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E POMN
ML Y E T
adE R IN S
n AN G
V o l. 4 N o. 7

J A N U A R Y 1958

DIVISION OF MANPOWER AND EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS
Seymour L Wolfbein, Chief
.

NEW NATIONAL

CONTENTS

EMPLOYMENT SERIES...

Article
Beginning with

this issue of

Changes in Plant Hours .......................................

ill

Employment and Earnings, the number
of construction

workers in contract

construction industries and the num­

Charts
Employees in Transportation Industries, Annual Averages, 1947-56
Hiring and layoff Rates in Manufacturing Industries.............

viii
ix

Employment H ighlights - December 1957..............•
..........

x

ber of nonsupervisory workers in se­
lected

public

industries

utilities

and trade

will be

published regu­

lar 1y in table A-8.

Summary tables

containing

these

months and years

data

for earlier

are available upon

request.

CHANGES IN HOURS WORKED...
The article beginning on page
ill analyzes the
gional

changes

of factory
fied numbers

industrial and re­
in the distribution

employees working speci­
of

hours

for

May of

each year since 1953*

STA TISTICA L TABLES
A-Employment
A- Is

Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division (December 1957)..... ............ ............. .
A- 2 s Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division and selected groups (December 1957)...........
A- 3s Production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group (December 1957)....................................
A- ¿s Index of employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division (December 1957)........ ...........
A- 5: Index of production workers in manufacturing, by major
Industry group (December 1957)....................... .
A- 6s Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division, seasonally adjusted (December 1957)...........
A- 7: Production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group, seasonally adjusted (December 1957)...... .
A- 8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry (November 1957).................................
A- 9: Employees in private and Government shipyards, by
region (November 1957)............... ...................
A-lOs Federal military personnel (November 1957)..... .........
A-ll: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division and State (November 1957)......................
A-12s Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by selected
areas and industry division (November 1957)•••••••••••••

1
2
3
U
U

5
5
6
12
12
13
16

B -Labor Turnover
B- Is
B- 2s
B- 3?
For sale b y the Superintendent of
Documents, U. S. Government Print­
ing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
Subscription price: $3.50 a year;
$1 additional for foreign mailing.
Single copies vary in price. This
issue ¿s kO cents.




Labor turnover rates in manufacturing (November 1957)....
27
Labor turnover rates, by industry (November 1957)....... ....28
Labor turnover rates in manufacturing for selected
States and areas (October 1957) ............. ............ ....32

Continued next page

E POMM
ML Y E T
adE R IN S
n AN G
„ '

< ' •
'

The national employment figures
shovm in this
adjusted to

report have been
first quarter 1956

CONTENTS - Continued

Page

C-Hours, Earnings, and Payrolls

benchmark levels.

E X P LA N A TO R Y NOTES

A brief outline of the concepts, meth­
odology, and sources used in preparing
data shown in this publication appears

C-lî Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manu­
facturing, by major industry group (December 1957).......
C-2î Gross average weekly hours and average overtime hours of
production workers in manufacturing, b y major industry
group (December 1957)............................. .
C-3: Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours in industrial and
construction activities (December 1957).........
C-4: Index of production-worker weekly payrolls in manu­
facturing (December 1957)....... ...... .
C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production workers or
nonsupervisory employees, by industry (November 1957)....
C-6: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable, of
production workers in manufacturing, in current and
1947-49 dollars (November 1957)........
C-7: Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding overtime, of
production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group (November 1957).................................
C-Bî Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manu­
facturing, by State and selected areas (November 1957)•••

in the Annual Supplement Issue. Sii^jle
copies of the Explanatory Notes may be
obtained from the
Labor,

Bureau

Division

of

of

U. S. Department of
Labor

Manpower

Statistics,

and Employment

Statistics, Washington 25, D. C.

List o f —
U. S DEI&RTM3NT CF LABOR'S
BLS REGIONAL OFFICES
ft«e 52
COOPERATING STATE AGENCIES
Inside back cover




*•**«***«*•
*********
«***««*
*****
***
*

33
34
35
35
36
45
45
46

C H A N G E S IN PLANT HOURS
Jeanette G. Siegel

Each month the Department of Labor’ Bureau
s
of Labor Statistics publishes the average
number of weekly hours for which factory em­
ployees are paid. These figures are plant
averages, and in addition to reflecting changes
in operating hours they also vary because of
time off without pay, part-time work, or em­
ployee turnover. To provide some background
information on the underlying industrial and
regional changes in establishment hours over
the past few years, a special tabulation was
made of the employment and hours reports sub­
mitted monthly to the BLS by the 44 ,000 es­
tablishments in its manufacturing sample. The
data show the distribution of production
workers in manufacturing plants working speciTable 1.
Month
and y e a r

Total
employment
(m i l l i o n s )

May 1953-.
1954..
1955-.
1956-1957--

17. 3
15.8
16. 3
16.7
16.8

Employment

N u m b e r of P r o d u c t i o n W o r k e r s on
4 4 - H o u r Week Decreasing

The period spanned by the study includes
fairly wide fluctuations in manufacturing em­
ployment and in weekly hours. Both total em­
ployment and production-worker employment in
May 1953 were only 200,000 below the alltime
peak reached in August of that year, the month
preceding the cessation of Korean hostilities.
On the other hand, employment in May 1954 was
1.5 million under the year before, the second
lowest level of any month during the entire
period. For manufacturing as a whole, weekly
hours varied by as much as l lA hours.
and hours,

Production
workers
(m i l l i o n s )

Gross average
w e e k l y hours
40.7
39. 3
40.8
40.0
39.7

13.9
12.4
12.9
13.1
12. 9

fied numbers of hours for each May ( a rel­
atively normal month) of the past 5 years,
for industry groups and 4 geographic regions.
It is estimated that the BLS figures, rep­
resenting hours paid for, average about 2
hours less than the scheduled workweek. For
example, plants on a scheduled 44-hour week
pay for an average of about 42 hours per week
for each production worker’ name on the pay­
s
roll, because of absenteeism, part-time em­
ployment, turnover, or time off without pay
for other reasons.




Ma y 1953 - 5 7

iii

Percent of workers
in p l ants averaging
42 or m o r e h ours
39. 5
24.0
38.4
32. 3
25. 3

Differences in factory activity can be ef­
fectuated in two ways— by changing the employ­
ment levels or by changing hours. In May of
1955 and 1957, the production-worker employ­
ment levels were identical at 12,900,000
workers, but weekly hours were about 1 hour
lower in the later period. In May 1957, only
25 percent of the employees were in establish­
ments averaging 42 or more hours (indicating
a scheduled workweek of at least 44 hours),
as compared with the 38 percent who had been
averaging 42 or more hours 2 years previously.
Overtime hours were lower in 1957 than in 1955

for almost all major groups, with the largest
drops in 3 industries— transportation equip­
ment, p r imary metals, and nonelectrical m a ­
c h i n e r y — t o g e t h e r c o m p r i s i n g 30 p e r c e n t of
manufacturing employment. Chart 1 below shows
a d e c i d e d shift to shorter hou r s for those
establishments, with the same total number of
production workers, which had averaged 42 or
more hours in the earlier year.

low point in average hours, many workers who
had previously been working overtime were no
longer working even a 40-hour week. The over­
time pattern of May 1957 was almost identical
with that of May 1954, with the same relative­
ly low proportions of workers in plants aver­
aging 42 or more hours.
Average hours were
slightly higher in May 1957 because of more
workers in plants averaging around 40 hours,
and less in those on a shorter week.
In any
month, regardless of general economic circum­
stances, there are always a few manufacturing
plants averaging less than 30 hours or more
than 50 hours per week.

The d i f f e r e n c e s over the p e r i o d in the
proportions of production workers working spec­
ified levels of hours are so substantial that
changes in scheduled hours rather than the rel­
atively m i n o r differences that would result
from absenteeism or turnover have obviously
been the primary cause of changes in the manu­
facturing average. The proportion of produc­
tion workers in plants averaging 42 or more
hours changed by as much as 16 percentage points
i n a y e a r (from May 1953 to May 1954). Table 2
shows the distribution of factory workers by
average weekly hours per establishment for each
of the months studied. During May 1954, the

Overtime Changes More Pronounced in
Durables Than Nondurables
The fluctuations in hours in the durable
goods industries, particularly in those e s ­
tablishments with substantial overtime (4 or
more hours), have been the m a j o r cause of
changes in the average for total manufacturing.
The percent of production workers inhard-goods

Chart 1. Percent of Total Production Workers
Paid for Specified Levels of Average Weekly Hours
P E R C E N T OF
TOTAL PRODUCTION W O R K E R S

30
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




M ay 1955 and M ay 19571

AVERAGE W E E K L Y HOURS

Over

Production-worker employment was the same. 12.9 million, in these 2 years.
Consequently, the comparison reflects only changes in hours.

iv

plants averaging 42 or more hours ranged from
24 to 44 percent for the group as a whole over
the period studied, while in plants producing
nondurable goods, the range was quite n a r r o w 25 to 32 percent. (See table 3.) In May 1953,
the proportion of production workers averaging
42 o r m o r e hours was 13 p e r c e n t a g e points
higher for durable than for nondurable-goods
plants; in May 1954 and 1957, the proportions
were equal for both groups at about 25 percent.

In May 1954, a period of recession, fewer
production workers were on overtime than in
By May 1955, the
any of the o t h e r years.
overtime pattern had improved for each of the
21 industry groups. In May 1956, the average
dropped from the 1955 level, and in 1957 had
declined further almost to the 1954 low. However, the 1957 durables picture was much improved o v e r 1954; in m o s t i n d u s t r i e s more
wor k e r s were on o v e r t i m e in 1957, but the
s u b s t a n t i a l d i f f e r e n c e in t r a n s p o r t a t i o n

T a b l e 2.
D i s t r i b u t i o n of gross ave r a g e w e e k l y h o u r s
o f p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s in m a n u f a c t u r i n g , M a y 1953— 57

Gross average weekly
hours per
establishment

Percent of production workers
May
1953

May
1954

May
1955

May
1956

May
1957

Manufacturing
14.0
1. 3
•7
1.8
3. 1
7.1

22.9
2. 3
2. 1
3.2
5.4
9.9

13. 2
1.2
.9
1.4
3. 2
6.5

18.0
1.6
1.1
2.7
4. 7
7. 9

18.1
1.6
1. 0
2.7
4.5
8.3

3 8 - 4 1 h o u r s ---------------------------3 8 .......... - ...... ................
3 9 .......................... .......
4 0 ...................... - ..........
4 1 - - ................................

46.5
10. 2
12.8
12.9
10.6

53. 1
9.7
16.3
16.6
10. 5

48.4
6. 9
14.0
15. 4
12. 1

49.7
8. 1
14.0
15. 3
12. 3

56.6
9.2
17.4
17.8
12.2

4 2 o r m o r e h o u r s --------------------4 4 - 4 5 ..............................
4 6 - 4 7 ..............................
4 8 - 4 9 ..............................
5 0 a n d o v e r ----------------------

39.5
16.6
10.5
5.8
3. 1
3.5

24.0
11. 1
5.9
3.4
1. 7
1.9

38.4
15.5
9. 2
6.6
3.4
3. 7

32. 3
14.5
9. 1
4.2
2. 2
2. 3

25.3
12.5
5. 9
3.4
1.7
1.8

T o t a l - P e r c e n t ----------------N u m b e r ( 0 0 0 ) ---------A v e r a g e w e e k l y h o u r s ----------

100.0
13,881
40.7

100.0
12,393
39.3

100.0
12,879
40.8

100.0
13,063
40.0

100.0
12,894
39.7

i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
«
i
i
i
i
i
00
i
02

3 7 o r l e s s h o u r s --------------------29 a n d u n d e r --------------------3 0 - 3 1 ..............................
3 2 - 3 3 ..............................
3 4 - 3 5 ..............................
3 6 - 3 7 ..............................




V

equipment, the largest single group in manu­
facturing, brought the average down almost to
the 1954 level.

later was decidedly lower. The highest percent
of production workers in durables plants averaging42 or more hours in May 1957, 33 percent,
was in fabricated metals, the only durablegoods industry where overtime was about equal
to the level of the preceding year.

Over the 2-year period, May 1955-57, the
trend in overtime hours was steadily downward
for 8 of the 11 durables groups, with especial­
ly notable decreases in primary metals, trans­
portation equipment, and lumber. In the m a ­
c h i n e r y i n d u s t r i e s , b o t h e l e c t r i c a l and
nonelectrical, overtime was about at the same
levels in May of 1956 as in 1955, but a year

The industry with the highest percentage
of employees working more than 42 hours is in
nondurable goods— paper and allied products.
Employment in this industry, reflecting the
expanded use of paper p a c kaging materials,

Table 3. Percent of produc t i o n workers in establishments
reporting average we e k l y hours of 42 or more, May 1953-57
May
1953

May
1954

May
1955

May
1956

May
1957

39. 5

24. 0

38. 4

32. 3

25. 3

44. 1

24. 2

42. 4

35. 2

25. 2

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ........
L umb e r and wood p r o d u c t s . . ......
Fur n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s ...........
Stone, clay, and glass products.
P r i m a r y metal i n d u s t r i e s .........
F a b r i c a t e d metal p r o d u c t s ...... *
M a c h i n e r y (except electrical)...
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y .............
Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t .........
Instruments and related products
Misc e l l a n e o u s manufacturing.....

40. 3
44. 4
41. 9
38. 9
43. 3
49. 9
48. 5
43. 3
40. 3
54. 3
38. 0

15. 9
35. 7
22. 5
30. 0
11. 6
32. 9
24. 6
16. 3
32. 4
10. 7
20. 6

26. 4
44. 7
36. 8
41. 6
41. 5
40. 4
45. 9
34. 2
50. 0
28. 0
35. 3

43. 7
36. 2
30. 6
39. 8
32. 6
33. 4
46. 7
35. 8
28. 8
26. 2
30. 9

32. 4
32. 3
27.,2
30. 4
17. 3
33.,1
30. 4
23. 8
21.,9
19. 3
22. 5

Nond u r a b l e g o o d s . ...........

30. 8

24. 7

31. 7

27. 6

25.,3

Food and k i ndred p r o d u c t s .......
Tobacco m a n u f a c t u r e s .............

39. 9
8. 1
26. 6

34. 0
9. 7
15. 6

37. 5
22. 0
20. 4

33. 9
20. 5
27. 2

34.,1
25.,0
19. 6

8. 9
60. 9

5. 8
53. 5

8. 1
58. 6

6. 5
44. 6

6.,6
52.,6

21. 9
40. 2
26. 4
36. 7
14. 1

15. 9
28. 6
28. 1
26. 8
6. 1

20. 8
36. 4
28. 7
41. 4
9. 5

20. 7
32. 7
24. 1
25. 6
8. 2

17.,1
32,►7
25.,9
24,.8
6..1

Industry group

Apparel and other finished
textile p r o d u c t s .................
Paper and allied p r o d u c t s .......
Printing, publishing, and
a llied i n d u s t r i e s ...... .........
Chemicals and allied products...
Products of p e troleum and coal..
L e a t h e r and leather products....




vi

C h a r t 2.

P e r c e n t of Production W o r k e r s in Establishments

W i t h A v e r a g e W e e k l y H o u r s of 3 8 a n d O v e r
PERCENT

By Region, May of 1953-57

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR SAITC
TT S I S

has been i n c r e a s i n g a t a f a s t e r rate than
most other manufacturing groups. For most of
the period studied, more than h a l f the e m ­
ployees in this industry were w o r k i n g 42 or
more hours.

presented here are for May 1957, the recent
deep cutbacks in the ai r c r a f t industry are
not reflected; however, an expanded program
of missile development could well change the
current picture.)

Hours More Stable in Western Region
Than in Rest of United States

Chart 2 shows, by region, the percent of
factory workers in establishments averaging at
least 38 hours, the approximate equivalent of
a scheduled 40-hour week.

The ups and downs of the past 5 years in
average hours in manufacturing, particularly
in durable goods, are readily apparent in all
regions except the West. Judging from hours
data, the effects of the early 1954 recession
were concentrated in other parts of the coun­
try. Part of this stability in hours in dur­
ables plants in the West has, o f course, been
due to the tremendous activity in the heavy
manufacturing industries such as airframe and
shipbuilding which are an important part of
the industrial makeup of the region, partic­
ularly in California.
(Since the latest data




In contrast with the comparatively un­
c h a n g i n g h o u r s - o f - w o r k p a t t e r n in durable
goods, in the West, substantial changes are
evident in durables in the Northeast and North
Central regions— areas with considerably more
diversification in types of durables produced.
The widest swings in hours in any sector oc­
curred in nondurable goods in the Southern
region, where textile mills, comprising onethird of the South’ nondurable goods employ­
s
ment, have experienced sharp fluctuations in
the workweek.

H ir in g

U N I T E D

S T A T E S

BUREAU

OF L A B O R




and

L ayo ff

D E P A R T M E N T
STATISTICS

O F

R a t e s in M a n u f a c t u r i n g

L A B O R

la t e s t

In d u s t r ie s

data:

Novem ber

1997

EMPLOYEES IN TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRIES
Annual Averages, 1947-56
Thousands

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT O F LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




E p y etHh hs
mlomn igligt
DECEM BER 1957
N o n fa rm e m p lo y m e n t r o s e b y 1 8 5 ,0 0 0 o v e r t h e m on th
t o 53 m i l l i o n i n D e c e m b e r— s u b s t a n t i a l l y l e s s t h a n t h e
u s u a l in c r e a s e .
P r e - C h r is t m a s e m p lo ym e n t i n c r e a s e s i n
r e t a i l t r a d e a n d i n p o s t o f f i c e s w e re t o a l a r g e e x t e n t
o f f s e t t h i s y e a r b y s h a r p c u t b a c k s i n m a n u f a c t u r in g .
M o r e o v e r , t h e in c r e a s e i n t r a d e e m p lo ym e n t w as s m a l l e r
t h a n u s u a l f o r D e c e m b e r, a n d t h e e m p lo ym e n t d e c l i n e i n
c o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n w as g r e a t e r t h a n s e a s o n a l.
T h e f a c t o r y w o rk w e e k r e m a in e d u n c h a n g e d a t 3 9 . 3
h o u r s , 1 . 7 h o u r s b e lo w t h e l e v e l o f a y e a r a g o . A v e r a g e
o v e r t im e h o u r s d ro p p e d fro m 2 . 3 i n N ovem b er t o 2 . 0 i n
D e c e m b e r. W e e k ly a n d h o u r l y e a r n i n g s i n m a n u f a c t u r in g
w e re u n c h a n g e d o v e r t h e m on th a t $ 8 2 .9 2 a n d $ 2 . 1 1 ,
r e s p e c t iv e ly .

M a n u f a c t u r in g E m p lo ym e n t D r o p s b y 2 5 0 ,0 0 0
F a c t o r y e m p lo y m e n t d e c l i n e d b y 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 b e t w e e n
N ovem ber a n d D e ce m b e r t o a l e v e l o f 1 6 . 3 m i l l i o n , a n
e s p e c i a l l y l a r g e d r o p f o r t h i s t im e o f y e a r . E m p lo ym e n t
c u t b a c k s w e re h e a v i e s t i n t h e d u r a b le g o o d s s e c t o r : i n
p r im a r y m e t a ls , e s p e c i a l l y s t e e l m i l l s ; i n f a b r i c a t e d
m e t a ls , w h e re p r o d u c e r s o f m e t a l s t a m p in g s a n d o t h e r
a u t o m o b ile co m p o n e n ts w e re r e d u c in g o p e r a t i o n s ; a n d i n
t h e m a c h in e r y a n d e l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y i n d u s t r i e s ,
w h e re s t r o n g c o n t r a s e a s o n a l c u t b a c k s w e re r e p o r t e d i n
m o st m a jo r s e c t o r s .
I n t h e t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t i n d u s t r y , c u t ­
b a c k s w e re c o n t in u e d b y some a i r c r a f t p l a n t s , b u t
t h e r e w e re i n c r e a s e s i n a u t o m o b ile e m p lo y m e n t r e s u l t ­
in g i n p a r t fro m t h e s e t t le m e n t o f s t r i k e s a t tw o
a u t o m o b ile p l a n t s .
T h e l a r g e s t e m p lo y m e n t d ro p i n t h e n o n d u r a b le
goods s e c t o r — ^ 3 ,0 0 0 i n th e fo o d in d u s t r y — r e f le c t e d
th e u s u a l w in t e r c u r t a ilm e n t o f c a n n e ry o p e r a t io n s .

T r a d e a n d G o v e rn m e n t E m p lo y m e n t R i s e

i n D e ce m b e r

F e d e r a l G o v e rn m e n t e m p lo ym e n t r o s e a lm o s t 3 0 0 , 0 0 0
i n D e ce m b e r a s a r e s u l t o f t h e u s u a l p r e - C h r is t m a s
h ir in g in p o st o f f ic e s .
T h e r i s e o f ¡¿ 8 0 ,0 0 0 i n t r a d e
e m p lo y m e n t, h o w e v e r , w a s som ew hat l e s s t h a n i t h a d
b e e n i n p r e v i o u s D e c e m b e rs . M o st o f t h e e m p lo y m e n t
d r o p o f 2 2 5 ,0 0 0 i n c o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n r e s u l t e d fro m
t h e n o rm a l w i n t e r s l a c k e n i n g o f b u i l d i n g a c t i v i t i e s .
C o n t in u e d c u t b a c k s w e re a l s o r e p o r t e d i n r a i l r o a d
e m p lo y m e n t.




F a c t o r y W orkw eek U n c h a n g e d a t

39.3

H o u rs

T h e f a c t o r y w o rk w e e k r e m a in e d a t 3 9 * 3 h o u r s i n
D e ce m b e r. T h i s w as t h e lo w e s t p o i n t f o r a n y D e ce m b e r
i n th e p o s tw a r p e r io d .
H o u rs o f w o rk d e c l i n e d s h a r p l y i n t h e s t o n e - c l a y g l a s s a n d t h e p r im a r y a n d f a b r i c a t e d m e t a ls i n d u s t r i e s
b e tw e e n N ovem ber a n d D e ce m b e r i n s t e a d o f s h o w in g t h e
u su a l r is e s .
T h e w o rk w e e k f e l l i n t h e t r a n s p o r t a t i o n
e q u ip m e n t i n d u s t r y a s a u t o p l a n t s c u t b a c k o n o v e r t im e
w o rk .
T h e r e w as a c o n t r a s e a s o n a l d r o p i n h o u r s o f
w o rk i n t h e a p p a r e l t r a d e s .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly o v e r t im e w o rk d e c l i n e d fro m 2 . 3 t o
h o u r s o v e r t h e m o n th , l a r g e l y b e c a u s e o f t h e s h a r p
d e c l i n e i n t h e a u t o m o b ile i n d u s t r y .
C om pare d t o a
y e a r a g o , o v e r t im e h o u r s w e re down b y 1.1 h o u r s .

2.0

E a r n i n g s o f f a c t o r y p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e re u n ­
c h a n g e d b e tw e e n N ovem b er a n d D e ce m b e r a t $ 82.92 p e r
w eek and $ 2 .1 1 p e r h o u r.
A v e ra g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s r o s e
b y 6 c e n t s s i n c e l a s t D e c e m b e r, b u t w e e k ly e a r n i n g s
w e re down b y $ 1.13 b e c a u s e o f t h e r e d u c t i o n i n h o u r s
w o rk e d .

N o n fa rm E m p lo ym e n t Down O v e r t h e Y e a r
A f t e r 3 y e a r s o f s t e a d y g r o w t h , n o n fa rm e m p lo y ­
m en t t u r n e d d ow nw ard i n S e p te m b e r 1 9 5 7 a n d b y y e a r - e n d
w as 6 0 0 ,0 0 0 b e lo w t h e l e v e l o f a y e a r a g o .
M a n u fa c ­
t u r i n g e m p lo ym e n t h a d b e e n d e c l i n i n g on a s e a s o n a l l y
a d j u s t e d b a s i s fro m t h e b e g in n in g o f t h e y e a r , b u t
t r a d e a n d s e r v i c e e m p lo ym e n t c o n t in u e d t o e x p a n d u n t i l
e a r l y a u tu m n .
D u r in g t h e l a s t m o n th s o f 1 9 5 7 , a n a c ­
c e l e r a t e d d e c l i n e i n m a n u f a c t u r in g , t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ,
a n d c o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n e m p lo y m e n t, a lo n g w i t h a r e ­
d u c t i o n , a f t e r s e a s o n a l a d ju s t m e n t , i n t r a d e e m p lo y ­
m e n t, b e g a n t o c u t i n t o t o t a l jo b l e v e l s .
B y D e c e m b e r, f a c t o r y e m p lo y m e n t h a d d ro p p e d
8 2 5 .0 0 0 b e lo w i t s y e a r - a g o l e v e l , w i t h m ore t h a n
t h r e e - f o u r t h s o f t h i s d e c l i n e i n t h e d u r a b le g o o d s
se c to r.
E m p lo ym e n t l e v e l s w e re down b y m ore t h a n
1 0 0 .0 0 0 e a c h i n m a c h in e r y , p r im a r y m e t a ls , a n d t r a n s ­
p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t .
E m p lo ym e n t i n r e t a i l t r a d e
sh o w ed n o g a in o v e r t h e y e a r .
O v e r-t h e - y e a r d e c lin e s
o c c u rr e d in c o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t io n , t r a n s p o r t a t io n ,
m in in g , a n d F e d e r a l G o ve rn m e n t e m p lo y m e n t.
C o n t in u e d
s t r e n g t h w as s t i l l e v id e n t i n s e r v i c e , S t a t e a n d l o c a l
g o v e r n m e n t, a n d f i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e .

H ISTO R ICA L EM PLOYM ENT D A T A
Table A-l: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division
(In t h o u s a n d s )

Year

Annual

and month

TOTAL

Mining

26,829
27,088

1,230

average:

1919..
1920..
1921..
1922..
1923..
192^..
1925..
1926..
1927..
1928..

24,125
25,569
28,128
27,770
28,505
29,539
29,691
29,710

1,12k
953

920
1,203
1,092
1,080
1,176
1,105
i,o4i

1929..
1930..
1931..
1932..
1933..
193^..
1935..
1936..
1937..
1938..

31,041
29,143
26,383
23,377
23,466
25,699
26,792

1,078

30,718

1,006
882

I939-•
19^0 ..
19^1..
19^2 ..
19*0..
19W . .
19^5..
191*6 ..
19*7..
191*8 ..

30,311
32,058

28,802
28,902

36,220
39,779
42,106
41,534
40,037
41,287
43,462
44,448

1,000
86k
722

735
874
888
937

Contract
con­
struction

1,021

848
1,012
1,185
1,229
1,321
1,446
1,555

1,608
1,606
1,497
1,372
1,214
970

809
862
912
1,145
1,112
1,055

Transpor­
Wholesale
t a t i o n and
and retail
public
trade
utilitie s

10,534
10,534
8,132
8,986
10,155
9,523
9,786
9,997
9,839
9,786

3,711

10,534

9,253

3,907
3,675
3,243
2,804
2,659
2,736
2,771
2,956
3,114
2,840

10,078

2,912

9,401

8,021
6,797
7,258
8,346
8,907
9,653

10,606

3,998
3,459
3,505

3,882
3,806
3,824
3,940
3,891
3,822

883
826

1,150
1,294
1,790
2,170
1,567
1,094
1,132

982

1,982
2,169

12,974
15,051
17,381
17,111
15,302
14,461
15,290
15,321
14,178
14,967
16,104
16,334
17,238
15,995
16,563
16,905

4,185

81*5

916

9k7

983
917
852
9^3

1,661

50,056

51,878

771

816

2,165
2,333
2,603
2,634
2,622
2,593
2,759
2,993

43,315
44,738
47,347
48,303
49,681
48,431

19^9..
1950..
1951..
1952..
1953..
1951
*..
1955..
1956..

M a n u f acturing

918
889
916

885
852
777

10,780

4,664

4,623
4,754

5,084
5,494
5,626
5,810
6,033

6,165

6,137
6,401
6,064
5,531
4,907
4,999
5,552
5,692
6,076
6,543
6,453

1,050
1,110
1,097
1,079
1,123
1,163
1,166
1,235
1,295
1,360

Service
and
miscel­
laneous

2,054

2,142

2,187
2,268
2,431
2,516
2,591
2,755

2,871

2,962

Govern­
ment

2,671
2,603
2,531
2,542
2,611
2,723

2,802
2,848
2,917
2,996

3,127
3,084
2,913
2,682
2,614
2,784
2,883
3,060
3,233
3,196

3,066

l,74l

3,321
3,477
3,705
3,857
3,919
3,934
4,011
4,474
4,783
4,925

3,995
4,202
4,660
5,483
6,080
6,043
5,944
5,595
5,474
5,650

11,292

1,765
1,824
1,892
1,967
2,038
2,122
2,219
2,306

4,972
5,077
5,264
5,411
5,538
5,664
5,916
6,231

6,612

3,013
3,248
3,433
3,619
3,798
3,872
4,023
4,122
4,l4i

6,940
7,4l6
7,333
7,189

3,949
3,977
4,166

9,513
9,645
10,012
10,281
10,527
10,520
10,846

4,221
4,009
4,062
4,157

Finance,
insurance,
and real
estate

7,260
7,522

8,602
9,196
9,519

1,431
1,398
1,333
1,270
1,225

1,247
1,262
1,313
1,355
1,347
1,399
1,436
1,480
1,469
1,435
1,409
1,428

1,619
1,672

3,149
3,264
3,225
3,167
3,298
3,477

3,662

3,749
3,876

5,856

6,026
6,389

6,609

6,645
6,751
6,914
7,178

1956:

D e c e m b e r ..

53,639

837

2,997

17,159

4,194

12,260

2,308

6,295

7,589

1957:

J a n u a r y •• •
F e b ru a r y ..

51,716
51,704
51,919
52,270
52,482
52,881

832

2,667

16,959

4,126
4,120
4,147
4,153
4,156
4,181

11,298
11,225

2,293
2,301

11,265

2,310

6,239
6,273
6,317
6,432

7,302
7,334
7,360
7,376
7,387
7,343

4,199
4,215
4,206
4,159
4,123
4,100

11,493
11,499

M a y ...............

833

831

833
835

2,673
2,756

2,906
3,082
3,232

52,605

A u g u s t .• • .
S e p te m b e r.
O c t o b e r.. .
N o v e m b e r. .
D e c e m b e r ..

858
857

862

3,275
3,305

53,152
53,043
52,807
52,992

853
837

829
820

3,224
3,059
2,833

52,891

3,285

16,945

16,933

16,822
16,762
16,852
16,710
16,955
16,905
16,783

16,581
16,333

NOTE: Data fo r the 2 most re ce n t months are p relim in a ry .




11,428
11,411
11,505

11,602

11,664
11,845
12,324

2,230
2,329
2,359

6,520
6,551

2,390

6,524

2,389
2,361

6,509

2,356
2,356
2,353

6,541
6,547
6,515
6,480

7,157
7,157
7,381
7,473
7,499
7,749

CURRENT EM PLOYM ENT D A T A

2

Table A-2: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and selected groups

(In thousands)
Industry division and group

December
1957

November

December

1957

1956

Decembei• 1957
net chaiiée from:

’ ’B T '

TOTAL...............................................................................

52,992

52,807

53,639

+185

-647

MIMING.................................................................................

820

829

837

-9

-17

103-7
234.6

104.5
235-8
118.6

111.1

-.0

242.4
115*7

-1 .2
-2 .8

115.8

-7 .*
-7 .8
♦.1

2,833

3,059

2,997

-226

- 16*

MANUFACTURING...................................................................

16,333

16,581

17,159

-2*0

-826

DURABLE GOODS.................................
NONDURABLE GOODS .............................

9,426
6,907

9,593

10,071

-167

-6*5
-1Ô1

CON TRACT CONSTRUCTION............ .............................. ..

6,988

7,088

-01

D u r a b le G ood s

116.2

117.9

132.9
696.9
380.4
558.O

- 16.7
-5**5
- 13 .O
- 26.1

Primary metal industries.....................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment)....

Instruments and related products............

1,357.3

-1 .7
-23.6
-6 .3
-11.6
-22.6

- 126.2

1.127.1
1,608.3
1,221.6
1.853.1
335.3
493.1

1,141.8
1,740.5
1,250.7
1,971.0
343.4
498.5

- 13.3
-22.1
-32.2
-3 .0
-7 .7
-23.5

- 28.0
- 15*.3
- 61.3
- 120.9
- 15.8
- 28.9

1,475.9
92.4
978.1
1,196.7
574.6
875.5
824.6
252.8

1,519.4
95-7
984.9
1,205.9
578.3
876. I

1,521.8
101.7
1.039.3
1.227.4

263.0
373.0

Lumber and wood products (except furniture)..
Furniture and fixtures.......................

268.9

-* 3 .5
-3 .3
-6 .8
-9 .2
-3 .7
-.6
-3 .0
-3 .5
-5 .9
-1 .9

-* 5 .9
-9 .3
- 61.2
- 30.7
-5 .5
+.7
- 9.8
-2 .*
- U .3
- 5.9

642.4
367.4
531.9
1.231.1

666.0
373-7
543.5
1,253.7

1,113.8
1 . 586.2
1,189.4
1, 850.1
327-6

469.6

N o n d u r a b le G ood s

Textile-mill products........................
Apparel and other finished textile products..
Printing, publishing, and allied industries..
Chemicals and allied products...... .........

827.6
256.3

374.9

580.1
874.8
834.4
255*2
274.3
378.9

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S .......................

4,100

4,123

4,194

-23

- 9*

TRANSPORTATION................................
COMMUNICATION.................................
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES........................

2,692

2,714
807

2,797

-22

601

602

-105
+5

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.........................................

12,324

11,845

WHOLESALE TRADE...............................
RETAIL TRADE«.................................

807

3,215
9,109
1,900.0
1 , 665.3
812.7
718.1
4,013.2

NOtE: Data f o r the 2 most recen t months are p relim in a ry .




3,211

8,634
1,559-8

1 , 650.6
809.6
644.4
3,969.2

802
595

0
-1

12,260

+*79

3,149
9,111
1,969.6
1, 612.2
816.6
758.5
3,954.2

+*
+*75
♦3*0.2
+1*.7
+3.1
+73.7
+ U .0

+66
-2
- 69.6
+53.1
-3 .9
-* 0 .*
+59.O

CURRENT EM PLOYM ENT D A T A

3

Table A-2: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and selected groups-Continued
(In thousands)
Industry division and group

December

Horembor

1957

1957

December
1956

December 1957
net change from:
November
December
1957

1956

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE..........

2,353

2,356

2,308

-3

+45

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS...................

6,k8o

6,515

6,295

-35

+185

GOVERNMENT.................................

7,71*9

7,499

7,589

+250

+160

2,435
5,314

2,148
5,351

2,483

+287
-37

-48
+208

FEDERAL........................................
STATE AND LOCAL...............................

5,106

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

Table A-3: Production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group
(In thousands)
Major industry group

December

1957

November

December

1957

1956

December 1957
net change from:
December
November
1957

MANUFACTURING

12,482

DURABLE GOODS .............................
NONDURABLE GOODS...........................

12,719

13,350

-237

7,160

7,318
5,401

7,827
5,523

-158

5,322

1956
-868

-667

-79

-201

82.5
627.8
319.6

-.7
-23.1
-5 .3
-10,6
-23.6

- I 5 .O
- 53 .O
- 33 .I
-26.9
- I 3I .3

907.8
1,277.2
1,477.8
233-3
401.0

-14.1
- 20.9
- 28.2
-2e0
- 6.3
- 23.0

-34.3
- I 54.O
-75.6
- I I 5.5
- I 6.8
-31.1

1,075.6
93.0
947.8
1,092.8
472.2
565.9
547.4
174.3
215.8
337-8

- 43.5
- 3.6
-6 .6
-9 .*
-2 .8
-.8
-2 .5
-3 .5
-4 .2
-2 .1

-44.8
-10.8
- 61.4
-30.1
-7 .5
-1 .2
- 20.5
- 6.3
-11.4
- 6.5

D u ra b le goods

Ordnance and accessories.......................
Lumber and wood products (except furniture)....
Furniture and fixtures.........................
Stone, clay, and glass products................
Primary metal industries.......................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment).....

67.5
574.8
306.5
437.6
1,004.1

873.5
1, 123.2

68.2
597-9
311.8
448.2
1,027.7

887.6

Instruments and related products..............
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries........

824.5
1,362.3
216.5
369.9

1,030.8

Electrical machinery...........................

1,144.1
852.7
1,364.3
222.8
392.9

1,074.3

464.5
1,135.4

900.1

N on d u rm b le G ood s

Textile-mil1 products..........................
Apparel and other finished textile products....

82.2

168.0

893.0
1,072.1
467.5
565.5
529.4
171.5

204.4
331.3

Printing, publishing, and allied industries....

886.4

85.8

333-4

1 , 062.7
464.7
564.7
526.9

NOTE: Data f o r the 2 most recen t months are p relim in a ry .




208.6

4

EM PLO YM EN T INDEXES
Table A-4: Index of employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division
( 1947- 49= 1 00 )

December
1957

November

1957

October
1957

December
1956

TOTAL..............................................................

121.1

120.7

121.3

122.6

86.5

C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n .....................................................................

134.6
109.4
117.1
100.4
100.7
131.0

87.4
145.3
111.1
119,1
101.6
101.3
125.9
128.6
124.9
136.5
133.1
132.5
113.8

88.3
153.2
112.4
120.3
103.2
102.2
124.0

88.3
142.4
114.9
125.1
103.1
103.0
130.3

In d u s try d iv is io n

T r a n s p o r t a t io n and p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ...................................

128.8

131.8
136.3
132.4
136.9
129.O
140.9

141.9

128.2

122.4

136.5
133.8
132.0

126.2

131.8
133-7

128.7

114.2
141.0

134.1
131.5
135.4

NOTE: D a t a f o r t h e 2 m o st r e c e n t m o nth s a re p r e l i m i n a r y .

Table A-5: Index of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group
( 1947- 49= 100)

December

November

October

December

1957

1957

1957

1956

MANUFACTURING ...............................................................

100,9

102.8

104.2

107.9

DURABLE GOODS.........................................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS..................................................................

107.3
93.5

109.6
94.8

110.7

96.6

117.3
97.0

300.0
77.9
104.0
100.7
97.5

300.0
81.0
105.6
103.0
99.9

308.8
84.4
107.3
104.8
101.9

366.2
85.1
108.4
106.9
110.3

112.2

114.1
102.6
135.7
129.2
114.9

116.6
112.3

133.2
111.9
97.*

114.0
100.6
133.2
133.4
114.9
103.4

106.6

140.6
144.5
120.1
105.5

87.1
77.6
72.5
102.1

90.7
81.4
73.1
102.9

96.6
89 .O

90.9
88.0

116.1

116.8

M a jo r i n d u s t r y g ro u p

Durable Goods

F u r n it u r e

and f i x t u r e s ...................................................................

F a b r ic a t e d m e ta l p ro d u c ts

(e x c e p t o rd n a n ce ,

98.8
128.8

Nondur able Goods

P r in t in g ,

p u b lis h in g ,

and a l l i e d

i n d u s t r i e s ...............

117.5
103.3
90.3
100.2
91.5

NOTE: Data fo r the 2 most re ce n t months are p relim in a ry .




117.8
103.7
92.5
102.6

92.1

74.1
103.2
117.3

11B .0

104.2
93.0
103.1
92.3

77.6
104.0
117.8
117.8
107.2
106.1
93.5

5

SE A SO N A LLY ADJUSTED EM PLO YM EN T D A T A
Table A-6: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division, seasonally adjusted

In d e x ( 1947- 49= 1 00 )
D ec.
N ov.
O ct.
D ec.
1957
1957
1957
1956

In d u s try d iv is io n

T O T A L .......................................

D u r a b le g o o d s ............................................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s .....................................................................

118.6

119 -4

86.1
138.1
iog. 0
116.6
100.2
100. 1
121. g
126.3
120.3
137.0
133.8

«7 . 0
140,■4
110,■3
118,.6
100.• 7
101 . 0
123 . 0
126,. 1
121..8
.
137' 2
.
133' 1
131 . 0
114.•9
.
139- 1

1 1 5 .1
139-5

NOTE:

120.0 120.1
88.3
143- 1

111.2
1 1 9 .8

87.9
146. 0
114.6
124 . 6
102.8
102.4
121.2
123.7
120.4

101.1
101. 9
123.2
126. 9
121.8
137.2 134- 4
i 3 2 - 5 130. 0
131.2 128.5
115-9 117.4
138. 9 1 3 4 - 0

Number ( in
N ov.
1957

D ec.
1957
5 1 ,8 9 5

52,237

816
2,906
16,281

825
2, g56
16,474
9,548
6, 926
4,112
ii,57i
3,148
8,423
2,368

9,390

6,8gi
4 , 076
11,471
3 , i 52
8,319
2,365
6,545

7 , 435

2,174
5,261

6,515

7,416
2,170
5,246

th o u sa n d s)
D ec.
O c t.
1956
1957

52,469
837

3,013
16, 604
9,64 g
6, 955
4,148
3 1 ,5 9 0

3, 168
8,422
2,368
6,482
7,427

2, 189
5,238

52,541
833
3,074

17,106
10,035
7 , 071
4 ,16g
11,408
3 , 087
8,321
2,320
6,359

7,272
2,217
5,055

D a ta f o r th e 2 m o st r e c e n t m onths a re p r e l i m i n a r y .

Table A-7: Production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group, seasonally adjusted

M a jo r i n d u s t r y g ro u p

MANUFACTURING..................................
DURABLE GOODS....................................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS.............................................................

I n d e x ( 1947 - 49= 100)
D ec.
N ov.
O ct.
D ec.
1957
1957
1957
1956

100.5 102., 0 102. 8

D ec.
1957

Number ( i n
N ov.
1957

107-5

12,431

106.8 iog., 0 110.1 116.7
9 6 .7
.
94-2
93- 1
9 3 -8

7
7
5,304

, 12

1 2 , 614
7 »272
5,342

th o u sa n d s)
O ct.
1957

D ec.
1956

12,717

I 3 , 2 g7

7,350
5,367

7,790
5,507

Durable Goods
Lu m b e r and wood p r o d u c t s ( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) . . . .
F u r n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s ...........................................................
P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ............................................... ..
F a b r i c a t e d m e ta l p r o d u c t s ( e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h in e r y , and t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t ).............
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y ................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t......................................................
In s t r u m e n t s and r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s ....................

300. 0 300., 0 308.8
82.0
79-.8
79-5
101. 9 102.■9 1 0 5 - 3
100.7 102. 1 103. 2
99« 9 101.9
97-1
■
111.0 112.. 8 113- 6
98. 2 101.■7 104.7
126.3 131- 2 1 3 4 - 3
136-2
133- 4 12g. 2
110.8 114.•4 114.4
99. ■5 102.1
9 6.3

366. 2
86.g
106.3
106. 9
iog.7

68
587
301

68
58g
304

438
999

1, 028

ng. 1
104.5

865
1,117
809
1,362
215
366

1, 156
840
1,364
222

9 3- 8

1, 062

1,04 g

83-3

77

115.4
111.8
137-7
144-5

444

879

378

70

605
311
449

83

64 1
314

465

1,04g

1 ,1 2 9

885
1,190
860
1,321
222
388

899
3 ,2 7 1

882
1,478
231

1,054

1,110
88

397

Nondurable Goods
Fo od and k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ....................................................

A p p a r e l and o t h e r f i n i s h e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s . . . .
P a p e r and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ....................................................
P r i n t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , and a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s . . . .

88.,6
-8
72. 3
71-4
100.5 102. 5
115.6 1 1 5 . 6
115-9 116.'5
,
102. 7 1° 3 • 1
9 1-4
93 -0
98. 2
101. 1
92. 6
9 1- 5
89. 7
72.9

NOTE: Data fo r the 2 most recen t months are p relim in a ry .




74

89. 0
73 - 8

74-1
101.7
116.1
116.7
103-3
93-0

102.1
9-2.9

7 6.4

103.4

117-3

116.1
106. 6

873

1,047
463
557

524

104 . 1

94-6

1
7.0
200

93-5

331

79

884
1,067
463
5Ô
0
526

78

go6
1,05g
465
561
527
173

934

1, 077
470
558
544

206

208

176
212

33 5

336

338

173

6

IND USTRY EM PLO YM EN T
Table A- 8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry
( In th o u sa n d s)
A l l e m p lo y e e s

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s *

Ifovember

October

November

1957

1956

Brooflibcr

October

52,807

53,043

53,007

829

837

837

I r o n m in in g ..............................................................
C o p p e r m in in g .........................................................
Le a d and z i n c m in in g ........................................

104.5
37-1
30.4
14.7

IO 5.7
38.1
30.3
14.9

111.3
36.5
33.7
18.1

32.2
25.2

12.2

88.8
33.2
24.9
12.4

95.7
32.2
28.7
15.4

ANTHRACITE MINING.....................

23.7

27.3

30.6

22.1

25.4

28.2

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING...............

235-8

237.3

240.7

212.0

214.5

220.5

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION...........................

In d u s try

1957

TOTAL................................................
M INING ..................................

METAL MINING..........................

1957

1956

HbvuÉber
1957

-

672
87.9

680

696

346.2

346.8

335.4

2*8.7

248.9

250.2

P e t r o le u m and n a t u r a l - g a s p r o d u c t io n
( e x c e p t c o n t r a c t s e r v i c e s ) .......................

205 .O

206.8

197.6

I25.9

127.4

128.8

NONMETALL 1C MINING AND QUARRYING.....

II8.6

120.1

118.7

IOO .9

102.3

101.8

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION...................
NONBUILDING CONSTRUCTION................................

3,059

652
275 .O

376.5
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION.......................................

2,407

3,224

3,174

715

647

320.2
395.0
2,509

274.1

372.8
2,527

2,660
571
2*0.4

322.6
2,089

2,822

636
293.9
342.0
2,186

2,786
570
250.2
320.2
2,216

GENERAL CONTRACTORS...............................

936.2

980.3

1,054.7

831.*

873.5

951.3

SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS.....................

1,470.5
339-6
199.0
231.8
700.1

1,528.2
350.4
211.8
237 .I
728.9

1,472.5
351.1
192.0
226.4

1,257.2
2&L .5
181 .6
185.7
608.*

1,312.3

1 ,265.0
291.4
177.6
183.0
613.0

P a i n t i n g and d e c o r a t i n g ................................
E l e c t r i c a l w o rk ....................................................
O th e r s p e c i a l - t r a d e c o n t r a c t o r s .............

703.0

291.9
194.7
190.9
634.8

MANUFACTURING...........................

16,581

16,783

17,180

12,719

12,893

13 ,39e

DURABLE GOODS.........................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS..................................................

9,593
6,988

9,687
7,096

10,067

7,318
5,*01

7,389
5,504

7,839

Durable

5,553

Goods

ORDNANCE AN ACCESSORIES..........................
D
LUM
BER AND W O PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
OD
FURNITURE).................................................
S a w m ills and p l a n i n g m i l l s ..............................
H i l l w o r k , p ly w o o d , and p r e f a b r i c a t e d
Wooden c o n t a i n e r s ....................................................

117.9

119.8

131.5

68.2

69.5

81.8

666.0
79-5
353.5

691.9
91.2
361.8

723.9
102.6

597.9
73.3
322.8

622.7
84.6
330.9

654.9
95-2
346.8

129.8

133.3

131.3
53.6
58.9

109.*

112.6
45.7
48.9

111.0
49.3

48.5
54.7

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




7,113

50.1
55-5

377.5

**.2
*8.2

52.6

IN D U STR Y EM PLO YM EN T

7

Table A- 8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry-Continued
( In th o u s a n d s )
A l l e m p lo y e e s
In d u s try

November
1957

Durable Goods—

October
1957

|

November
1956

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s *

November
1957

October

November

1957

1956

C o n t in u e d

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...................

378.1

S c r e e n s , b l i n d s , and m is c e lla n e o u s
f u r n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s ........................................

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........
P l a t g l a s s ........................................................................
G l a s s and g l a s s w a r e , p r e s s e d o r b lo w n .. .
G l a s s p r o d u c t s made o f p u r c h a s e d g l a s s . .
C em ent, h y d r a u l i c ......................................................
S t r u c t u r a l c l a y p r o d u c t s .....................................
P o t t e r y and r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ...........................
C o n c r e t e , gypsum , and p l a s t e r p r o d u c t s . .
C u t - s t o n e and s to n e p r o d u c t s ...........................
M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m e t a l l i c m in e r a l
p r o d u c t s ..........................................................................

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES.................
B l a s t f u r n a c e s , s t e e l w o rk s , and
r o l l i n g m i l l s ...................................................... ..
I r o n and s t e e l f o u n d r i e s .....................................
P r im a r y s m e l t i n g and r e f i n i n g o f
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ....................................................
S e c o n d a r y s m e lt in g and r e f i n i n g o f
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ....................................................
R o l l i n g , d r a w in g , and a l l o y i n g o f
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ....................................................
N o n fe r r o u s f o u n d r ie s ..............................................
M is c e ll a n e o u s p r im a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s . .

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT)..............................
C u t l e r y , h an d t o o l s , and h a rd w a re ...............
H e a t in g a p p a r a t u s ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c ) and
F a b r ic a t e d s t r u c t u r a l m e ta l p r o d u c t s .. . .
M e ta l s t a m p in g , c o a t i n g , and e n g r a v i n g . .
L i g h t i n g f i x t u r e s .......................................................
F a b r i c a t e d w ir e p r o d u c t s .....................................
M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s .

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)...........
E n g in e s and t u r b i n e s . . . . ............ ........................
A g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h in e r y and t r a c t o r s ..........
C o n s t r u c t i o n and m in in g m a c h in e r y ...............
M e t a lw o r k in g m a c h in e r y ..........................................
S p e c i a l - i n d u s t r y m a c h in e r y (e x c e p t

373.7
266.3

267.9

381.0
268.4

311.8
229.1

316.9
231.2

320.0
232.0

1*4.9

46.2

48.2

35.2

36.6

38.9

37.2

H o u s e h o ld f u r n i t u r e .................................................
O f f i c e , p u b l i c - b u i l d i n g , and p r o f e s ­
s i o n a l f u r n i t u r e ....................................................
P a r t i t i o n s , s h e l v i n g , l o c k e r s , and

38.4

37-7

27.7

28.8

28.2

25-3

25.6

26.7

19.8

20.3

20.9

543.5

563.4
35 .O

448.2

42.5

16.9
42.5

455.5
29.0
82.5
14.1
35.6
72.1
43.7
96.4

470.4
31.4

96.3

551.3
32.6
97.2

32.8

16.3

80.9
5O .4
U 5.3

118.3

19.4

92.8
16 .I

90.4

91.3

92.7

1,253.7

1,276.9

614.4
218.7

629.7
222.6

240.9

64.8

82.6

15 .I
36.6
74.7
48.6

16.7

96.1
16.9

64.8

65.4

68.4

1,353.6

1,027.7

1,049.2

1,134.1

663.5

507.8
187.7

523.2
190.8

564.3
209.8

64.6

69.7

51.0

50.7

56.0

13.9

14.1

14.3

10.3

10.4

10./

109.5
74.3

107.8
76.8

115.5

84.8

161.3

166.4

83.0
62.9
128.2

69.1

158.1

60.7
125.4

1,127.1
52.9
146.5

1,129.1
55.4
145.2

1,142.2
53.4

887.6

111.2
331.8
231 .O
55.5

109.9
336.5
228.5
54.6
58.7
140.3

117.0
316.0

85.5
246.9
190.O
44.3
47.5
111.0

1,635.9
81.8
142.5
144.0

1 ,722.2

1,144.1
57.1
95.3
97.6
194.6

1,166.4
57.0
100.6
101.6
200.0

1,262.3

120.7

122.3
168.7
92.0
119.0
205.2

132.8
178.3

58.8

139.4
1,608.3
81.8
136.3

139.4
261.1

126.6
163.2
267.6

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry .




118.8

43.8

19.3

174.6

453173 0 - 5 8 - 3

50.3

35.5

70.6

18.6

257.7
O f f i c e and s t o r e m a c h in e s and d e v i c e s . . .
S e r v i c e - i n d u s t r y and h o u s e h o ld m a c h in e s .
M is c e lla n e o u s m a c h in e r y p a r t s .........................

82.4

96.9
17.8
43.4
84.6
55.3

29.4
81.7
13.5

267.6

83.3

151.8

246.6
53.4
64.9
139 .I
85.5

139.2
I53 .I
286.9

177.2

188.2

260.6
129.2
163.0
270.0

267.1
130.0
193.7
278.5

45.6
II 6.8

166.3
89.0

119.4
204.1

889.4
48.1

115.6
83.8

251.2

187.8
43.5
47.3
112.1

90.6
133.6

910.5

46.3
122.9
89.6
235.8
206.5
42.9
53.8
112.7

61.7
96.6
110.7
220.5

97.9
145.6

216.2

8

IND USTRY EM P LO Y M E N T
Table A-8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by inclustry-Continued

Industry

Durable

(In thousands)
All employees
H o t « ber
Hb-vtriber
October
1957
1956
1957

Production workers*
ffovenber
October
SbvoMber
1057
1956
1957

G o o d s—- C o n t in u e d

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY...................................
E l e c t r i c a l g e n e r a t in g , t r a n s m is s io n ,
d i s t r i b u t i o n , and i n d u s t r i a l a p p a r a t u s ,
E l e c t r i c a l a p p l i a n c e s .......................................... .
I n s u l a t e d w ir e and c a b l e .....................................
E l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t f o r v e h i c l e s ..............
E l e c t r i c la m p s .............................................................
C o m m u n ic a tio n e q u ip m e n t..................................... .
M is c e lla n e o u s e l e c t r i c a l p r o d u c t s ...............

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT............................
A u t o m o b ile s ...................................................................,
A i r c r a f t and p a r t s ...................................................
A i r c r a f t ........................... ........................................... .
A i r c r a f t e n g in e s and p a r t s ........................... .
A i r c r a f t p r o p e l l e r s and p a r t s .................... .
O th e r a i r c r a f t p a r t s and e q u ip m e n t .. . . ,
S h i p and b o a t b u i l d i n g and r e p a i r i n g . . . ,
S h ip b u i l d i n g an d r e p a i r i n g ..........................
G o a t b u i l d i n g and r e p a i r i n g ...........................
R a i l r o a d e q u ip m e n t ...................... .......................... .
O th e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t......................

INSTRUMENTS AN RELATED PRODUCTS............
D
L a b o r a t o r y , s c i e n t i f i c , and e n g i n e e r i n g
in s t r u m e n t s .......................................... *.................... .
M e c h a n ic a l m e a s u r in g and c o n t r o l l i n g
in s t r u m e n t s ..................................................................
O p t i c a l in s t r u m e n t s and l e n s e s .................... .
S u r g i c a l , m e d ic a l, and d e n t a l
in s t r u m e n t s ..................................................................
O p h t h a lm ic g o o d s .......................................................
P h o t o g r a p h ic a p p a r a t u s .........................................
W a tch e s and c l o c k s ...................................................

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..
J e w e l r y , s i l v e r w a r e , and p l a t e d w a r e . . . .
M u s i c a l in s t r u m e n t s and p a r t s .................... ► ,
T o y s and s p o r t i n g g o o d s .......................................
P e n s, p e n c ils , o th e r o f f ic e s u p p lie s . . .,
C o stu m e j e w e l r y , b u t t o n s , n o t i o n s .............
F a b r i c a t e d p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s ......................... .
O th e r m a n u f a c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s .................... .

1,221.6

1,239*2

1 ,260.9

852.7

869.I

912.9

1*07.1
49.2

432.0
53.6
27.1
77.2
28.5
592.1
50.4

276.5
37.5
19.7
59.5

24.3
398.6
36.6

278.4
37.8
20.1
58.9

307.5

75.7
28.2
585.2
50.4

409.5
49.7
26.2
75.1
28.3
600.2
50.2

24.4
413.0
36.5

1,853.1
826.7

1 ,822.1
753.7

1,928.1
856.I

1,364.3
664.7

516.7
165.5

531.6

1,321.3
590.2
548.7
334.8
100.3
l4.l

25.8

806.7
489.7

158.2
20.1

847.2
20.6
144.4
145.8

870.7
177.7

19.0
142.4

519.6

316.4
95.2

13.7

64.8
10.6

U5.1
17.2
58.4
10.6

94.3
124.5
U0.5
14.0
47.3
8.2

335.3

336.9

343.4

70.3

71.6

82.9
13.9

84.1

42.2
24.6
69.5
31.9

41.6
24.6

îS î

129.9
16.6

129.7
16.1

63.3
9.9

493.1

50.0
17.7

88.4
32.2
60-5
88.4
155.9

13.7

69.2

32.1

132.3

222.8

223.4

234.6

71.9

39.5

39.4

41.9

88.1
14.0

55.9
10.3

56.9
10.2

61.9

41.3
24.9
69.3
33.9

28.8

28.4

19.3

19.3

28.8
19.6
44.3

96.1

97.3
33.0
64.1
91.4

32.5

89.9

1 ,438.4
693.7
579.2
351.9
112.8
12.8
101.7
113.1
98.5

8.8

516.7

61.4

62. k
25.I
417.5
36.9

14.6
43.6
8.8

505.5
50.6
17.6

U 0.6

*2.0
21.5

52.0
18.9

157.4

160.0

1,591.8

1,573.0
353.1
IO 5.7

42.7
26.3

13.5
49.5

42.6

26.6

10.5

27.6

405.4
40.0

418.8
41.3

15.1

16.1
82.7

392.9
39.4
15.1
74.7
24.0
48.1
68.8
122.8

70.2
124.8

1,074.3
265.4

1,143.2
264.2

81.8
24.5

49.0

24.7
51.6
73.5

128.9

Nondurable Gooda

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...................

Meat products..................... .
Dairy products....................
Canning and preserving...........
Grain-mill products...............
Bakery products...................
Sugar..............................
Confectionery and related products
Beverages......................... .
Miscellaneous food products...... .

1,519.4
332.1
96.5
193.3
II 5.4
289.5
49.4
85.O
218.4

139.8

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry .




330.7
98.8
261.5
II 6.8
290.7
43.3

85.6

222.1
142.3

215.8

II 6.8
292.I
46.8
86.6
218.1
138.0

65.2
161.8
80.9
170.8
43.9

70.5

120.2
95.6

66.9

228.9

82.2

171.8
37.9
71.3
122.3
97.7

1,125.2
283.8
69.4
184.6

81.8
174.7
40.9
71.7
124.2
94.1

IND USTRY EM PLO YM EN T

9

Table A- 8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by mdustry-Continued
(In

November

In d u s try

th o u sa n d s)
A l l e m p lo y e e s

P r o d u c t io n w o rk e rs *

October

November

November

October

95-7
35.8
32.7
6.5
20.7

103.8

85.8

94.0

32.8

104.7
34.6
34.7

6.5
29.3

6.8
28.6

984.9
5.3

998.I

1,046.7

1957

1957

1956

1957

1957

November
1956

N
ondurable G — C o n t in u e d
oods
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES....................
C i g a r e t t e s .....................................................................
C i g a r s ...............................................................................
T o b a c c o stem m in g and r e d r y i n g ......................

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS...................
Y a r n and t h r e a d m i l l s ..........................................
N arro w f a b r i c s and s m a llw a r e s ......................
K n i t t i n g m i l l s ...........................................................
C a rp e ts,

ru g s,

o th e r f lo o r c o v e r in g s ...

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS...............................
Men’ s and b o y s ' f u r n i s h i n g s and w ork
c l o t h i n g ........................................................................
Women’ s , c h i l d r e n ’ s u n d e r g a r m e n t s ..........
M i l l i n e r y ........................................................................
F u r g o o d s ................................................................ ..
M is c e ll a n e o u s a p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r i e s . .
O t h e r f a b r i c a t e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s .............

35.2

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES.............................

M is c e lla n e o u s c h e m i c a l s .....................................
NOTE:

Data

for

the




current

month

906.2

955.4

5.2
108.4
396.5

1 ,205.9
115.1

1 ,211.0
II9 .I

1 ,226.9
125.1

1 ,072.1
102.8

1,075.2

308.8
354.0

313 .I

311.1
359 .O
I25 .O

2Ö2.2
314.7

285.7
306.6

75.1
1 3 .I
65.3

6 9 .8

16.2
70.6

10.6
58.1
109.6

9.9
58.4
110.4

467.5

470.4

124.1

15.3

78.7

346.8
124.3

18.6
79.7

90.8
53.5
11.7

16.6

13.6

12.8

131.9

131.8

136.6

578.3

580.4

577.0
279.2

164.7

277.1
164.1
139.2

876.1

875.5

868.6

61.7
53.6
231.4

65.6

64.4

276.8

62.8
19 .O

64.8

322.8

63.1
18.9

161.9
135.9

25.6

195.3
77.2
41.4
9.0
47.6

106.1

111.1
I 3.2

111.3

228.6
132.8
109.0

228.3
132.9
106.3

566.8

565.5

469.9
230.6
132.6
106.7

33.9
48.1

49.2

13.8

14.3
37-5

529.4

309.6
107.6

832.2
105.8
309.3
106#
2

832.6
IO 7 .7
316.9
100.2

50.5

5I.O

5O .3

31.1
45.4

32.2

6.6
23.6

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

115.3

563.7
158.7
28.0
34.0

20.0

25.8

59-6

98.6

9.8
58.5

184.1

74.4

8.6

14.5

66.8

188.2

77.3

33.9
41.8

318.1
III .9

25-5
33.8
I87.4
47.9

77.9

8.0

284.6

54.0
227.3
64.5
46.1

32.5
41.4
97.7

1 ,092.1
112.6

160.4

46.7

77.0

51.6

161.5

45.3

827.6

6.2

112.4
422.9
26.3
2OI .5
79.5
44.7
10.3

316.7

13.8
36.0

75.8
P e r t i l i z e r s ...................................................................

893.0
4.6
107.1
391.2
25.0
191.6
76.6

61.0

104.5
D ru g s and m e d i c i n e s ...............................................
S o a p , c l e a n i n g and p o l i s h i n g p r e p a r a ­
t i o n s ................................................................................

26.1

57.1

48.9
10.3
57.1

33.0
5-7

26.8

40.0
9-3
47.6

28.7
2II .9
87.8

II7.2
424.1
29.3

95.7

30.9

18.2

221.7

418.7

53.5
231 .I

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..........

31.1
5.5

5.4

215.7
88.3
50.3
10.2

116.2

324.2

B o o k b in d in g and r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ..........
M is c e ll a n e o u s p u b l i s h i n g and p r i n t i n g
s e r v i c e s ........................................................................

31.0

6.8
121.5
449.9
29.8

62.3

P u lp , p a p e r , and p a p e r b o a r d m i l l s .............
P a p e r b o a r d c o n t a i n e r s and b o x e s ..................

30.6

5.9

136.8

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............

31.2

76.5
8.4
42.7
97.7

37.5
59.1
532.3
71.4
196.9
61.4
31.5
46.5
7.2
24.9

70.5
198.6
62.2

29.3

62.1

1

57-9
545.8
74 .I

3 O .5
47 .I
7 .I

29.8
62.7

30.1
62.8

212.0
58.7

23-4

10

INDUSTRY EM P LO Y M E N T
Table A- 8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by ¡ndustry-Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )

. A l l e m p lo y e e s
In d u s try

November
1957

October
1957

P r o d u c t io n w o rk e rs *

November

November
1957

1956

October
1957

November
1956

N o n d u r a b l e G o o d s — C o n t in u e d

20k.6

2O5 .O

257.9

256.0
203.9

I7 I .5
I3 I.O

173.0
131.2

I33.9

5I .7

52.9

52.1

*0.5

41.8

42.0

and i n n e r t u b e s ........................................

268.9
111.1

O th e r r u b b e r p r o d u c t s ........................................

22.3
I35.5

269.9
111.6
22.1
136.2

251.6
94.6
23.3
133.7

208.6
83.8
18.0
106.8

209.5
84.4
17.7
107.4

194.4
70.1
18.9
IO 5.4

375.4

376 .1

333.*

333.6

19.4

20.1

4.2
I 7 .3

4.0
17.3
215.1
14.6
31.4
15.2

335.2
37.7
3.9

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL........
P e t r o le u m r e f i n i n g ...............................................
C o k e , o t h e r p e t r o le u m and c o a l

RUBBER PRODUCTS... ....................
T ir e s

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS..........
L e a t h e r : ta n n e d , c u r r i e d , and f i n i s h e d .
I n d u s t r i a l l e a t h e r b e l t i n g and p a c k i n g .
B o o t and s h o e c u t s t o c k and f i n d i n g s . .
F o o tw e a r ( e x c e p t r u b b e r ) ................................
L u g g a g e ..........................................................................
H a n d b a g s and s m a ll l e a t h e r g o o d s .............
G lo v e s and m i s c e l l a n e o u s l e a t h e r g o o d s.

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES.....
TRANSPORT AT 1ON.................. ........................................
I n t e r s t a t e r a i l r o a d s ...............................................
C l a s s I r a i l r o a d s ...............................................
L o c a l r a i l w a y s and b u s l i n e s ...........................
O th e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n and s e r v i c e s ..............
Bu s l i n e s , e x c e p t l o c a l ..................................
A i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n (common c a r r i e r ) . . . .

COM UN 1CAT 1ON....................... ......................................
M

256.3

374.9
40.5
5.4

19.5
238.9
17.6
36.0
17.0

239-5

17.5
36.0
17.3

42.2
5-2

239-6
16.4
35.2
17.4

4,123

4,159

4,184

2,714
1 ,081.6

2,747
1 ,115.0
975.2

2,785
1,174.1
1,027-7

943.5
105.2
854.7
672.6
44.2
141.8

807

765.7
40.3
OTHER PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S .............................................

40.4
5-3

36.1

21k. 6
14.7

3 1.7

14.8

-

36.0

175.9

18.0
215.2

14.0

31.0
15.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

107.4
855.1
669.4

108.6
838.6
663.2

44.5
141.5

136.3

809
766.8

803
760.1

603
578.2

519.5
218.6

218.9

132.9

132.5

515 .I
216.1
133.2

41.0

42.0

42.4

-

541

-

—

541
519.0

145.2

E l e c t r i c l i g h t and g a s u t i l i t i e s
co m b in e d ........................................................................
L o c a l u t i l i t i e s , n o t e ls e w h e r e

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.. ......

251.3

251.3
145 .I

596
571.8
247.3
145.2

181.4

1 8 1 .8

179.3

168.0

167.6

165.8

24.1

Gas and e l e c t r i c u t i l i t i e s ................................
E l e c t r i c l i g h t and p o w er u t i l i t i e s ..........

24.3

23-8

21.7

21.7

21.4

602
577-9

.................

11,845

11,664

11,657

WHOLESALE TRADE ..............................................................

3,211

3 ,2 0 0

1 ,858.0
125.8

1,844.8

W h o le s a le r s ,

f u ll-s e r v ic e

and l i m i t e d -

G r o c e r i e s , fo o d s p e c i a l t i e s , b e e r ,
w in e s , and l i q u o r s ...............................................
E l e c t r i c a l g o o d s , m a c h in e r y , h a r d w a r e ,
and p lu m b in g e q u ip m e n t......................................
O th e r f u l l - s e r v i c e and l i m i t e d w h o le s a le d i s t r i b u t o r s ,
NOTE:

Data

for




the

o t h e r . .......................

current month

537

-

-

3,119

2 ,8 1 8

2,808

2,756

1 ,811.2
119.1

1,645-9

1,634.7

111.0

110.8

1 ,613.8

126.2

328.6

324.7

318.1

295-7

291.9

287.6

465-5

466.0

464.1

408.2

409.6

409.8

938.1
1,352.5

927.9
1,354.9

1,307.6

909.9

831.0
1 ,171.6

822.4
1,173.1

1,142.5

are preliminary.

-

104.6

811.8

INDUSTRY EM P LO Y M E N T
Table A - 8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry-Continued
(In thousands)
All employees

Industry

October

November

8,538
1 ,600.2

1,460.7

1,350.2

1 ,502.3

1 ,049.1
551.1
1 ,587.9
1 ,119.0
228.6

9*7.3
513.4
1,537.2
1 ,109.2

867.4

980.9
521.4

October

November

8,634
1,559-8

8,464
1,447.4

1,015.3
544.5
1 ,650.6
1 ,182.5

932.7
514.7
1 ,622.1
1 ,156.6

239.6

235-3

1957

mLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE—

Production workers *

November

November

1957

1957

1956

195b

Continued

RETAIL TRADE........................
Department stores and general mail­
order houses........ ...............
pood and liquor stores...............
Grocery, meat, and vegetable markets.
Dairy-product stores and dealers....
Other food and liquor stores........
Automotive and accessories dealers....
Apparel and accessories stores.......
Other retail trade....................
Furniture and appliance stores......

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE
Security ‘
dealers and exchanges.......
Insurance carriers and agents........
Other finance agencies and real estate..

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS.............
Hotels said lodging places............
Personal services:
Laundries............................
Cleaning and dyeing plants..........
Motion pictures.......................

GOVERNMENT............. .............
FEDERAL^................... .......
Executive.............................
Department of Defense................
Other agencies............. .........
Legisl ative............. .............

228.5

809.6

644.4
3,969.2
402.3
382.3

2,356

626.1
83.8
865.0
781.1

230.2

380.2

2,356
623.4

200.6

227.4
723.7
594.5
-

240.1
804.1
655.8
3,889.5
402.8
354.9

2,314
594.9

801.6
625.9

3,967.0
397 .'6

83.8
861.6
787.1

6,547
487.9

324.8

327.7

218.3

201.6
226.9

717.1
576.3
363.4

720.7
609.9
370.1
338.9

362.0

163.8
220.2

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_
—

331.7

163.6
226.6

203.0
223-0

_

6,327
488.2

162.1

1,482.6
1,054.1

_
_
_

82.9
828.5
807.9

6,515
480.4

368.1

363.6

482.8
1 ,509.8
1 ,083.8

_
“

~

7,499

7,473

7,334

_

_

-

2,148
2 ,120.9

2,156
2 ,128.9

2,201

4.5

_
-

_
-

_
-

961.2

533.8
625.9

22.1

4.6

971.5

526.6
630.8
22.0
4.6

2,174.7
1,037.5
518.9

618.3
22.0

State..................... ..... .......

5,351
1,371.4
3,979.9

5,317
1,359.8
3,957.1

5,133
1,322.7
3 ,810.2

-

_
-

-

2,489-9
2,861.4

2,448.9

—

-

2 ,868.0

2,316.4
2 ,816.5

-

Other.................................

STATE AND LOCAL ........................

.

Data are prepared by the U. S. Civil Service Commission and relate to civilian employment only.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

U

* For
m a n u fa c t u r in g , d a t a r e f e r t o p r o d u c t io n a n d r e la t e d v o r k e r s ; f o r c o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t io n , t o
c o n s t r u c t io n v o r k e r a ; a n d f o r a l l o t h e r In d u s t r ie s * t o n o n s u p e r v is o r y v o r k e r a .




SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT; MILITARY PERSONNEL
Table A-9: Employees in private and Government shipyards,
by region
(In thousands)

Region

November

—

October

November

1957

1957

1956

223.5

223.7

215.6

PRIVATE YARDS...............................................................................................
NAVY YARDS......................................................................................................

129.9
93.6

129.7
94.0

115.1
100.5

NORTH ATLANTIC...............................................

93.2
50.9
42.3

93.9
51.4
42.5

90.5
46.2
44.3

SOUTH ATLANTIC...............................................

36.0

36.0

36.4

17.5

18.5

17.5

18.5

16.6
19.8

32.8

32.5

27.3

48.4

15.6
32.8

48.4
15.4
33.0

52.0
15.6

6.7

6.5

4.5

6.4

6.4

4.9

ALL REGIONS............................................

GULF:
PACIFIC......................................................

36.4

GREAT LAKES:
INLAND:

^ The North Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Connecticut,
Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New. Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and
Vermont.
The South Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Florida,
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
The Gulf region includes all yards bordering on the Gulf of Mexico in the following States: Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas.
The Pacific region includes all yards in California, Oregon, and Washington.
The Great Lakes region includes all yards bordering on the Great Lakes in the following States: Illinois,
Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
The Inland region includes all other yards.
— / Data include Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard.

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

Table A-10: Federal military personnel
(In thousands)

November

TOTAL U .....................................................

refer

Data

to

for




forces

the

both

current

in

month

continental
are

United

preliminary.

States

1956

935.9

889.8

639.2
193.5

Marine Corps...............................................
Coast Guard................................................

•i/ D a t a

November

1957

2,689

Air Force..................................................

NOTE:

October

1957

Branch

30.2
and

abroad.

2,729
955.3

902.1

646.8
194.9
30.3

2,827
1,002.4
918.3
675.0

202.1
28.8

13

STATE EM P LO Y M E N T
Table A -11: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State
(In thousands)
TOTAL
State
Mov.

7*2.1
27 O .9
337.1
*,5*1.2
*75.0
929.O
I5I.I

737-4

272.6

Arkansas................

332.6
4,495.4

470.2

Connecticut.............

924.9
149.5

District of Columbia 1/...

Mining

1 957
Öct.

507.5

505.7

1956
Ho t .
743.4
257.7
334.1
4,469.0

465.1
914.7
I55 .I

505.5

Nov.

15.6

16.3
6.3
36 .I

15.9
(2 )
(3)

(3)
7.5

1957

Oct.

15.6

16.4
6.4

36.1
16.2
(2 )
(3)

(3)
7.5
4.9
4.4

1,079.2
985.3
146.6
3,538.8
1,427.3

10.1

659.0

657.6

30.2
10.5

555.1
-

563.7

554 .O
-

17.9

18.2

-

786.0

781.8

776 .1

1,109.3

1,137.5
978.9
145.5
3,495.3
1,416.8

Illinois................
Indiana.................
Iova...................
Kansas.................
Kentucky................
Louisiana...............
Maine..................
Maryland................

3,514.8
1,428.7

655.0

Georgia................

978.5
149.9

*.8

4.4
30 .O
3.6

(*)
46.8

3.8

37.7
47.3

Contract construction
1956
Nov.
14.6

40.1

16.2

23.6
18.1

6.4
37.3

16.5
(2 )
(3)

19.2
39.3
45.1
.5

38.9
7 O .2
I 3.5

16.1

17.9

Minnesota...............
926.7
Mississippi.............
369.4
Missouri................ 1,290.9
Montana.................
164.9
Nebraska................
354.5
Nevada.................
83.8
Nev Hampshire...........
182.8

939.8
372.8
1 ,291.0
I70 .O
357.6

918.6

20.1

21.8

20.1

4.3

167.9

*.3
8.7
9.6

359.0
84.4
184.2

2.1

2 .1

4.3
9.0
12.5

3.5

3.6

.2

New Jersey..............
Nev Mexico..............
Nev York................
North Carolina...... .
North Dakota............
Ohio...................
Oklahoma 1/ .............

1,894.6

1,905.1

209.9
6 ,063.7
1 ,096.3
120.1
3 ,120.1
575.9

210.2

*.5
I 6.5

6,076.9
1,104.8

1,944.5
200.5
6 ,171.6
1,112.5

123.2

118.8

373.4
1,301.7

86.5
186.5

10.7

3.9

1.8
21.7

3,148.9
576.2

3,194.6
573.1

487.0
3,793.5
282.5
530.7

485.9

1 .1

3,855.3
295.7
535-9

85.3
(3)
1.3

2,481.7

854.8
2 ,487.0

864.8
2,458.7

243.1
IOO .7
1 ,009.2

246.2

103.2

237.9
104.1
989.7
784.9
504.6
1,147.7

471.6

Pennsylvania............ 3 ,7 77 .5
Rhode Island............
280.4
South Carolina..........
530.6
South Dakota 1/..........
130.4
Tennessee...............
849.7
Utah...................
Vermont.................
Washington..............
West Virginia...........

788.8
500.0
1 ,136.1
Wyoming...... ..........
87.2
See'footnotes
NOTE:

Data

at

for

end
the




of

131.6

1,010.9

810.0

504.5
1,142.0

89.6

130.9

table.

current

month

are

preliminary.

85.8

48.3

2.6
8.6
130.3
15.5

1.3

19.2
1.9
79.4
3.8
8.5

(3)

35.1
53.8
12.3

206.4

16.5

(3)

20.2
283.2

10.0
213.5

1,859.7
2,482.9

.6
2.6

44.7
22.4

1 7 .O
119.0

1,840.1
2,338.2

Michigan................

283.7

1956
Nov.

16.7
117.5

.6
2.6

279.5

880.8

277.8
33.1
53.7
11.9

Oct •
40.4
23.7

1957

(3)
7.5
*.9
*.9
30.7
10.7
3.2

888.2

275.3
880.9
1 ,825.8
2,370.3

Ho t .

2.6

(3)

55.3
9-5

76.3
37.6

68.2
85.6
109.7

79.4
39.7

197.*
7*.3
39.3

41.4

35.*

-

70.2

14.4

70.6
89.3

117.8

.2

.2

6.5
9.5

7.4
10.3

4.5
16.6
11.2

4.8
16.4

112.4

1 1 .1

IO5 .O
I5 .7

265.2

15.7
276.6

1.8
22.0

1.8
22.6
50.2

52.9
10.9
I7 I.O
34.0

53.7
13 .I
184.8
34.6

1.2

1.3
94.6
(3)

177.6
18.4

3.8

48.8
86.4
(3)
1.3

5.0

4.1

22.5

17 .5

57.9

2.2

9.7

17.2
118.4
5* .7

58.2
17.2
68.6
12.1
20.0

8.8

15.6
292.3
32.5
52.4

64.7

17.9

71.3
14.1

21.0

24.5

185.4
18.1

10.0

-

65.3
14.6
73.0
87.9
125 .O
56.9

16 .I

73.8

12.6
21.3
6.2
9.9
112.2
I 6 .I
263.8
58.3
I O .3

I72 .7

31.8

24.4
189.3

17.8
28.1

1.2
2.6

28.2

130.3

131.8

155.2

167.2

168.4

15.9
1.3
19.4
1.9

15.8

15.7

16.4

16.3
5.0

2.6

8.7

80.8

3.9
8.7

9.4

1.4

18.5

2.4
84.2
4.2
8.7

8.4
39.7

27.9
9.8
42.3

5.4
69.3
43.1

71.8

59.2
7.1

62.3

28.8

5.5

46.7
29.9
7.4

10.3
42.5

68.6
47.0
24.9

60.6
6.8

STATE E M P LO Y M E N T
Table A-ll: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State-Continued
(In thousands)
State

Manufacturing
I95t>
1957
Hov.
Ho t .
Oct.
240.0
39.9

85.7

1,207.4
74.4
416.7

60.9
District of Columbia 1 / ......

16.9

168.3

326.1

25.4
Illinols•••••••••••••••••••••• 1,236.5
596.8
162.4

126.1
(4)

151.6

104.1
Massachusetts.................

265.9

677.4
1,014.1

244.0
40.1

88.6
1,254.7
75-3
422.1
61.4

16.8
161.3

325.4
27.5
1,255.3
607.5
165.4
129.1
163.3
149.3

106.1
270.2
685.8
962.0

247.5
37.3
89.2
1,239.0
74.2
435.1
60.3

West Virginia.................

235.5

236.7
90.4
319.9
41.8

Wyoming.......................

S e e ' f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h




are

1,972.7
481.8

6.6
1 ,368.2
91.6
138.8

1,534.2

127.2
230.2

21.2

38.5

8.8

10.3

152.2

151.3
20.4
500.9

62.8
13.2
220.6

62.9
13.6
222.0
50.1

20.4
499.1

49.9
46.5
304.8
15 .O
25.2
9.7
57.5
230.3

36.5
38.5
264.0

22.8
8.2

209.2

6 3.1
51.6

preliminary.

132.4
460.5
7.1

90.7

74.9
12.7

46.9
309.1
15.1
24.8
9.9
58.5

127.0
21.6

39.4
9.1
10.5

155.8

20.2
506.7

62.7

13.4

222.6
50.0
49.1
319.5

15.8

88.2

315.0
41.4
9T .7

18.2

34.1
348.2
46.3
1,344.8
227.9
39.5

638.1

145.9
109.2
752.1
53.1

25.7

109.0

230.0

59.8
231.7

201.6
692.6

22.8

22.4

57.7
20.4

8.3
90.9
64.0

10.0

8.2
90.0

75.8

52.0

64.3
51.7
75.8

13.0

12.8

39.4

236.9

187-9
92.1

251.0
19.6

140.5

135.3
138.4

236.7

38.9
35.4

131.2

136.6

89.4
27 .O

77-4

12.4
299.7
479.8

449.8
7.4

180.6

37.4
750.5
304.0
179.7

92.1
25.9
123.9
21.4
38.9
9.0
10.3

8 3 .1
20.6

224.9
12.3
290.4
481.5

230.3

304.1

94.1

320.6
222.8

90.5

823.6
19.8

265.7

91.0
330.6
220.3
38.3
743.0

25-3
124.7

784.8

37.3
34.1
263 .I
214.2
128.4
444.9
7.2

56.4
196.6
386.6

28.9

393.2
485.2

783.7

Utah..........................

21.0
78.6
120.8

123.2
159.1
29.0

383.8
471.8

82.7

287.4
480.7

21.0
76.2

122.8

ltfr.l

477.3

82.1

12.3

136.5
(4)
188.4

83.2

1,013.4

153.8

58.1
5-6
83.7

140.4

56.7
85.4

154.3
64.3

150.1

58.5
5.0

1 ,496.0
118.2

55.6
83.2

155.5
67.7
81.3
1,018.5

119.9

57.7
5.0

131.0

61.6

68.7
82.2

1956
Ho t .

118.2
151.0

21.8

1,479.5
114.7
223.5

93.0
343.2
222.4
37-9
752.4
307.2
I8I .2

60.5

22.0

86.8

28.9
90.5
73.7
15.5
309.0
101.4
5**7

15.6

155.8

Oct.

169.9
155.1
110.3
279.1
712.4
1,105.4

387.4

North Dakota..................
6.4
Ohio.......................... 1,293.6
Oklahoma 1/...................
87.0

29.1
90.9
73.5

58.1
(4)

1957

1,027.4
123.2
169.3
29.1

126.3

29.4

Ho t .

50.1
21.9
29.4
362.7
*5.5
44.7
10.9

307.3
99.8
53.7

222.7
107.7
391.0

1,893.3
480.6
6.4
1,312.5

28.1

365.9
45.1
46.5
10.3

Wholesale and
retail trade

50.3
21.6
28.4
368.3
*5.5
46.6
10.3

93.8
73.4
15.4
306.9
99.4
52.7

223.6
107.6

22.0

50.3
21.5

16.3
157.6
337.7
27.9
1,297.3
617.3
168.3

218.2
106.1
386.8
21.0

2 1.7
New York...................... 1 ,869.3
North Carolina................
472.0

Transportation and
public utilities
19!57
1956
Ho t .
Nov.
Oct.

185.6
56.5

191.2

88.8
311.9
42.1
98.O
18.7
34.5

186.7

57.2

192.0

100.0
18 .1
33.8

348.3
45.7
1,319.4
226.9
39.6
630.4
144.5

359.6
44.4
1 ,380.8
231.3

110.6

114.4
748.5
55.4

738.8
52.3
108.9
39.2
199.5

685.9
57.3

20.2

231.9
187.4
90.7
248.0

20.0

38.8

642.8
142.2

110.0

39.6
201.9
670.9

56.1
20.0
230.6
185.7

91.8

251.4
18.4

15

STATE E M PLO YM EN T
Table A-11: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State-Continued

1956

27.7
10.8
10.3
220.0
21.4
51.5
5-5

27.2
10.0
10.1
218.8
21.2
48.0
5.3

68.7
35-5
38.9
605.6
61.4
101.6
14.9

69.O
34.5
38.9
606.6
62.3
102.8
15.6

66.9
31.9
38.3
579.9
58.2
93.3
15.5

139.3
56.4
63.1
755.6
96.0
85.4
17.0

139.6
56.1
63.0
753.8
96.4
85.1
17.1

138.1
53.7
61.9
725.6
93.8
82.0
16.9

24.5
58.5
1*0.6
4.9
178.5
50.8
31.2

24.5
57.8
40.5
4-9
179.0
50-9
31.3

24.4
55.8
39.5
4.7
174.1
49.6
29.8

73.0
167.8
95.0
18.3
417-9
113.4
75-5

72.9
162.5
95.7
18.5
419.8
113.9
75.9

70.7
155.0
94.4
17.9
412.6
111.9
75.1

254.0
180.9
161.3
29.7
366.7
162.8
110.9

254.4
179.7
160.3
30.7
366.8
162.5
108.7

253.6
173.8
157.6
28.3
367.1
158.1
107.6

20.4
(4)
28.3
8.6
39.8
97.6
76.3

20.3
20.6
28.3
8.7
39.8
97.1
76.3

19.9
20.0
27.7
8.7
39.1
92.7
74.6

58.3
(4)
89.1
26.5
102.9
230.3
246.8

58.5
72.1
89.6
27.3
103.1
235.6
250.2

58.7
69.1
86.1
26.8
100.2
227.3
246.6

98.9
(4)
128.5
45.0
127.5
230.1
278.7

99.1
105.5
128.3
44.9
127.I
228.6
274.0

97-6
102.6
124.7
44.6
123.6
225.4
274.4

45.5

45.5

63.4
5-9
21.0
2.6
6.3

63.3
5.9
21.0
2.6
6.3

43.4
10.9
63.2
5.8
20.7
2.4
6.1

119.8
39.3
157.5
21.6
46.1
23.1
19.4

119*5
39.7
159.6
22.1
46.4
24.0
21.3

117.3
39.1
156.1
20.9
46.2
21.8
19.1

137.7
78.0
166.2
32.1
71.4
16.1
20.9

137.1
77.6
164.8
32.7
71.7
16.2
20.8

132.2
77.9
161.7
30.9
71.0
16.2
20.9

83.9
7.8
455.4
36.7
5.1
104.9
21.9

84.0
7.7
452.1
36.7
5.1
105.1
21.9

81.5
6.8
444.5
35.2
5.0
103.3
21.7

211.5
25.5
840.7
96.8
16.3
303.5
66.0

214.7
25.8
844.5
96.9
16.6
304.6
66.5

202.6
24.0
835.0
97.4
16.0
302.3
65.O

205.6
56.0
778.4
143.3
27.0
366.6
122.9

205.I
56.3
778.9
143.3
27.0
367.5
123.0

204.4
52.8
756.9
141.7
26.9
360.0
120.6

17.8
141.6
12.7
15.7
5.3
31.2
114.2

District of Columbia 1/ ¿/....

IS•57
H o t . ..-Q£Ll .-

27.6
10.7
10.2
219.6
21.1
51.6
5-4

State

(In thousands)
Finance, insurance,
Service and
and real estate
miscellaneous
1956
1956
1957
19
Hot .
Nov.
Oct.
Hot .
Oct.
Nov.

17.9
142.0
12.6
15.7
5.3
31.4
114.2

18.5
138.6
12.6
15.4
5.2
30.8
111.3

56.7
431.1
30.4
42.2
17.9
91.8
302.4

58.3
432.4
29.7
42.4
18.1
92.O
303.9

55.9
418.7
30.3
42.7
17.1
92.3
293.0

86.8
405.5
36.1
85.5
34.9
131.9
376.0

87.2
403.4
36.5
84.8
34.6
132.0
374.0

83.5
411.9
36.6
82.6
33.8
128.4
371.8

9.8
3.4
42.5
33.4
12.3
42.0
2.3

9.8
3.5
42.9
33.4
12.3
42.1
2.4

9.4
3.4
41.3
33.2
12.2
40.5
2.2

27.3
12.2
110.8
91.2
45.4
119.9
10.1

27.7
13.1
111.9
92.7
45.2
120.7
10.8

25.8
11.9
103.0
89.3
44.6
117.3
10.4

57.0
16.0
176.7
154.0
62.0
140.3
19.7

57.4
16.1
176.4
153.6
62.4
139.4
19.9

55.6
15.9
173.7
153.8
62.8
137.4
19.4

11.0

Utah.......................

11.0

Government
___

1/ Revised series; not strictly comparable with previously published data. 2/ Mining combined vlth construction*
¿ / M i n i n g combined with service, 4/ Hot available.
Federal employment In Maryland and Virginia portions of
Washington, D. C M e t r o p o l i t a n area included In data for District of Columbia. NOTE: Data for the current month
are preliminary.

453173 0 - 5 8 - 4




16

A R E A EM PLO YM EN T
Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division

Area and Industry
division
ALABAMA
Birmingham
Total...................
Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............
Mobile
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service 1/..............
Government..............
ARIZONA
Phoenix
Total...................
Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............
Tucson
Total...................
Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............
ARKANSAS
Little RockN. Little Rock
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service 1 / ..............
Government..............
CALIFORNIA
Fresno
Manufacturing..........

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and Industry
19SL
division
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Los Angeles-Long Beach

202.3
10 .7

8.9

65.5

16.5

*7.3

12.2
22.2

205.1
10.7

8.9
67.9

16.7

*7.3
12-3

208.1
9.7
13.5

68.8

16.7
*6.9
12.1

19.2

22.3
19.1

21.9
18.7

9*-7
5.8
22.5

95.0
5.9
22.5

93.3
7.1

19.8

19.2

19.2

19.6

11.0
*.2

9.9

22.2

11.1

*.2
10.0

22.3

10.8

Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service.................

9.5
22.5

135.*
.3

Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....

23.3
10.5
39.9
7.3

23.3
10.5
39.3
7.3

21.5
10.5

26.2

25.9

2*.*

11.0

18.8

10.8

18.0

36.6
6.8

16.7

58.5

58.0
2.3
5.5
9.5
*.9
13.*

*.9
9.2
5.1
13.3

9.1
11.7

8.7
11.7

2 .0

2.0

Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....

75.0
5.7

75.0

13.0

13.0

7.9
19.1
*.9

7.9
18.5
*.9

13.9

13.9

10.6

11.9

6.2

10.7

1*.2

8 .1

19.3
*.9
10.5

13.6

16.6

232.5

137.7
.5
9.7

1*1.0

135.0

17.0
12.3
28.6

.5

.6

12.5

9.9
15.3
13.1

10.1
20.1
28.2

28.0

5.5

5.*
12.3
51.9

51.9

5.3
11.5
51.3

31.6

32.1

30.3

222.6
.2

218.0
.2

.2

13.7

66.8
12.3
*7.5

*5.7

12.2

13.7

68.0
12.2
*6.5
10.1

26.4
*5.5

14.2

65.*

11.9
*5.6

10.0

25.9

**.8

San Franc Iseo-Oakland
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

Government..............

7*.l
*.9
12.9

2*7.3

10.1
26.0

2.2

1.8
8 .1
10.6

195é

Nov.

2, 182.1 2, 190.1 2, 166.0
15.6
15.3
15.3
123.0
126.*
130.3
76*. 0
737.2
7*9.7
1*2.2
1*2.5
137.9
*80.8
*86.3
*75.3
H 3.7
113.3
109.3
31*. 8
301.1
31*. 9

San Diego

55.2

2.3
5.6
9.2
*.9
13.7

Oct.

222.3

Government..............

128.3
.2
11.6

1957

Sacramento

San BernardinoRivers ide-Ontario

137.3
.3

Nov.

2*9.5

*.2

See’fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




Contract construction...

Number of emxjloyees

9*5.2
1.9
53.6

190.0
110.5

219.6
66.0
123.0
180.6

San Jose

137.*
Contract construction^..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....

.1
10.7
te .7
9.2

28.9
6.0
18.7
21.1

956.7
1.9
5*.5
201.4
111.3
217.7

66.0

123.*

180.5

1*1.2
.1
10.8
*8.2
9.3

950.5
1.9

62.8

19*.*
108.7

216.8
66.9
120.1
178.9

127.1

.1

11.4
38.4
8.5

28.3

26.9

18.6
20.1

18.5

5.8

5.8
17.5

17

A R E A E M P LO Y M E N T
Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued

Area and industry
division
CALIFORNIA — Continued
Stockton
Manufacturing......

COLORADO
Denver
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government..........

CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport
Total...................
Contract construction i j
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............
Hartford
Total...................
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing..........
Trane. and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............
Nev Britain
Total...................
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade.......... ........
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............
Nev Haven
Total...................
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
.2221
division
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.
Stamford

11.1

15.4

270.3
2.7
20.5
51.7

279.5
2.7

21.1
52.0
29.8

29.6

79.4
l6.0
35.8
42.7

79.7

15.8

35.7
42.6

12.1

273.6
3.1

21.0
50.6

29.3

78.0

15.2
33.9
42.5

124.8
7.2

68.2
6.0

21.3
3.0

127.1

68.9
6.0
21.1

124.1
7.1

73*6

3.0
10.3

10.2
8.3

8.2

217.7

217.8
12.0

79.3

80.9
8.5
44.7

11.8
8.6

45.9
30.3

6.2

6.0
20.8
2.9
9.8

7.9

214*4

11.0
81,8
8*7

44.1

28.8

19.1

30.0
22.8
18.9

42.4
1.7

43.0
1.7

43.9
1.5

22.8

26.9
2.2
6.1
.8
3.0
2.5

26.3
2.2
6.2
.8

2.9
2.4

21.7

18.3

28.1
2.2
6.1
.8
2.8

2.4

129.1
9.2

126.2
8.0

12.9
25.2

24.3

7.3
19.1
9.4

128.3
9.0
45.5

9.1

46.1

12.8

25.3
7.2

19.0
9.5

S e e ’ o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .
f
NOTE: D a t a for the cu r r e n t mo n t h




Number of employees
1957
195k
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

are

46.7

13.0

6.8
18.3

preliminary.

Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing........ ..
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service...............
Government.......... .

56.1

56.1

4.0

5.0
21.5
3.1
11.7
1.9
8.9
4.0

67.2

67.3

4.9
21.4
3.1

12.0
2.0
8.8

53.4
4.4
21.3
3.0

11.1
1.8
8.1
3.7

Waterbury
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing........
Trane. and pub. util....
Finance..... .
Service...... ..........
DELAWARE
Wilmington
Total...... ............
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trane. and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service 1/..............
Government..............

2.5
39.6

2.8
10.8
1.5
4.8
5.1

129.0
10.2
58.9
9.3
23.3
5.0
11.4
10.9

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Washington 2 /
Total................... 660.0
Contract construction...
38.0
Manufacturing..........
27.5
Trane. and pub. util.... 45.2
140.3
Finance.................
34.4
101.4
Government.............. 273.2
FIX® IDA
Jacksonville
133.5
9.2
19.9
14.8
40.9
Finance................. 11.4
Service \ j..................
17.3
20.3

Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....

2.6
39.8
2.8
10.7
1.5

4.8
5.1

128.7
10.5
58.5

9.2
22.9

5.1
11.5

11.0

68.3

2.3
41.9
2.7

10.6

1.4
4.4
5.0

134.1
15.1
58.3
9.9
23 .O
4.9

11.8
11.1

38.6

657.1
41.5

27.3
45.0
137.5
34.4
101.4
273.7

44.1
140.9
33.9
97.5
272.3

657.9

133.2
9.7
19.5
14.8
40.7

26.9

20.3

131.1
9.6
20.3
14.8
39.8
10.5
l6.4
19.7

276.3

263.5

11.2
17.2

Miami
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....

283.4

24.2
37.6
37.0

25.2
36.0
34.5

26.4
33.3
34.2

A R E A EM P LO Y M E N T

18

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued
(In thousands)
Area and industry
division
FLORIDA — C antinued
Miami— Continued
Trade.................. .
Finance................ .
Service 1 / ....................... .
Government.............
Tampa-St. Petersburg
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util
Trade...................
Finance.- -..............
Service 2 / .............
Government.............
GEORGIA
Atlanta
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util«...
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service l / ..............
Government..............
Savwnnfth
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing......... .
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service 1 / .........................
Government.............
IDAHO
Boise
Total........ ..........
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service 1 /.........................
Government..............
ILLINOIS
Chicago
Total...................
Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trane. and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............

Number of employees
1956
1957
Nov.
Oct.
Nov.

Number of employees
1956 _
1957
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.

Peoria

81.9
16.1

56.4
30.5

172.8
19.2
31.8
12.9

56.0
8.5

23.6
21.0

77.6

80 .I
I 5.9

15 .1

49.7
27.4

54.5
30.3

I68.8

19.4
31.0
12.8

53.8
8.3
23 .O

158.7
I8 .I
28.2
12.2
5I .5
7.8
21.5
I 9.6

20.6

346.6

344.2

346.4

19.7
87.1

20.3

Trans. and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service 1/ ..............

102.0
4.9
46.0
6.8
22.6
3.6
10.0
8.2

104.0
5.1
48.0
6.8
22.7
3.6
9.9
8.1

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

75.9
4.7
41.9
2.7
2.6
7.1
4.1

77.3
4.3
43.6
2.7
1 3 .I
2.6
7.1
4.0

68.2

Contract construction...

1.7
4.2

68.4
1.7
4.3

69.9
1.6
4.3

28.2

28.5

98 .O
4.8
42.3
6.7
22.5
3.6
9.9
8.2

Rockford
Contract construction l/
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Service.................
Government..............

12.9

18.8
90.8

34.8

92.6
25 .I

43.5
43-8

54.9
4.2

15.2
6.1
12.7

2 .1

7.4
7.2

23.1

1.8
2.0
2.8

7.0
1.4
3.3
4.8

2,626.4
3.8
134.7
1 ,001.8

219.3
560.9
145.5
328.4

232.0

85.3
34.4
9I .7
24.9
43.8
43.8

34.6

92.8

24.2
43.3
41.9

55.4
4.3
I 5.5
6.3

54.5
3.9
14.7
6.5
13.1

12.6
2 .1
7 .3

2.0

7.3
7.0

7.3

22.5

23.3
1.9

1.8
2.0

2.0
2.8

2.7

7.1
1.4
3.3
4.8

1.4
3.3
4.5

2,635.8

2,662.4
3.7

136.9
1 ,013.0

136.1

3.8

224.2
551.3
145.7
328.5
232.4

INDIANA
Evansville
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service 4 / ..............
Fort Wayne
Contract construction...
Manuf ac turing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service 5 / ..............
Indianapolis

1,046.5

225.8
557.5
143.0
320.5
229.3

4.8
14.9
2.2
12.2

78 .O
3.3
33.5
7.3
I7 .7
3.9
12.3

4.7
14.8
2.2
12.2

78.7
3.5
34.0
7.4

17.6

29.6
5.0
15.1

2.2
12.1

81.6
3.4
36.7
7-5

18.4

3 7

3.9
12.3

11.9
293.4
14.5

Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trane, and pub. util....

293.4
14.0
IO 6.7
22.1

294.3
14.5

107.7

109.0

Finance.................
Service 4/ ..............

67.6
I8.4
64.6

66.2
18.3
65 .o

17.5
63.2

6.8

S e e'footn otes at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry .




Area and Industry
division

22.6

22.6
66.6

South Bend
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service ^ ..............

83.6
3.1
41.8
4.7
15.8
3.5
14.7

84.3
3.2
42.7
4.7

15.7

3.5
l*-5

84.8
3.5
43.1
4.8
15.8
3.5
14.1

19

A R E A E M P LO Y M E N T
Table A-12. Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued

Area and industry
division

(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
1956
1957
division
Nov.
Oct.
Nov.
New Orleans

IO A
W

Dee Moines
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service J / ..........
Government..........

KANSAS
Topeka
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government..........
Wichita
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.................
Finance..............
Service...............
Government.......... .
KENTUCKY
Louisville
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Trade........ ..........
Finance.................
Service 1 / ..............
Government..............
LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge
Total...................
Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............

100.6

5.8
22.5
7.8
27.7

10.5
13.0
13.5

100.7
6.2
22.9
7.8
27.5

10.6
13.2
12.8

98.1

5.4
22.3
7.8

26.8
10.2
12.9
12.9

Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............

MAINE
Lewi 8ton
50.3

.2
5.7

6.2

7.2

10.0
2.6

50.9
.2

48.9

.2

4.1
6.3
7.3
9.9
2.5
5.9

6.4

6.0
7.3
9.9

2.6

5-8

5.8

12.8

12.8

12.8

132.4
1.9

135^
1.9
7.6

127.9
1.9
7.4
54.5
7.5

6.9
58.6

7.4

26.3

5.1
14.5
11.9

61.0

7.4

26.2
5.1
14.5
11.9

26.6

4.9
13.4
11.9

286.4
7.4

20.0
49.3
46.1
73.7
14.1
41.4
34.6

286.3
7.5

20.0
50.0

46.0
72.9
14.0
41.4
34.7

286.5
6.9
21.3
49.5
45.9
74.4
14.0
40.0
34.7

29.4

Finance.................
Service 1 / ..............
Government..............

28.3
1.1
15.0
1.0

28.5
1.1
15.0
1.0

.8

.8

3.5
1.3

3.7
1.3

3.5
1.4

52.6

3.6
12.5
6.3
14.8
3.5

53.2
3.8
12.9
6.4
14.8
3.5

53.7
4.2
12.9

8.0

3.8

8.0

3.9

3.8

609.0

607.5
.9
43.9
204.9

56.8

30.5

124.7
30.6
69.3
76.4

610.7
.9
45.8
211.4
59.0
125.4
29.5
67.2
71.5

1,017.9

Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....

1,019.8
51.1

1,025.1
51.2

5.6

5.6

1.2
15.8
1.0
5.7

.8

Portland
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service l/.............
Government..............

8.0

6.5

14.8
3.5

MARYLAND
Baltimore
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

242.9

71.8

71.4
.5
9.5
20.2

•y
9.5

20.2

4.2
15.7

2.6

6.5
12.7

15.9
88.9
23.3
55.6
10.3
25.9
23.0

4.2
15.4

2.6
6.6
12.6

254.1
14.3
99.5
23.5
57.3

10.2
26.1
23.3

66.9

.5
7.0
19.T
4.0

15.0
2.5
6.4
11.9

See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....

Number of employees
1956
1957
Nov.
Oct.
Nov.

Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............

•9
42.7
201.5
58.3

128.2
70.0
76.9

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Finance.................
Service 1 / ..............
Government..............

50.0
282.8
73.1
252.9
72.4
156.3
130.4

286.2

298.1

250.2
71.6

250.2
69.4
151.2

74.0

157.1

129.6

75.6

129.4

20

A R E A EM P LO Y M E N T
Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued
( In thousands)
Area and industry
d iv is io n

MASSACHUSETTS- -Continued
FallRiver
Total.................
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Government...........
Other nonmanufacturing
Nev Bedford
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans. and pub. util..
Trade.................
Government...........
Other nonmanufacturing

Sprlngfleld-Holyoke
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing....... .
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade................ .
Finance..............,
Service 1 / .......... .
Government...........,
Worcester
Total................ .
Contract construction.
Manufacturing....... .
Trans, and pub. util*.
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service \ ! ...........
Government...........

MICHIGAN
Detroit
Total...................
Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............

Flint
Manufacturing.

Number o f employees

Nov.

JL951

Oct,

Nov.

Number o f employees

1957

Oct.

H o v.

I 195é
Nov.

Grand Rapids
Manufacturing

25.6
2.7

8.1

3.0
6.9

*9.8

1.6
27.6
2.5

8.2

3.6
6.3

*5.8
25.1
2.7

8.0

50.2
1.7

28.0
2 .*
8 .1

71.3

35.1
7.3

3**5
7.3

17.*

17.5

*.3
*7.9

8.2
17.8

108.3
*.5
*9.2

6.0
20 .*

1.6
28.2
2.6
8.3
3.6

11.8
11.6

6.1

169.0
8 .*
75.6
8.7
3**5
7.1
17.5
17.2

111.1
5.1
51.7
5.8

6.0
20.1

5.1
11.7
11.5

1,27*.3

.8
62.5
562.1
80.0
258.8
18 .1
*
1 *1.0
120.8

8*.*

5.1

*7.8

5* *5

Lansing
Manufacturing

25.9

23.1

28.3

Muskegon
Manufacturing

2*.5

2*.2

26.6

25.1

2*.9

25.2

**.1
3.3
9*3
7.2
11.3

*5.2
3.5
9.6
7.7
11.3

2.0

2.0

6.7
*.3

6.7
*.3

*6 .1
3.3
10.5
7.7
11.7
1.9
6.9

512.5
27.1
1 *5-0
51.*
129.5

51*.9

512.6

28.7

27.5
1*9-3

50.3

3.6
6 .*

70.2
8.2

106.9

3.1
6.9

6.9

16*.2
7.6

17.6

26.0
2.8
8 .*

3.1

163.0
7.2

*7.2

*8.3

Saginaw
Manufacturing

*6.3

21.0
*•9
11.3
11.3

1,243*0

1,3*3.0

.8

MINNESOTA
Duluth
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 / ...........
Government...........
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.,
Trade................
Finance..............,
Service l / .......... .
Government.......... .
MISSISSIPPI
Jackson
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

6*.*
62.0

1*7.7
51.7
128 .*
33.0
63.9
61.3

57.*

57.6

3 3 .0

.8

3.7
10.5

*.6

15.5
3.6
7.8

67 .O
53*. 2
79.*
252.*
18 .1
*
1 *2.2
118.8

71.1
613.7
81 .*

267.6

*7.9
1*1.5

119.0

76.8

86.6

MISSOURI
Kansas City
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

.8
*.2
10.5

*.6
15 .*
3.6
7.8

11.1

10.9

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)

.8

See'footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




Area and industry
division

*.2

50.8
131.2
31.6

62.7
59.6

57.2

.8

3.8
10.9

*.6

15.5
3.6
7.7
10.5

3*8.7

.8
19.3
96.7

**.0

9*.3
20.7
* 0.6
32.3

21

A R E A EM P LO Y M E N T
Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued
(In thousands)
Number of employees
Area and industry
195b
1957
division
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.

Area and industry
division
MISSOURI— Continued
St. Louie
Total...................
Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans. and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............
MONTANA
Great Falls
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans. and pub. util....
Trade...............
Service 6y ..............
Government..............

NEBRASKA
Omaha
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans. and pub. util....
Finance.................
Government..............

Number of emjjloyees
1957
195Ò
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

NEW JERSEY
Newark-Jersey City 7/

720.8

719-9
2.7
41.1
271.8

2.7
42.5

271.8
66.6
152.2

66.2

153.3
35.5

35.4
83.5

727.1

2.6
41.5

276.8
68.8

157.0
35.5

839.9
Contract construction..
Manufacturing........ .
Trans, and pub. util...
Finance.............
Service................
Government.............

.2

32.5
351.5
84.5
154.6
49.9

838.9
.2

859.7

.2

35.4
350.8
83.7
153.0
49.9

37.0
365.4

86.6
160.3

66.4

66.1

81.6

47.8
88.8

63.3

Paterson 7 /

20.1

19.5
1.5
2.7
2.3

1.9

2.8

2.4
6.4
4.1
2.5

6.5

4.0
2.5

19.8
1.8
3.1
2.4
6.3
3.8
2.4

Contract construction..
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util...
Finance................
Service................
Government..... .......

92.1

91.8

74.1

73.6

400.4

403.0

1.6

1.6

415.6
1.9

27.9
177.6
24.3
72.9

29.9
179.0
24.2
72.1

42.9
41.1

43.2
40.9

40.7
40.9

159.9

82.9

160.4

6.5

83.2

7.4
83.5
9.0
23.5

166.0
.8

11.8
22.0

2.6

9.3
24.3
2.5

11.7
21.9

11.0

22.3

103.2
.1

103.5

104.7

.1

.1

3.1
40.6

3.3
40.7
6.7

3.9
41.9

74.6

12.1

Perth Amboy 7 /
150.7
8.9
32.4
22.3

150.7
8.7
32.4

22.1

38.2

38.5

13.0
20.4

13.0

20.4
15.7

15.6

151.5
9.4
32.4
22.4
39.0
12.5
20.3

15.6

Contract construction.,
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util...
Finance..... ..........
Service................
Government.............

.8

9.0
24.0
2 .c

12.1

.8

26.9
194.6
23.8

74.6

12.2

9.8

86.0

Trenton
NEVADA
Reno
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing 1 J .......
Trans. and pub. util....

27.1

2.8
1.7
3.1
7.1

See f o o t n o t e s
NOTE:

Data

at

for

end
the

of

2.2
1.7
3.3

7.3
4.1

7.2
4.1

6.9
1 .1
6.7
4.0

Contract construction..
Manuf ac tur ing.........
Trans, and pub. util...
Finance................
Service................
Government.............

6.6
17.6
3.5
13.7

18.0

17.6

3.5

13.6
18.0

6.9

18.3
3-3
13.1

17.2

NEW MEXICO
Albuquerque
41.8
2.3

41.3

2 .1

18.4
2.7

18.6

8.2
2 .1

8.2
2.1

2.7
4.8
3.1

4.7
3.1

42.0

2 .1
19.1

2.8
8.1
2.0

4.7
3.2

table.

current




25.9

1 .1

1 .1

Service.................

NEW HAMPSHIRE
Manchester
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............

27.5
3.0
1.7
3.3
7.0

month

are

preliminary.

Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...

67.8
4.9
11.7
5.6

18.1
Service 1 / .............
Government.............

3.6

8.8
15.1

67.7
5.0
11.7

5.6
17.8
3.5
8.7
15.4

62.9
4.4
10.3
5.7
16.4
3.5
7.9
14.7

22

A R E A E M P LO Y M E N T
Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued
(In thou8and8)
Number o f employees

Area and industry
d iv is io n

Kov. 1^ 7ô ê t r

NEW YORK
Albany-Schenectady-Troy
Total................. .
Contract construction.,
Manufacturing........ Trans, and pub. util..,
Trade................. .
Finance...............
Service l/.............
Government.............

206.9
8.2
71.2

at

for




end
the

of

39.9
79.*
3.0
*2.2

3.*

*1 .1

*.0

*.0
1*.0
2 .1
6 .1

7.6

*52.*
2 *. 5

1 *.*
2.0
6 .*

7.5

2 .1
6.2

7.5

*53.7
26 .*
199.3
36.9
88.5
1*.7
*6 .1
*1.8

198.7
36.8
90.1
1*.8
* 5.6
*1.9

32.8
16.0

3*. 3

17.6

6.5

6.5

10.2

10.2

330.9
25.7
97.7

336.5
27.0
99.8
21.6
75.9
11.5
*1 .3
59 .*

21.6

76.7
11.5

38.2
59.5

Nev York-Northeastern
New Jersey
Total.................. .
Mining................. .
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans. and pub. util....

7.2

21.8

78.2

l*.l

Nassau and Suffolk
Counties 7/
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util*.
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service l / ............
Government............

21*. 1
8.3
78.3
16 .*
*2 .1

39*6

*.0

Elmira
Total..................
Manufacturing.........
Trade..................
Other nonmanufacturing.

Data

21.9

78.2
3.1
*1.0

Buffalo
Total..................
Contract construction..
Manufacturing.........
Trans. and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service 1J .............
Government.............

NOTE:

72.3
16.4
* 1.2
7.2

16.4
*2 .*
7-2
21.9
39.6

Binghamton
Total................. .
Contract construction.,
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service 1 J ............
Government............

See'footnotes

207.2
8.6

1256.
Nov.

5,539.0

5 ,537.9
6 .1

6.0
227.7

239.5
1,715.*
*8 *.l

1,703.9
*8*.5

*65.6
23.9
212 .*
38.0
90.7

1*.2
*6.8

39.6

35.1

18.2
6.8
10.1

3 * 1.2

32.*

10*.5
21.8
77.7
11.5
37.8
55.6

5,632.9
6.3
239.0
1,791.2
*90.0

table.

current

month

are

preliminary.

Area and industry
d iv is io n

New York-Northeastern
New Jersey— Continued
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service.................
Government..............

Number of employees
1?57
Nov.
Oct.
Nov.

1 ,216.6
U55.2

811.8
633.3

Nev York City 7 /
Total................... 3,572.6
Mining..................
1.7
Contract construction...
117.1
Manufacturing..........
927.1
Trans. and pub. util....
328.3
Trade...................
835.9
Finance.................
367.7
Service.................
591.0
Government..............
*03.7
Rochester
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trane. and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service \ J ..............
Government..............
Syracuse
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service 1 / ..............
Government..............
Utica-Rome
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manuf ac tur lng..........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade....................
Finance.................
Service 1 / ..............
Government..............
Westchester County J j
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service 1 /..............
Government..............

226.2
10.6
112.3

10.1

*1.7
7.5
2*.l
19.9

1*6 .*
6.9
57.7
10.9
32.*
6.9

1,195.1
*52.3
813 .*

1 ,2* 0.2
***.1

3,563.7

3 ,618.0
1.8
111.2

936.5

328.6

975.7
332.0

819.7
36*.7
589.0
*02.9

853.3
358.8
585 .*
399.7

225.5

227.6
10.5
11 *.5
10.2

632.0

1.8
120 .*

11.1
112.2
10.1

*0.5
7.6

2*.2

1*6.7
7.3

153.5
7.7
63.5

58.2
11.0
31.6

7.0

102.8
*.3
*3.6
5.2
17.2
3.5
8.9
20.1

105.1
*.8
**.8

205.8
16.2

205.6

3*.*
25.9

2*.0

19.*

16 .a
15.0

1*.8
*8.3
10.5

*1.7
7.2

19.9

16.8
l *.8

55.7

798.6
623.5

5.5
17.*
3.5
9.2
19.9

17.5
5*.5
15 .0
*6.7

10.6

35.0

26.3

11.1

32.9
6.7

16.9

1*.7
103.7
3.6
*6 .*
5.*

16.6

3.3
8 .*
19.9

202 .*
19.2
53.7
l *.6
*6 .1

10.5

33.5

2*.8

A R E A EM PLO YM EN T

23

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued
(In thousands)
Number o f employees

Area and industry
d iv is io n

1S2L

NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte
Total................
Contract construction
Manufac turing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1/..........
Government..........

9T.0
9.0
23.1

97.3
9.1
23.1

10.9
Y.fc

6.8
10.8
7.5
44.3

22.4

2.2
2.2

2.2
8 .1
1.6

1.5
3.2
3.2

Nov.

144.3
7.6
9.2
15.7

1957

Oct.

Nov.

145.0
7.6
9.7

146.1
7.6
9.*

Tulsa 2/
Total..................
Mining.................
Contract construction..
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service................
Government.............

11.6

16.0

17.2

11.7

38.3
8.3
18.3
35.4

8.3

11.3
38.4
8.3

35.*

35.9

127.7
12.7
7.T
29.9

127.9
12.7
7.9

133.3

38.2

18.2

30.1

18 .1

13.0
8.6
3*.7

13.6

31.7

13.6
31.3

6 .1

6.2

31.9
6.3

17.5

17.7

17.0
8.2

249.2
13.1

254.0
14.0

57.6
29.8

60.9
29.8

254.6
14.4
61.4

13.6

8.6

8.6

2.3

2.3

2.3

8.0

OHIO
Akron
Manufacturing....... .

36.9

23.4
3.0

23.0
2.6
2.2

OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma City 2/
Total..................
Mining.................
Contract construction..
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service................
Government.............

Number o f employees

44.0

36.4

36.3

NORTH DAKOTA
Fargo
Total................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade................
Finance...............
Service 1/...........
Government.......... .

9.3
23.4
10.5
29.7
6.5
11.3
7.3

44.6

29.*

Winston-Salem
Manufacturing.......

98.0

10.6
29.2
6.8

10.6

Greensboro-High Point
Manufacturing.......

Hov«

Area and industry
division

8.0
1.5
3.1
3.1

3.2
3.2

OREGON
Portland
Total..................
Contract construction.r
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service 1/.............
Government.............

30.6
66.1

34.3
36.5

64.4
13.1
34.8
37.0

166.5

PENNSYLVANIA
Allentown-BethlehemEaston
Manufacturing.......

97.6

97.5

100.5

301.5

313.4

Erie
Manufacturing..... ..

39.5

41.5

44.9

72.9

74.2

77.0

94.9

102.9

142.7
.4
9.0
35.0
14.7
24.8
5.7
14.5

142.4
.4
7.7
35.9

95.*

141.7
.4
9.2
33.9
14.4
25.5
5. Y
14.4

38.6

13.6
38.6

45.1

45.4

45.7

93.1

92.5

83.9

56.4

57.7

156.4

159.4

Cleveland
Manufacturing*•••••••«

299.7

Columbus
Manufacturing....... ,
Dayton
Manufacturing........

13.0

13.3
33.6
35.2

64.0

Cincinnati
Manufacturing....... .

64.9

Canton
Manufacturing....... .

Toledo
Manufacturing........

59.6

60.3

63.0

Harrisburg
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government......... .

Youngstown
Manufac turing........

106.6

110.1

118.1

Lancaster
Manufacturing.......

See'footnotes
NOTE:

Data

at

for

end
the




of

table.

current

month

are

preliminary.

38.2

15.0
25.6

5.6

2U

AREA EM PLO YM EN T
Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued
(In thousands)
Number o f employees

Area and Industry
d iv is io n

Nov.

PENNSYLVANIA— Cont inued
Philadelphia
Manufacturing.......

5*3.5

Pittsburgh
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government..........

833.5
17.5
*4.5
330.4
67.9

1957

Oct.

545.2

838.O
17 .5
45.5
333.6

168.1
29.6

70.5
165.8
29.8

99.5

99.5
75.8

76.0

Reading
Manufacturing.......

50.6

51.1

Nov.

548.7

849.8
19 .1
43 .0
344.9
71.5

168.8
29.2
97.3

76.0

52.7

Scranton
Manufacturing.......

30.3

30.8

32.2

Wilkes -Barre— Hazleton
Manufacturing.......

38.8

39.1

39.*

York
Manufacturing.......

42.3

RHODE ISLAND
Providence
Total..............
Contract construction
Manuf ac tur ing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 / ..........
Government..........

274.0
16.3
122.7

13.4
50.5
12.3

28.1
30.7

SOUTH CAROLINA
Charleston 2/
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing...... .
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 / ..........
Government..........

I6.9

Greenville 2/
Manufacturing.......

29.4

See'footnotes
NOTE:

Data

at

for




end
the

of

56.0
3.7

10.0
5 .*
12.8
2.1
5.2

42.8

275.7

16.0
125.7

13.4
49.7
12.3
27.5
31.1

55.5
3.8
9.8
5.2
12.7

2 .1

5.3

45.5

291.8
15.8

137.8
14.0

52.6

12.4

28.0
31.2

55.7
3.7
9.9
*.9

13.2
2.1

16.9

5.1
I 6.9

30.0

30.8

table.

current

month

are p r el im in a r y.

Area and industry
d iv is io n

SOUTH DAKOTA
Sioux Falls
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service i j ..........
Government..........

TENNESSEE
Chattanooga
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.,
Trade................
Finance.... .........
Service..............
Government...........
Knoxville
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government..........
Memphis
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government..........
Nashville
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government..........

Number o f employees

Nov.

24.1

1.6

5.2

2.2
8 .1

1957

Oct.

Nov.

24.3
1.7
5.1

24.1
1.7
5.1

2.2
8.0
1.6

2 .1

3.6

8.3
1.5
3.4

2.0

2.0

2.0

91.1

91.7

93.0
.1

1.5
3.5

.1

.1
3.5
42.6
5.5

3.6
43.9
5.7

4.4
9.2
8.7

4.3
9.1
8.4

3.3
42.0
5.6
18.0
4.3
9.3
8.7

17.8

112.6
2.2
6 .1

113.8
2.2
6.2

18 .1

118.7

2.3
7.5
44.2
7.7

2.7
11.4

41.6
7.6
25.9
2.7
11.4

16.2

16.3

11.5
16 .I

189.1

189.7

189.9

40.6
7.6

26.0

.3
9.2
45.8

16.5

56.5
8.3
24.9
27.9

138.9
.3
6.5
39.0
12.5

32.8

2.7

16.6
56.2

.3
8.3
46.1
OL6 .9
57.4

8.3
24.7

24.2

28.0

28.6

138.4
.3
7.0
39.0
12.5

137.2
.3
7.5
37.*

.3
9.9
45.9

31.8

9.1

9.1

18.4

I8.4

20.6

26.9

20.5

8 .1

12.6
32.0
8.9

20.4
I8 .3

25

A R E A EM PLO YM EN T
Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by selected areas and industry division-Continued

Area and Industry
d iv is io n

TEXAS
Dallas
Manufacturing

(In thousands)
Number of employee 8
Area and industry
1957
¿25Í.
d iv is io n
Nov
Oct.
Nov.

86.8

88.8

84.7

Fort Worth
Manufacturing

54.0

54.0

60.2

Houston
Manufacturing

93.3

93.6

90.7

21.0

21.1

San Antonio
Manufacturing
UTAH
Salt Lake City
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............
Government..........

VERMONT
Burlington
Total.................
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Service...............
Other nonmanufacturing

Springfield
Total.................
Manufacturing........
Trane, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Service.............
Other nonmanufacturing

122.8

7.0

8.2
19.2
13.*
35.8
7.*

16.2
15.6

16.8

4.1
1.3
4.6
3 .3
3 .5

11.3
6.5
.6
1.6
1 .1
1.6

123.8
7.3
8.7
19.3
13.*
35.6
7.5
16.3
1 5 .7

I7 .I
4.2
1 .*
4.6
3.4
3.6

11.6
6.7

.6
1.6
1.2
1.6

1 Cm

1956 ..

Oct.

Nov.

166.6
.2
I2.5

166.8
.2
I3 .O

164.5
.3

21.9

13.6
19.5
21.7

39.4
I 6 .O
43.7
I3 .7
I9.2

40.2
I6.0
42.6

12.0

39.6
I 5.9
43.6
I3 .O
I8 .O

22.1

21.2

120.5
7.7
8.7

18.8
12.9
35 .1
7.2

14.9
15.2

1 6 .8

4.3
1.4
4.5
3.1
3.7

13.1

8.3

.6
1.6
1.0
1.6

VIRGINIA
Norfolk-Portsmouth
160.4
Total..................
159.8
159.3
.2
.2
.2
Mining.................
14.9
I 5.4
Contract construction..
13.4
14.9
Manufacturing.........
1 5.3
15.5
17.0
Trans. and pub. util...
17.2
17.1
Trade..................
44.4
44.0
* 5.2
Finance................
6 .1
6.0
5.8
Service................
16.7
17.5
1 7 .7
Government............
**.l
46.5
44.2
See‘
footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




Richmond 2/
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trane, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service............
Government..... .

Kov.

WASHINGTON
Seattle
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 J ..........
Government..........
Spokane
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 J ..........
Government..........
Tacoma
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 J ..........
Government..........

WEST VIRGINIA
Charleston
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans. and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance.............
Service..............
Government..........

329.8

77.8
I8.5
38.3
46.6

336.9
17.4
IO8.9
29.5
77.1
I8.6
38.7
46.7

314.9
I5 .I
92 .O
27.9
77.8

75.2
4.6

77.1
5.1

78.5
5.3
15 .O

16.2
IO 3.2
29.2

13.3

8.4
21.7
3.9

13.8
8.6
22.0

12.0

4.0
12.4

11.3

11.2

74.9
4.8

75.2
5.3
I 6 .I

16.4
6.8
16.6

3.0
8.9

18.4

92.9

9 .1

5.1

26.3
10.2
I9.6
3.1
9.3
10.5

6.9

16.7
3.0
8.9
18.3

93.3
9.2
5.2
26.4

10.2
I9.4
3.1
9.4

10.6

18.2
37.9
46.0

8.8
22.1

4.0

12.0
11.3

76.4
4.8

17.3

6.9

17.2

2.9

8.8
18.5

94.1

10.1
5 .1
26 .I
10.2
I9.5
3.3
9.5
10.4

26

AR EA E M PLO YM EN T
Table A-12: Employees i nonagricultural establishments,
n
by selected areas and industry division-Continued
(In thousands)

Area and industry
division
WEST VIRGINIA— Continued
Huntingtan-Ashland
Total.................
Mining................ ,
Contract construction.,
Manufacturing........ .
Trans, and pub. util*.,
Trade.................
Finance................
Service..............
Government.............
Wheeling-Steubenville
Total................. .
Mining................ .
Contract construction.,
Manufacturing........ .
Trans. and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance............... .
Service............... .
Government.............
WISCONSIN
Milwaukee
Total................. .
Contract construction..
Manufacturing........ .

Number of employees
1957
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

70.5

71.4

3.3
24.5

3.2
25.4

1 .1

8.0
16.0
2.6

7.2

8.0
114.1
5.4

6.8
50.8
8.6
21.0

3.0

11.0

7.6

457.9
23.7
195.4

1 .1

8.0
16.0
2.6
7.2
8.0
114.2
5.3

6.8

51.9

8.8
20.2
3.0
10.8

7.5

457.8
24.7
196.9

72.0
1.1

3.6
25.7

Area and industry
division
Milwaukee— Continued
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1 / ..........
Government..........

"TTovT

29.0

Oct.
29.4

8.0
117.1

5.6

5.8
54.1

8.9
21.6
2.9
11.0

7.4

461.8
24.9

202.2

Racine
Total................
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service 1/..........
Government..........
WYOMING
Casper
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade................
Finance..............
Service..............

9W

TTovT
29.4
96.3

95.7

20.8

92.8

53.2
40.1

20.7
53.1
40.2

20.3
50.1
38.6

41.7

40.6

2.2

2.2
20.2

41.9
a*i

8.2
15.9
2.5
7.1

1/ Includes mining.
2/ Revised series; not strictly comparable with previously published data.
3 / Not available.
4/ Includes government.
5/ Includes mining and government.
0/ Includes mining and finance.
2/ Subarea of New York-Northeastern New Jersey.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




Number of employe
i

21.3
1.7
7.3

1.7
7.4

21.7
1.8
7.5

.8

.8

4.7
3.6

4.7
3.7

4.5
3.6

3.3
2.7

3.6

1.8
1.7
4.1
.5

3.9
2.5
1.9
4.1
•5

3.8
.5

2.2

.8

1.8

1.6
1.8
1.8

2.2

2.0

LABOR TURNO VER

27

Table B-l: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing
___________________ ( P e r 1 0 0 e m p l o y e e s ) __________________
Year

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

5.2
4.4

4.5
3.9
4.2
2.5
3.2
3.1

k .6

4.5
3.7
4.3
2.4
3.5
3.3

June

4.5
3.9
4.1
2.7
3-8
3.4
3.0

Total

1951.....
1952.....
1953.....
195*.....
1955.....
1956.....
1957.....

k .k

2.8
3.3
3.3
3.2

2.8

3.9
k .k

2.8

3.6
3.1

2.8

2.8

Total

1951.....
1952.....
1953.....
195*.....
1955.....
1956.....
1957.....

4.1
4.0
3.6
*.3
2.9
3.6
3.3

3.8
3.9
3.6
3.5
2.5
3.6
3.0

k .l

3.7
k .l

3.7
3.0
3.5
3.3

k .6
k .l
k .3

3.8
3.1
3.4
3.3

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

4.5
5.9
4.3
3.3
4.5
3.8
3-2

4.3
5.6
4.0
3.4
4.4
4*1
3.3

4.4
5.2
3.3
3.6
4.1
4.2
2.9

3.9
4.0
2.7
3.3
3.3
3.0

3.0
3.3

4.4
5.0
4.3
3.1
3A
3.2
3.1

5.3
4.6
4.8
3.5
4.0
3.9
4.0

5.1
4.9
5.2
3.9
4.4
4.4
4.4

4.7
4.2
4.5
3.3
3.5
3.5
4.0

4.3
3.5
4.2
3.0
3.1
3.3
3.9

3.5
3.4
4.0
3.0
3.0

2.4

3.1
3.0
2.9
1.4

3.1
3.5
3.1

2.5

1.9

1.4
1.7

1.5

1.1
.9

1.7
1.3

1.4
1.3
.9

1.1
1.0

1.1
1.6
1.6

0.3
.4
.3

0.3
•3

0.3
.3
.4

accessions

4.9
4.9
5.1
3.5
4.3
4.2
3.9

4.8
3.9
4.4
3.3
3.2
3.7
3.4

Annual
average

Aug.

July

4.2
4.4
4.1
2.9
3.*
3.3
3.2

2.1

2.5
2.5

2.2

4.4
4.4
3.9
3.0
3.7
3.*

2.1

separations

4.3
3.9
4.2
3.1
3.2
3.*
3.0

2.8

4.4
4.1
4.3
3.5
3.3
3.5

Quits

1951.....
1952.....
1953.....
195*.....
1955.....
1956.....
1957.....

2 .1

2 .1

1.9

1.9

1951.....
1952.....
1953.....
195*.....
1955.....
1956.....
1957.....

0.3
.3
•3

2.2
1.0
1.0

2 .1
1.1
1.0

1.4
1.3

1.3

2.0

2.2

2.8
2.2

2.5

2.7

2.7

2.5

1.0

1.3
l. k

1.2

1.3

0.3
.3

0.3
.3

2.7

1 .1

1.0

2.5

2.2
2.6
1.1

2.2

1.5

1.6

1.1
1.6

1.3

1.5
1.4

2.5

1.0

1-9

0.3
.3
.4

0.4
•3
.4

0.3
.4
.4

0.4
.4
.4

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.2

.3
.3

.3

.3
•3
.3

•3
•3

.3
.3

.2

.2

.3
•3

1.3
.7
1.5
1.7

1.4
.7

1.7
.7
2.3

1.5

0.4
.3
.4

0.4
.3
.4

0.4
.3
.4

.2

.2

.3
.3

.3
.3
•3

1.6

2 .1

1.8
2.8
2.6
2.2

1.5
1.5
1.3

1.4

2.8
2 .1
1.2
1.8

2.2
2.2

2.4
2.3
2.3

Discharges

.k

•3

.k

.2
.2

.2
.2

.2
.2

.3

.2

.2

.3

•2

.2

.2

.2
.2

.2

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.3
•3

Layoffs

1951......
1952.....
1953.....
195*.....
1955......
1956.....
1957.....

0.6
1.3
.8
2.2
1.1
1.8

0.5
.3
•3

.2
.2
.2
.2

1.5
1.7
1.5

l. k

.4
.4

2.8

1.4
1.5

0.6

1.4
.9

0.8
1 .1
.8
2.3
1.3
1.6

l. k

1.0

1.0

.2
.2
.2
.2

0.5
.3
.3

1.3
.9
2.4

1.2

1.2
1.1
1.0
1.9

1 .1
1.6
1.5

1.0
1.1

•9
1.7
1.3

1.2

1.2

NOTLl D a t a
1:

0.7
.4
.4
•3
.3

»2

.3
for

the




current

month

.2
.2
.2
.2

are

0.4
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2
O

preliminary.

1.3

1 .1

Miscellaneous,

1951.....
1952.....
1953......
195*.....
1955.....
1956.....
1957......

1.3

2.2
1.1
1.6

1.3

1.4

1.0
1.3
1.7
1.3

1.2
1.6

1 .1

1.4

1.8

1.8
1.6
1.2

1.6
1.2

1.3
2.3

1.5

0.4
.3
.3

0.4

1.5

1.2
1 .1

2.5
1.7
1.4
1.4

1.3
1.9

1.0

1.2

1.5

2.6

including military

0.4
•3
.3

.2
.2
.2
.2

0.4
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2
.2

0.4
.3
.3
.3

.2
.2
.3

0.4
.3
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2
.2

.3
.3
.1
.2
.2
.2

0.3
.3

.2
.2
.2
.2

0.5
•3
.3

.2
.2
.2

LABOR TU R N O V ER
Table B-2: Labor turnover rates,
by industry
(Per 100 e m p l o y e e s )
Total
accession
rates

Industry

Separation
Total

rates

Di s c h a r g e s

Quits

Oct.
1957

Nov.
1957

Nov.
I 957

Oct.
I 957

Nov.

1957

MANUFACTURING............................

Nbv.
1957
2.1

2.9

3.9

4.0

O .9

1.3

DURABLE GOODS....................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS.............................................

2.1
2.2

2.9
2.9

*.3
3.3

4.4
3.2

.8
1.1

1.4

1.7

4.0

4.1

2.4
5.8
2.0

3.*
6.5
3.0

5.*
10.0
4.8

1.3

2.4

Layoffs

Nov.
1?57
2.6

Oct.
I???

0.2

Oct.
I???
0.2

1.2
1.4

.2
.2

.3
.2

.6

.9

.1

5.7
9.8
5.2

1.3
2.5
1.1

1.9
2.8
1.8

3.5

3.9

1.1

Oct.

Misc., i n c l .
military

2.3

Nov.
1957
0.2

Oct.
I???
0.2

3.0
1.8

2.8
1.4

.2
.2

.2
.2

.1

3.2

2.9

.1

.2

.2
.5
.2

.3
.2
.3

3.7
6.8
3.3

3.3
6.5
3.0

.2
.1
.2

.2
.2
.2

1.5

.2

.3

2.1

2.0

.1

.1

1.1
1.2
1.0

1.4
1.5
1.2

.3
.3
.4

.4
.4
.3

2.9
2.4
4.0

2.9
1.9
5.3

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

.1
.2
(1)
.3
.1

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1

1.7
l.l
.8
1.8
1.8

1.4
1.4
.3
1.5
1.4

.3
.1
.2
.5
.1

.2
.2
.3
.3
.1

1957

Du ra bl e Goods

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.................
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)..............................
S a w m i l l s a n d p l a n i n g m i l l s ..................
Millwork, plywood, and p r e f a b r i c a t e d
s t r u c t u r a l w o o d p r o d u c t s ...................

1.9
1.8
2.2

2.7
2.9
2.1

*.5
4.1
5.6

4.8
4.0
7.0

2.3
3.3
1.4
2.1
1.7

2.7
1.9
1.2
3.*
2.8

2.8
2.8
1.4
3.2
2.8

.6
.5
.2

a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ...............

1.5
1.7
.3
1.9
1.1

.8

1.0
1.0
.6
1.2
1.2

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES................

1.1

1.7

3.6

3.3

.4

.6

.1

.1

2.8

2.3

.2

.3

.7
1.6
1.6
2.5
1.4

1.1
2.3
2.4
3.3
1.7

3.7
3.5
2.7
2.6
*•7

3.0
4.1
3.*

.5
•9
1.0
.8

(1)
.2
.2
.2
•3

.1
.2
.2
.2
.3

3.0
2.5
1.9
1.4
3.8

2.2
2.8
2.1
2.4

*.9

.3
.5
.6
.7
.4

3.6

.3
.2
.1
.3
.2

.3
.2
.2
.2
.2

1.4

1.3

1.3

2.0

.5

.9

.3

.2

.4

.7

.1

.3

.9
2.4

1.1
3.6

2.1
5.*

1.5
5.6

.2
1.0

.3
1.3

.1
.2

.1
.4

1.6
4.0

.9
3.5

.2
.2

.2
.5

1.2

1.4

5.*

3.6

.6

.7

.2

.2

4.3

2.4

.2

.3

2.4
2.5
2.1
1.7
3.0

3.5
3.2
2.9
2.7
3.6

4.0
2.8
1.9
3.0
2.9

*.3
3.1
2.3
2.8
3.*

.8
1.0
.9
.9
1.1

1.2

.4
.4
.2
.2
.5

2.7
1.4
.6
1.8
1.3

2.5

1.4
1.0
1.4

.3
.3
.2
.2
.4

1 .3

.2
.1
.1
.2
.1

.2
.2
.2
.1
.2

2.6
4.2

3.0
3.7

*.3
1.7

4.4
2.9

.7
.6

1.4
1.2

.3
.4

.4
.3

3.1
.6

2.4
1.2

.1
.1

.2
.2

1.5
2.3
3.3

2.7
2.9
5.7

6.0
4.1
4.0

5.0
4.0
*.3

.8
.9
1.0

1.5
1.2
1.2

.2

.4
.4
.4

4.8
2.6
2.5

2.1
2.4

2.9

.2
.2
.1

.2
.2
.3

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES...................
H o u s e h o l d f u r n i t u r e ............................
O t h e r f u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ...............

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.........
Glass

and

Pottery

Blast

g l a s s p r o d u c t s .....................

furnaces,

steel

works,

and

G r a y - i r o n f o u n d r i e s ........ v . ...............
M a l l e a b l e - i r o n f o u n d r i e s . . . , ...............
S t e e l f o u n d r i e s ........... ....................
Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals:
P r i m a r y sme l t i n g and r e f i n i n g of
c o p p e r , l e a d , a n d z i n c .....................
R olling, drawing, and alloy i n g of
nonferrous metals:
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
c o p p e r ...........................................
N o n f e r r o u s f o u n d r i e s ..........................
Other primary metal industries:

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT)..............................

Heating apparatus (except electric)
a n d p l u m b e r s ' s u p p l i e s ........ .............
S a n i t a r y ware and p l u mbers' supplies...
O i l burn e r s , n o n e l e c t r i c h e a t i n g and
cooking apparatus, not elsewhere
Fabricated structural metal products....
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving..
S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h




.9

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

4.0

1.2

1 .3

.4
.4

1.2

.5

1.4

29

LABOR TUR NO VER
Table B-2: Labor turnover rates,
by ¡ndustry-Continued

Industry

Separation
Quits

rates

Discharges

1957

1957

1957

1957

1957

1957

1957

1.6

*.0

0.6

0.8
.8

*•9

.6

0.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2

0.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1

3.0
3.9

.7

*•9
7.3
5.3
*•3
*•3

3.8
*•3

.8

2 .1
2.6
2.6
1.6
1 .1

.7

1.1
1.8

.1
.1

.2
.2

1.8
1.8
2.0

.2
.2
.2

.2

NOV.

Oct.

1957 1957

Continued

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)...........
E n g i n e s a n d t u r b i n e s ..........................
A g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h i n e r y a n d t r a c t o r s ......
C o n s t r u c t i o n a n d m i n i n g m a c h i n e r y ........

Metalworking

Io r .

1957

.7

Goods-

NOV. Oct.

1957
D u ra b le

M i s c . , incl*
military

Layoffs

JÜOV. Oct. HOY. Oct. flov. Oct.

HO

(Per 100 e m ployees)
Total
accession
Total
rates

machinery

2.3

2.8

1.*

6.1

.6
.7

.7
.9

2.6

*•3
3.3

3.0
5.0
3.6
3.*

3>k

k .k

6.0

0.2
.2
.k

0.2
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

.1
.2

.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
.3
.3

k .k

.6

.8

5.*

.5

.7

3.1
5.5

1.9
5.2

.5
.9

.9

2.9
3A
2 .*

2.8

3.2
2.7

.7
.7

.6

k .k

*.2

.7

.8

.k

.7

.2

.2

3.1
2.3

2.8

2.9

1.7

.2
.2
.1
.2
.2

2.3

1.7

.2

.2

(except machine

1 .1
Special-industry machinery

.8

2 .k

.8

k .3

3.9

1.8
2.2
1.6

1.5
1.9
1.5

(except

1.3

G e n e r a l i n d u s t r i a l m a c h i n e r y ...............
Of f i c e and store m a c h i n e s and devices...
S e r v i c e - i n d u s t r y and household machines.
M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a c h i n e r y p a r t s ..............

1.6
l.k

.8
.9
.9

.3

.2

1.6

3.2
2.5

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY.....................

1.9

2.8

*.0

3.7

1.2

1.5

.3

.3

Electrical generating, transmission,
d i s t r i b u t i o n , and i n dustrial apparatus.

1.*

1.9
3.1

2.9

2.9

1.0
2.0

.2

k .k

.7
1.7

.2

1.9

.5

.k

1.8
2 .1

1.6
1.8

.2
.2

.2
.2

2 .*

3.7

6 .k

5.6

2.5

2.0

.k

.5

3.*

2.9

.2

.2

l.k

1.9

2.2

2.2

.8

1.5

.6

.3

.6

.3

.2

.2

2.8

3.9

*•5

3.5

1.0

l.k

.3

.k

3.0

1 .*

.3

.3

3.3
*.5

6.1

*•3

1.3

.2
.1

k .k

.k

l.k

.2
.2
.1
.1
.2

3.7
2 .k

1.0

5.1
3.8
5-5
5.1
7.1
(2 )

.2

k .3

.2

3.9
5.8
(2 )
7.3

Radios,

phonographs,

Telephone,
Electrical

telegraph,
appliances,

2.3

t e l e v i s i o n sets,
and r e l a t e d

3.2

A i r c r a f t ..........................................

.9

1 .1
(2 )
2.0

1.3
1.5

2.1

6.3

6.1

5.7
5.8
k .2

L o c o m o t i v e s a n d p a r t s ........................
R a i l r o a d a n d s t r e e t c a r s ...................
O t h e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t .............

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS........
P h o t o g r a p h i c a p p a r a t u s ........................
W a t c h e s a n d c l o c k s .............................
P rofes s i o n a l and scientific instruments.

(2 )

lO .k

(2)

(2 )

O t h e r a i r c r a f t p a r t s a n d e q u i p m e n t ......
S hi p and boat b u i lding and r e pairing....

6.0

(2 )

5-3
.5

2.5
7.6
3.0

10.9

3.5
9.9
10.9
5.7
*.3
6 .k

10.1

k .O

1.6

1.9

3.5

(2 )

.8

(2 )

2.5
1.3
3.8
2.7

(2 )

2.k

8.6
(2)

2.6
1 .1

3.1

1.8

3.7
3.7

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES... 2 . k

3.9
2.5

2.9

silverware,

.3

lamps, and

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.................

Jewelry,

.k

and plated ware....

2 .1

6.2

.8
.5

1.0
1.0
1.0
(2 )
•9
(2 )
(2 )

(2 )
.k

1.3
.9
(2)

.9
.7

.8

1.5

1.6
1.2

.9
1.9
2 .*

.6
.7
.5
2.3

1.0
.6
1.2
1 .1

6.0
2.0

1.2
1.2

1.9

*.0

1 .1

1.2

k .5

.7

.1
.1
.1
(2 )
.1

(2 )

.2

.3
(2 )

.5

.8

(2 )

.k

(2)

.1
.6
.5

10.0

7.8

3.9
3.9
2.7
2.4
7.*
7.5
*•3
2.7
5.0
.9

.2
.1

2.3

1 .1

.2

.5

(2 )

.3

2 .*

(2 )

.k

.9

.2
(2 )

.2

(2 )

(2 )

(2 )

.2

.2

2.6

2.0
1.2

.3

.k

.2

.2

*•7
1.3

3.6
*5

.3
.3

.3

3.0
2.7

.2

.2

.3

.k

2.2
2 .1

2.2
2.0

.1

(2 )

.2

(2 )

.7

.1
.1
.2
.1
.1

.3

(2 )
(2 )

.1
.1

.7
.3

.1

.2
.1

.2

.4

.1

.1

.1
.1

.1
.2

Nondurable Goods

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS................ 2.8
1.9
2.3

3.9
3.5
2.5
3.6

(2)

2.0

2.8

Beverages:

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .
N O TE : D a t a for th e c u r r e n t m o n t h




are

preliminary.

k .k

3.0
3.2
3.6

.5
.9
1.7

1 .*
.6
1.2
2 .0

(2)

*.9

(2 )

.k

*•5
3.8
3.3

(2 )

.1

1.5

1 .1

*.1

.2

.3

.1

.3
(2 )

.2
.2
.3

.1

.2

30

LABOR TU R N O V ER
Table B-2*. Labor turnover rates,
by ¡ndustry-Contmued
(Per
Total
accession
rates

Industry

100 e m p l o y e e s )
Separation rates
Total

BoV. Oct.
1957 1957
Nondurabl e Goo da—

No t .
1957

2 .1

1.8

1.1
3.*
1.6

.7
2.9
1.9

2.0
2.8
2.0

3.1

3.5
2.9
2.9

3*9
3.6

l.l
l.l

1.2

.0

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS....................
silk,

synthetic

f i b e r .............

K n i t t i n g m i l l s ...................................

2 .k
2 .k
2.5

2.2
*.0
2.3

2.1
2.1
t e x t i l e s ..............
floor coverings....

1.8
1.7
(2 )

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS.................................

2.6

D y e i n g and finishing
C a r p e t s , rugs, o t h e r

Discharges

Bor. Oct.
1957 1957

No t .
1957

Oct.
1957

0.2
.2

0.3
.3

M i s c . , incl.
military

Layoffs

Bor. Oct.
1957 1957

Nor.
1957

Oct.
1057

0 .1
.1
.1

0.1
.1

.1
.1
.1

Continued

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES.....................

Cotton,

Oct.
1957

Quits

2.8

3.5
3.*
5.0
3.3
3.*
3.0
1.9

2.1

2 .k

2.2

2.3

k.o
3.2

7.5

10.0

k .2

k .2

2.2
*.0
2.8
2.2
(2 )

2.5
3.3
*•5

1.2
.5

2 .1
.5
1.1
1.1
1.1

1.2
1.0

l.k
1.3

1.5
.9

2.2
1.0
1.6

1.5
1.7

1.8

1.3
1.9
1.7

1.6

2 .1

1.1

1.5
.9

2.2

k.k

.8
(2 )

1 .0

.3

.2

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
.2
(2 )

.2

.3
.3
.3
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2

.3

.1
.2
.2

0.3
(1 )
.5
.9

0.5
.7
.3

.
k

2 .0

1.9
1.7
1.9

.1
.2
(1 )
.1
(1 )
(1 )
.2
.2

.2

2.2
1.6

2.8

1 .1
(2 )

.9
3.1

.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
(1 )
(1 )
.1
(2 )

l.k
l.k
.7

6.2

2.5
.7

1.0
8.2
2.0

.5
•9

.1

.
k

Pulp,

paper,

and p a p e r b o a r d m i l ls.......

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS. .........
.
Industrial

inorganic

c h e m i c a l s ............

e.k

3.8
5-3

1.8
1 .*

1.8

.1

.2
.1

1.9
*.7

1.3
3.2

.1
.1

.1
.1

3.3

3.3

3.3

1.9

2 .*

.2

.2

1.2

.7

.1

.1

1.5
1.1

2.5

2 .8

2.7

1.1

3.0

.1

.2

1.5

3.2

1.1
.7
1.7

.3

1.5
3.6

.9
.5
1 .*

.3

2.0

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS................

2 .1

2.3

1 .8

2.6

M e n ' s a n d b o y s ’ s u i t s a n d c o a t s ...........
M e n ’ and boys' f u r n i s h i n g s and w ork
s

.*

.8

.5

.6
1.6

.2
.2
.1

.2
.2
.1

1.3

1.5
1.3
.9

1.9
1.5

1.6
1 .*

.6

.2
.1
.1
(1 )

.1

1.0

.7

.1

.7
.9
•5
.3

.6
1.2
.1

.1
.2
.1
.1

.1
.2
.1
.2

1 .1
1.0

.7

3.1

1.6

1.0

*.0

l.k
.9

2 .k
.7

RUBBER PRODUCTS.... .....................

1.6
2.8

.6

.7
.5

1.6

.3

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL..........

1.9
1.3

l.k

2.6

2.3
1.3
2.7
3.0

.7
3.7
1.7
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............
Leather: tanned,
Footwear (except

curried, and finished..
r u b b e r ) .....................

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .
NOTE: D a t a for t he c u r r e n t m o n t h




3-7

1.6
*.0

l.k

3 .k

3.5
3-9
3.*

*.0

are preliminary.

1.3

3-5
1.9
3.8

1.8

.7

.2

.6

1.2

.5
.k

1 .6
1 .1

.3
.3

2 .1

.3
.9
.8

1.9
1.5

.2
.2

.6

.1

.k

(1 )

2 .1

.8

1.*

.k

2.8
2.6

2 .1
1.0

.9
.5
1.7

.1
.1
.1
.2

.3

1.6

k*

1.9
.7

.2
.1
.2

.2
.2
.2

1.2

3.7
*•5

2.1

.8
.8

1.2
2.2
1.1

2 .*

A

.1

.1

(1 )

.8

.
k

.1
.1

1.8

1.1

.1

.1
(1 )

1.0
.6

1.0
.8

.3

.2
.2

.2

l.l
.7
.3

.8
.6

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

.5

.1

.1

.9

1.2

.7

1.0

1.5

2 .1

l.k

.1

.
k

.1
.1

.3

.2

.k

.5

LABOR TUR NO VER

31

Table B-2: Labor turnover rates,
by industry-Continued
(Per

Industry

100 e m p l o y e e s )

Total
accession
rates

Separation rates
Total

Quits

Discharges

Layoffs

M i s c . , incl.
military

Nov. Oct. Nov.

Oct.

Nov.

Oct.

Nov.

Oct.

Nov.

Oct.

1957

1957

1957

1957

1957

Nov.
1957

Oct.

1957

1957

1957

1957

1957

1957

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

2.2
.6
2.5
1.*

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

*•2
2.9
6.6
2.8

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

I .5
.3
2.1
.9

(2 )
(2)
(2)
(2)

0.3
(1)
.3
.2

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

2.2
2.3
3.7
1.5

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

0.3
.2

ANTHRACITE MINING........................

1.2

1.*

2.3

1.5

•7

•9

(1)

(1)

1.*

•5

.2

.1

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING...................

.8

.8

2.U

1.5

.k

.k

(X)

(1)

1.8

•9

.1

.2

(2)
(2)

1*7

(2)
(2)

1.7
1.9

(2)
(2)

1.3
.9

(2)
(2)

(1 )

.1

(2)
(2)

.2
.7

(2)
(2)

.2

HOHMAHUFACTURIHG

METAL MINING........................... .

COMMUNICATION:

l/ Less than 0 .05*
2/ Not available.

1.0

¿/ Data relate to dooeatlc employees except messengers.




.k

.2

.1

STATE A N D AREA LABOR TU R N O VER

32

Table B-3: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing for selected States and areas
( P e r 100 e m p l o y e e s )

State

and area

To t al
accession
rates

Separations
Total

Quits

rates

Di s c h a r ges

Layoffs

Oct. Sept. Oct. Sept.
1??7 W 7
1??7 1?57

Oct. Sept.
1957 1957

Oct. Sept. Oct. Sept.
1957 1957 1957 1957

4.1
3.2

6.3
5.2

2 .1
1.6

3.*
3.*

0.7
.4

1.4

2.4

1 .1

2 .1
2.8

.2

.2

1.5

.3
.3

.3
.3
.4

2.0

Misc., incl.
military

Oct. Sept.
1957 1957

CALIFORNIA:

CONNECTICUT.............................
Hartford................................

2.5

2.2
1.8

2.7

*.7

6.1

*.0

*•5

3.0
2.5

3.3
3.5

3.2

4.1
4.6
4.0
4.6
3.0

2.0

2.8

1.5
1.9

2.9
1.5

.2
.2

0.7
.4

0.2
.1

0.1
.2

.7

.9

1.2
1.2

.2
.1
.1
.1
.2

.2
.2
.2
.1
.2

3.1
2.4

.9

1.2

2 .1
1.3
1.3

2.0

2.2

2.6

3.*
2.3

3.5
2.9

3.6
1.7

*.5
2.3

8 .1
6.8

1.0

2.0

.7

1.5

.2
.1

.2
.2

3.1
1.3

5.8
5.0

.2
.2

.1
.2

4.1

4.1

4.2

5.0

2.2

3.5

.2

.4

1.6

.9

.1

.2

INDIANA 1/ ..............................

3.6

4.9

4.1

5.7

1.2

2 .1

.2

.2

2.5

3.2

.2

.2

KANSAS 2/...............................
Wichita 2 / .............................

3.3
2.3

4.o
*.5

6.5
8.7

4.2

1.6

2 .8

1.9

3.*

.4
.4

.5
.4

4.4
6.3

2.7
.3

.1
.2

.2
.2

KENTUCKY.................................

2.9

3.8

*•3

*.7

1.3

1.8

.3

.3

2.5

2.4

.2

.2

*.5

5.0

6.0

7.3

2 .0

3.*

.3

.3

3.6

3.*

.1

.3

.1
.1
.3

DELAWARE.................................

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:

6 .1

1.0

.1

3.2
3.1

3.3

4.1
3.9

5.0
*•5

1.4
1.4

2.2

.3
.3

.3
.3

2.2
2 .1

2.2

2.8

1.9

.1
.1

MISSOURI................................

3.*

3.6

*.7

*.9

1.6

2.5

.3

.4

2.5

1.7

.3

NEW YORK.................................
Albany -Schene ctady -Troy................

3.9
1.7

*.3
1.7

4.8

1.4

.4

.8

2.2
2.8

1.4

2 .1

.1
.2
.2

2 .0
1.2
.2

1.0

.1
.2
.2

2.8
1.0

2.0

2.3
1.3
2.3

.4

2 .1

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
.2
.1
.2
.2
.1

.1

.1
.1
.1

.1
.1
.2

MARYIAND................................

3.7
2.9
^•9
3.9
3.5
3.*
5.7

5.6
2.5
3.6
5.3
6.4

^•9
3.0
3.0
5.5
6.5
5.*
5.*
3.6
^•5
4.6
4.4

*.5
5.9
3.9

5.2
7.1
4.2

1.9

2.8

*.5
7.5
3.5

2.7

4.2

5.5

1.8

3.5

2.5

4.4
2.5

2.6

*•5

2.8
2.9

2.3
6.5
4.8
5.7

2.3
3.2
5.1

6.8

1.3

1.8

1.5
1.5

1 .1

1.4

2.3

3.0
2.5

2.2
2.6
2 .1

.5

.2
.6
.1

.3

.2

.5

1.8

.7
.3

3.2
4.7
3.*
.7

.3

2.0

.6
.2
.2

3.0
2.7
2.5
2.4
.7
1.9
1.9

.2
.2
.1
.1
.2
.2
.2

.3

.3

.3

3.5
4.2

3.0
3.9

.4

2.2

1.7

2.8

.3
.4
.3

.3

1.8

2.5
.9

6.2

2.0

3.8

.3

.3

3.0

1.9

.2

.2

3.3

.8

1.6

.1

.1

1.4

1.4

.2

.2

1.8

2.2

2.3
2.7

.6

3.2

1.2

1.6

1 / Excludes canning and preserving.
2/ Excludes Instruments and related products.
3/ Excludes paper and allied products, products of petroleum and coal, and Instruments and related products.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




.2

.3

CUR RENT H O U R S A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group

Major industry group

Average weekly earnings
Nov.
Dec.
Dec.
1956
1957
1957

Average weekly hours Average hourly earnings
Dec.
Dec.
Dec. Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
1956
1956
1957
1957
1957 1957

MANUFACTURING............... .........

$82.92

$82.92

$84.05

39.3

39.3

41.0

$2.11

$2.11

$2.05

DURABLE GOODS.......................
NONDURABLE GOODS....................

88.70

74.69

æ .93
74.30

91.34
73.84

39.6
38.9

39.7

41.9
39.7

2.24
1-92

2.24
1.92

2.18

38.7

95.91

95.60

96.70

40.3

40.0

42.6

2.38

2.39

2.27

70.41
70.75

71.55
69.30
84.21
97-16

69.25

39.1
39.6
40.1

39.8
41.3
41.2
41.2

1.76

1.81

1.83
1.75

1.74
1.73

100.94

38.9
40.2
39.6
37-8

2.53

2.55

2.45

90.09
96.70
84.46
105.95
84.87
72.67

40.0
40.5
39.6
39.8
39-9
39-8

40.5
39.6
39-5
40.7
40.1
39-7

42.1
42.6
41.2

2.22

2.23
2.34

2.14
2.27
2.05
2.43
2.07
1.79

1*86

Durable Gooda

Lumber and wood products (except
furniture)..........................

83.16

Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and transport»-

95.63

88.80
94.77

Instruments and related products.......
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries..

90.32

92.66

83.16
100.30

82.95
101.75

85.79
73.23

72.25

85.81

71.45

82.81

38.1

43.6

41.0
40.6

2.10

2.34

2.10

2.01

2.10
2.52

2.10
2.50

2.15
1.84

2.14

1.82

1.97
1.57

1.96
1.5fc
1.51

1.50

1.50

1.50
2.08

1.50
1.99

Nondurable Gooda

79.38
56.98
58.14

77.71
58.90

40.6

59.66
58.20

60.30

38.0
38.8

40.5
37.0
38.5

40.9
39.8
40.2

1.50

52.95
87.15

53.10
86.94

54.45
85.57

35.3
41.9

35.4
41.8

36.3
43.0

2.08

98.*3
93.52
110.57
93-73
58.19

95-89

38.6

37-9
41.0
40.5
39.9
36.5

39.1
41.6
41.0
41.4
37.7

79.98
Textile-mill products.................
Apparel and other finished textile
Printing, publishing, and allied

89.86

110.57
92.97
57.31

105.37
92.74
57.30

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.




96.19

92.66

41.2
40.5
40.4
37.3

1.90
1.48

2.27

2.26

2.53

2.46

2.73

2.73
2.33
1.57

2.57
2.24

2.55

2.32

1.56

2.16

1.52

34

O V E R TIM E H O U R S
Table C-2: Gross average weekly hours and average overtime hours of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group

Major industry group

December 1957

Over­

November 1957

October 1957

December 1956

time

Qross

Over­
time

Gross

Over­
time

Gross

2.0

39.3

2.3

39*5

2.3

41.0

3.1

1.9

39.7
..38.7.

2.2

39-8
39-0

2.3
2.4

41.9
39.7

2.6

.

-

-

-

4o.o
39.1
39-6
10 .1
(

1.2

39-9
40.2
40.7
40.6
38.5

1.2

1.6

42.6
39.8
41.3
41.2
41.2

3A
3.0
3.0
3.*
2.7

2.9

42.1

3.6
3.7

Gross

MANUFACTURING.................................

39-3

DURABLE GOODS.......................................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS................................................................

39-6

2.2

2.3,,

Over­
time

3-5

Durable Gooda

Ordnance and accessories...... ......... ......
Lumber and wood products (except furniture).....
Furniture and fixtures........................
Stone, clay, and glass .products.......... .....
Primary metal industries. ......................
Fabricated met.al products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment).....

-

-

-

-

2.7

2.2

3.0

38 .1

1 .1

-

IK>.5
39.6
39-5
40.7
40.1
39-7

2.7
1.9
1.5
3.2
1.9

40.7
40.2
39.4
39-5
39-9
40.0

_
-

-

3.3
1.4
2.3

-

-

40.5
37.0
38.5
35.4
41.8
37.9
41.0
40.5
39-9
36.5

40.2
38.3
39-1
35-9
42.4
38.4
41.0
40.6
40.1

2.4

2.9

2.6

3.3

2.1
1.7

2.2

1.9
2.6

k 2 .6

41.2
43.6
41.0
40.6

2.8

4.8
2.3
2.7

Nondurable Gooda

Food and kindred products.................... .
Apparel and other finished textile products.....
Paper and allied products......................... <. ...
Printing, publishing, and allied industries.......
Products
Leather

of petroleum

a n d c o a l .........................

a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ............................

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.




-

-

1 .1

4.0

2.7
2.2

1.8

2.7
1.2

36.8

3.2
1.4
2.3

1.2
^•5
3.0

2.2

1.8

2.9
1.2

40.9
39-8
40.2
36.3
43.0
39-1
41.6
41.0
41.4
37.7

3.2
1.5
2.7

1.2

4.6
3.5
2.3

1.8

3.2
1.3

35

INDEXES O F M A N -H O U R S A N D PAYROLLS
Table C-3: Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours in industrial and construction activities 21
( 1947 - 49 = 1 0 0 )

December
1957

November
1957

October
1957

December

101.1

103.5

107.5

112.5

M IN IN G ............................................

Ô0.6

79.5

83.2

8 7 .7

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.............................

122.7

130.9

149.6

135.9

MANUFACTURING ................... ...... ...........

99.*

101.2

103.1

110.8

DURABLE GOODS.......................................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS................................................................

105.5

108.2

109.6

92.9

95.*

122.0
97.4

295.2

300.1
81.9

Activity

TO T A L

2 / .........................................................

Durable

Goods

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ..................................
L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) .......
F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s .....................................
S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s .......................
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ..................................
Fa b ricated metal products (except ordnance,
m a c h i n e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ) ..........
M a c h i n e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ...........................
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y ........................................
Instruments

92.0

1956

a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s .......................

Nondurable

29*.4
73.2

102.1

98.1
93.5

111.1

98.1

127.2
135.*
111.4
95.6

76.5
102.2
101.8
96.3
114.3
97.8
131.3
138.7

115.1
101.1

106.7
104.6
99.5

115.2
101.2
133.7
130.4
114.9

380.4
81.8
109.3
108.2
115.3
121.4

117.4
144.7

161.0
123.3

105.0

105.6

92.0

87.9
91.9

102.8
117.2

105.5

Goods

T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ........................................
A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f i n i s h e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s .......
P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .................... ............
P r i n t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , a n d a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s .......
C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...........................
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l ..........................

83.7
77.5
72.4
99.8
114.4

115.2

87.1
78.8
72.5

100.8

114.8
113.4

102.9

102.9

103.7
91.0

89.6

90.1

92.0
104.6

89.4
7*. 6

114.9
103.4
93.0

105.6
90.5

80.3

119.1
116.8

107.9
94.6
112.3
93.8

1/ A g g r e g a t e m a n - h o u r s a r e f o r t h e w e e k l y p a y p e r i o d e n d i n g n e a r e s t t h e 15 t h o f t h e m o n t h a n d d o n o t r e p r e s e n t
totals for the month.
F o r m i n i n g a n d m a n u f a c t u r i n g , d a t a r e f e r to p r o d u c t i o n a n d r e l a t e d w o r k e r s .
For contract
c o n s t r u c t i o n , d a t a r e l a t e to c o n s t r u c t i o n wo r k e r s .
2J I n c l u d e s o n l y t h e d i v i s i o n s s h o w n .
NOTE: D a t a for th e 2 m o s t r e c e n t m o n t h s are p r e liminary.

Table C-4: Index of production-worker weekly payrolls in manufacturing
( 1947 - 4 9 = 1 0 0 )
Manufacturing
P r o d u c t i o n - w o r k e r w e e k l y p a y r o l l s .....................

December
1957

November
1957

October
1957

December

158.1

161.1

162.6

171.4

NOTE: Data f o r the 2 most r e ce n t months are p relim in a ry .




1956

INDUSTRY H O U R S A N D E A R N IN G S

36

Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by industry

Industry

Average weekly earnings
Ho y .
Oct.
Kov.
I 956
1957
1957

Averageî weekly hours
Ho y .
Ho y .
Oct.
1956
1957
1957

Average hourly earnings
Ho t .
Oct.
Ho y .
1956
1957
1957

M IN IN G :

METAL MINING..........................
Iron mining..........................

41.2

$2.46

$2.47

39.6

2.42

40.6

41.6
41.1

2 .71
2 .1*3
2.15

27.6

31.5

33-9

2.93

2.98

2.69

106.79

3*.l

36.4

36.2

3.05

3.04

2.95

106.92

101.50

40.3

40.5

40.6

2.69

2.64

2.50

86.50

91.19

87.22

42.4

44.7

44.5

2.04

2.04

1.96

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION..................

103.01

110.25

102.48

34.8

37.5

36.6

2.96

2.94

2.80

NONBUILDING CONSTRUCTION..............................

Highway and street construction....
Other nonbuilding construction.....

98.64
89.41
105.77

109.21
103.34
114.23

100.84
95.41

36.4

4o.6
41.5
39.8

2.69

39.0

2.47
2.89

2.49
2.87

2.54

m

105.30

36.2
36.6

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION.....................................

104.27

110.53

102.75

3**3

36.6

35.8

3.04

3.02

2.87

GENERAL CONTRACTORS..................

95.99

102.65

96.21

33.8

36.4

35.5

2.84

2.82

2 .71

SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS...........
Plumbing and heating................
Painting and decorating.............
Electrical work.....................

116.12
102.20

109.65

108.00

36.7
38.4
34.8
39.5
35.6

36.0
37.4
33.8
38.1
35.3

3.19
3 .O6
3.42

103.08

3*.7
36.4
33.*
37.*
33.5

3.16

U2.57
98.36
124.S7

103.52

115.97
122.11
105.79
135.49
110.00

3.09

3.04
3.*3
3 .O9

3.00
3.01
2.91
3.28
2.92

82.92

82.56

82.22

39.3

39.5

40.5

2 .11

2.09

2.03

2.24
I .92

2.23
1.90

2.16

ANTHRACITE MINING.....................

80.87

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING...............

$ 96.00

$ 98.31

Lead and zinc mining.................

$97.17
101.35
97.20
87.29

96.93
88.37

39.5
37.*
40.0
40.6

93.87

91.19

104.01

110.66

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION:
Petroleum and natural-gas production
(except contract services).........

108.1a

NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING.....

MANUFACTURING ..........................

127.91

106.23
92.20
88.10

98.21

39.8
39.2
38.1

2 .71

3.16

2 .71

2.17

3.18

$ 2.33
2.48
2.33

2.15

2.35

2.70

74.30

88.93

88.75
74.10

88.99
72.86

39.7
38.7

39.8
39.0

41.2
39.6

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES...............

95.60

94.96

94.50

40.0

39.9

42.0

2.39

2.38

2.25

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)............................

71.55

73.97
72.44
73.23
50.55
89.47

70.80
71.20
72.22
49.80

39.1

40.2
39.8
39.8
41.1
38.4

40.0
40.0
39-9
41.5
38.9

1 .83
1.82

1.77

2.34

1.84
1.82
1.84
I .23
2.33

76.57
7 7 .1 1
76.02
56.74
54.77
57.20
62.06

73.02
72.98
73.02

40.3
40.8
39.8
39.4
40.0
40.3

39.9
40.1
39.9
40.1
40.6
41.2

1. 91
I .89

1 .90
I .89

DURABLE GOODS................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS.........................................
Durable

Goods

Sawmills and planing mills, general..South................................
West.................................
Millwork, plywood, and prefabricated
structural wood products.............

Wooden boxes, other than cigar......

70.62

71.39
48.19
89.39
74.68
75.03
74.30
53.86

61.07

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




1.84

90.61*

56.14
56.03

1

61.39

38.8
38.8
39.5

38.2

39.1
39.7
38.9
38.3

38.2

39.*

1.84

1.22

1.91

I .43
1.41
1.55

1.91

1.44
1.43
1.5*

1.78
1.8 1
1.20
2.33
I .83
I .82
I .83
1.40

1.38
1.49

IN D U STR Y HO URS A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C-5 Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by industry-Continued

Averageì weekly earnings

Durable

Average weekly hours

Average

hourly

< arnings.
w

Nov.
1957

Oct.
1957

Nov.
1956

40.5
40.5

$1.75
1.67

$1.77
I .69

$1.72
1.64

41.6
40.6
39.2

41.2
41.0
38.4

1.49
I .85
I .90

I .50
1.86
I .92

1.82
1.87

39.8
*1.3

I .98
I .61

2.21

1.97
I .59

2.19

I .93
1.63
2.14

No t .
1957

Industry

Oct.

Nov.

1957

1956

Nov.
1957

$ 69.30

$72.04

$ 69.66
66.42

39.6
39.T

40.7
40.9

60.15

4o.4
39*6
37.1

Oct.
1957

Nov.
1956

G ood s — C o n t i n u e d

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES.................

66.30

60.20

Wood household

furniture,

69.12

73.26
70.49

62.40
75.52
75-26

74.62

79 .OO
63.27
85-97

78.41

79.52

65.67
83.66

66.83
88.81

39.9
39.3
38.9

38.2

41.2
41.0
41.5

83.64

87.70

84.45

38.9

40.6

40.6

2.15

2.16

2.08

68.90

70.12

64.91

39.6

40.3

39.1

1.7*

1.7*

1.66

84.21
124.32

84.85

82.61
119-23

40.1
42.0
39.5
40.5
37.8
39 .8
40.6
39.3
39.7
39.8
39.*

41.1
41.4
40.0
40.2
39.7
41.3
41.2
40.0
40.7
39.6
40.3

2.09
2.89
2.12

2.01
2.88
2.05
2.07
2.01

42.2
42.3
39.7

40.6
40.4
39.5
39.6
39.*
40.9
40.4
40.1
40.9
40.1
40.5
38.2
37.6
43.4
44.1
40.8

2.10

116.76

39.*
37.9
40.4
36.9

40.3
39-2
*1.5
36.3

except

Wood house h o l d furniture, upholstered.
M a t t r e s s e s a n d b e d s p r i n g s ................
Office, public-building, and p r o f e s ­
s i o n a l f u r n i t u r e ............. ...............
M e t a l o f f i c e f u r n i t u r e ....................
Pa r t i tions, shelving, lockers, and
f i x t u r e s ........................................
Screens, blinds, and m i s c e l l a n e o u s
f u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ....................

STONE, CLAY AND GLASS PRODUCTS........
F l a t g l a s s . .....................................
G l a s s and glassware, p r e s s e d or blown.
G l a s s c o n t a i n e r s ............................
P r e s s e d o r b l o w n g l a s s ....................
G l a s s p r o d u c t s m a d e o f p u r c h a s e d glass.
C e m e n t , h y d r a u l i c ............................
S t r u c t u r a l c l a y p r o d u c t s ..................

85.72
87.08
82.78

72.04
91-35
74.28

69.08
76.02
73.28

83.74
84.74
82.74
74.44

90.50
76.59

71.58

76.99
76.55
84.80
75.20

71.81

82.00
83.21

79.80
73.10

86.11
73.60
68.78

73-66
74.56
81.48
74.50
81.03
77.70
70.93

83.98
76.58
82.29
78.68

83.35

70.27

72.62

85.50

C l a y r e f r a c t o r i e s . ..........................
P o t t e r y a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s .............
Concrete, gypsum, and p l aster products.
C o n c r e t e p r o d u c t s ...........................
C u t - s t o n e a n d s t o n e p r o d u c t s .............
Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral

97-85

86.73

90.94

93.89

87.93

85.06

38.0
38 .I

38.8

38.4
43.8
44.4
41.0

2.96
2.17
2 .I5
2 .I9

1.81

2.25
I .89
1.7*
I.9I

1.86
2.21
2.01
I .95
1.86

2.14

2.10
1.82

2.24
I.9I
1.75
I .92
I .89

2.22
2.00
I .96
I .89

1.46

1.77

2 .O9
1.84

1.69
1.86
1.85
2.10
1.94
1.85
1.75
1.73

1.77

1.78

*1.3
41.0
42.3
40.9

2.17
2.32
2.17
2.37

2.18
2.32
2.20

2.40

2.06

2.10
2.29

87.67

91-30

r e f r a c t o r i e s .......................

87.45

87.12

87.14
96.52

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES...............

97.16

98.18

99.06

38.1

38.5

40.6

2.55

2.55

2.44

101.46

103.74

105.18

37.3

38.0

40.3

2.72

2.73

2.61

101.56

103.85

105.59
90.27
87.89

37.2
40.6
37.7
37.3

37.9
39.9

2.73
2.40
2.27
2.23
2.25
2.38

2.7*
2.40

2.62

38.0

40.3
40.3
40.5
39.9
40.3
41.8

2.28
2.23
2.23
2.39

2.17
2.12
2.12
2.28

Nonclay

Blast furnaces, steel works, and
r o l l i n g m i l l s ................. ...............
B l a s t furnaces, steel works, and
rolling mills, except e l e c trometal-

97.44

Iron

and

steel

f o u n d r i e s ..................

85.73
91-63

95-76
86.64
83.85
84.29
93.21

96.24
89-38

85.58
83.18

84.59
85.44

2.36

2.24

95.30

38.5

37.6
37.8
39 .O

97.04

93.71

40.1

40.1

41.1

2.40

2.42

2.28

89.50
107.59

90.03

99.06

39.9
40.0

39.6
40.6

41.3
40.6

2.24
2.63

2.26
2.65

2.18

105.20
89.76

M a l l e a b l e - i r o n f o u n d r i e s .................
S t e e l f o u n d r i e s ..............................
P r i m a r y smelting and refining of
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ...........................
P r i m a r y smelting and refining of
c o p p e r , l e a d , a n d z i n c ...................
P r i m a r y r e f i n i n g o f a l u m i n u m ...........
Secondary smelting and refining of

87.67

84.86

40.8

40.4

41.6

2.20

2 .I7

2.04

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p re lim in a ry .




38.1

2.44

INDUSTRY HOURS A N D E A R N IN G S

38

Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by industry-Continued

Average weekly earnings

Nov.
1957

Oct.

Nov.

1957

$96.32

Industry

Average

weekly hours

Average hourly

earn ings

Oct.
1957

Nov.

1956

Nov.
I957

40.2

40.6

$2.42

$2.42

$2.29

Oct.
1957

Nov.

1956

Nov.
1957

$97.28

$ 92.97

3 9 .8

1956

Durable Goods — Continued

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES— C o n t i n u e d
Rolling,

drawing,

Rolling,

drawing,

and
and

alloying
alloying

of
of

96.00

97.03

91.94

* 0.0

40.6

40.5

2.40

2.39

2.27

Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
a l u m i n u m ........................................

97.32

Miscellaneous p r i mary metal industries.
I r o n a n d s t e e l f o r g i n g s ....................

91.34
98.42
100.20

98.46
91.64
99-57
102.43

93.09
90.76
101.26
108.71
98.28
94.64

39.*
39-2
38.9

39.7
39.5
39.2

38.1

38.8

39.7
38.5

39-9

2.47
2.33
2.53
2.63
2.41

38.6

40.3
40.7
41.5
42.3
42.0
40.1

2 .3 I
2.23
2.44
2.57
2.3*

2.52

2.48
2.32
2.5*
2.64
2.42
2.52

87.56
90.80
85.70
75.53

* 0.5
40.1
40.8
39-8
39.9
*1.3

40.7
40.0
41.0
40.3
39.7
41.6

*1.3
40.9
41.4
41.5
40.8
41.6

2.23

2.22

2.12
2.22

Welded

a n d h e a v y - r i v e t e d p i p e ....... .

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
ORDNANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTA­
TION EQUIPMENT)................................................
C u t l e r y , h a n d t o o l s , a n d h a r d w a r e .......
C u t l e r y a n d e d g e t o o l s .....................
H a r d w a r e .........................................
Heating apparatus (except electric)

95.68
97.02

9O .32

97.04
89.35
75.62
85.39
93.75

96.56
97.27

90.35

96.00

89.38
76.17

84.96
94.02

84.05

88.61

2.42
2 .I9
I .90
2.14
2.27

2.40

2.18

2.26

2.07

1.89
2.14

2.26

1.82
2.06
2.13

84.46

M e t a l doors, sash, frames, molding,
a n d t r i m ........................................
B o i l e r - s h o p p r o d u c t s ........................
S h e e t - m e t a l w o r k ..............................
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving.
V i t r e o u s - e n a m e l e d p r o d u c t s ................
Stamped and pressed metal products....
F a b r i c a t e d w i r e p r o d u c t s ....................
Miscellaneous fabricated metal products
M e t a l s h i p p i n g barrels, drums, kegs,
a n d p a i l s ......................................

86.03

39 .I
39.5

40.2
39.5

38.0

2.16
2.28

2.14

87.69

80.36
81.70

39.2

90.06

2.22

2.05
2 .I5

82.08

85.46
94.39

79.80

93.02

89.42

38.9
40.8

40.5
41.4

39.7
41.4

2 .11
2.28

2.11
2.28

2.01
2.16

93.89

S a n i t a r y ware and plumbers' supplies..
Oil burners, n o n e l e c t r i c h e a t i n g and
cooking apparatus, not elsewhere
c l a s s i f i e d .....................................
Fabricated structural metal products...
S t r u c t u r a l s t e e l and o r n a m e n t a l m etal

96.37

90.69

41.0

41.9

41.6

2.29

2.30

2.18

90.54
92.57
92.75
92.84

89.82
94.85

81.93
91.14

40.1
41.6
41.1
40.5
41.7
40.7
39.9
39*5
41.0

39.2
42.0
42.0
42.1
40.6
42.4
40.9
41.2
42.0

2.23

2.24

2.09

39 .I

2.43
2.37

94.42

70.24
96.25

82.18
88.91

82.19
82.16
89.79

80.57
82.81
86.20

40.6
40.6
40.5
40.9
37.8
41.3
40.2
39.7
40.6

96.23

95.01
93.85

39.6
39.2
41.2
40.4

39.6
41.2
40.9

40.9
40.4
42.0
42.0

2.26

69.17

97.88
84.02

94.12

90.72
76.31

91.56
91.78

2.28

2.29
2.27
1.83
2.37
2 .O9
2.07
2 .I9

2.28
2.29

2.24
1.83

2.32
2.06
2.08
2.19

2.17

2.18
2.18
1.73
2.27
1.97

2.01
2.10

2.14

2.43
2.37
2.25
2.14

2.14
2.07

2.33

93.11
86.46

92.70
87.53

95.30
92.11
89.88
86.94

92.66
102.97

93.67
101.45

93.83
97.00

39.6
40.7

40.2
40.1

41.7
41.1

2.34
2.53

2.33
2.53

2.25
2.36

116.60

112.75

105.50

42.4

41.3

41.7

2.75

2.73

2.53

97.20

96.62

92.83
95.59

94.07
87.47
91.37

40.0
39.1

40.9
39.*
39.9

2.43
2.36
2.42

2.44
2.35
2.42

2.30
2.22

38.8

39.6
39.5
39.5

39.*
39 .O

39.4
39.5

38.7
41.6

2.29

2.30

2.27
2.31

2.12
2.21

38.7
39.5

39.1
40.4

41.4
42.1

2.29
2.32

2.30
2.33

2.20
2.22

92.90

B o l t s , n u t s , w a s h e r s , a n d r i v e t s .......
S c r e w - m a c h i n e p r o d u c t s .....................

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL).....................
E n g i n e s a n d t u r b i n e s .........................
S t e a m e n g i n e s , t u r b i n e s , a n d wax-er
Diesel and other internal-combustion
engines, not elsewhere classified....
Agricultural machinery and tractors....
Agricultural machinery (except
t r a c t o r s )......................................
C o n s t r u c t i o n a n d m i n i n g m a c h i n e r y .......
Construction and mining machinery,
e x c e p t f o r o i l f i e l d s .....................
O i l - f i e l d m a c h i n e r y and t o o l s . . . . . . . . .

92.28
93.90
90.23
89.70
88.62

91.64

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry .




89.44

82.04

91.25

91.94

89.93
94.13

91.08

93.46

2.28

2.29

39

IN D U STR Y H O U R S A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C - 5 : Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by ¡ndustry-Contmued

Average
Industry

weekly earnings

Nov.

1957

Oct.
1957

Average weekly hours

Nov.

Nov.

Oct.

Nov.

1956

1957

1957

1956

Average hourly

Ho y .
1957

1957

Oct.

earnings

N or
1956

D u r a b l e Gooda — C o n t i n u e d

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL) —

Continued
M e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h i n e r y .......... .........
M a c h i n e t o o l s ..............................
Metalworking machinery (except
m a c h i n e t o o l s ) . . . ........................
M a c h i n e - t o o l a c c e s s o r i e s . . . . . . . . . .. .
Special-industry machinery (except
m e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h i n e r y ) .................
P o o d - p r o d u c t s m a c h i n e r y .................
T e x t i l e m a c h i n e r y ..........................
P a p e r - i n d u s t r i e s m a c h i n e r y .............
P r i n t i n g - t r a d e s m a c h i n e r y and e q u i p m e n t
G e n e r a l i n d u s t r i a l m a c h i n e r y ..............
P u m p s , a i r a n d g a s c o m p r e s s o r s ..........
C o n v e y o r s a n d c o n v e y i n g e q u i p m e n t ......
B l o w e r s , e x h a u s t a n d v e n t i l a t i n g fans.
I n d u s t r i a l t r u c k s , t r a c t o r s , e t c .......
Mechanical power-transmission
e q u i p m e n t .......... ............. .............
M e c h a n i c a l stokers and i ndustrial
f u r n a c e s a n d o v e n s ..........................
O f fice and s tore m a c h i n e s and d e v i c e s . .
C o m p u t i n g machi n e s and cash registers.
T y p e w r i t e r s .....................................
S e r v i c e - i n d u s t r y and h o u s e h o l d m a c h i n e s
D o m e s t i c l a u n d r y e q u i p m e n t . . . . . .......
C o m m e r c i a l laundry, dry-cleaning, and
p r e s s i n g m a c h i n e s ..........................
S e w i n g m a c h i n e s ..............................
R e f r i g e r a t o r s and a i r - c o n d i t i o n i n g
u n i t s ...........................................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a c h i n e r y p a r t s ...........
F a b r i c a t e d pipe, fittings, and v a l v e s
B a l l sind r o l l e r b e a r i n g s .................
M a c h i n e s h o p s ( j o b a n d r e p a i r ) .........

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY....................................
Electrical generating, transmission,
distribution, and industrial apparatus
W i r i n g d e v i c e s a n d s u p p l i e s .............
C a r b o n and g r a p h i t e p r o d u c t s
( e l e c t r i c a l ) .......... ......... ............ .
E l e c t r i c a l indicating, measuring, and
r e c o r d i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ............. .
Motors, generators, and m o t o r g e n e r a t o r s e t s ................. ............ .
P o w e r and d i s t r i b u t i o n transformers..
Sw itc hge ar, s wit chboard, and
i n d u s t r i a l c o n t r o l s .......................
E l e c t r i c a l w e l d i n g a p p a r a t u s ...........
E l e c t r i c a l a p p l i a n c e s .......................
I n s u l a t e d w i r e a n d c a b l e ...................
E l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t f o r v e h i c l e s ......
E l e c t r i c l a m p s . . ..............................
C o m m u n i c a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ....................
R adi o s , p h o n o g r a p h s , t e l e v i s i o n sets,
a n d e q u i p m e n t ...............................
R a d i o t u b e s ....................................
Telephone, telegraph, and related
e q u i p m e n t .................................... .

39.7
39.2

40.4
40.1

43.9

*2.*9
2 .1*0

$2.48
2.40

$2.44

fc5.3

97.25
110.74

39.4
40.1

40.2
40.7

42.1
43.6

2.44
2.55

2.43
2.54

2.31

88.85

38.8

41.2
40.8
40.8
43.2
41.3
40.6
40.5
41.1
40.2
39.5

42.5
40.9
41.5
46.6
43.8
42.5
42.3
42.8
41.4
42.3

2.20
2.25

87.07

40.4
39.9
39.8
42.1
41.5
39.9
39.2
40.0
39 A

2.21

98.64
88.44
90.46

91.38
88.75
78.85
100.19
105.12
94.78
91.37
98.87
86.53
95.60

9^*07

93.96

96.02

40.2

40.5

42.3

94.66
92.73

98.00

40.8
39-8
40.0
39-6
38.7

41.7

38.2

39.8
39-9
39.8
39.7
41.8

41.2
41.1
40.8
43.1
39.6
40.9

* 98.85
94.08
96.14

97.69

102.26

103.38

89.28

89.78

76.81
91.78

99.60

92.17

87.42
96.00

90.64

91.80

78.74

94.18
99.12
93.38

90.72

2.25
1.93
2 .I8
2.40

I.93

2 .I8
2.40

2.29

2.09
2.26

2.3*

2.32

2.27

2.32

2.35

2.19

2.33

2.30

98.65

86.30

87.57

80.34

40.9
40.8

41.7
39.5

4l,
4o.

2.11
2.29

2.23

86.94

89.93

85.58

90.68

91.88
91.54
88.76

91.52

39.1
40.3
39-8
39 .1
41.1

38.9
41.6
41.2
4l.8
41.7

2.27
2.29
2.31
2.29

2.28
2.30

93.30

92.80
91.32

38.3
39-6
39-9
38.4
39.9

2.28

82.95

81.95

83.23

39.5

39.4

41.0

89.78
78.01

89.20

89.40
77.38

39-9
39.2

40.0

76.44

38.8

84.50

82.68

84.86

39-3

83.21

82.00

81.00

96.32

97.03
91.25

92.80
92.50

84.32
83.63

92.52
9^.37
83.71
*
84.26

87.19

86.58

92.17
87.94
90.97

92.80

2.50
1 .98
2.26

2.48
1 .96
2.27

2.35

2.36

2.24
2.37

2.08
2.18
2.26

2.10

1.95
2.19

2.30
2.27
2.27

2.20
2.20
2.21
2.22
2 .I9

2.10

2.08

2.03

41.2
40.3

2.25
1.99

2.23
1.97

2.17
1 .92

38.1

40.8

2.15

2.17

2 .08

40.2

40.0

40.1

2.07

2.05

2.02

93.11
97.71

40.3
40.0

40.6
39-5

41.2
42.3

2.39
2.32

2.39
2.31

2.26

92.80

40.4
40.5
39-5
41.1
39 .O
39-6
39-0

41.8
42.7
40.7
42.9
41.5
40.3
40.6

2.32

2.29
2.33
2.12

2.22

2.33
2 .1 *

2.07
2.23
2.00

2.05

2.05

1.99

2.22
1 .98

1.96

2 .18
1 .90
1 .92

38.9

40.2

I.9*

I.9I

2.86

88.04

91.05

78.41
76.44

76.57
77-95

40.0
39.7
39.4
40.4
39.1
39*5
39.1

75.66

74.30

69.74

74.77

71.80

67.90

39 .O

93.38

90.12

101.22

79.00
77.81

2.15
2.40
2.23
2 .16
2.31

2.20

2.29

89.77

88.09

2.15

2 .17
1 .90

2.21

2.24
2.40

78.01
90.12

93.43

2.5*

2.30

100.00
78.41
87 .46

91.5k
98.95

2.38

2.31

2.23
2 .1*0

90.23
92.06
96.70
89.65
86.33
92.43

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p re lim in a ry .




$100.19 $ 107.12
96.24 107.81

97.78
84.25
87-95

90.47

37-9

38.6

38.8

1.84

40.6

39.7

44.2

2.30

1.86
2.27

2.31

2.29
2.07

1.75
2.29

i*o

INDUSTRY HO URS A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by industry-Continued

Average weekly earnings
Nov.
Oct.
Nov.
1956
1957
1911.

Industry

Average weekly hours
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
13SL 1SSL 1956

Average hourly earnings
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.
1957
1956195L

D u r a b l e Goods — Continued

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY — Continued
Miscellaneous electrical products....
Storage batteries....................
Primary batteries (dry and wet).....
X-ray and non-radio electronic tubes.

$82.82
91.03
6 7 .6 k

92.11

*83.22

$82.19

9^.35
67.82
90.97

9^.30
6 5 .7h

89.60

10 .1
* *
*0.1
39 .1
10 .1
* *

10 .1
* *
1 1.2
*

$2.05
2.27
1.73

39.9

2.28

2.29
1.73
2.28

2 .50
2.58

2.1*7
2 .5I
*

2.39
2.1*7

2.57

2.50
2.06

39-2

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT..............
Automobiles..........................
Motor vehicles, bodies, parts, and
accessories........................
Truck and bus bodies................
Trailers (truck and automobile)....
Aircraft and parts...................
Aircraft.............................
Aircraft engines and parts.........
Aircraft propellers and parts......
Other aircraft parts and equipment..
Ship and boat building and repairing.
Ship building and repairing........
Boat building and repairing........
Railroad equipment...................
Locomotives and parts...............
Railroad and street cars...........
Other transportation equipment......

101.75

97.57 100.86
99.31 105.72

1*0.7

39.5
39.1

42.2
12 .8
(

IIO .83

100.1*9 107.75
82 .91* 81.58
85.68 80.1*7
95.81*
98.37
95.20
97.25
96.78
99-26
99.62
98.77
97.75 101.32
90.1(0
95.55
93.12
97.50
77*^1 71*.07
93.30
99-tó
102 .91* 97.10
98.1*3
91-63

1*2.3
38.7
37.2
10 .1
*
10.0
*
39.6
*1.5
1*0.7
37.0

39.1
38 .1
*
10.8
*
10 .1
*
10.0
*

1*3.1
39-6
38.5
1 2 .1
* *
1 2.1
*
1 2.6
*
13.5
*
1*3.3

77.29

81.18

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS.....
Laboratory, scientific, and engineer­
ing instruments.....................
Mechanical measuring and controlling
instruments........................ .
Optical instruments and lenses......
Surgical, medical, and dental
instruments.............»......... . *
Ophthalmic goods.....................
Photographic apparatus...............
Watches and clocks...................

85.81

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware
Jewelry and findings...............
Silverware and plated ware........
Musical instruments and parts......
Toys and sporting goods............
Games, toys, dolls, and children's
vehicles........ .................
Sporting and athletic goods.......
Pens, pencils, other office supplies
Costume jewelry, buttons, notions...
Fabricated plastics products.......
Other manufacturing industries.....

72.25
77-00
72.51
86.73

108.36
83.21

75.89
96. 6k

96.00

97.te

1 2.0
*

$2.06

1*1.3
U 2.1
39-6
1 1 .1
*

2.62
2.15
2 .0l
*
2 .1*1
2 .1*0
2 .1*6

2 .I6
2.10
2.39
2.38

2.1*5

$1.99
2 .2l
*

1.66
2.18

2.09

2.32
2.31
2.33
2.29
2.3I*
2.33
2 .1*0

76.61

39.7
39.5
39.8
37.7

39.5
*1.5
1*0.9
39-0
39.O
38.9
38.7
39.9
38.3
39.6

85.39

83 .61*

10 .1
*

39.9

10.8
(

2 .ll*

2 . 1k

2.05

99.22

95-68

95.11

1 1.0
*

39.7

1*1.9

2 .1*2

2 .1*1

2.27

85.79
85.1*1

86.65
86.00

85 .1*9
8U .23

39.9
10 .1
*

1*0.3
10.0
*

1*1.3
1(0.3

2.15
2.13

2.15
2.15

2.07

75.05

76.17
67.1*9
95.76
73.10

73.75
61*.61*

39.5
39 .*
10.5
*
39.7

1*0.3
39.7
39.9
39.3

1*0.3
39-9
1* .1
1
38.7

1.90
1 .67
2 .1*1
1 .87

I .89
I.70
2 .1*0

1.83

72 .1*0

71.73

39.7
1 1 .1
* *
1 1.2
*

10.0
*
1 1 .3
*
10.8
*
1 2.3
*
1 1.2
*

1.82
1.86
1.76
2.07

1.81
1.85

39.7

1(0.3
1*3.0
1*2.3
1*1*.3
1 1.8
*
38.9

1.78
1.83
1.70
2.08
2.01
1 .63

39.7
39.8
39.7
39.5
1*0.9
39.2

38.5
39-8
11.8
*
38.7
1*1.5
39.8

1.66
1.76
1.68

10.2
*

1*1.3
1*3.3
1*3.9
1 2.2
*
1*2.5
1*2.5
1 1.8
*

98.77
98.09
90.28
92.00

75.25

102.82
100.73
103.88

65.80

97-61
7l*.2U

85.08
65.57
61*.2l*
68.lt6

67.70
67.82

77-16
73-30

76.1*1
70.99
88 .1*1

85.70

65.90

61*.31

69.65
67.09
66.76
78.53
73.30

93.30
71.21
78.69
71.91
92 .lU

81*.02
63.1*1

62.76
65.27
69.39

63.08
7 7 .61
73.23

36.8
38.2

1*1.9
1 1 .1
*

38.8

38.7
38.9
1*0.3
39*2
10 .1
* *

39.2

38.8
38.8

2.38
2 .1*1
2 .1 1
**
2 .50

39-**
39.2
10 .8
(
38.5
39-9

1.97
2.59
2.55
2 .6I
2.05

2.50
1.99
2.57
2.58
2.57
2.05

I.92

2.07

1.69

1.73
1 .91

1.8 7

2.38
2.39

2.1*5

1.86

1 . 7k

2.09
2.08
1.66
1.62
1.75

1.69
1.69
I .92
1.87

1.88
2.38
2.38
2.38

2.09
1.62
2.27

1.81*

1 .63
1.61*

1.66
1 .63
I .87

1.81*

N
ondurable G o s
od
79-38
91.05

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
Meat products...........
Meat packing, wholesale
Sausages and casings...
Dairy products.........
Condensed and evaporated milk
Ice cream and ices...
NOTE:

Data

for




the

current

month

101.88

93.07
77.1(2
77-68

81.80
are

preliminary

77.99
89.13
99.29
90.72
77.38
77.61
82.59

78.06
9I.8O
101.85
88.62
75-23
75.23
78.17

10 .5
*
1 1.2
*
1 2.1
*
1 1.0
*
11 .1
* *
1 1 .1
*

1*0.9

1*0.7
1 1.2
*

1*0.5
11.6
*

*1.5
*1.5

1.96
2.21
2 .1*2

2.27
1.87
I .89

2.00

1 .9*
2.19
2 .1*1
2 .21*
1.86
1.87
1.99

1.89
2.12
2.32
2.10
1.77
1.77
I .87

INDUSTRY H O U R S A N D E A R N IN G S

in

Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by industry-Continued

Average

weekly earnings

Nov.
1957

Industry

Oct.
1957

Bov.

$60.15
1)0.13
63.47

$62.65

$ 57.56
w .76

1956

Average

Nov.
1957

weekly hours

Oct.
1957

Nov.

1956.

Average hourly

earnings

Nov.
Oct.
1957. . 1957

Nov.
1956

N ond ura ble G o o d s — C o n t i n u e d

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS—

Continued
C a n n i n g a n d p r e s e r v i n g .......................
S e a f o o d , c a n n e d a n d c u r e d ................
Ca n n e d fruits, vegetables, and soups..
Flour

and

other

grain-mill

products...

B r e a d a n d o t h e r b a k e r y p r o d u c t s ........
B i s c u i t , c r a c k e r s , a n d p r e t z e l s .........
S u g a r . ..............................................

50.66
65.90
88.21*

86.25
89.22
80.28

90.61*

82.21

77.60
79-39

76.1(0
78.59
68.61*

70.20
86.85

s u g a r ......................................

M a l t l i q u o r s ...................................
D i s t i l l e d , r e c t i f i e d , and b l e n d e d

86.20
63.67
61.23
87.02
65.69
105.1*9

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES....................

78.31
95.63
74.12
56.98
71.1*2

52.09
60.89
Tobacco

stemming

a n d r e d r y i n g .............

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS...................

ito. 30
58.ll*

60.56
51.99
51.85
54.43

56.79
56.16
57.53

56.06
60.58
60 .ii*

Knitting

m i l l s ..................................

89.66
85.31
62.71

62.09
«7.1*7

60.95
85.97

65.61
106.15

85.80
M i s c e l l a n e o u s f o o d p r o d u c t s ................
C o r n s i r up , s u g a r , oil, and s t a r c h . . . .

77.91
*
74.93
77-30
65.13
85.61*

78.81
93.91
72.80
61*.15

92.96
Beet

61.23
82.70
89.20

54.68
59.21
63.52
57.07
1*9.1*1

52.72

1*8.61*
56.92
1*9.68

63.83
102.57

Carpets, rugs, o t her floor coverings...
W o o l carpets, rugs, and carpet yarn...
H a t s ( e x c e p t c l o t h a n d m i l l i n e r y ) .......




43.7
39.3
39.0
39.2
10.3
*
38.5

38.6

2.02
2.07

1.88
1 .9*
I .97
1.80
1.73
2.24
1.77

1.62

1.57

2.22
I .63

$1.64
I .70

1.66
2.01
2 .O6
1.86
I .91

1.95
1.76

1.89
2.22
1.75

1.62
I .58
2.22
1.62

39.0

2.74

2.75

2.20
I. 9I
2 .3I
I. 7 O

2.19
I .89
2.29
I .67

$1.56
I .67
1.57
I. 9I

2.00

I .80
I .85
I .89
I .67
1.73
2.15
I .72
I .56
I .52

2.16

I .58
2.63

71.81

71.07

1*3.6

56.30

56.1*1
72.85
50.57

37.0
38.1*
38.3
36.9
32.5

38.3
37.9
38.9
37.1
38.3

37-5
37.3

1.24

38.5
36.7
37.1*
37.3

*
39 .I 10.2

I .51

38.0

1.51
I .60

1.39
1.39
l.4i
1.46
1.44
I .53
1.43
I .59
1.55

1.39
1.39
1.42
1.46
1.44

I .50
I .65
1.39
1.4o
1.42
1.46
1.43

1.53

1.52

1.59
1 .5*

1.60
1.51

68.98
52.90

90.50

60.1*7
**5.19

58.88
11 01
(*.

59.01*
59-81*

60.30
67.16

52.82

52.54

56.52

57.67

56.88
59.36
56.63

62.65
61 .1 I
*
55.19

58.28
62.09

56.1(6
50.25
52.85
l*9.7l*

55.46

56.00

51*.21*
59. **2
58.5**

59.58
58.36

61*.l6
58.59
55.15
60.37

61.20
60.30

49.50
51.07
1*9.2l*

67.06

66.91

70.55
76.31
74 .85
55.61

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry .

1*1.5

1*3.3
1*4.6
1*3.3
1*0.5
1(0.9
39 .O
49-5
1*1.7
1*9.6
1 0.2
*
10 .1
(
3 9 . b 39-8
( *
1*0.5 10 .1
1*3.9
44.0
11*.2
(
1(
0.0
1(0.3
39-0
1*1.7
1(2.3
1*
1.6
39-6
39.3

$1.63
1.83
1.64

10 .8
(
**1.5
1*1.9
1*3.0 1*3.6

58.05
1 9.82
*
70.22

61.62

39.0
50.2

36.9
26.8
39.0

88 .91*
, 75.95

58.06
51.75
67.16

7l*.37
69.32

1(2.7
1 3 .1
*
1*2.7
1 0.0
*
1(0.3

38.2
29.8
39.7

8l*.97
77.**9
95.26

67.16

K n i t u n d e r w e a r .................................
D y e i n g a n d f i n i s h i n g t e x t i l e s .............
Dyeing and finishing textiles (except

36.9
26.3
38.7

75.26
71.55

58.91

39.0
11.0
*
11 .1
* *

38.6

38.9
39 .O
37-6
39-2

38.1
38.8

37.2

38.2
10.2
(
37.3

36.6
38.2

36.3
37.2

36.0
10 .1
( *
1(0.7

10.2
*

38.3
36.9

38.8
1 1.0
*
1 1.6
*

37.4
37-8
39.8
39-5
39-5

38.8

39.6
39*4
39.7
37-8
37.6
39-3
36.9
37-5
38.3
37.4
37.7
37.5
1*0.7

38.9
1*0.7

38.6

1(0.7
39-9
10 .0
(

38.2

1(0.7

10 .8
(
39.2
11 .1
*
10 .1
*
38.8
38.3
39.2
10 .0
(
38.9
37.5

I. 5*
1.86
1.36
I .65

1.65

1.47

1.82
I .36
1.63
I .18

1.43

2.18
I .83

2.16
I .63
1.45
I .79
I .31
I .57
I.I8

1.42

38.1*
37.3
38.7
36.9
1*2.3

1.3*
1.53
1.38

1.46
I .55
1.58
I .53
1.3*
1.38
1.33
1 .5*
1.38

1.66

1.65

1.66

10.8 1*2.5
(
1(0.9 1*1.7
39.1 1*0.9
35-7 33.5

1.65
1.85
1.8 1
1.6 7

1.64
1.84

1.66
1.83
1.83
1.66

1.4 7
I .55
1.58
1.53
1.35

1.38

1.83
1.65

1.44

1 .5*
1.53
1.55

1.32

1.33

1.32
1.50
1.35

42

INDUSTRY HO URS A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by industry-Continued

Average weekly
Industry

earnings

A v e r a g e ■w e e k l y h o u r s

Average hourly

earnings

N o v.

Oct.

N o v.

N o v.

Oct.

N o v.

N o v.

Oct.

N o v.

1957

1957

1956

1957

1957

1956

1957

1957

1956

$70.13

$70.00

$70.28

39.4

40.0

4l. 1

$1.78

$1.75

$1.71

77.42

80.09
66.02
72.07
56.71

40.2
37.3
40.0
39.5

41.4

42.6
37.3
41.9
41.7

1.86
I .79
1.41

I .87
1.82
I .77

1.42

I .77
I .72

45.0

45.2
39.1

2.23
I .53

2 .I 8
I .52

2.06

I .50
I .79

1.49
1.77

1.48

I .28
I .29
I .29
I .18
1.64

I .28
I .29
I .29
I.I 6
1.64

1.28
I .30
I .29
1.15
1.62
I .59
1.27
I .99

N ond ura ble Goods — C o n t i n u e d

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS—

Continued
M i s c e l l a n e o u s t e x t i l e g o o d s ..............
Pel t g o o d s (e x c e p t w o v e n felts and
h a t s )..........................................
L a c e g o o d s .......................- ............
P a d d i n g s a n d u p h o l s t e r y f i l l i n g .......
P r o c e s s e d w a s t e and r e c o v e r e d fibers.
A r t i f i c i a l leather, o i l c loth, and
o t h e r c o a t e d f a b r i c s .....................
C o r d a g e a n d t w i n e ...........................

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS...............................
M e n ' s a n d b o y s ’ s u i t s a n d c o a t s ........
Men ' s and boys' fur n i s h i n g s and work
c l o t h i n g ........................................

Household

a p p a r e l ...........................

Women's, c h ildren's und e r garments....
Un d e r w e a r and nightwear, except
c o r s e t s ........................................

74.77
66.77
73.20

55.70
97.67
57-53

98.10
58.82

93.11
57.87

43.8
37.6

53.10

53.49
61.42

53.43

64.25

35.4
33.9

35-9
34.7

36.1

60.68
4^.44

46.98

42.57
41.30
55.92
53.92
47.32
66.79

45.82
48.49
45.54

4i.l8
56.25
55.24
45.89

37.15

35.5
36.5
33 .O
35 .O
34 .I
33.7
36.4
32.9
36.4

36.7
37.1
35.6
35-5
34.3
34.I
35.3

35.8
37-3
35-3
32.3
34.9
35.2
36.2
32.8
37.2

47.09

47.86
45.92

65.89
49.82

49.50

M i s c e l l a n e o u s apparel and accessories.
O t h e r f a b r i c a t e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s ......
Curtains, draperies, and oth e r house-

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS..............

48.08
52.48
56.24
49.59
51.24
58.97

48.88

49.88
58.44
56.45

M i l l i n e r y . ........ ..............................

51.19

58.67
58.56

86.94
95.24

49.59
58.83

50.37
56.30

51.66

37.6
35.2
35.3

36.2

36.9

38.2

84.55

42.4
43.4
42.0

84.38

77.71

78.31
77.65
83.42
74.57

41.8
42.9
41.1
41.3
39.7
40.4

95.89 97.15
102.53 103.46
102.29 104.49

102.28
96.92

83.16
82.91

92.86

94.57

82.68

95.35
95.55

96.56
96.19

73.34

73.72

62.87

92.75
63.76
72.54

IO
6.69

111.36

108.64

63.03

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry .




37.8

36.9

88.19
96.35

82.89

s e r v i c e s ................. ................... .• •

36.2
36.6

32-3

38.2
38.6

Other paper

G r e e t i n g c a r d s .................................
Boo k b i n d i n g and r e l a t e d industries....
Mi s c e llaneous p u b l ishing and printing

36.7
35.7
32.7

38.7

37.5
38.7
38.4

82.97
77.16

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES............................

48.00
52.93
56.95
48.94

52.10
60.72

80.56
80.12

a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ........

56.54
55.97
45.97
65.27
49.48

39.7
40.4

48.62
57.09
54.53

P u l p , p a p e r , a n d p a p e r b o a r d m i l l s .....
P a p e r b o a r d c o n t a i n e r s a n d b o x e s ........
P a p e r b o a r d b o x e s ............................
and

36.8

66.98
T .27
O
57.37

84.44

92.90

37.9
35.6
39.8

39.3

42.3

39.8

40.9
38.4

36.3

37.5
36.5
33.9
36.8
36.5
38.3

38.6

38.8

38.8

1.62

I .30
2.04
I .35

1.36

1.48

1.77

1.33

1.31
1.47
1.72
I .37

I .30
1.48
I .72
1.37
1.40
I .54

1.28
1.45

1.33

I .34
I .52
1.49

1.30

1.40
I .56

2.22
I .96
I .94

37.7

39.9
39.1

1.36

42.7
43.8
42.1
42.2
41.5
41.2

38.1
38.8

39.4
39.0

2.03

1.51

38.2
38.2

38.2

40.5
38.1

1.60

I .30

37.4
39.1
38.4

36.4
39.4
40.4
39.7
39.3
39.6
39.O

35-8

1.83

1.88

1.47

2.08

2.09
I . 9I

2 .O8
2.22
I .98
I .96
2.12
I .90

2.53
2.88
2.57

2.53
2.89
2.58

1.68

1.33
1.38
1.47
1.46
1.42

1.98

2.12
1.86
1.84
2.01

1.81
2.45

2.81

2.46

2.42
2.45
1.65
I .92

2.17

2.42
2.46
1.65
I .90

2.09

2.83

2.87

2.80

2.17

2.34
2.36
I .61
1.86

*3

IND USTRY HO URS A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by ¡ndustry-Contmued

Industry

Average weekly earnings
Oct.
1957

Ho t *

1957

Mov.

Average weekly hours Average hourly e
warnings
Bov.
Ho t .
ôct.
Oct. Ko y .
Ho t .

1956

1957

I 956

1957

1957

1956

* 2.26
2 .5I
2 .k 6
2 .k 2
2 .1
*
2.7*

% 2 .2k

*2.15

2 .5O
2 .1
*

2.36
2.32
2.30
2.32
2.52

1*0.9
■
*1.0

41.5
* 1.1
k 0.5
11.2
*
1 2.0
*
11.1
*
k0.3
kl.5
*0.8

1*0.8
1*1.2
1*0.3

k0.9
1*1.2
40.6

*1.1
*0.9
*1.*

2.1*0
2 .6I
2.22

68.81
75.82
69.97
87.17
82.81
68.97
9k.35

1*0.3
1*0.5
kl.5
k5.3
k5-7
11 .1
** *
1*0.1
39.1
kl.5

1*0.6
kl.7
1*1.7
1*5.8
1*6.2
1*5.1
1*0.2
38.6
kl.5

*1.*
*2.7
*1.7
*6.8
*7.6
*5.*
*1.2
*0.1
*2.5

2.17
1.95
I.7 I
1.7*
1.57
2.06
2.13
1.78

2.38

1.73
1.71
I .56
1.99
2.11
I .78
2.33

1957

Nondurable Goods— Continued

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS........

Industrial organic chemicals.......
Plastics, except synthetic rubber...
Synthetic rubber........ ........ .
Drugs and medicines................
Soap, cleaning and polishing
preparations......................
Paints, pigments, and fillers......
Paints, varnishes, lacquers, and
enamels.........................
Gum said wood chemicals.............
Fertilizers.......................
Vegetable and animal oils and fats...
Vegetable oils....................
Animal oils and fats..............
Miscellaneous chemicals............
Essential oils, perfumes, cosmetics.
Compressed and liquefied gases.....

♦ 92.66

102.66
100.9*
»

9Ö.71
*
IOI. 9O
II3.71
83 .*1
9*.89

*91.0*
IOI.5O
96.09
96.33
101.99
108.11*

83.01
9*.k8

$89.23

97.00
93.96

9k.?6
97-kk
103.57
78.99
91.30

85.28

81*.05

80.78

97.92
107.53
89.*7

106.30

97.3k

91.65

90.13

87 > 5
78.98
70.97
78.82
71.75
92.35
85.1*1
98.77

87.70
77.96
72.11*
78.32
72.07
89.75
84.82
66.71
96.70

110.57

110.03

69.60

99.39
87.35

85.70
76.01

1 1.0
*
1*0.9
1*0.7
10.8
*
11.6
*
1*1.5
10.1
*
1*0.9
1*1.1*

11.0
*
10.6
*
10.2
*
10.8
*
11.8
*
1*0.5

10 .1
*

2.08
2.32

2.06

2.41
2 .**
2.67
2 .O7
2 .3I
2 .O5
2.38

2.58

1.96
2.20
1.96
2.23

2.*3

2.22

2.11

2.16
I .87

2.07
I .78
I .65
1.62
l.*7
I .92
2.01
I .72
2.22

Coke, other petroleum and coal
RUBBER PRODUCTS.......................

113.36

105.II
109.20

1*0.5
*0.6

1*0.6
1*0.2

*0.9
*0.9

2.73
2.8*

2.71

115.30

2.82

2.57
2.67

9*.87

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL.......

99.66

91.96

1*0.2

kl.7

*0.7

2.36

2.39

2.26

87.89

2.33

2.17
2.55
1.83
1.97

Tires and inner tubes..............
Rubber footwear...................

92.97
106.35
79.35
8*.8*

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS.........

76.02
86.10

103.53
71.55
79*96

39.9
39.1
1*0.9
10 .1
* *

10.1
*

105.18

39.1
39.8
11.0
*

*0.5
*0.6
39.1
*0.6

1.9*
2.10

2.32
2.69
I. 9I
2.10

93.03

2.72

Leather: tanned, curried, and
finished.........................
Industrial leather belting and

yr.31

57.0>*

56.09

36.5

36.8

36.9

1.57

1.55

I .52

77.81

77.81

75.6k

39.1

39.1

39.6

1.99

1.99

1.91

Boot and shoe cut stock and findings.

79.17
5*.66

77.90
55.28
5k.l5

79.38
53.1k

1*0.6

36.2

1*1.0
37.1

53.30

35-7
36.9
38.6

36.1

5k.10

52.71
67.03

37.7
38 .I

1.95
I. 5I
I.5I
1.66
1.**

I .90
l.*9
1*50

62.21

*2.0
36.*
36.1
39.9
37.8

l.*2

I .89
l.*6
1.46
1.68
1.41

*9.13

k9.78

k8.37

35.6

36.6

36.1

1.38

I .36

1 .3*

(1)

9k.95
89.01

92.20

(1)
1*3.0

1*2.2
1*3.0

*2.1
*3.2

(1)

85.97

2.07

2.25
2 .O7

2.19
1.99

79.00

77.22
63. M
101*.00
87.15

77.08

10.1
*

39.2
37.3
1*2.8
1*1.5

*1.0
*0.5
**.0
*1.6

1.97
1.71
2.1*
2.09

1.97
I.7 O
2.*3
2.10

1.88

53.91

Handbags and small leather goods....
Gloves and miscellaneous leather

61.25
55.58

1.65

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S :
TRANSPORTATION:

Interstate railroads:
89.01

COMMUNICATION:

Telephone.........................
Switchboard operating employees 2J •
Line construction employees a/....

NOTE:

66.52

IO*. 1*3
85.69

Data for the current month are preliminary.




65.61
102.96

81*.03

38.9
1*2.8
11.0
*

1.62
2 .3*

2.02

INDUSTRY H O U R S A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production workers or nonsupervisory employees,
by industry-Continued

Average weekly earnings

nov.

Industry

1957

Oct.
1957

Wo t .

1956

Average weekly hours

Ho t . O ct,
1957 1957

Average hourly earnings

Ho t .
1956

Nov .

1957

Oct.
1957

Nov.
1956

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES— con.
OTHER PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S :

$94.21 ! 41.0
41.2
95-26
89.86
40.8

41.0
41.1
41.0

41.5
41.6
41.6

$2.39
2.U
2,28

$2.38
2.1*0
2.27

*2.27

96.00

41.0

40.9

41.2

2.1*

2.1*

2.33

85.63

83.03

40.0

40.2

40.5

2.13

2.13

2.05

62.79
44.48

60.42
42.63

37.5
33.7

37.6
33.7

38.0

34.1

1.66

1.67

1.31

1.32

1.59
1.25

49.93
65.34
82.84
49.30

47.75
63.98
81.72
47.47

34.2
35.8
43.5
34.1

34.2

65.16
82.65
* 9.10

43.6
34.0

34.6
37-2
43.7
34.4

l.l*

36.1

1.82

1*6
1.8 1

l.l*

1.90
1*5

1.38
1.72
1.87
1.38

71.31
7*.29

71.72
75.90

70.81

41.7
41.5

41.7
42.4

41.9
42.2

1.71
1.79

1.72
1.79

1.69
1.7*

6*.80
80.82

64.74
97.70
80.77

62.35
94.98

78.92

—
_
—

—
—
—

—
—
—

—
—
—

—
—
—

*4.40

44.00

¡2.63
»

40.0

40.0

10.6
*

1.11

1.10

1.05

43.29

43.73
51.35

42.29
50.56

39.0
37.8

39.4
38.9

39.9
39.5

1.11
1.31

1.11
1.32

1.06

49.52

Electric

light

and

100.58

102.94

95.73

,_
_

_

_

_

_

$97.99
99.29
93.02

$77*58
98.64
93.07

100.0*

G a s a n d e l e c t r i c u t i l i t i e s .................
Electric light and power utilities....

99.80

85.20
62.25

gas u t i l i t i e s

2.29
2.16

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE:
WHOLESALE TRADE.......................................................
RE TA IL TRADE (EX C EP T EATING AND
DRINKING P L A C E S ) ...................................................
G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d i s e s t o r e s .................
Department stores and general mail­
o r d e r h o u s e s ..................................
F o o d a n d l i q u o r s t o r e s ......................
A p p arel and accessories
Other retail trade:

s t o r e s ...........

**.15
*9.25

73.43

1.90

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE:
B a n k s said t r u s t c o m p a n i e s ........... .
S e c u r i t y d e a l e r s a n d e x c h a n g e s ...........

99.07

—
—
—

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS:
Hotels and lodging places:
H o t e l s , y e a r - r o u n d J5/................
Personal services:

Motion pictures:
M o t i o n - p i c t u r e p r o d u c t i o n and
- d i s t r i b u t i o n .........................
NOTE:

Data

for

the current month

U Not available.
2J D a t a r e l a t e t o e m p l o y e e s

1.28
—

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

in s u c h o c c u p a t i o n s in the t e l e p h o n e i n d u s t r y as s w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s ; s e r v i c e
assistants; operating room instructors; and pay-station attendants.
I n 1956 , s u c h e m p l o y e e s m a d e u p 1*0p e r c e n t
o f t he t o t a l n u m b e r o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r e p o r t i n g h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s data.
Ü / D a t a r e l a t e t o e m p l o y e e s in s u c h o c c u p a t i o n s i n t h e t e l e p h o n e i n d u s t r y as c e n t r a l o f f i c e c r a f t s m e n ; i n ­
s t a l l a t i o n a n d e x c h a n g e r e p a i r c r a f t s m e n ; line, cable, a nd c o n d u i t c r a f t s m e n ; a n d l a b o r e r s .
In 195 6 , such em­
pl o y e e s m a d e u p 2 7 p e r c e n t o f the total n u m b e r o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r e p o r t i n g h o u r s and
ea r n i n g s data.
4/ D a t a r e l a t e t o d o m e s t i c n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t m e s s e n g e r s .
JL/ M o n e y p a y m e n t s o n l y ; a d d i t i o n a l v a l u e o f b o a r d , r o o m , u n i f o r m s , a n d t i p s , n o t i n c l u d e d .




ADJUSTED E A R N IN G S

*5

Table C-6: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable, of production workers in manufacturing,
in current and 1947-49 dollars

November

October

1957

Item

1957

GROSS AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS:
19 47-4 9 d o l l a r s ........................................

November

Average,

1956

1 9 4 7 -4 9

$82.92
68.19

$82.56
68.18

$82.22
69.80

$52.95
52.95

67.99
55-91

67.70
55.90

67.63

46.03
46.03

75.40

75.11
62.02

75-04
63-70

51.68

NET SPENDABLE AVERAGE MEEKLY EARNINGS:
Worker with no

dependents:

Worker with 3 dependents :
C u r r e n t d o l l a r s .....................................
1 9 4 7 -4 9 d o l l a r s ........... ........................
NOTE:

Data

for

the

current

month

62.01

57-41

51.68

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

Table C-7: Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding overtime, of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group

Gross
Major

industry

group

average hourly earnings

Nov.

Average hour l y earnings,
e x c l u d i n g o v e r t i m e 1/

MANUFACTURING.........................................................

Nov.
I957
$2.11

Oct.
I957
$2.09

$2.03

DURABLE GOODS......... .......................................................................
NONDURABLE GOODS..........................................................................

2 .2*
I .92

2.23
I .90

1.84

2.16

2.18
1.86

2.39
1.83
1.75

2.38
1.84

2.25
I .77
I .72

2.12

1956

Nov.
I957
$2.05

Oct.
1957

Nov.

1956

$2.03
2.16
1.85

$1.96

2.35
1.77
I .71

2.35
1.78
1.71
2.01
2.50

2.17

2.16
2.28
2.06
2.*1
2 .O9

2.14

2 .0*

2.25
2.03
2.39
2 .O5

2.04
2.40

2.17
1.97
2.27

1.89

I .89

2.08

I .78

D u r a b le Goods

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) . ...........
F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s .............................. ..........
S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ..............................
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ........................ ...............
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,

2.55

1 .77
2.09
2.55

2.23
2.3*

2.33

2.10

2.22

2.10
2 .5O
2 .1 *
1.82

2.08
2 .*7
2 .1 *
1.81

I .96
1.5*

I.9*

2.01
2 .**

1.78

2.02
2 .5I

1.77

2.27

1.71

1.66
1.92
2.36

2.O9
I.75

2.00
I .72

1.87
1.45

1.81
l .*3
l .*5

N ond ura ble Goods

T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ............................................
A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r f i n i s h e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s . . ..........

I.5I
I.50

l .*7

l .*9

l .*5
1.50
l .*8

2.53

2.*5

2.08
P r i n t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , a n d a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s 2J ........
C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .................................
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l ...............................

2.08

2.2 6

2 .2*

2.53

2.73

2.33

I.57

2.7I

2.32

1.55

1.98

2.15
2.57
2.17

I.52

I.52
l .*7
l .*8
1.98

I.47
I.47
I.98

—

—

2.20

2.18

2.67

2.65

2.25

2.23

I.5*

I.53

1.46

1.88
—

2.09

2.51
2.10
I.50

D e r i v e d b y a s s u m i n g t h a t t h e o v e r t i m e h o u r s s h o w n in t a b l e C -2 are p a i d at t h e r a t e o f t i m e a n d o n e - h a l f .
A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g o v e r t i m e , are n o t a v a i l a b l e s e p a r a t e l y for the p r i n t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , and
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s g r o u p , a s g r a d u a t e d o v e r t i m e r a t e s a r e f o u n d t o an e x t e n t l i k e l y t o m a k e a v e r a g e o v e r t i m e p a y
significantly above time and one-half.
I n c l u s i o n o f data for the group in the n o n d u r a b l e - g o o d s total has little
effect.
NOTE: D ata for the current m o n t h are preliminary.

U
2J




STATE A N D A R E A H O U R S A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C- 8: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing
by State and selected areas

Average weekly earnings
State

and

area

40.0
39.5

* 0 .*
39.6

*2 .*
41.6

56.94

38.3

*0.5

58.58

56.43

39.2

80.02

91.91

91.99
74.68

92.35
92.93

95.11

Hov.
1956

ALABAMA...................................

*68.7*

$70.35

Mobile..................................

89.67
82 .*3

88.43

93.21

$66.92
87.48
76.25

87.30

89.60

90.90
88.70

ARKANSAS.................................
Little RockN. Little Boc k........................

56.68
56.84

CALIFORNIA..............................
Fresno..................... ............

93-14
72.34
93.30
94.œ

Sacramento.............................
San Bemardino-

95.66
84.53

87.12

$1.79
2.25
2.23

$1.69

2.24

2.21

2.25
2.24

2.19
2.15

* 0 .1

1.48

l.*7

1.42

* 0 .*

40.6

l.*5

l.*5

1.39

39.3
3*.8
39.7
37.7

39.*
38.5
39.7
39.*

40.7
37.*
41.2
40.6

2.08

2.37

2.33

2.26
2.00

2.35
2.50

2.36

91.03
96.24
93.61
92.41
79.66

39.*
39.7
38.3
* 0 .*

40.6
42.4
39.3
40.8
37.3

2.37
2.3*
2.51
2.39
2 .2*

2.26

38.9

39.*
39.8
38.9
37.5
39-9

2.13

2.27
2.14

84.46

59.54

96.10

85.09

hourly earnings

$1.79
2.27
2.13

92.86

93.72
92.42

Hov.
1957

Hov.
1956

89.44

93-35
92.94

Average

Oct.
1957

Hov.
1957
38.*
39.5
38.7

96.32

San Diego................... *..........
San Franc is co-Oakland.................

weekly hours

39.3
39.3
* 1.8

Oct.
1W

ABIZOHA..................................

Average

Hov.
1956
39.6
*0.5
39.1

Nov.
1957

92.61

Oct.
19*57

2.08

2.16
1.95

2.33

2.25
2.35

2.38
2.32
2.46

2.24
2.27

2.38

COLORADO.................................
Denver.................................

88.99

85.24

88.44

85.28

* 1.2
* 1 .1

39.1
* 0.2

41.4
41.2

2.16
2.21

2.18
2.20

2.04
2.07

C09HECTICX7T.............................
Bridgeport.............................

83.79
86.72
85.39
79.13

84.42

84.84
89.25
91.14

39.9
39.6
39.9

42.0
42.3
*3.*
*1.3
*1.5
*1.3
* 1 .0

2.10
2.19
2 .1*
2.05
2 .0*
2.24
2.15

2.10
2.18

2.02
2.11
2.10

39.6
* 0.8
* 0.8

* 0.2
* 0.0
39.9
39.6
39.5
*0.8
*0.7

90.83

87.20
84.99

80.78
80.18

91.39

90.58

82.19
80.51
88.80

87.72

86.69

e e .e e

90.86
101.19

85.60
96.00

8 5 .6 9

96.10

*1.3
*1.3

* 0.0
* 0.0

* 1.8
* 1.6

89.33

89.04

85.10

39.7

39.*

66.82

65.67
71.71

63.70
72.62
63.99

*0.5
39.2
* 0.0
* 0.8

61.26

New Britain............................
New Haven..............................

80.78

Waterbury..............................
DELAWARE............... .................
DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA:
FLORIDA.................................

70.56

Miami...................................
Taapa-St. Petersburg...................

65.60

GEORGIA..................................

61.62
81.00

67.73

66.17

66.40

64.06

38.6

2.02

2.20
2.45

2.14
2.40

2.05
2.31

39.*

2.25

2.26

2.16

39.8
39.*
* 0 .1
* 0.0

* 1 .1
*1*5
*0.5
* 0.8

I .65

I .65
1.82

1.55
1.75
1.58
1.57

1.80

1.64

1.65

1.66

1.66

1.56

1.89

1.97

1.52
I .89
1.84

2.16

2.09

2.03

* 1.2
* 1.2
*0.6
44.2

2.23
2.33
(1 )
(I)

2.33

2.23

2.24

2.15
2.25
2.25

2.12

* 0 .1

40.9

2-31

2.29

2.20

* 0 .1
38.4

40.7
39.6

2.12
2.30

2.10
2.28

2.01
2.11

79-58

77.49
77.28

39.5
*0.5
* 0.6

38.7
38.1
* 0 .7

40.3
* 1.0
*2.0

2.00

IDAHO....................................

86.18

82.35

83.23

39.9

39 .*

* 1.0

ILLINOIS................................

88.91

88.68
92.18

88.68
92.59

91.39
94.23

93.78

91.21

39.8
39.8
(1 )
(1 )

39.8
39.5
39.5
*2 .0

92-09

91.74

89.80

39.8

84.24

84.15
87.39

81.77
83.58

39 .7
39.3

92.63
(1 )
(1 )

90.08
See fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .




2.22

1.99
1.9*
2.15

2.13

72.01
80.18

59.21

2.13
2.04
2.03

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p r e lim in a ry .

1-96

1.53

2.31

STATE A N D A R E A HO U R S A N D E A R N IN G S

*7

Table C- 8: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued

Average weekly earnings
and

Nov.
1957

area

Oct.
1957

Nov.

$91-22

State

♦89.58
8l A l
9k.71

82.82
Wichita.................................

93-»
(1 )
(1 )

LOUISIANA................................
Baton JKouge............................

79.93
106.53

78.93

88.52
80.36

1956

Nov.
1956

Nov.
1957

Oct.
1957

Nov.
1956

* 89.15
8t.ll
92.1*2

*1.5
39.3
*1.3

38.6
* 2.2

*1.5

*2.3
*2 .0
*2.2

$2.20

$ 2.16

$ 2 .11

2.27

2 .11
2 .2*

76.23

(1 )
(1 )

*0.3
* 1 .0

* 0.0
* 1 .0

(1 )
(1 )

2.16

1.90
2 .11

76.7k

* 1.2
*0.2
39.7

* 1 .0
* 0.1
* 0.1

*2 .*
* 0.8
*0.7

2.65

1.96

1.98

2.67
1.99

1.81
2.58

38.0

*0.7
37.0
*0.5

39.9
35.3
*0.3

1.63
l.*9
1.72

1.63

1 .6l

1.50
1.72

1.69

2.09

2.08

2.20

2.19

1.91
2.05
1.5*
1.63
2*03

1.90
2.03
1.5*

86.36

MARYLAND.................................

105.26

61.91

66.*0

6V. 31
51.89

83.37

87.87
MASSACHUSETTS...........................
Fall River.............................

72.58
78.52

51.28

6 0 . 6k

79.58
77.58
MICHIGAN.................................

100.17

105.58

Flint................................... 113.91

87.VT

109.06
87.5*

9*.21
MINNESOTA................................

8 t.l*

55.60

75.30

68.33

81.96
86.66

82.25
87.15

39.9
39.9

39.*
39.5

* 1.0
* 1 .*

7k.M
79.78
57.13

73.26

38.0

39-2

76.63

38.3
33.3
37.2
39.2
37.3

39.3
3 7 .1
38.3
* 0.2

39.6
39.5
39.*
37 .6
* 1 .1
39.6

* 0.1
* 0 .1
* 3.0
39.*
*1.5
37.0
39.7

39-6 *1.5
39.2 *1.9
*0.7 **.8
* 0 .* * 0.0
38.* **.*
38.8 39.1
*0.9 *1.3

2.63
2.37
2.37

39.5
35.7
39.5

39.9
35.0
39.5

*0.9
39.*
* 0.6

2.13
2.33
2.19

1.56

61.66
80.80

57.13
59.03

81.38

82.59

81.97

98.k5
103 .*9
107.53

100.02
106.13

91.02
99.07

91.99

98.36

8k.k6

113.97

87.*0
111.93
88.80
9k . 12

39.9

1.85
1.9*
l.*5
1.57

1.98

2.07

2.07

2.*9
2.64
2.64
2.25
2.58
2.37
2.41

2.41
2.53
2.5*
2.19

2.52
2.27

2.28

2.22

2.00
(1 )
2.20

2.08

2.14

* 0.9

2.20

2.17

2.20

* 1 .*
*0 .6

* 1 .* *2.5
* 0 .* * 3 .1

2.06

2.04

1.88

1.87
1.99

93.86

39.0

38.3

38.0

2.57

2.60

2.47

6 3 .8 3

39.*
37.9

39.8

* 0 .*

1.62

1.61
1.55

1.58
1.52

39.7
*1.7

39.9
* 1 .8

39.6
*2.3

79-kO
(1 )

86.19

77.75
(1 )
86.79

79-26
85 .Wi
87.29

39.1
(1 )
39.7

38.9
(1 )
39.*

* 0.0
* 0.9
* 0 .7

86.71

85.39

89.79

39.5

39.3

79.51
83.7*

88.52

79-55

85.87

NEVADA................. .................

100.23

99.58

NEW HAMPSHIRE...........................
Manchester.............................

63.83

6*.08




2.01
2.11

2.03
(1 )

61.76

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .

l.*7

1.36

56.66
65.21

58.90

2.22

1.85

1.42
I .56

56.77

59.12

2.50
2.63
2.65

1.61
2.01

2.19

2 .0*
2 .1*
2.10

86.00

77.92

2.08

1.96

2.01

2.29

83.15

86.73

65.05

1.9*

69M

81.36

MISSISSIPPI................. ............

2.11

35.6
39-1

So.lk

83.20

Average hourly earnings

Oct.
1957

107.07
79.80

53.06
67.32

weekly hours

No t .
1957

78.61

MAINE................. ..................

Average

85.35
53.86

57.76

38.0

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p r e lim in a ry .

38.0

l.*3

1.92

1.56

2.12
2.18

1.46
1.98

48

STATE A N D AREA H O U R S A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C- 8: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued

Average weekly earnings
State

and

Nov.
1957

area

Newark-Jersey City 2 /.................

HEW MEXICO.............................

Albany-Schenectady-Troy...............

Oct.
1957

Nov.

$ 85.89

$8*.65
86.19

$ 85.27

1956

Average

Nov.
1957

weekly hours

Oct.

Nov.

1957

1956

$2.15

$ 2.10

♦2.17

84.52
86.65
83.85

*0 .7
* 0.8
* 1.5
*0 .5
* 0.3

2.19

2.14

2.06

92 .1
«)
9*.ito

92.3*
93.9*

86.30
86.11

40.0
40.0

41.2

40.5

*0.9
* 1.2

2.31
2.36

2.28
2.28

2 .11

82.*0

81.69
91.61

91.30

81.28

39.0
40.3
39.7
40.3
39.1

38.9
40.1
39.0
39.8
39*8

*0.0
*1 .5
*0 .0
* 1 .*
* 1.5

2.31
1*99
2.46

2.11

2.10
2.28

1.96
2.46

2.20

2.08

2.06

1.90
2.3*
I .96

39*7

*2 .7

2.20

2.20

2.23

2.10

2.10

2.05
1*99
2.15

93.07
79.05
99.05
81.23

76.57
97.7*

86.1*1

87.18

95-*5

39*3

80 .6*

80.85

81.18

77-*5
87.53

79-27
86.33

38.4
37*7
40.1
40.1
40.3
40.4

38.5
37.7
39.1
40.1
40.0
39.2

39.6
38.2
* 0.9
* 1.6
* 1 .3
* 1 .8

62.68
56.26

56.96
60.53
55-38

38.9
39*9
38.5

39*8
40.7

78.99
80 .6*

8*.89
83.*2

77.98

86.56

*1*3
39.5

9*.28

39*6
38.5
37*1

99.36
93.09
100.66
98.51
101.61

95.30
98.67
90.95
86.50
99.87
93.52
101 .1 *
100.26
10*.81

79-*0

8O.8O

Westchester County 2 / .................

87.90

NORTH CAROLINA.........................

56 .0e
61.*5

97.1*

89.*7

ffr.te

OKLAHOMA...............................

Nov.
1956

39.3
39.5
39.7
39.1
39.2

89.88
86.61
81.96

NORTH DAKOTA...........................

Oct.
1957

39.6
39.7
40.3
39.7
40.5

55-83

New York-Northeastern
New Jersey...........................

hourly earnings

Nov.
1957

86.*1
86.53
86.79
83 .1*

87.18
86.89
88.13
88.61

77-53

Elmira................................
Nassau and Suffolk

Average

78.62

82.05

86.*0
80 .8*
82.28

56.91

76.06
96.88
81.25

76.23
87.9*

2.20
2.16
2.22

2.18
2.13

2.22

2.12

2.09
2.14

2.09
2.03

2.05
2.24

2.05
2.24

2.16

2.08

2.18

2.16
2.02
2.10

*0 .*
*0.9

1.44
1.5*
1**5

1**3
1.5*
1**5

1.41
1.48
1.42

44.1
41.4

* 3.2

**.2

1*91
2.04

2.01

1*93

1.81
1.96

40.2

* 1.0

2.38
2.53
2.41

2.37
2.56
2.41

2.26
2.36
2.32

38.8

39 .7
39.6
* 1.8
* 2.0
*0 .*
* 0.5
39.2
* 0 .*

85.81

39*7
41.6
39*0

40.4
41.8
39**

* 1.2
* 2.9
* 0 .1

86.*8

92.66
93.76
91.95

87.21

98.37

86.01
96.88
91.27

103.5*
79-93
77.22

40.3

40.6
40.8
39*9
39.9
37*8

38.8

38.6

37*8
40.1
40.9
41.4
40.2
40.6

39.0

2.04

1.92

2.06

2.17
2.45
2.28
2.52
2.47
2.69

2.16

2.00

2.00
1.90
2.22

■1.9*

2.3*

2.32

1.89
2.25

2.44

2.26

2.52
2.47

2.70

2.09
2 .3*
2.13
2.39
2.33

2.56

1.80

87.75

88.51
85.66

89.66
86.**

88.51
85 .*9

37*6
37*0

38.3
37*6

38.2
38.3

2.35

2.32

2.30

2.23

82 .6*

OREGON.................................

79-*2
87**7

82.29

83.21

38.8

39*0

* 0.2

2.13

2.11

2.07

79.21

83.18
S8 .*l

38.0

37*9
40.4
39.1
40.9
38.9
39*0
39*7

39.8

2.12
2.18

2.09
2.17
1*93

2 .11

2.17

2.10

Allentown-BethlehemErie..................................

80.56
87 .te
73-53

7*.66
85.67
101.66
75.17

61.66
56.58

York..................................
See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




73.03

87.67

75**6
73.62
8*.*l
IOI .79
73-8*
61 .3%
56.52
72.09

75.83
73.28
8*. 8*
98.33
7**52
62.57
58*37
70 .0*

40.1
38.7
40.8
39*3
39.1
40.2
38.3
36.5
40.8

38.1

36.7
40.5

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p r e lim in a ry .

* 1.9

39.7

* 1 .*
* 0 .*
* 0.3
*0.5

39.6
38 .*
* 1.2

1.90
1.83

2.18
2.60

1.87
1 .6l
1*55
1.79

1.80

2.61
1.86
1 .6l
1.5*

1.78

2.14

2.09
1*91
1*77

2.44
1.84

1.58

1*52
1.70

STATE A N D A R E A HO URS A N D E A R N IN G S
Table C- 8: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued

Average weekly earnings

Average

BHODE ISLAND............................

Nov.

Nov.

1956

♦ 67.05

♦ 68.87
69 .O8

♦ 66.61

85.52
93-55

area

Oct.
1957

56 .7 *
65.40

and

Nov.
1957

67.79

State

66.*2

NOV.

1957

Oct.
1957

NOV.

1957

67.09

3 7 .7
38.3

39-6
39-7

38.5
39.7

♦1.78
1.77

♦1.7*
1.7*

$1.73
1.69

56.59
65.27

58.75
63.36

39-k
39-k

39-3
39-8

40.8
40.1

1.44

1.44
1.64

1.44

84.50
93.12

80.85

46.0
46.9

45.4

47.0

88.73

47.2

1*86

1*86

1.72

b 9.9

1.99

1.97

1.78

39.3
39-8
38.5
40.1
39.7

40.1
40.1
39-3
40.6
39-9

39.8
39.9
39.1
41.0
40.2

1.69
1.76
2.05
1.85
1.70

1.67

1.62
1.67
1.96
I .76
1.63

40.7
40.4
40.8
40.2
41.1

*1.3
*1.5
42.0
40.5
40.3

2.10
1.91
2.35
2.39
1.55

37.8
39.6

41.0
41.1

2.22
2.16

2.24
2.15

2.12
2.06

40.9
41.8
*1.5

1.69

38.6

40.8
40.3
39-2

1.73

1.67
1.69

1.63
1.57
1.97

39-8
41.8
40.5

k0.3
40.8
40.0

40.9
*1.5
* 1.5

38.2
38 .1
3 8 .7

37-5

38.7
39.0
40.0
37.2

39.1
40.4
37.6

39.7
40.5
39.*

40.0
39.1
39.0
40.2
39.5
39-8

4o.4
39.1
39.2

40.8

40.2
39-k

66.97

64.48

70.18

66.63

79-39
7k.30
68.23

76.64

72.16

84.25
77.16
93.02

82.19
78.02

65.53

62.62

96.08

93.2k
89.51

63.29

60.05

40.6
39-9
41.0
40.1
40.4

84.90

84.67

86.18

85.14

86.92

84.67

38.2
39-9

66.61
68.81
78.06

68.21

66.67

39-k
39-7

64.87
78.17
7k.52

64.88
73.85

89.38

68.04

78.38

71.60

89.17

65.71

81.82

63.80
72.62
71.38

88.78
9k . 83

89>9

37.7
37.4

9k.58

38.2

86.79

83.91

36.7

82.99
104.66
89.79

84.06
104.23

40.1

92.12

82.18
98.82
92.20

85.85

86.02

84.22

87.32
9k.53
85-k9

90.44

87.29
94.61

90.55
87.7k

89.24

58.28

92.56
90.44

93.13

89.26

83.32
i œ .90
92.k7
86.59

93.67
115.05

88.24
113.14

104.00

95.16

l/ Hot available.
2/ Subarea of lev York-Northeastern He* Jersey.

MOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




hourly earnings

Nov.
1956

70.05
78.92
7 k. 18
67-k9

96.35
95.8*

Average

Oct.
1957

85.26
76.21

Memphis................................
Nashville..............................

weekly hours

89.42

38.6

36.8

1.66

1.75

2.02

1.83
1.71

2.07
1.91

2.28

2.39
1.5*

2.03

2.00

1.63
1.8 7

1 .6l
1.81

1956

1.58

1.99

1.88
2.22
2.21

l.*9

1.56

1.84

1.79

1.75
1.72

2.37

2.33
2.33
2.45

2.31
2.29
2.37

2 . 3k

2.47
2.33
2.15

2.61

2.44

2.32

2.26

2.15

2.07
2.44
2.3*

2.58

2.45

39-k
39.6

40.6
*3.9
40.6
40.4

2.14
2.31
2.24
2.35
2.35
2.27

2.25

2.14

38.7
39-7

41.4
40.0

2.33

2.28

2.92

2.85

2.16
2.60

40.0

26.9

2.13

2.32

2.24
2.38

2.36

2.07
2.17
2.05
2.35

2.28




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