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tB o ts r fift » e r « ; M in K t o

A o t o f C on gress, ia t i e y o a r 1 8 9 8 , b y tb s W

YOL. 67.

il l ia m

CLEARING MOUSE RETURNS.

E'qht Months.

A u gu st.
1897.

N e w f o r k ...... 3,511.708.974 2,93d, >66.960
Ph iladelph ia.. 296,570.7111 259,147,40*
67.001,402
80.3 8.99 i
P ittsb u rg ..
71.43L.00C
66,7 8.30©
B a ltim o re .
17,22l,Hrt5l
B u ffa lo ....
17,357,758
6.911,715
W ash in gton ..
7.472,592
R och ester ....
5,98*305
7, *93.2571
3,7*3,034
Syracuse...
4.118,8*1
Scran ton .
3,392.291
3.556,044
3.220. 49
3,1*9.855
W ilm in g to n ..
1,430,700
B in gh am ton.. ____1,836,100
T o ta l M idd li 3.999,453,090 3.376,572,91)5

P ro v ld e n o e ...

H a r t fo r d ......
N ew H a ven ..
Springfield ...
W orcester....,
P o rtla n d ........
Fall R iv e r......

L o w e il..............
New B edford.

T o ta l N. Bug

410,344.207
49.879,950
33.278.5J. 9
85.109,941
19,798.061
15,103.000
11.774,567
6,441.429
7,497.857
2,«* 20,770
3.2 J0.424
2,664,8 6
1892,344
1.897,100
78*469
748.254
8^2.063
802,901
010,010,802

San Franoisoo.
S alt Lake City
P o rtla n d ........
L os A n g e le e ..
T a c o m a ...,

04,074.120
7,l8Vf.l9*J
6,928 404
6,360.407
3,104.872
6,808.35*<
3,195,036
843,1-2
880.78S
90,994,959

S e a ttle ___

S pokan e...
F a r g o ....... .
S iou x F a lls ....
T o ta l Pacific
Kansas City.
M inneapolis.
O m aha.........
St. P a u l... .
D en ver........
D a ven p o rt—
St. Joseph
Des Moines
S ioux City
L in coln . .. .
W lo h lta ....
T o p e k a ....
F r e m o n t.. .
H a stin g s...
T o t. o th ’r W.

P.Cl
*

f 19‘ 0 26,393, 502.513
2,391, 642.815
047,,081.982
1-19 w
599. 991.2-3
—3 5
138. 132.175
-0-8
4-7-3
,,748,033
69,,420,403
4-201
30. 460.79:
-H>*9
30,,5 42,270
+4*1
25,,390.550
—2*8
— 0-0
12 >040.801
♦•ISA 30,403.621.098

+ 144

00

,

47,00),895'
39,207.282
25,709,1131
15,844,424
11,040,9031
3.202.640
12,165.987
4.146.8
8.1*53,884
1,417.10 m
1.728.897
2.404,922
3H6.-40

890, »90..258 + 0 5 3,527,144 041 2.773.024.711+272
*0,284,,4o0
407,101,060) 05-9
430.994,250
.276
29,490,
192.250 28J 4-101
238.92o.012
,*C2
20,390,
202,620,77 * *-24*1
261.320,401
19,326. 092 +2-4
170,850,048
151,18/.>60 4-130)
14,133,,40u *+■0*9
119.849.450 +1S-0
185.459.300
9.000,,33 5 +22*6
72,318,6-01+33*6
89,342,0-6
50,067,73-) I
0.956.,287
49,050.8-'ll 0-12*2
50,099,094 +13*3
C8.65&.W30
10,810 8>3
84.881.002/ 0-20*3
3,240,,607
81,601,5001
2,491, U0i
80.4/4,706 t-24'9
25,676,19
1.408.,628
10,050,880 4-29 "0
13,807,978
8.870,825 +1 8 9
1.199,,816 t i e 'l l
10,640,94)
8,721,8*3 + * 8 1
j
965,,10< f40-3|
10,20(4,200
-a i
797 647
8,347.8511 rl4 * '
7.270,709
733,,551 + 2 0
6,428.106 i-10*0
7,459,182
6,000.0J21 4-1/*/
O,
699,589
793,,401 t-ll*2
+22*0
678. 8*0
P.
U 5,713.2051
-*9 516
505.090,,344
4.122,00J,l3i|0-23 i

0-7-3,
+ 12*91
-f-330

-7*4
-2 6 0
fl7*9
+28*8
0-81*1

0-18*8
+7-8 5,078,700,012
09.803. 302 —+8
521,307,577
6.803, 05 i +13*3
52,977,924
6.520. 9 c'l + 0 1
59,555.167
4,319.,799 t-11'2
48.000,70*
29, *15.823
2.287, 706 +38*8
3,342, 958 +58*8
45.403,500
27,311,039
2.781, 23d tin*
7,455,911
304. 721 +176
8,042,029
234. 101 -t-004

9 0 ,*,l,% lo

+ 0*8

5*
•rs
I,5d0
30,400,
19,831,.558 4-33*
1.940 0-6*9
14,820.
*.420 + 22 *.
9,825,
2.559. IP1 0-37-5
5,349..23. +129
5.781
41.562,

2,H6i,.9 2 + ***«

,012 0-41-0
2.115,
1.305,.439
1,619,,9dd
,193 + 2-0
40). 10rf — 1-1

+30-0*7

2.401.
,8
426. i0 —91
159,001,730 138.070,,710 0-15'e
106,075,569 108.P09.711 —1*8
28.9h9.W2i
24,053,479 —0*3
2 i,0 7 ?.lv9 +3*4
26.652,181
9.068.850 0-878
12,389.700
9.010,004 — VO
8.502,846
6,085.61* 0-5 5
7 051.6*0
3x7.141

796,728,7

tf,

309,291,083
201,702,091
190,097,29 1
126.090,157
90,757.215
24,201,801

83.4D3.529

.833+14-5
,312+10*9
,147 +691
88,54 4,.one;+ 2 6 'i

455,628.
46.815,
37.430,

14,980,,056 +90-3
*
10 770,.5TO +-14 4
19,754,,0 jk

38 S

3.9-0,,373*-89*7
1,716.',657> t-U2'

0 tsarinas at—

Boston.
Providence.
Hartford...
New Haven.
Springfield.
Worcester.
Portland
Fall River.
Low ell................
New Bedford.......
Total New Kng..
Chioago...............
Cincinnati
Detroit....
Cleveland
Milwaukee..........
Columbus
ludlanapolli ..
PeorJa.
Toledo............
GranB Rapids
Dayton...... ....
Lexington........
Kalamazoo
Akron
Bay City
Rockford.............
Springfield, Ohio...
Canton.................
Youngstown.........
Evansville*..........
Tot. Mid. West’n.
San Fr&nclsoo......
Salt Lake City......
Portland....
Los Angeles
Helena.......
Tacoma......
Seattle..... .
Spokane...,.
Fargo
Sioux Falls
Total Paolflo

635.979.7 H I 0-2o-l

Kansas City.......
Minneapolis........
Omaha,
147.371.7 j 7 i +88* l St. Paul
1O0.O03.U6 -rl9 '4
Denver
82,431.106 1-11-8 Davenport.
19 33 ,050 4-25 o St. Joseph
4 1,** .1 )7 0-IO j * Des Moines.........
81.951.9-09 +20*3 8loux City.
UL*20,fi82 4-39*1 Lincoln...............
1»,211.43 1+108
Wichita..............
13,0 -4 ,7 *5 '+ 1 2 7 Topeka..... ..........
13,993,624 + 2 9 1 Fremont.............
2.406.770! +50 7 Hastings.............
2,9
+23*0
Tot. other West
342,137,101 0-8 0

210,187,8231+24*5

40.342,9 -7
26,419.2811.3 I3,0fld
16,337,419
18.004,298
3.707,943
3,0d'».fl971
1,276,289,0jg* 1.042,6io,*>»| 0-22 d

810.771.213 4-7*2
2*9,093,28 :|+12*4
2-/9.994.2.(9 +9*9
Louisville......
76,308.059 +26*2
G a lv e sto n .......
75.413.431 -|-R*8
H o u s to n .......
07.S65.y8 4............
+4*3
Savannah. .
74>60,53* +10*0
6,563,930 0-45-8
12,478.020!
86,,167.803
Richmond_
_
4,9-2.
64,019.211.-1-28 1
70. 113.955
+ 2*.?
5.124,291
M em phis........
43.0* ),01, +2-8
4.3il.90«| —2 *
44 ,2*1.833
4,257,054
A tlan ta ... .
-*-8*1
S'*. 45,700 29,300,843 +7-3
8.,438.970
8.400,0901 8.300.233 -4-3 3
N orfolk . . . .
21,814.8*2 +S2-7
2,552.013 + 5 :ii
28 9t».47t
3.9*19.897
F o rt W o rth ..
2 .4 14,601 -0-0
1.951.407 -0 -3
22,370.016
1.9*0. 81
12,77* 045 + 18*0
15.O07.5S8
1.473,529 +8-3
1,595,20)!
B irm ingham
16.0 1.006 1-10-I
1.805,030 + li* l
2,184.237
17.4*3.6' 6
0,674.2to r«2 5
11.7-14,397
876,97* 4-30*7
1,191,411
7.480,135 —1-0
7.304.523
703,787 +2**1
871.055
• Jac k so n v ille .
9,443.44* 4-13 8
C h a tta n o o g a .
1,21196 + 171
ll.eS0.IK 8
1.4*8 00*/
17,610.(9 >0 17.2 fS.nOO -t-l 8
M acon ....... ..
1.5i7.ono| 2,230.000 -38*1
T o ta l S o uth 2f/.0/-h,o3Ul 222,178.192 t » 4 2,0i9,874,d0«) 1,896.66 ’.«20 + 10*2
T o ta l a ll.... 5,592.310,6 0; 1.838,345.88 / 4-16-0 43.022 35 *92 84,781.6 o.wHVf +25 4
O u tsid e N. T 9.080,617,070 ,901.488,990 +9** 17,921,702,9*9 14,869,700,2^6 + 1 5 9
M o n tre a l......... 51.80.5.221: 49,240,4*0 +4*i 471.214,000 87*. 0)5.713 4-3-»-0
82,390.991 29.H4 -.O'* 4 9 3 284,762,418 a.ij.065,t n 4-21*3
T o r o n to ........
41,*>04,067 - V i
H a lif a x ------6.611,97*1 6.554.485
40.05 ’ ,41(1
3 ‘.773.493 4-31*4
0.180 5**0 0,298,674 —1 9
62,0*9.812
W innipeg ...
21.43 >,402 + 8 0
2.H.' 5.068
8.4 *2.2')f tR 7
28,271,1 Ou
H a m ilto n * •
80,>196.028 -0*8
10.934.70fi
3.05H.W7| *.074,554 40-4
8 t. J o h n ...........
T o t.r anad* 101,14 <.2*0 98.0Al.thv + 6 0 897,4-0 *>0 787.010, . 01 4-2-4
’ P a r i t b l s o f e l o a r l n g a b y t s l e g r a s b s s o p . 4,6 1.
3t. L o u is....... .
N ew Orleans.,

1,379.2*9,
929,
280..070,113
2 50,.710.070
91..300,950
82,,019.621
70,,236.430'

MO 1732-

The week’s total for all cities shows a gain of 15 2 per cent
over 1897. The increase over 1896 is 63-7 per cent and the ex­
cess over 1895 is 35-2 p3r cent. Outside of New York th* gain
compared with 1897 is 7 2 psr cent, the gain over 1896 is
37*2 par cent, and the increase over 1895 reaches 18*8 p. c

New Yorx.
Philadelphia.
Pittsburg.
Baltimore.
Buffalo
Washington
Rochester.
Syracuse.............
Scranton............
Wilmington.
Binghamton
Total Middla

-f9'3
434.920,164 381,760,709 d -lS f 3.463,537,065
109,362,900
—2*5
19,291,3<*0 +2-7
14.8 *5,000
8,500.fi00 +3*8
+ 1-3
83,903.074
8.823,407
5,SC8,&0 -8'0
-4-2-3
52,085.718
6,305.154
40.R2i.49-J
4.940.569 4-23 6'
0,107,458
+ 9 ‘8
51,390,008
5.8 «6,74< + 8 *|
6.290.3511
+8*5
5,860.413 0-3*3'
0,052.2101
+95
4 >.600.031
26,853.089
-6*0
3,345.014 —2 )6
2,800. fi.nl
2,445,878 4-18*8!
+10-9
2,770,9071
23.258.781
1,674,577 4-14 51
49 1
10.10 i,0831
1.917.3551
435,437,281 + 12*8 3,984,711,0631 8,706.832,10*1 + 5 3
495,059,03'

C h ica g o ........ .
C in cin n a ti.. ...•
D e tro lL . .......
C le v e la n d ......
M ilw a u k ee....
Colum bus......
Indianapolis...
P e o r ia ...........
T o le d o ............
Grand Rapids.
D a yto n ..........
L e x in g t o n ....
K alam azoo....
A k ro n ............
Bay C ity...
R o c k fo r d .___
S p rin gfield ....
Canton —
T o u M .W est.

O o a r p A S T . 'n t h e o f f i c e o f t b e L i b r a r i a n o f C o n g r e s s

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1898.

For the month of Angast the clearings make a more satis­
factory exhibit than for July. Eighteen of the cities
included in our statement record losses from the corres­
ponding month of 1897, but in the aggregate for the whole
country the excess reaches 15 6 per cent. Outside of New
York the increase is 9*4 p. c.

B o sto n ..........

3. D i n

St. Louis............. .
New Orleans.
Louisville.
Galvoston.
Houston..........
Savannah.... ...
Richmond.........
Memphis..........
Atlanta............
Nashville........
Norfolk............
Fort Worth,
Augusta.............
Birmingham......
Knoxville..........
Little Rock
Tacksonvllle....
Chattanooga.,
Macon
Total Southern..
Total all...........
Outside N. York
Montreal............
Toronto...... ........
Halifax............... .
Winnipeg,, -....... .
Hamilton.....
St. John...............
Total Canada__________
• Not Included In totals.

150

THE CHRONICLE.

[V ol . UTVII.

above all conditions peace for best progress. With
two nations of such power against war, would not the
tendency set strongly towards the maintenance of
peaceful relations everywhere?
The monthly Treasury figures issued this week for
August disclose several features which will attract at­
tention. Interest is felt in them chiefly because of
the evidence they afford as to the productiveness of
the war revenue law, August being the second month
of its operation. It seems that the total receipts
were $41,782,708, against $19,023,015 in August
1897. No one, however, should be misled by this
comparison, as it is not a fair one; indeed no con­
clusion can be drawn from the difference shown, for
THE FINANCIAL SITUATION.
the reason that a year ago the receipts from Customs
The Czar of Russia calls for disarmament and peace. and from internal revenue were abnormally small,
No doubt the letter containing these proposals is a being so because it was the first month under the 1897
wise, earnest and convincing document. It states tariff law. The Customs revenue last month was
truly and clearly the alternative of bankruptcy con­ considerably better than in July, the now impost
fronting the nations to which a rejection of its sug­ of 10 cents on tea showing its influence, the total
gestions will in time bring them all. And yet very received from that department of the revenue being
few believe that an acquiescence in the request will be $16,249,699, against $15,169,000 in July and $13,the result. The reasons for disbelief are that ac­ 467,000 in May. As to the iuternal revenue
quiescence is on its face surrounded by such grave receipts, they were only $24,015,935 in August,
difficulties that the proposition seems almost quixotic; or about one million dollars less than in July, the
furthermore the operation of disarmament would be previous month. Altogether these results are very
likely to work to the advantage of some States and to promising. They probably indicate not far from $13,.
the disadvantage of others. A cycle of peace to Rus­ 000,000 as the net product in August under the war
sia would just now appear to be especially opportune. revenue bill, which would mean about 156 millions of
With its boundaries on the Pacific well rounded out revenue for a full twelve months added to the pro­
through the recent acquisition of a part of China, and ductiveness of the old law. Another feature of inter­
a perfect terminus for its trans-Continental railroad est is the disclosure in the debt statement that only
having been thereby secured, time to construct that $74,845,020 out of the 200 millions sold of the new 3 per
terminus and work out in connection with it, and in cents had been issued on the 1st of September. We
connection with other aims, some pressing interior notice also that of this amount of new 3s outstanding
problems would seem to be what was most of all need­ there were $14,035,760 at the same date held by the
ful for that country. On the other hand, to France, Government, of which $7,662,000 were as security for
with its lost provinces to ^recover—the absorbing and Government deposits in banks and $6,373,760 as se­
paramount purpose of the whole nation for so many curity for bank note circulation. Dealers in United
years—disarmament would be almost synonymous with States bonds tell us that a large amount of the new 3s
the abandonment of that purpose and. confirming Ger­ have been sold over the counter, to savings banks
many in her possession. And yet what a glorious vista and to other banks and institutions.
the mere proposal of universal peace opens !
The hopeful feeliDg which pervade^ business circles
A Notwithstanding the quarrelsome nature Congress is well illustrated by the report of mercantile failures
has had the reputation of showing in recent years, the for the month of August compiled by Col. W. M.
introduction of this country into the councils of Grosvenor for Dun’s Review. The failures are found
European nations is an event that cannot fail to make to have been the smallest of any month of the five
for peace. We^havejin mind the silent and yet pow­ years during which these excellent monthly records
erful influence, not of a union, but of an always possi­ have been kept. The liabilities of the defaulted con­
ble union,'between* Great Britain and the United cerns aggregate only $0,078,655. IIow much better
States as a make-weight for the settlement of any this is than the average will appear when we say
Continental differences. A compact, offensive the total in August last year was $8,174,428, that in
or defensive, established between the two gov­ August 1890 when the silver campaign was in progress
ernments is a very unlikely event; either party it was $28,008,637, that in August 1895 the amount was
would scarcely desire a general alliance or any $10,778,399 and in August 1894 $11,322,345. What is
alliance except when an emergency arose. Strong particularly gratifying, from our point of view, is
compacts between nations are not in any degree the that the improvement also extends to the comparison
product of gush. The fact that the two contracting as to the number of failures—which has not always
parties had the same origin would have little if been the case in the past. It seems only 748 con­
any weight. Self interest would be the first cerns failed in August 1898, against 921 in August
•motive; common aims and interests another; and 1897, 1,107 in 1896 and 1,025 in 1895. Com­
common language a kind of lubricator. When, if menting on the favorable nature of the re­
ever, we become a party to European questions, turns, Colonel Grosvenor says the record is not only
all these influences must come into play. They a most cheering one, indicative of a very unusual
would necessarily drive two nations together that are stato of health and commercial soundness, but it
not intent on war or revenge, or on territorial expan­ reflects conditions which do not seem likely
sion, and who have no long-standing quarrels with to be disturbed by adverse influences for some
their neighbors to adjust, but are seeking civil liberty, time. He notes, too, that it is interesting, now that
free commerce and trade development, which require the war has ceased and we have had nearly a full
TWO SUPPLEM ENTS THIS WEEK.
Two Supplements accompany the present number
of the Chronicle, both forming complete publica­
tions in themselves:
(1) The Quotation S upplement of 48 pages,
being the regular monthly number of that invaluable
publication.
(2) The Bankers’ and T rust S upplement, an
entirely new work, containing 80 pages, and devoted to
a report of the proceedings of the Annual Convention
of the American Bankers’ Association held at Denver
last week.

S eptember 3, 1898. J

THE CHRONICLE,

451

month without that hindrance to improvement, to Pittsburg there is $193,700 increase in gross with
observe how distinctly the gain in business increases, $63,200 decrease in net. Last year in July the
showing that, though the war cannot be said to Eastern lines showed $221,800 gain in gross and
have caused any depression while it continued, it $349,100 gain in net, and the We,'•tern lines $160,800
did in fact operate to hinder many important con­ loss in gross and $75,100 loss in net. The following
tracts and purchases and so retard in some degree the is a comparison for the Eastern lines for six years.
recovery of business.
LINKS BAST OF
It seems as if the effect of Leiter’s wheat operations P it tsb u r g . 1898, 1867. 1896. 1895. 1894. 1893.
*
»
*
1
*
$
were never going to be removed as an influence de­
5,258,595
5,552,047
pressing wheat values. The price has been down for Jross earnings...... 5,162,295 5,480,395 3,795,964 5,415,395 4,759,325 4,021,540
oerat’g expenses. 3,460,864 3,668,634
3,855.564 3,350.509
some time to 6" cents in New York and 63 cents in N e t earnings... 1,701,131 1,811,731 1,462,631 1,559,831 1,408,816 1,530,507
1
31.
Chicago, or fully thirty cents a bushel below the fig­ Sross earnings....... 36,525,706 35,069,903 35,563.870 34,974,170 31,007,503 39,437,464
ure prevailing at the corresponding date last year. Operat’g expenses. 23,285,325 24.776.8-25 26,588,688 25.768.9S3 22,727,968 29,071,492
Yet developments are all the time reported which Wet earnings... 10.240.381 Il0.,’fl3,081 8,975.187 9,205,187 8,279,585 10,365,972
would seem to confirm the views of those who hold that The Board of Directors of the Northern Pacific
our farmers should have no difficulty in disposing of all took important action yesterday with reference to
the wheat they may have to spare—and at fair prices too'. future dividends on the preferred stock. They set
On one day of this week there were three items of aside $3,000,000 out of surplus income as a reserve
news encouraging to better prices which at other to be available, as may be found necessary, until the
times would have exerted a perceptible influence on end of 1901, toward maintaining the regular quarterly
values, but which now pass unnoticed. In the first dividends on the preferred stock if at any time prior
place there was a dispatch from Washington reporting to that date current net earnings should prove insuf­
that Minister Angell Lad written from Constantinople ficient for that purpose. The step is simply a pru­
saying that on account of local needs the exportation dential one. A preliminary statement of the com­
of wheat from the Province of Scutari in Albania had pany’s income for the fiscal year ending June 30 was
been forbidden. Then there was a cablegram from submitted at the meeting and actually showed
St. Petersburg in the daily press which read: “ Owing a surplus of $2,897,874 on the operations of the
to the failure of harvest in seven districts, even the twelve months above the amount needed for the 4 per
landed gentry are asking the Government for relief. cent dividend paid on the preferred shares. But in
The Government is adopting measures for assistance, view of the fact that the results have been so unex­
but the distress is becoming more acute every day.” pectedly favorable—that the expansion in the revenues
Finally, a cablegram from Vienna was published re­ of the system has been so extraordinary, so far beyond
porting the annual estimate of the world's harvests of the expectations of the mostsanguine—it is deemed wise
wheat by the Minister of Agriculture of Hungary. to providejagainst the contingency of a possible reaction.
This estimate is always looked forward to with The Directors consider that the business prospects
much interest and generally accepted as fur­ of the company have never been better than they are at
nishing a useful forecast of the probabilities. It was this time, and of course if current available earnings
a significant fact, therefore, that the Hungarian continue as at present, the reserve provided need not
Minister should be found expressing the opinion that be drawn upon. If not used by 1901 the fund may
there would probably be a shortage of 13,800,000 to then, by vote of the Directors, be returned for the
15,100,000 metrical centners. The details in the cable­ general purposes of the company. In view of
gram are very meagre, and some of the figures are evi­ the large earnings which the company has been
dently mixed, so we shall not attempt to go into that making, there has naturally been some talk of
branch of the subject. The important fact is the possible dividends on the common stock. The action
estimate of a shortage, even if only a small one, for of the Board with reference to the reserve fund shows
such a condition would necessitate further trench­ that no dividend is likely as far as past earnings are
ing on stocks, already extraordinarily low. As concerned. It is reported, however, that the President
said, however, all these events have had no influence stated to the board yesterday that if present prospects
on wheat values, and thus the farmer is obliged to are maintained, of which he thought there was
accept a price which is far below what he should be every likelihood, it would be proper for the board in
the course of a few months to give consideration to*
able to get under natural and normal conditions.
The Pennsylvania Railroad report of earnings for the question of a dividend on the common stock from
July has been issued this week and makes an un­ current earnings.
favorable comparison with last year; but there is The bank return of last Saturday showed a loss of
nothing surprising in that. Our review of the coun­ $7,495,950 in surplus reserve, carrying this item
try’s railroad gross earnings for July showed that a to $21,343,300, or within $519,800 of the lowest,
good many adverse conditions existed during that of the year. Though this result of last week’s
month. There was in the first place a great contrac­ movements in money was somewhat anticipated, the
tion in the grain movement. In the second place character of the statement was not fully realized until
July 1898 contained five Sundays while July 1897 had Monday. Then there was a general marking up
only four, giving one less business day the present of loans by the banks, which led to some shift­
year. We also know that on the trunk lines the ing of contracts, and this created an early
rate situation was very unsatisfactory. As far as the demand for money at the Stock Exchange that caused
Pennsylvania is concerned, possibly too the competi­ the rate on call to advance to 3 per cent. Later there
tion of the new Pittsburg Bessemer & Lake Erie has came a report that $2,250,000 gold-had been engaged
encroached somewhat on the mineral traffic of the in London for shipment to New York, and though
road. On the lines east of Pittsburg and Erie the this report was not confirmed it had some slight influ­
Pennsylvania reports 8318,100 decrease in gross and ence upon money, the close being at per cent
8110,300 decrease in net, while on the lines west of after loans had been made at per cent. On the
J u ly .

1

Jan.

to J u l y

If

s&ii4 5 -

THE CHRONICLE.

[V ol . L.XVU.

following day there was a lighter inquiry, due to bonds have recently been made almost wholly in
the liquidation of important speculative account-, gold, and this will very readily account for the in­
and at the same time foreign exchange fell off, crease in the gold reserve.
indicating gold imports, and consequently the The feature in the European political situation this
tone of the money market grew easier, and loans ! week has been the proposal by the Emperor of Russia
on all were made at If and at 24 per cent, closing at for a general disarmament by all the Powers. The
2. On Wednesday and Thursday the rate ranged manifesto had only a slight influence upon the finan­
from 2 to 2.1 per cent and on Friday from 24 to 3 per cial markets, and London was chiefly affected by the
cent. As above indicated, money on call, represent- loss of gold to the Continent and by the prospective
:ug bankers’'balances, loaned at If and at 3 per cent movemontof the metal to America. Tho Bank of Eng­
during the week, averaging about 2f. Banks and land minimumrateof discount remains unchanged at 24
trust companies generally quote
per cent as the per cent. The cable reports discounts of sixty to
mi unimam, though a very few have standing loans at ninety-day bank bills in London If per cent. The open
3 per cent: but on Friday some marked their loans market rate at Paris is 1j@ ili per cent and at Berlin
up to 3. Time contracts are in bettor request at 3 and Frankfort it is 3J@3f per cent. According tt>
per cent for sixty days, 3$@4 per cent for ninety days our special cable from London tho Bank of England
to four months and 4 for live to six months on good lost £62,124 bullion during the week, and held £35,Stock Exchange collateral. The demand for com­ 003,218 at the close of the week. Our correspondent
mercial paper is limited, and not many of the banks further advises us that the loss was due to the export
or other institutions are buying. The supply is mod­ of £65,000 (of which £40,000 was to Germany and
erate* and rates are firm at 4 per cent for sixty to £25,000 to the United States), to shipments of
ninety-day endorsed bills receivable, 4@5 per cent for 000 net to the interior of Great Britain and to an im­
prime and 5® 6 per cant for good four to six months' port of £164,000, of which £140,000 were from Aus­
tralia, £15,000 from South America and £9,000 from
single names.
So far as is known, comparatively few of the banks Portugal.
have taken advantage of the offe- of the Treasury to The foreign exchange market has been lower this
exchange small notes for those of large denomination. week, influenced mainly by the dearer rates for money
The reason assigned is that the supply of largo, notes here and also by higher discounts in London. Selling
is light and no more chan sufficient for the current of long sterling, in the expectation of covering later
requirements of the banks. There are only about in the season at lower rates, still continues, and there
18,000,000 of legal-tender currency certificates held have been somewhat liberal offerings of cotton and grain
by the banks of this city. It is claimed that those of ^futures. Spot bills against these commodities are, how­
the banks which have a fairly good supply of legal- ever, scarce. The unusually small visible supply of
tenders and other notes, which they have been ac-^ wheat at Chicago and at other Western distributing
cumulating in anticipation of the demand from their centres indicates that the movement of the staple has
correspondents for cr,op purposes, are not willing to been and still continues light, probably owing to the
assist other banks in meeting deficiencies by turning absorption of the grain for milling purposes. The
over their large notes, and it is therefore thought new cotton is coming to market slowly and the ex­
that many of the banks will have to con­ port demand does not appear to be urgent. About
tinue to ship gold to the interior. The Treas­ the only spot commercial bills of importance now on
ury Departmeut is seeking to relieve the situation the market are those against provision^ and flour,
and the announcement is made that the October in­ and these are promptly absorbed. There have
terest on the 4 per cent Government bonds will be an­ been further arrivals of gold in transit to Cuba
ticipated on the 10th instant. This interest amounts this week, the amount received being $1,165,to 15,596,467. The Treasury has made the provision, 413, making, with the consignment of $433,009
customary at this season, to meet a demand for small last week, a total of $1,608,422. The engagement of
notes for crop purposes, and has caused to he printed $1,375,000 gold in London was announced by Lazard
large amounts of these notes, which can be -speedily Freres this week. The arrivals from Europe thus far
issued in exchange for notes of larger denominations on this movement have been $2,855,573. There has
whenever these shall be surrendered. Bankers who been an arrival of $2,000,000 gold at San Francisco
ire in a position to judge as to the probable season's from Australia and $3,000,000 more is reported in
requirements for crop purposes are of the opinion that transit from Sydney, N. S. W. The range for nomi­
not much more than $50,000,000 will be needed nal rates for exchange was, until Thursday, from 4 84
o satisfy the demand. The banks at the chief to 4 84& for sixty days and 4 85 for sight. Then a re­
distributing centres in the West are unusually duction in the long rate by Brown Bros. & Co. made
well provided with money, in consequence of the wide the range for sixty day from 4 83^ to 4 84£. The tone
listribution in payment for war supplies, and there was easy on Monday, but, with the exception of a reduc­
fore their drafts upon Eastern deposits will doubtless tion of one quarter of a cent in the rate for cable
be comparatively small. Banks report a good though transfers, compared with the close on Friday of last
not urgent demand from their correspondents in the week, to 4 85£@4 85£, there was no change in quota­
West and Northwest for re-discounts, and this in­ tions for actual business, long remaining at 4 83-J@
quiry is expected to increase as soon as the crops move 4 83| and short at 4 85@4 85.}. On Tuesday the mar­
more freely. Business is reported very good all ket was weak for long and short, and rates for actual
through the agricultural sections and in the principal business were reduced to 4 83@4 83|- for the former
cities. One feature of the situation this week has and to 4 84J@4 85 for the latter, while cable transfers
been the rapid increase in the net gold reserve of the remain unchanged. On Wednesday rates for actual
Treasury. This was reported on Thursday at $217.- business in long sterling were further reduced to 4 82f
’>04,484. The highest net gold reserve on record was @4 83E while those for short sterling and for cable
1218,818,253 on March 31 1888. The payments for transfers remained unchanged. The market was a
£ 1 6 1 ,-

THE CHRONICLE.

S eptember 3, 1898,J

shade firmer on Thursday, without any change in
rates, and it was steady on Friday. The following
shows daily posted rates for exchange by some of the
leading drawers.
OA.ILY POSTED RATES FOB FOREIGN EXCHANGE.
TT7N8.

•ro -n
...... { £ £ £ » ■
•ftring,
J30 days
Magoun & Co.. SightBank British
) 30 day*
No. America.. SightBank of
ICO day*.
Montreal.. .. 1eight..
Canadian Bang
da7*.
of Commerce.. » Sight....
Heidelbach. lekdays
elheimer & Co. Sight..

i
<

‘ 09
\ 00
>

LMard Freres... j
Merchants’ Bk. i 60 day*,
of Canada- . <Sight....

WSD,.

Fr i .
Frj
HON.,
Aug. 20 Aug. 29. Aug. 80. Aug. 81. Sept. 1. Sept. 2.
83*
94
84
M
64:
MX
86
86
66
90
86
86
64
84*
64
34*
»4 *
80
S0
86
S6
60
84
84
84*
8
4
34*
t4 *
86
86
*6
66
86
80

tfc*

6d*
>6
3
* *
80
84*
«6
84*
66
34*
80

£4*
86
*4 *

80

84*
86
8
4
80

SS*

84*
96
84
86
64
c6
84
86
*i*
80

84*
86
64
*6
84
66
84
86
94*
86

T

a *
64
86
6
4

64
86
8
4
66
84

80

84*
86

64
86
|4*
P6

The market closed steady on Friday, with rates for
-actual business 4 82f@4 83 for long, 4 84f@4 85 for
short and 4 85£@4 854 for cable transfers. Prime
commercial 4 82£@4 82| and documentary 4 81f@
4 82^-. Cotton for payment, 4 81|@4 82^; cotton for
acceptance, 4 82^@4 82£, and;’grain for payment,
4 82@4 82^.
The following statement gives the week’s movement
of money to and from the interior by the New York
banks.
Wetk Bndino Sept. 2, 1898.

Received by Shipped by Net Interior
N. 7 . Banka. N. 7. Banka. Movement.

Sold............................. ................

*4,791,000
823,000

*6,006,000 Loss. $285,000
2,104.000 Loss. 1,282,000

Total gold and legal tenders.....

*6,643,000

$7,110,0001 Losa.fl, 607,000

Result with Sub-Treasury operations and gold imports.
Week Ending Sept. 2,

189*.

Banks’Interior movemeot, at above
Snb-Treasuiy operations...............
Total gold and legal tenders—

lnu>
Banka.
*5.643.000
21,200,000

Out of
Banka.

Net. Change
Bank HoLdinga.

*7,110.0001
Lu8a.fi,667,000
28,700,000 Lose. 7.500.O00

t2J,7«3.000 $35,810,000 Loss $9,067,000

The following table indicates the amount of bullion
In the principal European banks this week and at the
corresponding date last year.
Bank of

Gold.

Sept. 1, 1898.
Silver.
Total.

Sept. 9, 1897.
Gold. | Silver.
lot «
s 1 *
l

*
*
*
U n g la n d .......... 35,003,218 .............! 35,003,218 35,772.737 .................
F r a n c e .... . 75,267.996 49,960.894 125,2*8,980 91,161,888 48,829.011
G e rm a n y . .... 29,266.090 15,075.000 44,340,000 28.538.000 14.702.000
109.4 95.000 4.376.000 113,871,000 94.152.000 4,926,000
B nfttla
A o tt.-H u n g 'y 34,SfcS.OOv 12,628,000; 47,626,000 37.996.000 19.667.000
S p a in ................ 10.614.000 5,483,000’ 15.997,000 9,028,000 10,690.000
I t a l y ................ 14.959.000 2.094.000 17,052,000 15,395,000, 2,477,000
N e th e rla n d s . 4.309.000 0.fN7.OOO; 11,186.000 2,633,OOo! 6.896,000
X a L B e lfia m . 2.863.000 1.427.000 4,280,000’ 2,767,333 1,888,667
T o t.th is w eek 316,763.264 97,82<Jb64 414,694,099 307.443.9c8 103470078
T o t. prev. w 'k J | 6.468.803 97.6 3,475 414 141,2*8 8C8.978.184 1035*5739

25,772,787
129,990,899
A3.2B0.0C0
99.078.000
60.503.000
19.718.000
17.873.000
; 9,629,000
4,151,000
409^914.036
412,618.923

BAN KERS’ CONVENTION—HOW TO ADD
TO ITS ATTRACTIONS.
Wo publish with this issue of our journal a Bankers’
and Trust Supplement of eighty pages. The work
was planned with the purpose of giving to our readers
in attractive shbpe, while the matter was fresh and
newsy, the entire proceedings of the National Bankers’
Convention, held this year at Denver, August S3 to 25.
We assumed that business circles would be gratified
to have within a few days after its meeting the ad­
dresses, speeches and transactions of that important
financial body. It is an interesting fact that another
year this organization will attain its twenty-fifth an­
niversary. Why would it not be a pleasing idea to mark
the event, not by any special celebration, bit by some
changes in methods which would give to the annual
gathering wider interest?
First of all, a point worthy of consideration is
whether the mid-summer is a suitable time for hold­

453

ing such a convention. That period was selected while
financial and banking interests were less engrossing
than now, and when the convention was looked for­
ward to as a holiday affair more than a gathering for
useful work. Perhaps it may still be considered the
most acceptable time. It is net, however, the portion
of the year in which such an undertaking naturally
fits into the habits of many of the most success­
ful and experienced representatives of financial
circles. That class take as much as they can
spare of the summer season for vacation and
rest and do not care to give any more of it to
business and work than their own banking offices and
round of duties require. The motive of the more
active members of the Association undoubtedly is to
have at these annual meetings as many as possible of
the best thinkers, speakers1 and those eminent for
,
practical skill and attainments, that the profession
contains. We do not need to say those classes are
largely represented now. There is of course no
room for doubt on that joint. The only question
suggested for consideration is, would not some season
other than the most trying of the year permit the
convention to draw more largely on the same classes.
There certainly are a great many of the highly-gifted
in banking circles who are conspicuous by their ab­
sence, a goodly number of whom might be induced to
be present if the date of its being held better suited
their habits.
i
We may sum up then the argument for a change of
date by saying that the summer is no time for travel­
ing over the country a thousand or two thousand miles
in hot dusty cars for a three-days’ session of a financial
convention. Such a journey to and back, with the
thermometer at 90 or over, may be n® serious obstacle.
to some; but it is to the over-worked business class, as
financial men of large interests are; it is, too, for
those of advanced years, most of whom need quiet
instead of the buzz of revolving wheels and the
strain of blowing whistles. Of course the weary
traveler this year had a decided relief in prospect,
a strong attraction at the end of his journey, in the
beautiful and comfortable city of Denver. But who
would not prefer to go even to Denver in June or
October, and keep nearer home in July or August ?
Then, too, a summer session calls for work in hot,
sultry Weather by those who are to make addresses or
otherwise take an active part in the session. This is
by no means desirable. It is hard on the writer to be
given am extra task at a time when the burdens should
be lightened; it is hard on the hearer because no writer
can do his best work when weary.
What we have said suggests another important par­
ticular in which there is large opportunity for im­
provement; indeed, the change we have proposed
above would help to bring to pass this other amend­
ment. It will be noticed that the addresses have
various merits; that withia moderate limits would be
natural. In this case, though, the extremes are wide
apart. Some are excellent, but some by ao means
come up to the standard of work expected ho proceed
from a convention of banks and bankers of the United
States. We do not take excepti»n to any of them be­
cause they advocate what we may call unsound views.
Both sides of every question affecting banking interests
must, we suppose, be given a hearing; but ought not
an address be required to have some merit before it is
inflicted on the convention, and through it on the
public?

454

THE CHRONICLE.

L ol. Lxvir,
V

In other words, should there not be more care We think that some of this bewilderment may be
in selecting the individuals to perform these du­ removed by au examination of the letter in which
ties, or may not their work be read and passed upon Count Muravieff communicates the wishes and con­
or edited by a committee before the convention victions of his Imperial master. Perhaps it will be
gives it a place in its records. It hns been worth while to analyze this remarkable document in
urged by a very good judge that all stated j detail. In saying first that “.the maintenance of gen­
addresses should be omitted. This is perhaps the eral peace and the possible reduction of the excessive
easier way of getting out of a trying situation : but is armaments which weigh upon all nations present
it a way out that would add most to the interest and themselves in existing conditions to the whole world
usefulness of these conventions? We should propose as an ideal toward which the endeavors of all govern­
rather that there be a smaller number of addresses, and ments should be directed,” the Ozar says nothing
with that decrease the greatest, care be taken to have more than he said in his farewell address to President
that smaller number worthy of the Association. What Faure at St. Petersburg, exactly a year ago. “ Our
is desired is the best thought of the practical business two nations,” the Emperor Nicholas then declared,
man. There are very few speeches made or essays “ are equally resolved to contribute with all their
written, proceeding from whatever source they may, powers to the maintenance of the peace of the world.”
which strike the average lieaTer with the force of the This sentiment has in fact been the burden of the
words of one whose views are drawn from the experi­ young Czar’s public and diplomatic statements since
ence of a business life as well as from a study of his accession to the throne. Doubtless, these earlier
hooks. We should for many reasons be sorry to have deliverances were regarded by many of their hearers,
this feature disappear from the proceedings of these as conventional if not hypocritical. But the Ozar was
not to blame for such popular interpretation, and it is.
conventions. ___________________
quite undeniable that both liis utterances and his pol­
TH E CZAR'S PEAC E M ANIFESTO.
icy have thus far been consistent.
Nothing more surprising or more seemingly out of The excessive modern armaments, the letter con­
tune with the prevailing spirit of the day could well be tinues, were founded and developed in order toimagined than the letter from the Ozar of Russia to the guarantee peace, and they have apparently failed of
foreign envoys at St. Petersburg. This proposition their purpose. Labor and capital are alike diverted
for a formal conference to devise means to stop the from their true channels by the maintenance of theseEuropean policy of continually increased armaments enormous standing forces. The burden on the people
comes not only on the heels of our own notable has become too great to be longer borne; if there­
demonstration of the power of a navy, but it is issued fore the system is to be continued, “ it will inevitably
at the very hour when rumors are circulating of an lead to the very cataclysm it is desired to avert.’7
impending armed collision between Russia itself and These are the grounds on which the Ozar appeals for
Great Britain. Perhaps no time could have been a conference of governments.
selected during the past thirty-five years when such a Let us observe, to begin with, that not one of these
proposition would have. been received with greater statements of fact can be controverted. They are the
astonishment. Had the document come from any plain truth, as every European statesman knows. We
other source astonishment would at once have given touched upon some of these phases of the modern
place to incredulity. But the nature of the Czar’s pro­ military system recently in writing on the life-work
posals, and the form in which they were made public of Prince Bismarck, and showed then the certainty
by Count Muravieff, leave no possible doubt as to the that sooner or later the system would, for these very
genuineness of the Russian Emperor's purpose.
reasons, work out its own ruin. The enormous
The perplexity caused by this wholly unprecedented modern standing army was established in Europe, as
move in diplomacy has been forcibly illustrated by the Czar’s letter truthfully declares, for a guaranty
the reception of the proposition. In some quarters, of peace. In the result it is found that the system iseven in England, the idea is characterized as quixotic. a Frankenstein which cannot be controlled. It can­
In others, as is natural, the project is examined with not stand still. Each nation, in order to ensure it­
distrust, the critics not being willing to believe that self against possible attack, must endeavor to bethe Czar’s purposes are sincere. In Germany, we a little stronger than its neighbor; but no
learn from the despatches, the Emperor is believed to sooner has it enlarged its own offensive and defensiveendorse the plan of his neighbor sovereign, but the armament than its neighbor State, for precisely the
political and military cliques treat the matter scorn­ same reason, makes the same increase with something
fully. Mr. Balfour remarks in the British House of more. The very nature of the theory renders such
Commous that in his judgment no such proposition results inevitable. But the upshot is a heaping of
could have been made with actual hope of practical Ossa on Pelion which must apparently continue toresults. Yet none of these authorities appears to the end of time, or until the resources of the States
have explained why, if wholly quixotic, the peace concerned are broken down (as has happened with
plan should have been contrived by the Czar of Rus­ half the Continental States already), or until, in sheer
sia, of all men; why, if his purposes were insincere,, desperation, the trial of arms between the nations isthe Ozar should have chosen a medium of introduc­ invoked so that there may at least be something to
ing them which would eventually bring the stigma of show for this unheard-of waste of public treasure in
bad faith home to him personally before the civilized time of peace. This, we say, is the conclusion of
world; or why, if the proposition could not be made sober logic from the existing situation. Not one
with expectation of serious results, an Emperor reputable statesman and not one intelligent thinker
should have deliberately chosen to make himself will question these conclusions. Yet because theridiculous. These orilicisms seem to us on examina­ same conclusions are publicly drawn by the Russian
tion to reflect very little except the bewilderment of Emperor they are regarded by the initiated politician
as something out of the usual run of human reasoning.
the critics.

S eptember 3, 1898. |

THE CHRONICLE.

455

We suppose that the Ozar reached his decision for the question narrows down, as it certainly would ap­
the issuance of this manifesto because he was con­ pear to do, to the survival of the State with the strong­
vinced that some international understanding of the est exchequer, it is obvious enough that Great Britain
sort was necessary to avert the ruin of his own State. would eventually be left alone in the field of solvent
It is well enough known what the system of modern Powers. Fortunately, England less than any other
armaments has done for Russia. Even in favorable State is inspired by motives of international hatred and
years the income of that Government comes nowhere national ambition. If the Continental Powers were
near meeting expenses. In the ten years of peace to oall for a pause in the development of modern arm­
preceding 1897 the Russian public debt increased aments, the assent of England’s Government is assured
one billion and a-half roubles, or more than a billion beforehand.
dollars. The annual charge for interest on that debt
MISMANAGEMENT IN THE ARMY.
is only a trifle less than the annual expenditure for
the standing army, and the two sources of expendi­ We trust sinceivfiy that the request for an investi­
ture together make up nearly one-half the total gation, as made by some of the army officers whose
annual outlay of the Government. Both have in­ departments have been accused of mismanagement or
creased by leaps and bounds during the past few neglect, will meet with an early and adequate re­
years, and there is not the slightest reason to suppose sponse. We do not express this wish through a feel­
that both will not increase still more rapidly in the ing that somebody must be punished because the
next ten years of standing armaments. Meantime soldiers have suffered, and we regret that a tone of
all the enlightened economic and fiscal schemes of M. personal vindictiveness has crept into the discussion
Witte, Russia’s intelligent Finance Minister, are of this question in the press. Least of all ought par­
threatened with destruction. Is it, then, so remark­ tisan political considerations to be allowed a moment’s
able that an intelligent Prince should ask where such hearing. Once it should come to be generally be­
a process is to end ? Once this question is seriously lieved that the attack on certain branches of the War
considered, there is but one answer which any man Department is a covert demonstration by one political
can make, and that is precisely the answer made in faction or party against another, intelligent popular
this week’s letter of the Czar.
• interest in the matter would cool off immediately.
It may perhaps be thought]that we have simply At the moment we do not believe that the very gen­
discussed the theoretical merits of this notable royal eral demand for an investigation has any such inspira­
communication and have ignored its practical possi­ tion. It is a spontaneous movement of indignation,
bilities. It is, indeed, painfully obvious that recogni­ to be sure, for what is believed to be a grave wrong,
tion of the evil by no means infers general willingness but it is first of all an appeal for an impartial tribunal
to adopt the remedy. There is only one remedy ; for which can establish the facts and, if need be, fix the
the alternatives of general bankruptcy of govern­ responsibility.
ments or of mutual destruction in war can hardly The impartial investigator is confronted at the start
be called remedial processes, and if these alternatives with several undeniable facts which qualify intelligent
are accepted there remains only the so-called “ quix­ criticism. Sickness of soldiers at the front or in camp
otic ” proposition of the Czar. The first and abso­ is an inevitable incident of war; the records of our
lutely essential step is to stop the annual Civil War, for instance, show that deaths in the army
increase in these armaments ; thi3, from the from disease were double the combined number of
very nature of the case, can be done only deaths in battle and from wounds, and by far the
by formal agreement of the Powers concerned. largest percentage of such deaths from disease were
It will he observed that out of the rather general cases of typhoid fever. It is, moreover, perfectly ob­
chorus of • skepticism from European critics of the vious that conditions this year, at the front at all
Czar’s proposals there has come one note of practical events, were more unfavorable than in the Civil War.
common sense : the suggestion that if Russia were to The army was more hastily recruited and mobilized;
abandon its plans for new war-ships, Great Britain its operations were more rapid and exacting; the hos­
too might revoke the order for increased naval arma tile country was a fever-stricken district, and was in­
vaded at the most dangerous season of the year.
ment lately submitted by Mr. Goschen.
It is not to be supposed fhat ^disarmament of the Finally the difficulties in the way of landing troops
nations could at this moment be seriously considered. and stores before Santiago, and of bringing them to
But it will readily be recognized that much will have the front, were vastly increased by the lack of a
been accomplished if the nations merely agree to stop serviceable harbor and the absence of anything like
available military roads. These facts must not be
with such armament as they have to-day.
We have pointed out the peculiar reasons which overlooked, and ought to be fully weighed in fair
Russia has for dreading the future under the system criticism of the misfortunes of the army.
now employed. It may be thought—it has been But it seems to us that these exceptional circum­
argued in some quarters—that Russia’s particular stances fall very far short of explaining the present
needs and embarrassments gave a motive to the Czar decimation of our army by disease. The Secretary of
which need not exist with other sovereigns. But as War, declaring this week that he will order no investi­
a matter of fact it can only be a question of time, of gation of the Quartermaster-General’s Department, of
relative endurance, when every State must reach the the Commissary-General’s Department, or of the Sur­
end of its rope under the remorseless strain of the geon-General’s Department, adds that “ there is no
modern military system. Greece, Italy and Spain fault to be found with them. If there has been any lack
gave way before the stronger financial nations made of supplies, food, medicine or clothing in any of the
any sign of distress; Russia’s finances might possibly camps, it has been due to the officers in command or
collapse before those of France or Germany, but the to unavoidable circumstances.” But this in our
Nemesis of the system must sooner or later, unless judgment is an extremely ill-advised way of meeting
some halt is called, overtake every State. Indeed, if the situation. Fault has been found with every on

456

THE CHRONICLE.

[Vol. LXVII.of those departments and with the War Department1 unloading were lost at sea, and hence that facilities
as a whole. The complaints are specific; they are for landing supplies were unavoidably cut oil. This
emphasized a thousand times by the shocking spec­ may be true ; but Surgeon Munson’s report clearly
tacle presented by our returning regiments. They proves that boats were to be had, and that iu the end,
are the burden of popular discussion at this hour after a fatally long delay, they wore obtained. Why
throughout the Union, and we greatly doubt if popu­ there were no such boats specifically available for the
lar opinion will submit to an ipse dixit of this kind, supply ships, and under the orders of the proper offi­
whatever its source. Moreover, even Mr. Alger ad­ cers, is not explained at all. We are perfectly well
mits that if such neglect, has been proved, the com­ aware that Gen. Shatter’s plan of campaign involved
manders are to blame, and it appears to us, since the quick attack, and that the first requisite was dehad conditions are no matter of doubt, that investi­ barcation of the troops and of the ammunition.
gation is absolutely essential to fix the responsibility, But to say that this part of the unloading
even if it rests on other shoulders •than those of the was necessarily the first is a very different
Department officers. If the medical and subsistence matter from excusing total neglect of provision
staifs at Washington are without blame in this mat­ for the wounded, even when serious fighting had be­
ter, they themselves ought to be the first to demand gun. The essential fact remains that there was
investigation. Surgeon-General Sternberg has already neither proper provision nor proper organization for
asked for such investigation, and a refusal by the the landing of the army. The navy sene boats to
Secretary would, in our judgment, he as grave an in­ bring the soldiers on shore ; why was no arrangement
justice to him as to the public.
made for the navy to land the stores? We have seen
Granting the fact that sickness on a considerable that a simple row-boat served the purposes of the
scale was unavoidable, there are, it seems to us, five surgeons later on. As the “Army and Navy Journal’’
very serious matters which demand investigation. We points out, the rules of the British Admiralty not
refer to the lack of proper food and medical supplies only provide explicitly that “ all troops, with their
daring the attack on Santiago; the lack of proper and baggage, regimental stores and horses, are to be
healthful transportation service for our soldiers on the. shipped and to he landed by the navy ; " but that
way to Cuba and Porto Rico; the shocking neglect of ‘'•'boats, lighters and tugs ” for landing stores “ must
the hospital ships returning with the sick; the bad in part, and should if possible entirely, be provided by
judgment shown in selecting and managing the mili­ the navy.” A naval fleet lay close at hand during this
tary camps in this country; and finally, the grave chaos at the Siboney landing-place. Does anyone sup­
blunders in the camp arranged at Montauk for the} pose that the medical staff would have remained cut
off from its supplies if intelligent co-operation of this
returning soldiers.
The circumstances surrounding all these incidents sort had been arranged by our War Department ?
are painfully well-known already to the newspaper­ The suffering of our soldiers in the matter of water
reading public. We do not need to recite them. We transportation has some excuse in the difficulty of
wish to add a few words, however, by way of showing securing sufficient transport vessels ou short notioe.
the need of an investigation—not only in justice to But neither this argument, nor tire stock argument
the officers now under popular censure but as an ab­ that army transportation cannot insure personal com­
solute necessity to the future remedy of existing de­ fort, wholly explains or excuses the overcrowding of
fects. Mr. Alger has declared, regarding the lack of some of these transports to such degree that disease
supplies at Santiago, that the troops sent to that broke outt before the troops were even landed. It is,
point “ took with them three months' supply of every­ for instance, a matter now sufficiently w*ell known that
thing, especially medicine and food." This statement, oar Porto Rico troop3 were in large measure unfitted
go far as it goes, is confirmed by Surgeon-General in advance for a serious campaign by such provision
Sternberg and by Surgeon Munson o| the medical for1their transportation. These bad results might
corps at Santiago. But Surgeon Munson, who is best have been avoided, even with the overcrowding, had
qualified to speak, goes on to show, in his report of food and water supplies been competently looked
July 29, that the medical supplies thus forwarded t after. But the water supplies ou several of these
were for the most part perfectly useless to the ships appear to have been so crudely arranged that
army in its hour of need, because the medical officers contamination followed as a matter of course.
were not allowed to unload them. Until a day or two The defects of this regular transport service were
after the fight at La Guasima, when the wounded however so far overshadowed by the scandals of the
were already crowding the hospital tent, the only hospital ships that not1 much has been heard of
facility allowed to the medical department for bring­ them. It is not only the people at large who are be­
ing tentage, appliances and medicines to the shore at‘ wildered at the show of iucompetency in the equip­
Siboney was one row-boat, the order for which was re­ ment of such boats as the “ Seneca’’and the “ Concho,’’
voked after a single trip from the supply-ship. Most but the official organs of the army frankly confess that
ctf these medical supplies remained inaccessible a week individual responsibility ought to be and can be
after the heaviest fighting in front of Santiago. fixed. For the lack of adequate supplies the Sec­
These are matters of official record, not questioned retary of War blames the captain of the “ Seneca,”
by anybody; what was involved by such neglect of and thus washes his hands of the matter. As to
decent provision for the wounded our people have the over-crowding of the vessel, the Surgeon-General
learned in the heartrending accounts of the hospital declares that an army officer transferred the sick
soldiers to the “ Seneca,” and thus declares himself
makeshifts at the rear of the Santiago army.
It is quite useless to argue that nobody was to blame free of responsibility. Even the lack of proper medi­
for such a situation, the result of which was death by cal attendance on the hospital boat’s long trip is
the score of soldiers whose lives would have been saved similarly waved aside. The regular medical corps, Dr.
by proper care and provision. Mr. Alger lays much Sternberg goes on to say, “ is not one-quarter Mg
stress ou the fact that lighters sent down for use in enough far the needs of the army,” and thus he ex-

S eptember 3, 1898,]

THE CHRONICLE.

plains not only the shocking lack of medical care
on the hospital ships but the utter lack of adequate
medical attendance in the hospital tents at Siboney.
We oannot help thinking that the average citizen
will brush aside these technicalities, and ask who was
responsible for committing sick soldiers to a ship of
whose capacity every one was ignorant; why such dis­
posal of soldiers seriously ill was not made subject (as
Surgeon Munson testifies it was not) to proper medi­
cal authorities, and who was so blind as to leave the
medical corps short-handed in a campaign whose
chief danger, as all the world knew, was disease in the
invading army? Readers of history will remember
that precisely similar excuses were made by the Brit
ish War Department for the hospital and commissary
scandals of the Crimean War, and these excuses have
been rejected as promptly by the judgment of the last
half-century as they were by the English public of
1855.
What we have said regarding the other phases of
this matter applies with equal force to the condition
of the army camps in the United States and to the de­
plorable mismanagement at Montauk Point. It is
maintained by some competent judges that such yel­
low fever as did exist in the Santiago army was brought
from the infected camp at Tampa. Be this as it may,
the fact remains that our soldiers returning from the
Southern camps, where they have had to face neither
Cuban malaria nor Spanish bullets, are in almost as
wretched physical condition as the soldiers from San­
tiago. We have never been able to understand why it
was necessary to station Northern soldiers in a South­
ern climate during mid-summer ; but the climate does
not explain the typhoid epidemic, which has put a
good part of our volunteer army out of service. Nor,
we think, is the matter satisfactorily disposed of by
the easy retort that volunteer soldiers are always care­
less and that typhoid in crowded communities is very
common. The very recognition of such facts ought to
have led to scrupulous care in the selection of camps
to shelter and officers to discipline the recruited troops.
We say again, therefore, that an official and impar­
tial investigation of these incidents of the war is a
positive necessity. If our methods of army manage­
ment have been wrong, we certainly ought to learn
both the evil and the remedy. If incompetent officers
have mismanaged matters in any grade of the service,
it is due to the country that it should be informed
who were the culprits and how they obtained
their offices. If appointments for political favor
have done this mischief, it is of the highest
importance that the evil should be exposed;
for politics in an army, as France proved twentyeight years ago, leads in the end to demoralization
and ruin. If, on the other hand, all these incidents
were inseparable from a war such as has just been
concluded, then, we should say, President McKinley
owes it to his subordinates in the War Department to
allow the facts to be brought forth in such manner as
will convince and satisfy the American public.
A NEW OFFICIAL COMMEUCIAL INTELLI­
GENCE DEPARTM ENT IN ENGLAND*.
Manchester , August 2-lth.
It is a significant indication of the growth of Euro­
pean official interest in the promotion of foreign trade
that the governments of Germany, France and Great
Britain have recently taken steps tending to increase
^Communicated by our Special Correspondent at Manchester.

457

and make more efficient the assistance which they
severally render to the mercantile and industrial inter­
ests of their respective countries in connection with
markets and commercial opportunities abroad. In
Germany, the constitution and functions of Chambers
of Commerce, which there as well as in France are
semi-official bodies—partly supported by the State—
have recently been revised with this object in view.
In France a new “ Commercial Intelligence Bureau”
has been established, and in England the report and
recommendations of a Special Departmental Committee
have just been published proposing some important
changes in the official methods of collecting informa­
tion in foreign countries and the British Colonies, and
of disseminating it amongst the commercial and in­
dustrial community at home.
The Committee, appointed on July 26th, 1897, was
composed of five representatives of the Foreign and
Colonial Offices and the Board of Trade, and five non­
official members, viz., the President of the Association
of Chambers of Commerce, the President of the Im­
perial Institute, the Presidents of the Manchester
and London Chambers of Commerce, and Sir James
Mackay, who has had extensive business experience in
India. Seventeen witnesses, including two from the
Manchester Chamber, were examined, and the Com­
mittee was supplied with answers to a number of in­
terrogatories which it had addressed to Chambers of
Commerce throughout the kingdom.
The report of the Committee premises that the
topics upon which it was specifically requested to ad­
vise were (1) the collection and prompt dissemination,
amongst those interested, of accurate information
upon commercial subjects, and (2) the official collec­
tion of samples, especially of goods of foreign manu­
facture competing with British productions, and the
exhibition of such samples to manufacturers and trad­
ers in the United Kingdom. In dealing with the first
of these points the report sets forth, at the outset, the
already existing methods of supplying commercial in­
telligence by the publications of the Foreign, Colonial
and India offices and the Board of Trade. These in­
clude, of course, the Consular Reports, which were
much criticised in the evidence—favorably and un­
favorably—and the Committee admits that they might
be improved. So far as their matter is concerned the
only material suggestion offered is that Chambers of
Commerce should from time to time indicate to the
Foreign Office specific subjects for special investiga­
tion by Consular officers. Some such plan has for
some time past prevailed in the United States. Every
regular reader of American Consular Reports can
testify to the frequency with which special investiga­
tions are made under instructions from the Depart­
ment of Foreign Commerce at the instance of com­
mercial bodies and even of individual firms. * Often,
indeed, the results of such inquiries are of great in­
terest and of practical value.
The report further recommends that in the British
colonies where there is no representation analogous to
that of Consuls in foreign countries, agencies for ob­
taining commercial intelligence should be established.
In the Crown colonies these should be selected from
Collectors of Customs or officers holding similar posi­
tions, and in the self-governing colonies it is sug­
gested that the various administrations might be will­
ing to appoint suitable men. Means of increasing the
efficiency of the Consulates, as commercial reporters,
are recommended. The addition of clerical or oxpeit

4f 8

THE CHRONICLE.

(V ol . LXYII.

assistance in some eases is proposed. More important ligence. The Committee is .to have power to withhold
still, regarded as a new departure, is the proposal to from general circulation such information a3 may ap­
dispatch, from time to time, properly qualified com­ pear to it more suitable for communication to Cham­
missioners to particular countries to investigate and bers of Commerce and other associations.
report upon the progress and condition of trade. The Composition of the new department, or rather
“ Thus, at intervals of say three years, a commercial of its controlling body, presents a feature which,
expert would visit British North America, the Aus­ though not quite without precedent, is novel in a per­
tralian and the South African colonies, with a view to manently constituted British organism. It is to he a
collecting and noting such developments us have committee made up of one representative from each
taken place since the last visit.” Similarly special of the four chief Governmental departments con­
agents are to be dispatched to foreign countries as cerned with foreign or colonial affairs, and six repre­
occasion may require. One such ageut is, indeed, sentatives of commerce and industry chosen, each for
already at work in the Argentine Republic, Southern a definite period, by the President of the Board of
Brazil and Chili. He left England about six months Trade. The Chairman is to he the representative of
ago, and the results of hi3 mission will doubtless that department, and the Secretary one of its per­
afford guidance to the Government in following up manent staff. The constitution of the Commit­
this proposal of the Committee.
tee follows approximately that of the “ Trade
To one suggestion put forward in the evidence the and Treaties Committee,” which sat from 1890
Committee is entirely opposed. It was denied that to 1893 to consider questions arising out of
British Consuls should furnish information as to the the European commercial treaties expiring at
financial standing of business houses in their districts, the beginning of 1892. Four or five years ago the
that they should assist iu the recovery of debts, and establishment, in permanence, of some such joint
even that they should act as agents for advertising or official and non-official body, for commercial purposes,
selling British goods. The report observes that to was earnestly pressed upon the attention of the Gov­
undertake duties of this kind would be to expose Con­ ernment by the Manchester Chamber of Commerce.
sular officers to responsibilities which they ought not The project has now received the approval o£ the
to beai", and that their assumption would prove a fruit­ Committee, though in a somewhat different form.
ful source of jealousy between rival traders. It may The concluding portion of the report recommends the
be noted here, however, that to a very limited extent maintenance in London of a commercial museum, the
British Consuls do sometimes render services of this contents of which should be circulated for inspection
kind, but these are variously limited by the interpre­ in the chief manufacturing and mercantile districts.
tation which each Consul is disposed to put upon the The museum is to be formed on very much the same
general instructions framed by the Foreign Office for lines as the museums of Brussels, Vienna and
his guidance.
Philadelphia.
But the most prominent innovation recommended It should he stated that although all the members
by the Committee is the founding in London of a new of the Committee sign the report, two notes are ap­
official department under the control of the Board of pended, expressing a certain reserve on the part of
Trade, to be called the “ Commercial Intelligence two of them. Sir James Mackay doubts the utility
Office.” Its function is broadly described as that of of the proposed new department, pointing out that
meeting “ the constantly increasing demand for British industry and trade have attained their present
prompt and accurate information on commercial mat­ vast importance entirely through private initiative
ters, so far as it can be met by Government action.” and private effort, and he thinks that private
The opinion is expressed that “ it is more than essen­ enterprise may be trusted, with a minimum of
tial in these days that our manufacturers and traders Government assistance, to maintain and enlarge
should rely mainly on their own efforts to extend the them. Mr. W. H. Holland, late President of the
area of their transactions and the amount of their Manchester Chamber of Commerce, says: “ It is a
business. The State may, however, usefully afford sound principle that governments should not be ex­
assistance in the interests of the trading community, pected to do for the trader what he is able to do for
as a whole, and may supply information from a broader himself.” He supports, however, the proposal to set
point of view than that of the individual trader.” up a Commercial Intelligence Office as an experiment.
The new department is not to take out of He also thinks that “ British commerce should look
the hands of the Board of Trade, the Foreign for its expansion chiefly to individual energy and
Office, the Colonial Office or other administra­ capacity,”
tive departments any of the duties with which
they are now charged, except such as may from time ANTHRACITE COAL RATES AND THE
ONTARIO & WESTERN.
to time be specifically indicated by Her Majesty’s
Government. Its chief work will be (1) to receive We have on previous occasions directed attention to
from these departments, and from other sources— the growth which lias occurred since 1890 in the reve­
public and private—all intelligence bearing upon the nues of the New York Ontario & Western and the
subjects committed to it3 care, and to digest, prepare great improvement in the position of the security­
and distribute such intelligence in ways most likely to holders which has followed as the result. Analysis
he useful to persons engaged in commerce and indus­ of past reports has shown that this improvement was
try; (2) to reply to all inquiries coming within the due principally to the anthracite coal traffic developed
scope of its functions, orally as well as in writing, and with thebuildiug of the Scranton Division, hut that at
(3) to direct applicants for special information, not at the same time the management have carefully looked
hand, to the proper sources from which it may be best after the other classes of business—building up the
obtained. One rtcommendation, quite original so far milk traffic, fostering the passenger traffic, and in
as British practice is concerned, evidently follows the various other ways seeking to add to the permanent
German method of utilizing official commercial intel­ e arning capacity of the property.

September 3, 1898.j

THE CHEQNICLE.

459

The annual report of the company for the fiscal year many of the low-grade bituminous roads, over some
ending June 30 1898 is now in the press, and we have of which fifty-car trains may be hauled.
been favored with early proof-sheets of the same. In Another difference is that in the anthracite trade
this period of twelve months there was no further ex­ there are known nearly a dozen varieties or sizes of coal
pansion, gross and net being substantially the same as while there is no sizing or grading of bituminous.
for the twelve months preceding ; but in being able Soft coal is generally dealt in, unassorted and unclas­
to make such a record as this the company must be sified, and trains do not need to be broken up or
considered to have done remarkably well; for the divided so as to get a particular size, nor need there
conditions were not favorable to improved results. In be any storing or side-tracking, the coal beiug gener­
the first place, industrial revival, from which much ally delivered at regular intervals under contracts
had been expected, was checked by the “ Maine” dis­ for large quantities. There is consequently much
aster and the subsequent outbreak of the war with less switching and shunting, and cars are unloaded
Spain: while the anthracite coal trade, from and returned much more promptly. On the other
which the road derives its largest source of hand each of the different sizes of anthracite
traffic, remained throughout the whole period, must be taken from chutes when the break­
as is well known, in an exceedingly unsatisfactory er is running and loaded into and carried in
state. Despite it all the net earnings fell but a trifle separate cars and side-tracked or stored until wanted.
below the total for 1896-7, which was the best ever At different seasons of the year certain sizes are
reached: in other words the road earned net of in demand, while other sizes may have no market
81,112,992, against 81,113,906. And as reflecting the whatever. Those sizes not required are dumped into
favorable character of its income exhibits, we may storage places and thus remain until it is possible to
note that with net of 81,112,992, the fixed charges dispose of them; or such sizes are carried in cars
amounted to only $710,532, leaving a surplus balance which are side-tracked sometimes for months at a
of over four hundred thousand dollars—8102,460. It time. Thus the anthracite carriers are in the posi­
should be borne in mind that the Ontario & Western is tion of having to render services not only as common
relatively a small road. There are systems several carrier but also a3 warehouseman, factor and some­
times as financial agent.
times its size whose surplus is no larger than this.
President Thomas P. Fowler in the present report Mr. Fowler also avers that rates in the case of bitu­
enters into an extended discussion of the conditions minous coal are usually on the basis of a 2.000-pound
prevailing in the anthracite coal trade; and this ton, while those in the case of anthracite coal are on the
part of his remarks is of general interest in view of basis of a ton of 2,240 pounds. Adverting to the claim
the fact that the topic is one of much concern to frequently made that the operations of the Ontario &
the whole anthracite carrying industry. After noting Western in this particular field furnish evidence that
that extreme depression has prevailed, and citing the the anthracite coal traffic is unduly profitable, Mr.
views pro and con as to whether an early improvement Fowler notes that the construction of the Scranton Di­
can be expected, he points out that the usual panacea vision involved the building of only 54 miles of line. The
has already been suggested, namely a reduction of the Ontario & Western previously had had, for many years,
freight rate. The claim is made, he says, that it is 325 miles of main line admirably located for reaching
manifestly unfair to charge higher rates for transport­ the anthracite markets via the Lakes and tide-water,
ing anthracite coal to market than is charged for as well as at other interior rail and water points. As an
hauling bituminous coal. He demonstrates very entirely new operation, he says, from the coal fields to
clearly and very conclusively that this notion has the markets, it could have offered no inducement to
nothing to support it.
either the capitalist or experienced railway promoter,
In the first place he states, what will we are sure be and in fact could not as such have been built.
a surprise to many, that the gross earnings from this We have in the foregoing given only an outline of
branch of the Ontario & Western’s traffic have aver­ Mr. Fowler’s arguments and reasoning. His entire
aged under seven mills per ton per mile from the time remarks must be read to appreciate what a strong case
the Scranton Division wa3 opened up to the present he makes out for the existing tariff charges of the
date. Furthermore, he says, it must be borne in mind anthracite roads.
that all coal traffic is one-way business—that is, the
coal trains earn nothing whatever when returning from
GROSS EARNINGS FOR HALF-YEAR.
the markets to the mines. Then he clinches the argu­ The improvement in the gross earnings of United
ment by saying that were the rates paid for hauling States railroads during the first six months of the cur­
bituminous coal applied to anthracite, the Ontario & rent calendar year was so marked that it seems desir­
Western would be oneof those which would be obliged able to know approximately the aggregate extent of
to retire from this branch of business, as.it could not that improvement as expressed in dollars. In other
profitably haul coal to tide water or other points at a words, how much the roads added to their revenues in
this period of time. In that way we get a better idea
rate of three mills per ton per mile.
Mr. Fowler proves, too, that there is no reason why of the change which has occurred in the condition of
the rate for hauling anthracite coal should be as low this important industry.
as the rate on bituminous coal or lower than the We published a very comprehensive statement last
present anthracite rates. The train loads are neces­ week which showed a gain in gross earnings over the
sarily much lighter than those of the bituminous corresponding six months of la3t year of somewhat
carrying railways, as all anthracite producing mines over 51 million dollars. This is a large amount, but
in this section of the country are located in the deep it does not represent the full extent of the expansion
valleys of the State of Pennsylvania, and various which occurred. The statement referred to, while
summits and heavy gradients are encountered in mov­ very elaborate and extensive, included only the roads
ing the product of the mines to markets. The actual which had made reports of both gross and net. Of
transportation cost is therefore heavier than it is on course it is impossible to procure returns from every

THE CHRONICLE.

460

road in the country. But there are quite a few which,
while not reporting net, give out statements of the
gross. Hence if wo undertake to compile figures of
the gross alone we can enlarge upon our statement
of last week. Starting with the totals reported in
that statement, we have in the following table added
46 other roads for which we have the comparisons as
to the gross though not as to the net.
GROSS UARN1NG9 OF UNITED 8TA.TES RAt LWAVS
J A N U A R Y 1 T O J U N E SO.
1893.

1897.

Increase. Decrease.

*
P re v ’slyrejOl (186r<!a) — 187,173.197 436,122,181 51151016
Additions for road in -1
clndtfd in above tot­
als for only 5 moot ha
15,311,361 14,503,122 808,24*2
which have since re ­
ported for June ... j
A ia N.O rl.& T e x. Pao —
73,189
617,54?
N e w Orl,«fe No East, ..
690,731
57,99f
331,612
276,816
Alabam a < Vick sb ......
fe
79,550
330.675
251,125
Y'l ckab. Sb re v, Pa o.___
,, ___
130,654
111,719
Boston R- B. & L yn n —
401,997
116,035
il,0 3 S
Chic.Peo. &St. Louis----7,862,376 L, 490,260
Chic, Rock TsM «fe Pao. — , 9,352,636
3,446,865
277,681
3,724,546
Chic. St, Paul M. < Ora..
fe
582,912
519,022
43,890
Ohio. Term. T ransfer____
..
26,956
27,850
CId . Genritet’wn »* Ports.
1,115,119
1 L0,029
1,225,1-18
Col. Hock Val. & T o l ....
8,550
8,800
Colusa. & L ak e.................
100,242 107,259
207,501
Det & Lnna Northern...
128,228,341
136,560
Evansville A In d ’p.lis—
4^4,260
89,855
574,115
Evansville A T .H au te —
1,199,293
1,513.*96
314,603
Fla. Cent. A Penin...........j
403,494
427,609
Georgia Car, A North......
7,858,773
6,128,013 L,730,760
Gt. Nor.—8. P M A M ......
669,965
46,911
716,876
Eastern of M inn...........
37,354
998,713
961,359
Montana Central.........
57,842
22,470
80.312
G o lf Beam’t A K an.C ......
1.546,070
72,215
1,618,285
In te rn a l! & Gt, N o r......
1,580,500
1,295,020 285,480
In ten ceanio (M a x .)........
1,555,605
883,906 671,699
K a n .C . Pitts. A G u l f . . . .
5,110
123,304
Kan. Cl tv A Omaha. —
118,194
55,582
Kan. City Sub. B elt........
‘ 2-1,880
1
169,-98
163,915
178,297
14,332
Lehigh
Hue so n ...........
39,090
39,749
L os Angeles Term inal...
729,452
653,860
75,592
Lonisv.Evans.ASr. L ____
2,016,500
1,804,000 212,300
Mexican R ailw a y ...........
335,562
Mexican Southern...........
360,631
73,471
Mo. Kansas A Texas......
5,0^2,766
4.929,295
Mo. Pacific Iron M t...... 12,276,11
4 10,620,147 1,655,967
171,863
650,354
Central B ran ch ..........
478,691
23,101
382,5 21
359,420
N e w London Northern...
12,255
Ohio R iver A L. E rie*..-10,809
1,446
314,963
5,292
Ohio Southern.................
309,671
502,535
Pitts. Bess.A L. E ric ........
265,039 237,491
158,741
16,449
142,292
St. L, Ohio. A St. P..........
4,466
St. L, Kennet A So’n......
29,458
24,992
St, Louis Southweat’n ...
2,392,669
2,040,414 352,255
685,884
33,707
St. Paul A D u lu t h .........
65V, 177
Bher.Shrev. A South .......
126,455
2,200
124,255
Texas & P a cific ..............
3,521,296
3,050,475
470,821
3,715
4,184
Visalia A Tulare.. ........
39,313
435
W abash Cfces A W est...
38,878
693,561
Wheeling
Lake E rie ___
492,411 201,150

$

}

&

&

18,935

.. _____
89 4
250

.. ____
24,115

* For five months.

PBIWIP.U. uHlNGES IS G U O S S BARKINGS IN S I X M O N T H S .
In e re a ie a .
I n c r o t i* e » .
Southern Puoille.......... §-1,930,607 8av. Fla. A W estern.... $326,609
Pennsylvaniar____ ____ 3,857,800 Internal, a Gt. N orth .
285,480
OhloMO Burl. & Q uin.. 9,909,904 ChlO.St. P. Mm A O m ..
277.681
Atoll Top. A San t. Fo. 2,707,33* Del. Lack. A W estern..
262,829
262,428
Chicago A North West. 2,628,660 1Choc Okln. A G u lf......
Illinois Cen tral............ 2,*28,825 Buff. Rooh. A P itts____
251.007
Northern P n o lllj......... 2,631,7-11 Pitts, Bess. A L. Erie ..
237,496
233,161
Chic. Mil. & St. P a u l... 2,010,898 Minn. St. P. & S. 8. M ..
232,421
I'naiultan P a o iile ........ 1,883,325 Un. Pao Den A G u lf...
221,219
Mo. Paoino
Ir. M t.... 1,927,660 Central of N . J erse y ...
212,300
Croat Northern S y . . .. 1,815,025 M exloau R ailw ay ......
210,705
Baltimore A O h i o ...... 1,550,610 Ala. N. O. A Tex. Pao..
t Milo. K nelt 1st. ,V P a r . . 1 ,1 9 1 ),2 6 6 W heeling A. Lake E rie. 201,150
194,615
PUI1. ® R mk1 a n d C .A I.* 1,305,710 Mobile A O hio..............
Oregon IUt & S a v lg ... 1,276,910 PitteUurg & W e s te rn ...
207,755
188,385
Louisville. A N a s h v ... . 1.133,119 Elgin Joilot A Eastern.
185,620
l ’aeilk1Coast................ 1,121,018 Nashv. Ohfttt. A St. L ..
.
183,836
W ab a sh ..................
992,258 Kan. city Mom. A Bir..
Union Par|Ho...............
933,717 Mexican C en tral.........
171,540
169,149
Southern R ailw ay........
905,630 Kan. Oily Ft, S. & Mem.
Dill. So. Shore A A r l .. .
157.274
Memphis Division.
108,902
148,397
Now York C en tra l. . . . .
830,717 Ft. Worth A Den. City.
E rie............................
603,787 Iow a C e n t r a l............ .
146,189
142,242
Denver
Rio G ra n d e ..
691,80*2 Long Island..................
133,082
Kan 0. P lus. A G u lf...
671,699 Peoria A E astern ___ ...
849,112 Chic. I ml. A Louts vine.
G ran d T ru n k ...... .........
135,781
123,208
L. Shore & Mich. South,
-1-8,759 Mexican Intornat'l —
118,141
oiev. Gill. Ohio. A-at. L .
471,563 G ran d Rapids A In d ...
116,8*8
cm . N. O. A Tex. P a c ...
489,245 Allegheny V a lle y .........
115,476
N. Y . Chic, A St. Lou is..
426,988 W est N. V. & Perm ......
Balt.
Ohio Southw ..,
419,27a Clev. Lorain A Wheel'g. 115,239
115,144
Mioh. Cent. & C a u .8 o ..
418,000 N ew E n g'am l...............
111,253
St. Louis A San. Fran ..
401,321 F itch bu rg.....................
In d ian ap ... 111,943
L V. R R .& L. V .C o a l.
400,>16 Terre H
110.029
Chesapeake A Ohio .. .
301,144 Col. Hock. Val. A T o l..
109,901
Wisconsin C en tra l......
390,371 Flint A Pere M a r q ......
Rap. A W est,.
109,291
Rio Grande W estern...
388.064 Det.
108,882
Phil. Wilm.
Balt......
365,100 Chic. A West. Mich......
Ohio & Grand T run k..
351,8*1 Det. A Lima N orthern. 107,259
101,370
347,418 Atm A r b o r ....................
Oregon Short Line......
Norfolk A W estern ......
343,866
Total (representing
St. Louis Soutliwest’n..
352,255
105 road3)............ $58,029,540
Fla. Cent- A Penlnsul'r.
3 14,603
Chic. Great W e s te rn ...
307,652

&

&

&

Gv.

&

(Covers lines directly operated east and west of P ittsb u rg ; the gross
on Eastern Hues increased 81,774,000 and on W estern lines $2,083,800. *For live months to M ay 31.

. ...
659
. . ___
25,0 i9

DEBT

S T A T E M E N T A U G U S T 31 1898.

The following statement of the public debt of the
United States on August 31 1898 is made up from
iffioial figures issued ou that day. Further ou we
give an interesting exhibit of the bonds issued in aid
of the Pacific R ulroads, and the Treasury cash hold­
ings, all of the same date.
Amount
$
$
c
*
\
IN TEREST-BEARING

__ ____
469

&

6/,103 733

l x v ii.

&

&

Total (232 roads)...... 567,053,205 506,020,873
Net increase (12*06 p.o.).
Miles of roads..................
164,161
163,095

IV ol.

70.391

1,066

Altogether, therefore, we have the res ults as to 232
separate roads, operating 164,161 miles of line. In
this way, it will be seen, the increase is raised to over
61 million dollars, the 232 roadshaving earned 567
million dollars in the first sis months of 1898, against
only506 million dollars inthe first six months of 1897.
In addition, however, there are, as already stated, a
number of other roads from which it is not possible
to secure returns. These, if they conkl be included,
would still further swell the amount of increase. In
the preliminary compilations published in our issue of
July 16, we estimated the probable improvement in
gross earnings on the railroad system of the United
States as a whole for the six months at 65 million dol­
lars. We are now inclined to raise this estimate, and
say that the improvement was probably in the
vicinity of 70 million dollars. We shall not
attempt to dilate upon the moaning and significance
of this expansion of 70 million dollars in the gross
revenues of our railroad transportation lines in a
period of six mouths. We wish simply to record the
fact itself. In the following we furnish a list of the
roads distinguished for large amounts of gain. The
statement is the same as that published last week, with
the addition of such roads as belong in the table now
that the basis of the compilation has been extended.

T itle o f L o a n —

In te r e s t
p a y a b le .

DEBT AUGUST

SI, 1898.

-A m o v / a t o u ts ta n d in g .O oupon.
lo ta L
R e g is te r e d ,

is s u e d .

2

t F u n d , loan, 1891, n __at
............
25,304,500
25,304.500
250.000.
000
Continued at p.e. >
7-10,909,200 491,025,400 08,618,450 559.640,830
is, Funded loan, 190?.,Q.— J.
.................
11.030
10,012.750
............
4s, Refund’g certified.Q.— J.
100.000. 000 011,353, i 50 31,64 0.559 100,000,000
5s, Loan of 1904...... .0.— F.
102,315,400 112,522,500 49,792.901 162,3 lb, 4.00
4s, Loan of 1925..... . .Q.— F.
08,070,760 74,845,020
; 4,8)5,020
0.174,260
?s, 10-208. 'of JBfiB...... Q — F.
Total, excluding Pac.____
1,368.081,3'/0 70l,4t?,UO 220,7'*:8.6J 022.212^00
.0
R R Bonds..
Bonds issued to Pacifle Railroads not yet matured: Central Pacific,
¥,9,197,000; Union Pacific, $.3,157,000; Western Pacific, $l,0oO,500;
total.................................................. ......................................
14,004,560
Note -Tlie dcnominat.ous of bonds are as follows . Two percents (registered
onlv), *50, *100, *500, $1,000, $5,000, *10,000. $20,000, ?50,0i)0; 4s of 1907, regis­
tered, $50, $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000, $20,0j0, $50,000, coupon, $50. *100,
$600, *1.00'’ ; is, refunding certificates, $10; 5s of 1904, registered, $50. $100,
■ 000 $10,000, coupon, 150, $LO , $L.ooo; 4s of 1925 registered. $50, $100, foOO,
1
O
tLOOo] $5,000,110,000, coupon, $50, $100. $500, $1,000.
DEBT ON W H IC H INTEREST HAS CEASED SINCE M ATUR ITY.
30.
Funded Loan of 1891, matured September 2,1891.. $12 .300 00
Olddebtmaturedpnorandsabsequentto.Jan.1,’61 1,131.750 26
1,130,'<30 26

July

August. 31.

22

Debt on which interest has ceased....................$1,260,050 26

$1,259,030 20

Bonds issued to Pacific railroads matured but not yet pre­
sented: Union Pacific, $'".000; Central Pacific, $15,000;
Kansas Pacific. $U,OoO; Sioux City & Pacific, $ J.oO ; total...
J

87,000 00

DEBT BEARING

NO INTEREST.
$310,681,016 00
G:l,997 50
30,206,200 00
,$15,260,€86' 1
4
. S,375,934 00
6,88-1,7^2 14

0nlted States notes....................................
Old demand notes. ..................................
National Bank notes—Redemption account.
Fractional currency......... ...........■- .........•
Less amount estimated as lost or destroyed,

.$383,885,971 64

Awreftato of debt bearing no Interest.
RECAPITULATION.

Claxtiiftcatton of Debt

August 81.

$
333,685,971 O
i
1898.

JF/I/3L,
?

In c re a s e o r
D e c re a s e .

*

1898,

8-17,367,730 00
t.260,050 20
384,297,411 61

In c .7 J,845,070 00
D ec. L020 00
D ec. i lM 70 CO

Total jrross debt....... ,1.'07.857.801 90 1,233,925,22190
251,841,215 06
Cash balance In Treasury- . 294,487,084 60

lnc.74,132,580 00
Inc, 39,042,869 54

922,212, *00 00
[nterest-be&riatf debt.
1.21
9,030 20
Debt, interest ceased......
Debt bearing no Interest...

T otal net debt........ . .

1,012,870.717 30

078,0 \L,006 B4

Incb

34,789,?10 40

The foregoing figures show a gross debt on August 31
1898 (interest-bearing and non interest-bearing) of $1,307,357,801 90 and a net debt (gross debt less net cash in the
Treasury) of $1,013,870,7 L7 30.
P acific R ailroad D ebt.— T hese bonds are never included
in the official total of the Government debt. To show their
present status we have made the following compilation :

THE CHRONICLE,

S eptember 3, 1898.J

BONDS ISSUED TO PACIFIC RALLEOADS—TH E IR STATUS SEPT. 1,1898
R a ilr o a d L i a b i l i t y
Bands
Is s u e d
b y G o v ’ t.

Nam e
o f R a ilw a y

.

N et
I n t . P a id
b y G o v ’t .

B on d s— M a t u r it y o f.
D ed uct
S in k in g
Fund,
& c.

L e a v in g
N it
P a s t-D u e . D u e J a n .
L i a b i l i t y . U n p a id .

1, 1899.

*

Central Pacific...
Western Pacific.
Cent. Br., U. Pac.
Sioux City Pac.

&

Total...........

$

$
$
*
*
25,8*5,1*20 30.593.939 8,902,317 53.570.742 10.088,120 9,197.000
5,390,6? 2 320,000 1,050,560
1.970,560 a,4 0,092
3.765,33H 1.600,000
1,600^000 2.105,33?
4,22«840 1,628,320
1.628.320 2,GOO,620
8,009,31* «6.8fi,f>7o 20.236.440 10,847,580
3L°84,000 44.779.887

T reasury C ash and D emand L iabilities .—The cash hold­
ings of the Government as the items stood August 31 we take
from the Treasury statement of that date. The net cash
balance given below is the same as deducted above in reach­
ing the net debt. CASH IN TH E TREASURY.

*148,2^1,190 67
Gold—Coin........ .
105.175.H 10-1253,377,193 83
97
Bars.........
400,200,209 03
Silver—Dollars...,
!0,903,44*5 73
Subsidiary com.
90.141,-34 9 0 - 513.400.8P4 09
Paper—United States notes.............................. 71,^85,435 00
4.339,020 00
Treasury notes of 1890...................................
1.040,140 00
Gold certificates............................................
8.117.131 00
Silver certificates........................... - .............
280.000 00
Certificates of deposit (Act June 8,1872)........
4,416,723 8 3 - 93,084,055 88
National bank notes.......................................
Other—Bonds, interest and coupons paid, await­
107.919 44
ing reimbursement........................................
1.^05.815 09
Minor coin and fractional currency..................
61,138,691 14
Deposits iu nat’l bank depositaries—genT acct—
4.829,770 01- 07,282,201 08
Disbursing officers’ balances..................... .......
Aggregate.......................... .................. .
*927,144,040 08
DEM AND LIAB ILITIE S.
Gold certificates............................................... $37,119,149 00
Silver certificates ................................................ 401.107,504 €0
Certificates of deposit act Jane 8,1872................ 20.560.00000
Treasury notes of 1890...................... ............. 99,2*0.280 (0 *558,040,933 00
Fund for redemp. of uncurrent nat’l bank notes
8,589.064 49
Outstanding checks and drafts.........................
8.25 \515 20
Disbursing officers’ balances............................. 52.901,005 23
Agency accounts, Ac...........................................
4,804,043 50 — 74,010,62348
Gold reserve............. ............. *100.000.000 00
ietcash balance....................... 194,487.084 60 ...................... 294,487,084 G
O
Aggregate.................................... ..................................... *927,144,640 03
Net cash balance in the Treasury July 30.1898.......................... *254,814,215 06
Net cash balance in the Treasury August 31,1898..................... 291,487,084 00

tl 9.042,8e9 54

Increase during the month

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF GOLD AND
SILVER A T SA N FRANCISCO.

461

per cent, Chicago 6'3 per cent, Baltimore 16'8 per cent and
St. Louis 19‘9 per cent.
3.

W e e k E n d in g S e p te m b e r

Cl e a r in g s .
R e t u r n s b y T e le g r a p h .

1893.

1897.

P e r O ent

New York...........................
Boston.................................
Philadelphia........................
Baltimore............................
Chicago...............................
3t. Louis....... - .....................
New Orleans......- ...............

$036,553,647
79,305,987
57,092.457
12,246,909
81,538,253
19,001,520
4,351,798

$001,949,263
76,002,391
58,342,073
14,024,046
87,058,468
24,470,508
4,304,553

+ 14-1
+4*4
-2-1
-16-3
-6-3
—19 9
+1-1

Seven cities, 5 days........
Other cities, 5 days..............

$940,750,571
145,013,207

$836,751,302
130,927,418

-+8*5
+10*8

Total all cities, 5 days—
All oities, 1 day...................

$1,085,763,778
230,014,706

$997,678,720
219,770.887

+8-8
+4-7

$1,315,778,484

$1.217,449.807

+8-1

1893.

E ig h t M o n th s ,

Total all oities for week..

Another table, our usual monthly detailed statement of
transactions on the various New York Exchanges, has also
been crowded off of the first page. The results for the eight
months of the current year are, however, given below and
for purposes of comparison the figures for the corresponding
period of 1897 are also presented.
E ig h t M o n th s ,

Description.

P a r V a lu e
o r Q u a n t it y

A c tu a l
V a lu e .

A v e r ’ge P a r V a lu e
P r i c e . o r Q u a n t it y

1897.

A c tu a l
V a lu e

A v e r ’ ge
P r ic e .

,

09,509 300
3t00k| Val8 *0,700,7 IL325 |5039787453 75*0
:
RR. bonds.. *552,454,910 *431,774.21* 78-5
.2-5,450 *12,571,204 111*1
Oov’t bonds *1L
*801,302 42*0
*1.879,700
tate bonds
*2 £0,319 232*7
*127,530
Bank stocks

42,8*8,019
*1092123750 j 2709337235 60*2
*330,104,290 *252,392,143 76*5
*8,431.00 1 *10,2i 2,917 121*1
*1,121,0 >
0
|03»,O
8v8 50*3
*226,010
*395,777 174*7

Total — *7,290,408 H 5 *5.537231110 75 9

*4432009050 *2,972969210 07*1

THE SALS'* OP STOCKS A T MB W TOR It STOCK SttH A V lllfi.
1898.

Month Number
of Shares

1897.

Values.
P a r.

V a lu e s .

N um ber

A c tu a l.

o f S h a re s .

P a r.

A c tu a l.

*
$
041,911,009 3,305,112 323.774.750
650,208.221 2,803,401 200,439,100
788,778,535 5,039,910 485.428.750

*
208,587,472
171,004,654
325,254.505

lstqr 28,328,203 2,770,575,825 2,080,897,815 11,208,729 1,075,033,000

705,448,031

Jan .. 9,290,391
Feb... 8.950,824
March. 10,080,9-8

1
912,554,075
373,528,400
984,492,750

April...
The Collector of Customs at San Francisco has furnished May.... 5,979,445 500.527.150 443,292,230 3,569,007 335,710,350 229,076,827
5
039,711.833 3,342.03
227,037,329
ns this week the details of imports and exports of gold and June... 9,191,084 871.430.150 035,445,535 6,438,920 324,135,850 432,592,253
9,173,051 873.080.150
017,015,100
silver through that port for the month of July, and we give
them below, together with the figures for the preceding 2d qr. 24,344,183 2,311,649,750 1,718,449,654 13,347,908|1,277,467,300 888,610,414
months, thus completing the results for the seven months of 0 mos.. 52,072,380 5.082,225,575 3,805.347.409 24,550,097 2,353,100,990 1,594,(.03,045
the calendar year 189S. The imports of gold have been quite July.... 4,791,787 401,349,550 309,601,010 0,896,074 053,123,800 458,958,385
large, the amount received reaching $3,039,735, of which August 12.105,133 1,’8L130,2OO 931.778.314 11 4*5.248'1,085,90i.050 650,315,855
$1,903,628 was in coin. Of silver there came in $83,215, of ■ The following compilation covers the clearings by months
which $70,730 was bullion. There has been received during since January 1,
the seven months a total of $16,202,746 gold and $881,394
MONTHLY CLEARINGS.
silver, which compares with $517,544 gold and $1,200,470 sil­
ver in 1897. The shipments of gold daring J aly were $;68,470 Month.
Clearings, lotal All.
Clearings Outside
York.
coin and the exports of silver have been $612,980 coin and
1897.
1898.
1897.
1898.
P.Ot.
$166,000 bullion. For the seven months the exports of gold
have been $384,483, against $287,096 in 1897, and $8,813,200
*
*
*
*
silver has been sent out, against $5,053,223 in 1897. The ex­ January. .. 0,O12,O91,40r- 4,499.443,006 +33*e 2,321,803,73P 1,910,100,731 +21*5
hibit for July and the seven months is as follows :
February
5,552,352,491 3.684,529,935 +50*7 2,030,094,78 1,039,399,756 +24*2
N ew

P .C t.

March.....

IMPORTS OP UOLD AMD SILVER AT SAN FRANCISCO.
GOLD.
MONTHS.
1898.
January...
February..
M arch......
A p ril........
M a y .........
J a n e ........
J u l y ........

Coin. B ullion

SILVER.

Total.

(Join.

885.905 35,5821 921.467 II
2,221,660 391,757 2,613, 417
1,512.0551137,914 1.649,999
2,648,886 418,253 3.067,139
2,949,(52 76.4523,075,504
2,437,761 447,724 2,885,485
1,903,628 136,107,2.039,735

•
44,228
13,365
32.680
20,435
6.183
7,362
12,485

B ullion.
• 9

|

58,986
122,98C
157.85C
129.59S
105,746
98,769 1
70,730 ]

Total.
$
103,211
136,345
190,530
150,034
111,929
106,130
83,215

Tot. 7 moe 14558947 1,043,799'16202746 1 136,733 744,661 1 891.394
EXPORTS OF GOLD AND SILVER FROM SAN FR 4.NCISOO.
GOLD.
MONTHS.

Coin.

1893.
January ..
February..
M a rc h .....
M >ril........
M a y .........
J u n e ........
J uly.........

$
13.630
78.865
3,656
10,995
81,16/
27,205
163,470

Tot, 7 mos

383,993

B ull’n
%

500

500

SILVER.

Total.
14,130
78.865
8.606
10,995
81,162
27,205
163,470

3 9 4 .4 9 3

Coin.
$
254,7 IP
68 916
24.504
15,848
121,880
165,916
612,980

Bullion.
*
334,600
381.000
343,1001
294,3441
529,334
166.000

5,040,749,765 4,211,070,471 +34 0 2,222,030,352 1,82.1,958,927 +21*9

1st qaar.. 17,205.093,749 12,395,048,472 +338 0,580,533,872 5,373,459,417 +22*5

Total.
$
589,318
449.946
367,604
310,192
651.214
165.946
778,960

1.2«4.82! 2.010 q - 8 1 o.3io.200
>

C leiriii's by Telegraph.—Sales of Stocks, Bonds, &c.—
Transactions of the Stock Exchange Clearing House. The subjoined table, covering clearings for the current week,
usually appears oa the first page of the C hronicle , but on
account of the length of the other tables is crowded oat
once a month. Tne figures ars received by te'egraph from
the leading cities. It will be observed that as compared with
the corresponding week of 1897 there is an increase in the
aggregate of 8'1 per cent. So far as the indivi lual cities are
concerned, New York exhibits an increase of 14*1 percent, and
the gains at other points are : Boston 4'4 per cent, and
New Orleans 1-1 per cent. Philadelphia records a loss of 2'1

April........
May..........
June.........

4.972,3^0,528 4.100.125,495 +21*1 3,103,431,592 1,850,358,730 +13*3
5,330,410,921 4,107,891,572 +28 4 2,191,005,203 1,852,734,206 +15*9
5,499,385,195 4,472,286.552 +23*0 2,233,533,405 1,900,739,814 +17*5

2d quar... 15,80-,103,014 12,746,303,0H f-24 0 0,527,970,170 5,009,832,816 +10*4
0 months. 33,013,262,393 25,141,352,091 +31*3 13.103,504.042 10,»93,292,203 +19*3
July .......
August. ...

5,010.770,419 4,608,837,90S +4*3 2,039,741,231 1,974,919,072 +3 3
5.592.3 0.65 - 4.838,345.830 +15*(! 2,030.517,170 1,901,489,920 +9*4
1 1

The course of bank clearings at leading cities of the coun­
try for the month of August and since January 1 in each of
the last four years isCLKARINOB AT LEAOINQ CITIES
shown in the subjoined statement.
BANK
(000,000*

,------------- -August--------------, .------ Jan. 1 to Aug.
1898.

1897.

1896.

1895.

1898.

1897.

3 1 . ------ .

1896.

1895.

19,929 :
18.851 19,032
New Y ork ... 3,512 2,937 1 971 2.317 26,394 :
303
38 L 3,464 3.257 2.927 3.089
392
Boston........
415
3,*27 2,773 2,966 3,005
366
319
Chicago.......
416
39 L
2 25
27 3 2,392 2,019 2,112 2,262
259
297
Pailadelphia
764
817
109
93
929
867
St. L o u is. . ..
H8
107
61
514
480
534
67
55
018
Pittsburg.. .
PO
55
457
600
504
478
50
71
Baltimore...
G7
441
441
521
456
54
70
57
65
Ban Fran’oo.
436
396
43 L
407
41
49
46
50
Cincinnati...
336
3 24
3 42
45
369
Kaosaw City
45
37
47
284
249
*295
2 so
29
23
24
New Orleans
24
210
210
23 L
20
Louisville...
24
27
190
26
197
210
223
262
24
26
SO
Minneapolis.
30
188
204
203
27
251
23
35
26
Cleveland...
211
203
229
392
32
27
29
33
177
168
174
169
22
19
17
20
157
154
171
151
19
16
19
20
118
143
196
147
15
16
19
26
14 L
146
13L
133
18
17
17
17
118
120
135
13
12
14
Columbus...
15
137
149
106
17 . 127
16
15
16
83
84
83
8
8
8
Hartford___
9
84
91
83
97
11
8
10
Denver........
12
31,958 32,459
3,957 41,645 :33,147 :
T o tal........ 5,360 4,613 3,381
182 1,977 1,641 1,717 1,598
182
205
232
Other oities..
5 592
Outside N.Y . 2,080

4.838
1,903

43.622 34 7 -8 33.675 .34 05
3,563 4.139 <
1,893 4 ^ 2 * 17,228 14,659 14,824 15,0

THE CHRONICLE.

[V ol , LXVII,

^XonctanjstfomwcvciaVguoUsfrlJcxus

satisfactory and peaceful settlement of the contemplated ar­
rangements between Austria and Hungary will be brought
[From our own oorrenpondent.]
about. In the Transvaal everything is quiet. In the Cape
London, Saturday, Aug. 20,1898. Colony the elections are being followed with great interest,
The acceptance of the preliminaries of peace by Spain has hat nobody can yet foresee what the result will be. So far
natnraUy been followed by a 'great rise in American securi­ the supporters of Mr. Rhodes have been victorious; but
ties. But the general public is not buying very much and whether that means general or only very parti al success we
probably will not invest upon a considerable seal e until po­ cannot yet say here.
litical apprehension dies away. We are now in the very in the meanwhile the mining companies in the Transvaal
slackest time of the whole year. The heat for this country continue to increase the output month by month. It looks
is very great and everybody who can get out of the city has now as if the total production will exceed this year 12 mil­
either gone or is going.
lions sterling. The fact is eagerly seized hold of by the Boer
Besides that the uneasiness respecting China continues. Government to prove that no concessions are required by the
Nobody who is competent enough to form a good opinion mining industry. But it is to be recollected that the number
believes that there is any serious danger of a war between of mining companies which are able to pay good dividends
this country and Russia. In the first place we have no wish is very small: that there is an immense number of com­
to burden ourselves with the Government of China. And panies which are unable to work at a profit, and that one of
we all fear that if war were to break out the Chinese Gov­ their great difficulties is the high taxation, the extravagant
ernment would collapse and that the Powers, or some of cost of living and the difficulty of obtaining labor, and all
them, would have to take the Government of China into these are the result to a very great extent of the policy of
their own hands. Lord S disbury and his colleagues have Government.
therefore been all along opposed to any policy on the part of The money market continues wonderfully easy. The sup­
the Continental Powers that might destroy the dynasty, and ply is large and rates continue low in spite of all the banks
the Continental Powers themselves must see that it is for the and the discount houses can do. How long this condition of
present at all events desirable to keep China together. On things will continue depends chiefly upon the course of the
the part of Russia it is perfectly evident that she is not pre­ New York money market. If the demand for moving the
pared for war. Just now she could not convey troops enough crops becomes very great while trade is so good and the
to the Chinese frontier. While the Crimean War was going Government absorption so large, it is possible that a very
on the moving of reenforcements from the interior of Russia considerable shipment of gold may take place. In that case
to Sebastapol caused greater mortality in the Russian Army rates will rise very sharply here. But if much gold is not
by far than the bullets of the British and the French and ex­ shipped to New York it does not seem probable that there
posure to the climate in the trenches and on the field. But will be very much pressure in the market.
if that was the result of marches in Russia itself what would Germany, of course, will take some gold, and the usual re­
be the consequence of attempting to move a very large Rus­ quirements for the interior, for Egypt, South America and
sian force to the Pacific ? And even when the Siberian Rail­ other colonies, that always occur in the autumn, will make
way is completed the difficulty of conveying a large army and themselves felt. But as far as can be seen at present there
keeping it reenforced and fully supplied with provisions and will be no great demand for gold such as would disturb the
munitions of war will be so great that unless the Russian London money market unless the shipments to New York
Government is mad it will not provoke war with a first-class become large. expectation here is that the shipments will be
The general
Power.
large and that either in September or October there will be a
Nobody then seriously believes that war is likely, but the very sharp rise in rates here.
Russian Government is undoubtedly trying to consolidate its Iu India, as usual in the rainy season, business is exceed­
is quiet.
power in Manchuria, and the corruption of the Chinese offi ­ ingly slack and the money market consequentlybring out The
Government has taken advantage
the
cers as well as the fears and weakness of the Emperor may rupee loan that was announced in of this to last March.
the Budget
possibly encourage them to go from one step to another, The amount is smaller than was expected—only 120 lacs—
which will keep alive the apprehension that in the end war and this week the minimum price has been fixed at 94J£.
The general expectation is
the demand for
between this country and Russia will be unavoidable. At be pretty active, especiallythatthe total amountthe loan will
as
is
all events the policy pursued by Russia is causing so much and that-it will goat a considerable premium, sayso small,
1% to 2
uneasiness that nobody cares to engage in new enterprises. above the minimum.
Then the expedition to Khartoum is just about to start, Meanwhile the India Council continues to sell its draftsfor tender Wednesday 25 lacs
and although we all hope for a speedy and successful term­ wonderfnllv well. It offered five times that amount. The
ination, yet nobody can shut his eyes to the mortality and the applications were for of its drafts so well since
Council, however, has disposed
likely to result at this season of the year in such a climate; the beginning of April that it is now holding out for a higher
and of course there are always possibilities of mistakes in price. Accordingly it refused to sell below is. 3 29-32d. per
at
price it
war. The Soudan expedition, however, counts for very lit­ rupee, soldwhich balance disposed of about 17 lacs. It could
have
the
tle so far as markets are concerned. The real cause of this Is. 3%d., but refused. at a considerable amount more at
stagnation is to be found in the state of China and the atti­ The following return shows the position of the Bank of
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of consols*
tude of the three Continental Powers.
In other respects the political position has undoubtedly &o., compared with the last three years:
1898
1807,
1800. Auo. SI.
180B.
improved. The French Government is pursuing a moderate
AUV. 17. Awg. 18.
19.
policy in China, while in Africa, by the settlement of the
£
%
C i r c l a t i o n . ( . ......
West African dispute, it has given assurance that it recog­ Publicudeposits...................... 28,019,030 27,803,401 87,335,<-85 20.457,03 07, 757,011 7,436.202 7,113.631
7,8 2,908
2S-8
® tb or d e p o sits.........- ......................
nizes the danger of pushing too far its opposition to British Government securities........... 42,440 103 88.807.,0-0 55.104.04W 44,784,131
14.960,00
5 14,796,426
13^58,013 18,2 0
Other securities..... ............... 80,'<74,200 20,4 80,036 28.738.053 24.341.032
interests.
Reserve of notes and coin,..,.. 23,772,837 24 .005,808 30,939,868 80,704,711
bullion,
,058,7 f
7.474,051
Above all, the Spaniards have accepted with amazing Coin Areserve toboth departm’ts 84,084,867 8655 7-168 458 15-16 40.421,741
?roP„
liabilities.p.ct.
47}*
t» 3-10
2 113 52
Bank ra
........percent.
»V6
apathy the result of the war. That they were utterly beaten Consols, t e ....... cent..........
M per
1
5-16
0-10
112* »0M 1072
Silver.
.........................
27*d.
24^d.
d, 3<?ad.
is, of course, apparent even to the most ignorant Spaniard, Clearing..House returns......... 101,808,000 171,729,000 US,$37,000 152,160,000and that the country was no longer in a position to continue The rates for money have been as follows :
hostilities is also clear. But that the people should accept so
V
Interest
meekly the incompetence of their rulers, their generals and
£
their admirals, the utter want of preparation, the gross cor­
•if
—
ruption—all the signs, in short, of national decay, is surpris­
$ 3
4
•4
6
. 3
ing even to those who have been accustomed to look upon Ju ly 22 H
1
w
2«
Spain as a dying State. Still, the apathy of the Spaniards “ 29 •'« m a t 9-in
1
m m ao
2*
1
1
2*s
indicates that there will be no serious troubles in that coun­ An g. 6 1 7-l0@ l&
1
m@3< l
try, and consequently makes it possible that some kind of “•• 213 1 7*16 lM & lO -lfl 2S4®2«
1
*2
1
2*
arrangement of the Spanish finances may be brought about Messrs. Pixley & Abell write as follows under date of
which will prevent serious disturbance on the Paris Bours3. August 18:
Furthermore the outlook in Italy—though it is disappoint Gold— aniaunts lately to hand have mostly been taken for 1ho
Tlie
len has received £181,000,
ing enough—is not quite so dark as it was a little while ago. East, but in the priceshaving rather fa.Bamoff, there has been a slight
redaction the demand Obtained. Bombay, £28,500; Colombo, £2,80c
And lastly, hopes are again beginning to be entertained that a during the week. Shipments: The
A

uq.

S

&

2

a llo io e d f n r d e p o s it * b y

O pen M a rk e t R a te s .

London.

Bank

M o n th *.

B ills .

M o n th s

D in ’t EC ss

T ra d e s m s .

M o n th s

M o*.

M as.

B a n k s C a ll D a y s
H

H

m

IH

m m

m

\ n m

m

n

H

THE CHRONICLE.

S eptember 3, 1898.]

T otal, £31,'-*96. Arrivals: N e w Zealand, £ 6 ,0 0 ); R iver Plate, £37,000:
Australia, £261,000; India. £59 040; Gape. £406,000 ; W e>t Indies
£34,000. Total, £807.000. For month o f J uly—Shipments : G erm any.
£2.019.000; France, £ 43,000; Japan, £373,030; Holland, £8ft ',000
A rriv a ls: Germany, £10,0)0; France, £32,000; Portugal, £48,000;
Japan, £284,000.
Silver -Since our last the market has slightly risen and has remained
steady at 2 7 ^ 1 on French inquiries for anticipated Spanish orders.
The Bombay price to day is Rs. 70 *». Shipments : Bombay, £123.000;
Calcutta, £25,0)0. Total. £ U 8,000. A r riv a ls : N ew York. £139,000;
N e w Zealand. £5,000; West Indies, £L5.000. Total. $159,000. For
month of July Shipments: Germany, £11.000; B l^ium, £•'8,000;
France, £772,000; Russia, £29 LOGO. A rriv a ls : Germany, £45,OuO;
Belgium , £328,0)0; France. £17,000.
Mexican D ollars—Rather less has been done in these coin, but the
price remains steady. Shipments to China, £ 9 1,30 . A rrivals from
N e w York, £14,000.

The quotations for bullion are reported as follows:
A ug. A uff.

j Aug.

London Standard. 18
11.
18.
s. d. s. d. Bar silver,fine...oz. 127Jn
d.
Bar gold, fine__ oz. 77 10% 7 71 0's Bar silver, contain’g !
Bar gold, parting.oz. 77 10%, 77 10%
Standard.

Gold.

London

Si l v e r .

463

®tfmmercial and 21KtisceXlauco\te|Jcnis.

N ational B anks . —The following information regarding
national banks is from the Treasury Department.
N A TIO N A L BANKS ORGANIZED.

5.132—

Tlie Linooln County National Bank of Stanford, Kentucky;
capital, *100,000; Samuel H. Slianks, President; John B.
Owsley, Cashier.
5.133—
The First N ational Bank of N ew Bloomfield, Pennsylvania;
capital. $50,0 JO W illiam C. Pomeroy, President; James T.
;
Alter, Cashier.
5,13i—The N ational Union Bank of Rock H ill, South Carolina. C api­
tal, $120,000. W . L. Roddey, Pre sid e n t; R. Lee Kerr, Cashier.

C O RPO R A TE EX ISTE N C E O F NA TION AL BA NK EX TE N D E D .

2.395— The
Aug.

11

Bennington
mont, Berkshire National Bank of North Adams, Massachusetts,
until August County N ational Bank of Bennington. V e r­
7, 1918.
The

2.396—

until A ugust 28, 1918.

d.

Government R evenue and E xpenditures .—Through the
jourtesy of the Secretary of the Treasury, we are enabled to
U . 8. gold ooln...oz.
place before our readers to-day the details of Government
G©rm’ii gold coin.oz.
French gold ooin.oz.
receipts and disbursements for the month of August. From
Japanese yen....oz.
previous returns we obtain the figures for previous months,
The Bank rate of discount and open market rates at the and in that manner complete the statement for the eight
chief Continental cities have been as follows:
months of the calendar years 1898 and 1897.
76 5 76
76 5 76
76 6 76
76 5%! 76

6
5
5
0 's

275*8

do 5 grs. gold.oz. 2 8 'in 27%
do 4 grs. goid.oz.j27i.ii8 27%
do 3 grs. gold.oz.j27=8 27 h s
Cake silver..........oz.[29=i 29716
Mexloan dollars.oz .26% 2033

Aug. 19.
Aug. 12.
Aug. 5.
July 29.
Bank Open Bank Open Bank Open Bank Open
Bate Market Bate. Mark> t Bate. Market Rate. Marke
2
2
2
2
i«
m
14
m
4
4
4
4
84
3M
3X
4
4
4
4
SX
8*
34
5
34
4
4
4
4
3)4
314
*54
SX
3
3
3
3
2M
2M
2X
3
3
3
3
2!4
2)4
2H
2)4
4
4
4
4
3H
w
34

Bate$ of
Interest at

IMPORTS.

K97-8.
1896-7.
1895-6.
1894-5.
Importsofwheat.owt.62 ,938,410 62,537,750 66,498,210 75,529,946
Barley............................19,683,304 20.860,500 21,471,342 24,730,514
Oats................................14,671.490 17,621,980 13,899,580 15,035,117
Baas................................ 2,294,145 3,236,895 2.444,460 2,242.719
Beans............................ 2.300,880 2,700.530 3,064.482 4,203,26 2
Indian corn.......... ''..51,370.200 56.244.760 4l,78l'.590 25i517’,624
Blonr............................ 19 ,237,470 19,295,620 19,206,050 1M41.330
Supplies available fo r consumption (exclusive of stocks od
September 1):
1897-8.
1896-7.
1895-6.
1894-5.
Wheat Imported, owt.62.938.410 62,537,750 66.498,210 75,529,946
Imports of flour.........19,237,470 19,295,620 19,206.050 18,441,330
Bales of home-grown.23,270,753 24,425,136 14,804,665 20,521,665
Total....................105,446,633 106,258,506 100,508,925 114,492,941
1897-8.
1896-7.
1895-6.
1894-5.
Aver, prioe wheat, w<«k. 33s. 8d. 29s. 8d. 22s. lid . 24s. 3d.
Average prloo, seas on..36s. 4d. 28s. 8d. 24s. lid . 21s. 2d.

The following shows ths quantities of wheat, flour and
■ aize afloat to the United Kingdom:
Th.it week.
Whsat..............qrs. 1,400.000
Floor,equal to qrs. 270,000
Maize.................qrs. 685,000

r,rut week.
1.635,000
220.010
695,000

1897.
790.000
230,000
710,000

1896

1.256.000
249,00 0

1.010.000

E :i;ll* li F in a n cia l M ark ets—P er Cable.

to C M
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00a e l l
XX 0-7
C to X -*
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o i b x b -ib
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a 01 x -.3 x <0

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• Deducted—from January, “Miscellaneous” 1898. ...
deceived from Union Pacific Railroad purchase 1897-98
Deducted from March “ Miscellaneous” 1898................
Received from Kansas Pacific Ry. purchase 1898..........
Deducted from April “ Miscellaneous” 1898................ .
Received from Kansas Pacific Ry. purchase, 1898........ .

0

X

0
0
O
l
X
C
0k
©
X
X

-.3

fa

'-1
X
X
to
X
X
X
fa
X

Jan.
9

The following shows the imports of cereal produce into
the United Kingdom during the first fifty weeks of
the season compared with previous seasons :

0X
0 *-*
5
5
•IXa

:3
;?

■s
s

.

28,795

44
6
34

rg: :

® It- rj

14,209
12,443
* 2,083

54
5
4

®to ®®
0X
0
-I X

■3 «3 a
: o.w a

: : : 3 s S5. : : : : : B a

11,090
10,024
2,719

4(4
5
3)4

5)4
5
4

© 35■ >3

S
3

r* o
s
3 srj la 2

O S ® g-

24,433

4K
5
8«

5«
6
4

m

£.2.-

O

8,000
4,947
3,230
1,040
12,375
0,139

4X
5

a o -a
aa

30,097

6*
5
4

23
x3

30,271

Paris.............
Berlin...........
Hamburg .
Frankfort ...
Amsterdam....
Brussels........
Vienna ...
St, Petersburg.
Madrid ____
<k>penhagen

RECEIPTS A N D DISBURSEMENTS (000 omitted.)
5
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$8,538,401 35
$3,051,500
$2,651,500

The daily olosiug quotations for securities, etc., at London To make the 1898
are reported by cable as follows for the week ending Sept, 2 : statement, the amountsfigures conform to the Government
mentioned in above foot-note should
L
,
Sat. Mon. Tuet. Wed. TKurt. Fri. be added. We have deducted those items as the purchase
money is not revenue, and if included would disturb the
27H, e 27%
Oliver, per oun 38___ d.
27%
2711,6 27%
27%
Oonsols., new, 2% p.ots. 1101%* 11013, 110 %„ 110%
1091016 10913I8 comparison with former and future years.
11013,0 11013,„ 110%
F or accoun t.............. 110
1101,
10915T reasury C urrency H oldings .—The following compila­
F r’oh rentes (In Paris) fr. 103 70 103 70 10340 103-35 103-55 10347%
Spanish 4s.................... 4 1 4
41
4138
41*4
41^
41%
tion, based on official Government statements indicates the
14%
14-4
Atch. Top. Sc Santa Fe
141-2
14%
MBs
14%
currency holdings of the Treasury on January 1 and Septem­
37
Do
do
pref. 3848
37%
37%
384
37%
90%
Canadian Pacific......... 88 »4
80
89%
88=8
88%
ber 1 in 1898 and 1897.
22%
Central Pacific.............
22%
18
18
20%
21%
ondon

Oh

Chesapeake <
fe
io...... 25
Chic. fell. & 8 t. Paul.... H 7 %
Denv. A Rio G r.t pref.. 57
Erie com m on.............
14%
le t p referred............

3034'
Illinois Central__
116%
Lake Shore.........
200%
Lonlsvllle & Nashville 68%
62%
Mo Kan. & Tex., oom.. 12%
N. Y. Cent’l Sc Hudson.
H. Y. Ontario Sc West’n 129%
17
Norfolk & West’n, pref. 57
Northern Pacltto,com. 41 %
Preferred.................
Pennsylvania ............. 80%
Phlla.ScScRead., 1st pref 6138
Read., per ah. 9%
Phil. Sc Read., 2d pref 23%
Phil.
Bonth’n Rallwav.com. 11 %
10
Preferred................... 37
Union Pacific........... 33%
Do new pref.. 09
Wahash, preferrea ... 22%

25*4
116%
57»s
14%

40
116*42
200%
61%
68*4
12 %
123
17
56%
41
79 08
61*4
94
2388
11*9
10
384
35
69
22%

25%
116%
57%
15

40
115 %
200%
60%
«8%
12%
122
17
56%
40%
78%
61%
97s
2314
11%
10
37*4
67 %
22%
3 4

25
116>4
57%
15

40
115%
200%
60%
6ft %
122 %
17
56=8
41%
%
61%
9*8
22%
%
%
37%
69%
24
1 2

7 9

1 1
1 0

3 5 1 3

24%
116

57=8

14 ’ e
39%
115%
200%
59 7g
12%
121>a
16%
563a
42
80%
61'8
9%
2238
11%
10%
37%
\
68%
24%
3 1

24%
l i e 's
57=8
147
8

39%
115%
60's
1278
122
16%
56%
41%
81%
61%
9%
23%
11%
10%
37%
34%
69%
2378

TRE ASU RY NET HOLDINGS.

Jan.

Sept.

Jan.

Sept.

1, ’98.
1, ’98.
1, ’97.
1, ’97.
f
$
I
«
^et gold coin and bullion....... 137,310.543 144,210,377 100,911.547 217,901,485
10,158,793
Net silver coin and bullion..... 18,927,739 23.197,584 13.507.913
4,339,020
2,904,344
Net U. 3. Treasury notes......... 35,045,059 29,624J03
Net legal-tender notes............ 34,983,258 24,973,702 40,885,089 54,005,435
4,415,724
5,180,r86
t
4,517,847
Net national bank notes......... 14,278,970
Net fractional silver............... 14,216,700 15,335,285 10,079.899 10.993.449
Total cash in Sub-Treas’s net 255.367.335 240.007,743 234.135,078 301,815,512
Amount in national banks...... 10,159,153 16.001.579 49,182,717 05,903,407
Cash In banks & sub-treas.. 271.620,488 202.-2^,342 283.318,395 307,783.979
43,200,108 44,108,135 47,833,020 73,296,814
Deduct other liabilities,

Holdings in Sub-Treasuries—

*net.

A n | nl cash balance......... 228.320.380 218,501,207 235,174,709 294,187,085
|
■ ■'Chiefly disbursing officers’ balances.”

C hanges in L
T e n d e r s a n d N a t i o n a l B a n k N o t e s to
S eptember 1.—The Comptroller of the Currensv has furnished
ns the following, showing the amounts of national bank notes
e g al

THE CHRONICLE.
[V ol . LXVII.
461
August 1, together with the amounts outstanding September The imports of dry goods for one week later will be found
our
1, and the increase or decrease during the month : also the inThe report of the dry goods trade. exports (exclusive of
statement of
changes in legal tenders held for the redemption of bank notes peoie)following is a of New York the foreign ports for the
from the port
to
np to September 1.________________________________ _
week ending Aug. 29 and from January 1 to date:
fiatw nal Hank .Votes—
$226,696,870
Amount Issued duringAug. 1, 1808.
$2,117,580
Amount outstanding Aug.............
181,715
1,885,535
Amount retired during Aug.............
$227,178,615
Amount outstanding Soft. 1,1898*---Legal Tender Woles—
AmountAug.deposit to redeem national bank
$31,004,184
notes on 1,1896................................. .
Amount depositedbauk notes retired in Aug. $1,000,685
601,273
Amt. reissued and during Au«.............. ... 1,061,958
Amountnotesdeposit1.1898........ national....................... I $30,402,911
on Sopl. to redeem ...........
bank
’ Circulation of National Gold Banks, not included in above, $83,035.

EXPORTS PROM SEW TURK FOR TitE WEEK.

1898.
1897.
1896.
1895.
for tbe week.. $9,011,798 $7,078,527 $7,016,036 $5,499,542
Prey, reported 310,615,077 262.522,103 241,156,597 213,614,819
Total 34 weeks $319,626,875 $261,600,690 $248,773,236 $219.114 362

The following table shows the exports and imports of
ipecia at the port of New York for the week ending Aug. 27
and since January 1, 1393, and for the corresponding periods
n 1897 and 1890.
BXPOBT8 AND IMPORTS OP SPECIE AT NSW YORK.

According to the above the amount of legal tenders on de­
posit September 1 with the Treasurer of the United States to
redeem national bank notes was §30,402,Oil. The portion of
this deposit made ( I) by banks becoming insolvent, (2) by
banks going into voluntary liquidation, and (3) by banks re
ducing or retiring their circulation, was as follows on the
first of each of the last five months.

Exports.
Week. Since Jan. 1.

Sold.

Ireat Britain.........
$200
Pcanoe....................
8,000
Lemma v ............
West Indies........... $541,553 5,168,921
Slexloo...................
Sooth America. ...
2,900 103,757
.20,292
ill other ooan tries.
Sept. 1.
Deposits by— j May 1, June 1. July 1. Ang. 1.
Total 1898........ $514,453 $5,301,170
Total 1897........
3,170 20,632,077
$
$
$
$
¥
Total 1896........
50.933,942
Inaolv’nt bfc®. 1,314,600 1,290,678 1,252,838 1,197,903 6,175,778
bks. 5,933,631 6,010,101 6,222,576 6,192,258 1,137,622
Liqald’gand. *
Exports.
Red’c'g
Silver.
act of 1874. 24,593,173 24,150,131 23,263,196 23,614,024 23,089,511
Week. Since JUfl,
Total.__ '31,691,404 31.456,910 30,738,610 31,004.185 30,402,911 Great Britain......... $1,153,212 $28,102,611
778.350
r’ranee....................
* Act of June 20, L874, and July 12.1882.
2,610
Jermany................
1,749 396,815[
C oinage by U nited S tates M ints .—The following state­ West tndies.............
14,159
Mexico...................
ment, kindly furnished ns by the Director of the Mint, shows •oath America......
*3,916 187,028
7,055
the coinage at the mints of the United Statesduring the month A'l other countries
Total 1898.
$1,158,871 $29,488,628
of Angnst and in the eight months of 1898.
943.715 31,244,468
Total 1897.
1,093.900 34,757.2361
Total 1896.
August.
Eight- Months 1898.
Denominations.
Of the above imports for the week
ValuePisces.
Value.
1

Imports.
Week. SinceJan.l.

$35,409,022
$352,225 13,098,989
20,263,381
8,251 2,606,231
64,074
28,148 362.210
1,350 546,235
$389,°74 $72,350,172
782,372 3,940,292
2,351,928 21,411,435

Imports.
Week. Since Jan. 1.

6,417
5t,307|
3,500
$64,224
109,872
21,543

$12,092
23,932
3,260
261,002
672,859
545,892
61,034
$1,580,071
1,903,433
1,989,639

in 1898 $7,828 were
American gold coin and $282 American silver coin. Of the
exports during the same time $0,087 were American gold
$
256.750 5,135,000 1,636,998 32,739,960 coin.
211.470 2,444,710, 1,074,594 10,745,910
352,900 1,764,500 1,487,359 7,436,795
Pieces.

D rable eagle®..
E.glea..............
Hall dollars..
Ttrreeeagle®__
262
Quarter eagles.
105
Dollars........ .
Total gold.
854,120 9,344,200 4,199,036 50,922,957
1,698,090 1.698.000 8.186.400 8.186,400
Dollars..............
416.000
208,000 4.752,992
Hall dollars___
unner dollars,
972.000
243.000 2,666,068 1,333,034
201.000
7.630.400 1,188,248
763,040
2 010,000
lin es...........
Total silver.
5.096.000 2.350.000 23,235,860 11,470,722
1.937.000
Five cent nickel..
96,850 8.867,289 443,364
6,693,625
One oent bronze
66,936 36,069,281 360,693
8,630,625
163,786 44,936,573 801,057
Total minor__
14,580,345 11,857.986 72,371,489 63,197,736
Total coinage
B onds H eld by N ational B anks .—The following interest­

g

,

ing statement furnished by the Comptroller of the Currency
shows the amount of each class of bonds held against national
bank circulation and to secure public moneys in national
bank depositories on August 31:

B readst u fl's F ig u re s B ro u g h t F ro m P a g e 4 9 4 .—The
tatem ents below are prepared by us from th e figures c o l­
lected by th e N ew Y ork Produoe E xch an ge. The reoeip ts at
W estern lake and river ports for th e w eek en d in g Aug. 27, and
since Aug, 1, for each o f th e la st th ree years, h ave been as
follow sReceipts

at—

Milwaukee -.
Duluth ..—

Cleveland...
St. Louis —
Peoria.......
Kansas City.
Tot.wk.’Q
S.
Same wfe.’97.
Same wk.’90.
uq 1.
1808...... ...
1897..... .
1806...........

U. 8. Bonds Held August 31, 1898, In Seeure- Since A .

D ucripliun oj Bonds. Public Deposits

Flour. Wheat.
Com.
Oats.
Barley.
Rvs.
BbUAQ6 U>s Bush.dOU)S Bush.hQlbs Bush.22lbs BushASlbs Bu. 50 lbs.
60,120
51/00
221,340
817
355
4,808

26,060
7,400

8C8 677
214,450
660,432
1,693,220
675,379
20S.874
48,ICO
374,498
15,750
88C',000

3,020,400
153.400
30,032
89,640
197,811
23,589
174,431
550,945
886,560
85,000

3,101,288
447,000

6,004,389
5,800,402
4,705,572

4,009,4 4
7,899,490
2,395,348

..........

240,891
08,890
0,51J

283,010
119,500
05,295
200,609
210,085
257.2H0
91,00)

....

35,400
47,619

22,395

12,000

2,100
2,400

4,778,044
6,310,402
4,131,220

328,008
508,103
302,214

223.371
415,709
161,495

3,183.808 15,155,946 15,390,659 14,763,440

678.818

818.512

374,030
316,391
329,31

b

1,024,710 21,144,572 25,331.934 23,432.384 1,197,061 1,408.235
Dank
980.209
1,165.104 16 478,547 10.300.225 14,719,3781
618,9?
in Banks.
Circulation. Total Held
The reoeipts of flour and grain at the seaboard ports for th
$3,106,000 $3,583,000 week ended Aug. 27, 1808, follow:
$477,000
Currency 6s, Pao. RR..17,161,100 24,196,400
6.735.000
5 p. ets., 1894, due 1904
,
Oats,
Corn,
.R rs
fc ,
4 per eta., landed 1907.. 21,240,000 145.335,600 166,581,600 TlMCipts at—
bush. Barley. hush.
26,213,650 35,341,650
9.131.000
4 p. ci*., 1895, due 1925
148.179 1,100,750 1,048 875
926,300 bush. 244,725
311.054
76,071
381,909
357,909 1,950 9.350
B o s t o n . .
1,609,300
22,005,750 23,615,050 Montreal..............• 62.092 574,036 818.854
2 per cts„ funded 1891 *.
700
6,373,760 14,035,760 Philadelphia ........ . 05,757 628.818 843.704 175.1? L
7.662.000
106.277
304.811
3 p. cts ,’98, dne 1908-18
*50,47?
119,393
82,601
4.991
34,900
9,990
2.250
T otal........................ $46,860,300 $220,496,160 $267,356,460 Richmond..
162,026
218,025
46.051=
13,736
61,000
12,000
110,303
4,823
Charleston.........
• Redeemable at option of the Uuitod States.
100.000
17,000
New port N o w s....
17,112
357
800
N o rfolk ,................
I mports and E xports fob th e W ee k .— The following are Galveston....... ..
299.000
13,000
F lo u r
b b ls .

the imports at New York for the week ending for dry ..oods
Ang. 25 and for the week ending for general merchandise
Ang, 26 also totals si use the beginning of the first week
In January. FORBIOK IMPORTS AT NEW YORK.

1897.
1896.
1895.
For week.
1898.
Dry goods ....... *1,G99,959 $1,041,337 $2,216,370 $2,958,301
Qen’I mer’dlse 4,913,644 5,917,327 5,404,674 6,445,811
T otal........ $6,013,603 6,961,684 $7,621,044 $9,401,112
Since Jan. 1.
$94,005,373 225,536,177
Dry good®...... $62,442,000 252,418,917 $77,689,477 $98,263,064
243,608,149
Cton’T mer'dlee 221,343,303
Total 34 weeks $283,785,303 $346,424,290 $303,225,G54 $341,271,213

W h e a t,
bush.

hush.

Total week...... *62.006 3,187,351 3,379.230 1,785,974
1,950
305.252
67,331
138,770
Week 1897............ 398,099 4,703,060 4,100.081 2,492.629
* Receipts do not Include grain pasaln jiL-rough New Orleans for foreign
orts on through bills of lading

Total receipts at ports from Jan. 1 to Aug. 27 compare as
follows for four years:
Receipts of
.

1896.

—
*
1898.
Flour ..................bblB. 12.330,250

1897.
17,0j6,219

5,316,536

Wheat....... .......hush , 70.006.659
139,280,818
64,104,330
3,062.142
9,635,755

43,214,547
122.681,185
61.473.353

35,411.469
65,100,9 i 5
43,887,790
4,919,603
2.157,129

C o rn ......................

Oats ..... ........
Barley................
Liye.....................

7,182.353

6,447,687

1896.
10,252,590
22,595,301
28.453,692

25,810,532
1,465.588
201,933

T o ta l g r a in ..,. “ 284.689,70 1 231,001,075
111,543,935
78,583.041
The exports from the several seaboard ports for the week
ending Aug. 27,18 J8, are shown in the annexed statement:

THE CHRONICLE

S eptember 3, 1898.J
^Exports from
New York.....
Boston..........
Portland.......
Philadelphia..
Baltimore.....
New Orleans..
Norfolk........
Newp’rt News
Montreal .....
Galveston —
Charleston ,

285,5i9
*92.180
184.000
153,920
SC
O
283,061
12<',000
£0,000

7*9,868
150,962
000,402
224.611
17,142
169,000
374.012
12,000

Total week .2.146.987 2,500,592
iame time’97.3.906,919 2,745,619

Flour,
bbls.

Oats,
bush.

06,591 114,077
50.521 43J.628

*4,893

Peas,
bush.

85.021
8,873

99,970
50,000

320,879
........

9,267

39,617

Bariev,
bush.

24,701

'54*529
40,709
3.712
17,‘ 00
42,465

Rye,
bush.

45,519

13,562

465

Reports of Non-Member Banks.—The following is the
statement of condition of the non-member banks for the
week ending August 27, based on averages of the daily results
We omit two ciphers (00) in all cases.
Deposit, yjith
Net
Capi­ Sur­ Loans & Specie. Leg 1. Olear'g Other De­
& B’k
tal. plus. Invest­
ments.
Notes. Agent. Bks.Scc posits

BANKS.
(00s omitted.)

N ew York Cit y .

A 8 tor Place..........
Colonial.............
Columbia.............
Eleventh Ward...
Fourteenth Street.
----------- > ------------------Franklin National.
Gansevoort....... .
27. 1,1897.
1,1897.
Hamilton........... .
Hide A Death. Nat,
1,055,036 68,614,470 1,668,057 93.099,963 Home...............
1,082,246 58,002.064
---------738.398 101,124,978 Hudson River..
873,937
1,624
163,917
68,018 1,556,10L Mount Morris..
1,375
Mutual............
2,700
24,500
502.814
9,705 1,123,204
1,995 1,452,483 Nineteenth Ward.
Plaza...............
2.500,592 128,617,810 2.500,592 197,900,258 Riverside.........
State................
3,903,919 67,962.184 2,745,019 174,186,300
Twelfth W ard......
Twenty-third W ’d.
Union Square...
Yorkville.........
Astor Nat’l Bank..

260,777 1,045,551
147,111 977,^91

108,272
277,523

54.766
20,784

13,562
94,087

The destination of these exports for the week and since
September 1,1897, -Flour.---------, r- Wheat.
is as below.
,-------Corn.

Exports for Week Since Sept. Week Since Sept. Week Since Sept,
week and since A uq. 27. 1,1897. Aug.
Aug. 27.
Sept. 1 to—
bbls.
bbls.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.

United Kingdom 207.790 9,756,226
• iviuguo
«
Continent.........
30,068 1,463,280
.
S. C. America.
tl£48 „ ^78,143
West Indies...... 27,0801,032,675
Br.N. Am. Colo’s
2.329
243,395
Other countries..
7,050
348,703

&

Total ............ 2t0,777 13,822,482
-Total 1897......... 147 111 12,014,990

HfThe visible supply of grain, comprising the stocks in
granary at the principal points of accumulation at lake and
seaboard ports, Ang. 27, 1898,Corn. as follows: Rye. Barlet.
was Oats.
Wheal.
In store at—

bush.

New York...............
163.000
Do
afloat.............. .......
Albany..................................
Buffalo....................
303,uvO
Do
afloat......................
Chicago...................
333,000
Do
afloat..
15.000
Milwaukee.......
Do
afloat........
.......
Duluth....................
664,000
Do
afloat...................... I
314.000
Toledo
Do
afloat..
96,000
Detroit.............
Do
afloat..
Oswego........................... .
<3t. Louis.................. 250.000
Do
afloat............. ........
Cincinnati.............
Boston................ .
19.000
12.000
Toronto................
Montreal..............
28.000
81.000
Philadelphia.........
2,000
Peoria..................
Indianapolis............
459,000
Kansas City.............
360,000
Baltimore................ 608,000
Minneapolis .......... 1,298,000
On Mississippi River..............
•Da Lakes.................
845,000
*-Dn canal and river. ..
17,000
Total Aug.27,1898. 5.927,000
5.850.C00
Total Aug.2*. 1897.15,473.000
Total Aug.29, 1890.45,574,000
Total Aug.31, 1-95 35,440,000

Z Total Ang.20,1898.

bush.
417.000

26,000
65,C00
715.000

bush.

bush.

16.0C0

128,000
'50,000

221,000

10,000

bush.

5.000

95,000

5,607,000

458,000

iiV.ooo
2,000

10,000

1,252.000

25.000

‘ bo.oob

37,00(

253,000

37,000

193.0CO

*67.000

’ 29,O 6
C

300,000
359.000

'*9,000

*

20,000
3,000

23.000
* 27,000
1,000
8.000

*28,000
416.000
156.000
109.000
09,000
509.000
617.000
8.388,066
2,088.000

1.351.000

I 6 T 30 .O O
O
10.123.000
27.893.000
13.904.000
5.412,000

3.298.000
2.910.000
9.27->.000
6.735.000
3.411.000

10,000

542.000
50.000
107.000

3,000

6,000
10.000

21,000

79.000
30.000

177.000
26.000

15,000
75.000
89.000

0,000

432.000
401.000
1,816,000
1.699.000
445.000

297.000
245.000
1,046,0(0
740.000
99,0(0

B r o o k ly n .

250.0 355.5 2,372,8
100.0
00,7 697.0
300.0 183.9 1.727.0
100.0 117,2 1.104.7
100,0 50.8 681,9
200,0
358.6
6,0
200,0
643.2
31.5
200,0 81,2 1.260.1
500.0 157.0 2,080,2
100.0 83,7 424.2
200,0 189.7 1.133.0
250.0 91.6 1.285.0
900.8
200.0 111.1
100,0 25.0 606.8
100,0 108.9 912.0
100,0 102.5 680.6
100,0 73.6 1.464.0
200,0 146.0 1.208.7
100,0 48.7 698.3
200.0 296.1 1.933.7
100,0 123.1 1.001.1
4,2 1.542.7
300.0

.

150.1
13.5

110,0

$
28,2
62.3
104.0
07.2
87.2
33,5
34.4
63.2
84.4
51,8
70.0
113,9

$
213.6 155.0 2.500.0
100,8
748.5
108,0 202.0 1.950.0
397.2
1.514.0
184.0
872.5
122,8
447,7
30.4
81,9
464.0
85.0
1,283,9
131.8
1.564.2
105.1
39,2
599.0
97.0
1.048.0
133.2 170,8 1.071.7
159.4
1,8
894.0
105.0
9
783.5
290.6
1.123.3
72,7
655.6
61.0 120,0 1.054.0
114.8 109,4 1,401,2
55.1 104.3
921.0
141.8
2.178.1
125.9 123.3 1.290.8
173.4
1.838.6

50.4
131,7
39.1
24.7
18.9
29.5
28.5
274,4
88.6
55.6
224.0
337.0
59.4
30.2
109,3
21.6
30.5
14.0
18.8
12.3
30.1

85.1
85.0 1.138.1
210.3
1.523.8
192.1
52,4 1.289.8
41.0
10.0
247.3
41.9
19,0
455.1
166.4
757.7
88.9
551.3
433.5
2.522.9
143.2
2.303.0
155.9
48,9
935.0
053.0
85.0 4.193.0
324.0
79.0 2.687.0
107.3 000,0 1.294.7
60.4
41.1
833.0
438.4 242,5 2.305.8
100,3
503.8
100,2
375.2
440.0
14.0 1.140.0
82.0
4,0
389.3
27.4
40.0
242.8
90,0 195,2
655.0

55.0
17.1
68.2
27.0
49,9
206,9
97.3
31.0
72.7
22.8 102.6
16.1 93.7
43.5
72.7
9,3 34.8
57.0 29.0
16.1 52.7
22,2
77.5
102.2 190.0
132,5 51.8
269.0 320.0

Bedford............
Broadway........
Brooklyn.........
Eighth W ard.......
Fifth Avenne.......
Fulton.............
Kings County...
Manufact’rs’ Nat’l
Mechanics............
Mech’s’ A Tradr’s’
Nassau National..
National City.......
North Side...........
People’s...............
Queens Co. (L.I.G.)
Sohermerhorn..
Seventeenth Ward
Sprague National..
Twenty-sixth W ’d.
Union...........
Wallabont........ .

150.0 107.2 1 020.8
100.0 112,0 1,312,9
300.0 157.0 1,237,1
100.0
33.4
288,5
100,0
50.9
503.1
200,0 171.7 822,0
150.0 59.1
576.7
252.0 414.4 2.035.8
500.0 387.5 2.502.0
100.0 191.0 822.8
300.0 550.7 3.794.0
300.0 546.7 2.194.0
100.0 109.8
042.3
100,0 108.5
777.1
100,0 123.5 1.644.9
59.9
100,0
504.3
100,0
71.2
402,9
200,0 205,4 1,000,4
100,0
50.0
362.3
100,0
43.1
3C0.0
29.5
457,8
100,0

1st Nat., Jer. City.
Hud. Co. Nat. J. u.
2d Nat., Jer. City..
3d Nat., Jer. City..
1st Nat., Hoboken.
2d Nat.. Hoboken.
Bank of Staten Isl.
1st Nat.,Staten Isl.

400.0 705.1 4.371.0 189,4 205.9 454,9 913,1 0,017,7
250.0 520.0 1.911.1
92.4
67,6 132.0 128,5 1.035.4
250.0 376.2 1,435,8
52.0 407.1
50.3
1,387,9
200.0 185,5
810,2 25,1
62,8 143.1 133,3
912.7
110,0 414.3 1,677,7 110,2
33,8 102.9 108,1 1.421.5
125.0 81,3
023,2
40,8
60,2 221,0
37.5
799.7
25,0 44,1
399,1
23.4
38,2 118.9
1,0
528.7
100.0
70,7
503,0
28,3
27.5 90,4
657,2

Ot h e r Cit ie s .

34.8
20.5
78.9
13.7
20.5
59.5
38.9
224.8
94.9
63.7
245.0
218.0
9.0
42.8
95,0
23.4
7.0

102.8

8,7
0,2
12,3

0,012,0 8,433.5 59,686,- 3,703^ 3,997,4 8,633,2 4,190,9 6 7 , 12 9 ,
Q,0/2,0 8,4385 59,5345
4,221,4
. 0,012,0 8 ,438 , 5156^ 0 1 . lfi74,4 3,9975 9,175,* 3,917,7 6 7 ,346 7
A
1,78oj 4,12 4 ,c Q.353,5
67,200

Totals Aug. 27..
Totals Autf. 20.. ’
Totals Aug. 13..

New York
Philadelphia Banks.—Below
New York City Clearing House Banks.—Statement of we furnish a City, Boston andweekly returns of the Clearingcon iition for the week ending August 27, based on averages House Bankssummary of the City, Boston and Philadelphia.
of New York
of daily results. We omit two ciphers (00) in all cases.
The New York figures do not include results for the nonOapital Surpl'a\ Loans. >Specie. Legalt. Deposits. member banks.
Bask s.
,
,

,

,
,

,
,

,
,

$940,0 $14,380*0
1.445.0 19.503.0
1.077.1 17,000,4
748.0 10.019.0
1.840.1 23,454,4
313.0 4.110.0
2,028,6 99.224.0
2.876.0
237,3
2,839,0 26.190.0
5.391.0
321.1
5.894.4
049.0
1.193.2
51.1
2 , 000,0
202.0
835.2
210.2
3.930.5
250.5
114,1 2 . 222.2
157.6 3.263.0
2,969,0 21,256,0
3,301,3, 23.000,3
148,31 0.758,1
901.0 11.495,1
462.8 3,004,4
502,21 18,970,5
847.01 0,157,0
408,7i 2,041,5
704,0! 12,879,3
1,059.8 43,134,3
408.8 3,909,0
2.731.7
122,5
3.137.9
383.4
0,544,8
593.5
3.502.9
875.4
781.0 11,300,4
6.715.7
405.8
330.0 i 1,880,0
880,0' 25,280,0
------- 48,040,0
1.289.4
20.201.3
15.074.0
0,720,0
3,591,1
30.818.3
1.223.9
3.415.0
3.020.8
2,822,3
41.055.3
9.170.9
2.952.0
4.419.5
7.691.9
0,252,7
2.300.7
5.969.0
2.413.0
10.250.0
1.560.0
35.512,7
0,008,0
13.350.4
6.100.8
4.087.5
3.309.6

Total................... 59.022.7 75.292.3 872,091,8 1559687 55,433,2 700,234,4

Oapital A

BANKS. Surplus.

MMMH
£•**>*.
Wcc*w««
;
O N O
iC W I
coo© 1

/Sank of N ew York.. $ 2 , 000,0 $1,841,7 $14,160..0 $2,950,0
Manhattan Co......... 2.050.0 2.215.2 15,017,' 0,111,0
,0
Merchants’ ............ 2 , 000,0 1.037.7 14.248,
3.271.2
2 000,0 1.959.8 10,362,
Mechanics’ .......—
2.138.0
4.574.4
America................ 1.500.0 2.563.2 19,947,
797.0
4,152.
Phenlx................... 1 , 000,0
226.3
1 000,0 4.119.4 78,008,,6 23,500.5
City......................
470.3
130,7
750.0
Tradesmen’s ..........
3,140,
5.973.0
300.0 7.001.4 24,721,
Chemical................
Merchants’ Exch’ge
4,829
176.1
600.0
998.0
1,181,6
7.245,
Gallatin.................. 1 000,0 1.702.1
120.2
1,015,
300.0
Batchers’* Dror’rs’
301.7
Mechanics’* Trad’s’
198.0
2,010
170.0
400.0
874,
171.6
200.0
Greenwich..............
101.3
475.9
Leather Manufacrs
855,6
600,0
3,947,
1,785
109.3
Beventh.................
511.0
300.0
{State of New York.. 1 .200.0
4,085
505.1
497.0
3.256.0
0
American Exchange 5.000.
2.527.3 25,732
1.988.2
3.464.7 30.081
0
Commerce.............. 5.000.
1.070.1
0,927,
1.609.2
Broadway............... 1.000 .0
2.251.0
988.0 10,137,
Mercantile............. 1 ,000,0
738.9
Pacific...................
2,310
475.1
422,7
Republic................ 1.500.0
4.262.5
868.7 10,757
857.2
Chatham................
978.5
0,031
450.0
288.3
1,884
252.5
People’s ...............
200.0
North America.......
2.448.5
569.3 10,941
700.0
Hanover....... ........ 1 000,0 2.238.7 34,890
8,292,8
Irving....................
700.2
3,478
500.0
357.1
2,576
531.2
Citizens’ ................
376.3
600.0
Nassau..................
371.5
2,038
267.9
500.0
Market * Fulton...
5,911
957.2
1.383.7
900.0
101.2
Shoe * Leather...... 1 000,0
400.0
3,230
Corn Exchange...... 1 000,0 1.330.8 10.005.
2.097.7
5,028,
Continental.........
1.237.0
600,0
1 000,0
178.0
1,884,
Oriental............. .
397.4
300.0
Importers’* Trad’rs 1.500.0 5.561.5 24,033
0,448.0
P a rk ..................... 2 , 000,0 3.204.8 30,515 13,024,0
Bast River............ .
252.0
1,299
147.7
250.0
Fourth................... 3.200.0 2,016,1 24,057
3.837.0
3.305.0
Central.................
495.8 10,902,
1 000,0
1.294.0
Second................ .
5,891,
711.0
300.0
702.2
Ninth................... * 750,0
3,210
281.1
7.261.5
First....................
500.0 7.564.4 29,840,
241.0
1,315,
N . Y. Nat’l Exch’ge
67,1
300.0
509.0
2,802,
611,2
Bowery...................
250.0
010.6
New York County..
3,225,
443.6
200.0
German American..
455.9
2,900
298,
750.0
Chase............
7.797.0
1 000,0 1,116,0 31.730.
7,908.
Fifth Avenue.
1.501.3
100.0 1.162.5
108.9
2,129
German Exchange..
570.8
200,0
Germania..............
654.0
3,301
748.3
200,0
Llnooln....... ..........
1.591.2
0,633
711.9
300.0
Garfield........
1.410.3
848.4
5,110,
200.0
Fifth......................
475.8
323,1
1,851,
200,0
4.777
Rank of theMetrop.
1.499.8
850.5
300.0
3.147
West Bide......
352.0
200.0
346.4
8,382
Beaboard.......
1.130.0
348.0
500.0
Sixth............
1,793.
288.0
348.3
200.0
Western...............
8.439.2
721.7 30,000,
2.100.0
1.505.0
4.367
First Nat. B’klyn...
937.7
300,“
Nat. Union Bank
2.837.2
938.0 12.470
1,200,
Liberty..................
4,156
1.005.0
329.6
500,
4.201
W. Y. Prod. Exoh’ge. 1,000,
1.090.3
353.5
3,034
Bk-of N . Amsterdam
030,0
298.4
250,

Loans. Specie. Ltoale. Deposits.! Oirc’Vn. Clearing
$
$
$
9
$
757,051,6 14,2*3,8 741,158,3
049.499.8 1889880
659,411,2 1002244
000,743,4 1045732
072.091.8 1559087

08.587.3 182.038.0 15.155.0
08.587.3 182.473.0 14 890,0
68.587.3 184.471.0 15.540.0
35.388.0 117.414.0
35.388.0 118.361.0
35.388.0 118.477.0

00,167,9
57.076.1 700,754,0 14,231,1 778,612,7
55,519,5 765,013,8 14,202,0 843,316,5
55.433.2 700,234,4 14,123,3 702,047,0
5.315.0 191.792.0
5.041.0 193.804.0
4.943.0 193.720.0

0 ,0 1 1 ,0

95.493.8
6,019,0 95.440.8
0,119,0 95,009,5

132.118.0 5.879.0
134.028.0 5.891.0
132.257.0 5.894.0

40.715.0
41.287.0
40.250.0

67,387,0
09,8 94,4
63,5*2,0

Anction Sales.—Among other securities the following, not
Iegniarly dealt in at the Board, were recently sold at auction.
By Messrs. R. Y. Harnett < Co:
Sr
Shares.
10 Standard Nat. Bank..........................................................................100

By Messrs. Adrian H. Muller & Son :
Shares.

1 Cataract of N. Y., Elec­ $9
tric Co. General $10.
1 Memb. N. Y.Wat. Works $130
2,589 Pooantico Prod. Ex.. lot
Co............................. $55
1 Market Bonds. Bk...226
& Fulton
$3,500 Michigan City, Ind.,
Lake Cities Elec. Ry.
Co.,30-year 6s...................... 1
1st

Bonds.

$5,000 St. L. Peo. & Nor. RR.
1st 5s, 1936, MAN........89 &
$2,000 Sinnemahoning 1940, int.
Iron
& Coal Co.,
Sept.,St. L. Pa.,1st 5s, on..$10 lot
1892,Cliio. & St. Paul
coupons
$2,000Co. 2d 6s ino., 1927— 5
Ry.
$80,000 Pocantico Wat. W'ks
Co. 1st on..........................
coupons6s, 1907, Jan., 1896, 5

g a iih ittfl n m l ffim w c ta L

Spcencer Trask & Co.,
BANKERS,

»T Sc %9 P IN E S T R E E T ,
65 Suite Street, Albany.

N EW

Y O R K .

INVESTMENT SECURITIES.

Gsokos B arclay Moffat .

Albxander M. Whits , J r

Mo ffa t & W
bankers,
N o .I NASSAU ST R E E T ,

hite,

NEW Y O R K .

INVESTMENT SECURITIES

463

THE CHRONICLE.
D I V I D E N D S .

N am e o f Com pany.
R a ilro a d * (S te a m .l

Atlanta A Charlotte A ir L in e ...

Books closed.
Per When
Cent. Payable. ( Days inclusive.j
Im to ",
m
m
3 (Sept 6

Kept
Sept.
Oct.
Oct..
|Sept.
|Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Cot.
Dot
Scipt.
$10 Sept.
Chicago Telephone (monthly).... 1 Sept.
Consolidated 6 as (N. Y (qu&r,). 2 Sept.
1% Oct.

Little Miami, soar. «gaar.)—
N. Y. Cent. A Hud Riv. tquar.)-..
N. Y. & Harlem, com. & wref....
Portion A Rum ford Falls, (qr.)
We-at Jerseyt AR Seashore...
S tre e
a il w a y s .
Chicago City Ry. (qu»r.)„
North Sh re Tract, (Boston) pf...
Troy City By, (quur.)........
illin rella n flo a i.

1*4
1
2
1
3
2is
3
a
4
1

W A L L STR EE T. F R ID A Y . SEP

15 Sept. 1 to Sept. 15
Sept. 1 to Sept. 9
15 Sept. 16 to Oct. 5
1 Sept. 16 to Oor. 5
15 --------- to ------- ----1 Aug. 21 to Sept. 1
15 --------- to -----------30 Sept. 17 to Sept. 20
1 Sept. 14 to Oct,. 18
1 Sept, 21 to Sept. 30
1 Aug. 26 to Sept. 1
30 --------- t o -------6 Sept. 1 to Sept 6
15 sept. 1 to sept. 15
13 ----------t o -----------10

V.

2. 1 S 9 S . - 5 P.

The Money Market and Financial Situation.—Business in
Wall Street has been more limited in volume this week than
for several weeks past. Saturday’s bank statement was in­
terpreted to foreshadow a firmer, if not a stringent, money
market, and this had a tendency to restrict aggressive opera
tions during the early part of the week. It is apparent,
moreover, that the outside demaud for securities has been bo
far satisfied as to make it much less urgent than it has re­
cently been. On the other hand, it is reported that repre­
sentatives of large financial interests have been steadily bu t ing securities at the lower quotations, which resulted from
the conditions mentioned above, and as a consequence the
markets are firmer as the week draws to a close.
No change of importance has occurred in the general situa
tion. There continues to be almost no difference of opiniou
as to prospects for the future, and investors with capital are
freely takwg desirable offerings. It is reported that the for­
eign demand has also increased and that considerable pur
chases of American securities by London have been made for
Continental account. The tendency of exchange has been
downward this week, and unless a change in the conditions
governing the foreign exchange market occurs gold imports
must increase iu the near future. In view of the probability
of a considerable influx of gold and a falling off in the de­
mand for currency from the interior, there is a good supply
of funds in the money market, and rates, especially for time
loans, are still relatively low.
The open market rates for call loans on the Stock Exchange
during the week on stock and bond collaterals have ranged
from \% to 3 per cent. To-day’s rates on call were 2J^ to 3
per cent. Prime commercial paper quoted at 4 to o per sent.
The Bank of England weeidy statement on Thursday
showed a decrease in bullion of .£62,124, and the percentage
of reserve to liabilities was 48-80, same as last week; the
discount rate remains unchanged at 2Jj> per cent. The Bank
or France shows a decrease of 3,350,000 francs in gold and
560,000 francs in silver.
The New York City Clearing-House banks in their state­
ment of Ang. 27 show-ed a decrease in the reserve held of 88 090,800 and a surplus ever the required reserve of $21,848,300,
against $28,839,250 the previous week.
1898. JTHfferen’tfP m 1897.
Aug. 27. 1 Jrrev. tceek. Aug. 28.

. 1896.

Aug. 29

[ V j J . 12 V II.

The following were the rates of domestic exchange on
New York at the under-mentioned cities to-day: Savannah^
buying 4 discount, selling par; Charleston buying 1-16 dis­
count, selling 1-16 premium; New Orleans, bank, $1 00 pre­
mium, commercial, par; Chicago, 50e. per $1,000 discount;.
St. Louis, par.
United States Bonds.—Sales of Government bonds at the
Board include $637,000 3s (when issued), at 1044 to 1054,
$2,000 4s coup., 1925, at 1264 to 127, $2,000 4s coup., 1907, at
111 and $5,((00 5s coup., at 112)4The following are the daily closing quotations ; for yearly
range see seventh page following.
Interest
Avff. Aug.
Periods. xSt: Aag. 30. 31. Sept. Sept.
29
1. 2.
28,..,.................. re#. Q. -Meh. * 98 * 98 * 98 * 98 * 98 * 08
i 3s, 1918,10-20s.op. Q.-Feb. 1055s 105 105 1O470 104% 105
4s, 1907............reg. Q.-Jan. *111 111 "111 m i *x09% no9%
48,1907.......... coup. Q. - J an. *111% •lllig 111 *111%! MU% *iii-%
48,1925 ______re#. Q. - Feb. '127 *127 *127 *127 *126% *126%
“
4s, 1925.......... oouii. Q.-Feb_ *127 126% 127 *127 *126% '126%
5s, 1904 . . . . . . ..re#. Q.-Feb. *112
■112 m 2
• %•
5 m, 1904........ .coup. Q.-Feb. *112 112 *112 *112 *111% 111 %
111
112%
*102%
6s, our’cy,'99-. .reg. .1. & J. *101 *102% *101 *10214 *102 % '102%
*10214
*101
4s, (Cher.) 1899,reg.l March.
*101 *101 ”101
• 1 1 2

sale,

'T h is is the nrloe hid at the m oraine b o a rd : no
w as m ade
( D alings are in bonds "w h en issued” and represent transactions
In the Unlisted Departm ent o f the Exchange.

State & Railroad Bonds.—Sales of State bonds at the
Board are limited to $427,0U0 Virginia Gs deferred trust, re­
ceipts, stamped, at 84 to 9)4, and $ 0,000 District of Colum­
bia 3-6os at 117.
The market for railway bonds has been less active this
week, the average transactions per day being about $1,000,000 less than for the two weeks previous. In sympathy with
the stock market there has been a tendency to weakness,.
but actual decline is limited to a few issues and is about offset
by advance in others. Colorado Midland 1st and 2d 4s were
conspicuous for activity and an advance of 8 and over 5
points, respectively. Wabash 2ds and debenture series B,
Kansas City Pittsburg & Gulf and Standard Rope & Twine
issues advanced from 1 to 2 points. Northern Pacific and
Union Pacific bonds were notably strong, The active list in­
cludes, in addition to the above, Atchison, Chesapeake &Ohio,
Central Georgia, Erie, New York Central & Hudson, Lake
Shore, Reading. Southern Railway, Texas & Pacific and UP. Denver & Gulf issues.
Stock and Bond Sales.—The following shows the volume
of business in stocks and bonds on the New York Stock
Exchange for the past week and since January 1.
Sales
,— Week ending Sept.
N. Y. Stock Exeh.

—* ---- Jan. 1 to
1898.

2
1898.
1897.
Government bonds
$ 6 45,100 $216,900
State bonds...... -137,000
9,000
RR. & mlsc.bonds.
15,878,700 19,326,000

$11,694,550
1,990,700
550,571,510

Sept. 2-,
1897.
$8,652,000
1,130,000
339,886,290

Total.............. $16,960,800
$19,552,200 $570,856,760 $349,668,290
stocks—No. shares
2,351,800
3,020,689
70,239,758
4-3,756,368
Par value...,$231,033,200$291,667,248 $6,801,298,525 $4,271,1(9,750
Bank shares, par
$550
$127,560
$226,610

val.

We add the following record of the transactions for each
day of ending ,
the week.
Week
Sept. 2 ,

1808.
Saturday............
Monday..............
Tuesday..............
Wednesday....... .
Thursday............
Friday.,.,..,.......

Blocks ---------- . R ailroad, dc. State • V. 8.
Shares. P a r mitte.
Bonds. B onds. Bonds.

----------

280.070
401,171
455,802
898,305
401,781
318,721

*88,705,750
18,1)88,800
44.605,0B0
38.554.500
40.080,800
30,544,800

*1,9*-1,000
3,848,100 §026,000
2,al8.500
61,000
8,297,000
40,000
1,019,100 100,000
3,107,500
11,000

Total............3,851,300 §331,083.200 *15,878.700 §137,000

§22,500
20.500
153.000
41,000
181.000

316,100

*645,100

The sales on the Boston and Philadelphia Exchanges for
the week .ending—Sept. 2, -------------% been as follows :
1893, have
— —
Boston.-

Philadelphia.. --------- 1
$
1
S
$
Ijisted Unlisted B ond
L isted U nlisted Bond
Capital................ 7E Oftb o/wil
.I
shares.
8ales.
shares. shares.
sales.
Surplus............... 59,022.700 .............. 74,363.900 60,622,700 Saturday. ..10,479 shares . $18,500
73,294,000
10.346
$182,725
8,773
9,901
Loans A diao’ntfi- 672'o91,800 Iuo’.’5i348.400 560,874,500 455,790,200 Monday — 28,962 10.465
81,850
14.100
9,062
281,200
Ciroulatlou......... 14,123,300jl)eo. 78,700 13,418,400 17,055,500 Tuesday.. ..22,829 14,771
73,450
17,960
5,525
130,000
Net deposits....... 760,'-31,400 Dec. 4,779 636.990.000 451,934,800 Wedtiesd’y.20,636 4, \ 05
87,650
16,104
13,893
70,100
155,968,700 Deo. 86,300 92,628.100 47,315,7. 0 Thursday. ..28,160 8,609
Deo.8,604,500
83,000
15,673
12,530
76,500
Legal tenders__ 55,433,200
106,138,600 74,474,200 Friday... ...15,000 5,500
2 2 ,0 0 0
17,814
0,037
283,830
Reserve held___ 211,401,900'Deo.8,690,800 198,766,700 121,819,900 Total.... I30,u72 53,855 860,450
59,054
00,673
020,855
Legal reserve__ 190,058,600 Dec.l,194,850 159.249.000 112,983,700
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.—The stock market
Surplus reserve 2l,343,30o! Deo,7,495,950 39,517,700 8,836,200 has been somewhat irregular this week. On Monday there
5 9

0

2 .7 0 0

,4 0 0

The Clearing-House, on Oct. 80, 1897, also began issuing
weekly returns allowing the condition of the non-member
banks which clear through the Clearing-House institutions.
The statement in full for the latest week will he found on
a preceding page.
Foreign Exchange.—Under a liberal supply of commercial
bills the market for foreign exchange has continued weak
and the tendency of prices is steadily downward.
To-day's aotual rates of exchange were as follows: Bank­
ers’ sixty days' sterling, 4 82^'@f 83; demand, 4 84%<34 85;
cables, 4 85'4(34 854; prime commercial, sixty days, 4 824 «
4 824; documentary commercial, sixty days,’4 81j4@4 824;
grain for payment, 4 82@4 824; cotton for payment, 4 814
@4 824 : cotton for acceptance, 4 8'<?4@4 824.
Posted rate3 of leading bankers folio w :
Sept, 2.

S ixty days.

Demand.

Prime com mercial....................................44 83
bankers’ sterling bills on bond on.
844
4 86
Prime
82V
Documentary commercial........................|4 81%a>4 sat,1
Purl-, bunkers’ (fra n c s)........................... 5
5 2 0 ta 9 1 9 l*i.
Amsterdam (guilders)(reiohiiiarka) b ’kers f>4%ip04'm 1 40b,5®401i
bankers................ 103401m
* rankfort or Bremen
S»5-®O.M1B

were reasons for anticipating a firmer money market,’ which
led to some liquidation by timid holders. The bear element
took advantage of the situation to depress prices and were
generally successful. Tuesday’s market was steadier but
without much change. Since Tuesday there has been an
undertone of strength and some stocks have materially ad­
vanced. The grangers and several high-grade issues, in­
cluding Illinois Central, Pennsylvania, N, Y. Central and
other so-called Vanderbilt shares, have been relatively steady,
although, with a few exceptions, the active list has declined
an average of between 1 and points. The Northern Pacific
and Union Pacific issues have been amoijg the strong features
of the market. The local traction stocks were erratic. Metro­
politan Street Railway fluctuated over a range of 7 points,
Manhattan Elevated over a range ol nearly 5- points and
Brooklyn Rapid Transit over a range of 4 points.
The miscellaneous list furnished material for active specu­
lation and many securities of this class advanced or de­
clined from 4 to 6 points, according to the varying success of
manipulators. General Electric was notably strong on re­
ports of extensive ne-.v contracts and Minnesota Iron and
Illinois Steel advanced on further progre§>| with consolida­
tion plans.

THE CHRONICLE.—STOCK PRICES (2 pages) P age 1.

S ept . 3, 1898 ]

New York Stock Exchange—A Daily, Weekly and Yearly Record.
8 T 0 0 £ S —H IG H E ST A YD LO W EST S A L E PRTOES.
S a tu rd a y , M onday, T uesday , Wednesday Thursday, F rid a y ,
A ug. 27. Aug. 29. Aug. 30. A ug. 31. Sept. 1. Sept. 2.

STOCKS.
N. Y . STOCK E X C H .

Sales Range for year 1898. I Rangefor previof the On basis of roo-sh're lots ous year fl897>.
Week.
Shares Lowest. Highest. Loxvest. Highest.

R a i l r o a d S to ck s.
A lbany & Susquehanna..
§183 Jan 4 180 Feb 8
20 11 Apr 21 15 Feb 8
l i n n Arbor...................
100 34 Jan 4 40%Feb 7
Do
pref.
2,715 1 0 %Apr 21 14%Aug 10
Atch. Topeka & Santa Fe.
50,186 22% Ala 12 37%Aug 27
Do
pref
alt.&0 .,tr.rpe.1 stins.pd 31,000 !2%.fan 25 29%Sep 2
alt. O. Southw., pref.
5%Jan 19
7%Feb 3
Bost. & N. Y. Air L.. pref.
§105 Mar 9 §105 Mar 9
Brooklyn Elevat., tr. rec.
25%Ang 17 28%Aug 22
63% 65% 02%
Brooklyn Rapid Transit... 76,284 35 Mar 12 09% Aug 22
65% 66*6
•31
32
200 25 Mar 12 31%Aug 22
♦31
38
Buffalo Roch. & Pittsburg.
.......
*68 70 *67% 70
1,334 62 May 6 75 Sep 1
70
Do
pref.
*75 ....
*75 ....
Bari. Cedar Rapids & N o ..
*75
§65 Mar 10 75 J’ly 1
*85
8 6 % •85% 87 *85%
2,525 72 Apr 21 90%Jan 20
anadian Pacific..........
549* 549* 53% 54
2,440 44%Mar 12 57%Feb 5
*53%
anada Southern..........
Capital Traction..............
02 Jan 4 70 Jan 25
92% 93
93** 03*
4,547 8 6 %Mar 20 98%Jan 7
89
92
90% 90% 90% 90% .89% 90 Central of New Jersey.. . .
21% 2 2 %
21 % 21 % 21% 23% Central Pacific................ 3,135 11 Apr 23 23%Sep 2
§18% 18% 19% 19% §2 0 % 21
24% 23% 24% Chesapeake Ohio.......... 10,547 17%Mar 20 24 Aug 17
24% 24% 23% 24% 23% 24% 23% 23% 24
•159 ....
159
*159 ...
*159
Chicago & Alton..............
§150 Mar 14 §166%Jan 14
•170 ....
170 ...
170
*170
170
*170
Do
pref.
§100 Mar 24 §166 Mar 14
118% 119
116% 117% 110% 117% 110 % 117
110% 117% 117% 117% Chicago Burl. & Quincy... 82,813 8 5%Mar 26 120 Aug 18
61
0 1 % 60% 01
00
60% 59% 60
59%
00 Chicago & East. Illinois... 2,600 49 Apr 19 66 J'ne 1
108%109
109 109
800 102 Jan 7 113%Feb 1
108 109 •108 109
108** 108
Do
pref.
107
17% 17% 17
17% 16% 17%
10 % 17% 10 % 1 0 %
1 0 % Chicago Great Western... 39,570 9%Feb 24 18 Aug 22
•70
74
74
*70
300 71%J’ly 15 73%Sep 2
§72
*70
74
72
74
*70
Do 4 p.c. debentures.
72% 73%
42
42
41
42% 42% 42% *41% 42% 41% 41%
41% 42
1,415 28 Mar 15 42%Aug 22
Do 5 p.c. pref. “ A ” ..
*29% 30
*29% SO
300 20 Apr 21 30% Aug 10
Do 4p.o. pref. “ B ” .
29% 29% *28% 29
28% 29% *28% 29
9%
*9
10
1 0
210
9%
*8 %
9 Chic. Indianap. & Louisv.
*8
7 Feb 24 11 J’ly 27
§8 % 8 %
9%
*33
35
83
33
•32
35
30
*33
*32
35
•38
Do
pref.
33
23 Apr 10 38%J’ly 27
113% 114% 112 113% 112 113% 1 1 2 % 113% 112 % 1127% 112% 112% Chicago Mllw. & St. Paul.. 152,228 83%Apr 21 114%Aug 27
....... 158
555 140 Apr 25 159 Aug 18
150% 156% 150%157 §157% 157% §156% 150% 157% 157%
Do
pref.
135% 136% 134% 135% 134 135
7,043 113%.Mar 12 I 30%Aug 23
134% 135
134% 134% 134% 13494 Chicago & North Western.
1175% 175%
10 163 Jan 3 175 Mar 7
Do
pref.
1057% 106% 104% 105% 104%105% 104% 105% 104% 105% 104%1C5 Chicago Rock Isl. & Pac.. 39,788 80 Mar 25 !08%J’ne l
85
86
84
85
4,003 65 Mar 12 87 Aug 17
83% 84% 84% 85% 83% 84% •84
85 Chic. St. P. Minn. & Ora...
•154 165 *154 104 *154 100 §154 155 •154 105
100 1148 Jan 5 §105 Aug 17
155 105
Do
pref,
224
§ % 8%
8
•8
9
9%.Mar 3
§8
8
•8 % 9 Chic. Terminal Transfer..
8%
8%
4%Jan 3
35% 36% 30
37% 35% 37
0,250 22%Jap. 3 37% Aug 29
35% 30
35
35% 34% 35%
Do
pref
43% 43% 41% 43
3,579 25 Mar 12 47%Aug 10
42
42% 42% 42% 42% 42% 41% 42 Clev. Cln. Chic. & St. L ....
Do
pref
77%Mar 9 90%Aug 10
15
15%
14% 15
15% 15% 14% 15% 10
16% 16
.Mar 26 19%Jan 12
16% Clev. Lorain Wheeling.. 13.300 1 1 %
*40
48% 40
11,174 45 May 2 52%iep 2
48% *40
48
47
49% 49% 52
Do
pref
51% 52%
*109 ...
•109 ...
•109 ....... *109
Cleveland & Plttsb., guar.
...
109 ...
109 ....
170 J*ne 7 §174 Aug 8
1,040
Colorado Mid., vot. tr. ctfs.
8 Sep 2
5%J’ne 23
3,157 14 J’ue 23 18%Sep 2
Do pref. vot. tr. ctfs.
15
1 0 % 16% 18%
*5%
0%
20 4%J’ly 30 8 %Feb 10
0
5% *5
5%
•5%
*5%
5% Col. Hocking Val. & Tol.
24
24 •....... 23
23
Do
pref.
17 Jan 7 25 Feb 9
♦109 110
108%109
1,107 103 J’ly 16 114%Feb 3
elaware Hudson..
108 108% x 106% 100 % 100% 100 % 100 % 107%
-*150% 151% 151 151 §151 151
345 144%Apr 21 159 Feb 5
el. Lack. & Western...
151% §150% 151%
151%
14% 14% *14
14% •13% 14% 14% 14% 14% 14% *14 " 15 Denver & Rio Grande..
1,235 10 Apr 20 14%3ep l
55% 50% 55
55% 55% 55% 55% 55% 55% BMj
Do
pref. 12,985 40 Apr 21 56% Aug 27
55% 56
*18
18%
100
8 % Apr 21 20 J’ne 10
17% 17% •17% 18% •17% 18% •17% 18% *17% 18% Des Moines & Ft. Dodge..
•80
♦80 ...
•80 ....
Do
pref.
•80
•80
*80
7%
7%
•7
100
8 % •0 % 8
5 Apr 4
8 % •0 % 8 % DuL So. Shore & Atl.pref.
14% 14% 14% 14% •14% 14% 14% 14%
1,115 11 Apr 21
rie...... . .................
14% 14% 14%
38% 38% 38% 80% 38% 38% 38% 38%
8,9 L3 29%Apr 22
38% 37% 38%
Do
1st pref.
*19% 20
19% 19% *18% 19% •18% 19% •18% 19% *18% 19%
100 15%Apr 22
Do
2d pref.
27
27
•27
28
1,400 22 May 9
28 Evansv. Terre Haute .
27
2 0 % 27% •27 28 •26% 28
55
55
Do
pref.
•54% 50
1,019 40 Jan 18
50
0 0 % •00 01
02 %
00
01
10 Mar 12
lint Pere Marquette.
30 Aug 5
Do
pref.
•22
25
21 Feb 8
•23
25 Ft. W. Den. C., stamped
•25 ......
*18% 15
•13% 15
•18% 15
Rio Grande.
♦10% 15 Ft. Worth
10 May 19
•18% 15
♦13% 15
138 138
135% 130
3,219 +122 J’ly 185%136% 130 136
137% 137% /Threat Northern, pref...
135%138
VTreen Bay Western..
§30 Jan 7
Do debt certfs. “ A ”
40%J’ne 23
Do debt certfs. “ B
3%J’!y 9
111 % 1 1 2 % 1 1 1 % 119% 1 1 1 % 1 1 2 % 1 1 1 % 11 1 % 112 112
112 112 % llinois Central..............
90 Apr 21
•96 100
*90 100
§94 Feb 18
*90 100
*95 100
Do leased line, 4 p. c.
•90 100
•96 100
•10
1 0 % •1 0
1 0 % •9% 10
7%Mar 18
•9% 10
•9% 10
•9% 10 Iowa Central............... ...
377% 37
37
♦80
37
Do
pref.
25 Apr 28
•30
37
36
36% 36% 36
0 Feb 2
•5%
0 % •5% 0 % •5% 0% •5% 0 % •5% 0 % I7'anawha& Michigan...
20
20
*20 20
15 Apr 26
19
20 »Van. City Pitts. G ulf..
18% 19
*18
18% 19
*
•4
5
*4%
5
3 Jan 27
•4
5
5
*4
5 Keokuk Des Molues.....
•4
5
♦ 10% 17
•10% 17
15 May 12
Do
pref.
10
10 %
10 % 10 % •10% 17
* 10 % 17
•29
32
•29
32
•29
32
•29
32 Keokuk Western..........
30 J’ne 2
32
•29
82
•29
•4
•4
9%
2 May 19
9%
9%
•4
9%
•4
•3
•4
9
9% Kingston & Pembroke....
*18% 20
110
19
ake Erie Western... .
1,410 !2%Mar 14
18% 19
18% 18% •18
19% 17% 18
70
70% 75
75
74% 75
803 60 Mar 14
§70% 76% 70
Do
pref.
•75% 77
70
• 102%
’192% ....
Lake Sh. Mich. South...
170%Jan 4
'192% ....
*192%
*192%
'192%
l80%Apr 19
Convert, ctfs. of deposit.
•50
58
40 Jan 20
•50
00
58
*53
•53
58
•50
58 Long Island....................
•52** 57
50% 00% 58% 59% 58% 59%! 58% 58% 58% 58% 57% 58% Louisville & Nashville.... 35,951 44 Apr 21
97% 99
97% 98% 96% 99% 91%
94% 97% 95% 98% Y/Tanhattan Kiev., consol. 148,344 91 Mar 20
105%106
163% 105%
105 fl49
151% 152% 151%153 IvLetropolitan Street...... 15,331 125%Mar 26
4%J’ne 15
425
6 % 6 % *0
0%
0% *5%
•5%
0 % •5% 0% Mexican Central..............
1 Feb 10
1
*%
1 Mexican Nat’l .tr. rects...
'%
•%
109% 108% 107%108% -t o ft 108% *107 109 •107%
100 09%Mar 12
'107 108 Michigan Central............
*27% 28% *27% 28% *27% 29
100 24 Mar 11
27
27 Minneapolis & St. Louis...
•27% 28% •27 ' O f *
*89% 91
§90% 90% •89% 91
10 84 May 14
Do
1st pref.
•89% 91
*89% 91
•89%
♦ 0 0 % 02
Do
2d pref.
•61% 02
200 40 Mar 20
0 0 % 60% •0 0
01
*00
01
♦ 00
0%Mar 1
1
•6 ....
*0 ....
*0
•0
•0 ....... Minn. St. P. 8 . S. Marie.
•0
1 2 % 1 2 % •12 12% 1 2 % 12 % •1 2
435 10 Apr 13
*12
12 % Mo. Kansas Texas.......
1 2 % •12
80% 30% 35% 30% 35% 35% 80
Do
pref.
3,150 28%Mar 12
35% 35%
30
35%
307% 37% 90% 36% 36
36% 30
36% 36
30% 35% 36 Missouri Pacific............. 13,025 22 Mar 12
•8 8 % 30
*28% 2 0 % •28% 30
200 24%Apr 19
29% Mobile & Ohio................
28% * 8 % 28% 28% *23
•170% 175 '170% 175 *170% 175 *170% 175 •170% 175
§107%Jan 4
'170% 175 Morris Essex...............
00 J’ne 1
VTash. Cbat. St. Louis..
118% 119
Y. Central & Hudson..
118 118% 117% 118% 118% 118% 118% 118% 118% 118%
8,488 105 Mar 20
•13% 14% •13% 14% •13% 14% •14
ll% M ar 14
14% •14% 14% •14% 14% N. Y. Chicago St. Louis.
•70
78
73 Feb 19
78
Do
1st pref.
•6 8 78 •6 8
*05
78
•05
78
•05
78
•34
30
28 Mar 25
•34
30% 35
85
34% 34%
Do
2d pref.
35
85
•34
30
§320 Jan 5
New York
Harlem......
*350 .......
§120 Apr 20
N Y. Lack. Western.. . .
*194 197 *193 190
55 §L78%Jan 7
'193 196 §194 194 §194 194
■191 194 N. Y. New Haven Hart.
7,405 13%Apr 25
15% 16% 15% 16% 15% 16
10
10% N. Y. Ontario & Western..
10 % 10 %
♦ 00 66
05 Jan 28
Southern........
*60
•0 0
66
00
•0 0
06
•00 06 •00 00 Norfolk Western.........
*15% 10
•15% 10
831 ll% A p r 21
15
15% •15
10 10 Norfolk
10
•15
10
54% 5 7
4 % 54%
54%
8,900 42%.Mar 12
54% 54% 54% 54% 54% 54% 54
Do
pref.
39% 41% 38% 44
0
1
38% 3 7
9%
4
39% 40% 39% 40% Nor. Pac. Ry., vot. tr. ctfs. 198,015 19 Feb 24
0
77% 78
Do
pref. 137,083 56%Mar 12
75% 77% 75% 77%
79%
78% 77% 79% 79
7 Mar 5
600
maha St. Louis........
01 6
1,750 35%.Tan 7
57 >6
00
60
60
00
r.RR.&N.Co.vot.tr.cfs.
57% 59
57% 58% •57
77% 77% 76
820 65% Mar 29
Do pref., vot. tr. ctfs.
•75% 77
70
76% 77% §77% 77% 70% 77%

«190 220
190 220 *190 220
*12
13
13
§119* H9* *11
37
37
*36*6 38
•80*$ 38
13% 13%
139* 14**
18% 14^
30%
30% 36
36% 37*6
20
22
2 +% 23
♦3
7
5
0 % 35
*105 108 *105 108 *105 108

190 220 *190 220
*190 220
♦11
13
*11
13
* 11 % 12 %
*35% 37
•36
38
•36% 37%
13% 13% 13% 13% *13% 14
36% 30% 35% 33% 35% 36%
25% 23% 27% 29%
20
27
§6
6
•0
0 % *5% 0 %
*105 108 ♦105 108 *105 108
*25% 27
26
27
*25
05
05% 64% 65
64
03% 05
31
31
30
*31
32
30
32
73
75
72
71
70
*75
70%
•75 ___
*75
___
*75 .......
8 6 % 80% 8 6 % 87% 88
88 % 88 %
54
§54% 54% 53% 5 4
53% 53%

35%
•5%

B

t

&

C

&

*»%

%

lit

&

&

D
E

ik

F

Sc
Sc

Sc

Sc

Sc

I

15

L

l6!3

Sc

Sc
Sc

Sc

Sc

i?8"
i*

8?«

Sc
Sc

IV *

Sc

10% 10%

Sc
Sc

S%

O

* These are bid and asked prices; no sales on this day.

O U T S ID E S E C U R IT IE S

(G ive * at

§ Less than 100 shares.

Sc

vSc

~See

Sc

Sc

t Ex dividend and rights.

Bid. Ask.
Bid. Ask. 1 S treet H a ll w a v e.
t.
Metropolitan—See Stock Exch 1IB
150 100
10 0 % 103SS Ninth Avenue—Stock---- 170 180
IH
t.
Second Avenue—Stock... 178 181
1st mort 5s 1909..MAN $107 100
170 195
Debenture 5s 1909. J&J $105 108
$110 1 18
Consol. 5s, 1948. ..F&A 115 115«
101 102
225
Sixth Avenue—Stock..... 200
320
So Fer 1st 5h 1919..A&0 $113% 114
108
Third Avenue
Stock Exch. list.
340 860
1st mort 5s 1937...J&J 124 125
02
112
28th & 29th Sts 1st 5s..’00 $110
113 116
Twenty-Third St—Stock. 330
07 100
Deb 5a 1000____...J&.J 103 .......
R
Jxoh 1 1st.

—See

170 Feb 177%Ap
9 Jan. 15%Aug
22%Apr 40 Aug
9%Apr 17 Sep,
17 Apr 35%Sep
9 J’ly 21%Sep.
2 J’ne , 9%8en.
102 Mar 100 Oot.
8 %Dec 8 %Oct.
18%Jan. S7%Deo
16% May 31 Dec
54%J’ly 60%Deo
6 8 Apr 70 Aug
40% Mar 82 Deo
44%Jan. 62%Sep«
50%Oct. 63 Deo
6 8 %\Iay 103%Jan»
7%Apr 18 Sep.
15%Mar 27%Aug
147 J’ly 170 Mar
!61%May 175WNOT
69%Jan. 102%Sep.
37%J’ne 61 Sep.
95 Jan. 103 Sep.
3%J’ne 2 0 %Aug
7 l%Oct. 75 Deo
dl%Aug 43 Sep.
19 Aug 33%Sep.
8 Oct. 13 Aug
20 Nov 38%Sep.
69%Apr 102 Sep.
130%May 140 Sep,
101% Apr 132%Sej»
153 Jau. 105%S9|*
60%Apr 97%S0F
47 Jan. 89%Sep.
133%Jan. !50%Dec
21% J’ne 41%Sep
63 J’ne 8 6 %Sep
39 Nov 49%Deo
101 Apr 168%Sep
l%Apr
14 Aug
09%Apr
140% May
9%Apr
30 Apr
7 Apr
31 Apr
5 Dec
ll% A pr
27 Apr
15%May
20 J’ue
28 Aug
7 J’ne
30 Mar
7%J’iy
J 2 Nov
L
120 Jau
27%Apr
50 Dec
3%Deo
91%Apr
8 8 Jan
0 Apr
23 J’ne
4 J’ne
17%Dec
2 Feb
12 Mar
32 Feb
1 Aug
13 May
58%Apr
152 Jau

18 Jat
40 Jan
123 Sep
164 Aug
14%Aug
50%Aug
14%J’ly
50% Aug
10%Aug
19 Sep
46%Sep
25%Aug
34 Sep
48 Sep
14%Aug
49 Oct
20 Sep
20%Sep
141 Sep
40 Aug
50 Deo
9 Aug
110%Aug
97 Aug
!3%Sep
41%Sep
9%Aug
29%Sep
4%Aug
28%Jan
30%Oct
2 Aug
2 2 %Sep
79%Sep
181 Sep

38 Dec
40%Apr
81%May
99%Oct
6 Aug
1 Nov
90 Jan
10 May
77%Mar
46 Feb
0 Dec
10 Apr
24%Apr
10 May
18 J’ne
102%J’ne
70 Jan
92%Feb
11 Feb
67%Apr
24 Feb
295 Feb
119 Jan
160 Feb
12 %Apr
0 Apr 17% Sep
22%May 48% DeO
11 Apr 22% Deo
32%Jan 6l% D eo
8% Deo
5%Nov
10 Apr 41 Sep
37%Jan

73%
8e_9

i Before payment of assessment.

foot of 7 consecutive pages).— STREET

Street lla flw n v a
| Bid. Ask.
S tree t It u llw a r s ,
NBW YOKK CITS’. 1
Blaeek St * Ful F stock. 32
31
_ l«tm o rt ?» 1900.,.,I*,i! toi
104
P way 7th Ave—Stock ! 213
D D K B Batt’y—Stock.
latraort 5s 1904...J*[)!4io5 106
»d mort 5s 1914..... 1a j 41 §0 112
Scrip 5a 1915....... F&A
Con 5a 1943—Sea Stock! Birch t
B’way Surf 1st 5sgu. 1924 l i t
1 1 0 %!
5a
m rental. 1905:4104
105%, 42d A Or 8 t Fer—Stock..
Central Crosstown—Stock) 255
lat M 3a 1932..... M &N'm H K
t*n Pk N t B k i t — Stock ISO 100
Consol 7s 1903.. . J t n $ n o
8 tk
111 1 Lex A Pav F 59

Sc

Sc
Sc

Sc
Sc

467

RAILW AYS, &c.
i75

Street ftu llw av o .
Union Railway—St-m k
j.
1st 5s 1942.......... F&A. $113
W estchest 1st. 5s ’43..J&J $LOO
BROOKLYN.
Atlan. Ave., B’klyn—
1st 5s 1909.......... A.&0 §107
Con 5s g 1931...... A&O $108
95
Impt 5s g 1934.....J&J
B. B.&W.E. 5s 1933. A * 0
Brooklyn City—Stock.... 213%
Consol 5s 1941...... J&J 114
R k ly n C ro s s tn 5 il9 0 8 I&.T 105
B'klyn Kiev
Stock E xch lis

93

—See

Ask.

200

114%

215
117

468

TOE CHRONICLE.- STOCK PRICES (2 pages) P age 2.

STOOK 8 —H IG H E ST A HD L O W E ST S A L E P R IO B 8 .
M onday, j 7W*rfaw, |Wednesday Thursday, F riday,
' , . A ug. *Ji) A ug. 30. j A up. 31. \ Sept. 1. Sept. 2,

STOCKS.

Saturday, j
Aug. 2 4 j
85

N. Y. STOCK EXOH.

874|
83*
454, 1 44

8M< 1 8SV 3Ok 36k 36k
86* 36k i 35k 35ii Oregon Short I-Ino..........
411
45
44k j 44tji 45 1
46 * §45
acific Coast Co...........
i$4k
185k 85k | *83 ' 87
87
•84
87
183
84
L)o 1st prof............
•05
07
64k 04*1 05
«5 k 65k
05kl *04k 00
65* 65k
Do 2d prof............
• 11b 'i 11VV, 110>4 110k 118k 118k llM k 1 1 ^ I u s * u s v 11894 119 Pennsylvania................
1
*k
1*
1*
ik
1 ^ *1
l k Poo. Decatur ICvansv..
Ik
(5
0
*4
*4
0 1 *4
*4
0 Peoria & Eastern...........
6
*4
6
444si « 8 * 44k
43k 4Ski *48k 45
*i3k *5 Pittsb. dn. Chic. Bt. L.
*48k 45
66
66 1 *«»
65* •03
*03
05
0&k *03
05k 1 *03
Do
prof
05k
•172 ...... ♦171
*171
•171 ...... *171
*172 ....... Pitts. Ft. W. ch., guar.
9
*9
10 Pittsb. & West., pref.......
•9
n*
*9
0*
n*
9*
9k
•0
10k
18k 10k
18* 19 i 1 S « 18k
1
1 8 k 18* 18* I B * D cadtng, voting tr. offs..
45
43
44* 441# 41* 44^1 4Sk 48-k §18
45!.
i s * -Lli let. prof., vot. tr. ctfs
•23
21* 21*t 2 1 * 21* •21* 21* "21k 22
22k 1 * 1 * 2 2
2d pref., voting tr. ctfs.
•1S5 lvS7kl*I»5 1691, *185 1871, ♦185 187k • 185 i8?k *185 187k RensselaerA Saratoga....
•30
30
•23
30
•28
32 , *28
31
•28
so
♦23
30 Rio Grande Western___
69 W •o s * 694,
69
69 ! *68
*08
69k
69 k
aov ♦08
69
Do
prof.
*183k 125 ♦123 105 *123 125 5123* 125 ;*l28k 125 *123k 125 Rome Watertown Ogd..
* 7^4
7*
! *7
7*
•7
7*
*7
7k
1 * T* IS *
t. J. G. 1st, vot. tr. ot.s
boh OU*
00
00
60
60
6 0 * 60*
*58
60*
Do
1st pref
♦00
23
20
20
20
20 i *19
21
•19
21
Do
2d pref
i9 k iv»k
•8 *
8*
8*
8H
St.
S. Fr., vot, tT. ctfs
M<
««
•3H* 68
67
07
•65* 66*
00
60
00
06k 00*4 60
Do
1st prof
83k 84*
33k 88^
3254 33k' 82k 33k
3 3 * 3il* 33 83k
Do
2d pref
•3 *
0
(5 *
»5 *
*5 *
8 * St.Louis Southwestern...
5*
5*
5*
6k
12k i s *
12* 13
1 2 * 18*
12* 13
12* 12*
13
13k
Do
pref.
24*M 244a
*23
26
*22
25
St. Paul & Duluth...........
*
1 91 '
*88
92 i *S8
92
Do
pref.
•169 178 a 07k ifi7k 168 103 *107 170
168 168 *167 ~ 170 St, Paul Minn. Man......
2 2 * 2 2 * 2 2 * 2 2 * 2 2 * 22k 2 2 * 22k 22k
22* 2 a *
91.
934 94,
0*
9*
n*
n*
»k.
»*
»*
85* 8 « *
SB* 30*
35is 8 6 *
3 6 * SUV
36
86 k
35k 36
Do pref., vot.tr. ctfs.
15
15
15* ^exas & Pacific............
1 0 * 154,
15* i5k
16*
i s * io k , 15* l o *
•173 17S 1175 175 *175 180 *170 180 ♦175 ISO
178 17S
-bird Avenue (N. Y .)...,
♦15
26
•14
25
•15
SO
20
*15
*15
25
•15
25
*30
•SO
40
♦30
40
•30
40
*35
50
40
40
♦33
Do
prof27* 23k
*29
83
•26
29k 30
30
80k
2SV 2 8 *
32* 84*
33
3 3 * 84
;>£ 38* 84*
3 8 * 84* f Tnion Pacific R y ..........
34*
34
2 .1 34*
65* 60*
8 0 * 07* ^
65* 6 6 *
6 0 * 60*
Do
...pref.
66* ovk
88M 07*
5*
574
0*
0 * Un. Pac. Den. &
tr. rec.
5*
6*
041 6
s*
5*
5*
6*
9
9
8*
8 * yiyTabush
9
8?4 9 *
9
h*
8*
32
21«i 92*
Do
pref.
82k
2 1 * 23* 2 8 * 24* 28 23* 2 2 * 28*
95:
* 95*
9 5 * 95*
965s
68*
95«
West Chicago Street.......
96*
2*
ss«
2*
2*
ar>
s 2*
2*
2*
1*
2*
25s
1*
H 4 * 15
15
1 4 * 14* • U * 15
15*
Do
pref. $5 do
14* 15*
12* 12*
*1
•1
*1
2
2
iscon. Cent,, vot.tr.ctfs.
*4
6
s
*4
8
♦5
Do
pref.
do
T fis e c lla u ’ * S t o c k s .
♦106
a io
1 1 0 m o 111 *110 ......
*106
110k m o
SO
3 7 * 38*
875,
38* 38
8 7 * 88*
38
37* 88*
89*
88
89
87* 87*
88
89
S37« 87*
86* 8 7 *
88* 89
pref.
4
(1
*25
40
•25
40
*25
80
30
*28
40
•25
40
*180 187 5180 132k *130 1S6 *180 136 •ISO 138 *130 186
a s * a i « 3 4 * So* 30 85* 85k 85k
84* 84*
3 3 « 81*
85
85
84
85
85
pref.
85
85*
S !> 85
34
85
84* 85
1
-4
14
13* 14*
SI 3 * 18*
13Vi 18*
13* 13V
fg.....
1 4 * 15
39
*39
40
pref.
40* 40*1
40
40k §19
89-H 39* 39*
35
38
33* 34
87* 88*
34
83*
84*
87* 40*
83* 8 6 *
88* 8 8 *
86M 89% 90
91
pref.
90
90%
flning..
143 1 8k 142k 144k 141?i 144k 143!l 144* 144 145V 143%145k
4
pref.
115V U S * 114* 11154 §11494 i n k H14& 114& U 15k 115k 115* 11594
•95
97
98
•96
98
98
•96
98
§97k 97k *96
144 146
14 4 144* 140>4 144
144W145% 142k 144k 142k145
• 132 L37 1132
184 1132 132 *131 130
Do
pref.
Do
dividend scrip.
9 9 * 99 99 *99 99k •06* 99* 99 99
*09k 99k *98
354
3*
SK
*3*
, 3*
3*
8*
8 is 8 * )ay State G as...,..........
?
3*
8
3*
Brooklyn Union Gas.....
127 L87* •125k128 1127* 187* §127 L2S
127 127
1 2 0 k 127
runsw. Dock & C. Jmpvi,
*1 0 * 1 1 * H O * 11* *10
10k 10k
9
*
. °«
*.......
% lolorado Coal& I. Devel.
Do
pref.
3k
♦ Ik
*ik
*ik
2k
* lk
3k
2k
24
135
25
*24
25
*23k So
2 , * •23 * 25
23k 23k
pref.
90 *..... . 90 *
90
Do
7
!6 «
6*
•5 *
8*
•5
*0
1
7
0«
e«
*0*
190
.90* IBS
[89
187 18?k <
189W191 x l«8 k l8 8 k 188 190
40
49k 62
4 5 * 45* 546* 4 5 * 43V 45 * 45k 47
49*
92^ 92->f *92M 96
♦98
90
pref,
9 2 * 92* §93 93
192* 92*
•40 ....... *40
*40 ....... (
*41
*41
•40
♦61
0 1 * 0 2 * 0 2 * 63V *63 65
63
63
•61
02* ♦61
*
00 ♦..... . 60
an *
60
132* *130 134 1 8 1 *1 8 2 * *131 132k *181
133k 183k ISO ISO
§124 12454
80
41
42
42% 4 2 * 45
45
46%
1 0 * 42*
4 1*
i o « 41
2 0 * 26* 26* 20* 2 6 * 21!* 20* 26^ *20k 20%
2 6 * 20*
00
72
78i* 78*
70* 70*
70* 7 2 *
7 2 * 73V '
71*
57
57V
07* 570j
01
62
57k 5bk J
6 6 * 59
58* 61
Do
90* 9
1
pref.
91
92
90*
92
6 1 * HIV
01
914,
jOUls).
*53
54
6 6 * 50V
5 0 * 51
50* 80*
x50k 5 1 *
SO* 50*
♦94
96
pref.
*94
'94
90
*94
96
90
95
95
00
§90
*45
52
•45
62
*45
52
*45
52
•45
52
*45
52
Llnnesota 1
99
98
9 6 * 99
97
99*
98k 9954 98k 99V 98
US*
3 3 * 835, •83 8 3 « '
32* 32*
32
83k
8 1 * 82*
3 1 * 32
pref.
97
*90
97
•96* 97
95* 96
595* » 6 * §97
*95k 97
37
37
37*
3 7 * 87(1
6 87* 87*
8 7 * 8 7 *1
88
8 8 * 38*
Do
pref.
1 1 2 * 1 1 2 * 111 111 §112 12 §1.10 ii o k
1118*118* 5112 k 11
6
0
6*
(! * f
0*
6
5*
6
•5 *
«*
6*
0*
8
8
8
*7 *
•7 *
*7 *
8 7
*7 *
8
H
•7 *
•7k
Do
*78
83
*73
83
*73
83
•73
88
*73
83
•73
8
,-5
Do
*20
*20
80
*20
30
*20
30
80
*20
30
80
•20
•35
43
43
43
•86
42 f
*35
*85
*35
*35
42
43
97
99* 7
90
90
n o*
88
94k
no* *87 , 90
9 3 * 97
0*
6*
6*
8*
6*
7
*0 «
7 7
6*
6*
0*
*0V
*4
*4
0
•4
•4
0 C
•4
6
*4
0
0
0
83* 34*
!M * 8 5 * '
34
84*
3 4 * 84* 84 34* 8 3 * 34
•330 ....... *330
•330
’830 ....... ’880
*380
106%107 I
100k108
105k107k 104^ 106k 108* 105* 105 k108
185 187k 180 180k 187k 187k il89k 189k I
184 184
87
186
•2
8*
*2
*2
*2
2* |
2
2
*2
3
8*
3k
Do
prof.
*6
7
7
*0
7
•5 «
*5%
6 '
♦6
6
♦6
7
..... *59& 00k *5im 60* ♦09* 6 0 * <Mlver Bullion Certlflo’t’s.
•09* 60VS
standard Rope & Twine.
9
9*
8*
8W
,8 *
S* 1
«*
8*
8*
8*
SI
32 r Penn. Coal Iron RR ...
8 0 « H I*
31* 82*
30* 82*
8 1 * 32
31* s
Do
prof.
Texas Pacific Land Trust.,
9
9
*8
9 1
8
*8
*8
9
*8
•8
*8
0
44
•41
45
♦40
45
♦42
*42
45 j nited States Express ..
*41
45
141k 41k
nited States Leather .,
7
•7 *
7*
7*
7
7 * 7*
7*
7*
7k
Do
pref.
72*
78k
7
7 2 * 73* 72* 72*
71k 72*
72k 78*
42* 44*
44
45
43* 445,
4 4 * 45* I
4554 4
42»X 45*
pref.
Do
105 105
10H k105
104 105k 105M 106k 105 105k 105% 105%
[Tells, Fargo A Co
122 122
120 125
120 123 1122 123 1124* 124* S125 120
V astern Union Telog’h.
M * 94*
94
94
84V 9 3 * 94*
» S « 94*
94*
94$< 95

H\

*4

h

P

H

&

&
.

&

'• m

&

SH

•m

It. &

SH

m

&

&

S

fl

&

S*N

»H

I

.

iliH

Q.,

Range fo r year ISPS. | .Ran^c fo r pre8 a leg
o f the O nbasieof roo-sh're lots viotis year (1S97),
Week.
Shares Lowest.
Highest. I Lowest, Highest,

i7WJ‘iy

4,025
1,743
10ft
1,00.1
2,87 I
SUO
.......
3,851
25(i

37 ‘1Aug 27
19k Jan
84%J'no!8? 47ft Aug 19
83% Aug 1" 91 J’ne 88
58 Aug l
07%Aug 22, ....
110k Mar 12 1 2 0 ^ Feb 7 10 3 k J a n
%J»ui 7 2k May 23
5k Fob 1
1
4 Feb 28
88%Jan
4?k-ifay 2i
57 Mar 23 71 Fob 7
1108 Feb 25 172%J’ly 13'
1,830
OkSep 1
5**.J'ne 1
1
6,272 151* Mar 25 23%Jan «
11,140 30 Mar 12 54kFeb 3
1,984 18%Mar 20 29 Jan 6
182 Jau 20 «185kJ'lv27
22 May 11 32 Aug 23
200 SOk'Mur 15 69kAug 27
8t lll6kM ar20 1125 Aug 31
140
8k Feb 1
1
B.kMar 7
835 •1 Fob
63 J'ne 1
1
5
40
1 Apr 25 23k.J*ne 11
3%
1,70
9 Aug 25
C Mur 26
823 52kMar 12 68S Aug 22
4
7,94
22k Feb 24 84% Aug 24
209
Jan 24
Ok Aug 30
7,959
7k Mar 12 14k Aug 18
27 Aug 11
150 18kJ’ly
60 78 Apr 20 90 Aug
450 128%Jan 12 171 Aug 20
1,730 12 Apr 13 23kAug 20
5,922
7 Apr 2
1 10 Aug 23
32,038 23%Mar 2« 3Ok Aug 27
12,55
8%Mar 12 16kAug 24
125 155 Apr 21 1 9 4 k F e b 10
112 Aug 20 i l 5 Feb 10
85 Aug 21 35 Aug 25
9%Dec
2,950 16kJan 12 SOkSofi 2
114,799 16k Mar 25 34k A up 30
131,74y 45tfjMar 12 07k Aug 27
1 Apr
0,3-1
4k Aug 8 lOkFeb 18
4%Mar
3,295
0kAug 3 i
6kMar 25
04,495 14kMar 7 24 k Aug 31 U k A p r
1,401 87WApr 25 !0 2 % Ja n 8 lOOkNov
3,500
k J ’ne
3k Jan 11
22
2k Apr
1,410
8 J’ly 9 10 Jan 12
1 J’ne
3%Jan 17
%Jan
6 Sep
5 Feb

24

W '\ J

6 J’iy 12

H
%

m

m

Gk'Nov
15 Dec

%J’ly
2 Oct,
15kJ‘ne
70 Nov
3k<me
136kJan.
28 Nov
80 J’ne
35 Feb
20 Jan.

'HH

72

H

S tree t R a ilw a y s .
BkinHgtAl at 5a 194 1A.fcO
BQnsCo.&S.—1st 5s.l941
Bklyn Rap.Tran
8to
Cal.Cem Gr.AB*kynl»t Be
Coney Island & Brooklyn.

L04
$109
ok Ex.
110
190
1 st 5s 1904..................IA J 108k
5b certfs lndbtl910..T&J 101

.—See

B ’k C.A New 5s ’3 9 . J& J

$112

Gr.SU&New l«t5s’OBAAO 104
O'p’t A Lorlmer St. 1st 0b. 110
F I uitb Co. BlovaL—Stock
4
Incomes............... .
10
Bond
Stock Exob. List.

*—3es

(G iv e n

Bid. Ask.
S tre e t R a ilw a y s ,
Ask. (
100 | Nasnan Elec 5» 1944.AAO 100
110 1 NewWmb’KAFllstexAkH 101 103
N T * Qub Oo 5s 1946. A&O
Ltst
Btelnway lstfla 1928.J& 5114* 115*
.J

10T

103

106
6
11

'

OTHER CITIES,
Balt L
Balt Consol—Stock—
Brldgep Tr-lst 5s '28.J&J §100
79*
Buffalo Street Ry—Sl/Ock,
1st consol 5a 1931 .F&A §113
Crosstown 5s 1932M&N m o *
Chicago City RR—Stock.. 290
CltLrena’ 8t (Ind’nap)-Sfc Phila

See

1st
105
SO*
115
111*
295
list, i

Bid.
0 **
}10()
00
§103
50
101
100
Phila
12*
70
{113
85
Comm on.................. .
98
Preferred . .............

Htreot l l a i l w » y « i .
Cleveland City Ry....... .
Clevel Oab-lBt5a ’09.JAJ
Cleveland Electric Ry... .
Con 5s 1913......... M&S
Columbus (Ohio)—Stock
Con 5s 1932.......... JAJ
Cro88t’wn-lBt5s,33J &D
Consol Tract’n (N J
Lake S (Chlc)Elev-Stock
t.
1st 58 1928............JA J
Louiav St Ry—5 p c bonds

)—See

49%Aug
96 Aug
52 Deo
60 Aug

22 Deo
8k Apr
SkNov
24 Jan.
830 Deo
91 Nov
152 Jan.
l k J ’ne
8 Apr
Gl%Aug
2k Deo
17 May
65 Apr
6 Apr
37 Feb
CkMay
50 Apr
10 J’ne
50 J’ly
97 Jan.
75%May

$ Ex dividend of 100 per cent In bonds.

c o n s e c u t iv e p a g e s ) .—

50 Aug

44

&

I Less than 100 shares.

a t fo o t o f

2 Aug
5 Sep
27%Sep
85 May*
Aug
24lkSep
41% ‘1
,J V
OOkJ’ly
37k May
60 Nov

Sep
21%Feb
88%Feb 109k Sep
10 May 23k Aug
3 May 13 Aug
SikM ar 90 Sep
8kApr 45 Aug.

m

• These are bid and asked prices ; no soles on this day.

O U T S ID E S E C U R IT IE S

15%Aug36 Aug'

22 May
70kMar
40 J’ly
38 Apr;

^l

m

U kSep
9k Sep
24kSep
112 Auc6k Jan
29 Jan
4%Aug8 Sep

29kApr

m

i

14-kDec

lOIMJan. 132k Sep
97 Feb 115k Aug
28%Ma.v 41kSbP

vtH

m

IgiX

SOkDeo
70k'Oct
172^ Aug
12 Sep
20kS©p
57k Sep
35%Sep
185 Jan
25k Sep
OlkDec
L22k Dec
9%Sep
64k Dec
20 k Sep
9 Aug
59%Dee
27kD»c
7
I4%gep
30 Sap
87kO«t
125 Aug
23k9ep
12kSep
38%Sep
15 Aug.
173 Deo
26kOot

S%Oet 16k Aug.
85 Jan 137 Sep

m

L

110 Sep

109kMar 159k Sep
lOOkJan 121kSep
85kJan 94 J’ne
67k Feb 90%Au£>
100 Feb 115 Aug

>

m m
m

» 3 « A dr

147k Feb 165 Oct
9kMay 26kSep
52k'Fe-b 80kSep
2 m Dec 27 J’ly
100kJan 119kNov

38H
32

H

[You LXVII,

SlkAug.
6kAug>
10%Jan
39kSep
340 Mas'
97%Deo
185 Sep
4k Aug,
13 Aug
OSkJan
1194 Jau
SSkSep
80 J’Jy9 Aug
48 J’ly
1Ok Aug.
72 Sep
25k Jon
7OkJan
80 Dec*
90%8ep

I Lowest is ex dividend.

STREET ’RAILW AYS, &o
Ask.
63
102
61
100
51
102
un*
list.
13k
89
100

S t r e e t R a li% v n v a .
la>vo Elect True (Cnic?..

Iiynn& B os-lst5a'24.J1;r
i
Met.rop West Side (Chic)

Bid.

Ask.

§104k 105
3
55

§ 53

8

New Orleans Tr—Com.... " ' i "
5
Preferred.............. .
Notes 6s 1904 ..
220 228
North Chicago—Stock.
1st 5s 1906-16........T&J §104 105
13
1
1
No Shore Tr (Bost)-Ooni.
77
1 *:
Preferred........ .
Buyer pays accrued Intere st,

75

$

1

S ept . 3, 1898.]
BONDS.
£5
W .Y.STO CK E X C H A N G E ■St
W e e k E x d in q S ept . 2,

A

T H E C H R O N IC LE.—BOND PRICES (5 pages) PAQS n
Frice
Week's
Friday , LRaange or
Sept. 2.
st Sale.

BONDS.

Range
S3 Jan.m1.
I 00 fro
,Bid. A sk. Low. H igh. No. Low. High

Frice
F riday,
Sept. 2 .

N .Y . STOCK E X C H A N G E
W e e k E n d in g S e p t . 2.

M-S
M-8

Bid. Ask.

469

Range
fro m
Jan. 1.
Low. High. No. Low. H igh

Ches A Ohio—(Con.)—
kron A Chic Jnc. See BAG.
Gen gold 4%s.............1992
87% Sale
87%
90
iabama Cent.
Sou Ry.!
!
93%
93%
Registered.............. 1992
Alabama Mid 1st gu
.1928,M -N * 92% 95
91
93%
R A A Div 1st con g 4s.l989 J - J *103% !
104" 104
Albany A Susq.
D A II. !
2d con g 4s............. 1089 J - J
90 Aug’98
Allegheny Val.
Penn Co.
Craig Valley 1st g 5s.. 1940 J - J
95% May’98
Am Dock & I.
Cen of N J.
88
89
88
90
Warm Spr Val lstg 5s.l041
89
81
Ann Arbor 1st g 4s...... 1995 Q-Jt
94%
95
Eliz Lex A B S gu g 5s. 1902
94% Sale
85
103% 103%
96%
Atch T
S Fe gen g 4s .1995 A - O
89% Mar’98
89* 89% Chic A Alton sink fd 0s. 1908
Registered.............. 1995 A - O
113% Apr.’98
71%
73%
72% Sale
Lou. A Mo Riv 1st 7s..1900 F - A 105% .
53* 73%
Adjustment g 4s.......1995 Novt
108 J’ne’9S
2d 7s.......................1900 M -N 107% .
107 J’ly ’98
Registered.............. 1995 Novt
Miss Riv B 1st sf g 0s.. 1912 A - O
Equip tr ser A g 5s.... 1902 J - J
Chic Burl A Nor.
C B A Q.
Chic A 8t Louis 1st 0S.1915 H - 8
115
Chic Burl A Q—Con 7s.. 1903 J - J
110
116
Atl Av Bklyn imp g 5s. .1934 J - J
99% Aug’98
Sinking fund 5s......... 1901 A - O 104% .
95
99%
105 Aug’98
Atlan A Danv 1st g 5s. .1950 J - J 97% 99
110% 109% 110%
Debenture 5s............. 1913
Atlanta A Char.
Sou Ry.
Convertible 5s............1903 M -S 117 118 119% 120
Austin N W.
So. Pac. i
Iowa Div sink fd 5s... 1919 A - O
at Creek AS. See Mich Cen1
111 Aug’98
, 115% 114% A tig’98
4s...........................1919 A -O
100 118%
102 Aug’98
alt A O 1st 6s Pkbg Br.’19 A - 0
, 115% 113% Aug’98
Denv Div 4s.............. 1922 F -A
113% 114
101% Aug’98
Trust Co. ctfs. of dep.......
118% Aug’9S
4s............................. 1921 M -S
Gold 5s ........... 1885-1925 F - A 118% .
80 118%
100 Aug’98
Chic A Iowa Div 5s.. ..1905 F -A .........100%
Coupons off......... .......... •..............
111% Aug’98
101% Sale 100
Registered..... 1885-1925 F -A ,
20 95 113% Nebraska Exten 4s.... 1927
112% 113
Registered...............1927
90 113%
Speyer A Co. certf of d e p ...... ....
97 May’98
Han. A St. Jos con 6s..1911
123 Aug’98
Trust Co ctfs of deposit.......... 114
117% Aug’98!
Chic Bur A Nor 1st 5s.l920 A - 0 .......I l l
97 117%
110% Aug’98
Consol gold 5 s ......... 1988 F -A , ....
110 Aug’98, ••• 103 116% C hicA E IU -lstsf cur 08.1907 J - I) 115% 116% 114% J’l y ’08
Registered....... .....1 9 8 8 F -A ....
116% Aug’98! ...
97 116%
Small................. .....1907 .J- D
J P M A Co ctfs of dep..........: ....
100 Aug’98
Balt B’lt lstg5smtgu.1990 M -S ....
84 101
132" Aug’98
1st con g 6s................1934 A -O *180’
General con 1st 5s....1937 M -N 100 10S 108
108
W Va A P 1stg 5s..... 1990 A - 0 ....
Registered............. 1937 M -N
Monon Riv 1stgug5s.1919 F - A ....
100% J'ne’98
104% Aug’98
105% 105%
ChicAIndCRy 1st 5s. 1936 J - J 102% .
Cen Ohio R lstc g 4%sl980 M- !■ 103
*
99 104%
Chicago A Erie.
Erie.
Col AClnM Istext4%sl930 J - J ....
Ak AC J I8tiutgug5s.l930 M -N ................ 1
105 Aug 98 •
105 105
Chic Ind A Louisville—
105 Aug’98
Louisv N A A Ch lst0s..’lO
115% J’ne’98
100 105
Coupons off............................ 102%....
J *114
01
107% J’ly ’98
Chic Ind A L ref g 5s. .1947
Pitts A Con 1st g 4s.. .1948 J - J
............
92 Aug’98
105%107%
J
B A O S Wistgug4%s. 1990 J - J *101% 103 102 Aug’98 j •
Refunding g 0s.......... 1947
107 Aug’98
98% 103
J
00 J’ne’97 •
B A O SW Rycong4%s 1993 J - J .............
Chic Milwaukee A St Paul—
Q
27% J’ne’98 .
1st luc g 5s ser A . .. .2043 Novt
1st 7s $ gold R D....... 1902 J - J *151
147 Aug’Q
27
27%
Rarw*« B..................2043 Dect *
*2043
9 J’ne’98 •
8%
1st 7s £ gold R D ... .1902 J -J
8
Series H
145 J’l y ’98
1st Iowa A D 7s......... 1899 J - J
B A O S W Ter Co gu g 5s.*42 M -N
Ohio A Miss 1st con 4s. 1947 .1 - J
141 Apr.’98
105 Aug’98
104% 105%
1st C A M 7s...............1903 J -J 151
22% J’ly ’98
150 Aug’98
120 % 122 % Chic Mil A St P con 7s. 1005 J - J *151
2d consol 7s............ 1911 A - 0
151% 151%
106
1st Spr’gdeld Dlv 7s. 1905 M-N 100 Sale 1C0
1st I A D Exten 7s.. ..1908 J - J 152
' 102% 108
1st Southwest Div 6s. 1909 J - J
117 Aug’98
1st general 5s......... 1082 J - D
110 M ar’98
1st La Crosse A D 5s.. 1919 J - J
Beech Creek.
N Y CAH .
118
1st So Minn Div 0s... .1010 J - J 118 Sale 118
Bel A Car.
S t L A r i tl.1
1st Hast A D Div 7s... 1910 J -J *128% 180% 128 Aug’98
Boonev Bridge. See 3 K A T.
1
109 Oct.’97
5s...........................1910 J - J
Bway A 7th Av. See Met S Ry. i
118% J’ly ’9S
112 J’l f ’98 •• j 112 113
Chic A Pac Dlv 0s......1910 J - J
Bklyn City 1st con 5s 1910-41 J - J
94
Bklyn El Tr Cocf Istg0sl924 ........
94 Sale
! ! 79
Chic A P W lstg 5s....1921 J -J 117% 117% 117% Aug’98
94%
114% Aug’98
80 J’ne’98 ••
80
80
Tr Co ctfs 2d g 5s..... 1915......... ....
Chic A Mo Riv Div 5s. 1920 J - J
08 May’98 •• i 08
Mineral Point Dlv 5s..l910 J - J 110 111 107 M ar’98
08
3d Instal pd.................... ....... ....
70% Dec’97
112 Apr.’98
Chic A L Su Div g 5s. .1921 J - J
8 A BBT Cocfs lstgug5s’4 2 ...... ....
114 J’ne’98
Wis A Minn Dlv g 5s. .1921 J - J *113% .
3d Instal pd............................. ....
Dn ElTrCocfs lstgug0s’37 ...... ....... 94% 93% Aug’981
113 J’l y ’98
80
04
Terminal gold 5s.......1914 J - J
127% Jan.’98
Bklyn Rap Tr g 5s........ 1945 A- O 105% Sale 105
Far A Sou assu g 08.. .1924 J -J
106
91 100
106% May’97
Cont sink l und 5a......1916 J - J
Bklyn A Montauk. See L Isl.
112 114 112 Aug’98
Bruns A West 1st g 4s.. 1938 J - J ...............
Dak A G t Sog 5s....... 1010 J - J
Gen gold 4s series A .. 1989 J-J§ 105%...... 105% ' 105%
Buff N Y A Erie. See Erie.
105% Feb.’98
107%
Buff R A Pgen g 5s......1937 M -S *104
105% 105
Registered.............. 1989 !-J5
104%108
Debentui^ 0s...........194 7 J - J ; ................. I......
120% 121 120 M ar’98
Mil A No 1st M L 0s. .1010
Boch A Pitta 1st g 0a..1021 F -A 123% 128% 127 Mar’98i
121 Aug’98
1st consol 0s............ 1913 J - D ....... 121
127 127
Consol 1st 0s..........192v J - D 123 ....... 123
123 I
122 124% Chic A Northw—Con 7s.l915 F .......143 142% Aug’98
......115
115 Aug’98
Apr* 97
Cl A Mah 1st gu g 5s. .1943 .1 - J *120 ....... 103
Gold 7s..................... 1902
D
114% Aug’98
Buff A Southwest. Sea Erie.
Registered...............1902 J - D ....... 115
Buff A Susq 1st gold 5s.. 1913 A -O ........................
124% Aug’98
Sinking fund 0s.. 1879-1929 A -O
115 J’ly ’98
Registered................1913 A- O .................i-----Registered......1879-1929 A - O
Bur C R A N 1st 5s....... 1900 .1 -1) * 100 % ....... 107
111 Aug’98
107
Sinking fund 5s. 1879-1929 A- O ♦ 110
104%109
Con 1st A col tr g 5s... 1934 A - O *10e>%.......107
107% J’ly ’98
J’ly’0t
Registered......1879-1929 A -O
100 109
Registered............. 1934 A - 0 ................. ..
Sinking fund deb 5s... 1933 M-N 118% 119 119 Aug’98
M A S t L 1st gu g 7s.. 1927 J - I ) ......................
117 M ar’98
Registered...............1933 M -N
C R I F A N W 1st g 0s..’201 -O 107 ....... .108 Dec’97
A
109% :09%
25-year debenture 5s. .1900 «■ N
109% M ar’0H
Jan.'98
1st gold 5s................. 1921 A -O ................ 105
Registered............. 1900 M-N
105 105
anadaSouth 1st 5s...l90H|J - J *108 108% 109% Aug'98
110 Aug’98
80-year debenture 5s.. 1921 A - 0
,107% 111%
117% Feb.’O
H
2d 5s..................... 1013 <*1-8 *107 110 109^6 110%
Registered.............. 1921 A - 0
:105 111
105% Aug’98
Registered................ 1913 M -S I
---- Jain’97
106 ’
Extension 4s.... 1886-1920 F -A
103 J’ne’98
CarbAShawu. SeeStLAATH.
Registered......1880-1926 F- A
Carthage A Ad. SeeNVCAlI.,
103% 108%
Gen gold 8%s............. 108' M-N
C R la F AN. See B C R A N.
Registered.............. 1987
Central Ohio. See Balt A O.—;
Bscan A L Sup 1st 0s. .1901
Cen HR A Bkg Co of Ga.—
Des Mo A Minn 1st 7s. 1007 F -A
Collateral gold 5s....... 1937 M-N
Iowa Midland 1st 8s... 1900 A -O
87
93*
92% J’ne’98
CentofOa Ry—ls t g 5*..1945 F-A4
Winona A St Pet 2d 7s. 1907 M-N
114% J’ue’98
114 119*
Registered.............1945 F-At
MU A Mad 1st 6s....... 1905 M- 8
90% Sale
Consol gold 5s........... 194 5 M-N
90%
84% 92%
Ott C F A St P 1st 5s..1909 M
90
Registered............ 1945 M-N
North lUinots 1st 5s... 1910
Sale
9 1st pref Income g 5g. ..1945 Oct.*| 42% oa.«
Mil L S A W lstg 3s.. 1921
30
41
44%
^ 2d pref Income g 5s— 1945 Oct.*' ....... 13
Convertible deb 5s.. 1907
14 Aug’
10 % 15%
113d pref Income g 5s....1945 Oct.*
6
7%
0% Aug’98
Ext A Imp 8 f g 5s.. .1020
4% 8 *
fid A N Dlv lstg 5s....1940 J - J * 90 ....... 92 Jam’98
92
02
Mich Dlv lstgold 03.1924
Mobile Dlv lstg 5s....1940 J -J * 95 ....... 90 J’ly ’98
95%
Ashland Div lstg 0sl925
Mid Ga A Atl Dlv 5 s . 1947 J -J ....... 90
Incomes................. 1011
Cent of N J—1st con 7s. 1899 Q-Jt 108%....... 103 Aug’98
108 104% Chic Rock I A Pac 0s.... 191
1st convertible 7s......1902 M-N ................. 113% Dec’07
Registered............. 1917
Convertible deb 6s.... 10Oh m -N ................ 112% J’ly ’98
i 10%112%
Debenture 5s............. 1921
General gold 5s......... 1987 J - J .........114% 114
Registered............. 1921
114
109%115
Registered..............1987 Q-Jt *118% 114% 113% Aug’98
108%114%
General gold 4s......... 1988
Leh A W B C oon as78.1900 ____ ■ 99% 100 101% 101%
Q-M)
00% 103%
Registered.........
1988
— -*1 v
-i
5b ..........................1912 (M-N
91 J’ly *98
90
93
Des M A Ft D 1st 4s.. 1905
Am Dock A Imp Co 5s. 1921 J - J
118% Aug’98
110 110
1st 2%s.................. 1905
N J South lnt guar 6a. 1800 J - J •102
Extension 4s.......... 1905
Central Pacific—
K eokA D esM 1st 5s.. 1923
Speyer A Co ctfs dp A .1898 ......
108 103
103 Feb.’98
Small.............................
Speyer A Co ctfs BCD. 1899 ......
103 103
Chic A St L.
At T A 8 F.
103 Feb.*98
Speyer A Cocttsdep E.1900 ......
Chic St L A N O.
1 1 Cent.
1
Speyer A Co ctf FGHI. 1901 ...... i
Chio 8t L A Pitta.
Pa Co.
San Joaquin Br g 0s. ..1900 A -O 104
102%105
102% J’ne’98
Chic St P M AO oon 0s. .1930
Guaranteed g 5s........ 1939 A - O
Ch St P A Min 1st 0s. .1918
Speyer A Co eng eta.......1
....... 1 ................
Nor Wisconsin 1st 0s..1930
Land grant gold 5s----1900 A -O *102
...... 102 M ar’98
100%102
8t P A S a t y lstg 08.1919
C A O Dlv ext g 5p,,.,19l8 J - J *102%...... 101 Jan.’98
101 101
Chic Ter Transfer g 4s ..1947
Western Pacific g fin. 1890;J - J | 102 ...... 104 J’ne'98
101 104
Ch A West I 1st s f g Os.1919
No of Cal 1st gu g 0s.. 1007; J - J 108% Sale
General gold 0s.......... 1932
100
Guaranteed gold Os.1938! A -O ............... 103% 103ii
Chic A West Mich Ry 5s. 1921
OentWaah 1st gdstrctfsl939!...... j ...............
40 Feb.’9t
40
Coupons off...............,1921
Charles A Sav 1st g 7s.. 1936 J - J ...............
Olu H A D con s f 7s... .1905
119 J’ly ’98
118 120%
Ches A O—g. 0s ser. A ... 1008 A-Ot ....... 1 2 u
2d gold 4%s............... 1937
115%120%
Gold 0s...................... 1911 [A -O V
122%
Cia D A I 1st gu g 5s. .1941
120% Aug’98
l.t cons
...............1B8H M-N
115% 110
81 111 117
0 I St L A C.
CC C A St L.
1989 M -N
Registered........
113 114% Olu S A C .
114 Feb.’98
C C C A St L.

&

Seeg..
See
See
See

M-S
M-S
M-N

See

B

M-N

See
See

&

M-N
M-N
M-S

% ioi%

See

ici*

73% 90
99" 105%
90
94
95
99%
97% io T '
112% 113%
107 111
107 107
113%118%
103%107
104% 110%
104%121%
109%111
98 104
O
'? 101%
99 100
95%101%
97
97%
119 128
105 110%
114% 110%

i‘22" 182"
101% 108%
101 106%
100%109
112
80
96
• 140

115%
92
107
147

See
See

9iH\

C

42«S

See

See
See

To*

ft Ht

See
See

No price Friday; these are latest btd and asked this week, t Bonds due July, t Bonds due Nov.

O U T S ID E - S E C U R I T IE S

(Given

at foot of

See

Bid. Ask.
Exch 1st, •
15
96
98

5108%
Y Stk
100

5101
5111

320

w go

Bid. |Ask.
S treet K a llw n m .
G an Secu rities.
Prov * Pawt’ck-lst5s ’38 5105 100
West End—
Boston
Worcester (Mass)Tr-Com
81
Rlchm RyAElec-lst 5s’20 5 78
Preferred........ .
11%
93 ICO
Con 8. 1980........ AJcO
Scranton Traction...... 50 t 12
15
N E W FORK.
1 0 0 % 107% , Central Union Gas—
1st 5s 1927........... JAJ
59
Bo Side El (Chic)—Stock.
60
Twin City R Tr—Com....
10
20 I Con Gas (N Y )—Stock—N
, Deb 5s 1908..........MAN
Eqult Gas......... .......
72
Un’d TrAKlec(Prov)-8L’k 70
1st 5s 1«33
......MAS 5108 109
1st Os 1899.......... FAA
95
95% I Con. 5sl932.......... MAS
Oon 1936....... ...MAN
I Mutual Gas...............

| Bonds due June.
|

7 consecutive

102%
116
335 i

T Bonds due Jam

pages).— QAS

G a s S e cu ritie s.
New Amsterdam Gas—

N Y A East River Gas—
1st 5s 1944............JAJ
Consol 5s 1945..... JAJ
Nor Un—
lBt 5sl027........... MAN

1st 5. 1980...... ..MAN

$ Bonds due May.

SECURITIES, &c.

Bid. Ask
G a s S e c u ritie s .
BROOKLYN.
29% Brooklyn Ua Gas—N Y St ock E xoh.
1st con 5s—N Y Stock Exch.
7
1
Williamsburg Gas—1st 0s 5101*6 102*
102
OTHER CITIES.
Balt.
Consolldat—
1 1 0 % 112 BaltimoreGas—N Y Stock Exch. List.
Bav State
108 109
Incomes....................
Boston UnltedGas Bonds- -Bosto nList
95
90
Buffalo City Gas—Stock.. 23V6 2 4 «
let 5s 1947..........A&O 5 95M 98*
186 140
150 155
ner sh *»re .
*110 119
Bid. Ask.

29
70
5101

Se e

THE CHRONICLE.—BOND PRICES (5 pages) r aQ a.
E

470

R ange \ |

P ol. OXVIl.fe'

Price

Week's | | g j R ange
BONDS.
!
BONDS.
! 51
from
F riday,
/Vidov,
R ange or
rom
H.Y. STOCK EXCHANGE i t Sept. *2, I1 Last Sale. )§*<$ --------- ------- , i N .Y . STOCK E X C H A N G E ; i C | Sept. 2. LRaange or g-gij Aan. 1.
Jaiu 1.
^
st Sale, <
S
. 2. i
■
WrtK JEsw sg SKfT, 2. -•Bid, A ik . !---------------- T fio . Low. High\ [ W E
,---------------Bid. Ask. Low. B i a h
Low H ig h 'TTLow. H igh
lint A Pure M g fi»., ,.1920 A - Of 115
117 Aug'98
110 117%
IV l«

1

W'wfc'j

t5*5
c
q

c
q

eek

0 t r * 8 Ky B a lt 1 st « 5 s .lM S :J
U ftarfleld A M ah. S f t B i,A i’.

g

C: A U f es * 2 1 #s..l«S0 F- A
<
" 7 5 " 70 Ang’OS
C A C « l IH 5s tr reu... 1 WI’ J - J *
T
H
83 J’ue’O ....
90
0 C C A St L—lieu « 4*,. JOOS J - D • 82
90 Aug’98 ••••
Cairo Dir 1st gold
.198# J - J
M-N
IO0 1 10
100
M- N
0C Mar'98
Registered.
M- b * 00
*
8pr i Col Div
J - J * SO
67
90
87 ! 1
00
90
90
1
Cln W A M Dir l st g 4s. 1991 J - J
:
99% M'ay’OSj ••••
Clo i St L C lstg 4a.l03f O-M 101
O-Kt
M -N ::::: ■ — ■
J -.1
11*4** Oct.*'97
Cin S Cl con 1st g 5sl_.
107% Feb’97
Ind B! at W 1st pf 7#.. 1900 .1 -J
OInd a W 1st pf 5s.. .1988 Q-Js
t
Peo & East 1st con 4s, 1040 A - O 799^ Sale
21 Sate
Income 4s.*. 1 9 9 0 A p r
01 G 0 < Ind lets f 7s... 1899 M -g l o ; % ...... 104 Aug'98
fe
130 ...... 135% J'iy’98
Consol 7s.a............... 1 9 U J - D
Consol sinking fd 7s..,1914 J - 0 130 .....
General oonflolgold Os. 1934' J - J 125 ..... IS T Jt M ay"98
Registered............ 1934, J - J
107% OcL’97
CAS 1st M C CC & 17s. 190l A - 0
103 May’98
Cl Lor it Wh eon 1st 5 5 .1 9 3 8 A - O
Clev A MariettaPa RR.!
,
Cler A Mahon Val g 5s.. 1938, J - J 120
c
Registered............ 1938 <Ju-J
OiOT A Pitts.
Penn Co. |
57
C01 Mldl’d— 1st g2-3-4s. 1947 J - J 6 1 Sale
73
65
73 Sate
1st g 4 s ................. 1047 J - J
Col A 9th Av.
Met St Ry.
Colnm A Greeny.
So Ry.
75 OcL’97
OoJ H V t Tul—Con K 5s. 1881 M - S
79
70
79 Sale
J P M A Co eng cfe $85 pd. ** ...
General gold 0s..........1994 J - D
57
00
61 Feb.’98
40 ......
General lien gold 4s... 1096 J - J
Registered............. 1996 J - J
Col A Cln Md,
B A O.
Col Conn A Term.
NA W
Conn A Pas Rlvs 1st g 4s.’43 A - O
ak A G t So.
C M A StP.
alias A Waco. Sf«M KAT.
Del Lack A Western 7s.. 1907 M _
122 Apr.’98
126 J’ly ’98
8yr Bing A N Y 1st 7s. 1906 A - O 124
Morris & Essex 1st 7s. 1914 H -K
140 Aug’98
7b .......................... 1900 J - J
. 106% 109 NOV’9^
b...................1871-1901 A -O 112
107
107
139 J’ne'9l
1st con goar 7s.......1915 J - D *112
Registered........... 1015 J - D
136% J’ly '98
N Y Lack A W 1st 6s.. 1921 J - J
118% Nov’07
Construction 5s......1023 F -A
Warren 2d 7s.,.......... 1900 A - O
108 Aug'98
Del & Hod 1st Pa DIv 7s. 1917 M -8 142 ..... 145 Aug’98
143 May'97
Registered..... ,...,.1917 M -8
Alb A S .6 1st con gu 7sl906 A - 0
125
125
Registered.............. 1906 A - 0
115 J’ne’98
Gold Os,...............-..1906 A - 0
117 Feb.’98
Registered............1906 A - 0
Rene A Sar lst7s.......1921 11-N
148% Aug’97
Registered............. 1921 M -N
141 May*98
Del Rlv HR Bge.
Pa RE.
Den Con Tr Co 1st g 5s..1933 A -O
Den Tram Co con g 68.1910 J - J
Met Ry Co 1st go g 6s. 1911 J - J
Den A RGr 1st gold 7s.. 1900
Ill
..... 111% 111%
97
97
98
1st con g 4
s
.
, 1986 J - J
Improvement gold 5s. 1928 J - D
Dea M A Ft D.
C R 1 P.
Dea M A Minn.
Ch A N W.
Des M Un Ry 1st g 5s... 1917 M -N ♦103 .....
99% J‘ne’98
DetMATol.
L S A M So.
D 87
Det A Mack 1st lien g 4s. 1995
D
55
Gold 4s..................... 1995
107 105% 106%
Dnl A Iron Range lBt5s.l987 A -O
Registered................. 1937 A -O
2d lien mortgage 0a... 1916 J -J
Dal Red W A S 1st g 5s. 1928 J -J
92%Feb.’98
Dnl So Shore A A t g 5s. 1937 J - J
. 112% 112% 112%
ast of Minn.
StPMAM.
a s t T Y a A G a . Ses.SoRy,
B i s Lex A B 8.
C A O.
Him Cort A No. SeeLebANY.
113 J’ly *98
Mrie 1st ext. g 4g....,,.,.194r M -N 118
i 2d ext gold 5a..,,,,.,.. 1919 M -S
119% Aug’98
8d ext gold 4%s.,...... 1923 M -S
113 Aug* 98
4th ext gold 5s..........1920 A -O
117 J’ne'98
5th ext gold 4s........ 1928 J - D U 0 2 ,
104% J’ne’98
litoonabl gold 7s......1920 M -S 140%
145 Aug’98
140 May’98
; ‘1st consol gold fd 7a. .1920 M -S
• Long Dock con gold 08.1935 A -O *137 189 138 Aug’98
183 J’ne’98
BuffN Y A Erie 1st 7s. 1910 J - D
1 ,Bnff A 8 W gold 0 s....1908 J - J ♦ i i o “ !!.'!!
l
Sm all.......... ................. J - J
100 Feb.*98
. Jen RR 1st gu gold 5a.l909 A-O)
Chic A Erie 1st g 5s... 1982 M -N l l lt g gale 111% 112%
Coal A RR 1st c gu 08.1922 M -N ► 0
1 0 ......
Dock A Imp 1st cur 6h 1013 J - J
.
“ N Y A Green Lgug5s.l940 M -N
105% 0<Jt/97
_ Small........ ......................
Hrle 1st con g 4a pr bda .1990 J - J
93% ■03" *93% 38
Registered....... .
1996 J - J
liteon genbeng 4s....1990 J -J
73 Sale "72% ' 74%
Registered..... ..1096 J - J
N Y BA W —1st ref 5a. 1037 J - J
108
108
92% Aug’98
2d gold 4%a..................... 1937F - A
General g 5 a ...,.,,,. 1940 F- A
89%
809
Terminal latg 5b. . . . 1943 M -N
109% J’ly ’9'
Regis $5,000 each. 1943 M -N
WllkA Eas 1 gu g 5b1942 J - D 99% ■
at
100 Aug'98
Mid RRofNJ 1st g 6s 1910 A - 0
, 124 120% Aug’98
■■can A L Sup.
C A N W.
00
05
Huroka Springs 1st g 08.19331 F - A
05 Nov’9
114 J’ly ’98
fcv A T II 1st cqu 08..... 19211 - .)
.7
85
89
80 Sale
let general gold 5a,...1942 A - 0
90
M t Vernon 1st 0a....... 19231A - O
.
75 .....
gull CoBr’ch l8tg5s..Ui30;A-O
EvAIndlstcongu g 6s..l020 J - J 88
92
89%J 1
1
FlWKO & Bo.
Ch M * St p j

A».

X

A

79 2
29

See

See

H

See

See

See

See

D

See

7

114 US

♦i'32%
115%.

See

N

See
See
See

97%
94% Aug’08

&

See
See

E

n ii’

.

107**I!!!!

*89 *!!!"

See

Set

OUTSIDE SECURITIES

F

7SH
82
00%
100
03

a

G

h

See

See
See
See
See
e
Sec

H
I

95
95
05% Aug'98

105 Mar'98
7* %
78
62
02
96
103
92

04

94%

VP IP

Ask.
78
103
List.
95
75
00
83
102
5
50

4

7

i

Bernla due April.

85
83

87,
ICj

05
95%

105

105
79%
54% 64

05

88% 97

97
Aug’97
J’Jy *08

92

12

92

88

94%

! 109%115
; 108% 109%
105 105
101 102%

109% Aug’98
109% J *Iy *98
105 Mar’Ui102% Apr.’98

1 st gold 8s s te r lin g ,,., 1951 M -S
R eg istered .....................1951 M - 8
Coll T ru st gold 4 s ........1952 A - 0 102 ....... 102% J’ly ’98
R e g iste re d .....................1952 A - 0 ............. 103 Apn’08
L N O & T ex gold 4s. .19 5 8 M -N .......102% 101% 101%
R e g iste re d .....................1953 M -N
101 Mar’9*
58
61%
99 Sop.’97
Coll tr 2-10 gold 4 s .... 1004 J - J
05
73
R e g iste re d .....................1901 J - J
W estern L ine 1 st g 4 s.l9 5 1 F - A 103
103% Aug’08
R e g is te re d ..................1951 F - A
"9 4 "
"9 4 "
L ouisville D iv g 3% s ,19 5 3 J - J
»2 M .
R e g is te re d ...............,1 9 5 3 J
80% 80 Aug'98
S t L ouis Div g 3 s ........ 1951 J - J
R e g is te re d ...................1951 J - J
Gold 3% s.......................1951 J - J 94% .
94" "94 %
R e g is te re d ___. . . . 1951 J - J
C airo B ridge gold 4s. .1950 J - D
R e g is te re d ......... 1950 J - D
M iddle Div reg 5 s ........1921 F - A
Spring D iv 1st g 3 % s.l9 5 1 J - J
122 128
R e g is te re d ...................1951 J - J
125% 126
C hic S t L A N O g 5 s ..1 9 o i J - D
123 Aug’98
137% 144
R eg istered ...................1951 J - D
118% Apr ’01
G old 3% s...................... 1051 J - D
107 118%
R eg istered ........1 9 5 1 J -D
136 142%
Mena D iv 1st g 4 s .... 1951 J - D
108% Jan.’98
R eg istered .................1951 J - D
130% 138%
B ellev A C ar 1 s t 6 s . . . . 1923 J - D n e
S t L Bou I s tg u g 4 a ... 1931 M -S 00
"o d " NoV’O
?
108 108
C arb A S l e t g 4 s ..........1932 M -S 89
143 145
In d B1 A W . See C C C A S t L.
120% 125% In d Deo A W 1 s tg 5 s .. ..1935 J - J * 10 1 % ....... 101% Aug’98
In d 111 A la 1st gold 4 s .. 1980 J - D ►96 ....... 86 Jan.’98
1 st e x t gold 5 s ................ 1943 M -S ♦106 ......
110 118%
I n t A G t No 1st gold 6s. 1910 M -N ....... 124 120% Aug’98
117 117
91
2d gold 5s..........................1900 M -S 87 Sale 87
3d gold 4s........................1 0 2 1 M - 8 56 60 56% 58%
141 145
Iow a C entral ls tg o ld 5s. 1938 J - D 104 Sale 104 104
Iow a M idland. S ee Ch A N W .
Jefferson R R . S ee E rie.
R See S
K al AAAMGich.. See TLol & M SC..
an
AO
108 111%
87% 9?% K C A M R&B 1 st g u g 58.1029 A -O
77% 78% 76% 78%
85% 94% K C P A G 1 st A col g 5a. 1923 A - 0
K an 0 A P ac. See M K A T.
K ansas M id. See S t L A S F
K entucky C ent. See L A N .
97 100
K eok A Des M. See C R I A P.
K ings Co El se r A lB t g 5a ’25 J - J
57% Aug’98
F u l El 1 st g u g 5s s e r A .’20 M -8
45
49 J 'ly ’98
104 110% K noxville A O hio. See So R y.
rie W 1 st g 5s.
J J
116 Aug’98
L ake EgoldA5s.................,.11987 J -- J *116
2d
941
*103
104 Aug’98
N o rth O hio 1 st gn 5 s .. 1945 A - 0
103% 101 Aug’98
92% 92%
101 112% L ak e S hore A M ich SouthD e tM o n A T o l 1 st 7s. 1906 F - A
121 Apr.’O
R
L ake S hore d lv ld 7 s ... 1899 A - 0 108% . . . 104% Aug’98
Consol 1st 7 s ........ ...1 9 0 0 J - J 105% . . .
105% Aug’98
R eg iste re d ............... 1900
105% 106% 106% 100%
Consol 2d 7 s . . , . . , , . . 1903
117
117
112 110
R e g is te re d .. . ......1 9 0 3 J - D
115% .T
’ne’98
110% 119%
G old 8% s.......................1997 J - D .... . 106% 100% Aug’98
108 113
R e g is te re d .. . . . . . . ,1997 J - D 106% Sale 105% Aug'98
118 118
CinASp 1 s t g u L SAM S 7s 01 A - 0
104%105
108% Deo *07
K A A G R I s tg u c 5 b. 1938 J - J
188 147%
M ahon C oal R lt ls t 5 s .’34 J - J
125 Deo’97
140 143
L eh Y ai (P a) cob g 5a .1997 M -N
104 Aug’98
183%139
R egistered ................... ..1 9 9 7 M -N
133 138
L eh V N Y 1 s tg u g 4 % a .. 1940 J - J
R e g is te re d .......................1940 J - J
L eh V T e rR y I s tg u g 5s 1941 A -O
111
111
106 100
R e g is te re d ................... ..1 9 4 1 A -O
. Ill
109% J’l y ’97
108 118%
L V Coal Co I s tg u g 5 s .. 1933 J - J
02% M ar’08
R e g iste re d .........................1983 J - J
L eh A N Y 1 st gu g 4 b . ..1945 M-fc * 90
91 Aug'98
R e g iste re d .........................1945 M -S
E l C A N l s t g Ia tp f 0 s .l0 1 i A - 0
84% 94%
G old g u a r 5 s.............1 9 1 4 A - 0
101 8©p.*0?
0 6 " '76 ‘ L eh A W likes? b. S e e C e n t N J .
L eroy A G aney V al. S ee M o P.
99 108& L e x A v A P F . See M e t S t Ry.
84% 92% L itc h C ar A W 1st g 6 s .. 1910 J - J
L ittle R AM em l s t g 5s 1937 )
83
98
T ru s t Co c e r t f s . )
109%111%
L ong Dock. See E rie.
L ong Isla n d —
93% 101
1 st con g 5s...........
1931
Jl
114%121
119% J’ne’98
1 s t c o n g 4 s .................1 9 3 1
J§
G eneral gold 4 s ...........1938 - D 90
90 J’ne’98
F e rry 1st gold 4 % s,. . . 1922 M -8
86% Apr.’9b
112 118
82
89
Gold 4 s ...............................1982 J - D • 01*
D e b en tu re gold 5 a ... . . 1034 J - D
N Y A R B l a t g 5 s .... 1927 M- 8
100 May’97
2d Incom e...............1 9 2 7 Sep
77% 89%
N Y B A M B con g 5&,» 196 A -O
107% Deo’97

at foot ot
—Sec

See

V

See

Bid. Ask. !
ib is H ecurifles.
( ju s 8 e c ttrb le i.
Bid.
Consuui Gas (J City)- Stk 75
Ch»rIe4tou (S C) Gas...25 t ...... 18
101
CharUers Valley Ga?-....
Detroit Gus—
N Y Stoo k List.
Chicago Consumer?) 1st 5s
Chicago Gas
N Y Sto ck Exjui.
Consol 5s 1918
N. y. e x .
Cicero Gas Co 1st 6s......
Income 5 « ..................
90
! ! ! ! ’.: 194
.
37 j 39
Fort Wayne (ind)—
-sto ,'k 70
•jlty Gas (Norfolk V a )....
1st 0S........ ................
Ut 6s 1025...........JttJ 85
OS 1105
Grand Rapids—-Stock,....
Cot umbos (O) Gas—Stock 85 | 67
80
lsi. 5s 1932............ J J 410-0 ,102
.fe
1st os 1015..........FA A 5160%
ConcolKlat Gas (Bull) .V# BaR Liist.
■Hartford (C l) Gas . . .25 t 42
Consolld Gaa iJ^J)—Stck
1
tidisua Nat A 1 ) as—Stk
1
54
18
21

—Sec

ept

i »t consol gold 6s.... 1939 M-NI 94
Pt Huron Dtv 1st g 5S.1939 A - O• 95
95%
Fla Cen A Pen 1st g 5#.,1918:J - J |
|
*103
1st land kt oxt gold 5s. 1980 J - J
Consol gold 5s....... . 1943 !J - J "9 0"
Ft S A V B B«t*.
BtLASF. I
Fort St
D Co 1st g 4%s!94 J J - J
Ft W A D G—1st g 4-6s.l921. J - I>| 7 7 Sale
80
S8% Ft W A Rio Gr 1st g S-4s. 192* J - J
62 Sale
80
9C% Fulton Hlev.
Kings Co KJ.!
/ ^al Bar A 8 A.
S P Co.
98% 101
95% 98
vJftl HAH o f ’82 1st 5S.1013 A - O
Ga A /Via Ry 1st pf g 5s. 1945 A - <) ....... 97
Ga Car A No 1st gu g Os.1929 J - J
Georgia Pacific.
So Ry.
Grand Rap & lad.
Pa Go.
an A St J.
CBAQ
70
80
ousatonlo.
N V N il AH
14
21
Houst 1 A W T 1 st 58.1033 >1-N
5
94 Bale
102 105%
Hous A Tex Con.
So PCo.
131% 187
llinois Cent l»t g 4s... 1951 J - J 110% .
Regi.Htered...... .
127%127%
1951 J - J 109% .
1st gold 8%s..............1951 J - J
Regtstered..............1951 J * ....... 104
«9W
82
68
90%
90

► price Friday; those are latent bid and asked this week, t Bonds due August,
No

(G iv es

n d in g

100 104
103 103
97%102%
101 101
101
15

105

9m

94%

so "

so“

02% ' 04%

115% 123%

103% 103%

97

86

104

88

110
78
44
97

105

123%
92 .
00
105

05

81%

104
99

104
104%

107* 112%
92% 92%
01** ' 92^

117

120
90
90

85^
861

j Btnda due January. ^ Bonds due July.
|

ooSTSecctive pages ).— GAS

SECURITIES, &g

Bid. Ask.
G a s H ecurifles.
lilts Seenvlf low.
Bid.
Indianapolis Gaa—Stock. 1 1 c 125
New Orleans Gas Light..
Ohio Indiana—Stock,.'.
1st 08 1920..........M&N 105 100
09
Jersey City Gas Light..... 100
| Peoples Gas & Coke—N Y Stock
Laclede Gas—N Y Stock Kxch.
79
Philadelphia Co.........50
j Lafayette (Ind) Gas—Stlt 75
87
01
Pittsburg Gas............ 50 tl35
1st Os 1924..........MAN
53
New 5h. . . . . . ........... .
j Logans pi A Wab Val—Stk 53
105
71
Portland (Me) Gas L ,..G t 85
O
1st 8» ilia5 ...........j&
)-> 72
90
St Joseph (M o ).......
Louisville Gas Light
34
(5
3
5s 1037................ JAJ
Madison (AVIs) Gaa—Stak ' 8 ’ * 1 0
90
46
1 1st a> Iflit,..........A&O 5 B8« 100% St Paul Gas—Stock.......
1 Memphis Gas.................
$ 82
n->*
n in
AAnr!
+T
,r!f*P m*r «V
51 nu i 05
i

it.

.....

'IP

Ask.”

57

72
Kxch
100
90
38
02
C
O
86
ure .

THE CHRONICLE.—BOND

Sept . 3, 1898.]

Week’s
Price
Range
F riday, R ange or
fro m
Sept. z. L a st Sale.
Jan. 1 .
B id. A sk. Low. H igh. No. Low.High.

PKICES (5 pages) P age 3.

S c
i« i

Bonds
Sold.

BONDS
* . Y . STO CK E X C H A N G E
W e e k E k d l s g Se p t . 2.

471

P rice
Week's
F riday, R ange or
Sept. 2. Last Sale.
Bid. A sk. Low. H igh. No.

» .

BONDS.
N. Y . STOCK E X C H A N G E
W e e k E n d i n g Se p t . 2.

See
See

Kontauk Ext.
Long 1 .
9
Long Island (Con.)
„ _
Bklyn A Mon 1st g 08.1911 M -S
Morgan’s La A T.
S P Co.
Morris A Essex. See Del LAW
1st 5s..................... 1911 M -B
Nor Shb lstcon ggu 5s..’32 0 - 0
ash Chat A S tL 1st 7s.’13 J - J *129 ....... 131 Aug’98 . . . .
N Y Bay Ex R 1st gug 5s’43 J - J
2d 0s....................1901 J - J .......106
105% Nov’97
1st con gold 5s.......... 1928 A - 0 1 0 2 X ....... 104% 104% 10
Montauk Ex gu g 5s. ..1945 J - J
1st 6 s T A P b ............1917 J - J
La A Mo Riv.
Chi Alt.
L E A8tLConcng5s.l989.
1st 0s McM M W A A l. 1917 J - J
40 Aug’98 .... 32
40
1st gold 6 s Jasper Bch.1928 J - J
Tr Co certs.................... ) •v •• ....... 40
9% Aug’97
Nash Flor A Shef.
LAN
General gold 4s......... 1943 M - 8
N ew H A D .
NYNHAH
Lou & Nash—Jecel Br 7sl0U7 M - 8 10 2 % ....... 100 Nov’97
N Y Cent.
120% 124% N J June RR.
N O & M lstg 0s....... 1980 J - J *123 ....... 122% Aug’98
106 108
N J Southern.
Cent N J.
2 d gold 0 s............... 1930 J - J *100 ....... 108 Aug’98
New A Cm Bdge. See Perm Co
B H A Nash lstg 0s...1919 J - D *114 ....... 115 Aug’98 :::: 113 117
110 % 12 0 % NO A NEpriorlieng0s.l915 A-07
General gold 0s.......... 1980 J - D *....... 119* 119 Aug’98
N Y B A Man Bch. See L I.
Pensacola div gold 0s. 1920 M - S 108 ....... 103% Sep/97
121 J’ly ’97
N Y Bay Exten RR. See L I.
8 t L div 1st g os........ 1921 M - 8
N Y Cent A Hud R 2d gold 3s............... 1980 M - S
105 J’ly ’98 .... 105 105
1st 7s........................ 1903 J -J 110% .
Nash A Dec 1st 7s......1900 J - J
116% 117
Registered............. 1908 J - J 116 .
Sink fd (SAA) g 6s....1910 A - 0
115% Aug’98
100% Aug’98
94 io i
Debenture 5sof. 1884-1904 M -S 108% .
S A N A con gug 5s.... 1980 F- A
111 Aug’98
104% Aug’98
Gold 5s..................... 1937 M -N
100%104%
Registered ... .1884-1904 M -S 108% .
110% J’ly ’98
8 8 % Bale 8 8 % 90 106 83 91% Reg deb 5s of .. . 1889-1904 M -S 108% .
Unified g 4s..... ......... 1940 J - J
109% Sep.’97
Registered.............. 1940 J - J
Debenture g4s. .1890-1905 J - D 104% .
105 Aug’98
*106 11 0
103% Aug’98
96% 109
Pens A A tl 1st gug 08.1921 F- A
Registered......1890-1905 J - D *104% .
104% Feb.’98
*3 101%108%
104
104
Coll trust g 5s............1981 M-N
Debt certsextg 4s----1905 M -N 105 .
104% J’ly ’98
109% J’ly ’98
108 109%
LANA MAM lstg 4%s.l945 MRegistered.............. 1905 M -N 104% .
104% J’ne’98
97 Aug’98
87% 98
N Fla A 8 lstgu g 5s 1987 F- A
G 3%s........................ 1997 J - J 1 0 0 % .
107% Aug’98
” *2 85 91
90
91 ....... 90
Kentucky Cent g 4a...1987 « - J
J
Registered...............1997 J - J
104% J’ly ’98
L Cln A Lex g 4 %s. . . .1 0 3 1 M-N m o x ....... 103 Jan.’98
103 103
Lake Shore col g 3%s. 1998 F - A
94
95
L A Jeff Bge Co gn g 4s. 1945M - 8
Registered............. 1998 F -A
94 Aug’98
Mich Cent coll g 3%s.. 1998 F - A
L N A A C. Ses C 1 A L.
I
94% 93%
94%
109 ila r ’98 .... 103 109
Louis Ry Co lstcon g5a. 1930 J - J
Registered............. 1998 F -A
ahon Coal.
L 8 A M 8 .1
Harlem 1st 7s............1900 M-N 107
107% J’ne’9*
4 90
95
95%
anhattan Ry con 4 s. 19901A - 0
98U
Registered..............1900 M-N 107
107% Aug’98
2
117 Sale 117
117%
N J June R gu 1st 4s .1980 F -A
Metropol El 1st g 0s... 1908: J - J
114X119*
..'108 103 May’97
2d 0s...................... 1899 M -N *103%104 103% Aug’98 .... 101 105
Registered..............1986 F -A
Mand W Coloniz g 5s...1934 J - D
West Shore 1st 4s gu.2301 J - J 109 110 109% A uk ’98
::::
Registered..............2301 J -J 109% Sale 109% 109%
Market St C Ry 1st g 0s. 1918 J - J
Beech Crk 1st gu g 4s. 1930 J - J
MoK’pt A B V.
P McKAY.
108% Nov’97
Metropolitan El. SesManKy.l
Registered.............. 1936 J - J
100 J’ne’98
113% 18 108%116%
Met 8 t Ry gen o tr g 5s.. 1997 J - A 113% 8 ale 113
F
2d gu gold 5s.......... 1930 J - J
120% Aug’98
114% 122%
|
BwayA7thAvlstcg5s.l943 J - D
Registered.............. 1930 J - J
Registered............. 1948 J - D
Clearfield Bitum Coal Corp
ColA9thAv lstg u g 5 s.l 9 9 3 ;M- S * ..... 124 122% Aug’98
*
1st s tint gug 4sser A .’40 J - J
116 i'23%
95 J’ly ’98
Registered............. 1993 M- 8
...................
8 mall bonds series B ..’40 J -J
Lex A t A P F lstgu g 5 s.’93 M- S
120 J’ly’98
117" 1 *3 | Gout A Oswe 1st gu g 5s.’42 J - D
*2 %
Registered....................IM -S *122 .......
R W AOgcon 1st ext 5s.’22 A -0 4 123%.
124% Aug’*9
8
03 Apr.’98
03
0 0 % Nor A Mont 1st gu g 5s.’10 A - 0
Mex Cent con gold 4s... 1911 J - J
lstcon Income g 8 s... 1939; J'lyf
R W A O T R 1st gug 5s. 18 M -N
................
Oswe A R 2d gu g 5s.. 1915 F-AI
2d con Income g 3s....1939 J*lyT
Utica A Blk Rlvgu g 4s.’22 J - J
Equip A coll g 5s....... 1917 A - O
107 Aug’98
76% Sale
70
78% 55 70
Moh A Mai 1st gu g 4s. 1991 M -S
Mex Internet 1st con g 4s.’77 M- 8
78><
Mex Nat 1st gold 0s..... 1927 J - D
Cart A Ad 1st gu g 4s. 1981 J - D
................
2d inc 6 s A Cp strapd. 1917 j-Vl-84
N Y APutlstcongug48.’93 _ -O
A
2d Income gold 0s B..1917! An.4 ................ 13 J’ly ’97 ....
N Y A North lstg 5s. .1027! A - O 124 127 123 J’ne’98
N Y Chic A St L lstg 4s. 1937 A - O 106 Sale 106
Mex North 1st gold 0s.. 1910 J - D
97 Feb ’97
106
Registered............... 1910;J - D
Registered.................1937 A -O
104 Apr.’98
Mich Cent—lstcon 7s.. 1902 M -N
115 Aug’98
n o 115% N Y AGreenwLake.
Erie
lstcon 5s................. 1902 M -N *105% Sale * 105% 108% 80 j 102 % 1 0 0 % N Y A Har.
N Y C A Hud.
122 Feb.’Os
0s.............................1909 M- S
I) L A W
122 123 1N Y Lack A W.
5 ..............................1931 11-8
121% J’ne’98
121 127
N Y L E A W.
Erie.
125% Jan.'9H
Long Is.
Registered......................1931U -M
125% 125%; jN Y A Man Bch.
4s...;........................ 1940 J - J
106 Feb.'98
100 100 |N Y A N E.
N Y N H A II
Registered............. 1940 J - J
108 Jan.’98 :::: 108 108
104% Oct.’97
N Y N H A Hart lstreg4s.’03 J - D
Bat C A Stor 1st gu g 3s '89 J - D
Convert deb certs $i,000 .. A - 0 102
100 Aug’98
Mtd of N J.
N Y Sus A V
V
Small cerifs 0100..........
*155 159 155
155
Mil El Ry A L 4U-yr g 5s. 1920 F - A
Uousatonlc R con g 5s. 1937 M -N 125 ...... 120%Aug’98
M L 8 A W.
Chic A N V
V
N H A Derby con6s...1918 M -N
MU A Mad.
Chic A N W
N Y A N E 1st 7s.......1905 J - J 120% .
120% Aug’98
MU A North.
Ch M A 8 t P
1st 08.................... 1905 J -J 114 .
114 Aug’98
MU A 8 t P.
Ch M A 8 t P
N Y A North.
N Y C A II.
Min A 81 L gu.
BC RA N,
N Y O A W con 1st g 5s. 1939 J - D 107 107% 107
107%
Minn A 8 t L— 1st g 7s ..1927 J - D 140 ...... 143 J’ly ’97
Refunding 1st g 4s... .1092 M-S I 99% Sale
99% 102
1st cons gold 5s........ 1934 M -N ....... n o
137
108
100%108%
Regis 05,000 only. ..1992 M-Sj
Iowa ex 1st gold 7s... 1909' J - D .......128
127 N or’97
N Y A Put.
N Y C A H.
South West ex 1st g 7s.'10lJ - D
N Y A R B.
Long Isl.
Pacific ex 1st gold 0s . 1921 A - O
N Y S A W . See Erie.
121% Aug'071
N Y Tex A M.
So Pac Co.
M A P 1st 5s st 4sintgu..’86 J -J
M 38MAA 1st g 4s lnt gu.’20 J - J
North Illinois. See Chi A NW.
MStPASSM con g 4s intgu'8 * J - J
North Ohio.
Erie A W.
Northern Pacific—
Minn 8 t Ry 1st con g 5s. 1919 J - J
Gen 1st RR A L G s f g6s.’21 J - J 112 % ..... 114 Aug’98
Minn Un.
8 t P M A M.
0 1 | 8 8 H 92%
5
91
Registered.............. 1921 J - J 113% 110 110 J’ne’9*
Mo Kan A Tex— lstg4s. 190O1 -D
J
89%
130 Aug'98
05% 117 57
2d gold 4s................. 1990 F-A!
S tP A N P gen g 8s...1923 F - A
64%
07 X
88 Aug’98
83% 88
1st exten gold 0s.......194 1 M N
127 J’l y ’98
Registered ctfs.......1923 Q- F
so
89
14 80
M K A T o fT lstgug5s.’42iM- W
i
37X
Prior Hen r A 1g g 4s.. 1907
101% Sale 100 % 101 %
70
100% Aug’98
Registered...............1997
73
70
75«
7!i« 15 71
K O A Pao lstg 4s.... 1990 F- A
* 3 % ......
81
Aug’98
Dal A Wa 1st go g 5s. 1940 M- N
General Hen g 8 s....... 204
67%
68%
84X
75
Boonev BdgCogu g 7s..’06 M-Nj ........112
Registered ............. 2047
114
i i a " i i T 114
Tebo A Neosho 1st 7s. 1908 J -D l
Nor Pac Ter Co 1st g 0s. 1933
10 I 93X 102
102
102
Mo K A E lstgu g 5a... 1042 A -O ,
Nor Ry Cal.
Cent Pac.
31 1 93 107X Nor W is.
100%
Mo Pao—1st con g 0s. ..1920 M- N
C St P M AO.
105M
102 J’ne’98
111% A U « ’ 98 .... 103%112
8 d 7s.........................1900 M-N
Nor A South 1st g 5s.... 1941 M -N 102
8 BOX 87X (Nor A West gen g 0s.... 1931 M -N 122
122 Aug’98
85
B6 X
box
Trust g 5s................. 1917 \i-8 t
124
124
New River lstg 6 s.... 1932 A - 0
Registered............. 1917 M-St
......124
78% Sale I 78%
Iraprvmt A ext g0s...l934 F - A *110
1st ooll gold 5s..........192o f - A
117% 117%
C O A T lstg u g 5s....1922 J -J 105 ...... 101 Feb’97
Registered............. 1920 F -A
100 106
Pao R of Mo 1st ex g 4 s.’3 H F- A 101% 105% 108% Aug'98
Scio VAN E lBtgu g4s. 1989 M -N
89%
89%
85
80
105% 109
N A W Ry lstcong 4s. 1996 A -O
2d extended gold 5s. 1938 J - J
80 Sale
86%
95%
100% J’ly ’98
.......
Registered............. 1996 A -O
Verd V l A W lstg 5a..’20 M -Si
Small..................... 1990 A -O
Leroy AC V A L 1st g 5s *20 J - J
107 110% Nor A Mont. See N.Y.Cent.
BtL A IM t 1st extg4%s.’4? K-Al
107
107
102%107%
2d ext g 5s..............1947 M -N 107%...... 107% J’ly ’98
g A L Ch 1st con 0s..1920 A - 0
95
102 108
Ark Branch ext g 5s. 1935 J - D 106%...... 105% J’ly ’98
Income................ 1920 A - 0
80 1 0 0 %
90 Sale
Income small........ ....... A - 0
98%
99%
Gen con ry A ld grtg5 s’31 A * 0
80 100
Gen con stampgtdg5s’31 A - O
100 Ang’98
O ln d A W .
C C C A St L.
Miss HIt Bdge.
Chic A Alt
Ohio A Miss. See BAO 8 W.
MobABtrm prior lien g5s.’45 J - J
Ohio River RR 1st g 5s.. 1936 J -D
, 104 LOS Jan.’98
General gold 5s..........1937 A - 0
Small............................J - J
85% Aug’98
Ohio Southern 1st g 0s..1921 J - D
90
Income gold 4s......... 1945 J - J
80
General gold 4s......... 1921 M -N
Small........... ........................
8%
8%
8%
118% 123
10 J’ne’98
122
122
Mob A Ohio new gold 0s.. ’27 J -D
Eng Tr Co certfa............
7
9
80 Aug’98
Ora A St L 1st g 48.......1901 J - J
119 Dec ’97
1st extension gold 0S.1927 Q-J*
.... 83
70
81
Ore A Cal. See So Pac Co.
80%
81
79
General gold 4s.........1088 M- 8
97% 102
112 Aug’98
Ore Ry ANav ls t s f g 6 a. 1909 J - J .......115
102
. 102% 102
Montgom Dir 1st g 5s. 1947 F - A
Ore RR A Nav con g 4s.. 1946 J - D 100 100% 99% 100%
Bt L A Cairo gn g 4s .. 1931, J - J
Ore Short Line 1st g 0s. 1922 F -A 127% Sale 127% 127%
Mohawk A Mai.
N Y C A Hi
L21 J’ne’98
Utah A Nor 1st 7s..... 1908 ,J - J
MonongnhelaR1t.
B it
102 May’97
Gold 5g..................192ft) J - J
Mont Cent.
8 t P M A M.l

See

\

& )

See
See
See

See

M

See

H

a

See

See
See
See

See

...

Ste
See
See
See
See
See

See.

128

131%

i 00

10*5*'

113%119%
113%119
100 112

100

111%

102 105
104%104%
100% 105%
104 105
105% 107%
104% 104%
94
96%
94
95
91% 95
107% 109^
107%109%
102 % 110 %

101% 110
106

100

95

95

119%124%

107

107

123
100
104

126
107%
104

145 160
145 158%
126% 126%
119 120%
113% 114
100
90

109
102%

See
See
See
See L

See

U

See

See

fr

*08% Sate

...
..
..

78%

O

See

See
See
See

’ No price Friday; these are latest bid and asked this week, t Bonds duo Jan.

O U T S ID E S E C U R I T I E S

(G iven

at foo t o f

| Bid. |
Ask. H T r ie s . A t T H n p h .
G an 8ecnrlll»i>.
Byracu.se Gas—Stock......• 10 % 17% Erie Teieg A Telephone..
1 yo 88
Franklin..................
1st 5s 1946...........JAJ
Gold A Stock................
jrn Oast Mil w)—Sick; List.
Bonds........................
5s—
N Y Stock Kxch
Hudson River Telephone
Trdeir. & T e le p li.
American Dint Tele—NY | Stock Kxch Internation Ocean.........
American Tel A Cab—NY1 Stock! Kxch Mexican Telegraph........
Gentrai a South Amer__ , 109 109% Mexican Telephone.... 10
New Eng Telep
Best
Chen A Poto Teiepb—Stk 51 |
;
Northwestern Telegraph.
Bond Ss
103 ! 1 0*6
Commercial Cable..,,
. 180 1185 1N Y A N J Telephone....
115 II 5s 1920 ............... J&J
Commer Union Tel (NY).. 112
lm u ly a * l».. - Gn>*
Atlantic .
,1 74 I 70 I) p«r>ier

Went

Low.High,

See

l\

See

Mange
fro m
J a n . 1.

See

—See

Bid. Ask.
72
71
50
40
110 113
00
75
73
100 112
200 205
05
00
C list
2
110 115
1 9 150
4
110
70
7«

7

112 119%
112 119
124 130
124% 127
90% 101%
93 100%
57
68%
104

114

102
120
118
117

105
125%
124
119%

82
91%
74% 87%

See

t Bonds due July.

HBonds due Juno,

i

| Electric Companion.
|Allegheny Co Light Co... 130 140
50
40
Brash Electric C o........
37
Br’dxprt (Ct) El Lt Co.25 t 82
20
Consol Electric Storage..
18
Eddy Electric Mfg Co..25 t....... 13
Edison El 1 1 Co N Y —N Y Stock Bxoh
1
Edison El 1 1Co Brk—N Y Stock Exch
1
14
1
1
1Edison Ore Milling Co—
7
1
Edison Rtoroero fVi . ...
23

102
85%
15
14%
82

80
8

10
75

111

110

121

121

89
118

100%
128

Bonds due May. T Bonds due Nov

consecutive pages).— TEL.
T e ieg . A: T e le p h .
Bid. Ask.
90
! Southern A Atlantic.......
85
! West'n Union Telog—N Y Stock Exch

LOS

& ELECTRIC, &r.

Electric Companion.
East End Electric Light.
1
Electro-Pneumatic.........
Fort Wayne Elec. Co..25 t 2
Series A .................. .
General Electric Co—N Y Stock
Do pref.—See Boston L 1st.
Hartford (Ct) Elec Lt Co. 119
Hartf’d(Ct) LtAPowCo25 t 4
12
Mo Edison Electric.
42
Do preferred.....
Narragan. (Prov)KI Co.50 t 83%
Now Hav (Ct) Elec Lt Co 170
tPploo

l"
ExoM
1*25*'
7
14
44
87
180

T H E C H R O N IC L E .—BOND PRICES (5 pages) Page 4.

472

Price
Week's
Banff*,
lY id a y , Banff* or RtSl from
Sept.
Jan
Sale,
Bid A sk. Low. H igh N o Low . High

Price
Friday,

[Vol. t.x err-

Week’s
R ange or
B a st Sale.

R ange
from
Ja n .

BONDS.
BONDS.
• £"§ j
§$
111
If.Y . STOCK E X C H A N G E ,
n .y * s t o c k e x c h a n g e 5 f
2.
. 1,
L a**
,
2.
1.
W e e k Ivkxhsr S k i t . 2. 4 £
W e e k E n d in o S k i t . 2.
-----------------------------------------------.
. !
Low.BxgK
OreSh L —1st oon g 3s... 1940 J - J 107 Sale
107
90 1 0 8 H|i8 av F A W latcon g 08.1034 A - O
....... 1 04% Oct.*971....
1
Non-ouiu ItlC A Sa......1040 Sop.*
75% Sale
SI
58
81*1 lstg 5s..................... 1934 A - O
Non-cu Ino B A co! tr.. 1040 OeL*
39
58 Sale
58% I Soloto Val A N E. Sr# Nor A W
58
Oswego * Rome.
N Y Cl
Scab A Uoa U t 5s........ 1920 J - J
104* Feb.’98
1104* 104*
O O F A Si P.
CA N W
Sea A B Bd«e.
Bklyn El.
AGCoast Go—1st j{09.10481*1 -D 103% Sale 105% 105%
1 303 100^ Sod Bay A So lot g &s. 4.1921 J - J
Bo Car A G& lstg 5a___ 1910 M -N
aoof Missouri.
Mo Pac
08% 93*
92
99%
PiinaK/i 1
st» f g 4 ^ s.... 1017 A - O
Southern Pacltlo Co—
S subsidy g 0s.......... 1910 M-N
Gal liar A S A 1st g Gs. 1910 F - A
107 Jan.*08
107 107
Pennsylvania Co—
J’Jv *08
100 105%
108 114
Penn Co gu 1st if 4*3.1921 J - J *110%
Mex A Pac di v Istghs.’fil M -N
113 Aug’Osi .
08 Sale
92
08*
110 110
Registered — .........1921 J - J iM10
110 J’ly ’981 .
.............
Hous A T O 1»t W A N 7s. ’ 03 J - J
Gtd3*scol trust tor. 10871M- 8 • 9 7 *
ls tg 5slnt gtd...... .1037 J - J *111 ..... 110% 1X0%
107% 111%
P O C & St L oon gu g 416h i
Con g 0a lntgtd ...... 1912 A - O *108% 112 109 Aug‘98
105 110
100% 118
112« a sm
Series A ..................1040 A-.O *113%
Gong 4s lntgtd...... 1921 A-0|
83
83% 15 7 0 * 88%
108 113
Series B guar..........1942 A - O * 1121*
'
112* 11214
Morgan’s La A T 1gt g 6a. ’20 J - J
120% Feb.'98
120% 120%
Series C gu ar.........1042 M -N
1st ...................... 1018 A - O
127 Apr.’08
•I •
127 127
Series 1) 4s guar,
1945 M- N
103 Oct.’97
N Y T A Mexgu lstg4s.*12 A -O
Pitta Cln St L let 7».1900jF- A
100%108
10S J'ne'98
Ore A Cal 1st gtd g os, 1027
75
75 Jan.*98
Registered.............. 1900 F- A
38 55% 71
6 7 * 09
109* A p r’07
8 A A A Puss 1st gu g 4b. ’43
08
00
Pitta Ft W
O 1st 7s. 1912 J - J
140 140*
140 May‘98
Tex A N O U t 7a...... 1005
110 M ar’98
2d 7s...................... 1913! J - J
140 140
140 Aug’98
Sabine div 1st g 6s.. 1012
100* Nov’97
3d 7s...................... 1912 A-O*
10l
101*
96% 101*
C S t L A P 1st con g 5s. 1932 A -O 1 1 7 «.
....... 109
SoPof Argu 1st g 0s.’OO-lO
112*4 Apr’97
109* 109*
100* 109%
R e g is te re d ...............1 9 3 2 A - O
110 ...... 110% Aug’98
S P o t Cai ls tg 0s.’05* 12
100* 110%
Gior Pitts con e f 7s. 1000 M-N 108 10Q& 107 May’98
102% Sale 102* 102%
1st con guar g 5s.. 1037
92% 102%
Gen gu g 4%s aer’a A. 1942 J -J
'8 7 ......
A N W lstgu g 5a. 1941
80%
80%
81% 8 7 *
B .......... ...1942 A -O
S P Coast lstgu g 4s.. 1937
GrRAIexlstgug4% s.l941 J - J
S Pac of N Meat 1st g 6 s .'ll
105% 110*
109*
Allegh V&l gen g a g 4s. 194 2 M -S
South Ry—i st con g 5a.. 1994
102 Nov’97
98% Sale
07
87
98%
98%
1
<
Bdgogengug4%s.’45 J - J
Registered.............. 1994
104* .
Penn RE 1st real esg 4s. 1923 M -N
Mem Div 1st g 4*4%-5sl996
108 May’9
103 103
103 J’ly ’98
Con sterling g 6s....... 1905 J - J
Registered............. 1990
Con currency 0s reg.. .1905 Q-Mt
E Teh reor lien g 4-5s, 1938
100 Aug’98
96 100
Cong 5s....................1919 M -S
Registered.........,..1938
Ala Cen R ls t g 0 s ....1018
Registered............. .1919 Q - S
112* Aug’0
Cong 4s.................... 1943 M -N
Atl Ch Air Line Inc. 1900
Cl A Mar 1st gu g 4%s.t Q35; M -N
Col A Greeny 1st 5-08.1916
119 D ec’97
D N J HR A Can gen 48.1944 M -S
106* Sale 100* 106%
E T Va A Ga 1st 7a— 1900
115*4115%
105% 103
115*4 Feb.’98
D H R H i Bge 1st gu is g.’SO F - A
Dlvislonalg 5a... ...1930
113% 114 1 4% Aug*98
112% 115
113% Sale 113
Pensacola At.
L Nash
Con 1st g 5 s...........1950
U3%
107 113%
Peo Dee A E lstg 6s tr rec.’20 J - J 98
122
Ga Pac Ry 1st g 5*08.. 1022
95 ! 0i%
118 123
119 JTy’98
93
Evans Div l8tg0strree.'2O M -S
90
90
96
Knox & Ohio 1st g 6s .1925
112 117%
115% Aug’98
20 1 8 « J’
2d g 5a tr rec 1st pd.. 1920 M -N
15
, 125 122% Aug’98
Rich A Dan con g 0s. . 1915
18%
118 125*
Peo East.
C C C A St L
*100
Equip sink fund g 5s.l909
101 Nov’97
2
Peo Pek U n ls tg 0s.. .1921 Q - F ■ 1 0
120
120
, 107
Deb os stamped......1927
95
90
3 J’ne’98
Sdg4% s........... Feb., 1921 M -N 1 85
107 108 108
Virginia Mid gen 5s... 1930
108
100 108
85% 80%
85%
*
107 108 107 J’ne’98
Pine Creek reg guar0a.. 1932 J - D 133
102 107
137 N o t’97
Gtd stamped........ 1930
Pitta Cln &St L.
Penn Co.
, 90
W O A W 1st cy gu 43,1024
8 7 * 90
90 Aug’98
West N C 1st oon g 03.1914
P C C 3t L. Sr# Penn Co.
110% 110%
118% Aug’98
Pitta Ciev A Tol 1at. g 0s.. 1922
♦106 107*4
S A N Ala.
L A N.
Pitts Connellsv.
B
*100
Spok FallsANor lstg 0S.1GS9
Pitta Ft W
Ch. S##Peun Co.
Statlsl Ry 1st gu g 4%s.l943 J - D *100
Pitts Juno 1st g 0a....... 1922 J - J 129
Sunb A Lewiatti 1st g 4s. 1030 J - J *105
Syra Bing A N Y.
DL&W.
Pitts L Erie—2d g 5a .. 1928 A-OI 106
Pitts McK Yo—lstgu 0fC32 J - J
rPer A of St L 1st 4%s.’39 A - O
• U 4% 112* Aug’98
109 112^
X 1st con gold 5s. 1894-194 4 F -A 107* .
2d guar 0s........ ........ 1034 J - J
105%110%
110 J’l y ’O
B
McKee B V ls tg 6s. 1918 J - J *120 ....
St L M Bge Ter gu g 5s. 1030 A -O
108 O c t’0
.... 00
Pitts P
F 1st g 5s......1910 J - J
Terre Haute Elec Ry g 0s.Pl 4 Q- J
.... 109* 109 Aug’98
Pitte Sh A L E 1st gos.. 1940 A -O
104 109* Tex A N O.
So Pac Co.
l8t consol gold 5s......1943 J - J ♦103
107* 110%
98 J’ly ’07
TexAF Ry E div lstg 0s. 1905 M - S 100% Sale 103 Aug’98
17 90%107%
91
1st gold 5s................ 2000 J - D ...... 107 100
Pitts A West 1stg 4s... 1917 J - J
93*4
92
107
2S«
Gold^a..............1891-1941 M -N * 50
32% 50 Aug’98
2d gold Inc. 5s, D ec...2000 Mch.
39
50%
4 6 * Sale
46%
40% 757 28
Pitta Y. Ash 1st con 5s1927. M -N *112
Third A t 1st gold 5s...»1937 J - J
117*124
122% J’ne’98
82*4 Bale
eading Oo gen g 4s... 1997 J - J
104
104
102 105
104
82*4
33*4 151 7 7 * 87% Tol A O C lst g 5s........ 1935 J - J
Registered............1997 J - J
West’n div 1st g 5s.... 1985 A - O 104
105 Aug’98
103 105
Rensselaer Sar.
D A EL
General gold 5s..... .. .1935 J - D
80
Rich AfDan.
South Ry.
Kan A M 1st gu g 4s. ..1990 A - O
70
82%
60 Aug’98
77
9 1 * 90
79
Rio Or West 1st g 4a — 1939 J - J
38
09
78
90;
77 Aug’98
91 Tol Peo A W litgold 4*.191? J - J
88
92
Rio GrJunc lstgu g 5s. 1939 J - D
85% 90
91 J’ne’S
90 Aug’98
21“ 94M T S t L A K C 1st g Gs tr. 1910 J - D
Rio OF So 1st g 8-4b...... 1940 J - J
T Hater A Del 1st c g 5s, 1928 J - D 100
54
98 104
66
60 J’ne’98
100% Aug’98
Roch Pitta.
B R A P.
Mon EUv.
Bklyn Kiev
Rome Wat. Og S « N Y Cent.
Un El (CM3) U t g oa. ...1945 A -O
alt Lake C lstg sf 8s. ’03-13
98% Sale
Un P a c-R R A1 g g 4s. 1047 J - J
98%
99 1033 88% 99%
79% Sale
98% 98%
79%
79%
Registered................ 1947 J - J
t Jo AG 11st g 2-3-48. .1947
6 8 * 81
98% Aug98
44
59*
8tL AAT H.
Illinois Cent,
Tr Co etfa g 4%a....... 1018 M -N
50
55
it L
CaL
Mob A Ohio.
48% 79
U P DAG 1st 6 g 5strro,’S 9 ......
70% Sale
77*
75*
St L
Iron Mount.
M P.
Uni N J RR AC Co.
Pa RR
Utah A North.
Ore S L.
St L K C A N.
Wabash.
St L M Br.
T RR A of StL
Utica A Black R.
N Y Cent
Bt Louis A San Francisco—
er Val Ind A W.
Mo P.
2d gold 0s Class A . .. .1000 M -N
Irglnia Mid.
South Ry.
111 116*
, 110*4 114 J’l y ’98
50 104% 112%
8d gold 0b Class B ......1906 M -N
, 110* 115% 115%
111% 110*
ab RR Co lstg 5s.. 1939 M -N 111* ..... 111*
* 2d gold 08 Class G ,..». 1906 M -N
74% 91%
90% 212
2d gold 5s........ 1039 F - A
90% Sale
113 116*
88 %
i U 0 * 114 Aug’98
1st g 0a Pierce C A 0..1919 F - A
Debenture series A .... 1939 J - J
39
34*
39 2372 21
General gold 0s........ .1931 J - J * 120* 121 120% 120%
Series B....... ....... ..1089 J - J
35
Sale
114 120 *
97 105%
General gold 5s.......... 1981 J - J 106* Sale 106
lstg5sDet A Ch Ext. .1941 J - J *104 100 104% Aug’98
106*
98% 106*
108%110
StChas Bridge lstg 03.1908 A - O *110
05 LO
O 100 J’lv ’98
92*< 100
110 J’ne’98
1st trust gold 58...... ..1987 A -O
F t S A Y BBdg lBtg0B.191O A - O 107 ....... 105 Oot.»97
Warren RR.
Del L A W
Kansas Mid ls tg 4a... 1937 J - D
Wash OA W.
Southern
81 Sale
103 110
BtL
S F R R g 4 s ....1996 J - J
68
82* West N Y A Pa—lstg 5s, 1037 J - J
80
81
108% J’l y ’98
4 7 * 59%
Bouthw Div 1st g 5a...1947 A -O
Gen g8-4s...............1943 A - O
Aug’98
97*
9 7 * Aug’98
10
10%
Income 5a....April, 1943 Nov.
10
8t L 8q.
Illinois Cent.
S tL 8 W ls tg 4b bdefs. 1989 M -N
West No Car.
South Ry,
78% Sale
78%
79%
81
Western Pac.
Cent Pac.
2d g 4s Ino bond Cfcfs.. 1989 J-JS
83 Sale
83
34*
85
W Chic 8 t 4 0 -yr 1st cur 5s.’28 M -N
gt Paul City Cab. o g 5s. 1937 J - J
90 Nov’97
40-year con g 5s........ 1930 M - N
99 Dao’9r
Guaranteed gold 5s... 1987 J - J
West Shore.
N Y Cent,
Bt Paul Duluth 1st 5a. 1931 F - A 106% 107 117 M ar’98
115 117
W Va A Pitts.
B A O.
2d 5s......................... 1917 A -O 112% 118*4 107
10
105 109
Bt Paul M A M 2d Os.... 1900 A - O 123 124* 122% Aug’98
120 122* W Va Cent A P 1st g 0s. 1911 J - J
Wheeling A L H 1st g5s.l920 A - O
100% 101%
101% M ar’98
Dakotaexi gold 0b.... 1910 M -N 120% ...
118%123
122 Aug’98
100 108
105 109 100 M ar’98
Trust Co certificates..........
128 132
lit conaol gold 8s......1988
132
132
J 132 ...
90 108
100
Wheel Div 1st gold 5a. 1028 J - J 100 Sale 100
Registered............ .1933 J - J
92% 92%
82
Exton A Imp gold 5s. .1930 F - A
92% Mar’98
105% 108*
Reduced to gold 4%s 1933 J - J 108%
108* 108*
10 35
39 Sale
30
Registered......... 1033
39
39
Consol gold 4b........... 19 w J - J
100% Mar’98
J
N Y 8A W
99*4 Sale
Mont Ext 1st gold 4b . .1987 J - D
98% 101% Wilke« A East
90%
99%
Registered..............1987 J - D
WU A Sioux F.
St P M A M
96
96
90 Fob.’Os
Minn Union 1st g 0b.. .1922
CAN W
122%122% Winona A Bt P.
J 128**!!!!! 122% Jan.’9b
Wls Cent Co 1st tr g 5b . .1987 J - J
34 Nov’97
Mont C 1st gu g 08.... 1037
129
129
118% 182
J
33% 55
02
53
52
53
Engraved trust certificates.
Registered............. 1937 J - J
115 A p r1 7
9
4
Income 5a.................. 1937 A-O*
7%
0 * Aug’98
6
1st guar gold 5s......1037 J - J ’110
109% May’98
107 109%
Registered ..............1937 J - J
1 Minn 1at div 1st g 6b. 1008 A - O 110% Sale 110% H 0%
5
105% 110% MISCELLANEOUS BONDS.
98% 102%
dams Ex—Col tr ft 4a, 1948 M - S 100 Sale 100
102%
Registered..............1908 A -O
102%109
m Cot Oil dob g 8s... 1900 Qu-F 106%...... 107% 107%
W t U A S F ls tg 5s.... 1938 J - D iii% • ” ; 113 Aug’98
113 118
*
Registered........... ..1938 J - D
Am Dk A Itnp 5s.
Cen N J
04
90
87
Am SpiritsMfg 1st g Og.lfilOi M-N
87% Sale
00
Bt P A Nor Pac.
Nor Pac
Atlanta G L Co lat g 5s. 1947 J-D
BtP 8 City.
C StP M AO
ar AS Car Co lat ar.6s.1042 J - J
8 A A A P.
Pao. Co.
oa U Gaatrot.fs b f g 5a.’80 J - J
9 0 * 91
9 0 * Jan/98
8 F A N P 1st a f g 5*.,, 1919 ,1 - J
100% Oct.'97

P

Set

t

&

Sept.

Bid. Ask.[Low. Sigh.lNo.

a

See

See

See

. . . I ...................

2d g 7s...................1005 J-D i 105 ........ 105
96*4 98%

,

----

7s

76

&

&

A

&C

&

A

A
A

........

See

A

See

See A O.

A

A

1

120

Sec

A
A

See
a

A
A

X

See

A

R

A

A

S

See A

A

See

Sec.

See

3u

See
See
Sec
See
See

A
A

A

Y
W

See
See
See
See
See

Sec
See

See

See
See

See
See

A

See
See
See

A

A ’x

See
See
See So

B

OUTSIDE SECURITIES

* No price Friday; these are latest bid and asked this week, t Honda due June,

K le c trlc ’i C om panies.
RhodeTsland Elec Pro Co.
Toronto (Cun) Elec L t Co.
Thom-Houet Welding Co.
United Elec Lt A P Co prof
Bonds .........................
Woonsocket (It I) El Co..
F e r r y Corn pan te*.
B’klyn A N Y Ferry-Bubs.
New stock.......... .
Bonds.................
Bobo ken Ferry—Stock...
1st 6s 1946*....... MAN
Metropolitan Ferry—5s..

See

Bid. Ask.
110 120
136* iy «x
........ .. 100
12
18
85
83
100 110

;
'
!
[

112
37% 88 !
97*
}
02
91
t io u « 108
108 110 ,

m

(O

iv e it

at

foot

of

7

i Bonds due July.

c o n s e c u t iv e

| Bonds duo March.
j
pa g e s

).—

Bid. Ask,
R a ilr o a d w
.
F e r r y Com panion.
Bid. Ask. j
Ateh A Pike’s Peak 1st 0s 101
N J A N Y Ferry—Stock..
Ate T A 9 Fo gu fd 0s notes 101
1st 6b 1 9 4 8 . .JAJ 1100 ib i
Atl’taA Gh Air L lat 7a *07 117
N Y A E R Ferry—Stock.
73
70
6
Atl&P eta of dep gu 4b st’d
Bonds 5b of 1932........ $ 97 100
t
B A O 8%s, when issued. f 95
95*
N Y A 8 B Traus A Ferry 25
80
S 02
Do 4a
*'
“
95
Bonds, 5s, of 1000..... $ 90
03
1
“
75
10th A 23d Sts Ferry......
80 | Do prof 4
83K
Boat A NY Air Line—Com
latmorb 5s 1919...JAD $ 98 101
Preferred—Sr# N Y Sto ck Ex Sh. ’ *
40 j
39
Union Ferry—Stock......
98
California Pacific lat4%s
1st 5a 1920..........MAN 3101 103
95
Do
2d inert guar
M ali road s.
Ch Mil A 8t P Dub Div ’20 $130
Ate Col A P lat 08 tr co Cta
T)a
Wta Val div 0* *20 9130
At J C A W 1st 0s tr co O
ta

..

T Benda due Jan. SBonds due Nov

F E R R Y & RAILROADS.
H ailro n d w .

C h& N W 1 st 7a M ud e x i' 11
D o M enom in e e e x t ’ 11
C h lc A T o m a h lst 6 a l9 0 5
N o rth w Un. lat. 7s 1917.
F roraB lkA M oV al l s t ’33
m ed
9XH W DoA S tP 1 stu n sta 7sp*10
in
ext
Ch A E a s t 111 sin k fd col tr
C lnA Spgf 2d 7 b gu C C CAI
J a c k L A Sag l a t e x t b s ’Ol
K in g sto n A P em b I s tM ..
L N A A Ch 1 s t Gs C & I Div
IntorotO.

+PH00

Bid. Aak.
U30
$130
$109
$132
$130
'129
130 143
103
103
113
l o r nh

THE CHRONICLE—BOND PRICES C pages) Page 5.
5

S ept . 3, 1898.]

Week’s
Price
Range
F rid a y , R ange or
fro m
Jan. 1.
Sept. 2. L a st Sale.
oi
B id. A sk. Low. High. N 19 Low H igh

BONDS.
N. Y . STO CK E X C H A N G E j
W e e k E n d i n g S e p t . 2.

BONDS.

«a
<

N . Y . STOCK E X C H A N G E
W e e k E n d in g Se p t . 2.

11554
10954 11554 Peoria W at Co g 0s.. 1889-19 M -N
B’klyn U Gas 1st con g 5s. .’45 M -N 114 ...... 115
8 91% 10054 PI Valley Coal 1st g 0s.. 1920 M -N
3
92
92 Sale
BFk’n W A W H Istg5s.l945 F - A
*
Procter A Gamb 1st g 0s. .’40 J - J
ah Coal Min.
T C I4 K .
St L Ter Cupples Station A
G L A C Co.
P G A C Co.
10954 Feb’97
Prop Co lstg 454s 5-20 yr’17 J - D
10954 10954
Chic Jc A St Yd col g 5s.. 1915 J - J
S Yuba Wat Co con g 0s. .’23 J - J
Clearf Bit Coal. <Se«NYC&H
100
100
Sp Val Wat Works 1st 0s.’00 M- S
95 102
Col C A I 1st con g 0s. ..1900 F - A
Stan Rope & T 1st g 0s.. 1940 F - A
ColC A I Dev Cogugos.. 1909 J - J
104 Jan.’98
100 104
Income g 5s............... 1940
Col Fuel Co gen gold 6 s. 1919 M -N
80 May’98
Sun Ck Coal ls tg s f 0s..1912 J - D
80
84
82
Col F A I Co gen s f g 5s. 1943 F - A
TennCoalTDiv Istg0s.l91~ a - oh
■Oolumbus Gas 1st g 5s.. 1932 J - J
10154 Apr.’98
Birm Div 1st con0s... 1917 J -J
10154 10554
Com Cable Co 1st g 4s...2397 - J
104 104
104 Feb.’98
Cah C M Co 1st gu g 0s..’22 J - D
Registered.................2397 - J
De Bar C & I Co gu g 0s.’10 F - A
Con Gas Co. S e eP G & C C o .
U S Death Co s f deb g0s.’13 31-N
e Bardel C A I.
T C & I.
Vt Marble 1st s f 5 s ......1910 J - D
el & H Can.
RR bonds
91
94^
89
9554 West Union deb 7s. .1875-00 31-N
Detroit City Gas g os.... 1923 J - J
94 Aug’98
Registered........ 1875-1900 31-N
90 103
Det Gas Co con 1st g 5s.. 1918 F - A
17 Aug’98
Debenture 7s.. . 1884-1900 31-N
17%
A -O
1054 19
Det MAM Id gr 3%s S A.1911
112 Aug’98
Registered......1884-1900 31-N
108 11 2 %
d El 1 1 1st conv g 5s. 1910 31- S '109% .
1
117% Aug’98
Col trust cur 5s.........1938 J - J
11454 119
1st con g 5s........... 1995 J - J '116% .
Mut Un Tel s f’d 0s. ..1911 31-N
11354 J’ne’9"
Ed El 1 1 B’klyn 1stg 5s. 1940 A - O '11054 •
1
Northwestern Tel 7s... .’04 J - J
Registered....................... A -O
9854 M ar’98
98% 9854 Westn Gas Co col tr g 5s...’33 31-N
Erie T & T col tr g s f 5s.. .1920 J - J
Wh L E & P C Co 1st g 5s.’10 J - J
Bq Gas L N Y 1st con g 5s.. ’32 31-S
Whitebrst Fgen s f 0s.. 1908 J - D
Bq G A Fuel.
P G A C Co.
108
108
90 108
i en Elec Co deb g os.. 1922 J - D 107
U. S. GOV. SECURITIES. (For
91% 9554 Jarn’97
- rRivCoal A C lstg g figt
0s..’19|A-O
U rf
-----------U S 2s registered... .Optional Q- M
Gr Rap G L Co 1 st g 5s. 1915 F - A
U S 4s registered.......... 1907 Q-Jt
ack W reor ls tg 5s..1920 J - J
U S 4s coupon.............. 1907 Q-Jt
111 Aug’97
end B Co 1st s f g 0s. 1931 M- S
U S 4s registered..........1925 Q- F
€ 1 Steel Co deb 5s........ 1910|J - J
1
U S 4s coupon.............. 1925 Q- F
70 Apr ’97
Non-conv deben 5s
1913; A - O
U S 5s registered.......... 1904 Q- F
■Iron Steamboat Co 0s... 1901 J - J
107 May’97
U S 5s coupon.............. 1904 Q- F
Jeff & Clear C A I lstg 5s 1926 J - D
80 May’97
U S 0s currency............1899 J -J
2d g 5s....................... 1920 J - D
U S 48 registered certs
K C Mo Gas Co 1st g 5s. 1922 A - O
of indebt (Cherokee) 1899 Mch
105)4 2 l| 100 105%
LacGas-LCoof StLlstg5s*19|"‘ ‘ 105 Sale 105
Small bonds..................... .
STATE SECURITIES.
102 J’ly ’97
Mad Sq Garden ls tg 5s. 1919 M -N
Alabama—Class A 4 to 5.1900 J - J
Met T A T 1st s f g 5a... 1918 M-N
Small...............................
Registered................ 1918 M -N
85 J’ne’97
Class B 5s..................1900 J - J
:::::: ::::::
Mich Pen Car Co ls tg 5s.’42 M - S
Class C 4s.................. 1900 J - J
Mut Fuel Gas Co
PeopGas
Currency funding 4s...1920 J - J
Mut Un Tel Co.
W n Un.
10754 Aug’98 .... 105 108 | Dist of Columbia—3-05s. 1924 F- A
at Starch Mfg Co 1st g 0s’20131-N 108
Louisiana—New con 4s..1914 J - J
Nwpt News S A D D 5s. .19901J -.15
Small...............................
N Y A N J Tel gen g 5s cy .’20 31-N
• •
Missouri—Bounding. ..1894-95 J - J
N Y 4 OntLan'd lstg 0s.l9lOi F -A
North Car—Consol 4s... 1910 J - J
NoWestnTeleg.
West.Un.|
S m a ll......................................... J - J
111 Nov’97
Peo Gas A C 1st gu g 0s. 1004 M- N
0s.............................. 1919 A - O
102 109
l07%J’ly ’98
2d gtd g 0s.................1904! J - D
So Carolina—454s 20-40.1933 J - J
; 115 120
119 11754 Aug’98
o
1st consol g 0s............1943! A- ^
Tenn—New settlem't3s.l913 J - J
Refunding g 5s...........1947 M
Small............................... J - J
M-S| .......
Registered.............. 1947 M
1100
100 | 2 1102 10054 : Virginia fund debt 2-3s.l991 J - J
Ch G-LACke 1st gug 5s’37;.l J *10054
Registered....................... J - J
105 !104 J’ly ’98 .... 101 100
Con G Co of Chlstgug5s’30 J
0 s deferred bonds............
10254 J’ly ’98 .... 102 108
Eq G & F Ch 1st gug 0s.'05 J - .1 ....... 105
Trust receipts stamped___
Mu Fuel Gas 1st gu g 5.1947 M- N 10554 Sale 110554 10554! 15 ‘ 10514 10554'

See
See

C

See
See

D
E

See

f

H

473

Price
Week’s
Ft'iday, R ange or i S R ange
fro m
Sept. 2. Last Sale.
Jan. 1.
B id. A sk. Low. High. No. Low H igh

ios

U 3 ” 118*'
101

8 154
23

Sale
Sale

92 Sale
....... 95

92
93

275
941

83

83

10554 Feb.’98
105 M ar’98

104*

113

10354.

10554 1055!
105 1055i

112 Aug.’98
111 M ar’98

105

112

101

101

101

111

M ar’98

111

daily record see seventh pa
98 .......
109% 110%
11154 11254
120%127%
126% 127%
111% 112%
11254 Sale
102 % .......

98 Apr.’98
11154 Aug’98
111
111
12754 Aug’98
120% 127
112 Aug’98
11254 11254
102% Aug’9S

101

See
See

See

10254 .

101

129 ......
103 ......
92% 95

128** Feb.v98

. .

9254
9854

111% 110

108
108
100
90
90
117
103

_ s|.....

82
24%

79
79

92
9354

51
11

*83“ Jan.’98
110 Aug’98

110

112

F eb ’97

77
............ 82
2L

.......
.......
.......
.......
.......
Sale
.......

7554.
9

Sale

*No price B’riday; these are latest bid and asked this week. t Bonds due July. t Bonds due May. I Bonds due April.
O U T S ID E S E C U R I T I E S (G iven at foot of 7 consecutive pages ). —

109 May’98
105 Aug’98
10554 Aug’98
98 Aug’98
117
117
104 J’ly ’98
10054 M ar’98

93

88

74

10854 109
105 108
10554 10554
98 100
10 115
100
98

Jan.’98

Aug’98
J’ue’98
Aug’98

8%

101

117
104
100%
101

128*' 128"
87
87
05

93%

88

74

9 4 426
5

RRs., BANKS, MISCEL.
| Bonds due January.

M iscellaneou s.
Bid Ask.
Bid Ask
Bid. |Aak. |
|
M isc e lla n e ou s.
M iscella n eo u s.
R a il roads.
Schwarzchild A Sulzb. 100 45
Texas A Pacific Coal. 100 50
55
00
Fidelity A Dep (B alt)..50 140 145
N Y El deb 5s gu Man Ry. 98
1st 0s 1908..........AAO 102
Semet-Solvay deb 5s
Galveston Wharf—1st 5s.
99 100
101 103
105%
No Pacitic Mo Dlv 1st 0s.
Title Guar A Trust.. .100 280 290
8 immons H ’rdw-Com.100 105
Genesee Fruit..........100
'Plttsb Connellsv 1st 7s 104
Trenton Pott—Com..100
Preferred.............. 100 116 120
7
10
30
German Am Real Est.100 23
Do con 0s gu by B A O 115
Preferred.............. 100 25
35
Glucose Sag Ref-Com. 100
Singer Mfg Co.......... 100 410 425
8 t P East A Gr Tr 1st 0s.
0 1 * 02
Standard Oil............. 100 408 410
Trow Directory-New. 100 35
45
::::::
Preferred...............100 107 108
gu by MUw L 9 & West.
05
Stan. Dist. A Die.—Com..
23* 2 1 * Union Switch A Signal.50 04
Goodyear Shoe Mach. .25 37* 38*
Tenn C IA Ry con 0s 1901
115
Preferred................50 1 1 0
Preferred...................
72
90
73*
Gorham Mfg Co-Com.100
Do So Plttsb 1st 1902..
10
12*
Union Typewr—Com.100
114
Preferred.............. 100 110
Stand Und’rg’d Cable. 100 115 120
Vlcksb A Meridian 1st fls
SlossIASlstQs 1917.FAA
1 st preferred........ 100 100 108
88
Great Falls Ice.......... 100 110
125
M isc e lla n e ou s.
Southern Cotton Oil.. .50 80
2 d preferred..........100 94 100
85
Acker Merrall & Con. 100 9754 101 i Hartford Carpet Co.. 100
27
Stat Isl R T 1st 0s’13AAO 107
U S Glass—Common.. 100 20
00
02
Am Air Power of N Y. 100 25
2054 Heck-Jones-J Mlll-Pf.100
80
2d 5s 1926.............JAJ
Preferred.............. 100 70
02
70
90
95
Amerlc’n Axe A Tool. 100
1st 0s 1922.......... MAS
100
U S Projectile Co..... 100
80
Her’g-Hall-Mar-Com .100
Still w-BIerce A Sm-V.100 70
Amer Bank Note Co.. .50 t 89
42
*
*
Swift A Co................100 100
Wagner Palace Car. ..100 173 171*
American Brake Co.. 100 90
101
Preferred...............100
93
2* 0
330
1 st 0 8 ................ ........ 1100
Westingh Air Brake.. .50
Hoboken Land A Imp’t .. 100
50
Amer. Caramel—Com...
45
Willimautic Linen Co..25
Susq Coal 0s 1911___JAJ 115
Preferred..................
5 s.............................. 105
101 103
10 2 *
Wool Exch’ge of N Y.100
Term Wareh—Stock. .100
10
80
9
Amer Groc—1st pref.100
International Elevat.100 75
24
28
Worth’t’n P ’mp-Com.100
1 st 0 s.................
82*
70
Amer Malt’g Co—
Com—8
Stk E xl’t International Navig.,100
Preferred.............. 100 92
95
Debenture 0s......
70
Preferred
Stock E xoh. 11 st.
St ock
International PaperlOO )
Exch list.
Am Pneumat Tool Co. 10
Preferred..........il00 {
110
Amer Press Assoc’n. .100 10 0
Bonds 0s..................... 1 0 0 * I l l
Bid. Ask.
B an ks.
B a n k s.
B a n k s.
American Screw....... 250 115 140
International Pulp...100
2
Am Smokeless Powd.100
Iron Steamboat........ 100 t i
101
N. Y. CITY.
Mercantile .. 107
55
60
4
8
Am Soda Foun—Com. 100
0s 1901................. JAJ
America*.... 352
Manufact’rs. 250
(Merchants’.. 151
1 st preferred.......... 100 47 53 John B Stetson—Com. 100 45
Mechanics*.. 225
Am Exch.... 105 170
Merch Exch. 110
110
2 d preferred.......... 100 15 25
Preferred.............. 100 100
Astor.........
Mech A Tra*. 245 255
Metropolis*..
17
12
Amer 8 teel A Wire. £
200
St’ck Ex rt JoumeayA Burnham. 100
Astor Place*
Mt Morris*.. 100
72
Preferred........... J
Preferred..... ........ 100 07
Bowery*......
Nat City..... 335 345
300
Mutual*...... 100
87
American Surety....... 50 100
Knickerbocker Ice.... 100
175
North Side*.. 100
Nassau*....... 150
90 ioi 1 Broadway.... 226 230
Am Typefo’re—Stock. 100
17*
Bonds 5s........... .
People’s* — 190 195
00
110 | Butch’sADr.. 100 70 New Amst.*.. 235
Amer Sewing Machine.. 5,
Lawyers’ Surety....... 100 100
Central......
Scherm’rh’n* 140 150
New York—
Amer Strawboard....100 ' 30* s o * Lawyers’ Title Ins.... 100 153 100
105
Chase.........
17th Ward*. 100
NewYork Co. 1100
Amer Wringer com... 100 104
Lortllard (P )—Pref... 100 118
215
Chatham .... 290 300
N Y Nat Ex..
5
Pref........................... 114
Madison Sq G— Stock. 100
Chemical..... 3700
20th Ward*.. 135 145
Ninth.......... 80
35
25
2d 0s 1919..........MAN
Amer Graphophone.... 10 130 135
100
Citizens’..... 125
19th Ward*.. 100
Maine S S................... 50 40
Preferred...............AO 130 110
City............ 1000
Wallabout*.. 103
North Amer. 130
Anderson (John) Tob.loO
10
1 2 * Merch A Miners’ S S__ 50 120
Colonial*___ 137
Oriental*---- 140
12 20
Automatic Vending... 10 25
Mech’nical Rub-Com.100
T ru s t Cos.
Columbia*... 150
Pacific*.......
40
BarneyASm Car-Corn. 100
32
13
Preferred.......... ...100
16
N. Y. CITY.
Park........... 300
Bosto n list Commerce... 202
Preferred.......
Mergenthaler Llnot—
100
55
Am Dep A L.
Continental. 125
Peoples’* ....
00
0s 1942.................JA.J 97 100
Meriden Britannia Co..25 55
Atlantic Tr.. 137*
Corn Exch*.. 275
Phem x...... 90
12
8
L list.
Mich-Pen Car—Com.. 100
Central Tr’st. 1350
East River.. 130
Plaza*......... 290 310
105 110
Preferred—Sec N Y Stoc k Exc h.
Colonial...... 195 205
11th Ward*. 225
Prod Exch*.. 110 118
92
90
1st 5s 1942.......... MAS
23
t 10
Continental. 187
F ifth .......... 220
Republic .... 155%
102
Bliss Company—Com..50 110
125
Minneapolis Brew 1st 7s
Consolidat’d.
Riverside*... 185
2500
105
Preferred............... 50 1 0 2 * 110
Hosier SafeCo........ 100
Farm Ln ATr 900 950
First...........
Seaboard.... 175
Bond A Mort Guar... 100 190
Monongahela Water...25 80% 37*
Fifth Ave Tr 340 860
First (St Isl)
Second ....... 450
Carter-Crumo—P re f.. 100 55
Nat Biscuit
N Y Sto ck Ex ch.
70
Guaranty Tr 420
150
120
Fourth.......
Seventh......
Celluloid Co.............. 100 70
74
Preferred—See N Y Sto ck Ex cb.
Kntck’rb’ck’r 240 280
98
100
Shoe A Le’th
80 | 14th Street*.
Cent America Tr’nslt.l00|
National Casket Co... 100 00
*
Manhattan.. 100
Sixth..........
Franklin.....
25
Cent Flrew’rks—Com.100
National Saw—Pref.. 100
Mercantile.. 400
Gallatin..... 300
State* ........
202
Preferred...............100 x35
National Surety.......100
45
Metropolitan 300
Ganaevoort*.
105
State of NY* 103
75
Chateaugay OreA Ir 0s ’ i 5
40
National Wall Paper. 100 05
N Y L I A Tr 1200
Garfield...... 1000
Tradesmen’s
50
Ches A O Grain El—Inc..
10
17* N Y Loan A Imp....... 100
N Y Sec A Tr 375
German Am*
12th Ward*.. iso*
4s...............................
03
07
N Y Biscuit 0s 1911.MAS 114 115* German Ex* 112
North Amer.
23d Ward*... 100
200
Chesebrough Mfg Co. 100 350 370
New Jer Zinc A Iron.. 100 • 100
..... .
Produce Ex. 202
Union......... 225
Claflln (H B )-lst pref.100
90
90
N Y Air Brake—See N Y S tock E xch. j Germania*... 300
. •. •••
Ileal EstTr’t 200
Greenwich* 105
Union Sq*.... 170
2 d preferred.......... 100 88%
48*
Nicholson File Co.......50
State Trust.. 190 205
Western...... 140
Hamilton*... 105
12
9
Common—See N Y Stock Exch.
Nicaragua Construct. 100
Union Trust. 1030
West Side*.. 275
Hanover___ 390
lark Mile End Thr’d.100 75
Peck, Stow A Wilcox..25 t 18 ......
U S Mtg A Tr. 290 300
95
Hide A L ’ath 85
Yorkvllle*.. 170
Collins Co................. 100 118
Pegamoid (£1 shares)
Unit. States.. 1190
155
Home*....
104
2
Pennsylvania Salt Mig.50 102
Comstock Tun—1st Inc...
4
Washington. 220
BR’KLYN.
Hudson IUv* 145
Consol id Cor Heating. 100 32* 37* Penn. Steel 5s 1917.MAN
BR’KLYN.
Bedford*.... 215
| Imp A Trad. 480
Consol Flrew’ks-Com.100
10
Penn. Water—Com....50
Brooklyn Tr. 390 405
Broadway*.. 190 200
Irving........ 147%
Preferred ...........
Phil A Wil Steamboat. 50 132 142
40
132% Franklin..... 225 285
Brooklyn* . ..
Leather Mfr. 170
2
Con Kan C Smelt A 1
_____
Pneumatic GunCar’ge. 1
0
Hamiltou.... ....... 285
85
3*
95
8 th Ward*...
Liberty ...... 140
4
8
Consol Rolling Stock.100
17
20
Pratt AWhitn—Com.. 100
Kings Co..... 280
5th Ave*.... 104 107
Lincoln....... 750
50
Cramps’ 8 b A Bn Bldg. 100 70
225'*
Isl li & Tr. 220
74
Preferred.............. 100 45
380 390
First...........
240
Manhattan*.
Diamond Match Co... 100 W 0 * 141
Procter A Gamble.... 100 285
200 Manufact’rs. 237
Fulton*....... 180
235
Market A Ful
Bnsley Land.........
Nassau....... 159 101
Preferred.............. 100 160 105
2 0 c.
Ger Amer*.. 90 100
Mechanics1 170
10
R.I. Perkins Horse Sh. 100
People’s..... 250 253
....... 75
H a m ilto n * ... 105
Mech A Tra* 100
40
80
Eastman Kodak Co..
Preferred ...........100
95 100
tPrloe per hare
Russell A Erwin..........25
05
80
* Banks marked with an asterisk (*) are State banks.
250 ....... Safety Car Heat A Lt.100 i oo 106 1
Purchaser also pays acorued interest.

&

Par.

—See

ee

See

120

See

—See

2

.
.

10 12

L

i

THE CHRONICLE.

474
B o s to n , P h ila d e lp h ia

and

B a ltim o re

S to c k

t y S hare P rices—Not P er C untum P rices,
.............. ...
l. {
i. 30. Aug, 31.’
7 0 ft
*7Cft 72
. . . . . . 7 1 ft
»....... 74
23
8 3 ft 8 3 ft 2 8 ft 2 8 ft 2 3 ft 8 3 ft 2 3 ft
8 3 « 93JS
Saturday, i Monday,
Aug. 37. Aug. 29.

sdau,
A ug

S e p t,

E xch ang es— A

[V ol, L x v n ,
D a ily

and

ACTIVE STOCKS.

F r id a y *
S e p t,

2.

Y e a rly
S a le s
o f th e

Week,

H I n d i c a t e s u n li s te d .

S h a re s

R e c o rd .

Range of Sates# in 1898,
L o w e s t,

H ig h e s t,

J t u l l r o u i l 8 to c k * i.
71 B altim o re C ity Pas-so on e r ... (B alt.)
, £5
7 5 ft F eb. 11
2 3 f t B altim o re C o n so lid a te d ,.. . . .
. 25
"
2 3 fy
H
2 4 ft Feb. U
28 23 ft 2 3 ft 2 d ft B altim o re C im so lid a te d T .. . . (P h ila .) . 25
2 4 ft F eb. 28
S3H 43H
250 A ug. 9
»4S» # 40 9 9 6 * * 8*8-5* * •23*5“ 2 8 7 ft 335*' 3*30** 235 235 235' 238 B oston & A lb a n y ,. . . . . . . . . . .(B o sto n ) .1 0 0
.100
E
0 8 03ft 6 9 6 9
69
09 6 9
0 9 ft A ug, 20
69
« » S 2215 320 ft ji 225 . .0. 9.ft 225 ft . .6. 9.ft *225 ft .......... | 220 ft 220 ft B oston A le v a te d ......................... 11
. .
.100
B oston L ow ell. . . . . , . . . . . .
4
>
. .
227 A ug. 27
8 47 89 7
.100
3 7 1 ft J a n . 7
1 6 4 ft 10-1 ft 16 4 ft 104ft 1 0 4 ft 104ft ■ 163 104 B osto n A M a in e ...................... *'
16SM I M H
11
44
.1 0 0
310ft A ug. IS
1 1 8 5 * 1 1SJ* 1Y7 ** i x i h l n o n i n f t 1 1 6 f t117 11 6 ft i1 7 ft 1237 ft1 1 7 ft Chi<J. B url. A Q u in c y .. . . . . . . .
124ft C hic. Ju n e . A UII. S tock Yda, ‘*
.100
124 125 124 134
12454 126
........125
12 0 ft A ug, IS
•1 8 4 l a e
1 2 3 f t1 2 8 f t 1 2 3 f t1 2 3 f t P re fe rre d ............................,, ,
123 136
"
124 A ug. 22
1 1 2 ft1 1 3 ft 1 1 2 f t1 l2 f t 113 113 11 2 ft 118ft 1L i 2 ft 112% Ohio. M ilw aukee A St. P a u l, (P hilnA
X U f t A ug. 27
. 50
2 5 ft 2 5 ft 9 5 ft 25ft 2 5 ft 25% C hoctaw O klflhom a A G ul f , . ‘4
27 A u g . 24
26 SCft 20 20
* 8 8 2m
li
42
50
P re fe d ...............
41
4 2 ft A ug. 26
li
2 7 ft J
42
42 5 2 4 1 ft 42 52 4 1 ft 41 4 i f t 4 1 ft 53f t 51f t 51 C onsol. rrera ctio n o f................... “ 44 ,.,100
53
52
T
N. J .1 ...
53 A ug. 11
37 ,1
62
100 A u g . 9
98 J
104 104 41*04 1 0 4 ft 1 0 4 ft1 0 4 f t 104 1 0 4 ft 1 0 4 ft1 0 4 ft 10 4 ft 10 4 ft P itch burg, p re f........................( B oston) .100
*40 41 G a. statu th e m A F lo rid a.... . . . (B alt.)
*40 .......... *40 _____ MO
*40
42 A ug. 26
2 7 ft 3
*40
171 8-1 I'
4)
9 2 ft A ug. SO
oT * •9156 9 2 ft 9 2 ft 9 2 ft •9 2 ft 93 *92ft 9S *92 9 2 ft 1 st p re fe rre d .,, . . . . . . . . . . . .
m
7 3 ft 7 3 ft 2d p re fe rre d ,..... ........................ “
844 55 Z
.100
72 7 ‘ ft 7 2 ft 7 2 ft 7 2 ft 73
2
7 3 ft A tig. 25
71 71
72
72
20 ft J a n . S
3 0 ft 21
SOft 21f t 21ft 2tft S i f t 2 1 ft L ehigh V alley.............................. (P h ila .) . 50 3,874 1,9ft .1
s iM s iM 21 21
*450 4 ft J
6
6
6
Oft J&u, 12
5 ft 6ft *3% 0 M exican C ontra!................. (B oston) .100
C
0
6
0
0
8 0 ft 8 0 ft N o rth e rn C e n t r a l ( B a l t ) . 50
20 7 0 ft J
83 J u n e 30
•8 0 82 * S 0 ft.......... ♦ soft . . . . . . *30ft
• s o f t .......... m
19,428 19 1
(P h ila .)
4 1
A ug, 26
8 9 ft 41
3 8 f t 3 9 ft S S ft 39ft 40 4 0 ft 40 4 0 ft 7 9 u 40 N o rth e rn Paejflc ...............
ft 79% P r e f e r r e d ... ..,,.,,.................
44 .100 0,230 6 7 ft 2
79 f t S ep t, 2
7 0 ft 7 6 ft 7Uft 77ft 7 7 ft 7 3 ft 7 7 ft 7 9 f t
77ft
9 185ft 2
(B oston)
190 190 ■ 100 193 192 192 Old Col o u r.
190 190 ‘..........190
195 J u ly 2
*.......... 105
.100
1,309 18 J
30 f t A ug. SL
SO 3 0 ft 8 0 ft 3 0 ft ♦ 30ft 3 0 ft 3 5 ft 3 5 ft O regon Stio r t L in o .................. *4
36 SO
85 35
,
i
(P h ila .) . 50 1,838 5 5 ft 3
5 9 ft 5 9 ft 5 9 ft 5 9 ft 5 9 ft 5 9 ft 5 9 ft 59ft P e n n sy lv a n ia .
00ft F eb. 7
5 9 ft 5 m
9 4 ft 9 4 ft 9 1 ft 9 4 ft *94 9 4 ft 94% 9 4 ft P h tlad elplila T ra c tio n . . . . . . .
44
■ 95 A ug. 29
, 50 1,581 77 2
a m
04?* 9 4 ft 95
. 50 4,529 7 13-10
lif t Jan 0
“
9 0- 10 m O ft 9 9-16
Oft Oft Oft 9 7-10 R ead ing Co mp& ny. . . . . . . . . . .
m
9 f t 9 f t 9 7-10
. 60 5,089 18f t ?
“
27 1-10 F eb . 8
2 2 7-16 e -lb 22ft 7-16 21 3-10 a if t 21 11-Id f t 2 1 ft 21% 21% 21% 1st p re ferre d ..............................
50 1,780
2(1 p r e f e r r e d . . . . .
1
1
14 9-10 Feb, 5
11 ,11 d o 13-19 ys MO H .......... 10 18-10
11 11
*11 ......
83 8 4 ft 34 3 4 ft 3 9 ft 8 4 ft 33% 3 3 ft O nion P a e iile............................ (B oston) .100 12,063 1 4 8 *
3 4 ft A ug. 27
33M 34 H 32ft 34
8,4 97
0 7 ft A ug, 27
B 5ft 67
05ft 60M 0 6 ft 0 0 ft 0 6 ft 6 7 ft 0 0 ft 0 7 ft P r e fe rre d ......................................(P h ila“.) .100 10,134 47 t 3.1
em
50
2.1 f t A ug. 22
12f
H
2 0 H 8 0 ft 20 ft 8 0 ft S o ft 2 0 ft 20ft 20 ft 21 ft 20% 21 O nion T ra c tio n ...............
515 7 8 2
87 87
87ft. A ug. 11
67 67
80M S7 W eat E nd S t r e e t . B o s t o n ) .. 50
*3 7 ft S 7 ft 8 7 ft 8 7 ft 87 87
i> li« e e IliL u e o it» S t o c k s .
*283 284 28 3 284 283 883 8 8 1 f t 2S2 2Slft 2Slft 279 281 A m erican B ell T e le p h o n e ... (B oston) ,.100
,.100
1 4 3 ft 14 0 ft 1 4 2 ft1 4 4 ft 142 1 4 1ft 1 4 3 ft 144ft 144ft 145% 148% 145 A m erican S u gar R eiim u g 1.. 44
P re fe rre d
“ ,1 0 0
115 11 5 ft 115ft 115ft 4 1 5 110 '115 116 1 15ft 110 1 1 5 f t 110
25
44
2 2 0 ft 2 2 6 ft 226ft 228 228 227 227 228 228 B oston & M o n ta n a ....................
2 2 m 2 3 0 ft 229
44 . 25
2 4 ft 2 4 ft - 4 f t 2 4 ft 2 4 ft 2 4 ft * 2 4 ft 2 4 ft 2 3 ft 2 4 ft 2 8 ft 2 3 ft B u tte &- B osto n $.....................
44
. 25
’..........590
585 585 590 590 C alum et & H eela
590 685 585
.100
60 00 *d5ft 60ft 06 * “8 6 ft 00 66 *05 ft 6 0 ft 00 00 C onsolidated G a s . ( B a l t . )
2 8 ft 24 D om inion Goa! — . . . . . . . . . . (B oston) .100
2 2 ft 23ft 2 3 ft 24
♦ 22ft 2 3 ft 28 22ft *22 ft 23
3 4 ft 3 4 ft 3 1 ft 8 4 ft 35 357^ 3 5 ft 3 0 ft 3 0 ft 3 7 ft E lectric S torage B a tte ry 7 .. (P h ila.) ,100
85 35
P
rre 7
.
44
•lift 41ft i1\3H 4 2 ft 42 42ft E riereTfeele pdh o n, e. .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...,. .(B o sto n ) .100
75 70 ft
.100
74
ft 75
”4
7 4 ft 7 4 ft 7 8 ft 7 4 ft 73 73
.100
7 0 ft 7 0 ft 70 7 l f t 72 7 2 ft 72 7 3 ft 73% 7 4 ft 7 2 ft 7 8 ft Illin o is S tee l.,............44
*22
22f L am so a S to re S e rv ic e . . . . . . . 44
t
. 50
*21ft 22
22
22 2:3
2 3 22
4 * 2 1 ft 22
50
38 ' 38 *3 7 ft 3 8 ft L eh ig h Coal A N a v ig a tio n .,. (P h ila.)
88 38
3 7 ft 3 7 ft 33 88
.100
,
44
*0% 5 ft M arsden C om pany 1
Oft 6 ft
6 ft 6 ft
6f t
6 ft 8 ft
sh
m
m
*140 1 4 0 ft New E ngland T e le p h o n e .. . . . (B o sto n ), . 100
♦ 140 144 ♦ 140 144 *140 143 .......... 143
25 8,613
41
a$M 2 9 ft 2 8 ft 39 Old D om inion C opper T .. . . . ,
2 9 ft 2 0 ft 29 29 ft 2 8 ft 2 9 ft 2 8 ft 29
s u f t 2 0 ft 20 ft '20ft 20% 1 9 ft 20 P a. M fg. L ig h t & P o w er? . . . (P h ila ,).
50 20,723
SOft 21ft. 20ft 2!
50 lO,.20i
1 2 0 ft 12 6 ft 119 f t1 2 d f t 119 f t 1 1 9ft 120 1 22ft 121ft 122ft 1 2 1 ft 122ft U nited G as Im p ro v e m e n t? .. 44
25 4,855
1 7 ft 1 7 ft 17 17ft 17 17ft 17ft 1 7 ' m i m i 1 8 ft 18ft O tilted S tates CHI...................... (B o s to n ).
5 3; 1.16
53 54 W elsbach L ig h t T ................. ,, (P h ila .) .
54 58
54 57ft o4 o5
51 51
(B o sto n ).,. 25
25
1
1
1 ft W est E n d L a n d ...................
♦1
1
*1
*1
le c tric
8
•Sift 58 ft *57 3*1ft *57 8 0 ft *57 321fft * 580 ft 58 f t 3 'fftt 57ft WPestiugh. dE........44 A M fg ... <4 ,. 50 1,470
32ft *31ft 5 82ft 80 58 ft 30 5 8 t *1 811 5 32
03
re fe rre
,. 50
68
ft
* Bid and ask ed prices; n o sa le was m ade. * T r. re c e i pt a; all Inatal paid- t T r. reels. 7 E x rig h ts.
B id . Ask,
B id . A s k
BONDS
STOCKS-BONDS B id , Ask,
SON PS
INACTIVE STOCKS B id . A ek.
M IS C E L L .—C oncluded.
B o s ! o n —Co del u tl ed.
JBn.I t i m o r e —C oneliPd,
R A IL RU A m — L r i C e S
Ogd & L C coti 6 s / 20 A&O * 95
3
2
JUifc B u tH A S M
44 10
A t T op A S F e .. (Bo&t) 100
H IM 116
Incom e 0 s ................ 1020
15
M arsdeu p r e n (P h il) 100 40
10S!*
A tl A C h a rlo tte (B a it) 100
A lergenthal e r .. (B e st) 100 181 180** R u tla n d 1 st 6s, / 0 2 MAN $ 100” 107 W ilC ol& A ug 68.1910 J& D
B a lt A O h io .... 44 100
§ 98
2d 5 s ,.........................,1 8 9 8 -P&A 100
115ft : : : : : :
M orris C a n a l...(P h il) 100
B ob & M aine pf, (B oat) 10C
150*' W est E nd S t 5 s .. '02 MAN 5105
P re f..........
4t 100
B oston A P ro v. 44 100
4 f t s . . . ........................ 1014 MAS
O sceola M lnlng(B ost) 25 5 0 ft 5 0 ^
Bonds—Pit! S el ph1n
ad
O a t & w i s a a ( P h U} 50
Gold -is........... 19 16 M&N 5104ft
A ill C ity 1 st 5 s g ./1 9 M & N 107ft 100
P a r r o tt SllACop 44 10
1 st p re f ........... 44 5 0
§ L04ft
4 s ..................................1917 F& A
B uffalo R y con 1 s t 5 s. ,’31 1 12ft
P e tm sy l S a lt ... (P h il) 50
C en tral M ass.. .(B o a t) 100
C atavrissa M 7s. 1900 F&A
P e n nay 1 SteelT . 44 100 20
F r e t...................... 44 100
Bon i|»— a l f 1more.
B
C hes& D C a n ls t5 s /1 8 J& J 5 2 1 55
P r e f 7 .............. 44 100 8P ft
C e n tra l O hio. . . (B ait) 50
P b il’d e ip h ia C o(Jiost) 50 80 37 f AC &• Ch 1 st 73.1907 J& J 119 122ft C hoe Old a & G p rio r lien 08 108|4
C hic A W M ich, (B oat) 100
P u llm a n 's P a l ,. 44 100 185 1S6 ! A tlG -LSghtl stS alft 17,1 & D
G eneral 5 s .... 1919 J& J 108 1 0 3 ft
C it’a S t o f In d a l <Phil} 100
Q uincy M ining,
44 25 119 U 9 f t| B a lt B e lt le t 5s, 19 9 0 MAN 100ft
C it's 'S t i:ty(Ind}con 5 s /88 78 80
C ity A S u b u rb ,. (B a li) 50
R eece B ut to n h . 44 10 m i 12 ; B al tC P as 1st 6s. 1911 MAN 115
C olum S t R y 1 st con 5 s / 8-2
C on n & P a se u m (B o st)! 00 153
Colum O C ro sst l3 t5 a ./3 8
5ft 5ft; B a it F u udg 53,1916 MAN 123
255 260 S a n ta Y eabel G 44
5
o r;R iv e ....
C on T ree o f N .3 1 st 5 a ./3 3 P. 0
15 T a m a ra c k M in. 44 25 179 L 79ft, E xch ang e 3:ft.a. 1930,1 &,] 107M |
lin t & P ere M. 44 100 14
B a it AC h lo 4,s g. 1985 A &C 118
D el & B ISSr 1 st 7 s /05 F&A
P r e L .,. . . . . . . . 44 100 89 4 0 ft U nited E l S e c ,. 44 50
.PitfsA C on 5 g. 19 25 FA A 118
P r e f , , . . .......... 44 100
B ast& A 1 s t M 5 s / 20 M AN 100ft
G T m n n fn P a ss (P h il) 50 133
S lat Id! 2d 5 g. 19.20 JA J
W a te r P o w e r., 14 100
i
E d iso n E le c 5a a tk t r ctfs, 110
H e sto n v M & T 44 50 40
ReceiverB c e rtif 0S.J& D
2-0
E ieeA P e o p 's T r s tlt t r c tfs o s u " 94' ‘
W ei s b ach Com T (P h II) .10 0
P r e f .. . . . . . . . .
50 0 7 ft
:. ||
80
P re f 1 .............. 44 100
Elm & W i Im 1 st 0 » / L0 J &J
H u n t & B ro ad T 44 50 10
D o P lttsb fo C o n 5d.JA<!
In co jae 5s... ,2 8 6 2 A&O
W esitm’re l Coal (P h il) 50
P r e f . . . . . . . . . . 4‘ 50 S8ft
Eq 111 G us-L la t g 5 s.l9 2 S 107 i d / g
W o 1v e rin e M ia. (B oat) 2 5 27 ft 2 7 ft B o M ain L in e 5 s .. . . . . . ,
K C F t S A M .. (B oat) 1 00 10
B& OSW l s U f t g, i 990.3 AJ 10 L 101ft H e sto n v M & F con 5s. *24
W o lla sto n I f d , 44 5
P r e f , ...........
44 TOO 45
1ft
B a lt A P I stdsm 11911A AO 121
H & B T op con 5 s / 25 A v O
L ittle S c h u T lk .(P h il) 50 5 3 ft
1st Os tu n n e l 191.1..JA J 122
I n te r n a l N av 0 s. . . . . 1906 106
B o n d s —B o s to n ,
M ain e C e n tra l. ( H ost) 100 130
B al T rue 1st 5s. 1 9 20M AN 115
K C S u b B 1 st Os. .'2 0 J& D 101
M etropoi S tL . .(P M l) 100 l 5 2 ft I 5 | f t A m Boil T el 7a. 1898 FA A
E x t &. Im p 6 g J 901M & S 10 5 ft 106
K C P & G 1 st O s,/23 A &O 78
M inehxll & S II . 44 ' 50 50 50 is, A T A S F g e n g 4 s . *95 A AO
9 3 ft
A d jn s tm e n t g -4a. .1995
il2 “
L ehigh N av 4 fts . / 14 Q-J
N e a q u e h n n ^ Y. “
50 53 55
71ft. N a B aitD iv 5s. 104 2J &■D 116
Oonv’rtlb le a s 1.9 06M&N 1 0 8 ft 10 4 '
B & M 3d is 7s.'D 2-07 MAN
108
37
. .
B osto n Term*} 8 ft a., 1947 .109 i i T * Cap e FA Y sr A tig. 19108 &D 71 7.5
onsul 7 . . . . : 1 ...
P r e f .................... 44 100 97
1 st 0s Her B ..1 9 16 t r re c 45 50
B os U » G as 1 a t 6». ’39 J &J A 93 9-1
G en M 4 fta g . . .1924 Q -F 1 0 2 ft
N o rth P e n n . ...(P h il) 50
1 st 6a aer C ..1910 tr roe 4 4 ft 50
*05* “
2d M 5 a ,........ 10,39 J& J
79 80
L eb V CM 1 s t5 s g /S S J M
N o A W B ra n c h 44 50
C ent Ohio 4 fts g /8 0 M&S 104
B ur& M o lil v c x 'p t 0s. J &,]
L ob Yal e x t 4s., 1048 J& D U 4M
P e n n Sc N W .,» 44 60 25
N on -ex em p t Os.’lS J& J t l o ? ‘ 108** C entra] Ry 0 s ... 1912 JA J
2 d 7 s ............. 1010 M&S
P h il & E r ie ..,.. 44 50 17
Consol 5 a ,.. . 1982 MAN 117
P la in 4 a .. . . . . . 1910 J& J | 95
P h il G erm & N . ** 50 180
Consol 6s.......1923 J& D 1115ft 11 6 ft
Oh B ur& N 1 s t 5a ABB A AO
123
A n n tiity 6 s .. . . . . . . ,J &D
107**; E x t & Im p 5s,1932M & 8 n o f t J 1 0 ft
H nU ed N J ........ 44 100 257
2d M 6 s ......... 1918 JA D 1 105 100 . C haiiC A A extS a. 1910 J &J 108
17
N ew ark P a s s con 5a. 1080 112
U n ite d T r o f P . 44 50
C heaap G as 0 s .. 1900 J& B 104ft
P r e f . . . , . ........... " 50 I I H •40 Ch B ur & Q 4 s .19 2 2 FA A $100
NY P h & N o rlst.8 s/2 S J& J
C ity& 8ub ta t 5 s.l922.IA U 115ft iVtift
W ent E n d p re f.(B o a t) 60 105 105ft Iow a D iv 4s. 1919 A&O $ 08
*enn
is ./8
Co] A G m v 1 st.5-0.1 9 1? J &J 116ft 117
Ch i.cago J unc 5s. 1915 J AJ |H 4
W e st J e r A 8 S ,(P k ii) 50 53
Cten M 7 a .........1908 J& J
Conuol Gas 6 S ..1 9 1 0 J& D 117 n o
Ch & N o M gn 5 s .’3 1 MAN | 58 60
W e st N V A P n , 44 ' 50
P e n n gen 0s r . . . 1010 V ar
m
m
5s.......................1.930 J& D n o m
Chi & W M gen 0a."3t J& D I 72
W lacon C en traft B oat) 100
2
C onsol 0s c . , , , 1005 V ar
C on. of V o rm 't 5s. T 3 J A J ♦ 74 '*7*5* * G a A A ittlatp f5 a10 4 5 A&O 104 105
P r e f ..................... 44 100
C onsol 5s r . ... 10 1 9 V ar
2
O u rr’t R lv Lit, 6s.’27 A AC $ 8Q 85 GaCurA N 1stSft ft, 19 2 9J &J 94 g if t
W o jN a a h A H . 44 100 125
CoHafcTr 4ftg g/1.3 J& D
M IB C ELLA N E C US.
D G R A IV 1 st 4.&.T0 A & 0
8 7 ft G e o rg laP lst5 -0 s 19 22 J& J 120 129 ft. P a & N Y C an 7 s ./0 6 J& D ..........
4
A lio u cr M ining (B u st) 25
Bom .in C oal !»t0s,T 8M & S | m " 112 Q aSo& Fl a l a t 5s .1945.1&J 100ft 100% C ons 5 a . , . . , . 1089 A&O
107* *
a’42M&.8
2
A m B y El L L I .( P h U ) ... .
C ons 4 s ..........1939 A&O
®>t E a st'll 1 at M 6s g.'Od MAS i n sft; 120 L uke R F! tl8 tg u .61990M&S 112ft 113
M.ac&N l« 4 ft h
F r Elk A M Y 1»t04*SS end $137
A n a co n d a M in ,(B o at) 25
P e n n S teel Iat,5 * /1 7 M&N “ tfs** 106"
MotST/ W a s h ) 1 b i; 5 b' 25 F A 118ft.
Unst-'p’d 1 st O s/38 A&O 1137
A nnlftton I*and. " 100
P e o p le ’s T r t r certa 4 s,*48 10 0 ft
lliin S teel oonv 5 8 /10 J &J l 09 100 N ew Or3 G as 1st 5 s ... V ar too
A rn o ld M ining. 44 25 1 0 ft
P e rk torn la ts e r S a /I S Q -J 102 '
Be ben tu re 5s, 19 13 A AO 1 m
A sh R ed M in'g. 44 25 J & i 3
P h titt E lec gold tr u s t c tfs 10 2 ft 102ft
9 7 N r>rth C ent 4 fts. 1925A AO 112
6a 1 0 0 0 , . . . . A&O 105
A tla n tic M in'g, 44 2 6 20 2 0 ft K C C A 8 1 s t 6s g / 26 A AO l 80 85
P h & E r gen M 6 g /2 0 A&O
6s gold 1900 ............. I&J 104
18
K C Ft, 8 AG 1si 7 8 /0 8 JA B $115 n o
G en M 4s g. .19 2 0 A&O
B a ltic M ining,. 44 25
1 L2ft
K C F SAM con 0 s / 28 MAN n o m
P h & R ead 2d 5 s /8 3 A&O
B a lt W a re h u fte(B alt) 20 21
10 3 ft 0s 1004....................... J A J 117
Series A 5a 1 9 2 6 .,,,J& J
K C M & B 1st 4 a ./3 4 M AS \ 80 8 1 ft
C onsol M 7 e ,. 1911 J& D 1*82 **
B ay S ta te G as7.(B oat) 50
m
Series B fm 19 2 0 ..., J &J 117
In co m e 5 s ......................... & 86 87
Con M 0a p ... 1911 J& D
B ergA E ng B r' f t (P h 1Q 100 60 75
10 7 ft
E x t Im p M'1.9 g,M 7 A&O 10834
Ohio AM l flt?8 D1905M &N
P re f
..........
100 95 96
K Q & M fly& B 5 8 /2 9 A AO $101
Pltts& C an 3at 7e 1898J& J LYi *'
Con M o f *82 J.s/3 7 J& J 101'
K C S t J o A O B 7 s / 07 J AJ ,'$119
B o sto n E lec L t.(B o s t) 100 159 105
P itt Un T rue 53.1997 J& J 105
-yr b f 5s g. 1002 F& A 1
B o sto n L a n d . , . lt 10
4
4 ft L atn s'n Bt'rci H 0 8 /0 9 MASP o tom V al 1a t da, 19 4 1J 6 3
L H ook& F S 1st. 7 4 /0 5 J Ad i’ T*
T erm ituil 5» g»194.1 Q -F ii s *
B o y b tq n S t LT, u
J5
o
Sec A vd’af P itt s ) 58*84,1 & u 11 Ift
P W ll &BaJfc 48.10 17A&O
C am bria Iro n * .(P h il) 50 ' m u ‘ W i l L IBASfc J. 1si (is y /2 0 A AO 40
108ft
Scab & R oan 5 b.1926 J& J 104* 1.0 4ft
O ollat tru s t 4a, 10 2 1 J& J
C an to n <-o.. . . . . 1B ali) 100 77 ft ^ r U \ 2d M 5-6 g.,.,19 36 A AO
P itt* C & StL 78,1.900 F&A i0 5 * ‘
Y irK M kU .st0iU 9O 0M & S 1 l 1
16
C tan te n M ining. (B oat) 25 1 8 ft i a g M ar II & O ut (L ../2 5 A &U $ 1* **
R ead Co gen 4a, 1907 J& J 8 2 ft 8 2 ftM ex C oiitm l 5a. 1917 A & l );► 5 ..
2d series 0s. . I l l 1 M&S 117
G entm l T ra n n ,, (P h il) 38 2-i
........
101)
Itoehesf e r R y con 5a. 1030
3 d scale a 0 s .. 1910 M AS 1 17
Dorn In CoaJ p t * (.Bent) 100 1 13 i i i f t ! 4s g . . . . . . . . . . . 1 9 1 3 J ' $ 6 6 ft 60
4 th «er 3-4-5s, .1921 M&S 100
Sob R E S tde LrSfcSe g 485J& D 105* *
E d n o n El I I I ,,. “ 100 105
1st eon Inc 3s g h oh-cum 13 14 ft
U nion T orn/1 1st 5*.F&A
6 th serie s 5s. 1086 MAS 105ft
F t W ay n e E lect “ i 25' 1
2d con In c 3a n an -ad im.
6
Y e (S ta te ) 3 l m ?w / 82,f&J s i f t 8 2 ft I U nited N J 4s, .1 94 4 M &S
<
F ra n k lin MlGi’g. 44 35' I t
1 4 ft New E n g T ele 0 8 /9 9 A 4 0 OOP
U n T raeP I 1,ts g y n 5s '0 7 J &.J 104ft
F ren ch B ay Ld. 44
&
, . .1 0 0 7
f'/jaid d e b t2 ‘8s. 1991J &J 7 5 ftt
f t N 0s . . , . E, n.g. ,1, st 7 fl/05A AO f i l l )
U:
iA ud ac cru e d in te re s t, 7 D nh Bt.ed.
YAN
J AJ
G en eral E leet-., 44 100
Y a& T en d 2d 58, i 909 J &J 100 ....
__ _
,c ton;
♦ Priceincludes o v erd u e c o u p e m .
1si m a rt h a ., ,J 905 J &.} H i 3ft' . . . .
8 s „ .................... 1900 J& J

.100
.100
.100
.100
.100
.100

20

mV

|w

10

THE CHRONICLE.

Septembek 3, 1808. j

'g u w is tm m t

ROADS.

AND

R A IL R O A D E A R N IN G S .
The following table shows the gross earnings of every
3TEAM railroad from which regular weekly or monthly returns
can be obtained. The first two columns of figures give the
gross earnings for the latest week or month, and the last two
columns the earnings for the period from January 1 to and
including such latest week or month.
The returns of the street railways are brought together sep
arately on a subsequent page.
Jan. 1 to Latest Date.

Latest Gross Earnings.
WeekorMo 1898.
1897.

1897.
1898.
*$
$
Adirondack......June.......... IS, 145 13,232 10^,061 100,330
Ala. Gt. South.. dwk Aug. 33,422 30,821 1,068,16 4 971,063
Ala. Midland.. A Pao. Juno. 68,493 49,755 408,790
Ala. N. O.A N. E June........ 25.000 23 000 825,216 335,237
Tex.
N Orl. Vioksb. IstwkAug.
738,705
Ala. ASb.&P. IstwkAug. 10.000 9.000; 388,488 321.752
Vicks Val.. July......... 219,557 218.082 383,465 1,369,-ld
IstwkAug.' 8,0U0 6 000
296,310
Allegheny
Ann Arbor........3dwk Aug. 25,973; 25.656 1,488,173 798,536
908.798!
8.301
Ark. Midland... July......... 3»7§6,«93 2,594,231 21,555,336;
June........1 5,9501 8.301' 55,068, 41.407
Atcb.T. A Char May......... 124,590 121,425 668.297 18,675,231
Atlanta AS.Fe.e
▲ tl.Knox.ANo. July......... 24. 18 24.5^81 176,461; 682,954L
J 49,81
Atlanta*Danv..j3dwk Aug. 39,490 37.759 273,128 264,035
Atlan. & W. P.jJune........ _11,699 10,590 355,727 335,374
10,914
Austin&N’west;.May......... 2,305.991 2,245,492 15,9 52,380! 75,211
Balt. & Ohio.... July.......... 9,542
*4,370
Bai. & O. Sou*w Ju e ........ 142,331 133,062 4,297,83 14,3 L4.261
3dwk Aug. 1,459 1,586 10,0371 3,893,824
BathAHam’nds
1,592 1,560, 14,346' 11,979
Blr. A Atlantic.!July......... 61,502 48.896 298,242 10,181
Brunsw’kAWest, Juuo........ 73,223 66.081
273,806
Buff.Rooh.APitt J u ly ........ 49,6 9 50,559 2,369,328; 2.077.013
3dwk Aug.
BuffaloRap.* N. :3d wk Aug. 107.036
& 8 u 8C[..
318,461! 2.412,322
2,513,499 320,568
Bur.O.
CanadianPaoitic July.......... 491.0 0 505,00 • 15,090,382 13,310, 96
3dwk Aug. 9,353 93.299 33.634
Car. Midland.... 3dwkAug. 85,326 84.532
30 232
5,788
Cent.of Georgia July.......... 1,034,644 1,239,433; 3,164.039 2,997.043
Central of N. J..
6,782,461 6,706a 31
Central Pacitio May......... 62,275 1,044,317!
Charlest’nASav June........ 1,474,335 50.1341 6,0b2,4>o 4.728,357
Chas’n A W.Car.iMarch...... 87,529 79,564! 386,552 349,631
Chattan’ga So..|.*dwk Aug. 258,551 1,774 260,457! 241,188
1 328
44.183 48,185
Ches. Bur. & Q.dlJuly.......... 3.086.197 3,043.059 7.366,115 6,979,789
Ohio. & Ohio— 3dwkAug. 102.912 224,146 22,937,948 10,98 4,906
76,430
Ohio. & East.Ill.jildwk Aug
Chic. Iud. & L.. 3dwkAug. 07,611; 71,19* 2,590,834 2,407.891
Chic. Gt. West’n 3dwk Aug. 125,189! 118,005 3,312.15 <| 2.981,099
2,022,228 1,893,216
Chio.MiL&St.P 3dwkAug. 652,674 619,316 20,195.213 18,26^,659
Ohio.* N’thw’n.'July......... 2,8l9.284i2,944,013 19,813,939 17,280.822
Chic.Peo.ASt-L July......... 50,873 53,719 406,908 458.716
Chlo.R’k I. * P.. June........ 1,570,709 L.385,015 9,352,636 7,862,376
Cblo.St.P.M.AO June........ 614,141 635,538 3,72 4,540 3.446,865
Chlc.Ter.Tr.RRJ.3dwk Aug. 22,75** 21,539 730,805 668.609
Ohio. &W. Mich J June........ 98,429 60,846 1,123,250 972,918
Choo.Ok.AGulf. 3d wk Aug. 43,890 33,042
Cin.G.APorts’Lb July.......... 400,539 312,602 739,*73 477,445
5,488 5,577 32,444 33,427
Cin.N.O. AT.P.jJuly.........
Cin.Ports.A Vlr. 3dwk Aug 22,716 10.707 2,589,021 2,031,839
March...... 12,270 19,412 61,408 52,283
Clev.Can.&So..
431,153 383,749
Cl.Cln.Ch.A8t.L^ 3d wk Aug. 287,763 277,780 8,87 .202 8,360,687
Peo. & East'n.. 4thwkJuiy 41,006 40,053 1.053,194 927,901
Cl. Lor. AWheel.. 3dwk Aug. 30.835 24,310 929,^88 758,298
CoL Midland.....July......... 140,953 143,507 910,169 938,649
Col.H. V. &Tol..13dwk Aug. 202,516 155,986 1,427,665 1,271,106
Col. Sand’y A H. July.......... 22,170 9,644 520,312 422.066
Colusa* Lake.. une..........j 1,300 2,155
9,850 10,955
Crystal..............JJuly.........
868
5,658
1,215
7,166
CumoTd Valley June........ 76,411 82.797 388.721 360,226
Oenv. &N. A Gr July......... 168,100 151,500 5.079,429 4,313,631
Rio W.. 3dwkAug.
Dea M.
228.452
Det.G.Rap. AW. 3dwk Aug. 35,0*7 35,485 294,086 773.236
Det. A Mackinac June........ 30,798 29,189 898,278 144,131
A Lima No. 3dwkAug. 8,134 7,207 205,855
Det. S.S.AAtl 3dwk Aug. 49,MO; 50,449 281,524 264,289
Duluth
ElginJoi.AEast. July......... 30,371 36,063 1,140,110 970,940
98.814 90 037 851,948 654,786
Erie....................July........... 2,570,090 2,850*894 18,069,993 17,747,004
EurekaAInd’plla June........ 4,338 4,076 25,924 28,799
Springs. 3dwk Aug.
Evans.v. AT. H. j dwk Aug. 8,720! 7,768 186,643 179,268
Evans
Fitchburg..........June......... 26,003 26,688 743.8O0 669,771
Flint & P.Marq. 3dwkAug. 564,663 596,437 3.392,613 3,278,360
1,686,731
Fla.Cent.* Pen. 3dwk Aug. 61,349 52,381 1,816.090 1,468.154
Ft.W’thADen.0. 3<iwk Aug. 73.767! 33,623 1,990,908 675,931
27,189 33,417 803,507 170, 57
Ft-W.ARioGr 3dwkAug. 6,340; 5,023 270,384
Gads. A Att. U. July.........
5,103
02-i:
723
4.206
Georgia RR......3dwk Aug. 26,4171 24.319 925,243 902,815
Georgia A Ala.. 3dwk Aug. 23,232; 20,911 752,627 631,239
Ga.CaPla A No. July......... 52,919, 57,533 403.494 427.609
Geo. So. A Fla.. June........ 88,433 76,622 570,652 483.549
Gr. Rap. AInd.. 3dwkAug. 47,053, 41,693 1,310,928 1,192,710
Cln.R.*Ft.W. 3dwk Aug. 9,509 8,328 279, U1 250,049
Aug.
Traverse City. 3dwk Aug.
7661
960 25,734 24,009
69.902
Mus. G. R. AI. 3dwk
2,734! 2,574 77,403 1,537,269
Tot alllines. 3dwkAug. 60,062, 53,555 1,093,264 L3,812,064
■ Chlc.AGr. Tr 2d wk Aug. 462,794! 487,093 L4,57o,204 1 , 8 1 4 ,010
Gr.Tr’nkSyst’m 3dwkAug.
Det.Gr.H.*M. 2dwkAug. 63,246 22,5 471 2,253,1 9 580,917
21,214 61,153
Great NortlTn—July......... 1,410,375 1.447,002 542,007 7,575,015
East of Minn. .July.......... 213,346 105,589 9,269,148 1,127,588
930,222 835,55
July......... 1,789,011 1.778.820 11.363,373 9,538,157
July......... 16\290 106,229 1,104.003 70,643
I uly.........
July......... 17,94 12.801 98,256 23,548
2 7,258
3,788 2,851 28,866 29,6 5
July.........
4,439 5,226
May......... 120430 6 119114075 »15273575 ♦ 1,102,773
178,339 179,227 1,108,857 12085769
Inly.........
137,484
32.218 140,363 393,072
Ind. m. North’n June........ 58.253 52,50 • 4(4,483 1,939,797
A Iowa April........
I(Interne. (Mex.)! 3dwk Aug. 54,754 01,454 1,980,130 1,642,050
a. AGt.
Wn Aug. 1 56,700
Iowa Central. Jdwk Aug3 45,099 55,490 1,974.700 997,056
1,160,810
3,06 4 39.5077 28,806 20.250
July.........
2.23
$

.

;

1

1

3 0 ,7

0

475
Jan. 1 to Latest D&te^

1898.

1897'
$
Jack. T. A K. W July.......... 29,547 20,179 217.583 185,490
Kanaw’a*Mic&
10,756 10.470 341,647 325,647
K.C.F. ScottAM 3d wk Aug. 83,572 90,564 2,972,633 2,851,467
Aug.
K.O.Mem.AW .... 3dwk Aug. 20,360 20,239 913,453 711,367
Kan. City AOin. July.......... 21,754 25,775 195,181 187,043
C. N. Bir. 3dwk
Kan.
K. C. Pitts. A G. 3dwk Aug. 6,153 7,058 154,353 152,137
Aug
Kan.C.Sub.Belt. 4thwkAug. 113,999 76 J 15 2,111.380 1.356,227
KeokukAWest.c 3dwk Aug. '10,735 13.371 *299.756 *227,322
3dwk Aug. 15,079 *9,0(0 343,223 342.687
L. Erie A Hud.. 3dwk
71,146 73,952 2,115,233 2,117,786
Lehigh A West
31,797 36.632 210.094 200,547
Lehigh Val. RR July......... 1,703,086 1,607,171 10,132,673 9,749.694
July..........
Leh. V. Coal Co July......... 1,432,937 1,455,761 7,924,064 7,833,836
Lex’gtonAEast. June........ 17,737 18.849 105,802 104,811
Long IslaudRR
525,925
Long Is. System. July.......... 528,470 472.635 2,366.012 2,207,798
Los Ang. TermT Juue........ 481.799 11,419 1,936,982 1,794,740
July......... 10,416
49,506 51,168
r.Anio L .C I*
’
.C
Louis.Ev.ASt.L 3dwk Aug. 1 32.834 29,676 938,497 865,384
Lou. EL A St. L.. 2dwk Aug. 8,571 10,-91 297.844 275,293
Louisv.ANashv. 3dwk Aug. 417,690 403,186 13,939,374 12,784,090
Macon A Birm.. July.......... 4,307 4,556 30,450 32,673
Manistique
:MexicanInter’l. July.......... 226,235 216.976 8,467,696! 8,191,202
dwk Aug. 12,163 15,879 71.816 76,197
Mexican Cent.. Ju n e........ 271,929 236,829 1,665,972 1, ">42,766
tMex. Northern . 3dwk Aug. 105,411 101.808 3,848,315 3,766,813
Mex. National
tMexican So...... May......... 44,352 78,009 2,552,100 2,314,000
Mexican R’wav WkAug.13 72.000 48,715 228,793 271,749
2dwk Aug.
Mineral Range. June........ 11,970 15,*54 418,542 450,250
15.748 13,386
Minneap.ASLL. *dwk Aug 46,597 48,619 1,286,868 1,219,142
M. Kan. ASt.P.AS.St.M.
3dwk Aug 70,913 66,547 2,323,029 2,124,561
Aug.
Mo.
Tex 3dwk
6.321,488 6,356,129
Mo.Pac.AIronM 3dwk Aug 209.948 223,393 15,690,114 14,057,312
Central Br’oh. 3dwk Aug. 493.000 534,00. 825,354 654,496
27.000 33,001
Total..
Mobile A Birm.. 3dwk Aug. 520.00 567,00- 16,515,468 14,711,808
4,282 5,187 196,337 166,247
Mobile A Ohio.. 3d wk July 339.700 299,143 2,411,644 2,176,472
J uly..........
Mont.AMex.G’f. July.......... 108.700 112,900 882,380 795,067
Nash. Oh. A St.L. July.......... 549,531 480.278 3,285,251 3,030,378
NevadaCentral. May.......... 6,163 3.777 20.338 13,642
N. Y. C. AH. R.. July..........
N. Y. Out. & VV.. 34 wk Aug. 3,298,217 3,632,250 25,* 70,640 24,973.926
82,221 8.-»,603
N. Y. usq. A W. May.......... 185.850 181,922 2,339,304 2,438,474
803,250 826,663
Norfolk* West. 3dwk Aug. 247,367 247,310 6,984,705 6,705,150
Northe ’n(Ga.). May.......... 4,294 3,833 28.^24 23,804
Northe’ ’n( .C.) March....... 50,230 45,870 162,676 160,159
North’n Central. July......... 530.S15 547,6-7 3.543,309 3,574.088
North’n Pacific. 3dwk
Ohio River... 3d\vk Aug. 454,124 404,835 13,470,129 10,654,692
Aug.
OhioRiv.AChas. July......... 22,428 23,153 568,750 570,411
Ohio Riv.AL.E. May.......... 12,923 12,665 112.971 10,809
2,800 1,901 12,255 99,326
Ohio Southern.. July......... 45.220 48,381 360,183 358,052
Om.Kan. C.A E. 2d wkMoh. 14.246 11,533 158,55 i 114,754
Oreg.RR.ANav. 3dwk Aug. 159,233 155,529 4,213,135 2,782,628
Oreg.Coast Co.. June........ 601,303 586,479 3,053,453 2,706,005
Pao. Sh. Line.. June........ 439,131 311.908 2,731,643 1,008,595
Pacific Mail......
406.409 393,132
Pennsylvania^.. June........ 6,162,295 5,480,395 36,525,706 35,069,906
PeoriaDeo.AEv. July......... 23.204 22,921 544,341 562,269
3d wk Aug.
Petersburg...... June........ 60,427 52,149 343.937 311,713
Phila. A Erie...
308,218 373,555 1.883,222
Phila. * Read... June........ 1,697,546 1,613,102 8,280,405 1,864.,±07
7,719,901
Coalboth Co’s. May.......... 1,802,851 1,037,609 7,931,568 7,186,362
A Ir. Co. May..........
Tot.R. A N. E. May.......... 3,500.397 3,250,711 16,211,973 14,906,263
Phil. Wilm. A B. July.......... 49.034 57,104 353,666 345,023
Phil.
890,717 752,417 8,771.176
Pitts.C.C.&St.L. Ju n e........ 1,231,892 1,171,245 4,641,183 4,276,083
Pitts.LiBb.* Wn July.........
July.........
3,378 2.648 25,476 8,009,418
25,486
Pitts.Bes.AL.E. July.......... 146.201 60,963 648,736 326,002
Pitts. * Wes’n.. 3dwk Aug. 33.246 33,211 1,106,610 1,057,3^-3
Pitts.Ci.ATol. 3dwk Aug. 22.257 17,602 668,793 522,293
Pitts. Pa. AF. 3dwk
7,878 222,375 208.249
Total system. 3dwk Aug. 10.204 58.69L 2,004,664 1,793,650
Aug. 05,767
Pittsb.Yo.* A.. J une........ 148,885 182,520 714,387 583.313
Rioh.Fr’KShA P. June........ 88,669 66,182 445,087 372,347
Rich.* Petersb. June........ 37.774 31,254 204,124 178,520
Rio Grande Jot.
RioGrande So’n June........ 37,065 28.613 175,562 229.250
3dwk Aug. 10,100 65,600 288,889 133,463
7,377
Rio GPde West._______
3dwk Aug.
t. Jos.&Gr. I..J3dwk Aug. 56,600 32,365 l,99i,258 1,643,894
31,528 22,659 731.421 668,230
St. L.CliL ASt.PJ July_____ 27,998
St.L.Ken’etA So 3dwk Aug. 0,677 6,126 186,739 164,951
30,135 31,118
St.L. ASanFran. July!........ 126.699 125,762 4,150,282 3,779,910
St.L.Southwest. July......... 93,900 84,200 3,029,827 2,618,461
3dwkAug.
St. Paul A Dill.. May......... 125,683 126,183 811,567 778,360
San. Ant. AA.Pi
SanFran.AN.P. July......... 129,209 144,858 761,582 777.254
S. FePres. APh. 2d wk July 85,492 87.684 454,423 422.313
15,072 13,220 422,448 368,026
Sav.Fla.AWest. June........ 482,237 326,384 2,061,313 1,734,704
5,842
her. hrev.A G .. thwkJuly 6,998 13,664 145,269 141,370
Sil.Sprs.O. A
June........ 27,816 6,054 132,440 100,589
Stlverwm ......... July.
1,400 20,763 111,981 100.871
8ioux C. & N or. June
16,955 2,535 12,454
8 0 .Haven AEast June
10,788
3,100
So. Paoilic C o .G al.H ar.A 8. A May..........
474,441 337,937 2.249.969 1,810,574
Louls’a. West. May..........
99,832 70,941 506,952 406,340
Morgan’sLAT. May..........
490,330 383.273 2,524,572 2,076,954
N. Y . T. A Mex. May..........
22.495 23,341 125,516 ir6,751
Tex. A N . Orl.. May..........
133,264 118,957 657.848 634,285
A tl.P ro p ’tea.h May.......... 1,235,370 944.565 6.177.969 5,128,068
So. Pac. of Cal. May..........
945,835 789.270 4.532,029 3,753,936
So.Pao.ofAriz. May..........
288,323 212.838 1,470,631 1,062,817
So.Pao.ofN.M.lMay
161.699 126.870 734.378 576.007
Northern R y .. jM a y .........
202.800 172.722 884,268 787,761
Paoitic system 'M ay......... 3,511.737 2,651,238 15,487,994 12,220,807
Total of all./ J u n e ........ 4,338,7.3 3,769,278 27,309,821 22,379,214
Southern Ry.//.. 3dwk Aug. 440,314 395,991 13,409,583 12,017,979
Memphis Div. 4tliwkJ’ne
32,L5 31,455 738,1h4 631,292
9,814
9,794
3,789
StonyCL AC.Mt. J u n e ........
4,137 4 184 161,428 134,558
4,485
Texas Central.. 3dw&Aug.
165 1*,154
120,298 123 019 4.321 971 3,871 053
T e x a s *P a c itlc . 3dw kA ug.
Tex. S.V.A N.W. J u ly .........
4,198 2,900 24 05
T oi.*O hloC ent. 3dwk Aug.
34.8 4 22,587 1,122.047 990,360
547.7H
22,155 588
20.876 52,144 1,355.393 1,374,951
Tol. P. * West.. 3dw k Aug.
51,058 1,399. *80 9.1 *6 389 8 136.012
Tol.St. L. * K.O. 3dw kA ug.
Union Pac. RR.. J u ly ......... 1.486.810
71,222 68.O il 2,302,348 2,062,456
J n .P .D en .A G .. 3 d w kA ug.
289.733 284.946 8,302,217 7,174,418
vVabasli............3dwk Aug.
8 751 97,518
9,221 12.136
W aooANorthw, J u n o ........
359.8 •‘1 331173 1,418.633 1,361,302
W.JerseyASea’e J uly.........
97.495 100.209 673.36 054,2(6
W.V.Oen.APitts J u ly .........
33,823 150.559 351,765
31.307 43,484 30 <.208 30 ,654
West Va. A P 1
tts. M ay.........
43.477 71,400 1,850,935 1,705,366
Western of A la. J u n e .......
65.9 0 17,589 902.676 010,578
West. N .Y .A P a . 3dwk Aug.
31,695
Wheel. A L. Erie 3dwk Ang.
<
g

f t a i l r o a d lu t j e lli& e t t j c e ,

R o ads*

Latest Gross Earnings.
Week or Mo 1898.
1897.

it

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8 0

4

THE CHRONICLE.

476
Latest Gross E arnings,
Week or M o 189 8,
1897.

Ro a d s .

:

[V ol. LXVI1,

tan. 1 to Latest Date.

1898,

1897.

-Gross E arning*.1898.
$
120,164
773,630

floods.

MontereyAto June 30une
$
$
*
f
Jan 1 Mex.O’f J
84,487 27,433
W U kgab.A E a s t A p ril........
London June 30 ...
69.270 56,180 205,092 186,357 NewApr. 1 to Northern— 197,805*
W il.O o L A Au*. M uroh...„.
95,40 i 86,220 3.010.533 2.636.999
Wisconsin Or til 3dwk Aug.
J.ui. I to June30.... 332,521
88,934
5,826
5.361
41,078
Wright* v.ATen. j o n e........
31,057 Oregon RR. A Nav.. July
35.285
5,780
5,231
528.157
York Southern June.........
Jan.. 1 to July 31.... 3,781,169
a These Heart's include results on leased lines. t> includes earnings
Pennsylvania—
from ferries, etc., not given separately.
e Includes Des Molnea A
LIEastdirectly operated—
tics of Pitts, w, E. July 5,162,295
KansasOtty for all periods.
d in find os operations of tlio Ohio. B u r­
e

lington A Northern In both Fears.
Includes results on A T. A S.
Fe, G u ll Ool. (I a Fe, S. Fe Pacific old Atlantic A Pacific! and So.
CaL By.
Includes the Pacific system, the Atlantic properties and
the Houston & Texas Central system,
Beginning July, earnings of
Memphis Division and Ml(Idles borough < Aiken branches are included
te
fo r both years.
• Results on Kansas City A Independence A ir Line are not included
for either year.
t Includes Chesapeake A Ohio So’ western for both years, but Ohio
V a lle y and Chicago ud Texas for 1893 only.
jM o x lia n currency.
I Covers results of lines direotly operated east of Pittsburg.

f

g

Latest Dross Earnings bj Weeks —The latest weekly earni ir s in the foregoing are separately summed up as follows:

For the third week of August our final statement covers
81 roads, and shows 3’05 per cent increase in the aggregate
over the same week last year.
3d week o f A u g u st.

Previously rop’d (51 r’dsi
Atlantic A D an ville.......
Burl.
Rap. * N o......
Central of G eorgia.........
Chattanooga Southern.,
Chicago * West MIohlgai
Clev. Canton A Soutli’n..
Olev. Cin. Ohio. A 8 t. L ..
Det. Gd. Rapids A West.
Duluth 8 0 . Shore A A ti..
F la Cent. A Peninsular.
F t Worth < Denver City
fc
Georgia A Alabam a — .
Grand Rapids A Indiana
Cm. Rich. * Ft. W ayne
Traverse City...............
Musk. Gt . Rap. A Ind..
K an. City Ft. S. A Mem.
Kan, C. Mem. & B u rn ___
Kansas City
O m a h a ..
Keokuk & Western.........
Louisville A N a s h v ille -..
Minn. St. P. * S. Ste. M ._
N orfolk A W estern.........
Northern Pacific............
Ohio R iv e r.....................
Oregon RR. A N a v .........
T e x a s C e n tra l................
Toledo Peoria
West’n..
Dn, Pao. Den.
G u lf....
Western N . Y. & Penn...

Ced.

&

&
&

Total (S I r o a d s )____ _
N et Increase !3'65 n. o.K.

1898.

1897.

$
$
5,775,727 '5,624.770
11,699
10.590
90,299
107,036
84,532
85.320
1,328
1,774
43,890
33,042
12,270
10,707
277,780
287.763
30,798
29.189
36,063
36,371
33.623
73,767
27,189
33,417
20,911
23,232
47,053
41,693
8,328
9,509
960
766
2.574
2,734
83,572
90,564
20,239
20,360
6,153
7,058
15,079
13,371
417,690
403,186
66,547
70,913
247,310
247,367
454.121
401,835
22,128
23,153
155,529
150.233
4,184
4,485
20.876
22,155
71,222
6 8 ,0 2 1
6i,900
71,100
8,235,860

7,915,804

...........

Increase.

8

237,779
1,109
8,73 7
794

Decrease .
$
136,822

446
10,848
1,563
9,983
l,fi09
308
40,144
6,228
2,321
5,360
1,181
160
........

121

___

194

6,99 2

_ r_
r

49.289
725
3,704
301
3,20 i

1,279
5,503

449,147
290,056

159,091

1898.

8

1897.

34,419
295,092

37.951
319,444

190,597
10.098
359,420
76,933
131,131
209,778
2,407,203 1,373.927

29,319
64,480
189.163
843,011

5,480,391 1.701,431 1,811.731
Jan. 1 to July 31....30,535,706 35,069,99610,240,181 10,293,031
W estof Pitts. & E.July
Ino. 193,700
Deo,
03,200
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....
In o .2.230,400
Doo.
93,300
Phil. Bead. *
E ...J u ly
49,031
57,164
11,539
21,598
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ..;.
353,663
345,023
89,136
118,076
Wo Grande South, b. July
42,324
31,770
18,291
10,332
Jan. 1 to July 31 . . .
259.728
207,311
132,145
77.811
8 t. L o u i s * Han Fr.b.Julv
197,535
528,496
158,291
195,473
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 .... 3,771,255 3,400,895 1,403,958 1,293,785
Southern Pacific, b June 4.333,723 3,769,278 1,159,420 1,115,028
J an. 1 to Juno 30....27,303,921 2 2 , 3 7 9 .2 1 1 9.154,686 6,756,781
July 1 to Juno 30 ...55.780,337 48,871,991 21,160,611 17,195,960
17,787
18,614
Texas C e n tra l.a ___June
1,506
1,778
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 ....
129.180
25,328
105,075
7,979
616,555
Onion Pao. R y .a ....J u ly 1 ,4 8 5 ,8 1 0 1,399.180
378,641
9,156,389 8,136,012 3,782,716 2,357,740
Jan. 1 to July 31..
Visalia & T u la reb —
2,122
1,853
354
Apr. 1 to June 3 0 ....
477
891
4,184
3,715
Jan. 1 to June 30—
993
257,655
W abash. 1 >.......... — July 1,079,2111. 1 970,635
329,433
Jan. 1 to July 31___ 7,464,191 ^^G,363,360 1,917,921 1,976,319
Wabash uhes. A West’n—
16,602
18.330 def.1,891
Apr. 1 to June 3 0 ....
971
39,313
6,334
38,876
Jan. 1 to June 30___
6,660
137,962
331,173
114,950
359,831
W. Jersey ifc Saas'e. b l uly
1,418,633 1,361,3 32
315,995
Jan. 1 to July 31 —
290,081
257,322
278,229
Wsat.N. Y .& Penn. 0. July
81,200
93,185
377,812
1,656,435 1,561,866
416,606
Jan. 1 to July 31 —

ft.

a Net earnings here given are after deducting taxes,
b Net earnings here given are before deducting taxes.

Interest Charges anil Surplus.—The following roads, in
addition to their gross and net earnings given in the fore*
going, also report charges for interest, &e., with the surplus
or defioit above or below those charges.
___

935

1,708
14,504
4,836

-Ifet E a rning

1897.
$
102,150
082,107

Roads.
Rev, B. &

Bost.
Lynn—
Apr. 1 to Jane 30___
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 .,..
Ohio.8 nrl.<fe Quinoy.Jnly
Ohio. & East. I U ...... July
Cin. Oil. A St. L . J uly
Peoria * Eastern.. July
Denver * Rio Gride.July
Rio Grande Sonth’n.July

-Ini., Rentals (Cc. ——> p- Bal. o f !fet E a rn 'q * .^
1897.
1898.
1898.
1897.
S
S
B
S
8
10,879
22,174
880,000
127,647
233,334
36,802
181,365
17,923

O.ev,

15,450
29,307
870,429
126,106
233,526
36,802
181,893
14,165

23.697
7,117
11,344
def.1,931
216,006
32,075
*51.799 *def.l,133
67,497
14,539
df.17,654 def.17,168
124,290
124,198
371
3,833

* After allow ing for other income received.

Net Earnings Uoatliiy to Latest Oates.—The table follow­
ing shows the gross and net earnings of STEAM railroads
reported this week. A full detailed statement, including all
roads from which monthly returns can be obtained, is given
once a month in these columns, and the latest statement of
■ 'his kind will be found in the Chronicle of August 27, 1898.
The next will appear in the issue of September 17. 1898.
Roads.
Boat. Rev. B. A Lynn—

-Gross E a rn in a s-

$

1898.

1897.
$

Sl’REET fiULVYIVS AND TRACTION COSPANIES.
The following table shows the grow earnings for the latest
period of all s t r e e t railways from whioh we are able to ob­
tain weekly or monthly returns. The arrangement of the
table is the same as that for the steam roads—that is, the
first two columns of figures give the gross earnings for the
and
columns the earnings
-Eel Earnings .— latest week or month,from the last two to and including such
or the calendar year
January 1
1898.
1897.
latest week or month.
$
$

81,674
Apr. 1 to June 3 0 ....
64,002
17,996
130,651
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 ....
111,719
20,243
50,559
B u ffa lo & 8 asaueh .a.Jaly
49,659
20,919
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....
313,461
320,563
115,870
Canadian Paolilo..a.July 2,041,303 2,107,002
730.689
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 __ 13,647,382 11,819,636 4,884,366
Cent, of N. Jersey..a.July 1,031,64 1 1,239,433
425,996
Jan. 1 to July 3 L .... 6,782,461 6,786,031 2,489,595
Cent. N. Y . & W e s t Apr. 1 to June 3 0 ....
15,438
...........
2,674
1,792
Jan. 1 to June 30___
29.287
...........
912,075
Ohio. Burl.& Q nln.b-.July 3,086.197 3,043,059
Jan. 1 to July .,1...... 22,937,918 19,934,906 7,754,100
Chicago & East. III.b July
321,003
273,876
131,829
Jan, 1 to Ju y 31 . . . . 2,320,132 2,193,770
....... .....
935,439
Oleve. Canton & 8o .July
60.932
42,349
8,958
Jan. 1 to July 31. .. .
397,196
51,071
Clov.Cln, 0 . * 8 t I .. a . J u ly 1,116,053 1,099,858
305,831
Jan. 1 to Ju’y 3 1 .... 8,045.305 7,527,317 1,960,172
Peoria < s E ast’n.a. July
S
122,386
130,174
19,148
927,900
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....’ 1,053,191
.
232,552
64,718
OoL Sand. & Hoek’g.June
84,030
17,093
358.095
Jan. 1 to June -iO . . . .
381,801
45.206
794,945
Jnly 1 to Juno 30 . . .
795,793
113,045
Den. * R. Grande, b . July
721,272
693,376
303,583
Jan. 1 to July 31...... 4,538,729
1,817,214
E r ie .a ...... ................ July 2,570.096 2.350.894
697,590
Jan, 1 to July 31...... 18,069.993 17,747,001 3,884,747
Lehigh V alley B E ..July 1,703.083 1,607,171
511,959
Jan. 1 to July 31....10.132,673 9,749,094 2,353,5 73
Dee. 1 to July 31 ...11,671.784 11,301,032 2,815,651
Lehigh Val. Coal Co July 1,432,937 1,455,761 <U. 152*588
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 .... 7,921,061 7,833,930 df.535,043
Dee. 1 to July 31 . . . 9,433,011 9,233,599 dt.591,430
Loulav. & N ash v.b.. July 1.927.667 1,795,457
513,726
Jan. 1 to July 31 ...12,750,50111,574,845 3,778,261
Mexican C en tral....J u ly 1,018,536
953,635
303,897
Jan. 1 to Jnly 31 . . . 7,757,829 7,521.418 2,468,137
M i n n . * 8 t. L o u is.a .J u ly
150.082
179,487
53,560
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 .... 1,153,627 1,088,837
409,429

353,651

8,874.031

39,147
10,651
24,703
147,170
914,359
4,531,553
553,036
2,367,992

1,636,435
7,335,131
103,885
886,869
2,573
44,35 9
253,085
1,827,375
19,634
182,605
15,536
12,33 0
105,450
306,183
1,639,492
798,185
4,177.184
448,815
1,843,191
2,200,11 4
29,060
df.232;300
Of.262,376
627,716
3.619,551

2 5 3 ,3 0 9
2 ,4 4 4 ,8 2 5

58,642
373,033

STREET

E

G ross

a r n in g s

R A IL W A Y S

.

AND

Akron Bedrid & Clev. July.
Albany R ailw a y ....... July.
Amsterdam He. R y .. July.
Atlanta R a ilw a y ...... July.
Baltimore Con. Ry," ... July.
Bath St. Ry. (Maine). M ay.
July. -Bay Cities Consol .. . ____
Binghamton St. R y ... J u ly —
Bridgeport Traction. IJuly. .....
Brookton Con. St. By. J u ly .........
Brooklyn E le v a te d ..[J u ly .........
Br’klyn Rap. Tr. Co.—I
Brooklyn Heights (
B ’klynQ’n s& Sub. ) a u g u s t....
Charleston City R y.. July
Oln. A Miami V al.. .. 'J u ly .........
Citizens’ 8 t.Ry.,Indp.! A p r i l.......
Oltls ns'(M unoieInd.) M a y .........
Jlty Eleo. (Rome.Qa.) J u ly .........
Cleveland Eleotrio... J u ly .........
Clove. Pal ns V. & E • . J u ly .........
Columbus St. Ry. (O.) J u ly .........
Oonsolt’d T ra o .(N .J .j A p r il.......
D an v.G as E l.L ig h t *
Street R v .............. J u n o .........
D ayton & W est Trac. J u ly .........
Denver Con. Tram w.. J u ly .........
Detroit Citrine’ St,Ry. 3d w k July
Detroit Eleo. R y........J u n e .........
Duluth st. Ry........... J u ly ...........
Erie Eleo. M otor-------J u n e .........
ft. W ayne
Belle l
Island (D e tro it)— J u n e ........
Harrisburg Traction. J u ly .........
Herkimer M ohawk It-1
ion * F ’kfort El. Ry. J u n e ........
Houston Eleo, Sti. Ry. J u n e ........
Interstate Consol, ofi
North Attleboro — 1M arch ......

..

&

T R A C T IO N

C O M P A N IE S .

Latest Gross E arnings. Jan. 1 to Latest D ale.
Week or Ato 1898. 1897. 1898.
1897.
11,304] 12.624
51,029
54,875
60,722 56,879 359,891
326.838
5,451
5.096
30,552
27,537
12,361
9,058
57,403
50,038
229,485 227,360 1,343,182 1,313,783
1,721
1,932
7,541
7,013
9,093
9,915
48,323
46,731
18.975 17,435
90.551
82,778
37,818 33,014
199,905
180,955
34,557 33,293
190,470 184,574
148,000 120,000
563,257 477,400 4.012,728 3,547,918
101,672
17,518 15.827
13,481 10,552
315B95
79,902' 68,031
283,626
26,74 5
5,327
22,872
5,671
13,835
2,181
13,024
2.741
143,200 971,126
147,988
922,896
55,336
13,9691
9,185
45,388
384,587 334.635
60,198 51.735
965,246
252.29U i238,813
883,540

j

8,138
6,364
69,115
24,972
32,123
17,790

8,206

53,003

420,752

50,831

12,212

67,441
24,422 629,388
33,T9 • 193,635
18,450 112,419
G3,G7u
12.736

408,858
5 J4,067
199,890
108,002
63,283

15.140
27,268

13,967
23,210

87,677
146,061

80,310
125,454

17,151

2.868

2,799
17,047

19,458
88,858

20,435
91,517

10,2971

9,523

27,301

26,843

IHE CHRONICLE

S eptember 8, 1898,]

L atest Gross E arnings. Ja n . 1 to h a t eat D a w
Week or Mo 1898. I 1897.
1898.
1897.
$
%

G ross
E a r n in o s .

5,516
'juiy......... | 9,293! 10,857 38,667 30,334
9,143
July......... 7,894 7,714 53,676 59,793
37,624
May..........1 5^,779 50.523 256,035 33,952
July......... 41,253 37,801 1,222,287 243,392
2dwk Aug. 97,8 59
June........; 5,500 5,478 612,418 1,095,746
22,738
May.......... j 143,987 129,246 838,938 21,582
July......... 4.673 4,278 31,776 768,338
July......... 238,088 218,508 1,22-^,424 l,0o0,l 18
July____ 11.564 10 59* 46,575 29,780
July ........ 6,059 5,201 21,104 44,680
June........ 112,163 104,063 792,315 19,871
July......... 19,799 15,'70 96,951 758,632
July......... 259,023 255 014 1,929,969 83.847
August--- 172,6-0 158,865 822,634 1,839,653
July.......... 2.673 2,632 10,432 792 449
July......... 37,427 34,002 209,430 9,995
July.......... 13,022
83.098 71,9 Jl
July......... 14,262 15,004 59,900 192,258
11,092
July.........
45,204
July.......... 7,146, 6,670 35,244 32,038
20,02
July......... 3,343
6,071
34,230
J uly.......... 34,330 33,251 213,339
July.........
196,098
J uly.......... 43,299 38,700 264,443 241,165
93,709! 92,016 534,383
June........ 196,516 184,719 1,201.550 472.386
July......... 19,089. 22,480 106.356 1,115,14.8
July......... 140 561, 127,343 869,677 125,089
July......... 143,964 146,943 817,774
June
806.957
23,947 23.444 116,718 109.186
.July
3 v,954 32,289
7,886
7,583!
July
26,518' 23,949 155,403
July
142.170
353,740 340,682 2,590,607 2,517,899
12,450, 12.444
39,*76 36,532
Maroh
45.222 44,434 279,278 272,195
July

Kingston City R y......
Lehigh T ra c tio n ......
London8t. Ry. (Can.).
LoweLl Law. «fe H a v ..
Metrop.(Kansas City)
Metro. W. Side (Ohio.)
Montgomery 8t. Ry..
Montreal Street R y...
Muscatine St. R y ......
Nassau Eleo. (B ’klyn)
N ew b u rg St. R y .......
N e w London St. R y..
N ew Orleans Traction
N orfolk St. R y..........
North Chic. St. R y ...
North Shore TractiOD
Ogdensbnrg St. R y...
Paterson R y ..............
Riohmond Traction..
R o x b ’h Cli.H.A N or’n
Schuylkill Val. Trac.
Scranton & Carbond’e
Scranton
Pittston.
8cranton R ailw ay—
Syracuse Rap. Tr. Ry.
Toronto R y ........... .
Twin City Rap. Tran.
Union (N. Bedford)..
United Tract. (Pitts.)
United Tract. (Prov.;
Unit. Trao. (Reading)
Wakefield & Stone—
Waterbury Traction..
West Chicago St. Ry. August___
Wheeling R ailw a y...
Wilkeab. & Wy. Valley

&

Street Railway Net Earnings.—The following table gives
the returns of S
railway gross and net earnings received
this week. In reporting these net earnings for the street rail­
ways, we adopt the same plan as that for the steam roads—
that is, we print each week all the returns received that
week, but once a month (on the third or the fourth Saturday)
we bring together all the roads furnishing returns, and the
latest statement of this kind will be found in the C hronicle
of August 27, 1898. The next will appear in the issue oi
September 17, 1898.
treet

-----

b—

(Irons E a rning *.----- -------Net E arnings ,—
1898.
$

Albany RR. (N. Y .)
Apr. 1 to J u d © 3 0 ..—
153,585
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 ....
299,169
Amsterdam St. K y ..fu ly
5,45 l
Jan. 1 to .July 31
30,552
D ry Dock E. B. < Bat*—
fc
Apr. 1 to June 3U..„.
163,074
Jan. 1 to Juue 3 0 ....
322.107
North Shore Tract’n.July
172,680
Jan. I to July 3 1 ....
822,634
Oct. 1 to July 31 . . . 1.159,171
Richmond Ry. A Eieo. Co.—
Jan. 1 to June 3 u ....
201,070

1897.

1898.
$

$

144.602
269,959

5,096

27.537
175.225
330. L90
154,865
792 449
1.110.337
192,780

1897.

67,238
98,699
2,058
7.655
5,972
48,317
44,325 71,941
84.95
90,3344 87,775
323,636 439,751
454,319 318,778
82,641 75,303
50,080
99.270

2,325

ANNUAL REPO RTS.
Annual Reports.—The following is an index to all annual
reports of steam railroads, street railways and miscellaneous
companies which have been published since the last editions
of the I nvestors’ and Street R ailway S upplements.
This index does not include reports in to-day’s C hronicle.
R a il r o a d

Volume 67—

and

R ailroads & Mis. Go’s—(Oon.)
Volum e 67—
Page.
New York Ont. & Western..........367
New England ........................... 421
H
& Western.................... 27 2
HH7 Norfolk UK. &
Z 7Z Orezon Short Navigation.......... 31 6
Oregon
ine................... 3 68
Pacific Mail 8S. Co......................219
Peoria A Eastern.......... ...........425
Hallway Equipment Co. of Minn.. 3 68
Bio Grande Southern................
l Rio Grand Western................... 425
4 24

M is c e l . Co ’s

Page.

American CereAl Oo................... 3tt£S
Atchison Topeka A Santa Fe...... ‘ » 1
A
Boston & Albany.......................31
Boston Maine..........................
Boston Electric Light..................
Buff. Roches. & Pitts.3 1 6 , 1*2J. 432
Calumet Hecla........................ 2 iO
Central Coal . . .Coke.................... 369
i
..
Chesapeake A h lo ..........315. 32 I
CbicagoJJurimgton Quincy...... 27
Cnic. * East, ill ........................ 42 4
Chicago Great West.. .219, 423, 133
Chic. North West.. .2 19, 234. 3 1•>
*
Chic. Peoria
St. I.ouis............ 367
Cleve. Cin. Chic. &St. L ...... ...... 4 2 4
Denver & Rio Grande.27 1,428. 429
Fitchburg RR ........................... 3 68
Georgia Alabama................... 2 72
Glucose Sugar Refining (10^mos.)27 2
lowa Central Ry ........................367
K. C. Ft. 8.
Mem.................... 4 2 4
K. C. Mem. A Birm..................... 4'24
Long Island ..............................2 7 2
Louisville * Nashville................ 316
Manhattan Ry..................3 6S
Mobile A Ohio............................2 7 2

A

A

fyr-

&

&

New York Ontario & Western Railway.
CReport fo r the year ending June 30, 1898.J.
The remarks of Mr. Thomas P. Fowler, President, will be
found in full on pages 485 to 487.
The traffic and earnings statistics, etc., have been compiled
for the C
as follows :
h r o n ic l e

operations and fiscal results .

Miles operated.........

Operations—

1897-98.
480

1895-96.
477

1896-97.
480

1894-95.
477

Pass, carried, N o —
872,632
808.811
849,583
825.883
Puss, carried 1 mile. 32,007,644 30,827,936 31,366,408 29,035,710
Rate per pas.per m.
2 005 cts.
2-072 cts.
2,o84 ots. 2-064 cts.
Freightcarrd (tons).
_____
.
2,479,292
2,492,056
2,524,622 2,540 157
Freight (tons) 1 m . . 354,127,528 353,100,732 356,414,070 359,358,052
R ite per ton per ill..
0 373 ets.
0-871 cts.
0-831 cts.
0 837 ots
$
$
$
$
Passenger.......................... 641,679
638,659
654,067
599,452
F r e ig h t ..............................3,090.280 3,075,505 2,960,595 2,908,035
Mail,-erpress, rents, etc... 122,774
121,659
122,906
122,932
Miscellaneous....................
59,902
58,580
41,767
38,694

E a rn in g s—

<

w Includes Baltimore Traction and City & Suburban for both years.

Roads.

477

.3,914,635

3,894,403

3,779,335

3,669,113

l
.1,544,816

1,531,201
457,718
5 46,017
120,924
124,637

1,518,339
466,916
479,193
121,460
112,650

1,503,844
434,356
481,743
116,408
101,061

.2,801,642 2,780,497 2,698,558
.1,112,993 1,113,906 1,080,777
Per cent exp. to earnings.. 71-56
71-40
71*40
INCOME ACCOUNT.
1897-98.
1896-97.
1895-96.
$
$
Net earnings...................... 1,112,993 1,113,906
Interest, etc......................
86,746
82,800
81,465

2,642,412
1,026,701
72-02

Operating expenses-

. 469,754
. 553,489
. 120,718
. 112,885

1,080,777

Receipts—

T o tal................................1,199,739

1,196,706

Interest on bonds ........... 615,000
Interest and discount.......................
R en tals.............................. 182,278

609,055
4,478
183,263

D isbursem ents—

1894-95
$
1,026,701
75,090

1,162,242

1,101,791

605,000 589,000
371
5,274
181,302 181,133

T otal............................ 797,278
786,673
796,796
775,407
399,910
Balance, surplus............... 402,461
375,569
326,384
GENERAL BALANCE 81IEET JUNE 30.
1897.
1898.
1896.
$
$
$
Franchises and property.............. 70, ,108,773 69, ,886,996 69,626,397
Investments in other com panies.. 3,,450,300
3 ,250,-<00
3,226.100
170,272
103,523
98,707
Cash at bankers.............................
303,031
219,210
230,111
Stores fuel, etc., on hand..............
292,261
Sundry accouuts due com pany—
957,477
961 987
525.407
416,648
Traffic accouuts due company......
422,715
840,485
987,392
,030.167
Loans and bills receivable............
25.335
13,810
18,626
Miscellaneous.................................
10 L,703
17,500
203,836
Cars under lease (ear tru sts)........

A ssets—

Total assets.............................. 75,648,919

75,991,359

75,848,791

Common stock................................58,113,983
Preferred stock..............................
5,000
Consol. 1st mort. 5 p o. b o n d s.... 5,60o,000
Refunding 4 p o. bonds............... 8,375,0<0
j
Interest due aud accrued.............
154,513
Sundry aoc’ts due by com pan y...
269,603
Traffic acc'ts due by com pany......
77,193
W ages for month of Juno.............
124,954
Loans and bill9 p ay ab le ...............
300,000
W h ar Val. R ’y oonst’n fund ...........................
Hancock Pa. RR. const’n fund................—
Bal. under car trust agreem ents...
17,500
Profit and loss................................ 2,611,173

58,113,983
5,000
5.600.000
8.375.000
152,105
307,756
75,955
127.238
250,000
54,206
147,327
101,704
2,681,087

58,113,983
6,000
5,600 000
8,125,000
150,214
17^,698
106,934
131,584
434,583
54,206
147,326
203.836
2,296,427

L iabilities—

&.

Total liabilities........................75,648,919 75,991,359 75,848,791
—V. 67, p. 367.

Northern Pacific Railway.
( Advance statement for year ending June 30, 1898.J
The following extract from advance sheets of the annual
report is official :
Results—The results of the operation of the property fori
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1898, are as follows :

Gross earnings......................................................................... 11,09c,371
Operating expenses................................................................
Net earnings.....................................................................$12,584,347
Deduct—
Additions and improvements charged.— in- $515,709
<t
S
A
come.......................... ......................... to - Equipment reduced in value........................... 296,000
A
S t r e e t R a il w a y s .
Volum es 67—
Page. Taxea................................................................... 682’-— -1,494,509
Bridgeport Traction..........
V4 !*
®
Buffalo Railway.......................... 368 Leaving available for interest and dividends......................
Brooklyn Rapid Transit............. 425
Add dividends and interest received...............
887,mo
Erie Railroad.
Available bonds..............................................$6,079,160
CAdvance statement for the year ending June SO, 1898.) Interest onrevenue...........................................-- ---.lv; VAX’’‘
divi­
The annual report is not yet ready for publication. In ad­ Dividends on preferred stock (including(4%) 3,000,000 ^
vance of it the following data are furnished covering all the dend payable Sept. 6,1898).................
lines of the system:
1896-7.
Increase. Surplus..................................................................................... 92’d89'8^9
1897-8.
Gross earnings................. ..........$33,740,860 $31,497,031 $2,243,829
$3,387,703
Working expenses..................... 25,438,038 23,332,243 2,105,795
$138,034 From which lias been appropriated as a reserve for the
$8,164,788
. *8.302.822
continuity of dividends upon the preferred stock........... ’___’__
75,473
134,312
209,785
Net earnings Erie coal cos.
. ..
$213,507 Leaving surplus income carried forward as balance
$8,299,100
. $8,512,607
proilt and loss to June 30. ................................................ * „ ’7,
24,382
179,201
203,583
Income from other sources.
No comparison has been made with the operations of the
A

&

St. Louis ct San Francisco ....
271
San Francisco Brewer es(Limited)369
Staten Island Rapid Transit....... 3 68
Southern Railway...................... 366
Wabash RR ............................. 316
Wagner Palace Car Co................369
Wefsbach Light..........................230
Western N. Y,
Penn................316
Wisconsin Central Co................. 4 2 4

previous year, as the company came into possession of t
property Sept. 1, 1890, and the first report covered only the
,
Surplus.................................
$633,917 $352,019 $281,898 operations to June 3 >, 1897—a period of ten months.
Of the deductions
$>15,709 represents
In 1895 90 gross earnings were $31,045,487; working ex­ amounts expended forfrom income, improvements which.
additionsand
penses, $33,719,403; net earnings, $7,920,084.—V, 67, p. 231.
$8,710,190
8,082,273

$237,888
$8,478,302
8,126,283 Doc.44,0 LO

THE CHRONICLE.

478

in the opinion of the board are not distinctly new property,
and therefore are chargeable to operating expenses, and
f306,Q0O represents a reduction in the value of equipment
s'ill in service, but of a character not to be much longer
economically used,
The property (roadway, structures and equipment) has
been improved during the year, and is well adapted for the
increased traffic which is expected from existing business
conditions and abundant harvests in the territory served by
the company. Included in the operating expenses is the cost
of ill locomotives and 870 cars purchased during the year to
provide for equipment put out of service.
Retetve Funtl.—As stated above, the directors have set
aside $3,000,000 out of surplus income, as a reserve to be
available, as may be found necessary, until the end of 1901,
toward maintaining the regular 1 "per cent quarterly divi­
dends on the preferred stock, if at any time prior to that date
the current net earnings should prove insufficient for that
purpose. So far as not so used by that date, the fund may
then, by vote of the directors, be returned to the general
purposes of the company. In view of the comparatively
short time which has elapsed since the organization of the
companv, and also of the fact that the unexpectedly favor­
able results of the fiscal year just closed caunot safely be
treated otherwiee than as excepticnal, the board have been
led to adopt this conservative policy, which will, no doubt,
commend itself to all who are interested in the company. Of
course if current available earnings continue as at present,
this reserve need not be drawn upon. Your directors may
add that the business prospects of the company were never
better than at the present time.—V. 67, p. 223.
Mexican Central Railway Co. (Limited.)
('Statement fo r six months eliding June SO, ISOS.)
The following is an official statement for the first half of
1898 compared with the same period of 1897:

[VOL. LXVII.

“ Work on the separation of grade crossings has continued
throughout the year at a coat of $150,193. There is no float­
ing debt and there has been no charge to construction. The
Improvement, and Ware River funds nave received $31,204 div­
idends and interest from the securities held by the Trustees,
and they now stand charged with $2,40:1,204.”
Tables in tbe report show the passenger traffic for a series
of years. In 1896 the numbers of both through and wa v pas­
sengers reached a maximum, namely, 123.072 and 12,665,355
respectively. In 1897 both classes of Traffic decreased, and
in 1898 the way passengers again decreased, while the
through passengers increased somewhat. The totals for the
late year were 111,980 through passengers an! 10,551,885 way
passengers. The way passengers, it will be observed, there­
fore decreased in the two years over 3 millions, or over 16 p. c.
The operations, earnings, charges, etc., for four years were
as below given :
OPERATIONS AND FISC AL RESULTS.

1897-98.

1896-97.

1895-96.

1894-95.

Passengers carried.. 10,063,795 11,296,337 12,7-18. ;27 12,151,070
Passenger mileage .211,810,933 214,657,453 231,209.428 212.832,031
Freight (tons) oarr'd. 4,56 (,662 4,130.955 4,122,412 3.994,340
Freight (I ns) 1 mile.511,297,081 449,039.917 433 975,620 427,085,496
Earnings—
.$
.$
$
$
Passengers................. 3,761,190 3,814,025 4,100,816 3,809,356
Freight ,................. 4,291,526 4, J2-1,320 4,131.198 4.130.405
Mail, express, etc... 1,188,853 1,176,280 1,115.6-8 1,185,105
Total earnings.. 9,211,569 9,114,625 9,350,632 9,130,866
O perating E
Maint. of wav,xpenses 1,453,695 1,902,610 1,753.573 1,315,656
Ma ilit. of equipm’t.. 838,082 621,1)7 941,313 832,351
Tramp, expenses... 3,636,562 3,267,112 3,348.H( 3 840,134
General ami taxes.. 866,662 867,236 868,373
Tot. (inol. taxes) 6,795,001 6,658,075 6,911,865 6,579,361
Net earnings........... 2,446,568 2,456,550 2,4)8,767 2,551,505
INCOME ACCOUNT.

1897-98.
1896-97.
1895-96. 1894-95.
$
$
$
$
N et earnings.____ _ 2,440,588 2,456,550 2,433,767 2,551,505
1898.
1897.
Inc. or Dec. lH s bit rse tnen ts —
Gross earnings....... ..................$6,739,293 $6,567,753 Inc. $i 7 1,540 Rentals paid.............
78,000
78,000
78,000
78,000
Operating expenses................. -1,578,053 -t,376,237 Inc. 201,816 1aterest on debt__ 337,980 337,^80 337,980 453,150
Dividends (8 p. a .).. 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,0if0 2,000,000
Net earnings.........................$2,161,210 $2,191,516 Dec. $30,276
Total dis burs1fcs. 2,415,980 2,415,980 2,415,980 2,531,150
1
Av. rate received for Mex. dots. 46-Qle.
49 90c. Dec. 3-86o.
30,588
20,355
Net earn. equivalentinU.S.our. $995,051 $1,093,614 Dec. $98,563 Balance, surplus.... BALANCE SHEET 40,57030. 22,787
JUNE
Add net credit of iniscel. items.
3
27,335 Deo. 27,332
1896.
1895.
1898.
1897.
Total..................................... $995,054 $1,120,949 Dec. $125,‘ 95 A ssets—
*
$
$
$
Fixed charges......................... 1,250,757 1,206,115 Ino. 44,612 Road & equipment.. 27,514,116 27,514,116 27,511,116 27,514,117
Hudson Riv. bridges 475,485 475,485 475,485 1,931,276
475,485
Deficit................................... $255,703 $85,168 Ino. $170,537 Other perm, inv’st’s.. 1,931,276 1,931,276 1,931,376
411,840
330,800
Tie tie netiroin theof the subsidy trust fund tor above,was $255,703 Materials & supplies. 223,650 422,375
Due from companies
But defloit income operation of tie railway, as tie first 6
and individuals...... 858,500 754,965 881,286 754,236
months ol 1898 waB............................................................... 84,979 Real estate................ 1,457,025 1,4 52,575 1,347,714 1,128,298
Making tie net deficit......................................................... $170,724 Special equipment... 627,000 627,000 627,000 627,000
The balance of the subsidy trust fund on .) uiy 1,1898, was.$2,446,379 Improvement fund.. 2,409,204 2,378,000 2 326,279 2,261,370
884,690
And the investment in tie $5,597,000 of priority bonds was. 6,122,646
Total assets........ 36,430,926 36,518,003 36,280,743 35,988,310
Making a total security July 1,1898, for payment of in­
Liabilities—
terest on the mortgage bonds of....................................$8,569,025 Stock, common......... .25,000,000 25,000,000 25,000,000 25,000,000
—Y. 66, p. 902.
Funded debt............ 7,485,000 7,485,000 7,485,000 7,531,000
197,500
Ulster & Delaware RR.
interest ~ accrued— 85,995 125,945
due and and rents 541,756 501,767 544,073 504,129
89,905
85,995
( Report for the year ending June 30, 1898.)
Dividends & interest.
Earnings, etc., have been as follows:
Ledger balances....... 1,948.722 1,921.914 1,879,365 1,822,040
567,979 781.885 630,649 488,767
Improvement fund...
EARNINGS, EXPENSES AND CHARGES.
Sinking fund & miso.. 160,481 156,085 146 915 176,830
1897-8. 1896-7.
1895-6. Grade crossings........ 365,000
300,000
300,000
.............
*
$
Piofit and loss......... 275,993 245,407 204,836 182,049
$
400 756 419,354
■ Gross earnings........
...2 8 9 ,2 0 2 289,699 314,913
Operating expenses
Total liabilities...36,130,926 36,518,003 30,280,743 35,988,310
—Y. 6 7 ,p . 318.
111,057 104,441
Net earnings......
... 10,000
16,700
Other in come...........
16,707
West Yirginia Central & Pittsburg Railway Co.
127,757 121,148
Total...................
( Report for the year ending June SO, 1898.)
92,658
Interest, etc............
119,956 l* 98,‘ 66
20,322
President H, G-. Davis says in part:
19,712
Taxes.......................
General Remarks.—Mention
the reports
...1 1 9 ,9 5 6 119,0*8 112,370 for the past few years of thehas been made in freight rates
Total...................
decline in coal
. . . 6,109
8,669
Balance, surplus__
8,778 and the effect it has had on the revenues of the company.
GENERAL BALANCE SHEET JUNE 30, 1898.
The net income for the past year was practically the same

Assets,

Oostof road and equip­
m ent...........................$3,548,657
Stocks of other cos__ 43,047
Supplies on hand......... 740,000
Open accounts, etc__ 42,549
Cash on hand................ 34,224
-V .Total...................... $1,408,478
65, p. 508.

Liabilities.

Capital stock................ $1,794,600
Funded debt................. 1,9>'7,300
Int. due and accrued... 14,096
Open accounts............. 160,124
1,877
Miscellaneous..............
Profit and loss, surp... 440,481
Total........................$4,408,478

Boston & Albany Railroad.
(Report for year ending June SO, 189S).
In tbe thirty-first annual report, President Bliss says :
‘ The receipts from freight increased during the year
$167,205 and from other sources $12,573; passenger earnings
decreased $53,885, leaving a net increase of $126,943. Tbe
outlay daring the year for expenses and improvements has
increased $18(1.926.
“ Traffic in the early months of the year gave promise of
a considerable increase in earnings, but on the declaration of
war with Spain the local business decreased, and the later
months of the year show a large reduction in revenue. Owing
to the sharp competition in all classes of freight traffic, the
rate per ton per mile decreased from 9 2-1U mills in the fiscal
year 1897 to 8 4-10 mills in the year 1898, Never before in
the history of the road was tbe rate for transportation of
freight so low nor the volume of traffic so great.

as the year before, but this was accomplished only by doing
a larger volume of business, and in reducing the cost per
ton per mile for hauling the same. The increase in coal was
over 60,00) tons [from 1,058,094 to 1,123,370 tons, the latter
forming about 70 per cent of the year’s tonnage.—E d .], and
of coke nearly 70,000 tons [161,175 to 230,294 net tons], and
yet the company received for this class of traffic $38,000 less
than it did for the preceding year. Tbe increase in passen­
ger traffic, miscellaneous freights, etc., made up the differ­
ence. The prospects at this time are good for a continued
increase in traffic. The coal companies report that they have
engagements for the present year in excess of last year’s
business, and the indications are that the lumber plants,
tanneries, etc., will increase their output.
The company now owns over 3,000 freight cars, and their
use over foreign roads is a source of considerable revenue.
Last year it amounted to $30,731, an increase of $0,191 over
tbe preceding year. Of the entire equipment "84 per cent
has automatic couplers and 31 per cent air brakes.
HuttonsviUe Extension,—The valley of the Tygart River,
especially its upper part, is one of the most fertile and pro­
ductive in the State of West Virginia, and from Beverly
south, 30 miles or more, the mum-aids are covered with heavy
•imber in its original growth. From Elkins south the West
Va. Cent. & Pitts, has a branch six miles to Beverlv, and the
company decided to extend it to Hnttonsville, 11 miles be-

S eptember

THE CHRONICLE.

3 1898.1

yond. The track is being laid and it is expected trains will
be running to Huttonsville late in the fall. No new step3
have been taken by this company since last report in the
matter of the connection with the Chesapeake & Ohio.
Bondi.—There were issued and sold daring the year
$100,000 bonds to meet indebtedness incurred in making per­
manent improvem mrs, building cars, purchasing locomo­
tives, etc. These bonds were sold at a premium of 9%.
Physical Condition.—As to this, the report says :
To the “ n ew improvements and betterments account” have been
added durint: the year $13,500. The expenditures under this heading
were only half the amount of the previous year. N e a rly a ll of the
expensive work necessary in the substitution of iron for wooden
bridges, iiUiug trestles, etc . has been accomplished. The roadbed is
now in good condi'Ion and believed to be quite secure against any
ordinarily bigh water. There have been 4'69 miles of 70-pound steel
rail laid in tbe main track, replacm g that amount of 56-pound r ils,
and tbe latter used for sidings, tbe cost being charged to operating
expenses. The road is now laid with 70-pound rails continuously
from Piedmont to Hendri ks, a distanoe of 60 miles Eleven miles
of 85-pound rails have been purchased and will be laid in the Pied­
mont
Cumberland road, replacing that amount of lighter rail,
which w ill he used on tbe Huttonsville extension.
D uring tbe year th -c om p au y lias built at its shops at Elkins and
added to its equipment 113 coal and c ke cars, and has also pu thased from tbe Baldwin Locomotive W orks three engines, the total
cost bei 'g $84,730, which amount has been charged to equipment, ao
count. In addition to this, 61 oars were built at a cost of $16,895.
and charged to operating e> peases. O f these 30 were used to re,,! ice
car3 d stroyed and 31 substituted for that number of iron coal hop­
pers now obsolete.

&

Statistics.—Earnings, expenses and charges have been:

1397-98. 1896-97.
152
Miles operated .......................... 152
E a rn in g s —
•$
$
101.557
Passengers.......................... .102 633
380,652
Coal and coke freigh ts...... .341,7< 6
251,977
Miscellaneous fr e ig h t s ...... .298,823
6,518
Express .............................. . 7,126
71,545
C ar mileage........................ . F 0,736
11.629
Mail service ............................. . 13 761
3,178
Telegraph .................................. . 3.402
15,737
Miscellaneous..................... . 40,026
842,792
Total earnings ................. .888,296
Expenses —
139,712
Maintenance of way, etc... .132,691
132.16 i
Maintenance of equipment. .166.259
Transportation................... .197,354
191.761
13,285
C ar m ileage........................ .. 19,69)
40,655
General ................................ 39,712
M iscellaneou s............ ...... . 3,626
3,633
2 .006
25,459
T a x e s..................................

1895-96.
152
3
101,496
355,155
27-.774
7,432
83.003
11,679
3,365
12,007
855,911
128,236
11-.694
194,561
11,465
45,366
4 0L4
28,500

Total expenses............ -.584,399 546,688 530,830
Net earnings..................... ..303.898 296,124 325,075
62*02
P. o. expenses to earnings . 65-78
64*80
INCOME ACCOUNT.
1897-98. 1990-97. 1895 96.
$
Net earn, of W.RR..........loss $
Va. C. «fe P. ..221,589 191.204 215,8C0
Pied. A Cumb.
15,415 pr. 5.159 pr. 10,633
Profits on coal.................. .. 78,457 77 665 102,60/
Total............................. -.284,631 271,028 329,139
Deduct —
Interest on bonds.............. ..183,000 180,000 180,000
Dividends........................... .. 27.500 55,000 82,500
Miscellaneous....................
22,253
Total.............................
235,000 284.753
Surplus...............................
39,028 44,386
CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET JULY 1.
1897.
1898.
Dr.
$
Real estate, embracing timber
37,651 $
acres of coal, iron ore ............ 5,968,965
land and mtne al rights.
RR. const., etc................. .......... 2,692,163 5,968,965
2,673,730
Equipment,2d track,build’gs, etc.. 1,378.303 1,29-4,571
Mine construction............... .........
44,6*5
48,503

1894 95.
152
$
97,672
302.911
231.627
7,* 12
82.96 <

11,675

3,4-3
12.666

750,567
108,247
88,272
175.636
9,476
40,2 4
3. "85

30,700

455,830
294,737
60*73
1894-95.
186,235
pr. 83,039
20,* 8#
239,563
180.000
82,5* 0
4,701
267,201
22,362
1896.
$

5,968,965
2,633,239
1,272,112

117,233
50,973
147,734

108.366
75.318
160,000

48,503
82.70 ^
90.739
147,018

T otal...................................... -.10,405,885

10,328,453

10,243,282

Stock outstanding...................... .. 5,500,000
Stock in treasury........................
First mortgage bonds................. .. 3,100.000
Coupons payable July 1............
93,33 >
Bills papab e ............................. ..
167,792
June pay-rolls, etc.....................
163,463
Profit and loss............................. ..
881,295

5,500,000
500,000
3,000,000
90.485
283.810
141,796
812,352

5,500,000
500,000
3,000.000
90,365
218.680
160.912
773,324

M aterials, mi plies, etc..............
Due b y RR. Cos., agents, etc___
C ash ............................................. ..

Or.

T otal.....................................
—V. 67, p. 31.

.10,405,885

10,328,458

10,243,282

Jacksonville Tampa & Key West Railway.
('Report for the year ending March 31, 1898.J
Receiver Joseph H. Durkee says in substance :
General Remarks.—The country adjacent to the line ie
slowly improving agriculturally. Daring the winter of
1897 98 the weather was severe enough to set back the
growth of the orange trees in many localities. The indica­
tions are still that this year’s crop will excel last season’s at
least fifty per cent. With favorable seasons the orange cul
tore will in a few years be restored to its former conditions.
A few turpentine orchards have been opened along the lint
and every encouragement is given to this industry.
Every economy consistent with the preservation of the
propertyjn good condition has been practiced. The physical
condition of the road, roadbed, trestles, bridges, engines and
all equipment is fuUy maintained.
The total amount of receiver’s certificates now outstand­
ing is $141,300 and their interest has been promptly paid.
Interest on Underlying Roads, Etc.—During the y*-ar tin
receiver has not paid interest upon bonds of the constituent

479

companies by the consolidation of which the defendant rail­
way company was formed. There are still outstanding
equipment trust bonds. Series “B.” to the amount of $8,000,
due, $4,000 on May 1, 1896, and $4 000 on Nov. 1,1896.
E arnings.-Under order of coart, Feb. 3, 1896, the earn­
ings of the several divisions are now reported separately, viz.:
EARNINGS YE A R ENDING MARCH 31, 1898.

IncL. R iver
Div.

M ain L ine.

Gross e arn in gs.................. $286,214
Operating expenses........... 232,836
N et earnings................

S. <f L. E.
Div.
Total

$16,876
22,229

$9,813 $312,903
21,792 276,858

$53,378 def, $5,354 def. $11,979

$31,045

Prior Claims.—On Nov. 11,1897, the Court, confirming the
Master's report, ordered that claims aggregating $277,860
(including receiver’s certificates for $141,300. and taxes
$30,(00,) should rank as a prior charge on the property, and
should be paid out of any proceeds arising from the sile of
the properties now in the control of the Court. The unpaid
taxes named above have since been paid. A decree was also
entered confirming the Master’s report upon compensation of
trustee and counsel, the amount involved being $56,030. On
Dec. 4, 1897, an appeal was taken by the mortgage trustees
from the decree of Court confirming the Master’s report, upon
priority of claims. This decree is still pending in the Circuit
Court of Appeals for the Fifth Judicial Circuit.
Statistics. —Operations, earnings and charges have been :
Operations—

OPERATIONS, EARNINGS, ETC.

1897-8.
Total tons m oved..........................
98,545
Total moved one m ile ..................
Rate per ton per m ile.................... 2*14 cts.
Total passengers c a rr ie d ..............
6 -»,528
Total passengers carried one mile. 3,585,254
Rate per passenger per mile.........
3 Ct8.
$
Passenger....................................... . 107,295
149,36L
F r e ig h t ..........................................
Mail, express, etc.......................... .
56.248

1896-7.
100.109
6,303.113
2*30 cts.
6S.-.72
3.762,161
2-77 o s.
$
101,861 1
144,804
59,623 j

E a rn in g s—

y

1895-6.
07,169
6,365,2 k
0
2*17 cts.
74.774
4 393,445
2 63 cts.
$
317,278

T o t a l..........................................
—
T ransportation..............................
tfaiut. of way and structures.......
Maint. of equipment.......................
G e n e r a l..........................................

312,901

306,288

317,278

120,852
67,071
50. 30
38,006

128,565)
67.448 [
52,237 f
39,070 J

322,945

T o t a l......................................... .
N et earnings............ ......................
Ollier income..................................

276,859
36,045
52 L

287,320
18,968
759

322,945
def. 5,667
954

Expenses

36,566

19,727

def.4,713

Interest on firsts, accrued!!...........
Equipment trust pay mental!........
Interest, discount, etc....................
Taxes...............................................
Overclia ges refunded...............
Extraordinary, etc........................

132,960

132,960

132,960
12,325

T o t a l.........................................
Balance, deficit........................

173,334
136,708

N r t income..............................

Deduct—

11,304
18,507
7,852
2,711

none

10,136
23,074)
12,115
2 ,5 *8 )

y

180,863
161,133

27,444
172,729
177,442

accrued

N o t e .—I n 1897-8 and 1896-7
of the
interest on firsts
here shown was paid, aud iu previous year only p art w as paid.
Equipment notes for $.8,000 feU due iu 1896 but were not paid.—V. 64,
p. 12*22.
GENERAL BALANCE SHEET MARCH 31, 1898.

Debit—

Steamer...........................
$655
J. T. & K. W . R y C o ...... 346,821
Agon 's and conductors...
3,327
Bills for collect!o ..........
7,075
U. 8 Post Office D ep’in’t.
8,047
Indian River Steam. Co..
60
Material on hand............
14,490
Southern Express Co......
120
Cash on hand..................
27,647
Jacksonville Tcrm ’alCo.. 15,000
T o la l..........................$123,242
— V. €4, p. 1222.

Credit—

Ma.*on Young, receiver.. $54,549
Rece.ver’s certificates... 141,300
937
Unclaimed w agos............
Approved vouchers........
13,847
Pay rolls, M arch ............
12,655
Certified drafts (unpaid).
1,088
Foreign roads.................
4,519
Miscellaneous.................
185
Switch-key deposit.........
285
Income and profit and loss 193,848
Total.......................... $423,242

Fall Brook Railway.
(Report for the year ending Jane SO, 1898.J.
The earnings for the late fiscal year compare as follows:
1895-6.
$
707,381
527,035

1894-5.
$
653.690
439.690

........... 649,577
Operating expenses. ...........459,131

1396-7.
$
630,251
442.645

Net earnings......
Other income (from leases,
rolHng stock, etc.)............. 374,521

187,606

180.346

214,000

275,268

252,002

182,155

...........564.967

462,874

432,348

396,155

27,908
305,000

19,200
27,172
305,000

3,500
27,679
305,000

332,903
129,966

351,372
80,976

336,179^
59,976

1897-8.

Deduct—

Interest..............................................
Taxes
9 953
Dividends (com. and pref ) . .305,000
Total...............................314,953
Balanoe, surplus..................250,014
—Y. 65, p, 513.

Metropolitan Street Railway Company of Kansas City, Mo.
( Report for the fiscal year ended May SI, 1898.J
Walton H H o lm es, Vice-President and (Jen. Manager, says :

Construction. D u
the year the oom m ny has putDo
tb“ double Boulevardinn linethe W yandotteBoulevardSecond-operation
8t.
-southwent track electric on on Southwest 86. from from M i lto the
and
St. to
"he city of Kosedale. Prospect Ave. h ro a d -1 2 miles o[ eitrack. Cm ]
[I n a lld m i esot
itdouble track electric Hue from fifteenth Street [to* Thirty first . meet.
also converted the
one line l i m l
long] into
.
During this period also the K ansas City <fc Independence All Line, a
•ornp titer of the company, went out and the left I>an mount, p®?5
■ etweeu Kansas Cltv and Independence, of thus
I aik
without transportation facilities. Aa the W ashington Park lease was
about to expiro we abandoned Washington Park aud bade a double-

THE CHRONICLE.

480

track extension to Knlnuonnt Park. This lino was put In operation tile
middle of May.
Park Connecting Railway. W ashington P a rk to
Fan-mount Park, -SS2 miles of double track,—E d ]
The Rlverviow Power Station has been completed aud put in suc­
cessful operation, supplying electric power as far as possible from
a central station. This station Is modern lu every particular,
l o r the year the percentage of operating expenses has
decreased to 54*83 per cent from 36*55 per pent for the previous year,
while the cost of currying passengers 1ms likewise decreased from
n o t hundredths cents per passenger to 2-S3 cents per passenger.
The pollov of maintaining the company's physical property In firstclass condition has been continued and rigidly followed throughout
the year. For repairs on oars and tracks alone the gross sum of
$01,081 was expended, an Increase of $17,147 over the amount e x ­
pended the previous year.
The equipment Includes: Cable ears,
1; oleetrio
oars, 105; sweeper* and snow plow s, 15; elevated railw ay ears,
closed motors. 30; closed motors (o u t of use), 8 .

S ip tm is ,-

[VOL, XLVII.

Middletown-Goslien Traction Company.
( Statement for the year ending June SO, 1S98.)
The following figures have been furnished to the Chronicle,
too late, however, for insertion in the Street Railway
Supplement of August 27:
1897-8.
$46,620
10,708

Statistics—Various statistics of interest follow :
OPERATIONS FOR TEAR 1897-98.
Electric L ines.
Cable Lines. 1898.
1897.
1897.

8
T otal earu’s..1,351,186
O p. expens.. 734,479

$
1,429 971
779,783

N e t c am ’s.. 619,707
650,188
P e r cent of exp. to c a m ’s — 54*55
M iles op. between term ini...31*19
M iles of single track............. 62*33
A v . N o. of oars run d aily___ 203 ^
Total No. of round trips...656,060
■Car m ileage................... 9.264,781
Revenue passengers___28,276,107

$
Total earnings...267,360
Oper. expenses.. 181,781

—V.
1898.
$
330,150
205,547

N et earnings.. 85,585 130,603
P e r cent of op. exp. to earna.61'15
Miles between term ini......... 29*94
Miles of single track..............55*20
A.v. N o. of cars run daily....... 39*5
Total No. of round trips.. .234,967
Car m ileage.................... 2,227,373
Revenue passengers...... 5,682,598

N o t e —On the cable lines the average number of trains run daily
w as of tw o ears to train 84*6 and of combination cars 34 3, making
the total number of ears operated 203»«; the operating expense per
ordinary oar per mile w as 7 ^3 cents and per combination car 13 cents.
The car mileage o f ordinary single truck cable oars w as 7,676,900 and
of combination cars 1,587,881.
On the electric lines the average num ber of cars run daily w as 39
and the operating expenses per oar iier m ile w as 9 2 cents. The oar
m ileage w as 2,227,373.

EARNINGS, EXPENSES AND CHARGES.

1897-8.
Gross earnings......................................... .$1,766,253
Operating expenses and t a x e s ............
987,399
N et earnings.
Other income......

1896-7.
$1,624,796
926,316

Total income................................

Charges—

$778,854
223

$696 480
3,680

$779,077

.............
..............................

$700,160

Interest and gu aran ty............
$437,274
50 Corrigan Street By. bonds retired.. . . . .
53,233
Transferred to construction account..___
95,889
Dividends p a id ........................................ (2%) 111,736
M isc e lla n e ou s.......................................
30,155

$445,321
52,050
f 6,535
( 2 3 % ) 139,670

1

$6,584

Total charges........................................ $728,292
$693,576
Balance, surplus, for year........................
$50,785
operating expenses
In 1895-6 gross earnings were $1,622,475;
^$934,815; net earnings, $687,660.
GENERAL BALANCE SHEET MAY 31, 1898.

D r.

*Constr*n and equ ip ...$13,243,357
R ea l e sta te ................
90,542
K an. C. E L Rv. stock.
2,601,010
do
advances.
457,891
Misc. stocks & bonds.
12,600
Uncollected b ills........
24,135
■Cash on deposit..........
212,355
Supplies......................
65,809
M iscellaneous............
45,493
T o tal........................ $16,753,193
— Y . 65, p. 1115.

Or.

Capital stock.............. $5,586,800
Bonds (direct oblig.).
8.164.000
Bonds guaranteed___
2.642.000
145,910
U np aid coupons.........
U n p aid vouchers........
71,173
U np aid dividends......
465
81,792
Aoerued interest........
Surplus.......................
57,367
Bal. of open accounts.
3,687
Total........................ $16,753,193

Third Avenue Railroad, New York.
(Statement fo r year ending June SO, ISOS.)
The statements to the New York Railroad Commissioners
•compare as follows:
18978.1
Gross earnings........................ $2,506,861
O perating expenses............... 1,419,206

1896-7.
$2,590,473
1,440,767

N e t earnings........ .............$1,087,655
O ther income..........................
104,030

$1,149,706
45,441

$1,115,473
40,991

Total in co m e......................$1,191,685
-emerges......................................
371,763
D ividen ds................................ (8%)800,000

$1,195,147
367,283
(8^)875,000

$1,156,464
347,119
(10)880,000

Surplus...............................
Betterm ents.............................

del. 947,136
($269,087

def. $70,655
...........

$10,922
$23,666

1895-6.
$2,628,628
1,513,155

6 6 , p.

574.

$5,867
deb, 2,353

$11,256
1,187

$3,514
$16,500
1,546

$12,443
$16,506
1,385

$ 1 2 ,2 1 0

47

E quipm ent.—

1895-6.
$52,815
41,559

. $5,912
.$16,500
, 1,622

Other income.

1886-7.
$46,665
40,798

. $5,912

Gross e a r n in g s ................. .

$14,532

$5,448

Ohio Falls Car Manufacturing.
( Balance Sheet for year ending June SO, 1898.)
The balance sheets June 30, 1896, 1897 and 1898, as audited
by Barrow, "Wade, G-nthrie & Co., are as follows:
BALANCE SHEET JUNE 30.
1898.
1897.
Assets—
$
$
Real estate, buildings, tools, m achin­
ery and fixtures........... .....................1,294,299 1,294,293
Stock of m aterials on hand, as pet
Inventory........................................
231,982
30,000
Bonds purchased for redem ption........
50,000
Bills rot eivable (net v a lu e )................. 292 i*?4
248,144
Accounts receivable............................ 142,6^8
120,776
59,775
Bonds and securities of other e o .s.....
66,375
Cash on hand and in banks ...............
21.464
12,442
2,041
Insurance premiums unexpired.........
3.36S
4,215
Freight paid in advance.....................
2,737
1,629
2,069
Total........................

1890.
$
1.294,299
238,936

2 1 ,0 0 0

309,189
126,292
51,0 49
23,999
4,890
837
2,284

.2,253,106

L iabilities—

Preferred capital stock..
Common capital stock..
First m ortgage b o n d s...
Bills payable.
Accounts paya
Unpaid labor.
Accrued interest on bonds........
Accrued interest on loan s.........
Accrued taxes.............................
Freights due................................
Reserve account.........................
Profit to cover bonds redeemed.
Undivided profits.......................
T o t a l....................................
—V. 65, p. 276.

2,03*2,192

2,072,775

. 800,000
. 400,000
. 480,000
. 198,415
.
67,123
.
25,437
7,200
1,809
2,609

800,000
400,000
500,000
102,624
19,074
4,544
7,500
2,139
3,443
1,062
87,798

800,000
400,000
520,000
185,661
44,072
1,058
7,800

.
.
.

87,798

1 2 0 ,0 0 0

2,750
87,798

62,716

104,007

23,636

.2,253,106

2,032,192

2,072,775

United Electric Securities.
(Report for the year ending Aug. 1, ISOS.)
The report for the six months ending Ang. 1. 1898, when
combined with that for the half-year ending Feb. 1, 1898,
makes the following exhibit of profit and loss. The balance
sheet of Ang. 1, 1898, is compared with that of Ang. 1, 1897.
PROFIT AND LOSS TE A R 1S97-93.

F irst
m onths.

6
Interest and. dividends received...... $170,581
Int. paid on collateral trust bon ds.. 103,809
Other expenses..................................
16,560

6

Second
months.

Total
year.

$147,437
90,288
15,936

$318,018
194,097
32,496

$50,212
Profits from sale of underlying b’ds
! 142,897

$41,213

$91,425

92,662

235,559

.$193,109
. 43,541

$133,875
182,928

$326,984
43,541

,$236,650
. 53,722

$316,803
35,000

$370,525
53,722
35.000

$181,803

$181,803

Dividend N o. 7 ..................
Carried to speoial reserve.

1 0 0 .0 0 0

Surplus end of period................. $182,927

BALANCE SH EET ON AUG,

Assets—

1898.

$

1897,
*

IdoMlitiAS—

1 0 0 ,0 0 0

m8s.

S to c k s,.........................1,018,200 1,282,100 C apital a to c k Bonds............
338,500
118,250
C o m m o n ,,.............. 600,000 500.000
P re fe rre d .............. .. 1,000,000 1 ,000,000
At els. r e c e i v a b l e . , 5,210
61,878
Notes receivable....
180,628 128,913 C o lla te ra l tr u s t 5s—
18,000
1st s c r ie s . ,......... .
80,000
T o ta l...................... 1,568,61 1 1,8? 8,011.
2d do
.........
80*000
117,000 117.000
Book va!n e 0 f abovo
853,815 071,654
3 d d o ............
90.000
90,000
1st M. b onds a t par
ltd do_ ....—
_
5tii d o ............ , 452.000 ■ 177,000
valuo to « ecure coIla te ra l tr u s t 5 8 .... .4,957,000 0,040,000
0 tll d o ..................*. , 308,000 448.000
701.000
L ess re se rv e 20 p. c. 001,100 1,208,000
7th d o . ............. . , 581,000
•15,000
Less special reserve. 110,0C0
8 th d o . . . . ............. , 337,000 051.000
Oth d o ................... , 372,000 715.000
T o ta l-................3,830,600 ■ 1,787,000 10t.h d o .................... 1, 000,000 ,000,000
20.000
77,718 N otes p a y a b le .......
A ccru ed in te r e s t.... 80,123
43,541
32.168 S u rp lu s ..................... . 181,‘803
C a sh .............................. 270,230
T o t a l ......... . 5,033.803 5,868.511
T o t a l ................... 5,033,803 6,808.641

Cash on hand June 30, 1898, $179,540. Total surplus, $36,
450.—V. 66, p. 1047.,
1
Muscatine Electric Railway.
(Statement for the year ending June 30, ISOS.)
The following is furnished for the late fiscal year:
The amounts originally issued and the amounts out­
standing
of collateral trust loans,
m
E arnings. Expenses Ncl earnings. list of theof the several issues as security (and offered for also
bonds still pledged
sale
J an uary......................
$3,575
$1,364
F ebru ary....................
.. 4,281
3,443
838 by the company) as they stood on Feb. 1, 1898, were given in
M a r e b .........................
3,402
333 the Chronicle of April 9, 1898, p. 707. Since that time the
A p ril............................
..
4,249
2,198
2,050 amount of collateral trust bonds outstanding has been re­
M a y ...........................
..
4,578
3,287
1,291
rune............................
..
4,761
3,350
1,410 duced from $3,793,000 to $3,352,000.—V. 66, p. 707.
United States Glass Company.
T o tal...... ..............
$19,315
$7,789
6 months ending Dee. 31. ’97. . 28,373
20,320
(Report for year endingJune SO, 1898.)
8,053
President D. C. Ripley in his report congratulates the
Y ear ending June 30, '99........ ..$55,470
$39,634
$15,841
Y e a r ending June 30, ’97........ .. 51,378
37,524
13,854 stockholders that the long-looked-for improvement in the
Y e a r ending .Juno 30, ’96........ .. 43,211
30,332
12,870 company’s affairs has arrived. Although prices of staples
The net earnings for the year ending June 30, 1898, it will have declined, the present feeling is justified by recent
be observed, show an increase of nearly 15 per cent over the sales that prices will now advance. The cost of glass has
preceding year and each year shows a gradual increase in been reduced 14c. per 100 pounds. The sales for the past
year show an increase of 19 per cent, and the loss for bad
gross ana net earnings.—V. 66, p, 574.

THE CHRONICLE.

S eptember 3, 1888,j

debts on this business did not exceed one-third of 1 per cent.
Daring the year the company has sold 15 acres of its Glassport property at an average price of $1.100 an acre, and the
company's investment in that property is showing satisfac­
tory results. The report makes the following showing:
Sales, royalties, etc..................................................................
G eneral and operating expen ses............................................ 1,602,4 5o
N et profits for y e a r .............................................. - .............
A v a ila b le assets—
.
. .,
.
Glass and materials on band, accounts receivable and cash.
L ia b ilitie s.................................................................................

$12,393
„ „ „„
$668, /33
490,872

N et available assets................. - - .......... ...............................
A d d cost of works, exclusive of G lassport........................... -,318,401
4b2,468
Glassport Land C o ..............................................- ...................
Total assets in excess of liabilities.......................... - .........$2,958,729

The surplus earnings of more than $12,000, as above, com­
pared. it is stated, with a deficit (of $1,300 last year and a
deficit of $30,OJO for the year before.
[The authorized capital stock is $5,COO,000 in $100 shares, of
which, it is understood, there has been issued (full paid) $3,458,100 common and $690,000 preferred. The company is a
Pennsylvania corporation and was organized in 1891 to manu­
facture pressed and blown glassware of every description.
Its plants are at Pittsburg, Glassport and Greensburg, Pa.;
Wheeling, W. Va,; Findlay, Steubenville and Tiffin, O., and
Gas City, Ind. The report has not been received and the
statement here given is taken from a Pittsburg paper.—Ed.]
The following were elected directors for the ensuing year:
Daniel C. Rip'ey (President), Addison Lyle. A. L. Brahm. Ralph
Bagalev, Marion G. Boyce, J. S. Craig, W . C. King, Joseph Anderson,
H. D. W , English.

481

Trustee, bond No. 76 for $1,000 has been drawn for redemp­
tion at 104 and accrued interest on Oct. 1st, 1898.
Baltimore & Ohio RR.—Time for Deposits Limited to
Sept. 15.—The reorganization managers announce that over
97% per cent of the bonds and over 95% per cent of the stocks
embraced in the reorganization plan (excepting the B. & O.
preferred shares and Akron & Chicago Junction preferred
shares) have been deposited under the plan of June 22, and
that further deposits will he accepted only upon a cash pay­
ment of 2 per cent of the par value of bonds and an addi­
tional cash payment of $2 per share of stock deposited until
Sept. 15, after which date no further deposits will be accepted
except in the discretion of the reorganization managers and
upon such terms as they may impose.—V. 67, p. 426,
Bath (Me.) Gas & Electric.—Lewiston Brunswick &
Bath Street By.—Assignment.—A press dispatch from Bath,
Me., Aug. 30, says : “ Galen C. Mo3es, one of the wealthiest
known of Bath's citizens, assigned to-day. This action is
said to he caused by alleged financial difficulties of the Bath
Gas & Electric Co. and the Richards Paper Company of
South Gardiner, both of which concerns later assigned. The
failure is thought to exceed $200,000.” Mr. Moses is Presi­
dent of the Bath Street Ry. Co., and one of the syndicate pro­
moting the Lewiston Brnnswiok & Bath Street Ry.—V.
66, p. 1001.
Bear Valley Irrigation Co. of Redlands, Cal.—Reorgani­
zation.—We enclosed a copy of the ite m respecting this com­
pany recently published in the C
to the Savings &
Trust Company of Cleveland, O., the mortgage trustee, and
requested fnrther information. In response we have this:
h r o n ic l e

Tlie clipping gives all the information that can be given at this time
W e are interested only as trustees under a mortgage, and the clipping

outlines a proposed basis of settlement between different parties in
GENERAL. IN V E S T M E N T N EW S,
litigation. There has been no printed circulars gotten out, simply a
as a basis of
Reorganizations, Etc.—Latest Data as to Defaults, Reor­ proposition made and put in w ritingcontemplates settlement, which, if
accepted by all parties
We
ganization Plans, Payment of Overdue Coupons, Etc.—Al! have not heard as yet asin interest, proposition ofreorganization. been
to whether
settlement has
accepted by the w ater consumers and others to the extent of making
facts of this nature appearing since the publication of the last it binding. Mr. A. G. H nbbard of Redlands, Cal., is C hiirm an of the
issues of the I
’ and the S
R
S
bond and
may be readily found by means of the following index. receivers’ note holders’ committee; also of the committee representing
certificates.—V. 67, p. 369.
This index does not include matter in to-day’s C
,
Brunswick Dock & City Improvement Co.—Additional
Full-face figures indicate Volume 67.
Stock Listed.—The New York Stock Exchange has listed
R
M
. C o ’s— (C on .)
R ailroads & Mis. C o.’s.
$730,200 additional capital stock, making total amount listed
Volum es 66 and 67—
Page. $5,000,010. The company has redeemed (and the trustee has
Volum es 66 a nd 67—
Page.
Appleton (WIs.) Waterr.cvr.'2'21,4 2 6 Nashville Tellico A Charleston.
Sue cess r Co.3 7 1
Astoria A Columbia River.co/i$169,200 of the $180,300 first mortgage
tractor's suit ........................... 4 2 6 Newark (N. V.) Water Works.-sate.27 5 canceled) and has made arrangements to pay off bonds out­
standing
the entire
Balt. A Oblo.coup0n8.856,859, 1013, *47 New Orleans A West .rec’vrs cert.320
do
do
............. plim.1235 N. V. Phila. A Norlolk.'lrpMir^ till
bonded indebtedness
Aug. -5.275 statement in V. 67, p. of the company. See the Treasurer’s
do
do
1088 ,
273.
1235, ‘ 7, 2 2 1 .3 6 9 Ohio River A*Cbarleston..... soW.275
2
do
do
notice to bondholdersA’2 *
do
do
.27 3
Ohio Southern.ftepoBits rill Auo.10.223
Buffalo & Niagara Falls Electric By.—First Dividend.
do
do
do
do
sale post pom <1.3 7'2
2 7 -t
do
do
___
' » tamings.'.i 1H Peoria Dec. A Evansville.Jorsclos.275 —The company has declared its first dividend, one per cent
do
do Balt. Belt bonds dep.3 IS Richmond Nlch. Irv. A Beattys(quarterly), payable Sept. 15.—V. 63, p. 559.
ville........................ sale Sent. 0.223
do
do secondinstat.of assess.426
sale of pre.f. s ock 4 2 b St. Louis Avoyelles A Southwest
Buffalo & Susquehanna RR.—Bonds Called.—First mort­
ern................................. sold.43*5
Bear Valley Irrigation C o.‘ Redland®, Cal.) .................... w ry. 369 Staten Isl.Rap.Tr.maj.o/2 dsdepot. -*75 gage five per cent, Series A, $1,000 bonds, numbers 1223 to
do
do penalty after a ug.22.27 5 1296, both inclusive, and Series B, $500 bonds, numbers 113
Central Br., U. P — sold.953.1013:
do
do
rtorg.
35
plan. 1139, ->2 Tacoma Land Co. ..........not ice. 4 75 to 116, both inclusive, and numbers 119 to 121, both inclus­
recvr. e
Central Ohio............... suit filed.d'27
Cent. Pac...Govt, foreclosure, suit .. 3 1N Union Pac. Lin. A CoLsaut to U. P .435 ive. have been called for the sinking fund, and will be re­
Central Stamp’* Co.assi/nment — 3 HO Union Pac. Den. A Gulf.rumor8
regarding vlan. 435 deemed at par and accrued interest on October 1, 1898, at
Central Vermont_ int.payment .273
_
Cent. Washington.reorq. 856: plan. 953 West Trov Water.............. reerr.'27 fi
Wheel. A L. E— ttem.1142; fortcl. 1 S the banking house of Messrs. Hatvey Fisk & Sons, No. 29
2
Chic. Ft. Madison & Des Moines...
rccr.222
do 2d inst. of assess. 123P, 17 H. 324 NassauStreet, New York.—V. 67, p. 427.
do
stock deposited.27 6
Clncin. A Mask. Val. successor ro.222
Wise. Cent. Co.rcc’shp. prods under
Buffalo Tonawanda & Niagara Falls Electric
Citizens’ Electric L. AP.Co. of Ko­
lift. mart, of 1879.27 6 Company,—This company has been incorporatedBy.—New
komo. Ind........rtcr. applied for .370
with au­
do
do Objection to foreclo.
Col. San.AHock.rr/rro plans. 176. 22 —deposits called for.2 76 thorized capital stock of $1,250,000 in $100 shares, and has
Dallas (Tex.) Elec.rtcr.applied for. 370
Denver Leadv. A Gunnison, .forecl.d 15
1
absorbed the Tonawanda Street RR. The directors are :
S
R
.
Hudson Tunnel Ry_
_
222
nvestors

treet

a il w a y

upple

m ents

h r o n ic l e

a il r o a d s a n d

is c

re o ro . m a t u r t .

p la n o p e r a t iv e
s u it o f p r r f . s h a re ­
h o ld e rs file d .
year

reoro.
reelisure/Ji

f o r e c lo s u r e .

do
do
...........
274
Jamestown A L. Erie../,
1
Jasper Town A Lands ............... 42S
Kearney A Black Hills.......*222. 372
Klnatleld A Dead Rlver.8oW.222. 37 l
Kingston A P em o ro k e .........
874
Litcofleld. Carrollton A Western
42S
Little Rock Hot Springs A Texas
In is
1.3*20
Lowell (Mich.) Wat. A Light
1

plan.
foreclosure decree.
private
until Oct.
fared."$7

Volumes 66 a nd 67—
Page.
result of nection, con­
Bridge efr.426
treet

a il w a y s

Brooklyn El

Buffalo Kenmore A Ton awanda
Electric.......... .. ..
----427
Fulton Wall A Cort. 8t. Ferries
RR...................................
42S
Petersburg Elec. Ry............. sate. >35
Saginaw (Mich.) Cons St. Ky......435
Union St. Ry. (Saginaw, Mich.).. .435
Lakeside Ry., Mahanoy City
1

sold.
sola.

.slatusproposition to bondholders.37

American Bell Telephone.—Output of Telephones.—The
following statement is published showing the increase in the
number of telephones in use by the company’s licensees:
,-M onth end. A ug. 20.—
.

1898.
Gross o u t p i t ................ 21,863
Returned........................12,022
N etiuorease..............12,841

1897.
15,767
10,154

5,613

tince Dec

,----1897-98.
212,747
95,328
117,419

VO.——
.
1896-97.
143,545

6 2 ,0 0 1

81,544

Total telephones in use Aug. 20, 1898, 1,036,541, against
854,171 in August, 1897; increase, 182,370.—V. 67, p. 426.
^American Debenture Co.—Foreclosure Sale Sept. 37.—
Foreclosure sale of the collateral securing the bonds of 1883,
series F, is advertised for Sept. 27. See list of collateral,
etc., in notice of sale in the advertisement in last week’s
C h r o n ic l e .

©Appleton ( Wis. | Water Works Co.—Bondholders’ Com­
mittee.—Wm. H. Barrows, Charles L. LoDg and Granville C.
Tyler, with W. W. Miller, of 30 Broad St., New York City,
as Secretary, constitute a bondholders’ committee represent­
ing more than a majority of the first mortgage bonds. They
have begun foreclosure proceedings and earnestly request all
bondholders who have not already received the committee's
circulars immediately to communicate with the secretary of
the committee.—-V. 67, p. 426.
Badger Electric Co. (Lt’d).—Bonds Called.—Under terms
of mortgage dated Oct. 1st, 1891, to the Atlantic Trust Co.,

n o r y B Smith. Bay City. Mich,; II. >1. GJIett, Bay City, Mich.; Timothy
E. Ellsworth. Backport: James A. Roberts, Burr Jo; George Sandrock, Buffalo:
Clarence M. Howard. Buffalo: Ja nes Bow. Niagara Falls: John A. Read, North
Tonawanda; Benjamin B. Rand, North Tonawanda.

The Tonawanda Street RR. was au electric line, bonded
for $50,000, and extending from Tonawanda to Gratwiek,
2% miles. The present intention as reported is to build a
double track road along the river front from Black Rock to
Tonawanda, and from the latter point to Niagara Falls over
private property.
Chicago Cattle Loan Co.—Chicago Junction Railways &
Union Stock Yards Co.—Object of New Company.—It appears
that the Chicago Cattle Loan Co., whose incorporation was
noted last week, was organized by interests identified with
the Chicago Junction Railways & Union Stock Yards Co.,
for the purpose of loaning money direct to cattle feeders in
the West, taking chattel mortgages on the cattle, and'stipuIating that the cattle when marketed shall be sent to Chicago.
The Kansas City and Omaha Stock Yards, it is stated, have
both organized cattle loan companies, and they have proved
of great advantage to the stock yards of those cities.—V. 67,
p. 427; Y. 66, p. 1043.
Chicago Great Western By.—Surveys.—This company
is running a preliminary line from Hampton, la., to Omaha,
Neb., not, however, with any present intention of building,
bat to secure information which maybe useful in the future.
(Official statement to “ Railroad Gazette.”)—V. 67, p. 423, 433.
Chicago Peoria & YVestern RR.—Glucose Sugar Refining.
—Proposed Connecting Line.—The Chicago P e o r i a & West­
ern has been incorporated in the interest ot the Glucose
Sugar Refining Co., to connect its plants in Chicago, Peoria
and Rockford, 111., and Davenport, la. Surveys are in progress between Chicago and Peoria. The officers of the new
company are those of the Sugar Refining Co., viz.: President,
C. H. Matthiessen; Secretary and Treasurer. S. T. Butler;
General Manager, W. J. Gorman.—V. 67, p. 319.

THE CHB0N4GLE.

482

Columbus Hocking* Valley & Toledo Ry.—Further Ad­
vance of 1 Per Cent fo r Interest on Consol. 5s Sept. 1.—J. P.
Morgan & Co., referring to their circulars of Feb. 25, 1897,
Aug. 31, 1897, and Feb. 28, 1898, give notice fcbafc they are
prepared to make a further advance of $20 on each $1,0 >0 5
per cent consol, bond of 1881 now deposited with them,—V.
66, p, 1041.
Commonwealth Electric Co.—Chicago Edison Co,—
Prospect us--Description of Bonds and Property.—Agree­
ment.—Of the sj.uOO.cDO of Commonwealth Electric bonds
recently issued it is announced that $500.00 > have been
placed in London with th** London*Scottish American Trust,
through Aldis, Aldis, Xorthcote & Wilson, In addition
$700,000, it is stated, have been placed in Chicago, $8 0,000
more have practically been placed and N. \Y. Harris & Co.
are offering the remaining $500,00!). A letter of President
Insun toN. W. Harris & Co. gives the following facts regard­
ing the company's property, its business, its bond issue and
its agreement with the Chicago Elison Co.:

rvoL, L x v n -

will issue negotiable certificates for the shares. The time
allowed for such deposits is limited to Sept, 20.”
Description of .Veto Purchase Money Bonds of Kings County
Co.—“ the trust company, after its receipt of two-tliirds of
the Edison stock, will assign the shares to the Kings County
Co. and receive the purchase price therefor, which will (in­
cluding the additional stock subscribed aud paid for) be
represented, par for par, by 6 per cent gold ninety-nine year
purchase money coupon or registered bonds of the Kings
County Co. The Kings County Co will, in addition, deliver
to the stockholders’ committee bonds of the same issue
which will produce an income agreed to be sufficient to meet
the expenses of the competent representation by the commit­
tee of the present and futnre int rests aud rights of the Edi­
son selliug stockholders in the necessary details of the pres­
ent transaction, in guarding the expenditures of the pro­
ceeds of the further issue of Edison first consolidated mort­
gage bonds and the investment of the guaranty fund pres­
ently mentioned, atid otherwise.”
“The purchase money boud of the Kings County Company
Property Owned —The Common wealth Company practically control
the entire oleotrio lighting husiness In Chicago sooth of Thirty-ninth will he s-cured by vendor's lien on the Edison shares to be
Street, north of Lincoln Park ami west of Ashland Boulevard. It re­ reserved by the Central Trust Company aud by a purchase
cently acquired at a cost of considerably more than $ 2 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0 the money mortgage, which, besides being a first lien on the
busiuesa and a sets of the following companies:
S ou th S ins.—People's Electric Light & Motor Power Co., M utual Electric Edison shares, will be a general lien on property, present
Llfrftt Co., Hy.le Park Thoms.«n H ouston Light Co.. Hyde Park Bloctrlc Light and futnre, of the Kings County Company, subject only to
A Pow er Co.. E>u*!ewo >1 Electric Light Co.. People's Light & Power Co.
its present first mortgage of $2,50 ',000. They will also be
W*ST SIDE.—W est C hieigo Light & Power Co.
N o rth S id e .—Western Light fit Power Co.. E dsew ater Light Co.
secured hy the deposit with the Central Trust Company of
The Commonwealth Company's ordinance confers the right to use $1 000,000 cash to be invested in securities to be approved by
streets and alleys throughout the entire city of Chicago for a period of the stockholders’ committee.”
fifty years from .J uuc, l ^07, in the operation of wrres and electric con
Consolidate I Mortgage of Elison Go. to be increased to
duotors for the distribution of electricity for furnishing light, beat
be 910.000,000 at J, Per Cent Interest.—“ It is proposed
and pow er The company has also acquired the ordinances or :
Garfield Electric Lighting Co., on th e west side.
that the Edison first consolidated mortgage, recently
W estern E lectric Co., on th e south side.
Fort W ayne .Tenney Electric Co.. Labe Electric .Lighting Co, and Town of authorized for $5,000,000, in 5 per cent bonds, shall be
L abe Electric Light Co , in th e town of Lake.
authorized instead to an amount not exceeding $ 0,0 10,000 in
L ake View Electric Light * o., in the city of Lake View.
The company therefore possesses full and ample ordinance rights forty year 1 per cent bonds. This mortgage will be secured
covering its operation in every part of Chicago.
by a first lien on all the Edison property, subject only to the
New Bonds —The $2,< 0",00<> of 5 per cent forty-five year gold bonds existing first mortgage bonds which will he paid off and can­
are secured by a mortgage to the Northern Trust Co., Chicago, The fu r­
celed in 1900. The Kings County Company will additionally
ther amount of $15«',000 is held in escrow for the retirement of $5
000 bonds of the Hyde Park Tliomsoo-Houston Light Co. and $100,- secure these bonds by a mortgage of its own property, sub­
000 of bonds of the Hyde Park Electric Light & Pow er Go. by purchase ject to $2,500,000 of its first mortgage bonds and the lien of
or exchange, for which arrangements are already on foot. A f t e r re­
tirement of the $ l oO,0 0 0 outstanding bonds said mortgage w ill be a its purchase money bonds to be received by the Edison sell­
first lien upon all property and rights of the Commonwealth Company. ing-stockholders. The first issue of the Eidison first consoli­
[Then follows a statement as to the right to issue additional bonds dated bonds will be $2,000,000, to provide funds to pay for
and the provisions touching the depreciation reserve fund, substan­ the stock of the Municipal Co enpany. Of the remainder,
tially as already reported in the C
of Aug. 13, page 319.]
F lan o f Operation.— Agreem ent w ith Chicago Edison as to Interest .— $1,875,000 will be reserved to retire the $l,500,f'00 of exist­
The various systems operated by the different companies above men­ ing first mortgage bonds, which will be called for payment
tioned have been consolidated and brought under one management, at 110 and interest in 1900, as provided in the mortgage. The
and five of the nine existing stations w ill be dispensed with.
A n extrem ely favora *le operating contract for the period of the life remainder of the $10,000,0.00 issue will be issued from time to
of the bonds has been form ally executed bet ween the Chic tgo Edison time as required for extensions, additions and other prop­
Co. and the Commonwealth Co., giving the latter the right to call upon erty, which, when acquired, will become subject to the
the Edison Co. *o supply all the current necessary to feed the Com­
lien of the mortgage.”
m onwealth Co.’s system at a very low cost of production.
Right to Subscribe for Consol. J? at 88 in 1900.—“ It is
U nder this operating contract it is provided that, if at any time the
Interest on the Com ■on wealth Company bonds shall be unpaid, all proposed to secure to the Elison stockholders ratably to
m oneys accruing to the E Uson Company und*-r the contract pending their holdings the right to subscribe in 1900 for the $1,875,000
such default shall be paid to the mortgage trustee to be used in paying
the matured interest coupons, the Edison Company allowing the p ay­ of E lison consolidated first mortgage bonds at the price of
m ent of interest by the C -mmonwealth Company in preference to its 88 per cent of their par value, which will provide the amount
o w n claims. It will thus be seen that the Edison Company practically necessary to redeem the $1,500,000 of existing first mortgage
stands sponsor for the payment, to the extent of moneys accruing to
The holders of Central Trust Co. certificates for stock
It under the operating contract, of the interest on bonds of the Com­ bonds.
deposited will thus for each 21 yA shares have the privilege in
m onwealth Company^
E a rn in ,s— The gross earnings of the various systems now owned 1900 of subscribing for one $1,000 bond at the price of $S80
for the year 1897 were approxim ately $333,000. The net earnings
for that period were $75,700. On A p ril 1, 1898, the Commonwealth and accrued interest.”
Extra Dividend of 2% to 3 Per Cent from Profit and Loss
Electric Co. took over the various properties, but did not commence
economizing until about M ay 15, since which time without any in­ Surplus.—“ The holders of trust company certificates will
crease in prices the lollow ln g results have been obtained:
»lso be entitled to their ratable shares of extra dividends to
Gross
Operating
Net
Av. per be declared by the Edison Company so as to distribute the
i«t«».
M a y ...............................................$25,911
f 19,07?
$4,832
*-*2,0*9 amount io the credit of profit and loss on June 30, 1898, in­
J u n e . . . . . ..................................... 27,474
1 8J5 3
9.411
112,9«4 cluding the insurance fund, less the expenses of the company
July.................................. 27,517
17,771
9,744
11(5,962
incident to the new mortgage and this transaction. The
The above figures are based upon the operation of the plants with­ amount of this dividend cannot be known until such expenses
out the advantage of the operating contract made with the Edison
and 3
C o., the advantages of which w ill increase as the business of the C om ­ are determined, but it will probably be between
monwealth Co. is extended. The total fixed charge* under a bond per cent.”
issue of $2,000,000, and including the interest on the u n d erL in g
Stockholders’ Committee.—“The duties of the stockholders'
bonds, will amount to $109,000. I t is estimated the net e m iin g s be­
fore the lapse of a year's operation w ill be at the rate of $140,000 p er committee, George Foster Peabody, Ethan Allen Doty and
Edwin M. Bnlkley, will, it is contemplated, continue until
annum.
investment shall have been made of the remaining $0,125,000
M anagem ent -T h e officers and directors are as follows:
P resid ent,. S am uel Instill; V ice Pres., R o b e rt T. L incoln: Sec. an d Tre&s., of the Edison first consolidated bonds reserved for extensions
F ra n * S. G o rto n , C om ptroller, W a lte r M . A n th o n y ; G e n e a l Super., L ouis A. and improvements. The membership of this committee will
F e rg u so n ; Directors, E dw ard L. B rew ster, S am uel In u ill. Jo se p h L oiter, R ob­ he in the control of the holders of a majority of the purchase
e r t T. L in co ln anti J o h n J . M itch ell,—V. 47, p. 370, 319.
money tonds to be received by the Edison selling stock­
Eastern Illinois Coal Co.—Payment of Coupons.—A Bos­ holders.”
ton paper says :
Deposit of Two-Thirds of Stock Necessary.—“ The agree­
"T reasu rer J. M. Pendleton announces that tile coupon ol Sent. 1
ment will become effectual upon depout with the Central
1808, w ill he paid on presentation at the Farm ers’ Loan & Tnm tCo.
The coupon of March, 1sos:, will be paid later on if it is possible to do Trust Company of two thirds of the Edison stock. The time
so, but ilie condition of the soft coal trade has been snob in the past allowed for such deposits is limited to September 20.”
few years that the company has been unable to uinlco inaw-s that
Capitalization of Kings County Company.—The Edison
w ould provide a revenue sufficient to meet the interest chargee It
Is hoped that the company w ill ho aide to meet the Interest in the Company has outstanding $4,000,100 of stock, which will bs
increased to $5,1100,00 ) and exchanged as above stated. If
future, hut it cannot be prom ised at this time.”
the entire issue is so
Edison Electric Illuminating Co. of Brooklyn.—Kings Kings County Companyexchanged, the capitalization :of the
will consist of the following
County Electric Light and Power.—Offleial Circular Gunny
Terms for Sale of S ’ode.—An official circular explains as fol­ Kings County capital Stock............. ............... .....................$2,500,000
First mortgage a
1897, due 1937
lows the plan under which the stockholders of the Edison Purchase money p. o. (A<fcO) gold bonds ofyear gold bonds 2,500,000
0
cent
Electric Illuminating Co. of Brooklyn can sell their holdings sheared by deposit perEdisonninety-nine by a second mort­
of
stock, nl>o
to the Kings County Electric Light & Power Co:
gage
of the
County Co., and
a
guaranty fund of $1,000,000, total
..
Deposit of Stock.—‘ Edison stockholders are to deposit Edison ou t'*e propertyinating Kings issue a bout.___ . . . .by.to 5,150,000
Electric Illum
llrstm ortgage 5s subject
their certificates of stock, together with an agreement to de­ cull in 1o o o .......................... ......................;......................... 1,500,000
posit- an amount of cash equal to 25 per cent of their stock Edison Electric Illuminating consol, m ortgage forty-year 4
with the Central Trust Co. (unless the right to subscribe for per Municipal Com pany’swhich to be issued at once to pay 2,000,000
cent, $10,000,000. of
for
stock...... ....................................
additional stock shall have been assigned), and are to assign —V. 67, p. 177.
to the trust company the shares represented by the certifi­
cates, together with the shares of the additional stock to be East Middlesex Street Tty.— Payment of Bonds.—The
acquired with the cash so deposited. The trust- company $125,000 bonds due Sept 1 are being paid at the National
h r o n ic l e

M o n th .

in c o •>*.

ex-

e a r n in o s .

y e a r.

S eptember 3, 18S8.J

THE CHRONICLE.

483

Hide & Leather Bank, Boston. Estabrook & Co. recently to have such transfer ticket used or offered for passage after the time
purchased a like amount of 5 per cents issued to refund the limited for its use shall have expired, shall he guilty of a misde­
meanor."
maturing loan.
Glas Consumers’ Association of the United States.—To New York & Harleiu RR.—Stockholders to Vote Oct. 5 on
special
Increase Capital Stock.—The stockholders will vote at the ProposedofSettlement of RefundingbeControversy .—A. 1898, at
the
will
field Oc . 5,
office of the company, 316 Post Street, San Francisco, on Oct., meeting o’clock,stockholders the purpose ofonconsidering the
twelve
20, upon a proposition to increase the capital stock from final report of a noon, “for appointed by the board of direct­
committee
$300,000 to $500,000, divided into 25,000 shares of the par ors to agree with, the board of directors of the New York
value of $20 each. D. L. Randolph is President and George Central & Hudson River RR. Co. upon a settlement of the
R. Kibbe Secretary of the company.
questions between the two companies arising out of the lease
of April 1,
of
mort­
Hudson River Tunnel Ry.—Sale Ordered.—Chancellor gage bonds 1873. and the refundingfor the consolidatedtaking
company,
the purpose of
McGill, at Jersey City, on Thursday signed the order direct­ final actionof thisreference toand proposed settlement and
such
ing the foreclosure sale of the property. The date of agreement.” with
the
sale will be fixed by Commissioner Randolph Parmly.—V. 67, given in the The terms of Aug.proposed settlement were
C hronicle of
13, p. 331. They provide
p. 274.
that the
from refunding
7s due
Illinois Steel—Minnesota Iron—Lorain Steel—Elgin May of 1900,saving per cent, $330,60 'the $12,000,000 ofCentral
1,
shall
Joliet Si Eastern RR.—Chicago Lake Shore & Eastern RR. and $200,000at the New York & Harlem, go to the to the
to
affording
—Federal Steel.—Official Statement as to Pending Consoli­ latter an amount equal to 2 per cent yearly on its stock.
dation.—On Tuesday Judge E. H. Gary gave to the press the The Harlem stock is now receiving in dividends 12 per
following statement:
after
from the
“The committee on consolidation reports that it has been cent yearly, andline willJuly, 1901, (when the rental cent to 4
Fourth Avenue
be increased from %% Per
decided to organize a new company, to be known as the Fed­ per cent) and the refunding of the consols will have been
eral Steel Co., under the laws of New Jersey. The capital accomplished, the
distribution
stock will be about $200,010,000, one-half in 6 per cent pre not 15, per cent. annual 67, p. 178 and should equal 1414, if­
See V.
223, and also Inves
ferred and one half in common stock. A syndicate which tors’ Supplement.—V. 67, p. 321.
will furnish the necessary working capital for the new com­
Northern Pacific R y.—Master's Report Touching Lands.—
pany will be managed by J. P. Morgan & Co.
“Arrangements for the purchase of the steel plants at Lor­ Special Master Carey at Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 25, filed his
ain, O., and Johnstown, Pa., have been consummated. A report, deciding that the preferred stock of the old company
majority of the stockholders of the Minnesota Iron Co., the does not possess the lien whieh was claimed for it upon the
Illinois Steel Co. and the Elgin Joliet & Eastern RR. Co. 3,738,874 acres of land in Minnesota and North Dakota east
have already signified their willingness to sell to the new of the Missouri River. The Master holds that there can be
no such thmg as preference of stock upon capital, in the
company.
“It is expected that a circular embodying the plan of or­ sense that the stockholder shall be repaid that which he has
ganization will be sent to the stockholders of the different contributed to the capital of the corporation, before the credit­
companies within a week. The transfers of stock will prob­ ors are satisfied.
ably be made by the Central Trust Co. It is expected that Report.—An advance statement for the late fiscal year will
the new company will be ready to begin business on Oet. 1.” be found on page 477 of to-day’s Chronicle.
The final details are to be left to a sub committee consist Dividend. —It is understood that at their meeting yesterday
ing of Robert Bacon of J. P. Morgan & Co. and Roswell P. the directors took no action regarding any dividend on the
common stock from the earnings of the past year, and that
Flower.
We are officially informed that the stockholders of the the annual report, as adopted, makes no mention of the sub­
Minnesota Iron Co. will receive a cash dividend of
per ject. The President stated to the board that if business
cent and for every $10,000 par value of stock $13,600 par value prospects continue as at present, of which there seems to be
of new preferred stock. They will also have the privilege of every likelihood, it would be proper for the board in the
subscribing for $10,000 of new common stock at 25.—Y. 67, p. course of a few months, to give consideration to the question
of a dividend on the common stock from the earnings of the
428.
Kansas City Pittsburg & Gulf RR.—Official Statement.— current year.—V. 67, p. 223.
President Stillwell has made the following statement regard­ Paducah (Ky.) Railway
ing the property: “ The prospects for our road were never dation.—New Lo in.—This & Light Co.—Status of Consoli­
announced,
blighter than they are to day. I hear all sorts of rumors of has been incorporated with company, as already$200,090, aud
a capital stock of
receiverships, big floating debt, &c., but the facts in the case we are officially informed will be bonded for $10 >,000,
are that the Kansas City Pittsburg & Gulf is to-day earning
by first mortgage, the only
its full interest and has the larger part of the money in the securedTfiea purpose is to absorb themortgage on the prop­
erty.
two street railway
bank to meet its October coupons. It has no floating debt. companies and the two electric-light companies, all of which
Our August earniDgs (‘812,000) are the largest in the history are now owned by the same people. The companies thus
of the road. The best previous month was November, 1897, to be amalgamated are the Paduiah Street Railway Co. and
with gross earnings of $303,600, Our earnings are now $11,- the People’s Light, Power & Railway Co , the last-named
000 to $12,000 a day. They should from nowon be largely
having
increased, for the cotton movement is just starting Five companyPower Co.already absorbed the General Electric
Light &
large lumber mills which have been in processs of construc­ There will
of street
besides a
tion for nine months will soon be completed, and they should large electricbe about 14}£ milesplant. Therailway,bonis are
light aud power
new
give us $5,000 a day in freight. One of the mills is now giving being sold through the American Trust & Savings Bank of
us $1,000 a day. The last week of July was the best week in Chicago, 111., and Mr. R. W. ViviaD, broker, of the same city.
the history of the road for the movement of lumber. We The preliminaries are not yet completed, bat it is hoped
handled 564 cars from the 119 saw-mills located on the road.” during the next few weeks to get everything in shape.—
—V. 67, p. 222.
V. 67, p. 127.
Kentucky & Indiana Bridge.—Bonds Sold.— Logan Mur­ Peoples Gas Light & Coke Co. of Chicago.—Cross Bill.—
ray, who is liquidating the Kentucky National Bank, it is In the suit of James Livingston the company has filed a cross­
stated, has sold $138,000 of the terminal bonds o’ the bill designed to show that at the time of filing his bill
Bridge at 00 to the Southern Railway Co. It is thought the Livingston was not the owner of the fifteen bonds in question,
bridge will be foreclosed this fall and the company be re­ but was and is now a mere tool of certain persons who have
organized.—V. 65, p. 976.
caused to be instituted the action in furtherance of a design
bond
de­
Mobile & Bay Shore Ry.—Mobile & Ohio RR.—New Pro­ to injure the stock aud value holders of the company byand
market
of the company’s assets
ject.—The Mobile & Bay Shore Ry. was recently incorporated preciating ths 67, p. 321.
by W. Butler Duncan, Adrian Iselin, Jr., j. H. Masson, securities,—V.
James C. Clarke, and others, identified with the Mobile & Port Arthur Duluth & Western Ry.—Sold.—The Toronto
Ohio, to build a railroad from Mertz Station, on the Dancan General Trusts Co. has sold the control of the road to Macken­
Branch, to or near Portersville and Alabama Port, a distance zie, Mann & Co. for a price said to be about $250,000. The
of 27 miles. All the rights of way have been secured. Books new owners, it is believed, will extend the road forty or fifty
of subscription to the capital stock of the Mobile & Bay miles into Minnesota to connect with the railways of the
Shore Ry. Co. will be opened in the Cotton Exchange Build­ Northwestern States and also to a connection with the Rainy
ing, Mobile, on Sept. 28th, 1898.—V. 67, p. 271.
River Railway, a charter for which Mackenzie, Mann & Co.
have secured, and
which it is said they
New Transfer Ticket Law in New York State.—Statute are now working. on the construction ofPort Arthur Duluth
A
in Effect.—The law providing a penalty for the unlawful use & Western was given description of the
in V. 64, p. 1002.
of trar sfer tickets issued by the street railways of New York
State went into effect on Thursday. The law is as follows:
(Juebee Montmoreney & Charlevoix Ry.—To Purchase
"Section 619a. N o transfer ticket or written or printed instrument Power and Light Plant.—The stockholders will vote Sept. 30
giving, or purporting to give, the right of transfer to any person nr on a proposition to purchase the Montmorency Power Com­
persons from a pnblio conveyance operated upon one lino or route of pany, which supplies the motive power of the street railway
a street surface railroad to a public conveyance upon another line or and lights to the city streets. Theprice is said to be $1,250,route of a street surface rail road, or from one car to another car upon the
000.—Y. 67, p. 75.
same line of street surface railroad, shall he Issued, sold, or given, ex
cept to a passenger law fully entitled thereto. A n y person who shall is­
Sedalia (Mo.) Railway Light & Power.—Sedalia Elec­
sue, sell or give away sueh a transfer ticket or Instrument as aforesaid
to a person or persons not lawfully entitled thereto, and any person or tric Co. - Purchased.—A press dispatch from Sedalia says
persons not law fully entitled thereto who shall receive and use or
offer for iiassage any such transfer ticket or instrument, or shall sell ihe Sedalia Railway Light & Power Co. and the Sedalia &
or give away such transfer ticket or Instrument to another, with Intent Brown Springs Electric, embracing in all 15 miles of track

43 4

THE CHRONICLE.

[VOL. I.XV II.

by the charges to operating e x pimsea fo r renew als and repairs,
and an electric-light plant have been purchased by Stewart ered from tin& Co., of New York, and will be consolidated under the andthe case/’ character of the machinery an d plant w e believe tills to
b©
name of the Sedftlia Electric Co. The uew officers are: S. These profits, averaging over $400,000 per annum, w ill leave a sur­
paying 5
cent ou bonds. 7 per
the preferred
H. G. Stewart of New York, President: John D. Crawford plus a4tor 8 per centpeir both classes of commoncent on The now com­
aud
stock.
of Sedalia, Vice-President, aud Calton H. Reeve of New stock has arranged toon
pany
continue for a period of years thy present m an ­
York, Secretary and Treasurer. The directors are the above
officers and A, C, Zimmerman of New York and W. II. agement, and some of the form er directors will remain as directors.
Powell, Jr., of Sedalia.
Third Avenue RR. (Now York City).— Beady fo r UnderStandard Rope ,v Twine.—Union Selling Co.—Selling- ground Trolley.—Edward Lanterbach, counsel:and one of the
Agent'}/.—The Union Selling Co. has been organized, with a directors of the company, is quoted as saying
“
to
the cable
capital of .$500,000. Mr. Thomas Russell, for thirty years and The underground trolley which is my replace in opera­
methods of the comp will
agent of the Clnrk Mile-End Spool Cotton, is President and tion other traedionafter the beginning of the work be the main
in sixty days
on
Mr. Charles E. Borden is Vice-President. Mr. Borden has
Before
been at the head of the sales department of the Rope &Tw!ne Third Avenue line. operated the snow flie3 the cars of the 43d
line
Co. The other directors are Mr. Henry D. Cooper of J. F. StreetStreetwill be ninety by electricity and those of the
125th
line
The
"White & Co., Mr. J. W. Spanidiug of A. G. Spaulding & Co. left over nntd theinspring. days. changeDry Dock line will be
Tne
from cable to trolley
and Mr. E. A. Walton of the Citizens’ Insurance Co,
will result in little, if any, interference with the operation of
We understand that the purpose of the Union Selling Co. the Third Avenue system, except perhaps on the 43d Street
is, in its relation with the Rope & Twine Co., to act as selling
from
agents, and at the same time to finance the Rope & Twine line. When, seven years ago, the change was made opera­
to
there was no
Co.’s business to an extent which will enable it to run its fac­ horsesandcable traction Washington ainterference with from
recently at
tories on fall time and so place it in the position in the trade tions, to electricity without a hitch. change was made
which it should occupy. Hitherto the Rope & Twine Co. has cable the changes and improvements contemplated for the
“ All
been unable to do what is now proposed to he done through system will cost from $12,000,000 to §15,000,000. The new cars
the intermediary of the Union Selling Co., owing to lack of will be lighted by electricity, will bs handsomely equipped
sufficient working capital. It will he seen that this arrange­
properly
season. We are reaching
ment will enable the Rope & Twine Co. to effect large econ­ and with the heated for the cold and improving its service
Union Railway Co.
omies in its manufacturing expenses, and as the Selling Co. out
and onr
Metropolitan
will assume the charge for selling, the net benefit to the Rope steadily, continuerelations with theThe change on Street Rail­
way Co.
to be pleasant.
Third Ave­
& Twine Co will be considerable.—V. 60, p. 951.
nue from cable to electricity was brought about by the force
Staten Island Rapid Transit RR.—Oyer 93 Per Cent of of sound logic and no considerations that involved delay were
Seconds Deposited—Pt nalty After Sept. .9.—Hallgarten & Co. heeded.”
announce that over 92 per cent of the o per cent second A statement of the earnings for the year ending June 30,
mortgage bonds guaranteed by the Baltimore & Ohio RR, 1898, is given under “ Annual Reports.”—V. 66, p. 1047.
Co. have been deposited with the Central Trust Co. under United
Mortgage & Trust
the July agreement. Notice is given that further deposits New York States Exchange.—Series GCo.—Listing of B mds on
Stock
will only be accepted without penalty until September 9, in Estate first mortgage collateral trustof this company’s Real
bonds
listed last
elusive, after which date there will be a penalty of $30 per week on the New York Stock Exchange. In Jwerelast several
nne
bond.—V. 67, p. 435.
of the previous issues were listed and the statement then
Swift & Co.—Increased Dividend.—The company has in­ made to the Exchange described very fully the nature of the
creased the rate of its quarterly dividend from 6 per cent per Real Estate Bonds and their collateral, and also the financial
annum, at which it has stood since April, 1895, to 7 per cent. standing of the company as shown by income account, bal­
ance sheet, etc. This statement will be found at length on
Previous to 1895 the rate was 8£ yearly.—V. 67, p. 8.21.
page 487 of this issue of the Chronicle.—V. 86, p. 1239.
Terre Haute Electric Ry. -Majority of Bonds of 1S9S De­
feated—Further Deposits till Sept. IS.—The first mortgage United States Sugar Refining Co. Waukegan, 111.—Com­
bondholders’ committee of the Terre Haute Street Railway petition in Glucose.—This company with a capital of §2,000,Co. has prepared a bondholders’ agreement and has secured
and $1,000,000 6
bonds has
following
the deposit of more than a majority of the bonds thereunder. 000 stock President, C. M. per cent of Syracuse theVice Presi­
officers :
Warner
;
The limit of time for receiving deposits at the Illinois Trust dent, Wrn. H. Bartlett of Bartlett, Frazier & Co. ; Treasurer,
6 Savings Bank has been fixed at Sept, 15.—V. 67, p. 323.
Thos, A. McIntyre of McIntyre &Wardwell. The directors
:
Nash, President of the Corn
Torrington (Needle) Company—Excelsior Needle Co. of areR. Wm. A. director of the U. S. Leather ExchangeB.Bank :
Ladew,
Wal­
Connecticut—New Company —Securities Offered. —Kidder, E. ; Herman W. Hoops, Timothy Hogan andCo. ; E. Forbes.
den
Wm. J.
Peabody & Co, this week offered for subscription at par The “ Wall Street Journal” says :
$1,000,000 first mortgage os, $1,000,000 preferred stock and The
company call for a factory with a dally capacity of
$1,000,000 Class “A” stock of the new Torrington Company. 15,000plans of the corn, which Is about one-sixth of the capacity of the
bushels of
The company is capitalized as follows :
Glucose Co. It is stated by people connected w ith the new com pany

First mortgage 5 per cent 20-year gold bonds, dated Sept.
1,1898, interest M&S. o'. Mortgage trustee. New 110
landinterest............Boston. Issue subject to call at Eng­
and Trust Co., of *...................... ......................................$1,000,000
7 per cent cumulative stock, preferred as to principal and
dividends; $25.................................................................. . 1,000,000
of shares, issue subject to call at 125 per cebt; par value
■ Class “A” common stock, entitled for before auy8 dividend
5 years to per cent
dividends to Class “B,” par value of shares $25................ 1,000,000
payments each year, cumulatively,
■ Class “B” common stock, par value of shares, $25.............. 1,000,000

The subscription lists were opened on Thursday, Septem­
ber 1, and were to be closed on or before September 3, [898.
The Torrington Company is incorporated under the laws
of the State of Maine, and was formed for the purpose of ac­
quiring and carrying on the business of the Excelsior Needle
Co. of Connecticut, which has been in business since 1866. It
will own directly aod through ownership of the shares of
subordinate companies the factory and plant at Torrington,
Connecticut, where are manufactured sewicg-machine* and
knitting-machine needles, and also bicycle spokes and nip
pies and swaging machinery ; also the factory at Springfield,
Massachusetts, where are manufactured needles ; and the
needle factory in Redditch, England; also a considerable in­
vestment in store supplies in Boston, New York, Philadel­
phia, Chicago and London, England, and in its bicycle spoke
factory in Leicester, England. The prospectus eays :

that the factory w ill be in operation 1ti October. The new company
bases its plans on the expectation of a profit, of 25 oeuts. whioh is re­
garded as conservative. There arc practically no patents covering
the production of glucose, but it oosts from $L, '00,000 to $2,000,000
to equip a modern plant, and tills fact is of itself a guaranty against
destructive competition, i t is not likely that the entry of a competi­
tor in the glucose field will bo productive of disturbance in the trade,
as the Glucose Co. feels that It is desirable from various points of
view that there should bo a certain amount of independent com petition
in the trade.—V. 6G. p. 6L7.

Union Suburban Telephone & Telegraph Co. of Cleve­
land.—This company has been incorporated with $1,000,060
authorized capital stock to operate from Painasville to San­
dusky, with branches all over Ohio. H. A. Everett aud J,
B. Hanna are among the incorporators. The syndicate, of
which Mr. Everett is at the head, it is ^stated has secured
control of the Home Telephone Co. and is planning this ex­
tension.
Utah & Pacific RR.—Oregon Short Line RR.—New Line.
—The Utah & Pacific RR. has been incorporated in Utah to
build a railroad from Milford s mbhwest to. the boundary
line of Utah in Iron Oonnty, about 80 miles. The road will
be virtually an extension of the Oregon Short Line, and will
use the old grade, which was completed by the Union Pacific
several years ago from Milford to Pioche. Nevada, UO miles.
A contract with the Oregon Short Line provide: that the lat­
ter shall furnish the rails and equip the road. Tae contract
with the Short Line, it is stated, also calls for the com­
pletion of the road within one year from August 10: 40
miles to Sulphur Springs, it is hop ad. will be re idy fo* opera­
tion by January 1. The capital stock is $850,000. and the illcorporators are: Alfred W. MeOnne. of Silt Lake. Presi­
dent; David Eccles, of Ogden, Vice-President: William L.
Hoge, of Anaconda, Mont.. Secretary; Ch'is. W. Niblev, of
Baker City, Ore.. Treasurer; Joseph F. Smith, Richard Mack­
intosh, of Salt Lake: Thomas D. Dse, of Ogden, and Robert
C. Lund, of St. George, The work of construction will be
carried on by the Utah Construction Co., with Robert S.
Campbell as President.—V. 67, p. 372.

The officers of the old company state that it produce* a large major­
ity of all in this country. needles company spokes all the old
producedthe sewing-machineThe newand bioycleacquires and nipples
company, free of
and will start with With
ing liabilities on all ineunibroncos, assets. The books of uo outstand­
$175,000 cash except the above-mentioned bonds and the oldabout
hand, beside cash
comanychartered accountants by Messrs. and New York, whoGriffiths as
o., have been examined of London Deloitto, Dovers, report &
follows:
“ We have examined the accounts or the Excelsior Needle Co., Tor­
rington, Conu.. theHaven, Conn., audCo., Springfield, Mass., andfor the
National Needle we ilud the total profits A. H.
Smith companies, before charging any depreciation and interest on
three & Co., New
capital,80th June, 1897, Year ended 30th June, 1390. $480,074; 1898.
ended to be as follows: $398,040; year ended J-Oth June. year
$405,725, Theseof the business In England and the various result of
profits are arrived at after
thethe United States. In the profits for the rearincluding the agencies
In transactions an amount of $71,912, derived ended30th June, 1898,
there is included
from the sale of pat*ent rights in Germany. We are assured that all depreciation Is cov­ \W ~ F o r o th e r In c o n tin e n t Ite m * i* e pa-re 4 8 8 .

S

S eptember 3, 1898.]

THE CHRONICLE,

485

contract was thereupon made with the Wagner Company
for running sleeping-cars only, for a period of ten years, the
Railway Company reserving the right to operate its own
drawing-room cars, the earnings from which will hereafter
N EW Y O R K O N T A R I O & W E S T E R N
he included in the earnings of the Railway.
In addition to the amount invested by the company in the
R A ILW A Y C O MPANY.
stock and bonds of the Ontario Carbondale & Scranton Rail­
NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPOET—FOR THE FISCAL way Company, further sums were necessary to complete
that line, amounting at the close of the fiscal year to §628,YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1898.
894 76. While these advances have been carried as, and do
constitute, an asset, enforcible by judgment against the
Office of the President, )
subordinate company, should any necessity arise for such
New York, September 1st, 1898. f
action, to protect the interests of the company or its secur­
To the Stockholders:
ity-holders, is evident that the item
quick asset
The receipts and disbursements of the Company for the available foritthe purpose of discharging is not aliabilities.
direct
fiscal year ended June 30, 1898, compared with the preceding Surplus earnings having been used in the completion of
year were as follows:
the line, the Board decided to charge the item against the
RECEIPTS.
profit and loss account aud to credit the same account with
1897. 26 the balances carried in the construction accounts of the
1898.
$638,659
$841,673 52 3,075,505 24 Wharton Valley and Hancock & Pennsylvania roads (the
From Passengers............
3,090.280 31
“ Freight...................
122,774 23
121,658 63 latter being the portion of the O. C. & S. line in New York
“ Mails and Express.
59,902 18
58,579 86 State), both which accounts are now dosed.
Miscellaneous............... .
Various
...............................$3,914,635 27 $3,894,402 99 collectible other minor accounts have also been closed, un­
Total Receipts
claims charged off and settlements of old claims
OPERATING EXPENSES.
effected, making a further charge to profit and loss, the net
result of all being a reduction of the profit and loss surplus
1897.
1898.
Maintenance of Way and Structures__ $553,489 31 $546,017 30 from $2,681,087 28 at June 30, 1897, to $2,611,173 02 at June
457,717 59 30, 1898 The charges and credits referred to are set out in
67
MaintenanceTransportation................... 1,544,816 22 1,531.200
Conducting of Equipment................... 469.753 68
120,923 70 more detail in the Treasurer’s report.
General Expenses................................... 120,718 26
PASSENGER RECEIPTS.
Total................................................... 112,865 23
Taxes.........................................................$2,688,777 47 $2,655,859 26 In view of recent legislation obliging railway companies
124,636 97
of
charging a rate of fare
Total Operating Expen sea and Taxes $2,801,642 70 $2,780,496 23 in the StatecentsNew York place on sale mileage booksex­
ceeding two
a mile to
of
1,000 coupons, at two
mile,
in the
Net Earninga............................................$1,112,992 57 $1,113,906 76 500 orof any person presentingcents per trains,good officers
them on
the
713,995 77 hands
Interest, Rentals and Charges............... 710,532 36
the Company,
mature reflection,
to make
Surplus..................................................... $402,460 21 $399,910 99 ofuniform rate ofaftercents a mile for all concluded traveled
a
two
distances
Local passenger receipts were $560,633 09, compared with over the Company’s lines, at. the same time withdrawing all
$563,389 54 in the preceding fiscal year ; through passenger other forms of tickets, including the mileage books pre­
and immigrant earnings were $81,045 43, compared with viously issued. The use of such books led to abuses which
$75,269 72. Mail and express receipts were $122,774 23, com­ the officers of the Company were unable to control or rec­
pared with $121,658 63. Freight traffic earnings, classified tify. At several connecting points it was necessary to meet
as in former reports and compared with the five years be­ the two-cent rate established long since by the New York
Central Company, and being confronted by these condi­
ginning with the fiscal year 1894, were :
tions, the plan of charging a uniform rate of two cents per
1888.
1897.
1696.
1S95.
1891.
I
t
i
l 303,58131 226.291 55 mile was finally adopted. It is believed that for a time this
l
Through F reigh t 352,697 04
322,03214
292,519 07
concession may result in reduced passenger receipts, but the
L o ca l
F reigh t... 637,458 53
587 128 19
654,007 76
611.511 96
662,80739 Board and officials of the Company have reason to expect
M ilk........ 433,882
60
443,408 48
426.61110
381,681 20
351,03794 that the reduction from three cents to two cents per mile
C o a l....1,666,24217
1,722,036 43 1,588.424 38 1,681.227 29 1,753,874 31
will, in the end, stimulate passenger travel and develop the
M iscellaneous...
59.902 18
58,57986
41,767 43
38,691 68
41.11300
country adjacent to the main line and its branches, thus
Total............ 3,150,182 52 3,131,085 10 3,002,362 72 2,916,729 57 3,088,129 28 eventually augmenting the Company’s revenues, both as to
The following comparative statement of operations for local freight and passenger earnings.
LOCAL FREIGHT RECEIPTS.
the last nine years is worthy of consideration :
After a prolonged period of dulness and depression there
E a rnings Oper. Exwere indications of an improvement in business conditions
Year end. peases a nd 1Yet
J u n e 30. Taxes. Revenue. Charges. Surplus. during the first months of the calendar year. The .“ Maine”
*
*
*
i
*
disaster was, however, immediately followed by a period of
1890 ................... 2,200,446 01 1,768,042 13 432.403 58 235,961 67 116.44191 uncertainty and serious mercantile depression, which has
1891 .....................2,819,70216 2,155 372 18 651,330 00 553 ‘ 90 «8 100,139 32 continued with more or less force since war was declared in
1892 ................... 3,265.417 89 2,481,136 39 814.28150
597,202 22 207,019 28
1893 ..................... 8,683,173 92 2,798,225 62 889,948 90
633,095 79 250,852 51 April last. There are now, however, indications of a ma­
1894 .....................3,842,119 63 2,732.54016 1,109,579 47 690,012 89 419,508 68 terial improvement in business throughout the country, in
1895 .....................3,669.113 18 2,612,11241 1,026,70074
700,317 03 326,382 SI which your company will be prepared to participate when
1896 .....................3,779,335 51 2.898,558 06 1,080,777 45
705,208 02 375,509 IS peace shall have been declared and normal conditions hap­
1597......................... 3,894,402 99 2,780,496 23 1,113,906 76
713.995 77 399,910 99 pily resumed.
1898......................... 3,914,636 27 2,801,642 70 1,112,992 57
710,532 96 102,400 21
MILK RECEIPTS.
Since the opening of the Scranton Division, July 1, 1890, As stated in the last annual report, the rates on milk were
the anthracite tonnage and revenue, including coal received re-adjusted in accordance with a decision of the Inter-State
from the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company at Sidney, Commerce Commission, then recently rendered. While such
has been in each of the following years :
rates were established, on the basis of the old uniform rate
R et Tons.
Revenue. of thirty-two cents per can, as the maximum rate to be
1891
.................................................
811.185
$782,218 29 charged for the longest distance, a considerable reduction
1892
................................................. 1,120,416
1,126,456 77
1893
................................................. 1,352,225
1.436,539 53 on the shorter hauls was made, which it was intended should
1894
.................................................. 1.612.063
1,753,874 34 benefit the shippers located in near-by districts. These re­
1895
................................................. 1,715,991
1,581.227 29 ductions in the freight rate have not enhanced the price of
1896
................................................. 1,673,861
1,588.424 3« the commodity, so far as the farming community is con­
1897
................................................. 1,653,51-6
1,722,936 43
For example, while the rate on milk shipped by rail
1898
...........................
1,605,508
1,666,242 17 cerned.
from Orange
from thirty-two
Within the last year the final payments on account of car to twenty-six County stations was reducedquart received by
can, the price per
trust indebtedness have been made, with the exception of the farmer hascents perno material increase. The prices re­
shown
three notes held by the Guaranty Trust Company and ma­
the months
June in the years
turing August 15, 1898, (since paid), November 15, and Feb­ ceived for and 1898 haveof April, May and an Orange County
1896, 1897
been
ruary 15, 1899, amounting in the aggregate to $17,500, when shipper, and were as follows: furnished by
the last car trust obligation of the Company will have been
1896.
1897.
'1898.
discharged.
April......... l-k-l'a
l ’a-lSi
On or after June 1st, 1899, the Company lias the right to May..........m o ts. ct8. per qt. l^scta. cts. per qt. l ’a-1%2 cts. per qt.
“ “
“ “
“ “ “
pay off or refund by issue of its four per cent bonds $5,“
“ “ 1% “ “ “
006,000 of Consolidated First Mortgage five per cent bonds. June..........lb -lk i cts. “ “
This matter is now having the careful consideration of the It is too often assumed that a panacea for the ills of the
Board, and will be carried through when such a price for shipper may be found in the reduction of the rate he pays
the fours can be had as, in the judgment of the Directors, the railway for transporting his product. Experience shows
they should and are likely in the near future to command. that the reduction is in most cases absorbed by the middle
No bonds have been issued or disposed of during the last man or consumer and that the producer fails to derive any
great benefit from such concessions, while the loss tails
fiscal year.
The contract with the Adams Express Company having entirely upon the carrier. Upon the prosperity of the agri­
expired, a new agreement, taking effect July 1st, was en­ culturalist depends, in great measure, the financial success
tered into for a period of five years, and thereafter to con­ of the railway, and all proper concessions which the railway
tinue until one year's notice shall be given, by either party company can extend to the farming community along its
lines are as a rale cheerfully made, because their interests
to the agreement, of its termination.
The Sleeping and Drawing-room Car contract with the are identical, and it is an elementary business proposition
Pullman Company terminated March 31st, 1898. A new that facilities and rates which promote the prosperity of the

ftepcrrts and Hcrcumeuts.

1 J4

486

THE CHRONICLE.

skipper also benefit the carrier to an appreciable extent.
These conditions apply to other branches of traffics as well ns
to milk. Uniform and just rates, giving no advantages what­
ever to favored shippers, are of paramount importance, but
the continual reduction of freight rates is of no material ad­
vantage to the shipper, simplv because the agents, factors,
middlemen or consumers at the other end of the line are in­
dividually or collectively astute enough to absorb the
amount of such reduction, or as much of it as possible. This
has been the case heretofore and is likely to continue to be
so in the future.
The constantly increasing demand for milk shipped in
bottles instead of cans, and the higher freight paid on
bottled milk, are conditions which promi-e to reimburse the
carrying companies to some extent for the reduction made
in the can rate. The superior quality of the milk produced
in the country tributary to the main liue and branches of
your company, and the untiring attention given to the
"development of this traffic by the freight department a d
operating officials, promise a continuation of the satisfac­
tory growth of this branch of traffic.
C O A L T R A F F IC .
Again this year it is necessary to report extreme depres­
sion in the anthracite coal trade, and consequently coal
traffic earnings do not show that improvement which your
officers had hoped to be able to place before you. For the
first time in more than a decade the consumption of
anthracite coal is not likely to show a material increase.
It is believed by many well-informed persons, who are
familiar with the trade,"that these conditions are temporary
and that there will he a revival of the demand and an im­
provement in prices with a return of prosperity in other
fields; that economy in t he domestic uses of anthracite is to
be looked for when in other branches of business unusual
depression has led to similar conditions. On the other
hand, there are also experienced and intelligent people who
hold the view that the increasing use of bituminous coals,
gas oil and electricity for domestic and business purposes
has introduced a new factor of a most serious cbaracter,
which the anthracite trade must promptly take steps to
combat or the future is dark indeed for this great industry.
The usual panacea has already been suggested, viz., a re­
duction of the freight rate. It is claimed that it is mani­
festly unfair to charge higher rates for transporting anthra­
cite coal to the markets than are charged for hauling
bituminous coal.
The earnings and details of the anthracite coal traffic have
been very clearly presented by the General Manager, in this,
as well as in former reports. The gross earnings from this
branch of the Company's traffic may be said to have aver­
aged under seven mills per ton per mile, from the time the
Scranton Division was opened until the present time. It
must be borne in mind that all coal traffic is one-way busi­
ness, that is, the coal trains earn nothing whatever when
returning from the markets to the mines, 'it may be stated
as a further proposition that were the rates paid for hauling
bituminous coal applied to anthracite, this Company would
he one of those which would be obliged to retire from this
branch of business, as it could not profitably haul coal to
tide-water or other points at a rate of three mills per ton per
mile or even less. The railways which regulate the prices
of bituminous coal at tide-water and other markets haul
large trains over low-grade lines to comparatively inexpen­
sive terminal points, spell as Norfolk, Ya,, for instance.
The rates are abnormally low and the roads doing the busi­
ness are not conspicuously prosperous.
Bituminous coals are mined in various localities through­
out the United States, easily accessible from the seaports
and great manufacturing centres. Competition.is keen and
the condition of the trade for a number of years has been
unprofitable, and at times almost lamentable. Neither the
owner of the fee, the operator or the miner have been at
any time within the last ten or twelve years upon a basis
even approaching prosperity. The old remedy of low rates
has been applied with caustic severity; but without avail.
To apply these conditions to the anthracite trade could in
no way benefit the mine owner or operator. It is manifestly
unreasonable to assume that the rail rate can be lowered
and the high royalty and comparatively high price received
for coal at the breaker at the same time be retained. The
very low price received for bituminous coal at the mine,
sometimes as low as sixty or seventy cents per ton, would
not be possible in the case of the individual or Company
operating an anthracite breaker, and yet it is clear that in
order to compete with bituminous coal on equal terms, in
the New England and other manufacturing markets, not
only the rail rate but the cost at the mines must be reduced
to the prices ruling on the bituminous product. The objec­
tive point, the end to be arrived at, should be an increase
in the freight rates on bituminous coal to a reasonably
profitable point and not the reduction of the anthracite
rate to the ruinous bituminous basis.
Aside from these considerations, there is no reason why
the rate for hauling anthracite coal should be as low as the
rate on bituminous coal, or lower than the present anthra­
cite rates. The train loads are necessarily much lighter
than those of the bituminous carrying railways, as all
anthracite producing mines in this section of the country
are located in the deep valleys of the State of Pennsylvania,
and various summits and heavy gradients are encountered
in moving the product of the mines to the markets. The

[V ol,

LXVII.

actual transportation cost is therefore heavier than it is on
many of the low-grade bituminous roads, over some of
which fifty-car trains may be hauled. In the anthracite
trade there are known nearly a dozen varieties or sizes,
while there is no sizing or grading of bituminous.
Soft coal is carried long distances, usually at regular inter­
vals under contracts for large quantities, entered into at the
beginning of each year. As ibis generally run of mine coal
which is dealt in, unassorted and unclassified, trains no not
need to be broken up or divided in order to get a particular
size, nor need there be any storing or side-tracking. There
is consequently much less switching and shunting, and cars
are unloaded and returned much more promptly.
Each of these sizes of anthracite must be taken from
chutes when the breaker is running and loaded into, and
carried in separate cars, and side-tracked or stored until
wanted. At different seasons of the year certain sizes are in
demand while other sizes may have" no market whatever.
Those sizes not required are dumped into storage places and
thus remain until it is possible to dispose of them ; or such
sizes are carried in cars which are side-tracked sometimes
for months at a time. As a car, in which twenty-two tons
on the average can be carried, costs in the neighborhood of
five hundred dollars, and as these cars are held on tracks,
the average cost of which cannot be far from fifteen thous­
and dollars a mile, it will be seen that the accumulation of
interest and cost increases at a somewhat alarming ratio.
When carried at storage places, the re-handling, interest on
cost of an expensive plant, and maintenance, constitute a
very serious item of expense, all of which is borne by the
railway company.
All of these facilities are provided, and services are in­
cluded in the freight rate paid.
It is also manifestly unfair to compare tin; freight rates
paid for hauling and handling anthracite and bituminous
coals without giving prominence to the fact that in the
anthracite trade the custom is to deal with long or gross
tons of 2,240 pounds, whilst generally in the bituminous
trade only short tons are known. This difference will aver­
age four thousand eight hundred pounds weight on every
twenty tons carried in a coal car.
It will thus be seen that the somewhat peculiar and com­
plicated relations existing between the transportation com­
pany and the shipper in this particular branch of traffic
result in putting the railway company in the position of
having to render services not only as common carrier, but
also as warehouseman, factor, and sometimes as financial
agent.
The amount of capital required by an anthracite coalcarrying railroad company to enable it to compete success­
fully with other railway companies in the same territory, is
therefore much in excess of the funds necessary merely to
construct and equip a line of railway. It is also a difficult
task to introduce and find markets for the anthracite coals
of a newly opened line. If an anthracite trade is to be
conducted successfully and profitably, it is necessary to be
able to reach the Northern and Western markets, as well as
the tide water and Eastern consumer and costly and exten­
sive terminals are required on the Great Lakes, as well as at
tide-water points, and barges and vessels must be built or
controlled, in the proper conduct of the business.
The market value of the article transported bears, some
proper relation to the rate charged for carrying and caring
for it. One must consider whether the rate charged is rea­
sonable for the services performed and cannot justly com­
plain because it may cost more to ship a bale of silk a cer­
tain distance than it does a box of boots. That the rate on
anthracite coal is a reasonable rate there can be no doubt.
In fact, that question has once already been passed upon by
the Inter-State Commerce Commission and the Courts. The
shipper undoubtedly would be entirely content to pay even a
higher than the prevailing rate, as he has done in the past,
provided he could realize more for his product at the mine.
The price at the breaker and the freight rate are insep­
arable factors, dependent one upon the other, and properly
so. It is well known that in no other portion of the globe
are freight and passenger rates so low as they are in this
country, and there are no people anywhere who get the best
of fuel at a costo slow. It may be authoritatively stated
that last year the rates obtained by the London & North­
western Railway of England for all coal handled
over its lines averaged one and a quarter cents per
ton per mile. The average distance was, no doubt,
quite equal to the rail haul of anthracite coal to tide­
water points and lake ports, It is undeniably true
that competition reduces but never enhances the market
price of a commodity or the rate for carrying it. It must
likewise be admitted that there are to-day engaged in
the anthracite carrying trade too many lines competing
sharply with each other for the traffic offered. In other
words, there has not only been over-production in the out­
put of the mines but in transportation facilities as well.
The only possible remedy would seem to lie in the direction
of the proper control of the product and its curtailment to
the requirements of the trade. Such co-operation, if earn­
est and honest, would probably lead to and secure to the
producer reasonable prices and profits, and to the transpor­
tation companies fair and stable rates. The officers of
this Company have at all times and in all seasons, expressed
their willingness, even anxiety, to co-operate for these praise­
worthy and desirable ends. As an indication that the an-

THE CHRONICLE.

S eptember 3, I818.J

tliracite coal traffic is unduly profitable, the operations of the
New York Ontario & Western Railway in this particular
field are frequently referred to. It may be proper to state
in view of these assertions that the construction of the
Scranton Division involved the building of only fifty-four
miles of line. It connected with the upper coal field of
Pennsylvania, three hundred and twenty-five miles of main
line, which had for many years been in active operation
and which are admirably located for reaching the anthra­
cite markets, via the lakes and tide-water, as well as at
other interior rail and water points. As an entirely
new operation from the coal fields to the markets
it could have offered no inducement to either the
capitalist or experienced railway promoter, and in fact
could not as such have been built. It is not denied, on the
contrary it has repeatedly been asserted in these reports and
elsewhere, that the construction of the Scranton branch has
been a profitable operation for your company and seems
likely to continue so, but only in connection with its then
existing line and the natural advantages it possesses for
reaching markets for other commodities than anthracite in
all directions.
It is again a pleasant duty to state that all employes of
the company have continued throughout the year to dis­
charge their various duties in a faithful, efficient and satis­
factory manner.
Bv order of the Board.
THOMAS P. FOWLER,
President,
U N ITED

STA TES MORTGAGE
COM PANY.

&

TRUST

APPLICATION TO LIST REAL ESTATE FIRST MORT­
GAGE COLLATERAL TRUST BONDS ON THE NEW
YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.

New York, June 18, 1898.

The United States Mortgage & Trust Company, a corpora­
tion duly organized under the laws of the State of New
York, respectfully begs to make application to list
its $5,000,000 First Mortgage Trust Gold Bonds, and submits
herewith a certified copy of its charter and by-laws, which
shows in Section 2, Subdivisions 1 and 2, the authority of
this company to loan money on bond and mortgage and to
issue its bonds against such security, as follows :
Se c t io n 2. -1 . “ To loan money on bond and mortgage on real estate
situated within the United States, or upon the hypothecation of such
real estate, or upon the hypothecation of bonds and mortgages on
such real estate, for any period of credit, and repayable by w ay of an­
nuity or otherwise.”
2. “To Issue bonds of said company, and to sell and dispose thereof;
but the amount of such bonds outstanding at any time shall not ex­
ceed the amount of moneys then ow ing to the said company upon the
loans aforesaid; and such bonds may be payable to bearer, or may be
registered bonds.”

In pursuance of such authority the company has loaned
$5,109,264 on first mortgage and has issued against these
mortgages $5,000,000 of its bonds. These bonds are the direct
obligation of the company, and are additionally secured by
the deposit with the Guaranty Trust Company of New York,
trustee, of at least an equal amount of first mortgages on
improved income-producing real estate in selected cities of
the United States. Herewith is presented the certificate of
the Guaranty Trust Company of New York, trustee, stating
that these underlying mortgages have been duly deposited
and assigned to it, together with all necessary certificates
as to title, recording of mortgage, insurance policies as­
signed, etc., etc. The amount of insurance so deposited
with the Guaranty Trust Company of New York in connec­
tion with these mortgages aggregates $4,161,125, or 81 per
cent of the total amount loaned.
At and after the duly authorized date options of redemp
tion of bonds at par and interest may be exercised by giv­
ing thirty days' prior notice to all registered holders of
bonds, and by making a public advertisement once a week
for four weeks previous to the date of call.
The issuance of mortgage trust bonds by this company is
limited by Article XV of the by-laws to ten times the
amount of the capital and surplus, which now amounts to
$3,250,1 00.
In case foreclosure of any loan becomes necessary, it is
withdrawn from the Guaranty Trust Company of New
York, trustee, and other mortgages to an equal amount
substituted therefor.
These bonds are issued in following series:
Series B --$1,600,000, 5 per cent, 5-20 years, dated May 1, 1891, re­
deemable 189 1 , due 1914: interest dates, M ay 1 and November 1:
denominations $1,000. $500 and $100: numbered from A l t o A d S l
for $1,01,0 each, B l , 2 and 4 to B72 for $500 each, C3 to C37 for $100
,
each.
Series U—$1,000,000 5 p er cent, 5-20 years, dated A p ril 1,1895, redeemarde lfloo. due 1915; interest dates, April L and October 1; de­
nominations, $ l,0 i0 , $500 and $100; numbered from A l t o A 9 9 3 for
$1,000 each, B l to B9 for $100 e a o b .f i to C 2 2 andC 24to C26 for $100
each.
Series D —$1,000,000 4 per cent. 5-20 years, dated January 1, 1896,
redeemable 1901, due 1916 ; interest dates January 1 and July 1; de­
nominations $l,00o, $500 and $ 00, numbered from A t to A997 for
$1,000 each, B 1 to B 1 for $500 each, C'l to CIO for $100 each.
Series E $1,009,000 4 per cent, 10-2o years, dated June 1.1897,
redeemable 1997, due 1917; interest dates June 1 aud December 1;
denomination $1,000, numbered from 1 to 1 ,0 0 0 for $1,000 each.
Series F $1,000,000 l per cent, 10-20 years, dated March 1, 1898,
redeem able 1908, due 1918; interest dates March 1 and September 1;
denomination $1,000, numbered from 1 to $1,000 for $1,000 eacb.

487

These bonds are severally secured by deeds of trust made
to the Guaranty Trust Company of New York, as trustee,
certified copies of which are herewith submitted. All bonds
are coupon bonds with privilege of registration as to princi­
pal only, or upon surrender of coupons thereto attached the
bonds may be registered as to both principal and interest.
The place of payment of alt bonds is the office of the com­
pany, No. 59 Cedar Street, New York, which is also the
place of registration and transfer.
These $5,000,000 bonds are originally secured by first
mortgages aggregating $5,109,264, and located in the fol­
lowing cities : No. o f
Loans. A m ount.

Oily.

Atlanta, G a ........ .
Augusta, G a ...... .
Bayonne, N. J — ..
Cleveland. Ohio.. .
Chicago, 111............. ..
Cincinnati, Ohio. .
Columbus, O h io.. .
Council Bluffs, la
Dayton, Ohio — .
Dulut , M inn---- .
Detroit, Mich — .
Denver. C ol........ .
Des Moines. la ... .
Ft Wayne, Ind . .
Houston, T e x ......... .
Indianapolis, Ind .
Jersey City. N. J. .
Kansas City, Mo. .

37
6
1
1
4
10
25
2
I
2
3
11
30
8
1
2
3
55

$
506,581
24,750
35,000
4,000
200,000
86,900
277,400
3,500
7,000
12,000
28,000
81M 00
142, *00
22,900
20,000
10,933
55, *>00
170,6 0

No. o f
Loans. A m ount.

City.

Louisville, K y ___ .
Lenox, M ass........ .
Keene, N . Y ......... .
Minneapolis. Minn.
N e w York, N . Y ...
O m a h a , N e b ......... .
Rock Island, 111...
Portland. O re ...... .
Peoria, 111 ............... .
St. Paul, M in n ___ .
Salt L ik e City, U . .
Seattle, W a s h .........
Spokane. W a s h ... .
Tacoma, W a s h ___ .
Toledo, O hio........ .
W ashington, D. C. .

1
1
1
7
1
58
1
14
6
20
19
18
4
1
41
6

53)00
30,000
12,000
69,800
120,000
143,900
30,000
665,500
30,900
173,800
137,250
460,000
194,500
12,000
569.200
26,900

401

5,109,264

The average amount of these several mortgage loans is
$12,741.
The properties covered by these mortgages have been ap­
praised by our local agents as follows :
Series B . Series C. Series!). SeriesE . Series F.

^
^
L an d ..................1,147,655
881,550 1,356,514 1,222,575 1,325,193
Buildings...........1,089,600 1,462,250 1,029,450 1,123,260
987,446
Total............ 2,237,255 2,343,800 2,385,994 2,315,835 2,312,639

All appraisals of land and buildings have been first made
by the local agents and the local advisory committee, and
have then beeen approved by the executive committee of
the company.
Under Section 17 of the Charter, loans must not exceed
two-thirds of the estimated value of the property.
The income showing of these properties from the latest,
statements is as follows :
Series B. Series 0. Series D. SeriesE .
$
155,783

Series F.
$
166,644

$
Gross rents........ 178,276
Taxes, insurance,
64,249
etc...................

$
157,490
45,015

43,559

50,972

49,949

Net income..
Interest on trust
bonds..............

114,027

112,475

112,224

105,472

116,695

50,000

50,000

45,000

40,000

40,000

Net surplus..

64,027

62,475

67,224

65,472

76,695

The total of these figures is as follows :

$
156,444

Bonds iSBued...............................................................
First mortgage securing sam e...... . .................................. .

$5,000,000
5 , 1 09,264

Properties covered by these mortgages are appraised as
follows:

L an d ........................................................................................ $5,933,517
Buildings...................................................................................
5,692,006
Total .................................................................................$11,625,523
Gross rental of all properties...............................................
$814,637
Taxes, Insurance, etc., all properties..................................
253,744
Net income, all p ro p e rtie s ...................................... .
Interest on bonds...................................................................

$560,893
225,000

Net surplus on all properties..........................................

$335,893

The last statement of the United States Mortgage &
Trust Company December 31, 1897, was as follows:
L iabilities.

A ft8Pt.fi

U. S. bonds............ ’ $1,890,000 00
N. Y. City bonds .
613,795 00
Otb. st’oks & bonds
840,179 22
Mortgages.............. 6,080,014 74
Loans, demand and
tim e .................... 4,468,713 64
Bills purchased___
52,515 66
Heal estate............
214,000 00
Foreign departm’t.
497,400 Of)
Acc’dint.receiv’ble
237,888 66
Cash on hand and
in bank...............
1,312,974 99

C ap ital................... $2,000,000 00
Surplus..................
1,250 000 00
Undivided profits..
143,158 71
Deposits................. 7,284,072 82
Mort. trust bon-ls
series A , B, C, D,
a n d E ............... ..
5,000.000 00
397,400 00
Foreign departin’t.
104,893 51
Acer’a int. p ay’ble.
27,956 87
Certified checks...

$16,207,481 91

$16,207,481 91

The officers of the company are as follows: George W.
Young, President; Luther Kountze, Vice-President: James
Timpson, Second Vice-President; Arthur Turnbull, Treas­
urer; Wm, P. Elliott, Secretary; Clark Williams, Assistant
Treasurer; Richard M. Hurd, Assistant Secretary.
The directors of the company are as follows : Samuel D.
Babcock, Frederick O. Barton, C. Ledyard Blair, Dumont
Clarke, Charles D. Dickey, William P. Dixon, David Dows,
Jr., Robert A. Granniss, George G. Haven, Jr., Charles R.
Henderson, James J. Hill, Gustav E. Kissel, Luther Kountze,
Charlton T. Lewis, Richard A. McCurdy, Theodore Morford,
Robert Olyphant, Charles M. Pratt, Eben B. Thomas, James
Timpson, George W. Young.
Respectfully yours,
_
By G. W. YOUNG, President.
J R. M. HURD, Assistant Secretary.
The committee recommended that the above-described
$5,000,000 Real Estate First Mortgage Collateral Trust Gold

488

THE CHRONICLE

Coupon Bonds. Series “B," “C," “D," “E " und “F” be ad­
mitted to the list.
Adopted by the Governing Committee, June 23, 1898.
SERIES “G" ALSO LISTED.
N ew Y ork , August 23,1898.

At a meeting held this day, the Committee on Stock List,
under authority from the 'Governing Committee, directed
that on August*36, the $1,000,000 Real Estate First Mortgage
Collateral trust Gold Coupon Bonds, series “ G," Nos. A1 to
A953 for $1,000. Bt to B81 for $300. 01 to C75 for $100 each,
to be added to bonds now listed, making total amount
listed at that date of series “ G,” $1,000,000, numbers as
above.
These $1,000,000 bonds are originally secured by first
mortgages aggregating $1,024,660.
The average amount of the several mortgage loans is
$12.-195.
The properties covered are appraised by the company's
own representative as follows :
Laud...... .
Buildings

$1,342,635
. 1,097,560

$2,440,195

3?he (&owmercM

COMM E RCI AL E P I T O M E .

F riday Night, Sept. 2, 1898.
The extreme hot weather experienced the past few days
has had a tendency to interrupt business operations to some
extent: still, trade conditions as a rule have been fairly satis­
factory, a moderate amount of merchandise changing hands.
The retail trade has been a fair buyer of supplies to cover its
wants for the fall season and in the main fair values
have been obtained. Reports received from the South
stating that some effort is being made to have planters hold
back their cotton at present low prices, has reoeived some
attention in the trade. A severe wind and rain storm was
reported at Savannah and immediate vicinity on Wednesday.
It did considerable damage to property. The Czar’s proposi­
tion for an international conference for the purpose ot ob­
taining real and lasting peace among the Powers has been a
topic o£ considerable interest during the week.
Slocks o f M erchandise.

Fire insurance amounts to $954,200 and the rental of the Park___________
Lxrd....................
properties is as follows :
Tobacco, domestic
Grogs income..................................................................................$182,750
Taxes. Insurance, repairs, oto....................................................... 51,-122
N etiucouie.....................
$131,328

Interest on Series G bonds amounts to $40,000.
Series G bonds are described as follows: $1,000,000, four
per cent, five-twenty years; dated August 1, 1898; redeem­
able 1908, due 1918; interest dates August 1 and February 1;
denominations of $1,000, $500 and $100. Option for the
redemption of the bonds, after five years, may be exercised
by giving thirty days’ prior notice to all holders of regis­
tered bonds, anil by making public advertisement once a
week for four weeks previous to the date of the call.
W all & C ortlandt Street Ferries Ry.—Fulton Wall
Street A Cortlandt Street Ferries RR.—New Company
Incorporated.—The Wall & Cortlandt Street Ferries Rail­
way Co. has been incorporated, with a capital stock of
$1,000,009, to succeed to the franchises of the Fulton Wall &
Cortlandt Street Ferries RR. Co., sold under foreclosure last
week. Tne directors are F. D. Moffat, Charles Base, K, S.
Hogg, E. L. Conant, H. W. Bean. M. E. Gill and J. P. Shef­
field, of this city. A deficiency judgment for $573,318 has
been entered by the Central Trust Co. against the company
foreclosed, to represent the amount remaining due on the
mortgage. The franchise provides, it is understood, for a
street railroad running as follows :

[Voi», LXVII,

Tobacco, foreign.. ...........bales.
Coffee, Rio............
0 1 tree, other........
Ooffee, Java, & a...
Sugar...................
Sugar................... ........ ..hhds.
idolasses, foreign
aides................. .............. No.
Gorton.................
Rosin.............. ...... ........... .bbla.
Solrita turpentine ............bbls.
Tar.......................
Ktoa, E. I ..............
Rice, domestic__
Linseed...._____
Saltpetre............
Jute butts.............
Mualia hemp........
Sisal hemp........... bbls. & sacks
Flour....................

I,
1898.
18,461
11,305
15,300
3,400
532.204
82,500
105,753
1,165
369.002
None.>
71,40
52,015
44,523
1,420
1,159
6,(i 00
1,400
None.
None.
12,535
79,152
75,«00

Sept.

1,
1898.
20,831
16,453
15,144
3,211
507,248
92.013
109.491
9,249
605,936
None.
36,400
93,242
34,367
1,428
1.448
22,000
630
None.
6,400
None.
9,325
59,060
58,600

A ug.

Sept. 1,

1897.
12,667
15.245
15,909
2,225
417,085
141,181
81,482
3,040
1,055,224
None.
52,600
39.714
35,850
2,119
1,040
5,100
510
None.
21,300
1,000
27,494
5,096
68,300

Lard on the spot has had a fair shipping demand at the
West, and locally there has been a moderate export demand
from' the West ‘indies. The tone of the market has been
steady, and changes in prices have bsen unimportant, closing
at5'35e. for prime Western and 5'lOc. for prime City. Refinedlard has been quiet, closing at 5'60c. for refined for the
Continent. The speculation in lard for future delivery has
been quiet, and the tone has been unsettled, closing easy in
sympathy with a decline in corn.
DAILY CLOSING PRICES OF LARD FUTURES.

Sat. M on. Tuns. Wed. Thiers. F ri.
From Fulton Ferry through South Street, Maiden Lane and Cort­
landtreturning West Street, thence alongtothe latter to LibertyMaiden September delivery..in fair demand for export37 the35West5'32
Street to through Liberty Street its junction with Street, Pork has been .0. o-37 5-50 5"50 5 to 5
In­
and
Lane. William andthe Wall StreetBroadway Cortlandt Street Ferry, via dies bat at easier prices, closing at $9(39 50 for mess. CatWall, Also from Fine Streets, Ferry to and Cortlandt Street.
Rumors unconfirmed, but not lacking in probability, have meats also have had a fair sale to the West Indies and

suggested that the Metropolitan Street Ry. Co. will pres­
ently be found in control.—V. 67, p. 428.
West Jersey & Seashore RR.—$367,008 Stock Offered at
Par to Shareh'- Iders.—‘‘ To provide a portion of tlie money
required to pay for double-tracking the line to Atlantic City,”
the holders of "the common capital stock are offered the priv­
ilege of subscribing at par for new stock to the amount of 8
per cent of their holdings as registered on the books of the
company at 3 P. M. Aug. 20, 1898. The subscriptions muBtbe
made between Sept. 1 and Sept. 15, inclusive, and payment
must he made in full on or before Sept. 15, 1898. Receipts
will be given exchangeable for new stock on or after Oct.
15, 1S98. Shareholders entitled to a fraction of a share may
subscribe for a full share. The new issue will amount to
$367,008, and wilt increase the outstanding issue from 84,587,600 to $4,955,608.—V. 66, p. 055.
W heeling <fc Lake E rie Ry.—Coupon Payments.—On next
Thursday interest payments will be beguu of two past-due
coupons—a full year’s'interest—on all three issues of Wheel­
ing & Lake Erie bonds underlying the consols. These pay­
ments will be as follows:
Zoan .
Coupons.
1‘aid, at
Lake Erie Division 5a, Oct,, 189!. and April, 1898, Mercantile IT. Oo.
WeeeUug Division 5s, July, 1897, and Aug., 1897, Central Tr. Co.
Extension 276. imp. 5s, Fell., 1897, and Jan., 1898, Central Tr. Co.
—V. 67, p. and

W ilkcsbarre & N orthern RR.—Sold.—This property, it is
stated, has been sold by the Anthracite Savings Bank, as
mortgage trustee, to J. W. Hollenback, E. Troxell, John
Graham, John A. Schmidtt, George R. Bedford, Pierce But­
ler and Thomas A. Barber. The motive power is being
changed from steam to electricity, per plan in V, 66, p. 1190,
York Southern RR.—Hew Officers —President W. F. W al­
worth of Cleveland, O., resigned Aug. 27, and D. F. Lafean
of York was elected as hi3 successor. The other directors
elected are H. H. Weber, C. H. Dempwolf, H. C. Niles of
York and George K. McGaw, C. I. Nes and M. H. House­
man. Messrs. Niles, Nes and Houseman hold over from the
former board. Pennsylvania RR. interests were recently
negotiating for control, but the present election leaves it
doubtful to what system, if any, the control has passed,—V.
67, p. 224.1

at steady prices. Tallow has been quiet but steady at 3jg'c.
Cotton seed oil has been easier at 22>4@32^o. for prime
yellow. Batter and cheese have been quiet but steady.
Fresh eggs closed barely steady.
Brazil grades of coffee have had only a limited distributing
sale, but values have held steady. The market for invoices
has been moderately active, business having been transacted
on a cost and freight basis. Rio No. 7 on the spot closed
steady at 6 7-16c. TheWe3t India growths have been firm
bnt quiet, closing at 9>£c. for good Cucuta. East India
growths have been quiet at 24J§@23c, for standard JavaSpeculation in the market for contracts has been quiet and
prices have weakened slightly in response to easier foreign
advices.
Following are final asking prices:
Sept...................5*55o. I Deo................ 5’85o. f May................. 6*20o.
Oct.................... 5*G5o. 1Mar................... 610o. I July................... 6 35o.
Nov................... 5 ()0o. Jan........ ......... 5*90o.

Raw sugars have been active and higher, closing firm at
4%o. for centrifugals, 96 deg. test, and 8 13 18e. for musco­
vado 89-deg. test- Refined sugar has been in demand and
1 16c, higher, closing at 5 7-16c. for granulated. Other
groceries have been steady to firm.
Kentucky tobacco has been sparingly offered locally and
prices have been firm. Seed leaf tobacco has had only a
limited sale. Business for the week amounted to about 1,050
cases,
The market for Straits tin has been easier in response to
weaker foreign advices. The close .was steadier at 1Q'10@
16’15c. Ingot copper has continued in active demand and
firm, closing at 12t£6. for Lake. Lead has been quiet but
steady, closing at 4'l( @4’)5c. for domestic. Spelter lias been
firm but quiet at 4 75@4-80c. for domestic. Pig iron has had
a good, sale at steady prices, closing at $9 75@11 50 for
domestic.
Refined petroleum has been unchanged, closing at 6’50e. in
hbls., 4c. in bulk and 7-15c. in cases ; naphtha unchanged at
6c. Crude certificates have been steady, closing at turpen­>
99j@e,
credit balances have been unchanged at $1. Spirits
tine has been firmer bnt quiet at 28t£@30c, Rosins have
been dull and lower at $1 27J£@ 1 30 for common and good
a'rained. Wool has been dull but steady. Hops have been
firm but quiet.

THE CHRONICLE.

bEPTEMBER 3, 1898.]
C

O

T

T

O

N

489

in addition to aoove exports, our telegrams to-night also

.

give us
folio wing amounts
on shipboard,
F riday N ig h t , September 2, 1898. - cleared, the the ports named. of cotton similar figures not
at
We add
for
T he M ovement op th e Crop , as indicated by our telegrams New York, waioh are prepared tor our special use by Messrs.
from the South to-night, is given below. For the week ending

this evening the total receipts have reached 32,231 bales, Lamberts Barrows, Produce Exchange Building.
ON SHIPBOARD, NOT
M Ragainst 40,273 bales last week and 8.873 bales the previous
week, making the total receipts since the 1st of Sept., 1898
Great France. Other Coast­
Sept. 2 of
11,396 bales, against 20,310 bales for the same period of
B rita in .
Foreign wise Total.
1397,showinga decrease since Sept. 1,1898,of 9,114 bales.
New Orleans... 3,153 None. 1,732 None.
Receipts at— Sat.

Mon. Tucs. Wed. Thurs. Fri.

Galveston........ 4.492
loidl. Savannah........ None.
Charleston...... None.
19,196 Mobile............. None.
5.-237 Norfolk............ None.
100
New YQrk......
355 Other ports__ 1,000
3,843 Total 1898... 8.748
Total 1897... 5,135
...... Total 1896... 35,659
952

460
None.
None.
None.
None.
15
None.
475
3,130
7,249

1.835
None.
None.
None.
1,000
3,753
700
9,017
2,50
16,5*n2

L eaving

stock.

1,M)0 4,883 52,746
19,234
None. ,8.28 7 10,958
50 None.
50
3,SOO
None. None.
5,620
1,500 2,500
1,577
None. 3,865 48,530
None. 1,700 12,371
3 050 2L.290 154,836
1,898
12,635 74,332
w.8^9
6«,30-< 191,033

Galveston........ 2,364 792 1,992 6,884 2,919 4,245
......... ......
Tex. City, Ac. ...... ...... ......
New Orleans... 1,031 927 934 1,609 102 634
Mobile..............
86 53 30 62 23
96
Savannah......... 189 1,013 401 196 668 1,343
.....
Brans w’k, Ac. ...... ...... ...... ......
Charleston.......
41 332 161 143 123 102
Speculation in cotton for tuture delivery has been quiet.
Pt. Royal,Ac. ...... ...... ...... ..... ..... .....
Wilmington—
20 15 16 59 38 42 . 190 Both buyers and sellers have shown little disposition to
make new ventures, holding back awaiting developments.
45 1,132 The tone of the mar ket has held steady and during the latter
17 279 571,
31
Norfolk............
189
part of the week prices hardened a few punts on buying by
The les3
crop
ICO
100 local shorts tothecover contracts. and somefavorableefforts
Atlantic States
talk of
45 367 150 222 219 1,178 accounts from
Boston.............. 175
being made among planters to hold cotton back had a tend­
Baltimore........ ...... ...... ...... ..... ..... ......
33
3
Philadel’a, <feo..
31
67 ency to create a desire among bear operators to reduce their
outstanding engagements. Saturday there was a dull
Tot. this week 4.136 3.321 4,044 9,353 4.738 6,658 32,250 ■ but steady market. Monday prices weakened a few points

The following shows the week’s total receipts,the total since early in the day in response to easier foreign advices. Subse­
Sept. 1,1898, and the stock to-night, compared with last year. quently, however, heavy rains reported in the Atlantic States
stimulated some buying and the early loss was recovered.
Slock.
1897.
1898.
Tnesday the market again opened lower. Foreign advices
Receipts to This Since Sep. This Since ep.
were disappointing
orders. Bear
ept. 2. week. 1, 1898. week. 1, 1897. 1898.
1897. operators, however, and brought a few sellinggenerally hold­
were not aggressive, th -y
awaiting
Daring the latter
of
Galveston... I9,l9q 7,164 21,865 11,437 27,521 19,333 ing back the tone developments. The weekly report partthe
th9 day
was steadier.
by
279
279
Government's
Bureau was considered unfavorable
736 20,167 3,861 57,634 6,034 and oontinuedWeatherrains were reported in the Atlantic
New Orleans 5,237
heavy
90 469
313 5,620 1.751 States; this stimulated some baying by shorts to cover con­
Mobile........
355
tracts. The close showed prices 2 to 3 points higher for
Savannah... 3.8431 2,011 4,809 2,769 10,958 10,232 the day. Wednesday there was a quiet market and
150
150
150 under the favorable crop accounts from Texas and
960 3,850 2,174 the Mississippi Valley prices eased off 1 to 3 points. Thurs­
Charleston..
952
225 1,566
........
........ ........
P. Royal, Ac.
...... day the trading was more active. Both foreign and local
340 5,983
190
80 414
Wilmington.
548 shorts were moderate buyers to cover contracts, and there
was considerable buying by a Wall Street commission house.
113 4,077
Norfolk...... 1,132
616 123
103 Prices showed an advance for the day of 8 to 9 points. To­
day the market was easier. There was some selling for foreign
79
79
52,395 43,914 account, and during the afternoon there was some selling by
New York...
100
Boston........ 1,178
441 149
149 4,000 1,20»> local account, prompted by a free movement of the cr»p in
1,500
Baltimore..
60
po
170 the interior. The close was quiet, with prices 6 to 7 points
33 136 ........
2,588 1,359 lower for the day. The spot market has been quiet; prices
Phlladel.Ao.
67
116c. on
Totals....... 32,250 11,396 50,271 20,510 176,126 86,997 advancedat 5 13-16c.Thursday. The close was quiet and un­
changed
for middling uplands.
In order that comparison may be made with other years, On the basis of the rates on and off middling as established
by the Revision Committee, the prices for a few of the
we give below the totals at leading ports for six seasons.
U tceiptt a t— 1898. 1897. 1896. 1895.
1894. 1893. grades would be as follows:
8

8

G a lv e s 'ii, dec.
19,196 22,144 42,357 3,575 13,994 7,657
New Orleans 5,237 20,167 27,537 6,515 7,933 6,479
Mobile.........
355
469 3,428
329
828 1,270
•avannah... 3,843 4,809 20,649 3,431 10,396 9,629
Ghaa’ton, Ac.
952 1,566 10,200
677 3,309
332
Wllm’ton, Ac
190
414 6,179
552
36
107
Norfolk....... 1,132
128 5,634
16
689 1,418
N. News, &o.
15
79
193
71
65
Ail others... 1,345
664
630 1,160
495
444
Tot. this wk. 32,250 50,271 116,890 15,093 38,396 28,117
S in c e Sept. 1
11,396 20,510 62,207 13,802 33,396 31,168

The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total
of 31,815 bales, of which 35,693 were to Great Britain, 650
to France and 5,472 to the rest of the Continent. Below
are the exports for the week and since Sept. 1, 1898.
from—
G a lveston ......

Tex. City, Ao..
N ew O rlean s..
M obile............
Pen sacola......
Savannah.......
B runsw ick___
Charleston___
P o rt R oyal —
W ilm in g to n ...
N o rfo lk ..........
N ’port N., Ac..
N ew Y o rk ......
B o s to n .........
B altim ore......
P h iladelph ia..
•an Fran.. Ac.

Week Ending Sept. 2, 1808. From Sept. 1,1806, to Sept. 2, 1808.
Exported to—________ _________ Exported to—__________
Great France Conti­ Total Great .France Conti­ Totai
Brit'n.
nent. Week. Britain.
nent.
______

17,705

2,823

8,017

0,913

0,918

5,310

S a t.

GULF.

S T A IN E D .

4k
S 6 is
5k

4k
55.6
5k

67,«

67,.

67.6

6

6

67K

6

6

49te
5k
5 Isis
61,6
6k

Fn.
59 8
4
5.3,6

s4e

M o il T n e . W e d

Th.

F r l.

4k
5*18

5k

5k
<Bi 8

4%
59is

4%
5»is

6

6

6k
6 »is 6 l i is
61*

S a t.

Low M iddling...........................
M iddling............ . .....................
Strict M iddling........................
Good Middling Tin ged ............

4k
56, „
5%

5«,s
5k

S a t.

Dow M iddling..........................
M iddling...................................
Good M iddling.........................
Middling F a ir................. .........

IWon T n e» W e d T il.

4k

55i517,3
5%

4k

55|a
517,
5k

6 l ie
6 6 ,6
6k
« 11 (. 6 k

6

6k

6111 a
qm

W ed T h .

4k
56,6

4*1*
5H

M on T

418

4k
5 »,.

6

4k
56,6
517j3 5 k ;
5k
5k

6 » ,6
6k

F rl.
43.6
5k

519*? 519S3
5131 513.6
6

The quotations for middling upland at New York on
Sept. 2 for each of the past 32 years have been as follows. -

...0.127S 1874
1882. .......12% 1873. ...c.lbei
1898. ... 0 . 513,6 1890 ...0.11
1881.
1389.
1897. ■ —
1880. .......1113,6 1872. .......19%
1896. .... 713ie 1887.
86„ 1888.
1871.
1879. .......12*6 1870. .......I97s
1895.
1878 .......12‘16
1894. ..... 83,6 1886. ....... 93,6 1877. .......11
. . 67g
1893. ..... 778 1884. ..... lOifi 1876. .......1178 1869.
1885. .......1078
1868.
1892. .... 8*3
1875. ...... 14k 1867. .......27
1891. .... 7k 1883.
N
.—On Oot. 1,1874, grades of ootton as quoted were changed
Aooordingto the new classification M iddling was on that day quoted
Ho. lower than Middling of the old classification.
ote

.....

SL?

017

MARKET AND SALES.
S po t M a r k e t
CLOSED.

1,700
2,581

T o t a i..........

25,003

M » 7 ....

e.sao

Total.

139 17,004

UPLANDS.
Good O rdinary........................
Dow M iddling...........................
M iddling...................................
Good M iddling.........................
Middling Fair......... .................

060

060
6.118

8,01.0

6.420
2,684

6.472 81,816
1,795 18.803

3,010
.......
.......

8,913
1.080

8,010
1.270

Qniet ...............
Q liet & steady.
Boeady___ _ ...
Q a ie t................
Steady at lie ad.
E asy.................

S te a d y .......
Qaiet < st’dy
fe

8,010

.....
3.074

F utures

12,923
8 080

Saturday ..
Monday..
T uesd ay...
Wednesday
Thursday..
F rid ay......
Tetal......

M arket
Closed.

Sa l k s

op

Sp o t A C o n t r a c t .

Ex­ Con- Con­
port. sum p. tract. Total.
725

D a l i . ..........
S te a d y ........
Q aiet...........
725

397
481
1,293
700
239
514
3,632

200
500
2,500
3,200

1 ,1 2 2

684
1,298

1 ,2 0 0

2,739
514
7,557 ’

THE CHRONICLE.

4 90

[VOL. LXV II.

Fotorf.s.—The highest, lowest and closing prices of AT the Interior Towns the movement—that is the receipts
Futures at New York are shown in the following table.
for the week and since September 1, the shipments for tha
week and the stocks to-night, and the same items for the
jorreaponding period of 1897—Is set out in detail below.

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0 *01

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’ Bast year’s figures are lor Columbia, 8. C.
1-4

1

by

cable and telegraph is as follows. Continental stocks, as w< 11
as those for Great Britain and the afloat are this week’s retarns and consequently all European figures are brought down
to Thursday evening. But to make the total the complete
figures for to-night (Sept. 3), we add the item of exports from
the United States including in it the exports of Friday only.

1898. 1897
1890 1895.
Stook at Liverpool......bales. 790,000 487,000 482,000 1,136,000
Stook at London.....................
5,000 3,000 3,000 8,000
Total Great Britain stook.
485,000 1,194,000
Stook at Hamburg............... 795,000 490,000 32.000 31.000
20,000 19.000
Stook at Bremen.................. 152,000 71.000 88.000 187.000
Stook at Amsterdam............
1,000 1,000 6,000 13.000
200
Stook at Botterdam...............
300
200
200
Stook at Havre.................... 140,000 82.000 140,000 337.000
at Antwerp..................
9,000 2,000 13.000 16.000
Stook at Marseilles................. 4,000 5,000 6,000 4,000
Stook
53.000 57.000 60,000
Stook at Barcelona................ 27,000 32.000 20.000 27.000
Stook at Genoa........................ 57,000 14.000 36.000
Stook at Trieste...................... 19,000
Total Continental stooke.. 429,300 282,200 396,200 7»7,2uu
Total European stooks
Indiaootton afloat tor Enrope 1,224,300 772,200 863,200 1,901,200
37.000 20,000 26,000 35.000
Amer.oottonafloattor Europe 72.000 36.000 51,000 23.000
Bgypt, Brazil,&o.,»tlt.f or E'pe 13.000 14.000 9,000 13.000
Stook in United States ports . 176,126 86,997 259,344 3 5 ,8 9 2
Stock In U. S. Interior towns.. lul,730 49,890 125,827 281,457
United States exports to-day. 7.755 3,674 13,014
T otal visible saD plj........... 1,631.911 932,701 1,307,385 2,289,549
Oltbeabove,totals ot Amorloan and other descriptions are as tollows:
A m e tK s a n —
Liverpool stook. -------bales. 710,000 376.000 357.000
Continental stooRs.................. 367,000 217.000 280.000 1,056,0C0
American afloat tor Europe— 72.000 30,000 51,000 615,000
23,000
United States stook................ 176,126 86,997 259,341 281,457
United States Interior to-day. 101,730 49,890 125,827 35,892
States exports Btooks. 7,755 3,074 13,014 ........
United
Total Amerloan............. 1,434,611 769,561 1,086,185 2,011,349
Matt Indian, Brazil, da —
Liverpool stock...................... 80,000 114,000 125,000 130,000
London stook..........................
5,000
3,000 3,000 8,000
Continental stooks................. 62,300 05,200 118,200 92,200
India afloat tor Europe......... 37,000 20,000 26,000 35,000
Egypt, Brazil, Ao„ afloat...... 13,000 14,000 9,000 13,000
Total Amerloan................1,431,911 213,200 281,200 278,200
Total East India, &o........ 197,300 769,561 1,088,185 2,011,349
Total visible supply........1,031,911
Middling Upland, Liverpool- 3if:ijd 982,701 1,387,385 2,289.5 49
42*^32d,
iSsod.
4J*d,
..........
Middling Upland, New York. 513,eo 51, «d,
8 I3 O.
76go.
Silo.
EgyptGood Brown, Liverpool
61*4.
68,a.
07sd.
8Md.
Pernv,Rough Liverpool..........
Good, Liverpool
53sd.
4133 d,
Broaoh Fine,
% d!
3632d.
4*sd. H isfl. 4 *331^
Tinnevelly Good, LlverpooL. 31532<l.
3 2 .0 0 0

4 »sd .

t y The imports into Continental ports the past week have
been 16,000 bales.
The above figures indicate an increase in the cotton in sight
to-night of 849,150 bales as compared with the same date
of 1897, a gain of 264,526 bales over the corresponding date
Of 1896 and a decrease of 657,638 bales from 1895.

The above totals show that the interior stocks have
increased during the week 269 bales, and are to-night 51,840
oales more than at the same period last year. The receipts at
all the towns have been 20,278 bales less than the same
week last year and since Sept. 1 they are 15,718 bales less
than for the same time in 1897.
Overland Movement for the W eek and Since S ept . 1.—
We give below a statement showing the overland movement
for the week and since Sept. 1, as made up from telegraphic
reports Friday night. The results for the week ending
Sept. 3 and since Sept. 1 in the last two years are as follows.
September 2.

1897.
1808.
Since Week. Since
Week. Sept. 1.
Sept. 1.

lAipped—
Via St. Louis............ ............
Via Cairo......................... —
Via Parker..... ...................—
Via Rook Island..................
Via Louisville.......................
Via Cincinnati......................
Via other routes, &o............
Total gross overland__
Jeduct shipments—
Overland to N. Y., Boston, &0—
Between Interior towns........
........
Inland, <fco.,from South........
Total to be deducted__
Leavlngtotal net overland*—
• Including movement by rail to Cauada.

1,968
130
75
172
2,351
474
" 2 4 2

716
1,635

........

190
23
226
5
32
108
584
209
287
496
88

The foregoing shows that the week’s net overland movemen t
this year has been 1,635 bales, against 88 bales for the
week In 1897, and that for the season to date the aggregate net
overland exhibits an excess over a year ago of 1,547 bales.
1897.
1898.
8mee Week, Since
Week. Sept. 1.
Sept. 1.
20,510
11,396
Eeoolpts at ports to Sept. 2........
88
1,635
get overland to Sept. 2................15,000
10,000
lontbern consumption to Sept. '2
35,598
23,031
Totalm arketed.......
4,927
500
Interior stooks In exoess.
Came Into slghtdnrlng week.
40,525
23,531
Total In sight Seyt. 2-----.....
4,037
North’nspInners tak’gs to Sept. 2
In B ight a n d S p in n ers’
T a kin g s.

THE CHRONICLE.

S eptember 3, 1898.J

491

(QUOTATIONS FOB MIDDLING COTTON AT OTHER MARKETS,— inch. The thermometer has averaged 80, ranging from 70
Below are closing quotations of middling cotton at Southern to 94
and other principal cotton markets for each day of the week. Corpus Christi, Texas.—We have had rain on two days of
the week, the rainfall reaching seventy-five hundredths of an
0LO8ING QUOTATIONS FOR MIDDLING OOTTON ON—
inch. The thermometer has ranged from 74 to 92, averag­
ing 79.
Sept. 2.
F ri
Tuss. Wednes. T huri.
M on.
Batur.
Weatherford, Texas.—We have had rain on three days dur­
57 l 6
57,8
G alveston. .
57l6
5718
5 !l«
5R8
ing the week, to the extent of forty-one hundredths of an
53
5%
53s
538
N e w Orleans
538
538
inch. The thermometer has averaged 79, the highest being
5k
5k
5k
5=18
M o b ile ........
5»,e
55ie
93 and the lowest 65.
5k
5k
5k
S avan n ah . .
54
5»ie
5*8
5
5
5
5
5
Charleston..
New Orleans, Louisiana.—Rain has fallen on five days of
5k
5k
5k
Wilmington.
54
54
5)4
the week, the precipitation being one inch and twenty-nine
55
5k
5k
N o rfo lk ......
5=8
54
55s
hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 81.
513l8
5%
5%
5k
5k
B oston........
5\
6
6
6
6
6
Shreveport, Louisiana.—Rain has fallen on two days of the
6
Baltim ore...
6
6
6 lt 6
6
6
Philadelphia
r -611
8
week, to the extent of seven hundredths of an inch. The
53*
5k
5%
5%
5716 ® k
Augusta......
5%
thermometer has ranged from 70 to 92, averaging 81.
538
538
5 6
>>1
Memphis___
5%
5=18
5%
Columbus, Mississippi.—There has been rain on three days
57,8
5h a
5b8
St. L ouis___
5 ‘1
6
57 is
5718
H o u sto n ___
571
6
57,8
5718
5718
5llS
of the week, the precipitation reaching nineteen hundredths
57l6
6
6
5k
5k
6
6
Cincinnati..
of an inch. Average thermometer 86; highest 98, lowest 70.
59,6
59,8
59,,
Louisville...
59,6
5*18
5’ 18
forty-eight hundredths.
The closing quotations to-day (Friday) at other importer,t August rainfall two inches andhas been no rain the past week.
L eland, Mississippi.—There
Southern markets were as follows.
The thermometer has averaged 79'4, the highest being 91 and
N a s h v ille ........
I Columbus, Miss 5
54
the lowest 69.
Ath en s.. . . . . . . .
54
N a to b e z . . . ....
53,
| E n fa u la ... . . . . .
54
Vickiburg, Mississippi.—It has rained on three days during
R a le ig h ........ .
Charlotte__ _ 5% 1Little R ook .... 5
54
the week, to the extent of ten hundredths of an inch. The
47jj
1M ontgom ery... 51,8-4 Shreveport____
Columbus. G a . 5 4
thermometer has averaged 80, ranging from 70 to 90,
the P lantations.— T h e following t a b le
Little Rock, Arkansas.—No rain during the
Indicates the actual movement each week from the plantation, thermometer has ranged from 70 to 94, averagingweek. The
82.
The figures do not include overland receipts nor Southen Helena, Arkansas.—Crops are spotted. Some are too rank
consumption; they are simply a statement of the week!) from an excess of rain, while others have not had enough
movement from the plantations of that part of the crop whicl moisture. Rain has fallen lightly on two days of the week,
finally reaches the market through the outports.
the precipitation being sixteen hundredths of an inch. Av­
erage thermometer 76, highest 84 and lowest 66. August
St'k at Interior Towns. Rec'ptsfrom PlanVnt rainfall three inches and fifty hundredths, on five days.
Week Receipts at tke Ports.
Ending — 1898. | 1897. 1896. 1898. 1897. 1896. 1898. 1897. 1896.
Memphis, Tennessee.—The weather has been favorable and
723 cotton is opening fast but picking is not general on account
9,728 3,20? 5.539 121,074 28,743 78,164
181
July 29 ..
2 4.930 119.85; 28,640 78,890 8,717 3,949 3,656 of the hot weather. Rain has fallen on two days of the
Aug. 5..... 10,534 4.0 >
9.820 13,027 week, to the extent of nine hundredths of an inch. The ther­
3 887 7,396 16.370 115,541 31,061 76,547
“ 12 ..
“ 19 ...
8.8-2 19,060 33,961 108,839 30,284 89,793 2,189 24,280 50,207 mometer has averaged 8J’C, the highest being 90'8 and the
August rainfall two inches and sixty-nine
“ 26 ... 20 273j 32,718 38,557 101.461 36,941 110,181 12,876 33,375 88,945 lowest 70.
M.271 116,890 101.730 49.890 125,827 33,519 04.220 132,536 hundredths.
Sept. 2
It
The above statement shows: l.—That the total recelpls Mobile, Alabama.—Crop reports are gloomy.rust, is claimed)
very serious damage has resulted from
rot, shed­
from the plantations since Sept. 1, 1898, are 11,590 bales; in that and worms. The week’s rainfall has been two inches
ding
1897 were 35.437 bales; in 1896 were 65,449 bales.
2.—That although the receipts at the outports the past week and seventy-six hundredths, on five days. The thermometer
73 to 90,
were 32,3)0 bales, the actual movement from plantations was has ranged from thirty-five averaging 80. August rainfall
hundredths.
32,519 bales, the balance going to increase stocks at Interior twelve inches and
towns. Last year receipts from the plantations for the week to Montgomery. Alabama.—Cotton crop reports are bad, owing
six weeks of almost continuous rain. All sorts of dam­
wore 64,210 bales and for 1896 they were 132,536 bales.
age to the crop are reported, and the Agricultural Commis­
sioner makes the condition at close of August 74. Rain has
Cotton Crop Circular.—Oar Annual Cotton Crop Review fallen on five days of the
will be ready in circular form about Thursday, Sept. 8. seventy five hundredths. week, to the extent of one inch and
Average thermometer 80, highest
Parties desiring the circular ia quantities, with their business 91, lowest 70. August rainfall seven inches and ninety-two
card printed thereon, should send in th9ir orders a3 soon as hundredths.
Selma, Alabama.—Cotton has been damaged considerably
possible, to ensure early delivery.
by continued rains. Too rapid growth is reported from bot­
Weather R eports by T elegraph.—Reports to ns by tele­ tom lands and the lower bolls are rotting on the stalk. Rust
on uplands. It
very
graph this eveniag from the South denote that rain has bean now on to makewill require crop. favorable weather from
average
Rain
quite general during the week, but in the Southwest the pre days of the week, an the extent of one inchhas fallen on four
to
and
cipitation wa3 as a rule moderate and beneficial. Along the hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 84,seventy-four
the highest
Atlantic and in portions of the Gulf States, however, the rain­ being 97 and the lowest 70.
Madison, Florida.—It
of the past
fall was excessive, especially so in sections of Georgia and week, the rainfall beinghas rained on each dayhundredths.
South Carolina. Damage from various causes is claimed in Thermometer averaged 82,two inches and ten92.
ranging from 72 to
Alabama and Georgia. Elsewhere the crop is doing well on Leesburg, Georgia.—Cotton rotting as a result of too muchthe whole and cotton is opening rapidly. Picking is being rain. The week’s precipitation has been five inches and
forty-three hundredths. The thermometer has ranged from
retarded to some extent by the hot weather.
to 88, averaging 73.
Galveston, Texas.—We have had rain on four days of the 68Savannah, Georgia.—There has been rain on each day dur­
week, the rainfall reaching one inch and sixty-five hun­ ing the week, the precipitation reaching fourteen inches and
dredths. The thermometer has averaged 82, ranging from thirty-four hundredths. Average temperature 78, highest 89
74 to 90.
Palestine, Texas.—There has been rain on two days during and lowest 69.
Augusta, Georgia.—There has been rain on each day during
the week, the precipitation being one inch and fifty-eight the week and the rainfall reached seven inches and twentyhundredths. The thermometer has ranged from 68 to 94, six hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 78, the high­
averaging 82.
being 86 and the
Huntsville, Texas.—There has been rain on two days dur­ estCharleston, South lowest 70.
Carolina.—There has been
on six
ing the week, the precipitation reaching fifty-six hundredths days during the week, to the extent of four inches rain ninetyand
of an inch. Average temperature 80, highest 91 and lowest 69. nine hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 79, rang­
Dallas, Texas.—We have had rain on one day of the past
week, the precipitation reaching twenty-four hundredths of ing from 72 to 56. Carolina.—There has been rain on each
Stateburg, South
an inch. The thermometer has averaged 86, the highest be­ day the past week, the precipitation reaching three inches
ing 95 and the lowest 67.
twenty
San Antonio, Texas.— We have had heavy rain on four days and ranged hundredths—too much rain. The thermometer
has
67 to 88,
during the week, the rainfall reaching two inches and forty- eight inchesfrom forty-eight averaging 76. August rainfall,
and
hundredths.
four hundredths. Minimum temperature 70.
Greenwood, South
six
Ruling, Texas.—There has been rain on two days the past days of the week, theCarolina.—There has been rain onand
precipitation reaching four inches
week, the precipitation reaching ninety-five hundredths of an nine hundredths. Average thermometer 76, highest 82, low­
inch. The thermometer has ranged from 69 to 92,.averag est 70. August rainfall, seven inches and eighteen hun­
ing 84.
Columbia, Texas.—It has rained heavily on five days of the dredths.
The followingstatement we nave
week, the rainfall reaching nine inches and forty one showing the height of the riversalso received by telegraph,
at the points named at
hundredth of an inch. Average thermometer 80, highest 91
and lowest 68.
Sept. 1, ’98. Sept. 2, ’97
Cuero, Texas.—There has been rain on two days during
Feet.
Feet.
the week and the rainfall reached thirty-one hundredths of N ew O rlean s......
6-7
3-8
an inch. The thermometer has averaged 88, the highest be M em phis............
5*6
91
ing 98 and the lowest 72.
2*3
2*4
Nashville............
2*5
0*3
Brenham, Texas.—Showers have fallen on four days of the Shreveport.......... ........Above zero of gauge. 20*4
8*0
past week, the rainfall reaching sixty five hundredths of an Vloksbnrg........... ........A b o v e zero ol gauge
q

q

THE CHRONICLE.

492

fVoL. LX VII •

I
C
M
P
.—The r e c e ip t s
T h e S t a n d a r d B a l e . —A demand for a standard square
of cotton at Bombay anil the shipments from all India p o rta bale of American cotton of uniform dimensions is now gen­
for the week ending Aug. 31, and for the season ending eral throughout the United States and Europe. The move­
Aug. 31 for three years have been as follows:
ment among the cotton interest during the past summer has
1895-96.
1896-97.
1897-98.
produced the endorsement of the bale of 24x54 inches, inside
Beeetpls at—
St nett
S ine*
Since.
Week. Sept. 1. week. Sepi. 1. Week. Sept. 1. measurement of the country box as the standard by all the
Cotton Exchanges of the UnitedStates as well as by the Liv­
2.000 1,800,000
4,ooosi,ei8,6ta 10,000 2,155,716 erpool Cotton Association, and the Havre and Bremen Cotton
B om bay— ...
Since September 1.
For the Week.
Exchanges. This action has brought about such a wide­
Exports
spread interest that all branches of the cotton trade, from
Conti­
Great
l
Great
fro m Total.
nent.
B rita in . nenL Total. B rita in .
the planter to the shipper, have taken active measures in
their respective territories to reach the result that upon the
Bom bay—
482,000
449,000
3,000
3,000
13,000
1897-98..
592,107 opening of the next season, 1898-99, cotton coming to hand
1 ,0 0 0
560,132
1,000
31,975
1896-97..
797,129 will be principally packed In uniform standard boxes, 24x54
73,705
723,42 4
1895-96..
6,000
6,000
Calcutta—
34,000
38,000 inside measurement.
4.000
1897-98..
9-0,393
87,573
8,320
1890-97..
The reasons for this movement are, first of all, the greatly
30,987
95,885
1895-96..
8,898
M adras—
reduced freight rate which is obtainable on packages of this
2.000
7,000
5,000
1897-98..
0,521
21,312
27,633 size, due to the fact that they are capable of better com­
1896-97..
2,000
‘ .OCO
i
4,000
16,106
10,005
35,111 pression, which is now brought down to 40 lbs. to the cubic
1895-96..
A ll others—
146,000 foot, against 22^ lbs. formerly.
2,000
16,000
18^7-98..
2,000
130,000
109,971
3.000
1,000
31,571
138,400
1890-97..
1 ,0 0 0
Many shippers and steamship agents, as well as railroad
129,630
4.000
22,510
15 .-,190
1895-96..
4,000
carriers, appreciating this fact, have instructed their repre­
Total a ll—
653,000 sentatives to discriminate in freight in favor of the standard
5,000
618,000
5,000
35,000
1897-98..
807,417
4,000
836,104
5,000
1896-97
,000
78,6*7
bale. Experiments made last season demonstrated that these
12,000 14,000 1 121,219
2.000
959,096 1,080,315
1895-96..
According to the foregoing Bombay appears to show a standard bales could be carried with equal profit at a reduc­
decrease compared with last year in the week's reoeipts of tion of 40 per cent in the freight rate. While this applies to
3,000 bales. Exports from all India ports record a ----- all carriers, it is a noticeable feature in the item of ocean
of ----- bales during the week and since September 1 show freight; 40 per cent on Dresent rates means from $1 to $1 25
a decrease of 233,104 bales.
per bale less than rates necessary to make a ship a profitable
A l e x a n d r ia R e c e ip t s a n d S h ip m e n t s o p C o t t o n . —
under the old and irregular-sized bales that formerly
Through arrangements we made w ith Messrs. Davis, Benachi carrierto hand. It does not require much thought to see
& Co., of Liverpool and Alexandria, we sviw receive a weekly i came
cable of the movements of cotton a t Alexandria, Egypt. The where this advantage in shipping okarges settles itself ; prac­
following are the receipts and shipments for the past week tically it is a gain to the farmer of not less than $1 per balls
and since the beginning of the season in each of tiie last according to the average of ocean freight rates prevailing
three years.
during the last few years ; this gain applied to every bale of
A lexan dria, B uupt,
' cotton lie raises brings np the aggregate to say $10,000,000
1896-97.
1895-96.
1897-98.
Aug.nst 31.
per annum, more or less, according to the size of the Ameri­
Receipts i cantata*)___
cas! crop.
5,000
Thla m eek ........ .. ......
4,000
7,000
5,275,383
Sln ee8ept. l ............
6,5 23,000
5,879,750
In consequence of the uniformity of the package and the
TAis
Since This Since This Since greater density obtained through this uniformity, the ship
week. Sept. 1. meek. Sept. 1. vjeek. Sept. !
generally is enabled to load her dead-weight capacity, and as
e x p o rts (b a les)—
4.000 339,904 all shippers of cotton are familiar with the advantages of
348.000
2,000 340,760
To L iv e r p o o l..
2,000 484.000
3,000 409,617
2.000 343,379 giving every ocean carrier a full cargo, competition to this
To C on tin en t!.........
5,000 750,376
T o t a lE o r o p a ........ 2,000 832,000
6,000 683,283 ;end necessarily lowers the freight rate, which in turn enables
* A e a n t a r la 98 pounds.
the interior buyer to pay the farmer a higher price for his
t O f v t io h t o A m e rloa ln 1897-98,53,788 b a l«e : In 1896-9T; 61,056
bale of cotton, which, especially at the present price, is moat
tales: In 1895-96,59,31.1 bale*.
M
'.I
, — Oar report received by cable ’ acceptable to him.
to-night from Manchester states that the market continues Another great advantage of the reduced measurements of
quiet for both yarns and shirtings. The demand for cloth is
poor. We give the prices for to-day below and leave those the bale is that it allows the bagging to come well down over
the sides of the bale, covering its contents entirely, thus re­
for previous weeks of this and last year for comparison.
ducing the chances of country damage and protecting the
1898,
1897.
contents of the package from other exposure.
SH ibs. Shirt­
82# Cop. 81* Ibe. Shirt­ Con'7-, 32s Oop. ings, common Oott’T. There is a saving also in insurance. The underwriters are
Mid.
ings, common Mid. Twist.
TwitC
to finest. Upldt prepared to make lower rates for both the lire and murine
to.finest. Uplde
a. d. d. 4 d. s.
a, 367jfi e. d. s. d. 31^32 0715 977 j6 e. 2 1*0 8a. a. risk on account of greater density and mare freedom from
a.
J ’ly29 59ie
4 O’a a e 713
* 933
land damage of the standard bale.
8
4%2
4 o m » 0 713 315.}2 6% Z*7Rf 4 2 W
Aug.5
Three yews ago an effort was made in Texas to bring about
5 n u a>e*Q 4 1 9 6 7>i 3 *9 67l8 ®77le 4 2 i«® 6 8
7
333 0’s »7 7 ,g 4 2 « 6 8
5°10 3638 4
4
n o 7*a
5%3 U65] ft
* 26 5 *< 'ft>6$iq 4 0 ® 6 e>s 311.32 67,8 a7M 4 2l i « © 6 71* till a uniform standard bale. Meetings of various bodies, such
»7%
6%
till as farmers, ginners and others interested in cotton, were held
4 0 9 6 6b}
Seiji 2
J u t e B u t t s , B a g g i n g , &o,—The m arket fior jute bagging and resolutions passed leading to this end. At that time it
has continued steady during the week under review at un­ "was thought that a measurement of 28x58 was all that was
changed quotations, the close this evening being at
for necessary.
package became
\% lbs. and 6J^c. for 2 lbs-, of standard grades. Car-load 'the State of This sized later it was found almost universal in
Texas, but
that the movement
lots of standard" brands are quoted at 6%o. for 1% lbs. and
for 2 lbs,, f. o. b. at New York. The market for jute was not radical enough. Consequently numerous experi­
butts has been dull. Quotations are nosnisally -80o. for, ments were made until it was demonstrated that the standard
paper quality and l% c. for mixing.
From Messrs. Ira A. Kip & Co.’s circular we ascertain'- . of a square bale as mentioned above,of24x54, developed all the
that the deliveries of jute butts and rejections at New York advantages desired in a square bale cotton. Several ship­
and Boston daring August were 30,095 bales, against 50,785 ments of cotton of this standard were made during the past
bales for the same month last year, and since January 1 the season and reached their destination in good order, holding
deliveries have reaehed 339,107 bales, against 289,390 bales
parties interested.
in 1897, The aggregate stock in the hands of importers and the density satisfactorily to all of the past spring and present
speculators in New York and Boston on August 31 was nil After the vigorous campaign
bales, against 1,000 bales at the corresponding date of 1897, summer to bring about a uniform standard bale of Ameri­
and the amount afloat reaches 34,812 bales, against 56,503 can cotton, there is good reason for the belief that the results
bales last year.
thus far obtained will continue to develop until the better
P r i z e S t e a m e r s R e l e a s e d . —The clearances from New condition in which American cotton is received has been ex­
York on Tuesday, August 30, included the two Spanish
steamers Catalina and Miguel Jover, which were seized by tended to all our milling centres in this country as well as to
the Government last April, but were recently released by those of all foreign countries, and that we have heard the
order of a prize court. The steamers have on board the end of the wretched way in which our great product of the
same cargoes with which they sailed from New Orleans
has
heretofore handled.
April last, as followB: Catalina, 2,775 bales cotton for Bar­ South wishbeen standard bale of 24x54 all the success that is
We
the
celona and 400 bales for Genoa: Miguel Jover, 3,900 bales for
claimed for it.
Barcelona.
n d ia

otton

ovem ent

1

anchester

aslk st

o h io c

from

all

orts

THE CHRONICLE

sK S eptember 3, 1898. ]

Government W eekly Cotton R eport.—Mr. W. L. Moore,
Chief of the Weather Bureau of the Agricultural Depart­
ment, made public on Tuesday the following telegraphic
reports on the crop in the Southern States for the week
ending August 29:
V i r g in i a .— Cotton poor.
orth arolina First h alf of week w arm
sunny, was fa v o r­
able and crops improved, but too much rain in south portion latter
half; ootton im proving in some sections, in others shedding and rust
continue; it is opening rapidly and picking will soon become general.
outh arolina —M ore sunshine and less rain than
except in C eu tra l'a n d Peedee counties, where excessive rainfall
hooded bottoms, destroying much cotton; cotton opening freely and
picking quite general, rust widely prevalent; shedding and rotting of
bolls continue to iDjure prospects.
eorgia
rains
to
increasiog.
lorida
damaged
labama Last few days cool and w et with heavy to excessive
rains; cotton rusting and shedding generally, boll worms more
numerous and some complaints of bolls sprouting, it
opening
rapidly, but picking has been retarded by rains.

N

C

S

C

.—

and

last week,

4 93
Satur.

Liverpool........... c .
H avre.................
Bremen.............. c .
H am burg...........o.
Amsterdam........ c.
Rev&l, v. Hamb..c.
Do v.Brem ’n.c.
Do v. H u ll...e .
Rotterdam.........
H en oa...............
Trieste...............
Antw erp............
Ghent, v .A n tw ’p.d.
t Cents net per 100

c.

e.
d.
d.
d.

Mon.

15t
%
22t
251
30<
....
....
331
301
301
321
%

Tuts. Wednes. Thurs.

15t
4
22f
251
30t
....
....
33t
301
301
32t

151
>4
221
251
30+
. . ..
....
331
301
30t
32+
*6

15t

H

22t
25+
301
....
....
S3t
SOI
30t
32t
%

F ri.

15t
*4
22f
251
301
....
....
331
30t
30t
32t
hi

15t

h

22
25 +
30 +
. . ..
. . ..
331
30i
30'
32+

G
.—General and heavy
increasing dam age ootton;
B32
532
632
®32
<!3
s
ootton rotting, shedding and rusting badly and boll worms
lbs.
F
. -F req u en t rains
cotton.
Liverpool.—By cable from Liverpool we have the follow
A
.—
j a g statement of the week’s sales, stocks, &c., at that port.
is
A ug. 12. A ug. 19. A ug. 20. Sept. 2.
M lssibsippi.—Cotton improving, bolls opening rapidly and picking
progressing, although retarded Hy hot w eath er; bales of new cotton Sa+ea of the w eek ......... hales. 58.000 54.000 32.000 47.000
becoming more numerous in all sections, some dam age by shedding, Of which exporters to o k ...
900
2,200
800
1,100
rust, rot, worms, and abnorm al grow th of plant1
800
1,600
800
L ouisiana .—Fore part of week warm and dry, followed by cool • 3aOf which speculators took. 51.000 50.000 30.000 42.000
,ea Am erioan ....................
showery weather, unfavorable for cotton, which was damaged some
by rust, shedding and koll worm s; caterpillars appearing, but with­
out material damage; cotton picking progressing slowly.
exas — Local showers every day. but drought continues south­
west portion, rainfall generally
cotton improved in cen­
tral and northern portions, but boll worms, caterpillars and sharp­
shooters are causing damage in many localities, worm bflngpoisoned;
picking in southern and central portions progressed rapidly, but some
delay
showers; some ootton opening prematurely account
previous dry weather, aud some shedding, rains checked opening in
northern portion.
A r k a n s a s -C otton being damaged b y worms, blight and ru s t; in
gome looaliwes it continues to shed and
being injured
rain, while fci otfliers it is being dam aged by drought ; it is opening
rapidly, but nicking is not general on aocount of excessive heat;
cetton has been marketed.
ennessee Except some
showers, warm, dry
vailed, inducing rapid development and maturing crops; ootlon
improved, opening rapidly, picking progressing well.
klahoma Cotton picking begun, first bales marketed Thursday,
crop not in as good condition as formerly, considerable shedding and
damage from boll worms and sharpshooters.
issouri —Cotton opening nicely.

T

.

in'Ufiioient;

frera

is

T

.—

O

local

.—

Aetna export........ ................
Forwarded..............................
Total stook—Estimated.........
Of which American—Estm ’d
Total import of the w e ek ......
Of whloh Am erioan............
Amount afloat........................
O f which Am erioan............

3,000
55.000
875.000
789.000
24.000
14.000
33.000
29.000

4,000
49.000
843.000
761.000
22.000
18,000
28,000
22,000

5,000
41.000
814.000
733.000
18.000
12,000
31.000
24.000

3,000
40.000
790.000
710.000
19.000
15.000
34.000
30.000

The tone of the Liverpool market for spots and futures
each day of the week endimg Sept. 2 and the daily closing
by too much . prices of spot cotton, have been as follows.______

some
w eather pre­
much

S a fd a y. M onday « Tuesday. Wed 1day. Thursday F riday

Spot.

j

Market, )
1:45 P. M. J

Easier.

Quiet.

Moderate Increased Steadier.
demand. request.

Mid. U pl’da.

811,3

811,2

3<ha

3*16

These reports on cotton are summarized by the Depart­ tpeo.&exp.
Futures.
ment as follows:

3,000
300

7,000
300

6,000
300

8,000
1,000

M arket,
:45 p . M.!

Quiet.

M

The week lias been very unfavorable to ootton, especially over the
greater part of the eastern portion of the ootton belt, where it has
suffered from heavy rain®, which have been continuous for the past
month, causing rust. sReddlng and too rapid growth of stalk. In por­
tions of North Carolina and over the central part of the cotton
region conditions of the past week have been somewhat more favor­
able and the crop is improved in Tennessee, Missouri and portions of
Mississippi and Arkansas. Cotton has also improved in Central and
Northern Texas, but insectsiare causing damage In many localities,
and premature opening and shedding are reported from the central
and southern portions of the State. Picking is becoming general in
the northern-portion.

Egyptian Cotton Crop.—Mr. F. Jao. Andres of Boston

bas received the following from the Cotton Department of
the Anglo-Egyptian Bank, Alexandria:
“ Temperature during J aly has been hot. W orm s and fogs have
been very rare and have done no harm. These oircumstanceg, so
favorable to the plants, have been to a oertaln extent counteracted
by the water difficulties. However, thanks to the great care and
energy in the distributions the waterings strictly n eo esjw v have
been obtainable over the greatest part of the D elta; bnjjgtie e x ­
tremely limited supply could not reach everywhere, the higiuiJ parts
must have suffered considerably and the plants so situated are not
therefore in a good condition. For some days past the Nile has risen
and it is hoped by the 10th or 15th of August there w ill be no further
anrlety about the water supply. In U p p e r Egypt the condition of the
plants Is very satisfactory, they have in no w ay suffered from short­
age of water. Flowering aud the formation of pods is very advanced.
From the Fayoum the news is no* quite so favorable.’*

)

l

M arket,
4 . P. M. $

Quiet at Steady ai
partially partially
1-64 dec. 1-64 adv.

Barely
steady.

Barely
steady.

Steady.

2b1
6
10,000
500

Firm.
311,3
8,000
500

Quiet at
1-64 de­
cline.

Quiet at
partially
1-64 dec.

Quiet at
2-64 ad­
vance.

Steady.

Quiet but
steady.

Quiet.

The prices of futures at Liverpool for each day are given
clause, unless otherwise stated.

below. Prices are on the basis of Uplands, Low Middling
S a l.

Sept. 2.

12*3
P.M.

■ d.

-'n o n .
1

P. M.

d.

August....... te 15 3
Vug.-Sept... 5 14 3
9ept.-Oot___ 3 12 3
Oct.-Nov___ 3 10 3
Nov-.Dec. .. 3 10 3
Qeo.-Jan___ 3 10 3
Jan.-Feb___ 3 10 3
Feb.-March. 3 10 3
Moh.-April.. 3 11 3
Vprll-M ay .. 3 12 3
May-June... 3 13 3
June-Jnly..

15
14
12
10
10
10
10
11
11
12
13

I
: T oes.

1:451 4 1:45
P. M. P . M. jp. M.

4

W ed.
1:45

P .M . P .M .

T h u rs.

4 1:45
P.M. P.M.

d. \ d. \ d. d. d. d. d.
3 14 3 14 3 13 3 13 3 12 3 12

3 13 3 13|3 12
3 L I H 10 3 09
3
3 09j3 09j3 OS
3 0 > 3 08 3 07
3 09 3 08 3 07
3 09 3 08 3 07
3 10 3 09! 3 08
3 10f8 1013
11*3 10 3 09
3 1 2 J 1 1 3 lb
3
............. 1— -

3

0<

3 12
3 10
3 08
3 08
3 08
3 08
3 09
3 09
3 10
3 11

3 12
3 09
3 07
3 07
3 07
3 07
3 08
3 08
3 09
3 10

3 12
3 09
3 08
3 07
3 07
3 07
3 08
3 09
3 10
3 10

3 13
3 10
3 08
3 08
3 08
3 08
3 08
3 09
3 10
3 11
3 11

4

F ri.
1:45

4
P.M.

d.

a.

312

3 14

if.
3 14

P .M . P .M .

3 10
3 08
3 08
3 08
3 08
3 08
3 09
3 09
11
3 11

3

3 1 2 3 11
3 10 3 10
3 09 3 09
3 09 3 09
3 09 3 09
3 10 3 1 0
3 1 3 10
1
3 1 2 3 11
3 12 3 L2
3 13 3 13

B R E A D S T U F F S .
Shipping News.—As shown on a previous page, the
exports of cotton from the United StaXes the past w e e k h a v e
F
, Sept. 2, 1898.
reached 31,815 bales. The shipments in detail, a s m a d e up No improvement has been apparent in the demand for
from mail amd telegraphic returns, are as follows: Total bale-a. > wheat flou». Bayers generally have been slow in placing
N
Y
—T Liverpool, per steamer Cymric, 760..................
760 orders for supplies, their purchases as a rule having been
To Hull, per steamer Idaho, 1.000......................................
100 limited te small lots,
iin fact the trading has been almost
To Havre, per steamer L a Gascogne, 600 upland and 50
exclusively of a hand-to-mouth character, and as there have
Hea Island.............................................................................
650
To Bremen, der steamer Friedrich der Grosse, 2,490..........
2,460. i been fairly free offerings of new crop flour to arrive, the tone
To Barcelona, per steamer Picqua, 550........ ........................
550 has been easy and prices have weakeu«4 slightly. Rye flour
N
Orleans —To Liverpool—Aufc. 30—Steamer Engineer.
has hewt in fair supply and as demand has been limited,
2,817............................................... ...................... ”
........
2,817
To B e lfa s t -A u g . 20—Steamer Iniahowen Head, 200..........
200 prices have favored buyers a little. Corn meal wa3 sold
To Bremen—Aug. 27-S tea m er Europa, 720...... ..................
72" slowly and prices have weakened somewhat under fairly free
To H a m bu rg —Aug. 2 6 -Steam er York, 1,303.......................
1,303 offerings.
To Copenhagen -A u g . 30—Steamer Kentucky, 300..............
300
Speculsifeion in wheat for future delivery has been quiet,
Galveston —To L iverpool—A u g. 26—Steamer Dominic, 7.852
— Aug. 31—Steamers Cambria, 2,158; Eden Hall, 7,755. 17,765 •but the tendency *f prices has been towards slightly higher
To H am burg—Aug. 27—Steamer Duchess of York, 139......
139 prices. The principal ball point has been crop damage re­
C
—T o Liverpool—Aug. 0—Steamer Vera. 6 1 7 .____
617 ports from Russia, which have given a steadier ton- to the
B oston —To Liverpool—Aug. 23—Steamer Philadelphia. 27___
foreign advices. Saturday prices advanced early in response
Aug. 2 1-Steam er Corinthia. 2 ...... Aug. 25—Steamer
.to stronger foreign advices, accompanied by some buying
Canada, 3---- Aug. 29 - Steamer Sagamore, 19____Aug. 30
—Steamer Armenian, 2,483.................................................
2,534 orders, but later reacted under moderate offerings, prompted
movement of the crop ip the Northwest
Total..............................................................
31.815 by a predicted free week. Monday prices advanced }4@%c.
the coming
The particulars of the foregoing shipments, arranged in duringwas moderate buying for both local and foreign ao­
There
our usual form, are as follows.
count, stimulated by the small world’s shipments for the week
Great French Qer- r—Oth. J?rope—> Mexico ,
B riV n. ports, m any. North. South. dbc. Japan. Total . and further talk of crop damage in Russia. The estimate by
New Y ork. 1,760 650 2.460
550 ................
5.420 the Hungarian Minister that the world’s production of
N. Orleans.
3,017
2,023
300
.......................
5,340 wheat would be slightly below
the' consumption had
Galveston.
17,765
139
.................................. 17,904 apparently little or
no influence upon the situation,
Charleston
617 .......................................................................
617
B o sto n ___
2,534 .....................................................................
2,534 Tuesday the market was easier early in the day under
moderate offerings prompted by a large crop movement in
T o t a l.... 25,693
650 4,622
300
550 .................... 31,815 the Northwest and weaker foreign advices. Subsequently,
Cotton freights at New York the past week have been however, there developed a demand from shorts to cover
contracts and the loss was recovered, Wednesday the
as follows.
r id a y

ew

ork

o

ew

.

.

h ar lesto n

THE CHRONICLE.

491

lower prices than before. Both the overcoatings and cloak­
ings divisions continue dull at previous prices. Dress goods
h ive sold more freely but at generally easy prices. Flannels
and blankets are firm, but the demand is light,
D omestic C otton G oods.—The exports of cotton goods
from this port for the week ending August 39 were 4,313
packages, valued at $138,595, their destination being to the
points specified in the tables below :

market was easier on weaker foreign advices, and continued
large receipts at the Northwest prompted free offerings, and
prices declined. Thursday the market was easier early in the
day on Western selling. Daring the afternoon there was re­
newed buying by shorts tocover contracts and prices advanced,
closing
higher for the day. To day the market was
weaker under the free movement of the crop in the North­
west and easier foreign advices, closing at J_f<S 1'jO. decline
for the day. Business in the spot market was fairly active
during the latter part of the week, the free movement of
the crop in the Northwest causing the premiums on cash
wheat to rapidly disappear. The export sales to-day here
and outports were 600.0JO bushels.
DAILY OLOSISO FRIGES OF NO. 2 BED WINTER WHEAT.
Sat, Mon, Tiies. Fed. T h u n .

September delivery.......0.
December delivery.. e.
May delivery................o.

69*8
60%
681*

68%
66%
67*2

6^8
66*%
08

08%
66%
677
s

68 %
66%
GS

FW.
67%
66*4
67%

[VOL. LXVII,

1898.
N ew Y ork

to

A

do.

29.
Feek.

Great B rita in .......................
Other E u ro p e a n .................
In d ia ....................................
A rabia..................................
A frica ...................................
W est Indies..........................
M exico___ . . . . . ....................
Central Am erica..................
South Am erica....................
Otlier Countries..... .............

54
11
1
12
147

1897.

Since J a n . 1. Week. Since J a n . 1
2,342
797
116,492
9,657
23,212
8,862
9.748
3,004
5.032
35,764
12,951

160
12

3,427
2,499
97,574
5,967
16,34913,806
9.826
2,336
5,801
33,281
3,338

104
238

256
81
Indian corn futures have been moderately active and the
147
369
tendency of prices has been towards a higher basis; values
3,573
676
have gradually hardened throughout the week on reports of
12
56
crop damage by dry, hot weather. Early in the week the im­ T o tal............................... 4,213 227,971 1,686 194,284
provement in prices was only slight, but later in the week,
13,960
14,566
as the reports of crop damage by the dry, hot weather be­ China, v ia Vancouver’*.....
T o tal............................... 4.213
241,931
1,636
208,850
come more numerous, there was more disposition shown to
buy and the advance in prices became more pronounced. * From N ew KnRiand m ill points llreot.
To-day the market was easier under more favorable crop ac­ The value of the New York exports for the year to datecounts. The spot market was fairly aotive at lower prices. has been $7,933,207 in 1893 against $7,507,891 in 1897.
The sales for export were 350,000 bushels.
in heavy brown sheetings and drills sellers have shown an
easier attitude on both spots and contracts, and the tendency
DAILY CLOSING PRICES OF NO. 2 MIXED CORN.
sat. Mon. Tues. Wed. T h u n . Fri. is in favor or buyers. The home demand is fair, but bujfing
34% for export light.
35%
34%
34%
34%
September delivery___.0.
o.
34%
Fine yarn gray gools are rncmly l-16c.
35%
0.
34%
35%
D ecem ber delivery___ o.
34k!
35%
35%
dearer. Bleached cottons still quiet, bnt low grades firmer
—
....
c. ___ . . . . . . . .
May delivery__
37%
inactive
Oats for future delivery have been dull but in sympathy under print cloth influences. Wide sheetings firm and
very
with the advance in the market for corn values have im­ at unchanged prices. Cotton ablankets business. Den­
steady,
quiet
proved slightly. The crop movement has been moderately cotton flannels in favorwith
and
Ticks quiet and
large. At the West some export business has bsen reputed ims dull plaids in moderate o£ buyers, cheoks and stripes
request, and
transacted. Locally, however, the volume of trading has unchanged, slow at previous prices. Kid-finished cam­
been very moderate. To day the market was dull and easier, and cheviots steadier Fancy prints in well-sustained re­
in sympathy with the decline in other grains. Tne spot brics rather
and steady, and the demand for indigo blues, mourn­
market was more active. The sales for export were 370,000 questand other staple lines shows considerable improvement,,
ings
bushels. DAILY CLOSING PRICES OF NO. 2 MIXED OATS.
with a steadier toie in the market. Ginghams are m a wellSat. Mon. Tues. Wed , Ttiurs. F n , sold condition with steady demand. Print cloths have sold
largely and the market nas advanced 1-16 j., to 3 1-I6c. for
September delivery __c. 24% 25
24%
24%
25
24%
Rye has had a moderate sale at steady prices. Barley has extras, at which price sellers are firm but the demind much
quieter.
been more freely offered, but values have held steady.
F
D
G
—Orders for fall lines of dress goods,
The following are closing quotations:
silks, riobons, etc., have been numerous, but only small
FLOUR.
quantities individually called for. Demind readily mat all
F in e .............................i?215r >2 30
3
Patent, w in te r...... $3 60 1M 15
City mills, extras . 4 70 ■®5 00
Superfine...... ......... 225 w2 60
around and prices irregular. No business of importance yet
E x tra, No. 2 .............. 250@2 75
Rye flour, superflae 2 40
E x tra, No. i ......... 2 70 ® 3 OO
Buckwheat flour................... 90 recorded for next spring.
Importation* and Warekonse Withdrawals of Drf Goode
C le a rs....................
320
3 50
Corn m eal—
Western, e tc ...--. 2 05 ©2 15
Straights................. 33 ) ■ Wl 30
The importations and warehouse withdrawals of dry goods
Patent, S prin g___ _ 4 40 <*4 80
B r a n d y w in e ......
2 20
at this port for the week ending Sept. 1, 1898, and since
[Wheat"floor in sacks sella at prices below those for barrels,
January 1, 1898, and for the corresponding periods of last
GRAIN.
year are as follows:
o.
Corn, p er bush—
o.
o.
Wheat—
o.
o r e ig n

H a rd Duluth, No. 1.
B e d W inter, No. 2..
H a rd Man., No. 1..
Northern,
1 .. .
Oats—M ix ’d, per bsh.
W h it e ....................
N o. 2 m ixed......... No. 2 w hite........ .

No.

71
72*2
69 ® 71*s
71% ® 72 %
69% ft 70%
25 -a 27*2
26 7
37
26%® 27%
29% a 30%

i>

F o r o t h e r ta b le #

dbuh Mv

Western m ixed........ _.34% #36%
No. 2 m ixed.............. .3-1% $36%
Western Y e llo w .........35% *37
W estern W h ite ...........353
s®37%
R yeWestern, per bush . . . 4 S%?»5 0 %
State and J ersey........45 ®49%
Barley—W e s te rn ..........47 ® 54
F e e d in g ........ „..........-.33 ®35
g iv e n h e re see plitre 4-6 4.

DRY GOODS T R A D E .
N
Y
. F
, P. M., Sept. 3, 1898.
The chief feature of the week in the cotton goods division
of the market has been the advance in print cloths in re
sponse to the most active demand which has come forward
for a long time past. This has had a modified sympathetic
effect upon directly allied goods, but with that its influence
has ended. In other directions the tendency has been, in
fact, to favor buyers, for there the raw cotton situation still
operates as chief factor. The general deman i daring the
week has been well sustained at both first and sec­
ond hands, and a considerable aggregate business
has been recorded. The results for the month
of August, so far as cotton goods are concerned,
ara significant of tne liberal business doing throughout the
country. The policy of buyers was uniformly conserva­
tive; in no direction was there any trace of speculation; and
yet a large aggregate business has been reported in nearly
all descriptions as the outcome of steady day-to-day hand-tomouth purchases. This character of buying is expected to
keep up longer than usual, as trade at second hand is still
good, and supplies held by jobbers must be quite moderate.
The woolen-goods division of the market has continued inac­
tive and disappointing.
W oolen G oods.—The week's business in men’s-wear wool­
ens and worsteds for spring has been of very moderate pro­
portions only and still leaves the light-weight situation very
unsatisfactory. There are but few mills which have secured
an average volume of business, while there are a number
which have so few orders booked up to the present time that
they are more likely to shut down than to continue rauning.
In addition to slow new business, cancellations of early orders
on serges are reported. The price situation is unsettled by
these conditions, bnt agents will rarely quote openly any
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THE CHRONICLE.

S eptember 3, 1898.]

Washington County, Pa., $500,000 4
cent
City VtfM nm in, year Court House bonds, awarded to per Dollar3-28the
Sav­

•tate

and

~ ~

TER M S OF S U B S C R IP T IO N .

The Investors’ Supplement will be furnished without
tiitra charge to every annual subscriber of the Commercial
F inancial Chronicle.
The State and City Supplement will also be furnished
w ith o u t extra charge to every subscriber of the Chronicle.
The Street Railway Supplement will likewise be fur­
nished without extra charge to every subscriber of the
Chronicle.
The Quotation Supplement, issued monthly, will also be
famished without extra charge to every subscriber of the
Chronicle.
TERMS for the Chronicle with the four Supplements
above named are Ten Dollars per year within the United
States and Twelve Dollars in Europe, which in both cases
and

includes postage.

495

_______

Terms of Advertising—(P er inch space.)

Transient m atter (each time)$3 50 j Three Months (13 tim ps). .$25 00
• t a n d in g b u s in e s s c a r d s .
s
S ix months
(26 tim es).. 43 00
T w o months t8 times)......... 18 00 I T w e lve Months (52 tim es).. 58 00

MUNICIPAL BOND SALES IN AUGUST.
The total amount of municipal bond sales recorded
in this Department during the past month was the
largest total for any August since 1892, from which
year our records date. In fact, the total is over three
.and one-half millions heavier than that for August
1895, which amount ($8,464,431) prior to the present
year was the highest total for any August ever re­
ported. According to our records, the total of the
sales of municipal securities marketed during the
month of August was $12,196,425. In this total we
do not include $1,302,600 temporary loans recorded,
nor do we include the $12,688,992 36 bonds of New
York City, which, although awarded, the City Comp­
troller was prevented from delivering pending a de-cision of the Court as to the legality of the award.
This decision, although expected daily, has not yet
been handed down.
This total for August, as given above, compares
with $6,449,536 for August of last year and with
$7,868,563 for the month of July of the present year.
Including the New York sale, eliminated from the
table given below, the total would have reached $24,885,417, the highest for any month ever recorded, if
we except November 1896—the month when the sound
money cause triumphed in the Presidential election.
The decided increase in the amount of municipal
securities sold during August, it is proper to say, is
due partly to the sales of some large issues; there has
been a decrease in the number of municipalities as
•compared with the previous|month, there being 159
(emitting 188 separate issues), as against 179 (emitting
199 issues) for July. In August 1897, as it happens,
there were also 159 municipalities and 188 separate
issues recorded.
The month has been notable, too, for the high prices
which the bonds have commanded, and the active
competition indulged in by the intending purchasers
of many of the issues floated.
The principal sales of the month were as follows:
The Massachusetts $1,000,000 3 per cent 30-year loan
and $2,900,000 3i per cent 30 and 40-year loan,
awarded to R. L. Day & Co, and Blake Bros. & Co.,
Boston, bidding jointly, at 101-309 and 110-459, re­
spectively; Cincinnati, Ohio, $500,000 3 | per cent
20-40-year (optional) water bonds, awarded to a syn­
dicate, at 103-70; Essex County, N. J., $500,000 4 per
cent 4C-year gold park bonds, awarded to Mason,
Lewis & Co. and the Illinois Trust & Savings Bank,
Chicago, bidding jointly, at 112-199; Salt Lake City,
Utah, $500,000 4 per cent 20-year refunding bonds,
awarded to E. H. Rollins & Sons, Boston, at 100-575;

ings Bank, Pittsburg, at 109-74; Cleveland, Ohio,
$300,000 4 per cent 28-year water-works bonds, awarded
to Estabrook & Co., Boston, at 113-91, also $225,000
4 per cent 10-year funded debt bonds, awarded to
Whann & Schlesinger, New York, at 106-517; Nor­
walk, Conn, $300,000 3^ per cent 20-year funding
bonds, awarded to Parson, Leach & Co., New York,
at 101-10.
In the following table we give the prices which were
paid for August loans to the amount of $11,613,952
issued by 129 municipalities. The aggregate of sales
for which no price has been reported is $582,473, and
the total bond sales for the month $12,196,425. In
the case of each loan reference is made to the page of
the Chronicle where a full account of the sale is
given.
Page.

Location.

A ugust

B ond Sa l e s.

Rate.

M aturity.

1918
10............ 4 U908-1918
6 1899-1918
4 1899-1916
5
4*2 1905-1909
38i 1945
4 Sept. 1,1918
4 1914-1924
5 11908-1918
5L, 1899-1913
5
1906
4
918
4 1899-1902
3<fl 1899-1918
5
3*4 1938
31, 1918
3*4 1899-1903
5*4 1913
4 1899-1906
1
4*2 1928
4*2 1899-1908
4 11899-1913
4 11899-1913
4
1901
3 U918-1938
4 >4 Oct. 1, 1908
4 Oct. 1. 1926
4 1902-1918
4
1928
4
4 1901-1928
4
1928
4
1912
4 1908-1915
*1913
5
4Lj 1909-1923
4*2 Aug. 1, 1938
1924-1928
4 11899-1909
4 1899-1904
4
5
1918
6 1900-1904
7 1905-1909
5
1918
6
5 1901-1910
4 1913-1928
4 1899-1918
4
4 Apr. 1, 1908
335..
Ham ilton Co., Ohio.... Aur. 10, 1918
388.. Haverhill, Mass.......... 4
335 .Highland Park, Mich..
1928
44 3 ..
Hoboken, N. J .... 4
335.. H olly Springs, M iss.... 6
11903-1918
1938
443 Houston, T exas........... 5
443 . .
Hudson, N. Y . .... 4
1908
1900-1912
443.. Hudson Co., N. J......... 4
1899-1918
49s . H y de Park. M ass........ 4
335 Jefferson City, Mo . . . . 5
*19i'3-1918
388.. Jersey City, N. J ......... 4
1918
444 Joplin (Mo.)SchoolDis­
U003-1918
trict........................... 6
1,899-1903
286 Kenton, Ohio............... 6
444 Klngwood, V . V a .......
V
5 H908-1928
5 U903-1918
286 ..
Kirksville, M o ..
336 La Harpe (111.) School
4*2 1901-1917
District No. 4 ..........
444.. Lanesboro, M inn......... 5
1899-1908
5 1904 1910
336..
Lima, Ohio.........
1899-1908
336 ..
Lima, Ohio......... 5
1901-1910
336.. Lima, Ohio..................
1901-1910
336 ..
Lima, Ohio........ 444 .Liucoln, N e b ............... 4*2
1903-1935
388 ..
Little Falls, N. Y . 3*2
1899-1910
388 Lorain Co., Ohio.........
1899-1908
3^ 1905-1914
336..
Lowell, M ass......
444..
Malta, Ohio........ 5
444..
Manitowoc, W ls. 4ia Jan. 15,1906

386. Am lierst Co.. V a .........
3 8 6 -.Anaoonda (Mont.) Sch.
Dist. No.
497..
Andover, N. Y ...
442..
Ann A rbor (Mich.) 8ch.
D istrict.....................
387 ..
Auglaize Co., O hio....
284.. Aurora (111.) School D is­
trict No, 5 .................
284..
Baltimore, M d ...
442..
BelleviUe (111.) School
District.....................
442..
Bellevue, P a ......
28 4 ..
Berea, O hio........
334..
Billings Co., N . D a k ...
334.. Blakely, P a .................
334 . Brattleboro, V t .........
387 Bristol Co., M a s s ......
387..
Buffalo, N. Y ......
387 ..
Caldwell Co., T e x a s ...
387..
Cambridge, Mass. (2
issues)
.................
387 a Cambridge, M ass........
397 ..
Cambridge, M a s s ......
442..
Cambridge, Ohio.
442 ..
Camden (N. Y .) School
District No. ...........
284..
Canton, Ohio......
285..
Carlstadt, N. J ...
387.. Chillicotlie, Ohio ........
387.. Chiilicothe, O hio.........
387.. Ohillicothe, O hio.........
285..
Cincinnati, Ohio.
387..
Cleveland, O hio.
443..
Cleveland, Ohio..
285..
ColumbU8, Ohio (7 is­
sues)...... ...................
387..
Concord, M ass...
443 ..
Crafton, Pa. (2 issues).
387..
Cumberland C o .,M e...
388. .Duluth, Minn...............
498..
Dunmore (Pa.) School
District.....................
498. Eaton R ipids, M ich...
498..
Elbow Lake, M in n .....
443. . Elyria, Ohio.................
443 ..
Elyria. Ohio........
335..
Essex Co., N. J ...
388 ..
Fremont, O hio...
388..
Fremont, Ohio...
443 Freeport, 111...............
4$ 3.. FresnoCo. (Cal.) Bo wles
Sohool D istrict.........
443 ..
Fresno Co. (Cal.) Fres­
no School D istrict...
498..
Fresno Co. (Cal.) H e rminghaus Sch. D ist..
335..
Gallipollp, O hio..
443 ..
Gaylord, M in n ...
388..
Glouster, Ohio...
443..
G rove City, P a ...
285..
Greenville, P a ...
285 ..
Hagerstown, M d .

A m ount. Price.

$40,000 101*25
30,000 106-275
20,000 112
14,000 102*143
18,000 109-81
10,000 100
17,500 104*52
17,500 104*25
48,000 103*08
3,500 100
13,000 105-857
16,000 109*333
105*33
15,000 101*963
70,000 100
50,000
70,000 100-214
100,000 107-517
140,000'[
10,000 105-32
7,413
8,000 101*29
102*0625
4,834 104*10
30,000 100*90
15,600 100-70
7,400 100-296
675 103*70
500,000 106*517
225,000 113-91
300.000
68,000 103-943
30,000 113*08
19,500 102*575
18,000 102*03
300,000 §100
5,000 10) *20
25,000 102-18
4,000
150,000 103*175
45,000 108*73
111*85
500,000 112-199
16,000 100*50
3,000 101-367
35.000 112
1,500 102
5,000 107-033
107*25
1,400 112*857
7,000 106*052
5,000 106*50
12,000 100
15,000 102-57
10,000 ) 104*025
2,500 j
110*57
107,000 U 14*00
34,500 -108*25
105 891
60,000 106-43
50,000 100-465
43,000 106-317
100,000 106*15
10,000 103*29
26,000
25,000 105*17
6,000 103*78
100,000 104*54
106*48
2,500 100*37
1,365 100
10,000 104*031
40,000
8,500 100
103-071
7,000 106
50,000 105-31
3.200 107*40
20,000 107-40
20,0<«0 100
33,000
65,000 10246
35.000 104-671
100
25,000 102-51
10,000 104*02
15,000 | 105*708

THE CHRONICLE.

496
Page*

Location.

imoMH/.
$10,000
1,000,000
2,900.000
2,600
1.200
153,000
14.500
23,300

the present District-At torney lias done nothing as yet in regard
to the matter, and as his term of office expires "the eoaring
fall, it will probably be left to his successor to attend to.
Melrose, Mass.—City Charter.—At a spscial town me sting
held recently the Town Moderator was instructed to appoint,
a committee of fifteen to draft a city charter, which com­
mittee is to report at the town meeting to be held in No­
vember.
100,000 101
Mineral Ridge, Ohio.—Boat Litigation.—The “Ohio State
100*86 clined to reports that the Council of Mineral Ridge has aid
28,000 101*762 Journal” pay 810,00) worth of bonds which were issued to de­
71,000
40,000 100
in the construction of the Mineral
Niles Electric
100,000 108*71 Railway, and that the holders of theRidge & (a Kansas City
bonds
40,000 100
101*66 company), will begin suit in the United States District Court
3,000 100*63 to recover on them.
80,000
New York City.—Outlying B onis Declared Legal.—Oa
20,000 101*10 August 26. 1893, the Corporation Counsel forwarded to the
111*73
opinions holding
Sept, 1,1918 300,000 )
4,000 105*93 Comptrollerdistricts valid: the following issues of bonds
1899-1901
of outlying
1,900 (
1899-1904

Pale,

M aturity.

1899-1903
Apr. 1, 1928
1928-1038
1908
11903-1938
1899-1908
U 90S-1908
Optional
1901-1901
Aug, 1,1004
i 699-1902
1913
1899

5 89 .. M ansfield, O h io .,..* .* . 6
8
444. H aas& ohuiott*....... ...
444..
M assa ch u setts..... 3 *g
386 .M ayn ard , M inn . . . 6
44 4 - .M ayv fllo , N . .............. 4
4 93 . .
M eadvUle, P a ... 6
444..
M ercer Co , Ohio (3 Is­
s u e s ) ....................
6
286..
M ethuen, M a ss... 4
S 8 9 . M ichigan . O h i o ........... 8
4 4 5 ..
M itchell Co., Iow a (2
issu es)........................... 4
498 M ontj^om eryCo,. Ohio. 4
SS 9 H ouut V ertion , N . Y . .. 6
88 6 ..
N e w a rk , N . J . ...... 4
2 8 6 ..
N ew B rita in . C o n n .... 3 *s
4 4 5 .. N obles Co. (Minn.) 8 oh.
D istrict No. 1 0 ........... 5
2 8 6 . -N ortham pton, M a s s ... 4
4 9 3 ..
N orth B ergen (N, J.)
School D is tric t....... . 5
4 4 5 .. N orw alk, C o n n ,....... . 3 hu
3 3 9 .. O herlin, O h io ................ 6
8 8 9 ..
0 .e r lin . O h i o ..... 6
S 89 Ohio U n lv e r., Athene,
O hio............................... 5
889..
0 .a n g e C o., T e x a s ..... 5
498..
0 .le a n s L e v e e D is., La. 5
49 3 . . 0 .r v ille , O hio.......... . 6
3 3 7 . O shkosh, W is................. 4
337..
0 .h k o sh , W ls........ 4
3 3 7 . . 0 .t a w a Co., Ohio — . . 6
2 8 6 . . P a ssa ic Co., N. J ........... 4
286 .P a s s a ic Co., N. J ........... 5
445 .P a terson , N. J .............. 4
4 9 9 . . P a u ld in g Co., O hio....... 4
286..
P a w P a w , M ich ... 5
3 8 9 . P e rrysb u rg, O hio......... 4
499..
P iq iia (Ohio) Soli. D is t. 5
445 Pom eroy, O hio.............. 4*2
337..
Proviso, 111....... .
6
4 4 5 . . R am sey Co., M in n ....... 3*3
390 R och ester, N. Y ............... 3*2
3 9 0 . . R o ck Isla n d , III.. . . . . . . 4
446 . . 5 .d d le R iv e r T w o . (N,
.1.) School D is t r ic t ... 5
3 9 0 . . 5 .g in a w , M ich .............. 4
3 9 0 . . 5 .le m , Ohio (2 issu e s), 5
3 9 0 . . 5 .le m , Ohio (4 issues). 6
3 90 . .S a lt L a k e C ity , V t a b ... 4
3 9 0 . S an d u sky Co., O hio............
3 3 8 .. Sharon, O h io ................. 6
390 Sharon. (O.) Sch. D ie t .. 6
3 9 0 .. S h asta Co. (Cal.)L a to n a
School D is tric t.......... 7
3 9 0 . . 5 1.k iyo u Co. (Cal.) P eb ­
ble School D is tr ic t... 8
3 9 0 . . 5 .r m g v H K N. Y ------- 4
3 3 8 . . 5 .th e rla n d (la.) School
D is tr ic t.......................- 5
2 S 7 .- 8 \vam pscott, M a s s ..,,. 3 %
499 ..T a re n tm n , P a. ,(2 is ­
su es).............................. 5
4 4 6 . . T iillu , O h i o ................... 6
3 38 . T renton , N. J . . . , ......... 4
446 . . Vailsbur<r, N. J .............. 4 ^
5 0 0 . .W allaW a lla Co. (Wash.)
School D ist. No. 1 . . . 5
4 1 7 . W arren T w n ’ p., O h io .. 4*2
2 88 . . W ashington Oo., P a . . . 4
288 W ebb, N . Y ................... . 6
5 91 . . W hitm an Co. (Wash.)
School D ist. No. 37 .. 8
33 9 . . W ilco x Tw p. (Mich.)
School Disn-iet No. 1 . 6
339.
-W ilkesbarre (Pa ) Soh.
D is tr ic t......................... 5
447..
W orcester, M aes........ ....................

Y

Price,

10567
101*309
110-459
101153
100
103*765
110151
104-69

5,000 107*461
Sept. 1,1904 30,500 101-64
11903-1038
104*06
325,000 j 104-1
11,000 >108*204
1899-1908
91.000 \ 103 125
1918
15.000
1918
15,000 121*673
1904-1918
1903-1909 100,000 102-70
30,000 104-20
1900-1901
15,000 10-17
1918
103*628
*1902
74,200 103 089
18,000 101-60
5,500
Aug. 15,1913 15,000 111-333
Aug. 1,1913
7,000 .102
Sept. 1,1918 15,000 105-764
1899-1903
Sept, 2, 1918 200,000 105*825
1903 50,000 100
Aug.1903
1,
45,000 100
8,500 101*05
1903-1909
70,000 101*752
1899-1908
47,000 7 111*108
1899-1918
2,015 j
1899-1903
Sept, 1, 1918 500,000 100 575
103*833
6,000 109 003
25,000
5,000 114-03
1899-19i8
1,500 105*333
1899-1903
1,000 104
1899-1903
4,8i0 10405
1903-1927
2,000 101*15
1901 -1904 100,000 105*2776
1928
11908-1928
24,000 106*212
25,000 113*05
Sept, 5,1908 72,000 106*278
Sept. 1,1908 40,000 105-13
1913-1928
1908
80,000 102-52
5,000 101*75
1809-1908
1901-1926 500,000 109*74
1904-1912
16,000 116*012
500 100-30
1903
1900-1914
2,500 102
*1913
35,000 112-32
Apr. 1, 1907 200,000 106*25
4
Total (129 municipalities, covering 158
separate issues)................... -....................$11*613,952
Aggregate of 9ales municipalities,price has
been reported (30 for which no covering
30 separate issues)....................................... 582,473
_Total bond sales for August, 1898...........{$12,196,425
* Average and mature in the later year. to including $1,302,600
earlier year of dates of maturity, t SubjectI Notcall In and after the
ofIssued to contractors in payment for work done. §Less a commission.
temporary loans reported and which do not belong in the list.
If

In the C hronicle of August 6, 1898, page 284,
a list of July bond sales amounting to $7,836,563,
will bo found. Since the publication of that state­
ment we hare received the following additional reports:
a d d it io n a l

J uly B ond Sa les.

M aturity. A m ount , Price.
$10,003 104*559
334.. Amsterdam, N. Y........
335 Erne worth (Pa.) School
8,500 102
1899 1915
District...................... 5
336..Kendrick (Idaho) Sell.
1908
4,000 102075
District No. 24......... 6
444..Lo» Angeles Go. (Cal) 6 1899-1903
1,500 102-823
SanFernandoSeh.Dis.
339.. Wyandot to (Mich.) Sell. 5
1903-1912
8,000 107*575
District..................
Total additional sales for July...................... . S32.000

Page.

Location.

[VOL. UXVII

Pate.

These additional loans will make the total sales
(not including temporary loans) as reported for July
1898 amount to $7,868,563.

T illag e Of R ichm ond H ill,* 70,000 4 % reg . s tre e t Im p ro v em en t b o n d s (so m etim es
(.•Allot! th ird issu e), d a te d M ay 1,1807. A lso flSO.OOO <1$ re g iste re d tMdewulk
bonds, d a te d J u n e 1.1897.
T ow n o f M iddletow n . R ich m o n d C ounty, 528,000 4* re fu n d in g b o n d s, d a te d
O ctober 8, 1 m9L
T illa g e of W h ite sto n o . 550,000 ro a d b onds, d a te d D e c em b e r l , ISfD,
V illage o f T o tte n v llle , 430,000
w a te r bonds, d a te d S e p te m b e r 1. 1897.

On August 31, 1898, the following bonds were declared
legal:
Jam a ic a U nion F re e School D istric t N o. i , *125,000, d a te d S e p te m b e r 10.1897.
a n d payable *5.000 an n u a lly , c o m m en cin g in 1950.
N ew Ijois. tow n im p ro v e m e n t bonds, fo r p aving A tla n tic A v e n u e : b a la n c e of
issu e a m o u n tin g to *54,000. an d d a te d M ay 19,1850.

Oregon..—Status of W arrant Not Yet Determined.—We
quote from the Portland “ Oregonian”as follows: “ The
status of the $35,000 warrant issued in payment for a branch
asylum site in Eastern Oregon, yet to be determined by the
State Treasurer, is a subject of interest to lawyers here. The
Supreme Court rendered an opinion holding that the Treas­
urer should he perpetually enjoined from paying it. Upon
request of counsel for the holders of the warrant, the cause
was remanded to allow the filing of an answer. The lower
Court accepted stipulations and made an order authorizing
the payment of the warrant. State Treasurer Mrischan has
not yet passed on the matter. It is held by some that he will
not be warranted in taking up the paper while the Supreme
Court decision stands uureversed, notwithstanding the order
of the lower court. The warrant and interest amount to
about $33,600.”
Sacramento County, Cal.—Bonds Invalid.—Oa May 10,
1898, E. E. Gaddis, Superior Judge of Yolo County, handed
down a decision in which he stated that the Board of Super­
visors had not the power to levy and collect a tax for county
road purposes on property situated in a municipality within
a county. The Supreme Court recently affirmed this de­
cision, which affects an issue of $75,000 44 Fulsom Highway
bonds sold last February. The Supreme Court finds that the
powers of the Supervisors are restricted on road matters to
the country portion of the county and not within the limits of
municipalities, and the levy of the special tax would fsll upon
property-owners of the corporate cities as well as those of
the country districts. By levying a tax to pay for these
bonds tbe Supervisors did indirectly what the law. prohibits
doing directly—tax municipalities for road work of a district.
San Francisco, Cal.—Bond Litigation.—We take tbe fol­
lowing from the San Francisco “ Chronicle” of Aug. 23, 1898:

A decision re n d e red y e ste rd a y b y J u d g e M orrow in th e U n ite d S ta te s C irc u it
C o u rt d elays fo r a tim e tb e p a y m e n t of In te re s t d u e on th e M ontgom ery A v e ­
nue bonds and tb e red em p tio n o f th e b onds th e m se lv e s. T h e delusion is a n im ­
p o rta n t one, th e e n tire a m o u n t in vo lved b e in g m ore th a n *3,000.4)00.
T h e history o f th e bond Issue and th e su it In q u e stio n is to th e effect th a t o n
’A pril 20,1872, an A ct o f th e C alifo rn ia L eg isla tu re w as a p p ro v ed w h ich p ro ­
v ided th a t th e city a n d c o u n ty o f 9un F ran cisco co u ld issu e bonds to m e e t th e
expense o f opening M ontgom ery A venue. T h e A ct w as passed i» resp o n se to
a p e titio n signed by a m a jo rity of th e p ro p e rty ow n ers a»onf? th e proposed
stre e t, an d pro vided th a t th o se p ro p e rty ow n ers should he a ssessed eaob yewr
to pav th e interest, coupons an d fo r a sinking fu n d to red eem th e b o n d s a t
m a tu rity . A fte r th e Act. was a p p ro v ed by th e C ounty C ourt. 1,.179 b o n d s w ere
issu ed , payable th irty y e a rs a f te r d a te , un less o th e rw ise re d e e m e d , b e a rin g in ­
te re s t a t <3.<, p ayable sem i-an n u ally . T h ese b o n d s w oro sold to th e h ig h e st
b id d ers a fte r being a d v e rtise d . S ep tem b e r 21,1874, th e B oard o f P u blic W o rk s
th a t had charge o f th e w ork tra n s fe rre d th e a v e n u e to th e city a u th o ritie s , it
h a v in g been co m pleted by m ean s o f th e m o n ey realised from th e b o n d sale.
Ja b o b Slcbel. a re s id e n t of G erm any, pu rch ased tw e n ty of th e b o n d s and, n o t
receiv in g any in te re s 1 on th e m , b ro u g h t a s u it in e q u ity lu th e U n ited S ta te s
C ircuit C ourt d u rin g th e m ay o ralty o f A dolph S u tro a g a in st th e M ayor, th e
B oard o f P u b lic W o rk s, B oard o f S u p erv iso rs, c ity aud c o u n ty o f S an F ra n ­
cisco, its T re a s u re r and Tax C ollector, an d 15,000 o th e rs, alleg ed to be o w ners of
p ro p erty on M ontgom ery A v en u e. T h e s u it w as to com pel th e citv officials to
le w assessm ents on th e p ro p e rty h o ld ers as p ro v id e d by th e act th a t th e In ­
te re s t m ig h t be paid o n tu e bonds. T h e bill In eq u ity sets fo rth th a t fro m 1873
to 1879 ta x es w ere le v ie d su fficien t to p a r in te r e s t on all c oupons u p J a n u a ry ,
1880, an d th a t th ee# ta x e s w ere paid; th a t each su b oquon t y e a r Tjnb S u p e r­
v iso rs w ore called upon by th e p lain tiff to le v y a ta x u pon th e ia tn ?su fficien t
to pav th e In te re st, b u t th e B o a rd did n o t do so; th at, on J u ly 1 ,1S9L, th e T re a s ­
u re r h id on bund ^12,818 *01u th e sin k in g fun d, b u t ro fu sed to a d v e rtise fo r
th e red e m p tio n o f th e bonds, an d u n d e r re so lu tio n o f th e B o a rd ©f S u p erv iso rs
tra n s fe rre d th e a m o u n t to th e g en eral fu n d o f th e C ity T re asu ry an d su b se­
q u e n tly o th e r sm a lle r sum s m o t th e sam e fa te . T h e plain tiff ask ed fo r a decree
th a t th e principal an d in te re s t o f th e M ontgom ery A venue b o n d s be a lie n
u p o n th e p ro p erty d escribed in S ection 4 o f th e A c t re fe rre d to a u d th a t th e
p ro p erty be liable fo r asse ssm en t fo r th e p a y m e n t o f th e principal a n d In te re st
o f th e bonds.
A tto rn e y n rw w e ll, re p re se n tin g th e officers o f th e oity a n d c o u n ty o f San
F rancisco, n a m e d * ! d e fe n d a n ts in th e bill, in terp o sed a d e m u rre r on g en eral
g ro unds th a t th e actio n w as n o t o ne o f e q u ita b le cognisance, and th a t th e b ond­
h o ld er had an ad e q u a te rem edy n l law an d th a t th e officer* o f th e city sh o u ld
be com pelled to a c t If at. all, th ro u g h th e S ta te c o u rts. H e fu rth e r held th a t a
d e c re e based upon th e Will iu eq u ity w ould be fu tile , us it could d e c la re n o th in g
m o re th a n th e s ta tu te declare* and w ould n o t e n fo rc e th e s ta tu te , an d , fu rth e r m ore, th a t eq u ity w ould n o t aid a sta le claim , th e fa c t o f tb e p la in tiff m aking
no a tte m p t to ootuuel th o S u p erv iso rs to n e t d u rin g th e past s ix te e n year*
a m o u n tin g to acquiescen ce In th o fa ilu re o f th e B oard to a c t a u d th e ir reason*
^ T h e C o u r t su sta in e d th e d e m u rre r an d d ism issed th e case, leav in g th e p la in ­
tiff fre e to find h is rem e d y elsew here.
O ne im p o rta n t p o in t decided Is th a t te e b onds do n o t a c t as a lie n o n th e
p ro p erty e x c e p t by m oan* o f re g u la r a sse ssm en ts m a d e by th e m u n icip a lity .

Kootenai County, Idaho.—No Action Taken to Test Le
aality of Bonds.—Referring to our item in the CHRONICLE of
Alar 21, 1898. p. 1010, where we stated that the Board of Tacoma, Wash. — Warrant Litigation. — The Tacoma,
County Commissioners had ordered the County Treasurer to “News” on August 35,1898, Btated that another warrant suit
cease paying interest on the $80,000 bonds issued in 1892, had been commenced against the city and another petition
pending legal action to test the validity of the bonds, we are filed asking that the City Treasurer b9 restrained from using.
now advised that the case has not yet been taken into Court;

September 3, 189S. ]

HE CHRONICLE.

any of the city funds until plaintiff’s warrants had been fully
paid. suit is brought by the Quaker City National Bank of
The
Philadelphia, which holds about $100,000 of the alleged ille­
gal Boggs warrants. Substantially the same question is inrolved in all the suits recently filed, the effort being to have
the courts compel the city to pay what . tli© city claims has
once been paid. The injunction asked for against the Treas­
urer will probably be heard Saturday, August 27, 1898.
B o n d G a lls and R edem ptions.

Astoria, Ore — Warrant CaU.—City Treasurer Carney has
called for payment all warrants drawn prior to March, 1898.
Easthampton, Mass. -Notes .Redeemed.-The Town Treas­
urer has redeemed two water notes amounting to $3,500. The
water debt now remaining is $30,000.
Henry County, Mo.—Bond Coll.—The County Court has
called for payment at the County Treasurer’s office in Clinton,
on September 2, 1898, court-house bonds Nos. 1 to 8, inclu­
sive. Securities are in denomination of $500, dated March 1,
1892, with interest at 8£.
King County (P. 0. Seattle), Wash.— Warrant Call.—It is
reported that County Treasurer Whittlesey is about to issue
a call for 541,000 of outstanding school warrants.
Lockwood School District, Dade County, Mo.—Bond Call.
—The district has called for payment the following bonds :
N os. 1 an d 2 o f $100 each , d a te d A ugust 1. 1832. an d b e a rin g in te re s t. P a y ­
able a t th e D ade C ounty B a n k o f G reenfield o n O c to b e r 1, 1898.
B uilding bond No 8 fo r $50i», d a te d A pril 1. 1885. a n d beariD g 8* in te re s t. P a y ­
a b le a t th e B an k o f L ockw ood o n O c to b er 1. 1888.
R e fu n d in g b onds N os. 3. 4 and 5. d a te d S ept. 1. 1884, a n d b e arin g 8 % in te rest.
P ayable a t th e L aclede N a tio n a l B ank, S t. L ouis, on O ct. 1.1898.

Pierce County, Wash.— Warrant Call.—The County Treas­
Stephen Jndson, has called for payment special school
warrants of School District No. 10 from No. 27 to No. 41, in­
clusive, dated May 5, 1898 ; also warrants Nos. 5009 to 5011,
both inclusive, dated August 13, 1898. Interest will cease
after August 30, 1898.
The County Treasurer has also called for payment war­
rants on General County Fund of Pierce County from No.
3701 to 5536, both inclusive, dated in 1896. Interest will
cease after August 30, 1896. Also a number of warrants of
various school districts in the county, interest on which will
cease after September 1, 1898.
Seattle, Wash.— Warrant Call.—A. H. Foote, City Treas­
urer, has called for payment at his office August 31, 1898, the
following warrants: Twenty-third Avenue South, Ordinance
No. 4837, warrants Nos. 686 to 690, inclusive ; Eighteenth
Avenue. Ordinance No. 4875, warrants Nos. 652, 653, 654 ;
Yesler Way, Ordinance No. 4737, warrants Nos. 702, 703, 704;
East Jefferson, Twentieth and Twenty-first Avenues, Ordi­
nance 4760, warrant No. 598.
Stockton, Cal.—Bond Call.—The folio wing bonds of various
municipal improvement funds have been called for payment:
u re r,

No. 1. B onds Nos. 38 to 40, Series 8. No. 2, B onds N os. 22. 23 a n d 24. Series 8 .
N o. 3, B onds Nos. 15 an d 10. Series 8. N o. 4, B onds N o. 23, 23 an d 24, Series 8.
N o. 5, B onds Nos. 13 a n d 14, S eries 7.

Interest on all of said bonds will cease September 10, 1898.
Washington.—Warrant CaU.—State warrants No. 26,651
to No. 28,930, inclusive, on the general fnnd, have been called
for payment September 7, 1898. Amount of call, $43,261 76.
Bond Proposals and Negotiations this

week have been as follows:

Andover (Village), N. ¥.—Bond Bale.—On August 24,1398,
$20,0i0 4; refunding bonds were sold to W. W. Miller, Cashier
First National Bank of Wellsboro, Pa., at 106-275. Other
bidders were Comptroller of the State of New York, 105-875;
W. J. Hayes & Sons, Cleveland, 101*41, and Peter Dn Puy,
NuDda, 106-25. Principal will mature $40J yearly, from 1899
to 7918, and $12,000 in 1918.
Arkansas City, Kan.—Bonds Authorized.—The City Coun­
cil has passed an order authorizing the issuance of the$95,000
water-works bonds which were voted on August 12, as told in
the Chronicle of August 20, p. 386.
Ballston Spa (N. T.) School District.—Bonds Voted.—At
an election held on August 24, 1898, the people voted to issue
$40,750 school bonds. The details of the issue will be deter­
mined later bv the Board of Education.
Bellevue (Borough), Pa.—Bids.—As stated in the C hron ­
icle last week, the $43,000 4% sewer bonds were awarded to
William Bell & Co., Pittsburg, at 103-03. The following bids
were received:

W m . M. Hell, H tts b u rtt.................10.T0S l \ l e i . G. U utegraO . P itts b u rg -. ,100'75

R obinson
ittsn
........108 023 ob. . B row no. itts u rg .. ..100-110
Juo. K.ros.B&ros., .PPitts b uuerg......... .10^-09 IIJRealmEstate Sav.oPBk„ bPltUburg.lOO tO
BryOen.
rg
102114 W . .1. H ay es * S ns (less *175). .1001 0
D ick B
Co P h ila d lp h ia
M e rc a n tile T ru s t Co.. P ittsb u rg . 101‘dS I

Heal Estate Savings Bank, Pittsburg, bid for $10,000 bonds
at 100-50.
Bennett, Pa.—Bond Election.—At the election to he held
Nov. 8, 1896, the question of issuing $25,000 of bonds for an
additional pump and a larger engine and dynamo so as to in­
crease the power of the electric-plant will be submitted to a
vote of the people. The question of building a town hall is
also being considered.
Bountiful (Davis County), Utah.—Bonds Votei and A u­
thorized.—At a special election held on August 20, 1898, this
city was authorized by a majority vote of the qualified elec­
tors thereof to issue $10,000 6-i coupon water-works bonds.
Securities will be in denomination of $500, dated September
1, 1398: interest will be payable March 1 and September 1 at

497

the Deseret National Bank, or its successors, Salt Lake City.
Principal will be due and payable at the office of the City
Treasurer of Bountiful September 1, 1918. Bonds will be
free from taxation. Date of sale has not yet been determined.
Breckenridge (Town), Col.—Bond Offering.—Proposals
will be received until 8 P . M. September 6, 1898, by Jas. K.
Darnell, Town Clerk, for the $35,000 6% water bonds which
were authorized at the election held on July 25, 1898. Se­
curities will be in denomination of $500, dated September 1,
1898; interest will be payable March 1 and September 1 at
the office of the Town Treasurer. Principal will mature
September 1, 1913, subject to call after September 1, 1908.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check equal to
2£ of the amount bid for.
Cairo, 111.— Warrants Not Yet Sold.—We are advised that
none of the anticipation warrants maturing in 1900 and 1901,
the offering of which we gave in the Chronicle of August
20, have yet been sold, nor have any bids been received above
par and accrued interest.
Canton, Ohio.—Bond Offering.—Proposals will be received
until 12 ii. September 19, 1898, by Louis N. Ley, City Clerk,
for $15,000 coupon water-works refunding bonds. Securi­
ties will be in denomination of $1,000, dated September 1,
1898; interest will be at not more than 5%, payable March 1
and September 1 at the banking house of Kountze Brothers
in New York City, or at the office of the City Clerk of Can­
ton, at the option of the buyer. Principal matures Septem­
ber 1, 1908. Bonds are issued pursuant to Section 2701 of
the Revised Statutes of Ohio and an ordinance authorizing
this issue August 8, 1898. Each bidder must accompany his
bid with a certificate from the First National Bank of Can­
ton, showing that he has deposited with said bank $500 as a
guaranty of good faith. Bids must be made on blank forms
furnished by the city.
Cattaraugns (Village), N. Y.—Bond Offering.—Proposals
will be received until 1 p . m . September 5, 1898, by F. S.
Oakes, President of the Board of Water Commissioners, for
$6,0C0 4i water bonds. Securities will be iu denomination of
$500, dated September 1, 1898; interest will be payable semi­
annually at the Seaboard National Bank, New York City.
Principal will mature $500 yearly on July 1, from 1899 to 1910,
inclusive. Bonds were authorized at the election held on
March 15, 1898, and also by resolution of the Board of Water
Commissioners passed at a regular meeting of said Board
held on February 22, 1898. According to the official circular
this village has never defaulted In the payment of any of its
debts or obligations at their maturity.
Chicago, 111.—Rond Offering.—Proposals will be received
until 3 p . M. September 12, 1898, by R. A. Waller, City Comp­
troller, for $100,000 3 }0 gold refunding bonds. Securities
are dated October 1, 1898, and mature October 1, 1918. They
are in denomination of $1,C00, with interest payable April
and October at the American Exchange National Bank, New
York City. A certified check for 5%of the amount of bonds
applied for must accompany proposals.
Cleveland, Ohio.—Proposed Bond Issue.—Local papers re­
port that this city is considering the issuance of $500,000 of
river improvement bonds.
Cohoes, N. V.—Bond Offering.—On September 6, 1898, at
12 m ., Miller W. Hay, City Chamberlain, will offer for sale,
at his office in the City Hall, at public auction, a $1,933 18 4%
registered municipal bond of the city known as “ Public Im­
provement Bonds of the City of Cohoes,” dated September 15,
1398; interest will be payable January 1 and July 1 at the
office of the Central Trnst Co., New York City. The prin­
cipal of said bond will mature January 1, 1905. Terms made
known at time and place of sale. This bond is issued pur­
suant to Chapter 227, Laws of 1898.
Columbia, Mo.—Proposed Bond Election.—An election will
be held in this city on September 27, 1898, to vote on the
proposition to issue $25,000 of sewer bonds.
Columbus, Ohio.—Bond Issue.-Relative to the proposed
issuance of $5,000 Third Avenue improvement bonds and
$3,500 Marshall Avenue bonds, mention of which was made
in last week’s Chronicle, we are advised that all city bonds
have been tendered to the Trustees of the Sinking Fund and
accepted.
Condon, Ore.—Bond Election.—An election will be held to­
day (September 3, 1898). to vote on the question of issuing
$3,1 00 water-works bonds.
Conneautville (Borongh), Pa.—Proposed Bond Issue.—
The Borough Council has under consideration the issuing of
water-works bonds. We are advised, however, that nothing
definite has been settled in the matter.
Coshocton, Ohio, —Bond Offering.—Proposals will be re­
ceived until 12 m. September 5, 1898, by F. F. Wagner, Vil­
lage Clerk, for $22,500 6% street-paving bonds. Securities
will be in denomination of $1,500, dated September 5, 1898;
the first instalment of interest will be payable March 1 1900,
and the remaining instalments thereafter on March 1, and
September 1 at the Commercial Banking Company Bank,
Coshocton. Principal will mature $1,500 yearly on Septem­
ber 1 from 1900 to 1914, inclusive. Bonds are issued under
authority of a city ordinance passed July 15, 1898, entitled
“An Ordinance to improve Main Street,” etc., and pursuant
to sections 2267, 2704 and 2705, Revised Statutes of Ohio.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check for of
the gross amount of bonds bid for.
Delphos (Village) Ohio.—Bond Offering— Proposals will
be received until 12 m . September 27,1898, by W. R. Cochran,
Jr., Mayor, for $>,000 5% water-works bonds. Securities will

THE CHRONICLE.

498

[LX VII.

Philip F. Kelly.
W. J. H
be in denomination of $1,000, dated October 1, 1851$; interest l)an. McNum» r Philadelphia..,103-705 Denison, Prior Sons. Clove....,101*37
M<>adv.(*3,000) (Oii-80
A
payable semi-annnallv at the Fourth National Bank, New CyrusBros X Co. Philadelphia.,.1000» Lrmiprecht Bros. Co., Clove 101-38Dio*
Co., Clove
101-83
Pieros. Pblla (*76,OOP)..,10307 8 A. Kean, Chlcouo ...... ......101'25
York City. Principal will mature $1,000 yearly on October T. Nichols, Memlvllle (*S.O .102000 Mason, Lewis & Co.. Boston....101-10
OlS).
I, from 1916 to 1920, inclusive. Bonds are issued pursuant to C. McLaughlin,Phlla. (*78,000) ..101'52 Merchants* Vat.Bank 1*10.000)101'00
Mendrlllp........101*715 N V . Harris & Co.. N. Y .........101'0#25
V
Hoyl Major.
sections 2835, 2886 and 2837 of the Revised Statutes of Ohio, j E. il. sGay A Co., Philadelphia-.101*315 L. 8. Tylor (local, *5,000) ..... lOO’OO
and an ordinance passed the 9th day of August, 1898, author­ Bonds mature
1928, subject
Octo­
ising their issue. These bonds were voted at an election held ber 1, 1903. ForOctober 1, description of to call after hron­
further
bonds see C
on August 8, 1898; the vote was 285 for and 60 against their icle August 27, 1898, p. 444.
issuance. A deposit of 2;{ of the total amount of bonds will Mercer County, Ohio.—Bids.—As stated in last week's
be required.
C
, the $14,500
ditch
Dexter, Me.—Bonds Proposed.—This town is considering were awarded on Augustroad andSpitzerbonds of this county
19 to
& Co., Toledo, at
the issuance of water-works bonds.
Dnnmore ( Pa.). School District.—Bond Sale.—On August 110-151. Following are the bids ;
25, 1898, the $5,000 I f school bonds were awarded to Edw. Spitzer A Co., Toledo................ $1,472 Briggs, Smith A Co., Cincinnati..$1,451
Seasongood A Mayer,
1 1
,-1
C. Jones Co., New York, at 102T8. Following are the bids : DeuLoti.Prior A Co., Cleveland. 1,471 [|Citizens’ Banking Co.,Cincln ... 1,2605
Rudolph Kleyholte A Co.,Ctucin. 1 7
,-1 0
Cellua.....
E dw . C. Jo n e s Co.. Now Y o rk ...,102*18 | T . J . H u g h e s (local, fo r $2 ,0 0 0 ).... P a r Commercial Bank, Celinu.......... 1,462 [ Farson, Leach A Co., Chicago___ l.OCK}
IV. J . lltiy e s A Sons, C le v e la n d .. 100*10 | F. F . S w artz (local, fo r $500)...........P a r
The $5,000 Frysinger road improvement bonds will mature
Bonds mature in 1912, For further description of bonds $500 yearly on September 1 from 1899 to 1908, inclusive. The
see Chronicle August 20, 1893, p. 338.
Eaton Rapids, Mich.—Bond Sale.—The sale of $25,000 Iff $7,000 Eelchart road improvementtobonds will mature on Sep­
1809 1901, inclusive, $1,000 in
water bonds to Michigan State Bank, at 101-2004, was re­ tember 1, $500 yearly from 1904, $510 in 1905, $1,000 in 1906,
1912, $300 in 1903, $1,000 in
cently reported.
Elbow Lake (Village), Minn.—Bond Sale.—On Augnst29, $500 in 1907 and $1,000 in 1908. The1Mercer County Dilch
will mature >5.0
yearly
1898, the $4,000 5;f water-works bonds were awarded to bondsinclusive. All ofon September will bearfrom 1900 to
1904.
above bonds
date of Sep­
Martha J. Cullen at 103T75. Following are the bids :
tember 1, 1893, and interest will be payable semi-annually at
M a rth a J . C all o n ......... .. .............. ,..$4,127 I M inn. L oon & T ru s t C o............. ,.,.$4,050 the County Treasurer's office.
J . C b.N orton, St. P a n !.................. -1,120 I D u k eM . F a rso n . C h ic a g o .. . . . . . . . 1,020
F irs t N a t. B ank, Elbow L a k e .. . 4,060 I E W . P o et, S t. P a u l........................... *,000
Missouri.—Bonds Registered.—The State Auditor
K an e A Co., M in n eap o lis............... 4,055 | S. K ean , C hicago......... ................ 3,980 25, 1898, registered the following bonds issued by on Aug.
various
Bonds mature $500 yearly on September 1 from 1908 to 1915, school districts :
inclusive. For further description of bonds see Chronicle, Cooper Comity1,School District No. 1,40,16, four Q%bonds of $250 each, dated
September 1898.
August- 20, 1898, p. 388.
Clay County School District No.
63,
four
of
dated
Everett, Mass.—Bond Sale.—On August 29, 1898, the $10,- Pemiscott County School District3,No. 82, 20, 13,0% bondsbond$300 each, dated
August 15,1898.
3,
one 3%
for $500,
000 25%- year water bonds, which were recently authorized August 15. lMK
by the Board of Aldermen, were sold to Blake Bros. & Co., Callaway September 1, 1898,and bearing 6;S interest. bonds and one $75 bond
County School District Ko. 1, 46.11, tvro $50
dated
Boston.
County School District No.
bond,
bearing 8$.
Fresno County (Cal.) Henningliaus School District.— Jefferson issued August 10,1898, and 4. 40, 5, two $116 67 bonds and one $116 66
Bond Sale.—Local papers report that $1,400 bonds of this Montgomery County (V. 0. Dayton), Ohio.—Bond Sale.—
district have been sold to Robert Effey at 107-25.
The following'bids were received on August 25, 1898, for the
Galesville (Village), Wis.—Bond Offering.—Proposals will $71,000 4% bridge bonds
be received until September 5, 1898, for the $3,000 a% water­ German Nat. Bank, Cincin...$72,26l 00 I Farson, Leach ACo.,Chicago.$71,637 57
Denison. Prior Co.. Clave..
works bonds recently authorized. Securities will be in de­ Briggs, Smith A Co , Ciucin.. 71,900 00 |Mason, Lewis ACo., Chicago. 71,536 00
Seasongood & Mayer, Clncln.
00
71,380
nomination of $5C0; interest will be payable September 1 at New First Nat.Bk,, Columbus. 71,737 00 {I R. Kleybblte AACo., Cmein 71,365 5&
71,735
00
the Village Treasurer’s office. Principal will mature $500 Principal will mature $18,000 on September 1 of the years
yearly from 1907 to 1912, inclusive. H. L. Bunn is the Vil­ 1931, 1902 and 1903 and $17,000 September 1,1904. For de­
lage Clerk.
July 30,
Graham County, Kan.—Bond Sale.—We are advised that scription of bonds see CY.—Bond Sale.— 1898, p. 242,$33,Q0q
Montour Falls, N.
sale of
the $10,000 bon (is,"to which reference was made in the Chron­ bonds to Street, Wvkes & Co. at par, The3-65 per cents is
as
icle of August 20, p. 388, are being purchased by the Farm­ reported.
ers’ & Merchants’ Bank of Hill City.
Mount Gilead
t art
Hyde Park, Mass.—Bond Sate.—On August 29, 1898, the election held on (Village), Ohio.—Bonds Defeated.—Aissue
August
to
$25,000 Library Building bonds were awarded to George $38,000 electric-light and 27, 1898, the proposition defeated,
water-works
was
A. Femald & Co., Boston, at 105-17. Following are the bids: but as there was only a light vote polled bondspeople are con­
the
Geo. A . F e rn a ld A Co., B o s to n .. 105*17 I B lak e B ros. & C o .,B o sto n ,........104*27
E stnb rook & Co„ B o sto n ...........104*649 | D . W . H o w la n d & Co., B oston. 10-4*155 sidering holding another election in the near future.
Muskegon, Mich.—Bond Issue.—The city has issued $4,C ushm an. F ish e r A P h elps,B o& .l04*599 i Jo se , P a rk e r & Co., B o sto n .. ...104*1895
E. H . R ollin s A Son. B o s to n
104‘59 | R , L . D ay A Co., B o s to n .... 10-4*139 123 88 one-year improvement bonds to the holders of old
B lo d g et, M e rritt A Co., B o sto n . 104*577 l P a rk in s o n A B urr, B o sto n .. .104*07
bonds now matured.
A d a m s A Co., B o s to n ....................104*43 R u d o lp h K Jtiybolte A Co., C ln. 103*93
N . W . H o rn s A Co., B o s to n — .104*835 | 8. A . K ean, C h ic a g o .............1 0 2 * 2 5
New Britain, Conn.—Bond Offering.—Proposals will be
Principal will mature yearly on May 1 as follows: $2,000 received until 8 P. h . Saturday, September 10, 1898, for $50,000 i% sewer-construction bonds. Interest will be payable
from 1899 to 1903, inclusive, and $1,000 from 1904 to 1918, in­
clusive. For description of bonds see Chronicle of last February 1 and August 1 at New Britain National Bank.
Principal will mature August 1, 1925, subject to call after
week, p. 443.
Jackson, Miss.—Bonds Authorized.—The City Council has August 1, 1910. G. C. Dunham is City Engineer.
authorized the issuance of $20,000 ii%20 year bonds. Of these North Bergen (N. J.) School District.—Bond Sale.—The
bonds $18,400 will be for the construction of bridges and the district has awarded $20,000 5%school bonds to the Hudson
remaining $1,600 for school-building purposes. The bonds Trust & Savings Institution at 111-73, Following are the bids:
Trust A Sav. Inst
.
Wbauu A Scblesincrer.
will be issued at the meeting to be held on October 4, 1898. Hudson Jones Co., New York—,.11L*73 I R. B. Smith A Co., NewN. Y -----108*75
109*301
Jewett, Texas.—Bonds Registered.—On August 23 the Edw. C. A Storrs, New York....109 26 | K. D. Shepard A Co., N. York. ..108*73
Bertron
Y .......108*475*
A Eventt N. Y.,.........109*173
State Comptroller registered $2,760 school bonds of this city. BenwellLeach A Co., N. Y ........108‘8?9 j George M. Habn, New York___108*54
La Porte, Ind.—Bonds Voted.—The people of this city Farson,Stanton A Co., N, Y ., .,,.108*895 |D. A. Moran A Co., New York. ..107*789
have voted to issue water-works bonds. We are advised that Walter
Orleans Levee District, La.—Bond Sale,—On August 25,
no details of the issue have yet been determined upon.
1898,
of this
awarded
Lee County (P. 0. biddings), Texas.—Bonds Registered to M. $270,00 i of the 5% bondsat 104‘04,district were at 104-16.
H. Sullivan, Pensacola,
and $5,000
and Sold.— On August 25, 1898, the State Comptroller regis­ The remaining $50,000 of this issue were awarded to the
tered $40,000 fcourt-house bonds of this county, and on the Germania Savings Bank at 104-05. Following are the bids:
same date $35,000 of the bonds were sold to the State Board M. IT.Sullivan..
( $50.0000101*50’
$5,0000104*10
of Education.
320,000(1® 104*04 New Orleans Nat.Blc. 50,0000101*00
fiO.OOOf.n 104*05
( 50,0400100*60
Lincoln, Neb.—Bond Sates.—The city has sold $1,500 ad­ M .H . Sullivan.
50,0000103*88 Columbia Deben.Co. 22,0000108*00
ditional of the $139,500 4y2% refunding bonds at par. The
01‘,0000103 *63 Dr. W. G. Owen..... 10, 00001102*00
20,000®
total amount of this issue sold to date is $79,500. The city German iu 8av. Bk , 25,0000103*25 Louisiana Deb. Co... ( 50.000®101*60
101-126
50,0000101*00 Hibernian Nat. Bk..
has also sold to Isaac M, Raymond of Lincoln the % issue of
50,0000103*75
t 60,0)00101*64
l 50,0000 103*50 Firemen's Charit­
paving bonds for Districts Nos. 1 and 2 at 102. The amount
I 60,0000101*32
able Association..
4,000®104*00
of the bonds will be determined later as the improvement
f 10,0000) L01
*50
60.0000 H‘l*45
! 6O,O(M0 101*54 Ed. Eisenhauer , f 10,0)00102*00
progresses.
IsadoreNewman ... ' 60,0000101*81
j 10,0000102*50
Long Branch (N. J.) School District.—Bond Offering.—
76.0000102*03
l 10,0000103*00
50,0000102*27
Proposals will be received until September 30, 1898, for $45,- N. W . Harris A Co. ( 325,0000101*63 Chas. Hernsbeim — 100.0000101*25
Stanton A Littlefield 25,0000101*00
000 5;J High School bondB. Principal will mature 32 years State Nati inal Bk.. f SVB.0010101*0025
f 5,0000101*75
J 5,0000102*00
50.0000100*00
from date of issue.
i 50,0000100*50 Horatio Lnnge........ 1 5.001®102*25
60,0000101-00
5,(1000102*50
Manchester, N. H.—Temporary Loan —This city has ne­ Louisian i Nat . Bk. 100,0000 101*50 H C. Cane............. {' 15,0000101*50
gotiated a $50,000 3 months’ temporary loan with George
i 50,0000102*00 Eugene Chaasniol. •• 3,000® 103*25
5,0000.102*50
Mixter, Boston, at 2‘96%.
125,0000'03*0626 Jos. A.Guaeh ........
Germania Nat. Bk
30,''0:-Obi 02* 5626 John Klein.............
5.00001100*54
Manchester, Va.—Loan Authorized.—At a special meet­ H. & B. Beer.
30,0000101*5025
ing of the City Council held August 30, 1898, a loan of $9,000
.....! 30.0000 100*5626
was authorized to meet the cost of constructing an overall For description of bonds see C
Aug. 13,1898, p. 337.
factory.
Orrrille (Village), Ohio.—Bond Sale.—On August 30.
Maricopa County (Ariz.) School District No. 50.—No 1898, the $11,000 6$ Market Street improvement bonds were
Bond Issue.—It has been reported that $1,500 school bonds of awarded to the Lamprecht Bros. Co., Cleveland, at 108-304.
District No. 60 of this county were recently authorized, but Following are the bids:
upon inquiry we learn that no such bonds will be issued.
I.aimirm-hl. Bros.
Oleve. .$11,003 60 1 R udolph KlOYboItafc Co., C ln .tll,868
Meadville, Pa.—Bond Sale,—On August 31, 1898, the O rrvilie Banking C o............. 11,900 0 0 1W . .J. H a yes « Sons C le v e — I I , S2 35
A bid of 108-50 was received from S. A. Kean, Chicago!
$153,000 4% water-works bonds were awarded to Philip F.
providing the population reached 2,000, and the village not
Kelly, Philadelphia, at 103-765, Following are the bids utch a

h

h r o n ic l e

A.

h r o n ic l e

h r o n ic l e

C o .,

70

499

T H E C H R O N IC L E

S eptember 3,1898. |

having the required population the bid was not considered. nomination of $504 74, dated September 1, 1898; interest will
Bonds mature §1,000 yearly from 1899 to 1907, inclusive, and be payable annually. Principal will mature $504 74 yearly
September 1 from
$3,000 in 1908. For further description of bonds see C h r o n ­ onSan Luis Obispo, 1899 to 1908. Election.—An election will
Cal.—Bond
icle August 6, 1898, p. 286.
be held in this city
1898, to submit to
Paulding County, Ohio.—Bond Sale—Press reports record people the question ofon September 5, gold sewer bonds. the
issuing $36,000
If
the sale of §74.2( 0 5*1 4-year average turnpike bonds of this bonds are issued they will bear interest at the rate of 5 per
county to W. J. Hayes & Sons, Cleveland, at 103'628.
Piqua (Miami County, Ohio.) School District —Bored cent, payable semi-annually. Principal will mature $900
from 1899 to 1938.
Sale.—On August 26, 1898, the $15,000 o% school bonds were yearly Mateo, Cal.—Proposed Bond Election.—It is reported
San
awarded to the Piqua. National Bank at 111 '333. Principal that an election will be held in this place some time in Octo­
will mature August 1,1913. For description of bonds see ber to vote on the question of issuing water-works bonds.
C
August 20, 1898, p. 389.
Date for holding the election has not yet been determined.
Poeomoke City, Md.—Bored Off.ering.—Proposals will be Schenectady, N. Y —Temporary Loan.—This city has ne­
received until 2 p. . September 21, 1898, by the Mayor and gotiated a temporary loan of $9,000 with local banks in an­
Council, for $25,000 5%water and sewer coupon bonds. Se­ ticipation of the collection of taxes.
curities are in denomination of $1,000, dated October 1, 1893. Shreveport, La.—Proposed Bond Election.—It is stated
Interest will be payable January 1 and July 1, and the prin­ that an election will soon be held in this city to submit to the
cipal will mature October 1, 1928 Bonds are issued pursu­ people the question of issuing public-improvement bonds.
ant with Chapter 249, Laws of 1898. Interest will be payable South Portland, Me.—Bonds Defeated.—At a recent elec­
at the Manufacturers’ Bank of Baltimore. Bonds are ex­ tion the people voted against the proposition to issue $18,000
empt from all taxation in the State of Maryland except for bonds for a sewer system, because, it is stated, the town has
already reached the o% debt limit authorized by law.
State purposes.
Beading, Pa.— Bond Election.—The Select Council on Spring School District (P. 0. Salinas), Cal.—Bonds
August 30, 1898, passed an ordinance providing for an elec­ Voted.—This district has voted to issue $1,650 school-house
tion to vote on the question of issuing bonds fora filtering bonds.
plant. The question will likely be voted upon at the Novem­ Stockton (N. J.) School District—Bond Bale.—The dis­
ber election, and the plant will cost about $230,009.
trict has sold to the Edw. C. Jones Co,, New York, $6,000 4£
St. Joseph (Mo.) School D istrict—Bonds Proposed.—The bonds for the new Rosedale school house.
Board of Education has under consideration the refunding of Stockton Township, Camden County, N. J.—Loan Au­
the 5%bonds now outstanding, and the question will prob­ thorized.—At the meeting of the Town Council held August
ably soon be submitted to a vote of the people.
23, 1898, it was decided to borrow $50,000 to pay for a sewer
St. Louis. Mich.—Bond Offering.—Proposals will be re­ along Federal Street.
ceived until 12 M., September 26, 1898, bv John R. Wilson, Tarentnm (Borough), Pa.—Bond Sale.—On August 31,
City Clerk, for $20,000 electric-light plant bonds. Securi­ 1898, the $15,000 5% sewer bonds and $9,000 5% paving bonds
ties are issued pursuant with Section 4, Chapter 27, Acts of were awarded to Lamprecht Bros. Co., Cleveland, at 106-212.
1895. They are in denomination of $1,000, dated November Following are the bids :
1, 1898. Interest will be payable semi-annually at the Pres­ L am p re c h t B ros. Co.. C le v e ..*95.491 00 I N. W . H a rris & Co , N. Y ....... *21,990 00
ton National Bank of Detroit. Principal will mature $1,000 .1 KJ.. BHryden.AKSons. C lePv ae ..... 25,200 51 I Ma sercan tile T ru sPt itts b uPrgtts b . 24,962 40
ranklin.
25,471
Co., i
24,900 00
YV.
ayes
00 J . C arotliers,
.......
yearly on November 1 from 1908 to 1927, inclusive.
T aren tu m N ational B ank. ... 25,200 0" | R obinson B ros., P itts b u rg ___ 24,800 00
D
24,739 00
Salem, Ohio.—Bond Of ering.—Proposals will be received D arr & M oore,r P* itts b uCrg ........ 25,190 00 M etro p o l’n N a t.B a n t, P itts b . 24,500 00
rio Co., le v
B
until 12 M. September 6, 1898, by Geo. Holmes, City Clerk, **enison, P mature Sept.e .. 25.017 00 | W m . M .to ell Co., P itts b — 1 ,19C8.
1,1928, subject call after Sept.
for $5,047 6% street-paving bonds. Securities will be in de- ‘ Bonds
IN VESTM EN TS.
N EW LOANS.
N EW LOANS.
h r o n ic l e

m

&

# 1 2 , O O O t o gt 1 5 . 0 0 0

4% ST R E E T IM PRO VEM ENT BO NDS,
BO RO UG H OF If A SB R O U C K H E IG H T S
N. J .
SEALED PROPOSALS will be received at the of­
fice of the BOROUGH CLERK until TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 6,1898. for the purchase of $12,000 to
$15,000 4 per cent 18 to 30 year bonds, denomination
$1,000. Bonds will bear date September 1, 1808; in­
terest payable semi-annually.
Each bid must, be accompanied by a certified check
for $300, to be drawn to the order of the Major and
Council, Borough of Hasbrouck Heights. Deposits
will be returned to unsuccessful bidders.
All bids must be sealed and marked “Bond Bid.
enclosed In a second envelope, addressed to the
Lierk.
Bonds awarded must be taken Immediately after
notlce that they are ready for delivery.
Circular containing fuil Information upon appll
1!1ij.
'
The right is reserved to reject any and nil bids.

R e c is t e r e d B o n d s
LEGAL INVESTMENTS FOR NEW
YORK SAVINGS BANKS. '

8130,000 White Plains, N. Y., Water
Works Bonds, maturing 1901
to 1928.
$150,000 Cincinnati, Ohio, 3J,££ Water
Works Bonds, due August 1,
1938, optional Aug. 1, 1918.

U N IT E D

STATES

3 % Bonds
BOUGHT

AND

SO LD.

R. L. D A Y & CO.,
4 0 W a ter S treet, B oston .
1 B road S treet, N ew Y ork .

G. II. ItAM.SDEN, C erk. Price and particulars on application. A D A M S & C O M P A N Y ,
Borough
BANKERS

N O T IC E O F R E D E M P T IO N .

SALT

LAKE

C IT Y .

The City Treasurer will pay at his office, September
first, 1898, the entire Issue of $500,000 Salt Lake City
bonds of 1888. Interest ceases Setember L
Ordered by the Council, Aug. 16 , 1898.
Legal notice In Salt Lake Papers.
G. H. BACKMAN,
_____
City Recorder.

Rudolph Kleybolte & Co,,
BANKERS.

J N assau S treet, N ew Y ork.
$ 3 5 ,0 0 0

41%

L o r a i n C o u n t y , O..
(Elyria County Seat)

$ 1 7 5 ,0 0 0

C H ILD R EN S* HOM E BO NDS.

Los Angeles Ti action Co,

Afsessed valuation................................$18,900,000
Total debt (this issue only )
..............
35.000
Population, 60,000.
Price and particulars upon application.

1st [U ortgnge 6 * 2 0 -y e a r G o ld B o n d . .
Total Issue * 2 * 0 .000 .
First Mortgage at *H.000 per mile.
Net earnings
28 months of opr ration. *89.983 St
equivalent to 12* on the total Issue of bonds.
Population of Los Angeles 103,079.
8end for full description of properly.

B R IG G S . S M IT H & C O .,
3 3 Enut T hird Street, - C incinnati, O hio.

tor

E. H. R O L L I N S & S O N S ,
19 i>Iilk Htreot. Boston, M a in .

MOSCOW, IDAHO, GOLD 6s
School Bonds, Due 1911.

Moscow Is the County Seat of Latah County, one
of the best agricultural nectlons in the State. For
price and full particulars address
H. B. POWELL, Woodstock, Vermont. "

DEALERS

IN

IN V ESTM EN T BONDS,
Members of Boston Stock Exchange.'

No. 7 Congress and 31 State Streets,
BO STO N
Government a n d
Municipal Bonds
B O U G H T AND SO LD.
APPRAISEM ENTS MADE OR QUOTATIONS
FURNISHED FOR THE PURCHASE, SALE, OR
EXCHANGE OF ABO VE SECURITIES.

JLISTS ON A P P L IC A T IO N .

N. W. H A R R I S & CO.,
BANKERS*

31 NA SSA U ST . (B ank of Com m erce B ld g .)

Holders Allen County, Kan,, M. A. Devitt & Co., Blodget, Merritt & Co.,
BO ND S.

Holders Of A L L E N COUNTY', KANSAS, R AIL­
ROAD-AID BONDS will learn something to their
interest by corresponding with
SPITZER & CO.,
Toledo, Ohio

M U N ICIPAL BONDS.

BANKERS,

F irst N ational B a n k B uilding^

16 C o n g re ss Street, Boston

C H IC A G O .

STATE, CITY & RAILROAD B0N »S

T H E C H R O N IC LE .

500

Tliomaston, (*&,—Bonds Voted.—At the election held Aug.
29, ISAS, the issuance of #10,000 fit educational bonds was
authorized. Bonds will mature #500 yearly on J .nuary 1,
from 1900 to 1919, inclusive. Interest will he payable Jan­
uary 1 and July 1, Full details have not yet been determined.
Throckmorton County, Texas.—Bonds Registered.—On
August 25, 1893, #17,000 court-house refunding bonds of this
county were registered by the State Comptroller.
Toledo, Ohio,—Bonds Proposed.—The city has under con­
sideration the issuing of #300,000 30-year bonds for building
a new city ball. The securities, if issued, will be in denom
ination of #1,000 and the interest not more than 4<. The
proposition to issue these bonds will be submitted to the peo­
ple at the election to be held in April, 1899.
Vailsburgh, N. J. —Bond Au‘ard Corrected.—In the
CHRONICLE of last week (p. 446) we stated that, on August 24,
1898, the #40,000 4%7 water-plant bonds were awarded to R. B.
Smith & Co., New York City, at 106'87. We are now ad­
vised that the above firm did not deposit the #500 agreed
upon as a guaranty, and the Common Couneil therefore
awarded the bonds to Benwell & Everitt, of New York City,
at 105-18,
Talley County (P. 0. Ord), Neb.—Bond Offering.—The
#32,000 P4% optional refunding bonds recently registered with
the Secretary of State will be sold at private sale to the high­
est bidder. Securities are in denomination of $1,000, and the
principal will mature May 1, 1918, but are subject to call
prior to maturity.
Wadley (Ga.) School District.—Bonds Voted.—On Aug.
29, 1898, the district, by a vote of 80 to 2, authorized the is­
suance of #7,000 07 school bonds. Securities are in denom­
ination of $500 and mature one bond yearly from 1908 to
1914, inclusive. The date of sale has not yet been determined.
Walla Walla County (Wash.) School District No. 1.—
Bond Bate.—On August 15, 1898, the #30,000 5% school bonds
were awarded to N. W. Harris & Co., Chicago, at 101-75,
Principal will mature ten years from-date of issue. For de­
scription of bonds see C hronicle August 13, 1898, p. S83.
Westchester County (P. 0. White Plains), N. Y.—Bond
Offering.—Proposals will be received until 1 p . m. September
8, 1898, by Francis M. Carpenter, County Treasurer, for
$64,978 4j; bonds issued to pay for Warburton Avenue exten­

[V ol . LX T il

sion bridges. Each bond from No. 1 to No. 64 is in denom­
ination of #1,000, No. 65 of $978, and all are dated September
15, 1899; interest will be payable June 1 and December 1 at
the office of the County Treasurer at White Plain?. Princi­
pal will mature $10,000 yearly on June 1 from 1900 to 1904,
inclusive, and $14,978 in 1005.' Each bid must be accom­
panied by a certified check for $1,250 drawn to the order of
the County Treasurer.
Whittier, Cal.—Proposed Bond Issue.—Lical papers state
that this place will soon advertise for bids for $40,000 20-year
water-works bonds.
York (Pa.) School District.—Proposed Bond Issue.—This
district will issue $37,000 of bonds. Tus date of sale has not
yet been determined, but it will probably be some time in
October or November.
S T A T E A N D C IT Y D E B T C H A N G E S .
Charlotte, N, Y.—R. M. Schwartz, Clerk. This village
is in Monroe County.
Sewor bonds, -i**8............. $15,000 I Assessed valuation peril. $80,600
W a t e r B o nds—
|Total valuation 1898....... 760,100
Akis, Ann., $25,000................ 1928 I Assessment about % actual value.
E l e c t r ic -L ig h t
[ City tax (per M) 1893...... $8,533
4U)S, Ann., $10,000.............. 1923 I Population in 1390 w s < .......... 930
Bonded debt Aug. 1, ’98 ..$50,000 |Population In 1898 (esfc.)__ .1,305
Assessed valuation, real. 679,500 1

Boiros—

Suffolk, Ya.—R. L. Brewer, Jr., Mayor; John F. Lotzea,
Treasurer. This town is the county B eat of Naneemond
County.

L O A 'S U7t«n D k c
5s, J&.J, N$55,000............................ . Total valuation 1897.. $1,383,379
Assessment
value.
Bonded debt June 1, ’98..$ >5,000 Tax rate (perabout % actual.$17-20
Assessed valuation, peril..43i.624 Population in $1,000) ’97 -.
real.. .948,755
1890 was........3.354
Assessed valuation,
Population In 1898 (est.) 5,000
TAX EXEMPT.—Bonds are exempt from town taxation.

Towner County, N. Dak,—D. K. Brightbill, County
Auditor. Cando is the county seat.
Bonded debt July 1,1898.$35,300
Sinking fund...................... 18,892
Net debt July 1,1898........ 16,408
Assessed valuation, real... 665,970
Assessed valuation, peril. .406,898

Total valuation 1397.. .$1,072,863
Assessmentlax (p50% actual value.
abt. r
State A Co. in 1890 M.) >98..$2l-00
Population
was........1,-150
Population in 1899 (est.'......5,00o

IN V ESTM EN TS.

IN V ESTM EN TS.

IN V E S T M E N T S .

W IL SO N & S T E P H E N S ,
41 W A L L S T ., N . Y ., B U Y
A N D SE L L O U T R IG H T OR
ON C O M M ISSIO N S T A N ­
D A R D RA ILR O A D A N D
M U N IC IP A L B O N D S . U N ­
D ER L Y IN G A N D S H O R T TIM E B O N D S FOR B A N K S
A N D IN S T IT U T IO N S A
SP E C IA L T Y . L IST S O F
O F F E R IN G S O N A P P L I­
C A T IO N .

W. Hampton Wade,

Whann & Schlesinger,

A T T O E N E Y -A T -IA W ,
'

S iV A M A H , G E O R G IA ,
Nine Tears practice in Alabama.
Sir yeara In Georgia.

M U N IC IP A L

BONDS,

71 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

C o rp o ra tio n L a w a S p e c ia lty .

TRO W BRID G E,
M A S O N , L E W I S & C O .,
M a c D o n a ld
B A JiK E E S ,
& N iv e r C o .
6 7 M ilk S tre e t, B oston,
1 7 1 L a S u ile S tre e t, C hicago,
M U N I C IP A L B O N D S ,
OFFER FOR SALE:
S ta te ol M aH H acbnsetts.................................-3 ^s
E ast C hester, N, Y .............. ................... ..........4 h 1st Nat. Bank Bldg. • - CHICAGO
SUITABLE FOB
S to w e . V t............................................................ -.4*
R e n o C ounty, K a n s a s ......... ......................
GOOD
INVESTM ENTS
L a k e C o unty, I n d ..............................................5 h
S A V I N G S B A N K A N D T R U S T M om cnce, 111....................................................... 5 h
N E T T IN G 5 TO 8 P E R C E N T .
And Other Desirable Securities.
FUNDS.
W a s h in g to n W a r r a n ts , B onds a n d S e e m 2
tie s o f a ll k in d s B o u g h t a n d Hold.
R .
LISTS MAILED ON APPLICATION.
C A LV IN PHILIPS,
307-8-9 CALIFORNIA BUILDING,
M u n ic ip a l B o n d s ,
T A C O M A , - W A S H IN G T O N .
Farson, Leach & Co.
171
LA SA LLE ST R E E T
C H IC A G O ,
NEW Y O R K
W illiam E. Nichols,
1 0 0 D e a rb o rn 8 t.
3 5 N a ssa u 8 t.
CHICAGO .
1 5 W A L L S T R E E T , - N E W YORK.

PUBLIC SECURITIES

F.

E D W A R D C. J O N E S C O .
D E A L E R S IN

W.

FU LTO N & CO.,

J .

Hayes & Sons,

BA N K ERS)
D E A L E R S IN M U N I C I P A L B O N D S
Btreet Railway Bonds, and other high-grade in­
BONDS.
vestments.
BOSTON, MASS.,
C lev e lan d , O hio,
S y r a c u s e , N . Y ., R a p i d T r a n s i t J V v r n y 5 h . 7 Rxeh&nge Place.
3 1 1 -3 1 3 S u p e rio r B i
Mu nicipal, Railroad,
Street Railw ay and Gas

NEW YORK, - 1 NASSAU STREET.
PH IL A D EL PH IA - 421 CHESTNUT ST.

E.

M U N IC IP A L BO N D S.
C. S t a n w o o d & Co.
BAN HERB,

121 Devonshire Street.
BOSTON.

Cable Addr*»*. " K E N N E T H ”

V IU N IC IP A L BONDS.
Securities Netting from 3 % to <i%

ALWAYS ON HAND.
Bend lor our Investm ent Circular.
DUKE M. F A R S O N , Banker,
Municipal Bonds.
1 8 2 D e a rb o rn S treee
C H IC A G O .

M UNICIPAL W A R R A N T S .
SEND FOR LISTS

CHOICE MUNICIPAL BONDS
from S O U T H E R N & W E S T E R N states,
y ie ld in g 4 to 5 % $ .
ROSENBEItGER & LIVERMORE,
F o rty W a ll S tre e t, N ew Y o rk .

B a n k a n d T ru s tC o m p a n y S t o c k s
New Y o rk and Brooklyn
B O U G H T A N B SO U ».

CLIN TO N G IL B E R T
1 W A L I. S T ., N E W Y O R K .