.6
42.0

43.4
40.3
39-*

39.0

41.4
43.7

40.7
39.1

45.7

38.6

42.1

38.2
38.2
38.9
38.8
38.3
39.2
38.2

41.6
40.2
37-2
34.9
37-9
33.6

35.9
37.4
37.5
37.4
37.9
37.3
39.8

36.1
36.0

41.8

37.4
40.0

39.6
40.7
37.5

41.7
39.6
37.6
36.4

39.8
39.6
38.2
36.2

36.6

36.9
35.9
38.9

36.8

36.6
38.6
36.3

38.4

$ 1.61
I .65

1.62

2.04

2.09
1.88
1.98
2.02
1.82
2.16

2.03
2.08
I .87
1.97

2.02
1.81
I .89
I .93
I .73
2.09

1.66
2.89

2.01
1.82
2.16
2.32
2.06
1.68
1.63
2.32
1.65
2.88

2.24
I .94
2.29
I .69

2.22
I .93
2 .3I
1.68

2.20
I .87
2.26

1.67
I .92
1.37

1.67
1.92

I.6I
1.87
I .32
1.64
1.44

2.33

2.06
I .69

1.63
2.33

1.68
I .50
1.50
I .60

1.40
1.40
1.43
1.45
1.43
1.53
1.4l

1.60
1.55

1.45
1.51
1.54
1.50
1.35
1.39

1.34
1.51

1.37
1.64

1.63
1.89
1.83
1.65

1.37

1.67
I .51
1.51

I .60
1.40
1.40
1.42
1.45
1.43
1.53
1.41
I .61
1.55
1.46
I .52

1.54

I .51
1.35
1.39

1.34
I .52
1.38
1.66
1.65
1.90

1.84

1.66

2.23
I .98
1.63
I .58
2.25

1.66
2.77

1.63

I .50
1.65
1.39
1.39
1.41
1.45
1.43
1.53
1.41

1.60
1.53
1.45
1.55

1.54
1.55
1.31

1.35
I .30

1.54
1.36

1.64

1.63
1.82
I .80
1.63

45

In d u stry H o u r s a n d E a r n in g s

Ta b le C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings

July

June

1958

Industry

Average weekly hours

1958

July
1957

July
I 95Ö

June
.1958

July
1957

$ 68.60

$ 69.65

$69.77

39.2

39.8

75.66
65.16
71.71
56.94

75.27
68.71
72.22
58.87

72.52

69.36
71.20
58.80

39.2
36.4
39.4
39.0

38.6
38.6

91.36
60.04

92.23
59.67

97.00
57.83

53.40

52.50
61.59

54.15

44.70
44.07
45.63
41.76
55.44
53.61

46.48
46.48
47.34
43.50
59.33
54.42

Average hourly earnings
July
^Tuly
June

1958

1958

40.1

$1.75

$ 1.75

$1.74

I .93
1.79

39.9
40.6

39-2
37.9
40.5
41.7

1.95
I .78
I .81

I .85
I .83
I .76
1.41

42.1
39.5

42.5
39.0

44.7
38.3

2.17
1.52

2 .I7
1.53

2.17
1.51

35.6
34.8

35.0
34.6

36.1
36.1

1.50
1.76

I .50
I .78

1.50
1.77

36.2

35.2
34.7
35.1

36.6
36.6

1.28
1.28
1.30
1.16
1.67
1.63
1.31
2.05
1.35

I .27
I .27
1.30
I .16

1.27
1.27
1.29
1.16
I .70
1.61
1.28
2.11

1957

Nondurable Goods — Continued
TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS— Continued
Misce l l a ne o u s textile g o ods............
Pelt goods (except woven felts and
h a t s )....................................
Paddings and u p h o l s t e r y filling......
P r o c essed waste and recovered fibers.
Artificial leather, oilcloth, and
other coated f a b r i c s ..................

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS..............................
Men's and boys' suits and coats .......
Men's and b o y s ’ furnishings and work

61.25
46.34

46.72

46.54
39.44
57.78
54.12

45.98
Women's, c h i l d r e n ’ under garments....
s
Underwear and nightwear, except

72.37
47.93
46.57

51.11

Millinery. ................................
Mi s cellaneous apparel and accessories.
Other fabricated textile p r o d u c t s .....
Curtains, draperies, and other house-

61.24

51.71
50.62

46.33
64.62
48.28

63.90

45.06
74.91
48.01

46.05

46.46

53.00
58.71
50.65
50.20

51.62

Fiber cans, tubes,

and drums..........

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES.......... .................

97.38

97.38

103.72

104.02

Bookbinding and related industries....
Miscellaneous publishing and printing
servicejs.......................... .......
NOTE:

Data

for th e

current




month

85.80
97.36
100.23
63.75
72.72
111.13

are preliminary.

100.23
35.75

96.22
98.81
66.39
74.07

111.22

1.28

36.6
39.4
41.7

36.8

38.4
40.7

36.9
39-9
39-9

1.35
1.53
I .50

1.54
I .55

1.31
1.52
1.49

41.8
42.6
41.2
41.3
40.3
40.8

41.8
42.8
4l.l
41.3
39-3
40.4

42.3
43.4
41.4
41.6
4o.l
41.0

2.12
2.26
2.02
2.00
2.16

2.11

2.06
2.20

2.02
2.00
2.16

1.95

1.93

1.93

37.6
35.4
39.O

2.59
2.92
2.64

2.59
2.93
2.57

38.9

38.3
35-4
40.2
39-6
39.8
39-4

72.94

37.6
35.1
39.4
39.0
39.1
39.0
37.5
37.1

37.6

IIO .30

37.8

37.7

88.20

102.49

1.33

1.52

88.62
96.28
83.22
82.60
87.05
78.74

77-97

1.29
1.51

37-*

59.45

84.89

1.36

1.79
1.38
1.41
1.53

63.09

32.60

36.1

38.2
36.0

48.34

83.02

35.5

1.32
1.97

32.8

50.05
59.14

95.87

32.8

1.66
1.67

36.7
35.6
37.2

58.64
52.72
50.40

62.55
Pulp, paper, and paperboard m i l l s .....
Pa perboard containers and box e s .......

33.4
32.1
35.1

36.7
37-5
34.9
33.8
• 35-2
35-5
36.3
35-6
34.7

60.28
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.............

36.0

35.7
35.1

56.10

49-41

34.0
34.6
33.2
35.1
35.3
35.5

1.45

36.1
34.3
34.6
37.2
35.9
37.2

56.92

56.54

36.5
35.8

1.82

1.46

60.50
87.14

95.48
80.73

80.70
83.01

76.67
95.75

100.54
100.90
83.95
95.12

98.50
63.63

38.8
38.8
38.6

1.29
1.49
1.77
1.39
l.4l

2.20

1.36

2.24

2.21

38.8

38.8

2.49
2.57
I .70
I .96

2.48
2.54
I .72
I .97

38.3

2.94

2.95

1.45
I .69
I .38
i.4o

1.50

1.94
2.07
1.87
2.50

2.84

2.51
2.12
2.39

2 .5O
1.64

1.88
2.88

46

In d u stry h o u r s a n d E a r n in g s

T a b le C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings
Industry

J u ly

Ju n e

1958

1958

J u ly

,„1SS7_ .

Average weekly hours
J u ly

1958

Ju n e

1958

J u ly

Average hourly earnings
J u ly

Ju n e

1957

1958

41.0
40.7
40.7
40.9
41.8
41.2
40.3
41.6
40.6

$2.33
2.57
2.55
2.48
2 .5I
2.74
2.40
2 .I3

2.35

41.0
41.0
41.4

2.46

2.45

2.67
2.30

2.66

2.24
I .93

2.22
I .94
I .76
I .92
I .85
2.01
2 .I7

1958

J u ly

1957

Nondurable Goods— Continued
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS........
Alkalies and chlorine.................
Industrial organic chemi c a l s .........
Plastics, except synthetic rubber...
Synthetic f i b e r s .......................

$ 94.83

104.34
103.53

$94.94
IO4.96
101.66
100.12

86.07

102.75
112.61
85.44
95.65
86.11

100.94
IOI.9I
111.79
95.28

85.84

$92.25
100.94

99.31
98.16
IOI.I6
108.77
83.42
95.68
82.42

40.7
40.6
40.6
40.7
40.6
40.8
40.6
39.7
40.3

41.1
41.0
40.5
40.7
41.1
41.1
40.3
40.7
41.2

Soap, cleaning and polishing

IOO .61

$2.25
2.48
2.44
2.40
2.42
2.64

2.12

2.07
2 .3O
2 .O3

2.09

Miscellaneous c h emicals ...... . ........
Essential oils, perfumes, cosmetics.
Compressed and liquefied g a ses......

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL.......

95.53
IO3.73

40.9
41.0
41.7

41.0
42.1

93.41
81.45
73.26
84.63

93.91
79.93
72.51

88.81
80.91
71.80

79.90
89.49

80.29
89.24

82.47
76.46
89.95
67.94
96.79

42.3
41.2
41.2
43.9
43.4
44.4
40.3
39.0
41.8

41.5
43.5
41.5
44.1
43.2
45.2
40.2

98.64

87.45
72.15
100.74

41.7
42.2
40.7
43.4
42.5
44.3
39.6
38.3
41.1

41.9

2.40

113.16
116.85

111.93

111.64

115.92

41.0
41.0

41.0
40.9

41.5
41.4

2.76

115.75

2.85

2.73
2.83

2.69
2.80

99.87

Paints, varnishes, lacquers, and
e n a m e l s ................................
Gum and wood c h e m icals ................
Fe r t i l i z e r s ..............................
Vegetable and animal oils and fats....
Vegetable o ils.........................

100.21
109.06
95.57

98.71

98.41

41.1

41.3

41.7

2.43

2.39

2.36

92.12
106.59

91.10
103.63

94.16

77.20
83.77

39.2
38.9
39.4
39.4

39.1
38.1

40.0
39.7

41.3
42.5
39.2
40.7

2.35
2.74
I.9I

2.33
2.72
1.93

2.28

112.20
72.13
82.62

2.12

2.11

2.64
1.84
2.03

57.82

57.46

58.67

37.3

36.6

38.1

1.55

1.57

1.54

76.40

78.98

76.83

38.2

39.1

39.4

2.00

2.02

1.95

74.11
57.00
55.65

73.73

57.15

77.36
56.74

56.09

63.91
53.36

64.40
53.34

38.2
38.1
36.0
38.5
36.8

40.5
38.6
37.9
4o.o
37.3

I .93
I .50
I .50
I .69
1.43

1.93
I .50
I.5I

66.25

38.4
38.O
37.1
39.2
37.1

1.66
1.45

I .91
1.47
1.48
I .61
1.43

50.54

50.04

49.32

36.1

36.0

36.0

1.40

1.39

1.37

101.19

95.42

41.3
43.0

42.6
43.7

(1 )
2.12

2.24

90.02

(1 )
43.0

2.45

91.16

2.12

2.06

38.4
36.4
41.9
41.9

38.2
36.2

39.5
37.9
43.0
42.2

2.07

2.05
1.75
2.54

1.94
1.69

2.41

2.18

2.10

109.47
95.91

85.54

70.86

Coke, other petroleum and coal

RUBBER PRODUCTS.......................

75.25
83.53
LEATHER AND J.EATHER PRODUCTS.........
Leather: tanned, curried, and
fin i s h e d................................
Industrial leather belting and
p a c k i n g.................................
Boot and shoe cut stock and findings.
L u g g a g e ...................................
Handbags and small leather goods.....
Gloves and miscellaneous leather
goods. ...................................

84.29

54.36

53.05

90.67

83.21

40.9

2.12

$2.31
2.56
2 .5I
2.46
2 .5O
2.74

38.6

1.80
I .95
1.88
2.02
2.16
I .85

2.27

1.85
2.41

2.33
2.53

2.19
2.14

1.86
1.73

1.87
1.77
1.99

2.07

1.76

2.31

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S :
TRANSPORTATION:

Interstate railroads:
Class I r a i l r o a d s ....................

(l)

91.16
COMMUNICATION:

T e l e p h o n e .............................. .
Switchboard operating employees 2 7 *

NOTE:

Data

for

the




current

month

are

79.49
78.31
63.70 : 63.35
107.68 104.90
91.34
91.76
preliminary.

76.63

64.05

103.63
88.62

41.3
41.9

1.75
2.57
2.19

^7

In d u stry H o u r s a n d E a rn in g s

Tab le C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings
Industry

July

June

1958

1958

$ 100.61

$ 100.12

95-vr

July

Average weekly hours
July

1957

1958

9 3 .6 7

$ 96.00
98.41
90.72

40.9
41.0
40.8

103.38

1 0 3 .6 3

97.58

88.26

8 7 .4 2

48.36

66.18

June

1958

July

Average

hourly earnings

July

June

1958

July

1958

40.7
41.0
40.2

41.2
41.7
40.5

$2.46
2.48
2.3^

$2.46
2.48
2.33

$2.33

40.7

40.8

41.0

2.5^

2.54

2.38

85.24

40.3

40.1

40.4

2.19

2.18

2.11

64. 9 4
47.68

64.46
^5.67

38.7
35.3

38.2

33.6

1.70

34.6

1.71
1.37

1.67

3^.8

1.37

1.32

53.91

53.61

51.01

1.51

1.47
1.78

43.8
3^.7

3^.7
37.9
^3.9
35.5

1.51

6 8 .0 8

35.7
37.2
43.8
35.1

35.5

69.56

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES—

1957

1.92
1.47

1.92
1.47

1.92

1.72

1.71

1.82

1.78

1957

con.

OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES:
G a s a n d e l e c t r i c u t i l i t i e s ........ .......
El ect r i c light and power utilities....
Electric

light

a n d gas u t i l i t i e s

101.68

101.68

2.36

2.24

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL T A E
RD:
WHOLESALE TRADE.........................
RETAIL TRADE (EXCEPT EATING AND
DRINKING PLACES).......................
G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d i s e s t o r e s ................
Department stores and general mail-

A u t o m o t i v e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s d e a l e r s ......
A p p a r e l a n d a c c e s s o r i e s s t o r e s ...........
O t h e r reta i l trade:
F u r n i t u r e a n d a p p l i a n c e s t o r e s ..........
L u m b e r a n d h a r d w a r e s u p p l y s t o r e s .....

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL E T T :
SAE

67.46
84.29
50.77

36.6

1.87

1.86

84.10

84.10

51.60

5 1 .0 1

72.41
78.14

7 2 .0 7

71.14

42.1

77-35

76.01

42.7

41.9
42.5

41.6
42.7

1.83

—
_

—
_

—
_

__

_
__

_
__

-

—

-

—

-

—

1.72
'

1.^3

82.81

8 2 .8 6

64.52
101.44
81.33

45.26

45.31

1*3.93

39.7

40.1

40.3

1.14

1.13

1.09

^5^9

45-37
53.47

43.38
^9.91

39.9
38.5

39.8
39.9

39.8

51.21

38.1

1.14
1.33

1.14
1.3^

1.09
1.31

98.06

B a n k s a n d t r u s t c o m p a n i e s ..................
S e c u r i t y d e a l e r s a n d e x c h a n g e s ...........
I n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r s ............................

96.55

100.33

,
_

__

__

__

66.01

6 5 .5 6

103.75

105.42

—

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS:
Hotels

and lodging places:

Personal services:

Motion pictures:
M o t i o n - p i c t u r e p r o d u c t i o n and

NOTE:

__

__

D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .
Not available.
D a t a r e l a t e t o e m p l o y e e s i n s u c h o c c u p a t i o n s in t h e t e l e p h o n e i n d u s t r y a s s w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s ; s e r v i c e
assistants; operat ing room instructors; and pay-s tat ion attendants.
In 1 9 5 7 , s u c h e m p l o y e e s m a d e u p 3 9 p e r c e n t
o f the tot a l n u m b e r o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r e p o r t i n g h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s data.
.2/ D a t a r e l a t e t o e m p l o y e e s i n s u c h o c c u p a t i o n s in t h e t e l e p h o n e i n d u s t r y a s c e n t r a l o f f i c e c r a f t s m e n ; i n ­
s t a l l a t i o n a n d e x c h a n g e r e p a i r c r a f t s m e n ; line, cable, a n d c o n d u i t c r a f t s m e n ; a n d l a b o r e r s .
In 1957, s u c h e m ­
p l o y e e s m a d e u p 29 p e r c e n t o f t h e t o t a l n u m b e r o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r e p o r t i n g h o u r s a n d
e a r n i n g s data.
4 / D a t a r e ’a t e t o d o m e s t i c n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t m e s s e n g e r s .
l
£/ H o n e y p a y m e n t s o n l y ; a d d i t i o n a l v a l u e o f b o a r d , r o o m , u n i f o r m s , a n d t i p s , n o t i n c l u d e d .

X
I
2J




48

A d ju s te d E a r n in g s

Table C -6 : A verage w eekly earnings, gross and net sp endable,
of production or construction workers in selected industry divisions,
in current and 1947-49 dollars
Gross
Division,
month and year

average weekly earnings

Current
dollars

1947-49
dollars

Net

spendable

average weekly earnings

Worker with no dependents

Worker with

3 dependents

Current
dollars

dollars

$ 8 6 .2 5

$84.84

$70.23

82.37
8 O .9 8

8 3 .0 8

6 7 .1 6

$92.85
90.96

8 1 .8 8

6 6 .0 9

8 9 .6 8

73.53
72.38

88.64
89.37
90.46

73.38
72.25
73.01

9 6 .9 1
9 7 -7 0

8 0 .2 2
7 8 .9 8

111.53

9 O .3 6
8 9 .OI
9O.O2

98.36

79.79

82.39
8 3 .IO

6 8 .2 0
6 7 .1 8

5 5 .O8

74-97
75.55

6 2 .0 6
6 1 .0 8

8 3 .5 0

67.39

55.25

7 5 .8 8

61.24

1947-49

Current
dollars

1947-49
dollars

MINING:
July
July

1 9 5 7 ....................
1 9 5 8 ....................

$104.19
I O I .8 9
100.33

$76.36

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION:
July

1 9 5 7 ....................

I O 9 .I5
1 1 0 .1 1

July

1 9 5 8 ....................

MANUFACTURING:
J u l y 1 9 5 7 ....................
J u n e 1 9 5 8 ....................
J u l y 1 9 5 8 ....................

NOTE:

Data for the current month are preliminary.




67.57
68.14
68.46

55.9^

A d ju s t e d E a r n in g s
Table C -7: A ve ra ge hourly earnings, gross and excluding overtime,
of production workers in manufacturing, by major industry group

Gross
Major

industry

group

average hourly earnings

Average hourly earnings,
ex c l u d i n g overtime 1/

June

July

July

June

195.Ô.
.

MANUFACTURING .......................................................................

July

ISS?.

1957

1958

1958

1957

July

$ 2 .1 2

$2.07

$ 2 .0 8

$ 2 .0 7

$ 2 .0 1

2 .2 8

2.27
1.94

2 .2 0

1.9^

I .8 9

2.23
I .8 9

2 .2 2
I .8 9

2.14
I .8 3

12.48

$2.48

12.34

¿2.42

i'2.43

1 .8 8

1 .8 8

1 .8 2

1 .8 2

1 .8 1

I .7 8
2.11

DURABLE GOODS....................................
NONDURABLE GOODS.................................

$2.13

1 .7 8

2.10

2 .6 7

2 .6 1

1.7^
2.05
2.53

1.71
*
2.04
2.63

1.74
2.03
2.57

$2.29
1.76
1.70
1.97
2.46

D u r a b l e Goods

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s .......................................
F abricated metal products (except ordnance,

2 .2 8

2.22

2.21

2.12

2 .3 0

2.15

2.33
2.12
2.46

2.23
2.01
2.35

2.20
1.84

2.19
1.85

2.05
2.41
2.10

2.33
2.12
2.47
2.17

2 .1 6

2 .0 6

1 .8 1

1 .8 0

1 .8 0

1.76

2.00

a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ............................

2.19

2 .3 8

2 .1 5
2 .5 2

Instruments

2.27

2 .3 8

2.01
1.67

1.91
1 .6 1

1.51
1.50
2.11

1 .5 0
2 .0 6

1.92
1.63
1.46
1.48
2.03
—

1.94
1.63
1.47
1.48
2.02
—

2 .2 8

2 .2 6

2 .6 9
2 .2 8

2 .6 9

2.68

2 .2 8

2 .2 6

2 .1 9
2 .6 2
2 .1 8

1.5^

1.53

1.55

1.51

2 .5 0

N o n d u r a b le Goods

1.67
1.50
1.50
2.12
Printing,

publishing,

and

allied

i n d u s t r i e s 2 / ........

2.59
2.33
2 .7 6

2.35
1.55

U
2J

2.59
2.31
2.73
2.33
1.57

1.50

2.50
2.25

I .8 3
1.57
1.46
1.48
1 .9 6

—

.Derived b y a s s u m i n g t h a t t h e o v e r t i m e h o u r s s h o w n in t a b l e C - 2 are p a i d at t h e r a t e o f t i m e a n d o n e - h a l f .
A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g o v e r t i m e , are n o t a v a i l a b l e s e p a r a t e l y f o r t h e p r i n t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , said
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s group, as g r a d u a t e d o v e r t i m e r a t e s are f o u n d to an e x t e n t l i k e l y to m a k e a v e r a g e o v e r t i m e p a y
s i g n i f i c a n t l y above time and one-half.
I n c l u s i o n of data for the group in the n o n d u r a b l e - g o o d s t o t a l has little
effect.
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r rent m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .




50

S ta te a n d A r e a H o u rs a n d E a r n in g s

Table C-8: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas
Average weekly earnings
July
June
July

State and area

Average weekly hours
J uly
June
July

Average hourly earnings
July
June
July

1958
A L A B A M A .....................................
B i r m i n g h a m ................................

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

$ 70.62

$70.41

$69.45

38.8

38.9

38.8

79.42

38.6

38.8

38.0

$ 1.82
2.3*

$1.81
2.29

*1.79
2.29

92.06

91.96
81.45

92.29
82.26

92.57

91.88
93.20

91.21
88.04

39-9
40.1

40.3
40.7

4o.9
40.2

2.32
2.3*

2.29

2.28

2.23
2.19

A R K A N S A S ....................................
Little Rock-N. Little R o c k .............

58.25
59.57

57-77
59.94

58.03
58.87

39-9
40.8

39-3
40.5

40.3
40.6

1.46
1.46

1.47
1.48

1.44
1.45

C A L I F O R N I A .................................
F r e s n o ................................ . —
Los A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h ..................

97.56
80.46
97.26

97.18

39-8
37.1
40.4
38.7
40.2
40.4
39.1
40.5
40.5

2.45
2.13
2.43

2.45
2.13
2.43
2.55
2.44
2.55
2.55
2.44
2.27

2.32
2.09

106.65
IOI .87
107.66

39.9
37.8
40.1
40.9
41.3
41.7
39-4
40.3

39-7

S an B e r n a r d i n o - R i v e r s i d e - O n t a r i o ......

92.38
77.64
93.32
95.26
93.30
92.38

A R I Z O N A .....................................

93-03

76.81
96.89
103.16

39-3

40.3

36.0

40.2

2.11

2.12

99*22
98.91
88.48

96.01
88.22
87.44

38.6

39-9
40.5
40.9
42.0
39.0
40.5
39.0

92.39
92.34

91.08

88.80
88.56

40.7
40.5

40.3
40.1

41.3
41.0

2.27

91.43

2.26
2.28

84.71

84.50

87.86
88.26
80.85
80.29

84.45

39-4
40.1
39-5

39.3
39-4
39.4
38.5

2.15
2.23
2.24

2.10
2.10
2.26
2.20

2.10
2.08

39-9
39-3

40.6
40.5
41.2
40.2
40.1
40.4
40.6

2.15

90.22

S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d ...................
San J o s e ..................................
S t o c k t o n ..................................

101.40
93.90

C O L O R A D O ....................................
D e n v e r .....................................

C O N N E C T I C U T ................................
B r i d g e p o r t ................................
H a r t f o r d ..................................
New B r i t a i n ...............................
New H a v e n .................................
S t a m f o r d ..................................
W a t e r b u r y .................................

99.91

107.25

88.57

88.48

80.85
81.48

89.78

90.63
86.90

85.28

87.89
87.76
82.01
80.60
87.67

38.5
38.8

84.45

40.1
39-5

38.6

2.61

2.47

2.58
2.58
2.33

2.30
2.28

2.25

2.24

2.25
2.17

2.09

2.31
2.46

2.32
2.29
2.46

2.18
2.16
2.15

2.16
2.08
2.17
2.13
2.04

2.01
2.17

2.08

82.92

83.60
94.86

85.27
96.59

39-3

38.6

40.0
39-2

40.8
41.1

2.11

9*.57

2.45

2.09
2.42

2.09
2.35

92.69

D E L A W A R E ....................................
W i l m i n g t o n ................................

94.25

85.02

40.3

40.8

39.0

2.30

2.31

2.18

(1 )
(1 )
(1 )
(l)

69.08

64.55
71.42

40.4
39*8

63.80
63.18

(1 )
(1 )
(1 )
(1 )

38.8

(1 )
U>
(1 )
(1 )

1.71
1.85
1.69

1.63
1.79
1.64

40.7

39.6
39.9
38.9
39.O

58.82

38
.8

DI S T R I C T OF COLUMBIA:

F L O R I D A .....................................
J a c k s o n v i l l e ..............................
M i a m i ......................................

73.63
65.57

68.38

1.68

1.62
1.52

82.12

72.5*
79.5*

40.4
41.2

38.4
39-7
41.9

38.7
39.0
41.0

1.56
1.97
I .96

1.55
1.95

1.96

1.9*

86.28

91.38

86.71

40.7

42.7

40.9

2.12

2.14

2.12

89.88
(1 )

89.24

90.20

90.94

39.5
(1 )
(1 )
(1 )

39.3
39-2
39-5
38.9

40.1
40.0
39.7
41.5

2.28
(1 )
(1 )
(1 )

2.27
2.39
2.41
2.23

2.20

93.78
95-16
86.57

88.03

(l)
(1 )

2.31
2.27
2.19

91.00

91.24

89.97

39.1

39 A

39.9

2.33

2.32

2.25

87.27
90.64

G E O R G I A .....................................

81.41

40.0

86.07

39.8
39.0

2.18

2.15

38.6

39.7

89.53

2.05
2.23

I D A H O .......................................

IL L I N O I S ....................................

59.52
77.42

60.53
79.59
80.75

I N D I A N A .....................................

See

footnotes

at

end




of

table.

NOTE:

Data

for

85.69

the

current

92.24

month

are

preliminary.

38.6

2.35

2.30

1.86

51

S ta te a n d A r e a H o u rs a n d E a r n in g s

Table C -8 : Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued
Average weekly earnings

July

KANSAS........... .....................
W i c h i t a ....................................

KENTUCKY...............................

June

1958

State and area

1958

$ 89.55
84.03
94.46

$89.18
91.04
93.69

$87.10

86.65
90.60

79-00

80.60
82.21

89.98
LOUISIANA..............................

81.80

92.50

July1957

Average weekly hours

Average hourly < arnings
e

July

June

1958

1958

41.2

39.8

41.4
41.8

41.4

41.5

41.4
41.4
41.5

79.50
90.15

39-9
40.7

40.3
41.2

40.3
41.1

2.21

80.16
103.7*
81.19
79-52

39.9
39-8
38.3
40.3

40.3
39-7
39-2
40.8

40.9
39.0
40.8
42.3

2.05
2.70
2.05
1.90

1.92

39-6

1.66

1 .6*

1-51
1.77

1.51
1.76

1.71

2.13

2.12
2.22

2.06
2.16

1.95

1.95
2.09
1.57
1.58

1.88
2.00

July
July
.1.251... . 1258„_
$2.10

2.11
2.28
1.98

June
I958
$2.15

2.18
2.26

July
.1957
$ 2.10

2.09
2.19

2.00

1.97
2.19

2 .0*

I .96
2.66

2.25

107.46
78.52
76.57

66.71
57.72
74.85

64.94
55.64
67.53

65.74
56.24
69.70

40.3
38.3
42.3

38.3

41.0
38.5
40.9

84.07

84.64
89.57

80.90
85.48

39-5
39.4

40.0
40.3

39-4
39.6

2.26

76.44
82.74
55.35
60.64

76.25

74.26
79.00
5*.83

39.1
39-4
34.7
37.4
40.4
38.5

2.10

83.22
80.85

39*2
39-4
35-7
37.9
40.0
38.9

39-5
39.5

82.80
80.91
96.99
101.94

MARYLAND.............................. .

107.59
80.75
78.34

98.54
104.53
102.27
91.09

39.0
38.7
39-9

39-5

39.2
37.3
39.7

39-4
39-4
39-2
39-9
39.*
37-7
40.0

39.6
39-7
39.5
39.3
39-7

2.39

2.*2

2.59
2.39
2.*5

39-*
37-3
39.*

41.0
38.3
39-9

2.13
2.50
2.23

2.18
2.37
2.23

2.03
2.31

88.85
MASSACHUSETTS..........................

105.81
88.70
IOI .76
69.18
96.03

82.35
54.48
59.09

101.89
90.25
97.92

60.92
81.20
81.41

96.97
100.33
101.46
88.45
99.07

90.90
92.74

38.8

36.8

36.8
38.8
40.4
40.3

38.5

1.55

1.60

2.07

2.06
2.^9
2.63

2.65
2.29

2.60

2.71

2.06

1.99

1.88
1.60
l .*6

l.*9
1.57

2.06
2.10

2.01
2.02

2.50

2 .*6
2.61

2.65
2.61
2.28

2.56
2.23
2.51
2.31
2.3*

85.94
99.36
88.41

85.92
88.24

83.31
88.44

87.80

86.21

40.3
39-7
39-6

59.34

66.91

59.85
70.38

56.52
62.93

39-3
40.8

39-9
42.4

39.8
41.4

1.51
1 .6*

1.50
1.66

l .*2
1.52

80.66
(1 )

79.95
89.72

77.*3
84.30

38.8

89.66

86.17

39-6
39-*

39-3
39.2
39.7

2.06

89.94

39.1
(1 )
39.6

(D
2.27

2.06
2.26
2.28

2.16

92.05

92.02

83.21

40.2

40.2

37.3

2.29

2.29

2.23

87.01

79.92

81.50
87.12

78.17
83.19

41.8
*1.3

42.6
41.6

42.0
41.4

2.11

1.91

1.91
2.09

1.86
2.01

102.02

101.52

95.76

38.5

38.6

37.7

2.65

2.63

2 .5*

65.ll

65.44
59.25

63.92
59.52

39-7
38.0

39-9
37-5

40.2
38.9

1 .6*

1 .6*

1.59

59.66

See

footnotes

at e n d

of




table.

NOTE:

Data

for

the current month

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

1.57

2.16

1.97

2.17

1.58 I 1.53

52

S ta te a n d A r e a H o u r s a n d E a r n in g s

Table C-8: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued
Averag e weekly earnings
July
June
July
1958
1957
..1258

State and area

Averagtî weekly hours
July
June
July
1958
1958
1957

Average hourly earnings
July
June
July
1953

1958

1957

$86.61

39.3
39.4
39.8
39.1
39.0

39-7
39-8
40.3
39.9
38.7

$2.22
2.25

$2 .1*
2.17

2.19

$2.20
2.23
2.17
2.27
2.15

NEW M E X I C O .................................

2.19
2.29

2.15
2.27

NEW Y O R K ....................................
A l b a n y - S c h e n e c t a d y - T r o y .................

2.16

2.15
2.35
1.99
2.50

B u f f a l o ....................................
Nassau and Suf f o l k Counties 2J ........
Nev York - N o r t h e a s t ern Nev J e r s e y ......
Nev York City 2 / .........................

$86.46
87.74
66.41
68.64
83.93

$85.08

86.57
85.15
88.22
82.43

39.1
39-2
39.*
38.9
39.6

100.07

NEW J E R S E Y .................................
Newark-Jersey Citv 2 / ...................
PaterBon 2 / ...............................
Perth Amboy 2 / ...........................

91.10

66.80
94.66

87.45
90.52

* 1.6
*3.7

41.3
41.7

40.3
42.3

83.19

82.91

81.81
90.38
74.07
97.51
80.8l

38.5
38.9
35.8
(1 )
38.9
*0.6
38.3
37.*
39.2
39.5
*0.3
39.1

38.5
39.1
36.7
39.3
39.1
40.6
38.4
37.4
39.3
39-4
40.1
39.5

39.0
40.0
39.1
40.3
40.2
39-5

39.0
*0.9

38.1

38.2

40.4
36.5

38.7
39.8
37.2

*3.2
*1.2

42.9
42.1

45.6

38.7

38.9
36.4
37.3
39.6

88.00
84.91

89.43
86.68

91.06

70.75
(1 )

80.51

91.91
83.U
79.54
90.42

91-79
73-10

96.21
81.06
92.12

82.94

78.96
90.36
86.05

87.14

81.45
77.52
87.34

84.58
81.83

86.98
82.74
85.08

81.71
85.73
55.25
63.43
53.29

60.89

G r e ensboro-High P o i n t ...................

56.55
64.62
56.15

NORTH D A K O T A ...............................
F a r g o ......................................

81.05
83.11

80.82
86.35

82.1b
87.42

92.58
91.88
89.63

87.38
93.80

92.47
91-58
90.17
87.51
94.42

86.56

90.62

93.98
100.44
90.35
84.70
97.57

NORTH C A R O L I N A ............................

82.77

55.34
53.57

end




of

table.

NOTE!

for

2.17

2.18
2.12
2.01
2.08

l.*7

l.*5
1.57
l .*6

l.*3
1.53
1 .**

1.88
2.02

1.88
2.05

1.83
1.92

2.05
2.17

l.*5

1.58

2.39

2.55
2.*6
2.21
2 .**
2.26

2.30

2.38

2.52

2.*2
2.21
2 .*3
2.28

2.3*

2.*8
2.37
2 .1*

87.85

91.87
90.79

87.85
87.02

37.9
(D

38.6
38.6

37-8
37-9

2.39
(1 )

2.38
2.35

2.32
2.30

81.75

83.98

38.6
38.0
*0 .*

38.2

39.8
37-9
40.0
39.9
40.0
39-8
40.2
39.4

2.15
2.09
2 .2*
1.93

2 .1*
2.10
2.21

2.11
2.06

97.23

Data

2.07

2.20
2 .0*

2.30
2.20

2.07

81.39
78.54

82.99
79.*2
90.50
73-92
74.80
87.64
104.02
71.63

at

2.*2
2.01
2.21
2.11

2.09
1.90
2.*0

85.28
76.28

90.51
(1 )

footnotes

1.90

40.9
42.0
40.3

84.85
78.28

56.36
69.77

38.1

2.16
2.11

2.10
2.26

41.2
41.2
41.2

100.12

62.91

40.2
40.5

2.27

2.17

2 .1*

* 0.6
*1.2
*1.3

101.47
95.13

102.07
97.60

99.12

44.8

2.08

2.13

36.8

90.49

103.82

See

36.5
39.5
38.5
38.3
* 0 .*
39.5
37.7

37-5
40.2
40.0
40.6
39-9

2.3*
1.98
U>
2.07
2.27
2.17
2.13

2.11
2.21

39-5
40.9
41.2
40.6
39-4
41.1

103.52
98.17

W i l k e s - B a r r e — H a z l e t o n ..................

36.0

38.6

2.16
2.30

76.86

87.07
73.3*

72.60
66.36
98.80
71.62
62.16
56.29
72.45

the c u r r e n t

108.62

78.07

86.80
77.81

38.3
*1.1
39.3
39.*

71.20
85.97

102.11
72.89

38.1

61.50

37.9
35.9
*0.1

59.09
68.57
month

are

38.8

39.8
40.0
39-5

36.6
39.4
38.4
40.0
38.9

38.0
38.3
37-9
35.4
40.7

preliminary.

38.2

37.4
40.1

2.56

2.*9
2.75

1.82

2.20

2.55
2.*7
2.72

2.50

1.99
1.87

1.90
2.36

1.91

1.88
1.66

1.82
2.22
2.60
I .87
1 .6*

1.57
1.7*

1.59
1.78

2.23
2 .6*

2.39

2.*1
2 .6*

2.18

2.17
1.95
1.78

2.16
2.5*
1.85

1.61
1.58
1.71

53

S ta te a n d A r e a H o u r s a n d E a r n in g s

Tab le C -8 : Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued
Average weekly earnings
J uly
June
July
1958
. 1958
. 1957. .

Average weekly hours
July
June July
1958
1958 1957

1958

1958

I957

R H O D E I S L A N D ...............................
P r o v i d e n c e ................................

$ 66.97

$70.37

$67.51
67.55

39.1
39.8

* 0 .*
*0 .*

39-2
39.5

$1.76
1.73

$1.76
1.75

$ 1 .7 2

S O UTH C A R O L I N A .............................

56 .*o
65.31

55.82
67.30

56.16
66.91

38.9
36.9

38.5
38.9

39 .O
40.8

l.*5
1.77

l.*5
1.73

1 .**
1 .6*

82.77

83 .3*
93.*1

80.05
86.72

* 5.1
*7.2

**.8
*6.0

*5.1
*5.8

1 .8*
2.00

2.03

67.83

66.25
69.06
60.36
67.28

39.9
39.3
39.8
39.8
*0.9

39-2
38.8
39-2
37.8
*0.8

*0.2
39-9
39 .I
*0.2
*0.2

I .70
I .78
2 .O5
1.83
1.77

I .78
2.05
1.78
1.76

I .71
1,98
1.83

71.81

66.33
68.23
77-*2
73.57
67.5*

85.69
79.15
101.50

86.11

* 0.8
*0.6
* 1.6
*0.7

*1.*
*0.9
*1.3
*1.5
*1.3

2.09
1 .9*

2.08

39.6

*1.0
*0.8
*1.6
*0.6
39 .O

2.10

76.89
92.51

89.84
86.51

39.1
39.8

39.*
39-6

41.4
41.0

67.53
64.49

* 0.2
* 1.0

39-9
*0.0

38.2

65.61
68.85

89.3*
88.07
9*-76

State and area

S O U T H D A K O T A ...............................
Sioux F a l l s ...............................
T E N N E S S E E ...................................
C h a t t a n o o g a ....... .......................
K n o x v i l l e .................................
M e m p h i s ....................................
N a s h v i l l e .................................

68.85

9*.*7
69.95
81.59
72.83
72.39

85.68
T E X A S ........................................
78.36
D a l l a s .....................................
IOI .92
Fort W o r t h ................................
H o u s t o n .................................... ' 97.27
63.96
S a n A n t o n i o ...............................
U T A H .........................................
Salt Lake C i t y ...........................
V E R M O N T .....................................
B u r l i n g t o n ................................
S p r i n g f i e l d ...............................

V I R G I N I A ....................................
Norf olk-Port s m o u t h .......................
R i c h m o n d ...................................
W A S H I N G T O N .................................

87.97

87.56
68.06
72. *1

75.19
65 . 7 k

66.66
9**71

89.32
96.31
95*38

91.*8
W Y O M I N G .....................................

97.07

117.62

1.68
1.88
2.2*
2.37

1.51
2.17
2.11

40.5
39-9

38.0

38.6

I .69
1.77
1-97

I.7I
I .72
2.01

1.67
I .62
1.97

39.6
*0.0
* 0.5

39.7
39 .*
* 0.3

40.5
39.8
41.8

Í.66
1.79

I .65
I .78
I .85

1.62

38.6
38.3

38.4

2.*0

*0.2
38.3

38.0

2.*3

87.32

38.6
38.6
39 .*
37.1

38.0

2.33

2.38
2.3*
2.53
2.38

2.33
2.32
2.*1
2 .3O

85 .*7
106.75
92.11

84.71
102.3*
91.1*

38.9
*1.2
37.8

38.5
*0.9
35-7

39>*
*1.1
36.9

2.27
2.62

2.68

2.22
2.61
2.58

2.15
2.*9
2.*7

88.37

85 .*9
86.25

*0.5
*0.8
*0.1

*2.1
38 .I
39-2
*0.9
*0.8
39-3

2.10

2.18

2.03

9*.95
87.1*

*1.3
39.5
39.9
39.7
39.7
39.6

2.2*
2. *2
2.*0
2 .3I

90.52
119.56

39.3
*0.7

39-7
*2.7

2.*7
2.89

67.98

68.6*
76.*7

65.50

89.58
101.63
91.33

99.70
69.6*
91.*3
96.25
92.31
9*.62
118.90

76.28

7*.*0

85.37

92.30

l/ Not available.
2 / S u b a r e a of New York -Northeastern N e w Jersey.

NOTE: D a t a for the current mo n t h are preliminary.
SOURCE: C o o p e r a t i n g State agencies listed o n inside back cover.




1.59

2.**
2.*0
I.6I

1.65

2.29
2.19

91.91

88.30

62.36

1.69

1.77

1.89

2.25

86.72

92.*9
93.6*
98.05

107 .9*

98.36

1.93
2.*5
2.39

1.86

1.71

2.20

90.22

70.13
7*.56

101.30
W I S C O N S I N ...................................

97-**
62.79

71.60
7**92

86.58
W E S T V I R G I N I A ..............................
C h a r l e s t o n ................................

70.70

Average hourly earnings
July
June
July

39.1
39.9
39.6
38.7

*1.0

39.*

1.85

2.*9

2.39

2.**
2.2*
2.3*
2.*1
2.33
2.*5

2.90

1.73
I .78

2.26

2.18

2.26
2.33
2.22

2.28
2.80




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UNITED STA TES DEPARTM ENT O F L A B O R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

COOPERATING STATE AGENCIES
Labor Turnover Program

A LA B A M A

- D epartm ent of Industrial R elation s, M ontgom ery 4.

ARIZO N A

- Unem ploym ent Com pensation D ivision , E m ploym ent Security C om m ission ,

ARKANSAS

- Em ploym ent Security D ivision , D epartm ent o f L a b or, Little R ock .

CALIFO RN IA

- R e s e a r ch and Statistics, D epartm ent of E m ploym en t, Sacram ento 14.

CONNECTICUT

- Em ploym ent Security D ivision , D epartm ent o f L a b o r, H artford 15.

Phoenix.

DELAW ARE

- Unem ploym ent C om pensation C o m m is sio n , W ilm ington 99.

DISTRICT OF COLUM BIA

- U. S. Em ploym ent Service fo r D. C . , W ashington 25.

FLO RID A

- Industrial C om m ission , T a lla h a ssee.

GEORGIA

- Em ploym ent Security A gen cy, Departm ent of L a b or, Atlanta 3.

IDAHO

- E m ploym ent Security A gen cy, B o ise .

INDIANA

- Em ploym ent Security D ivision , Indianapolis 25.

KANSAS

- Em ploym ent Security D ivision , D epartm ent o f L a b or, Topeka.

KENTUCKY

- Bureau of Em ploym ent Secu rity, D epartm ent of E co n o m ic S ecu rity, F ra n k fort.

MAINE

- Em ploym ent Security C om m ission , Augusta.

M ARYLAND

- D epartm ent of Em ploym ent Secu rity, B a ltim ore 1.

MINNESOTA

- D epartm ent of Em ploym ent Secu rity, St. Paul 1.

MISSOURI

- D ivision of Em ploym ent Security, J e ffe r so n C ity.

NEVADA

- Em ploym ent Security D epartm ent, C a rson C ity.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

- D epartm ent of Em ploym ent S ecu rity, C on cord .

NEW M EXICO

- Em ploym ent Security C om m is sio n , A lbuquerque.

NEW YORK

- Bureau of R esea rch and S tatistics, D iv ision o f E m ploym en t, State D epartm ent

NORTH CAROLINA

- Bureau of R esea rch and S tatistics, E m ploym ent Secu rity C om m is sio n , R aleigh.

NORTH DAKOTA

- Unemploym ent Com pensation D ivision , W orkm en 's C om pensation Bureau,

OKLAHOMA

- Em ploym ent Security C om m ission , Oklahoma C ity 2.

RHODE ISLAND

- D epartm ent of Em ploym ent Secu rity, P rov id en ce 3.

SOUTH CARO LINA

- Em ploym ent Security C om m is sio n , C olum bia 1.

SOUTH D AKOTA

- Em ploym ent Security D epartm ent, A b erd een .

VERMONT

- Unemploym ent Com pensation C o m m is sio n , M on tp elier.

WASHINGTON

- Em ploym ent Security D epartm ent, O lym pia.

WEST VIRGINIA

- D epartm ent of Em ploym ent S ecu rity, C h arleston 5.

of L abor, 500 Eighth Avenue, New Y ork 18.

B ism a rck .




U. S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1958 O -479523
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