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Employment
and Earnings
SEP TEM B ER 1957

V o l.4 N o .3

D IV ISIO N OF M ANPOW ER AND EMPLOYM ENT S T A T IS T IC S
Seym our L. W olfbein, Chief
CO N TEN TS
QUIT RATES RELATED TO EARNINGS
AND WORK FORCE COMPOSITION...
The quit rate,

& measure of workers

voluntarily leaving jobs,

is higher

in industries with low earnings,
m&ny women employees, and relative­
ly large numbers of production work­
ers.

This subject is discussed in

an article beginning on page iii.

NEW AREA SERIES...
Manufacturing employment, hours, and
earnings data for Fort Worth and San
Antonio, Tex.,

are now shown in ta­

bles A-7 and C-6.

Pag«

ARTICLE
The N ature of Industries With High and Low Q uit R a te s..

iii

Chart
The Chemicals and Allied FToducts Industry, Annual Averages,
1947-56.....................................................

viii

E m p l o y m e n t Trends
Sumnary..... .............. .......... ••••..... ............
Table 1: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry division and selected groups.............
Table 2: Production workers in manufacturing, by major
industry group.....................................
Table 3 : fours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing, by major industry group..............
Table 4: Gross average weekly hours and average overtime hours
of production workers in manufacturing, by major
industry group .....................................
Table 5: Index of employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division...............................
Table 6: Index of production workers in manufacturing, by
major industry group...............................
Table 7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry division, seasonally adjusted..............
Table 8: Production workers in manufacturing, by major
industry group, seasonally adjusted.................

ix
xi
xii
xiii
xiv
xv
xv
xvi
xvi

DETAILED STATISTICS
A - E m p l o y m e n t a n d Payrolls

For sale by the Superintendent of
Documents, U. S. Government Print­
ing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
Subscription price: $3*50 a y e a r;
$1 additional for foreign mailing.
Single copies vary in price. This
issue is 40 oents.




Table A-l: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry division.... ............................
Table A-2: A H employees and production workers in nonagri­
cultural establishments, by industry..............
Table A-3: Indexes of produotion-worker employment and weekly
payrolls in manufacturing.......................
Table A-4: Employees In Government and private shipyards,
by region........................................
Table A-5: Government civilian employment and Federal military
personnel....................................... .
Table A-6: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry division and State.......................
Table A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments for
selected areas, by industry division..............

Continued next page

1
2
7
8
9
10
13

Employment
and Earnings
CO N TEN TS - C o n tin u e d

Pag«

B-Labor Turnover
Table B-l: Monthly labor turnover rates in manufacturing...... ... 24
Table B-2: Monthly labor turnover rates in selected industries.
25
Table B-3: Monthly labor turnover rates in manufacturing for
selected States and areas..... ................... ... 29
The national employment figures
shown in this report have been
adjusted to first quarter 1956
benchmark levels.

M M M M M M MMliM

W w w w W W W w W W

To renew your subscription to
Ercpimmpnt. and Earnings. and to

C-H o urs and Earnings
Table C-li Hours and gross earnings of production workers or
nonsupervisory employees........ .................
Table C-2: Gross average weekly earnings of production workers
in selected industries, in current and 1947-49
dollars........................... ..............
Table C-3: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable,
of production workers in manufacturing, in current
and 1947-49 dollars..............................
Table C-4: Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding
overtime, of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group.................
Table C-5: Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours in industrial
and construction activity........................
Table C-6: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for selected States and
areas............................................

30
39
39
40
41
43

NOTE: July 1957 data are preliminary.

obtain additional data free of
charge, see pages 9-E and 10-E.




EXPLA N A TO R Y NOTES
INTRODUCTION.................................................
ESTABLISHMENT REPORTS:
Collection.......................... ............... .....
Industrial Classification.................................
Coverage.......................................... .......
DEFINITIONS AND ESTIMATING METHODS:
Employment................................................
Labor Turnover............................................
Hours and Earnings........................................
STATISTICS FOR STATES AND AREAS..............................
SUMMARY CF METHODS FOR COMPUTING NATIONAL STATISTICS..........
GLOSSARY.....................................................

1-E
1-E
1-E
1-E
2-E
3-£
4-E
5-E
6-E
7-E

#*****###*

REGIONAL OFFICES AND COOPERATING STATE AGENCIES

Inside back cover

The Nature of Industries With High and Low Quit Rates
Robert M. Shaw

The Quit rate, a measure of workers vol­
untarily leaving jobs, is not only affected
b y general economic conditions, but at any
particular point in time shows decided varia­
tions among industries. In this article, some
of the c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of i n d u s t r i e s with
high and low quit rates are examined.
Al­
though such an investigation does not yield
definitive reasons for quits since it lacks
information concerning individual motivations,
working conditions, community facilities such
as h o u s i n g and transportation, etc., some
light may be shed on the nature of industries
with high and low rates. This knowledge will
not only aid in understanding the differences
among industries but will also suggest p o s ­
sible sources of v ariation betw e en the e x ­
perience of an individual firm and rates for
the industry as a whole, published monthly in
table B-2 of this publication.
The seasonal and long-term trends in quit
rates for manufacturing industries in general

C h a rt I.

Q u it

R a te s
in

QUIT RATES

57

and

were analyzed in an earlier issue of Etaployment and Earnings. 1 Briefly, in that article
it was demonstrated that a seasonal pattern
exists, and that there is a long-term decline
in the quit rate among workers in manufactur­
ing industries.
The list of industries examined here has
been limited to those for which certain sta­
tistical m e as ur es of char ac te r is ti cs exist
(see table).
Specifically, for all the 57
manufacturing industries selected, the fol­
lowing BLS data are available: number of all
employees and production workers; number of
women employees; labor turno ve r rates; and
gross average hourly earnings of production
workers. The statistical data used are annual
averages for 1956, with one exception which
has been noted.
(Similar data compiled for

* See E m p l o y m e n t a n d E a r n i n g s , D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 6
(pp. iii-ix); r e p r i n t s a v a i l a b l e upon request.

G ro ss

A ve ra ge

M a n u fa c t u r in g

H o u r ly

E a r n in g s

In d u s t r ie s

ANNUAL AVERAGES, 1956

(Per 100 Employees)

3.0
•

•

•
2.0 —

•

•

•

•

M EDIAN
Q U IT R A T E

_
• •

iii

•

.
i

$1.60
$1.80
$2.00
$2.20
GRO SS AVERAGE HO U RLY EARN IN G S

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




•

•

i

•

•

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

i

-

•
•

1

$1.40

i
i
ii

•

•

•

0
$1.20

••
••------------

•

•

1.0

•

•

M ED IA N
EA R N IN G S
•
•
1
*
* .
I
•
1
•
1
•1
(2)
•
•
M
*:
-•
i
•
\
• •
.
• •• •
i
•

i

i

$2.4 0

$ 2 .6 0

$2.80

Quit rates, hourly earnings, and percent of women employees and production workers
in 57 selected manufacturing industries, annual averages, 1 1956

ûuit rate
(per 100
employees)

Industry

Productionworker gross
average
hourly
earnings

2.6

Sawmills and planing m i l l s ........ .................. ..............

$ 1 .2 4

2 .5
2 .5
2 .5
2 .3
2 .3
2 .3

1 .8 2
2 .2 5
1 .9 3
1 .7 7
1 .8 3
1 .4 4
1 .2 7

2.2
2.2
2.1
2. 1
2.0
Yarn and thread mills . . . . . . .....................................
Millwork, plywood, and prefabricated structural wood products
B road-woven fabric mi l l s .............. ............................

Cutlery, hand tools, and h a r d w a r e ............ ....................
Pottery and related produ c t s . . . ..................................
Iron and steel foundries...........................................
Heating apparatus (except electric) and p l u m b e r s ’ supplies...
Fabricated structural metal products............................
Metal stamping, coating, and e n g r aving ........ ..................
Aircraft and p a r t s ................................... ..............
Other rubber products................. .........
Construction and mining m a c h i n e r y ................................
Electrical generating, transmission, distribution, and
Jewelry, silverware, and plated w a r e ............................
Carpets, rugs, other floor c o v ering.............................

Office and store machines and devices. ..........................
Service-industry and household m a c h i n e s ................ ........
Miscellaneous machinery p a r t s .....................................

Agricultural machinery and tractors................ .......... .
Meat products. .... ......... .........................................
Paints, pigments, and fillers.....................................
Leather: tanned, curried, and finished..........................
Cigarettes. ...........................................................
Pulp, paper, and paperboard m i l l s ................................
Drugs and med i c i n e s .................................................
Automobiles........... ...............................................
Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling m i l l s .................

1 .9
1 .9

1.8
1.8
1.8
1 .7
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1 .5
1 .5
1 .5
1 .5
1 .5
1 .4
1 .4
1 .3
1 .3
1 .3
1. 3
1 .3
1 .3
1 .3
1 .3

1.2
1.2
1.1
1. 1
1. 1
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
.9
.9

Tobacco and s n u f f ...................................................

.8
.8

Tires and inner t u b e s ..............................................
Industrial organic c h e micals.....................................
Petroleum r e f in i n g . ............. ................. .................

.7

X I October 1950 data used to calculate percent of women employees.




iv

.6
.4

1.88
1 .8 0
1 .6 2
1 .4 2
1.34
1 .8 3
1 .4 0
1 . 72
2 .1 8

2.00
1 .9 1

2.12
2.02
2.11
2.12

Percent of—
Women
employees

Production
workers

84
51
4
19
4
29
56
79
48

92
82

22

83
92
82
90
95
70
60

18

86

68

91
93
85
94
90
83
81

44

8
39
63
14
30
35
4

12
7

21

2 .2 8
1 .94
1 .8 0
2 .1 7

16
32
9

2.10

30
41
25
13
15
14

1 .7 8
1 .8 0
2. 18
1 .8 7
2 .3 0
2 .4 1

2.10
2 .1 9
2 .1 4
2 .1 5
1 .8 1
1 .6 0
2 .1 7

2.02
2 .0 7
1 .8 7
1 .7 5
2 .0 6
2 .3 2
1 .9 3
2 .0 3
2 .3 5
2 .5 2

2.22
1 .5 4
2 .3 7
2 .5 3
2 .2 6
2 .6 5

86

8

12
11
28
15
18
53

22
10
25
15

12
49

11
8
39
3

11
4
29
43

8
15
14
7

88
87
78
75
83

66
79
89
73
71
80
84
67
71
73
77
71
76
77
78
81
87
72
80
62
90
90
83
69
59
84
80
85
64
84
76
76

68
65

More women workers, no re quits

two other years, 1950 and 1954, with higher
and lower average quit rates than 1956, evi­
denced the same relationships between quits
and earnings, women, and production workers.)

The relationship between the proportion
of women employees in an industry and the quit
rate provides the basis for chart II. 3 For
that half of the industries where the number
o f women employees is less than the median 18
percent, quit rates are lower than the median
in 18 instances.

Low earnings, high quits
When the quit rates in the 57 selected
industries are charted against gross average
howrly earnings of production workers in these
same industries (see chart I), a definite re­
lationship between the two items e m e r g e s . 2
At the extremes, we find that low-earnings in­
dustries have relatively high quit rates and
vice versa.
Of that half of the industries
with earnings less than the median, 17 had
quit rates higher than the median quit rate,
while 19 industries with higher than median
earnings had lower than median quit rates.

T ur n i n g to the i n d us t ri es wh e re women
workers comprise a significantly large p e r ­
centage of the work force, those beyond the
2 _,
The a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s c o v e r p r o d u c t i o n
a n d r e l a t e d w o r k e r s , w h e r e a s the l a b o r t u r n ­
o v e r rates a p p l y to all employees.
This d i s ­
p a r i t y p r o b a b l y d o e s not i n v a l i d a t e the c o n ­
c l u s i o n s a p p r e c i a b l y , b e c a u s e the p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s e g m e n t s h o w s g r e a t e r f l u c t u a t i o n s in
l e v e l a n d s h o u l d t h e o r e t i c a l l y have m o r e in­
f l u e n c e on l a b o r t u r n o v e r rates. In addition,
the p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s c o n s t i t u t e the m a j o r
p o r t i o n of t h e w o r k f o r c e in m a n u f a c t u r i n g
i ndustries.

This relati on sh ip bet we en earnings and
quit rates does not prove that high pay rates
will reduce turnover.
It does show that the
complex of factors in low-earnings industries
is such that these industries generally have
higher quit rates, while the opposite is true
of high-earnings industries.

3»

As s t a t e d earlier, the d a t a used in this a r ­
t i c l e a r e a n n u a l a v e r a g e s f o r 1956, e x c e p t
f o r the p r o p o r t i o n of w o m e n e m p l o y e e s , w h i c h
r e l a t e s to O c t o b e r 1956.
A n n u a l a v e r a g e s are
not c o m p i l e d f o r t he l a t t e r s e r i e s , but the
p r o p o r t i o n v a r i e s o n l y s l i g h t l y in m o s t i n ­
d ustries over r e l a t i v e l y short time periods
s u c h as a year.

Chart II. Quit Rates and Percent of Women Employees
in 57 Manufacturing Industries
QUIT RATES-ANNUAL AVERAGE, 1956
PERCENT OF WOMEN EMPLOYEES-OCTOBER 1956

QUIT RATES
C Per 100 Employees )

3.0

M ED IAN P E R C E N T
OF WOMEN E M P L O Y E E S

2.0
•

•

_ M EDIAN_

----------------- • • ----------------------L -------------------------

" o u r r RATE

••
•

1.0

O

• V

10

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT O F LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




20

30

40

50

WOMEN EMPLOYEES AS PERCENT OF
TOTAL EMPLOYMENT

v

60

70

80

85

resulted from illness o r disability and, of
course, practi ca l ly none from household re­
sponsibilities. Further, more than 39 percent
of all male job leavers surveyed in 1955 quit
to improve their status (better pay, pl ea s­
anter working conditions, e t c . ) as against
less than 35 percent of the female job leavers.

40-or 50-percent line on chart II, the evi­
dence becomes stronger that these industries
a ct ua ll y do ha ve h i g h e r than a v e ra ge quit
rates.
In fact, the tendency is persistently
upward as the proportion goes beyond 60 per­
cent, although the number of observations is
too small to reach any firm conclu s io ns in
these upper extremes. Supporting evidence is
available, however, from the table published
quarterly in Employment and Earnings whi c h
shows quit rates among men and women employees
separately in 20 major manufacturing groups.
These statistics show that the quit rates for
women tend to be considerably higher in nearly
all industry groups.

Quits tend to be higher for
production workers than office workers
A third variable among the 57 industries
is the ratio of produc ti on workers to total
employment in the industry. The relationship
between the p r o du c ti on worker-all employee
ratio and the quit rate for all employees is
plotted in chart III.
At the lower end of
the scale, those industries where production
workers c o n s ti tu te less than the median 81
percent of the work force, the quit rate is
below the median 1.5 per 100 in 19 industries.

At the very least,one can conclude that a
relatively high quit rate is not unexpected
where women workers predominate.
It seems pertinent to point out here that
t ur n o v e r a m o ng m e n is p r o b a b l y a bit m or e
susceptible to control than that among women.
About 9 percent of the job terminations among
women in 1955 were for such compelling rea­
sons as illness or household responsibilities,
items whici; are beyond effective remedial ac­
tion on the employer* s part . 4 Only 3 percent
of the job terminations among male workers

4
Current Popul at ion Reports, Labor Force, Se­
r i e s P- 50, No. 70, D. S. Bureau of the Census.
Job t e r m i n a t i o n s in t he Census s u r v e y were
not l i m i t e d to q u i t s , but covered both vol un­
t ar y and i nv o l u n t a r y s e p a r a t i o n s .

Chart UL. Quit Rates and Percent of Production Worker Employment
in 57 Manufacturing Industries

QUIT RATES

ANNUAL AVERAGE

(Per 100 Employees)

3.0

1956

M EDIAN P E R C E N T
OF P R O D U C TIO N W O R K ER S*

2.0
I •

•

U «
•)

c)
e
•••

__M ED ]A N _
Q U IT7 R A T E"

I
•
• I ••

1.0

•

I

-ÜL
40

50

60

70

-L.

80

90

lOO

PRODUCTION W O RKERS AS PERCENT OF TO TAL EMPLOYM ENT
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT O F LABOR

BUREAU Of LABOR STATISTICS




Vi

On the ot her hand, the quit rates are c o n ­
sistently above the median among the 6 indus­
tries where the proportion of production work­
ers is greater than 90 percent.
A closer look at chart III shows that the
tendency for lower quit rates among the group
of industries with smaller production workerall employee ratios is p a rticularly p e r s i s ­
tent. Among that half of the industries where
production workers constitute 80 percent or




less of the work force, only 2 have quit rates
above 1.6 per 100.
Prom the foregoing discussion, it appears,
therefore, that the quit rate among production
workers is higher than among workers not di­
rectly a ssociated with production, such as
m a n a g e r i a l , personnel, a nd sa le s staffs.
Without separate labor turnover rates for the
two classes of workers, however, this may only
be surmised.

The Chemicals and Allied Products Industry
A n n u a l A verag es, 1 9 4 7 -5 6
Index (1947-49:100)

Thousands

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU O F LABOR STATISTICS




Dollars

Rate (Per 100 Employees)

Employment Trends
NOWFAHM EMPLOYMENT RISES 238,000 IN AUGUST 19$7

automobile hardware. A strong seasonal employment
upturn was noted among manufacturers of radio and
television sets. A job increase in cement plants
reflected the return of striking workers.

Nonfarm employment rose by 238,000 over the
month to a level of 52.8 million in August 1 9 5 7 *
The rise, which resulted from the usual latesuramer expansion in food processing, apparel, and
several other manufacturing industries, was mod­
est in relation to the rise in most recent years.

In contrast to the persistent raonth-to-month
employment gains registered in nonmanufacturing
activities, manufacturing employment has shown
small declines, on a seasonally adjusted basis,
since the beginning of 1957. Factory job levels
have declined by almost 280,000 over this period,
after allowing for the usual seasonal change.
About two-thiras of this decline occurred in dur­
able -goods producing industries. Aside from the
transportation equipment industry, where the drop
in employment from December to August reflected
different stages in the automobile production year,
substantial job reductions on a seasonally adjusted
basis were reported by the primary metals, machinery,
lumber, and food processing industries. On the
other hand, the electrical machinery industry re­
ported considerable job growth over the same period.

Average hourly earnings of factory produc­
tion workers held steady between July and August
at $2«07* Average weekly earnings rose to $82*59
as a result of an increase in the workweek from
39.7 to 39.9 hours.
NOmANUFACTURIHG EMPLOYMENT STEADY
Job levels in nonmanufacturing activities
were, on the whole, little changed between July
and August. Employment in trade held firm over
the month, but construction employment rose by
less than the usual amount, partly because of in­
dustrial disputes.
A rise in inventory of petro­
leum products resulted in a small employment cut­
back in petroleum and natural*gas fields. Employ­
ment in the transportation industry increased with
the return of railway express workers after settle­
ment of a strike.

FACTORY WORKWEEK AT 39.9 HOURS
The factory workweek rose from 39.7 to 39.9
hours between July and August 1957. Although the
rise was approximately seasonal for the period,
the level of 39.9 hours was 0 .1 hours below a year
*
ago and generally below the August level of previ­
ous years. In only 3 of the 10 years from 19i*7 to
1956 has the August workweek averaged less than hO
hours.

FACTORY JOBS UP LESS THAN SEASONALLY
Manufacturing employment rose by 251,000 to
16.9 million in August, a somewhat smaller than
usual rise for the month. The largest employment
increases occurred in food processing (77 ,000),
where cannery activity was stepped up to process
fruit and vegetable harvests,and in apparel
(58,000), where large-scale production of the
winter clothing line commenced. The increase in
apparel employment between July and August was be­
low that of previous years. Employment changes
in other nondurable-goods industries were mainly
seasonal.

The increase of 0.2 hours in durable-goods in­
dustries was below average for this month. The
lumber and fabricated metals industries reported
smaller rises in hours of work than are usual in
August, and the workweeks in the machinery and
primary metals industries declined slightly, al­
though small increases normally occur.
In the nondurable-goods sector, hours of work
declined by more than the usual amount from July
to August both in food processing establishments
and in petroleum refineries. The printing industry
however, reported a gain considerably greater than
seasonal.

The August job increase in durable-goods in­
dustries was smaller than usual. There was vir­
tually no change in job levels in the lumber in­
dustry between July and August. The steel indus­
try reported a continuation of job declines instead
of the usual small increase, and substantial job
cutbacks were reported by aircraft manufacturers
and producers of machine-tool accessories.

Average overtime work in manufacturing declined
by 0 .1 hour over the month to a level of 2.3 hours,
0 .1 hours below a year ago.
*

Increasing employment activity, apparently
connected with preparation for 1958 car model pro­
duction, was reported by a number of automobile
component suppliers— notably producers of metal
stampings, electrical equipment for vehicles, and

Compared with a year ago, substantially shorter
hours of work prevailed in a number of industries,
notably lumber (1 .5 hours below a year ago), ma­
chinery (1 .1 hours), transportation equipment and
food (1.0 hour), ordnance (0 .7 hours), and electrical

438863 0 -57 -2




ix

unchanged at $2.07.

machinery and tobacco (0*6 hours)«

Factory earnings were higher by 9 cents per
hour and $2.80 per week compared with August 1956.
Industries reporting the largest over-the-year
increases in weekly earnings were primary metals
($7 .00), rubber ($6 .52 ), fabricated metals ($5 .73 ),
and chemicals ($ln96).

FACTORY EARNINGS RISE
Earnings of factory production workers rose
by h i cents to $82.59 in August as a result of
the lengthened workweek. Hourly earnings were




x

TobU 1. Employ«** in nenagricultural ostablishmonts,
by in d u s tr y division a n d soloctod groups
(In thousands)

Year
ago

C u rre n t
In d u s t r y d iv is io n

and g ro u p

Aug. 1957

July 1957

i/
TOTAL..... ...............................
MINING....................................
Metal mining............................
Bituminous-coal............... .........
Nonmetallie mining and quarrying.......

1/

52,600

52»838

854
113.1

856

114.2
230.4
119.3

231-8
120.7

June

Aug.

1957

1956

52,881
858
112.4

241.9
118.7

52,258
839
110.2
235.3
120.9

August- 1957
net change fro m :
Year
ago

P r e v io u s
m onth

+238

+580

-

- 1.1
4 1.4
+ l.t

♦ 15
4 2.9
- 3.5
.2

2

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION...... ..............

3,299

3,280

3,232

3,361

♦ 19

- 62

MANUFACTURING..... .......................

16,9*9

16,698

16,852

17,035

+251

- 86

DURABLE GOODS............................
Ordnance and accessories........ .
Lumber and wood products (except
furniture).'. 1..........................
Furniture and fixtures..................
Stone, clay, and glass products........
Primary metal industries...............
Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and transportation
equipment).................. ..........
Machinery (except electrical)..........
Electrical machinery....................
Transportation equipment............... ,
Instruments and related products....... .
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries..

9,807
125-3

9,752
124.8

9,913

126.7

9,780
129.3

+ 55
+
*5

♦ 27
- k.O

715.2
376.0
559.*
1,297-i»

714.1
369.3
538.1
1,301.8

729.7
371.8
555.2
1,318.9

789.2
379.6
567.4
1 ,307.6

4 1.1
♦ 6.7
4 21.3
- k.k

-

1,126.4
1,668.7
1,2*5-7
1,871.0
338.4
483.8

1,108.7
1,685.7
1,220.6
1,886.0
335-2
467.3

1,125.6
1,714.6
1,222.0
1,925.9
338.0
485-0

1 ,094.7
1 ,707.6
1,215.1

1,746.0
338.6
505.0

4 17.7
- 17.0
4 25.1
- 15.0
4 3.2
4 16.5

♦ 31.7
- 38.9
4 30.6
+125.0
.2
- 21.2

NONDURABLE GOODS..........................
Food and kindred products.............. ,
Tobacco manufactures....................
Textile-mill products........... ........
Apparel and other finished textile
products.............. ................
Paper and allied products.............. ,
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries.............................
Chemicals and allied products.......... .
Products of petroleum and coal.........
Rubber products......................
Leather and leather products........... ,

7,142
1,648.7
103.3
1,003.9

6,946
1,571.3
79-9

6,939
1,510.7

7,255
1,707.1

+196

♦

986.4

1,004.2

1,047.8

77.*
4 23.*
+ 17.5

-113
- 58.*
- 2.8
- *3.9

1,215-3
577*3

1,157.3
570.0

1,180.5
578.7

1,220.5
577.4

4 58.0

-

+ 7.3

-

855.2

860.3
829.2

861.7
831.8
259.1
255.7
373.9

852.2
832.8

- 5.1
♦ 1.9
4 .7
♦ 4.6
4 10.6

+ 3.0
- 1.7
4 .2
- 1.7
- 2.5

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES------TRANSPORTATION........ ...................
COMMUNICATION*........................... .
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES....................
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE................
WHOLESALE TRADE................ ..........
RETAIL TRADE............................ .
General merchandise stores.............
Food and liquor stores..................
Automotive and accessories dealers......
Apparel and accessories stores........ .
Other retail trade......................

831.1

261.4

260.7
258.5
372.3

263.1
382.9

82.5

106.1

261.2
264.8
385.4

821

2,766
821

4,181
2,762
813

615

606

4,190
2,769
813

11,505

11,510

11,505

11,198

4,202

4,223
2,785
617

3,140

608

3,064
8,134
1,344.4

4 21
♦ 19
0
4 2
-

3,992.9

3,955.1

563.2
3,880.1

582.8

619.8

16

-- 8
i
4 9

+109

*■883

8,365

+ 33

♦

+307

1,379.8
1,606.9
803.6

8,344
1,35*.6

5.2
.1

5

+ 7
- 12
4 1.2
- *.9
- 1.0
- 12.5
4 *.7

3,166

3,173
8,332
1,355.8
1,600.6
807-3
570.3
3,997.6

7*.0
3.6
8.0
10.2

419 8

4 IX .k
♦ 59.1

4 2.7

♦ 7.1
+117.5

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE....___

2,393

2,392

2,359

2,361

4 1

+ 32

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS.................

6,506

6,32*

6,551

6,293

- 18

4213

GOVERNMENT............... ................
FEDERAL..................................
STATE AND LOCAL.......................... .

7,109
2,227
4,882

7,138
2,219
*,919

7,343
2,211
5,132

2,208

6,981

- 29
♦ 8
- 37

4128
♦ 19
4109

1/ P relim in a ry.




3d

4,773

Table 2. Production workers in manufacturing, by major industry group
(In thousands)
Yea«*
ago

Current
Major industry group

Amg. 1957
1/

July 1957
1/

June

Aug.

1957

1956

A««iwt 1957
net change from:
Previous
Year
month
ago

MANUFACTURING..............................

13,031

12,783

12,955

13,256

•»248

-225

DURABLE GOODS...................... ..............................................

7,^81

7,*27

7,603

7,572

♦ 5*

- 91

72.3
Lumber and wood products (except

Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and transportation

72.8

75.8

79.6

-

.5

- 7.3

644. 3
314.9
459.8

644.6
308.2
442.7
1,071.1

658.9
311.0
*59.3
1,092.5

718.1
318.2
474.6
1,091.0

-

.3

- 73.8
- 3.3
- 14.8

869.9
1,206.1
830.1

686.5
1,238.6

368.6

386.1

- 6.5
+ 2.5
♦ 14.9

+
+
-

1, 0 7 0 . 0

886.6

4 6.7

+ 17.1
- 4.1
+ 16.7
- 14.1

- 2 1 .0

22*9
57.9
1.5

1,369.1
221.0

854.9
1,415.2
224.0

863.7
1,249.9
872.8
1 ,265.8
230.7
407.9

5,550

5,356

5,352

5,684

+194

-134

1,190.2
93.9
913.8

1,113.9
70.7
895.1

1,056.4
73-2
912.9

1,246.4
97.7
956.2

+ 76.3
♦ 23*2
+ 18.7

-

1,079.7
465.6

1,025.0
459*2

1,044.7
468.9

1,089.0

+ 54.7
+ 6.4

- 9.3
- 4.8

551.5
533.0
176.6
204.2
341.6

532.8
530.8
176.6
W9.9
331.7

556.0
534.7
175.3

550.2
545.1
178.8
205.5
344.6

- 1.3

♦ 1.3

+

- 1 2 .1
2 .2

1,192.0
871.3

Instruments and related products........
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries...
NONDURABLE GOODS........................................................... ..

1,362.6
223.5
383.5

Apparel and other finished textile
Printing, publishing, and allied

l/ Preliminary.




X il

196.8
332-7

470.4

+ 2 1 .2

2 .2

0
♦ 4.3
♦ 9.9

96.8
7.2
24.4

• 56-g
3-8
- 42.4

- 1.3
- 3.0

Table 3. Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group
Average weekly
earnings

1956

1957

M a j o r industry group
Aug.

1/

Average weekly
ho u r s

July

1/

Aug.

1957

Average hourly
earnings

1956

Aug.

July

1/

1/

Aug.

1956

1957
Aug.

July

1/

1/

Aug.

MANUFACTURING..................

$82.59

$ 82.18

$79.79

39.9

39.7

40.3

$2.07

$2.07

$1.98

DURABLE GOODS.................

88.44

88.00

85.68

40.2

40.0

40.8

2.20

2.20

2.10

O r d n a n c e and a c c e s s o r i e s ......
L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c t s

95.58

93.60

90.64

40.5

40.0

41.2

2.36

2.34

2.20

73.20
71.05

71.89
68.03

75.12

40.0
40.6

39.5
39.1

41.5
41.1

1.83
1.75

1.82

1.74

1.81
1.70

84.46
IOO .69

82.62

81.36

93.69

41.0
39.8

40.3
39.9

41.3
39.7

2.06

100.55

2.53

2.05
2.52

2.36

89.98

88.91*
93.61

84.25

95-68

80.19
94.25

40.7
41.7
40.5
40.8

2.18

81.18

40.8
40.7
39.6
39.7

2.20

82.19

40.9
40.6
39.9
39.8

84.42

84.61

82.21

40.2

40.1

72 A O

71.31

69.95

40.0

74.86

71.68

76.78
57.37
59.19

79.30

63.76

F u r n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s .........
Stone, clay, and glass
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ......
Fabricated metal products
( e x c e p t o r d nance, m a c h i n e r y ,
and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y ...........
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ......
I n s t r u m e n t s and r e l a t e d
p r o d u c t s .........................
Miscellaneous manufacturing
i n d u s t r i e s .......................

P a p e r and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .....
Prin t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , a nd
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ..............
C h e m i c a l s and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m and
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ..................
L e a t h e r and l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s . .

2.07

2.21

2.06

2.42

40.7

2.10

2.11

2.02

39.4

40.2

1.81

1.81

1.74

39.4

39.4

39.6

1.89

1.90

1.81

40.2
38.5
39.2

41.3
39.6

41.2
39.1
39.2

1.91
1.49
1.51

1.92

1.80

57.90

74.16
55.52
56.45

1.50

55.57
87.55

54.30
87.14

54.17
83.50

36.8

42.5

36.6
42.6

1.51

1.50

42.3

2.06

2.06

97.52
92.70

95.88

94.28
87.74

38.7
41.2

41.0

38.8

41.0

2.52
2.25

2.51

92.25

2.25

2.43
2.14

103.89

40.6
41.3

41.6
41.2

40.9
40.2
37.6

2.66
2.27

2.69
2.26

1.53

1.53

2.54
2.17
1.50

96.32

108.00
93.75
59.06

111.90
93.11

58.29

92.16

87.23
56.40

1/ P r e l i m i n a r y .




1.97

2.30
2.05
2.41

92.97

NONDURABLE GOODS...... ........
F o o d and k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s .....
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ...........
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........
A p p a r e l and o t h e r f i n i s h e d

69.87

xiii

38.6

38.6
36.2
38.2

38.1

2.29

1.61

1.98
2.31

1.42
1.44
1.48
1.96

Tablo 4. Gross ovorago wookly hours and avorago ovortimo hours of production
workors in manufacturing, by major industry group

Major industry group

Axuruat 1956
Aufua t 10*57
June 1OTT
J ulL 1957
v
Gross
Average
Gross
Average
Gross
A v e r a g e Gr o s s A v e r a g e
average
over­
average
over­
av e r a g e o v e r ­
average
over­
weekly
time
weekly
weekly
time
time
weekly
time
hours
hours
hours
hours
hours
hours
hours
hours

MANUFACTURING.......................................................................

39.9

2.3

39.7

2.4

1*0.0

2.4

1*0.3

2.7

DURABLE GOODS...................................

10.2
*

2.2

10.0
*

2.3

1*0.5

2.4

1*0.8

2.9

1*0.0

1.6

*
*

39.5
39.1

2.9

1*0.7
1*0.7
39.7
1*0.9
1*0.2

2.0

*
“

3.1
2.3
3.3

41.2
41.5
4l.l
41.3
39.7

3.6
2.9
3.6
2.3

-

-

2.9
3.5
2.5
2.7
2.3

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e )...•
F u r n i t u r e suid f i x t u r e s ...............................

1*0.3

2.2
3.3

39.9

2.1
2.8

-

1*0.8
1*0.7
39-6
39-7
1*0.1
39.*

2.5

-

Fabricated netal products

•
-

-

-

-

-

(except ordnance,

-

39.4

A p p ar e l and othe r finished textile products....
Printing, publishing, and allied industries....
C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ......................
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s . .......................................

jJ Preliminary.




-

Ins t ru m e n ts and r e la t e d p r o d u c t s . ..............

xiv

2.2

2.6

1.8
1.8
2.1

1*1.2
1*1.1
1*0.3
1*0.1
40.5
39.9

1.8
2.2

1*0.7
41.7
1*0.5
1*0.8
1*0.7
1*0.2

39» *

2.5

39.2

2.4

39.6

2.5

1*1.3
39*6
38.6
36.2
1*2.3
38.2
11.0
*
41.6
1*1.2
38.1

3.5
2.0

1*0.9
38.6
38.9
35.8
1*2.2
38.4
41.2
40.9
1*0.9
37.8

3.3
1.5
2.3

41.2
39.1
39-2
36.6
42.6
38.8
41.0
40.9
40.2
37.6

3.3
1.0
2.4

2.5
1.7

2.1
1.1

4.6
2.7
2.2
2.3
3.9
1.3

2.9
2.7
2.0
1.9

1.1
4.1

2.8

2.2
2.0
3.1
1.2

2.6

1.2
4.5
3.2
2.2

2.1
2.8

1.2

Tabl* 5* Indox el employees in nenagricultural establishments,
by industry division
(1 9 4 7-4 9 -1 0 0 )

Year
ago

Current

August 1957
ll

July

1957

ll

June

August

1957

1956

12 0. 8

Transportation and public
Wholesale and retail trade *•••••••••••
Finance» insurance, and real estate* «•

1/ Preliminary.

130.5, respectirely.

120.3

120.9

119.5

90.1
156.7
113.5

90.3
155.8
111.8

90.5
1 53.5
1 12 . 9

88.5
159.7

103.7
122.3
138.6
133.0
125.6

103.2
122.3
138.6
133.3
126.1

102. 7
122.3
1 36.7
133.9
1 29.7

114.1
102.9

1 19.0
13 6.8
12 8.6
123.3

2/ March, April, May 1957 rerlied! Total, 118.7, 119*5, 120.0j gorenaunt, 130.0, 130.3,

Tabl* 6. Index of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group,
( 19 4 7-4 9 -1 0 0 )

Year
ago

Current
Major industry group
Au g u s t

1957

1/
MANUFACTURING.........................

Jttty 1957
i!

June

Au gu st

1957

1956

Lumber and wood products (except

103.3

104.7

107.2

112.1

111.3

113.9

113.5

317.6

322.1

335.3

352.9

87.3

DURABLE GOO D S .............................

IO5A

87A

89.3
105.3
105.5
106.2

97.3
107.7
109.2
106.0

114.4

106.7

Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and trans-

105.7
104.0

113.9

133.3
115.5
101.1

132.7
133.9
113.9
97.1

101.6

97.5

94.0

94.0

99.8

100.5
89.0

67.2

94.1

89.2

73.2

69.1
74.7

105.3
92.7
78.2

103.7
116.3

98.4
114.6

100.4
117.1

104.6
117.3

114.8
104.4
95.2
100.2
94.6

115.0
io4.o
95.2

115.7
104.8
94.1
96.7

114.4

136.0

NONDURABLE Q O 0 D S ...... ...................

Textile-mill pr od uct s .............. ....
Apparel and other finished textile
Paper and allied prod uct s..... .........
Printing, publishing, and allied

Rubber p r od uct s.................. .

j/ Preliminary.




U1.7

110.9
109.9
136.3
123.8
119.1
107.4

104.8
instruments and related p r od uct s. »..•.
Miscellaneous manufacturing Industries .

104.3
101.8
104.3

74.8

106.1

98.2
91.8

109.0

133.5
138.4

115.5

92.1

106.8
96.2
101.1
95.*

Seasonally Adjusted Data
Table

Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division, seasonally adjusted
7.

Number

Index

(In t h o u s a n d s )

(1 9 4 7 —4 9 « 1 0 0 )
Industry division
August
1957

U

TOTAL 2 J ...................................

120.7

M i n i n g ....................................

89. 2
143.8
112. 7
103.0
124. 1
136.6

T r a n s portation and public utilities..
Wholesale and retail t r a d e ............
Finance, insurance, and real estate..

13 2 -3

130-5

ÎJuly

June

August

August

July

June

August

19 57 1/

195 7

1956

195 7 1/

19 57 1J

1957

19 56

120.7

120. 6

119-3

52, 78 8

52, 809

52 ,7 7 3

52, 180

go.7

90. 1
147.6

87.7
146.5
113- 2
102. 2
120.8
134.8
128.0
128. 2

854

831
3,083
16,901
4 , 159

145-6

113.0
102.5
123.8

^ 3 -4

135-9

135-3
131-9

132.7
129-9

102. 3
123. 1
129.9

846
3,027
16,828
4 > 192
11,675

2,358

860

3,065

16,869
4 , 171
11,653

3, 108
16, 924
4 , 164
n ,5 7 9

2,336

11,364

2 ,3 45

7,3 54

6,4 54
7 ,354

7 ,2 54

6,492

6,474
7 ,3 88

2,326
6, 262

Preliminary. 2 / Revised data for 1957 : Total - March,' 5 2 , 5 47 ; April, 52 , 593 ; May, 1 20 .5 and 52 ,698 . GovernmentMarch, 129 . 5 , 7 , 331 ; April, 129 .8 , 7 , 3 47 ; May, 130 .0 and 7 , 358 .

Table 8. Production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group, seasonally adjusted

Number
(In thousands)

Index

(1 9 4 7 - 4 9 = 1 0 0 )
M a j o r industry group
August
1957

JJ

July

June

August

July

June

August

19 57 1/

1957

1956

1957

U

195? j y

1957

1956

August

104.8

105-3

106. 2

12, 929

12,966

•
13,026

13 , 137

112. 8.

113- O
'

113.8

114.1

7 ,5 25

7 ,5 4 3

7 ,5 9 8

7,6i6

322.1

3 3 5 -3

3 52 - 9

72

73

76

80

83-9
108.4
104. 6
104.4-

85.6
108.7
102. 8
105-4

86.3
108.7
105. 1
io6„ 2

109.4
108.0
106.5

93 - 5

619
320

632
321

321

115-0
107. 6
138.8

DURABLE 8 0 0D S .............................................

104-5

3 17 -6

MANUFACTURING.......................

115. 1
107-7

113-9
107-9
134-9

Lumber and wood products (except

F abricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and transpor-

637

690
323
470

455

447

457

1,075

1, 085

1,093

1, O96 !

123.8
121.1

139-1

896
1,223
889
1,363
227

897
1, 224
881
1,369
226

891
1,227
864
1,415
225

1, 282
89I
1, 266

388

392

410

112. 1
112.8

873

Paper and allied pr o d u c t s ........... .
Printing, publishing, and allied

102.1

103.2

107-9

386

94-9

9 5 -2

95-3

96.9

5,4 04

5 ,4 2 3

5,428

5 ,5 21

90.0

90.5
7 8.5

92. 9

75 -5

77-6
7 5-5

74-7

84.2
79 - 1

1,059
85
923

1,065
82
923

1,071
83
913

1,100
89
966

101.7
115.8

103.0
115-8

104. 6
117. 1

102. 6
116.8

1,059

464

1,073
464

1, 089

1,068
468

116.1
106.0

Textile-mill p r o d u c t s ...................
Apparel and other finished textile

116.5

138-4
116.0

8 9 -5

NONDURABLE GOODS.....................................

137-6
133-9

101.6

Instruments and related p r o d u c t s ......
M iscellaneous manufacturing

133-3

116.3
106.2

115-7

115-7

558
541
174

559
542
174

556

543

20 6

172
197

556
553
175

335

335

335

338

117.0

80.4

93-5

101. 1
92. 6

9 3-5

101.1
92. 6

106.4
9 2.5
96.7

92. 6

1/ Preliminary.




xvi

108.4
94- 1
102.1
9 3-5

206

469

235

208

Table A-l: Employees in nonagricultural establishment*,
by industry division
(In t h o u s a n d s )
Contract
con­
struction

TOTAL

Mining

26,829

1,124
1,230
953

1,021
848

25,569
28,128
27,770
28,505
29,539
29,691
29,710

1,203
1,092
1,080
1,176
1,105
1,041

1,229
1,321
1,446
1,555

31,041
29,143

1,078
1,000
864

23,377

Y e a r a nd m o n t h

722

1,497
1,372
1,214
970

Manufac­
turing

Transpor­
Fina n c e ,
Wholesale
insurance,
t a t i o n and'
and r e t a i l
and real
public
trade
es t a t e
utilities

Service
and
miscel­
la n e o u s

4,664
4,623
4,754
5,084
5,494

2,054

Govern­
me n t

Annual a v e r a g e :

1919-•
1920..
1921..
1922..
1923..
1924..
1925..
1926..
1927.•
1928..

27,088
24,125

1929..

1930..
1931-.
1932..
1933..
193*.■
1935..
1936..
1937-.
1938..

26,383

23,1166
25,699
26,792
28,80e
30,718

735
974
888
937

28,902

1,006
882

30,311
32,058

845

36,220

947
983
917

1,012
1,185

1,608
1,606

809
862

912
1,145
1,112
1,055

39,779
42,106
41,534
40,037
41,287
43,462
44,448

1949..
1950..
1951..
1952..
1953..
1954..
1955..
1956..

883
826

1,150
1,294
1,790
2,170
1,567
1,094
1,132

982

1,982
2,169

43,315
44,738
47,347
48,303

1939.•
1940..
1941..
1942..
1943..
1944..
1945..
1946..
1947..
1948..

918
889
916
ODe

2,165
2,333
2,603
2,634

916

852
943

1,661

10,534

9,401
8,021
6,797
7,258
8,346
8,907
9,653

10,606
9,253

10,078
10,780

12,974
15,051
17,381
17,111
15,302
14,461
15,290
15,321

3,711
3,998
3,459
3,505
3,882
3,806
3,824
3,940
3,891

A u g u s t . ...
September*
O c t o b e r . ..
Iov«sber..
December..

January...
February..
March.... *
*
May...... *

1,247

6,543
6,453

1,313
1,355
1,347

3,060
3,233
3,196

3,749

1,399
1,436
1,480
1,469
1,435
1,409
1,428
1,619

3,321
3,477
3,705
3,857
3,919
3,934
4,011
4,474
4,783
4,925

3,995
4,20e
4,660
5,483
6,080
6,043
5,944
5,595
5,474
5,650

4,972
5,077
5,264
5,411

6,026

2,912

3,013
3,248
3,433
3,619
3,798
3,872
4,023
4,122
4,141

3,256
3,361
3,342
3,296
3,174
2,997

16,301
17,035
17,119
17,238
17,180
17,159

4,161
4,190
4,191
4,189

51,716
51,704
51,919
52,270
52,482
52,881
52,600

832
833
831
833
835

2,667

16,959
16,945
16,933

4,126
4,120
4,147
4,153
4,156
4,181
4,202

July.....

* Revised.
438 8 6 3 0 - 5 7 - 3




858
856

2,673
2,756
2,906

3,082

3,232

3,280

16,822
16,762
16,852

16,698

2,723
2,802
2,848
2,917
2,996

4,999
5,552
5,692

2,736
2,771
2,956
3,114
2,840

765
839
842

837
837

2,871

2,611

2,659

51,258
52,258
52,663
52,952
53,007
53,639

836

2,755

2,542

6,401
6,064
5,531

2,593
2,759
2,993

816

6,165

2,187
2,268
2,431
2,516
2,591

2,671
2,603
2,531

3,907
3,675
3,243
2,804

777
777

852

2,622

5,810
6,033

2,142

6,137

48,431
50,056
51,878

oop

5,626

1,050
1,110
1,097
1,079
1,123
1,163
1,166
1,235
1,295
1,360

3,822

14,178
14,967
16,104
16,334
17,238
15,995
16,563
16,905

49,681

1956»

1957s

920

10,534
10,534
8,132
8,986
10,155
9,523
9,786
9,997
9,839
9,786

3,949
3,977
4,166
4,185
4,221

¡£
2
4,157

4,184
4,194

4,907
6,076

6,612
6,940
7,416
7,333
7,189

7,260

7,522
8 ,6 œ
9,196
9,519

9,513
9,645
10,012
10,281
10,527
10,520
10,846
11,292

1,431
1,398
1,333
1,270
1,225
1,262

1,672

1,741
1,765
1,824

1,892

1,967
2,038
2,122
2,219
2,306

11,164
11,198
11,319
11,445
11,657

2,349

11,298
11,225
11,265
11,428
11,411
11,505

2,293
2,301

12,260

11,510

2,361

2,325
2,315
2,314
2,308

2,310

2,320
2,329
2,359
2,392

2,962

3,127
3,084
2,913

2,682

2,614
2,784
2,883

ss

5,916
6,231

3,066

3,149
3,264
3,225
3,167
3,298
3,477

3,662

3,876

5,856

6,389

6,609

6,645
6,751
6,914
7,178

6,296
6,293

6,966

6,322
6,343
6,327
6,295

6,981
7,203
7,290
7,334
7,589

6,239
6,273
6,317
6,432
6,520
6,551
6,524

7,302
7,334
* 7,360
* 7,376
* 7,387
7,343
7,138

n il'll t

Table A-2: All employees and production workers in nonagricultural
establishments, by industry
'In t h o u s a n d s )
Production workers

Al l e m p l o y e e s

Industry

1956

IS>57

1956

1957

J u ly

Jun e

J u ly

TOTAL l/...................................

52,600

52,881

51,258

H IH IH G ...................................

856

858

765

114.2
39.4
33.2
17.5

112.4
38.9
33.4
17.5

85.3
33.5
17.3

34.4
27.5
14.8

ANTHRACITE........................ .....

31.0

30.6

29.0

BITUMINOUS-COAL......... ..............

230.4

241.9

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION............................

361.1

P e t r o l e u m an d n a t u r a l - g a s p r o d u c t i o n
( e x c e p t c o n t r a c t s e r v i c e s ) .............

NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING......

METAL MINING.......... ................
I r o n m i n i n g .................................

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION....................
NONBUILDING CONSTRUCTION.....................................
O t h e r n o n b u i l d i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n .........
BUILDIN G CONSTRUCTION.............................................

GENERAL CONTRACTORS....................
SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS..............
P l u m b i n g and h e a t i n g ......................
P a i n t i n g and d e c o r a t i n g ..................
O t h e r s p e c i a l - t r a d e c o n t r a c t o r s ........

MANUFACTURING...................................
DURABLE GOODS.................................
NONDURABLE GOODS...........................................

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES ..................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.............
D a i r y p r o d u c t s .............................

M i s c e l l a n e o u s f o o d p r o d u c t s .............

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...................

JL




700
96.6

Ju n e

J u ly

704

625

95.5
34.2

28.0

14.8

68.7
6.3
28.4
14.7

28.9

28.3

26.5

188.6

207.6

218.9

168.6

354.8

342.9

265.2

260.6

259.6

216.3

212.0

205.3

138.6

136.3

137.4

119.3

118.7

119.4

101.5

100.9

102.0

3,280
730
332.6
397.8

3,232
714
321.5
392.0

11.2

3,256
705
323.9

381.1

2,550

2,518

2,551

1,044.7

1,005.5

1 ,087.8

1,505.7
330.8
224.7
245.2
705.0

1,512.5
342.7

205.2

237.2
727.4

1,463.2
346.4
202.3

205.8
708.7

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

~

~

_
~

16,698

16,852

16,301

12,783

12,955

12,536

9,752
6,946

9,913
6,939

9,313

6,988

7,427
5,356

7,603
5,352

7,113
5,423

124.8

126.7

130.9

72.8

75.8

81.7

1,571.3
328.7

1,510.7
325.7

1,598.4
336.7

1,113.9
260.4
77.3

1 ,056.4

1,139.9

111.0

245.3
115.3
292.5
C o n f e c t i o n e r y and r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s . . . .

J u ly

28.0

72.3
234.1
144.1
79.9
34.2
29.9
6.3
9.5

109.8

197.1

113.2

289.5
27.1
73.8
229.4
145.1

82.5
34.3

32.6
6.6

9.0

118.8

255.7
122.3
291.5
27.4

70.0
232.0

144.0

212.1

79.7
173.8

257.9

76.0
164.3
77.5

22.8

171.6
22.0

130.1

59.9
127.1

58.4
99.3

100.1

83.9
34.2

70.7

73.2

32.2

28.3
5.3
7.5

6.9

10.6

29.6

29.8
30.9
5.6
6.9

267.8
80.2

223.7

86.6

173.2

22.1
56.0
131.6
98.7
75.5
30.7
30.5
5.8
8.5

Table A-2: All employees and production workers in nonagricultural
establishments, by industry - Continued
(In

th o u sa n d s)
A l l e m p lo y e e s

In d u s try

July

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS...................

986.4
6.4

C a r p e t s , r u g s , o t h e r f l o o r c o v e r i n g s ..........
H a t s ( e x c e p t c l o t h and m i l l i n e r y ....................

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS...............................
M e n 's and b o y s ' s u i t s and c o a t s .......................
M e n 's and b o y s ' f u r n i s h i n g s and w o rk
c l o t h i n g ............................................................................

C h ild r e n 's

o u t e r w e a r .................................................

1,004.2
6.9
117.7
428.4

1,019.9

July

211.8
86.2

29.0
216.2
88.1

10.2
56.6

10.6

12.3

57.9

58.8

1,157.3
117.5

1 ,180.5
122.8

1,154.5

1 ,025.0

302.7

309.4
336.1

305.9
331.0
114.7
16.4
74.7

422.8
28.4
m i l l s . .............................................................

June

P r o d u c t io n w o rk e rs

195b
July

895.1
5.7
105.7
396.3
24.7
191.4
75.1
40.3
9.0
46.9

115.0
K n it t in g

1957

49.0

328.0
U 6.5
16.7
78.8
12.0
60.8

49.4

119.2

14.1
79.6
12.5

6.8

119.3
442.2
28.4

215.1

86.4

50.6

118.5

12.6

105.1

276.5

1957

June
912.9

6.2

928.3
6.3
110.4
415.2
24.9
195.2
75.0
41.8

108.7
401.4
25.4
196.7
76.7
40.2
9.4
48.2
1,044.7

1,024.7
106.9

282.2

279.9
291.7

110.0

289.5

295.8

14.4

11.9

103.2

195É)
July

106.0

70.0

70.6

9.4
55.2

10.6
48.9

102.0

14.2
67 .O
9.5
53.1
100.4

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE).............................
S a w m ills and p l a n i n g m i l l s ...................................
M illw o r k , p ly w o o d , and p r e f a b r i c a t e d

124.3

61.7

125.1

59.3
121.4

9.1
54.5
102.7

103.6

714.1
99.9
374.7

729.7
110.9
377.3

773.3
123 .O
400.8

644.6
93.3
343.3

103.1
345.5

115.6

131.9
52.5
57.1

137.6
54.6
57.3

112.1
45.9

111.5
48.2

116.3

50.1
56.5

M is c e lla n e o u s a p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r i e s . . . .
O th e r f a b r i c a t e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s . . . ..........

50.0

50.6

50.2
51.0

132.9

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..................

658.9

703.4
370.3

305.7
221.4

47.5

47.7

37.3

37.8

38.4

38.6

36.2

29.1

28.9

26.1

24.7

26.0

19.2

19.3

19.8

570.0

578.7
281.5

568.9

468.9

462.2

158.8

138.4

279.9
154.6
134.4

459.2
226.3

157.1
137.3

S c re e n s, b lin d s ,

311.0
225.0

275.6

s h e lv in g ,

308.2
222.6

24.7

P a r t it io n s ,

367.2
257.3

38.9

p u b lic -b u ild in g ,

261.0

46.9

O ffic e ,

369.3

371.8

258.8

125.8

107.1

232.8
128.0
108.1

230.9
125.4
105.9

860.3
320.0

861.7
321.8

847.0
313.7

58.5
53.3

53.9

552.8
157.1
23.9
34.0
184.9
46.9

556.0
159.3
24.2
34.1
184.1
47.4

45.5

36.4

12.6

37.1

543.6
154.0
27.0
32.8
178.3
46.5
15.6

70.4

57.3

57.2

54.7

and p r o f e s s i o n a l

lo c k e r s ,

and

and m i s c e l la n e o u s

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS................

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES.............................

59.2
53.3

227.9
62.1

227.2
62.5

17.3

B o o k b in d in g and r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ...............
M is c e lla n e o u s p u b l i s h i n g and p r i n t i n g




45.6

; 17.6
46.1

74.9

74.7

62.3

220.6
62.0
18.6

36.7

Industry r npL-y ir.rnt

Table A-2: All employees and production workers in nonagricultural
establishments, by industry - Continued
( In th o u sa n d s)
A l l e m p lo y e e s

1< 7
p

In d u s try

July

June

829.2
107.6
316.0

831.8
108.1

104.4

102.6

S o a p , c l e a n i n g and p o l i s h i n g
p r e p a r a t i o n s .......... . .....................................................
P a i n t s , p ig m e n t s , and f i l l e r s ...........................

50.5
79.0

F e r t i l i z e r s ................................................. . ...................
V e g e t a b le and a n im a l o i l s and f a t s ...............
M i s c e lla n e o u s c h e m i c a l s ..........................................

8.8
30.4
35.8
96.7

50.7
77.9
8.5
33.5
36.5

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS............

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AMD COAL...........
C o k e , o t h e r p e t r o le u m and c o a l p r o d u c t s . .

RUBBER PRODUCTS.........................

315.8

98.2

L e a t h e r : ta n n e d , c u r r i e d , and f i n i s h e d . . .
I n d u s t r i a l l e a t h e r b e l t i n g and p a c k i n g . . .
B o o t and sh o e c u t s t o c k and f i n d i n g s ..........

July

June

1956
July

823.7
109.1
313.4
99.5

530.8
71.9
205.1
59*7

534.7
73.0

538.9
74.6

205.8

210.5
58.6

50.4

31.1
48.6
7.4

30.7
47.7
7.2
24.4
24.4

76.8
8.3

135.2
41.4

175.3
133.3
42.0

170.4
134.2

261.6

199.9
84.4

196.8
78.2

202.8

126.7

16.9
98.6

101.2

99.1

376.7
41.8
4.9

331.7
36.3
3.8

332.7
36.7
3-2

52.8

258.5
110.1

255.7
104.5

111.3

373.9

41.0
5.0
19.9
243.6
17.1

23.6

19.6

243.4

17.8
218.7

17.0
29.6
17.2

17.1

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS..........

538.1

555.2
30.7
97.7

559.5
33.4

442.7

91.2
16.1

41.5
83.3
51.4

43.9

79.7
13.7
23.7
73.5
43.0
98.9

30.6

G l a s s and g l a s s w a r e , p r e s s e d o r b l o w n . . . .
G l a s s p r o d u c t s made o f p u r c h a s e d g l a s s . . .

94.1
16.3
30.3

16.5

16.8

24.1
61.3

L u g g a g e .................................................................................
H a n d b a g s and s m a ll l e a t h e r g o o d s ....................
G lo v e s and m i s c e lla n e o u s l e a t h e r g o o d s . . .

30.2

30.2

47.6
7.0

176.6

253.1
205.5
47.6

372.3
40.5
5.1
19.9
243.0

59.2

21.6

259.1
206.3

21.8
129.4

1C>57

30.6
36.8
98.8

260.7
208.4
52.3

21.7
126.7

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS.............

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s

1956
July

32.7
17.5

14.3
25.5
15.3

26.9

62.3

17.4

17.8
219.0

14.4

22.1

24.8
63.5

36.2
84.7

19.0
336.5
37.5
3.7
17.5
219 .I
14.4

25.8

28.8

15.1

15.5

459.3
27.1
83 .O

466.4

13.8

29.8
76.8

13.4
37.0
79.0
46.0
99.9

16.5

34.6
73.3
44.5
99.1
16.4

91.9

66.8

67.5

67.3

1,318.9

966.0

1,074.1

1,092.5

747.2

647.5
224.6

652.1
229.0

312.1
235.5

541.2
193.2

546.6
197.9

203.9

66.7

67.9

68.7

52.2

53.5

55:.1

14.1

14.1

14.1

10.5

10.5

10.4

109.8

112.3
77.0

115.6

85.0
61.9
130.1

87.4

90.9

83.6

C o n c r e t e , gyp su m , and p l a s t e r p r o d u c t s . . .
C u t - s t o n e and s t o n e p r o d u c t s ..............................
M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m e t a l l i c m in e r a l

49.7
121.5

52.7
121.7

B l a s t f u r n a c e s , s t e e l w o rk s , and r o l l i n g
m i l l s ...................................................................................
I r o n and s t e e l f o u n d r ie s ........................................
P r im a r y s m e lt in g and r e f i n i n g o f
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a ls ......................................................
S e c o n d a r y s m e lt in g and r e f i n i n g o f
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a ls ......................................................
R o l l i n g , d r a w in g , and a l l o y i n g o f
N o n fe r r o u s f o u n d r ie s .................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s p r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s . . .

Jl




18.9

19.8

93.0

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES................

19.0

122.2

88.8

93.0

1 ,301.8

75*8
163.3

166.5

75.5
144.5

63.2

133.4

17.2

212.7

61.8

112.4

Table A-2: All employees and production workers in nonagricuitural
establishments, by industry • Continued
(In

th o u sa n d s)
A l l e m p lo y e e s

1957

In d u s t r y

P r o d u c t io n w o rk e rs

1956
Julv

Julv
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT)...............................
C u t l e r y , h and t o o l s , and h a r d w a r e ..................
H e a t in g a p p a r a t u s ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c ) and
p lu m b e r s ’ s u p p l i e s ................................ ...................
M e ta l s t a m p in g , c o a t i n g , and e n g r a v i n g . . .
L i g h t i n g f i x t u r e s .........................................................
F a b r i c a t e d w ir e p r o d u c t s ........................................
M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s . .

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)............
E n g in e s and t u r b i n e s .................................................
C o n s t r u c t i o n and m in in g m a c h in e r y ..................

June

1 ,108*7

1 ,125.6
58.4

1,054.0

June

140.9

61.0

137.4

869.9
52.4
106.8

886.5
51.0

118.1

84.1
247.8

59*
136.7

111.4
334.2
228.7
51.1
60.4
140.5

1,685.7
81.9
142.8

59.8
I36 A

110.0

332.1
223.5

182.5

56.8
127.6

39.9
48.1
108.3

1,714.6
83.9
146.6

1,703.1

1 ,206.1

1 ,238.6

146.5

151.2
283.2

152.1
289.I

152.1

279.6

101.1
108.0

214.4

179.9

183-7

124.1
92.4
127.4
209.4

47.6

76.6

131.7
174.1
274.0

134.9
179.6
277.4

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY......................

1 ,220.6

1 ,222.0

1,187.3

413.3
48.0

417.6
47.4

421.1

26.1
72.6

26.2

73.6
28.3
578.6
50.3

25.3
66.4
28.4
548.5
47.4

1,925.9
793-9
905.6
556.2
178.9

1,759.1
741.9
813.9
500.9
164.3

266.9

28.4

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.............
A u t o m o b ile s .......................................................................

581.8

50.4

1 ,886.0
759.5

902.2

A i r c r a f t ............................................................................
A i r c r a f t p r o p e l l e r s and p a r t s .........................
O th e r a i r c r a f t p a r t s and. e q u ip m e n t.............
S h ip and b o a t b u i l d i n g and r e p a i r i n g ..........
S h i p b u i l d i n g and r e p a i r i n g ................................
R a i l r o a d e q u ip m e n t......................................................
O th e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t.........................

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS.........
L a b o r a t o r y , s c i e n t i f i c , and e n g i n e e r i n g
in s t r u m e n t s .....................................................................
M e c h a n ic a l m e a s u rin g and c o n t r o l l i n g

553.9
176.7

21.0
150.6
147.2

130.2
17.0
67.5

P h o t o g r a p h ic a p p a r a t u s ................................ ............




267.3

20.6
149-9
148.7
129.9

18.8

67.7

50.2

16.8

131.9
132.9

115.0

17.9
60.4

57.1

59.2
104.3
109.1

220.2

1956
Julv

823.2
53.9

108.8

90.9

211.2
172.8

1,247.3

37.5
46.4

101.7
54.6

104.1

110.6
213.9

127.9
174.1
97.2
133.4

133.8
175-1
94.0
153.4

213.2

207.8

850.1

854.9

849.1

281.1
36.1
I 9.9

286.7
35.6
19.9
57.6
24.5
394.2
36.4

299.0

172.2

56.5
24.6
395.6
36.3

1,369.1
597.1

586.0

357.8
109.9
14.4
103.9

1,415.2
632.4
593.9
363.2
112.3
14.2
104.2

39-3

20.0
51.6
25.2
379.7
34.3
1,279.5

581.2

530.8
324.1

101.8

126.0

128.0

52.2

52.7

8.2

ll.l
93.8
114.3
98.8
15.5
44.9
8.3

226.1

111.7
14.3

111.9

16.1

9.6

10.0

10.0

7.8

335.2

338.0

333.2

221.0

224.0

75.5

75.1

68.0

42.1

42.2

38.9

85.4

10.2

58.3

58.0

28.6
18.2

13.8

13.8

84.0
13.7

41.7
23.5

42.2
24.0

40.6
25.5

70.0
26.2

69.4
28.1

84.5
O p t i c a l in s t r u m e n t s and l e n s e s .........................
S u r g i c a l , m e d ic a l, and d e n t a l
i n s t r u m e n t s .....................................................................

85.2

213.0

I89.2
262.4
124.9
202.3
269.5

C o m m u n ic a tio n e q u ip m e n t..........................................
M is c e lla n e o u s e l e c t r i c a l p r o d u c t s ..................

111.4

249.7
I87.8
40.2
48.8
112.4

50.8

292.5

S p e c i a l - i n d u s t r y m a c h in e r y ( e x c e p t
m e t a lw o r k in g m a c h in e r y ) .......................................
G e n e r a l i n d u s t r i a l m a c h in e r y ...................... ..
O f f i c e and s t o r e m a c h in e s and d e v i c e s . . . .
S e r v i c e - i n d u s t r y and h o u s e h o ld m a c h in e s . .
M is c e lla n e o u s m a c h in e r y p a r t s ...........................

E l e c t r i c a l g e n e r a t in g , t r a n s m is s io n ,
d i s t r i b u t i o n , and i n d u s t r i a l a p p a r a t u s . .
E l e c t r i c a l a p p l i a n c e s ...............................................
I n s u l a t e d w ir e and c a b l e ........................................
E l e c t r i c a l eq u ip m e n t f o r v e h i c l e s ..................

1957
Julv

68.8
32.6

57.8

43.5

20.6

10.2

10.4

29.0
18.7
43.5

28.2
20.1

22.1

44.2

26.3

Table A-2: All employees and production workers in nonagricultural
establishments, by industry - Continued
(In thousands)
All employees
Industry

Production workers

1956

1957

1956

1957

J u ly
J e w e l r y , s i l v e r w a r e , and p l a t e d w a r e . . . .
M u s ic a l in s t r u m e n t s and p a r t s . . . . ...............
P ens, p e n c ils , o th e r o f f ic e s u p p lie s .. . .
C ostum e j e w e l r y , b u t t o n s , n o t i o n s ...............

J u lv

J u lv

Ju n e

J u lv

467.3
45-9
15.5

485.0
47.2

16.9
88.9
31.9
59-5

368.6
35.7
12.7
69.5
23.6

383.5
36.9

31.5
57.9

479.0
46.6
17.5
94.0
31.4

386.1
36.8

83.6

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES...

Jun e

86.0

O t h e r m a n u f a c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s ............... ..

146.9

88.8
151.8

61.2
82.7
145.6

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ..............

4,202

4,181

4,161

TRANSPORTATION............................

2,766

2,762
1,144.5
1,011.9

2,742
1 ,171.8
1 0 3 1 .7
110.4
798.8
661.0
43.6
133.1

L o c a l r a i l w a y s and b u s l i n e s ............... ...
T r u c k in g and w a r e h o u s in g ..........................
O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n a nd s e r v i c e s ..................
A ir t r a n s p o r t a t io n

( common c a r r i e r ) . . . . .

COMMUNICATION.....................................................................

1,139.9
1,007.7
107-7
833.8
684.3

45.5
147.2

821

778.8
41.9
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES.......... .........
G as and e l e c t r i c u t i l i t i e s .................... ..

615
589.9

256.6

108.0

829.2
679.8
45-1
146.1
813

s u

770.0

767.2

41.9

42.8

606
581.5
253 .O

608
583.0

147.4

146.1

253.3
147.6

185.9

182.4
24.4

25.1

69.2
120.0

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

14.7
79.3
23.3
49.3

-

65.1

114.9
'
-

_

_

-

-

_

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

182.1

24.8

46.1
65.7
115.3

14.0
74.5
24.0
47.6

E l e c t r i c l i g h t and ga s u t i l i t i e s
Local u t ilit ie s ,

n o t e ls e w h e r e

11,505

11,164

3,166

3,140

3,033

1,824.8

1,807.9
123.7

1,766.9

125.2

120.8

321.3

319.3

309.9

_

466.6

464.4

461.8

_

_

_

9U-7
1,340.8

1 ,332.0

1 ,265.8

-

-

-

8,344
1,354.6

8,365

8,131
1,338.5

_
-

_

1,379.8

_
-

877.3
477-3
1 ,605.5
1 ,126.8
244.8
233-9

888.4
491.4
1 ,606.9
1 ,127.6
241.9
237.4

876.9
461.6
1 ,549.8
1,076.5
242.7

_

.

M
HOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE........................................ 11,510
WHOLESALE TRADE 2 / ......................................................
W h o le s a le r s ,

G r o c e r ie s ,

f u ll- s e r v ic e

a nd l i m i t e d -

fo o d s p e c i a l t i e s ,

b e e r,

E l e c t r i c a l g o o d s , m a c h in e r y , h a r d w a r e ,
and p lu m b in g e q u ip m e n t........................................
O t h e r f u l l - s e r v i c e and l i m i t e d - f u n c t i o n

RETAIL TRADE ............. ..........................
G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s t o r e s ...................................
D e p a rtm e n t s t o r e s and g e n e r a l m a i l - o r d e r
O t h e r g e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s t o r e s . . . . . . . .
G r o c e r y , m e a t, and v e g e t a b le m a r k e t s . . . .
D a ir y - p r o d u c t s t o r e s and d e a l e r s . . . . . . . . .
O t h e r fo o d a nd l i q u o r s t o r e s .......... .. ..............
A u to m o tiv e and a c c e s s o r i e s d e a l e r s ...............

900.5




803.6
619.8

3,992.9
392.3
3?6rP

JL.

808.3
582.8

3,955.1
392*8
... 312,4

-

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

_

874.4

230.6
810.1
572.0

3 ,860.2

390.2
344.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table A -2: All employees and production workors in nonagricultural
establishments, by industry - Continued
(In thousands)
A l l e m p lo y e e s
In d u s try

July
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ........................
B a n k s and t r u s t c o m p a n i e s . ^ . . . .......... ..
S e c u r i t y d e a l e r s and e x c h a n g e s ......................
I n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r s and a g e n t s .........................
O t h e r f i n a n c e a g e n c ie s an d r e a l e s t a t e . .

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS.................................

1957

July

1957

June

1956
July

2,392
625.9
85.2
866.2
814.2

2,359
614.4
83.8

2,349
593-5
84.1

-

_

_

-

-

_

853.1
807.8

833.8

-

-

_

837.8

-

-

-

6.524
601.4

6,551
539-7

_

_

_

606.4

-

-

-

338 .O
163.0
228.6

336.5

341.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

~

“

P e rso n a l s e r v ic e s :
C le a n in g and d y e in g p l a n t s ..............................
M o tio n p i c t u r e s ............................................................

June

P r o d u c t io n w o rk e rs

1956
July

167.6

228.9

GOVERNMENT 1 / .......................................................

7,138

7,343

FEDERAL..................................................................................
STATE AND LOCAL l / ....................................................

2,219
4,919

2,211

5,132

6,296

166.8
234.5

6,966
2,208

4,758

1/ March, April, and May 1957 data revised as follows: Total - 51,919, 52 ,270, and 52,482; government - 7,360,
7 ,376, and 7 ;387; State and local - 5,157, 5,171, and 5,105, respectively.
2/ Erratum: August 1957 Employment and Earnings - wholesale trade should have read 3,011 for June 1956.

TabU A-3: Indoxos of production-worker employment
and wookly payrolls in manufacturing
Year
1939....
194 0
194 1
194 2
194 3
194 4
1 945....
1946___
1947....
1948___
1949....
1950....
1951....
1952....
1953....
1954....
1955....
1956....

Production-woi:ker employment Production-worker Year
Number
Index
and
payroll index
month
(in thousands) (1947-49 = 100) (1947-49 = 100)

8,192
8,811
10,877
12,854
15,014
14,607
12,864
12,105
12,795
12,715
11,597
12,317
13,155
13,144
13,833
12,589
13,061
13,196




66.2
71.2
87.9
103.9
121.4
118.1

104.0
97-9
103.4
102.8
93.8
99-6
106.4
IO6.3
111.8
101.8

105.6
106.7

29.9
34.0
49.3

72.2

99.0
102.8

87.8

81.2
97.7
105.1
97.2
111.7

129.8

136.6
151.4
137.7
152.9
161.4

1956

July...
Aug....
Sept...
Oct....
No v ___
De c ....

Production-wo]-ker employment Production-worker
Number
Index
payroll index
(in thousands) (1947-49 = 100) (1947-49 = 100 )

12,536
13,256
13,345
13,465
13,392
13,350

101.4
107.2
107.9
108.9
108.3
107.9

150.5

13,150

165.5
165 .0
164.3

160.4

1957
Jan....
F e b ___
Mar....
Apr....
May....
June...

13,114
13,085
12,894
12,955

10 6.3
IO 6 .O
10 5.8
104.8
104.2
104.7

July...

12,783

10 3.3

12,960

161.5

166.7
169.0

168.2
171.4

161.5
161.0
163.8

Shipyards

Table A-4: Employees in Government and private shipyards, by region
(In thousands)
1956

1957
R e g io n

V

J uly

June

Ju ly
/
.

ALL REG1OHS................................................

229.1

228.3

216.2

P R IV A T E YARDS.........................................................................................................

130.2

129.9

115.0

NAVY YARDS.................................................................................................................

98.9

98.4

101.2

95-3

94.7
50.5
44.2

88.3
4 4.0
44.3

37.2

36.4

19.0

18.2
19.0

16.6
19.8

33.8

33.0

28.4

50.9
15.7
35.2

50.7
15.5
35.2

53.0
15.9
37.1

5.8

6.3

4.8

6.4

6.4

5.3

NORTH ATLANTIC.....................................

50.6
44.7

SOUTH ATLANTIC.....................................

36.9
1 7.9

GULF:

PACIFIC............................................

GREAT LAKES:

INLAND:
1/ The North Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Connecticut,
Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and
Vermont.
The South Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Florida,
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
The Gulf region includes all yards bordering on the Gulf of Mexico in the following States: Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas.
The Pacific region includes all yards in California, Oregon, and Washington.
The Great Lakes region includes all yards bordering on the Great Lakes in the following States: Illinois,
Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
The Inland region includes all other yards.
.2/ Data include Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard.

8




L>ov em m en t

Table A-5: Government civilian employment and Federal military personnel
(In thousands)
Unit of Government

Air

1957

June

1956

J u ij

TOTAL Cl VI L I AH EMPLOYMENT i/.*...........................

7,138

7,343

6,966

FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT a/..............................

2,219

2,211

2,208

2,191.9

1,023.3
521.4
647.2
22.3
4.6

2,184.4
1 ,023.0
518.7
642.7
22.3
4.6

2,182.0

237.0

236.3

233.7

215.9
68.3

215.2
88.2
8.9
118.1

212.8
90.1
8.6

Post Office D e p artment ..........................

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 3/..........................

Post Office Depart m e n t ..........................

8.8
118.8

20.4
.7

STATE AND LOCAL EMPLOYMENT*.......................

20.4
.7

1,046.2

510.1
625.6
21.9
4.3

114.1

20.2

•7

TOTAL MILITARY PERSONNEL 4/.....................................

5,132

4,758

1,295.9
3,622.6
E d u c a t i o n ...... ........................................
O t h e r * .................................................

4,919

1,340.3
3,791.3

1,252.6
3,504.9

2,960.2

1,958.3

2,216.5
2,915.1

1,877.2
2,880.3

2,840

2,826

2,839

1,001.3

921.8
685.0
201.4
30.5

998.0

919.8

677.1
200.9
29.9

1,027.3
909.0
673.6

200.5
28.7

1/ Data refer to Continental United States only.
2 / Data are p repared by the Civil Service Commission.
3 / Includes all Federal civilian employment in Washington Standard Metropolitan Area (District of Columbia and

adjacent M aryland and Virginia counties).
4 / Data refer to Continental United States and elsewhere.

*
March, April, Hay 1957 revised: Total civilian eaploynent-- 7 ,360, 7,376, and 7,387*, State and local
e«plqy*ent~ 5,157; 5ATI, and 5,3£5; local eaploynant— 3,823.8, 3 *830.1 , and 3,840.0; other enployaent—
2,806.2, 2,820.0, and 2,842a*

438863 0 -57 -4




_2_

Table A-6: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State
(I n thousands)
Mi ni ng

T O T AL
State

1957
Ju ly

A l a b a m a .....................

F l o r i d a .....................
Id a h o ........................
Il li no is ....................

735.7
25 4 . 6
332.2
4,4 96 .9
478.8
918.5
149.2

Or e g o n ......................

328.0

15.5

16.6
6.4

4,354.6
460.4
904.7
152.5

38.2
16.4
( 1/)
(2/)

504.2

39-2
i 5 .1

(¿ 0

(!/)

560.4

555.0

(!/)

18.2

48.1

39.3
48.9

.6
2.6
( 2/)
3.7.1
21.8
3.9
8.7
11.8

12.1

2.3
4.7
.3

778.7
288.6
878.0

93 3.9
36 0.9
1,287.5
35 6.0
92.1
189.3

509.9

1, 098.4

-

781.1
287.0

1, 003.0

761.8
291.8

88 4 . 0
1,859.7
2 , 365.6

841.3
1,844.0
2,352.5

.6
2.6
(2/)
17.2

918.3

898.1
362.6

21.9
3.9

359-6
1,289.5
174.8
358.3

90.2
188.5

1, 928.6

1,290.5
175.7
358.7
90.9

186.1

1,073.6
122.4
3,125.2
572.8

3,153.1
571-5

1,929.1
195.5
6, 013.0
1,078.7
120.7
3,056.7
572.8

505.9

506.2

511.8

3,832.1

3,595.5

205.3

6, 045.0
1,079.2

121.2

8.6

11.5

2.2
4.6
.3
4.8

17.6
11.2
4.0

1.6
22.8
51.7

1.2
89.4
(2/)

128.5

285.2
528.0
128.0

2,486.4

852.4
2 , 4 82 .6

2,41 7.0

137.6

245.1

240.6

108.2

105.0
1, 012.6
817.0
495.4

234.7

15.7

1,009.5

822.0
492.3
(a/)

95.3

See footnotes at end of table.




(2/)
7.6
4.8
4.8
30.7

15.8
6.6

(a/)

283.4
52 7.8

Vi r g i n i a....................

16.2
( 1/)
(2 /)

12.4

656.5

3 , 806.8

U t a h .........................

15.5
16.7
6.3
37.4

963.5
149.3
3,464.4
1,344.3

New Jersey................ 1,926.9
205.8
Rev Y o r k .................... 6, 032.6

Fo rth C a r o l i n a .............
North D a k o t a ...............
O h i o .................. .......

241.3

970 .6
146.3
3,514.5
1,411.7
660.4

176.6

Ne v H a m p s h i r e ..............

698.6

June

Contract construction
1956
J uly

(2/)
7.6
4.9
4.7
29.7
10.4
3.4

1,842.7
2,329 .9

M i s s o u r i ....................

739.0
25 5. 9
332.5
4,511 .0
468.3
929.7
151.9

195?

.

51^.3
1,089-5
969 .0
148.3
3,487.7
1,405.0
655.7

K a n s a s ...... ................

M a i n e ........................

Ju n e

1956
July

1,144.4
93 -9

291.2
527.2
130.7

858.8

108.9

972.2

782.6
479.9
1,149.5
94.2

1.3
2.7
(3/)

1.4

19.0
2.0
80.1
Ü/)
9.2

(2 /)
7-5
5.0
5.0

1957
Ju ly
42.3
19.7

20.8
265.6
33.5
53.1
11.7

18.1
114.1

58.8
10.7

218.8

10.2

30.8
11.2

3.3

3.3

73.0
42.8

19.3

(l /)

4 .8
17.1
11.3
4.1
1.7
23 .O
51.1

36.0
45.8
.7

2.6

( 2/)
10.4

17.8
111.8
58.3
9.9

213.2
69.8
41.3

17.2
2 91. 7
35.9
53.9

20.2

18.1
112.9
57.3
11.9
205.5
80.9
44.5

72.0
15.0

35.8

-

43 .8
-

69.5
14.7

60.1
16.1

72.5
89.9

87.7

70.1

74.8
92.5

127.0

8.3
3.7
8.5

67 .I
16.5
72.2
15.0

61.3

2.5
5.4
.3

22.3

8.6

15. 9
69.3
14.4
21.4
8. 4

10.7

10.0

66.7
18.4
77.4
14.5
24 .0
8 .5

4.4

112.0
16.0
276.1

108.9

16.3
10.3
4.2
1.7

22.6
53.3
1.3

68.9
(2/)

2.2

12.2

4 0.9
20.3

112.2

93.0
(2/)
1.3
2.7
8 .2 137.5

80.7
4.2
9.2

43.4
19.4
18.3
284.5
31.3
52.5

1956
Ju l y

116.1

1.2

15.7
1.4
19.O

Jun e

56.3
13.7
184.9
38.9

26.7
182.3
20.0
28.9
11.7

1.3
2 .7
9.6
137.5

(3/)
174.7

14.7
1.4

19.2
5.6

18.2
2.3
77.0
3.5
9.1

84.2
46.8
27 .7
(1/)
7.7

11.2

114.5

15.9
275.1
55.5
12.5
179.9
37.6

16.0
272.1
61.3
12.6

25.4
184.5

19.2
28.6

28. 4
199.5
19.1
29 .5

11.5
42.2
169.3

46.2
169.4

18.1
5.5

82.2
45.2

26.8
58.7
7.7

169.4

36.1

12.8

17.9
5.6
74.6
48 . 7
24.5

66.0
8. 4

Table A-6: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State - Continued
( I n th o u sa n d s)

Manufacturing
State
Julv

California.•••••.*••••••••••••

1957

244.2
4o.o
87 -7
1,259-4
75 -8
419-5

60.6

District of Columbia.........

1956

June
24 5. 7
40.2

88.5

1,246.8
72.3
430.6

61.2

July
225.2

50.8

36.4
91.1
1,203.4

21.9
28.7
370.6
46.0
46.0
11.0

50.8
21 .8
28.4
365.9
45.6
46.2
11.0

29.4
93.0
72.9

29.2
92.6
72.8

65.6
429.4
57.9

Illinois....................

16.5

16.2

154.8
325.6

159.7
326.4

29.0

27.8

1,245-5
598. 8
165.7

1,259.6
601.5

140.9
330.1
29.9
1,251.3
547.0

16.6

166.0

Michigan....................

130.0
166.5
(3/)
147.8
149.7
109.8
110.6
272.4
275.3
694.4
676.1
982.1 1,007.4

Mississippi.................

232.4
107.5

22 2. 7

394.3

394.5

(a/)

22.1
57.1
5.8

82.1
795.8

20.4

Ohio........................

1,847.8
457.6
6.7
1,306.9

86.9

Rhode Island.... ............

149.9
1,503.6
115.9
2 24.4
11.9
(| / )
488.2

Utah........................

106.9
21.7
57.0
5.8
83 .7

167.8
123.9

163.4
150.7

112.8
249.7

See footnotes at end of table.




79.6

45.7
44.8

128.4

1, 010.0
127.2

982.0
125.6

164.2

30.0

153.1
2 8.9

89.9
327.8

292.1

10.2

90.1

15.8

36.8

216.1
36.6

215.3

309.5
99.9
57.0

731.1
302.7
177.9

735.4
303.4
178.7

729.8
297.0
177.5

64.2
57.0

(3/)
<a/)

134.9
137.4

133.6
134.7
184.0
57.9
180.9

88.0
22.0
75.3
120.5
153.8

808.7
20.0

152.7
20.3
504.4
62.3
13.8
223.8
48.7

463.6
90.0

150.3

161.6
1,350.6

123.0
226.5
12.1
298.6

9.4
10.7

49.1
312.3
15.4

10.6
152.1
20.0
62.6

62.6

13.7

13.9
220.3

48.5

50.2

48.3
312.9
15.4
25.5

467.6

10.0
58.6
228.8

33.7

22.8

22.6

37.6
255.0
211.8

8.4
92.1

8.3

258.5
2 37. 1
129.9
45 2 . 0

121.9
466.1

6.2

6.8

68.7
52.6
(a/)

13.6

4 1.0
9.6
10.9

503.0

25.2
10.1
(3/)
229.6

34.8

88.3

26.2

155.2
20.3
502.3

223.6

91.8
67.6
52.7
77.3
13.5

62.6

320.5
216.4

22.9

39.9
9.2

162.2
29.8

153.1

29.2

128.4

22.3
40.1

89.2

62.8

87.7
73.5

22.0

256.5

Vest Virginia................

79.4

25 .7
124.4

38.3
36.3
24 0. 0
126.7
(3/)
6.7

78.3

62.2
55.9
85 .O
21.4
77.1
121.5

1956

July

1, 013.0

91.8
25.6
125.0

86.9

36.6

84.4

21.8

53.9

June

360.8

221.1
107.0
386.0
22.3
58.1
6.0
81.2

6.9
1,257.5

48 7. 8

(2/)
(2/)

101.9

1957

149.9
59.1
79.6

152.2

1,847.7

11.7
291.9

307.7
101.7
54.2

15.7
305.0

July
152.8

121.1
152.0

460.6
6.5
1, 323.9

224.9

15.8

Wholesale and
retail trade

48.9
21.4
28.7

687.8
1 , 007.0

803.2
20.9
1,862.8

1, 516.0
118.6

Transportation and
public utilities
1956
V» 7
July
June
July

49.9
303.3

16.0
26.2
10.4
59.7

183.6
57.8
186.6
386.3
472.2
230.3
88.6

183.8
56.8
188.2

90.5

36.8

392.0
475.9

386.2

229.2
43.4

230.3
89.1
317.9
43.4

87.9

475.5

307.6
43 .8
97.8

308.8
98.1

98.8

20.1

19.4
34.8

19.7
33.7

354.5
45.4

354.6
43.4
1,331.3
224.1
38.5

35-3
354.6
45.7
1,306.7
224. 8

39.1
628.2
138.2
117.9
730.0
52.2
107.3
38.3

1, 320.1
224.3
39.0

626.8

627.2

137.7

140.7

116.7

115.8

732.9
53.1

106.8
38.1

717.8
53.9
105.9
4 0.0

196.0

230.8

(a/)

197.3

679.1

676.3

654.6

23.2
8.2

57.2
20.5
232.1

57.1
20.3

55.9
20.3
219.4

90.5

67.2
51.1

78.8
13.6

184.6

90.0
Q/)

21.8

232.1
182.5
90.0
2 49.0
21.5

182.2
87.9
244.2
21.5

Sì jtr 1 m p U ' y m o n t

Tabl« A-6: Employ««* in nonagricullural «stablishm«nts,
by industry division and Stat« - Continued
(In thousand«)
Finance, insurance,
and real estate

State

July

1957

1956

June

July

28.8
10.2
10.5

222.2
21.6

10.4
218.4
21.5

51.7
5.5

50.8
5.4

25.2
58.1

Arkansas....................

28.7

25. 1
57.0
40.4
4. 8
179.7
52.5
31.5

40 .5
4. 9
182.4
53.0

Idaho.......................
Illinois.... ................
.

31.8
(a/)

10.1

20.6
20.6

27.5
9.6

10.1
219.8

25 .O

71 .7
164.7

55 .0
39.1
4.7
178.4

(a/)
(a/)

45.1

44.3

21.1

11.1

64.6
5.7

21.1
2.5
6.3

20.8
2.5
5.9

23.6

83.2
7.1
454.6
36.6
5.1
106.2
23.6

82.8
6.7
450.0
35.0
5.0
105.6
22.8

18.7
144.5

142.7

2.5
6.3

flew Jersey..................
New York....................
Ohio........................
Oklahoma....................

84.5
7.3
46 0. 0
37.0
5.1
107.9

13.0
15.7
5.4
(a/)

18.7
12.9
15.8

115.4

West Virginia................

5.3
31.7
115.4

9.6
3.5
44.1
34.7
12.5
(3 /)
2.5

9.6
3.5
43.6
34.3
12.5
42.3
2. 4

1/ Mini ng c om bin ed w i t h construction. 2/
misce ll an eou s an d total revised; n o t s tri ct ly
st ri ct ly comparable w i t h p r e v i o u s l y p u b li she d
Washington, D. C., M et ro pol it an ar e a included

12




420.2

20.2
20.5
27.8

45.7
11.3

64.4
5.9

96.6
18.8
109.8

96.2
76.2

64. 7
5.9

15.0

51.2
30.2

8.7
39.7
93.5
75.6

11.2

38.5

601.2
65.4
102.3

28.4
40.4

67.6
31.0

21.3
48.1
5.2

28.3
8.9
40.5
97.6
77.1

8.8

.July

19.0

142.1
12.5
15.5
5.4

31.2
111.1
9.6
3.5
42 .9
34.6

12.6
41 .0
2.3

75.6

90.0
30.3

103.2

Service and
miscellaneous
June
67.4
31.4
38.6
603.7
63 .V
101.4
16.3

65.5
2 9.7
37.2
570.0
64.7
94.6
15.1

72.4
165.0
96.4
18.6
423.0
111.7
77.7

69.9
147.5

60.8
71.6
90.2
29.3

104.3

2 4 1 .9
248.8

239.2
250.4

114.3
39.4
157.9

116.3

23.6
46 . 4
25 .4
23 .4

220.8
26.1
868.5
97.6

16.3

Government

1956
July

1957

39.4
157.5

23.2
47.0

2 4. 4

95.6
18.7
409.3
107.5
74.0
58.2
69.3

86.5
30.2
100.2
238.0

July

July

133. T
52.4

134.4
53.7

60.2
726.7
91.1
83.8
15.6

62.4
744.3
90.8
83.9
15.8

128.3
49 .0
57.5
687.7
86.5
80.9

263.2
176.7
153.3
27.6
352.4
155.6

259.0
176.9
155.4
28.1
368.0
160.8
108.2

(a/)
(a/)

97.9
102.7
125.6
44.8
126.0
228.7
274.3

104.4

124.5
44.4
121.9
229.8
«64.2

112.3
39.0
154.2
23.2
45.7

130.4

68.1
157.2
32.4

69.0
15.7

22.1

23.0

20.5

217.7
2 5.9
85 4 . 8
97.6
16.3

209.9
23.4
863.4
97.3
15.8

201.7

314.4
64. 4

344.7
119.5

305.9
65.3

306.8
65.2

62.8

62.3
43 8. 0

52.4
75 7 - 9
134. 0

26.2

60.0

79 .6

419.4

17.6

30.6
42.9
17.6

405.0
36.2
81.8
30.8

302.9

93-9
2 9 9 .8

93.9
29 4. 8

35 8.9

28.3

28.2

27.1
17.0
106.1
90.6

43 9. 7
30.7
43.2
17.7
(3/)

17.4

112.3
96.0
45 . 1
(3/)

15.0

30.0

42 .9

13.7

112.5
94.9
44 .8

122.1
14.0

1956

June

246.3

24.1

1957

54 .0
15.5

169.2

45.5

149.2
57.6

14.0

18.8

119.6

132.8
68.7
161.9
32.4
71.6
15.8
20.8
2 04.2
53.0
763.3
137.9
26.4
36 3.0

15.0
255.3
159.4
147.6

26.5
350.0
149.5
102.4

96.8
97.2
118.9
43.4

118.1
225.5
25 6.9

126.8
68.1
153.5

31.6

67.7
15.1
19.9
199.0
49 .4
735.8

130.6
26.2

120.9

339.7
115.3

83.3
412.1

75. 8
393.9

36.0
82.2
31.2
128.6
367.7
54.5
15.9
172.9
153.2
58.0
138.7
19.4

36.1

79.4

30.0
123.6
351.2

52.6
15.4

165.5

145.2
59.4
130.4

18.5

Mi ni ng co m b i n e d w i t h service. 3 / Not available, 4/ Service a n d
comparable w i t h p r e v i o u s l y p u b l i s h e d data. 5/ Rev is ed series; n ot
data. 6/ F e d e r a l emp lo ym ent in Mar y l a n d a n d Vi rg i n i a p or tions o f
i n d a t a fo r D is t r i c t of Columbia*

A

Tobi* A-7: Employ*«« in nonogricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division
(In thousands)
Area and Industry
division

Number of employees
1956

1957
J u ly

Jun e

J u ly

ALABAMA

B i r m i ng ham
T o t a l .............................................

Contr ac t co n s t r u c t i o n . ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............
T r a n s . an d p u b . u t i l . . . .
T r a d e .....................
S e r v i c e ........................................

M o b ile
T o t a l .............................................

Contract construction...

21 2. 6
10.7
14.9
71.3
r 1 6.7
46 .8
12 .1
22.3
17. 8

185.8

90 .7
5.0
20 . 7
11.2
18.2
3. 9
9. 7
22.0

87.6

125-9
•2
9.9
23.5
1 0.1
35.8
7 .0
15.7
23 . 7

126.2

117.2

5 4.4
2.3
4.1
9.8
5.2
12 .4
1.8
8.6
10.2

54.9
2.4
4.0
9 .7
5.3
12 .6
1.8
8. 5
10 . 6

212*3
10.7
15.1
71 . 0
16.7
1*6.8
12.3
22.3
17.6

(!/)
(2/)

(i/)

T r a n s . and p u b . u t i l . . . .
T r a d e .............................................

Service l/.............
G o v e rn m e n t................................
ABIZOKA
P h o e n ix
T o t a l .............................................
C o n tra c t c o n s t r u c t io n ...
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................
Trans, an d p u b . u t i l . . . .

S e r v i c e ........................................

(2/)
(I/)
(2/)
(2/)
(2/)

.2
9. 5
23 . 5
10.0
35 .7
6.9

16.0

24.4

7 .6
13.2
51.8
16.3
46 .5
12 . 0
21.8
16.7

5.1
19.9
9.6
18. 4
3.7
9.3
2 1. 8

.2
10.3
20.5
9. 9
33.4
6.6
14.4
2 1.9

Tu cson
M i n i n g ....................
Co ntract construction...
T r a n s . an d p u b . u t i l . . . .

ARKANSAS
L it t le B ockN . L it t le R ock

T o t a l .....................
Co ntract construction...
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .......
T r a n s . and p u b . u t i l . . . .
F i n a n c e ........................................
S e r v i c e 1 / ........... .

71 .4
5.7
12.1
7.7
17.7
4.9
10.3
13.1

70.3
4. 6
12 . 0
7. 7
17.9
4.9
10.3
13 .1

52.3
2.2
5.1
9.2
5.2
12.0
1.7

7.5
9.4

72.2
5.7
12.5
8.0

18.5
4.8
10.2
12.7

C A LIFO RN IA

F r e sno
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............

13.9

13 .7

16.0

Area and Industry
division
L o s A n g e le s - L o n g B e a c h
T o t a l ........................................
M in in g .....................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................
T ra n s , and p u b . u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e ...................................
G o v e rn m e n t...........................
S a c ra m e n to
T o t a l ........................................
M in in g .....................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................
T ra n s , and p u b . u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e ...................................
G o v e rn m e n t............................
S a n B e r n a r d in o B i v e r 8 id e - O n t a r io
¿ /
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................
S a n D ie g o
T o t a l ........................................
M in in g .....................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................
T ra n s , and p u b . u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e ...................................
G o v e rn m e n t...........................

S an F r a n c is c o - O a k la n d
T o t a l ........................................
M in in g .....................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g . ..................
T ra n s , and p u b . u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e ...................................
G o v e rn m e n t............... ..

San Jo s e
T o t a l ........................................
M in in g .....................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g . ..................
T ra n s , and p ub . u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e ...................................
G o v e rn m e n t...........................

Number of employees
1956
IS ¡57
J u lv

Jun e

J u ly

2 , 166.6

2 ,190.6

15.7
107.9
763. 8
144.2
478.1
113.6
310.9
2 32.4

15.7
126.7

766.2

141.6
477.0
112.1
310.9
240. 4

2,103.3

15.8

135.8
733.3
136.2
461.6

108.8
29 3. 4
218 .4

130.7
.5
10.0
14.4
12.9

51.7

137.7
.6
9.7
17.7
12.2
27.5
5.4
12.3
52.3

32.1

30.8

29.7

226.0

226.5

209.9
.2
14.3
59.2
11.7
44.8
9.9

136.9
.6
10.0
16.7
12.6
27 .5
5.5
12.3

.2
12.9
7 2.6
12.4
46.7
10.0

26.8
44.4

.2
13.8
72.2
12.1
46.5
10.0
26.3
45.4

950.7
2 .0
58.1
197.4
112.3
215.1
67.O
121.9
176.9

949. 0
2.0
57.7
196.7
111.0
214.2
66.2
121.4

141.9
.1
10.5

131.9

51.2
9.1

28.1
5.9

18.0
19.0

179.8

.1
10.2
40.5
8 .8

28.5
5.9

18.5
19.4

26.7
5.6
11.5

49.1

26.6
43.2

928.6
1.9
60.3
191.9
107.9
210.9

65.2

1 17.9
172.6

127.4
.1
11.2
43.4
8.5
24.7
5.7

16.2
17.6

See footnotes at end of tal>le.




13




ble A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishn
>r selected areas, by industry division - Continu
(In thousands)

Number of employees
1956.
1957
June
July
July

12.6

11.7

281.5

277.1

51.3

20.4
49.7

2.8
21.2

30.2

79.2

16.2

37.6
43.0

126.6
7.2
71.5

20.6

3.1

10.2
8.0

217.0

11.7
83.4

8.6

43.0
29.4
22.3

18.6

43.0

2.8

29.8
78.8
16.1

36.5
43.0

127.4
6.7

72.8
6.0

20.7
3.0
10.3

12.6

275.2
3.0

23.2

48.6
29*4
76.5
15.7
36.7
42.1

124.8
6.7
71.9
5.9

20.0
2.8

8.0

9.7
7.8

218.5
11.7

204.8
11.4

83.8
8.9

76.1

29*2

8.3
41.0
28.4

18.7

18.5

44.0
22.3

21.1

43.5
1.5
27.8
2.2
6.0
.8

43.5

2.9
2.4

2.7
2.3
125.5

24.4
7.3

129*1
8-7
47.9
12.9
24.4
7.2

9.*

9.*

9.2

1.6

27.4

2.1

5.8

.8
2.8

2.4
128.7
9.2
46.8

12.8

18.8

Le.

18.8

1.6
28.2
2.2

5.8

.8

Ares and Industry
division
Stamford
Total................
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing........
Trans. and pub. util..
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........
Waterbury
Total..................
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing....... ...
Trane, and pub. util....
Trade..................
Finance................
Service................
Government.............
DELAWARE
W ilm in g t o n

Total..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing......... .
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.................

F i n a n c e .......................................
S e r v i c e 1/............

Government.............
D IS T R IC T OF COLUMBIA
W a s h in g to n

Total.................
C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n . •.

Manufacturing........ *,

T ra n s , and pub . u t i l . . . ,
T r a d e .......................................... .
F i n a n c e .......................................
S e r v i c e 1 / t .............................

Government............

FLORIDA
Jacksonville
Total................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.....••••
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1/...........
Government...........

53
4,

20.

3.

10,
1,
8,

3.

68,
2,

42,
2,
9<

1,

4,
4,

L32.

18.
55«
9«

22.

4.

12.
10.

>51«

44,

27*

43«
133«
35«
95«
>72.

L28,
9«

20,
14,
38,
10,
16,
18,

8.1

46.1

13.0

23.9

6.8
18.3

Miami
Total................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..

251

25
30
32

Tobi* A-7: Employ««« in nonogricultural establishments,
for s«l«ct«cl ar«as, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Number of empi oyees

Area and Industry
division

¿UBS-

FLORIDA-Continued
Miami-Continued
Trade..........
Finance........
Service 1/......
Government.....

- m .
2
M y

80.4
16.0
55.6
27.0

GEORGIA
Atlanta
Total................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade................
Finance..............
Service l/.......
Government...........

74.2
14.7
48.8
24.7

156.2
17.8
27.5
12.4
50.5
8.2
21.4
18.5

Tampa-St. Petersburg
TOtal........ . my ..
Contract construction.
Manufac turing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1/...........
Government...........

80.0
15.8
55.5
28.6
157.5
17.7
27.8
12.1
51.1
8.1
21.4
19.5

146.3
16.7
24.8
12.1
46.8
7.8
20.4
17.8

343.2
21.2
86.9
34.3
89.8
24.9
43.9
42.2

342.6
21.0
86.8
34.3
89.9
24.8
43.6
42.2

337.9
20.5
86.2
34.1
90.1
24.1
42.5
40.4

55.2
4.2
15.3
6.2
13.0
2.1
7.6
6.8

55.6
4.1
15.8
6.2
12.9
2.0
7.6
7.0

54.6
4.0
14.7
6.6
13.1
2.1
7.4
6.7

IDAHO
Boise
Total..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade............. ....
Finance................
Service................
Government.............

22.6
1.9
2.0
2.6
6.8
1.4
3.3
4.6

22.5
1.8
2.1
2.6
6.8
1.4
3.3
4.5

22.6
2.2
2.0
2.6
6.8
1.4
3.3
4.3

2.617.2 2 , 628.8
3.7
3.7
138.2
1*1.4
1.007.3 1 , 016.2
221.4
223.4
540.0
543.6
146.6
146.8
328.9
327.5
230.3
225.1

See footnotes at end of table.




2,546.5
3.7
141.2
947.4
225.5
540.0
147.1
318.2
223*4

t s

Number of employe«
..
June
e :

Peoria
Total................
Contract construction...
Manufac turing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 / ...........
Government...........
Rockford
Total................
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing....... .
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade................
F i n a n c e ...................................

Savannah
Total..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade..................
Finance................
Service l / .............
Government.............

ILLINOIS
Chicago
Total..................
Mining.................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Trade................
Finance................
Service................
Government.............

Area and industry
division

Service..............
Government...........

INDIAN A
E v a n s v ille
T o t a l ........................................
M in in g ..........................................
C o n tra c t c o n s t r u c t io n ...
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................
T r a n s , and pub . u t i l . . . ^
T r a d e .......................................... 4
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e 4/...........
F o r t W ayne
T o t a l . .....................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g . ..................
T r a n s , and p u b . u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e 5 / . .........................
In d ia n a p o lis
T o t a l ........................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................
T r a n s , and p ub . u t i l . .
...................................
T ra d e
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v ic e
.........................

ai-

S o u th Bend
T o t a l ........................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................
T r a n s , and p u b . u t i l . .
T r a d e ............... ........................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e J J / ............................

102.2
*.9
46.6
6.8
22.0
3.6
9.9
8.3

100.6
5.4
46.0
6.8
21.7
3.7
9.7
7.4

76.7
4.4
43.0
2.7
12.9
2.6
7.1
4.1

75.9
4.7
42.8
2.8
12.5
2.6
7.0
3.6

31.0
4.8
14.6
2.2
12.3

71.6
1.7
4.4
31.5
4.8
14.7
2.2
12.3

70.2
1.7
4.4
30.0
4.9
14.7
2.2
12.3

79.5
3.4
34.8
7.6
17.6
3.9
12.2

79.9
3.3
35.3
7.5
17.6
3.9
12.3

82.5
4.0
37.3
7.4
1Ä.3
3.7
11.8

292.4
14.4
107.6
22.9
65.9
63.3

292.5
13.4
106.9
23*2
66.1
18.1
64.8

288.3
14.5
109.0
21*9
64.0
17.4
61.5

80.7
3.3
39.7
4.7
15.5
3.6
13.9

83.4
3.3
42.3
4.8
15.4
3.6
14.0

79.7
3.7
39.1
4.7
15.3
3.5
13.4

f f l
lì/)

(2/)
I/)
<!/)
(2/)

70.8
1.7

4.2

18.3

Arca Imployment

Table A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and Industry
division

IOWA
Des Moines
t h h l :.“............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util*.
Trade........ .......
Finance.... ....... .
Service 3/...........
Government...........

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and Industry
Î95T
. 1252.
division

July

102.2
6.0
24.5
7.8
27.1
10.9
13.2
13.0

49.6
.2
5.3
6.0
7.2
10.0
2.6
5.9
12.5

Wichita
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, end pub. util..
Trade.•••••••••••••••.
Finance..............
Service..... ........
Government...........

135.2
1.9
8.1
62.7
7.3
26.3
5.0
12.8
11.3

102.8

5.8

24.8
7.8

27.0

10.8
13.5
13.4

49.1

.2
^.7
6.1
7.3
9.9
2.6

6.0

12.6
132.9
1.9

100.3
5.9
23.9
7.9

26.6

10.6
13.0

12.5

49.1

.2
4.4
6.4
7.6
9.8
2.4

6.0

12.5
124.6
1.9
• 9.1

52.0

7.3
26.3

7.5
25.9

12.8

1957

T r t i i r — . ......... .
Mining.... ......... .
Contract construction
Manufacturing....... ,
Trans, and pub. util.,
Trade...... ........ .
Finance.... ...... ..,
Service..... .
Government.......... .

MAINE
Lewiston
Total...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade............ .
Finance............. ,
Service 1/..........
Government..........
Portland
TblSl7:
Contract construction
Manufacturing.•••••••
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.... ,
Finance...,
Service 1/,
Government

283.3
7.3
20.1

51.0

45.6

72.2

14.1
40.3
32.9

28.5

11.5

23.4
55.5
10.3
25.9
23.6

Trans, and pub. util.
Trade...............
Finance..... .......
Service 1/..........
Government..........

69.4
.5
20.4
4.1
15.1

2.6

6.5
11.5

See footnotes at end of table.

June
283.8
7.*
20.0

50.8

45.8
72.5
14.2
40.2
33.1

1956
July
281.4
7.0
18.4
50.7
46.8
71.8
14.2
39.3
33.3

1.1
14.9
1.0
5.6
.8
3.8
1.3

1.1
14.9
1.0
5.6
.8
3.8
1.3

28.5

29.1
1.3
15.^
1.0
5.6
.8
3.7
1.3

5^.5
3.8
13.4
6.6

5^.3
3.8
13.7
6.5
l4.8
3.6
8.1
3.8

55.6
4.6
13.9
6.7
14.9
3.5
8.3
3.7

609*2

568.1

15.0

3.6
8.3
3.8

1 2 .4

4.9

252.5
16.0
97.8

Manufeusturing........




July

4.9

xi.a
HABYLAHD
Baltimore

KENTUCKT
Louisville
Total ... «T..........
Contract construction

16

July

New Orleans

KANSAS
Topeka
Ttotal................
MLnlng..*....••*«•.«*.
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util*.
Trade................
Finance....... ......
Service............ .
Government....... ....

LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge
■b k t :.!?:.............
t
Mining.................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..... ....
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade..... ......... .
Finance.••••••••.......
Service................
Government.............

June

Number of employees

68.3
.5
8.0
20.3
4.1
15.0
2.6
6.4
11.6

255.6
16.9

99.8
23.0
56.4
10.3
25.7
23.4

64.9
.5
7.0
19.6
4.1
14.5

10.4

T o ia l...“. ........................

Mining................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...... .
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.......... .......
Finance................
Service........... •••••
Government.............

605.9
.9
44.3
207.7
59.0
120.4
31.0
69.3
73.3

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston
T b B T . ................. 1,017.0
52.8
Contract construction...
286.1
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
7^.9
244.4
Trade......... ........
72.4
Finance........... •••••
155.8
Service l/............ .
130.6
Government............. .

.9
42.8

209.6

57.8
122.4
30.9

.9
*5.5
183.4
56.4

116.6

30.2

69.8

66.5

1,031.1

1 ,008.5
52.1

75.0

51.2

295.3
74.6
249.2

72.0
158.0

130.8

68.6

289.7

76.6

238.1

69.1

151.1
131.8

Tabl« A-7: Employ««« in nonagrkultural Mtablishm«nts,
for s«l«ct«d ar«as, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Number of employees
10*56
10*57
•Tune
Ju l y

Area and industry
division

A r e a and Industry
division

Number of eonployees
195Ö
15 57
Jnn*
July
Ju l y

G r a nd Rapids

M A S S A C H U S ET TS -Continued
F a l l R iv e r
T o t a l . • .T .......................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................
T ra n s , and pub . u t i l . .
T r a d e .............................. ..
G o v e rn m e n t.................... ..
O th e r ^ n o n a a n u f a c t u r ln g

4Oo0

2.6
7. 8
3.1

6.8

44.8

5I A

50.9

24.4

25.7

25. 3

24.4

25*2

26.0

24.4

43.2
22 .9

24.6

23.6

45.4
3.7
9 .9
7.5
11 .4
1. 9
6.7
4.3

*5.1
3.6
9.9
7.6

39 . 6
3.2
7.3
5 .0
11.4
1.9
6.7
4.2

43 . 9

23.9
2.7
8.2

22.9
2.8
8.1

Lansing

3.1
6.9

3.1
7.0

M u s k ego n

Sa gi na w
K ev B e d fo rd
T o t a l......
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n
M a n u f a c t u r in g ..................
T ra n s , and p u b . u t i l .
T r a d e .....................................

49.4
1.5

1.4

27.2

28.0

2.4

2.5

8.2

8.2

3.6
6.5

O th e r n o n n a n u f a c t u r in g

S p r in g f ie ld - B o ly o k e
T o t a l ........................... « •
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n
M a n u f a c t u r in g .................
T ra n s , and p ub . u t i l .
T r a d e .....................................
F in a n c e ................................
S e r v i c e 1 / .........................
G o v e rn m e n t.............. . . . . .

50.0

3.6
6.3

47.5

1.6

25.3
2.3
8.3
3.6
6.4

I 63.O
7.9
70 .I

165.7
8.6

8.8

33.7
7.4
17 .?
17 .4

34.3
7 .2

32.7
7.2

18.1

17.7
16.9

8.6

7.6
72.5

MINNESOTA.
Dulut h 3/
Contract c o n s t r uc ti on. ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..........
Trans, an d pub. util....

165.5
8.8

11.1
1.9
6.7
4.3

73 .4
Mi nneapoli s- S t . Paul 3 /

509.6
29*0

126.9

17. 4

509.3

148.2
51.1
12 6.9
32.7
6 2.4
59.5

C ontract c o n s t r uct io n. .. 29.9
M a n u f a c t u r i n g . ........... 148.9
Trans, a n d pub. util.... 51.4
33.1

W o rce ste r
T o t a l . . • • • • • • • • • ..........
C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ..................
T ra n s , and pub . u t i l .

Trade................

1 0 4 .9
4 .5
46.4
5.9

19.9

5.2
U .6
11 . 4

F in a n c e .................... ....
S e r v i c e 1 / .........................
G o v e rn m e n t.......................

109.7
4.5
50.5
5.9
20.3
5.0
11.7

11.8

62.1

106.7
4.8
48.1
5.5

20.5
*.9

11.7
11.2

56.9
MISSI SS IP PI
J a c kso n
& t Z L . ...................
C ontract c on str uc ti on. ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............
Trans, a n d pub. util....

56.6
.8

500.8

30.4
145.0

52.0
125.9
32 .3

60.5
54 . 8

56.5

5 5. 7

4.1

4. 5

.8

.8

.,260.4

.8
66.1
549.3
79.6
255.I
48.6
140.3

1, 270.7

69.5
548.5

4.6

15.3

15.3

1
'£/)
1

344.2

347.4

3.6
7.5
10.3

.8

64.6

4.6

3.6
7.5
10.3

1, 264.1

.8

10.6

15.3
M ICH IG AN
D e t r o it
T o t a l . .....................................
M in in g .....................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...............
T ra n e , and pub . u t i l . .
T r a d e .................... ...................
F in a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e . . ..............................
G o v e rn m e n t ...........................

4.3
10 . 4
4.6

560.2
80.2
25 5.4
48.1
142. 4

80.0
258.3
4 8 .5
147.1
11 1 . 4

MI S SOU RI
Kansas City

10.2
3.6
7. 3
9. 7

F lin t
M a n u f a c t u r in g . . . . . . . . .

59.9

118.9

72.6

73.5

g/S

.8
15.8

1
m

120.6

Mining.
Contract con st ru cti on ...
H a a u f a c t u r i n g . ...........
Trans, a n d pub. util....

9 M
43.7
94.2

20 * 5
95.°
44.2
93.4

.8

w
1 i
m
1

21.0

40.6
33.2

21.1
40.7

31.7

See footnotes at end of table.
438863 0 - 5 7 -5




17

Arca Lmplcyment

Tabl* A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
A re a and in d u s t r y
d iv is io n

(in thousands)
Number of employees

1957
July

MIS SOURI-Cantinued
St. Louis
Total..................
Mining..................
Contract construction....
Manufacturing....... .
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade..................
Finance................
Service.................
Government..............

June

■ m -

NEBRASKA
Omaha
T o t a l ......................
Contract c o n st ru cti on ....
Ma nu f a c t u r i n g ............
Trans, an d pub. u t i l .....
T r a d e .......................
F i n a n c e ....................
Service
.................
Go v e r n m e n t .................

.........

1957
June

195é
July

8 3 7 .8

84 5 . 6

841. 3

.2

•2

J u ly

NEW JE R S E Y

I « w r k - J « n . T City 7/ 3/

722.2
2.2
42.4
275 *5
67.O
150.8

66.8
151.5

¿3.3
64.5

36.3
82 .7
64.9

72 4. 4
2. 5
43 .0
27 6. 7

721.8
2.6
69.1

92.6
72.6

C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .. .
M a n u f a c t u r in g .. . . . . . . . . .
T ra n s , and pub. u t i l . . . .

155.0

36.6
82.3
60.3
Batttwm

20.9
2.4
3*1
2.5
6.4
4.1
2.4

20.8
2.4
3. 1
2. 5
6. 4
4. 0
2. 4

3. 0
2.5

412.9

34.6
352.9
84.9
15 0.7
49.3

.2

40.6
35 7. 8

85.8
150.6
48 .5

88.1
69.7

7 / 3/

2 0.4

2.2

34 . 6
3 5 7 .7
84 . 4
15 3. 4
W.7
92 . 4
74.2

41 1. 0

36.5

44. 6
27 1.3

MONTANA

Great Falls
Total.... ..............
Contract construction....
Manufacturing.•
Trans, and pab. util.«...
Trade...............
Service 6/.......... .
Government..............

A re a and in d u s t r y
d iv is io n

C o n tra c t c o n s t r u c t io n ...
M a n u f a c t ia r I n g . . . . . . . . . . .
T ra n s , and p u b . u t i l . . . .

1.8
28.2
188.9

1.8
27*8

40 9* 4

1.8
27 .9
189 .9

12.5
43.6
40.4

160.7

4.0
2.5

16 2. 4

.8

6.2

1 90.5
23 . 7
72.3
12 .4
43 .8
40 .6

164.9

.8

8.5

8. 4
83.9
9.1
24 . 3

.8
10.2
85.4

23.8
71.8

23*6
72.2
12.8
41 .1
40 . 1

Parth A*>cor 7 / 3 /
151.3
9.0
32* 6
23 * 0
38.I
1 3*0
20 .5
15 * 4

152.1
8.6
32.3
22 *9
38.2

13.0
21.2
l6«0

152.8
9. 7

32.8
23.6
38.6
12.6

C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .. .
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................
T ra n s , and p ub. u t i l . . . .

82.6
9. 1
24 .0

2.6

20.5
15.1

2.6

9.3
23 . 5

2.6

11.7
21 .4

11 .7

21.6

22.2

102 .4

1 0 3 *1

99.9

.1

.1

.1

6.6

4.3
38 . 1
6.9

3. 5
13.4
17.5

17 *5
3* 4
13.5
17 .4

3 .4
12 .4
16 *9

65.8

66.8

5.3
10.5
5.8
17.7
3.3
8.7
14.5

5.2
U.3

10. 9

T re n to n

NE VA DA
Reno
T o t a l .......................
C ontract construction....
M anufacturing
..........
Trans, a nd pub. u t i l .....
T r a d e .......................
F i n a n c e ....................
S e r v i c e ....................
Go v e r n m e n t .................

N E W HAMPSHIRE
Manch est er
T o t a l ....................
Co ntract construction....
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .............
Trans, a n d pub. u t i l .....
T r a d e .......................
F i n a n c e . ........... .
S e r v i c e ....................
G o v e r n m e n t ........... ..

See footnotes at end of table.

OS




2 8. 4
2.4
1. 8
3*4
7*1
1.1
8* 5
4.1

27.4
2. 3

28.2
2.3

3.4
7. 1

3. 7
7. 0

1.1

1.1

7. 7
4. 0

8. 3
3. 8

1.8

2.0

C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .. .
M a n u f a c t u r in g . . . . . . . . . . .
T r a jis . and p u b . u t i l . . . .

G o v e rn m e n t................................

NEW^MEXICO
A lb u q u e r q u e

41*2
2.4
18 . 1
2.8
8.2
2.1
4.6
3*1

*1.9
2*2
lB.6
2.8

41 . 4
2.3

2*1

18.8
2.8
8.1
2.0

4.7
3. 1

4.5
2.9

8.4

C o n tra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .. .
M a n u f a c t u r in g .......... ..............
T ra n s , and pub. u t i l . . . .

4.1
40.0

6.6
17.2

4. 1
40 . 5

5.8
17.6
3.3
8.7
1*.9

17.8

61.4
5. 0
10.3
5. 6

15.8
3. 4
7*9
1 3* 4

Tobl« A-7: Employ««« in nonagricultural establishments,
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and industry
division

(In thousands)
Number of employees

1327.
u Z lL
m sl

NEW YORK
^ A lh a iy - S c h e n e c t a d y - T r o y
T o t a l . .....................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................
T ra n s , and p ub. u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F i n a n c e ..................................
S e r v i c e 1 /.......................
G o v e rn m e n t...........................

208.0
8,6
73-5
16.7
39-9
7.2
2 2.4
39-7

B in g h a m to n
T o t a l ........................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g . .................
T ra n s, and pub. u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e 1 / ........................
G o v e rn m e n t...........................

B u f f a lo
T o t a l . ......................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .,
M a n u f a c t u r in g .................... .
T ra n s , and pub. u t i l . . ,
T r a d e ..................................
F i n a n c e .................................. .
S e r v i c e 1 / .....................
G o v e rn m e n t........................... .

209.5
8.7
74.4

July

209.2
8.0
75.2

16.8

16.8

40.4
7.2
22.3
39.7

40. 1
7.2

78.8

22.5
39.5

78.9
3.3
41.8
4. 0
13.9

3.3
41.6
4.0
14.1

79.2
3.4
41.5
4. 0
14.3

7.7

7. 8

6.3
7.7

2.1
6.1

449.8
25.3
199.7
37.1

86.9
14.7
46 . 0
40.1

E lm ir a
T o t a l ........................................,
M a n u f a c t u r in g ......................
T r a d e .........................................
O t h e r n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ,

N a s s a u and S uf fo lk
Counties 7 /
Total
Co nt rac t construction...
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............
T r a n s . a n d pub. util....
T r a d e .....................
F i n a n c e . ........... ......
Service 1 / ................
G o v e r n m e n t ................

June

•w

35.1
18.4
6.4
10.3

347.2
27.4
104.1

21.8

77.8
11.5
46.5

58.1

N e v York-Northeas tern
N e w J e r se y 3 /
T o t a l ...................... 5,479.7
M i n i n g .................... ... 6*3
Co nt ra ct construction... 235*2
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..... ...... 1 ,677 •0
Trans, a n d pub. util.... 485.4

2.0
6.1

45 1 . 9

23.8
202.6
37.1
87.1
14.5
46. 7
40.3

35.2

18.3
6 .5
10.4

2.1

429.2
23 .4

182.3
36.7

87.8
14.3
46 .8
37 . 9

34.6
17.3

6.6
10.7

345.6
29 .4
104.4

100.8

11.5
44.3
57. 4

21.9
74.8
11.5
42.1
53.3

21.8
76.8

5.523.6

338.7
34.2

6.3

5,483.9
6.3

242.6

250.2

1.697.7
485.0

1,705.4
484.3

Area and industry
division

N e w York- No rt hea st er n
N e w Jersey- Co nti nu ed
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e ............
S e r v i c e .................
G o v e r n m e n t .............
N e w York City j J
T o t a l ...................
M i n i n g ..................
Contract construction.
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........
Trans, a n d pub. util..
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e .................
S e r v i c e .................
G o v e r n m e n t ............ .

R oc h e s t e r
T o t a l . ..................
Co nt ra ct construction.
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ .
Trane, a nd pub. util..
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e ................
Servi ce 1 / ............ .
G o v e r n m e n t .............

Syracuse
T o t a l ...................
Co n tract construction,
M a n u f a c t u r i n g . .........
Trans, an d pub. util.,
T r a d e ..... ............ .
F i n a n c e .................
Service 1 / ............ .
G o v e r n m e n t ............ .
Ut ica-Bome
T o t a l .................
C o n tra ct construction,
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........
Trans, and pub. util.,
T r a d e .................. ,
F i n a n c e . ..............
Se rvice 1_/............
G o v e r n m e n t ............ .
W e s t c he ste r C o u n t y j /
T o t a l ..................
Co nt ra ct construction,
M a n u f a c t u r i n g . ........
Trans, an d pub. util.,
T r a d e ....... ..........
F i n a n c e ...........
Service l / ............ .
G o v e r n m e n t ............

Nuaber of employees
- ■ ■

Ju l y

1957

June

1,180.7
457.2

811.6

1,195.5
452.2
814.0

626.3

630.3

3,489.2

3,524.3

1.8

116.4
884.4
328.7
806.1
370.1
579.2
402.5

224.3
11.4

112.0
10.3
39.5
7.7

23.6
19.8

«
1,188.9
44 8. 9
794.2
605.7

121.4

3,501.7
1.9
114.6

898.3

910.6

328.7

327.8

817.6
365.7

819.2
362.2

404.6

575.7
389.8

1.8

586.1

224.0

223.0
11.1
112.6
10.0

40.1
7.5
24 .0
19.5

39.4
7.3

11.0
111.8
10.2

147.8
7.2
59.5
11.3
31.7
7.1
16.4
14.6

148.7
7.0

60.3
11.2
32.0

23.2
19.3

14 4.8
7.6
57.0

11.2

31.1

16.5

6.6
16.8

14.7

14.6

106.4
5.0
45.2
5.5

105.7
4.2
46.2
5.6

102.1

16.9

16.7

16.5

3.6
9.3

21.0
203.8
18.1
53.4
15.1
46 .0
10.3
35.9

25.0

7.0

3.4
9.1
20.4

203.0
18.8
52.0

15.3
46.9
10.4
34.1

25.5

3-8
43 .5
5.5
3.4
9.1

20.2
19 7. 8
20.3

50.0

14.1
44.7
10.4
34.3
24 . 1

See footnotes at end of table.




19

Area Imploymcnt

Table A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Number «pf employees
Area and industry
12 5 1 m :
division

Area and Industry
division

NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte
Total.«««........... «
Contract construction.
Manufacturing•........
Trans, and pub« util«,
Trade...............
Finance«............ <
Service l/.......... .
Government««••••••«••<

96.8

9.3
23.2
10.3

29*2
6.9

10«9
7.0

96.7
9.0
23.1
10.4
29.1
6.9

10.9
7.3

95.2
9.1
23.0
10.0

29.1

6.4
11.1
6.5

Greensboro-High Point
Manufacturing...... .

43.4

43.1

43.7

Winston-Salem
Manufacturing........

33.8

3^.5

33.7

NORTH DAKOTA
Fargo
Total................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.«..... .
Trans« and pub« util..
Trade............... .
Finance............. .
Service 3/.......... .
Government.......... .

23.3
3.1
2.2
2.1f
7.9
1.6
3.1
3.0

22.8

22.5

2.2
2.3
7.9
1.5
3.2
3.0

2.5
2.3
2.3
7.9
1.5
3.0
3.0

OHIO
Akron
Manufacturing,

91.3

91.6

91.8

Canton
Manufacturing.

5 9 .h

60.1

50.1

Cincinnati
Manufacturing,

162.3

163.1

Cleveland
Manufacturing.

303.4

Columbus
Manufacturing,

73.2

2.7

Pilsa
Total.................
Mining....... «••••«•••
Contract construction* «
Manufacturing«.«•«•••••
Trans« and pub. util...
Trade........... .
Finance...............
Service..... «..... .
Government..... .

10.9
37.9
8.2

11.0

16.1

16.6

38.2

8.1

35.5

8.2
17.8
34.8

128.1
13.3
8.4
30.8
14.2
30.3
6.4

131.7
13.3
10.0
33.5
13.8
30.9
6.4

16.6

16.1

259.*
15.7
65.7
30.8

67.1

6.5
16.6

18.0

67.2

8.1

13.5
35.3
35.0

7.8

13.2
3^.5
32.3

94.0

97.9

82.8

309.9

294.8

Erie
Manufacturing ««..... «

40.8

*3.5

i*.5

73.6

76.4

142.5
.4
8.1
35.5

142.3
.4
7.7
35.5
14.9
25.I

135.3
.3

59.7

Youngstown
Manufacturing,

111.7

112.7

72.3

Lancaster
Manufacturing........




1*5.3
8.1
10.8

163.8

61.0

20

144.5
8.0
10.0

PENNSYLVANIA
Allentown- BethlehemEaston
Manufacturing..... .. «

60.4

See footnotes at end of table.

June

259.6
14.8
63.7
30.2

129.1
13.4
8.7
31.3
14.3
30.4

OREGON
Portland
Total.*.............
Contract construction
Manufacturing..... ..
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade............. .
Finance. «..... .
Service 3/«.**......
Government..........

Toledo
Manufacturing,

92.7

19ZL

0KIAH0MA
Oklahoma City
Total.«••••••........
145.0
Mining...............
8.1
Contract construction..« 10.3
Manufacturing........
16.0
Trans, and pub* util«.
11.0
Trade............... «
37.9
Finance........ .
8.2
Service............. .
17.9
Government.«.........
35.8

Harrisburg 3/
Total...7.............
Mining...............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.
Finance...... ••••••••
Service..............
Government...........

Dayton
Manufacturing.

Number of employees

93.8

98.8

15.0

25.1
5.7
14.3
38.4
44.8

Q .k

30.0
14.3
2 k .5

a

38.6

5.6
13.6
38.6

>»5.3

^5.7

1

Ar v j

f rtìp !c>
\rn<vrit

Tabi* A-7: Employ**« in nonagricultural establishments,
for s*l*ct*d ana», by industry division - Continued
Area and Industry
division
PENHSYLVAHIA-Continued
Philadelphia
Manufacturing......... .
Pittsburgh
t b S i :.:*..............
Mining........... .....
Contract construction. ..
Manufacturing......... .
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.......... .......
Finance........ ••••••..
Service................
government...... ......
Reading
Manufacturing..........

(In thousands)
Number of employees

■ 1 5 June
■21
July
551.3

837.*t

18.1

53.6
336.9
70.5
158.4
28.7
97.9
73.3

49.4

552.1

845.8

18.1
56.0

338*4
70*4

160*9
28.3
99.1
74.6

49.6

m
July

526.5

700.1

5.8
1*6.4
233.1
68.1
156.5

28.5
91.6

70.1

49.2

Scranton
Manufacturing..........

31.5

31.9

32*3

Wilkes-Barre-»Hazleton
Manufacturing........ . •

38.0

38*9

37.8

Tork J/
Manufacturing..........

RHODE ISLAND
Providence
Total........ ....... .
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade*............ •••••
Finance...... •••••....
Service 3/.**..........
Government........ •••••
SOOTH CAROLINA.
Charleston
Botai....... .........
Contract construction..
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade.... ............
Finance............ .
Service 3/............
Government............
Greenville
Manufacturing*..*.....

42.0

277.2
17.7
124.3
13.7
49.6
12.7
28.4
30.8

54.2
3.*

42*8

279.0

17.0
126*8
13.7
50.5

12.4

27.8

30.6

44*7

285.4
16*9
131.8
14*3
51.2
12*3
28*2
30*7

2.2
5.2
15.9

54*8
3.8
9.6
4*9
13.6
2.2
5.0
15.9

52.9
3.3
9.9
4.3
12*9
2.1
5.0

30.2

30.3

30*7

n

13.5

15.6

Area and industry
division

SOUTH DAKOTA
Sioux Falls
"k b x :::...
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade......... ......
Finance..............
Service 2 / ...... ..
Government......... ..

Chattanooga
Total..."..............
Mining........ ........
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans* and pub* util....
Trade..................
Finance............. .
Service................
Government....... .....
Knoxville
Total. .7........... .
Mining.................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..... *••••••••••
Service........... .
Government....... ••••••

S ? . ................
Mining.................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade......... ........
Finance................
Service................
Government.......... .
Nashville
Total..................
Mining..... ...........
Contract construction..*
Manufacturing.•••••*.•••
Trans* and pub. util....
Trade..................
Finance................
Service................
Government.............

Number of

July

1957

£5 »loy*

June

24*4
1*8
5.3
2*2
8.0
1*6
3.5
2.0

24*1

91.8

92.4

*1
3.7
42*6
5.6

17.6

*.5

8, l
9:

113.7
2.1
6.4
41.9
7.6
25.4
2*7
11*6

1.7
5.2

2.2
8.0
1.6
3.6
2.0

.1
3.6
43.1
5.6
17.7
4.4
9.*
8.7

w

24.9
2.0
5.*
2.2
8.3
1.5
3.*
2.0

93.4
*1
3.8
44.0
5.5

18.3

*•3
9.*
8.1

114*7
2*1
6*7
42*3
7.7

117.6

2.7
11.6

2.7
11.5

25.6

2.2
7.2
44.8
7.6

25.8

16.2

16.2

188.3
.3
9.5
*5.9

186.9

189.0

55.2
8.3
24.6

16.5

16.7

28.0

55.3
8.3
24.5
27.9

136.8
.3
6.8
38.6
12.5
31.2
9.2
20*6

136.5
.3
6.6
38.2
12.5
31.0
9.2
20.7

16.6

17.8

.3
8.8
45.4

18.1

15.8

.4
9.7
46.3
55.7
8.3
24.9

27.2

132.5
.3
6.1
36.7

12.5

30.4
8.9
20.3
17.5

See footnotes at end of table.




21

A

y:i'i

Table A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and Industry
division

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Ju ly

Ì22L

June

July

TEXAS

Dallas
Manufacturing.........

89.6

88.5

82.8

Fort Worth
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........

58.3

59.0

57.1

Ho us to n
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........

93.2

92.5

86.4

21.1

Area and industry
division

Richmond.
T o t a l ..................
M i n i n g .................
Co ntract construction
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........
Trans, a nd pub. util.
T r a d e .............
F i n a n c e ................
S e r v i c e ................
G o v e r n m e n t ............

Number of employees

1957
Jul2_

T555-

Juñe

166.7

167.2

13.4

13 .1
40.0
16.0
42.7

19.6

19.3
22.2

•3

.3

159.8
.3
12.2
38.7
16.1
40.3
13 .1

21.0

S a n A n t o ni o
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........

UT A H
Salt Lake C i t y
T o t a l ...................
M i n i n g ..................
Co ntract construction.
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..........
Trans, a nd pub. util..
T r a d e ...................
F i n a n c e ............ .
S e r v i c e ........ ........
G o v e r n m e n t .............

21.3

123.9

7.6
9.3
I9.O
13.4
35.5
7.6
I6.8
14.7

V E R MO NT
Burl ing to n
T o t a l ...................
Ma n u f a c t u r i n g . ........
Trans, a nd pub. util..
T r a d e . ..................
S e r v i c e .................
Other nomman uf ac tur in g

17.6
4.5

1.4
4.7
3.5
3.7

Springfield
T o t a l ..........
Manufacturing.
Trans, a nd pub
Trade
Service
Other n o n ma nu fa ctu ri ng

VIRGINIA
N o r f o lk -P ort sm ou th
T o t a l ..................
M i n i n g .................
Co ntract construction
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........
Trans, a nd pub. util.
T r a d e ..................
F i n a n c e ...............
S e r v i c e ................
G o v e r n m e n t ............

12.4
7.4
.6
1.6
1.2
1.6

161.5

.2

15.2
15.3
17.6
43.3
6.2

18.8
44.9

See footnotes at end of table.

22




123.3
7.6
9.1
18.5
13.3
35.6
7.5
I6.5
I5.2

I7.5
4.5
1.4
4.6
3.4
3.7

12.4
7.5
.6
1.6
1.2
1.7

I62.O
.2
14.7
15.6

17.7

43.4

6.0
18.9

45.5

121.0
7.7
9.9
18.6
I3 .I
34.4
7.4
15.6
14.3

17.3

4.0
1.5
4.6
3.4
3.9

13.5

8.6
.6
1.6
1.2
1.7

156.3

.2
12.7
15.6
17.3
41.3
5.8

18.1

45.3

WA SH IN G T O N
Seattle
T o t a l .................. .
C o n tr act construction,
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ .
Trans, a n d pub. util,,
T r a d e ..................
F i n a n c e ................
S ervice 1 / ............
G o v e r n m e n t ........ ...

Spokane
T o t a l ..................
Co nt r a c t construction
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....... .
Trans, an d pub. util.
T r a d e ..................
F i n a n c e ................
Se rvice l / ............
G o v e r n m e n t ............

Tacoma
T o t a l ....... ..........
Contr ac t construction
'M a n u f a c t u r i n g . .......
Trans, a n d pub. util.
T r a d e ..................
F i n a n c e ................
Ser vi ce 1/......... .
G o v e r n m e n t ............

W E S T V IRG I N I A
Ch ar le sto n
T o t a l ..................
M i n i n g .................
C o n t r a c t con struction
M a n u f a c t u r i n g * .......
Trans. a n d pub. util.
T r a d e ..................
F i n a n c e ................
S e r v i c e ........ .
G o v e r n m e n t ............

39.7
I6.I
42.6
13.7
21.3

13.6

18.6
20.5

331.4
I 7 .O
108*7
28.7
75.5
18.6
38.7
44.2

308.7
I6.6

76.4
4.5
14.8
8.9
21.5
3.9
11.7
11.1

78.0

5.6
15 .0
9.1
21.4
4.1
12.2
10.6

77.5
4.8
17 .1
7.3
17.3
3.1
9.1

77.2
4.6

76.9

16.9

17.7
7.5
17.1
3.0
8.9
18.7

93.1
9.5
5.3

93.7
9.8
5.4
26.4
10.3
19.7
3.3
9.4
9.6

338.I
17.8

113.4
29.3
76.2
18.8
39.O
43.6

76.7
4.9

15.0

9.2
21.4
4.0
11.5
10.7

18.8

26.3

10.3
19.5
3.2
9.4
9.7

7.2
17.1
3.1
9.1

19.2

87.1
28.5
75.5

18.6

39.1
43.3

4.0

92.1
10.5

4.6
25.4
10.2
19.I
3.3
9.6
9.6

A? i \ )

PmpL'vuu’
nt

Tabl« A-7: Employ««* in nonaaricultural «stablishmcnts.
for s«l«ct«d areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and Industry
222 L
division

Area and Industry
division
WEST V IR G IN IA - C o n t in u e d
W h e e lln g - S t e u b e n v llle j /
T o t a l ............................................
M in in g ..........................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .•.
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................
T r a n s , and p ub . u t i l . . . .
T r a d e ............................................
F i n a n c e .......................................
S e r v i c e .......................................
G o v e rn m e n t................................
W ISCONSIN
M ilw a u k e e
T o t a l . ....................................... .
C o n tra c t c o n s t r u c t io n ...
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...................... .
T ra n s , and pub . u t i l . . . .
T r a d e .......................................... .
F i n a n c e ........................... ..
S e r v ic e
...............................
G o v e rn m e n t...............................

]J

I
I

June

123.2

5.6
6.9

49.8

115.2
5.6
6.5
51.9
8. 9

101.7

5.6
5.2

11.0

3.0

39.5
8.9
21.5
3.0

U.O

10«9

7.3

7.3

*3 5 . 9

*29.7

J u ly

~ w t

(2/)
n

Ju n e

J u ly

*H .7

*1.6

2.4
20.8

2.3
21.5

1.7
7. 6
.9

1.8

<!/)

*.5

k .2

(2 /)

3.7

3. 6

3.5

3. 5
1.6
1. 8
1. 9
4.1
.5
2.*

3.8
1.8
1. 9
1. 8
*.3
.6
2.0

7. *

7.2

(2/)
2/.

R a c in e
T o t a l . ............... ..
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g .............
T r a n s , and p u b . u t i l . .
T r a d e .......................................
F in a n c e ...................................
S e r v ic e j / ...........................
G o v e rn m e n t...........................

Number of employees
.

9.0
20.7
3.X

( I/)

(2/)
m

21.1

22.6

191.3
29.*
87.9
20.7

23*6
190.8
29 . 6

86.2
8Ò.4
46 .0
33.0

WYOMING
C asp er
M in in g ..................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n
M a n u f a c t u r in g ..................
T ra n s , and p u b . u t i l .
T r a d e . ..................................
F in a n c e ................................ '
S e r v i c e ................................

1. 6
1.8
2.0

k.k
•5
2.3

.8

Includes mining.
Not available.
Revised series; not strictly comparable with previously published data.
Includes government.
Includes mining and government.
Includes mining and finance.
Subarea of New York-Northeastern New Jersey.




23

Tabi* B-lt Monthly labor turnover rates in manufacturing
(TW.-ino T V í r M
Tear

Jan*

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

3.6
5.2
4.4

3.¿
4.6
3.9
4.4
2.8

3.5
4.5
3.7
4.3
2.4
3.5
3.3
2.8

2.9
4.1
3.7

1950...........
1951...........
1952...........
1953...........
1954...........
1955...........
1956*•••••••••••
1957...........

2.8
3.3
3.3
3.2

3.2
4.5
3.9
4.2
2*5
3.2
3.1
2*8

1950...........
1951...........
1952...........
1953...........
1954...........
1955...*.......
1956...........
1957...........

3.1
4.1
4.0
3.8
4.3
2.9
3.6
3.3

3.0
3.8
3.9
3.6
3.5
2.5
3.6
3.0

1950...........
1951...........
1952...........
1953...........
1954...........
1955...........
1956...........
1957............

1.1
2*1
1.9
2.1
1*1
1.0
1.4
1.3

1950...........
1951...........
1952...........
1953...........
1954...........
1955...........
1956...........
1957...........
1950...........
1951...........
1952...........
1953...........
1954...........
1955...........
1956...........
1957...........
1950...........
1951...........
1952...........
1953...........
1954...........
1955...........
1956...........
1957...........




3.6

3.1
2.8

k.l

3.7

3.0

2.8
4.6

k.l

4.3

3.8
3.1

Ally

Aug.

Tot«il aoceiision
1.8
4.7
4.5
k.9 4.2
4.4
3.9
4.9
5.1
4.1
4.1
2.7
2.9
3.5
3.é
4.3
3-*
4.2
3 .*
3.3
3.2
3.0
3.9

M*y

u

Totiú. sera•atlon
3.0
2.9
4.6
4.4
4.3
5.0
3.9
3.9
k.k 4.2 4.3
3.1
3.3
3.2
3.2
3.4
3.4
3.2
3.7
3.4
3.0
3.2

3.1

3.5
3.3

3.4
3.3

1.0
2.1
1.9
2.2
1.0
1.0
I .3
1*2

1.2
2.5
2.0
2.5
1.0
I .3
1.4
1.3

1.3
2.7
2.2
2.7
1.1
I .5
I .5
1.3

0.2
.3
.3
.3
.2
.2
.3
•2

0.2
.3
.3
.4
.2
.2
.3
.2

0.2
.3
.3
.4
.2
.2
.3
.2

0.2
.4
.3
.4
.2
.3
.3
.2

o.y

1.7
1.0
1.4

2 .k

1.1
1.2
1.1
1.0

x*p

1.4

1.4
.8
1.1
.8
2.3
1.3
1.6
1.4

1.2
1.0
1.3

2.8
1.5

1.7
.8
1.3
.8
2.2
1.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

.9

.7

.4
.4
.3
0?
.2
.3

.6
.4
.4
.2
.2
.2
.2

•5

.3
.3

.2
,2
.2
.2

.9

1.2
1,4

June

1.6

2.8
2.2
2.7
1.0
I .5

1.6

1.4

.k
.3

.4
.2

.3
.3
•3

1.9

1.1
1.6
1 5
x*p

Sept.

Oot.

Nov.

6.6
*•5
5.9
4.3
3.3
4.5
3.8

5.7
4.3
5.6
4.0
3.4
4.4
4.1

5.2
4.4
5.2
3.3
3.6
V.l
4.2

4.0
3.9
4.0
2.7

k.2

4.9

*.3
4.7
4.2
4.5
3.3
3.5
3.5

5.3
4.6

k.a

3.5
4.0
3.9

1.8
2.4
2.2
2.5
1.1
1.6
I .5
1.4

2.9
3.1
3.0
2.9
1.4
2.2
2.2

DischaiT*e
0.3
0.3
.4
.3
.3
.3
.k
.4
.2
.2
•3
.3
.2
.3
.2
.2

0.4
.4
.3
.4
.2
.3
.3

1.7
2.5
2.2
2.6
1.1
I .5
1.6
1.3

Layofj »
0.9
1.0
1.1
•9
1.7
1.2
1.-3
1*1

0*6
1.3
2.2
1.1
1.6
1.3
1.2
1.4

0.6
1.4
1.0
1.3
1.7

1.3

1.2

MLsccillaneous. ine]Ludlne nilitan
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.3
.k
.k
.4
.4
.5
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
•3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
•2
.2

5.1

4.9
5.2
3.9
4.4
4.4

3.4

3.3
3.0

3.8

4.3
3.5

4.2
3.0

3.1

3.3

Dec.

Annual
aver­ Tear
age

3.0

4.4
4.4
4.4
10
J*7
3.0
3*7
3.4

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957

3*0
3.5
3.4
4.0

3.5
4.4
4.1
4.3
3.5
3.3
3.5

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957

3.0
3.3
2.1
2.5
2.5
2.2

3.0
3.0

2.8

1.8
2.8
2.6

2.7
2.5
2.8
2.1
1.2
1.8
1.7

1.5

1.7
1.4
1.7
1.1

1.4
1-3

1.1
1.0

1.9
2.4
2.3
2.3
1.1
1.6
1.6

0.4
.3
.4
.4
.2
.3
.3

0.4
.4
.4
.4
.2
.3
.3

0.3
.3
.4
.3
.2
.3
•3

0.3

0.3

.3
.3
.4
.2
.3
•3

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957

0.7

0.8
1.4

1.3
1.5
1.0
2.5
1-7
1.4

1.4

1.1
1.2
1.1
1.3
1.9
1.2
I .5

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957

0.3
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2

0.2
.5
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957

3.1

3.5

3.1

2.1
1*9
2.1

l.X
>

1.3
.7
1.5
1.7
1.1
1.4

1.1

1.1
1.7
.7
2.3
1.6
1.2
I .5

0.4
.4
.3
.3
.3
.2
.2

0.4
.4
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2

O.3
.4
.3
.3
.1
.2
.2

.7

1.8
1.6
1.2

.9

.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2

n

Tab I* B-2: Monthly labor turnover rates in s .I.c t .d industries
(Per 100 employees)

Industry

Total
acce ssion
raite

Si ftaration rate
Total

Quit

Discharge

Layoff

Misc., inc|.
m ilitary
J u 3 y IfflA
19 5 7 19 57
0. 2
0.2

July June July June July June July

June J u l y

1?57 1957

1957

1957

1?57

1957

1957

MANUFACTURING............................

3. 2

3.9

3.2

3.0

1. 4

1.3

0. 2

1957
0. 2

19 5 7
1 .4

DURABLE ^ t)0DS................................
NONDURABLE ¿0 00 3 .............................

3. 2
3.3

^•9
3.9

3.4
2*9

3.1
2.7

1.3
1.5

1.3
1.4

.3
.2

.3
.2

1.6
.9

1.3
.9

.2
.2

.3
.2

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES...............

2.9

3.4

2.1

3 .4

.8

1.0

.1

.1

.9

2.1

.2

.2

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS........ .....

4.0
3.3
3. 1
4.1

«>.6
4.0
^•5
4.9

3.3
3.2
2.7
3.1

3.5
2.6
2.6
3.3

1.3
.8
1.2
2.0

1.3
.8
.9
2.1

.3
.2
.1
.4

.3
.2
.2
.4

1.6
1.9
1.3
.6

1 .7
1.3
1.3
.6

•2
.2
.1
.2

.2
.2
.2
.2

(i/)

8.3

Cl/)

4.2

(1/)

.7

(Ì/)

.2

(i/>

3.1

Cl/)

.1

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...................

4 .2
4. 8
4. 4
.6

2.1
2.3
1.8
2.5

2.7
1. 8
4.2
1.3

1.7
1.1
2 .2
1.8

1.5
1.1
2.2
.7

1. 2
.7
1. 7
1.1

.2
.2
.3
.1

.2
.2
.2
.1

.8
.1
1. 7
(2/)

«2
.1
.3
.2

.2
.3
.1
.5

.1
.1
(5/J

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS..................

3.1
4. 0
3.0
2 .8
4.1
3.6
1 .7
4.1
3.4
2.0

3.1
2.8
3.1
2.9
4.6
3.7
1.2
3.9
3.0
2.6

3.3
3.3
3.2
3.1
4.2
3. 9
5.1
2. 9
2.4
2.7

1.8
1. 9
1. 8
1. 9
1 .6
2.0
1. 9
1.7
1.6
1.1

1. 6
1.6
1. 6
1. 6
1.4

1.3
1. 5
1.2
1.1
1.8

1. 0
.6
1. 2

.4
.3
2.1

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
(2/)
.2

1.5

(1/)

(i/>

.9

(!/)

.2
.3
.2
.2
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

1.2
1 .0
.9
.8
2 .1
1 .6

1. 6
2 .0
1.2
1. 1

.2
.2
.3
.2
.3
.2
.3
.2
.2
.2

(1/)

3.2
3.5
3.2
3.2
3.6
3.0
2.8
2.7
1.6
3.5
3.8

(i/>

2.5

(1/)

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
(2/)
.2
.2

3.8
2. 4

3.5
3.8

3. 4
2.2

3.1
1.8

2.5
1.7

2.0
1. 2

.2
(2/)

.2
.1

.6
.2

*9
.3

.2
.2

.1
.1

4.0

3.6

3.6

3.5

2.7

2.3

.3

.2

.5

.9

.1

.1

4. 2
7. 7
3.9

6.6
11.0
6.0

5.3
11.4
4.3

4.2
4.5
4.5

2.8
5.1
2.5

2.4
3. 4
2. 4

.4
.5
.5

.4
.3
.5

I .9
5.7
1. 1

1.1
.6
1. 4

.2
.1
.2

.2
.2
.2

3. 2

5.4

2.8

2.6

2.0

1. 7

.3

.3

.5

.5

.1

.1

Household furniture. ...••••..... ...... .
Other furniture and fi x t u r e s ............

3. 8
4.1

3.5
3.5
3.4

3.0
2. 9
3.3

3.8
4 .4
2.6

1.7
1.8
1.4

1. 5
1. 6
1.3

.3
.3
.3

.3
.3
.2

.8
.6
1.3

1.9
2 .2
1.0

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............

3. 2
2.0
3 .7

3.8
3.3
^.5

2.4
1.6
3.0

2.4
1.8
2.4

1.3
.8
1. 9

1.3
.8
1. 7

.3
.1
.4

.2
.3

.7
.6
.5

.7
•7
.2

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

2.0

3.1
3.1
2.5
1.7
4.0
2.9

1. 9
2.8
1.6
1.3
1.4
1.8

1. 4
1.3
1 .2
1 .2
1.3
1 .4

.8

.8
.8
.5
.4
1. 1

.1
.2
.1
(2/)

.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
.2

.8
1 .6
.9
.8
.1
.6

.3
.2
.5
.6

.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
.1

.1
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1

G rain- m i l l p r o d u c t s .......................
Beverages:

Y a r n and t hread m i l l s . .................. .
B r o a d - w o v e n fabric m i l l s ........... .
Cotton, silk, synthetic f i b e r . .
W o o l e n and worsted. ............... ......
Kni t t i n g m i l l s .............................
Sea m l e s s h o s i e r y . ........ •
..............
K ni t u n d e r w e a r ....... *...................
D yei n g and finishing t e x t i l e s ...........
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings...

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS.............................
Men's and boys' suits and c o a t s ........
Men's and boys' furnishings and work
c l o t h i n g......... ............. ...........

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)............. ..............
Logging camps and c o n t r a c t o r s . .........
Sawmills and planing m i l l s . . ...........
Millwork, plywood, and prefabricated
structural wood p r o d u c t s ...............

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES....... .........

Pulp, paper, and paperboard m i l l s . .....

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..........
Industrial inorganic c h e m i c a l s ...........
Industrial organic c h e m i c a l s ............
Synthetic f i b e r s ••••••••••••••••••••••
Drugs and m e d i c i n e s ............ ..........
Paints, pigments, and fil l e r s ...... ....,

1#
1 .7
4
1.5
3.1
1.5

.3
1.0
.9

.8

.2

.1

2.7

June
1957
1. 1

.7
.9

(a/)
«3

See fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .




_2L

Tabi* B-2: Monthly lab

Industry

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL..........
RUBBER PRODUCTS........... .............

s in soloctod industrios-Continuod
(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
Total
rate

Separation rate
Qtfit

Discharge

Layoff

July June July June July June July June July June July
1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957
1.5 3.3 0.8 0.9 0.3 0.4 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.2
.6
.2
.1 (2/)
.2
•9 3.1
.7
•3 (2/) (2/)
3.1
2.5
3.0
3.5

3.2
2.5
3.0
3.8

2.3
1.5
2.3
2.9

2.1
1.4
2.0
2.8

1.2
.8
1.7
1.5

1.0
.7
1.4
1.3

.2
.1
.2
.4

.2
.1
.1
.3

.5
.3
.2
.8

5.1
2.4
5.5

4.8
2.8
5.1

3.9
2.4
4.2

3.5
2.4
3.7

2.4
1.2
2.6

2.2
•9
2.4

.3
.2
.3

.3
.3
.3

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........

3.0
3.5
2.3
2.7
3-3

3.4
3.8
3.1
3.4
2.6

3.8
5.8
1.7
4.1
3.1

2.5
2.5
2.3
2.6
3.3

1.1
1.0
.8
1.3
1.5

1.0
.9
.8
1.5
1.4

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2
.3
.3

2.3
4.2
.4
2.3
1.2

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES................

1.8

2.6

2.4

1.9

.6

.7

.2

1.5
2.0
2.1
1.5
2.1

2.5
2.2
2.0
2.6
2.2

2.1
2.8

.5
1.0
1.1
1.0
.8

.9
1.0
1.0
.9

.1
.2

2.1
3.0

1.5
2.5
3.0
1.8
2.3

.6

1.4

2.7

2.4

2.3

.7

1.1
3.2

1.8
4.1

1.1
4.1

1.2
2.8

1.7

3.4

1.8

3-5
2.5
2.6
2.1
2.7

4.1
2.5
1.2
2.4
2.9

3-5
2.6
3.9
3.9
3-5

Other rubber p r o d u c t s .....................

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............
Leather: tanned, curried, and finished..

Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
nonferrous metals:
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of

O t h e r pri m a r y metal industries:

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT)............................
Cutlery, hand tools, and h a r d w a r e .......

H a r d w a r e .................. ..................
Heating apparatus (except electric) and
S a n i t a r y ware and plumbers* supplies...
Oil burners, nonelectric heating and
cooking apparatus, not elsewhere
Fabricated structural metal products....
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving..
See fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .




.6

June
1957
0.2
.2

.3
.3
.9

.3
.3
.3
.3

.3
.3
.2
.3

.6

.6

.6

.7

.9

.3
.6

.5
.3
.5

1.0
1.2
1.0
.7
1.4

.3
.4
.2
.2
.1

.2
.2
.3
.1
.2

.2

1.3 . .7

.3

.3

.1
.3

.1
.2
.2
.2
.3

1.2
1.4
1.4
.8
1.6

1.7
.3
.8

.3
.2
.2
.2
.2

.3
.2
.2
.3
.2

1.1

.4

.4

l.l

.6

.2

.2

.5
1.3

.4
1.0

.1
.3

.1
.4

.3
2.1

.2
1.1

.3
.4

.4
.3

2.5

.7

.9

.2

.3

.7

1.1

.2

.2

3.6
2.5
1.8
2.3
2.8

3.2
2.9
3.3
2.1
3.2

1.4
1.3
1.1
.9
1.6

1.2
1.1
1.1
.9
1.2

.3
.3
.1
.2
.4

•3
.3
.3
.2
.3

1.6

1.3
1.2
1.6
.8
1.3

.2
.3
.2
.4
.3

.2
.3
.2
.2
.3

4.0
2.5

4.4
1.9

2.8
2.1

1.7
.9

1.4
.9

•3
.3

.4
.2

2.2
.5

.7
.6

.2
.2

.3
.4

4.7
4.6
3.7

5.9
2.8
4.7

3.2
2.6
4.2

2.2
1.5
1.4

1.6
1.3
1.1

.4
.4
.3

.6

3.1
.7
2.7

.8
.7
2.4

.2
.2
.3

.2
.2
.4

Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling

Steel fou n d r i e s ...........................
Pri m a r y smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals:
Pr i m a r y smelting and refining of copper,

Misc., incl.
military

3 .0

.2

.4
.3

.6

.6

.4
.8
.5

.6

.5
1.1

Tabi* B-2: Monthly labor turnover rates in s .l.c t .d ind ustri.s-Con tinu.d
(Per 100 employees)

Industry

Engines and t u r b i n e s ........................
A g r i c ultural m a c h inery and trac t o r s ......
Construction and mining m a c h i n e r y ........
Metalworking m a c h i n e r y . ................
Metalworking m a chinery (except machine

Separation rate
Total

Quit

July ¿une JUly June July June
1957 X957 1957 1957 1957 1957
2.0 2.6 2.8 3.0 0.9 1.0
2.0 2.1 2.4 3.8
.7
.9
.8
1.7 2.9 2.6 2.8
.9
2.2 2.7 3.1 3.7 1.1 1.2
.8
1.1 2 .1
2.5 2.3
.9
.7
•9 1.6 2.4 2.2
.9

Discharge

II

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)............

Total
accefssion
ra te

0.2
.1
.2
.3
.2
.2

Misc., inci.
m ilitary

Layoff

June July Jam» July June
1957 1957 1957 1?57 1957
0.2 1.4 1.5 0.3 0.3
.2 1.4 2.4
.4
.2
.2 1.1 1.1
.4
.5
.2
.2
.3 1.5 1.9
.2 1.4
.2
.3
.9
.2 1.3
.2
.3
.9

1.0
2.0

2.1
2.7

2.0
3.5

2.3
2.5

.7
.9

.9
1.1

.1
.3

.2
.3

1.0
2.1

.9
.8

.2
.2

.2
.3

1.5
2.6
1.9
3.3
1.9

2.3
3.0
3.0
3.1
2.4

2.1
2.2
2.3
6.5
2.1

2.3
2.5
2.3
6.8
2.1

.8
1.0
.9
.9
.9

1.0
1.1
1.2
.9
.9

.2
.3
.1
.2
.2

.2
.3
.2
.1
.2

.8
.7
1.0
4.9
.7

.9
.9
.7
5.6
.7

.3
.5
.3

.2
.2
.2
.3
.3

3.5

3.8

2.9

3.0

1.4

1.6

.3

.3

1.0

.9

.2

.3

2.8 1.3
3.0 (±
/>

1.3
1.9

.2
(1/)

1.0
.2
.5 <l/>

.2
.3

3.2

2.0

.3

Sp e c i a l - i n d u s t r y m a chinery (except metalGeneral industrial m a c h i n e r y ..............
Office and store machines and devices....
Service- i n d u s t r y and household machines..

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY....................
Ele c t r i c a l generating, transmission,
d istribution, and industrial apparatus..
Radios, phonographs, television sets,

2.7
(1/)
5.1

2.7 2.7
4.7 <±
/)
5.7

3.0

1.7

Telephone, telegraph, and related
E l ectrical appliances, lamps, and miscel-

TRAN8P0RTATI0N EQUIPMENT................
A u t o m o b i l e s ..................................

Airc r a f t engines and p a r t s . . . ............
A i r c r a f t propellers and p a r t s ............
Other aircraft parts and e q u i p m e n t ......

(1/)
4.4
4.2
4.0
3.0
3.1
2.0

%
(y)
R a i l r o a d e q u i p m e n t .................. -.......
2.5
Locomotives and p a r t s . ....................
1.3
3.3
7.8
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS.........
Photographic a p p a r a t u s ..................
Watches and c l o c k s ..........................
Professional and scientific instruments..

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES....
Jewelry, silverware, and plated w a r e .....
See footnotes at end of table.




2.3
W )

(i/)
1.8
*.7
2.0

3.1 (±
/)
3.4

4.8

2.5 (i/>
3.9

1.4

.2 1.0
.3 (1/)
.3

.8

.5 (l/>

.3

.4

2.6

.4

.4

1.6
.3
.4
2.0
.6
.2
.4
.2
.2
1.3
.1 Ü / Ï
1.4
.1
5.3 (1/)
1.0
.5
.8
1.3
.8
.3
.1
.3

.4
.7
.2
.2
.3
.2
.1
.3
.4
.6
.2
.1

.2

1.2

.2

1.4
.3
.8
.2
.2
1.7
1.8
.2
1.2
.2
.9 (1/)
.6
1.9
2.8 (1/)
1.0
.2
.9 (2/)
1.1
.3
.6
1.6

.3 2.6
.2 2.6
.2 1.8
.2 1.9
.1
.7
.2
.5 2.3
.7 (l/>
.5 3.3
.1 3.9
.7 2.9
.7 (2/)

$

2.2 1.3
1.3
2.7 (i/)
2.3 1.1

1.1
.3
.7
1.3 (I/)
.2
1.2

.8
.2
.1
.2 (1/)
.2 1.0

3.2
1.5

4.1
1.6

1.8
.9

.2

.2 <l/>

3.6 1.4
.8
3.8
2.7 1.7
2.5 1.8
.9
2.9
1.4 (¿/)
3.9 2.2
9.0 (1/)
2.8 1.0
.6
2.9
2.8 1.2
2.5 2.0

5.5
2.5

.2

1.4 (1/)

4.6 4.5
3.8 4.0
4.2 3.9
4.6 4.1
2.4 x '?
3.3 <i/)
4.9 5.3
11.7 (1/)
3.4 4.9
1.9 5.3
4.0 4.7
5.1 3.0
3.1
2.6
3.3 (l/)
3.3 2.5

.6

.2
.2

2.0
1.0

.4
.1

.4
.1

.9
.3

2.0

.7

(1/)
.1

.2
.2
.4
.2

1.5
.3

.2
.2

.2
.2

.7
.3
.8

Tabi* B-2: Monthly lab

loctod industrios-Continuod
(Per 100 employees)

In d u s t r y

T o ta l
a c c e s s io n
ra te
J u ly
Ju n e

1??7 m i

Seip a r a t io n r a t e
Q u it

T o tal
J u ly

Ju n e

J u ly

19?7 1957 1957

D is c h a r g e

Ju n e

1957

J u ly

Ju n e

1957 1957

M is c . , i n c l .
m ilit a r y

L a y o ff
J u ly

Ju n e

1957 1??7

J u ly

1957

Ju n e

1957

HOHHAHUFACTUBIMQ:

METAL M UING,.................... .................................

2.2
.8

2.4
1.5
ANTHRACITE MINING.............................................. (1/)
BITUMINOUS-COAL M INING.................................
COMMUNICATION:

1.1
(1/)
(1/)

4.1
1.6
2.8
5.2

4.0
2.9

1.7
.2
3.0
1.4

2.4
.2
3.2
1.9

.8 (1/)

10.3

(A/>

.3

(i/)

1.8

1.5

.5

.4

3.6 ( 1 / )
2.7 (1/)

2.1
1.6

1.7
1.0

.9

2.7
.6
4.0
4.1

3.2
.8

(i/)
(1 /)

0.2
.1
.2
.2

0.3

0.3
.3
.1
.7

(2 /)

( i/)

9.9 (1/)

.1

(2 /)

1 .1

(i/)
(i/)

.1
(2 /)

(1 /)
(1 /)

•3
.2

0.5

0.4
.4
.5
.3

(2 /)

(2 /)

.3
2.3

.9

0.3

.2

.2 (1/)
.2 (1/)

1/ Hot available.
2/ Less than 0*05.
j J Data relate to domestic employees except messengers and those compensated entirely on a commission basis.




•5

Tabl* B-3: Monthly labor turnover rat** in manufacturing
for s*l*ct*d Stat** and area*
( P e r 100 e m p lo y e e s )

State and area
COBUCZXCtJT.............................
lev Haven.............................
Waterbury......................... .

T o tal
a c c e s s io n
ra te

S e p a r a t io n r a t e
T o ta l

Q u it

D is c h a r g e

June May June Nay June Nay June Nay
1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957
0.2 0.2
3.3 2.8 3.0 3.3 1.5 1.6
.2
2.9 2.4 3.1 3.5 1.4 1.5
.3
3.4 2.5 2.7 2.9 1.7 1.7
.4
.4
3.5 3.1 5.1 3.0 1.9 1.9
.3
.3
3.0 2.9 2.0 2.7
.8 1.1
.1
.2

L a y o ff

M is c ., i n c l .
m ilit a r y

June »toy June * y
1957 1957 1957 1957
1.1 1.3
0.2 0.2
.2
.2
1.3 1.5
.4
.6
.2
.2
.1
2.6
.7
.3
.4
.7 1.1
.3

EKIAWAHE:
3.8

3.1

2.7

2.3

1.1 1.2

.2

.2 1.1

.8

.3

.2

UDIAHA 1/.............................

4.0

2.9

3.1

3.5

1.2 1.3

.2

.2 1.4

1.7

.3

.3

XMBAS 2/..............................
Wichita ¿/............................

6.8

5.2

3.5
3.8

3.5
3.4

3.3
3.3

2.5 2.4

1.8 1.8

.3
.4

.2 1.1
.2 .4

1.1

.5

.2
.2

.1
.2

Hwrocnr ...............................................................................

3.9

3.1

3.2

3.1

1.2 1.3

.2

.3 1.6

1.3

.2

.2

MABXLMQ)....................................

Baltimore.......................... .

4.4
3.8

3.5
3.1

3.6
3.3

3.9
3.9

1.5 1.6
1.5 1.6

.3
.3

.3 1.6
.3 1.3

1.9

1.8

.2
.1

.1
.1

MISSOURI...............................

4.6

3.6

3.5

4.1

1.7 1.6

.3

.3 1.2

1.9

.3

.3

4.6
2.3
3.6
3.6
3.5
5.6
3.2
3.3
4.7

3.4
1.4
2.3
2.4
2.4
4.5
2.4

4.1

4.4
1.9

1.4 1.4

.3

.3 2.1
.1 .6
.2 .1
.2 1.4

2.5
.7
.3
1.4

.3

m

TOBOL..................................................................

lUJWJM

Albany-Schenectady-Troy................
Pf
| ## . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
Buffalo...............................
Kassau and Suffolk Counties............

2.8

2.0
1.8

3.0
3.7
5.4

2.0
2.6

2.0

3.0
3.5
5.9

2.1

1.0 .8
1.2 1.4
1.1 1.2
1.8 1.3

.3

1.0 1.1

.1
.2

1.4 1.3

1.4 1.6
1.5 1.5

.1

.2

.3
.5

.4 1.4
.5 3.3
.2 .7
.3
.7
.3 1.1

1.6

.6
1.2
1.2

.2

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

.3
4.1 3.1
.2
Westchester County.....................
.3
Exclude» canning and preserving.
— —
Excludes instruments and related products.
Excludes paper and allied products, products of petroleum and coal, and instruments and related products.

HOBS:

3.3
3.1

.2

.3

.2
.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2

Jane 1957 data are preliminary.




29

Hours and Lu nin o s

Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees
In d u s try

A v e ra g e w e e k ly
e a r n in g s

A v e ra g e h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

A v e r a g e w e e k ly
h o u rs

July

June

Ju ly

Ju l y

June

Ju ly

1957

1957

1956

1957

1957

1956

$98.65

$ 98.81
IO3 .O6

40.1
39.2
40.6
40.1

41.0
40.1
41.2
41.1

42.3 $2.46

98.88
89.60

$ 96.02
89,05
100.39
90.30

42.9
42.0

1/

IOO.5O

92.20

1/

34.3

112.73

114.68

102.16

36.6

P e t r o le u m and n a t u r a l - g a s p r o d u c t io n
( e x c e p t c o n t r a c t s e r v i c e s ) ...........................

110.00

109.18

IO6.OI

NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING.......

91.10

90.*5

109.35

O th e r n o n b u ild in g c o n s t r u c t i o n ....................

110.62
107.31
113.36

BUILDIN G CONSTRUCTION..............................................

GENERAL CONTRACTORS...................

Ju ly

1957

1956

2.68

2.44

$2.41
2.57
2.40

2.17

2.18

$2.27
2.46
2.34
2.15

35.6

1/

2.93

2.59

37.6

36.1

3.08

3.05

2.83

41.2

41.2

41.9

2.67

2.65

2.53

88.01

45.1

45.0

45.6

2.02

2.01

1.93

108.11

103.25

38.1

37.8

38.1

2.87

2.86

2 .7 I

IOI .33
III .32

106.63

105.58
102.70
107.68

41.9
43.8
40.2

40.7
41.7
39.9

42.4
43.7
41.1

2.64
2.45
2.82

2.62

2.43
2.79

2.49
2.35

2.62

108.78

108. lt9

103.23

37.0

36.9

37.0

2.94

2.94

2.79

101.94

IOO .65

96.52

36.8

36.6

36.7

2.77

2.75

2.63

113.90

li 58
lt-.
119-42

108.25

37.2
38.4
35.3
39.9
36.4

37.2
38.5
35.1
39.5

3 .O7
3 .O9
3.02

36.6

3.37
2.97

3 .O8
3.11
2.99
3.36
2.99

2 .9I
2.95
2.85
3.14
2.84

* h
3

June

HINIHG:

METAL MINING............... ..........
C o p p e r m i n i n g .............................................................
L e a d and z i n c m i n i n g ............................................

ANTHRACITE............................
BITUMINOUS-COAL.......................

105.06
99.06
87.02

36.2

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION:

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION...................
NONBUILDING CONSTRUCTION.......................................

SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS.............

118.04
IO7 .2I
I3I .77
108.41

105.55
134.06
108.84

100.04
124.03
IO3.94

37.1
38.2
35.5
39.1
36.5

82.18

82.80

78.60

39.7

40.0

40.1

2.07

2.07

1.96

88.00
74.86

84.25

74.09

7 I.7 I

40.0
39.4

40.5
39.2

40.7
39.4

2.20
I.9O

2.19
I .89

I .82

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES..........

93.60

94.83

91.74

40.0

40.7

41.7

2.34

2.33

2.20

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.............

79.30
87.33
95.56

78.94
87.13

75.03
82.20
89.44
87.34
75.95
77.43
78.69
61.23
49.77
64.27
81.35
82.99
78.05
74.21
75.85

41.3
41.0
41.2
41.7
43.5
43.6
43.7
40.0
34.6
42.0
44.8
44.4
45.4
40.8
40.9
40.5

40.9
41.1
41.5
41.8
43.1
43.2
42.8
38.0
32.O

41.0
41.1
41.6
42.4
43.4
44.5
43.0
39.5

I .92
2.13

1.93
2.12
2 .3I
2 .I8
I .83
1.85

1.83
2.00
2 .I5
2 .O6
1.75
I .74
I .83
1.55
1.59
I .56
1.87
1.93
1.75
1.81

E l e c t r i c a l w o rk ........................................................

MANUFACTURING...........................
DURABLE GOODS................................ *...............................
NONDURABLE GOODS................................................... ..

D a i r y p r o d u c t s ...........................................................

90.91

80.04
80.66
86.09

63.20

S e a f o o d , ca n n e d and c u r e d ...........................
C an n ed f r u i t s , v e g e t a b l e s , and s o u p s ..
F l o u r and o t h e r g r a i n - m i l l p r o d u c t s . . .
B a k e r y p r o d u c t s ........................................................
B r e a d and o t h e r b a k e r y p r o d u c t s ...............
B i s c u i t s , c r a c k e r s , and p r e t z e l s ............

-2£




55.36
65.94
86.91

89.69
82.63

77.11
78.94

70.07

88.70

95.87
91.12
78.87

79.92
83-89
61.18

50.24
64.08

83.66
86.17
80.10

76.89

78.53
70.35

113.58

67.08

38.6

43.8
43.3
44.5
40.9
40.9
40.9

31.3

41.2
43.5
43.O
44.6
41.0
41.0
40.9

2.32

2.18
1.84

1.85

1.97

1.58
I .60
1.57

1.94

2.02^

1.82
I .89

1.93
1.73

1.96

I .61

1.57

1.66
I .91
1.99
1.80
1.88
I .92
I .72

2.07

1.85

1.64

Hours and tamings
Table C -l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
A v e ra g e w e e k ly
e a r n in é s

In d u s try

Ju ly
19*57

June
1957

July

$ 87.57

$92.44
102.38
81.61

$ 83.36

1956

A v e ra g e w e e k ly
h o urs

A v e ra g e h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

July
1957

June
1957

July
_ 1956

J ul y
1957

43.4
45.3
40.2
40.4
40.2
40.6
42.5
40.2

42 .1
44.5
38.6
39.6
38.8
41.2
42.0
41.6

June
1957

July
1956

$2 .08
2.22
1.96
1.63
1.58
2.23
I .65
2.77

$2.13

$1 .98
2.09
1.96
1.57
1.52

2.21
1.84
2.18

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS - Continued
C a n e - s u g a r r e f i n i n g .................................................
B e e t s u g a r ......................................................... ............
C o n f e c t io n e r y and r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ...............

113.02

111.35

110.24

42.1
43.6
40.7
39.3
38.9
41.4
43.5
40.8

85.36
78.17
94.55
75-93

84.42

76.36
90.69

81.48
72.04
80.70
71.71

38.8
41.8
42.4
46.3

38.2
41.5
41.6
44.6

38.8
40.7
3 8.8
45.1

2.20
1.87
2.23
1.64

39-6
43.4
36.3
37-9
38.3

38.6
40.1
37.6
38.0
37.6

38.9
41. 1
37.3

1.61
1.87
1.32

38.1

3 8.6
42 .2
38.2
38.2
38.5
38.8
38.3
39.1
38.2
41.5
40.3
37.1
34.7
37-8
33-5
36.5

38.8
44.0

38.6

38 .9
42 .1
38.3
38.3
38.9
38.9
38.4
39.0
38.3
42.0
40.4
37.3
35.2
37.7
34.1
37.0
38.1

36.2
38.4
37-5
39.8

36.8
38.4
37.6
41.7

39-5
39-8
38.4

41.7
39.5
38.2

96.79
79.77
64.06

61.46
92.32
71 .78
M a lt l i q u o r s ..................................................................
D i s t i l l e d , r e c t i f i e d , and b le n d e d

C o rn s i r u p ,

su ga r,

o il,

and s t a r c h .............

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES....................

T o b a c c o stem m in g and r e d r y i n g ...........................

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS...................

63.76

81.16
47.92
62.16
54.77

65.85
63.92
91.35

70.98

72.70

61.94

58.74
72.34
47.74
55.39

54.52

51.05

58.35
68.20

55.87
70.84
51.05
51.05
53.45
53.82
51.72

60.99
74 . 5 9
49.63

s y n t h e t ic

f i b e r .........................

53.24
54.46

56.41

54.77
59.82
53.86
66.40

54.91
59.67
54.00

61.66

s ilk ,

57.90
70.47
53.10
53.10
54.29

56.26
C o tto n ,

61.41
54.46

53.80
53.79

58.21
51.93

47.82
52.11
47.06

52.85

67.20
54.56
58.06
53-20

49.21

59-14
51.00
D y e in g and f i n i s h i n g t e x t i l e s ...........................
D y e in g and f i n i s h i n g t e x t i l e s ( e x c e p t
C a rp e ts, ru g s,
W ool c a r p e t s ,

o t h e r f l o o r c o v e r i n g s ..........
r u g s , and c a r p e t y a r n ..........

51.05
48.94
58.75
51.14

65.67

69.22

64.39
72.83

69.50
59-01

69.89
P e l t g o o d s ( e x c e p t woven f e l t s

68.81

72.29
68.76
59.76
69.37

58.80
50.82
64.53
57-77
53.25
56.39
56.77

56.52

45.44
49.79
44.80
57.72
48.86
64.31
63.59
71.38
71.68
58.03
64.78

36.2

38.1
38.1
39.3
39.0
38.6
39.2
38.5
41.1
39.3
37.5
37.1
38.1
36.7
35.5
38.6
35.0
39.0
37.3
40.7

2.26
2.03
1.63
1.59

2.25
1.67
2.77

1.63
1.58

2.16
1.58
2.65
2.10
1.77
2.08
1.59

1.64
1.43

1.86
1.32
1.63
1.45

1.51
1.76
1.28
1.53
1.34

1.50
1.67

1.50
1.62

1.61

1.39
1.39
1.41
1.45
1.43
1.53
1.41

1.38
1.39
1.40
1.45
1.43
1.53
1.41

1.60

1.60

1.53
1.45
1.55
1.54
1.55
1.31
1.35
1.30
1.54

1.52
1.46
1.55
1.54

1.36
1.65

1.36

1.56
1.33
1.34
1.33
1.53
1.66

1.63

1.65

1.83
1.81

1.83
1.80
1.66
1.73

1.44
1.34
1.34

1.36

1.38
1.34
1.50

1.32
1.57
1.47
1.42
1.52
1.49
1.54
1.28

1.29
1.28
1.48
1.31
I .58
1.57
1.78
1.81

36.2

36.0

40.4

40.1

40.5
40 .1
39.6
35.6
39.5

39.2
37 -9
40.6
4 1.9

39.3
37.8
40.2
41.6

38.4
38.3
39.7
40.1

1.85
1.83
1.76

1.82

1.41

1.74
1.41

1.75
1.74
1.71
1.31

4 4.9
38.3

43.9
38.2

4 3.8
38.6

2.14
1.51

2.12
1.51

1.95
1.44

1.63
1.73

1.63
1.64

and

72.52

69-36

P a d d in g s and u p h o ls t e r y f i l l i n g ....................
P r o c e s s e d w a s te and r e c o v e r e d f i b e r s . . . .
A r t i f i c i a l l e a t h e r , o i l c l o t h , and




93.01
75.66
62.17
58.98
88.99
66.36

7 1 . 46
59.08

96.09
57-83

73.49
68.80
69.95

58.66

93.07
57.68

67.20
66.64

67.89
52.53

85.41
55.58

1.87

-21

Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued

In d u s try

July
1957

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS...............................

A v e ra g e w e e k ly
e a r n in g s

Jim«
1957

July
_ 1956

A v e r a g e w e e k ly
h o u rs
July A m
July

A v e ra g e h o u r l y
e a r n in g s

1957

1957

1956

July
1957

Jtm*
1957

s u i t s and c o a t s ......................
f u r n i s h i n g s and w ork

♦1.^9 $1.46
1.79 1.73

$54.30
64.61

♦53.34
64.08

$52.27

62.11

36.2
36.3

35.8
35.8

35-8
35.9

$1.50
1.78

46.36
46 .85
47.21
43.07

46.37
45.97
47.13
42.92
55.24
53.09
45.50
65.73
48.11
45.95
52.41
54.94
51.61
49.63
57.23

44.88

36.5

2.11
1.33

1.58
1.30
2.01
1.34

37.6

35.9
36.2
37.1
36.0
35.0
34.5
35.1
35.8
35.7
35.7
35.7
35-9
36.7
36.9
37.2

1.27

61.75
49.18
49.08
52.82

36.8
36.2
36.3
37.0
34.1
33.6
35.0
32.7
35.9
35-9
35-9
32.9
37.4
35.2
37.9

1.45
1.69
1.38
1.39
1.52

1.46
1.67
1.38
1.41
1.51

47.92
59.40
59.09

45.67
57.92
57.63

36.9
39.8
40.1

36.3
39.6
40.2

35.4
39.4
40.3

1.31
1.52
1.48

1.32

60.50

H e n 's and b o y s '
Men’ s and b o y s '

71.89
70.41
71.19
49.(XL
85.98

74.89
73.42
74.40
49.25

72.36
73.35
74.15

39.5
38.9
38.9
40.5
36.9

40.7
39.9
40.0
40.7
39.1

40.2
40.3
40.3
41.4
39.2

1.82

1.21
2.33

1.84
1.84
1.86
1.21
2.35

75.79
77.46
72.57
57.31
58.29

77.71
77.46
78.34
57.08
57.49
63.14

74.34
73-53
74.52
57.53
57.40
60.53

40.1
41.2

38.6

39.8
40.2
40.3

40.9
41.2
40.8
40.2
40.2
41.0

40.4
40.4
40.5
40.8
41.0
40.9

I .89
1.88
1.88
1.44
1.45
1.53

1.90
1.88
1.92
1.42
1.43
1.54

68.03
64.52

69.08

58.07
68.22
76.55

58.80

H o u s e h o ld a p p a r e l . . . ...............................................
W om en's, c h i l d r e n ' s u n d e r g a r m e n t s ...............
U n d e rw e a r and n i g h t w e a r , ' e x c e p t c o r s e t s .
C o r s e t s and a l l i e d g a r m e n t s ..............................

M is c e lla n e o u s a p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r i e s . . . .
O th e r f a b r i c a t e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s .................
C u r t a i n s , d r a p e r i e s , and o t h e r h o u s e -

54.58
45.06
75.12
48.01
46.46
51.62
60.I6
52.44
50.04
57.15
48.34
59.35

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE).............................

M illw o r k ,

p ly w o o d ,

and p r e f a b r i c a t e d

M ill w o r k .......................................................................... ..

Wooden b o x e s ,

o t h e r t h a n c i g a r ......................

61.66

91.89

44.89

46.75
39.96
57.40
53.48
43.88
73.03
46.41
44.63

50.69

49.68
92.51

36.6

36.6
36.5
35.0
33.9
35.2
35-6

36.1

36.3
35.6
35.6

38.0
36.0

1.28

1.29
1*18
1.68
1.6l

1.28

1.28

1.81

1.83

July
1956

1.26

1.25
1.24

1.16
1.62

1.11
1.64
1.55
1.25
2.04
1.30
1.25
1.42
1.72
1.34
1.33
1.42

1.27
1.30

1.28

1.50

1.47

1.26

1.29
1.47
1.43

1.80
1.82

1.84
1.20

2.36
1.84

1.82

1.84
1.41
1.40
1.48

39-7
39.6

40.2
39.8

1.74

1.74
1.66

71.00

59.20

39.5
37.9
40.5

40.0
38.8
40.3

40.7
37.6
40.2

1.47
1.80

1.89

1.48
1.83
1.91

1.42
1.77

76.97

57.79
66.55
72.36

63.18

77.22
64.94

38.6

85.69

40.5
36.7

39.6
41.1
37.5

41.4
41.6
41.0

1.94
1.56
2.15

1.95
1.58
2.15

1.90
1.62

80.63

78.66
67.39

2.09

86.05

84.05

40.0

40.4

41.0

2.14

2.13

2.05

67.72

u p h o ls t e r e d ...

39.1
39.1

68.00

66.26

39.6

40.0

40.9

1.71

1.70

1.62

except

Wood h o u s e h o ld f u r n i t u r e ,

63.68

85.60

Wood h o u s e h o ld f u r n i t u r e ,

67.54

1.68

65.74

78.91

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES..................

O f f i c e , p u b l i c - b u i l d i n g , and p r o f e s s i o n a l
f u r n i t u r e . ........................................................................

P a r t it io n s ,
S cre e n s,

s h e lv in g ,

b lin d s ,

lo c k e r s ,

74.88

and

and m i s c e l l a n e o u s f u r n i -

32




1.65

1.60
1.80

Hours and Earning
Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings o! production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
A v e ra g e w e e k ly
e a r n in g s

July
1957

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS................
P u lp ,

p a p e r,

and p a p e r b o a r d m i l l s ..................

F ib e r ca n s, tu b e s,

and d ru m s ..............................

II

In d u s try

$07.1*
95.70
80.73
80.70
80.77
76.67

I85.67
93.53

80.10
79.V6
8V.87
75.85

A v e ra g e w e e k ly
h o urs

Jtoly

July

June

July

1956
18V .26
93.21
75.62
75.76
75.66
73.87

1957
*2.3
V3.5

1957

1956

July
1957

June
1957

July
1956

V2.2
V3.1
Vl.5
Vl.6

V3.0 $2.06
VV.6 2.20
Vl.l 1.95
VIA
I .94
39.2 2.05
Vl .5
I .87

12.03
2.17
1.93

*1.96
2.09
1.84
1.83
1.93
1.78

Vl.V
VI.6
39.V

Vl.O

M is c e l l a n e o u s p u b l i s h i n g

vi.o

97.71
8V .56
95.OV
97.66
63.96
7V.07

93.80
98.73
95.60
83.81
92.73
96.56
62.69
71.71

38.2
35.V
vo.i
39.V
39*7

38.V
36.0
39.V
39.7

IIO.30

92.25
100.69
98.7V
97.92

99.63

91.88

95.88
100.5*
100.25
8V .32
9V .88
99.15
63.V7
72.96

I n d u s t r i a l i n o r g a n i c c h e m i c a l s .........................

e x c e p t s y n t h e t i c r u b b e r ...............

100.60
105.99
83.02
95.22

Soap,

c le a n in g

and p o l i s h i n g

P a i n t s , p ig m e n t s , and f i l l e r s ...........................
P a i n t s , v a r n i s h e s , l a c q u e r s , and

F e r t i l i z e r s .......................J .............................................
V e g e t a b le o i l s ................................ ............................
A n im a l o i l s and f a t s . . . .......................................
E s s e n t i a l o i l s , p e r fu m e s , c o s m e t i c s ..........
C o m p re s s e d and l i q u i f i e d g a s e s ......................

83.23

o t h e r p e t r o le u m and c o a l p r o d u c t s . .

RUBBER PRODUCTS.........................




82.62

39.5
38.7
38.V

2.14
2.39
2 .5I
1.64
1*90

109.20

38.2

38.3

39.0

2.87

2.88

2.80

87.76
9V.V2
92.92
93.71
93.68
103.75

Vl.2

Vl.2
V0.7
vo.t
Vl.l
V2.2
Vl.5

2.25
2.48
2.45
2.40
2.43
2.63

2.23
2.43
2.39
2.38
2.40

2.13
2.32
2*30

79*20
86.18
78.57

Vl.O
V0.6
V0.3
V0.8
Vl.V
V0.3
V0.3
Vl.V
V0.8
V0.8
V0.9
V1.5

Vl.2
Vl.2
Vl.6

V1.6
V2.8
V1.7
W.l
V2.9
V 5.5
V0.3

Vl.6
V2.2
Vl.8
V3.9
V3.0
V5.0
vo.v

90.69

89.0e
79.61
72.IV
82A 7

88.61

83.63

75.93
90.09

83.82

68.V6
96.33

115.51
99.6V
93- u

58.29

76.83

77.52

56.89
55.9V

78.07
71.06

80.78

73.53
89.55
8V.03
69.V5
96.83

77.70

69.30

77.53
70.36

Vl.O
V0.5

Vl.l
Vl.5
39.8
Vo.5
Vl.2
V0.7

2.34
2.54
2.19

2.34
2.55
2.18

2.14
1.86
1.73
1.87
1.77

2.13
I .85
I .70
1.84
1.71
1.99

Ve.i

Ve.o

V1.6
Vl.V
V2.V

V0.9
V0.9
Vi.o

Vl.8
Vl.5
V3.1

2.79
2.35

85.75
98.lV
71.28
77.78

V1.2
42.1
39.2
VO.8

V0.9
Vl.V

39-7
39.1
39.6
V0.3

2.26
2.61

56.62

38.I
39 .V
V0.8
38.7
37.8

37.8
39.9
V0.2
39.0
37 .V

38.0

1.53
1.95

89.88

IO8.79
II3.70
9V.30

107.01
111.22
92.67

91.21

58.21

VIA

V3.9
V2.0
W.3
V2.9
V6.1
V0.5

73.V9

71.20

5V.05
5V.96

39.5
V0.7

39-3
VO.O
37.8
37.9

2.31

2.69

1.83
2.02

1*90
1.47
1.48

2.28

1.94

2.26

Vi a

1.62
1.82

2.03

2.30
2.04

Vl.6

2.33
2.39

2.05

2.61

2.06

via

2.09

2.22
2 .5O
1.99

39.8
39.9
V0.5

38.3

79.79
65.ll

38.8

77.81
7V.77
57.72
55.73

VO.O
VO.I

1.98
2.08
I .76

86.67

38.9
V1.7

107.23
72.29
81.81

2.43
2.75
2.39

39.8
VO.V
38.7
39.V

91.V9
100.19
86.53

71.7V
82.V2

L e a t h e r : t a n n e d , c u r r i e d , and f i n i s h e d . . .
I n d u s t r i a l l e a t h e r b e l t i n g and p a c k i n g . . .
B o o t and sh o e c u t s t o c k and f i n d i n g s ..........

97.82
99.60
103.88
83.03
93.9V

2 .5I
2 . 6k
2*50

2.07
1.85

39.6
39.7
38.3
39.V

96.VI
105.06

109.68
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS.............

96.80

38.6
35-9

1.91

2 .5I
2.86
2.48
2.13
2.40
2.46
1.67
1.88

95.V7
103.89
90.89

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL........... III .90
Coke,

96.38

102.96

and p r i n t i n g

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS............

P la s t ic s ,

Vl.O

109.63

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES...... .......................

A v e ra g e h o u r l y
e a r n in g s

2.08

1.79
2.30

2.16

2.21
2.42

2.08
2.02
1.77
I .65
1.75
1.64
1.88
1.97
I .70
2.14

2.66
2.78

2.56
2.68
2.15

2.23
2.59
1.83
2.01

2.16
2.51
I .80

I .54
1.95
1.86
1.48
1.49

1.49
1.87
1.78
1.43
1.45

2.30

1.93

Hours and Earnings
Table C-l: Hours f id gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
Industry

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS - Continued
Handbags and small leather goods........
Gloves and miscellaneous leather goods...

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........
Flat glass...............................
Glass and glassware, pressed or blown....
Glass containers........................
Pressed and blown glass................
Glass products made of purchased glass...
Brick and hollow tile..................
Sewer pipe..............................
Clay refractories.......................
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products...
Concrete products.......................
Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral
products................................
Abrasive products.......................
Asbestos products.......................
Nonclay refractories...................

Average weekly
earnings

Average weekly
hours

July
1957

June
1957

July
1956

July

$62.96
53.08
*9.18

163.50
52.82
50.01

$61.69
50.09
47.82

40.1

82.62
110.48
83.79
8V .56
82.41
69.17
82.72
75.95
71.55
76.21
75.58

83.44
108.90
84.02

112.06

71.68
84.20
71.51

72.07
85.55
83.59
72.22

85.81
89.67

87.7*
91.71

85.36

80.91

85.65

80.77

81.00

83.63

81.40

75.66

86.51
75.7*
71.55
76.80
73.51

87.78
73.80
71.99
74.52
76.59
74.77

69.42

83.28

67.20

69.26

82.70
81.07

69.63

June
1957

July
1956

37.6
35.9

39.2
37.2
36.5

38.8
37.1
36.5

40.3
39.6
39*9
39.7
40.2
39-3
37-6
40.4
41.6
39.9
40.2
38.8
36.2
43.4
*3-5
40.4

40.9
39.6
40.2
40.4
39.9
39.0
41.0
40.5
41.6
40.0
39.1
39.1
36.4
44.1
44.7
40.8

41.0
41.2
39-9
40.4

40.1
39*5
41.9

1957

Average hourly
earnings

July
1957

June
1957

July
1956

n . 5 7 $1.62
1.41 1.42
1.37 1.37

$1.59
1.35
1.31

2.04
2.75
2.09
2.12
2.04

1.97
2*72
2.03
2.07
1.95
1.68
2.10

41.2

2.05
2.79
2*10
2.13
2.05
1.76
2*20
1*88
1.72
1.91
1.88
2.20
1.98
1.94
1.86
1.77

39-8
39.6
40.7
33.0

2.14
2.27
2.15
2.37

2.27

36.1

41.0
40.4
42.8
37.8

2.35

2.03
2.21
2.02
2.23

38.8

40.0
41.8
41.0
42.6
40.5
41.4
37.2
35.7
44.7

45.8

1.78

2 .11
1.87
1.72
1.92
1.88
2.13
1.98
1.94
1.87
1.77
2.14

1.80
1.69

1.84

1.85

2.01
1.94
1.85
1.77
I .69

Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling
mills, except electrometallurgical
Electrometallurgical products..........
Iron and steel foundries................
Gray-iron foundries.....................
Steel foundries.........................
Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals.......................
Primary smelting and refining of
Secondary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals.......................
Rolling, drawing and alloying of
nonferrous metals.......................
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of

100.55

99.70

91.88

39.9

40.2

40.3

2.^2

2.48

2.28

107.86

104.67

96.47

39.8

39.8

38.9

2.71

2.63

2 .48

108.26

105.07

95.2*

38.9
38.7
40.7
40.2
39*8
42.0

2.64
2.30
2.23

84.89
96.41

39.8
40.0
39.7
39.1
39.3
41.2

2*22

85.24

39-8
38.9
39.5
39.1
39.0
40.7

2.72

87.69
85.24
83.85

97.25
85.53
85.47
82.41
81.19
93.66

2.15
2.34

2.34

2.50
2.21
2.10
2.05
2.04
2.23

96.05

95.53

93.18

40.7

41.0

41.6

2.36

2.33

2.24

90.83
102.82

92.42
9*.5*

40.8
.40.5

41.1
40.8

42.2
40.4

2.25
2.51

2.21

101.66

2.52

2.19
2.34

86.27

86.71

83.21

40.5

40.9

41.4

2.13

2.12

2.01

94.24

95.88

89.91

40.1

40.8

40.5

2.35

2.35

2.22

94.00

97.11

90.32

40.0

41.5

40.5

2.35

2.34

2.23

94.87
91.77

Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling

92.88
88.83

91.80

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES................

85.56

80.79
87.52
82.21
73-59

94.40

89.24

40.2
39-9
40.7
41.0
39.8
41.6

40.0
40.3
41.4
41.5
41.2
42.0

40.2
40.7
41.2
41.1
41.6
41.3

2.36
2.30
2.49
2.59
2.36
2*50

2.36

2.22
2.19
2.35
2.48
2.25

90.09

92.58

Miscellaneous primary metal industries... 101.34

106.19

Welded and he&vy-riveted pipe..........

34




93.93
104.00

92.00
88.53

91.88
102.67

107.90
97.23
104.58

89.13
96.82

101.93
93.60

94.16

2.38

2.18

2.17

2.18
2.16

2.28

2.48

2.60
2.36
2.49

2.28

Hours and Earnings
Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
A v e ra g e w e e k ly
e a r n in g s

In d u s t r y

Jtily
1957

A v e ra g e w e e k ly
h o u rs

A v e ra g e h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

June
1957

July
1956

July
1957

June
1957

July
1956

July
1957

June
1957

July
1955

♦89**0

40.8
43.5
39.9
40.0

40.7
42.9
40.0
40.3
40.1
39.8

$2.17

$2.05

40.4

*1.2
*2.2
*0.3
40.2
39.7
40.6

$2.18

8*.63
7*.77
82.97

♦83.**
93.52
79.20
71.33
79.80
80.79

1.84
2.09
2.19

2.09
2.17

1.98
1.77
1.99
2.03

85.53

81.90

83.77
85-97

78.39

80.89

39.0
38.7

39.7
38.9

39.0
37.8

2.10
2.21

2.11
2.21

2.14

80.16

82.80
93.68

77.03
85.*9

39.1
41.9

40.0
42.2

39.5
41.1

2.05
2.24

2.07
2.22

2.08

95.79

95.67

85**9

42.2

42*9

41.3

2.27

2.23

2.07

82.21

41.3
41.8
41.5
40.0
42.4
40.1
39.7
39.8
41.4

41.4
41.6
42.0
40.9
38.9
41.2
39.4
40.4
41.6

40.3
40.5
42.0
40.8
40.2
41.2
40.0
40.4
41.5

2.22
2.27
2.22
1.74
2.31
2.01
2.05

2.18

2.16

2.23
1.77
2.33
2.00
2.04
2.14

2.04
2.10
2.13
2.11
1.67
2.21
1.89
1.91
2.03

107.87
88.07

87.36

83.23
82.60

42.7
40.3
41.3
41.3

43.5
41.5
41.2
41.6

46.1
40.4
41.0
41.3

2.42
2.35
2.19
2.10

2.38
2.36
2.18
2.10

2.03
2.00

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORDNANCE,
MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT). *88.9*
T i n c a n s and o t h e r t i n w a r e ...................... ..
C u t l e r y , h and t o o l s , and h a r d w a r e ..................
C u t l e r y and ed g e t o o l s ..........................................
H a rd w a re ............................................................................
H e a lin g a p p a r a t u s ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c ) and
S a n i t a r y w are and p lu m b e r s ' s u p p l i e s . . . .
O i l b u r n e r s , n o n e l e c t r i c h e a t in g and
c o o k in g a p p a r a t u s , n o t e ls e w h e r e
F a b r i c a t e d s t r u c t u r a l m e ta l p r o d u c t s ..........
S t r u c t u r a l s t e e l and o rn a m e n ta l m e ta l
M e ta l d o o r s ,

sash ,

f r a m e s , m o ld in g ,

and

102.66
8*.19
73.60

80.67
88.1)8

93.86

90.03

S h e e t - m e t a l w o rk ......................................................
M e ta l s t a m p in g , c o a t in g , and e n g r a v i n g . . .
Stam p e d and p r e s s e d m e ta l p r o d u c t s .............

M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r i c a t e d m e ta l p r o d u c t s . .
M e ta l s h ip p in g b a r r e l s , d ru m s, k e g s ,

92.80

9*.21

88.80

73.78
92.63
79.80
81.59
89.te
1Q3.33
9*.71
90.*5
86.73

97.90

88.10

90.25

91.10

85.05

68.85
96.00

67.13
91.05
75.60
77.16

9*.92
91.21
78.80

82.te
89.02
103.53
97.9*

89.82

89.*6
86.09

8*.25

38.6

2*36
2.11

2.18

2.32
2.10
1.86

2.19

2.26

2.18

2.01

1.95

2.34

2.18

2.20

101.60

9**53

91.96
93.9*

40.7
40.6

41.1
41.3

41.8
41.2

2.30
2.47

2.30
2.46

2.28

U* . 7 0

U2.99

97.11

42.8

42.8

41.5

2.68

2.64

2.34

96.87

91.60

85.I*

93.52

39.6
39.8
39.4

40.7
40.0
39.5

41.2
39.6
40.2

2.29
2.34

2.37

2.38
2.29
2.33

2.27
2.15
2.20

89.87
91.71

90.72
93-3*

40.3
40.4

40.5
41.3

38.9
41.8

2.23
2.27

2.24

89.*5

2.09
2.14

91.20

92.89
93.60

108.68

40.0
41.2
42.5
41.3

41.1
41.6
43.3
42.5

41.0
43.6
44.6
45.1

2.25

102.00

92.87
107.*9
103.28

100.26

E n g in e s and t u r b i n e s .................................................
Stea m e n g in e s , t u r b i n e s , and w a te r

100.28

93.85
91.1*
92.20

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)............

99.25
116.33

96.73
U*.30

41.6
43.6

41.7
44.4

42.8
45.0

2.41

2.38

2.60

2.62

89.82
91.88

89.6*

89.*6

41.2
41.2
40.7
43.5
41.3

41.5
41.3
40.8
44.0
41.1

42.4
42.1
40*9
46.4
44.2

2.18

93-61

D i e s e l and o t h e r i n t e r n a l- c o m b u s t io n

A g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h in e r y ( e x c e p t
C o n s t r u c t i o n and m in in g m a c h in e r y ..................
C o n s t r u c t i o n and m in in g m a c h in e r y ,
e x c e p t f o r o i l f i e l d s ..........................................

92.70
106.25
97.88

92.0*

88.**

81.30

88.15

M e ta lw o r k in g m a c h in e r y (e x c e p t m a ch in e

113.36
S p e c i a l - i n d u s t r y m a c h in e r y ( e x c e p t m e t a l-

P a p e r - i n d u s t r i e s m a c h in e r y ................................
P r i n t i n g - t r a d e s m a c h in e r y and e q u ip m e n t.




77.7*
93.09
99.12

91.69
77.93
9*.l6
97.82

90.9*
75.67
96.98
10*.75

2.28
2.50

2.37

2.23
1.91
2.14
2.40

2.26
2.26

2.25
2.51
2.40

2.16

2.22
1.91
2.14
2.38

2.15
2.13
2.41
2.29

2.26

2.54

2.11

2.16

1.85
2.09
2.37

35

Table C-1: Hours and gross oarnings of production workers
or nonsup«rvisory employees - Continued
A v e ra g e w e e k ly
e a r n in g s
Ju n e
J u ly
J u ly

1957

In d u s try

1957

1956

$92.39
88.44
97.9*

$9 2. 48
9 0 . 39
9 6.93
87 .72
90.50
94 .12

$ 90.27

Average weekly

Average hourly
earnings

J u ly

h o urs
Jun e

J u ly

J u ly

Ju n e

J u ly

1957

1957

1956

1957

1957

19 56

40.7
40.2
41.5
39.7
40 .0
40.8

41.1
40.9
41.6
40.8
40.4
41. 1

41.6
41.2
42.0
41.7
39.*
41.8

$2 .27
2. 2 0
2.19
2.27
2.31

$2 .2 5
2.21
2.33
2. 15
2. 2 4
2.29

$2.17
2. 1 2
2 .27
2.10
2.13
2.19

40.4
39.9
40.8
38 .4
39-*
40.4

41.9

2.28

2.26

4o.o
38.9
39.3
39-*

40.8
41 .4
42.4
40.5
40.3
40 .1

2.25
2.42
1.90
2.23

2.27
2.44
1.93
2. 19
2.24

2.18
2.21
2.34
1.99
2. 12
2.17

42.0
40.3

39.5
40.1

41.1
42 .5

2. 24

2. 0 2
2.2 3

1.9 6
2.20

39 .1
40.7
40.5
39-5
41 .2

40 .0
41. 0
40 .1
40 .1
41 .9

2.21
2. 25
2.23
2. 2 4

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL) - Continued
Pum ps, a i r and g a s c o m p r e s s o r s ......................
C o n v e y o r s and c o n v e y in g e q u ip m e n t...............
B lo w e r s , e x h a u s t and v e n t i l a t i n g f a n s . . .
I n d u s t r i a l t r u c k s , t r a c t o r s , e t c .................
M e c h a n ic a l p o w e r - t r a n s m is s io n e q u ip m e n t.
M e c h a n ic a l s t o k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l
f u r n a c e s and o v e n s .................................................
O f f i c e and s t o r e m a c h in e s and d e v i c e s . . . .
C o m p u tin g m a c h in e s and c a s h r e g i s t e r s . . .
S e r v i c e - r i n d u s t r y and h o u s e h o ld m a c h in e s ..
C o m m e rc ia l l a u n d r y , d r y - c l e a n i n g ,

and

86.94
90.80
9*.25
92.11
89.78
98.74
72.96

85.89
90.09

94.69
89.89
97.60
7 5 . 08
86.07

88.26

87.34
95.34
87.57
83.92
91.54
88.94
91.*9
99-22

80.60
85 . 4 4

87.02

39.6

86.52
S e w in g m a c h in e s ..................................... .....................
R e f r i g e r a t o r s and a i r - c o n d i t i o n i n g
M is c e lla n e o u s m a c h in e r y p a r t s . ...............
F a b r i c a t e d p i p e , f i t t i n g s , and v a l v e s . . .
B a l l and r o l l e r b e a r i n g s .....................................
M a ch in e s h o p s ( J o b and r e p a i r ) . . . . . . . . . .

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY....................
E l e c t r i c a l g e n e r a t in g , t r a n s m is s io n ,
d i s t r i b u t i o n , and i n d u s t r i a l a p p a r a t u s . .
W ir in g d e v i c e s and s u p p l i e s . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C a rb o n and g r a p h it e p r o d u c t s
( e l e c t r i c a l ) ................................................................
E l e c t r i c a l i n d i c a t i n g , m e a s u r in g , and
r e c o r d i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ...................... ................ ..
M o to r s , g e n e r a t o r s , and m o t o r - g e n e r a t o r
Pow er and d i s t r i b u t i o n t r a n s f o r m e r s ..........
S w i t c h g e a r , s w it c h b o a r d , and i n d u s t r i a l
c o n t r o l s .........................................................................
E l e c t r i c a l w e ld in g a p p a r a t u s ...........................
I n s u l a t e d w ir e and c a b l e .......................................
E l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t f o r v e h i c l e s .................
E l e c t r i c la m p s ................................................................
C o m m u n ic a tio n e q u ip m e n t..........................................
R a d io s , p h o n o g ra p h s, t e le v i s i o n s e t s ,
and e q u i p m e n t . . ........................................................ i

79 -7 9

80.56

90.27

89.42

93 . 5 0

85. 41
91. 30

84 . 8 0
87 .33

89.95
92.39

86.41
91.58
90 .3 2
88.48
93.11

89. 2 5

39.0
40.4
40.2
39.8
40.7

81.18

83 .02

79.**0

39-6

40.3

88.48
76. 44

89 .13
7 7 . 41

86.73
75 . 5 5

40 .4
39.2

84.77

8 4.23

84.66

80.00

83 .03

94.89
93.43
92.25
91.48
81.87
83.84
85.97
7*.67
75.85

89.65

2.26

40 .1

2.05

2.06

1.98

40 .7
39-9

41.3
40 .4

2.19
1.95

2. 19
1. 9 4

2.10
1.87

39.8

40.3

40. 7

2.13

2.09

2.08

78.39

3 9.8

40.9

40.2

2.01

2.03

1.95

93 .79
92.80

90 . 0 1
93.72

40.9
40.8

40 .6
40.7

4 1. 1
42 .6

2.32
2.29

2. 3 1

2.19
2. 2 0

93.15
9 9 .53

90.29
102.56
81. 1 3

41.0
39-6
41.1
38.9
39.3
39.1

4 1.8
4 4.4
3 9.6
41.7
3 9. *
39 .5
39.2

2.25
2.3 1
2. 1 1
2.0 4
2. 2 1

2.25
2 .3 2
2.13
2.0 4
2.20

2.16

82.98
81.56

41.4
42.9
38.7
42.2
38.9
39 .*
40.4

1.90

1.92

1.81

1.94

1.97

1.87

1. 9 1

1.83
1. 7 1

2 .29
2.00
2.2 3
I .69
2.21

2.16

82.43
86.09
85.58
7 5 .65
7 9 .5 9

71 . 5 0
73 . 3 0
72 . 8 3

86.36
80.20
87.86

94.81

M is c e lla n e o u s e l e c t r i c a l p r o d u c t s .................
P r im a r y b a t t e r i e s ( d r y and w e t ) ....................
X - r a y and n o n - r a d i o e l e c t r o n i c t u b e s . . . .

66.59
93.34

67.43

84.8 9
76. 57
83.77
6 3 . 20

09.06

86.67

t e le g r a p h ,

3
6



2.06

2.27

85.81
85.01

7 6.97
7 1 . 89

T e le p h o n e ,

2.18

2. 12
2.13
2.14
2. 1 2
2.13

75.05

67.86

2.36

63.61

38.8

2.23

2.26

39.5
37.7

40.3
39 .5

39 .8
37 .2

1.90
1.80

38.9
40.3
3 9. *
39 .*
41.3

41.4
40 .4
40.1
39.9
40.3

39.3
40.3
39.7
40.0
40 .5

2.22
1.99
2.23
I .69

and r e l a t e d

80.80
89.42

2.19

2.26

2.26

2.28

1.82

2. 3 1
2. 0 5
1.99
2. 07

1. 9 0
2.11
1.58
2.14

Hours ami Kirnmgs
Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
A v e ra g e w e e k ly
e a r n in g s

96.08
M o tor v e h i c l e s ,

b o d ie s ,

p a rts,

85.20

( t r u c k and a u t o m o b i l e ) ....................

81.14

94.94
A i r c r a f t e n g in e s and p a r t s ................................

93.13
96.05

96.76
O th e r a i r c r a f t p a r t s and e q u ip m e n t ; ..........
S h ip and b o a t b u i l d i n g and r e p a i r i n g ..........

R a i l r o a d e q u ip m e n t......................................................
L o c o m o t iv e s and p a r t s .............................................
R a i l r o a d and s t r e e t c a r s .....................................

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS.........
La b o ra to ry ,

s c ie n t if ic ,

97.42

June
1957
40.1
39.6

July

July
1957
40.8 $2.41
39-9 2.47

June
1957
$2.40
2.46

July
1956
$2.30

39.6
39.5
40.1
40.6
39-9
41.0
40.9
42.4
40.4
40.4
41.0
39.8
40.5
39.5
40.1

39.9
39.9
39-7
41.9
41.7
42.2
42.6
42.3
40.0
40.1
39-*
40.5
42.8
39.*
40.0

2.50
2.13
2.07
2.35
2.34
2.36
2.36
2.37
2.40
2.45
1.97
2.53
2.52
2.53
2.03

2.49
2.11
2.07
2.3*
2.33

2.35
2.02
2.04
2.29
2.29

78.00

40.0
39.2
40.4
39.8
40.7
41.0
41.8
40.4
40.4
40.1
40.2
40.7
40.0
39.0

2.35
2.36
2.38
2.45
1.92
2.49
2.53
2.48
2.03

2.29
2.24
2.30
1.84
2.37
2.36
2.37
1.95

$93.84
92.57

and

97.25
T r a ile r s

June

1957
$96.24

.
.

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.................

July
1957
195-68

A v e ra g e h o u r l y
e a r n in g s

11

In d u s try

A v e ra g e w e e k ly
h o urs

and e n g in e e r in g

99.07

96.96
98.98

79.00
101.71

98.60

83.35
83.01
95.00
92.97
96.76

96.12
100.06
96.15

98.98

93.77
80.60
80.99
95-95
95.*9

96.22
97.13

96.87
89.60

92.23
72.50
95.99
101.01
93.38

July

1957
39.7
38.9
38.9

1956

2.36

2.32

2.28
2.28

101.20
79.17

78.72
99.10
102.47
97.96
81.40

84.61

85.46

81.81

40.1

40.5

40.5

2.11

2.11

2.02

102.56

95.04

96.05

95.*0

40.1

40.7

42.4

2.37

2.36

2.25

M e c h a n ic a l m e a s u r in g and c o n t r o l l i n g
in s t r u m e n t s .....................................................................
O p t i c a l in s t r u m e n t s and l e n s e s .........................
S u r g i c a l , m e d ic a l, ana d e n t a l i n s t r u -

85.65
85.63

86.69

81.80
83.02

40.4
40.2

40.7
40.3

40.1
40.3

2.12
2.13

2.13
2.13

2.04

O p h t h a lm ic g o o d s ...........................................................
P h o t o g r a p h ic a p p a r a t u s ............................................

74.59
68.00
93.79
70.05

75.30
67.5*
9**71
72.15

70.75
64.80

40.1
40.0
40.6
38.7

40.7
40.2
41.0
39.0

40.2
40.0
40.9
38.7

1.86
1.70
2.31
1.81

I .85
1.68
2.31

1.76
1.62

71.31
72.40
67.49
81.61
70.95
64.08

71.82
74.34
70.88

68.90

39-6
39.8
39.*
40.6
40.7
38.8

1.80

81.20
79.37

39-9
40.4
40.5
40.1
40.0
38.9

1.81
1.81

80.20
82.00
64.96

39-*
40.0
39.7
40.6
35-3
38.6

1.84
1.75
2.00
2.05
1.67

1.74
1.76
1.65
2.00
1.95
1.58

61.99
68.46
65.74
64.35

62.53
69.3*
68.64

61.23

38.5
38.9
38.9
39.0
41.6
39.1

38.6

39.0
38.4
40.2
38.3
41.0
39-5

1.61
1.76
1.69
1.65

1.62

1.57

39.*
41.1
38.9
40.9
40.1

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES....
J e w e l r y and f i n d i n g s ...............................................
S il v e r w a r e and p l a t e d w a re ................................
M u s ic a l in s t r u m e n t s and p a r t s ...........................
T o y s and s p o r t i n g g o o d s ..........................................
Gam es, t o y s , d o l l s , and c i h i l d r e n ' s
v e h i c l e s ..........................................................................
S p o r t i n g and a t h l e t i c g o o d s ..............................
P e n s , p e n c i l s , o t h e r o f f i c e s u p p l i e s ..........
C o stum e j e w e l r y , b u t t o n s , n o t i o n s .................
F a b r i c a t e d p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s ..............................




80.29

7*.29

85.84

63.41
78.12
75.39

91.62
70.05

70.05

65.01
61.30

61.82
65.93
60.13
74.21
73.87

1.70
2.01
2.01
1.66

1.93

1.90

1.85

1.76
1.67
1.63
1.91
1.88

2.06

2.24
1.81

1.61

1.64
1.57
1.81

1.87

37

liui i

Tabl* C-1: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsup«rvisory employees - Continued
Industry

Average weekly
earnings
July
June

W 7

1957

1956

Average weekly
hours
July
June
July

1957

1957

1956

$85.67
85.73

8 »

(1/)
44.1

Average ho.urly
earnings
June
Jul y
Jttljr

1957

1957

1956

40.6
43.3

(1/)
$2.05

(1/)
$2704

$2.11
1.98

TRANSPORTATION AMD PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S :

TRANSPORTATION:
Class I r a i l r o a d s ......................

$89.59
COMMUNICATION:
T e l e p h o n e..................................
Switchboard operating employees 2/...
Line construction, installation, and
maintenance employees 3 / .............
Telegraph ¿ J ...............................

1.86

76.2*
63.5*

76.44
63.21

74.21
61.34

39.3
37.6

39-2
37>

39-9
38.1

1 .9*
1.69

1.95

1.69

1.61

102.72

88.62

103.20
88.62

102.75
85.24

42*8
42.2

43.0
42.2

44.1
42.2

2.40
2.10

2.40

2.10

2.33
2.02

96.17
98.41
91.13

95.30
98.59

41.1
41.7
40.5

40.9
41.6
40.1

41.4
*1.9
40.6

2.34
2.36
2.25

2.33

2.23

89.42

92.32
9*.69
86.48

2.37

2.23

2.13

96.93

96.05

93.56

40.9

40.7

41.4

2.37

2.36

2.26

85.05

84.82

82.22

40.5

40.2

40.5

2.10

2.11

2.03

64.46
*5-9*

63.41
45.75

62.17
**.73

34.8

38.6

38.2
34.4

39.1
35.5

1.67
1.32

1.66
1.33

1.59

65.62

34.9
37.1
*3.9
35.0

36.0
38.6

43.9
35-3

1.47
1.78
1.93
1.42

1.47
1.77
1.94
1.43

1.39
1.70
1.89
1.37

1.71
1.78

1.71
1.78

1.67
1.72

OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES:
Gas and electric u t i l i t i e s...............
Electric light and power u t i lities.....
Gas u t i l i t i e s ............. ................
Electric light and gas utilities com­
b i n e d ......................................

2.26

WHOLESALE AMD RETAIL TRADE:

WHOLESALE TtAtf....... .................
RETAIL TRADE (EXCEPT FATINI AH» ORINKING
PLACES)...............................
General merchandise s t o r e s ...............
Department stores and general mailFood and liqiKTT » tor««...* ................
A utomotive and accessories d e a l e r s ......
Apparel and accessories s t o r e s ...........
Other retail trade:
Furniture and appliance s t o r e s .........
Lumber and hardware supply stores ......

84.73
50.13

85.17
50.05

82.97
48.36

35.0
37.8
43.9
35.3

70.62
75.83

71.65
75.65

69.97
7*.30

41.3
42.6

41.9
42.5

41.9
43.2

62.11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

51.*5

67.28

51.30

65.67

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE:
Banks and trust c ompanie s . . . . . ..........
S e c u r i t y dealers and e x c h a n g e s ...........
Insurance c a r r i e r s .........................

64.26
100.51

63.80

50.04

1.26

80.62

100.13
80.95

9*.75
78.32

43.93

43.42

42.23

40.3

40.2

41.0

1.09

1.08

1.03

43,38

44.04
52.40

42.42
*9.90

39.8

40.4
39.6

1.09
1.30

I .05

38.2

40.4
40.0

1.09

49.66
100.27

101.03

90.20

-

-

-

-

-

-

SERVICE AMD MISCELLANEOUS:
Hotels and lodging places:
Personal services:
L a u n d r i e s..................................
Cleaning and dyeing p l a n t s ..............
Motion pictures:
Motion-picture p roduction and distri-

1.31

1.26
-

l / Not available.
2 / Da ta relate to employees in such occupations in the telephone industry as switchboard operators; service a s ­
sistants; operating r o o m instructors ; and pay-station attendants. D u r i n g 1956 such employees made up 4 0 percent of
the total num be r of nonsup er vis or y employees in telephone establishments reporting hours and earnings data.
3/ Da t a relate to employees in such occupations in the telephone industry as central office craftsmen; instal­
latio n and exchange rep air craftsmen; line, cable, and conduit craftsmen; and laborers. D u rin g 1956 such employees
made up 27 percent of the total number of nonsupervisory employees in telephone establishments reporting hours and
earnings data.
k/ Data relate to do mestic employees except messengers and those compensated entirely on a commission basis.
5/ Mon ey payments only; additional value of board, room, uniforms, and tips, not included.




Adjusted Earnings
Table C-2: Gross average weekly earnings of production workers
in selected industries, in current and 1947-49 dollars

Year

B it u m in o u s -c o a l
L a u n d r ie s
m in in g
C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9 C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9 C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9
M a n u f a c t u r in g

Annual
a v e ra g e :

Year
and
m onth

B i t u m in o u s - c o a l
L a u n d r ie s
m in in g
C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9 C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9 C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9
M a n u fa c t u r in g

M o n th ly
d a ta :

$23.86 **0.17 *23.88 **0.20 ♦17 .6* *29.70 1956
25.20 *2.07 2* .71 *1.25 17.93 29.93 J u l y . . . . $78.60 $ 67.18 $ 102.16 $87.32 $42.42 $ 36.26
29.58 *7.03 30.86 *9.06 18.69 29.71
102.49 87.75
41.90
68.31
79.79
35.87
36.65 52.58 35.02 50.2* 20.3* 29.18 Sept.... 81.81 69.86 106.12 90.62 42.61 36.39
58.30 *1.62
23.08 31.19
* 3 .1*
82.21
110.38 93.78 42.61
36.20
69.85
* 6.08 61.28 51.27
68.18 25.95 3*.51
82.22
69.80
106.79 90.65 42.29 35-90
36.06
**.39 57.72 52.25 #.9 5 27.73
8*.05 71.23
36.36
115.33 97.74 42.91
*3.82 52.5* 58.03 69.56 30.20 36.21
*9.97 52.32 66.59 69.73 32.71 3*.25 1937
5*.l* 52 .61 72.12 70.16 3*.23
33.30
82.41
110.63 93.60 42.59 36.03
69.72
112.51 94.79 42.59 35-88
Feb.... 82.41
69.43
82.21
69.14
109.58 92.16 42.69 35-90
19*9...., 5*-92 53.95 63.28 62.16 3*.98 3*.36
68.*3 35.*7 3*.50
1950.... 59.33 57.71 70.35
111.74 93-66 43.20 36.21
81.59
68.39
58.30 77.79 70.08 37.81 3*.06
68.38
81.78
107.76 90.10 43.93
1951.... 6* .71
36.73
1952....- tfr.97 59.89 78.09 68.80 38.63 3*.0* J u n e . . . . 82.80
114.68 95-41
44.04
36.64
68.89
71.69 62.67 85.31 7*.57 39.69 3*.69
1953....
71.86 62.60 80.85 70.*3 *0.10 3*.93 J u l y . . . . 82.18
112.73 93.32 43.38
195*....
68.03
35-91
96.26
84.07
*0.70
66.83
1955.... 76.52
35-55
1956....J 79-99
68.8* 106.22
* 2.32
36.42
91.*1

1939....
19*0.....
19*1....
19*2....
19*3....
19**....
19*5....
19*6....
19*7....
19H8..........

Table C-3: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable, of production workers
in manufacturing, in current and 1947-49 dollars
Year

G ro s s a v e ra ge
N e t s p e n d a b le
a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s
w e e k ly e a r n i n g s
W o rke r w it h
W o rk e r w ith
In d e x
no d e p e n d e n ts
3 d e p e n d e n ts
Am ount ( 1 9 4 7 - 4 9
C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9 C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9
= 100)
•

Annual
a v e ra ge :

N et s p e n d a b le
G ro ss av e ra ge
a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s
w e e k ly e a r n in g s
In d e x
W orker w it h
W o rke r w it h
3 d e p e n d e n ts
no d e p e n d e n ts
Amount (1 9 4 7 - 4 9
C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9 C u r r e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9
= 100)

M o n th ly
d a ta :

*23.86
193 9
194 0 j 25.20 i
19*1.... 29.58
19*2.... 36.65
19*3.... * 3 .1*
19**.... *6.08
19*5.... **.39
19*6.... * 3.82
19*7.... *9.97
19W .... 5*.l*
19*9.... 5*.92
1950.... 59.33
1951.... 64.71
1952.... 6 7 .9 1
1953.... 71.69
195*.... 71.66
76.52
195 5

195 6

Year
and
m onth

79.99




*5.1
*7.6

55.9
69.2
81.5
87.0
83.8
82.8
9*.*
102.2
103.7
112.0
122.2

128.*
135.*
135.7

144.5
151.1

*23.58 *39.70 *23.62 *39.76 1956
2*.69 *1.22 2*.9J; *1.65 J u l y . . . . $78.60
28.05 **.59 29.28 *6.55 A u g .......... 79.79
31.T7 *5.58 36.26 52.05 S e p t . . . . 81.81
36.01 *8.66 *1.39 55.93
82.21
82.22
38.29 50.92 **.06 58.59
*8.08 *2 .7 * 55.58
36.97
84.05
37.72 *5.23 *3.20 51.80
* 2.76 **.77 *8 .2* 50.51 1937
*7.*3 *6.1* 53.17 51.72
82 .41
*8.09
51.09
5*.0*
55.66
58.5*
59.55

*7.2*
*9.70
*8.68
*9.0*
51.17
51.87

53.83 • 52.88
57.21 55.65
61.28 55.21
63.62 56.05
66.58 58.20
66.78 58.17

63.15

55.15

70.45
73.22

65.86

56.68

148.4
150.7
154.5
155.3
155.3
158.7

$ 64.78

$55-37

65.71
67.30
67.62
67.63
69.10

56.26

58.56

76.54

67.58
67.58
67.42
66.93
67.08
67.90

57.17
56.93

56.49

74.99
74.99
74.82
74.31
74.47
75.31

67.40

55.79

74.80

Ju n e .. . .

82.80

155.6
155.6
155.3
15^.1
154.4
156.4

J u ly ....

82.18

155.2

F e b ..........
A p r ..........

82.41

82.21
81.59

81.78

57.47
57.45
57-41

56.70
56.10

56.09

$ 72.11

73.06
74.70
75.03

75-04

$ 61.63
62.55
63.79
63.75
63.70
64.86
63.44

63.18
62.93

62.29
62.27
62.65
61.92

61.53

63.01

32.

Table C-4s Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding overtime,
of production worker* in manufacturing, by major industry group
Gross average hourly earnings
Major industry group

Average ho urly earnings,
excluding pvertime JLI

1957

1957

July
1956

$1.96

$2.01

$2.01

$1.90

2.19

2.07

2.14

2.13

2.01

2.34

2.33

2.20

2.30

2.28

2.13

1.82

1.84
1.74
2.04
2.1*
8

1.80
1.68

2.28

1.77
1.70
1.96
2.41

1.73
1.63

1.97

1.75
I .69
1.97
2.1 6
*

2.05

2.11

2.10

2.20

1.98

2.23

I .98

2.23

2.30
2.02

2.35

1.74

2.36
2.06
1.76

1.76

1.93
2.23
1.97
1.70

J u ly

Ju n e

1957

1957

1956

MANUFACTURING...........................

$2.07

$2.07

DURABLE GOODS..................................................................

2.20

Lumber and wood products (except

1.74
2.05

2.52
Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and transporta-

J u ly

J u iy

dune

1.88
2.20

Instruments and related p r o d u c t s ........
Miscellaneous m an ufa cturing industries..

2.11
1.81

2.17
2.30
2.06
2.1*
0
2.11
1.80

NONDURABLE GOODS...........................................................

1.90

1.89

1.82

1.84

1.83

1.76

1.92

1.61

1.93
1.58
1.50

1.83
1.51
1.44

1.84
1.57
1 .1*
6

1.85
1.55
*
1 .1 6

1.76
1.49
1 .1 0
*

1.50

1.49
2.03

1.46

1 .1*
8

1 .1 6
*

1.44

1.94

1.85

2.51

2.51
2.23
2.66
2.23
1.54

2.43
2.13

2.I9

2.T7
2.60

2^08

2.18
2.30

2.05
2.41

1.50
Apparel and other finished textile
Paper and allied p r o d u c t s .................
Printing, publishing, and allied

2.06

2.25

2.69
2.26

1.53

1.96

2.56
2.16
1.49

2.01

1.95

2.6l

2.16

1.51

2.02

2.06

2.15
1.52

2.11

2.49
2.09
1.47

JL/ Derived by assuming that the overtime hours shown in table 4 are paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
2J Average hourly earnings, excluding overtime, are not available separately for the printing, publishing, and
allied industries group, as graduated overtime rates are found to an extent likely to make average overtime pay
significantly above time and one-half.
Inclusion of data for the industry in the nondurafcle-goods total has l i t ­
tle effect.

*
0



Man Hour Indexes
Table C-5. Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours
in industrial and constniction activity ^
(1947-49 = 1 0 0 )
Year
and
month
19^7:
1948:
1949:
1950:
1951:
19^2:
1953:
1954:
1955:
1956:

Average..
Average..
Average..
Average*.
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average
A v e ra g e ..
A v e ra g e ..

1956: J u l y ..........
A u g .............
S e p t ..........
O c t .............
N o v .............
D e c .............

TOTAL 2 /

103.6
103.4
93. 0
I O I .5
IO 9.5
IO 9.7
II 3.3
I O I .9
108.4
110.3

105.1
105.*
89.5
91.0
95.0
90.9
87.5

IO 6.8
II 3.2
114.7
I I 5.2
112.6

78.3
86.4

112.5

Manufac­
turing
division

Total:
Durable
goods

Total:
Nondurable
goods

104.8

Contract
Mining
construction
division
division

IO 6 .I
104.1
¿9.7
IO 2.7
II 5.7
II 6.6
125.2
IO 7.5

103.1
102.1
94.7
99.2
99.7

94.6
IO 3.4
102.0
IO 9 .I
124.1
I27.5
I23 .I
II 8.9

108.1

154.6
I 6I.I
160.7
I 57.7

81».7

101.1
108.4
108.4
113.6
101.1

I 25.9
I 38 .O

77 .*
81.1

101.8
108.1
109.9
111.0

103.2
92.0

107.7

A u g .......... ..
S e p t ..........
O c t .............

1957: J a n .............
F e b .............
M a r .. . . . .
A p r. . . . . .

J u l y ..........

92.7
97.5
93.7
91.4

366.3

76.2

360.9

76.3
77.0
80.1
84.0

83.8

I I O .7

93.7

3 1 5 .2

102.9

1956: J u l y ..........

368.7
355-0
371.8
373.6
3 7 1 .9
380.4

355-6
350.9
337-0
333 -9

15^.8

96.7

94.8
99-8
101.1
100.2
97.6
97.4
94.0
94.0
93.7
91.9
91.4
93.2

87.0

106.6

107.8

115.1
II 7.3

II 7.9
II 7.7
II 6.8
II 5 .I
114.0
114.7

108.2

A v e ra g e ..
A v e ra g e ..

91.1
88.8

112.0
119.8
I 23 .O
I 3I.I
141.4

151.5

106.2
IO 8.5

1(13.2
375-3

110.8

88.1

103.3
104.6
92.1
111.5
105.9

97.4
97.2

135.9

107.0
106.9
IO 6.3
104.5
103.7
104.9

Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..

116.3
117.2

98.6

87.7

J u l y ..........

1947:
1948:
1949:
1950:
1951s
1952:
1953s
1954:
1955s
1956:

107.0
102.7
90.3
99.6
102.7
96.9
93.0
84.7

120.2
120.2
122.0

109.9

85.1

Furniture
and fixtures

99.7
93.5

107.6
91.1
107 a
290.*
625.0
798.5
509.7

144.2

106.4
107.2
107.0
106.5
107.0
109.5

Year
and
month

101.2

88.3
86.9
85.2

F e b .............
M a r .............
A p r .............
M a y .............
J u n e ..........

1957: J a n .............

Manufacturing * Durable goods
Lumber and
Ordnance and
wood products
accessories
(except
furniture)

85.3
84. 3
84.0

Manufacturing - Durable goods - Continued
Stone, clay,
Machinery
Fabricated
Primary metal
and glass
(except
metal
industries
products
electrical)
products
106.7
108.3
102.8
105.*
106.6
103.8
106.6
103.9
89.4.
88.0
85.1
93.3
10*. 1
94.0
106.5
102.9
116.9
111.4
115.8
115.7
10fc.6
118.4
112.1
104.3
119.0
106.6
123.*
II 3.9
94.2
99.2
108.8
100.9

107.4

108.2
109.3

101.7
IO 8.3
110.6
111.7
107.3
109.3
102.9
104.0
104.0
102.2
99.7
102.1

106.2

108.1

99.9

1 00.9

105.6

Electrical
machinery
111.1
102 .9

86.0
107.6
123.7
131.2

85.8
81.8

87.8
83.3
Transporta­
tion
equipment
i o e .9
100.9
96.3
106.1
124.5

138.0
158.6

14 7.1
12 3. 1

1 3*.3

110.5

118.0
116.3

106.4
115.6

130.6
138.6

147.2
139.0

108.2
110. 9
10 8.9
111.2
109.3
108.2

74.2
IO 6.7
114.5
II 3.9
II 3.3
II 5.3

106.6
111.6
117.1
121.1
119.7
121.4

112.4
112.5

132.8
138.0
142.0
145.8
145.8
144.7

130.2
128.8

151.6
161.0

103.3
103.2
103.9
104.1
105.4

114.3
111.6

117.2
117.6
116.9
115.5
116.0

114.0
111.4
109.8

1 3 9 .2
138.7
137.2
13 3- 9
132.4
134.5

154.1
153.8
151.3
146.5
142 .9
141.7

112.8

105.9

131.3

135.8

110.1

109.7
108.0

106.6

114.7

114.4
114.0
113.7
117.4
116.3
117.2

116.5

127.6
141.3

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




Jti

Table C-5. Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours
in industrial and construction activity ^ Continued
and
month

1947:
1948:
1949:
1950:
1951:
1952:
1953:
1954:
1955:
1956:

Manufacturing
Instruments
and related
products

Average..
Average..
Average..
Average*.
Average*.
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average*.
Average*.

107.5

103.0

89.5
97.4
117.5
122*7
129.9
115*9
117.5

121*1

(1947-49 = 1 00 )
Durable goods-Con.
Miscellaneous
Food and
kindred
manufacturing
products
industries

104.6
104.2

91*2

101*3
103.1
100*5
109.5

98.8

104.2
105.5
98.4
IO6.2
109.5
112.6

IO3.9

100.0
96.1
95.2
95.9
94.7
93.7
90.5
90.5
90.7

97.7
105.9
103.9

92.4
91.9

75.8
79.0
79.1
80.9
80.8
80.3
77.0
76.9
76.0
74.8
73.7
74.7

102.6

79.2

85.0
80.0
72.0
67.2
70.6
70.2
69.5

72.8

123.3

1957: Jan.....
Feb.....
Mar.....
ADr....*•

121*4
121*5
121*0
120*0
117.1

98.3
99.4
100.5
98.9
98.7

100.0

81*1
86.5

114.3

94.2

92.0

117*0

Year
and
month

99.6
101.6
98.8
103.0
101.9
104.5
106.9
98.8

72.8
94.9
107.6

93.6

109.4
105.6

May*.....

104.5
105.7
89.9

100.1

118*0
123*0
123.8
123.2

105.9
101*0
S*1
89.2
91.2
92.2
90.1
88.5
90.3
85.6

1956: July....
Auff.••.* t
Sept....
Oct......
Ho t ••••••
Dec .....

121*0

Manufacturing - Nondurable goods
Textile-mill Apparel and other
Tobacco
finished textile
products
manufactures
products

102*8

107.8

99.8
92*9
87.9

81*6

79.2

78*8

101.6

96.0
90.7
89.6
78.7
83.1
80.6

104.9
104.5

106.3

104.9
105-5

106.3
106.7
101.6
99.1
99.6

98.6

Manufacturing - Nondurable goods - Continued
Paper and
allied products

1947: Average*.
1948: Average. *
1949: Average*.
1950: Average.*
1951s Average..
1952: Average*.
1953s Average..
1954: Average*.
1955: Average*.
1956: Average..
1956: July....
Au*...*..
Oct ••••*•
Nov.....

ioe.6
ioe.3
95.1
105.4
109-9

105.9
111.6
109.3

Printing, pub­
lishing, and
allied industries

101.4
100.5
98.0

99-5
101.6
ioe.7

105.4

104.7

114.4

116.9

108.7
113.0

116.6

111.0

119.0
118.3
U 7.9

114.7

117.7

119.1
1957: Jan*.....
Feb.....
Mar.....
Apr.....
May.....

116.3
115.8
115.8
115.6

July....

114.2

114.6

116.2

112.9
116.3

115.1

116.8

112.6
112.8

114.5
113.8
112.7
111.6

112.8

Chemicals
and allied
products

Products of
petroleum
and coal

103.5
107.0
107.9

99.0
102.7
98.3
97.3
102.1
98.2
100.9
95.8
94.5
94.6

105.1
105.8
107.5
107.7
107.3
107.9

94.4
96.9
97.8
95.2
95.2
94.6

107.2
106.9
107.3
107.1

93.6
93.8
93.1

103.3
102.6
94.1
97.2
105.5
104.7

108.1

Rubber
products

109.8

102.0
88.1
101.9

108.5

108.4
111.6
96.4
112.4

106.7
101.3
103.9

106.9
110.1

98.8

112.3

Leather and
leather products

105*8
100*8
93.4
97.8
92*1
96.9
96.5
89.9
95.5
94.4
94*2
95-6
91.4

91*2
91.1
93.8

106.1
104*2

9*-7
94.2
95.0

102.7
101.1

94*0
95.9
95.6
90.7
86.8
92.7

103*0

97.4

103.5

93.0

111.1

109*2

107.2

96.2

If- Aggregate man-hours are for the weekly pay period ending nearest the 15 th of the month and do not represent
totals for the month. For mining and manufacturing industries, data refer to production and related workers. For
contract construction, the data relate to construction workers.
2 / Includes only the divisions shown.
42




Stale ^ n d A i e a H o u r s a n d

Table C-6: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for selected States and areas
State and area
ALABAMA..................
Nobile.................
ARIZOXA.................
Phoenix.................

Average weekly earnings
M56
1957
June
, July
July
♦ 59.90

38.7

40.0
(1/)

38.9

85.20

75.01
78.55

40.2
40.0

38.4
39.9
40.7

$68.89

$68.85
88.84

(i/)

91.60

Average weekly hours
1957
June
July
July

Average hourly earnings
1957
' 1956
JulT
June
Julr
." Î 7 --$1.78
*1.56
$1.77
1.88
2.21
2.29
2.13
1.93
a /)

88.88

86.46

89.20

89.89
89.68

40.7
40.4

40.0

39.3

42.4
42.5

2.23
2.20

2.23
2.20

2.12
2.11

ABKAHSAS.................
Little BockV. Little Bock.........

58.03

57.38

56.5*

40.3

39.3

40.1

1.44

1.46

1.41

58.87

58.58

5*.67

40.6

40.4

40.2

1*45

1.45

I .36

CALIFORNIA ...............................

92.38
77.12
93.08
9*.*3

93.te
79.66
93.59
87.15

89.80
78.08
69.64
93.59

39.8
37.0
40.3
38.3

40.1
38.0
40.5
35.7

40.5
39.1
40.8
40.2

2*32
2.09
2.31
2.47

2.33
2.10
2.31
2.44

2.22
2.00
2.20
2.33

93.30

93.32
92.61
96.50
94.66
83.92

87.37
93.26
91.52
87.07
87.48

40.2
40.4
39.1
40.5
40.5

40.5
40.7
39-6
40.4
38.5

40.6
41.7
39-*
42.0
41.7

2.32

2.45
2.18
2.16

2.31
2.27
2.43
2.34

2.18

2.15
2.24
2.32
2.07
2.10

Los Angeles-Long Beach...
San BernardlnoBiTerslde -Ontario......
San Franclsco-Oakland....

90.76

92.22

95.87
88.22
87.«*

2.28

88.97

86.88

89.46

80.77
84.67

41.4
41.0

42.0
40.6

41.0
41.3

2.14
2.17

2.14

2.13

1.97
2.05

84.45

84*45

61.18

82.01

82.82

41.0
41.2
42.7
40.1
40.7
39*6
40.8

2.08

87.89

40.6
40.5
41.2
40.6
40.5
40.0
40.6

2.08

87.89

COLORADO.................

2.08

2.17
2.12
2.04
2.01
2.14
2.07

1.96
2.05
2.05
1.96
1.91
2.10
1.99

88.60

80.60
87.67
84.45

85.60

77.7*
83.I1
6

81.19

40.6
40.5
41.2
40.2
40.1
40.4
40.6

85.89

84.67
95.82

75.81
89.95

40.9
40.9

41.3
40.6

39.9
39.8

2.10
2.37

2.05

96.93

2.36

1.90
2.26

84.97

87.74

81.93

38.8

39-7

39.2

2.19

2.21

2.09

64.55
(1/)
(!/>
(1/)

65.20

39*6
(1/)
(1/)
<l/>

40.5
41.0
38.6
40.0

41.0
39-9
40.7
40.2

1.63
(1/)
i/)
a/)

1.61

63.69

63.55
67.43
64.31

1.77
1.65

1.60

1.55
1.69
1.58
1.54

GKOBGIA..................
Atlanta.... ........... .

58.59
72.91
80.3*

59.13
74.80
81.25

69.65
79.10

56.02

38.8
39.2
41.2

38.9
40.0
42.1

38.9
39.8
42.3

1#S
1.86
1-95

1.52
1.8?
1.93

1.44
1.75
1.87

TTUHH...................

86.71

87.78

88.74

40.9

41.8

43.5

2.12

2.10

2.04

n x a o i s .................
Chicago.......... .
Peoria.

88.02
(Ì/)

88.81

40.1
(1/)
0/
(V )

40.5
40.4
40.3
42.8

40.4
40.5
40.9
41.9

2.20
a/)
a /)
a/)

2.19
2.30
2.26

2.18

2.15
2.15
2.05

COUIBCTICOT..............

87-76

Stamford................
DELAWARE.................
Wilmington........ .

87.3%

81.41
84.04

84.46
87.5*

78.60

DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA:
FLORIDA...................
Jacksonville............
Miami..................

72.57

64.00

61.91

2.17
2.13
2.04
2.01
2.17

2.08

\y )

91.26

(1/)

93.36

84.17
87.16
68.12
85.93

HDIAKA..................

90.79

91.23

62.83

40.0

40.4

40.2

2.27

2.26

2.06

IOWA............. ...... .

81.40
86.07

81.57

74.95
75.15

39.7

39.8
39.5

39.9

2.05

2.05
2.23

2.08

92.97

88.16

38.6

36.1

2.23

1.92

See footnotes at end of talile.




43

> tjto a n d A r v j

H o u r s jrul I cUTiing

Table C-6C Hours and gross oarnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for selected States and areas - Continued
State and area
EAXSAS...................

Average weekly earnings
19*P 1956
June
Julr
July
*87.12
(1/)

*85.89

Average weekly hours
1956
19;
57
June
Julr
July

Average hourly earnings
1957
1Q*56
June
Julr
Julr

41.4
(1/)
(1/)

41.2
40.8
41.1

41.8
41.6
41.8

$ 2.10

72.69

81.78

(±
/)
(l/)

40.3
41.1

39.7
40.0

<!/)
Q/ )

2.19

*83.72

80.26

$2.08
2.03

$2.00
1.93

1.98

1.83
2.04

1.93
2.56
1.93

1.87
2.66

1.60

(V )

82.65
89.00

mraocKi.................
Loulsrille..............

(1/)
o/ >

90.12

L00ISIA1A................
Baton Bouge.............
lev Orleans.............

80.16
101.79
81.39

78.55
103.42
79.90

76.86
108.79
74.61

40.9
39.0
40.9

40.7
40.4
41.4

41.1
40.9
39.9

1.96
2.61
1.99

M A D E ....................
Levlston................

65.7*
96.2*
69.70

63.85

55.00

63.08
56.ll
72.48

41.0
38.5
40.9

40.0
37.5
40.6

40.2
38.5
43.2

1.46
1.71

1.47
1.70

1.57
1.46
1.68

MABXLAMD.................
Baltimore...............

80.71
85.2*

83.64
88.54

77.11
82.07

39.4
39.6

40.7
41.2

40.7
41.1

2.05
2.15

2.05
2.15

2.00

MASSACHUSETTS............
Boston..................
Vail Hirer..............
lev Bedford.... .
Springfield-Holyoke.....
Worcester..... ........

74.26
79.00
54.83
60.92
81.20
81.41

74.82
79-60
54.15
59.66
80.40
83.23

71.06
74.26
53.87
56.46
77.93
78.76

39.5
39.5

40.0

39.8

39.7
39.5

38.8
40.4
40.3

40.2
41.0

1.88
2.00
1.49
1.57
2.01
2.02

1.88
1.99
1.50
1.57
2.00
2.03

1.79
1.88
1.46
1.53
1.91
1.94

97.70

97.56
103.02
98.63
88.70
96.30

93.83
100.12

2.46

2.45

Wichita.................

7 9 .6 6

69.06

86.86

36.8

36.1
38.0

36.9
36.9

40.8
40.6

(±
/)
0/)

1.60

2.16

2.08

1.87

1.90

38.5
40.1

40.6
40.8
40.2
40.4
40.1
39.5
40.5

(l/>
(1/)
(1/)

(l/>
(1/)
(±
/)

40.4
38.1
40.6

61.01

40.0
41.1

39.9
40.9

40.0
41.5

85.10

39.3
(1/)
39.9

39.5
39.9
40.0

39.8
39-4
40.2

(1/)

2.17

1.96
2.13

87.29

75-28
79.43
83.49

2.18

2.08

88.29

88.09

91.21

39.4

39.2

40.6

2.24

2.25

2.25

HEBBASEA.................
Omaha...................

(1/)
(l/>

79.37
84.28

73.55
78.24

(1/)
(1/)

42.6
42.0

41.8
41.8

(1/)
(1/)

I .87
2.01

1.76
1.87

EEVADA...................

95.38

97.15

95-23

37.7

38.4

38.4

2.53

2.53

2.48

HEW HAMPSHIRE............

64.32
59.52

65.44
60.37

57.60

63.80

40.2
38.9

40.9
39.2

40.9
38.4

I .60
1.53

1.54

1.60

1.56
1.50

MICHIGAN.................
Detroit.................
Flint...................
Grand Baplds............

101.35
101.42
88.59
97-41
90.56
92.58

39.7

38.8

95.88
85.61
94.92

93.19

88.16
88.86

39.6
39.8
38.9
39.1
39.7

(1/)
(1/)
(1/)

(1/)
(1/)
(1/)

79-48
76.46
83.30

56.80
62.88

55.46

53.60

61.76

77.42
Cl/)

78.39

MOHTAJU..................

m u m b s o t a ................

Minneapolis-St. Paul....
MISSISSIPPI..............

MISSOURI.................

86.50

See footnotes at end of table.

44




88.67

39.9
39.7
39.2
40.1

38.8

2.56
2.23
2.50
2.32
2.33

2.52
2.21
2.48
2.30
2.32

2*31
2.45
2.39
2.12
2.37
2.23
2.19

<i/>

(4/>
(1/)
(i/)

1.97
2.01
2.05

1.39
1.51

1.34
1.47
I .89
2.01

2.61

a /)

(1/)

1.42

1.53
1.97

2.60

M,)U* a r d

Arvj

Hour

jnd

[jrmn

Table C 4i Hours and grots earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for selected States and areas - Continued
State an d area

H E W J E R S E Y .................
M e v a r k-Jersey C i t y 2 /...

Average w e ek ly earnings
1956
19!
Ju n e
* 85.51

* 85.61

$ 2. 1 4
2.17
2.10
2. 2 1
2. 13

$2 . 1 4
2.10
2.17
2.11

$ 2 .05
2.07
2.02
2.12
1.99

2.17
2.14

2.19
2.1 7

2.10
2.0 0

84.60

80.12

40.4
40.2
40.3

87.45
90 .52

9 0 .45
9 2 .01

86.10
81.60

40.3
42.3

41.3
42.4

41.0
40.8

81.81
9 0 . 38
74 .0 7
97.51

81 . 4 9
90.79
7 5 - 00
96. 63

39 .0
4 0. 0
39 .1
40.3
40.2

39-2
39-9
39 .6
40 .4
40.3

39 .5
40.6
39-4
40. 8
39-9

3 9.5

40.0

38.6
37.5
40.2
4 0.0
40 .6
39.9

H E W M K X T C O .................

H E W Y O R K ...................
A l b a n y- Sc hen ec ta dy- Tr oy •

z j ...........

40.2
40.0
40.7
40 .6
40.2

87.06

86.60
85.97

39.9

39.8

Average hourly earnings
1957
195 6

40.1
40.0
40.9
40.1
40.0

*82.53
82.72
82.42
85.91

86.49
84.96
88.80
85.80

Perth Amboy

Average w eekly hours
19 56
19-¡7

2.16

2.10

2.08

2.26
1.90

2. 2 7

2.42
2. 01

2. 39
2.01

2.00
2.12
1.88
2. 2 7
1.93

41 .8

2.21

2.20

2.1 7

39.0
37 .8
40 .0
40 .5
40.6
41.3

39 .1
37 .9
40.7
41 .6
41.1
39 .8

2. 1 1
2.07
2. 1Ô
2.12
2.01

2. 09
2.03

2.08

2.09
1.99
2. 1 1

2.03
1.99
2.12
1.99
1. 91
1.98

38.6
40.5
37-3

39.1
39 .2
3 7. 9

1.43
1.53
1 .44

1.43
1.53
1 .4 5

1.43

52.30

38.7
40.1
37.1

75.74
82.87

44.7

45.6

42.8
42.3

44 .5
44.6

1.83
1.92

1.83
1*94

1.70
1.86

88.73
92.73
86.14
83.05
92.36
84.52
97.49
91.60
94.86

40.2
41 .1
37.8
39.5
40.7
41 .4
40.5
39.4
40 .4

40. 1
40 .2
39-3
39-9
40.3
40.6
40. 2
40.4
39-0

40.6
39-2
39-9
4 0.8
41.2
40.2
4 1. 1
40.0
41.1

2.34
2. 48
2. 37
2.14
2.39
2. 2 1
2.50
2.43
2.65

2.32
2.45

2. 1 9
2. 37

78.66
75.58
84.05

40.9
42 .1
40.2

40.9
42.7
40. 0

41.4
42.7
4 1. 0

92.04
8 8 . 34

89.86
86.07

37.8
(1/)

39*4
38.9

83.74

83.18

76.81

39-5

8e.i6

79.13
87.54
75.83
7 1 . 91
86.00
10 1. 05
7 4 . 21

73.58
84.33
67.37

39.5
40.2
39.9
40 .1
4 0.0
40.1
39.6
37 .8
37.2
40.4

80.81

81.10

87.14

B u f f a l o ...................
E l m i r a ....................
V a s s a u an d S u f f o l k

78.99
86.22
73-97
92.46
76.91

87 . 9 4

90.70

8 1 . 45
7 7 . 52
87.34
8 4 . 58

79-37
75.56
86.15

82.77

81.51
76 . 8 0
87 . 0 7
84 . 5 2
80 . 6 4
86 . 9 7

5 5 . 34
6 1 . 35
53.4 2

55.2 0
61.9 7
54.09

81.94
8 7. 4 2

82.07

1.89

l e v I ork-Mort he ast er n
M e v lark City

2 /........

W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n t y 2/.•.
I Q R T H C A B O L H A ............
G r e e n sb or o- Hig h P o i n t . . •
1 0 B T H DAKOTA...............

O H I O ........................

O K L A H O M A ...................

81.83

93.99
10 2. 09
89.7 7
84.65
97.40
91.3 3
10 1 . 2 0
95.61
107.01

T u l s a ......................

81 . 3 9
78 . 3 1
87.64

O R E O O I ......................

87.85
(1 / ) '

..............
Allent ow n-B et hl ehe m-

heusilyaiia

E r i e .......................

86.03
77.81

70.98

P h i l a d e l p h i a .............

86.40

102.26
B e a d i n g ...................

73 . 2 6
61 . 2 4
58 . 4 0

V likes -Barre-— H a z l e t o n ..
69.08
$ J . ..................
See footnotes at e n d of tal>le.




78. 27

93 . 0 5

98.62
89.66
85.28

95 . 3 5
88.75
1 00.01
96.49
10 2. 18

80.98
79.85

87.60

61.66
58.13
69.03

82.56
78.55
78.65
53.18

56.06

67.68
82.17
90.74
73.16
58.98
55.39
67.39

2.18

1.36
1.38

2.28

2.16

2.14
2.37
2.19
2 .49
2.39

2.62

2.04
2.24
2 .1 0
2 .37
2.29
2 .31

1.99
1.86
2. 1 8

1 *98
1.87
2.19

1.77
2. 05

38 .7
38 .7

2. 32
(1 /)

2.34
2. 27

2.32
2.22

39-8

39 .8

2.12

2. 09

1.93

38.6
41. 1
39 .7
40 .4
4 0. 0
40.1
39-9
38.3
37.5
37.9

39.9
41 .5
39 .4
40.0
40.2
39 -8
40 .2
38 .2
37.1
40.4

2.08

2. 05
2.13
1.91
1. 78
2.15
2.52
1. 86

1.85
2.03
1. 71
I .69
2. 0 4

1.61

1. 54
1.49
1.67

2.14
1.95
1.77

2.16
2.55

1.85
1.62
1.57
1.71

1.55
1.73

1*90

2.28
1.82

45

M Jt

.i vl Aft.i
ri

He

Table C-& Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for selected Slates and areas - Continued
State a nd area

Average weekly earnings
1956
19*rr
...
..
July

Average wee k l y hours
1957
1956
JUM

Average hourly earnings
19 56
1957
Julv

HB G D B I S L A X D ..............
P r o v i d e n c e .. * ............

$ 67.51

* 66.51

67.55

68.80

$ 66.13
66.33

39 .2
39.5

40.0
40.0

39-6
40.2

* 1.7 2
1 .71

S O O T H C A B O L H A ............

56.16
66.34

56.45
62.41

54.79
64.40

3 9. 0
4 0.7

39.2
39 . 5

39-7
40 .5

S O U T H D A K O T A ..............
S i o u x F a l l s ..............

80.06
86.72

80.20
87.43

74.66
81.4 4

45.2

44 . 9
46.1

lYffinpsffiv..................
Ch a t t a n o o g a ..............

68.23

(i/}

63.04
63.14
72.37
70.11
64.8 0

( 1/)
39.9
39.2

V a s h v i l l e .................

7 7.62
73.53
6 7 . 54

65.50
68.17
77.22
72.58
67.03

B Z A 8 .......................
D a l l a s ....................
F o r t W o r t h ........ .......

86.11
76.92
9 2.10

85.28
77.93
94.75

.71
1.72

$1.67

1 .44
1.63

1.44
1.58

1. 38
1. 59

44 .5
46.0

1.77
I .89

1.79

1. 6 8
1. 7 7

39 .4
38 .5
38.7
41.0
40.0

(Ì/)
1.71
1.98

1. 6 5
1. 7 0
1.9 7

40.4
40. 2

39.7
40.1
39.2
40. 1
39.9

1.81

I .60
1. 6 4
1.87
1. 7 1

1 .68

1.68

1.62

41.4
4 0.7
41 .3
4 1.9
41.0

41.6
40 . 8
42.3
42.0
40.8

41.5
41 .1
42.8
42.2
40.8

2.08
1.89
2.23
2. 36
1. 50

2 .0 5
1.91
2 .24
2.33
1 .49

1. 9 5
1.83
2. 1 1
2. 1 7
1.44
1. 95
2.02

45.8

1.82

n

1* 9 0

1.65

98.88
61.50

97.86
60.79

80.93
75.21
90.3 1
91.57
58.75

8 9.44

90.85
88.58

76.83
83.83

41.6
41.0

40 .2
4 1.2

3 9.4
4 1.5

2.15
2.12

2.26

69.0e

67.68
61.10
85.65

40.5
39 .9
38.6

41 .3
39.7
40 . 5

42.3
4 1.1
44 .4

1.61

1.67

1.60

1.97

1. 6 7
1.63
2.00

64.88
71.05
73.21

61.75

40 .5
39.8
41.6

40 .3
4 0. 6
40 . 9

40.1
39.5
40 .9

1.62

1.61

1. 54

1.73
1.77

1.75
1.79

1.65

89.80
89.07
93.20
84.14

38.4
38.1
39.4
37.6

38.8

94.69
86. 7 1

90.28
87.39
94.52
89. 9 7

37.8
39.5
39-2

39.2
39.2
40.2
37.4

2.33
2.32
2.40
2. 3 0

2.33
2. 3 1
2.39
2. 2 9

2.29
2.2 7
2.32
2.25

84 . 2 8

81.90

78.92
98.74

3 9.2
4 1.5

39.0
40.6

38.5
40.8

2.15
2.47

2. 1 0
2.46

2.05
2. 4 2

Se .43

41.1
39.1
40.8
40 . 8
40.7
39.6

41 .6
38.0
4 0.9
40 .0
41 .6
39-3

te/)
te/,)
te/)
(i/)

82.86

(1/)
(±/)
(1/)
(1/)
1/)
(Ì/)

<1)
(1/)

2. 11
2.27
2.19
2.31
2.34
2. 2 3

1. 98
2.15
2.00

1/
(1/
(±/>

86.53
88.77
89.24
94.2 5
95.2 4
88 . 2 4

2. 25
2 .1 1

91.94
119.56

93.12
115.42

90.72
110.09

39 . 8
42 .7

38.8

40.5
41.7

2.31
2.80

2. 4 0
2.85

2.24
2.64

U T A H ........................
Sa l t La ke C i t y ...........

86.92

T O B M O V T ....................
B u r l i n g t o n ................
S p r i n g f i e l d ..............

67.46
64.32
76.28

V E K I H A ...................
H o r f o l k - P o r t o M u t h ......

65.61
68.85
73.63

W A S H H G T O t f .................

89.36

88.29

W E S T V I B G I H I A .............

102.50
w i s c o h s h i ..................

W)

i/>

W)

M i l w a u k e e .................

64.65

81.20

99. 88

65.18
68.71

81.95
8 1.68

86.29
93.51

40.5

1/ lot «TKllabl*.
2/ Subarea of lav Iork-lortheaatem lev J.r»«y.
¿/ Beriasd serie*; not strictly ccaparabl* with prerioujly published data.




2.15

1. 49
1.93

1.68

2.16

Explanatory Notes
INTRODUCTION

or engaging in more than one activity, the entire
employment of the unit is included under the industry
indicated by the most important product or activity.
The titles and descriptions of Industries presented
in the flfa.wa.mT TtMTnnfaHnl m « « Blflcal Mutual. (U. S.
Bureau of the Budget, Washington, D. C.) are used for
classifying reports from manufacturing and government
establishments; the 19A2 ImhiafcH«] Claai.TfloAt.Tni»
Code. (U. S. Social Security Board) for reports from
all other establishments.

The statistics for nonfarm industries presented in
this monthly report are part of the broad program of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics to provide timely, com­
prehensive, accurate, and detailed information for the
use of businessmen, government officials, legislators,
labor unions, research workers, and the general public.
The statistics are an integral part of the Federal
statistical system, and are considered basic indica­
tors of the state of the Nationfs economy. They are
c. Coverage
widely used in following and interpreting business
developments and in making decisions in such fields as
tenthly reports on employment and, for most indus­
tries, payroll and man-hours are obtained from approx­
labar-management negotiations, marketing, personnel,
imately 180,000 establishments. (See table below.) The
plant location, and government policy. In addition,
Government agencies use the data in this report to com­ table also shows the approximate proportion of total
pile official indexes of production, labor productivity, employment in each industry division covered by the
group of establishments furnishing monthly employment
and national income.
data. The coverage for individual industries within
the division may vary from the proportions shown.

ESTABLISHMENT REPORTS:

Approxim ate size and coverage of BLS

a. Collection
The employment statistics program, which is based
on establishment payroll reports, provides current data
for both full- and part-time workers on payrolls of
nonagricultural establishments (see glossary for defi­
nition, p. 7-J5) during a specified period each month*
The BLS uses two "shuttle" schedules for this program,
the BLS Form 790 (for employment, payroll, and manhours data) and the Form 1219 (for labor turnover data).
The shuttle schedule, used by BLS for more than 25
years, is designed to assist firms to report consist­
ently, accurately, and with a minimum of cost* The
questionnaire provides space for the establishment to
report for each month of the current calendar year; in
this way, the employer uses the same schedule for the
entire year.
Under a cooperative arrangement with the BLS,
State agencies mail the forms to the establishments
and examine the returns for consistency, accuracy, and
completeness. The States use the information to prepare
State and area series and then send the data to the BLS
Division of Manpower and Employment Statistics for use
in preparing the national series.
b.

Industrial Classification

Establishments are classified into industries on the
basis of their principal product or activity determined
from information on annual sales volume. This informa­
tion is collected each year. For manufacturing estab­
lishments, a product supplement to the monthly 790
report is used. The supplement provides for reporting
the percentage of total sales represented by each pro­
duct. Information for nonmanufacturing establish­
ments is collected on the 790 form itself. In the
case of an establishment making more than one product




em ploym ent and p a y ro lls sample U

Industry division

Mbnh% ...................

Contract construction..
Transportation and
public utilities s
Interstate railroads
Other transportation
and public utilities.
Wholesale and retail
Finance, insurance,
Service and misoelGovemment:
Federal (Civil Service
State and local......

Employees
Nunfcer of
establish­
ments in Nuaber in R m e n t
sanple of total
sample
393,000
860,000
11,779,000

47
26
69

1,152,000

97

15,700

1,693,000

57

65,100

2,244,000

20

12,900

757,000

33

11,^00

848,000

13

2,196,000
3,148,000

100
63

3,500
22,000
43,900

—

—

5,800

1/ Some firms do not report payroll and man-hour in­
formation. Therefore, hours and earnings estimates
m y be based on a slightly smaller sample than employ­
ment estimates.
2/ 1,900 reports covering 1,305,000 employees, col­
lected through the BLS-State cooperating program, are
used in preparing State and area estimates.

Labor turnover reports are received from approx­
imately 10,000 cooperating establishments in the manu­
facturing, mining, and communication industries (see
table below)« The definition of manufacturing used in
the turnover series is not as extensive as in the BLS
series on employment and hours and earnings because of
the exclusion of the following major industries from
the labor turnover sample: printing* publishing, and
allied industries (since April 1943;; canning and pre­
serving fruits, vegetables, and sea foods; women's and
misses1 outerwear; and fertilizer.
Approximate size and coverage of BLS labor turnover
sample used in computing national rates
Number of
Group and industry

ments in
sample

Manufacturing....... .
Durable goods....
Nondurable goods....
Metal wfTilTig.........
Coal mining:
Anthracite
Bituminous.... ... •*
Communication:
Telephone..........
Telegraph..........
1/ Does not apply.

10,200
6,2*00
3,800
120

6,000
71,000

19
32

661,000
28,000

20
200

8
3

Employees
Number in Percent
sample of total
5,99U,000
39
h ,1 9 9 , 000
U3
1,795,000
32
57,000
53

88
65

'

DEFINITIONS AND ESTIMATING
METHODS:
A.

EMPLOYMENT

Definition
Employment data for all except Federal Government
establishments refer to persons who worked during, or
received pay for, any part of the pay period ending
nearest the 15th of the month. For Federal Government
establishments current data generally refer to persons
who worked on, or received pay for, the last day of
the month.
Persons on an establishment payroll who are on paid
sick leave, paid holiday, or paid vacation, or who work
during a part of the specified pay period and are un­
employed or on strike during the other part of the
period are counted as employed. Persons are not con­
sidered employed who are laid off or are on leave with­
out pay, who are on strike for the entire period, or
who are hired but do not report to work during the
period. Proprietors, the self-employed, unpaid family
workers, farm workers, and domestic workers in house­
holds are also excluded. Government employment covers
only civilian employees; Federal military personnel
are shown separately, but their number is excluded
from total nonagrlcultural employment.
With respect to employment in educational institu­
tions (private and governmental), BLS considers regular
full-time teachers to be employed during the summer
vacation period whether or not they are specifically
paid in those months.
Barmhnwyk Data
Employment estimates are periodically compared with
complete counts of employment in the various nonagri-

2-E




cultural industries, and appropriate adjustments made
as indicated by the total counts or benchmarks. The
co^arison made for the first 3 months of 1956 resulted
in changes smutting to 0.5 percent of all nonagricultural e^)loyment, as against 0.8 percent in the first
quarter 1955 benchmark adjustment. Changes ranged from
0.1 to 2,1 percent far 6 of the 8 major industry divi­
sions; for the other 2, service and miscellaneous
industries required an adjustment of 3.4 percent, con­
tract construction 4*3 percent. The manufacturing
total was changed by only 0*1 percent. Within manu­
facturing the benchmark and estimate differed by 1*0
percent or less in 53 of the 132 individual industries,
39 industries were adjusted by 1*1 to 2.5 percent, and
an additional 22 industries differed by 2.6 to 5*0 per­
cent. fas significant cause of differences between the
benchmark and estimate is the change in industrial
classification of individual firms, which cannot be
reflected in BLS estimates until they are adjusted to
new benchmarks. Other causes are aaigUng and response
errors.
The basic sources of benchmark information are the
quarterly tabulations of employment data, by industry,
compiled by State agencies from reports of establish­
ments covered under State unemployment insurance laws.
Supplementary tabulations prepared by the U. S.
Bureau of Old Age and Survivors Insurance are used for
the group of establishments exempt from State unem­
ployment insurance laws because of their small size.
Benchmarks for industries wholly or partly excluded
from the unemployment insurance laws are derived from
a variety of other sources.
The BLS estimates which are prepared for the
benchmark quarter are compared with the new benchmark
levels, industry by industry. Where revisions are
necessary, the monthly estimates are adjusted between
the new benchmark and the preceding one. Following
revision for these intermediate periods, the industry
data from the most recent benchmark are projected to
the current month by use of the sample trends. Under
this procedure, the benchmark is used to establish
the level of employment while the sample is used to
measure the month-to-month changes in the level.
Estimating tfetfaod
The estimating procedure for industries for which
data on both "all employees”and 1production and re­
1
lated workers" are published (manufacturing and
selected mining industries) is outlined below; the
first step under this method is also used for indus­
tries for which only figures on "all employees" are
published.
The first step is to compute total employment (all
employees) in the industry for the month following the
benchmark period. The all-employee total for the last
benchmark month (e.g., March) is multiplied by the
percent chaise of total employment over the month for
the group of establishments reporting for both March
and April. Thus, if firms in the BLS sample for an
industry report 30,000 employees in Jferch and 31,200
in April, April employment is 104 percent (31#200
divided by 30,000) of March employment. If the all­
employee benchmark in Nkrch is 40,000, the all-employee
total in April would be 104 percent of 40,000 or
41,600.
The second step is to compute the productionworker total for the industry. The all-employee total
for the month is multiplied by the ratio of production

workers to all employees. This ratio Is computed from
establishment reports in the monthly sample. Thus, if
these firms in April report 24,960 production workers
and a total of 31,200 employees, the ratio of produc­
tion workers to all employees would be .80 (24,960
divided by 31,200). The production-worker total in
April would be 33,280 (41,600 multiplied by .80).
Figures for subsequent months are computed by
carrying forward the totals for the previous month ac­
cording to the method described above.
The number of women employees in manufacturing,
published quarterly, Is computed by multiplying the
all-employee estimate for the industry by the ratio
of women to all employees as reported in the industry
sample.
Employment Adjusted for Seasonal Variation
Employment series for many industries reflect a
regularly recurring seasonal movement, which can be
measured on the basis of past experience. By elimi­
nating that part of the change in employment which can
be ascribed to usual seasonal variation, it is pos­
sible to clarify the cyclical and other nonseasonal
movements in the series. Adjusted employment aggre­
gates are shown and also indexes (1947^49 3 100) de­
rived from these aggregates. The indexes have the
additional advantage of comparing the current sea­
sonally adjusted employment level with average employ­
ment in the base period.
Comparability with Other Employment
Employment data published by other government and
private agencies may differ from BLS employment sta­
tistics because of differences in definition, sources
of information, methods of collection, classification,
and estimation. BLS monthly figures are not directly
comparable, for example, with the estimates of the
Census Monthly Report on the Labor Force (MRLF).
Census data are obtained by personal interviews with
individual members of a small sample of households
and are designed to provide information on the work
status of the whole population, classified by their
demographic characteristics. The BLS, on the other
hand, obtains data by mail questionnaire which are
based on the payroll records of business units, and
prepares detailed statistics on the Industrial and
geographic distribution of employment and on hours of
work and earnings.
Since BLS employment figures are derived from
establishment payroll records, persons who worked in
more than one establishment during the reporting peri­
od will be counted more than once in the BLS series.
By definition, proprietors, self-employed persons,
domestic servants,' and unpaid family workers are ex­
cluded from the BLS but not the MRLF series.
Employment estimates compiled by the Bureau of the
Census tram its censuses and/or annual sample surveys
of manufacturing establishments also differ from BLS
employment statistics. Among the important reasons
for lack of comparability are differences in indus­
tries covered, in the business units considered parts
of an establishment, and in the industrial classifi­
cation of establishments. Similar differences exist
between the BLS data and those in County Business
Patterns published jointly by the U.S. Department of
Commerce and the U.S. Department of Health, Education
and Welfare.




B. LABOR TURNOVER
Definition
"Labor turnover," as used in the BLS program, re­
fers to the gross movement of wage and salary workers
into and out of employment status with respect to in­
dividual firms during a calendar month. This movement
is subdivided into two broad types: accessions (new
hires and rehires) and separations (terminations of
employment initiated by either employer or employee).
Each type of action Is cumulated for a calendar month
and expressed as a rate per 100 employees. All em­
ployees, Including executive, office, sales, other
salaried personnel, and production workers, are cov­
ered by both the turnover movements and the employment
base used in computing labor turnover rates. All
groups of employees— full- and part-time, permanent,
and temporary— are included. Transfers from one es­
tablishment to another within a company are not con­
sidered to be turnover items.
Method of Computation
To compute turnover rates for individual indus­
tries, the total number of each type of action (ac­
cessions, quits, etc.) reported for a calendar month
by the sample establishments in each industry is first
divided by the total number of employees reported by
these establishments, who worked during, or received
pay for, any part of the pay period ending nearest the
15th of that month. The result is multiplied by 100
to obtain the turnover rate.
For example, in an industry sample, the total
number of employees who worked during, or received
pay for, the week of January 12-18 was reported as
25,498. During the period January 1-31 a total of
284 employees in all reporting firms quit. The quit
rate for the Industry Is:
284 x 100 = 1.1
25,498
To compute turnover rates for broader industrial
categories, the rates for the component Industries
are weighted by the estimated employment.
Separate turnover rates for men and women are pub­
lished quarterly for 1 month in each quarter. Only
accessions, quits, and total separations are publish­
ed. These rates are computed in the same manner as
the all-employee rates; for example, the quit rate for
woman is obtained from an industry sample by dividing
the number of women who quit during the month by the
number of women employees reported.
Average monthly turnover rates for the year for
all employees are computed by dividing the sum of the
monthly rates by 12.
Comparability with Earlier Data
Labor turnover rates are available on a compara­
ble basis from January 1930 for manufacturing as a
whole and from 1943 for two coal mining and two com­
munication industries. Rates for many individual in­
dustries and industry groups for the period prior to
January 1950 are not comparable with those for the
subsequent period because of a revision which in­
volved (1) the adoption of the Standard Industrial
Classification (1945) code structure for manufactur­
ing industries, and (2) the introduction of weighting

3-R

in the computation of industry-group rates.
Comparability with Employment Series
MDnth-to-month changes in total employment in man­
ufacturing industries reflected by labor turnover
rates are not comparable with the changes shown in the
Bureau's employment series for the following reasons:
(1) Accessions and separations are computed
for the entire calendar-month; the em­
ployment reports, for the most part,
refer to a 1-week pay period ending
nearest the 15th of the month.
(2) The turnover sample excludes certain in­
dustries (see under coverage, p. 2-E) •
(3) Hants on strike are not included in the
turnover computations beginning with the
month the strike starts through the month
the workers return; the influence of such
stoppages is reflected, however, in the
employment figures.
C.

HOURS AND EARNINGS

Definitions of production workers, nonsupervisory
employees, payrolls, and man-hours from which hours
and earnings data are derived are Included in the
glossary, page 7-E. Methods used to compute hours
and earnings averages are described in summary of
methods for computing national statistics, page 6-E.
Gross Average Hourly and Weekly Earnings
Average hourly earnings for manufacturing and non­
manufacturing industries are on a "gross" basis, i.e.,
they reflect not only changes in basic hourly and in­
centive wage rates, but also such variable factors as
premium pay for overtime and late-shift work, and
changes in output of workers paid on an incentive
basis. Employment shifts between relatively high-paid
and low-paid work and changes in workers1 earnings in
individual establishments also affect the general
earnings averages* Averages for groups and divisions
further reflect changes in average hourly earnings for
individual industries.
Averages of hourly earnings differ from wage rates.
Earnings refer to the actual return to the worker for
a stated period of time; rates are the amounts stipu­
lated for a given unit of work or time« However, the
average earnings series does not measure the level of
total labor costs on the part of the employer, since
the following are excluded: irregular bonuses, ret­
roactive items, payments of various welfare benefits,
payroll taxes paid by employers, and earnings for
those employees not covered under the productionworker or nonsupervisory-employee definitions.
Gross average weekly earnings are affected not
only by changes in gross average hourly earnings, but
also by changes in the length of the workweek, parttime work, stoppages for varying causes, labor turn­
over, and absenteeism.
Average Weekly Hours
The workweek information relates to average hours
worked or paid for, and is somewhat different from
standard or scheduled hours. Normally, such factors




as absenteeism, labor turnover, part-time work, and
stoppages cause average weekly hours to be lower than
scheduled hours of work for an establishments. Group
averages further reflect changes in the workweek of
component industries.

Average Overtime Hours
The overtime hours represent that portion of the
gross average weekly hours which were in excess of reg­
ular hours and for which premium payments were made.
If an employee works on a paid holiday at regular rates,
receiving as total compensation his holiday pay plus
straight-time pay for hours worked that day, no overtime
hours would be reported.
Since overtime hours are premium hours by defini­
tion, the gross weekly hours and overtime hours do not
necessarily move in the same direction fro« month to
month; for example, premiums may be paid for hours in
excess of the straight-time workday although less than
a full week is worked. Diverse trends on the industrygroup level may also be caused by a marked change in
gross hours for a component industry where little or
no overtime was worked in both the previous and cur­
rent months. In addition, such factors as stoppages,
absenteeism, and labor turnover may not have the sane
influence on overtime hours as on gross hours.
Groaa Average Weekly Earning« In Current and
19A7-4.9 Dollars
These series indicate changes in the level of
weekly earnings before and after adjustment for
changes in purchasing power as determined from the
BLS Consumer Price Index.

Het Spendable Average

Egmlrwa

Net spendable average weekly earnings in current
dollars are obtained by deducting Federal social se­
curity and income taxes from gross weekly earnings.
The amount of income tax liability depends on the
number of dependents supported by the worker, as well
as on the level of his gross income. To reflect these
variables, net spendable earnings have been computed
for two types of income receivers: (l) a worker with
no dependents; and (2) a worker with three depend­
ents.
The computations of net spendable earnings for
both the factory worker with no dependents and the
factory worker with three dependents are based upon
the gross average weekly earnings for all production
workers in manufacturing industries without regard to
marital status, family composition, and total family
income.
Net spendable weekly earnings in 1947-^49 dollars
represent an approximate measure of changes in "real"
net spendable weekly earnings. "Real" earnings are
computed by dividing the current Consumer Price Index
into the spendable earnings average for the current
month* The resulting level of spendable earnings ex­
pressed in 1947-«49 dollars is thus adjusted for
changes in purchasing power since that base period.

ATTtf Hotn-lT h w H n n .
Owwtlj».
of Production Worker» In Hmofacturlng
Average hourly earnings, excluding premium overtine pay, are computed by dividing the total produotion-worker payroll for the industry group by the sum
of total production-worker man-hours and one-half of
total overtine man-hours. frior to January 1956, data
were based on the application of adjustment factors to
gross average hourly earnings (as described in the
Monthly Labor Review, M*y 1950, pp. 537-540; reprint
available, Serial No. R. 2020). Both methods elimi­
nate only the earnings due to overtime paid for at
one and one-half t i m w the straight-time rates. No
adjustment is made for other premium payment provi­
sions, for example— holiday work, late-shift work, and
overtime rates other than time and one-half.
Indexes of Aggregate Weekly Mm-Houra
The indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours are pre­
pared by dividing the current month's aggregate by the
monthly average for the 1947-49 period. These aggre­
gates represent the product of average weekly hours
and employment.
The aggregate man-hours are defined as total manhours for which pay was received by full- and parttime production or construction workers, includili
hours paid for holidays, sick leave, and vacations
taken. The man-hours are for 1 week of the pay period
ending nearest the 15th of the month, and may not be
typical of the entire month«
Hours and Earnings
The figures for Class I railroads (excluding
switching and terminal conpanies) are based upon month­




l y data summarized in the M-300 repgpf of thm Inter­
r
state cbnniBrce^(ibmcds8iari and relate to all employees
vho received pay during the month, except executives,
officials, |and staff assistants (ICC Group I). Gross
average hourly earnings are computed by dividing
total compensation by total hours paid for. Average
weekly hours are obtained by dividing the total number
of hours paid for, reduced to a weekly basis, by the
number of employees, as defined above. Gross average
weekly earnings are derived by nultiplyiz^ average
weekly hours by Average hourly earnings.
Because
hours and earnings data for manufacturing and other
nonmanufaoturlng Industries are based upon reports to
the BLS which generally represent 1 weekly pay period
ending nearest the 15th of the month, the data for
railroad employees are not strictly comparable with
other Industry Information shown in this publication.

STATISTICS FOR STATES AND AREAS
State and area ea^xLoyment, hours, earnings, and
labor turnover statistics are collected and prepared
by State agencies in cooperation with tbs BLS. These
statistics are based on the sane establishment re­
ports used by the BLS for preparing national esti­
mates. State employment series are adjusted to bench­
mark data from. State unemployment Insurance agencies
and the Bureau of Old Age and Survivors Insurance.
Because some States have more recent benchmarks than
others and use slightly varying methods of commutation,
the sum of the State figures may differ slightly from
the official U. S. totals prepared by the BLS.
Additional Industry detail may be obtainable
from the cooperating State agencies listed on the
inside back cover of this report.

NOTE: Additional information concerning the preparation
of the employment,

hours,

earnings,

and labor turnover

series-— concepts and scope, survey methods, and reliability
and limitations— -is contained in technical notes for each
of these series, available from BLS free of charge.

For all

of this information as veil as similar material for other
BLS statistics, see Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statis­
tical Series, BLS Bull. 1168, December 19$ k .

Copies are on

file in many public and university libraries, or may be ord­
ered from the Superintendent of Documents,

U. S. Government

Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. at © cents each.

SUMMARY OF METHODS FOR COMPUTING N ATIO N AL STATISTICS
EMPLOYMENT, HOURS, AND EARNINGS
Item

Individual manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries

Total nonagriculturai divisions,
major groups, and groups

MONTHLY DATA
All enmloyees

All-employee estimate for previous
month multiplied by ratio of all
employees in current month to all
employees in previous month for
sample establishments which re­
ported for both months.

Sum of all-employee estimates for
component industries.

Production workers

All-employee estimate for current
month multiplied by ratio of pro­
duction workers to all employees
in sample establishments for cur­
rent month.

Sum of production-worker estimates
for component industries.

Average weekly hours

Total production or nonsupervisory
man-hours divided by number of pro­
duction or nonsupervisory workers.

Average, weighted by employment, of
the average weekly hours for com­
ponent industries.

Average hourly earnings

Total production or nonsupervisory
worker payroll divided by total
production or nonsupervisory worker
man-hours.

Average, weighted by aggregate manhours, of the average hourly earn­
ings for component industries.

Average weekly earnings

Product of average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

Product of average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

A N N U AL AVERAGE DATA
All emolovees and rsrodwctlon workers

Sum of monthly estimates divided
by 12.

Sum of monthly estimates divided
by 12.

Average weekly hours

Annual total of aggregate manhours (employment multiplied
by average weekly hours) divided
by annual sum of employment.

Average, weighted by employment,
of the annual averages of weekly
hours for component industries.

Average hourly earnings

Annual total of aggregate pay­
rolls (weekly earnings multiplied
by employment) divided by annual
aggregate man-hours.

Average, weighted by aggregate manhours, of the annual averages of
hourly earnings for component in­
dustries.

Average weekly earnings

Product of average weekly hours
and average hourly earnings.

Product of average weekly hours
and average hourly earnings.

6 -S




GLOSSARY
ALL EMPLOYEES - The total number of persons on estab­
lishment payrolls who worked full- or part-time or
received pay for any part of the pay period ending
nearest the 15th of the month* Includes salaried
officers of corporations as well as employees on
the establishment payroll engaged in new construc­
tion and major additions or alterations to the plant
who are utilized as a separate work force (forceaccount construction workers). Proprietors, selfemployed persons, domestic servants, unpaid family
workers, and members of the Armed Forces are ex­
cluded*
CONSTRUCTION WORKERS - Includes working foremen,
journeymen, mechanics., apprentices, helpers, labor­
ers, and similar workers engaged in new work, al­
terations, demolition, and other actual construc­
tion work, at the site of construction or workirç
in shop or yard at jobs (such as precutting and pre­
assembling) ordinarily performed by members of the
construction trades; includes all such workers re­
gardless of skill, engaged in any way in contract
construction activities*
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION - Covers only firms engaged in
the construction business on a contract basis for
others* Force-account construction workers, i.e.,
hired directly by and on the payroll of Federal,
State, and local government, public utilities, and
private establishments, are excluded from contract
construction and included in the employment for such
establishments *
DURABLE GOODS - The durable-goods subdivision includes
the following major manufacturing industry groups :
ordnance and accessories; lumber and wood products;
furniture and fixtures; stone, clay, and glass pro­
ducts; primary metal industries; fabricated metal
products; machinery; electrical machinery; trans­
portation equipment; instruments and related pro­
ducts; and miscellaneous manufacturing industries as
defined. This definition is consistent with that
used by other Federal agencies, e.g., Federal Re­
serve Board*

speculative builders, subdividers, and developers;
and agents and brokers).
GOVERNMENT - Covers Federal, State, and local govern­
ment establishments performing legislative, execu­
tive, and judicial functions, including Government
corporations, Government force-account construction,
and such units as arsenals, navy yards, and hospi­
tals* Federal government employment excludes em­
ployees of the Central Intelligence Agency* State
and local government employment includes teachers,
but excludes, as nominal, employees, paid volunteer
firemen and elected officials of small local units*
LABOR TURNOVER:
Separations are terminations of employment during
the calendar month and are classified according to
cause: quits, discharges, layoffs, and miscellaneous
separations (including military), as defined below*
Quits are terminations of employment during the
calendar month initiated by employees for such
reasons as: acceptance of a job in another company,
dissatisfaction, return to school, marriage, mater­
nity, ill health, or voluntary retirement where no
company pension is provided. Failure to report aft­
er being hired and unauthorized absences of more
than 7 consecutive calendar days are also clas­
sified as quits. Prior to 1940, miscellaneous
separations were also included in this category*
Discharges are terminations of employment during
the calendar month inltitated by the employer far
such reasons as employees' Incompetence, violation
of rules, dishonesty, insubordination, laziness,
habitual absenteeism, or Inability to meet physical
standards*
Layoffs are terminations of employment during the
calendar month lasting or expected to last more than
7 consecutive calendar days without pay, initi­
ated by the employer without prejudice to the work­
er, for such reasons as lack of orders or materials,
release of temporary help, conversion of plant, in­
troduction of labor-saving machinery or processes,
or suspensions of operations without pay during
inventory periods.

ESTABLISHMENT - "A single physical location where busi­
ness is conducted or where services or industrial
operations are performed; for example, a factory,
mill, store, mine, or farm* Where a single physical
location comprises two or more units which maintain
separate payroll and Inventory records and which are
engaged in distinct or separate activities for which
different Industry classifications are provided in
the Standard Industrial Classification, each unit
shall be treated as a separate establishment* An
establishment is not necessarily identical with the
business concern or firm which may consist of one
or more establishments* It is also to be distin­
guished from organizational subunits, departments,
or divisions within an establishment." (Standard
Industrial Classification Manual, U. S. Bureau of
the Budget, Vol* I, Part I, p. 1, November 1945«)

Persons on leave of absence (paid or unpaid)
with the approval of the employer are not counted as
separations until such time as it is definitely de­
termined that such persons will not return to work*
At that time, a separation is reported as one of the
above types, depending on the circumstances.

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE - Covers private
establishments operating in the fields of finance
(banks, security dealers, loan agencies, holding com­
panies, and other finance agencies); insurance (in­
surance carriers and independent agents and bro­
kers); and real estate (real estate owners, including

Accessions are the total number of permanent and
temporary additions to the employment roll during
the calendar month, including both new and rehired
employees. Persons returning to work after a layoff,
military separations, or other absences who have been
counted as separations are considered accessions.




Miscellaneous separations (including military)
are terminations of employment during the calendar
month because of permanent disability, death, re­
tirement on company pension, and entrance into the
Armed Forces expected to last more than 30 consecu­
tive calendar days. Prior to 19kOf miscellaneous
separations were included with quits. Beginning
September 1940, military separations were included
here*

7-a

MAN-HOURS - Covers man-hours worked or paid for of
specified groups of workers, during the pay period
ending nearest the 15th of the month. The specified
group of workers in manufacturing and mining indus­
tries, laundries, and cleaning and dyeing plants is
production and related workers; in the contract con­
struction industry, it is construction workers; and
in the other industries, it is nonsupervisory em­
ployees* The man-hours include hours paid for holi­
days, sick leave, and vacations taken; if the em­
ployee elects to work during a vacation period, the
vacation pay and the hours it represents are omitted.
MANUFACTURING - Covers private establishments engaged
in the mechanical or chemical transformation of in­
organic or organic substances into new products and
usually described as plants, factories, or mills,
which characteristically use power-driven machines
and materials-handling equipment« Establishments
engaged in assembling component parts of manufac­
tured products are also considered manufacturing if
the new product is neither a structure nor other
fixed improvement. Government manufacturing opera­
tions such as arsenals and navy yards are excluded
from manufacturing and are included under Government.
MINING - Covers establishments engaged in the extrac­
tion from the earth of Organic and inorganic miner­
als which occur in nature as solids, liquids, or
gases; includes various contract services required
in mining operations, such as removal of overburden,
tunneling and shafting, and the drilling or acidiz­
ing of oil wells; also includes ore dressing, beneficiating, and concentration.
NONDURABLE GOODS - The nondurable-goods subdivision
includes the following major manufacturing industry
groups: food and kindred products; tobacco manu­
factures; textile-mill products; apparel and other
finished textile products; paper and allied products;
printing, publishing, and allied industries; chemi­
cals and allied products; products of petroleum and
coal; rubber products; and leather and leather pro­
ducts. This definition is consistent with that
used by other Federal agencies, e.g., Federal Re­
serve Board«
NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES - Includes employees (not
above the working supervisory level) such as office
and clerical workers, repairmen, salespersons,
operators, drivers, attendants, service employees,
linemen, laborers, janitors, watchmen, and similar
occupational levels, and other employees whose
services are closely associated with those of the
employees listed«
OVERTIME HOURS - Covers premium overtime hours of pro­
duction and related workers during the pay period
ending nearest the 15>th of the month. Overtime hours
are those for which premiums were paid because the
hours were in excess of the number of hours of either
the straight-time workday or workweek. Weekend and
holiday hours are included only if premiun wage rates
were paid. Hours for which only shift differential,
hasard, incentive or other similar types of premiums
were paid are excluded.
PAYROLL - The weekly payroll for the specified groups

S-B




of full- and part-time employees who worked during,
or received pay for, any part of the pay period
ending nearest the l£th of the month. The specified
group of employees in the manufacturing and mining
industries, laundries, and cleaning and dyeing
plants is production and related workers; in the
contract construction industry, it is construction
workers; and in the other industries, it is non­
supervisory employees and working supervisors. The
payroll is reported before deductions for old-age
and unemployment insurance, group insurance, with­
holding tax, bonds, and union dues; also includes
pay for sick leave, holidays, and vacations taken.
Excludes cash payments for vacations not taken,
retroactive pay not earned during period reported,
value of payments in kind, and bonuses, unless
earned and paid regularly each pay period«
PRODUCTION AND RELATED WORKERS - Includes working fore­
men and all nonsupervisory workers (including lead
men and [trainees) engaged in fabricating, processing,
assembling, inspection, receiving, storage, handling,
packing, warehousing, shipping, maintenance, repair,
janitorial, watchman services, products development,
auxiliary production for plant's own use (e«g«,
power plant), and recordkeeping and other services
closely associated with the above production opera­
tions.
REGIONS:
North - Includes all States except the 17 listed as
South.
South - Includes the following 17 States: Alabama,
Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida,
Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Jâryland, Mississippi,
North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia*
(In the case of sawmills and planing mills, general,
a third region is identified - the West - and in­
cludes California, Oregon, and Washington«)
SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS - Covers establishments pri­
marily engaged in rendering services to individuals
and business firms, including automotive repair
services. Excludes domestic service workers. Non­
government schools, hospitals, museums, etc., are
included under service and miscellaneous; similar
Government establishments are included under Govern­
ment.
TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES - Covers only pri­
vate establishments engaged in providing all types
of transportation and related services; telephone,
telegraph, and other comnunication services or pro­
viding electricity, gas, steam, water, or sanitary
service. Similar Government establishments are in­
cluded under Government.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE - Covers establishments en­
gaged in wholesale trade, i.e., selling merchandise
to retailers, and in retail trade, i.e., selling
merchandise for personal or household consumption,
and rendering service incidental to the sales of
goods. Similar Government establishments are in­
cluded under Government.

EM PLOYM ENT A N D EA R N IN G S D A T A
Available from the B L S free of charge

• IN D IV ID U A L HISTO RICAL SUMMARY TABLES of national data fo r oaeh industry

or special aerie» contained In tables A-l thresh A-5, A-6, and
C-l through C-5
When orderiig, specify each Industry or special series wanted see table for same of industry

• STATE EMPLOYMENT, 1939-56 - Individual somry tables for each State,

by industry division

• GUIDE TO STATE EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS - Shows the industry detail, by

State, vhioh is available fro* cooperating State agencies and
the beginning date of each series

• GUIDE TO EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS OF BLS - Shows the begimiix« date of all

national series published and gives each industry definition

• TECHNICAL NOTES on:

Measurement of Labor turaovfg
ifeasurement of Industrial Employment
boors and Earnings in Nonsgrieultural Industries
The Calculation and Uses of the Net Spendable Earnings Series
BLS Earnings Series for Escalating Labor Costs

8. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Division of Manpower and Employment Statistics
Washington 25, D. C.




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