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Consumers’ Prices
in the United States
1942-48

Analysis of Changes
in Cost of Living




Bulletin No. 966
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. T obin, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

F or sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, U. S. Government P rinting Office,
W ashington 25, D. C.
P rice 35 cents

Letter of Transmittal
U nited States D epartment op L abor,
B ureau op L abor Statistics ,

Washington, D. C., Dee. 15,19U9.
The Secretary op L abor :
I have the honor to transmit herewith a bulletin summarizing data on
consumers’ prices during the years 1942 through 1948. Much of this in­
form ation is released currently in mimeographed reports giving the Bu­
reau’s regular index numbers o f consumers’ prices for moderate-income
families in large cities. This bulletin also contains a historical record of
some o f the special indexes maintained by the Bureau during the war.
The bulletin was prepared by members of the staff of the Prices and
Cost of Living Division, under the general direction of Edward D. Hol­
lander, chief. Planning and coordination of material included was the joint
responsibility o f Louise J. Mack o f the Consumers’ Prices Branch and
Doris P. Rothwell of the Cost o f Living Branch.
E w a n Clague, Commissioner.
Hon. M aurice J. T obin ,




Secretary of Labor.

Preface
This bulletin, Consumers’ Prices in the United States, 1942-48, presents a compilation of
retail price data collected for the Consumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income Families in Large
Cities (form erly called the Cost-of-Living Index) compiled by the Bureau o f Labor Statistics. With
this publication, the Bureau resumes its regular series of periodic bulletins on this subject, which
was discontinued during the war. The most recent of these was Bulletin No. 710, Cost o f Living
in 1941. The current bulletin brings the series up to date with presentation o f data from 1942
through 1948 in a single publication. Detailed statistical tables of the Bureau’s national and city
indexes for this period for all items and m ajor groups are given at the end of the bulletin.
The bulletin discusses the movement of prices at the consumer level during the war and up to
the end of 1948, with particular reference to the effects of price controls. Reference is made to the
subsidy program, especially for foods, and to allocations and rationing programs. Some discussion
of price developments not reflected in the Bureau’s index, such as quality deterioration, black mar­
ket prices, and upgrading, is included. Price changes in large cities are compared with price
changes in small cities. Price movements are discussed separately for m ajor commodity groups.
During the course of the war, the Bureau’s functions as the price collection agency for the
United States Government were expanded greatly. Not only were the Bureau’s regular series of
great importance as a guide to Government policy regarding wartime price and wage controls,
but demands were made of the Bureau’s trained staff for additional data and for special surveys of
various kinds. Some o f these are described in this bulletin.
Increased interest in the Bureau’s price data, due in part to the rapid rise in prices during
the war, occasioned heavy demands on the Bureau’s price reporting services by consumers, labor
unions, and businessmen. This interest and widespread use of the index in connection with wage
determinations led to much public discussion and investigation of the index in 1943, 1944, and
1945.
In addition, the Bureau found itself called upon more frequently for technical advisory
assistance to State governments, universities, foreign governments, other Federal agencies, and
private research organizations interested in initiating surveys and indexes of consumers’ prices
and the cost of living.
In response to insistent demands for measures of actual dollar values o f the cost of living and
of relative differences in the cost of living between cities, the Bureau published its City Worker’s
Family Budget in the spring o f 1948. This report, a major contribution in the field o f fam ily budgets
and the cost of living, is referred to briefly in this bulletin.
Continuing the Bureau’s established policy of making its data and methods freely available,
this bulletin contains a detailed account of the Bureau’s wartime pricing policies and of the revi­
sions in its techniques necessitated thereby, as well as of certain postwar adjustments of the in­
dex procedure. Finally, it includes a bibliography of various publications to which the reader is
referred for further details.




iii

Contents
Page

Analysis of changes in cost o f living:
Summary:
Economic characteristics of the p eriod -----------------------------------------------General character o f price m ovem ents----------------------------------------------December 1941 to May 1942: Transition to war economy----------------------------Price situation, December 1941----------------------------------------------------------The transition to controlled p rice s-----------------------------------------------------May 1942 to May 1943: Prices under the General Maximum Price RegulationMay 1943 to June 1946: Holding the price lin e ------------------------------------------June 1946 to March 1947: Decontrol of p rice s------------------------------------------March 1947 to December 1948: Postwar p rice s-------------------------------------------

1
2
9
9
11
12
14
17
20

Consumers1Price Index, 34 large cities:
Description --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------T itle ____________________________________________________________________
Coverage _______________________________________________________________
Uses of the In d ex_______________________________________________________
Adjustment o f w a g e s----------------------------------------------------------------------Determination of purchasing p ow er----------------------------------------------------Guide to general economic p o licy --------------------------------------------------------Wage stabilization---------------------------------------------------------------------------International com parison------------------------------------------------------------------Allowance adjustm ent----------------------------------------------------------------------Long-term con tracts-------------------------------------------------------------------------Methods o f price collection and tabulation-------------------------------------------------Historical background_______________________________________________
Basic method of calculation_____________________________________
Price collection procedures__________________________________________
Relative importance o f com ponents----------------------------------------------------Index adjustments caused by the w a r--------------------------------------------------------Changes in qualities of goods available-----------------------------------------------Introduction of wartime a rticles_____________________________________
Changes in commodity w eights-----------------------------------------------------------Changes in collecting rental d ata _____________________________________
Criticisms and appraisals of the in d ex-----------------------------------------------Five-point adjustm ent----------------------------------------------------------------------Revision o f population w eigh ts______________________________________
Postwar adjustments of the in d ex________________________________________
Reintroduction o f prewar specifications ----------------------------------------------Restoration o f prewar w eigh ts---------------------------------------------------------Introduction of children’s app arel-----------------------------------------------------Changes in processing of food prices---------------------------------------------------Revision of retail food store sam ple-----------------------------------------------—
Changes necessitated by budget cut in fiscal year 1948 ------------ ----------- -----Estimating national indexes__________________________________________
Reduction o f number of items priced--------------------------------------------------Presentation and publication of d a ta ---------------------------------------------------------

23
23
24
24
24
25
25
25
25
26
26
26
26
26
27
27
28
28
29
30
31
31
32
33
33
33
34
34
35
35
35
35
36
37

Consumers’ Price Indexes for additional cities:
Small cities and war production cen ters___________________________________
Twenty small citie s__________________________________________________
Twelve war production centers-----------------------------------------------------------Methods u sed _______________________________________________________
Seven estimated citie s____________________________________________________
Twenty-two cities in which food prices only are obtained------------------------------

38
39
39
39
39
40

iv




CONTENTS
Page

City worker’s fam ily budget----------------------------------------------------------------------------

40

Cooperation with other Government agencies:
States ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Territories --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Federal agencies________________________________________________________

41
42
43

Appendix tables:
A. Consumers’ Price Index in large cities (national average), by group o f com­
modities, 1929-48 ___________________________________________________
B. Consumers’ Price Index in 34 large cities, by group o f commodities,
1935-48 ___________________________________________________________
C. Consumers’ Price Indexes in small cities and war activity centers for
selected periods, by groups o f commodities, 1939-47 ________________
D. Estimated indexes of consumers’ prices for 7 additional cities, for selected
periods, 1939-45 --------------------------------------------------------------------------—
E. Apparel: Indexes of retail prices o f selected articles in large cities,
1935-48 ___________________________________________________________
F. Housefurnishings: Indexes o f retail prices o f selected articles in large
cities, 1935-48 ______________________________________________________
G. Miscellaneous: Indexes of retail prices o f selected articles in large cities,
1935-48 ___________________________________________________________
Charts:
Chart 1.— Consumers’ Price Index for moderate income families in large cities
Chart 2.— Average monthly percent change in consumers’ prices, August 1939
to December 1941___________________________________________________
Chart 3.— Average monthly percent change in consumers’ prices, December
1941 to May 1942 ___________________________________________________
Chart 4.— Average monthly percent change in consumers’ prices, May 1942 to
May 1943 _________________________________________________________
Chart 5.— Average monthly percent change in consumers’ prices, May 1943
to June 1946_______________________________________________________
Chart 6.— Average monthly percent change in consumers’ prices, June 1946 to
March 1947 ________________________________________________________
Chart 7.— Average monthly percent change in consumers’ prices, March 1947
to December 1948____________________________________________________
Bibliography ________________________________________________________________




44
45
62
67
68
72
74
vi
10
11
13
15
18
20
80

v

C hart I.— Consumers' Price Index for Moderate Income Families in Large Cities
INDEX

UNITEO STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTIC S

vi



1935-39*100

INDEX

Consumers’ Prices in the United States, 1942—
48
Analysis of Changes in C ost of Living
Summary
Economic Characteristics o f the Period
The history of prices in the 7 years 1942 to
1948 is the history of one o f the severest infla­
tions o f the American economy, fairly success­
fully held in check for 4 years by a wartime
program of economic stabilization, only to erupt
in a violent price rise after controls were re­
moved. The inflation and its effects on prices
penetrated every corner o f the economy and
every part o f the country. The most extreme
impact was on the prices o f foods; the least on
residential rents. Only toward the end o f the
period, late in 1948, did it appear that the in­
flation might have spent its force and that the
adjustment to a postwar price level might be
under way.
The underlying cause o f the inflation, of
course, was the increase in incomes and pur­
chasing power generated by the Government’s
expenditures for the military establishment,
and the concomitant diversion o f production
from supplies fo r civilian consumption to sup­
plies for the armed forces and for the reinforce­
ment and reconstruction o f foreign countries
in support o f the Nation’s foreign policy. Dur­
ing the last 2 years o f the period the influence
of deferred demand for consumer goods made
itself felt, and additional demands arose from
a substantial boom in domestic investment in
capital goods. So great were these demands in
the aggregate that, until the last year of the
period, not even a volume o f industrial and
agricultural production much the largest in the
history o f this or any nation was able to supply
them.
The period saw first the transition from a




heavily armed peace economy to one o f all-out
war and then back again. The expenditures fo r
the military and for economic foreign policy in
the 7 years totaled 344 billion dollars, or 23 per­
cent of the national product. A t the height of
the war military expenditures alone reached an
annual rate of over 90 billion dollars, or more
than 40 percent o f the national product. Per­
sonal incomes rose from 73 billion dollars in
1939 to 95 billions in 1941 and to 214 billions in
1948. The early effect of this rise was to stimu­
late production and consumption in an economy
still recovering from depression; but as the
slack was taken up and the economy approached
more nearly the limits of capacity o f materials,
manpower, and facilities, the additional income
exerted greater and greater pressures on prices
and threatened to generate a gigantic price
inflation.
The threat first became serious as the Nation
began to arm itself after the fall of France;
and as the rate o f rearmament increased, so
did the force of inflation. Consumers’ prices, as
measured by the Consumers’ Price Index o f the
Bureau o f Labor Statistics, after having re­
mained largely unaffected through the first
year and a half of the war in Europe, began to
rise early in 1941 and the rise picked up mo­
mentum as the year went on. In July the Presi­
dent asked the Congress for emergency legis­
lation to deal with the flow of supplies and with
the rise in prices. The Emergency Price Con­
trol A ct o f 1942 was enacted 6 months later,
and the Nation embarked on its first broadscale attempt to control prices. For the next 5
years the history o f prices was the history o f
price control and economic stabilization. As the
war progressed and controls became increas­
ingly effective, the price rise was almost halted.
1

2

CONSUMERS’ p r ic e s i n

Toward the end of the war, the economic and
political pressures for relaxation of controls be­
came insistent, and prices resumed a slow ad­
vance, culminating in the explosive rise in the
latter half o f 1946 when controls were suddenly
abandoned. The rise continued into the post­
war free markets o f 1947 and almost until the
end o f 1948. (See chart 1.)
The history o f these 7 years is the history
also o f revolutionary changes in consumers’ in­
comes and expenditures. The rise o f employ­
ment and wages in the first years o f the war
quickly lifted the Nation from post-depression
levels o f expenditures. But even before full em­
ployment was reached, consumption was cur­
tailed by shortages and by rationing which be­
came increasingly rigorous as the war effort
accelerated. Higher taxes, and an unprece­
dented rate o f saving that rose above 20 per­
cent o f incomes for 3 years, as a result of bond
drives, curtailed purchasing power and con­
sumption and eased the inflationary pressures
during the war. A fter the end o f the war and
the reconversion o f the economy to the pur­
suits of peace, the denied wants o f the war
years and the large accumulation of consumer
savings generated a volume of demand that for
several years exceeded the reconversion capa­
city o f industry and agriculture and forced
prices higher still. The peak of prices in 1948
was reached at a time when the most urgent of

T ab le

1.— Percent

th e

u n it e d

states

the postwar demands were being filled, and the
ensuing decline of prices accompanied the eas­
ing of demands. As production, employment,
and incomes leveled out or declined late in 1948,
prices declined moderately; but even in the face
of the declines it appeared that incomes and con­
sumption, as well as prices and expenditures,
were leveling out on a plane much higher than
prewar. Nevertheless, a new resistance to high
prices indicated that substantial demands
awaited a more favorable income-price rela­
tionship.
General Character of Price Movements
PERIODS OF PRICE MOVEMENTS

The “ defense period,” from the outbreak of
the war in Europe to Pearl Harbor, was one o f
gathering inflationary momentum. The early
price movements were spotty and speculative,
affecting principally wholesale markets for ma­
terials most immediately in demand and most
inelastic in supply. Only toward the middle o f
1941 were consumers’ prices much affected.
The Consumers’ Price Index turned upward in
April and continued to rise during the year.
At the time o f Pearl Harbor, consumers’ prices
were nearly 10 percent higher than in Decem­
ber 1940 and 12 percent higher than in August
1939.

change and average monthly rate o f change in Consumers’ P rice In d ex,
by major group, fo r selected periods, 1 9 8 9 -4 8

Defense
period
August 1939 to
December 1941
Major group
Percent
change

Transition to
controls
December 1941 to
May 1942

GM PR
period
May 1942 to
May 1943

“ Hold-the-line”
period
May 1943 to
June 1946

Decontrol
period
June 1946 to
March 1947

Postwar
period
March 1947 to
December 1948

Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
monthly Percent monthly Percent monthly Percent monthly Percent monthly Percent monthly
rate of change rate of change rate of change rate of change rate of
rate of
change
change
change
change
change change change
(percent)
(percent)
(percent)
(percent)
(percent)
(percent)

All items-----------------------------------

12.1

0.43

5.0

1.00

7.8

0.65

6.6

0.18

17.3

1.92

9.7

0.46

Food_____ _________ ___________
Apparel-----------------------------------Kent______ ____________________
Fuel, electricity, and refrigeration.
Gas and electricity_________
Other fuels______________
Ice---------------------------------Housef urnishings_______________
Miscellaneous goods and services-

21.0
14.5
3.7
6.8
—2.3
18.8
5.1
16.1
7.3

.75
.52
.13
.24
— .08
.67
.18
.58
.26

7.5
9.9
1.6
.8
— .1
.9
(>)
4.6
3.0

1.50
1.98
.32
.16
-.0 2
.18
0)
.92
.60

17.6
1.3
—1.7
2.6
— .5
5.7
(*)
2.4
4.0

1.47
.11
— .14
.22
— .04
.47

1.8
22.9
.5
2.7
—4.2
10.3
1.3
24.8
10.9

.05
.62
.01
.07
— .11
.28
.04
.67
.29

30.2
17.2
.5
6.4
.1
11.5
5.5
16.8
8.1

3.36
1.91
.06
.71
.01
1.28
.61
1.87
.90

8.2
8.7
9.6
17.2
3.4
29.0
14.0
8.9
11.4

.39
.41
.46
.82
.16
1.38
.67
.42
.54

ilable.




.20
.33

ANALYSIS OP CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

The entry o f the United States into the war
in December 1941 was followed by a period o f
rapidly rising consumers' prices. The Con­
sumers’ Price Index rose at a rate o f 1.0 per­
cent a month from December 1941 to May 1942,
when retail prices of most consumer goods and
many services were frozen at March levels by
the General Maximum Price Regulation.1
The General Maximum Price Regulation
slowed, but in the absence of general economic
stabilization measures it did not stop the rise
of consumers’ prices. The Consumers’ Price In­
dex between May 1942 and May 1943 increased
at a rate of about two-thirds o f 1 percent a
month. Following up the enactment of the Eco­
nomic Stabilization Act in October 1942, the
President issued the “ hold-the-line” order (E x­
ecutive Order 9328) in April 1943, laying down
a broad program o f economic stabilization.
Measures to effect this were taken beginning in
May, inaugurating a period o f comparative price
stability which lasted through the war and
almost to the end o f price control. From May
1943 to June 1946, the Consumers’ Price Index
rose only 6.6 percent, or at a rate of less than
one-fifth o f 1 percent a month.
The decontrol period beginning in July 1946
was the occasion o f the sharpest rise ever re­
corded in the Consumers’ Price Index. In 9
months the index rose 17.3 percent, or almost
2 percent a month. By March 1947, however,
the effect o f decontrol seemed to have run its
course. Though prices continued to rise, they
were affected more by postwar supply and de­
mand conditions than by the accumulated war­
time inflationary pressures.
From March 1947 to the end of 1948 con­
sumers’ prices rose nearly 10 percent, as a re­
sult of rising postwar demands, rising costs,
and many shortages. The rise might have been
less and ended sooner but for the short crops
of bread and feed grains in 1947 in the face of
unprecedented demands, at home and abroad,
which forced up the prices of many important
foods and postponed by perhaps a year the
peak o f consumers’ prices. The great 1948
crops in America and Europe and the easing
i
See TJ. S. Bureau o f Labor Statistics Bulletin No. 879: The Gen­
eral Maximum Price Regulation; also First Quarterly Report, Office
of Price Administration, pp. 36-41.




3

o f demands for consumers’ and capital goods
seem to have broken the back of the postwar
price rise late in 1948, when the Consumers’
Price Index entered on its first sustained de­
cline in a decade.
HIDDEN PRICE INCREASES

The extent o f the recorded price increases in­
cludes no measure o f the costs o f quality de­
terioration in the form o f inconvenience, dis­
com fort, and inferior services forced on con­
sumers by the shortages and disruptions o f the
war. By the same token, the restoration of
standards o f quality after 1945 is not reflected in
the postwar price indexes. From the consumers’
standpoint, these quality changes may be as
important as the price changes.
It has been recognized that the Consumers’
Price Index did not measure fully the extent
of the price rise, and especially the extent of
increases in living costs, during the war.2 The
rigors o f the war economy enforced widespread
changes in availability and quality o f goods and
services, many of which necessarily escaped
measurement.3 Furthermore, attempts by sell­
ers to circumvent the effects o f price control
led to substitution o f inferior for standard
goods, elimination o f lower-priced lines, cur­
tailment o f services, and outright black market
transactions at illegal prices. It was estimated
that the combined effect of these, if they had
been fully reflected in the price indexes would
have been to raise the Consumers’ Price Index
by 3 to 4 percent by the end of 1943. By 1945,
the accumulated understatement was estimated
at 5 percentage points, but since VJ-day most
of it has been canceled out by a reverse trend
toward improvement of quality.4
*
2 “ In general it can be said that price statistics, no matter how care­
fully gathered, are likely to understate the changes which are actually
occurring in these m arkets; they fail to allow fully for improvement
in quality on a falling market and, as at present, inadequately reflect
reductions in quality which occur during a rising market. This is
true, regardless of how carefully the specifications for price collec­
tion are prepared. M ajor modifications o f fabric or workmanship can
of course be detected, but there is no feasible way o f making any
quantitative allowance for all the countless changes which have been
made and are being made in order to maintain customary price lines/*
Monthly Labor Review, February 1941, pp. 290-291; or reprint,
Serial No. R. 1257, pp. 5-6.
3 For discussion o f the effects on the index procedures, see pp. 29-31.
4 For sources o f these estimates, cf. pp. 32-33, and Report o f Presi­
dent’s Committee on the Cost o f Living, Office o f Economic Stabiliza­
tion, Washington, 1945.

4

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

Probably much the most important of these
hidden increases in its effect on consumers gen­
erally, was the deterioration of quality of goods
and services, most particularly apparel and
housefurnishings.5 Almost from the outbreak
of the war in Europe in the fall of 1939, rising
prices o f wool and silk caused the substitution
of mixed fabrics using cotton and rayon, and
shifts to more inexpensive fabric construction,
in attempts to maintain established price lines
in the face of rising costs. As the rearmament
of the United States diverted more and more
materials from consumer uses, and as imported
materials became scarcer, the processes of sub­
stitution became more widespread. In the sum­
mer of 1941 the importation of silk ceased, and
stocks were frozen for military use. The out­
break of war with Japan cut off supplies o f
rubber and tin from the East and curtailed sup­
plies of wool and other fibers. The great ex­
pansion in the war production program pre­
empted greater quantities of metals, leather,
wool, rayon, cotton goods, and other materials
which enter widely into production of con­
sumers’ goods. By the middle of 1942, the Gov­
ernment had intervened to control the consump­
tion of many important materials, through
orders limiting their uses to production essen­
tial to the armed forces or to the civilian econ­
omy. These limitations became increasingly
severe until the peak of war production was
passed in 1944; thereafter they were relaxed,
gradually until mid-1945 and rapidly after VJday.
By mid-1942 “ weight and wool content of
fabrics in apparel, blankets, and other products
made o f wool had been lowered; thread counts
in cotton fabrics had been reduced; silk in nu­
merous uses had given way to cotton or rayon;
cheaper grades of leather had been substituted
for calf in shoes and so on.” 6 Similar use o f
inferior fabrics, and metal substitutes brought
about deterioration of quality of furniture and
other housefurnishings. “ In most cases no
form al price reductions were made to compen­
sate for this deterioration in quality, and sub-

stitutes have commonly sold in the same ‘price
lines’ as the originals.” 6
Some of these changes were made in com­
pliance with Government orders for conserva­
tion of scarce materials and manpower; others
were initiated by sellers to reduce costs and
maintain margins in the face o f price control,
particularly under the General Maximum Price
Regulation. The conservation orders were di­
rected toward simplifying and standardizing
styles and curtailing or eliminating the use o f
scarce materials. Efforts were made by the
price control authorities to establish maximum
prices which reflected changes in cost, but the
physical characteristics of apparel and house­
furnishings made it difficult to detect and pre­
vent hidden price increases. The use o f stand­
ards and standard labeling in the enforcement
o f maximum prices was tried, but provoked
such trade opposition that it was limited by
statute in 1943.
By the end of 1943 it was estimated that the
quality deterioration not reflected in the index
might have increased the clothing index by an
estimated 4 to 5 percent, the housefurnishings
index by an estimated 7 to 9 percent, and the
food index by an estimated 1 to 3 percent, if
it had been possible to measure them.7 How­
ever, after VJ-day and especially during 1946
and 1947, the improvement of quality, likewise
not fully measured, may have caused the index
to overstate the postwar price rise.
Consumers’ services also deteriorated during
the war in ways not fully measured by the in­
dexes, but the effects were less serious. Cur­
tailment of luxury services, fewer deliveries,
longer waits, use of inferior materials, and
shortages o f manpower were characteristics of
laundries and dry cleaning establishments.
Medical care was hard to get because o f short­
ages of doctors, dentists, and nurses; hospital
care was stripped to a minimum. Transporta­
tion services were overtaxed and uncomfortable.
Nevertheless, it was believed that “ except inso­
far as unskilled work, for instance, sometimes
causes increased wear and tear, these incon­

5
For details see the following reprints from the Monthly Labor Re­
view: Serial Nos. R. 1257, R. 1488, R. 1492, R. 1573, and R. 1935,
from issues for February 1941, November 1942, September 1943, and
July 1948.

® See Indirect Price Increases in Monthly Labor Review, Novem­
ber 1942, p. 909, or reprint, Serial No. R. 1492, p. 7.
7 Report o f the President’s Committee on the Cost o f Living, Office
o f Economic Stabilization, Washington, 1945, pp. 316, 337-8, and
355-6.




ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

veniences result in no increase in money cost
and they can be regarded as necessary incidents
o f the war situation.” 8
As costs rose, the effect of controlled prices on
some clothing and housefurnishings goods was
to narrow sellers’ margins. When this happened
on low-priced lines, where prewar margins were
often lower than average, there were incentives
to shift production to higher-priced lines where
margins were more favorable. This led in some
cases to the disappearance o f cheaper qualities
altogether in such goods as shoes, shirts, housedresses, work clothing, children’s clothing, and
household textiles. In spite of incentives (such
as priority allocations of materials) and regula­
tions intended to limit shifts to higher-priced
lines and to restrict introduction of new styles
and models, shortages of lower-priced goods per­
sisted throughout the war and into 1947 and
1948. It was not until the urgent demands were
filled, in one line o f goods after another, that
sellers again had incentives to restore lowerpriced goods. In some lines— radios, vacuum
cleaners, and washing machines, for example—
this occurred rather early during 1947; in auto­
mobiles, on the other hand, lower-priced models
had not reappeared by the end o f 1948. In most
textiles and in shoes, the change occurred dur­
ing 1948.
Much o f the price effect o f the disappearance
of low-priced goods was reflected in the Con­
sumers’ Price Index by procedures used to sub­
stitute higher-grade for lower-grade items as
the latter disappeared.9 To the extent that the
very low-priced lines were not represented in
the index before the war, the effects of their dis­
appearance would not influence the index. Esti­
mates of understatement made very little al­
lowance for this factor since much trading-up
by consumers was voluntary, reflecting higher
incomes.1 1 The estimated effect of forced trad­
0
ing-up, if it had been fully reflected in the index,
amounted from 0.06 to 0.11 percentage points.1
1
It was also estimated that the indexes had
understated the increase in prices by about onehalf of 1 percent because o f failure to take into
8Report o f the President's Committee on the Cost o f Living, Office
o f Economic Stabilization, Washington, 1945, p. 368.
» Cf. pp. 28-29.
10 Report of the President's Committee on the Cost o f Living,
Office o f Economic Stabilization, Washington, 1945, pp. 261-262.
11 Ibid., p. 12.




5

account fully the disappearance of special sales
and mark-downs; and by about one-fourth to
one-half of 1 percent because of under-reporting
o f prices actually charged.1 The most important
1
factor in the latter was the failure to reflect
black market prices.
Black market operation made headlines early
in 1943 and gained momentum, reaching a climax
toward the end of the war and immediately
after. As in other countries, black markets
in the United States arose from a variety of
factors— scarcity of many goods, price con­
trols, rationing, and the inevitable fringe o f op­
portunists ready to capitalize by illegal means
on the wartime disruptions. Consumers’ prices
were affected most seriously by illegal practices
in the sales and distribution o f goods in acute
shortages, such as meats, butter, gasoline, tires,
and nylon hosiery. Other consumers’ prices af­
fected included those for sugar, fats and oils,
fish, cigarettes, and, to a smaller extent, a wide
variety o f other goods. Although no accurate
measurement can be made of the effect o f black
markets on consumers’ prices, it was estim ated12
in February 1944 that 3 to 4 percent of the
average cost of all food was due to black market
operations.
Black markets for meats and gasoline were,
perhaps, the most publicized. Operators in these
markets bootlegged their wares, counterfeited
and stole ration coupons, passed forged rationcurrency checks, slaughtered cattle without li­
cense, and wasted badly needed hides. Butter,
tires, and nylon hosiery were also traded in out­
right black markets.
Other violations o f price ceilings were op­
erated more in the open— usually over the retail
counter. These involved overcharging by up­
grading, shortweighting, and plain over-ceiling
pricing, often by passing illegal wholesale
charges on to the consumer. There were “ imi­
tative” black markets not always caused by
scarcity. Fresh fish prices, for example, rose
unduly in many instances, in sympathy with
illegal meat and poultry prices. Mild circum­
ventions of regulations occurred in a great many
ways, some o f which were legal or quasi-legal.
These included so-called “ gray” markets such
12
Address by Chester Bowles, Administrator, Office of Price Ad­
ministration at New York, Times Hall, February 29, 1944.

6

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

as for textile fabrics, tie-in sales, the introduc­
tion o f new brands at higher prices, keeping
popular brands of cigarettes under the counter,
etc. The consumer was far from blameless, and
those who supported the black markets some­
times even encouraged these conditions in order
to get desired goods, by means o f gifts to re­
tailers, laxness in checking weights of goods
purchased, deliberate acceptance o f upgrading,
and willingness to pay exorbitant prices in the
face of scarcity.
The timing o f black market operations varied
for different goods. The worst of the abuses of
the black market in gasoline were suppressed
by strict enforcement procedures, and the end
o f gasoline rationing in 1945 quickly ended il­
legal gasoline transactions. Black markets for
most other consumers’ goods ended with the
lapse of price controls on June 30,1946. A few
consumers’ goods continued to be sold at black
or gray market prices, however, and illegal
rents still were being charged in early 1949.
During the height of black market operations,
the Bureau obtained many over-ceiling prices
at its regular price collections, which were in­
cluded in the Consumers’ Price Index. Adjust­
ments could not be made for the effect of underthe-counter sales. In mid-1943, a special com­
mittee of the American Statistical Association
concluded that the error in the Bureau’s food
price index, caused by under-reporting of above­
ceiling prices, did not exceed 2 percent.
Most o f the price increases not reflected in
the indexes were canceled out with the return to
peace, the elimination o f price controls, and
the restoration of normal patterns o f production
and sales in 1946-48. The understatement of
the increase in rents, however, continued in 1947
and 1948. This understatement arises partly
from the failure of the rent index to reflect the
difference in level between rents of new units
coming on the market and comparable units al­
ready on the market.1 The extent of this under­
8
statement depends on the number of new units
added and the differential between them and
the rents for comparable old units. As new units
were added in the postwar building boom, and
especially after February 1947 when new units
13 Report o f the President’s Committee on the Cost o f Living,
Office o f Economic Stabilization, Washington, 1945, p. 360.




were decontrolled, the underestimate became
greater. By August 1948 it was estimated at a
maximum of 4 percent o f the rent index.1
1
*4
3
In addition to the understatement due to new
units, the rent index during the war could not
measure completely the indirect increases aris­
ing from the failure o f landlords to make neces­
sary repairs or provide adequate janitor serv­
ice, or from other unmeasurable costs such as
payment o f extra fees or bribes as prerequisites
for obtaining desirable accommodations.
Throughout the discussions of the Consumers’
Price Index during the war, it has been empha­
sized that the index was designed to be used as
a measure of prices, not o f the total costs of liv­
ing nor of fam ily expenditures. “ The index rests
upon observed changes in prices o f the goods
and services that go to make up a previously
measured standard list o f goods and services.
It does not rest upon measurement of changes in
fam ily expenditure, which may reflect either
a better or a worse standard of living.” 1 To
5
this may be added: “ To most people ‘cost of liv­
ing’ means the amount o f money a fam ily spends.
If it buys more food and finer clothes, or moves
to a roomier home, its cost of living goes up.
* * * The widespread opinion that the BLS
index grossly understates the rise in cost of
living is justified, if cost o f living is taken to
mean the amount of money a fam ily spends for
the commodities and services it buys. Even
careful housewives seldom distinguish sharply
between this meaning and the highly technical
sense in which the BLS uses cost o f living—that
is, average change in the prices of a list of fam ily
supplies kept as constant as the character o f
the supplies on the market allows.” 1 Neverthe­
6
less, a special committee of the American Sta­
tistical Association1 1 reported in 1944 that
7
8
“ * * * the index provides an acceptable approxi­
mation to recent changes in living costs. W e be­
lieve that as a measure of price changes affect­
ing urban workers in large cities it is a good
approximation.” 1
8
14 For details see Monthly Labor Review, January 1949, pp. 66-67,
or reprint, Serial No. R. 1947.
is Report o f the President’s Committee on the Cost o f Livin&r,
Office o f Economic Stabilization, Washington, 1945, p. 6.
16 Report o f the President's Committee on the Cost o f Living,
Office o f Economic Stabilization, Washington, 1945, pp. 261 and 263.
17 Cf. pp. 31-32.
18 Ibid., p. 109.

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING
COMMODITY PRICE MOVEMENTS

Food, as the most important class o f fam ily
expenditures, had the greatest effect on aver­
age consumers’ prices in each period. During
the defense period farm prices were recovering
from depression levels, and the demand for food
was increasing as incomes rose. From August
1939 to December 1941, food prices on the aver­
age rose 21 percent, or three-fourths o f 1 per­
cent a month. A fter Pearl Harbor, the rate of
increase doubled. Although many foodstuffs,
accounting for 60 percent of food purchases,
were subject to the General Maximum Price
Regulation, the remaining 40 percent were by
law exempt from control. Prices o f foods sub­
ject to control continued to rise slowly as ad­
justments were made in ceiling prices under
the General Maximum Price Regulation; exempt
prices, on the other hand, rose about four times
as fast. Not until farm prices were brought
under control and the General Maximum Price
Regulation was succeeded by dollars-and-cents
ceilings reinforced by subsidies on important
foods, was the rise in food prices checked. From
May 1943 to June 1946 food prices rose less than
2 percent, or about one-twentieth of 1 percent
a month. However, decontrol meant sudden and
spectacular increases in food prices. The food
index rose 30 percent in 9 months—between
June 1946 and March 1947— or 3 y$ percent a
month. The heavy demands and the short crops
o f 1947 carried the index higher still—by nearly
15 percent— to an all-time high in July 1948.
Improved supplies and slackened demands
brought prices down about 5 percent by the end
o f 1948. This decline, though small compared
to so prolonged and steep a rise, was the longest
and largest in a decade.
Apparel and housefumishings prices were
subject to many of the same influences and
moved much alike during the 7 years. Both
rose a little more than one-half of 1 percent a
month during the defense period, and very much
more between the United States entry into the
war and the effective date o f the General Maxi­
mum Price Regulation. A t first, both were held
firmly under control under the General Maxi­
mum Price Regulation; but as the supplies of




7

materials diminished with growing demands for
war purposes, the deterioration of quality and
disappearance o f lower price lines raised many
problems of pricing and price control. This was
particularly true o f cotton textiles— both gar­
ments and housefumishings— on which ceiling
prices were repeatedly raised to encourage
production and to comply with statutory re­
quirements for the pricing of all goods made
of cotton. The result was a steady increase
in apparel and housefumishings prices, par­
ticularly marked toward the end o f the control
period. Even in the “ hold-the-line” period, from
May 1943 to June 1946, these prices rose by more
than 20 percent, or about three-fifths o f 1 per­
cent a month; and in the last 6 months o f con­
trols (January to June 1946) the monthly in­
crease averaged nearly 1 percent. Because o f
more gradual relaxation o f controls, the rise
that followed final decontrol o f apparel and
housefumishings prices, though substantial, was
less spectacular than the rise o f food prices.
Prices increased by about 17 percent, or a little
less than 2 percent a month. This rate o f in­
crease dropped to less than one-half of 1 per­
cent a month in the final period, from March
1947 to December 1948, as the postwar price
level was restrained by consumer resistance.
This factor emerged as the dominant influence
in the closing months o f 1948 when the reap­
pearance o f buyers’ markets forced price con­
cessions in many lines.
Retail prices o f fuels, especially of petroleum
fuels, responded quickly to increased demand
and growing shortages. The crucial importance
of fuels led to price control regulations for both
petroleum products and coals in 1941 and 1942,
even before the General Maximum Price Regu­
lation, with the result that fuel prices remained
almost stationary between December 1941 and
May 1942. The tightening o f the supply situa­
tion and the disruption o f customary methods
of water transportation caused repeated ad­
justments in fuel prices. Between May 1942
and May 1943, fuel prices rose more rapidly
than any other except food, and they continued
to rise through the end o f price control. The
greatest increases, however, occurred in 1947
and 1948. Coal prices were raised several times,

8

CONSUMERS’ p r ic e s i n

more than enough to cover increased wage rates
and higher freight costs. Oil prices shot up­
ward in 1947 and 1948 as prices o f crude oil
were bid up. In these 2 years, fuel prices rose
far more than any other.
On the other hand, prices o f gas and elec­
tricity, under public utility regulation, de­
clined during the war years, continuing their
long downward trend. Only in 1947 and 1948
did they increase appreciably, principally as a
reflection of higher fuel costs.
Prices o f miscellaneous goods and services,
as defined for the Consumers’ Price Index, in­
clude costs o f transportation, automobile pur­
chase, operation and upkeep, medical care, per­
sonal services, household operation, recreation,
and education. Traditionally, these prices re­
spond slowly to changing price trends. Many
of them are restrained by custom or otherwise
from rapid change. Throughout much of the
7-year period they rose more slowly than other
consumers’ prices; but during the period o f
strictest price control, from May 1948 to June
1946, they rose faster than average because so
many services were exempt from control al­
together.
Alone among the principal components of
living costs, rents were subject to controls of
one kind or another throughout the 7-year per­
iod and rose far less than any other. Even be­
fore the enactment of the Emergency Price Con­
trol Act early in 1942, attempts were made to
control rents in crowded centers of war pro­
duction by voluntary measures. Like other con­
tractual prices, rents are comparatively slow
to move. During the entire defense period they
increased less than 4 percent or about oneeighth of 1 percent a month. The increased de­
mands for space in the centers of war activity
led to the control of rents in the spring of 1942
in 323 areas, covering 86 million people in some
673 counties. In four-fifths of these areas rents
were frozen at levels of March 1942; in one-fifth
they were rolled back to 1941 levels. Between
May 1942 and May 1943 rents actually declined
nearly 2 percent, as the result o f roll-backs of
rents from the peak reached in the spring of
1942 to 1941 levels. For the next 4 years rents
remained almost stationary, increasing alto­




th e

u n it e d

states

gether only about 1 percent. In the early part
o f 1947 the rent control law was modified to
exempt newly built dwellings and to curtail
somewhat the authority o f the housing admin­
istrator. As a consequence, in 1947 and 1948
rents increased by more than 10 percent—more
than in the preceding 7 years combined. Nor
was there any prospect that rents had reached
their peak. The persistence o f the housing
shortage in most urban areas indicated that
rents would continue to rise for some time, about
as fast as rent control would permit.
CITY PRICE MOVEMENTS

No part of the United States escaped the force
o f the inflation, but the timing and the extent
o f the effects varied among the 34 large cities
for which consumers’ price indexes are com­
piled. In general, the price rise began earliest
in the centers where war production had the
greatest impact on employment and incomes—
especially in shipbuilding centers. Portland,
Oreg., Norfolk, Savannah, Jacksonville, and
Seattle showed sharp increases by mid-1942,
when retail price controls were first applied. By
mid-1946, when decontrol began, all of these but
Norfolk were still among the 8 cities (the top
quarter) with the highest consumers’ price in­
dexes, indicating the greatest increases since
prewar; and 3 of them were still in the top
quarter when consumers’ prices reached their
peak in 1948. There was some tendency, too, for
prices to rise more in cities (especially south­
ern cities) where incomes and prices before the
war were lower and where the effect o f wartime
employment and earnings was particularly
marked. The bottom group, cities with least in­
creases since prewar, has included cities like
Boston, Kansas City, Mo., Richmond, Va., and
Denver, where war production was relatively
less important.
Indexes computed for 20 small cities and 12
war production centers during the w a r1 indi­
9
cate the same tendency. The average price trend
of the 20 small cities paralleled pretty closely
that of the 34 large cities, but the magnitudes
o f the price increases varied considerably by
city, reflecting dissimilar economic conditions.
10 Cf. pp. 38-39.

ANALYSIS OP CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

Of the 20 cities, Vicksburg, Miss., center of the
cotton-growing area and site of several lumber
mills, experienced by far the largest price in­
crease (35 percent from December 1940 to
March 1945) and was more directly affected by
wartime changes than many of the other cities.
In Stillwater, Okla., on the other hand, a col­
lege town having no m ajor industries, prices
rose much less (23 percent over the same
period). In most o f the war production centers
prices increased more rapidly than either the
average of 34 large cities or the nearest large
city in the Bureau’s Consumers’ Price Index.
The differences among cities in the rate and
timing of the increases, however, are small
compared to the magnitude o f the changes in
all cities arising from the wartime and post­
war inflation.
COMPARISON OP PRICES IN WORLD WARS I AND II

The movement o f consumers’ prices in the
Second W orld War was in sharp contrast to
movements of 1914-18. For the first 2 y% years,
while price changes were virtually unrestrained,
it appeared that the earlier experience would
be repeated: there was the same period o f com­
parative stability, lasting about 1 ^ years, and
the same acceleration of the increase in the
second and third years as the United States
economy became more deeply involved. There­
after the parallel ceased. Whereas consumers’
prices rose rapidly after 1916 and particularly
after the United States entered the war, the
rise was slowed in 1942 and after mid-1943 al­
most stopped by the economic stabilization pro­
gram.
It was not until mid-1946, a year after the
end of the war, that the parallel with World
War I reappeared. The spurt of prices after de­
control closely resembled the rise in 1919 and
1920, but it was shorter-lived. A fter the imme­
diate effects of decontrol, the rate of increase
moderated; and although the rise lasted longer
(3 years beyond the end of World War II com­
pared to 11/2 years after World War I ), and
carried farther, neither the rise nor the subse­
quent decline was so precipitate. Six months
after the peak o f prices in 1920, the Consumers’
Price Index had declined more than 7 percent;




9

the decline from September 1948 to March
1949 was less than half as much. The difference
appeared to lie not so much in the rate or ex­
tent of the preceding rise as in the basic condi­
tion o f the economy which in 1948 was less in­
flated by speculation, more prudently managed
in its inventories, and buttressed by a more
solid support of mass purchasing power.
T a b l e 2 . — Consumers* Price Index fo r moderate-income
fam ilies in large cities— estimated annual averages, 1 9 1 8 -4 8
[1935-39 * 100]

All
items

Fuel,
Miscel­
elec­
House- laneous
tricity, furnish­ goods
and
and
refriger­ ings
ser­
ation
vices

Food

Ap­
parel

Rent

1913...............
70.7
1914...............
71.8
1915........... .
72.5
1916...............
77.9
1917...............
91.6
1918............. 107.5
1919............... 123.8

79.9
81.8
80.9
90.8
116.9
134.4
149.8

69.3
69.8
71.4
78.3
94.1
127.5
168.7

92.2
92.2
92.9
94.0
93.2
94.9
102.7

61.9
62.3
62.5
65.0
72.4
84.2
91.1

59.1
60.7
63.6
70.9
82.8
106.4
134.1

50.9
51.9
53.6
56.3
65.1
77.8
87.6

1920...............
1921..............
1922............
1923...............
1924...............
1925...............
1926...............
1927...............
1928...............
1929...............

143.3
127.7
119.7
121.9
122.2
125.4
126.4
124.0
122.6
122.5

168.8
128.3
119.9
124.0
122.8
132.9
137.4
132.3
130.8
132.5

201.0
154.8
125.6
125.9
124.9
122.4
120.6
118.3
116.5
115.3

120.7
138.6
142.7
146.4
151.6
152.2
150.7
148.3
144.8
141.4

106.9
114.0
113.1
115.2
113.7
115.4
117.2
115.4
113.4
112.5

164.6
138.5
117.5
126.1
124.0
121.5
118.8
115.9
113.1
111.7

100.5
104.3
101.2
100.8
101.4
102.2
102.6
103.2
103.8
104.6

1930............... 119.4
1931.............. 108.7
1932.............. 97.6
1 9 3 3 ............ 92.4
1934............... 95.7
1935...............
98.1
1936...............
99.1
1937.............. 102.7
1938.............. 100.8
1939..............
99.4

126.0
103.9
86.5
84.1
93.7
100.4
101.3
105.3
97.8
95.2

112.7
102.6
90.8
87.9
96.1
96.8
97.6
102.8
102.2
100.5

137.5
130.3
116.9
100.7
94.4
94.2
96.4
100.9
104.1
104.3

111.4
108.9
103.4
100.0
101.4
100.7
100.2
100.2
99.9
99.0

108.9
98.0
85.4
84.2
92.8
94.8
96.3
104.3
103.3
101.3

105.1
104.1
101.7
98.4
97.9
98.1
98.7
101.0
101.5
100.7

100.2
105.2
116.5
123.6
125.5
128.4
139.3
159.2
171.2

96.6
105.5
123.9
138.0
136.1
139.1
159.6
193.8
210.2

101.7
106.3
124.2
129.7
138.8
145.9
160.2
185.8
198.0

104.6
106.2
108.5
108.0
108.2
108.3
108.6
111.2
117.4

99.7
102.2
105.4
107.7
109.8
110.3
112.4
121.1
133.9

100.5
107.3
122.2
125.6
136.4
145.8
159.2
184.4
195.8

101.1
104.0
110.9
115.8
121.3
124.1
128.8
139.9
149.9

Period

1940...............
1941...............
1942...............
1943..............
1944...............
1945...............
1946...............
1947...............
1948...............

December 1941 to May 1942:
Transition to W ar Economy
Price Situation, December 1941
At the start of the war in Europe, the retail
price level had not recovered completely from
the depression of the 30’s. Consumers’ prices in
this country were 1.4 percent below the 1935-39
average, reflecting the especially sharp decline
in food prices during the recession. The first 5
months o f war were the climax of a long

CONSUMERS’ p r ic e s i n

10

period during which the American economy
underwent a gradual change from a post-de­
pression slack to a state of preparedness for
war.
Chart 2.— Average Monthly Percent Change
In Consumers' Prices

During the defense period there was no statu­
tory authority for control of prices and no at­
tempt was made to control price rises at retail
because moderate advances were considered
consistent with expanding employment and the
trend toward full economic recovery. A rela­
tively small number of basic commodities ex­
erted the chief pressure on the price system,
and price rises for these commodities were
checked by informal controls or maximum price
schedules established at the primary market
level.
Retail prices began to advance late in 1940
and more sharply in the spring of 1941 as for­
eign orders for munitions necessitated diver­
sion of some raw materials and industrial
equipment from peacetime uses. In July 1941 a
bill to fortify the price control program was
introduced in the Congress and passed at the
end of January 1942 as the Emergency Price
Control Act.
During the entire 28 months following the
outbreak of war in Europe, average retail prices
increased 12 percent. Advances for major
groups of items in the fam ily budget ranged
from 3.7 percent for rent to 21 percent for food.




th e

u n it e d

states

The rise in food prices from their relatively
low level in August 1939 was caused mainly
by increased demand arising from the high
level o f consumer purchasing power and Gov­
ernment requirements for the military forces
and Lend-Lease. Until March 1941, the aver­
age rise in food prices was slow, but after that
date food prices began to advance more rapidly.
In mid-December 1941, the moderate-income
fam ily’s clothing bill was about 15 percent
higher than at the outbreak o f war. Prices of
cotton clothing advanced more than clothing of
other fabrics, reflecting diversion of cottonloom capacity to fill the needs of the expanding
armed forces. On the average, costs of cotton
clothing articles increased 22.4 percent and o f
woolen garments 12.5 percent between August
1939 and December 1941.
Housefurnishings costs increased 16.1 per­
cent, slightly more than clothing prices. Because
most of the raw materials used in the manufac­
ture o f wooden and upholstered furniture were
free from price control until late in 1941, fur­
niture prices rose more rapidly than prices of
bedsprings, sewing machines, refrigerators and
other items utilizing price-regulated metals.
Cotton housefurnishings articles, also uncon­
trolled, advanced 20 percent between August
1939 and December 1941, reflecting large Army
and Navy purchases.
Changes in residential rents showed consid­
erable intercity variation from the average rise
of 3.7 percent in 34 large cities, ranging from
a 25.5 percent increase in Mobile, Ala., to an
0.2 percent decrease in Scranton, Pa. Public
housing projects eased the acute housing short­
age in some war production areas but gener­
ally by the end of 1941 the amount o f new
building was inadequate to meet the demand.
Homes renting for less than $30 per month, in
great demand, generally had advanced the most.
Fuel, electricity, and refrigeration prices in­
creased 6.8 percent on the average during the
defense period. An advance of over 17 per­
cent in retail coal prices reflected a recovery in
mine prices from the depressed prewar condi­
tions in the industry, which was partly specu­
lative, but reflected also the relatively short
supply of coal and higher wage costs. An in­
crease of 25.7 percent for fuel oil was a result

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

of the growing shortage of tankers, especially
on the Atlantic seaboard. In contrast, gas and
electricity rates declined 2.3 percent and 2.4
percent, respectively, in a continuation of their
prewar trend.
Average costs o f miscellaneous goods and
services were 7.3 percent higher in December
1941 than in August 1939, with average prices
higher for most of the items in this group. The
cost of automobiles, for example, rose almost
19 percent; motion picture admissions, laundry
services, barber services, cigarettes, and tele­
phone service were from 5 to 11 percent higher.
During this same period railroad fares de­
creased approximately 10 percent.

11

9 percent. Similar increases affected common
articles o f clothing: work trousers 11 percent;
socks 9 percent and pajamas 14 percent; men’s
and women’s shoes 9 and 5 percent, respectively.
Chart 3.— Average Monthly Percent Change
In Consumers' Prices

The Transition to Controlled Prices
The rate o f price advance was accelerated as
soon as the United States entered the war. The
Consumers’ Price Index rose 1.4 percent be­
tween mid-December 1941 and mid-January
1942, and continued to advance at the rate o f
about 1 percent a month until mid-May 1942.
Immediately after the attack on Pearl Har­
bor, United States war production was greatly
expanded and the manufacture o f consumer
goods sharply curtailed. In December produc­
tion of automobiles for civilian use was stopped;
and during the following months plants pro­
ducing civilian goods were converted to war
production or their output was preempted in
whole or in part for military use. The spread
o f shortages in the face o f rising incomes in­
creased the pressure on prices and indicated
the need for a comprehensive program of price
control to replace the selective controls of the
defense period.
Growing demand and diminishing supplies
were pushing up prices at retail. Between De­
cember 1941 and May 1942, foods increased 7.5
percent; apparel, 9.9 percent; housefurnishings, 4.6 percent; and miscellaneous goods and
services, 3.0 percent. Rents, usually stable in
short periods of time, rose 1.6 percent in the
5 months. Some commodities, many of them
important in fam ily consumption, rose much
more. Between December 1941 and March 1942,
for example, canned peas increased 9 percent;
ham and pork chops 16 percent; dried prunes




By January 1942, commodities accounting
for about a fifth of the value of the wholesale
price index had been brought under form al con­
trol and another fifth under informal control.
The formal controls were stepped up to about
one-third in February and March, and to about
two-fifths in April. These controls on primary
market prices provided the only restraints on
retail prices. Only in a few emergency situa­
tions, such as flashlights, automobiles, and tires,
had retail prices been controlled.
The broadening o f control over primary mar­
ket prices of such commodities as wool, canned
fruits and vegetables, cotton and rayon piece
goods, and pork products was intended to re­
strain increases in consumers’ prices. The first
comprehensive action on retail prices was taken
during this period to control prices o f m ajor

12

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

household appliances and typewriters, which
had become increasingly scarce. Soon after,
retail gasoline prices were frozen on both
coasts, as tanker sinkings made deliveries diffi­
cult and supplies precarious.
As a first step toward halting the rise in
rents, 20 war production areas (including 7 of
the cities covered by the Consumers’ Price In­
dex) were designated as “ defense-rental areas,”
preliminary to issuing rent control orders.
Rationing also made its appearance during
this period. Sales o f tires, automobiles, and
typewriters were restricted to essential users.
The first program for rationing of a commodity
for universal consumption was undertaken
when sugar rationing began in May. Shortly
after, gasoline rationing was introduced in 17
eastern States.
While these measures were intended to equal­
ize available supplies and ease the pressure on
prices, they were not enough. Prices continued
to rise. On April 27 the President recommended
to the Congress a sweeping program of eco­
nomic stabilization, including higher taxes and
stabilization o f wages. On April 28 the Gen­
eral Maximum Price Regulation was issued,
under the authority o f the Emergency Price
Control Act of 1942, establishing comprehensive
controls o f prices, both wholesale and retail.20
The regulation, in effect, “ froze” retail prices
of most goods and many services at the highest
level charged by each individual seller during
March 1942. The control over commodity prices
at retail was effective on May 18; over prices
o f services on July 1.
Though it was much the most ambitious and
comprehensive price control action ever at­
tempted in the United States, the General Maxi­
mum Price Regulation still left much room for
price increases. Some commodities and many
services were exempt by statute; others because
control was administratively not feasible. Most
notable among the statutory exemptions were
those required because the law did not permit
controls of prices of agricultural commodities
unless they attained a level above parity. Ex­
emptions under this provision included fresh
20
See U. S. Bureau o f Labor Statistics Bulletin No. 879: The Gen­
eral Maximum Price Regulation.




fruits and vegetables, butter, cheese, canned
milk, flour, fresh fish and seafood, and some
meats. Personal services not connected with
commodities (e.g., barber and beauty shops and
professional services) Were exempt; but laun­
dries, dry cleaning, shoe repairs, and automobile
repairs were covered.
Concurrently, additional defense-rental areas
were designated, to a total o f 323, covering 86
million people in 673 counties and independent
cities. Rents in four-fifths of these areas were
frozen as of March 1, 1942. In the remainder,
reductions were ordered to cancel exorbitant in­
creases, and maximum rents were fixed at levels
of January, April, or July 1941. This had the
effect of canceling, in most of the 64 localities,
between 25 and 75 percent of the increase in
rents that had occurred since the beginning o f
the defense period.
These sweeping actions established the basis
for even more effective restraints later on.

May 1942 to May 1943:
Prices under GM PR21
For a few months after May 18, when retail
prices were controlled by the General Maximum
Price Regulation, the rise of consumers’ prices
was checked. Between May and September, the
increase in the Consumers’ Price Index was held
to 1.6 percent, or 0.4 percent a month. This was
only two-fifths the rate in the months immedi­
ately preceding the General Maximum Price
Regulation. But from September to May 1943
the increase was 6.2 percent or nearly 0.8 per­
cent a month. At the end of a year after the
General Maximum Price Regulation, the index
had risen 7.8 percent and food prices 17.6 per­
cent, and the cost of living was still not under
control.
The weakness of the General Maximum Price
Regulation was evident almost from the outset.
The statutory restrictions on control o f farm
prices left approximately only 13 percent o f the
value of items in the cost-of-living index free
from control; but in that segment prices were
rising very rapidly, with direct effects on retail
21 See Living Costs Since the Beginning of Retail Price Control, in
Monthly Labor Review, July 1943, or reprint, Serial No. R. 1547.

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

food prices. Even in the first 4 months, food
prices rose more than 4 percent; in the next 8
months the rise was 13 percent. Prices for
cereal products, beverages, fats and oils, sugar,
and beef and pork products, which were mostly
controlled, rose moderately over the year. But
prices of fruits and vegetables increased 48 per­
cent; fish, 34 percent; chickens, 30 percent and
eggs, 23 percent; lamb, 20 percent; and dairy
products, 11 percent.
Chart 4.— Average Monthly Percent Change
In Consumers' Prices

The difference in price changes between con­
trolled and exempt food articles is plain from
the following summary:
Percent of change,
May 1943 to May 1943

All foods........................................................................+ 17.6
Controlled by GMPR (May 18, 1942)........................ + 4.1
Controlled between May and October 1942_________ + 19.7
Controlled in October 1942_______
+31.7
Controlled between October 1942 and May 1943____ + 62.3
Still uncontrolled as of May 1943__________________ +73.1

The increases in controlled prices reflected
upward adjustments in ceilings to compensate




13

for higher costs, particularly higher prices of
basic farm products. The parity limitation on
control of farm prices made control particularly
difficult because the rising prices of foods and
feed bought by farmers entered into the parity
index and constantly pushed up the parity prices
that set the floor under price ceilings.22 Viola­
tion o f ceiling prices was also an important fac­
tor in prices o f some foods, especially meats.
Although prices of commodities other than
foods, and of services, were effectively controlled
by the General Maximum Price Regulation, the
rising food prices and the accumulating force
o f inflation led the President in September to
ask amendment of the Emergency Price Control
Act to permit more effective price control and
to stabilize wages. The result was the passage
o f the Stabilization A ct o f 1942 on October 2
which directed stabilization of prices and wages,
as far as practicable at levels o f September
1942. The act of October 2 amended the original
act to permit ceilings on agricultural products
at parity or the highest price between January
and September 1942.
Under the amended acts, controls were estab­
lished immediately on prices of butter, poultry,
cheese, evaporated milk, eggs, flour, potatoes,
onions, and other foods, bringing to 90 percent
the proportion of all food expenditures under
control. Food prices continued to rise neverthe­
less, as ceiling prices were raised or violated.
Extension o f controls in February 1943 to a
number of fresh vegetables brought 96 percent
of food expenditures under control, and a be­
ginning was made in control of restaurant
prices in April. But these failed to solve the
problem o f food price controls and their ad­
ministration. Between September 1942 and
May 1943, large price increases occurred in al­
most all important classes of foods except cereal
products, eggs (which declined seasonally),
fats, and sugar. It was clear that retail food
prices could not be “ frozen.”
Prices o f clothing and housefurnishings, on
the other hand, were held well in check. Be­
tween May and September 1942 clothing prices
declined slightly and housefurnishings prices
increased only 1 percent. Between September
22 For a detailed discussion of this effect, see Second Quarterly Re­
port, Office of Price Administration, pp. 11-13.

14

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

1942 and May 1943, both increased slightly.
Over the year clothing prices rose at a rate of
0.1 percent a month and housefurnishings at a
rate o f 0.2 percent. Most of the increase was
the result o f introduction o f new lines at higher
prices and the discontinuance of lower-priced
lines.
More important were the unmeasured effects
o f quality deterioration. The shortages o f ma­
terials forced the substitution o f inferior quali­
ties of fibers and metal substitutes. Maximum
prices on established lines encouraged cheapen­
ing o f products to evade the effects of ceiling
prices. Government measures to conserve ma­
terials limited the quantities available for use
and resulted in few er and “ stripped” models.
Thus, less cotton was used in garments, less
wool in blankets, less metal in furniture.
Increases in fuel prices were moderate despite
shortages. The average increase over the year
was 2.6 percent, largely the result o f adjust­
ment of ceiling prices for coal and fuel oil to
compensate for increased transportation costs.
Prices of miscellaneous goods and services
averaged 4 percent higher in May 1943 than in
May 1942. A great part of the increase occurred
in those services exempt from control, such as
medical and hospital care, beauty and barber
shops, and movies. For many services shortage
o f supply rather than price increase was the
consumers’ principal concern. Doctors were
scarce, especially in rapidly expanded war pro­
duction areas; and laundries were unequal to
the increased loads laid upon them by wartime
patterns of living.
The rent control program was successful
from the beginning. Because of the unique
character of the rent transaction, rents were
both administratively and economically amena­
ble to control. The rent control orders issued
concomitantly with the General Maximum Price
Regulation effected a decline in rents of 1.7 per­
cent between May and September 1942 and vir­
tually froze them thereafter. Though many
families incurred increased housing costs as
they moved from their established homes in re­
sponse to the exigencies o f the war, rentals o f
dwelling units themselves were effectively sta­
bilized.




During the year May 1942 to May 1943, as
shortages spread, a number o f important con­
sumer goods were brought under rationing.
Fuel oil was rationed in October 1942, shoes in
February 1943, and meats, fats, cheese, and
processed fruits and vegetables in March 1943.
The rationing program assured equitable dis­
tribution of what supplies were available and
eased the pressure on prices by limiting the
demand.
Largely because o f rising farm and food
prices and the inflationary pressures building
up from increased incomes, the President in
April 1943 issued the “ hold-the-line” order in­
structing the agencies responsible for economic
stabilization to fix and hold maximum prices
on farm products as far as the law permitted
and to stabilize employment and wages, in an
effort to prevent further rise in the cost o f
living. This order set the pattern for economic
stabilization for the next 3 years.

May 1943 to June 1946:
Holding the Price Line
The “ hold-the-line” order and the measures
for economic stabilization taken to implement it
ushered in a period of comparative stability of
consumers’ prices. In the 3 years from m id1943 to mid-1946, the Consumers’ Price Index
rose only 6.6 percent, or at a rate of less than
one-fifth o f 1 percent a month. Food prices
were first reduced and then held in check, and
by June 1946 they were less than 2 percent
above the level of May 1943. Rents were sta­
bilized. Prices o f fuels and o f miscellaneous
goods and services rose slowly, at the rate of
less than 0.3 percent a month. Clothing and
housefurnishings prices proved most difficult
to control, especially toward the end o f the
period. They also proved most susceptible to
quality deterioration. Because o f price in­
creases and the disappearance o f low-priced
lines, the indexes of clothing and housefurnish­
ings prices rose by more than 20 percent, at a
rate o f about two-thirds of 1 percent a month.
Foods.— The immediate effect o f the meas­
ures taken in support o f the “ hold-the-line”
order was a decline in the Consumers’ Price

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

Index, the first in nearly 3 years. Beginning in
June 1943, the index dropped by 1.4 percent in
3 months. Primarily this was the result o f the
“ roll-back” of food prices through the payment
of subsidies to processors to compensate them
for the difference between high farm prices and
lower food ceilings. Between May and June
the average price of butter was reduced 5 cents
a pound; between June and July meats were
reduced by as much as 4 cents a pound. Lower
ceiling prices were imposed on fresh vegetables,
with reductions, for example, of 50 percent for
cabbage and 25 percent for lettuce.
Chart 5.— Average Monthly Percent Change
In Consumers' Prices

HOLDING

THE PRICE

LINE

Percent

Housefurnishings
Apparel
Miscellaneous
A L L IT E M S
Fuel,Elec.8 Refrig.
Food
Rent
May 1943 to June 1946
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The firmer control of food prices was partly
the result of the shift from individual store
maximum prices under the General Maximum
Price Regulation to dollars-and-cents ceilings
for various classes o f stores in each city. The
weakness of the individual store ceilings was
recognized early, and soon after the General
Maximum Price Regulation was issued meas­
ures were taken to replace it with a more ad­
m inistrate type of control.2 In May 1943
3
specific ceiling prices were set for almost all
grocery commodities in all stores in more than
130 metropolitan areas, and by the end of June
community prices had been issued for an aver­
age of about 1,000 grocery items in about 200
large cities. Specific prices were set for four
classes o f stores for food items by brand name




15

and package size. Dollars-and-cents prices were
also fixed for beef, veal, lamb, and mutton. This
type of ceiling remained in effect throughout the
rest of the control period and simplified controls
for consumers, for retailers, and for the Govern­
ment.
The combined effect of these actions was a de­
cline in prices that carried the index o f city
food prices down 6 percent in the 10 months
following May 1943. By 1944 virtually all foods
were controlled, and prices thereafter fluctuated
in response to seasonal adjustments in ceilings
for foods such as eggs, fruits, and vegetables,
as well as to changes in controls and subsidies.
The decline in the first quarter of 1944, for ex­
ample, was the result o f seasonally lower prices
for eggs, fruits, and vegetables and a slight re­
duction in bread prices made possible by a sub­
sidy to millers.
In December 1944, average food prices were
higher than a year earlier, for the first time
since the decline in mid-1943. Although prices
at the seasonal low in March 1945 were still 5
percent below the 1943 peak, the year-to-year
gap increased through 1945 and into 1946. The
index in December 1945 was nearly 3 percent
above December 1944. The relaxation o f eco­
nomic stabilization measures after the end of
the war led to price increases in the first half
o f 1946. Ceilings for meats were adjusted to
cover high wage costs; dairy products prices
were raised to encourage production; ceilings
for butter, peanut butter, and cheese were raised
as subsidies were withdrawn; controls were
suspended on fresh fish. Rationing was ended,
except for sugar, and distribution of supplies
o f some foods became more difficult. The food
index almost regained the May 1943 peak in
May 1946 and surpassed it in June, the last
month o f comprehensive price control.
Clothing and housefurnishings.— Because o f
problems of control, clothing and housefurnish­
ings prices became the most serious threat to
the stabilization of living costs. The variety o f
articles and styles, the lack of standardization,
the shortages and extensive substitution of ma­
terials, the deterioration o f quality, and the
disappearance of low-priced lines— all these
23 See U. S. Bureau o f Labor Statistics Bulletin No. 879, The Gen­
eral Maximum Price Regulation, pp. 25-46.

16

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

combined to impede stabilization and to raise
consumers’ prices in ways that preclude com­
plete measurement.
Between May 1943 and June 1944, clothing
prices on the average rose 8 percent and housefurnishings prices 11 percent. Supplies were
short, especially in the lower-priced lines where
margins under ceiling prices were less favora­
ble. In attempts to attract manpower for in­
creased production, wage increases were per­
mitted in a number of cases, and ceiling prices
were adjusted to compensate for higher labor
costs and to encourage production.
The Stabilization Extension A ct of 1944 re­
quired modification o f methods for controlling
prices o f cotton textiles and clothing. An
amendment to the act required that ceiling
prices for individual items— rather than for
the average of items—made o f cotton must be
high enough to permit payment of parity prices
for cotton to the grower. By October 1944 ceil­
ings had been increased on fabrics which ac­
counted for more than half of cotton consump­
tion. The act also outlawed the earlier price
control limitation under which men’s and
women’s clothing could not be offered in a
higher price line than the highest in the base
period. As a result of these modifications and
the growing scarcity of inexpensive articles,
the index of clothing prices increased another
3.5 percent, and the index o f housefurnishings
3.3 percent between June and December 1944.
During the year 1944, prices of men’s pa­
jamas and shorts rose 16 percent and housedresses 14 percent. Scarcity o f low-priced
children’s wear, work clothing and shirts,
towels, sheets, and furniture forced consumers
to “ trade up” at increasing cost. Toward the
end o f 1944, after the peak of war production,
some “ reconversion goods” returned to the
civilian markets, at prices that were raised to
cover accumulated increases in costs during
their absence. The return of all-wool clothes
and spring-filled furniture at materially higher
prices contributed to the advances in the price
indexes.
In an effort to increase the production o f
lower priced textiles and to reduce prices, pri­
ority assistance was granted early in 1945 for
the manufacture of goods selling below speci­




fied prices. A t the same time clothing manu­
facturers were required to distribute their pro­
duction by price lines to maintain their aver­
age price in an earlier base period. “ Pre-ticketing” garments and freezing retail mark-ups
on specific items of textiles, clothing, shoes,
furniture, and housefurnishings were pre­
scribed to replace the General Maximum Price
Regulation and tighten price controls.
The rate of increase slackened in 1945. Cloth­
ing prices rose 4.6 percent and housefumishings 3.7 percent. The increases were most
marked for cottons— both clothing and house­
hold textiles. Prices o f cotton housedresses in­
creased 16.9 percent; sheets, 13 percent; towels,
7 percent; men’s shirts, 14.9 percent. Short­
ages persisted, in spite o f the special programs
for stimulating production and reducing prices.
As demands increased after the end of the
war, pressures mounted for relaxation o f price
controls to encourage expansion o f supplies.
Supplies increased, but not fast enough, and
prices were raised repeatedly. Clothing prices
rose 2.5 percent in the first quarter o f 1946,
and 2.7 percent in the second. Housefurnishings
prices rose 1.3 percent in the first quarter and
3.9 percent in the second. The demobilization
of the armed forces and the reuniting of fam i­
lies generated demands which outstripped the
reconversion rate of production and created in­
flationary forces which the price control ma­
chinery could not withstand.
Fuel, electricity, and, refrigeration. — Fuel
prices, both for coals and oils, increased mod­
erately throughout the 3-year period of strict
controls. Coal prices, both anthracite and bitu­
minous, were higher, year by year. Oil prices
also rose steadily, except for a 14-percent de­
cline in fuel oil prices in the third quarter of
1945, representing the withdrawal o f an earlier
increase to compensate for higher transporta­
tion costs during the war. Rates o f gas and
electric utilities declined just as steadily, under
constant pressure from price control authori­
ties. In June 1946, fuel prices averaged 10 per­
cent higher than in May 1943, but rates for gas
and electricity averaged 4 percent lower.
Miscellaneous goods and services.— Persistent
shortages of labor, and the exemption o f many
services from control, were principally respon­

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

sible for the year-by-year increases in the in­
dex of prices of miscellaneous goods and serv­
ices. The increase raised the index in June 1946
nearly 11 percent above May 1943. While trans­
portation costs remained relatively stable, prices
o f personal and household services rose as the
quality deteriorated and inconveniences became
commonplace. Laundry service was uncertain
and more expensive. Medical care, by both
physicians and hospitals, was limited by short­
ages of facilities and personnel, but rates were
higher. Barber and beauty shops persistently
increased their prices.
Rents.— Once rent control was firmly and
nearly universally in effect, rents remained al­
most stationary. The rent index in June 1946
was only 0.5 percent higher than it was 3 years
earlier.
Nevertheless, the dislocations of wartime
living uprooted many families and sent them
in search o f new homes near the sources o f
war jobs. The traditional mobility of the Ameri­
can labor force led to great shifts of popula­
tion which aggravated the housing shortages
in war production areas. War housing met some
o f the need, but building was limited by scarcity
o f men and m aterials; and as the war went on,
the housing shortage became worse. The in­
creased costs, both in money and discomfort,
of improvised living is not measured by any in­
dex. The complaint that it costs more to live
in a new place than in the old, was borne out
by the experience of many families.

June 1946 to March 1947:
Decontrol of Prices
Beginning in July 1946, controls were lifted
rapidly from prices of consumers’ goods and
services, and prices rose at the sharpest rate
ever recorded (table 3 ). In the first quarter
of decontrol (June-September 1946), the Con­
sumers’ Price Index rose at the rate of nearly
3.2 percent a month. In the second quarter, the
rate had slowed to 1.7 percent. By the end of
the year, nearly all prices except residential
rents had been decontrolled. The average rise
was halted in the first 2 months of 1947, when
food prices dropped, offsetting the continued
increases in prices o f all other commodities.




17

In March, food prices resumed their rise, and
the index turned sharply upward. By April it
appeared the wartime pressures for increases
which had been largely suppressed since m id1942 had finally been realized in higher prices,
and thereafter prices responded directly to the
market influences o f the postwar period.
T a b l e 3 .— Decontrol o f consumers' prices— Changes in Con­
sumers' Price In d ex , J u ly 1946-M a rch 19 4 7 , by months

Month

All
items

Food

Apparel

Housefumishings

Fuel,
electric­
ity, and
refrigera­
tion

Rent

Miscel­
laneous
goods
and
services

Percent change from preceding month

14
96

July______
August___
September _
October —
November _
December..

14
97

January_
_
February. .
March____

5.9
2.1
1.2
1.9
2.4
.7

0

— .1
2.0

13.8
3.3
1.7
3.4
4.3

1.0

1.2
1.3
3.5
1.8
1.5
3.6

0

1.0

1.6
2.9
1.3
1.7
3.2

—1.1
— .8
3.9

1.4
1.4
1.5

1.1
.9
.8

1.6
.2
.1

-

2.5
.4
.7
.3
.6

0
*0.2
.1
0
0
0
»0

.1
.1

0 .2
1 .2
.1
1.1
2 .7
.7
.2
.6

1 Not available.
2 Change from June.
* Change from September.

Although gradual relaxation o f price ceilings
and controls had been in progress since VJ-day,
the termination came suddenly. Price controls
lapsed entirely on July 1 for a brief time, when
the President and the Congress failed to agree
on an extension of the Price Control Act. No
controls were restored until July 25, when the
Price Control Extension Act o f 1946 became
effective. Those 3 weeks brought a sample of
what was to follow. Between June 15 and July
15, the Consumers’ Price Index increased by
nearly 6 percent, almost altogether the result
of a 14-percent rise in food prices. Prices o f
clothing and housefurnishings were more re­
strained, as retailers waited to see what re­
placement would cost.
The new act reinstated most o f the controls
which had lapsed, except on agricultural com­
modities, but it prescribed many limitations
on price controls and established new standards
and procedures for decontrol. The act expressed
itself in opposition to controls and subsidies
and made rapid decontrol a national policy.
It exempted a large proportion of agricultural
commodities from control at least until August
21, and specified that only those commodities

18

CONSUMERS’ p r ic e s i n

in short supply could be recontrolled then. It
required that maximum prices must cover in­
creases in average costs since 1940 and guaran­
teed distributors margins in effect in March
1946. It forbade regulations providing for the
maintenance of prices which would average
not more than specified maximums for all pro­
duction. It specified that prices for cotton and

Chart 6.— Average Monthly Percent Change
In Consumers' Prices




th e

u n it e d

states

wool products must cover specific raw material
costs, mill costs, and a reasonable profit.
Restoration of controls, even with these im­
portant modifications put a brake on consumers'
prices. Prices rose less from July to August—
the Consumers’ Price Index 1.9 percent and
food prices 3.3 percent. The price increases for
clothing and housefurnishings, however, were
stepped up, as retail prices began to reflect
higher ceilings on prices charged by manufac­
turers.
The rate of increase in the Consumers’ Price
Index was accelerated in October, as controls
were terminated gradually, and still more in
November, as almost all controls were aban­
doned under a general decontrol directive from
the President. However, in December, food
prices dropped for the first time, and in Febru­
ary 1947 the Consumers’ Price Index declined
very slightly for the first time in a year, al­
though clothing and housefurnishings prices
continued their rise. The Consumers’ Price In­
dex in March was 17.3 percent above the June
1946 level.
Foods were most quickly and most markedly
affected by decontrol. In the interim of decon­
trol in July, food prices shot up 14 percent,
primarily because of sharp increases in average
meat prices, ranging from 25 to 45 percent.
Round steak, for example, increased nearly 20
cents a pound; chuck roast and pork chops, 14
cents; hamburger, 13 cents; and ham, 12 cents.
Butter jumped nearly 20 cents a pound and milk
2y% cents a quart. By comparison, increases in
cereal products (3 percent), eggs (9 percent),
fruits and vegetables (3 percent), and fats and
oils (9 percent), seemed moderate.
Food prices rose again in August, with the
largest increases for pork products and lard,
even though fresh produce declined seasonally.
A t the end of August, livestock, meats, cotton­
seed, and soybeans were recontrolled but dairy
products, grains, poultry, and eggs were not.
Fresh fruits and vegetables, not being in short
supply, remained decontrolled. The new ceil­
ing prices for meats would have lowered prices
for meats by more than 20 percent; but pro­
ducers were dissatisfied with maximum prices
and withheld livestock from market. As a re­
sult meat was not generally obtainable. Butter

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

prices rose again, but lard and oil dropped
sharply to the new ceiling prices.
The meat shortage and the difficulties of ad­
ministering the new law led the President late
in October to order decontrol of all foods ex­
cept sugar, sirups, and rice, which were in
short supply the world over. Supplies quickly
became plentiful. Meats reappeared at an aver­
age of about 9 percent above the uncontrolled
prices of August and more than 50 percent
above the controlled prices of June. Butter
averaged 96 cents a pound and lard prices
doubled in a month to an average o f 53 cents.
By December the effect o f decontrol on food
prices was largely completed. Seasonal in­
creases in supplies brought meat prices down
3 percent. Lard dropped almost as spectacu­
larly as it had risen; eggs and fresh produce
were down. The food price index fell 1 percent.
The less volatile prices, such as for cereal and
bakery products, continued their rise into Janu­
ary and February, and by March the food in­
dex was 30 percent higher than in June.
Not all of the decontrol period rise in the
second half o f 1946 represented increased re­
turns to producers. A very large part o f the
increases for some products was the result o f
the termination of subsidies which had been
used during the war to compensate food proces­
sors for the difference between prices o f their
agricultural raw materials and the ceiling prices
o f their products. Withdrawal of the subsidy,
for example, accounted for more than half the
increase on retail flour prices between June
and December 1946; about half the increase
on b eef; about one-fifth of the increase on pork;
two-fifths of the increase on butter; and onehalf the increase on milk. The prices of bread
and canned peas rose less than the amount of
the subsidy withdrawn .
Clothing and housefurwishings prices, hav­
ing been less firmly held in check during price
control, were under less pressure to rise as con­
trols were removed. The interim decontrol
period in July had less effect on price tags in
clothing and housewares stores, which rose
only about 1 percent in the month, with re­
tailers electing to hold prices pending final de­
cision on the status o f price controls. The more
liberal pricing provisions of the new law, how­




19

ever, permitted rises o f about iy% percent in
August and from 3 to 3 y% percent in September.
A fter the final decontrol in November, manu­
facturers passed on to retailers higher costs of
fabrics and labor. December prices on the aver­
age were up more than 3 percent. The rise con­
tinued at a diminished rate through March,
but an increasing selectivity on the part of con­
sumers was beginning to be felt. The accumu­
lated increase from June 1946 to March 1947
was about 17 percent.
Cotton clothing rose more rapidly than wool,
and many kinds o f cotton garments, especially
in the lower price lines, remained scarce
throughout 1946. This, o f course, added to pres­
sure for higher prices, especially after controls
were removed. Men’s shirts, pajamas, under­
wear, and work clothing rose sharply with great
demands from men recently demobilized by the
armed forces; suits and coats more moderately.
The increases for women’s clothing were much
less. The largest increase in apparel prices was
for shoes, which rose 23 percent between June
and December 1946, reflecting the precipitate
advances in costs of raw materials in primary
markets.
Housefumishings prices had already ad­
vanced 5 percent between December 1945 and
June 1946, and rose 13.5 percent more by the
end of 1946. Higher wages and raw cotton costs
raised prices of sheets and towels. Floor cover­
ings and furniture also rose rapidly. Toward
the end of 1946 household appliances reappeared
in consumer markets, at prices substantially
higher than in 1941 when they were last made.
In a few fields, such as smaller electrical ap­
pliances, particularly radios, production was
above prewar volume— a precursor of price de­
clines which were still to come.
Prices o f fuels responded quickly to decon­
trol. Petroleum products were among the first
to be decontrolled, and a quick increase in the
price of crude oil was soon followed by retail
price increases. Fuel oil rose more than 15 per­
cent. Coals and coke also were higher. Fuels on
the average were 11.5 percent higher in March
1947 than in June 1946. Gas and electric rates,
on the other hand, were almost unchanged.
Many o f the goods and services classified as
“ miscellaneous” in the Consumers’ Price Index

20

co n su m ers’

p r ic e s

in

were exempt from price control throughout the
war, so that the effect of decontrol was indirect
and comparatively moderate. All types of medi­
cal care continued to rise, as did personal serv­
ices. Soaps rose rapidly with the decontrol o f
fats. The miscellaneous group in the index rose
8 percent in 9 months, with the largest increase
in December after the final general decontrol
of prices.
Although the housing shortage grew more
and more acute, rents alone remained under
firm control after all other prices were freed.
The rent index remained substantially un­
changed during the decontrol period. Although
rents for identical dwellings did not rise, many
families were forced to rent or buy more ex­
pensive quarters than they wished or, in some
cases, than they could afford. The decontrol
of building materials prices set off a rise in
building costs that raised both rents and sales
prices of postwar homes.

th e

u n it e d

states

wardrobes, women’s acceptance of the “ new
look” apparel, the equipping of newly-built
homes, and the replacement of household inven­
tories of goods which had been scarce or miss­
ing during the war created an enormous and
not-too-discriminating demand, and prolonged
shortages in spite of increasing production. The
price movements of this period reflect the
gradual shift from the sellers’ markets of 1947
to the buyers’ markets that emerged late in 1948,
as demands became more discriminating and
supplies more plentiful.
Chart 7.— Average Monthly Percent Change
In Consumers' Prices

March 1947 to December 1948:
Postw ar Prices
The first phase of postwar prices, following
the decontrol period, saw consumers’ prices
carried to a succession o f peaks, reaching a
climax in August and September 1948, and de­
clining for 5 months thereafter. During this
period the Consumers’ Price Index rose nearly
10 percent, at a rate of nearly one-half o f 1
percent a month. The rise was punctuated by
occasional declines, mostly the result of tempo­
rary recessions of food prices. All other prices
rose almost without interruption through the
fall of 1948. The decline from the highest peak
of August and September 1948 seemed to offer
some prospect that the prices were over the
postwar hump and might stabilize at a lower
level.
Throughout most of this postwar period, em­
ployment, wages, and incomes generally were
rising to new highs and purchasing power was
largely and freely used. During 1947 and 1948,
consumers continued to spend to satisfy wants
denied during the war. Filling out of men’s




Price movements in 1947 were dominated
by the high level o f purchasing power and de­
mand for both consumers’ and producers’
goods; the very heavy demands abroad for
American goods, especially foods; the extensive
damage to the United States corn crop and
cereal crops abroad; and increases in prices

ANALYSIS OP CHANGES IN COST OF LIVING

of basic metals and fuels. In 1948, the increase
in purchasing power slowed down, export de­
mands declined, supplies o f goods were becom­
ing plentiful, and buyers were less avid and
more cautious.
By the spring o f 1947 industrial production
was about 15 percent higher than a year earlier,
and prices had leveled out just below the March
peak. In April, food prices declined (contraseasonally) and prices of clothing and housefurnishings increased only slightly. In May,
food and housefurnishings prices declined while
clothing rose only 0.1 percent, and it began to
appear as if prices might have reached an equili­
brium point. However, spring weather was un­
favorable to the corn planting; and, even in
the face o f a record winter wheat crop, the news
o f poor crops abroad and the prospect o f a 20percent decline in the United States corn crop
sent grain prices to the highest levels since
1920.
With consumers’ demands for food at their
peak, rising grain and feed prices quickly af­
fected prices of livestock, meat, and dairy prod­
ucts. Food prices in June began a rise that was
interrupted in only 3 o f the next 13 months and
carried the food price index up more than 15
percent to the peak in July 1948.
Prices of coal and steel, and freight rates
were raised in the summer o f 1947, with farreaching effects on other prices. Throughout
1947 and most of 1948, prices of textiles and in­
dustrial materials— metals, building materials,
fuels, and chemicals— were raised to cover in­
creased wages and other costs and, in many
cases, wider margins. These increases ulti­
mately found their way into retail prices. Be­
tween the low point in May 1947 and the peak
o f August-September 1948, the Consumers’
Price Index rose about 12 percent.
Food prices were lower in April and May
1947 than in March because of declines in meat
prices and seasonally lower prices for dairy
products; but the less sensitive prices of cereals
and bakery products continued to rise, and when
meat prices turned sharply higher in June the
index o f average food prices reached a new




21

high. By July the extent of the losses in the
corn crop were appraised, and related foods—
meats, eggs, dairy products, and cereals— were
higher. The increase in August was greater,
and in September greater still.
From June on, the Government made extraor­
dinary efforts to fulfill commitments for ex­
ports o f foods to countries where shortages
were acute. By September the export require­
ments to forestall starvation abroad led to the
appointment o f a Citizens Food Committee to
stimulate and coordinate grain conservation
measures. These included “ meatless,” “ egg­
less,” and “ poultryless” days, a grain holiday
for distilleries, and campaigns to encourage
farmers to cull herds and flocks o f animals to
reduce diversion o f bread grains to animal feed.
The restraint on consumption o f livestock prod­
ucts reduced the demands, while the culling
increased supplies temporarily, with the result
that prices of meats, poultry, dairy products,
and eggs declined in October. The decontrol
o f sugar prices— the last of price control— was
scarcely noticed. Meat prices continued lower
in November and December, but prices o f milk,
butter, and bread were higher. By December,
bread had increased 1 cent a pound and milk 1
cent a quart above September, and butter
reached an average price of over 95 cents a
pound. As a result, the food index again reached
a new high in December.
The rise in meat prices was resumed in Janu­
ary 1948 and sent the index up again. A de­
cline in February and March reflecting sharp
declines in grain prices, was followed by a 4
months’ rise in which meat prices rose another
20 percent and the food index another 7 percent.
July saw the last of the 1948 peaks for food.
Although meats and milk rose fo r another
month, seasonal reductions in prices of fruits
and vegetables and fats and oils brought aver­
age food prices a trifle lower. The real decline
began in September and continued through the
year and into 1949. The year-end decline in­
cluded most food prices except those which rose
seasonally. By December the index had fallen
more than 5 percent from the peak.

22

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

At the July-August peak, prices of individual
common foods reached heights which will be
long remembered:
July-August
Decern- Febru1948 high
her 1948 ary 1949
Range
Average Average Average

Hound steak___ pound. _$0.60-$1.50 $ 1.01 $0.88 $0.74
Rib roast_________do__ .55- 1.10
.62
.81
.73
Hamburger_____ _ _do_ _ .35- .90
.56
.48
.63
Pork chops_______ do__ .59- 1.25
.91
.66
.67
Bacon___ _______ do__ .57- .98
.79
.75
.68
Ham......... _______ d o - .49- 1.00
.74
.66
.63
.74
Butter___ _______ do__ .76- 1.20
.92
.76
Potatoes. — 15 pounds. .40- 1.65
.85
.89
.75
Navy beans___ pound— .14- .33
.17
.23
.18
.29
.27
.20
Lard_____ _______ do__ .22- .45
.44
Oleomargarine____ do__ .29- .59
.34
.38
.14
.14
.00- .18
.14
Bread____ ........... - d o .22
.22
Milk (delivered).quart. . .18- .26
.23

The declines o f 1948-49 reflected the end o f
the shortages and a more conservative attitude
of consumers. The crops of 1948 were good;
the export demand declined.
Clothing and housefurnishings prices rose al­
most without interruption from June 1947 to
October 1948, before they turned down slightly.
The clothing and housefurnishings indexes were
about 9 percent higher in December 1948 than
in March 1947, an average monthly increase o f
about four-tenths of 1 percent. Higher costs of
cotton and wool textiles, leather, metals, and
w ood; higher wages; and wider margins yielded
higher retail prices, supported by strong de­
mand until toward the end o f 1948. It was
then that consumers, their most urgent de­
mands filled, finally balked at top prices and
forced reductions first on retailers and then on
manufacturers.
Prices of nearly all clothing and housefurn­
ishings rose generally through 1947. Shoe
prices were repeatedly advanced. Higher cot­
ton and wool fabric costs were reflected in
prices of clothing and household textiles and
floor coverings, and higher metals prices in
household appliances. Rayons were higher. A
notable exception to the increases was nylon
hosiery, which declined as output rose.
Of the important classes of textiles and house­
furnishings, cotton textiles were the first to
show some signs of price weakness. Cotton
print cloth began to decline early in 1948 and
dropped steadily throughout the year. Tanners




and shoe manufacturers lowered their prices in
the winter of 1947-48. The wholesale furniture
markets reflected the search by retailers for
more moderately priced lines to meet consumers’
demands. Radio prices declined in the face of
very high output. Seasonal and other clearance
sales began to reappear. In short, markets be­
gan to resume their normal, selective behavior.
Yet prices of nearly all woolen clothing and
most hard goods continued to rise in 1948. But
as one line after another caught up with the
backlog o f demand, prices leveled off or de­
clined. Radios were first; vacuum cleaners and
electric refrigerators followed. Some declines
were noted on prices of men’s shirts and under­
wear. By summer other cotton garments were
lower, reflecting lower cotton textile costs. To­
ward the end of the year, prices o f men’s wool
clothing were reduced after a disappointing
fall season. The declines o f the indexes were
only a fraction of a percent from the peak.
More important declines of both apparel and
housefurnishings followed in the early months
of 1949.
Prices o f miscellaneous goods and services
increased by 11 percent, or about one-half of
1 percent a month, between March 1947 and
December 1948. The steady increase included
almost all these goods and services. The prin­
cipal contributing factors were the continued
advance o f automobile and gasoline prices, in­
creases in local transportation rates, and higher
costs of medical care. Prices of soap declined
in several months.
Average prices of fuel, electricity, and refrig­
eration rose 17 percent, or 0.8 percent a month,
during the period. Gas and electric utility rates
were increased because of higher fuel costs,
but the rise was only 3 percent in 21 months.
Fuels rose more rapidly than any other class
o f commodities— 29 percent, or 1.4 percent a
month. Coal prices were raised by $1 to
$1.25 a ton in mid-1947, more than compensat­
ing for a large increase in wages. Several other
increases covering higher wage and freight
costs left coal prices at the end o f 1948 near
their postwar peak. A 25-percent increase in
crude petroleum prices in the fall o f 1947 raised
fuel oil prices to new highs, from which they

ANALYSIS OP CHANGES IN COST OP LIVING

did not begin to recede until the very end o f
1948.
Rents alone remained under control through
1947 and 1948, but rose nearly 10 percent be­
tween March 1947 and December 1948. Under
the rent control law in effect at the beginning
of 1947, rents rose only very slightly— less than
0.2 percent in 3 months. The Housing and Rent
Act o f 1947 somewhat relaxed control and per­
mitted voluntary agreements between landlord
and tenant, providing increases up to 15 per­
cent on leases. Under this law, rents rose 0.7
percent in July, 1.1 percent in August, 2.2 per­
cent in September, and 1.1 percent in October.
The total increase from June to December was
5.7 percent— more than in the preceding 8
years.24
The greatest increases were in Chicago (11
24 See Residential Rents Under the 1947 H ousing and Rent A ct, in
M onthly Labor Review, January 1948, p . 14, or reprint, Serial N o.
R . 1917.

23

percent) and in Indianapolis, Birmingham,
Minneapolis, and St. Louis (more than 8 per­
cent) . The smallest were in cities like Manches­
ter, N. H., Mobile, and Savannah where the
cessation of war production has diminished de­
mand for housing. In Washington, D. C., and
New York City, with local rent control laws, the
increase was only a little over 1 percent.
The privilege o f raising rents by agreement
expired on December 31, 1947, so that the rate
of increase dropped in the early months of 1948.
The rent index rose only 0.3 percent between
January and April. In April voluntary in­
creases up to 15 percent were again permitted,
and rents resumed their rise. The increase was
0.9 percent from April to July and 1.9 percent
from July to December, when the privilege
again expired. The increase for the year was
3.5 percent. The continued shortage of housing
and the low vacancy rates offered little prospect
that rents could be held in check except by law.

,

Consumers* Price Index 34 Large Cities
Description

Title

The Consumers’ Price Index for ModerateIncome Families in Large Cities, form erly called
the “ Cost-of-Living Index,” measures average
changes in retail prices o f goods, rents, and
services weighted by quantities bought by
families o f wage earners and moderate-income
workers in large cities in 1934-36. The general
purpose o f the index is to represent the changes
in the prices of a specific, fixed market basket,
or shopping list o f goods and services o f con­
stant quality. As such, the index is a measure
of change in retail prices, or o f how much more
or less it costs at one time than at another time
to purchase a fixed bill o f goods commonly
bought by a city worker’s fam ily.
Prices fo r different items and groups o f liv­
ing essentials advance or decline at different
rates. Besides the change in average prices o f
all goods and services, the index indicates which
m ajor groups o f items in fam ily budgets are
changing most rapidly.

The most precise and accurate title for the
index is that which was applied to it more than
10 years ago, “ Changes in the Cost of Goods
and Services Purchased by Wage Earners and
Lower-Salaried Clerical Workers in 1934-36.”
Unfortunately this title became shortened for
everyday use to the fam iliar “ Cost-of-Living In­
dex.” By popular interpretation this came to
represent the total amount fam ilies spend for
goods and services, rather than, in technical
statistical parlance, the changes in fam ily ex­
penditures due solely to changes in unit prices.
This has been a m ajor source of misunderstand­
ing, particularly during the war. Actually the
total cost of living is affected by many factors,
including prices, fam ily income, changes in
manner o f living, variations in the quantity and
quality o f goods purchased, differences in liv­
ing costs caused by moving from one city to
another, etc.
The index does not indicate whether prices




24

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

of commodities and services used in family liv­
ing are higher in one city than in another. The
index enables the user to make comparisons at
different points of time within one city but not
between cities. Special indexes which do meas­
ure differences in price levels between cities
have been computed and published at intervals
by the Bureau. (See City Worker’s Family
Budget, p. 40.)
As a result of continued confusion regarding
the purpose of the index, the American Statis­
tical Association and other agencies recom­
mended the adoption of a more suitable short­
ened name. The current title, “ Consumers’ Price
Index for Moderate-Income Families in Large
Cities,” has been adopted as a result, and used
on all releases o f the Bureau since August 1945.

of most of the more than 1,400 different articles
and services bought by American families. Since
it is not possible to price all these goods and
services, the Bureau selected only those items
which were relatively important in terms o f
family spending and which had distinctive price
movements. The items were selected and the
weights derived on the basis of actual consump­
tion of the families included in the 1934-36
survey. Approximately 190 individual items are
priced for the index, including 49 foods, 58
articles o f apparel, 10 kinds of fuel, 23 articles
o f housefurnishings, 49 miscellaneous goods
and services, and rent. Since two or more quali­
ties are priced for many articles, prices fo r
about 270 different articles and qualities are
used in the index calculations.

Coverage

Uses of the Index

The commodities and services included in the
index, their weights and specifications, the
cities covered, and the sample o f stores within
cities were all selected with a view to the defini­
tion and primary purpose of the index. They
relate to families of wage earners and lowersalaried clerical workers whose annual income
ranged from $500 to $3,000 and averaged $1,524
in 1984-36. The index does not represent other
population groups such as single individuals,
families living in rural areas, families o f busi­
ness and professional men, high-income fam i­
lies, and families deriving a m ajor portion o f
their income from sources other than earnings.
The index is based on price changes in 34
large cities for groups o f items other than food.
Food prices are surveyed in 22 additional cities.
(See p. 40 for list of 22 cities.) The 56 food cities
account for approximately 60 percent o f the
total population of cities of over 50,000 popula­
tion in the United States. The Bureau is fre­
quently asked to calculate regional indexes, but
its sample o f cities is not adequate for this pur­
pose. The 34 cities include 3 New England, 5
Middle Atlantic, 6 East North Central, 3 West
North Central, 7 South Atlantic, 3 East South
Central, 2 West South Central, 1 Mountain,
and 4 Pacific cities. (See p. 36 for schedule of
price collections.)
The index represents the movement in prices

Adjustment of Wages




The index was originally developed for use
in wage negotiations and this has continued to
be one o f its primary functions. Traditionally
it has been an important factor in determining
equitable rates o f pay, and in some cases union
management contracts have provided for speci­
fic automatic wage adjustments during the life
of the contract based on the movements of the
index.
Prior to the war only about 5 percent of
union agreements in manufacturing industries
allowed for such automatic adjustments, but
since the war its use for this purpose has be­
come more widespread. Under the wartime
wage stabilization program, which will be dis­
cussed later, such automatic adjustments were
eliminated or suspended as a result of orders
o f the War Labor Board.
In 1946, 71 agreements out of 99 key agree­
ments in 22 m ajor industry groups provided for
wage reopening during the life of the agree­
ments. The index was one of a number of fac­
tors to be considered in reopening most o f the
contracts and 5 of these 71 agreements related
renegotiations exclusively to changes in the
Consumers’ Price Index.
On May 25, 1948, one of the most important
agreements of this sort was made between the
General Motors Corp. and the United Automo­

CONSUMERS’ PRICE INDEX— 34 LARGE CITIES

bile Workers (C IO ). This agreement provided
for an immediate 8-cents-an-hour increase to
compensate for increases in living costs from
1940 to April 1948, and also for quarterly ad­
justments in wages based on the movement of
the Bureau’s national Consumers’ Price Index.
Other companies which have similar agreements
include the International Shoe Co. and the
Brown Shoe Co.
Determination of Purchasing Power
As a measure o f changes in retail prices, the
index is also an indicator of changes in purchas­
ing power o f the consumer’s dollar, or the vol­
ume of goods and services a dollar will buy at
different points in time. As prices increase the
purchasing power o f the dollar decreases, and
vice versa.
The index is thus the basis for most estimates
o f changes over a period o f years in the real
earnings of labor. Since it refers to prices o f
goods purchased by wage earners in large cities,
it is most satisfactorily used as a measure of
changes in the buying power of money wages
o f large groups o f city workers. It is, of course,
considerably less satisfactory when used for
specific occupational groups, or in an area
where buying and price conditions may vary
markedly from the average.
Guide to General Economic Policy
One o f the developing uses of the Consumers’
Price Index is as a guide to broad economic
policy. It is used as a measure of the extent o f
inflation; that is, as a barometer o f the effect
of price changes on workers’ families’ earnings
and, by extension, to the United States popula­
tion as a whole.
In the early part o f the war, the movements
of the Bureau’s Consumers’ Price Index and its
components served a m ajor role in the extended
hearings preceding enactment o f the first Price
Control Act. During the course of the war the
index and its components served as a highly
useful guide to Government price stabilization
officials in formulating administrative and fis­
cal policies regarding commodities to control,
decontrol, or subsidize. It was valuable in




25

measuring the effectiveness of price controls,
particularly the community ceiling program for
foods, and in determining the effects o f pro­
posed changes in price ceiling regulations or
subsidies.
The rent index, one o f the m ajor groups of
living essentials included in the Consumers’
Price Index, continues to be used as a measure
o f the effectiveness of rent controls. The index
also has been used to gage the relative effec­
tiveness of price control policies in different
countries. It was a consideration in the form u­
lation of war and postwar fiscal policies re­
garding taxation, sale of bonds, control o f
credit, and related matters.
Wage Stabilization
The Consumers’ Price Index came into great
prominence in connection with the Little Steel
formula for wage adjustments under the wage
stabilization program. This formula originated
as a guiding policy o f the National War Labor
Board in its wage decision o f July 1942 in the
Little Steel case of Bethlehem Steel Corp., Re­
public Steel Corp., Youngstown Sheet and Tube
Co., and Inland Steel Co. and was expressed as a
definite policy for all industries in October 1942.
The formula limited general wage increases to
a total o f 15 percent above January 1, 1941, to
compensate for increased living costs between
January 1941 and May 1942, as measured by
the Bureau’s index.
The War Labor Board, in its statement o f
policy in October 1942, specified that general
wage increases of up to 15 percent above Janu­
ary 1,1941, were permissible, and in his speech
on February 9, 1943, Director Byrnes an­
nounced as a basic wage policy that there should
be no general wage increases in excess o f the
Little Steel formula.
International Comparison
The rate o f change in consumers’ prices in
different countries is an invaluable tool in the
analysis of business cycles and related prob­
lems, and is intimately connected with the sta­
bilization o f international exchange rates.

26

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

Allowance Adjustment
The index, or some o f its components, is also
frequently used by welfare agencies to adjust
allowances for families at the relief level, and
by unemployment commissions as a criterion
for revising unemployment compensation al­
lowances. Even alimony payments are occa­
sionally adjusted on the basis o f changes in con­
sumers’ prices.
Long-Term Contracts
A fairly rare use o f the index, but of con­
siderable importance when it does occur, is as
a measure o f the price level in long-term con­
tracts. It has been used to adjust rentals in
99-year leases, and to provide income payments
to beneficiaries so that annual payments change
according to the purchasing power of the dollar.

Methods of Price Collection
and Tabulation
Historical Background
In the period of rapidly increasing prices dur­
ing and immediately following World War I,
the Bureau initiated its “ Cost-of-Living Index”
for use in wage negotiations. Prior to this time,
information on retail prices had been limited
to the cost-of-food index, begun in 1903 and
carried back to 1890 “ * * * to determine,
approximately at least, the changes in cost of
living in the several years covered.”
In 1919 the Bureau began the publication of
indexes for shipbuilding centers and then for
other industrial cities, weighted according to
the consumption o f wage earners and clerical
workers in 1917-19 as determined by the Bu­
reau’s fam ily expenditure studies at that time.
In April 1933, at the request of the Secretary
of Labor, the American Statistical Association
appointed an advisory committee to study the
statistical work o f the Department. With the
advice o f this committee, and pending a basic
change in consumption weights, three metho­
dological changes were incorporated into the
calculation of the index in the fall of 1935. These
changes were (1) an increase in the number
of foods priced to 84 and a revision o f the




weights used; (2) adoption of the group ag­
gregate method o f combining group indexes to
obtain the all-items index; (3) use of popula­
tion weights, representing the metropolitan
area where prices are collected and adjacent
large urban centers, to obtain the composite
index for the United States.
The basis for the comprehensive revision of
the index which was completed in the spring
o f 1940 was furnished by the Nation-wide study
of disbursements of about 14,500 urban families
o f wage earners and lower-salaried clerical
workers in the period 1934-36. This study is
still the basis for the weights used in the cur­
rent index. On the recommendation o f the Cen­
tral Statistical Board, the new index was cal­
culated on its current base, 1935-39=100. The
revision included a completely new list o f items,
including a reduction in the number o f foods
priced from 84 to 54, new quantity weights,
and new population weights. It is described in
detail in the Bureau’s Bulletin No. 699 and in
the reprint from Monthly Labor Review (Au­
gust 1940), Serial No. R. 1156.
Basic Method o f Calculation
The index is based on the formula of Laspeyres:

p _
* ~ SqoPo

where the (g0 are the average quantities of each
)’s
item used by families in the wage earner and cleri­
cal group in the base period, the (p«)’s are the
prices for these items in the base period, and the
(Pi)’s the prices in a current period. In this form,
the formula is used only in calculating the food
index.
For groups other than food, the Bureau calcu­
lates the index on a variation of this formula, as a
weighted average of price relatives for each item:

where the (g0
pj_i)’s are the “ cost weights” in
the previous period, the (^ 7~ \ s are the price
relatives for each item, and j i is the index for
B<_
the previous period. The two formula forms
yield identical results.

CONSUMERS’ PRICE INDEX— 34 LARGE CITIES

The food component o f the index is calcu­
lated monthly for 56 cities. Average prices
calculated both for chain and independent
stores are combined with the use of weights
based on total sales for the two types of out­
lets. The index fo r each city is calculated as a
fixed base weighted aggregative index. The na­
tional index is calculated by combining the city
cost weights with the use o f weights based on
population.
The rent index is calculated once in 3 months
for each city and is estimated each month for
34 large cities combined on the basis o f the 11
or 12 cities surveyed during the month.2 Rents
5
in the current pricing period are compared with
the previous quarter rentals after adjustments
have been made for changes in facilities in­
cluded, so that the rentals reported are for com­
parable housing in both periods. A relative
change is calculated based on the sum of the
rental rates for the same units in both periods,
and this relative is applied to the previous in­
dex to obtain the index for the current date.
Thus, the rent index is calculated as a simple
link relative index with weighting implicit in the
sample selection.
For groups other than food and rent, the in­
dexes are calculated as weighted averages o f
price relatives. The fuel, electricity, and refrig­
eration group index is calculated for each of 34
cities and for large cities combined every month.
Indexes of prices of apparel, housefurnishings,
and miscellaneous goods and services are calcu­
lated for 10 key cities each month and for the
other 24 cities every 3 months, of which 8 are
surveyed each month. The national indexes for
these groups are based on actual price changes
for the 18 cities surveyed during a given month
and estimated changes for the remaining 16
cities.
Price Collection Procedures
Prices used in the index are those actually
charged customers in a sample of outlets pa­
tronized by moderate-income families. Except
for fuel, electricity, rent, telephone, transporta­
tion, and a few miscellaneous items, they are
25 The Rent Index— Part 2, in M onthly Labor Review, January
1949, p. 60, and reprint, Serial N o. R . 1947, p. 8.




27

obtained by Bureau representatives in personal
interviews with store buyers or managers.
Rent data are collected from tenants by personal
visits once a year supplemented by mail ques­
tionnaires each quarter. Food prices are collected
by part-time agents during the first 3 days of
the week including the fifteenth of each month.
Prices for most clothing, housefurnishings, and
miscellaneous articles and services are collected
by highly trained full-time Bureau representa­
tives. At least 4 prices (5 in New Y ork) are
obtained for each item over a period centering
around the fifteenth o f each month. Fuel and a
few miscellaneous items are collected by mail
questionnaire or from official manuals or rate
books.
Every effort is made to obtain prices on arti­
cles o f comparable quality from one period to
the next. Each agent is supplied with “ speci­
fication” manuals, which describe articles to be
priced in detail. These specifications are care­
fully written with advice of industry specialists.
For clothing, for example, the fabric, stitching,
size range, style, grade of workmanship, and
other features are included. Whenever possible
the agent prices the identical article from per­
iod to period. When this is not possible the
agent is instructed to price another article con­
form ing to the same specification.
Relative Importance of Components
Relative importance figures are percentage
distributions o f the value factors (cost weights)
which result in the index calculation when aver­
age 1934-36 fam ily expenditures for groups of
items are multiplied by price relatives that
measure average price changes o f the items in
the group. The relative importance o f individual
items and groups o f items changes from time
to time chiefly because prices of goods and serv­
ices change at different rates. Weight adjust­
ments, such as those made during the war to
account for rationing and shortages, and reallocations made in June 1947 when the number
of items priced for the index was reduced and
items o f children’s apparel added, also changed
the relative importance of items in the index.
For a complete discussion, see Consumers’ Price
Index: Relative Importance o f Components,

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

28

reprinted from Monthly Labor Review (August
1948) as Serial No. R. 1933. This report gives
the relative importance o f individual items in
December 1947. A mimeographed report giv­
ing data for December 1948 is available on re­
quest.
The relative importance o f m ajor groups of
items in the index as o f December 15, 1948, is
shown below:
Relative importance (percent)
December 15, 1948

Food__.......................
Apparel____ __________
Rent__________
Fuel, electricity, and refrigeration............................
Housefurnishings.................................
Miscellaneous goods and services.................. ........... __

40.6
12.4
12.5
5.1
4.7
24.7

All items________ _________________________ 100.0

Index Adjustments Caused by the War
Changes in Qualities of Goods Available
The military program made heavy demands
on our raw materials, manpower, and manufac­
turing equipment from 1942 through August
1945. In addition, drastic reductions in imports
such as rubber, silk, skins, and burlap changed
the nature of many consumers’ goods retailed
from 1942 through 1945. Not only was the
fiber, leather, metal, or other raw material con­
tent o f most goods limited or altered by Gov­
ernment limitation and conservation orders, but
production of many apparel and household ar­
ticles was discontinued entirely by the end of
1942. As a result the list o f goods priced for the
Consumers’ Price Index and the specifications
for many of these commodities had to be
changed during the four war years in order to
correspond to the articles which were actually
available to civilians. Most of the prewar manu­
factured goods which were irreplaceable or for
which substitutes had to be used during the war
did not reappear in the m ajority of stores until
6 to 12 months after the end o f the war, and in
many cases were not readily obtainable until
the end of 1947.
The description o f nearly all the articles of
apparel in the index had to be changed one or
more times. As early as September 1942 the
minimum new wool content specified by the




Bureau was reduced for most woolen clothing,
and soft woolen suitings replaced worsted fab­
rics in men’s suits. Silk was withdrawn from
the Bureau’s specifications for women’s hosiery,
slips, men’s ties, and yard goods, and virgin
rubber removed from girdle specifications in
1942. The thread count (construction) o f ma­
terials used in men’s cotton furnishings and
women’s cotton apparel were lowered to con­
form to WPB fabric standards which expedited
the weaving of essential cotton fabrics. The
quantity of cloth specified for work clothing
and men’s cotton furnishings was reduced in
1943 to conform to limitations on yardage and
dimensions imposed by WPB limitation orders.
The quantity and quality o f leather used in
shoes and shoe repair services priced for the
index had to be lowered as a result of WPB con­
servation orders. These and similar revisions
were usually based on detailed information ob­
tained in interviews with manufacturers.
The war also altered strikingly the types o f
housefurnishings and miscellaneous goods sold
to consumers after Pearl Harbor. Between
January 1942 and March 1943 a number of im­
portant metal and electrical goods disappeared
from retailers’ stocks and did not reappear un­
til 1946. Under the first m ajor rationing or­
ders, production o f automobiles for civilian use
was entirely forbidden and special permission
was required to purchase new tires and tubes.
New automobiles were dropped from the index
in January 1942 and automobile tires and tubes
in March 1942. Heavy electrical appliances
such as refrigerators and washing machines
disappeared from stores and were deleted from
the index by September 1942. Other commodi­
ties deleted included gas refrigerators, radios,
vacuum cleaners, and sewing machines.
Whenever possible, wartime substitutes, such
as “ victory” models o f gas stoves, replaced pre­
war articles in the index. Steel bedsprings were
almost nonexistent after December 1942, and
substitute models with wooden frames and bor­
ders were introduced into the index in their
place. Solid-construction upholstered sofas,
chairs, and sofa beds replaced the spring-filled
articles in the index during the first half of
1943. At the same time, output o f innerspring

CONSUMERS’ PRICE INDEX— 34 LARGE CITIES

mattresses was discontinued and cotton felt
mattresses were priced for the index instead.
In 1943 and 1944 Axminster rugs with all wool
pile became scarce, and the Bureau collected
prices for Axminsters having a 50 percent rayon
pile.
Introduction of Wartime Articles
Frequently, even in normal periods, a field
representative finds that a brand of garment for
which she has been obtaining prices is no longer
stocked by retailers and another article which
conforms to the same specifications must be
priced in the outlet in place of the discontinued
article. The substituted article may differ
slightly in construction and other physical char­
acteristics and often differs in price from the
discontinued line of similar merchandise, but
both articles fall within the limits of the speci­
fication being priced. Since 1943 the Bureau’s
regular procedure in such cases has been to com­
pare the current price of the new article directly
with that of the article of the same specifica­
tion previously priced, and to allow the price
difference to affect the index.
If more than one pricing period has elapsed
since prices were obtained for the article in a
given store, a similar procedure is used, but the
last price reported is adjusted by applying to it
price relatives for the intervening periods com­
puted from the quotations from the other stores
in the city sample. The change represented by
this adjustment has already been reflected in
the index.
In a relatively few cases when it is impossible
to price to specification and the description of
the goods differs greatly from the commodities
previously priced, prices of a new line of mer­
chandise have been “ linked” into the index so
as to eliminate any price change due to price
differences between the old and the new quality.
This procedure has sometimes been used when
prices have not been obtained from a store for
the same type of goods for a long period of time.
WARTIME CHANGES IN PROCEDURE

During the period from March 1943 through
March 1945, a m ajor exception was made to the
principle o f direct comparison of prices of dis­




29

continued goods with prices of substitutes meet­
ing the same specification from the same store.
Problems of pricing to specification were par­
ticularly difficult during this period since many
outright price changes were accompanied by
quality changes or other hidden price changes.
As has been pointed out,2 no statistical methods
6
existed for measuring, in such cases, the amount
of “ real” price changes. However, inasmuch as
the quality of nearly all consumer goods tended
to deteriorate during this acute phase of war­
time shortages, it was extremely unlikely that
an article of as good a quality as the preceding
article could be offered at a lower price. There­
fore, during this period, whenever a lower price
was reported for goods substituted for a dis­
continued line in the same store, prices were
linked so as to show no decrease in price. For
wartime goods which were introduced into the
index at the same or higher price than discon­
tinued goods of superior wearing character­
istics, it was possible to reflect in the index only
the increase in absolute price. A fter March
1945 it was assumed that textiles and housefurnishings of equivalent or even improved qual­
ity could replace discontinued lines of merchan­
dise. Therefore, the price of the new goods, even
if lower, again was compared directly by regular
procedure with the last price of the discontinued
line of similar goods.
In addition, some changes in basic procedures
for handling substitutions of items not meeting
specifications were required. When the prewar
types of apparel or housefumishings became
unavailable in two or more stores visited by the
Bureau’s field representatives in a city, revised
specifications were written and introduced into
the index city by city. Current prices of the
wartime substitutes then were not linked but
were compared directly with the prices of pre­
war specifications in the preceding period, with
only a few exceptions.
Prices of wartime commodities which were
superior in quality or utterly dissimilar to pre­
war grades of the same general category were
linked into the index according to the regular
procedure described above. For example, rayon
hose were linked into the index in place of silk
2« C f. p p. 3-6.

30

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

stockings, and cotton felt mattresses in place of
innerspring mattresses.
Still a different technique was used occasion­
ally when the Bureau priced separately and con­
currently several qualities of an article which
could be closely defined. For example, if the
lowest grade o f men’s woven shorts could no
longer be priced in one or more stores in the
city, the last price o f this quality was usually
compared with the current price of the next
higher quality o f shorts specified for pricing.
This procedure enabled the Bureau to measure
more fully the cost to the consumer o f the dis­
appearance of lower cost apparel, which was an
appreciable living cost factor in the war years.
In spite o f the painstaking preparation of
specifications for articles of apparel and housefurnishings which are priced for the index, in
the 1942-46 period the field representatives
frequently had to select from a limited quantity
of stock the item which most closely approxi­
mated the specification. For example, during
the period of textile shortages, prices had to be
accepted for colored oxford cloth and striped
broadcloth shirts instead of white broadcloth
shirts. Blanket weights might exceed or fall
short of the range specified, and the coverings
,and other details o f furniture construction
might not conform to the specification. If a
description deviated too much from that of the
commodity specified for pricing, as in the case
of Wilton instead of Axminster rugs, the quota­
tion was not used in the index calculation.
Prices for articles which deviated from speci­
fication were not introduced into the index
sample of prices for an individual specification
if 3 other prices for articles meeting the speci­
fication were available. The number of these
quotations used in the index computations for
apparel, housefumishings, and miscellaneous
goods declined appreciably as the supply of
civilian goods improved after 1945. By the end
of 1948 these deviations had become minor.
Computation o f price indexes for foods and
for fuels did not require as refined adjustments
for shortages and shifts in brands or styles as
apparel and housefumishings did. Price indexes
for foods have always been computed from
much larger samples o f quotations than for




other commodities in the index. The relatively
stable characteristics o f foods and fuels have
also simplified index computations for these cate­
gories of consumer goods.
Changes in Commodity Weights
For goods such as automobiles, washing ma­
chines, radios, and sewing machines, there were
no wartime substitutes and the Bureau did not
find it practicable to price second-hand models,
other than automobiles and tires, which were
priced for a brief period in 1942. For the most
part the index weights of items which were un­
available and therefore were deleted from the
index were transferred to a group of unpriced
items until the commodities could be priced once
more in dealers’ establishments and retail stores.
The prices of this group of items were assumed
to move in the same degree as the composite of
all priced goods and services. Portions o f the
weights regularly assigned to automobiles, tires
and tubes, etc., were added to public transporta­
tion items.
As the supply of many other essential goods
declined sharply after Pearl Harbor, the Bureau
made further adjustments of weights. Ration­
ing of gasoline, which began along the East
Coast in May 1942, led to a 50-percent reduction
in the index weights for gasoline and motor oil
in cities in that area in June 1942. Simultane­
ously, because of informal conservation pro­
grams, the weight for these items was reduced
by one-third in the remaining cities. When
gasoline rationing became Nation-wide in De­
cember 1942, the weights of gasoline and motor
oil in indexes for cities outside the Eastern Sea­
board were further reduced by 25 percent,
thereby cutting the weight to one-half of its
original quantity. An additional 10-percent cut
in gasoline weights was made in East Coast
cities in January 1943, making a total cut o f
55 percent.
Fuel oil rationing, which was initiated October
19, 1942, occasioned a one-third reduction of
weight in 9 of the 10 cities for which this type
o f fuel was sufficiently important to be used in
the index.
Rationing also brought wartime changes in

CONSUMERS* PRICE INDEX— 3 4 LARGE CITIES

weights assigned to various foods.27 In March
1943 on the basis of estimates from the Depart­
ment of Agriculture of anticipated per capita
consumption of foods, the quantity weights were
lowered for fresh beef and lamb, salmon, butter,
coffee, sugar, dried prunes, and navy beans, as
well as canned peaches, pineapple, corn, peas,
and tomatoes. A t the same time the weights
were reduced for fish, apples, bananas, cabbage,
carrots, lettuce, spinach, and corn meal. Larger
quantity weights were assigned to several cereal
and bakery products, pork products, roasting
chickens, cheese, milk, eggs, oranges, onions,
potatoes, lard, salad dressing, oleomargarine,
and peanut butter. The list o f foods priced for
the index was revised to include 7 new items—
rolled oats, beef liver, hamburger, sliced ham,
corn sirup, canned grapefruit juice, and canned
green beans. Most of these foods had acquired
increased importance in the fam ily shopping
list because o f rationing and shortages of re­
lated foods. Grapefruit juice and canned green
beans were added to give better representation
o f canned fruits and vegetables.
Changes in Collecting Rental Data
As the defense program got under way, the
Bureau in September 1940 changed from quar­
terly to monthly rental surveys in 21 of the 34
large cities, and continued to collect rental data
on a quarterly basis for the remaining 13 cities.
Prior to the summer o f 1942 the Bureau ob­
tained its rental data from real estate manage­
ment agencies. Since that time a smaller pro­
portion of rental property has been handled by
rental agencies. Moreover, soon after the first
cities were brought under Federal rent control
in June 1942, it became evident that the Bureau
would be more likely to obtain reports of viola­
tions o f rent ceilings if rental data were ob­
tained directly from tenants. Consequently,
the Bureau selected for this purpose a repre­
sentative sample of housekeeping dwellings on
a block basis, and by June 1943 had completed
the shift to collection of rents directly from
tenants in each o f the 34 cities surveyed for
the Consumers’ Price Index. In addition to the
27
Bureau o f Labor Statistics Cost-of-Living Index in Wartime, in
Monthly Labor Review, July 1943, p. 82; reprinted as Serial No. R.
1545.




31

regular surveys o f rent changes, taken on a com­
paratively small sample, checks were made on
the validity of the rent sample through a pro­
gram o f dwelling-unit surveys, beginning in
June 1944.2
8
The quarterly collections of rental data by
personal visit to tenants— on a March, June,
September, December cycle— were maintained
until the summer of 1944. A t that time, with
the rent stability experienced under the rent
regulation, the Bureau shifted to semiannual
collection of rental data by personal visit until
1947. During this period, half o f the cities were
surveyed in March and September and the other
half in June and December.
In anticipation of a sharp budget cut for the
fiscal year 1948, the Bureau in January 1947
began rent collection in 5 or 6 cities every month
to distribute the field load more evenly over
the year. A cycle of pricing the cities was de­
veloped to provide an adequate cross section o f
cities each month in order that an estimate o f
the combined city rent index could be made
monthly.2 * In March 1947 the Bureau began to
9
contact the tenants in its rent samples by the
use o f mail questionnaires rather than by per­
sonal visit, using the same pricing cycle and
estimating procedure. In 1948 personal inter­
views with tenants were reduced to one a year,
with rent quotations in the intervening quarters
obtained by mail questionnaires sent to a seg­
ment of the tenant sample-units in each city.
Criticisms and Appraisals of the Index
Despite the numerous adjustments which were
made, interest in and public discussion o f the
validity o f the index was widespread. In view
of the form al charges directed against the in­
dex by union representatives and others, cul­
minating in the decision to change its title in
28 For a detailed discussion o f the sampling procedures o f these
sample check surveys, together with a description o f the methods em­
ployed in the maintenance o f the rent index, see The Rent Index— Part
2 : Methodology o f Measurement, by Helen Humes and Bruno Schiro,
in Monthly Labor Review, January 1949, p. 60. The December 1948
issue o f the Review contains Part 1 o f this article, dealing with the
concept o f the rent index. Both articles are reprinted as Serial No.
R. 1947.
29 The Rent Index— Part 2, in Monthly Labor Review, January
1949, section entitled “ Estimating 34-Large-City Rent Index.’ * In­
cluded in reprint, Serial No. R. 1947.

consumers’ prices in th e united states

32

the summer of 1945, several technical commit­
tees and a cost-of-living committee appointed
by the President were requested to make inde­
pendent reports on the validity of the index.
These reports are given in detail in the Report
o f the President’s Committee on the Cost o f
Living, Office o f Economic Stabilization, 1945,
and in other documents listed in the Bibliogra­
phy on page 80.
In particular, the index was criticized for
failure to measure the total increase in the cost
o f living during the war resulting from hidden
increases in price.80 Doubts also were raised as
to its representativeness for all units and areas
of the population and for the adequacy of the
sample o f items. It also was criticized for omis­
sion of certain items, such as restaurant meals,
children’s apparel, and costs o f home owner­
ship.
A fter considerable investigation the general
accuracy and reliability o f the index for what
it purports to measure were attested by the
technical committees and by the President’s
Cost-of-Living Committee. In October 1943 a
special committee o f the American Statistical
Association reported “ First, that within the
limitations established for it, the cost-of-living
index provides a trustworthy measure of
changes in the prices paid by consumers for
goods and services. Second, that many of the
difficulties and doubts which have arisen con­
cerning the index have their origins in attempts
to use it uncritically for purposes to which it is
not adapted.”
In June 1944 the technical committee ap­
pointed by the chairman of the President’s Com­
mittee on the Cost of Living reported that “ the
BLS has done a competent job under very dif­
ficult market conditions, in providing a measure
of price changes for goods customarily pur­
chased by families * *
Summarizing the
wealth of material presented to it, the Presi­
dent’s Committee reported that “ the accuracy
of the BLS index figures for what they are in­
tended to measure is confirmed.”
Five-Point Adjustment
It was recognized, however, that there were
certain hidden price increases which could not
30

Cf. pp. 3-6.




be reflected in the index.8 From June 1944 to
1
January 1947 the Bureau explained with each
month’s release that “ the index does not show
the full wartime effect on the cost of living o f
such factors as lowered quality, disappearance
o f low-priced goods, and forced changes in hous­
ing and eating away from home.”
Although the Bureau never made a precise
estimate of the amount o f these factors, the
President’s Committee on the Cost o f Living
reported in November 1944 that “ Under the
exceptional market conditions which exist in
wartime, and so long as we have a seller’s mar­
ket, allowance should be made for a hidden in­
crease in the cost of living of probably as much
as 3 and certainly not more than 4 percentage
points, due to quality deterioration, disappear­
ance of cheaper goods * * * .” 82 In December
1945 the Stabilization Director, in connection
with Executive Order No. 9599 of August 1945
and No. 9651, amending it, which provided for
modification of wartime controls, indicated that
if account were taken of continued deteriora­
tion of quality and unavailability o f merchan­
dise between September 1944 and September
1945, the allowance for the period from January
1941 to September 1945 would total approxi­
mately 5 points for large and small cities com­
bined.
In summary, the technical committee said:
“ If the BLS had obtained strictly accurate re­
ports o f all the prices it tries to collect; if it
had caught the change in average prices caused
by their reduction in bargain sales; if it had
priced the qualities bought by families with
very low income and the qualities bought by the
most prosperous of wage earners as well as
those in the middle groups; and if it had made
full allowance for increases in expenditures
forced on families by quality deterioration that
can be offset by buying more goods, its index
would probably not be higher than it is now by
more than three to four points.” 8 To which
8
they added “ not to exceed one-half o f one [per­
centage] point” to compensate for what they
judged to be the more rapid rise o f prices in3
2
1
31 C f. pp. 3-6.
32 Report o f the President's Committee on the Cost o f Living, Office

o f Economic Stabilization, Washington 1945, p. 14.
33 Ibid., p. 12.

CONSUMERS’ PRICE INDEX— 3 4 LARGE CITIES

small cities than in the large cities covered by
the index.
The President’s Committee in establishing the
original adjustment had explained that the dis­
advantage to a buyer in a sellers’ market '“can
be expected to disappear as soon as we can re­
sume full production of consumer goods and
services in a competitive market.” By the end
of 1946, it was evident that several of the fac­
tors leading to the 5-point adjustment had dis­
appeared or diminished in importance since the
end o f World War II, such as the failure to
measure adequately over-ceiling food prices.
Other factors still remained, and some had in­
creased, such as special rental charges.
The President’s Committee had noted that
the methods used “ to estimate the hidden in­
crease in living costs in a seller’s market * * *
should not be adopted by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics” since they were “ not suitable for
use in preparing an official index.” No other
agency has attempted to estimate the amount
of hidden factors affecting the index after Sep­
tember 1945. Therefore, after January 1947,
the Bureau dropped all reference to this adjust­
ment from its reports.
Revision of Population Weights
In calculating the indexes for the average of
large cities, cost weights for each city are
weighted on the basis of the population of the
metropolitan area of the city and of other cities
in the same region and size class. When the
index was revised in 1939 the latest available
population data were from the 1930 census, and
population weights based on these data were
used in the index calculation. A fter publication
of the 1940 census, giving population data for
April 1940, there were marked shifts in popu­
lation due chiefly to migration of industrial
workers to centers o f war activity. In 1942 the
Bureau of the Census published estimates o f
changes in the population of metropolitan coun­
ties from April 1940 to May 1942, based on
registration for the sugar ration book. Revised
population weights, based on the 1940 census
adjusted by these estimates, have been used in
the index computations since March 1943 as no
postwar population estimates are available. At




33

the same time 5 cities were added to the list of
51 cities previously included in the food index.
The revised population weights used for com­
bining cities into a composite index for the
United States are given in Bureau of Labor
Statistics Cost-of-Living Index in Wartime,
Serial No. R. 1545, from the Monthly Labor
Review, July 1943.

Postwar Adjustments of the Index
Reintroduction of Prewar Specifications
Prewar qualities of garments and housefurnishings were reintroduced into the index in
the 2 years following the war, whenever such
goods became available to consumers in suffi­
cient quantities. When three or more quotations
could again be obtained from representative
stores in a city for a commodity described by a
prewar specification, the postwar prices were
compared with the quotations for this specifica­
tion in December 1941, a period when retail
stocks were normal and before quality deteriora­
tion had become a serious problem. For example,
innerspring mattresses conforming to the Bu­
reau’s prewar specification displaced their war­
time substitute, cotton felt mattresses, begin­
ning in September 1946. The price relative from
December 1941 to September 1946 was applied
to the December 1941 cost weight for innerspring mattresses to obtain the September 1946
cost weight for mattresses of that description.
This “ long term” method of reintroducing the
grade of commodities priced before the war was
adopted in order to make the best possible ad­
justment o f the level of the index for any war­
time quality changes, usually deterioration,
which might not have been correctly measured
during the war years. Moreover, selection o f a
single date uniformly for all items greatly sim­
plified the calculations. By September 1946 re­
turn to prewar specifications was virtually com­
plete.
Some important consumer goods, such as
women’s silk hose and part-silk slips, had not re­
turned to store shelves by the end o f 1948 in suffi­
cient volume to warrant their restoration to the
list of goods used in computing the index. Retail
prices o f women’s nylon stockings, as of March

34

CONSUMERS’ p r ic e s i n

1946, were compared with the December 1941
prices of their prewar silk counterparts o f simi­
lar full-fashioned construction. Specifications
developed for women’s rayon slips during the
early war years continued to be used in the
1946-48 period. Some kinds o f prewar dress
materials were outmoded and very little modi­
fication of the rayon dress specifications pre­
pared in the war years was made in these im­
mediate postwar years. Asphalt-saturated feltbacked floor coverings replaced the burlapbacked commodity in the postwar revision o f
the housefurnishings portion o f the index. In
September 1946 radio-phonographs replaced
prewar table-model radios because combinations
were the only articles available with the prewar
wooden case. Other postwar revisions o f the
housefurnishings group in conformance with
industry trends included the addition o f the
tank type o f vacuum cleaner and the substitu­
tion o f electric ranges for other non-gas types
o f cooking stoves in several cities.
Restoration of Prewar Weights
As goods became more generally available,
the Bureau also restored the prewar weights.
Quantity weights for foods, which had been ad­
justed fo r rationing and shortages in March
1943, were readjusted and the prewar weight
pattern was restored to a large degree in Febru­
ary 1946, except that minor adjustments were
necessary because the 7 foods added to the in­
dex in the March 1943 revision were retained
in the index.3
4
Rationing for gasoline and motor oil, weights
for which had been reduced, was terminated on
August 15,1945, and most of the weight was re­
stored to these commodities in the index the
following month. Complete return to prewar
weight patterns was effected a year later when
the supply o f automobiles and tires had reached
much more normal proportions. Prices of auto­
mobiles were reintroduced and weights restored
34 See Store Samples for Retail Food Prices, in Monthly Labor Re­
view. January 1947.




th e

u n it e d

states

in September 1946, and tires in December 1946.
Prices o f other durable goods were reintroduced
gradually and, by September 1946, restoration
o f prewar weights was virtually complete for
these commodities.
Reintroduction was effected by making a
long-time comparison o f current prices with
those for December 1941, according to the pro­
cedure outlined above. This procedure auto­
matically corrected any error resulting from the
fact that cost weights in the interim for the
most part had been adjusted by the average
price change for all priced items.
Introduction of Children’s Apparel
Until July 1947 girls’ coats and children’s
shoes were the only articles of children’s or in­
fants’ apparel specifically priced for the index.
On the basis of studies made prior to 1940, the
price movement o f children’s apparel had been
assumed to correspond closely to those of adults’
apparel. In making comparisons of prewar and
postwar price data a special analysis o f chil­
dren’s apparel price trends was made to ascer­
tain whether identical types o f garments for
men and women showed the same price be­
havior as those for boys and girls. Changes in
retail prices collected by the Bureau for 5 types
o f children’s apparel between March 1939 and
June 1944 were compared with price move­
ments o f related types of adults’ garments for
the same period. Another comparison was made
o f the trend o f prices for 6 types of garments
in the interval from June 1944 to March 1947.
The rise in the average retail price of children’s
apparel was greater than the advance in prices
of adults’ similar garments from March 1939
to June 1944, whereas the prices of adults’ ap­
parel rose more than prices o f related types of
children’s apparel from June 1944 to March
1947.
Because o f the observed lack o f correlation
between the price movements of individual types
of children’s apparel and the corresponding gar­
ments for adults, the following articles were
added to the index in July 1947 in addition to

CONSUMERS’ PRICE INDEX— 8 4 LARGE CITIES

girls’ coats and diapers, which were already
being priced:

35

that price changes for foods were not based upon
identical samples, as before.

Boys* Apparel

Overcoats
Mackinaws
Suits, wool
Slacks, wool
Slacks, cotton (to be added in 1949)
Shirts, woven
Shirts, polo
Shorts, cotton, knit
Oxfords
Girls9 Apparel

Dress, cotton
Dress, rayon (deleted December 1947)
Slip, cotton
Brief, cotton, knit
Anklets

The expenditure weights fo r these articles o f
apparel were determined from the Bureau’s
1934-36 field surveys and deducted from the
related types o f adult apparel to which they had
been assigned.
Changes in Processing of Food Prices 85
In February 1946, in addition to restoration of
prewar weights for food, the Bureau changed its
procedure for (1) applying sales taxes, (2) com­
bining chain and independent store quotations,
and (3) editing prices for comparability o f out­
let samples. Indexes o f retail food prices contin­
ued to reflect changes in sales taxes, but average
prices published for the individual foods were
made exclusive of sales taxes. Formerly, prices
for all stores were weighted together in one
average. Unless a full sample of quotations was
obtained for all stores the weighting pattern did
not maintain the chain-independent ratio o f sales
volume importance. Beginning in February
1946, a separate average was computed fo r in­
dependent stores and for chain stores, and the
two averages were combined in accordance with
a fixed chain-independent ratio to obtain the
average price for the city.
Previously, with the exception o f meats, fresh
fruits and vegetables, and certain canned goods,
a price was used only if it was for the identical
size, grade, and brand o f the food quoted the pre­
ceding month by the same store. Beginning in
February 1946, all price quotations obtained for
foods within the specification were averaged, so3
5
35 Store Samples fo r Retail Food Prices, in Monthly Labor Review,
January 1947.




Revision o f Retail Food Store Sample
In June 1946 the Bureau’s sample of independ­
ent retail food stores was revised. The revision
established, for the first time, a constant rela­
tionship between the total number o f independ­
ent stores in the sample and the total number in
the city. It also included the stratification o f the
sample in accordance with the distribution o f
stores (1) by type o f store in terms o f kinds o f
foods sold, (2) by size of store in terms o f an­
nual sales volume, and (3) by location within the
city. The size of the independent store sample
was increased for 50 of the 56 cities and de­
creased for 6 cities. The Bureau continued to
obtain prices from all important chain organi­
zations operating in a city.

Changes N ecessitated by
Budget Cut in Fiscal Year 1948
Estimating National Indexes
The serious cut in budget appropriations for
the fiscal year 1948 necessitated a number of
significant changes in the Bureau’s work for
the Consumers’ Price Index. The national index
continued to be issued monthly but the estimate
was based on price collection in few er cities
monthly, with quarterly collection in the remain­
ing cities. Food prices continued to be collected
on a monthly cycle in 56 cities. Instead of per­
sonal collection o f rental data at regular pricing
periods, the Bureau instituted a schedule o f three
mail questionnaires and one personal collection
per year. For fuels, collection of prices was con­
tinued monthly but was limited to the 34 large
cities in the index rather than 55 cities in which
prices previously had been collected.
Greatest savings were made in price collection
o f apparel, housefurnishings, and miscellaneous
commodities. Formerly prices had been collected
monthly in 21 cities and quarterly in 13 cities.
Beginning in July 1947 prices for these groups
were collected monthly in 10 key cities and quar­
terly in the remaining 24 cities according to a
rotating quarterly cycle as listed below. The
cycle was carefully determined on the basis of

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

36

historical price movements for individual cities
and coordinated with the cycle previously estab­
lished for rents,36 so as to approximate the
national trend as closely as possible.
Febru ary, M a y, A ugu st,

M onthly

Birmingham
Boston
Chicago
Cincinnati
Detroit
Houston
Los Angeles
New York
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh

N o vem b er

Atlanta
Cleveland
Milwaukee
New Orleans
Norfolk
Scranton
Seattle
Washington

With the reduction in city coverage, a con­
comitant change in the method of calculation of
price indexes for individual items (see p. 68)
was necessary. The estimating procedure used
for combining 34 city group totals was too costly
for individual articles. Therefore, it was decided
to calculate these relatives quarterly, based upon
the 10 monthly cities and the 8 cities priced in
March, June, September, and December, listed
above, weighted to represent all 34 cities. The
effect o f price changes in the 16 unpriced cities
thus is not reflected directly in price indexes for
individual commodities (other than food) and
services after July 1947.
Reduction of Number of Items Priced

January, A p ril, July,

M arch, June, Septem ber,

O ctober

D ecem ber

Buffalo
Denver
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Manchester
Portland, Oreg.
Richmond
Savannah

Baltimore
Jacksonville
Memphis
Minneapolis
Mobile
Portland, Maine
St. Louis
San Francisco

In addition to a change in the estimating pro­
cedure for the national rent indexS , the reduced
7
city coverage necessitated a change in the
method of calculating the United States indexes
for the apparel, housefurnishings, and miscel­
laneous groups. In any given month, indexes
(and cost weights) for these groups are calcu­
lated according to standard procedure for 18
cities (10 monthly and 8 quarterly). Cost
weights for each of the 16 unpriced cities in any
given month are estimated on the basis of the
price trend in one of the priced cities and com­
bined with actual cost weights for 18 cities to
obtain the United States total. The choice of
estimator cities, which is reviewed periodically,
is based upon similarity of price movement in
earlier periods for these commodity groups. At
each pricing period, errors of estimate for the
quarterly cities are automatically corrected.*
7
8
36 The Rent Index— Part 2, in Monthly Labor Review, January
1949, and reprint, Serial No. R. 1947.
8 Idem.
7




Both the number o f foods priced and the
number of individual quotations for each food
were reduced in August 1947. The list was re­
duced from 62 to 50 food s; 13 were discontinued;
and 1, rice, was reintroduced for the first time
since August 1939. The number o f quotations
obtained from independent stores on some foods
(dried groceries and staple foods) was reduced
substantially, but was left unchanged for meats
and fresh fruits and vegetables, for which vari­
ation in price from store to store is greater than
for dried groceries and staples. No change was
made in the size o f the sample quotations from
chain stores for any of the 50 foods. The reduc­
tions diminished by 20 percent the total number
of quotations obtained from independent stores.
Tests made by the Bureau show that the re­
duction in number o f foods priced and number of
quotations obtained has had no significant effect
on the “ all foods” index or the average food
prices for all cities combined.
Similar savings were effected in other com­
modity groups— chiefly a reduction in the
number of different qualities priced. In most
instances where prices for two or three qualities
of a garment or an article of housefurnishings
described by separate specifications had been
used in the index, one quality was selected to
represent a commodity after June 1947. The
following tabulation summarizes the number of
specifications of commodities other than foods
and fuels which were used in the Consumers’

CONSUMERS’ PRICE INDEX— 3 4 LARGE CITIES

Price Index before and after the decrease in
July 1947:
Number of specifications used
in computing the Consumers*Price Index
as of—
June 1947

Apparel__________________ 100
Housefumishings_________ 38
Miscellaneous goods and services 100

December 1947

63
25
62

The quantity weights for specifications
dropped from the index were assigned to the
same type o f commodity, if one remained in the
index; otherwise the weight o f the deleted item
was allocated to the unpriced items of the group
(i.e., apparel, housefumishings, or miscellane­
ous commodities) to which it belonged. In July
1947 the number o f unpriced articles imputed
directly to priced articles of apparel also was
reduced, and their weights were transferred
to the composite o f unpriced items for the ap­
parel group. The movement of composites of
deleted items for a specific commodity group
was assumed to correspond to the average price
movement of all the priced articles in the same
group, rather than to priced articles of all
groups.

Presentation and Publication of Data
It is the policy o f the Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics to make its indexes available on as wide a
scale as possible. The Consumers’ Price Indexes
are released regularly in various publications of
the Bureau (listed below) and in other Govern­
ment periodicals. The Bureau’s procedure and
statistical methods are explained in such bulle­
tins as Bulletin No. 699 (described below) and in
special reports such as “ Store Samples for Retail
Food Prices,” in the January 1947 issue o f the
Monthly Labor Review. Unless otherwise indi­
cated, the publications listed may be obtained
upon request from the Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics, Washington 25, D. C.
I. Monthly Consumers’ Price Index Releases
and Monthly Labor Review.
A. The Consumers’ Price Index is released
to the press monthly in mimeographed form
as soon as available. It contains the United
States averages and indexes for each of the
34 large cities, for all items, for m ajor




37

groups, and for food and fuel subgroups,
for the current month and several other
selected dates, and a brief analysis of price
changes during the month. Tables o f per­
centage changes from selected earlier dates
are also presented.
Also published in this release are average
retail prices of individual foods for 56 cities
combined and the retail food price index for
the 22 cities for which consumers’ price
indexes are not calculated.
In addition to the national press release,
releases for individual cities are issued
from the Bureau’s regional offices.
B. The Consumers’ Price Index is carried
in the Monthly Labor Review, the official
publication of the Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics. The United States averages for all
items, m ajor groups, and food subgroups,
and for all items and food indexes for each
of the 34 cities are published by months for
the previous year and for certain other
selected periods. Also presented are current
indexes for all the m ajor groups by cities.
The Monthly Labor Review may be
obtained from the Superintendent o f Docu­
ments, U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C., at 40 cents per copy
or $4.50 per year.
C. Retail Food Prices by Cities, another
mimeographed monthly release, contains
retail food price indexes, percentage
change tables, and average prices and price
ranges for individual foods in the United
States and in the 56 individual cities.
II. Historical Tabulation of Indexes.
Historical mimeographed tabulations o f
indexes for all available periods for all items
and the m ajor groups (fo o d ; apparel; rent;
fuel, electricity and refrigeration; housefurnishings; miscellaneous) are available
back to 1913 for the United States and for
individual cities.
III. Recurring Bulletins and Special Reports.
A. Changes in Cost of Living in Large
Cities in the United States, 1913-41 (Bulle­
tin No. 699). This is the most comprehen­
sive treatment of the Consumers’ Price

CONSUMERS’

38

p r ic e s

Index in print. As part of a description o f
the comprehensive revision in 1940, it in­
cludes explanations o f the construction of
the index; the method o f weighting; tables
of relative importances; tabulations, by
city, of the indexes from their inception to
1941; other pertinent tabulations; and a
comparision o f the index as revised in 1940
with the original index. Copies may be
obtained from the Superintendent of Docu­
ments, Government Printing Office, Wash­
ington 25, D. C., at 25 cents each.
B. Handbook of Labor Statistics contains
all the m ajor statistical series compiled by
the Bureau, including the national Con­
sumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income
Families in Large Cities, by m ajor groups
of commodities, from 1913 to date; indexes
for all items and foods in 39 United States
cities and 4 territories and possessions,
from 1923 to date; indexes of retail prices
of foods in 22 additional cities, from 1923
to date. The most recent handbook (Bul­
letin No. 916) was published in 1947 in
loose-leaf form . Insert sheets will be sup­
plied from time to time covering new ma­
terial and bringing regular series to date.
The Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1947
Edition, may be obtained for 75 cents from
the Superintendent o f Documents, U. S.
Government Printing Office, Washington
25, D. C.
C. Retail Prices o f Food, 1946 to 1947 (Bul­
letin No. 938). This bulletin, which is part
o f a regular series, includes a summary of
retail food price developments and trends

in

th e

u n it e d

states

during 1946 and 1947, a discussion o f food
price controls and subsidy programs, and
indexes o f retail prices o f food and average
retail prices of principal foods, by cities.
V. Price indexes for individual articles and
services other than food, fuel, and rent have
been calculated as a byproduct of the index
calculation. They are shown for quarterly
periods back to 1935 in tables E, F, and G,
pages 68-79. Currently they are based on
the 18 cities priced in March, June, Sep­
tember, and December weighted to repre­
sent all 34 cities. The samples of quotations
for these commodities are considered inade­
quate for publication o f relatives for indi­
vidual cities or of actual prices, as is done
regularly for foods and fuels.
A. Price indexes are available for about
50 articles of apparel including the follow ­
ing special groups:
Men’s apparel
Women’s apparel
Children’s apparel
Woolen apparel
Cotton apparel

Silk and rayon apparel
Nylon apparel
Footwear
Other apparel
Services (dry cleaning and
shoe repairs)

B. Price indexes for housefumishings and
miscellaneous items are available fo r about
30 items and 95 items, respectively, includ­
ing the following special groups: All
furniture, all furniture and bedding, trans­
portation, medical care, physicians’ fees,
prescriptions and drugs, household oper­
ation, recreation, personal care, and all
services excluding rent.

Consumers* Price Indexes for Additional Cities
Small Cities and
War Production Centers
In planning and administering a program to
combat the inflationary tendencies which had
become apparent as early as 1940, government
agencies had found a need for some indication of
price movements not only in large cities but also




in small cities and in cities where emergency
situations had developed because o f the rapid
expansion of war production facilities. Accord­
ingly, with funds made available by the National
Defense Advisory Commission, the Bureau in
1940 initiated indexes o f consumers’ prices in
20 small cities selected as a representative
sample o f all urban communities in the 5,000-to-

CONSUMERS’ PRICE INDEXES FOR ADDITIONAL CITIES

50,000 population class, and in 10 war produc­
tion centers o f larger size. Two additional war
production centers were added later.
Twenty Small Cities
Index series were calculated from June 1939
to the spring of 1945 fo r 12 small cities and from
June 1940 for 8 additional cities. The 20 cities
are:
Battle Creek, Mich.
Bloomington, Ind.
Chester, S. C.
Clarksburg, W. Va.
Clinton, Iowa
Falls City, Nebr.
Globe, Ariz.
Goldsboro, N. C.
Jonesboro, Ark.
Lebanon, Pa.

Mattoon, 111.
Oconto, Wis.
Oswego, N. Y.
Stillwater, Okla.
Torrington, Conn.
Vicksburg, Miss.
Vineland, N. J.
Walla Walla, Wash.
Watertown, S. Dak.
Zanesville, Ohio

39

C, p. 62, for all available periods are on a Decem­
ber 1940 base except for Phoenix, for which the
base period is March 1943. For 5 cities (Bridge­
port, Corpus Christi, Gadsden, Omaha, and
W ichita), prices were not collected in December
1940. Indexes for this date were estimated by
assuming an even rate of change between the
nearest pricing dates.
Methods Used

Twelve War Production Centers

In general, the methods used in calculating
the indexes for small cities and war production
centers were the same as those used in the
Bureau’s regular series for large cities. Prices
were obtained periodically from representative
retail stores and service establishments in these
cities and were weighted by the quantities o f
goods and services usually bought by moderateincome families. Weights were based on data by
regions obtained in the Bureau’s extensive
studies o f fam ily expenditures in 1934-36. Ad­
justments similar to those in the Bureau’s
indexes for large cities were made to take
account of rationing and shortages.
In Charleston, S. C., Newark, N. J., and
Wichita, Kans., only food and fuel prices and
rents were available from October 1939 to Janu­
ary 1941. For Charleston and Wichita, indexes
for other groups during this period were based
on average changes in the 34 large cities and
for Newark on changes in New York City.

Indexes were begun in October 1939 for 10
war production centers:

Seven Estim ated Cities

Prices were collected in June and December o f
each year until December 1940 and quarterly
from March 1941 through September 1943. In
all cities except Battle Creek, Mich., and Leba­
non, Pa., the frequency of pricing was reduced in
March 1944 to semiannual collections. Indexes
for all 20 cities (presented in table C, p. 62, for
all available periods) have been converted uni­
form ly to a December 1940 base. This was the
pricing period nearest January 1,1941, the base
date for the Little Steel formula.

Bridgeport, Conn.
Charleston, S. C.
Corpus Christi, Tex.
Gadsden, Ala.
Newark, N. J.

Omaha, Nebr.
San Diego, Calif.
South Bend, Ind.
Vallejo-Benicia, Calif.
W ichita, Kans.

In addition, indexes were initiated in September
1940 for Newport News, Va., and in June 1941
for Phoenix, Ariz. In 7 cities prices were col­
lected quarterly through 1943 and semiannually
until the series were discontinued in 1945. In 5
cities (Bridgeport, Omaha, San Diego, South
Bend, and W ichita), designated as m ajor recon­
version centers, the series were continued
through April 1947. Indexes presented in table




The Bureau also calculated estimated indexes
of consumers’ prices for 6 additional cities from
October 1939 to 1945, and one additional city
from October 1940 to March 1945 on the basis of
changes in prices of foods, fuels, and rents in the
given cities and on changes for other groups
based on average changes in 34 large cities. In­
dexes are presented in table D, p. 67, for all
available periods. The 7 cities fo r which esti­
mated indexes were prepared are:
Dallas, Tex.
Little Rock, Ark.
Louisville, Ky.
New Haven, Conn.

Peoria, 111.
Rochester, N. Y.
Knoxville, Tenn.

40

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

Twenty-two Cities in Which
Food Prices Only Are Obtained
Indexes o f retail food prices only are calcu­
lated monthly for 22 cities in addition to the
Bureau’s regular 34 large cities, and are incorpo­
rated in the Bureau’s national indexes for foods
and all items. These 22 cities a re:
Bridgeport, Conn.
Butte, Mont.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Charleston, S. C.
Columbus, Ohio
Dallas, Tex.

Fall River, Mass.
Jackson, Miss.
Knoxville, Tenn.
Little Rock, Ark.
Louisville, Ky.
Newark, N. J.

New Haven, Conn.
Omaha, Nebr.
Peoria, 111.
Providence, R. I.
Rochester, N. Y.

St. Paul, Minn.
Salt Lake City, Utah
Springfield, 111.
W ichita, Kans.
Winston-Salem, N. C.

Indexes3 are on a 1935-39=100 base except
8
for the 5 cities added in June 1940 (Cedar
Rapids, Jackson, Knoxville, Wichita, and
Winston-Salem), which are on a June 1940=
100 base. Five o f the 22— Bridgeport, Charles­
ton, Newark, Omaha, and Wichita— were war
production centers, as listed on page 39.
38
See Retail Food Prices by Cities, descirbed on p. 37 ; and Bulletin
No. 938, Retail Prices o f Food, 1946 to 1947, p. 38.

City W orker’s Family Budget
In the spring o f 1945, the Labor and Federal
Security Subcommittee o f the Committee on Ap­
propriations of the House o f Representatives
directed the Bureau o f Labor Statistics “ to find
out what it costs a worker’s fam ily to live in the
large cities o f the United States.” The subcom­
mittee was interested in relative differences in
living costs between cities, as well as dollar costs.
Pending a more complete study, indexes o f
relative differences in the cost of equivalent
goods, rents, and services among the large cities
for which consumers’ price indexes are calcu­
lated were computed for March 1945 and pub­
lished in the spring o f 1946.8 These indexes
9
reflected the effect o f two factors of variation in
costs among cities: the level of prices and rents,
and variations in requirements imposed by cli­
mate. This was the first intercity index published
by the Bureau subsequent to the discontinuance
in June 1943 o f the series released between 1939
and 1943 entitled “ Estimated Intercity Differ­
ences in Cost of Living.” This older series is
based on the estimated cost of a “ maintenance
budget” as defined and priced by the Works
Progress Administration in 1935.3
40
9
The results of the Bureau’s comprehensive
investigation in response to the congressional
directive were published in the City Worker’s
39 Relative Differences in the Cost o f Equivalent Goods, Rents, and
Services in 33 Large Cities, March 1945, mimeographed release, June
1, 1946.
40 A brief description o f this “ maintenance budget” is given in
Cost of Living in 1941, Bulletin No. 710, p. 34 ff.




Family Budget in late 1947.41 The 34 large cities
in the United States which are covered in the
Bureau’s Consumers’ Price Index were selected
for study, and the budget was priced for March
1946 and June 1947.
The budget includes the cost of food, clothing,
housing, medical care, transportation, reading
and recreation, personal care, tobacco, and an
allowance for other essential needs such as pub­
lic school expenses, gifts and charily donations,
taxes, and insurance and union dues. The level
of living provided by the budget is neither one
of “ subsistence” nor o f “ luxury” but a modest
and adequate American standard of living based
upon the kinds and quantities of goods and serv­
ices that workers actually select. Thus it is more
liberal than the W PA maintenance budget.
The budget fam ily consists o f four persons
living in a rented separate house or apartment.
The fam ily is made up of an employed father
aged 38 years, a housewife o f 36 not gainfully
employed, a boy of 13 in high school, and a girl
of 8 in grade school. Budget approximations
have been made for families of different sizes.
Dollar costs of the total budget, ranging from
about $3,000 to $3,500 in June 1947, as well as
of major components, were calculated fo r each
of the 34 cities. These figures provided a meas­
ure of relative differences in costs o f goods and
services between cities and supersede earlier
41 In Workers’ Budgets in the United States, Bulletin No. 927, p. 3.

CITY WORKER’ S FAM ILY BUDGET

estimates of intercity indexes published by the
Bureau.
In order to provide a means of measuring
intercity price deferences without repricing the
budget in its entirety, the Bureau has developed
an intercity index formula based on the pro­
cedures and weights o f the City Worker’s Family
Budget but requiring the use o f only 57 items
instead of the more than 435 items in the bud­

41

get.42 This formula makes it possible to esti­
mate at a given time the relative deferences
in the over-all cost of goods and services, not
only for the 34 cities in the Bureau’s Consumers’
Price Index but also for any city in the United
States which is essentially urban in its manner
of living.
42 The method is described in Measuring: Intercity Differences in
Living: Costs, in Monthly Labor Review, March 1949; reprinted as
Serial No. R. 1952.

Cooperation With Other Government Agencies
The Bureau has provided technical advice
and assistance over a period of years to various
Federal and State governmental agencies in col­
lecting price data and setting up special price
indexes. The extent o f the assistance, particu­
larly to the States, has been limited, however,
by the amount of Bureau staff available.
STATES
Wherever possible, assistance has been given
to State agencies or universities in establishing
price indexes for cities where the Bureau does
not regularly collect data. Much of this assist­
ance has been in terms o f devising weighting
patterns for various localities and in providing
technical instructions on collection and process­
ing procedures. In a few cases when staff was
available, the Bureau has undertaken to assign
personnel to review the work performed by a
State Agency. States to whom such assistance
has been given include the follow ing:
Illinois. In September 1948 the Institute o f
Labor and Industrial Relations o f the Universi­
ty of Illinois undertook a place-to-place com­
parison of prices in Freeport with prices in Chi­
cago and Milwaukee. A member o f that organi­
zation attended training classes held by the Bu­
reau for its own staff, and members of the Bu­
reau’s professional staff later made a complete
review and analysis of the materials before final
publication of the indexes by the institute.
Louisiana. The College o f Commerce, Louisiana
State University, has published consumers’
price indexes semiannually beginning in 1942




for Baton Rouge, Shreveport, Lake Charles,
Alexandria, and Monroe. When these indexes
were initiated, Bureau staff prepared weight­
ing patterns based on its own expenditure stu­
dies and provided staff to train university peo­
ple in collection techniques. Later, at the request
of the university, the weighting patterns were
revised to conform to the Bureau’s own revision
o f weights in July and August 1947. Current in­
structions on collection and tabulation proced­
ures are continuously supplied to the university.
Massachusetts. The Commonwealth o f Massa­
chusetts, Department of Labor and Industries,
has been calculating price indexes since 1910.
Currently, the State is publishing a monthly re­
tail price index for the State. At various times
the Bureau has provided technical assistance on
weight revisions, collection, and calculation pro­
cedures.
Michigan. Beginning in 1941 the Michigan
State Department of Labor has compiled quar­
terly consumers’ price indexes. Currently, in­
dexes are published for 10 cities: Battle Creek,
Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, Lan­
sing, Marquette, Muskegon, Pontiac, and Sag­
inaw-Bay City. Weights for these indexes were
prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics on
the basis o f information taken from its own ex­
penditure studies, and reallocated recently to the
reduced list of items priced by the Bureau since
July and August 1947. The Bureau also supplies
currently to the State Department of Labor
copies of all instructions on collection and tabu­
lation procedures and sample copies of schedules.

42

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

Pennsylvania. The Commonwealth o f Pennsyl­
vania, Department o f Labor and Industry, has
published quarterly consumers’ price indexes
for six cities since 1938: Connellsville, Johns­
town, Lancaster, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and
Scranton. BLS figures are used for the last
three cities named, but are converted to a base
o f June 15, 1941=100. Cost weights for the
first three cities were derived from BLS ex­
penditure data, and members o f the Bureau’s
staff have reviewed the tabulations at various
times. The State also publishes quarterly in­
dexes of food and fuel prices fo r 10 additional
cities: Allentown, Altoona, Du Bois, Erie, Har­
risburg, Oil City, Pottsville, Reading, Williams­
port, and York.
Utah. The State has established consumers’
price indexes for five cities: Salt Lake City,
Logan, Price, Richfield, and Cedar City. The
Bureau of Labor Statistics assigned a staff mem­
ber to set up weights for these indexes in 1946,
and staff was also assigned to train local people
in procedures applying to the collection of data.
The work in Utah was carried on by three co­
operating State agencies: Department o f Em­
ployment Security, State W elfare Commission,
and Bureau o f Business Research o f the Uni­
versity of Utah. Indexes have been published
for December 1945, March and September 1946,
March 1947, and March 1948. The Bureau o f
Labor Statistics has provided personnel to re­
view the indexes on several occasions and has
revised weights to conform to revisions in its
own indexes in July and August 1947. It con­
tinues to provide copies of all current instruc­
tions on collection and tabulation procedures.
The above States are those to which the Bu­
reau has provided technical assistance in vary­
ing degrees for the purpose o f setting up and
maintaining local indexes. Several other States
or local agencies are currently publishing vari­
ous types of price indexes. The Bureau has re­
cently had requests to supply assistance and
advice in establishing indexes by government
agencies in Washington, Montana, Ohio, Maine,
Connecticut, Nebraska, New Mexico, and North
Dakota.




TERRITORIES
The Bureau o f Labor Statistics has made a
number o f surveys in the Territories, either in­
dependently or in cooperation with Territorial
governments. Generally, the Bureau’s staff has
conducted income and expenditure studies
which have provided the basis fo r weighting
patterns for retail price indexes. Once the in­
dexes were set up, the Territorial governments
have continued, in most cases, to collect price
data and publish indexes periodically. Terri­
tories where such work has been undertaken
include the follow ing:
Alaska. Expenditure studies were made in
Juneau and Fairbanks in the summer o f 1944.
Consumers’ price indexes were published for
Juneau, Fairbanks, and Anchorage for March
1943, July, September, and December 1944, and
March, June, and September 1945. This work
was all done by Bureau staff.4 The Territorial
8
government has recently resumed the publica­
tion of food price indexes for several Alaskan
cities. In July 1948 the Secretary of the Ter­
ritorial Department o f Labor was in Washing­
ton to discuss Bureau procedures fo r collection
and calculation of retail food price indexes with
a view to initiating these procedures in the Alas­
kan indexes.
Hawaii. In the summer o f 1943 the Bureau
made a survey o f income and expenditures o f
Honolulu families.4 Since that time, retail
44
3
prices have been collected and an index pub­
lished quarterly fo r Honolulu by the Depart­
ment of Labor and Industrial Relations, Bureau
of Research and Statistics, Territory of Hawaii.
Puerto Rico. The Bureau provided technical
guidance to an income and expenditure study
made in Puerto Rico in 1940-41. The study was
made as a Works Project Administration proj­
ect sponsored by the Insular Department o f
Labor.45 The Puerto Rico Department o f Labor,
43 See report Income and Living Costs in Alaska, 1943-45.
44 See Wartime Earnings and Spending in Honolulu, 1943, Bulletin
No. 788.
45 See Incomes and Expenditures o f Wage Earners in Puerto Rico,
1940-41, in Monthly Labor Review, February 1948, or reprint, Serial
No. R. 1516.

COOPERATION W ITH OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

Bureau of Labor Statistics, has collected prices
and published indexes monthly up to the present
time for San Juan, Adjuntas, Comerio, Salevas,
Cabo Rojo, and Manati. Members o f the Puerto
Rico Department o f Labor were trained by Bu­
reau personnel in techniques o f collecting price
data.
Virgin Islands. Early in 1943, at the request
o f the Director o f Territories and Island Pos­
sessions in the Interior Department, the Bureau,
in cooperation with the Wage Commissioner o f
the Virgin Islands and the staffs o f the Depart­
ments o f Public Welfare, conducted a survey to
determine changes in prices for important goods
and services in the three urban centers in the
Virgin Islands— Charlotte Amalie, Christiansted, and Frederiksted.46 Indexes o f consumers’
prices were published for September o f each
year from 1939 through 1942 and for October
1943.

43

entirety by BLS and results o f the studies
turned over to the contracting agency fo r their
confidential use. This was in contrast to the
work with the States, where the activity was
usually a cooperative one, at least in some
phases o f the study.
Atom ic Energy Commission. Retail price in­
dexes have been computed fo r Oak Ridge semi­
annually since December 1946 and for
Knoxville semiannually since December 1947.
Intercity indexes have also been compiled at
the same periods fo r Oak Ridge, Knoxville,
Washington, Cincinnati, Memphis, Atlanta, and
Birmingham. In October 1948, the Bureau
started an income and expenditure study in
Los Alamos, N. Mex., and has contracted to
calculate a quarterly consumers’ price index for
that city in January, April, July, and October
o f each year, and intercity indexes for Los
Alamos, Los Angeles, Denver, New York, and
Chicago fo r the same periods.

FEDERAL AGENCIES
As the price collection agency of the Federal
Government, the Bureau has undertaken special
surveys for other Federal Government agencies
at various times. Particularly during the war
years, BLS collected a vast amount o f data for
such wartime enforcement agencies as OPA
and NHA.47 Most o f this work was done in its

Department of State. Retail prices for selected
items are collected quarterly in Washington,
D. C., fo r the State Department. These prices
are compared with prices o f similar items in
foreign countries, and the comparisons provide
the basis for adjustments in living allowances
to United States employees o f the State Depart­
ment working in foreign countries.

46
See Bureau o f Labor Statistics release Index o f Consumers* Prices
in the V irgin Islands, September 1939 to October 1943.

47 See Activities o f the Bureau o f Labor Statistics in World W ar II,
Historical Reports o f W ar Administration, No. 1, 1947.




CONSUMERS’ PRICE INDEXES FOR ADDITIONAL CITIES

44

Appendix Tables
T able A.— Consumers’ Price Index1 for Moderate-Income Families in Large Cities

(National Average), by Group of Commodities, 1929-48
[1935-39 = 100]
Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

All
items

Food

Apparel

1943: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15 —
Dec. 15__

120.7
121.0
122.8
124.1
125.1
124.8
123.9
123.4
123.9
124.4
124.2
124.4

133.0
133.6
137.4
140.6
143.0
141.9
139.0
137.2
137.4
138.2
137.3
137.1

126.0
126.2
127.6
127.9
127.9
127.9
129.1
129.6
132.5
133.3
133.5
134.6

108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.1

107.3
107.2
107.5
107.5
107.6
107.7
107.6
107.6
107.6
107.8
107.9
109.4

123.8
124.1
124.5
124.8
125.1
125.4
125.6
125.9
126.3
126.7
126.9
127.9

113.2
113.6
114.5
114.9
115.3
115.7
116.1
116.5
117.0
117.6
117.7
118.1

1944: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 1 5 May 15—
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15_
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

124.2
123.8
123.8
124.6
125.1
125.4
126.1
126.4
126.5
126.5
126.6
127.0

136.1
134.5
134.1
134.6
135.5
135.7
137.4
137.7
137.0
136.4
136.5
137.4

134.7
135.2
136.7
137.1
137.4
138.0
138.3
139.4
141.4
141.9
142.1
142.8

108.1
108.1
108.1
108.1
108.1
108.1
108.2
108.2
108.2
(3
)
(3
)
108.3

109.5
110.3
109.9
109.9
109.8
109.6
109.7
109.8
109.8
109.8
109.9
109.4

128.3
128.7
129.0
132.9
135.0
138.4
138.7
139.3
140.7
141.4
141.7
143.0

118.4
118.7
119.1
120.9
121.3
121.7
122.0
122.3
122.4
122.8
122.9
123.1

1945: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

127.1
126.9
126.8
127.1
128.1
129.0
129.4
129.3
128.9
128.9
129.3
129.9

137.3
136.5
135.9
136.6
138.8
141.1
141.7
140.9
139.4
139.3
140.1
141.4

143.0
143.3
143.7
144.1
144.6
145.4
145.9
146.4
148.2
148.5
148.7
149.4

(3
)
(3
)
108.3
(3
)
(3
)
108.3
(3
)
(3
)
108.3
(3
)
(3
)
108.3

109.7
110.0
110.0
109.8
110.0
110.0
111.2
111.4
110.7
110.5
110.1
110.3

143.6
144.0
144.5
144.9
145.4
145.8
145.6
146.0
146.8
146.9
147.6
148.3

123.3
123.4
123.6
123.8
123.9
124.0
124.3
124.5
124.6
124.7
124.6
124.8

1946: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

129.9
129.6
130.2
131.1
131.7
133.3
141.2
144.1
145.9
148.6
152.2
153.3

141.0
139.6
140.1
141.7
142.6
145.6
165.7
171.2
174.1
180.0
187.7
185.9

149.7
150.5
153.1
154.5
155.7
157.2
158.7
161.2
165.9
168.1
171.0
176.5

(3
)
(3
)
108.4
(3
)
(3
)
108.5
(3
)
108.7
108.8
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

110.8
111.0
110.5
110.4
110.3
110.5
113.3
113.7
114.4
114.4
114.8
115.5

148.8
149.7
150.2
152.0
153.7
156.1
157.9
160.0
165 6
168.5
171.0
177.1

125.4
125.6
125.9
126.7
127.2
127.9
128.2
129.8
129.9
131.0
132.5
136.1

1947:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 1 5 Apr. 1 5 May 15—
June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

153.3
153.2
156.3
156.2
156.0
157.1
158.4
160.3
163.8
163.8
164.9
167.0

183.8
182.3
189.5
188.0
187.6
190.5
193.1
196.5
203.5
201.6
202.7
206.9

179.0
181.5
184.3
184.9
185.0
185.6
184.7
185.9
187.6
189.0
190.2
191.2

108.8
108.9
109.0
109.0
109.2
109.2
110.0
111.2
113.6
114.9
115.2
115.4

117.3
117.5
117.6
118.4
117.7
117.7
119.5
123.8
124.6
125.2
126.9
127.8

179.1
180.8
182.3
182.5
181.9
182.6
184.3
184.2
187.5
187.8
188.9
191.4

137.1
137.4
138.2
139.2
139.0
139.1
139.5
139.8
140.8
141.8
143.0
144.4

108.5 1948:Jan. 15—
109.4
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. _
110.1
Apr. 1 5 110.6
May 15__
110.9
June15__
110.9
111.1
July 15__
111.1
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15__
111.4
111.8
Oct. 15—
112.7
Nov. 1 5 112.8
Dee. 15—

168.8
167.5
166.9
169.3
170.5
171.7
173.7
174.5
174.5
173.6
172.2
171.4

209.7
204.7
202.3
207.9
210.9
214.1
216.8
216.6
215.2
211.5
207.5
205.0

192.1
195.1
196.3
196.4
197.5
196.9
197.1
199.7
201.0
201.6
201.4
200.4

115.9
116.0
116.3
116.3
116.7
117.0
117.3
117.7
118.5
118.7
118.8
119.5

129.5
130.0
130.3
130.7
131.8
132.6
134.8
136.8
137.3
137.8
137.9
137.8

192.3
193.0
194.9
194.7
193.6
194.8
195.9
196.3
198.1
198.8
198.7
198.6

146.4
146.4
146.2
147.8
147.5
147.5
150.8
152.4
152.7
153.7
153.9
154.0

Food

Apparel

Rent

1929: June_____ 122.1
D ec_____ 122.8

131.3
133.8

115.4
114.7

141.4
139.9

111.1
113.6

111.7
111.3

104.5
104.9

1930:June_____ 120.3
D ec_____ 115.3

128.1
116.5

113.8
109.4

138.0
135.1

109.9
112.4

109.9
105.4

105.2
104.9

1931: June_____ 108.2
D ec_____ 104.2

102.1
96.5

103.5
96.3

130.9
125.8

107.3
109.1

98.1
92.6

104.3
103.3

1932: June_____
D ec_____

97.4
93.5

85.7
82.0

91.1
86.2

117.8
109.0

101.6
102.5

84.8
81.3

101.8
100.2

1933:June_____
D ec_____

90.8
93.9

82.2
88.1

84.8
94.4

100.1
95.8

97.2
102.9

81.5
91.1

97.8
98.1

1934: June_____
N ov_____

95.3
96.2

93.0
95.4

96.6
96.5

94.0
93.9

100.3
101.8

92.9
93.6

97.9
97.8

1935: Mar. 15. _
July 15__
Oct. 15.. _

97.8
97.6
98.0

99.7
99.4
100.0

96.8
96.7
96.9

93.8
94.1
94.6

102.1
99.0
100.5

94.2
94.5
95.7

98.1
98.2
97.9

1936: Jan. 15__
Apr. 15__
July 15__
Sept. 15._
Dec. 15__

98.8
97.8
99.4
100.4
99.8

101.5
98.4
102.6
104.8
101.6

97.3
97.4
97.2
97.5
99.0

95.1
95.5
96.5
97.1
98.1

100.8
100.8
99.1
99.9
100.5

95.8
95.7
95.9
96.6
97.9

98.2
98.4
98.7
99.0
99.1

1937: Mar. 15—
Junel5__
Sept. 15__
Dec. 15__

101.8
102.8
104.3
103.0

105.0
106.0
107.9
102.7

100.9
102.5
105.1
104.8

98.9
101.0
102.1
103.7

100.8
99.2
100.0
100.7

102.6
104.3
106.7
107.0

100.2
100.9
101.7
102.0

1938: Mar. 15
June 15__
Sept. 1 5 „
Dec. 15__

100.9
100.9
100.7
100.2

97.5
98.2
98.1
97.2

102.9
102.2
101.4
100.9

103.9
104.2
104.2
104.3

101.2
98.6
99.3
100.0

104.7
103.1
101.9
101.7

101.6
101.8
101.6
101.0

1939: Mar. 15. _ 99.1
98.6
June15__
Aug. 15 2_ 98.6
Sept. 15._ 100.6
99.6
Dec. 15__

94.6
93.6
93.5
98.4
94.9

100.4
100.3
100.3
100.3
101.3

104.3
104.3
104.3
104.4
104.4

100.1
97.5
97.5
98.6
99.9

100.9
100.6
100.6
101.1
102.7

100.5
100.4
100.4
101.1
100.9

1940: Mar. 15. _
June15__
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
N o v .15._
Dec. 15__

99.8
100.5
100.4
100.2
100.1
100.7

95.0
98.3
97.2
96.2
95.9
97.3

102.0
101.7
101.6
101.6
101.6
101.6

104.5
104.6
104.7
104.7
104.7
104.9

100.6
98.6
99.3
99.9
100.3
100.7

100.5
100.1
100.3
100.4
100.6
100.4

100.8
100.6
101.4
101.6
101.7
101.8

1941: Jan. 1 2
—
Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15. _
Oct. 15—
N o v .15—
Dec. 15__

100.8
100.8
100.8
101.2
102.2
102.9
104.6
105.3
106.2
108.1
109.3
110.2
110.5

97.6
97.8
97.9
98.4
100.6
102.1
105.9
106.7
108.0
110.7
111.6
113.1
113.1

101.2
100.7
100.4
102.1
102.4
102.8
103.3
104.8
106.9
110.8
112.6
113.8
114.8

105.0
105.0
105.1
105.1
105.4
105.7
105.8
106.1
106.3
106.8
107.5
107.8
108.2

100.8
100.8
100.6
100.7
101.0
101.1
101.4
102.3
103.2
103.7
104.0
104.0
104.1

100.2
100.1
100.4
101.6
102.4
103.2
105.3
107.4
108.9
112.0
114.4
115.6
116.8

101.8
101.9
101.9
101.9
102.2
102.5
103.3
103.7
104.0
105.0
106.9
107.4
107.7

1942: Jan. 15___
F eb .15__
Mar. 1 5 Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15__
Oct. 15___
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

112.0
112.9
114.3
115.1
116.0
116.4
117.0
117.5
117.8
119.0
119.8
120.4

116.2
116.8
118.6
119.6
121.6
123.2
124.6
126.1
126.6
129.6
131.1
132.7

116.1
119.0
123.6
126.5
126.2
125.3
125.3
125.2
125.8
125.9
125.9
125.9

108.4
108.6
108.9
109.2
109.9
108.5
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0

104.3
104.4
104.5
104.3
104.9
105.0
106.3
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.3

118.2
119.7
121.2
121.9
122.2
122.3
122.8
123.0
123.6
123.6
123.7
123.7

1 For description see p. 23.




Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
Rent ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

Period

All
items

Period

2 Estimated.

* Not surveyed this month.

APPENDIX TABLES

45

T able B .— C onsum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
b y G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48
[1935-39 = 100]
Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

Period1

All
items

Food

1935____ _____
1936..................
1937__________
1938.............. .
1939................ .
1940.................
1941..................
1942................ .
1943..................
1944.................
1945..................
1946..................
1947..................
1948..................

98.6
99.8
102.9
99.9
98.8
99.1
104.6
115.8
123.8
125.9
130.2
139.9
162.0
171.4

102.2
102.2
105.7
95.6
94.3
94.2
103.8
122.8
138.8
136.7
140.0
159.0
198.7
208.4

96.2
97.8
103.5
102.6
99.9
102.3
109.1
124.5
128.6
135.0
141.9
156.8
182.9
201.7

93.9
96.6
101.2
104.2
104.0
104.3
105.0
106.4
106.5
106.7
106.8
107.5
111.1
118.4

100.5
101.5
99.8
99.3
99.0
99.9
103.9
110.0
112.7
114.6
114.7
116.3
132.5
145.1

98.2
99.3
104.1
99.6
98.8
98.2
106.2
119.2
120.7
129.8
143.5
159.7
185.8
195.6

97.9
99.4
101.1
101.4
100.3
100.3
103.5
111.2
118.1
125.6
132.3
138.1
145.9
152.6

1942: Mar. 1 5 ..
June 15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

113.9
115.5
117.3
119.2

118.4
121.8
125.9
130.2

124.0
124.9
125.7
125.5

106.3
106.5
106.5
106.5

111.4
110.4
110.6
111.2

119.2
119.4
119.5
119.5

109.5
111.0
112.3
113.8

1943: Mar. 1 5 June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

123.0
125.2
124.6
124.3

137.7
143.9
139.9
137.3

127.4
128.5
129.6
130.8

106.5
106.4
106.5
106.6

112.7
112.5
112.9
113.8

119.9
120.3
120.7
123.0

117.3
117.1
119.5
120.6

1944: Mar. 15. _
June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

123.6
125.6
127.1
128.7

133.0
135.2
137.8
138.8

131.9
134.1
137.2
139.7

106.6
106.7
106.7
(2
)

114.0
114.5
114.6
114.1

125.3
131.3
132.6
133.7

122.9
125.9
126.5
130.4

1945: Mar. 1 5 ..
June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

128.7
130.1
131.5
131.4

136.9
140.6
141.5
141.6

140.7
141.5
142.6
144.1

106.7
(2
)
106.8
(2
)

115.9
115.3
115.4
112.5

140.5
145.3
146.1
146.1

131.3
130.8
134.3
134.1

1946: Mar. 15. _
June 15__
Sept. 15._
Dec. 15__

131.6
133.8
146.5
155.8

137.7
141.0
173.4
188.7

148.8
152.7
162.6
172.5

107.3
(2
)
107.7
(2
)

113.0
113.9
116.3
129.3

153.3
155.6
165.4
173.8

136.4
138.2
137.1
143.8

1947: Mar. 15—
June 1 5 ...
A u g .1 5 ..
Nov. 1 5 -

160.9
159.1
162.2
167.5

199.6
193.0
198.9
206.9

179.0
(2
)
180.4 3108.2
184.1
(2
)
190.5 116.1

128.5
128.5
136.9
140.0

185.5
185.4
186.2
189.6

145.2
145.5
146.1
147.1

1948: Feb. 15__
May 15__
Aug. 15. .
Nov. 15 __

169.2
170.8
176.2
173.7

205.6
207.9
215.7
205.9

198.5
200.4
206.7
206.9

140.4
144.3
148.2
148.2

1935____ _____
1936..................
1937..................
1938.......... .......
1939..................
1940.................
1941.................
1942..................
1943.................
1944........ .........
1945............. .
1946..................
1947..................
1948..................

98.6
99.7
101.9
100.2
99.6
99.9
106.1
118.4
125.7
127.5
131.5
141.5
163.1
174.8

99.8
100.9
104.3
98.2
96.7
96.6
107.0
127.8
145.3
141.8
147.4
166.1
203.7
221.2

98.0
98.3
101.7
101.3
100.7
101.5
106.0
124.4
129.8
143.3
151.1
163.6
185.6
198.4

95.8
97.6
100.6
102.8
103.2
104.2
108.8
110.2
106.7
106.4
106.5
106.8
110.1
114.8

1942: Jan. 1 5 ...
Feb. 15—
Mar. 15__
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 15—
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15_
Dec. 15__

113.9
114.9
116.7
117.3
118.2
119.2
118.5
119.1
119.8
120.4
120.9
121.8

119.0
120.5
123.0
123.6
125.8
127.1
128.3
129.6
131.2
133.8
134.9
137.3

116.9
118.4
124.7
126.7
126.2
125.9
125.9
125.1
125.7
125.7
125.8
125.8

113.2
113.6
113.6
113.7
113.7
113.7
106.9
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7

Apparel

Rent

Period *




Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

1943: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15 —
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

122.6
122.3
124.8
126.7
128.2
128.1
126.0
125.6
126.0
126.9
125.2
125.9

139.1
137.9
144.0
148.6
152.6
152.5
146.3
145.2
145.3
147.0
142.4
142.5

125.8
126.6
127.5
127.8
127.4
127.4
129.7
129.7
132.4
132.8
133.1
137.0

106.7
106.7
106.8
106.8
106.8
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.6
106.6
106.5
106.6

106.3
106.6
106.8
106.8
106.8
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.8
106.8
106.8
108.9

127.6
128.5
128.9
128.9
128.9
129.0
129.4
129.7
130.4
130.7
130.8
132.6

113.1
113.2
113.7
114.4
114.4
114.3
114.3
114.3
114.6
115.7
115.7
115.8

1944: Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15—
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 1 5 ...
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

126.7
125.5
125.9
126.7
126.9
127.5
128.3
128.6
127.7
128.3
129.2
129.2

142.5
140.2
139.3
140.3
140.5
141.2
143.1
143.5
140.7
142.0
144.3
143.9

137.3
138.5
141.0
141.8
142.8
143.6
144.0
145.3
145.9
146.2
146.3
146.5

106.6
106.6
106.5
106.4
106.4
106.4
106.4
106.4
106.4
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

109.2
110.7
109.4
109.4
109.4
108.9
108.9
108.9
109.0
108.9
109.0
108.9

133.1
133.5
134.1
138.4
139.7
144.7
145.7
146.3
146.7
147.4
147.8
148.4

115.9
116.3
118.8
119.9
120.2
120.5
120.7
120.7
120.8
121.0
121.3
121.5

1945: Jan. 1 5 ...
F eb.15__
Mar. 15__
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15_. _
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 1 5 ...
Nov. 15__
Dec. 15__

129.8
130.0
129.8
130.0
131.0
132.9
133.0
132.6
132.3
132.1
131.9
132.5

145.2
145.2
144.1
144.9
146.9
151.4
150.4
149.1
148.1
147.5
147.5
148.1

147.2
147.4
147.7
147.2
148.2
149.8
151.7
152.5
155.1
156.0
153.9
156.5

(2
)
(2
)
106.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
106.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

108.7
109.1
109.3
108.7
108.7
108.8
111.8
111.7
111.3
111.2
111.2
111.5

148.4
148.5
149.4
150.1
150.7
152.3
151.9
152.3
145.7
147.3
147.7
148.7

121.8
122.7
123.3
123.4
123.4
123.5
123.6
123.6
123.5
123.0
123.2
123.2

193.6
191.4
200.6
201.8

150.4
151.6
155.1
156.7

1946: Jan. 1 5 ...
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15. _
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

132.2
131.5
132.1
133.4
133.7
135.6
143.2
146.7
148.1
150.9
154.9
155.7

147.7
145.6
147.1
149.4
149.3
152.4
170.5
178.0
180.1
186.1
195.1
192.3

155.5
156.1
155.4
158.4
160.8
161.5
163.1
165.1
166.1
169.5
172.1
179.0

(2
)
(2
)
106.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
106.9
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

112.0
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.2
116.3
116.6
117.6
117.9
118.0
118.1

148.6
148.3
150.2
151.4
157.0
161.0
160.9
165.4
171.8
172.8
177.3
182.1

123.2
123.4
123.2
123.5
123.4
125.8
127.0
128.6
128.9
129.8
131.1
135.2

102.6
101.8
98.6
99.0
98.0
98.7
101.9
104.1
106.9
109.2
110.2
114.7
127.7
143.1

94.2
97.4
102.9
104.2
101.4
101.8
110.1
127.0
129.6
142.2
149.4
162.2
188.6
200.5

1947: Jan. 15__
98.9
F eb.15__
100.0
Mar. 15. _
100.2
Apr. 15—_
100.3
May 15__
100.7
June15__
100.9
Sept. 15_
103.4
Dec. 15__
110.7
114.5 1948: Mar. 1 5 ..
119.8
Junel5__
123.2
Sept. 1 5 126.9
Dec. 15__
139.0
146.9

156.2
155.9
159.6
159.7
159.4
160.5
167.8
171.3

191.4
189.7
199.3
197.7
198.5
202.2
212.8
217.8

182.8
184.0
185.7
185.2
182.6
180.5
187.0
192.3

107.2
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
111.5
112.6

119.9
119.9
120.0
127.2
124.7
125.0
132.8
135.0

181.5
184.1
182.9
184.0
182.5
186.3
193.8
197.2

136.1
136.4
136.7
137.7
137.2
136.4
141.2
143.5

170.9
176.1
179.2
174.0

212.3
225.3
228.7
214.6

198.1
198.5
200.8
198.3

113.9
114.5
115.6
116.5

138.7
142.3
148.0
148.3

198.1
200.1
203.5
201.9

145.5
145.5
149.0
149.4

103.5
103.5
103.5
102.7
103.8
103.8
104.8
104.6
104.6
104.7
104.7
104.7

124.4
125.1
126.5
127.4
127.7
127.7
127.7
127.6
127.6
127.6
127.6
127.6

107.1
107.8
108.8
109.7
110.2
110.7
111.2
112.3
112.3
112.3
112.9
112.9

97.3
98.5
103.7
101.2
99.2
99.8
106.6
118.2
125.5
129.2
132.2
142.5
164.8
175.2

102.2
102.6
107.7
95.6
91.9
93.1
103.3
122.4
139.3
139.9
143.4
164.4
203.5
211.7

102.8
101.1
101.3
99.7
95.2
92.2
96.3
99.7
101.8
104.5
106.6
111.5
125.0
133.7

95.9
97.2
104.1
101.8
101.0
98.8
106.1
118.9
121.4
133.7
140.0
150.0
173.7
189.7

98.9
98.9
100.5
101.0
100.7
100.7
104.2
111.5
115.8
123.3
126.6
128.8
137.9
145.7

BALTIMORE, M D .

Seelfootnotes on p. 61.

Food

BALTIMORE. M D .—Continued

ATLANTA,, GA.

116.7
117.5
120.0
121.4

All
items

1935..................
1936..................
1937..................
1938..................
1939.............. —
1940..................
1941..................
1942..................
1943..................
1944..................
1945..................
1946..................
1947..................
1948..................

BIRMINGHAM. ALA.
95.4
96.7
103.6
103.3
100.9
102.4
109.0
125.7
130.3
138.2
142.9
155.5
184.4
205.1

83.3
89.8
102.7
112.6
111.5
113.9
121.3
124.6
121.8
122.5
122.5
122.8
129.4
137.2

46

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES
T able B.— Consumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income Families in 34 Large Cities,

by Group o f Commodities, 1935-48— Continued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and fumish- cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.— Continued
115.1
116.4
117.3
118.2
118.7
117.1
117.2
118.8
118.8
H 9,9
119!9
120.8

115.2
117.0
117.8
118.9
120.5
120.9
121.2
126.1
125.3
128.1
127.7
130.2

120.1
121.8
125.8
128.1
127.1
126.5
126.6
125.5
126.8
126.8
12618
126.8

129.5
130.4
130.4
131.0
131.0
120.4
120.4
120.4
120.4
120 4
120! 4
120.4

100.1
100.1
100.1
98.5
99.0
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5
100 2
100.2
100.2

117.5
117.9
118.9
119.3
119.5
119.1
119.2
119.2
119.1
119 1
119.1
119.1

1943: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15 __
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15__
Dec. 15__

121.3
121.4
122.8
125.5
125.8
126.4
126.2
126.6
127.6
127.3
127.4
127.6

131.4
131.7
134.8
141.0
140.7
141.9
140.9
141.3
142.9
141.8
141.7
141.2

126.8
126.6
128.0
128.3
129.2
129.3
129.7
130.3
132.5
133.4
133.8
135.4

120.8
120.9
121.2
121.6
121.8
121.8
122.0
121.9
122.3
122.3
122.4
122.4

100.2
100.2
100.4
101.1
101.7
102.4
102.4
102.4
102.4
102.4
102.5
104.0

119.4
119.9
120.0
120.8
121.3
121.8
121.8
121.8
121.8
122.1
122.4
124.3

1944: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15 __
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15-_
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
N o v .15—
D ec. 15__

127.8
127.1
126.9
127.6
128.7
129.5
130.1
131.7
130.0
129.8
130.5
131.0

140.6
137.8
136.2
136.1
138.5
139.8
141.4
145.4
140.3
139.5
141.3
142.3

135.5
135.7
136.5
136.8
137.3
138.4
138.5
139.6
139.9
139.9
139.9
140.3

122.4
122.4
122.4
122.5
122.5
122.5
122.5
122.5
122.5
(2
)

104.3
104.6
104.6
104.6
104.6
105.8
104.0
104.2
104.2
104.5
104.5
104.5

124.3
124.3
124.3
133.6
134.7
134.9
134.9
136.3
138.9
138.9
138.9
140.6

1945: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 15. .
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
N o v .15—
Dec. 15__

131.3
130.5
130.3
131.0
131.4
132.2
133.5
133.9
133.0
133.1
133.0
133.5

142.8
140.6
139.8
141.1
141.4
143.7
146.9
147.5
144.1
144.2
143.8
145.2

140.9
141.1
141.6
141.6
141.7
141.8
142.0
142.6
145.0
145.3
145.4
145.9

104.7
104.8
104.8
104.8
107.5
107.5
107.5
107.5
107.5
107.6
107.6
107.6

140.8
139.9
139.9
139.5
139 4
139.4
139 4
139.8
140.3
140.2
140.4
140.8

1946:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15—
A u g .1 5 -.
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

133.3
132.9
133.2
133.6
134.5
136.5
143.3
148.6
147.1
150.4
157.9
158.5

144.6
142.9
142.8
142.3
144.0
147.7
166.6
180.8
176.6
183.0
203.5
198.4

145.4
147.2
147.5
150.8
152.1
154.2
154.8
155.9
161.1
163.0
163.5
170.1

108.3
108.3
108.3
108.3
108.3
112.9
113.0
113.0
114.1
114.3
114.6
114.6

140.5
139.1
141.5
143.7
148.0
150.6
152.8
152.4
150.5
156.3
158.5
166.4

1947: Jan.15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15_
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15. .
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

158.7
158.1
162.0
161.7
160.7
162.1
164.1
166.6
169.1
169.7
171.6
173.8

196.0
193.5
202.9
198.8
195.8
197.3
201.8
204.8
210.9
210.7
212.7
217.0

173.5
175.2
179.5
180.3
180.4
184.4
183.6
187.8
188.0
190.7
192.8
197.0

120.5
120.5
120.5
120.5
120.5
120.5
128.8
128.8
128.8
129.8
129.8
130.9

169.9
169.5
172.3
171.4
169.1
171.7
173.1
173.5
176.7
177.2

1948: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__

174.4
172.8
172.0
172.7
173.7
174.7

218.0
211.1
207.2

196.7
200.1
203.1
204.4
204.5
205.3

2 0 7 .5

209.6
212.7




(2
)

<)
2
122.3
(2
)
( 2)

122.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
( 2)
( 2)

122.5
(2
)
(* )
«
(2
>
(2
>

122.5
(2
)

122.6
( 2)

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
( 2)

124.8
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
131.6
(2
)
(2
)
135.6
(2
)
(2
)
136.0
(2
)
(2
)
137.5
(2
)

131.9
132.0
131.8
131.8
131.8
131.8

All
items

Food

Apparel

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
Rent ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.— Continued

1942: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15—
Sept. 15-Oct 15
Nov. 1512
Dec. 15__

(2
)
(2
)

Period1

1 7 8 .2

182.2
181.3
182.2
184.1
191.8
191.1
190.9

108.9 1948: July 15__ 177.0
110.0
A u g .15._ 179.3
110.5
Sept. 15— 178.6
111.5
Oct. 15__ 176.9
111.6
Nov. 1 5 - 175.0
111.7
Dec. 15__ 174.8
111.6
111.6
112.0
112 4
99.7
113.1 1935..................
99.9
113.0 1936..................
1937................ . 102.5
99.7
113.0 1938..................
98.2
113.0 1939..................
99.3
113.4 1940..................
1941.................. 103.5
114.8
115.5 1942— ............ 114.5
115.9 1943................. 120.7
116.3 1944-................ 122.0
117.2 1945-................ 124.4
117.6 1946.................. 134.6
117.6 1947.................. 153.0
117.6 1948.................. 165.4
117.7
1942:Jan.15__ 109.5
F eb .15__ 111.0
119.2
Mar, 15— 111.6
120.3
Apr. 15__ 112.0
121.4
May 15__ 113.4
122.8
June15__ 113.9
123.5
July 15__ 115.8
124.2
Aug. 1 5 - 115.3
124.4
Sept. 15— 116.2
124.4
Oct. 15— 117.9
124.4
Nov. 1 5 - 118.8
124.7
Dec. 15— 118.9
124.8
125.1
1943: Jan. 14— 118.9
F eb.15__ 118.9
125.1
Mar. 15— 120.6
125.1
Apr. 15__ 121.8
125.2
May 15__ 122.3
126.6
June15__ 121.8
126.7
July 15__ 120.3
126.7
Aug. 1 5 - 120.0
127.1
Sept. 15— 120.4
127.3
Oct. 15__ 121.6
127.4
Nov. 1 5 - 121.0
127.4
Dec. 15__ 121.1
127.4
127.4
1944: Jan. 15— 121.1
F eb.15__ 120.4
127.4
Mar. 15— 120.5
127.4
Apr. 15__ 121.2
128.6
May 15__ 121.3
128.9
June15___ 121.8
128.6
July 15__ 122.4
128.9
Aug. 1 5 - 122.8
128.5
Sept. 15_ 123.3
128.9
Oct. 15__ 122.7
126.1
Nov. 15 — 123.0
128.6
Dec. 15__ 123.5
130.2
134.1
1945: Jan. 15— 123.6
F eb.15__ 123.3
134.2
Mar. 15— 122.9
134.3
Apr. 15__ 123.0
134.6
May 15__ 123.9
137.4
June 15__ 125.5
137.8
July 15__ 125.8
138.7
Aug. 1 5 - 125.7
138.5
Sept. 15— 124.6
138.2
Oct .15— 124.5
139.1
Nov. 1 5 - 124.6
139.9
Dec. 15— 124.9
141.1
141.1
1946: Jan.15__ 125.5
F eb .15__ 125.0
142.1
Mar. 15 — 125.7
142.9
Apr. 1 5 - 126.6
143.2
May 15__ 126.7
143.0
June15__ 127.9
143.3
142.9
See footnotes on p. 61.

218.0
219.3
216.3
210.8
205.4
204.8

205.4
207.0
209.0
209.3
208.8
207.4

RO STO N

(2
)
138.7
(2
)
(2
)
139.4
(2
)
1UA.Q.Q

* ■

135.6
135.6
135.6
135.6
135.6
135.6

191.7
192.3
192.1
193.7
192.6
193.0

143.8
149.3
149.3
149.3
149.2
150.0

•

101.0
101.2
104.7
97.8
95.3
96.2
103.2
121.3
133.1
130.9
133.6
153.1
184.0
200.9

97.8
98.7
102.3
101.6
99.6
100.9
105.2
121.1
125.7
136.5
143.1
156.4
176.3
189.2

99.9
99.7
99.9
100.3
100.2
100.5
101.5
104.9
104.9
104.9
105.1
105.3
108.3
113.3

97.9
98.2
102.0
101.6
100.2
105.0
108.2
114.2
118.4
120.1
119.4
121.0
131.2
150.7

96.4
96.4
104.2
103.0
100.0
98.2
105.0
118.0
120.5
131.0
143.4
152.4
174.4
186.3

99?
99.4
101.1
100.4
99.5
100.3
102.8
108.8
112.7

112.6
115.1
115.3
115.3
118.3
119.9
122.6
122.5
124.4
128.5
130.4
130.7

113.7
116.5
120.2
123.0
123.6
121.7
121.8
121.7
122.5
122.6
122.7
122.8

104.2
104.6
104.6
104.9
105.0
105.0
104.9
104.9
105.1
105.1
105.1
105.0

110.4
110.4
110.4
111.9
112.7
112.6
120.7
116.6
116.3
116.3
116.3
116.4

115.6
117.0
118.7
118.8
118.6
118.3
118.1
118.2
118.3
118.3
118.3
118.2

105.2
106.8
107.6
107.9
108.4
108.7
109.5
109.2
109.4
110.0
111.1
111.1

130.5
130.4
134.1
137 1
138.1
136.8
132.5
131.1
131.0
133.1
131.4
130.9

121.7
121.4
123.3
123.5
123.6
123.3
124.5
125.1
128.8
130.2
130.8
132.2

105.0
105.0
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9

118.1
118.2
118.2
118.3
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
119.7

118.3
119.5
119.7
119.8
119.5
119.8
120.2
120.6
121.5
121.7
121.7
123.9

111.1
111.2
111.3
111.4
111.8
112.2
112.4
113.4
113.5
114.5
114.5
114.7

130.9
128.7
128.6
129 5
129.6
130.4
131.9
132.2
132.9
131.1
131.8
132.7

132.4
132.7
134.5
135.4
135.6
135.9
136.1
137.5
139.2
139.4
139.6
139.9

104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9

119.7
121.0
120.2
120.2
120.2
120.0
120.0
120.0
120.0
120 0
120.2
120.2

123.5
123.4
123.3
125.1
126.5
132.8
133.0
134.0
134.3
138.4
139.4
139.5

114.6
114.7
114.8
116.0
116.2
116.4
116.4
116.9
117.2
117.2
117.3
117.3

132.8
132.1
130.6
130.8
133.0
136.8
136.6
135.7
133.4
133.3
133.8
134.5

140.0
140.2
140.7
140.8
141.7
142.7
143.3
143.6
146.4
146.7
146.0
145.1

(2
)
(*)
(2
(2
)
(2
)
105.1

120.2
120.7
120.7
120.2
120.1
120.1
121.8
122.2
116.8
116.8
116.8
117.0

139 5
139.3
143.0
143.8
144.4
144.9
145.3
145.6
146.6
141.2
142.6
144.8

117.5
117.6
117.7
117.7
117.6
117.5
118.4
119.1
119.2
119.1
119.1
119.2

135.1
133.3
134.1
135.9
135.1
138.0

145.6
147.0
150.5
150.7
153.8
153.9

118.0
118.9
118.1
118.2
118.2
118.2

143.9
143.3
145.2
147.1
148.5
149.4

120.5
120.6
120.4
121.2
121.5
122.0

( 2)
(2
)
(2
)
2)

(2
)
105.0

( 2)
( 2)

105.1
(2)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
105.2
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

JJ6 .2

118.3
123.4
136.5
143.2

APPENDIX TABLES

47

T able B.— C onsum ers’ P rice In dex fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
b y G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Bent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity,and furnish- cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

BOSTON , MASS.—Continued

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

BUFFALO , N. Y.—Continued

1946: July 15__
Aug. 15—
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

137.6
140.0
141.6
144.6
146.1
148.2

161.9
165.2
168.0
174.4
177.8
178.1

155.1
158.0
161.8
165.1
165.7
169.4

(2
)
105.4
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2
)

121.2
124.0
124.2
123.7
124.1
125.4

149.9
151.6
155.4
162.2
162.6
169.2

1947:J an.15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 1 5 ...
M ay 15__
June15__
July 1 5 ...
Aug. 1 5 ..
Sept. 15__
Oct. 15__
N o v .15._
Dec. 15__

148.7
147.4
150.3
149.4

177.6
172.7
180.0
176.3

1 4 8 .6

1 7 5 .6

150.3
151.9
154.5
158.6
157.5
158.3
160.4

179.6
183.5
187.9
195.3
191.8
192.4
195.7

170.8
174.5
172.7
172.5
171.8
173.5
174.6
178.8
180.4
180.7
182.1
183.3

(*)
(2
)
105.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
>
i& .
(2
)
(2
)
111.4

126.8
126.9
127.0
130.0
127.5
127.5
129.0
133.5
133.6
134.3
138.0
140.7

169.0
171.0
173.7
175.1
174.7
175.2
173.1
173.3
177.2
175.7
176.6
178.6

1948: Jan.15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 15__
M ay 15__
June 15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__.

163.1
161.3
160.8
163 6
164.1
166.1
168.6
168.7
169.0
167.8
166.7
164.7

200.3
195.0
192.2
198.2
199.2
204.1
210.2
208.8
207.2
202.6
199.2
194.2

183.5
185.0
186.9
188.1
189.2
188.5
188.5
190.7
192.3
193.1
192.8
192.1

(2
)
(2
)
112.1
(2
)
(2
)
112.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
114.6
(2
)
115.2

145.6
147.3
147.9
148.8
148.1
148.7
149.4
152.3
153.0
156.0
156.1
154.8

181.4
181.3
181.9
182.6
182.8
184.8
186.4
186.9
189.4
192.2
193.1
193.0

1935
......
1936
......
1937
......
1938
......
1939
......
1940
......
1941
......
1942
......
1943
......
1944
......
1945
......
1946
......
1947 ______
1948..................

97.5
99.0
103.1
100.8
99.5
101.0
107.5
120.0
126.3
126.1
128.5
138.3
158.6
170.3

100.7
101.4
104.7
97.4
95.9
98.2
108.5
126.5
140.3
134.1
136.8
152.7
187.0
204.9

97.3
98.3
102.8
101.0
100.5
101.0
106.1
126.0
129.4
136.6
144.7
160.4
188.8
197.5

91.6
95.1
101.8
105.6
105.8
106.2
110.5
115.1
114.6
114.7
114.9
115.2
116.3
121.0

102.6
102.2
100.3
97.8
97.0
98.9
101.1
103.5
105.0
107.1
106.9
112.5
122.0
134.6

95.1
94.6
106.0
103.6
100.7
100.0
109.2
125.0
126.4
137.1
143.2
160.5
192.7
201.6

1942: Jan. 15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
N o v .1 5 ..
Dec.15_
_

115.0
116.2
117.8
119.0
120.5
120.9
120.9
120.5
120.5
122.0
123.0
123.6

118.4
119.6
121.5
122.4
125.2
127.3
127.8
127.6
127.6
131.8
133.7
135.5

117.4
120.2
126.1
128.7
129.3
127.2
127.2
127.2
127.2
127.2
127.1
126.9

114.7
114.7
114,9
116.3
117.9
115.5
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6

103.3
103.3
103.5
103.1
103.5
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.6

121.0
123.8
125.7
126.0
126.1
125.9
126.1
125.3
125.1
125.1
125.1
125.0

BUFFALO, N. Y.

1943: Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15_.
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15—
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
N o v .1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

124.7
125.0
126.4
127.4
128.8
127.8
126.2
125.4
125.5
126.1
125.9
126.1

137.3
138.1
141.2
144.0
147.8
145.2
140.5
137.9
137.3
138.5
137.8
137.6

126.6
126.4
127.8
128.0
127.5
127.6
128.4
129.3
132.1
132.5
132.6
133.4

114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6

105.0
105.0
105.0
105.0
105.0
104.8
104.8
104.8
104.8
104.8
104.8
106.5

125.2
125.2
126.5
126.5
126.5
126.6
126.6
126.6
126.8
126.8
126.9
127.1

1944: Jan. 15__
F eb .15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15—
A u g .1 5 ..

125.2
125.0
124.8
124.9
126.0
126.3
126.6
126.3

135.0
134.0
133.3
132.5
134.2
134.6
135.0
134.0

133.1
133.3
134.5
135.0
135.2
135.5
136.0
136.7

114.6
114.6
114.7
114.7
114.7
114.6
(2
)
(2
)

106.5
108.4
107.3
107.3
107.3
106.9
106.9
106.9

127.3
127.4
127.5
128.5
138.1
141.7
141.8
141.9




Period1

122.? 1944: Sept. 15— 127.1
124.9
Oct. 15__ 127.1
Nov. 1 5 - 126.7
124 6
125.0
Dec. 15__ 127.1
125.8
132.4 1945: Jan. 15__ 127.4
F eb.15__ 127.6
Mar. 15. _ 127.2
134.8
135.5
Apr. 15__ 127.1
136.2
May 15__ 127.8
137.0
June15__ 129.4
July 15— 129.3
136.4
Aug. 1 5 - 129.4
136.3
Sept. 15— 128.5
135.8
Oct. 15__ 128.6
136.1
Nov. 1 5 - 129.4
136.2
Dec. 15__ 129.8
136.8
137.7
138.8 1946: Jan. 15__ 129.8
F eb.15__ 129.8
Mar. 15__ 130.2
140.4
Apr. 15__ 131.2
140.0
May 15__ 132.0
140.6
June15__ 132.6
142.6
July 15__ 139.6
143.0
A u g .1 5 .. 142.2
142.6
Sept. 1 5 .. 144.9
142.9
Oct. 15__ 146.5
143.8
N o v .1 5 .. 149.6
144.7
Dec. 15__ 151.7
145
146.3
146.1 1947: Jan. 15__ 152.7
F eb .15__ 152.4
Mar. 15. _ 155.3
Apr 15___ 155.3
May 15__ 156 .2
96.7
June15__ 157.7
98.9
July 15__ 159.1
102.5
Oct. 15__ 162.6
101.9
100.0 1948: Jan. 15__ 167.4
101.6
Apr. 15__ 167.2
106.3
July 15— 173.1
116.8
Oct. 15__ 172.7
121.7
124.9
126.0
131.8
145.1 loss
97.2
98.5
153.9 } 9 3 6 : : . . . : : . : :
}937.................. 103.0
112.3 }938.................. 101.5
113.8 }939..................
99.8
114.6 }940.................. 100.6
116.2 }941.................. 105.7
117.1 }942.................. 116.3
118.8 1943.................. 122.8
118.8 1944.................. 124.7
117.5 1945.................. 127.3
117.4 1946.................. 138.4
117.4 1947.................. 160.8
118.8 1948.................. 174.9
118.8
1942: Jan. 15__ 112.0
120.7
Feb. 1 5 - 112.4
121.1
Mar. 15— 113.7
121.3
Apr. 15__ 115.3
121.4
May 15__ 116.5
121.8
June15__ 116.3
July 15__ 116 4
121.6
121.6
A u g .1 5 .. 117.4
121.6
Sept. 15_ 117.3
121.7
Oct. 15__ 118.9
122.4
Nov. 15— 119.5
122.5
Dec. 15__ 119.5
122.7
1943: Jan.15__ 119.8
122.7
F eb .15__ 120.6
122.7
Mar. 15. . 122.3
Apr. 15__ 123.5
122.8
May 15__ 124.5
124.5
124.9
June15__ 124.1
125.1
July 15__ 122.5
125.4
125.7
See footnotes on p. 61

106.9
106.9
106.9
106.9

142.2
142.5
142.8
143.0

126.2
126.2
126.2
126.2

106.9
107.1
107.2
106.9
104.6
104.8
106.8
107.4
107.4
107.4
108.1
108.4

142.9
138.3
138.8
138.7
138.8
141.5
145.5
145.4
146.1
147.4
147.3
147.8

125.7
125.7
125.7
125.7
125.7
125.7
125.7
126.2
126.8
126.4
126.4
126.4

108.9
108.9
108.9
108.9
108.9
108.9
114.9
114.9
116.2
115.8
117.3
117.7

148.0
149.3
150.5
151.0
150.8
153.3
154.9
157.1
174.2
175.6
178.1
183.1

127.4
127.7
128.4
128.4
130.9
130.9
130.7
132.6
134.1
134.8
135.8
140.0

8

(2
)
(2
)
115.4
(2
)
(2
)
117.2

119.5
119.5
119.5
119.5
117.8
118.1
120.0
126.4

185.0
187.3
189.8
188.0
188.9
190.1
195.3
197.4

142.2
142.4
143.4
144.4
144.0
144.0
144.5
146.6

119.1
119.7
121.3
122.1

127.1
128.4
139.1
140.2

200.3
200.9
202.3
204.9

151.7
151.4
152.8
157.3

93.7
95.9
104.2
103.4
102.7
102.0
107.5
119.3
120.8
135.2
138.7
149.7
176.2
181.9

97.5
98.5
101.8
102.2
99.9
100.3
103.0
110.1
114.4
119.2
122.1
125.7
138.3
149.7

134.8
134.7
133.4
134.1

139.4
139.8
140.2
140.9

135.5
136.3
135.2
134.7
137.1
140.2
138.9
138.4
135.3
135.6
136.7
137.6

140.3
140.8
141.0
141.8
142.2
144.8
145.1
146.1
147.0
147.3
149.9
149.8

136.9
136.1
136.4
138.8
139.0
140.2
157.9
162.8
164.7
168.4
175.4
175.8

150.4
151.4
152.1
153.9
155.1
156.2
157.5
161.0
167.6
169.2
172.1
178.7

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2
)
(2
)
115.2
(2
)
115.2
(2
)
(2
)

175.9
173.3
179.7
179.2
182.5
187.0
188.7
193.3

180.3
183.8
187.2
188.1
187.6
186.5
189.4
193.2

202.1
200.2
212.9
206.4

193.8
196.8
197.2
200.9

1

114.8
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
l& O

8

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.2

(2
)

CHICAGO , ILL.
97.7
98.9
103.2
101.1
99.1
99.7
104.0
120.2
125.3
133.0
140.3
154.7

91.3
93.6
99.6
107.0
108.5
108.6
110.5
114.1
114.5
114.7
114.8
115.5

1 8 4 .8
2 0 0 .0

1 2 1 .8

132.8

98.7
98.2
99.6
102.1
101.3
100.3
101.6
103.5
103.4
105.1
106.0
105.2
115.2
127.7

116.0
115.1
117.5
120.0
121.7
122.1
122.8
125.5
124.9
128.9
129.9
129.9

1 1 2 .7

116.7
119.5
124.0
123.1
120.4
120.9
119.8
121.4
121.4
121.5
121.3

112.5
112.7
112.8
112.8
116.2
115.6
114.4
114.4
114.4
114.4
114.4
114.4

103.4
103.4
103.4
102.7
103.2
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.7
103.7

116.2
118.3
119.5
120.7
120.5
119.6
119.7
119.4
119.4
119.4
119.6
119.6

107.4
108.3
109.1
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.5
110.5
110.9
111.6
111.7

129.9
132.1
135.9
138.6
141.1
140.0
137.1

121.2
122.0
123.7
123.7
123.5
123.7
124.9

114.4
114.4
114.4
114.5
114.5
114.5
114.5

104.5
102.6
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2

119.7
119.8
120.1
120.2
120.3
120.4
120.5

112.8
112.8
113.1
113.6
113.7
113.8
113.8

100.0
101.4
106.1
97.8
94.9
96.7
106.1
122.9
136.0
135.0
137.8
160.1
197.5
215.2

48

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

Table B.— C onsum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e Fam ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
b y G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period 1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

CHICAGO, IJ Ij.— Continued
j
122.9
123.7
123.8
122.8
123.1

136.4
137.0
136.6
133.9
133.7

125.1
128.3
128.8
129.0
129.6

114.5
114.5
114.5
114.5
114.7

103.2
103.2
103.2
103.2
104.4

120.6
120.9
121.3
121.6
123.9

1944: Jan. 1 5 ...
F eb.15__
Mar. 15._
Apr. 15___
May 15__
June 15—
July 15—
A u g .15._
Sept. 15. _
Oct. 1 5 ...
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 1 5 ...

122.7
122.3
122.5
124.0
124.2
124.8
126.2
125.7
126.1
125.8
125.9
126.3

132.5
131.3
131.6
133.9
134.2
135.4
138.6
137.1
137.3
135.8
135.8
136.5

129.6
130.0
130.8
131.2
131.5
132.0
132.3
133.2
135.7
136.1
136.3
137.2

114.7
114.7
114.7
114.7
114.7
114.7
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
114.8

105.0
105.2
105.0
105.1
105.1
105.1
105.1
105.1
105.2
105.2
105.2
105.2

124.0
124.7
124.7
135.1
135.7
138.7
138.8
139.0
139.8
140.1
140.5
141.4

1945: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
M ay 15__
Junel5___
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15. _
Oct. 1 5 ...
N o v .1 5 ..
Dec. 1 5 ...

126.0
125.7
126.0
126.5
127.9
128.2
128.5
127.9
127.5
127.6
127.4
128.0

135.3
134.5
135.0
136.2
139.5
140.2
140.7
139.2
137.5
137.8
137.8
139.3

137.6
137.8
139.0
139.5
139.7
139.9
140.3
140.3
142 9
142.0
142.2
142.3

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
114.8
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.0

105.2
105.2
105.2
105.2
105.9
105.9
106.4
106.6
106.5
106.5
106.6
106.7

141.9
138.6
138.0
138.0
138.6
138.8
137.2
137.3
138.5
138.9
139.3
139.7

i946: Jan. 15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15—
May 1 5 ...
June15.
July 1 5 ...
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15..
Oct. 1 5 ...
Nov. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

128.1
127.8
128.0
129.9
130.1
130.9
141.1
144.0
146.1
149.5
152.5
153.0

139.2
138.6
138.7
141.9
141.9
142.8
168.4
174.0
176.2
183.4
189.4
187.0

142.9
142.4
146.6
148.4
150.3
152.1
152.9
155.0
162.4
164.0
166.9
172.0

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.2
(2
)
(2
)
116.0
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

106.5
106.8
103.9
103.9
102.5
102.7
104.6
105.7
105.9
106.1
106.2
107.7

139.9
140.1
138.0
139.1
140.8
147.8
148.5
150.7
157.1
160.6
163.3
170.3

1947: Jan. 15.
Feb. 1 5 ...
Mar. 15. _
Apr. IS ...
May 15__
June15__
July 1 5 ...
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 1 5 ..
Oct. 15.
Nov. 15.
Dec. 1 5 ...

153.0
152.8
156.2
155.7
156.8
158.3
160.1
162.7
168.3
167.3
168.3
170.1

184.5
183.2
190.8
188.6
190.6
193.9
198.4
203.1
211.0
207.1
207.8
210.5

175.5
178.1
182.4
181.0
183.0
184 8
183.9
186.3
189.2
189.4
191.0
193.4

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
116.4
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
127.6
(2
)
(2
)
129.2

110.3
110.4
110.7
111.3
111.7
112.4
115.2
118.7
118.7
119.2
121.7
122.5

171.2
172.2
173.3
174.5
173.4
175.8
179.4
176.8
178.1
178.5
180.0
181.1

1948: Jan. 15
Feb. 15.
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 1 5 ...
Mayl5___
June15__
July 15..
Aug. 1 5 ..
Sept. 15 ..
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 15__

171.5
168.8
169.0
172.1
174.9
176.2
178.6
178.8
179.4
178.1
175.9
175.4

213.2
204.8
204.3
212.2
218.4
221.3
224.7
223.6
221.4
218.0
211.9
208.2

193.5
198.0
199.3
199.2
199.2
199.2
197.8
200.6
203.6
204.0
203.2
202.4

(2
)
(2
)
130.6
(2
)
(2
)
131.5
(2
)
(2
)
133.7
(2
)
(2
)
138.3

123.0
123.1
122.8
125.2
125.7
126.1
130.1
131.0
131.5
131.5
131.5
131.4

181.4
180.5
180.8
179.9
178.8
179.8
181.5
180.4
183.4
184.4
185.5
186.0

100.9
100 3
100! 6
99.8
98.4
98.6
101.1
103.1
103.8
106.0
107.1

92.5
95 1
105^5
104.5
102.4
100.6
110.5
125.3
128.9
140.9
143.9

CINCINNATI, OHIO
98.7
99 8
103.0
100.3
98.3
99.0
104.8
116.5
123.1
125.5
128.3




1 0 2 .5

103.5
105.5
96.2
92.3
94.3
105.0
124.0
136.0
135.3
137.6

94.2
95 7
103^9
104.0
102.3
103.7
108.0
126 9
133.5
138.7
147.6

96.6
97 4
100! 7
103.0
102.4
102.2
103.0
104.8
105.2
105.5
105.6

All
items

Food

Apparel

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
Rent ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

CINCINNATI, OHIO— Continued

1943: Aug. 15__
Sept. 15__
Oct. 15__
N o v .15__
Dec. 15__

1935_____
1936____
1937_______
1938______
1939............
1940.........
1941..............
1942............
1943................
1944..................
1945__________

Period 1

113.9 1946__________ 138.6
115.3 1947__________ 160.7
116.2 1948__________ 173.0
116.3
117.0 1942: Jan. 15— 111.8
F eb .15__ 112.6
117.1
Mar. 15 — 114.4
117.0
Apr. 15__ 115.3
117.1
May 15__ 115.9
118.5
June15__ 116.8
119.0
July 15__ 116.7
119.3
A u g .1 5 .. 117.4
119.8
Sept. 15— 118.0
119.8
Oct. 15— 119.2
119.8
Nov. 1 5 - 119.6
121.0
Dec. 15__ 120.0
121.2
121.4 1943: Jan.15__ 119.9
F eb.15__ 120.0
Mar. 15. _ 122.0
121.8
Apr. 1 5 - 123.4
122.0
122.2
May 15__ 123.8
122.3
June15__ 124.3
July 15__ 124.0
122.3
122.3
Aug. 15 .- 124.0
122.3
Sept. 15— 123.7
122.4
Oct. 15— 124.0
122.4
Nov. 15— 123.6
Dec. 15__ 124.2
122.5
121.4
121.4 1944: Jan. 15— 123.9
F eb.15__ 123.4
121.5
Mar. 15— 123.2
Apr. 1 5 - 125.2
121.4
May 15__ 124.6
121.6
June15__ 126.6
123.4
124.0
July 15—_ 127.1
124.5
A u g .1 5 .- 126.5
124.9
Sept. 15— 126.3
Oct. 15— 125.8
126.6
127.6
Nov. 1 5 - 126.3
129.0
Dec. 15__ 126.6
131.0
133.3 1945: Jan. 15— 127.0
F eb.15__ 126.7
Mar. 15— 126.5
134.9
Apr. 15__ 127.0
134.8
May 15__ 128.0
135.3
June15__ 129.4
137.0
July 15__ 129.5
137.4
Aug. 15. . 129.3
137.6
137.2
Sept. 15. _ 128.9
Oct. 15— 129.3
138.9
Nov. 1 5 139.4
(2
)
Dec. 15— 129.5
141.1
142.5
143.2 1946: Jan. 15— 129.6
F eb.15__ 129.0
144.7
Mar. 15 — 129.4
Apr. 15__ 130.2
145.0
May 15__ 131.0
144.8
June15__ 132.2
145.0
July 15__ 140.2
146.9
Aug. 1 5 - 143.5
147.0
150.9
Sept. 15-_ 145.4
152.7
Oct. 15— 146.5
Nov. 1 5 - 152.9
154.8
154.6
Dec. 15— 152.7
155.1
155.0 1947: Jan. 15— 152.6
F eb.15__ 153.2
Mar. 15— 157.0
Apr. 15__ 157.2
May 15__ 156.8
97.9
June 15__ 158.5
99 0
July 15__ 160.4
100! 8
Aug. 15- . 162 2
101.5
Sept. 15— 166.3
100.8
Oct. 15— 167.1
100.8
Nov. 1 5 - 167.1
103.8
Dec. 15— 170.3
110.6
115.9
See footnotes on p . 61.
122.1
125.4

156.0
195.5
212.8

158.2
184.2
194.2

106.2
107.8
112.8

110.7
121.2
139.5

156.5
180.1
191.0

130.8
141.4
151.4

115.8
116.4
118.9
120.7
122.4
124.3
124.2
125.8
126.9
130.1
130.6
131.5

117.0
118.9
125.5
128.5
128.1
128.2
128.1
128.3
130.0
130.2
130.2
130.3

104.1
104.2
104.4
104.4
104.8
104.9
104.9
104.9
105.1
105.2
105.2
105.2

104.6
104.6
104.6
103.1
102.2
103.1
103.1
102.4
102.5
102.5
102.5
102.5

124.2
125.2
126.0
125.7
125.5
125.7
125.7
125.3
124.8
124.8
125.1

108.0
109.2
109.9
110.1
110.2
110.7
110.6
111.5
111.3
111.3
112.2
112.2

131.0
131.1
135.1
138.2
138.3
139.2
137.9
137.6
136.2
136.1
134.9
135.9

130.6
130.6
132.4
132.8
132.9
132.6
133.8
133.8
135.2
135.7
135.9
136.0

105.2
105.2
105.1
105.1
105.1
105.1
105.1
105.2
105.2
105.3
105.4
105.4

102.5
103.2
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
103.8
105.4

125.2
125.4
126.0
126.9
128.4
128.6
129.2
130.6
131.3
131.5
131.7
132.2

112.6
112.6
113.8
114.5
116.1
116.8
116.8
116.8
116.8
117.8
118.0
118.4

135.1
133.7
132.9
135.4
133.7
138.4
139.2
136.8
135.8
133.4
134.4
134.7

135.8
135.9
136.7
136.7
136.8
137.0
137.6
138.8
140.8
142.0
142.6
144.2

105.4
105.4
105.5
105.4
105.5
105.4
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
105.6

105.6
105.6
105.6
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.1
106.1
106.2
106.2
106.2

132.3
132.3
132.4
140.1
140.3
143.0
143.4
144.6
144.7
145.6
145.7
145.8

118.4
118.6
118.6
122.1
122.2
122.5
122.7
123.3
123.4
124.4
124.7
124.5

135.5
134.6
134.1
135.0
137.5
140.6
140.8
140.0
138.2
139.0
137.7
138.7

144.0
145.3
145.6
146.4
146.8
147.6
147.6
148.7
149.3
149.3
(2
)
150.7

(2
)
(2
)
105.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
105.7
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.8
107.8
107.7
107.7
107.7

146.1
141.5
141.7
142.3
142.9
143.8
144.1
144.2
144.2
144.2
(2
)
146.3

125.0
125.0
125.2
125.0
124.8
125.0
125.0
125.1
125.7
126.4
(2
)
126.5

138.2
136.1
136.9
137.9
139.1
141.4
161.6
168.6
169.3
171.3
187.0
184.0

151.7
152.3
153.0
152.8
153.6
154.1
155.2
156.9
164.0
164.8
168.7
171.1

(2
)
(2
)
106.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
106.4
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

108.3
108.3
108.3
108.4
108.4
110.3
111.5
112.1
113.3
113.3
113.3
113.4

146.7
147.1
146.3
146.9
149.3
150.8
155.8
158.0
167.6
170.0
169.4
169.9

127.3
127.5
127.6
129.4
130.2
130.3
130.2
131.5
132.1
132.6
134.3
136.9

182.4
182.8
191.3
188.9
187.9
191.1
194.3
198.3
206.7
206.9
204.2
211.6

171.8
174.7
176.6
181.7
181.9
185.5
190.0
187.2
190.0
190.8
191.2
189.1

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
106.3
(2
)
(2
)
109.2
(2
)
(2
)
110.7

115.2
115.2
115.2
116.2
116.2
116.2
116.2
125.6
126.0
128.3
131.5
132.2

171.4
175.6
175.7
178.8
178.2
179.3
183.6
181.2
181.6
183.6
184.3
187.7

137.4
137.2
139.2
140.3
140.0
140.3
140.5
141.4
142.3
143.9
146.9
148.0

12 5 .3

49

APPENDIX TABLES

T able B.— C onsum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
by G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C on tin u ed
[193&-39 = 100]

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

Period1

,171.2
§170.1
169.3
1170.8
* 172.3
4173.5
:175.9
1175.7
|176.3
175.5
f 173.8
172.2

213.0
209.0
206.1
210.1
213.5
216.3
220.4
218.1
218.0
214.4
209.4
205.2

188.9
191.1
191.5
192.2
193.1
192.7
193.2
197.5
198.1
198.4
197.9
196.1

(2
)
(2
)
111.4
(2
)
(2
)
112.1
(2
)
(2
)
114.1
(2
)
(2
)
115.1

134.7
134.7
134.9
135.3
137.6
137.4
141.1
141.1
141.8
145.1
145.1
145.7

188.4
191.1
191.6
189.6
189.8
190.6
191.5
189.6
190.3
192.2
193.2
193.5

CLEVELAND, OHIO
1935..................
1936.............. —
1937................ 1938................ 1939..................
1940__________
1941..................
1942__________
1943............... 1944..................
1945-................
1946............... 1947..................
1948------- --------

97.2
98.1
102.3
101.5
100.9
101.3
107.2
118.9
127.1
129.2
131.2
141.3
161.7
174.1

100.3
100.6
104.1
98.6
96.3
97.7
107.7
125.7
142.6
142.0
143.2
163.9
200.1
218.8

96.4
97.6
103.2
102.1
100.7
101.9
107.9
126.4
133.0
140.3
145.9
155.1
184.5
195.1

90.9
92.9
101.5
107.2
107.4
107.9
111.0
116.1
115.4
115.7
115.8
116.0
118.9
123.7

97.0
98.0
98.2
99.1
107.8
108.5
110.4
112.0
113.6
114.1
113.3
116.3
125.1
140.9

95.7
96.5
105.1
102.2
100.4
100.6
110.0
123.5
125.6
136.3
145.5
152.2
170.3
181.8

1942: Jan. 15—
F e b .15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 15-Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15-Dec. 15__

114.7
115.2
117.0
117.9
118.8
119.5
119.2
118.9
119.6
121.4
122.0
122.9

117.8
117.9
120.5
122.3
124.1
127.4
126.7
125.8
127.3
131.8
132.5
134.8

120.4
120.6
125.7
127.2
127.4
127.2
127.2
127.2
128.4
128.4
128.3
128.2

116.4
116.4
117.0
118.0
118.4
115.7
115.5
115.3
115.1
115.0
115.0
115.2

112.0
112.0
112.0
111.3
111.5
112.0
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.2
112.3
112.3

121.7
122.4
123.7
124.0
124.1
123.7
123.6
123.4
123.9
123.9
123.9
123.9

1943: Jan.15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 15-Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15__
Dec. 15__

123.1
123.8
125.5
126.2
128.0
129.2
127.9
128.0
128.3
128.5
128.2
128.3

134.6
135.9
139.5
141.4
146.3
149.5
145.0
145.2
143.9
143.9
143.1
142.6

129.1
129.2
130.8
131.0
131.0
130.8
133.0
133.4
136.2
136.5
136.7
137.7

115.2
115.2
115.3
115.3
115.3
115.4
115.4
115.4
115.5
115.5
115.5
115.6

113.0
113.1
113.5
113.7
113.7
113.5
113.5
113.5
113.5
113.5
113.5
114.6

124.0
124.1
124.6
125.0
125.0
125.1
125.4
125.7
126.1
127.0
127.1
127.7

1944: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15_ _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 15. _
Sept. 15_ .
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

127.7
127.8
127.8
128.8
128.9
128.9
130.5
130.6
130.4
130.1
130.4
129.1

140.8
140.6
140.3
141.7
141.9
141.3
144.6
144.3
142.8
141.9
142.6
140.6

137.9
138.2
138.7
138.8
139.0
139.4
139.7
140.6
142.4
142.6
142.9
143.7

115.6
115.6
115.7
115.7
115.6
115.7
115.7
115.7
115.8
(2
)
(2
)
115.9

114.7
114.8
114.8
114.8
114.9
115.0
115.0
115.3
115.3
115.3
115.3
104.1

127.7
127.9
128.9
135.8
137.1
138.5
139.0
139.5
139.7
139.7
139.8
141.9

1945: Jan. 15—
F eb .15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
A u g .15 -.
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15-Dec. 15—

129.8
129.7
129.7
130.1
131.7
132.3
132.2
132.1
131.4
131.7
131.9
132.3

140.8
140.1
139.6
140.7
144.6
146.4
145.8
145.6
142.7
143.3
143.8
144.8

144.0
144.3
145.1
145.5
145.4
145.5
145.6
145.3
147.3
148.0
147.4
147.4

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.7
(2
)
(2
)
115.8
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

112.2
112.4
112.5
112.5
113.6
113.6
113.6
113.7
113.8
113.8
113.8
113.9

141.9
143.6
143.9
144.3
145.9
145.9
146.4
146.1
146.5
147.1
147.7
147.1




Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

CLEVELAND, OHIO— Continued

CINCINNATI, OHIO— Continued
1948: Jan.15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 15 __
Apr. 15—
May 15—
June 15__
July 15—
A u g .15._
Sept. 15__
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15__
Dec. 15__

A11
items

149.1 1946: Jan. 15—
148.7
F eb .15__
148.7
Mar. 15—
149.3
Apr. 15__
149.0
May 15__
June15__
149.4
152.2
July 15__
Aug. 15- .
153.0
153.9
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
154.3
Nov. 15-_
154.5
Dec. 15__
154.fi

132.2
131.6
131.7
132.7
134.0
135.7
143.8
147.0
147.6
149.5
154.0
156.2

144.2
142.7
142.7
144.5
146.7
149.3
171.3
178.6
179.3
183.1
193.1
191.4

147.2
147.2
148.6
150.2
150.9
152.3
153.5
154.7
156.8
161.1
164.4
174.6

(2
)
(2
)
115.8
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
116.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

114.4
114.4
114.4
114.4
114.4
114.9
117.2
117.2
118.1
118.1
118.1
120.0

147.6
145.1
144.7
145.6
145.6
151.3
151.9
153.3
153.9
157.1
161.0
169.4

124.2
124.1
124.1
124.7
126.6
128.1
128.1
129.6
129.7
129.7
131.9
135.9

1947: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15—_
May 15__
June15__
Aug.15_ _
Nov. 15__

156.1
155.9
159.2
159.2
159.0
160.3
163.0
166.9

189.1
186.9
195.1
195.0
194.3
198.3
204.3
206.1

177.7
181.1
182.3
182.9
183.4
183.5
183.6
190.4

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.9
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
122.9

122.2
122.2
122.3
122.3
122.3
122.3
130.6
134.1

166.8
168.0
171.5
169.4
169.0
170.2
169.5
171.6

137.1
137.2
138.0
138.8
138.5
138.0
138.9
142.4

171.6
173.7
179.3
176.2

212.5
218.0
229.0
217.0

194.5
195.8
196.3
198.8

123.6
123.9
124.3
125.6

136.4
139.3
143.6
145.1

182.9
180.6
184.0
185.0

147.3
147.2
152.2
153.3

98. £
98.9
100.8
101.5
100.7
99.8
102.8 1948: Feb. 15—
110.4
May 15__
115.8
Aug. 15-_
120.4
N ov.15__
123.0
128.1
139.4
149.1
1935..................
107.5 1936..................
108.6 1937____ _____
109.6 1938.......... .......
109.8 1939..................
110.4 1940..................
110.5 1941— ............
110.4 1942..................
110.5 1943____ _____
110.5 1944.............. —
111.3 1945..................
113.1 1946..................
113.2 1947.......... .......
1948..................
113.6
114.4 1942: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
114.9
114.9
Mar. 15 __
Apr. 15__
115.0
May 15__
115.3
115.4
June 15__
July 15__
115.5
Aug. 15—
117.3
Sept. 15—
117.7
117.7
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 117.9
Dec. 15__
117.8
118.5 1943: Jan. 15—
F eb .15__
118.5
119.3
Mar. 15—
119.5
Apr. 15—
May 15__
119.9
121.1
June15__
July 15___
121.6
Aug. 1 5 121.9
Sept. 15. _
122.1
122.2
Oct. 15—
122.3
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15—
122.5
122.5 1944: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 122.6
Mar. 15__
122.6
Apr. 15__
122.6
May 15__
122.8
122.9
June15__
July 15__
123.0
123.3
A u g .1 5 ..
123.5
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
123.8
Nov. 1 5 123.8
Dec. 15__

DENVER, COLO.
97.4
98.9
103.5
100.7
99.4
99.3
103.9
115.6
122.1
124.5
127.1
137.1
157.2
170.1

100.4
101.6
106.3
97.1
94.6
94.4
103.2
123.7
137.2
137.1
138.8
158.3
194.0
210.0

98.8
98.3
102.7
101.3
98.9
100 0
104.1
122.1
124.9
130.4
136.2
151.5
182.4
195.5

90.6
94.8
102.4
105.8
106.4
106.7
107.2
109.0
109.0
109.3
109.6
110.4
113.7
122.0

99.2
99.6
101.3
101.8
98.1
98.0
97.7
99.1
100.7
103.9
102.7
99.3
102.3
109.2

94.3
96.8
103.3
103.5
102.1
103.7
107.7
121.2
122.2
139.0
158.0
176.8
203.1
217.0

97.5
98.6
101.9
101.2
100.8
100.1
103.7
110.8
115.6
120.0
123.7
127.1
137.3
148.7

111.3
111.8
113.1
114.6
115.6
115.7
116.0
116.3
117.2
117.8
118.5
119.5

116.4
115.8
117.7
120.2
122.9
123.7
124.4
126.0
126.8
128.4
129.9
132.4

114.3
116.6
120.8
125.3
124.4
123.2
123.3
123.4
123.4
123.3
123.3
123.4

108.4
108.4
108.9
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.1
109.1
109.1
109.1
109.1
109.1

98.2
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.5
99.1
99.1
99.1
98.9
99.3
99.4

117.5
118.6
121.3
122.3
122.1
122.0
122.0
122.0
121.7
121.7
121.9
121.9

108.1
109.2
109.7
110.2
110.8
110.8
110.7
109.5
112.2
112.4
112.8
113.1

119.6
120.3
121.8
122.5
124.4
123.5
122.7
121.1
121.6
121.9
122.5
123.5

132.6
133.9
137.2
139.0
143.8
141.0
138.4
134.5
134.8
135.3
136.8
138.7

123.7
123.9
124.7
124.7
124.0
124.2
124.6
124.7
125.9
126.0
126.2
126.6

109.1
109.1
109.1
109.1
109.1
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.0

99.6
100.0
100.1
100.1
100.1
99.7
100.4
100.9
101.3
101.3
101.3
103.5

121.9
121.9
121.8
121.8
121.8
121.9
121.9
121.9
122.0
122.6
123.2
123.8

113.2
113.9
114.5
114.5
115.5
116.1
116.2
116.2
116.2
116.6
116.6
117.1

122.6
122.6
122.9
123.9
125.1
124.7
126.0
124.9
124.9
125.2
125.3
126.1

136.0
135.7
135.7
136.6
139.3
137.5
140.6
137.1
136.4
136.2
136.4
137.9

126.2
127.2
128.3
128.5
128.6
129.6
130.1
131.1
133.1
133.5
133.7
134.6

109.0
109.0
109.1
109.2
109.3
109.3
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
109.5

103.6
103.6
103.6
103.6
104.1
104.1
104.1
104.1
104.1
104.1
104.1
104.2

124.2
126.0
126.5
136.4
136.7
143.2
143.4
144.4
145.3
146.7
146.9
148.8

117.5
117.5
117.7
119.5
120.1
120.1
120.6
120.6
120.6
122.0
122.0
122.1

See footnotes on p . 61.

50

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

T able B.— C onsum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
b y G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100J

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

Period1

DENVER, COLO.—Continued

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

DETROIT, MICH.—Continued

1945: Jan. 1 5 ...
Feb. 15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 15 __
Sept. 15 ..
Oct. 1 5 ...
Nov. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

126.2
125.9
126.0
126.5
128.4
128.4
127.8
127.7
126.6
126.8
126.8
128.3

137.8
136.9
136.9
137.9
141.8
142.0
139.8
139.3
136.1
138.0
137.9
141.7

134.9
135.4
135.7
135.8
135.7
135.9
136.2
136.7
136.8
136.9
136.9
137.1

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
109.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2)
(2
)
109.9

104.2
104.2
104.1
104.1
104.4
104.4
104.4
105.1
105.1
97.3
97.3
97.3

152.4
153.4
155.3
154.9
155.0
155.8
159.3
160.1
160.2
161.7
163.2
164.9

122.1
122.1
122.2
122.6
124.3
124.1
124.5
124.5
124.4
124.5
124.5
124.7

1944:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 ..
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15
Dec. 15__

125.0
124.4
124.5
125.2
125.8
126.6
127.9
127.3
127.4
127.2
127.1
127.5

132.8
130.9
130.8
131.2
132.4
133.0
136.5
134.4
134.0
132.8
132.3
132.7

133.6
134.5
135.4
135.7
135.9
136.1
136.5
138.2
139.1
140.3
140.4
140.9

114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.7
114.7
114.7
114.8
(2
)
(2
)
114.9

111.8
112.0
112.0
112.0
111.9
112.4
112.3
112.3
112.3
112.3
112.3
111.9

129.5
130.1
130.4
134.4
136.5
141.1
141.5
141.6
142.6
143.6
143.9
146.3

124.0
123.9
124.0
125.8
126.1
128.2
128.0
128.0
128.4
128.5
128.6
129.4

1946:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 ..
Sept. 1 5 ..
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15 . .
Dec. 15__

127.9
128.0
128.9
129.4
130.1
131.7
138.1
140.1
142.5
143.7
151.9
152.5

139.8
139.5
139.9
140.5
141.7
145.3
161.8
166.3
170.1
171.4
192.7
190.6

139.4
140.5
146.6
148.3
149.8
151.2
150.7
150.5
154.3
157.5
162.6
166.9

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.3
(2
)
110.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

97.8
97.8
97.8
97.9
97.9
98.3
99.7
99.7
100.7
100.8
101.3
102.4

163.3
166.6
170.8
172.3
173.8
171.9
173.0
177.9
184.6
186.6
188.6
192.4

124.7 1945:Jan.15__
124.9
F eb.15__
124.8
Mar. 15 _.
124.7
Apr. 15__
125.1
May 15__
125.2
June15__
126.3
July 15__
127.5
Aug. 15—
128.7
Sept. 15—
129.8
Oct. 15___
130.7
N o v .1 5 ..
132.8
Dec. 15__

127.5
127.5
127.3
127.8
129.1
130.8
130.8
131.2
130.8
130.7
131.0
131.3

132.4
131.7
131.4
132.1
135.0
139.2
138.3
138.4
136.8
136.4
137.5
138.3

141.1
141.1
139.8
141.6
142.6
144.0
146.1
147.2
148.7
148.6
148.8
149.3

(2
)
(2)
<)
2
(2
)
(*)
115.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.1

112.4
112.8
113.1
112.8
113.4
113.3
113.9
114.7
114.6
114.7
111.5
111.6

146.7
154.7
156.3
157.1
158.0
156.1
156.2
156.7
156.2
156.6
156.8
158.0

129.5
129.5
129.5
129.6
129.8
129.9
130.1
131.1
131.1
131.2
131.6
131.4

1947: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 1 5 ...
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Oct. 1 5 ...

151.4
152.2
154.8
155.8
155.8
155.9
155.7
160.4

185.0
185.7
191.4
192.4
191.9
191.9
191.6
197.2

170.8
177.6
181.3
181.5
182.3
183.7
182.5
185.9

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.6
(2
)
(2
)
117.7

102.5
98.9
98.9
98.9
99.5
99.5
101.0
105.5

195.6
198.5
199.9
201.1
202.4
200.9
200.5
206.8

134.0
134.1
134.7
136.7
136.9
136.7
136.5
139.0

1948: Jan. 1 5 ...
Apr. 15__
July 15___
Oct. 1 5 ...

167.0
168.5
172.5
171.0

208.6
208.5
217.0
208.3

188.9
194.8
196.1
200.6

119.5
121.0
122.6
123.4

106.6
106.7
109.3
112.1

217.2
216.2
217.3
218.3

144.7
147.3
149.0
151.3

1946:Jan.1 5 ...
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 15 ._
Sept. 15. .
Oct. 15_._
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15—

132.3
132.0
132.2
133.6
134.4
136.4
144.2
145.4
146.6
148.8
152.0
153.1

137.8
136.7
137.0
140.1
141.6
145.4
166.9
168.5
163.4
173.9
181.6
179.2

149.7
150.2
151.4
152.4
152.7
154.4
154.7
155.7
161.6
163.2
166.0
172.2

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.2
(2
)
115.9
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

111.3
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
115.9
116.5
117.5
117.5
117.6
117.9

158.9
158.6
156.5
158.9
161.6
164.3
165.2
166.2
173.2
174.4
176.8
178.7

136.9
136.7
136.9
137.4
138.0
139.5
138.8
140.3
141.1
141.7
142.7
147.2

1947: Jan. 15—
F eb .15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 ..
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

153.0
153.1
156.5
156.7
156.8
158.7
160.2
162.8
164.2
166.7
166.6
169.0

176.5
175.1
183.0
182.7
182.7
188.5
191.4
195.5
197.4
199.0
196.7
202.0

175.4
178.0
181.9
182.1
181.9
182.1
182.7
184.5
186.8
189.6
190.8
191.6

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.4
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
121.3
(2
)
(2
)

121.8
121.6
121.8
121.6
122.2
122.3
124.0
134.1
134.1
135.2
137.2
137.1

180.6
183.0
185.6
186.7
188.4
190.3
192.4
193.8
199.6
200.6
200.3
201.7

147.7
148.3
149.1
150.0
150.1
149.8
151.0
152.4
153.7
155.0
156.6
158.6

1948: Jan. 1 5 ...
F eb .15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15__
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15__
Dec. 1 5 ...

170.6
169.0
168.7
171.8
173.2
174.5
175.9
176.1
175.4
174.6
173.1
172.8

205.1
199.4
197.7
203.9
208.0

191.2
193.2
195.5
195.7
195.0
195.2
194.3
197.8
198.5
199.0
198.5
198.3

123.8
(2
)
(2
)
124.4
(2
)
(2
)
125.3
(2
)
(2
)
126.5
(2
)
(2
)

137.6
138.2
138.3
137.8
141.8
143.3
147.3
149.7
150.6
150.6
150.5
150.4

200.6
201.9
202.2
203.1
203.4
204.4
205.5
207.6
206.4
206.0
207.1
206.7

159.4
159.1
159.2
162.6
162.2
162.2
163.9
166.1
166.5
166.5
166.4
166.7

1935.................
1936..................
1937..................
1938..................
1939..................
1940..................
1941.............. .
1942................ ..
1943.................
1944........ .........
1945—..............
1946..................
1947.................
1948..................

97.2
98.2
102.1
101.6
100.8
101.2
105.7
116.6
122.7
123.9
126.4
136.3
159.8
172.8

102.9
101.2
99.5
99.6
96.7
93.9
93.3
93.3
91.2
91.1
90.4
89.6
94.3
96.7

90.3
93.3
101.9
106.3
105.5
104.9
110.9
122.1
122.9
126.8
143.7
157.4
185.9
196.1

98.4
98.8
100.8
101.5
100.5
100.1
102.5
110.0
117.0
121.9
124.2
128.4
140.4
151.0

DETROIT, MICH.
1935..................
94.9
1936..................
98.3
1937.................. 104.5
1938................ . .102.6
1939..................
99.6
1940.................. 100.3
1941.................. 106.6
1942.................. 118.3
1943.................. 124.7
1944.................. 126.3
1945__________ 129.6
1946____ _____ 140.9
1947____ _____ 160.4
1948.................. 173.0

99.5
101.8
106.8
98.2
93.7
95.7
104.9
123.4
135.8
132.8
135.6
156.4
189.2
204.9

96.5
97.7
102.9
102.2
100.8
101.7
106.8
124.9
130.4
137.2
144.9
157.0
184.0
196.0

81.0
92.6
106.9
111.3
108.1
107.9
112.3
116.5
114.4
114.7
115.0
115.5
117.9
125.3

102.7
102.3
98.9
98.2
97.9
98.5
101.9
106.9
108.9
112.1
112.6
114.0
127.8
144.7

94.3
96.6
104.2
103.3
101.6
99.9
107.9
120.4
123.7
138.5
155.8
166.1
191.9
204.6

97.0
97.6
102.3
102.9
100.1
100.5
105.4
113.2
121.1
126.9
130.4
139.8
151.9
163.4

1942: Jan. 1 5 ...
F e b .15__
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 1 5 ...
July 1 5 ...
A u g .15._
Sept. 15_
Oct. 1 5 ...
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

114.5
115.4
117.2
118.4
118.8
118.5
118.5
118.0
118.4
119.9
120.6
121.4

115.0
116.5
118.6
121.0
122.4
124.5
125.0
123.7
124.7
128.2
129.6
131.8

117.3
120.9
124.7
127.0
126.4
125.8
125.1
125.1
125.1
127.0
127.0
127.1

118.4
118.6
119.3
119.5
119.5
115.1
114.9
114.7
114.5
114.5
114.4
114.4

106.7
106.7
106.8
106.5
106.7
106.7
106.9
106.9
107.3
107.3
107.3
107.3

117.8
119.7
120.6
121.3
121.0
121.0
120.8
120.6
120.3
120.5
120.6
120.8

111.2
111.9
112.9
113.3
113.4
113.4
113.3
113.3
113.5
113.6
114.5
114.6

1943: Jan. 1 5 ...
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15. _
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 15__

121.0
122.2
124.0
125.0
127.3
126.8
126.0
124.6
124.4
125.0
124.6
125.4

130.0
132.3
135.7
137.4
143.4
141.6
138.8
134.8
133.6
134.5
133.3
134.2

128.0
128.3
129.3
129.3
129.2
129.3
130.0
130.5
132.4
132.5
132.7
133.3

114.4
114.4
114.3
114.3
114.3
114.4
114.4
114.4
114.4
114.4
114.5
114.6

107.7
108.2
108.9
108.9
108.9
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
111.4

121.0
121.2
122.2
122.4
122.7
123.0
123.2
123.7
124.0
125.7
126.3
128.9

115.2
116.6
118.9
120.7
121.3
122.0
122.7
122.7
122.5
123.3
123.4
124.0




2 1 1 .3

213.2
210.2
207.6
204.4
199.9
198.7

HOUSTON, TEX.

See footnotes on p. 61.

99.6
99.9
103.9
98.7
97.8
99.4
108.9
127.6
139.0
136.2
138.7
158.3
201.2
219.9

97.6
97.2
102.3
102.1
100.9
102.9
107.5
125.8
130.9
136.3
140.1
152.7
189.9
208.4

91.2
95.8
101.2
105.3
106.5
106.7
107.1
108.4
109.1
109.4
109.4
110.4
113.3
119.4

51

APPENDIX TABLES
T able B.— C onsum ers’ P rice In dex fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
b y G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period1

All
items

Food

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
Apparel Rent ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

Period1

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and fumish- cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

94.3
98.4
98.4
99.6
99.6
99.7
99.4

198.8
199.1
199.3
198.4
198.8
198.8
198.5

149.7
151.1
152.6
152.5
152.9
153.5
153.4

90.1
93.9
101.3
106.8
107.9
110.0
114.5
117.5
115.5
115.7
115.9
116.1
119.5
128.1

102.2
100.9
99.8
99.8
97.2
97.4
101.3
103.3
108.8
112.1
113.1
116.3
129.3
150.0

94.0
96.1
105.4
103.3
101.1
99.9
109.6
125.0
129.1
143.7
148.8
154.9
177.0
187.2

99.4
99.5
100.4
100.8
99.9
100.1
103.6
112.2
117.9
122.7
127.8
131.3
144.8
157.7

125.2
125.5
125.4
125.8

119.0
119.4
115.3
115.3

103.1
103.4
103.4
103.6

125.6
125.4
125.3
125.3

111.6
112.3
112.9
114.0

134.8
140.3
134.6
134.4

128.7
128.5
131.0
130.9

115.3
115.6
115.5
115.6

106.1
110.4
110.3
111.6

127.7
129.4
130.4
130.6

117.1
118.2
118.8
119.1

124.4
126.2
127.6
128.0

131.0
132.6
134.3
133.8

133.4
134.1
136.4
136.8

115.6
115.6
115.7
115.9

112.0
112.1
112.2
112.2

133.4
148.2
150.0
149.5

120.4
122.3
124.0
126.7

127.5
129.5
129.5
130.4

132.1
137.4
136.0
137.7

137.5
137.6
138.8
139.2

(2
)
115.8
(2
)
116.0

112.2
113.4
113.6
113.9

150.1
148.0
148.2
148.5

126.7
127.4
128.7
129.3

130.0
131.9
146.1
154.2

136.0
141.5
172.4
184.3

142.2
143.0
156.2
169.7

(2
)
116.3
116.1
(2
)

114.7
112.8
118.5
119.4

148.5
148.5
158.7
171.8

128.4
128.6
132.4
139.0

157.5
158.0
159.5
167.8

187.8
188.7
204.5

177.0 4116.0
176.4
(2
)
176.2 116.8
180.9 125.4

123.1
123.1
125.8
136.5

175.8
176.6
176.5
178.6

141.6
142.6
143.4
148.7

172.3
172.5
176.5
178.0

208.2
205.7
212.6
211.8

186.0
191.2
191.1
195.7

126.6
127.2
128.5
129.1

144.1
144.3
152.1
155.2

182.4
184.7
187.8
191.6

155.1
155.2
158.2
160.5

1948: June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15—

172.5
173.7
175.2
175.4
174.7
173.9
173.8

220.0
222.1
223.8
223.7
220.8
217.6
218.1

122.2
122.3
122.4
122.4
122.6
122.8
123.0
123.2
123.2
123.2
123.2
124.0

112.0
112.3
115.5
116.5
117.4
118.0
118.4
118.4
118.5
118.7
118.8
119.2

1935..................
1936..................
1937..................
1938..................
1939..................
1940..................
1941..................
1942..................
1943..................
1944_................
1945— ............
1946.................
1947..................
1948..................

97.9
99.0
103.0
101.1
99.1
100.3
106.7
118.4
124.5
126.3
129.0
138.7
161.5
174.9

100.6
101.9
106.4
97.6
93.5
95.8
106.3
125.2
135.5
133.0
135.4
156.5
193.1
209.2

95.9
96.2
103.4
103.5
101.0
102.9
108.2
124.8
129.3
134.7
138.1
150.2
177.9
191.1

91.2
91.2
91.2
91.2
91.2
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1

123.8
123.6
124.0
124.1
124.4
127.1
127.8
127.8
128.1
128.9
129.4
132.4

117.2
119.2
119.1
120.9

120.8
125.7
127.1
131.4

123.5
126.2
124.7
124.8

(2
)
(2
)
109.4
(*)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
109.2
(2
)
<)
2
<)
2

91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
88.2
88.2
88.2

139.2
140.0
143.8
144.0
143.7
144.1
144.1
144.1
145.2
145.3
145.2
145.6

139.1
140.0
145.6
145.9
147.4
149.6
152.3
155.2
159.4
161.8
164.2
171.9

(2
)
(2
)
109.2
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(*)
111.3
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

88.7 145.6
145.7
88.7
88.7 146.5
88.7 148.2
88.7 , 150.3
154.2
88.7
88.7 154.9
88.7 157.6
88.8 166.3
88.8 170.0
171.1
94.1
179.1
94.1

192.5
190.6
196.3
199.2
197.1
196.2
198.7
200.8
206.4
208.7
210.2
218.1

175.7
179.3
185.4
187.6
187.0
188.5
190.4
192.2
196.5
197.0
198.7
200.5

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.7
(2
)
(2
)
<)
2
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
116.7
(2
)

94.2
94.2
94.3
94.3
94.4
94.4
94.3
94.3
94.4
94.4
94.3
94.3

182.0
185.2
186.3
186.3
182.4
184.2
184.0
185.5
186.7
186.9
190.6
190.7

119.4 1942: Mar. 15—
June15__
119.5
Sept. 15_
119.5
Dec. 15__
121.1
122.5
1943: Mar. 15—
122.8
June15__
122.8
Sept. 1 5 122.9
Dec. 15—
122.9
123.0 1944: Mar. 15—
123.0
June15__
123.2
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__
123.2
123.2
1945: Mar. 15—
123.3
June15__
123.5
Sept. 15_
123.8
Dec. 15__
123.8
124.1 1946: Mar. 15—
124.1
June15__
125.5
S ept.15_
125.6
Dec. 15__
125.5
125.0 1947: Mar. 15-_
June15__
125.0
July 15__
125.1
Oct. 15__
125.5
125.9
127.0 1948: Jan. 15__
Apr. 15__
127.2
July 15__
128.1
Oct. 15__
130.0
128.8
130.4
132.0
135.3 1935..................
1936..................
136.0 1937..................
136.6 1938..................
138.3 1939..................
139.7 1940..................
139.8 1941..................
139.8 1942..................
139.2 1943..................
140.4 1944..................
140.9 1945..................
142.5 1946..................
144.5 1947..................
147.4 1948..................

221.5
218.1
216.0
219.3
218.1

199.4
202.9
205.9
206.4
208.9

(2
)
118.1
(2
)
(2
)
119.5

94.3
94.3
94.3
94.3
94.3

191.0
191.6
188.8
194.6
195.4

149.3 1942: Mar. 15 —
149.2
June 15—
149.4
Sept. 1 5 149.5
Dec. 15—
149.2

112.5
114.0
115.3
115.7
116.2
115.7
116.7
117.6
118.0
118.8
118.8
119.5

120.1
122.5
124.6
124.6
125.9
124.9
128.2
130.0
130.8
132.9
132.4
134.4

119.6
122.5
125.7
127.3
127.5
126.7
126.7
126.7
126.7
126.7
126.5
126.7

107.4
107.4
107.6
108.5
108.6
108.6
108.6
109.0
108.8
108.9
108.9
108.9

93.9
93.9
93.9
93.7
93.7
93.0
92.7
92.8
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9

120.6
121.0
122.3
122.5
122.5
122.5
122.5
122.5
122.2
122.2
122.2
122.2

107.1
108.5
109.2
109.6
109.8
109.7
109.6
110.5
111.0
111.1
111.8
111.9

1943:Jan.15__ 119.6
Feb. 15— 120.8
Mar. 15. . 123.5
Apr. 15__ 124.0
May 15__ 124.4
June15__ 123.2
July 15__ 122.3
Aug. 1 5 -. 122.0
Sept. 15-- 123.3
Oct. 15— 123.4
Nov. 15-_ 123.1
Dec. 15— 123.3

134.8
137.9
142.7
143.4
143.7
140.0
137.4
136.2
138.7
138.4
137.3
137.3

125.8
126.4
129.4
129.7
130.2
129.4
130.4
131.0
134.4
134.5
134.6
134.9

109.0
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.1
109.0
109.2
109.2
109.1
109.2
109.2
109.3

93.1
93.2
92.2
92.2
92.2
92.8
88.6
88.6
88.6
90.4
91.2
91.2

1944: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15 .Apr. 15__
May 15—
June15__
July 15—A u g .1 5 -.
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15—

123.4
122.9
122.6
123.2
123.8
123.6
124.3
124.7
124.8
124.6
124.0
124.7

137.5
135.9
134.9
135.3
135.9
135.0
137.0
137.8
137.5
136.6
134.6
135.9

135.0
135.2
135.4
135.5
135.6
135.7
135.7
136.3
137.3
137.7
138.0
138.7

109.3
109.3
109.4
109.4
109.4
109.3
109.3
109.2
109.6
(2
)
(2
)
<>
*

1945: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
M ay 15—
June15__
July 15—
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15_
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15—

125.2
124.8
124.8
125.6
126.2
126.7
127.5
127.4
127.6
127.2
127.0
127.3

136.5
135.4
134.8
136.7
138.4
139.5
141.6
141.2
140.5
139.7
139.5
140.9

138.7
138.8
139.1
139.6
139.8
140.6
140.3
140.4
141.2
141.3
140.7
140.4

1946: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15 -Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

127.2
126.8
127.6
128.0
128.5
130.5
136.6
140.7
142.8
144.2
150.0
152.3

140.8
139.3
139.3
139.7
139.7
144.0
160.4
168.8
173.5
174.7
190.0
189.8

1947:Jan.15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15—
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

153.9
154.1
157.1
158.6
157.6
157.6
158.4
159.7
162.1
163.4
165.8
169.3

1948: Jan.15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 1 5 Apr. 15__
May 15—

170.8
170.4
170.0
171.4
171.5




Food

Apparel

HOUSTON, TEX.— Continued

HOUSTON, TEX.—Continued
1942: Jan.15__
F eb .15__
Mar. 15_
Apr. 15__
M ay 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15 -Sept. 15-_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15-_
Dec. 15—

All
items

2 0 8 .8
2 0 8 .2

210.9
213.2
213.1
212.3
211.0

(2
)
(2
)
121.1
(2
>
(2
)
121.5
(2
)

INDIANAPOLIS, IND.

1 9 1 .7

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
98.8
99.4
102.8
100.1
98.9
100.1
107.4
120.1
129.4
132.0
135.9
144.1
166.0
176.4

99.8
101.0
104.1
98.4
96.7
98.6
108.6
130.3
147.6
144.7
148.2
166.5
202.6
216.2

96.8
97.3
104.7
101.1
100.1
101.6
106.9
124.0
129.2
137.5
142.3
154.0
179.6
194.9

94.9
99.1
100.9
102.4
102.7
104.1
111.8
115.1
112.2
112.7
113.4
113.3
115.2
124.7

104.2
100.7
100.7
97.9
96.5
96.6
101.2
108.8
112.7
114.2
115.3
119.7
132.0
144.4

98.5
97.2
102.8
101.7
99.8
100.7
106.7
120.9
126.0
143.2
150.3
153.7
172.6
186.1

99.3
98.7
101.9
100.8
99.3
100.0
105.8
112.4
122.6
131.1
137.7
139.4
151.5
157.8

118.0
119.9
121.5
123.3

124.3
129.3
134.2
138.3

123.5
124.6
125.2
125.4

117.1
117.9
112.2
112.0

108.1
108.0
109.6
109.5

120.7
121.3
121.3
121.3

111.7
111.1
113.5
114.9

See footnotes on p. 61.

52

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

T able B.— C onsum ers’ P rice In dex fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
by G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100]

Fuel,
electric- House- MisRent ity, and furnish- cellarefriger- ings
neous
ation

Period 1

All
items

1943: Nov. 15. _
June15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

127.0
130.7
131.9
130.4

146.0
151.7
150.0
144.2

126.5
127.8
131.9
133.2

112.2
112.1
112.2
112.4

112.0
112.1
113.5
114.2

125.7
125.8
126.8
128.2

116.6
122.6
127.2
128.8

1944: Mar. 15. _
June 15__
Sept. 15 ..
Dec. 15__

129.1
131.7
134.1
134.4

139.6
142.9
148.1
146.8

134.9
137.1
139.8
141.0

112.5
112.5
(2
)
113.2

114.2
114.2
114.2
114.2

128.9
149.0
150.1
153.4

129.2
131.4
131.7
133.8

1945: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

133.6
135.6
138.2
137.4

142.8
147.5
151.9
150.7

141.4
142.0
143.0
143.7

(2
)
113.4
113.5
(2
)

113.9
114.0
117.8
118.0

147.7
151.1
151.6
149.1

137.2
137.3
139.6
138.4

1946: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

136.1
138.4
150.2
158.8

146.5
150.8
180.7
194.8

146.0
149.4
159.4
170.0

113.3
(2
)
113.4
(2
)

117.7
117.7
119.2
127.3

148.5
149.5
158.5
162.9

138.3
139.4
137.6
144.0

1947: Mar. 15 __
June15__
Sept. 15. .
Dec. 15__

163.4
163.5
168.5
173.9

198.8
199.1
209.1
216.6

180.3
177.0
180.3
186.0

112.8
(2
)
116.5
118.5

129.9
130.5
133.9
139.0

170.7
170.6
172.5
183.5

150.1
151.1
152.5
156.4

1948: Mar. 1 5 ..
June15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

172.8
178.3
179.1
176.2

208.1
222.9
219.3
209.9

194.2
193.9
197.7
198.1

123.0
124.3
127.1
127.7

142.5
145.2
146.9
146.8

185.0
184.8
186.3
190.7

1935..................
1936.................
1937
......
1938
......
1939
......
1940
......
1941
......
1942..................
1943.............. .
1944.................
1945__________
1946..................
1947..................
1948..................

98.4
99.1
102.5
100.7
99.4
98.4
102.8
114.2
121.1
123.4
126.6
135.3
152.9
165.1

101.4
101.2
105.6
97.5
94.3
91.8
101.2
119.4
133.0
130.6
133.0
150.7
185.1
199.8

96.6
97.0
102.2
102.9
101.2
102.8
106.1
121.8
127.0
136.0
145.9
152.3
173.3
188.0

96.6
97.9
100.3
102.7
102.6
102.8
104.5
108.6
108.7
109.5
109.7
110.0
114.4
122.2

99.9
100.5
101.6
100.0
97.9
98.6
101.6
105.6
108.0
110.1
111.7
116.1
118.0
124.4

95.9
97.1
103.3
102.9
100.7
98.2
104.7
116.8
119.6
125.9
135.6
152.4
171.8
182.9

1942: Jan. 1 5 ...
F eb .15__
Mar. 15 —
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15. __
July 15__
Aug. 15. _
Sept. 1 5 ..
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 15__

109.8
111.1
112.9
113.7
114.1
114.1
113.8
114.9
114.7
116.4
117.0
117.7

112.2
112.7
116.5
117.2
118.8
119.0
118.3
121.2
120.7
124.0
125.0
127.2

114.1
118.2
121.6
124.4
123.0
122.5
122.5
122.4
123.5
123.1
123.1
122.6

108.1
108.5
108.7
109.0
109.4
108.6
108.6
108.7
108.5
108.4
108.4
108.4

102.8
105.5
105.6
105.6
105.7
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0

113.4
116.0
116.9
118.4
118.3
117.2
117.0
116.4
116.9
117.2
117.1
117.0

1943: Jan. 15....
F e b .15__
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15. _
Oct. 15_
_
N ov.15 . .
Dec. 1 5 ...

117.8
118.7
120.7
122.2
122.5
121.8
120.8
120.8
121.3
121.8
121.9
122.4

127.3
129.4
133.7
137.4
137.9
135.8
132.0
131.7
132.6
132.6
132.7
132.7

122.4
122.6
124.5
125.4
125.2
125.4
127.8
128.6
129.8
130.7
130.8
131.3

108.4
108.4
108.4
108.5
108.6
108.7
108.7
108.8
108.7
108.9
109.0
109.1

107.1
107.7
107.9
107.9
107.9
107.9
107.9
107.9
108.1
108.2
108.1
109.2

117.2
117.4
117.8
118.5
119.2
120.3
120.4
120.6
120.8
120.9
121.0
121.2

1944:Jan.1 5 ...
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15—
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
N o v .1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

121.9
121.9
122.1
122.9
123.6
123.5
124.2
123.9
124.3
124.0
124.2
124.8

1 3 0 .3

129.8
129.8
130.1
131.4
130.5
132.5
131.2
130.9
129.7
130.3
131.0

130.6
131.5
133.3
133.6
134.2
134.8
134.7
136.1
139.9
140.3
140.5
142.2

109.2
109.3
109.3
109.2
109.3
109.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
109.8

109.4
110.2
110.2
110.2
110.2
110.2
110.2
110.2
110.2
110.2
110.2
110.2

121.2
121.2
121.3
124.5
126.3
126.9
127.3
127 7
127.8
128.1
128.2
130.0

155.8
156.7 1947:Jan.1 5 ... 147.7 175.4 164.7 110.1
160.1
F eb.15__ 148.7 176.6 169.0
(2
)
159.6
Mar. 15— 150.8 182.3 170.7
(2
)
Apr. 1 5 - 151.0 182.7 170.1
(2
)
May 15__ 150.5 180.7 170.0
(2
)
June15__ 149.5 180.0 169.0
(2
)
July 15__ 150.5 181.3 168.5 113.0
96.9
Oct. 15__ 157.9 193.5 181.2 119.2
98.2
100.9 1948:Jan.15__ 162.4 199.4 185.3 120.8
101.7
Apr. 15__ 163.3 197.9 187.8 121.0
102.3
July 15__ 166.3 204.4 186.4 122.2
101.1
Oct. 15— 167.5 201.1
192.0 123.7
102.4
110.9
L O S A N G E L E S , C A L IF .
116.9
124.1
126.5 1935..................
96.4 100.3
96.7
88.4
130.3 1936..................
97.6
99.9
92.7
96.7
139.0 1937.................. 103.1 106.0 101.6 103.3
150.5 1938.................. 101.8
97.7
102.8 107.8
1939................. 101.0
96.2 102.3
107.8
107.8 1940.............. . 101.1
97.1
103.4 106.8
108.9 1941.................. 106.2 107.7 108.0 107.0
109.7 1942.................. 119.3 131.9 126.2 109.8
110.3 1943.................. 125.4 143.3 131.2 110.0
110.3 1944.................. 127.3 141.2 137.8 110.5
110.7 1945.................. 130.9 145.6 143.2 110.8
110.5 1946.................. 141.0 166.6 154.2 111.4
111.1 1947.................. 159.0 198.6 179.7 114.7
110.6 1948.................. 169.9 212.5 194.6 122.5
113.0
114.0 1942: Jan. 15__ 113.5 120.6 119.0 108.6
114.0
Feb. 1 5 - 114.5 121.4 121.6 108.8
Mar. 15— 116.5 124.9 126.1
109.7
114.1
Apr. 1 5 - 117.1
125.2 128.0 109.9
114.6
May 15— 118.1
128.1
128.0 109.9
115.7
June15__ 118.6 129.8 127.2 109.9
116.1
July 1 5 ... 120.0 133.6 127.1
110.0
116.7
A u g .1 5 .. 121.2 136.8 127.1
110.0
116.7
Sept. 15— 121.7 137.9 127.6 110.1
117.0
Oct. 15— 122.7 140.0 127.6 110.1
117.0
Nov. 1 5 - 123.4 141.5 127.6 110.0
117.2
Dec. 15— 123.9 142.8 127.5 110.0
118.7
118.7 1943: Jan. 15__ 123.7 141.8 128.6 110.0
120.1
F eb.15__ 122.9 139.5 128.9 110.0
Mar. 1 5 .. 124.6 142.8 129.7 109.9
121.7
Apr. 1 5 - 125.9 146.2 129.8 109.9
121.8
May 15__ 125.8 146.2 129.3 109.9
121.8
June15__ 126.3 146.8 129.6 110.0
124.1
July 1 5 ... 125.2 142.4 130.7 110.0
124.5
Aug. 1 5 - 124.7 141.1 130.8 110.0
125.0
Sept. 15— 125.4 141.8 133.5 110.1
124.9
Oct. 15— 126.3 143.3 134.2 110.2
125.0
Nov. 1 5 - 126.8 144.4 134.5 110.2
125.0
Dec. 1 5 - 126.6 143.3 135.3 110.3
125.1
125.1
125.3
See footnotes on p. 61,

Food

Apparel

Period1

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.—Continued

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

KANSAS CITY, M O.— Continued

K A N S A S C IT Y . M O .




All
items

1945: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15—
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
N o v .1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

125.1
125.1
125.1
125.6
126.3
127.1
127.4
127.6
127.0
127.0
127.4
128.0

131.6
130.6
130.3
131.5
132.4
134.4
135.0
135.4
132.8
132.9
133.8
135.3

142.8
143.9
144.2
144.4
145.7
145.9
146.4
147.3
147.6
147.7
147.4
147.7

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
109.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
109.7

110.2 130.4
110.2 130.7
110.2 131.2
110 2. .132.2
111.9 133.3
111.9 135.5
113.0 134.8
112.5 134.1
112.6 140.4
112.6 140.8
141.5
112.6
112.6 142.1

125.4
126.0
126.4
126.4
126.5
126.7
126.7
126.6
126.7
126.8
126.8
126.9

1946:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

127.9
127.3
127.7
128.5
129.0
129.4
136.4
140.4
141.1
142.1
146.8
147.0

134.5
132.6
133.6
134.0
134.9
134.8
154.4
164.3
165.3
166.6
178.0
175.4

147.2
147.1
147.6
148.2
148.8
149.6
150.4
152.7
156.1
157.6
159.5
162.6

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.0
(2
)
(2
)
110.2
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

114.3
114.3
114.3
114.4
114.4
114.4
118.3
118.3
117.2
117.3
118.1
118.2

145.2
145.6
146.1
147.1
149.4
150.0
150.3
152.2
157.2
159.5
161.1
165.2

126.9
127.0
127.2
129.2
129.3
130.6
130.0
131.4
130.5
131.7
134.2
136.0

121.2
121.2
121.2
121.3
121.3
109.4
112.6
117.1

167.2
167.6
168.7
169.0
170.2
171.4
171.5
175.3

136.6
136.9
137.0
137.6
137.9
138.3
138.3
140.4

120.5
120.7
127.0
129.1

179.2
181.5
183.5
185.0

145.8
149.0
150.1
154.3

104.4
100.3
99.1
98.8
97.4
95.5
94.3
94.2
93.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
94.5
94.2

94.1
96.8
104.0
103.8
101.2
101.0
107.2
118.2
119.0
129.9
143.2
153.1
179.4
187.5

95.9
97.9
101.2
102.6
102.4
102.0
105.0
112.3
117.8
124.2
127.6
131.2
139.4
149.4

94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2

116.1
117.0
118.7
118.8
118.5
118.4
118.3
118.3
118.5
118.5
118.4
118.4

109.2
110.3
111.0
111.8
112.1
112.1
112.6
112.8
112.8
113.7
114.5
114.5

94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
94.2
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5

118.5
118.6
118.9
119.1
119.2
119.3
119.1
119.1
119.1
119.1
119.1
119.2

114.8
114.6
116.2
116.2
116.2
117.2
118.9
118.9
119.2
120.1
120.3
121.0

APPENDIX TABLES

53

T able B.— C onsum ers' P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
by G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100]

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

Period1

All
items

1944: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15___
Aug. 15. _
Sept. 15__
Oct. 15—
N o v .15__
Dec. 15__

126.3
125.8
126.2
126.0
127.6
126.8
126.6
127.6
128.0
128.7
128.8
129.1

142.0
140.5
140.9
138.6
142.0
139.2
138.5
141.1
141.4
143.0
143.3
143.9

135.4
135.7
136.3
137.3
137.2
137.3
137.5
138.1
139.6
139.7
139.9
139.9

110.3
110.3
110.4
110.4
110.4
110.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.7

92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5

119.7
119.8
119.8
120.2
129.9
132.3
132.6
132.9
136.5
138.4
138.4
138.0

121.5
121.7
122.2
124.3
124.6
125.0
125.2
125.2
125.2
125.3
125.3
125.3

1945: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15—
A ug.15_.
Sept.15_Oct. 15—
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 15__

129.2
128.7
129.2
130.0
130.3
130.5
130.6
131.0
132.0
132.3
133.0
133.7

143.4
141.8
142.7
144.4
144.5
144.8
145.2
145.9
147.2
147.2
149.2
150.9

140.6
140.6
140.8
141.6
141.6
142.0
142.2
143.0
146.2
146.6
146.2
146.8

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.9
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.8

92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5

139.6
143.2
143.2
144.0
144.1
145.0
141.9
142.8
143.1
143.5
143.8
143.7

1946:Jan.15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 15_ _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15_ _
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 15__

132.7
132.5
133.1
133.4
134.3
136.1
142.3
144.6
145.5
148.5
154.5
154.5

148.6
148.4
148.9
149.0
150.7
154.8
171.2
175.1
176.5
182.8
198.1
195.1

145.4
144.7
147.9
149.0
150.3
151.3
153.0
156.2
159.3
161.6
164.0
168.3

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
111.3
(2
)
111.7
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5

143.5
144.3
144.3
145.9
148.0
149.1
151.3
152.0
157.4
162.4
166.3
173.1

1947: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

155.3
155.9
156.9
157.4
157.6
156.3
157.2
157.8
161.6
161.3
164.1
166.0

194.3
194.1
195.5
195.7
196.7
193.8
193.8
195.4
204.2
201.9
206.7
211.1

172.5
174.9
178.5
179.5
179.5
177.1
177.5
178.4
182.9
184.2
184.3
187.1

111.7
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
113.7
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
118.9
(2
)

94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.3

176.2
179.9
180.4
181.3
179.1
176.1
178.8
176.7
179.6
180.8
181.2
182.5

125.8
125.9 1945: Mar. 15. .
126.3
June 1 5 126.7
Sept. 1 5 127.5
Dec. 15—
127.5
127.9 1946: Mar. 15 127.9
June15__
128.2
Sept. 15—
129.2
Dec. 15__
129.2
129.5 1947: Mar. 15. .
June 15__
July 15—
129.4
129.3
Oct. 15—
129.4
129.8 1948: Jan. 15__
129.9
Apr. 15__
July 15__
130.1
130.5
Oct. 15—
132.2
131.3
132.7
134.4
135.2 1935..................
1936................ .
136.2 1937.............. .
136.9 1938__________
137.2 1939__________
138.2 1940..................
138.2 1941..................
138.3 1942........ .........
139.6 1943__________
140.0 1944____ _____
140.7 1945................ 141.7 1946__________
142.4 1947__________
142.8 1948..................

1948: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 1 5 May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 ..
Sept. 15._
Oct. 15—
N o v .15.Dec. 15—

167.6
168.1
167.4
169.3
169.1
168.8
170.3
171.0
171.0
171.8
172.2
172.7

212.2
210.9
208.9
213.9
212.7
212.1
213.1
212.7
212.1
213.1
213.7
214.9

189.9
194.7
194.2
193.7
195.8
196.2
195.7
194.8
194.5
195.3
195.5
194.8

(2
)
120.2
(2
)
(2
)
120.9
(2
)
(2
)
123.9
(2
)
(2
)
124.8
(2
)

94.3
94.3
94.3
94.3
.94.3
94.3
94.3
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0

185.3
186.5
187.7
188.7
187.5
185.5
185.9
187.0
189.0
189.0
189.2
189.0

Food

Apparel

Rent

Period1

LOS ANGELES, CALIF—Continued

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and fumish- cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

MANCHESTER, N. H .— Continued

MANCHESTER, N. H .
1935..................
1936..................
1937__________
1938..................
1939..................
1940................ .
1941..................
1942..................
1943..................
1944..................
1945.............. .
1946..................
1947— ............
1948..................

99.1
100.0
102.4
99.9
98.8
-100.1
105.2
118.4
126.3
127.6
130.2
140.2
162.2
174.7

100.1
101.9
104.2
98.0
96.3
97.9
104.7
124.0
136.4
132.9
135.2
156.6
191.6
209 3

99.0
99.2
101.7
100.6
99.3
100.6
105.7
125.8
132.1
142.2
148.6
157.6
178.3
189.8

99.8
99.3
99.7
100.3
101.0
102.3
104.5
107.4
107.7
107.9
107.8
108.4
109.0
111.1

97.1
98.0
104.3
102.1
98.5
102.5
107.0
117.0
123.5
126.0
126.1
124.9
135.2
154.3

96.3
96.6
102.0
103.1
101.9
100.1
105.0
120.2
123.2
137.5
148.8
163.9
188.8
199.5

1942: Mar. 15-_

115.6

118.7

124.9

107.2

111.7

120.3




All
items

1942: June 15__ 119.1
Sept. 15— 120.2
Dec. 15__ 122.8

125.3
126.8
132.3

127.7
127.5
127.6

107.5
107.6
107.7

114.9
119.5
121.2

121.2
120.9
120.8

111.9
111.9
112.9

1943: Mar. 1 5 June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

126.2
128.5
125.5
126.4

137.8
143.4
133.9
133.8

130.4
130.4
134.0
136.6

107.6
107.6
107.8
107.8

123.4
123.5
123.5
124.3

121.4
122.6
124.3
126.4

114.3
114.0
115.8
118.1

1944: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

126.3
126.8
129.0
129.3

132.0
130.9
134.2
133.6

140.1
141.7
143.8
146.4

107.8
107.9
108.0
(2
)

124.7
125.7
127.4
127.4

128.6
136.6
145.2
146.4

118.7
120.5
121.4
122.1

128.9
131.3
130.0
131.0

132.7
137.4
134.9
137.3

146.5
147.8
150.3
151.3

107.8
(2
)
107.8
(2
)

127.5
127.9
122.5
122.2

146.2
148.4
149.6
153.1

122.2
122.6
122.1
121.6

131.0
134.7
147.0
156.5

136.4
144.4
170.0
186.7

153.0
154.0
161.2
167.5

108.2
(2
)
108.5
(2
)

121.4
122.0
127.5
128.6

155.6
160.4
167.7
181.3

121.8
122.4
124.6
131.7

158.1
160.4
162.1
166.1

186.8
190.3
192.6
198.0

174.9
176.1
179.1
184.0

(2
)
108.6
(2
)
109.6

128.7
131.5
132.4
139.5

186.3
187.4
188.1
193.0

133.5
135.6
137.2
138.4

172.5
172.0
178.1
176.5

208.8
204.9
218.4
210.4

185.7
190.2
191.4
192.6

110.0
110.3
111.4
111.7

153.4
151.7
152.8
157.2

195.0
196.3
200.0
204.9

140.7
143.5
144.8
147.6

98.6
99.4
120.9
100.3
98.8
98.9
104.7
117.5
126.7
128.9
131.4
140.5
164.0
174.6

103.3
102.0
105.8
96.1
92.7
93.3
103.8
125.8
145.5
144.6
148.1
171.3
211.6
224.4

96.4
97.6
102.7
102.1
101.2
102.0
108.1
131.8
138.0
145.2
149.2
158.4
194.9
209.5

93.3
96.8
101.4
104.1
104.4
105.7
110.1
115.1
115.7
116.0
115.6
115.3
119.5
127.2

99.8
100.9
102.4
101.2
95.8
94.2
96.4
103.5
104.3
105.2
106.2
109.2
119.3
130.9

92.3
94.8
103.9
105.0
104.0
102.0
108.9
123.8
125.1
134.7
140.7
143.8
162.4
180.3

98.3
99.2
100.7
100.8
101.0
100.6
102.9
107.0
112.4
118.0
120.1
122.6
131.9
138.6

114.8
117.4
119.3
122.3

117.8
124.1
129.7
137.1

130.8
133.0
134.2
134.5

114.6
115.3
115.7
115.6

104.1
104.1
104.1
104.4

124.2
124.4
123.9
123.9

106.7
107.1
107.1
108.1

125.6
127.0
128.4
127.7

144.8
148.3
148.2
144.5

135.3
136.5
140.7
142.1

115.5
115.6
115.8
115.9

104.4
104.2
104.2
104.7

124.3
124.7
125.7
126.6

110.7
111.0
114.5
115.8

126.9
129.2
130.2
130.2

141.0
144.7
146.5
145.6

144.2
145.1
146.0
147.0

116.0
116.0
116.1
(2
)

104.9
105.2
105.4
105.4

127.5
138.1
138.5
139.0

116.4
118.0
119.3
119.6

1945: Mar. 15— 129.1
98.8
June15__ 132.0
98.8
Sept. 1 5 - 131.6
Dec. 15— 133.3
101.0
100.8
100.7 1916: Mar. 15— 132.5
101.1
June 1 5 - 134.5
105.4
Sept. 15— 146.2
111.7
Dec. 15__ 156.3
115.1
120.3 1947: Mar. 15— 158.8
122.2
June15__ 160.6
124.3
Sept. 1 5 - 169.0
Dec. 15__ 173.5
136.1
144.8
1948: Mar. 1 5 - 172.4
111.2

144.4
149.8
148.1
151.8

147.7
148.7
149.8
152.3

115.7
(2
)
115.4
(2
)

105.5
106.3
106.6
106.6

138.1
139.7
142.6
144.0

120.0
120.2
120.2
120.3

148.8
153.6
185.3
206.0

153.2
155.2
158.8
173.0

115.3
(2
)
115.2
(2
)

107.3
107.4
111.2
112.1

140.6
143.9
142.7
149.8

121.3
121.4
122.5
127.4

205.1
205.1
220.5
229.7

185.7
195.1
204.6
205.2

H15.6
(2
)
*120.5
124.5

113.8
116.2
122.8
127.0

157.6
159.0
168.7
171.7

130.1
131.7
133.5
134.5

219.9

209.8

126.1

128.0

181.2

136.6

145.7 1942: Mar. 1 5 June15__
145.9
Sept. 15—
146.0
Dec. 15__
146.8
146.5
1943: Mar. 15—
146.3
June 15__
€50.2
Sept. 15—
151.7
Dec. 15__
152.4
153.6
153.4 1944: Mar. 15—
June 1 5 154.1
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

MEMPHIS, TENN.

See footnotes on p . 61.

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

54

T able B.— Consumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income Families in 34 Large Cities,
by Group o f Commodities, 1935-48— Continued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period 1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric- House- Misity, and furnish­ cellaneous
refriger- ings
ation

Period1

128.1
135.0
135.0

180.4
180.7
182.6

137.2
141.4
141.5

102.3
104.1
108.6
108.2
108.3
108.8
108.9
111.0
116.4

98.7
101.4
103.8
106.0
109.5
110.5
114.4
125.3
141.1

100.3
108.8
124.2
124.9
137.4
144.3
159.5
188.6
195.3

121.1
122.6
122.4
122.6

107.9
110.5
108.3
108.2

103.8
103.9
103.9
103.9

124.6
124.6
124.3
124.4

134.2
138.7
133.6
132.9

124.4
124.6
127.4
127.9

108.2
108.2
108.2
108.2

104.1
106.6
106.8
108.5

124.5
124.6
125.1
125.6

121.6
123.8
124.3
124.3

131.9
135.5
135.5
135.2

130.2
130.3
133.4
133.9

108.3
108.3
108.3
(*>

109.2
109.6
109.9
109.5

127.4
142.7
142.6
142.7

1945: Mar. 1 5 ..
June15__
Sept. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

124.2
127.0
126.6
127.2

133.8
141.0
137.8
139.1

135.7
135.9
140.4
140.1

108.8
108.8

109.5
110.1
111.5
111.6

142.5
143.6
145.0
147.6

1946: Mar. 1 5 ..
June15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

127.1
131.2
142.8
150.6

136.5
144.3
170.3
179.7

147.0
150.7
157.5
173.6

108.8
109.0

111.8
112.9
117.2
117.4

147.4
150.9
168.1
183.4

1947: Mar. 1 5 ..
June15__
A u g .15._
Nov. 15—

154.5
156.6
159.0
164.0

186.9
190.8
196.8
200.7

180.3
184.3
183.3
191.9

109.2
114.7

119.1
122.6
131.8
132.9

187.7
189.0
185.5
193.1

1948: Feb. 15__
May 15__
A u g .15—
Nov. 15. .

166.9
171.1
174.5
171.2

203.4
213.7
218.8
207.5

198.0
200.0
200.8
201.4

115.5
116.0
116.7
117.3

135.0
139.4
145.2
145.8

195.9
194.0
196.4
195.3

226.7
227.8
217.9

209.0
210.5
210.5

174.7
177.1
174.3

1940..................
1941..................
1942..................
1943__________
1944..................
1945..................
1946..................

98.7
103.9
114.7
121.3
123.3
126.0
136.0
158.0
170.8

95.0
104.0
120.7
134.9
134.2
137.4
156.5
191.8
211.0

99.3
104.1
121.4
125.6
131.4
137.5
154.4
184.3
199.7

1942: Mar. 1 5 .. 112.7
June 15__ 115.7
Sept. 15_ 115.3
Dec. 15__ 118.2

116.0
122.0
121.0
128.6

1943: Mar. 1 5 ..
June 15__
Sept. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

120.7
122.7
121.4
121.5

1944: Mar. 1 5 ..
June15__
Sept. 15_
Dec. 15__

126.8
128.0
129.5

MILWAUKEE WIS.

1943: Apr. 15—
May 15—
June 15—
July 15—
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

121.0
121.8
121.9
121.0
120.8
121.0
121.7
121.7
122.1

96.8
98.5
102.8
101.4
100.5
100.8
106.0
115.9
121.0
122.2
124.4
135.5
156.4
170.5

99.2
100.8
104.9
97.9
97.2
97.2
106.6
121.8
132.0
129.6
132.0
153.0
185.5
202.7

98.5
98.5
102.6
101.2
99.2
100.8
106.4
123.8
124.8
135.6
141.5
160.2
190.8
205.1

91.9
94.6
100.9
105.4
107.2
108.0
108.4
109.7
110.0
110.3
110.3
110.9
116.3
125.7

101.4
101.3
101.4
99.1
96.7
96.5
97.4
98.8
101.6
103.8
103.3
106.6
118.7
137.0

93.4
94.6
103.9
104.6
103.5
103.2
109.2
123.5
125.4
132.0
140.6
156.3
181.6
193.4

1942: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
M ay 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 15—
Sept. 15. _
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

111.9
112.7
114.3
114.7
115.9
115.9
116.1
116.4
116.8
118.0
118.9
119.2

114.9
115.4
117.3
118.0

116.1
117.8
124.2
125.2

12 0 .9

1 2 5 .6

121.4
122.1
122.9
123.3
126.6
128.9
129.9

124.5
124.0
124.3
125.7
125.8
125.9
126.0

109.1
109.2
109.3
109.4
109.5
109.5
109.7
109.9
110.1
110.4
110.3
109.9

98.8
98.8
98.8
98.4
98.5
98.6
98.9
98.9
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0

120.8
121.9
123.6
124.1
123.8
123.4
123.8
123.4
124.2
124.3
124.3
124.3

100.3
103.2
110.3
114.9 1944: Jan.15__ 120.8
117.7
Feb. 1 5 - 121.1
119.9
Mar. 15— 121.3
124.9
Apr. 15__ 121.7
136.8
May 15__ 122.2
146.8
June15__ 122.2
July 15__ 123.0
108.9
Aug. 1 5 - 122.7
109.7
Sept. 1 5 - 122.6
111.6
Oct. 15— 123.0
112.7
Nov. 1 5 - 122.9
Dec. 15__ 123.2
114.1
115.0 1945: Jan. 15— 123.3
115.6
F eb.15__ 123.2
116.1
Mar. 15— 123.1
Apr. 15__ 123.2
116.5
May 15__ 123.9
117.9
June15__ 124.6
118.4
July 15__ 125.0
119.2
Aug. 1 5 - 124.9
Sept. 15— 125.1
119.5
Oct. 15__ 125.2
120.0
Nov. 15— 125.6
120.1
Dec. 15__ 126.1
120.6
1946: Jan.15__ 126.3
120.6
F eb.15__ 126.0
123.9
Mar. 15— 126.1
125.4
Apr. 15__ 126.5
134.1
May 15__ 127.5
June15__ 129.4
135.8
July 15__ 138.0
135.7
Aug. 1 5 - 139.5
135.1
Sept. 15— 142.4
140.4
Oct. 15— 145.9
Nov. 1 5 - 148.8
144.0
Dec. 15__ 149.7
144.8
148.7 1947: Jan. 15__ 148.3
150.0
F eb.15__ 149.0
Mar. 15— 151.6
Apr. 15__ 151.4
May 15__ 151.5
June15__ 152.9
95.9
Sept. 1 5 - 162.1
98.0
Dee. 15__ 166.2
101.8
103.0
101.2 1948: Mar. 1 5 - 167.7
June15__ 171.4
101.3
Sept. 1 5 - 173.8
105.8
Dec. 15__ 170.8
114.0
117.6
120.9
123.0
127.1 1935
98.8
139.9 1936..................
98.6
154.7 1937.................. 102.6
1938.................. 100.5
111.2 1939..................
99.5
112.4 1940..................
99.2
113.5 1941
107.2
113.6 1942.................. 120.4
114.6 1943.................. 126.7
114.7 1944.................. 127.8
114.4 1945.................. 129.7
114.5 194fi
138.9
114.4 1947.................. 161.9
114.4 1948.................. 173.3
115.0
115.0

1943: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 1 5 ..

119.0
119.6
121.0

129.1
130.7
133.0

126.2
126.4
127.5

109.9
109.9
109.8

99.8
100.0
100.0

124.4
124.0
125.0

115.1
115.1
117.3

1947
194ft

( 2)

108.7
( 2)

( 2)
( 2)

( 2)

M IN N E A P O L IS , MINN

1935
......
1936
......
1937
......
1938..................
1939..................
1940
......
1941
......
1942
......
1943
......
1944..................
1945..................
1946..................
1947..................
1948..................




Food

Apparel

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
Rent ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.— Continued

MEMPHIS TENN.— Continued
1948: June 15__
Sept. 15_
Dec. 15__

All
items

See footnotes on p. 61

133.5
134.9
134.1
131.3
130.4
130.4
132.3
132.2
132.3

127.7
127.1
127.7
128.1
128.3
129.7
130.2
130.5
131.9

109.9
109.9
110.0
110.0
110.0
110.1
110.1
110.1
110.3

100.0
101.5
101.9
1A1 .y
lu i A
102.5
102.5
102.5
102.5
103.8

125.2
125.5
125.8
1O A
A
1ZO.U
126.2
125.5
125.6
125.6
125.9

116.2
117.2
118.2
1 lo.4
xt O A
118.6
118.9
118.8
118.8
118.8

128.3
128.9
128.7
128.9
129.5
129.0
131.3
130.5
129.7
130.4
130.0
130.4

132.4
133.2
135.0
135.0
135.4
135.7
135.7
135.9
136.5
137.4
137.6
138.0

110.2
110.3
110.2
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.4

103.8
104.0
104.0
104.1
104.9
104.9
104.9
103.1
103.1
103.1
103.1
103.1

126.5
127.1
128.3
132.2
132.3
132.5
132.5
132.5
134.2
134.7
135.2
135.7

119.0
119.1
119.1
120.2
120.8
121.2
121.3
121.6
122.0
122.1
122.1
122.4

130.7
129.7
129.3
129.5
131.2
133.0
133.7
133.2
132.6
132.6
133.7
135.1

138.1
140.1
140.1
140.2
140.5
141.1
141.5
141.2
143.6
143.9
144.1
143.9

(2
)
(2
)
110.2

102.6
102.6
102.6
102.6
102.6
103.1
103.3
104.2
104.0
104.1
104.2
104.3

135.9
138.6
138.7
138.8
138 9
138.9
139.4
139.8
143.8
144.1
144.7
146.1

122.5
122.6
122.6
123.0
123.0
123.0
123.1
123.2
123.3
123.4
123.4
123.4

134.3
132.5
131.8
133.0
134.9
137.5
160.9
163.3
167.9
177.6
181.7
180.2

146.5
148.2
152.1
152.8
153.8
158.0
158.7
160.9
167.7
169.9
175.6
178.8

104.7
105.1
105.1
103.1
103.6
103.6
107.3
107.6
109.0
109.0
110.1
110.7

147.1
148.1
148.7
149.8
151.7
153.4
153.5
156.7
163.9
165.0
167.5
169.9

123.9
124.0
123.6
123.6
124.2
126.4
126.8
127.9
128.8
129.0
131.9
135.1

174.0
174.6
181.3
179.6
179.0
182.6
197.2
199.3

185.3
185.4
186.7
187.0
187.0
188.1
194.7
200.8

119.6
122.4

111.7
112.2
112.6
112.7
114.5
114.9
124.1
129.0

173.8
173.9
175.1
176.9
177.3
178.9
186.9
|192.2

135.5
135.7
136.2
137.1
137.5
1Q . O
V
lot K
141.8
148.0

198.1
206.2
206.0
195.6

207.2
204.5
205.9
204.2

123.1
125.9
126.6
129.8

131.0
139.2
139.6
142.8

195.9
190.7
195.2
191.7

150.8
152.4
159.9
159.5

102.3
99.8
100.4
99.7
97.8
95.6
98.1
103.1
105.2
103.9
103.3
105.6
119.5
128.4

92.0
96.4
105.5
103.3
102.8
102.0
107.7
120.9
121.5
136.8
139.5
150.6
170.2
176.2

98.5
98.0
101.0
101.7
100.8
98.9
103.6

( 2)

(2
)
(2
)

( 2)
( 2)
(2
( 2)
( 2)

110.3
( 2)

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
( 2)

110.6
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

111.0
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

111.4
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

MOBILE, ALA.
100.2
100.3
105.5
97.6
96.3
96.5
109.0
131.0
146.6
144.5
147.1
164.5
201.0
217.0

99.2
97.4
101.9
101.6
99.8
100.6
107.2
125.7
128.3
134.5
139.0
154.4
182.9
202.2

96.2
97.0
99.4
103.2
104.2
106.6
115.7
120.4
114.0
114.6
114.9
114.4
118.3
123.6

1 1 1 .0

115.4
119.0
119.9
122.7
132.2
140.8



[1935-39 = 100]

by Group o f Commodities, 1935-48— Continued

T able B.— Consumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income Families in 34 Large Cities,

56

CONSUMERS’

p r ic e s

in

th e

u n it e d

states

T able B.— Consumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income Families in 34 Large Cities,
by Group of Commodities, 1935-48— Continued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Fuel,
electric- House- MisRent ity, and furnish- cellarefriger- ings
neous
ation

Period1

All
items

NEW YORK, N. Y.— Continued
164.9
167.7
173.9

117.1
117.0
117.1
117.3
115.6
116.9
117.5
120.5
124.4
124.7
125.8
126.2

176.2
176.7
177.6
175.4
175.0
173.2
174.4
174.9
176.4
179.1
180.6
181.2

127.1
127.6
128.3
128.3
129.0
130.0
131.0
132.9
133.3
133.2
133.4
133.3

184.9
184.6
184.9
184.2
182.7
183.1
184.1
186.7
187.5
188.2
188.2
187.4

99.8 101.6
96.9 100.1
1935__________
1936
___ 100.1 102.4
97.7
98.8
1937
___ 102.2 105.0 102.5
99.5
96.7 102.3
99.6
101.0
1938..................
98.3
1939..................
94.2
100.5 101.6
98.9
1940..................
95.0 102.9 102.9
1941................. 107.5 107.4 109.4 110.7
1942.................. 121.1
129.3 128.7 112.2
1943__________ 129.8 147.6 133.6 108.7
1944
...... 130.5 143.1
139.4 108.8
1945
...... 132.5 143.8 143.5 109.2
1946
...... 141.9 164.6 155.6 109.2
1947
...... 163.1 202.9 176.1
110.8
172.0 213.9
1948
............................................................
193.0 114.0

101.4
100.3
100.0
99.4
98.9
94.4
108.0
114.2
116.0
118.4
120.2
121.1
128.8
145.6

97.7
97.5
103.1
102.1
99.5
99.9
108.2
123.4
129.0
139.3
144.2
157.9
181.1
191.5

1942: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

120.5
120.3
122.1
124.4

126.7
128.5
131.9
136.4

127.3
130.9
130.4
130.7

119.5
108.7
108.7
108.7

113.4
114.0
114.4
114.9

123.5
123.9
123.8
123.8

1943: Mar. 1 5 June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

128.6
131.4
131.1
130.2

144.5
151.7
149.7
145.1

132.1
132.6
135.5
136.0

108.9
108.6
108.6
108.7

116.2
116.0
116.0
117.4

128.5
129.1
129.6
131.1

1944: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

130.0
130.3
130.6
131.6

143.7
142.0
141.1
143.2

137.9
139.5
140.7
141.1

108.8
108.6
108.9
109.1

117.4
117.8
119.5
119.7

132.6
140.8
143.0
145.6

1945: Mar. 15—
June 15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

131.2
132.3
133.1
134.0

141.4
143.4
144.1
145.2

141.4
143.8
144.1
146.4

109.2

(2
)

119.7
120.3
120.5
120.5

142.5
142.5
143.2
150.2

1946: Mar. 15—
June 1 5 Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15—_

133.8
135.2
148.8
157.6

144.5
146.0
177.4
195.0

146.7
152.3
163.8
165.9

109.3
109.2

120.9
120.1
122.2
122.5

148.2
153.8
164.0
173.2

1947: Mar. 1 5 June15__
A u g .15—
Nov. 15—

160.9
160.9
163.6
168.2

199.8
198.0
203.2
210.6

171.0
(2
)
175.1 U 09.3
178.7
(2
)
182.5 113.4

125.3
125.3
130.7
137.5

179.0
182.9
182.8
182.0

1948: Feb. 1 5 May 15—
Aug. 15 —
Nov. 15—

170.1
171.9
176.2
174.0

210.2
213.3
220.5
211.8

189.9
194.4
196.3
197.0

141.5
143.3
147.8
149.9

189.5
189.7
195.3
196.2

186.7
188.6
186.1

184.0
187.9
193.1

1947: Jan. 15.._
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug.15_ _
Sept. 15__
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

154.6
154.2
157.4
156.8
155.6
156.9
157.5
158.6
161.9
161.7
163.3
164.9

183.5
182.1
189.5
187.3
184.8
187.9
191.7
194.3
203.0
200.6
203.9
206.1

193.6
195.2
198.1
199.6
200.5
201.2
191.6
190.8
188.9
189.4
189.7
191.7

1948: Jan. 15—
F eb.15__
Mar. 15__
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15—
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov.15__
Dec. 15—_

167.1
166.4
164.3
167.0
167.5
169.1
172.6
173.3
173.3
171.7
171.0
169.2

209.7
206.7
201.2
208.6
210.0
213.9
217.9
216.9
216.2
211.5
208.7
204.3

192.1
194.6
196.2
195.5
195.9
195.9
196.8
200.3
202.9
202.1
202.2
200.7

n




(2
)
(2)

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
104.1
(2
)
(2
)

105.6
(2
)
(2
)

106.5
(2)
(2)

106.6
(2)
(2
)

107.1
(2)
(2
)

107.5
(2
)
(2
)

O R P o n r. v a

(2
)

109.1
(2
)

(2)

113.6
114.1
115.2
115.5

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

116.2
116.5
116.6

1946: Oct. 15__ 152.8
Nov. 15__ 154.3
Dec. 15__ 155.2

Food

133.7
134.6
139.8

1935............. .
98.8
1936......... ....... 100.1
1937__________ 102.5
1938........ ......... 100.1
140.7 1939__________
98.5
140.3 1940.............. 98.7
140.5 1941__________ 103.6
141.2 1942— ............ 115.3
139.9 1943— ............ 122.7
140.1 1944__________ 124.4
140.6 1945— ............ 127.4
140.6 1946............ —_ 138.4
140.9 1947.................. 158.4
141.9 1948____ _____ 170.9
143.1
145.5 1942: Jan. 15— 110.6
F eb.15__ 111.2
147.7
Mar. 15— 112.7
Apr. 15__ 113.8
148.1
May 15__ 114.7
146.7
146.7
June15__ 114.9
146.3
July 15__ 116.3
146.7
Aug.15_ _ 116.7
155.3
Sept. 15— 116.9
157.7
Oct. 15__ 117.7
Nov. 1 5 - 118.8
157.0
Dec. 15__ 119.7
157.8
159.4
159.6 1943: Jan. 15 „_ 119.9
F eb.15__ 119.7
Mar. 15— 121.4
Apr. 15__ 124.3
May 15__ 124.8
98.9
June15__ 123.8
99.6
July 15__ 122.6
100.5
A u g .15-_ 122.5
100.7
Sept. 15_ 122.7
100.3
Oct. 15__ 123.6
101.1
Nov. 1 5 - 123.0
104.9
Dec. 15__ 123.6
115.5
123.9 1944: Jan. 15— 123.4
128.1
F eb .15__ 123.0
132.1
Mar. 15— 122.7
134.9
Apr. 15—. 123.5
143.8
May 15__ 123.7
148.3
June 15__ 124.8
July 15__ 124.9
112.6
Aug. 1 5 - 125.5
114.9
Sept. 15— 125.5
117.8
Oct. 15__ 125.0
120.3
Nov. 1 5 - 125.0
Dec. 15__ 125.9
123.4
123.7 1945: Jan. 15—_ 126.0
124.0
F eb .15__ 126.5
126.4
Mar. 15 — 126.0
Apr. 15__ 126.0
126.5
May 15__ 127.3
128.4
June15__ 127.8
129.2
July 15__ 128.4
129.5
Aug. 1 5 - 128.4
Sept. 15_ _ 128.0
131.2
Oct. 15__ 127.8
131.5
Nov. 1 5 - 128.2
133.7
Dec. 15__ 128.6
133.1
1946: Jan. 15__ 128.8
133.6
F eb .15__ 128.3
133.6
Mar. 15— 129.4
133.6
Apr. 15__ 130.2
141.7
May 15__ 131.0
June15__ 132.5
143.5
July 15__ 140.0
143.3
Aug. 1 5 - 143.7
143.4
Sept. 15_ . 146.0
145.3
Oct. 15__ 147.8
Nov. 1 5 - 150.5
147.1
Dec. 15__ 152.5
147.2
150.2
152.0
See footnotes on p. 61

100.1
102.5
105.7
97.2
94.4
94.1
102.4
121.3
135.8
134.0
137.1
156.8
189.2
205.3

96.4
97.6
101.9
104.0
100.1
101.3
105.9
124.0
129.0
138.9
146.8
157.6
181.9
193.3

97.2
97.8
100.1
102.2
102.7
103.2
104.7
106.6
106.7
106.8
106.9
107.3
111.3
118.0

101.3
101.3
100.5
99.1
97.7
98.0
101.5
103.4
106.1
109.4
111.6
117.8
126.3
138.4

94.0
95.9
103.9
105.1
101.1
102.3
107.2
121.1
123.8
134.7
144.7
160.0
183.2
198.9

98.9
99.4
99.9
100.9
100.8
101.1
103.9
111.1
115.1
119.0
120.8
125.5
137.9
147.8

113.9
114.5
115.5
117.5
119.4
119.7
122.9
124.0
123.9
125.8
128.2
130.5

114.0
116.0
123.5
126.2
125.8
126.0
126.2
126.1
126.1
126.2
126.2
125.9

106.0
106.0
106.5
106.8
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7

103.4
103.4
103.4
101.9
103.5
103.5
103.7
103.7
103.7
103.7
103.7
103.7

117.5
118.5
120.9
121.3
121.7
121.6
121.7
121.8
122.0
122.1
122.2
122.4

108.4
108.9
109.5
109.9
110.5
111.0
111.5
111.2
112.6
112.7
113.6
113.6

130.2
129.6
133.5
140.5
141.6
139.2
135.8
135.3
135.2
137.1
135.4
136.1

126.0
125.9
127.3
127.6
127.7
127.5
128.7
129.7
131.4
131.6
131.8
132.3

106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.8

105.8
105.9
105.9
105.9
105.9
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
108.6

122.4
122.6
122.7
123.0
123.4
123.9
124.2
124.3
124.6
124.7
124.8
125.0

114.3
114.4
114.5
114.7
114.8
114.8
115.0
115.0
115.3
116.2
116.2
116.2

135.0
133.3
131.9
132.5
132.8
134.5
134.8
136.1
134.7
133.5
133.3
135.0

132.9
133.3
136.1
136.2
137.3
138.5
138.9
139.5
143.2
143.4
143.5
144.0

106.8
106.8
106.8
106.8
106.8
106.7
106.7
106.7
106.8

108.6
110.7
110.4
110.4
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.1
109.1
109.2
109.2

125.2
125.7
126.0
132.3
133.7
137.7
138.1
138.7
139.1
139.1
139.2
141.2

116.9
117.0
117.0
118.9
119.1
119.7
119.6
119.7
119.8
120.1
120.3
120.5

135.1
135.9
134.3
134.2
137.7
138.8
139.2
138.9
137.6
137.2
137.9
138.7

144.1
144.7
144.9
145.4
145.9
145.5
146.8
147.4
148.9
149.1
149.3
150.1

(2
)
(2)

109.3
110.4
110.5
109.4
109.2
109.5
113.2
113.3
113.5
113.4
113.3
113.8

141.5
142.9
144.2
144.7
144.1
144.2
143.4
144.2
146.1
146.2
146.6
147.8

120.7
120.7
120.7
121.0
120.8
121.1
121.2
121.2
120.7
120.5
120.5
120.5

138.9
137.6
139.0
139.6
141.0
143.5
160.8
169.2
172.6
176.2
181.6
181.8

149.9
149.7
151.5
152.1
153.3
156.0
156.5
157.7
162.4
163.5
165.6
173.2

115.0
115.0
115.0
114.9
114.9
115.0
119.8
119.8
121.2
121.2
121.1
121.2

148.0
149.0
150.9
153.2
155.1
158.5
159.1
160.7
166.7
168.7
171.7
178.4

120.5
120.5
121.9
123.8
124.3
124.9
125.7
126.6
127.0
128.1
129.2
133.3

(2
)
(2)
(2
)

106.9
(2)
(2
)
(2
)
(2)
(2
)

106.9
(2)
(2
)
(2)
(2
)
(2)

107.2
(2)
(2
)
(2
)
(2)

107.3
(2
)
(2)
(2
)
(2
)

APPENDIX TABLES

57

T a b le B .— Consum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
b y G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and fumish- cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

Period 1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

PITTSBURGH, PA.— Continued

PHILADELPHIA, PA.—Continued
1947: Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug.15_ _
Sept. 15._
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

152.3
151.6
156.1
154.9
155.1
157.1
158.3
159.5
163.2
162.2
164.2
166.3

179.7
177.2
185.8
181.9
183.4
187.1
188.9
191.7
199.8
196.2
197.5
201.8

176.3
177.1
180.9
181.1
180.2
182.3
181.8
181.8
183.4
184.8
185.8
186.8

(2
)
107.7
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
116.3
(2
)

122.8
125.2
125.2
125.2
122.4
122.7
124.3
127.8
129.1
129.8
130.4
130.4

179.5
179.7
179.8
180.2
180.2
180.2
182.2
182.1
186.3
186.4
189.0
193.0

133.3
133.2
136.6
137.9
137.4
138.9
138.5
158.3
139.0
139.5
140.7
141.6

1945: Jan. 15—
F eb .15__
Mar. 15 —
Apr. 1 5 May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15_ _
Oct. 15—
N o v .15—
Dec. 15__

128.1
128.0
127.6
128.1
128.9
130.5
130.7
130.2
129.9
130.0
130.0
130.9

136.4
135.6
133.8
135.4
137.1
141.2
142.4
141.3
139.6
140.0
139.7
140.3

164.9
165.6
166.3
166.0
166.4
166.7
166.8
164.8
168.7
169.1
169.8
175.4

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
107.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
107.5

112.1
112.0
112.0
112.0
112.7
111.9
111.8
112.1
112.2
112.1
112.1
112.1

139.8
143.1
145.5
145.7
147.6
147.8
142.8
143.2
142.8
143.1
144.1
144.2

119.6
119.6
119.9
120.0
120.0
120.0
119.9
120.1
119.8
119.4
119.6
119.8

1948: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15—
Apr. 1 5 May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
A u g .15—
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

168.4
166.6
165.5
169.3
170.4
172.1
172.9
174.8
174.8
174.1
171.7
170.6

205.6
199.3
196.3
202.8
205.0
209.4
210.9
212.5
212.0
208.4
202.0
199.3

188.6
191.5
191.6
191.3
193.8
193.2
193.3
194.2
195.0
195.8
196.0
195.5

(2
)
117.3
(2
)
(2
)
118.1
(2
)
(2
)
119.2
(2
)
(2
)
119.8
(2
)

135.1
135.1
135.1
135.1
135.1
136.1
136.1
142.6
142.6
142.6
142.6
142.6

190.5
193.6
195.9
198.0
196.7
197.1
198.9
202.7
204.6
204.9
202.5
201.7

142.4 1946: Jan. 15—
142.2
Feb. 1 5 142.1
Mar. 15 __
147.7
Apr. 1 5 147.4
May 15__
147.4
June15__
148.2
July 15__
149.7
Aug. 15—
150.0
Sept. 15—
152.1
Oct. 15—
152.3
Nov. 15—
152.6
Dec. 15__

131.4
131.0
131.2
131.8
132.2
134.7
142.8
145.9
147.4
149.4
153.8
155.4

141.0
140.4
141.4
142.5
142.8
147.1
167.6
174.0
176.9
179.3
188.4
187.7

175.2
172.9
170.4
171.8
172.8
175.7
178.9
181.3
185.4
191.7
197.6
200.3

(2
)
(2
)
107.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
107.6
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

112.8
112.7
112.8
112.8
112.8
114.1
115.8
115.9
116.9
116.9
116.9
116.8

144.6
145.8
146.7
150.1
152.2
155.2
157.0
159.1
158.3
162.5
164.6
172.7

120.5
120.4
120.9
120.9
121.4
123.6
123.4
125.0
124.9
126.1
128.2
133.3

1947: Jan. 15—
F eb .15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 1 5 May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 15—
Sept. 15-_
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

156.0
156.5
159.2
159.0
159.6
161.1
162.6
164.9
168.2
167.8
168.1
170.2

185.2
185.6
192.0
189.9
192.4
196.9
199.9
202.0
209.8
206.1
205.2
209.6

205.0
207.9
211.2
210.5
210.7
209.1
207.8
212.2
216.1
217.1
218.3
219.3

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
108.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
112.2
(2
)
114.6
(2
)
(2
)

120.1
120.1
120.1
120.7
120.7
120.8
127.0
127.0
127.6
127.6
129.2
132.4

180.7
180.8
182.2
182.6
181.1
179.4
183.6
189.3
189.5
191.6
192.4
193.6

135.0
135.3
135.5
136.9
136.3
136.5
136.6
136.6
137.0
138.2
139.6
140.6

172.3
170.1
170.1
171.9
173.5
175.7
177.8
178.3
178.3
177.1
175.9
174.9

212.8
205.4
204.8
209.8
213.7
219.6
222.3
220.9
219.5
215.1
211.0
208.0

216.5
220.0
221.4
221.9
222.4
224.0
224.2
229.1
232.8
233.2
234.6
234.1

115.9
(2
)
(2
)
115.9
(2
)
(2
)
118.5
(2
)
(2
)
119.0
(2
)
(2
)

132.9
133.0
132.9
132.9
134.4
134.4
137.2
138.8
138.8
138.8
138.8
139.7

193.7
196.0
198.8
199.2
200.9
200.0
203.0
203.7
205.0
205.3
205.7
205.4

144.8
144.4
144.0
143.8
143.9
143.8
145.0
146.5
146.6
147.7
148.1
148.5

PITTSBURGH, PA.

107.5
107.6
111.3
117.7

98.8
99.4
100.9
100.3
100.6
101.6
105.3
108.0
110.3
111.9
112.1
114.8
124.4
136.0

95.3
95.5
103.7
103.5
102.0
102.0
108.8
121.7
123.9
133.1
144.1
155.7
185.6
201.4

118.0
123.0
125.8
126.5
126.7
126.2
126.8
126.7
128.2
127.9
128.2
128.1

107.0
107.1
107.1
107.1
108.8
108.8
107.6
107.5
107.3
107.3
107.3
107.3

106.7
106.7
106.8
106.8
108.4
108.4
108.4
108.4
108.4
108.4
108.4
109.6

119.1
121.5
122.4
122.4
122.3
121.5
122.2
121.3
122.1
122.0
121.9
121.8

133.4
133.8
137.2
139.4
142.4
142.3
138.9
137.8
137.4
138.2
138.0
135.1

128.2
127.5
129.9
130.8
131.2
131.5
133.0
133.9
140.4
142.6
143.4
146.0

107.3
107.3
107.3
107.3
107.3
107.3
107.2
107.2
107.3
107.3
107.3
107.4

109.8
109.8
110.1
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.3
110.3
111.6

121.6
121.8
122.1
122.8
123.1
123.6
124.3
124.7
125.4
125.8
125.9
126.2

99.0
100.5
100.9
100.6
99.0
99.7
102.9
110.0
114.7
118.4
119.8 1948: Jan. 15—
124.0
F eb .15__
137.0
Mar. 15-_
145.6
Apr. 15__
May 15__
107.2
June 15__
108.3
July 15__
108.8
Aug. 15-_
109.1
Sept. 15- _
109.7
Oct. 15—
109.7
Nov. 15-_
110.3
Dec. 15__
109.6
111.1
111.2
112.4
112.5 1935.......... .......
1936..................
112.6 1937............ —
112.6 1938..................
113.7 1939..................
114.2 1940............ —
114.3 1941..................
114.2 1942..................
114.6 1943..................
115.6 1944.................
115.8 1945..................
116.0 1946—.........—
116.2 1947..................
116.5 1948-................

134.6
133.1
132.9
134.8
134.6
135.8
136.7
138.7
138.0
136.6
134.7
136.1

147.1
148.4
151.3
151.7
151.8
154.8
155.2
157.4
159.4
160.1
160.5
164.7

107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
107.4
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
107.6

111.7
111.8
111.5
111.5
111.5
112.4
112.4
112.0
112.0
112.0
112.0
112.0

126.6
127.6
128.0
130.6
130.7
133.7
134.3
135.0
136.5
137.1
137.8
139.6

116.5
116.5
116.5
117.9
118.5
119.0
119.0
119.0
118.9
119.5
119.6
119.6

1935..................
1936..................
1937..................
1938..................
1939..................
1940..................
1941..................
1942..................
1943..................
1944..................
1945.......... .......
1946................ .
1947..................
1948..................

97.9
99.3
103.1
100.9
98.8
100.1
105.5
116.2
123.7
126.3
129.4
140.6
162.8
174.7

100.2
101.4
106.4
98.5
93.5
96.2
106.2
123.4
137.8
135.6
138.6
160.8
197.9
213.6

96.1
97.1
102.5
102.6
101.7
102.6
107.0
126.0
134.9
155.2
167.5
181.2
212.1
226.2

1942: Jan. 15—
F e b .15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15—
Aug. 1 5 -.
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15—
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

112.1
112.8
113.8
113.9
115.8
116.9
116.6
116.7
117.5
118.8
119.2
120.0

116.9
116.3
117.8
117.7
121.4
124.7
124.1
125.0
125.9
129.4
129.6
131.6

1943: Jan. 15—
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 .Sept. 15-_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

120.7
120.8
122.6
123.7
124.9
124.9
123.9
123.8
124.4
125.0
125.1
124.4

1944:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 1 5 May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15__
Dec. 15__

124.4
124.0
124.3
125.4
125.5
126.5
126.9
127.9
127.9
127.5
126.9
128.0




93.5
96.2
101.2
104.2
105.0
105.5
106.5
107.5
107.3
1 0 7 .5

PORTLAND, MAINE
100.4
100.5
102.6
99.1
97.4
98.2
103.3
116.0
122.8
124.3
125.9
134.6
155.7
166.5

102.2
102.5
105.6
96.2
93.6
94.7
103.5
122.8
135.2
132.9
133.6
153.3
186.3
200.8

99.6
99.3
101.2
100.3
99.6
100.1
104.0
122.5
127.9
138.3
145.8
156.5
180.8
197.8

100.2
99.6
99.6
100.2
100.4
100.6
101.2
105.5
106.4
106.6
106.5
106.3
107.3
111.5

99.5
100.3
103.0
100.9
96.3
100.6
103.5
111.2
116.8
119.2
117.2
119.0
130.4
148.7

97.2
97.8
102.9
102.2
99.8
99.6
104.5
120.0
121.6
133.2
141.5
155.0
180.1
189.2

99.6
99.9
101.2
100.1
99.2
99.1
103.7
112.7
117.2
120.3
122.3
124.8
138.6
148.4

1942: Mar. 15 „
June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

112.9
116.7
118.0
120.1

117.1
122.9
125.8
131.3

121.0
126.0
123.7
123.7

105.0
106.2
106.0
105.9

107.1
110.5
114.0
113.7

120.1
120.4
121.0
120.9

110.3
113.1
114.2
115.2

1943: Mar. 1 5 June 1 5 Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

122.1
124.5
122.4
123.5

134.4
140.6
132.7
134.4

126.0
125.7
130.7
131.9

106.2
106.4
106.4
106.7

116.9
116.9
116.7
118.6

120.9
121.1
121.8
123.3

116.4
117.4
117.9
118.2

See footnotes on p . 61.

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

58

T able B.— Consumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income Families in 34 Large Cities,

by Group of Commodities, 1935-48— Continued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Fuel,
electric- House- MisRent ity, and furnish- cellarefriger- ings
neous
ation

Period1

PORTLAND, MAINE—Continued
122.9
124.1
125.2
125.6

131.6
131.1
133.6
133.1

134.1
138.9
141.2
142.6

106.6
106.6
106.7
(2
)

119.2
119.2
119.0
119.3

125.3
139.0
135.6
137.9

118.5
120.8
120.8
122.4

1945: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

125.4
126.7
125.5
126.4

131.4
135.2
133.1
135.2

145.2
145.6
146.6
147.2

106.6
106.4
(2
)
*106.3

119.2
118.2
113.5
113.6

141.1
141.2
141.6
144.1

122.6
122.5
122.0
122.2

1946: Mar. 15—
June 15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

126.8
128.7
141.4
149.2

134.8
138.4
167.0
180.5

149.5
155.2
160.3
168.0

(*)
106.2
106.3
(2
)

115.8
115.9
123.7
123.5

145.3
146.9
163.0
174.9

122.7
122.3
124.9
133.1

1947: Mar. 15 „
June 15__
Sept. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

152.5
153.3
159.2
162.0

184.8
185.3
193.6
195.2

177.8
178.6
183.3
191.4

«
*106.1
108.0
109.7

125.2
127.5
133.2
140.6

177.5
178.9
183.1
183.7

135.0
136.2
142.7
144.4

1948: Mar. 1 5 ..
June15__
Sept. 15. .
Dec. 15__

162.7
167.4
170.7
167.1

192.4
204.1
207.0
195.0

196.1
197.2
200.6
200.2

109.9
111.7
112.4
113.3

146.6
144.6
154.4
154.0

185.8
189.7
191.2
193.4

145.8
147.4
151.0
152.0

PORTLAND. OREO.

1935.................
1936
......
1937
......
1938
......
1939
......
1940
......
......
1941
1942
......
1943
......
1944
......
1945
......
1946
......
1947
......
1948
......

96.1
98.0
103.0
102.0
100.9
100.9
107.3
122.1
129.2
130.7
135.0
144.5
163.4
178.0

96.7
99.8
105.6
99.7
98.3
99.2
111.5
135.5
147.3
144.8
149.5
169.0
203.6
226.4

97.3
98.0
102.0
101.7
100.9
102.9
106.6
123.6
131.1
139.7
142.5
152.2
180.3
195.8

88.6
94.3
103.2
107.2
106.6
106.5
109.3
115.5
115.3
115.4
114.7
114.2
117.2
123.4

98.4
100.4
101.2
101.0
99.1
93.4
97.0
111.9
116.5
114.6
119.0
121.4
122.3
127.6

97.6
96.6
102.6
102.3
100.9
100.4
106.9
120.9
122.9
133.3
145.9
158.7
176.4
187.3

1942: Mar. 1 5 Junel5__
Sept. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

119.1
122.1
124.9
126.8

129.7
134.6
141.2
145.9

122.4
124.5
126.0
125.9

114.4
117.6
115.6
115.2

106.7
110.1
116.5
116.6

121.0
121.4
121.8
121.2

1943: Mar. 1 5 June15__
Sept. 15._
Dec. 15__

128.7
130.7
129.0
129.5

148.5
152.1
144.8
144.9

128.9
129.5
134.0
135.0

115.2
115.4
115.4
115.2

116.4
116.5
116.5
116.6

121.8
122.9
123.1
125.1

1944: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 15 ..
Dec. 15__

129.4
129.4
131.8
133.3

143.3
144.4
144.8
148.1

138.0
140.2
141.3
141.8

115.4
115.5
(2
)
115.4

116.8
92.1
116.6
116.6

125.4
136.9
137.3
138.0

1945: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 15_
Dec. 15__

133.2
135.5
135.3
137.3

145.8
150.3
149.3
153.9

142.1
142.6
143.1
142.5

(2
)
114.7
(2
)
114.3

116.6
120.3
120.5
120.5

145.1
146.1
146.1
150.4

1946: Mar. 15—
Junel5__
Sept. 15._
Dec. 15__

135.9
140.3
150.9
157.8

149.9
158.4
184.5
196.0

143.7
149.7
156.3
167.4

(2
)
114.1
114.3
(2
)

121.2
121.3
122.4
122.6

156.0
159.1
156.8
169.3

1947: Mar. 15—
June15__
July 15__
Oct. 15__

160.6
161.5
162.1
166.5

198.1
199.7
202.7
208.7

178.4
(2
)
179.9 *113.9
178.4
(2
)
184.9 120.8

122.0
122.8
120.4
121.7

175.4
176.2
175.2
178.0

1948: Jan. 15__
Apr. 15__
July 15__
Oct. 15__

174.4
175.8
180.3
180.1

223.0
223.2
233.7
227.7

190.0
195.9
194.8
200.9

122.1
122.5
123.2
124.5

125.0
126.4
127.2
129.2

184.3
187.3
186.4
190.5

100.2
99.6
99.9
100.3
99.9
99.6

95.4
95.9
102.9
103.3
102.5
103.7

RICHMOND , VA.
99.0
100.1
102.3
100.1
98.6
99.0




101.6
103.6
105.4
96.5
92.9
92.9

95.4
96.7
102.4
103.6
101.9
103.5

96.9
97.9
100.4
102.2
102.6
102.9

Food

Apparel

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
Rent ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

RICHMOND, VA.— Continued

1944: Mar. 1 5 ..
June15__
Sept. 15—
Dec. 15__

1935
......
1936
......
1937..................
1938_________
1939___ _
1940..................

All
items

1941.......... .......
1942.......... .......
1943.................
1944..................
1945..................
1946..................
1947__________
1948.................

104.2 103.4
115.7 ‘ 123.2
121.7 137.1
122.7 134.1
125.3 136.4
133.9 155.1
155.9 192.8
166.9 205.6

109.0
129.8
133.3
140.0
144.5
156.0
183.7
196.9

103.4
104.5
103.9
103.9
104.1
104.2
107.1
112.8

101.6
104.6
106.4
108.1
109.4
111.0
121.8
138.9

111.9
126.8
128.0
135.4
144.9
159.1
190.4
206.4

103.1
109.2
113.0
115.5
118.7
122.3
131.9
140.1

1942: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

113.4
115.8
117.2
119.3

118.4
122.9
126.2
131.3

129.2
131.5
131.3
131.4

104.2
104.3
105.1
104.6

104.3
104.6
104.8
104.8

126.9
127.4
127.5
127.1

107.4
109.5
110.0
111.7

1943: Mar. 15—
June 15—
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

121.2
122.6
122.0
122.1

135.8
139.6
136.7
136.0

132.8
132.0
133.8
135.8

103.9
103.9
103.9
103.7

106.5
106.5
106.5
107.9

127.3
127.7
128.6
129.1

112.4
113.1
113.5
113.4

1944: Mar. 15—
June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

121.2
122.6
123.3
124.4

131.8
134.0
134.1
137.1

138.3
139.6
141.8
142.4

103.8
103.9
103.9
(2
)

107.9
107.4
108.6
108.6

129.1
134.7
140.8
140.8

114.4
116.0
116.2
116.2

1945: Mar. 1 5 June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

124.1
125.2
126.2
126.4

133.5
136.1
138.5
138.6

144.5
144.4
144.6
145.7

104.0
(2
)
104.2
(2
)

108.6
109.6
109.9
i no A
iuy.o

142.7
144.7
147.3
147.1

118.9
118.9
119.0
119.2

136.5
138.4
167.4
186.5

145.8
153.2
160.7
173.6

104.1
(2
)
104.2
(2
)

110.1
110.3
112.6
113.1

149.4
154.8
167.0
173.8

120.1
122.1
122.1
127.6

188.8
185.8
188.4
205.1

182.3
183.8
183.2
186.7

(2
)
104.6
(2
)
111.4

116.7
117.8
120.2
126.4

187.6
190.2
192.2
193.4

130.7
131.6
132.1
133.4

209.1
200.6
209.4
209.7

189.9
193.8
198.2
203.4

1 1 1 .8

133.9
135.1
142.3
142.4

203.4
205.5
208.4
207.1

135.7
137.0
141.7
143.2

79.4
97.4 1946: Mar. 15— 126.0
101.2
June15__ 128.2
102.4
Sept. 1 5 - 139.8
101.6
Dec. 15__ 149.3
101.2
104.7 1947: Mar. 15— 152.9
112.5
June 15__ 152.6
118.7
July 15__ 153.8
124.4
Oct. 15__ 161.7
130.0
133.7 1948: Jan. 15— 165.1
142.1
Apr. 15__ 163.4
152.9
July 15__ 168.9
Oct. 15__ 170.0
111.8
112.8
113.2
114.1
1935__________
98.5
116.4 1936__________
99.5
118.7 1937............ .
102.7
120.4 1938__________ 100.3
121.7 1939__________
99.0
1940__________
99.6
122.1 1941................. 104.8
124.4 1942__________ 116.1
126.0 1943
122.4
127.0 1944.......... ....... 124.2
1945____ _____ 126.5
128.7 1946.......... ....... 137.4
130.4 1947__________ 159.3
130.8 1948.................. 171.2
131.9
1942: Jan. 15— 111.8
130.7
F eb .15__ 112.9
132.7
Mar. 15— 114.8
135.0
Apr. 15__ 115.4
138.7
May 1 5 „ _ 115.6
June15__ 116.6
140.9
July 15— 116.3
141.4
Aug. 1 5 - 117.4
141.4
Sept. 15— 116.6
142.9
Oct. 15__ 117.9
Nov. 1 5 - 118.4
149.0
Dec. 15__ 119.8
150.5
153.9 1943: Jan. 15__ 119.3
155.8
Feb. 1 5 - 119.9
Mar. 15— 121.8
Apr. 15__ 123.1
May 15__ 124.0
June15__ 123.7
98.9
July 15__ 123.2
99.5
A u g .1 5 .- 122.7
100.6
100.8
100.2
See footnotes on p. 61
100.5

112.1
113.0
113.5

S T . LOUIS,, M O .

99.7
101.2
105.2
98.2
95.7
96.8
107.5
126.1
139.6
138.5
141.4
162.4
201.4
217.5

96.2
97.5
102.9
102.1
101.3
102.8
106.9
125.7
130.6
138.0
141.7
155.8
181.2
199.1

97.8
98.3
100.7
101.8
101.4
101.5
102.1
106.2
106.1
106.0
106.0
106.2
109.5
117.4

98.8
100.0
100.2
100.5
100.5
101.7
104.2
106.1
106.3
107.2
107.8
110.1
120.9
134.1

95.3
96.1
104.8
102.8
101.0
96.9
102.2
115.8
117.4
124.4
127.0
139.2
160.6
172.6

98.6
99.2
101.0
101.0
100.1
100.8
103.0
109.0
112.4
117.3
120.1
124.5
133.9
142.2

119.8
119.9
122.9
123.8
123.8
125.9
126.0
129.0
126.7
129.9
130.8
134.4

118.6
121.1
125.3
127.5
127.4
126.9
127.0
126.9
126.9
127.1
127.1
126.9

104.2
104.5
106.2
106.6
107.5
108.5
1Q6.4
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.1

106.3
106.3
106.3
105.4
105.9
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2

113.1
114.4
116.0
116.5
116.1
116.2
116.1
116.2
116.3
116.3
116.3
116.3

105.5
107.9
108.5
108.8
108.9
109.2
109.0
109.2
109.2
109.7
110.6
111.0

133.1
134.4
138.9
142.4
144.7
143.5
141.6
140.2

126.6
127.6
128.8
128.8
128.8
128.9
130.8
131.0

106.1
106.1
106.1
106.1
106.2
106.1
106.1
106.1

106.3
106.4
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2

116.3
116.4
116.4
116.6
117.5
117.6
117.6
117.6

111.0
111.1
111.6
111.7
1 1 1 .8

112.3
112.5
112.5

APPENDIX TABLES

59

T able B.— C onsum ers’ P rice In dex fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L a rg e C ities,
by G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100]
Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

Period1

All
items

1943: Sept. 1 5 „
Oct. 15.. _
N o v .15._
Dec. 15__

122.6
122.7
122.9
123.3

139.1
139.1
138.7
139.3

133.1
133.6
133.9
135.1

106.1
106.1
106.1
106.0

106.2
106.2
106.2
106.7

117.6
118.0
118.3
118.9

112.9
112.9
114.4
114.5

1944: Jan. 1 5 ...
F eb.15__
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15—
A u g .15._
Sept.15._
Oct. 15__
N o v .15—
Dec. 15__

122.9
122.3
122.5
123.6
123.9
124.3
125.7
125.2
125.2
124.6
124.9
125.3

137.9
136.0
135.9
137.4
137.8
138.7
141.9
140.1
139.8
138.0
138.5
139.5

135.1
135.8
137.2
137.4
137.5
137.6
137.7
138.4
139.7
139.7
139.8
139.8

106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2
107.2

120.5
120.8
121.5
124.2
124.2
125.7
125.9
125.9
126.0
126.1
126.1
126.2

114.6
114.8
114.8
117.0
117.2
117.2
118.3
118.4
118.4
118.5
119.2
119.3

1945: Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 15. .
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

125.5
125.1
124.9
125.3
126.4
127.4
127.0
127.5
126.8
126.9
126.8
128.4

140.0
139.1
138.1
139.0
141.7
144.0
142.9
144.0
141.4
141.4
141.4
144.1

139.5
139.5
139.6
140.1
140.5
141.0
141.0
141.5
144.3
144.9
143.8
144.3

(2
)
(2
)
106.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
105.8
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

107.2
107.3
107.3
107.3
107.7
107.8
107.9
108.0
108.3
108.3
108.3
108.3

126.4
124.9
125.1
125.8
126.5
127.0
127.2
127.4
127.9
128.5
129.1
128.0

119.4
119.5
119.9
119.9
119.9
119.9
119.9
120.0
120.0
120.0
120.0
122.6

1946: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15—
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 15__

128.7
128.1
128.4
129.2
129.6
131.2
139.6
142.5
142.9
146.6
150.6
151.2

144.3
142.3
142.6
143.4
144.5
147.4
169.7
175.5
174.5
183.6
191.8
189.3

145.3
145.8
146.8
150.2
151.5
154.6
155.0
156.5
162.3
164.2
166.5
170.5

(2
)
(2
)
106.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
106.2
(2
)
(2
)
(2)
<)
2

109.4
109.4
109.4
109.4
108.3
108.7
110.0
110.3
111.6
111.6
111.6
111.6

129.2
131.4
132.9
133.4
133.2
134.8
137.8
143.2
144.5
146.4
148.2
155.0

122.7
122.8
123.0
123.0
123.2
123.4
122.8
124.3
124.3
125.0
128.3
130.9

1947: Jan. 15__ 151.1
Feb. 1 5 - 151.8
Mar. 15-_ 155.8
Apr. 1 5 - 155.1
May 15__ 154.6
June15__ 155.6
Sept. 1 5 - 165.4
Dec. 15__ 167.9

187.4
188.4
198.9
195.2
193.4
196.8
215.9
215.2

172.7
175.8
177.7
178.4
178.3
177.9
183.2
192.9

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
106.3
113.1
115.3

114.3
114.3
114.4
118.0
118.0
116.6
124.5
128.7

155.9
155.1
155.2
155.5
156.4
158.7
164.7
168.5

131.2
131.5
132.1
132.9
133.0
132.7
134.7
138.5

1948: Mar. 15—
June 15__
Sept. 15_
Dec. 15__

167.8
172.1
175.0
171.1

210.9
222.0
223.0
212.2

199.1
196.8
202.2
201.4

115.6
116.3
119.6
119.7

129.4
134.9
138.3
135.7

171.5
171.0
174.8
175.4

140.2
140.8
144.9
145.3

1935..................
1936..................
1937..................
1938..................
1939..................
1940..................
1941..................
1942..................
1943..................
1944..................
1945..................
1946..................
1947..................
1948..................

98.6
98.1
101.8
101.4
100.2
100.4
105.9
118.7
126.4
129.4
132.9
143.7
162.8
174.2

100.8
100.3
104.4
98.5
96.0
96.5
107.0
128.5
143.4
143.8
148.2
170.1
203.7
220.8

96.1
96.4
102.3
103.1
102.1
103.0
107.0
124.5
128.6
137.0
143.3
154.7
178.1
192.5

96.8
97.1
100.1
102.6
103.4
103.7
104.3
106.0
106.0
106.2
106.3
106.6
109.2
114.4

109.2
103.1
97.8
96.0
93.8
91.7
91.8
93.8
92.3
92.6
92.8
85.8
82.6
82.9

94.5
95.5
103.0
104.4
102.5
101.8
107.3
119.2
119.1
131.0
132.0
134.8
155.2
164.6

97.3
96.6
99.9
103.4
102.8
102.9
106.7
115.7
123.2
128.8
132.8
138.6
149.5
159.5

1942: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 1 5 Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 -.
Sept. 15—

113.9
114.2
115.7
117.0
117.6
117.9
118.3
119.6
120.9

120.7
120.1
121.9
123.6
125.5
126.1
126.6
130.2
133.5

118.3
119.4
123.5
128.2
126.1
125.5
125.5
125.4
125.4

105.6
105.6
105.6
106.1
106.6
106.4
106.4
106.1
105.9

92.9
93.2
93.3
93.3
94.0
94.0
94.5
94.1
94.1

117.0
118.0
119.7
120.3
120.0
119.3
119.5
119.5
119.2

111.7
112.7
113.8
114.1
114.6
115.4
116.1
116.3
116.9

Food

Apparel

Rent

Period1

ST. LOUIS, M O .— Continued

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.— Continued

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.




All
items

1942: Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

121.7
123.6
124.0

134.6
139.3
140.1

125.3
125.4
125.5

105.9
105.9
105.9

94.1
94.1
94.1

119.2
119.2
119.2

118.5
119.3
119.5

1943: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15-_
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 15-_
Sept. 15-_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

124.5
124.6
126.1
128.5
128.1
128.7
125.3
124.3
125.6
126.8
127.4
127.5

141.3
141.7
143.7
149.7
148.0
149.8
140.0
137.3
139.9
142.4
143.7
143.7

126.0
126.3
128.1
128.1
127.3
127.5
127.1
127.2
130.1
131.7
131.9
132.1

105.9
105.9
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.0
106.1

94.1
92.2
92.2
92.2
92.2
92.2
92.1
92.1
92.1
92.1
92.1
92.1

119.1
119.0
119.0
119.0
119.0
119.0
118.7
118.7
118.9
119.0
119.0
120.9

119.6
119.6
121.8
122.4
123.7
123.2
124.3
124.3
124.3
124.8
124.8
125.1

1944:Jan.15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15—
Apr. 15—
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 15-_
Sept. 15-_
Oct. 15__
N o v .15-_
Dec. 15__

127.6
127.0
127.4
128.3
129.4
129.2
129.3
129.4
129.9
131.0
131.6
132.7

143.6
141.6
142.2
142.2
144.7
142.5
142.4
142.4
143.3
145.2
146.3
149.1

132.8
133.7
134.9
135.1
135.5
136.5
137.0
137.8
138.8
140.0
140.6
141.4

106.1
106.1
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.3
106.3
106.3
106.3
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

92.1
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6

120.9
120.9
120.9
120.9
120.9
137.4
137.6
138.1
138.7
138.7
138.7
138.8

125.2
125.2
125.2
128.8
129.1
129.2
129.8
129.8
129.8
130.8
131.1
131.2

1945: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15-Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15_ _
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15—

132.0
131.2
131.8
132.8
131.9
132.7
133.6
132.5
132.6
133.0
134.4
135.8

146.9
145.3
146.2
148.4
145.7
147.5
150.1
147.1
147.3
147.9
151.5
154.1

141.8
141.8
142.1
142.1
142.7
143.5
143.1
143.1
143.6
143.6
144.7
147.0

(2
)
(2
)
106.3
(2
)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2
)
106.4
(2)
(2)
(2)

92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.8
92.8
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9

139.3
130.6
130.5
130.5
130.7
131.3
132.1
131.9
131.6
131.6
131.5
132.0

131.3
131.3
132.3
133.0
133.0
133.1
133.1
133.1
133.1
133.3
133.2
133.8

1946: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

134.2
133.5
133.6
134.1
134.8
137.8
144.4
147.9
150.9
153.3
159.1
160.4

149.5
147.7
148.3
149.3
150.4
155.5
172.1
180.6
186.5
191.4
205.2
204.6

147.3
148.1
146.8
147.4
149.7
152.6
154.3
155.4
159.4
161.4
164.4
169.6

(2
)

92.9
92.9
88.3
85.9
85.9
85.9
86.1
82.3
82.3
82.3
82.3
82.5

132.6
130.2
129.4
129.8
132.0
132.0
133.3
134.4
135.9
137.8
141.7
149.0

134.0
133.9
134.7
135.0
135.1
137.9
138.6
139.9
141.3
142.7
144.3
146.4

1947:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
Sept. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

159.3
158.4
160.3
161.3
160.5
159.3
165.7
168.9

200.6
195.4
199.5
201.7
199.9
196.9
210.4
215.7

171.4
176.3
178.9
179.5
178.6
176.6
178.8
181.5

(2
)
106.8
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
110.4
112.2

82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.6
82.7
82.7
82.7

150.1
151.0
151.9
151.7
153.1
155.1
157.1
161.3

146.7
147.6
148.0
148.6
148.5
148.1
150.8
152.8

1948: Mar. 1 5 June15__
Sept. 1 5 Dec. 15__

171.4
174.2
177.1
176.7

215.3
221.6
224.2
221.1

191.7
190.8
196.7
196.0

113.3
114.5
115.3
115.9

82.8
83.1
83.1
82.8

165.1
161.4
165.2
169.6

156.6
158.7
162.4
164.2

99.1
99.6
100.8
101.0
99.5
97.5
98.7
107.6
113.2
112.4
113.0

96.9
98.3
103.1
100.8
101.0
104.8
108.4
119.7
121.5
134.4
155.1

100.4
99.2
100.6
100.3
99.6
100.4
104.0
113.2
121.5
128.2
130.0

(?)

106.4
(2
)
0
(2
)
106.7
(2)
?2)
(2)

(?)

SAVANNAH, GA.
1935..................
1936.................
1937..................
1938..................
1939..................
1940..................
1941..................
1942..................
1943..................
1944..................
1945..................

99.2
99.5
102.1
99.8
99.3
100.6
106.8
120.7
130.7
133.8
136.7

See footnotes on p . 61.

99.9
101.5
104.4
97.6
96.7
98.7
109.8
130.5
149.7
150.9
153.7

97.3
97.4
103.5
101.8
100.0
101.8
107.4
125.9
131.8
140.0
145.1

97.5
97.7
99.0
101.9
103.9
104.7
107.8
115.0
114.9
115.3
115.7

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

60

T able B.— Consumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income Families in 34 Large Cities,

by Group of Commodities, 1935-48— Continued
[1935-39 = 100]

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

Period 1

All
items

100.2
102.5
105.5
97.1
94.8
97.3
104.9
123.0
138.9
136.2
139.4
159.9
194.9
209.8

97.0
97.6
101.8
102.0
101.5
101.8
108.1
126.3
129.9
140.4
148.3
161.2
189.6
201.5

101.0
100.6
100.4
99.5
98.4
98.1
98.3
98.1
97.4
97.2
97.9
101.9
103.1
106.9

106.3
104.7
97.2
96.8
95.1
95.8
97.7
99.2
104.5
111.6
114.5
124.6
130.7
139.2

97.5
97.9
105.9
100.7
98.0
98.9
108.4
122.8
123.9
136.8
142.8
155.1
179.0
182.2

100.3
100.3
100.7
100.0
98.6
100.3
103.3
108.3
110.3
114.1
115.5
121.1
133.9
138.5

1942: Mar. 15. _
June15__
Sept. 15. _
Dec. 1 5 ...

112.1
114.3
115.2
117.8

117.6
123.0
125.6
131.7

127.5
127.3
126.5
126.7

98.4
98.1
98.0
97.8

99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5

123.0
123.5
123.3
122.9

108.0
108.4
108.5
109.4

1943: Mar. 15. _
June15__
Sept. 1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

120.5
123.6
121.2
121.5

136.9
144.4
137.2
136.2

128.4
128.6
131.6
132.9

97.5
97.3
97.3
97.2

103.9
103.9
103.9
109.9

122.9
123.9
124.6
125.0

109.7
110.2
110.8
111.2

1944: Mar. 15. .
June15__
Sept. 15_
Dec. 15__

120.9
123.2
125.0
125.0

132.4
135.9
138.1
137.2

136.5
138.3
144.8
146.4

97.1
97.2
(2
)
97.2

112.2
111.0
111.0
111.1

127.7
139.2
142.9
144.0

112.6
114.7
114.9
115.5

1945: Mar. 15. .
Junel5__
Sept. 15. _
Dec. 1 5 ...

124.3
128.2
126.9
128.1

135.9
144.5
139.3
141.3

146.8
147.9
149.5
150.5

(2
)
97.8
(2
)
98.4

111.0
111.0
117.9
118.7

140.6
141.7
143.7
145.9

115.3
115.6
115.7
115.5

1946: Mar. 15. . 128.6
June 15__ 132.2
Sept. 15._ 146.4
Dec. 15__ 154.0

141.8
144.0
174.0
185.2

151.0
(2
)
158.7 *104.3
166.9 101.6
177.1
(2
)

119.5
120.0
130.4
129.9

147.7
151.2
159.1
170.4

116.6
119.3
122.5
131.0

157.3
159.9
162.8
165.2

188.9
194.9
199.5
202.8

188.6
190.4
191.1
192.3

101.5
(2
)
103.4
105.1

129.5
126.6
133.4
134.5

178.0
177.5
178.7
184.1

132.3
133.9
134.1
136.2

166.5
170.2
174.7
169.4

203.2
212.2
217.3
202.8

197.2
202.1
205.2
206.9

106.0
106.7
108.1
109.0

134.5
134.5
144.5
144.7

185.5
180.8
184.5
182.2

137.3
136.3
141.1
141.8

175.0
212.4
220.8

157.5
178.3
193.7

115.5
115.8
117.3

115.4
129.4
150.2

171.8
192.1
204.2

132.8
142.6
153.0

1942: Jan.15.._
F eb.1 5 ...
Mar. 15
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 1 5 ...
A u g .1 5 ..
S ept.15._
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15__
Dec. 15__

115.4
116.7
118.4
120.2
120.9
120.2
121.6
121.6
122.1
123.6
123.4
124.2

121.2
123.2
125.2
128.6
130.3
129.4
132.0
132.3
133.3
137.1
136.0
137.6

118.2
119.6
125.6
128.2
128.6
127.0
127.0
127.0
127.5
127.5
127.5
127.6

113.8
114.7
114.9
116.0
116.3
115.0
114.9
114.9
114.9
114.9
114.9
115.0

106.5
105.9
106.2
106.2
106.2
106.2
108.7
108.8
108.8
108.8
109.6
109.6

118.3
118.8
119.8
119.9
119.9
120.1
120.1
120.1
119.9
119.9
119.9
119.9

109.9
111.2
112.1
112.6
112.9
113.1
114.1
113.6
114.0
114.3
115.1
115.8

1943: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 ...
Mar. 15__
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
N o v .1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

125.3
126.2
128.2
131.2
131.9
132.3
132.3
132.1
132.5
132.5
131.9
131.8

139.8
141.3
145.1
152.5
153.8
153.8
153.0
152.4
152.5
152.2
150.4
149.7

127.8
128.1
130.1
130.3
130.5
130.6
132.5
132.5
134.2
134.8
134.8
135.6

115.0
115.0
114.9
114.9
114.9
114.9
114.9
114.6
114.9
114.9
114.9
114.9

112.6
112.6
113.1
113.1
113.1
113.1
113.3
113.2
113.5
113.5
113.5
113.4

120.3
120.9
121.4
121.4
121.4
121.5
121.5
121.6
121.8
121.9
122.0
122.6

115.9
117.3
118.7
119.7
120.6
122.6
123.0
123.4
123.8
124.0
124.3
124.6

1944: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15—
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15. _
Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
N o v .1 5 ..
Dec. 15__

132.6
132.2
131.9
133.4
133.2
133.7
134.8
135.6
135.1
134.5
134.4
134.6

151.1
149.5
147.2
150.8
149.4
150.2
152.9
154.7
152.8
150.9
150.6
150.5

135.5
136.5
139.5
139.6
139.1
139.8
139.8
140.7
141.6
142.5
142.8
142.9

114.9
114.9
115.0
115.1
115.2
115.2
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(*)
(2
)
115.7

113.8
113.8
113.8
111.8
111.8
111.8
111.8
112.0
112.0
111.9
111.9
111.9

123.9
124.8
125.8
126.1
136.4
137.9
138.1
138.4
139.8
140.2
140.2
141.8

125.9
126.0
126.4
127.9
128.4
128.5
129.1
129.1
129.4
129.3
129.3
129.4

1945:Jan.15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15. .
Sept. 15._
VJCt. ID__
N o v .15._
D ec. 1 5 ...

134.9
135.1
135.3
135.2
135.8
136.4
137.7
138.3
138.3
10 7 .O
104 c
137.8
137.7

150.7
150.9
150.7
150.8
151.7
153.1
156.6
157.5
157.2

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.9
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

155.6
154.4

143.4
143.7
143.8
143.9
144.2
144.5
144.6
145.4
145.8
146 0
147! 6
148.6

(*)
115.5

113.0
113.0
113.0
113.0
113.0
113.0
113.1
113.1
113.1
113.0
112.9
112.7

145.9
146.8
152.3
153.6
156.1
156.3
156.2
157.6
157.3
158 6
159^6
160.5

1946: Jan. 15—
F e b .15__
Mar. 15 __
Apr. 15__
May 15—
June15__
J u ly
__
Aug. 15. .
Sept. 1 5 ..
Oct. 15 ~~
Nov. 15 . .
Dec.15__

137.6
138.4
138.7
139.2
139.2
140.6
148.8
152.7
153.8
155.2
161.8
162.2

153.8
155.6
154.7
155.7
155.8
158.5
180.1
187.2
190.9
192.2
209.4
205.8

149.5
150.2
154.0
154.6
153.0
154.3
154.6
159.5
161.3
164.2
164.8
169.7

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(*)
(2
)
115.5
(2
)
115.5
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

113.0
113.0
113.1
112.5
112.5
112.5
114.2
118.4
119.1
118.2
118.6
120.0

160.9
162.1
167.7
169.5
172.4
172.3
169.4
170.7
171.9
176.5
179.6
188.3

1947:Jan.15
F e b .15__
Mar. 15_
Apr. 1 5 May 15—
June15__
July 15__
Oct. 1 5 ...

162.3
162.5
166.6
166.2
165.5
165.8
165.9
171.5

203.8
203.1
213.1
208.9
208.2
209.4
207.4
219.2

170.7
174.6
175.2
174.8
174.0
172.6
177.9
183.7

115.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
115.6
116.6

121.9
121.9
122.0
128.1
128.2
128.2
128.2
133.5

192.0
190.6
194.4
193.9
190.4
189.2
187.3
192.4

1948:J an.15__
Apr. 15__
July 15—.
Oct. 15__

175.6
177.6
180.2
178.4

222.9
221.4
228.3
219.2

190.3
192.8
194.0
197.0

116.9
116.9
117.0
117.9

143.3
147.1
151.4
155.8

203.2
205.2
202.3
205.6

129.5
129.9
130.0 1948: Feb. 15__
129.4
May 15__
129.7
A u g .1 5 ..
129.7
Nov. 15. _
129.7
130.0
130.5
129 8
129! 9 1935..................
131.3 1936..................
1937..................
131.3 1938..................
131.3 1 9 3 9 ...............
131.1 1940..................
131.3 1941..................
131.8 1942..................
132.8 1943..................
133.0 1944..................
134.1 1945..................
132.1 1946..................
133.6 1947..................
134.6 1948..................
137.0
1942: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
139.0
Mar. 15. .
139.3
Apr. 15__
140.4
May 15—
143.1
June 15__
142.6
July 15__
142.7
A u g .1 5 ..
143.7
Sept. 15 ..
143.6
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 ..
146.2
Dec. 15__
153.8
153.4
155.4 1943:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 1 5 ..
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__

See footnotes on p. 61




Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

100.4
101.1
102.5
98.9
97.2
98.6
103.3
114.1
121.4
123.2
126.6
138.2
160.7
169.2

147.4
167.6
178.0

1 5

Rent

1935..................
1936..................
1937................ .
1938..................
1939..................
1940..................
1941..................
1942..................
1943..................
1944..................
1945..................
1946............ .
1947..................
1948..................

1946..................
1947..................
1948..................

(i\

Apparel

SCRANTON, PA.

SAVANNAH, GA.— Continued

1 EC A
1 0 0 .4

Food

1947: Mar. 15. .
June15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Nov. 15. _

KTCATTT/R. WASH
96.8
98.0
102.7
101.5
101.1
101.7
107.8
121.1
127.5
129.2
132.2
142.4
160.8
172.9

98.9
100.5
105.5
97.9
97.2
99.4
110.2
132.8
144.0
141.6
144.4
164.3
198.7
217.6

95.3
96.6
103.0
102.8
102.3
103.6
108.4
126.8
131.5
138.2
145.4
155.9
178.3
191.3

91.3
93.7
101.4
106.8
106.9
106.7
111.5
114.6
110.4
111.3
111.4
112.0
114.7
121.2

98.7
98.3
100.5
102.4
100.0
96.7
96.4
100.6
101.9
102.9
104.5
107.0
114.6
123.1

95.3
97.7
104.0
102.8
100.2
98.7
104.6
118.9
121.6
130.0
144.0
157.3
182.5
191.8

97.2
97.7
100.5
102.2
102.4
102.5
106.1
114.6
123.9
129.9
132.4
136.6
144.2
152.8

116.7
117.9
119.6
120.4
121.2
119.2
119.7
121.7
122.7
124.0
124.7
125.6

125.3
126.0
126.7
127.5
129.9
129.4
130.9
136.1
137.3
139.6
141.3
143.6

117.7
121.6
125.2
129.2
129.0
128.9
126.9
128.9
128.9
128.8
128.3
128.2

118.3
118.8
122.7
122.8
122.4
111.0
110.9
110.1
109.8
109.8
109.6
109.6

100.6
100.7
100.7
100.7
100.7
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.6

115.5
117.8
118.6
119.2
119.2
119.2
119.3
119.5
119.6
119.6
119.6
119.6

110.2
111.5
112.9
113.1
113.4
113.4
114.1
114.1
116.5
118.3
118.8
119.2

125.8
126.2
127.0
127.9
129.5
128.1

143.5
143.9
144.7
145.9
150.3
146.6

128.7
129.2
130.8
131.0
131.0
130.4

109.6
109.6
110.1
110.2
110.2
110.6

100.6
100.7
101.4
101.9
101.9
101.9

119.6
119.7
119.9
120.1
120.4
120.8

119 9
120.8
121.7
123.1
123.1
122.8

61

APPENDIX TABLES

T able B.— C onsum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in 34 L arge C ities,
b y G roup o f C om m odities, 1935-48 — C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100]

All
items

Period1

Food

Rent

Apparel

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

Period1

i

>

id

3
iH

00

140.9
139.8
142.4
142.8
143.6
143.1

130.9
131.0
133.2
133.6
133.7
134.0

110.6
110.7
110.8
110.8
111.0
111.2

101.9
102.4
102.4
102.4
102.4
102.4

121.2
121.3
121.4
123.4
125.0
126.8

123.5
123.5
126.5
127.2
127.2
125.3

1944: Jan. 1 5 ...
F e b .15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15. .
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 15__

128.4
127.7
128.2
127.9
128.9
128.8
129.5
129.7
129.9
130.5
130.3
131.1

142.5
140.6
140.5
139.2
141.3
140.4
141.9
141.6
141.7
143.3
142.7
143.9

133.6
134.0
135.9
136.4
136.9
137.8
138.4
139.7
141.6
141.5
141.5
141.4

111.1
111.1
111.3
111.4
111.4
111.5
111.6
111.7
111.3
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

103.1
103.1
103.1
101.4
101.7
102.1
102.4
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5

126.9
127.0
127.2
127.3
127.3
129.2
129.2
129.4
131.0
131.0
133.8
141.0

127.7
127.6
128.4
129.8
130.2
130.4
130.6
130.6
130.6
130.6
130.6
131.2

1945: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15—
Dec. 15__

131.2
130.8
131.4
131.4
132.1
132.0
132.7
132.9
132.4
131.9
132.9
134.7

143.4
142.2
143.0
143.0
144.4
144.0
145.7
145.8
144.2
142.7
145.3
149.6

141.8
142.3
143.7
144.5
145.1
145.7
145.4
146.0
146.7
147.6
147.5
148.9

(2
)
(2
)
111.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
111.8
(*)
(2
)
(2
)

103.7
103.9
103.9
103.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.9
104.7
104.7
104.8
104.7

141.2
140.6
142.4
142.6
145.1
145.3
145.5
145.6
143.9
144.5
144.9
146.5

131.8
132.0
132.3
132.3
132.2
132.2
132.7
132.7
132.6
132.5
132.5
132.9

1946:J an.15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June 15__
July 15__
A u g .15._
Sept. 15_.
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. _
Dec. 15__

133.5
133.6
134.2
134.6
135.3
137.0
142.9
144.8
147.9
151.9
155.3
157.2

146.0
146.1
145.6
146.3
147.1
151.6
167.1
170.0
175.6
186.1
194.6
195.9

148.3
148.6
150.2
150.6
153.2
153.8
154.5
156.9
160.6
161.5
164.1
168.3

(2
)
(2
)
111.9
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
112.1
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(*)

105.0
105.2
105.6
105.8
105.8
105.8
106.6
107.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
109.7

146.8
148.7
152.2
151.4
151.4
151.8
153.6
155.6
166.9
167.1
166.7
175.8

133.1
133.2
135.2
135.2
135.7
135.8
135.9
137.3
138.2
138.8
139.7
141.6

1947: Jan.15__
F e b .15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
A u g .1 5 ..
Nov. 15—

155.7
155.4
158.2
159.1
158.5
158.3
161.8
166.2

189.6
187.4
194.3
196.4
193.9
193.3
200.3
207.6

171.5
173.0
176.0
177.1
178.0
178.2
180.3
181.8

(2
)
(2
)
112.2
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
114.5
119.1

111.5
111.7
111.7
112.1
112.1
112.4
117.4
118.7

177.8
180.1
183.4
183.6
183.6
184.8
179.7
184.8

142.1
142.8
142.8
143.0
143.4
143.1
144.2
146.6

1948: Feb. 15__
May 15__
Aug. 15—
Nov. 15. _

170.7
174.3
176.2
174.3

214.7
221.4
221.9
213.4

185.7
191.8
195.5
197.2

120.8
121.3
122.2
123.2

119.9
122.1
124.2
126.5

186.5
189.9
197.2
197.9

151.2
152.0
154.7
156.9

w

a cm xrr>Tnw

*

n

Food

r

1935..................
1936__________
1937..................
1938..................
1939..................
1940..................
1941..................
1942.................
1943..................
1944..................
1945..................
1946..................
1947..................
1948..................

99.1
99.6
102.3
100.0
99.1
99.7
104.3
115.5
122.6
124.2
128.0
138.9
157.1
165.6

102.6
101.4
105.0
96.1
95.0
96.4
105.4
123.9
138.2
134.9
139.9
159.8
193.7
208.2

94.5
97.7
102.7
103.1
102.0
103.1
109.3
130.6
137.3
147.1
156.4
178.2
206.1
217.7

98.3
99.6
101.0
101.0
100.2
100.0
100.6
100.5
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
101.1
102.7

102.2
101.1
99.5
99.2
98.1
98.3
100.1
102.9
106.2
109.2
110.4
114.6
122.4
133.2

92.8
96.5
103.4
104.3
103.0
104.6
113.9
128.6
131.6
135.6
141.7
157.3
191.1
201.7

98.5
98.8
100.9
101.3
100.5
100.7
103.3
113.0
119.7
125.0
128.3
133.4
143.5
150.4

1942:Jan.15__

111.1

116.4

122.2

100.7

102.1

125.6

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

1942: Feb. 15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15—_
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15. _
Oct. 15__
Nov. 1 5 Dec. 15__

111.9
113.5
113.8
114.7
115.5
116.4
116.9
117.1
117.7
118.2
119.0

116.2
118.3
118.0
120.7
123.2
125.3
127.5
128.1
129.5
130.5
132.7

125.8
130.5
132.9
132.4
132.0
132.0
131.7
131.8
131.8
131.8
131.8

100.7
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.7
100.7
100.4
100.3
100.3
100.3

101.7
101.7
101.0
102.8
102.8
104.0
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.6
103.8

127.8
128.8
129.0
128.7
129.1
128.9
128.6
129.1
129.1
129.1
129.1

110.2
111.7
112.3
112.9
113.1
113.9
113.4
113.5
114.5
115.4
115.7

1943: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
A u g .15—
Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. .
Dec. 15__

119.5
119.3
121.3
122.5
123.7
123.1
123.2
123.0
123.5
124.2
123.4
123.4

133.8
132.2
136.9
139.9
142.5
142.7
140.1
138.5
138.5
140.2
137.5
135.9

131.9
132.7
134.5
135.0
134.7
135.5
137.0
137.8
141.0
141.5
141.8
143.9

100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3

105.8
105.8
105.6
105.6
105.7
105.3
105.3
106.5
106.6
106.6
106.8
109.2

129.4
130.4
131.4
131.4
131.3
131.5
131.6
131.7
132.2
132.4
132.6
132.9

115.8
116.7
117.9
118.6
120.3
120.2
120.3
120.8
121.0
121.4
121.4
121.6

1944: Jan.15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15—
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15—
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. .
Dec. 15__

123.6
122.9
122.5
123.3
123.9
124.4
124.3
125.0
124.8
124.8
125.5
125.8

136.4
133.6
131.7
132.8
134.1
135.3
134.9
136.7
135.2
134.7
136.7
137.1

144.3
145.0
145.6
146.1
146.3
146.6
146.9
147 3
148.9
149.1
149.3
149.8

100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
100.3

109.3
110.7
109.4
109.4
109.4
108.8
108.8
108.9
108.9
108.8
108.8
108.8

133.4
133.6
133.8
133.8
133.8
134.6
134.6
134.6
137.7
138.3
139.0
139.7

121.7
122.1
122.6
124.4
125.1
125.8
125.7
126.0
126.0
126.6
126.6
126.8

1945: Jan. 15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. .
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 15__
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. .
Dec. 15__

126.1
126.1
126.0
126.4
127.6
128.5
128.9
128.9
129.1
129.0
129.5
129.9

138.0
137.4
136.8
137.8
139.7
141.6
142.2
141.7
141.5
140.2
140.8
140.9

150.2
150.4
150.6
151.3
155.0
156.3
156.7
157.0
159.6
160.9
163.1
165.7

(2
)
(*)
(j)
(2
)
(2
)
100.3
(2
)
(2
)
(2)
(2)
(2)
100.3

109.0
109.6
109.7
109.1
109.2
109.6
111.8
112.1
111.1
111.1
111.1
111.5

139.9
140.4
140.6
139.9
139.9
140.8
140.9
141.3
142.0
144.4
145.2
145.1

126.8
127.1
127.2
127.4
128.2
128.4
128.7
128.9
128.9
129.3
129.3
129.4

1946:Jan.15__
F eb.15__
Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
July 1 5 ...
Aug. 1 5 Sept. 15_
Oct. 15__
Nov. 15. _
Dec i 15.—

130.9
130.3
131.2
131.7
131.4
133.8
140.5
142.6
145.0
147.6
150.3
152.0

143.0
141.0
141.3
142.2
141.1
145.5
164.8
169.9
174.7
180.6
186.8
186.1

167.0
165.3
171.2
172.3
172.2
175.7
177.8
179.5
183.9
186.6
189.6
197.9

(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2)
(2
)
100.3
(2
)
(2
)
100.3
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)

112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.2
112.2
116.1
116.5
117.4
117.4
117.1
117.7

145.8
146.5
147.6
147.6
149.4
153.3
156.0
158.0
162.4
168.4
172.0
180.3

129.8
130.6
130.8
131.0
131.1
133.1
133.4
134.3
134.8
135.6
137.1
139.2

1947: Jan. 15__
Feb. 1 5 Mar. 15. _
Apr. 15__
May 15__
June15__
Aug. 15—
Nov. 15. .

152.1
151.5
154.7
154.8
154.6
156.0
159.1
161.7

183.7
181.3
190.3
189.4
187.8
190.9
197.1
202.0

201.1
200.2
201.9
202.7
202.8
205.1
208.3
211.7

(2
)
100.7
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
(2
)
101.1
101.8

119.7
120.5
120.5
121.0
118.1
118.9
124.5
126.8

183.0
185.8
187.2
188.2
188.3
189.8
193.9
196.7

139.8
140.1
140.5
141.5
143.2
143.7
144.8
146.0

1948: Feb. 15__
May 15__
Aug. 1 5 ..
Nov. 1 5 ..

163.2
166.7
169.2
167.1

202.0
209.7
214.9
203.5

215.0
220.1
219.8
221.5

102.5
103.0
103.5
104.1

129.8
130.9
136.4
137.7

201.0
204.5
201.1
204.8

148.4
149.1
152.1
155.4

109.1

1 Data are shown for all periods, 1942 to 1948, inclusive, for which allitems indexes were computed. Indexes for food and fuel areavailable
monthly in other publications of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
2 Not surveyed this month.
* M ay 15,1947, index.




Apparel

WASHINGTON, D . C.— Continued

SEATTLE, WASH.— Continued
126.2
Aug.15_ _ 125.8
Sept. 15_ 127.8
Oct. 15__ 128.2
Nov. 15_ . 128.6
Dec. 1 5 _„ 128.6

All
items

4Feb. 15,1947, index,
* Aug. 15, 1947, index,
•Nov. 15, 1945, index.
7 Apr. 15, 1947, index.
8 May 15, 1946, index

62

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

T able C.— Consum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in Sm all C ities and W ar A ctiv ity
C enters in the U nited States, by G roup o f C om m odities, fo r Selected P eriods 1939-47
[December 1940 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

Period 1

All
items

Food

Rent

Apparel

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

93.9
95.2
97.6
100.0
101.8
108.7
114.6
115.8
120.6
126.6
128.1
135.5
140.7
144.7
142.6
141.3
135.1
135.8
141.0
140.8
138.1
144.2

96.2
97.1
97.8
100.0
101.1
104.8
109.0
111.3
114.4
116.6
117.5
120.4
122.8
124.7
124.7
124.5
122.7
123.9
126.8
127.2
126.3
128.5

97.7
97.9
97.6
100.0
102.4
103.3
104.8
105.0
105.2
105.8
106.0
105.8
105.8
106.0
106.8
107.3
107.3
107.6
108.1
(l)
107.7
0)

99.6
99.7
99.9
100.0
100.3
101.7
111.3
115.4
123.7
123.8
124.8
126.1
128.5
129.4
132.4
132.7
134.8
135.2
137.3
139.1
139.5
140.0

93.8
97.1
97.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
105.6
105.8
105.8
105.9
105.9
106.1
106.3
106.3
105.8
106.5
107.3
107.8
107.8
108.0
108.0
108.9

103.7
103.7
100.5
100.0
100.9
103.4
109.0
115.2
118.1
118.1
118.0
117.9
118.0
118.8
118.7
120.6
122.1
122.4
142.2
142.3
142.5
142.4

100.9
102.9
101.2
100.0
98.9
98.9
100.5
101.1
101.5
101.3
101.2
101.5
106.0
106.2
106.2
108.0
106.8
106.8

105.2
104.7
100.4
100.0
100.1
102.8
107.9
112.9
114.9
115.0
115.0
114.9
115.1
115.6
117.5
121.4
129.2
129.6

96.4
98.9
99.7
100.1
98.2
101.1
103.3
103.6
105.2
111.2
109.3
111.4
112.2
112.2
112.2
115.0
115.4
115.4
115.4
115.7
115.6
117.3
112.2
114.3
122.5
124.8

99.5
98.9
99.6
100.2
103.4
106.5
115.6
119.7
121.7
121.5
121.6
121.5
123.5
122.5
128.6
128.9
131.7
134.3
134.8
136.1
130.8
132.0
136.8
137.4
153.4
169.8

98.0
99.0
99.0
98.9
100.0

101.3
99.7
100.0
100.2
100.0

BLOOMINGTON, IND.
1939: June_____
December
1940: June_____
December
1941: March___
June____
September
December
1942: March___
June_____
September
December
1943: March___
June____
September
1944: March___
September
1945: March___

1939: October. .
1940:June_____
October. _
1941: January..
April____
July------October. _
1942: January. _
April____
July_____
October. .
1943: January. _
April____
July_____
October. _
1944: January. _
April____
July_____
October. .
1945: January. _
April____
July_____
September
1946: March___
September
1947: April____

93.3
95.6
96.5
100.0
101.1
108.4
112.5
115.9
121.5
127.1
127.7
132.6
138.8
144.5
141.1
137.3
144.6
143.6

97.7
98.7
98.7
100.0
100.4
103.4
105.8
108.5
112.4
114.9
115.2
117.8
121.3
123.6
122.8
122.9
127.5
127.4

98.8
99.8
99.6
100.1
102.5
106.5
111.0
113.5
117.4
119.7
120.6
122.3
126.2
126.3
126.7
126.0
125.3
127.5
128.1
127.6
127.6
129.7
128.6
129.8
145.9
154.8

99.6
99.7
100.2
100.0
100.1
100.1
100.1
100.0
100.0
100.9
101.1
102.8
102.9
103.4
104.1
106.7
110.2
109.4

99.6
99.9
100.4
100.0
100.4
101.7
105.9
111.4
122.6
122.7
122.5
123.3
124.3
124.5
127.1
129.5
132.0
134.5

BRIDGEPORT, CONN.2
99.6
102.3
99.1
100.2
104.5
111.8
114.1
119.5
123.3
129.7
133.6
137.7
145.1
144.5
142.5
140.4
136.6
140.8
140.7
139.5
139.2
144.2
141.3
142.3
175.5
187.5

100.8
100.8
100.8
99.6
101.1
102.7
116.4
116.9
130.0
130.1
130.1
126.6
131.6
132.5
140.0
138.7
142.4
144.5
149.1
148.5
149.3
149.0
151.9
156.2
162.0
180.0

96.6
97.0
99.4
100.3
101.8
103.7
106.0
106.6
107.2
102.5
102.3
102.3
*102.4
*102.5
*102.7
*102.8
*102.7
*102.6
*102.6

0)
C)

*103.1
103.1
103.2
104.0
104.1

CHARLESTON ,
1939: October- _ 100.2
99.3
1940: June____
October. _ 99.8
November 99.5
December 100.0




s. c.<

102.3
99.5
99.7
98.7
100.0

99.4
99.9
99.9
99.9
100.0

99.0
100.1
100.0
100.0
100.0

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

CHARLESTON, S. C.— Continued

BATTLE CREEK, MICH.
1939: June____
December
1940: June____
December
1941: March_
_
June____
September
December
1942: March_
_
June____
September
December
1943: March___
June____
September
December
1944: March___
June_____
September
December
1945: March___
June_____

Period 1

100.2
99.1
99.6
96.0 1941: January. _ 99.8
99.3
100.6
April------ 100.9 101.9
96.5
97.0
July_____ 104.4 111.7 100.6 101.2
October. . 108.2 116.9 106.4 102.6
100.0
111.3
120.9 114.1
100.2 1942: January. _ 113.1
April____ 116.3 127.4 117.2 112.3
103.9
July_____ 117.7 129.8 117.3 112.1
106.0
110.2
October. . 118.7 132.5 117.8 112.1
112.5 1943: January. _ 120.2 136.0 118.3 112.0
April____ 123.9 145.8 119.6 *111.9
112.5
July_____ 123.2 141.7 120.3 *112.1
113.4
142.4 121.4 *112.1
114.5
October- . 124.1
116.2 1944: April____ 123.7 137.2 123.5 *112.4
October- . 125.6 139.7 126.8 *112.6
117.8
119.2 1945: April____ 125.6 138.7 127.1 *112.6
119.3
119.6
CHESTER, S. C.
123.1
124.0
89.2
96.5
95.0
98.6
1939: June____
125.0
101.2
98.7
96.1
December 99.8
125.7
99.7
97.9
96.1
100.0
1940: June____
125.4
December 100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0
100.1
1941: March___ 102.0 105.6 100.1
June____ 104.3 110.7 102.4 100.2
September 109.0 119.2 114.0 100.8
99.1
December 112.4 124.7 116.2 101.5
99.4 1942: March___ 115.9 130.7 121.4 102.5
121.5 102.6
June____ 116.8 133.1
99.0
September 119.3 139.9 122.3 103.1
100.0
100.2
December 121.5 145.5 122.2 103.1
101.3 1943: March___ 127.5 161.2 123.6 103.4
102.3
June____ 127.9 161.2 124.7 104.0
September 127.7 159 5 126.1
104.4
105.1
108.1 1944: March___ 127.3 154.8 133.0 105.2
September 130.3 160.8 134.9 106.0
109.3
109.3 1945: March___ 130.7 160.5 135.3 107.4
111.3
114.2
CLARKSBURG, W . VA.
114.2
114.5
97.9
95.2
99.7
100.0
116.6 1939: June____
December 97.7
94.6
99.8 100.0
121.1
98.2
99.9
96.5
99.8
121.7 1940: June____
December 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
1941: March___ 100.8 102.1 100.0 100.0
100.2
June____ 104.3 111.0 101.1
111.3 100.5
September 107.3 114.1
99.3
December 110.4 118:6 115.6 100.9
98.4 1942: March___ 112.2 121.4 117.7 101.0
99.7
June____ 114.4 126.7 118.0 101.1
September 116.1
100.1
130.9 120.1
101.1
102.3
December 118.1
135.5 120.8 101.1
104.7 1943: March___ 119.8 138.4 123.8 100.9
110.2
June____ 123.2 147.3 124.2 100.7
September 121.0 140.2 125.2 101.1
111.6
115.6 1944: March___ 120.1
135.9 125.8 101.5
September 123.8 141.8 130.5 102.3
116.6
115.0 1945: March___ 123.4 138.6 132.8 103.6
116.2
118.5
CLINTON, IOWA
119.3
120.4
95.6
99.7
1939: June____
91.8
96.8
120.6
December 96.8
93.5
99.7
96.8
122.2
95.2
1940: June_____ 97.4
99.9
98.0
123.5
December 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
124.3
101.9
99.9
102.0
124.4 1941: March. . . 101.1
June____ 105.4 110.7 100.9 105.5
124.8
September 107.8 112.4 110.7 106.3
124.9
December 110.8 115.6 113.0 107.1
125.3
126.3 1942: March___ 114.7 121.6 123.9 107.4
June____ 117.0 127.1
125.7 108.3
135.5
September 117.6 128.7 126.4 108.1
144.3
December 120.8 136.7 126.8 107.9
1943: March___ 123.3 141.5 129.3 107.8
June____ 126.3 149.1
130.0 107.8
September 124.5 142.4 133.8 107.8
99.4 1944: March___ 123.8 137.8 137.4 108.1
98.8
September 126.5 141.9 139.5 108.2
99.8 1945: March___ 126.9 142.0 140.1
108.4
99.9
100.0
See footnotes on p. 66.

100.0
100.0
100.0
102.8
103.8
103.8
107.0
107.0
107.0
107.2
107.3
107.4
110.8
110.7
110.7

99.9
99.8
100.8
103.3
107.3
108.4
108.3
108.2
108.2
108.4
110.4
111.0
111.6
116.0
116.1

100.0
100.8
102.1
105.3
109.4
111.8
113.3
113.0
113.9
114.3
116.5
118.6
121.8
123.7
125.2

96.8
100.0
96.8
100.0
99.9
100.0
101.7
102.7
102.7
102.1
102.1
102.1
103.8
104.1
104.1
104.4
104.6
105.1

101.3
102.3
99.4
100.0
102.9
104.6
111.9
115.1
118.1
118.7
118.7
119.9
120.2
121.1
121.6
126.4
131.3
136.4

99.4
100.2
98.1
100.0
100.5
101.7
102.8
106.4
108.9
109.1
109.2
110.1
111.0
111.2
111.6
112.0
113.3
113.6

99.4
99.4
98.5
100.0
100.0
97.9
97.9
97.9
97.9
98.0
98.4
98.4
100.1
100.1
100.2
101.7
102.3
102.4

99.7
99.1
98.9
100.0
100.2
104.6
111.4
115.5
119.3
119.4
119.2
119.2
120.2
121.4
126.2
126.2
133.8
140.6

98.2
98.4
98.4
100.0
100.3
101.9
104.1
107.6
109.3
110.5
110.3
111.4
112.3
113.2
113.3
114.8
117.7
118.2

94.6
99.9
98.0
100.0
101.3
100.7
104.0
104.0
104.1
104.1
104.1
104.1
105.4
106.1
106.1
106.4
106.5
106.9

101.8
102.5
100.3
100.0
100.3
103.3
109.7
112.0
117.2
118.0
118.1
118.1
119.1
120.8
122.5
126.8
141.6
145.0

97.0
97.8
98.2
100.0
100.2
102.9
103.7
108.7

111.1
111.2

111.0

112.1
114.0
114.2
114.8
116.5
119.3
120.1

APPENDIX TABLES

63

Table C.— C onsum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e Fam ilies in Sm all C ities and W ar A ctiv ity
C enters in the U nited States, b y G roup o f C om m odities, fo r Selected P eriods, 1939-47 — C ontinued
[December 1940 = 100, unless otherwise indicatedj

Period1

All
items

1939: October. _
1940: June____
October..
1941: January—
July_____
October __
1942: January—
April____
July_____
October. _
1943: January—
April____
July.........
October—
1944: April____
October. _
1945: April____

99.6
97.2
99.3
100.4
105.3
110.9
114.0
117.4
120.4
122.3
125.2
128.7
129.8
130.3
129.5
132.5
132.7

1940:June____
December
1941: June____
December
1942: M arch .June_____
September
December
1943: M arch .June____
September
_
1944: March_
September
1945: March_
_

97.7
100.0
101.1
108.9
113.2
115.1
116.6
117.9
120.5
123.0
121.3
121.9
124.0
126.0

93.8
100.0
99.1
112.5
120.3
125.7
129.3
132.7
137.1
143.3
136.2
136.0
138.8
140.6

1939: October-_
1940: June____
October—
1941: January. _
July_____
October—
1942: January_
April____
July------October __
1943: January_
April____
July_____
October—
1944: April____
October—
1945: April

99.1
97.4
99.3
100.4
105.4
111.9
116.3
119.1
118.7
122.4
124.6
130.7
129.9
131.5
131.5
133.3
134.0

98.6
93.7
98.2
101.0
110.0
118.4
123.8
128.7
127.1
138.0
143.4
156.6
153.2
155.6
151.2
154.8
155.0

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and fumish- cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

Period1

CORPUS CHRISTI, T E X .8
100.1
93.4
98.6
100.7
110.8
116.9
122.3
128.2
136.7
140.9
143.4
151.4
152.2
152.3
147.0
151.1
150.4

99.3
100.6
100.5
99.7
102.7
113.6
118.2
124.0
121.7
124.4
126.4
129.4
130.6
131.8
132.9
135.5
135.7

96.4
97.6
98.2
100.9
102.1
102.2
102.3
102.4
102.4
102.4
103.1
3103.2
*103.8
*103.9
*103.9
*104.1
*104.2

99.3
100.0
101.7
103.3
103.6
103.9
103.4
103.3
103.2
103.2
103.3
103.6
104.8
107.7

102.6
99.7
100.0
100.0
105.0
110.6
116.3
120.5
119.9
119.8
122.0
122.6
123.1
123.2
136.5
144.1
145.8

99.9
98.5
99.7
100.1
103.1
109.5
111.4
113.4
114.9
115.7
121.9
122.7
124.9
126.1
128.2
132.3
133.8

100.0
100.0
100.6
100.6
100.7
101.2
101.2
101.5
101.9
102.8
102.9
105.9
105.9
106.0

99.6
100.0
103.8
115.2
120.5
121.0
120.7
121.1
121.6
121.6
126.4
126.4
128.0
0)

98.1
96.0
100.0
100.0
103.3
106.4
109.7
109.7
110.4
111.3
114.5
111.7
113.4
113.8
120.6
121.0
122.0

102 1
99.2
99.9
100.1
107.9
116.1
119.2
121.3
121.3
121.3
121.3
121.8
123.2
123.8
125.5
132.2
134.6

108.2
105.8
100.3
100.0
100.0
105.4
105.4
105.4
107.7
114.6
114.7
103.7
103.7
102.7
102.9
102.9
103.4
101.4

104.0
103.8
100.2
100.0
100.0
104.1
111.8
117.2
120.8
120.8
120.7
120.9
121.2
121.0
121.5
126.6
141.8
145.1

100.8
100.0
100.1
102.0
102.3
102.3
102.6

98.7
100.0
108.6
117.2
118.4
118.2
118.0

98.8
100.0
101.1
106.3
109.8
109.9
110.0
110.6
113.8 1939:June_____ 97.6
December 98.6
114.8
115.8 1940: June_____ 98.6
December 100.0
116.6
_ 100.8
119.6 1941: March_
June_____ 104.9
121.5
September 108.9
December 111.9
1942: March_
_ 115.4
June____ 119.1
99.7
September 120.7
98.9
December 122.9
99.7
126.4
100.1 1943: March.
June____ 129.9
103.5
September 128.4
110.0
December 129.3
114.2
_ 128.1
115.9 1944: March_
June____ 129.7
116.0
September 131.1
116.2
December 131.6
117.1
_ 131.9
121.8 1945: March_
June____ 134.1
122.2
123.5
125.6
126.3
127.6 1939: June____
97.6
December 98.2
1940: June___ _ 98.9
December 100.0
_ 100.2
98.8 1941: March_
June____ 102.7
98.6
98.1
September 107.3
100.0
December 110.3
100.0 1942: M arch-114.3
101.1
June____ 116.2
101.9
September 117.1
106.5
December 118.9
_ 122.1
109.8 1943: March_
110.2
June____ 123.1
110.5
September 122.4
111.9 1944: March_
_ 121.2
111.9
September 124.5
_ 126.1
112.8 1945: March_
115.7
115.7
116.3
117.1 1939: October- _ 99.3
1940:June____ 100.7
October— 99.6
November 99.6
99.0
December 100.0
100.0 1941: January— 100.1
101.5
April____ 101.5
106.3
July......... 103.7
108.8
October-- 107.6
109.1
See footnotes on p . 66.
124.0

GADSDEN, A LA.8
98.9
100.1
100.0
100.0
103.2
112.9
117.9
122.3
122.3
123.3
122.8
128.8
129.5
132.4
134.8
136.1
138.1

98.2
99.1
99.5
100.2
102.3
104.1
108.1
109.0
109.2
109.2
109.2
*109.3
*109.3
*109.6
*109.6
*109.2
*109.2

GLOBE, ARIZ.
1939:June____
December
1940:June____
>
December
1941: M arch .. .
June____
September
December
1942: March_
_
June____
September
December
1943: M arch-June____
September
1944: March_
_
September
1945: March_
_

97.8
99.5
97.5
100.0
99.8
104.0
107.4
111.0
115.8
117.9
120.8
122.2
122.3
124.6
125.9
124.1
126.8
126.5

91.7
98.2
93.6
100.0
99.2
109.5
115.3
119.9
126.2
130.3
136.1
140.5
139.8
146.5
147.0
139.9
144.7
142.3

99.5
99.8
99.8
100.0
100.4
101.1
109.5
112.6
118.4
118.0
118.6
118.8
122.0
121.5
124.8
127.7
131.2
133.5

99.8
99.8
100.0
100.0
100.1
101.7
102.2
103.1
109.0
110.4
114.8
116.2
115.8
115.6
115.3
115.5
115.6
115.2

GOLDSBORO, N. C.
1940:June____
December
1941: June____
December
1942: M arch .June_____
September

98.3
100.0
103.5
110.5
114.9
115.4
121.4




96.6
100.0
105.3
116.8
125.7
125.8
131.8

98.3
100.0
106.3
114.8
120.7
122.4
124.1

99.1
100.0
101.6
103.8
103.9
105.7
105.3

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

GOLDSBORO, N. C.— Continued
100.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
96.5
96.5
96.5
96.5
96.5
96.5
96.5
96.1

FALLS CITY, NEBR.
99.8
100.0
104.7
117.2
121.8
121.8
125.3
125.5
127.5
128.1
130.1
131.3
133.1
135.5

All
items

1942: December
1943: March_
_
June____
September
1944: March_
_
September
1945: March_
_

123.9
126.6
128.7
128.8
129.1
131.2
130.5

1940: June_____
December
1941:June____
December
1942: M arch .—
June_____
September
December
1943: March. . .
June____
September
_
1944: March_
September
1945: March_
_

95.0
100.0
100.0
112.0
115.4
115.7
118.0
122.6
125.7
124.6
125.7
124.8
128.0
129.5

137.6
144.8
150.4
149.4
143.3
144.6
142.3

125.3
126.7
126.9
128.7
132.6
137.4
138.5

104.9
103.8
103.6
103.7
104.1
103.9
104.2

102.8
103.0
104.6
104.6
105.5
106.1
106.4

117.8
117.8
117.9
120.0
120.0
137.9
150.1

125.1
125.4
125.2
125.5
133.2
134.7
133.4

98.0
100.0
99.6
102.8
103.6
101.4
103.0
103.2
104.7
105.1
105.1
105.8
105.8
105.8

98.7
100.0
105.8
116.0
118.6
119.3
119.3
119.2
119.3
119.3
123.0
122.8
125.1
141.8

98.2
100.0
100.3
107.6
109.9
111.4
111.9
116.2
117.5
117.3
118.4
122.0
127.3
127.8

98.7
98.8
97.9
100.0
100.0
101.5
104.0
104.0
104.0
105.4
105.8
105.8
109.8
109.8
110.0
118.1
117.3
116.6
116.1
116.1
116.1
116.1

102.5
102.2
99.4
100.0
101.1
104.6
110.9
118.4
121.6
124.4
124.3
124.5
126.2
128.2
128.7
130.0
137.2
154.5
158.4
159.9
160.3
159.4

97.9
98.6
98.4
100.0
100.7
102.2
104.4
108.2
111.1
111.4
112.7
113.6
117.0
117.0
118.9
119.3
119.6
121.5
121.9
122.5
123.6
124.6

97.4
101.9
99.5
100.0
99.7
99.4
102.3
100.4
100.8
100.5
100.6
100.7
102.8
103.1
103.3
104.0
104.1
105.8

100.6
100.4
100.3
100.0
101.3
103.6
108.3
115.8
120.2
120.5
120.3
120.2
122.4
122.2
125.6
129.7
136.8
142.1

98.5
98.0
98.2
100.0
100.2
101.4
104.8
109.2
111.9
113.4
113.1
114.1
114.6
114.7
115.9
116.7
119.7
121.0

97.6
98.2
99.2
99.6
100.0
100.0
99.6
101.3
102.8

103.4
100.9
100.5
100.7
100.0
99.0
100.0
102.0
105.4

99.5
99.3
100.0
100.1
100.0
99.9
100.2
100.6
102.9

JONESBORO,, ARK.
85.9
100.0
97.0
122.0
126.6
126.7
132.1
142.0
149.7
145.9
146.5
140.2
144.1
146.2

100.0
100.0
103.4
114.1
122.9
123.7
124.5
124.5
124.5
125.2
129.0
130.5
132.6
133.3

99.9
100.0
100.8
101.1
101.8
101.8
102.0
102.5
102.5
103.2
103.3
104.4
104.7
105.0

LEBANON, PA.
95.4
97.5
98.1
100.0
101.0
111.3
117.3
120.3
124.7
133.8
137.1
142.5
148.2
157.0
150.1
148.2
143.4
144.8
147.6
148.2
147.8
153.3

99.1
99.4
99.3
100.0
101.2
102.1
110.1
114.2
123.0
124.0
124.1
124.6
126.8
128.5
133.8
140.9
144.0
145.0
147.4
148.8
149.8
150.1

98.4
99.0
99.6
100.0
100.4
100.4
101.4
102.4
103.4
103.7
103.9
103.9
103.9
104.0
104.2
104.3
104.2
104.7
104.5
(0
104.6
C)

MATTOON, ILL.
94.4
95.8
98.2
100.0
100.0
106.4
114.5
117.1
124.6
128.4
130.5
134.9
141.4
144.0
139.1
133.8
139.1
140.3

99.6
99.6
99.8
100.0
100.4
101.4
105.9
111.8
118.9
119.1
120.7
120.8
123.5
123.4
129.4
131.3
134.4
137.8

100.1
100.1
100.2
100.0
100.4
100.0
100.7
101.2
101.0
102.0
102.1
102.1
103.2
103.3
103.6
104.4
105.3
106.6

NEWARK, N. J.*
99.2
102.9
99.3
98.9
100.0
100.6
103.8
108.0
113.2

98.6
99.9
99.4
99.5
100.0
99.3
100.2
101.6
109.2

99.5
99.8
99.9
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.5
101.8
104.2

64

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

T able C.— C onsum ers’ P rice Index fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in Sm all C ities and W ar A ctiv ity
C enters in the U nited States, b y G roup o f C om m odities, fo r Selected P eriods, 1939-47 — C ontinued
[December 1940 — 100, unless otherwise indicated]

Period1

AH
items

Food

Apparel

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
Rent ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

NEWARK, N. J.—Continued
1942: January__
April____
July_____
October—
1943: January—
April____
July_____
October—
1944: April........
October—
1945: April____

110.5
113.2
115.4
117.6
120.1
122.5
123.1
123.4
123.9
125.4
125.4

1940: September
December
1941: March—
June____
September
December
1942: March___
June_____
September
December
_
1943: March_
June____
September
December
1944: March—
June____
September
December
1945: M a r ch ...
June____

98.7
100.0
101.8
106.5
111.2
114.5
118.9
119.4
121.0
123.5
126.9
130.9
130.5
129.3
128.7
129.4
129.8
130.4
130.2
131.2

97.8
100.0
103.9
112.0
117.9
121.7
130.0
133.1
136.5
142.0
150.8
162.3
160.0
155.4
152.9
153.6
153.1
154.2
153.2
155.5

1940: June____
December
1941: June____
December
1942: March_
_
June_____
September
December
1943: March_
_
June____
September
1944: March_
_
September
1945: March_
_

98.3
100.0
101.0
107.6
111.7
114.8
116.7
118.6
121.8
124.7
123.8
122.6
125.5
127.0

95.7
100.0
100.9
112.8
119.3
126.1
130.6
134.6
139.5
143.7
139.7
133.9
137.5
141.2

1939: October __
1941: January_
April-----July_____
October __
1942: January—
April........
July_____
October. _
1943: January_
April-----July------October __
1944: January—
April-----July_____
October __
1945: January_
April____
July.........
September
1946: March_
_
September
1947: April____

100.6
99.7
100.7
102.0
105.5
108.2
110.9
111.4
114.5
115.4
117.9
117.2
117.5
117.4
118.2
118.1
118.5
118.8
118.9
120.2
119.8
121.1
138.1
146.5

100.1
99.1
101.7
104.7
109.3
114.4
119.2
121.1
128.5
130.0
136.6
134.7
133.9
132.5
132.4
131.8
131.4
132.0
131.6
134.9
132.5
133.9
172.8
185.1

118.1
121.5
127.4
132.7
138.0
143.2
143.8
143.4
140.1
141.3
140.5

114.9
118.8
118.6
118.6
118.0
120.3
120.7
123.5
129.1
135.2
137.4

105.0
108.2
107.8
107.8
107.8
*107.8
*107.8
*107.8
*107.8
*107.8
*107.8

98.8
100.0
102.0
104.4
107.0
108.5
109.4
104.2
103.7
103.3
103.3
103.0
103.0
103.6
103.2
103.3
103.3
103.6
C)
1
103.6

109.0
112.2
112.1
112.4
112.2
114.8
115.1
116.8
121.6
129.5
131.2

97.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
104.4
104.5
104.7
104.8
105.7
108.1
108.3
108.4
108.6
110.1
110.1
110.1
108.0
108.3
108.3
107.2

99.9
100.0
99.8
102.4
111.6
115.6
118.7
119.1
119.1
119.1
118.9
119.1
120.4
121.3
122.3
124.2
128.0
128.3
130.1
130.1

101.4
100.0
102.5
103.3
103.3
103.3
103.3
103.3
103.5
108.0
106.2
106.2
107.7
107.7

99.6
100.0
103.9
112.2
114.9
115.3
114.6
114.5
122.5
122.6
124.9
134.8
144.1
145.5

97.6
100.2
100.2
101.3
103.3
103.7
104.1
104.0
104.3
104.8
105.6
105.7
105.9
107.3
107.7
107.7
108.2
108.5
108.6
110.2
110.2
111.3
115.5
121.2

102.3
99.8
100.8
103.5
110.0
113.5
114.8
114.7
114.7
115.0
114.7
115.1
116.3
116.4
122.0
125.2
125.9
127.3
130.7
131.3
133.9
136.5
159.5
170.8

OCONTO, WIS.
99.8
100.0
101.5
109.6
117.7
121.5
121.8
122.2
124.4
125.9
131.3
135.5
138.0
137.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.1
99.9
99.8
99.8
99.9
99.9
100.4
100.9
101.1

99.7
100.0
100.0
99.5
100.2
100.2
100.3
100.0
100.8
100.2
*100.3
*100.4
*100.4
*100.6
*100.7
*100.7
*100.9
(0
*101.0
0)
101.0
101.1
101.3
101.4

OSWEGO, N. Y.
i939: June.........I 98.2 I 96.3 I 99.1 I 98.7 I 100.1 I 103.3
December! 98.8 1 97.6 I 99.3 1 98.9 I 99.7 I 103.3




Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

104.3 1940: June____
98.9
98.5
December 100.0 100.0
105.6
_ 100.3 101.2
105.6 1941: March_
June____ 104.5 110.6
107.0
September 108.1
109.2
115.5
December 110.5 118.2
109.9
_ 114.4 123.8
111.5 1942: March_
June____ 117.4 130.1
112.2
September 118.6 133.0
116.8
December 121.1
139.2
118.6
_ 123.9 145.3
118.9 1943: March_
June____ 127.2 153.2
September 123.8 142.6
1944: March_
_ 123.8 139.9
143.1
September 126.1
99.6
_ 126.8 143.5
100.0 1945: March_
100.2
PHOENIX, ARIZ.
105.1
107.5 1941: June____
78.3
87.4
112.0
December 92.3
85.8
114.9 1942: M a r ch ...
90.2
95.6
115.8
June____
93.2
96.9
117.3
September 99.3
97.4
118.8
December 100.2 100.5
119.0
March—
118.9 1943: June____ 100.0 100.0
101.2 103.1
119.3
September 101.4 102.4
120.2
December 100.3
98.6
121.5
_
99.1
94.9
122.5 1944: March_
95.8
June____ 100.3
123.3
September 101.9
99.4
123.5
December 101.8
98.7
123.8 1945: March_
_ 101.1
95.8
123.9
June____ 103.2
99.0

100.0
100.0
100.6
101.3
110.6
115.2
123.7
125.7
126.3
126.3
127.7
128.2
131.7
135.6
139.2
141.0

99.8
100.0
99.9
100.6
100.7
100.9
101.2
101.4
101.6
101.4
101.4
101.3
101.3
101.3
101.5
101.5

98.3
100.0
100.0
100.5
102.9
101.6
100.8
101.3
101.7
101.7
103.9
103.7
103.7
106.9
106.3
108.4

99.9
100.0
99.4
102.4
111.2
116.7
120.2
121.1
120.8
120.8
122.6
123.9
125.9
131.8
134.4
137.7

98.5
100.0
99.7
102.1
103.7
106.8
110.8
112.4
112.3
113.6
113.9
115.1
115.8
116.1
119.0
119.6

114.2
114.2
115.1
115.3
115.4
102.5
100.0
100.3
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5

85.0
93.4
97.6
97.6
99.2
99.9
100.0
100.0
102.8
103.0
105.3
108.9
110.8
111.3
114.2
117.1

90.6
93.7
96.7
97.7
98.8
99.9
100.0
99.7
100.4
101.7
101.9
104.5
104.6
104.6
105.4
106.8

103.6
101.7
101.7
100.0
99.2
95.2
95.2
95.2
95.3
97.5
97.5
97.5
95.4
95.4
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
94.3
94.3
94.3
95.3
96.0
98.6

100.8
99.6
99.6
100.0
100.2
104.8
113.3
120.2
122.6
122.4
122.2
122.1
123.0
122.5
122.9
124.1
132.2
136.0
137.5
139.3
147.0
150.2
148.8
151.8
171.7
184.6

99.3
97.4
99.7
100.0
100.2
102.1
105.5
107.7
110.9
111.2
111.9
114.8
117.0
117.8
118.6
119.2
121.3
121.8
122.8
123.4
124.4
125.7
125.9
127.2
131.8
139.7

102.0
96.6
99.9
100.0
100.1
102.4
103.6
103.9
103.9
104.2
104.2
104.4
108.1
105.9
105.9

101.0
99.1
99.5
100.0
100.3
106.8
113.5
117.6
120.3
120.2
120.3
120.3
121.7
122.3
123.9

98.2
98.1
100.1
100.0
100.0
102.6
107.5
108.9
110.9
111.1
112.1
113.5
116.7
118.5
119.5

(Mar. 15, 1943=100)
86.4
92.5
96.9
97.2
98.9
99.8
100.0
99.9
101.2
101.9
103.9
104.9
105.3
107.0
107.6
110.0

97.7
99.1
99.3
98.8
100.6
99.8
100.0
100.1
100.4
100.7
100.3
100.3
100.5
(l)
101.0
0)

SAN DIEGO, CALIF.

OMAHA, NEBR.2
100.2
100.0
100.5
101.8
109.5
116.5
121.2
120.9
122.7.
123.2
123.9
123.3
125.7
125.9
128.9
129.0
132.4
132.3
132.6
132.6
133.9
140.2
158.7
172.0

All
items

OSWEGO, N. Y.—Continued

102.8
102.6
103.6
103.5
105.2
105.3
105.2
105.2
107.3
105.6
105.6

NEWPORT NEWS, VA.
100.0
100.0
101.5
103.6
112.0
114.8
120.8
120.8
121.5
122.0
123.5
122.6
125.0
124.9
126.4
127.2
130.6
131.3
132.4
133.4

Period1

98.9 1939: October __ 99.3
99.9
100.3
100.0 1940: June____
98.5
99.7
100.3
100.7
October __ 99.4
99.6
100.1
104.9
December 100.0 100.0 100.0
107.8 1941: January. _ 100.3 100.2
99.9
108.1
July------- 105.8 112.4
101.1
109.1
October— 111.2 120.8 108.0
110.5 1942: January. _ 115.8 129.4
113.3
114.2
April........ 118.9 132.9 119.9
116.9
July------- 120.1
139.7 118.2
117.9
October— 122.8 147.4
118.5
119.3 1943: January. _ 125.0 151.7 118.5
122.9
April____ 127.6 156.9 121.2
123.0
July------- 126.7 153.8 121.8
October. _ 128.4 157.5 123.5
1944: January. _ 127.6 154.0 125.1
April------ 127.3 150.2 127.7
July......... 128.1
151.7 128.5
102.4
October-_ 130.6 157.3
130.1
99.8
1945: January. _ 130.4 156.3 130.3
100.1
April____ 131.6 158.1
131.4
100.6
July------- 132.4 158.6 132.7
103.4
September 132.5 159.3 131.2
104.3
_ 134.6 161.6 140.2
106.3 1946: March_
September 145.2 184.3 149.5
106.2
171.1
107.2 1947: April____ 158.6 209.4
108.9
109.0
SOUTH BEND,
109.2
110.2 1939: October. - 98.0
98.4
100.5
111.0 1940: June_____ 98.4
98.7
100.9
112.2
October,. 100.2 100.1
100.8
112.5
December 100.0 100.0 100.0
112.8 1941: January. _ 100.2 100.0
99.6
112.9
July------- 106.2 113.4 101.5
113.2
October. _ 110.6 117.4
112.3
113.2 1942: January— 114.5 125.9 115.2
113.9
April____ 117.6 130.4
124.4
114.3
J u l y ------ 117.2
133.2
124.3
119.3
October- _ 118.4 136.5
126.7 1943: January— 120.6 141.5 124.6
126.0
April------ 124.4 149.5 127.2
July------- 124.3
148.3 127.0
October- - 124.3 147.1
128.8
I 9876
I 98.9
See footnotes on p. 66.

96.6
96.6
97.6
100.0
101.2
107.1
110.4
113.4
114.2
108.5
107.6
107.5
*107.7
*107.4
*107.4
*108.0
*107.7
*107.6
*107.6
0)
*107.7
0)
107.9
107.4
108.0
108.8
IND.
92.9
96.5
99.6
100.0
100.1
102.5
104.1
105.9
106.9
100.4
99.2
98.8
*98.8
*98.7
*98.9

65

APPENDIX TABLES

T able C.— C onsum ers’ P rice In dex fo r M oderate-Incom e F am ilies in Sm all C ities and W ar A ctiv ity
C enters in the U nited States, by G roup o f C om m odities, fo r Selected P eriods, 1939-47 — C ontinued
[December 1940 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

Period1

All
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and fumish- cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

Period1

All
items

1944: January. _
April____
July_____
October. .
1945: January. _
April____
July------September
1946: M a r ch ...
September
1947: April____

143.6
140.9
146.4
143.8
145.0
144.5
150.8
148.0
144.7
169.5
197.1

128.6
131.1
131.5
135.4
134.4
134.6
134.6
138.7
143.3
158.4
173.9

399.2
*99.2
399.4
899.5
0)
899.5
C)
1
99.8
100.3
100.8
100.9

106.9
106.9
107.2
107.5
107.5
107.6
108.7
108.7
108.9
113.4
115.3

124.7
134.5
136.7
137.2
138.5
141.5
140.9
141.0
141.4
158.0
169.0

119.6
120.7
120.9
121.2
121.2
122.8
122.8
122.6
121.9
130.4
138.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

99.2
100.0
103.0
112.6
114.9
115.4
115.4
115.4
119.8
123.5
132.3
134.6
138.2
136.7

98.1
100.0
102.3
108.5
111.3
111.4
111.4
113.0
113.3
113.3
114.4
115.3
117.3
117.5

97.6
100.0
98.7
100.1
100.0
100.3
105.4
105.4
106.3
106.3
106.3
107.8
107.2
107.7

96.3
100.0
105.1
112.1
115.4
115.7
115.1
115.3
117.0
117.2
121.9
125.2
133.4
135.3

100.4
100.0
103.0
108.5
113.3
114.0
113.5
115.6
119.8
120.1
120.3
121.0
122.5
122.8

STILLWATER, OKLA.
1940: June____
December
1941: June_____
December
1942: March___
June____
September
December
1943: March___
June____
September
1944: March___
September
1945: March___

98.1
100.0
100.7
107.8
109.7
109.8
111.7
114.2
117.2
118.1
118.8
120.3
122.0
122.6

1940: June____
December
1941: June____
December
1942: March___
June____
September
December
1943: March___
June____
September
1944: March___
September
1945: March___

97.5
100.0
103.5
109.2
112.0
114.7
115.4
118.3
121.1
123.6
122.1
120.8
122.8
123.0

1939: October. _
1940: June____
December
1941: June____
December
1942: March___
July_____
October. _
1943: January. _
April____
July_____
October- .
1944: April____
October. .
1945: April____

99.3
98.4
100.0
103.0
109.7
113.9
117.5
118.1
121.6
124.6
123.3
124.1
123.3
124.3
125.9

1940: June____
December
1941: June____
December
1942: March___
June____
September
December
1943: March___
June____
September
1944: March___
September
1945: March___

97.4
100.0
102.3
113.3
114.7
115.6
118.9
122.9
126.7
125.7
129.5
130.0
134.0
135.2

95.1
100.0
99.2
113.6
117.7
118.3
124.2
131.2
138.9
140.1
137.1
136.9
138.6
140.1

99.5
100.0
103.1
112.8
116.7
116.8
117.3
117.5
120.3
121.2
125.8
131.1
135.9
136.3

100.8
100.0
98.1
96.4
93.4
92.6
92.9
92.4
92.7
93.9
96.6
99.1
99.1
99.4

TORRINGTON, CONN.
94.2
100.0
104.2
112.8
114.9
122.2
124.2
130.9
135.3
141.8
136.3
130.4
133.8
133.6

98.0
100.0
109.2
116.2
121.6
121.7
123.0
123.4
125.3
126.6
129.7
134.9
137.4
139.2

98.9
100.0
102.3
104.5
105.3
104.8
102.1
102.0
102.1
102.1
102.1
102.1
102.1
102.1

VALLE JO-BENICIA, CALIF.
98.2
95.9
100.0
104.8
115.8
123.4
130.7
134.3
142.3
149.4
143.3
143.6
140.0
139.1
140.5

98.9
99.8
100.0
103.6
111.9
118.8
120.2
121.1
121.6
121.9
121.0
125.6
130.6
132.8
134.7

98.0
98.3
100.0
102.7
105.6
106.2
107.2
101.3
100.4
*100.3
*100.2
*100.0
*100.0
*99.9
*99.6

109.5
109.5
100.0
101.4
103.4
103.6
103.6
103.7
103.8
100.5
100.4
100.4
94.5
94.5
94.7

99.9
99.0
100.0
104.8
112.5
115.2
115.5
115.1
120.0
121.5
121.3
123.1
124.2
139.3
142.7

97.6
100.0
98.4
102.7
104.0
104.3
105.9
105.7
105.7
105.7
105.7
105.7
110.0
110.0

99.7
100.0
104.6
117.1
120.3
120.4
120.7
120.7
120.7
120.7
121.2
121.6
122.3
123.7

VICKSBURG, MISS.




91.3
100.0
105.3
128.2
129.1
131.0
138.8
147.1
154.2
150.3
158.7
157.1
162.5
158.3

98.9
100.0
103.4
115.8
119.9
120.1
121.6
121.8
122.8
123.6
127.4
130.2
136.1
138.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.4
100.7
102.1
105.9
108.1
106.8

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
neous
refriger­ ings
ation

VINELAND, N. J.

SOUTH BEND, IND.— Continued
123.3
123.1
125.3
124.9
125.3
125.5
127.8
127.3
126.6
139.5
152.7

Food

1939:June_____
December
1940: June_____
December
1941: March___
June____
September
December
1942: March___
June_____
September
December
1943: March___
June____
September
_
1944: March_
September
_
1945: March_

98.9
99.5
99.6
100.0
101.1
104.6
109.1
111.5
116.4
119.4
121.0
123.3
125.3
127.6
128.1
127.4
131.3
131.5

98.1
99.4
100.3
100.0
101.9
109.5
115.3
117.3
124.6
130.1
132.8
138.3
144.1
150.2
147.5
141.6
146.2
145.2

99.5
99.6
100.0
100.0
100.3
102.3
114.4
118.0
128.6
129.0
131.1
131.4
131.6
131.7
137.6
142.7
149.8
151.1

100.2
99.9
99.9
100.0
100.4
100.7
101.9
102.2
103.6
103.7
104.4
104.4
104.4
104.3
104.3
104.6
104.6
105.0

98.1
101.2
98.2
100.0
100.0
97.6
100.9
101.4
101.4
101.5
101.6
101.6
101.6
101.6
104.6
108.1
108.9
108.9

102.1
102.4
99.3
100.0
102.6
109.2
116.9
120.8
127.0
127.4
129.1
129.1
129.1
129.2
129.8
134.0
156.6
162.4

98.6
98.7
99.0
100.0
100.9
103.4
105.1
108.6
111.8
115.8
117.0
117.9
117.8
118.0
120.1
121.2
123.8
124.5

100.3
100.3
100.0
100.0
99.6
96.9
96.5
104.4
104.4
104.4
104.4
104.8
105.0
105.0
105.0
105.1
92.0
112.3

101.6
102.0
99.4
100.0
101.0
103.7
112.7
114.8
120.4
120.9
121.3
121.4
122.8
123.7
124.2
124.9
136.9
141.1

98.3
98.7
98.1
100.0
100.3
101.7
103.0
107.1
109.9
111.5
111.9
115.8
116.6
117.4
117.7
119.4
121.4
122.7

100.0
100.0
100.3
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.6
100.2
101.6
99.7
99.9
100.6
100.6

99.2
100.0
104.3
113.2
116.1
116.1
116.2
116.3
116.4
116.5
122.8
128.7
137.7
143.5

97.4
100.0
101.6
105.9
108.5
108.9
110.2
110.6
113.1
112.8
114.3
114.4
121.0
121.3

96.8
96.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
102.6
102.5
102.5
102.8
102.8
103.7
104.6
105.1
106.3
108.1
108.9
108.9
108.9

101.4
99.7
100.0
100.3
99.7
100.0
107.0
114.0
117.4
120.8
121.7
121.3
123.4
125.6
132.1
133.9
136.4
138.1
142.1
148.5

99.2
98.8
99.8
9 9 .9
100.1
100.5
101.2
104.1
104.7
107.9
108.6
108.5
108.8
110.4
110.5
113.1
115.0
117.5
118.4
119.1

WALLA WALLA, WASH.
1939: June_____
December
1940: June_____
December
1941: March___
June_____
September
December
1942: March—
June_____
September
December
1943: March—
June____
September
1944: March—
September
1945: M arch—

98.3
98.9
99.2
100.0
101.2
103.6
107.8
110.8
115.1
117.2
119.1
122.4
123.1
124.9
125.7
125.4
127.1
129.7

95.9
97.5
99.9
100.0
103.8
109.6
117.8
120.3
126.9
131.4
136.7
143.2
143.1
147.3
147.8
144.2
148.4
149.4

99.9
100.0
99.9
100.0
100.1
101.4
110.6
113.0
122.4
123.2
123.3
123.4
126.8
127.7
130.3
133.2
135.3
137.9

100.2
100.2
100.1
100.0
100.1
100.2
100.2
100.2
101.0
101.0
101.4
101.3
101.3
101.8
102.6
102.9
102.9
103.8

WATERTOWN, S. DAK.

98.1
1940: June____
December 100.0
1941: June____ 102.7
December 108.6
1942: March— 111.6
June____ 113.6
September 114.1
100.3
December 115.9
99.3 1943: M a r ch ... 118.2
100.0
June____ 120.1
101.0
September 119.2
105.0 1944: March_
_ 119.6
107.3
September 123.3
109.2 1945: March_
_ 124.5
110.9
112.8
114.4
118.9
99.3
119.3 1939: October ._
119.7 1940:June_____ 99.9
October __ 99.2
122.9
November 99.4
126.2
1941: January. _ 99.8
April____ 101.2
July------- 104.3
October _. 108.0
100.8 1942: January. _ 111.1
100.0
April____ 115.5
100.4
July_____ 115.2
105.4
October.. 117.8
106.4 1943: January. _ 119.3
107.2
April____ 124.7
108.8
July_____ 123.2
112.9
October.. 124.1
117.7 1944: January. _ 124.9
118.2
April____ 125.0
118.9
July......... 127.0
119.7
O ctober.. 127.0
122.2
131.3
See footnotes on p . 66.

96.7
100.0
105.7
116.2
120.6
126.6
125.8
131.1
135.5
141.0
134.6
134.7
136.9
138.5

99.5
100.0
103.0
111.9
119.4
119.5
121.7
121.9
123.7
123.7
127.0
128.1
129.3
130.8

99.8
100.0
100.4
101.0
100.8
100.9
101.4
101.4
101.7
102.5
103.8
103.8
108.7
109.8

WICHITA, KANS.
100.2
102.2
97.5
97.8
99.4
103.3
109.8
113.4
119.8
129.1
132.2
139.5
142.4
156.2
150.1
149.2
149.5
147.6
151.9
150.2

99.5
100.6
100.5
100.5
99.5
99.7
100.6
103.2
105.7
107.0
107.1
109.0
110.0
111.7
114.3
117.0
117.7
119.2
120.2
122.2

98.3
99.0
99.7
100.0
100.0
100.6
103.9
110.2
113.4
115.3
105.3
105.1
105.4
*105.2
*105.3
*105.8
*105.6
*105.5
105.5
*105.7

66

co n su m ers’

p r ic e s

in

th e

u n it e d

states

T able C.— Consumers’ Price Index for Moderate-Income Families in Small Cities and War Activity
Centers in the United States, by Group o f Commodities, for Selected Periods, 1939-47— Continued
[December 1940 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

Period 1

AH
items

Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

Period 1

WICHITA, KANS.—Continued
iy40: January..
April____
July_____
September
1946: March_
_
September
1947: April____

127.7
128.7
129.4
128.8
129.5
145.3
154.4

151.4
153.4
154.4
152.2
151.4
190.9
203.3

122.9
0)
124.5 3105.8
125.2
<
l)
124.9 105.4
128.0 7105.2
135.0 105.6
151.5 104.6

91.8
93.5
96.9
100.0

98.0
98.0
99.9
100.0

100.2
100.2
100.0
100.0

148.4
148.5
148.5
149.6
158.0
169.8
196.4

119.8
120.4
120.6
121.5
123.1
127.7
134.3

94.8
95.4
95.1
100.0

101.3
100.5
99.8
100.0

97.9
97.9
98.0
100.0

1Data not available.
2 Prices for December 1940 base, estimated by assuming an even rate of
change between nearest pricing dates.
2 Rental data apply to 1 month earlier.
4 From October 1939 to January 1941, indexes of living costs in Charleston
were computed by combining figures on changes in food, fuel, and rental
costs in this city with figures on average changes in costs of apparel, housefurmshings, and miscellaneous goods and services in 34 large cities in the
United States.
5 From October 1939 to January 1941, indexes of living costs in Newark
were computed by combining figures on changes in food, fuel, and rental




Food

Apparel

Rent

Fuel,
electric­ House- Mis­
ity, and furnish­ cella­
refriger­ ings
neous
ation

ZANESVILLE, OHIO—Continued

108.9
108.8
111.0
111.3
112.1
117.2
123.5

ZANESVILLE, OHIO
1939:June____
96.3
Dec.8 ___
96.9
1940: June____
98.1
December 100.0

All
items

_
1941: March 8
June____
Sept. 8_
_
December
1942: M a r ch ...
June____
September
December
1943: March_
_
June____
September
1944: March_
_
September
1945: M a r ch ...

100.3 100.0
102.0 103.3
106.9 113.1
109.7 116.3
112.6 121.6
113.9 ! 125.1
114.6 126.4
117.6 134.1
120.2 139.8
122.3 145.5
120.5 139.4
118.9
131.4
122.1
134.7
124.0 138.1

100.6
101.9
105.4
110.6
114.8
115.1
118.0
118.5
119.4
119.3
120.7
123.2
126.6
127.9

100.5
101.0
101.5
102.0
101.8
101.6
101.5
101.3
101.3
101.3
101.7
102.1
103.9
105.1

100.0
100.0
108.4
108.5
108.7
108.7
108.7
108.7
111.5
111.5
111.5
115.4
115.6
118.4

101.6
104.7
107.9
112.9
116.1
115.2
114.6
114.5
115.1
115.2
116.7
122.6
141.5
140.9

100.1
101.4
103.4
106.5
108.9
109.4
109.1
110.3
111.1
111.7
112.0
113.6
116.7
117.3

costs in this city with figures on average changes in costs of clothing, house *
furnishings, and miscellaneous goods and services in New York City.
®Prices for clothing and miscellaneous commodities and services in
Wichita, collected for quarterly dates since January 1941, and housefumishmgs prices collected since July 1942 have now been used in preparing a
complete cost-of-living index. Previously estimates of changes in the cost of
living in Wichita were prepared on the basis of changes in the cost of food,
rent, and fuel in that city and in other costs in large cities in the United
States.
7 Data apply to January 1946.
8 Estimated.

67

APPENDIX TABLES
T able D.— Estimated Indexes o f Consumers’ Prices for 7 Additional Cities,

for Selected Periods, 1935-45
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

All items 1

Period

Food

Rent

Fuel,
electricity,
and
refriger­
ation

October____________
1942: January____________
A p r il..
.

July_____
October____________
1943: January____________
March______________
June_______________
September__________
December__________
1944: March______________
June_______________
September__________
December__________
1945: March______________

99.8
98.3
99.2
99.0
100.4
103.1
108.2
110.2
113.3
114.9
116.9
117.6
120.4
121.7
122.1
123.0
122.1
123.2
124.6
125.3
125.7

95.8
91.2
93.1
92.6
95.7
100.9
110.0
112.7
116.0
120.9
126.1
127.2
134.3
136.6
134.8
135.5
131.6
130.8
132.9
133.4
133.8

104.4
104.5
104.5
104.6
104.5
105.1
105.5
106.3
106.6
106.9
107.0
106.7
106.6
107.0
107.1
107.2
107.2
107.4
107.4
107.8
107.7

KNOXVILLE, TENN. (June 1940 = 100)
1940: October____________
1941: January
____
April_______________
J u ly ___________________

October____________
1942: February___________
M ay_______________
July.............................
October____________
1943: January _
March______________
June. . _
September__________
December__________
1944: March.........................
June_______________
S ep tem b er.............

December__________
1945: March.........................

99.0
99.3
101.2
104.8
108.9
113.0
118.0
117.7
119.6
122.2
125.7
129.3
129.9
130.4
128.9
130.7
132.7
133.2
132.7

96.0
97.1
101.2
109.0
113.7
120.7
131.0
130.3
134.9
141.4
149.7
158.5
157.9
157.4
151.7
154.1
157.9
158.3
156.3

100.2
100.1
100.8
101.0
102.3
103.3
104.4
104.0
104.1
103.9
103.9
103.7
103.8
104.3
104.1
103.8
103.8
103.7
103.7

LITTLE ROCK, ARK.
1939: October____________
1940: .Tune
October____________
1941: January. _
April___.
_
July................. ..........
October____________
December__________
1942: March______________
July________________
Oetnbnr . _ . . . . . . .
1943? January
.. .
March______________
June _ _
September
December__________
1944:~March _ _ __
.Time
. _
September
December. __
1945: March---------------------

100.0
99.3
98.9
100.2
101.9
105.4
110.2
112.5
116.4
117.5
119.6
120.0
123.1
124.4
123.4
124.3
124.1
125.3
127.2
127.4
127.4

97.2
95.3
92.8
95.6
98.4
104.9
111.3
115.5
120.1
124.7
130.5
130.6
137.4
140.1
135.0
135.5
133.2
133.8
137.4
137.0
136.1

104.4
105.4
106.1
107.4
109.4
111.2
113.7
115.4
116.9
118.5
117.1
117.1
117.0
116.7
117.1
117.5
118.0
118.2
118.3
118.4
118.5

LOUISVILLE, KY.
1939: October____________
1940: October____________
1941: April_______________
July________________
O ctober.___________
1942: January____________
April_______________
July________________
October____________
1943: January-------------------

99.9
99.7
102.5
107.0
110.9
113.9
117.4
117.4
119.4
120.5

96.5
94.9
99.7
107.9
111.6
116.8
120.6
122.4
126.9
128.9

Food

104.4
104.8
109.1
112.7
115.7
116.5
118.0
113.0
112.8
112.8

132.6
122.6
96.3 1943: March______________
139.5
125.7
June_______________
96.2
134.9
September__________
124.8
96.3
134.0
125.1
December__________
96.4
129.7
123.9
97.3 1944: March______________
126.2
132.9
June_______________
97.5
131.7
126.5
September__________
97.6
132.0
127.0
December__________
98.0
130.2
126.6
98.4 1945: March______________
96.4
NEW HAVEN, CONN.
97.1
97.1 1939: October____________
95.9
103.0
97.2 1940: June_______________
104.2
98.6
97.5
103.3
95.0
October____________
97.7 1941: January____________
95.7
103.9
98.1
106.2
99.8
April_______________
94.6
105.9
109.5
July________________
94.7
108.3
114.4
October____________
94.8
111.1
115.9
December__________
94.9 1942: March______________
121.1
118.0
94.8
124.2
125.0
July________________
128.6
125.4
October____________
132.1
126.9
1943: January____________
129.7
136.1
March______________
100.1
143.1
132.9
June_______________
100.1
136.6
131.4
September_ _______
_
100.7
136.9
131.5
December__________
101.5
133.0
130.8
March.........................
106.0 1944: June_______________
131.2
132.6
106.5
136.3
133.4
September__________
106.3
135.3
132.9
December__________
106.3
133.5
132.3
106.6 1945: March______________
106.7
PEORIA, ILL.
106.8
108.3 1939: October____________
97.7
99.9
108.3 1940: June_______________
100.1
100.8
108.9
98.4
100.6
October____________
111.2 1941: January____________
99.0
100.8
111.5
April _
103.5
102.4
111.9
July________________
110.2
106.0
111.9
114.7
October _ _
_____
109.6
111.9 1942: February-_
121.2
___
113.5
129.0
117.6
M ay_______________
130.0
July ___
___
117.9
135.2
120.0
October____________
96.4 1943: January____________
136.1
120.8
94.2
123.1
March______________
140.8
95.3
146.9
125.8
June_______________
97.1
September
_____
140.6
124.3
97.1
140.8
125.0
December__________
97.8 1944: March______________
138.0
124.6
100.4
138.2
125.7
June_______________
100.4
127.3
140.6
September__________
104.8
140.5
127.8
December__________
104.8 1945: March______________
139.7
127.8
105.1
ROCHESTER, N. Y.
(05.3
(07.1
97.4
100.1
107.1 1939: October____________
101.7
101.6
107.2 1940: June_______________
100.5
97.5
October____________
109.1
99.9
101.5
109.4 1941: January..__________
103.1
April_______________
103.0
109.4
109.7
106.3
July.............................
109.6
111.1
108.9
October____________
108.8
116.3
111.8
108.8 1942: January____________
114.0
118.4
March______________
125.5
115.8
July..........................
128.2
117.0
October____________
132.2
118.8
_
100.0 1943: January_ _________
121.3
137.6
March_____________
101.9
122.0
138.6
June_______________
102.5
September
..... .
132.1
120.4
104.2
121.2
132.5
December__________
105.5
128.2
120.2
105.5 1944: March_____________
131.3
122.5
June_______________
105.8
124.0
133.8
September__________
106.4
124.5
134.0
December__________
106.7
124.3
132.6
106.6 1945: March--------- -----------

1Except for New Haven, the “ all items” index is based on changes in local
prices of food, rent, gas, and electricity, and average changes in prices of
other goods and services in large cities in the United States. The New Haven




All items 1

Rent

Fuel,
electricity,
and
refriger­
ation

LOUISVILLE, KY.—Continued

DALLAS, TEX.
1939: October____________
1940: June_______________
October____________
1941: January____________

Period

112.8
113.1
113.2
113.2
113.1
113.0
113.2
113.6
113.6

108.5
108.6
109.2
110.5
110.8
111.0
111.1
111.1
111.1

104.4
104.4
105.0
105.3
106.0
106.5
108.4
108.8
109.6
109.9
106.8
106.6
106.5
106.8
106.8
106.9
106.9
106.9
106.8
106.9
106.9

95.6
100.7
99.7
103.3
100.5
101.3
106.5
105.3
105.3
115.6
111.2
113.4
114.2
114.1
114.1
115.3
115.6
115.8
115.7
115.7
116.2

104.4
104.4
104.4
104.4
104.7
104.7
104.8
104.7
104.7
104.6
104.7
104.8
104.8
105.0
105.0
105.2
105.9
106.1
106.9
107.5
106.9

91.9
94.5
96.1
96.1
96.3
98.0
99.2
100.6
102.0
102.0
101.2
103.5
104.1
104.3
105.1
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.9
106.6
108.7

104.4
104.5
104.6
104.7
104.9
105.2
105.9
106.8
107.3
107.5
107.5
107.4
107.4
107.6
107.6
107.7
107.8
108.0
108.1
108.1
108.1

96.2
99.9
97.8
100.2
100.4
102.9
104.6
104.6
104.7
105.4
105.4
106.4
106.5
106.5
106.5
107.9
109.6
111.8
111.8
111.9
112.9

“ all items” index is based on changes m prices of food, rent, fuel, and electricity in that city, and average changes in prices of other goods and services
in Bridgeport, Conn.

68

CONSUMERS' PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

T able E.— A pparel : Indexes of Retail Prices of Selected Articles Purchased by Moderate-Income

Families in Large Cities of the United States, 1935-481
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
Wool apparel

Period *

AU Men's
ap­
ap­
parel parel
3

ftS
fl

96, g
96
98 7
96^ 9

96 7
93.
96
96.8

8

97.6

8

9 7

5

8

9 7 .3

Apr

9 7 . 2

9t!4

97.3
97 3
97!
98.7

9 7 , 2

97! 5
9 9 .0

6

Wom­
en’s Boys’ Girls’
ap­
ap­
ap­
parel parel* parel *

9 7

94.3
94.1
94.3
94.4

97 7
4
97. fi
!
97! 5
99.1

95.9
94.8
95.1
95.0
95.9
99.4

.7

104.6
102.3
104.2
107.5
107.3

9 7

.O
0
8

9 7

9 7

2

1 0 2

Sept

8

103 1

1 0 2

1 0 0

9

1 0 0

8

101 0

1 0 2

8

1 0 2

102 5
108
104
1

8

fi!
105. 5
1 0

6

1 0 2

2

102 9

.
103.2

1 0 2

1 0 2

1

1 0 2 .2

2

4
100 9
1 0 1

Tien

100 5
100 4
100 3
100 3
101.3

1940: Average
.7
M ar ____
!
June___ lOl! 7
Sept___
Dec____
1 0 1
1 0 2

0

101. 0

100 7
100 4
100 3
1 0 0

2

100/2
1 0 1 .1

1 0 1 .8
1 0 1 .8

Total

96
!6

9 7

2

104.9
104 3
1 0 2
1 0 2
1 0 2

103.9
105.1
104.1

1

!

8
0

101 4
100l9
1 0 0

1 0 2 .8

101.9

93.3

Coats,
Suits, Suits,
heavy,
Top­ year- sum­ Trou­ Jack­ Sweat­ furets
trim­
coats round mer
sers
ers
weight weight
med

94.9

93.5
93.7
102.7

109.1
106.7

103.6
102.4

97.7

105.6

100.5

1 0 1 .1

101.7
102.3
102.4
102.4
102.3
102.5

101. 5
!
lOl! 5
0

1 0 1 .6

101.9
.9
1 0 1

1 0 1 .2

1 0 1 .6

1 0 2 .1

1 0 1 .2

1941: Average 106.3
M a r__ I
103.3
Sept___ lio!
Dee
114!

107.3
103.1
104.7
!
114.1

106.3
.4

t Q -2 A VC i Ag c _
46 * A V PTo ffA
X 1
M ar___
June___
Sept___
Tlftp.

124.2
123.6
125! 3
125!
125! 9

125.3
124! 7
126! 5
!
127.4

123.2
122! 7
124! 3
124! 5
124*. 5

129.7
127.6
127.9
Sept _____ 132! 5
D aa
134!

130.8
128.8
129.7
132. 5
134!

129.0
126!
126!
132! 1
134! 2

129.4
126.4
126.7
132.8
135.1

"Dee

138.8
136.7
138*0
141.4
142!

137.3
135.6
136! 5
138!

i4
o!o

140.4
137! 4
139.0
143! 5
145! 2

138.8
136.2
136.4
142.2
143.2

I04.fi’ x v v v*. c » 5 v _
X < n u « Average
M a r___
June___
Sept
T>ee

145.9
143*
145.4
148.2
149.4

143.3
14o!6
142.3
145! 2
147.7

148.4
146! 3
148.0
150.6
150.6

145.6
143.7
144.2
147.6
148.5

1Q * Average
4A
M ar___
P ftA

160.2
153.1
157.2
165.9
176.5

163.2
152! 4
159.3
169.1
184

158.4
153.4
154! 7
I !4
169.0

154.2
148.9
152.5
158.1
161.8

1947: Average
M a r__ 7
June___
Sept___
Dec.......

185.8
184.3
185.7
187!
191.2

191.4
19o!3
191.2
1912
196.1

180.8
179! 1
180.8

1948. Average
M a r__ I
June.
Sept —
Dec.......

198.0
196.3
196.9
!
200.4

203.2
20l! 7
203.6
205*. 3
205.5

102.4
103.6

8

8

1

8

043* Average
Mar*___

6

1044*A V V i
X 9 T t > Average
M a r___
June___
Sept___

in u ,A v c ia g c _

Sept___

8

7

6

2 0 1

0

1 1 1

1 2 7

1

0

6

8

. 0

♦September 1947 = 100.




107.8
103.6
105.1

1 0 1

1 0 2 .1

110. 7
115! 5

1 1 2 .8

113.3

6

2

6 2

1 0 0 .6

ioo.o

185.8

102.4

1 0 2 .8

170.0
166.3
168.0
174.7
175.5

193.1
19l! 9
191
196*.
195.7

105.0
103.8
103.8
107.3
106.8

104.4
103.3
103.4
106.4
105.7

185.1
178.8
181.5
193.2
192.5

mi

6

8

95.9
94.9
95.3
95.3
96.6
97.8

95.1
95.1

104.4
101.4
103.7
107.5
108.7

104.3

104.3
105.9
104.8
102.7
101.4

105.0

I04.T1 l02.4
105.3 103.3

1 1 0 .8

111.3
1 2 0 .1

119.2
122.4

124.3
124.3
124.7

i27.4
128.8

126.5
129.3
129.3

129.9
130.2

131.6
135.4
i36.4

133. i
134.9

136.9
137.8
136.0

i46.8
151.3

142.7
147.2
155.2

i56.8
157.9

mT
161.0
161.9

164.2
167.4

95.9
94.6
95.5
95.3
96.4
97.3

97.8
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
1 0 0 .6

104.3
101.7
103.5
107.1
108.9

104.1
102.3
104.6
106.8
104.0

104.4
106.1
104.8

166.5
166.9

Coats, Coats,
heavy­ light­ Suits* Skirts Dress­
es
weight, weight,
plain plain

93.4

96.6

93.4

98.3
99.2

96.7

106.8

106.7

1 0 1 .2

98.2
99.5

96.6

104.9
103.0

101.7

1 0 1 .8

103.4

101.5
102.3
1 0 0 .6
1 0 0 .1

101.4

1 0 0 .8
1 0 0 .8

99.5
99.5

106.0
104.7

1 0 0 .1

100.5

1 0 1 .2

1 0 1 .2

101.5

101.7
101.7
101.7
101.7

161.8

1 0 2 .1

1 0 1 .8

101.4
101.7

106.3
109.1

105.2
107.2

102.4
102.5
108.3
103.9
105.6
114.9
116.0

.

2

105.8

108.7
104.3
106.1
1 1 2 .8

115.9

129.6
129.2
131.8
131.9
132.2

124.2

134.3
133.4
134.0
135.1
137.3

13i.3

137.9
138.1
138.0
138.4
138.3

140.5

140.2
138.6
139.0
142.1
143.4

145.5

154.8
146.7
156.2
158.4
167.5

162.6

127.3
126.7
128.9
128.9
129.3
134.3
133.3
133.3
135.9
137.2

99.8

101.7

1 0 0 .2

1 0 1 .6

100.3

1 0 0 .8

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .8

101.3

1 0 0 .8

1 0 1 .6
1 0 1 .1

_________

101.9
115.0
113.9

108.0

119.6
119.0

121.4
119.7

123.1
127.2

132.5
134.8

1 2 2 .6

135.2
136.4

136.4
139.6

148.8
149.4

138.4
141.2

149.2
150.1

152.4
154.9

149.3
145.9
148.1
152.4
154.1

150.6
157.1

151.5
156.3

154.1
150.9

i58.0
159.8

164.2
155.8
161.3
169.4
178.3

175.1
177.3

162.4
164.8

156.3
153.2

168.4
167.2

179.4
175.0
178.5 191.9
182.3
188.8 .............

178.3
184.7
184.7
170.0
162.8
171.2 ............. 162.0

168.8
164.1

189.7 .......
184.3 .............

206.2
204.7
206.6
210.9
209.9

186.4
182.9
186.5
191.4
192.1

182.2
178.5

110.7
217.0
221.7 ............. 109.7

135.7
136.3

150.9

161.3

154.8
154.5

140.6
146.8

149.4

156.6

For other footnotes see p . 79.

126.4
132.0

142.2
146.1
147.7

152.3
155.5

150.5
149.3

165.8

171.3

189.7

115.2
115.2

129.7

154.7

164.5
163.7

112.7

126.2
126.5

115.4
114.2
135.6

124.8
132.6

1 1 2 .1

1 1 0 .8

108.7
117.8

118.6
117.5

101.3

1 0 1 .1

1 0 1 .1

1 1 2 .1

140.9
138.9
140.2
142.8
144.1

218.2

100.3

1 0 0 .8

1 0 0 .8

1 0 2

103.9

103.4

100.3

1 0 0 .8

98.6

1 0 2 .1

104.0
1 0 0 .2

96.7

96.9
96.9

96.6

100.9
97.9

96.2

94.7
97.6

101.7

1 0 2 .2

1 1 2 .6

96.7
96.7
96.7
96.7

1 0 2 .6

102.3

111.7

94.6
94.6
94.6
94.6

1 0 0 .6

1 0 2 .2

1 2 1 .6

123.9
124.9
125.2

95.1

1 0 1 .2

1 0 1 .1

122.9

1 0 2 .1

94.5
94.4
94.4
94.5

100.7
100.5
100.4

1 0 1 .0
1 0 0 .8

1 0 1

1 0 2

Over­
coats

1 0 1 .2

6

100 4
100 4
100 3
.5

Women’s

Men’s

1 0 0 .0

_______

96.9

160.5
166.2

103.8

____
........

175.8
171.0

APPENDIX TABLES

69

T able E.— A pparel : Indexes of Retail Prices o f Selected Articles Purchased by Moderate-Income

Families in Large Cities o f the United States, 1935-481 Continued
—
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
Cotton apparel

Wool apparel—Continued

Men’s

Children’s

Period *

Shirts,
work

Shirts,
busi­
ness

Paja­
mas

98.1

100.8
100.8
100.8
100.8

102.6
102.8
102.9
101.9

102.2
101.8
101.8
103.1

98.6
98.5
98.5
98.9

98.2
98.1
98.1
98.7

100.7
100.8
100.8
100.8

101.3
101.2
101.2
101.8

100.1

101.1
100.8
101.1
101.2
101.2
101.0

100.6
102.6
100.8
100.1
99.9
99.8

101.1
103.1
101.2
100.9
100.6
99.7

99.0
98.9
98.6
98.7
99.1
100.0

98.8
98.1
99.2
98.7
98.7
99.2

99.2
99.8
99.8
98.8
98.8
98.8

100.3
101.1
100.9
100.1
99.7
99.7

102.0

103.5
102.8
104.0
104.4
103.6

103.0
101.7
103.8
104.6
102.8

103.4
102.4
103.5
104.9
104.5

102.6
102.0
103.4
103.3
102.6

102.1
100.9
102.6
103.2
103.2

102.6
100.8
104.6
103.6
102.7

102.6
101.0
103.7
103.8
103.4

100.1

98.5
99.4
98.2
97.0
97.1

97.7
97.8
97.1
96.9
96.9

98.3
99.6
97.6
98.7
96.7

100.5
100.7
100.2
100.2
100.1

100.8
100.9
100.4
100.4
100.4

99.4
99.8
98.8
98.8
98.8

98.7
99.1
98.0
97.9
97.9

98.6
98.7
98.8
97.8
99.5

98.1

96.2
96.4
95.9
95.7
96.4

95.9
95.9
95.3
95.2
97.5

95.1
95.1
94.7
94.6
95.3

99.4
99.3
99.2
99.0
99.9

100.1
99.8
99.8
99.8
101.5

98.1
97.8
97.8
97.8
98.8

96.9
96.7
96.7
96.6
97.2

99.8
99.8
99.9
99.8
100.0

Girls’
coats*

Over­
alls

99.7
100.7
99.2
98.7
98.8

Boys’
Boys’ macki­
slacks* naws

Trou­
sers,
work

102.4
101.0
102.4
104.2
103.3

Boys’
suits*

Suits

99.5
99.8
99.6
99.3
99.3
99.5

Boys’
over­
coats*

102.1

97.4
97.1
97.3
97.9
98.0

99.2
99.3
99.6
99.2
99.2

97.5
96.8
97.4
97.7
98.5

100.1
100.2
100.2
99.8
100.0

101.4
101.5
101.5
100.9
101.5

98.6
99.8
97.8
97.8
98.8

96.9
97.3
96.8
96.6
96.7

110.9
101.4
107.5
118.6
125.3

109.0
99.4
103.7
116.5
126.9

103.8
100.1
100.8
107.0
111.6

111.9
102.6
107.6
119.4
126.0

105.5
99.8
99.8
109.6
119.4

103.1
97.2
98.1
109.7
114.5

Total

99.7
99.7
99.5
99.7

U ftp p .m h A r

1940*

A vA ra jrA
TVTn.rr»h
J im a
RApt.Aim'hAr

December.. . .

Shorts, Under­ Unionsuits
woven shirts

107.4
100.5
102.7
112.5
120.9

104.0

105.9
99.4
103.1
111.1
117.4

132.3
133.0
133.7
133.3
133.7

117.8

129.5
129.1
130.8
130.8
131.6

139.0
138.0
140.2
140.2
140.2

141.3
140.6
143.0
142.5
143.0

124.6
124.5
125.6
125.4
126.3

144.4
143.8
146.1
147.2
148.3

132.6
132.7
133.7
134.6
134.6

130.6
129.7
131.9
132.8
133.3

135.4

December

139.6
136.3
137.6
143.1
145.2

134.3
134.2
134.2
135.1
136.0

143.6
141.3
141.3
146.1
147.3

148.5
145.8
147.3
150.6
152.9

130.1
127.4
128.2
133.0
133.9

158.1
153.9
156.1
162.8
165.0

148.4
139.3
148.8
152.6
162.1

138.4
136.2
136.6
140.4
143.8

A V A .rajrA
M a r Ah
J irn A
SA pt.Am hA.r
D o f ip m h p r

152.3
148.6
152.0
154.9
158.2

141.2

137.7
136.8
137.7
138.6
138.6

150.1
148.9
149.9
149.9
154.8

156.5
153.9
155.7
157.1
161.3

136.8
135.7
136.8
137.5
139.2

178.4
168.9
176.7
184.5
192.8

174.6
165.0
171.6
182.0
188.6

148.0
145.9
148.1
149.4
151.2

1 9 4 5 • A VA.rs^A
M arch
JnnA
S a p tA m h A r

165.8
159.7
164.8
170.1
173.8

145.3

144.7
140.4
144.8
144.8
153.2

161.1
156.4
161.3
163.4
167.1

162.8
160.3
162.1
164.5
165.9

145.3
135.5
142.0
151.6
160.0

204.2
201.7
205.6
204.5
209.9

205.9
185.8
205.7
229.4
209.1

159.1
153.0
156.1
161.6
174.1

196.0
181.8
190.0
204.5
224.4

168.1

176.2
161.7
177.6
188.6
197.0

198.3
169.7
205.1
214.6
235.2

186.4
168.3
189.6
194.2
212.2

192.8
173.5
182.6
210.0
239.4

272.8
262.4
270.0
277.6
317.6

236.9
208.2
226.7
259.1
297.9

182.7
171.7
171.7
188.4
209.2

182.6

198.6
197.8
197.8
198.9
201.1

231.8
248.5
227.4
222.4
220.5

209.6
215.9
207.1
205.6
207.9

247.8
246.3
247.7
247.4
249.3

339.4
335.5
345.8
342.0
343.2

298.0
295.2

210.8
213.3
208.7
209.8
208.7

202.2
201.1
202.1
203.2
203.2

219.5
•221.8
219.9
218.0
217.4

210.6
212.5
210.2
211.7
208.6

248.8
256.3
250.1
246.1
239.6

318.4
343.2
321.6
302.4
288.4

1Q * A v A r » £ A
41
M arch
.Tun a

September.. . .
T)A A A m hA r
1

942*

A vA ra crA
M arch

June
R A p tA fn h A r
T )A c p m h p ,r
1Q43- AvA.rajrA
A/Tarati
JnnA
SApt.ATnV>Ar

1944*

December___
1 9 4

A- A v c r a ? p
A/TarAh

June________
September___
T)AAAml"»Ar
1947* A varajTA
A /fa r n h
JnnA
R d jJ t Um h a r . . . .
U p n i c lilU v l
1 / C w l U U C l —- « _

100.0
100.7

1948* A r r p r a g o
A/Tarph
JnnA

September___
December-----

100 0
102.6
107.5

105.0
105.0

September 1947 = 100.




112.5
110.4

100.0
98.6
100.5
98.2
98.6
103.7
102.8

100.0
101.0

103.0
101.0

100.0
98.2

235.2
233.8
236.9
236.1
238.6

104.4
102.1

240.5
243.4
241.3
240.3
236.8

174.3

For other footnotes see p. 79.

298.5
292.7

212.5
215.5
217.7
209.8
206.4

Socks

98.7

97.9
98.0
98.0
97.8

99.6
100.9

97.7
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.4

106.2
101.4

100.8
97.4
98.7
104.7
105.1

97.8
99.6

102.1
102.0
101.7
101.7
101.7

98.7
99.6

101.3
101.3
101.3
101.3
101.3

99.6

101.6
101.5
101.5
101.7
101.7

108.5
111.5

104.4
101.7
102.0
106.9
109.9

127.9
128.8

120.2
120.0
121.3
122.0
121.7

130.7
132.6

123.8
122.9
123.1
124.9
127.0

138.2
140.1

129.8
127.9
129.9
131.2
131.8

145.3
150.8

136.6
134.5
136.1
136.6
141.2

170.1
202.7

151.2
145.8
146.0
154.3
166.6

208.8
199.7

174.7
174.1
179.1
175.0
172.9

211.9
214.9

170.4
170.9
169.8
170.9
168.8

io o .o

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

70

T able E .— A pparel : Indexes o f R etail P rices o f Selected A rticles P urch ased b y M oderate-Incom e
F am ilies in L arge C ities o f the U nited States, 1 9 3 5 -4 8 1— C on tin u ed
[1935-39 — 100, unless otherwise indicated]
Rayon and nylon apparel

Cotton apparel— Continued

Period >

Women’s

Men’s

Children’s

Women’s

Yard Boys’
Dress­ House- Night­ goods, shirts, Boys’ Boys’ Girls’ Girls’ Girls’ Girls’ Dia­ Total Socks, Dress­ Slips, Pan- Hose, Yard
rayon
es,
rayon ties, nylon* goods,
es, dresses gowns per­ broad­ polo shorts, dress­ slips * pan- ank­ pers*
rayon
rayon
rayon
ties* lets*
street
cale cloth* shirts* knit* es*
99.3
99.4
99.0
99.2

97.6
97.6
97.6
97.6

101.4
101.6
101.0
101.6

98.4
98.4
98.2
98.4

97.6
97.6
97.6
97.6

98.8
98.8
98.6
98.8

97.4
97.4
97.4
97.5

100.1
100.3
100.2
99.8

99.7
99.1
99.1
100.9

99.5
99.6
99.6
99.3
99.3
99.5

97.9
97.6
98.7
97.6
97.6
98.2

100.6
101.6
101.6
99.8

98.6
98.9
98.7
98.5
98.4
98.4

95.5
97.6
95.2
95.2
95.2
94.7

98.9
98.9
99.1
98.7
98.9
98.7

97.7
97.5
97.5
97.6
97.7
98.0

99.4
99.6
99.4
99.2
99.2
99.4

100.9
100.9
100.9
100.9
100.9
100.9

101.9
101.0
103.5
102.9

101.0
99.3
100.5
102.9
102.9

105.1
106.4
107.5
105.1

101.4
100.2
101.1
102.9
102.7

99.2
95.2
95.8
104.2
104.8

102.0
101.1
102.0
103.7
102.5

101.0
100.6
101.1
101.7
101.8

100.7
99.3
100.1
102.0
102.5

103.9
103.5
104.4
104.4
104.4

100.1

100.5
100.6
100.3
100.0
100.0

102.2
102.9
102.3
101.7
101.7

97.3
98.7
95.6
96.2
95.1

101.0
101.4
100.8
100.6
100.7

103.8
104.2
103.5
103.5
103.5

100.2
100.1
99.8
99.8
100.4

101.7
101.7
101.7
101.7
101.7

101.2
101.5
101.1
100.9
100.9

99.2
100.9
100.0
97.4
95.6

99.4

98.7
100.0
99.8
94.8
100.6

101.4
101.7
101.1
101.1
101.7

95.2
95.1
95.1
95.1
95.6

100.7
100.2
100.3
100.6
102.2

104.1
104.2
104.2
104.2
104.2

100.3
100.2
100.1
100.4
100.4

102.0
101.4
101.3
102.0
103.9

98.6
99.5
98.3
97.8
97.8

96.5
93.9
94.8
95.6
104.4

1940: Average
Mar
*
"
June___
99.4
Sept
Dec

100.1
100.0
99.9
100.0
100.3

103.3
102.9
103.5
103.5
104.0

96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2

102.0
103.1
101.9
101.3
101.3

104.0
104.2
104.2
103.5
103.5

100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5

106.3
105.2
106.8
107.1
107.7

98.1
98.2
98.1
98.2
98.2

105.9
107.9
105.2
105.2
106.1

1941: Average
Mar
June___
Sept
Dec

100.0

111.9
100.4
102.7
119.7
138.0

108.9
105.3
107.1
110.0
117.2

109.1
97.4
105.7
117.7
124.7

105.8
101.0
101.0
110.0
115.7

106.3
103.5
103.5
107.2
114.9

103.6
100.3
100.5
106.2
112.5

113.6
107.6
108.5
119.9
125.3

101.6
97.9
97.9
103.5
112.1

112.7
105.2
106.1
120.0
126.1

1942: AverageMar ___ 109.8
June___ 119 4
Sept___ 119.4
Dec

152.5
149.3
154.5
154.7
154.7

137.8
137.4
141.0
140.3
140.3

143.3
143.7
145.5
145.5
145.5

125.5
125.3
127.1
126.6
126.6

127.2
125.6
129.2
129.2
128.5

124.5
124.8
126.2
126.3
126.3

133.0
132.4
133.7
134.1
133.7

120.5
119.1
121.1
121.1
121.5

132.9
130.4
133.9
134.8
135.6

1943: Average
M a r ___ 125.4
June___ 128.0
Sept___ 129.5
Dec

171.2
159.3
161.4
185.7
189.7

153.6
146.9
149.3
161.3
165.4

146.1
146.1
146.1
146.1
146.1

127.3
127.9
125.2
127.3
129.6

133.4
131.6
132.8
135.8
137.6

130.0
128.4
128.7
131.5
135.8

137.3
136.3
137.5
139.0
140.1

123.3
122.1
122.8
123.1
127.4

136.1
135.6
135.6
136.5
137.3

1944: Average
M a r__ I
June___
Sept___
Dec

144.2
154.0
156.6
158.9

202.6
195.2
200.3
208.6
215.8

179.3
170.8
179.8
182.2
194.1

148.0
146.7
147.8
148.4
150.7

134.4
133.1
134.2
135.9
136.9

143.3
142.4
143.0
144.8
145.4

142.2
140.0
141.8
145.0
146.4

141.7
140.9
141.3
142.1
143.9

130.1
129.1
129.7
131.4
132.0

143.8
139.9
144.1
146.6
148.3

D ec

168.4
161.5
173.6
173.3
173.6

237.0
223.3
234.8
252.4
252.2

195.5
195.9
191.1
195.3
201.9

154.9
151.8
155.2
157.5
157.5

* 139.1
137.9
138.8
140.5
140.4

148.6
147.8
147.8
147.8
153.6

150.0
147.9
149.0
152.9
154.6

144.9
145.8
146.9
147.3
134.7

132.7
132.0
132.0
133.0
134.3

153.2
150.8
155.0
154.2
155.0

1946: Average
M ar__ 7
June___
Sept___
Dec

180.1
173.4
180.9
184.9
187.2

273.2
262.6
272.4
283.8
288.9

241.7
227.0
224.6
259.2
283.1

173.3
155.8
158.6
177.4
222.9

148.2
145.2
145.8
150.9
156.1

172.6
161.7
168.6
179.0
202.6

152.8
151.4
147.6
156.6
161.1

131.6
129.9
130.6
132.4
140.2

135.6
131.6
134.0
136.7
145.2

96.5
98.7
99.8
100.6

164.2
157.5
162.6
168.5
174.4

1947: Average.
M a r__ 7 196.8
June ___ 222.5
Sept___
Dec____

303.9
305.8
309.8
301.6
300.3

314.3
318.3
319.5
313.9
317.6

245.3
233.1
243.9
254.2
263.1

100.0
107.9

100.0
99.2

100.6
103.1

100.6
107.5

100.0
105.6

100.0
103.8

100.0
100.7

100.6
100.0

167.2
169.6
166.8
166.4
171.2

200.7
209.6
197.5
191.7
203.3

174.7
172.5
175.7
176.1
182.2

157.7
152.8
155.0
159.6
175.3

160.7
161.2
160.5
162.9
162.9

103.3
110.4
102.4
100.0
100.3

218.0
204.0
220.1
231.1
238.4

1948: Average.
Mar — 7 237.7
June___ 246.5
Sept___
Dec....... ...........

297.9
304.2 317.6
299.5 321.4
293.4
291.7 ..........

265.6
280.7
271.9
261.6
241.7

107.0
103.9
100.0
113.4
112.6

104.3
99.2
96.1
112.5
114.8

99.9
98.8
99.4
100.0
100.6

106.6
105.5
106.0
107.9
106.8

105.0
106.9
105.6
105.6
100.0

108.2
107.5
108.8
108.8
110.0

104.2
101.4
104.3
106.4
106.4

94.2
96.3
92.6
92.6
92.6

177.3
177.3
177.3
178.6
178.8

202.5
206.2
202.3
200.4
200.4

188.8
188.1
188.4
190.1
192.3

190.4
191.8
191.8
192.1
191.5

169.3
167.6
169.2
172.4
170.8

102.2
101.8
101.6
103.3
103.0

255.3
257.7
261.4
256.8
250.4

1935; Average
Mar
July
Oct

ioo

. 2

Jan
Apr
99.8
Dec
Mar w
.Time
Sept _
Dec

100.6

m

1938: Average
Mar
June
Dec
Mar
June

Sept
S r Dec
S

1945: Average.
M a r __ 7
June___
S ept___

101.5

♦September 1947 = 100.




100.4

100.4
105.6

For other footnotes see p . 79.

APPENDIX TABLES

71

T able E.— A pparel : Indexes of Retail Prices o f Selected Articles Purchased by Moderate-Income

Families in Large Cities of the United States, 1935-481 Continued
—
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
Footwear

Other apparel

Period *

Jack­
Total Neck­ ets,
Hats, Hats, Coats,
fur
ties leath­ fur- straw
er*
felt

Gir­ Gloves, Hats, Total
dles leather woolfelt

93.7

97.9
97.8
97.8
98.8

99.4
99.6
99.2
99.2

95.9
95.7
95.6
96.1

99.3
99.2
99.2
99.2

95.7
95.4
95.5
95.9

94.2
93.7
93.9
94.5

94.9
94.4
94.8
95.3

96.5
96.4
96.4
96.8

95.9
95.8
95.9
95.9

98.8
99.2
99.2
98.0

99.9
100.7
100.4
98.6

96.8
96.5
97.0
96.8

95.2
103.5

99.8
100.0
100.0
99.6
99.6
99.6

98.3
98.4
98.4
97.8
98.4
98-4

99.7
99.6
100.0
99.6
99.6
99.6

97.4
96.8
97.3
97.3
97.6
97.8

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

97.3
96.7
97.3
97.2
97.5
97.7

97.3
96.1
97.5
97.5
97.5
97.5

97.2
96.8
97.2
97.2
97.4
97.4

97.5
96.9
97.2
97.2
98.0
98.2

96.6
96.5
97.0
96.5
96.4
96.7

97.6
98.0
97.8
97.3
97.2
97.5

97.6
98.3
97.8
97.3
97.3
97.3

97.5
97.2
97.6
97.2
97.1
98.3

111. 5
111.0

99.7
99.6
99.6
99.6
100.0

102.0
100.3
101.5
104.7
103.4

101.7
101.4
102.5
102.5
100.7

102.7
99.4
102.1
106.3
105.7

101.9
100.4
102.3
104.7
100.4

102.5
99.0
101.9
106.2
105.9

102.8
99.1
102.5
106.1
106.7

102.4
98.. 7
102.2
105.4
106.2

102.7
99.6
101.7
106.7
105.2

101.9
97.9
101.3
105.4
106.1

100.6
99.1
100.5
102.0
102.4

99.9
98.6
99.3
101.4
101.8

101.6
99.6
102.4
102.8
103.1

99.7
100.6
99.1
99.3
__ 106.8
100.3
99.1
99.6 ............. ............. ............. 97.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

101.4
102.2
101.5
100.3
100.9

99.3
99.2
98.5
99.2
100.0

102.8
103.8
102.7
101.6
101.6

98.7
98.6
97.9
97.9
100.4

103.0
104.3
103.1
101.8
101.7

103.7
105.0
103.9
102.3
102.1

103.4
104.7
104.1
101.7
101.7

102.6
103.7
102.6
101.5
101.2

103.1
104.3
103.0
101.9
102.0

101.9
102.1
102.1
101.9
101.1

101.3
101.3
101.3
101.3
100.8

102.6
103.0
103.0
102.5
101.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.3
100.3
100.3
100.9

99.7
99.6
99.6
99.7
99.8

101.4
101.1
101.1
101.2
102.3

99.8
99.8
100.4
101.7

101.6
101.4
101.3
101.4
102.4

101.9
101.5
101.5
101.6
103.1

102.0
101.4
101.5
101.6
104.1

100.9
100.8
100.7
100.8
101.1

102.4
102.2
102.1
102.1
103.6

101.2
101.2
101.1
101.4
101.3

101.1
100.9
100.9
101.4
101.3

101.5
101 7
101.5
101.4
101.6

l02.2
102.2

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.7
99.8

103.1
103.1
103.1
103.2
103.3

105.5
105.3
105.6
105.9
105.9

105.2
105.8
105.3
104.9
105.2

101.1
101.1
101.2
101.2

102.3

103.3
103.3
103.4
103.4
103.4

1 0 1 .1

104.6
104.7
104.6
104.6
104.8

100.8
100.9
100.8
100.7
100.5

100.2
100.4
100.3
100.1
99.9

101.6
101.6
101.6
101.6
101.6

102.4
100.0
100.0
106.5" 105.8
109.1 107.2

107.1
103.8
105.0
109.7
113.3

103.5
107.2

107.1
103.9
105.3
110.2
113.7

111.1
106.6
109.3
115.6
118.5

111.4
105.4
108.7
116.5
121.5

103.1
101.1
101.5
105.2
108.2

108.9
105.5
106.6
111.8
116.5

102.2
100.5
101.3
102.9
106.1

101.5
99.7
100.6
102.4
106.0

103.6
101.8

”Ii2.4
121.7

102.9
100.0
100.0
105.1
109.4

104.5
107.2

127.3

120.2
119.6
121.6
122.0

121.2
120.5
121.5
122.9

131.8

121.7
121.4
122.5
122.5

129.0
128.8
129.9
130.2

132.7
132.1
133.7
133.7

114.2
113.9
114.8
114.8

111.3
109.4
112.5
112.6

125.9

122.0

116.5

118.0

123.1

133.0

122.6

133.7

114.8

125.5

113.0

109.3
109.2

117.0
114.0
117.8

130.3

124.7
124.3
125.4
125.1

108.7
107.2
109.8

116.5

115.9
112.0
118.0
118.0

133.5
136.9

136.5
129.6
132.4
142.4
151.2

123.3
120.6
121.8
127.3
128.4

126.6
124.9
126.0
128.5
129.2

138.9
139.6

126.2
124.5
125.7
128.0
128.7

133.3
132.4
133.6
134.2
134.9

140.7
135.8
139.1
145.1
147.2

118.2
116.6
117.5
120.0
120.4

129.4
127.4
128.9
131.7
132.8

117.9
114.8
116.5
120.8
122.7

110.6
109.4
109.6
111.4
112.7

130.5
124.1
129.1
136.9
139.9

152.7
152.7

164.9
160.0
165.2
168.8
172.4

135.9
133.2
133.2
138.2
140.4

130.8
129.9
130.6
131.7
132.2

146.8
147.5

130.1
129.4
130.1
130.8
131.4

135.2
135.0
135.1
135.3
135.4

151.1
149.9
151.6
152.1
152.6

121.8
120.9
121.8
122.3
123.2

135.2
134.0
135.0
136.8
137.3

125.1
123.9
124.8
126.3
126.9

114.2
113.9
113.9
114.6
114.8

144.0
141.8
143.7
146.4
147i 8

154.1
155.1

176.7
176.0
178.0
177.6
176.4

141.0
140.4
141.9
140.5
135.8

133.7
132.7
133.6
134.4
134.9

148.8
150.1

132.9
131.9
132.9
133.6
134.1

137.1
136.1
137.2
137.8
138.7

154.5
154.2
154.7
154.7
155.2

124.2
123.6
124.4
124.3
124.9

139.6
137.8
138.7
141.5
141.5

127.9
127.5
127.8
128.4
128.6

115.2
114.8
115.2
115.6
115.6

150.2
149.5
149.8
150.9
15L 7

166.6
167.1

171.8
175.2
167.2
169.6
171.6

135.6
136.2
131.5
136.3
136.3

150.2
138.7
143.9
155.6
176.0

161.6
167.4

148.7
138.1
143.6
155.3
176.4

157.9
143.0
152.4
164.9
194.3

171.6
159.9
168.9
180.1
200.8

137.8
128.7
133.0
144.3
160.9

153.5
145.3
147.3
158.9
179.3

137.6
132.6
135.1
140.6
149.0

119.5
116.6
117.9
120.6
126.4

168.3
161.4
165^0
175! 5
188] 1

189.1
193.8

191.1
189.4
192.5
190.7
199.6

211.1
208.9
210.9
210.9
222.2

211.6
209.9
206.7
215.1
220.5

173.4
172.6
177.7
170.8
179.5

198.0
194.0
196.4
201.9
208.4

152.4
150.8
151.8
153.4
155.8

130.6
128.5
129.8
132.1
134.7

190.6
Igg* 4.
190] 5
190.9
192.8

200.6
204.6

209.2
210.3
209.2
210.5
210.4

230.5
229.9
229.8
232.8
233.1

230.7
232.5
231.3
231.9
230.7

191.2
193.3
191.2
192.4
192.3

213.8
214.7
214.7
213.9
213.6

159.1
157.9
159. 2
159.7
161.3

137.1
135.9
137.1
137.3
139.7

198.1
197.0
198 5
199.2
200.0

97.8
97.8
97.8
97.7

1936: Average
Jan
Apr.......
July___
Sept___
D ee

98.3
97.8
97.9
97.6
98.2
100.4

100.2
99.6
100.1
100.1
100.6
100.6

1937: Average.
M a r .r „
June___
Sept___
Dec___

102.6
101.2
101.9
104.3
104.1

100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6

1938: Average.
Mar_I__
June___
Sept___
Dec.......

102.1
103.3
102.6
101.7
99.4

1939: Average.
Mar___
June___
Sept___
Dec___

99.0
99.0
99.0
98.9
99.1

99.4
99.6
99.6
99.1
99.1

1940: Average .
Mar......
June___
Sept......
D e c ......

99.4
99.3
99.2
99.6
99.7

99.8
99.1
100.0
99.1
99.6
99.1 _______
' ’ 99.T
"loo " Y
99.1
” 96."5" 99.6
99.1 ............. 101.3 ............. 96.0 100.0

1941: Average.
M a r ___
June___
Sept......
Dec____

104.8
100.8
101.1
108.7
113.1

98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6

1942: Average.
Mar.......
June___
Sept......

122.0
122.1
124.1
122.5

100.0
100.1
100.1
100.1

___

126.6

D e c .........

122.3

100.1

.............

127.1

1943: A v era g e.
M a r ........
J u n e ____
S e p t ____
D ee
_

128.4
124.9
126.5
131.3
135.2

100.6
100.1
100.1
101.1
101.6

1944: A vera g e. 144.6
M a r ........ 139.6
J u n e ____ 142.2
150.2
Sept
D ec
151.8

101.6
101.6
101.6
103.1

100.1
100.1
100.1
100.1 .............

98.0 .............

99.7

99.3
102.5

_
___

99.3
99.7

________

95.6
95.2

105.1
ll2.3
114.6

■"99.1"

126.6
103.3
.............

128.9
110.9
132.1
134.4
139.0
116.6
145.3
146.2
147.2
122.3
149.5
149.9

1946: A vera g e. 166.6
M a r ........ 161.6
J u n e ____ 161.6
171.9
Sept
D e c _____ 177.7

1948:A verage.
M a r ____
J u n e ____
S ept........
D e c .........

99.3

99.3
99.3

1945: A v e ra g e . 156.2
M a r ___ _ 153.8
J u n e ____ 155.8
S e p t ___ 158.6
D e c ......... 159.0

177.6
180.4
180.5
174.7
173.2

Dry
W om­
clean­
Men’s
Men’s Men’s en’s Chil­
ing Shoe
rub­
bers Total shoes, shoes, shoes, dren’s Total and
re­
street work street shoes
press­ pairs
ing

100.3
100.4
100.4
100.0

1935: Average.
Mar_r__
July___
Oct.......

1947: A verage .
M a r____
J u n e ____
S ep t........
D e c .........

Shoes

Women’s

Men’s

Services, dry
cleaning, and
shoe repairs

155.2
175.5
184.9

173.7
171.0
171.8
177.7
174.9

184.4

.......

♦ September 1947 = 100.




id o .6
100.0

117.2
117.8
122.2
134.2
136.1
140.5
158.2
160.1
169.0
189.3
203.2

200.8
193.2

175.6
177.6

173.4
176.4

116.5

161.2
160.7

190.4
188.2
191.2
190.4
199.5

194.4
193.2

208.4
209.3
208.3
209.7
209.7

212.1

176.9'
97.6
94.0

180.8
180.8

..................

175.4
169.3

177.6
176.5

135.2
137.0

F or other footnotes see p . 79.

m e

118.9
120.0

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

72

T able F.— H ousefurnishings : Indexes of Retail Prices of Selected Articles Purchased by Moderate-

Income Families in Large Cities of the United States, 1935-48 1
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

P e r io d 2

A ll
housefu r n is h in g s 2

Rug,
w o o l,
Axm in ­
ster

C ar­
p et,
w o o l,
v e l­
vet

R ug,
fe lt base

F lo o r
cover­
in g ,
in la id

A ll
fu r n i­
tu re
and
bed­
d in g

A l l f u r n it u r e

T ota l

L iv in g - B e d ­
room
room
s u ite s s u ites

D in ­
ette
sets*

D in i n g
room
su ite s

S ofa
beds

R a­
Ra­
M a t­
d io s ,
d io s ,
R a d io B e d - tresses, t a b le
t a b le
phono­
sp r in g s in n e r m o d e l, m o d e l, g ra p h s*
s p r in g w o o d p la s t ic
ca se
ca se

1935: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h ................................
J u l y ......................................
O c t o b e r . . .........................

9 4 .8
9 4 .2
9 4 .5
9 5 .7

9 0 .2
8 7 .4
8 9 .4
9 4 .1

9 0 .2
8 7 .3
8 9 .4
9 4 .0

1 05 .2
1 0 4 .6
1 04 .6
1 06 .6

9 8 .4
9 8 .6
9 8 .3
9 8 .3

9 1 .3
9 0 .6
9 0 .9
9 2 .2

90 .1
8 9 .3
8 9 .6
9 1 .1

8 9 .4
8 8 .6
8 8 .8
9 0 .5

9 1 .0
9 0 .1
9 0 .5
92 .1

9 0 .0
8 9 .3
8 9 .6
9 0 .8

9 3 .1
9 2 .1
9 3 .1
9 3 .9

9 7 .9
9 8 .2
9 7 .7
9 7 .7

9 6 .9
9 6 .0
9 7 .3
9 7 .4

9 9 .9
9 9 .3
9 9 .8
1 0 0 .7

1936: A v e r a g e ................ .............
J a n u a r y ..............................
A p r i l . I ________________
J u l y ....................................
S e p t e m b e r .......................
D e c e m b e r .........................

9 6 .3
9 5 .8
9 5 .7
9 5 .9
9 6 .6
9 7 .9

9 3 .3
9 4 .3
9 3 .7
9 1 .8
9 2 .1
9 4 .8

9 3 .3
9 4 .2
9 3 .7
9 1 .8
9 2 .1
9 4 .9

1 02 .9
1 06 .3
1 0 6 .8
102 .7
9 8 .3
9 9 .3

9 8 .3
9 8 .3
9 8 .3
9 8 .6
9 8 .2
9 8 .1

9 5 .3
93.1
9 3 .7
9 4 .7
9 6 .6
9 8 .9

9 4 .7
9 2 .2
9 2 .8
94.1
9 6 .2
8 8 .9

9 4 .5
9 1 .7
9 2 .5
9 3 .8
9 6 .2
9 9 .2

9 5 .0
9 2 .9
9 3 .5
9 4 .4
9 5 .9
9 8 .6

9 4 .6
9 2 .0
9 2 .6
9 4 .4
96.1
9 8 .2

9 5 .6
9 4 .6
9 4 .7
9 5 .0
9 6 .5
9 7 .5

9 8 .5
9 7 .9
9 8 .3
9 8 .2
9 8 .7
9 9 .3

9 8 .4
9 7 .6
9 7 .6
9 8 .1
9 8 .9
9 9 .9

9 8 .9
1 00 .3
9 9 .1
9 8 .6
9 8 .0
9 8 .8

1937: A v e r a g e .................... ........
M a r c h . .............................
J u n e . . . ..............................
S e p t e m b e r ..................... ..
D e c e m b e r .........................

1 0 4 .3
1 0 2 .6
1 04 .3
1 0 6 .7
1 0 7 .0

107 .7
102.1
1 0 5 .5
114 .8
115 .6

107 .9
1 0 2 .2
105.6
115.1
1 16 .0

1 0 4 .4
104.1
10 5 .4
105.1
105 .1

1 01 .7
1 0 1 .2
102.1
1 0 2 .6
1 02 .6

106 .3
1 04 .5
1 06 .4
10& 8
1 0 9 .2

1 0 7 .2
105.1
107 .3
1 09 .9
1 1 0 .4

107 .4
1 04 .9
107 .7
110.1
110 .7

107.1
105 .3
107.1
109 .9
1 10 .2

106 .5
1 04 .7
1 0 8 .5
1 0 9 .2
1 0 9 .5

1 03 .4
101 .3
103.3
1 06 .0
1 0 6 .0

1 0 1 .8
1 00 .6
1 0 1 .8
1 0 2 .7
103 .3

1 03 .0
10 2 .5
1 02 .8
1 04 .0
1 0 4 .2

1 03 .7
1 0 1 .5
1 0 1 .7
1 07 .0
1 07 .5

1938: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h ........................ ........
J u n e ....................................
S e p t e m b e r . . ...................
D e c e m b e r . . . ...................

103 .3
1 0 4 .7
103.1
1 01 .9
1 0 1 .7

1 0 3 .2
1 0 6 .2
1 0 4 .7
9 7 .5
9 8 .8

103 .3
106 .3
1 04 .8
9 7 .5
9 8 .9

9 3 .9
100 .5
9 1 .7
8 8 .8
8 9 .0

1 00 .8
102 .1
100 .1
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

104 .6
105 .7
1 0 4 .2
1 03 .4
1 0 3 .2

105.1
106 .4
104 .6
1 03 .7
1 03 .5

105.3
1 06 .8
104 .7
103 .8
103 .5

104 .7
1 05 .8
104.1
103.4
1 02 .8

1 0 5 .2
1 0 6 .2
1 04 .7
103 .9
1 0 4 .2

103 .7
1 0 4 .2
1 0 3 .9
103.1
1 02 .6

1 0 2 .0
1 0 1 .9
102 .1
1 0 1 .9
1 0 1 .5

1 0 2 .2
1 0 2 .0
1 0 2 .0
1 0 2 .2
1 0 2 .0

1 00 .9
1 0 5 .2
1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
9 7 .1

1939: A v e r a g e ........... ...............
M a r c h . ..............................
J u n e ............ ........................
S e p t e m b e r .......................
D e c e m b e r ......... ...............

101 .3
1 0 0 .9
1 0 0 .6
101.1
1 02 .7

1 0 4 .8
1 0 3 .0
1 0 3 .2
105 .3
112 .1

1 0 6 .2
10 3 .4
10 3 .2
107 .5
116 .6

9 0 .2
8 9 .3
8 9 .8
9 0 .5
9 2 .2

9 9 .4
9 9 .9
9 9 .4
9 9 .2
9 8 .6

102 .5
102.3
101 .7
1 02 .0
104.1

102 .8
1 02 .6
1 02 .0
102 .4
104 .8

1 0 3 .2
1 0 2 .7
102.1
102 .7
106 .4

1 0 2 .0
102.1
1 01 .6
101 .4
103 .0

103.1
1 03 .0
1 02 .4
103 .0
1 03 .9

1 0 2 .2
102.1
1 01 .8
102.1
1 0 3 .2

100 .3
1 0 0 .2
100 .0
10 0 .0
100 .6

9 9 .8
9 9 .9
9 9 .5
9 9 .1
9 9 .9

9 6 .3
9 5 .9
9 5 .0
9 6 .5
9 8 .3

1940: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h . ..............................
J u n e .......... ..........................
S e p t e m b e r .......................
D e c e m b e r .........................

1 0 0 .5
1 00 .5
100.1
100.3
1 00 .4

11 5 .0
1 1 3 .6
1 1 5 .2
116.1
1 16 .5

120 .5
119.5
121 .2
121 .5
121 .4

9 0 .1
9 2 .2
8 9 .5
8 8 .8
8 8 .5

9 8 .3
9 8 .6
9 8 .2
9 8 .1
9 8 .3

104.1
1 04 .2
1 03 .8
103 .8
104.7

1 04 .9
105.1
104 .6
104 .5
105 .6

106.6
1 07 .2
106.5
105 .9
1 07 .2

1 02 .8
102.6
102.3
102 .8
103.9

104.1
1 0 4 .2
103 .9
103.9
1 04 .5

1 02 .5
1 02 .4
102.1
102.1
1 0 3 .2

100 .5
1 0 0 .4
1 00 .5
1 00 .5
1 00 .5

9 9 .7
9 9 .5
9 9 .4
9 9 .8
100 .5

9 6 .9
9 6 .6
9 6 .2
9 7 .7
9 6 .7

1941: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h ................................
J u n e . . ................................
S e p t e m b e r .....................
D e c e m b e r ........................

107.3
1 01 .6
105 .3
1 12 .0
1 16 .8

121 .9
117 .3
12 2 .9
12 4 .8
125 .6

126.8
122.4
127.0
130.1
130 .6

8 7 .9
8 7 .8
8 7 .8
8 7 .8
8 7 .8

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6

116 .4
107 .5
112.9
1 24 .4
129 .0

118 .5
1 08 .8
115.1
127.3
131 .5

1 2 2 .2
110 .7
1 18 .2
132.5
1 37 .2

114 .8
100.7
111 .8
122.6
126.5

115 .7
1 0 7 .7
113.1
1 2 2 .8
1 26 .4

111 .6
104.1
1 07 .4
1 1 8 .2
123.1

105 .9
100 .9
1 0 2 .8
110 .3
11 4 .0

10 7 .4
101.6
1 0 3 .2
1 11 .2
119 .3

9 9 .4
9 5 .1
9 5 .3
100 .0
1 0 9 .2

9 6 .5
9 8 .2
1 11 .8
124 .1

1942: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h _________ ________
J u n e ..................................
S e p t e m b e r .......... .............
D e c e m b e r ........................

1 2 2 .2
1 2 1 .2
1 22 .3
1 2 3 .6
1 23 .7

1 2 9 .9
1 2 9 .7
130.1
1 30 .5
1 3 0 .5

136.6
13 6 .2
1 37 .2
137.8
13 7 .8

9 0 .0
9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6

132 .4
132 .6
1 32 .7
132 .8
133 .0

134 .6
134 .7
134 .9
135 .0
1 35 .2

140.6
140 .6
141 .0
141 .0
1 41 .2

1 29 .4
129.8
129.6
129 .5
1 30 .0

1 29 .5
1 29 .4
129 .7
130 .3
1 30 .0

12 9 .2
129 .8
1 2 9 .8
1 2 9 .8
12 9 .8

115 .7
115 .9
11 5 .9
115 .9
115.9

124.6
124 .6
124 .6
125.3
125.3

11 1 .8
1 11 .6
112.3
11 2 .6
11 2 .6

129 ,5
1 3 0 .0
130. 0
1 30 .0
1 3 0 .0

1943: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h . ........................... ..
J u n e . ..................................
S e p t e m b e r . .......... ..........
D e c e m b e r ........................

1 2 5 .6
124 .5
1 2 5 .4
126 .3
1 2 7 .9

1 3 0 .9
1 30 .5
1 30 .9
131 .3
1 31 .7

1 3 8 .2
137 .8
13 7 .8
1 38 .8
1 3 8 .8

9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6

1 39 .4
135 .9
1 4 0 .4
141 .7
142 .7

1 36 .8
135 .7
1 36 .5
1 3 7 .4
138 .7

1 4 3 .0
1 41 .8
1 42 .8
1 43 .8
144 .7

131.1
130. 5
1 30 .8
131.5
1 33 .0

131.3
1 30 .0
130 .9
1 3 1 .8
133 .6

1 3 0 .4
12 9 .8
1 2 9 .8
131 .3
131 .3

1 1 5 .5
115.9
1 1 5 .9
11 5 .9
113 .5

126 .8
127 .7
126.9
126 .9
127 .4

1944: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h ..............................
J u n e ................................
S e p t e m b e r . ....................
D e c e m b e r .........................

1 3 6 .4
1 29 .0
1 3 8 .4
1 4 0 .7
1 4 3 .0

1 33 .0
1 32 .5
132 .9
133.3
1 33 .7

139 .6
139.3
1 39 .8
139.8
1 39 .8

9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6

157.1
143 .6
160 .9
164.6
167 .8

153 .5
139 .7
158.1
161.1
1 63 .2

172 .7
145 .7
183 .3
18 6 .9
1 90 .0

136 .3
134.1
1 35 .8
1 38 .0
1 39 .5

1 36 .8
1 3 4 .2
136.3
1 3 9 .0
1 3 9 .9

1 6 7 .9
131 .3
1 65 .5
1 8 8 .4
2 1 4 .0

11 0 .8
111 .3
110 .3
110 .3
110 .3

127.4
127 .4
127 .4
127 .4
127 .4

1945: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h ................................
J u n e .......... ..........................
S e p t e m b e r .......................
D e c e m b e r .........................

14 5 .8
14 4 .5
14 5 .8
14 6 .8
1 4 8 .3

1 3 6 .2
1 35 .5
1 3 5 .2
137 .6
134 .6

143.3
1 4 1 .2
1 42 .8
1 45 .2
1 46 .0

9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2
9 0 .2

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 8 .6

1 7 2 .0
170.1
171 .8
173 .3
1 75 .4

167 .8
16 5 .7
167 .5
1 6 9 .2
171 .5

196 .0
1 92 .8
195 .5
19 8 .3
2 0 0 .9

142 .8
142.3
142.8
143 .3
145 .5

142 .7
1 41 .4
142 .6
143 .5
1 45 .0

2 1 9 .0
216. 7
2 1 9 .4
2 2 1 .2
2 2 1 .2

110 .6
110.3
110.3
110.3
1 12 .0

127 .7
127 .4
127 .4
127 .9
1 2 8 .4

1946: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h ..............................
J u n e ....................................
S e p t e m b e r .......................
D e c e m b e r ........................

1 5 9 .2
1 5 0 .2
156.1
1 65 .6
177 .1

1 4 4 .8
136 .5
1 47 .8
149.1
1 58 .0

151.4
144 .4
149 .6
152 .6
165.1

9 7 .9
9 0 .2
9 5 .2
9 7 .7
117 .7

106 .9
1 00 .0
104.1
1 06 .8
1 25 .7

1 8 5 .9
177.3
183.1
191 .6
199 .6

1 80 .9
173.5
1 8 0 .0
18 4 .8
192.1

2 1 0 .8
2 02 .6
2 1 0 .7
2 1 5 .3
221.1

155 .6
149 .0
154 .5
158.5
169.1

1 5 2 .0
145 .3
149 .8
1 56 .6
161 .6

2 30 .7
2 23 .0
2 24 .8
2 3 8 .5
2 44 .0

113 .3
1 12 .0
1 12 .0
1 12 .9
118 .1

145.6
129 .4
132 .0
169.2
182 .7

1947: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h ................... .............
J u n e ............ ......................
S e p t e m b e r .....................
D e c e m b e r ........................

1 8 4 .4
182 .3
1 82 .6
187.5
1 91 .4

1 65 .4
1 6 5 .8
163. 5
167 .1
167 .3

167 .5
175.1
176.1
1 6 3 .4
150 .7

127.7
122.7
129 .0
1 30 .9
133 .4

206 .7
205 .4
203 .5
2 0 8 .2
2 14 .8

200.3
198.5
197.1
2 0 2 .2
2 09 .0

223.1
225 .9
219 .0
2 22 .6
2 27 .0

183.6
177. 2
180.1
1 8 9 .2
197 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 05 .2

243 .9
2 4 4 .0
240 .3
243 2
2 49 .9

1 2 4 .2
120. 7
120 .7
12 o! 8
1 33 .8

182 .0
185.3
180.1
179 .6
180.6

1948: A v e r a g e .............................
M a r c h ..................... ..........
J u n e . . ................................
S e p t e m b e r .......................
D e c e m b e r .........................

195 .8
194 .9
194 .8
198.1
198 .6

175 .9
1 7 3 .2
174.3
17 9 .6
181.1

161 .6
1 58 .7
161.6
165 .6
165 .6

134.3
134 .6
134 .0
134.6
134 .6

2 26 .8
2 22 .6
2 27 .8
231 .3
231 .0

2 21 .8
2 1 6 .9
2 2 3 .2
2 26 .9
226 .3

233.1
2 32 .4
2 3 2 .2
235.1
2 3 5 .9

2 17 .0
207 .8
2 20 .8
225. 2
2 22 .5

115 .0
110 .8
116.3
1 19 .0
118 .7

2 5 3 .5
253. 7
2 53 .7
2 5 3 .7
2 5 4 .7

1 4 5 .0
142. 5
1 43 .4
1 4 8 .7
151 .3

184.8
185.7
184 .7
1 84 .7
185.7

♦September 1947 = 100.




i3 3 .8
140 .6

- ............ -

168.6
172 .4

For other footnotes see p. 79.

—

1 8 7 .8
1 9 4 .4

198 .7
1 9 4 .4
io o .o
102 .5
9 5 .2
9 9 .6
9 4 .4
9 2 .0
9 1 .1

73

APPENDIX TABLES

T able F .— H ousefurnishings : Indexes o f R etail P rices o f Selected A rticles Purchased by M oderateIncom e F am ilies in L arge C ities o f the U nited States, 1935-48 1— C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

Period *

Din­
nerSew­ Wash­ Vacu­ Refrig­ Refrig­ Refrig­
era­
era­ Stoves, ware,
era­
um
ing
ing
53tors, tors, cook,
clean­ tors,
ma­
ma­
piece
gas
gas
elec­
chines chines ers
ice
set
tric
94.8
94.6
95.0
94.8

1935* Average___________

95.7
95.2
95.6
95.6
95.9
96.2

January.....................

100.9

91.3
90.5
90.9
92.1
95 5
93.6
93.8
95.7
97.3
97.5
1 0 2 .8

March ___________
10C. 9
O f
101 5
December................ . 103.9

99.9
102.4
105.5
106.4

A

106.4
106.9
106.6
106
105.4

1 0 0 .1

1

June.

_-----------------

December..................

104 0
104.2
104.4
104 3
103.0
1 0 2 .8

102.3
103 2
102.7
D e c e m b e r.................... . 103.0
1

Q A A V TlP (T ................................... 101.3
* A TcP age
9 A
IVTor/»Vj --XVIal CU ---------------J lin e __________________ 100.9
1

1 0 1 .1

ftpptpm L or
Pp.pflTti L or

1 0 1 .1

101.9

2

104.3
105 0
103.8
103.5
104.6

97.0
96.9
97.1
97.3

97.0
96.9
97.1
97.3

91.4
90.9
91.3
92.0

94.5
93.8
93.8
95.9

94.7
93.9
94.5
95.8

99.1
99.9
99.1
98.6
98.9
99.4

92.9
92.9
92 9
92.9
92.9
92.9

95.6
86.7
95.4
95.5
95.3
95.2

95.4
96.7
95.1
95.2
95.1
95.0

93.2
92.0
92.6
93.2
93. 9
94.3

96.7
95.9
95.9
95.9
97.9
97.9

96.2
95.8
95.5
95.8
96.4
97.6

IC . 5
O
100.9
100.9
99.0
100.4
101.5

100.4
99.5
99.9

102.3
107.1
107.1

1 0 2 .8

.
102.7

105.3
104.1
104.1
108.2
108.2

104.8
105.4
106.1
106.1

1 0 2 .1

101.9
98.9
102.9
104.0
105.6

103.9

1 0 0 .0

101.3
100.9
101.9

1 0 1 .6

1 0 0 .6

1 0 2 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

104.5
104.6
104.8
104.7
104.7

105.3
105. 7
105.1
105.1
104.9

104.1
106.2
104.1

101.3
100.5

104.7
104.8
104.9
104.9
104.9

99.9

1 0 0 .0

101.5

1 0 1 .8

105.9
104.9
106.3
106.3
106.7

99.5
99.3
99.5
99.8

92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9

1 0 1 .0

1 0 0 .0

99.8
.
99.5

1 0 0

0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .2

1 0 2 .1

101.5
101.4
98.9
95.8
96.1
96.0
96.0
93.3

104.2
104.3
104*
1013
103.8

98.3
98.5
98.5
98.1
97.5

112.4
106.4
109.8
117." 9

99.1
97.1
97.1
9 .* 5
9
105.4

106.5
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1

96.9
92.9
95.9
96.9
106.1

106.6
106.9

107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.1

1 08 .9
1 0 9 .2
1 0 9 .2
1 0 9 .2
1 0 9 .2

113.0
107.1
115.9
115.9

1 0 1 .1

100.5
1 0 1 .8
1 0 2

2

101.7
1 0 1 .8
1 0 1 .6

101.3

1 0 9 .2
1 0 9 .2

3

Blan­ Blan­ Blan­
Cur­ kets, kets, kets, Elec­
all- cotton tric
allTum­ Tow­ Sheets, tains,
mus­
cot­ wool, wool, and 5 light Brooms
blers,
els,
4
ton*
lin
glass bath
3 ^ percent bulbs
wool
lb.
lb.

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

8 8 . 8

88.7
8 8 .1

87.2
85.5

106.6
106. 5
106. 5
106.4
107.4

1 0 2 .1

103.9
106.1
108.4

1 0 2 .2
1 0 2 .0
1 0 1 .6

103.8

1 0 2 .0

99.8
99.2
99.0
.5

1 0 2 .8

107.7
100.4
99.6

1 0 2

102.5
97.1 —

1 0 0 .0

96.0
96.6
95.7
95.3
96.5

93.5
95.7
91.7
92.4
94.6

1 0 0 .1

1 0 2 .1

99.7

1 0 2 .1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .1

1 0 0 .0

103.1

100.9
101.5

117.3
127.9

111.3
104.1
112.4
114.4
119.6

1 33 .0
1 32 .9
133.3
133.3
133.1

103.0

97.8
98.9
105.4
115.2

105.7
97.5
101.9
115.3
123.6

123 .1
122 .7
1 23 .7
123 .7
1 23 .7

1 05 .8
106.1
106.1
106.1
106.1

131 .6
132 .6
132 .6
133.7
133.7

1 3 5 .8
134.3
135 .7
136 .8
1 3 9 .2

1 2 4 .5
123 .7
124 .7
1 2 4 .7
1 25 .7

106 .6
106.1
106.1
106.1
1 09 .0

1 43 .2
139.1
1 43 .4
145 .6
149 .9

1 27 .4
125 .7
127 .7
127 .7
1 29 .7

111 .4
109 .0
111 .9
111.9
114 .8

160 .9
1 56 .4
157 .5
166 .2
170 .5

194/5* A v e r a g e
M areh
June
S e p te m L e r
D ecem b er

15 4 .8
158 .0
157 .5
152 .8
151 .9

13 2 .8
129 .7
131 .7
134 .7
137 .7

11 8 .8
11 4 .8
120 .7
120 .7
120 .7

179 .0
173 .8
180 .3
183 .6
182 .5

1Q4R* A v e ra g e
M arch
Juno
S ep tem b er
D ecem b er

113 .7
127 .4

161 .4
153.3
1 57 .4
167 .7
178.3

147 .6
1 40 .7
1 4 6 .8
1 50 .8
1 58 .9

1 33 .4
1 32 .5
1 35 .4
1 3 5 .4
1 35 .4

2 03 .5
177.1
195 .6
2 19 .5
2 4 1 .2

1 36 .2
129 .0
1 3 2 .2
143 .4
1 46 .2

190.4
187.9
1 9 0 .2
192.6
198 .4

169 .8
1 6 9 .0
1 69 .0
172 .9
1 72 .9

235.3
2 46 .6
2 3 2 .5
226.1
2 33 .6

150.6
148.1
145 .9
154.3
1 5 8 .2

201 .7
200 .6
200 .8
202 .6
205.1

180 .8
178 .3
179 .9
181.4
1 8 9 .2

23 8 .7
2 3 4 .7
23 9 .0
2 4 3 .2
2 4 0 .0

1 2 0 .2

242 .3
2 4 2 .0
240.1
240 .1
2 49 .7
2 5 5 .8
2 5 6 .0
2 56 .9
2 5 6 .4
2 5 6 .4

S eptem ber............... .
D e c e m b e r____________
10A9* A V v K I g O — A T70T9<ra

__ . . . . . . . . .
XVJ.al C il-------- . . . . . ________

S eptem ber .............................
D e c e m b e r .................... ..
1Q43* A V v r ft w
I v l O » Xjlv p l digC . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M a rch
XVlcH b l l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S ep tem L er
D ecem b er
1944* A v e r a v e
TVTarph
XVJLcU b l i . .
.
June

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Septem ber
D ecem b er

107.4
109.3

1 2 2 .0

107.6
107.4 125 .5
107.4 1 25 .0
107.4 —
107.4

106.* 4
106.9
106 .9

108.2
107.4
108.6
108.6
108.6

1 08 .8
108. C
108 .6
109 .7
109 .7

1 08 .6
1 09 .8
109 .8

109 .7

1 1 7 .4
1 35 .4

14 5 .5
169.1

128.1
135 .5

S e p to m L or
D ecom L or

1 41 .4
1 3 7 .2
138.1
143 .6
152 .7

1 88 .4
179 .6
1 8 7 .2
1 95 .9
2 00 .5

139 .7
1 39 .0
1 4 1 .0
142 .0
137 .0

1948* A v e ra g e
M arch
Juno
S e p te m L e r
TJecem Ler
x /w C X U U v l

1 59 .0
1 54 .5
1 5 8 .2
1 6 2 .7
164 .5

2 0 2 .8
2 0 1 .2
1 9 8 .8
2 05 .6
2 0 8 .0

1 35 .2
135 .5
134.0
134.5
136 .5

1Q 47* XV VCX C C ---. —
XvT| • A
4
rg

M firp u
XVXclI vh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

J u n e.................................

* September 1947 = 100.




89.3
85.9
89.9
92.3
94.3
9 8 .4

115 .9

1 22 .7
1 24 .6
125.1

1 4 2 .8
154 .7

113 .0
1 18 .9

"l5 4 " 7 " " I 21. 9*
137 .8
1 5 4 .7

115.1
109. 5
1 1 2 .6

1 0 0 .6
1 0 1 .2
1 0 1 .8

1 38 .3
1 4 4 .2

1 0 2 .8

105.8
105.0

117.3

1 9 2 .2
1 6 4 .0
1 8 4 .8
2 0 7 .4
2 37 .6

1 0 2 .8

1 0 0 .0

99.8

1 2 1 .2

_________

For other footnotes see p . 79.

1 2 1 .2

13 0 .8
1 3 0 .8

1 3 8 .4
14 8 .0

1 48 .0
1 49 .9

157 .5
161 .3

16 7 .0
1 67 .0

102.3

107.0
107.0

116.6
120.5

127.3
129.5

1 4 0 .9
1 4 0 .9

143.1
1 5 2 .0

1 5 4 .2
1 5 8 .7

172 .1
174 .3

17 4 .3
1 7 6 .6

96.1

97.4
94.8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .6
1 0 0 .8

1 4 9 .2
143.1
1 4 6 .9
150.1
16 2 .8

1 0 1

101.4
101.4

1 0 0 .6

1 4 1 .4
141 .3
141.3
1 41 .9
141 .9

• A TcCnI i ©
« A v 7 V*ag(YA____________ 104.7
"A Qr/>ii
yr
.9
XVldt Cil-____________________

100.7
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .6

140.1
140.1
140.1
1 4 0 .7
1 4 0 .7

1 46 .2
14 0 .2
14 6 .0
148.1
157.0

1 0 0 .6

1 3 7 .4
1 39 .5
138 .9
1 39 .5
140.1

1y i
x Q41i

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .1

91.6
91.0
89.9
91.2
94.5 —

102.4

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .1

94.8
94.6
93.9
94.5
96.2

103.1

103.2

111.7 _________ ______ ______ ______
113.0
111.9
100.4
106.9 108.2 106.1 100.4
108.6 —

100.3
1 0 0 .6

99.0
101.4
98.6
97.3
98.6

1 0 0 .2

101.7

99.4
100.3
100.3

1 0 1 .1

1 1 1 .0

1 0 2 .1

1 0 1 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.4

95.9
99.9
94.8
90.5
93.4

1 0 1 .0

93.9

1 0 2 .6

103.8
105.5

96.4
97.6
94.8
95.4
95.7

1 0 2 .1

92.9

1 0 2 .6

102.9
104.2
102.7
101.5
101.5

1 0 2 .1

99 7
98.4
99.6

103.4
102.7
105.4
102.7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .6

99.4
99.7
99.2
99.1
99.1

1 0 0 .0

106.5
109.7

84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4

105.0
102.7
102.7
106.8

1 1 9 .4
1 1 9 .4

8 0 .7
8 4 .4
8 4 .4
7 6 .6
7 4 .0

1 1 6 .0
114 .9
1 1 6 .2
1 17 .6
1 1 7 .6

1 2 5 .7
1 2 5 .7

7 2 .0
7 2 .7
7 1 .4
7 1 .4
7 1 .4

1 3 1 .6
1 2 2 .9
1 2 8 .2
1 33 .5
1 53 .9

131 .9
1 3 5 .0

7 4 .3
7 2 .7
7 5 .3
7 5 .3
7 5 .3

179 .3
169 .6
1 8 6 .2
18 6 .2
1 8 6 .2

1 31 .0
1 3 1 .9

76 .1
7 5 .3
7 6 .6
7 6 .6
7 6 .6

1 8 6 .2
1 8 6 .2
1 86 .2
1 8 6 .2
1 8 6 .2

1 6 3 .2
1 7 8 .9

7 8 .4
7 6 .6
7 6 .6
8 0 .5
8 1 .8

1 8 8 .7
1 8 9 .0
1 8 6 .2
187 .6
1 94 .5

99.0

1 0 0 .6
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

101.4
101.4

1 1 0 .8

161 .4
1 60 .7

1 88 .6
1 90 .4
18 9 .0
184 .8
1 9 0 .4

1 60 .7
1 62 .9

194 .6
1 9 3 .2
1 9 4 .6
1 94 .6
198. 7

101.8
102.7
102.7
1 0 3 .4
9 7 .7

1 0 0 .0

89.6
99.1
85.8
84.3
84.2

8 1 .8
8 1 .8
lo o . 6
100.2

98.6
98.5
98.6
97.3
98.6

CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

74

T able G.— M iscellaneous : Indexes of Retail Prices of Selected Articles Purchased by Moderate-

Income Families in Large Cities of the United States, 1935-481
[1 93 5 -3 9 =

100, unless otherw ise indicated]
D e n tists’ fees

P h ysicia n s’ fees

P eriod*

A ll
A ll
m iscel­
ser­
lane­
vices,
ous
good s exclu d ­
ing
and
ser­
ren t
vices*

M e d i­
cal
care
and
drugs

M e d i­
cal
care,
exclu d ­
ing
drugs

Surgeons’ a n d
specialists’ fees

G eneral practitioners’
fees

T o ta l

O ffice
visits

H ouse
visits

Ob­
stetri­
cal
cases

T o ta l

T o ta l

A p p e n ­ T o n s il­
lec­
d e c­
tom y ,
to m y ,
adult
ch ild

T o ta l

F ill­
ings

E xtra c­
tion s

C lea n ­
ing
teeth

1935: A v era g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u l y . . . .............
O c to b e r............

98.1
98.1
98.2
97.9

99.5
99.7
99.4
99.3

99.0
98.9
99.0
99.0

98.9
98.8
99.0
98.9

99.3
9 0
99.3
99.3

99.3
99.3
99.3
99.2

99.6
99.7
99.7
99.4

99.1
98.9
99.1
99.1

98.9
98.8
98.8
99.2

99.3
99.2
99.2
99.5

99.4
99.2
99.2
99.7

99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4

98.4
98.2
98.6
98.4

97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8

98.5
98.3
98.9
98.3

98.8
98.4
99.1
98.9

1936: A vera g e............
J an u a ry...........
A p r il.................
J u l y . . . .............
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

98.7
98.2
9 8.4
98.7
99:0
99.1

99.0
99.2
99.3
98.7
Qg.8
99.1

99.3
99.2
99.2
99.2
99.3
99.6

99.3
99.1
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.7

99.9
99.6
99.9
99.9
99.9
100.2

99.9
99.6
99.9
99.9
99.9
100.2

99.8
99.7
99.7
99.7
99.7
100.1

100.2
99.6
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.5

99.3
99.2
99.2
99.2
99.2
99.6

99.6
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5
100.0

99.8
99.7
99.7
99.7
99.7
100.3

99.5
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
100.0

98.6
98.6
98.4
98.5
98.5
99.1

97.7
97.8
97.5
97.5
97.5
98.4

99.0
98.9
98.9
98.9
98.9
99.5

99.1
99.1
98.9
99.1
99.1
99.4

1937: A v era g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e ..................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r ____

101.0
100.2
100.9
101.7
102.0

100.0
99.3
100.0
100.4
100.8

100.3
100.1
100.3
100.5
100.7

100.4
100.3
100.4
100.7
100.7

100.3
100.2
100.3
100.3
100.3

100.3
100.2
100.3
100.3
100.4

100.2
100.1
100.2
100.2
100.2

100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5

99.9
99.6
99.6
100.0
100.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.9
100.6
101.0
101.5
101.1

101.2
101.1
101.4
101.8
101.6

100.6
100.1
100.7
101.3
100.7

100.7
100.3
100.8
101.3
100.8

1938: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e .................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

101.5
101.6
101.8
101.6
101.0

100.7
100.8
100.7
100.7
100.7

100.6
100.7
100.6
100.6
100.6

100.7
100.8
100.7
100.7
100.7

100.2
100.3
100.2
100.2
100.2

100.2
100.4
100.1
100.1
100.1

100.0
100.2
99.9
99.9
99.9

100.2
100.5
100.1
100.1
100.1

100.8
100.5
100.9
100.9
100.9

100.4
100.0
100.6
100.6
100.6

100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3

100.7
100.0
101.1
101.1
101.1

101.0
101.1
101.0
100.8
100.9

101.5
101.6
101.6
101.4
101.4

100.7
100.7
100.7
100.7
100.7

100.6
100.8
100.6
100.4
100.6

1939: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e __________
S eptem ber___
D e c e m b e r____

100.7
100.5
100.4
101.1
100.9

100.8
100.8
100.9
100.8
100.8

100.7
100.6
100.8
100.8
100.9

100.9
100.7
101.0
101,0
101.1

100.4
100.2
100.5
100.5
100.5

100.3
100.1
100.4
100.4
100.4

100.2
99.9
100.4
100.4
100.4

100.2
100.1
100.2
100.2
100.2

101.2
100.9
101.3
101.3
101.3

100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6

100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3

101.1
101.1
101.1
101.1
101.1

101.1
100.9
101.1
101.2
101.2

101.6
101.4
101.6
101.8
101.8

101.1
100.7
101.3
101.3
101.3

100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.6

1940: A vera g e............
M a r c h ...............
Ju n e...................
S eptem b er___
D ec em b er____

101.1
100.8
100.6
101.4
101.8

100.9
100.7
100.5
101.2
101.5

100.8
100.8
100.7
100.7
100.8

101.0
101.0
101.0
101.0
101.0

100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3

100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4

100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4

100.2
100.2
100.2
100.2
100.2

101.3
101.3
101.3
101.3
101.3

99.5
99.2
99.5
99.5
99.5

100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.3

98.5
98.3
98.3
98.3
98.3

101.1
101.1
101.1
101.0
101.0

101.8
101.8
101.8
101.8
101.8

100.8
100.7
100.7
100.7
100.7

100.5
100.6
100.6
100.4
100.4

1941: A vera g e ...........
M a r c h ..............
J u n e__________
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

104.0
101.9
103.3
105.0
107.7

102.1
101.4
101.6
102.3
103.9

101.4
100.9
101.2
101.7
102.3

101.6
101.2
101.4
101.8
102.5

100.7
100.5
100.6
100.8
101.1

100.7
100.5
100.6
100.7
101.0

100.5
100.4
100.4
100.5
100.7

100.2
100.2
100.2
100.3
100.3

103.2
102.6
103.4
103.4
104.8

100.5
100.3
100.3
100.6
101.4

101.5
101.4
101.4
101.4
102.5

99.2
98.9
98.9
99.5
100.1

101.5
101.2
101.4
101.9
102.0

102.4
102.3
102.3
102.5
102.7

101.1
100.7
100.7
101.3
101.9

101.0
100.4
100.9
101.5
101.5

1942: A v era g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e____ _____
S eptem ber___
D e c e m b e r____

110.9
110.1
110.9
111.4
112.8

106.7
105.7
106.6
107.5
108.3

104.2
103.1
104.0
105.1
105.9

104.6
103.2
104.2
105.7
106.5

102.9
101.4
102.5
104.1
104.9

102.9
101.3
102.4
104.1
104.7

102.4
101.1
102.0
103.4
103.7

102.2
100.7
101.8
103.3
104.0

107.7
105.2
106.5
109.8
111.1

103.3
101.7
102.8
103.7
106.2

104.4
102.5
104.8
105.3
105.9

101.9
100.7
100.7
101.8
106.4

104.1
102.9
103.9
105.1
105.8

105.7
105.1
105.1
107.1
107.6

103.0
101.9
102.5
103.7
105.0

103.0
101.6
103.3
103.9
104.5

1943: A v era g e...........
M a r c h ...............
J u n e .............. .
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

115.8
114.5
115.7
117.0
118.1

111.4
109.9
111.2
112.6
113.7

109.2
107.7
109.4
110.5
110.9

110.2
108.4
110.3
111.6
112.8

109.5
107.3
109.6
111.3
112.2

109.3
107.2
109.7
111.4
112.4

108.4
105.8
109.2
110.7
112.2

107.6
106.6
107.6
109.1
109.7

118.6
114.6
118.7
122.1
122.9

109.4
108.2
109.2
110.7
111.5

110.6
110.4
111.0
112.2
112.2

107.8
105.9
107.1
108.9
110.6

108.8
107.0
108.7
109.9
111.7

109.2
108.1
109.0
109.7
112.2

107.8
106.2
106.8
109.2
110.4

108.8
106.4
109.2
110.2
111.6

1944: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e ..................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

121.3
119.1
121.7
122.4
123.1

116.8
114.8
117.5
118.1
118.3

112.6
111.8
112.5
113.2
113.8

114.6
113.8
114.5
115.3
115.9

113.9
113.1
113.7
114.6
115.2

114.0
113.2
113.7
114.7
115.3

113.8
113.1
113.3
114.5
115.5

111.4
110.5
111.3
112.3
112.4

123.8
123.3
123.7
124.1
124.9

113.6
112.9
113.7
114.3
114.9

114.5
113.9
114.5
115.1
115.7

112.8
111.8
112.9
113.5
114.1

114.8
113.8
115.0
115.6
116.6

113.8
113.1
114.2
114.4
114.9

115.1
113.5
114.7
117.2
117.2

115.2
114.2
115.4
115.7
117.4

1945: A vera g e...........
M a r c h ..............
J u n e . ...............
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

124.1
123.6
124.0
124.6
124.8

119.3
118.8
119.2
119.9
120.0

115.3
114.7
115.2
115.7
116.7

117.7
116.9
117.5
118.1
119.3

116.6
115.9
116.5
116.8
118.3

116.6
116.1
116.4
116.6
118.2

117.2
116.6
116.8
117.2
119.5

113.3
113.0
113.3
113.3
113.9

126.1
125.3
125.7
126.1
128.6

116.9
115.2
117.1
117.7
119.1

118.2
116.3
119.1
119.1
119.7

115.7
114.1
115.2
116.3
118.5

119.7
118.6
119.5
120.8
121

.7

118.8
117.7
118.6
120.2
120.7

121.4
119.7
122.2
122.8
122.8

119.5
118.6
118.9
120.1
121.7

1946: A v era g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e .................
S eptem ber___
D e c e m b e r ........

128.8
125.9
127.9
129.9
136.1

123.6
121.3
123.2
125.1
127.5

121.6
118.5
120.9
123.7
126.4

124.8
121.3
124.2
127.2
130.1

122.4
119.2
121.3
124.6
127.4

122.4
119.0
121.1
124.8
127.8

123.5
119.9
121.5
126.4
129.7

118.0
115.0
117.3
119.9
122.5

133.7
129.9
133.3
135.8
139.2

122.3
120.2
122.4
123.8
124.9

122.4
119.7
123.1
124.2
124.2

122.3
120.7
121.8
123.5
125.7

126.9
123.2
127.3
128.6
132.1

127.3
122.3
128.3
130.1
132.6

128.4
125.3
129.0
129.6
133.3

125.8
122.9
125.7
126.7
130.8

1 9 4 7 ! A vo.raprA

139.9
138." 2
139.1
140.8
144.4

129 9
128.9
129.5
130.6
132.3

131.6
129.8
131.3
133.4
134.7

135.3
133.5
135.0
137.1
138.4

130.2
129.3
129.9
131.3
131.9

130.3
129.6
130.0
131.3
131.7

131.5
131.0
131.7
132.0
132.3

125.3
124.8
124.8
126.5
126.6

143.7
141.3
142.6
145.9
148.0

129.4
127.4
129.1
131.2
132.5

128.2
125.9
128.7
129.7
130.7

130.7
129.0
129.6
132.8
134.4

137.4
135.5
136.9
139.6
140.5

137.7
135.6
137.7
140.0
140.2

139.0
136.4
137.6
141.5
144.2

149.9
146.2
147.5
152.7
154.0

137.3
134.1
136.1
140.3
142.1

140.1
137.6
140.3
142.1
143.3

144.4
141.5
144.6
146.6
147.9

135.5
133.1
136.2
136.9
137.5

135.2
132.8
136.1
136.6
137.3

136.9
133.3
138.4
138.7
139.5

128.5
127.7
128.5
129.2
129.8

153.4
149.7
155.1
155.5
155.9

135.8
133.6
135.9
137.8
137.8

133.1
131.2
132.8
134.8
134.8

138.7
136.0
139.3
140.9
140.9

144.8
141.7
143.6
147.5
149.1

145.1
141.7
144.0
148.0
150.1

146.8
144.5
145.7
149.3
149.7

M a r c h ..............
J u n e ..................
S eptem ber___
D e c e m b e r____
194ft* A

M a r c h ..............
J n n fi

S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

See footnotes on p. 79.




134.6
135.6

APPENDIX TABLES

75

T able G.— M iscellaneous : Indexes of Retail Prices of Selected Articles Purchased by Moderate-

Income Families in Large Cities o f the United States, 1935— 8 1 Continued
4 —
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

See footnotes on p . 79,




CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

76

T able G.— M iscellaneous : Indexes o f R etail P rices o f Selected A rticles P urchased b y M oderateIncom e F am ilies in L arge C ities o f the U nited States, 1 9 3 5 -4 8 1— C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
R ecreation

H ou seh old operation
L a u n d r y soap
P e r io d 2
T o ta l

Laun­
dry
bun­
dle
ser­
vices

R esi­
dential D o m e s­
tele­
tic
ser­
p hon e
ser­
vices
vices

N ew spapers

T o ta l

Laun­
d ry
soap,
ye l­
lo w

Laun­
d ry
soap,
granu­
lated

Cleanser,
Laun­
scour­
dry
ing
starch
pow ­
der

M a tc h ­
T o ile t
es,
paper
k itch en

T o ta l
T o ta l

D a ily
D a ily ,
and
sold
Sun­
on
d a y, d e ­
street
livered

S un­
day,
s old
on
street

1935: A v era g e ...........
M a r c h .......... .
J u ly ....... ...........
O c to b e r............

100.4
100.4
100.5
100.2

100.5
101.4
100.9
99.1

101.2
101.2
101.2
101.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

99.5
98.6
99.7
100.4

101.4
99.9
101.8
103.0

100.0
99.8
100.0
100.3

101.6
101.8
101.8
101.4

99.6
98.6
99.9
100.6

99.4
98.5
99.6
100.1

101.1
101.1
101.1
101.3

96.7
96.6
96.5
97.0

95.4
95.2
95.2
95.8

94.7
94.4
94.4
95.2

95.0
94.9
94.9
95.1

100.0
100.6
100.0
100.0

1936: A vera g e...........
J an u ary............
A p r il.................
J u ly ...................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r ____

99.6
100.1
99.7
99.4
99.4
99.4

98.0
98.9
98.2
97.6
97.7
97.7

100.8
101.3
101.2
100.5
100.5
100.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

99.7
100.1
99.6
99.6
99.6
99.7

100.2
101.8
100.3
99.9
99.2
99.9

99.5
99.5
99.8
99.5
99.5
99.0

100.5
101.1
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4

100.0
100.6
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9

99.8
100.1
99.6
99.6
99.6
100.1

100.5
101.1
100.6
100.6
100.3
100.1

97.4
97.1
97.1
97.2
97.4
98.3

96.5
95.8
96.2
96.1
97.1
97.1

96.3
95.2
95.9
95.9
97.2
97.2

95.4
95.1
95.1
95.1
95.7
95.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1937: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e .................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

100.2
99.7
100.1
100.7
100.7

100.0
98.9
99.6
101.4
101.6

99.4
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

101.4
100.8
101.7
101.7
102.0

101.7
101.1
101.8
101.8
102.6

100.3
99.8
100.6
100.8
100.8

100.3
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.0

101.6
101.3
101.9
101.9
101.9

101.6
101.2
101.7
102.2
102.2

100.1
99.8
100.3
100.3
100.1

100.2
99.6
100.3
100.6
101.6

98.5
97.7
98.0
99.0
100.3

99.1
98.1
98.5
100.0
101.4

96.5
95.9
95.9
96.8
98.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1938: A vera g e............
M a r c h . . . .........
J u n e .................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

100.2
100.4
100.3
100.0
99.7

101.0
100.9
101.1
101.0
100.5

99.5
99.4
99.5
99.5
99.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.6
101.5
ICO. 7
100.0
99.4

99.8
101.5
99.2
98.8
98.1

100.3
100.6
100.3
100.0
100.0

99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.0

100.5
101.3
100.6
99.9
99.3

100.6
101.2
100.6
100.1
99.6

99.8
100.1
100.1
99.3
99.3

102.5
101.8
103.1
102.7
102.9

103.7
101.2
104.9
105.0
105.3

103.9
102.7
104.5
104.8
105.3

104.9
98.5
108.4
108.0
108,0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1939: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e ..................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

99.4
99.6
99.4
99.2
99.3

100.5
100.5
100.6
100.5
100.6

99.3
99.4
99.1
99.4
99.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

98.6
99.1
98.6
98.0
98.2

97.1
97.7
97.3
96.5
96.1

99.7
100.0
99.5
99.2
100.3

98.4
99.0
98.6
97.9
97.5

98.4
99.3
98.6
97.9
97.3

98.5
99.0
98.5
98.5
97.4

98.6
98.8
98.5
98.2
98.8

103.4
102.9
102.6
104.3
104.2

105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8

106.2
106.3
106.3
106.3
106.3

108.0
108.0
108.0
108.0
108.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1940: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e ..................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

99.2
99.2
99.2
99.1
99.1

100.5
100.2
100.5
100.5
100.5

99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4

102.8
100.0
103.2
103.2
107.5

97.1
97.8
97.4
96.5
96.1

95.4
95.7
95.3
95.0
94.6

98.5
99.5
99.2
97.4
96.6

97.7
97.9
97.9
97.5
97.5

96.6
97.3
96.0
95.0
97.3

97.1
97.4
96.9
97.4
96.5

99.6
99.5
99.5
99.8
100.1

105.9
104.1
104.2
108.0
108.6

107.0
106.2
107.0
107.7
107.8

107.9
106.9
108.0
108.6
108.9

109.3
108.4
108.9
110.4
110.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1941: A vera g e............
M a r c h _______
J u n e ______
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

100.9
98.9
99.6
101.7
105.3

102.9
100.5
101.1
103.8
108.7

99.9
99.2
98.8
98.8
104.7

111.3
107.0
110.8
111.8
119.4

99.8
95.4
97.3
103.6
106.3

96.8
94.3
95.0
97.7
102.2

101.9
96.0
99.5
107.3
108.6

98.0
97.9
99.0
97.5
97.5

97.0
96.0
96.6
98.6
96.6

99.6
96.5
97.4
99.6
109.0

100.2
99.5
99.8
101.3
101.3

108.8
108.2
108.5
108.7
110.3

108.3
107.8
108.4
108.5
108.5

109.6
108.9
109.8
109.9
109.9

110.5
110.4
110.4
110.6
110.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1942: A vera g e............
M a rch
J u n e ..................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

107.6
107.1
107.6
108.1
109.0

110.6
109.9
110.7
111.1
111 1

105.4
1017
104.7
104.7
108.6

130.4
122.6
124.7
139.2
143.0

110.3
109.9
110.9
110.9
111.0

106.4
106.0
106.8
107.2
107.5

112.5
112.3
113.1
113.1
113.1

98.7
98.6
98.6
99.0
99.3

97.9
98.6
98.6
97.3
97.3

113.1
112.7
113.7
113.7
114.3

107.5
108.0
108.5
107.7
108.2

113.0
111.8
112.4
113.3
116.8

112.7
111.0
112.6
114.2
115.0

114.7
113.0
114.3
116.3
117.5

115.2
113.0
115.8
117.0
117.4

101.0
100.4
100.8
101.6
102.0

1943: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e .......... .......
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

112.9
110.0
111.6
112.7
114.8

114.7
112.8
113.4
114.9
119.8

108.6
108.6
108.6
108.6
108.6

173.8
154.2
177.0
186.5
193.4

113.2
111.4
113.0
114.2
115.9

109.9
107.5
109.0
111.4
112.9

115.2
113.6
115.2
115.7
118.1

103.2
99.3
103.6
105.6
107.0

97.3
97.3
97.3
97.3
97.3

116.3
114.3
116.4
117.3
118.9

109.8
109.5
109.8
110.0
111.5

120.9
119.6
121.0
122.2
123.1

121.4
120.4
122.3
122.5
123.0

126.2
125.0
127.5
127.5
128.3

120.5
119.4
121.0
121.0
121.0

104.8
104.1
104.1
105.4
105.4

1944: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e ..................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

117.9
116.2
118.5
118.8
119.5

122.8
122.2
122.6
123.2
123.5

111.9
108.6
113.6
113.6
113.6

221.5
209.3
223.3
228.1
241.3

116.4
116.6
116.6
116.3
116.3

113.5
113.3
114.1
113.3
113.3

119.0
119.7
118.9
118.9
118.9

108.7
107.0
109.4
109.7
109.7

98.2
97.3
98.6
98.6
99.3

118.9
118.4
118.9
118.9
119.4

111.8
111.5
111.8
112.1
111.8

129.4
124.7
130.8
132.1
133.6

125.9
123.4
125.7
127.7
128.6

130.9
128.7
131.7
131.7
133.2

125.3
121.4
122.6
130.1
130.1

106.4
105.8
107.0
107.0
107.0

1945: A vera g e............
M a r c h ..............
J u n e .................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

120.6
119.8
120.4
121.3
121.5

124.7
123.6
124.9
125.6
125.8

113.6
113.6
113.6
113.6
113.6

257.7
247.9
253.2
269.4
289.8

116.7
116.5
116.5
116.8
117.2

114.5
113.7
114.1
114.9
116.1

119.2
119.2
119.2
119.2
119.5

109.8
109.7
109.7
109.7
110.0

99.2
98.6
99.3
99.3
99.3

120.5
120.4
120.9
120.9
120.9

112.4
112.1
112.4
112.7
112.7

134.7
134.3
134.8
135.3
135.0

129.4
129.1
129.5
129.5
130.6

134.1
134.0
134.3
134.3
135.2

130.5
130.1
130.5
130.5
132.5

107.3
107.0
107.4
107.4
107.4

1946: A vera g e............
M a rch
J u n e ........
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

126.5
122.4
123.2
125.9

11
4 .2

131.7
128.9
129.6
132.1
141.3

113.6
113.6
113.6
113.6
113.6

274.5
275.5
275.5
273.2
275.9

125.3
116.9
118.6
123.0
181.7

131.4
116.1
121.5
133.9
199.7

125.6
120.3
120.5
121.5
171.0

111.6
110.0
109.6
112.8
120.8

106.8
98.6
101.2
115.8
118.5

120.8
120.4
119.9
120.9
124.0

121.9
112.5
115.9
125.7
145.1

139.2
135.9
137.6
141.3
146.3

134.2
131.2
134.2
135.6
140.6

139.5
136.1
139.6
141.0
145.9

135.2
132.5
135.7
137.3
138.7

110.8
108.2
110.7
111.5
119.3

1947: A v e r a g e ..
M arch
J u n e ..................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

144.4
142.3
143.5
143. 5
151.6

144.2
141.2
143.5
145.7
149.1

115.6
114.0
114.2
117.8
117.8

278.5
272.3
280.5
281.2
281.9

180.3
181.1
177.9
169.4
198.8

198.7
199.0
202.5
188.6
208.8

166.1
168.1
159.3
154.3
188.7

127.7
130.1

115.1
117.1

130.3
132.9

166.0
157.8
166.6
170.7
181.4

149.5
148.6
148.9
150.1
152.1

145.4
146.6

123.1
123.1

1948: A verage
M a r c h ..............
J u n e ..................
S eptem b er___
D e c e m b e r____

151.2
152.2
150.0
150.4
152.7

153.0
151.0
151.4
152.9
160.7

121.5
120.6
120.9
122.7
123.6

282.4
281.9
282.6
282.6
282.6

185.2
193.2
181.8
179.9
179.6

194.7
208.5
191.4
187.7
185.8

175.7
181.2
172.4
171.5
172.2

187.4
188.8
188.8
188.0
185.7

156.6
153.3
155.6
159.3
161.4

145.9
161.5
161.5
169.5

148.0
149.9
152.6
152.6

See footnotes on p. 79.




145.8
147.4

152.7
163.9
165.5
169.4

151.9
150.9
153.1
153.1
153.9
165.2
156.6
167.8
169.9
172.6

APPENDIX TABLES

77

T able G.— M iscellaneous : Indexes o f R etail P rices o f Selected A rticles Purchased by M oderateIncom e F am ilies in L arge C ities o f th e U nited States, 1 9 3 5 -4 8 1— C ontinued
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

Personal care

Recreation—Continued
Motion picture admissions

Chil­
dren

Cigar­
ettes

Beauty shop services

Tobacco products

Period*
Total

Adults

Total

Cigars

Pipe
to­
bacco

Total

Men’s
hair
cuts

Total

Wom­
en’s
hair
cuts

Sham­
poo
and
wave
set

Perma­
nent
waves

1935: Average.........
March............
July................
October..........

95.7
95.1
95.4
96.6

95.5
94.9
95.2
96.4

96.6
95.8
96.2
97.5

97.9
98.2
97.8
97.8

102.7
107.0
101.1
99.3

96.7
96.3
96.8
97.3

101.8
103.2
101.8
100.4

94.9
95.7
94.2
94.6

92.8
93.8
91.7
92.5

92.9
93.0
93.0
93.1

94.4
94.4
94.4
95.0

92.9
9.30
93.0
93.0

91.9
92.0
92.0
92.0

1936: Average.........
January.........
April..............
July................
September___
December......

97.7
97.0
97.2
97.5
97.6
99.4

97.5
96.8
96.9
97.3
97.4
99.4

98.5
98.2
98.2
98.5
98.5
99.1

97.6
97.6
97.5
97.5
97.5
97.8

98.6
98.4
98.4
98.4
98.7
99.3

97.2
97.3
97.2
97.2
97.0
97.4

99.5
99.9
99.5
99.5
99.2
99.2

96.1
94.7
96.2
95.7
96.5
97.2

93.7
92.0
94.1
93.0
94.1
95.0

94.5
92.1
94.7
93.8
95.2
96.5

95.2
93.3
94.4
94.4
96.0
97.6

94.6
92.3
95.5
93.7
95.1
96.5

94.0
91.4
94.0
93.7
94.7
95.9

1937: Average..........
March............
June..............
September___
December___

101.3
99.8
101.6
101.6
103.9

101.3
99.7
101.6
101.6
104.0

101.1
99.8
101.4
101.4
103.3

100.3
100.2
100.5
100.6
100.7

99.6
99.6
99.6
99.6
99.9

100.5
100.6
100.9
100.9
101.0

99.1
98.8
99.2
99.2
99.2

101.7
98.8
102.2
103.4
105.0

101.9
96.8
102.7
104.9
107.6

102.2
98.2
102.7
104.3
107.0

100.6
98.7
100.9
101.9
103.1

102.6
98.3
103.0
104.8

m3

102.8
97.9
103.8
105.3
108.3

1938: Average.........
M arch...........
June________
September___
December___

103.4
103.8
103.2
103.0
103.4

103.5
103.9
103.3
103.1
103.4

102.7
103.0
102.4
102.4
102.7

101.1
100.7
101.8
101.1
101.0

99.8
100.2
100.2
99.3
99.3

101.5
100.9
102.2
101.5
101.4

100.1
100.2
100.2
100.2
100.2

104.0
104.0
103.8
103.8
103.8

105.6
105.9
105.3
105.4
105.4

105.1
105.3
104.8
104.8
105.0

102.0
101.9
101.9
101.9
101.9

105.9
106.2
105.5
105.5
105.8

106.4
106.7
106.0
106.0
106.3

1939: Average.........
March
June...............
September . . .
December___

101.9
103.0
101.7
101.2
101.0

102.0
103.1
101.7
101.4
101.0

101.1
102.4
101.4
99.5
100.4

102.9
101.1
101.2
105.5
105.4

99.1
99.3
99.0
99.0
99.0

103.8
101.5
101.7
107.0
107.0

99.7
100.2
99.7
99.7
99.0

103.6
103.5
103.7
103.5
103.4

105.9
105.4
106.5
105.9
106.1

105.3
104.8
104.8
105.8
106.3

107.9
107.4
107.4
109.6
110.1

103.9
103.3
103.3
104.0
104.8

105.0
104.7
104.7
105.0
105.3

1940: Average.........
March
June..............
September___
December___

104.3
100.9
100.9
108.2
110.2

104.6
100.9
100.9
108.7
110.7

102.1
100.4
100.4
105.0
104.1

106.1
104.9
104.8
107.8
107.7

98.8
99.0
98.7
98.7
98.7

108.1
106.4
106.4
110.2
110.2

98.5
98.5
98.5
98.5
98.5

103.4
103.7
103.6
103.1
103.1

105.6
105.8
106.1
105.3
105.0

105.9
106.6
106.1
105.0
105.6

109.1
110.1
109.6
107.9
108.5

103.8
104.8
103.6
102.6
104.0

105.9
106.3
106.3
105.7
105.3

1941: Average..........
March
June..............
September___
December___

109.8
109.1
109.9
109.2
111. 5

110.3
109.6
110.5
109.7
111.3

106.4
105.4
105.4
105.4
112.2

108.1
107.5
107.4
108.3
110.0

98.6
98.4
98.7
98.7
98.4

110.9
109.9
109.7
111.0
113.1

98.6
98.5
98.5
98.5
98.8

106.1
103.6
103.8
108.1
111.7

107.6
105.0
104.5
110.0
113.4

110.4
107.2
108.2
113.5
116.0

114.5
111.2
111.2
119.9
119.3

111.5
107.2
109.4
114.4
120.0

107.0
105.0
105.3
108.9
110.6

1942: Average..........
March............
June________
September___
December___

115.7
114.1
116.0
116.7
118.5

116.0
114.1
116.2
117.0
118.9

113.9
113.5
114.1
114.1
114.8

111.2
110.3
110.1
110.3
116.3

101.6
98.4
98.4
98.4
117.7

114.2
113.3
113.1
113.4
118.5

99.1
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.9

116.4
114.4
115.8
118.4
119.9

120.3
116.0
118.1
124.7
127.3

121.8
118.9
121.3
123.3
126.6

124.9
121.5
125.3
127.5
128.6

128.7
125.0
127.5
130.4
135.7

113.8
111.8
113.1
114.5
117.4

1943: Average..........
March
June...............
September___
December___

126.0
123.1
126.1
128.6
130.1

126.3
123.5
126.8
129.2
130.7

121.5
119.8
121.4
123.7
124.4

116.9
116.5
116.5
117.2
118.0

122.6
120.7
121.0
123.4
129.1

118.8
118.5
118.5
119.1
119.5

100.0
99.9
99.9
100.1
99.9

128.3
124.1
127.9
132.0
133.7

139.7
134.5
138.0
145.4
148.2

144.2
133.8
145.6
153.0
156.6

137.4
131.3
136.1
145.4
145.9

160.8
144.5
161.7
172.6
178.9

133.2
125.7
136.5
139.7
142.5

1944: Average..........
March
June...............
September___
December___

145.7
134.1
151.7
152.2
152.2

147.2
135.1
151.7
152.2
152.2

145.3
128.0
151.7
152.0
152.3

120.0
118.6
118.9
120.7
123.4

140.5
134.8
135.4
144.4
156.7

120.5
119.5
119.7
120.9
122.9

100.3
99.9
100.1
100.8
100.8

137.4
134.7
138.0
139.1
139.7

150.7
148.6
150.7
152.2
152.7

165.4
159.8
166.0
168.9
171.0

152.2
147.4
151.7
155.0
157.1

193.4
185.3
194.9
198.2
200.0

147.8
143.8
148.2
150.7
153.0

1945: Average_____
March
June________
September___
December___

153.2
152.6
153.1
153.6
153.6

153.1
152.6
152.9
153.5
153.5

1,53.9
152.3
154.6
154.3
154.3

124.9
124.5
125.1
125.8
124.6

165.6
163.6
165.7
169.3
170.8

123.2
123.2
123.5
123.7
121.7

104.0
102.7
104.1
104.8
106.8

141.7
140.5
141.4
142.9
143.4

156.1
154.0
155.8
158.1
158.4

175.8
172.8
175.2
177.9
180.1

164.5
157.1
162.6
169.7
173.0

204.3
203.2
203.9
205.0
206.8

156.9
154.6
156.8
158.4
160.3

1946: Average.........
March
June..... .........
September___
December___

157.7
156.0
156.7
159.1
163.7

157.8
156.2
156.7
159.2
164.0

156.7
154.6
155.9
157.9
161.2

129.1
121.5
128.4
132.1
137.4

184.0
172.6
173.5
197.2
205.6

125.1
120.8
122.9
127.0
132.6

112.4
111.0
112.2
114.1
115.5

152.0
144.2
150.7
153.7
167.4

173.8
159.9
177.8
180.8
186.0

186.1
181.1
184.2
189.8
193.6

179.4
173.0
175.7
182.8
191.0

214.6
208.2
211.7
220.2
224.4

164.4
161.5
164.3
166.5
167.1

1947: Average.........
March............
June..............
September___
December___

165.0
165.4
163.5

160.6
162.5
158.5
161.0

140.3
138.4
139.3
141.9
142.9

207.2
207.7
206.8
206.8
207.7

135.8
133.3
134.6
138.0
138.8

117.8
117.9
117.9
117.2
119.8

169.7
169.2
168.7
168.7
174.8

188.0
186.3
186.3
188.5
193.4

192.8
192.6
192.6
193.8
193.4

187.2
187.2

166.9

165.1
165.7
164.1
164.1
167.5

224.8
224.1
224.4
226.8
223.5

167.2
167.4
167.1
167.1
169.4

1948: Average_____
March
June...............
September___
December___

166.7
166.8
165.4
165.7
169.9

167.8
167.7
166.4
167.1
171.0

159.7
160.0
159.4
157.3
162.8

146.7
143.9
143.9
150.9
150.9

212.5
207.1
206.8
219.7
220.9

143.0
140.0
140.2
147.3
147.2

120.5
120.0
120.0
121.2
121.2

176.4
175.7
174.4
177.6
179.4

201.2
197.6
197.6
205.1
210.4

192.6
194.6
191.9
191.8
191.5

225.2
224.7
225.6
225.6
225.9

166.1
170.6
164.
164.
163.

See footnotes on p . 79.




CONSUMERS’ PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

78

T able G.— M iscellaneous : Indexes o f R etail P rices o f Selected A rticles Purchased by M oderateIncom e F am ilies in L arge C ities o f the U nited States, 1 9 3 5 -4 8 1 C ontinued
—
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

Personal care—Continued

Transportation

Toilet goods

Automobiles

Period *
Toilet Shav­ Tooth
soap,
ing
Total float­ cream paste
ing

Face Cleans­ Sani­ Razor Toilet Total
tary
soap,
ing
pow­
hardder cream nap­ blades milled
kins

Total Chev- Fords Plymrolets
ouths

Tires Tubes Gaso­
line

M o­
tor
oil

1935: Average...........
Mar.................
July.................
O ct.................

97.3
98.3
96.5
96.6

92.7
92.8
92.0
92.8

100.2
101.7
100.1
98.5

100.6
103.5
98.4
98.7

100.1
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.5
100.8
100.8
99.7

95.0
94.4
94.4
96.4

96.8
97.5
96.2
96.2

92.6
92.9
92.2
92.5

98.4
98.4
99.1
97.6

96.7
96.5
96.6
96.7

97.2
96.8
97.0
97.1

96.1
96.0
96.3
96.4

96.9
96.8
96.9
97.1

94.4
96.2
94.5
92.2

94.2
96.4
93.9
91.4

97.0
97.1
99.5
94.0

97.4
97.4
99.9
94.5

1936: Average...........
Jan..................
Apr..................
July.................
Sept.................
Dec..................

98.4
97.7
98.2
98.6
98.6
99.0

96.1
93.5
94.9
96.7
97.4
97.7

100.0
99.3
100.1
100.1
100.1
100.1

100.0
100.8
101.3
99.5
98.9
99.1

100.6
101.5
101.5
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.4
100.2
99.7
100.8
100.8
100.8

97.0
95.4
95.4
98.2
98.2
98.2

97.2
97.5
96.8
96.8
96.8
98.8

96.0
93.2
94.7
96.5
97.5
97.9

99.3
98.4
99.1
99.7
99.6
99.6

97.6
97.6
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.5

99.5
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
97.8

96.1
95.6
95.9
95.9
95.9
97.4

97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2

93.8
92.5
91.9
93.8
94.5
96.9

93.7
93.9
91.4
93.9
93.9
96.4

100.7
96.1
99.1
102.8
102.7
102.7

100.8
96.5
99.1
103-0
102.7
102.7

1937: Average..........
Mar.................
June................
Sept.................
Dec..................

101.2
100.3
101.4
101.9
102.1

103.2
101.3
103.8
105.0
105.0

99.7
99.3
100.1
99.3
100.1

99.9
100.0
100.0
99.8
100.4

99.6
100.0
98.5
100.0
100.0

100.6
100.8
100.8
100.8
99.7

101.0
98.2
102.2
102.2
103.1

101.0
99.5
101.3
102.1
102.1

103.1
101.1
103.6
105.0
105.0

101.0
100.5
100.7
101.5
102.1

99.5
97.6
97.7
100.6
104.6

100.3
98.0
98.2
102.1
105.2

99.4
97.4
97.4
100.6
104.2

98.6
97.2
97.4
97.4
104.5

103.9
102.0
105.7
104.6
107.0

102.9
101.2
103.7
103.7
106.2

105.0
105.4
105.7
106.0
103.3

105.3
105.5
105.9
106.2
103.6

1938: Average...........
M ar.................
June
Sept.................
Dec..................

102.1
102.1
102.2
102.1
101.9

104.9
104.6
105.3
105.0
104.6

100.1
100.1
100.1
100.1
100.1

100.2
100.4
100.0
100.2
100.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

99.7
99.7
100.2
99.7
99.1

103.5
104.0
104.0
103.1
103.1

102.6
102.7
102.7
102.7
102.7

104.9
104.7
105.0
105.0
104.7

101.7
102.0
102.2
102.0
100.0

104.2
104.6
104.6
104.6
102.1

104.2
105.2
105.2
105.2
99.3

104.2
104.2
104.2
104.2
104.2

104.3
104.5
104.5
104.5
103.3

105.8
107.4
105.7
105.7
103.0

106.4
108.7
106.2
106.2
103.7

101.9
103.0
103.3
101.9
97.3

102.2
103.3
103.6
102.2
97.7

1939: Average...........
Mar.............
June................
Sept.................
Dec..................

101.1
101.4
101.,2
100.9
100.3

103.2
104.2
103.5
102.5
101.8

100.1
100.1
100.1
100.1
100.1

99.2
99.3
99.1
98.9
98.9

98.6
98.5
98.5
98.5
98.5

98.9
99.1
99.1
99.1
98.0

103.3
103.1
103.1
103.1
104,0

102.6
102.7
102.7
102.7
102.1

103.4
104.0
104.0
103.2
101.1

99.5
99.1
99.3
99.8
99.4

101.9
102,1
102.1
102.1
101.2

98.8
99.3
99.3
90.3
96.5

104.3
104.2
104:2
104.2
104.8

103.2
103.3
103.3
103.3
102.7

101.9
103.0
103.0
103.3
95.6

102.9
103.7
103.7
103.7
98.8

95.5
93.8
94.7
96.8
97.1

94.5
94.0
94.0
94.3
94.3

1940: Average.........
Mar............
June................
Sept.................
Dec..................

100.7
100.9
100.8
100.6
100.5

101.2
102.1
101.8
100.6
100.3

100.1
100.1
100.1
100.1
100.1

98.7
98.7
98.7
98.7
98.7

98.5
98.5
98.5
98.5
98.5

97.6
98.0
97.4
97.4
97.4

104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0

102.0
102.1
102.1
102,1
101.3

104.5
105.0
105.0
105.0
105.0

98.8
99.1
98.0
98.5
99.4

102.1
101.1
100.8
101.3
105.2

97.3
96.5
96.2
96.7
99.7

105.9
104.8
104.5
104.9
109.8

103.7
102.7
102.5
103.0
106.8

94.2
94; 5
93.8
93.8
94.2

97.1
98.8
96.4
96.4
96.4

93.8
95.7
92.4
93.7
91.9

94.5
94.5
94.5
94.5
94.3

1941: Average...........
Mar............
June................
Sept...............
Dec..................

103.1
100.9
101.3
104.1
108.6

104.5
101.8
102.8
107.1
109.3

101.7
100.1
100.1
103.3
104.9

100.4
99.1
99.1
100.2
105.2

100.2
98.5
98.5
98.5
108.8

99.1
97.4
97.4
97.4
107.6

113.0
105.1
105.1
122.4
127.2

101.5
101.3
101.3
101.3
102.7

107.7
104.7
106.1
109.7
111.7

102.1
99.6
101.7
102.6
107.1

109.8
105.2
106.9
106.9
121.2

103.1
99.7
99.7
99.7
113.3

114.7
109.8
111.7
111.7
126.8

113.0
106.8
111.3
111.3
125.8

97.4
94.2
93.8
97.6
107.0

98.7
96.4
96.4
98.8
108.7

100.1

98.5
92.9

12
0 .8
12
0 .2

95.3
94.8
94.8
96.0
96.0

1942: Average.......
M a r ...........
June.................
Sept
Dec..................

111.2
111.1
111.4
111.5
111.7

115.2
114.3
116.1
116.5
116.5

106.0
105.7
105.7
106.6
106.6

106.7
106.4
106.6
107.1
107.3

108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8

109.0
108.7
109.3
109.3
109.3

123.5
129.1
122.4
120.4
119.5

103.3
102.7
104.0
103.3
103.3

119.3 ' 110.6
118.9 110.6
120.0 111.4
120.4 110.7
121.0 110.9

104.1
103.0
105.2
103.8
104.8

96.5
96.5
96.3
96.3
98.0

1943: Average...........
M a r ...............
June................
Sept.................
Dec..................

112.8
112.2
112.9
113.0
113.8

117.3
116.8
117.8
117.2
117.9

108.1
108.2
108.2
108.2
108.2

107.9
107.7
108.0
108.0
108.2

109.3
108.8
109.5
109.5
109.5

110.4
109.9
110.5
110.5
111.1

117.8
117.6
117.6
117.6
117.6

103.8
103.9
103.9
103.9
103.9

123.8
122.0
123.8
125.3
125.6

110.6
111.0
110.4
110.5
110.6

105.2
104.9
105.1
105.3
105.7

98.5

1944: Average___
Mar____
June...........
Sept............
Dec................

115.6
113.7
116.5
116.6
116.6

119.8
118.7
120.5
120.5
120.9

108.2
108.2
108.2
108.2
108.2

110.0
108.8
110.7
110.7
110.7

116.2
109.5
119.5
119.5
119.5

118.4
111.7
121.8
121.8
121.8

117.6
117.6
117.6
117.6
117.6

104.2
103.9
103.9
104.5
104.5

126.0
125.9
126.3
126.3
125.9

110.7
110.6
110.8
110.8
110.8

105.6
105.8
105.7
105.4
105.3

98.6
98.6
98.6

1945: Average___
Mar............
June...........
Sept.................
Dec..................

116.5
116.6
116.2
116.7
116.7

120.4
120.5
120.5
120.1
120.1

108.4
108.2
109.0
108.2
108.2

110.4
110.7
109.0
110.9
110.9

119.5
119.5
119.5
119.5
119.5

121.7
121.8
121.8
121.8
121.2

117.6
117.6
117.6
117.6
117.6

104.6
104.5
104.5
104.5
105.1

126.4
126.3
126.3
126.7
126.7

110.5
110.6
110.5
110.6
110.3

105.0
105.3
105.3
105.2
104.0

98.4
98.6
98.6
97.8
98.4

1946: Average.........
M ar...............
June...........
Sept...............
Dec................

121.6
116.8
116.9
118.6
142.6

128.4
120.5
119.4
121.9
203.2

109.0
108.2
109.8
109.0
109.0

111.5
111.1
111.1
111.3
113.2

119.8
119.5
119.5
120.2
120.2

121.2
121.2
121.2
121.2
121.2

124.7
118.5
118.5
133.5
133.5

105.4
104.5
105.8
105.8
105.8

133.9
126.7
127.1
129.2
193.6

112.3
111.5
112.3
112.3
114.6

150.2
158.7

136.1
148.9

160.7
166.0

156.8
165.6

120.4

120.3

107.0
103.9
103.9
111.4
112.3

100.0
98.4
98.4
100.3
105.0

1947: Average...........
Mar............
June................
Sept...............
Dec..................

146.4
146.7
145.7
143.6
153.1

115.4
117.8

121.6
121.6
121.8
123.0
123.8

123.0
119.5
121.6
125.8
127.4

121.2
122.3

147.9
135.4
150.4
155.2
159.0

105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8
105.8

185.4
196.2
180.1
170.1
195.0

118.7
116.2
117.4
120.7
123.4

163.1
158.8
159.3
168.3
169.5

152.2
149.0
149.1
156.3
157.1

171.7
165.4
167.8
178.3
180.2

169.1
167.2
164.2
173.7
174.2

113.9
120.4
110.8
109.0
112! 7

118.0
101.8

121.3
116.1
120.2
124.6
130.8

107.7
106.2
107.4
108.7
110.0

1948: Average..........
Mar.................
June................
Sept.................
Dec..................

151.0
151.5
149.7
151.1
151.0 .......... - - - - - -

127.4
124.1
123.8
132.3
132.4

127.6
127.4
127.7
127.7
127.7

169.4
161.9
170.5
175.3
175.3

105.9
105.8
105.8
105.8
106.4

183.5
189. 6
183.2
178.0
177.3

131.7
125.9
128.4
138.8
139.1

178.2
170.4
170.6
189.3
189.2

162.6
157.9
158.3
168.8
169.0

191.9
181.3
181.3
207.1
206.6

183.5
174.7
174.9
195.9
195.9

115.9
113.9
113.9
118.8
119.1

137.3
137.7
137.6
137.8
138.6

21
2 .0

207.2
207.9

See footnotes on p. 79.




—

>.6
8

119.5
122.0
123.2
123.9

APPENDIX TABLES

79

T able G.— M iscellaneous : Indexes o f R etail P rices o f Selected A rticles Purchased b y M oderateIncom e F am ilies in L arge C ities o f the U nited States, 1 9 3 5 -4 8 1 C ontinued
—
[1935-39 = 100, unless otherw ise indicated]

Transportation— Continued
Auto repairs
P eriod4
Total

1935: Average.
M a r___
July-----O ct.......

Streetcar and bus fares

Adjust
brakes
(labor
only)**

Auto­
mobile
insur­
ance

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

Chassis Front
Chassis lubri­
end
lubri­
cation suspen­
cation** (new
sion*
series)*

Auto
opera­
tors’
Over­
Com­
licens­
Re­
haul
plete
es
line
brake brakes** and
and
repair
adjust­
fees
dutch**
ment*

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9

127.4
127.4
127.4
127.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0

100.0

Total

Street­
car
fares

Bus
fares

Rail­
road
fares,
coach

Post­
age

1936: Average.
Jan....... .
A p r____
July____
Sept___
D ec........

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9

101.4
127.4
127.4
82.9
82.9
82.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1937: Average.
M ar____
June_.
Sept___
D ec____

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
100.0

99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.9

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
100.2

83.3
82.9
82.9
82.9
85.1

100.0
100.0
100.0

1938: Average.
M ar____
June___
Sept___
D ec____

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9

100.3
99.9
100.5
100.5
100.5

100.3
99.9
100.5
100.5
100.5

100.1
99.9
100.2
100.2
100.2

90.8
85.1
85.1
98.9
98.9

100.0
100.0
100.0

1939: Average.
M a r____
June___ .
Sept.......
D ec........

99.8
100.0
100.0
99.7
99.3

100.0
100.0
99.1
99.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

ioo.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
98.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4

100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5

100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5
100.5

100.2
100.2
100.2
100.2
100.2

96.8
96.6
96.6
96.6
96.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1940: Average.
M a r.......
June
Sept.......
D ec........

99.5
99.0
99.7
99.3
100.3

99.2
98.2
99.1
99.1
100.9

99.3
100.0
100.0
97.2
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

99.6
9$. 9
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
102.7

99.0
100.7
97.3
97.3
100.7

100.8
100.5
100.9
101.0
101.0

100.9
100.5
100.9
101.1
101.1

100.2
100.2
100.2
100.2
100.2

87.5
96.6
83.0

H
o

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1941: AverageM ar.......
June
Sept.......
D ec........

103.9
101.4
102.0
105.1
110.6

101.6
100.9
100.9
102.6
102.6

105.5
102.8
105.6
108.3
10$. 3

106.3
101.8
103.6
108.9
116.1

104.8
101.1
101.1
104.6
118.4

103.6
102.7
102.7
103.3
106.0

101.2
100.7
99.6
99.4
106.9

101.0
101.0
101.0
101.0
101.2

101.1
101.1
101.1
101.1
101.3

100.3
100.2.
100.4
100.4
100.4

84.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
87.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100JO
100.0

1942: Average.
M a r.......
June
Sept.......
D ec........

113.0
111.2
114.0
114.0
113.7

101.8
99.4
102.6
102.6
102.6

112.5
105.8
115.9
115.9
113.4

120.5
121.0
121.0
121.0
121.0

122.9
122.6
123.6
123.6
123.6

146.9
150.8
150.8
150.8
150.8

112.5
113.6
114.1
114.1
108.8

101.6
101.2
101.8
101.8
101.8

101.7
101.3
101.8
101.8
101.8

101.6
100.4
102.0
102.0
102.0

96.2
95.5
95.5
95.5
102.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1943: Average.
M a r.......
June___
Sept.......
D ec........

114.5
114.3
114.3
114.6
115.4

103.4
103.3
103.3
103.3
104.0

110.5
109.1
109.1
111.2
111.2

122.2
122.5
122.5
122.5
122.5

125.7
125.5
125.5
125.5
127.4

150.8
150.8
150.$
150.8
150.6

101.0
108.8
97.1
97.1
97.1

101.6
101.8
101.6
101.6
101.6

101.6
101.8
101.6
101.6
101.6

102.0
102.0
102.0
102.0
102.0

102.8
102.8
102.8
102.8
102.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

1944: Average.
M a r.......
June
Sept.......
D e c .....

115.9
115.7
116.0
116.0
116.3

104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
140.0

111.2
111.2
111.2
111.2
111.2

123.4
122.5
124.0
124.0
124.0

128.6
128.4
128.4
128.4
129.4

150.6
150.6
150.6
150.6
150.6

98.0
97.1
98.2
98.5
98.5

101.6
101.6
101.6
101.6
101.7

101.6
101.6
101.6
101.6
101.7

101.9
102.0
102.0
102.0
101.2

106.1
102.8
107.7
107.7
107.7

109.7
100.0
114.6
114.6
114.6

1945: Average.
M a r.......
June____
Sept.......
D ec........

116.7
116.3
116.3
116.6
118.3

104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0
104.0

111.7
111.2
111.2
111.2
113.3

125.2
124.0
124.0
125.5
130.0

129.7
129.4
129.4
129.4
131.3

149.8
149.8
149.8
149.8
149.5

98.1
97.9
96.2
98.2
100.5

101.5
101.5
101.5
101.5
101.3

101.6
101.6
101.6
101.6
101.6

100.9
101.0
101.0
101.0
99.5

107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7

114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6
114.6

1946: Average.
M a r.......
June___
Sept.......
D ec........

120.4
118.0
118.3
121.1
127.0

104.8
104.0
104.0
104.0
108.7

114.1
113.3
113.3
113.3

lia i

131.6
128.5
128.5
132.9
139.5

136.0
131.3
132.3
139.0
146.4

127.4
149.0
149.0
97.1
97.1

117.2
107.1
113.1
129.1
129.1

104.5
103.2
104.1
106.1
106.2

105.1
103.8
104.7
106.8
106.9

99.8
99.5
99.5
100.4
100.6

107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7

114.2
114.6
114.6
114.6
112.2

1947: Average.
M a r____
J u n e___
Sept___
D ec____

130.4
129.5
130.1
130.8
133.2

111.1
111.9

120.5
118.1

139.5
141.1

150.5
151.3

100.0
103.4

97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1
97.1

132.1
130.5
132.1
133.7
133.7

109.0
108.2
109.1
109.3
112.0

109.7
108.7
109.5
109.9
113.4

104.5
103.5
105.1
105.1
106.2

113.6
107.7
116.5
116.5
116.5

112.2
112.2
112.2
112.2
112.2

1948: Average.
M a r.......
June____
Sept.......
D ec........

138.0
134.5
137.6
141.0
141.6

107.2
103.4
107.8
111.2
107.8

100.0
99.6
100.6
100.6
100.6

156.9
133.7
157.7
174.7
175.3

122.0
113.3
117.6
131.6
132.1

124.1
115.3
118.4
134.8
135.0

111.4
106.2
112.7
114.1
115.6

127.5
121.5
121.5
136.9
136.9

112.2
112.2
112.2
112.2
112.2

100.0

100.0

100.6
100.8

100.0
101.3

103.4
102.4
103.3
103.3
106.5

105.8
102.7
104.7
108.7
110.1

100.0
100.0

100.0

100.0

♦September 1947=100.
♦♦June 1939=100.
*See page 44 for description of method of calculation.
‘ Indexes for many items were
calculated for periods in addition to those shown here (monthly from 1941 to 1946). Annual averages for these items were based on all available data.
‘ Index based on 34 cities. See table A , p 36.




Bibliography
Description of Consumers’ Price Index
T h e C P I —A

S u m m a r y o f it s E s s e n tia l F e a t u r e s . By
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Statistics.

C o n su m e rs9 P r ic e I n d e x f o r M o d e r a te -In c o m e F a m ilies
in L a r g e C i t i e s : A S h o r t D es c rip tio n .

A February
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A B r i e f D e s c r ip tio n o f th e S te p s R e q u ire d to P ro d u ce
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P r ic e s f o r a G iv e n L o c a lity .

A February 1948 re­
lease of the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

C o n su m e rs9 P r ic e I n d e x f o r M o d e r a te -In c o m e F a m ilies
in L a r g e C i t i e s : U s e s o f T h is I n d e x .

A release of

By Joseph W.
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S to r e S a m p les f o r R e ta il F o o d P r ic e s.

C h a n g es in C o s t o f L iv in g o f F e d e r a l E m p lo y e e s in the

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Index Series

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L is t o f I t e m s on W h ic h R e ta il P r ic e s A r e C o llected f o r

C o n su m ers9 P r ic e In d e x f o r M o d e r a te -In c o m e F a m ilie s
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(ta b u la tio n s fr o m

A release of the U. S. Bureau of
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S u p p lem en ts I , I I , and

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☆

U . S . G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F IC E : 1 9 4 9 — 8 4 0 9 2 7