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Employment
and Earnings
DIVISION OF M A N P O W E R A N D EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS
Seymour L. Wolfbein, Chief
CONTENTS

Pa>*

Hourly Earnings Excluding Overtime Pay................

HOURLY EARNINGS
EXCLUDING OVERTIME...

Charts

A new technique has been developed
for preparing the series

iii

on aver­

Gross Average Hourly Earnings— Full-Fashioned and Seamless
Hosiery, Annual Average, 1949-56................................
Average Hourly Earnings, Gross and Excluding Overtime, of
Production Workers in Manufacturing.............................

ix
x

age hourly earnings excluding over­
time, published regularly in table
C-4.

The new method is described

in an

article

beginning

on page

iii.

REGIONAL EARNINGS
IN HOSIERY MANUFACTURING...
Charts
average

showing the trend of gross
hourly

full-faaha cned

earnings
and

in

the

seamless

Table 1: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
xi
industry division and selected groups.................
Table 2: Production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group.................................................... xii
Table 3: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing, by major industry group................ xiii
Table 4: Gross average weekly hours and average overtime hours
of production workers in manufacturing, by major
industry group.......................................... xiv
Table 5: Index of employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division...................................
xv
Table 6: Index of production workers in manufacturing, by major
xv
industry group..........................................
Table 7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry division, seasonally adjusted................ xvi
Table 8: Production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group, seasonally adjusted............................. xvi

ho­

siery industries, North and South,
are presented on page ix.

For sale by the Superintendent of
Documents, U. S. Government Print­
ing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
Subscription price: $3.50 a year;
$1 additional for foreign mailing.
Single copies vary in price. This
issue is IfO cents.




Employment Trends

DETAILED STATISTICS
A-Employment and Payrolls
Table A-l: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry division.....................................
Table A-2 : All employees and production workers in nonagri­
cultural establishments, by industry............. .
Table A-3: Indexes of production-worker employment and weekly
payrolls in manufacturing..........................
Table A-4: Employees in Government and private shipyards,
by region.............................................
Table A-5: Government civilian employment and Federal military
personnel.............................................
Table A-6: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry division and State............. ...... ......
Table A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments for
selected areas, by industry division................

Continued next page

1
2
7
8
9
10
13

Employment
and Earnings
CONTENTS - Continued

Pago

B-Labor Turnover
Table B-l: Monthly labor turnover rates in manufacturing........
Table B-2: Monthly labor turnover rates in selected industries. •
The national employment figures
shown in this
adjusted to

report have been
first quarter 1956

benchmark levels.

**********

To renew

your

C-Hours and Earnings
Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers or
nonsupervisory employees.......................... .
Table C-2: Gross average weekly earnings of production workers
in selected industries, in current and 1947-49
dollars............................................ .
Table C-3: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable, of
production workers in manufacturing, in current and
1947-49 dollars.......................................
Table G—14s Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding over­
time, of production workers in manufacturing, by
major industry group.................................
Table C-5: Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours in industrial
and construction activity................. ..........
Table G-6; Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for selected States and
areas............................... ..................

28
37
37
38
39
41

subscription to

Employment and Earnings, and to
obtain

23
24

additional data free of

Note.— May 1957 data are preliminary.

EXPLANATORY NOTES

charge, see pages 9-E and 10-E.




INTRODUCTION.......................................................
ESTABLISHMENT REPORTS s
Collection................................................... .
Industrial Classification.... .................................
Coverage.............. ..........................................
DEFINITIONS AND ESTIMATING METHODS:
Employment......................................................
Labor Turnover..................................................
Hours and Earnings.... .........................................
STATISTICS FOR STATES AND AREAS...................................
SUMMARY OF MSTHODS FOR COMPUTING NATIONAL STATISTICS............
GLOSSARY............................................................

1-E
1-E
1-E
1-E
2-E
3 -E

4-E
5-E
6-E
7-E

**********
REGIONAL OFFICES AND COOPERATING STATE AGENCIES

Inside back cover

HOURLY EARNINGS EXCLUDING OVERTIME PAY
Shirley Grossman
With this issue of Employment and Earnings,
The U. S. Departtent of Labor's Bureau of Labor
Statistics begins publication of hourly earn­
ings excluding preaiua overtime pay for each
of 20 aajor n a n u f a cturing industry groups.
Siailar data have previously been available
only for Manufacturing, durable goods, and
nondurable goods. Nov, as a result of regu­
lar collection of overtiae hours statistics,
industry group data are available froa January
1956 forward. The series assuaes that overtiae hours are paid at the rate of tiae and
one-half; no a d j u s t a e n t is aade for other
preaiua payaents, such as shift differentials,
holiday work, and overtiae at rates other than
tiae and o ne-half (e.g., any overtiae work
paid at double tiae would be treated as if it
were paid at tiae and one-half).

The table was based on an analysis of the
hours of work in aore than 100 aanufacturing
industries for which BLS data were available.
Total average weekly hours per eaployee and
average weekly overtiae hours were deterained
for each industry, and the relationship at
v arious levels of w e ekly hours produced a
aatheaatical foraula that could be used to
estiaate the probable nuaberof overtiae hours
for any given workweek. Further calculation
produced the correction necessary to eliainate
preaiua overtiae pay at the rate of tiae and
one-half. The table then provided the percent
of earnings estiaated to be straight tiae for
each tenth of an hour of weekly hours.
Earnings excluding overtiae preaiua pay
have been prepared by use of the table for
aanufacturing, durable goods, and nondurable
goods since 1941.

Earnings Excluding Overtiae a Vorld War II Development

Factors Reliable for
Total Manufacturing

Straight-tiae earnings statistics for aanufacturing were developed early in World War
II to provide a measurement of the trend of
basic wage rates (as distinguished froa earn­
ings) during the war period.

In 1947, the Bureau again collected inforaation on overtiae hours and earnings as well
as total hours and gross earnings froa about
2,000 aanufacturing e s t a blishments. A c o m ­
parison of actual earnings excluding overtiae
preaiua and earnings coaputed by use of the
table proved the adjustaent factors reliable
for total aanufacturing and for durable and
nondurable goods.

Statistics had been collected relating to
the averag e h o urly ear n i n g s of p r o d u c t i o n
workers in various industries and areas. Most
of the available aaterial, however, reflected
the influence of o v e r t i a e work at p r e a i u a
rates. Inclusion of this extra coapensation
prevented coaparisons between groups of workers
w ho aight be w o r k i n g d i f f e r e n t aao u n t s of
overtiae and also prevented accurate aeasure­
aent of wage rate changes froa one period to
another.
In response to increased interest
wage rates, the Bureau prepared a
adjustaent factors which peraitted
tion of preaiua overtiae payaents on
aated basis.




When applied to individual industry groups,
the adjustaent factors were less successful.
In general, they tended to take out too auch
overtiae for aost industries averaging about
40 hours a week and for industries exeapt froa
the overtiae p r o v i s i o n s of the Fair Labor
Standards Act. Conversely, the factors reaoved too little overtime froa soie industries,
such as apparel, in which overtiae rates are
often paid after 35 hours.

in basic
table of
eliainaan esti-

iii

Table 1. Average hourly earnings, excluding premium overtime, of
production workers in manufacturing, by major industry group 1/
January 1956-March 1957

1957

1956

Feb.

Jan.

$1.99

$1.98

$1.91

$1.98

$1.96

$1.94

$1.93

2.11
Ordnance and accessories.........
Lumber and wood products..........
Furniture and fixtures......
Stone, clay, and glass
products.............. ..........
Primary metal industries.........
Fabricated metal products...... .
Machinery (except electrical)....
Electrical machinery....... ......
Transportation equipment.........
Instruments and related

Mar.

Annual
average

$1.99

Major industry group

2.10

2.10

2.03

2.09

2.06

2.06

2.06

2.23
1.71
1.69

2.22
1.67
1.68

2.21
1.66
1.67

2.12
1.69
1.64

2.18
1.68
1.67

2.17
1.71
1.66

2.16
1.72
1.66

2.14
1.73
1.66

1.95
2.40
2.07
2.20
2.01
2.30

1.94
2.39
2.06
2.19
2.00
2.29

1.95
2.39
2.06
2.18
1.99
2.29

1.88
2.29
1.99
2.12
1.92
2.23

1.93
2.37
2.06
2.17
1.98
2.30

1.92
2.36
2.04
2.17
1.97
2.27

1.91
2.35
2.04
2.15
1.95
2.27

1.90
2.34
2.03
2.15
1.94
2.27

Dec.

Nov.

Oct.

Sept.

2.04

2.03

2.03

1.96

2.01

2.00

1.99

1.99

Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries......................

1.76

1.76

1.96

1.69

1.73

1.72

1.71

1.70

Nondurable goods 2/..........

1.81

1.81

1.81

1.75

1.80

1.78

1.77

1.76

Food and kindred products........
Tobacco manufactures.............

1.87
1.51
1.46

1.86
1.48
1.46

1.86
1.47
1.45

1.76
1.43
1.40

1.82
1.45
1.45

1.81
1.43
1.45

1.76
1.37
1.44

1.73
1.36
1.40

1.47
1.91

1.45
1.90

1.47
1.89

1.43
1.84

1.47
1.89

1.46
1.88

1.46
1.88

1.46
1.87

2.12

2.11

2.11

2.05

2.10

2.09

2.06

2.06

2.52
2.14
1.51

2.51
2.15
1.50

2.54
2.15
1.50

2.47
2.09
1.47

2.52
2.15
1.49

2.51
2.10
1.50

2.50
2.11
1.49

2.52
2.12
1.49

Apparel and other finished

Chemicals and allied
Products of petroleum and
Rubber products.... .............




iv

Table 1. Average hourly earnings, excluding premium overtime, of
production workers in manufacturing, by major industry group 1/
January 1950-March 1957— Continued
1950
Major industry group
Aug.

July

June

May

Apr.

Mar.

Feb«

Jan.

$1.91

$1.90

$1.91

$1.90

$1.90

$1.88

$1.86

$1.87

2.03

2.01

2.02

2.01

2.00

1.99

1.98

1.96

2.13
1.73
1.64

2.13
1.73
1.63

2.13
1.74
1.64

2.10
1.71
1.63

2.09
1.69
1.63

2.06
1.64
1.62

2.06
1.59
1.60

2.05
1.59
1.60

1.89
2.30
2.00
2.12
1.93
2.24

1.88
2.20
1.96
2.11
1.93
2.23

1.88
2.26
1.99
2.10
1.91
2.22

1.86
2.26
1.97
2.09
1.90
2.21

1.85
2.25
1.97
2.09
1.90
2.20

1.84
2.24
1.96
2.08
1.88
2.18

1.83
2.24
1.95
2.08
1.87
2.18

1.84
2.24
1.95
2.07
1.86
2.18

1.97

1.97

1.95

1.94

1.93

1.92

1.91

1.91

1.69

1.70

1.69

1.69

1.69

1.68

1.66

1.66

Nondurable goods 2/.....

1.75

1.76

1.75

1.75

1.74

1.73

1.70

1.70

Food and kindred products....
Tobacco manufactures........
Textile-mill products.......
Apparel and other finished
textile products...........
Paper and allied products....
Chemicals and allied
products....... ............
Products of petroleum
and coal...................
Rubber products......... .
Leather and leather predicts.

1.73
1.41
1.40

1.76
1.49
1.40

1.76
1.49
1.40

1.76
1.48
1.40

1.77
1.47
1.39

1.77
1.46
1.39

1.74
1.38
1.37

1.74
1.38
1.37

1.45
1.86

1.44
1.85

1.43
1.83

1.41
1.81

1.41
1.80

1.42
1.79

1.37
1.78

1.37
1.79

2.08

2.06

2.06

2.04

2.02

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.48
2.10
1.48

2.49
2.09
1.47

2.48
2.08
1.47

2.48
2.09
1.48

2.48
2.08
1.47

2.45
2.08
1.46

2.40
2.07
1.42

2.36
2.06
1.41

Manufacturing. *.............

Ordnance and accessories.....
Lumber and wood products....
Furniture and fixtures......
Stone, clay, and glass

Fabricated metal products....
Machinery (except electrical)
Transportation equipment....
Instruments and related
products....................
Miscellaneous manufacturing

1/ Derived by assuming that the overtime hours shown in table 4 are paid for at the rate
of time and one-half.
2 / Data are not available separately for the printing, publishing, and allied industries
group, as graduated overtime rates are found to an extent likely to make average overtime pay
significantly above time and one-half. Inclusion of data for the industry in the nondurablegoods total has little effect.
N O T E . — Current data are shown in table C-4.




v

Overtime Honrs Are Now Collected Monthly

January 1957, registering an increase of 1 or
2 cents in alaost every aonth (table 1). In­
dividually, nearly all of the industry groups
showed a parallel trend. This can be expected
in a period of rising wage rates, with each
industry following the general trend to e n ­
able it to coapete for workers. When there
is a strong upward aoveaent, rates in the var­
ious industries Bay increase aore or less than
average, but seldoB decline.

In January 1956, the Bureau began collect­
ing data on overtiae hours froa aanufacturing
eaployers as part of its regular eaployaent
statistics prograa, and consequently no longer
needs to rely on the table of adjustment fac­
tors to separate overtiae froa straight-time
hours. The overtiae hours reported are those
hours in excess of noraal scheduled hours for
which preaiua rates are paid.
T h ese data,
available by industry, also perait computation
of overtiae earnings and earnings excluding
preaiua overtiae pay by industry.

Increases froa January 1956 through January
1957 rang e d froB 7 cents in f u r n i t u r e and
rubber to 18 cents in petroleua. The textile
industry, although it has been undergoing d i f ­
ficulties for soae tiae, showed an 8-cent rise.

Data for aanufacturing and durable and non­
durable goods have been revised back to January
1956, using the regularly collected data in­
stead of the foraula. Since the differences
were found to be insignificant at these in­
dustry levels, 1956 data on the new basis are
considered coaparable with data back to 1941.
Earnings excluding preaiua overtiae are not
available for individual industry groups prior
to January 1956.

Hard-goods industries generally had larger
increases than industries in the soft-goods
segment.
Ordnance had a 16-cent increase,
followed by primary aetals with a 15-cent in­
crease and electrical aachinery with a rise

Average Hourly Earnings,
Excluding Premium Overtime, in Selected Industries

Derivation of Data

JANUARY 1956 - MARCH 1957

Average hourly earnings excluding overtiae
are coaputed froa January 1956 forward by d i ­
viding total production-worker payroll by the
sua of total production-worker aan-hours and
one-half of total overtiae aan-hours.
(See
glossary, pp. 7-E and 8-E. for definitions.)
This Bethod eliminates the preaiua earnings
due to overtiae paid for at one and one-half
tiaes the straight-tiae rates.

DOLLARS
2.10

2.00

____________'

MANUFACTURING

1.90

-

/ ------------ "

FOOD y

1.80

1.70

Earnings Without Overtiae
Reflect Basic Wage Rate Increases

¡T

'

LUMBER ^

1.60

Hourly earnings with the influence of overtiae premium pay removed clearly show the pat­
tern of rising wages d u r i n g 1956 and early
1957.

1.50

-

<

>

o]1-------L
J

f

m

a

m

j

j

1956

Hourly rates in aanufacturing rose by an
average of 11 cents froa January 1956 through




_J------I-------- I-------1
-------1
------- 1
-------1
------- 1
------- 1
-------1
-------

U I D S A E DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
N TE T T S
B RA O LBRSAITC
U EU F AO TTSIS

vi

a

s

o

n

d

j

1

_ J ___J
f

m

1957

of 13 cents. Except for petroleum (18 cents),
earnings excluding overtime in nondurablegoods industries rose 12 cents or less over
the year.

Seasonal Factors Evident
in a Few Industries
Three industries— food, tobacco, and lumber— show the influences of seasonal factors
in the trend of earnings. Both food and tobacco expand employment in late summer and
Table 2.

early fall by hiring large numbers of temporary, relatively lower paid workers. Earnings
excluding overtime for these industries were
lower during the third quarter of 1956, rising
sharply in the last quarter as seasonal workers
quit or were laid off.
In the lumber industry (see chart), summer
brings expanded employment in the North and
Northwest where wage rates are higher than in
other parts of the country. The seasonal pattern of earnings excluding overtime in lumber

Wee k l y hours of work in manufac t u r i n g by m a jor industry group
A nnual average, 1950
Gross
average
weekly
hours

Average
overtime
hours
2.8

Durable g o o d s ............................

40.4

38. 1

41.1

2. 9
3-3

M a n u f a c t u r i n g . ....... .

37.6

3.0

Major industry group

Average
straighttime hours

41. 8
40. 3
40.8
41.1
40. 9
41.2
42.2
40.8
41. 0
40.8
40.3

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ..................
Instruments and related p r o d u c t s ........
M i s c e llaneous ma n u f a c t u r i n g industries..

2. 9
2. 3
2.6

38.9
37.0
38.0
37. 5
38. 1
38.2
38.5
38.2
38. 1
38.5
37.7

N ondurable g o o d s . ........................

2.5

37.0

39.5

3.3
1 .1

37.7
37.8
37.1
35. 1
38.2
35.6
39.0
39.1
37.4
36.2

41.0
38.9
39.7
30.3
42.8
38.8
41.3
41. 1
40.2
37. 6

Furniture and f i x t u r e s . . ..................
Stone, clay, and glass p r o d u c t s . . . ..... .

2.8

3. 6
2.8

3.0
3.7
2.6

2.0

Apparel and other finished textile products

1.2

Printing, publishing, and allied industries.

4.6
3.2
2.3




2.0
2.8

1.4

vi i

is the reverse of food and t o b a c co-higher in
the summer months vith a subsequent decline
with the approach of winter.

Overtime Adds About 7 Cents Per Hour
On the a l l - m a n u f a c t u r i n g level, hourly
earnings excluding overtime averaged about 7
cents below the gross figure of $1.98 in 1956.
The d i f f e r e n c e b e t w e e n gross ear n i n g s and
earnings wit h o u t o v e r t i m e p r e m i u m pay was
slightly greater in the durable-goods sector
where more overtime was worked per week; dur­
able-goods indu s t r i e s a v e r a g e d 3 hours of
overtime w e e k l y in 1956, while nondur a ble
goods averaged 2-3$ (table 2). For the hardgoods segment, o v e r t i m e added 7 cents per
hour, as compared to 5 cents for soft goods.
Among i n d i v i d u a l indust r i e s , overtime
added as much as 10 cents an hour in the paper
industry and as little as 2 cents in tobacco.
Again, the wide range reflected the difference
in amount of o v e r t i m e worked per week — 4#
hours in paper and 1 hour in tobacco.

Straight-Time Hours Obtainable
by Subtraction
Straight-time hours in manufacturing (aver­
age weekly hours minus overtime) averaged 37.6

NOTE.— Next month's issue of Employment
time pay in American industry.

and

hours in 1956, and the maximum regular wor k ­
week recorded was 39.1 hours.
Since the 40-hour workweek has come to be
regarded as standard, a few possible reasons
for the seeming shortness of the actual week
might be mentioned here:
(1) Although many establishments in an in­
dustry may be working a 40-hour week plus sev­
eral hours of overtime, other establishments,
for reasons either economic or traditional,
may work fewer than 40 hours and have no over­
time. In this way, they tend to reduce both
average overtime and average straight time.
(2) Even within a plant where a 40-hour
week plus overtime is scheduled, some workers,
by order or for personal reasons, may work and
be paid for less than 40 hours. Others may
normally work only part time, or may have been
hired on a temporary basis for only part of
the week.
(3) In some establishments overtime p a y ­
ment may begin after 35 to 39 hours instead
of 40, usually as a result of labor-management
agreements. Provisions of this nature are es­
pecially prevalent in the apparel industry,
where the straight-time workweek averaged 35.1
hours in 1956.

Earnings will feature an article on over­

Included will be a table showing estimates of average weekly overtime pay for

20 manufacturing major industry groups, January 1956-June 1957.




viii

Gross Average Hourly Earnings
A n n u a l

A v e r a g e ,

1 9 4 9 - 5 6

DOLLARS

1 9 4 9

1 9 5 0

1951

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

432953 O - 5 7

-2




1 9 5 2

1 9 5 3

1 9 5 4

1 9 5 5

1 9 5 6

AVERA G E

HOURLY

EARNINGS

OF

PRODUCTION

WORKERS

IN M A N U F A C T U R I N G

Gross a n d Excluding Overtime

DOLLARS

DOLLARS

$2.25

$2.25

2 .0 0 -

2 .00

1.75 -

1.75

GROSS AVERAGE
HOURLY EARNINGS

1.50

1.50

1.25

1.25

1.0 0

1.00

.75

.75
AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS
EXCLUDING OVERTIME

.50

.50

.25

.25

1941

1942

1943

Digitized for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
FRASER
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS


1944

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

Data for May 1957: Preliminary
* Data Not Available

Table 1. Employ««« in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and selected groups
(In thousands)
Year
ago

Current
Industry divi s i o n and group

June 1957
1/
TOTAL.

MINING............................
Met a l m i n i n g ........................
B i t u m i n o u s - c o a l .................. *.
N o n m e t a l l i c mini n g and quarrying.

52,727

851

11*. 3
2 * 0 .6

II 9.2

May 1957

52,1*20
836
112.2

238.8
117*8

June

April
1957

1956

52,2*5

52,135

833

110.8
239 .O
II 5 .3

833
112 .0
233 .*
119 .7

June 1957
net

from:

change

Previous
month

Yea r
ago

+307

+ 592

+
+
+
+

♦ 18
+ 2.3
+ 7.2
.5

15

2 .1
1.8
l. k

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.

3,210

3,080

2,906

3,2 37

+130

- 27

MANUFACTURING........

16,826

l6 ,7 l8
l

16,822

16,825

+ 78

+

DURABLE GOODS.................................................................... .

Or d n a n c e and a c c e s s o r i e s ..... .............
L u m b e r and woo d p r o d u c t s (except
f u r n i t u r e ).................................. .
Fur n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s .....................
Stone, clay, and glass p r o d u c t s ..........
Pr i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ............. .
F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (except
ordnance, machinery, and transpor t a t i o n
e q u i p m e n t ) .................................. .
M a c h i n e r y (except e l e c t r i c a l ) . . . . ........
Elec t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y ........................
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ...................
Inst ruments and r e lated p r o d u c t s ..........
M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g industries...
NONDURABLE GOODS................................................

Foo d and k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ..... ,....
Tob a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s .................
Text i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ................
Appa r e l and o t h e r f inished textile
p r o d u c t s ...............................
P a p e r and a llied p r o d u c t s ...........
Printing, publishing, and allied
i n d u s t r i e s ............................
Chem i c a l s and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ......
Prod u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m and coal.....
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s .......................
Lea t h e r and l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s .......

9,879 ^

9,880
127.6

9,927 L
129.*

9,800
130.5

-

127.6

1
0

+ 79
- 2.9

728.5
371.*
550.0
1,315-0

70*.3
368.3
550.1
1,315.3

68O.O

781.6
372 .8
569 .*
1 ,3 3 5 .7

♦ 2 b .2
* 3.1
.1
.3

- 53.1
- l. k
- I9 .k
- 20.7

1 ,122.8

1 ,121 .*

1 ,128.2
1 ,750 .1
1 ,216.2

1 ,098.7
1 ,72*.0

+

l. k

-

20.U

1.193.5
1 .766.6
333.3
*9*.3

+ 5.7
- 17.3
- 1 .1
+ 3*6

- 2 k .l
•
- I6 .8
+ 21 .
+I 5I .9
+ 5.2
- 9*7

6,895
1,*33.1

82.8
1 ,012.1

7,025
1,550.3
86 .*
1,057-8

+ 79
+ V 7.8
+
.3
- 1.0

- 78
- 1 9.6
*
- 3.8
- 5^.2

+ 15 .O
+ 7.1

+
+

+

+ 16.2
+ 5.0
* 5.7
- 1*.3
- 6 .k

1,707.2
1 ,21*.9
1,918.5
338.5
*8*.6

WHOLESALE TRADE.................................................
R E T A IL TRADE.........................................................

Gene r a l m e r c h a n d i s e s t o r e s ..........
Food and liquor s t o r e s . . . . . .........
Auto m o t i v e and a ccessories dealers.
Apparel and access o r i e s s t o r e s .....
Other r etail t r a d e ....................

1,950.8
3*2.3
18 0 .1
)

6,868

1,186.5

580.2

1,171.5
573.1

1,20*.5
575.0

1 ,18 1.8
572 .I

866.1

860.2

863.8
8*1 .8
256.8

8* 9 .9
828.0

82.6
1 ,003.6

833.0
261 .*

258.1
37^.5
*
CI
V

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.

1,727.6
1 ,209.2
1,935.8
339-6
l8 l.O
t

372.5
5*9.0
1 ,328.0

6.9^7
1,500.7

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES.
TRANSPORTATION...................................................
COMMUNICATION.....................................................
OTHER P U B L IC U T I L I T I E S ...............................

1

1,*52.9
82.3
1 ,00*.6

837-5
257.5
262.5
366.3

3,123
8,325
1,372.9
1,601.7
799.9
622.*
3,920.3

:

U

+

8 ,2

597

+ 13
+ h
+ l
+ 8

- 21
- kk
+ 17
+ 6

11,*28

11,236

+ 1*7

+212
*112
+100
*
+
+

^,153
2,7*7

810

809

11 ,1)01

255.7
262 .*
380.9

5.9
U.5

3,021

1,378.7
1,599.1
798.0
622.7
3,893.3

3,11*
8,31*
1,1)01.9
1 ,602.6
795.8
657.9
3,855.6

3,870.1

* lk
+ 33
- 5.8
+ 2.6
+ 1.9
.3
* 35.0

3,109

8,292

8 .1

*,191
2,798
79k
599

V 57
2,750
597

11,**8

2*9.7
375.3

-

k .T

8,225
1 ,380.2
1 ,55^-2

808.6
6 11.9

7.3
vr.5

8 .7
10.5
58.2

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE.

2,357

2,331

2,320

2,328

+ 26

+ 29

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS...........

6,5*7

6,511

6 ,*32

6,320

♦ 36

+227

GOVERNMENT......

7,318

7,356

7,351
2,205
5,1

7,165
2,193
*,972

■ 38
- 2
“ 36

+ 153
* 7
+ llf6

FEDERAL.....................
STATE AND LOCAL.

1/ Pre l i m i n a r y .




2,200
5,118

2,202
5,15^

Table 2. Production workers in m anufacturing, by major industry group
(In t h o u s a n d s )
Year
ago

Current
Major industry group

June 1957

May 1957
1/

1/

April

June

June 1957
ne t c h a n g e from:
Year
a go

Previous
month

1957

1956

MANUFACTURING.............................

12,935

12,886

12,960

13,108

+49

-173

DURABLE GOODS.......................................................................

7,575

7,587

7,635

7,636

-12

- 61

75.5

76.2

78 .3

83.2

658.9
310.8

Lumber and wood products

634.5
307.9
6
1 ,009.5

611.8
311.5
455.2
1 ,101.0

882.5
1 ,254.9

.7

- 7.7

712.8
312.3
477.4
1 ,118.9

+24.4
+ 2.9
- 1.0
+ 1.4

- 53.9
- 1.5
- 22.8
- 28.0

889.4
1 ,277.3
853.0

1,446.0
229.5
382.3

870.7
1 ,274.0
861.7
1 ,298.6
228.5
398.0

- .7
-21.7
+ .9
-I7 .8
- 1.7
+ 2.5

+ 11 .1
- 40.8
- I 5.5
+114.1
- 3.5
- 12.5

5,325

5,472

+61

-112

1 ,094.4
7 8 .1
965.8

+40.7
+ .2
- 1.6

- 49.2
- 4.9
- 54.9

+ 12.8
+ 6.4

+
+

454.6
Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n

1 ,090.9
881.8

I n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ...........
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries...

1,233.2
846.2
1,412.7
225 .O
385.5

8*5.3
1,*30.5

226.7

383.0

+
+
+

+ 9.5
- 10.8
+ 3.6
- 2.7
- 7.0

5,360

5,299

1,045.2
73.2

1,004.5
73.0

989.8

910.9

912.5

919.4

1,050.4

1,037.6
464.7

1,068.9

471.1

467.1

1 ,050.3
466.9

558.9
537.8

556.2
546.1

559.2

549.4

178.8

174.8

200.7
333.0

NONDURABLE GOODS............................................................. .

325.2

73.6

Apparel and other finished textile

Printing,

publishing,

.1

4.2

and allied

C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...............

204.6

l/ P r e l i m i n a r y .




-

(except

X ii

549.1
173.4
191.3

333.6

548.6

175.2

203.4
340.0

2 .7

8.3
4.0
3.9
7.8

Table 3. Hours and gross e arn in gs of production workers in m anufacturing,
by major industry group

Major industry group

Average weekly
earnings
1956
19 57
May
June
June
1/
1/

Average weekly
hours
June
1/

May
1/

June

June
1/

May
1/

June

Average hourly
earnings
1956

1957

1956

1957

MANUFACTURING...................

$82.59

$ 81.78

$ 79.19

39.9

39.7

40.2

$2.07

$ 2.06

$1.97

DURABLE GOODS..................

88.70

87.64

85.27

40.5

40.2

40.8

2.19

2.18

2.09

Ordnance and accessories......
Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)...........
Furniture and fixtures.......
Stone, clay, and glass

94.37

94.42

91.52

40.5

40.7

41.6

2.33

2.32

2.20

73.35

73.31
68.11

40.3
40.0

40.3
39.2

40.5
40.3

I .85
1.75

1.82

1.81

1.73

1.69

41.4
40.9

2.02

2.47

2.46

I .96
2.34

2.17
2.29

2.28

74.56

70.00
82.42

Primary metal industries.....
Fabricated metal products
(except ordnance, machinery,
and transportation equip­
ment )........................
Machinery (except electrical).
Electrical machinery..........
Transportation equipment.....
Instruments and related
products.....................
Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries...................

67.82

98.80

97.42

81.14
95.71

40.8
40.0

40.7

89.40

87.94
93.71

84.46

40.9

94.35

83.22

82.21

92.20

41.1
40.1
39.9

41.0
42.1
40.6
39.9

2.39

2.05
2.37

2.29

82.21

39.6

2.02

96.32

94.56

79.98
91.37

41.2
41.2
40.4
40.3

85.26

83.81

81.20

40.6

40.1

40.6

2.10

2.09

2.00

72.04

71.86

69.77

39.8

39.7

40.1

1.81

1.81

1.74

NONDURABLE GOODS...... ........

73.90

73.13

70.95

39.1

38.9

39.2

I .89

1.88

1.81

Food and kindred products....

78.96

78.38
61.46
57.60

75-21
59.58
55.87

40.7

40.4

1.94

1.83

39.0

38.9
38.4

41.1
39.2

1.94

38.8

38.8

1.58
1.50

1.58
1.50

1.52

52.98
84.00

51.48
82.41

35.7
42.3

35.5
42.7

1.48
2.03

1.48

42.0

2.00

1.45
1.93

96.64

93.80

38.3
41.1

38.5
41.1

38.6

87.77

41.4

2.51
2.23

2.51
2.20

2.12

104.81
84.74
55-95

40.8
40.3
37.8

41.0
40.1
36.3

41.1
39.6
37.3

2.65
2.22

2.61
2.22

2.55
2.14

1.55

1.54

1.50

61.30

Textile-mill products........
58.50
Apparel and other finished
textile products............. 52.84
Paper and allied products.... 85.87
Printing, publishing, and
allied industries............ 96.13
Chemicals and allied products. 91.65
Products of petroleum and
coal.......................... 108.12
Rubber products............... 89.47
Leather and leather products.. 58.59

90.42

107.01
89.02
55.90

1/ P r e l i m i n a r y .




Xiii

35.8

2.06

2.15

2.06
2.19
1.97

1.44

2.43

Tablo A. Gross average w eekly hours and a ve rag e overtime hours of production
w orkers in manufacturing, b y m ajor industry group
June 1957
M a jo r i n d u s t r y

G ross
a vera ge
w e e k ly
h ou rs

group

Kay 19*57

A verag e
over­
t im e
h ou rs

G ross
a vera ge
w e e k ly
h ou rs

A u r i l 1<W7
A vera g e
G ross
A verage
over­
a vera ge
over­
t im e
w e e k ly
t im e
h ou rs
h ou rs
h ou rs

June 1956
G ross
avera ge
w e e k ly
hou rs

A vera g e
over­
t im e
hou rs

MANUFACTURING..............................

39-9

2.4

39.7

2.2

39.8

2.3

40.2

2.7

DURABLE QOODS.....................................

40.5

2.4

40.2

2 .2

U0.5

2.4

40.8

2.9

-

40.'7
40.3
39.2
40.7
39.6

2.2

in.4
40.0
39-7
40.4
39-8

2.4

2.7
I .9
3 .I
I .9

2.6
2.0

41.6
40.5
40.3
41.4
40.9

2-7
3.5
2.5
3.7
2.9
2.9
3.6
2.4

Lum ber a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) . . . .
F u r n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s ...............................................................

F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t o rd n a n ce ,
m a c h i n e r y , an d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ) . . . . . .

-

-

-

2.2

2 .1
2.2

41.0
42.1
40.6
39-9
40.6
40.1

38.9

2.2

38.9

2.2

39-2

2.4

40.4
38.9
38.4
35.8
42.0
38.5
41.1
41.0
40.1
36.3

3.0

40.0

1 .1
I .9
1 .0

36.8
38.6

2.7
•5

41.1
39-2

3.5
1.3

-

•

39.1

2.3

-

-

-

-

-

A p p a r e l and o t h e r

fin is h e d

t e x t ile

p r o d u c t s ....

P r in tin g ,

p u b lis h in g ,

and a l l i e d

in d u s t r ie s .. . .

Chemicals and allied products .............................................

-

-

jJ Preliminary.




xlv

2.0

40.9
41.4
40.3
40.6
40.6
39-9

40.9
41.1
40.1
39.9
40.1
39.7

-

2.9

2.7
2.7
I .9
1.5
1.9

4.0

2 .8
2.2
2.2

2.4
•9

35-7

42.1
38.5

41.2
41.2
40.0
36.9

2.7
3 .O

2.0

2.4

2 .1
1 .1

4.2
2.9

2.2
2.2

2.4
1.1

2.2
2.2
2.3

38.8

2.2

35-5

•9
4.4
3.0
2.3

42.7
38.6

41.4
41.1
39-6
37.3

2.2
2.3
1.0

Table 5. Index of employees in n on agrkultu ral establishments,
by industry division
( 1947 - 49 = 1 0 0 )

Year

Current

ago

Industry division
June

m y 1957

1957
1/

ll

April
1957

June

119.2

TOTAL....................................

120.5

119.8

II 9 A

C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n .....................

89 .B
152.5

138 .I

112 .7

88.2
1*
16.3
112.2

102 .k
I 2I .7
136.6

102.1
121.2
I3 5 .I

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n and public
u t i l i t i e s ............. ......................
Finance,

insurance,

and real estate...

133.8
I 29.3

133.1
I 3 O.O

87.9

112.7

1956

87.9
153.8
112 .7

102.0
121.5

102-9
119.1»
13 M

129.9

I 26.6

1 3^
I 3 I .5

129.2

ll P r e l i m i n a r y .

Table 6. Index of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group,
( 1947 - 4 9 = 1 0 0 )

Year
ago

Current
Major

industry group
Jun e

I 957

April
1957

June

1/

ffey 1957

1/

1956

MANUFACTURING............................

10U .6

10^.2

10U .8

106.0

DURABLE GOODS................................................................

113.5

II 3 .7

ll4,U

llU.lt

335.3

335.3

3I A .1

366.2

89.3
105.3
10k .6

86.0
10lt.3

10^.8
105.9

82.9
105.6
10U .6
107 .O

96.6
105.6
109.7
108.7

113 .^

uA.l

138.2
116.0
101.6

132.0
139.9
117.0
100.8

133.2
lUi.it

111.8
112.0
13^.6
127 .O
II8.0

9>Kl

93.0

93.5

96.1

L u m b e r and w o od p r o d u c t s (except
f u r n i t u r e )..................................

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s .................
F a b r i c a t e d metal products (except
o r dn a n ce , m a c h in e r y, and t r a n s ­
p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ) .....................

1 0 6 .0

113.2
108 .k

UO.lf

132.1
I n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s .......
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries .
NONDURABLE GOODS........................................................

112.3

118.6
100.5

IOU.7

88.3

Apparel and other finished textile
P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ................
Printing, publishing, and allied

8U .9

83.6

69.1

69.1

T^.5

7^-7

75-2

92.U
73.8
79 .I

100.8
117.6

116.1

99-7

102.7
116.6

II 6.6

116.3

115.7

116.3
107.6

C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...........
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l .........

I 05 .lt
96.2

L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ............

98.7
92 .I

107.0

94.1

100.7
89.9

l j Preliminary.




XV

70.0

93.0
93.8
92.3

100.8
lilt - . 2

107.6
9U.I
99-7

9U .0

S e a s o n a lly A d j u s t e d

D a ta

Table 7. Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division, seasonally adjusted
Number
(In t h o u s a n d s )

Index
( 1947 - 4 9 «=100 )
Industry division
June

June

May

April

June

1956

1957 1/

1957 1[

1957

1956

1 2 0 .3

120.3

120. 2

118. 9

52 ,6 1 5

52 ,639

52 ,5 6 8

5 2 , 026

89-3

8g. 0
14 7 .0

88. 7

841

829

113-4
1 0 2 .2
122. 6

847
3.0 8 7
16,893

3.°95

1 1 3 .1
10 2-0
12 2 .5

1 3 5 -1
1 3 1 .1
1 2 9 .5

129- 4

3.059
16,965
4 , 160
1 1 ,5 0 1
2 ,3 2 0
6 ,4 0 0
7,3 22

3.113
16,895

I3 5 * 2

87.4
1 4 7 .9
1 1 3 -2
10 2- 5
120. 2
133- 5
127- 3
126. 8

844

145- 3
113.6
102. 2
122. 2
134-4
130-8

129.5

Transportation and public utilities..
W h o l e s a l e a n d r e t a i l t r a d e ..............
Finance, insurance, and real estate..

June

1957

13 1.8

M i n i n g ...........................................

April

1957 1/

146.7

TOTAL..................................

May

1957 1/

1 6 .9 3 5
4,160

4.153
11,522
2 »334
6 ,4 5 0

11. 532
2.331

I.3 2 9

7.327

6.415

4.174
11,307

2 .3 0 5
6, 227
7 . 176

%/ Preliminary.

Table 8. Production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group, seasonally adjusted
Number
(In tho u s a n d s )

Index
( 1947 - 4 9 = 1 0 0 )
Major

industry group
June

and

glass

p r o d u c t s .........

April

June

1957 1 /

1957

1956

105. l

1 0 5 .7

105- 9

1 0 6 .5

13,006

13,068

13. 094

13 .1 7 8

113- 4

11 4. 0

114-4

114- 3

7.571

7, 60 9

7.637

7, 628

335-3

335-3

344- 1

36 6.2

76

76

78

83

8 6 .3
108. 7
104. 1
106. 0

8 5 -6
107. 0
104. 8
1 0 6.4

85. 1
10 6 -3
104. 6
107- 0

93- 4
1 0 9 .0
109. 2
108. 7

637
3 21
453

632
316
456
1,095

628

314
455

689
322

1 1 3-9
1 0 9 .3

114. 1
110. 6

133-4
139- 9
1 1 7 .5

133-2
1 41- 4

886
1, 221
855

118. 0

112.3
110. 9
13 6 .0
127. 0
118. 6

226

1.243
854
1 ,4 3 1
228

102. 9

101. 6

1 0 6 .3

392

9 5- 4

95- 9

95-8

97-5

90-3
7 9- 5
75- 1

9 1 .0
81.4

93-9
84. 2

75- 2

79- 1

105. 1
117. 6

105. 0

104. 8
117. 8

105. 1
116. 6

1 ,0 9 4

117- 3

116.3
107. 0
94- 6
98- 7
92- 6

clay,

(except

May

1957 1/

89 -5

Stone,

and wood products

June

1956

103. 2

Lumber

June

1957

133 - 5
138-2
116-5

DURABLE GOODS...............................................

April

1957 1 /

113- 7
10 7 .4

MANUFACTURING..........................

May

1957 1/

1 1 6 -3
107. 6

116. 9
106. 6

114.2
1 0 9 .1

93-5
101. 1
93-2

94- 1
95-3
93- 2

92-5
99-7
9 4- 6

2,091

l , 101

475
1 ,1 1 9

Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and transpor-

1.413

887

889
1 .258

853
1 . 4 46
229

1 .2 9 9
230

391

386

404

5.435

5.459

5.457

5.550

1 .0 5 9

l, 069
84
918

2.077

919

1 ,1 1 1
89
9 66

471

1 . 0 93
470

1 ,0 9 1
472

1 ,0 9 4
46 7

559
546
176
201

559
549
174
206

562

549
557

335

337

Miscellaneous manufacturing

NONDURABLE GOODS.......................................

T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s .......................
Apparel and other finished textile
P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .................
Printing, publishing, and allied

78 - 5
74-5

1/ P r e l i m i n a r y .




xvi

875
1 ,2 6 1
871

83
gn

86

544
175
194
337

172
203
342

H i s t o r i c a l Dcit.i

Table A-l: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division
(In t h o u s a n d s )

Annual

27,088

2*,125

25,569
28,128
27,770
28,505
29,539
29,691
29,710
31,0*1
29,1*3
26,383
23,377
23,*66

1929..
1930..
1931.•
1932..
1933..
193*..
1935..
1936..
1937..
1938..

25,699
26,792

28,802
30,718

28,902

1939-•

30,311

19*0 ..

32,058
36,220

19*1..
19*2..
19*3-.
19**..
19*5..
19*6 ..
19*7-.
19*8..

39,779
*2,106
*1,53*
*0,037
*1,287
*3,*62

1,230
953

920

1,203

1,092
1,080

1,176
1,105
1,0*1

1,078
1,000
86*
722
735
37*

888
937

Manufac­
turing

Transpor­
Wholesale
t a t i o n and'
and retail
public
trade
utilities

Finance,
insurance,
and real
estate

Service
and
miscel­
laneous

Govern­
ment

May......
June.....
July.....
August....
September.
October...
November..
December..
January...
February..
March....
Apr il ....
M a y ......

51,258

52,258

52,663

52,952
53,007
53,639

51,716
51,70*
51,89*
52,21*5
52 ,1*20

1,555

1,608
1,606
1,*97
1,372
1,21*
970

809
862
912

1,1*5

*,66*
*,623
*,75*
5,08*
5,*9*
5,626
5,810
6,033
6,165
6,137

1,050
1,110
1,097
1,079
1,123
1,163
1,166
1,235
1,295
1,360

2,05*
2,1*2
2,187
2,268
2,*31
2,516
2,591
2,755
2,871
2,962

2,671
2,603
2,531
2,5*2
2,611
2,723
2,802
2,8*8
2,917
2,996

10,53*
9,*01
8,021

3,907
3,675
3,2*3
2,80*
2,659
2,736
2,771
2,956
3,11*
2,8*0

6,*01
6,06*
5,531
*,907

1,*31
1,398
1,333

3,127
3,08*
2,913
2,682
2,61*
2,78*
2,883
3,060
3,233
3,196

3,066
3,1*9
3,26*
3,225
3,167
3,298

3,321
3,*77
3,705
3,857
3,919
3,93*
*,011
*,*7*
*,783

3,995
*,208

6,797
7,258
8,3*6
8,907
9,653

8*5

1,150
1,29*
1,790
2,170
1,567
1,09*
1,132
1,661
1,982
2,169

10,078
10,780

2,165

1*,178
l*,967
16,10*
16,33*
17,238
15,995

916

9*7
9$3
917

883
826
852
9*3

918
889
916
885
852

51,578
52,135

1,**6

3,711
3,998
3,*59
3,505
3,882
3,806
3,82*
3,9*0
3,891
3,822

10,606

*3,315
**,738
*7,3*7
*8,303
*9,681
*8,*31

1956..

1,185
1,229
1,321

10,53*
10,53*
8,132
8,986
10,155
9,523
9,786
9,997
9,839
9,786

1,112
1,055

982

50,056
51,878

1,021
8*8
1,012

1,006
882

**,**8

19*9-•
1950..
1951..
1952..
1953..
195*..
1955-.

1957:

1,12*

Contract
con­
struction

average:

1919.•
1920..
1921..
1922..
1923..
192*..
1925..
1926..
1937.•
1928..

1956r

Mining

26,829

Year and month

TOTAL

777
777

816

806
833

765

839

8*2
836
837
837

832
833
831
833

836

2,333
2,603
2,63*

2,622

2,?93
2,759

9,253

12,97*
15,051
17,381

17,111

15,302
l*,*6l
15,290
15,321

*,999
5,552
5,692

6,076
6,5*3
6,*53

2,912
3,013
3,2*8
3,*33
3,619
3,798
3,872
*,023
*,122
*,1*1

6,612
6,91*0

3,9*9
3,977
*,166
*,185
*,221

9,513
9,6*5

7, *16
7,333
7,189

7,260

7,522

8,602

9,196
9,519

10,012
10,281

10,527

*,iX>9

10,?20

*,062

1,270
1,225
1,2*7

1,262

1,313
1,355
1,3*7
1,399

1,*36
l,*8o
l ,*69
1,*35

1,*09
1,*28
1,619
1,672

7,216

6,296
6,293
6,322

6,966

11,126
11,236

2,299

*,l 6l
*,190

11 ,161*
11,198

*,191
*,189
*, 18*
*,19*

11,319

2,3*9
2,361
2,325
2,315
2,31*

2,997

17,159

2,667
2,673

2,756

16,959
16,9*5
16,933

2,906
3,080

16,822
16,7*8

11,657

2,3 28

12,260

*,1*7
*.153
*,157

2,308

11,298
11,225
11,265
11 ,1*28
11 ,1*01

*,126
1*,120

5,650

6,282
6,320

*,1*9
*,191

.11,**5

6,0*3
5,9**
5,595
5, *7*

6,751

16,730

17,238

6,080

5,661*
5,916
6,231

2,038
2 Ldfi
2, 21$
2,306

16,825

17,180

5, *83

5,856

2,970
3,237

3,17*

*,660

*,972
5,077
5,26*
5,*11
5,538

*,157

16,301

3,876

1,765
1,82*
1,892
1,967

16,905

17,035
17,119

3,7*9

*,925

2,993

3,256
3,361
3,3*2
3,296

3,662

1,7*1

10 ,8*6
11,292

16,563

3, *77

2,293
2,301
2,310

2.^20
2,331

6,3*3
6,327

6,295
6,239
6,273

6,317
6,1*32

6,511

6,086
6,389

6,609
6,6*5
6,91*
7,178

7,165
6,981
7,203
7,290
7,33*
7,589
7,302
7,33*
7,335
7,351
7,356

i

4 3 2953 0 - 5 7 - 3




1

----

Industry Employment
Table A -2 : A ll em ployees and production workers in n o n a g ricu ltu ra l
establishments, b y industry
( In

th o u sa n d s)
All

Industry

employees

1957

Production workers

195&

1956

1957

M ay

April

M ay

TOTAL....................................

52,1*20

52,245

51,578

M IN IN G .......................................................................

836

833

806

110.8
36.1
33-5
18.2

110.0
36.9
33.0
17.4

95.7
3*.o

m i n i n g ........................

112.2
38.5
33.5
17-3

28.2
14.6

15.5

9*.2
32.5
27.9
1*.9

ANTHRACITE............................

26.6

28.5

24.6

24.8

26.6

22.5

BITUMINOUS-COAL.......................

238.8

239-0

230.7

216.3

217.*

210.1

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION...........................

340.6

339-8

324.1

248.8

2*8.8

2^6.2

Petroleum and natural-gas p r oduction
( e x c e p t c o n t r a c t s e r v i c e s ) ..............

204.6

204.0

191.9

129.7

130.1

128.*

NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING......

117.8

115.3

117.0

100.6

98.0

100.1

METAL MINING..........................
I r o n m i n i n g .....................................
Lead

and

zinc

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION........................................
N O N B U 1 L D 1 NG C O N S T R U C T I O N ....................................................

H i g h w a y a n d s t r e e t ...........................
O t h e r n o n b u i l d i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n ..........
C O N S T R U C T I O N ..................... .

BUILDING

GENERAL CONTRACTORS...........................
SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS...................
P l u m b i n g a n d h e a t i n g ........................
P a i n t i n g a n d d e c o r a t i n g ....................
E l e c t r i c a l w o r k ................................
O t h e r s p e c i a l - t r a d e c o n t r a c t o r s .........

MANUFACTURING.......................................
DU RABL E

G O O D S .....................................

NONDURABLE

G O O D S .................................

3,080
660

294.9
364.7
2,420

98I .7
1,438.5
333.1
I89.6
221.1
694.7

2,906
572
237.3
334.7
2,334
944.6
1 ,389.5
334.6
176.5
218.2
660.2

2,970

628
283.5

344.7

2,342

April

M ay

686

M ay

685

673

9*.2
31.5

28.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

972.2

-

-

-

1 ,369.5
323.5

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

179-2
179.9

686.9

16,748

16,822

16,730

12,886

12,960

13,063

9,880
6,868

9,927
6,895

9,785
6,945

7,587
5,299

7,635
5,325

7,6*8

5, *15

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES....................

127.6

129.4

129.4

76.2

78.3

83 .*

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................

1,452.9
320.5
104.5
168.1
114.9
287.2
24.9
73-5
218.8
140.5

1 ,433.1

1,487.0
329.9
112.0
183.9
117.1
286.8
26.2
74.1
214.4
142.6

1,00*.5

989.8

1,0*2.1

71.3
136.1
79.6

68.5

95.7

91.8

82.3
33-9
32.9

82.8
33.7

86.1
34.2
34.0
7.1
10.8

73.0

73.6
29.3

77.8

29.5

5.6
6.7

5.7

6.0

6.9

M e a t p r o d u c t s ..................................
D a i r y p r o d u c t s .................................
C a n n i n g a n d p r e s e r v i n g .....................
G r a i n - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................
B a k e r y p r o d u c t s ................................
S u g a r ..............................................
Co n f e c t i o n e r y and related products....
B e v e r a g e s ........................................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s f o o d p r o d u c t s ..............

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES..........................
Tobacco
Tobacco

a n d s n u f f .............................
s t e m m i n g a n d r e d r y i n g ...........

JL



6.7
8.8

320.3

101.5
166.1

114.4

286.5

25.4
75.6
207.4
135-9

33.4

6.7
9.0

252.6

169.0
19.7
59.7
120.8

31.2

252.7

135.1
78.7
168.*
20.3

61.3
113.0

31.7

261.1
75 .*
152.7
82.2
170.9
21.1
59.8
120.2

98.7
30.7
32.3
8 .8

Table A -2 : A ll em ployees and production w orkers in n o n agricu ltu ral
establishm ents, by industry - Continued
CIn thousands)
Production workers

All employees
Industry

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS.....................
Scouring

a n d c o m b i n g p l a n t s .................

N a r r o w f a b r i c s a n d s m a l l w a r e s ...............
K n i t t i n g m i l l s ...................................
D y e i n g a n d f i n i s h i n g t e x t i l e s ...............
C a r p e t s , r ugs, o t h e r f l o o r c o v e r i n g s .....
H a t s ( e x c e p t c l o t h a n d m i l l i n e r y ...........

May
1 ,00*.6
6.6
118.1
* 30.6

29.2
213.5
B 7 .7
51.1
9.7

5 8.1
APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS..................................

1,171.5

120.8
Men's and boys' furnishings and w o r k
c l o t h i n g .........................................

C h i l d r e n ' s o u t e r w e a r ...........................
Miscellaneous apparel and accessories....
O t h e r f a b r i c a t e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s . . . .....

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)................................
L o g g i n g c a m p s a n d c o n t r a c t o r s ...............
S a w m i l l s a n d p l a n i n g m i l l s ...................
Millwork, plywood, and p r e f a b r i c a t e d

30*.8
335.7
121.3
15.1
75.2
1 1 .*
6o .6

126.6
70*.3

96.8
368.2
129.2
52.7
57.*

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES....................

iS>57
April
1,012.1
6.2
118.5
*3*. 5
29 .*
211.7
88.9

1956

May
1 ,061.2

6.7

123.2

* 60.8

29.8
219.3
92.3
5 *.8
12 .*

May
912.5
5 .9
108.9
403.6
25.6
193.5
76.2

1957

1956

April
919.4
5.5
109.5
407.1

25.8

Mar

968.9
6.1
114.1
433.3

26.2

199.8

61.9

48.2

191.5
77.4
43.7
9.6
49.3

1 ,20*.5
122.6

1 ,176.0
12*.7

1,037.6

1,068.9

1,046.0

108.2

110.0

112.2

307.2
357.9

315.8
331.7

278.1
295.4
108.3

280.6

12.9
66.6
8.6

18 .1

52.8
10.9
59.2

123.8
20.5
72.5
9.8

118.2
13.8

72.9
1 1 .*
61.9

42.0

8.6

316.5
110.5
63.7
7.0
54.9

80.2

46.4

10.8
52.0

290.1

293.2
105.7
11.7
65 .O
8.4
55-5
104.2

125.6

54.2
105.3

107.6

680.0
83.2

750.9

634.5

611.8

359.5

393.7

88.9

337-8

76.3
329.2

682.7
99.0
364.1

127.2
52.2

136.8
56.2
58.1

108.7

107.1
47.9
51.3

116.0
51.8
51.8

61.2
129.0

57.9

106.1

48.3

50.8

Screens,

shelving,

blinds,

307.9

311.5
226.9

312.5

222.8

*7.6

*7.3

37.7

38.0

38.2

37.7

37.3

28.5

27.9

28.2

2* .2

Partitions,

372.3

260.6

38 .1

public-building,

372.5

263.2

*7.2

Office,

368.3

258.8

2*.0

27.1

18.9

18.7

2 1.1

573.1
277.9
157.0

575.0

566 .*

464.7

275.9
155.*
135.1

229.8
126.6

467.1
231.1

463.6

278.8

126.6

108.3

109.4

126.7
107.3

8*5.9
313.*
63.1
52.9

556.2
159.5
24.8
34.3

546.7
156.7
27.5
32.9

54.3

and p r o f e s s i o n a l

lockers,

225.0

and

and mis c e l l a n e o u s

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.................
P u l p , p a p e r , a n d p a p e r b o a r d s m i l l s ........
P a p e r b o a r d c o n t a i n e r s a n d b o x e s ............

860.2
320.2

863.8
320.0

59.1
53.5

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES.............................. .

138.2

157.1
139.1

59.7
5*.o

227.6
62.6
16 .*
* 6 .*

220.0
62.1
18 .3

183.6

62.3
16.7
* 6.0

*5.8

47-4
11.7
36.9

559.2
158.7
25.4
34.8
184.2
47.7
11.3
37,4

75.*

77.1

70.3

58.0

59.7

227.0
B o o k b i n d i n g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ........
M i s c e l l a n e o u s p u b l i s h i n g and p r i n t i n g




229.6

178.6

46.5
13.1
37.1

Industry Employment
Table A-2* A ll em ployees and p ro duction w orkers in n o n a gricu ltu ra l
establishm ents, by in d u stry - Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )
All employees
Industry

iî157

315.1
101.5

Abril
841.8
107.7
316.4
101.5

>•9.9
77.5
8.6
te.3
37.0
97.6

50.3
77.0
8.7
44.9
38.0
97.3

257.5

256.8

205.6

MMT
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.............

837.5

108.0
I n d u s t r i a l o r g a n i c c h e m i c a l s ................
D r u g s a n d m e d i c i n e s ............................
Soap, c l e a n i n g and p o l i s h i n g

V e g e t a b l e a n d a n i m a l o i l s a n d f a t s ........

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL............

Production workers

1956
m r

829.8
108.7

8.3
42.3
38.3
96.7

30.7
47.2
7 .4
35.8
25.9
61.8

62.8

252.1
200.0
52.1

174.8
133.7
4i.l

173.4
132.7
110.7

172.3
130.2
42.1

204.6

191.3
71.1
17 .5
102.7

210.8
86.4
20.0
104.4

333.6
36.3
4.0
17.7
218.9

330.5
38.2
4.0

249.7
97.5
21.7
130.5

269.1
112.8
24.5
131.8

366.3
>10.%
5.1
19.7
238.6
16.7

375.3
40.7
5.2
19.9
243.7

371.2
42.5
5.2
19.3
242.3

16.6

17.0
26.1
16.8

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS...........
G la s s and glassware, p r e s s e d or blown....
Glass products made of pur c h a s e d glass...

16.6

16.6

550.1
30.5
95.8
16.4
te .6
80.7

5>»9.0
31.5
9^.8

16.7

29.8

30.4
47.5
7.3
33.2
24.7
62.4

262.5
111.0
21.6
129.9

32.6

555.9
75.3
217.7

49.9
76.1

RUBBER PRODUCTS............................

29.2

1956
ifcjr

208.6
58.8

51.9

Leather: tanned, curried, and finished...
I n dustrial l e ather belting and packing...
B o o t a n d s h o e c u t s t o c k a n d f i n d i n g s .....
F o o t w e a r ( e x c e p t r u b b e r ) .....................
L u g g a g e ............................................
H a n d b a g s a n d s m a l l l e a t h e r g o o d s ...........
Gloves and m i s c e l l a n e o u s leather goods...

^nrll

315.0
94.5

other p e t r o l e u m and coal products..

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS..............

1957

549.1
73.2
208.4
58.7

205.5
51.3

Coke,

May
546.1
73.2

85.1
17.3
102.2
325.2

36.1
3 .9
17.6

214.2
l4.o

56.0
47.3
7.0
33.6
26.4

17.2

lfc.7

14.6

217.3
14.6
24.4
14.8

455.6
27.2
81.5
13.8
35.7
70.4
45.3

455.2

473.0

28.3
80.5

30.2
81.2

70.5

14.8
36.4
77.7

19-9

16.8

16.8

98.3
17.4

565.8
33.8
96.O
17.4
43.4
87.7
55.5

24.7

14.0

28.1

l4.o
35.3

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES..................
Bl ast furnaces,

steel works,

and rolling

I r o n a n d s t e e l f o u n d r i e s .....................
P r i m a r y smelting and refi n i n g of
Secondary smelting
Rolling,

drawing,

and r e f i n i n g of




92.5

67.5

68.3

67.9

1,315.3

1,328.0

1,331.6

1,089.5

1,101.0

1 ,118.2

648.8
229.5

654.6
231.5

652.4
239.0

544.0
197.9

548.9
199.9

208.0

67.8

68.9

66.2

53.8

54.7

53.4

14.4

14.3

10.7

10.8

10.7

112.0
77.3

112.4
79.6

87.1

87.5

96.2

165.6

166.6

120.3
77.2
162.2

52.0

120.4

119.6

97.*

46.7
94.8

and alloying of

N o n f e r r o u s f o u n d r i e s ........ ..................
Miscellaneous primary metal industries...

h

93.1

14.3

Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral

19.2
92.5

S t r u c t u r a l c l a y p r o d u c t s .....................
P o t t e r y a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ............. .
Concrete, gypsum, and p l a s t e r products...

42.2
80.5
53.4
117.6
19.2

63.3
132.7

65.6
133.6

49.1

554.6

63.8
131.5

IndtiMi v

[m p L n m c n !

Table A -2 : All e m p lo ye e s and production workers in n o n a g ricu ltu ra l
establishments, b y industry - Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )
All employees
Industry

Najr

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT)............................. .
T i n c a n s a n d o t h e r t i n w a r e ...................
Heating

apparatus

(except electric)

1957

1,121.4
56.5
143.1

1 ,128.2

111.3
327.9
230.1
51.2
60.7
140.6

111.7
323.4
236.0

1,727.6
84.0
147.6
153.5

1957

1956
April

1,108.4
58.9
147.8

882.5
49.1
113-6

11*.9

882.1
51.7
118.7

84.9
243.8

188.5

141.2

123.5
299 7
230.2
48.8
61.0
138.5

40.6
49.2
112.8

85.1
239.5
193.9
*1.*
50.7
113.7

224.2
I 89.8
38.8
50.2
112.3

1,750.1
85 .O
154.2
155.2
292.3

1,722.9
76.1
153.0
150.5
284.0

1,254.9
59-4

1,277.3
6Q .5

188.0

128.2

57-4
144.4

889.*
50.2

and

F a b r i c a t e d s t r u c t u r a l m e t a l products . . . . . .
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving...
L i g h t i n g f i x t u r e s ..............................
F a b r i c a t e d w i r e p r o d u c t s .....................
M i s c e llaneous-fabricated metal products..

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL).............
E n g i n e s a n d t u r b i n e s ...........................
A g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h i n e r y a n d t r a c t o r s .......

290.6
S p e c i a l - i n d u s t r y m a c h i n e r y (except
m e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h i n e r y ) .....................
G e n e r a l i n d u s t r i a l m a c h i n e r y ............ .
Offi c e and store mach i n e s and devices....
S e r v i c e - i n d u s t r y and house h o l d machines..

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY.......................
Electrical generating, transmission,
distribution, and industrial apparatus..

Electrical equipment

April

Production workers

1956
•toy

f o r v e h i c l e s .........

183.7

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT..................
A u t o m o b i l e s .......................................

110.4
222.6

224.3

128.4
175.8
99.8

134.1
173-4
95-3

111.8
112.5

174.4
98.4
140.8
214.5

146.4
217.8

168.0

134-7
187.5
279.1

136.0

192.9
282.5

1,209.2

1 ,216.2

1,189.3

845-3

853.0

866.3

418.5
47.7

424.1
50.4

418.8
52.6

289.3

26.0
71.2

75.3

543.1
49.4

552
24.7
384.5
3i5-6

294.2
38.7
19.9
59.5
24.7
380.3
35-7

302.8
42.0
20.8
57.2
25.1
381.9
36.5

1,790.4

1,430.5

1,446.0

800.2

650.9

663.0
601.6

50.5
8.0

14.1
104.2
123.2
106.3
16.9
50.5
7.7

1,324.1
633.3
519.*
313.7
101.9
10.7
93.3
112.3
9*.l
18 .*
50.*
8.3

568.0
49.4

1,935-8

811.7

S h i p a n d b o a t b u i l d i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g .....
S h i p b u i l d i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g .................
B o a t b u i l d i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g .................
R a i l r o a d e q u i p m e n t .............................
O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t . . . . ........

902.4
554.3
179-3
20.4
148.4
146.5
127.1
19.4
65.5
9.7

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS..........

A i r c r a f t .........................................

183.8
268.2

106.2

1,279-9
55.0
111.4
110.7
218.7

257.2
124.9
215.7
273 5

266.9

28.4
C o m m u n i c a t i o n e q u i p m e n t .......................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s e l e c t r i c a l p r o d u c t s .........

52.0
62.1

96.4

26.2
28.5
562.4
49.3
1,950.8
823.4
909.1
557.0
183.3
20.6
148.2
143.6
124.0

26.0

71.2

28.2

783.7
477.5
160.7
15.9

129.6

36.2

19.8

595.1
363.6
113*3
13-9
104.3

366-5

116.8

213.3

scientific,

342.3

332.0

226.7

229.5

228.2

75-6

65.8

42.2

44.3

38.*

85.9
13.9

86.4
14.0

83.7
13.9

59.0
10.3

58-5
10.4

38.6

42.2
24.0

42.3
24.2
68.6

41.0

29-1
18.8

29.4
18.9
42-9
25-1

28.6

19.6

and engi n e e r i n g

Mech a n i c a l measuring and controlling
i n s t r u m e n t s ....... , .............................
O p t i c a l i n s t r u m e n t s a n d l e n s e s .............
Surgical, medical, and dental
O p h t h a l m i c g o o d s ................................




339.6
74.7

Laboratory,

65.3
9.4

131.0
110.0
21.0
65.5
10.0

68.5

30.4

31.2

26.0
67 .I
34.5

126.0
109.3

16.7

42.9
24.4

10.7
20.6
*3»*
27.9

Industry Employment
Table A -2 : A ll em ployees and production w orkers in nonagricultural
establishments, b y industry - Continued
(In thousands)
All employees
Industry
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES...
Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware....
Pens, pencils, other office supplies....
Costume jewelry, buttons, notions..... -

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES........
TRANSPORTATION............ *................

May
*81.0
*7.1
17.1
88.2
31.1

1957

58.2

88.1
151.2

4,157
2,750
1 ,137.1

1,004.4

Trucking and warehousing...........
Other transportation and services........
Bus lines, except local.................
Air transportation (common carrier).....
COMMUNICATION..............................

OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES.....................
Gas and electric utilities..........
Electric light and power utilities.....
Electric light and gas utilities
Local utilities, not elsewhere

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE..............
WHOLESALE TRADE............................
Wholesalers, full-service and limited-

108.5
821.3
683.O
44.0
145.1

April

*80.1
*7.7
17.3

Production workers

1956
May
491.8
49.2

18.1

8*.9

94.3

87.9
152.3

60.3
85.2
153.1

31.0
59.0

31.6

May

383 0
36.7
1*.2
73.5
23.3
*6.7
68.7
119.9

4,149

-

2,747
1 ,136.0
992.4
108.4
821.1
681.4
43.2

2,773
1,210.5
1,063.4
111.6
792.4
42.4
129.0

April

382.3
37.1
1*.*
70.1
232
*7.5

68.9

121.1

_

144.7

1957

4,153

658.0

-

1956
May
397.*
39.1
15.*
79.5
23.5
*8.9
68.5
122.5
-

_

_
-

-

-

-

810
767.4
42.1

766.3
42.1

809

788

_
-

_
-

_
-

597
573.0
249.1
143.7

597
572.5
248.8
143.6

564.4
245.3
142.7

588

_
-

_
-

_
-

180.2

180.1

176.4

.

_

24.2

24.0

23.4

-

-

11,401

11,428

744.6
42.6

-

11,126

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

3,114

2,974

1,793.6
121.4
Groceries, food specialties, beer,
wines, and liquors......................
Electrical goods, machinery, hardware,
and plumbing equipment.................
Other full-service and limited-function

3,109

1,796.3
121.6

1,734.8

117.8

-

-

.
-

314.9

318.4

303.7

_

_

_

460.8

461.4

453.1

_

_

_

896.5

894.9
1 ,317.6

1,238.7

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
_
-

1,315.7
RETAIL TRADE................................
General merchandise stores...............
Department stores and general mail-order
Other general merchandise stores........
Grocery, meat, and vegetable markets....
Other food and liquor stores.... .......

8,292
1,378.7

8,314
1,401.9

8,152
1,394.7

881.4
497.3
1,599-1
1,125.5
237.0

890.5

890.8

236.6

798.0

622.7

3,893.3

392.4
360.8

6



860.2

511.4
1 ,602.6
1,124.7
234.0
243.9
795-8
657.9
3,855.6
394.7
364.2

503.9
1,545.2
1,075-6
233-3

236.3
808 .I
608.4
3,795-4
391.4
337-7

.

m

Table A -2 ! A ll em ployees and production w orkers in nonagricultural
establishments, b y industry - Continued
(I n t h o u s a n d s )
All e m p l o y e e s
Industry

1957
ttay

FINANCE,

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE.............

B a n k s a n d t r u s t c o m p a n i e s . . . . . ..... .
S e c u r i t y d e a l e r s a n d e x c h a n g e s ............
I n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r s a n d a g e n t s ...........
O t h e r finance agencies and real e s t a t e . .

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS..................................
H o t e l s a n d l o d g i n g p l a c e s ...................
Personal services:
C l e a n i n g a n d d y e i n g p l a n t s ................
M o t i o n p i c t u r e s ................................

April

2,331

2,320

607.3
82.9

846.0
794.9
6,5X1

508.2
333-3

167.5
226.9

606.9
83.0
8*5.6
78*.3

6,432
499.0
328.5

164.0
224.1

Production workers

1956
May
2,299
572.4

82.3
814.4

829-6
6,282

Aoril

1956
Mav

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

335.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

168.8

235-8

7,356

7,351

7,216

FED ER A L............................................
STATE AND LOCAL.................................

2,202

2,205

2,176

5,146

1957

513.5

GOVERNMENT.........................................

5,154

May

5,040

-

~

—

Table A-3! Indexes of production-worker employment
and weekly payrolls in manufacturing
Year

1939....
1940....
1941....
1942...
1943....
1944....
1945....
1946....
1947....

1948....
1949....
1950....
1951....
1952....
1953....
1954....
1955....
1956....

Production-worker employment Production-worker
Index
Number
payroll index
(i n t h o u s a n d s ) ( 1 9 4 7 - 4 9 = 100)
( 1 9 4 7 - 4 9 = 100)

8,192
8,811
10,877
12,854

15,014
14,607
12,864
12,105
12,795
12,715
11,597
12,317
13,155
13,144
13,833

12,589
13,061

13,196




66.2

71.2

87.9
103.9
121.*

118.1

10*.0
97.9
103.*
102.8
93.8

99.6
106.4
106.3
111.8
101.8
105.6
106.7

29.9
3*.0
*9.3
72.2
99.0
102.8

87.8
81.2
97.7
105.1
97.2
111.7
129.8
136.6
151 .*
137.7
152.9
161.*

Year
and
month

1956

P r o d u c t i o n - w o ]' ker e m p l o y m e n t P r o d u c t i o n - w o r k e r
’
Number
Index
payroll index
(in t h o u s a n d s ) ( 1 9 4 7 - 4 9 = 100) ( 1 9 4 7 - 4 9 = 1 0 0 )

M a y . ..
June..

13,063
13,108

105.6
106.0

156.*

July..
A u g ...
Sept..
Oct...
N o v . ..
D e c ...

12,536
13,256
13,345

13,465
13,392
13,350

101.4
107.2
107.9
108.9
108.3
107.9

150.5
161.5
166.7
I69.O

13,150
13,114
13,085

106.3
106.0
105.8

165.5
I65.O
16*. 3

1957
Jan —
F e b ...
M a r . ..
A p r ...
M a y ...

12,960
12,886

104.8
104.2

158.5

168.2

171.*

161.5
160.9

7

Shipyards
Table A -4 : Em ployees in Government and p rivate shipyards, by region
(In thousands)

1956

1957
Region

1/

May

April

May

225.3

223.1

211.4

127.1

12*. 0

110.0

NAVY YARDS.................................................

98.2

99.1

101.4

NORTH ATLANTIC......................................

93.*

**.2

93.1
48.6
*4.5

86.5
42.2
44.3

36.7

37.6

35.6

17.8
I8.9

18.6
19 .O

15.8
19.8

31.6

29.O

26.2

50.9

35.1

50.3
14.7
35.6

15.8

6.6

7.3

4.8

6.1

5.8

5.2

ALL REG IO N S
.................................................

*9-2

SOUTH ATLANTIC......................................

GULF:

PACIFIC.............................................

15.8

53.1
37.3

GREAT LAKES:

INLAND:
1/ The North Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Connecticut,
Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and
Vermont.
The South Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Florida,
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
The Gulf region includes all yards bordering on the Gulf of Mexico in the following States: Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas.
The Pacific region includes all yards in California, Oregon, and Washington.
The Great Lakes region includes all yards bordering on the Great Lakes in the following States: Illinois,
Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
The Inland region includes all other yards.
2]

Data include Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard.

8



Government
Table A-5: Government civilian employment and Federal m ilitary personnel
( In t h o u s a n d s )
Unit

May
19^7

of Government

TOTAL C IV IL IA N EMPLOYMENT i/................................

FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT 2 / .............................................

L e g i s l a t i v e .....................................................
J u d i c i a l .........................................................

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

3 / .......................................

L e g i s l a t i v e .....................................................

STATE AND LOCAL EMPLOYMENT............................

April
1957

Majr
I 956

7,356

7,351

7,216

2,202

2,205

2,176

2 ,175.8
1 ,021.1
522.3
632.4
21.9
4.5

2 ,178.6
1 ,025-2
521.8
631.6
21.9

2 ,150.0
1 ,030.0
509.9
6IO.O

4.5

21.9
4.3

232.1

232.8

228.5

211.3
87.0
8.9
115.4
20.1
.7

212.0

207.6
88.1

87.3
9 .O
II 5 .7

8.5
lll.l

20.1

20.2

•7

•7

1,340.7
3,804.9

1 ,296.8
3 ,742.9

2 ,350.8
2,794.8

2 ,245.0
2 ,794.7

2,819

2,821

2,841

1 ,000.2
916.1

1 ,001.1

1,039-4

675-9
197.4
29.7

A r m y .....................................................................

5,040

2 ,341.5
2 ,812.9
4 / .............................................

5,146

1 ,339.9
3 ,814.5

TOTAL M ILIT A R Y PERSONNEL

5,154

678.0
197.7

914.8
29.5

1/ D a t a r e f e r t o C o n t i n e n t a l U n i t e d S t a t e s o n l y .
2/ D a t a a r e p r e p a r e d b y t h e C i v i l S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n .
3/ I n c l u d e s a l l F e d e r a l c i v i l i a n e m p l o y m e n t i n W a s h i n g t o n S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a
adjacent Maryland
4/ D a t a r e f e r

and V i r g i n i a c o u n t i e s ) .
to C o n t i n e n t a l U n i t e d S t a t e s

4 2 5 0 -57 -4
393



and elsewhere.

908.2
666.2
198.6
28.7
(District

of Columbia

and

State Employment
Table A -6 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State
(In thousands)
Mining

TTL
OA
State

1<
?57
M
ay
7 * 0.8
255. T

California............
Colorado..................
Connecticut...............

330.6

4,460.3
458.3

922.1
148.5

District of Columbia.....
Florida...................
Georgia...................

Iova......................

505.8
1,109.4
972-3
142.5
3,495.1
l, 4o6.o
655.5

556.2
772.2

Maine.....................
Massachusetts.............

273.8

871.7

1956
Apr.

M
ay

M
ay

737.4

706.7

257.2
328.0

239.7
329 .O
4,268.3

15 .*
I6.6

4, 434.9
454.1
917^9
147.8
505.6

498.4

1, 132.7
974.8

1,030.5

654.9
553.4

554.0

775-5

751.0

266.2
866.7

860.2

1,842.2

2,409.9

2,422.0

893.9

874.0

882.6
364.1

1,283.3

168.9
(2 /)
87.2

363.7

1 ,285.2

1, 289.8

35 1.7

357.5
85.3

163.0
84.2

182.8

180.I

1 ,912.6

1,908.1
202.0

202.8
6, 018.8
1 , 080.7
119.3

3,146.2

567.4
Pennsylvania */............
Rhode Island..............
South Carolina............
South Dakota..............

276.1

489.6

3,807.0

283.0
531.9
125.4
854.0

6,014.6

1 , 083.7

167.0

29.8
10.6
3.3

1 1 .7

42.2
I9.2
I7 .O
277.2

41.6

15.6

38.6
19.6
I6.3
287.7
32 .O
49 .I
19.6

(1 /)
(2 /)
(2/)

7.6
4.8
4.9

29.9
10.4

3.1

20.7
3.3
8.7

I9 .I
3.8
8.7
12.3

12 .1

2.6
(2/)
lZ . 3

180.7

.2

2.2
4.8
.2

1 ,904.7
191.6
6 ,032.4
1 , 080.9
116.9

*.8
1 7 .O

4.8
16.9

%

11.2

3 ,802.6

492.4
3,786.3

285.3
534.5

292.2

1 .1
88.5

532.6

123.2

129.3
860.0

854.5

14.2
lb. 5

18.0
39.5
47 .O

3,146.6
574.0

480.2

M
ay

18.1
39-3
4b. 5
.6
2.6
(2/)
I 7 .O

4.1
1.5
22.5
*9.3

II 5 .3
3,130.9
566.3

Apr.

6.2

*.8
*.8

(2 / )

1.3

10.8
4.1

1.6
22.3

50.1
1.0

90.4
(2 /)
1.3
2.5

6.4
37.9

26.0

49.9

12.2

45.7
12.3

(2/)
7.5

I8 .I
IO 8.9

IO 7 .9

56.I

63.3
34.6

I9 .I

34.I

33.0

42.3

m

66.6

69.0

56.6
13.3

67.9

.6
2.6
( 2/)
1 7 .7

62.3

56.8

84.7
II 3.0

78.9

106.3

115 .7

20.2

54.3

43.2

56.5

3.7
8.4

15 .7
67.8

13.1

12.2
2.5
5.1
•3

13.8

*•3
I5.9

IO9.5

11.1

4.1
1.7
22.4
53.2

9.2

15.4
265.8
54.2

10.8
174.1
36.3

1 .1
9I .2
(2/)

23.9
I 78 .I

2.6

1.3

17.4
28.5

249.7

253.8

52.9
7.9

160.6
35-2
22.5

168.2
19.1
28.7

14.4
4.7
80.3
43.6

14.4
4.0
77.0
42.8
23.9
52.4
5.7

I 5 .5

969.4

19.O

19.0

18.1

765.5
497.0
1,123.4

81.2

2.3

2.5
81.5
4.2

25.6

85.8

8.8

8.6

6.2




103.0

16.1

161.4

15.4

2.3

4.2

1.4

81.2

4.1
8.4

1.4

57.5

17.2
72.7

IO7.7

8.1

159.3

1.4

84.7

7.1

I3O.9

15.3

73.3

12 .7
22.3
8.4

9.9
41.6

231.4
104.2

10

6 7.1
10 .7
19 .I

9.0

231.5
102.3
1 , 002.5
786.2
494.6
1 , 129.7

See footnotes at end of table.

14.4

8.1
I 32 .O

232.9

84.2

10.6

2.6
8.0
131.5

2,395.1

86.6

54.2
8.2
193 .*

17.6
IO 5 .9

37.0

8.9
203.8

2 ,456.4

497.7
1,135.8

1 7 .7

54.4
10.0
188.3
8O.O
39.I

5.0
*.7
3O.7
11.1
3.2

2,459.7

West Virginia..........
Wisconsin.................

15 .O
272.5

27.2

Utah......................
Virginia..................

19.3

1 5 .7
(1 /)
(2 /)

Texas.....................

103.0
1 ,007.0
800.0

1956

M
ay

36.6
15.6

(2/)
7.6

1957

M
ay

6.2
15.8
(1 /)
(2/)

Contract construction
1956

Apr.

36.6

965.8

142.5
3,483.7
1,420.0
652.4

140.7
3,500.2
1,404.3

1,841.9

362.2

North Dakota..............
Ohio......................

903.4
153.1

1,845.1
2,392.4

Minnesota.................

Mew York..................

451.6

1(ï>57

8.7
39.9

10.4

15.3

58.9
9.8
147.4
34.7
24.7
186.4

18.0

27.4

1 1 .1
45.1
160 .I
15.5

4.6

71.0

44.6
22.4
58.9
6.7

State fmpiovment
Table A-6: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State - Continued
(In thousands)
Transportation and
Manufacturing
public utilities

State

M
ay

1957
_ Apr. .

245.0
39.3
88.0
1,238.4

72.6
430.8
60.3
District of Columbia..........

16.5
161.2

327.8
25.4

242.9

38.7
87.9
1 , 236.0
72.4
434.6
59.4
16.5
162.7
329.9
24.7

1956
M
ay

M
ay

69.7
435.6
59.7

360.7
**„8
*5.5
11.0

16.2

29.2

149.2
332.7

29.1

92.9
73.2

90.1
1 , 172.1

26.3

61.1

1,284.8
611.2

166.9

166.9

129.3

128.8
164.5
147.2
99.6
274.4

123.6

61.2

170.7
148.3
105.5

55-9
8*. 3

Minnesota.....................
Mississippi...................
Missouri.......................

273.6
693.3
1 , 032.7
221.8

700.6

1,057.3

707.6
1,070.2

218.9
106.9

215.2
106.0

105.6
389.8

391.0

20.5
m

19.7
55.7
5.6

Nevada.........................
Nev Hampshire.................

82.3

82.2

New Jersey....................

797.9

798.7
20.0

5.6

20.3
1 ,860.3

North Carolina................
459.3
North Dakota..................
6.3
Ohio........................... 1 , 328.2
86.4
Oklahoma.......................
Oregon.........................
139.9
Pe nnsylvania.................. 1 , 508.0
Rhode Island..................
117.6
South Carolina................
226.3
South Dakota..................
11.2
Tennessee.....................
292.8
Texas..........................
485.6
Utah...........................
Vermont........................
Washington....................
West Virginia.................
Wisconsin......................
Wyoming........................

34.6
36.7
257.0

226.7
128.9
450.3

6.0

268.5

1, 887.8
463.0
6.3

1,335-7

85.8

134.3

303-2
101.7

20.8

78.0
121.2

152.8
90.2
25.4
123.3
21.6

151.6

151.3

19.4
1,897.1
460.7
6.6
1,364.0
90.5

19.7
502.5
62.k
13 .*
223.1
1*8.2

149.0
1,515.3

118.3

125.0

11.2
294.2
484.3

230.5
11.5
300.5
469.3

58.6
226.9

228.1

34.5
37.5
258.3
215.5

128.7

454.0
5.9

33.8
38.7

255.6

204.2
132.7
454.3

6.0

25.8
9.8

22.2
8.2
91.1
66.*

52.3
76.3
12.9

19.6

501.5

62.6

13.0
220.8
*8.3

153.7

62.5
80.1
994.8

124.6

162.9
29.4

A
r>r.
155.0
62.9
79.7

987.4
123.9
161.8
29.h

89.2

90.0

73.6
15.6
307.9
102.3
55.8

343.5

62.*
56.6

134.3

152.6

22.0
*0.*
9.3

10.6

136.5

103.4
55.6
106.3
385.4
*73.1

217.6
87.6
307.*
*1.7
(3/)
16.1
33.8

15*. 3
3*9.3
19.6
**.6
50*. 0 1 , 308.6
62.2
22*o 9
38.6
13.5
625.2
225.3
50.0
137.8

kl.k

*8.2

312.9
15.3
25.5
9.7
58.3
226.3

318.*
15.9
25.6

22.0
8.0
90.*
65o
9
51.9
75.1
12.8

1957
M
ay

334.3
214.9
36.2
734.2
301.7
178.9

91.0
25.6
127.6

809.1

9.0

28.9
87.1

89.2
25.*

10.5

(3/)

*9.*
20.3
2806
352.1
**.8
**.5
10.9

86.6
21.0
76.9
120.6

57-2
5-7
81.0

20.4

1956
M
ay

55.6
84.5
20.5
78.*
121.1
152.2

12*.*
21.0
33.7
9.0
10.*

386.5

*7.5
312.9
15.4

1 , 512.0

28.0

52.8

15.6

6o4.8

147.9
102.0

21.3

93.6
73.7
l5o5
30*. 8
101.9
52.9

1 , 272.1

165.1

50.0

50.1
21.*
27.7
362.3
*5.3
*5.8
11.0

230.3
35-5

Illinois....................... 1 , 256.1
600.2
Indiana........................
164.6
Kentucky......................
Louisiana.....................
Maine..........................
Maryland......................

1957
Apr.

Wholesale and
retail trade

10.1
59.3

226.2
22.5
8.1

89.0

6*.l
51.7
77.*
13.3

115.0
725.9
53-5
107.5
38.1

198.1
670.2
53.*
20.0
231.7
179.3
90.1
2*7.0
19.5

217.5
36.0
737.9
302.3
179.5
133.8
136.8
185.8
i .9
>4
167.4
387-7
475.3

216.1

88.8
308.7
40.8

98.0
17.5
33.4

1956
M
ay
150.7
59.3
79.9
957.9

120.6
154.3
27.8

89.6
308.1
216.2
35.8
731.5
297.3
177.3
133.6
134.2
180.9
55.8
179.8

384.2
483.4
216.4

89.0

318.4
41.2

98.2
18.1
32.5

348.1
350.3
44.5
42.4
1,311.2 1,336.8
224.0
225.9
38.4
37.9
622.4
522.5
138.3
l4o.9
114.7
732.5
53.6
108.3

114.4
717.9
55.4

107.0

38.0
199.7

40.0
196.3
647.5

53.0

53.8
19.7

669.1
19.8

231.7

219.1

178.8

177.0

90.9
244.6

241.0

18.8

18.9

89.0

Sec footnotes at end of table.




11

State Employment
Table A -6 : Employ»«« in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State - Continued

State

_______________
(In thousand»)______________
Finance, Insurance,
Service and
and real estate
miscellaneous

T55T

Tg.
Alaba
Arizona................
Arkansas...............
California.............
Colorado.............
Connecticut............
Delaware...............
District of Columbia 6/
Florida................
Georgia................ .
Idaho..................
Illinois............... .
Indiana................ .
Iowa................... .
Kansas................. .
Kentucky............... .
Louisiana.............. ,
Maine.................. .
Maryland 6 / ............ .
Massachusetts...........
Michigan............... .
Minnesota..............
Mississippi............
Missouri...............
Montana................
Nebraska...............
Nevada.................
New Hampshire..........
New Jersey.............
New Mexico.............
New York...............
North Carolina.........
North Dakota...........
Ohio...................
Oklahoma...............
Oregon................. .
Pennsylvania...........
Rhode Island...........
South Carolina.........
South Dakota...........
Tennessee £ / ...........
Texas.................. .
Utah...................
Vermont................
Virginia 6 /............
Washington.............
West Virginia..........
Wisconsin..............
Wyoming.

28.3
10.1
10.2

217.9
21 .*

50.2

5.5

2*.6
56.6
*0.2
*.8

177.1
51.7

30.6

20.2

Apr.

28.1
10.2
10.2
218.0
21.2
49.9
5-4

24.6
57.0
40.0
4.8
176.3
51.4

30.6
20.2

95.0
75.*

20.4
27-7
8.7
40.1
95.0
75.3

*2.9

42.7

20.5

27.8
8.8
*0.1

11.1

63.7
5.9
(2 /)

2.5
6.2

82.5
7.0

1*53-9

36.2

5.1
104.8
22.9
18.5
141.0
12.7
15.5
5.2
31.2

113.8

9-5
35
43.1
34.2

11.1
63.6

5-9

20.8
2.4

6.2
82.3
7.0
452.0
35-7
5.0
104.4

22.9
18.5

139.2

12.8

15.5
5.1
31.1
113.5

12.*

9.5
3.5
43.0
34.2
12.3

2.3

2.3

*1.6

17 Mining combined with construction.

*1 .*

May

26.9

9-4

10.0
215.2
20.8
46.9
5-2

24.8
54.3
38.5
4.7
173.8
49.6
29.1
19.7

20.1

27.2
8.5
39.0
90.7
74.0
41.5

11.0

63.4
5-6
20.4
2.5
5-8

81.0

6.7
445.5
33-8
4.9
99.7
22.3
18.4
137.6

12.2

15.4
5-3
30.4

67.1

72.8

72.1
182.7

_Ì22L

J*2£ _

J5SL

Apr-

JÜZ_

65.6
29-8

139-0
54.5

138.8

133.5

37-4
564.2
59-4
93.1
14.5

70.6

62.9

736.0

91.0
83.0

255.4

255-6
177.7
159.2
28.4
367.2
157-7

15.9

60.5

6o.4
71.4

89.6

98.5
104.2

88.3
26.6
101.0

71.2

98.2

45.4
125.7

73.2

27.5
103.1
235-7
249.4
105.4
39-4
158.4
21.9
(3/)
23.2

20.0

95*5

18.2

418.7

232.9
241.1

226.8

279-0

105.6

105.4
38.9
155.0
21.4
46.4
21.3

141.0
73.6
164.2
31.4
(1 /)

39 3
158.3
21.5
46.2

22.2

19.1

301.2

60.8
30.6

42.7
17.5
93-5

28.5

367.4
158.5
110.9

232.4
249.3

306.0

435.2

158.9

126.1

208.8

64.4

178.0

85.5
27.5

213.0

25.4
846.5
96.9
16.3

58.3

24.8
837.0
96.9
16.4
63.7

59.1
431.4
30.4
42.7

15.6

19.9

20.7

202.1

204.0
53.4
770.1
142.7
27.3
362.3

22.5
841.0
97-4
15.7
311*3
64.2

58.0

414.9
29.7
43.1
17.1
93.4

25.8

110.2

108.6
92.6

103.8
88.5

174.1
154.0

118.5

118.9

11*. 1
11.1

140.3

93.5
*5.0
11.1

**.*

10.7

*5.3

126.0
44.8

31.2
130.2
16.1
62.2

19.8

50.2
60.3
701.2
88.6
80.1
15.4

250.7
167.3
149-7
27-5
356.8

156.6

105.4
95-0

100.2
121.6
43.9

121.9

126.0
226.2
278.0

221.5
267.3

139.3
74.0
163.4
31.1

136.3
72.7
157.8
31.5

71.0

15.6
20.5

204.2
53.1
764.7
142.6

26.8

363.5

82.7
416.0
35-8
84.4
30.9
130.4
373.7

26.6

12.3

98.1

103.7

82.9
417.4
35-8
84.3

373.9
56.4

12.4

111.3

122.0

291.0

27.1
12.7

15-9

122.1

17.2
92.8
296.1

9-7
3-4
42.6
33-4

62.7

91.0
83.2

112.6
76.2

96.4
18.3
423.5
113-7
77-6

54.5

738.2

151.1
95.7
17.9
409.9
111.9
75-8

298.5

39-7
2.3

66.8

33.8
38.3
587.7
59.2
97.5
14.4

108.7

12.2

Apr.

32.1
38.5
594.9
60.4
99.1
14.2

169.9

Government

1957

56.1
16.I

70.0
14.9

20.2

202.8

49.8
743.0
139.8

26.9

353-9

118.2

78.6

404.6

36.0

82.3
31.8

126.0
361.4
54.8

61.3

16.0
170.2
151.2
62.8

19.6

18.9

174.5
154.1

139-4

133.8

2/ Mining combined with service. 3/ Not available. */ Mining and
total revised; not strictly comparable with previously published data. 5 / Government and total revised; not
strletly comparable with previously published data. 6/ Federal employment in Maryland and Virginia portions
of Washington, D.C., metropolitan area Included in data for District of Columbia.

12



Area Employment
Table A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division

Area and Industry
division
ALABAMA
Mining..................
Contract construction...
M^nuf«-ctnri n g . ••••**** + *
Trans, and pub. util. ...

(in thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
19^0
1957
division
May
May
Apr.
Los Angeles-Long Beach
C JC «C
m L.
J-U. (
1*.*
70.8

¿ u y .0
y .0

1 3 .7

1 1 .9

Government
Mobile
Total...................
Contract construction. ..
Trans, and pub. util....

1 6 .7
* 7 .0
12.0
22.0
18.8

22.1
18.8

9 0 .*
5 -0
2 0 .5
10.8
18.1

3 .7

Q «
y .7
22.8

ARIZONA
Phoenix
Total.
Mining.
Contract construction. ..
Mflmifaet.ui'i nff. . . . . . . . . . .

Trans, and pub. util....
Trade • • • • • ..... .
Finance ........... .
Service
Government
Tucson
Total.
Mining.
Contract construction...
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade
Finance
Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Government••••••••••••••
ARKANSAS
Little RockN. Little Rock
Total....................
Contract construction. ..
Manufacturing.......... .
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.
Finance...••••••••••••••
Service 1 / . ••••••••.....
Government ••••••••••••..
CALIFORNIA
Fresno
Manufacturing••..•••••••

1 2 7 -4
O

89.1
*.9
19.1
10.7
18.3

y •l
I’
22 Q

129.0
.2

3 0 4 .4

238.5

238.1

J LjO.1
e
:
O

1 3 5 .3

1 2 9 .9

0
9.1
18.0

9 .2

17.8

8 7 .0
5 .0
1 8 .3
10.1
18.*

3 .7
9 .5
22.2

1 1 7 .3
.2
10.0
20.1
8.8
33.8

2 5 .1

25.2

p^
0

5 * .3
O
cL•11
3 .9

55.0
2.*

52.6
2.2
*.8

i A
JL.O
Q x
y •1
10.8

6.5

1 * .9

.n
u

9 .2
5 .2
1.6

7 .6
9 .7

Sacramento
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.... ......
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.... ••••••••••••
Service........•••••••••
Government....... ......
San BernardinoRlvers ide-Ontario
Manufacturing.....

.

*.2
12.0
7 *7
1 (
18.2
*.8
10.*

1 3 -8

1 3 .6

70 O
(U 3
3 .8

12.8
8.1

12.1

O

C\

16.1
12.6
PS f

27.7
5.*
1 0. 1
XC .X

12.3
26.5
5.*
11 A
-Li. .O

51.5

51.7

5.*
11.3
*9.2

28.1

28.0

P 1 3
^ 7 •J

Mining • . . . • • ..... • • • • • •
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

2 2 4 .8
Q

223.5
0
.c.

ono n
O

1*.0

1*.0

71 f
fX.O
11 y
XX. Q

70.9
11.8

*6.0
i .U
X Un n
25.8

* 5 -9
i n n

13*8
5*.6
11.2
**.0
Q . ly i

Finance....
Service.••••••••••••••••
Government •••••••••••••

45.3

25.7
k^ n

2 5 -4

9 3 9 .1
1 .9
5 5 .1
1y a (
xQ P . 7

9 2 6 .9

h q MMO. k

San Franc isco-Oakland
Mining.
Contract construction.. .
Manufacture n g .........
Trans, and pub. util....

940.0
2.0

110.2
Pl
1
u X j •X
66.2
120.9

1.8
63.2
189.*
106.4
208.6
6*.*
117.2

1 7 9 *0

1 7 5 .9

129.4
1

1 2 8 .7

1

116.6
.1

9.8
*0.1
8.6

9^ 8

11.2

*0.*

3 2 .9

8 .3
2 7 .5

8.2
2*.l

5.8
17.7
19.1

l6.1

55.6
1Q "3 7
109.6

2 1 3 .3
66.2
120.8
178.8

7 3 .0

12.1

9 -3
1 7 .5

San Diego

Finance • • • • • • ..... .
Service................
Government • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
ICS Q
fu.y

7 6 7 .6
1 * 0 .7
* 7 0 .*

2 1 .7

16.5

12.5
i A
1.0
8.6
1v Q
xO .y

1 30 7

11 n A
XXU.O

3 6 .2
7 •n
l V
17 5

3.9

15.4

s

3 0 7 .2

3 5 -9
7 .0

Q 0
y .\
j
5 .1
1 2 .9

1pp

2,083.8

1X
X 1 1X .U

9.7
P^ P
i U .w
X n n

9.2
5.0

1 5 .5

16.3
47.3
i
A
1 t1 .0

9 .4
OQ 3
¿ 3 O“
i n n

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

2,170.0

1 5 -5
1 2 3 .3
7 6 5 .7
1 4 1 .1
4 7 3 .3

7 2 7 -3
1 'îk 1
Xj*+ .X
* 5 * .0
1 0 5 .1
2 9 1 .5
2 2 3 .7

(U o

1 6 .7
* 7 -0

2,176.2

lûû 1
6.8
12.6

Number of employees
— .Ì2SS ___
19*57
May
May
Apr.

7 .8
18.1
*.8
10.2
13.8

1 3 .*

5 .5

18.7

* .7
10.2
13.2

Ik.k

San Jose
Mining. ••••••••...... ..
Contract construction...
Manufacturing•••••••••••
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance............ ....•
Service.................
Government......... .

27.7
5.9
18.0
19.2

5 .7
1 8 .3

See footnotes at end of table.




J3.

Area Employment
Tabl« A -7: Employ«** in nonagricultural «stablishm«nts
for s«l«ct«d areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and industry
division
CALIFORNIA -Cont inued
Stockton
Manufacturing.....

(in thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
1956
IS>57 _
division
May
May
Apr. _

11.5

COLORADO
Denver
271.2
Total...............
Mining..............
2.7
Contract construction..• 17.4
Manufacturing......
50.4
Trans, and pub. util.... 29-5
77.2
Trade...............
15.8
Finance.............
Service.............
35*2
Government..........
*3.0

CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport
126.8
Total...............
6.4
Contract construction J J
73.0
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
5.9
Trade.................
20.5
Finance...............
2.9
Service...............
10 .1
Government............
7.9
Hartford
216.8
Total...............
10.8
Contract construction \ j
Manufacturing........
83.4
Trans, and pub. util.
8.9
Trade................
**.0
Finance..............
29.1
Service..............
22.0
Government...........
18.7
New Britain
Total...............
Contract construction 1 j
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service................
Government.............

*2.7
1 .*
27.*

2 .1

5.8
.7

2.8

2.4

New Haven
Total..................
127.7
8.2
Contract construction 1
*7 .8
Manufacturing..........
12.8
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
2 *.l
Finance................
7.2
Service................
18.5
Government.............
9.3
See footnotes at end of table.

1*



11.5

270.7
2.7
17.3
50.3
29.5
77.*

15.6

3*.8
*3-1

12.2

266.2
2.9

21.6

*7.1

28.8
7**5

15.2
3*.*
*1.7

126.3
5-9
73.5
5.9
20.3
2.9
9.9
7.9

125.6

215.8

207.5

9.9
8 3 .*
.8.9
*4.1
29 .I

11.0

21.8
18.6

*2.6
1 .*
2 7 .*

6 .0
73.1
5.9

20.1
2.8

9.8
7.8

78.*
8.3
*1.9

28.1
2 1 .*
18 .*
**.5
1.5

2 .1

29.0
2 .1
6.0

2.8
2 .*

.7
2.7
2 .*

5.8
.7

126.8

7.8
*7.8

125.1
7.6
*6.8

12.6
2*.0

23.7

7.1
18.3
9.3

9.1

12.8
6.8
18.2

Stamford
Total..............
Contract construction l/
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service................
Government.............
Waterbury
Total..................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util.,
Trade................
Finance.............. ,
Service..............
Government........... ■
DELAWARE
Wilmington
Total................
Contract construction,
Manufacturi n g ........,
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 J ...........
Government...........
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Washington
Total.
Contract construction
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1/...........
Government..... .....
FLORIDA
Jacksonville
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. \itll.,
Trade................
Finance.............. .
Service 1 J ........... .
Government........... .
Miami
Total................ .
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..

Number of employees
Apr.

1956
May

5 *.8

53.8

52.6

*.8
21.8

*.2
21.6

21.0

May

3.0

11.2
1.9

1957

3.0

11.0
1.9

*.3
3.0
10.5
1.7
8.3
3.7

8 .*

8 .*

66.1
2 .1

65.8
2.0

39.9
2.7
10.5
1.5
*.5
*.9

39.9

2 .1
**.1

10.3
1.5
*.5
*.9

2.7
9.9
1 .*
*.3
*•9

3.8

130 .1
10.8
58 .*
9.9

23.2

5.0

11.8
11.0

3.8

2.8

129.9

10.8
58.3
9.8
23.3
*.9
11.8
11.0

69.5

13 *. 8
17.6
57.5
9.8

22.2
*.6
12.3

10.8

656.0
*0.3
27.9
*3 .5

27*. 3

13*. 9
35.2
99.7
27*. 5

6* 5.6
* 3 .3
26.9
* 3.2
132.2
3 5 .*
96.2
268 .*

130.9
9.2

131.1
9.2

19.8

19.6
15.0
* 0.1
10 .7
16.6
20.0

127.0
9 .1
20.1
1*.6

656.5
*1 .*
27.7
* 3.6
13*. 1
35 2

100.2

1*.9
39.8

10.8
16.6
19.9
278.*
23.9
36.1
35.8

37.9

10.2
16.1
19.2

285.8

256.3

23.5
36.9
35.9

23.0
3*.3
32.3

Area Employment
Table A -7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and industry
division

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
. H E
division
May
May
A Pr-

FLORIDA-C ont inued
Miami-Continued
Trade...........
F in a n ce .. . .
S erv ice 1_/.
Government.

75.7
1*.5
50.*

28 .1

26.1

157.8
17.5

l 6l . *

1*8.3

17.6

28.1

28.3
12.2

25.7
11.8
* 8.1
7.7

15.6

57.2
28.3

12.0
51.4

8.0

52.5

8.0

21.6

23.7

19.2

GEORGIA
Atlan ta
T o ta l..................................
Contract c o n s tru ctio n .
M anufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. u t i l . .
Trade..................................
F inance..............................
S ervice l / * ......................
Government.......................

19.2

3*2.2
19.8
87.6

3*.3
89.3

2*. 6

20.8
18.2

3*3.3
19.2
88.4
3*.7

337.3
20.3

90.1

90.0

101.6

101.9
*.7
*7.0
6.7
22.1
3.6
9.9

*6

100.1

2*.*

23.6

Rockford
T o t a l......................................
Contract con stru ction l /
M anufacturing.....................
Trans. and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade......................................
Finance..................................
S e r v ic e ..................................
Government............................

46.5

* .1

6.8
2 2 .2

3.6
9.9
8.1

8.0

46.0
6.7
22.2
3.5
9.8
7.8

76.7
*.5
*3.6
2.7
12.6
2.5
7.1
3.8

76.0

76.1

3.9
*2.8
2.7
13.0

3.9
*3.1
2.7

2.6
7.1

2.5
7.1
3.9

72 .0
1 .7

72.1

*.8

72.5
1.6
*.1
32.5
*.8

1*.8

1*.8

1*.8

2 .2
12.3

2.2
12.5

2 .2
12.2

79.2
3.3
35.*
7.5

79.9
2.8

83.7
3.8
38.*
7.5

*.0

13.0

33.8

*3.6
*2.9

*2.2
* 0.6

55.5

56.0

*.0

*.0

15.6
6.7
12.6
2.0
7.5
7.1

IDAHO
B oise
T o ta l......................................
Contract c o n s tr u c t io n ...
M anufacturing.....................
Trans. and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade......................................
F in an ce..................................
S e r v ic e ..................................
Government............................

Apr.

86.8

* 2 .9

15.9
6 .5

5*.8
3-8
1*.9
6.8

13.0

2.0
7.3
7.0

INDIANA
E van sville
T o t a l................................
Mining..............................
Contract con stru ction
Manufacturing...............
Trans, and pub. u t i l .
Trade................................
Finance............................
S erv ice 2 / .....................

13.0

2. 0

* 3.7

Savannah
T o t a l..................................
Contract co n stru ctio n .
M anufacturing.................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . .
Trade..................................
Finance..............................
S ervice 1 / .......................
Government........................

May

16.1

81.7

Tampa-St. Petersburg
T o t a l.........................
Contract con s tru ctio n .
M anufacturing.................
Trans, and pub. u t i l . .
Trade..................................
Finance..............................
S ervice ! _ / .......................
Government.......................

ILLINOIS
Chicago
T o ta l........................
M ining....................................
Contract c o n s t r u c t io n ...
Manufac tu r in g .....................
Trans. and pub. u t i l . . . .
Trade......................................
F inance..................................
S e r v ic e ..................................
Government............................

85.1
15.7
60.7

P eoria
T o t a l..............................
Contract c o n s t r u c t io n ...
Manufac t ur in g .....................
Trans. and pub. u t i l
Trade................................
Finance..................................
S erv ice 1 / ............................
Government............................

Number o f e miploye
J- f s
1957

7.*
7.2

22.0
1.7
1.9
2.6
6.7
1 .*
3.3

21.7
1.5
1.9
2.6
6.6
1 .*
3.3

* .*

* .*

2 , 61*.8

2 ,6 2 3 .8

3.7

3.6

1 ,012.0

128.3
1 ,0 2 6 .6
222.6

133.0

220.5
5* 2.0

1**.6

330.0
229.1

5**. 3
1*3.6
325.6
229.2

22 . 0

1.9

F ort Wayne
T o t a l............... ................
Contract con stru ction
M anufacturing...............
Trans, and pub. u t i l .
Trade................................
F inance............................
S ervice 3/ .....................

*.2

32.0

17.0

3.8
12.2

35.8
7.5
17.7
3 .8
12.3

1.7

* .1
32.2

*.9

18.6

3.6
11.8

2. 0

2.6

6.6

1 .*

3.2
*.3

2 , 6 l *.0
3.7
13*.*
1,027.*
226.5

537.1
143.2
316.8
22*. 7

In d ia n a polis
T o ta l.................................
C ontract con stru ction
M anufacturing............... .
Trans, and pub. u t i l . ,
Trade................................ .
F in an ce.............................
S erv ice 2 / ..................... .
South Bend
T o t a l..................................
Contract con stru ction ,
M anufacturing............... ,
Trans, and pub. u t i l . ,
Trade..................................
F in an ce.............................
S ervice 3 ./.......................

291.1

13.2
106.7

22.9
66.3
17.7

291.0
12.9
107.6
23.2

289.9

13.3
109.*
23 .0

66.0

6*.5

17.6

6*.3

63.7

17.2
62.5

83.3
3.2

8*.l

80.9

*2 . 0
*.8
15.3
3.6
1* .*

2.9
*3.0
*.9
15.2
3.6
1*.5

3.5

*0.1

* .7
15.2
3.5
13.9

See footnotes at end of table.




15

Aroa Employment
Table A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and Industry
division

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
1956
1C>57
division
May
Apr.
May

IOWA
Des Moines
101.5
Contract construction...
5.1
Manufacturing.... ••••••
2 *.7
Trans, and pub. util....
7.7

101.6
*•9
24.6
7.6

26.8

KANSAS
Topeka
“
Total................ .
M i n i n g . 00.e.e.
Contract construction.•.
Manufacturing........ .. .
Trans, and pub. util.»..

27.2

10.4
13.7
13.4

10.3
13.9

23.2

7.6
25.9
10.3
13.3
12.7

48.6

47.5

48.9

.2

.2

.2

4.0

3.5

6.2

6.0

7.3

7.3
9.8
2.5
5.9
12.5

9.8
2.5
5.9

12.8
Wichita
Total....................

13.2

98.5
5.6

131.1
1.9
7.6

4.1
6.4
7.5

9 .8

6.0
12.7
122.9
1.9

7.2

130.5
1.9
7.1
59.*
7.2

26.0

25.6

12.6
11.6

12 .1
11.0

59.6

4.8
12.7
11.4
KENTUCKY
Louisville
Total....................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing......... ..
Trans, and pub. util....

252.7
15.*

98.0

23.4
55.6
10.3

26.7

23.3
LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge
Total................ .

4.8

248.3

13.2

97.2
23.4
55.5

10.2
25.5
23.3

8.8

51.7
7.3
4.7

258.1

15.8
102.7
22.9

56.2
10 .1
26.8
23.5

64.6
.5
6.7

4.0
14.9
2.5
6.4

12 .1

Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade..... .......... .

67.9
•5
7.6
19.9
4.1
14.9
2.5
6.4

12 .1

11.6

68.5

•5

8 .1
20.0

See footnotes at end of table.

16




MAINE
Lewiston
Total...«.............
Contract construction,..
Manufacturing«
Trans* and pub. util...
Trade..
......... ..
Finance.... . .»••••••••
Service l/.
Government. •

2.4

26.0

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

New Orleans
Total.................
Mining...........
.o
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.... ....
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade........... .
Finance
Service............. ..
Government......... .

19.1

4.0
14.1
2.5
6.3

Portland
Total. ..••••••........
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.•••••••.........
Finance.... ...... .
Service 1/.... .......
Government.•••••»•••••
MARYLAND
Baltimore
Total.................
Mining.
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.••••••••
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade..........
Finance........... .
Service...... ........
Government............
MASSACHUSETTS
Boston
Total.... ............
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance................
Service l /............
Government............
Fall River
Total................
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................

Number of employees
---'
May
Apr.
May

285 .I
7.1

20.2
50.0
*5.9

72.6

14.0
41.2
3*.3

285.7
7.1
20.3

50.1
*5.9
73.2
14.0
40.9
34.4

278.2
6.3
17.3
49.6
47.1
70.5
13.9
39.8
33.9

29.0
1 .2
15.6

27.9

1 .0

28.2
1 .0

1**5

15.1

5.6

5.5

.9
5.*

3.7
1.3

3.5
1.3

3.6
1.3

53.0
3.7

52.2

1 .0

.8

1 .0
.8

.8

6.4
14.6
3.6
7.9
4.0

6.4
14.4
3.6
7.8
3.9

53.0
4.1
12.9
6.4
14.5
3.5
7.9
37

602.9

600.3
.9
34.2

592.1
•9
*5.3

210.6
58.9
122.6

205.0

12.8

.9
38.0
209.5

58.6

121.5

3.3

12.8

57.5
117.1

30.7
67.9
7*.5

29.6

,020.0
49.2
293.0
7*.7
246.5
70.5

1 ,016.3

999.9
*7.3
292.3
76.7

129.5

128.6

44.3
237
2.7

46.0
25.4
2.7
8.3

30.6
69.4
74.4

156.6

8.2

46.2
295.2
75.1
246.3
71.0
153.9

66.3
70.4

256.5
6 7 .1
152.0
128.0
*7.5
26.7

2.8
8.3

M t

iovmerit

Table A -7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
1956
1957
division
Apr.
May
.
MINNESOTA
Duluth
Total...................
3.1
3.1
3.1
Contract construction...
6.6
6.5
6.6

Area and industry
division
MASSACHUSETTS-Continued
Fall River-Continued
Government.............
Other nonmanufacturing.

50.0
1.3

28.0
2.6
8.2
3.6
6.3

8.3
3.6

50.4
1.5

28.6
2.3
8.3
3.5

6.2

6.2

18.0
17 .*

164.8
6.7
73.1
8.4
34.3
7.1
17.7
17.5

164.8
8.4
73.*
8.7
32.7
7.0
17.5
17.1

109.8

Springfield-Holyoke
Total..................
Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service 1 / .............
Government.............

110.0

111.0
4.3
52.8
5.6

165.2
7.*
72.5
8.5
3*. 3
7.1

Worcester
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service _1/............
Government............
MICHIGAN
Detroit
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............

50.0
1.2
28.1
2.6

*.5
50.5
5.9

20.5

*.9
11.8
11.7

4.2
50.9
5.8
20.8
5.0
11.6
11.7

1 ,289.1

1 ,300.1
.8

6k. 2

60.6
588.8
80.2
256.8

.8

575.*

81.0
25*. 2
*7.7

1*4.8
121.0

20.8
*•7
11.8

11.0

08
65.6
592.7
79.2

78.5

Flint
Manufacturing.

7*. 9

79.2

Grand Rapids
Manufacturing.

*9.2

50.6

Lansing
Manuf ac turing.

27.4

Muskegon
Manufacturing.

26.0

26.2

27.6

Saginav
Manufacturing.

2*. 3

24.5

24.6

28.1

Contract construction...
Trans. and pu b. util....

Government..............

52.6

6.9

11.0
6.8
10.1
1.8

10.3
6.9
10 .*

6.5
4.2

6.5

498.4
29.9
1*7.5
*9.6

*93.1
1*7.1
*9.*

120.0

50.2
120.6

31.5
59.*
60.3

31.*
59.*
59.6

30.*

58.0
58.1

56.8
.8

56.6
.8

56.0
.8
*.2

2.8
11.1
10.2
1.8

*.2

2.2

1.8
6 .*
*.2

26.2

* 90.8
30.5
1* 3.0

MISSISSIPPI
Jackson
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans. and pub. util....

4.0

10.7

4.6

15.2
Government..............

3.6
7.5

10.6

3.8
10.7
*.6
15.2
3.6
7.6
10.6

10.3
*.5
15.2
3.6
7.*
10.1

MISSOURI
Kansas City
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans. and pub. util....

261.0

120.5

*2.2

*3.5

Minneapolis-St. Paul

1,304.6

47.5
141.9
115.9

*7.7
144.6

Service 1 / ..............

* 2.8
2.5

120.2

Trans, and pub. util....

New Bedford
Total..................
Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Government.............
Other nonmanufacturing.

Number of eonjloyees
1957
195(5
Mav
Apr.
Mav

3*3.2
.8
l6.4
9*.*
*3.*
93.8

20.8

4o.4
33.2

3**. 3
.8
17.2
9*.8
*3.2
9*.0
20.8
*0.8
32.7

3*7.1
.9
19.9
95.2
**.2
93.6

718.3
2.5
39.5
27*. 7

722.1

20.9

*0.6
31.6

St. Louis
Contract construction...
Trans, and pub. util....

718.5
2.5
*1.2
27*.l
66.2

151.6
36.0
83.1
63.8

28.1
MONTANA
Great Falls

20.5
Contract construction...

2.3

67.6
152.1

35.9

2.7
*2.9

270.7

68.8
155.9
36.1

82.7
63.3

83.0
62.0

19.8
1.6

19.3
1.9

See footnotes at end of table.

17
432953 0 - 5 7 - 5




Area Employment
Table A -7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and Industry
division
MONTANA-Continued
Great Falls-Continued
Manufacturing...........
Trans. and pub. util....
Trade...................
Service */..............
Government..............

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
.1221
division
May
Apr.
May

3.0
2 .*
6.3

3.0
2 .*
6.3

*.0

*.0

2.5

2.5

NEBRASKA
Omaha
Total.................... 150.0
8.2
Contract construction...
32.1
Manufacturing...........
22.5
Trans, and pub. util....
38.0
Trade.................. .
Finance.................
12.7
20.6
Service
.... .........
Government............... 16.0
NEVADA
Reno
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing 1 / ........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.... ............
Service.................
Government..............
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Manchester
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufactur ing.........
Trans. and pub. ut il....
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............

26.5
2.5
1.7
3.2

32.1

22.3
38.3
12.6
20.5
15.8

32.2
23.2

38.*
12.3

20.6
15.5

6.8

1.7
3.2
6.7

1.1

1. 1

6.9

6.5
3.9

Perth Amboy
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...... .
Trenton
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufactur ing........
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

11.9
39.7
*1.5

11.9
39.0
*1.7

12.1
38.0
*1.1

158.*

158.*

158.0

.8
7.6

.8
7.8

82.5

82.6

9.1
23.3
2.5

9.1
23.1
2.5

.7
7.7
83.1
9.*

10.6
22.0

103.0
.1

22.0

22.6
2 .*
10.0
22.1

102.1

102.3

10.5

3.7
*0.5
6.7
17.5
3.*
13.7
17.*

.1
3.8
39.8
6.7
17.5
3.*
13.5
17.3

65.8

65.2

*.9
10.9
5
17
3

5.0

61.3
5 .0

10.8

10.2

.1

3.7
* 1 .*

6.8

1.1

7.2

*.0

26.0
2.k

*.0

1 1.0
+

*1.0

2. 0
18.2
8.3

1 .9
18.5
2 .7
8.2

2. 1

2.1

1.9

*.6

*.6

NEW MEXICO
Albuquerque
Total..................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..... ...........
Finance...............
Service 1 / ............
Government............

*.6

2.8

3.0

Paterson 5/
Total.................. . 391«
2.0
Mining..................
Contract construction... 2*.9
Manufacturing........... 179-9
Trans, and pub. util.... 2*.7
Trade................... ^7 *0
See footnotes at end of table.




8.0

151.1
9.0

25.9
2.3
1.9
3.5
6.7

NEW JERSEY
Newark-Jersey City 5/
826.8
Total.
.2
Mining................
Contract construction... 26.9
358.5
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util.... 8*.l
1 *1 .*
Trade.................
*7.6
Finance...............
85.9
Service...............
82.2
Government............

18

1*9.6

2.8
2 .*
6.0
3.8
2 .*

Paterson ¿/-Continued
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

Number of employees
1956
1957
May
May
A Pr -

3.0

*0.7
1.9

18.6
2.8

8.0

5.7

17.7

3.3
12.5
16.8

5.6

17.0

15.6

3.*
8.5

15

1*.8

3.*
7.8
13.7

206.0

206.2

210.2

2.8
NEW YORK

827.8

831.7

.2
26.9

.2

359.*

29.8
36*. 1

8*.2
1*3.0

86.2
1 * 2.0

8*.9

82.3
80.5

*7.0

82.2

392.3

2. 0

2*.*
I8l.*
2*.6
67.3

*6.6

385.5
1.9
21.0

182.0
23.6
65.8

Albany-Schenectady-Troy
Total..................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.............. .
Finance..... .........
Service 1 / ............
Government............
Binghamton
Total..................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pubo util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service l / ............
Government............

8.6

72 .0
16.7

7.7
73.2
16.6

6.9

78.0
16.6
*0 .0

39.7
7.2

39.7
7.2

22.1

22.0

39.7

39.8

22.1
39.*

78.0

77.8
2.3
*1.7

7 8 .0

3.0
*1.5

*.0
13.9
2. 0

6.1

7.5

*.0
1*.0
2.0

6.2

7.5

7 .2

3.1

*1.0
*.0

l*.l
2. 0

6.2

7.7

Area Employment
TabU A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
1956
_
1957
division
May
May
Apr. _
_

Area and industry
division
NEW YORK-Continued
Buffalo
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance..................
Service 1 / ............. .
Government..............

Syracuse
*53.2

22.9
203.8
37.2

36.8
88.1

1*.3
*7.2
* 0.2

l*-3
*6.6
* 0.1

3*.9

3*.*

18.1
6.5

18.0

10.3

Nassau and Suffolk
Counties 5 /
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service \ J ..............
Government..............

Nev York City 5 /
Total.................
Mining....... ........
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance................
Service...............
Government............

**9.2
20 .*
202.9

87.6

Elmira
Total.................. .
Manufacturing...........
Trade..... .............
Other nonmanufacturing..

Nev York-Northeastern
New Jersey 6/
Total.... ............
”
Mining.......... ......
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government........... .

Number of employees
1956
1957
May
May
Apr.

9.8

337-7
29.1
103-9
21.7
7 *.8
11.5
39.8

6.5

332.8

27.0
105.2
21.8
73.5
11.5
37.0

*55.9

21.6
208.1
38.2
88.1

l*.l
*7.7

38.0
3 *.6
17.7
6.5
10 .*

318.2
33.2
91.9
2 1.7
70.5
11.5
38.2
51.2

56.9

56.8

5,*73.7

5,* 8*.2

5 ,*67.6
6.2
22*. 2

1,719.*
*85.2
1,171.8
**9.0
791.0
639.7

1,722.5
*86.7
1 ,180.1
**2.9
785.5

6.5
230.0
1 ,692.2
*85.9
1 ,167.6

*50.7
798. k
6* 2 .*

6.5
221.6

619.5

3,527.8

3,5*7.3

1.8
120.2
905.1
329.2
810 .*

1.8
116.5
928.5
328.7
816.1

366.0

36*. 9

587.1
* 08.0

585.5
* 05 .*

221.0

220.5
9 .*
110.5

9-9
39.2
7.0

Trans, and pub. util....

Government..............

Rochester
Total.................. .
Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance.................
Service 1_/............. .
Government............. ,

9.9

110.2
10.1

39.9
7.*
2 *.l
19.*

7.*
23.7
19.3

9*0.3
329.9
830.3
359.6
583.3
393.8

Contract construction...
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service l/..............
Government..............

111.1

23.8
18.9

11.1
31.8

1*7-3
6 .*
59.9

32.5

11.1
31.8

1*.6

1*.5

16.8
1*.8

103.8

102 .*

6.9
16.8

3.6

* 5 .7
5.5

3.0
*5.6
5.*

6.5

99-5
3.3
*3.*
5.5

16.5

16.1

3.*

3.*

3.3

8.8

8.6
20 .*

8.5

20.3

Westchester County 5/

16.1

19.3

Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service l / ..............
Government..............

195.9
I6.9
51.1
1*.9

19*.*

10.3
33.8
2 5 .*

**.8
10 .*
32.6
25.2

*5.2
9.9

96.8

Contract construction...

96 .*

8.7
23.5
10 .*

8.3
23.5
10 .*

201.7
19.1
51.3

15.2
*6.5

NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service 1/.........

28.9
6 9
11.0
7 .*

18.3
50.3

1*.2

32.2
2*.3

9 *.8
9.0

23.2
9.7

7.*

28.8
6.2
11.1
6.8

29.0
6.8
11.0

Greensboro-High Point
Manufact uring...........

*2.9

*3.*

*3.0

Winston-Salem
Manufacturing...........

3*.3

3*.*

33.6

22.2

21.7
1.7

21.7

NORTH DAKOTA
Fargo
9.1

60.3

1 *8.6
6.0
60.7
11.2

Utica-Rome

3,551.*

1.8
112.2

1 *7 .8
6.5

7.0
16.7

219.0

10.0
* 0.2

Contract construction...

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service 1/..............
Government..............

2.3

2 .1
2.3
7.9
1.5
3.2
3.1

2 .1
2.2
7.9
1.5
3.2
3.1

2 .1
2 .1
2.3
7.7
1 .*
3.1
3.1

See footnotes at end of table.




19

Area Employment
Table A -7: Employ««« in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and industry
division
OHIO
Akron
Manufacturing.
Canton
Manufacturing.
Cincinnati
Manufacturing.

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
1956
1957
division
Mav
Apr.
Mav
PENNSYLVANIA
Allen tovn-Be thlehemEastan
91.0
83.2
91.3

60.2
162.4

60.4

63.1

i64.o

162.9

L

May

1957
Apr.

T95tT '
May

98.3

99.0

100.2

43.8

Uk.l

43.5

142.6
.5
Contract construction••
9-3
Manufacturing..........
35.5
Trans, and pub. util...
l4.4
24.3
5.9
13.1
Government.............
39.6

lkl.0

136.3
.5
6.0
34.1

Erie
Manufacturing..........
Harrisburg

Cleveland
Manufacturing.

309.2

312.6

31^.7

Columbus
Manufacturing.

75.1

75.8

78.3

Dayton
Manufacturing.

96.3

98.4

103.5

Toledo
Manufacturing.

61.9

60.7

62.2

Lancaster
Manufacturing..........

Youngstovn
Manufacturing.

114.4

115.2

118.3

Philadelphia
Manufacturing..........

.5

8.2
35.2
l4.4
24.3
5.9

39.6

14.6
23.5
5.8
12.4
39-4

44.6

44.5

45.4

547.9

550.4

542.9

840.7

836.7
18.2

825.0
18.1

12.9

Pittsburg
OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma City
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government........... .
Tulsa
Total............ .....
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............
OREGON
Portland
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util*.
Trade.................
Finance............
Service 1 / ............
Government............

143.8

143.9

144.4

9.7

10.4

10.8

10.8

37.7

37.7

10.9

35.9

17.7
35.9

8.0

9.9

15.6




16.0

8.0

16.5

Contract construction.• 52.5
Manufacturing.......... 337-7
Trans, and pub. util...
70.4

158.9
27.8

49.7
338.1
69.9

160.2

46.0
341.2
71-5
156.3
27.4

129.0

13.1
9.3
31.5
14.2
30.2

6.3

16.5
8.0

8.1

129.8
13.2

9.0

32.1

14.2
30.4
6.3

16.6
8.0

99.6
75.7

27.4
97-9
75-3

49.5

8.1
17.8

48.9

51.7

Scranton
Manufacturing..........

31.7

32.1

32.1

Wilkes-Barre «»Hazleton
Manufacturing..........

38.8

39.6

38.4

York
Manufacturing..........

42.6

43.4

45.2

278.0
15.4
126.9

280.7

286.8

Finance................

38.0
8.1

17.8

34.7
131.4
12.9
9.5
34.8
13.4

Reading

31.0

6.3

16.1

92.6

71.9

7.6
RHODE ISLAND
Providence 6/

253.4
13.7
60.9

29.6
67.O

13.1
34.6
34.5

See footnotes at end of table.

20

8.1

18.1

251.3
13.4

253.4
14.2

60.1

63.2
29.8

29.7

66.8
13.2

33.5
34.6

Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...

66.0

12.9

34.0
33.3

Service l / .............

13.7
50.9
12.4
28.3
30.4

17.0
128.0
13.6
51.0
12.6
28.1

30.4

16.0

134.0
14.2

52.6

11.9
27.5
30.6

Area Pmplovmerit
Tabi* A-7: Employ««* in nonagricultural «stablishm«nts,
for s«l«ct«cl areas, by industry division - Continu«d

Area and Industry
division
SOUTH CAROLINA
Charleston

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and Industry
1956 _
1<
division
May
Anr.
Mav
Nashville
55-5
3.6
9.6
5.2

Contract construction...
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade....................

13.6

16.1

30.2

31.0

23.5
1.*
*.8
2.1
8.0
1.5
3.6
2.0

Government...............

92.3
.1
3.6
*3.0
5.6
*.*
9.3
8.7

Service.................

23.2
1.3
*.9
2.1
8.0
1.5
3.5
2.0

2*.5
1.7
5.1
2.2
8.*
1.5
3.5
2.1

92.2

.1
3.3
*3.*
5.6
17.7
*.3
9.3
8.6

9*.l
.1
3.8

Contract construction.•.
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

TEXAS
Houston
Manufacturing..........

Mining.................
Contract construction..
Trans, and pub. util...

136.7
.3
6.7

136.3
.3

38.0

37.9
12.5
31.3
8.9

6.6

1956 _
May
_
13**6
.3
7.2
37.1

12.6

12.5
31.3
9.0
20.7
18 .*

20.5
18 .*

20.1
18.2

90.5

91.6

8 8 .9

122 .*

120.5
7.5

119.5
7.5
8.9

7.6
8.9
18 .*
12.9
35.5
7.2

8 .1
18 .*
12.9
3*.8
7.3

30.5
8.7

17.6

15.9

13.1
3*.*
7.5
15.1
15.*

16.9

16 .7

*.5
1 .*
*.5
3.2
3.5

3.9
1.5
*•5
3.0
3.9

12.7
7.9

13.1
8.5

1-5

1.5

1.6

1 .1
1.6

1 .1
1.6

160.8
.2

160.3
.2

155.2

1*.7
15.5

13.7

16 .1
15.8

116.1
2.0
6.6
*3.1
7.7
25.9
2.7
11.5
16.7

116.5
2.0
6.7
*3.3
7.6

26.0

2.8

11.5
16.7

Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...

5.5
18.2
*.2
9.*
8.3

Other nonmanufacturing.
Springfield
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...

116 .*
2.2
6.1
**.3

7 .9
25.8
2.7

15.6

186.8

.3
8.3

.3
7.9

16.6

Contract construction..

55.*
8.3
2*.*

28.6

.*
9.2
* 6 .*

16.7

16.3

55.5

55.5

8.2
2*.2

8.2
25.0

28.5

27.9

7.6

.6
1,6

17.8

*3.2
5.9
18.3
*5.2

188.7

* 5.8

12 .*

.6

.6

VIRGINIA
N orfolk-Portsmouth

Trans, and pub. util...

18 7.1

3.2
3.5

l.l
Other nonmanufacturing.

11.*

16.2

17.1
*.5
1 .*

*.6

**.7

Knoxville

Memphis
Total...................

Service................

Apr.

VERMONT
Burlington

17.8

Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...

UTAH
Salt Lake City

SOUTH DAKOTA
Sioux Falls
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans. and pu b. util....

Trans. and p u b . util....

16.6

30.0

Greenville
Manufacturing...........

Contract construction...

3.5
10.*
*.9
13.7
2.2
5.0

53.*
3.3
10.0
*.2
13.0
2.0
*•9

2.2
5.0
16.5

Service l/..............

TENNESSEE
Chattanooga
Total...................

56.1

1957
_ May

16.0
17.*
*3.7
5.8

.2
12.0
15.6
17.0
* 1.2
5.7

17.8

17.6

*5.7

*5.9

165.1

159.6
.3
11.7

Richmond
Mining.
Contract construction..

165.7
.3

12 .7

.3

12.2

See footnotes at end of tat>le.




J2L

Table A -7: Employ*«* in nonagricultural *>tablishm*nts
for selected areas, by industry division - Continued
Area and Industry
division
VIRGINIA -Cont inued
R ichmond -C ont inued
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............
WASHINGTON
Seattle
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service 1 / ............
Government............
Spokane
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service 1_/............
Government............
Tacoma
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service 1 / ............
Government............
WEST VIRGINIA
Charleston
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
1/
2/
3/
*/
5/
6/

(in thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
1956
-1251
division
M ay
May

39.9
15.9
*2.6
13.5

18.7

22.2

326.6
I6.8
10*.7
28.1
75.0
18 .*

38.0

* 5.6

*0.0

15.8

*2.3

13.5
18.6
22 .*

317 .*
15.9
97.8

27.6
7*.5

18.3

37.8
*5.5

8.8

7 *.6
3.9
1*.*
8.7

21.2

20.7

75.*

* .1

1*.*
3.8
12.0
11.1

75.5

* .1
16 .*
7 .0
17 .1
3.0

8.8
19 .1

95.2
10.0

6 .1
26.2
10.1

3.8
11.9
11.2

7*. 9
3.9
16 .*
6.9

16.9

3.0
8.8
19 .O

38.9
1 5 .7
*0.6
13 .O
17.9

21.5

302.5

15.2
83.8
27.5
7*.*

18.3
38.1

*5.2

7 7 .0

5.2
15 .0
8.5
21.3

*.0

Charleston-ContInued
Trade...............
Finance.............
Service.............
Government..........
Wheeling-Steubenville
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans. and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............
WISCONSIN
Milwaukee
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service l / ............
Government............




19 .7
3.2
9.*
1 0 .7

19 .7

3.2
9.3

I 8.9
3.2
9.5

10.5

10.1

113 .*

112.6

II 5.2
6.0

5.9
5.6
52.5
9.2
19 .*
3.1

10.6

7.2

5.9
5.6
52.2
9.3
19.3
3 .1
10.3
7.2

*.6

5*.6
9.6

19.9

3.0

10.5

7.2

3*.l

* 2*. 8
2 2.2
I 90 .I
29 .O
85.5
19 .7
*5.7
32.7

* 1.8

*2. 1

*3.2

2.3

2.1

2.2

21.2

21.6
1.7

23.5

7 .3
.9
* .7
3.6

7.3

*3*.l
21.7

192.1
29.0
87.8
20.5
* 8.9
3*.o

*3*.0

20.9
193.9
28 .*
87.7

20.5
* 8.5

12.2

10.8
75.1
3.7
17.2
7.0
16.9
2.9
8.5
1 8.9

9*.0
9.9
5.6
25.9

*.2
26.0

10.1

10 .0

91.8
10.1

Racine
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service 1 J ............
Government............
WYOMING
Casper
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............

Includes mining.
Includes government.
Includes mining and government.
Includes mining and finance.
Subarea of New York-Northeastern New Jersey.
Revised series; not strictly comparable with previously published data.

22

Number of employees
195T
,
M ay
A p r.
*

___________ 1 9 7 3 -

1.7
7.*
.9
*.5
3.7

3.3
1 .*

1.8

1.9

* .1
.5
2.3

3 .1

1.2

1.8
1.8
*.0
.5
2.2

1.8

.8

* .1
3.5

3.3
1.6
1.8
1.6
3.7

.6
2.0

Labor Turnover
Table B-lt Monthly labor turnover rates in manufacturing
(Bar 100 employees i
Jan.
1950,
1951«
1952.
1953,
1954,
1955,
1956,
1957.
1950,
1951,
1952,
1953,
1954
1955,
1956,
1957,
1950,
1951,
1952,
1953,
1954

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

3.6
5.2

3.2
*•5
3.9
*.2
2.5
3.2
3.1
2.8

3.6

2.8
3.6
3.1
2.8

3.5
*•5
3.7
*•3
2.U
3.5
3.3
2.8

2.9

2.8

k.l

k.6
k .l

k.k
k.k

2.8
3-3
3-3
3.2

*.0
3.8
*•3
2.9
3.6
3.3

3.0
3.8
3.9
3.6
3.5
2.5
3.6
3.0

1 .1
2 .1

1.0
2 .1

3.1
k .l

k.6

3.9

3.7
k.l

3.7
3.0
3.5
3.3

1.2

*•3
3.8
3.1
3A
3.3

June

May

Toti*1 accession
*.8
*•7
*.2
k.5
*•9
k.k
3.9
*•9
k.l
k .l
5.1
2 -2
2‘
?
3.0
<•3
3.Í
*.2
3.3
3.*
2.9
k.k

Tot*i l
3.1
4.8
3.9
k.k

3-3
3.2
3.7
3.3

s e w •ation
3.0
2.9
k.k
*•3
5.0
3-9
*.2
*•3
3.1
3.1
3.2
3-k
3.2
3.*
Quit
1.7
2.5

1.9

2.0

2.2

1.6
2.8
2.2

2 .1
1 .1
1.0

2.2
1 .0
1.0

2.5

2.7

2.7

1.0

1 .1

1.0

2.2
2.6
1 .1

1.3

l.k

1.6
l.k

1.5

1.3
1.2

1.5

1-3

1.5
1.5
1.3

1950,
1951,
1952,
1953,
1954,
1955,
1956,
1957,

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.3

.3
.3
.3

.3
.3

Ô .2
.3
.3

-3

.k
-3

.k

.k

.k

.2
.2

.2
.2

.2
.2

.2

.k

.3
.2

.3
.2

.3
.2

1950,
1951,
1952,
1953,
1954,
1955«
1956.
1957.

1.7

1.7

1955.

1956.
1957.

1950.
1951.
1952.
1953.
1954.
1955.
1956.
1957.

1.9

1.0

.8

l.k

1.3

1.5
1.7
1.5

.8
2.2
1 .1
1 .8
l.k

0 .1

0.1

-9

2.8

2.5

l.k

1.3

l.k

.8
1 .1
.8

.k

-3

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

.3

.2

.3




.2

.2

1.5

Disch a i 'sre
0.3
0.3
.k
.3
.3
.3

Nov.

Dec.

5.2

k.o

k.k

3.9

3.0
3.0
3-3
2.1
2.5
2.5
2.2

k.k
k.k
k.k

3.5

5.7
*•3
5.6
4.0

3.8

k.i

k.2

k.2

k.9

5.3
*.6
*.8

5.1

k.3
k .l
k.2

k.3

3.6
3.5

3.5

3 -k

k.5

k.2

k.o

3.3
3.5
3-5

3.0
3.1
3-3

3.0
3.0
2.8

2.7
2.5

2 .1

1.7

1.9

l.k

3-k

k.9

2-5

5.2
3.9

3.9

k.k

2.9
3.1
3.0
2.9

3-k

l.k

1.8
2 .8
2.6

k.o

2.2
2.2

3.1
3.5
3.1

5.2
3.3
3.6
4.1

1-3

0.3
.3

.2

.2

.2

.3
.3
.2

.3
.3
.3

-3

.3
.3

.3
.3

-3

.3

1.2
1.0

1 .1
1.2
1 .1
1.0

0.6
l.k
1.0

0.7
1.3
.7
1.5
1.7

1.3
-9

1.2

1.9

1 .1
1.6

Lavofj
0.9

1.0
1 .1

.9
1.7

1.2

0.6
1.3

2.2
1 .1
1.6
1.3

1.3
1.7
1.3

O.k
-3
.k
.k

O .k
.k
.k
.k

1 .1

3.8

1.7

.2
.2

k.o

2.7
2-2
3.3
3.0

2.8
2 .1
1.2
1 .8

.2
-3

1 .1
1 .0

1 .1
1.6
1.6

0.3
.3
.3

0.3
.3
.3

1.0

.k
-3
.2

0.8

1 .1

l.k

1.7
.7
2.3

1.6
1.2

o.k

0.3

.2
.2

-3
-3
.2
.2
.2

l.k

MLsccillaneoiis. ine]Ludine nilitar^r
0.2
0.1
0 .*
0.1
0.3
.k
.k
.k
.k
.k
.5
.3
.3
-3
.3
-3
.3
.3
.3
.3
-3
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.3
.2

.2
.2

.3

.2
.2

.2
.2

.2
.2

.2
.2

.k

1.9

2 .k

l.k

0.1

1.2

k.3

3.5
3-3
3.^

1 .1

1.5

l.*

1.2

k.k
k.l

1.7

.3
.3

.7

3.0
3.7
3.*

1.5

.3

1.8
1.6
1.2

3-9

2 .1

1.3

1 -5

1.3

Year
1

6.6
*•5
5.9
*.3
2*3
k.5

.2

l.k

.k

1 .1
1.6

Annual
aver­
age

Oct.

.k

1.6
l.k

.k

2.5

Sept.

.k

2 .k

.k

.6

1.6

1.8
2 .*
2.2

Aug.

O.k
.k
-3
.k

.k

2.3
1.3

o.i
.5
.3
.3

.7

1.3
2.7

July

.k
-3
-3
.1
.2
.2

.9

.2
.2
.2
.2

1.3
1.5

1.0

2.5
1.7
l.k
l.k

0.3
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2
.2

2.3
2.3

.k

.2
.3
.3

1 .1
1.2
1 .1
1.3
1.9

1.2

1.5

0.2
.5
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957

23

Lj bo I

T a b le B -2 : M onthly la b o r tu rn o v e r rates in selected in d u strie s
(Per
—

— ------ —

—

’

.... ....

-1

100 e m p l o y e e s )

Total
accession
rate

Industry

May
1957

Separation
Total

Quit

rate

Discharge

Layoff

Misc., incl.
military

May
1957 1957

A p r.

May
1957

A p r.

1957

May
1957

A p r.

1957

May
1957

A p r.

1957

May
1957

A p r.

1957

2.9

2.8

3.3

3.3

1.4

1.3

0.3

0.2

1.4

1.5

0.3

0.2

DURABLE GOODS.....................................................................
NONDURABLE tiOODS.............................................................

3.0
2.9

3.0
2 5

3.5
2.9

3-3
3.2

1.4
1.4

1.3
1-3

.3
.2

.3
.2

1.6
1.0

1.5
1.4

.3
.2

.3
.2

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES...............

2.2

3.0

2.8

2.6

1.0

1.1

.1

.2

1.5

1.1

.1

.2

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS..............

4.4
3-7
3-7
3-9

3.5
3.1
2.0
3.6

3.5
3.5
3.1
3.0

3.7
4.6
3.2
2.7

1.3
•9
1.1
1.9

1.1
.6
•9
1.7

.2
.1
.2
.3

.2
.2
.2
.3

1.7
2.1
1.7
.6

2.2
3.5
2.0
.6

.2
.4
.1
.2

.2
.3
.1
.1

U/)

*.3

(1/)

3.1

(1/)

.5

a/)

.2

(±/>

2.3

(1/)

.1

2.3
2.7
2.0
1.5

¿•5
1.8
3.5
1.0

2.6
1.8
3.5
1.9

2.1
1.7
2.6
1.6

1.4
1.1
1.9
.8

1.1
.7
1.6
.7

.3
.3
.4
.1

.2
.1
.2
.1

.6
.1
1.2
.5

.6
.6
.7
.1

.2
.3
(2/)
.4

.2
.2
.1
.7

3.5
4.1
3.1
3.0
3.5
3.6
3.6
3.0
(1/)
*•5
(1/)

3.9
3.1
3.4
3.3
3.7
4.4
5.2
*•5
3.0
3.6
5-2

1.6
1.9
1.6
1.6
1.4
2.1
2.1
1.6
(1/)
1.1
(1/)

1.5
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.5
1.8
1.6
1.6
1.7
1.0
1.0

.3
.3
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
(1/)
.4

1.4
1.8
1.1
1.0
1.7
1.1
1.2
1.0

(±
/)

.3
.2
.3
.3
.3
.3
.2
.3
.2
.2
.2

2.8
(1/)

1.9
1.1
1.3
1.2
1.7
2.3
3.3
2.4
1.1
2.1
3.8

.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
(1/)
.3
(1/)

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
.2
.2

.1
.2

.1
.1

(2/)

.1

MANUFACTURING............................

Meat

p r o d u c t s ....................................

Beverages:
M a l t l i q u o r s ....................................

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...................
Tobacco

and

s n u f f ..............................

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS..................
Y a r n a n d t h r e a d m i l l s ........................
B r o a d - w o v e n f a b r i c m i l l s ....................

Full-fashioned

h o s i e r y ......................

K n i t u n d e r w e a r .................................
D y e i n g a n d f i n i s h i n g t e x t i l e s .............
Carpe t s , rugs, o t her floor coverings...

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS..............................

Apr.

2.9 2.7
3.4 2.9
2.3 2.6
2.2 2.4
3.0 3.9
3-7 3.3
1.6 1.2
4.0 3.*
(1/) 2.9
2.6 2.2
(1/) 1.4

a/)

1957

s u i t s a n d c o a t s ..........
furnishings and work

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)............................
L o g g i n g c a m p s a n d c o n t r a c t o r s .............
S a w m i l l s a n d p l a n i n g m i l l s .................
Millwork, plywood, and p refabricated
s t r u c t u r a l w o o d p r o d u c t s ...................

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES.................
Other

furniture

and

f i x t u r e s ..............

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............
Pulp,

paper,

and paperboard

m i l l s .......

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..........
Industrial
Industrial

Paints,
See

i n o r g a n i c c h e m i c a l s ...........
o r g a n i c c h e m i c a l s ..............

pigments,

footnotes

at

2*




and

end

f i l l e r s . . .......... ,

of table.

3.1
3.2

2.1
2.1

3.2
3.1

3.7
4.2

2.1
1.4

2.1
1.6

.2
.2

.3
.2

.8
1.3

1.2
2.3

3.*

Men's and boys'
M e n ’ and boys'
s

3.0

3.3

3.5

2.4

2.1

.2

.4

.7

.9

5.3
10.1
*.5

5*5
8.7
5.3

4.0
4.1
4.0

*.3
8.0
3.5

1.9
1.9
1.9

2.4
4.2
2.2

.4
.3
.4

.3
.2
.3

1.4
1.8
1.4

1.4
3.*
.7

.2
.1
.2

.2
.3
.1

3-3

*.5

3.0

3.6

1.5

1.9

.2

.3

1.0

1 -3

.2

.2

3.9 3.5
5 3.8
2.6 2.8

3-9
4.2
3.3

3.7
4.1
2.7

1.8
2.1
1.2

1.5
1.7
1.1

.4
.3
.4

.3
•3
.3

1.6
1.6
1.5

1.6
1.9
1.0

.2
.1
.2

.1
.1
.2

2.4
1.6
3.3

2.2
1.4
2.8

2.4
1.7
3.2

2.6
1.6
2.9

1.3
.8
2.0

1.2
.7
1.7

.3
.1
.4

.2
.1
.3

.7
.5
.6

1.0
.6
.7

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

1.6
1.*
1.0
1.3
1.*
1.9

1.4
1.7

1.7
1.5
1.3
1.5
1.8
1.5

1.5
1.5
1.3
1.2
1.3
1.5

.9
.8
.5
.5
1.3

.7
.8
4
.3
•9
1.0

.1
.2
.1
.1
.1

.1
1
.1
.1
.1

.5
.3
.6
.8
.2

.2

.1

.2
.2
.1
.2
.2
.2

.1
.2
.2
.2
.1

.1

•5
.3
.6
•7
.3

.8

•9
1.4
1.5

1.0

.2

.1

Libor Turnover
T a b le B-2! M o n th ly la b o r turnover rates in se le cte d in d u strie s-C o n tin u e d

Industry

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL..........

(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
Total
rate
May

Apr. m y
1957 1957 1957
1.2
0.9
1.3
.6
1.0
.7

Separation rate
GUIit

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............
Leather: tanned, curried, and finished..

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES................

2.0
1.4
3.9
2.1

1.9
1.3
2.9
2.3

2.6
1.4
3A
3.5

3.0
2.0
3.6
3.6

1.0
.5
1.7
1.3

1.2
.7
I .9
1.4

.2
.1
.3
.2

.1
.1
.1
.2

1 .1
.5
•9
I .7

3.2
2.8
3.3

3.1
2.8
3.1

3.6
2.5
3.7

b .6

3.5
*•7

2.0
1.0
2.2

1.1

.2

.1
.2

.2
.1
.2

1.1
.8

2.4
2.8
1.7
2.7
2.2

2.5
2.6
1.5
3.9
1.7

3.5
3.6
1.5
2.3
3.9

l.l**

1.1
1.0
.6
1.3

1.0
.8
.6
1.3

1.5

.2
.2
.1
.2
.2

.2
.1
.2
.3
.4

1.5

2.0

1.7

2.6

2.7

.8

.8

.2

1.5
2.0
1.7
2.3
2 .1

1.3
2.1
2.1
2.3
1.9

1.8
2.9
3.6
2.3
2.3

2.1
3.*
3.8
3.5
2.9

.5
1.1
1.3
1 .1
.9

.6
1.1
1 .2
1.3
1.0

1.9

2.3

1.7

1.0

1.6
3.1

1.6
2.6

2.2
5.5

1.6
6.3

1.9

2.0

2.7

3.0
1.8
1 .2
1.9
1.8

3.0
2.2
2.0
1.5
2.8

2.5
2.0
2.8
3.2
3.7

Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling
Iron and steel foundries................
Gray-iron foundries....................
Malleable-iron foundries...............
Steel foundries.........................
Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals:
Primary smelting and refining of copper,
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
nonferrous metals:
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
Other primary metal industries:
Iron and steel forgings................

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT).............................
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware......
Hardware................................
Heating apparatus (except electric) and
Sanitary ware and plumbers’supplies...
Oil burners, nonelectric heating and
cooking apparatus, not elsewhere
Fabricated structural metal products....
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving..

Layoff

Apr.
May Apr.
Apr. May
Apr. May
1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 I 957
0.4
0.1
0.5
O
.9
1.5
(§
/) 0.2
1.2
.1
.3
.3
(2/) (2/ )
.7

1.6

RUBBER PRODUCTS.........................

Discharge

Misc., incl.
military
Apr.
my

1957 1957
0.2
0.2
.2
.2

1.4
.9
1.3

.3
.2
.4

1.7

.3

1.6
1.9
1.5

.5
.3

.6

•5
.4
.5

2.3
.5
.6
1.4

1.9

1.2
1.6
.3
1.4
1.2

.3
.2
.3
.2
•9

.2
.2
.2
.3
.2

.2

1.4

1.5

.3

.3

.1
.3
.3
.1
•5

.1
.3
.3
.3
.3

.9
1.2
I .7
•9
.7

1.1
2 .1
I .7
1.4

.3
.3
.3
.2
.2

.3
.2
.2
.2
.2

1.2

.4

.2

.6

.1

.3

.2

.6
1.3

.5
1.3

.3
.4

.1
.4

1 .1
3.h

.7
*.3

.3
.4

.4
.3

3.0

1.0

1.0

.2

.3

1.3

1.3

.2

.3

4.0
4.2
4.1
3.6
*•5

3.6
3.2
2 .1
3.7
3.3

1.4
1.4
1.6
1.3

1.3
1.4
1.0
1.3

1.6

.3
.3
.2
.2
.4

2 .1
2 .2
2 .1
2.0
2.4

1.8
1.3
.8

1.5

.3
.3
.2
.1
.3

1.0

.2
.3
.3
.2
.4

.2
.2
.2
•
3
.2

3.0
2.3

3.7
3.0

3.5
3.2

1.3
.9

1.3
1 .0

.4
.3

.4
.3

1 .8
1.6

1.5
1.7

.3
.3

.2
.2

3.5
3.3
3.2

b.l

3.6
2.6
6.5

1.5
1.5
1.5

1.5
1.4

.4
.4
.4

.4
.3
.4

1.9
1 .1
3.6

1.5

.2
.2
.4

.2
.2

3.1
5.8

2.6
2.8
3.2
3.2

2.3

2.5

1.5

.8

1.7

1.9

.8
4.4

.3
.3
.3
.3

.?

S e e footn o t e s at end of table.




25

DBBBH

Table B-2: Monthly labor turnover rates in selected industries-Continued
(Per

100 e m p l o y e e s )

Total
accession
rate

Industry

Separation
Total

Quit

rate

Discharge

M i s c . , incl.
military

Layoff

M ay

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)............
E n g i n e s a n d t u r b i n e s .............................
A g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h i n e r y a n d t r a c t o r s .......
Metalworking
Metalworking

m a c h i n e r y ..........................
machinery

(except

G e n e r a l i n d u s t r i a l m a c h i n e r y .................
Office and store machines and devices....
S e r v i c e - i n d u s t r y and household machines..
M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a c h i n e r y p a r t s ................

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY.....................
Electrical generating, transmission,
distribution, and industrial apparatus..
C o m m u n i c a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ........................
R a d i o s , p h o n o g r a p h s , t e l e v i s i o n sets,
a n d e q u i p m e n t ....................................
Telephone, telegraph, and related
e q u i p m e n t ..........................................
E l e c t r i c a l appliances, lamps, and m i s c e l ­
l a n e o u s p r o d u c t s .................................

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.................
A i r c r a f t .............................................
A i r c r a f t e n g i n e s a n d p a r t s ...................
A i r c r a f t p r o p e l l e r s a n d p a r t s ..............
O t h e r a i r c r a f t p a r t s a n d e q u i p m e n t .......
S h i p a n d b o a t b u i l d i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g ......
R a i l r o a d e q u i p m e n t ................................
L o c o m o t i v e s a n d p a r t s ..........................
R a i l r o a d a n d s t r e e t c a r s .....................
O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ..............

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS.........
P h o t o g r a p h i c a p p a r a t u s ..........................
W a t c h e s a n d c l o c k s ................................
Professional and scientific instruments..

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES....
silverware,

a n d p l a t e d w a r e ......

See footnotes at end of table.

26




M ay

Apr.

M ay

Apr.

M ay

Apr.

M ay

Apr.

M ay

Apr.

1957
2.0
1.5
2.2
2.1
1.5
1.1

1957

1957
1.2
1.1
(1/)
1.3
1.0
1.0

1957
1.1
1.0
1.2
1.2
.9
.9

1957
0.2
.2
(1/)
.2
.3
.2

19?7

1957

1957

.2
.2

19?7
1.6
1.6
(1/)
1.2
.8
1.0

1957

3.3
3.2
(1/)
3.0
2.3
2.5

1957
2.8
2.1
2.9
2.6
2.1
2.0

1.2
.7
.9
.8
.7
.7

0.3
.7
(1/)
.2
.2
.3

0.3
.3
.6
.2
.2
.2

1.6
2.0

1.6
2.2

1.9
2.4

1.7
2.7

.9
1.2

.9
1.1

.3
.3

.2
.2

.6
.6

.4
1.1

.2
.2

.1
.2

1.6
2.2
2.8
3.2
1.9

2.1
2.1
3.1
1.8
1.9

2.7
2.7
2.8
6.1
3.0

2.4
2.6
2.8
4.7
2.8

1.1
1.2
1.6
1.1
1.1

1.1
1.1
1.5
1.1
1.1

.2
.3
.2
.2
.2

.3
.3

.2
.2
.2

1.0
1.0
.8
4.5
1.5

.8
1.0
.9
3.1
1.2

.3
.2
.1
.2
.3

.2
.2
.2
.4
.2

2.8

2.7

2.9

3.3

1.4

1.4

.3

.3

1.0

1.4

.3

.2

1.5
3.6

2.2
3.1

2.7
2.7

2.6
3.1

1.1
1.6

1.3
1.5

.2
.3

.2
.3

1.2
.6

1.1

.9

.2
.3

.2
.2

5.7

*•3

3A

3.7

1.8

1.6

.3

.4

1.0

1.5

.3

.2

1.2

1.3

1.8

1.8

1.2

1.1

.3

.2

.1

.2

.3

.2

3.4

2.5

3.5

5.3

1.2

1.1

.3

.3

1.6

3.4

.5

.4

3.7
2.9
2.8
2.9
1.1
3.7
5-5
(1/)
(1/)
(1/)
7-7
6.0

3.6
2.6
2.9
3.0
1.7
3.1
4.2
12.8
*.9
4.2
5.0
3.*

4.2
4.5
3.0
2.9
2.7
2.6
5.0
(1/)
(1/)
(1/)
2.9
3.2

3.8
4.1
2.5
2.4
2.2
2.0
3.6
10.2
5.2
2.2
5.8
2.4

1.5
.9
1.9
2.0
1.2
1.6
2.5
(1/)
(1/)
(1/)
1.2
2.3

1.3
.7
1.5
1.6
1.1
1.0
2.0
2.9
1.0
.5
1.2
1.6

.3
.2
.2
.2
.1
.4
.7
(1/)
(I/)
(1/)
.6
.3

.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
.3
.6
.6
.4
.2
.5
.3

1.8
2.4
.7
.5
1.1
.4
(1/)
(1/)
(1/)
1.0
.4

1.9
2.5
.6
.5
.8
.6
.9
6.5
3.3
.3
3.9
.3

.5
.9
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
(1/)
(1/)
(1/)
.1
.2

.4
.6
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
.4
1.3
.2
.1

3.3
?.o
2.6

2.1
1.3
5.2
2.0

1.5
(1/)
1.3
1.2

1.1
.7
1.1
1.2

.4
(!/)
.2
.3

.2
.1
.4
.2

1.3
(1/)
4.2
.9

.7
.2
3.5
.4

.1
(1/)
.3
.1

.2
.2
.2
.1

4.1
2.4

4.1
2.9

1.7
1.1

•3
.3

.3
.2

1.9
.8

1.9

1.5

.2
.2

.2
.2

0.2
.2
.2
.3

machine

M a c h i n e - t o o l a c c e s s o r i e s .....................
Special-industry machinery (except metal-

Jewelry,

Apr.

1957
2.0
1.4
(1/)
1.7
1.4
1.0

2.7
(1/)
3.8
2.6

2.2
1.0
2.5
2.5

3.4
1.9

*•9
2.1

u/>

1.7
1.0

1 .7

1 aboi Turnover

T a b le B -2 : M o n th ly la b o r tu rn o ver rates in se lected m d u strie s-C o n tin u e d
(Per 100 employees)

Industry

Seiparation rate

Total
accession
rate
May Apr.

195,

Total

Quit

Discharge

L a y off

M isc., in c l.
m ilita ry
M
ay Apr.

ay Apr. M
ay Apr. M
ay Apr.
M
ay Apr. M
1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957 1957

HOHHAHUFACTURIHS:
METAL MINING............................
Copper mining
Lead and zin c mining

1.5
.9

se

2.9
1.2
2.6
2.4

1.7

2.2

4.6
1.0

2.6

5.3

(
i/}

1.1
.3
(1/ )

0.1
(2/)

II)

0.4
(2/ )
.3

1.7

2.9
.4
3.6
2.4

.1

.1

0.6
1.0
(1/ )

O
.9
.2
.1
2.6

0.3
.4

1
.3

0.3
.4
.5
.2

( /)

ANTHRACITE MINING.......................

.6

1.1

1.3

1.3

.3

.7

(2/)

(2/ )

.7

.4

.3

.2

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING..................

.8

.9

1.3

1.3

.5

.5

(2/)

(2/ )

.?

.6

.1

.1

(1/ )

.1
.1

( /)

1

.1
.3

( /)

1

.1
•
3

COMMUNICATION:
Telephone............................ ..

(i /)
(i /)

1.8
1.7

(±/) 1-5
Q/> 1.7

Ci/)
0 /)

1.2
1.1

ü/>

<i/>

Q/>

1/ Not available.
2/ Less than 0.05*
3/ Data relate to domestic employees except messengers and those compensated entirely on a commission basis.




27

H o u rs and Earnings
Table C-1: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees
Average weekly
hours

Average weekly
earnings

Industry

M ay

1W

April
1957

May

M ay

l< iñ 6

1957

April
19*57

19*56

$S7 .10

$98.50

40.8
3 7 .6
42.3
41.6

Average hourly
earnings

M ay

April
1957

M ay

43.2
42.1
44.2
42.2

$ 2.38
2.55
2.35
2 .I7

$2.38

$ 2.28
2.39

M av

1957

1956 _

M IM IN G :

METAL MINING.............................
Copper

m i n i n g ....................................

$ 98.06

99.96
99.17
89.62

99.83

99.89

91.10

89.89

41.2
39.2
42.2
41.3

96.26

100.62

2.56
2.36
2 .I9

2.26
2 .I3

ANTHRACITE...............................

88.99

92.06

70.66

30.9

31.1

29.2

2.88

2.96

2.42

B 1TUM 1NOUS-COAL..........................

106.20

111.74

106.02

35.4

37.0

38.0

3.00

3.02

2.79

103.83

100.75

99.94

40.4

40.3

40.3

2.57

2.50

2.48

NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING.......

87.52

84.87

85.69

44.2

43.3

4 5 .I

1.98

I .96

I .90

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .....................

106.11

104.88

100.61

37.1

36.8

37.4

2.86

2.85

2.69

NONBUILDIMG CONSTRUCTION....................................

103.22
96.1*0
109 .te

100.88

99.31

2.41
2.77

2.58

38.6

40.7
41.3
40.1

2.34

103.86

39.1
39.9

2.28

106.54

39.8
40.0
39.5

2.44

94.16

2.60

93.37

2.76

2.59

106.65

IO 5 .7 O

100.74

36.4

36.2

36.5

2.93

2.92

2.76

GENERAL CONTRACTORS.....................

98.73

97.46

93.96

35-9

35.7

36.0

2.75

2.73

2 .6I

SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS...............

112.30
117.73

111.33
116.97

36.7

2.88
2.91

101.44

35*3
39.4
35.7

3 .O5
3 .O7

130.48
105.14

36.9
38.3
35.2
39.3

3 .O6
3 .O9

131.99
106 .71*

36.5
38.1
34.8
39.3
35.4

81.78

81.59

78.40

39.7

8 7 .61*
73.13

88.29
72.74

84.86

40.2

NONDURABLE GOODS.......................................................

70.20

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES................

94.42

95.63

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...............

78.38

77.20
84.99
93.15

CRUOE-PETROLEUM ANO NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION:
Petroleum

Other

and

natural-gas

nonbuilding

production

c o n s t r u c t i o n ...........

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION...........................................

P l u m b i n g a n d h e a t i n g ..........................
P a i n t i n g a n d d e c o r a t i n g ......................
E l e c t r i c a l w o r k .................................
O t h e r s p e c i a l - t r a d e c o n t r a c t o r s ..........

MANUFACTURING ..............................

104.14

86.28
95.17
88.34
D a i r y p r o d u c t s ..................................
C o n d e n s e d a n d e v a p o r a t e d m i l k ...........
C a n n i n g a n d p r e s e r v i n g .......................
S e a f o o d , c a n n e d a n d c u r e d ................
C a n n e d fruits, v egetables, and soups..
Flour

Bread

and

and

other

other

28



grain-mill

products...

b a k e r y p r o d u c t s .........

7 7 .7 1
79.06
83.03
63.17
54.11

66.86
83 A 2
85.50

79-42
75-33
77-33
67.72

102.31

87.08

75.84
78.14
79.27

62.83
53.69

66.47
82.22

84.91

79.06
74.37
76.55

66.69

106.27

111.45
99.62

38.1

36 .1

2.95
3.35
2.99

2.94
3.32
2.97

39.8

40.0

2.06

2 .O5

1.96

40.5
38.9

40.fi
39.0

2.18
1.88

2.18

30.9

I .87

2.08
1.80

90.71

40.7

41.4

41.8

2.32

2 .3I

2.17

74.12

40.4
40.7
41.2
40.9
42.7
43.2
42.8
37.6
31.1
39.1
4 3 .O
43.4
43.4
40.5
40.7
39-6

40.0
39-9
40.5
40.5
41.9
42.7
1 1 .*
* 5
37.4
31.4

40.5
40.6
40.8
41.6
42.9
44.0
42.0

1.94
2.12
2 .3 I
2.16
1.82
1.83
1.94
1.68

1.93
2.13
2 .3O
2 .I5

122.22

80.79
87.31

84.86
73.79
75-68
76.44
59.82
50.53
64.15
79.49
81.03
75-77
72.85
7‘
5.03

65.18

38.2

42.6
43 .I
43.2
40.2
40.5
39.0

38.1
29.9
39.6
43.2
43.1
43.8
40.7
41.0
39-5

1.74
1.71

1.94
1.97
1.83

1.86
I .90
I .71

1.8 1
1.83
1.9 1
1.68
I .71

1.74
1.93
1.97

1.83
1.85
1.89
I .71

2.83
3.11

2.81

1.83
1.99
2.14
2.04
I .72
I .72

1.82

1.57
I .69

1.62

1.84

1.88
1.73
1.79
1.83
l.e>5

H o u rs and Earnings
Table C - l: Hours and gross earnings of production w orkers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
Average weekly
earnings

Industry

Average weekly
hours

May1957

April
1957

May1956

$84.02
91.10
74.97

$81.16

63.57
60.99
89 .2k
67.65

63.60

$76.24
8I.8O
73.73
60.92
59.19
34.42
64.33
102.14

40.2
41.5
40.0

79.31
71.51
84.25

37.8
40.4
41.4

67.55

45.0

58.35
72.16
47.24

38.9
41.3
37.3

Average hourly
earnings

May
May
1956 _ 1957

April
1957

May
1956

39-3
40.1
33.4
39-3
39-2
40.2
41.5
39.9

$ 2.09
2.19

$ 2.06

$1.94
2.04
1.92
1.55
1.51

2.71

2.68

1.55
2.56

33.5
40.9
40.6
44.8

38.5
41.1
41.5
43.3

2.21

2.21

2.06

1.83
2.14
1.63

1.74
2.03
1.56

36.8

38.9
41.0
37.2

1.58
I .85
1.31

1.55

36.8

1.62

1.62

May
. 1957
.
.

April
1957

40.2
41.6
37.3
39.0

39.4
40.2
39.0
39.5
39.2
39.8
41.0
39-5

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS - Continued
S u g a r ..................................................
C a n e s u g a r r e f i n i n g .............................
B e e t s u g a r ..........................................
C o n f e c t i o n e r y a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s .........
C o n f e c t i o n e r y .....................................

87.64
78.39
61.54

87.16

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES......................
Tobacco
Tobacco

a n d s n u f f .................................
s t e m m i n g a n d r e d r y i n g ................

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS.....................
Scouring

and

combing

p l a n t s ...................

103.1*0

65.19
105.36

83.54
73.93
89.42
72.90

74.85
86.83
73.02

61.46

57.04

76.41

B o t t l e d s o f t d r i n k s .............................
M a l t l i q u o r s .......................................
Distilled, rectified, and blended
l i q u o r s ............................................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s f o o d p r o d u c t s ...................
C o r n s i r u p , s u g a r , o i l , a n d s t a r c h .......

67.88

85.09

48.86
59.62
54.72

47.55
57.83
53.6?

57.04
52.25

57.60

57.90
64.72
52.44

56.16
65.60

65.92
52.30
52.54

54.60

52.68
54.60
56.26

silk,

syntbe'tic

f i b e r ..............

S o u t h ...............................................

K n i t t i n g m i l l s .....................................
F u l l - f a s h i o n e d h o s i e r y ........................

55.06
57.46
54.43

66.88
60.10

Cotton,

55.83
53.96
57.00
53.72

65.44
60.10

53.87
55.96
57.90
55.22

53.65
57-97

47.88
Knit

o u t e r w e a r ....................................

51.17
47.48
57.00

50.18

D y e i n g a n d f i n i s h i n g t e x t i l e s ................
Dyeing and finishing textiles (except

66.42

65.69

56.62

58.40
47.30
50.59
46.90
55.88
51.47
67.49

50.54
50.67

51.22
55-18
53.06

57.66

52.40

66.83

57.28
52.97
58.13
58.14
58.03
44.76
49.27
43.99
56.30
50.57
61.46

60.76
71.20
71.20

38.6

36.8
38.0
38.4
41.2
37.9
37.8
39.0
38.5

other
rugs,

f l o o r c o v e r i n g s ......
a n d c a r p e t y a r n ......

M i s c e l l a n e o u s t e x t i l e g o o d s ...................
F elt goo d s (except w o v e n felts and

P a d d i n g s a n d u p h o l s t e r y f i l l i n g . . . . ......
Proce s s e d waste and recovered fibers....
A r t i f i c i a l leather, o i l c l o t h , and

38.0

38.0

36.0




37.2
35-3
37.2
35.0
37-5
37.3

1.38
1.39
1.40
1.45
1.42
1.52
1.4l
I .60
1.51
1.46
1.55
1.54

1.56

1.57
2.19
1.59

2.10

1.50

1.81

1.76

1.31
1.45

1.27
1.55
1.35

1.50

1.44

1.61

1.60

1.38
1.39
1.40
1.45
1.43
1.52
1.41

1.33
1.33
1.32
1.39
1.35
1.49
1.33

1.60

1.58

1.51
1.45
1.55
1.49
1.57
1.34
1.36
1.34
1.49
1.38

37.2
34.7
37.9
34.1
38.3

1.33
1.35
1.33
1.52
1.64

1.65

1.45
1.42
1.55
1.53

1.56

1.29
1.30
1.29
1.47
1.31
1.56

37.9
35.7
37-5
36.9
40.5

40.9

39-4

40.3
39.7
39.1
36.4
39-5

40.7
40.4
39.8
33.3
39.7

39-2
4o.o
4o.o
35-6
39.7

1.84

1.63

1.64
1.84

1.82
1.62
1.70

1.64
1.70

1.61
1.62

38.5
37.6
40.4
40.8

38.6

39-3
37.8
38.9
4l.l

1.85

1.84

37.4
40.6
40.5

1.79
1.73
1.40

1.80

1.75
1.74

1.73
1.39

1.68
I .29

41.6
39-2

41.6
39.4

2.07
1.50

1.50

2.05

1.95
1.45

71.02
67.32

69.89

7 0 . 2k

57.12

56.30

65.77
65.35
53-02

86.73

85.28
58.80

81.12

41.9

57.13

38.1

57.15

38.0
38 .1
38.8

36.1
37.6
35.4

2.16
1.62

1.50
I .60

38.6

41.8
39-8
36.9

38.5
37.8

1.83

39.0
41.0

40.9
39.8
37.0
37.4

37-5

66.75
74.34
72.44
54.61
67.49

68.78

38.8

2.22
I .63

1.44

3 8 .1

73.05
71.16
58.97
67.15

57.32
64.31

38.6

40.2
38.0
37.9
39.0

1.63
1.58

38.7

39-7
39-3
38.7
39-4
42.3
39-5
37-3
37.5

38.0

71.23
67.30

Carpets, rugs,
Wool carpets,

37.5
36.3
35-7
37.0

2.01

2.18
2.01
1.61

38.6

1.36

1.82

1.55
1.78
1.78

SL
S

Table C-1: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
Average w e e k l y
earnings

Industry

Av e rage w e e k l y
hours

May
1957

April
19*57

May
1956

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS................................................................... $52.98
Men's and boys' suits and c o a t s ...........
63.19

$52.84
62.48

60.29

32.0

47.93
45.92
51.74
49.90
49.28
48.16
55.20

45.72
44.67
47.55
45.75
57.70
59-01
48.10
59.87
47.70
45.95
51.60
57.62
48.28
48.37
54.54

45.98
43.38
51.34
51.50

35.5
35.6
35.2
30.8
36.5
34.4
37.3

46.64
57-30
58.55

48.86
56.74
56.34

44.80
55.54
55.81

35.6
38.2

73-35
71.42

72.00
70.67

71.38
72.45
73.67

Men ' s and boys'

f u r ni s h i n g s and work

16.10
)

i^ .5 7
46.67
45.75
57-35
58.38
48.10
W o m e n ' s suits, coats, and s k i r t s ........
W omen's, c h i l d r e n ' s u n der g a r m e n t s .......
U n d e r w e a r and nigh twear, except corsets.
C o r s e t s and a l l i e d g a r m e n t s ........... . . .

M i s c e l l a n e o u s a p p a r el and accessories....
Ot her f a b r i c a t e d t e x tile p r o d u c t s ........
Curtains, d r a peries, and other housef u r n i s h i n g s .................. ..............

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)...............................................................

62.08

May

Millwork, plywood,

“S p H l
1957 1957

May-

1956

$50.91
61.42

35.8
35.7

35-7
35*5

35.6
37.0

$1 .48

$1 .1«8

1.77

1.76

$1.43
1.66

44.52
43.77
47.00
41.58
54.70
55.36
44.98

36.3
35.6
35.9
39.1
35.4
35.6
37.0

36.0

3 5.9
35.3
37*3

1.2 7
1.28

1.27

1.24

1.28

1.24

1.31

1.26

1.17

1.13
1.59

47.16

48.64
51.52

4 o .l

48.64
89.31

49.86
92.20

76.33
75.52
77.71
57.08

74 .4o
73.63

74.12
73.44
75.36
57-26
56.71
59.^5

40.6
40.6
40.9
40.2
40.3
4o .5

66.47
63.04

39.2
38.8

67.82

58.34

89.63

71.86

May

1956

40.3
39*9
39.9
40.7
38.8

72.62

May

1957 JL257

49.65

S a w m i l l s and p l a n i n g m i l l s .................
S a w m i l l s and p l a n i n g mills, g e n e r a l .....

April

Av e r a g e h o u r l y
e a rnings

34.9
36.3
39.1
35.4
36.2

37.0
30.7
35.6
35.9
35.1
34.3
36.3
34.8
37.1

36.8
3 4.4
34.6
35-7
31.4
35.1
34.7
35.9
31.4

36.0

1.30

1.17

1.62

1.64

1.30
1.9^
1.35

1.29
1.47
1.62

1.63
1.63

1.30
1.95

1.3^

1.28

1.47

1.68

1.26

I .92
1.31

1.25
1.43

1.64
1.31
1 .34
l.4 o

36.3

1.35
l.itO

1.1*8

1.39
1.1*7

37.3
38.6
39.4

35.0
38.3
39.3

1.31
1.50
1.1*6

1.31
1.47
1.43

1.28

4o.o
39.7
39.7
40.2

4 o .l
40.7
40.7
4 1.9
3 9.4

1.82

1.80
1 .7 8
1.8 1

1 .7 8

4o.o

39.0

36.8

1 .7 9
1.82

1.22
2.31

1.33

I .60

1.21
2.29

1.45
1.42

1.78

l.8l

1.19

2.34

and p r e f a b r i c a t e d

M i l l w o r k ......................................

M i s c e l l a n e o u s w o o d p r o d u c t s ................

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES........................................
W o o d h o u s e h o l d furniture, except

56.82
61.56
67.82

64.02

76.11
56.82
56.42

61.76
68.28

65.01
58.80

1.88
1.86

40.5
40.8
40.3
4 0.9
40.8
41.0

1.42

39.7
39A

1.86

1.83

1.85
1.8 7

l.k l

1.4l
i.4o

1.80
1.87

1.52

1 .5 1

1.45

39.8
3 9.4

1.73

1 .72
1.65

1.67

40.0
39.3
37-2

40.8
38.1
37.1

1.8 1
1.8 7

1.47

1.4 7
1.83

1 .84

1.43
1.78
1.78

41.4
43.3
41.7

1 .9 1
*1.58
2.15

1-93
1.57
2.14

1.88

39.8
4o.7
4o.3
40.3
40.9

1.90

1.65

l.4 o
1.39

1.60

Office, publi c - b u i l d i n g ,

Partitions,

shelving,

Screens, blinds,

68.45

66. o4

39.7
37-2
38.7

77.78
64.06
84.10

77.83
71.45

4 o .l
40.2

85.90

39.1

40.3
4o.8
39.3

85.44

84.23

83.03

40.3

4o.3

40.7

2.12

2.09

2.04

67.26

68.04

65.36

39.8

4o .5

4 o .l

1 .69

1.68

1.63

71.92

and professional

lockers,

and

and m i s c e l l a n e o u s furni-




58.36
67.33
72.37
77.79
63.52
84.07

Woo d h o u s e h o l d furniture, upholstered...

1.65

2.06

H o u rs and Earnings
Table C-1: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued

I n d u s t ry

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.................
Pulp, paper, and p a p e r b o a r d m i l l s .........
P a p e r b o a r d c o ntainers and b o x e s ...........
F i b e r cans, tubes, and d r u m s ...............
O t h e r p a p e r and a l lied p r o d u c t s ...........

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES................................

Average weekly
earnings

May
1957
$81*. 00
92.23
77.55

76.92
81.60

7i*.i*a

96.61*
IO 3.53

96.08
85 .W

April
1957
$81*. 20
92.1*1*
77.71
77.08
82.1*2
75.07

May
1956

Ave r a g e w e e k l y
hours

May

April

May

1957

1957

1956

$80.79
88.68
71*.11
**
73.62
79-37
71.23

1*2.0
1*3.3
1*0.6
1*0.7
1*0.0
1*0.7

42.1
1 3 .1
* *
40.9
1 1.0
*
10 .1
* *
1*0.8

1*2.3
1*3-9
1*0.9
1*0.9
1*0.7
1*0.7

95.87
101.03
101.09

93.65
IOO .55
9**.17

36.2

38.5

85.26

38.5
35.7
39.8

83.63
92.17

38.7
36.3
39.1*
1*0.1*

10.0
*
39.3
38.0
39.0

39.9
39.8
38.6

Average hourly
earnings

May
1957
$2.00
2.13
1.91
I .89
2.01*
1.83

April
1957
$2.00

39.1*

2 .5 I
2.86
2.1*7
2.12
2.38
2.1*5
I.7 I
1.88

2 .1*9
2.83
2 .51*
2.10
2.38
2.1*3
1.71
1.88

2.13
I .90

1.88
2.01*
1.81*

May
1956
$1.91
2.02
1.82
I .80
1.95
1.75
2.1*2
2.77
2.39

9<*.l*9
96.78
65 .81*
7 2 .91*
M i s c e l l a n e o u s p u b l i s h i ng and printing

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.............
I n d u s t r i a l i n organic c h e m i c a l s ............
I n d u s t r i a l org a n i c c h e m i c a l s ...............
Plastics, except syn t hetic r u b b e r .......
S y n t h e t i c r u b b e r ............................

95.50

61*.98
73.32

62.15
71.71

38.9
1*0.3
39-7
39-5
38*5
38.8

109.82

109.52

107.59

38.1*

38.7

38.7

2.86

2.83

2.78

90.1*2
98.09
95 .in

89.1*0
97.99

86.32

2.20
2.1*1
2.35
2.35
2.59
2.02

2.56

2.27

2.02

2.25

77-93

1*1.3
1*1.0
1*0.9
1*1.0
1*2.3
1*1.2
39.7
1*0.5
1*0.8

2 .O9
2.30

97.86
103.9**
80.80
92.25
81.61

1*1.2
1*1.0
1*0.7
1*0.9
1*2.0
1*0.6
1*0.1*
1*1.0
1*0.1*

2.17

98.18
105.93
81.1*1

1*1.1
1*0.7
1*0.6
1*0.9
1*1.6
1*0.9
1*0.3
1*1.5
1*0.3

2.02

1.95
2.13
I. 9I

1*0.8
1*0.9
1*1.0

11.0
*
1 0.9
*

1*1.1

1*0.7
1*0.6
1*1.5

2.32

88.78

89.51*
97.85
85.08

2.53
2 .I7

2.30
2 .5I
2.16

2.20
2.1*1
2 .O5

86.93
77.35

82.81
75-95

70.36
71*.90
67.62

1*1.2
12.5
*
1*3.6
1*3.6
!*3-5
1*3.8
1*0.7
39-3
1*2.2

1*1.2
1*3.1*
1*3-7
1*3.8
1*2.8
1*5.1
1*0.7
38.9
1 2.3
*

2.11
1.82

70.63
76 . 7 k

1*1.1
1*3-3
1*1*.!*
1*3.1*
1*2.9
1*1*.1
1*0.5
38.9
1*1.5

I .76
2.29

2.26

2.01
1.75
I. 6I
I.7 I
I .58
1.88
1.95
I .70
2.12

1*1.0
1*1.0
1*1.0

1*1.2
1*1.1*
1*0.6

1*0.7
1*0.5
1*1.2

2 .6I
2.70
2 .3O

2.59
2.68
2.28

2.53
2.66
2.11*

1*0.1
1*0.1*

1*0.0
1*0.1
38.6
1*0.2

39-9
39-7
39.7
1*0.1

2.22
2.57
1.83
1.99

2 .I9
2.58
1.83
I .98

2.15
2 .5I
1.82

36.5
39.7
39.6
37.0
35-8

I. 5I
*
1.93
1.81*
1.1*7
1.1*9

I. 5I
*
1.93
1.86
1.1*5
1.1*9

96.12

91*.21

81.1*1

95.20

95.65
95.30

93.13

9**.30
92.!*3
92.25
92.61*

103.00

77.1*2

86.27

Soap, cle a n i n g and p o l ishing

91*.66

Paints, pigments, and f i l l e r s .......... .
Paints, v a r nishes, lacquers, and

F e r t i l i z e r s ....................................
V e g e t a b l e and animal oils and f a t s .......

103.1*8
88.97

87.13
79.67
75-01*

78.12
70.79

E s s e n t i a l oils, perfumes, c o s m e t i c s .....
C o m p r e s s e d and l i q u ified g a s e s ...........

87.32
83.1*3
68.1*6
95.01*

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL............

107.01

A n i m a l oils and f a t s ....... ...............

110.70
Coke, other p e t r o l e u m and coal products..
91*.30
RUBBER PRODUCTS............................

89.02
103.83
71.92

79.60

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS..............

55.90

Leather: tanned, curried, and finished...
I n d u s t r i a l leather bel ting and packing...
B o o t and shoe cut s t o c k and f i n d i n g s .....

75.27
7^.3^




51**68

53.01*

9^-30
102.66

69.17
87.60
83.03

68.78
95.37

81*.79
79-37

66.13
89.68

IO 6.71
110.95
92.57

102.97

87.60

85.79

103.1*6
70.61*
79.60
56.83
76.1*3
73.1*7
53.07
5^.39

107.73
88.17
99.65
72.25
76.99

39.3

1*0.0

1*0.6

69.30

1*0.1*

36.9
39.6
39-5

51.91

37.2
35.6

36.5

51**75
73.81*
53.28

36.3
39.0

36.6

2.36

2.12
1.81*
I .69
1.80
I .65
I .98

2.06

2.39
2.35
2.33
2.33
2.00

1.62
I .76
1.59
2.00
2.01*
1.75

2.07
2 .3I
2 .3I
*
I. 6I
1.82

2.26

2.25
2 .I9
2.50

1.92
1.50

1.86
1.75
1.1*1*
1.1*5

H o u rs and Earnings
Table C-l: Hours nnd gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
Average we e k l y
earnings

Industry

H a n d b a g s a n d s m a l l l e a t h e r g o o d s ...........
G l o v e s and m i s c e l l a n e o u s leather goods...

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS...........
and

glassware,

pressed

or

blown....

May

1956

May
1957

Apr.
1957

May
1956

38.1
35.7
36.1

37.7

39.3
35.3
36.9

$ 1.62
1.1*1*
1.37

$1.63
1.43

$ 1.58
1.37
1.31

40.7
40.3
40.4
40.7
39-8

41.5
4i.4
4o.l
4o.7
39.2
4o.6
4l.l
41.3
42.5
4o.l
42.2

2.02
2.75

2.01
2.77
2.05
2.07
2.03
1.75

40.7
40.2
41.3
40.0
39-3
39*0
37-2
43.6
44.1
40.8

4o.4
40.0
39.6
4o.o
38.9
39.8
40.7
40.0
41.0
39.5
38.8
39.2
37.9
42.6
43.2
39.8

Glass products made of pur c h a s e d glass...
C e m e n t , h y d r a u l i c .................................
S t r u c t u r a l c l a y p r o d u c t s .......................
B r i c k a n d h o l l o w t i l e ..........................
F l o o r a n d w a l l t i l e .............................
S e w e r p i p e ..........................................
P o t t e r y a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s .................
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products...
C u t - s t o n e a n d s t o n e p r o d u c t s .................
Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral

83.00
92.21

40.6
39.8
42.3
36.7

40.6
40.6
42.0
36.9

40.9
40.0
41.5
40.8

Apr*
1957

May
1956

May

$61.72
51.41
49.46

$61.45

52.05

48.96

$62.09
48.36
48.34

82.21
110.83
84.03

81.20
110.80

80.93
112.19

85.88

82.80

81.19
67.55
84.66
75.17

83.44
75.66

69.65

70.62
76.00

74.28
83.07
72.91
82.84

80.26
72.62
85.67

78.97
84.66
74.00

69.29
73.87
71.00
83.50
73.91

80.51
78.62
70.05

85.67

80.20

66.58

82.20
74.34
71.83
73.38
73.85

80.60
72.01
82.90
80.15
70.55

82.21
86.40

1957

38.6

36.4
36.0

39.9
37.9

45.3

45.8
41.5

2.08

2.11
2.0l*
1.75

2.08

1.87
1.71
1.90
1.89
2.13
1.96
1.90
1.82
1.78
2.11

1.36

2.08
1.85

1.69
1.87
1.83
2.13
1.95
1.89
1.82
1.76

1.95

2.71

2.00
2.05
1.93
1.61*
2.00

1.80
I .69
1.83
1.75
2.02
1.90
1.83
1.75
1.70

2.12
2.31

2oll
2.25
2.13
2.33

2.00

2.26

2.01

2.16

84.78
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES..................
Blast

furnaces,

steel

works,

and

97.42

97.91

95.53

39.6

39.8

4l.0

2.1*6

2.1*6

2.33

103.89

IOO .69

39.2

39-5

4o.6

2.62

2.63

2.1*8

103.10

p r o d u c t s ................................
p r o d u c t s .......................... ...

91.35
89.46
85.98

102.70

Abrasive
Asbestos

89.95

81.18

Average hourly
earnings

Apr.
1957

May
1957

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS - Continued
L u g g a g e ...................................

Glass

Average weekly
hours

104.28
91.25
86.68
82.78
82.01

101.09
88.73

4o.6
40.7
41.2
40.7
39.9
42.9

2.63
2.27
2.20
2.15
2.ll*
2.32

2 .1*9
2.18

96.98

39-5
40.2
39.4
38.5
38.5
41.8

2.61*

82.62
81.00
96.10

39*2
39.6
39-3
38.4
39.1
41.3

94.02

89.62

40.9

40.7

41.3

89.57

89.68

rolling

B l a s t f u r n a c e s , steel, w o r k s , a n d r o l l i n g
mills, except e l e c t r ometallurgical

89.89
Iron

and

steel- f o u n d r i e s .......................

86.46

82.56

86.11

2.27

2.26

2.20
2.15
2.13
2.32

2.09
2.03
2.03
2.2l*

2.31

2.31

2.17

2.19

M a l l e a b l e - i r o n f o u n d r i e s ......................
S t e e l f o u n d r i e s ..................................
Pri m a r y smelting and refining of
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ................................
P r i m a r y smelting and refining of

83.67
95-82

P r i m a r y r e f i n i n g o f a l u m i n u m ................
S e c o n d a r y s melting and refi n i n g of
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ................................
Rolling, drawing
and alloying of
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ................................
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of

102.00

101.25

87.57
93.79

40.9
40.8

40.9
40.5

41.7
4o.6

2.20
2.50

2.50

2.10
2.31

86.51

87.56

82.57

41.0

41.3

41.7

2.11

2.12

1.98

94.54

94.30

92.13

4o.4

40.3

41.5

2c 31*

2.31*

2.22

93.56

92.40

93.91

40.5

40.0

42.3

2.31

2.31

2.22

95.27
90.40
99.38
105.52
94.94
96.47

95.99
89.95
100.12
105.52
96.52

89.28
87.29

40.2
40.0
40.4
40.9
4o.4
39.7

40.5
39.8
40.7
40.9
40.9
40.0

4o.4
40.6
41.9
4i .9
42.1
41.2

2.37

2.37

2.21
2.15
2.36
2 .1*7
2.27
2.28

94.48

89.98

Rolling,

drawing,

and

alloying

of

N o n f e r r o u s f o u n d r i e s .............................
Miscellaneous primary metal industries...
I r o n a n d s t e e l f o r g i n g s .......................
Welded

and

he&vy-riveted

32




p i p e ..............

96.80

36.88

103.49
95-57
93.94

2.26

2.1*6

2.58
2.35
2.1*3

2.26

2.1*6
2.58
2.36
2.1*2

H o u rs and Earnings
Table C-l:

Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued
Average weekly
earnings

I n d ustry

May
1957

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORDNANCE,
MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT).

April
1957

$87.94
93.20
84.44
74.40

$87.94
97.25

May

1956

Average w e e k l y
hours

May
1957

April May
1557 . 1956

A v erage hourly
earnings

May
1957

April
19*57

$2.0l*

S a n i t a r y ware and p l u m b e r s ’ supplies....
Oil burners, n o n e l e c t r i c heating and
c o oking apparatus, not elsew h e r e
F a b r i c a t e d s t r u c t u r a l metal p r o d u c t s .....
S t r u c t u r a l steel and orna m e n t a l metal
M e t a l doors,

sash, frames, molding,

40.9
42.1
40.2
4o.4
39-7
4o .3

40.7
41.7
40.2
40.9
40.6
39.8

81.93
84.53

79.00
82.71

39.1
38.7

39-2
38.6

39.5
39-2

2.10

2.09

84.75

2.19

2.19

80.75
93.04

80.77
91.96

77.22
86.32

39.2
42.1

39.4
4l.8

39.6
41.5

2.21

2.06

2.05
2.20

1.95

93-93

86.74

42.6

42.5

41.7

2.23

2.21

2.08

89.21

H a r d w a r e ......................................
H e a t i n g a p p a r a t u s (except electric) and

74.34
82.58
85.84

40.9
40.7
40.4
40.0
39.9
40.7

$2.15

90.07
78.39
71.98
80.79
79.20

95.00

T i n cans and o ther t i n w a r e .................
Cutlery, hand tools, and h a r d w a r e .........
C u t l e r y and edge t o o l s .....................

87.91

2.16

40.5
37.3
40.6
39.7
40.2
41.7

39.3
41.7
42.8
40.0
37.7
40.2
39-5
40.6
41.9

2.16

1.77
2.27
1.99
2.02
2.13

I. 7I
*
2.26
1-97
2.02

2.03
2.09
2.11
2.09

84.22

41.3
42.0
41.6
40.7
36.7
40.9
39.6
39-7
41.5

40.7
41.8

89.24

79.78
87.15
90.31
83.60
63.71
86.83
74.26
78.76

2 . 1k

1.88
1.9^
2.01

97-64
94.60
90.27

100.35

88.32

41.2
4o.6
4l.6
42.5

44.8
40.7
41.6
42.5

2.33
2.31
2.17
2.09

2.37
2.33
2.17
2.10

2.2l*
2.17
2.07
1.98

82.99
87.91
82.11

and

B o i l e r - s h o p p r o d u c t s ......................
S h e e t - m e t a l w o r k ...........................
M e t a l stamping, coating, and engraving...
V i t r e o u s - e n a m e l e d p r o d u c t s ................
S t a m p e d and p r e s s e d m etal p r o d u c t s ......
L i g h t i n g f i x t u r e s ............................
F a b r i c a t e d w i r e p r o d u c t s ....................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s fabr i c a t e d m e tal products..
M etal shipping barrels, drums, kegs,

92.40
92.35
89.13
64.96
92.84

78.80
80.19
88.40

83.21

91.54
90.61

88.29
64.90
91.76

78.21
81.20

$ 83.03

4 l.o

2.29
2.09
1.86

2.08
2.16

2.20
2.22

2.19

$2.15
2.31
2.07
1.81*

May
1956

2.08
2.13

2.19
2.21

2.18

2.16
1.95
1.76
1.99
1*99
2.00
2.11

2.08

1.69
2.16

and r i v e t s .........

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL).............
S t e a m engines, turbines,

89.25

86.11
84.15

41.8
40.4
41.4
41.9

93.71
99.39

94.39
98.23

92.42
93.56

4l.l
40.9

4i.4
4l.l

42.2
41.4

2.28
2.43

2.28
2.39

2.26

113.35

Bolts, nuts, washers,

97-39
93.32
89.84
87.57

111.11

96.64

43.1

42.9

41.3

2.63

2.59

2.31*

93.60
90.4o
90.94

93.32
90.57
91.64

92.74
84.99
88.44

40.0
40.0
39.2

4o.4
39-9
39-5

41.4
39.9
40.2

2. 31*
2.26
2.32

2.31
2.27
2.32

2.21*
2.13
2.20

89.98
93.15

89.28

80.98

40.9
41.4

4o.4

41.6

39.5
43.1

2.20
2.25

2.21
2.26

2.16

93.34
93.63
109.50
102.53

93.56
94.28

93.31
92.44

43.0
43.4
45.5
46.0

2.26

109.20
105.80

4i.4
41.9
44.5
43-7

2.26

110.81

41.3
41.8
43.8
42.9

2.39

2.25
2.1*9
2.39

2.17
2.13
2.1*0
2.30

97.88
115.67

41.9

42.7
45.7

43.5
45.9

2.36
2.61

2.36

2.25

45.1

2.60

2.52

89.66

41.4
4l.4
4o.4
44.1
42.7

41.7
41.6
4o.3
46.0
42.8

42.9
42.0
41.4
46.1
43.8

2.16

2.16

2.09
2.1£
1.81*

and w a ter

D i e s e l and other i n t e r n a l - c o m b u s t i o n
engines, not e l s e w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d ......
A g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h i n e r y and t r a c t o r s ......
A g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h i n e r y (except
t r a c t o r s )....................................
C o n s t r u c t i o n and mini n g m a c h i n e r y .........
C o n s t r u c t i o n and min i ng machinery,
exce p t for oil f i e l d s .....................
O i l - f i e l d m a c h i n e r y and t o o l s ............
M a c h i n e t o o l s ................................
M e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h i n e r y (except machine

94.02

104.44

98.88 100.77
M a c h i n e - t o o l a c c e s s a r i e s ..................
S p e c i a l - i n d u s t r y m a c h i n e r y (except m e tal-

P a p e r - i n d u s t r i e s m a c h i n e r y ................
P r i n t i n g - t r a d e s m a c h i n e r y and equipment.




117.71

118.82

89.42
91.08
76.76
94.82
102.05

90.07
91.52
76.57
99.82

102.29

93.10

89.04
76.18
95.89
102.93

2.21*

2.50

2.20
1.90
2.15
2.39

2.20
1.90
2.17
2.39

2.19

2.05

2.08
2.35

33

our

j r m

n ^

Table C-1: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued

May

1957

Average hourly

Ave r a g e w e e k l y
hours
May
April M a y

May

1957

1957

1956

1957

41.3
41.4
41.7
40.5
40.2
41.1

41.3
41.1
42.1
40.5
40.6
41.4

42.7
42.5

$2.24

42.8
41.5
42.2
42.9

2.35
2.14

41.7
40.3
40.4
39.8

2.18

36.7

42.5
41.0
41.4
40.1
39-3
39.8

2.22
2.22

84.38

41.6
39.7
40.5
39.0
38.9
38.7

2.24

2.18
2.20

Average w e e k l y
earnings

T nHnct.T* v
1X1UUO ux j
r

April
1957

May
1956

$ 92.10
89.19
99.36
85.05
90.54
93.98

$92.23

e a rnings

April
1957

May

1956

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL) - Continued
Pumps, air and gas c o m p r e s s o r s ...........
C o n v e y o r s and c o n v e ying e q u i p m e n t .......
Bl o wers, e x h a u s t and v e n t i l a t i n g fans...
I n d u s t r i a l trucks, tractors, e t c ........
M e c h a n i c a l p o w e r - t r a n s m i s s i o n equipment.
Me c h a n i c a l s t o k e r s and industrial

$92.51
90.25

98.00
86.67
89 .2%
93.71

89.68

95.44
84.66
90.73
94.38

2.22
2.28

$2.23

2 .17
2.36
2.10

2.23
2.27

$ 2.16

2 .11

2.23
2.04
2.15

2.20

86.69

93.41
89.47
95.34
77.61
84.15
80.74

80.98
90.09

81.76
88.80

80.18
88.78

40.9
40.4

41.5
40.0

40.7
41.1

1.98
2.23

1.97

2.22

2.16

84.10
89.95
89.47

82.04

87.98
87.12

91.49

92.60

89.67

38.3
41.1
40.5
39.7
41.9

38.7
41.5
40.9
40.6
42.1

2.21
2.22
2.22
2.21

2.20
2.21
2.23
2.20
2.21

2.12
2.12

M a c h i n e shops (job and r e p a i r ) ...........

38.4
40.7
40.3
39.7
41.4

2.19

88.13

81*. 26
90.83
90.32
87.34

2.13
2.09
2.13

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY.......................

82.21

83.02

79-77

40.1

40.3

40.7

2.05

2.06

1.96

86.74

92.35

O f f i c e and store m a c h i n e s and devices....
Co m p u t i n g m a c h i n e s and cash registers...
S e r v i c e - i n d u s t r y and h o u s e h o l d machines..
D o m e s t i c l a u n d r y e q u i p m e n t ................
C o m m e r c i a l laundry, dry-cleaning, and
S e w i ng m a c h i n e s ................. * ..........
Re f r i g e r a t o r s and a ir - c o n d i t i o n i n g

F a b r i c a t e d pipe, fittings,

and valves...

E l e c t r i c a l generating, transmission,
di s tribution, and industrial apparatus..

88.13

95.99
75.27
84. 80

91.38

2.18

88.56

94.81

78.60
82.92

84.85

38.6

2.37
1.93

2.24

2.22
2.36
1.95

2.15

2.16

2.29
1.96

2.11
2.12
1.97

77-02

76.07

40.4
39.7

40.5
39.5

41.5
40.9

2.17
1.94

2.17
1.93

2.09

7 6 . 2k

81* A O

85.26

83.23

40.0

40.6

40.8

2 .11

2.10

2.04

82.01

81.20

79.56

40.2

40.0

40.8

2.04

2.03

1.95

91.25
91.94

90.85
93.89

88.56

40.2
40.5

40.2
41.0

41.0
42.6

2.27
2.27

2.26

2.16
2.18

92.10
98.64
81.83
86.70
82.78

92.13
97.44

41.3
42.7

41.5
42.0
39.1
42.1
39.0
40.1
40.2

42.3
45.5
39.8

2.23
2.31

2.22

2.12

39-2
40.9
40.4

2.04
2.15
1.90
1.96

2 .11

42.7

87.67

87.89

1.86

C a r b o n and g r a p h i t e prod u c t s
E l e c t r i c a l indicating, measuring,
Motors, generators,

and

and m o t o r - g e n e r a t o r

P ow e r and d i s t r i b u t i o n t r a n s f o r m e r s .....
S w i tchgear, switchboard, and industrial

E l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t for v e h i c l e s ........
El e c t r i c l a m p s ................................
Radios, phonographs, t e l e v i s i o n sets,

74.86

78.60
76.21
69.45

Telephone,

telegraph,

P r i m a r y bat t e r i e s (dry and w e t ) ..........
X - r a y and n o n - r a d i o e l e c t r o n i c tubes....




85.46

91.37

105.56
80.00
83.27

80.20
86.94
70.11
88.26

38.6

42.5
38.5
39.4
40.1

2.29
2.32

2.16
2.32
2.01

2.03
2.15
1.90
1.97

1.95
2.03
1.84

76.19
79-19

79.58
75.26
75-14

76.61
69.63

72.22
67.83

39.9

39.9
38.9

39-9
39-9

1.91
1.79

1.92
1.79

1.8 1

38.8

97.75
80.79
86.94

93.94
76.73

41.8
40.3 '
39.7
41.0
40.3

42.5
40.6
39.7
40.8
40.0

42.7
40.6
39-9
40.0
41.3

2.29
1.99
2.19
1.71
2.19

2.30

2.20
1.89
2.08
1.61

83.85

and rel a t e d

95.72

34

82.50

92.87

70.18
88.00

82.99
64.40

88.38

1.99
2.19
1.72

2.20

1.86
1.70

2.14

H o u rs and Earnings
Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued

I n d u s try

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT....................................

Average weekly
earnings
May
May
April
1956
1957
1957

*<*.56
93-21

M o t o r vehicles, bodies, parts, and

T r a i l e r s (truck and a u t o m o b i l e ) ..........
A i r c r a f t ......................................
A i r c r a f t engi n e s and p a r t s ................
A i r c r a f t p r o p e l l e r s and p a r t s ............
O t h e r a i r c r a f t parts and e q u i p m e n t ......
Sh i p and boat b u i l d i n g and r e p a i r i n g .....
S h i p b u i l d i n g and r e p a i r i n g ................

R a i l r o a d and street c a r s ..................

94.14
83.37

80.16
9 4 .83
93.90
9*. 83
97.76
98.47

96.80
98.89
80.03
98.95

97-28
99-50

L a b o ratory,

scientific,

and engi n e e r i n g

M e c h a n i c a l m e a s u r i n g and c o n t r olling
O p t i c a l instru m e n t s and l e n s e s ............
S u r g ical, medical, ana dental instru-

and pl a t e d w a r e .....

M u s i c a l i n s t r u m e n t s and p a r t s ..............
T oy s and s p o rting g o o d s .....................
Games, toys, dolls, and dhi l d r e n ' s
S p o r t i n g and ath l e t i c g o o d s ...............
Pens, pencils, o t her office s u p p l i e s .....
C o s t u m e jewelry, buttons, n o t i o n s .........
F a b r i c a t e d p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s ...............
O t h e r m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s ............




9 5 .11

86.02
81.20
84.65
94.69
94.43
93.18

38.9
39.7
39.1

40.5

85.86
80.94
99.12
97.76
I O O .25

102.58
101.24
94.87
97.60
77-93
100.44
102.48

99.60

85.58

95.42
97. 3 8
88. 8 4

92.00
74. 7 0
93.13

100.66

40.7
4 0.3
40.7
41.6
41.9
40.5
40.2
41.9
39-9
40.2
39.8

39.3

39.1
42.0
41.6
42.3

39.6
37.7

37-k
40.0
40.5

41.9

_

$2.37
2.39

$2.27

2 .1 2
*

2 .1 2
*
2.12

2.30

2.05
2.33
2.33
2.33
2.35
2.35
2. 3 9
2 .1*
6
1.91
2.48
2 .1 2
*

2.07

$2.37
2.3 9

2.10

4o.o

42.9
40.2
40.0
40.8
40.5
42.0
40.0
40.1

41.6
41.6
42.6
42.9
40.2
40.0
41.5
39.8
43.2
38.4
40.2

2.50
2.01

43.1

2.27
2.03

2.36

2.09
2.26

2.35
2.37

2 .21*

2.38
2.36
2.36

2.27
2.24

1.91

2.27
2.21
2.30
1.80

2.1*9
1.9 8

2.31*
2.33
2.35
1.93

2.kk

2 .1 8
*
2 .11
**

85.26

81 .39

4 o .l

40.6

40.9

2.09

2.10

1.99

93.03

9 7 -31
»

9 3 .91

4 o .l

41.6

42.3

2.32

2.34

2.22

85.44

87.5*
85.05

83.84
82 .41

40.3

41.1

41.3
40.2

2.13

40.5

2.12

40.1

2.13

2.10

2.03
2.05

73.38
67.54
93.84

70.53
¿ 4.96

40.5
40.0
40.7

40.1
40.2
4o.8

40.3
40.6
41.1

I .83

38.2

38.1

38.6

1.81*
I .69
2.31
1.85

39-7
40.1

39-9
4o.4
39-7
41.7
40.7
39.

40.2
41.2
41.6
40.4
40.8

38.9

33.8
3S.3
41.1
39.3
41.2
40.3

85.41

9 4 .02
70.67

silverware,

39.9
39.0

4o.6
39-4

83.81

7 * -52

Jewelry,

$ 89.89

9 0 .24
77-59

67.60

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES....

$ 96.22
9 ^.17

Average h o urly
earnings
MayMay
April
1956
1957
1957.

79. 4 0

80.40
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS...................

Aver a g e w e e k l y
hours
May
A p r i l Ma y
1256
1957
1957

70.10

71.86

72.22

73.38
69.77

73.93

80.40
82.21
65.57
63. 5 3
69.17

68.88
64.57
76.36

7^.82

89.60
69.09
69.95
73. 3 4

68.68

70.30

4 o .l

84.23
83.44
66.59

78.73
7 8 . 3k

40.2
40.3

60.99

38.8

63.80

61.30
60.90
66.17
63.67
74.16
74.56

38.5
39-3
41.0
38.9
40.4
39.8

70. 9 8
67.23
64.19

76.92
74.82

4 o .l
40.5
38.9
40.7
39-8

38.6

1.81
1.83
1 .71*

2.00
2 .01*

1.68
2.30

2.18

1.81*

1 .7 9

1.81
1.83

1.71*
1. 7 8
I .69
1.95
1.92

1-73

2.02

1.6 9

2.05
I .69

1.65
1.76

1.64
1 .77

1.68
1.66
1.89
1.88

1.75
l.bO

1.66
1.65
1.89
1.88

1.58
1.58
1.59

1.61
1.62
1.80
I .85

35

Hours an,1 K üpim
Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory employees - Continued

Industry

Average wee k l y
earnings

May
1957

A v erage w e e k l y
hours

A ve r a g e h o u r l y
earnings

April
. 1957

May
1956

May

1957

April
1957

May
1956

$92.82
87.29

$88.1*1
84.83

(1/)
43.5

42.0
43.0

42.3
43.5

75.27
62.56

74.69
60 .1*5

72.15
59.20

39.0
36.8

38.7

36.2

101.1A
89.25

101.91
86.11

100.22
80.94

93.38
95.30

90.42

87.82

94.07
95-82
87.23

95.18

H 3S
8
—4$

Table C -lï

April
1957

May
1956

(1/)
$2.03

$2.21
2.03

$2.09
1.95

39.0
37.0

1.93

1.93
I .67

1.85

1.70

42.5

43.0 43.2
1*1.1* 42.6

2.37
2.10

2.37
2.08

40.6
40.9
1*0.1

40.9
41.3
40.2

41.1
41.4
40.6

2.30

2.30

91.91
85.26

2.33
2.19

2.32
2.17

2.20
2.22
2.10

96.52

92 .1*8

40.5

1*0.9 41.1

2.35

2.36

2.25

83.62

82.80

81.00

1*0.2

1*0.0

40.3

2.08

2.07

2.01

62.32
14.67
*

59.75

38.0

1*2.31

3**.l

3Ê.0
34.1*

38.3
34.4

1.64
1.31

1.62

44.38

1.29

1.56
1.23

1*9-76

1*8.22
62.87
81.10
1*6.99

34.9
36.7
**3.9
33-9

34.8
36.7
1*3.8
34.1

35.2
37.2
43.6
34.3

1.45
1.92
1.42

1.43
1.74
1.90
1.40

1.37
1.69
1.86
1.37

69.37
72.85

1*1.6
1*2.4

1*1.8
42.2

42.3
42.6

1.70
1.77

1.67

1.64

1.75

1.71

61.51

-

-

-

“

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S :
TRANSPORTATION:

Local r a i l w a y s and bus l i n e s .............
COMMUNICATION:

S w i t c h b o a r d o p e rating e m ployees 2/ . . .
Line constr u c t i o n, installation, and
T e l e g r a p h 4 / ................................
OTHER PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S :

Gas and el e c t r i c u t i l i t i e s ....... ........
E l e c t r i c light and p o wer u t i l i t i e s .....
Gas u t i l i t i e s ...............................
E l e c t r i c light and gas utili t i e s com­
b i n e d .......................................

42.8

1.60
2.32

1.90

WHOLESALE AMD RETAIL TRADE:
WHOLESALE TRADE.........................................................
R E T A IL TRADE (E XC EPT FATING AND DRINKING
P L A C E S ) .................................................................. ..

G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d i s e s t o r e s ................
D e p a r t m e n t stores and general m a i l ­
order h o u s e s ...............................
A u t o m o t i v e and a c c essories d e a l e r s ......
A p parel and acc e s s o ries s t o r e s ...........
O t h e r r etail trade:
F u r n i t u r e and appliance s t o r e s ..........
Lumber and h a r dware s u p p l y s t o r e s ......

50.61
61*.59
81*.29
1*8.11*
70.72
75.05

61.56

63.86
83.22

1*7.74

69.81
73.85

1.76

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE:

63.78
97.1*5

63.52
99.67
80.1*8

80.32

100.53
77.08

42.93

42.21

1*2.02

1*0.5

40.2

1*3.82

52.26

43.20
52.26

1*2.54
51.91

40.2
1*0.2

40.0
40.2

96.80

S e c u r i t y d e a l e r s and e x c h a n g e s ...........

94.09

93.51

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

40.8

1.06

1.05

1.03

40.9
41.2

1.09

1.08

1.30

1.30

1.04
1.26

-

-

-

-

-

SERVICE AND MTSCELLANEOUS:
H o t e l s and lodging places:
P e r s o n a l services:

Motion pictures:
M o t i o n-picture p r o d u c t i o n and distri-

-

-

1/ Not available.
2/ Data relate to employees in such occupations in the telephone industry as switchboard operators; service as­
sistants; operating room instructors; and pay-station attendants. During 1956 such employees made up 40 percent of
the total number of nonsupervisory employees in telephone establishments reporting hours and earnings data.
3 / Data relate to employees in such occupations in the telephone industry as central office craftsmen; instal­
lation and exchange repair craftsmen; line, cable, and conduit craftsmen; and laborers. During 1956 such employees
made up 27 percent of the total number of nonsupervisory employees in telephone establishments reporting hours and
earnings data.
4/ Data relate to domestic employees except messengers and those compensated entirely on a commission basis.
5/ Money payments only; additional value of board, room, uniforms, and tips, not included.
36




A d Iu s t e d

Li c m nos

Table C-2: Gross average weekly earnings of production workers
in selected industries, in current and 1947-49 dollars

Year

Bituminous-coal
Laundries
m ini n g
Curr e n t 1 9 4 7 -4 9 Current 1 9 4 7 -4 9 Current 1947-49
Manufacturing

A nnual
av erage :

Year
and
m o nth

Bituminous-coal
Laundries
mining
Current 1 9 4 7 -4 9 C urrent 1 9 4 7 -4 9 Current 1 9 4 7 -4 9
Manufacturing

Monthly
data:

1256
1939......... * 23.86 **0.17 * 23.88 **0.20 * 17 . 6* *29.70 M a y ....
* 1.25
2*.7I
17.93 29.93 June....
19*0........ 25.20 *2.07
30.86 * 9.06 18.69 29.71
19*1........ 29.58 *7.03
52.58
35.02 50.2* 20. 3* 29.18
1^*2..... 36.65
23.08 31.19 July....
19*3........ * 3 . 1* 58.30 * 1.62 56. 2*
1$**.... * 6.08 61.28 51.27 68.18 25.95 3* .51 Sept....
19*5........ **.39 57.72 52.25 67.95 27.73 36.06
30.20 36.21
69.58
19*6........ * 3.82 52.5* 58.03
19*7........ * 9.97 52.32 66.59 69.73 32.71 3*.25
72.12 70.16 3*.23 33.30
19*8........ 5 *.l*
52.0T

19*9........ 5*.92
59.33
195 0
6* .71
195 1
67.97
195 2
1953. . . . . 71.69
195* ........ 71.86
76.52
195 5
195 6
79-99

63.28
70.35
77.79
78.09
62.67 85.31
62.60 80.85
96.26
66.83
68.81* 106.22
53.95
57.71
58.30
59.89

62.16
68 .*3
70.08
68.80
7*.57
70.*3
8*.07
91.*1

3*.96
35.*7
37.81
38.63
39.69
*0.10
1*0.70
* 2.32

3**36 1 9 5 7
3*.50

3*.06

$78.*0

68.15

78.60
79.79
81.81
82.21
82.22
8*.05

67. Ì8
68.31

82. *1
82.*1
82.21

3*.0*
3*.69
3*.93
35*55
36.*2

$67.9*

79.19

81.59

81.78

69.86
69.85
69.80
71.23
69.72
69-*3
69. 1*

68.39
68.38

* 106.02 *91.87
107.82 92.79

102.16
102.*9
106.12
110.38
106.79
115.33

93.78
90.65
97-7*

n o . 63

93.60

87.32
87.75

90.62

112.51 9*-79
109.58 92.16
111. 7* 93-66
106.20 88.80

** 2 . 5*
* 2.95

$ 36.86
36.96

1 2 .*2
*
* 1.90
* 2.61
* 2.61
* 2.29
* 2.91

36.26

*2.59
*2.59
* 2.69
*3.20
*3.82

35.87
36.39

36.20
35.90
36.36
36.03
35-88
35.90
36.21
36. 6*

1

Table C-3: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable, of production workers
in manufacturing, in current and 1947-49 dollars
Ye a r

G r o s s average
weekly earnings
Index
A m o u n t ( 1 9 4 7 -4 9

= 100 )

Net spendable
average w e e k l y earnings
W o rker wi t h
W o r k e r with
no d e p e n d e n t s
3 dependents
Current 19 4 7 -4 9 Current 1947-49

Annual
av erage

Year
and
mon t h

Gr oss average
we e k l y e a rnings
Index
Amount (1 9 4 7 -4 9

= 100 )

Net spendable
average w e e k l y e a rnings
Worker with
W o r k e r with
3 dependents
no depe n d e n t s
Current 1 9 4 7 -4 9 Current 1 9 4 7 -4 9

Monthly
data:

1939...
1 9 *0 ...
1 9 *1 ...
1 9 *2 ...
1 9 *3 ...
1 9 « * ...
1 9 *5 ...
19* 6 . . .
1 9 *7 ...
1 9 *8 ...

* 23.86

1 9 *9 ...
1 9 5 0 ...
195 1 ...
1 9 5 2 ...
1 9 5 3 ...
1 9 5 *...
1 9 5 5 ...
1956...

5*.92
59.33
6*.71
0T.9T
71.69
71.86

25.20

29.58

36.65
*3.1*
* 6.08
**.39
*3.82
*9.97
5 * .l*

76.52
79.99

*5.1
*7.6
55.9

69.2
81.5
87.0
83.8
82.8
9*.*

102.2
103.7

112.0
122.2
128 .*
135.*
135.7
1**.5
151.1




* 39.76 m
*1.65 May.... $78.40
* 6.55 June.... 79.19

*23.62
2*.95

38.29
36.97
37.72
*2.76
*7.*3

*39.70
* 1.22
**.59
*5.58
*8.66
50.92
* 8.08
*5.23
**.77
* 6 .1 *

*2.7*
*3.20
*8 .2*
53.17

52.05
55.93
58.59
55.58
51.80
50.51
51.72

*8.99
51.09
5*.0*
55.66
58.5*
59.55
63.15

*7.2*
*9.70
*8.68
*9.0*
51.17
51.87
55.15

53.83
57.21

52.88 1957
55.65 Jan. .

*23.58

2*.69
28.05
31.77

36.01

65.86

56.68

29.28
36.28

*1.39

**.06

61.28

63.62
66.58
66.78
70.*5
73.22

July•••<
Aug....
Sept
Oct....
Nov....
Dec....

55.21 Feb..
56.05 4ar..
58.20 Apr..
58.17 4ay..
61.53

1 *8 .1
1*9.6

78.60 1*8 .*
79.79 150.7

81.81
82.21
82.22

* 6*.62
65. 2*

* 56.00
56. 1*

6 k . 78

65.71
67.30

15*. 5
155.3
155.3
158.7

67.62
67.63
69.10

82.*1 155.6
82.*1 155.6
82.21 155.6

67.58
67.58
67 A 2

15*. 1
15*.*

66.93
67.08

8*.05

81.59

81.78

*71.95
72.58

*62.35

55-37

72.11

61.63

57. *7
57-*5
57-*l

58.56

73.06
7*.70
75.03
75.0*
76.5*

62.55
63.79
63.75
63.70

57.17
56.93

7*. 99
7**99

63.**
63.18
62.29

56.09

7*. 31
7*. *7

56.26

56.70
56.10

7*.82

62.*6

6*.86

62.93

62.27

63.01

JL

Table C-4c Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding overtime,
of production workers in m anufacturing, by major industry gro u p

Gross average hourly earnings
Major industry group

Average hourly earnings,
excluding pvertime xJ

May

April

May

May

April

May

1957

1957

1956

1957

1957

1956

MANUFACTURING...........................................................

$ 2.06

$2. 0 5

$1.96

$ 2.00

$ 2.00

$1.90

DURABLE GOODS..............................................................

2.18

2.18

2.08

2.12

2.11

2.01

Ordnance and accessories.................
Lumber and wood products (except

2.32

2.31

2.17

2.26

2.24

2.10

1.82

1.80
1.72

1. 7 3
1. 6 7
1 .95
2.33

1.76
I .69
1.95
2.40

1.74

1.73

1.71
1.63

2.09

1.81

2.10
1.81

2.0 4
2. 1 9
I .96
2.27
1. 9 9
1.74

1.88

I .87

1.94
1.58

1.93
1.55

1.50

1.50

Fabricated metal products iexcept
ordnance, machinery, and transporta­
tion e q u i pment)..........................

2.02

2.01

2.4 6

Stone, clay, and glass products .........

2.46

2.15

2.28
Transportation equipment .................
Instruments and related products........
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries..
NONDURABLE GOODS................ ......................................

Apparel and other finished textile

2.05
2.37
2.09

2.15

2.28
2.06
2.37

1 .48

1.48

2.00

2.00

2.51

Paper and allied products................
Printing, publishing, and allied

2.49
2.17
2.59

2.20
2.61
2.22
1.54

2.19
1.54

1.68
1.9 4
2.40

1.86
2.26

2.08
2.20
2.01

1.9 7
2.09
1.90

2.3 1
2.04
1. 7 6

2.21

2.05
1.76

1.94
1. 6 9

1.80

1.83

1.82

1.75

1.83
1.50
1.44

1.87
1.55
1.46

1.87
1.54
1.46

1.76
1.48
1. 4 0

1.43
1. 9 1

1.46
1 .91

1. 4 6
1.91

1.81

2.42
2.09
2.53
2.15
1. 5 0

2. 1 4
2. 5 4
2.15
1.52

2.12
2.52

2.0 4
2.48

2.13
1.52

2.09

2.21
2.01
2.32

1.41

1 .4 8

1/ Derived by assuming that the overtime hours shown in table 4 are paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
ZJ Average hourly earnings, excluding overtime, are not available separately for the printing, publishing, and

allied industries group, as graduated overtime rates are found to an extent likely to make average overtime pay
significantly above time and one-half. Inclusion of data for the industry in the nondurable-goods total has lit­
tle effect.

3L



Man H our Indexes
Table C-5. Indexes of aggregate w eekly m an-hours
in industrial and construction a ctivity ^
( 19 4 7 -4 9 = 1 0 0 )

Year
and
m onth

1947:
1948:
1949:
1950:
1951:
1952:
1953:
1954:
1955 •
1956 :

Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average,.
Average..
Average..

T O T A L 2J

103.6

103.4
93.0
101.5
109.5
109.7
113.3
101.9
108.4
110.3

9V .6
103.4
102.0
109.1
124.1
127.5
123.1
lie. 9
125.9

105.1
105.4
09.5

91.0

95.0
90.9
87.5
t (•*

8 1.1

138.0

84.7

Manufac­
turing
division

Total:
Durable
goods

Total:
N o n d u r ab le
goods

104.8
103.2
92.0
101.1
108.4
108.4
113.6
101.1
107.7

C o ntract
Mining
construct ion
d i vision
division

106.1

M a n u f acturing - D u rable goods
Lumber and
O rdn a n c e and
woo d products
accessories
(except
furniture)

103.1

104.1
89.7

102.1

101.2

108.1

116.6
125.2
107.5
116.3
117.2

99.7
93.5
97.4
97.2

107.6
91.1
107.4
290.4
625.0
798.5
509.7
413.2
375.3

102.7

115.7

94.7
99.2
99.7

98.6

107.0
102.7
90.3
99.6

102.7
96.9
93.0
84.7
91.1

88.8

1956: M a y .....
June....

111.2

84.0
87.1

137.4
15^.3

106.0
106.6

116.1
116.2

93.9
95.2

3 7 7.3
374.6

89.7
94.6

July....
Au g .....

106.8
113.2

78.3
86.4

108.1

101.8

107.8

94.8
99.8

368.7

S e p t .....
O c t ......
N o v ......
D e c ......

355.0

115.2
112.6
112.5

154.6
161.1
160.7

92.7
97.5
93.7
91.4

1957: Jan.....
F eb .....
Mar.....
Apr.....
M a y .....
iear
and
mo n t h

1947:
1948:
1949:
1950:
19515
1952:
1953s
1954:
1955 •
1956 :

Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..

1956: M a y .....

108.5

114.7

106.4

107.2
107.0
106.5
106.9

F u r n i ture
and fixtures

103.3
104.6
92.1
111.5
105.9

106.2
108.5
96.7
106.6

107.4

102.9

104.1
July....
Au g ......
Sept....
Oct.....
Nov.....
Dec.....
1957: Jan.....
F eb.... .
M a r .....
Apr.....
M ay.... .

88.3
86.9
85.2

157.7
144.2
135.9

87.7

85.1

112.0
119.8

85.3
84.3
Ö4.Ö
83.5

123.0

131.1
141.0

102.8
103.9
93.3
102.9
111.4
104.3

106.6

99.*

108.2
109.3

1 11 .1
111.9

101.7

108.2
110.9
108.9

102.9

104.0
104.0

102.2

99.8

110.8
107.0

106.9
106.3
104.5

103.6

120.2
120.2
122.0

117.9
117.7

116.8
115.1
113.7

101.1
100.2

97.6
97.4

94.0
94.0
93.7

91.9

91.5

Manu f a c t u r i n g - Durable goods - C o n t inued
Stone, clay,
Machinery
Fabricated
Primary metal
and glass
(except
metal
industries
products
electrical)
products

10b . 3
110.6
111.7
107.3
109.3

109.9
111.0
109.9

i±5.1
117.3

111.2
109.3

108.2

105.4

380.4
366.3

360.9
355.6
350.9
335.6

E lec t r i c a l
machinery

108.3
106.6
85.1
94.0
116.9
118.4
119.0
100.9
106.4
115.6

111 .1

110.1
110.5

106.7
103.8
89.4
106.5
115.8
112.1
123.4
106.8
lxo.0
116.3

112.9
112.7

114.1

113.6

116.4
115.6

137.6
136.5

106.6
111.6

112.4
112.5

132.8
138.0

106.6
88.0

104.1
U 5 .7
104.6
II3.9
94.2

74.2
106.7
114.5

113.9
113.3
115.3

117.1

121.1
119-7
121.4

114.3

117.2

103.2

111.6

103.9
104.1

117.6
116.9

105.0

108.0
106.3

103.3

371.8
373.6
371.9

109.7

115.5
114.7

114.4
U4.0
113-7
117.4

116.3
117.2

116.5

114.0
111.4

102.9

86.0
107.6
12 3 .7
131.2
14 7.1
123.1
130.6
138.6

142.0
145.8
145.8
144.7

139.2
138.7
137.2
133-9

132.1

85.8
81.8
76.2
76.3
77.0

80.1
83.7
Tr a n s p o r t a ­
tion
equipment

102.9
100.9
96.3
106.1

124.5

138.0
158.6
134.3
147.2
139.0

131.0
129.5

130.2
128.8
127.6

141.3

151.6
161.0
154.1
153.8
151.3
146.5
142.4

See footnotes at end of table.




39

Man H our

n Jo xi
Table C-5. Indexes of aggregate w eekly man-hours
in industrial and construction activity ^ Continued
( 19 4 7 -4 9 = 1 0 0 )
Manufacturing

- Durable

goods

Miscellaneous
manufacturing
industries

Food and
kindred
products

10 7 .5
10 3 .0
89.5
97*4
11 7 .5
I22 .7
129.9
11 5.9
11 7 .5

19^7: Average..
1948: Average..
1949: Average..
1950: Average..
1951: Average..
1952: Average..
19535 Average..
1954: Average..
1955! Average..
1956: Average..

10*.6

IO 3.9

IO 5.9

105.5

100.0
96.1
95.2
95.9
94.7
9 3.7
90.5
90.5
90.7

101.0
9 3.1
89.2
91.2
92.2
90.1
88.5
90.3
85.6

104.5
105.7
89.9
100.1
96.0
90.7
89.8
78 .7
8 3 .1
80.6

99.6
101.6
98.8
103.0
101.9
104.5
106.9
98.8
10*. 9
10^.5

103.5

84.5

75.0
76 .0

7Q S

78.9

OQ O
yy.u
99.2

72.8

75.8

121.1

1956: M a y .......

120.1

104.2

91.2
101.3
103.1
100.5
109.5
98.8

104.2

II 9.5

1957: Jan.....
F eb .....
M ar.....

98.4
106.2
109.5
112.6
109.4
105.6

121.4
121.5

Sept......
Oct......
Nov.....
De c ......

98.3

121.0
120.0
II 7 .I

Ma y .....

Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..
Average..

Average..
Average..

1956: M a y.....

102.6
102.3
95.1
105.4
109.9
105.9

93.6

102.8
107.8

94.9

107.6
101.6

99.8
92.9
87.9

85.0
80.0
72.0
67.2
70.6

78.8

98.9
98.7

8 I.I

79.2

- Nondurable

Printing, pub­
lishing, and
allied industries

101.4
100.5
98.0
99.5
101.6
102.7
105.4

77 .u
ff n
76.9
76.0
74.8
7 3.8

goods

Chemicals
and allied
products

IO 3.3

102.6

94.1
97.2
105.5
104.7

Products of
petroleum
and coal

99.0
IO 2 .7
98.3
97.3

102.1
98.2
IOO .9

108.7
113.0

115.3

111.8
112.0

108.8
107.5

92.8

116.6

111.0
112.9

105 .I
105.8
107.5

109.3
114.4

116.9
117.0

104.7

95.8
94.5
94.6
95.3

1957: Jan.....
Fe b .....
M a r .....
A p r .......
M a y .....

119.0
118.3

114.7

116.3

107.7

117.9
119.1

July....
A u g .....
Sept....
Oct.....

115.1

107.3
107.9

94.4
96.9
97.8
95.2
95.2
94.6

116.3
115.8
115.8
115.6

112.6
112.8
113.8

114.5

113.1

107.2
106.9
107.3
107.1
106.4

93.6
93.8
93.1
94.7
95.0

117.7

116.8

114.5

_1j A g g r e g a t e m a n - h o u r s a r e f o r t h e w e e k l y p a y p e r i o d e n d i n g
totals for the month.
F o r m i n i n g and m a n u f a c t u r i n g industries,
c o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n , the d a t a r e l a t e to c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e r s .
_2 / I n c l u d e s o n l y t h e d i v i s i o n s s h o w n .




Apparel and other
finished textile
products

97.7
105.9
103.9
106.3
104.9

102.6
106.3
106.7
101.6
98.9

- Continued

108.1
103.5
107.0
107.9

111.6

70 . U
f y fi
70 1
(7*-L

91.9

79.2

100.5

Textile-mill
products

80.9
80.8
80.3

92.4

8I .6

9 9 -h

Manufacturing
P a p e r and
allied products

Tobacco
manufactures

90.0

J.03.1*

118.0
121.0
I2 3 .O
123.8
123.2
123.3

July....
Aupr. »* .. .

1947:
1948:
I 949:
1950:
1951 •
1952:
19535
1954:
I955 :
195 6 :

- Nondurable
-

Instruments
and related
products

and
month

Year
and
month

Manufacturing

goods-Con.

Rubber
products

109.8
102.0
88.1
101 .9
108.5
108.4
111.6

96.4
112.4

106.7

L e a t h e r and
leather products

105.8
100.8
93 .^
97.8
92.1
96.9
96.5
89.9
95.5

91 *
*.1

105.7
101.1

89.0

101.3
10 3.9
10 6.9

94.2
95.6
91 .U

111.1
10 9.2
107.2
96.2
I03 .I

110.1
98.8
11 2.3

93-5

91.2
91.1

93.8

94.0
95.9
95.6

90.7
86.9

n e a r e s t t h e 15 t h o f t h e m o n t h a n d d o n o t r e p r e s e n t
data refer to p r o d u c t i o n and r e l a t e d workers.
For

State and Area Hours and tamings
Table C-6: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for selected States and areas
Average weekly earnings
1956
1957
Apr.
May
MSI

State and area

73.78

38.5
l0 .2
l
1 1.0
*

38.7
10 .0
(
1* .1
1 *

39.5
lio.l

Nobile...................
ABIZOÄA...................

89.69
86.22

90.31
85.70

1*0.3
39.6

10 .1
( *
10 .1
(

ABKAISAS..................
Little BockI. Little Bock..........

57.82

57.31

56.1*3

39-6

58 .1
*

58.32

55.08

CALIFORNIA................

91.82
78.66

93.51
81.55
91*.k o

75.32

Los Angeles-Long Beach. ••

88.90

96.79

85.63

90.68
96.05

87.39
91.11

$ 67.38
87 .61*
81*.87

$67 .3 *
*
88 .1*0

85.28

89.06
85.93

ALABAMA...................

.

Average weekly hours
1956 .
1957
Mat
Apr-. S S L —

92.38
9^-32

San Bernardino*

90.76
90.65

$60.53

7^.26

88.67

38.8

2.18

$1.74
2.21

2.07

2.06

1 2.6
*
11 .1*
*

2.21
2.17

2 .I5

2.12
2.07

39.8

10 .6
(

1.46

1.44

1.39

1*0.3

1(0.5

1(0.5

1.45

1.44

1.36

39.8

1(0.5

10 .1
*
38.2
b o .6

2.31

2.21
1-97

10 .2
*

38 .1
11 .1
*

2.31

3 7 -b

1*1.7

1*0.5

39-8

1( .0
0
1*
2.0

1(0.3

2.19
2.12

39.0
39.8
39.3

11 .0
*

2.28
2.26

2.27
2.28

39.5
10 .1
(

2.41

2.42

2.30

3 7.0

2.15

2.27
2.16

2.16
2.22
2 .3I
2.16
2.08

1(0.3

11 .1
*
U1 .0

2.12
2.12

2.12
2.09

2.01
2.98

1 1 .1
*
11 .0
*

2.06

2 .O8
2,16
2.16

I .96
2.05
2.05
I .96
I .90

1*0.5

76.82

86.50
86.50

81*.1 1
**

85 .IA

82.61
81.18

1 0.8
*
1( .8
0

85.1*9

81 .51*

87.29
88.61

DELAWARE..................

90.59
81*.89

83.81tlev Britain..............

9>*.l*9

81*.l*5
COLORADO..................

88.56

85.1*9
87.95

1*0.7
1(
0.6
11 .6
*
11 .1
* *
10 .1*
(
39-9
10.2
*

1* .0
1
11 .1
*
10 .1
(
10 .1
( *

11 .6
*
U1 .7
1 2.9
*
1*1.3
1*1.5
39-9
1 1 .2
*

81*.1*5

93.10
83.61*

80.95

81.20
81*. 99
83.21

83.02
85 .1*1
83.63

81.58

83.22

85.08

78.17

78.85
83.79

2.14

2.30
2.32

9k . k 2

91.10

2.22

2.10
2.29
2.35

1( .1
0
39.1
39.6
39.2

86.1*7

$1.56
1.88
1.84

*1.75

91.13

San Francisco-Oakland....

Average hourly earnings
195Ö
1957
May
Apr.
.MajL

10 .1
( *

1*3.1

2.15
2.13
2.04

2.04

2.01

2.02

2.13
2 .O7

2.13

2.07

I .98

2.10

89.87

10 .1
( *
10 .1
*

1 1 .1
*
11 .1
*

1*0.5
1(0.3

2.06
2 .3I

2.07

95.35

2.32

I .93
2.23

86.76

85.02

85.03

39.8

39.0

1(0.3

2 .I8

2 .I8

2.11

65.12

63 .1
*
68.06
61*.96

1* .0
1
1( .8
0
1( .6
0
39-6

I .60
1 .7 b
1.63
1.59

1.59
I.7 I

63.52

to .7
1(0.9
39 .O
10 .0
(

39.9

63.60

62.33
68 .5U
62.93
59.1*0

1-52

71.17
63.57

58.59

58.59
72.13
77.98

55.91
69.52
71.69

38.8

38.8

71.92
78.66

39-3
1 1 .1
* *

39-2
1*1.7

39.1
39-5
1 1 .2
*

I. 5I
1.83
I .90

1.87

1.76
1.74

86.09

79.20

86.32

10 .8
(

39-8

1*1.7

2 oii

1.99

2.07

87.66

88.07
92.01

85.19

91.59

10 .2
(
10 .2
(

2.18
2.28
2.25
2.17

2.09
2.17

89.83

10 .1
* *
10 .1
* *
39.7

2.18
2.28

89.1*3

88.69

2.16

2.09

2.22

2.10
I. 9I

92.63

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:
FLORIDA...................
Miami....................
Tampa-St. Petersburg....
GEORGIA...................

39.8
10 .1
(
10 .2
(

1.62
I .58

I. 5I
1.84

93.1*5

1*
2.8

1*2.9

10 .8
(
10 .8
(
10 .8
(
11*.8
(

88.1*3

81*.39

1( .1
0

39-9

10 .2
*

2.23

81.62

80.65

76.25

39-7
38.9

39.9
39-5

2.03

85.53

82.28

10.0
(

2.04

86.17

ILLINOIS..................

2.21

2.20

93.07
INDIANA...................

92.86

89 .2U




39.9

O•
ON
CO

See footnotes at end of table.

87.91

2.25

1.68

I .55
I .50

1.43

2.15

2 .O8

Slate

and

Area

Hours

^nd

farnmgs

Table C-& Hours and gross earnings of production woHcers in
manufacturing industries for selected Slates and areas - Continued
Average weekly earnings
State and area
KANSAS................ ....

Wichita..................

IQ S7
M elv _ .
.
.
Ad t .
$85.66
$87.61

82.12
89.02

KENTUCKY..................

W ,i

(1 /)

83.06
9k. 15

1956

___ M l —
$ 81.76

80.28
85.k6

Average weekly hours
1956
iq ■57
May
kl .2
kl.l
kl.l

Average hourly earnings
1957

Apr •

I 950

May

Apr.

May

kl .8
kl.l
k2.8

41.5
kl.7
kl.7

$2.08

$ 2.10

2.00
2.17

2.02

2.20
1.97
2.14

1.85
2.01

May

76.82
85. k8

7k. 16
82.12

W )

39.1
3 9.9

ko.o
ko.9

(X /)

w )

(1/)

$1.97
1.93

2.05

LOUISIANA.................

78.76
99.90
78.80

77.57
101.56
78.39

7k. 66
101.8k
73.38

ko.6
39.8
ko.o

ko.k
ko.3
k0.2

ko .8
ko.9
k o .i

1 .9b

2.51
1.97

1.92
2.52
1.95

1.83
2.49
1.83

MAINE.....................

63. 1
«)
52.97

6k. 8
5
5k. 9
6
71.57

62.20
52.60

39.7
35. k
ko .5

k O .l
36.8
k l.5

k o .i

1.60
1.50
1.70

1.62
1.50
1.73

1.55
1.47
1.64

8 l.ll

78.67

ko.o
1(0.3

39-7
ko.o

ko.7
ko.9

2.03

2.04

2.12

2.13

1.93
2.02

71. k2

39.3
39.5
35.6
37.5

39.6
39.8
35.3
37.9

39.7

39.9

39-9
k o .i
3k .8
3 6 .9
ko.9
k l.l

1.88
I .98
1.51
1.55
2.00
2.04

1.87
1.97
1.49
1.56
1.99
2.05

1.79
1.87
1.48
1.53
1.90
2.00

39.3
39.6
37.3

39.6
39.2

2.39

2.40

2.28

2 .1 *
2.19
2.42
2.29

2.42

68.6b

MARYIAND..................

81.20
85.^3

MASSACHUSETTS.............

85. 0
k

73.88

7k.05
78. k l
52.60
59.12

78.21

53.76
58.13

80.20

80.99
MICHIGAN..................

Flint....................

9k. ok

99.63
90.83

87.96

68.75
82.68

7k. 99
51.50

80.20
81.80

77.71
82.20

9k. 8k
98.90
93.86
87.5k
96.15
91.16

89.79
95-51

81.01
82.99
85.23
87.28

39* ^
39-5
35.5
39-5
37.k
39.6
37-7

2.52

2.52

2.42

2.28

kO.2
36.7
39.2
39.6

82. k2
82.09

ko .2
38.7
ko.o

1)0.5
39.2
ko.3

2.08

2.08

38.9

2.27
2.13

2.22
2.13

1 .98
2.10
2.04

53.33
59.78

39-k
k l.6

k l.9

39.2

k o .i
k2.7

i.4 o
1.48

1.39
1.48

1.33
1.40

88.82

80.53

83.50

83.60

80.06

86.30

kO.3

k l.9

38.8
k o .i
39.7
39-6
39.3

88.78
89.92
89.50
87.89

k o .i

35.9

k o .i

2.26

2.18
2.42
2.30

2.26

2.10

2.28

2.20
2.14

85.19

85.63

55.16
61.57

62.01

MISSOURI.............

77.0k
8k. 22
85.72

82.75
86.27

77-39

73.69
79-97
81.36

39.2
39-7
39.8

39-5
39-2
k0.2

39.2
39-7
39.8

1.97

2.12
2.16

I .96
2.11
2.15

1.88
2.00
2.05

MONTANA...................

88.31

88.87

90.7k

k o .i

ko.3

kl.O

2.20

2.21

2.21

76.09
80. 6k

73.07
77-72

( 1 /)
£ />

k0.6
k l.O

k l.2
k l.6

o />

<&)

W )

I .87
1.97

1.77
1.87

99.kO

96.50

91.72

39.6

38.6

37.9

2.51

2.50

2.42

6k. 00
57.29

63.60

62. k7

ko.o

ko.o

ko. 3

1.60
1 . 5k

1.59
1.5^

1.50

MISSISSIPPI...............

NEBRASKA..................

NEW HAMPSHIRE.............

See footnotes at end of table.
42




5k.k9

58.52

57.00

37.2

ko.3

38.0

38.0

1.55

Mjîe

.irid A r v j

Hours

jnd

[jrmngs

Tabla C-& Hours and gross earnings of production worker* in
manufacturing industries for selected Slates and areas - Continued
Average weekly earnings
19*56
1957
. _
May
Apr.
May

State and area
NEW JERSEY ..............
Newark-Jersey City 2/..
Patersoa 2/ ..........
Perth Amboy 2/ .......
Trenton ...............

$84.11
84.77
8k. 77
86.72

83.89

$84.51

85.80
8k. 81
87.06
81 .9k

$82.30

83.47
82.01

84.70
80.84

Average5 hourly earnings
195?
_ .. 195b
May
Apr.
May

39-9
39-5
40.5
40.0
40.1

39.9
40.0
40.5
40.1
39.7

40.5
40.5
40.8
40.9
40.5

$ 2.11
2.15
2.09
2.17
2.09

$ 2.12
2.15
2.09
2.17

$2.03
2 .0b

2.06

2.00

40.7
42.2

41.6
42.9

41.3
41.2

2.15

2.15
2.09

2.09
2.03

39-3
40.5
39-6
40.5
39-8

2.06
2.21
1.88
2.36
1.98

2.06
2.20
1.87

2.11

1.98

1.87
2.25
1.92

2.01
2.07

89 .kk
89.66

86.32

80 .kk
89.10
7k. 38
95.13
78 .9k

77-41
85.57
74.00
91.32
76.27

39-0
39-9
39-k

78.31

39-6

39.0
40.5
39.7
40.3
39.9

86.29

91.25

89 .5k

39-7

41.3

42.3

2.17

2.21

2.11

79-90

NEW MEXICO ..............
Albuquerque ..........

80.50
76.06
86.07
8k. 36

77-81
73-37

38.6

2.17
2.07
I .96
2.03

1.99
1.94
2.07

77.18
78.43

39.1
37.8
40.6
40.6
41.0
40.3

2.07
2.02

79-32

38.7
37.4
39.6
40.6
40.6
39.7

2.08

37.6
39-9
39-9
40.5
39-4

2.02

1.95

53.84
56.77
51.99

38.7
40.4
36.5

39.0
41.2
37.5

39-3
39-7
37.4

1.43
1.53
1.45

1.43
1.53
1.46

1.37
1.43
1.39

43-5
43.8

42.0
41.7

43.7
42.6

1.82

1.79

1.93

1.88

1.70
1.80

39-9
39-9
38.2
40.5
40.5
39-9
39-2
39-7
39-2

40.0
39.5
38.4
40.4
40.8
40.1
39.0
39-7
40.2

40.3

2.30
2.46
2.35

2.28
2.41
2.33

2.19
2.32
2.21
2.01

2.35
2.17
2.45
2.37
2.57

2.34
2.17
2.43
2.39
2.57

2.30
2.28

40.2
41.9
40.1

40.5
42.0
40.6

41.0

1.96

42.2

1.95
1.83

1.90
1.75

40.6

1.84
2.17

87-49

88.62

NEW YORK ................
Albany-Schenectady-Troy
B i n g h a m t o n .............
Buffalo ...............
Elmira ................
Nassau and Suffolk
Counties 2/.........
N e w York-Northeastern
New Jersey .........
New York City 2 / .....
Rochester ............
Syracuse ..............
Utica-Rome ...........
Westchester County 2/..

80.31
88.33
7 k. 2k

9k. ko

76.02
86 .7 k
82.55
79-30
79-93

80.08

83.64

83.89
81.19

NORTH CAROLINA .........
Charlotte .............
Greensboro-High Point..

61.81

63 .0k

52.93

5k.75

NORTH DAKOTA .............
Fargo ..................

79-02
8k. 70

7k.97
78.53

74.01

OHIO ....................

91.58
98.32

91-30
95.22

88.08
89.96

89.66
85.52

83.10

55.3k

89.59
85.92

55-77

76.65

87.87

Cincinnati ...........
Cleveland .............
Columbus ..............

95.01

95.5k

86.39

86.95

Toledo ................
Ycungstown .............

9k. 19
IOO .65

94.98
103 .kk

96.59

78.79
77.10

78.98
76.86
88.51

77.90

96.16

OKLAHOMA .................
Oklahoma City ........

87.02
OREGON ..................
P O R T L A N D ..............
PENNSYLVANIA ............
Allentown-B e thlehemErie ..................

9k.93

91.78

83.86
90.20

91-50

73.85
83.64

See footnotes at end of table.

39-8
41.3
40.9
40.5
39-3
40.2
39-7

2.12

2.36

2.03
2.17

2.08
1.95

2.12

2.00
1.88

2.24
2.07
2.43

2.18

2.06

2.33

2.36

90.02

39-2
38.4

38.0
37.2

39.0
38.7

2.30

2.26

2.33

82.76

82.97

79-92

39-6

39.7

40.0

2.09

2.09

2.00

83 .8k
88.99
75.65

83.56
87.72
78.3k

77-81
85.13
72.67

40.7
41.2
39-**
40.3
39-7
39-9
39-7
38.7
37-1
40.6

40.4
40.8
40.8
40.8
39-6
40.3
39^

39-2
42.1
39-6
40.6
40.1
40.9
40.1
37.9
36.9
41.0

2.06
2.16

2.07
2.15
1.92
1.78
2.14
2.50

88.43

72.62

6k .9
6
Reading ................
Scranton ..............
W ilkes -Barre — Hazle t o n .
Y o r k ..................

38.6

2.36

1.97

8 k .22

92.55

92.04

ko.o

2.10

88.28

71.33




Average weekly hours
1957
1956
May
Apr.
May

8k. 7k

99-35

7k. 2k

ICO. 75
73-28

95.67

61.92

61.50

59-12

57.13

69.83

68.94
81.72
71.98

57-Ok

54.65

68.85

68.55

38.2
36.8

39.8

1.92
1.77
2.14
2.49
1.87

1.60

1.86
1 .6l

1.54
1.72

1.55
1.73

1.99

2.02

1.84
1.70
2.04
2.34

1.-80

1.56
1 .1|8

1.67

Table C-6: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for selected States and areas - Continued
State and area
RHODE ISLAND..............

Avéra» 5 weekly earnings
May

$67.26

67.66

1956

Apr.

M
ay

$66.63

$65.74

68.06

Average weekly h O U T 8
1956
19!>
1
Apr.
M
ay
M
ay

Average hourly earnings
1957
195b
Apr.
May
May

39.b

$1.71
1.70

66.00

39.8

39.1
39.8

39.6
4o.o

65.53

64.24

56.59

54.12
61.86

39-0
40.7

39-3
39.9

4o .7

1.61

SOUTH DAKOTA..............
Sioux Falls............ ..

80.16
89.09

73.75
78.93

73.00

78.38

44.8
47.1

1*1.3

43.6
44.3

1.79

TENifTE.ssEE.................

65.3^

65.34

6?. 73
64.24
73.78
69.19

39-6
4 o .i
39.2
40.2

39.6
40.2

SOUTH CAROLINA............

56.16

19:f
t

69.14

Nashville................

68.57
76.83
72.36
66.30

66.63

65.69

39.7

EEXAS......................

82.21

Knoxville................

77.22
72.36

41.9

39.5

1.44

$1.70
1.71
1.44

1.37

1.52

1.81

1.67

1.88

1.65

1.65

1)0.2
39 -9

39.7
39-9
40.1
40.7
40.8

1.96
I .80
1.67

1.96
1.80
1.67

39'b

1.65

1.61

1.89
1.71

$ 1.66

1.72

1-77

1.58

1 .6 l
1 .8 4

1.70

1.61

82.82
94.21

78.7^
91.15

40.7

4 i.o
in . 5

4o.8
42.2

2.02
2.28

2.02
2.27

1.93

93.9^
UTA H.......................
Salt Lake City...........

87.64
85.22

89.44

84.44
82.82

39.3
40.2

39‘
b

86.05

40.4
4o.8

2.23
2.12

2.27
2.13

2.09

VERMONT...................

67.97
64.18

40.8
40.0
4o.i

40.2
1)0.2

39 .b

Springfield..............

80.22

VIRGINIA..................
N orfolk-Portsmouth......

6 4.5 6

68.63
72.75

41.2

40.4

67.58

67.67

64.57
70.83

56.55
84.56

64.64
72.49
70.35

66.75
67.56

4o.l
39.9
4l.l

4o.4
41.9
40.2

88.49
85.79
89.31
86.75

38.6
38.0
38.7
38.0

61.91

40.9

42.2

1.67

1.60

1.65

1.6l

1.96

1)0.2
40.7
40.7

1 .6 l
1.72
1.77

1.60

l.5h

1.73
1.75

1 .64
I 06
6

39.2
39.6
38.9
38.4

39.1
38.9
39.3
39.1

2.33

2.34
2.32
2.40

2.21

93.61

Tacooa...................

88.63

91.90
91.70
93.23
88.73

WEST VIRGINIA.............
Charleston...............

82.32

81.69

100.37

99.63

79.20
98.77

39-2
40.8

38.9
40.5

39.6
in . 5

2.10
2.46

2.10
2.46

WISCONSIN.................

85.59

85.90

83.59

40.8
38.9
39.3
41.0
4o.4
1)0.2

41.5

40.0

2.10
2.23
2.15
2.31
2.33
2.22

2.11
2.23
2.15
2.30
2.33
2.23

4o.o

40.6
40.7

4o.6
40.3

2.33
2.66

2.64

La Crosse................
Madison..................

WYOMING...................

84.81
93.16
9 3 . 9b
88.49
93.20
105.34

89.62

84.42

40.7
38.4
39.5
40.3
40.3
39-8

91.76
107.1(5

90.94
L05.59

39.6

94.38
94.18

78.05
79.32

87.68
92.50

l/ Not available.
2/ Subarea of New York-Northeastern New Jersey.




1.60

2.00

43.6

89.99
87.10

86.74
8 4 .1 *

2.03
1 .4 4
1.9^

WASHINGTON................
Seattle...... ....... .

85.41

2.16

36.6
40.2
40.7

4l.4

2.29
2.42
2.33

2.31

2.26

2.27

2.27
2.22

2.00

2.38
2.02
2 .14
1.97
2.16

2.24
2.11

2.24

2.62

E x p la n a t o r y

IN TRO DU CTIO N
The statistics for nonfarm industries presented in
this monthly report are part of the broad program of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics to provide timely, com­
prehensive, accurate, and detailed information for the
use of businessmen, government officials, legislators,
labor unions, research workers, and the general public.
The statistics are an integral part of the Federal
statistical system, and are considered basic indica­
tors of the state of the Nation 1s econoiijy. They are
widely used in following and interpreting business
developments and in making decisions in such fields as
labor-management negotiations, marketing, personnel,
plant location, and government policy. In addition,
Government agencies use the data in this report to com­
pile official indexes of production, labor productivity,
and national income.

ESTABLISHM ENT REPORTS:

N o t e s

or engaging in more than one activity, the entire
em pl oyant of the unit is included under the industry
indicated by the most important product or activity.
The titles and descriptions of industries presented
In the Standard Industrial CJ as«rl fl «*1 M m »« i - (u. S.
Bureau of the Budget, Washington, D. C.) are used for
classifying reports from manufacturing and government
establishments; the 1942 ifodtretaka„CJjff9gifisatioR
Code. (U. S. Social Security Board) for reports from
all other establishments.
c.

Coverage

Monthly reports on employment and, for most indus­
tries, payroll and man-hours are obtained from approx­
imately 155,000 establishments. (See table below.) The
table also shows the approximate proportion of total
employment in each industry division covered by the
group of establishments furnishing monthly employment
data. The coverage for individual industries within
the division may vary from the proportions shown.
Approximate size and coverage of B L S

a.

Collection

The employment statistics program, which is based
on establishment payroll reports, provides current data
for both full- and part-time workers on payrolls of
nonagricultural establishments (see glossary for defi­
nition, p. 7-^3) during a specified period each month«
The BLS uses two "shuttle1 schedules for this program,
*
the BLS Form 790 (for employment, payroll, and manhours data) and the Form 1219 (for labor turnover data).
The shuttle schedule, used by BLS for more than 25
years, is designed to assist firms to report consist­
ently, accurately, and with a minimum of cost* The
questionnaire provides space for the establishment to
report for each month of the current calendar year 5 in
this way, the employer uses the same schedule for the
entire year.
Under a cooperative arrangement with the BLS,
State agencies mail the forms to the establishments
and examine the returns for consistency, accuracy, and
completeness. The States use the information to prepare
State and area series and then send the data to the BLS
Division of Manpower and Employment Statistics for use
in preparing the national series.
b.

Industrial Classification

Establishments are classified into industries on the
basis of their principal product or activity determined
from information on annual sales volume. This informa­
tion is collected each year. For manufacturing estab­
lishments, a product supplement to the monthly 790
report is used. The supplement provides for reporting
the percentage of total sales represented by each pro­
duct. Information for nonmanufacturing establish­
ments is collected on the 790 form itself. In the
case of an establishment making more than one product




employment and p a yro lls sample
Division
or
industry

Number of
es tablish—
menta in
samole

Contract construction..

3,100
20,900
1 0 ,¿*00
*

II
Employees

Number in Percent
sample
of total

350,000

Other transportation
and public utilities.
Wholesale and retail
Finance, insurance, and
real estate...........
Service and
miscellaneous:
Hotels and lodging

10 ,980,000

1 ,128,000

95

lit, 600

1 ,581,000

57

58,300

1 ,928,000

18

12,000

693,000

31

1,200

HtU .000

37

2,300

Transportation and
public utilities:
Interstate railroads.

1*5
2i*
65

9U,000

19

2 ,162,000
2 ,033,000

100

—

Barsonal services:
Laundries and clean­
l y and dyeing
Government:
Federal (Civil Service
. . .

State and local......

U,l*oo

735,000

la

¿ / Some firms do not report payroll and man-hour
information. Therefore, hours and earnings estimates
may be based on a slightly smaller sample than employ­
ment estimates.

Labor turnover reports are received from approx­
imately 10,000 cooperating establishments in the manu­
facturing, mining, and coinanlcation industries (see
table below)* The definition of manufacturing used in
the turnover series is not as extensive as in the BLS
series on employment and hours and earnings because of
the exclusion of the following major industries from
the labor turnover sample: printing, publishing, and
allied industries (since April 1943); cannix^ and pre­
serving fruits, vegetables, and sea foods; women's and
misses * outerwear; and fertilizer.
Approximate size and coverage of
B L S labor turnover sample
Nuafcer of
Group and industry

ments in
sample

Manufacturing...... .
Durable goods.......
Nondurable goods....
Ms tal «rfnlwg..........
Coal mining:
Anthracite..........
Bituminous.... •••••
Conmmicatlon:
Telephone
Telegraph...........
l / Does not apply.

10,200
6 ,1*00

Employees
Nuafcer in Percent
sample
of total

120

5,99l*,000
U,199,000
1,795,000
57,000

39
U3
32
53

20
200

71,000

6,000

19
32

661,000

88

3,800

w

28,000

65

D EFIN ITIO NS AN D ESTIM ATING
METHODS:
a

. emucucht

D a f lr r f t i« .

Employment data for all except Federal Government
establishments refer to persons who worked during, or
received pay for, any part of the pay period ending
nearest the 15th of the month. For Federal Government
establishments current data generally refer to persons
who worked on, or received pay for, the last day of
the month*
Persons on an establishment payroll who are on paid
sick leave, paid holiday, or paid vacation, or who work
during a part of the specified pay period and are un­
employed or on strike during the other part of the
period are counted as employed* Persons are not con­
sidered employed who are laid off or are on leave with­
out pay, who are on strike for the entire period, or
who are hired but do not report to work during the
period. Proprietors, the self-employed, unpaid family
workers, farm workers, and domestic workers in house­
holds are also excluded. Government employment covers
only civilian employees; Federal military personnel
are shown separately, but their number is excluded
from total nonagrlcultural employment*
With respect to employment in educational institu­
tions (private and governmental), BLS considers regular
full-time teachers to be employed during the summer
vacation period whether or not they are specifically
paid in those months.
Bftwchnwrir Put*
Employment estimates are periodically compared with
complete counts of employment in the various nonagri-




cultural industries, and appropriate adjustments made
as Indioated by the total oounts or benchmarks. The
co^jarison made for the first 3 months of 1956 resulted
In changes amounting to 0.5 percent of all nonsgricultural e^loyment, as against 0*8 percent in the first
quarter 1955 benchmark adjustment. Changes ranged from
0.1 to 2,1 percent for 6 of the 8 major industry divi­
sions; for the other 2, servioe and miscellaneous
industries required sa adjustment of 3*4 percent, con­
tract construction 4*3 percent. The manufacturing
total was changed by only 0,1 percent* Within manu­
facturing the benchmark and estimate differed by 1*0
percent or less in 53 of the 132 iadiTldiisd industries,
39 industries were adjusted by 1*1 to 2*5 percent, and
an additions! 22 iadnstries differed by 2,6 to 5*0 per­
cent. Okie significant esnee of differences between the
benchmark sad estimate is the change in industrial
classification of individual firms, which cannot be
reflected in BLS eetlmates until they are adjusted to
new benchmarks. Other censes are sanpHing and response
errors.
The basic sources of benchmark information are the
quarterly tabulations of employment data, by industry,
compiled by State agencies from reports of establish­
ments covered under State unemployment insurance laws.
Supplementary tabulations prepared by the TJ. S.
Bureau of Old Age and Survivors Insurance are used for
the group of establishments exempt from State unem­
ployment insurance laws because of their small size.
Benchmarks for industries wholly or partly excluded
from the unemployment insurance laws are derived from
a variety of other sources*
The BLS estimates which are prepared for the
benchmark quarter are compared with the new benchmark
levels, industry b y industry. Where revisions are
necessary, the monthly estimates are adjusted between
the new benchmark and the preceding one. Following
revision for these intermediate periods, the industry
data from the most recent benchmark are projected to
the current month by use of the sample trends. Uhder
this procedure, the benchmark is used to establish
the level of employment while the sample is used to
measure the month-to-month changes in the level*

The estimating procedure for industries for which
data on both "all employees”and "production and re­
lated workers" are published (manufacturing and
selected mining industries) is outlined below; the
first step under this method is also used for indus­
tries for which only figures on "all employees*1 are
published.
The first step is to compute total employment (all
employees) in the industry for the month following the
benchmark period. The all-employee total for the last
benchmark month (e.g., March) is multiplied b y the
percent change of total employment over the month for
the group of establishments reporting for both March
and April* Thus, if finas in the BLS sample for an
industry report 30,000 employees in ffarch and 31,200
in April, April employment is 104 percent (31,200
divided by 30,000) of March employment* If the all­
employee benchmark in terch is 40,000, the all-employee
total in April would be 104 percent of 40,000 or
41 ,600.
The second step is to compute the productionworker total for the industry. The all-employee total
for the month is multiplied by the ratio of production

workers to all employees« This ratio is confuted from
establishment reports in the monthly sample. Thus, if
these firms in April report 24,960 production workers
and a total of 31#200 employees, the ratio of produc­
tion workers to all employees would be «80 (24,960
divided by 31,200)« The production-warker total in
April would be 33,280 (41,600 maltiplied by «80).
Figures for subsequent months are computed by
carrying forward the totals for the previous month ac­
cording to the method described above«
The number of women employees in manufacturing,
published quarterly, is computed by multiplying the
all-employee estimate for the industry by the ratio
of women to all employees as reported in the industry
sanple«
Employment Adjusted for Seasonal Variation
Employment series for many industries reflect a
regularly recurring seasonal movement, which can be
measured on the basis of past experience« By elimi­
nating that part of the change in employment which can
be ascribeji to usual seasonal variation, it is pos­
sible to clarify the cyclical and other nonseasonal
movements in the series« Adjusted employment aggre­
gates are shown and also indexes (1947-49 3 100) de­
rived from these aggregates* The indexes have the
additional advantage of comparing the current sea­
sonally adjusted employment level with average e n j o y ­
ment in the base period.
With Othoi- M n w w t

LABOR TURNOVER

Definition
"Labor turnover," as used in the BLS program, re­
fers to the gross movement of wage and salary workers
into and out of employment status with respect to in­
dividual firms during a calendar month« This movement
is subdivided into two broad types: accessions (new
hires and rehires) an d ^separations (terminations of
employment initiated b y either employer or employee)«
Each type of action is cumulated for a calendar month
and expressed as a rate per 100 employees« All em ­
ployees, including executive, office, sales, other
salaried personnel, and production workers, are cov­
ered by both the turnover movements and the employment
base used in computing labor turnover rates. All
groups of employees— full- and part-time, permanent,
and temporary— are included« Transfers from one es­
tablishment to another within a company are not con­
sidered to be turnover items.
Method of Computation
To compute turnover rates for individual indus­
tries, the total number of each type of action (ac­
cessions, quits, etc«) reported for a calendar month
by the sample establishments in each industry is first
divided by the total number of employees reported by
these establishments, who worked during, or received
pay for, any part of the pay period ending nearest the
15th of that month« The result is nultiplied by 100
to obtain the turnover rate.

IhM»*«.

Employment data published by other government and
private agencies may differ from BLS employment sta­
tistics because of differences in definition, souroes
of information, methods of collection, classification,
and estimation« BLS monthly figures are not directly
comparable, for example, with the estimates of the
Census Manthly Report on the Labor Force (Mttf).
Census data are obtained by personal interviews with
individual members of a snail sample of households
and are designed to provide information on the work
status of the whole population, classified by their
demographic characteristics« The BLS, on the other
hand, obtains data b y mail questionnaire which are
based on the payroll records of business units, and
prepares detailed statistics on the industrial and
geographic distribution of employment and on hours of
work and earnings«
Since BLS employment figures are derived from
establishment payroll records, persons who worked in
more than one establishment during the reporting peri­
od will be counted more than once in the BLS series.
By definition, proprietors, self-employed persons,
domestic servants, and unpaid family workers are ex­
cluded from the BLS but not the MRIF series«
Employment estimates compiled by the Bureau of the
Census from its censuses and/or annual sample surveys
of manufacturing establishments also differ from BLS
employment statistics« Among the important reasons
for lack of comparability are differences in indus­
tries covered, in the business units considered parts
of an establishment, and in the industrial classifi­
cation of establishments« Similar differences exist
between the BLS data and those in County Business
Patterns published jointly by the U.S« Department of
bommeree and the U.S. Department of Health, Education
and Welfare«




B.

For example, in an industry sample, the total
number of employees who worked during, or received
pay for, the week of January 12-18 was reported as
25,498. During the period January 1-31 a total of
284 eiq>loyees in all reporting firms quit. The quit
rate for the industry is:
284 x 100 « 1.1
25,498
To compute turnover rates for broader industrial
categories, the rates for the component industries
are weighted b y the estimated employment.
Separate turnover rates for men and women are pub­
lished quarterly for 1 month in each quarter« Only
accessions, quits, and total separations are publish­
ed« These rates are computed in the same manner as
the all-employee rates; for example, the quit rate for
women is obtained from an industry sample by dividing
the number of women who quit during the month b y the
number of women employees reported«
Average monthly turnover rates for the year for
all employees are computed b y dividing the sum of the
monthly rates b y 12«
Comparability with Earlier Data
Labor turnover rates are available on a compara­
ble basis from January 1930 for manufacturing as a
whole and from 1943 for two coal mining and two com­
munication industries« Rates for many individual in­
dustries and industry groups for the period prior to
January 1950 are not comparable with those for the
subsequent period because of a revision which in­
volved (1) the adoption of the Standard Industrial
Classification (1945) code structure for manufactur­
ing industries, and (2) the Introduction of weighting

in the computation of industry-group rates.
Comparability with Employment Series
l-bnth-to-month changes in total employment in man­
ufacturing industries reflected by labor turnover
rates are not comparable with the changes shown in the
Bureau's employment series for the following reasons:

as absenteeism, labor turnover, part-time work, and
stoppages cause average weekly hours to be lower than
scheduled hours of work for an establishments. Group
averages further reflect changes in the workweek of
component industries.

Average Overtime Hours
(1) Accessions and separations are computed
for the entire calendar-month; the em­
ployment reports, for the most part,
refer to a 1-week pay period ending
nearest the 15th of the month.
(2) The turnover sample excludes certain in­
dustries (see under coverage, p. 2-E).
(3) Flants on strike are not included in the
turnover computations beginning with the
month the strike starts through the month
the workers return; the influence of such
stoppages is reflected, however, in the
employment figures.
C.

HOURS AND EARNINGS

Definitions of production workers, nonsupervisory
employees, payrolls, and man-hours from which hours
and earnings data are derived are Included in the
glossary, page 7 - E . Methods used to compute hours
and earnings averages are described in summary of
methods for computing national statistics, page 6-E.
Gross Average Hourly and Weekly Earnings
Average hourly earnings for manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries are on a "gross” basis, i.e.,
they reflect not only changes in basic hourly and in­
centive wage rates, but also such variable factors as
premium pay for overtime and late-shift work, and
changes in output of workers paid on an incentive
basis. Employment shifts between relatively high-paid
and low-paid work and changes in workers* earnings in
individual establishments also affect the general
earnings averages. Averages for groups and divisions
further reflect changes in average hourly earnings for
individual industries.
Averages of hourly earnings differ from wage rates.
Earnings refer to the actual return to the worker for
a stated period of time; rates are the amounts stipu­
lated for a given unit of work or time. However, the
average earnings series does not measure the level of
total labor costs on the part of the employer, since
the following are excluded: irregular bonuses, ret­
roactive items, payments of various welfare benefits,
payroll taxes paid by employers, and earnings for
those employees not covered under the productionworker or nonsupervisory-employee definitions.
Gross average weekly earnings are affected not
only by changes in gross average hourly earnings, but
also by changes in the length of the workweek, parttime work, stoppages for varying causes, labor turn­
over, and absenteeism.
Average Weekly Hours
The workweek information relates to average hours
worked or paid for, and is somewhat different from
standard or scheduled hours. Normally, such factors
4-E




The overtime hours represent that portion of the
gross average weekly hours which were in excess of reg­
ular hours and for which premium payments were made.
If an employee works on a paid holiday at regular rates,
receiving as total compensation his holiday pay plus
straight-time pay for hours worked that day, no overtime
hours would be reported.
Since overtime hours are premium hours by defini­
tion, the gross weekly hours and overtime hours do not
necessarily move in the same direction from month to
month; for example, premiums may be paid for hours in
excess of the straight-time workday although less than
a full week is worked. Diverse trends on the industrygroup level may also be caused b y a marked change in
gross hours for a component industry where little or
no overtime was worked in both the previous and cur­
rent months. In addition, such factors as stoppages,
absenteeism, and labor turnover may not have the same
influence on overtime hours as on gross hours.
Gross Average Weekly Earnings in Current and
19A7.-4 9 M l ara
These series indicate changes in the level of
weekly earnings before and after adjustment for
changes in purchasing power as determined from the
HLS Consumer Price Index.

M .„gpenfeM Ayscgfig ..Weg&y gfimtijgg
et.
Lft
Net spendable average weekly earnings in current
dollars are obtained by deducting Federal social se—
curity and income taxes from gross weekly earnings.
The amount of income tax liability depends on the
number of dependents supported by the worker, as well
as on the level of his gross income. To reflect these
variables, net spendable earnings have been computed
for two types of income receivers: (l) a worker with
no dependents; and (2) a worker with three depend­
ents.
The computations of net spendable earnings for
both the factory worker with no dependents and the
factory worker with three dependents are based upon
the gross average weekly earnings for all production
workers in manufacturing industries without regard to
marital status, family composition, and total family
income.
Net spendable weekly earnings in 1947-49 dollars
represent an approximate measure of changes in "real"
net spendable weekly earnings. "Real" earnings are
computed by dividing the current Consumer Price Index
into the spendable earnings average for the current
month. The resulting level of spendable earnings ex­
pressed in 1947-49 dollars is thus adjusted for
changes in purchasing power since that base period.

ly data summarized in the M-300 report of the Inter­
state Commerce Commission and relate to all employees
who received pay during the month, except executives,
officials, and staff assistants (ICC Group I). Gross
average hourly earnings are computed b y dividing
total compensation by total hours paid for. Average
weekly hours are obtained by dividing the total number
of hours paid for, reduced to a weekly basis, by the
number of employees, as defined above. Gross average
weekly earnings are derived by multiplying average
weekly hours by average hourly earnings.
Because
hours and earnings data for manufacturing and other
nonmanufacturing industries are based upon reports to
the BLS which generally represent 1 weekly pay period
ending nearest the 15th of the month, the data for
railroad employees are not strictly comparable with
other Industry information shewn in this publication.

Avarag. Hwr»1v t t t m l w . ftraludlng f w « » .

of Production Worker» «" thnnfkntnT-in»

Average hourly earnings, excluding premium over-*
tine pay, are computed by dividing the total ptroduction-^worker payroll for the industry group by the sum
of total production-worker man-hours and one-half of
total overtime man-hours, ftdor to January 1956, data
were baaed on the application of adjustment factors to
gross average hourly earnings (as described in the
Monthly Labor Review, Ifay 1950, pp. 537-540; reprint
available, Serial No. R. 2020). Both methods elimi­
nate only the earnings due to overtime paid for at
one and one-half times the straight-time rates. No
adjustment is made for other premium payment provi­
sions, for exanple— holiday work, late-shift work, and
overtime rates other than time and one-half.

Indexes o f Aggregate Weekly Han-Houra

STATISTICS FOR STATES AND AREAS

The indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours are pre­
pared by dividing the current month's aggregate by the
monthly average for the 1947-49 period. These aggre­
gates represent the product of average weekly hours
and employment.

State and area employment, hours, and earnings
statistics are collected and prepared by State
agencies in cooperation with the BLS.
These sta­
tistics are based on the same establishment reports
used by the BLS for preparing national estimates.
State enploymant series are adjusted to benchmark
data from State unemployment insurance agencies
and the Bureau of COLd Age and Survivors Insurance.
Because some States have more recent benchmarks
than others and use slightly varying methods of
computation, the sum of the State figures may
differ slightly from the official U. S. totals
prepared by the BLS.

The aggregate man-hours are defined as total manhours for which pay was received by full- and parttime production or construction workers, includili
hours paid for holidays, sick leave, and vacations
taken. The man-hours are for 1 week of the pay period
ending nearest the 15th of the month, and may not be
typical of the entire month.
Ibtllroiid Honra and Earnings

Additional industry detail may be obtainable
from the cooperating State agencies listed on the
Inside back cover of this report.

The figures for Class I railroads (excluding
switching and terminal companies) are based upon month­




NOTE:
of the

Additional information concerning the preparation

employment,

hours,

earnings,

and

labor

turnover

series-— concepts and scope, survey methods, and reliability
and limitations—

is contained in

technical

notes for each

of these series, available from BLS free of charge.
of this information as well as

similar

material

For all
for other

BLS statistics, see Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statis­
tical Series, BLS Bull. 1168, December 1?5U.

Copies are on

file in many public and university libraries, or may be ord­
ered from the Superintendent of Documents,

U. S. Government

Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. at 65 cents each.

J t±

SUM M ARY OF METHODS FOR COM PUTING N A T IO N A L STATISTICS
EM PLOYM ENT, HO URS, A N D EA R N IN G S

Item

Individual manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries

Total nonagriculturai divisions,
major groups, and groups

M O N TH LY DATA
All emolovees

All-employee estimate for previous
month multiplied by ratio of all
employees in current month to all
employees in previous month for
sample establishments which re­
ported for both months.

Sum of all-employee estimates for
component industries.

Production workers

A31-employee estimate for current
month multiplied by ratio of pro­
duction workers to all employees
in sample establishments for cur­
rent month.

Sum of production-worker estimates
for component industries.

Average weekly hours

Total production or nonsupervisory
man-hours divided by number of pro­
duction or nonsupervisory workers.

Average, weighted by employment, of
the average weekly hours for com­
ponent industries.

Average hourly earnings

Total production or nonsupervisory
worker payroll divided by total
production or nonsupervisory worker
man-hours.

Average, weighted by aggregate manhours, of the average hourly earn­
ings for component industries.

Average weekly earnings

Product of average weekly hours and
avérage hourly earnings.

Product of average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

A N N U A L A VERA G E DATA
All emolovees and pro­
duction workers

Sum of monthly estimates divided
by 12 .

Sum of monthly estimates divided
by 12 .

Average weekly hours

Annual total of aggregate manhours (employment multiplied
by average weekly hours; divided
by annual sum of employment.

Average, weighted by employment,
of the annual averages of weekly
hours for component industries.

Average hourly earnings

Annual total of aggregate pay­
rolls (weekly earnings multiplied
by employment) divided by annual
aggregate man-hours.

Average, weighted by aggregate manhours, of the annual averages of
hourly earnings for component in­
dustries.

Average weekly earnings

Product of average weekly hours
and average hourly earnings.

Product of average weekly hours
and average hourly earnings.




G LO SSA R Y
ALL EMPLOYEES - The total number of persons on estab­
lishment payrolls who worked full- or part-time or
received pay for any part of the pay period ending
nearest the 15th of the month. Includes salaried
officers of corporations as well as employees on
the establishment payroll engaged in new construc­
tion and major additions or alterations to the plant
who are utilized as a separate work force (forceaccount construction workers). Proprietors, selfemployed persons, domestic servants, unpaid family
workers, and members of the Armed Forces are ex­
cluded.
CONSTRUCTION WORKERS - Includes working foremen,
journeymen, mechanics, apprentices, helpers, labor­
ers, and similar workers engaged in new work, al­
terations, demolition, and other actual construc­
tion work, at the site of construction or working
in shop or yard at jobs (such as precutting and pre­
assembling) ordinarily performed by members of the
construction trades; includes all such workers re­
gardless of skill, engaged in any way in contract
construction activities.
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION - Covers only firms engaged in
the construction business on a contract basis for
others. Force-account construction workers, i.e.,
hired directly by and on the payroll of Federal,
State, and local government, public utilities, and
private establishments, are excluded from contract
construction and included in the employment for such
establishments.
DURABLE GOODS - The durable-goods subdivision includes
the following major manufacturing industry groups:
ordnance and accessories; lumber and wood products;
furniture and fixtures; stone, clay, and glass pro­
ducts; primary metal industries; fabricated metal
products; machinery; electrical machinery; trans­
portation equipment; instruments and related pro­
ducts; and miscellaneous manufacturing industries as
defined. This definition is consistent with that
used by other Federal agencies, e.g., Federal Re­
serve Board.

speculative builders, subdividers, and developers;
and agents and brokers).
GOVERNMENT - Covers Federal, State, and local govern­
ment establishments performing legislative, execu­
tive, and judicial functions, including Government
corporations, Government force-account construction,
and such units as arsenals, navy yards, and hospi­
tals. Federal government employment excludes em­
ployees of the Central Intelligence Agency. State
and local government employment includes teachers,
but excludes, as nominal employees, paid volunteer
firemen and elected officials of small local units.
LABOR TURNOVER:
Separations are terminations of employment during
the calendar month and are classified according to
cause: quits, discharges, layoffs, and miscellaneous
separations (including military), as defined below.
Quits are terminations of employment during the
calendar month initiated by employees for such
reasons as: acceptance of a job in another company,
dissatisfaction, return to school, marriage, mater­
nity, ill health, or voluntary retirement where no
company pension is provided. Failure to report aft­
er being hired and unauthorized absences of more
than 7 consecutive calendar days are also clas­
sified as quits. Prior to 1940, miscellaneous
separations were also included in this category.
m
are terminations of employment during
the calendar month inititated by the employer for
such reasons as employees* incompetence, violation
of rules, dishonesty, insubordination, laziness,
habitual absenteeism, or inability to meet physical
standards.
are terminations of employment during the
calendar month lasting or expected to last more than
7 consecutive calendar days without pay, initi­
ated by the employer without prejudice to the work­
er, for such reasons as lack of orders or materials,
release of temporary help, conversion of plant, in­
troduction of labor-saving machinery or processes,
or suspensions of operations without pay during
inventory periods.

ESTABLISHMENT - "A single physical location where busi­
ness is conducted or where services or industrial
operations are performed; for example, a factory,
mill, store, mine, or farm. Where a single physical
location comprises two or more units which maintain
separate payroll and inventory records and which are
engaged in distinct or separate activities for which
different industry classifications are provided in
the Standard Industrial Classification, each unit
shall be treated as a separate establishment*
An
establishment is not necessarily identical with the
business concern or firm which may consist of one
or more establishments. It is also to be distin­
guished from organizational subunits, departments,
or divisions within an establishment . n (Standard
Industrial Classification Manual, U. S. Bureau of
the Budget, Vol. I, Part I, p. 1, November 1945.)

Persons on leave of absence (paid or unpaid)
with the approval of the employer are not counted as
separations until such time as it is definitely de­
termined that such persons will not return to work.
At that time, a separation is reported as one of the
above types, depending on the circumstances.

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE - Covers private
establishments operating in the fields of finance
(banks, security dealers, loan agencies, holding com­
panies, and other finance agencies); insurance (in­
surance carriers and independent agents and bro­
kers); and real estate (real estate owners, including

Accessions are the total number of permanent and
temporary additions to the employment roll during
the calendar month, including both new and rehired
employees. Persons returning to work after a layoff,
military separations, or other absences who have been
counted as separations are considered accessions.




Miscellaneous separations (including military)
are terminations of employment during the calendar
month because of permanent disability, death, re­
tirement on company pension, and entrance into the
Armed Forces expected to last more than 30 consecu­
tive calendar days. Prior to 19lj0, miscellaneous
separations were included with quits. Beginning
September 1940, military separations were included
here.

MAN-HOURS - Covers man-hours worked or paid for of
specified groups of workers, during the pay period
ending nearest the 15th of the month. The specified
group of workers in manufacturing and mining indus­
tries, laundries, and cleaning and dyeing plants is
production and related workers; in the contract con­
struction industry, it is construction workers; and
in the other industries, it is nonsupervisory em­
ployees. The man-hours include hours paid for holi­
days, sick leave, and vacations taken; if the em­
ployee elects to work during a vacation period, the
vacation pay and the hours it represents are omitted.
MANUFACTURING - Covers private establishments engaged
in the mechanical or chemical transformation of in­
organic or organic substances into new products and
usually described as plants, factories, or mills,
which characteristically use power-driven machines
and materials-handling equipment. Establishments
engaged in assembling component parts of manufac­
tured products are also considered manufacturing if
the new product is neither a structure nor other
fixed improvement. Government manufacturing opera­
tions such as arsenals and navy yards are excluded
from manufacturing and are included under Government.
MINING - Covers establishments engaged in the extrac­
tion from the earth of Organic and inorganic miner­
als which occur in nature as solids, liquids, or
gases; includes various contract services required
in mining operations, such as removal of overburden,
tunneling and shafting, and the drilling or acidiz­
ing of oil wells; also includes ore dressing, béné­
ficia ting, and concentration.
NONDURABLE GOODS - The nondurable-goods subdivision
includes the following major manufacturing industry
groups: food and kindred products; tobacco manu­
factures; textile-mill products; apparel and other
finished textile products; paper and allied products;
printing, publishing, and allied industries; chemi­
cals and allied products; products of petroleum and
coal; rubber products; and leather and leather pro­
ducts. This definition is consistent with that
used by other Federal agencies, e.g., Federal Re­
serve Board.
NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES - Includes employees (not
above the working supervisory level) such as office
and clerical workers, repairmen, salespersons,
operators, drivers, attendants, service employees,
linemen, laborers, janitors, watchmen, and similar
occupational levels, and other employees whose
services are closely associated with those of the
employees listed.
OVERTIME HOURS - Covers premium overtime hours of pro­
duction and related workers during the pay period
ending nearest the 15>th of the month. Overtime hours
are those for which premiums were paid because the
hours were in excess of the number of hours of either
the straight-time workday or workweek. Weekend and
holiday hours are included only if premium wage rates
were paid. Hours for which only shift differential,
hazard, incentive or other similar types of premiums
were paid are excluded.
PAYROLL - The weekly payroll for the specified groups

3-E




of full- and part-time employees who worked during,
or received pay for, any part of the pay period
ending nearest the 15th of the month. The specified
group of employees in the manufacturing and mining
industries, laundries, and cleaning and dyeing
plants is production and related workers; in the
contract construction industry, it is construction
workers; and in the other industries, it is non­
supervisory employees and working supervisors. The
payroll is reported before deductions for old-age
and unemployment insurance, group insurance, with­
holding tax, bonds, and union dues; also includes
pay for sick leave, holidays, and vacations taken.
Excludes cash payments for vacations not taken,
retroactive pay not earned during period reported,
value of payments in kind, and bonuses, unless
earned and paid regularly each pay period.
PRODUCTION AND RELATED WORKERS - Includes working fore­
men and all nonsupervisory workers (including load
men and trainees) engaged in fabricating, processing,
assembling, inspection, receiving, storage, handling,
packing, warehousing, shipping, maintenance, repair,
janitorial, watchman services, products development,
auxiliary production for plant's own use (e.g.,
power plant), and recordkeeping and other services
closely associated with the above production opera­
tions.
REGIONS:
North - Includes all States except the 17 listed as
South.
South - Includes the following 17 States: Alabama,
Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida,
Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi,
North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
(In the case of sawmills and planning mills, general,
a third region is identified - the West - and in­
cludes California, Oregon, and Washington.)
SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS - Covers establishments pri­
marily engaged in rendering services to individuals
and business firms, including automotive repair
services. Excludes domestic service workers. Non­
government schools, hospitals, museums, etc., are
included under service and miscellaneous; similar
Government establishments are included under Govern­
ment.
TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES - Covers only pri­
vate establishments engaged in providing all types
of transportation and related services; telephone,
telegraph, and other communication services or pro­
viding electricity, gas, steam, water, or sanitary
service. Similar Government establishments are in­
cluded under Government.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE - Covers establishments en­
gaged in wholesale trade, i.e., selling merchandise
to retailers, and in retail trade, i.e., selling
merchandise for personal or household consumption,
and rendering service incidental to the sales of
goods. Similar Government establishments are in­
cluded under Government.

E M P L O Y M E N T

A N D

E A R N I N G S

D A T A

Available

v td e x

from

the

B L S

Free

of

charge

éeC aev

• IN D IV ID U A L H ISTO R IC A L SUM M ARY TABLES of national data for each industry
or special series contained In tables A-l through A-5, A -8, and
C-l through C-5

When ordering, specify each industry or special series wanted see table for name of industry

• STATE EM PLOYM ENT, 1939-56 - Individual summary tables for each State,
by industry division

• G U ID E TO STATE EM PLOYM ENT STATISTICS - Shows the industry detail, by

State, which is available fro m cooperating State agencies and
the beginning date of each series

• G U ID E TO EM PLOYM ENT STATISTICS O F BLS - Shows the beginning date of all
national series published and gives each industry definition

• T E C H N IC A L NO TES on:
Msasurement of Labor Turnover
Measurement of Industrial Enzploya*nt
Hours and Earnings in Nonagricultural Industries
The Calculation and Uses of the Net Spendable Earnings Series
BLS Earnings Series for Escalating Labor Costs

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Division of Manpower and Employment Statistics
Washington 25, D. C.




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