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Emptoyment
Earnings
AUGUST

1954

VOL. 1 NO. 2
CONTENTS

Pag#

ANNOUNCEMENT.........................................

ii

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS.....................................
Table 1: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and selected groups........
Table 2: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
in manufacturing major industry groups.........

iii
v
vi

CURRENT S T A H S H C S

More man-hour data...
The coverage of the aggregate
man-hour indexes in table C-5 has
now been extended

to include the

mining and contract

construction

industry divisions.

See story on

pape ii.

Turnover rates
of men and women...
The quarterly table comparing
labor

turnover rates

women

in selected manufacturing

industry groups

is presented in

table B-3, page 28.




of men and

A.— EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLLS
Table A-l: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division....................
Table A-2: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and group...........
Table A-3: All employees and production workers in
mining and manufacturing industries.......
Table A-4: Production workers and indexes of productionworker employment and weekly payroll in
manufacturing industries................
Table A-5: Employees in Government and private
shipyards, by region....................
Table A-6: Federal civilian employment..............
Table A-7: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State...........
Table A-8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division....
B.— LABOR TURNOVER
Table B-l: Monthly labor turnover rates in manufac­
turing industries, by class of turnover...
Table B-2: Monthly labor turnover rates in selected
groups and industries...................
Table B-3: Monthly labor turnover rates of men and
women in selected manufacturing groups....
C.— HOURS AND EARNINGS
Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production
workers or nonsupervisory employees.......
Table C-2: Gross average weekly earnings of production
workers in selected industries, in current
and 1947-49 dollars.....................
Table C-3: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spend­
able, of production workers in manufacturing
industries, in current and 1947-49 dollars..
Table C^4: Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding
overtime, of production workers in manufac­
turing industries......................
Table C-5: Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours in
industrial and construction activity......
Table C-6 : Hours and gross earnings of production
workers in manufacturing industries for
selected States and areas...............

1
2
4
9
10
11
12
15

23
2
4
28

2
9
37
37
38
39
41

NOTE: Data for June 1954 are preliminary.
EXPLANATORY NOTES

INTKODIETION.........................................
1-E
SECTION A - Employment..................... ........... 1-E
B - Labor Turnover.............................
4-E
C - Hours and Earnings.......................... 4-E
D - Glossary..................................
7-E
LIST CF COOPERATING STATE AGENCIES............ Inside back cover

...

INDEXES OF AGGREGATE WEEKLY MN-HOURS

for which both production-worker employment and aver­

IN INDUSTRIAL AND CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY...

age weekly hours estimates are available.
The aggregate man-hours represent total man-hours

For many years the Bureau of Labor Statistics has

for which pay was received by full- and part-time pro­

published monthly estimates of employment and average

duction or construction workers,

weekly hours as part of its statistical program. These

for holidays,

two series have now been used to prepare indexes of

man-hours

aggregate weekly man-hours for industrial and construc­

nearest the 15th of the month,

tion activity.

of the entire month. The average weekly hours, used as

Indexes are published for the mining,

contract construction,

and manufacturing divisions

each month in table C-5 of this report.
The aggregate weekly man-hours

and vacations taken.

The

for 1 week of the pay period ending
and may not be typical

a factor in computing aggregate man-hours, differ from
scheduled hours because of such factors as absenteeism,

figures are the

product of average weekly hours and production- or
construetion-worker employment.

are

sick leave,

including hours paid

labor turnover, part-time work, and stoppages.
The indexes are a composite measure of the trends

Average weekly hours

in production- or construction-worker employment and

and production-worker employment are published monthly

average weekly hours. Thus, the indexes provide a more

in the Employment and Earnings report and the Monthly

meaningful measure of industrial activity than the em­

Labor Review.

ployment or average weekly hours

Unpublished estimates of the number of

construction workers in contract

construction indus­

tries are specially prepared for

computing the man-

hour aggregates.

The indexes are prepared from these

aggregates, with the monthly average for 1947-49=3.00.

the level

series alone, since

of production is dependent upon both the

number of workers

employed and the length of their

workweek.
Information relating to the

concepts and methods

Indexes are published for total industrial and con­

of computation utilized in the preparation of the em­

struction activity,

ployment and average weekly hours series is presented

manufacturing,
facturing
groups.

mining,

contract

construction,

the durable and nondurable goods manu­

subdivisions, and 21 major manufacturing
The same method may be applied to any series




in the Explanatory Notes beginning with page 1-E.
Summary tables

shewing

these

index series from

January 1947 are available upon request.

Emptoyment Trends

N O N F A R M E M P L O Y M E N T T O T A L DIPS
SLIGHTLY IN JULY
The nonfarm job total fell by about 290,000 be­
tween June and July 1954 to 47. 9 million, as e m ­
ployment gains in construction, finance, and serv­
ice were offset by seasonal decreases in retail
trade and public school employment, as well as by
a 227, 000 drop in manufacturing. Nearly all of the
loss in manufacturing employment, however, was
attributable to July vacation shutdowns and scattered
work stoppages. After allowance for these factors,
decreases were noted in only a few industries.
Moreover, the factory workweek was stable for the
sixth consecutive month, as the June to July change
in average weekly hours followed the usual seasonal
pattern.
These two developments supported the evidence
of last month that the employment downtrend of the
past year had virtually ended.
NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G SECTOR SHOWS
CONTINUED STRENGTH
Most nonmanufacturing industries showed more
than seasonal employment gains between June and
July. The number of workers in the construction
industry rose by 89, 000 over the month to 2 8 mil­
.
lion. As a result of this increase--one of the larg­
est recorded for this time of year--construction
employment remained at peak levels for the month.
In finance and service, over-the-month in­
creases were recorded as employment in these in­
dustries continued at record levels. The increase
of 44, 000 in service industries was the largest rement in summer resorts and vacationers' accomoda­
tions.
Wholesale and retail trade establishments lost
43, 000 workers between June and July. Employment
tail stores cut back payrolls during the summer slack
season. The decline this year was somewhat less
than usual, so that trade employment of 10. 4 million
was only 33, 000 below last July's alltime peak for
the month.
Employment in mining at 727, 000 was 21, 000
less than the previous month. Mining employment

Government employment, at 6 5 million, con­
.
tinued at peak levels. The decrease of 155, 000 in
State and local governments reflected the closing




The transportation and public utilities sector
was the only nonmanufacturing activity which failed
to meet seasonal expectations. A seasonal gain of
15,000 in communications and other public utilities
was almost offset by a decrease of 11,000 which
occurred in transportation activities.
S U M M E R VACATIONS P R E D O M I N A N T INFLUENCE
IN M A N U F A C T U R I N G E M P L O Y M E N T C H A N G E S
Manufacturing employment fell by 227, 000 be­
tween June and July 1954, to 15.7 million. For the
most part, this employment decrease did not repre­
sent a continuation of the downtrend of recent months,
but was due to plant shutdowns which accompanied
the summer vacation season. In addition, work
stoppages in lumber, rubber, and textiles accounted
Signs of a continued downtrend persisted in only
three durable goods industries. In these, transpor­
tation equipment, fabricated metals, and machinery,
the over-the-month losses were sharper than usually
occur at this time of year.
On the other hand, in the furniture, leather,
and stone, clay, and glass industries, there were
small employment gains, contrasting with the m o d ­
erate decreases usually reported for these indus­
tries between June and July.
F A C T O R Y W O R K W E E K DEC LINES S E A S O N A L L Y
IN JULY
averaged 39. 4 hours in July, two-tenths of an hour
lower than in June. The change was about the same
magnitude usually-occurring at this time of year as
factories cut back production for the summer vaca­
tion season. However, in the durable goods sector,
several industries reported longer hours of work or
did not shorten their workweek as much as is cus­
tomary. In primary metals and electrical machin­
ery hours rose between June and July, contrasting
with declines generally recorded. The workweek
in transportation equipment and in instrument man u­
facturing did not fall by the expected amount.
Hours of work in nondurable goods plants re­
mained virtually unchanged between June and July,
as is usual for these industries. Only in paper and
petroleum, where the workweek was shortened by
four-tenths of an hour, was the over-the-month
change in the workweek greater than usual.
The July average of 39.4 hours was less than
an hour below last year's level and was the lowest
recorded for July in the past five years. Nearly
every manufacturing industry group showed some
over-the-year loss in weekly hours.

F A C T O R Y W O RK E R S ' EARNI NGS F E L L SLIGHTLY
IN JULY

of summer replacements and other temporary e m ­
ployees, such as students on vacation.

Factory workers' average weekly earnings fell
by 76 cents between June and July to $70.92. This
decrease was due, for the most part, to the vaca­
tion-shortened workweek. Average hourly earnings
for manufacturing workers remained virtually un­
changed between June and July.
Gross hourly earnings of factoryworkers includ­
ing overtime and other premium pay, was $1.80 in
July, about the same as in June and 3 cents higher
than a year earlier. Almost all manufacturing indus­
tries recorded some gain in hourly earnings over the
year. The largest gains— 8to 10 cents — wereinordnance, tobacco, and printing. Other large gains were
recorded in electrical machinery, instruments,
chemicals, food, and paper.

Most industry groups took part in the over-themonth upswing, but the hiring pickup was especially
strong in furniture, chemicals, electrical machinery,
transportation equipment, and petroleum. In other
industries--food, paper, and leather--the gain was
slightly below seasonal expectations.

F A C T O R Y HIRING RISES, L A Y O F F S D E C L I N E
SLIGHTLY IN JUNE
Factory hiring picked up seasonally between
May and June while layoffs fell by the usual amount.
Nevertheless, layoffs were the highest for the sea­
son in 5 years and hiring was at a postwar low for
the month.
Hiring rates in the Nation's factories rose from
27 to 36 per 1,000 employees, reflecting the hiring

ix.




Layoffs dropped seasonally to a rate of 17 per
1 000 as compared with 19 in May. Almost all in­
,
dustry groups Reported fewer layoffs. In furniture,
fabricated metals, apparel, andmiscellaneous manu­
facturing, the drop was larger than usual. However,
in the transportation equipment industry, layoffs
rose appreciably and there were small increases in
machinery, paper, and stone, clay, and glass.
The rate at which factory workers quit their jobs
remained unchanged for the seventh consecutive
month. At 11 per 1,000, quits were at the lowest
June rate in recent years.
As is usual in June, hiring exceeded total separa­
tions, including quits, discharges, layoffs, and mili­
tary and other separations. However, this June the
margin of difference--5 per 1 000--was one of the
,
smallest for the month in the postwar period.

Tab!* 1. Em p!oye*s in nonagricuttura! estab!ishm$nts,
by industry division ond seiected groups

industry division and group

TOTAL................................
M!MtMG...............................
Nonmetallic mining and quarrying.......

July 1954
1/
47,861
727
101.2
193.7
105.2

June 1954
l/
48,150
748
100.4
214.4
104.1

July 1954
net change from:

Year
ago

Current
May
1954
47,935
737
98.8
213.3
103.2

July
1953

Previous
month

Year
ago

- 289

-1,855

49,716

_
+

836
105.9
275.4
107.2

21

-

20.7 -

+

ia -

+

CONTRACT CONSTRUCT!OM..................

2,819

2,730

2,634

2,768

MAMUFACTUR!M6.........................

15,661

15,888

15,836

17,336

- 227

89

+

109
4.7
81.7
2.0
51

-1,675

DURABLE GOODS........................
Ordnance and accessories..............

8,878
164.3

9,121
169.0

9,152
175.6

10,190
258.3

-

243 -1,312
4.7 - 94.0

Furniture and fixtures*..................
Stone, clay, and glass products..........
Primary metal industries..............

685.8
330.5
511.5
1,163.1

772.7
328.5
510.5
1,178.4

747.1
330.6
509.5
1,172.4

796.3
369.7
541.9
1,348.5

+
+
-

86.9
110.5
2.0 39.2
1.0 30.4
15.3 - 185.4

1,007.3
1,524.4
1,071.8
1,671.0
300.0
447.8

1,037.3
1,551.5
1,073.8
1,734.1
306.0
458.9

1,040.4
1,567.7
1,087.1
1,752.5
310.5
458.3

1,145.7
1,705.4
1,216.9
1,981.3
334.4
491.7

-

30.0
27.1
2.0
63.1
6.0
11.1

6,783
1,596.1
89.8
1,052.0

6,767
1,509.5
90.3
1,073.0

6,684
1,457.8
89.8
1,063.2

7,146
1,634.9
91.6
1,181.5

+
+
-

16
363
86.6 - 38.8
1.8
.5 21.C - 129.5

1,105.9
519.0

1,113.6
525.8

1,107.3
522.7

1,192.5
529.5

_
-

802.9
771.2
256.7
221.8
367.7

304.7
775.9
255.2
255.6
363.5

801.7
781.3
252.6
253.7
353.5

786.2
804.3
265.4
277.3
382.6

+
+
+
+
+

ordnance, machinery, and transportation
Machinery (except electrical
Electrical machinery........ ........
Transportation equipment..............
Instruments and related products.......
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries..
.
KOKOMOASLE 6000S.....................
Food and kindred products............ .
Tobacco manufactures.................
*produ^r"
''Ind^rl.r"'*""'' " "
Chemicals and allied products............
Products of petroleum and coal...........
Rubber products..........................
Leather and leather products..........
TRAMSPORTAHOM AMO PUBLtC UT!L!T!ES......
TRAMSPORTAHOM.......................
COMMUM!CATtOH........................
OTHER PUBUC UT!L!T)ES................

4,033
2,689
748
596

4,029
2,700
741
588

4,008
2,685
741
582

4,283
2,934
760
589

WHOLESALE AMD RETAtL TRADE..............

10,381

10,424

10,375

10,414

-

138.4
- 181.0
- 145.1
- 310.3
34.4
- 43.9

7.7 _
6.8 -

86.6
10.5

1.8
4.7
1.5
33.8
4.2

+
-

16.7
33.1
8.7
55.5
H.9

4
11
7
8

+

250
245
12
7

-

43

-

33

+
-

+
+
+
-

1
34
34.7
25.4
9.1
7.3
23.6

2,774
7,607
1,299.2
1,411.0
811.0
567.3
3,518.0

2,757
7,667
1,333.4
1,422.1
810.7
595.2
3,506.0

2,746
7,629
1,339.3
1,416.3
808.8
600.0
3,464.6

2,773
7,641
1,333.9
1,385.6
820.1
560.0
3,541.6

+
+

17
60
34.2
11.1
.3
27.9
12.0

F!MAHCE, !MSURAMCE, AMD REAL ESTATE......

2,127

2,106

2,081

2,067

+

21

+

60

SERV!CE AMD MtSCELLAMEOUS..............

5,644

5,600

5,563

5,607

+

44

+

37

6,469
2,163
4,306

6,625
2,164
4,461

6,701
2,160
4,541

6,405
2,281
4,124

— 156
1

+

- 155

+

64
118
182

WHOLESALE TRADE.......................
RETA!L TRADE........................
General merchandise stores.
Food and liquor stores. ..................
Automotive and accessories dealers. ......
Other retail trade.......................

STATE AMD LOCAL........................




-

-

Tabte 2:

Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing maior industry groups

Avera^ekiy
Major industry group

1954
July
June
1/

1953
July

l
/

1954
June
July
i/

1953
July

1954
June

l/

l/

July

1953
July

l/

39.6

40.3

31.80

31.81

31.77

39.8

40.0

40.8

1.91

1.91

1.88

77.87

40.4

40.3

41.2

1.98

1.98

1.89

68.21
62.33

67.16
61.05

41.0
39.0

40.6

40.7
39.9

1.64
1.57

1.68
1.57

1.65
1.53

70.62
82.92

71.10
81.12

70.58
85.07

39.9
39.3

40.4
39.0

40.8
40.9

1.77
2.11

1.76
2.08

1.73
2.08

75.41
80.40
72.25
84.59

76.92
81.00
71.68
84.19

76.41
81.73
70.58
84.86

39.9

Machinery (except electrical).
Electrical machinery........
Transportation equipment....

39.7
39.9

40.7
40.5
39.6
39.9

41.3
41.7
40.1
40.8

1.89
2.01
1.82
2.12

1.89
2.00
1.81
2.11

1.85
1.96
1.76
2.08

'prod^ts^ ^

72.65

72.83

71.86

39.7

39.8

40.6

1.83

1.83

1.77

"industries""

62.79

63.52

61.93

39.0

39.7

39.7

1.61

1.60

1.56

NONDURABLE GOOCS............

64.57

64.74

63.76

38.9

39.0

39.6

1.66

1.66

1.61

Food and kindred products
Tobacco manufactures........
Tex tile—mi 11 produc ts.......

69.81
52.16
51.41

69.55
51.71
51.41

66.72
47.87
53.18

41.8
37.8
37.8

41.4
38.3
37.8

41.7
37.4
39.1

1.67
1.38
1.36

1.68
1.35
1.36

1.60
1.28
1.36

^exHL^roducIs.f!?!^....
Paper and allied products....

47.03
74.52

46.55
73.95

47.88
73.44

35.1
42.1

35.0
42.5

36.0
43.2

1.34
1.77

1.33
1.74

1.33
1.70

^allied^industriel!^' .
....
Chemicals and allied products.

86.71
78.91

86.94
79.07

84.75
76.63

38.2
41.1

38.3
41.4

3?.7
41.2

2.27
1.92

2.27
1.91

2.19
1.86

^ o a l ^ . ° f . ^ ° ^ ' . ^ ....

92.66
(2/)
50.83

94.39
81.00
51.01

92.32
78.98
51.82

41.0
(2/)
37.1

41.4
40.5
36.7

/J.4
40.5
38.1

2.26
(2/)
1.37

2.28
2.00
1.39

2.23
1.95
1.36

370.92

371.68

371.33

76.02

76.40

76.70

Ordmnce and accessories

79.99

79.79

Furniture and fixtures......

67.24
61.23

^product^' ^
Primary metal industries....

MANUFACTURE...............
DURABLE GOODS..............

39.4

39.7

(except ordnance, machinery,

Rubber products
Leather and leather products..

2/ Not available.




40.0

Htstonc^l

E\itj

Tab!# A-l: Emptoyeos in nonagricuitura! estabiishments,
by industry division

Wholesale
Year and ...th

TOTAL

Mining
utilities

1MMNS

Annu3l avercL^e:
1919............
1920 ............
19 2 1............
1922 ............
1923 ............
1924............
1925............
19^6............
1927 ............
1928 ............

2(,829
27,088
24,125
25,569
28,128
27,770
28,505
29,539
29,691
29,710

1,124
1,230
953
920
1,203
1,092
1,080
1,176
1,105
1,041

1.0J1
848
1,012
1,185
1,229
1.321
1,446
1,555
1,608
1,606

13,53-'
10,yy*
8,132
8,986
10,155
9,523
9,786
9,997
9,839
9,786

;.YH
3,998
3,459
3,505
3,882
3,806
3,824
3,940
3,891
3,822

4,644
4,623
4 754
5,084
5,494
5,626
5,810
6,033
6,165
6,137

1,050
i,no
1,097
1,079
1,123
1,163
1,166
1,235
1,295
1,360

2,054
2,142
2,187
2,268
2,431
2,516
2,591
2,755
2,871
2,962

2,671
2,603
2,531
2,542
2,611
2,723
2,802
2,848
2,917
2,996

1929 ............
1930 ............
1931............
1932 ............
1933 ............
1934............
1935............
1936............
19 3 7............
1938............

31,041
29,143
26,383
23,377
23,466
25,699
26,792
28,802
30,718
28,902

1,078
1,000
864
722
735
874
888
937
1,006
882

1,497
1,372
1,214
970
809
862
912
1,145
1,112
1,055

10,534
9,401
8,021
6,797
7,258
8,346
8,907
9,653
10,606
9,253

3,907
3,675
3,243
2,804
2,659
2,736
2,771
2,956
3,114
2,840

6,401
6,064
5,531
4,907
4,999
5,552
5,692
6,076
6,543
6,453

1,431
1,398
1,333
1,270
1,225
1,247
1,262
1,313
1,355
1,347

3,127
3,084
2,913
2,682
2,614
2,784
2,883
3,060
3,233
3,196

3,066
3,149
3,264
3,225
3,167
3,298
3,477
3,662
3,749
3,876

1939............
19^0............
1941............
1Q42............
19^3............
1 9 ^ ............
1945............
1946 ............
19^7............
19^8............

30,287
32,031
36,164
39,697
42,042
41,480
40,069
41,412
43,438
44,382

845
916
947
983
917
883
826
852
943
982

1,150
1,294
1,790
2,170
1,567
1,094
1,132
1,661
1,982
2,169

10,078
10,780
12,974
15,051
17,381
17,1U
15,302
i4,46i
15,290
15,321

2,912
3,013
3,248
3,433
3,619
3,798
3,872
4,023
4,122
4,141

6,612
6,940
7,416
7,333
7,189
7,260
7,522
8,602
9,196
9,519

1,382
1,419
1,462
1,440
i,4oi
1,374
1,394
1,586
1,641
1,7 1 1

3,321
3,477
3,705
3,857
3,919
3,934
4,055
4,621
4,807
4,925

3,987
4,192
4,622
5,431
6,049
6,026
5,967
5,607
5,456
5,614

1949 ............
1950............
1951............
1952............
1953............

43,295
44,696
47,289
48,306
49,660

918
889
916
885
844

2,165
2,333
2,603
2,634
2,644

14,178
14,967
16,104
16,334
17,259

3,949
3,977
4,166
4,185
4,224

9,513
9,645
10,012
10,281
10,533

1,736
1,796
1,862
1,957
2,025

5,000
5,098
5,278
5,423
5,486

5,837
5,992
6,348
6,609
6,645

1P53! May........

bP,$3l
b9,90b

842
846

2,607
2,711

17,283
17,bl6

b,233
f ,260
t

I0,it0$
lo,b73

2,01b
2,037

$,$3b
$,$76

6,613
6,$8$

July.......
August **#<<**
September....
October....

49,716
<*9,962
50,M 0
$0,180
b9,8$l
$0,197

836
844
839
826
829
822

2,768
2,62$
2,866
2,889
2,789
2,632

17,336
17,$37
17,$10
17,301
16,988
16,76$

4,283
b,27b
b,26$
b,2$7
i ,216
t
i ,167
t

10,bib
10,392
10,$23
10,669
10,828
11,361

2,067
2,067
2,0bl
2,0b0
2,03b
2,0b0

$,607
$,601
$,$66
$,$06
$,b67
$,b3$

6,bo$
6,b22
6,$90
6,692
6,700
6,9$$

b8,lb7
b7,880
b7,8b8
1)8,068
47,93$
b8,l$o

80$
790
772
749
737
748

2,349
2,356
2,415'
2,$35
2,634
2,730

I6,b3b
16,322
16,23b
16,000
1$,836
1$,888

i,06?
t
i,039
t
3,992
i,
t 008
i,008
t
i,
t 029

M,b21
10,310
10,30$
10, t
i 96
10,375
1,ti
0i2t

2,033
2,0bb
2,0$7
2,07$
2,081
2,106

$,377
$,380
$,b06
$,$06
$,$63
$,600

6,6$9
6,639
6,667
6,699
6,701
6,62$

Monthly deta:

February...
May........




1

industry Empt^yment
Tabte A-2: Empioyees in nonagricu!tura) estab!ishments^
by industry division and group

195b

1953

Industry d n H n o n and group

June

May

April

June

May

b8,l50

M!N!MG....................................
Metal mining ..............................
Crude-petroleum and natural-gas production...
Konmetallic mining and quarrying.............

b7,935

b8,068

b9,90b

b9,531

7b8

737

7b9

8b6

8b2

100.ii
28.b
2l!;.b
300.7
lOb.l

9S.8
29.3
213.3
292.2

106.6
53.6
2eb.i
29b.7
107.1

105.b
55.6
285.2
2S9.7
106.0

103.2

98.b
219^
291.2
101.0

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTtON.......................

2,730

2,63).

2,535

2,711

2,607

HONBU!LDiMGCONSTRUCT!ON....................

583

550

b97

553

521

269.1
31b.l

2!t3.6
306.7

208.0
289.3

2b6.0
306.8

297.9

Highway and street.........................
Other nonbuilding construction..............

BUtLDtMGCOMSTRUCHOM......................
General contractors.........................
Special-trade contractors...................

Other special-trade contractors.............

2,lb7
92b.7
1,222.6
296.9
15'f.l
167.?
608.1

2,08b
892.5
1,191.7
292.0
139.2
l6b.2
596.3

2,038

867.8
1,169.9
290.1
I3it.5
162.0
583.3

223.2

2,158

2,086

969.8
1,188.1
286.8
I5b.l
158.3
5C8.9

931.0
l,15'b.7
281.b
lbS.3
156.5
568.5

MANUFACTUR!MG..............................

15, M S

15,836

16,000

]7,bl6

17,283

DURABLE GOODS.............................

9,i?i

9,152

?,2?0

13,3d

10,269

169.0
772.7
328.5
510.5
l,178.b

175.6
7ii7.1
330.6
50?.^
l,172.b

lG8.t;
716.5
337.c
510.9
1,186.8

253.2
811.1
373.6
550.7
1,356.7

2b8.7
791.P
376.3
5b5.7
l,3bC.3

1,037.3
i,55i.5
1,073.8
l,73b.l
306.0
bpe.?

i,obo.b
1,567.7
1,087.1
1,752.5
310.5
b56.3

l,0'i7.b
1,590.7
1,108.5
1,793.'^
315.3
b6b.7

1,162.7
l,^36.i.
l,23?.b
1,987.0
336.2
502.9

1,157.5
1,736.7
1,238.8
1,990.9
333.8
b98.5

6,767

6,68b

6,7bO

7,115

7,0lb

1,509.5
90.3
i,073.C
l,H3.6
525.8
coh.7
775.9
25^.2
255. r
363.5

l,b57.8
89.3
1 ,063.2
1,107.3
522.7
801.7
781.3
252.^.
253.7
353.5

l,b3b.9
89.9
1,073.3
1,155.1
522.7
803.7
791.1
251.8
252.8
36b.0

1,536.6
91.3
1,209.6
l,2ib.b
532.2
790.1
80b.6
263.5
28b.l
383.5

l,b78.5
91.7
1,203.6
1,200.8
525.0
78b.9
&0b.7
260.1
283.8
380.6

Ordnance and accessories....................
Lumber and wood products (except furniture)....
Furniture and fixtures......................
Stone, clay, and glass products..............
Primary metal industries....................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment)....

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.......

Food and kindred products...................
Apparel and other finished textile products....
Paper and allied products...................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries....

Leather and leather products................

2




tndusttA

Employment

Tabie A-2: Emptoyees in nonagricuttura! estabiishments,
by industry division and group - Continued

1954

1953

Industry divtstcn and Sroup

June

May

April

Jnna

TRANSPORTAHON AMD PUBUC UT!L!T!ES...........

4,029

4,008

4,008

4,260

TRAWSPORTAT!OW....................................

2,700

2,685

2,685

2,928

2,911

1,227.9
1 ,073.8
12 . t
2i
684.0
66$.8
48.4
105.0

1 ,215.6
1,
061.9

1 ,206.4

1,399.9
1,229.2
128.6
723.8
676.0
52.9
105.7

1 ,387.0

Interstate railroads

..................

Air transportation (common carrier)............

123.5
680.1
665.h
48.6
105.3

1,052.4
125.4
683.7
669.8
48.5
105.3

"*y
4,233

1,217.5
128.3
720.8

674.7
52.1
103.1

741

741

742

751

749

698.8

698.6

706.0

41.2

MA

699.6
41.5

703.2
44.6

44.6

Gas and electric utilities
...................
Local utilities, not elsewhere classified......

588

5B2

581

581

573

563.2
24.9

OTHER PUBLtC UT!L!T!ES............................

^7.1
244

556.3
24.5

557.3
24.1

549.3
23.6

10,424

10,375

10,496

10,473

10,405

2,757

WHOLESALE AMD RETA!L TRADE....................

2,746

2,762

2,765

2,747
7,658

7,667
General mercnandise stores

Other retail trade...............................

FtNANCE, !NSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE............
Qanks and trust companies

*

*

*

.

Insurance carriers and agents...................
Other finance agencies and real estate..........

SERVtCE M)D MtSCELLAHEOUS....................

7,629

7,734

7,708

1,333 A
1,422.1
8IO.7
595.2
3,506.0

1,339.3
1,416.3
808.8

1,408.6
1,419.6

600.0

807.7

1,385.7
1,390.5
814.5

1,390.1
1,384.2
805.4

3,464.6

659.0
3,438.6

3,514.0

3,474-1

2,106

2,081

2,075

2,037

2,014

525.7
66.?
776.7
736.3
5,600

521.3
65.8
770.9
723.2
5,563

603.6

603.9

522.6

506.8

499.1

65.4
771.2
715.4

66.5
738.4
725.2

731.1
717.3

5,506

5,576

66.7

5,534

526.2
Persinal^ervi^s..................
Laundries......................................

501.7

488.0

538.9

508.3

336.6

333.6
171.3
235.7

330.8

347.0
174.3
237.4

342.0

170.9

172.8
Motion pictures............................ ......

236.5

233.4

172.3
236.2

6,625

6,701

6,699

6,585

6,613

FEDERAL............................................

2,164

2,160

2,168

2,303

2,304

STATE AHD LOCAL...................................

4,461

4,541

4,531

4,282

4,309

GOVERNMENT............................... .

309742 O - 54 - 2




hidustr^

Tabte A-3? A!! emptoyees and production workers in mining and
manufacturing industries
All employees

Production workers

industry group and industry

June
1954
MM/AfC..............................
METAL M!M!NG..................

M
ay1954

Apr.
1954

June
1953

June
1954

May
1954

Apr.
1954

June
1953

748

737

749

846

-

-

-

-

100.t
i

98.8

98.4

106.6

30.7
24.3
12.9

86.1

84.2

92.0

30.9
23.4
12.8

30.4
23.2
12.8

35.8
24.6
14.9

84.8

Iron mining
Copper nining..
Lead and zinc mining.............

35.3
28.t
i
15.3

35.3
27.5
15.1

34.9
27.4
15.2

4o.6
28.7
17.5

AWTHRACtTE.................................................

28.4

29.3

38.8

53.6

25.6

26.0

35.4

50.3

B)TUW)W0US-C0AL......................................

214.4

213.3

219.7

284.1

195.3

194.9

200.8

263.1

CRUOE-PETROLEUM AM MATURAL-GAS
D
PRODUCT)OH..............................................

300.7

292.2

291.2

294.7

-

-

-

128.7

134.7

86.6

93.0

135.1

s ervlet)"

NOMMETALUC M!W!WG AMD QUARRY!MG..
......................

Goods................
M/!dMrc6/g Goods..............

104.1

103.2

101.0

107.1

129.0

89.2

88.6

15,888

15,836

16,000

17,416

12,484

9,121
6,767

9,152
6,684

9,260
6,740

10,301
7,115

7,180
5,304

ORDWAWCE AMD ACCESSOR)ES .......

169.0

FOOD AMD KtNDREO PRODUCTS.......

1,509.5

Meat products
Dairy products...................
Canning and preserving...........
Grain—will products..............

317.5
130.0
191.7
123.3
282.6
29.1

310.0
124.2
172.6
119.7
280.2
29.1

310.6
118.7
163.2
112.5
282.7
28.3

314.7
128.5
210.0
121.6
288.2
28.5

246.6
88.3
163.4
91.4
174.3
23.8

Miscellaneous food products.....

75.0
219.2
141.1

74.5
209.6
137.9

76.6
205.1
137.2

78.1
222.4
144.6

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...........

90.3

89.8

89.9

31.6
39.8
7.8
1 1 .1

31.4
39.5
7.9

31.6
39.2
8.0

Sugar.............................
Confectionery and related

Tobacco

-

stemming and redrying....

TEXT!LE-MtLL PRODUCTS..........................

175.6

119.8

12,437

12,590

13,985

7,206
5,229

7,309
5,281

8,326
5,659

125.2

136.8

193.9

1,077.9 1,031.1

1 ,0 11.1

1,108.3

238.6
84.0
144.2
87.9
171.9
23.8

241.1
80.2
135.2
80.6
174.2
23.0

248.9
89.5
178.6
89.6
183.1
23.2

6l.l
127.9
10 1.1

60.3
121.8
98.6

62.0
117.1
97.7

64.0
126.9
104.5

91.3

82.3

81.5

81.7

83.2

28.7
37.8
6.7
9.1

28.3
37.5
6.7
9.0

28.6
37.2
6.8
9.1

28.5
38.3
6.8
9.6

188.4

253.2

1,457.8 1,434.9

1,536.6

11.0

11.1

31.4
40.3
7.9
11.7

1,073.0 ' 1 ,063.2

1,073.8

1 ,209.6

980.1

968.6

979.0

1,112.7

5.1
113.1
451.5
25.3
192.2
75.5

4.9
115.3
455.2
25.7
191.6
76.6

6.4
138.5
513.9
28.2
219.6
81.9

Narrow fabrics and smallwares....
Knitting mills...................
Dyeing and finishing textiles....
Carpets, rugs, other floor

Millinery
...........
Miscellaneous textile goods.....

4




6.0
123.7
485.4
29.1
217.4
85.7

5.6
122.5
481.1
29.0
213.2
86.0

5.4
124.8
484.9
29.4
212.6
86.9

7.0
148.6
31.9
240.6
92.8

5.5
114.4
457.3
25.3
196.3
75.3

5o.i

Scouring and combing plants .

50.1

52.9

58.5

41.0

4 i.c

43.8

49.5

13.8
61.8

14.0
61.7

13.9
63.0

17.0
68.8

12.3
52.7

12.5
52.4

12.2
53.7

15.3
59.4

544.4

tndu>!f\ fmpkAMICHt
Tab!e A-3: A!! emptoyees and production workers in mining and
manufacturing industries - Continued
All employees

Production workers

industry group and industry

APPAREL AMP OTHER F!M!SHED
TEXTtLE PRODUCTS.............

May

Apr.

June

June

May

Apr.

June

195b

June

195b

1953

iysb

195b

195b

1953

1,155.1

l,2lb.b

989.2

98b.9

1 , 029.7

l,08b.5

118 .
s

123.7

I36.b

IO9.6

105.3

110.2

123.0

283.6
32b.1

290.1
353.2

313.9
3b5.0

262.9
282.7

26l.b
286.8

267.7
31b.2

290.3
30b.6

107.5
Children's outerwear.............
Fur goods........................

1 , 107.3

123.2
28S.O
321.1

Men's and boys' suits and coats..
Men's and boys' furnishings and

1,113.6

109.9
15.0
69.5

113.9
17.1
7b.5
ib.5

95.3
10.6
69.1
9.9

97-2
13.1
63.0

10.9

111.3
19-9
69.3
8.9

8.2

98.8
17.9
63.0
6.3

101.0
lb.8
67.9
11.7

12.6
75.8
12.9

accessories.....................
Other fabricated textile
products........................

57-6

55.9

57.1

6b.o

51.b

b9.b

50.3

56.8

117.7

119.9

121.6

135.1

97.7

100.5

101.3

llb.b

LUMBER AMD WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURMtTURE).................

772.7

7b7.1

716.5

811.1

703.9

678.5

6b8.7

7bo.3

129.3

boo.6

116.1
390.5

96.7
380.3

115.9
b3b.6

120.7
371.9

108.3
361.3

89.9
350.8

108.3
b03.1

^ ^ ^ r ^ r u c t u r a l ' w ^ d products?.
Wooden containers................
Mis.ella.eous wood product......

127.8

125.9

12 . i
3i

61.3

60.9

6 1.1

53.7

53.7

55.0

13b.2
67.3
59.1

107.5
56.5
b7-3

105.5
56.1
b7.3

103.3
56.b
b8.3

113.8
62 Jt
52.7

FURM!TURE AMD FtXTURES.........

328.5

330.6

337.0

371.6

27b.5

276.5

282.7

317.3

Household furniture..............
Office, public-building, and
professional furniture..........

228.1

230.7

236.8

26b.2

196.1

198.6

20b.3

231.5

i02
).

39.9

100
*.

b2.3

31.9

31.9

32.1

3b.6

33.2

33.0

33*3

35.8

25.3

2b.9

25.2

27.7

27.0

27.0

26.9

29.3

21.2

21.1

21.1

23.5

525.8

522.7

522.7

532.2

b35.7

b32.5

b32.7

bh2.5

259.0
1 25
1* .
12b.3

256.9
lb2.1
123.7

256.5
Ut2.0
1 i .2
2t

258.0
lb8.7
125.5

219.b
117.2
99.1

217.9
116.3
98.3

217.3
116.3
99.1

121.9
101.3

PR!HTtMG, PUBL!SH!MG, AMD ALHED
!MDUSTRtES.................

80h.7

801.7

803.7

790.1

518.2

51b.7

5l6.b

512.b

Newspapers
Periodicals......................

295.2
61.5

293.7

289.5

ib5.8
26.0

lb5.6
26.0

30.b

29.5
167.2

59.2
19.1

5.t
9l
18.8

20.0

166.5
b5.6
lb.o

168.0

20.it

lb7.3
25.b
30.8
167.9
b5.b
15.3

lb6.6
25.6

206.1

292.8
62.9
51.2
207.2

b5-7
13.8

bb.O
15.2

b3.9

b3.9

1A.2

bb.6

3b.7

3b.5

3b.8

35.2

66.9

66.7

67.2

63.9

51.b

51.3

51.9

b9.7

Logging camps and contractors....
Sawmills and planing mills......

PAPER AMD ALL!ED PRODUCTS......
mills............................
Paperboard containers and boxes..
Other paper a.d allied product...

Comme^rci al printing. .............
Lithographing....................

^ d u i t r i " f . " f . ^ ! . t f ........




...

50.8
207.0

59.0

61.9

51.1

60.7

50.2
20b.b
56.8

30.6

219.3

-2-

tndustry

Employment

Tabie A-3: Ai! empioyees and production workers in mining and
manufacturing industries - Continued
All employees

Production workers

industry group and industry

June
1954

May
1954

Apr.
1954

June
1953

June
1
95ii

May
195il

Apr.
195h

June
1953

CHEMtCALS AND ALL!ED PRODUCTS....

775.9

781.3

791.1

804.6

517.9

525.3

533.8

550.it

Industrial inorganic chemicals....
Industrial organic chemicals......

94.6
298.0
90.9

93.6
297.0
90.8

93.4
298.5
91.5

92.8
321.8
91.7

67.5
201.3
55.9

67.1
201.0
56.2

66.7
201.7
56.6

66.0
226.5
57.0

Paints pigments, and fillers.....
Gum and wood chemirals............

51.6
72.8
8.0
33.1

51.4
72.6
8.3
40.3

51.7
72.8
8.3
46.8

51.3
75.4
7.8
34.7

31.8
i .
i5 9
6.8
2i.6
i

31.7
h5.6
7.1
31.7

32.0
it6.o
7.0
38.h

32.1
i83
*.
6.6
26.5

fats..............................
Miscellaneous oh.mi.als...........

37.1
89.8

37.8
89.5

39.5
88.6

38.0
91.1

25.9
58.2

26.7
58.2

28.t
i
57.0

26.7
60.7

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AMD COAL...

255.2

252.6

251.8

263.5

179.8

178.6

176.2

189.3

Petroleum refining................
Coke and other petroleum and

204.8

202.9

202.9

207.6

139.1

138.it

137.0

lit3.3

50.4

49.7

48.9

35.9

i07
i.

i O.
t 2

39.2

i6.0
i

255.6

253.7

252.8

28i .
in

199.1

197.0

195.2

226.5

Other rubber products..........

113 .1
25.0
117.5

111.5
25.0
117.2

111.2
24.5
117.1

122.7
29.1
132.3

85.7
19.7
93.7

83.9
19.8
93.3

83.2
19.2
92.8

96.0
23.5
107.0

LEATHER AMD LEATHER PRODUCTS.....

363.5

353.5

364.0

388.$

32i.2
t

315.1

325.1

3i*9.5

finished..........................
Industrial leather belting and
packing...........................

43.7

43.1

43.3

i8.0
t

39.2

38.6

38.8

i 3.2
i

4.7

4.7

4.8

5i
.i

3.6

3.6

3.6

h.5

findings..........................
Footwear (except rubber)..........
Luggage............................
Handbags and small leather

16.0
241.7
14.6

14.9
234.4
13.9

15.7
241.7
13.4

17.2
253.2
17.6

lt
i .2
217.5
12.3

13.2
210.8
11.8

lii.O
217.8
11.3

I5.ii
229.it
i5.ii

26.5

27.0

30.0

28.7

23.2

23.7

26.7

2.l
5i

lt
i .2

13.ii

12.9

16.2

^partt^s'

RUBBER PRODUCTS................
Tires and inner tubes
Rubber footwear...................

^goods ^

leather

16.3

15.5

15.1

I8.t
i

510.5

509.5

510.9

550.7

i28.0
t

i*26.9

i:28.3

i67.2
t

28.3

27.7

28.2

31.2

25.3

2h.7

25.0

27.7

90.6

91.0

91.6

100.0

77.3

77.9

78.,
i

86.9

glass.............................

15.3
39.3
79.1
51.7

15.5
40.5
77.8
52.6

15.8
40.9
77.1
53.4

l8.t
i
il7
t.
82.1
56.0

13.2
32.6
70.5
it5.6

13.3
33.7
69.2
i6..
t i

13.7
3ii 2
.
68.5
ii7
.1

16.0
35.0
73.6
i .
i9 9

^rodu^tsJf!'^:.^!'.^"^ ....

103.6
18.5

101.8
18.7

100.0
19.0

106.2
18.1.

85.0
16.1

83.3
16.3

8l i
.t
16.8

87.6
16.2

84.1

83.9

84.9

%.7

62.i-

62.1

63.2

7t3
i.

STOME, CLAY, AMD GLASS PRODUCTS....
Flat glass........................
Glass and glassware, pressed or

"liner^"products""'

6




tfidustr\ [mpk'\nicnt
Tabte A -3:Att emptoyees and production workers in mining and
manufacturing industries - Continued

All employees

Industry group and industry

PRIMARY METAL !NDUSTR)ES........

June
195b

May

l,17S.b 1 ,172.'4

Production worker.

Aor.
195b

June
1953

June
1954

Hey
195
it

Apr.

J9i
.5t

June
1953

1 ,186.8

1,356.7

985.1

975.6

991.1

1 ,152.6

rolling mills.................
Iron and steel foundries........
Primary smelting and refining of
non ferrous metals......... ....

578.1
220.3

573.9
219.1

530.1
223.0

662.1
256.1

hP0.3
191. S

it83.3
190.t
i

it90.8
19it.2

567.2
225.9

58.b

57.8

57.7

60.S

<t7.5

i
t7.1

it
7.1

50.3

of nonferrous metals...........
Rolling, drawing, and alloying

12.^

12.6

12.7

13.7

9.2

9.3

9.3

10.2

102.*4

71.9

101.8
72.b

10?.0
75.1

115.7
93. b

81.0
4
57.<

fo.6
57.6

80.9
60.0

9<t
.0
78.0

13b. 9

13b. 8

136.2

lp'b.9

l.79
''.

107.3

108.8

127.0

1,037.3

l,0a0.b

i,ob7.b

1,162.7

830.0

833.3

839.5

952.9

57.0

55.3

5b. 2

58.0

S0.t
i

i8.8
t

i .
t7 5

51.2

li-b.6

166.2

117.1

119.3

120.3

137.3

89.2

109.9

Mlsc^Hnlofslr^ry'metal.....

FABRiCATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
ORDNANCE, MACH!NERY. AND TRANS­
PORTAT) ON EQU!PMENT)...........
Cutlery" h ^ d ^ t o o l s ^ ^ d l k r d l " "

lb6.9

lb7.9

117.7

115.9

116.0

136.9

91.7

89.6

269.3

266.6

265.7

273.1

20i .6
t

202.8

201.7

211.1

22b.O
b3.3
53.2

230.b
b3.3
53.8

23b.b
bb.6
5b.6

266.2
50.9
65.1

185.1
3ti
i.t
it3.8

191.1
3it
.3
ii.
tt3

195.3
35.5
't5.o

225.2
il
t .8
5t7
i.

128.2

128.2

130.0

lb6.3

102.9

103.1

105.0

121.2

1,551.5

1,567.7

1,590.7

l,736.b

i,i!t9.9 1 ,165.0

1 ,186.6

1,330.2

75.5

7 i
6. i

77.3

90.3

5i
t.2

5t6
i.

66.1

150.1
12b.O
2-0.0

lb9.7
123.7
28b.7

151.?
12b.6
290.7

176.8
137.5
3H .6

110.7
90.2
2
1it.7

110 .1
89.6
219.5

111.6
9 .it
0
22it.9

I3it.7
103.0
2it7.5

17b.3
226.8

175.5
227.9

177.2
230.8

191.0
2b6.l

12i .8
t
15it.l

125.8
155.7

127.8
158.2

litO.6
17it.O

103.5

103.3

10b.8

109.3

81.9

81.3

82.8

88.6

mach ines......................
Miscellaneous machinery parts...

165.8
251.5

175.3
251.2

I80.b
253.7

203.9
269.9

12i.2
t
195.8

I33.it
I95.it

138.0
198.3

158.9
216.8

ELECTRtCAL MACH!MERY............

1 ,073.8

1,087.1

1,108.5

l,232.b

778.3

791.2

810.9

936.7

industrial apparatus...........

363.6
60.6
23.b
70.7
27.7
b77.0
b5.8

369.0
62.6
28.6
72.1
27.7
b8l.6
b5.5

373.5
65.0
28.8
73.5
28.1
b9b.3
b5.3

bO^ .9
71.9
3b.3
8b.9
28.5
55b.6
b9.3

253.3
i8.1
t
22.7
$6.6
2it,0
339.3
3t3
i.

263.2
259.2
5o.it
52.9
23.2
23.1
57.7
58.9
2it.2
2t5
i.
3<t2.6
35it.3
3it.0 1 33.9
)

297.3
60.1
28.5
70.3
25.0
itl7.8
37.7

Fabricated structural"met^l^^
.....

Mi scell l^eouslabricated' metal* '''
products......................

MACH!NERY (EXCEPT ELECTR!CAL)....
Agr^culturll^mlchinery'^d......
tractors......................
Construction and mining machinery.
s j e c i l l - i n d u s t r y ^ ......
(except metalworking machinery)..

53.5

O f f l c e ^ l d ' s t o r ^ L c h i n l s ^ d ....
Ser^ce-industry' Md' household''' *

Insulated wire and cable........
Electrical equipment for vehicles.
Electric lamps.................
Communication equipment.........
Miscellaneous electrical products.




7

Industry

hnpk^mcnt

Tabie A-3: A!! em pioyees and production workers in mining and
manufacturing industries - Continued

All employees

Production workers

Industry group and industry

June
195it

May
195ii

Apr.
I95h

June
1953

l,73it.l

1,752.5

1,793.1;

1,987.0

1,321.3

1 ,i2i
3t.t

735.7
80i .2
t
it93.8
166.1
17.6

71A.8
806.9
i96.2
t
169.5
13.1

770.9
816.6
i;98.9
17it.5
13.8

950.0
78it.8
it75.2
177.it
17.9

591.6
569.9
3i8.6
t
H3.it
12.6

600.9
575.0
353.3
116.2
9.1

625.0
58it.5
356.2
121.3
9.3

787.1
572.1
3i i .
ttO
126.5
13.2

126.7

128.1

129.t{

llit.3

95.3

9 .i
6 t

97.7

88.t
i

Other transportation equipment...

127.it
105.3
22.1
57.
it
9i
.t

132.0
109.1
22.9
59.8
9.0

132.7
111.8
20.9
6h.5
8.7

155.6
131.7
23.9
8t9
i.
11.7

110.6
91.2
19. t
i
il5
t.
7.7

115.2
95.0
20.2
ii.
tti
7.2

115.6
97.2
I8.t
i
i83
t.
7.0

136.9
115.6
21.3
67.1
9.9

!MSTRUMENTS AMD RELATED PRODUCTS..

306.0

310.5

315.3

336.2

215.2

219.5

223.9

2
it5.3

50.3

5i.it

52.5

55.3

29.7

30.5

31.7

3t6
i.

7t5
i.
13.7

76.9
13.8

77.3
l .
it l

82.2
15.1

51.7
10.8

5it.o
10.8

5ti
i.t
11.0

59.it
11.9

39.7
25.5
67.0
35.3

39.7
25.8
66.8
36.1

itO.O
26.2
67.6
37.6

h i.
i l
27.2
67.6
ii.
jt7

27.7
20.1
it 9
5.
29.3

27.7
20.5
i57
t.
30.3

28.0
20.8
i .
t6 3
31.7

31.5
21.9
it 5
7.
38.5

it58.9

ii58.3

h6h.7

502.9

373.9

373.9

380.1

iti6.7

51.8
15.2
81.6

51.9
15.5
81.2

52.9
15.9
80.0

52.9
17.1
97.5

il
t .6
12.9
68.3

i .
ti 9
13.2
67.9

i2.6
t
13.5
67.0

i .
t3 l
it
i .8
83.8

29.2
62.1
69.8
lit9.2

29.3
59.6
70.1
150.7

2 i
9. t
60.7
71.5
I5ii.3

29.6
66.0
77.5
162.3

22.1
51.5
57.0
120.5

22.1
i 9.
t 1
57.3
122. j
i

22.1
50.5
58.8
125.6

22.3
55.5
6t7
i.
132.5

TRANSRORTAHON EQU!PMEMT.......
Automobiles

Aircraft engines and parts.*....
Aircraft propellers and parts...
Other aircraft parts and
Ship and boat building and
repairing.......................
Boat building and repairing....

Laboratory,

scientific,

May
1
95it

Apr.
195h

June
1953

1 ,380.t 1,573.1
i

and

M e c h l n l c a ^ m e l s u r ^ ' ^ d .......
controlling instruments........
Surgical, medical,

June
195
it

and dental

M!SCELLAMEOUS MAHUFACTURtMG
!MDUSTR!ES.................
Jewelry, silverware, and plated
Musical instruments and parts....

P^s/penciny^d^r'cff!^"
Costume jewelry, buttons, notions
Fabricated plastic products.....
Other manufacturing industries...

8




Pj\rol! Indexes

Tabte A -4: Production workers and indexes of production-worker
emptoyment and weekty poyro!! in manufacturing industries
Production-worker employment
Period

Number
(in thousands)

(1947-49 aver­
age = 1 0 0 )

Production-worker
payroll index
(1947-49 aver­
age = 100)

Annual

1939..............
1%)..............
19M..............
19 2..............
it
19 3
it ...............
I i i ..............
9tt
I t
9i 5...............

8,192
8,811
10,877
12,83b
15,01b
lb,607
12,86b

66.2
71.2
87.9
103.9
121.i
t
118.1
lOit.O

29.9
3b.O
b9.3
72.2
99.0
102.8
87.8

I9 6...............
it
19 7
i* ..............
19 ..............
it8
I9i ..............
t9

12,10$
12,795
12,713
11,597
12,317
13,155
i3,ibb
13,650

97.9
103.i
t
102.8
93.8
99.6

81.2
97.7
105.1
97.2
111.7

1953: M
ay.......................
July.....................

1951..............
1952...............
1953................................

106.3

129.8
136.6

112.0

151.6

13,690
13,985

112.3
113.1

151.9
153.9

13,875
lb, 070
lb,061
13,852
13,53b
13,319

112.2

151.1
i5b.o
I53.b
152.6
lb8.0
lb7.2

13,002

105.1
ic t 3
i.

106.it

"da^a!"




12,906
12,818
12,590
12,b37
12,h8b

113.6
113.7
112.0

1 .i
09 t
107.7

103.6
101.8

1G0.5
100.9

ibo.8
ibo.5
138.b
135.0
135.1
136.7

9

Ship Buitding

Tab!e A-5r

Emptoyees in Government and private shipyards,
by region

195b

1953

Region 1/

June

May

211).1

219.b

105.3

April

June

May

223.8

256.6

257.3

109.1

111.8

131.7

130.7

108.6

110.3

U 2.0

12b.9

126.6

90.6

93.2

95.0

11$ .2

116.1

Private yards
Navy yards 2/.......... ............

b2.1
b8.5

b3.9
b9.3

bb.b
50.6

59.2
56.0

$9.0
$7.1

SOUTH ATLANT!C....................

38.2

38.9

39.7

b3.3

i*3.5

17.8
20.b

18.2
20.7

18.9
20.8

19.5
23-8

19.7
23.8

22.?

22.0

21.7

2b.6

23.7

ALL REG!0MS.......................

WORTH ATLAMTtC.....................

Private yards...... ......... ......
Navy yards..........................

GULF:

PAC!F!C..........................
Private yards
.............
Navy yards..........................

52.h

5b.8

55.7

61.2

61.5

12.5
3?.?

ib.5
bo.3

15.1
bo .6

16.1
^.1

15.8
M.7

5.5

6.1

7.0

7-0

7.2

b.7

5.3

$.3

GREAT LAKES:
Private yards......................

!MLAND:
Private yards.......................

b.5

The South Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in the following States: Florida,
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
The Gulf region includes all yards bordering on the Gulf of Mexico in the following States:
Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas.
ThePacificregionincludesallyardsinCalifornia,

Oregon,

Alabama,

and Washington.

The Great Lakes region includes all yards bordering on the Great Lakes in the following States:
Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
The Inland region includes all other yards.
2/ Data include Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard.

10




Illinois,

Federal G o v e r n m e n t

Tabte A -6: Federa! dvitian *mp)oym*nt

1953
Branch and agency

June

Legislative

Di$trict of Columbia J3/....................

Department of Defense

.......

Other agencies.........................
Legislative

...........................

309 74Z O - 54 - 3




May

2,16!*

2,160

2,168

2,303

2,30it

2,13!*.2

2,liil.9

2,277.2

2,277.6

1,025.2
50ii.8
608.1

1,028.6
502.it
603.2

1,036.0
502.6
603.3

1,138.1
50i*.3
63it.8

1,HiO.it
507.5
629.7

21.8
i.
tO

21.8
3.9

22.3
3.9

22.3
3.9

228.7

226.6

227.8

2ii3.2

2i*3.8

207.8

Post Office Department.................

June

21.9
i.
tO

Executive 2/

April

2,138.1

TOTAL FEDERAL 1/ .......................

May

20$.8

207.0

222.1

222.7

87.2
8.9
111.7

86
.ii
9.0
110.ii

87.1
9.2
110.7

90.1
9.1
122.9

90.2
9.2
123.3

20.1
.8

20.0
.8

20.0
.8

2 .i
0 t
.7

20 i
.t
.7

11

Shite Emplo\ment
Tabte A-7: Emptoyees in nonagricuttura! estabiishments,
by industry division and State
(In thousands)
Total
State

1954

Mining

M
ay

1953
June

Colorado...........................

302.5
3,824.8
407.3

662.3
201.7
305.6
3,810.6
397.6

Connecticut......................

850.2

District of Columbia........

486.2

Georgia.............................

June

(^)

513.6

824.9
888.9

487.4
846.0
890.6

909.1

(2/)
7.3
4.5

(2/)

805.7

(2/)
7.3
4.5

131.9
3.307.1
1 , 298.0

130.5

136.3

3,298.7
1 , 302.4
628.1

4.6
32.3
10.6
3.2

4.6
32.1

633.0

543.9

539.3

3,454.3
1,433-3
639.4
553-3

4.9
35.4
11.9
3.2
18.7

Maiyland...........................
Massachusetts...................

283.1

18.5

10.5

3.0
18.2

42.9
33.8
.6

42.5

2.2

32.9
.6

813.4
1,837.7

(2/)

2.2
(2/)

826.0

868.2

18.1

17.0

1 , 234.0
158.1

1,236.5
153.3

1,285.4

8.3

158.2

11.6

8.3

11.6

352.5
75.7
175.9
1,779.3
177.6

348.8
74.3
170.4
1,767.7
176.3

353.9
73.3
178.4
1,854.2
178.0

1.8

4.8
.2
4.5
14.1

1.7
4.7

5,800.9
977.7

5,790.8
975-9
111.4
2,917.5
531.6

5,977.4
1,003.4
114.2
3,084.7
541.5

11.9
3.5
2.0
21.3
47.0

633.2
-

112.7

2,917.6
534.5
462.3
3,593.1

282.0

513.0
121.5

454.4
3,585.3
279.3
514.6
119.3

Tennessee..............
Texas.-...............
Utah . 2 ...............
.4
Vermont...............
Virginia..............

817.7
2,244.0
205.4
102.3
659.7

816.2
2 , 223.0
205.2
100.1

Washington.............
West Virginia.........................

747.5
469.8
1,055.4
84.5

741.0

See footnotes at end of table.




695.8

5.7
35.6
12.4

784.2
1,747.1

Michigan...........................

12

(y)

(1/)

273.9
791.0
1,755.9

Wyoming......................................

10.6

233.3
27.5

31.4
18.9
13.3
228.5

884.1

-

Oregon................
Pennsylvania...........
Rhode Island...........
South Carolina.........
South Dakota...........

16.7

846.8

690.3
265.8

Nev York..............
North Carolina.........
North Dakota...........
Ohio..................

32.0

13.0
6.3
36.7
12.2

15.9
13.5
5-6
35.4

-

Nev Mexico.............

18.1

15.7

692.3

Nebraska..............
Nevada................
Nev Hampshire..........

M
ay

677.6
199.2
317.9
3, 891.8
416.7

13.8

859.3
471.6
1 , 045.5
80.0

477.9

1.3

.2

4.5
13.8

11.9
3.5
1.9
21.3
45.0

1.3

3, 883.6

98.0

101.2

305.9
538.1
123.9

(2/)
1.2
2.5

(2/)
1.2
2.5

837.3
2,259.7
214.8
104.9
897.5

8.7

8.6

126.2
11.8

121.0

751.1
509.1
1,099.9
87.1

1.3
15.4
2.7
80.7

4.2
8.4

1954
June

M
ay

Kentucky...........................
Louisiana.........................

Mississippi......................
Missouri...........................
Montana............................

Contract construction
1953
June

June

661.0
198.1

Illin ois...........................
Indiana............................
Iowa.................................
Kansas..............................

1954

11.3
1.3
15.4
2.6
81.3
4.0

7'
.7

13.8

1953.
June
34.8
17.0
20.6

25.0

251.4
28.4

40.1

38.8

41.5

16.2
76.7

16.2

19.1

74.3
46.2

76.8

7.7
170.3
53.6
37.9

7.7
165.4

9.9
173.2

52.2

66.9

38.4

34.9
36.5

35.6
33.8

47.8
31.6
.5
2.2

55.3
14.2

54.6
13.5

62.5

(2/)

69.7

60.5
68.0

58.3
13.0
63.6
76.1

7.3
4.6

-

20.6
8.1
11.3
1.8

4.8
.2
4.7
15.3
11.7
3-9
2.2
23.1
47.3

48.9

-

-

43.4
57.3
10.9

42.1
-

25.1
9.3
7.8

23.0

101.6

14.2
234.9
47.2
8.9

56.6

9.6
9.0
6.8
99.9
13.8
222.7

53.3

53.1
49.5
10.3
21.8
8.2

7.4
95.1
13.4
235.7
53.4
9.8

38.4

46.1
8.5
155.3
37.1

1.1
141.4
(2/)
1.3
2.6

23.9
200.0
15.9
40.6

184.6
15.2
4o.i

193.0
15.7
54.0

10.9

10.3

10.5

9.1
123.5
13.7
1.4
18.4

60.7

173.0
11.5
4.4
54.0

56.7
162.1

54.9
174.6
10.4
4.4

2.9
98.4
4.3
9.6

52.3
19.3
52.5
5.3

162.2

23.7

10.4
3.8
53.7

50.2
19.2

48.6
4.8

152.7

36.4

26.0

58.0

51.2
22.5
56.3
5.3

Shite hn p ! c \ m u i t

Tabte A-7: Emptoyees in nonagricutturat estabtishments,
by industry division and State - Continued
(in thousands)
Manufacturing

State

1954

Transportation and
public utilities
1954
1953
June
May
June

Wholesale and
retail trade
1954
1953
June
May
June

June

May

1953
June

224.2
25.8
79.2
1,022.3
63.8

223.7
25.8
80.6
1,020.7
62.7

233.8
28.5
82.6
1,057.8
68.1

51.1
20.1
27.7
332.2
43.0

51.0
20.0
28.0
330.7
42.7

52.1
21.2
30.6
342.5
46.5

134.9
49.6
72.6
876.8
107.1

135.0
50.2
73-2
870.0
104.6

136.8
49.9
75.6
887.2
107.2

414.2
57.7
16 .1
120.0
304.1

416.3
57.3
16.3
123.2
304.4

460.7
62.4
17.2
117.4
315.7

42.3
29.6
74.4
69.6

42.2

42.5

149.9

148.9

144.0

-

-

29.7
75.2
69.6

31.3
74.6
72.5

88.6
247.8
201.4

88.2
259.1
203.5

92.9
241.1
201.5

23.4
1 ,210.6
567.8
163.3
132.8

22.3
1 ,207.2
571.2
160.8
131.2

25.2
1,343.7
677.1
172.9
142.0

15.5
295.5
98.5
57.6
64.8

15.3
294.0
98.0
57.0
63.8

16.9
313.2
108.8
60.8
70.0

34.3
707.2
275.4
170.0
130.7

33.9
705.1
274.5
170.3
129.7

35.3
711.2
279.7
170.3
133.4

148.2
155.2
107.9
250.8
665.4

145.9
154.0
102.6
247.0
663.0

160.7
160.8
119.2
272.6
744.5

57.5
81.0
20.2
75.2
118.1

57.5
81.0
19.7
74.3
117.1

59.9
82.6
20.1
78.6
120.0

126.1
159.9
52.9
162.6
368.4

127.8
160.3
52.0
162.2
367.2

128.3
16O.9
53.1
16 1.1
369.7

1,045.5
207.8
92.9
377.7
18.6

1 ,051.2
206.3
91.8
379.2
17.2

1 ,260.1
224.8
98.2
420.7
18.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

86.6
26.3
126.6
22.5

85.7
26.1
126.0
22.3

95.5
25.9
134.6
24.3

205.3

204.2

212.0

-

-

-

298.5
40.3

297.7
39-3

314.7
40.2

New Jersey...............
New Mexico...............

59.4
4.2
78.7
770.5
16.5

58.4
4.0
77.0
767.5
16.3

62.1
4.3
82.4
854.2
16.5

41.9
8.9
10.6
146.3
18.9

40.8
8.7
10.7
145.7
18.6

44.7
9.1
10.9
149.0
20.2

92.2
16.1
31.8
318.3
41.7

91-9
15.8
31.1
313.9
41.3

94.6
15.2
31.7
322.5
41.6

New York.................
Worth Carolina............
North Dakota.............
Ohio....................
Oklahoma.................

1 ,832.3
423.7
6.6
1 ,280.0
82.8

1 ,838.7
421.3
6.3
1,284.7
82.6

2,005.1
442.5
6.4
1,435.3
84.8

503.9
60.3
14.0
216.5
49.3

502.9
60.3
13.6
215.4
48.9

517.0
63.3
14.6
235.9
51.7

1 ,263.9 1,264.2
196.1
195.7
37.5
37.5
561.1
563.2
127.1
127-7

1 ,282.1
197.8
37.5
572.5
133.1

Oregon...................
Pennsylvania.............
Phode Island.............
South Carolina.............................

140.5
1,428.8
124.8
216.0
12.0

135.3
1,437.0
122.8
215.7
11.6

149.7
1 ,635.8
148.2
226.8
12.3

45.4
308.3
16.0
25.9
9.9

44.5
304.6
16.0
26.1
9.7

48.5
336.9
16.5
27. '
6
10.4

105.4
673-8
52.1
100.0
37.8

104.7
672.5
52.4
100.6
37.0

110.8
695.2
53.1
100.0
39.1

Tennessee........................................
Texas...............................................
Utah.
..........................................
Vermont............................................
Virginia..........................................

272.6
424.6
30.1
37-4
236.7

272.9
421.7
29.8

295.4
444.1
31.9

236.4

255.0

59.5
224.0
21.8
8.4
81.0

59.7
221.7
21.4
8.3
80.7

62.0
233.8
23.3
8.7
85.5

180.7
598.7
49.1
19.4
190.7

181.7
597.6
48.5
19.0
19 1.1

182.1
593.9
50.5
18.9
197.9

Washington...............

200.5
125.6
427.6

196.8
124.7
424.4
6.2

201.3
137.3
472.5

64.8
49.5
77.2
14.4

64.2
49.0
75.8
14.0

68.3
53-9
81.2
15.9

165.3
80.8
227.7
19.7

163.9
81.7
226.0
18.5

166.4
85.6
228.1
19.1

Connecticut..............

Idaho...................
Illinois.................
Indiana..................
Kansas...................
Kentucky.................
Louisiana................
Maryland.................
Michigan.................

Wisconsin........................................

6.6

36.9

4o.6

6.4

-

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.




13

Shite Emplo\ment
Tab!* A-7: Emptoyees in nonagricuiturat #!tab)i*hm#nh,
by indwtry divMton and Stat* - Conttnwd
fin thousands)

State

Finance, insurance,
and real estate
195 4
.1953. .
June
May
June

Service and
miscellaneous
1954
. 1953
June
June
May

^ovemmenn
15
<54
June

May

1953
June

22.4
7-5
9-1
173-5
18.2

22.1
7.5
9-1
173.1
17.9

20.7
7.1
8.9
172.3
17.6

58.1
25.0
35.8
510.1
54.7

58.0
24.9
36.0
503.7
52.3

58.1
24.0
36.6
502.5
55.5

122.6
39.6
58.6
64i.o
80.6

125.2
40.9
59.8
648.5
81.8

123.2
38.5
56.7
641.4
81.2

43.9

43.1

42.2

85.9

84.4

-

-

83.1

23.7
42.1
33.5

23.5
42.2
33.3

23.0
39.1
32.8

65.O
117-3
83.8

65.3
123.6
84.1

65.9
113.2
84.8

73.9
13.2
247.0
139-3
143.1

73.1
13.3
246.2
141.1
14$.0

70.1
12.6
264.2
136.2
143.9

Idaho....................
Illinois..................
Indiana...................
Iowa.....................

4.2
169.8
44.4
28.4
18.3

4.2
167.9
43.9
27.6
17.8

4.2
166.2
43.1
27.7
17.5

15.8
380.1
99.5
71.4
55.3

15.6
381.8
100.8
71.4
55.3

16 .1
375.3
100.5
71.7
55.0

26.4
341.3
148.2
101.3
85.1

26.9
345.1
151.2
103.4
86.8

25.8
336.2
145.3
97.3
82.9

Kentucky..................
Louisiana.................

17.6
24.2
7.4
37.0
85.3

17.8
24.0
7.4
36.5
84.3

18.0
22.9
7.2
35.6
83.4

62.9
74.5
29.1
85.7
219.2

63.5
73.7
27.8
84.8
216.5

65.0
73.6
28.9
83.9
217.9

91.9
108.4
41.6
115.0
229.8

93.6
109.8
42.2
116.7
231.0

91.9
105.1
41.1
115.8
226.1

-

10 1.1
149.9
20.6

237.7
129.8
68.3
150.6
28.6

242.1
129.0
69.6
152.9
29.O

230.8
120.4
66.3
147.4
27.7

Arkansas................. .
California................
Colorado..................
Delaware.......... . y.....
District of C o l u m b i a .....
Florida...................
Georgia...................

M a r y l a n d ...............
Massachusetts.............

-

-

-

-

-

-

40.9
9.2
60.9
5.1

4l.O
9-1
61.3
5-1

40.7
9.0
60.5
5.0

154.1
20.5

100.6
154.5
19.2

18.9
1.8
5.4
63.8
5.9

18.7
1.8
5-3
63.6
5.9

18.8
1.6
5.2
63.2
5-7

46.1
18.3
20.4
I83.O
23.8

46.2
17.8
18 .1
179.4
23.5

44.8
18.0
20.4
177.4
24.0

67.1
12.3
21.0
191.3
42.5

68.1
12.5
21.2
193.2
43.1

65.2
12.1
20.2
188.1
41.3

Oklahoma..................

415.2
28.0
4.6
92.3
19.8

416.1
27.6
4.6
91.3
19.5

413.3
27.1
4.5
9 1.1
19.1

806.6
90.2
13.2
264.3
59.5

797.4
89.3
13.2
265.9
59.1

798.1
90.3
13.4
261.5
59.2

732.2
129-1
25.9
317.8
110.0

737.0
131.7
25.9
322.6
112.3

714.4
125.1
25.7
312.5
109.9

Oregon...................
Pennsylvania..............
Rhode Island..............
South Carolina.............
South Dakota..............

17.4
129.5
1 1 .7
12.4
5.0

17.3
128.9
11.5
12.3
4.9

17 .1
127.9
11.3
12 .1
4.8

56.9
372.8
27.7
39.4
14.7

55.1
371.0
27.4
39.4
14.5

55.5
375.7
28.0
40.0
15.3

71-5
381.9
33.8
77.5
28.9

72.5
385.5
34.0
79.2
29.1

69.2
377.7
33.1
76.3
28.9

Tennessee.................
Texas....................
Utah J A ..................
Vermont
..............
Virginia.
..............

28.4
101.1
8.2
3.1
34.3

28.1
99.9
8 .1
3.1
33-9

27.7
98.2
7.7
3.0
34.2

86.0
275.5
22.9
12.3
86.0

85.7
272.1
22.7
11.5
84.1

87.3
268.4
23.6
11.8
85.3

121.1
320.9
50.0
16.0
161.6

122.8
326.9
53.0
16.1
164.0

118.8
323.2
53-7
16.2
163.2

Washington................
West Virginia.............
Wisconsin.................
Wyoming...................

29.4
11.2
38.3
2.2

29.0
11.0
37.8
2 .1

28.8
1 1 .1
36.6
2.0

84.9
43.9
103.1
11.4

85.1
44.4
102.0
9.9

83.7
43.3
100.7
12.7

147.6
58.8
124.9
16.5

149.3
60.3
127.0
16.8

148.5
57.0
120.2
16.1

Michigan..................
Missouri..................
Nebraska..................
New Hampshire.............
Nev Jersey................
New York..................
North Carolina.............

101.2
-

-

* Finance and government do not conform vith definitions used for national series aa shown in Glossary. l/Mining
combined with construction. 2/Miningcombinedwith service. ^/Revised series; not strictly comparable with
previously published data. 47 Federal employment in Maryland and Virginia portions of the Washington, D. C.,
metropolitan area included in data for District of Columbia.

14




Art\i Employment
Tab!e A-8: Emptoyees in nonagricuttura! estabiishments
for seiected areas, by industry division
(In thouaanda)
Number of employees
1954
1952..
June
May
June

Area and industry
division
ALABAMA
Birmingham
Total.............
Mining............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trana. and pub. util.,
Trade.............
Finance........... .
Service...........
Government........ .

187.4
11.2
10.4
61.3
16.8
42.6
10.2
19.0
16.0

187
11
10
60
16
42
10.2
19.0
16.6

191.4
12.8
10.7
63
17.
42.
9
19.
1
5.

Mobile
Manufacturing......

16.5

16.2

16.4

94,

94.8
.2
8.9
16.1
8.9
27.7
4.7
11.2
17.1
43.4
1.6
4.2
6.4
5-6
9.9
1.4
6.5
7.8

1954
June

May

1953
June

Sacramento
Manufacturing...... .

ARIZONA
Phoenix
Total..............
Mining............ .
Contract conatruction.
Manufacturing.......
Tran8. and pub. util..
Trade.............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

8
15
8
27
5.1
12.0
17.8

97-4
.2
9.6
15.5
8.9
27.6
5-1
12.1
18.4

Tucaon
Total..............
Mining............ .
Contract conatructionManufacturing...... .
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

39.6
1.8
3-3
4.5
4.9
9.8
1.3
6.6
7.4

40.7
1.7
3-6
4.4
4.9
10.0
1.3
6.8
8.0

ARKANSAS
Little RockN. Little Rock
Total.............
Contract conatruction
Manufacturing......
Trana. and pub. util.
Trade.............
Finance........... .
Service l/........ .
Government........ .

67.0
4.6
12.0
7.4
17.5
4.2
9.6
11.9

67.7
4.5
12.6
7.4
17.6
4 .1
9-7
11.9

69.7
4.7
12.9
8.5
17.9
4.0
9.8
11.9

CALIFORNIA
Fresno
Manufacturing......

12.7

11.9

12.6

1 ,818.7
14.9
104.3
624.8
121.9
410.5
82.9
255.7
203.7

1 .815.9
15.0
102.9
625.3
122.7
407.8
82.9
253.4
205.9

1 ,838.0
15.7
120.2
641.6
122.5
410.5
80.8
251.2
195.5

Loa Angeles
Total.............
Mining............
Contract conatruction
Manufacturing......
Trana. and pub. util.
Trade.............
Finance...........
Service...........
Government........

Area and industry
division

11.3

11.3

11.5

San BernardinoRiveraide-Ontario
Manufacturing.......

25.9

25.7

25.8

San Diego
Total.............
Mining.............
Contract conatruction.
Manufacturing.......
Trana. and pub. util..
Trade.............
Finance *..........
Service............
Government *.......

179.9
.2
11.1
47.3
10.5
40.5
5.9
24.3
4o.i

179.7
.
2
11.3
47.6
10.3
40.0
6.0
23.9
40.4

185.3
.2
13.6
47.9
10.5
42.1
5.9
24.6
40.5

San Franciaco-Oakland
Total..............
Mining............
Contract conatruction.
Manufacturing...... .
Trana. and pub. util..
Trade.............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

855.8
1.4
54.1
177.2
97.2
196.7
55.3
109.0
164.9

857.0
1.4
51.7
178.7
97.5
197.6
55.2
108.7
166.2

878.5
1.4
52.0
188.6
103.1
200.0
54.9
107.4
171.1

San Joae
Manufacturing...... .

23.8

24.1

23.4

Stockton
Manufacturing...... .

11.2

11.7

13.1

COLORADO
Denver
Mining..............
Contract conatruction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trana. and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service..............

1.8
19.4
43.3
25.6
63.1
12.9
31.0

1.8
18.4
42.8
25.6
62.6
12.8
30.8

1.5
19.5
45.4
27-9
64.8
12.6
31.8

CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport
Total...............
Contract conatruction l/
Manufacturing........
Trana. and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance.............
Service..............
Government...........

117.6
5.3
67.8
5-7
19.2
2.6
9.7
7.4

116.2
3.9
68.2
5.6
19.2
2.5
9.7
7.2

125.7
5.8
75.4
5.5
19.3
2.5
10.0
7.1

Hartford
Total...............
Contract conatruction l/
Manufacturing........
Trana. and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............

195.0
9.0
75.3
7.4
39.4
26.6

195.8
8.6
76.1
7.5
39.6
26.7

197.2
9.1
77.7
7.6
40.2
25.7

See footnotes at end of table.




15

AfVjLmplo\ment

Tabie A -8: Empioyees in nonagricuiturai estabiishments
for seiected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Area and industry
division
CONNECTICUT - Continued
Hartford - Continued
Service............
Government.........

Number of employees
15*
95
1953
June
June
-May.

20.0
17.4

20.2
17.2

20.4
16.5

New Britain
Total..............
Contract construction l/
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

42.3
1.3
27.6
2.1
5.5
-7
2.8
2.3

42.3
1.2
27.8
2.1
5.5
.7
2.8
2-3

43.6
1.2
29.6
2.0
5.4
.7
2.6
2.2

New Haven
Total..............
Contract construction l/
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

119.0
5.8
46.5
11.6
22.6
5-7
18.2
8.5

117-6
5.5
46.1
11.6
22.4
5.6
17-9
8.5

121.0
5.7
49.6
11.5
22.8
5.7
17.9
8.0

Stamford
Total..............
Contract construction l/
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

48.3
3.3
20.9
2.7
9.2
1.5
7.4
3.3

48.0
3.2
21.0
2.7
9.1
1.5
7.3
3.3

50.3
3.4
22.5
2.7
9.3
1.5
7.6
3.3

Waterbury
Total...............
Contract construction l/
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

66.8
2 .1
42.5
2.7
9.3
1.3
4.3
4.7

67.1
2.0
42.9
2.7
9.3
1.3
4.2
4.7

73.1
2.1
48.8
2.7
9.4
1.3
4.3
4.6

DELAWARE
Wilmington
Manufacturing........

52.7

52.8

57.2

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Washington
Total...............
Contract construction...
Manufacturing........
Trans, andpub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service l/...........
Government...........

598.9
32.5
26.3
41.4
121.9
31.9
82.6
262.3

599.3
32.7
25.9
41.5
121.5
31.6
82.6
263.5

629.2
38.2
27.0
43.7
127.4
31.0
83.6
278.3

FLORIDA
Jacksonville
Total...............
Contract construction...

115.0
9-3

114.8
9.9

111.2
8.2

Sss footnotes st end of table.
16




Area and industry
division

1954
June

May

1953
June

Jacksonville - Continued
Manufacturing........
Trans, andpub. util...
Trade..............
Finance.............
Service l/.......... .
Government.......... .

19.0
14.3
35.5
8.1
13.4
15.6

18.0
14.4
35-7
7.9
13.5
15.6

18.3
15.0
34.2
6.9
13.1
15.7

Miami
Total..............
Contract construction..
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade.............. .
Finance.............
Service l/..........
Government..........

197.9
16.3
23.7
26.7
64.8
11.3
36.2
18.9

202.4
16.3
24.3
26.8
66.7
11.2
38.3
18.9

186.7
17-6
22.0
25.3
59.3
10.5
33-9
18.1

Tampa-St. Petersburg
Total..............
Contract construction..
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util...,
Trade..............
Finance.............
Service l/.......... .
Government.......... .

120.4
12.3
22.4
10.4
39.7
6.2
14.8
14.8

122.3
12.1
23.0
10.5
40.8
6.2
15.1
14.8

116 .1
11.4
22.3
10.3
38.7
5.6
14.2
13.8

GEORGIA
Atlanta
Total.............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, andpub. util.
Trade.............
Finance...........
Service l/........
Government........

296.3
17.3
77.7
30.7
78.2
21.2
37.7
33.5

296.7
16.3
78.2
30.8
79.0
2 1.1
37.9
33.4

299.9
15.9
78.7
31.7
80.8
21.2
37.5
34.1

Savannah
Total..............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade............. .
Finance...........
Service l/........ .
Government........ .

48.8
3-3
13.4
6.5
12.5
1.5
5.8
5.8

48.4
3.1
13.6
6.5
12.3
1-5
5-6
5.8

51-3
4.5
14.4
6.8
12.5
1.5
5.8
5.8

IDAHO
Boise
Total.............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.............
Finance...........
Service...........
Government........

19.6
1.5
1.9
2.3
5.7
1.2
2.9
4.1

19.5
1.5
1.8
2.3
5.7
1.2
3.0
4.0

20.9
2.3
1.8
2.6
6.2
1.2
3-0
3.8

Arej

Lmp[(j\ment

Tab)# A -8: Emptoyees in nonagricuttura! estabiishments.
for seiected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Area and industry
division
ILLINOIS
Chicago
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

Number of employees
1954
1951
June
May
June

Wichita - Continued
Trans, and pub. util....
,446.9
3.7
97.0
967.1
210.0

506.2
144.5

295.2

223.2

INDIANA
Evansville
Total..............
Manufacturing.......
Nonmanufacturing....

64.8
29.9
34.9

209.0
503.2

142.8
296.7

225.6

2,563.9
4.0
102.0
1,066.8
221.4
516.8
141.4
291.3
220.2

66.4
31.7
34.7

7.5

23.8
4.5
11.3
9-3

LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge
Manufacturing........

18.6
11.7

7.5
23.5
4.4
11.1
9-1

7.8
24.3
4.1
11.1
8.9

18.5

19.4
11.9
1.9

11.7
2.0

78.2

43.0
35.2

New Orleans 2/

265.5

73.2
34.7
38.5

73.4
35.1
38.3

81.7
41.2
40.5

267.3
10.1
62.7

267.6
63.3

15.3
179.2

15.3
179.5

Contract construction..
.

284.0
12.6
65.3

4.7
19.1
53.5
43.4

266.3
4.5

19.0

269.3
4.5
18.4
56.3
43.8
66.6

191.1

9.5

Trans, and pub. util....

66.0
11.8
34.9
32.4

53.8
43.6

66.2
11.7
34.7
32.9

11.6
35.7

32.6

15.0
MAINE
Leviston

South Bend
Total..............
Manufacturing.......
Trade..............
Other nonmanufacturing

22.7

91.6
4.5
22.2
7-9
24.1
10.0
12.1
11.0

KANSAS
Topeka
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

74.1
36.5
14.6

23.0

90.3
4.2
21.8
7.6
24.0

9.7
12.0
11.2

92.7
53-1
15.5
24.1

28.9
1.2

Contract construction..
.

27.9
1.4
14.8

27.3
1.3

Trans, and pub. util....

1.1

1.1

Service l/...........

73.1
35.9
14.5

IOWA
Des Moines
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service l/.........
Government.........

Wichita
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......

2,441.4
3-7
95.4
964.9

Number of employees
1954
1953
June
June
May

2.0

Fort Wayne
Total..............
Manufacturing.......
Nonmanufacturing....
Indianapolis
Total..............
Contract construction.
Trade..............
Finance............
All others.........

Ai^ea and industry
division

5.1
.7
3.8

5.0
.7
3.8
1.0

1.0

53.2
4.2
13.7
6.4

51.9
3.7
13.5

52.9
3.7
13.9

14.3

14.1

1.0

91.2

1.2

5.2
.6
3.8

23.0
7-9
25.0
9.8
12.0

10.6

Portland
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

43.7
.1
2.4
6.0
7.6
8.8

116.1

115.0

118.6

1.4
6.7

1.4

1.3
7.0
54.3

6.2

6.3

8.2

8.0

3-1

14.6
3.0

3.3

3.3

3.4

551.0
.8

45.1

43.7
.1
2.4
5.9
7.6
9.0
2.3
5.1
11.5

548.6
.8

562.7

8.0

.2
2.5
6.4

8.0 MARYLAND
9-5

2.3
5.1
11.5

5.0
11.5

Baltimore

2.2
Contract construction..
.
Trans. and pub. util....

6.5
51.6

15.9

3.0

3.1

51.8

14.4

38.9
189.3
57.8

110.8
28.5
60.1
64.8

38.0
188.0
57.0
110.4

28.2
60.5
65.7

.8
38.7

202.5
59-4
110.4
27.7

58.0
65.2

See footnotes at end of table.




12-

A re j Employment
Tame A -8: Emp!oyees in nonagricuitura! estabiishments
for seiected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Area and industry
division

Number of employees
1954
1951
June
May
June

Service l/...........
Government...........
Fall River
Total...............
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Government...........
Other nonmanufacturing..

Government...........
Other nonmanufacturing..
Springfield-Holyoke
Total...............
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

Government...........
Worcester
Total...............
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

Government...........

1954

June

1953

May

June

27.0
950.8
40.3
279-5
79-2
223.9
63.9
131.8
132.2

946.5
39-4
278.1
78.6
223.9
62.7
131.0
132.8

987.7
45.4
309.6
79.0
229.6
62.8
131.0
130.3

47.1
27.2
2.4
8.2
4.8
4.5

47.4
27.3
2.4
8.3
4.8
4.6

50.2
30.3
2.5
8.1
4.6
4.7

48.5
1.0
26.1
2.2
8.4
4.9
5.9
155.6
4.9
67.8
8.8
31.5
6.3
15.6
20.7
100.9
3.5
46.7
5.2
20.6
4.2
9.7
11.0

48.8
l.l
26.3
2.2
8.4
4.9
5.9
155.6
4.7
68.1
8.7
31.5
6.2
15.6
20.8
100.8
3.5
46.7
5-2
20.4
4.2
9.7
11.1

54.5
1.4
31.7
2.2
8.6
4.7
5.9
165.0
4.6
76.8
9.0
31.6
6 .1
15.5
21.4
107.1
4.0
53.4
5.3
20.2
4.1
9.6
10.5

27.1

29.4

42.7

42.4

7.6
10.9

9.8
7.6
10.9

44.7
2.4
10.7
8.3
11.3

MINNESOTA
Duluth
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Service l/...........
Government...........

2 .1
10.0
1.8
6.2

4 .0

2.0

1.8
6.2
4 .1

1.8
6.0

4.2

Minneapolis

Trans, and pub. util....

260.3
11.2
69.8
28.0

261.9
13 .1

73.2

Contract construction..
.
Nev Bedford
Total...............
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

Number of empl(arees

Saginav

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston 2/
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

Area and industry
division

72.8
19.8

19.6
Service l/...........

33-2

70.7
27.9
32.7

270.9
14.2
76.9
29.4
74.9
19.4
32.3

25.2

24.9

23.8

147.4
7 .0

151.1

21.4
33.1
10.5
17.6

148.1
8.1
41.3
21.4
33.2
10.4
17.7

16 .1

16 .1

8 .9

9.0

9.3

(2/)
(2/)

364.6
.7

364.5
.7
7 .0

St. Paul
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Service l/...........
Government...........
MISSISSIPPI
Jackson
Manufacturing........

41.7

8 .1
43.8
21.8
33.8

10.3
17.3

16.0

MISSOURI
Kansas City

581.0

746.8

Flint
79.4

80.7

76.3

( 3 /)
( 3 /)

45.9
94.4

20.8

2 1.1

39.9
30.3

40.2
29.9

264.4

582.8

20.9
1 1 1 .7

(2/)

MICHIGAN
Detroit

(2/)

d /)

Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

266.4

301.4

2 .7

2.8
2.6

2.8
2.8

5 .9
3.4

5-8
3 .4

( 3 /)

122.0
47.0
96.6

St. Louis 2 /

Grand Rapids
53.0

53.5

56.9

31.0

32.2

35.3

Lansing
Muskegon
24.5

See footnotes at end of table.
18




25.2

31.3

MONTANA
Great Falls
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

2.6
6.0
3.4

Are.i Employment
Tab!# A -8: Emp!oyees in nonagricutturat estabiishments,
for seiected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Area and industry
division
NEBRASKA
Omaha
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans. and pub. util.
.
Trade..............
Finance............
Service l/.........
Government.........

Number of employees
1954

June

141.4
8.4

32.2
22.8
34.3
10.5
18.2

15.2

NEVADA
Reno
Contract construction
Manufacturing l/...
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.............
Finance...........
Service...........

2.0
1.9
2.9
5-9
.8
5.4

NEW HAMPSHIRE
Manchester
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........
NEW JERSEY
Newark-Jersey City j /
?
Manufacturing......

39.3
1.3
19.1
2.6
7.5
1.9
4.2
2.7

1951

May

139.9
7.8
31.7

22.5
34.3

10.3
18.4

15.0

1.9

1.8
2.8
5.7
.8
5.1

June

143.0
7.3
31.7

25.2
35.6

10.6
18.1
14.6

1.3
1.9
3 .0

5.7
.8
5-7

40.6

7.4

7.6

Nassau and Suffolk
Counties 5/
Manufacturing........

1.0
18.7
2.6
1.8
4.2
2.7

1.4
20.5
2.5
1.8
4.3

2.6

394.2

Paterson
Manufacturing.

168.3

167.7

183.1

Perth Amboy j /
)
Manufacturing.

78.9

79.5

85.7

NEW MEXICO
Albuquerque
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service l/.........
Government.........
NEW YORK
Albany-Schenectady-Troy
Total.............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.............
Government........
Other nonmanufacturing

52.3
4.2
8.8
5.2
13.5
2.7
7.3

10.6

38.6

52.0
4.0

8.7
5.1
13.4

2.8
7.3

10.7

206.3

205.9

16.5

5.8
79.3
16.4
39.3
37.3

6.4
78.5
39.6
37.1

28.2

Buffalo
Total..............
Contract construction..
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..............
Finance.............
Service l/..........
Government..........

38.5

349.4

38.9

Binghamton
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans. and pub. util.
.
Trade..............
Other nonmanufacturing

Elmira
Total..............
Manufacturing........
Trade..............
Other nonmanufacturing.

354.0

Trenton
Manufacturing.

Ai^ea and industry
division

28.0

Nev York-Northeastern
Nev Jersey
Manufacturing......
Nev York City j /
?
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

Number of employees
1951
1954
. n
Tu e
Mav
June
75.8
3-5
41.1
3.9

40.9

12.9

12.9

14.5

14.4

14.3

432.7

432.6
18.6
201.6

457.4

20.3
200.9
39.3

81.3
13.3
45.5
32.1

75-3
3.1

3.9

39.1

82.1
13.2
45.8

77.1
3.0
42.4
4.1
13.3

19.8

221.2
40.8
84.2

13.0
45.6

32.1

32.8

6.3
9.8

32.4
16.4
6.3
9.7

33.8
17.3
6.5
10.0

102.7

102.5

98.0

1,654.2

1,656.7

1,814.4

3,477.0
1.9

3,492.3
1.9
112.0
900.5
336.0
809.4
343.6
559.5
429.5

3,583.5
1.9
106.7
990.1
342.5

208.9
7.6
110.0
11.0

214.6
8.9
115.9

32.8
16.8

110.5

893.4
336.0

807.5
342.5
558.5
426.7

827.1
342.5
554.1

418.7

46.0

53.5
4.4
8.9
5.3
14.3

Rochester
Total..............
Contract construction..
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..............
Finance.............
Other nonmanufacturing.

2.8

7.1

10.7

224.6
6.8

Syracuse
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Other nonmanufacturing

91.6
17.9
40.4
39.7

28.2

Utica-Rome
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......

212.5
10.0

110.8
11.0
38.2
6.5
36.0
138.1

38.1

6.4
35.8

11.1

37.3
6.2

35.3

33.5

29-9
33.5

146.0
7.0
64.8
11.5
29.7
33.1

95.3

94.9

102.0

5.8
57.7

11.5
29.7

2.8

43.9

139.0
5.8

58.4
11.4

2.5

44.1

4.3

49.0

See footnotes at end of table.
TO?742 () - 54 - 4




19

Arej

Empto^meHt

Tabte A -8: Emp!ov$e$ in nonagricuitura! estab!ishments
for setected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Area and industry
division
NEW YORK - Continued
Utica-Rome - Continued
Trana. and pub. util.
Trade.............
Finance...........
Service l/........
Government........
Westchester County 5/
Manufacturing......
NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte
Total.............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.............
Finance...........
Service l/........ .
Government........
Greensboro-High Point
Manufacturing......

Number of employees
1 954

June

1953 _

May

Area and industry
division

Number of employees
1 ?54
<

1953

June

May

June

238.6
12.1
59.6

235.9
12.1
57-7
28.7

248.2
13.4
62.9

OREGON
Portland
6.1

6.1

15.0

14.9

3.0
7.3
17.3

6.4
15.3

3-0
7.5
16.9

16.5

2.9
7-5

Contract construction..
.
Trans, and pub. util....

29.0

30.8

84.3

6.0
22.0

42.2

45.0

547.8

615.7

22.4
327.3
64.4

377.0
73.8

28.3

28.0

28.5

47.9

52.6

29.7

30.1

31.3

34.0

38.5

44.8

39.2

36.2

22.1

39-3

30.7

45.1

47.8

275-3
14.1

273.4
13.5

299.9
13-9
154.9

Harrisburg

39.5

48.8

42.5

10 .1
6.3

40.9

31-7

9 .8
24.7
5.4

104.7

Erie

6.1

9.6
24.4
5.3
10.1
6.2

94.2

40.3

PENNSYLVANIA
Allentovn-BethlehemEaston
Manufacturing........

91.6

( 3 /)

82.9
6.0
21.3

31.2

52.8

12.4
33.0
32.0

63.1
12.5
34.2
31.3

47.9

82.7
6.1
21.2
9-6
24.4
5.3
10.0

46.6

60.0

544.7

46.4

60.4
12.6
33.7

Lancaster
Philadelphia

NORTH DAKOTA
Fargo
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.............
Finance...........
Service...........
Government........
OHIO
Cincinnati
Manufacturing......
Cleveland
Manufacturing......
OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma City
Total.............
Mining............
Contract construction
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.............
Finance...........
Service...........
Government........

2.2
2.3
7.4

1.4
2.8
(3 /)

155.7
304.1

2.0
2.3
7.4
1.3
2 .8
( 3 /)

156.3
305.7

2 .1
2.3
7.5
1.3

Pittsburgh
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....

2.7
2.8

324.9
67.5

Reading
171.3
342.3

Scranton
Manufacturing........
Wilkes-Barre— Hazleton
York

134.3
6.6

9.0
16.4

10.6
36.1
7.7

133.5
6 .6
8.8

138.6

16 .1
10.6

16.2

35.6
7 .7

6 .6
9 .6

RHODE ISLAND
Providence

11.3

36.8

Contract construction..
.

131.6

7.6

16.8

16.6
31.6

33.7

113.4
11.2
9.4

113 .O
11.2

115.6
11.2

28.8

29.2

9.3

8 .8
30.4

12.4
27.6
5-2

12.4
27.5
5.1
13.7
5.6

27.9
4 .9
14.2
5-7

16.6

See footnotes at end of table.
20




31.3

129.6
14.2

49.5

49.8

29.5

Trans, and pub. util....

14.2
11.5

Tulsa
Total.............
Mining............
Contract construction,
Manufacturing......
Trans, and pub. util.,
Trade............. .
Finance........... .
Service............
Government........ .

28.8

11.3
25.3
29.7

48.9
3.6
8.4
4 .0
11.5

48.7
3.5
8.3
4 .0
11.5

24.9

13.6
5-1

14.7
50.6
ll.l
25.8
28.9

SOUTH CAROLINA
Charleston

12.5
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

50.8
3.7
9.0
4.5

11.8

An\i

hnp!o\ment

Tab)# A-S: Emptoyees in nonagricuttura! estabtishments,
for seiected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Area and industry
division

Number of employees
June

SOUTH CAROLINA - Continued
Charleston - Continued
Finance............
Service l/.........
Government.........

1.6
4.5
15.4

Greenville
Manufacturing.......

27-7

SOUTH DAKOTA
Sioux Falls
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service 6/...........
TENNESSEE
Chattanooga
Total...............
Mining..............
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service..............
Government *.........
Knoxville
Total...............
Mining..............
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service..............
Government *.........
Memphis
Total...............
Mining..............
Contract construction..
.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........
Nashville
Total...............
Contract construction l/
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance..............
Service..............
Government...........

May

1.6
4.6
15.4

28.0

1952..

June

1.4
4.5
15.9

30.1

5-5

5.2

5.4

2.0

2.0

2 .1

7.2
1.3
4.7

7.1
1.3
4 .8

7.6
1.3
4 .9

88.3
.1

87.7

94.8

.1

.1

3.4
41.5
5.2
17.4
3.8
9.2
7.8

3-3
41.3
5.2
17.3
3 .8
9.0
7.8

4 .8
46.7
5.3

116.0
1.8
14.9
43.0
7.2

22.2
2.2
H .3

13.6

164.4
.3

116.0
1.8
14.1
43.3
7.1

22.2

2 .2
11.4
14.0

165.6
.3

17.6
3.6
9.0
7.8

116.9
2.0
12.2
45.3
7.6

21.7
2.2
11.4
14.6

171.5
.4

10.7

10.6

10.8

41.5
14.6
48.8
7.5

42.2
14.8
49.5
7.4

44.7

18.7
22.5

18.6

7 .7
19.3

22.3

23.1

120.6

120.3

9.9
33.8

9.5
33.8
12.1
26.4
7.0
17.2
14.4

12.0
26.2
7.1
17.3
14.4

15.4

50.3

125.1
10.7
37.6

12.2
26.3
6.8
17.2
14.3

A^ea and industry
division
UTAH
Salt Lake City 2 /
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, andpub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........

?54

1953

June

May

June

106.9
6 .0
6.5
16.4
12.6

104.0
5.6
5.7

106.0

16.0

16.6

12.2
30.7
6.2
12.9
14.7

12.7
31.3
5.9
13.3
14.1

17.7
6.4
1.2
4.5
2.3
3.3

31.0
6.4
13.5
14.5

6.5
5-6

VERMONT
Burlington
Total..............
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Service............
Other nonmanufacturing

17.1
5.3
1.2
4.7
2.8
3.1

15.9
4.6

Springfield
Total..............
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Service............
Other nonmanufacturing

12.4
7.8
.6
1.6
.8
1.6

12.5

1.6

13.1
8.9
.6
1.4
.7
1.5

14.9

14.8

15.4

145.0

144.6
.4

148.3
.3

VIRGINIA
Norfolk-Portsmouth
Manufacturing.
Richmond
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, andpub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government.........
WASHINGTON
Seattle
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service l/.........
Government.........
Spokane
Total..............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service l/.........
Government.........

.4

1.2
4.6
2.7
2.9

8.1
.6
1.5
.8

10.2

10.0

35.3

35.4

14.9
36.1
11.7

16.7
19.7

282.1
13.3

80.1
26.3

14.9
36.2
1.6
16.5
19.6

36.6
11.4

16.9
19.6

280.1
12.8

280.2
13.6

79.7

77.2
27.5

26.2

16 .1

69.9
15.9

36.5
39.3

36.0
39.6

68.8
5.2
14.2
8.3
17.9
3.4
10.7
9.1

67.4
4.6
13.3

70.5

10.5
37.6
15.4

8.2

69.8
15.8
36.0
40.3
71.6
5.1
15.1
9.0

17.9
3.4

19.2

10.8

10.9

9-2

9.1

3.2

See footnotes at end of table.




21

Are.i Employment
Tabie A -8: Empioyees in nonagricuiturai estabiishments
for seiected areas, by industry division - Continued
(In thousands)
Area and industry
division
WASHINGTON - Continued
Tacoma
Total............. .
Contract construction,
Manufacturing...... .
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.............
Finance............
Service l/.........
Government.........

Number of employees
1<
1953
?54
June
May
June

Area and industry
division
WheelingSteubenville - Continued

69.5
3.7
17.0
6.7
14.8
2.5
7.5
17.3

69.2
3.5
17.0
6.8
14.7
2.5
7-3
17.4

72.5
4.7
18.1
7.2
15.0
2.6
7-6
17.3

89.9
11.4
4.5
26.0
10.4
17.5
2.7
8.8
8.8

89.4
11.6
4 .1
25.8
10.3
17.4
2.7
8.8
8.9

98.6
16 .1
5.4
28.5
10.4
17.9
2.8
8.7
9-0

Wheeling-Steubenville
Total..............
Mining.............
Contract construction.

110.2
5.8
4.0

109.5
5-8
4.0

115.3
7.3
4.1

Racine
Manufacturing........

53.0
9.0
19-0
2.7
9.6
6.6

55.7
9.9
19.6
2.7
9.5
6.7

181.3

196.2

21.6

22.1

24.9

2.8
1.0
2.0
1.7
3-5
.4
2.0

2.6
.9
1.9
1.7
3.5
.4
1.9

3-0
.9
1.9
1.7
3.6
.4
1.9

WYOMING
Casper
Contract construction..
.
Trans, and pub. util....

* Does not conform with definition used for national series as shown in Glossary.
Includes mining.
2/ Revised series; not strictly comparable with previously published data.
3/ Not available.
4/ Includes mining and finance.
5/ Subarea of New York-Northeastern New Jersey.
6/ Includes mining and government.




53.5
9.0
18.9
2.8
9.7
6.7

182.3

Trans, and pub. util....

WISCONSIN
Milwaukee

WEST VIRGINIA
Charleston
Total.............
Mining.............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance............
Service............
Government *........

22

Number of employees
1954
1953
June
June
May

Labor

! ut

Tabte B-l: Monthty iabor turnover rates in manufacturing industries,
by ctass of turnover
(Per 100 employees)

Year

1939.
1947.
1948.
1949.
195°.
1951.
1952.
1953.

1954.
1939
1947
1946.
1949.
1950
1951
1952
1953.
1954
1939.
1947.
1948,
1949
1950,
1951
1952,
1953.
1954

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

3.2
4.9
4.3
4.6
3.1
4.1
4.0

2.6

3.5

3.8
4.3

3.6
3.5

3-1
4.9
4.5
4.8
2.9
4.1
3.7
4.1
3.7

0.9
3.5

0.6

2.6

1.7
l.i
2.1

1.9
2.1

1^1
0 .1

.4
.4
.3
.2
.3
.3
.3
.2

4.5
4.7
4.1
3.0
3.8
3.9

5.2
4.7
4.8
2.8

4.6
4.1

May

4.3
3.8

3-3
0.7
3.5

2.5
2.0

2.2

2.8
2.2

2.2
1.0

2.5

P.7
1.1

2.7
-1*0.

0.1
.4
.4
.3
.2
.3
.3

0 .1

o.i
.4
.4
.2
.2
.4
.3

o.i
.4
.3
.2
.3
.4
.3
.4

3.2
2.5
1.4
1.0
5.1
1.9

.4

.2

1.2

1. 0

.4
.4
.3
.2
.3
.3
.4
__

2.6
1.0
1.2
2.8
1.2
1.0
1.3

2.8

1.6
1.6

2.2
.9
1.2
2.5
1.7
1.0
1.4

1.9
.8
1.7
2.3
1.7
.8
1.3

.9
2.8

.8
2.2

.8
2.3

1947.
1948.
1949.
1950.
1951.
1952.
1953.
1954,

0.1

0.1
.i
.i
.i
.6
.4
.4
.2

0.1
.1
.1
.1
.5
.3
.3
.2

0.1
.1
.1
.1
.5
.3
.3
.2

0.1
.1
.1
.1
.4
.3
.3
.
2

1939.
1947.
1948.
1949.
1950.
1951.
1952.
1953.

i.
tl
6.0
4.6
3.2
3.6
5.2
4.4
4.4
2.8

3.1
5.0
3.9
2.9
3.2
4.5
3.9
4.2

3.3
5.1
4.0
3.0
3.6
4.6
3.9
4.4
2.8

2.9
5.1
4.0
2.9
3.5
4.5
3.7
4.3
2.4

3.3
4.8
4.1
3.5
4.4
4.5
3.9
4.1

1939
1947,
1948,
1949
1950.
1951.
1952.
1953.

1954

1954.




2.5

2.2
.9
1.2
2.8
1.4
.8
1.1

.9
2.4

July

Total separation
3-5
3.3
3.3
4.6
5.4
4.7
4.4
4.3
4.5
5.2
3.8
4.3
3.0
2.9
3.1
4.4
4.8
4.3
5.0
3.9

0.8
3.7
3.0
1.7
1.3
2.7

0.8
3.5
2.8
1.6

June

2.7
1.4
1.1
3.3
l.i
1.2
1.1
1.0

1.9

2.7

4.2
3.1

Aug.

3.0
5.3
5.1
4.0
4.2
5.3
4.6

Sept.

2.8
5.9
5.4
4.2
4.9
5.1
4.9

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

2.9
5.0
4.5
4.1
4.3
4.7
4.2

3.0
4.0
4.1
4.0
3.8
4.3
3.5

3.5
3.7
4.3
3.2
3.6
3.5
3.4

^.2

4.5

4.2

4.0

1.1

0.9
3.6
2.8
1.5
2.7
2.5
2.8
2.1

0.8
2.7
2.2

0.7
2.3
1.7
.9
1.7
1.4
1.7
l.i

0.2

0.2

.4
.4
.2
.3
.3
.4

.4

.4
.4
.2
.4
.4
.4
.4

.3

o.i
.4
.3
.2
.3
.3
.
3
.
2

2.1
.8
1.2
1.8
.6
1.4
1.0

1.6
.9
1.0
1.8
.7
1.3
.7

1.8
.9
1.2
2.3
.8
1.4
.7

2.0
.8
1.4
2.5
1.1
1.7
.7

2.7
.9
2.2
2.0
1.3
1.5
1.0

1.3

1.5

1.8

2.3

2.5

0.1
0.1
0.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
.3
.4
.4
.4
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.2
Total accession
4.2
5.1
3.9
5.3
5.5
4.9
5.0
5.7
4.7
4.4
4.4
3.5
6.6
4.8
4.7
4.2
4.5
4.9
4.4
5.9
4.9
4.1
4.3
5-1
3.6

0.1
.1
.1
.4
.4
.3
.
3

0.1
.1
.1
.4
.4
.3
.3

0.1
.1
.1
.3
.4
.3
.3

0.1
.1
.1
.3
.3
-a
.2

<.
52
5-9
5-1
4.1
5.7
4.3
5.6
4.0

5.9
5.5
4.5
3.7
5.2
4.4
5.2
3.3

4.1
4.8
3.9
3.3
4.0
3.9
4.0

2.8
3.6
2.7
3.2
3.0
3.0
3.3
2.1

4.3

4.6

Quit
0.7
0.7
3.1
3.1
2.9
2.9
1.4
1.5
1.8
1.7
2.4
2.5
2.2
2.2
2.6
2.5

0.8
4.0
3.4
1.8
2.9
3.1
3.0

2.9

3.1

Discharge
o.i
0.1
.4
.4
.4
.4
.2
.2
.3
.3
.4
.
3
.3
.3
.4
.4

0.1
.4
.4
.3
.4
.4
.3

0.1
.4
.4
.2
.4
3
.4

.4

Laj'Off
2.5
2.5
1.0
l.i
l.i
1.0
2.1
2.5
.6
.9
1.0
1.3
l.i
2.2

1.1

1.1

.9
1.7

4.5
3.9
2.1

3.4
3.1
3.5

1.2

2.1
1.9
2.1

1.5

2.7

23

Labor T urn over
Tabte B-2: M on th ty ta b o r turnover rates in setected g ro u p s
a n d industries

Separation
industry group and industry

Total

Discharge

Quit

May
May
1954 1954 1954 1954

Layo ff

Misc.,incl.

accession

May
1954 1954

June

1954

May
May
1954 1954 1954 1954

June

May
1954

3.1

3.3

l.l

1.0

0.2

0.2

1 .7

1.9

0.2

0.2

3-6

2.7

0Mr<?6/g &Mds......................... 3.4
Coocfs.................. 2.6

3.6
3.0

1.0
l.l

1.0
1.1

.2
.2

.2
.2

2.0
1.1

2.2
1-5

.2
.1

.2

3.4
3.9

2.5
3-0

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSOR!ES............ (1/)

4.1

(1/)

.9

.2 (1/)

2.8

(1/)

(1/)

2.1

FOOD AND KiNDRED PRODUCTS...........

3-3
3.9
1.9
3.5

3.6
4.1
4.2
3.7

1.2
.9
.9
2.0

l.l
1.2
2.0

5.8
5.9
4.7
5.0

4.9
6.3
3.1
4.6

^""liquors....................

1.6

2.1

.6

7.1

4.8

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............
Cigarettes.............................

1.9
1.4

Tobacco and snuff.....................

l.l

2.0
1.3
2.6
1.5

.........................

TEXT!LE-M!LL PRODUCTS.............. 2.9
3-2
Yarn and thread mills.*#.**..
Broad—woven fabric mills...#.**##*#.## 3-3
3.2
4.0
2.3
Full-fashioned hosiery# ###..######### 2.2
2.0
2.2
1.7
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings.. (1/)
APPAREL AND OTHER F!N!SHED TEXT!LE
PRODUCTS........................
.....

FURWtTURE AMD FtXTURES.............

.4

.1

.2

.8

1.3

.1

l.l
1.0
1.4
.4

1.1
.9
1.4
.5

.2
.2
.2
.2

3.2 1.1
1.2
3.5
3.2 1.2
3.0
1.2
5.4 1.0
1.2
3.3
2.7 1.1
1.2
3.5
3.6 1.2
.6
2.5
3.6 (1/)

1.1
1.4
! l.l
, l.l
, .8
! 1.4
1.4
1.4
1.6
.8

.4

.2
.2
.2
.2
.5
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
(1/)

.3
-5
.5
,
.2 (2/) (2/)
.4
.8
.9
.1
(2/)
.7

.1
.2
(2/)
.4

.2
(2/)
.3

3.0
4.0
2.4
1.5

2.5
2.4
3.0
-7

.2 3.0
.1 3-5
.3 3.1
.3 2.9
.6 5.2
.1 3.1
(2/) 2.1
.2 4.2
(2/) 2.8
.1 2.5
.4 (1/)

2.7
2.7
2.8
2.6
5.2
2.8
1.3
3.3
3-9
1.8
2.1

.2 1.4
.1 1.7
.2 1.6
.2 1.5
.3 2.3
.8
.1
.8
.2
.1
.3
.1
.9
.2
.8
.1 (I/)

1.8
1.9
1.7
1.5
3.6
1.7
1.2
1.8
1.8
1.4
2.7

.2
.1
.3
.3
.1
.1
.1
.
3
.1
.2
(1/)

2.2
1.5

.1
.1

.1
.1

1.5
1.4

2.5
2.1

.1
.1

.1
.1

4.4
5.6

3.5
3.8

3.8

5.9

1.6

2.4

.1

.1

2.1

3.4

(2/)

.1

4.6

3.7

3.9 2.0
5.4 (I/)
3-2 2.2

2.2
3.7

.2
(1/)

.3
.9
.2 (l/)

1.3
1.4

2.0

.2

.2

.6

.8

.3
(l/)
.2

.1
.1

.2

5.4

5.7
11.9
4.7 4.8

tyi

1.8

3.1

1.0

1.2

.1

.3

.5

1.6

.2

.1

3.9

2.7

2.9
3.2

5.7
6.9
3.0

1.3
1.5

1.3
1.4

.3
.3

..3
.3

1.2

1.3

4.0
5.1

.1
.1

1.0

.1

.2

.8

1.6

.3

4.6
4.9
4.0

2.8
2.8

1.0

.2
.2
.2

1.9
1.3
2.4

1.1

1.0

.2
.1

.5
.3

.1

.1

3.4

2.5

.7
1.4

.2
.1

.6

.6

.3

2.8

1.8

.3

.3

.6

.2

.3
.2

3.7

3.0

PAPER AND ALL!EC PRODUCTS...........

2.1
1.2




1.9
2.9
2.5
.8

.8

1.6
.9

2.2

24

1.7
2.6
.5
.9

.1
.2
.2
.1

4.9
3-8

Other furniture and fixtures..........

Paperboard containers and boxes......

.3
.2
.4
.5

.4
.2
.3
.7

3-3
2.5

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURN!TURE)....................... 3.4
(1/)
Sawmills and planing mills............ 3-1
^^ruc^rafw"od^productI!f^^^!'^..

(1/)

2.5

1.5

.3
.5

2.9

Labor T urnover

Tabte B-2: Monthty !abor turnover rates in setected groups
and industries - Continued

Separation
industry group and industry

Total

Quit

Discharge

June
1954

Industrial inorganic chemicals......
Synthetic fibers.................
Paints, pigments, and fillers.......

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AMD COAL......

June
1954 1954

May

1.8
1.7
2.0
2.8
1.3
1.1

1.4
1.8
1.!)
1.8
.9
1.3

.6
.7
.6

0.5
.7
-3
.3
.7

1.0
.8

.8
.4

.2

1.4

CHEMtCALS AMD ALLtED PRODUCTS.......

May

1-3

0.7
-7

.4

May

3.5

LEATHER AMD LEATHER PRODUCTS........

2.4

3-4

1.6

2.7

2.5

3.5

Footwear (except rubber)...........

STOME, CLAY, AMD GLASS PRODUCTS.....

3.4

accession

May

May

.6

.3

0.1
0.1
.3
.2
.1
.1
.1 (? /)
.1 (S/)
.1
.1
(2/)

0.7
.6
1.3
1.9

.2
-2

0.6
.7
.9
1.3
.1
.3

0.1
.2
.1
.2
.2
.1

0.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.2

3.3
2.9
4.2
8.6

2.1

(2/)

.h

.4
.1

.1
.1

.1
.1

(R/)

1.2
^4
.8

.5
.8

.1

2.0

2.2

.3
.1
.3

(? /)

.3

.9
.9

!6
1.2
.8

(2/)
.1
-2

1.5
.7
1.6

1.4
.5

.2
(2/)
.2

1.7
2.0

.1

.1

1.6

.2

.5

1.6

.1

.1
.1

.1
.1

1.6
p. 4

1-5

.1
.1

.2

.2

.2

.2

-3

1.4
.3

1.3

.1

.1
.1

2.0

.1
.3
.1
.1
(2/)

.5

.1

.1

1.3

1.6

.1
.2

(2/)
.2
.3

1.2

4.1

.4
.7
.7
.9
.6

.6

3.5
3.6
2.5
3-9

.6
.8
.8
.9
.7

-3
.3

.2

2.7
3.2
1.0
2.9

1.0

1.3

.4

.6

(2/)

.1

.2

1.5
4.4

1.0

.4
.9

.3
.8

.1
.4

.1

4.9

3-8

2.9

.4

.2

4.2

1.0

3-2
1.9
2.8

.8
.4
.6

.9
.9
.7
.6

3.8

l.l

1.2

.3
.1
.1
.1
.2

1.4

1-3
2.5
2.9

1.0
.9

2.4

2.4

.6

1.8

4.0

PRtMARY METAL tMDUSTRtES...........

.7
.7

1.6

Cement, hydraulic.................
Structural clay products...........
Pottery and related products.......

2.6

.6
.6
.7
.9
.7

2.5
3.4
.9
2.7

4.5
2.5

Prif^y'smelt^g'and refining of
copper, lead, and zinc...........

copper........................
Other primary metal industries:
iron and steel forgings...........

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
ORDMAMCE, MACHINERY, A t
tD
TRAMSPORTATIOM EQUtPMEttT).........
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware.....
Cutlery and edge tools............
Hand tools......... .




3-7
4.0
2.1
3.1
4.9

2.5

May

1954 1954 1.954 1954 19^4 1954 1954 1954 1954

RUBBER PRODUCTS..................
Other rubber products.............

Misc.,incl.

L ayo ff

.2
.2

1.8

1.8

2.4
1.8
2.5
1.8

3.1
.1
.1
.1

3.8
3.3
3.9

.1

3.2
3.8

.2

1-3
1.9
1.2
2.0
.7
1.8
1.0
.6
2.0

2.4
2.3
3-3

2.8

3-4
2.2

2.9
2.1

.1
.1
.1

3.1

1.9

2.4

1.6

-3

.2

2.7

1.9

-3
.2
-3
.3
.2

2.8

2.4
2.4
1.2
2.8

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

3.0
3.3
2.5
2.9

1.7
2.4

.2

.3

-3

2.3

2.1

4.5

3.1
1.9
1.9

.5

.5

2.7

3.5

.4
.4

.2
.2

1.9
3.2

1.6
2.8

.1

3.2

2.2

.1

.1

1.9

1.4

.2

2.2
2.9

2.8
2.0

.1
.2
.1
.1
.2

.2
.1
.1
.1
.1

3.9
2.3
1.9

3.2

.1
.1
.2

1.4

1.1

2.3
3-5

2.0
2.3

2.1
2.5

1.6
1.6

1.4
1.7

25

Libot

)umo\er

Tabte B-2: Monthty tabor turnover rates in setected groups
and industries - Continued
(Per 100 employees)
Separation

Industry group and industry

Total
June

May

Quit
June

Discharge

May

June

1954 1954 1954 1954 1954

May

Total
Layoff
June

May

Misc.,incl.
military
June

May

May

1954 1954 1954 1954 1954 1954

1954

FABR!CATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
ORDNANCE, MACH!NERY, AND
TRANSPORTAT!ONEQU!PMENT)-continued
1.4
1.3

4.1
3.7

0.6

1.6
0.3

2 .1

0.1

0.2

6.5

4.5

3.4

2.8

l.l

.8

.6

.2

1.6

1.7

.1

.1

7-4

3-9

3.9

5.0

1.4

1.9

.7

.4

1.6

2.5

.2

.2

5.8

4.9

2.5

3.5

1.2

1.0

.3

.2

.9

2.0

.1

.2

3.6

3-0

.8

.1

.1

4.7

5.6

.3

.3

4.4

4.0

.2
.1
.1
.2
.2
.1

2.0
1.7
3.6
1.3
1.9
1.8

1.9
1.3
1.6
2.3
2.3
2.9

.2
.1
.4
.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
-3
.1
.2
.2

2.3
2.3
3.0
2.4
1.7
1.5

1.5
1.5
1.8
2 .1
1.0
.7

Oilburners, nonelectric heating
and cooking apparatus, not elseFabricated structural metal

6.0

6.9

-9

3.3
2.7
5.1
2.6
3.1
2.7

3-0
2.4
2.7
3.4
3.4
3.7

.8
.7
.8
.9
.8
.6

.7
.8
.7
.8
.7
.6

.2
.1
.2
.2
.1
.1

2.9
4.1

2.8
3-1

1.0
1 .1

.9
.9

.2
.2

3
.3

1.6
2.6

1.6
1.6

.1
.2

.1
.2

1.4
2.5

1.0
1.9

3.2
2.8

3-2
2.7

.9
.8

1.0
.7

.2
.2

.2
.1

1.9
1.6

1.8
1.7

.2
.1

.2
.2

1-9
2.8

1.7
1.4

1.9

2.3

1.0

.8

.1

.2

.6

1.2

.1

.1

3.0

1.6

5.8
1.9

4.8
2 .1

.9
.6

.7
.6

.7
.1

.2
.1

3.9
.9

3.6
1 .1

.3
.2

.3
-3

2.7
1-9

1.6
1.5

3-4

3.4

1 .1

l.o

.2

.2

1.8

2.0

.2

.3

3.3

1.9

3.2
2.9

2.3
3.5

.9
1.2

.7
1.2

.1
.2

.1
.2

1.9
1 .1

1.2
1.9

.2
.4

.2
.3

1.6
3.1

1.2
1.9

Telephone,telegraph, and related equipments

3-2
2.4

4.4
2 .1

1.2
.9

1.3
.8

.2
.1

.2
.1

1.4
1 .1

2.5
.9

-5
.3

.4
.3

4.2
.9

2 .1
.6

miscellaneous product...............

4.3

4.9

.9

.9

.2

.2

3-0

3.5

.2

.3

4.7

3-0

1.0
.6
1.3
1.4
1 .1
(1/)
.9

.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
(1/)
.3

.2
.1
.2
.2
.2
(1/)
.3

.2
.3
.2
.2
.1

.2
.4
.2
.1
.2
(1/)
.1

4.0
3.5
2.6
2.7
1.6
(1/)
3.7

2.8
2.7
1.9
2.0
1.4
(1/)
2.2

engraving............................

MACHtHERY (EXCEPT ELECTRtCAL).......
Agricultural machinery and tractors..
Construction and mining machinery....

Metalworking machinery (except
Machine-tool accessories............
Special-industry machinery (except

Office and store machines and
Service-industry and household

Communication equipment..............
Radios, phonographs, television

TRAXSPORTATtOHEQUtPMEMT...........

Aircraft propellers and parts......
Other aircraft parts and equipment..

26




4.2 1 .1
4.9
.6
5.1 3.5
1.4
2.7 2.8
2.1 2.4 1.5
4.8 4.3 l.l
(1/) (1/) (l/)
1.0
2.9 2.2

3.4 2.7
4.0
2.3
1.0
1.2
.3
.7
3.3 2.8
(1/) (1/)
1.5
.9

(2/)

L ib o r

) m [io\cr

Tabte B-2: Monthty tabor turnover rates in setected groups
and industries - Continued

Separation
industry group and industry

Total

June
1954

Quit

May June
1954 1954

Discharge

May June
1954 1954

Total
M ise., in cl.

Layo f f

May June
1954 1954

accession

May June May June
1951 1954 1954 1954

May
1954

fRANSPORTAHON EQU!PMENT-Continued
Railroad equipment....................... ..
Locomotives and parts.................... .
Railroad and street cars.................... ..
Other transportation equipment............
!N
STRU EN A D RELATED PRODUCTS..........
M TS M

14.0 12.3 2.0
1.9
15.0
.7
-3
(1 /) 10.8 (1/)
1.0
11-9 17.6 1 .1
1.4 2.9
.4
.4
2 .1

0.6

1.2
(1/)
3.0

.6

.1

.1

1.0

4.4 1.0

1 .1

.2

.2

3-5

4.2 1.0

1.0

.1

.2

2.4
M TA M!N!NG..................................................
E L
Iron mining.................................................... 1.7

4.4 1.2
4.0
.4
4.0 1.0
1.8 1.6

2.3
.3
3-5
1.4

.2
(2/)
.3
.1

.4
(2/)
.3
.1

(1/)

.3

(1/)

(2/)

.4

1 .1
.9

1.7

ANTHRACITE M!N!NG........................................ ! (1/)
B!TUM!N0US-C0AL M!N!NG..............................

18.8

2.3

2.7

.4

( 1/ )
( 1/ )

1.4

(1/)
(l/)

1 .1
.6
1.2

.1
(2/)
.1

3-5

Lead and zinc mining................................ j 2.6

2.2
.1
.2 (1/)
-3 2 .1

.1
(1/)
.1

2.8

..........................

1.4
.1
.4 (l/)
l.O
.1

.6
.6
.5

1.9

M
!SCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURE
!NDUSTR!ES....................................................
Jewelry, silverware, and plated

0.6
2.6
1.3
3.5
0.9

(1/)
.3
(2/)

4.8

.6

0.2 12.4
.7 (1/)
1 .1 (y)
.5 ^.9
1.0
.2

11.2
9.0
(1/) 13.3
9-3
(1/)
9-9 15.0
.9 2.3

2.3
.7
1 .1 (1/)
.8
2.7

^inflruients ^

0.3
(1/)
(1/)
.6
.1

0.5
.2
.1
-3
(2/)

1.9

.2

.2

1.9

1.3

2 .1

3-0

.2

.1

2.6

2.6

2.3

2.0

.1

.1

1.9

1 .1

.7 1.4
1 .1
3-,3
.1 (2/)
.2
.1

.3
.2
.3
.7

.2
-3
.2
.1

2.3
.9
3 .1
3.5

5.5
5.2
6.3
1.9

(1 /)

10.1

( 1/ )

(2/)

.1

1.7

2.2

(1/)
(1/)

.1
(2/)

(l/)
(1 /)

.1

.3 ( 1 / )

.7

1.0

1.4

.1 (1/)
.2 (1/)

1.2
1.5

.1

C0MMUN!CAT!0N:

1.3

.2 (1/)
.2 (l/)

l/ Not available.
2/ Less than 0.05.
3/ Data relate to domestic employees except messengers and those compensated entirely on a commission
basis.




- 2L

L ibor

tu m o

labte B-3: Monthty tabor turnover rates of men and women
in setected manufacturing group* i /

April 1954
Men (per 1Q0 men)

Women (per 100 women)

industry group
Separation
Total
Quit

Total
accession

Separation
Total
Quit

Total
accession

.....................

3.6

0.9

2.3

4.5

1.6

2.6

Cbocfs....................

3.9

.9

2.3

4.7

1.4

2.3

5-0

.8

i.r

7.6

1.5

1-5

5.1
5.0
p. 6
3.7

2.0
1.4
-7
.6

4.4
2.4
1.9
1.7

2.8
6.0
3.7
3-9

1.6
1.4
l.l
1.3

3.2
1.8
2.9
1.6

4.3
3.7
3.1
4.2
2.4

.9
.
7
.6
.9

3.4
1.6
1-3
2.8
.0

1.4
1.4
1.5
1.4
l.l

......
Industrie.......................

4.7
4.2
4.6
3.8
3-1

3.2
1.7
2.4
2.3
1 .5-

4.2

1.0

2.2

7.4

1.7

2.5

Cood5..................

2.7

.8

22
.-

4.4

1.7

2.9

3.3
3-3
3.2

*9
1.0
i.i

3.6
2.3
2.4

7.0
2.0
4.0

1.4
1.3
1.3

4.9
1.3
2.9

7.0
1.8
1.4
.6
2.6
4.1

1.5
.9
.4

2.4
2.0
1.0
.8
1.9
1.9

5.0
3-2
2.6
3.5
5.2
3.5

2.3
1.4
1.2
3.1
1.5
1.8

2.6
2.6
1.9
1.5
3.3
2.7

2^""°Lrw.*d°p"d^t*'!

.....

"chineryf"^d
transportation equipment)..........
Machinery (except electrical).......

Food and ki.dr.d products
Tobacco manufactures............ .
Ipparir^^oth^finished..........

Rubber products................ *...
Leather and l.ath.r product.........

1.2

l/ Ihese figures are based on a slightly smaller sample than those in tables 3-1 and 3-2, inasmuch
as some firms do not report separate data for vomen.

26




Hours and Earnings
Tabie C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory emptoyees

Aver^e.kly
" '^ ngs ^
industry g r o u p s ^ s t r y

June
195)4

May
1P5!)

..........
Copper mining
Lead and zinc mining...............

$83 j i
tt
81.20
8
7.31)
7i).07

ANTHRAC!TE......................

91.36

62.7h

B!TUM!N0US-C0AL..................

83.66

76.32

METAL M!N!NG.....................

June
1953

June
195!)

May
195!)

June
1953

June
1 4
95^

May
195^

June
1953

1
)0.7
38.3
12!
).)
3.)
9!

!)0.C
36.7
bl.5
!)0.3

!t3
.6 32.03
!)3.8 2.12
!1.
) ) 8 2.06
!)1.9 1.88

$2.05
2.12
2.03
1.88

$1.99
2.07
1.96
1.90

91.63

3.)
6!

2
5.1)

36.8

2.51

2.h7

219
.*

91.25

33.6

30.9

36.5

2.^9

2.h7

2.50

$82.00 $86.76
77.80 90.67
8h.25
37.81
75.76 79.61

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCT!ON:
9.t
0!0

9it.58

87.02

!) .
00

1 3
)1.

101
).

2.26

2.29

2.17

78.58

77.88

76.78

!i.
))9

1! .
))5

1)5 7
.

1.75

1.75

1.68

.................

95.63

9h.50

92.25

38.1

37.5

38.6

2.51

2.52

2.39

NONBU!LD!NGCONSTRUCT!ON............

96.37
100.53

91.51)
^ .1 0
91).19

hl.9
!27
).
1)1
.2

1)0.6
1)1.0
i
)0.3

M.8

Other nonbuiLdmg construction......

93.79
86.97
97.93

13!
).)
!)0.6

2.30
2.15
2.Mt

2.31
2.17
213
.;

2.19
2.03
2.32

BUtLMMGCOttSTRUCTtOM..............

95.1)6

9h.69

92.23

37.0

36.7

37.8

2.58

2.58

2.1A

6EMERAL CONTRACTORS...............
SPECtAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS..........
Electrical work....................
Other special-trade contractors.....

89.79
99.70
103.H
91.78
112.81
95.89

89.67
88.55
98.36 95.23
101.95 97.67
89.78 87.75
113.59 110.21
9
lt.68 91.98

36.8
37.2
38.3
35.3
38.9
36.6

36.6
36.7
37.9
3 ).8
!
38.9
36.0

38.5
37.2
38.3
35.1
39.5
36.5

2.Mi
2.68
2.70
2.60
2.90
2.62

2.^5
2.68
2.69
2.58
2.92
2.63

2.30
2.56
2.55
2.50
2.79
2.52

.........................

71.68

71.13

72.01)

39.6

39.3

!07
).

i.ei

1.81

1.77

DURABLE GOODS.....................
NONDURABLE GOODS..................

7
6.i<0
6h.7it

76.21
63.91

7
7.1)2
63.52

!)0.0
39.0

39.9
38.5

!l!
).)
39.7

1.91
1.66

1.91
1.66

1.87
1.60

ORDNANCE AMD ACCESSOR!ES...........

79.79

78.80

78.88

1)0
.3

1)0.0

!)
1.3

1.98

1.97

1.91

FOOD AND K!NDRED PRODUCTS..........

69.55
76.0!)
78.50
76.96
71.52
7
it.73
72.65
53.52
Mt.98
56.82
76.L9
78.58

66.56
7l).29
76.63
7it.56
68.39
72.05
68.61
5.))
111
!)3.33
5i).l0
72.16
7i).59
70.97
65.36
66.91)
58.1)9
72.58
78.37
67.37
51).35
52.13
79.66
63.cc
9l).98

!i<
).)
! .
tl i

1)0.8
101
).)

111
).
!16
).

ho.3

1!.
))7
! 3
)7.
!)3.5
38.5
31.9
! 3
)0.
1)5.E
!1.
))9
!)7 5
.
a.!)
1 1.5
)
!)0.8
Li.3
hl.8
1)0.5
39.7
39.6
! l.l
)
! 2.5
)
! 0.8
)

1.68
1.85
1.91
1.8h
1.59
1.57
1.65

!li
).)
3.
9 !)
hl.2
hl.8
!0i
).
38.7
38.5
!
)0.3
hl.i
101
).)

1)1.6
11
) .5
1;
1.2
! 3.1
)
!!.
))?
171
).)
! 3.
) 7
38.1
30.3
39.2
1
)5.1
!!.)
))!
!)7.0
! 1.
) 9
!)2
.1
1)0.9
!)2
.2
1) .
33
39 !
.)
39.1
38.9
1)2.6

1.68
1.85
1.91
1.85
1.60
1.58
1.67
1.39
l.hl

68.31
69.72
63.2!t
72.28
76.L9
70.E8
57.17
55.CL
80.56
63.33
95.!)7

68.5!t
7t7t
l.i
76.97
76.36
69.01
71.75
69.63
5h.72
lt6.63
57.31
73.37
76.39
70.53
67.65
69.11)
60.68
72.9?
77.33
71.38
55.31)
53.13
78.18
6C.L2
92.92

7 : 69
1.

73.53

72.pl

38.7

38.7

MONMETALUC M!W!NG AMD QUARRY!NG.....

91.81

Dairy products.....................

Cannedfruits, vegetables, and soups.
Grain-mill products................
Flour and other grain-mill products..

7ti
!.o
Bread and other bakery products....
Biscuits, crackers, and pretzels....
Sugar.............................
Beet sugar........ ...............
Confectionery and related products....
Confectionery....................
Malt liquors......................
Distilled, rectified, and blended
liquors.........................
See footnotes at end of table.




!< .
iS

!3 !
). )
1)5.7
1)2.2
38.0
29.7
39.8
!1.
);2
1)3
.9
1
)5.5

hl.o

i.M

l.bh
1.66
1.7h
1.55
1.65
1.67

1!.)
))!
!21
). i

1.67
1.75
1.56
1.65
1.68
1.55
1.75
1.83
1.75
l.hh
1.39
1.96
l
.i*9
2 i
.3 i

1.77
1.85
1.78
1.^3
1.38
1.9^
li7
.i
2.30

1.60
3.79
1.86
1.73
1.53
1.52
1.57
1.35
l t
.i 3
1.38
1.60
1.68
1.51
1.56
1.59
1
.1*3
1.72
1.81
1.71
1.39
1.3h
1.87
1 *
.1 2
22*
.1

39.2

1.93

1.90

1.86

lbi
.l
1.57

i.5h

29

Hours and Earnings
Tabie C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory empioyees - Continued

"la r L n g s ^

industry group and industry
June
19$4

M
ay
19$4

19$3

June
19$4

Hay
19$!:

June
19$3

19^

May
1O,.
K'.

June
1953

FOOD A O KiHDRED PRODUCYS-Cont inued
M
$6$.h7
80.70
^4.75

j,6$.78
82.8h
65.71

."62.28
f l.6 $
-'-2.1$

41.7
41.6
4$.3

41.9
42.7
^ -.6

41.8
-i:3.?
4$. 7

n .$ 7

$1.71
6$. $3
L2.09
$3.02
00

49.98
61.^0
$3.02
h$.l4

46.99
$4.4$
^2.22
$1.03
42.13

38.3
hO.7
36.6
3 7 .37.9

37.3
38.$
3''V37.^
3 '.4

37.0
36.3
37.7
37.8
3$. 7

1.3$
1.61
1.1$
1.41
I.2.!-

"l.-'tl
^3.$2
4$.63
4i.;.2$
47.63
L 7 .^
(i/)
(i/)
6?. 68
$4.10
Lf.3!t
$4.2.:.
(1 /)
(T /)
!i0.f3
(V )
(1 /)
51.99
4$.1'4
$9.90

^1.10
^-1.30
J^'.oo
L'!.$0
L7.37
48.97
47.34
53.72
4$. 8^
^2.1''4.6$
47.^$
r-5.12
$4.37
$$.20
39.31
42.72
38.3$
$1.32
43.68
$9.$$

$3.72
6$.3$
h9.$3
49.$3
:0.42
[3.47
^l.^"*
$'-.$4
49.90
''3.90
$$.7$
48.?';
$ 4 .^
$5.78
$3.91
40.07
4$.0$
38.90
51.19
4 $.22
63.72

37.8
40.2
36.$
36.2
37.$
37.7
37.2
( 1 /)
( 1 /)
40.7
39.2
36.9
36.'4
(1 /)
( 1 /)
3^.5
(i/)
(l/)
37.4
37.0
40.2

37.3
38.8
3 -.0
3$. 6
37.3
37.1
3 '.7
38.1
3^.4
4 o .i
39.6
36.1
36.$
36.1
36,8
3 $ .l
36.2
3$.0
36J4
36.1
39.7

h l.l
39.0
39.0
39.7
39.9
3, .7
40.1
39.6
.':0.7
hO.h
37.4
36.2
36.7
3$.7
37.1
38.5
3^.7
38.2
38.0
42.2

. $9.6h
66.73
Carpets, rugs, other flo o r c o v e r in g s ....
Wool carpets, rugs, and carpet yam.... 6$. 02
$$.$7
Hats (except cloth and millinery).....
61.69

$9.30
68.38
6$.19
$2.39
61.23

63.1$
68.74
66.91
$7.83
62.^2

40.3
39.$
37.8
364
39.8

39.8
39.3
37.9
3$.';
39.$

42.1
h o.2
3!i.9
38.3
41.2

71.$8
I^ace goods ........................ * 60.31
6J..71
Paddings and upholstery filling......
Processed waste and recovered fibers.. $1.0$
.

-'6.0$
$7.96
-9.14
$1.73

70.86
-3.43
6-3.2h
$1.91

40.9
37.0
39.7
41.$

38.it
36.0
41.4
42.4

h i.2
39.4
40.8
42.9

^ o t h f r ^ c o L e r f a b r i c s !!^ ° ^ ! . ^ ....
Cordage and twine...................

79.61
$2.06

^7.$9
$2.20

81.4$
$3.99

43.$
38.0

4 2 .'t
38.1

4 $.o
39.7

1.83

APPAREL A D O E F!M!SHED TEXT!LE
M TH R
PRODUCTS...............................................................
Men's and boys' suits and coats.......

h6.$'$4^92

Ir .07
$2.97

48.0$
$8.67

35.0
33.9

34.9
32.9

39.78
39.7?
40.h7
34.13
48.82
h?.19
39.21
''0.h$
43.91

39.67
39.67
h l.h l
34.20
49.76
$3.4$
39.79
$1.44
43.^7

41.$1
41.78
h 6 .io
34.76
$0.66
L<9.16
39.$3
62. $1
4^.01;

3$.2
34.6
34.3
36.7
33.9
33.7
34.7
32.$
3$.7

40.2h
48.$1
$ 2 .fl
45.68

40.1h
48.78
44.68
44.29

hl.h7
47.71
$0.0$
4$.26

3$.3
36.2

TO
BACCO M
ANU
FACTU
RES.........................................
CLgare t te s ...........................................................
Tobacco stemming and redrying....................
TEXTtLE-MiLL PRODUCTS........................... ........
Scouring and combing p la n ts ....................
Yam and thread m i lls ...................................
Thread m ills .....................................................
^ C o t ^ l i if ^ s y n t h e ^ c ' ^iber! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Narrow fab rics and smallwares
Knitting m ills ............................................
Full-fashioned h o s ie r y ^ ............................
North?'............................
Seamless hosiery....................
Knit outerwear................................................
Knit urderwear . .
.
.............
Dyeing and finishing textiles.........

C lo th in g ,
Work shirts
............
Womer's outerwear
..............
/omen's dresses..............................................
Women's suits, coats, and skirts.....
Women's, children's under garments....
......
Millinery
......................
Children's outerwear......................................

30




42.09

1.94
I.h3

1.36
l.$ 8
1.?$
1.2$
1.27
1.3?
1.28
(V )
i.$ 4
1.3C
1.31
l.!t9

$1.$7
1.94
1.41

$1.49

1.34

1.27

1.60
1 . 1$
1.41

1.89
1.36
l.$ 0

1.12
1.3$

1.2h

1.18

1.37
l.$ 8
1.2$
1.23
1.27
1.32
1.29
1.41
1.26
I.-*-1.38
1.32
l.$ l
l.$ 2
l.$ 0
1.12
1.18
1.11
1.41

1.36
i.$ 9

1.27
1.27
1.27
1.34

1.29
1.41
1.26

l.$ 0

l!3 8
1.29
l.$ l
l.$ 2
1.51
1.08
1.17
1.06
1.34
1.19
l.$ l

1.49
1.74
1.72
1.48
1 .$$

l.$ 0
1.71
1.72
l.$ l
l.$ 2

1.72
1.61
1.22

1.72
1.61
1.55
1.21

1.37

1.83
1.37

1.81
1.36

36.h
3^.9

1.33
1.62

1.32
1.61

1.32
l.$ 9

34.8
34.f
34.8
3^1.0
34.8
3$.4
36.$
28.9
3$.$

37.4
37.3
38.1
38.2
34.7
33.9
36.6
32.9
36.7

1.13
1.1$
1.18
.93
1.44
1.43
1.13
1.8'-

1.14
1.14
1.19
.9$
1.43
l.$ i
1.7f
1.23

1.11
1.12
1.21
.91
1.46
1.4$
1.08
1.90
1.20

36.6

1.1$
1.34
i.$ 3

1.13
1.30
1.54

37.3

36.7
36.7
32.$
37.1

1.14
1.34

32.8

34.9
36.')
29.2

1.12
( 1 /)
(1/)
1.39
1.22
1.^9
1.48
1.74

1.72

i.$ i
1.5$
1.7$

1.63
1.63
1.23

1.23

1.61
1.23

1.2 1

1.67

1.09

1.2 1

1.22

Hours and Earnings
Tabte C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory emptoyees - Continued

Avera^weekly
industry group and industry
June

May

June

June

May

June

June

M
ay-

June

155b

195b

1953

195b

195b

1953

1954

1951;

1953

$b2.96
b7.36

$b3.19
b7.b7

tbb.27
b8.l3

35.5
37.0

36.8

35.b

37.2
37.6

$1.21

$1.22

$1.19

house furnishings...................
Textile bags........................
Canvas products.....................

^ .M
50.b6
$2.80

bl.bo
b9.71
53.33

bl.15
b9.i3
53.32

36.1
37.5
bo.7

1.16
1.36
1.34

1.15
1.34
1.35

1.14
1.31
l.3 l

L M E A D W O PR D C (EXCEPT
U B R M O D O U TS
FURW
tTURE).......................................................

68.21

Logging camps and contractors.........
Sawmills and planing mills..............
Sawmills and planing mills, general....

66.56

67.03
76.80
67.23
67.6b
b3.26
8 85
b.

68.31 bo .6
8 .b 6 37.b
b
67.16 bl.3

1.68
2. Oil
1.66

1.68
2.11
1.66

1.67
( 1/ )
( 1/ )

1.67
1.04
2.17

1.65
2.07
1.63
1.65

1.71

1.71

APPAREL AND OTH F!N!SHED TEXTiLE
ER
PRODUCTS-Continued
Miscellaneous apparel and accessories..
.
Other fabricated textile products.....

76.30
68.97

37.1
39.5

67.98
b3.76
85.b6

bl.3
(V )
( 1/ )

bo.5

b l .6
39.1

b l.b
b0.8
b l .2
b l .2
b2.9
39.2

69.86
72.16
51.88

69.89

b l.7
b2.6
bo.5
b0.6

52.08
55.99

b0.8

bo.8
b l.b
bo.b
b0.3
bo. 2
b0.5

b2.1
b2.6
b2.7
b l.5
b2.0
b2.1

39.9
36.b
bo.5

39.7
39.3

38.8
38.2

bl.O
bo.7

1 .5 1

38.9
36.1
38.b

b l.5
39.6
39.8

1.67

bo.b

1.29

1.75
1.26
1.27
1.36

Millwork, plywood, and prefabricated

1.28

1.02
2.18

1.66
1.64

FU W U E A D FtXTURES..................................
R tT R W
Wood household furniture, except
upholstered........................
Wood household furniture, upholstered..
Mattresses and bedsprings............
Office, public-building, and
professional furniture
....
Partitions, shelving, lockers, and
fixtures...........................

PA R A D ALLtED PRO U
PE W
D CTS............................
Pulp, paper, and paperboard mills.....
Paperboard boxes.

PRtMTiNG, PUBL!SH!WG, A D ALHED
W
!NDUSTR!ES.............................................................

5l.bb
55.b9

69.77
69.55
71.10
b9.97
b9.85
5b.68

62.33
59.3b

60.53
57.30

5b.b0
65.63

52.52
58.bS
63.7b

55.61
6b.5S

66.0
7

bo.o
37.5
39.3

69.1b
58.80
76.55

69.08
57.75
75.60

70.73
60.70
75.03

bo .2
39.2
bo.5

38.5
bo.o

b2.1
bO. 2
bl.O

1.72
1.50
1.89

1.89

1.68
1.51
1.83

7 6 .il

73.8b

73.03

bo.7

39.7

b0.8

1.87

1.86

1.79

6b.7b

..............
Plywood
.
Wooden containers
............
Wooden boxes other than cigar ......
Miscellaneous wood products...........

71.31
71.99
70.88

35.7
37.1
39 .b

36.0

1.28

6b.b8

63.33

bi.5

b l.6

b2.5

1.56

1.55

1.49

73.95
79.97
69.31
69.06
73.60
66.26

72.83
78.19
67.89
67.65
71.82
66.b2

72.bl
78.68
68.00
67.73
69.55
6b.58

b2.5
b3.7

b2.1
b3.2
b0.9
bl.O
39.9
bl.O

b3.1
bb.2
b2.5
b2.6
b l.b
b l.b

1.62

1.68
1.78
1.60
1.59
1.68
1.56

2.27

! 2.27

2.20

2.60
2.22

37.1
39.7

2.60
2.21
1.93
2.17
2.18
1.37
1.73

51.16

61.13

62.73

60 2
. b

3
3

..................

Bookbinding and related industries....
Miscellaneous publishing and printing

CHEMtCALS AN ALL!ED PRODUCTS.......................
D

Plastics except synthetic rubber....
Synthetic rubber
***.........
Synthetic fibers
............
Explosives..........................




bi.5
b i.6
bo.o
b0.9

1.68
1.76

1.69

1.2b
1.24
1.35
1.56
1.50

1.3 6
1.63

1.53
1.48

1.35
1.62
1.66

1.57

1.25

1.63

1 .7 1

1.50

1.74

1.73

1.83

l.8 i

1.67
1.66
1.814

1.66
1.65
1.80

1.62

1.24

1.33

1.3 4

1.66

i
86.9b
93.86
85.09
75.66
8b.85
88.29
51.38
68.16

86.71
93.86
86.1b
75.27
8b.b6
G5.97
5b.05
67.6b

85.36
92.35
82.68
73.b5
8b.00
85.b6
b6.75

103.33

Bo-kg

bo.5

1.69

79.07
88.20
87.96
Cb.05
83.80
90.98
7b.07
73.00

66.70

37.5
39.b

38.2
36.1
38.8
38.8
39.1
39.8
37.8
39.1

I0b.i3

102.83

38.7

39.0

39.b

77.71
85.06
82.21
82.62
82.76
89.20
72.90
77.81

75.58
8b.00
87.60
80.16

b i.b
b2.0
b2.7
bl.O
'tl.9
bo. 8
b0.7
bo.o

!j0.9

bl.3
b2.0
b3.S
bo. 9
b3.0
b0.9
bO.l
38.7

83.85
86.71
69.77
73.53

38.3
36.1
38.5
39.2
39.1

bo.5

b0.7
bO.l

bo.5
b l.8
bO.0
bO.l
39.7

38.8
36.5
39.0
39.7
bo.o

bo.5

1.9 4

2.16
2.16

2.53

2.12
1.85
2.3D

1.73

2.11
1.26
1.68

2.6?

2.67

2.61

1 .9 1

1.90

2.10
2.06

2.09
2.05
2.0)j

1.83
2.00
2.00
1.96
1.95
2.12
1.74
1.90

2.05

2.00
2.23

1.82
1.95

1.43

^ 1.98
' 2.23
I 1.82
1 1.9 6

Hours and E.tnnngs
Tab!e C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory emptoyees - Continued

hours

"'"earnings^

industry group and industry

June

May

June

June

May

June

June

May

June

195!*

195b

1953

1954

1954

1953

1931*

1931*

1933

$71.81

$71.46

$66.90

40.8

40.6

40.3

$1.76

$1.76

$1.66

81.97
89.19
78.25

80.97
88.56
77.87

77.30
83.34
76.20

41.4
41.1
41.4

41.1
41.0
41.2

40.9
40.7
42.1

1.98
2.17
1.89

1.97
2.16
1.89

1.89

.....
Gum and wood chemicals..................
Fertilizers.........................
Vegetable and animal oils and fats......
Vegetable oils .....................

76.59
67.73
62.18
70.02
64.68
77.98

76.45

41.4
42.6
42.3
44.6
44.o
45.6

41.1
41.1

81.51

1.86
1.61
1.1*7
1.31*
1.1*3
1.70
1.76
1.36
i.9i*

1.78
1.33
i.i* l
1.33
1.1*1*
1.61*

70.70

42.0
41.3
41.9
44.4
43.3
45.9

Miscellaneous chemicals............ .
Essential oils, perfumes, cosmetics....
Compressed and liquified gases.......

62.33
68.53
63.35
75.99
70.93
59.90
81.29

74.76
64.02
59.08
67.93
62.35
75.28
69.70
57.37
79.38

94.39
97.58

93.52
97.17

86.54
91.94

.....

82.64

80.06

78.58

RUBBER PRODUCTS.....................

81.00
94.48
67.54
71.56

77.81
88.65
65.b6
70.98

51.01

CHEM!CALS AMD ALLtED PRODUCTS-Continued
^preparations^ ^

Pd^hing

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL........
"products"""'

Rubber footwear
.....
Other rubber products................

59.99

66.17

40.4

40.3

41.0

38.7
41.8

38.4
41.9

42.0

1.83
1.39
1.1*7
1.37
1.1*7
1.71
1.73
1.33
1.93

41.0

4 i.4

41.2
41.0

4o.8
40.5

2.28
2.38

2.37

2.17
2.27

42.6

41.7

41.8

l.9i*

1.92

1.88

78.55

4o.5

39.7
39.4
39.2

40.7
40.0

2.00
2.31
1.68
1.78

1.96
2.23

71.28

40.9
40.2
b o. 2

1.93
2.23
1.66
1.73

52.33
69.26
64.88
51.74
49.90
55.57
46.36
44.17

36.7
39.6
39.4
37.5
35.9
39.3
37.7
35.4

35.4
39.0
38.0
36.0
34.5
38.4
35.3
35.5

40.4

40.4

89.20
68.06

Leather: tanned, curried, and finished..
Industrial leather belting and packing..
Boot and shoe cut stock and findings....

50.63

Luggage.............................
Handbags and small leather goods......
Gloves and miscellaneous leather goods..

47.75
58.95
47.13
43.90

49.21
68.25
61.9b
48.96
45.89
57.60
45.18
44.02

71.10

71.10

70.11

97.28
69.45
72.65
64.88
58.44
76.73

99.38

95.65

40.2

68.40
71.23

38.8
39.7
37.5
38.7
41.7
41.2
43.2
40.7

LEATHER AMD LEATHER PRODUCTS..........

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.......
Flat glass..........................
Glass and glassware, pressed or blown...
Glass containers.
Glass products made of purchased glass..
Cement, hydraulic.................... *

69.70
65.01

66.33
Brick and hollow tile...............
Floor and wall tile.................
Sewer pipe ........................

65.23

69.60
67.98
65.52

69.81
73.38
65.25
59.10
73.98
66.74
65.82

68.40
68.06
66.06

64.91
58.75
73.99
64.74
62.64
67.97

66.01
66.13
61.09

41.2
36.4
35.8
44.3
45.0
4o.5

60.82
73.48
71.44
65.16

73.54
72.82
64.17
73.67
79.59
77.43
68.35

39.4
38.8
'41.8

61.15

72.52
75.86
77.23
61. 0b

81.12

79.b9

......

84.10

Electrometallurgical products........

84.10
79.00

Pottery and related products..........
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products..
Concrete products...................
.....
Abrasive products
................
Asbestos products
...........
Nonclay r e fr a c to r ie s .....................................

PRtMARY METAL )M0USTR)ES.............
^roiLfr^:

^

[urgicfl"prod!.=ts''^




60.14
73.5b
72.45

63.18

73.28
75.27
78.58

2.06
1.81

42.4
44.5
44.3
44.7

40.1

4 o.4
39.0
40.1
37.5
39.4

4 1.1
41.2
43.3
4o.o

41.0
36.7

36.2
44.0
44.1
41.5

38.5

41.0
41.2
38.2
40.5
40.3
38.9
37.8
37.8
38.0
36.5
41.0
40.7
40.0
40.7
39.1
40.8
41.8
41.5
43.2
40.7
4 i.o
38.9
36.8
44.3
44.4
4 i.4

1.39
1.76
1.63
1.33
1.33
1.30
1.23
1.21*
1.76
2.1*2
1.79
1.83
1.73
1.31
1.8!t
1.61
1.31
1.71
1.63

2.27

1.67
1.77
1.39
1.73

1.63
1.36
1.33
1.30
1.28
1.21*

1.68
1.66
1.61
1.36

1.76
2.1*6
1.79
1.83
1.7l*
1.30
1.80
1.62
1.32
1.71
1.66
1.80
1.68
1.67
1.62
1.37

1.80

1.70
i.!*9
1.89

1.37
1.71
1.61
1.33
1.32
1.1*7
1.22
1.21
1.71
2.33
1.71
1.73
1.66
1.1*1*
1.77
1.36
1.1*3

1.67
1.6 1
1.70
1.66

1.66
1.61*
1.33

1.81

31.2

39.2
38.9
41.3
31.3

40.4
43.5
35.6

1.86
1.91*
1.88
1.96

1.83
1.93
1.87
1.93

1.97
1.78
1.92

84.25

39.0

38.4

41.3

2.08

2.07

2.01*

81.22

87.53

38.4

37.6

40.9

2.19

2.16

2.11*

81.22
78.41

87.53
79.95

38.4
39.9

37.6
39.8

40.9

2.19
1.98

2.16
1.97

2.H*
1.93

40.7

4 i.o

Hours and Earnings
Tabte C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory empioyees - Continued

Avera^eekly

^'etrnin^

industry gr.up and industry

June
195b

May
195b

June
1953

June
195b

May June
195b 1953

June
19$ii

May
19$!t

June
19$3

PRtMARY METAL tMDUSTRtES-Continued
Gray-iron foundries....................
Malleable-iron foundries...............
Steel foundries........................

$73.3b
73.12
71.06
7b.65

472.77
72.56
72.01
73.b8

478.bb
76.78
79.52
81.95

38.6
39.1
37.6
37.7

38.3
38.8
37.7
37.3

bl.5
b i.5
bl.2
b l.6

$1.90
1.87
1.89
1.98

$1.90
1.87
1.91
1.97

$1.89
1.8$
1.93
1.97

.°f.......

79.19

78.!t0

80.51

bo. 2

bO.O

bl.5

1.97

1.96

1.9^

76.02
8b.b5

7b.66
8b.b5

79.61
80.79

bo.6

39.5

bo.6

bl.9
b0.6

1.91
2.08

1.69
2.08

1.90
1.99

"f.....

75.b8

73.80

73.?2

bl.7

bl.O

hl.6

l.Pl

1.80

1.76

^ n o ^ r r o u r M t h s ^ . ^ ^ ! ! ' ! . ^ ......

80.99

80.20

8b.83

b0.7

b0.3

b3.5

1.99

1.99

1.9$

.....

81.61

79.80

90.25

bo.6

39.9

bb.9

2.01

2.00

2.01

79.77
79.19
86.03
8b.b8
88.19
86.92

79.58
79.00
83.53
8b.ob
6b.21
8b.85

77.27
80.97
86.9b
69.bb
86.73
81.59

bo.7

bo.6

39.b

39.5
39.b
38.2

b l .l
b l .l
bl.6
b l.6
bl.9
39.6

1.96
2.01
2.1ii
2.20
2.12
2.12

1.96
2.00
2.12
2.20
2.10
2.09

1.88
1.97
2.09
2.1$
2.07
2.0$

76.92
83.13
72.6$
65.90
72.52
75.20

77.33
82.7b
7b.7b
66.00
72.31
78.50

77.28
75.2b
75.36
65.92
75.96
78.02

b2.0

39.7
39.7
39.2
bO.O

bo.b

b2.0
bl.8
i.2.1
bl.2
b2.2
b2.b

1.89
1.97
1.83
1.66
1.8$
1.88

1.90
1.97
1.8$
1.6$
1.8h
1.91

1.81i

b2.2

7b.b0
77.79

73.28
75.66

72.98
7b.26

bO.O
bO.l

39.b
39.2

bo.l

1.86
1.9li

1.86
1.93

1.82
1.88

73.20
80.06

72.29
79.30

72.32
80.)[6

bO.O

39.5
b l.3

bo.b

bl.7

b2.8

1.83
1.92

1.83
1.92

1.79
1.88

.

82.13

8o.bl

61.97

b3.0

b2.1

b3.6

1.91

1.91

1.88

!....
Boiler— shop products...................
Sheet-metal work.......................
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving..

77.52
78.55
79.73
79.97
62.98
82.61
71.10
72.58
7b.i5

76.99
78.7b
79.73
80.36
61.06
83.01
71.82
72.58
73.78

81.13
80.09
76.81
78.58
58.22
81.67
70.98
72.16
79.97

b0.8
b0.7
b l.l

bo.l

'<2.7
b2.6
bl.7
bl.8
38.3
b2.1
b0.1
bl.O
b3.7

1.90
1.93
1.9ii
1.96
1.6ii
2.01
1.80
1.81
l.8it

1.92
1.93
1.9li
1.96
l.$9
2.01
1.80
1.8h

1.9C
1.88
1.89
1.88
l.$2
1.9h
1.77
1.76
1.83

85.2!,
78.21
73.!t7
73.53

85.68
75.0b
72.91
7b.l2

83.61
83.69
81.03
83.25

b3.1
b2.7
b3.8
b5.o

2.02
1.99

2.0h
1.98

1.9i;
1.96

1.86

1.86

1.8$

1.82

1.83

1.8$

81.00
83.31

81.61
86.07

8b.26

9h.76

Agricultural machinery and tractors....
tractors................................

83.4!,
78.60
78.78

82.82
78.80
80.77

tractors)..............................

78.36

76.99

"c^pplr ' " ' a d ^ L d ^ i n f
Primary refining of aluminum...........

^ n fe r r c u n ^ l!.

.°f.....
Wonferrous foundries-...................
Miscellaneous primary metal industries..
Iron and steel forgings................
Wire drawing...........................
Welded and heavy-riveted pipe..........

FABRtCATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
OMMAHCE, MACmttERY, A M TRAMSPORTATtOH
EQUtPMEHT).........................
Tin cans and other tinware. ............
Cutlery hand tools
and hardware.......
Cutlery and edge tools.................
Hand tools
.
Hardware..
.......... ............ .

"pl^bLs"'supplI.l"°''''
Sanitary ware and plumbers' supplies...
cooking apparatus,
Fabricated

bo.2
38.b
b l.6
bl.O

b0.7

bo.l
bo.6

bc.7
bO.O
39.3

bl.l

39.5

1.80
1.79
1.60
1.80

18i
.i

not elsewhere

structural metal products...

^work!?!^.

"tld\r^": "'!*!.f""":

Stamped and pressed metal products.....
Lighting fixtures.......................
Fabricated wire products...............
Miscellaneous fabricated metal products.
Metal shipping barrels, drums, kegs,
Steel springs
.
................
Bolts nuts washers and rivets.......
Screw-machine products.................

MACmttERY (EXCEPT ELECTRtCAL).........

^ngiLs^not^elsiwhere^^assi fied??.




39.8

bo.8
38.b
b l.l
39.5
b o .l
b0.3

b0.8
b l.l
bl.O
38.b
b l.3
39.9
b o .l

bo.l

1.81

b2.2
39.3
39.5

h2.0
37.9
39.2

bo.b

bo.5

82.b9
8b.67

bo.5

bo.6

b o .l

bo.6

b2.3
bl.3

2.00
2.09

2.01
2.12

1.9$
2.0$

87.9b

38.3

bl.2

b0.9

2.20

2.30

2.1$

83.63
76.62
78.80

b0.8
39.9
39.0

bo.b
39.8
39.b

b l.b
39.7
39.6

2.0$
1.97
2.02

2.0$
1.98
2.0$

2.02
1.93
1.99

7b.6l

bo.6

bo.l

39.9

1.93

1.92

1.87

Hours and Earnings
Tabte C-l:

Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory emptoyees - Continued

Average^ekiy
June
195b

Hay
195b

June
1953

June
195b

$79.76

$80.60

bl.0

Average hourly
earnings

May June
195b 1953

June
1954

May
195b

June
1933

bo .9

b2.2

$1.93

$1.95

$1.91

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTR!CAL)-Continued

Oil field machinery and tools........
Metalworking machinery...............
Machine tools.......................

79.37
81.93
92.21
87.78

78.57
82.5b
92.87
88.61

80.22
82.18
9b .89
93.b3

b0.7
bl.8
b2.3
b2.0

bo.5
bl.9
b2.6
b2.6

b2.0
b2.8
b5.b
b5.8

1*9$
1.96
2.18
2.09

1.9b
1.97
2.18
2.08

1.91
1.92
2.09
2.0b

Machine-tool accessories.............

8b.66
98.70

8b.b6
99.62

90.09
97.61

bo.9
b3.1

b0.8
b3.5

bb.6
b5A

2.07
2.29

2.07
2.29

2.02
2.13

^'ood products machinery.............
Textile trachLnery..................
Paper-indu:st.ries machinery...........

78.55
79.77
69.63
83.28

79.15
80.97
69.52
82.9b

81.27
81.51
72.b5
82.8b

bo.7
bo.7
39.9
b3.6

bo .8
bl.l
39.5
b3.2

b3.o
b2.9
bi.b
bb.3

1.93
1.96
1.73
1.91

1.9b
1.97
1.76
1.92

1.89
1.90
1.75
1.87

General industrial machinery..........
Pumps air and gas compressors........
Convenors and conveying equipment....
Blowers, exhaust and ventilating fans..
Industrial trucks, tractors, etc.....

87.51
79.79
77-02
82.62
7b.l5
80.19

91.56
79.39
76.63
82.00
73.38
77.b2

92.00
83.38
82.37
8b.97
77.51
82.7b

bo .7
bo.3
39.7
bo.9
bo.3
bo.S

b2.o
bo.3
39.5
bl.0
bo.l
39.7

b3.6
b3.2
b2.9
b3.8
b3.3
b2.0

2.15
1.98
1.9b
2.02
1.8b
1.98

2.18
1.97
1.
91*
2.00
1.83
1.95

2.U
1.93
1.92
1.9b
1.79
1.97

.......

79.80

79.79

85.06

bo.1

bo.3

b3.b

1.99

1.98

1.96

"furnaces\nd°ovens^.!^"!^!^....

79.99
79.00
8h.53
73.63
75.b6
7b.88

79.60
77.b2
83.10
72.13
77.22
7b.88

81.02
77.76
83.62
70.75
77.76
77.bl

39.6
39.7
39.5
39.8
39.1
38.b

b0.2
39.3
39.2
39.2
39.2
38.6

b2.2
bo.5
bo.2
bo. 2
bo.5
39.9

2.02
1.99
2.14
1.83
1.93
1.95

1.98
1.97
2.12
1.8b
1.97
1.94

1.92
1.92
2.08
1.76
1.92
1.9b

73.97
79.80

75.85
79.60

76.bb
77.01

b0.2
bO.l

bl.0
39.8

b2.0
39.9

1.8b
1.99

1.85
2.00

1.82
1.93

75^7
77.79
78.20
75.1*6
79.32

78,oi
77.60
78.bO
7b.50
79.52

78.96
78 .bb
77.08
78.12
80.09

38.9
bo.l
bo.l
39.1
bl.l

39.2
bO.O
bo.o
38.8
bl.2

bo.7
bl.5
bl.0
bo.9
b2.6

1.94
1.9b
1.93
1.93
1.93

1.99
1.9b
1.96
1.92
1.93

1.9b
1.89
1.88
1.91
1.88

71.68

71.90

71.81

39.6

39.5

bo.8

1.81

1.81

1.76

Wiring devices and supplies..........

76.80
66 .h7

76.22
66.08

77.79
67.89

bo.o
39.1

39.7
39.1

bl.6
bo.9

1.92
1.70

1.92
1.69

1.87
1.66

Metrical

7b.26

7b.82

77.83

39.5

39.8

bl^t

1.88

1.88

1.88

Weirding instruments.

73.57

72.bb

72.92

bo.2

39.8

bl.2

1.83

1.82

1.77

"sets':

81.80
78.18

80.78
79.19

8b.b2
76^5

39.9
bo.3

39.6
bo.2

b2.0
bl.l

2.03
1.9b

2.0b
1.97

2.01
1.86

74.96
83.01
73.15
69.03
7<t.68
63.69
68.51

7b.99
81.99
76.22
69.1b
78.17
6b.85
67.b2

7b.b6
83.78
Tb.80
72.93
77.90
63.12
66.66

b0.3
bl.3
38.3
39.9
39.1
38.6
39.6

bo.1
bl.2
39.7
b0.2
bo.5
39.3
39.2

bl.6
b2.l
bo.o
b2.b
bl.0
39.7
bo^

1.86
2.01
1.91
1.73
1.91
1.65
1.73

1.87
1.99
1.92
1.72
1.93
1.63
1.72

1.79
1.99
1.87
1.72
1.90
1.59
1.65

67 .b9
63.11

66.08
62.65

6b.6b
62.73

39.7
39.2

39.1
39.b

39.9
bl.0

1.70
l.6l

1.69
1.59

1.62
1.53

79.20

78Jtl

82.91

bo.o

39.8

b2.3

1.98

1.97

1.96

^exce**^fo°"oil^f"elds^

"equipment

Office and store machines and devices...
Computing machines and cash registers..
Service-industry and household machines.
Domestic laundry equipment...........

"prlssl^\ich^s' "^-"""""3'
"ufi ts^^°^.

...

Miscellaneous machinery parts......... .
Fabricated pipe, fittings, and valves..
Ball and roller bearings.............
Machine shops (job and repair).......

ELECTR!CAL MACHINERY.................
^distributi^n^E^i^
.........

Power and distribution transformers....

"c^ois!':
P'lectrical welding apparatus.........

Electric lamps

.................

....
^footnotes




at end of taEle.

Hours and Earnings
Tabte C-l:

Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory emptoyees - Continued

*'larlings'^
industry group and industry

June
195b

May
196b

June
1953

June
195b

May June
195b 1953

June
1954

M ya
1954

June
1953

$1.76
1.98
1.51
1.92

$1.74
1.93
1.52
1.93

$1.68
1.87
1.46
1.75

2.11
2.16

2.11
2.16

2.07
2.15

2.16
1.88
1.89
2.06
2.06
2.07
2.08
2.06
2.07
2.14
1.76
2.10
2.08
2.11
1.82

2.17
1.80
1.82
1.99
1.97
2.02
2.06
1.98
2.02
2.07
1.73
2.03
2.09
1.98
1.82

ELECTRiCAL MACHiWERY-Continued
Miscellaneous electrical products.....
Storage batteries...................
Primary batteries (dry and wet)......
X-ray and non-radio electronic tubes...

$69.87
79.99
59.19
76.b2

$67.51

$68.0b

39.7

38.8

bo.5

75.66
57.91
77.59

78.5b
58.bO
67.73

bO.b
39.2
39.8

39.2

38.1
bo.2

b2.0
bO.O
38.7

TRAHSPORTATHMEpUtPMEMT..............

8b.l9
8b.69

85.67
88.3h

85.08
89.23

39.9
39.3

b0.6
b0.9

bl.l

Automob iles.........................
Motor vehicles, bodies, parts, and
accessories
Truck and bus bodies
Trailers (+ruck and automobile)
Aircraft and parts
Aircraft
Aircraft engires and parts
Aircraft propellers and parts........
Other aircraft parts and equipment...
Ship and boat building and repairing....
Ship building and repairing
Boat building and repairing . . . .
.
Railroad equipment .................
Locomotives and parts..
. .............
Railroad and street cars.
.
.
.
Other transportation equipment........

89.16
77.08
76.17
83.8b
83.8b
83.b2
79.87
85.08
80.9b
82.82
72.3b
80.85
82.78
79.13
73.35

90.06
72.18
73.16
81.99
80.18
8b.8b
8b.67
83.75
79.59
81.lb
70.bl
81.20
85.06
78.01
75.17

39.2
bO.9
bl.b
b0.7
b0.7
bO.b
38 .b
bl.3
39.1
38.8
bO.6
39.1
b0.2
38.2
bl.2

72.83

72.07

73.87

82.59

81.56

90.09

7b.37
73 .a

73.60
7b .52

66.bo
58.95
80.98
61.50

iMSTRUMEMTS AMD RELATED PRODUCTS.......

bl.5

b0.9

bi.5

bl.O

bo.l

b0.3
b0.7
b0.7
b0.3
38.b
bl.3
39.1
38.7
bl.l
38.5
39.8
37.5

bo.3

b0.2
bl.2
b0.7
b2.0
bl.l
b2.3
39 .b
39.2
b0.7
bO.O
b0.7
39.b
bl.3

2.18
1.89
1.91
2.07
2.07
2.09
2.10
2.06
2.05
2.12
1.75
2.10
2.11
2.09
1.88

39.8

39.6

bl.5

1.83

1.82

1.78

39.9

39.b

b2.9

2.07

2.07

2.10

7b.52
79.98

bO.2
39.9

bO.O

bl.b
b3.0

1.85
1.89

1.84
1.84

1.80
1.86

65.97
58.20
79.79
62.98

66.7b
58.69
76.30
67.78

bO.O
39.3

39.5

bl.2
b0.2
b0.8
b2.1

1.66
1.50
1.98
1.64

1.67
1.50
1.98
1.64

1.62
1.46
1.87
1.61

63.52
65.61
63.2!)
70.62
70.8b
57.81

63.b3
66.00
62.80
71.60
67.06
59.0b

63.80
67.36
63.38
7b.73
70.35
60.60

39.7

39.b

bo.5
bo.8
39.9
39.8
38.8

bO.O
bO.O
bO.O
38.1
39.1

b0.9
b2.1
bl.7
b2.7
b0.2
b0.b

1.60
1.62
1.55
1.77
1.78
1.49

l.6l
1.65
1.57
1.79
1.76
1.51

1.56
l.6o
1.52
1.75
1.75
1.50

57.57
58.05

59.13
58.71

60.70
60.2b

38.9
38.7

38.9

b0.2
b0.7

1.48
1.50

1.52
1.49

1.51
1.48

61.05
57.62
67.20
66.30

61.31

59.C6
59.83
67.16
6b.7l

bo.7

bo.6

56.b5
66.86
66.13

39.2
bO.O
39.7

38.b
39.8
39.6

bl.O
b0.7
ltl
.2
b0.7

1.50
1.47
1.68
1.67

i.5i
l.h7
1.68
1.67

1.46
1.47
1.63
1.59

85 .b6
77.30
79.07
8b.25
8b.25
8b.bb
80.6b
85.03

80.16
82.26
71.05
82.11
8b.82
79.8b
77.b6

Laboratory, scientific, and
Mechanical measuring and controlling
instruments............................
Surgical, medical, and dental
instruments ... .......................
Ophthalmic goods ...................
.............
Photographic apparatus
hatches and clocks...................

MtSCELLAME0USMAm)FACH)R)N6!MDUSTR!ES...
Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware....
Jewelry and findings................
Silverware and plated ware...........
Musical instruments and parts . ......
.
G3
<nnes, toys, dolls, smd children* s
veh icles..........................

supplies
^ostume jewelry' buttons

notions

Other manufacturing industries........




bo.5

bo.9

38.8
bo.3

37.5

38.b

39.b

35

Hours and Earnings
Tabte C-l:

Hours and gross earnings of production workers
or nonsupervisory emptoyees - Continued

June
1 5)
9 4

May
195
)4

June
1953

June
195)4

May June
195)4 1953

$7^92

$76.05
77.9h

$77.75
78.37

(1/)
43.6

39.2 41.8
)
43.3 46.1

$1.81

1.80

67.36
56.39

67.38
56.98

65.13
5it.09

38.6

38.5

37.1

39.0
37.0 37.3

9h.75
77.15

93.88
75.78

93.53
75.60

82.);0

81.59

WHOLESALE TRADE...................

7)4.12

RETAtL TRADE (EXCEPT EAT)MG AMD
DR)MK)M6 PLACES).................

57.52

1954

May
1954

June
1953

(V )

$1.94

$1.86
1.70

1.7h

1.52

3.75
1.54

4?.3

i 2 1 43.3
t.

2?;
.)

2.23

2 .i6

hi.7

it2.1

ij2.0

1.85

1.80

1.80

^0.22

41.2

hl.O 41.5

2.PC

1.99

1.93

73.93

71.10

40.5

! 0 ) 40.4
<.4

1.83

1.83

1.76

56.M
39.91

55.36
39.65

39.4
35.6

38.9

39. L
-

1J;6

t<1.65

3 4 7 35.4
).

1.17

l.!-!5
1.15

1.40
1.12

it7.h5

!5.82
*

36.5
38.7

35.8
38.1

35.9
39.3
44.9
i).
t43
3
)4.9 35.5

1.28

1.27

1.58

1.57
1.71
1.30

1.50

76.27

it5.59
58.95
7it.98
h5.09

1.30

59.82
75.75
it5.37
62.73
67.39

i<2
.l 42.1

l.5o

68.02

6 )4 .6 7

43.4

1.56

1.49
1.56

.47
.49

56.97
92.07
69.it7

57.39
91.53
69.72

5)4.28
82.55
67.20

(!/:

39.81

itO.13

38.22

)tl.9

41.8

)4 2 .0

.95

iti.Ol
h9.08

L0.30

).0.08
'47.06

)4 0 .6

40.3

L0.9

)47.32

ttO.9

ho.i )ti.3

61.66

97.30

91.55

TRAWSPORTAHOW:
C0MMUM!CAT)0wf

OTHER PUBL!C"UT!HT!ES:

61.15
i
46.6t
<

63.60

61.89

44.6
35.6
42.4
43.6

)<3.2

June

1.71
1.31

(1/)

1.67
1.45

1.67
1.27

(I/)
(I/)
<y<

<y<

3 /)

^^/Cf M O

(V)

(i/)

.96

.91

1.01

1.00

1.2C

1.18

.98
1.14

(V )

(V )

(V )

l/ Not available.
2 / Data relate to employees in such occupation) in the telephone industry as switchboard operators; service
assistants; operatirg room instructors; and pay-station attendants. During 1953 such employees made up 45 per­
cent of the total number of nonsupervisory employees in telephone establishments reporting hours and earnings
data.

2/ Data relate to employees in such occupations in the telephone industry as central office craftsmen; in­
stallation and exchange repair craftsmen; line, cable, and conduit craftsmen; and laborers. During 1953 such
employees made up 24 percent of the total number of nonauperviecry employees in telephone establishments report­
ing hours and earnings data.
Data relate to domestic employees except messengers and those compensated entirely on a commission basis.
2/ Money payments only; additional value of board, room, uniforms, and tips, not Included.
aNOTE:

Data for April 1954 revised asfollows:
FULL-FASHIONED HOSIERY - $54.53, 36.6, and $1.49.
NORTH- $52.35, 34.9, and $1.50.

36




Ad)usted Earnings
Tabte C-2: Cross average weekty earnings of production workers
in setected industries, in current and 1947-49 dottars

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Laundries

Laundries

Period

Period
1947-49

1947-49

194 7 -4 9

1939... *23-36 $40.17 $23.68
1940... 23.20
42.07 24.71
30.86
1941... 29.38
47.03

1 9 4 7 -4 9

dolors

do'Irs

do^Irs

do"Irs

$40.20 $17.64 $29.70
41.25 17.93 29 93
49.06
18.69
29.71

1953
Hay...
June..

194 7 -4 9

d^Hrs

d^I^

1 9 4 7 -4 9

$71.63 $62.03 C8b.P7 $7b.5b 3b0.67 935.68
72.0i 62.92
)
79.69 bo.oe 35.0c
91.25

1942...
1943...
1944...

36.
63, 52.38
58.30
43.14
46.08 61.28

35.03
41.62
51.27

50.24
56.24
68.18

20.34
23.08
25 95

2918
31.19
34.51

July..
Aug...
^ept..

71.33
71.69
71.b2

62.19
62.3b
62.00

8b.97
92.88
66.15

74.08
80.77
7b.78

39.30
39.30
39.80

3b.26
3b.00
3b.55

1945...
1946...
1947..
.

44.39
43.82
49-97

57 72
52 54
33.32

52.25
58.03

27.73
30.20
32.71

36.06
36.21
34 25

O c t ....

Kov...

66.59

67.95
69.58
69.73

72.1b
71.60
72.36

62.51
62.26
62.98

89.78
81.17
82.25

77.80
70.58
71.58

39.70
itO.OO
b0.60

3b.bo
3b.7S
35.3b

1948...
1949..
.
1930...

54.14
54.92
59 33

52.67
53 93
57-71

72.12
63.28
70.35

7 0 .1 6

62.16
68.43

34.23
34.98
35.47

33 30
34.36
34.50

F eb. . .

Mar..
.

70.92
71.28
70.71

61.56
61.98
61.59

82.3b
79.0it
73.06

71.b8
68.73
63.6b

39.70
39.80
39.60

3b.b6
3b.6l
3b.b9

1931. .
.
1952...
-953...

64.71
67.97
71.69

58.30
39.89
62.67

77.79
78.09
85.31

70.08
68.80
74.57

37.81
38.63
39 69

34.06
34.04
34.69

Apr..
.
May..
.
June..

70.20
71.13
71.68

61.26
61.85
62.28

71.67
76.32
83.66

62.5b
66.37
72.68

i0.80
t
b0.30
M .01

35.60
35.ob
35.63

Tabte C-3:

Average weekty earnings, gross and net spendabte, of production workers
in manufacturing industries, in current and 1947-49 dottars

weekly e l ' i n g s
Period
Amount

(1947-49
= ]00)

average\eek t u r n i n g s
no"dependents
1947-49
1947-49
dollars
dollars

1939-- -- $23.86
1940_
_ 25.20
1941—
29 58

45.1
47-6
55.9

1942_
_ 36.65
1 9 4 3 ... 43-14
1944_
_ 46.08

69.2
81-5
87.0

31.77
36.01
38.29

45.58
48.66
50.92

36.28
41.39
44.06

1943.-..
1946_
_
1947...

44.39
43.82
49 97

83.8
82.8
94.4

36.97
37 72
42.76

48.08
45.23
44.77

1948_
_
1949....
1950....

34.14 102.2
54.92 103.7
59 33 112.0

47.43
48.09
510 9

122.2
128.4
135.4

54.04
55.66
58.54

1951.... 64.71
1932.... 67 97
1933... 71.69




D e c ...

$23 38 $39.70 $23.62 $39 76
24.69 41.22 24.95 41.65
28.05
44.59 29.28
46.55

weekly ^Irnings

average\eekly*earnings

Anount (1947-49
=100)

no°depLdents
^ e p ^ n t s '
1947-49
1947-49
dollars
dollars

Period

1953
May.. $71.63
.
June.. 72.0b

135.3 $58.b9
58.81
136.1

$51.31 $66.53
51.36 66.86

$58.36
58.39

52.05
55.93
58.39

July.. 71.33
Aug... 71.69
Sept.. 7l.b2

13b.7
135.b
13b.9

58.26
58.5b
58.33

50.79 66.29
50.90 66.58
50.63 66.36

57.79
57.90
57.60

42.74
43.20
48.24

55.58
51.80
50.51

136.2
135.2
136.7

58.89
58.!i7
59.06

51.03 66.9b
50.8b 66.50
Si.bo 67.11

58.01
57.83
5S.bl

46.14
47 24
49.70

53.17
53.83
57-21

51.72
52.88
55.6^

Oct... 72.1b
Nov.. 71.60
.
Dec... 72.36
I95h
70.92
Feb... 71.28
Mar... 70.71

133.9
13b. 6
133.5

58.80
59.09
58.63

5i.0b 66.00

57.29
57.65
57.3b

48.68
4904
51.17

61.28
63.62
66.58

55.21
56.05
58.20

Apr... 70.20
May.. 71.13
.
June.. 71.68

132.6

58.22
58.97
59.bi

I3b.3
135.b

51.38 66.30
51.07 65.83
50.80

51.28
51.62

65.bl
66.18
66.63

57.08
57.55
57.89

37

Adjusted Earnings
Tabie C-4: Average hourty earnings, gross and exc!uding overtime,
of production workers in manufacturing industries
Manufacturing
Period

Gross
Am
ount

Durable goods

!-:xcludi ng overtime

Gross

Index
(1947-49 = 100)

Am
ount

Amount

Nondurable goods
Gross

o v e r t i^
Amount

Amount

Amount

Annual
average:
19^1...................
1942...................
19*3....................

$0,729
853
.961

$0,702

54.5
62.5
69.4

$0,808
.947
1.059

$0,770

.805
.894

1944....................
1945....................
1946....................

1.019
1.023

.947
1/.963
1.051

73.5
1/74.8
81.6

1.117
1.111

1.156

1.029
1/1.042
1.122

1947....................
1948....................
1949....................

1.237
1.350

1.198
1.310
1.367

93.0
101.7
106.1

1.292
1.410
1.469

1.434

1930....................
1931....................
1932....................
1933....................

1.465

10 9 9

116.8
125.0
132.8

1.67

177

1.415
1.53
1.61
1.71

May.........
uune. . . .

1.76
1.77

1.70
1.70

J u ly .. . .
..0.
.
Sept#. . .

1.77
1.77
1.79
1.79
1.79

1.71

1.086

1.401
1.59

1.67

.881

! $0,640
'
.723

.976

.803

1.250
1.366

!

$0,625

.698
.763

1
j
i

.861

.814

904

1.015

[
!

1/.858
.981

1.17 1
1.278
1.325

1.133
1.241
1.292

1.480

1.378
1.48
1.54

1.87

1.60
1.70
1.80

1.61

1337
1.43
1.49
1.56

132.0
132.0

1.86
1.87

1.79
1.80

1.60
1.60

1.55
1.56

1.88
1.88
1.90
1.90
1.89

1.82
l.C l
1.8b
1.83
1.83

1.61
1.61

1.90

1.81-

1. 6
b

1.56
1.56
1.58
1.58
1.59

l.7b

132.8
112.8
134.3
13a.3
135.1
135.1

1.76

136.6

1.91

1.86

1.75
1.75
1.75

135.9

1.90
1.90
1.90

1.85
1.85
1.85

1.65
1.65
1.65
1.65

1.537
1.77

Monthly
1953:

l.GC195b:

Jan.........
Feb.........
Mar.........
Apr.........

1.80

1.80

1.79
1.80
1.81
2.81

1.71
1.73
1.73
1.7b

1.76
1.76

!
1

135.9
135.9
136.6

136.6

!
!

1.91
1.91

1.86
1.86

l/ 11-month Average; Awguet 194? excluded became of YJ-day holiday period.




1.63
1.62
1.63

1.66
1.66

1.59

1.61
1.61
1.61
1.61
1.62
1.62

M a n -H o u r in d ex e s
Tabte C-5. indexes of aggregate weekty man-hours
in industriat and construction a c tiv ity ^
(1 9 4 7 -4 9 = 100)

Manufacturing -Durable goods
Period

TOTAL 2/

Total:

Mining

Total:

"turfng"

^ ^ r i ^

'°d!v^on°"
Annual average:
1947.........
1948.........
1949.........
1950.........
1951.........
195?.........
1953.........

103.6
,103.4
93-0
101.5
109.5
109.7
113.5

105.1
105 4
89.5
91.0
95.0
90.9
86.6

94.6
103.4
102.0
109.1
124.1
127-5
124.2

104.8
103.2
92.0
101.1
108.4
108.4
113.7

106.1
104.1
89.7
102.7
115.7
116.6
125.5

103.1
102.1
94.7
99-2
997
98.6
997

101.2
107.6
91.1
107.4
290.4
625.O
826.7

107.0
102.7
90.3
99.6
102.7
96.9
94.0

114.0
115.8

87.0
90.0

122.9
130.9

114.5
115.4

128.4
128.5

97.9
99.7

855.7
866.7

96.2
100.3

July.....
August...
September..
October....
November..
.
December..
.

114.1
116.5
114.5
114.8
110.6
108.4

86.9
89.4
86.5
86.5
83.2
82.9

132.0
137.1
133.2
140.2
130.1
120.6

113.4
115.4
113.7
113.0
109.6
108.4

124.7
125.6
123.4
123.6
119.6
118.4

99.9
103.3
102.2
100.5
97-6
96.4

885.9
860.5
862.1
854.3
809.2
812.7

96.7
97.6
94.7
95.2
91.2
86.1

1954:January....
February...
March....
April....
May......
June.....

101.9
102.4
101.8
99-9
100.4
102.2

80.3
78.0
73.9
71.5
72.3
76.2

98.3
106.0
109.8
115.9
122.5
129.5

103.8
103-5
102.5
99-5
99.1
100.1

113.7
112.5
110.6
108.1
107.2
107.0

92.1
92.8
92.9
89.2
89.4
91.8

764.1
712.1
654.3
587.8
542.0
522.5

79.6
82.3
84.1
85.3
88.5
93.5

Monthly data:
1953:May......
June.....

Period

ar^Tix^s

"(ex^pT

industries

Electrical
equi^nt

Annual average:

103.3
104.6
92.1
111.5
105.9
106.2
108.2

102.8
103.9
93.3
102.9
111.4
104.3
106.6

105.4
106.6
88.0
104.1
115.7
104.6
114.0

106.7
103.8
89.4
106.5
115.8
112.1
123.7

108.3
106.6
85.1
94.0
116.9
118.4
118.9

111.1
102.9
86.0
107.6
123.7
131.2
148.0

102.9
100.9
96.3
106.1
124.5
138.0
158.7

109.1
107.6

107.7
108.6

116.7
117.4

127.0
127.3

122.6
121.3

150.5
149.2

163.1
161.7

July.....
August...
September..
October....
November..
.
December..
.

103.7
106.8
105.8
106.3
103.8
101.4

105.8
108.3
106.9
108.3
105.4
103.2

115.2
114.9
111.7
IMA
106.7
105.4

122.7
123.9
121.5
121.4
117.8
115.4

116.5
114.5
113.5
113.8
111.4
112.3

143.6
148.0
148.4
146.9
143.3
138.3

158.9
159.2
153.1
153.9
146.3
15 1.1

1954:January....
February..
.
March....
April....
May......
June.....

96.1
96.7
96.2
91.6
88.8
90.2

96.2
97.8
98.2
97.3
97.6
97.9

101.4
97.5
94.4
92.8
92.4
94.7

112.9
111.5
109.4
106.9
107.8
107.5

109.4
108.6
106.6
103.7
102.0
100.6

13 1.1
130.6
127.9
121.8
122.0
120.1

148.6
144.0
141.0
138.6
136.0
131.6

I9*t7.........
1948.........
1949.........
1950.........
1951.........
1952.........
1953.........
Monthly data:

1953:May......
June.....




-32-

\1 J!1 H ^ U f

hiJcxcs

Tabie C-5. !ndexes of aggregate w eekiy ^nan-hours
in industria! and construction activity ^ Continued
(1947-49 = 100)
Manufacturing— Durable goods-Con.

Manufacturing— Nondurable goods

Period

Textile-mill

and ^r a t t e d

manufactures

finished textile

Annual average:

107.5
103.0
89.5
97.4
117.5
122.7
129.1

104.6
104.2
91.2
101.3
103.I
100.5
109.8

103.9
100.0
96.1
95.2
95.9
94.7
93.5

105.9
101.0
93.1
89.2
91.2
92.2
90.1

104.5
105.7
89.9
100.1
96.0
90.7
90.0

99-6
101.6
98.8
103.0
101.9
104.5
106.8

130.5
131.3

109.9
110.4

87.0
92.2

76.3
76.4

91.9
92.7

104.3
105.0

J*ly.....
August...
Septamber..
October....
November..
.
December..
.

126.3
126.8
128.6
128.7
129.1
128.1

104.4
111.0
111.9
115.3
112.1
107.5

100.3
106.6
1U.2
101.6
95.1
89.4

77.6
101.6
108.9
106.8
96.1
101.7

89.3
89.8
86.3
86.0
84.2
83.2

ioa.2
109.2
102.0
106.0
102.6
103.3

1934:January....
February..
.
March.....

121.9
120.9
118.9
114.3
112.0
U0.4

98.7
102.1
101.0
96.6
95.6
96.2

83.8
81.8
81.5
81.3
84.2
99.3

87.3
80.1
75.0
73.3
75.5
78.2

1947.........
1948.........
1949.........
1950.........
1951.........
1952.........
1953.........
Monthly data:

1953:M*y......

M-y......

Period

Paper and
allied products

-

98.2
78.5
104.3
79.5
106.1
79-2
93.8
76.5
76.0
91.3
---- 18*1--- ... 92J3------Rubber
products

alli^^u^ies

Leather and
leather products

Annual average:

102.6
102.3
93.1
105.4
109.9
105.9
111.4

101.4
100.5
98.0
99-5
101.6
102.7
105.5

103.3

102.6
94.1
97.2
105.5
104.7
107.8

99-0
102.7
98.3
97-3
102.1
98.2
100.9

109.8
102.0
88.1
101.9
108.5
108.4
111.7

105.8
100.8
93.4
97.8
92.1
96.9
96.4

110.3
112.0

104.9
103.1

108.6
107.7

101.8
ioa.4

114.6
113.8

94.3
98.3

111.3
113-7
112.9
113.2
112.3
lil.l

103.6
104.7
106.9
108.1
107.2
109.0

106.6
106.7
108.8
107.3
107.2
106.1

104.3
103.8
102.3
100.2
993
97.3

111.6
110.3
108.0
106.0
104.0
102.8

96.3
97.4
89.1
68.7
88.7
92.3

107.6
107.5
107.8
105.7

1947.........
1948.........
1949.........
1930.........
1931.........
1952.........
1933.........

104.3
103.7
105.4
104.0
104.0
104-8

103.0
104.4
104.9
103.8
101.8
101.4

93-3
94.9
94.0
94.0

100.1
99-1
96.4
93.0
98.3
101.3

91.9
9^.9
93.8
85.3
82.2

Monthly data:

l933:M*y......
June.....

September..
October....
November..
.
December..
.
1954:January....
February..
.
March....
April....
May
...

as

.............. ________________

^ A g g r e g a t e man-hours are for the weekly pay period ending nearest the 15 th of the month and do not represent
totals for the month.
Forminingandmanufacturi n g i n d u s t r i e s , data refer to production and related workers. For

4o




St.ite jnd Atwi Houts n!id Ljmtngs
Tabte C-6: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for setected States and areas
State and area

Average weekly earnings
1954
1951
June
June
May

Average weekly' hours
)54
1951
1<
May

Average hourly earnings
1954
1951
May
June

$55.20
68.06
63.36

38.3
39.2
40.9

38.5
39.6
41.3

40.0
39.8
40.1

$1.44

66.26

$54.67
70.09
67.32

1.78
1.62

$1.42
1.77
1.63

$1.38
1.71
1.58

ARIZONA..............
Phoenix

81.51
79.10

79.71
76.97

79.29
75.71

41.8
41.2

41.3
40.3

42.4
41.6

1.95
1.92

1.93
1.91

1.87
1.82

ARKANSAS..............
Little RockN. Little Rock

50.96

50.22

49.73

41.1

40.5

41.1

1.24

1.24

1.21

48.96

49.37

49.32

40.8

40.8

41.1

1.20

1.21

1.20

81.44

80.85

79.05
67.89

39.9

39.8

38.1

40.3
38.7

4 o .i
39.9

40.0
37.5

2.04
1.86
2.01
1-99

2.03

38.2

39.8

ALABAMA..............
Birmingham
Mobile

$55.15
69.78

CALIFORNIA............
Fresno
Los Angeles
Sacramento
San BernardinoRiverside-Ontario
San Diego
San Francisco-Oakland
San Jose
Stockton

79.43
80.79
83.33
78.94
77.79

83.18

80.66

77.35
75.66

79.90
72.67

40.3
39.6
39.3
39.2
4o.o

COLORADO..............
Denver

75.21
73.35

72.76
73.20

72.83
72.14

CONNECTICUT...........
Bridgeport
Hartford
Nev Britain
New Haven
Stamford
Waterbury

72.40
75.17
76.26
70.31

71.82
74.80
75.30
70.27

70.86
81.17
77.10

72.11

80.26
78.03
77.51
81.35

78.88
71.05
76.67
74.71

40.5

37.8

40.5

4 o .i
39.2

38.7
39-3
4o.o

39.0

38.0

1.97
2.04
2.12
2.01
1.94

4 l .l
40.3

40.2
40.0

42.1

1.83

4o.o
40.2
41.0
39.5
39.8
40.2
40.1

39.9
40.0
40.7
39.7
39.7

38.8

41.7

1.82
1.81

1.89

1.98

1.81

2.00
1-95

1.95

1.95
2.03
2.12
1.99
1.94

1.89
1.93
2.05

1.81

1-73
1.73

1.83

1.88

2.00
1.91

1.80
1.87
1.85

1.76

1.77
1.72

1.74
1.69

68.85

68.28

78.39
72.58

78.99
70.88

74.80
74.93
79.35
74.12
71.32
78.58
79.30

DELAWARE..............
Wilmington

71.16

71.02
84.23

70.41
85.33

40.5
40.8

39.9

85.31

41.2
42.2

1.76
2.09

FLORIDA..............
Tampa-St. Petersburg

55.62
54.80

55.07
54.93

54.86
53.21

40.9

41.1

41.3

41.9
41.1

1.36

41.2

GEORGIA..............
Atlanta
Savannah

48.51

47.88

50.90

38.0
39-5
41.4

40.4
41.1
42.4

1.26
1.58
1.56

1.26
1.58
1.55

1.50

1.92

1.91

l.9 l

1.85

40.3
39.6

40.3

42.5

41.4
43.6
42.6
42.2
41.8
44.3

1.87

1.86
1.78
1.73
1.95

1.81

1.33

1.96

1.81
1.82

1.88

1.79

1.79

1.78

1.71

2.09
1.34
1.33

2.02
l.3 l

1.30
1.26

64.58

62.41
64.17

63.60

38.5
39-3
41.4

IDAHO................

80.12

78.34

78.88

41.3

40.8

41.3

1.94

ILLINOIS..............
Chicago

76.20

75.25

76.18

78.02

79.82

40.0
40.0

39.5
39.4

41.1
41.4

1.91

79.27

1.98

1.98

1.93

INDIANA..............

75.58

75.78

77.15

39.4

39.6

41.0

1.92

1.92

1.88

40.8
40.2

1.76

1.76

1.93

1.94

1.69
1.85

1.84

1.86
1.69

62.09

64.53

IOWA.................
Dea Moines

71.27
76.95

70.57
77.71

68.75
74.37

40.5
39.8

4 o .i
40.1

KANSAS...............
Topeka
Wichita

76.80
72.74

78.15
69.30

80.19

81.70

73.37
62.42
74.26

41.7
42.2
41.0

42.0
40.9
41.7

41.2
40.6
40.4

1.72
1.96

KENTUCKY..............

67.61

66.75

67.98

40.5

40.0

41.5

LOUISIANA.............
Baton Rouge
Nev Orleans

65.89

65.67

41.7

93.15

92.74
66.99

41.3
41.4
40.6

41.3
42.2
39.5

67.06

63.19
89.46

61.62

41.4
40.4

1.57

1.78

1.96

1.54
1.84

1.67

1.67

1.64

1.58
2.25
1.66

1.59
2.24

1.65

1.53

2.12
1.56

See footnotes at end of table.




4l

Stjtc and A r c j

Houis ,md Latnings

Tabie C-& Hours and gross earnings of production wodters in
manufacturing industries for setected States and areas - Continued
State and area

Average weekly earnings
i?54
1953
May
June

June

Average veeklsr hours
195*t
1953
June
May
June

Average hourly earnings
19 54
1953
May
June
June

MAINE................
Portland

$56.17

60.66

$54.70
59.64

$56.79
58.27

40.2
41.1

40.5

38.9

40.9
41.5

$1.40
1.48

$1.41
1.47

$1.39
1.40

MARYLAND..............
Baltimore

68.66
72.57

68.20
72.16

67.57
72.02

40.2
40.3

39.7
40.0

41.1
41.3

1.71
1.80

1.72

1.64
1.75

MASSACHUSETTS.........
Boston
Fall River
Nev Bedford
Springfield-Holyoke
Worcester

65.24
68.16

68.78

64.57

67.16

71.62

69.42

1.66
1.73
1.38
1.45
1.79

71.75

40.7
40.3
39.5
40.3
41.4
41.0

1.65
1.69

70.80

38.9
39.3
36.3
37.4
40.0
39.0

1.66

51.34
55.54
71.96

39.3
39.4
37.2
38.3
40.2
39.6

86.31

87.28
88.96

40.0
39.2
40.6
4 i.o
42.1
37.1

40.5

41.6

38.5
40.4

39.9
46.0

2.14
2.25
2.20
1.96
2.24
2.07
2.09

39.0
40.6
39-5

40.2
39.7
39.7
39.4

41.2
39-0
4 l.l
40.3

1.83
1.87
1.85
1.92

1.86
1.83
1.93

1.77
1.84

71.28

85.48
88.16
89.20

50.46
53.86

68.11

54.12
57.23

1.80

1.80

1.75
1.39
1.44
1.77

1.78

2.13
2.23
2.23
1.96

1.37
1.42
1.73
1.75
2.10

MICHIGAN..............
Detroit
Flint
Grand Rapids
Lansing
Muskegon
Saginav

8o.4o
94.14
84.56

82.05

95.17

40.5

MINNESOTA.............
Duluth
Minneapolis
St. Paul

74.22
72.75
75.03
75.81

73.36
73.73
72.48

72.58
70.79

40.7

MISSISSIPPI...........
Jackson

47.74
50.70

46.10
48.26

46.78

49.20

40.8
39.3

39.4
38.3

41.4
4 i.o

1.17
1.29

1.17
1.26

1.13
1.20

MISSOURI..............
Kansas City
St. Louis

67.24
( 1 /)

67.51

68.05

38.8

38.8

40.2

74.95

39.7
39.0

40.2

1.73
(1 /)

1.88

1.74
1.90
1.86

1.69
1.85

72.25

(l/)
39.3

40.5

73.63

75.46
72.54

MONTANA..............

76.20

78.25

82.89

39.4

40.2

42.9

1.93

1.95

1.93

NEBRASKA..............

67.97

67.43

66.74

42.7

42.1

43.2

1.59

1.60

1.54

NEVADA...............

84.38

86.00

83.62

39.8

40.0

41.6

2.11

2.15

2.01

NEV HAMPSHIRE.........
Manchester

57.57
53.34

55.58
51.70

58.22

39.7
37.3

38.6
35-9

4 i.o
39.1

1.45
1.43

1.44
1.44

1.42
1.43

74.73

40.9

4 i.i
41.5
41.3
41.3
41.3

1.87
1.91
1.86
1.88
1.81

1.82
1.85
1.82

40.4
39.5

39.7
39.7
40.2
40.2
39.3

1.87
1.90
1.85

70.50

74.76
76.69
75.17
75.12
75.12

39.9
39.8

75.99

74.08
75.55
74.29
75.54

1.88
1.79

1.82
1.82

NEW MEXICO............
Albuquerque

77.19
73.22

77.38
73.92

75-42
73.02

41.5
41.6

41.6
42.0

41.9
42.7

1.86
1.76

1.86
1.76

1.80
1.71

NEW YORK..............
Albany-S chenectady-Troy
Binghamton
Buffalo
Elmira
Nassau and
Suffolk Counties
Nev York City
Rochester
Syracuse
Utica-Rome
Westchester County

71.11
75.02
65.13
82.42
73.53

70.60

71.27
78.60

38.7
39.3
37.5
4 o .l
40.6

38.6

1.84

1.83
1.90

40.5
40.5

39-9
40.9
40.0
42.1
40.8

1.78
1.92
1.70
2.00
1.76

41.5
37.3
40.0
39-7
39.4
38.9

40.7
37.2
39.6
39.9
39.5
39.0

Nevark-JerseyCity
Paterson
Perth Amboy
Trenton

42




76.91

76.06
76.03
71.61

84.89
67.77

76.86
72.88
68.72
71.37

89.34
97.59
79.93
96.70
79.73

76.08

74.14

63.86
82.70

101.53
81.77
101.64

81.32

72.78
74.23

55.91

66.06

73.03

84.41
71.98

82.52
67.36
75.45
73.20

83.34
66.74
77.58
77.44

68.62

69.38
72.83

71.56

4 o .l

43.8
4o.8

43.6

39.1

36.8

40.9

44.2
42.7

45.6

42.2

38.0

41.8
42.3
40.9

40.7

1.91

2.18
2.30

2.22
2.07
2.03

1.92
2.23
2.04
2.07

1.83

1.76

1.82

1.80

1.74

1.74
2.04

l.8 l

1.80

2.05
1.82
1.92
1.83

2.03

1.98
1.76

1.91

1.74

1.86
1.83
1.70

1.83

1.79

2.06

1.75
1.84

1.81

1.83

Stjte

jn d

Atw i

HoLits

jtid

Lirm rtos

Tab!# C-& Hours and gross earnings of production workers in
manufacturing industries for se!ected States and areas - Continued
State and aree

Avera;* veekiy earnings
e
>54
1953
June
May
June

Averapp veekiy hours
IS54
1953
June
May
June

Average hourly earnings
19 54
_ 1953
May
June
June
$1.26
1.31

$1.26

1.28

1.30
1.28

1.28

NORTH CAROLINA........
Charlotte
Greensboro-High Point

$47.75
52.27
46.59

$46.75
51.87
44.93

$48.19
51.84
(i/)

37.9
39-9
36.4

37.1
39.9
35.1

40.5
( 1/ )

NORTH DAKOTA..........
Fargo

70.22

66.87
65.99

45.8
(1 /)

44.1
(1 /)

45.7
44.2

1.53
(1 /)

1.51
(1 /)

1.46

(1 /)

66.42
(1 /)

OHIO.................
Cincinnati
Cleveland

78.34
73-77

81.22

77.70
73.69

80.21
73.65

39.5
40.2
39.7

39.3
40.1
39.4

41.2
41.2
42.1

1.98
1.84

1.98
1.84
2.04

1.95
1.79

OKLAHOMA..............
Oklahoma City
Tulsa

72.45
71.70
79.52

71.69
68.69
78.53

68.56

41.4
43.5
41.2

41.2
42.4
40.9

41.3
43.2
41.4

1.75

67.39
74.93

OREGON...............
Portland

83.88

83.58

38.6

76.17

37.8

38.8
38.1

38.6

77.34

84.89
77.80

PENNSYLVANIA..........
Allentovn-BethlehemEaston
Erie
Harrisburg
Lancaster
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Reading
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre— Hazleton
York

69.46

69.33

70.92

38.2

62.43
73.24

62.08

66.57

35.9
39.4
37.7
40.6
38.9
38.3

60.47
63.54
73.68
79.20

63.89
53.35
49.92
62.46

RHODE ISLAND..........
Providence

60.60

SOUTH CAROLINA........
Charleston

48.89

SOUTH DAKOTA..........
Sioux Falls

64.15

TENNESSEE.............
Chattanooga
Knoxville
Memphis
Nashville

58.03

61.10
50.82

69.81

57.18
67.42
66.88

60.09

80.56

84.92

39-5

2.05

$1.22
(1 /)

1.49

2.02

1.62
1.92

1.74

1.66
1.56
1.81

2.19

37.9

2.17
2.05

2.04

2.16
2.01

38.1

40.0

1.82

1.82

1.77

35.7
39.6

1.74
1.86

1.86

1.74

1.73
1.79

1.42
1.34
1.53

1.36
1.56

1.39
1.35
1.52

1.65

1.93

63.03

62.90

73.59
78.42
63.47
54.40
50.57

38.1

37.8

60.49

73-73
81.64
67.40
54.74
51.07
64.73

37.7
37.2
40.8

37.1
38.7

38.5
4l.l
40.1
41.6
4o.6
40.8
40.6
39.3
37.8
42.7

59.89
6o.4o

61.61
61.31

39.7
40.2

39.3
4o.o

40.8
40.6

1.53
1.52

1.52
1.51

1.51
1.51

48.13
52.27

50.22
52.10

38.8

38.2

40.5

1.26

1.26

1.24

38.5

39.6

4o.7

1.32

1.32

1.28

63.95
70.77

64.51
70.36

42.5
43.3

42.3

43.5
44.4

1.51

1.51

1.48

1.62

1.58

57.31
57.04

56.57
57.63

40.3

39-8

40.7
40.3

1.44

1.44
1.47
1.69
1.55
1.49

1.39
1.43

73.50
58.55

65.23

64.94
59.45

73.69
64.76

66.08
63.12
58.63

36.8
40.3
39-0

38.2

38.2

43.8

38.8
38.6

38.9
39.2
42.6
40.6

41.9
39-9

41.3
4 i.8
4 i.o

1.60
1.57

1.89
2.07
1.68

1.61

1.47
1.72
1.57
1.48

1.59

1.56
1.89
2.05
1.68
1.42

1.62
1.51

1.82
2.00
1.66

1.60

1.51
1.43

TEXAS................

72.28

71.69

69.30

41.3

41.2

41.5

1.75

1.74

1.67

UTAH.................
Salt Lake City

74.40
75.44

73.28
74.34

72.76
73-87

40.0
41.0

39.4
40.4

40.2
41.5

1.86
1.84

1.86

1.81
1.78

VERMONT...............
Burlington
Springfield

59.71
58.13
68.67

59.53
59.05

63.20

40.6
39.4
39.0

40.5

43.2
39.5

45.6

1.47
1.47
1.76

1.47
1.50

1.46

39.5
4 o .l

1.74

1.79

VIRGINIA..............
Norfolk-Portsmouth
Richmond

56.66
62.78
60.55

39.3
4o.o
39.3

40.6
39.8

40.7

1.42
1.52
1.51

1.42
1.53
1.51

l.4 i
1.44
1.47

WASHINGTON............
Seattle
Spokane
Tacoma

82.03
78.25
82.19
81.47

39.0
38.3
4 i.i
39.0

38.9

2.10
2.04
2.03
2.07

2.08
2.03
2.02
2.05

2.05

58.99

69.85

81.62

61.20

55.81

57.39
58.46

59.34

58.51

39.9
41.3
40.1

80.98

79-61
75.83
77.83
77.02

39.1
38.4
40.6
39.3

77.84

83.17
80.17

38.1

39.7

38.1

1.84

1.49

1.99

1.96
2.02

See footnotes at end of table.




J3-

Mjtr

jnd

\r\j

md

Lumno

Tabte C-& Hours and gross earnings of production wodter* in
manufacturing industries for setected States and areas - Continued
State and area

Average weekly earninga
IS?54
1953
June
May
June

WEST VIRGINIA.........
Charleston

$70.66

WISCONSIN.............
Kenoaha
La Crone
Madiaon
Milwaukee
Racine
WYOMING...............
Casper
l/ Not available.

44




Average weekly hours
1<
>54
1953
June
May
June

$70.64
91.54

$70.84
85.05

38.4
39.9

75.31
77.50
76.79
78.40
81.48
79.49

75.28
75.62
75.02
77.35

40.9
39.1

81.09
76.83

74.55
74.79
73.49
76.40
79.60
78.41

63.95
97.52

85.44
93.09

91.68

88.58

79.20

38.6
39.8

40.2
39.9

40.7
36.3
39.6
40.0
39.9
39.2

39.6
41.5

40.3
40.3

4o.8

40.3

Average hourly earninga
1954
June
May
June

39.6
40.5

$1.84

41.9
38.8

1.84

4 o .i

40.3
4 i.i
41.1

39.6
40.3

2.22
1.96
1.68
1.94

2.03
1.99

2.12
2.35

$1.83

$1.78

1.85
1.96
1.89
1.94

2.03
1.96

1.78
1.93
I .83
1.90
1.94
1.91

2.12
2.31

2.28

2.30

2.10

1.99

Exp!anatory Notes
tNTRODUCHON
The statistics for nonfarm industries presented in
this monthly report are part of the broad program of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics to provide timely, com­
prehensive, accurate, and detailed information for the
use of businessmen, government officials, legislators,
labor unions, research workers, and the general public,
and are an integral part of the Federal statistical
system. Current statistics on employment, labor turn­
over, hours, and earnings are basic indicators of
economic change. They are widely used in following
business developments and in making decisions in such
fields as marketing, personnel, plant location, and
government policy. The BLS employment statistics
program also provides data used in making official
indexes of production, productivity, and national
income.
The Bureau publishes monthly statistics on employ­
ment, and hours and earning s for the Nation, for all
states, and for selected metropolitan areas. For
employment, the total of employees in nonagricultural
establishments is shown; for hours and earnings, data
are available for production workers in manufacturing
and selected groups in nonmanufacturing industries.
Within these broad activities data are published in
varying industry detail. Labor turnover rates are
presented for both total manufacturing and component
groups, as well as for selected mining and communica­
tions industries.
Statistics on the number and proportion of women
employees in manufacturing industries and turnover
rates for men and women separately are published
quarterly. In addition, earnings adjusted for price
changes, Federal taxes, and overtime for selected in­
dustries appear monthly, as well as indexes of production-worker aggregate weekly man-hours for major
manufacturing groups.
These data are reprinted regularly in the M m t M v
Labor Review. Each of the series, from the earliest
period to date, may be obtained by writing to the BLS
Division of Manpower and Employment Statistics. Such
requests should specify the industry series desired.
Mare detailed descriptions of these series are
available through reprints of Technical Notes which
may be obtained upon request:
"Technical Note on the Maasurement of
Industrial Employment"
"Technical Note on Maasurement of Labor
Turnover"
"Technical Note on Hours and Earnings
in Nonagricultural Industries"

Sect-on A - EMPLOYMENT
Definition of Employment
BLS employment statistics represent the total
number of full- and part-time nonagricultural workers
on establishment payrolls during a specified period
each month.




Persons on an establishment payroll who are on
paid sick-leave, paid holiday, or paid vacation, or
who work during a part of the specified pay period and
are unemployed or on strike during the other part of
the period are counted as employed. Persons are not
considered employed who are laid off or are on leave
without pay, who are on strike for the entire period,
or who are hired but do not report to work during the
period. Proprietors, the self-employed, unpaid family
workers, farm workers, and domestic workers in house­
holds are also excluded. Government employment covers
only civilian employees.
Employment data for nongovernmental establishments
refer to persons who worked during, or received pay
for, any part of the pay period ending nearest the
15th of the month. Current data for Federal Government
establishments generally refer to persons who worked
on, or received pay for, the last day of the month;
for State and local government, persons who received
pay for any part of the pay period ending on, or im­
mediately prior to, the last day of the month.
Beginning with January 1952, the data for Federal
employment are not strictly comparable with those for
prior years, primarily as a result of changes in defi­
nition. For the national series and except for a few
states and areas as noted the following changes were
made starting with that month: (1) data refer to the
last day of the month rather than the first of the
month; (2) employment of the Federal Reserve Banks and
of the mixed ownership banks of the Farm Credit Admin­
istration was transferred from the Federal total to
the "Banks and Trust Companies" group of the "Finance,
Insurance, and Real Estate" division; (3) fourth-class
postmasters, formerly included only in the table show­
ing Federal civilian employment, are now included in
all tables showing government series.
Collection of Establishment Reports
The employment program is based on establishment
payroll reports. An establishment is defined as a
single physical location, such as a factory, mine, or
store where business is conducted. In the case of a
company with several plants or establishments, the
BLS endeavors to obtain separate reports from each
business unit which maintains separate payroll records,
since each may be classified in a different industry.
The BLS, with the cooperation of State agencies,
collects current employment, payroll, and man-hour in­
formation by means of "shuttle" schedules (BLS 790
Forms) mailed monthly to individual establishments.
This shuttle schedule, which has been used by BLS for
more than 20 years, is designed to assist firms to
report consistently, accurately, and with a minimum of
cost. State agencies mail the forms to the establish­
ments and examine the returns for consistency, accu­
racy, and completeness. The states use the informa­
tion to prepare State and area series and then send
the schedules to the BLS Division of Manpower and
Employment Statistics for use in preparing the
national series. Each questionnaire provides a line
for the State agency to enter data for December of the
previous year, as well as lines for the cooperating
establishments to report for each month of the cur­
rent calendar year. The December data, copied Arom
the completed previous year's form, give the reporter
a means for comparison when reporting for January as

1=5

an aid to collection of consistent data. The same
form is returned each month to the reporting establish­
ment to be completed. Definitions of terms are de­
scribed in detail in the instructions on each form.

Industrial Classification Code. (U. S. Social Security
Board) for reports from nonmanufacturing establish­
ments.
Benchmark Data

Coverage of Establishment Reports
The Bureau of Labor Statistics obtains monthly
reports from approximately 155,000 establishments,
distributed by industry as shown by the following
table. The table also shows the approximate proportion
of total employment in each industry division covered
by the group of establishments furnishing monthly
employment data. The coverage for individual indus­
tries within the divisions may vary from the propor­
tions shown.
Approximate size and coverage of monthly sample
used in BLS employment and payroll statistics l/
Number of
Employees
establish­
ments in Number in Percent
sample
sample
of total
3,300
440,000
50
Contract construction..
19,700
783,000
28
44,ioo 11,207,000
68
f&nufacturing........
Transportation and
public utilities:
Interstate rail­
—
1,357,000
roads (ICC).......
96
Other transportation
and public utilities
13,600
1,430,000
(BLS)....... .....
51
Wholesale and retail
trade....... .......
60,300
1,889,000
19
Finance, insurance,
and real estate.....
10,600
486,000
25
Service and
miscellaneous:
Hotels and lodging
1,300
145,000
31
Personal services:
Laundries and
cleaning and
2,300
99,000
dyeing plants....
19
Government:
Federal (Civil Service
—
Commission) .......
2,368,000
100
State and local
—
(Bureau of the Census)
2,760,000
67
Division
or
industry

Some firms do not report payroll and man-hour
information. Therefore, hours and earnings estimates
are based on a slightly smaller sample than employment
estimates.
Classification of Establishment Reports
To present meaningful tabulations of employment,
hours, earnings, and labor turnover data, establish­
ments are classified into industries on the basis of
the principal product or activity determined from in­
formation on annual sales volume. This information is
collected annually on a product supplement to the
monthly report. The supplement provides for reporting
the percentage of total sales represented by each pro­
duct. In the case of an establishment making more
than one product, the entire employment of the plant
is included under the industry indicated by the most
important product. The titles and descriptions of
industries presented in the 1945 Standard Industrial
Classification Manual. Vol. I (U. S. Bureau of the
Budget, Washington, D. C.) are used for classifying
reports from manufacturing establishments; the 1942




Experience with employment statistics has shown
that without adjustment to new benchmarks, the employ­
ment estimate tends toward understatement which
becomes larger as the distance from the earlier bench­
mark increases. To adjust for this, the estimates
must be periodically compared with actual counts of
employment in the various nonagricultural industries,
and appropriate revisions made as indicated by the
total counts or benchmarks.
Basic sources of benchmark information are quar­
terly tabulations of employment data, by industry,
compiled by State agencies from reports of establish­
ments covered under State unemployment insurance laws.
Supplementary tabulations prepared by the U. S. Bureau
of Old Age and Survivors Insurance are used for the
group of establishments exempt from State unemployment
insurance laws because of their small size. For in­
dustries not covered by either of the two programs,
benchmarks are compiled from special establishment
censuses: for example, for interstate railroads, from
establishment data reported to the ICC; for State and
local government, from data reported to the Bureau of
the Census; for the Federal government, from agency
data compiled by the Civil Service Commission. Estab­
lishments are classified into the same industrial
groupings for benchmark purposes as they are for
monthly reporting.
At the time new benchmark data become available,
the BLS estimates which had been prepared for the
benchmark quarter are compared with the levels of the
benchmarks, industry by industry. Where revisions are
necessary, the levels are adjusted between the new
benchmark and the last previous one. Following revi­
sion for these intermediate periods, the industry data
fTom the most recent benchmark are projected to the
current month by application of the sample trends used
prior to the revision. The benchmark establishes the
level, while the sample determines the trend.
Estimating Method
The estimating procedure for industries for which
data on both "all employees" and "production and re­
lated workers" are published (i.e., manufacturing and
selected mining industries) is outlined below; the
first step of this method is also used for industries
for which only figures on "all employees" are pub­
lished.
The first step is to compute total employment (all
employees) in the industry for the month following the
benchmark period. The all-employee total for the last
benchmark month (e.g.,March) is multiplied by the per­
cent change of total employment over the month for a
group of establishments reporting for both March and
April. Thus, if firms in the BLS sample for an in­
dustry report 30,000 employees in March and 31,200 in
April, April employment is 104 percent (31,200 divided
by 30,000) of March employment. If the all-employee
benchmark in March is 40,000, the all-employee total in
April would be 104 percent of 40,000 or 41,600.
The second step is to compute the production-worker
total for the industry. The all-employee total for the
month is multiplied by the ratio of production workers
to all employees. This ratio is computed Rrom those
establishment reports which show data for both items.
Thus, if these firms in April report 24,400 production

workers and a total of 30,500 employees, the ratio of
production workers to all employees would be .80
(24,400 divided by 30,500). The production-worker
total in April would be 33,280 (41,600 multiplied by
.80).
Figures for subsequent months are computed by
carrying forward the totals for the previous month ac­
cording to the method described above.
Comparability With Other Employment Estimates
Data published by other government and private
agencies differ from BLS employment statistics because
of differences in definition, sources of information,
methods of collection, classification, and estimation.
BLS monthly figures are not directly comparable, for
example, with the estimates of the Bureau of the Census
Mmthlv Report on the Labor Force (MKF). Census data
are obtained by personal interviews with individual
members of a small sample of households and are de­
signed to provide information on the work status of the
whole population, classified by their demographic char­
acteristics. The BLS, on the other hand, obtains data
by mail questionnaire which are based on the payroll
records of business units, and prepares detailed
statistics on the industrial and geographic distribu­
tion of employment and on hours of work and earnings.
Since BLS employment figures are based on estab­
lishment payroll records, persons who worked in more
than one establishment during the reporting period
will be counted more than once in the BLS series. By
definition, proprietors, self-employed persons, domestic

servants, and unpaid family workers are excluded from
the BLS but not the MRIF series. The two series also
differ in date of reference, BLS collecting data for
the pay period ending nearest the 15th of the month
(except for government), while the MRLF relates to the
calendar week containing the 8th day of the month.
Employment estimates derived by the Bureau of the
Census fi*om its censuses and/or annual sample surveys
of manufacturing establishments also differ from BLS
employment statistics. Among the important reasons for
lack of comparability are differences in industries
covered, in the business units considered parts of an
establishment, and in the industrial classification of
establishments.
Employment Statistics for States and Areas
State and area employment statistics are collected
and prepared by State agencies in cooperation with the
Bureau of Labor Statistics. These statistics are
based on the same reports used for preparing national
estimates. State series are adjusted to benchmark data
from State unemployment insurance agencies and the
Bureau of Old Age and Survivors Insurance. Because
some States have more recent benchmarks than others and
use slightly varying methods of computation, the sum of
the State figures may differ slightly fi*om the official
U. S. totals prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
State and area data in greater industry detail and for
earlier periods may be secured directly upon request to
the appropriate State agency or to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. The names and addresses of these agencies
are listed on the inside back cover of this report.

- EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY OF METHODS OF COMPUTATiON

Item

Individual manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries

Total nonagricultural, divisions,
major groups and groups

MONTHLY DATA
All employees

All-employee estimate for
previous month multiplied by
ratio of all employees in
current month to all employees
in previous month for sample
establishments which reported
for both months.

Sum of all-employee
estimates for component
industries.

Production workers
(for mining and manu­
facturing )

All-employee estimate for cur­
rent month multiplied by ratio
of production workers to all
employees in sample establish­
ments for current month.

Sum of production-worker
estimates for component
industries.

ANNUAL DATA
All employees and
production workers




Sum of monthly estimates
divided by 12.

Sum of monthly estimates
divided by 12.

2=g

Section B - LABOR TURNOVER
Definition of Labor Turnover
"Labor turnover," as used in this series, refers
to the gross movement of wage and salary workers into
and out of employment status with respect to individ­
ual firms. This movement is subdivided into two broad
types: accessions (nev hires and rehires) and separa­
tions (terminations of employment initiated by either
the employer or the employee). Each type of action is
cumulated for a calendar month and expressed as a rate
per 100 employees. Rates of accession and separation
are shown separately. All employees, including execu­
tive, office, sales, and other salaried personnel as
veil as production vorkers are covered by both the
turnover movements and the employment base used in
computing labor turnover rates. All groups of em­
ployees - full- and part-time, permanent and tempo­
rary - are included. Transfers from one establishment
to another vithin a company are not considered to be
turnover items.
The terms used in labor turnover statistics are
defined in the glossary under "Labor Turnover."

For example, in an industry sample, the total
number of employees vho vorked during, or received pay
for, the veek of January 12-18 vas reported as 25,498.
During the period January 1-31 a total of 284 employees
in all reporting firms quit. The quit rate for the in­
dustry is:
284 x 100 = 1.1
25,498
To compute turnover rates for industry groups, the
rates for the component industries are veighted by the
estimated employment. Rates for the durable and non­
durable goods subdivisions and manufacturing division
are computed by veighting the rates of major industry
groups by the estimated employment.
Classification of Establishment Reports
Beginning with data for January 1950, manufacturing
establishments reporting labor turnover are classified
in accordance vith the Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion (1945) code structure. Definitions of nonmanu­
facturing industries are based on the Social Security
Board Classification Code (1942).
For additional details, see Section A-Employment.

Source of Data and Sample Coverage
Comparability With Earlier Data
Labor turnover data are obtained each month from
a sample of establishments by means of a mail ques­
tionnaire. Schedules are received fi*om approximately
7,100 cooperating establishments in the manufacturing,
mining, and communication industries (see belov). The
definition of manufacturing used in the turnover series
is more restricted than in the BLS series on employ­
ment and hours and earnings because of the exclusion
of certain manufacturing industries from the labor
turnover sample. The major industries excluded are:
printing, publishing, and allied industries (since
April 1<%3); canning and preserving fruits, vegetables,
and sea foods; vomen's and misses' outervear; and fer­
tilizer.
Approximate coverage of BLS labor turnover sample
Group
and
industry

Number of

Nondurable goods.....
Metal mining...........
Coal mining:
Anthracite...........
Communication:
Telephone............

Employees

ments in Number in Percent
of total
samole
sample
6,600
4,800,000
34
4,000
3,400,000
38
2,600
1,400,000
27
130
63,000
60
40
275
( 3 /)
( 3 /)

30,000
120,000

45
33

582,000
28,000

89
60

Data are not available.
Msthod of Computation
To compute turnover rates for individual industries,
the total number of each type of action (accessions,
quits, etc.) reported for a calendar month by the
sample establishments in each industry is first divided
by the total number of employees (both wage and salary
vorkers), reported by these establishments, vho vorked
during, or received pay for, any part of the pay period
ending nearest the 15th of that month. The result is
multiplied by 100 to obtain the turnover rate.

4-E




Labor turnover rates are available on a comparable
basis from January 1930 for manufacturing as a vhole
and from 1943 for tvo coal mining and two communication
industries. Labor turnover rates for many individual
industries and industry groups for the period prior to
January 1950 are not comparable with the rates for the
subsequent period because of a revision vhich involved
(1) the adoption of the Standard Industrial Classifi­
cation (1945) code structure for manufacturing indus­
tries, and (2) the introduction of veighting in the
computation of industry-group rates.
Comparability W3th Employment Series
Month-to-month changes in total employment in manu­
facturing industries reflected by labor turnover rates
are not comparable vith the changes shown in the Bu­
reau's employment series for the following reasons:
(1) Accessions and separations are computed
for the entire calendar-month; the em­
ployment reports, for the most part, refer
to a 1-week pay period ending nearest the
15th of the month.
(2) The turnover sample is not as large as the
employment sample and includes propor­
tionately fever small plants; certain in­
dustries are not covered (see paragraph
on source of data and sample coverage).
(3) Plants are not included in the turnover com­
putations in months vhen vork stoppages are
in progress; the influence of such stoppages
is reflected, however, in the employment
figures.

Section C - HOURS AND EARNtNGS
Production-and Nonsunervisorv-Worker Employment.
Payroll, and Man-Hours
The monthly employment and payroll schedule provides
the following information required to compute averages

of hours and earnings:
(1) The number of fall- and oart-tima woduotionworkera or nonsuoervisory employees who worked during,
or received pay for, any part of the pay period re­
ported. Data cover production and related workers in
manufacturing, mining, laundries, and cleaning and
dyeing plants. Employees covered in the contract con­
struction industries are those engaged in actual con­
struction work. For the remaining industries, unless
otherwise noted, data refer to all nonsupervisory em­
ployees and working supervisors. (See glossary.)
(2) Total cross payrolls for such workers before
deductions for old-age and unemployment insurance,
withholding tax, bonds, union dues, and special cloth­
ing allowances. The payroll figures also include pay
for sick leave, holidays, and vacations taken. Ex­
cluded are: cash payments for vacations not taken;
retroactive pay not earned during the period reported;
value of payments in kind; contributions to welfare
funds, and insurance or pension plans; and commissions
and bonuses, unless earned and paid regularly each pay
period.
(3) Total man-hours, whether worked or paid for,
of full- and part-time production or nonsupervisory
workers including hours paid for holidays, sick leave,
and vacations taken. If employees elect to work
during a vacation period, only actual hours worked by
such employees are included.
The period reported generally represents the
weekly pay period ending nearest the 15th of the month.
Some establishments, however, use a 2-week or longer
pay period. Such schedules are edited to reduce the
payroll and man-hour aggregates to their proper equiva­
lents for a weekly period.
Collection of Establishment Reports

earnings for those employees not covered under the
production-worker or nonsupervisory-employee defini­
tions.
In addition to the factors mentioned, which exert
varying influences upon gross average hourly earnings,
gross average weekly earnings are affected by changes
in the length of the workweek, part-timB work, stop­
pages for varying causes, labor turnover, and absen­
teeism. Gross weekly earnings are not the amount
actually available to workers for spending because no
deduction has been made for income and social security
taxes, group insurance, occupational supplies, and
union dues. For weekly earnings after deduction for
Federal taxes see table C-3. For approximations of
"real" gross weekly earnings, i.e., after adjustment
for price changes, see table C-2.
Average Weekly Hours
The workweek information relates to average hours
worked or paid for, and is somewhat different from
standard or scheduled hours. Normally, such factors as
absenteeism, labor turnover, part-time work, and stop­
pages cause average weekly hours to be lower than the
hours of workers who are on the payroll during the
whole workweek* Group averages further reflect changes
in the workweek of component industries.
Gross Average Weekly Earnings in Current and
l%7-49 Dollars
,
Table C-2 shows gross average weekly earnings in
both current and 1947-49 dollars for selected indus­
tries. These series indicate changes in the level of
weekly earnings before and after adjustment for changes
in purchasing power as determined from the Bureau's
Consumer Price Index. The 3-year average— 1947, 1948,
and 1949— was selected as the base in conformity with
the Bureau of the Budget recommendations that Federal
statistics have a common 1947-49 base period.

See Section A-Employment.
Nee Spendable Average Weekly Earnings
Coverage of Establishment Reports
See Section A-Employment.
Classification of Establishment
See Section A-Employment.
Description of Gross Average Hourly and
Weekly Earnings Series
The average hourly earnings information for manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries are on a
"gross" basis; i.e., they reflect not only changes in
basic hourly and incentive wage rates, but also such
variable factors as premium pay for overtime and late
shift work, and changes in output of workers paid on
an incentive basis. Employment shifts between rela­
tively high-paid and low-paid work and changes in
workers' earnings in individual establishments also
affect the general earnings averages. Averages for
groups and divisions further reflect changes in average
hourly earnings for individual industries.
Averages of hourly earnings should not be confused
with wage rates. Earnings refer to the actual return
to the worker for a stated period of time; rates are
the amounts stipulated for a given unit of work or time.
However, the average earnings series should not be in­
terpreted as representing total labor costs on the part
of the employer, since the following are excluded: ir­
regular bonuses, retroactive items, payments of various
welfare benefits, payroll taxes paid by employers, and




Net spendable average weekly earnings are obtained
by deducting appropriate amounts for social security
and Federal income taxes from gross weekly earnings.
The amount of income tax liability depends on the
number of dependents supported by the worker, as well
as on the level of his gross income. To reflect these
variables, net spendable earnings have been computed
for two types of income-receivers: (1) a worker with no
dependents; (2) a worker with three dependents.
The computations of net spendable earnings for both
the factory worker with no dependents and the factory
worker with three dependents are based upon the gross
average weekly earnings for all production workers in
manufacturing industries without regard to marital
status, family composition, and total family income.
The spendable series measures relative changes in the
average disposable earnings for two types of incomereceivers .
Net spendable weekly earnings in 1947-49 dollars
represent an approximate measure of changes in "real"
net spendable weekly earnings as indicated by the
changes in the Bureau's Consumer Price Index. "Real"
net spendable weekly earnings are computed by applying
the current CPI to the spendable earnings average for
the current month. The resulting level of spendable
earnings expressed in 1947-^49 dollars is thus adjusted
for changes in purchasing power since that base period.
A detailed technical note on net spendable weekly
earnings may be obtained upon request.

SE
=

Average Hourly Earnings. Excluding Overtime, of
Production Workers in Manufacturing Industries
The Bureau publishes average hourly earnings exclu­
sive of overtime premium payments for manufacturing as
a whole and the durable- and nondurable-goods sub­
divisions. These data are based on the application of
adjustment factors to gross average hourly earnings (as
described in the Monthly Labor Review. May 1950, pp.537540; reprint available, Serial No. R. 2020). This
method eliminates only the additional earnings due to
overtime paid for at one and one-half time the straighttime rates after 40 hours a week. Thus, no adjustment
is made for other premium payment provisions— for
example, holiday work, late shift work, and penalty
rates other than time and one-half.
The set of adjustment factors can be used to eli­
minate premium overtime payments from average hourly
earnings in any manufacturing industry where overtime
for individual workers consists typically of hours in
excess of 40 per week naid for at the rate of time and
one-half. As these factors yield results which are
only approximate, they may not be appropriate when exact
figures are required.
Indexes of Production^orker Aggregate Weekly
Man-hours

1 week of the pay period ending nearest the 15th of the
month, and may not be typical of the entire month. Ag­
gregate man-hours differ fjrom scheduled man-hours due
to such factors as absenteeism, labor turnover, parttime work, and stoppages.
Railroad Hours and Earnings
The figures for Class I railroads (excluding switch­
ing and terminal companies) are based upon monthly data
summarized in the M-300 report of the Interstate Com­
merce Commission and relate to all employees who re­
ceived pay during the month, except executives, offi­
cials, and staff assistants (ICC Group I). Gross averqge
hourly earnings are computed by dividing total compensa­
tion by total hours paid for. Average weekly hours are
obtained by dividing the total number of hours paid for,
reduced to a weekly basis, by the number of employees,
as defined above. Gross average weekly earnings are
derived by multiplying average weekly hours by average
hourly earnings. Because hours and earnings data for
manufacturing and other nonmanufacturing industries are
based upon reports to the Bureau of Labor Statistics
which generally represent 1 weekly pay period ending
nearest the 15th of the month, the data for railroad
employees are not strictly comparable with other in­
dustry information shown in this publication.
Hours and Gross E^i-nin^s for Selected States and Areas

The indexes of production-worker aggregate weekly
man-hours are prepared by dividing the current month'
s
aggregate by the monthly average for the 1947-49 period.
These aggregates represent the product of average weekly
hours and production-worker employment.
The aggregate man-hours are defined as total manhours for which pay was received by full- and part-time
production workers, including hours paid for holidays,
sick leave, and vacations taken. The man-hours are for

HOURS AND EARN!NGS Item

The State and area hours and earnings data for manu­
facturing are prepared by cooperating State agencies.
These estimates are based on the same reports used in
preparing national estimates. Inasmuch as the estimates
presented in this report relate only to manufacturing as
a whole, variations in earnings among the States and
areas are, to a large degree, caused by differences in
industrial composition. For additional details on State
and area statistics see Section A-Employment.

SUMMARY OF METHODS OF COMPUTAT!ON

individual manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries

Manufacturing division, groups, subgroups, and nonmanufacturing groups

MONTHLY DATA
Average weekly hours

Total production or nonsupervisory
man-hours divided by number of pro­
duction or nonsupervisory workers.

Average, weighted by employment, of
the average weekly hours for compo­
nent industries.

Average hourly earnings
(i n d o l l a r s )

Total production or nonsupervisory
worker payroll divided by total pro­
duction or nonsupervisory worker
man-hours.

Average, weighted by aggregate manhours, of the average hourly earnings
for component industries.

Average weakly earnings
(in
d o l l a r s)

Product of average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

Product of average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

ANNUAL DATA
Average weekly hours

Annual total of aggregate man-hours
(employment multiplied by average
weekly hours) divided by annual sum
of employment.

Average, weighted by employment, of
the annual averages of weekly hours
for component industries.

Average hourly earnings
(i n
d o l l a r s)

Annual total of aggregate payrolls
(weekly earnings multiplied by em­
ployment) divided by annual aggregate
man-hours.

weighted by aggregate manhours, of the annual averages of
hourly earnings for component in­
dustries.

Average weekly aaminca
(in
dollars)

Product of average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

Product of average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.




Section D -G L O S S A R Y

separations (including military), as defined below.
Quits are terminations of employment during the
calendar month initiated by employees for such
reasons as: acceptance of a job in another company,
dissatisfaction, return to school, marriage, mater­
nity, ill health, or voluntary retirement where no
company pension is provided. Failure to report after
being hired and unauthorized absences of more than
seven consecutive calendar days are also classified
as quits. Prior to 1940, miscellaneous separations
were also included in this category.

ALL EMPLOYEES - Includes production and related workers
as defined below and workers engaged in the follow­
ing activities: executive, purchasing, finance, ac­
counting, legal, personnel (including cafeterias,
medical, etc.), professional and technical activities,
sales, sales-delivery, advertising, credit collection,
and installation and servicing of own products, rou­
tine office functions, fhctory supervision (above the
working foreman level). Also includes employees on
the establishment payroll engaged in new construction
and major additions or alterations to the plant who
are utilized as a separate work force (force-account
construction workers). Proprietors, self-employed
persons, domestic servants, unpaid family workers,
and members of the Armed Forces are excluded.

Discharges are terminations of employment during
the calendar month initiated by the employer for such
reascnsas employees' incompetence, violation of rules,
dishonesty, insubordination, laziness, habitual ab­
senteeism, or inability to meet physical standards.

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS - Includes working foremen,
journeymen, mechanics, apprentices, helpers, laborers,
and similar workers, engaged in new work, alterations,
demolition, and other actual construction work, at the
site of construction or working in shop or yard at
jobs (such as precutting and preassembling) ordinarily
performed by members of the construction trades; in­
cludes all such workers, regardless of skill, engaged
in any way in contract construction activities.

Layoffs are terminations of employment during the
calendar month lasting or expected to last more than
seven consecutive calendar days without pay, initi­
ated by the employer without prejudice to the worker,
for such reasons as lack of orders or materials, re­
lease of temporary help, conversion of plant, intro­
duction of labor-saving machinery or processes, or
suspensions of operations without pay during inven­
tory periods.

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION - Covers only firms engaged in the
construction business on a contract basis for others.
Force-account construction workers, i.e., hired di­
rectly by and on the payroll of Federal, State, and
local government, public utilities, and private estab­
lishments, are excluded Arom contract construction
and included in the employment for such establishments

Miscellaneous separations (including military) are
terminations of employment during the calendar month
because of permanent disability, death, retirement on
company pension, and entrance into the Armed Forces
expected to last more than thirty consecutive calendar
days. Rrior to 1940, miscellaneous separations were
included with quits. Beginning September 1940, mili­
tary separations were included here.

DURABLE GOODS - The durable goods subdivision includes
the following major industry groups: ordnance and
accessories; lumber and wood products; furniture and
fixtures; stone, clay, and glass products; primary
metal industries; fabricated metal products; machinery;
electrical machinery; transportation equipment; in­
struments and related products; and miscellaneous
manufacturing industries as defined. This definition
is consistent with that used by other Federal agencies,
e.g., Federal Reserve Board.
FINANCE, INSURANCE,AND REAL ESTATE - Covers establish­
ments operating in the fields of finance, insurance,
and real estate, and beginning January 1952, also in­
cludes the Federal Reserve Banks and the mixed-ownership banks of the Farm Credit Administration for
national and most State and area estimates. However,
in a few State and area estimates the latter two
agencies are included under Government until revisions
can be made by the cooperating State agencies con­
cerned. These exceptions are appropriately noted.
GOVERNMENT - Covers Federal, State, and local government
establishments performing legislative, executive, and
judicial functions, including Government corporations,
Government force-account construction, and such units
as arsenals, navy yards, and hospitals. Fourth-class
postmasters are included in the national series and
most State and area series. Exceptions are noted.
State and local government employment includes
teachers, but excludes, as nominal employees, paid
volunteer firemen and elected officials of small local
units.
LABOR TURNOVER:
Separations are terminations of employment during
the calendar month and are classified according to
cause: quits, discharges, layoffs, and miscellaneous




Persons on leave of absence (paid or unpaid) with
the approval of the employer are not counted as sepa­
rations until such time as it is definitely determined
that such persons will not return to work. At that
time, a separation is reported as one of the above
types, depending on the circumstances.
Accessions are the total number of permanent and
temporary additions to the employment roll during tht
calendar month, including both new and rehired em­
ployees. Persons returning to work after a layoff,
military separation, or other absences who have been
counted as separations are considered accessions.
MANUFACTURING - Covers only private establishments.
Government manufacturing operations such as arsenals
and navy yards are excluded from manufacturing and
included under Government.
MINING - Covers establishments engaged in the extraction
from the earth of organic and inorganic minerals which
occur in nature as solids, liquids, or gases; includes
various contract services required in mining opera­
tions, such as removal of overburden, tunneling and
shafting, and the drilling or acidizing of oil wells;
also includes ore dressing, beneficiating, and con­
centration.
NONDURABLE GOODS - The nondurable goods subdivision in­
cludes the following major industry groups: food and
kindred products; tobacco manufactures; textile-mill
products; apparel and other finished textile products;
paper and allied products; printing, publishing, and
allied industries; chemicals and allied products;
products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and
leather and leather products. This definition is con­
sistent with that used by other Federal agencies, e.g.,
Federal Reserve Board.

7-E

NONSUEEHVISORY EMPLOYEES - Includes employees (not
above the working supervisory level) such as office
and clerical workers, repairmen, salespersons, opera­
tors, drivers, attendants, service employees, line­
men, laborers, janitors, watchmen, and similar occu­
pational levels, and other employees whose services
are closely associated with those of the employees
listed.
PAYROLL - Private payroll represents the weekly payroll
of both full- and part-time production and related
workers who worked during, or received pay for, any
part of the pay period ending nearest the 15th of the
month, before deduction for old-age and unemployment
insurance, group insurance, withholding tax, bonds,
and union dues; also includes pay for sick leave,
holidays, and vacations taken. Excludes cash pay­
ments for vacations not taken, retroactive pay not
earned during period reported, value of payments in
kind, and bonuses, unless earned and paid regularly
each pay period.
PRODUCTION AND RELATED WORKERS - Includes working fore­
men and all nonsupervisory workers (including lead
men and trainees) engaged in fabricating, processing,
assembling, inspection, receiving, storage, handling,
packing, warehousing, shipping, maintenance, repair,
janitorial, watchman services, products development,
auxiliary production for plant's own use (e.g., power
plant), and record-keeping and other services closely
associated with the above production operations.
REGIONS:

South - Includes the following 17 States: Alabama,
Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida,
Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi,
North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
(In the case of sawmills and planing mills, general,
a third region is identified - the West - and in­
cludes California, Oregon, and Washington.)
SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS - Covers establishments pri­
marily engaged in rendering services to individuals
and business firms, including automotive repair serv­
ices. Excludes domestic service workers. Nongovern­
ment schools, hospitals, museums, etc., are in­
cluded under service and miscellaneous; similar
Government establishments are included under Govern­
ment.
TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES - Covers only pri­
vate establishments engaged in providing all types
of transportation and related services; telephone,
telegraph, and other communication services; or pro­
viding electricity, gas, steam, water, or sanitary
service. Similar Government establishments are in­
cluded under Government.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE - Covers establishments
engaged in wholesale trade, i.e., selling merchan­
dise to retailers, and in retail trade, i.e., selling
merchandise for personal or household consumption,
and rendering services incidental to the sales of
goods. Similar Government establishments are in­
cluded under Government.

North - Includes all States except the 17 listed as
South.

F or sale b v the Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts, U. S. G overn m en t P rin tin g O ffice, W a sh in g ton 2.1. D C .
P rice 30 cents (single c o p y ).
price: $3; $1 additional for foreign m ailing. Single co p ie s va ry in p rice




S ubscription

U. S. GOVERNMENT PR!NTiNG 0 F F !C E :O — 1954