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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
G. W . W. HANGER, Acting Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES )
/WHOLE
BU R E A U OF L A B O R STA TISTIC S \ ’ ' ' \ NUMBER
CONCILIATION

AND

ARBITRATION

SERIES:

No.

10/1
l^ T T
1

CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION
IN THE BUILDING TRADES OF
GREATER NEW YORK




JUNE 16, 1913

■WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1913




CONTENTS.
Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York:
Page.
Introduction and summary.....................................................................................
5-10
The plan of arbitration............................................................................................ 11,12
Parties to the agreement.......................................................................................... 12-14
Financing of the plan............................................................................................... 14,15
Explanation of chart showing plan of conciliation and arbitration................ 15,16
Work of the General Arbitration Board................................................................ 17,18
Grievances of unions and of employers................................................................ 18-20
Cases settled by conciliation and arbitration..................................................... 21-25
Wage rates and union membership........................................................................ 25-29
Summary and analysis of typical grievances filed by unions.......................... 29-34
Summary and analysis of typical grievances filed by employers...................34-36
Appendix A.—Joint arbitration plan between employers’ association and
unions of building trades of Greater New York.............................................. 37-40
Appendix B.—Rules of procedure of the General Arbitration Board............. 41,42
Appendix C.—Trade jurisdiction in the building trades of Greater New
.York......................................................................................................................... 43-95
Painting and decorative trades....................................................................... 44-48
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America. 44-47
Amalgamated Glass Workers’ International Association of America. 47,48
Upholsterers’ International Union.........................................................
48
Natural and artificial stone-working trades................................................. 48-53
Amalgamated Blue Stone Cutters, Flaggers, Bridge and Curb
Setters of America..................................................................................
49
International Association of Marble Workers...................................... 49-51
Journeymen Stonecutters’ Association of North America................. 51,52
Stonemasons’ International Union........................................................
52
International Association of Granite Cutters of America..................
52
Tunnel and Subway Constructors’ International Union.................. 52,53
Electrical trades................................................................................................. 53-55
Inside electrical workers.......................................................................... 53-55
Fixture workers..........................................................................................
55
Plain and ornamental clay products trades................................................. 55-64
Bricklayers, Masons, and Plasterers’ International Union................
56
International Union of Hod Carriers and Building Laborers of
America....................................................................................................
57
Operative Plasterers’ International Association................................. 57-61
Plasterers’ laborers.....................................................................................
61
International Slate and Tile Roofers of America................................ 61,62
Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ Inter- 62-64
national Union........................................................................................
Woodworking trades.......................................................................................... 64-68
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America.............. 65-68




3

4

CONTENTS.

Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York— Coned.
Appendix C.—Trade jurisdiction in the building trades of Greater New
York—Concluded.
Page.
Motive power trades.......................................................................................... 68-74
69
International Brotherhood of Boilermakers.........................................
International Union of Elevator Constructors..................................... 69,70
International Union of Steam Engineers..............................................
70
United Portable Hoisting Engineers..................................................... 70-73
International Association of Machinists................................................ 73,74
Pipe-fitting trades.............................................................................................. 74-78
United Association of Journeymen Plumbers, Gas Fitters, Steam
Fitters, and Helpers.............................................................................. 74-77
Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Union of New York City.................. 77, 78
Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Helpers’ Union of New York C ity..
78
Structural, sheet, and fabricated metal trades............................................. 79-89
International Union of Wood, Wire, and Metal Lathers.................. 79-81
Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance.......... 82-86
International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers.. 86-89
Composition plastic trades............................................................................... 89-93
American Brotherhood of Cement Workers......................................... 89-92
International Brotherhood of Composition Roofers, Damp, and
Waterproof Workers............................................................................... 92,93
Miscellaneous trades.......................................................................................... 93-95
Riggers and derrick men..........................................................................
94
National Association of Heat, Frost, General Insulators, and
Asbestos Workers of America.............................................................. 94,95
House Shorers, Movers, and Sheath Piters’ Union....................... .
95




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
W HOLE NO. 124.

WASHINGTON.

JUNE 16, 1913.

CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION IN THE BUILDING
TRADES OF GREATER NEW YORK. .
BY CHARLES H. WINSLOW.
INTRODUCTION AND SU M M ARY.

There have been conciliation and arbitration agreements, or agree­
ments to arbitrate differences, between employers’ associations and
the unions in the building industry in New York City for more than
28 years.
These agreements, beginning with the agreement entered into by
the Master Builders’ Association of New York and the Bricklayers’
Unions Nos. 2, 33, 35, and 37 and the Amalgamated German Unions
of the City of New York, April 24, 1885, included the right to settle
every character of grievance except that of trade jurisdiction. This
latter question had been considered by the unions prior to the estab­
lishment of the general arbitration board in 1903 as “ not a subject
for arbitration” between employers’ associations and the unions, but
a proper subject for legislation as between one international union
and another.1 Moreover, the same position had been taken by the
bricklayers in a communication to the mason builders as early as
April 9, 1885. The communication in part reads as follows: “ We
fervently hope that we will be able to arrive at a conclusion, admit­
ting that all laws governing our trade must be established by joint
legislation between the unions and the employers.” It is significant
that the bricklayers’ unions of New York have never been attached
1 Section 11 of Article I X of the constitution of the American Federation of Labor which governs the
practice of the unions in the building trades reads as follows:
“ N o charter shall be granted by the American Federation of Labor to any national, international, trade,
or federal labor union without a positive and clear definition of the trade jurisdiction claimed b y the appli­
cant, and the charter shall not be granted if thfe jurisdiction claimed is a trespass on the jurisdiction of exist­
ing affiliated unions, without the written consent of such unions; no affiliated international, national, or
local union shall be permitted to change its title or name, if any trespass is made thereby on the jurisdiction
of an affiliated organization, without having first obtained the consent and approval of a convention of the
American Federation of Labor; and it is further provided t that should any of the members of such national,
international, trade, or federal labor union work at any other vocation, trade, or profession, they shall join
the union of such vocation, trade, or profession, provided such are organized and affiliated w ith the Ameri­
can Federation of Labor.”




5

6

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

to or affiliated with any board of business agents or any building
trades council during this entire period.
The circular embodying the agreement for the first board of arbi­
tration in the building trades, addressed to the bricklayers’ unions,
reads as follows:
N o t ic e .1

According to agreement, the Joint Arbitration Committee of the Master Builders’
Association and the Bricklayers’ Unions of New York City will meet every Wednes­
day evening at 8 o’clock, at No. 1321 Broadway, to hear grievances and settle all dis­
putes between employers and employees. Complaints will be received either in per­
son or by communications.
The following agreement has been entered into by the above-named organizations,
respectively:
N e w Y o r k , April 24, 1885.
It is hereby agreed between the Master Builders’ Association of New York and the
Bricklayers’ Unions Nos. 2, 33, 35, and 37 and the Amalgamated German Unions of
the City of New York:
First. That the journeymen and foremen who were members of the unions last
summer be reinstated on payment of dues to date, and by the latter, of dues and
assessments to date, which shall not exceed $50.
Second. That the wages of bricklayers from May 1, 1885, to May 1, 1886, shall be
42 cents per hour, nine hours on any day; Saturday, eight hours, with eight hours’ pay.
It is particularly requested that all grievances be immediately laid before the
committee in order to avoid all difficulties.
(Signed)
M arc E id l id t z , Chairman.
H. O s c a r C o l e , Chairman.

The history of the Joint Arbitration Committee of the Mason Build­
ers’ Association and the Bricklayers’ Unions, as shown by their
minutes, evidences that the same character of grievances that are
the real contentions of to-day then gave the building industry serious
concern. For example, the following grievances frequently appear:
“ Employment of nonunion men,” “ discrimination by employers,”
“ paying under the scale of wages;” and on the part of the employers,
“ against the restriction of apprentices,” “ men leaving employers for
higher wages (than the union rate),” “ stoppage of work.” However,
notwithstanding this friction, both sides seemed content and re­
newed the agreement yearly. The success of the agreement between
the Mason Builders’ Association and the Bricklayers’ Unions was
followed by a second agreement. This second agreement, signed
May 10,1892, was between the Mason Builders and the Laborers’ Pro­
tective Society, or masons’ laborers. Only a few months elapsed
before a third agreement in the industry was signed, this time between
the Hod Hoisting Employed Association and the United Association
of Engineers. The agreement included, among other matters, an
“ understanding between the parties concerned in relation to hours of
work, scale of wages, sympathetic strikes, and an opportunity to
legislate their own affairs.”
1 From Industrial Arbitration and Conciliation, b y Josephine Shaw Lowell, pp. 66, 67.




CONCILIATION*, ETC., IK BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

7

In 1887 efforts to organize an employers’ association included the
Dealers in Building Materials, the Boss Stone Cutters’ Association,
the Plumbers’ Association, and several others, but the Mason Build­
ers’ Association passed a resolution declining to take part in the
movement. However, gradually the employers organized, and during
the 15 years that followed, or until 1902, spasmodic efforts were made
to organize these employers’ associations into one central association,
but without success.
The original Board of Delegates in the building trades was organ­
ized in 1884. This board at its inception was composed of delegates
or business agents from only four unions, but by 1890 it had embraced
all the unions in the building trades with the exception of the
bricklayers.
In 1894, because of internal strife in the board, a dissolution took
place, one faction joining the newly organized and recognized author­
ity in the building trades, the Building Trades Council, the other
remaining with the Board of Delegates.
The Board of Delegates continued its existence without recognized
authority constitutionally, and for six years, or until 1900, these two
hostile boards claimed the same field of action; in other words, every
known method was employed by each faction to extend its jurisdic­
tion so as to embrace all the different trades represented by the war­
ring boards. In the fall of 1901 efforts were made to bring the factions
together, and in March, 1902, the amalgamation took place, the
United Board of Building Trades taking the place of the former two
boards. This new board included all the strong unions in the build­
ing industry except the bricklayers. Delegates to this board were
elected by each local union in the building trades and admitted to
membership in the board only on credentials signed by the officers
of such unions. The aims and objects were “ to secure harmony and
unity of action.” It further provided for arbitration of jurisdictional
disputes, and during its life settled 15 important such disputes.
The number of organizations affiliated was 37, of which 22 were
skilled craftsmen, while 15 belonged to the unskilled class. The life
of the board was short, however, as the strike of the carpenters and
teamsters split the skilled and unskilled crafts asunder. The skilled
trades seceded and formed a new Board of Skilled Mechanics.1
About this time, June, 1903, the 30 associations of employers
formed the Building Trades Employers’ Association. Each existing
trade association preserved its own autonomy, but it Was provided
that each employer or contractor should become a member of both
his trade association and the general association. This general asso­
ciation was to possess such powers as were delegated to it, but in no
J a n u a ry 13,1909, the Building Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor issued a
charter to the Building Trades Council of Greater New Y o rk , and September 20,1911, on account of
noncompliance w ith the term6 of the grant, the charter was revoked.




8

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

way to interfere with the autonomy of each individual trade unit.
The powers delegated to the Building Trades Employers' Association
were broad and included the power “ generally to determine, regulate,
and control the conduct of the members of this association and the
employers7 associations represented on the board in all matters per­
taining to their relations with their employees.”
Immediately upon completing its organization the Board of
Governors drafted a plan of arbitration designed to overcome the
evils to which the industry had been subjected during the past 20
years or more. The intention of the board was to undertake the
consummation of their scheme directly with the unions rather than
through the walking delegate, and the secretaries of the unions were
therefore addressed in the following communication on June 2,1903:
For the last few years the conditions in our industry have been steadily growing
worse until they culminated in the present cessation of work. As you can see from
our platform and plan of arbitration, we have but one object in view, namely, to
conduct our business relations in a fair, honest, and American way, and we want
you to help us. * * * No doubt our actions, our motives, and our plans will be
attacked by those representatives of labor who are unwilling to be deprived of any
powers which have been given to them or have been assumed by them. * * * We
refuse to believe that the rank and file of labor is acquainted with many of the acts
of these representatives and of the conditions which exist in some of the trades, but
how grievous they were is proven by the present standstill and the fact that within
three weeks nearly 30 employers’ associations of our industry have become a unit,
as a living protest against oppression and extortion. We therefore call upon every
conservative and thinking mechanic to attend the meeting of his union and register
his vote against the un-American methods that have crept into the trade, and to
insist upon the plan of arbitration as,suggested.1 * * *

The ultimatum, as it was considered by the unions, caused a dead­
lock for more than three weeks, but disinterested parties arranged a
conference at the end of that time which was attended by representa­
tives of a majority of the trade-unions and 60 members of the Board
of Governors.2 The conference, which began July 3, 1903, continued
in session until the morning of July 4. At that time an adjournment
was taken until July 9, at which time a plan of arbitration, includ­
ing three “ explanatory clauses,” was adopted and submitted to all
the unions. Four weeks later two-thirds of the unions had signed
the plan and the General Arbitration Board was organized. The
following week, or on August 10, 1903, rules of procedure of the
General Arbitration Board of the New York Building Trades were
adopted, and actual work began.
The method of procedure in handling grievances provided that in
the first instance an effort be made by the secretary to adjust the diffi­
culty by conciliation. Indeed, the secretary was expected to exhaust
every possible means to effect a settlement by conciliation. If this
method failed, then the complaint, which meanwhile had become a
1 From the Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. X V I I I , 1904, pp. 409,410.
2 This conference was arranged b y the National Civic Federation.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

9

formal written complaint, was referred by the secretary to an execu­
tive committee of 12 members. In accordance with the plan, the
executive committee must meet within 24 hours after notification by
the secretary and endeavor to adjust the dispute. But if the question
at issue was considered a matter for arbitration, then a special arbitra­
tion board of four members was organized. This special board was
further empowered to employ an umpire in pursuance of its duties.
Whatever may have been the intent of the promoters of this plan
of arbitration in the building industry in Greater New York, its
establishment caused much more to be done by indirection than it
was ever expected to accomplish by direct action. It has wielded
a firm authority, and its decisions have been sufficiently respected to
involve principles of far-reaching consequences. For example, the
“ general strike” has almost been eliminated, wage rates have grad­
ually increased, and jurisdictional disputes settled on a more nearly
equitable basis than ever before. Instead of the former heated dis­
cussion, open warfare, and unreasonable action, there has appeared
a desire on the part of both parties to settle grievances peaceably and
according to the facts presented.
During the period October 1, 1903, to December 31, 1909, a total
of 2,751 grievances were submitted to the secretary of the General
Arbitration Board, 2,433 of them by labor unions and 318 by employ­
ers’ associations. The general secretary adjusted 1,070 of these dis­
putes by conciliatory methods; 1,681 went to arbitration and of
these 24 were compromised, 251 abandoned, and 52 referred to the
trade boards for adjudication.
While there were 214 complaints of employers against unions and
24 complaints of unions against other unions for engaging in strikes,
the influence of the strike has been minimized, for in most cases the
strikers were ordered back to work within a few days and the dispute
was settled according to the arbitration plan.
The formal agreement under which the above-described plan
came into operation expired July 1, 1910. The present method of
handling disputes is to have the aggrieved union present its com­
plaint to the chairman of the emergency committee of the Building
Trades Employers' Association, who immediately convenes the
emergency committee. The matter is then formally presented and
a decision rendered or a settlement reached in accordance with the
standards established or in strict compliance with the jurisdictional
code formulated by the General Arbitration Board. It is to be
understood, however, that the arrangement of individual employers’
associations and the unions of each craft signing conciliation and
arbitration agreements still continues.
While the arbitration plan per se can be said to be in abeyance, the
suspension is considered only temporary by both employers’ associa­
tions and unions,



10

BULLETIN OF T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

The actual suspension of the plan occurred July 1, 1910, but
almost immediately thereafter formal overtures were made by the
employers’ associations to the unions, through the United Board of
Business Agents, to reestablish the plan, but inasmuch as the employ­
ers failed to include each and every union in the building trades in
their proposal the United Board of Business Agents refused to accept
the proposition. Twice since similar efforts have met with the same
result and for the same reasons.
The present attitude of employers in associations and of tradeunionists toward a rehabilitation of the plan in a modified form or
to some similar scheme of arbitration is expressed in all recent
renewals of contracts between them. During the year 1912 a
majority of the employers’ associations signed contracts with a like
majority of the unions, in which the following clause appears:
It is further mutually agreed that both parties to this agreement shall send repre­
sentatives to a convention for the formation of a general arbitration plan, said con­
vention to be composed of the representatives of the several employers’ associations
and a majority of the unions of the building trades of New York City.

The numerical strength of the unions having such contracts repre­
sents 75,000 members out of an approximate membership of 90,000
in the industry. As to further evidence that the dissolution of the
plan of arbitration is considered only temporary, the following is
quoted from the minutes of a meeting of the Building Trades Employ­
ers’ Association held July 13, 1910:
Resolved, That it is the sense of this board of governors that all decisions heretofore
made affecting jurisdiction of trade shall be maintained until reviewed by a duly
authorized arbitration board of employers and employees.
Resolved, That this Building Trades Employers’ Association stand for the principle
of arbitration.

The attitude of trade-unions in the building trades is expressed in
section 2 of the preamble to the constitution of the United Board of
Business Agents of Greater New York, adopted September 21, 1912,
which is as follows:
It declares in favor of arbitration in the settlement of trade disputes and of the
resorting to any and all honorable means to prevent strikes and lockouts.

As to the recognition of decisions affecting trade jurisdiction, it
declared that—
all decisions rendered under the plan of arbitration as adopted by the conference held
on July 3, 1903, between the Building Trades Employers’ Association and the repre­
sentatives of labor unions, and as further since amended up until 1910, shall be recog­
nized as the law of procedure wliieh shall govern the actions and findings of the
executive council.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF NEW YORK.

11

THE PLAN OF ARBITRATION.

The original plan of arbitration adopted July 9, 1903, recognized
the closed-shop principle between members of employers’ associations
and organized labor in the building industry of Greater New York.
A revision of the plan, adopted April 22, 1905, provided for the
employment, directly or indirectly through subcontractors, of union
men only. At the same time new sections were added,1 permitting
sympathetic strikes under certain circumstances against employers
engaged in the building industry not members of the plan of arbitra­
tion, in order that the unions might better maintain their schedules
of wages, hours, and working conditions.
The General Arbitration Board consisted of two representatives
from each employers’ organization affiliated with the Building Trades
Employers’ Association, of which there were 31, and two representa­
tives from each union recognized as a party to the plan, of which there
were a like number. Regular sessions of the board were held monthly,
but special sessions were subject to the call of the chairman of the
executive committee upon the filing with the secretary of a written
request from five organizations represented in the plan.
The executive committee was composed of 12 members, elected
from the General Arbitration Board, six of whom were elected by the
representatives of the unions and six by the employers, to serve for
a period of six months. All decisions of the executive committee
become final and binding unless disapproved by the General Arbitra­
tion Board. Complaints are presented directly to the general secre­
tary of the General Arbitration Board, whose duty it is to endeavor
to adjust them through such conciliatory methods as he may deem
expedient. Failing to adjust a dispute by this means, the secretary
brings it to the attention of the executive committee.
While the plan recognizes the unions and employers’ associations
or the Building Trades Employers’ Association, as such, it does not
recognize any council of trade-unions, and for that reason the central
body of trades-unions has no right to sue before the General Arbitra­
tion Board. However, the Building Trades Employers’ Association
or an individual employer has that right. For this reason the equity
of the general arbitration plan has often been questioned.
While the General Arbitration Board has no power to levy a fine
upon either unions or employers for noncompliance with or refusal to
obey the decisions of the arbitrators, the executive committee usually
reported the attitude of delinquent employers to the Building Trades
Employers’ Association, the parent body of the various organizations
of builders, suggesting that summary action be taken against the
offenders. Fines ranging from $500 to $5,000, and sometimes expul­
sion from membership, have followed charges for disobeying the



1 Sections 31 and 32.

12

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

injunction of the executive committee. Censure is visited more or
less sparingly, but fines are levied with regard to the gravity of the
case in hand.
The original conception of the plan was to provide equal represen­
tation from employers and unions to the General Arbitration Board,
thereby securing a panel from which arbitrators could be selected for
any particular dispute. But this method has been superseded by an
executive committee, chosen jointly, which has really become a joint
arbitration board for the building industry, chiefly for the purpose of
settling disputes without recourse to an arbitrator or umpire outside
of the industry.
PARTIES TO THE AGREEMENT.

The parties to the plan of arbitration on the part of the employers
were the 31 employers’ associations which comprise the Building Trades
Employers’ Association of Greater New York. These 31 associations
of employers represent a membership of more than 1,000 firms, cor­
porations, or establishments doing business in the building industry.
An estimate of the magnitude of the undertakings of these master
builders can be gleaned from the fact that they have to do with the
building, erecting, and equiping of approximately 13,000 building
operations each year, the annual expenditure for which is estimated
to be approximately $200,000,000.
Employers’ associations represented in the plan of arbitration are
as follows:
Employers’ Association of Architectural Iron Workers.
Bluestone Dealers’ Association.
Master Carpenters’ Association.
Master League of Cement Workers.
Composition Roofers and Waterproofers Employers’ Association.
Greater New York Cut Stone Contractors’ Association.
Electrical Contractors’ Association.
Elevator Manufacturers’ Association.
New York League of Heat and Cold Insulation.
The Hoisting Association.
House Movers’ and Shorers’ Association.
Association of Interior Decorators and Cabinet Makers.
The Iron League Erectors’ Association.
The Lighting Fixture Association.
Marble Industry Employers’ Association.
Mason Builders’ Association.
Mason Contractors’ Association.
Metal Ceiling Association of New York.
Association Manufacturers of Metal Covered Doors and Windows.
Employing Metallic Furring and Lathing Association of New
York.
Mosaic Employers’ Association.



CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

13

Ornamental Bronze and Iron Masters’ Association.
Association of Master Painters and Decorators of the City of New
York.
Parquet Flooring Association.
Employing Plasterers' Association.
Contracting Plumbers’ Association of the City of New York.
Employers’ Association of Roofers and Sheet Metal Workers of
Greater New York.
Master Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Association of New York.
Employing Stone Setters’ Association.
Tile, Grate, and Mantel Association.
Manufacturing Woodworkers’ Association.
The trade-unions represented in the general arbitration plan com­
prise 31 distinctly separate unions haying contractual relations with
employers’ associations engaged in building operations in Greater New
York and vicinity. These 31 building trade-unions represent approxi­
mately 90,000 members in good standing, employed exclusively in the
building industry of Greater New York.
The unions represented in the plan of arbitration are local organiza­
tions of the following national or international unions:
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners.
Bricklayers and Masons’ International Union.
Operative Plasterers’ International Association.
International Union of Elevator Constructors.
International Union of Steam Engineers.
Upholsterers’ International Union.
International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers.
International Brotherhood of Boiler Makers, Iron Ship Builders,
and Helpers.
International Hod Carriers and Building Laborers.
Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ Inter­
national Union.
Amalagamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance.
National Association of Heat, Frost, General Insulators, and
Asbestos Workers.
International Slate and Tile Roofers’ Union.
American Brotherhood of Cement Workers.
Stonemasons’ International Union.
Bluestone Cutters’ International Union.
International Association of Steam and Hot Water Fitters.
Cement and Asphalt Workers’ International Union.
Wood, Wire, and Metal Lathers’ International Union.
International Association of Marble Workers.
United Association of Plumbers and Gas Fitters.
International Brotherhood of Composition Roofers, Damp and
Waterproof Workers.



14

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.
Derrickmen and Riggers’ International Union.
House Shorers, Movers, and Sheath Pilers’ Union.
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of
America.
Progress Association of Steam, Hot Water, and General Pipe
Fitters’ Helpers.
International Association of Machinists.
International Wood Carvers’ Association.
Amalgamated Woodworkers.
Amalgamated Painters.
Tunnel and Subway Constructors’ International Union.
Machine Stone Workers.
FINANCING THE PLAN.

The method of financing the General Arbitration Board is as follows:
“ The cost of maintaining the headquarters of the General Arbitra­
tion Board, including the salaries of the secretary and his assistants,
shall be divided equally between the Building Trades Employers’
Association and the unions collectively.” “ The executive committee
shall have control of all receipts and expenditures.” The financing
of the plan for the year 1908 has been selected as showing the cost per
normal year.
The contribution from the Building Trades Employers’ Association
to the financing of the plan is based on an equitable assessment levied
on each individual employers’ association by the parent organiza­
tion, which in turn pays over to the General Arbitration Board the
sum thus collected. The method employed by the union is to levy
an assessment or per capita tax on each union covering the average
membership.
B u d g e t a n d F in a n c ia l S t a t e m e n t of th e G e n e r a l A r b it r a t io n B o a r d fo r
the

Y e a r 1908.
budget.

Salary, 12 members of executive committee.......................................................
Salary, secretary of General Arbitration Board..................................................
Salary, stenographer of General Arbitration Board...........................................
Office rent....................................................................................................................

$3, 600
2,500
1,040
2,100

Total..................................................................................................................

9, 240

f in a n c ial st a t e m e n t .

Per capita tax paid by unions................................................................................ $4,952. 70
Building Trade Employers’ Association assessment.......................................... 4,572. 80
Total receipts from all sources................................................................................
9,569.48
Total expenses for year 1908...................................................................................
9,460. 25




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.
P e r C apita T a x P aid b y U n io n s D u r in g

15

1908.

Bricklayers.............................................................................................. $900. 00
Carpenters..............................................................................................
600.00
Sheet-metal workers.............................................................................. 424.40
Electrical workers.................................................................................. 310. 60
Steam fitters........................................... ................................................ 220.00
Steam fitters’ helpers............................................................................
220. 00
Stonecutters.................................................................................. .........
210.00
Plumbers.................................................................................................. 200.00
Elevator constructors............................................................................
190.00
Plasterers.................................................................................................
184.50
Marble cutters.......... .............................................................................. 155.00
Woodworkers...........................................................................................
143. 60
Marble carvers and setters...................................................................
120.00
Upholsterers........................................................................................... 120.00
Asbestos workers....................................................................................
90.00
Cement masons.......................................................................................
80.00
Metallic lathers.......................................................................................
80.00
Wood carvers...........................................................................................
78. 80
Hoisting engineers.................................................................................
75.00
Tile layers................................................................................................
70.00
Machinists..............................................................................................
60.00
Mosaic workers.............. .........................................................................
60.00
House shorers..........................................................................................
60.00
Bluestone cutters..................................................................................
56.00
Riggers and derrickmen......................................................................
45. 00
Modelers and sculptors.........................................................................
44.80
Stone setters............................................................................................
41. 60
Tile layers’ helpers................................................................................
40.00
Composition roofers................................................................................
33. 40
Stone planermen....................................................................................
30.00
Slate and tile roofers.............................................................................
10. 00

Total...................................................................................... 4,952.70
EXPLANATION OF CHART SHOWING PLAN OF CONCILIATION AND
ARBITRATION.

The plan of arbitration and conciliation, with the employers’ asso­
ciations and labor unions included in the plan, is shown in the accom­
panying chart.
The left of the chart is intended to show the interrelation between
each association of employers and the Building Trades Employers’
Association. Each association claims the right of trade autonomy,
but each and every firm, corporation, or establishment claiming
membership in an association of employers must also become mem­
bers of the parent association. In accordance with, the laws of the
Building Trades Employers* Association, contractual relations
between employers* associations and the unions can not be consum­
mated without the sanction of the parent association. While recog­
nition through the General Arbitration Board to this interrelation is
given, no such recognition is given to the organizations represented



16

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

on the right of the chart; or, in other words, the Building Trades
Employers’ Association is permitted to present grievances to the Gen­
eral Arbitration Board, but the unions collectively are guaranteed no
such right. The General Arbitration Board fails to give the same
recognition to a general council of unions as it does to a central
organization of employers.
The top of the chart indicates the machinery of the General Arbi­
tration Board, through which a grievance proceeds. The large
square shows representatives of employers’ associations and labor
unions in the Board. This Board contains approximately 120 mem­
bers, two representatives from each employers’ association and two
representatives from each union recognized as parties to the plan.
This Board meets once a month and has the power to elect a general
secretary and an executive committee of 12 members, 6 of whom are
elected by the representatives of the unions and 6 others represent­
ing the employers in the General Arbitration Board. The chairman
and the vice chairman of the Board are elected semiannually by and
from the members of the Board. One of these officers must be an
employer and the other an employee.
The square below represents the executive committee of 12 mem­
bers, which is vested with the power to act as a board of conciliation
as well as with all other powers vested in the General Board, between
regular meetings of that Board, except to amend the code of procedure
or fix the manner in which and by whom the expenses of special arbi­
tration boards shall be paid. The members of this committee serve
for a period of six months. The committee meets once a week or upon
the call of the secretary, and reports all its proceedings to the General
Arbitration Board. All the findings and decisions of this board are
final and binding unless disapproved by the General Arbitration
Board. The salaries of the members of the executive committee are
at the rate of $300 per year.
The small square represents special arbitration boards. These
boards consist of not less than four members chosen from the Gen­
eral Arbitration Board, representative of employers and the unions.
The compensation for members of this board is $6 per day. To these
boards are referred all questions which are considered subjects for
arbitration. In case of failure on the part of a special arbitration
board to render a decision the entire matter is referred to an umpire,
whose decision is final.
The center of the chart shows a series of local trade boards. The
plan provides that where a trade agreement exists between an
employers’ association and a union all local trade disputes must be
settled by a trade board, with an umpire if necessary, the decisions to
be considered final. Failure to agree upon an umpire or failure to
abide by the decision of a trade board automatically places the griev­
ance in the hands of the General Arbitration Board.



PLAN o ARBITRATION®* CONCILIATION
f
o
f
1904-1909
inth
e
BUILDING TRADES

GREATER NEN YORK

/ u m p ir e A

_VsPfX/AL

/

1-\

GENERAL
NARBITRATIOW

hEnPlOYtRy

BUILDING

TRftDFS

I n m v m tM ivts




10.)

\

BOARD

/
/

\ ubor

\

•epftibtmMiviy

CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF NEW YORK.

Vl

W ORK OF THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD.

Some idea, of the activities of the Board of Arbitration can be gained
by a study of the following tables. The Board considered on an
average 440 complaints a year, or reviewed that number of decisions
if it did not actually sit as a court of arbitration in each case.
The following table shows, by years, the number of complaints filed
by unions and employers; also the disposition of the same. The total
number of complaints filed was 2,751. Of these, 2,433 were sub­
mitted by the unions and 318 by the employers. The greatest num­
ber of complaints submitted in any one year by the unions was 497,
filed in 1906, as against 233, filed in 1904 for a period of 15 months, or
from October 1, 1903, to December 31, 1909, an increase of 79 per
cent. The greatest number of cases submitted by employers in any
one year was 103, filed in 1909, as against 41 filed in 1904 for a period
of 15 months, or an increase of 151 per cent.
It is of interest to note that after the year 1906 the unions show a
slight but gradual diminution of complaints, while the employers
show a gradual increase for the same period except for the year 1908,
when there appeared a decided decrease.
G R I E V A N C E S F I L E D B Y U N I O N S A N D B Y E M P L O Y E R S A N D A C T IO N T A K E N T H E R E O N
B Y T H E G E N E R A L A R B I T R A T I O N B O A R D , 1904 T O 1909.

Filed by unions.
Number of cases—
Number
of griev­ Decided Decided
favorably adversely Compro­
ances.
to com­
to com­
mised.
plainant. plainant.

Years.

Referred
to trade
board.

W ith ­
drawn.

1904 i .........................................................................
1905.............; ..............................................................
1906.............................................................................
1907.............................................................................
1908.............................................................................
1909.............................................................................

233
385
497
472
428
418

144
288
342
350
272
259

68
82
124
88
83
52

1
1
3
7
4
8

7
2
12
8
7
8

13
12
16
19
62
91

Total..............................................................

2,433

1,655

497

24

44

213

Filed by employers.
19041 .........................................................................
1905.............................................................................
1906.............................................................................
1907.......................................................................
1908.............................................................................
1909.............................................................................

41
34
40
66
34
103

20
30
33
48
17
67

5
1
5
15
5
26

3
1
1
1
2

13
2
2
2
11
8

Total..............................................................

318

215

57

8

38

1 Including last three months of 1903.

97394°—Bull. 124—13------2




18

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

G R I E V A N C E S F I L E D B Y U N I O N S A N D B Y E M P L O Y E R S A N D A C T IO N T A K E N
T H E R E O N B Y T H E G E N E R A L A R B I T R A T I O N B O A R D , 1904 T O 1909— Concluded.

Filed by unions and employers.
Num ber in which decisive action was
taken.

Years.

Total
number
of griev­
ances.

Favorable to—

Adversely to—

Unions.

E m ploy­
ers.

Unions.

Compro­
mised.

Referred
to trade
board.

W ith ­
drawn.

E m ploy­
ers.

19041.................................
1905...................................
1906...................................
1907...................................
1908...................................
1909...................................

274
419
537
•538
482
521

144
288
342
350
272
259

20
30
33
48
17
67

68
82
124
88
83
52

5
1
5
15
5
26

1
1
3
7
4
8

10
3
12
9
8
10

26
14
18
21
73
99

T otal....................

2,751

1,655

215

497

57

24

52

251

i Including last three months of 1903.

GRIEVANCES.

During the existence of the general arbitration plan, or from
October 1, 1903, to December 31, 1909, the employers’ associations
and the unions submitted to the general secretary a total of 2,751
grievances. Of this number, 2,433 were submitted by unions and
318 by employers’ associations. Of the total number submitted by
both parties to the agreement, decisive action was taken on 2,424
cases, 24 cases were compromised, and 251 abandoned, while the
remaining 52 cases were referred to the several trade boards for
adjudication.
GRIEVANCES OF UNIONS.

Of the 2,433 complaints submitted by the unions, 1,655, or 68
per cent, were decided in favor of the complainants, while 497, or
20.4 per cent, were decided adversely. Twenty-four complaints, or
1 per cent, were compromised and 44, or 1.8 per cent, were referred
to trade boards, the plan providing that where a trade agreement
exists between an employers’ association and a union all disputes
in that trade shall be settled by a trade board, with an umpire if
necessary. The decision of said trade board or umpire shall be
final. In case of failure on the part of either side to abide by the
decision of the trade board or umpire, the question shall be referred
to the General Arbitration Board for action within 24 hours after
such failure or refusal. The remaining 213 cases, or 8.8 per cent,
were abandoned because of their insignificance or because of decisions
rendered making the presentation to the board unnecessary.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

19

GRIEVANCES OF EMPLOYERS.

The total number of eases submitted by employers was 318, of
which 215, or 67.6 per cent, were decided favorably; 57, or 17.9 per
cent, were decided adversely; 8, or 2.5 per cent, were referred to trade
boards; and 38, or 11.9 per cent, were withdrawn.
The total number of grievances presented by employers and by
unions during the entire period of six years and the manner of dis­
posal are set forth in the following tables:
G R IE V A N C E S F I L E D B Y U N IO N S F R O M O C T . 1, 1903, T O D E C . 31, 1909, A N D D IS P O S IT IO N
TH EREOF.

Per cent of cases—

Num ber of cases—

Trades.

Carpenters and framers.................
Steam and hot water fitters.........
Sheet-metal workers.......................
Painters and decorators................
Electrical workers...........................
Marble cutters, carvers, and set­
ters.....................................................
Metallic lathers.................................
Housesmiths and bridgemen___
Plasterers............................................
Plumbers and gas fitters.-...........
Engineers, portable, hoisting___
Elevator constructors...................
Riggers.................................................
Cement m asons...............................
Cement and asphalt workers___
Tar, felt, and waterproof workers
House shorers and sheath pilers.
Tile layers...........................................
Marble polishers, rubbers, and
sawyers............................................
M a ch in ists.......................................
Stone setters......................................
Asbestos workers.............................
Mosaic workers.................................
Bluestone cutters.............................
Stonecutters.......................................
W ood carvers....................................
Marble cutters' helpers................
Roofers, slate and t i le ...................
Bricklayers.........................................
Plasterers’ laborers.........................
TJpholsterers......................................
Modelers and sculptors.................
Marble machine workers..............
Woodworkers, machine................
Tile layers’ helpers.........................
Mosaic workers’ helpers................
Machine stone workers..................
H od carriers.......................................
Cabinetmakers.................................

De­
Total
De­
R e­
cided
griev­
cided
ad­ Com­ ferred W ith­
ances
favor­
verse­ pro­
to
filed.
drawn.
ably
ly to mised trade
to un­
un­
board.
ions. ions.

319
234
217
173
161

219
165
154
111
108

58
51
42
49
32

1
1
2
1
1

8
3
1
1
4

33
14
18
11
16

68.7
70.5
71.0
64.2
67.1

18.2
21.8
19.4
28.3
19.9

0.3
.4
.9
.6
.6

2.5
1.3
.5
.6
2.5

10.3
6.0
8.3
6.4
9.9

151
142
107
107
95
88
85
71
60
53
49
42
40

115
95
84
67
50
67
55
39
46
40
33
34
24

22
26
18
28
39
14
24
21
3
2

1
2
1
1
1
1

1

12
19
3
10
5
4
5
9
6
9
2
2

76.2
66.9
78.5
62.6
52.6
76.1
64.7
54.9
76.7
75.5
67.3
81.0
60.0

14.6
18.3
16.8
26.2
41.1
15.9
28.2
29.6
5 .0
3.8
22.4
14.3
17.5

.7
1.4
.9
.9
1.1
1.1

.7

*5*6' "5.0

7.9
13.4
2.8
9.3
5.3
4.5
5.9
12.7
10.0
17.0
4.1
4.8
12.5

32
27
26
24
21
17
14
14
11
9
9
7
7
4
4
4
3
2
2
1
1

21
17
13
12
15
16
11
8
9
7
7
3
1
2
1
3
1
1

3

65.6
63.0
50.0
50.0
71.4
94.1
78.6
57.1
81.8
77.8
77.8
42.9
14.3
50.0
25.0
75.0
33.3
50.0

9.4
18.5
26.9
25.0
14.3

7.7
4.2
4.8

25.0
18.5
15.4
16.7
9.5

11
6
7

1

1
1
2

1
1

1
1
1

2

2

2

5

2
1
1

8
5
4
4
2

4

1

5
7
6
3

1
1

3
4
1

2
1
2
2

2
3
2
3

1
3

1
1

1

1

1

” i.T
1.7
1.9
2 .0

4.2

.9
.9

"iY
1.2
1.4
6.6
1.9
4.1

5*9
2L 4
28.6
9.1

14.3
9.1
22.2
22.2

28.6
42.9
50.0
75.0

i4.3

14.3

42.9
25.0

33.3
50.0

33.3

2

100.0

1

100.0

1

Total......................................... 2,433 1,655




De­
De­
cided cided
Re­
favor­ ad­
Com­ ferred
W ith ­
ably verse­ pro­
to
to un­ l y to mised trade drawn.
ions. un­
board.
ions.

100.0
497

24

44

213

68.0

20.4

1.0

1.8

8.8

20

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

G R IE V A N C E S F I L E D B Y E M P L O Y E R S ’ A S S O C IA T IO N S F R O M O C T . 1,1903, TO D E C . 31,1909;
A N D D IS P O S IT IO N T H E R E O F .

Number of cases—

De­
De­
De­
Total
cided cided
cided
Re­
griev­
favor­ ad­
favor­
ferred
ances
W ith ­ ably
ably verse­
to
filed.
to
ly to trade drawn. to
em ­
em­
em­
board.
ploy­ ploy­
ploy­
ers.
ers.
ers.

Names of associations.

Mason Builders’ Association...............................
Master Carpenters’ Association.........................
Master Steam and H ot W ater Fitters’ Asso­
ciation......................................................................
Employing Plasterers’ Association..................
Master League of Cement W orkers..................
Mason Contractors’ Association.........................
Composition Roofers and Waterproofers’ As­
sociation..................................................................
Elevator Manufacturers’ Association..............
BuildingTradesEm ployers’ Association____
Interior Decorators and Cabinetmakers.........
Tile, Grate, and Mantel Association.................
Roofers ana Sheet Metal Workers’ Associa­
tion ........................................................................... .
Metal Ceiling Association......................................
Iron League Erectors’ Association....................
Marble Industry Employers’ Association—
Electrical Contractors’ Association....................
Association of Manufacturers of Metal Cov­
ered Doors and W indow s...................................
Manufacturing Woodworkers’ A ssociation.. .
Architectural Iron Workers’ Association.........
Association of Master Painters and Deco­
rators..........................................................................
Parquet Flooring Association..............................
Contracting Plumbers’ Association...................
Individual Employers.............................................
The Hoisting Association......................................
Metallic Furring and Lathing Association . . .
Cut Stone Contractors’ Association...................
League of Heat and Cold Insulation.................
Employing Stone Setters’ Association............
Mosaic Employers’ Association..........................
Ornamental Bronze and Iron Masters’ Asso­
ciation......................................................................
T o ta l..




Per cent of cases—

71
42

49
35

11
5

24
21
15
12

20
14
9
9

1
5
5
3

12
11
11
10
9

8
5
1
9
7

2
6

9
7
7
7
7

6
7
3
6
2

2

6
6
5

5
5

4
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
1

4
1
1
3
2
1
1

318

69.0
83.3

15.5
11.9

83.3
66.7
60.0
75.0

4.2
23.8
33.3
25.0

1

66.7
45.5
9.1
90.0
77.8

16.7
54.5

66.7
100.0
4 42.9
85.7
1 28.6

22.2

10
1
1

1
4
1

1

1
1

1
1

1

100.0
33.3
33.3
100.0
66.7
50.0
1 50.0

2
1

57

14.1
4.8
12.5
9.5
6.7

8.3

8.3

10.0
11.1

11.1
11.1
57.1

14.3
14.3

57.1
16.7

16.7
100.0
66.7
33.3

33.3
33.3

50.0
" ’ so.'o

100.0
50.0 50.0
100.0

1
215

1.4

90.9

83.3
83.3

5

1
.

1

10
2
3
2
1

1

1
1

2
1

De­
cided
Re­
ad­
ferred
verse­
W ith ­
to
ly to trade drawn.
em­
board.
ploy­
ers.

100.0
8

38

67.6

17.9

2.5

11.9

CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF NEW YORK.

21

CASES SETTLED BY CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION .

Section 18 of the plan provides that “ All complaints shall be
addressed to the secretary in writing, who shall endeavor to adjust
them and report them to the executive committee.” If this method
of conciliation proves unsuccessful, then the complainant, through the
secretary, files a formal and specific complaint and the executive
committee is conferred with within 24 hours of the receipt of the
complaint. Then, if it is decided that the question at issue is a sub­
ject of arbitration, the executive committee organizes a special
arbitration board to hear and decide the point at issue. The special
arbitration board thus selected must convene and complete its organi­
zation by the selection of an umpire within 24 hours.
Under the provisions of section 18 of the plan the secretary is
empowered to adjust disputes through conciliatory methods, and has
succeeded in adjusting 1,070 cases out of a total of 2,751 cases filed, or
38.9 per cent. Of these 1,070 cases adjusted by conciliation, 1,052,
or 98.3 per cent, were filed by the unions, and 18 cases, or 1.7 per cent,
were filed by the employers. Thus it will be seen that of the 2,433
cases submitted by the unions, 1,052, or 43.2 per cent, were settled
through conciliation, while 1,381, or 56.8 per cent, went to arbitration.
Of the 1,052 cases submitted to conciliation by the unions, 779,
or 74 per cent, were sustained, and 273 cases, or 26 per cent, were
not sustained.
Of the 1,381 cases presented for arbitration on the part of the
unions, 876, or 63.4 per cent, were decided favorably, and 224, or 16.2
per cent, adversely; 24 cases, or 1.8 per cent, were compromised; 44
cases, or 3.2 per cent, were referred to and settled by trade boards;
and 213 cases, or 15.4 per cent, were withdrawn.
As only 18 cases out of a total of 318 cases submitted by employers
were considered possible for conciliation, and inasmuch as all cases
submitted were sustained, it would seem to indicate that the policy
of the employers was to present cases only for arbitration. Of the
300 cases presented for arbitration, 197, or 65.7 per cent, were decided
favorably; 57, or 19 per cent, adversely; 8, or 2.7 per cent, were
referred to trade boards; and 38 cases, or 12.7 per cent, were with­
drawn.




22

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

The following tables present, by unions and associations, the number
and disposition of cases submitted for conciliation and arbitration:
G R IE V A N C E S F I L E D B Y U N IO N S F R O M O CT. 1, 1903, T O D E C . 31, 1909, A N D S E T T L E D
B Y C O N C IL L V T IO N O R A R B I T R A T I O N ..

Cases settled b y con­
ciliation
through
general secretary's
office.
Trades.

Total
griev­
ances
filed.
Sus­
tained.

Carpenters and framers........
Steam and hot-water fitters.
Sheet-metal workers..............
Painters and decorators____
Electrical workers..................
Marblecutters, carvers, and
satters......................................
____
lflihers___t _
Housesmiths and bridgem en..........................................
Plasterers...................................
Plumbers and gas fitters___
Engineers, portable and
hoisting...................................
Elevator constructors- - - _
_
Riggers........................................
Cement masons.......................
Cement and asphalt work­
ers ................................... ........
Tar, felt, and waterproof
workers...................................
House shorors and sheath
pilers ....... ..............................
Tue layers.................................
Marble polishers, rubbers,
and sawyers
. . ....
Machinists
. ... ......
.......................
Stone setters
Asbestos workers....................
Mosaic workers . . . . . . . . .
33lues tone cutters
S tonecutters
IVnAf]l norTAK •«••••••••«•••
f TUv wv v » vlo
Cl
Marble cutters* helpers
Roofers slat© and til©
B ricklay ers
Plasterers’ laborers
Uphols terers
Modelers and sculptors
Marhlfl maphiTiA worlrflrs ••
iximUiu ItlcW /IIJ WV/IACIO•
L ilO
Woodworkers machine

Cases referred to arbitration, and disposition
thereof.

D e­
D e­
cided
Com­
cided
N ot
ad­
favora­
pro­
sus­ Total.
versely mised.
tained.
bly to
to
unions. unions.

319
234
217
173
161

85
62
65
71
44

28
27
23
31
17

113
89
88
102
61

134
103
89
40
64

30
24
19
18
15

1
1

151
142

44
45

12
20

56
65

71
50

10
6

107
107
95

74
43
28

14
15
19

88
58
47

10
24
22

88
85
71
60

29
22
24
18

9
10
14
2

38
32
38
20

R e­
ferred
W ith ­
to
trade drawn. T o ta l
board.

8
3
1
1

33
14
18
11
16

206
145
129
71
100

1

1

12
19

95
77

4
13
20

1
1
1

1
1

3
10
5

19
49
48

38
33
15
28

5
14
7
1

1
1
1
4

4
5
9
6

50
53
33
40

1
1

1
1

53

7

7

33

2

1

1

9

48

49

20

5

25

13

0

1

2

2

24

42
40

19
11

3
5

22
16

15
13

3
2

2

2

2
5

20
24

32
27
26
24
21
17
14
14
11
9
9
7
7
4
4
4
3
2
2
1
1

5
9
10
4
3
6
8
5
1
5
4
3
1

1
3
5
1
2

6
12
15
5
5
6
8
5
1
5
4
4
3
2
1
1
2
1

16
8
3
8
12
10
3
3
8
2
3

2
2
2
5
1

1

2
1
1

8
5
4
4
2

26
15
11
19
16
11
6
9
10
4
5
3
4
2
3
3
1
1

1

1

Total................................ 2,433

779

273 1,052

Mosaic workers' helpers-----Machine stone workers
S o d carriers
flflhiiiptTnalrpr*!




1
1
1

1
2
2
1
1

1
3
4
1

2
1
2
2

1
1

1
3

1

2
3
1

2
1
1

2
1

876

224

24

1
44

213

1,381

CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.
G R IE V A N C E S F I L E D B Y E M P L O Y E R S ’ A S S O C IA T IO N S F R O M O CT. 1, 1903, T O
31, 1909, A N D S E T T L E D B Y C O N C IL IA T IO N O R A R B I T R A T I O N .

Cases settled b y con­
ciliation
through
general secretary’s
office.
Names of associations.

Total
griev­
ances
filed.
Sus­
tained.




DEC.

Cases referred to arbitration, and dis­
position thereof.

D e­
D e­
R e­
cided
cided
N ot
ferred
ad­
favor­
W ith ­
sus­
Total.
to
Total.
versely
drawn.
ably
tained.
trade
to em­ to em­
board.
ployers. ployers.

Mason Builders’ Association.............
Master Carpenters’ Association.........
Master Steam and H ot W ater Fit­
ters7 Association.................................
Em ploying Plasterers’ Association..
Master League of Cement W ork ers..
Mason Contractors’ Association.........
Composition Roofers and W ater­
proof ers' Association.........................
ElevatorManufacturers’Association.
Building Trades Em ployers’ Asso­
ciation......................................................
Interior Decorators and Cabinet
Makers......................................................
Tile, Grate, and Mantel Association.
Roofers and Sheet Metal Workers’
Association.............................................
M etal Ceiling Association.....................
Iron League Erectors’ Association..
Marble Industry Employers’ Asso­
ciation......................................................
Electrical Contractors’ Association..
Association of ManufacturersofMet
al Covered Doors and W indow s.. .
Manufacturing Woodworkers’ Asso­
ciation......................................................
Architectural Iron Workers’ Asso­
ciation......................................................
Association of Master Painters and
Decorators..............................................
Parquet Flooring Association.............
Contracting Plumbers7 Association.
Individual employers............................
The Hoisting Association.....................
Metal Furring and Lathing Associ­
ation.........................................................
Cut Stone Contractors’ Association..
League of Heat and Cold Insulation.
Employing Stone Setters’ Associa­
tion............................................................
Mosaic Employers’ Association.........
Ornamental Bronze and Iron Mas­
ters’ Association...................................
Total.................................................

23

40
24
14

11
12
11

11
10

318

18

18

197

57

38

300

24

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

NATURE AND

D IS P O S IT IO N

O F G R IE V A N C E S F I L E D B Y U N IO N S F R O M O CT . 1, 1903,
T O D E C . 31, 1909.

Number of cases—

Nature of grievances.

Total
griev­
ances.

De­
De­
cided
cided
Re­
Com­
favor­
ad­
ferred
W ith ­
pro­
ably
versely
mised. to trade drawn.
to
to
board.
unions. unions.

Em ploym ent of men not members of unions....................
Application for removal of p lan ..............................................
Infringement upon trade jurisdiction...................................
Nonpaym ent of wages.................................................................
Failure of employers to com ply w ith decisions................
Use of nonunion products.........................................................
Nonpayment of union wage scale...........................................
Unions versus unions for engaging in strikes.....................
Refusal of employers to admit business agent to build­
ings ...............................................................................................
Refusal of employers to increase wages...............................
Locking out members of unions.............................................
Miscellaneous grievances...........................................................

1,563
381
263
42
41
38
28
24

1,058
343
102
36
39
16
21
14

12
12
4
25

Total......................................................................................

2,433

353
27
82
3

1

22

22

13

129
11
44
3
2
10

9
7
7

3

11
3
1
11

1
1
7

4
1

2

1
4
2
4

1,655

497

24

44

213

3

N A T U R E A N D D IS P O S IT IO N O F G R IE V A N C E S F IL E D B Y E M P L O Y E R S F R O M O CT. 1,
1903, T O D E C . 31, 1909.

Number of cases-

Nature of grievances.

Total
griev| ances.

DeDe­
cided
cided
Re­
favor­
ad­
ferred W ith ­
ably
versely to trade drawn.
to em­ to em­ board.
ployers. ployers.

Employers versus unions for engaging in strikes..............................
Application of employers for restoration of plan...............................
Failure of unions to comply with decision..........................................
Employers versus unions for threatening to engage in strikes...
Employers versus unions for violating agreements.........................
Failure of unions to supply mechanics.................................................
Miscellaneous grievances.............................................................................

214
42
22
18
9
3
10

162
26
18
3
2
2
2

29
13
3
5
3
1
3

5

2

3

T otal.......................................................................................................

318

215

57

8

33




1

18
3
1
10
3

CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.
N U M B E R A N D P E R C E N T O F G R IE V A N C E S O F E A C H S P E C IF IE D N A T U R E F I L E D
U N IO N S A N D B Y E M P L O Y E R S F R O M OCT. 1, 1903, T O D E C . 31, 1909.

25
BY

Grievances filed.

Nature of grievances.

By
unions.

Em ploym ent of men not members of unions......................................
Application for removal of plan................................................................
Infringement upon trade jurisdiction.....................................................
Employers versus unions for engaging in strikes...............................
Application for restoration of plan...........................................................
Nonpayment of wages..................................................................................
Failure to comply with decisions.............................................................
Use of nonunion products. .......................................................................
Nonpavment of union wage scale............................................................
Unions* versus unions for engaging in strikes......................................
Employers versus unions for threatening to strike...........................
Refusal to admit business agents to buildings...................................
Refusal of employers to increase wages.................................................
Violation of agreements...............................................................................
Locking out members of unions...............................................................
Failure of unions to supply mechanics..................................................
Miscellaneous grievances.............................................................................

1,563
381
263

Total........................................................................................................

2,433

By
employ­
ers.

214
42
42
41 ............ 22 ‘
38
28
24
18
12
12
9
4
3
25
10
318

Total.

Per
cent of
total
griev­
ances.

1,563
381
263
214
42
42
63
38
28
24
18
12
12
9
4
3
35

56.8
13.9
9.6
7.8
1.5
1.5
2.3
1.4
1.0
.9
.7
.4
.4
.3
.1
.1
1.3

2,751

100.0

WAGE RATES AND UNION MEMBERSHIP.

No data are obtainable to present accurately information as to
wages and membership in unions prior to 1906. A few unions have
complete records of membership, but on account of the many inde­
pendent or dual unions that have been connected with the general
arbitration plan it is impossible to show the precise increase in mem­
bership of a large number of unions. Again, it must be understood
that the question of jurisdiction and amalgamation has had a very
marked influence on membership.
It is for just this reason that it is impossible to show the number of
men receiving increased compensation, but in considering the skilled
crafts as a whole the increase in 1913 over that paid in 1906 was
approximately 6.5 per cent, while the unskilled occupations show
an increase of about 5.5 per cent.
In the skilled occupations the greatest increase in wage rates for
1913 over 1906 was received by the boiler makers, $1.50 per day, or
from $3.50 to $5 per day. The smallest increase was 20 cents, re­
ceived by the carpenters and structural and ornamental iron workers,
or from $4.80 to $5. The house shorers, considered a semiskilled
occupation, though fast becoming a skilled occupation, received
an increase of only 18 cents during the same period.
Among the unskilled occupations the plasterers’ laborers were
obliged to accept a reduction in wages from $3.50 per day to $3.25
per day, but the general increase in the other unskilled occupations
amounted approximately to 25 cents per day on the average.
The table following shows the minimum daily rates of wages in the
building trades since 1906. The rates are those reported as prevail­
ing throughout the greater part of each year shown.



26

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

M IN IM U M D A I L Y R A T E S O F W A G E S IN T H E B U I L D I N G T R A D E S IN T H E B O R O U G H S
OF M A N H A T T A N A N D T H E B R O N X , N E W Y O R K , B Y T R A D E S AN D Y E A R S .
[The rates are those reported as prevailing throughout the greater part of the year in each case. Eight
hoars constitute a day? work in all trades; 4 hours are worked on Saturday (44 hours per week). J
s

Trades.

1906

1907

1908

1909

1910

1911

1912

1913

Asbestos workers and insulators.. . $4.50 $4.50 $4.50 $4.50 $4.50 $4.50 $4.65 $4.75 $4.75
Asbestos workers and insulators1
helpers...............................................
2.80 2.80 2.80 2.80 2.80 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.00
4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50
Bluestone cutters..............................
Bluestone cutters’ helpers.............
2.80 2.80 2.80 2.80 2.80 2.80 2.80 3.00
3.50 3.50 3.50 4.25 4.25 4.25 5.00 5.00
Boiler makers.....................................
Boiler makers’ helpers....................
3.20 3.20 3.20 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50
Bricklayers..........................................
5.60 5.60 5.60 5.60 5.60 5.60 5.60 5.60 6.00 $6.00
4.00 4.00 4.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00
Cabinetmakers...................................
Carpenters and framers1................
4.80 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00
Cement and asphalt workers........
2.80 2.80 2.80 2.80 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00
Cement and concrete masons____
5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00
Decorative art-glass workers........
4.00 4.00
4.50 4.50 4.50 5.00 5.00 5.00
Decorators and gilders.................... 24.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50
3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 4.00
Derrick men and riggers................
Electrical fixture workers..............
4.00 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50
Electrical workers.............................
4.00 4.00 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50
Electrical workers’ helpers............
2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20
Elevator constructors......................
4.50 4.50 4.50 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.28
Engineers, portable and hoisting.. 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.75 6.00 6.00 6.00
Engineers, stationary.......................
4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.75 5.00 5.00 5.00
Granite cutters................................... 34.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50
H od carriers.........................................
3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00
House
shorers, movers, and
sheath pilers....................................
3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.68 3.68 3.68
House
shorers, movers, and
sheath pilers’ helpers...................
2.65 2.65 2.65 2.65 2.65 2.65 2.65
2.65
Machine stoneworkers, derrick
m en..................................................... . 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00
Machine stoneworkers’ helpers___ 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75
Machine stoneworkers, planer men 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25
Machine stoneworkers, ru b bers.. . 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00
Machine stoneworkers, saw yers.. . 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50
Machinists.............................................. 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 5.00 5.00
Marble bed rubbers............................ 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75
Marble carvers...................................... 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 6.00 6.00 6.00
Marble cutters and setters............... 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.50 5.50 5.50
Marble cutters and setters’ helpers 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.25 3.25 3.25
Marble polishers................................... 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00
Marble sawyers..................................... 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25
Metallic lathers..................................... 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.80 4.80 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.30
Mosaic workers..................................... 4.00 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.50 4.50
Mosaic workers’ helpers.................... 2.50 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 3.00 3.00
4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00
Painters
5 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00
Paper hangers...............................
3.50 3.50 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25
Plasterers’ laborers.....................
Plasterers, plain and ornamental •. 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50
Plate and sheet glass glaziers.........
3.00 3.00 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50
5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.50 5.50 5.50
Plumbers and gas fitters.................
3.00 3.00 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.50 3.68 3.68 3.68 3.68
Rock drillers and tool sharpeners.
2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50
R ock m en.............................................
Roofers, tar, felt, and composition. 3.75 3.75 3.75 3.75 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00
Sheet-meta! workers...............
4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.75 4.75 4.75 5.00 5.00
4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75
Slate and tile roofers...............
5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00
Stair builders.............................
Steam and hot-water fitters............ 4.50 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50
Steam and hot-water fitters1
3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00
helpers...............................................
5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50 5.50
Stonemasons........................................ 4.60 4.60 4.60 4.60 4.60 4.60 4.60 4.80
Structural and ornamental iron
4.80 4.80 4.80 4.80 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00
workers..............................................
Structural and ornamental iron
3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50
workers’ helpers.............................
5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.50 5.50
Tile layers.............................................
Tile layers’ helpers............................ 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.28
4.00 4.08 4.08 4.08 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50
Upholsterers........................................
4.00 4.50 4.50 4.50 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00
W ood carvers......................................
W ood lathers....................................... 76.00 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.30
2.50 2.50 2.75 2.75 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00
Woodworkers, machine...................

$6.00
5.00

4 3.68
<2.50

1 Framers are employed in the building of forms to be used in connection with reenforced concrete or
cement structures.
2 Includes also stripers, letterers, grainers, and vamishers.
* Granite cutters receive $4.50 per day in yards; $5 per day on bridge work.
* Same rate for 1917.
* Paper hangers usually work piecework, but charge 75 cents per hour when working daywork.
8 The m inimum wage for modelers is $5.50 per day; the m axim um reaches $100 per week.
7 W ood lathers usually work piecework, but charge 62J cents per hour when working daywork.




CONCILIATION, ETC.? IN BUILDING TRADES OE N E W YORK.

27

Data relative to rates per hour and per day are shown for each
occupation in separate groups in the following table. This table also
shows the number of skilled and unskilled in subdivided groups, with
the per cent in each group:
N U M B E R I N E A C H O C C U P A T IO N , M IN IM U M H O U R L Y A N D D A I L Y W A G E R A T E S , A N D
P E R C EN T OF T O T A L M EN E M P L O Y E D A T E A C H R A T E .
[Eight hours constitute a day’s work in all occupations; 4 hours are worked on Saturday (44 hours per
week).]

Occupations.

Minimum rate
of wages.

N um ber
in occu­
pation,
October,
1912.

Per hour
(cents).

Per cent
Men at
o f total
each rate men at
o f pay. each rate
Per day.
of pay.

SKILLED OCCUPATIONS.

504
Woodworkers, machine........................................................
Machine stoneworkers (saw yers),.......................................
100
100
Plate and sheet glass glaziers................................................
House shorers and movers.....................................................
430
2,000
R ock drillers and tool sharpeners..................................... .
T>Arriftlr men an<i r i g g f t r s .............................
550
Marble polishers.........................................................................
480
Machine stoneworkers (rubbers).........................................
200
Painters.........................................................................................
8,958
Roofers, tar, felt, and composition.....................................
626
Marble sawyers...........................................................................
20
2Z5
Machine stone planemen........................................................
Bluestone cutters.......................................................................
300
Decorators and gilders.............................................................
70
Electrical-fixture fixers...........................................................
1,500
Electrical workers.....................................................................
2,524
Granite cutters...........................................................................
618
95
Mosaic workers...........................................................................
744
Upholsterers................................................................................
Stonemasons................................................................................
1,005
Asbestos workers.......................................................................
213
Marble bed rubbers...................................................................
100
Slate and tile roofers.................................................................
88
574
Boiler makers..............................................................................
1,415
Cabinetmakers...........................................................................
14,519
Carpenters and framers...........................................................
Cement and concrete masons...............................................
520
Decorative art-glass workers.................................................
265
Engineers, stationary...............................................................
1,300
Machinists....................................................................................
400
Metal lathers...............................................................................
500
Sheet-metal workers.................................................................
3,101
Stair builders..............................................................................
170
Structural iron workers...........................................................
1,959
W ood carvers..............................................................................
300
W ood lathers...............................................................................
300
Elevator constructors..............................................................
400
Marble cutters and setters. . . .............................................
1,100
Plasterers......................................................................................
3,825
Plumbers and gas fitters.........................................................
3,303
Steam and hot-water fitters..................................................
i, m
Stonecutters, carvers, and setters.....................................
470
Tile layers.....................................................................................
428
7,675
Bricklayers...................................................................................
Engineers, portable and hoisting.........................................
1,280
Marble carvers............................................................................
200
Paper hangers (decorators)...................................................
300
Total, skilled occupations..........................................




Z7i

S3.00

504

}

433

3.50

200

.30

}
%
1

46

3.63

2,430

3.63

l

50

4.00

10,814

16.16

53*

4.25

295

.44

561

4.50

5,851

8.75

57*

4.83

1,005

1.50

59|

4.75

401

.60

C2J

5.00

25,323

37.85

66

5.28

400

.60

68|

5.50

10,226

15.28

70

5.60

7,075

11.47

7
5

6.00

1,780

2.66

66,904

100.00

0.75

I
}
*

1

28

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

N U M B E R IN E A C H O C C U P A T IO N , M IN IM U M H O U R L Y A N D D A I L Y W A G E R A T E S , A N D
P E R C E N T O F T O T A L M E N E M P L O Y E D A T E A C H R A T E — Concluded.

Occupations.

Num ber
in occu­
pation,
October,
1912.

Minimum rate
of wages.

Per hour
(cents).

Per day.

Per cent
Men at
of total
each rate men at
of pay. each rate
of pay.

UNSKILLED OCCUPATIONS.

Electrical workers’ helpers.................................................
1,500
Rockm en.......................................................................................
1,345
House shorers and movers’ helpers....................................
60
Machine stoneworkers’ helpers.............................................
50
Asbestos workers’ helpers......................................................
213
Bluestone cutters’ helpers.....................................................
33
Cement and asphalt workers.................................................
1,600
H od carriers.................................................................................
11,997
Machine stoneworkers, derrick m en..................................
50
Steam and hot-water fitters’ helpers.................................
1,000
Tile layers’ helpers
...................................................................
375
Marble cutters’ helpers...........................................................
400
Plasterers’ laborers...................................................................
2,725 }
Boiler makers’ helpers.............................................................
345
Structural iron workers’ helpers.........................................
448 }

27J
31J
33*
34§

$2.20
2.50
2.65
2. 75

1,500
1,345
60
50

6.77
6.07
.27
.23

37i

3.00

15,268

68.96

40§

3.25

3,125

14.11

« }

3.50

793

3.58

Total, unskilled occupations.....................................

22,141

100.00

Grand total......................................................................

89,045

Taking into consideration all the occupations in the building
industry, it is important to note that 75.1 per cent of the 89,045
men included in the inquiry were skilled craftsmen. The remaining
22,141, or 24.9 per cent, were of the class of unskilled workmen. Of
this latter class it is estimated that more than 50 per cent are in the
process of training as recruits for the skilled occupations, while a
very large proportion of the remaining unskilled workmen will con­
tinue as building laborers.
For the purposes of a summary of the wage rates of the skilled
craftsmen three divisions have been made, those receiving $5 and
not more than $6 per day, those receiving $4 and not more than
$4.75 per day, and those receiving $3 and not over $3.68 per day.
Of the total of 66,904 skilled craftsmen, 25,323, or 37.85 per cent,
earned 62.5 cents per hour; 400, or 0.60 per cent, earned 66 cents per
hour; 10,226, or 15.28 per cent, earned 68.75 cents per hour; 7,675,
or 11.47 per cent, earned 70 cents per hour; 1,780, or 2.66 per cent,
earned 75 cents per hour. Thus 45,404, or 67.86 per cent of the
skilled craftsmen, received from 62.5 cents to 75 cents per hour, or
from $5 to $6 per day.
Of those receiving the rates from $4 to $4.75 per day 10,814, or
16.16 percent, earned 50 cents per hour; 295, or 0.44 per cent, earned
53.13 cents per hour; 5,851, or 8.75 per cent, earned 56.25 cents per
hour; 1,005, or 1.50 per cent, earned 57.5 cents per hour; and 401,
or 0.60 per cent, earned 59.38 cents per hour. Thus 18,366, or 27.4
per cent, received from 50 cents to 59.38 cents per hour.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

29

Of the remaining 3,134 skilled men, 504, or 0.75 per cent, earned
37.5 cents per hour; 200, or 0.30 per cent, earned 43.75 cents per
hour; and 2,430, or 3.63 per cent, earned 46 cents per hour. These
include the rates per day from $3 to $3.68.
Taking those employed in unskilled occupations, four divisions are
made, those receiving $2.20 and not over $2.75 per day, those receiving
$3 per day, those receiving $3.25 per day, and those receiving $3.50
per day.
In the first group, 1,500, or 6.77 per cent, earned 27.5 cents per
hour; 1,345, or 6.07 per cent, earned 31.25 cents per hour; 60, or
0.27 per cent, earned 33.13 cents per hour; and 50, or 0.23 per cent,
earned 34.38 cents per hour, making a total of 2,955, or 13.35 per
cent of the unskilled men earning less than $3.
The largest group, 15,268, or 68.96 per cent, earned 37.5 cents per
hour. The next group, 3,125, or 14.11 per cent, earned 40.63 cents
per hour, and 793, or 3.58 per cent, earned 43.75 cents per hour.
SUM M ARY AND A N A LYSIS OF TYPICAL GRIEVANCES FILED BY
UNIONS.

The table on page 25 shows that there were collectively 16 different
classes of grievances, not including a miscellaneous class, filed with
the General Arbitration Board. Other than the miscellaneous class
the unions filed 11 kinds of grievances, while the employers filed
only 6 different kinds.
EMPLOYMENT OF NONUNION MEN.

The most important complaints, from a numerical standpoint,
were those filed by the unions against employers for employing non­
union workmen. The greater portion of these cases were against
subcontractors to whom work had been sublet by employers. They
were, therefore, *in reality against employers who were not in the
first instance participants in the plan of arbitration, but who were
later compelled to comply with the provisions of the plan. Of the
1,563 complaints of this nature filed, 1,058, or 67.7 per cent, were
decided in favor of the unions and 353, or 22.6 per cent, were decided
adversely. One was compromised, 22 referred to trade boards, and
129 withdrawn.
APPLICATION FOR REMOVAL OF PLAN.

The next largest number of complaints submitted by the unions,
and probably more important than any other kind of complaint filed
except that of jurisdiction, was for permission to remove the protec­
tion of the plan from a job or shop where the conditions established
by the arbitration plan were not maintained. Section 31 of the plan
is as follows: “ When the conditions established by this arbitration




30

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

plan are not maintained in a shop or on a job by employers or em­
ployees not parties to this plan, the plan shall not apply in this par­
ticular shop or job for the time being: Provided the nonmaintenance
is proven to the satisfaction of the executive committee of the Gen­
eral Arbitration Board and the dispute can not be adjusted by it
within 24 hours.” In effect, the above section permitted sympa­
thetic strikes against employers not members of the plan. In com­
pliance with section 32 of the plan, the unions had agreed “ to main­
tain the wages, hours, and other conditions of employment prescribed
by the several trade agreements within the territory covered by the
plan.”
The incorporation of this section afforded an opportunity for the
unions to proceed against independent firms in an effort to maintain
these conditions. The number of complaints of this kind was 381,
of which 343, or 90 per cent, were decided in favor of the unions,
27 cases, or 7.1 per cent, against the unions, and 11 cases, or 2.9 per
cent, were withdrawn.
INFRINGEMENT UPON TRADE JURISDICTION.

Controversies involving trade jurisdiction are the third largest in
number in the chronicle of disputes considered by the General Arbi­
tration Board, but in relative importance are considered first. The
interest manifested in these cases by employers and employed is
generally coequal, but at times the interest of the employers greatly
exceeds that of the unions themselves.
The aggrieved unions presented 263 complaints on account of juris­
dictional disputes or infringement upon trade jurisdiction. Regarding
grievances of this character, the plan provides that “ in case of a
dispute concerning a question of jurisdiction of trade or a dispute
caused by conflicting provisions of two or more trade agreements, the
complainant shall notify the general secretary,” who is authorized to
call a conference of the unions and employers’ associations interested.
In the event of a refusal or failure of the parties concerned to adjust
their differences within 21 days after the complaint has been filed,
the General Arbitration Board or the executive committee must
determine whether the question at issue is a subject for arbitration.
Of the 263 complaints, 102 were decided in favor of the contenders,
82 were decided adversely, 22 were compromised, 13 were referred
to trade boards, and 44 were withdrawn.
The judgments rendered and awards made by the arbitrators,
particularly in cases of this nature, are believed to have eliminated a
great source of trouble and have also insured and maintained friendly
relations between the trade-unions, by which the building of struc­
tures progressed without interference.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

31

With the evolution in the building industry, new ideas in archi­
tecture, the introduction of new inventions, new materials, new
practices and processes, which in turn involved the control of those
processes as well as the installation of new appliances, have kept the
several trades constantly in controversies as to jurisdictional claims.
Naturally the keenness for possession or dispossession at times is fought
with much personal or local feeling, as the determination of the claim
usually secures much more employment for the union into whose
possession the jurisdictional claim is awarded, and a corresponding
decrease in employments to the dispossessors.
The charter rights and prerogatives of the several international
unions are jealously guarded, the theory being that the least encroach­
ment upon their jurisdiction as claimed in their charter must not be
tolerated. It is not always because the personnel in one trade as
against another is better able to perform the particular kind of work
in dispute, but rather because certain particular occupations are
becoming increasingly more technical and subdivided in their char­
acter and every effort is made to control each and every item of
employment possible in order to secure more employment for its
members, and in just the proportion that one union deprives another
union of employments, it increases the opportunities for employment
of its own membership. For example, take the jurisdictional dis­
putes of the plumbers and steam fitters; while the steam fitter and
the plumber have a uniform wage scale and uniform conditions of
employment, and both handle pipe as the principle material of their
respective trades, the rights of the steam fitter to the installation of
pipe for the conveying of steam are carefully protected from the
encroachment of the plumber, who installs the identical kind of
pipe for the conveying of water.1
Again, for example, take the installation of an elevator which
involves seven trades, the machinist, electrical workers, steam fitters,
steam fitters’ helpers, structural iron workers, carpenters, and cement
masons. The electrical workers do all the electrical wiring, the
machinists set the electric elevator machinery, including the lining
up of the motor to the winding portion of the machine, the electrical
workers commence at the terminals of the motor and do all the wiring
for operating and controlling circuits, and when the elevator is ready
to start the electrical workers make the adjustments, start the
machine, and set the automatic stops where elevators are controlled
by a switch in the car or on the landings. When an elevator is con­
trolled by a hand rope or mechanical wheel or crank device in the
car the machinists start and adjust the elevator and machinery.
* Since January 1, 1913, on account of the amalgamation of the plumbers and steam fitters, jurisdic­
tional disputes in the pipe-fitting trades have been eliminated in cities other than New Y ork.




32

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

The structural iron workers erect all structural work, including
elevator towers, division beams for hatchways, and structural sup­
ports for overhead work; the machinists drill and set the sheave
beams and supporting beams for the machines and the necessary
leveling shims or chairs. The machinists install all elevator car and
counterweight machined steel guide rails and the necessary brackets
for fastening them in place, except when rivets are used; rivets are
driven by the structural iron workers.
The machinists also install the mechanical control speed governor
and its appurtenances and the installation of fabricated car frames
and platform and guardrails on freight elevators.
The ornamental-iron worker sets all cabs on passenger elevators,
and when elevators used for freight purposes are provided with
ornamental-iron cabs the ornamental-iron workers set them also.
When wood guideposts with wood car or counterweight guides are
used they are set in place and the fastenings made by carpenters.
The steam fitters and steam fitters’ helpers do all hydraulic pipe
work in connection with hydraulic or other elevators, and when the
steam fitting for pump or engine is included the steam fitters and
steam fitters’ helpers do that also. The machinists assemble the
hydraulic machinery.
The building laborers do all the digging and concreting of all
foundations relative to elevators or machinery pertaining to systems,
except finishing work, which is done by cement masons. The founda­
tion bolts are set by machinists.
NONPAYMENT OF W AGES.

The nonpayment of wages was never considered as a serious dis­
pute directly between employers and employees under the plan, but
rather between subcontractors indirectly parties to the plan. There
were 42 complaints of this nature filed by the unions. Of these 42
cases, 36 were decided in favor of the unions, 3 adversely, and 3 were
withdrawn.
USE OF NONUNION PRODUCTS,

Restriction against the use of nonunion products is claimed by the
unions in practically all contracts made between the employers and
the unions, and has been kept inviolate except in a few instances.
Of the 38 complaints recorded, 26 were filed by the carpenters’ union.
Controversies over the use of nonunion material has caused many
injunctions to be issued by the courts against this union, but a recent
decision of the courts is believed by the carpenters to confirm their
contentions against the use of nonunion products. Out of the 38
complaints filed 16 were sustained, 9 were not sustained, 3 were
referred to trade boards, and 10 withdrawn.




C O N C IL IA T IO N , E T C ., I N

B U IL D IN G

TRADES OF N E W

YOKK.

33

FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH DECISIONS.

Failure of employers to comply with the decisions or obey the
orders of the arbitrators occasioned serious consideration at the hands
of the executive committee. While the executive committee acting
as a committee of the Board of Arbitration had no authority to inflict
punishment upon employers for failure to comply with the decisions
of the arbitrators, the records show that a recommendation from the
executive committee to the board of governors of the Building Trades
Employers’ Association that cognizance be taken of the offense com­
mitted and that the offenders be disciplined never failed to have the de­
sired result. In many instances the punishment was considered severe.
The character of the punishment meted out to the offenders varied
from expulsion from the association, suspension from membership,
fines ranging as high as $5,000, or both fine and suspension, to the
lighter punishment of imposing a censure with a warning against
future disobedience. There were 41 complaints of this kind, 39 of
which were sustained, the remaining 2 being withdrawn.
NONPAYMENT OF UNION WAGE SCALE.

Complaints against firms for nonpayment of union wage scale
numbered 28. Approximately one-half of these were made by the
unions of carpenters and painters. This issue usually resolved itself
into the question of the responsibility of a subordinate in charge of a
piece of work and his authority to fix the rate of wages of men hired
by him without the knowledge of his superior in charge. Of the 28
comglaints filed 12 were adjusted by conciliation. The remaining 16
were referred to arbitration with the result that 9 were decided in
favor of the unions, making a total of 21 cases decided favorably as
against 7 cases decided adversely.
UNIONS v. UNIONS FOR ENGAGING IN STRIKES.

Complaints of unions against other trades for engaging in strikes
usually involved the question of jurisdiction of trades. Of the whole
number recorded with the Board of Arbitration the majority were
filed by the plasterers and gas fitters. These disputes also involved
the question of the removal of the protection of the plan of arbitration
as well as the employment of nonunion workmen. The complaints
of this nature usually cited the fact that several trades were striking
in opposition to the complainant and in defiance of the plan. Twentyfour cases of this kind were referred to arbitration, 14 of which were
decided favorably, 7 adversely, and 3 were withdrawn.
REFUSAL TO ADM IT BUSINESS AGENTS TO BUILDING.

Refusal of employers to allow business agents to enter buildings
was the cause of serious discussion on the part of the executive com­
mittee and resulted in the passing of a resolution empowering the
97394°— Bull. 124— 13------ 3




34

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

committee to issue cards or credentials to business agents permitting
them to enter buildings. Eight of the 12 complaints recorded were
filed by the Sheet Metal Workers’ Union. The objection on the part
of the sheet metal employers was that they believed the business
agents were endeavoring to obtain possession of secret processes and
they did not propose to allow them to secure access to these processes.
The other complaints were for a variety of reasons, but the executive
committee decided favorably in 11 of the 12 cases.
REFUSAL TO INCREASE W AGES.

Refusal of employers to increase wages occasioned 12 disputes
distributed, among as many associations and for a variety of causes.
Chiefly among them, however, was the inability of employers and
employees to enter into new agreements which represented an advance
in the wage scale. One prominent case kept the interested parties
in conference over this one point for a period oi eight months without
arriving at a settlement. The final outcome of the majority oi such
cases was that the executive committee usually brought the repre­
sentatives oi the unions and associations to an understanding of their
obligations to each other by assisting in the formation of a new agree­
ment. Of the 12 complaints referred to the arbitrators, 3 were
decided in favor of the unions, 1 was decided adversely, 4 referred to
trade boards, and 4 were withdrawn.
SUM M ARY AND A N A LYSIS OF TYPICAL GRIEVANCES FILED BY
EMPLOYERS.

The total number of complaints filed by the employers was 318.
Of this number 214 were against unions for engaging in strikes and 18
for threatening to engage in strikes, or a total of 232 complaints of the
above nature. It is of special interest to note that this character of
complaints constituted 73 per cent of all the complaints recorded by
employers.
Section 2 of the plan of arbitration provides that “ the unions as a
whole or a single union shall not order any strike against a member of
the Building Trades Employers’ Association, nor shall any number of
union men leave the works of a member of the Building Trades
Employers’ Association, nor shall any member of the Building Trades
Employers’ Association lock out his employees.”
The records of the Board disclose the fact that there was a multi­
plicity of reasons given by the unions as excuses for their constant
violation of the section referred to, but chiefly they are as follows:
“ Because the employers had violated the trade agreement” ; employ­
ment of nonunion men” ; requests to “ erect unfair material” ; refusing
to “ scab it on another local union” ; “ against subcontractors not a
party to the plan” ; “ encroaching upon jurisdiction” ; “ employers



CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

35

handling nonunion products” ; “ nonpayment of union wage scale” ;
“ against the introduction of dual unions” ; “ refusal to increase
wages” ; and “ sympathetic strikes.” Of the total number of com­
plaints for engaging in strikes (214) and threatening to engage in
strikes (18) the disposition is as follows: One hundred and sixty-five
cases were decided favorably and 34 unfavorably to the employers,
5 were referred to trade boards, and 28 were withdrawn.
APPLICATION FOR RESTORATION OF PLAN.

Applications for restoration of the plan involved the next largest
number of disputes. These applications usually concerned a dispute
as to whether strictly union conditions obtained on the job when an
application for a removal of the protection of the plan had been
granted the unions. The executive committee usually ruled that
“ it is not necessary for this committee to affirm the fact that the
plan is back on a building. The very fact that the condition for
which the plan was removed has been removed automatically puts
the plan back.” It appears that when the executive committee was
satisfied that everything had been done to establish and maintain
strictly union conditions on the buildings affected, but without the
desired result, it was useless and unnecessary to continue the sympa­
thetic strike. The number of cases filed was 42. Of this number
26 cases, or 61.9 per cent, were granted; 13 cases, or 31 per cent, were
refused; and 3 cases, or 7.1 per cent, were withdrawn.
FAILURE TO COMPLY W ITH DECISIONS.

There were 22 complaints against the union for not complying witn
the decisions of the arbitrators. These complaints were not confined
to any one kind of dispute, but involved nearly as many kinds as
there were disputes. But the principal reason given for noncompli­
ance with the terms of the decision was that the decision “ over­
reached” and therefore ought to be modified. However, 18 of the
22 cases recorded were enforced, 3 others it was found inexpedient to
enforce, and 1 was withdrawn.
There appears not to have been any method of discipline provided
for offenders among the unions, as in the case of the employers, for
this character of complaints, and therefore no record of the method
of enforcement.
FOR VIOLATING TRADE AGREEMENTS.

The employers were not as fortunate in getting favorable decisions
in this class of complaints as in others, for the reason that the viola­
tions were of an extremely technical nature.
The cases that were decided favorably were cases where workmen
had violated the terms of their agreement by working for individuals




36

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

not regularly engaged in the business of contracting for pipe covering
and asbestos work. This was held to be in violation of the agreement,
inasmuch as it happened to be within a radius of 25 miles of New York
City. The agreement provides that union men are “ to work only
for firms that are regularly engaged in the business of pipe covering
and asbestos work.” The other case was for refusing to comply with
the terms of an agreement “ fixing the ratio of helpers to journeymen
by electrical workers.”
The 7 remaining cases, though apparently of seeming import to the
complainants, were decided as follows: Three adversely, 1 referred to
a trade board, and 3 withdrawn.
FAILURE OF UNIONS TO SUPPLY MECHANICS.

In most agreements between employers and unions “ it is mutually
agreed that in placing men” the unions “ shall at all times give prefer­
ence” to employers who are parties to the arbitration plan. This
clause was held by the unions not to interfere with its members who
were employed by independent concerns, or, in other words, the unions
did not consider this clause as compelling them to withdraw any of
its members from the employ of independent concerns in order to
supply mechanics to members of the employers’ association. How­
ever, a decision of an umpire was to the effect that the unions must
supply mechanics to members of the employers’ associations, “ even
though the union must take such men from shops of employers not
members of the association of employers.” This decision served to
stand as a precedent for complaints of this nature and is believed to
have avoided many difficulties. Of the 3 complaints filed, 2 were
decided favorably and 1 adversely.




APPENDIX A.— JOINT ARBITRATION PLAN BETWEEN THE BUILDING
TRADES EMPLOYERS’ ASSOCIATION AND THE UNIONS OF THE
BUILDING TRADES OF GREATER NEW YO R K.
[Adopted July 3, 1903: revised July 9, 1903, and April 22, 1905.]
S e c t i o n 1. This arbitration plan shall govern the relations between the members
of the Building Trades Employers’ Association and the unions, parties to this plan,
employed by them on buildings or structures under construction or alteration, and
in such shops as were unionized and recognized as union shops by the Building Trades
Employers’ Association on or after July 3, 1903, and in the shops where trade agree­
ments provide that this plan shall govern; and it shall apply within all the territory
known as Greater New York, unless otherwise specified in trade agreements. This
plan applies to the mechanics of the trades and those helpers’ organizations from which
the mechanics of the trades are largely derived.
S e c . 2 . The unions as a whole or as a single union shall not order any strike against
a member of the Building Trades Employers’ Association, nor shall any number of
union men leave the works of a member of the Building Trades Employers’ Associa­
tion, nor shall any member of the Building Trades Employers’ Association lock out
his employees.
Sec. 3. The employers parties to this arbitration plan agree to employ members of
the trade-unions only, directly or indirectly, through subcontractors or otherwise, on
the work and within the territory as described in section 1 of this plan.
S e c . 4. There shall be a General Arbitration Board, consisting of two representatives
from each employers’ association affiliated with the Building Trades Employers’ Asso­
ciation and two representatives from each union recognized as a party to this plan.
Sec. 5. The General Arbitration Board shall exercise the powers delegated to it by
the several provisions of this plan; shall determine the manner of adjustment of any
dispute which is not specifically covered by this plan; shall adopt and amend a code
of procedure; and shall determine the manner in which and by whom the expenses
of special arbitration boards shall be paid.
Sec. 6. Each association of employers and each union of employees, parties to this
plan of arbitration, shall elect semiannually two arbitrators and two alternates who
shall serve for six months or until their successors are elected. In case of the inability
of an arbitrator and his alternate to attend, an association of employers or a union of
employees may appoint a temporary substitute. All representatives of employers’
associations on the General Arbitration Board shall be engaged in, or officers of a corpo­
ration engaged in the trade they represent. All representatives of the unions on the
General Arbitration Board shall be working at their trade.
S e c . 7. Regular meetings of the General Arbitration Board shall be held once each
month. Special meetings may be called by the chairman or the executive committee,
and shall be called upon the filing with the secretary of a written request from five
organizations represented in said board.
S e c . 8 . At all meetings of the General Arbitration Board and the executive com­
mittee a majority vote shall carry any question, including the election of officers,
except a member call for a division, when, in order to carry a question or to elect an
officer, it shall require a majority vote of the representatives of each side present and
voting. In case of disagreement and inability of the body to agree upon a motion a
conference committee shall be appointed, which shall report a motion or motions to
the meeting.




37

38

BULLETIN OF TH E BUEEAU OF LABOE .STATISTICS.

S e c . 9. The chairman and the vice chairman of the General Arbitration Board shall
be elected semiannually by and from the members of the General Arbitration Board
and shall hold office until their successors are elected. One of these officers shall be
an employer and the other an employee.
S e c . 10. The general secretary shall be elected by the General Arbitration Board
for a term of one year and shall serve until his successor is elected.
S e c . 11. The cost of maintaining the headquarters of the General Arbitration Board,
including the salaries of the secretary and his assistants, shall be divided equally
between the Building Trades Employers’ Association and the unions collectively.
S e c . 12. The general arbitrators must be given power by the organizations they
represent.
S e c . 13. The headquarters of the General Arbitration Board shall not be the
meeting room nor the clubrooms of any association of employers or employees.
S e c . 14. There shall be an executive committee of the General Arbitration Board,
which shall consist of twelve members of said board, six of whom shall be elected by
the representatives of the unions in the General Arbitration Board, and six of whom
shall be elected by the employers’ representatives in the General Arbitration Board.
S e c . 15. The executive committee shall exercise the powers delegated to it by the
several provisions of this plan; shall have control of all receipts and expenditures;
shall act as a board of conciliation; shall exercise all the powers vested in the General
Arbitration Board between the regular meetings of said board, except the power to
amend the code of procedure and fix the expenses of special boards. It shall report
all its proceedings to the General Arbitration Board. The committee shall meet once
a week or upon the call of the secretary.
S e c . 16. The executive committee first elected shall divide itself by lot into six
classes, so that one employer and one employee shall serve one, two, three, four, five,
and six months, respectively. At the expiration of the term of each committeeman
his successors shall be elected to serve for a period of six months.
S e c . 17. All decisions of the executive committee shall be final and binding upon
all the parties to this arbitration plan unless disapproved by the General Arbitration
Board, in the following manner: Upon the receipt of the report of the executive com­
mittee any decision of the executive committee may be subject to review by the
General Arbitration Board at the request in writing of an association of employers or
employees under seal of the organization and endorsed by a majority vote of the
representatives of either side present and voting. In the case of such review the
question before the board shall be, “ Shall the decision of the executive committee be
disapproved?” If the decision is disapproved the General Arbitration Board shall
proceed to dispose of the question.
S e c . 18. All complaints shall be addressed to the secretary, in writing, who shall
endeavor to adjust them and report them to the executive committee.
S e c . 19. Where a trade agreement exists between an employers’ association and a
union, all disputes in that trade shall be settled by a trade board of arbitration with
an umpire, if necessary. The decision of said board or umpire shall be final. Should
the trade board fail to agree upon an umpire, or should either side fail to abide by the
decision of the trade board or the umpire, the question shall be referred to the General
Arbitration Board, for action, within twenty-four hours after such failure or refusal.
S e c . 20. Should a dispute arise in a trade in which there is no trade agreement
between the employers’ association and the union of the trade, or between an em­
ployer and a union between whom there is no trade agreement, said dispute shall be
referred to the General Arbitration Board.
S e c . 21. In the case of a dispute concerning a question of jurisdiction of trade or a
dispute caused by conflicting provisions of two or more trade agreements, the com­
plainant shall notjfy the general secretary, and the secretary shall immediately call
a conference of the unions and employers’ associations interested. The conference




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YOBK.

39

shall settle the dispute by conciliation, if possible, or refer it to arbitration, if neces­
sary. Pending the adjustment of the dispute, the work shall be performed by such
mechanics members of unions parties to this plan as the trade contractor for the work
may have elected to employ. In case of refusal or failure on the part of any union or
employers’ association concerned to adjust such a dispute in the manner above
described within twenty-one days after the filing of the complaint, the dispute shall
be submitted to the General Arbitration Board or the executive committee, which
shall determine whether the question at issue is a subject for arbitration. Should the
General Board or executive committee decide that the question is a subject for arbi­
tration, it shall refer the case to a special board, provided the dispute can not be ad­
justed by conciliation.
S e c . 22. The work that has been heretofore recognized to be in the possession of a
trade shall not be submitted to arbitration; provided, when possession is claimed by
a party or parties to a jurisdiction of trade dispute, that question shall be decided by
the executive committee, and in case of a disagreement the executive committee
shall refer the question to an umpire. If the executive committee or the umpire
decides that the work has not been to the possession of a trade, the question of who
shall perform the work shall then be referred to a special board of arbitration.
S e c . 23. “ Unskilled trades” are hereby defined to be those of laborers, helpers,
or workers from whose ranks mechanics of a particular trade are not regularly recruited.
Any difficulty arising in the unskilled trades may be adjusted in accordance with the
provisions of this plan through the mechanics of the trade in which the unskilled are
working and should the mechanics of a trade repeatedly refuse to file a complaint it
may be presented upon the written request of five organizations parties to this plan.
S e c . 24. Special arbitration boards shall consist of not less than four members, and
shall be chosen from the members of the General Arbitration Board. They shall meet
within twenty-four hours when notified by the general secretary.
S e c . 25. It shall be the privilege of any union or employers’ association, through
its representatives on the General Arbitration Board, to select the members of a
special board to act for them, but no general abitrator can act when the dispute is
occurring in the trade which he represents. In case of the failure of any party to a
complaint to select arbitrators within two weeks after an arbitration by a special
board has been ordered, the executive committee shall select the necessary arbitrators.
S e c . 26. The arbitration papers are to be drawn by the general secretary, and shall
contain a specific statement of the question in dispute and a provision that all parties
agree to abide by the decision of the special board or the umpire. The umpire must
be selected before the case is opened. In case of refusal of any party to sign the
arbitration papers, the executive committee shall determine, from the papers in the
case, the specific question to be arbitrated.
S e c . 27. The arbitration papers must be properly signed and sealed by the con­
tending parties, each party receiving its copy. After a careful hearing of the case,
stenographically reported, the verdict obtained by a majority vote, cast so as to
include at least one representative of each of the contending parties, or a decision of
the umpire shall be final and binding. No organization of employers or employees
shall be permitted to alter or amend any decision or part thereof rendered by the
General Board, executive committee, or a special board of arbitration.
S e c . 28. Members of special arbitration boards who may be in the employ of mem­
bers of the Building Trades Employers’ Association are guaranteed reemployment by
their firm or corporation when the special board on which they shall have served has
disposed of the case.
S e c . 29. No lawyer is to act as arbitrator, counsel, or advisor at any proceeding
held under this plan.
S e c . 30. Business agents of the unions parties to this plan shall be permitted to enter
all shops, buildings, or structures described in section 1.




40

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

S e c . 31. When the conditions established by this arbitration plan are not main­
tained in a shop or on a job by employers or employees not parties to this plan, the
plan shall not apply in this particular shop or on the particular job for the time being,
provided the nonmaintenance is proven to the satisfaction of the executive commit­
tee of the General Arbitration Board and the dispute can not be adjusted by it within
twenty-four hours.
S e c . 32. The Building Trades Employers’ Association agrees that its members and
the labor unions collectively agree that the several unions and their members shall
faithfully observe and abide by the provisions of this plan, and the labor unions
collectively agree to maintain the wages, hours, and other conditions of employment
prescribed by the several trade agreements and this arbitration plan wherever
members of any trade-union, parties to this plan, are employed within the territory
covered by this plan.
S e c . 33. After the date of the adoption of this plan, no union shall become a party
thereto without the consent of the General Arbitration Board, but should the General
Arbitration Board disagree on the question of admitting a union, it shall refer the case
to arbitration.




APPENDIX B.— RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE GENERAL ARBITRA­
TION BOARD.

The rules of procedure as adopted were the result of considerable
study on the part of a special committee appointed for that purpose.
That they were not satisfactory to all concerned was admitted, but
after a thorough study by the board of their actual workings for a
period of several months, amendments were proposed and adopted,
and the final draft was as follows:
R ules of P roced ur e

op

the

G e n e r a l A r b it r a t io n
B u il d in g T r a d e s .

B oard

of

the

N ew

Y ork

[Adopted A u g. 10, 1903, and amended Mar. 1, 1904.]

1. Complaints shall be specific and shall be first addressed in writing to the general
secretary and signed by the secretary or business agent of the union or secretary of
the employers’ association. The General Arbitration Board or the executive com­
mittee, as the case majr be (see secs. 2 and 9 of the plan), shall be convened by the
general secretary within 24 hours of receipt of a complaint, but the complaint, if
made by a union, must receive its seal before being presented to the meeting.
2. Upon the receipt of-a complaint the general secretary shall immediately address
a copy of the same to the president and secretary of the association or union of which the
party or parties complained of are members, also a copy to the business agent of the
union and the individual employer concerned.
3. If, on a complaint being presented to the General Board or executive committee,
as the case may be, by any party to the arbitration plan, and another party to the arbi­
tration plan considers itself involved, the General Arbitration Board or the executive
committee, as the case may be, may make such parties parties to the complaint, pro­
vided the application is made at or previous to the meeting of the Board in which the
complaint is considered, and the general secretary shall notify the new parties to the
complaint in the same manner as he does the original parties.
<
4. After the General Arbitration Board or executive committee has authorized the
special arbitration board and the parties to a complaint have selected their arbitrators
from the General Arbitration Board (see sec. 10) the general secretary shall call a
meeting of the special board so selected within 24 hours. Should the parties to a
complaint decline or fail to select their arbitrators from the General Arbitration
Board within 24 hours, after being notified to do so, the general secretary shall call a
meeting of the executive committee of the General Arbitration Board within 24
hours and said executive committee shall at once organize a special arbitration
board to decide the point at issue, as provided in section 9 of the agreement.
5. The special arbitration board shall convene within 24 hours, shall be called to
order by the general secretary, and shall organize by electing a chairman and secre­
tary. The umpire shall then be selected and his acceptance obtained before opening
the case as provided for in section 12 of the agreement.
6. Arbitration papers as provided for in section 12 of the joint arbitration plan, in
which the complaint and questions to be arbitrated must be specifically stated, shall
be signed by the official representatives of all parties to the complaint and presented
to the special arbitration board after the receipt of the acceptance of the umpire.
The said board shall then proceed forthwith to conduct the hearing under the following
rules:
(A)
The party (or parties) making the complaint shall each have the right to pre­
sent its case and evidence without interruption, excepting that when oral evidence is
introduced, cross-examination of witnesses shall be allowed. The opposing party (or
parties) shall have the same right to present its case. The first party or parties shall
then have the right to present evidence strictly in rebuttal and the opposing party
or parties shall in turn be allowed to present counter evidence strictly in surrebuttal.




41

42

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

(B) In case either side is unable to present particular evidence at the moment
under the provisions of paragraph A, the order of procedure may be varied to the
extent of allowing such evidence to be presented at such session as may be agreed
upon by the parties to the arbitration or as may be ordered by a majority of the special
board of arbitration. All evidence must be presented at the regular open sessions of
the board. No evidence shall be considered by the special arbitration board except
that which is presented at its regular open sessions.
(C) After all evidence has been presented, the defendants and then the complain­
ants shall present their oral arguments. Each party to the case shall be represented
by one of its members only, acting as counsel.
(D) A majority of the special board of arbitration must agree upon the exact times
and places of hearing and all parties shall receive notification.
(E) The umpire shall not confer directly or indirectly on the matter in arbitration
with either or any of the parties interested from the time of his appointment until the
decision has been duly signed by the umpire or a majority of the special arbitration
board. The members of the special arbitration board shall be permitted in any case
to visit together any building to investigate the testimony presented. Any viola­
tion of the provisions of this or the preceding section proven to the satisfaction of the
body authorizing the special arbitration board shall invalidate all acts of said special
arbitration board and proceedings shall begin anew.
(F) When the hearings are concluded, the arbitration board shall without unneces­
sary delay go into executive session, from which all persons except the members of the
board and its stenographers shall be excluded. The award of the board must be
formulated and signed by at least three members thereof at a regular executive session,
after there has been full opportunity for consideration and discussion, due notice of
such session having previously been given to each member.
(G) The arbitration board shall not be compelled to set forth its reasons for making
the award and may do so only in the written award. In framing its award, the find­
ings shall be expressed in detail, in order that no misunderstanding shall afterwards
occur.
(H) Should a majority of the special arbitration board fail to agree upon an award
or decision within a reasonable length of time, all records, evidence, and exhibits in
the case and the briefs of the members of the board (if they desire to submit briefs)
shall forthwith be transmitted to the umpire, who shall be privileged to confer with
the parties to the complaint (all parties to the complaint must receive proper notifica­
tion of the proposed conference) and who shall render his decision without unnecessary
.delay.
* (I) The transcript of the report of the stenographer shall be accepted as the true
evidence of what occurred at all hearings, unless it can be conclusively shown that
. substantial errors exist in said transcript.
7.
The general secretary shall notify the secretaries of the organizations, parties to
a complaint, of all meetings of the executive committee, General Arbitration Board,
and special arbitration board if called for the purpose of considering the same. He
shall mail copies of the proceedings of all meetings of the General Arbitration Board
. and copies of all arbitration decisions to the secretaries of all unions and associations.
„ 8. The chairman of the General Arbitration Board, who shall be elected annually at
the first meeting held during the month of July, shall be chairman of the executive
' committee, and the general secretary shall be secretary of the executive committee.
4 0. There shall be a vice chairman, who shall be elected annually at the first meet­
ing in July, to serve for one year and who shall perform the duties of the chairman in
the absence of that officer.
10. It is the unanimous opinion of the members of the General Arbitration Board
that all disputes arising between employers and employees in trades having joint
agreements should be adjusted by the trade arbitration or conference board of the
particular trade.
11. The meetings of the General Arbitration Board and of the executive committee,
except as otherwise provided for, shall be conducted in accordance with the rules of
procedure and debate outlined in Cushing’s Manual.
12. Members of special arbitration boards shall be remunerated for lo3t time while
serving as members of said boards at the rate of $6 per day, each arbitrator to be paid
by the parties for whom he is acting.




APPENDIX C.— TRADE JURISDICTION IN THE BUILDING TRADES
OF GREATER NEW YORK.

The following descriptive matter concerns the jurisdictional claims
of the 31 unions in the building trades industry in Greater New York.
Divided into occupational units there are 63 separate and distinct
divisions of labor with exactly that many independent jurisdictional
claims and wage rates.
The purpose is to show: First, the original trade jurisdiction as
provided for in the charter grant of the national or international union
with which each respective local union in the building trades industry
is affiliated. It must be understood that the original “ jurisdiction
claims” in charters granted to national or international unions by
the American Federation of Labor constitute the jurisdiction claimed
by the organization thus chartered, and allowed by the American
Federation of Labor, except that in each such charter grant the
trade jurisdiction is “ held to be controversial.”
Second, all agreements that have been made between national and
international unions in the settlement of jurisdictional claims over
work which has been in dispute betwen said national and interna­
tional unions.
Third, all decisions and awards that stand as the legal jurisdic­
tional findings made in conventions of unions of the building trades
affiliated with the .building trades department of the American
Federation of Labor.
Fourth, all contractual relations between employers’ associations
and the unions in the building trades industry which apply to trade
jurisdiction in Greater New York.
Fifth, all decisions, awards, and rulings effecting in any way the
jurisdiction of trades made by the General Arbitration Board, the
executive committee, special arbitration boards, or umpires in con­
nection with the building trades arbitration plan in Greater New
York.
An effort has been made to present this information concerning
jurisdiction of trades by occupational units in related trade groups.
This grouping permits of a close relationship as regards jurisdiction
and is presented in 10 industrial divisions, as follows: Structural, sheet,
and fabricated metal trades, natural and artificial stone-working
trades, woodworking trades, electrical trades, painting and decora­
tive trades, composition plastic trades, plain and ornamental clayproducts trades, pipe-fitting trades, motive-power trades, and the
miscellaneous trades.



43

44

BULLETIN OF T fiE BUREAU OF LAB0R STATISTICS.

Accompanying this descriptive matter as outlined above, there
is presented a table showing the occupational units in each related
group. These tables also give the number of unions in their respec­
tive trades in Greater New York, and for each trade the membership
and daily wage rate for 1913.
PAINTING AND DECORATIVE TRADES.

The crafts ,in this group cover the application of every form of
decoration used in or on a building or structure. The work in the
painting trades consists of the application of oil, paint, water colors,
varnishes, stains, or other material used for preservation or decora­
tion, including enameling and gilding of furniture, mural decorations,
and structural woodwork; in the paper-hanging industry, the hang­
ing of all paper or other fabrics used for the covering of walls, and
the preparation of walls for receiving the same.
The decorative art glass work extends to the making and setting
of art or stained-glass windows, cutting and setting glass mosaics,
cutting and setting decorative glass for walls or ceilings.
Decorative upholstering includes the making and hanging of cur­
tains, draperies, wall slatting, wall hanging, also the making of
cushions, slip covers, and shades.
NUM BER

O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E S O F W A G E S I N
D E C O R A T I V E T R A D E S , B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

P A IN T IN G A N D

Number of
unions.

Number of
members.

Decorators and gilders, fresco painters...........................................................
Decorative art glass workers...............................................................................
Paper hangers...........................................................................................................
Plate and sheet glass glaziers.............................................................................
Painters.......................................................................................................................
Upholsterers...............................................................................................................

1
1
1
1
1
1

70
265
300
100
8,958
744

Total.................................................................................................................

6

D aily rate
of wages,
1913.

10,437

Occupations.

*4.50
5.00
6.00
3.50
4.00
4.50

B r o t h e r h o o d of P a in t e r s , D e c o r a t o r s , a n d E a p e r H a n g e r s o f A m e r ic a .
ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIMS AN D JURISDICTION.

The Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America, chartered
by the American Federation of Labor, is recognized by it and by its affiliated organiza­
tions as having jurisdiction over all men engaged in the painting, paper hanging,
and decorating industry, and in all kindred occupations which have been and are
performed by the men employed in that industry. This work in which its members
are employed consists of the applying of oil or other paints, water colors, plastic com­
position, varnish, stains, and all other materials applied with a brush, by dipping or
other process, to plaster, wood, metal, or other materials for their preservation or
decoration, including all house, sign, pictorial, car, carriage, machinery, ship, and
railroad equipment, painting or decorating, the finishing of all woods used in build­
ings, or for furniture of office fixtures, the hanging of all paper or other fabrics used
for the covering of walls, the preparation of walls for receiving the same, the placing
in position of finished wall moldings, the imitation of woods (graining), marbles, or




CONCILIATION, ET®.* IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

45

other materials, the enameling and gilding of furniture, mural decorations, and struc­
tural woodwork, the setting of all glass with the exception of art leaded glass. (Sub­
ject to revision.)
Decorators and gilders.—The painting (frescoing), decorating, enameling, and
gilding of furniture, mural decorations, and structural woodwork.
Paper hangers.— The hanging of all paper or other fabrics used for the covering of
walls, the preparation of walls for receiving the same, and the placing in position of
finished wall moldings.
Plate and sheet glass glaziers.— The Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper
Hangers of America has jurisdiction over the setting and glazing of all plate and
window glass, mirrors, beveled plate, rough-ribbed wire or colored glass and art glass
set or glazed with putty or for moldings in wood, copper, iron, or other metal, or in
marble or stucco or other material which is set in sash or doors or other openings in all
buildings in course of erection or repair.
JURISDICTION A W A R D S OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AM ERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABO R .

Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America v. International
Brotherhood of Composition Roofers, Damp and Waterproof Workers.
Agreement entered into by and between the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators,
and Paper Hangers of America and the International Brotherhood of Composition
Hoofers, Damp and Waterproof Workers.
First. That the painters do not claim the right to apply any of the material claimed
by the International Brotherhood of Composition Roofers except such material as
is applied by a brush that is ordinarily used by the painters in applying the materials
covered in their jurisdiction.
Second. That the International Brotherhood of Composition Roofers does not claim
the right to apply any of the material in dispute except when applied by or with a
three-knot, long-handled brush, mop, or swab.
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America v. Ceramic, Mosaic,
and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers International Union.
Agreement entered into by and between the general executive board of the Brother­
hood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America and the general execu­
tive board of the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers Inter­
national Union shall take effect December 5,1910, and remain in force until amended,
revised, or changed at a meeting between the representatives of both organizations
called for this purpose.
S e c t i o n 1. It is agreed by both parties to this agreement that all plate and window
glass, mirrors, beveled plate, rough, ribbed, wire, figured, colored, or art glass set in
sash, frames, doors, or skylights, constructed of wood, sheet metal, iron, stone, or other
material and set with putty or molding, shall be set by the members of the Brotherhood
of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America, and that where glass is used
as a substitute for ceramic, mosaic, or encaustic tile, and set on floors, walls, and ceil­
ings in mortar, cement, or other plastic material used to secure such tile in position,
shall be set by members of the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and
Helpers International Union, when cut to size and shape for setting. It is further
agreed by the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers International
Union that all glass delivered on jobs in stock sheets shall be cut to the required size
by a member of the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America.
Sec. 2. Should any differences arise regarding the work as covered by this agree­
ment, a committee appointed by and representing the district council or local union
of each organization in that locality, shall meet and adjust such differences. Should




46

BULLETIN OF TH E BUEEAU OF LABOE STATISTICS.

the committees of the local unions fail to agree, an executive officer of each inter­
national union shall be requested to attend and assist in the adjustment.
S e c . 3. It is further agreed that the national officers of both organizations shall
insist that ail agreements entered into shall be carried out by affiliated unions.
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America v. Amalgamated
Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance»
Agreement entered into by and between the general executive board of the Brother­
hood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America, and the Amalgamated
Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance, shall take effect December 1, 1910,
and remain in force until amended, revised, or changed, at a meeting between the
representatives of both organizations called for this purpose.
S ection 1. It is agreed by both parties to this agreement that all glass set in sheetmetal sash, frames, doors, or skylights shall be set by members of the Brotherhood of
Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America, according to their claim of
jurisdiction granted by the convention of the Building Trades Department, American
Federation of Labor, at St. Louis, December, 1910; and that all sheet-metal work on
sheet-metal sash, frames, doors, or skylights shall be done by the members of the
Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance.
Sec. 2. In localities where differences now exist or may arise in the future, such
differences shall be adjusted by a committee appointed by and representing the
district councils or local unions of both organizations in that locality. Should this
committee be unable to agree, a representative of the general executive board of
each organization shall be called in to assist in the adjustment.
S e c . 3. I t is also agreed that the national officers of both organizations where local
unions fail to agree, shall insist that this agreement be carried out b y affiliated unions.

Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers v. United Association Jour­
neymen Plumbers, Gas Fitters, Steam Fitters, and Steam Fitters’ Helpers.
[Decision of the Bochester Convention, Building Trades Department, American Federation of Labor,
adopted N ov. 29,1912. See p. 141 of printed proceedings.]

Resolved, That the United Association of Plumbers, Gas Fitters, Steam Fitters, and
Steam Fitters’ Helpers be and is instructed to require that its affiliated unions desist
from further trespass upon the jurisdiction of the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators,
and Paper Hangers of America, and when and where necessary to notify their employ­
ers that neither journeymen nor helpers will be permitted to do this work.
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America v. International
Association of Marble Workers.
Agreement entered into by and between the general executive board of the Broth­
erhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America and the general exec­
utive board of the International Association of Marble Workers, shall take effect
December 5, 1910, and remain in force until amended, revised, or changed at a
meeting between the representatives of both organizations called for this purpose.
S ection 1. It is agreed by both parties to this agreement that all plate and window
glass, mirrors, beveled plate, rough, ribbed, wire, figured, colored, or art glass set in
sash, frames, doors, or skylights, constructed of wood, sheet metal, iron, stone, or
other material and set with putty or molding, shall be set by the members of the
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America, and that where
glass is used as a substitute for marble in interior finish or decoration, and is carved,
cut, polished, or rubbed, shall be set by members of the International Marble Workers
of America.
Sec. 2. Should any differences arise regarding the work as covered by this agree­
ment, a committee appointed by and representing the district council or local union




CONCILIATION, ETG.? IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

47

of each oiganization in that locality shall meet and adjust such differences. Should
the committees of the local unions fail to agree, an executive officer of each intemaional union shall be requested to attend and assist in the adjustment.
Sec. 3. It is further agreed that the national officers of both organizations shall
insist that all agreements entered into shall be carried out by affiliated unions.
AWARDS AND DECISIONS OP THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW
YORK.

Amalgamated Painters and Decorators v. The Iron League—Painting of structural
ironwork.
U m p ir e ’ s D e c is io n , S e p t e m b e r 7, 1904.—I find: I. That temporary painting,
shop coats, priming coats, whether put on at the shop or at the building in process
of erection, roughly applied as with large brushes, long-handled brushes, intended
for the temporary protection of steel or iron work to be inclosed in the course of the
construction, is unskilled work which may be done by nonpainter apprentices,
laborers, etc., and that the defense is, therefore sustained in his contention with
regard to rough painting of steel and iron work for temporary protection.
Where, however, it is rendered clear by the specifications or contracts that the
painting is not merely for temporary protection, but for permanent protection, as for
example, where specifications or contracts provide for several extra coats, mate
careful provisions as to the paint to be used, the colors, mixtures, etc., that the paint
be carefully and evenly applied and thoroughly rubbed in, etc., or otherwise indicate
and call for the work of a professional, painter, I find:
II.
That this painting, although the structural steel or iron work to be painted is
intended to be inclosed, is clearly not for temporary but permanent protection and
calls for skilled labor and is, therefore, according to the arbitration plan, work which
must be done by union painters.

Painters’ District Council v. J. B. & J. M. Cornell—Exposed ironwork, applying of
shop coats or priming coats.
D ecisio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , M a r c h 8, 1907.—The painting of all exposed
ironwork shall be done by painters. The applying of shop coats or priming coats,
whether put on at the shop or at the building in process of erection, roughly applied
with large brushes or long-handled brushes, and intended for the temporary protec­
tion of steel or iron work to be inclosed in the course of the construction is unskilled
work which may be done by nonpainters, apprentices, or laborers.
A m a l g a m a t e d G l a s s W o r k e r s ’ I n t e r n a t io n a l A ssociation op A m e r ic a .
ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIMS AND JURISDICTION.

Jurisdiction covers the making and setting of art glass or stained glass windows.
The trade is subdivided into the following craft3:
Cutting, glazing in lead or metal, and setting same in buildings.
Cutting and copper glazing globes and shades.
Cutting and setting glass mosaics.
Cutting and glazing decorative glass for walls and ceiling, and all preliminary work
connecting with any of the foregoing branches.
The making of beveled plate glass and mirrors and the setting of same.
These are known in their craft specialties as follows: Glass cutters, lead glaziers,
metal-sash glaziers, prism glaziers, bevelers, silverers, scratch polishers, embossers,
engravers, designers, glass painters, draftsmen, sand-blast workers, glass chippers,
glass -mosaic workers, setters, putty glaziers, cementers, benders, flat glass or wheel
cutters, giass-sign makers.
Jurisdiction i3 claimed over cutting of glass for lead and metal glazing; glazing of
glass in lead and metal; cutting and copper glazing globes and shades; cutting and




48

B ULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOB STATISTICS.

setting glass mosaics; cutting, glazing, and setting decorative glass for walls and ceilings;
cutting, glazing, and setting in sash or otherwise (with putty or cement) any glass cut
or manufactured in our shops; also the cutting, glazing, and setting (with putty or
cement) of all outside glass of whatsoever kind, for the protection of art or leaded glass,
transferring and cutting of all patterns, waxing glass on easels and removing same,
and all other preliminary work connected with the trade.
UPHOLSTERERS* INTERNATIONAL UNION.
ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIMS AND JURISDICTION.

The united upholsterers claim jurisdiction over the following branches: Decorative
upholsterers, furniture upholsterers, railway coach upholsterers, carriage and auto­
mobile upholsterers, carpet upholsterers, and mattress and box-spring makers. Also
the making and hanging of curtains, draperies, wall slatting, wall hanging, cushions,
slip covers, and shades.
AWARDS

AND

DECISIONS

OF THE

GENERAL

ARBITRATION

BOARD

OF

GREATER

NEW YORK.

Carpenters* Joint District Council v. Upholsterers’ Union—Putting up wall cover strips.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , A u g u s t 14, 1907.—The work of putting up
wall cover strips for the purpose of hanging wall covers or fabrics, where the strips
do not exceed three-eighths of an inch in thickness and two inches in width, is work
that has bee*n and is now in the possession of the. upholsterers.
NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL STONE W ORKING TRADES.

This group is composed of all the crafts working in natural or
artificial stone; cutters, carvers, and sculptors in blue stone, brown
stone, and granite; cutters, carvers, sculptors, setters, polishers,
rubbers, plariermen, sawyers, and helpers in natural or artificial
marble; all workers on machines used in the cutting of stone or
marble, stone masons, rock drillers run by hand or power, including
jap drills and guns, tool sharpeners, and helpers.
NUM BER

O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E S O F W A G E S I N N A T U R A L
A R T I F I C I A L S T O N E W O R K I N G T R A D E S , B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

Occupations.

N um ber
of
unions.

300
33
618
1,100
400
200
480
20
100
200
50
50
275
100
270
200
1,005
2,000
1,345

Bluestone cutters, flaggers, curb setters.........................................................
Bluestone cutters, flaggers, curb setters7 helpers........................................
Granite cutters..........................................................................................................
Marble cutters and setters....................................................................................
Marble cutters and setters’ helpers...................................................................
Marble carvers..........................................................................................................
Marble polishers.......................................................................................................
Marble sawyers.........................................................................................................
Marble bed rubbers................................................................................................
Machine stone workers, rubbers........................................................................
Machine stone workers helpers.........................................................................
Machine stone workers, derrickmen.................................................................
Machine stone workers, planermen..................................................................
Machine stone workers, sawyers........................................................................
Stone cutters and setters......................................................................................
Stone sculptors and carvers.................................................................................
Stone masons.............................................................................................................
Rock drillers and tool sharpeners.....................................................................
Rockmen.....................................................................................................................
Total..................................................................................................................




Num ber
of
members.

19

8,746

AND

D aily rate
of wages,
1913.

§4.50
3.00
4.50
5.50
3.25
6.00
4.00
4.25
4.75
4.00
2.75
3.00
4.25
3.50
5.50
5.50
4.60
3 .6 8
2.50

i...............

CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TEADES OF N E W YORK.
A m algam ated

B lu esto ne

C u t t e r s , F l a g g e r s , B r id g e a n d C u r b

49

S e t t e r s of

A m e r ic a .
NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

It is agreed that the cutting and dressing of bluestone in Greater New York shall be
done by the members of the Bluestone Cutters and Flaggers’ Association of New York,
except the following kinds of work, on which no restrictions are to be placed: (1) All
work done with stoneworking machinery; (2) all circular and molded work requiring
a hand finish; (3) quarry-cut templates, bond, and capstone of any thickness (without
checks) but not of more than four (4) superficial feet. No restrictions to be placed on
any finished stonework which is to be used outside of Greater New York.
DECISION OP THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW YORK.

Amalgamated Bluestone Cutters, Flaggers, Curb and Bridge Setters v. Journeymen Stone
Masons and Setters’ Local No. 34— Setting curbing.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , S e p t e m b e r 30,1908.—We visited the Black­
wells Island Bridge job and inspected the work referred to in the dispute. We find
that this work consists of certain lines of granite curbing, and in some cases it is set up
against a wall as a protection to the wall. The curbing is not being done with any
structural stonework, and in our opinion this curbing belongs to the Amalgamated
Bluestone Cutters, Flaggers, Curb and Bridge Setters and should be set by them.
The report of the subcommittee is concurred in, and the executive committee finds
that the complaint of the Amalgamated Bluestone Cutters, Flaggers, Curb and Bridge
Setters is sustained, and the Journeymen Stone Setters’ Local No. 84 is directed to
cease performing the work.
I n t e r n a t io n a l A sso c ia tio n of M a r b l e W o r k e r s .
ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AND JURISDICTION.

Carving, cutting, polishing, rubbing, and sawing of marble, Caen, and similar light
stone, used for interior finish or decoration, and the setting of same in the building.
Setting of slate, glass, or composition used in place of marble, excepting encaustic
tile.
Cutters and carvers.
S e c . 2. (1) Marble cutters and carvers shall cut, carve, and set all interior marble,
all exterior polished slab marble, slate, glass, or any stone or composition used for
interior finish or decoration and all other material used in place of marble, excepting
encaustic tile. The cutter and setter to control all machines used in the cutting of
interior marble work, such as planers, reels, (countersinking) machines, lathes, returns,
brakes, checks, etc., jointing and carving on all interior marble work, and the setting
of the same in the building. He shall confine himself to tool finish.

Polishers.
(2) Marble polishers shall rub, polish, and clean all marble, slate, glass, and any
stone composition or imitation that requires the same process of finishing as is used
in the finishing of marble, bed rubbing excepted.
Bed rubbers.
(3) Bed rubbers shall rub all marble or slate in the rough on a rubbing bed only
and can not be classed as hand rubbers or polishers.
97394°— Bull. 124— 13------ 4




50

BULLETIN- OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Helpers.
(4) Helpers shall do all utility work, such as loading and unloading stock in shop
and building, building scaffolding and rigging for heavy work, and assist in other work
as required by the cutter and setter.
Sawyers.
(5) Sawyers shall run all gang, cable, and diamond saws, set all blocks in gangs,
and hammer and set all saws.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

International Union Marble Workers v. United Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners—
Building of scaffolding.
Building of scaffolding for marble workers where carpenter’s tools are not required
belongs to the marble workers.
But where carpenter’s tools are required, then the work belongs to the carpenters.
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America v. International
Association of Marble Workers.
Agreement entered into by and between the general executive board of the Brother­
hood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America and the general execu­
tive board of the International Association of Marble Workers shall take effect Decem
ber 5, 1910, and remain in force until amended, revised, or changed at a meeting
between the representatives of both organizations called for this purpose.
Section 1. It is agreed by both parties to this agreement that all plate and window
glass, mirrors, beveled plate, rough, ribbed, wire, figured, colored, or art glass set
in sash, frames, doors, or skylights, constructed of wood, sheet metal, iron, stone,
or other material and set with putty or molding shall be set by the members of the
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America, and that where
glass is used as a substitute for marble in interior finish or decoration and is carved,
cut, polished, or rubbed, shall be set by members of the International Marble Workers
of America.
Sec. 2. Should any differences arise regarding the work as covered by this agree­
ment, a committee appointed by and representing the district council or local union
of each organization in that locality shall meet and adjust such differences. Should
the committees of the local unions fail to agree, an executive officer of each inter­
national union shall be requested to attend and assist in the adjustment.
Sec. 3. It is further agreed that the national officers of both organizations shall
insist that all agreements entered into shall be carried out by affiliated unions.
International Association Marble Workers v. International Association Bridge and,
Structural Iron Workers.
Slate treads on iron stairs having provoked a dispute in jurisdiction between the
organizations above named, was submitted to the executive council November 29,
1909. The action taken follows:
The executive council of the building trades department, on being called upon
for a decision awarded the work in question (slate treads) to the marble workers.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

51

International Association of Marble Workers v. United Association Journeymen Plumb­
ers, Gas Fitters, Steam Fitters, and Steam Fitters’ Helpers.
[Decision of the Rochester Convention, B uilding Trades Department, American Federation of Labor,
adopted November 28,1912. See page 132 of printed proceedings.]

Resolved, That the setting of floor slabs, backs, partitions of urinal stalls, closets,
and shower baths properly belongs to the International Association of Marble Workers.
The foregoing decision does not concede to the marble workers the right to install
marble work that is connected with the water supply or sewer or water-tight work
regularly catalogued as plumbing fixtures.
NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

Jurisdiction over hand cutting, carving, and setting, and operating all machines
for molding, cross cutting, and checking on all interior marble and stone work con­
tracted for by them; but will not work any marble manufactured by convict labor or
manufactured marble imported into the United States (except antique mantels), or
marble finished outside of New York or vicinity, for use in New York or vicinity,
other than domestic marble floor tiles, treads, and platforms not more than 2 inches
thick, and such tiles, treads, and platforms shall not be convict manufactured.
AWARDS AND DECISIONS OP THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OP GREATER NEW
YORK.

Reliance Labor Club of Marble Cutters v. Wm. Baumgarten & Co.— Setting marble
mantels.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , A u g u s t 28, 1905.—The committee finds that
the firm of Wm. Baumgarten & Co. violated the arbitration plan by employing men
not members of the recognized marble workers’ union to set the mantels on the job
mentioned in the complaint.

Reliance Labor Club of Marble Cutters, Carvers, and Setters v.G. A. Suter and the Sheet
Metal Workers’ Union—Drilling holes in marble.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , N o v e m b e r 8, 1905.—The work of drilling
holes in marble is in the possession of the marble workers’ union, excepting where
holes are one-half inch in diameter or less, and the amount of such drilling does not
require more than eight hours’ work.

Reliance Labor Club Marble Cutters v. Wm. Bradley & Son— Marble toilet and bath-room
work.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J u n e 18, 1907.—The work referred to in the
complaint (Brooklyn Training School for Teachers) consisting of toilet and bath-room
work, composed of wall linings, backs, partitions, front plates, and stiles, is work that
has been in the possession of the Reliance Labor Club.
Jo u r n e y m e n

S t o n e c u t t e r s ’ A s s o c ia t io n

o r ig in a l

charter

c l a im s

and

of

N o r t h A m e r ic a .

j u r is d ic t io n .

The members of this association shall consist of journeymen stonecutters, stone
carvers, stone setters, and machine men.
This association claims the setting of all cut stone and artificial stone.
All stonework on which a mallet, mash hammer, and chisel are used, shoddy work
and pitch-faced ashlar and artificial stone included, shall be considered as practical
stonecutting and must be performed according to the rules and regulations of the
branch under which it is done, provided it does not conflict with the constitution and
by-laws of the general union.




52

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
DECISION OF THE G EN ER AL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER N E W Y O R K .

Reliance Labor Club v. Exterior Stone Setters’ Union— Erection certain exterior marble
worh.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , May 1,1907.— The work in question, exterior
marble, is in the possession of the Journeymen Stone Setters’ Union.
S t o n e m a s o n s ’ I n t e r n a t io n a l U n io n ,
o r ig in a l

charter

c l a im s

and

j u r is d ic t io n

.

This union claims that all stone, whether set in brickwork as trimmings or otherwise,
ancl all artificial stone, terra cotta, and pointing of all kinds is considered stone
masonry. A further declaration is made as to the right to the cutting of all rock-face,
ashlar, broken-range work, with mash hammer or mallet and tools of any kind, as
required by such work.
d e c is io n

of

the

general

a r b it r a t io n

board

of

GREATER N E W Y O R K .

Amalgamated Bluestone Cutters, Flaggers, Curb and Bridge Setters v. Journeymen Stone
Masons and Setters’ Local No. S4— Setting curbing.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , S e p t e m b e r 16,1908.— The agreement between
the unions (Journeymen Stone Masons and Setters’ Local No. 84, and Amalgamated
Bluestone Cutters, Flaggers, Curb and Bridge Setters) does not apply to the work of
setting curbing when the curbing is not set in connection with other stonework.
I n t e r n a t io n a l A s s o c ia t io n o f G r a n it e
o r ig in a l

charter

c l a im

and

Cu t t e r s of A m e r ic a ,

j u r is d ic t io n .1

All men who have served a regular apprenticeship at granite or hard stone dressing,
polishing, sawing, cutting, and carving, or are otherwise qualified to be considered
journeymen, including all operators on granite dressing, polishing, cutting and carv­
ing machines, and pneumatic tools, are eligible to membership. Men who cut stone
with mallets and tooth chisels can not become members unless they are also practical
workmen on granite or hard stone cutting. Tool sharpeners who sharpen granite cut­
ters’ tools are also eligible.
The Granite Cutters’ International Association of America claims the right of juris­
diction over cutting, carving, and dressing all granite and hard stone on which granite
cutters’ tools are used. This includes from the roughest of street work and rock-faced
ashlar to the finest of molded work, carving, statuary, machine cutting, turning, rub­
bing, polishing, or dressing of any kind on granite and other hard stone on which granite-cutting tools or machines are used; and making up, sharpening, or dressing said
tools, either by hand or machine. Said association, its branches and districts, as they
apply, claims and exercises the right, in accordance with its constitution, of deciding
who is entitled to membership therein. No other trade, craft, or calling has any right
or jurisdiction over cutting, carving, turning, rubbing, polishing, or dressing granite
and hard stone of any kind on which granite-cutting tools, including machines, are
used, nor of any person connected therewith, excepting as a member of and according
to the laws governing the Granite Cutters’ International Association of America.
T unnel and

Su b w a y

C o n s t r u c t o r s ’ I n t e r n a t io n a l U n io n .

ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AN D JURISDICTION.

The Rock Drillers and Tool Sharpeners’ Local Union claims jurisdiction over drilling
of tunnels, sewers, cellars, cutting of streets, also railroad cuts where rock drills are
i The International Association of Granite Cutters of America, as such, was never a party to the plan.
Representatives of a granite cutters' local union, organized b y the bosses, were seated in the General
Arbitration Board.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

53

used regardless of whatever power, either by hand, steam, or air, including jap drills
and guns. The jurisdiction of the tool sharpeners shall be the sharpening of all tools
for rock drillers in this class of work.
ELECTRICAL TRADES.

The electrical trades as applied to the building industry include
wiring, installing, repairing, and maintaining all electrical machines
and devices of whatever nature used or operated in buildings or
structures, as well as wiring for the installation of thermostat sys­
tems, the wiring, assembling, turning, hanging, and globing of gas,
electric, and combination fixtures in or on any building or structure.
N U M B E R O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E O F W A G E S IN E L E C T R I C A L T R A D E S ,
B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

Number
of unions.

Number
of
members.

Inside electrical workers.......................................................................................
Inside electrical workers* helpers......................................................................
Fixture workers, gas, electric, and combination.........................................

4
1
1

2,524
1,500
1,500

Total.................................................................................................................

6

5,524

Occupations.

I n s id e

Daily rate
of wages,
1913.

$4.50
2.20
4.50

E l e c t r ic a l W o r k e r s .

ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AND JURISDICTION.

Inside electrical workers shall include wiremen, armature winders, cranemen,
switchboard, rheostat, and transformer makers and assemblers, and fixture hangers.
They shall have jurisdiction over the following work:
W iring in and wiring and installing conduit in building, subways, ships, bridges
T
and arches. Manufacturing, installing, repairing, and maintaining isolated and block
plants, except linework. Manufacturing, installing, and repairing of all electrical
machines and devices, except in central light and power stations, when work is done
by distributing company. Electric-bell, flash-light annunciator, and thermostat
systems. Automatic controlling devices, making all electrical decorations and signs
and connecting same to the service wires. Erecting and operating all electric motors
used for hoisting or carrying material of any kind, installing private fire, burglaralarm, and telephone systems, except linework. Wiring, assembling, hanging, and
connecting all electric and combination fixtures. All cutting or channeling made
necessary by the introduction of electrical devices herein specified.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OP THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OP THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OP LABOR.

Agreement entered into by and between the International Union of Elevator Con­
structors and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, filed with the
department December 14, 1912:
The International Union of Elevator Constructors has conceded the work described
hereunder as belonging to the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers when
the same is done in connection with the construction of elevators:
‘'The electrical work on flash lights, electrical annunciators and lamps, and feed
wires to the controller.”




54

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

This local shall have jurisdiction over all inside electrical work and all inside
electrical workers within the territory known as Greater New York and Long Island,
and also to a point halfway to the jurisdiction of the nearest local of the International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, as defined by a charter granted by the International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. The work of the members of this union shall
consist of the erecting, installing, and assembling of all dynamos, motors, compen­
sators, including the channeling, cutting, and drilling of all material and preparing
the way for placing and fastening all iron or other conduit moldings, cables, or wires
of any description used in connection with electrical work. Wiring in and wiring and
installing all conduits, and moldings, cables in buildings, subways, ships, bridges
and arches, cars; installing, operating, repairing, and maintaining isolated and block
plants; installing electrical switch and signal apparatus and all wiring pertaining
thereto, except linework; installing and repairing of electrical machines and devices,
except in central light and power stations, when work is done by distributing com­
pany; electric bell, flash-light annunciator, and thermostat systems; automatic con­
trolling devices; installing and operating all lamps used for projecting machines;
making all electrical decorations and signs, hanging and connecting same to the
service wires; erecting and operating all electric motors used for hoisting or carrying
material of any kind; installing private fire, burglar-alarm, speaking tubes, and tele­
phone systems, except linework wiring; assembling, hanging, and connecting all
electric and combination fixtures; all cutting or channeling made necessary by the
introduction of electric devices herein specified.
AWARDS AND DECISIONS OF THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW YORK.

Electrical Contractors' Association v. Electrical Workers’ Union No. S—Switchboard
question.
A r b it r a t o r s ’ D e c isio n of F e b r u a r y 18, 1902.—Switchboards may be delivered
and erected at the job by manufacturers of same, but all wiring on and to the board
shall be done by members of the union.1

Electrical Contractors’ Association and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers v.
Mason Builders' Association and Bricklayers' Unions— Cu tting of pipe chases.
A r b it r a t o r s ’ D e c isio n of N o v e m b e r 18,1903.—New work.— 1. Builders shall do
the cutting necessary for the installation of electric conduits, of all solid brickwork,
also of all fireproofing where three or more conduits run together, and for all panels
and cut-out boxes at their own expense.
2. That electricians shall cut on all fireproof partitions where less than three con­
duits run together, and may drill holes through floors or walls, and cut any brickwork
for slight changes.
3. Contracts entered into prior to the date of this award shall be executed as here­
tofore. That is, if the cutting is in the electrician’s contract he shall employ his own
men, at his option, to cut. If in the builder’s contract, he shall employ the men he
now employs; but after the date of this award the cutting of solid brickwork, and of
all fireproofing, where three or more conduits run together, and all panels and cut­
out boxes shall be eliminated from the electrician’s contract.
4. Old or repair work.—Where cutting or piercing is through or on old walls the
electrician shall cut with whom he may choose. Where cutting is through or on new
walls, the builder shall do the cutting necessary for the installation of electric conduits
of all solid brickwork; also, of all fireproofing where three or more conduits run
together and of all panel and cut-out boxes at his own expense, and electricians shall
cut the fireproofing partition where less than three conduits run together, and may
drill holes through floors or walls or cut any brickwork for slight changes.
i This award was made prior to the organization of the General Arbitration Board, but became part of
the code.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

55

New York Electrical Workers' Union v. Chas. L. Eidlitz Co.— Current-carrying parts of
switchboards.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , A u g u s t 10, 1906.— The Chas. L. E id litz Co.
is ordered at once to com ply with the provisions of section 19 of the electrical trade
agreement and em ploy none bu t members of the New York Electrical Workers’ U nion
to assemble the current-carrying parts of the switchboards on the A ltm an Building.

New York Electrical Workers’ Union v. Elevator Constructors and Millwrights1 Union—
Installing electrical annunciators and car-lighting appliances.
D e c is io n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , O c to b er 3, 1908.—The work of installing
electrical annunciators and car-lighting appliances is in possession of the Electrical
Workers’ Union.

New York Electrical Workers’ Union v. Elevator Constructors and Millwrights’ Union—
Running temporary feed wires to motors.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , O c to b er 12, 1906.—The work of running
temporary feed wires to motors to run drills for hydraulic elevators is in possession of
the electricians.
F ix t u r e W o r k e r s .
ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIMS AND JURISDICTION.

Fixture workers claim all wiring, assembling, trimming, hanging, and globing of
gas, electric, and combination fixtures in or on any building. The cutting of all
outlets, drilling of all holes for fastening of fixtures, and putting in of all extra fastenings
that may be necessary to properly put up fixtures.
Helpers may do journeymen’s work while actually employed in assisting a journey­
man; under no consideration shall helpers be allowed alone on jobs.
DECISION OF THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW YORK.

New York Electrical Workers’ Union v. Tiffany Studios— Hanging fixtures, Dr. Parkhurst’s Church.
D ecisio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , M a r c h 21, 1906.—The Tiffany Studios is
instructed to employ members of the recognized Electrical Workers’ Union on the
work of hanging fixtures on the job in question.
PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL CLAY PRODUCTS TRADES.

The clay-products trades include brick, hollow tile, and terra cotta
laying, clay slate for roofing, tile roofing, tile laying, including ceramic
and encaustic tile decorations for both pavements and wall, and all
plaster mixtures used as mortar or cement.
N U M B E R O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E S O F W A G E S I N P L A I N A N D O R N A ­
M E N T A L C L A Y P R O D U C T S T R A D E S , B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

Occupations.

Number of Number of
unions.
members.

Bricklayers and hollow-tile layers...................................................................
H od carriers...............................................................................................................
Mosaic workers.........................................................................................................
Plasterers, plain and ornamental*.....................................................................
Plasterers’ laborers..................................................................................................
Slate and tile roofers...............................................................................................
Tile layers, ceramic and encaustic....................................................................
Tile layers' helpers..................................................................................................

5
7
1
8
4
1
1
1

7,675
11,997
95
3,825
2,725
88
428
375

Total.................................................................................................................

28

27,208




Daily rate
of wages,
1913.

$5.60
3.00
4.50
5.50
3.25
4.75
5.50
3.28

56

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
B r ic k l a y e r s , M a s o n s , a n d
o r ig in a l

charter

P l a s t e r e r s ’ I n t e r n a t i o n a l U n i o n .1
c l a im

and

j u r is d ic t io n .

Bricklaying masonry shall consist of the laying of bricks in, under, or upon any
structure or form of work where bricks are used, whether in the ground or over its
surface, or beneath water; in commercial buildings, rolling mills, iron works, blast or
smelter furnaces, in mines or fortifications, and all underground telegraph, electric,
and telephone conduits where a trowel and mortar is used, or other work requiring the
labor of a skilled person. Fireproofing, block arching, terra cotta setting and cutting,
and the setting of all cut-stone trimmings on brick buildings is considered bricklayers’
work, for which the regular rate of wages of the locality must be charged, as the same
is considered brick masonry.
Stone masonry shall consist of laying all rubble work, with or without mortar, setting
all cut stone cut in yard or in quarries by stonecutters, when the same is covered by
stone; cutting all shoddies, including all broken ashlar, rock-faced ashlar, range or
random ashlar in the rough, jambs and corners, and laying the same.
This is to apply to all work on buildings, sewers, bridges, railroads, or other public
works where the same can be controlled by the union in locality; and to all kinds of
stone, particularly to the product of the locality where the work is to be done.
BRICKLAYERS AND MASONS— NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

Members of the Mason Builders’ Association must furnish their own mason materials
for the building, and must include in their contract for a building all cutting of
masonry, interior brickwork, the paving of brick floors, the installing of concrete
blocks, the brickwork of the damp-proofing system, and all fireproofing—floor arches,
slabs, partitions, furring and roof blocks, and they shall not lump or sublet the installa­
tion, if the labor in connection therewith is bricklayers’ work as recognized by the
trade, the men employed upon the construction of the walls to be given the preference.
The installation of the fireproofing must be in progress before bricklaying is begun
on the topmost story of any building in course of construction. They shall not lump
or sublet the laying up of the front, if same is of brick or terra cotta.
The building of sewers, telegraph, electric or telephone conduits up to and including
what is known as the four-way ducts, where a trowel and mortar are used, must be
done by bricklayers.
That all cutting of masonry be done by those best fitted for the work and that the
members of the Mason Builders’ Association make the selection; but cutting of all
brickwork, fireproofing, terra cotta, concrete arches, and partitions, as well as the
washing down and pointing up of front brickwork and terra cotta, shall be done by
bricklayers.
If the jambs of an opening have to be rebuilt, the cutting out of the toothing for
bonding the new jambs to the old work shall be done by bricklayers.
If any brick have to be cut on the building, this cutting shall be done by bricklayers.
(No member of these bricklayers’ unions shall work for anyone not complying with
all rules and regulations herein agreed to.) No laborer shall be allowed upon any
wall or pier to temper or spread mortar which shall be delivered in bulk, said mortar
to be spread with a trowel by the bricklayers, who shall work by the hour only.
DECISION OF THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW YORK.

Bricklayers’ Union v. Tile Layers’ Local JVo. 52— Setting of terra cotta and baching up
with brickwork.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , M a y 13,1908.—The work in question, setting
of terra cotta and backing up same with brickwork, is in possession of the bricklayers.
i This is the only international union which is a party to the plan and not affiliated with the American
Federation of Labor.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.
I n t e r n a t io n a l U n io n of H o d Ca r r ie r s a n d
o r ig in a l

charter

c l a im

B u il d in g

and

L aborers

of

57

A m e r ic a .

j u r is d ic t io n .

Wrecking of buildings, excavating of buildings, digging of trenches, piers, and
foundations, holes, digging, lagging, sheathing of said foundations, holes and caisson
work, concrete for buildings, whether foundations, floors, or any other, whether done
by hand or any other process, tending to masons, mixing and handling all material
used by masons (except stone setters), building of scaffolding for masons’ plasterers,
building of centers for fireproofing purposes, tending to carpenters, tending to and
mixing of all material for plastering, whether done by hand or any other process,
clearing of debris from buildings, shoring, underpinning and raising of old buildings,
drying of plastering, when done by salamander heat, handling of dimension stones.
JURISDICTION A W A R D S

OF THE

BUILDING

TRADES

DEPARTMENT

OF THE

AM ERICAN

FEDERATION o f l a b o r .

Hod Carriers and Building Laborers v. United Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners of
America.
B u i l d i n g o f S c a f f o l d i n g . — The building of scaffolding for plasterers, bricklayers,
and masons where carpenters1 tools are not required, where such scaffolding is not
framed, spliced, bored, nailed, or put together in such manner requiring skilled labor,
belongs to the laborers’ organization, but where scaffolding is built, and where car­
penters’ tools are required, then the work belongs to the carpenters.
T h e B u i l d i n g a n d S e t t i n g o f C e n t e r s . — The building and setting of centers
where scaffold plank is used exclusively on flat floor arches and where carpenters’
tools are not required belongs to the laborers.
All other forms, centers, and arches where carpenters’ tools are required belong to
the carpenters.
T h e S h o r i n g a n d U n d e r p i n n i n g o f B u i l d i n g s .— The shoring and underpinning
of buildings where carpenters’ tools are required belong to the carpenters.

American Brotherhood of Cement Workers v. International Union of Hod Carriers and
Building Laborers.
[Decision of the Tampa Convention, Building Trades' Department of the American Federation of Labor,
adopted October, 1909. See printed proceedings Tam pa Convention, pages 130 and 131.]

We, your committee, recommend that where there are existing agreements between
the American Brotherhood of Cement Workers and International Union of Hod
Carriers and Building Laborers they shall remain the same, but we concede the right
to the cement workers to control all laborers working exclusively at the cement
industry.
d e c is io n

of

the

general

a r b it r a t io n

board

of

greater

N E W YO R K .

Bricklayers> Union for Laborers v. T. New Construction Co. and Composition Roofers—
Hoisting roofing material.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J a n u a r y 20, 1909.—The work cited in the
complaint is in the possession of both the composition roofers and the Laborers’ Pro­
tective Society with equal rights.
O p e r a t iv e

P l a s t e r e r s ’ I n t e r n a t io n a l A s s o c ia t io n .

o r ig in a l

charter

c l a im

and

j u r is d ic t io n .

All plastering, plain and ornamental, when done with stucco, cement, lime mortars,
or patent materials, artificial marblework, and compo work in all its branches.
All moldings in permanent buildings must be run in place and the ornament placed
and pointed by practical plasterers.




58

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

(Practical plasterers are men who are proficient in the use of the hawk and trowel
and other implements or tools of the trade.)
No member of this association will be allowed to put up staff that can be run. All
staff shall be classed as plastering.
Believing that the Operative Plasterers’ International Association is an organization
that stands for the protection and advancement of the plastering industry throughout
the United States and Canada, whether it is done by its old and usual system of plas­
tering or for the purpose of ornamental decoration. And considering that the aforesaid
industry and products could not be controlled for the best interests of the members of
the Operative Plasterers’ International Association unless the producers of any of the
said industries are likewise controlled by the same organization. That it shall be
the duty of every local affiliated with the Operative Plasterers’ International Asso­
ciation to organize as speedily as possible all workers following any of the branches
of the plastering trade, and especially those that follow the ornamental plastering
branch of the trade, including the modelers, by either forming new locals or by taking
them into their own locals.
It shall be the duty of the organizers, wherever possible, to organize locals of model­
ers, and when any locality has not sufficient modelers to form a local make all effort
to have them affiliate with local Operative Plasterers’ International Association.
No member of this association shall be allowed to use models or cast from models
unless same have been made by modelers affiliated with the Operative Plasterers’
International Association. In localities where no union modelers are employed, or
boss modeler does his own modeling, members of Operative Plasterers’ International
Association can handle work as furnished, but under no condition shall we recognize
any combination of modelers to enter a combination of partnership to defeat the
provisions of this act.
All models produced by members of the Operative Plasterers’ International Asso­
ciation must bear an embossed stamp that will reproduce itself on all casts taken from
such models, said stamp to be copyrighted and bear a number that will designate the
employer using same.
No members of the Operative Plasterers’ International Association shall use or
handle any models or casts that do not bear such stamp.
No union modeler or shop hand shall do work for any contractor who is unfair to
the Operative Plasterers’ International Association.
All interior or exterior plastering of cement, stucco, stone imitation, or any patent
material, whether cast or worked in place, also comer beads when stuck, must be
done by practical plasterers of the Operative Plasterers’ International Association.
This includes the plastering and finishing with hot composition material in vats,
compartments, or wherever applied; also the setting in place of cork plates, and the
application of any plastic material to the same must be done by members of the
Operative Plasterers’ International Association who are practical plasterers.
It is agreed that on walls upon which a foundation or base coat is put on must be
put on by the plasterer, and ample room shall be allowed for a final coat of not less
than three-eighths of an inch to be put on by the tile layer so as to give sufficient bed
for the placing or sticking of tile or mosaic.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

American Brotherhood Cement Workers v. Operative Plasterers’ International Association.
Agreement entered into between the representatives of the Operative Plasterers’
International Association and the American Brotherhood of Cement Workers at the
headquarters of the Building Trades Department on January 16, 1909:
The Operative Plasterers’ International Association claims for its members all
exterior and interior plastering, whether of stucco, cement, or any patent material,
when done in and by the usual methods of plastering.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TBADES OF N E W YORK.

59

We contend the covering of all walls, ceilings, soffits, piers, columns, or any other
part of a construction of any sort, when any part of said construction is covered with
any plastic material in the usual methods of plastering, is the work of the plasterers.
The above claim is recognized by the representatives of cement workers as not to
apply to the construction of any concrete work in building, erection, or the forming or
casting of asphalt or cement blocks, nor does the term “ compo” employed in the
above claim refer in any manner to concrete construction.
It is further agreed that sanitary base not to exceed 6 inches in height when run in
connection with cement floor shall be the work of cement workers.
Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ International Union v. Oper­
ative Plasterers’ International Association.
This agreement made and entered into by the Operative Plasterers’ International
Association and the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ Inter­
national Union for the purpose of defining the demarcation lines of jurisdiction cover­
ing the preparation of walls and ceilings for reception of tiles:
First. It is agreed that on all walls upon which a foundation or base coat is put on
by the plasterers ample room shall be allowed for a final coat of not less than threeeighths (f) of an inch to be put on by the tile layers to act as a binder and regulator for
the float coat upon which the tile is placed.
Second. It is also agreed that the plasterers shall use only sand and cement in
preparation of walls for work above stipulated.
Third. It is further agreed and understood that this shall not interfere with the
right of the tile layers to do all scratch coating on small jobs of one or two ordinary
bathrooms.
Fourth. It is further agreed that no scratch coating shall be put on except by
mechanics of either trade.
NEW

YO R K

JURISDICTION— AG R EE M EN T

BETW EEN

THE

EMPLOYING

PLASTERERS’

ASSOCIATION A N D THE OPERATIVE PLASTERERS’ INTERN ATIO N AL ASSOCIATION.

S ectio n 1. All plastering on lath shall be known as three-coat work— scratch coat,
brown coat, and hard finish. All scratch coat to be thoroughly dried before being
browned. On concrete, fireproof or brick, it shall be two (2) coats—brown and hard
finish. All plaster plates to be browned with gauged mortar or patent material and
finished.
Sec. 2. When patent cement is used for scratch coat, it must be properly set before
the brown coat is applied.
This clause to be governed by any existing written agreement between the Tile
Layers’ International Union and the Operative Plasterers’ International Association.
Sec. 3. It shall be permissible to lay off work on alteration and repair jobs when
not calling for more than half the alteration. When laid-off work is permissible, it
shall be done with gauged mortar, mixed in the proportion of one (1) part plaster to
five (5) parts mortar or patent plaster.
S e c . 4 . All work must be done in a thorough workmanlike manner and as per plans
and specifications, and all journeymen must complete the work in such a manner or
be compelled to make it right on their own time.
All employers shall furnish screed rods, darbies, cornice rods, feather edges, and all
facilities necessary. On all jobs where scaffolds are erected in rooms, mortar boards,
when it is practicable, shall be put on scaffolds. Moldings or coves shall be run with
a regular mold and run on rods.
Members of the unions who are parties to this agreement, when browning, shall have
the right of raising the mortar board to the height of 10 inches from scaffold.
Sec. 5. All columns, whether of cement or other material, before being browned
shall have rings of the proper dimensions.




60

BULLETIN OF THE BUEEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

S e c . 6. In permanently established or occupied dwellings, where original con­
tractor has completed his contract, a changed character of decoration may be com­
pleted as desired.
S e c . 7. When any member of the Employing Plasterers’ Association obtains a con­
tract for the entire plastering of a new building or buildings, he may sublet the plain
or ornamental plastering in his general contract to a member of the Employing Plas­
terers’ Association. But in cases where any portion of a new building or buildings
is reserved for any special character of ornamental decoration, said reserved portion
must include all parts of plastering—plain and ornamental— and it shall be done by
the contractor for the same.
All models to be made in union shops.
S e c . 8. All paneled ceilings of an intricate geometrical design, whether plain or
enriched, and all moldings on other ceilings and walls, if enriched 75 per cent of
their width, not exceeding eight (8) inches wide, may be cast and placed on a finished
surface.
Coffered ceilings, plain or enriched, when the panels do not exceed twenty-four (24)
inches at the ceiling line and 4 feet 6 inches on the major line, may be cast and set in
place.
All plain moldings of whatever dimensions shall be run on the job.
S e c . 9. Alterations shall be known as a building wherein the new plastering does
not exceed sixty (60) per cent of the entire plastering. On such alterations all cor­
nices and ornamental work may be done in any manner desired by the architect,
owner, or contractor.
Sec. 10. When waterproof paint is used, the walls and ceilings covered by said
paint shall be scratched and allowed to dry before second coat is applied, unless
gauged or patent mortar is used.
Sec. 11. When preparing for tile on walls or ceilings, it shall be done by plasterers,
parties to this agreement.
S e c . 12. All scaffolds whereon plasterers work, if not constructed by plasterers,
shall be built by members of the Plasterers’ Laborers’ Society, or other mechanics
recognized under the plan of arbitration.

AWARDS AND DECISIONS OP THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OP GREATER NEW YORK.

Journeymen Plasterers’ Society, Ornamental Plasterers’ Society, and Employing Plas­
terers’ Association v. United Cement Masons' Union No. 1 and Master League of
Cement Workers— Work of applying cement mortar to the exterior of buildings.
U m p i r e ’ s D e c i s i o n , J u n e 27, 1906.— The special arbitration board has rendered a
unanimous decision as to the disputes, differences, and controversies between the
parties of the first part and the parties of the second part brought before the board,
except as to one particular, viz, relative to the work of applying cement mortar to
the exterior of buildings. As to this the board failed to agree, and this is the only
matter before me for decision. After reading every word of the entire proceedings,
including all the testimony, the presentations of counsel, and the briefs of the arbi­
trators, covering between 700 and 800 pages of typewritten matter, after having made
a close study of the exhibits, and after giving a most careful consideration to all the
questions involved, I have reached the decision that the applying of cement mortar
to the exterior of buildings should belong to the cement masons and to the plasterers
with equal rights.
I therefore herewith award the applying of cement mortar to the exterior of buildings
to the cement masons and to the plasterers with equal rights.

Wood Carvers and Modelers’ Association v . Employing Plasterers1Association— Modeling
for plasterers.
D e c i s i o n o p E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , M a r c h 7, 1906.— The work of modeling for
plasterers is in the possession of the Modelers and Sculptors’ Guild.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

61

Ornamental Plasterers' Society v. Carpenters’ Joint District Council— Erection of certain
plaster cast work, Phipps house.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J u l y 18, 1906.— The work described in the
complaint has been in the possession of the plasterers.
Plasterers’ L abo rers,
o r ig in a l

charter

c l a im

and

j u r is d ic t io n .

The plasterers’ laborers claim jurisdiction in the handling of all material used for
the purpose of having plastering done. All scaffolds whereon plasterers work, if not
constructed by plasterers, shall be built by plasterers’ laborers. The cleaning of
floors and the attendance of salamanders, when not called for in the plasterers’ speci­
fications, shall not be insisted upon being done by the plasterers’ laborers, nor shall
sand screened on buildings for the purpose of being used in plastering work be done
by plasterers’ laborers unless called for in the plasterers’ specifications.
I n t e r n a t io n a l
o r ig in a l

Slate a n d
charter

T il e R o o f e r s

c l a im

and

of

A m e r ic a ,

j u r is d ic t io n .

All slate where used for roofing of any size, shape, or color, including flat or prom­
enade slate, with necessary metal flashing to make water-tight.
All tile where used for roofing of any size, shape, or color, and in any manner laid,
including flat or promenade tile, with necessary metal flashings to make water-tight.
All cementing in, on, or around the said slate or tile roof.
The laying of all felt or paper beneath the above-mentioned work.
The dressing, punching, cutting of all roof slate.
The operation of all slate cutting or punching machinery.
All substitute material taking the place of slate or tile, as asbestos slate and tile,
cement or composition tile, excepting shingles of wood and metal tile.
The removal of all slate or tile roofing as defined above where the same is to be
relaid.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION of l a b o r .

International Brotherhood Composition Roofers v. International Union Slate and Tile
Roofers.
Agreement entered into between the International Brotherhood of Composition
Roofers, Damp and Waterproof Workers, and the International Slate and Tile Roofers
Union of America.
It is mutually agreed that all papering of roofs under slate and tile of one-ply thick­
ness be allowed to the slate and tile roofer.
It is also agreed the prevailing condition with regard to promenade tile between the
two organizations shall remain in force as it is at present.
Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ International Union v. Slate
and Tile Roofers' International Union.
Agreement entered into this 21st day of February, 1911, by and between duly
accredited representatives of the organizations above named, to wit:
Jurisdiction is hereby conceded the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers
and Helpers’ International Union over the laying or setting of flat-faced tile of every
description when laid in a composition of sand and cement on all flat roofs or promenade
roofs.
Jurisdiction is hereby conceded the Slate and Tile Roofers’ International Union
over flat-faced tile of every description, and corrugated tile, when laid in any prepara­
tion of asphalt on roofs, flat or otherwise.




62

BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
DECISION OP THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW YORK.

Slate and Tile Roofers' Union v. Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Local 11—Slate
and tile roofing.
D e c i s i o n o p E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J u n e 20, 1906.—The Amalgamated Sheet
Metal Workers’ Local No. 11 is ordered to remove their members from the slate and
tile roofing on the job mentioned in this complaint, and is further ordered not to inter­
fere with the slate and tile roofers by withdrawing the sheet metal workers from the
sheet metal work.
C e r a m ic ,

M o s a ic , a n d

E n c a u s t ic

T il e

L ayers

and

H e l p e r s ’ I n t e r n a t io n a l

U n io n .

ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AND JURISDICTION.

The Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ International Union
claims the preparation of spaces on walls, floors, and ceilings where tiles are to be set
or laid.
Also the setting of all ceramic, mosaic, and encaustic tiling, and all rubber, glass,
cement, marbleithic, tessalated, tiffany, quarry, faience, terre vitrae, grueby, and
enameled tiles, or any kindred composition that may be added to or substituted for
the above at any time.
Also the repairing and setting of all fireplaces and mantels.
Definition.
Tiles that are U 3ed for sanitary or decorative purposes for covering spaces on walls,
floors, ceilings, mantel facings, or other spaces interior or exterior, depending on their
adhesion through the agency of cement or its basic requirements to another body,
and do not enter into the actual construction of the building.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OP THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OP THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ International Union v. Slate
and Tile Roofers’ International Union.
Agreement entered into this 21st day of February, 1911, by and between duly
accredited representatives of the organizations above named, to wit:
Jurisdiction is hereby conceded the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and
Helpers’ International Union over the laying or setting of flat-faced tile of every
description when laid in a composition of sand and cement on all flat roofs or promenade
roofs.
Jurisdiction is hereby conceded the Slate and Tile Roofers’ International Union
over flat-faced tile of every description, and corrugated tile, when laid in any prepara­
tion of asphalt on roofs, flat or otherwise.
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America v. Ceramic, Mosaic,
and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ International Union.
Agreement entered into by and between the general executive board of the Brother­
hood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America and the general executive
board of the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ International
Union shall take effect December 5,1910, and remain in force until amended, revised,
or changed at a meeting between the representatives of both organizations called for
this purpose.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

63

S e c t i o n 1. It is agreed by both parties to this agreement that all plate and window
glass, mirrors, beveled plate, rough, ribbed, wire, figured, colored, or art glass set in
sash, frames, doors, or skylights constructed of wood, sheet metal, iron, stone, or other
material and set with putty on molding, shall be set by the members of the Brotherhood
of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America, and that where glass is used as
a substitute for ceramic, mosaic, or encaustic tile, and set on floors, walls, and ceilings
in mortar, cement, or other plastic material used to secure such tile in position, shall be
set by members of the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ Inter­
national Union, when cut to size and shape for setting. It is further agreed by the
Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ International Union that
all glass delivered on jobs in stock sheets shall be cut to the required size by a member
of the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America.
Sec. 2. Should any differences arise regarding the work as covered by this agree­
ment, a committee appointed by and representing the district council or local union
of each organization in that locality shall meet and adjust such differences. Should
the committees of the local unions fail to agree, an executive officer of each international
union shall be requested to attend and assist in the adjustment.
Sec. 3. It is further agreed that the national officers of both organizations shall insist
that all agreements entered into shall be carried out by affiliated unions.

Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers' International Union v. Opera­
tive Plasterers' International Association.
This agreement, made and entered into by the Operative Plasterers’ International
Association and the Ceramic, Mosaic, and Encaustic Tile Layers and Helpers’ Inter­
national Union, for the purpose of defining the demarcation lines of jurisdiction cover­
ing the preparation of walls and ceilings for reception of tiles:
First. It is agreed that on all walls upon which a foundation or base coat is put on by
the plasterers, ample room shall be allowed for a final coat of not less than three-eighths
of an inch to be put on by the tile layers, to act as a binder and regulator for the float
coat upon which the tile is placed.
Second. It is also agreed that the plasterers shall use only sand and cement in
preparation of walls for work above stipulated.
Third. It is further agreed and understood that this shall not interfere with the
right of the tile layers to do all scratch coating on small jobs of one or two ordinary bath­
rooms.
Fourth. It is further agreed that no scratch coating shall be put on except by
mechanics of either trade.
A.WARDS AND DECISIONS OP THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW
YORK.

Tile, Grate, and Mantel Association v. Tile Layers' Union—Laying of rubber tile.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J u l y 17, 1907.—The laying of rubber tile i3
Work that is and should be in the possession of the tile layers; and be it further,
jResolved, That this decision does not affect existing contracts or contracts made
before August 1, 1907.

Tile Layers' Local No. 52 v. Batterson & Eisele and Reliance Labor Club of Marble
Cutters—Setting iron fireplace linings.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , A p r i l 1, 1908.—The work of setting of iron
fireplace linings is in the possession of the tile layers.




64

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Mosaic and Encaustic Tile Layers' Union No. SO v. Reliance Labor Club of Marble
Cutters, Carvers, and Setters—Laying or setting of marbleithic tile.
A r b i t r a t o r s ’ D e c i s i o n , F e b r u a r y 29, 1904.— We, the special arbitration board
appointed to decide upon the complaint filed by the Mosaic and Encaustic Tile
Layers’ Union No. 30 against the Reliance Labor Club of Marble Cutters, Carvers, and
Setters, after hearing all the evidence presented in the case, and visiting a number of
jobs where marbleithic tile has been laid, after careful consideration, find that the
laying or setting of marbleithic tile rightfully belongs to the mosaic and encaustic tile
layers’ union.

Tile Layers Union v. Bricklayers' Union—Setting 9 by 9 quarry tile, City College Building.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J a n u a r y 18,1906.— The laying of the product
commercially known as quarry tiles, such as specfied in the complaint, is work that
has been in the possession of the tile layers.

Tile Layers' Local No. 52 v. Bricklayers' Executive Committee—Erection of terra-cotta
blocks.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , A u g u s t 19, 1908.—The erecting of the terra­
cotta blocks used on the job in question (stations of N. Y ., N. H. & Hartford R. R. at
Port Morris, Hunts Point, Westchester, and Morris Park) is work that is in possession of
the bricklayers. The setting of the tiles used in the panels on these jobs is work that
is in possession of the tile layers.

Tile Layers v. Mosaic Workers—Setting marble tile.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J u l y 7, 1909.—The committee finds the
charge sustained by admission, and the mosaic workers are ordered to desist from doing
tile layers’ work.

Bricklayers' Union v. Tile Layers' Union—Laying of soap brick.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , N o v e m b e r 17, 1909.—The work in question,
the setting of soap brick, is not in the possession of the bricklayers or the tile layers.

Mosaic Workers' Association v. Reliance Labor Club of Marble Cutters—Setting of terrazzo
base.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , M a r c h 11,1908.—The charge is sustained and
the Reliance Labor Club is ordered to cease setting the base.

Mosaic W
orkerrs v. Reliance Labor Club—Setting of terrazzo base, Grand Central Station.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , May 26, 1909.— That the Reliance Labor Club
and Mr. John H. Shipway are to be notified that the committee has decided that the
setting of terrazzo base is in the possession of the mosaic workers.

W OODWORKING TRADES.

The woodworking trades extend to every form of work done in
wood. The carpenter, aside from his other duties, has developed as
a framer for reenforced concrete structures, and in most large cities
the trade is subdivided to include joiners, stair builders, car builders,
millwrights, planing mill bench hands, and operators of woodworking
machinery. The wood carver has extended his activities from hand
carving to cover machine and spindle wood carving as well as model­
ing and designing. The wood lather is a specialist.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.
NUM BER

O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E O F W A G E S I N
T R A D E S , B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

Occupations.

65

W O O D W O R K IN G

Number of Num ber of
unions.
members.

Carpenters and framers.........................................................................................
Cabinetmakers..........................................................................................................
W ood carvers, modelers, and designers..........................................................
W oodworkers.............................................. ..............................................................
W ood lathers.............................................................................................................
Stair builders.............................................................................................................

69
2
1
4
1
2

14,519
1,415
300
504
300
170

Total.................................................................................................................

79

Daily rate
of wages,
1913.

$5.00
5.00
5.00
3.00
5.00
5.00

17,208

U n it e d B r o th e r h o o d of Ca r p e n t e r s a n d J o in e r s of A m e r ic a .
ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AND JURISDICTION.

The jurisdiction of the United Brotherhood extends over all journeymen carpenters,
or joiners, stair builders, ship joiners, millwrights, planing mill bench hands, cabinet­
makers, car builders, or operators of woodworking machinery.
Our jurisdiction extends over all men engaged in the occupations enumerated above,
whether on the building in its erection or repairs, or employed in the preparation or
manufacture of material for same.
Our jurisdiction extends over men engaged in putting up all kinds of wood molding,
putting up “ runs,” strips for plumbers, the valves passing through floors, joists, or
partitions, where coming in contact with wood; also the setting of all woodwork in
toilet rooms.
Fastening on all wood cleats to ironwork, cutting up and hanging all rough lumber
between iron girders and joists for fireproof or concrete centers, and all forms used in
concrete work. The setting of all floor strips and cement floors.
The setting of all sash, doors, windows, and other frames. The building and setting
of all centers made of wood. Putting on of plaster boards and putting on all plaster
grounds, and also the erection of all furring for cornices, where wood is used.
The building of all scaffolding where any carpenters’ tools are used; the building
and construction of all derricks; making of mortar boards, boxes, and trestles; putting
in “ needles,” uprights, and all shoring of buildings, razing and moving buildings, etc.
The nailing and cutting of all wooden stops in doors and windows, the framing of all
false work, derricks, etc., when applying to structural-iron work.
The handling of all material used by carpenters and joiners in and around buildings,
including all joists, frames, and all lumber and material used by the carpenter and
contractor.
N o t e .—Burkett sheathing as well as compo board, no plaster applied, is conceded to
carpenters.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

International Union of Marble-Workers v. United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners—
Building of scaffolding.
Building of scaffolding for marble-workers where carpenters’ tools are not required
belongs to the marble-workers.
But where carpenters’ tools are required, then the work belongs to the carpenters.
97394°—Bull. 124—13------ 5




66

B U tL t fU N

OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Sheet Metal Workers' International Alliance v. United Brotherhood of Carpenters and
Joiners.
Under a decision by tlie Tampa Convention of the Building Trades Department, the
right of manufacturing and erecting of all metal door and trim was conceded to the
sheet-metal workers.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers v. United Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners.
The Bridge and Structural Iron Workers claim the erection and removal of all necessary
false work, but as this is only of temporary nature and refers more particularly to the
erection and construction of steel and iron bridges, it was conceded that this comes
properly under the claim of jurisdiction of the ironworkers*
N ote.— The above refers to the erection and construction of steel and iron bridges,
and not to false work in or around buildings.
Derricks and travelers and the handling and operation of same belong to the iron­
workers.
The framing of travelers and derricks where wood is used belongs to the carpenters.
S c a f f o l d in g .— As no framing is necessary in the construction of scaffolding for
the ironworkers, any more than to throw timbers or planking from one beam or girder
to another, or hang same by means of rope or chain, and as the ironworkers are under
heavy expenses in the payment of disability claims, and death claims as well, resulting
very often from the manner in which scaffolding is erected, they decided to erect
their own scaffolding in their own way, and will not work on scaffolding erected by
other men, be they mechanics or laborers. But where framing is necessary with
carpenter’s tools then such framing work belongs to the carpenters.
P l a c in g of M a c h in e r y in P o s it io n .— As the placing of heavy machinery in
position does^ not include the alignment, leveling, adjustment, and fitting up of said
machinery ready for use, that being work that comes under the jurisdiction of the
millwrights, United Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners of America, no objection is
raised by the United Brotherhood against the ironworkers placing heavy machinery
on buildings where designated.
W h a r f B u il d in g a n d D o ck B u il d in g .— The ironworkers do not claim jurisdic­
tion over wharf and dock building where same is constructed solely of wood, but where
iron is used, and sheds built of corrugated iron, they claim that part.
On this matter we agree that where wooden beams and timbers are used, with heavy
planking and flooring, that same belongs to the carpenters, but where iron girders,
iron columns, steel trusses are used, or ironwork of any form, same belongs to the
ironworkers solely.
S e t t in g of S e a t s i n P u b lic B u il d in g s .— All metal or partly metal seats fastened
to metal—the assembling and setting of same—is conceded to the ironworkers, and all
seats fastened to wood— the assembling and setting of same— is conceded to the car­
penters.
K a l a m in e a n d I r o n D o o r s .— The dispute at issue in the matter of hanging kalamine and iron doors was laid over for further investigation by the representatives of
both organizations, so that a satisfactory adjustment of the disputed points may be
arrived at if possible.
Hod Carriers and Building Laborers v. United Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners oj
America.
B u il d in g of S c a f f o l d in g .— The building of scaffolding for plasterers, bricklayers,
and masons where carpenter’s tools are not required, where such scaffolding is not
framed, spliced, bored, nailed, or put together in such manner requiring skilled labor,




CONCILIATION, ETC ., IN BUILDING TBADES OF N £ W

T O E S.

67

belongs to the laborers’ organization, but where scaffolding is bu ilt and where car­
penter’s tools are required, then the work belongs to the carpenters.
T h e B u il d in g a n d S e ttin g op Ce n t e r s .— T he building and setting of centers where
scaffold plank is used exclusively on flat floor arches, and where carpenter’s tools are
not required belongs to the laborers.

All other forms, centers, and arches, where carpenter’s tools are required, belong to
the carpenters.
T h e S h o r in g a n d U n d e r p in n in g op B u il d in g s .— T he shoring and underpinning
of buildings where carpenter’ s tools are required belong to the carpenters.
WOODWORKERS— NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

Jurisdiction is claimed for the woodworkers in New York City over the making
of doors, sash, interior and exterior window blinds, molding, interior trim, and all
millwork material, the erection and installation of all material known in the trade
as millwork, except that made in nonunion factories and prisons.
INTERNATIONAL

WOOD

CARVERS’

ASSOCIATION—ORIGINAL

CHARTER

CLAIM

AND

JURISDICTION.

Wood carvers claim jurisdiction over any wood carver, hand, machine, and spindle
wood carver, plaster carver, modeler, or designer.
AW ARBS AND DECISIONS Op THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OP GREATER NEW YORK.

Brotherhood of Carpenters v. Guy B. Waite Co.— Cutting andfitting of lumberfor centers
for concrete arched.
D e c isio n op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , Ju n e IQ, 1905 — The cutting and fitting of

lumber for centers shall be done by carpenters.
and June 11,1907,

See decisions of November 22, 190$,

Carpenters’ Joint District Council v. Guy B. WaiU Co.— Cutting and fitting of wooden
centers for concrete arches.
D e cisio n op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , N o v e m b e r 22, 1905.— The work referred
to in the complaint shall be done by carpenters, provided there is four hours’ consecu­
tive work cutting and fitting. See decisions June 10, 1905, and June 11, 1907.

Carpenters’ Joint District Council v. Gillis & Geoghegan and Harry Alexander— Weather
strips.
D ec isio n op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , Ja n u a r y 9, 1906.— The installation of the
weather strips on this job is work that is in possession of the carpenters.

Carpenters’ District Council v. Davis Brown—'Construction of scaffolds.
D ec isio n op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , F e b r u a r y 20,1907.—Mr. Brown is instructed
immediately to employ carpenters, members of the recognized union, on the work
referred to in the complaint, building of scaffolds on church, De Kalb and Tompkins
Avenues, Brooklyn.

Carpenters’ Joint District Council v. Heda Iron Works—Plating temporary wooden
treads on stairs.
D e c isio n op E x e c u t iv e Co m m it t e e , F e b r u a r y 27, 1907.— The work of placing
temporary wooden treads on stairs requiring the cutting, fitting of lumber, is work
that must be performed by carpenters.




68

BTfLLOTm OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Carpenters’ Joint District Council v. Guy B . Waite Co.— Installing centering known
as Waite type of fireproof arches.
D e c isio n op S u b co m m it t e e op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , Ju n e 11, 1907.— In the
installing of the centering known as the Waite type of fireproof arches, at least one
carpenter must be employed to every five laborers, and no job shall be run without a
carpenter being employed thereon. See decisions June 10, 1905, and November 22,
1905.

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Union v. Carpenters’ Joint District Council—
Setting of iron or steel door trim and doors.
U m p ir e ’ s D e c is io n , A pril 23, 1909.— The question presented has proved difficult
to answer, but after reading all the evidence and the papers submitted to me I came
to the conclusion that the setting of the iron or steel door trim and doors, samples of
which were submitted to me, does not belong to the sheet metal workers. They are
thick castings and not of the kind of sheet metal which the sheet metal workers handle
and to which their tools are adapted. The samples before me are so thick that they
have to be cut with a saw, and no doubt such castings may be even thicker. They
could not be cut with a shears, or bent, or united, or worked, or soldered after the
manner sheet metal is handled and fashioned. They are not contemplated by the
rules which fix the domain of the sheet metal workers. The method and skill which
the work requires does not belong to the craft of the sheet metal workers but to that of
the carpenters. The substitution of metal for wood does not oust the carpenters.
Even though the butts on which the trim and hinges are to be put be of iron or steel
the case is the same.
M o tion op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , M a y 5, 1909.— T hat the decision of Judge
Gaynor [quoted above] in the case of the Sheet M etal Workers v. the Carpenters be
received and placed on file and em bodied in the minutes of the executive com m ittee.
(Unanim ously carried.)
MOTIVE-POWER TRADES.

The motive-power trades include all crafts engaged in or connected
with the assembling, erection, and installation of all motive-power
devices operated either by hydraulic power, steam, or electricity; the
operating of stationary, portable and hoisting, and electrical engines,
boilers, gas engines, compressed air, including pumps, siphons, and
pulsometers.
N U M B E R OF

U N IO N S A N D

M E M B E R S A N D R A T E OF W A G E S
T R A D E S , B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

Occupations.

IN

M O T I V E -P O W E R

Number of Number of
unions.
members.

Boiler makers............................................................................................................
Boiler makers’ helpers...........................................................................................
Elevator constructors............................................................................................
Elevator constructors’ helpers............................................................................
Engineers, stationary engines.............................................................................
Engineers, portable hoisting engines...............................................................
Machinists...................................................................................................................

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

574
345
400
400
1,300
1,280
400

T otal.................................................................................................................

7

4,699




Daily rate
of wages,
1913.

$5.00
3.50
5.28
3.40
5.00
6.00
5.00

CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF NE3Y YORK.
I n t e r n a t io n a l B r o t h e r h o o d

of

69

B o il e r M a k e r s .

ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AND JURISDICTION.

Jurisdiction is claimed over boiler makers, riveters, chippers, calkers, fitters-up,
heaters, holders-on, and helpers on all new and repair work. All riveting gangs shall
consist of two riveters, one holder-on, and one heater on machine or hand work.
All boiler work, all iron or steel smokestacks (except sectional or other steel stacks
erected in office buildings and hotels, and stacks erected in small power plants in con­
nection with hotel and office buildings, extensions and repairs to such stacks); breech­
ing and uptakes, iron and steel shipbuilding; all iron and steel tanks (pontoons, air,
oil, and water tight), purifying boxes, standpipes, smoke consumers, brewery vats,
water towers; all work in and around blast furnaces and rolling mills (except skips,
stock houses, top rigging, and other frame buildings), gasometers, including a?l frame­
work in connection with same, steam, air, gas, oil, or water tight tank work; the
laying out, building or fitting up of all sheet, steel, or iron one-sixteenth inch or
over, and all iron or steel work contracted for by boiler shops.
I n t e r n a t io n a l U n io n

of

E le v a to r Co n str u cto r s.

ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AND JURISDICTION.

The assembling of all elevator machinery, to wit, hydraulic, steam, electric, belt,
and compressed air; also assembling and building escalators or traveling stairways;
the assembling of all cars complete; putting up all guides, either of wood or iron; the
setting of all tanks, whether pressure, open, or pit tanks; the setting of all pumps
(where pumps arrive on job in parts they are to be assembled by members of this
union). All electric work connected with car machinery and hoisting, including
bells, annunciators, and lights; all overhead work, either of wood or iron, and sup­
ports for the same when required; the setting of all templets, all indicators, all founda­
tions, either of wood or iron, that would take the place of masonry; the assembling of
all hydraulic parts in connection with elevators; all locking devices in connection
with elevators; the boring, drilling, and sinking of all plunger elevators; all link
belt carriers; and all work in general pertaining to the erection and equipment of an
elevator complete.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

International Union Steam Engineers.
[Decision of the St. Louis Convention, Building Trades Department, American Federation of Labor,
adopted December, 1910. See printed proceedings, p . 128.J

The operation of elevators of all kinds when used for hoisting any material used in
the construction of buildings is hereby conceded to the hoisting engineers, affiliated
with the International Union of Steam Engineers.
AWARDS AND DECISIONS OF THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW
YORK.

International Association of Machinists, District Council No. 15, v. Elevator Construc­
tors and Millwrights’ Union No. 1—Assembling of pumps in connection with ele­
vators.
A r b i t r a t o r s ’ D e c i s i o n , J u l y , 1904.—We, the special board of arbitration selected
to hear the case of trade jurisdiction relative to the assembling of pumps in connec­
tion with elevators, after carefully considering the evidence presented, find: That




70

BUJjE^TIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

tiie work in question belongs to the elevator constructors. We are sustained in this
conclusion by the decision of the American Federation of Labor in according the
setting and assembling of all pumps, where pumps arrive on jobs in parts, to the ele­
vator constructors.
Elevator Constructors and Millwrights' Union v. Machinists' Union— Erection of coal
conveyors.
D e c i s i o n 02? E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J u n e 7,1905. — That the work of erecting con­
veyors has been heretofore and is now recognized to be in the possession of the Eleva­
tor Constructors and Millwrights’ Union.

Housesmiths'and Bridgemens' Union v. Elevator Constructors and Millwrights' Union—
Hanging 1‘ Meeker" fireproof doors.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , O c t o b e r 25, 1905.—The executive com­
mittee finds that the erecting of “ Meeker” fireproof doors belongs to the Elevator
Constructors and Millwrights’ Union.

Elevator Constructors and Millwrights' Union v. Housesmiths and Bridgemens' Union
and Post <c McCord—Erecting counterweight guard on Fisher Building.
S
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , O c t o b e r 25, 1905.— The executive com­
mittee finds that the work of erecting counterweight guards on the Fisher Building is
in possession of the Elevator Constructors and Millwrights’ Union.

Elevator Constructors and Millwrights' Union v. Carpenters' Joint District Council—
Millwright work.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , N o v e m b e r 13, 1906,—The secretary is
instructed to notify the Carpenters’ Joint District Council that millwright work is in
the possession of the Elevator Constructors and Millwrights’ Union.

Elevator Constructors'

Union v. Machinists' Union—Erection of elevators, Depew
Building, Canal and Brunswick Streets.

D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , A u g u s t 18, 1909.—Resolved,, That the work
in question is in the possession of the elevator constructors.
I n t e r n a t io n a l U n io n
o r ig in a l

ch arter

of

c l a im

Steam
and

E n g in e e r s .

j u r is d ic t io n

.

All those engaged in the operation of stationary, marine, portable and hoisting and
electrical engines and boilers, gas engines, or any machine that may displace the
steam engine.
Hoisting and portable.
AH hoisting and portable engines on building and construction work, where operated
by steam, electricity, gasoline, hydraulic or compressed air, including pumps, siphons,
pulsometers, concrete mixers, air compressors and elevators, where used for hoisting
building material, street rollers, steam shovels, dinky locomotives, cableway, clam
shells, and pile drivers.
U n it e d

P ortable

H o is t in g E n g in e e r s .

JURISDICTION AWARDS o f t h e BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.
[Decision of the St. Louis Convention, Building Trades Department, American Federation of Labor,
adopted December, 1910. See printed proceedings, p. 128.]

The operation of elevators of all kinds when used for hoisting any material used in
the construction of buildings is hereby conceded to the hoisting engineers affiliated
with the International Union of Steam Engineers.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES 03? N ®W *sYOBK.

71

That hoisting and portable local unions of the International Union of Steam
Engineers have jurisdiction over the motive power of all derricks, cement mixers,
hod hoists, pumps, and other machines used on construction work.
This shall not, however, be construed as preventing the International Brotherhood
of Electrical Workers from using a hand or electric winch for the purpose of pulling
wire or cable through conduits, nor the wiring and repairing of all electrical appliances.
WORKING AGREEMENT BETWEEN LOCAL 184, INTERNATIONAL UNION STEAM ENGINEERS,
AND THE UNITED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINEERS OP GREATER NEW YORK.

1. The portable engineers shall have jurisdiction over all machines, irrespective of
motive power, that are used in the construction of buildings, chimney stacks, monu­
ments, and the ironwork on all elevated railroads and continuations of the same.
2. The safety engineers shall have exclusive jurisdiction over all machines, irrespec­
tive of motive power, on all other work, including pile driving, excavating and roller
Work, except as hereinafter provided for.
3. The ironwork on all subways or continuations to the same, whether they be under­
ground or in the open, and the work on bridges, bridge approaches, and retaining walls
shall be considered as open to members of either organization.
4. The dividing line between the excavating work and the building work shall be
done as follows: When the general contractor does his own excavating, the safety
engineer shall give way to the portable engineer when one-half of the bases are set.
This is not to apply where a boiler or engine is used exclusively for excavating purposes.
5. It is understood by all parties to this agreement that when one-half of the bases
are set the pumps shall be considered within the jurisdiction of the portable engineers,
providing said pump i3 not attached to a boiler used exclusively for excavating pur­
poses.
6. The safety engineers agree not to handle building material on buildings other
than grillage or bases, and then only when the general contractor does the excavating.
7. The portable engineers agree not to do any pumping or excavating until one-half
the bases are set.
8. Where a contractor has a yard for the handling and storing of material used for the
construction of buildings, the machines used in same shall be operated by members of
the portable engineers.
9. It is further agreed by all parties to this5agreement that none but a licensed
engineer shall operate any machine, irrespective of motive power, used in. the handling
of building material on any or all jobs.
10. It is further agreed by all parties to this agreement that the scale of wages speci­
fied in the trade agreements of the United Portable Hoisting Engineers and their
employers shall be maintained on all building work.
NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

Agreement between the Masters’ League of Cement Workers and the United Portable
Hoisting Engineers of Greater New York.
All engines, irrespective of power, including single and double drum, used for hoist­
ing material, and air compressors used for other purposes on concrete structures shall
be operated by members of the United Portable Hoisting Engineers. Nothing in the
agreement shall be construed as prohibiting the shifting of an engineer from one
machine to another. Only steam or compressed air driven concrete or mortar mixers
shall be operated by members of the United Portable Hoisting Engineers’ Union.
The engineer on the job shall supply power from the boiler of the hoisting engine to,
and attend the mixer engine, and when so engaged shall receive one hour’s pay each
day in addition to his regular rate. It is understood that in the event of the mixer
being placed in a position where the engineer of the hoisting engine can not attend the
same, a second engineer shall be employed. The engineer on the job shall supply




72

BUtfifiTIST OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

power from the boiler of the hoisting engine to, and attend an air compressor, a pump,
or a siphon, and shall be paid in the same manner as for a concrete mixer when so
operated.
Memorandum of agreement made between the Hoisting Association of the City of New
York and the United Portable Hoisting Engineers of Greater New York.
The Hoisting Association agrees that all boilers, engines, pumps, electric motors,
gasoline or oil engines, and all air compressors and mixers, not leased, used in build­
ings and bridges under construction shall be operated by members of the United
Portable Hoisting Engineers’ L^nion. But this does not include mixers and pumps
operated by motive power other than steam or compressed air. Where a hoist is used
for elevating building materials it shall be operated by a member of the United
Portable Hoisting Engineers’ Union.
Memorandum of an agreement made between the Iron League Erectors’ Association and
the United Portable Hoisting Engineers’ Local Union 403 of Greater New York.
There shall be no discrimination on the part of the engineers as to the hoisting
of any material entering into the construction of a bridge or building upon which
they are employed.
All boilers, engines, machines, pumps, and compressors used in the construction
or razing of bridges, buildings, and structures shall be operated by members of the
United Portable Hoisting Engineers.
On all jobs where a steam compressor is operated from the boiler setting on frame
of the hoisting engine and furnishing air for not more than three (3) guns, six (6)
hours additional per week shall be paid to engineer operating the hoisting engine.
Electric compressors producing not over seventy-five (75) cubic feet of free air per
minute shall be paid for in a like manner. All compressors other than those specified
above shall be operated by an engineer other than the one operating hoisting engine.
A reamer shall be considered equal to two (2) guns.
AW A R D S

AND DECISIONS OF THE

G EN ER AL ARBITRATION BOARD

OF GREATER N E W

YO R K .

United Portable Hoisting Engineers Local 296, the Elevator Constructors and Mill­
wrights’ Union Local No. 1, v. The Hoisting Association, Elevator Manufacturers
Association and Mason Builders Association— Conference report.
D e c i s i o n , F e b r u a r y 11, 1907.— The elevator constructors may hoist building
material on the house elevators after the hoisting for the plastering above the first
floor has been done; previous to this time the work of hoisting of all building material
must be performed by the United Portable Hoisting Engineers except material
used in the construction of elevators which may be hoisted by the elevator con­
structors.
This means that if house elevators are used for the purpose of hoisting building
material before the hoisting for the plastering above the first floor has been done said
house elevators must be operated by members of the United Portable Hoisting En­
gineers’ Union. While house elevators are in control of the elevator manufacturers
they must be operated by the elevator constructors.
This agreement permits the engineer to hoist building material with the hoisting
machine and the elevator constructor to hoist building material on the house elevator
after the hoisting for the plastering above the first floor has been done.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF S|EW - YORK.

73

United Portable and Hoisting Engineers v. Mason Builders' Association and Master
League of Cement Workers— Operation of pumps and mixers by other power than
steam or compressed air.
U m p ir e ’ s D e c is io n , Ja n u a r y 4, 1909.—After carefully weighing all the evidence
submitted, I have reached the following as my decision:
First. Pumps and mixers operated by other motive power than steam or com­
pressed air not being in possession of any trade may be operated by the hoisting
engineers if the contractor so elect.
Second. Pumps and mixers not operated by steam or compressed air may also
be operated by either members of the Brick Masons Helpers’ Union or Cement
Workers Helpers’ Union as the contractor may determine, and under the plan of
arbitration governing the building trades of New York City.

United Portable Hoisting Engineers v. George A. Fuller Co.— Hoisting materials—
caisson work.
D ec isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , M a y 31, 1906.— The Fuller Construction Co.
is instructed to employ engineers, members of the recognized union, to operate engines
used for handling all materials used in building construction work. This includes all
construction in connection with caisson work.

United Portable Hoisting Engineers v. Elevator Constructors and Millwrights' Union—
Hoisting building material.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , O c to ber 17,1906.— The work of hoisting build­
ing material is in possession of the hoisting engineers and is covered by their agree­
ment.
Further, the Elevator Constructors and Millwrights’ Union does not claim the work
of hoisting building material.
The organizations interested in the question involved are hereby ordered to hold a
conference for the purpose of arranging properly the details of hoisting for the com­
pletion of the buildings.
(See conference report, Feb. 11, 1907.)
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , O cto b er 23, 1906.— T he E levator Construc­
tors and Millwrights’ Union is ordered to refrain from hoisting building material.
I n t e r n a t io n a l A ss o c ia tio n of M a c h in is t s ,
o r ig in a l c h a r t e r claim a n d ju r isd ic t io n .

The International Association of Machinists claims jurisdiction over the building,
assembling, erecting, dismantling, and repairing of machinery in machine shops,
buildings, factories, or elsewhere where machinery may be used.
This is the jurisdiction recognized by the American Federation of Labor and under
which the International Association of Machinists has been operating since its birth,
May 4, 1888.
NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

The International Association of Machinists claim jurisdiction for machinists in the
erection of buildings or structures in New York City as follows:
First. We claim on behalf of our organization that all machinery, engines, and pumps
that are to be placed and used for the operation of plant in any particular building
or structure, constitutes machinists’ work, and the erection and assembling of ma­
chinery, engines, or pumps should be done by machinists.




74

BTJEL&Tm OF TH E BUBEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Second. This claim applies to all machinery and engines that are to be assembled
or erected on the particular job in any building and to any machinist work that may
be necessary on machinery, engines, or pumps that may come on the particular job
assembled.
Third. And also all pumps that may be used for the transmission of power to operate
elevators or other necessary appliances in the building. When a pump is sent to any
particular building to be erected or assembled, the work of erection or assembling of
this pump shall be performed by machinists from our association in preference to
men from other crafts or trades.
Fourth. Sectional boilers that are to be erected or assembled in the buildings is
distinctly machinists’ work, and as this work has been performed for years by machin­
ists, consequently we claim it as our work.
Manufacturing, constructing, erecting, assembling, disassembling, maintaining,
repairing of engines, pumps, elevators, escalators, conveyors, refrigerating machinery,
printing presses and printing machinery, and metal machinery of all kinds and
descriptions, and metal appurtenances thereon, or attached thereto, or operated in
connection therewith, or independent of any thus specified above.
The manufacturing, erecting, constructing, assembling, dissassembling, maintain­
ing, repairing of machine tools for all lines of manufacturing, and, when used to
operate on metals, the operator thereof and the filer and fitter of the machined parts.
PiPE-FITTlNCi TRADES.

In the pipe-fitting trades are grouped all the crafts which have
to do with the installation of piping of every description. This
includes the plumber, gas fitter, steam fitter, hot-water fitter, and
sprinkler fitter. The duties of this group, not excluding those
known to common practice of the several divisions of the pipefitting trade, are to install pneumatic vacuum-cleaning systems,
thermostatic work, refrigerating systems, and all inside piping for
both fuel and illuminating purposes.
N U M B E R O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E O F W A G E S IN P I P E -F I T T I N G T R A D E S ,
B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

Num ber of Num ber of
unions.
members.

Occupations.

Plumbers and gas fitters...............................................- ......................................
Steam and hot-water fitters.................................................................................
Steam and hot-water fitters* helpers......................................................... ......

8
1
1

3,303
1,100
1,000

Total.................................................................................................................

10

Daily rate
of wages,
1913.

5,403

U n it e d

A s s o c ia t io n

of

Jo u r n e y m e n
and

o r ig in a l

ch arter

Plum bers, G as

F it t e r s , S t e a m

$5.50
5.50
3.00

F it t e r s ,

H elpers.
c l a im

and

j u r is d ic t io n .

All piping for water, waste, supply, leader, soil, sewerage, fire, and vent lines.
AH piping for water filters, water meters, and setting of same.
AH piping for hot and cold water used for domestic and culinary purposes.
All piping for sprinkler work of every description.
All piping for pneumatic vacuum-cleaning systems of every description.
All piping for oil and gasoline tanks, automobiles, garages, etc.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TKADES OF N E W 'XOKK.

75

All piping for drinking-water fountains.
All piping for sterilizing systems of every description.
All piping for pneumatie-tube work.
All piping for railing work of every description.
All piping of block tin coils and all air pumping for same in connection with bar
work.
All piping for house pumps and ejectors in connection with sewerage systems.
All piping for natural and artificial gas for any purpose.
All piping for pumps of every description.
All piping for engine and boiler connections of every description.
All piping used for power or heating purposes, either by water, air, steam, or any
other method.
All piping for refrigerating ice machines, whether brine or ammonia.
All piping for hydraulic, vacuum, pneumatic air piping of every description.
All pipe fitting in connection with locomotives and railway cars.
All marine piping.
All sheet-lead lining for any purpose.
All assembling, hanging, and connecting of all fixtures used for illuminating
purposes.
AH piping for connecting stoves, fire grates, furnaces, driers, heaters, and boilers
of every description.
All iron piping for speaking tubes.
The assembling and placing in position of all fixtures used in connection with
plumbing, gas fitting, steam fitting, power pipe fitting, and sprinkler fitting.
To set all plumbing fixtures; also fit up all toilets and bathroom auxiliaries, such
as soap and sponge holders, paper holders, towel racks, glass shelves, and medicine
closets, furnished by plumbing manufacturers; all water, gas, and waste to and from
all laundry machines; also all compressed-air work.
All plumbing fixtures and their appurtenances, m follows: Water filters, water
meters, hot-water tanks, cold-water tanks, suction tanks, sump tanks, all water pumps,
all bathtubs, all water-closets, all sinks, all showers, all washbasins, all urinals, all
wash trays must be purchased and furnished by the master plumber, otherwise the
journeymen parties to this agreement refuse to install or connect the same.
WORKING RULES.

Duties of a plumber.
Sec. 121. All piping for waste-water leaders, soil and vent lines, all sewerage drains
for and within buildings.
Sec. 122. All pipe work in connection with pneumatic vacuum-cleaning systems.
Sec. 123. All thermostatic work in connection with plumbing.
Sec. 124. All water piping for priming of pumps, cooling jackets, and drain pipes
from the same, and all water-pipe connections with ice-machine work.
Sec. 125. All pipe for hot and cold water used for domestic and culinary purposes;
all pipe for water supplies.
Duties of a steam fitter.
Sec. 126. All steam-pipe work for power and heating of every description.
Sec. 127. All hot water for heating and ventilating.
Sec . 128. All thermostatic work connected with steam heating and power plants,
except where lead is used.
Sec. 129. All ice-machine pipe works, whether brine or ammonia, or any other
system pertaining to refrigerating purposes, except the water lines, and all air piping
pertaining to power, except vacuum-cleaning systems.




76

BULKBTIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Du ties of a gas fitter.
130. All piping inside of buildings for both fuel and illuminating purposes.
131. All “ assembling, ” hanging, and connecting of all fixtures used for illu­
minating purposes. (Note sec. 128.)
Sec. 132. All connections for stoves, fire grates, furnaces, driers, heaters, and boilers
where gas is used.
Sec. 133. All iron pipe for speaking tubes.
S e c . 134. All air pipe, except sprinkler and thermostatic piping.
(Note sec. 135.)
Sec.
Sec.

Duties of a sprinkler fitter.
135. All fitting and hanging of pipes in buildings connected with sprinklers.
136. All fire pump, tank, or water-main connections used for fire-protection
purposes.
S e c . 137. The steam end of fire pumps or pipes for heating of tanks is to be done by
steam fitters, providing they are members of the United Association of Journeymen
Plumbers, Gas Fitters, Steam Fitters, and Helpers.
Sec.

Sec.

A W A R D S AN D DECISIONS OP THE G EN ER AL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER N E W Y O R K .

Plumbers’ Union v. Thos. B. Leahy Co. and Bricklayers’ Union— Running vitrified pipe
drain line.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J a n u a r y 18,1906.— The running of pipe from
fixtures, trapped and connected with a sewer and for the purpose of conveying waste
water or acids, as specified in the complaint, is work that has been in the possession of
the plumbers.

Journeymen Plumbers and Gas Fitters’ Local No. 480, United Association, and the
Contracting Plumbers’ Association v. The Enterprise Association of Steam, Hot Water,
Hydraulic Sprinkler, Pneumatic Tube, Ice Machine and General Pipe Fitters, and the
Master Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Association— Installing system of dust cleaning
in building, corner of Fifty-fifth Street and Madison Avenue.
U m p i r e ’ s D e c i s i o n , F e b r u a r y 25, 1907.— In arriving at a conclusion, I am not
able under the terms of the complaint to take into consideration any work done after
January 20, 1906.
After careful consideration of all the evidence and exhibits submitted to me, my
decision is: That the work of “ installing a system of dust cleaning” in the building
located at the southeast corner of Fifty-fifth Street and Madison Avenue, by a firm
known as the Baldwin Engineering Co., is work that has been before recognized to be
in possession of the complainants.

Plumbers v. Blackall & Baldwin Co. and Electrical Workers’ Union— Running of Risers
vacuum system.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , M a y 19, 1909.— That Blackall & Baldwin be
notified that the installation of the vacuum system for cleaning purposes is in the
possession of the plumbers.
That the inside electrical workers be notified that the installation of the vacuum
system for cleaning purposes is in the possession of the plumbers.

Steam Fitters v. Plumbers—Running of air lines at Pennsylvania Terminal— General
jurisdiction.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , D e c e m b e r 8 , 1909.— The running of air lines
for the blowing off of motors and generators and the operating of switch and signal
systems is in the possession of the steam fitters.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES O F ' N E W YORK.

77

The running of air lines for the operating of soil ejectors is in the possession of the
plumbers.
The running of air lines for the operating of pumps for the discharge of water and the
testing of air brakes is not in the possession of the plumbers or the steam fitters.
Further, where the work is primarily for the blowing off of motors or generators, or
the operating of switch and signal systems, or such other air lines as have been awarded
to the steam fitters, the trunk lines shall be run by the steam fitters.
And further, when the lines are primarily run for the operating of soil ejectors from
sump pits, and such other work as has been awarded to the plumbers, the trunk lines
shall be run by the plumbers.
St ea m

and

H ot W a t e r

F it t e r s ’ U n io n

of

N ew

Y ork

Cit y .

AGREEMENT WITH MASTER STEAM AND HOT WATER FITTERS’ ASSOCIATION.

All pipe cutting and threading and screwing on of fittings, by machine at the shop,
or by hand on the job, shall be optional with the employer. Radiator branches and
coil connections shall be cut and threaded by hand on the job. All fittings on sprinkler
work 5 inches and under shall be made up on the job, according to rule No. 5.
All pipe used for temporary radiator connections having been cut by hand on the
job and returned to the shop may be used again.
In case the employer places a pipe-cutting machine on the job it must be operated
by a fitter.
Item I. All steam power, steam heating, and hot-water heating plants, and all
appliances used in the construction of the same; also hot-water boileis or heaters and
the connections from same to hot-water tanks.
Item II. All engine and boiler connections of every description.
Item III. All piping used for power or heating purposes, either by water, air, steam,
or any other method.
Item IV. All piping used for refrigerating, cooling, ice machine, or ice-making pur­
poses, either by brine, ammonia, or any other method.
Item Y. All piping used for fire extinguishing purposes by either water, steam, or
any other method.
Item Y I. All piping used for hydraulic, vacuum, pneumatic and air piping of every
description not including air piping for thermostatic heat control apparatus.
Item V II. All piping on pumps and all other power generators.
Item V III. All hot-water heaters and connections from same to hot-water tanks.
Item IX . All piping for oil systems.
Item X . All piping used for mechanical and manufacturing purposes.
AWARDS AND DECISIONS OF THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW
YORK.

Steam fitters v. plumbers— Installation of a lubricating system, Wanamaher Building.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , S e p t e m b e r 27, 1905.—That the work of in­
stalling apparatus for supplying lubricating fluid to engines and machinery by means
of pipes, pumps, and tanks is recognized as having been in the possession of the steam
fitters.

Journeymen Plumbers’ Local No. 480 v. Enterprise Association of Steam Fitters—Pos­
session of work of erecting fire lines.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , N o v e m b e r 21, 1906.— The work in question,
the erection of fire lines, has been in the possession of the plumbers and the steam
fitters.




78

BVJiLETIX OF THE BUEEAXJ OF LAB OS STATISTICS.

Enterprise Association of Steam Fitters v. Plumbers’ Union—Installing sprinkling
system.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J a n u a r y 2,1907.— The work of installing the
sprinkler system described in the complaint (Hammerstein Opera House) is work that
has been in the possession of the steam fitters.

Enterprise Association of Steam Fitters v. Milliken Brothers— Running temporary air
lines.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J u l y 2, 1907.—All temporary air lines and
extensions of air lines used to supply power to operate guns for riveting ironwork,
which are run after the steam fitters commence the steam work on the job, shall be. run
by steam fitters.

Air Line Case— Temporary air line decision.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J u l y 10,1907.—Before the steam fitters begin
the steam fitters’ work on the job, the lines shall be run by the engineers or steam fitters
with the assistance of other union men.

Air Line Case—Running temporary air line.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , M a r c h 11, 1908.—All temporary air lines and
extensions of air lines used to supply power to operate guns for riveting ironwork shall
be run by union men, and lines which are run after the steam fitters commence the
steam work on the job shall be run by steam fitters.
S t e a m a n d H ot W a t e r F it t e r s ’ H e l p e r s ’ U n io n o f N e w Y o r k : C it y ,
agreem ent

w it h

m aster

steam

and

hot

w ater

f it t e r s ’

a s s o c ia t io n

.

The agreement between the Master Steam and Hot W ater Fitters’ Association and
T
the Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Helpers’ Union of New York provides jurisdiction
over the following items:
I. All steam power, steam heating, and hot-water heating plants, and all appliances
used in the construction of the same; also hot-water boilers or heaters and the connec­
tions from same to hot-water tanks.
II. All engine and boiler connections of every description.
III. All piping used for power or heating purposes, either by water, air, steam, or
any other method.
IV. All piping used for refrigerating, cooling, ice machine, or ice-making purposes,
either by brine, ammonia, or any other method.
V. All piping used for fire-extinguishing purposes by either water, steam, or any
other method.
VI. All piping used for hydraulic, vacuum, pneumatic, and air piping of every
description, not including air piping for thermostatic heat-control apparatus.
V II. All piping on pumps and all other power generators.
V III. All hot-water heaters and connections from same to hot-water tanks.
IX . All piping for oil systems.
X . All piping used for mechanical and manufacturing purposes, and it is further
agreed that the master steam fitters shall have the right to employ additional helpers
whenever the steam fitters’ union after six (6) days’ notice fails to supply steam fitters;
these helpers to do steam fitters’ work until such time as the steam fitters’ union can
replace them by competent steam fitters. Such additional helpers to receive the reg­
ular helpers’ rate of wages.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OFI' N £££ .YORK.
STRU CTU RAL, SHEET, AND

F A B R IC A T E D

79

M ETAL TRADES.

The trades in this group compose all those working in sheet metal,
including tin,, copper, and light iron, cornice, and skylight making,
metal roofers, and hollow metal door and trim workers, light iron and
steel assembling, fabricating and erecting wire and metal lathing,
the fabrication and erection of structural and ornamental steel and
iron in buildings.
N U M B E R O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E O F W A G E S I N S T R U C T U R A L , S H E E T ,
A N D F A B R I C A T E D M E T A L T R A D E S , B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , X913.

Number
of unions.

Occupations.

Number
of mem­
bers.

Metallic lathers..........................................................................................................
Sheet-metal workers (tinsmiths), cornice and metal ceilings................
Structural and ornamental iron workers................. - ....................................
Structural and ornamental iron workers’ helpers.......................................

1
2
5
1

500
3,101
1,959
443

Total.................................................................................................................

9

Daily rate
of wages,
1913.

6,008

$5.00
5.00
5.00
3.50

I n t e r n a t io n a l U n io n of W oo d , W ir e , a n d M e tal L a t h e r s .
ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AN D JURISDICTION.

Erecting and installing of all light iron construction, furring, making and- erecting
of brackets, clips, and hangers*; wood, wire, and metal lath, plaster board, or other
material which, takes the place of same, to which plastic material is adhered; comer
beads, all floor construction, arches erected for the purpose of holding plaster, cement,
concrete, or any other plastic material.
N o t e .— Plaster board, substituting lath, composed of plaster of Paris, shavings,
rope, fiber, and straw, is conceded to lathers.
JURISDICTION. AW A R D S

OP THE

BUILDING TRADES

DEPARTMENT

OF THE

AMERICAN

FEDERATION OF LABOR.

Woody Wire, and Metal Lathers’ International Union v. International Association
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers.
[Decision of the Denver Convention, Building Trades Department, American Federation of Labor,
adopted November, 1908. See printed proceedings Denver Convention, pp. 69 to 71, inclusive.]

After going into an extended hearing of the junsdietional claims of both organiza­
tions, your committee recommends that the erection and installation of ail light iron­
work, such as light iron furring, brackets, clips, hangers, steel corner guards or beads,
and metallic lathing of all descriptions, belongs solely to the lather.
This does not give the right, however, to the lathers to install or erect any other
ironwork than as herein specified and outlined.
This decision is based m conformity with the agreement entered into by the national
officers of both organizations and indorsed by the Kansas City Convention of Struc­
tural Iron Workers and concurred in by the American Federation of Labor.
In supplement of the foregoing decision the Rochester Convention of the Building
Trades Department, November 29, 1912, awarded juiisdiction over hy-rib lath to the
Wood, Wire, and Metal Lathers’ International Union.




80

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance v. Wood, Wire, and Metal
Lathers' International Union.
Agreement entered into this 27th day of November, 1908, at Denver, Colo., by
and between the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance, parties
of the first part, and the Wood, Wire, and Metal Lathers’ International Union, parties
of the second part.
The parties to this agreement respectfully agree to reaffirm the agreement entered
into by the aforesaid parties on January 7, 1903, and January 27, 1904; and the
party of the second part further agrees not to erect any metal studding or furring
which plastic material is adhered to, and which has not been manufactured or con­
structed by members of the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International
Alliance, the making of which is covered by the jurisdiction claims of party of the
first part; and the party of the first part, in return, agrees at no time to allow their
members to assert jurisdiction over the erection of metal studding or furring which
plastic material is adhered to.
The party of the second part, in return, hereby agrees to recommend to the general
membership of the wood, wire, and metal lathers the request of the party of the first
part. That the members of the party of the second part will refuse to lath up heating
and ventilating duct, or other sheet-metal work, which does not bear the union label
of the party of the first part.
NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

The jurisdictional agreement between the Master League of Cement Workers and the
Metallic Lathers’ Union of New York is as follows:
First. The term “ fireproof construction” shall apply to concrete slabs, arches, and
other bodies of concrete supported by or reenforced with rods of mesh, and used in
connection with structural steel. This includes also arches supported by corrugated
or other sheet metal.
Second. The term “ reenforced concrete construction” shall apply to bodies of con­
crete of any kind used for sustaining loads, where the concrete structure wholly or in
part replaces structural steel.
Third. On the laying and setting of light iron or steel or mesh used in fireproof con­
struction, also on the cutting and bending of all light iron or steel, metal and wire lath
or mesh or sheets for floor, arches, and the making of hangers, clips, and stirrups,
whether made on the job or elsewhere.
On each job of fireproof construction there shall be a foreman who shall have charge
of the metallic lathers and laborers on fireproof concrete, who shall be a member of the
Metallic Lathers’ Union in good standing, and who shall work with his tools when
requested to do so when no concreting is going on.
Fourth. On the fabricating and assembling of all columns, beams, and girders, of
metal or wire lath, light iron or steel, on the cutting, bending, and setting of all light
iron and steel, and of metal and wire lath or mesh used in construction of reenforced
concrete, including hangers, clips, and stirrups, whether made on the job or elsewhere,
excepting the making and assembling of such work as is made in the shop by heating
processes that can not be fabricated on the job. When skeleton frames of reenforced
steel, iron, or metal lath, or wire lath or mesh, are made and assembled in the shop by
heating processes that can not be fabricated on the job, the same shall be handled after
arrival at the site of the job solely by members of the party of the second part. On
each job of reenforced concrete there shall be a foreman, who shall have charge of the
metallic lathers and over the reenforced concrete, who shall be a member of the
Metallic Lathers’ Union in good standing, and who shall work with his tools when
requested to do so when no concreting is going on.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

81

The agreement between the Employing Metallic Furring and Lathing Association
of New York and the Metallic Lathers’ Union provides for the fabrication, assembling,
and erection of all iron and steel furring and framing. This includes all furring in
connection with metal lath and plaster ceilings, bracket work for ornamental effects,
partition work and wall furring*, also the applying and placing of wire lath, sheet,
metal lath, and paper lath and plaster boards, comer beads, and metal grounds, and the
fabricating of hangers, clips, and stirrups, whether made on the job or elsewhere, for
the above specified work; this includes also the supports for arches of corrugated or
other sheet metal.
A W A R D S AN D

DECISIONS OP THE

G EN ER AL ARBITRATION

BOARD

OF GREATER N E W

YORK.

Metallic Lathers' Union of New York and Employing Metal Furring and Lathing Asso­
ciation v. New York League of Heat and Cold Insulation and Union of Heat and Cold
Insulators—Erection of hanging ceiling framework on Wanamaker Building, New
York City.
A r b it r a t o r s ’ D e c is io n , J u n e 1, 1905.—The undersigned committee, acting as a
special board of arbitration, in the dispute between the Metallic Lathers’ Union and
the Employing Metallic Furring and Lathing Association, parties of the first part,
and the Union of Heat and Cold Insulators and the New York League of Heat and
Cold Insulation, parties of the second part, relating to the erection of hanging ceiling
framework on the Wanamaker Building, New York City, find as follows:
That the work in question shall be erected by the members of the Metallic Lathers1
Union.

Sheet Metal Workers' Union, Local No. 11, v. Housesmiths' and Bridgemens' Union,
Metallic Lathers' Union, and Berger Manufacturing Co.— Installing corrugated iron
floor arches.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , A u g u s t 28,1905.— The executive committee
finds that the work of installing corrugated iron floor arches for the purposes of holding
plastic material or concrete has been in the possession of the Metallic Lathers’ Union.

Metallic Lathers' Union v. H. W. Miller & Co.—Stapling on of wire lath.
R ec o m m e n d a t io n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , O c to ber 18, 1905.—The executive
committee adopted the following as a recommendation to the interested parties: The
stapling of wire lath on a wood-lath job may be done by any skilled mechanic where
the amount of wire lath stapled on wood does not exceed 75 square yards. If the wire
lath on a wood job excseds 75 square yards it shall be stapled by metal lathers, and on
all metal and wire lath jobs the work shall be done by metal lathers.

Metallic Lathers' Union v. Lenox Iron Works— Work of iron furring.
D ec isio n of E x e c u t iv e Co m m it t e e , F e b r u a r y 2 7 ,1 9 0 9 . — The Lenox Iron Works
is directed to employ metallic lathers (members of the recognized union) on all
work of furring carrying metallic lathing.

Metallic Lathers' Union v. Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers' Union, Local 11—Angle
iron placed in ducts for lathing.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , D e c e m b e r 16, 1908.— The work in question,
1-inch angle iron placed in ducts for the purpose of holding metallic lath, which in
turn is used for the purpose of holding the cement, is in the possession of the metallic
lathers.

97394°—Bull. 124— 13------ 6




82

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
A m algam ated

S h e e t M e t a l W o r k e r s ’ I n t e r n a t io n a l A l l ia n c e ,

ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AND JURISDICTION.

A sheet-metal worker, in the sense used and considered by this International Alli­
ance, shall be one who can command the minimum r£te of wages at any of the various
branches, which shall consist of tin and sheet-metal workers, metal roofers, cornice
and skylight workers, metal furniture, hollow metal door and trim workers, furnace
and range workers, the making, setting, and finishing of metal sash and frames,
jobbers, assortment workers and coppersmiths, and those who put on iron ceilings
and sidings (both interior and exterior), and all sheet-metal work made of No. 10
gauge and lighter.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance v. Wood, Wire, and Metal
Lathers’ International Union.
Agreement entered into this 27th day of November, 1908, at Denver, Colo., by and
between the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance, parties of the
first part, and the Wood, Wire, and Metal Lathers’ International Union, parties of the
second part.
The parties to this agreement respectfully agree to reaffirm the agreement entered
into by the aforesaid parties on January 7, 1903, and January 27, 1904; and the party
of the second part further agrees not to erect any metal studding or furring which
plastic material is adhered to, and which has not been manufactured or constructed
by members of the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance, the
making of which is covered by the jurisdictional claims of party of the first part; and
the party of the first part, in return, agrees at no time to allow their members to assert
jurisdiction over the erection of metal studding or furring which plastic material is
adhered to.
The party of the second part, in return, hereby agrees to recommend to the general
membership of the wood, wire, and metal lathers the request of the party of the first
part; that the members of the party of the second part will refuse to lath up heat­
ing and ventilating duct, or other sheet-metal work, which does not bear the union
label of the party of the first part.
Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance v. United Brotherhood of Carpenters and
Joiners.
Under a decision by the Tampa Convention of the Building Trades Department the
right of manufacturing and erecting of all metal door and trim was conceded to the
sheet-metal workers.
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America v. Amalagmated
Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance.
Agreement entered into by and between the general executive board of the Brother­
hood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America and the Amalgamated
Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance shall take effect December 1, 1910, and
remain in force until amended, revised, or changed at a meeting between the repre­
sentatives of both organizations called for this purpose.
S e c t i o n 1. It is agreed by both parties to this agreement that all glass set in sheetmetal sash, frames, doors, or skylights shall be set by members of the Brotherhood
of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America, according to their claim of
jurisdiction granted by the convention of the Building Trades department, American




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

83

Federation of Labor, at St. Louis, December, 1910, and that all sheet-metal work on
sheet-metal sash, frames, doors, or skylights shall be done by the members of the
Amalgamated Sheet-Metal Workers’ International Alliance.
Sec. 2. In localities where differences now exist or may arise in the future, such
differences shall be adjusted by a committee appointed by and representing the dis­
trict councils or local unions of both organizations in that locality. Should this com­
mittee be unable to agree, a representative of the general executive board of each
organization shall be called in to assist in the adjustment.
Sec. 3. It is also agreed that the national officers of both organizations where local
unions fail to agree shall insist that this agreement be carried out by affiliated unions.
Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance v. International Association
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers.
At a conference held at Tampa, Fla., October 1 4 ,1909> by and between committees
representing the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance and the
International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers the following agree­
ment was entered into:
First. In regard to steel sheeting, it was agreed that in localities where either
organization has possession of the work it shall remain undisturbed. In localities
where the w;ork is in dispute, the highest rate of wages and the best working condition
maintained by either organization shall prevail in the erection of the work. This
being understood to apply only to corrugated sheeting attached to iron frames. Sheet­
ing applied to woodwork being conceded to the sheet-metal workers.
Second. In regard to metal furniture, it was agreed that where there are more T ’s
or angles or iron heavier than 10 gauge used in its construction it shall be done by
the bridge and structural iron workers. Where there is more sheet metal of 10 gauge
or lighter used in the manufacture of said work it shall be done by the sheet-metal
workers.
Third. The sheet-metal workers waive all claim of jurisdiction over stair or other
work such as grill work or elevator inclosures.
Fourth. In the matter of erection of fans, hot-blast rooms, and cold-air inlets heavier
than 10 gauge, [it] shall be done by the bridge and structural iron workers. All fans,
hot-blast rooms and cold-air inlets 10 gauge or lighter shall be done by the sheetmetal workers.
Fifth. All future disputes that may arise between the above-named organizations
in connection with work not herein set forth shall first be taken up by the international
presidents of both organizations, and on their failure to agree the building trades
department’s laws and rules shall govern the settlement of the disputes.
Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers v. Bridge and Structural Iron Workers— Floor domes.
In supplement to the foregoing, the following agreement was entered into by and
between representatives of the Bridge and Structural Iron Workers’ International
Union and the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Association, Roches­
ter, N. Y ., November 27, 1912:
First. We reaffirm the agreement entered into by the parties at interest at Tampa,
Fla., October 14, 1909.
Second. That in the matter of floor dome used in floor construction, manufactured
of sheet metal of No. 10 gauge and lighter, was not in contention at the time the agree­
ment was entered into.
Therefore, we, the representatives of the Bridge and Structural Iron Workers,
concede that work to the Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance. (See printed
proceedings, Rochester Convention, p. 140.)




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B ULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
N E W YO R K JURISDICTION.

All sheet-metal work in connection with buildings and structures, including hollow
metal sash, frames, skylights, and the glazing of all skylights, cornices, crestings,
awnings, circular moldings, excepting stamping of same, ventilators (except such as
are patented), heating and ventilating and ventilating apparatus (except patented
articles and mechanical equipment such as fans, blowers, air washers, etc.), the
setting of all registers and register faces in connection with sheet-metal work, the
applying of metal to ceilings and the side walls, all the furring and sheathing of same,
and such other sheet-metal work of No. 10 gauge and lighter not herein specified as
has been awarded them in the past, shall be made and erected by members of the
Brotherhood of Union Sheet Metal Workers of New York and vicinity. In Kalamein
shops the work of members of the Sheet Metal Workers’ Union shall be confined to
the cutting and forming of the metal before same is applied to the wood and any
soldering that may be necessary in the finishing of the assembled parts, and the
covering of wood doors with tin.
AW ARDS AND

DECISIONS OF THE G EN ER AL ARBITRATION BOARD OF G REATER N E W
YORK.

Sheet Metal Workers’ Union v. Carpenters’ Union— Installing of hollow metal sash.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , A u g u s t 2, 1905.—The executive committee
finds that the work of hanging hollow metal sash has been in the possession of the
Sheet Metal Workers’ Union.

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Union v. Marc Eidlitz <c Son— Manufacturing
S
clothes driers, etc.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , S e p t e m b e r 20, 1905.—The general secretary
is instructed to notify Marc Eidlitz & Son and the secretary of the Building Trades
Employers’ Association that the work of manufacturing clothes driers and similar
sheet-metal appliances belongs to the Sheet Metal Workers’ Union.

Sheet Metal Workers’ Union v. Elevator Supply & Repair Co.— Manufacture of metalcovered doors for freight elevators.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , O c to b er 25, 1905.—The Elevator Supply
& Repair Co. is notified that all this kind of work must be manufactured by mem­
bers of Local 11 of New York, and as these particular doors were delivered before
the company was aware of the conditions imposed by the trade agreement, the doors
of the Wanamaker building are exempted from the rule.

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers v. Carpenters’ Union—Setting hollow metal frames.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , M a r c h 20, 1907.—The setting of all hollow
metal frames made under conditions as exist per the agreement between the Amal­
gamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Local No. 11 and the employing sheet-metal associa­
tions shall be in the possession of the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Local No.
11 and the Carpenters’ Joint District Council, it being understood that neither party
will set any frames not manufactured under conditions satisfactory to the Amalgamated
Sheet Metal Workers’ Local No. 11.

Sheet Metal Workers v. Glaziers—Glazing metal sash.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , Ja n u a r y 23,1907.—The work of glazing metal

sash where a cap or solder is used is work that has been in the possession of the sheetmetal workers. The work of glazing metal sash where a cap or solder is not used is
work that has been in the possession of both the sheet-metal workers and the glaziers.
The cutting of glass is work that has been in the possession of the glaziers.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IK BUILDING TRADES OP N E W YORK.

85

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Union No. 11 v. Turner Construction Co.— Manu­
facture of boiler breechings.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , F e b r u a r y 14, 1908.—The work of manufac­
turing of boiler breechings is in the possession of the sheet-metal workers.

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Local No. 11 v. Master Steam and Hot Water Fitters9
Association— Manufacturing of tempering coil casings.
U m p i r e ’ s D e c i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 21, 1909.—This question came before the special
board appointed by the General Arbitration Board on two complaints: No. 41 of
Baker, Smith & Co., “ that the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Local No. 11 have
struck on the erection of the tempering coil casings on the job known as the Grand
Central Station, Forty-second Street and Lexington Avenue,” and complaint No.
48 of the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers, Local No. 11, against Baker, Smith &
Co. for “ violating the provisions of section 3 of the joint arbitration plan by employing
sheet-metal workers not members of the recognized union to do sheet-metal work on
the job known as the Grand Central Station, Forty-fourth Street and Lexington
Avenue.”
By action of the executive committee on complaint No. 41, the sheet-metal workers
were “ ordered to proceed with the work” and the “ question of manufacture of coil
casings referred to the trade board for consideration.” By decision of the executive
committee, on complaint of No. 48, Baker, Smith & Co. were ordered “ to employ
sheet-metal workers to complete the work.” The question of the manufacture of
tempering coil casings thus referred to the General Arbitration Board was by them
referred to a special board and, by failure of that special board to agree, comes now
before the umpire.
The questions at issue are whether, under the agreement between the Employers’
Association and the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers, Local Union No. 11, the latter
have the right to claim the manufacture of tempering coil casings and whether, under
this agreement, the Employers’ Association have the right to demand that tempering
coil casings not manufactured within the Greater New York territory nor by the
members of the Sheet Metal Workers’ Union shall be erected by the latter.
The whole case turns on the interpretation of Clause II of the agreement. The Sheet
Metal Workers’ Union No. 11 claim that the first paragraph of Clause II: “ All sheetmetal work in connection with buildings and structures” includes tempering coil
casings and that, if such tempering coil casings have not in the past been manufac­
tured by sheet-metal workers, that has been a violation of the agreement. The
Master Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Association claim that this clause is really modi­
fied by the words succeeding a few lines later: “ And such other sheet-metal work of
No. 10 gauge and lighter, not herein specified, that has been regarded in the past as
belonging to the Sheet Metal Workers’ Union.”
After a careful study of the documents submitted, viz, the four volumes of evidence,
the arguments of counsel on both sides, the briefs of the members of the special arbi­
tration board on both sides, and the numerous exhibits, it seems to me that the evi­
dence shows that the contention of the Master Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Associa­
tion in this matter is correct; that the phrase “ all sheet-metal work in connection with
buildings and structures” was not intended to be interpreted by itself, without
connection with the words already quoted “ and such other sheet-metal work of No.
10 gauge and lighter, not herein specified, that has been regarded in the past as belong­
ing to the Sheet Metal Workers’ Union,” which are, in fact, to be regarded as a quali­
fying phrase. There is no dispute that blowers, although they are sheet-metal work
in connection with buildings and structures, do not belong to the Sheet Metal Workers’
Union, and the evidence shows that the common practice, certainly for many years,
has been for the Master Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Association to furnish tempering
coil cases manufactured by firms having their factories outside of the Greater New




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BULLETIN OF TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

York territory, and that such tempering coil cases not manufactured by the Sheet
Metai Workers’ Union No. 11 have been erected by sheet-metal workers practically
without question until some time after the conclusion of the agreement, and, indeed,
until the commencement of the present dispute.
I therefore decide that tempering coil casings do not belong to the Amalgamated
Sheet Metal Workers’ Local No. 11, but may be bought by the Master Steam and
Hot Water Fitters’ Association from firms outside of the Greater New York territory
as part of the heating and ventilation units manufactured by such firms; and that under
the terms of the agreement the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ Local No. 11 must
erect such tempering coil casings.
I n t e r n a t io n a l A sso c ia tio n of B r id g e a n d S t r u c t u r a l I r o n W o r k e r s ,
o r ig in a l c h a r t e r claim a n d j u r isd ic t io n .

The fabrication and erection of bridge, structural, and ornamental steel and iron
in bridges, viaducts, buildings, etc., as set forth in sections 4, 5, 6, and 7 of our con­
stitution, which is as follows:
The erection and construction of all steel and cast-iron structures, ornamental or
otherwise, viz, bridges and viaducts, steel stacks, steel coal bunkers, ash, coal, and ore
conveyors, car dumpers, jail and cell work, steel grain elevators and steel stand­
pipes, steel water tanks, iron and steel bulkheads, steel towers, blast furnaces, includ­
ing skip hoists and top rigging ash pans and ash hoppers. All structural work per­
taining to buildings or in support of boilers, frames, and all steel or cast-iron work
pertaining to buildings or in support of boilers, including foundation beams, columns,
beams, or girders, and structural work for safe-deposit vaults, mullions, steel or cast
iroa; also the wrecking of bridges, viaducts, and steel buildings; also any work required
to change or alter in field material shipped from the shops, such as framing, cutting,
bending, and drilling; ornamental front work (solid or shell), corrugated sheet work
when attached to steel frames, plates, anchors, caps, corbells, light lintels, etc.
The erection and removal of all necessary false work, derricks, travelers, and scaffold­
ing; all pile driving and wharf building, and the handling and operating of derricks
in connection with same, where no bona fide union of pile drivers or derrick men
exists.
Iron, steel, and reenforced concrete are included in the above claim, but under
no circumstances are any of the above three items to be conceded to a pile drivers’
or derrick men’s union by this association. The moving and placing of heavy macninery in bridges and buildings, elevator cars, elevator pans; all grating, bucks for hall­
ways, iron partitions, ceilings, hangers, clips, and all bracket work; all ironwork
appertaining to concrete work; all steel corner beads; all iron flooring, rolling shutters
and curtains, iron frames, kalamine and iron doors, shutters, cast tiling, French
frames, plates, overhead travelers, all wirework, railings, window guards, and all
fencing.
The erection and construction of all ornamental and structural iron, brass and
bronze, 'ill grill work, sidewalk and vault lights, skylights, roofs, and towers; all
elevator and dumb-waiter inclosures; all iron fronts, metal furniture, mail chutes;
all cast or wrought iron ventilators, iron stairways, fire escapes, iron or steel signs,
and all blacksmith work on buildings.
JURISDICTION

AW ARDS

OF THE

BUILDING

TRADES

DEPARTMENT

OF THE

AM ERICAN

FEDERATION o f l a b o r .

Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance v. International Association
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers.
At a conference held at Tampa, Florida, October 14, 1909, by and between commit­
tees representing the Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers’ International Alliance




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TKADES OF N E W YOBK.

87

and the International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers the following
agreement was entered into:
First. In regard to steel sheeting, it was agreed that in localities where either
organization has possession of the work it shall remain undisturbed. In localities
where the work is in dispute, the highest rate of wages and the best working condition
maintained by either organization shall prevail in the erection of the work. This
Tjeing understood to apply only to corrugated sheeting attached to iron frames, sheeting applied to woodwork being conceded to the sheet-metal workers.
Second. In regard to metal furniture, it was agreed that where there are more T ’s
or angles or iron heavier than 10 gauge used in its construction it shall be done by
the bridge and structural iron workers. Where there is more sheet metal of 10 gauge
or lighter used in the manufacture of said work it shall be done by the sheet-metal
workers.
Third. The sheet-metal workers waive all claim of jurisdiction over stair or other
work, such as grill work or elevator inclosures.
Fourth. In the matter of erection of fans, hot-blast rooms, and cold-air inlets heavier
than 10 gauge shall be done by the bridge and structural iron workers. All fans,
hot-blast rooms, and cold-air inlets 10 gauge or lighter shall be done by the sheetmetal workers.
Fifth. All future disputes that may arise between the above-named organizations
in connection with work not herein set forth shall first be taken up by the interna­
tional presidents of both organizations, and on their failure to agree the building
trades department’s laws and rules shall govern the settlement of the disputes.
International Association Bridge and Structural Iron Workers.
[Decision of the Tam pa Convention, Building Trades Department, American Federation of Labor, sup­
plemented b y a decision of the St. Louis Convention.]

Resolved, By this department in convention assembled, that the fabrication, erec­
tion, and placing of all iron and steel in reenforced concrete and cement construction
and in all floor construction properly belongs to the International Association of
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers, and that they are hereby conceded full and com­
plete jurisdiction over this class of work.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers v. United Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners.
The bridge and structural iron workers claim the erection and removal of all nec­
essary false work, but as this is only of temporary nature and refers more particularly
to the erection and construction of steel and iron bridges, it was conceded that this
comes properly under the claim of jurisdiction of the iron workers.
N o t e . — The above refers to the erection and construction of steel and iron bridges,
and not to false work in or around buildings.
Derricks and travelers and the handling and operation of same belong to the iron­
workers.
The framing of travelers and derricks where wood is used belongs to the carpenters.
S c a f f o l d i n g . —As no framing is necessary in the construction of scaffolding for
the ironworkers, any more than to throw timbers or planking from one beam or girder
to another, or hang same by means of rope or chain, and as the ironworkers are under
heavy expenses in the payment of disability claims and death claims as well, result­
ing very often from the manner in which scaffolding is erected, they decided to erect
their own scaffolding in their own way, and will not work on scaffolding erected by
other men, be they mechanics or laborers. But where framing is necessary with
carpenter’s tools, then such framing work belongs to the carpenters.
P l a c i n g o f M a c h i n e r y i n P o s i t i o n . — As the placing of heavy machinery in posi­
tion does not include the alignment, leveling, adjustment, and fitting up of said
machinery ready for use, that being work that comes under the jurisdiction of the




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BULLETIN OF THE BUBEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

millwrights, United Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners of America, no objection,
is raised by the United Brotherhood against the ironworkers placing heavy machinery
on buildings where designated.
W h a r f B u i l d i n g a n d D o c k B u i l d i n g . —The ironworkers do not claim jurisdic­
tion over wharf and dock building, where same is constructed solely of wood, but
where iron is used, and sheds built of corrugated iron, they claim that part.
On this matter we agree that where wooden beams and timbers are used, with
heavy planking and flooring, that same belongs to the carpenters, but where iron
girders, iron columns, steel trusses are used, or ironwork of any form, same belongs
to the ironworkers solely.
S e t t i n g o f S e a t s i n P u b l i c B u i l d i n g s . —All metal or partly metal seats fastened
to metal, the assembling and setting of same, is conceded to the ironworkers, and all
seats fastened to wood, the assembling and setting of same, is conceded to the car­
penters.
Wood, Wire, and Metal Lathers’ 1nternational Union v. International Association Bridge
and Structural Iron Workers.
[Decision of the Denver Convention, Building Trades Department, American Federation of Labor,
adopted November, 1908. See printed proceedings Denver Convention, pp. 69 to 71, inclusive.]

After going into an extended hearing of the jurisdiction claims of both organizations,
your committee recommend that the erection and installation of all light ironwork,
such as light iron furring, brackets, clips, hangers, steel corner guards or beads, and
metallic lathing of all descriptions, belongs solely to the lather.
This does not give the right, however, to the lathers to install or erect any other
ironwork than as herein specified and outlined.
This decision is based in conformity with the agreement entered into by the national
officers of both organizations and indorsed by the Kansas City Convention of Struc­
tural Iron Workers and concurred in by the American Federation of Labor.
International Association Marble Workers v. International Association Bridge and
Structural Iron Workers.
Slate treads on iron stairs having provoked a dispute in jurisdiction between the
organizations above named, was submitted to the executive council November 29,
1909. The action taken follows:
The executive council of the Building Trades Department, on being called upon
for a decision, awarded the work in question (slate treads) to the marble workers.
AWARDS AND DECISIONS OF THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OF GREATER NEW
YORK.

Housesmiths and Bridgemen’s Union and the Iron League Erectors’ Association v. The
Riggers’ Protective Union and the Master Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Associa­
tion— Erection of iron and steel smokestacks.
U m p i r e ’ s D e c i s i o n , A u g u s t 10, 1905.— I find and determine the rights of the
parties to this arbitration to be as follows:
First. The complainants are exclusively entitled to erect iron and steel smoke­
stacks heavier than 10 gauge either inside or outside of buildings in connection only
with the erection of new buildings of iron or steel frame construction or in which iron
or steel beams or girders are used.
Second. Otherwise than as prescribed in the foregoing finding designated “ First,”
no party to this arbitration has any exclusive jurisdiction in the erection of stacks of
the character above specified.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

89

Housesmiths and Bridgemen’s Union v. Electrical Workers’ Union— Drilling holes in
ironwork.
D e c isio n op G e n e r a l A r b it r a t io n B o a r d , S e p t e m b e r 20, 1905.— The drilling
of holes through iron where it requires the services of one man for eight hours or more
is conceded to the ironworkers. The electrical workers shall send for iron men when
the work involved requires more than eight hours’ work continuously.

Housesmiths and Bridgemen’s Union v. Daniel Papay—Putting up angle-iron framework.
D e c isio n op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , Ju l y 26, 1905.—Mr. Papay was instructed to
employ housesmiths to put up the angle-iron framework for wirework on the Bronx
Park and on other jobs.

Housesmiths and Bridgemen’s Union v. Estey Wire Works—Erection of angle-ironframe­
work for wirework.
D e c isio n op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , O c to b er 25, 1905.—The secretary was
instructed to notify the Estey Wire Works and the Wire Works Manufacturers’ Asso­
ciation that the members of said association must employ housesmiths to put up angleiron framework on all jobs.
COMPOSITION PLASTIC TRADES.

The plastic trades cover the preparation and application of cement
mortar on walls of any character, the molding or modeling of forms
of cement, concrete, and asphalt, and the application of tar, felt, and
composition to roofs.
N U M B E R O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E O F W A G E S I N C O M P O S IT IO N P L A S T IC
T R A D E S , B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

Occupations.

Number of Num ber of
unions.
members.

Cement and concrete masons..............................................................................
Cement and asphalt workers
..............................................................................
Tar, felt, and composition roofers.....................................................................
Total.................................................................................................................

1
1
1

520
1,600
626

3

D aily rate
of wages,
1913.

2,746

$o
3
4

A m e r ic a n B r o th er h o o d op C e m e n t W o r k e r s .
ORIGINAL CHARTER CLAIM AN D JURISDICTION.

The American Brotherhood of Cement Workers claims for its members all artificial
stone, concrete, bed for all street paving, coping and steps, concrete wall or foundation
work, concrete floors and sidewalks, the applying of cement mortar on walls of any
character, or its use in any form for renovating or imitating stone, or for waterproofing,
the running of cement base, molding or caps of any form, cement mold work, the
manufacture of cement paving tile and block and the laying and setting of the same,
curbs and gutters, fireproof floors, sidewalk lights set in cement, and all concrete
construction; all composition or plastic work of any character, and the preparation
of all material used in its manufacture.




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BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

JURISDICTION AWARDS OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

American Brotherhood of Cement Workers v. International Union of Hod Carriers and
Building Laborers.
[Decision of the Tampa Convention, Building Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor,
adopted October, 190&. See printed proceedings Tam pa Convention, pp. 130-131.]

We, your committee, recommend that where there are existing agreements between
the American Brotherhood of Cement Workers and International Union of Hod Car­
riers and Building Laborers, they shall remain the same, but we concede the right to
the cement workers to control all laborers working exclusively at the cement industry.
American Brotherhood Cement Workers v. Operative Plasterers’ International Association.
Agreement entered into between the representatives of the Operative Plasterers’
International Association and the American Brotherhood of Cement Workers at the
headquarters of the building trades department on January 16, 1909:
The Operative Plasterers’ International Association claims for its members ail
exterior and interior plastering, whether of stucco, cement, or any patent material,
when done in and by the usual methods of plastering.
We contend the covering of all walls, ceilings, soffits, piers, columns, or any other
part of a construction of any sort, when any part of said construction is covered with
any plastic material in the usual methods of plastering, is the work of the plasterers.
The above claim is recognized by the representatives of cement workers as not to
apply to the construction of any concrete work in building erection or the forming or
casting of asphalt or cement blocks, nor does the term “ compo” employed in the
above claim refer in any manner to concrete construction.
It is further agreed that sanitary base not to exceed 6 inches in height when run in
connection with cement floor shall be the work of cement workers.
NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

(a) All laying out of work, such as setting joists, laying strips or screed rods.
(b) The laying and finishing of all cement-finished concrete basement, floors, yards,
sidewalks, driveways, areas, and other surfaces where cement-finished surfaces or
surface is laid; also where finer material is laid over rough concrete, where strips
have to be set, material ruled down, or surface finished with cement masons’ tools.
(c) The construction of all glass vault or sidewalk lights, where same are set in
cement, excepting the carpenter work, including pointing, facing, and finishing up
of same when forms are taken down.
(d) The setting up all forms for steps, landings, platforms, coping, caps, and curbs,
except where underforms or centers are required and the filling in of all fine material
for facing of same, also the filling in of forms and molds where a fine coat is applied
next to the molds.
(e) The running of all cement base.
( / ) The applying of all cement mortar on walls, including the cutting, patching,
and finishing of concrete fireproofing on walls, piers, and columns; the finishing in
cement of concrete walls, piers, and columns; the applying of cement mortar for
renovating, patching, and imitating of stone; the applying of cement mortar on
exterior of walls for the purpose of preserving or protecting against the weather or
other purposes; the applying of cement mortar for damp proofing, waterproofing, or
sanitary purposes.
(g) The cutting, pointing, and all work in preparing walls for cement mortar.
(h) The patching of all concrete arches, columns, beams, girders, and walls.




CONCILIATION1 ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OP N E W YOBK.
,

91

(i) The cutting of all concrete where cement finish is applied.
(j) The applying and finishing of all material known to the trade as composition,
floors, base, and wainscot.
(k) The setting of carpet pins and sockets in cement floors.
(I) Notwithstanding anything apparently to the contrary, all decisions of the
General Arbitration Board as to jurisdiction of trade shall obtain.
AWARDS AND DECISIONS OP THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OP GREATER NEW
YORK.

United Cement Masons’ Union No. 1 v. Journeymen Plasterers’ Society and Fountain
& Choate— Cement finished floor and stair worky Convent Avenue between 155th and
156th Streets.
D e c isio n op E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , M a y 31, 1906.—Fountain & Choate are
instructed at once to employ cement masons, members of the#
recognized union, in the
finished floor and stair work on the job referred to in the complaint.

Plasterers’ Council v. United Cement Masons’ Union No. 1— Finishing of coal pockets.
D e cisio n of E x e c u t iv e Co m m it t e e , M a y 29,1907.— The work referred to in the
complaint, namely, the finishing of coal pockets of cement or concrete construction,
is in the possession of the cement masons.

United Cement Masons No. 1 v. Bricklayers’ Union and Geo. Vassar’s Son <c Co.—
S
Cement finishing.
D e cisio n of E x e c u t iv e Co m m it t e e , A u g u s t 16, 1905.—It is the decision of the
executive committee that Geo. Vassar’s Son & Co. and the bricklayers’ union violated
the cement mason’s trade agreement by doing cement finishing on the Schwab mansion.

Journeymen Plasterers’ Society, Ornamental Plasterers’ Society, and Employing Plas­
terers’ Association v. United Cement Mason’s Union No. 1 and Master League of Cement
Workers.— Running of base on interior walls and patching of concrete and cement arches
and beam work.
A r b i t r a t o r s ’ D e c i s i o n , M a r c h 22, 1906.—The special arbitration board in the
matter of the “ disputes, differences, and controveries” between the Journeymen Plas­
terers’ Society, the Ornamental Plasterers’ Society, and the Employing Plasterers’
Association, parties of the first part, and the United Cement Masons’ Union No. 1, and
the Master League of Cement Workers, parties of the second part, after careful consid­
eration, is unable to agree as to “ the work cf applying cement mortar to the exterior
of buildings. ”
The special board, as to the other matters in dispute, finds as follows:
First. The applying of cement mortar on the interior walls of buildings, in the form
commonly known as the “ running of base ” shall be done as follows: W ien the base is
of the kind known as sanitary or curved base the work shall be done exclusively by
cement masons. When the base is without a cove, commonly known as “ straight
base, ” the work shall be done by either the plasterers or the cement masons.
Second. The patching of concrete and cement arches and beam work with cement
mortar shall be done exclusively by cement masons.

Cement Masons’ Union v. McNulty Bros, and Plasterers’ Union— Running of sanitary
base.
D e cisio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , A u g u s t 2, 1909.—That McNulty Bros, are
instructed to employ members of the recognized union of cement masons on the run­
ning of sanitary base on the job in question.




92

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

Cement Masons’ Union v. Plasterers' Union—Sanitary cove base, subway loop at Canal
Street.
D ecisio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , O cto ber 27, 1909.—That the plasterers be
directed to cease doing cement masons’ work, in accordance with the decision of the
special arbitration board in respect to cove base.

Plasterers' Union v. George A. Fuller Co. and United Cement Masons' Union—Apply­
ing finished coat of cement mortar to ceilings and beams.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e Co m m it t e e , M a r c h 29, 1909.—The executive committee
finds that when cement finish is put on the bottom of arches and on girders, spandrels,
etc., by a skin coat floated on and troweled down, the work is in the possession of the
plasterers, and where the arches are finished by a coating of thin cement applied by
a brush it is in the possession of the cement workers.

United Cement Masons' Union on behalf of Cement and Asphalt Workers' Union v. F. T.
Nesbit Co.— Installation of cinder concrete arches.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , M a r c h 27,1908.— The F. T. Nesbit Co.
is directed to employ members of the Cement and Asphalt Workers’ Union (cement
masons’ laborers) on the installation of the cinder concrete arches on the job in ques­
tion.

United Cement Masons' Union v. John Thatcher & Son— Laying of cement floor termed
“ dolomite."
D e c isio n o f E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , A pril 1, 1908.—Mr. Thatcher is directed to
employ cement masons, members of the recognized union, to perform the work in
question.

United Cement Masons' Union v. Geo. A. Fuller Co.— Applying cement wash to concrete walls.
D ec isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , J u l y 1, 1908.— The Geo. A. Fuller Co. is
directed to employ cement masons to perform the work in question, the applying of
cement wash to concrete walls.

Plasterers' Council v. United Cement Masons' Union—Applying composition wainscot.
D e c isio n of E x e c u t iv e C o m m it t e e , A u g u s t 26, 1908. The work of applying the
composition wainscot on the job referred to in the complaint (Blackwells Island job
of Thomas B. Leahy Building Co.) is work that is in possession of the cement masons.
N E W Y O R K JURISDICTION OF THE CEM ENT A N D ASPHALT W O R K E R S.

The cement and asphalt workers claim jurisdiction over laborers for the mixing,
spreading, leveling, ramming, and wheeling of all mixed concrete, cutting concrete
when cement finish is not to be applied. Striking centers and handling floor fillers
from elevator, except ash fill, and one man feeding concrete mixers. Handling or
wheeling unmixed or dry materials, handling of all lumber, forms, reenforced steel,
and all other labor in connection with cement or concrete work.
I n t e r n a t io n a l

B rotherhood

of

C o m po sitio n

proo f

R o ofer s, D a m p , a n d

W ater­

W o rkers.

o r ig in a l c h a r t e r claim a n d j u r is d ic t io n .

All forms of plastic slate, slag, gravel, and all kinds of asphalt and composition roof­
ing, including rock asphalt mastic when used for damp and waterproofing, and all




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YORK.

93

prepared paper roofing, and all compressed paper, all chemically prepared paper,
all burlap when used for roofing or damp and waterproofing purposes, with or without
coating, and all damp-resisting preparations when applied with a mop, three-knot
brush, or swab, in or outside of buildings, including all damp courses, sheathing or
coating on all foundation work, also all tarred floors, also the laying of tile or brick,
when laid in pitch tar, asphalt mastic, mormolite, or any form of bitumen.
JURISDICTION AWARDS OF THE BUILDING TRADES DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

International Brotherhood Composition Roofers v. International Union Slate and Tile
Roofers.
Agreement entered into between the International Brotherhood of Composition
Roofers, Damp, and Waterproof Workers and the International Slate and Tile Roofers’
Union of America.
It is mutually agreed that all papering of roofs under slate and tile of one-ply thick­
ness be allowed to the slate and tile roofer.
It is also agreed the prevailing condition with regard to promenade tile between
the two organizations shall remain in force as it is at present.
Nothing contained in this agreement shall conflict with the agreement entered
into at the St. Louis (Mo.) Building Trades Department Convention, between the
International Brotherhood of Composition Roofers, Damp, and Waterproof Workers
and the International Union of Slate and Tile Roofers.
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paper Hangers of America v. International
Brotherhood of Composition Roofers, Damp, and Waterproof Worker's.
Agreement entered into by and between the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators,
and Paper Hangers of America and the International Brotherhood Composition Roof­
ers, Damp, and Waterproof Workers.
First. That the painters do not claim the right to apply any of the material claimed
by the International Brotherhood of Composition Roofers except such material as is
applied by a brush that is ordinarily used by the painters in applying the materials
covered in their jurisdiction.
Second. That the International Brotherhood of Composition Roofers does not claim
the right to apply any of the material in dispute except when applied by or with a
three-knot, long-handled brush, mop, or swab.
NEW YORK JURISDICTION.

Jurisdiction shall include plastic slate, gravel, and all kinds of asphalt or composi­
tion, waterproofing, and damp proofing of substructures, floors, and roofs, including
rock asphalt, mastic when used for waterproofing or roofing, the applying of all cork
and wool fiber when used in conjunction with tar, pitch, asphalt, or any other com­
position; also the running or pouring of all pavements and brick with tar or asphalt,
and the right to protect all roofing and waterproofing with concrete, the taking off and
lowering down of old roofs, handling and hoisting of all material after delivery to job
to be used in connection with the composition roofers’ work. Truck drivers, yard­
men, and stablemen need not be members of the union.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES.

Under miscellaneous trades are grouped such occupations as have
no relation to or connection with any of the several skilled trades.
These occupations are fast becoming to be considered as among the
semiskilled class, and as the building industry develops these occu­
pations develop. The asbestos workers and insulators, derrickmen,



94

BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

and riggers, as well as the house shorers, were scarcely known 20 years
ago, but are fast becoming a necessary adjunct to the building
industry.
NUM BER

O F U N IO N S A N D M E M B E R S A N D R A T E O F W A G E S IN
T R A D E S , B Y O C C U P A T IO N S , 1913.

Num ber
of unions.

Occupations.

M IS C E L L A N E O U S

Num ber
of m em ­
bers.

Asbestos workers and insulators........................................................................
Asbestos workers and insulators’ helpers.......................................................
Derriekmen and riggers......................................................................................
House sharers, movers, sheath pilers............. ........................................... . .
House shorers, movers, sheath pilers’ helpers..............................................

1
1
1
1
1

213
213
550
430
60

T otal..................................................................................................................

5

D aily rate
of wages,
1913.

1,466

R ig g e r s a n d
o r ig in a l

charter

$4.75
3.00
4.00
3.68
2.65

D e r r ic k m e n .

c l a im

and

j u r is d ic t io n .

Jurisdiction is claimed over the handling of derricks for stone setting, also for the
handling of all cut stone or artificial stonework of solid facings, porticos constructed
of stone, also steps with side ashlar or platform shall be classified as solid stonework.
Terra-cotta and concrete blocks when handled with derricks shall be considered as
derrickmen’s work.
AWARDS AND DECISIONS OP THE GENERAL ARBITRATION BOARD OP GREATER NEW
YORK.

Riggers’ Protective Union v. Master Steam and Hot Water Fitters’ Association—Employ­
ing riggers.
D e c i s i o n o p E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , A u g u s t 10, 1906.—The complaints of the
Riggers’ Protective Union against members of the Master Steam Fitters’ Association
are dismissed and the master steam fitters are directed that where they do employ
riggers they must employ members of the Riggers’ Union, a party to the arbitration
plan.

Riggers’ Protective Union v. Elevator Constructors’ and Millwrights’ Union— Handling
material.
D e c i s i o n o p E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , F e b r u a r y 14, 1908.—Wherever the ele­
vator manufacturers handle their own material, it shall be done by elevator construc­
tors, but where that material is delivered and put in the building by the truckmen,
this work shall be done by the riggers.
N a t io n a l

A s s o c ia t io n

op

H eat,

F rost, G en er al

W orkers
o r ig in a l

ch arter

op

I nsulators, an d

A sbestos

A m e r ic a .

c l a im

and

j u r is d ic t io n .

The jurisdiction claimed is the application of all insulations, whether designed for
steam or other heated surfaces or conduits, or ice or cold storage plants, in any build­
ing in the course of construction, alteration, or repair, the application of all magnesia,
asbestos, hair felt, wool felt, cork, mineral wool, infusorial earth, mercerized silk,
flax fiber, fire felt, asbestos paper, or millboard, and asbestos lumber in any form and
for any purpose whatever.




CONCILIATION, ETC., IN BUILDING TRADES OF N E W YOBK.
AW A R D S A N D

DECISIONS OF THE

G EN ER AL ARBITRATION

BOARD

95

OF G REATER N E W

YORK.

Insulators' Union v. Brotherhood of Carpenters— Nailing cork to wood, insulating.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , J a n u a r y 16,1907.— The work of nailing cork
to wood is work that has been in the possession of both the carpenters and the insu­
lators.

Insulators and Asbestos Workers Local No. 12 v. Union Construction and Waterproofing
Company—Setting of cork insulation.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , A p r i l 26, 1907.—The setting of cork insula­
tors on the job specified in the complaint is in the possession of the insulators.
H ou se

Sh o r er s, M o vers, a n d

Sheath

P il e r s ’ U n io n .

N E W Y O R K JURISDICTION.

The New York union claims, and their employees agree to the following: All house
shoring, sheath piling of banks for the protection of highways, sheath pilkig of piers,
holes, and trenches for the foundations of buildings, bracing of old or new walls, raising
and lowering of floors and roofs, building overhead and passenger bridges, gangways,
and platforms, putting buildings on posts, wedging of walls with wedges, house mov­
ing, the underpining of walls with tubes by hydraulic or screw jacks, all steel sheath
piling, and the handling of all machinery to drive said sheath piling, except that the
employers may put on one man other than a shorer to operate said machinery and he
shall not receive less pay than a journeyman shorer. It is mutually agreed that the
handling of all materials on jobs that have been or are to be used to accomplish any
of the work stipulated shall be construed as work belonging to the party of the second
part. It is also agreed that derricks can be used to hoist materials, teamsters not
included in this article.1
A W A R D S A N D DECISIONS OF THE G EN ER AL ARBITRATIO N BOARD OF GREATER N E W Y O R K .

House Shorers v. Bricklayers' Laborers— Sheath piling and boxing pier holes and trenches,
Sixty-fourth Street and Central Park West.
D e c i s i o n o f E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e , A u g u s t 18,1909.—The committee finds that
the Laborers’ Protective Association is performing house shorers and sheath pilers’
work on the job in question and orders that they cease at once the violation of the
house shorers and sheath pilers’ agreement.




1 See hod carriers and building laborers.