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NEWSPAPER,

A WEEKLY

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

NEW YORK, NOVEMBER 6, 1869.

VOL. 9.

Rider &
73

Cortis,

BROADWAY,

A.

NEW YORK

NEPHEW,

V.

NO
AND

SONS.

Van

B.

Drafts on Englan
Ireland and Scotland.
Bankers furnished with Sterling Bills of Exchange,
and through passage tickets from Europe to all arts
el theUUfteoStates.

Hatch, Foote & Co.,
BANKERS
AND DEALERS IN GOVERNMENT SECURITIE

GOLD, Ac.

Duncan, Sherman & Co.,
bankers;
GOBNE& OF PINE AND NASSAU STS.,
CIRCULAR NOTES AND CIRCULAR LETTERS
OF CREDIT,
For the use of Travelers abroad and in the United

Skates, available in all the principal cities of the
world; also,
COMMERCIAL CREDITS,
For use In Europe, east of the Cape of Good Hop
West Indies South America, and the United State

•

M. K.

•

1

■

"

■.

■

19 New Street.

c,

TRAVELLERS,

DRAW at Sight or Sixty Days on PARIS, Sterling
Buis at Sight or Sixty Days, on

New York, November 5,1869.
E. S. MUNROE.

E. S. MUNROE ft CO.

Jesup & Company,

BANKERS AND

MERCHANTS,

12 PINE STREET,
egotlate
Honda and Loans for Railroad Coe.,
Contract for
Iron or Steel

Accounts received and interest allowed on same.
Stocks and Bonds nought and sold at the Uew York
Stock Exchange. RAILROAD LOANS NEGOTIATED

James Robb, King & Co.,

Rolls, Locomotives,

Watertown, N. Y.
G. F. Paddook,

> Plt
orin C. Frost,
Andrus, > rroPrietor3.
Cashier.
Correspondents :
Central Nat. Bank. New York; -fay Cooke ft Co.;
N. Y. State Nat. bank, Albany, N.Y.
Special attention paid to collections in New York
Merritt

State and Canada.

Care, etc.

J. L. Brownell & Bro.,
BANKERS A

McKim, Brothers & Co.,
No. 47 Wall Street, New York.
BANKERS AND
BROKERS,
DEALERS

28 BROAD

GOVERNMENT

IN

Stocks, Bonds and Gold bought and Sold exclusively
Commission, interest allowed on Deposit Accounts

Wm, &

Jno. O’Brien,

BANKER* AND
58 WALL

Ward,

Continue to

BROKERS,

STREET,

Stocks, Bonds, Government Securities and Gold
Bought and Sold exclusively on commission.
Accounts of Banks, Bankers and individuals receiv¬
ed on favorable terms.
t

mission,

COMPANY.
6$ WALL STREET, NEW YORK,

AND TO THE NEGOTIATION OF

BARING BROTHERS A

BOSTON.

LETTERS OF CREDIT FOR TRAV¬
ELLER'S.

James G. King’s Sons,
54 William Street.

C. B.

CitizensBknkop Louisiana
Capital and Reserved Fund
AGENCY,

A. D.

LOANS,

Draw

Also, continue to receive money on deposit, subject
draft, and allow interest on daily balances.

Wm. R.
W.
BANKERS

Utley & Geo.
Dougherty,
AND

snms

NO. 11 WALL STREET, NEW

YORK.

x. Q. PEARL.

BANKERS

Gibson, Beadleston & Co,
BANKERS,

Parle and the Union Bank of
London*

Lancaster A Go.
Richmond.

Brown, Lanoabtee A Co.
Baltimore.

Frank & Gans,
BANKERS AND DEALERS IN U. S*
GOVERNMENT SECURITIES,




AND

Co.,
BROKERS,

64 BROADWAY ft 19 NEW ST.f

No. 50 EXCHANGE PLACE.

and Bonds of'

every description bonght and sold on Commission.
Southern Securities a specialty.

Taussig, Fisher & Co.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS
No. 33 Broad

Street, New York.

Buy and SeU at Market Bates

SECURITIES,

SoUcit accounts from MERCHANTS, BANKERS a n
others, and allow Interest on daUy balances, street
to Sight Draft.

Make collections
and
of

on

f avoradle

the most favorable terms.
INTEREST allowed on deposits

on

either in Curranoy

Gold, subject to check at sight, the same as with
the City Banks.
AD Van CES made on all marketable securities.
CERTIFICATES of Deposit issued bearing interest.
COLLECTIONS made at aU points of the UNION
and BRITISH PROVINCES.
or

negotiated on FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
PRODUCE, m store and afloat. We Invite particular
attention to this branch of our business in vhlch/we
have unusual faculties —

terms,

promptly execute orders for the purchase or sa.e
■

STOCKS, BONDS. GOVERNMENT SECURITIES.
FOREIGN EXCHANGE and GOLD bought and sold

LOANS

NEW YORK.

Government Securities, Gold, Stocks

ALL UNITED STATES

76 State Street. Boston,
19 William Street, New York

LESS IN ALL PARTS OF EUROPE

D. F. JETT

Pearl &r

Government Securities, Stocks. Gold and Specie
Southern Securities aud Bank Notes; Central and
Union Pacific Railroad Sixes; State, City, Town,
County and Corporation Bonds; Insurance. Manufac

[Successors to Bowles, Dbevet A Co.]
No. 12 Roe de la Paix, Paris.

CIRCULAR LETTERS OF CREDIT FOR TRAVEL

Marcaard, Andre ft Co

Fould ft Co,
London,
Paris
to points suiting buyers of Sterling or Francs.

BROKERS

Bowles Brothers & Co.,

on

on

Bank,
Baring, Brothers ft Co,
In

$2,500,000,

SELLECK, 37 Pine St, N.Y.

London Joint Stock

taring and Bank Stocks, BOUGHT AND SOLD.

BUIe

Kbperences

Fonda., Pres. National Meclc Banking Ass. N. Y.
Blair, Pres. Merchants’ Nat, Bank Chicago.

to instant

EXCHANGE ON LONDON AND PARIS.
SIGHT DRAFTS ON EDINBURGH A GLASGOW

STOCKS AND BONDS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.

J. H.

give their attenti in to the

Purchase and ^ale of Stocks on com¬

AGENTS FOB

48 STATE STREET,

SECURITIES

BROKERS,

STREET, NE W YORK,

on

No, 50 Wall Street.

S. G. & G. C.

WM. L. MONTAGUE

Dealers in Railway and other Shares current at the
New York Stock Exchange.
We furnish to, or purchase of, appUcants in lots to

-

LONDON.

JAB. H. JORDAN.

GEO* F. PADDOCK Sc COM*ITS BANK.

all business connected with Railways

Credit

MeMrs^ROEERT^B^SONACoV }

Co.,

suit, on favorable terms..

nd undertake

CIRCULAR

FOR

Munroe &

S.

No. 13 WALL STREET.
■—

of

OF

ABM. BELT

Sterling Exchange business.

Letters

E.

STREET.

BROAD

30

OFFICE

Dyck,

STOCK, BOND AND GOLD BROKER,

Successors to

8AML. THOMPSON’S

Bankers and Brokers.

Bankers and Brokers.

Foreign Bills.

NO. 228

Gold,

j

State, Federal, and Railroad

Securities,

'

Warren Kidder & Co.,
NO. 4 WALL STREET, ifcW YORK.
Orders for Stocks Bonds
cuted. FOUR PER CENT INTEREST ALLOWEDon

tepot-ft suhJeev to efcesk st

sight-

£HE CHRONICLE.

578

'rfiy.

■

/ [November

—

1

Flna^ciaL

•

BANKING HOVSC:

6,1869

\

-««>!'1
*

Financial.

Bankers and Brokers.

;
•

Banking House of

or

Jay Cooke 6c Co.,
York, Philadelphia an*

New

Dealers In U.S. Bonds and Members of Stock and Gold

Washington.

KO.

We Buy, Sell and

YORK

STREET, NEW

WALL

20

Exchange at most liberal rates,

Exchanges in both Cities.
Receive Accounts of Banks and Bankers on liberal
terms.

al

SON, London.

B.METZLER S.SOHN Sc CO.Frankfort

BONDS.

GOVERNMENT

JAMES W. TUCKER Sc
SUPERIOR AND MISSI8SIPP
RAILROAD COMPANY, and execute orders lor pur
and Bonds of LAKE

CO., Paris.

AND OTHEE PRINCIPAL CITIES

Interest -allowed

;

And Letters of Credit available throughout Europe.

Circular Notes

OPIATE RAILROAD AND MUNICIPAL

as

OANS, receive Deposits, subject to Check, allowing
terest,and transact a general Banking Business.

AND

CO.,

&

CREDIT

LETTERS OF

CIRCULAR

tor

JAY COOKE & CO.

SMITH

TRAVELERS,

Sold on Commission.
ADVANCES made upon

COMMERCIAL CREDITS,

W.

Co.

Bliss Sc

Wor THINGTON, Vermilye

N.

at

ISSUED BY

Morton,

approved Securities.
made, and Loans Negotiated.

Co.,

Sc

3IXMBBR ar. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE,

BANKER
14

WALL

STREET,

.BANKERS,

BROKER,

AND

NEW

Nob. 16 A 18 Nassau

YORK.

Particular attention paid to the purchase and sale

Stocks, Bonds, Gold and. Exchange,
DEPOSITS RECEIVED SUBJECT to SIGHT DRAF
And Four Per Cent interest

allowed

on

DEALERS

AND IN

especial

GOLD AND

Collections made on all Southern Points.

37 WALL

COUPONS,

-

RA1LW AY

STOCKS, BONDS AND

BROKERS,

GOLD,

,

STREET,

MAKING LIBERAL ADVANCES.

New York.

John P.

Marquand,

George H. B. Hill

Stocks, Bonds and Gold, bought and Sola on com
mission. Business Paper Negotiated.

Interest

MR, WALTER hi. FURIVS RETIRES
this day from our New York and London firms.
MORTON, BLISS & Co.
MR. WALTER WATSON (late Agent for the Bank
ot British N< rth America, New Yont), is this day ad¬
mitted a partner in our firm.
New York, October

1st, 1869.

MORTON, BLISS & CO.
Bartholomew House

Bank, )
London, October 1st, 1869. >
The Hon. JOHN ROSE Gate Minister of Finance for
the Dominion ot Canada; joins our firms this day,
which will be continued under the style of MORTON,
KOoE & CO.

L. P.

MORTON, BURNS & CO.

Ward Sc

Co.,

54 WALL

usual rates. Foreign Ex¬

change negotiated. Draw Bll s on the
UNION BANK OF LONDON.

Deposits in Gold and Currency received and inte¬
allowed on balances exceeding $1,000.

John J. Cisco 6c Son,
.

WALL

PURPOSES
There Is in the country. It is now in practical uBe
and giving the BhibT of SATISFACTION, and is
adopted by some of the best ENGINEERS, MECHAN¬

ICS and MANUFAt TUR1<RS in the country.
Will
bear the most CRITICAL EXAMINATION. Capital¬
ists will find it worthy ol their examination.
l or

Receive money on denosit, subject to check at sight
allowing interest on daily balances at the rate cf k>u
per cent per annum, credited monthly.
Issue Certificates of Deposit bearing

terest,

four cent in

payable on demand or at fixed periods.

Negotiate Loans.
Execute promptly orders lor the purchase and sale
of Gold, Government and other Securities on com¬
mission.
Make collections
and Canada.

on

all parts

of the United States

particulars enquire of

w. jr. McAllister sc go.,
178 Broadway, New York.

HAVE THIS DAY TRANSFERRED OUR
WE Interest in the business heretofore conducted

wolf,

ABRAHAM

INTEREST ON CITY STOCKS.
—The Interest

the

City and '

B°S w .A:
office, in

on

the Bonds and Stocks of

ountj^of JTe# York, due

and. pavabie

^daybv PETER
at his

?n
Chamberlain of the City,
the New Court House,
»

Jhetransier books will be closed FRIDAY, October
/ WCHABD B. CONNOLLY, Comptroller.
Department of Finance, Comptroller’s Office, New
r>

York, September 24th, 1869.




’

ew

Addison Cammack

Osborn

Sc
B

Cammack,

INKERS,
34 BROAD STREET.

S'ociis, State Ronds, Gold and Fcdei al
Securities,

HuWnUNG, Ulverp°o1-

CTFULLY SOLICIT FROM THE FRIENDS
of the late Hi m a continuance of their favors and con
dence.—No.40 a.roadway,New York.November 118 9.
LEWIS BENJAMIN. '

commis¬

Banking Accounts may be
opened with us upon the same con¬
ditions ns Currency Accounts.
Bailroad, State, City and other

Corporate Loans negotiated. •
Collections made everywhere in
the United States, Canada * and
Europe.
Dividends and

Coupons collected.

United States
New

Treasury.

York, November J, 1869.

NOTICE.

By direction of the Honorable the Secretary of the
Treasury, the purchases of 6 20 Bonds and Bales of
Gold by the Treasury during the month of Novem¬

ber will be as follows :

PURCHASE OF BONDS.

8—Two millions.
4—One million (Sinking Fund)
10— i wo millions.
17—Two millions.
18—One million (Sinking Fund)
November 24—Two millions.
November
November
November
November
November

SALES OF GOLD.
November 2—One million.
November 6—One million.
November 9—One mi’lien.
November 11—One million.
November 12—Odo million.
November 16—One million.
November 19-One million,
November 23—One million.
November 26—One million.
November 26—One million.
November 30- One million.

with

C. J. Osborn.

in New York under the firm name of A. WOLF & CO.
to Mr. Lewis Benjamin, whose interest in our Liver¬
pool house will cease from and after this date. Mr.

Benjamin will alone sign in liquidation, and hereafter
conduct the business in New York under his own firm
made for his account.

on

Gold

STREET, NEW YORK,

(Brown Brothers & Co.’s Building,)

STEAM

Securities,

•

rest

BANKERS,

NE OF THE MOST VALUABLE PATENTS FOB

Aaron

first-class

Established 1820.

Gold and Government Se

cur¬

and
Coupons, and execute orders for the
purchase and sale of Gold and all

STREET, NEW YORK.

Orders in Stocks. Bonds,
curities promptly filled at

NO. 59

For Sale.

buy, sell and exchange all

issues of Government Bonds at
rent market prices, also Coin

Chas. II. Ward.

BANKERS,

Miscellaneous,

O

Deposits.

Wm. G. Ward.

Henry II. Ward.

Office of Morton, Bliss & Co.,)
New York, October 1st, 1869.
>

on

Dealers,

times, on approved collaterals,

We

BUY AND SELL ON COMMISSION

Marquand, Hill Sc Co.,
AND

GOLD

our

market rates of interest.

sion.

SECURITIES

GT

Securities
have
attention.

BANKERS

^N ALL ISSUES OF

Daily

Balances.

Southern

Street, New York,

GOVERNMENT

fixed

at

or

Advances made to
at all

.

DEPOSITS received and interest allowed at best
Current Rates.
GOVERNMENT and STATE SECURITIES, GOLD,
RAILROAD BONDS, STOCKS, etc., bought and

on

States.

AVAILABLE IN ALL PARTS OF EUROPE
ALSO,

JNo. 40 Wall Street, New York.

demand

date,
bearing interest at current rate, and
available in all parts of the United

BANKERS,

COLLECTIONS

with National Banks.

able

•

ALEXANDER

on :

Certificates of Deposit issued, pay-'

Stocks, Bonds and Gold.

WILLIAM

all

Daily
Currency or Gold.
Persons depositing with us can
check at sight in the same manner

chase and sale of

WE NE

STREET.

Balances of

ISSUE BILLS OF EXCHANGE ON

C. J. HAMBRO Sc

ssues ot

32 WALL

BOUGHT AND SOLD ON

Particular

Attention

COMMISSION.

pall to Invest*

ments In Southern State

86 SOUTH

STREET. NEW YORK.

Bight Drafts and Exchange payable in all

pans of Great Britain and Ireland,

W. TAPSCOTT & CO., Liverpool. Ad
on consignments.
Orders for Govern
Stocks, Bonds and Merchandize executed.

Credits
vances

ment

on

made

THURSDAY, the 18th of November, having beetf
apart by the Preeid nt of the United fetates and
the Governor of New York as a day of Thanksgiv¬
ing and Prayer, the purchase of Ore Million Bonds
for the Sinking Fund . falling on thut day will take
set

place on

WEDNESDAY;

the 17th inst.

chase of the 17th will be Three

Millions.

The pur¬

DANIEL BUTTE H FIELD,
Assistant Treasurer*

Bonds.

Tapscott, Bros, Sc Co.
Issue

The purchases and sales will be in accordance
the regulations heretofore in pracli e. A certified
check tor 6 per cent, of the amount ol each bid must
be deposited with the proposal The proposals will
be opened at 12 o’c.tcknoon, on the days fbove
mentioned. Further particulars can be had on : pplicati- n at the Treasury.
■

Henry
anker atid

Meigs,

krokef, Na.-27 Wall St.,

Member ot New York

Stock Exchange,

ormerly the firmoftH. Meigri. Jr., & Smith).and late
caabier of he Metropolitan Bank.
or
Jffers his services lor the purchase and sale of Gov"

ameht and sir other Stocks, Bonds
nterest allowed on deposits
fn treat man tfl r.arefnllv Attended to.

and Gold,

•
c,
/ ■£

/
♦

November 0, I860}:

*

■i

THE

•

t-?

1

.

CHRONICLE.
~

....

....

•: ?
it-

jn ^

-■•

■

Boston Bankers.

Financial.

Western Bankers.

«»'

Page, Richardson & Co., Gilmore, Dunlap
BANKERS,

SOUTTB* & Co.,
l|ANKER»,

70 State

WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK.

NO. 88

Bills of

Interest allowed on

Deposits subject to Sight Drat

The Cltv

Bank,

110

West Fourth Street*
/

;

i

-

)

> PARIS.

AND

Dealers in

GOLD, SILVER and

BANKER, FACTOR AND

Commission

Marcuard, Andre Sc Co., )
COLLECTIONS MADE at all accessible

Circular Notes available for Travelers in all parts of

Europe and the East.

points and remitted tor

Jr.

Ever

&

ett

28 State

Merchant,

Co.,

CHECKS

ON

Street, Boston,

.

_

•

_

Speoial attention given to consignments of Cotton.
Gold, Stocks, Bonds and Foreign and Domestic
LxchaBge* bought and sold,
collections promptly remitted for
Orders solicited for the purchase oi bales of Produce
and Securities. Prompt attention guaranteed.
New York Correspondents: Lawrence Bbos. & Co.

HEARD

Sc.

I

'•

i

u,

J

day oi payment.
PARIS

AND

FOR SALE'
-

ACGC STINE

on

LONDON

»GENTS FOR

P. Haydbn.

Smnnali) Ca,

all Him, of

GOVERNMENT BONDS.

_

Edward C. Anderson,

'

CINCINNATI, OHIO.

V LONDON.

Munrod Sc Co.

,

.

on

Co.,)

Robert Benson Sc

rCheok. ■ Advances made on approved securities.

Collect? Visboth inlinaand foreign promptly made.
Foreign and Domestic Loans Negotiated.

Sc

1

and

Special facilities foi negotiating Commercial Paper.

108

Exchange, and Commercial and Travelers’
Credits issued

Dealer* in Bills of Exchange, Governments, Bonds

Stocks, Gold, Commercial Paper, and all Negotiable
Securities.

Street, Boston*

& Co.,

^

-

Jos. Hutcheson.

W. B* Hayden.

CO.,

OF CHINA AND JAPAN.

Advances made on consignments of approved mer

Hayden, Hutcheson &Co
BANKERS,

chandize.

NO.

13

S.

HIGH

STREET,

.

COLUMBUS, OHIO,

Philadelphia Bankers.

Do

General

a

Banking, Collection, and Exchange
Business.

Williams&Guion,
Galon A

New York.

’ London.
Advances made on consignments to onr Correspon¬
dents, and orders for the purchase of Merchandise,
Stocks and Bonds, executed by Cable or Mall.
,v

&

Oberge,

WALNUT STREET,

Commission Stock Brokers.
J. BELL AUSTIN.

New

York,

85 BRUHL.

Southern Bankers.

principal cities 'of Germany, Switzerland,
.ngland, France, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Bel¬

.

H. D. COOKE Cof Jay Cooke & Co.,)
WM. S. HUNTINGTON, Cashier.

Letters of Credit for Travelers.
available in all parts of Europe.

Also

cities

-

ESTABLISHED 1837.
:

Depository and Financial
Agent of the United States.

Capital paid In

STATE

:
:

in..,

,

*~**Ji3
»

^

r*

-

>

£ ' *

.....$3,410,300

....

having reorganized as a NatfonidBank

This Bank,

prepared to do a general hanking business.'
Securities, Coin, Gold Dust and Bullion
bought and sold at current rates. Special attention
is

buy and Sell all classes of

now

Government

Government Securities
of the most favorable
;iou to

Canadas.

in St. Louis.

President.

U overnment
We

ana

NATIONAL RANK OF THE
OF MISSOURI.

FIRST NATIONAL. BANK OF WASH¬
INGTON.

gium, Russia, Italy, Spain, Denmark, Ac.

isue

LOUIS, MISSOURI.

Draft* on London and Pari* for Sale*

Washington.

Draw in sums to suit
the

ST.

CHAS. H. OBERGE

of the United States

Leipzig, Saxony,

AND

BRi)AD ST.

Co.,

Buy and Sell Exchange on all the principal

Travelers' and Commercial Credits Issued, available
all parts of Europe, Ac.

BANKERS.

Benoist &
BANKERS,

n

Knauth, N achod &Kuhne

L. A.

PHILADELPH1 A.

Alex. 9. Fetrle Sc Co.*

Co.,

Liverpool,,

313

i

71 Wall Street,

Austin

terms, and give especial atten-

H. Britton, throughout K. Diox
fiven to collections Pres. Chas.the West on

•

ames

Edwabd P. Cubtis Cashier

Business connected with tbe several

Department of tiie Government.

Farmer, Hatch & Co.,
BANKERS Sc

Full information with regard to Government
at all times cheerfully furnished.

BROKERS,

Stocks, Bonds and Gold bought and sold exclusively
commission.

Freedman’s

Accounts of Banks and Bankers received. Collec¬
tions made in the United States, British Provinces and

Europe.

Bills of Exchange drawn on London, Paris, Ac.
E. J. Farmer A Co.,
C. J. Hatch & Co..

Cleveland, O.

Central

Office

Borg,

Southern and [Miscellaneous Securities

In connection with the Manhattan

Memphis, Tenn.

Washington, D, C.,

at

BRANCHES AT

K.

Savings Bank

£liis, Nashville, Chattanooga, Louisville, St. Luuis
lartlnsburg, New York ana Washington.
Collections promptly made.
These Banks are for the Colored

The

Deposits are

D. L. EATON, Actuary.

Swan &

Payson,

BANKERS AND
50 WALL

BROKERS,

STREET, NEW YORK,

Government Securities, Stocks, Bonds and Gold
Bought and sold on commission.
Otis D. Swan, Geo. P. Payson, Wm. S. Alexander,jr.
Of the New York Stock Exchange.

Correspondent.

Lancaster &

Co.,

58 Wall Street. New York.
and

88

STATES TR

BBT,

BOSTON,

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.
And

Sterling Gredlts,

DEALERS IN COMMERCIAL PAPER.
Sell Mass&chussetts and New York State
Buy
Stocks.
Government Securities, Stocks Bonds, and Gold,
bought and sold strictly on Commission.

The Trade
•

,

r

* i

i * r*

,

v

l

vt

MflOHAI.
■:

it'.!

891

* »

.

..

.

-

•




.

.

..

...

.4

.

.

R. H. Maury &
‘

•

... ..... M

RICHARD BERRY, lAeslden,. •
ANTHONY HALBE Y Cashie

.d An-

Street, Louisville, Kyv dealer* In

Foreign and Domestic Exchange, Government Bonds
and au Local Securities. Give prompt attention to
collections and orders for investment of fluids. - -

& Co.,

BANKER?.
PITTSBURGH

PA.

Bank,

Second National

TITUSVILLE, PENN.,

$200$QUO

Capital • •
•
■
*
DeDosited with U. S. Treasurer o secure
p
and Deposits 500,000.
Cashier.

G. C. HYDE,

Circulation

CHAS. HYDE, Pres’t.

J. L. BROKER
Levy,

J. M. Weith,

J

.

,

GXO.‘AKitSt*

Weith, & Arents,

M.

Late J. M. Weith & Co., •:

.r

tdt sl!. -*3-

DEALERS IN SOUTHERN IJONISCELLANEOUS ScCtBiTIES, - Loan*

", No. NEW STREET.
Negotiated.

,

STOCK

23

.«flt000,0
4.
470,00

150 West Main

Co.,

BANKERS & BROKERS,
No. 1014 MAIN ST. RICHMOND, VA.
Sterling Exchange, Gold and Silver, Banl Notes,
9tate, City and Railroad Bonds and Stocks, &c.,
oought and sold on commission.
13P” Deposits received and Collections made on all
accessible points in the United states.
N. 1. Correspondent, YERMILYE & CO.

AND

Exchange Dealer,

BBOADWAY, NEW YORK.

SURPLUS

,

YORK.

BOB’T T. BBOOXF.

JAS. L. MATTBY.

*

BANK.

Morton, Galt & Co.,

EX¬

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND.

No. 23 NASSAU STREET, NEW

s m e n s
... -

Hewson,

S. McClean

BROWN, LANCASTER Sc (30.,
No. 30 SOUTH STREET,

EOB’T H. MAURY

F.

Street, Richmond, Va.

LANCASTER, BROWN Sc CO

Blake ; Brothers &

Broker*,

STOCK BROKER,
Office No. 21 West Third Street, Cincinnati, Ohlb.
Refer to: All Cincinnati Banks, and Messrs.LOCKWOOD & Co., New York.

Co.,

BANKERS
A\D STOCK
AND
CHANGE BROKERS,
No. 1113 Main

Bond

BANKERS,

$1,250,000,

J. W. ALVORD, Pres’t.

JAY COOKE & CO., New York

W. M.

people.

now

Gaylord & Co.,

and

NO. 323 NORTH TRIED STREET,
SAINT LOUIS, MO.

Savings Bank

Baltimore, Norfolk, Richmond, New Berne, Wil
mlngton, Raleigh, Charleston, Beaufort, Augusta,
(Ga.), Savannah, Macon, Jacksonville, TaUahasse,
Mobile, Huntsville, New Orleans, Vicksburg, Mem-

dealers in

No. 41 PINE STRuET, NEW TO

Stock

CHARTERED BY CONGRESS IN 1865,

Milwaukee, Wis.

Levy &

Sam’l A.

NATIONAL

78 BROADWAY AND 5 A 7 NEW STREET.

on

Loans

CARO NILE LET

STREET,

NEW ORLEANS.
Sen^ral Pertner

..

Pa. tuer in Coinmendum

J* L. Levy.

E. J. Habt.

collection* laade on all point*.

Lounsbery &.Fanshawe,
BANKERS Sl BROKERS,

No

8

WALL

STREET, NEW YORK.

Government Securities,
Geld and Foreign Exchange.
BICrJLS

P.

LOUNSBEBY.
■4

*WILLIAM 8. FANSHAW*

r

[November 6, 1369

CHRONICLE.

THE

580

"X

Financial.

Financial.

Financial.
SEVEN PER CENT

AND

BOUGHT AND SOLD.

Fund

GOLD,

CENT

PER

SEVEN

Convertible Sinking

______

FREE OF GOVERNMENT TAX.

38 PINE

and

Pekin Railroad Company

Bonds

First Mortgage

granted Three Millions of Acres of the finest
Colorado, which are mortgaged
for the security of a loan of

Far¬

N. V. <fc OSWEGO

MIDLAND K.K.
It

THESE BONDS CAN BS

SIX MILLONS OF

$2,00 »,000

$3,000,000

The Bonds are a first mortgage on the railway, its
rolling stock, depots, machine shops, lands, and the
entire property of the Company




Topography.

The road is 117 5*100 miles in length, the only East
and West line connecting the Cities of Danville, Ur-

hana, Bloomington and Pekin on the line of the old
Emigrant Road. This Bection has been justly named
the Garden of the West, and is noted for its large

agricultural and manufacturing products, also for its
valuable mines of coal. The local business will make
the line a FIRST CLASS PAYING ROAD.
Valuable Connections.

large through
business, having as MANY VALUABLE CONNEC¬
TIONS EAST AND WEST AS ANY ROAD now in
operation. The line has lately been consolidated with
the Indianapolis and Danville Road, makiDg over 200
In addition the Company provide fora

At

one

management.

Indianapolis it connects with the Pennsylvania

Central, Baltimore and Ohio, also with several other
llnea at Danville, with the Toledo, Wabash and W est-

and at Pekin with Peoria, making a new through
direct route to Illinois, connecting Philadelphia, New
York, Boston and Baltimore with Peoria, Keokuk,
Burlington, Omaha and the far West.
•rn,

Completion of the Road.
rapidly constructed, all graded
bridged, the track laying at the rate of one mile
per day, all the iron and a large amount of rolling
atock provided. The whole road WILL BE COM¬
PLETED BEFORE THE 1ST OF JANUARY NEXT.
The road is being

and

Profit of tbe Investment.

secured in the most effectual manner.
represents a road in profitable operation, and will

the trade of the Rocky Mountain country, and
the East. It is
considered to be one ot the best loans In the market
open

REGISTERED.

connect it with the great markets of

Free of Government Tax

miles under

$6,fr 00,000.
This loan is

October,

l (Length and

an

lands in Kansas and

3
Principal and Interest Payable In Gold at the
mers’ Loan and Trust Company, New York.
Coupons payable First of April and

-

ation irom Kansas
has

OF

Capital Stock*

Railway now in successful oper¬
City to Sheridan, proposes to build
extension to Denver, Colorado. The Government

The Kansas Pacific

OF ILLINOIS,

-

yoad under construction ;

bonds issued

on

issue limited

to $20,000 per

built and in

mile of road

running order, BEING ONLY

ABOUT HALF THE ACTUAL

EVEN BETTER IN SOME RESPECTS THAN
GOVERNMENT SECURITIES.

The bonds average LESS THAN EIGHTEEN
THOUSAND DOLLARS PER MILE, are CONVERTI¬
BLE INTO STOCK AT PAR, at the option of the

holder, at any time, and may be registered in the name
of the owner if desired.
The stocks of several of the principal lines of Illinois
are selling at lrom above par to nearly 200.
There is a
reasonable prospect of the stock of this road, at no
distant day, selling as high as either of them, which
makes the convertible clause a valuable option.
We have PERSONALLY EXAMINED THE ROAD,
aad consider the bonds a CHOICE SECURITY; we
therefore take pleasure in recommending them to in¬
▲

as

SAFE, PROFITABLE AND RELIABLE.

large portion of the loan has already been sold.

We are authorized to offer them lor the present at
96 and accrued Interest In c urrency, the Company re

serving the right to advance the price without notice.

THEY PAY TEN PER CENT in currency
—nearly FIFTY PER CENT MORE THAN THE

At this price

The coupons

for cash ; 100 miles are done, and
most thorough manner ; .50 mile3 ad¬

in the

ditional wil be finished in
the whole line

(over 400 miles) it is expected

completed within the ensuing year.

will be
It is

one

of the most important

roads in the

It shortens the

State of New York.

DABNEY, MORGAN Sc CO.,
M. K. JESUP & COMFY.
12 PINE STREET, N. Y.

(7) SEVEN PER CENT

populous district destitute of other railroad
facilities, which u ust furnish it a large and

May

pleted at an aggregate cost far below that

These advantages

competing line.

cannot fail to

make it

one

of the best pay¬

ing roads leading from the metropolis, and
Mortgage Bonds one of the safest
securities ever issued. All mortgage bonds
its Fiist

railroads running from

issued

on

New

York

the City cf

good, end the interest

are

promptly paid, although some of them are
moitgaged far more than double the amount
mile that the Midland is. Among the
bonds now off ring we know ol none equal

per

to

these. For the investment of t ust or other

funds there is

nothing better; and in

large increase of income, besides capit l:zing
the premium. They are meeting with rapid
sale, and we have been gratified to fiud that
they are taken chit fly by the most conserva¬

Nassau-st., New York

interest

in

Pi i

currency.

City

at

Comptrollers

Office.
For Sale

SISTARE,

GEO. K.

24 Nassau-st.

Wm. A. Stephens

Gbobgb Opdyke.

G. Fbanois Ofdykb.

BANKING HOUSE OF

Geo. Opdyke &
NO.

25

*e par

and

Circulars,

pamphlets, &c., on hand for distribution.
GEORGE ©PDVUE Sc CO.»

Bankers, 25 Nassau St.

Co.,

NASSAU STREET,

(Corner of Cedar street.)

^

DEPOSITS received from Indlvldnals, Firms, Banks,
Bankers and Corporations, subject to check at

sight, and interest allowed at the rate of Foub per
cent per annum.

CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT issued, bearing Fottb
xed dates.
Ser cent Interest, payable on demand, or

after

COLLECTIONS made on all accessible points In the
United States, Canada and Europe.
Dividends
and Coupons also collected, and all most promptly

accounted for,
ORDERS promptly executed, for the purchase and
sale of Gold; also, Government and other Securi¬
ties, on commission.
INFORMATION furnished, and purchases or ex-

changes of Securities made for

Investors.

GOTIATIONS of Loans, and Foreign Exchange
effected.

Lockwood

&

Co.,

BANKERS,
No. 94 BROADWAY & No. 6 WALL STREET.

DEALERS IN GOVERNMENT
OTHER SECURITIES.
Interest* allowed upon
renev,

AND

deposits of Gold and Cup
Gold loaned tr

sutyeet to Check at Sight.

Merchants and Bankers upon favorable term*.

No. 14 WALL STREET.

R. T. Wilson

sagacious capitalists in exchange

accrued

No. 14

ex¬

change for Government Bonds they give a

tive and

November,

and

Transferable

profitable local business ; and it will be comof any

CUV STOCKS.

INTEREST PAID

Oswego 45 miles; it traverses a

to

for Government Securities.

BANKERS,

PLACE, N. Y,

53 EXCHANGE

rou e

City to Buffalo 70 miles,

from New York
and

November; and

change at highest market rates. Bonds forwarded by
express fret of charge.

BROTHEB8,

will be payable semi-annually in either

Frankfort, London, or New York, and will be free
from Government taxation. The bonds for the pres
ent are sold In currency at 96, with accrued interest.
Circulars, maps, and pamphlets sent on application.

economy

SAME AMOUNT INVESTED IN GOVERNMENTS
Gold and all marketable securities received in ex.

TURNER

thirty years to run, principal and in¬
payable in gold, semi-annually, seven per cent.

The loan has
terest

CASH

built with great

The road is being

COST.

No

SUBSCRIPTION’S.

SrOJK

UP

DOLLARS PAID-

__

vestors

GOLD LOAN.

$6,500,000.

Danville, Urbana, Bloomington

-

STREET, NEW YORK

PER CENT

SfeVtoN

A

Neatly 10 Per Cent Currency.

-

COPELAND,

G.

OF THE

'**'

R.R. Companies

Loans Negotiated for

Gold Bonds

Total Issue

BONDS

ROAD

RAIL

Mortgage

First

City, '5 County

State,

Security.

A Choice

c-

& Co.,

LATE

WILSON, CALLAWAY Sc CO.,
Bankers and Commission
No. 44 BROAD

Merchants,

STREET, NEW ZORC,

Government Securities, Stocks. Bonds and Gold
bought and sold on the most liberal terms. Merchants
Bankers and others allowed 4 per cent on deposits
The most liberal advances made on Cotton, Tobbacco
A Ac., consigned to ourselves or to our correspondent
Messrs, K. GILLIAT * CQ., Liyerpoa

§ailwat} ghmifoy, and gttsmtanc* gourtwl.

ante’ feotte, (StommewM
A

WEEKLY NEWSPAPER.

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OE THE UNITED STATES.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1869.

VOL. 9.

CONTENT8.
!

THK CHRONICLE.

Reducing the Interest on the

Debt...
A Gold Price for Cotton

681
682

Transportation of BreadBtuffs...

533

Review of the Month
Annual Report of the

684

Manufac nrers’ Association...
The Debt Statement

686
687

LatestMonetary and Commercial
English News
Commercial and Miscellaneous

688

News

Cotton

THE BANKERS GAZETTE AND RAILWAY

Money Market. Railway Stocks,
U. 8. Securities, Gold Market,
Foreign Exchange, New York
City Banks, Philadelphia Banks

...

.

689

MONITOR.

I Railway News
593
| Railway, Canal, etc., Stock List. 694
I Railroad, Canal and MiscellaneI ous Bond List, f
695-6
690 j Southern Securities
597
692 J Insurance and Mining Journal ..
598

National Banks, etc
Sale Prices N.Y. Stock Exchange
THE COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Commercial
Cotton
Tobacco
Breadstuff's

602
603

699 I Groceries
600 Dry Goods
601 I Prices Current

Epitome

607

6011

®l)e (Eljroniclr.
The Commercial

and

Financial Chronicle is issued every

ought, it possible, to call in its six per cent bonds, and
replace them, at par, with four per cents. That, in the case
of a country with the vast resources of the United States, all
this ought to be, and that abundant reasons can be given
why it should be, there is no controversy whatever. But of
what profit is all this argument when to-day in London FiveTwenties are selling at 84 ?
Can we persuade the foreign
holders ot these bonds to buy our four per cents at par, when
they stand ready to sell out their six per cents below par?
This is the point which Mr. Bowles seems to overlook; and
still it is the only point which is really a question.
Instead of showing us how to achieve this great feat of
inducing our national creditors to give up their six per
cent bonds in exchange for bonds at
four per cent,
the writer

Satur¬

NO. 228.

we

prefers the easier task of showing what advantages
such a conversion. He says for exam¬

should realize by

day morning by the publishers of Hunt's Merchants' Magazine, ple, and very justly, that our Government bonds
with the latest news up to midnight of Friday.
intarest rate have a decided effect upon our other

and their

securities,
both abroad and at home, and he appeals for proof to the
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
ForTms Commercial
Financial Chronicle, delivered by carrier
Massachusetts State Sterling Bonded Dnbt. These five per
to city subscribers, ana mailed to all others, (exclusive of postage,)
For One Year
$10 00 cent gold bonds, before the war, when they were known only
For Six Months
6 00
The Chromclb will be sent
subscribers until ordered discontinued by letter. in great foreign money-centers, were current at above par, but
Postage is 20 cents per year, and is paid by the subscriber at his own post-office.
now the Government bonds so compete with, overshadow, and
DANA,
WILLIAM B. DANA & CO., Publishers,
1
FLOYD, jb. }
79 and 81 William Street, NEW YORK.
affect them, that Mr. George Walker, the State envoy to
Post Officb Box 4,692.
Europe, who had every support and co-operation from the au¬
MGff* Remittances should invariably be made by drafts or Post
thorities, could get no better offer for them than about 83 per
Office Money Orders.
cent upon their sterling par of £225 to the £1,000 or about
90 per cent upon actual par.
REDUCING THE INTEREST ON THE DEBT.
On this he offers the following
and

..

to

WILLTAM

B.

JOHN e.

Wall street suffices to show
have chosen a less favorable
time than the present for discussions about the reduction of
the interest on the national debt. Still, as Congress in a few

A very cursory, brief visit to
that it were scarcely possible to

weeks will

commence

its winter session, and* since a

large

remarks

:

to our country and to Massa¬
? It is not lost, only over¬
shadowed ? To do this you have bat to fund the United States debt
at its just rate of four per cent by the issue of untaxed gold hoods ;
and when thus relieved of I heir parent-competing bonds of questioned
reputation, your State bonds will not only go back to their ante-bellum
price, but exceed it in just eo much as the number of intelligent custo¬
mers or investors has been increased by and since our triumphs over
the rebellion and these its sequent difficulties.
The case above cited
will be confirmed as a test by the late experience of all similar State,
railroad, and other money-seeking enterprises of the day. No reflec¬
tion is meant upon the distinguished English bankers who have for so
many years protected the Massachusetts State finances abroad. Their
good services have hardly been sufficiently appreciated. They cannot
help it if the State allows its credit to be injured, nor if it leaves them
alone to protect it—by a questionable rejection of the fair offers of
others.
These Massachusetts five per cent thiity-year bonds, as com¬
pared with English three per cent con ols, when at par, are worth
189$, and should command at least 120 in gold, when reinstated and
compared with our future four per cents at par. If, then, the removal
of the Government debt by funding at four per cent should appreciate
a State or corporation
debt nearly 30 per cent, even though a little
Would you remedy this, and give back
chusetts the world-wide confidence of all

projects will doubtless be submitted as usual for
disbursing the funded bonds of the Government, some of the
projectors of such schemes are ventilating their propositions
in the newspapers so as to be first in the field. Prominent
among these financial authors is Mr. C. P. Bowles, on whose
ingenious scheme we offered some remarks a short time ago.
He is not satisfied w:th the small favor his impracticable
plans have commanded, and he solicits a reversal of the
popular judgment. Yesterday he appealed to the public by
a
very long letter in one of the morning papers. And we
must do him the justice to say that there are fewer points of
time and patience should now be necessary to recover this rightful po¬
objection in this communication than in his previous ones. sition, who will attempt to estimate the savin * in .millions upon all
Still he fails to show how his plan of a foreign loan can be similar values at home and abr ad, or the added impetus to onr power
and progress which shall ensue upon our release from such a tax I
Everybody agrees with Mr.
practically carried out.
In other words, Mr. Bowles assumes that the United
Bowles that the United States ought to be able to
borrow money at four per cent; that four per cent States have the power to dictate terms to its creditors, and
gold bearing untaxed bonds of the United States ought to be can fix at pleasure rates of interest which they are willing to
selling at par; that if this could be realized this Government pay. On this he builds the theory that if the United States
number of




THE

682

CHRONICLE*

requires to pay more than four per cent, and if
consequently its four per cent bonds go up to par in the
Government

[November 6, 1869.

careful shipper must buy his gold
his cotton. Purchases also, for future delivery

the risk become that the
first and then

then the bonds of Massachusetts (a legitimate business), are rendered, from this same cause,
rise proportionally, and the result almost as uncertain as a ticket in a lottery.
These facts have long led the Northern cotton merchant,
will be a general appreciation of the quotations for all descrip¬
especially those engaged in a foreign business, to desire
tions of American bonds.
freedom from our present unstable currency. To await till
Such is a general view of this new funding scheme, and
we return to a specie basis, may require the continuance for
our readers will remember to have seen the self-same notions
proposed many times during the past four or five years. If years of the existing difficulties ; whereas a very simple and
Mr. Bowles had associatiated more with financial men here, immediate remedy, so far as this branch of business is con¬
it seems impossible that he should have been misled by so cerned, may be found in selling cotton hereafter for gold;
money market of Europe,
and of other States will

quotation, but simply a quota¬
gold. As is well known, this has always been done
We spoke with a qualified approval of another part of Mr.
in Galveston, and the South generally is in a condition to
Bowles* scheme, which applied to the National Banks. This
make the change.
At the recent Commercial Convention in
scheme he now elaborates more completely, as follows:
In the place of the Legal Tenders and of the National Bank issues Louisville there was presented a communication from Mr. R.
the Government should prepare itself for the one and uniform issue of W. Lathram, of Washington, in which were embodied the
gold demand notes, tc any legally incorporated bank, upon pledge of views of a meeting of Southern gentlemen, who, in July,
Ua new gold bonds.
Among other provisions, these notes might be
made payable in triple currency, similar in tbis feature to the proposed
passed resolutions in favor of the organization of banks at the
Triple Currency Consols. Their denomination and all prominent fea¬
South, under State loans and on a coin basis. The meeting
tures should be
now, and it would only be necessary to insert in the
body of the note that they would be redeemed by our Treasury clear¬ resolved that our present paper currency was an undesirable
ing agencies at their equivalent in francs or sterling, to make them medium of
exchange ; that the South had less than its pro¬
available in all foreign countries and to greatly increase their circula¬
tion apd consequent utility as a valuable medium in the interests of portion of national bank currency ; that planters sell their
foreign relations. This uniformity of feature in the demand notes
and that
with the bonds is eminently desirable. The only distinction should be cotton, hemp, tobacco and sugar for coin only;
that, while the rate of exchange should be fixed at our Mint value in they make their labor contracts payable only in specie. The
the bonds, in the demand notes it should not be so specified ; for we
expressly wish to locate the bonds by giving them a fixed place and subject referred to in the concluding portions of this resolution
has been widely discussed at the South, and is looked upon
rate of coupon payment in any and all countries, thus removing the
main
of their vagrant and oscillating character; while, on the
with favor by leading and influential men, as well as by the
contrary, we are desirous of making the demand notes an international
medium of circulation, and for this we should not make them in charac- journals of that section, as a means of reconstructing our
ter uniform with the bonds, but leave them to be bought and sold
internal commerce upon a sound and safe basis, and avoiding
freely, like ether Government bank notes. Our foreign agencies would
only intervene, if needed, to protect them from causeless depreciation the fluctuations that peril and render uncertain so much of
that

is, having no currency

tion

transparent a series of unfounded arguments.

in

as

our

cause

abase before

they should be well known. Our United States bank the business of the country.
formerly circulated in Europe as do those of the Banks of England
The cotton crop, at present prices, is worth say
and France to-day. Large shipments of cur present greenbacks, even,
have been and are being made to Europe, for sale to coming immi¬
000, and of this value nearly two-thirds is taken
grants. In the surely coining time of international assimilated decimal
currencies this feature of our circulation will give us a great advantage and goes abroad as the medium of settling our
or

notes

over

other nations.

We do not discuss this

singular currency machinery. We
merely refer to it as a subordinate part in Mr. Bowles’ scheme
for funding the d^bt. Its international feature appears to be
desired rather to meet some of the obstacles that might
arise in working out the negotiations. The first and greatest
obstacle of all is, however, untouched and apparently unper¬
ceived by Mr. Bowles. To this we would commend his early
attention. The public would be glad to bear from him as to
the means by which he expects to be able to persuade the
holders of our six per cent gold-bearing Five twenties to give
them up aDd to take in exchange non-taxable five per cent
bonds at par.

The desirableness of

a

return to

a

stable basis of values is

admitted

by every one and many are the methods proposed
by which that point may be reached. There is at present a
Want of fixedness and an absence of certainty in business trans¬
actions, which all deplore and which must continue while the
price of gold or more correctly speaking the value of the
greenback is daily and almost hourly changing. For with
this large and irredeemable paper currency, thus changing in
its purchasing power day by day, prices vary, the spirit of
speculation is kept active, and an unhealthy and unsteady
tone prevails in all financial and commercial circles.
In

no

branch of business is this continued fluctuation

more un¬

favorably felt than in the cotton trade. There is now no large
margin as formerly in prices between different countries. The
telegraph has brought this market and Liverpool and all
other cotton markets so closely together that a commission is
about all the merchant can secure in any transaction, and a
slight turn in gold can more than wipe out this, leaving a
loss as the net result of the operation. In fact sq great has




for export,

exchanges.
Entering thus with controlling influence into our foreign
commerce, how essential this change becomes.
With it
there would be uniformity in price at New Orleans, at
Mobile, at Charleston at New York, and at Liverpool*
Purchasers [would know what they were buying, and pro¬
ducers would know what they were selling.
On the other
hand, the present selling currency price, as stated above,
must always be first adjusted to the gold value at the
moment of purchase, and even then, before the transaction is
closed, it is clouded, and its results are, perhaps, materially
changed by the varying humors of the Gold Room. With
every hour the figure fluctuates; a rise or fall of several per
in a day, or a week. Gold rings are organ¬
ized, whose operations utterly paralize foreign commerce, and
a
wide-spread uncertainty and doubt become the rule where
order, harmony, stability and fixedness should govern.
The South, also, is now out of debt, and for this reason in
an excellent condition to inaugurate this scheme and put it
into effective practice. The old debts of the South have either
been paid, or where they could not be thus liquidated, they
have been wiped out by the Bankruptcy Act. There is not,
therefore, any debtor class to suffer by a return to specier
payments. At present the merchants from that section are
the favorite buyers in our market. They usually come wkh ,
cash, and have had behind them the immense value of the
cotton crop.
Formerly the South depended largely, indeed
almost entirely, on this great staple, and the money for it was
spent before the crop was raised. The changed condition*
resulting from the war, has introduced a changed method of
agriculture.
Industry is more diversified, and attention is
paid to the raising of a variety of crops.
The food
for which they once looked so largely to the north¬
west is now produoed at home in greater quantities than
cent may occur

A GOLD PRICE FOR COTTON.

$300,000,-

tforemb# 0.1809.1

IBB CffBQNlCML

688

They, buy fewer products for consumption. They borne along. They would be lifted from their currency moor¬
have a large surplus of cotton from the proceeds of which ings and wafted into an open sea where there was depth, a safe
anchorage and ample sea room. If there ever was a time wheh
they are accumulating wealth.
But it may be said that the step we have indicated is a stability in business should be sought for it is at the present mostep towards the resumption of specie payments. It is cer ment. We have learned many lessons by experience, and we
tainly a movement in that direction, and for that reason a grow more assured every day that the real prosperity of the
special benefit to the north. Its influence would be felt in the country depends upon a return to specie payments, and upon
north and west, and would tend to modify and render more the subordination of our vast commercial interests to the
certain business transactions in all parts of the country. Be¬ established principles of financial action.
sides, this step is rendered the more necessary in view of the
TRANSPORTATION OP BREADSTUFFS.
possible action of the Supreme Court of the United States
in declaring the Legal Tender Act unconstitutional. There
In the course of an article in September, on the subject of
have been intimations that the opinion of this court would be Breadstuffs, the
probable supply, and the demand from
adverse to the legality of the act, and there are very many who
Europe, we briefly alluded lo the fact that the matter of
believe that the delay iu rendering a decision is due to the
transportation might. become of unusual importance in its
apprehension of the Court of the effect of a sudden announce¬ relation to the course of prices. Year by year the eentre of
ment of the conclusion reached by them.
Be this as it may, the great wheat-growing districts of the United States has however, much of this apprehension would soon be found to been moving westward, until, from being in the Genesee
be groundless if a good start was already made in doing an
Valley, as it was thirty-five years ago, or in Ohio or
important branch of business upon a specie basis. There Michigan, as it was twenty years ago, it is now on the banks
would be at least one solid rock of real credit and value upon of the Mississippi, or to the westward of that great river •
which commerce could be re-erected, and which would defy And as the centre of the wheat growing region has moved
whatever tempest and disaster might from any cause result. westward, the
quantity which it is necessary to bring to the
But the apprehension and dread of those who predict im¬ seaboard every year has
increased. The same remark
mediate disaster upon a declaration of the unconstitutionality
applies, in a less degree, to other cereals—corn, oats, rye, -•
of the Legal Tender Act, is, according to our view, by no
barley, &c.; and the subject of the means provided and the
means certain of
being realized. No decision of this Court rates paid for the transportation of the vast [quantities of
could have a more damaging effect upon the general trade of breadstuffs now seeking the seaboard from far western fields,
the country than the late speculations in gold which pros, is one whose
importance is constantly asserting itself.
before.

.

,

trated the business of the nation

effectually as if it had
been stricken by a tornado or upheaved by an
earthquake.
Prices declined, the import trade ceased, the export business
was
checked, confidence departed, and the healthful com¬
mercial transactions of the whole country were suddenly and
unexpectedly arrested. Such lesults as these we have seen
recently. The “flurry” of a week culminated in a shock
which was at once composed by stupefying all the interests that
had been perturbed by it. If there had been a price in cur¬
rency before for cotton, it ceased to have a value then, and
as

mathematical calculation could solve the intricate mys¬
teries of the market, and bring order out of the confusion

no

that

prevailed. Under our present currency system, we are
continually liable, and each succeeding year more liable to a
recurrence of these gold corners, and it would
appear that no
decision, however sweeping in its effects, could have a more
damaging influence upon the business interests of the country.
But more than this, we are led to believe that the govern¬
ment will take such steps that its issues of
currency will be
redeemable in gold on the announcement of such a
decision,
and the immediate effect may thus be of far less moment than
any imagine. We shall discuss this point more fully on a
future occasion.
In view of what has been said would it not be possible
and also the part of wisdom, for this city to take the lead in
this

extremely important matter. The cotton is at the South
but the great body of the capital which makes the
exchanges and transacts the business are here. Let cotton
factors explode these currency rates at once, quoting cotton in
a
language intelligible to all the world and not requiring an
elaborate arithmetical investigation to render it comprehen¬
sible. This staple offers the best point of departure because, as
we have
already stated, of its great value, and because so much
of it enters into
export, and is employed in adjusting the
balances of the foreign trade. There is a significance about
gold dealings in cotton which do not belong to grain or
tobacco. They are comparatively modern elements in our
commerce with the rest of the world, but they would not long
resist the impulse of the new tide on which business would be

to be sure,




The serious breaks in the Erie

Canal, which were produced

by the severe floods of October, and against which no fore¬
sight could have guarded, suspended navigation about two
weeks, and was attended by various circumstances which gave
it unusual

*

importance, and finally forces the whole subject of

transportation of breadstuffs eastward upon public atten¬
tion. The crop of spring wheat was fully twenty days late
this season, and this break occurred just at the time when it
began to move,—delaying the first considerable arrivals of
spring wheat at this market to about the first of November,
instead of the first of October, as usual; giving us, in fact
but about one month’s free deliveries by canal, instead of '
two, as usual.
Should the weather prove exceptionably •*>
favorable, we may have yet five weeks of canal navigation,
during which we have to accumulate such a stock of grain in •store as will, with the aid of the receipts by rail, enable a ✓
steady export movement to be maintained, in addition to the
local demand, without giving room for any important advance >
in prices. But if the canal should be suddenly closed by
frost in the last week in November, it would be a serious
the

,

circumstance.

period during which the Erie Canal remains closed is
usually about twenty weeks—sometimes as many as twentytwo, and often not more than eighteen. The largest accumu¬
lation of grain in store at this market, at the close of naviga¬
tion, has been about fourteen million bushels. The actual
wants of this market for consumption arq about 85,000 <
bushels per day; namely, 15,000 bushels wheat, 35,000
bushels corn, 25,000 bushels oats—the balance rye, barley,
&c. Thus fourteen million bushels in store will nearly meet
the wants of consumption during the winter months. But it
often happens that the quantity in store at the close of
navigation is unequally divided, there being a surplus of one
sort and a deficiency in another.
The railroads or specula¬
tion must restore the equilibrium.
It is but two years since the railroads began to deliver any.
considerable quantities of grain at this market.. In the fall
of 1867, we think, we found at the close of navigation but
about 1,500,000 bushels of ooro in store—a quantity so
The

•

N

t

;

THE

584

CHRONICLE.

notoriously inadequate to our wants, even when supplies from
the South were added to it, that a great speculation and a
large advance in prices resulted therefrom. These high
prices induced the Erie railroad to make the needful prepara¬
tions to bring forward corn in cars, and very soon we had a
supply of from twenty to thirty thousand bushels per day.
The speculation broke down, and every legitimate interest
*was vastly benefited.
This marked a new era in the trans¬
portation of grain from the West. We have since received
large quantities of wheat and oats by the same means. For
the eight weeks ending last Friday, the deliveries of grain at
this market by rail amounted to the handsome aggregate of
3,412,600 bushels, over 70,000 bushels per business day
and nearly equal to the home wants of the market. The
Erie road has now many competitors in the business. The
New York Central, in connection with the Hudson River
Railroad, and the Pennsylvania and New Jersey Roads1, are
all engaged in bringing grain to this market.
During the winter season, these roads cannot bring to us
so much
grain as now. They will then be encumbered with
latge quantities of perishable products, which usually seek the
market in cold weather. Dressed hogs, game, and dressed
poultry—these justly claim and receive the preference. But
if the deliveries of grain by rail at this market be reduced to
50,000 bushels per day, there would not, even then, be danger
of any deficiency in supplies.
It is very probable that an ac*
cumulation of stocks in December will approximate eight
million bushels. The export demand is confined entirely to
wheat; and of this, unless the shipments shall be much larger
than for the past few weeks, a stock of four million bushels
will be ample.
Besides, there

are

routes to the seaboard

from the West

other than those

[November 6, 1869.

cumstance, while it has helped to keep money comparatively abundant here, so that the rate on call loans has ranged, in the midst of
the crop season,

at 4®? per cent, must be expected to be followed
by an unusually light return ©f currency after the compl tion of the
crop movement. Some considerable amounts of money were sent,
early in the month, to New Orleans and Savannah ; but, later, the
demand from that qnarter ceased i.lrr.ost entirey. The South
would, undoubtedly, have drawn upon New York more freely, had
the banks been able to supply small currency, to Eend notes in
denominations of

over

#50

was

of

no

avail, when the money was

required largely by interior dealers foi the purchase of small lots
The cotton traders have, consequently, been compelled
to effect their operations as best they could, though, of course, with
some
inconvenience. Throughout the month the deliveries of new
currency of the lower denominations from the Treasury have been
quite nominal. The expectation of an ample supply of small notes
in November, and the suppo ition that money might then be sent
out more freely to the South and West, have induced the bank* to
keep their funds as much as possible on call, in preference to
employing them on time. Merchants have, consequently found it
difficult to get their paper discounted outside their own banks, and
the difficulty in selling notes has again increased the pre sure from
sellers, which, iu turn, has produced distrust among buyers, and at
the close oh the month, the best paper was negotiated with difficulty
at 10@12 per cent.
Tnis stringency in the discount market has,
perhaps, been the most unsatisfactory feature of the business of the
of cottou.

month.

e

speculation stiil shows the effect of the severe blow
September gold operations. That
denouement gave an exposure of the hollowness of a certain class of
speculative operations which appears likely to hold the gambling
propensities of the “ street” hereafter in severe check. Operators
appear disposed to conduct their speculations within a lower range
of prices; and in every branch of business there is a very marked
caution. TLere is a certain undefined hesitancy about engaging in
operations for high prices, which appears to be inspired by a con¬
viction, grounded upon the general aspect of affairs, that we are on
the eve of a geLerally lower range of values. The markets have
been more cr less effected by a disposition to discount the proba¬
bility that Secretary Boutwell, iu his report on the assembling of
Congress, will make decidedly conservative recommendations,
designed to facilitate the resumption of specie payments; and this
feeling is encouraged by intimations, coming from quarters which
give them some weight, that the Supreme Court will pronounce
the Legal Tender Act unconstitutional.
Notwithstanding these
conservative tendencies, there has been a steady -recovery in
Wall street interests from the effects of the November • panic,
confidence beiDg more settled and prices steadier.
As an
illustration of the contraction of speculative operations, it may be
Wall street

dealt in the culmination of the

leading to New York. Portland is an im¬
portant point, and nearly monopolizes the export of oats;
Philadelphia and Baltimore can get forward liberal quantities
of grain by rail.
We noticed the other day the charter of a
to load wheat at Philadelphia for a British port.
vessel
This
is an unusual circumstance. In lormer years, that city, as
well as Baltimore, drew on us largely for wheat. There re¬
mains .to be considered the Mississippi route, via New Or¬
leans. It is a long and expensive one, it is true; but during
the active export of cotton, ships at New Orleans are glad
to get some grain for ballast, and will accept low rates.
This
may in a measure overcome other obstacles to a movement of
stated that the total recorded transactions in stocks for the month
grain in that direction.
We conclude, therefore, that although rates for carrying have been only 447,911 shares, against 2,362,027 shares in the
same month of 1868;
while the sales of Government bonds at the
grain from the growing districts to the seaboard are likely to
be high for some months to come, there is no danger of such Exchange have been only #10,608,500, as against #23,479,150 in
October of last year.
ft scarcity of supplies at this market as to. promote successful
United States bonds have been decidedly weak, prices being, at
speculation, or seriously interfere with the regular course of the close of the month, about 2 per cent below the opening figures i
shipments to Europe, unless something unforeseen should which, taking into account the accumulation of one month's interest,
occur; and we infer that the lateness of the crop of spring is equal to a decline of fully 2£ per cent. Considerable sales have
wheat, and the break in the Erie Canal, are not likely to be be n made by investors and financial institutions with a view to
attended with the important effect upon prices which many buying other securities, which, since the late panic, have ruled ex¬
seem to expect.
Still, if they shall attract attention to the ceptionally low, while Government's had yieded comparatively
little. Tne pi ice of gold also has steadily declined; and, the quo^
growing importance of increased facilities for transporting the
tatioDS for bonds abroad having but
.

products of the West to the seaboard at all
year, an

seasons

of the

important service will have been performed.
REVIEW OF THE MONTH.

partly responded to the re¬
premium, a fall in securities here was required to equalize the
home aud foreign markets.
The purchases of bonds by the Government, during the moqth
aggregated #10,000,009.
duced

October has
than

was

passed with an easier condition of ihe money market
expected. Notwithstanding the abundance of the crops,

the amount of currency rent from this centre for
moving them
been much less than usual.
This fact arises partly, perhaps, from

BONDS BOLD

Classes.

U.S. bonds
State & city bonds

AT TUX N.

T. STOCK EXCHANGE BOABD.

1868.

$23,479,160
11,145,100

1869.

$10,608,600
4,996,600

'

Inc.

$.....

Dec.

$12,870,650
6,148,600

has
2,081,400
1,214,600
816,900
the Company bonds
reduced prices of produce, but principally from the circumstance of
Total—October
$16,819,600
$19,836,150
$36,665,650
195,621,090 378,234,609 $77,713,619
........
the banks not having had sufficient small notes to meet the wants of Since January 1
the agricultural sections, where the lower denominations of
The daily closing prices of the principal Government securities
currency
lire required for the purchase ofgrain from the producers. This cir- ftt the New York Stock Exchange Board in the month of Oo




.741282.. :
1
5

9.7. 02123

November 6, 1869.]

tober,

THE

CHRONICLE.

represented by the latest] sale officially reported,
following statement:

as

Michigan Central

are

Day of

OF GOVERNMENT SECURITIES AT

r-6’s, 1881.—
Coup. Reg.

month.
1

1862.

139%

219

120

119

119*

.

H9%

119%
119%
119%

«

:

120%
12;-%
120%

119%

123

120%

119%

119%

120%

22

2»

120
120

120
119%
119%
119%

119%

119%
119%
114

119%
120%

Highest
Lowest
Last

120%
120%
121
120%

119%

113

117%
117%
117%

119%
120
117

117%

11 %
118%
115%
116%

118%
J1H%
11H%
116%

119%

Third

Cons Am. seenri ties
for U. S.jlll.C Erie
shs.
mon.

5-208[8h’6.

Friday

1
...«
Saturday
2
Monday.;... 4
Tuesday.... 6
Wednesday 6
Thursday.... 7
Friday
8
8atu^d *y
9
..

93
93

8.1%

91*

81%

84%

21* Friday
24* Saiuiday
24
Monday

94%
94%
94*

22
2i
25
26

93%
93%
93%
9 %
Tuesday
24% Wednesday.. .27 93%
28 93%
23% Thursday
23
WViday
29 9 %
23% Saturday
aO 93%
23%

84%

M%
81%

96
96
97

81%

9T%

82.

98
98

81%

123%

1 3%

10 %

101*

120
97
232
158
135
130 ”
112
24

87%
83

232

206*

140

140
130
112

do

32%

....

pref...

*

240

185

venue

32%

110
185

..

83%
83
40
60

117%
lu2

173*

195*

123
130

no
131

70
240

70
240

250

*

28*

93%
109
185

83%
93%

14C

130%

197%

67

55

80

76*

64
78

40

40

40

40

40

60
28

29”

27*
220
120

250
124

63%

13

13 '

54"

53
9

16%

26%
220
120

54

18

*

10%

60
8

19

12*

15*

12
35

*69%

9%

66*

69*

13

14%

14

»%

9%

15

60
8
18
12

36%

36
150

27*
230
123

12

9
14
12

160

Express—

197%

59*
78

13

150

85*
96*

80

16

3i%

210

55%

2»%
63%

*

*

26
70

93

80%
f6

•

97

122 “

122

•

26
•10
soo

88*

197%

80
88
120
95

1 5

85%

197*

67*

180
•

*27%

"

*

29*

ao

Ciciz ns Gix
Bankers & Brokers Ass.

ii i* *198%

87

26*

123

1*0
103

83*
88%

130
130
112

‘

119

65*
79%
8H%
117*
M%

29%
59%

126

pref.
Quicksi’ver
«*st. Union Telegraph.

70

168%

40
to
28

31%

Mariposa

109%
109%
10.%
107%

91
105
185
60
80

124

68%
81%

120
1 0
232

240

97*

Canton

107%

*

251

122

80
80

87%

232

203%

...

37

36

9%

»%
52*
8

36%
14%

86%
•

104** 105“

•

*

104

•

•

105

Am r can M. Union....
Adams
United States

38

30

30%

31

36

^0

67*

49%

61*

58*

52%

35
67

63

49*

68*

Wells, Fargo & Co

19

50
11
17

60

11%

60
11
16

62%
60%

Merchant’s Union

Cons Am. secur ities
for u.s. Ill.C. Erie
mon. > -20s sh’s. sh’s.

Date.

68

Miscellaneous—
American Coal
C' niral Co il
Cumberland Coal
Pennsylvania Coni
Del. & Hud. Canal
125%
At antic Mail
2»%
80
Pacific Mail
Boston Water ower
15%
Brunswick City Land...

COURSE OF CONSOLS AND AMERICAN SECURITIES AT LONDON.

Date.

118

61
75

Toledo, Wab. & Western 83%
do
do
dopict. 83

108
108

120
119%
121
119%
118% 119% 117
119% 11h% 117%

118

80%
89*
88*

Pitts., F. W. & Chi. gunr
Reading
97%
It me, W. & Ogdensb’g
105

108%

117%
116%

ii«%

115%
11 %

Mississippi

do
Panama

108%
108%
103*
1'8%
108%

117%

131

79%

scip

..

116%

118%

Ohio &

108%
10-%
108%

117%

129

130
Norwich & Worcester.. 112

118%

117%

do

do

103%
108%

116%

119
120

lit*

117%

1*18“

118%

.....

108%
108%
108%
300%

.....

120%
119.%
119%
119%
119%

109%

1<'9

117%

119%

First..

317%
117%

...

120
120
120%

119%
11%
119%

318%

....

119%
119%
119%
119%
119%

119%
119%

5’s,10-40.
’6^.
C’pn.

....

119%
119%

120%

9
11

...

119%
119%

118%

NEW YORK.

6’s, (5-20 yrs.)Coupon
lHt5, new
1864
’67.
li9* 119% 117% 118%
119% 119% 117% 1H%
jl9* 117% 117%
118% 117
317% 117%
118%
117% 11.%
119% 110% 117% Ilf*
120
118% 138%
119% 120
118
1 >%
113
118%
119% 117% 118
119% 119% 118
118%
119% 119% 117% 117%
H7% 117%
119%
117% 117%
119% ll8
118%
119%
Ii8%
119% 119% 118
US
119% 117% 117%
119% 120
117% H7%
119% 117% 117%
119% 119% 117% 117%
118% 119% 117% l’.7%
18% 119% 117% 11%
118% llt% lin% ll«%
117
It*
115% 1:5%

...

Milwaukee A St. Paul..
Ao
do pref.
Morris & Essex
New Jersey
do
Ccuirnl
New Haven &Hutfjrd.
New York Central
do
A N. Hav n.

shown in the

PBICE3

585

18

26%

17* *

20%

.

21%
21*
21*
21*
21%
2 %
21%

ulative

movem n s.

die freedom from specThe wholesome lessons of the panic of Sep¬

tember 24th appears to

have made a deep impression on the gold
operators; so much so, that it has been found impossible, thus far,
82% 98%
to establish, in connection with the Gold Exchange, any arrange¬
82% 97% 21%
Monday
li
ment 'or clearing the transactions of dealers, those facilities having
Tu sday... .12 93* 84% 94
23% Lowest
81% 93% 20%
93% 84% 98
23%
Wednesday .13 9<% 84% 94% 2*% Highest
in the past very materially contributed to the activity of speculation
%
Thursday ...14 93% 84% 94
23* Range
2%
4*
3%
Last
94% 22
Frldy
15 93% 82
82% 97% 21%
and to irresponsible parties taking large risks. The general ten¬
Saturday.... 16 93% 82% 94% a%
9 % 82%
Low 1 0th
Monday ....It*
94% 20%
92* 74% 92* 17* dency of ihe market has been downward ; the decl ne having been
95
94
81* 9s% 28%
Tuesday ....19 93* 82
I 20 % Hi- J.gg
due to the anticipation of the supp’y coming from the November
95
1 22* R"g \
1%
R% 11%
9%
Wednesday..20 93% 81%
95
Tlmrsdav
.21 93% 81%
21% L’isr.
93% 82% 97% 21%
interest payments, to the sale of $11,000,000 of gold by the Treas¬
The etoci market has oeen characterized by a dull Ciutious ury, and to a growing feeling that the improving condition of 'ha
movement, though with a gradual improvement in prices, and a pub ic finances and the abundance of the exportab e crops warrant
steady recovery of confidence. The earnings of the roads which the expectation of a lower premium. The exports of specie for the
report publicly their receipts have not been such as to encourage a month have been quite nominal.
saoguine speculation; which may partly account for t-e fact, that
COURSE OF GOLD AT NEW YORK.
price* are far from having recoverel the figures from which they
fcJD
declined in September, and rule still much below the average. The
Date.
Date.
exceptionally low range of prices appears to have encouraged a cer¬
e
a
tain amount of buying for investment, and, as a rul
stocks are Friday
1-0 *130%
1 130
130
atuiday. ,..23 131% 13'% 31% 11
25 131% 1130% ’31% li0%
129%
129% Monday
now held in strong hands.
Speculation his been confined to en¬ Saturday... 2 130% 1.8% 130% 128% Tuesday
0
26 13“*|130% 1 0% !8»)%
Monday.
41130
61123% 128% 130% 130
Wednesday.. 27 130% •29% 130% 12‘)%
couraging temporary fluctuations of 2@3 per cent, rather thin Tu sday
131
31
80
Thursday.... 2 129% 1 8% 129% 128%
Wednet-day. 6 130
7 131% 131% 132
'ih i’Fday.
29 12-v 128* 128* 128%
131% F id y
promoting a direct movement for either a rise or a fall.
.

....

93%

81*

8«%
93% 81*
92* 8 !*
92% 84%

93*

94*
94
94
94

...

—

—

—

—

,

.

.

...

...

.

.

.

STOCKS BOLD AT THE NEW YORK

2,383
2,01 Vi44
6,209
109,189
19,775
44,331

Steamship44
Expr’ss&c44

Increase.

Dec.

1,6.6

1,623,241
3 052

11,450
10,107

9,74M
18,875
34,226

109,833
66,261

12,914

9 *,91

17,913

38,448

2,362,027

447,911

16,906,045

9,877,756

Improv’nt44
Tefegraph44

....

Total—October
Since January 1....

.

-

..

Saturday

3,157

44

Mining

1869.
767
890.7U8

1868.

Classes.
Bank shares
Railroad 44
“
Coal

Friday

8T0CK EXCHANGE BOARD.

900

<

1,914,11

..
...

.

8 131%
9 1*0%
.11 13(»%
.12 13 %
.13 130%
.14 13o%
.15 130
.16 1 0
.18 130%
.19,130
.

.

Monday
Tuesday
Wed esday.
Thursday...
Friday
Saturday ..
M nday
Tuesday ....
Wedne^ay. .20 130
Thursday... .211110%
Sv 131
Irday.
...

13 %

131% 130%

139%j 13' %jl3>i]

130% 130% H0*
13»% 130% 13 •%
130% {130* 1130%
1 o% 130
130
130
130% 1130
130
130
130
130

13t'%j 139%
130% 130

1.0% 1130%

1130
131%; 100%
131% >131%

Saturday

80 128% 128% 129% >29

1869....
1868.*...
1867....
1866....
1865....
1864

Oct.,

130

128% 132 1129
149% 133% 140*il83%
113% 140% H5%!140*
1 6

145% 154%, 146%
144% H4% no
146%
192
189
22 % I-223%
1863.*.. 119% 140% 150* 145%

44

...

44
44

1862.... l2l% 122

138% 129%

130%

130%
130%
..

S’ce Jan

1,1869. 134% 1-8% 162% 129

7,028,269

....

Foreign exehauge has been comparatively steady. Importers
highest, lowest and
have been free buyers of bills, but the supply has been well sustained
closing prices oi all the railway and miscellaneous securities sold
at the New York Stock Exchange during the months of Sep¬ by tie liberal exports of cotton and grain.
COURSE OF FOREIGN EXCHANGE (60 DAYS) AT NEW YORK.
tember and October, 1869 :
The following table will show the opening,

—Octol 3er

-September—
Railroad Stocks—
Alton A Terre Haut
14

**

4*

Open. High. L>w. Clos. Open. High. Low.
•

pret

Bos’on, Hartford A Erie

69

& Rock Island. 115

—

Mar. A Cinein., 1st
♦♦
>4
3d




•

156

170

«

•

•

135
135
160

•

•

18

•

146
144
105

145
135
165

63
79
302

70*
25

82

93

95

79
113

73

139%
-

106%
20

8*

74*
1< 5*
1* ’5
32

•

147
165
73*

85%
110

26%
104
78
111
no

30

56
17

185%
130%
159*
69%
83%
108%
22

*6%
73%
109
108

149%
112

129%
105%

11

111

103

154%

161%

174%

156%

134
•

34%
59%

29*

58
135
no

«

137

139

132

•

•

•

76*

82*

20

20
8

8

110
108

S3*

57%

121
92
97
134
134
*

74%

32
60
13
146

12?
107
97

67%

186%
-

100*

104
27

125
)23

.

85

105*

111

125

8%

•

112

34

160

101

54

24%

115%

160

139

30
56

•

71%
84%
109*
26%

86*
95

42
71

123
186%

•

54

154*

70

37

20
•*

•

«

•

Colamb., Chic. A lnd. C. 33%
Cleve. & Pittsburg
109
do Col.,Cin &Ind.. 78
Del., Lack & Western.. 112%
Dubuque & Sioux city ..111
Erie
do preferred
Harlem
Hannibal A St. Joseph .
do pref.
do
Hudson River
Ilinois Central
Joiiet A Chica 0
Lake Sho. & Mich. South

•

....

Chicago A Alton
. 154*
do
do pref.... 156
Chicago, Bnrl. & Quincy 170
do
A Northwest’n 84*
do pref. 94%
do
do

•

59

85

92%
94*

20

20

92%
t f • •

64

92%

?1*
18
fit.

London,
cents for

Clos.
82
59

Da]

69%
84%
103%
26%

1.
2.
4.
5.
6
7.
8.
9.
11.

86%

12.

17%
115
147

159*

78
111

108%
30
54

143%
108%
109%
173
139

92%
91%
18

13.
14.
15.
16.
18.

19.
20.

Paris,
centimes
for dollar.

Amsterdam. Bremen, Hamburg.
Berlin
cents for
cents for
cents for
cents for
rix daler. M. banco.
florin.
thaler.

@40%

78

@40%

78 @78%

522% ■ 529
522% (§1520

40
40

5t8%@5t7%
518%@51i%
6ls%@517%
518%@617%
622% @520
522 * @520
622* @520
518%@517%

40*®U>%
40%@40%
4l*%@40%
40% @40%
40% @40%
40% @40%
40% @4 i%
40%@4o%
40% @40%
40% @40%
4U%@40%
40% @40%
40% @40 *
40% @40%
40% @40%
40% @40%
40%@40%
40%@40%
4>%@40%
40% @40%

518%@517%
518%@517*
518 *@517%
618%@517*
516% @516%
616, @515

21
22.
23.
25.
26.
27.

516*@515

28,

si wmw

516*@5 5
516*@515
51*>%@515
61?%@516%
5 6*@516%

@78%

85%@35%
85% @35%

70%@7 %
70% @70%

S5%@35%
3i%@35%
3*%@35%
35%@35%
85*@35%
a5%@35*
35% @35%
35%@83%
35% @35%
S5%@35%

70% @70%
7;)%@70*
70%@;u%
“O%@T0%
70% @70%
70% @70%
70%@70%
70% @70%

I regmar.

78% @78%
78% @78%
78%@78%
78% @78%
78%@78%
78% @78%
78% @78%
78% @78%
78%@7'%
78% @78%
78% @78%
78% @78%
78% @78%
78%@79

78%@79
78%@74
78%@19
78%@:9
78%@79
78%@79

40% @40% 78*@78%

35% @35%

35% @35%
35% @35%
86 @ 6*
36 @36%
86 @36%
36 @36%
36 @36%
36 @36%
36 @36%
85% @36%

70% @70%
70% @70%

70%@7d%
70%@7o%

70% @70%
71* @71%
71 *@71%
71%@71%
71 *@71%
71*@71%
71%@7l%
71%@-1%

vxmx

CHRONICLE.

THE

586
99. ..108%@10S%

80...108%@10*%

78%@78% 85%@35% 71%©71%
35% @35% 71%@71%

40%@40%

518%®517%
518%@517%

40%@40% 7S%@78%

Totals

Showing
“

18G9.107%@109% 522%@515
40 @40% 73 @79
35%©36% 70%@71%
Oct.,
1868.108%@110% 520 @513% 40%@41% 79 @79% 35%@36% 71%@72%
ANNUAL

REPORT OF THE

MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIA¬

COTTON

TION, PRESENTED OCT, 12, 1869.
meeting, held in New York, June 30, 1869, the Statist’cal
Report embraced returns irom 794 cotton mills, having over 99 per cent of all
At the annual

the

spinning machinery in the country.

The de ails and results ol the siatis-

tlcs thus obtained appear in the published proceedings of that meeting.
We
here repeat the st te-rent ihen made of the home consumption of cotton,
North and South, for the year 1867-8, and have, for the greater frcility of com¬

parison, changed the quantities from pounds to bales o' 466 pounds each, th tt
being the actual average, as is shown by the table of weights appended to this
report.

Consumption of cotton, year ending 31st August, 1S6S:
Northern M ills
Mills returned
M Us estimated

Spindks.

502,974

861,840

247,583
13,000

76,955
4,430

260,583

81,3S5

103

6,833

Used in m;lls, otherwise than for spinni eg,

24,165

Quantity returned
Quantity estimated

....

30 0.3 —54,208

844
Totals
6,763,557
Deduct for exceptional cases in which the quantity reported was
the consuming capacity, and not the actua^ consumption

997,433

Actual home consumption, North and South, 1867-8

965,666 bales

—

..

31.707

This consumption represents the quantity tak< n
crop of 1867-8, except the * mall difference in the

stocks held by the mills at

theneginning and <nd ol the year.

*

*

by the home mills from the

*

*

*

The Committee desiring to obtain the mill statistics for 186S-9, for compari¬
son with those of the previous
year, and to facilitate the correct preparation
of the annual crop statements, directed the is-uc, about the 1st of August, of a
circular a* dressed to the managers of all the cotton mills in the country,
inclosing a copy, for correction, of the return for the year ending August 31,

1863, and asking for the statistics of each mill, for the year ending August 31,
18t.9.

*

*

*♦**.

*

By September 1st the Secretary had received returns from 77 per cent of the
mills reported last year, and by October lrt from 90 per cent of all these, and
from a few mills which did not then report, but were included in the estimates
then given. The results are shown in ihe following table :
SYNOPSIS OP NEW RETURNS TO OCTOBER 1, 1869.
State.
Mills. Spindles.
Maine
19
490,424
New Hampshire... 43
745,930
Vermont
11
22,163
Massachusetts
143
2,366,025
Rhode Island
89
906,681
Connecticut
73
514.549
43
New York
439,911
New Jersey
136,002
17

Pennsylvania

27,882
1,793,644

512

5.999,110

28%

306,75i,964

27,148

14%
12%
12%

2,263,168

1
2
3

North Ca oliua.
South Carolina.

.

Alabama....

.

Missis-ippi.

.

.

Arkansas.
.

Kentucky....**
South

271,946
35,108
33,802
13,270
10,800
460

20,743

5
.

.

112.534

83.80
120.13
123.64
133.92

3

Indiana...
Illinois

.

680,431

51.13

7
15

8

Ohio

,

30%
28%
33%

11%

Maryland

North

26

12,064

7

Missouri

23%

Otherwise
used.

52 54
40.39
49.67
43.71
39.18
68.85
56.60
147.75
124.24
134.07
60.61
143.68

50

Delaware

Yarn.

Avcr’e per
Cotton spun. Spindle.
61.20
25,090.017
“
62.81
39,394,541
48.73
1,071,867

29, <84
73,556
27,364

26
8
3
2
1
7
2

3.332

1,716
516

9,800

30

25,559 591

32%
36%

18,791,162
5,323,718
18,725,056
1,986,886
4,994,237
1,643,608
1,447,908

19

20%
12%
10%
14

27

197,759

512
76

5,999,140
197,759

2,486,741
3,582,595

9,909,947
2,460,738
242,000
209,300
95,863
735,071
788,795

22,773,718

457*909
100,000

3,038,3GS

11%
9

.

Total

28%
12%

306,751,964
22,773,718

•

•

•

.

•

.

.

51.13

3,038,368

115.02

5:8

28
53.17
6,196,399
329,525,682
3,038,868
year’s report that have not now reported were
generally of small capacity, having in the aggregate only 676,689 spindles.
The returns from 681 mills last year and this year, compare as follows:

Lba.

mills, which for 1867-8 reported 5,827,947 spindles,

consuming
Report for 1S68-9, 5,977,684 spindles, consuming

Showing a falling off of 7.86 per cent, or
75 Southern mills, which for 1807-8 reported
suming
Report for 1868-9, 195,659

331,559,311
305,484,085
26,075,226

195,921 spindles,

con¬

27,390,108
si

indies, consuming

22,678,719

Showing

a falllrg off of 17.20 per cent, or
Together, 581 mills, which in 1857-8 reported 6,023,868 spindles,

consuming

4,711,390
358,949,419
328,162,803

Report for 1868-9,6,173,313 spindles, consuming

?

Showing

a falling off of 8.57 per cent, or
These 581 mills reported for
1867-8, as cotton used otherwise than
for spinning
And report for 1868-9

Showing a falling eff of 41.30
It is fair to

30,786,616
4,705,600
i ,761, s76

assume that a
by returns from 90 p - r cent o/ the
spindles reporting last year, and 89 per cent of all in the United States, taken
as they come, will be a just and true ratio for the whole
manufacturing power in
the comparison of the last and the
preceding year’s work. It is therefore
applied to all the mills reported and uereoorted in the following statement of
the home consumption in the mil's, North and South, for the
year 1868-0, reck¬
oned, as last year, in bales of 466 pounds each.
’
„

..

used4a mills, hut not for spinning...




Mills.
730
108

Spindles,
6,670.346
«60,ooo

Bales used

f.r spinning.767,512
64,998

31,744

«

production of heavy goods after January, said, “The aggregate for the whole
year is believed to be less than for the year preceding, hut this can be deter¬
mined only by renewed returns from the mills to he made at the close of the
season, 31st August.”
We have those returns, and they confirm the impres¬
sion which was common among manufacturers tint the home consumption has
been less than in the preceding year. On the other hand the stock of cotton held
in mills August 31,1869, was larger than that held August 31, 1868. The ex¬
cess this year was estimated by the Commercial and Financial Chronicle
of New York to be 30,000 bales. That estimate was too small, as shown by
later developments, as to stocks held, and by the limited quantities taken by
spinners since September 1st,—about 10,000 bales per week.
The actual consumption having been
864,254 bales

1865-079

And the increase of stock in the mi Is

50,000

914,254

quantity taken by the manufacturers was

“

“

consumption south of the Potomac) were approximately correct, and a valnab e
contribution to the indu»trial statistics of the country. Your committee feel
compel ed to show that the Shipping Lift is no longer to bs regarded as au¬
thority, and to expose the errors which have rendered its cotton statistics
worse than useless since the close of the war.
They do it reluctantly. * * * *
Ml the authorities agree substantially in the statistics of exports foreign, and
of the stocks at the beginning and end of the year. They also agree in the
s’atistiosof Southern ports. It is the cotton moved by inland routes which
gives occasion for confusion and opportunity for misstatement. The attempt
to apportion its quantiti s to mill and ma ket, respectively, by estlma'ion only,
was in a matter of this consequence, a fault.
Persistence in such a course, after
its errors have been pointed out, beermes worse than a fault. Any error thus
produced in the amount of receipts” of cotton required a corresponding
error in the “home consumption” to balance it.
The item was madee^ast'c,

compressible, or expansible, to snit the exigencies of the case, and correspana
to the required amount of “ receipts at the ports.”
But in this item of hr me
consumption of cotton, both planters and manufacturers had a strong interest,
prompting a desire to know the truth about it. In ascertaining the consump¬
tion and its proportions, North and South, the Asiociation haB established a
statistical detector.

The several quantities: 1, of cotton retained for home

destroyed; 2, of cotton exported; 3, of s ocks in the ports at the be¬
ginning and end of the year; are all the elements required for ao exact state¬

uses, or

ment of the cotton crop.
The eta'ement of the Shipping

List was as follows:

Total Crop of the United States
Add Stocks on hand, 1st September,

—bales 2,260,557

1868

Makes a supply of
Deduct therefrom,

Kxport to foreign ports
on har d, 1st September, 1869

1,444,668
11,160

Stocks

203

Manufactured in Virginia
“

“

“

2,297,935

“

Burnt in transit...

Tak^n for home use

87,898

“

20,000

1,476,031

and burnt,

821,924
178,208

North of the Potomac and Ohio Rivers
South

“

“

“

Total consumed and burnt in the

United States, (including burnt

the ports,) 1868-9
...
995.127
It will be observed that here, as in years p st, the SMpplng List excludes
from “the crop” all the cotton which it estimates to have been retained in
the South, except 20,000 hales used in Virginia, and 203 bales burnt. The
at

bales
173,208
“
2,260,557

quantity excluded is

which, added to the “Total Crop” as above

would show an aggregate production of
“
2,433,760
The wool consumed in the Western States, is not excluded from any annual
st-itement of the clip of wool in the United States.

The cotton goods consumed in Great
mercial or Board of Trade statement ol

Britain are not excluded from the Com¬

British manufactures. There is no rea¬
why the Southern consumption of cotton should be excluded from the cot’.on
“

quantities respectively taken for home use

Rivers,” and south of the Potomac aDd Ohio

follows:

Total.

731,725
854,089
968,165
995,127

127,640
250,672
168,348
173,203

604,085
573,367
799,817

821,924
During the last year ample proof has been given that the States sou h of the
Potomac River never consumed, for spinning purposes, in mills and families,
(except during the late war) so much as 85,000 bales of cotton in a year. The
use of cotten for mattresses and other upholstery nearly or quite ceased with
the advent of war prices. The cotton burnt or otherwise destroyed, after bein® baled, has not this year exceeded 4,500 bales. Statistics aie worse than
useless if not accurate. The question at issue is not merely whether the South¬
ern consumpt on of cotton, the past year, was 50,000 hales or 178,000 hales,
th< ugh that is an important one; but the question is, whether the public is
not misled by receiving as standard authority a compilation radically defective.
In the form used by the Shipping List, the subtraction of 173,203 bales from
the

production of the country, instead of 80,0U0or 85,010 hales left the “crop

smaller by the excess subtracted.

Thus, if the true Southern consumption only

”

had been deducted, the crop of

1868-9 would have been about 2,860,000 bales assuming that the other data and
the mthod of the Snipping List were correct. By similar ptocess the crop of
1867-8 would have been shown to be over 2,600,000 bales; of 1866-7 over 2,160,000
ha es • of 1865-6 over 2,20 ',000 hales, that is, if the several amounts appropria¬
ted in excess for Southern use were transferred to the several appropriations
for Northern use, and thence counted in the “ crop ” (as the Shipping List

always reckoned the Northern consumption in the crop), then the severalcr ps
would have been increased, as stated. For instance, the Shippii g List's an¬
nual statement for 1866-7, st ited the crop thus:

1,951,988

Total crop of tbe Un;ted States
Stock on nand, 1st September, 1866

283.692

2,285,680

Makes a supply of
Deduct—Experts to foreign p'Tts

.

Stock on hand, September 1, 1867
Burnt and manufactured in Virginia

..

1,553,316

80,296
28,672

T,943,L24

per cent, or
ratio afforded

"Orth

101.412

..

report in June, after remarking upon the con-iderab'e contraction in the

Rivers, burnt, &c., in its annual crop statements for four years, as
North.
South.

The mills embraced In last

508 Northern

“
“
Southern
Cotton otherwise used

“

crop ol the United States.
The S'ippisg List stated the
“
north of the Potomac and Ohio

RECAPITULATION.

North

Total
Our

son

115.02

10

12%

168,674
375,000
2G7,820
719,500

*9.94
72.63
121.97
184.81
75.
175.29

12%
15%
8%
9%

4,500

76

124,298,128
36,593,689

a

“

864.254 in 1868-9
965,666 in 1867-8
65,448 ba^es
18,600
“ 22,464
4‘

For many yea*s the Shipping and Commercial List of New York, was lustly
the standarn authority for annual statements of the cotton crops of the United
States. Down to 1862 its statements were well prepared from data, obtained
at the several seaports of the South whence nearly tne whole crop was shipped
to either Northern or Foreign ports, and the resu’ts (excluding an estimated

855,007

6

7S 6

6,980,846
844
6,763,557
reduction in Northern mills, for spinning
“

The whole

Bales of cottr n
used for spinning.

6,4' 2,974
50,000

43

..

Southern Mills.
Mills returned
Mi Is estimated

XT

844

Against

Oct.,

[November 6; 1869.

Taken for home use north of Virginia ...
“
“
“
in Virginia aud ekewhere

Toti.l consumed in the United States,

1,662,318

..

throughout the U. S..

including burnt, &c

280,67*
854,039

The statement of the Southern consumption at 280,673 bales was so obvi
ously wrong that it was severely assai ed at the time, and in its next year s
annual statement the Shipping List changed the figures In its tab'e, ana
brought forward the home consumption of 1866-7, thus: North of Virginia,
697,367; elsewhere, 156,672; having taken 124,000 bales from the South and
added it to the North, but without any note or other reference totals remark¬
able change. This increase of the Northern consumption, it will be. seen,

November 6, i860.]

THE

CHRONICLE.

necessitated

a like increase in the
crop receipts, because the exports and
stocks were fixed facts, and the erop receipts ana
consumption enough to bal¬
ance them were the only elastic or convertible
quantities.
The statement amended by the Shipping List's own
figures must have stood

thus:
Total crop of the United

Stock

States, 1856-7

283,692

Mak^s a supp^ of

Deduct—-Exports to foreign ports

2,359,6S0

1,558,315

Stocks in ports Sept. 1, 1867
Burnt and manufactured in Virginia

80,296

28,672

.

1,662,313
Taken for heme use, north of Virginia
Taken for home use in Vi rginia and elsewhere

bearing interest in Lawful Money.

’s, Certificates..On demand (interest estimated)
’s, Navy pen. f d.Interest only applic. to pay. of pensions

$47,640,000 00 $1,071,900 00
14,000,000 00
140,000 00

Aggregate of debt bearing interest in lawful money. $61,640,000 00 $1,211,900 00
Debt on whtcli Interest lias ceased since
maturity.

bales. 2,075,988

hand Sept. 1, 1866

on

Debt

687

Bonds
Matured December 31,1862
’s, Bonds
Matured December 31,1867
’s, Bonds
Matured July 1,1868 (9 months’ inter.).
’s, Texas indem.Matured December 31,1864
Var., Tr*y notes.Matured at various dates
5@5#’s, Tr’y n’es.Matured March 1,1859
6’s, Treas. notes.Matured April and May, 1863
3-10’s, 3 years.. .Matured August 19 ana October 1,1864
s, 1 & 2 years.. .Matured from Jan. 7 to April 1,18&6
’s, Certir. of ind.Matured at various dates in 1866
’s, Comp. int. n.Matured June 10,1867, and May 15,1868
5 & 6’s, Temp. l.Matured October 15, 1866
3-10’s, 3 years...Matured August 15, 1867, and June 15
and July 15,1868

$6,000 00
14,150 00
58,700 00
242,000 00
103,614 64
2,400 00
3,250
31,000
300,852
12,000
2,576 210

...

697,367
156,672

Total consumed in the United States (Including burnt,
&c.). 854.039
had been so stated, what would have become of the
&c., that were settled in accordance with the Shipping List's contracts,
stat.ment,
making the crop less than two million bales? f So much to llustrate the untrustworthy character of the
system that has be^n
followed. Returning to the details of the last crop, the committee
present the

ollowing as a true statement of the entire production of cotton for 1868-9 In
the United States:
Home uses—In mills North, spun
bales. 767,512
In mills South, spun
64,998
In mills North and South, not spun
31,744
In mills North and South, added to slock
50,000
In home spinning, &c., South
Burnt

Exports foreign,
u
“

or

otherwise

18,000

1,466,000

Stock 1st

2,392,254
38,130

September, 1869

12,343

25,787
Total production, 1868-9
2.366,467
The committee, after a careful examination of
every point involved, feel
entire confidence in the

substantial correctness of the statement of the
crop of
1868-9 which they have presented above. Yet
they would not. wholly rely upon
any one method or form of statement or collation of facts, if another is prac
t: cable.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
As in the statistics of cotton, quantities are
usually stated in bales, the com¬
mittee have deemed it quite
important that the true average weighis of bale*
of United 8tates cotton shou d be
accurately ascertained, and they have insti¬
tuted Inquiries to this end.
In calling for returns from the mil’s of their actual
consumption the past
year, it was requested that the answers should be in both
pounds and hales.
The request was generally complied
with; seventy per cent (in consuming
capacity) of the Northern mills reported in the form desired, and, with a
very
few

March

Average.

Pounds.

463

436,619,18G
114,670,822
169,695,175
87,534,920
162,625,240
60,260,000
27,803,500

497
475

357,253
198,943

440
472
460
425

314 545

131,000
65,420

466.4/ 5
,270,909
1,059,208,843
average net weigni oi an me American (united
States) cotton received
at Liverpool the last three
year was 444 ponnds per bale. As gross
weights are
given in our statistics, the tare (equal to 4# per
of
weights) must he added to thiB average, and the result will centan the gross
be
average of
465 pounds. A further test has been made
by the committee. Bv the courtesy
of manufacturers and merchants of Boston
desPng in cotton, they collected
from them the actual invoice weights of
j.iiw

always

ection, of the

se

„

crop of

1868-9,

as

follows:

nearly 180,003 bales, taken without

Of this the

Average

Bale?.

V

greater part

Orleans, and its

was

Pounds.

85,561
98,564

,

From merchants
From manufaeturers

37,256,591
44,167,287

we’ght.
474.31
472.05

179,125
81,423,878
473.13
from Memphis, Mobile, Savannah and New

average is above the average of the whole crop.
As the result of these several
inquiries, we have the
Average weight of ba es—As per returns of Northern followiug: lbs. 465 3-10
mills
Invoices from Southern markets....
466#
Liverpool weights,with tare restored 465
Boston weights
473#
And these result in the common
average used by the committee, at 466 pounds
per bale for the whole crop.

Respecfnlly submitted.

„

THE DEBT STATEMENT FOR OCTOBER.
The

$4,389,986 64

$570,993 16

following is the official

statement of the

public debt,

appears from the books and Treasurer’s returns
close of business on the last day of

October, 1869

Debt bearing Interest in Coin.

Character
of Issue.
a

s, Bonds.

5e, Bonds

"When Payable.
After 15 years from January 1,1859
After 10years from January 1,1861....

5,8 of 1881
After December 81,1880
5,8. Oreg.War,’81.Redeemable 20 years from July 1,1861.
*8 of 1«J1
At
“

“

pleas, after 20 years from June 30, ’61
'

-

Accrued

Outstanding.
$20,000,000 00

Interest.
$333,333 33
117,033 33

7,022,000 00
18,415,000 00
945,000 00
189,317,600 00
-

coin .'
payment

:

These bonds

are

6,099,817 50

6,659,979 00

2,591,779 00
850,787 00
8,750,706 25

$52,024,843 58
redeemable

and Dayable after 20
years.

JAhe8eJ^oni8 are redeemable
ana payable after
40




1,500,000 00
1,621,394 17
116,475 00
8,766,839 00

years.

at any

tirjo after 5

at any tjiiie after 10

years from the date here

years

given

from the date her? giyen
-

a<,uao,M4 so

)

28,731,520 00

$421,880,220 88
Amount ;

Debt bearing Interest in Coin—Bonds at 5 p. cent.
Bonds at 6 p. cent.
Total debt

bearing interest In coin

$2,107,936,800 00 $52,024,843 58
$47,640,000 03
14,000,000 00

Total debt bearing interest in lawful money
Debt on which Int. has ceased since maturity.
Debt Bearing no Interest—
Demand and legal tender notns
Postal and fractional currency
Certificates of gold deposited —.
Total debt

bearing

no

Interest

In*ere8t-

Outstanding.
$221,589,300 00
1,866,347,500 00

Debt bearing Interest in Lawful Money—
Certificates at 3 per cent
Navy pension fund, at 3 per cent

$61,640,000 00
4,389,986 64

..

1,211,900 00
570,993 16

$356,113,258 50
37,035,442 38
28,731,520 00

interest.

$421,880,220 88

Total

$2,595,847,007 52 $53,807,736 74
and interest, to date, including coupons due
presented for payment
$2,649,654,744 26

Total debt, principal
not

Amount tn the Treasury—
Coin

$116,994,211 69
7,248,295 24

Currency
Sinking iund, in United States coin int’st bonds, and accrued
interest thereon
Other United States coin
accrued interest thereon

interest

bonds

18,260,001 47

purchased, and

46,020,546 50

Total

$188,523,564 90

Debt, less amount in the Treasury

$2,461,181,189 36
2,468,495,072 11'

Debt, less amount in the Treasury on the 1st ultimo
Decrease of debt during the past month.
Decrease of debt since March 1,

7

7,363,882 75

1869,....

$64,S32,070 65

Bonds Issued to tbe Pacific Railroad

Companies, Interest

payable in Lawful Money,
Interest

Union Pacific Co
Kai.sas Pacific, latj U.P.
E. D
Sioui City and Pacific..

paid hv

Interest
-

Balance of

repaid by inte’t paid

outstanding, and not
United
transp’tion by United
yet paid.
States, of mails,&c. States.
$26,638,000 00 $533,738 97 $2,081,869 89$1,105,941 51 $975,928 38

,,

t
,
Cential p.-inPacific

6,303 000
1,628,320
2,362,000
22,009,000

Central Branch Union
Pacific
assignees ot*
Atchison & Pike’s P’k

Western Pacific
Total issued

Catest

Interest

accrued

Amount

Character of Issue.

00
00

126,090
32,565
00 41,254
00 439,594
,

1,600,000 00
l,648,0i.0 00

00
40
22
83

834,813
S6.508
588,816
1,130,399

32,000 00
10,135 64

09
631,224 99
16 2 7
69
83?
q. «./.
75 5 -*236 48

205,808 26

203,588 10
96,49 ! 42
.

mi

qca .a

LW4,*W) 10

5,29G 79

200,517 47
46,606 03

46,606 03

62,188,320 001,215,350 09 4,984,622 54 1,836,780 04 3,148,092 50

Ullonetara aitir (Eomtnerctal (Engliaf) Jfttns

KATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON. AND ON LONDON
AT LATEST DATES.

EXCHANGE AT LONDON—
OCT. 22.

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.
LATEST

ON—

TIME.

Amsterdam...

Antwerp
Hamburg

BATE.

11.19 @11.19#
short.
3 months. 25.37#@25.42#
13.11 @13.11*

90 days.
3months

Lisbon
Milan
Genoa

51#@ 51#
J6.77# @26.82;
“
“
®
“
@
“

TIME.

BATS.

Oct. 21.

short.
short.
short.

short.

11.92#@
25.17#@
13. 6#@
25.13 @

3 mos

122.80

44

II
it

Oct. 21.
41

41

41

Oct. 15.
“

20.

short.
90 days.
90 days.

—

—

—

—

@

6,23#
119. 0#@
50.25

03#

.

New York....
Jamaica....
Havana
Rio de Janeiro
Bahia

Oct. 22. 60

109#

1 p. c. pm.
17# p. c.

Sept 80.

Sept. 22.
Sept. 20.
Sept. 22.
Sept. 24.
Sept. 15.

Valparaiso....

Singapore....
Hong Kong..
Ceylon
Bombay

days.

Sept. 5. 90 days.
Oct. 18. 60 days.
44

Pernambuco.

60

days,

4s Ad
45 4d
1 p. c.

Madras
Calcutta

Sydney

-•

DATE.

Paris
25.32#@25.37#
short.
Paris
25.12#@25.20
Vienna...... Smonths, .2.67#@12.62)
Berlin
6.27#@ 6.28
Frankfort
1.20#@ 1.21
Cadiz
43#@ 49

30

days.

dis.
s\\{d^Ul\ d
Is ll#ef
15 11 #(2
# p. c. dis.

I From our

.$2,107,936,800 00 $48,274,187 S3

Total interest
*

00
00
00
00

368,300 00
18,900 00
3,786,352 00
15,443,148 00

$113,258 50

856,000,000 00

Recapltnlation*

Naples

:

125,561,800 00

Coupons due, not presented for

the

Amount

203,327,250
332.998.950
379.588.950
42,589,350

Aggregate of debt bearing interest in

at

Amt. outstand

Fractional currency
Certificates for gold deposited

....

as

720 00

31,295 10

Aggregate of debt bearing no Interest

exceptions, in such detail as to indicate that their books had been carefully
consulted.
From these returns it appeared that of 338
mills, consuming 244,509,147
pounds, which was 80 per cent of the who e consumption, or
525,441 bHee,
each bale averaged 465.84 ponnds.

Bale*.
943.022
230,726

3,1803 and June 30,1864

March 3,1863

-

The following averages for the several localties
stated have been deduced
from a great number of invoices from each.
Applying these averages to the
quantities produced in the same localities, we have tne
following result for
1868-91

1,131 50
15,042 60

857,400 00

Authorizing acts.
Character of issue.
July 17,1861 and Feb. 12,1862
Demand notes
Feb. 25 & July 11,’62, & Mar. 3, ’63 ..U. S. legal-tender notes

'

Disposed of through the year
Deduct—Difference in stock in ports:
Stock 1st September, 1868

1

182,410 00

which int. has ceased since matur.

926,254

1,448,000

through Canada

on

120 CO
195 00

00
00
00
00
00

Debt bearing no interest*

7,500
4,500

destroyed after packing

as per New York tables

to and

Aggr’te of debt

849 00

2,641 50
12,100 00
3,072 35

495,901 46
7,564 65

,

If the crop

$360 00

own

19#
45# @45#
19#

4444

6 mos.
44

44

Sept. 20.
Oct. 9.
Oct. 5.

44
44
44

Oct. 11.

Aug. 12

19#

44

30

days

45.

5#</.@
d.@

45. 6

—

—

par.
15.11 ll-16d.
15.
15. 11 #@1511-16
1 p. c. pm.

Correspondent. J

London, Saturday, Oct. 23, 1869.
market affords no indication of increasing
trade, and it is considered doubtful whether, during the present year*
we shall haye ft much higher minimum than at
present. The upward
The

position of the

money

[November 6, 1869.

CHRONICLE.

THE

588

The following statement shows the present position of the Bank of
Russia would, it was thought,
Western Europe before now, bu^ Englan 1, the Bank rate of discount, the price of Oonsol9, the average
value of English wheat, the price of Middling Upland cotton and of No.
up to the present time no perceptible effect has been produced. This
40 mule yarn, fair, second quality, compared with the four previ >us
may pos ibly arne out of the circumstance that the advance in Eastern
Europe has been caused by an exuberance of speculation, in conse¬ years :
1868.
1869.
1867.
1865.
1866.
£
£
£
£
*
£
quence cf which the lenders of monev in the West are not much dis¬
Circulation, includingposed to trust their surplus funds out of their own countries. Certain Bank p st bills
22,370 215 24,353,932 25.379,299 25,167,705 24,516,991
3. vl 8,291
3,5*8,966
8,550,282
4,i07.785
Public deposits
8.793,582
it is, however, that the supply of bullion in the Bank of France con¬
Other deposits
13,279,933 18,764,0." 6 20,076.186 20,405.854 18,175,412
tinues remarkably large, while in the discount market, ordinary bills, Government securities 9 3 8,073 12,191,426 12,891,203 15,935,871 15,2 1,953
other securities
20,(i08,638 2<',653,187 16.807 174 15,8ol,648 14,854,216
having at'out three months and unier to run, are taken at 2|- per cent.
9.891,809
7,659,r,98 13.0 *,311 10,453,384
Reserve
6,019,*43
13,219,213 16.377,358 22 786,666 19.947,174 18.828,314
Premier banque paper, in fact, is discounted as low as 1^ and 1^, but Cola and nullion
2 p. c.
2 p. c. 2X P- C.
7 p. c.
Bank rate
4X P C.
MX
these figures must not be looked upon as a guide to the actual state cf Consol*
91*
8SX
89},'
94X
47s. 0d.
63s. 8d.
67s. 6d.
52s. 2d.
42s. Id.
Price of wheat
the market. Paris is now the cheapest money market in the world, Mid.
16d.
*12* d.
22d.
10*d.
8}*d.
Upland cotton...'
and the wonder is that some profitable means of employing the large 40 mnle yarn, fair 2d
Is. l^d. ♦Is. 8d
Is. Id.
2s. 6d.
Is. 9d.
duality
supplies of idle capital are nit discovered. In this country enterprise
Premium October 14.
is certainly recovering.
Telegraph companies continue to he formed,
The trade for wheat has been rather firmer this week, and a larger
and, although trade, taken as a whole, is certainly quiet, there are
amount of busiuees has been transacted.
English and also American
marked and decided symptoms in some branches of business not only
wheats have improved in value to the extent of la per quarter ; but in
of an approaching, but of an actual impr >vement.
Tne iron trade,
bolh as regards pig and railway descriptions, is very firm, and it is Russian produce no quotable change has taken place.» It is not
quite certain that the buoyancy which prevails in this depattment will improbable, now that the lowest point seem9 to have been reached, that
ootinue throughout the coming year.
The necessity of railway com¬ a healthy feeling will pervade the market. A slight rise is likely to
take place, inasmuch as, at present quotations, and with cheap money,
munications is becoming more and more urgent, and it is 8»id that
millets may not be unwilling to Lcrease their stocks.
Our importa¬
Russia, who has not been borrowing during the present year, v il

in Germany, Austria and
have influenced the money markets of
movement

-

..

....

....

*

early part of 1870, and will strive to
work of railways much more complete than it is at

to do so in the

recommence

render htr net

In India an extension of the present railway e stem is in
progress, chiefly with the object of fa ilitating the production of citton,
while in South America, Australia and elsewhere new lines are*n con¬
templation. These facts cannot but inspire the iron trade with the
h->pe of a good business for along time to come. A touch of winter—
for we have had some -harp fro ts this week, while in the North and
in Scotland the hills have been covered with enow—has also given a
stimulus to the trade for winter clothing, and in the woolen districts a
fair degree of activity has prevailed; but in other respects business
must be reported quiet.
present.

The Bank

.

bills
year

they

reduced to the low total of £14,854,200.

are

Last

in 1866,

in 1867, £16,807,124;

£15,881.648 ;

were

therefore, there

£2<>,553,187 ; and in 1865, £20,008,638. Since 1867,
has been a diminution of about £2,000,000.

this week, has been to a fair extent, an 1, at

The demand Tor money,

period, very Ii*tie accommodation was obtainable under the Back
late.
During the last few days, however, there has been less anima¬
tion, and the rates of discount in the open mirket are now somewhat
easier.
The following are the quotations for bills having variouperiods to ruu :
1868.
1869.
Per cent. Per cent.

1869.
1868.
Per cent. Per cent.
Bark minimum.... 2

2*©..

@...

Open mirket ra’es:
30 and 60 days’ bills 1*@1*
3 months, bills
l}«(3)ltf

2*@2*
x*(a,2*

The rates of interest allowed




deposits

are as

Joint stock banks
Discount houces, at call

IX
IX

1

@2#

2*@2%

@2*
@2*

2*@2*
3 @3*

:

’69.

1

4 months, ba’k bills 2
6 months’ ba’k (tills 2
4 and 6 trade bills.. 2

by the joint stock banks and discount

follows
’68.

’68. ’69.
Disc’t houses, 7 days notice, IX IX
do
14
do
IX 1*®2

Germany the quotations remain firm ;
den a id ha< been to a fair extent, there is
In

but at Paris, although the
no

decided firmness.

The

supply of bullion held by the Bank of France has increaced, whilt
discounts show a considerable diminution. The following are the

prices of money at the leading continental cities:
B’krate—.
1868. 1869.

1868.

1869.

2X

2*

2X

V/t-X

Vienna
4
Berlin
4
Frankfort. 2*

5

5
$X

4
3

Amst’rd’m 2X

*X

At Paris
...

r-B’k rate—x
1868. 1869.

r-Op. m’kt—,

-3X
l*-2
2X

Op. m’kt—
1869.

1868.

Turin
5
Brussels
%X
Madrid ...5

—

—

Hamburg

5
4%
3X

—

2*

4

t>X

5X

5

—

St. PetVg. 7

4*

—

—

2*-3

2X

..

.

5X

2*-3
—

silver very

little is doing.

Gold is in fair [demand f

The following

are

r export,

but in

the prices of bullion

:

gold

s.

.....peroz.standard.

BarGold
do
do

77
77
77

do
do

fine

Reflnable

75

Spanish Doubloons

peroz.
8outb American Doubloons... do
United States gold coin.

do

74

None here.

d.

--

10 X

9
©77
HX

0

3

—

—

s.

.

d

s.

9X

—

0

@76
©—

—

©—

—

d.

SILVER.

Bar Silver Fine....
do
do containing
Fine Cake Silver
Mexican Dollars
Pnanish Dollars (Carolus)

.per oz. standard nearest.
5 grs. gold..
do

quiet

per oz.
peroz.
per oz.

6 (j*
5
1
6
5X
4 31
—

—

©

__

__

&

—

—

©

—-

—

none

peroz. 4 11* ©
Quicksilver, £0 17s, per bottle; discount 3 per cent.

Fivefrauc pieces

d.

s.

© 5 Ox

here.
—

—

16.

POE THE WEEK ENDING OCTOBER

1869-70

cwt.

Whent

SO’,597

eai

Heans

SINCE THE

,

5,792,344

55,124

enns

-

604

1,424,«69

7.496
1,567
271
125
5,560

1,167,6*18
140,599
565,33 2

311
5

3,011,698
910,047

83,791

4,053,140

-

2,573

02,' 32
e 241,263

.

331

(SEPT. 1).

l. 46

1,160,530

Oats
Fens

....

98.435

54

5 4,3*0

....

Barley

2,644
275

816,157102,347

....

COMMENCEMENT OP THE SEASON

Wheat

107,662
44,670

5

950,174
135,813

Inaiun corn
Flour

15

24*,263

782
130

31 502
68 577

,

Imports. Exports
0,732
66 ,532

....

171,062

O ts

1869-69

,

,

Impor s. Expo ts.
3,Ui5,734
7,lo3

Hailey

1,955,699
472,663

1,011
2,753

.

following figures show the average prices of English wheat, bar*
lay and oat9 in EnJind and Wales for last week, compared with ihe
The

four

previous

years :

Wheat-

1-69.
47s. Od.

Parley

38

1

Oats.

24

1

-

45

27

41

7

62s.

42

8

22

‘ 25 10

1

The following relates to the state

1865.
43*. Id.

1866.

1867.
67s. 6d.

1868.
53s. Sd.

2d.

89 11

ll

20 11

11

of trade at Manchester

:

ho”gh the market has been ve y quiet siDce Tuesday, prices, on the whole,
continue firm and steady.
Atiheclo^e of la»t week a co siderable business
wa- done, wh ch g ve producers an opportunity of selling, and relieved them
from stocks wh ch had begun to accumulate
Some sninuers and nunufacture s got pretty well under e ntr ct, and accordin ly raised their quotations, and
declined to make further sales unless they could obtain sc me aivai ce. The
engagements which sp nn« rs entered into gave a s igh stimulus to the LtverP' O' mm ket, and a large basinets was done there on Monday and Tuesday.
Ihismirk. t, how v r, was not further influenced by the an mution in * iverool, and si. ce '1 uesday tbe demand has filien off, and some spinners who
omitted to s 1 earl in the we k have been rather easier to deal with today.
A1

T.

e

►

ale- of

cor on

f

»r

the we-k

exceed the aggn gate amount ot sales

istlng of

culat

rep »rted daily by fully 20,000 bales, the excels chi*
con
sp*
tran-actions. !lncon-equence of ar quisi ion from a number of li
ex ort > nd im ort firms, tbe * iverpoul Cotton Brok* rs’ Association has
mat«d that in future the daiy estimate of sal swill not be made up
ll o’cloc , A. .vr ; an hour certainly early enough for all practical purposes.

fly

flue tial
i tiuntlafier

This

spinners h»ve bought cotton more free y than they h.ve done for soma
time, and it is-urmLed that the coi-snmj ti./n has Increased again.
Cotton
sti l ci mes forward fretly at the ports, hut r-om • authorities assert with confi¬
dence that tbe crop he matured ea ly, and that the bu k of it will be marketed
'j his ind* ces a cautious *, olicy among those sellers who
.oo'ier than umihI.
incline to this view, and prevent* them from entering into long engagements.
On tue other hand, there if nothin** in the advices received from abro *d. either
from near or distant markets, to stimulate buyers into making ex ens ve pur¬
chases and hhipments.
Tbe Continental marke’s remain dull, and our own
home trade has been quite staguant since August.
weex

Mr. Grant

Towards the close of the week the exchanges became rather more
favorable to this country.

since September 1:

exports for last week, and

In dan corn
Flour

ODe

houses for

Last week’s

shows that the “ other securities,” or advances, and

return

discounted,

large, and are still considerably in excess of last yea'.
import of wheat was as much as 1,015,734 cwt., against
561,532 cwt. in 1868.
Of Indian com and flour the imports have
also been considerable.
The following is the statement of i uportsand

tions continue

Duff, the Under Secretary for India, in the course

of a

speech to his constituents in Elgin, stated that the amount of India
exported last season, 1868-9, rose to 697,680,796 lb9., while, for
the season before, it was only 614,056,049 lbs.
He added he bad no
doubt that there would be a steady improvement both in quality and
quantity if, as there is every reason to expect, tbe present demand goes
on.
The Secretary of State and the Viceroy have the extension and
improvement of our cotton supply much at heart, and we have already
some active officers who are engaged in doing their very best to promote
them—Mr. Rivett-Carnac, for example—and the number will no doubt
increase. When the Government, however, has done its utmost, a vast
deal will remain to be done.
Enlightened self-interest must be the real
dtiving-wheel, the enlightened self-interest of persons in this country
who want cottoD, and the enlightened self-interest of the Indian peasant

otton

who wants rupees.

'

7

7 •'

November 6, 1869.)

1847.26
The

ioto

following figures shows the imports and exports of cotton
and from the United Kingdom from Sept. 1 to Oct. 21 :

American

17,5*0
33,608
95,477
933

66,870

404,9«2
9,020

Egyptian
The

Exp’ts

cwt 30,657

br*Z ltm
Fan I idlan

each of tho

130,7C4

525,640

same years :

London.
Cwt

1816

Liverpool.
Cwt.

.100,761

OF

Olher ports
of U. K.
Cwt.

296,584

1849..1t0,872

8,779,993
8,'65,493
5,470,386
6,1149,393

1850 .146,’<*55

5,274,451

f 04 087

1861.. 208,454

6,222,478
7,769,611

836,387
376,026

1863..410.985
1864..176.809

7.190,111
7,516,745

392,514

1855.. 30 ,025
1856.. 818,583
1857. .821,868

7,522.570

,133

1848.. 223,439

1852.

.155,992

210,829
673,427

615,491

280,063
134,476
259,153
253,223

8,664,106

8,078,042

DESCRIPTIONS IMPORTED INTO

ALL

London.
Cwt
1858.. 215,205
1859.. 212,597
1> 60.. 316,861
18 1 473,1-00
te6*.. 534.435

Liverpoo1.
<

L-ther ports
Of U. K.
Cwt.

;wt.

194,971
234,281

8.8*5,022

10,499,4 53

374.514

11 727,691
10,396,4fcC

318,018
59,628
16,893
62,879
69,330
155,979

4.084,270
6.246,063

18*13..715,461

7,086.*57

1864..826.899
1865 5 5,190
1866 841,736
1867 7)5.540

8.137,4*9
11,298,038
10.505,117

1868..853.497

10,945,959

British Possessions
in East udtes.
( wt.

of America.
< wt.

1848
1817
t‘ 48
1819
185-*

3,58»,834

368,394

....3,255, 61

749.416
750 910

5,35‘,858

632,137

5,605,216
4,403,153

1851
1852...

6.827,134

1,091,364
1,094,884

6.835,987

753.2:36

5,879,034
6,447,780

1,623,644

1854

1,296,243
1,011,577

1357

6,085,977
6.964,643
5,846,054

7,439,6 3

9,963,309

1,185,023
1,717,210
1,822,689 '

7,310.969

Surat, Ac. possessions.
21 o,2*7
S.081,777 *

Bombay,

1801

120 751

1863

67,040

126.321

7,9*2 617

7.962,1-71

9.141,842
4,63 4
9,235,14*8
10,946,331

12,419,096

611,105
1,051,7.7

11,22’,078
4,078,338
5,978,42*
7,975,9:45

2,04*,575

3,3*7,047
3,537.484
2,157,663
2,107 6>9

969,513

„

8,731.949
12,295,803
4,715,733
11,272,651
5,128,971
3,296,068
2,820,827
11,857,893
The amouot of business passing in the Stock Exchange has been very
moderate this week.
The tone of the market* has been rather dull;

1865
18*46
1667
1868

1,212,790
4,644,370

829,191

1,707,855
1,122,721
1,112,027

-

but in foreign government

The fallowing

apparent.

Consols and the
week

securities rather a better feeling has been
the highest and lowest quotations of

were

principal American securities on each day of the

:

Fri’ay.

Monday. Tuesday. Wed’ay. Thu’ay

uct. 23.

Sat’day

$681,653
28,564,235

$64,708,298
23,692,977
33.560.342
32.686,3o9
26,48*,66l

1858.

j

| 1857
25,288,218 I 1856
39,729,572 11855
39,042,834 | 1854
49.9U2.205 | 1853
3,295,652 I 1852
41,613,119 1

8%612,176
21,326 961

23,1)6,1ST

of specie at this port during the past week Lave been

The imports
as follows:

Oct. 25—St. Arizona,
Silver
Gold
“

2\OQ0
9,7 0

$29,248,888

..

..

12,600

Gold
Oct. 26—Brig Curacoa,
G *ld
Silver

Aspinwall
$1 8‘0
4,000

25—brig Virginia, St. Marlin,

1,606

Curacoa,

$13,900

Total Cor the week

,.14,757 936

Previously reported

—The attentio

1

5,0:34
1.410

..

of

.$11,771,838

1, 1869.
.4.

our

.

reader is again called to th3

..

6,326,932
2,848,204

bonds >f the

O-wego Mi lland Railroad offere I for a tie by des^rs.

George Oodyke it Co. The road hts now been completed from Oswego
down to Che ango county, and lias been chiefly paid, for by the sub¬
scriptions of the towns and co inties on its route, whi'h amount to the
large sum of $6,n00,000, to be expen le I up n the road before the sale
of bonds is resorted to.
The bon Is bear seven per cent interest in
gold, at whico rate they pay about 10 per cent in currency. The
route of this road is well knows to our readers, and as the b uds are a
home investment they merit the attenti m of ad parties having funds
fur investment.
—We call the attention of

capitalists to the advertisement of Messrs
Co. in another column
The improvement offered
by the above firm is kno vn as Jenkins’ “ Patent C impressible Valves
and Guage Cocks.” The fact that these valves, alter bei ig in constant
W. J. McAlister

nearly three years, are recomraen led as the beat in the ountry by
the Quintard, Morgan and Novelty Iron Works, of this city, is sufficient
evidence of their worth to justify an investigation, every facility for
which wi l be afforded by calling on Messrs. McAlister & Co., 178
Bro idway.
Me 8t*s. E. 3. Munme & Co., No. 19 New street, dealers in railway
and other shares, give notice in another column that they are prepared
use

—

to

buy

or

As this particular ola-s

sell stocks in lots to suit applicants.

of business is carried on by very few houses, the card of Messrs.
Munroe <fe Co., merits particular notice.
Attention is called to the advertteement of Cotton Ties,by Messrs.
—

%-93%|93%-93% 93^-93%
9314-93% 93%-93%|93%-93%
81% 8l%.8!%-81% *1%-81%
8l%-82
82 -82% 8l%80 -82
80- -82
80 -83
80 -8*
80 -82
80 -82
81 %81%-81% 81%-.... 81%-81% Sl%-81%hl%^2%-82% 82%-82%
U. 8.5-2'e, 1887..
83 -83% >3%-83% 83 -83* 83%-.
76
U. 8. 10-408, 1904.... 76 -76% 76 -76% 76 -76% 75%-76% 75%-76

Consols
U. 8. 5-20’s, 1882
U. 8. 5-20s, 18*i4.'
U. 8. 5-20s, 1885

I860

New York and

Other

442,527
874,-561

3,063,317
3,0 4,196
3,573,048
3,152,184
3,784,915
3,326,538

1,200

.

Total since January
S«ime time 18 >8
Same t me 1887

633,098

u

186743 837,332
1866
55,685,777
1865
1864
1863
1862.
1861

1,000
39.300

...

| Same time in
$67.942,Ml | 1859

1868

FROM

610,552
642,419

i>ars

8 1 vftr oar*
30-S .City of Brussels,
L ver pool,
SU/er b rs
Bri ish goid

1,1869

6,762,319
8, .01,629
4,5' 0

579 851
56 ,622
67 0417

2 2 <5 162

8,58 V>72

Total since Jan.
Same time in

1,000

.

....

4,238,461
6,3i)6,2 1
6,7 *5, *57
5,924,798

404,873

1, 69,964

An

<’d

P leire H vre,
ei ic.*n goi i....

4,* 0J

2,815

14,662

.

ara.

Total for the week
Previously reported

4,177,288

460, *70
340.301
7(7,400
490,882

P0—St

Liverpool,

53,437

447.657

1

78 846

...

silver

Amer cang

Hamburg,

,

an

28—Schr. ►rankTicat,

“

Foreig si ver
27—St. Minnecota,

“

All Parts.
Cwt

Other Parts.
Cwr.
280,(60
233,694
255,938

26—St. Hoteati

“

9,760
2,600

d....
Paris,

Foreign ilver
“

A'»eri.

$1,000

Foreign gold
<-old bars

51,974

QUANTITIES OF COTTON WOOL IMPORTED INTO THE UNITED KINGDOM

United States

Amer CSugo
26—S
tio s-itia,
.

an account

QUANTITIES OF COTTON WOOL

> m^’icnn gold...
2!—St. H lsatlt, 1 ondon,
jVexicaa silver...

“

“

of the total quantities of Cotton Woo!
imported ioto the ports ot London and Liverpool respectively, and int»
othei ports of the United Kingdom collectively, in each year from 1846
to 1868 ; and also the quantities imported into the United Kingd m in

following is

Pa-,

Imports. Exp’ts
14,131
3,126

Miscellaneous

British gold
$486,000
Oct. 28— Sc. Eagie, Havana,'

Oct. 26-8 hr. C. C. Warren,

50268811 78,'*-95
Imports.

589

CHRONICLE.

THE

r

9

...
..

Littlejohn <fc Co., 245 Pearl street. The Ties sold by them are said to
be of superior quality, and are either with buckles or without.

.

_

COUPONS

NOVEMBER

THE

OF THE

..

Atlantic A G’t West. |
consol’d mort.b’ds 23%-25
23%-2'% 25%-25% 25%-....!24%-25%l 25%- .
21 -22% *1%-22% 121%-22
Erie Shares($100).. 20 -21% 19% -21
I 21%-....
95 -95% 15%-....|95% -96% | 96
Illinois shares ($100)|94%- ... 94%-95

COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
Week.—The imports this week
are about the same in dry goods, bnt show a considerable decrease in gen
•ral merchandise, the total being $4,052,420, against $4,425,831 last
week, and $8,737,789 the previous week. The exports are $4,182,157
this week, against $3,997,794 last week, and $4,149,217 the previous
week. The exports of cotton the past week were 11,017 bales, against
18,100 bales last week. The following are the imports at New York
for week ending (for dry goods) October 29, and fur the week ending
(for general merchandise) October 80:
Imports

and

Exports

for

8EVEN

FIRST

FOR THE WEEK.
1867.
1868.

CENT

MORTGAGE SINKING FUND BONDS
OF

THE

PORT HURON AND LAKE MICHIGAN RAILROAD
Will be

COMPANY

paid in gold, free of government tax, at the office of
S. W. HOPKINS <fc CO.,

the

'71

BROADWAY.

COUPONS

NOVEMBER

THE

SEVEN

FIRST MORTGAGE

PER

OF THE

CENT

SI > KING FUND

BONDS

OF 1HE

PENINSULAR
Will be

COMPANY OF

RAILWAY

MICHIGAN,

paid in gold coin, free of Governm-nt tax, at the office of
S. W. HOPKINS &

71

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK

1866.

PER

CO.5
BROADWAY.

1869.

$1,339,840

$1,013,957

$1,0 3,811

$1,630,309
2,423, ill

$3,947,056

$3,611,663

Previously reported... 245,421,180

$3,497,014
206,227 144

208,055,771

$4,< 52,420
248.180,380

$249,363,236

$209,724,168

$211,667,484

$262,532,300

Drygoods

...

General merchandise..
Total for the week..*^

Since Jan. 1

la

our

2,667,216

2,483,057

2,537,852

report of the dry-goods trade will be found

the imports of dry

goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive ofspecie)from
the port of New York to foreign ports, for the week ending Nov. 1 :
EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR

THE WEEK.

1866.

For the week..

Previously reported....
Since Jan 1

1867.

1868.

18S9.

$3,093,780

$4,*97,023

$3.121,997

$4,13‘,1 7

118,268,667

152,211,148

I35,49>,(k5

16 J,128,594

$161,862,447

$156,808,171

$138,621,082

The following will show the exports of specie from
Tork for the week ending Oct. 80, 1869 i




3tf)t Banker©’

DIVIDENDS.

PER

NAME OF

COMPANY.

WHEN

CENT.

Banks.
Nassau

National Bank State

N. Y....

Kxpress,
United Sta*es Express
Mlsc llaneon*.
Bankers & Brokers Assoc’n...

Railroads.
Boston. * on. & Montreal

$164,265,751

the port of New

©autte.

pr...

BOOKS CLOSED.

4
4

Nov. 10.
Nov. 10.

Oot. 30.
Oot. 30

2%

Nov. 15.

Nov. 5.

3

Nov. 9.

Nov. 6.

3

Nov. 2.
Nov.

3^

~

Nov. 30.

m

NoV. 25.
Novem.

5
2

Cleveland & Mahoning

pay’ble

...

-

THE CHRONICLE.

690

Friday Evening,

The Money Market —The chief feature

November 5.

of the market has been

activity in cal! Joans. The Broadway Bank, as the
depository of the city funds, has had to disbuise about 87,0* 0,000
in interest and principal upon city and county bond^ and bonds for
the return of taxes ; and the preparation for these payments has
involved the calling in of some heavy loans, with the result of a
more active movement.
This produced a temporary advance of
about 1 per cent in the rate of call loans; but, at the close, the
an

increaced

market has fallen back imo its former ease, the rate on stock
bond collaterals

being $@7

per

and

cent, with exceptions at 5 per cent

to dealers in Governments.

Some moderate amounts of currency have been sent to the South ;
and orders for money have b:e» received from Louisville and Cin¬

(November 6,1869.

to-night at that point. Next in point of interest were the Tennessees, which were generally lower, on the question of some internal
matters relative to railways and banks.
The Southern securities
were all firm, but quiet.
The

following are the closing prio
preceding week :

s

of State bonds compared

with the

Oct. 29.Nov 6. {
Oct. 29.Nov. 5.
Tennessee Sixes, x c
69# | Louisiana Sixes... ....... 66
60#
65#
Tennessee Sixes, new
61
60
| Louisian* Sixes, levee .... 64
63
North Carolina Sixes, old. 47
46
I Louisiana Eights, levee... 82#
80
North Carolina Sixes, x.c 38
37# j Alabama Eignts
90#
90
North Carolina special tax ....
40
91
j Gerrgia Sevens
90
Missouri Sixes..
60
Virginia t^ixes, old
50
87#
87#
62
66
| South Carolina Sixes, n’w. 66
Virginia Sixe^, new
62#

Railroad

and

Miscellaneous Stocks.—The stock

market has
been a

be?n devoid of any features of special moment.
There has
certain amount of speculative interest, but the operations have

receipts from various other quarteis will
probably suffice to offset these shipments; so that the banks can
have lost but little upon their country exchanges. The operations
of the Tieatury h..ve been in favor of the baukr, its sales of gold
havii g been 82,000,000, equ 1 in currency to about $2,540,000;
while its payments, against purchases of $4,000,000 of bond?, have
been about $4,520,000, leaving a balance which has gone into the
banks of about $1,980,000. The Treasury is distributing the new
United States notes of ihe lower denominations rather more freely,
but not in sufficient volume to materially affect the ability of the
banks to meet the wants of their country correspondents.
It is not to be expected that the present ease, unusual for this
season, will be maintained without interruption through the moving
of the pork crop.
Usually, several millions of currency are sent to

lacked
spirit, operators on both sides being apparently unable to discover
grounds for any decided movements. On Monday the terms of con¬

the West in connection with that movement; and the
to Louisville aDd Cincinnati, within the past week, may

by a resolution of the directors. After this
York Central fill from 193 to 184f, and has

cinnati.

But the small

remittances
be regarded

solidation between

New York Central

and

Hudson River

were

formally announced. According to these terms the New York Cen¬
tral stockholder are to receive upon every 100 shares of stock 100
shares of consolidated stock, 107 shares of consolidated scrip, and
$1 80 per share in cash. The stockholders in Hudson Riv.r re¬
ceive 100 shares consolidated stock and 85 shares of consolidated

scrip.

The

now

outstanding 80

cent scrip on New York Cen¬
scrip, and at an early day

per

tral will be convertible into consolidated

the

scrip will be detac- ed from the stock and called on the Stock
Exchange separately. The consolidated scrip will be entitled to
the

same

dividends

as

the stock and will be convertible into stock

announcement New

since stood between
8S the beginning of the ou fl >w in that diiection.
180$ and 181$. Pacific Mail has been firm, owing to the adoption
of a resolution by the Chamber of Commerce favoring the petition¬
The discount market remains stringent. There is a c a siderable
amount of paper on the market, and the banks are taking little ing to Congress to grant an additional subsidy to the company,
beyond their customers’ rates Prime paper continues at 10@12 enabling it to run a semi-monthly line to China in lieu of the
present monthly line. St. Paul has been strengthened by largely
per cent, and names ranking as “ good” at 14@21 per cent.
United States Securities—The bond market has exhibited increased earnings in tie last week of October. The Northwestern
shares a’so have been fi. mer under semi-official intimations that the
more activity, but the predominant tendency has been downward.
The influences to which we alluded last week as having depressed company will be in a position to declare a dividend next month of
the market have combined to operate this week until Sixty-Sevens 3$ per cent on the common stock and 5 per cent on the preferred.
touched 115 ; at which figure the price halted, and has since steadily The highest and lowest prices for leading stocks have been as foladvanced. The Government proposals for the purchase of bonds 1 ows:
72#
Northwestern
65#
for the week, have been for £1,000,000, on account of the Sinking Har’em
143
134
do
preferred... 86#
82#
PacifioMnil
61#
68
Rock Island
105# 101#
Fund, and for $2,000,0(0, subject to the approval of Congress. New York Central
194# 178
85# 84#
SO#
27# Fort Wayne
The offerings at each purchase werequite limited,being on Wednes¬ Erie
St. Paul
.'
70#
65
Reading
97#
93
do
preferred
83# 78
Michigan Southern.
92# 88#
day $3 581,450, and on Thursday $3,281,100. The Secretary Ohio <fc Mississippi
Hudson River
175
157#
26#
25
$2,000,000, in lieu of the $1,000,000, for which
yesterday accepted
The following were the closing quotations of the regular board
the proposals called. These features in the Government purchase
have produced a strong* r feeling within the last two day", and the compared with those of the six preceding weeks ;
Sept 24. Oct. 1.
Oct. 8. Oct. 15. Oct. 22. Oct 29. Nov. 5
market closes firm, atllC$ for Sixty-Sevens.
The foreign markets Cumberland Coal
28
26#
30
27#
26#
14#
12
13
12#
14#
12#
12#
have kept about even with home prices, so that no opportunity has Quicksilver
50
52
50#
Canton Co
52#
52#
52#
occurred for either the import or export of bonds.
17
16
16
14#
16#
16#
16#
Mariposa pref....
59
72
Pacific Mail
58#
60#
61#
6S#
5rt#
The following are the closing prices of leading government New York Central
177
181#
192#
187#
172#
182#
175#
•

•

•

•

•

•

Erie

securities, compared with preceding weeks :
Oct. 1.

.

U. 8. 5-29’a, 1862 coup....
U. S. 6-20’s, 1864
44
U. S.6-20’8,1865
“
U. 8. 6 20’b, 1865, July cpn
U S.5-20’s, 1867, coup . ...
U* S. 5-20’s, 1868, “
...
U. 8.10-40’s.
“
Pacific Sixes
...

Oct. 8.

319#

120#

121#
119#

120#

H9#

119#

118

218
31S
118

118#

109#
109
....

Oct. 15. Oct. 22. Oct. 29. Nov. 5
118 *
119#
119#
118#
121
120#
119#
115#

119#
119#
317#
117#
117#
108#
107#

119#

108#
107#

119#

117#

120

118

113#
118#

117#
117#

116

116

116#

116#
115#
107#
107#

117#
1(8#

107#

315

107#
107#

Purchases of bonds

by the Government during the past week were
■on Wednesday, $2,COO,000, the total
offered "being $3,481,450,
and on Thursday $2,000,000, the total offerings being $3,281,000.
The bonds purchased were as lollow3 :
Ncv. 3.

Nov. 4.

Nov. 3. Nov. 4.

Hudson River....

35
164

•

•

•

•

•

•

158
96

Reading

94#

Mich. Southern..

92

Michigan Central

130

120

101
72

89#
69#
83#
107#
82#

99#
72#
84#
108#

131
27
67
80
55

133#
28#

Clev. and Pittsd.

Northwestern....
44

preferred

Rock Island......
Fort Wayne
Illinois Central
•Ohio & Miss
Milw & St. Paul.
..

44

44

prl

Tol., Wab. & W’n
*

'

87

139

28#
71#
82#
70

85#

82#

83#
107#
*

29#

85

08

82#
59#

82#
158#
94#
90#

83#
171#

124

83#

83#
158
98

122#

92
122

102#
71#
83#

100

70#
84#
104#

28#
157#
97#

86#*

71

106#

85#
134

27#
67#
81#
64#

178

96#
93#

83#
105#
85

135

26#
69#
82#
66#

85

138#
26#
67#
80
64

90#
120

70#
85#
103#
S5#
136
27
70

88#
62

Ex-dividend.

The Gold Market.—In the

gold market there has been a

gradual increase of speculative transactors, which, however, have
The price has gradually
reg....
49,COO
28,000
cou,... 234,800
declined from 128$, our last quotations, to 126$; but, to-day, the
’68, reg
reg....
f5,000 29,000
’68, cou
cou...
400
2,100
41,500 market took a strong upward turn, under speculative purchases,
Total Bonds now held hv the Treasury. $66,844,000, as follows : and
advanced to 127$, closing steidy at that figure. The Treasury
5-20’s of 1862, reg
$7450,200 5-20’s of 1865, new, reg.... $3,938,200
59,500
1862, cou
1865, new, cou
19,273,200 has sold, during the week, two lots of gold of $1,000/00 each*
1864, reg
1867; re?....
3,341,000
3,119,650
1864, cou
1867, cou
5,416,700
18,380,950 The imports of specie have been only $180 0 0.
1865, reg
1868, reg:
2,675,000 '
327,000
The following table will show the course of the gold premium
1865, cou
1808, cou
1,505,6(10
1,610,000
State Bonds—Have been, as a rule, devoid of speiiil feature each day the ofpast week :
Quotations.
or speculative
interest, with the exception of 44 Special Tux ”
Lowest. Higcest.
Opening.
129
129#
128#
128#
bonds, which have been largely traded in. Early in the week,
128#
128#
128#
128#
127#
133
und.r a vigorous buying movement, the price advanced to 44, but Tuesday,
127#
127
137
127#
Wedn’day,
126#
137#
later, under heavy realizing sales, the price broke to 40, closing Thursday,
126#
20’s of 1862, reg....
“
44

44
44

44

•

1862,
1864,
1864,
1865,
1865,

cou

$132,000 $343,600
3,COO

6-2j’s of ’65, new, r.
“

,l

$39,600 $70,500
’65, new, c. l,4S2,6c0 879,700
’67, reg
44,500
’67, cou...
4,150 560,300

been conducted with extreme moderation.

.

“

....

“

“

“

...

“
“

•




44

..

..

November g, I860.]

THE CHRONICLE

Friday,

126#

126#

Jan. 1 ’69, to date

128#
131#
134#

126#
128#

127#
129#
131#
162#

126#

127#
127#
128#
127#

Foreign Exchange.—Hag been

fairly active, at steady rates.
The market has been well supplied with bills; and to-day, upon the
appearance of some bond bills rates fell off £ per cent.
Ti e
advance in the Bank of England rate of discount from 2£ to 3 per
cent caused au advance in sight sterling of -J- per cent, the difference
between 60 days and 3 days bills being now -§■ per cent.
October 15.

•

London Comm’l.

October 22.

October 29.

November 5.

108#® 108#
108#® 108# 108 © 108#
do bkrs’to<7
10*)^® 169# 108#® 108# 108#® 1(8#
do
do 8hrU
109#® 110
109#® 109# 109#® 109#
Paris, long
6.18#®5.17# 5.16#@> 15
6.18#@5.17# 5.17#®5.16#
do short
6.15#@5.15
5.13#@5.!2# 5.15#@5.15 6.15 @5.13#
Antwerp
5.20 @5.18#
5.17#®5.16# 5.18#@5.18# 5.18# @5 17#
Swiss
5.20 @5.18#
5 17#®5.16#
5.18#@5.18# 5.18#@5.17#
Hamburg
35# & 35#
36 ® 36#
35#@ 35# 35#@ .J5#
Amsterdam
40#@ 40#
40#® 40#
4<)#@ 40# 40#@ 40#
Frankfort
40#® 40#
40#® 40#
40#® 40# 40#© 40#
Bremen...*
78#® 78#
78#® 79
78#@ 78# 78#® 78#
Berlin
7C#® 70#
71#® 71#
71#@ 71# 71#@ 71#
The transactions for the week at the Custom House and SubI rcasary

107#®108#
109 ©109#
10!)#® 129%

have been

as

Custom
House.

:

Sub-Treasury.
Receipts.
—Payments.- Gold.
Receipts.
Gold.
Currency.
Currency.
$293,600 00 $1,93S,190 50 $1,615,640 38 $1,897,956 89
$462,069 35

Oct. 39
Nov. 1.

,

318,01)0 00

462,327 63

474,000 00

2.
8.
4.

Total

follows

,

1,051.631 97
1,870,699 20

478,000 IH)
499,000 00
303,000 00

635,417 85
693,779 25

$2,370.60) 00 $6 702,045 9 )
Balance, Oct. *9
81,622,505 90
.

$88,3 >4,551 89

Payments during week 6,831,903 87
Balance Nov. 5..
Jjj 0
ft

480,474 51
897,757 08
1,769,136 67
325,840 26
241,572 69

4.830.421 59

753,001 77

337,059 87

730,654 81
1,616,209 52

258,029
868,912
2,052,408
2,560,637

482,800 30
1,381,280 58

$6,864,803 87

76
S7
41

76

$6,537,018 02

4,843,611 38
9,674,032 97
6,539,018 02

Decrease'.'*’**:’.’.*.*.*!.* "[162,857

1,703^96*43
following statement shows the
Associated Banks of New York City for the week
97

New York City Banks.—The

oondition of the

ending at the commencement of business

on

October 30, 1869

;

AVERAGE AMOUNT OF

Loans and

Clrcula-

Bakes.

Net

Legal

Capital. Discounts. Specie.
tion. Deposits. Tenders,
New York
$3,000,000 $8,253,812 $ 3,927,679 $892,602 $6,205,231 $1,893,762
Manhattan
2,050.000 5,451,937
450,756
10,157 8,362,030
695,851
Merchants’.....
3,000,000 6,510,154
1,691,433
879,592
6,102,651 2,063,199
Mechanics
2,000,000 5,923,582
■3,586
515,124
4,766,571
970,132
Union
1,500,000 4.168,378
208,093
492,007
2,619,501
759,394
America
3,000,000
7,007,135 2,447,751
1,650
6,755,747
1,723.092
Phoenix
1,800,^0 8,931,157
1,442,103 537,500 8,767,674
612,511
City
1,000,000 4,486,518 1,305,756
2,699.050
172.667
Tradesmen’s
1,000,000 2,986,680
53,815
770,333
1,497,042
560,883
Fulton
600,000
1,971,886
261,474
1,483,803
485,421
Chemical
300 000
6.114,637
498,966
4,204,689
1,078,905
Merchants’Exchange.... 1,235,000 3,023,201
43,666
450,15-4
2,065,493
658,861
National
1 500,000
3,281,647
185,592
491,014
1,305,573
325,119
Butchers’
800,000
2,337,400
51,300
261,200
1,762,600
573,300
Mechanics and Traders’.
600,000
1,900.780
27,721
195,720
1,115,311
330,163
Greenwich
200,000
1,114,480
.3,003
758,884
128,327
Leather Manuf. National
600,000 3,003,486
1 879,129
274,159 26-1,956
674,103
Seventh Ward, National.
500,000 1,200,135
56,973
177,208
680,153
225,225
State of New York.
2,000,000 4.432,742
501,714
456,000
8,437,819
1,271.695
American Exchange
5,000,000 9,800,319
698,619
978,922
5,056,666
1.454,258
Commerce
10,000,000 22,364,536
431,003 5,838,330 5,448,995
4,847,786
Broadway
1,000,000 8.2 ;8,608
66,583 900,000
7.244,410
2,026,312
Ocean
1,000,000 2,623,256
80,128
797,840
1,005,944
388,081
94.705
Mercantile
1,000,000 3.145,613
480,760
2,512,668
786.601
4.819
Pacific
422,700 1.717,370
16,756
1,328,564
824,517
Republic
2,000,000 4 614,375 1,217.479 858,362 4.083,203 1,081.733
2 535,778
Chatham
151,593
450,000
2,296,030
130,688
618,875
42.499
People’s
412,500
1,355,496
5,996
1,126,763
185,794
North American
1,000,000
2,899,021
114,919
4,129
1,894,583
263,000
Hanover
1,000,000
2,306,591
291,882
103,313
1,231,009
318.734
Irving
11,000
193,969
500.000
1,621,000
1,441,000
439,000
716,968 2,185,742
Metropolitan
4,000,000 10,290,296
4,838,506
1,288,533
Citizens
400,000
18,454
1,484,468
131,473
1,124,967
808,182
Nassau
1,000.000
1,910,811
56,73 L
8,979
1,653,491
320,461
Market
1,000.000
2,856,888
206,589
557,458
1,981,442
579,961
72,706
St. Nicholas
1,000.000
748,901
2,653,885
1,106,546
495,843
Shoe and Leather
900.000
1,500,000 4,061,500
33,200
2,2:3,610
796,600
Corn Exchange
5,973
1,000,000 8,010,253
24,883
352.000
1,775,940
Continental
2,OO0,OOO 3,678,478
553,733
127,819
2,026,675
685,000
Commonwealth
750,000 2,836.886
87,116 232,127 2,298,243
449,363
Oriental
300,000
10,939
1,379,415
4,932
1,061,808
209,311
Marine
400,000 1,444,220
135,670
360,000
894.450
1,138,510
Atlantic
300,000 1.180,371
99,432
18,554
855,489
227,979
333,870 503,002
Importers and Traders’.. 1,500,000
7,852.547
7,553,803 2,033,253
Park..
2,000.000 12,121,815
905,612 1,028,000 14,721,40) 2,835,251
Mechanics’ Banking Ass.
15,039
500,000
1,122,549
307,770 1,436,152
782,776
Grocers’
21,001
643,433
8O0,OOO
2,015
126,924
828,657
17,892
400,000
945,721
North River
11,017
1,131,518
163,781
614517
East River
965,565
16,429 283,500
350,000
219,952
5,283
Manufacturers & Mer....
500,000
1,139,816
183,099
778,955
713.026 2.933,821 12.404,426
Fourth National
3,590.555
5,000,000 16,252.693
Central National
247,191 l,890,0r0 9,046,919 2,887,457
3,000,000 10,666,431
Second National
321,495
933,257
270,000
300,000 1,302,955
Ninth National
166,279
811,562 4,338,116 >1,310,024
1,000,000 4,867,733
First National
933,596
500,000
3,271,229
393,649
349,692
3,541,916
795,850
Third National
331,413
1,159.838
3,591,415
1,000,000
3,841,580
New York N. Exchange.
580,939
201,796
18,673
263,515
300,000 1,101,225
39,500
483,700
Tenth National
9:2,100
343,000
1,000,000
1,940,800
750,416
10,818 225,COO
255,198
Bowery National
250,000
852,817
1,749.206
Bull 8 Head
6,793
5,559
200,000 1,642,998
National Currency
216,384
90,000
4,903
96,312
100,000
215,437
405,689
Stuyv3flant
200,000
389,53S
EleveithWard
200,000
393,624
74,560
458.210
718.724
250,000
5,998
278,451
Eighth National
250,000
924,772
25.8SS
American National
218,381
449,560
577,4n5
500,000
665,618
*
660,888
72,482
Germania
713,503
8,624
53,000
Manufacture & Builders
261,329
235,752
.

21,925,0403-1,136,249 180,828,882 52,177,881

Same as last week.

The deviations from the returns of
Inc $1,553 760

Loans

Specie

Inc

Circulation

Deo.

.

2,523,345
08,ISO

previous week

Doposlta,
Legal Tenders

are as follow?:
Inc. $5,029,063
140,279
Inc

July 3. 258,368,471
Jaly 10 255,424,942
July 17 257,008,289
July 24 259,641,889
.

.

.

Oct.
Oct.

2.
9.

Oct.

16.
23.

Oct.
Oct.

30.

Boston Banks.—Below

Specie.

Circula¬
tion.

we

.National Ba’iks, as returned to

1,1869.

200,220,008
198,952,711
192,021,646
188,754 63!)
191,101,086
188,82 *,324
185,390,130
180,230,793
183,124,508
179,214,675
178,642,936

56,066,834 614,875,633

54,780,089 5*2,821,627
63,070,>*31 566,650,630
52,792,834 603,i*01,8ll

65,829,732
51,487,867
51,259,197
50,025,081
64,209,088
62,017,583
53,229,5)4
175,798,919 6 V 37,604
180,828,882 52,177,831

656,889,275
791,753 844
662,419.788
989,274,474

792,893,772
628,880,852
534.390.262
581.610.262
540,450,647

give a statement of the Boston
the Clearing House, Monday, Nov.

,

Loans.
Capital.
Specie. L. T. Notes Deposits. Circula.
$750,000 $1,584,209 $1,355 $112,998 $437,578
$442,935
2,594,928
311,210
I,520
1,500,000
630,563
783,836
Blackstone
12,981
255,167, 1,340,556
1,500,000
3,193,012
798,5172
Boston
1,000,000
1,880,762
178,521
7,142
575,144
598,237
219
Boylston
1,473,000
174,505
500,000
680,632
448,8 S3
Columbian
3,902
1,000,000
34?,667
2,141,555
626,613
795,077
Continental
588.307
6,300
1,000,000
1.870.657
146,433
566,476
Eliot
98,5-4
2,490,832 140,115
1,000,000
847,588
795,525
15 368
Everett
200,000
519,706
24,286
293,055
100,040
Faneuil Hall..*. 1,000,000
28,625
2,528,980
421,217 1,118,970
586,655
Freeman’s
14,014
126,738
1,374,529
600,000
501,178
866,421
Globe
I,525
245,857 1,254,070
856,030
2.303.183
1,000,000
Hamilton
801,838
1,314,234
121,082
750,000
II,193
242,578
Howard
139,000
1,929
1,800,279
433,624
443,510
750,000
Market
494,833
10,281
1,418,3^3
102,503
854,155
800,000
894.071
Massachusetts..
69,049
212,325
924,794
800,000
1,860,628
Maverick
917,005
1,428
262,530
88,451
244,775
400,000
Merchants’
866,751 2,415,902
6,195,992 223,033
3,000,000
1,817,925
Mount Vernon..
606,121
71,485
2,334
174,577
326,809
200,000
New England... 1,000,000
2,293,497
3,000
387,163
719,276
799,059
North
219,000
2,225,493
49,745
568,892
793,467
1,000,000
Old Boston
1.910.657
863,446
386,277
979,109
900,000
79,769
833,741
Shawmut
237,474
1,881
698,749
2,272,994
1.000,000
Shoe & Leather. 1,000,000
831,227
2,277,315
223,873
859,444
27*047
State
382,000
93>,540
997,051
2,000,000 3,716,792
Suffolk
3,220,010
328.942
1.500,000
52,342
621,575
752,150
Traders’
600,000
1,100,541 i 5 22,579
300,641
109,571
178,250
Tremont
410,497
8.131.845
69,720
867,855
2,000,000
705,002
110,955
673,643
594,968
Washington .... 750,000 1,872,822 14,261
First
404,239 1,034,464
8,594,484 10,000
789,135
1,000,000
Second (Granite) 1,600,000
715,666 1,857,182
4.520.184 31,98*2
789,683
Third
931,001
II,481
484,532
75,064
300,000
174,292
B’k of Commerce 2,000,000
4,670,34-1
702,300 1,264,387
2,927
972,185
Q’kof N. Amer. 1,000,000
19.545
273,034
1,849,321
479,113
596,974
B’k of Redemp’n 1,000,000
618,515
4,153,719 104,992
971,866
799,0i0
B’k of the Repub. 1,500,000
212,500
2,831,742
798,933
711,118
217,414
458,461
457,201
City
1,000,000 1,680,962 14*946
109,643
616,467
343,831
Eagle
1,000,000 1,871,663 22,242
192, S25 1,123,457
798,125
1,000,000 3,833,592 122,204
Exchange
Hido & Leather. 1,500,000
2,870,427
55,515
192,095
791,261
796,461
Revere
396,810 1,609,304
897,380
2,000,000 3.590.846 16.546
3,029
610,301
45,808
445,015
180,000
♦Security
200,000
47,816
266.942
769,296
Union
1,000,000 2,935,015
546,860
803,252
262,928
Webster
1,500,0<>0 2,467,450 24,347
495,267
Banks.
Atlantic
Atlas

.

...

Deposits.
23,520,207 34,217.973 179,929,407
30,260,912 34,277,945 183,197,239
81,055,450 34,178,437 188,431,701
80,079,424 34,110,798 193,622,260

47,100,000 103,410,9901,363,721 11,711,185 35,310,864

Total
♦

Not received

^Same as lat week.

The deviations from last

Loans’.1.*.’.* 1 .*.*.’!.*!.*.*.’.Dec.

weeks returns

$251,630

Iuc.

Specie

The

273,591

U

it

Aug.
i.6
44
(4

Sept.
44
44
44

Oct.
44

44
44

Nev.

are as

follows

Legaltender notes
Deposits
Circulation

:

Inc

.

Inc.
Inc..

392,599
483,793

109,487

following are comparative totals for aseries of weeks past:
Lor.ns.

July

25,321,519

12
19
26
9

....

23
30
6
13
20
27
4
11
18
25
1

Specie.

102,633,948
101.4* 5,241
102,702,540
103.804,554
103,811,271
102,988,791
103,053,(07
103,904,545

3,140,676
3,255,151
3,024,595
2,365,920
2,154,616

104.437,227

104,478,949
104,375,531
105,289,208
104,946,179

104,551,831
103 662,620
103,410,990

2,117,372
1,871,713
1,715,563

1,2:8,474
915,681
518,579
652,197
3,091,712
1,151,251
1,090,130
1,863,721

Legal
Tenders.

Deposits. Circulation

9,595,668
9,54l,8;.9
9,793,461
10.719,569
10,438,595
11,210,664
11,908,736

84,851,745
34,520,417
35,211 103
37,308,687
36,117,973

11,792,519
12,371,211

85,229,149

25,835,701
25,325,085
25,254,204
25,514,706
25,279,282
25,244,003
35,200,081

37,041,015
37,362,741
87,086,497
36,917,666
86,88-•,894
31,891,701
34,446,SOS
34,877,071
85,310,1564

25,227,274
25,277,734
25,307,121
25,321,464
25,888,696
25,313,494
25,212,0S2
25,831,519

32,747,357
12,950,087
12,707,004
11,913,893
11,376,043
ll,3!9,:86
11,711,185

34,933,731

25,202.279

Banks.—The following is the average condition
of the Philadelnhia Banks for the week preceding Monday, Novem¬
Philadelphia

ber 1, 1869 :
Total net
Loans. Specie. L. Tend. Deposits. Circulat’n
Capital.
$1,500,090 $5,064,00C$182,000 $1,054,000 $3,266,000 $1,000,000
Philadelphia
North America ..
1,000,000 4,081,439 55,816 l,051,5r'2 3,015,331
774,000
Farmers’ & Mech.
8,000,000 4,782,894 24,540 1,230,347 3,494,072
717.420
810,000 2,238,000
Commercial..
516,000 1,214,000
5,800
622,000
526,000 1,241,000
Mechanics’
800,000 2,315,000
480,000
500,000 2,474,000
Bank N. Liberties
665,000 1,854,000
461,000
5,536
Southwark
451,900 1,357,900
250,000 1,415,100
219,820
250,000 1,136,102
4,926
298,000
983,810
224,405
Kensington
1,804,816
Penn Township..
997,173
600,000
218,597
178,075
1,322,627
353,637 1,829,959
400,000
Western
2,768
6,525
282,500
570,150 1,523,500
Manufacturers’
900,120
419,779
852,832
250,000
B’k of Commerce.
646,402
252,876
214,065
1,000,000 3,159,000 23,000 1,( 21,000 2,526,000
Girard
596,000
178 987
200,000 1,234,557
356.562
Tradesmen’s
842,176
3,154
258,310
270,000
300,000 1,106,288
F05,652
Consolidation
400,000 1,222,564
1,900
368,811
862,348
767,090
City
300,000 1,000,377
Commonwealth..
221,282
760,204
212,815
500,000 1,678,000 16,200
Corn Exchange...
386,000 1,201,000
450,000
30°,000 1,219,000 24,000
239,000 1,266,000
Union
319,000
First
1,000,000 3,589,000
1,313,000 3,284,000
797,0C0
300,000 1,010,475
267,609
Third
289.563
926,341
638,648
Four h
200,000
567,151
133,625
171,857
475,000
324,000
Sixth.
150,000
185,000
112,000
715,000
Seventh
250,000
498,000
219,000
183,000
791,000
550,000
275,000
243,000
2,r,(i0
243,000
Eighth
Central
750,000 2,530,000
580,000 1,715,000
684,000
Bank of Republic
1,000,000 1,826,000
417,500
353,000 1,137,000
2,475
586,000
802,000 175,010
800,000
208,000
Exchange
Banks.

....

'

...

....

Legal

Aggregate

Tenders.

Clearings.

46,737,263
48,702,728
51,859,706
54,271,862

846,763,301
676,540,290

711,328,141
558,455.091

JUly 81. 269,580,225 27,871,988 84,068,677 196,416,443 56,101,627 614,4^5,487




Sept. 4.
Sept. 11.
Sept. 18
Sept, 25.

26,003,925 33,947,985
266,505,365 24,154,499 33,992,257
£62,741 133 21,594,510 34,0 -8,104
261,012,109 19,409,102 33,999,742
262,549,839 17,461,722 33,960,035
268,864,533 14,942,066 33,964,196
266,496,024 14,533,109 83,972,759
263,441,828 13,968,481 33,996,081
255,239,649 15,902,849 31,169,409
250,749,974 21,513,526 34,178,925
248,537,984 20,399,070 31,217,114
249,: 95,073 19,399,701 34,204,431
250,948,833 21,926 046 34,186,249

.

The following are the totals for a series of weeks past
Loans.

264,879,357

Ang. 28.

.

83,970,200 250,948,833

Total
*

7.

14.
Aug. 21.

Aug.

...

.$81,459,648 02 $3,135,014 95

.

Auv.

591

-

Total...

16,055,150 51,532,214 854,845 13,104,244 87,965,411 10,597,973

[November 6* 1869.

THE CHRONICLE.

592

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE,
REPRESENTED BY THE LAST SALE REPORTED OFFICIALLY OI« EACH DAY OF THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, NOV. 6, TOGETHER
WITH THE AMOUNT OP BONDS AND NUMBER OP SHARES SOLD AT BOTH BOARDS IN THE SAME WEEK.
cJTOCKb AMO

rican Gold

Satur. Mon

BECI'KITIES

do
do

do
do
do
do

6s. 1881

6s,
6b,
6s,
6b,

A

«U

Eri.

hurt

11°% 117% 118

coupon.

117%
117% 118%

119%
1881 ..registered
5-20b ('62)coupoT< 119% 116 115

——

1 5

115% 115%
112% H %

—

_
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

6s, 5.20b

do registd

—

115

6b, 5.20b (1861) coup 116* <16% 115% 115% 115% H5%
115% 115%
6b, 5.20b do regisd 1'6 % 116%
115%
6s, 5.20b (1868) coup 116% 116% 116% 115%
——

6b, 5.20b

Ko

10-408 .registered.

—

572,0 0 Cleveland, Col. Cin. and Ind. ...100
—
20,9 0 Columbus C. & Ind. Cent
2,657,000 Cleveland and Pittsburg
50
42,400 Delaware, Lackawana and West 50
110,600 Dubuque & Sioux City
1 0
Eric
d »
35

,000

91

90%

90

—

92

(new)..........
Illinois Canal Bonds, 1SG0
def

7b

do Registered, 1860
do 6b,con.,’79,aft.’60-62-65-70
do
do 1877...;.
do
do 19:9
do
Indiana 5s

—

163.500

107%

do
Ohio 6b,

6s. (new)

61

87%

37%

37%

—

—

47

40

38%

53%

53%

—

52%

52%

6b, (new)
6s, (reg.)

52%

Municipal :
Brooklyn 6b, Water Loan
do
6b, P«rk Loan
Jersey City Water Loan,
Kings County ns,

New York 5s, 1870
do
5b. 1875
Bank stocks :
American Exchange
Rank of New Y rk
Bank of Republic

Central
Commonwealth
Commerce

..Continental.

Corn t-xcliarge
Fourth
Hanover

Imp iters & Traders

61%

53

—

100
100 131%

100

*-. o »\

100
loo
lOo
...10<)

c*

oO

11*0

100

Marke*

—

—

—

—

—

—

"

-—

—

—

—

Merchants

Exchange

.....

40
38

_f

°ary

50
-100
20

1,000

«t.0

61

51
x5 1

—

-

—

53

do
do

3,000 Chicago. R. I. and

—

2,491

107% 107% 107%

—•

107

89%

20

—

119%

—

66%

65%
79%

90%

660
700
200

90%

4,455
810

SCO

—

120
67 H

120
70

12C

524

71

4,800
5,156
7*6

2,8*6
135
61

—

—

—

85%
96%

85%

85%

96

95%

85%
95%

85%

4.8C0

ICO

85

96%

97%

105
A

9

—

58

61% 62

63

1.983
1 ,285
15

—

100

—

—

91%

91%

91%

Fund,

100

—

1,3(0

61%
75

50

—

8,COO

1st mortgage...
Income

10,000

91%

<r

—

107%

—

94

—

4,000

—

1,000

—

1,000
11,000

89

87%

—

94

95

94%

Pac, 7 i ercent.

91%

—

—

23,* 08

94%

—

do
do
' 4tli mortgage.
Cleveland and Toledo, Sink’g Fund

-

76%

Col., Chi. & Ii,d. Central 1st.
do
do
2d ni

No.
--

'

do

—

—

145

—

109
124

fitr'

—

20
20

139%
—

Great

97
87

2
10

~~

111

3,i 00

—

26,000
1,000

85

—

-

1888.

Western, 2d mortgage

-

«...

-

—

-

—-

—

99

—

9*%

100

—

—-

—

—

4,000
8,000

—

—

■

—

—

117
—

L
—

83
40

—

—

—

2d mort.,7s...
Milwaukee and St. Paul. 1st mort..
do
do
7 8-lOconv
do
do
8* 1st mort
do
do 1st Iowa... —
Morris and Essex, 1st mortgage...
do
do
2d mortgage...
do
do
construe ion...
do
do
6b eoBveitihle
New York Central 6s, 1883
do
do
6s 1387
do
do
7s, 1876
N. Y. & New Haven 6b
New Jersey Central new
do
do
1st
do
do
2d
Ohio and Mississippi, 1st mortgage
dc
do
coneol. bonds
do

—

— ■-

LOCO
6,000
9,400

—

—

old

Michigan Southern, SinkingFund.
do

-

S5

86

Han. & St Jos., 1st convertible ..
Harlem. 1st mortgage, 1569-72—
Hudson River, 1st mortgage, 1869
2d mort, (S. F.), ’8t
do

do

193,000

—
—

mortgage

do

—

96
96

2d mortgage, 1879
8d mortgage, 1883.*
4th mortgage, 1880

Galena & Chicago, 1st
19 Great Western, 1st mortgage,
'

—

do
do
do

ro

—

76%

2d in.

do

do

Erie, 1st mortgage, 1868
-20

—

—

77

77

De’aw’e, Lackawan. & West, Id m
34

—

—

6,000

93%
88

68

x89%
87%

SO

87%

S9%
87%

12,GO
17,COO

95%

92%

16,000
8,000
5,(00

87

~4,000
'

4,100

.

27
122

600
10

—

no
HO
700

—

52

ifi

:.::ioo

50%

51

I

Is
1

36%

36%

19%

59% 58

59

61

100
100

58

55%

57

67% 57

35%

34%

34%

35

5S

57

18%

20
8

68% 56
19

—

r

1«%

—

15

15

—

15%
——

35

—

—

15

4.551

do
do

do
do

do
do

96%

93

866

...
3,8o0 Long Dock bonds
Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw,lst,W.D
Union Pacific, 1st mort..,. ........

2,000

99

2d mort.
3d mort.

St Lords, Jacksonville & Chicagolst
St. Louib, Alton & Terre H, lBtm
do
2d, pref
do
do
do
do
do
income,
872
st Louis & Iron Mountain, 1st m.
1,035 Toledo & Wabash, 1st mort.,ext..
do
do
2d mortgage,
410
40ft
do
do
equipment...
cons. con....
do
do
600

10,000
8,t 00
1,000

98

2,970 Pittsh’g, Ft. Wayne & Chic., 1st m.

1

100

Miscellaneous—Banker* «fe Bro. Ass
Union Trust..*

28
49

,

50

100 14%

5t»

hicago & Rock Ida id, 1st
Cin
Hum. & Dayton, 1st
Cleveland and Pittsburg, 3d mort
1

Pacific Mail




9%

80 ft 0 Chicago & Milwaukee. 1«-1 mort..
409,000 Chic & Northwest.,Sin 1 ing Fund,
1,0 0
do
do
Interest b’nus
do
do
1st mort
9,0i;o
do
do
consolid’ted
ro
exten. bonds*
do

50

100
100
100

28%

17,600

Chicago,Burl’ton & Quincy, 8 p. c. 108

x00

60

American
6oo
Ameiican and M. Union.100
Mer chants’ Union
100
United States
100

900
766
280

——

jMariposa Trustee 10s certifica es..
Michigan Central 8s, new, 1882

--

29

106%

—

107
1-9

91%

91%

bird Avenue

do
do

~

—

Union Navigation

Wells, Fargo &Co
Mining.- Mariposa Gold
Manpofia preferred
Quicksilver

—

50

1
1

--

30
51

4,9(0

■

—

Illinois Central bonds
Lake Shore, div. bonds

Telegraph.—Western Uni on... .100 36% 36% 36%
Steamship.—Atlantic Mail
ioo
Repress.—Adams

51

279

27%

4,600

67%

1

Improvement.—Boat. Wat. Pow.100
Brunswick City Land....—
Canton

86

108

*4%

l:-G
135
143% 141
173
170%; 63
161% 159% 158%
137% 137%

Toledo, Wabash and Western.
do
do
do preflO
Railroad Rond* :

—

'

Wilus Barre
Gaw.-Ciuz-n*

pref 50

Chicago and Alton, Sinking

1

Ph*enix..
Sh e and Leather
100
State ol New York
100
Teu'h
10C
Union
Miscellaneous Stocks :
Cojtf.—American
25
Ashburton
50
Central
100
Cumberland
100 27%
Delaware and Hudson...100

Pennsylvania

2d

53,0 a Buffalo and State • ine 1 onds..
769,001) Huff-do, N. Y & Frie, 1st
94,OOt Cent)a! Pacific gold born s .. .

-

Manha t»n
Merchants

Nassau
Ni.. h
North River
Ocean
Park-

27%

110

111
109

v8%

132,00 Rome,Watertown &Ogdensburg —
1,000 St. Louis, Alton & Terre Ilau e.lOO
do
do
do pref.100

87%

104

—

77

78
28

—

87%

—

1(>0
,100

do

d<*

Reading..

'

123

4,666
8,475

—

Pitts,, F’t Wayne&Chic. guar.

\U

123

18,590

—

_

—

Metropolitan

60

S3

——

896

.

3s%

*50

—

30

78

27%

—

—

Virginla6s, (old)

155

165

(8

—

42%

*60

485
600

S««
80
82% 83%
do
do
pref.,.101 88
87% 87% 87%
Morris & Essex
6(
7,000
New 11-iven ana Hartford
10*
100 193% :9C% 180% 181% 181% 181
New York Central
139
139
140
100
New York and New Haven
132%
do
do
scrip. —
New .Jersey
Norwich & Worcester
100
26
26
25% 25% 25% 27
Obioand Mississippi
10ft
do
do
pref
100
100
38,i 00 Panama

—

38%

*61

2,725

—

91%

—

i61 %

iet & Chicago
10C
Lak * Shore and A ich. South.,.. —

Michigan Central.

33%

41
33

400

96%

—

18,CC0

.

—

26%
86%

—

90

88

1870

S'rath ’a^olina 6s, old
South Car* lina 6b, new
Tennessee 5b
do
6b (old)
do
6s. (new)
do
do

60

60

'—

Mu con and Western

90%

97
148

146%

—

50

105,0U0 Longlsl-nd

Kentucky 6b

Louisiana 6s
Louisiana 6b Levee Bonds
8s Levee Bonds
do
Michigan 6b, 1878
Missouri 68,
do
6b,(Han. & St. Jos. RR.)
New York 6s, 1872
do
68,1873
do
78,1870...
do
7s, State B’yB’dsfcoup)
do
do
do
(reg.)
North Carolina,6s
do
(new, spec’l tax>

Hannibal and ^t. Joseph

o

lr»7%
107

145

—

71% 71%
66% 69
83% 83 % 84% 86% 86%
103% Y2% 1'2% 103% 104% 104%

60
10< 108%

;

Harlem
Hudson River.,

Caliiurnia, 7a .
Connect icu- 6b

Georgia 6b

100

pref

—

—

97

97%

pref.lOU 84%

do

Chicago. Rock Island and Pac 100

State:

Alabama 8s ..
5s..
do

do

151,500

107% 107% 107% 107%

107%

—

do

—

do regisa

6s, Oregon Was 1881
6b,
do. (\y'rly)
107%
6b, Currency
5b, 1871
coupon.
5b, 1871 ..registered.
5b, 1874
coupon
5b, 1874. .registered
K=8
5b, 10-40b ...coupon

—

preferred... .100
9 ,000 Chicago, Burlington and QuincylOO
86,700 Chicago and Great Eastern
106
56.000 Chicago and Northwestern
10(1 89%

—

—

do

Week’*S

*o.

95%

145

27.500

304,70*

113

-

115

Frl.

17%
95

$41,500

—

<12%
11’ %

Wed. Than*

Mon* Tues.

Railroad Stocks:

11?%

—

—

Saiur.

STOCKS AND SECURITIES.

Week’eSales

126% 127%

5-208 do registu 113%
112%
5-20b C^)coupe?, 117% 113% 112%
112 V
112%
6b, 5.20b do regisUi
113% 113% 113%
6s, 5.2O8(’ii5)C0tt7>o7. 118% 114
6b, 5.20b do reqisCu
115% 115% 116%
6b, 5.20b (’65 n.) cpn 116% 116

do

io
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

*

12S% 127% 127

Coin <Si'k Exch'ge,

National:

Uli ed States

Tues.

93

To, 000

79%

1,000
9,000

76

81%

4,(*00
8,(00
2,0(0

8.1K.0

68

14,0 (K)

85

Tojico
6,(MX)

1,000

79%

8\%

from the Government some recompense for the great amount of railroad
material an I supplies turned over by these companies to general
side on bis advent to East Tennessee, in 1863, aa well as for the U9«

®l)c Batin) ay M o nit or.

Burn¬

u of the roads by the Union armies from 1863 to 1865.
against the Government amount to about #700,000. The
United states has taken the initiative to force the collection of its
claims in the Courts.
Both parties are willing to submit to the decision
of the Courts.
The prayer of the bills in equity filed by the United
States is for the appointmeut of receivers for both roads.”

occupati

and

TABLES.
1. The Table of Railroad, Canal and Other
Stocks,
the next page, comprises all Companies of which the stock is said in any of the
principal cities (except merely local corp rations), or upon which dividends are paid.
Quotations are always given of the per cent value whatever the par of the stock may
The figures just after the name of the company indicate the date of the (Jhr> »nbe.
ICLE in which a report o! the Company was last published.
A star (*) indicates
leased roads; in the dividend column x=extra; s=stock or scrip.
2. The Tables of Railro d. Canal and other Bonds
occupy in all, four pages, two of wnicli will be published in each number. In
these pages the bonds of Companies which have been consolidated are sometimes
jfiven under the name of Consolidated Corporation. The date give, in brackets
immediately after the name of each Company, indicates the time at which the stateTHE STOCK AND BOND

EXPLANATION OF

These claims

on

finances was made. In the *T»terest Column” the abbreviatio s
follows : J. & J.=January and July ; F. & A =February and Augu t j M.
March and September ; A. & G. = April and October : M & N.=May a d
ber; J Sl D.=June and December. Q.—J =Quarterly, begi uing
Q.—F.=Quarterly, beginning w th Februa
Q. M.=Quarterly,
me-1 of its

March.

593

TUE CHRONICLE.

November 6, 1869.]

3. The Table of United States
published monthly, on tlio last Saturday of the month.
4. Quotations of Southern Securities are
Table.

these:

Virginia and Tennessee Railroad Company.
“Every preparation has now been made for the funding of the past
in the manner aud upon the terms of which notice has been previous y given.
“Onandafte the 1st day of November, I shall be glad to receive the past
coupons of the Company, aud to have such communication upon the
wise, which bondholders may desire to make in furtherance of this subject.

are as

due interest,
due

subject other¬

in the Company’s main building at Lynchburg.
;“ ChauI.ES W. StaTHAM, Funding Agent, Lynchburg,

“

I shall occupy a room

Tlio

Va.”

Virginia.—ft i? reported that the Richmond
of Virginia has paid into the State
half of the inteie9t due t e State on its loans, and the re¬

Railroad* of

Danvule Railroad Company

nod

given in a separate Treasury

one

paid on Decembir 16th, under instruction from General
The Orange au 1 Alexandria Radroad is yet behind. The an¬
nual interest due from the corporation is • about #1 8,<>00, while the
Southside Railroad owes the sum of $252,000, the lime f>r payment of
mainder is to be

Stocks can possibly be made.

5. No reliable prices of Insurance

publu-hed in regard to

“Bondholders of the

<fc S.=
Novem¬
with January;
beginning with
and State Securities will bs

.

Railroad Bo ads .—The following

Virginia and Tennessee
notice is

Canby.
Latest Week Reported-

Weekly Railroad Earnings por the

Week.
Oct
,4th O t
,4th Oct..
.4. h
,.4.h

Road.

and A1 on
...
Chicago and Northwestern
....
Chicago Rock Inland Hud Pacific.
i..3d
Lake S^tro and Michigan Soutnern..3d
Marietta and iuciuuati
ad
Chic

go

.3d

..3d
3d

Toledo, vVaoash and Western

3d

Union Pacific

137,1J3
112,921

.

267 000
31.400

i cr,....

..

satisfied of the pecuniary position of the Com¬
their own accord. The Virginia and Tennessee
Railroad owes about #420,000 interest to the State, and the last-men¬
tioned road appears not to be in a condition to m*et its liabilities at
present. The Chesapeake and Ohio R lilroad is negotiating a loan with
which it expects to liqui late its entire indebtedness to the State, princi¬
pal and interest, in all about #350,000.

which, the Legislature,

9,473

....

609.412'.

142,100
310,095
Oct....
30,103

4th
.

Dec

Inc.

1863.

127,709
481,233

'

...

3d

Michigan Cectril

Milwaukee and St. Paul
St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute.

1869.

...

25 179

pany,

9,179
43,095

1,297
110,9.'5
...
2'.l().:!30 92 070
2,266
46,411
....
13,335
106,<90
....

Oct.... 100,49 >
Oct.... 381 100
Oc
44,145
Oct..
92,<r5
Oct...
204,668
.

...

Liability of Clties for their Bonds to
this subject the New York
gives me
States Courts when appealed to, have nvariably
tions of the Western cities arid counties to pay

Times

the receiver

loaned the Co upany ; third, it authorizes the payment to
of the b dance due the Cunpvny from the Mechanics’and Farmers’
Bank of Albany, or Iro n any otner bank or person.
authorized to borrow' money on the credit of the Company without.

The receiver is not

special authority from the Court.
Southern Railroads.—The

ou

Washington corres

pondeut of the New York Times gives the lol owing statement on this
subject: ‘ The United States Government has filed bills in equity
in the Circuit Court of the United States for the Eastern District of
Tennessee against the Eist Tennessee ami Virginia and East Tennessee
and Georgia Railroad Companies, the ohj ret of which is to collect from
the first-named road the sum ot #250,OOU, and from the last named the
sum of $356,uoO.
The evidence of this indebtedness is bonds executed
by the Pres dent of the roads, and they were given f.s security for the
purchase of engines, rolling stock and mater al turned over to the roads
by the Government in August, 1863. The paymeut of the bonds has
been delayed by the companies in the hope that they might secure

question

pay

1867.

(94 m.)

$38,169
51.831

60,029
81,156
95,828
121,702

1868.

(350 m.)

$64,4“3
86,937
81,3116
96,481

106,835
164,729

128.166

259,590
251,8 2
262,770
296,422
2'6,5o2

75,871
1,421,525

679.000

$3,300,767

181,2^7
200,550
31*, 09

511,854

697,500

1867.

(708 m.)
$647,119
524,871

417,071
440,271
477,007
516,494
525,242
709,326
738,580
823,901
727,809

1868.

(708 m.)
$587,442
536,165
444,413

618,800
572,651
626,248
549,714
763,779

613,330

889,966
931,629
685,400
631,040

7,160,991

1063.

(864 m.)

(735 r/i.)
$819,765
240,756
261,145
816,268
401,892

869,358

365,404
850,564
751 739

(820 m.)

$369, ->28
821.202

.Nov

Jan

5,683,605




..

•

791,772

uly...
838.777 ...Aug ..
1,239,735 ...Sep....

r

96,535
106,594
114,716

1869.

1867

1868.

(825 m.) (340 m.) (340 m.)
$45 »,130. $242,793 $211,973
231,351
219,064
330,233
279,647

460,287
630,844

284,729

678.800

423 397

6*6,342

522,683
''71,024,045

525,363
724,514

1,039,811

132,387
123,383

1,258,713

282,939
240,185
234,633
322,521
865,372
879,367

265,905
252,149
2)4,019
217,082

194,455
287,557
807,122

336,066
272,068

283,329
274,686
233,861

8,459,319

2,964,039

1867.

1869.

(210 m.)
(340 m.)
149,658
$180,366 ..Jan....
149,342
216,080. .Feb...
.

2 *1,459. ..Mar...

214.409 .April..
218.639 ...May..
§23.236 ..June..
192,364 J u 1 y*..

275,220

Aug.. .
Sept.*.

292,803
828,044, ,.Oct

....

♦.Nov,*..
Bee,...

174,152

.Year

(210 m.)

(210 m.)

$132,6’<2
127,817
175,950

130,545

!7t,8f8
157,397

156,065

140.408

151,132

172,933
220,788

143,986

204,596

144,164
186,8*9

168,162
171,736

219,160

230,340

155,388

196,436
210.473

204.005
171,499

1,923,862

157,379

(521 m.)
$§£7,654
200,793
27 U, 630
817,052
829,078
804,810
809,591
364,723
382,996
406,766

351,759

174,500

8,207 930

202,233

it

283,669
375,210
362,783

333,952
184,977
313,021
398,998
464,778
506,295

• •

31)7,948

212,509
236.435
193 959
2<’3 6516

2U 456
2 9.408
253 367

218,317
271,425
237,451

841,783
320,025

293,296

262,798
230,061

-

265.136

257,799
286,825
260,529
293 344
283, > 83

484,208
450,203
429,894

323,279
399,438

6,788,890 4,013,200

(329 m.>
$384,119'

821,013

32 ',636
388,527
411,814
40 *,646
366,622
329,950

392,942
456,974

473,546

304,115
826,880
415,758
869,625
325,501

853,669

511 820

410,825
390,671

4,371,071

4,570,014

(521 m.)

$278,712

(329 m )
$343,^90

330,373

412.933

r-Toledo, Wab.1868.
A Western.
1869.
1867.

1869.

133,392
149,165

304.097

Oct
Nov....
Bee....

T. Haute.-^

$127,594

(329 m.)

140.473.. Sep

1868.

20I,H2
1«0,840
239,522
247, *61

242,205
236,160

Michigan Central. 1869.
1868

.

1,294,095

ir>©».

(3'>Cm.)

1867.

$98,510. Jan..
91,660. .Feb
103,558. .Mar....
109.526...April..
111,037 May. <.
113.648...June..
109,502 ..luly...
129.383.. Aug....

121,519
125,065
.119,169
121,403

121,217
142,823

18*8.

(390m.)

2,918,317

.

95,924
308,413
126,556

St. L. Alton A

T.::..:

(251 m.)

81,599
98,482
108,461
95,416

Oct....
Nov...
Bee....

-Ohio A Mississippi.—->

424,5-9
433,434

2
S

Cincinnati
I860

Year..

1,507,493

894,934

g 4s;0,900

$92,433

84,652
72,768
90,526

J

JL44I »,300

4,358,611 4,797,461

78,976

June...

661,793
790,328
915,020

341,885

568,380

(251 m.)

May...

740.949

297.512

(377,053

(251m.)
$94,136

April..

655 046

27h,681

1868.

Mar...

608,730
595, .355

420,771

6,517,64 i

.

(508,000

f 444,1 24

£.442,274

Marietta and

(864 m.)

645,789
362,900
410,000

378,4 6

^297,625

CJev. Col. Cm. AI-n

^566,403 g-553,3S6 *579,00)
1,414,231 $ 599,548 S591,209 £581,000

1867.

lens.

Feb...

436,412

1,101,778 S 1,037,468
§766,617 « 566,917
g 488,825 ® 468,879

..

South.-

558 782

383,507

665,718
458, t90

1.092,378
1,269,934
1.258 284
1,167,155
1,032,813
1.321,139

£01.952
316,708

276,431

263.369

4,712,248 13,429,534

.Oct...

$681,6*6

r-Milwankee A St. Paul.-*
1868.

1,094,597

.Year..

501,238. .Sept..

7,817,620

1867.

1.149.258

.Bee...

501,666. .Aug..

4,508,642

1869.

850.192

895,712 1 206,796
898,357 1,167,544
880,324 1,091,466
1,063,236 1,251,940
!,451,2S4 1,518,483
1,54 ,056 1,570,066
1,210,387 1,135,334
918,088 1,001,892

301,6-5. June.
351,746., .July..

-Lake Shore A Mich

(708 m.)

807,478

774,280

•

224,621
272,454

827,2‘>4

574,664
757,134

204,827. .Feb...
393,<i48 Mar...
331,148 April.
345 556 ..May..

279,121
303 342

3,892,861

Illinois Central.-

(431 in.)

$339,762. .Jail..,

335,510
(384,564
342,357
354,244 A 404 012
415,982 S 558,100
408,999 *486,196
426,752 S503.745
859,103 'r'409,568
(301,700
330,169

568,270
55 s,0.-0

842, M3

174.812

(280 m.)
$276,116
275,139
267,094

(280 m.)
.212,604 $243,787
£ 218,982
157,832
285,961
g 391,308
282,165
”485,048

RAILROADS.

PRINCIPAL

North westerner -Chic-Rock Is.and Pacific
1868.
1869.
1867.
1867
1868.
1869.
(454 m.) (520-94 m.)
(410 m.)
(1,152m.) (1,152m.) (1,157m.) $292,047 $308,587 $351,767
696,147
$724,890 $871,218
319,441
297,464

1868.

1867.

1809.
69.) m.)

diem.

^Chicago A

-Chicago and Alton.—
1869.

-

interference by
is concerned ;
all the power
should be used to
there see ns to be
who have issued
and honestly to compromise or
far
Federal

al. vs. Harry Fulton, settles,the
so
a* any
the State Courts with the proteases of the
Courts
and the Federal Courts having already determined that
of the Government under the control of the Court
enforce its mandates for the collection of these bonds,
n<> other alternative than for
the cities and counties
their bonds to go to work in good faith

MONTHLY EARNINGS OF
-—Central Pacific—in gold—,

Railroads.—Upon

fallowing: Hie United
enforced the obliga¬
their bonds issued for
railway purposes, without reference to the responsibility of the railways
negotiating or indorsing the bonds. In the State of Iowa it was sup¬
posed that a Slate constitutional defence ought he interposed t> the
collection of these bonds, but the Fe eral Courts have decided other¬
wise, uwd after a prolonged and vexitious litigation, involving a conflict
of jurisdiction, the following conclusion has been arrived at.
We quote
from the Des Moines State Register :
“J he conflict in the decision* and orders of the State and Federal Courts
the question of the payment of certain bonds issued by various cities
and counties in this State for the purpose of aiding in the construction ot
railroads, we are glad to know, is sabstantial y at an en >. The late
decision of the State supreme Court, in the case of Joseph Holman et

Railroad—Judge Johnson’s Decision
at Rochester.—Rochester,
November 3.—The decision of Judge
Johasoo, of ths 8upreme Court, was tiled to-day in the matter of the
Albany and Susquehanna Railr -ad Co n piny. It requires the receiver
to pay, first, the current expenses of running the road ; seton >, the
interest due on the Comp my’s b >nds, as we l as the Albany City bonds
The Susquehanna

Suits Against

has extended oi

-Union Pacific-*
I8r>9.

(1053 m.)

(521 m.)

$284,192. .Jan....

265 137. .Feb....
852.704. .Mar....

811,"32. .April..

312,529 .May...
818,890 June..
810.800 .July. .
450,246 .Aug....
470,720. .sept....
.Oct

.Nov....

•Bee...

1.

Y#*r...

691,420
706.602

623,559
617,585,

755,084

594

THE

CHRONICLE.

[November 0, 1869.

RAILROAD, CANAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS STOCK LIST.
Subscriber* will conier
COMPANIES.
For afull explanation of this table,
see Bailway Monitor, on the pre¬

ceding

a

jrreat favor by giving: us immediate notice of
any error discovered in
DIVIDEND.

Stock
Out¬
stand¬

ing.

Last paid.

Periods.

Bid, Ask.
Date.

page.

Railroads.

For

Augusta and Savannah*

100;

Washington Branch*
Parkemmrg Branch

100
50

Hcrksliirc

.100

Boston and

iOct.,' ’6'i

4
5

600,600) Quarterly.

I,0

Oct.,

50

preferred

50

....

..

•

’69

May

&'Nov

•

•

47X

•

ii;%

5
3

150

4
5
5

....

142
....

119?* 119%
.

.

.

.

o

30

Nov:, ’69

3

36
14

73%

"a %

do

do

))))

Last j >aid.
Bid. Ask
Rate.

pref

t

.

Oct.. ’69

NOV., ’69

„

;;;;

....

Jan., ’69
July, ’69
Aug., ’69
Oct., ’69

4
5 8.
5
5
4

July, ’69

•

•

•

Quarterly. Oct.,

Portland and Kennebec (new).. 100

’69

•

•

•

•

•

•

56
225

109%
57
•

«

.

•

•

•

96%

96%
118%
140X 141%
101% 102%
117

30
10
20
85

•

IX

Jau. & July. July, ’69
8
June & Dec. June, ’69 3 gold Ill
Jan. & July. July, ’69
5
•

Providence and Worcester
100
Raritan and Delaware Bay*
100 2,530,700
Rensselaer and Saratoga con ...100
April & Oct. Oct., ’69
Richmond and Danville
100
Richmond and Petersburg
100
847,100
Rome, Watert. & Ogdensburg ..100 2,500,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Rutland
100
do
100
preferred
Feb. & Aug. Feb” ’69
St. Louis, Alton & Terre Haute. 100 2,300,000

97%

55
215
109
56

„

6
5

do

pref. 50
Pitts., Ft.W. & C. guar*. Aug.21.100
-

97

T

Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’69

May & Nov.
Jan. & July.
Jan. & July.
Jan. & July.
Feb. & Aug.
April & Oct.
Jan. & July.

50
50

3

July. July, ’69

Quarterly.

Philadelphia and Read. Feb. 27. 50
100
Philadelphia and Trenton*
Philadel., Germant. & Norrist’n* 50

do

Jan. &

8,<-69,00(

100

Portland, Saco & Ports. Sep. 18.100

....

5

50
100

Pacific (of Mi-souri)
Panama
Pennsylvania. Mar. 6
Philadelphia and Erie*

do

.36

3%

Periods.

Date.

100

50
Pittsburg and Connellsvllle
Pittsburg, Cincin. & St. Louis... 50

133

ing.

..100

Philadel., Wilming. & Baltimore 50

i7

16 %

1 159 500

2’206)000

Cedar Rapids and Missouri*
100 5,432,000
do
do pref..
Central Georgia & Banking Co.AOOj 4,666,800
Central of New Jersey
100! 15,(XX),000
Central Ohio
50 2,500,000
do
50
preferred
500,000
Cheshire, preferred
100 2,085,925

....

....

....

Albany
100 !l 4,934)100! Jan. & July. July, ’69
Boston, Con. & Montreal .pref. .100; 800,000IMay & Nov Nov., ’69
100 18,989,800
Boston, Hartford and Erie
Boston and Lowell
500 , 2,169,000! Jan. & July. July, ’69
Boston and Maine. Sept.18
100 : 4,550,000: Jan. & July. July, ’69
Boston and Providence
100j 3,360,000; Jan. & July Ju 1V, ’69
Buffalo, New York and Erie*... 100
950,0001 June & Dec June,’69
Burlington and Missouri River .100] 1,285,0001
do
do
pref. 100
380,000!
Camden and Amboy
100; 5,000,000! Fel). & Aug Feb., ’69
Camden and Atlantic
50
377,100'
do
do
preferred.. 50
731,200
Cape Cod
60
801,905!Jan. & July. July / ’69

Catawissa*

‘ 128

stand¬

PAR

Colony and Newport
Orange and Alexandria
Oswego and Syracuse

1,650,000 April & Oct. Oct., ’69

PRICE.

Out¬

Old

July July,
July. jJuly,

DIVIDEND.

Stock

full

explanation of tills table,
Railway Monitor, on the pre
ceding page.
a

see

Rate.

50 2,241,250 Jan. & July.

Atlantic and Gulf
100 3,691,200,
Atlaft. & St. Lawrence* Ocr. If..100 2,494,900 Jan. &
Atlanta and West Point. Sept. 18.100: 1,282,2001 Jan. &

do

COMPANIES.

PAR

Allegheny Valley

r

PRICE.

Tables*

our

.

40
11
22

85%
.

....

.

114

....

....

~3%

....

....

“5* 105*' iio“

June & Dec. June, ’69
Jan. & July. Jan., ’69
June & Dec. Dec., ’AH
June & Dec .Tiliu1, ’(X)
Jan. & July July, ’69
Mar. & Sept. Sept.,’69
Mar. * Sept. Sept., ’69
Mar- & Sept. Sept., ’69

5

....

28“

do

....

i

"3%

32
75
30

....

May & Nov. May, ’69

....

do
do pref. 100 2,040,000
56
7
Annually. May, ’69
Louis, Jacksonv. & Chicago*. 100 1,469,429
3
50
Sandusky, Mansfield & Newark. 100
901,841
3
Schuylkill Valley*
50
576,050 Jan. & July. July ’69
2
83
*2%
Shamokin Valley & Pottsville* 50
Chicago and Alton. Mar. 27—100 5,141,800
869,450 Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’69
3
5
145** 148
Shore Line Railway
do
do preferred —100 2,425,400
100
635,200 Jan. & July. July, ’69
90
100
4
5
150
South Carolina
50 5,819,275
Chic., Burling. & Quincy. Aug. 7.100 13;825;025
5
157
South Side (P. & L.)
100 1,365,60t»
Chicago and Great Eastern
100 4,390,(XX)
South West. Georgia.*
Sen. 11.100 3,939,900 Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’69
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska*. .100 1,000,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
“s’
Syracuse, Bingh’ton & N. York. 100 1,314,130
Chicago and Milwaukee*
100 2,227,000,
Terre Haute and Indianapolis
50 1,988,150 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Chicago and Northwest. Aug. 21.100 14,590,161! June & Dec. June, ’69
6*
5
TOX
Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw
100 2,700,000
do
do
pref
100 18,159,097 June & Dec. June, ’69
5
85% 86
do
do
do 1st pref.100 1,700,000
Chic., Rock ls.& Pac. June 12. .100 14,000,(XX) April & Oct.
ct., ’69
3% miA 104%
do
do
do 2d pref.100 1,000,000
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton.100r 3,500,060 April & Oct. Oct., ’69 5-s.
80
31
Toledo, Wabash & Western
100 9,387,000
Cincinnati, Richm. & Chicago* .100]
6ix 62%
382,600
do
do
do pref.100 1,000,000 May & Nov. May, ’69
Cincinnati, Sand. & Cleveland.. 50 2,989,090
77
“3‘
3%
Utica and Black River
100 1,497,700 Jan. & July. July, ’69
do pref. 50j
do
do
4
21
398,073 May & Nov. Nov., ’68
Vermont and Canada*
100 2.250,000 June & Dec. June, ’69
Cincinnati and Zanesville
50; 1,676,345
4
102
Vermont and Massachusetts
100 2,860,000 Jan. & July. Jan., ’69
Clev., Col., Cin. & Ind. May 15. .100 10,460,900 Feb. & Aug. Aug,, ’69
60
2
58
3 % 75“ 77“
Virginia Central
100 3,353,679
Cleveland and Mahoning*
50 2,056,750 May & Nov. Nov.,’69
3%
Virginia and Tennessee
100 2,941,791
Cleveland and Pittsburg. Mar 27 50 5,958,775
5 *80*
15s. 80
84
Nov.,’69
do
do
100
555,500
Columbus, Chic. & Ind. CcntralMOO 11,100,000
uarterly. Oct., ’67
2% 27
27*4 Western (N. Carolina) pref
100 2,227,000 Jan. & July. Jan., ’64
Columbus and Xenia*
50 1,786,800 Dec. & June June, ’69
4
95
98
3%
Wilmington and Manchester... .100 1,147,018
Concord
50 1,500,000 May & Nov. Nov., ’69
5
74
Wilmington and Weldon
Concord and Portsmouth
100
1,463,775
350,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
3%
Worcester and Nashua
100 1,550,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Connecticut* Passumpsic,pref.l(X) 2,0.84.200 Feb. & Aug.
"i
3
Aug., ’69
Connecticut River
100 1,700,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
5
129
Canal,
Cumberland Valley
50 1,316,900 April & Oct.
4
April,’69
50 1,983,563 June & Dec. June, ’69
Dayton and Michigan*
100 2,380,172
3
80
20“ 25" Chesapeake and Delaware
82%
Chesapeake and Ohio
25 8,229,594
Delaware*
50
891,206 Jan. & July. July, ’69
40
3
Delaware Division*
,38* 107
50 1,633,350 Feb. &
Delaware, Lackaw. & Western 50 14,100,600 Jan. & July.
9cT 92“
Aug. Aug., '69
4*
5
WJX
Delaware and Hudson
100 15,000,000 Feb. &
jJuly, ’69
Detroit and Milwaukee. June 27.100i
5
121
123
Aug. Aug., ’69
452,350
Delaware and Raritan
...100 4,999,400 Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’69
do ‘
do
pref.... 50 2,095,000
5
1“
i«“
Lehigh Coal and Navigation.... 50 8,739,800 May & Nov. May, ’67
Dubuque and Sioux City*
100 2,142,250 Jan. & July. Julv, ’69
3
65% 66
3% ios% 109
Monongahela Navigation Co.... 50
do
do
728,100 Jan. & July. July, ’69
88
pref... 100 1,988,170 Jan. & July. July, ’69
90
3
3%
Morris (consolidated)
100 1,025,000 Feb. & Aug.
Eastern (Mass.)
100 3,883,300 Jan. & July. July, ’69
29
30
4
VAX iiix
do
preferred
100 1,175,000 Feb. &
EastTenn. Georgia, Oct. 9
100 1,290,067
58
Aug. Feb., ’69 10s.
57%
Pennsylvania
50 4,300,000
East Tennessee and Virginia—100 1,902,000
Schuylkill Navigation (consol.). 50 1,908,207 Feb. & Aug. Feb.*/ ’67
Elmira and Williamsport*
50
6
lT*
500,000 May & Nov. Nov., ’69
60
2%
do
50 2,888,977 Feb. & Aug. Feb., ’67
pref.
do
do
20
pref.. 50
6
32
500,000 Jan. & July. Julv, ’69
3% 80
50 2,002,746
Susquehanna & Tide-Water.
Erie. April 17
100 70,000.000 Feb. & Aug. Feb., ’66
10
20
27 % 28
4
Union, preferred
50 2,907,850
do preferred
100 8,5:>6.900
-47
49
7
January.
Jan., ’68
We6t Branch and Susquehanna. 50
Erie and Pittsburg
50
1,100,000 Jan. & July. Jan., ’65
'*5'
962,990
58
58
Fitchburg
100 3,540,000 Jan. & July July, ’69
5
Miscellaneous.
130%
100 4,156,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Georgia. May 29
4
Coal.—American
25 1,500,000 Mar. &
Grand Trunk (.Can.)
100 14,867,950
3
42
Sept. Mar., ’69
Ashburton
50 2,500,000
Great Western (Can.)
100 17,391,695
Butler
25
Hannibal and St. Joseph
100 1,822,000
500,000 June & Dec. Dec., ’68 60 cts.
107*'
Cameron
do
do
pref....UK) 5,078,000
107*^
Central
100 2,000,000 Jan. & July.
Hartford * N.Haven, Oct. 23... 100 3,300,000
70
"5
July, ’69
5
....1230
Quarterly. Sept., ’69
Cumberland
100 5,000,000
Housatonic, preferred
100! 2,000,000
27
4
27%
July, ’69
Pennsylvania
;
50 3,200,000 Quarterly. Aug., ’69
Hudson River. April 3
230
100i 13,932,700 April & Oct. Oct., ’69
5
240
4
158
158%!
Spring Mountain
50 1,250,000 Jan. &
Huntingdon and Broad Top*— 50
5
60
491,380
July. Jan., ’69
Spruce Hill
10 1,000,000
do
do
pref. 501
"3 %
190,7rX) Jan. & July. Jan., ’68
Wilkesbarre
100 3,400,000 May & Nov,
Illinois Central. Mar. 27
100 25.277,270 Fel). & Aug.
5
Nov.,’69
*5* 46“ 75
135
Aug., ’69
j
Wyoming Valley
100 1,250,000 Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’66
Indianapolis, Cin. & Lafayette.. 50 6,185,897,Mar. * Sept. Sept.,’67!
#</$.—Brooklyn
25 2,000,000 Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’69
Jeffersonville, Mad. & in..<J.t 30100 2,000,000 ,Jau. & July, j Jam, ’66
5
145
65
5
Citizens (Brooklyn)
20 1,200,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Lackawanna and Bloomsburg.. 50 1,335,000
5
160
j
Harlem
50 1,000,000 Feb. &
5
'69
“4* 00%
Aug. Aug., ’69
Jersey City and Hoboken... 20
Jan. & July. July, ’69
386,000
5
’69
5
Manhattan
50 4,000,000 Jan. &
Lehigh and Susquehanna
50 8,739,8001 May & Nov.'I May,’ ’67
5
225
5
July. July, ’69
Metropolitan
100 2,800,000
Lehigh Valley
50 16.058,150) Quarterly. |Oct
’69
106
2%
New York
50 1,000,000 May & Nov. May, ’69
Little Miami
50 3,572.400; June & Dec
'*5*
’69
95
*
3% 94
Williamsburg
50
Little Schuylkill*
750,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
5
’69
4 % 84
50 2,646,100 Jan. & July.
152%
Improvement—Canton
16%
731,250
Long Island
50 3,000,000
’66
2
50% 52
Boston Water Power
100 4,000,000
Loulsv., Cin. & Lex., prf. Sep. 11.100 848,315 Jan. & July. July/ *69
14
July/ ’66
14%
4% 97
Brunswick City
do
consol
50 1,621.736 Jan. & July. July, ’69
1.
8
9%
Cary Improvement
Louisville and Nashville
100 8.681.500 Feb. & Aug.
’69
4
62%
Aug.,
i6x
Telearaph—West.Union. Sep. 25.100 41,063,i00 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Louisville, New Alb. & Chicago.100 2,800,000
2
36% 36%
•'acifle & Atlantic
2*> 3.000.000
Macon and Western
100 2,000,000 June & Dec.
'*69
^uarterly. July, ’69
80
“2*
2% 72
Express.—Adams
100 10,000,000
Maine Central
100 1.611.500
5
57
quarterly. April,’68
58
Amer. Merchants’ Union.... 100
Marietta & Cin., 1st prf. Aug.21. 50 8,1:50,719 Mar. & Sept.
18,000,000
85
’66
36
16
3s.
Sept.
United States
i00i 6,000,000 Quarterly. Nov., ’69
do
do
2d pref.. 50 4,460,368 Mar. &
'66
8
3-9.
*2% 57 59
Sept.
Weils, Fargo & Co
do
do
common
100; 10,000,000
18
2,029,778
20
3
Steamship.—Atlantic Mail
100 4,000,000
Manchester and Lawrence
100
(XX) May & Nov.
uarterly. Dec-, ’67
5
’69
131
2% 27
Pacific Mail
100 20,000,000
Memphis and Charleston. Sep. 25.25 5,312.725
uarterly. Sept.,’69
3
’69
3
59X 60
Trust.—Farmers’ Loan & Trust. 25 1,000,000 Jan. &
Michigan Central. July 24
100 II,197,348 Jan. & July.jJuly, ’69
July. July, ’69
5
5
120
National Trust
100 1,000,000 Jan. & July. 1 July, ’69
Milwaukee and St. Paul. May 29.100 7,151,069 Jan. & July.:
4
’69
14s.
70
re %
Jan.,
New York Life and Trust.. .100
do
do
1,000,000 Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’69
pref ...1(X) 8,1S8,272 January. Jan., ’69 7* 10 v 83%
10
270
300
Union Trust
100 1,000,000 Jan. & July.! July, ’69
Mine Hill & Schuylkill IIaven* 50 3,775,600 Jan. & July.
4
’69
4
106%
United States Trust
100 1,500,000 Jan. & July, j July, ’09
5
Mississippi Central*
1001 2,948,785
Minin{/.—Mariposa Gold
100 2,836,600
Mobile* Montg. pref. Aug. 14..
I f 1,'788.700
7%
8%
Mariposa Gold, pref
100 8,693,400
Mobile and Ohio
100 4,26.1,820
‘
15
15%
do
do Trust, certif.
2,324,000 Jail. & July.
Montgomery and West Point.. .100; 1,614,1(41 June & Dec.
40
44
’67
“4'
Quicksilver. Apl. 27
Morris and Essex*
100 10,000,000
50 4,823,500:.Jan. & July.
Feb., ’65 5 gold 14% 15
July, ’69
3% 87% 87 Xi
Nashua and Lowell
100
720,000 May & Nov. May. ’69
5
Nashv. & Chattanooga. Sep. 11..100 2,056,544
N. Y. & BROOKLYN CITY PASSENGER
RAILROADS.
Naugatuck. Mar. 20
100! 1,818,900 Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’69
“4'
Quotations by A. H. Nicolay, Stock Broker & Auctioneer, 43 Pine Street
New Bedford and Taunton
100
500,000 Jan. & July.
’69
4
New Haven & Northampton
1(*>i 1,500,000 Jan. & July.
3
65
STOCK. DIVIDENDS PAID, PER OT. BID. ASK.
New Jersey
KX)i 6,250,000 Feb. & Aug.
’69
5
120
New London Northern
100!
995,000 Mar. & Sept.
’68
4
Bleecker street and Fulton Ferry,
900,000 Year end. Oct. 1,’68.
New York Central Mar. A)
40
45
’69
100'28,795,000 Feb. & Aug.
4
180% 181
Broadway (Brooklyn)
do
do
do
200,000
do
int er, cert if. .100 22,829,600 Feb. &
8
’69
4
Aug.
Broadway and Seventh Avenue
103 2,100,000
do
New York aud Harlem. Apl. 3.. 50j 5,5<X),000 Tan. &
do
60
53
’69
4
July.
141
1U% Brooklyn, Bath & Coney Island... 100
^do
do
do
99,850
do
pref
50j 1,500,(XX) Jan. & July.
’69
4
135
136*4 Brooklyn City
100 1,500,000
New York and New Haven
do
do
i2 205 2io
100 9,000,000 Tan. & July.
’69
5
139% 140
Brooklyn City and Newtown
100
New York, Prov. and Boston ..100
do
400,000
do
2,000,000 Jan. & July.
’69
3% 81%
Brooklyn, Prospect Park & Flatb. 100 254,600
do
Norfolk and Petersburg, pref...100
do
300.500
do
do
Brooklyn and Rockaway Beach... 100 144,600
do
do
guar. .1(H)!
137.500 Jan. & July.
’69
"3'
Buslnvick (Brooklyn)
100 262,200
North Carolina. Oct. 2
do
do
lOOi 4,000,000
?68
6
Central Park, North & East Rivers 100 1,066,200
Northern of New Hampshire
do
do
A-85
100 3,068,400 June & Dec.
45
’69
4
1<K%
Coney Island (Brooklyn)
Northern Central. May 10
100 500,000
do
do
50 4.798.900 Quarterly.
66
’69
2
92
94
Dry Dock, East B’dway & Battery 100 1,200,000
do
Northeast. (S. Carolina). Mayl.
do ’69.
5
80
90
898,950
Eighth Avenue
100 1,000,000
do
do 8 p.c.,pref
do
do 68.
165
12
180
155,000 May & Nov.
Fdrty-secoud St. & Grand St. Ferry 100 748,000
North Missouri
do
do
100 7,700,000
.” 10
105
:
ii %
Grand Street & Newtown (B’klyn) 100
do
North Pennsylvania
170,000
do
50 3,150,000
70
80
5s.
78
80
Hudson Avenue (Brooklyn)
Feb., ’69
100 106,700
Norwich and Worcester *
do
do
100 2,863,700 Jan. & July.
’69
5
112
Metropolitan (Brooklyn)
100 194,000
do
do
Ogdensburg & L. Champ. Sep. 4.100 3,040,900 Annually.
’69
3
66“’ Ninth Avenue
100 797,320
do
do
do
do
pref. 100 1.994.900 April & Oct. Oct., ’69
4
105% Second Avenue
100 800,000
do
Ohio aud Mississippi. Mar.20....100 19,522,900
do
67
75%
Sixth Avenue
26%
100 750,000
do
do
do
pref
io 125%
100 8,844,400 June* Dec.
'69
3% 65
Third Avenue,,
100 1,170,000
do
Creels aud Allegheny River. 80 4,359,150 Quarterly. Oct *09
do
13
,
2% 15
78X Van Brunt Street (Brooklyn)
100 75.00Q c <10
do !
j jHII
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great favor by giving u» Immediate notice of any error
Pages 1 and 2 of Bonds will be published next week.

Out¬
For a full explanation of this standing
Table see ‘‘Railroad Monitor”

preceding page.

c3

INTEREST.

PRICE.

TER OF SECURITIES

Mortgage Bonds

6
a!

w

When

Where

paid.

paid.

this'standing
*

For a full explanation of
Table see “ Railroad Monitor”

T. 5

5

on a

<

Mort., extension
Convertible Bonds

1st

'.

N.'Orl., J. dk Ot. North. (Dec. 1/68):
1st Mort. for $8,000,000
2d Mort. for $1,500,000
N. Orleans dk Mobile (July 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
N. Orl.y Opelo.dkOt W. (Jan. 1,’69):
1st More., construction
2d Mort.

2,941,000
1,370,000

1,842,600

1st

Q

M.& N. New York

125,000

’68):

7

F.&
M.&
M.&
F.&
J. &

Extension

Norfolk dk Petersburg (Oct. 1, ’68):

6

F. & A. New York ’73-’78
44
1881
J. & J.
44
1883
M.& N.

...

1st

Mortgage
dk Newport (Dec.1/68):
Company Bonds
Company Bonds
Company Bonds
Orange, Alex, dk Manas. (Oc t .1, ’68):
Old Colony

1st Mort. (O. & A. RR.)

2d Mort. extension (O. & A.)...
3d Mort. extension (O. & A.)...
4th Mort. extension (O. & A.)...
1st Mort. (O., A. & M. RR)
Va. State Loan (34 y’rs) s’k’g fd

Osage Valley (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (5-20 years)

Oswego dk Rome (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage, guaranteed
Income Mortgage

Oswego dk Syracuse (Oct. 1, ’68):

Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Pacific of Missouri (Mar. 1, ’69):
1st

Mortgage (gold)

Mortgage Construction Bonds.

Panama (Jan. 1, ’69):

1st Mortgage, sterling
1st Mortgage, sterling
2d Mortgage, sterling

Pate/rson dk Newark (Jan. l, ’69;:
1st Mortgage, guaranteed
Paterson dk Ramapo (Jan. 1, ’69):

Mortgagee, guaranteed

dkHightst'n (Jau.1/69):

Mortgage, endorsed

Pennsylvania (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (Penn. RR.)
.9a Mortgage (Penn. RR.)

2d Mort. (Penn. RR.), sterling
General Mort. (Phil, to Pittsb.)
State works purchase
.Short Bonds (debentures)

Pennsylvania dk N. Y. (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage, guaranteed
Pensacola dk Georgia (Apr. 1, ’67):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
1st Mortgage (Tallahasse RR.).
Peoria dk Bureau Val. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage, guaranteed
Peoria Pek.dkJacksonv. (J an .1 ,’69):
1st

Mortgage

i erkiomen (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st

Mortgage

Perth Amboy dkWoodbJJan.1/69):
1st Mortgage, guaranteed
Phtladel. c\Balt. Cent. (Nov.1/68):
1st Mort rage

Philadelphia dk Erie (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mort. (Sunbury & Erie RR.)
1st General Mortgage
r.
2d General Mortgage
itral Mortgage
SdGea
*




M.& N.
M. & S.

89
98
85
85

7
7
7

M. & S. Charlest’n
44
M. & S.

7
7
7

J. & J. New York
44
A. & O.
A. & O New York

6
10
7

6
6

7

6
g
6
6

44

Philadel.
44

385,000
1,000,000
945,000

convertible

Pittsburg dkConnellsv. (Nov.1/68):
1st Mort. (new) for $4,000,000
Baltimore Loan (now 2d lien)
1st Mort. (Turtle Cr. Div.)
Pittsb., Ft IK. dk Chic. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (series A)
lBt Mortgage (series B)
1st Mortgage (series C)
1st Mortgage (series D)
1st Mortgage (series E)
1st Mortgage (series F)
2d Mortgage (series G)
2d Mortgage (series H)
2d Mortgage (series I)
2d Mortgage (series K)
2d Mortgage (series L)
2d Mortgage (series M)
3d Mortgage
Bridge (O. & P. IiR.) Mortgage
Equipment Bonds of 1869
Placerville dk ,Sacrum. (Jan. 1/69):
1st Mortgage
1st Mortgage (gold)

....

100

Q.-J. Baltimore.
44

J. & J.
A.&O.
\f fr x
J. & J.’
J. & J.

44
44
44
<4
44

J.&J.
A.&O.

7

J.&J. New York

45,000

7

300,000

8

2.050,000
850,000
546,000
221.500
1,780,000

7
7
7
7
7

101,861

7

3,170,000

7

1,388,000

7

J.&J.

....

•

•

.

....

....

....

...

....

....

....

Boston.

Boston.
44

J. & J.
F. & A.

44

....

....

....

....

88
lfi6

Irred
1885
1900
1870
1871
1877
1900

81

1st

....

*

•

1st

87

....

31

....

1874

....

18..

....

....

*.

.

•

.

Philadel.

18..

80

F. & A.
A. & O.
M. & S.

Boston.

1877
1875
1876

M.& N.
J. & J.
M.& N.
M.& S.
J.&J.

New York

44

J. & J.
J. & J.
A. &

41
44

44

J.& J.
J.&J.

44

95

....

....

....

458,000

6

1,000,000

6

400,000
1,130,50U
573.500
331,700
708,000

6
6

249,962

8
8
7
6

44

44

44

Richmond
Alexand’a
New York

1873
1875
1873
1880
1882

44

J.&J.

....

200,000 10

J & J
M.& N. New York
44
F.& A.

1916
1891

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

•

•

•

•

....

....

7
6

198.500

7

375,000

7

M.& N. New York ’70-’80
44
1885
M.& N.

7,000,000

6

F.& A. New York

1,500,000

7

J.&J.

416,000
316,000

7
7

1,150,000

7

A. & O.
A. & O.
F. & A.

500,000

7

85,000

7

160,000

6

4,972,000
2,594,000

6
6
6
6
5
6

....

2,283,8-10
1,545,000
6,232,755

3,520,728

....

....

J. & J.
A. & O.
A. & O.

London.
44

44

New York

1888
1880
1870
1875

•

•

•

....

18..

....

St.L.,Vand. £ T.Haute (Jan. 1/69):
IstM.skg fd (guar.)for $1,900,000
2d M. skgfd (guar.) for $2,600,000
St.Paul cfc~/Yz(\,lst Dlv.(Apr.l/69):
1st Mort. (10 m.) tax free
1st Mort. (St. P. to Watab,80m.)
97*
2d Mort. (land grant)
94*
General Moi;t., for $2,020,000

....

New York

18..

....

Philadel

1880
1S75
1875
1910
1890

97
94
94

92

f4

90

A. & O

Harrisb’rg

Q’t’ly.

Philadel.

,69-’71

Philadel.

18..

89 *

18..

•

1 J.

....

18..

& J. New York
44

.

.

.

.

....

-

a

•

•

General Mort., sterling

....

IstjMort., West, l’e, for $6,000,000
2d M.,W. line (land) for$,3000,000
St. Paul dk SiQuxCity (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. for $16,000 per mile ...

,

Sandusky,M.dkNew’rk (Julyl/69):
1st Mortgage
Funded Coupons

•

....

18..

....

....

....

....

206,000
600,000

8

J.&J. New York

18..

1,000,000

7

J. & J. New York

1887

255,000

6

100,000

6

44
....

^

Schuylkill dk Susqueh. (Nov. 1/68):

....

18..

New Yoa-k

18..

575,000

7

J. & J.

Philadel.

1,000,000
5,000,000
4,000,000

7
6
6

A.&O.
A.&O.
A.&O.

Philadel.

8.000,000

7

J, & J.

1876

....

....

....

•

•

•

1st

«

1877

95

85*

<i

m

83* 85

Mortgage

2d Mortgage
3d Mortgage
Selma. Rome dk Dalton (Jan. 1/69):
1st Mort. (Ala. & Tenn. Rivers)
2d Mort. (Ala. & Tenn. Rivers).
Gen. Mort. for $5,000,000, tax free

....

1881
1901

—...

Seaboard dk Roanoke (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
3d Mortgage
Selma dk Meridian (Apr. 1, ’68):

....

44

•

J.&'J. San Franc.
J. & J.

1894
1894

'New York

18..

Boston.
Boston.
Boston.

1883
1895
1873

350,000

IPortland.

18..

100,000
50,000

M.& S. Provid’ce,
J. & D.

1871

1,000,000
250,000
2%,000

M.& S. New York
M.& S.
M. & S.

1888
1888
1876

M.&S.
J. & D.

1882
1884

2,000,000

153,000

500,000
225,000
525,000

650,000
350,000
150,000
450,000
400,000

500,000

6

6
6-

7
7

iA.&'O.
\/& ().
A. & O.

Philadel.

96

86* Shamokin V.dkPottsv. (Nov.1/68):

y

93*

P

1912
1912
1912
1912
1876
1874

88
89*

1877

J. & J. New York 1873
’80-’87
J. & J.
1886
M. & S.
1890
M.& N.

600,000

67,778

1,334,000
757.500
511.500

571,000

1st Mortgage

J. & J. New York
J.&J.
M.&N.
M.& N. Richmond
F.&A.
“

J.&J.!

London.

1875

1870

J. & D.|N. Y. & B
M. & S.i Philadel.

1919

New York

....

M. & S. New York 1880
’69-’74
J. & I).

1891

J. & D.
Boston.

J. & J. [New York
F.& A. Sacram’to

1,400,000
150,000
500,000

M.& S.
M.& S.

1,100,000

J.&J. New York
A. & O.l

1,100,000
1,400,000
1, '400,000

’75-’90

.

F.& A.
F.& A.

400,000

'87-’88
’75-’76
’75-’90

Boston.

1863
1863
1875
1881
1893

1893
1882

F.& A.
M.& N.

1894
1894

M.& N.

4,000,000

F.& A. New York

1892

2,365,000
860,000

A. &

J.&J.

1894
1898

1,000,000

M.&

0.|Ncw York

|

N.!ncw

York

1893

522,000
710,000

J. & J. New York

1897
18..

120,000
700,000

7Sb',000

Vf. &
J. &
J. &
J. &
J. &

103,000

J.&J. New York

1896

1,290,000
860,000

J.&J. New York
44
J. & J.

1875
1875

J.&J
S. New York
J.
D.
J.

J.

London.
New York

1892
1892
1892
18..
18..

guaranteed

Philadel.

1873

217.000l
73,000;

New York

1880

New York
Selma.

97,000

& J.

52,000

665,000
838,500
211,000

187)

New York
& J. New York
& J.
.&0.

toq'.ooo

F.&A.

80

80

1894
1894

1,700,000

1,200,000

92*
92*

1894

79,830

1st Mortgage

Philadel.

.

875,000
875,000
860,000
860,000
860,000
860,000
860,000
860,000

....

18..

8
7

256,000

1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1812
1812
1912

329,000

2d Mort. (guar.) $5,000 per mile.
St. Louis dk St. Joseph (Apr. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (gold)

....

New York

4 4:

J. & J. New York
F.& A.
M. & S.
A.&O.
M.& N.
,J. & I).
J. & J.
F.& A.
M.& S.
A.&O
M.& N.
J. & D.
A.&O
M.& N.
M. & S.

100,000
875,000
875,000
875,000
875,000

F.& A.N.Y.orLon

1st Mortgage
St. L„ Jacks, dk Chic. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (guar.) $15,000 per m..

•

1872

1900

1898
1886
1889

St. Louis dk Iron Mt. (July 1, ’69):

...

«...

Q.-J.

...

....

91

1884
’71-’76
1887

J. & J. Baltimore.
44
J.& J.
F. & A. New York

1,000,000

9,000,000

St. Joseph dk C. Bluffs (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (80 m. in Mo.)
1st Mort. (52 m. In Iowa)
2d Mort. (52 m. in Iowa)
St. L., Alt. dk T. Haute (July 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (series A) sink, fund .
1st Mort. (series B) sink. fund..
2d Mort. (series C)
2d Mort. (series D).
2d Mort. (income.)

....

92
90 >4

London.
Philadel.

2,697,000
1,185,300

44

....

44

13,500
130.500
175,000

2d Mortgage (gold)

....

....

44

J.&J. 'New Yo’-k

’68):

Sink. F’d Mort. (Wat. A Rome).
Guaranteed (Pots. & Watert’n)
Sink. Fund Mort. (general)..
Rutland dk Burlington (Jan. 1/69):
1st M. (conv. into Rut. pref. st’k)
2d M. (conv. into Rut. com. st’k)
Saci'amento Valley (Jan. 1, ’69)
1st Mortgage (gold)

....

1888

500,000
200,000

....

1893

775,000

■,

....

97

1893

44

J. & J. 'Richmond

Rockf R■ /- dk St. Louis (Jan.1’69):
1st Mort- (gold) convert, free
Rock Isl. dk Peoria (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
Rome, Wat. <k Ogdensb. (.' m.1/69):

....

1880
1886
1880
*72-77

Philadel.

172,800

..

....

44

161,600
1,298,000
408.500
160,000

Richm. dk Petersburg (Oct. 1,
1st Mort., convertible
2d Mort., coupon and reg
3d Mort. of 1865. coupon

....

77*

14

London.

Richm., Fr. dk Potomac (Oct.1/67):
Sterling Bonds
Convertible Bonds.

....

91

J.&J? New York

Philadel.

1871

44

Richmond dk Danville (Oct. 1, ’68):
State Sinking Fund Loan
Bond guaranteed by State
Consol. Mortgage, coupon
Consol. Mortgage, reg
Roanoke Valley RR. Bonds

65

1872
1872
1874
1882
1898
1898

1st Mort. (Sara. & Whitehall)..
1st Mort. (Troy, Salem & Rutl’d)

....

....

Mortgage

Equipment, convertible
Reading dk Columbia (Nov. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Rensselaer £ Saratoga (Oct.1/68):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

....

’69-’78

44

J. & J.

F.& A.

1870

4 4

3,000 000

91,871

(Jan. 1, ’69):

2d Mortgage
Raritan dk Dela. Bay (Jan. 1. ’69):
1st Mortgage, sinking fund.,.,.
2d Mortgage

....

1870

6,208.000

229,200
300,000 i

Prov., War. dk Bristol (Dec. 1, ’68):

....

•

.

extended

Funded Interest
Portland dk Rochester
1st Mortgage

89
110
88* 89
•

Mortgage

Consolidated Mortgage

...

....

1877
1877

Philadel.

Port Huron dk L. Mich. (Mar.1/69):
1st Mort. (gold) for $16,000 per m
Portland dk Kennebec (Jan. 1, ’69):

....

1880
1887
....

6

6
7

94

79

44
....

J. & J.
A.&O.
A. & O.

477.500

...

1895
1888
1888

44

6

400,000
12 i,500

1869
1868
1875

Pliiladel.

Col. & Newark Div. Bonds...:.

....

1867'

J.&J.

J.&J.
A.&O.

1877
1877
1872

O.
J.
J.
J.
J.
J.
O.
O.

228,000

1st Mortgage
1st M- Steubenv. & lnd. re-org.

....

paid.

A. &
J.&
J. &
J. &
J. &
J. &
A.&
A. &

401,600
106,000
2,497,800
171.500
182,400

Pittfib.,Cin. dkSt.Louis (8ep., ’69):.

90

Shops N.C. -72 ’78
44

400,000

.

Mississippi (.July 15, ’69):
1st Mortgage (E. Div.)
1st Mortgage (W. Div.)
2d Mortgage (W. Div.)
Income Mortgage (W. Div.)
Consol. Mort. for *6,000,000
Consol. Mort. sterling
Oil Creek dk Allegh. R. (Nov.1/68):

8
8

44

120,600

(Mass, loan) s’k’gfund

Equipment Mortgage

J.&J.

44

952,000

Northern Pacific :
ISt Mortgage, land
Norwich, dk Worcester (Dec. 1, ’68):

Ohio dk

8

1,862,000
1,223,000
175,000
25,000
500,000

..

Ogdensb. dk L. Cham. (Apr. 1, ’69):

8

J. & J. New York
J. & J.

1,500.000

,

Construction Bonds
8teamboat Mortgage

7

2,500,000
360,000
276.500
327,339

.

Mortgage of 1865
2d Mortgage of 1868
81 Mortgage for $5,000,000
North Pennsylvania (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Chattel Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Funding Scrip
Northern Central (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (Baltimore guar.)
2d Mortgage (sinking fund)....
Sd Mortgage (sinking fund)....
1st Mortgage (Y. & C. Rli.)
2d Mortgage (Y. & C. RR.)
3d Mortgage (Y. & C. RR
Consolidated Mortgage, gold
Northern, N. H. (Apr. 1, ’69):
Company Bonds of 1854
Northern Neio Jei'sey (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage (guaranteed)

1st

A

6,000,000
4,000,000
300,000

;

1st

1st

7
6

.Cr

700,000
145,000
228,086

Mortgage Bonds (various)
Bonds uue in 1867
Northeastern (March 1, ’69):

Pemberton

TT

465,000
95,000

North Carolina (Sept., ’69):

1st Mortgage,
Loan of 1866
Loan of 1867

....

18..

1875

M.& N.

13,000

Mortgage
1st Mortgage
Funding Mortgage

1st

44

“

110.500
303,000

1st

1st Mort.

D.

44

1883
1876
1883
1883
1876
1887

A. & O. New York

250,000
100,000
250,000

Improvement

N.
N.
A.

44

6

1,059,500

Mortgage

44

1889
1887

1873

Mortgage

New YorkyProv.de, Lost.(Sep.l,’68):

A.

New York

7

Funded Interest (certificates)
North Missouri (Jan. 1, ’69):

....

Where

paid.

2,255,000

Loan of 1849
Loan of 1861
Loans of ’43, ’44, ’48 and ’49
Loan of 1857, convertible
Loan of 1836, sterling
Loan of 1836, sterling
Loan of 1868
Loan of 1868

•

1886
1890

New^York

3,000,000
1,767,000

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

•

.

Mortgage of 1808

1st

44

195,000
2,900,000

Consolidated Mort. of 1863
? ew York dk N. Haven (Apr. 1, ’69):
1st

44

t

6
7
6
6
7
6

162,000

Convertible (till Aug. 1, ’69)
Renewal bonds
NiW Yoi'k dk Flushing (Oct. 1, ’68):
York dk Harlem (Oct. 1,

A.&O.

J. & J.

5,946,689
1,514,000
592,000

Real Estate

Mortgage

J. & J. New York

8
8

•

1872

8

(funding) for $1,000,000

Sinking Fund (assumed debts).
Subscription (assumed stocks).

1st

44

•

Phila., Wilm. dk Balt. (Nov. 1, ’68):

Premium Sinking Fund

ew

J.’& J.'

1871
1835

....

New York Central (Oct. 1, 68):

I

J. & D. N. London
A & O New York

7
g
7

When

preceding page.

Railroads;
Philadelphia dk Read. (Dec. 1, ’68):
60,000
300,000
300,000

PRICE.

INTEREST.

ISSUED.'Amount
Out-

Railroads:
Nero London North. (Jan. 1, ’69):

discovered In our Tables.

COMPANIES, AND CHARAC- I

COMPANIES, AND CHARAC¬
TER OF SECURITIES ISSUED, Amount

on a

MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST.

RAILROAD, CANAL AND

-

-

695

XttB, CHBON1CLE.

November 6, 1869.]

Philadel.

1872
1864
1897

1873

81

5SG

CHRONICLE.

THE

[November 6, 1869.

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST.
Subscribers will confer

great favor by giving ns Immediate notice of any error dlseoveredl In onr Tables*
Pages 1 and 2 of B nds will be published next week.

a

COMPANIES, AND CHARAC¬
For a foil explanation of this
Table see “ Railroad Monitor”
on a

COMPANIES, AND CHARAC¬

C8 0)

INTEREST.

TER OF SECURITIES ISSUED. Amount

PRIOR.

uut-

anding

Rate.

preceding page.

When

Where

paid.

paid.

Print pays

3

Bid.

CO

Hal roads :

Railroads:
Whitehall dk Plattsb. (Feb. 1, ’69):

Sheboygan dk F. du Lac (Jan.1/69):
1st

Mortgage

Sioux City db Pacific (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
2d Mort. (governm.

subsidy)...

Somerset db Kennebec (Jan. 1/69):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

Mortgage

Special Mort.(Appomattok RR)

Southern Minnesota (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage, 10-20 years
Southw. Pacific of Mo. (Jan.1,’69):
1st Mort. (gold) $25,000 per mile

Southwestern, Ga. (Aug. 1, ’69):
Company Bonds
Muscogee RR <>nds
Staten Island (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Sterling Mountain (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Summit Branch (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Sullivan (Jan. 1. ’69):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Sussex (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
Syrac., Bingh. db X. Y. (Oct. 1, ’68):

Mortgage

Tol., Peoria db Warsaic(Jan.1,’69):
1st Mortgage (W. Div.)
1st Mortgage (E. Div.)
2d Mortgage (W. Div.)
Tol., Waft. £ Western (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (Tol. A 111., 75 m.)

1st M. (L. Erie. W.& St.L.,167 m.)
1st Mort. (Gt. Wtn, W. I).,100 m.)
1st Mort. (Gt. W’t’n, E. I)., 81 m.)
1st Mort. (Gt. W’t’n of’59,181 m.)
1st Mort. (Quin. & Tol., 34 m.)..
1st Mort. (Ill. & S. Iowa, 41 m.).
2d Mort. (Tol. * Wab., 75 in.)
2d Mort. (Wab. & W’t’n, 167 m.)
2d Mort. (Gt. W’t’n of’59,181 m.)
..

Equipment Bonds(T.& W.,75 m.)
Consol. Mortgage (500 m.)couv.
Troy dk Boston (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

6
6

T. A D.
J. & D.

Augusta.

5

7

T. & J.
J & J.
A. & O.
J. & J.
I. & J.
I. A J.
M. A S.

London.

5

8

....

6

A* & O.

750,000

7

M.& S. New York

563^500

7
6
7
6

377,010
353,500
41,000

3o;ooo

....

8
6
6
6

800,000
300,000
817,000
175,000

6
6
6

8

3,000 pm

1st Mortgage
Yermont Central (June 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (consol.)

Mortgage (consol.)
Equip. Loans of ’66 and ’67

2d

'869

,,..,

2d Mortgage
8d (enlarged) Mortgage
4th Mortgage, for $1,000,000....
Income Bonds

Warren (Jan. 1, ’69):

i'*t Mort., guaranteed
WestcKt*ter & PMla. (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage, convertible

Mort^j. registered

West Jersey v Jai1,
Loan of 1883... v tv • • •
Loan of 1896,1st M°rt..
West Shore Hud. Riv. (Oct.

1, ’68)

• •

guar

Western Maryland

(Jan. 1, ’69):
Mort., endors.by Baltimore

Mortgage, unendorsed
2d Mort., endow, by Baltimore.
2d Mort., end. by Wash. Co
West. Pennsylvania (Nov. 1. ’68):
1st

Mortgage, guaranteed

Western Union (Jan. 1, ’69):
is.
^age




Boston.

....

'

s

n

9

9

.

Mortgage

....

1880

1887

....

84-’90
’84-’90
M
96-’(30
New York 1887
Petersb’g. ’70-’75
«
62-’72
44
65-’68

1888
1898

®

9

»

*

....

....

....

500.000

250,000

6
6

200,000

6

1,720,000

7

A. & 0.

New York

1876

1,800,000
1,600,000

7
7
7

F.& A
J. & I)
A. & O

New York

1896
1894
1886

79
82

F.&
F.&
A. &
F. &
F.&
VI .&
F. &
U.&
VI.&
VI.&
VI .A

New York

1890
1890
1871
1865
1888
1890
1882
1878
1871
1893
1883
1907

88
88

1,300,000

7
7
10
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7

900,000
2,500,000
1,000,000
45,000

1,455,000
500,000
300,000
1,000,000
1,500,000
2.500,000
600,000

2,700,000

....

Philadel.

J. & J
F. & A

Boston.
44

A
A
0
A
A
N
A
N
N
N
N

Q.—J.

41

r

-

-T

1886

1874

....

....

....

....

....

1875
1880

....

44
(1

44
II
44

44
44
41
44

II

6
6

I. & J
r. & j
A. & O

N.Y.&B’tu ’95-’99

•

•

•

•

,,

,,

79 k<
88

....

41

<4
II

II

44
44

6
6

J. & J
J. & J

New York

6
6

F.& A
1. & D
1.& J
VI.& N
M. & S

New York

1887
1885
1875
1882

89
89

....

3,000,000
1,500,(XX
1,000,000

-

.

,

.

r

.

•

1830

70

75

Mortgage

J.«& D. New York

1884

78

85 |

Mortgage

7

J. & J.

Brooklyn. 1872

7

J. & J.

Brooklyn. 1875

•

•

.

.

•

•

•

•

7

M.& N.

....

1878

•

•

♦ •

•

•

«

•

6

J. A J.

Boston.

18..

....

•

•

•

•

85*

....

....

....

Mortgage

Mortgage
Mortgage
(Oct. 1, ’68)*
Mortgage

f

.

.

41

44

41
41
44
II

1873
1878

’95-’9(
1889
1895
1895
1895
1896
’95-’97
1896
’71-’76
1916

....

84 >*

1st

....

SiJi

1st
1st

....

80
77

82
79

65

71

....

ii

.

.

.

....

Boston.
Boston.
14

I

1886
1891
’76-’77
1889

78
35

73>*
37

101k*
....

7
7
7

Philadel.

1890
1890
1890

.

.

.

•

*

*

♦ *

....

1890

....

44

II
14

New York
II
1#
14

14

1872
1868
1884
1900
1865

....

90

1,800,000

4^00,OOC

4

-

-

t

•

t

•

•

•

J. & J. New York

1873

....

....

100

7

J.& J.

Philadel.

18..

)

7

J. A J.

Philadel.

18..

....

...

)

7

J. & J.

Philadel.

18..

•

•

.

•

,,,,

)

7

J. A J. New York

1877

.

.

.

.

•

•

•

•

)

7

J.& J.

Philadel.

1874
«

•

•

A

•

•

•

J. & J. Brooklyn.

1878

)

7

J. A J. New York

18..

.

D
[)
0

6
6
6

J. & J.
J.& J.
J. A J.

Newark.

1881
1880
1883

....

0

6

J. & J.

Philadel.

18..

....

•

•

•

MM

J. A J

Philadel.

1873
1878

95

A. & O

6
6

M.& S
J & J

1883
1896

82

14

Philadel.
44

New York

18.,

London.
New York

1888

J
J
J
J

Baltimore

1890
1890
1890

6

J.
J.
J.
J.

6

A.&O

Philadel.

• • • t

97

....

....

83

A

A

«

«

•

44

14
If

F.*A New York

AAA*

^

89

1890

•

r4 GO

...

1896

•

• I

f

»l

.

...

0
0

7
7

J. A J. New York

18..
18..

....

0

7

A. A O.

Troy.

1872

....

•

0

7

J. A J.

Utica.

1887

....

•

A

A

Mortgage

0

7

J. A J.

Albany.

1872

....

•

•

•

Mortgage

0

7

J. A J.

Philadel.

1869

....

...

0
2,089,400

6

J. & J.

Philadel.

1886

....

0
0

6
5
6

J. & J. Baltimore

1870
1890
1885

0
800,000

6

J. & J.

Philadel.

1878

10
10
0

7
7

M. A 6 New York
II
M.&N
II
J. A J.

1870
1877
1884

Mortgage
Mortgage

’68):

14
....

•

f

•

....

67k*
91
♦ •

f •

•

9*

9

9 9 9 9

95
...

100
100

•.

;

0

7

Q.-J. Baltimore.
Q.-J. London.

♦ •

....

...

80

...

....

...

* a

♦

4
>6

7
7

J. A J.
J. A J.

Philadel.

10
2
0
K)
•0

6
6
6
6
6

J. A J.
Q.-J.

Philadel.

J. A D

II

J.&D

II

10
10

6
6

J. & J.
J. A J.

Pittsburg.

>0
0

6

7

«i<«5 OO

JerseyCity

10
601,000

6

J. A J. 'Philadel.

3
0
0

6
6
«

M. A S.
J. A J.
M.& N.

1872

0
0
0

6
6
6

J. A J. London.
J. A J. Baltimore

6

M.& N.

•

A

18..

0

Mortgage

96

II

II
II

Q.-J.

1865
1878

....

1878
1884
1897
1897
1877

ra*

84k

81
86
94
81

82

1887
18..

85

86

1876
1889

64
64

85
65

80
56

58

58

54

6

8

86k
94k

81k
...

....

Morris (Feb. 28, ’69):
1st Mortgage
Boat Loan, sinking

fund
Pennsylvania (Nov. 1, ’68):

..

Guaranteed Bonds

Schuylkill Navigation (Nov.l, ’68):
1st
2d

Mortgage
Mortgage.....
Improvement
Susq. db Tide Water (Nov. 1, ’68):
Maryland Loan
Loan of January 1, 1878
Pref. Interest Bonds
Union (Nov. 1, ’68)
1st

89
r

.

....

Philadel.

Mortgage

Philadel.
II

if

II

J. A J.

Philadel.

1882
1870

1885
1878
1894

1883

West Branch dk Susq. (Nov. 1, ’68)

1884

A.& O

....

41

II

,

....

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage..

•

.

tfi

8

7

•

18..

Loan of 1873
Loan of 1884
Loan of 1897
Gold Loan of 1897
Convertible Loan of 1877

AAA.

4

7

400,00< )
900,00 )
900,(XX

•

J. A D. New York

,

&
&
&
&

•

7

*68):

Bonds for interest

....

AAA.

1875

6
6
6

•

0

Mortgage

Monongahela Naviga. (Nov.1/68):

New York

300,00< )

18..

....

Registered Bonds (taxfree)..,
Registered Bonds (tax free)...

....

....

F.& A

7

7
7

•

Delaware ck Raritan (Jan. 1. ’69).
See Camden A Amboy Railroad
Erie of Pennsylvania (Nov. 1, ’68)

....

500, OCX

1874

J. A J. New York

•

1877

Lehigh Navigation (Nov. 1, ’68):

722,500
850,000
154,000

J. & J

New York

7

95

•

1874

Coupon Bonds

....

1860
1860
1859

7

M. & S

78

•

J. A D. New York

Chesapeake dr Delaw. (June 1,69)
1st Mortgage
Chesapeake dr Ohio (Jan. 1, ’69):
Maryland Loan, sinking fund
Guaranteed Sterling Loan
Bonds having next preference
Delaware Division (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Delaware dr Hudson (Aug., ’69):

1st

New York
Boston.
New York

7

7

72k*

J. A J.

...

„

A. A O
A. & O
A. A O

38,600

18..

....

Canal:

....

7
6

i

J. A J.

7

West Philadelphia (Nov. 1, ’68)

....

386,000
114,000
293,200

983,50(

7

7

Watervliet (Oct. 1,

56

1883

400,(XX
562,50(

18.;

0

Ulica, Clin.dkBingh'ton (Oct.1/68)

.

....

—

Troy dk Dmstngburg (Oct. 1, ’68)

....

Boston.

7

J.& J. New York

0

Sixth Avenue (Oct. 1,

.

J. & J.

511.40C

7

7

1st Mortgage
Third Avenue (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Real Estate Mortgage

6

J.&D

6
7

Mortgage

2d (now 1st)

521,000

138,500

Philadel.

J. & J. New York

1st Mortgage (Broad street)....
1st Mortgage (O. & N.)
2d Mortgage (O. A N.)

....

J. A D
J. A D
T. A D
M. A S

....

7

1st

80

78

....

6
6
6
8
6

7

f

t

1878

494,000
23,500
990,000 i
736,000 i

68,200

Mortgage

85
81 *

New York

p°

....

Metropolitan (Oct. 1, ’68):

•

J. & J.

J

....

7

1st

....

7

1886
1886
1886
1873

....

Philadelphia City (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Second Avenue (Oct. 1, ’68):
81*
1st Mortgage
79k* Second dk Third St. (Nov. 1, ’68):
t

9

*

»

■

....

1,273,500

D. New York
II
D.
*1
D.
II
N.

....

Hestomv'le, M. dkFairm't (No .1 ,’68):

tf

84
75

18..

1 e,?°.

J. A
J. A
J. A
M.&

R.R.

Grange dk Newark (Jan. 1, ’69:

New York

7

7
7
7
7

7.

1st

....

....

T. &D
r. & D
M.& N
»i.& N

....

725,000
146,000
528,(300
80,000

....

1st

6

7
7
8
8

....

....

....

Green db Coates (Nov. 1, *68):
1st Mortgage
Harlem Br.,Sf.dk Ford.(Oct.,1 ,’68):
1st Mortgage

....

7

200,000

....

1897

Ninth Avenue

New York

....

1888

m

....

Mortgage
Eighth Avenue (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
42 d st.dk Grand st.Ferry (Oct.l,'G8):
1st Mortgage
Real Estate Mortgages
Frankfiord drSouthw'k(Kov.l,'68):
1st Mortgage
Germantoicn (Nov. 1, ’68):

....

T. & J
J.& J

J’el/73

Philadel.

J. & J. New York

1st

....

....

6
6

6

J. & J.

8

Coney Isl. dk Brooklyn (Oct. 1/68):
1st

....

....

New York

7
7
7

150,000
1,000,000

Cambridge (Dec. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
CentralP.jY.dbE. River{Oct.1/68):
1st Mortgage

...

....

1. & J
A. & O
\I.& N
M. A S

7

1873

Bi'ooklyn C.&Newtown (Oct.1/68):

-

’77-’80

7
7
7
7

300,000
300,000

New York

Broadway dk 7th Ave. (Oct. 1, ’68);

New York

44

J. & J.

6

Mortgage
D,yD'k,EJI'dicuydrBat. (Oc.l, *68):

6

New York

7

Mortgage
Brook.,Pros.P. dbFlatb'H Oc.l ,’68):

528,000

....

250,000

•H

1881
1886
1896

1st

350,000

J. & J. New York

paid.

Brooklyn City (Oct. 1, ’68):

7

Macon.

Where

paid.

....

7

Var.

S1

When

i

-P

T. A J.
London.
44
M.& N.
J. & J. New York

Street Passenger

Petersb’g.

Boston.

....

©

PRICE.

’3

1st

....

New York

J. & J. New York

J? ®
ea

1st

....

....

200,000

238,0(X

West Wisconsin (May 1, vqJ1st Mort. sterling for £800,VW<
Western, Ala. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st
1st

44

....

....

50i.000

Yermont dk Mass. (Dec. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
Vermont valley (Jan. 1, ’69):
lit Mortgage
1st Mortgage
fid Mortgage
Vicksburg £Merid. (Mar. 1, ’69):
Consol. Mort,, 1st class
Consol. Mort., fid class
Consol. Mort., 3d class
Consol. Mort., 4th class
Virginia & Tennessee (Oct, 1, ’68)
1st Mortgage

Mortgage,

44

8

.

1st

44

71-’85
71-’85
69-’?2
73-’74
88-’91
1892
1871

....

399,000
300,000

....

Mortgage

44

New York

J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J
J.& J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.

6

....

Union Pacific (June 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (gold), tax free
25,998,000
2d Mort. (government subsidy) 25,998,00C
Land Grant Bonds for $10,000,000
Union Pacific, Cent. Br.(Jan.1,’69):
1st Mort. (gold), tax free
1.600,000
2d Mort. (government subsidy)
1,600,000
Union Pacific, E. Div. (Jan. 1, *69):
1st Mort. (gold), 140 m
2,240,000
1st Mort. (gold), 253.94 m
4,063,000
2d Mort. (government subsidy)
6.303.00C
1st Mort. (Leavenworth Br.)
600,000
Land Grant Mort. for $500,000
361,000
Income B’ds (gen.) $10,000 p. m.
4,275,000
Union Pacific, S. Br. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (gold), $25,000 p. m
Utica dk Black River (Nov. 1, ’68):
—

(Jan. 1/69):

Mort., endow, by N. Car—
Wilmin g. d; Man Chester (Oc t.l ,’68):
1st Mortgage, 1st pref
1st Mort., 2d pref. (conv.)
1st Mort., 3d pref.
2d Mortgage
Wilmington dk Read. (Nov, 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Wilmington db WeldoJi (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage, sterling
Sterling Bonds
Sinking Fund Bonds of 1867

1st

2d Mort., guaranteed

1st

44

1874
1876

500,000
360,000

Troy Union (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mort., guaranteed

Mortgage

Wil., Charl.dbRutherf'dUl an.1/69):

1st

650 non

Convertible Bonds

2d

44

325^666

3d Mortgage

do

1st

1st

Mortgage

South Side, Va. (Oct. 1, ’68):
Consol. M. (1st pref.) for *709,000
Consol. M. (2d pref.) for *651,000
Consol. M. (3d pref.) for $540,000
Va. State Loan (suspended) —
2d Mort., Petersburg guarantee

00

1898
1898

1st

150,000

Mortgage

South Side, L. I. (Oct. 1, ’68):

1st

6

262 500

Domestic Bonds (G)
Domestic Bonds (I)
Domestic Bonds (K)
Domestic Bonds (special)
South db N. Alabama (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st M., end. by Ala., $16,000p. m.
South Shore (Dec. 1, ’68):

8d

1,628,320
1,628,320

2,012,944

Sterling loan, £452,912 10*
Sterling loan, £59,062 11s. 6rt
Domestic Bonds (H)

1st

1st

Wicomico dk Pocomoke
A. & O. New York
44
J. & J.

300,000
250,000

South Carolina (Jan. 1, ’69):

1st

264,000
7

INTERE8T.

TER OF SECURITIES ISSUED. Amount
Out¬
'or a full explanation of this
standing
Table see “ Railroad Monitor”
on a preceding page.

1st Mortgage
Wyoming Valley (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Miscellaneous:

0' 6

Var.

Philadel.

1878

J. A J.

Philadel.

1878

10

6

0

7

J. A J. New York

1886

92

94

0

7

J. A J. Baltimore.

1886

• • e •

....

0
0

7

7

J. & J. New York
F A A.
••••

1881

'.....

0
0

7
7

J.&D. New York 1879
J. A J.
1879

nr.

Q

1

M.*N. flow York 1879

Amer. Dock dk Imp. Co.(Jan.1,’69):
Bonds (guar, by C. RR. of N. J.)
Consolidated Coal (nan. 1, ’69):

Mortgage, convertible
Cumberland Coal (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
Pennsylvania Coal: Mortg.B’ds.
1st

Quicksilver (Jan. 1. ’69)
1st Mortgage (gold)
2d Mortgage (gold)
IF. Vinton
■>¥.,

'

i

.

....

•

• •

1879
•

•••

f»%4

••M

m

A*A|

INSURANCE STOCK LIST.

SOUTHERN SECURITIES.

(*) are
participating, A (t)

Street.

bio Ask
bid As
90
9c* Savannah, Albany.* Gulf 7s
77
bouds, end. by Savannah.. 75
60
67
45
Pensacola A Georgia 1st m 7s 40
83
80
44
44
2dm 7s. 12*
t>8
44
44
85
67
pref st’k
At’anta & West Point stock
91

securities.

Alabama 8s
44

5s

..

Georgia 6s, old
6s, rew
44

•

•

44

95 $200,000
50 800,000
American*
50 200,000
American Exch’e.100
200,000
Arctic
50 250,000
Astor
25 250,000

Ij6VG6
8s, Lev. e

44

44

44

b’ds

d

44

.

60

51*

bonds...
registered stock, old
“

44

“

“

Augusta, Ga., 7s,

Churle-ton,C

,

46

70

68

rcrip,

Nashville 6s

.

...

6s bonds

lus

“

8s, gold

72*

44

44

44

44

63*

...

54

8s, lot
2 mtg, 8s

2r
25

14

.

.

Mobi e A Montg. R‘<, 1st m.. 77
Mobile A Great iNorth. l^tsm
Selma and Meridian 1st m. 8s 53
Aiabama A Tenn. 1st m. 7s.
feel Rome A Halt. 1st m. 7e.
stock
1nt: mt.tr. 7a
stock

44

44

Orange & Alex, a Man.
Va. & Tenn lsts 6s..*
44

OatiImI RR
44

..

44

SouthwesternRtt., 1st mtg.
44
stock

Macon and Southwestern s’k
Macon A Augusta bonds . ..
44
44
end bonds
•
44
stock....

Brunsw’k end b. 7s
Macon A Brans wick stock ..
44

A

Mnscogee
44

4*

44

stocks..

..

stocks...

44

2nds, 6s
3ds, 6s
4th, 8s
fa d. int. 8s

44

44

l03
96

Fre’ksb’g & Poto. 6a

44

*

44

Bennehoff.

65
73

82*
77
75
85

44

44

■

84

30
30

82*
82*
86

77*

Richmond & York R 1st 8s..
J
4
-»d
,..

77
36

76
34

.

.

....

75

70
.

.

.

...

....

LIST.

N. Y. & Alleghany,
Northern Light
Pit Hole Creek
2 00 Rathbone Oil Tract

25

par 10

Bliven Oil
Blood Farm

40
1 00
40
78

48

Sherman A

—

25
10

Barnsdale...

...

m

m

2

Union

2 0d

1 00
75

Albany & Boston

Companies.

Black Hawk
Benton

35
10

—

5

Bullion Consolidated.... —

Combination Silver....

Consolidated Gregory..';00
Corydon
35
Grass Valley.
Gunnell Gold
Ram’ .touu.A S.b <?s.

.

—

Charter Oak

—

Caledonia
Calumet

25
16
75
70
15 00 16 00




'rosso.

100
Manhattan Silver
5
Montana
10
New York
New York & Eldorado

•

.

•

# •

1 35
....

25
•

•

•

A

•

•

•

•

•

1 45
....

80

-

•

8

•

•••

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

....

Owyhee
People’s G. * S. of

QnartzHill
Bonky MnnntAiti

Smith * Parmelee

Symonds Forks

Twin River Silver
Vanderburg

.

5
25

20
—

100
—

Ju'y ’69. io

J«n. ’66. .8

Flint

10 Jniy

.

.

•

„

•

•

Jnly ’09. .5
July ’69..5
Ang ’69.10

Sep. ’69..5

Jnfy ’68. .5

5
10
10

Jnly *69. .5

July *69. .5

Jan’. ’66 .6
July ’C9. .5

10

Jan. ’65.*5

Jnly ’89..6
July ’69. .5
July ’69..5
Jnly ’69..6
July ’69..5

10

10

*

5
10
10

....

Isle Royale*
Keweenaw

1 30

•

Knowlton

16
14
8
10
8,
11
:o
8

....

•

•

•

•

....

1

July’69.. 5
July ’69. .6
Jn y ’69. .5
July *69. .1
Julv ’69. .5

Jnly ’69..6
Ju y .69. .6
July ’69..8
July *69..5
Jn y 69. 5

July ’69.10
July ’69. .4

10 io July *69..5
18 20 July ’69.10
12 12 Ju'y ’6». .6
10 10 July’69..5
11 14 July ’69..8
0 12 Au*. ’69. .8
10 10 Ju’y’«9..5
10 10 'u’y ’69..5
10 10 Oct. ’69..5
t:
10
10

10
10
10
11
11
10

Jmy 69. .5
Ang. 69..8

13
5
#

,

,

July ’69..8

16

10 J. ly *69..6
1C Aug. ’09. .0
10 July ’69..0
10 Ju y ’69..5
10 Julv ’69..5
10 July’69..5

10
10

10
10
6 11
10
11 10
10 10
10 10
10 10
10 10
,

,

Ju y

2

Ju y

July ’69..7
Ang. ’69. .5
Jn’y ’69..5
Juiy ‘69. .5

•

5
8

20
5)4

90 00, South

19
88

3)4

84
10)4

.

.

i’66

3 75

5 03

6 00 12
•

23 00

66

1

|25*66
i‘00

•••*•••••••

—

Tremont...i

Winthrop

10

6)4
76
6)4

Superior

5
8

80
1 68

7

5)4

Pewahic

South Side
Star

fcO

3

*

St. Clair

Schoolcraft
.

’69..5

Julv *69. .7

6
5)4

Rockland

35

’69..5

July ’69..5
Aug. *69..5

Bid.lAskd

Resolute

—

69 .5

ug.

Aug. ’69. .5

,

STOCK LIST.

Quincyt

—

17
2

60

11)4

11
IK
4)4

*60

t Capital $5J*. ,000,in 100,uW/ share!
shares.
^
nf T-aVa SnnAfior comninies generally $501000 in 90,000.

Capital $1,000,000, in

• • •

Juiv ’69. .5

10
10

Pontiac

16

23)4
2)4
25

July ’69..5

Pittsburg & Boston... 5)4

5)4

....

Sep.’69. .5

12
l'i
10

Petherick
Pewabic
Phoenix

00
15

8)4

Bluff

teel River

Humboldt
Huron

•

•••

•

-

Hilton

1 70 1 90
•

10
10
10
20

Companies.

—

Hecia

....

1 25

3)4

Eagle River

....

.

July ’69. .5
’69..5
M*y *65. .6
Ang. ’69. .6

5

Ogima

24)4

Davidson

.

...

5
4

Dana

Franklin
Gardiner Hill
Hancock

—

Cal

15

Central
Concord
Copper Falls

Bid. Askd

Companies.

1)4

Canada

35

29

—

*

•

fit

„

14

,

io

Lake Superior
Madison
Manhattan
Mendotat..
55 00 Mesnard
Minnesota
National
Native

25 X

I854

Evergreen
Bid. Askd

429,161
427,267
218,610
828,845

Bid.lAskd

Bay State

MINING STOCK LIST.

GOLD AND SILVER

July ’69. .5
Jnly *69. .6

13
10
14 15
10 10
to 10
8* 7 10
10 10 t2
10 10 12
8 10 10
20 20 25

500,000
350,000
200,000
200,000
150,000
150,000

Allouez

—

m

10

14

1 75

—

United Pe’tl’m F’ms....
8 00 United States
m

7 5
8

Home

Rynd Farm

85

-

90
60
55

Fet>. ’69..5
Oct. ’69.10

10

m

10
10
16
10
15

254,0^4
do
420.892
379,545 Jan. and July.
200,000
865,473 Feb. and Ang.
1,000,000 1,871,1186 Jan. and July.

Companies.

par.. 5

262.895

COPPER MINING

bid. Askd

Companies.

Bid. Askd

.

Ug. ’69. 7*
uly ’69..10
Jn y ’69..7
July ’69..5
July ’69. .5
‘ng. ’69.. 4
Inly ’69..5
Jmy ’69.'.5
July ’69. .8

10
10
to
8
9
10
16

,

do '
178,843
436,717 April and Oct.
397,873 Jan. and July. 12
10
uo
281,215
251,364 Feb. and Ang. V
Peter Cooper .... 20
215,986 Jan.and July. 8
People’s
26
8
do
Phoenix + Br’klyn 50 1,000,0(X. 1,581,471
10
do
Reliei
50 200,000 30o,965
7
do
ion 800,000 661,18
Republic*
7
do
Reeolute*
100 200.000 261,71*2 Feb. and
Aug. 10
315,978
200,000
Rutgers’
25
5
St. Nicholast
25 150,000 210,799 Jan. and Jnly.
1,000,000 1,845,80? Feb. and Ang. 3*
Security t
50
'0
Standard
50 200,000 860,828 Jan. and July. 10
do
200,000 303,588
Star
200,000 255,368 Feb. and Aug. 5
200,000 803,270 Feb. and Ang. to
150,000 368,661 Jan. and Jnly.
Tradesmen’s
10
do
250,000 414,028
United States....
10
400,000 764,629 Feb. and Ang. 7
WilliamsburgCity 50 250,000 525,074 Jan. and July. 10
do
fonkers A JN. Y.100 500,000 822,981

North American* 50
25
North River
25
Pacific
Park....
loo

82*
67*

.

50

Niagara

70
72

.

200,000
200,000
300,000
150,000
150,000
200,000
300,000
210,000

60

Metropolitan * t. .ICO
Montauk (B’klyn) 60
Nassau (B’klyn).. 60
National
7)4
New Amsterdam. 35
N. Y. Equitable 8 85
N.Y.Fire and MarlOO

63

.

PETROLEUM STOCK
COMPAKIXB.

Merchants’

.

.

conv.7a
4
8g

44

44

•

72
74

...

44

#

..

84

69
70
44
79
lsts 8s
80
Sonthside, 1st mtg. 8s
“
2dm guart’d6s.. 60
44
25
8dm. 68
44
25
4th m. 8s
Norfolk & Petersburg 1 m 8s 80
44
44
?g 78
Bichm. & Petersb. lstm 7s 82
44
44
2d m. 6s
44
44
3d m. 8s 95

95

90

25

100
Market*...
100
Meehan’ & Trade’ 25
Mechanics (B’kly) 50
Mercantile
10'

76
74

Rich. A Tanv. lsi conn’d 6s.
44
Piedmont bra’h

96

118
91
96
120
75 77
87* 90
80
35
75
76*

..

Gulf 7s bords
44

Atlantic

4th, 8s
44

115
94
91
115

bonds endorsed...
44

lsts

Virginia Central l sts, 6s
44

58

94

.

.

Lorillard*

76
71
82
70
72
66
72
61
70
?0
74
72
83

2d. 6s
Sds 6s

4*

75

94
100

64

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

300,000 532,490
160,000
22i,117
200,00u 341,384
1,000,000 1,550,3'5
500,000 1,202,104
680,526
200,000
200,000 405,085
186,000
150,000

Lamar
100
Lenox
25
Lon gleland (B’ kly) 60
Manhattan

2<la 6s....
Sds 8s
4ths8s

44

GEORGIA.

Georgia RR. 1st mtg

35
20

80

•July ’69 10

•

VIRGIN TA.

69
65
56
3>
30
1782

95

..

•

#

endorsed

44

•

15

6s

Memphis & L.14Rock lsts, 8s
44

8s income.

44

44

40
31

..

Orange & Alex., lsts 6s,

stock

44

44

83
72

Memphis and Ohio 10s
44

86
90

89

55

...

stock

44

,

5

Aug. ’6°. .8

14*

.

,

.fnnt’69

m

,

44

44

#

,

Virgin!» 6s, end
by Siate Tenn. 60

“

84

bonds, endorsed by
sterling

&Geo'P-iaCs

•

•

•

79

Memp. & Charleston lets, 7s
44
2nds, 7s

70

85
60
75

Enialla 1st

State of Alabama

6s...

2d
4
6s...
end. by state

44

62
70

#

.

1:9
82
72

TENNESSEE.

ALABAMA.

Mobile and Ohio,

44

Sorth Eaetern 1st mtg.

Railroad Securities.

Montgomery and

7s..
st'ek

44

East Tenn

•'5

Montg’ry & West14P. 1st, 8s..
“
end

55
72
76

69
95

68
84

8s

»•

45

Columbia and Augusta 1st m

«5

eel$r-burg 6s
Richmond 6s
Savannah 7s, bonds
Wilmington, N. “C., 6s

Union 7s,

guaranteed by State S. C.
Railroad 6s..

44

12 12
200,000
20 20
153,000
50
20 20
Citizens*
30 300,000
60
City
70 210,000 427,977 ..Quarterly... 12* 14*
100 260,000 357,918 Jan. and July. 10 12
Clinton
do
Columbia*
100 300,000 436,321
7!*
do
10 10
200,000
250,72?
Commerce (N.Y.).IOO
71
400,000
641,464 Feb. and Aug. 10 10
Commerce (Alb’y)lOO
6
£02,761 Jan. and July. 10 10
Commercial
50 200,000
62*
Commonwealth ..100 250,000 415,978 Jan. and July. 10 10
Continental *
.100 500,000 2,066,854 Jan. and Jnly. 14 14
400,000
426,078 March and 8ep
Corn Exchange.. 50
90
io 10
and
Eagle
40 800,000 532,877 Apriland Oct. 14 14
Jnly.
200,000
256,145 Jan.
Empire City
100
do
10 10
200,000 347,685
Excelsior
50
Feb. and Aug.
Exchange
30 150,000 186,478 Jan. and July. :o 10
39i,449
Firemen’s
17 204,000
76*
8.
do
150,000
204,832
Firemen’s Fund.. 10
9o
do
206,289
150,001
Firemen s Trust. 10
do
10 10
803,247
200,001
Fulton
25
147,066 May and Nov.
150,001
Gallatin
50
200,000 259,659 Feb. and Aug. 10 10
Gebhard
100
955,475 Jan. and Jnly. 10 12
500,000
Germania
60
62*
200,000 282,419 Jan. and July. 10 10
Globe
50
200,000
81-3,782 Feb. and Ang. 1C 12
Greenwich
25
50
200,001
224,746 Mar and >;pt.
50
Grocers’
200,000
235,360 Jan. and July. 7 7
Guardian
—
57
do
8 10
150,00(i
242,293
Hamilton
15
75
do
10 10
650,682
400,000
Hanover
50
79
do
5
207,141'
200,001
Hoffman
50
42
do
10 10
Home
100 2,000,000 3,966,282
do
75
Hope
25 150,000 225,779
do
12 10
Howard
50 500,000 723,988
do
Humboldt
loo 200,000 266,099
S2
do
Import’ATraders 25 200,000 265,377 Feb. and Ang. 7
International
100 500,000 1,117,492
67*
Jan. and Ju'y. 10 10
Irving
25 200,0(H' 330,424 March and Sep 10 10
200,010
329,240
30
62* Jefferson
Jan. and July. 10 10
85
King’s Co’ty(Bkln 20 150,000 238,875
do
10 10
280,000
382,382
Knickerbocker... 40
75
do
10 10
182.719
150,01H'
41
Lafayette (B’klyn) 60

’69. .5
’69. 7
’69.,6

Aug! ’69* !s

5
10
14
20
20

....

60

South Carolina

78

60

Norfolk 6s

80

6s,

and Savannah 6s,

44

io is

...

22*

Carolina.

14

35
25
17

10

’69..5

fuly
•nly
Aug
Sep.

10
10
11

io

10
10

.

50

45
67

—’

New Orleans
•\

**

55
76

....

•

12*

guar’d by estate S. C

60
75
70
57

58

..

17* 14* i'uiy ’t>9..7

7* 10 10

m

89
75

75
85

44

Bowery (N. Y.)
Broadway
Brooklyn

;

fune’64..5

...

•

Chari. A Rutherf.

guar, b' btsto S.
'pmen burg and

62*

60

•

60

ha leston

road..

•

44
44
m 7s.

44

35

Beekman

paid.

ast

i

io fuly ’69..8

10

6
14

...

Greenville and C Inmbia

45

Merap.

bonds

.

.

71
80
51

Memphis 6s, « nd. by Memp
A Little Hock A >tate ...
Memphis past due coupons..
gg

.

.

.

2d
gj
2d

4.

200,000
200,000
300,000

25

235,269 Tan. and July.
437,451 Ian. and Jnly.
712,541- fan. and July.
289,093 Ian. and July.
310,566 fan. and Jnly.
4S0.65S Feb. and Aug.
495,319 March and Sep
210,241 May and Nov.
279,764 Feb. and Ang.
515,106 June and Dec.
383,: 66 Feb. and Aug.
826,136 Jan. and July.
633,754 Jan. and Jnly.

’t*

’66 ’6

....

70
5
60

Sorth Carolina 8s
“
stock
SOUTH CAROLINA.
Charlotte A S Carolina 7s

15
75

•

800,000

(Br’klyn) 60

Periods.

.

cert, 8s
stock..

44

44

42*

bunds, old

Mobile, Ala., 5s,
•»

Atlantic
Baltic

<2*

,

....

2ds, 8s

44

52*

•

•

44

87
83

#

6s, “
new
Memphis 6s, end. by
and Charleston Rat

.

CAROLINA.

44

69
76

•

Wilmington & Weldon 7*gv>
Manchester 1 pfd 7s

50
60
72

bonds
6s, stock.

6-*. bonds

44

NORTH

86
80

LynchbU'-i- 6s
Memphis 6s
t4‘

.

6
46

Opel.lsts, 8s

44

44

44

Iredricksburg 6s
llaco

44

N. Or. Jack’n &

51
49

47

44

44

49
61
58

50

186
1867

6s, bouds

Columbus, “

•

Jackson lets,8s 78*

44

5v*
44* 45*

8s, bonds

Atlan a, Ga,

•

54
15

12
70

44

8,1

N. Orleans &

Securlt es.

rity

•

52*

7r

...

44

51
43
60

tew

“

44

44

59*

bonds

Virginia ex-coupon
*4

60*

65

6s

“

»4

2<J

61

Tennessee cx coupons
new

•

72

.

6s, new

44

•

70

stock
8'
44
A Ten •. 1st m. 7s
45
46*
“
2d
“
44
87* 38
South. Mississippi 1st m. 7s.
70
69
44
44
2d
44
65
66*
44

registe’d s’ck

44

Mississippi Cent. 1st mtg.
*4
44

62

60
60

new

South Caro ina 6s, 0

•

LOU^IANA.

MISSISSIPPI AND

m 66*

••«.••••

North Care lina, ex-coup

Adriatic

....

7t*, new
Louisiana 6s, ex-coupons...
“
new bonds
^

•

•

•

•

•

*

•

Netas’ts

AStna

•

•

Capital.

write Marine Risks.

-

suie

DIVIDENDS.

Jan. 1, I860.

Marked thus

1H« Weltli Sc Aren la* 9 New

Quotations by J*

697

CHRONICLE.

THE

November 6, 1869.J

20,000 shares,

Capital $200,000, In 30,000

?

Exports of Leading Articles from New York*

Commercial Jinxes.
COMMERCIAL

The

following table, compiled from Custom House returns, shows
exports of leading articles of commerce from the port of New
Yor
6ince January 1, 1869.
The export of each article to the
everal
porta for the past week can be obtained by deducting the
amount in the last uuraber of the Chronicle from that here given.
th.

EPITOME.
Friday Night, November 5.

The

steady decline in the premium on gold in the past
week, by discouraging speculation and inducing buyers for
consumption to operate with much reserve, has imported
weakness to the markets, although unaccompanied thus far

by

[November 6,1869.

THE CHRONICLE.

598

Nov. 1.

Oct. 1.

13,141
12,658
12,065
18,818
68,173
8,801
43,391
77,412
107,351

16,459
24,378
9,210
21,687
110,559
20,300
88,391
99,054
119,269
95,667

668

11,096
113,000
18,000
50,000

13,264
164,300
l'',222
41,274

15,005
60,500
22 000
65,210

300

212

685

Pork, barrels
Tobacco, foreign, bales

Tobacco, domestic, hogsheads
Coffee, Rio, bags
Coffee, other, bags
Coffee, Java, mats
Sugar, hogsheads
Sugar, boxes
Sugar, bags

105,403

Melado, finds
Molasses, hogsheads
Hides, No
Cotton, bales

Rosin, barrels
Crude turpentine, barrels.
Spirits turpentine, barrels
Tar, barrels

1,800
5,700

783

11,085
200

Rice, E. I., bags
Rice, Carolina, casks
Gunny Cloth, bales
Gunny Bags, bales

3,670
3,940
6,450

211

9,250
13,800

1 2 400
16,800
123,240
6,119
26,600
17,852
5,500

21,400
22,200
50,310
12,250
3,850
ll,98g
11,250

400
800

500
700

100

153,500

Jute, bales
Manila Hemp,bales
Tin, slabs

Spelter, tons

Lead, tons...-

Petroleum, for

3,00o

exception among leading staple?, has
been active and advancing; the wants of
shippers are large.
Speculative operators who have sold for delivery this month,
have been caught “short,” and the rates of
freight from the
producing districts to the seaboa-d have been advanced.
All Hog products continue extremely dull,
and without
an

t~cT

co 1-1 CO oo
1-1 1-1 CO th

we k. 3:,158 1.785

io

for

the

Week

Ja:u 1.

The

same

This
week.

Ashes...pkgs.

146

Grass seed.
Flax seed
..

Beans

Peas
C. meal.bids
“

bags

Buckwh’t &
B.W.fl’r pkg

Cotton.bales.

Copper..bbls.
M

94,186
....

343

Since
Jan. l.

7,930

5,943

.pkgs.
Hemp ..bales.
Hides ....No.
Hops., .bales.
Grease

Leathei- .rudes
Lead ....pigs.
Molasses bbds
oe

bbls

33,116
802,786

976

190,199

231,454

891

13,550
514,U00

9,074

358

1,937
....

10

12.104
24.9-28
19.768

3,361
3 495

5,7' 6
337.181
8,01 1
83,8 9
45,Gi:> 2,335,351
....

10

Naval btores<:r.

214,925 1,469,701
20,150
86,593

1,251
1,112
2.483

plates.

Dr’d frult.pkg

73.604

117,517

Ports, 12, 42
a>

o

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428.645
36.818

2,802

1,180,668
6,03?

19,411

11,221

13,239

Spirits
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9.933!

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rH

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1,356
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93 549

144

15,998

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716,698

398

8,071
568,710

66,196

30,147

19,791 556 486
83,168 1,104,813
256

69,800

3,467

438

178,063
71,271
53,307
57,611
12,792
15,882

3,178

246 584

472

2,198
928
500

87339

6-6

1,967
444

3,467
2,367

2,255
13,267
100,700
75*93
118,809
51,2:0

54,59!

24,072,

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IPWK

oo

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ai

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£s

£*&&&&&A
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rH©©

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£.— Tp 1—l rH

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973 353

69,774
195.802

oOOS

m a*

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70,411

406,790

.CO Vi

°°r

u

Su^ar, hhds and
Tallow, pkgs
Tobacco, pkgs.
Tobacco, hhds.
Whiskey, bbls..
Wool, bales
Dressed hogs No
Rice, rnuah buna

8.440

5,292

Provisions—

Butter, pkgs..

57,1«8
57,3 1
475,549 £91.396
69,550
31,981
7,969

•

Sf ■
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turpen

1,251

©TP
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> * 2
O
OS

rH Cl

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.

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Since
Jan. l.

Vi

cq_

10

►» Cj

This

in

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inti

F—I

Britsh Guian 46,308 6,147
a

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week.

Lard, pkgs
591.770
Lard, kegs.
15.355 Rice, pkgs...
6.8 .5 Starch.......
31,071 Stearlne
3.974 Spelter, slabs

turpen620

m

1

follows:

Same
time ’68.

19,748
82.952
44,027
79,097

19,188

t- rH

CO

TP

Breadstuffs—
Flour .bbls.
106,401 2,878,294 1.762,520
Wheat .bus. 1,155,707 18,193.843 9,274,029
Corn
780,747 9,428 595 17,622,074
Oats
I 340,801 5,811,2*6 7,622,414
4 >4.887
Rye
270.562
4,106
Malt
4-4.163
9,442
563.145

Barley

as

i

(OflioOHOHCsffirio5t-©cc©in

(Ti

time in 1868, have been

co «♦.»«

t-©©t-©t-Tpcct-©©n»©t-»
•

and since

receipts of domestic produce fir the week and since Jan.

and for the

rHqs_©

d

..

Receipts of Domestic Prodace

(CCOnnH

eo

©©©c'"dci©,orH
\iQt~CDlOCOtO'z'vj[cOcZ''a in co in in"©"© hohooiol-WoS
HfCOT-nfOr-lOSCOift*
tioisc-S

TP 90 CO TP *

2t

much actual strength, though the declining
tendency on a
few articles appears to have been partially checked at the
moment.
The light demand prevailing is
solely Tor iinme
diate use by consumers.
Shippers report very unfavorable ad¬
vices from abroad, and not only refuse to
purchase, but are in
some instanceselling out contracts, whenever buyers can be
found. Mess Pork has declined to $27 for
January delivery ;

prime steam Lard to 16£c for prime delivery; Cumberland
Bacon, 131@13fc. Some new prime Mess sold to-day at
$28.50, on the spot.
New Beef has partially opened at
$31£ for India Mess, and $28 for Prime Mess. Butter" is 3@
4c lower.
Cheese heavy, with shippers
bidding only 17@
17£c for prime Factory. Wool is without essential change.
Hides have advanced to 22fc, gold, for prime
dry Buenos
Ayres. Freights have ruled dull, and close very unsettled.
The spe ulation in Grain and Petroleum has checked
ship¬
ments o<* those staples.

ci ar> as «n © in t- t'pP|HOC»0,fl’ —
t-i
ci co
a* iq

!•(*>

m

v

5,373
18,400
18,537
4,000

•

Linseed, bags
Saltpetre, bags

co to

08

4,424
13,485

•£

©

Nov. 1.

19,169
20,397
9,214
20,573
149,569
29,310
1,486
47,277
80,190
39,788

ad eo

© co »n

—

■t-©TP©TPrnat— ©d©'
'ooiof i »n in — in t- © © <

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;
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I-IO’P 5! I

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Beef, tierces and barrels

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1868.

%

>2 m

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*V:

(trllOH

any

1869

—

ai «o «

general decline in currency prices; those goods which
are usually sold for gold
are of course held for belter gold
prices.
The following is a statement of the stocks of leading articles
of foreign and domestic merchandise at dates given :

TPrH(w©©inTpc©TPt-©©a5t-eo

IQ rH —I <
f o: O 00 1

©cocoas
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'3‘9C•

November 0,

599

CHRONICLE.

THE

1869.]

Receipts and Exports of Cotton (bales) since Sept* 1

Imports of Leading Articles*
The

followiag table, compiled from Oustom House returns, show
lefureign imports of certain leading articles of commerce at this port
f>r the last week, since Jan. 1,1869, and for the corresponding period

RECEIPTS

t

ia 1868:

(The quantity Is given in packages when not otherwise specified.]

PORTS.

Since
Jan. 1,
the
week.
1869.

For

Sam 3
limj
1868.

Since

9,389
44,145
325,379
21,834

21,346

11.3-9
51,328
4.9,319

471
2.6
65

16,226
7,902
5,130

5,277

113,116

Cocoa, bags
Coffee, bags...... 12,090

16,949

18.184

898,111

930,561

2,246

980

18,247
24,777

10.750
27,604

Earthenware...
Glass
Glassware

61*

Glass plate
Buttons
Coal, tons..

Cotton

bales.....
Drugs, &c.—
Bark, Peruvian

140
94
47

Blea

powders..
Brimstone, tons
Cochineal
Cream Tartar..
Gambler

Iron, KK bars.
Lead, pigs

Spelter, lbs....

6.042

18,792
5,803
1,664

5

ICO
88

Hardware

3,798
4,454
834,2.7
462,456

7,557
11,284

2,830
18,221
13,201

Tin, boxes
Tin slabs, lbs..
Rags

I 308

Su^ar^ hbds, tes

4,853

624,397
>9,<90

2,133

Tea

849,707

378,003

1,894
1,085

Sugars, boxes &
bags

751,063
801,420
35,093
2,067

507,78 L
712,132
37,472
1,108

668
31

6,664 Tobacco
4,952 Waste
1,371 Wines, &c—

33,515

17,519

Champag’e,bk8

4,482

505

1,050

>2
79

2,758

44,58*

21,201

i

2,960
4,051
11,830

322

5,343
9,022

Wines
Wool, bales
Articles report’d

101,701
1(53,864

74,529

608

247

534

•

•

•

.

•

Gams, crude....
Gum, Arabic...
indigo

40 9-15

8,0*5
S

*

.

•

4,298 47,456
2,525
7,376

2,055
12,462

9,646,651 5,170,560
141,727 225,161
1,034,111 756,258
3,374,600 3,894,964
S9.0S5
43,949

413 527

Steel

6,230
115,542

Florida
North Carolina

89,253

435,477

Total this year.’.
Total last year

The

21,193
2,626

2,946

Other ports

Metals, &c—
Cutlery

China, Glass and

806

4,131

Virginia

the
Jan. l,
week.
1859.

EarthenwareChina

Texas
New York

Forign

29,r27
1,359

1

1,029

22,067

6,354

443
260

35,651
56,086
7,689

5,216

15,859
843

4,460

9,911

.

61 8*7

1,030
10,?82
38,851

....

795

1,709

....

2,504

36,357

22,670

52.415

35,307

8,140

326,583

Stock.

67,010
14,406

10,317

109,758

....

....

%

to Nor.
Total.
Ports.

Other

Britain France

1868;

141.067 148,010 27,136
40,593 12,*04
49,038
54,533 28,764 6,094
104,791
56,580 14,830
83
23,459 19,823

Charleston
Savannah
Same
time
1868.

Ship
menu

Great
1869.

i

1 TO—

EXPORTED SINCE SEPT.
•

New Orleans
Mobile

For

and

Stocks at Dates mentioned.

65,439
20,063

13i008
83,159
14,898

19,000

lico
2,094
7,500

168,803 177,572 176,681
95,862 138,081

157,687

iparket the past week has continued quiet, and with*

out any decided
ment the early

change,

There

slight upward

was a

move

part of the week, under the influence of the

last week’s receipts, which were less than anticipated, and
also of the Liverpool advices, which showed some improve¬
ment.
The higher rates and decline in gold, however, check¬

ing the shipping demand, and the spinners continuing to con¬
fine their purchases to their more immediate wants, th3

again and lower, and closes to-night at
25|c for middling uplands, being -Jo off from last Friday
104
39,392
44,352
Oil, Olive
Cotton on the spot for immediate delivery continues in very
83
741
855 Fancy goods....
Opium
15,925 622,421 413,990 limited
75,828 111,892 Fish
Soda, bi-carb...
supply, and as our prices here are under the
106
31.426
37,316 Fruits, &c—
Soda, sal
Lemons
393
4,962 417,500 389,226 Southern
33,398
33,731
8oda, ash
markets, the amount coming forward is also
437
1.701
21
696,887 523,055
Flax
Oranges...:'
1,538
587,694
59-1,174 small.
98
Nuts.“
5,142
Furs
*.
5.331
But receivers are unwilling to accumulate stock
29,390 700,(02 1,114,291
Raisins
5,320
10,829
Gunny cloth
70,713 8,644,932 5,890,687
182
6.322 Hides undressed
For forward delivery there
Hair
and hence are free sellers.
7,627
241,936 797,235
Rice
101,163 118,055
Hemp, bales
has been more doing, at ab >ut the prices of last week. The
Hides, &c—
Spices, &c—
179,673 114,124
30
Cassia
Bristles
1.356
1,217
total sales of this description reach 8,800 bales (all low
31,660
39,165
203
7,45
13,910
Ginger
Hides, dressed.
223,814 194.925
25 832
21?
india rubber
32,963
Pepper
13 549
176,753
middling, or on the basis of low middling), of which 250
2,592
1,930 Saltpetre
Ivory
WoodsJeweiery, &c—
bales were for October, 50 at 25|c. and 100 at 26c. (settlement);
162,968
Cork
76
2.042
2,114
Jewelry
66,351
115,41,
95>
Fustic
973
Z
Watches
1 900 bales were for November, 800 at 24£c., 100 on private
23,6’8 504,336 2 >6,322
Logwood
LI nseed
537,429 410,131
81.746
91.251
454
Manoiranv
Molasses
1,412. 154,931 171,815
terms, 1,050 at 25jc., 1< 0 at 25jc., 100 at 25Jc , 250 at 25c.;
2,750 bales for December, 950 at 25c., 1,300 at 25Jc., 500 at
COTTON.
25ic.; 1,200 bales for January, 400 at 25Jc. 200 at 25£e., C00
Friday, P. M., November 5, 1869.
at 25 Jc.; 250 bales for January and December, half each
By special telegrams received by us to-night from each of month, at -25Jc.; 500 bales for February, 100 on private
the Southern ports we are in possession of the returns show
terms and 400 at 25jc.; 1,000 bales for present delivery free
on board at Charleston, 500 at
24fc. and 500 on private
iog the receipts, experts, &c., of cotton for the week end¬
terms ; 200 bales for November free on board at New Orleans
ing this evening, Nov. 5. From the figures thus obtained at
24£c.; 750 bales for December free on board at New Or¬
it appears that the total receipts for the seven days have
leans, 500 on private terms and 250 at 24Jc. The total sales
reached 95,269 bales, (against 80,043 bales last week, 82,395 for immediate delivery this week foot up 16,993 bales (includ¬
bales the previous week, and 67,995 bales three weeks since)} ing 8,073 bales to arrive), of which 5,542 bales were taken by
making the'aggregate since Sept. 1, 1869, up to this date, spinners, 928 bales on speculation, 9,873 bales for export, 650
bales in transit, and the following are the closing quotations ;
530,690 bales, against 394,528 bales for the same period in
Upland &
Nevi
•Florida.
Mobile.
Orients
Texas.
1868, being an increase this season over last season of 146,162
Ordinary
$ ft) 24#®....
24#®....
24#®....
25 @....
bales. The details of the receipts for this week (as per tele- Good Ordinary
25 ®.
25#®
25#®...,
25#®*.*.
Low Middling
25*©....
25#@.. .
26 ©....
26#®....
Middling
£5#®....
20#®....
26#® ..
26#®....
graph) and the corresponding week of 1868are as follows:
/—Receipts.->
Below we give the total sales of cotton and price of middling
r-Receipts.—,
1868
Received this week at-- 1869.
Received this week at—
1869. 1868.
bales
866
495 at this market each day of the past week:
New Orleans
bales. 34,435 81,403 Florida
Madder
Oils, essence....

by value—
Cigars

Corks...

•

•

•

*

.

•

.

•

•

„

•

„

•

•

„

•

*

.

•

.

•

market became weak

$15,865 $700,858 $530,094
591
122,629 167,015
44,06? 1,791,672 1,187,177

.

.

*

*

.

„

...

..

11,852
11,547
18,869
6,286

6,253
6,950
13,463
6,050

2,9J1

Mobile
Charleston
Savannah
Texas

2,422

Tennessee, &c

North Carolina

2,160

1,278

Virginia

7,763

6,683

95,269 74,997
20,272

Total receipts
Increase this year

week ending this evening reach a total
of 38,777 bales, of which 23,669 bales were to Gieat Britain
and 15,1* 8 bales to the Continent, while the stocks at all the
ports as made up this evening, are now 220,480 bales. Below
we
give the exports and stocks for the week, and also for the
corresponding week of last season, as telegraphed to us from
the various ports lo-uight:
The

To al
sales.

..

....

/

Exported to

G’t Britain.

3,989
....

....

s

«

•

•

•

Total..

•

•

•

11,9S1

1,648

9

2,080

23,669

15,108

38,777

2,561
....

•

7,567
2,564
13,629
2,089

5,574

..

Total

Same week
1868.

Contin’t. this week.
9,795
6,806
3,133

13,504
8,630
2,176

2,930
1,725
10,570

35,499

964

,

*
Sto ck
1868.
1869.

89,244
27,489
18,398
37,115
17,597
19,000
11,637

78,391
26,668
6,462
24,317
16,213
24,512

220,4S0

186,063

9,500

Florida.

New
Orleans.

Mobile.

26#®....

26#®....

2,827
1,756
2,225

26#®....

26#®
26#®

8,769
3,062

Satnrday

exports for the

Week ending
N ov. 0.
New Orleans .
Mobile
Charleston
Savannah....
Texas
New York...
Other ports

Upland &

26

3,354

26#®,...

26#®....
<&....

25#®....

26#®.

...

.

.

..

£6#®...
20#®....

26#®
26#®....
26#® ...
26#®....
.

26#®....
26#®....

Texas

26#®....
27

27

®.....
®....

26#®....
26#®....
26#®....

to be, we think, a disposition just
the estimates of the crop. The extremely favorable
weather which has been enjoyed during the entire picking season,
The Crop.—There appears

now

to increase

exeption of last week, has resulted
reports from some portions of the South.

with the

in much more favorable

In fact, from sections

supposed to be lost, we now hear a contrary
story. Furthermore, the point we referred to last week may have
an important bearing on the total crop, as it certainly is having on
present estimates; that is to say, the fact that the proportion of lint
to seed is this year much geater than last year.
For instance, the
weight of the lint last season was only about 28 per cent, while this
season it is stated to be about 38 per cent, which would show a total
increase in the product of about 30 per cent. These circumstances,
together with the further one that the land planted is this year,
supposed to be at least 10 per cent m excess of last year, furnish the
basis for the increased estimates. The storms of a week ago dp not
appear to have resulted in very general injury, though we see the
New Orleans Price Current of October 30th states that in some lo¬
calities in that vicinity considerable damage was done. In conse¬
quence of the rains the rivers are now higher, and we may there¬
fore look for freer receipts at the Gulf ports.
Indta Crop.—We are not receiving as favorable advices from In¬
where the top crop was

foregoing statement it will be seen that, compared
with the corresponding week of last season, there is an increase
in the exports this week of 3,278 bales, while the stocks
to-night are 34,417 bales more than they were at this time a year dia at present as we were a few weeks since. Both by mail and
a<ro
Tbe following is our usual tablet showing tha yioT3raeat telegraph the accounts are less encouraging. The principal com¬
plaint is of excessive rains. By telegraph we hear of considerable
of wit's* at all the poits since September 1, to October 29- injury to the Oomrawattee cotton from this cause, while in Dharwar the crop is said to have suffered from drought.
In Gazerat,
We do not include our telegrams to night, ai we cannot
damage from locusts is reported. But the end of their season is as
insure the accuracy or obtain the detail necessary by tele* yet too far off to make any definite estimate of the probable supply
from that quarter. Should, however, prices decline materially wo
graph.
From the




THE

600

CHRONICLE

expect to see a much larger portion than during the past year sent
from that country to China.
Table of Weekly Reck pts.—Some of our readers have taken

[November 6, 1869,

To Bremen, per steamer Hsnsa, 1,0S2
To Hamb rg, per steamer Allemania, ?C9
New Orleans—To Liv rpool. per bark William Rathbone, 8,136....per
eh p - Area' in, 3,774 .,. Lammington, 3,057
T » Hambirg, per steamer Sa > oni *, 2,455
To Havre, p r steam -rs Aihambra, 1.986 ...Saxrnin, 50
per ship
S. S Sturgess, 4,129 . per bark M. W. Norwood, 1/01
To BarGciOua.-per bark, Joven Caime ita, 297 ..per thip Favoriti,

1,082
859
9.f67

2,455
exception to our weekly table of receipts because the total is usu¬
ally larger than that cf a leading broker s circular published in this
7,666
citv.
This is rather an unfair way of reasoning, would it not be
2,400
2,697
much more sensible to show wherein our figures are inaccurate ?
To Hav*i a, per bark J. S. Norw ood, 1.213
1,118
They are given in such detail that an error in them is very easy of Mour e—To Liverpool, per snip Gallatin, 4,251
4,251
I o ' remen, p r brig Adorn-,443
443
detection, and yet none has been pointed out. If they are too large,
which portion of them has that defect? There is certainly a differ¬ Charleston—To Liverpool, per steamer Pioneer, 32 bags Sea Is and
and 2,224 Uplands
2,256
ence in our respective results; but the cause of it lies simply in the
Sava nah—To Liverpool, per ships Alexandria, 2,778....Crescent
C t
fact that our figures are kept on a totally different plan from those
4,804
7,582
Liverpoo’, per bark Agra, ICO.... i
150
of the circular iu question.
Take, for instance, Florida. We Battimors—To A.
Boston—To N.
Provinces, 29
29
include in our Florida receipts all received from Florida at the
Total exports of cotton from the United States this week ....bales.
ports North and South, except New .Orleans, and deduct this from
49,726
the totals of the several ports.
For example, last week we gave
The particulars of these shipments, arranged in our usual form,
are
Florida as follows: received direct at New York, 233 bales; at
as follows :
Charleston, Savannah, &c., 317 bales—total 550 bales. These
Liv r- GlasBre- Ham- Barce*
British
Florida receipts at Charleston, Savannah. &c., were deducted from
pool. gow. Havre, men. burg. Iona. Havana. Prov.
Total.
New
744
40
359
1.0:52
the weeks totals at those ports.
11,017
The other authority in question Nw York... 8.792
Orleans. 9,967
7,600
2,455
2,097
3,213
23,998
gave Florida at 233 bales, losing sight entirely of the 317 bales. Mobil-i
13
'•
4,251
4,694
Again, as to Virginia and North Carolina, we do not make up our ( ha leston... -.256
2.256
Savnn ih.... 7,582
7.582
figures by the arrivals at New York, Boston, Baltimore and Phila¬
Baltimore...
156
150
delphia. and should no more think of doing so thau we should Boston
29
29
think of counting the New Orleans or Mobile receipts that way.
It would be a very good mode of making our totals emails but not
Total ..33,993
40 8,410
1,525 2,814 2,697
1,213
29
49,726
of making them accurate. Virginia and North Carolina receipts
Gold Exchange, and Freights.—Gold has fluctuated the
past we-*k
are made up iu our tables by tak ng i he arrivals at the principal
between 196§ and 129^, and th^ close to-night was 127f.
Foreign
ports of those States. For instance: Norfolk received last week exchange ch-sed weak, owing to the improving supply of cotton bills
7,141 bales; Petersburg, <fcc., 1,263 bales—total Virginia, therefore, and limited purchases of importers. Late transactions were effec ed
8,404 bales. If we had kept our figures by the arrivals at the four on a basis of 1'
8f@ OSf for Lon on bankers long, 109§®l09f for
Noithern ports named, we should have lost at least 1.500 bales of short and
10S@>08^ for commercial. Frei hts closed at f@7-l6d by
this am unt, as the circular in question did.
We have not the steam and 7-32@£d by sail to Liverpool, lfc by steam and fc by sail
space to enlarge further up<>n this subjec, but would simply add to Havie, fd by s eam to Hamburg and
l£d by steam and lc by sail
that the care we bestow upon these figures, and the detailed returns to
Mremen.
we obtain, make it quite
impossible that an error of any extent
By Telegraph from Liverpool—
...

...

,

...

•

•

•

••••

•

•

••••

•••

•

•••

••••

•••»

••••

••••

••••

*

•

•

#

*•

•

••

•

•

could be made iu them.

The exports of cotton thi9 week from New York stow a decrease
from last week, the total reaching 11,017 bales, against 13,103 bales last

week.
New

Below

give our table showing the exports of cotton from
York, and their direction for each of the last fou * weeks; also
we

the total exports

and direction since September 1, 1369; and in the
same period of the previcm year:

last column the total for the

Liverpool, N'vernber 6—4:30 P. M.—'The market ins ruled steady to-day
with sales reaching 12.006 bales, including 3,060 for speculation an 1 export.
The .-ales of the * eek h ve b-di 106,000 hu e*, of which 2 ',060 were taken for
ex >ort. ana 24,060 on speculat on.
The receipts of the week have been 44,000
bales, of wbic 16,000 a e American. T ie i-tock in port s etimatea at 89 ,0 0
bales, of which 31,nun are Americ n. 1 he stock of cotton at sea is estimated at
341,000 bales, of whicti 68,000 are American.
For the convenience of our rea icrs we give ‘he following, showing the sales
and stocks at and afloat for Liverpool each of the l.-nt. four weeks :
Nov. 5.
Oct. 22.
Oct 15.
Oct 8.
Total sales
106 000
92.000
56.000
60,000
Sales for export
2 ',0 0
17,000
8.000
10.000
,

Exports of Cotton (bales) from \ew lfork since Sept. 1,18€9
WEEK

Same
time

ENDING

Total
IXPORTED TO

Oct.

7,127

Other British Ports

19.
7 876

Total to Gt. Britain.

7,1*7

)>rev.
year.

8,792

47,311

23,365

40

145

....

10,971

8,83 2

47,456

23,390

744

7,876

(-peculation

2 5,000

25

2.

10,971

....

....

to

date

Nov.

26.

li.

Liverpool

Oct.

Oct.

S .ies on

4,457

4,336

....

Total Frencli

794

Hamburg

*

Other ports

•

•

744

4,4b0

4,336

1,082

736

359

6,637
4,271

2,766

....

...

3,164

1,441

2,129

1,431

....

....

4.1S7

9,911

Spain, Oporto and Gibraltar &c

*

All others

•

Grand Total

••

....

....

Spain, etc

The foliowir.g

....

1,393

....

794

.

3

....

....

1,051
2,113

•

....

Total to N. Europe

....

393

....

Bremen and Hanover

....

7,921

...

....

328

....

....

11,433

....

....

13,100

....

61,827

11,017

82,25i

the receipts of cotton at New York, Boston, Phil
for the last week, and since September 1, 1869

are

detphia and BnWin-

‘e

NEW

YORK.

PHILADELPHIA

boston.

:

This
week.

Since

This
week.

Sept. 1.

New Orleans.
Texas
Savannah
Mobile
Florida
South Carolina.

3,968
3.620

North Carolina..

1,0'0
32,532

1,8S9

10,479

Virginia

4,095

21,7<8

Since

Septl.

North’rn Ports.

Tennessee, <fcc.
Foreign
Total this year
Total last year.

2,74
822
•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

7>

2,229
....

19,438
17.013

16,236
6,608
46,208

360

860
•

•

•

•

.

.

.

347

20

...

....

3,512

1,801

....

....

145

215
•7

•

1,764

10.242

6,381

436

1,560

117,133

Since

Septl.
....

5,535

•

4,457

141,969

This
week.

ce

245
•

1,130

—

Si-

Septl.

3,089

2,7o7

93

This
week.

•••

....

191

135

....

....

...

487
152

2,195
.147

....

....

1,436

....

....

109
....

3,835 19,390

782

5,106| 17,223

1,382

19

84

1,751

••••

.....

5,638

8,041

217

655

6,754

2.950
855
-

j

12 @19*
12i®U*

Wed.

Thu.

12*®..
12*®..

.

1?*®..
la*®..

lvi®.. 12*®..
12*®. 124®..

3,612

19,242

3,593

S'maria, 1,055....Denmark, 2,944
Glasgow, per Bteamer Europa, 40
To Havre, per steamer Percire, 744.

....

mar¬

kets, our correspondent in London, writing under the date of Octo¬
ber 21, states:
Liverpool, Oct. 21.—The demand for cotton increased in the early
p >rt of the week, and on Monday and Tuesday the market was very
strong at full prices. The sales since have been to a fair extent, and

prices remain without material change, with the exception of American,
which is free y offered and has falleu fd to £ 1 per lb.
The dec ine in
the prices of common Sea Island has attracted the attention of
buyer*,
and more business has been done than for many Weeks
past; in some
instances rather lower rates have been accepted, but holders now
gener Hy refuse to make
further concessions.
Brazil has been in fair
request, but, the market being well supplied, prices are in some
instunc-s fd per lb lower. For Egy ptian there has been a good demand,
especially for the qualities about “ fair,” but without quotable change
in prices.
In East India a large business has been transacted, at an
advauce of f d to f 1 j er lb ; bu with rather le?s demand, this
improve¬
ment has to-day been barely sustained.
The transactions “to arrive”
have been to a lair extent, and higher rates have been
paid, but the
latest quotations are : American, basis of Middling, from Cbarleiton,
steamer Darned, llfd ; ship named, llfd; any
port, October-November
shipment, llfd; November-December, llfd ; Bengal, fair new Mer¬
chants, July sailing, September sailing and ship named, 8d per lb. The
sales of the week, including forwarded, amount to 91,960 bales, of which
21,800 are on speculation and 17,010 declared for export, leaving
53,660 bales to the trade.
The following are the
with those of laut year:

prices current of American cotton, compared
r-Fair &—>

r-Ordl. & Mid—,

Sea Island....
Stained

12,163

Total bales

746....Minnesota, 69
City of Brussejs, 678

Fr.

Up. tD arrive
European and Indian Cotton Markets.—Id reference to these

Description.

exports
reported by telegraph, and published in the Chronicle last Fri¬
day, except Galveston, and the figures for that port are the exports for
two weeks back.
With regard to New York, we include the manifests
only up to Tuesday night, to make the figures correspond with the offi¬
cial week.
Below wa give a list of the vessels in which these
nhipments from all ports, both North and South, have been madn:




Tues.

12*®
12f®..

(i

Shipping News.—The exports of cotton from the United States the
past week, a* per latest mail returns, have reach*d 49,726 bales. So
far as the Southern ports are concerned, these are the same

Exported this week from—
New York—To Liverpool, per steamers Java,

10.000

,

BALTIMORE.

RECEIPTS PROM-

To

Mon.

Sat.

Price Vfidd. Uplds
**
“
Orleans

....

Other French ports

890
3

8,0h0

closing prices lor the week:

“

Havre

Total

21,0 0

Tot 1 stick
398.000
434,000
425,000
459,000
Stock of Ameri an
31,00 4
36.000
4/,000
46,000
Total afloat
341,000
842,000
SSH.ih'O
840,0'0
Ameri'an afloat
...
6\000
20.000
12, 00
33,000
The market for y rns and fabrics at Manchester is less favor hialthough
not >1 fleet ng the cotton m rivet.
The fo.lowing table will show the daily

8,792
40

744

21
11

8

23
12

Ord G.Ord. L.Mid.

Upland

....

10*

Mobile

New Orleans.
Texas

....

10%

11%
11%
11%
11%

The following are the
date aud since 1866:
1866. 1867.

Mid. Sea Island 26(1.

Upland...

15

Mobile.... 15
Orleans... 15%

16d.

H%
11%

11%
11%

-26
-13

Mid.
12

G’d <fe—,
—Same date 1858—,
fine.
Mid.
Fair, Good.
30 -48
24
26
80
15 -17
12
18
17
G’d Mid.
..

12%
12%
12%

..

..

.

-12%
-12%
-12%
-12%

10%
10%

11%
l'%

11
11

12
12

prices of middling qualities of cotton at this
1868. 1869.
2id. 21d.

8%" 103*
8#
9

g’d fair

10%
11

1*
12%
12*

1866. 1867.

Mid. Pernamb 15%d.

Egyptian. 12

Broach... 10
Dhollerah 10

Sd.
6%

1868. 1869

10%d.ll%
9%
8%

6

7%

8

6

7*4

8

Havre, Oct. 22.—The stock of cotton.yesterday evening was 70,800
bales, of which 10 300 were American and 44,000 bales Blast Indian.
It was estimated that 3,20 > bales of American and 21,000 bales of East
Indian cotton were afloat to the port,

November

THE

6,1869.]

601

CHRONICLE.
The

TOBACCO.

receipts of Flour have been more liberal, though still
on the corresponding week of
1888,—but

smaller than

.Friday, P. M., November6,1869.

exports of crude Tobacco for the past week from coming upon a market already oppressed with lower quota¬
tions from abroad, and declining gold, lower prices have been
all the ports reach 1,732 hhds., 277 cases and 2,728 bales.
the result, in which all grades have about equally shared.
Of these exports 851 hhds., 180 cases and 2,708 bales were
The stocks continue small, for there has been no opportunity
from New York; 750 hhds. from Baltimore ; 131 hhds and
for extensive accumulation, but there is little disposition to
20 bales from Boston and 97 cases from San Francisco. The
send Flour to store, as it is plain that the railroads will have
direction of the shipments of hhds. was as follows : To Bre¬
no
difficulty in keeping up our supplies. The very low
men, 180 ; to Rotterdam, 287 ; to Liverpool, 39 ; to London,
grades, such as superfine and unsound extra, have been most
47; to Fiume, 363; to Marseilles, 722 ; to British North
wanted, and, at the concession, they have moved pretty freely
American Colonies, 20; to other foreign 122, and the balance
The total

and better grades have been reduced
lbs., of which 128,548 25@50c. per bbl, in order to induce the trade to purchase
more
fieely. The decline in Southern Family Flour is
lbs. were to Melbourne. The full particulars of the ship¬
especially marked.
ments from all the ports were as follows:
Hhds.
Man’d.
The market to day was seriously depressed by large receipts
ibs.
Tcs. Stems. Pkgs.
Hhds. Cases. Bales.
Exp’d this week from
207,234 and pressure to sell;
180
2,708
851
there were large sales of unsound
New York
21
Baltimore
3J
20
131
superfine aud extra State and Western at $5@$5 40, for
Boston
different ports. During the same
manufactured tobacco reached 207,234
to

period the exports of

for

export. The medium

....

...

•

«

...

Philadelphia

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

....

....

.

•

....

-

....

New Orleans.
Portland
San Francisco

•

"

....

....

....

....

• •

.

....

....

....

....

6

export.

from the break in the
The quotations from abroad, except the closing last
66
207,284 canal.
277
2,728
1,732
Total
519
154
250
81,789
537
1,553
Total last week
156
120
8
217,411 night and the opening this morning, have been constantly
4,594
7,824 1,112
Total previous week...
The market for tobacco the past week has been inactive; declining, in the face of very small receipts at Liverpool,
prices unsettled and nominal. In Kentucky leaf, the sales of Gold and exchange have declined, and this discouraged the
the week are limited to about 400 hhds., in small lots, to
speculation with which the first receipts from the canal
shippers, and for local consumption. Prices are high, in the were received.
A decline in ocean freights has been
face of the late decline in gold, freights are high, aiid there
the only
circumstance operating in favor of sellers,
fore shippers cannot operate to any extent at la e prices ; while,
and there is consequently a decline of 2@3c per bushel
with unfavorable crop accounts, holders are not disposed to
give way in prices. Parties being thus wide apart in their This concession is most decided in the inferior and unsound
views, there is a mutual cessation of offerings and inquiry, the Reds, both Spring and Winter; the better qualities have
stock is only 18,818 hhds. against 20,573 last November.
been better supported, partly by their comparative soarcity,
Seed leaf also remains dull ; it is held very firm, but there is
some speculation, and a demand for shipment by sail. White
very little demand. It is remarked, by Messrs. Gans & Son,
that, “ as to the new crop, we are confident that at least we Wheats are scarce, with an inquiry for export; a cargo of
will have 80,000 cases, as stated in our report of last month. White Canada was taken by a shipper at $1 43, in bond.
We learn that already considerable purchases have been made The business of the week for export has been mainly at
of New York State, at 20c(a)25c ; Massachusetts, at from 25c
$1 40@1 44 for Amber Winter, and $1 28@l 32 for fair
to 35c; of Housatonic tobacco at from 25c@30c for running
No. 2 Spring, closing at the lower figures.
crops ; and Hartford County wrappers at 50c. This is, in
Corn has been subject to wide fluctuations; as low as
our
opinion, 25@30 per cent too high for the starting price.”
The sales in this market embrace about 320 cases, including $1 01 for prime Mixed, and as high as $1 08.
The receipts
a line of old Connecticut, at 25c, and new Connecticut wrap¬
this week have been of much better average quality than for
pers 45c to 65c, with a straight lot of Ohio on private terms. some months, and this has narrowed the range of prices.
Spanish tobacco is dull, sales 150 bales Yaraon, private terms,
and 200 bales Havana, at 3Gc, gold, in bond, and 95c@110c, The liberal receipts have been met by a brisk demand from
currency, duty paid. The stock the past month has increased the local and coastwise trade ; but yesterday, on the assump¬
to 13,621 bales against 9,211 bales last month, and 10,522 tion that our supplies of Western Corn for the coming winter
last November. Manufactured tobacco has become quiet.
are to be much curtailed, while those from the South of the
The following are the exports of tobacco from New Yoik
new crop will be quite deficient, an
active speculation took
for the past week:
place. Corn was bought largely by parties who design
EXPORTS OF TOBACCO FROM NEW YORK.*
....

97

—

c

•

•

....

...

—

■—

—

•

•

•

....

...

....

....

....

....

•

■

—

•

•

•

•

■■

•

•

•

•

....

—

Wheat has

come

forward very freely

■

•

...

..

Hhds. Cases.
47
108

jvondon

Manfd
lbs.

22,452
8,800

....

Liverpool
Rr«m«n...

Hales

30

at $1

r

Hamburg

287
363

■Rnfcf ftrdrtm

Flume
Melbourne

...

British North Am. Colonies
British West Indies ...

5
20

4

...

Cuba

4

Argentine Republic
Chili
Total

851

....

’25

61

”‘6

*iflB

480

21,849

2,708

207,834

The direction of the foreign exports for the two week, from
the other ports, has been as follows:
From Baltimore—To Marsailles 722 hhds... .To Liverpool 28 do... .ToJHarbor
Grace, N. F. 21 pkgs.
From Boston—lo St. Thomas, 1 hhd
To Hayti 20 hf bales....To Gonaives
20hfdo....To 8t Johns 30 boxes
ToHalifhx and Charlottetown 6 hhd
To the Provinces 2 h hds, 9 boxes and 6 half do.... To other foreign
...

122 hf boxes.
From New Orleans—To Ruatan 6 pkgs.
From San Francisco—To Honolulu 93 cases...
*

The

exports in this table to European

ifests, verified and

.To Burrards Inlet 4 do.

ports are made up from man¬

corrected by an inspection of the cargo.

Friday, November 5,

Wheat and

jvbpb closing flat,




1869, P. M.

depressed for Flour,
Barley, and firmer for Corn an4 Oafs, but the
past week has been

advanced 2@3c per bushel, but
supplies yesterday, a portion of tbe improvement
was lost; prime Western canal loads closed at 64c.
Rye remains dull and almost nominal.
«
Barley has been in better supply, and prices have declined
10@15c per bushel; our outside quotation is for prime Can¬
with freer

ada West.

to

Barley Malt is also lower, but so unsettled as
quote.
Canada Peas are still nominal.
The following are closing quotations :

Flour—

Superfine...^.. .$ bbl. $5 20® 5 50
Extra State
5 75® 6 00
Extra

Western,

com¬

mon

BREADSTUPTS.
The market the

03.

Oats, from actual scarcity,

128,548
25,105

14

180

sending to store, and the price advanced four cents per
bushel, but were lower to-day, prime cargoes of Mixed closing

Double Extra Western
and St. Louis
Southern supers

Southern,

extra

and

Wheat, Spring, per bush.
Red. Winter
Amber do
White

6 60® 5 86 White California

6 20® 8 CO

5 80® 6 40

$1 08® 1 88
1 25® 1 85
1 39® 1 41
1 43® 1 65
...

Corn,Western Mix’d,new
Yellow new
White new

Rye

6 65® 9 50 Oats
California
6 50® 8 25 Barley
Malt
Rye Flour, fine and super *
fine
4 75® 6 00 Peas, Canada,
Corn Heal
5 00® 5 75
family

to be difficult

®....

'97® 1
1 06® 1
J 03® 1
1 05® 1

£2®

•
-

04

10
06

12

66

1 10® 1 35
® ••••
®

♦»*?

602

THE

The movement in breadstuff's

at this market has been

as

CH$0*ilULE.

follows:

[November 6, 1869.

In store at Milwaukee
682,000
Afloat on N. Y. canals fcr tide water
8,865,762
Afloat on lakes for Buffalo and Oswego 641,075
Rail shipments from Chicago,#Mil¬
waukee and Toledo for week
399,445
..

RECEIPTS AT

NEW TORE.

1869.

Since
Jan. 1.

For the
week.
100.835

Flour. bVfl..
Com meal, bbIS

2,900

120,035
3,260
821,120
283,180
25,885

209,405

127,845

880,170

Foreign exports

from new

bbls

bush.

bbls.
25
35

10,160
549,699
N. A. Col. week..
9,817
Since Jan. 1
170,076

bush.

•

•

•

•

•

••••

•

•

•

•

....

Oats,

•

•

•

■

400

•

•

•

•

39,384

•

67

2,076

27,665

135,218
4,048

■

•

*

bush

17,0001 ,337,802

....

....

Com

bush,

•

•

67
78
90

47,186 1 ,639,091
60,715 >,612,956

Since Jan* 1 from

150,949
120,111
268,677

Boston

Philadelphia,
Baltimore

28,347
29,089
23,525

“

“

“

50

712,943
656,999

•

*

•

61,868
7,202

•

30,8S3
77,283
522,221

221,612

144,631

222,921

42,091

8,437,872

....

,

27,602

2,280,600 1,459,260

23...7,616,660 8,876,551 2,055,405 1,099,221
Oct. 16...6,926,(69 4,121,749 1,878,748
663,101

“

“

Oct.

8...6,812,051 4,840,246 1,921.118

Oct. 2...5.659,455

394,375
1,989,450
8,916,750

bush.

214,434
15,247,537

693

Total exp’t, week 81,535
Since Jan. 1,1869. 11(6,162
Same time, 1868.. 820,622

Oct.

“

17,763,825

Earley.

25,979
1,062
225
62,336
1,785
258,011
116,3801 5,887,149 139,876
169,324 4,555,731 152,993

4.099
Weitlnd. week..
Since Jan. 1
284,312

Total in a'ore and in transit Oct. 80.. .7,787,842
“
“

4,723,888

1,658,584

515,979 '

GROCERIES.

for the week and since jan. 1.

tore

Gt* Brit. week..
Since Jan. 1

2,24»,005
227,129
9,546,765

345;545

Flour, C. meal, Wheat, Rye,
To

Since
Jan. 1.

week:

1,118,805
6,790,165

1,129,885
646,975

,

For the

'

2,609,385
178,545
18,218,235
9,182,955
265,150

2,340

Wheat, buah
Com, bush
Bye, bush....
Barley, Ac., bush
Oats, buah

“r~1868.

*

958*5i4 1,102*228

1,461,687

Friday Evening, November 5, 1869.

The

of trade

during the week has been marked by
declining prices in the principal grocery markets, a good part
of which may be attributed to the steady fall in
the price of
gold which has settled from 12S£, at which it closed one week
ago, to 127£, at which it closes to-night.
course

The amount of business

done, notwithstanding the lower
prices, has not been large. The occurrence of the State elec¬
tion occasioned

scarcely a ripple of interruption upon the cur¬
The following tables, prepared for the Chronicle by Mr. E. H.
business, and the inactivity must be certain to find
its source in a general
Walker, of the New York Produce Exchange, show the grain in sight
langour of the trade. The advance in
and the movement of breadstuff^ to the latest mail dates :
westward freight alluded to in our last report has been made,
GRAIN IN NEW YORK AND BROOKLYN WAREHOUSES.
but is inconsiderable, the new arrangement being
upon the
1869.
1868.
1867.
Oct. 30.
Oct. 23.
Oct. 31.
>ov. 2.
basis of $1.40 perewt. for first class
freight io Chicago, instead
986,475
655,047
Wheat, bush
1,416,3*28
647,577
Com, bush
821,429
261,082
2,873.017 ' 1,666,651 of $1.25, which was the
existing tariff.
Oats, bush
232,318
130,949
2,066,974
1,819,294
Barley, bush
13,745
6,082
Raw sugars have declined steadily, losing f since our last
238,144
332,384
31,700
81,700
Rye, bush
85,100
62,834
Peas, bush
7,457
8,957
64,618
7,114 report, and closing without strength.
The decrease in firm¬
Malt, bush
69,445
71,146
14,327
62,602
ness is
owing partly to the lower rates of gold, and partly t°
Total grain, bush
Refined sugars have also declined*
-..1,632,569
1,167,963
Gt758,508
4,598,356 the liberal offers of holders.
California wheat 160,003 bushels.
selling quite readily, however, and prices are f lower.
RECEIPTS AT LAKE PORTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING OCT. 30.
Molasses has been in good demand, and there has been an
Flour* Wheat.
Corn.
Oats.
Barley. Rye.
bbls.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
improvement in the amount of business done; but in this line
At
(196 lbs.) (60 lbs.) (56 lbs.) (32 lbs.) (48 lbs ) (56 lbs.) of
groceries also, prices have fallen off very decidedly, and close
Chicago
51,636 555,412
820,996 403,592
73,148
35,221
•

•

•

•

10

3.847

rent

of.

>

—

m

Milwaukee
Toledo
Detroit
Cleveland

29,250

30,581

32,272
10,000

Totals

745,745
129,095
92,585
80,000

12,575
35,737
1,112
18,500

17,123
17,800
11,457
19,160

6,258
24,984

4,975

4,780

10,736
8,000

2,800
47,776

153,739 1,552,837

469,132 122,126

145,228 1,576,951

Previous week

38S.918
336,503
440,447
483,522
401,062

409,731 100,190
825,213 137,607
582,725
73,592
367,699

345,902

153,898

79,652
40,276
77,*69

113,840

71,026

21,132

Correspond’g week, 68. 136,974 1,591,585
“

5

’67. 135,908 1,428,570

“

*66. 166,985

“

’65

.

1,141,936
648,513

325,810

Comparative Receipts at the

inclusive, for four

same

40,887

ports, from January 1 to Oct. 30

years :
1S69.

1868.

Flour

bbls.

4,148,441

8,480,022

3,068,650

3,283,708

Wheat
Com
Oats.

bush.

37,682,521
28,481,811
11,749,590
1,298,209

27,449,954
28,798,105
17,493,950

24,800,188
28,444,107
12,827,425

2,851,930
1,524,019

2,652,680
1,559,591

70,283,991

74,894,058

Barley
Bye

...

1,232,386

Total

77,617,958

80,444,517

And from

1867.

August 1st to October 31, for four
1869.
bbls.

Flour

years :

3868.

1867.

1,751,406

1,306,796

Wheat

1866.

11,718,785

19,067,980
9,649,027

5,687,320
895,775
677,363

11,122,712
1,938, 00
1,303,256

9,970,668
9,214,025
2,134,348
996,068

Total grain, bushels.... 38,044,101

43,081,075

41,878,733

Corn

Oat*

Barley

Rye

Eastward

1866.

1,648,435

19,588,724

1,463,405
12,562,681
12,864,363
3,055,023

1,117,365
30,486,82

Movement from Chicago, Milwaukee, Toledo and Cleveshipments

land for week ending October £0, including, in 1869, rail
from Chicago, Milwaukee and Toledo for the latter year :
Wheat,

Flour,

Corn,

bush.

bbls.

“

1,117,034
69,976 630,815

1866
1865

54 973

Comparative Shipments from

Barley,

Rye,

262,903
324,695
613,518

27,822
26,107

646,480

39,833
89,258
9,148

19,641
39,220
10,190
19,625
140,241

busb.

529,569
599,716
2 JO,855
488,284

Week ending Oct. 30.... 123,883 1,374,971
Previous week
124.192 1,290,316
Cor. week, 1868
77,755 1,353,060
“
1867
104.313 1,3r,474
“

Oats,

bush.

660,632

260,027
614,173 ‘ 128,222

bush.

20.540

ports, including rail, (excepting
Cleveland) from the opening of navigation to October 30, for four years,
same

viz.:

1869.

Flour, bbls
Wheat, bush
Com, bush ...;
Oats, bush

.

.

Barley, bush
Bye, bush

...

.

1867.

2,037,855

..

1868.

1,818,622

1,442,999

7,062,673
183,868
341,821

18,845,465
24,409,182
12,194 656
113,681
832,258

Total grain, bush...
grain

55,895,237
“

IN

SIGHT

”

OCT.

bush.

986,475

...,

la store at Chicago




.

8,283,631
l,2ul,869
990,869

46,527,815

885,962

958,188

The totals

are

as

follows:

Total at all ports
At N. York.
r-From Jan 1 to date-,
this Week.
1869.
i
1868.
lbs
40,967,464
82,250,161

Tea

Tea (indirect import)....

Dkgs
bags
bags.

Coffee, Rio
Coffee, other
Sugar......
Sugar
Sugar

34,140
285,086
554,241
529,887
658,058
341,732

900

2,130

bags

Molasses

hhds.

,

Molasses, New Orleans

-bbls

11,078

989,988^

123

....boxes.
^.hhds.

23,896
942,937
337,807
429,419
647,621
899,308
398,878

17,643

12,427

1,625

TEA.

The week has elicited ouly a very moderate trade in teas.
For In¬
voices the demand has been unimportant and sales are of small amount.
In Lines there has been a fair business and we notice more
inquiry for

Oolongs in which the poor qualities have fully shared, and which
has taken up quite freely most of the offerings in this branch of the
trade. The operations have been, it is thought, on speculative account
mostly, they include to-day nearly 8,000 half chests of OoloDgs, sold
from second hands.
The reported sales are 5,481 half-chests of Greens
8,260 do of Oolongs, and 600 do of Japans.
There have been no receipts during the week.
COFFEE.

For Rio Coffee the demand has been fair and with

light offering s
prices have been steady. The semi-monthly telegram from Rio d®
Janeiro, under date of October 8th, was received on Monday. Ths
shipment to and sales of Coffee for the United States between steamer
fall considerably below those reported- in the next preceding telegram
and our market has been strengthened by the advices. - In West India
Coffee the movement has been unimportant, but the market remains

firm. Stocks, both in these and in Brazil Coffee, are very light.
AmoDg the sales of the week a noticeable one has been that of some
1,629,869 500 bags of Plantation Ceylon Coffee at 25c, gold.
Among the sales
are 13,497 bags of Rio : 1,200 do of
Lagnayra, and 500 do of Plan¬
16,206.300 tation
Ceylon.
32,012,487
The imports for the week have been moderate, including three cargoes
8,737,189
8S0 600
of Rio, as follows: “P. C. Warwick,” 4,559 bags ; “ Harriet Thomas,”
1,225,690 8,668 bags ; “ Foreningen,” 4,200
bags. Of other sorts only 123 bags

69,062,216

very

of Jamaica have come to hand.
The stock of Rio Nov. 4, and
New

Corn,

Oats.

bueh.

Barley,

bush.

bush.

821,429
502,245

202,818
827,248

18,745
114,798

555,808

800,082

704,478

heads.

1866.

80, 1869.

Wheat.
In tjiore at Ne vr fork
In store at Buffalo

15.930,081
20,120,905

sus¬

Imports of the week have been comparatively small, and
importance. There have been no receipts of tea;
12,427 hags of Rio coffee, and 123 bags of Jamaica.
Receipts of Sugar and Molasses are also small.
The imports at New York for the week, and at the several
ports since January 1, are given below under their respective

bush.

65,875

about as last quoted.
closes firm with prices

of little

23,683,370
3J,104,051
11,383,319
1,778,755
1,939,563

without firmness.
Teas have been quiet and prices
Coffee is steady, and the market
tained at our previous quotations.

In

Bags.

Stock..

Phila-

York.

delphia.

68,860

Sams date1868. 139,436

Imports....... 629,627
«
1111808. 641,480

imports since Jan. 1,
Baltimore.

18,000
,

are as

follows

New Savan. & Gal¬
Orleans. Mobile.
veston.

3,000
8,200

81,000
259,827

8,000
2,000
77,068

19,786

820,951

67,671

1,000
-.

4,500

19,666

16,081

:

Total.

i*,6oo

2,600

85,860
180,936
989,988

8,800

949.987

November 6, 1869.]

_

and the imports at the

Of other sort9 the stock at New York, Nov. 4
several ports since Jan. 1 were as follows:
Stock. Import,

lags.

Java

Ceylon

•

Maracaibo

•

•

•

•

•

1,713

I*fc?ayra

1.178

5,162
Total
*

8,789
80,285

7,693
1,163

221,337
263,174

•

*17,375

64,005
16,856

*

d

import, import. import.

♦45,762
*4,884
17,109
62,229
20,543

t736

,

Singapore

N. Orle’s

Balt.

New York—. Boston Philadel
In

603

THE

40.440

943
•

•

u

....

1,109

13,366

•

•

•

•

sx

•

.

•

•

•

•

•

18,762

■*->

■a

W

O

1,254

1,008

1,246

21,125
22,628

47,529

1,009
1,379

1,246

285,086
837,807

207

t Also 47,391 mats.

Includes mats. &c., reduced to bags.

SUGAR.

Prices have continued to decline and have

dropped £(S-Jc in

raw

sugars since our last. The loss has not been quite so marked in sugars
of grocery grades, but they have been weak at at least *c lower rates.
Refiners have been discouraged by the depreciating rates realised by
their products, and have reduced their purchases very considerably,
while Western buyers have held off in anticipation of the receipts of
Louisiana sugar, and the trade here have found themselves sufficiently
well stocked for their wants. One element of weakness has been the

made in

disposition of holders to “ unload/’ and the liberal offerings

The sales include 8,439 hhdsof Cuba, 200 do Demerara,
821 do Porto Rico, 4,767 boxes of Havana and 18,854 bags of Manila.
Imports for thj week at bew York, aud stock on hand November 4,

consequence.

follows

were as

Cuba, P. Rico, Other, Brazil, M’nila,&c
♦hhds.
bgs.
*hhds.
bgs.

Cuba,

*hhds.

bxs.

Imports this week

.

1,029

900

..

*

....

149,476

75,076
43,882
27,061

101,181
29,551
49,287

Stock on hand
Same time 1868
**
“
1867

501

....

Boxes
1869.
1868.

Y’g Hyson, Com. to fair...
do
Super, to fine..
do

Brazil, Manila

bags. bags.

72® 78
82 @1 11

Oolong, Common to fair... 65 <2> 70
do
Superior to fine... 75 $ 90
do
Ex fine to finest. .1 10 ©1 40
Sono & Cong., Com. tofalr .. ® 85
do
Snp’rtoflne. .. ©1 €0
do
Ex ttoflnestl 10 ©l 40

Exfinetofinest.1 25 @1 50

Ganp. & Imp., Com.to fair 85 ®l 00
do
Sup.»to fine .1 00 ®1 25

do do Ex. r. to finest..... @1 70
73
H. Sk. & Tw’kay ,C, to fair. 68
82
do
do Sup. to fine 75
Gofliee.
Duty : When imported direct in American or equalized vessels
place of its growth or production; also, the growth of countries this

•

standard, 8;
above No. 15 Dutch standard, not re fined,
cents
lb

19

Molaises.

Cuba Muscovado,

refining... 48 ® 55

Portland..
Boston....
Pbiladel..
Baltimore.
N. Orleans

“

“

“

“

“

“

“

11,046
69,239

9,833
G6,263
68,545
63,609
9,615

18,886
60,868
53,819
27,397
62,809

8,858
82,616
32,575
42,762
78,867

1869.

71,934 49,650
61,562

10,955

....

72,398

Including tierces and barrels reduced to hhds.

*

do

activity in this line of Groceries but at consider¬
ably lower prices, the rates at which the bulk of the week’s transactions
have taken place having been from 8(3)5c lower than those recently
current.
The sales have been mostly from the finer grades suitable
for grocers’ use,
the maiu stock of inferior Molasses remaining almost
undisturbed. In the scarcity of fine grades the arrival of the new crop
There has been more

The sales comprise 539
Rico, end 70 bbls of New Orleans.
The receipts of the week at New York, and the stock on hand Novem¬
ber 4, were as follows :
of Domestic is awaited with some eagerness.

hhds of Cuba, 561 do of Porto

Stock

on

hand
“

same

Other.
♦Hhds.

V

J

f

1,087

1,989
2,383

7,936
time 1868... 9.938

N. O.
Bbls.

80

751

794

Imports this week

*H hds

Boston

u

bbls,
1869.

1868.

164,896
56,117
54,228
77,460
23,478
18,199

13,719

46,821
91,207

Philadelphia..

it

**

rt

44

«(

44

(t

tl

It
'

44

893,878

17,637

Baltimore
New Orleans..

...

22,610

341,732

Total at all ports..
♦

.

762

2,722
434
....

Including tierces and barrels reduced to hhds.
SPICES.

The market has been firm for all
to jobbers.
We make no change

kinds and active in the way of sales

in our quotations.

FRUITS.

In the market for foreign dried fruits there has been very little spec¬
ulative demand and prices, so far as they have changed, have been in
the direction of lower figures. Raisins are firm. Turkish Prunes very

Spfefc at for dried apples. Of these, few State andthe principal inquiry
been our quoted prices. In domestic dried scarcely any West¬
as

ern

have yet

made their appearance.

40
45

46
60

peppei

and

|

Southern have been active and

have advanced; for sliced £c better prices can be obtained, and we
learn of some sales of choice fruit made in small lots at prices consid¬

30

®

15
15

1 10 ®

Penang. 1 10 ®

Pimento, Jamaica.(gold)
do in bond...(sold)

Cloves............(gold)

10}® 10*
25}® 26
25 ®

...»

19 ®

4
26*

S}®
26®

Fruit.

Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plums and Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds,
Almonds,6; other unts,2; Dates, 2; Pea Nuts, 1; Shelled do, 1}, Filbert*and
Walnuts, 3 cents $ lb; Sardines, 60; Preserved Ginger, 50; Green Fruits,
$ oent ad val.
9 qr. box
17}® 18
Raisins,Seedless.. $ mat. 7 75®8 00 Sardines
$ lb
Figs,Smyrna
.. © 16
do Layer, new. $ box 4 4C® ..
do New
per lb
18 ® 22
do Valencia.old $ lb
15 ® ..
Brazil Nuts.
•• ® 15
do 2 new
do
18 © ..
15 © 16
Currants, new
$ lb
14 ® .. Filberts,Sicily
© 10*
Citron, Leghorn
® 36 Walnuts^ Bordeaux
© 18
Prunes, Turkish
12 ® 14 Macaroni, Italian

® 12

Dates

28 ®

Almonds,Languedoc
do
do
do

Dried Fruit—

..

©23

Piovence

Sioily, Soft Shell
Shelled, Spanish

Sardines

1869.

ll

._

Duty ;

$ni.box

..©16

39 ® 40
..

©82

THE DRV

N. O.

Total imports since Jan. 1 at New York....
44
Portland
«

»...

—

1,974

.

(t

cases

have been as follows :

Imports at the several ports since January 1

U

(gold)

Nutmegs, casks

P. Rico. Demerara.
♦Hhds. ■ ♦Hhds.

*»**.

Duty : mace, 40 cents; nutmegs, 50; cassia and cloves, 20;
pimento, 15 ; and ginger root, 5 oents 98 lb.
Pepper, in bond...(gold)
Cassia Bata via. gold,
44 ® 45
Cassia, i n mats- gold lb
45 ® 46 Pepper, Singapore
do Sumatra
Ginger,race and Af(gold)
12 ® 12}
Mace

MOIiA9SES.

Cuba.
♦Hhds.

j do Clayed
1 Barbadoes....

Spices.

554,211 429,419 529,837 547,621 208,991 444,067

Total

• • •

Duty : On raw or brown sugar, not above No. 12 Dutch
on
white or clayed, above No. 12 and not
per
8%; above 15 and not over 20, 4; on refined, 5; and on Melado 2)4
do 19 to 20 14}® 15
do
do
10}
Cuba,inf.to oom refining.. 10}
do
do
white .... 14|® 15}
do fair to good
do ... 11 © Hi
Porto Rico, refining grades. 11}® Ut
do pr me
11|®
do
grocery grades..,12 ® 18}
do fair to good grocery.. 11*® 11*
Brazil, bags
11 ®
do pr. tooholoe
..
12 ® 12}
do
10}® 11*
do centrifugal hhds &bxs 10]® 13} Manila, bags..
15}® 15}
do Melado
6 ® 8} Hards
la}®
do molasses
9}£ 11} White sugars, A
do
do
B
®
flav’a, Box,D.S. Nos. 7 to 9. 10|® 11}
do
do
extra....
14}® 14}
do
do
do 10 to 12 11]@ 12}
Yellow sugars
18*®
de 18 to 15 12}@ 18
do
do
do
do
do 16 to 18 13}® 14}

12,600 159,486

“

14

side the

..

Imp’ssince Jan 1, atNew York 359,063 205,640 311,472 321,433 185,786 281,581
“
‘r
“
“

from the

Cape of Good Hope when imported indirectly in American or equalized ves¬
sels, 5 cents per Id.; all other, 10 per cent ad valorum in addition.
Native Ceylon
171® 19
gold 17
do.Prime,uutypaid ...gold lit® 12
gold 16*®
o
good
gold 10}® 111 Maraoalbo
do fair
Laguay ragold 16}® 18
gold 9*® 10
© 10*
St. Domingo, in bond-.gold
do ordinary
—.gold 8}® 9
..gold 15 ® 16
Java, mats an J bags ....gold 23 ® 23} Jamaica
Sugar.

$ gallon.
$ gall.80 ® 93
60 ® 70

18b9.

1868.

do Ex f. to fln’st nominal,

Uncol. Japan, Com.to fair.. 80 ® 85
do
Sup'rtoflne. 88 ® 95
do
Ex f. to finestl 06 ®1 90

Ex fine to finest.. .1 05 ®1 80

do

Duty : 8 cents
NewOrleans
Porto Rico

1869.

do

78 ® 85
90 ®1 00

14*

follows:

as

*Hhds

,

,

been

Duty paid-

-Duty paid—*

Hyson, Common to fair...
do
Superior to fine....

15*

39,478
17,903

Imports at the several ports since Jan. 1 have

Duty: 25 cents per Jt>.

El«

#

«...

with considerable rapi lity. Few selected fruits have been sellfng at
$4 25(34 50 per bbl. by the carload ; at the close there is a shade less
animation in the market. Other domestic fruits hive been unchanged.
We annex ruling quotations in first hands :

Apples, Southern..$ lb

do
do
Blackberries

.

sliced

7

9}C

14

Peaches, pared new
Peaches, unpared

20
8}<

GOODS TRADE.
Friday, P. M.%

November 5, 1869.

during the week has been inactive with a
downward tendency in prices of some goods. Cotton has
been rather weak under the large receipts of the incoming
crop, and with an unimportent demand for goods there has
been nothing to support pi ices, except, in some particular
instances, the smallness of stocks.
In consequence, however, of th« low prices already touched,
there has not been a further general decline in Sheetings, and
Prints have even shown more firmness for new styles. There
is a tolerably healthy condition of affairs on the market, taken
altogether, and if we could look for any decided activity soon
the prospects would be very fair; as it is, there seems to be
reason to expect only a moderate demand during this part of
the season, but probably better than at the same time iu
previous years, on account of the small stocks held in the
The market

interior.
As to the sentiment of manufacturers about stocking up
with Cotton for their mills, we belive that the more

general
erably beyond our trade quotations. We note also that a movement of
importance has been inaugurated in this kind of dried fruit, both here feeling is, that at 24£ cents cotton will be a good purchase,
and in the Philadelphia and Baltimore markets upon the strength of
the injuries inflicted upon the harvest in the West by the late severe and should it decline to that price for present or future deliv¬
froetei The transactions altogether embrace some 1,400 bbls. Peaches ery, large purchases would be made on manufacturers*
are very quiet, but without any quotable decline.
Blackberries are account.
firm at 18I@14c.
The exports of dry goods for the past week, and since Jan¬
In green fruits foreign varieties, except for Messina Lemons, have
uary 1, 1869, and the total for the same time in 1868 and
been in rather light supply.
The late and anticipated arrivals of the 1860 are shown
in the following table:
letter have reduced the prices somewhat and they are now jobbing at
FROM BOSTON.
-FROM NSW TORE.
$7 50(§8 CO per box. Barracoa and Havana Oranges still command
Domestics.
Dry Goods,
Domestics.
Bananas were received during
50@2 00 per bunch. Cofor Barracoa, and $60 per
Oarthagena. Green Apples have been changing bands

|12 00 per bbl. A cargo of Barracoa
the week in very poor order and sold at $1
coanuta are unchanged at $85 per thousand

thoumd for
f,




*

*

*

7 *

•

•

’

*

Exports to
Cuba

Danish West Indies
British West Indies.

pkgs.
2

85
85

Val.

$191
2,581

4,497

packages.
....

Val.

$•••**

P*K».

THE

604
Brazil

23

Clsplatine Republic.

28

40

Peru

Liverpool........

..

8.106
8,884

....

....

1,500
89
26

....

16,893
10,991
19
20
60
12
19

Gon&ives

Hay ti
St. Domingo

British ProvinceB

Total this week..
163
Since Jan. 1, 1869. ..18,255
Same time 1868
21.990
“

We

78,872

I860

annex a

manufacture,

our

$15,189

65

$27,884

130

1,970,665

4.475

894,665

6,085

4,294

1,363,070

7,415
31,900

1,292,867
....

....

...

particulars of leading articles of domestic

few

prices quoted being those of the leading

jobbers:
Brown Sheetings

Shirtings

still

dull, except in some few
of the finer grades, which have been in fair request at firm rates.
Other brands admit of a concession in agents’ bands, and in some in¬
stances jobbers have offered them at rates fully one cent below prices
in first hands.
The demand is limited, however, and there is little
and

are

probability we think of any resumption of activity in operations before
the opening of next season, unless the low rates should tempt specula
tors to take hold.
Agawam F 86 12$, Amoskeag A 86 16$, do Z 36
11*, Atlantic A 36 15*, do H 36 16, do P 86 12$, do L 36 14, Appleton
A 86 16, Augusta 36 14$, do 30 18, Broadway 26 12$, Bedford R
3010, Boott H 21 11, do O 34 12, do S 40 14, do W 46 19, Com¬
monwealth O 27 8, Grafton A 27 9, GraDiteville A A 36 16$, do EE 86
14*, Great Falls M 86 13,doS 38 11$, Indian Head 36 16*. do 80 13, In¬
dian Orchard A 40 18, do C86 13$, do BBS6 12$, do W 3412, doNN 86
14*, Laconia O 89 14*,do B 87 14, do E 36 12$,Lawrence A 36 12$, do C
86 16, do F86 18,do G 84 12$, do H 27 11 $, do LL 86 12$, Lyman 0 36 14,
do E86 16$, Massachusetts BB 86 18$, do J 30 12,Medlord 86 14, Nashua
fine38 !4,do36 !6$,doE 40 18, Newmarket A 13, Pacificextra86 16$,
doH86 16, do L 86 14, Pepperell 7-4—, do 8-4 35, do 9-4 40, do
10-4 46, do 11-4
Pepperell E fine 89 16$, do R 36 14, do 0 38
13*, do N 30 12$, do G 80 18, Pocaeset F 30 10, do K 86 13$, do Canoe
40 16, Saranac fine O 33 14, do R 36 16$, do E 39 17$, Sigourney 36
10*, Stark A 86 16, Swift River 86 12, Tiger 27 9, Tremont M 88 11.
Bleached Sheetings and Shirtings are in fair request for the lead¬
ing makes, while medium and lower grades can be moved only upon
concessions, and not then to a large extent. The present condition of
rates and the weak state of the market for the raw material, combined
with the uncertainty in financial matters, has rendered buyers very
timid, and they invest ooly upon actual wants. Several brands of lea iing makes are extremely scarce, and for these agents will not accept
orders for future delivery except at full value, or, in other words, from
1 to 1* cents advance on present nominal rates.
Stocks of all grades
are
by no means excessive. Amoakeag 46 19, do 42 17$, do 64 24,
American A 36 14, Androscoggin L 36 16$, Auburn 86 —, Attawaugan XX 86 l.’s*. do X 36 10, Atlantic Cambric 36 24. Ballou &
Bon 86 14, do 31 11$, Bartletts 36 15$,do 38 14, do3113*. BatesXX
86 17*, do B 88 14, Blackstone 36 16, do D 37 13$, Boott B 36 15,doC
83 13*, do E 36 12$, do H 28 11$, do O 30 12$, do R 28 10, do
W 46 19$, Clarks 36 20, Dwight 40 21,
Ellerton 10-4 60, Forestdale 36 16, Fruit of the Loom 36 17, Globe 27 8$, Gold Medal 36 16,
Greens M’fg Co 86 12, do 31 10$, Great Falls Q 36 16$, do J 33 —, do S
81 12, do A 82 14, Hill’s 8emp. Idem 36 16, do 83
14$, Hope 36 16,
James 86 14$, do 38 13$,do 31 —, Lawrence B 86 16, Lonsdale 36 16$
Masonville36 17,Newmarket C 86 —, New York Mills 36 22$, Pepper¬
ell 6-4 30, do 8-4 40, do 9 4 45, do 10*4 50, Rosebuds 86 16$, Red
Bank 86 12, do 38 11, Slater J. <t W. 36 —, Tuscarora 86 18, Utica 6-4
*2$, do 6-4 37$, do 9-4 62$, do 10 4 67$, Waltham X 83 —, do 42 18,
do 6-4 82$, do 8-4 40, do 9-4 46, do 10-4 60, Wamsutta 46 28, do 40$
26, do 86 20, Washington S3 9$.
Brown Drills have been dull.
Amoskeag 17$, Graniteville D 16,
Hamilton 17, Laconia 17, Pepperell 17, Stark A 17, do H 16$.
Prints are improving gradually ; new goods in desirable
styles are
taken about as fast as opened at the reduced prices, and stocks of ihese
are quite small in both first and second bands, while old
stock in passe
and undesirable styles is really a drug on the market. The number of
poor designs produced this year is large, and buyers, in view of the
other circumstances depressing the market during the past season, were
not sufficiently tempted with the
array of the patterns submitted ;
hence the accumulation of stock. The prospects for the
ensuing season
in the way of designs, however, promise well, and we have no doubt
but the business will compensate in a great measure for the past sea¬
son’s.
Allens 12, American 12$, Amoakeag —, Arnolds 10$, Conestoga
12*,Dunnell’s 12*, Freeman 10$,Gloucester 12, Hamilton 18$, Home 8$,
Lancaster 12, London mourning 11$, Mallory 12, Manchester 12$, Mernmac D 12$, do pink and purple 16, do W 14, Oriental 12, Pacific
12$,
Richmond’s 12, Simpson Mourning 11$, Sprague’s
purple and pink 13$,
do blue 18$, do shiitings 18$, Wamsutta 9$.
Print Cloths are slightly improved, but the change is not sufficiently
marked to render holders any satisfaction.
Printers engage small
amounts for causual and ordered work, tut refain from
entering into
any large transactions ; speculators may push the market a little after
a while, as the time grows nearer for
printers to lay in for spring work;
64 cloth of standard quality has been sold at
7* cents, and other trans¬
actions at 7* centB ; prices are merely nominal, however.
Muslin Delaines are in good demand ; large
quantities in the aggre¬
gate are moviDg on orders, while the city and near-by trade absorb
quite respectable amounts. Rates are quite firmly maintained, and the
exhibit wl ich this line presents is extremely
satisfactory to all parties.
Hamilton 20, Tycoon Reps 27$, Lowell 20, Pacific Armures 20, do Robe
de C 22$, do Alpacas 22$ do ao 6-4 26, Peicales 4-4
81, Pekin Lustres
IP.

Ginghams

in fair,

steady request, but the market on the whole
is not very brisk ; the advanced state of the season accounts in this
however.
Rates are unchanged, and, upon the whole,
quite firm.
Stocks *re rather email, aad sold pretty well op. Allaraance
plaid 18,




are

Glasgow 16, Hampden 16, Lancaster

.

Havre
St. Pierre

“

Caledonia 14, Earlston 22 $-2 5,
17. Pequa 13*.

....

...

[November 6, 1869.

CHRONICLE.

Cotton Flannels are quite active compared with the majority of
cotton goods, end stocks in jobbers bands are much reduced, which fact
has strengthened the views of agents considerably.
Brown—Amoakeag
A A 32, do A 24, Ellerton N 27, do O 24, do P 21*, Great Falla F 28,
Laconia 18$.
Bleached—Amoskeag A 27, do B 26, Ellerton W H 42,
do N 80, Great Falls F 26, Naumkeag F 19.
Other Cotton Goods have been inactive. -Ticks have been reduced
in price, and others will probably follow Boon.
Checks.—Caledonia 70 27$, do 60 26, do J2 26$, do 11 22$, Kennebeck 26, Lanark No. 2 12$-18, Medford 13, Park No. 60 J9,do 70 21,
do 80 24, do 90 27$, do 100 30, Pequa No. 1,200 18$, do 2,000 25,' o
2.800 27$, Star Mills 12 18, do 20 22, Union No. 20 26, do 50c 27$,
Watls No. 80 16.

Tickings.—Albany 11, American 14$, Amopkeag A C A 84, do A

27, do B 22, do O 20. do D 18, Blackstone Rivet 17, Conestoga extra
82 26, do 36 80, Cordis AAA 29, do BB 17$, Hamilton 26, do D—,
Lewiston 36 34, do 82 80, do 30 26$, Mece. and W’km’e 29, Pearl River
31, Pemberton A A 26, do E 18$, Swift River 16, Thorndike 17.
Whittenden A 22$, Willow Brook No. 1 28, York 30 26, do 32 82$.

Stripes.—Albany 11, Algodon 16$, American 14-16, Amoskeag
Haymakei 14$ 16, Sheridan A 14$, do
16$, Uncasville A 17, do B 16, Whittenton AA 20, do A 20, do

21-22, Boston 12$, Hamilton 22,
G
BB 17, do C 16, York 26.

Denims.—-Amoskeag 28, Blue Hill 13, Beavei Cr. blue 26$, do CC

18$, Columbian heavy 26, Haymaker Bro 16, Manchester 20, Otis AXA
24, do BB 22, do CC 19, Pearl River 27, Thorndike 19, York 81.
Corset

Jeans.—Amcskeag 14, Androscoggin 13, Bates 12$, Everett*

15, Indian Orch. Imp 13, Laconia 16, Naumkeag 16$,
12$, Washington satteen 17*.

Newmarket

Cambrics.—Amoskeag 9, Portland 7*, Ptquot 10, Victory H 8*. do
A 9, Washington 9.
Cotton Bags.—American $87 60, Androscoggin $40 00, Arkwright
A $40 00, Great Falls A $42, Lewiston $41, Ludlow AA 1$--, Stark A

$42 60, do C 3 bush $27 50, Union A $i7 60.
Cotton Yarns and Batts.—Best Georgia Cotton Yarns Nos. 6 to 12
39, Best South Carolina small skeins 39.
The demand has fallen off
Woolen Goods are dull and inactive.

suddenly, and transactions are limited both in numbers and amount.
Cloths are quiet, few goods moviDg beyond those for keeping up stocks
in jobbers’ hands. Overcoatings are also quiet—clothiers are taking
few or none, and about the only trade doing is, as we have stated pre¬
viously, of cloths for sorting up.
Cassimeres are inactive. 'Ihe finer grades of plaids and fashionable
designs are in slight inquiry, but, on the whole, the market is quite dull.
Flannels and Blankets are moving moderately, although far behind
anticipations for the time of the year. Present indications point towards
a closing of the season’s business
in this line.
Kentucky Jeans are quiet, with rates rather weak.
Shawls are still in active demand for desirable ptyles, while lesser
grades show a slight falling off in inquiry. • The business in this line
this season thus far has been excellent, an! manufacturers may well
congratulate themselves on their success. Stocks in jobbers’ hands are
much reduced, and m agents’ hands also, while the leading mil's are
running night and day to fill orders already placed. The business has
been a remunerative one, and the proof of it is shown in the number of
really beautiful designs produced.
The auction sales have developed no features differing from what has
been reported during the past two weeks.
Owners of goods are offer¬
ing all that the market will bear, while buyers are a ting very cauti¬
ously, though they are ready to take almost any quintity of goods at
their own prices. This determination is followed up from day to day
with a persistency which is not unfrequently successful. Latterly the
auction sal69 have shown more interesting features.
The election
being over, buyers have time to attend to business. Besides this, the
steady decline in gold enables owners to offer goods at lower prices, and
the auction rooms are Letter supplied than for some days previously.
The attendance was good and the bidding mote animated, although at
a much lower grade of prices.
IMPORTATIONS OF DRY GOODS AT Tfl£ PORT OF NEW YORK.
The importations of dry goods at tbis port for the week ending Nov.
4,1869, and the corresponding weeks of 1867 and 1868, have been lb
follows:

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION FOR THE WEEK ENDING NOVEMBER

-1867.Value.
Pkgs.
Manufactures of wool..
547
$199,578
do
cotton.
463
127,507
do
silk....
427
802,491
do
flax....
116,216
Miscellaneou s dry gooas. 286
103,552 '

-1868.-

Pkgs.
541
667
323
715
229

.

.

Total

2,323

WITHDRAWN

$849,339

2,875

FROM WAREHOUSE AND THROWN

4,1869.

-1869.-

Value

$188,444

Pkgs.

Value.

158,846
838,175
177,521
91,300

675
403
483
705
400

$283,731

$849,235

2,616

$875,455

INTO

THE MARKET

115,109
801,689
140 859

86,167
DUR1PG

THE SAME PERIOD.

Manufactures of wool..
do
do
do

326

785

$120,714
23,024
65,940
62,094
80,887

consu,pt,L2,823

$302,669
849,839

cotton.

silk....
flax....

.

72

.

57
824

.

.

Miscellaneous dry goods
Total
Add ent’d for

Total th’wn upon maket3,8S7 $1,151,998

323

71

636

$115,347
16,883
31,558

$224,844
78.836
106 408

108,139

49,128

252
79
400

421

36,996

465

85,992

1.017
2,875

$248,866
849,285

1,838
2,616

$544,814
875,456

20
182
_

8,892 $1,098,141

4,448 $1,419,609

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING DURING THE SAME PERIOD.

Manufactures of wool...

..

do
do
do
Miscellaneous

cotton.,
silk
..

649
162

flax
S. 612
dry goods. 512

Total,.

1,838

Add ent diorcou»u*pt,n.2,828
0.2,828

Total entered At the

$106,8H0

146,955
35,626

281
154
88
276
984

$582,628
849,839

1,733
2,375

$220,784
48,215
81,098

port4456 $1,881,967

$102,110
60,810

86,444
84,974

206
222
01

1,098

17,874

81

140,014
10,416

$288,096
849,286

1,718
2,610

$263,701
875,455

42,441

4,1C8 $1,187,881

-

60,851

4,834 $1,889,166

OFFICE OP THE

Pacific Mutual Insurance

JENKINS, VAILL & John S. &

BROADWAY.

New York, January 13th. 1869.
The following

pany is

charter :

of Section 12 of its

Outstanding Premiums January 1,1868
$119,049 43
Premiums received from Jan. l, toi’ec.Sl,
1868 inclusive
524,448 47

THIS COMPANY HAS ISSUED NO POLICIES, EX¬
CEPT ON CARGO AND FREIGHT FOR THE
VOYAGE.
No liiftkgliave been taken upon
or upon Hulls of Vessels.

Premiums marked off as

Earned, during the

Seriodas above
Losses and
lor

&c., during the

Expenses, less .-avings,
same period

Time

$8 i 3,2 4 31
234,512 95

76,WO 0)

Company, estimated at

AMERICAN SILKS.
Brothers.

MERES.

Handkerchief*,

end alter Tuesday the2d day of Febi uary next.
The whole of tlie

on

ut»t:iiidi’)g Cor.iii at<* of the Com*
pioy of the isnicot l 864)
will be redeemed and paid in cash, to the holders
tuereof, or their legal representatives, on and after
Tuesday, the 2d day of February next, from which
date interest thereon will cease
The Certificates to
be produced at tlie time of payment and cancelled.
A Dividend in Script of FORTY Per Cent is declare I
O’lthe net amount of Earned Prenii-uns for tlie year
eti'Tng December 31st, 13>8, for which Certificates will
be i‘- uc l on and after Tuesday, the sixth day of April
<

SON,
New York.

102 Franklin Street,

Manufacturers

4 Otis Street,

Boston.

LEONARD BAKER Sc GO.,
210 Chestnut Street,

CHASE, STEtVART Sc

CO.,

10 and 12 German

Street, Baltimore.

Ephraim L. Corning
A. 8. Barnes,

Egbert Starr,

A. Wesson,
John A. Hadden
William Leconey,
j
John A. Bartow,
JOHN K. MYERS, President.
WILLIAM LECONEY, Vice-President.

THOMAS HALE, Secretary.

lOl

o

rOLHEMUS Sc CO.,

Duck,

Have removed

Nos. 13 Sc 15

LISPENARD STREET.

89 Leonard

Sc

SHOE THREADS,

BLATTERS, AND

MACHINE THREAD5*,

GILL NETT TWINES, FISH LINES,
TWINES, FLAX, ETC.

99 Chambers Street, Corner

NEW

JERSEY

Thos. H. Bate &

WOOL

York

Church Street, New

WORKS. PATERSON,

Co.,

fVe are

GENTS9 FURNISH*

MANUFACTURERS OF

NEEDLES,

prepared to make cash advances
on the spot or in transit.

Fishing Tackle.
STREET, NEAR BROADWAY.

Miscellaneous.

No

No

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
THE LOUISl4NA STATE

160

Cor

Bankers and Brokers.
EXTRA

QUALITIES OF

American
& Foreign
Bar Iron,
Including all the usual sizes
In lots to suit




Borneo

and
Domestic Bagging,
ROPE Sc IRON
FOR SALE

T. B.

J

TIES,

BY

Carter & Co.,
144 Water Street.

Ports

AND

CARRYING THE UNITED

2

HENDERSON BROTHERS,
Bowllug Green, New York.

BALE

& China,

Touching at Mexican

aMBflMinMB

No. T

purchasers,

KGLESTON BROTHERS Sc GO.,
Successors to EglestOL, Battell & Co.,
166 SOUTH STREET, NEW YORK.

of No.

Scotch Pig Iron,
IN YARD, ON DOCK, AND TO ARRIVE.
In lots to suit purchasers. Apply to

and shapes of

ULSTER IRON,

STEAMSHIP COMPANY’S

rOA$k''

SCOTCH PIG IRON,

Gunny,

Companies.

To California
AC.,

Slip, New York,

approved Brands

Place.

THROUGH LINE

MANUFACTURERS OF

the

of Exchange

PACIFIC Mail

SALERATUS,

All

Wool,

BROADWAY NEW YORK,

58

Steamship

John Dwight & Co.,
Nc. II Old

upon

Broker,

Wool

Fish Hooka and

Shirts,

BROKERS,

CHRISTY DAVIS,

SUPER GARB. SODA,

Fine

Shipman,

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

NO. SO

MANUFACTURERS OF

DRILLED-EYED

E. J. Shipman

Abu. Mills

Mills &

Barbour Brothers,

Co.,

GOODS,

AGENTS

Sale oi

ANDVWOOLENI,

COTTONS

NEW YORK.

&

Street, New York.

For the

NO. T WARREN

Beebe

J. F. Mitchell,

MANUFACTURERS

from 59 Broad Street, to

Specia

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
87

Miscellaneous.

Cotton

C. B. &

&

H. D. Polhkmus,

Tunner.

J. Spencer

SEWI' G

THEODORE

COTTON CANVAS, FELTING DUCK. CAR COVER¬
ING, BAGGING, RAVENS DUCK, SAIL TWINES
AC. “ONTARIO'
SEAMLkSS BAGS,
“
AWNING STRIPES.’’

Also, Agents

LINEN THREADS.
CARPET THREADS.

Removal.

lONSAlLDUCK

COT

United States Bunting Company.
A full supply all Widths and Colors always in stock
13 A 15 Llspenard Street.
Theodor* Polhxmus.
E. A. Bbinckrrhofp,

lRWr£B«i:

Alex. M. Earle,
Oliver K. Y lng.
Wm. T. Blodgett
C. H. Ludington,
J. L. Smallwood,
Thomas Eakin,
If. C. Southwlck,
Wm. Hegeman,
James R. Taylor,!
Adam T. Bruce,
Albert B. Strange,
A. Augustus Low,
Dean F. Fenner,
Emil Hetneraan,
Jehtal Read,
John TS. Waller.

and Dealers in

And all kinds oi

Philadelphia

S)PI

Martin Bates,
Moses A. Hoppock
B.W. Bull,
Horace B. Claflln,
W. M. Richards,

TheodorePol hemus&Co.

CHENEY Sc MILL litEN,

order of tlie Board.

A. C, Richards,
G. D. H Gillespie
C. E. MUnor,

Columbus, Eagle,

AGENTS:

EDWARD If. ARNOLD Sc

next.

John K. Myers,a

Ticks*

AAA, BB. Duck AA.By Thorndike A.C
Swift River, Palmer, New England.
Stripe*.
Cordis Awning, Thorndike. B.C., Otis CC, Mount Ver

Cordis ACE,

Hingham, Farmers’ AA and Swiit River Brown Sheet¬
ings, 40-in. Rceity Mountain Duck, Bear, Raven's Duck

PURPOSES TO ORDER.

SPECIAL

Palmer, Bos

Pawnee, Farmers' and Mechanics
Hmwn Denims.
Columbian XXX, Otis BB, Warren AJ3.D JC.

ton, Northfleld,

non,

Belt Ribbons.
SILKS FOR

E, G
Beaver Cree

Otis AXA, BB, CC,D, O,

Warren FF Fine Sheetings.
BLEA. AND BROWN.
Brown and Bleached Goods.
Thorndike H. B. A C. Brown and Bleached Sheetings,

Silk Warp Poplins,
Silk Dress Goods,

$l,hb,324 3j

Interest,
on the outstanding Certificates of Profits will be paid
t > tae hold ts thereof, or t tieir le tul represent itives,

Mills' Snlloways

Ac.

Bine Denims.

Poniards and Florentines,

Pongee

Shaker Socks, Ac.,

Columbian Heavy,

Sewing Mlk,
lia^is and Organztnea,
ORGANZINE8 FOt. SILK MIXTURE J5ASSI-

INK

Pepper and Gilmanton

Union, Arlington, Oxford, Mt. Vernon,
AA, BB, CC, Thorndike, C. Haymaker,

Six Per Cent.

j.y

Hosiery.
Otis Co.,

Machine Twist,

21,457 f7

Total assets.

Bdknap A Grafton
Shirtings, Flannels, Rob Roys, Carssimere&.Repellairt*
Cottonades, Domestics, Boys* Checks, Snlloways,
Shaker Flannels.

Of Several Mia

251,184 90

'1 heCompaujr lias the following
C sh In bank and on hand..
$11,919 81
United Slates ami other stocks... 5;>2>18 59
Loans on tt >cks Urawirg interest isft.700 00
Premium notes and lulls receivable
Subscription noies in advance of premiums
Re-1 'surauce and other claims due the

Arlington Mills,
Fancy Dres9 Good4,3-4 and 6-4 Roubaix Cloth. Tmper
lal Chines, Alpacas, Reps Cobnrgs, &c.,«c.
And

MANUFACTURED BY

46,862 74

*

Otis Hosiery Mills,

Thorndike Company,

WOOLBNS,

COTTONS AND

$539,034 44 Cheney

Return Premiums

,

Soto Agents for Its sale of

$643,497 90

Total amount of Marine Premiums

r~.

Otis Company,
Belknap Mills,
Columbian Mfg Company, Grafton Mills,
!!
Warren Cotton Mills,
Sumner Falls Mills,I •
.
Boston Buck Company,
Gllmanton Hosiery Mills,
Cordis Mills,
Pepper Hosiery MlRs,

MERCHAHtl

AT GOODS COMMISSION

Co.,

92 * 94 Franklin Street, New York,
140 Devonshire Street. Boston.
AGENTS FOR THE

46 LEONARD STREET,

Statement of the affairs of the Com¬

publishediu conformity with the requirements

Eben Wright &

PEABODY,

COMPANY/
HOWARD BUILDING, 176

Dry Goods.

Dry Goods.

Railroads.
,

605

CHRONICLE.

THE

6,1869]

November

STATES MAILS.

Each Month.
of Canal street
wbeh those dates
preceding Saturday)
Panama Railway
Steamships from %nsma
MANZANILLO*
Also, connecting at Panama with steamers ro r
SOUTH PACIFIC AND CENTRAL AMERICAN
PORTS
One hundred pounds baggage allowed each adult.
Baggage-masters accompany baggage tbrougft, ana
attend to ladles and children without male Rf0tu¬
tors. Baggage received on the dock the day beiore
sailing, from steamboats, railroads, and passengers
who prefer to send them down early. An experienced
surgeon on board. Medicine and attendance free.
For passage tickets or inrtber information apply to
the Company’s ticket office, on the wharf, foot o
Canal street, North River, New York.

On the

5th and 21st of

Leave PIER 42 NORTH RIVER, foot
at 12 o’clock noon, as above (except
fall on Sunday, and then on the
for ASPIN WALL, connecting tia
with one of the Company’s
for SAN FRANCISCO, touching at

F. R. BABY, Agent.

THE

606

CHRONICLE.
Insurance.

Miscellaneous.
BANKING HOUSE OF

Luther

'

Fire Insurance

Kountze,

NO.

62

52 Wall Street. New York.

WALL

Deposits received from Banks and Individuals, sub

Hardy

No. 4 Wall

iEtna Insurance
Capital

& Son,

Mutual Insurance Co.,

Comp’yj

NEW

$3,000,000 00
$5,150,931 71

Springfield
FIRE & MARINE

Street, New York.

affairs

&

INSURANCE

CO.,

AD1ERIC AN
NO. 7 RUE

INSURANCE
OF

BANKERS,

Premiums

SCRIBE, PARIS,

John Munroe & Co.,
NO. 8 WALL STREET,

$200,000 00
$392,425 52

American

NEW YORK.
I

Issue Circular Letters of Credit for Travellers In all
parts of Europe, etc., etc. Exchange on Paris.

SUR1NCE

STREET,

FIRE
NEW

COMMISSION.
COLLECTIONS made in all parts of Europe.

OFFICE

DeFreitas

6c

Government Securities, Gold, Stocks and Bonds,
bought and sold exclusively on Commission ac the
New York Stock Exchange.

1 terest allowed on Deposits.
Reler to WM. H. COX, Es^
National Ban’*

Cashier

,

Mechanics

fI

]

offer for sale at 91 and 93 John street. New York
and 133 and 135 Federal Street, Boston.
They have also in stock their usual supply of every
description of bar and Sheet Steel.

Morris, Tasker 6c Co.,

Cask

STREET, NEW

$13,660,831 8t

’

245,911 93

Surplus, July 1st,
1868, $745,911 93.

Insures Property against Loss or Damage
by Fire at
he usual rates.
Policies issued and Losses paid at the office of the
Company, or at its various Agencies in the principal
cities in the Urilcd States.

V
f.

Six per cent Interest on tke outstand¬
ing certificates of profits will be paid
to the holders thereof or their legal representative*
on and after Tuesday
tke Second of
February next,'
The

outstanding certificates of tlie tssne cC

IS65 will be redeemed and paid to the hold¬

thereof, or their legal representatives, on anf
Tuesday tke Second of Februai*
next, from which date all interest thereon wf 1
cease.
The certificates to be produced at the tik a
ers

alter

JAMES W. OTTS. President.
R. W. BLEECKER, Vice Pres
II. Carter, Secretary,
Griswold, General Agent.

of

Queen Fire insurance Co
OF LIVERPOOL

AND

LONDON.

Authorized Capital
Subscribed Capital
Paid up Capital and Surplus

£2,000,000 Stg.
1,893,226
$1,432,810

Special Fund of $200 000
Deposited in the Insurance Department at Albany.
Onitkd States Branch, No. 117
Broadway, N. Y
GEORGE ADLARD, M

m

Willtam H. Ross, Secretary.

payment and canceled.

nager

A

Dividend of

declared

on

Forty

Per Cent Is

tke net earned premiums

of the Company, for tke year
ending 31 s!
December 18689 for which certificates will Of
issued on and after Tuesday, the Sixth ot Apit
next.

By order of the Board,
J. H.

•

CHAPMAN,
Secretary^

THE
TRUSTEES!

North British

J. D. Jones,
Charles Dennis,

_

Mercantile Insurance Co
OF

YORK.

LOCOMOTIVE

M. Baird &

WORKS.

LONDON

AND

EDINBURGH.

"

PAID UP CAPITAL AND ACCUMULATED FUN

$14,044,635

31

f

IN GOLD.

H

UNITED STATES BRANCH

Co.,

50 WILLIAM

PHILADELPHIA.

and

thorough

Workmanship,

OFFICE,

STREET, NEW YC

j

A,

C^ALLArNE’} Associllte M-an< < -1*

CHAS. E. WHITE, Assistant Manager.

d.
BAIBD.

GEO. BUBNH\M.

OHAS

Hartford

T. PARBY

FIRE

INSURANCE COMB AN V
HARTFORD, CONN.
Capital and Surplus $2,000 000.
Geo. M. Coit, Sec’y.
Geo. L. Ch.lSE, Pr v‘<
OF

XTENSION

TABLES

(EXCLUSIVELY),
Of Every Style

and

Quality,

PHOENIX
at
D.

EERDT, Manufacturer,

150

WOOSTER STREET,

between privok

aij-d

NEW

•

ucreTox

sr?a

Joseph Gaillard. Jr

W. S. H. Moore,

James Low,
B. J. Howland,

Losses

promptly adjusted by the Agents here, andpald
in

W!HTE

current money.

ALLYN Ac CO.,
Agents,
NO, 50 WILLIAM STREEV.

BeDj. Babcock,
Robert B. Minturn,
Gordon W. Burnham
Frederick Chaunce*
R. L.

Sheppard Gandy,
Francis Skiddy,

Bryce,

Charles P. Bordett.

Daniel S. Miller.
Wm. Sturgis,

Robert

tes
m

O.'Fergnaacq

Samuel G. Ward,
William E. Bnata,
Samuel L.

Henry K. Bogert.

JoMN D.

Stephenson,

William H. Webb,
Paul Spofford,

William E. D.dge,
David Lane.
James

Taylor,

Geo S.

Caleb Barstow, *
A. P. Pillot,

FIRE

INSURANCE C
HARTFORD, CONN.
Capital and Surplus $1,400 000.
W. C. Skilton,
H. Kellogg, Pres
Sec’y,

C. A. Hand,

Hefcry Coit,
Wm. C. Pickersgil',
Lewis Curtis,
Charles H. Russell,.
Lowell Holbrook,
R. Warren Weston,
Royal Phelps,

OF

OiC'tly Reduced Prices.




Real estate and bonds and mortgages
210,000 08
Interest, and sundry notes and claims
due the Company, estimated at...., 296,680 03
Premium notes and bills receivable
.j,.^ 2,953,267 61
Cash in bank ..tU.%7.,\.V.....-.r.
405,548 86

Total amount of assets

Capital and

AND

OFFICE AND WAREHOUSES:

WM, IS

"J

Works, Philadelphia.

Mains, Artesian Well Pipes and Tools,
Gas and Steam Fitters’ Tools, &c.

BALDWIN

as¬

-

"

THIRD

$500,000 00

Surplus

anufacturers of Wrought Iron Tubes, Lap Welded
Boiler Flues, Gas Works Castings and Street

15 GOLD

’

SONS,

Importers of Norway & Suedes Iron. Including
UB, A£B, SF, and other brands, which they

Pascal Iron

following

sets, viz.:

AVENUE.

Norway and Swedes Iron
WM. JE SOP A

\

$1,883,230 61

BROADWAY,

Cask Capital

Brokers, 17 Broad St.

$3,081,080 49

stock, city bank and other stocks... $7,tfc?»488 *4
Loans secured by stocks and other¬
wise... r...\2,214,100oo

INSURANCE.

BRANCH OFFICE 9 COOPER INSTITUTE

$6,807,97$ 8t

United States and State of New York

INCORPORATED 1823.

Rathborne,
Bankers and

$324,345 60

114

period....,

The Company has the

$209,000 00

American Fire
Insurance Co.,

on

White,

ary, 1868, to 31st December, 1568...
Losses paid duriDg the

expenses

North

HAMBURG,
FRANKFORT-DN-THEBERLIN,
MAIN, VIENNA, etc.
STOCKS, BONDS and GOLD BOUGHT AND SOLD

$9,346,972 11

connected with marine risks.
Premiums marked off from 1st Janu¬

Reports of premiums and

YORK.

Sight and Time Bills on LONDON, LIVERPOOL,
EDINBURGH and
DUBLIN, PARIS, BREMEN,

2,668,002 3(

policies have been issued upon
risks; nor upon fire risks dis¬

same

JA8. A. ALEXANDER, Agent.

RANKERS.
NASSAU

No

OF PROVIDENCE, R. I.

Stoker, Taylor & Co.,

1868

Total amount of marine premiums

.

COMPANY,

Cask Capital
Assets

Policies not marked off

life

PROVIDENCE, R. I.

Capital
Assetn...,

$6,782,969 82
on

1st January,

company,

Casli

on

1868. .7.

$500,009 00
$901,657 11

| Providence Washington

Co.,

the 81st

December, 1868:
Marine Bisks,
irom 1st January, 1868, to 8lst Dec*
on

Premiums received

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.
Cash Capital
Assets

YORK, JANUARY 26, 1869.

The Trustees, in conformity to the Charter of tbs
O' mpany, submit the following statement of He

Banking. Exchange, and Brokerage Business.

Munroe

21

Atlantic

HARTFORD, CONN.
Cask

Execute orders at the New York Stock, Government
and Gold Exchanges, In person, and transact a Gen

eral

OFFICE OF THE

Agency,

STREET.

Assets

C.

Insurance

NEW YORK.

ect to check at sight, and Interest allowed thereon at
FOUR PER CENT per annum.
Collections made throughout the United States, the
British Provinces and Europe.
Governments Securities bought and sold.

H.

[November 8,1880

G. De Fojreet.

JONES, President,
y.

j*-

CHARLES

■.-

<

Jr

✓

■■

He-*-

s

DENNIS, Vlce-PreddexA,

W. II. If. in

OORE, 2!« VIce-PresH.

I, P. HEWLETT, 33 Vie'

x

November

....

Sarsaparilla,H.,g’d,in b’d
Sarsaparilla, Mex.
“

ft ib

17
15

26

40
88

®
©
©
®
®
©
©
®
©
©
@

55
44
40
45
86
43
86
86
28
42
40

©

??*
18

16X©

...

15

16
14

©

11K©

Farm dairies, common
Skimmed

~

©

12

....@
....©
25 @
20 ©

48
58
27
22

10

CANDLES—
Refined sperm, city

$ n>

Stearic
14 ounce.
Adamantine.... 14 ounce.
CEMENTRosendale
$ ft
COAL—
s
Newcastle gas, 2,240ft ....

2

00©

....©

....

....© .*..
....©
9 50© 10 50

Liverpool gas cannel
Liverpool nouse cannel...
Anthracite,V ton of2,000 ft

....

COCOACaracas (bond) (gold) $ ft 14X@
27 x@
do
Maracaibo do
mil do
do
10X©
Guayaqn
St.Domli
lngo do
do .... ....©
COFFEE.—See special report
COPPERSheathing, new
ft ft ....@
©
Bolts
Braziers’
83 ©

15 X
28

....

Yellow metal nails.
American ingot

11X

82
83
85
21
27
27
27

20 ©

Sheathing, &c., old
Sheathing, yel. metal,new
Bolts, yellow metal

..,.@
©
©

CORKS—

Ravens, light
V pee.15 00
Ravens, heavy
17 00
Scotch, G’ck, No. 1, V yd —
“
—
Cotton, No. 1

ft ft

Annato, good to prime .
Antimony, reg. or...gold
Argols, crude
Argols, refined
gold
Arsenic, powdered. “
Assafoetida
r
Balsam capivi
Balsam tolu
Balsam Peru

'

Bark

50 @
....©
....@
@
26 ©

2X@
46

@
....©
©
@
3 50 ©

petayo

Berries, Persian
gold
27
Bicarb.soda,N’castle4* 3 75
Bi chromate

potash
Bleaching powder

3

35

Borax, refined

©

•

•

•

12X
12X
•

•

•

2%
47X
60

©

Camphor, refined

73 ©

Carb. ammonia, in bulk.

19
25
83
22
30

@

Cardamoms, Malabar... 8

©

Cutch

Epsom salts
Exrtact logwood
Fennell seed

Flowers,benzoin..$ oz.
Gambler
gold

Gum Arabic, picked.
Gum Arabic, sorts
Gum benzoin
Gum kowrie

gold

Gumgedda
Gum aamar
Gum myrrh, East
Gum
Gum

India..

myrrh, Turkey....

>

4X@

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

.

•

IK®
©

30

©
& @
....©
....©
10
10 ©
30 ©

sx@

Bahia
Rio Hache
Curacoa
Port au Platt
Texas
Western

....

6X
4
14
....

60
•

70
33

@
@

—@
40 @
55 @
55 @

39
15
46

Maranham
Pernambuco
Bahia
Matamoras

1

Buenos AyreB..ftft
Rio Grande

Senegal
@
Gumtragacanth.sorts..
65 @ 70
Gum
tragacanth,
w.
flakey
gold 1 12X@ 1 S7X
Hyd. potash, Fr. and
Eng........
gold 8 50 @3 70
Iodine,resublimed
@350

Ipecacuanha, Brazil
Jalap, in bond—..gold

Lac aye...
Licorice paste,
Licorice paste,

Calabria.

Sicily...

Licorice paste, Sp., solid
Licorice paste, Greek...

Madder, Dutch..... .gold
Madder. Fr, EXF.F. ■<“
Manna, large flake
Manna, smau naau.....
Mustard seed, Cal....
Mustard seed, Trieste...
Nui
, Aleppo..
11 ams
currency

8 11 cassia
Oil

bergamot




@ 2 75
60 @ 75
80 @ 45

39
24
20
81

@
©
@
@
11 @
@
2 00©
95 ©
....

vx@

S*
29

12X
1«X

California
Para
New Orleans

30

10

Minas...
Sierra Leone

Calcut.

8

3 65

12)4

in oil.

11

24
20
40
82

4
18

ft ft

@

HORNS—
Ox, Rio Grande

ft C

Ox,Amerioan

......

•

-

@8 00
....@600

•

#

©

Plumbago

China clay
Chalk.;....;..

....

2 00® 8 50

gold
“

“
“
“

“
“
“

Malaga, dry
Malaga, sweet

Claret
f* cask “
Claret
ft doz. “
WOOL—
Amer., Saxony fleece.ft ft
Amer., full blood merino.
Amer., X and % merino ..
Amer., native & X merino

86@ 1 25

_

2 25© 3 50
1 00© 1 25

90© 1
70©
80© 1
1 00© 1
1 10© 1
85 00@60
.

California, medium, “
California, common,“

'

Valparaiso,

X

South
South
South
South

11
11

©

60
56
50
52
65
45
46
40
26
25

55
52
45
48
53

merino, “
mestiza, “
creole, “
Cord’a, wash.

22
24
21
32
27
18
27
88

27
24
85
83

21

Cape G. Hope, unwashed..
India, washed
80
Mexican, unwashed
17
Texas, fine
-80
Texas, medium
28
Texas, coarse
. ^ 20

51
40
45
20
86
52

East

13

ux

IX

Am.,
Am.,
Am.,
Am.,

**

ZINC—
Sheet

ft ft

00
85
60
25
25
OO

2 60© 9 00

40
Superfine, pulled
42
No. 1, pulled
87 @
California, fine, unwashed 23

Chalk, block
ft ton.23 00 @24 00
2X
Barytes, American..ft ft ,..
PETROLEUM...,@
Crude, 40®47 gray, ft gall.
20X©
20X
Crude, in bulk
Refined In bond, prime L.
S. to W. (110©115 test) ....©
35 *1
>.'4&@
:dl nlte
Standard! b:
‘

82

8 50
7 87}*
6 00
8 25

ft gall. 8 50® 7 00
1 25@ 9 00

Marseilles Madeira...
Marseilles port

40

@

@
31 }*©

Amer., combing domestic
Extra, pulled

©
6
ft ton.28 00 @29 00
ft ft

83

Sicily, Madeira
Red, Span. & Sicily...

90
Vermillion, Trieste ...88 ©
....©
Vermillion, Calcutta....
22 w
27*
©
Vermillion, Amer., com.
~~
Venet. red (N. C.) V cwt. 2 25 @ 2 75
Carmine, Tleman’s..ft lbl3 00 @16 00
*

88}*
83*

88 @

“

Lisbon

©

....

ft ft,gold

Burgundy port

72}*

Ti

11}*

Port

Zinc, white, American,
8 ©
8X
dry, No. 1.
Zinc, white, American,
12
9 ©
No. 1, in oil.
11X©
UK
Zinc, white, French, dry
16
13 ©
Zinc, wh.. French, in oil
2X
2 @
Ochre, yel., French, dry
8 ©
10
Ochre, “ground, moil
00 © 1 25
Spanish bro., dry. ft 100 ft
8 @
9
Span. bro.,gr’d in oil.ft ft
2 75 @ 8 00
Paris white. No. 1
15 ©
35
Chrome, yellow, dry —
Whiting, Amer.. ft 100 ft 2 00 @
90 @
95
Vermillion, China...ft ft

.... @
15}*
14
18X© ''
18 @

prime)

•

©
@
©

10X®
10X©
10X@

dry.

@

@

35

Lead, white, Amer.,pure

11X©

12*

11

.

.

Litharge, city
ft ft
Lead, red, city
Lead, white, Amer.,pure

1154®

10 @

.

.

Paraffine, 28 & 30gr. lubr.

S*

2SX©

.

@

Sherry

PAINTS—

1154®

Bavarian.,

© 8 12)*

•

13
13

Madeira

“

Bank
Straits

@

WINES—

...

13

©
©

@

8

©

10

“
char. I. C..ft box 8 87}*@
I. C. coke...
6 75 @
Terne charcoal
@
Terne coke
7 75 @
TOBACCO—See special report.

....

13X
1354

«X®

ft ft

©

Plates,
Plates,
Plates,
Plates,

20
<0
25
50
00

Olive, Mars’es, qts (cur¬
rency) ft case 5 00 @6 00
Olive, in casks—ft gall. 1 47j*@ •••
Palm....
ft ft
10X©
Linseed, city
ft gall.
94 © 96
Whale, crude Northern.. 1 00 ©....
Whale, bleached
1 12 ©
1 75 ®....
Sperm, crude
Sperm, winter bleached. 1 98 @2 00
Lard oil, prime
1 45 @1 55
© 90
Red oil, city dist., Elain
@
Red oil, saponified

16

11 m
14 @
12 @

pale

15
16
16
19
IS

10 ®

English

...

OILS—

17

20

4 50
6 00

“

17

2154

pale
extra

...

@2
@2
@4
@5
@9

8*

11}*@
12)*®
14 @
10}*®

....

TIN—
Banca
Straits

City thin, obi., in bbls.ft ton.45 00©
in bags
@49 00
West, thin, obl’g, in bags.. .46 00©47 00

19

@

2 15
2 28
2 90

18 @ 22
9 @

ft ft

American, prime, country
andcity..ftft 41

...

@
©

inb 1 88© 1 45
1 85© 1 45
1 18@ 1 19

TEAS—See special report.

3 50 @3 75
3 62X@3 75
@2 90
2 75 @.
46 © 47
2 12 @....

strained
No. 2
No. 1

OAKUM
OIL CAKE—

1?
18

12)*@
12X@

oity sit. ft ft gold

1869 (good to

“

1854

Cuba(duty p’d) goldftgall
do

21X

27
18

8 00© 5 50

“

TALLOW-

...

@

5 00@18 00
4 50© 4 75
3 50@ 8 75

SUGAR—See special report.

26 © 30
88 @ 40

(6d.)..ft ft

Turpentine, soft ..ft 280 ft
Tar, N. County
ft bbl.
Tar, Wilmington
Pitch, city
Spirits turpentine, ft gall.
Rosin, common...ft 280 ft
“

23
28

@
....@

Calcutta, dead green....
Calcutta, buffalo..i.ft ft
Manilla A Bat. buff., ft ft
HONEY—

Crop c 1868
rop of

5K

6 25

Zinc
NAVAL STORES-

'SO
24 ® 26

Gambia and Bissau
Zanzibar
East India Stock—

ft 100 ft4 75 @

5 50@18 00
50@10 00
50@10 00

5
5

American blister
American cast
Tool
American spring....
“
American machinery “
American German..
“

35©

Yellow metal

S’*

19
88

English, cast
English, spring
English blister
English machinery
English German

6 50@17 00

“

STEEL-

80 00
70 00

5 50@18 00

“
“

Rum, pure
Whiskey

45 00
27 00

.

,-ft gal!.-%

«
“

.

“

Copper

12
8

19

cash

Marett & Co
Leger Freres
Other foreign brands
Rum—Jam., 4th proof.
St. Croix, 3d proof...
Gin, different brands
Domestic liquors—Cash.
Brandy, gin & pure sp’ts

“

“

.

Brandy—
Otard, Dupuy & Co..gold.
Pinet, Castillon & Co “
Hennessy
“

45 00© 60 00

Oak and ash

“

@
@
@

@
@
©

Plates, for’n .ft 100 ft .gold 6 12}*@8 25
Plates, domestic
ft ft
9 @ 12
SPICES—See special report.

65

....@
....©

Maple and birch
80 00@
White pine box boards ... 23 00©
Wh. pine merch. box b’ds. 27 00©
Clear pine
60 00©
Laths
ft M.2 75 ©
Hemlock.. .3x4, per piece. ... .@
...4x6,
- ....@
“
...bds,
“
2*2©
Spruce
bds,
“
28©
plk IK in.
44
31@

“

8 25@10 00
9 25@10 50
@ 7 25
8 60© 9 00
7 00© 7 25

8 00© 9 50
Canton,re-rld,fairtoexao 7 25@ 9 00
medium to super’r. 8 00@11 25

125
33 00
50 00
55 00
Pop. &W.W’d, b’ds & pl’ks 45 00© 45 50
Cherry boards and plank. 70 00@ 80 00

Clinch
Horse shoe, fd

2 18

Tsatlee, No. 2, 4 & 5.. ft ft.
Tsattee,re-rld,No. 1,2, A 3
Tsatlee, usual
Taysaams, usual, No. 1 &2
Taysaam, No. 8 and4
Taysaams, re-rld, No 1,2,3

Black walnut
^M.
Bl’k walnut, logs ft sup. ft.
8©
Bl’k wain, figur'd & bust’d
22©
Yel. pine tim., Geo.,f»M.ft. 82 00@
White oak, logs, ft cub. ft. 45 00©
White oak, plank, ft M. ft. 50 00@

1454

~

....

SILK—d CalC’a> N’ Y’k’ “ 2

6©
ft. 80 00@ 90 00

2 in.

18

....

rough.V bus. 2 40 @ ....
Lins’dCalc’a.Boat’n, g’d
@2 17}4

Bird’s-eye maple, logs ft ft.

do

@

....

....

Llns’a Am.

LUMBER—

strips, 2x4

ft ft

«..

SPIRITS—

Rockland, common.ft bbl.
Rockland, heavy

“

20X©

City sl’ter trim. & cured
Upper Leather Stock—
B. A. & Rio gr. kipft ftgld

“

poor

LIME—

18

9
10
12

rough
good damaged...

“
“

Cut, 4d.@60d

16

cur.

light....

15X@
11)*@
4}*@

Timothy,reaped.fthush. 4 00 ® ....
ft bush. 4 25 @ 6 25
Canary
Hemp, foreign..
@2 10

NAILS—

12}*©

“
“
“

middle.

“

“

....

ft ft

Clover

46
42
42
45
45
45
31
31
31
28
31
31
28
80
80
40
28
23

30
26
29
29
35
25
20

44
....

gold

SEED—

18©
per M. ft. 18 00© 21 00
MOLASSES—See special report.

18
16
15

gold.

“

“

“

13}*©

HOPS—

6 S7X® 6 75

“

17

17

“
“
“
“
“
“

“

“

1854

15

Refined,pure

Crude..
Nitrate soda

“

17X®

©

“

44

18X

©

middle.

light...
California, heavy.
middle
light..
Orinoco, heavy

41

18

....©
18 ©

,

22X@

3 60 @

Maracaibo..
Savanilla
Wet Salted Hides—

33

.

17X©

.gold.

Payta

©

....©
©
©
...©

“

Chili

29X

“

“

21
21

cur.

Dry Salted Hides—

•

@ 1 15
75
@
35
....©
50 ©
85

20

“
“
“
“
“
“
“

Maracaibo
Truxillo

12
70

29 ©

22}*®

“

Porto Cabello

....

•

4X@

“

Tampico
Bogota

90
80
2

•

7X@

gold

Ayres.. ft ft gold
Montevideo
“
“
Rio Grande
Orinoco
“
California
“
“
San Juan
Matamoras
“
Vera Cruz
“

•

28
28

14X@
11X©

Sisal

.

“

“

gold.270 00©

Buenos

•

©
©
....©

.

250 00©

ft lb

h

rout

••

HEMPAraerican dressed, .ft ton.260 00@300 00
American undi’essed
—©

Russia, clean

middle

light..
slaughter
Heml’k,E A.,&c., heavy .
“

65 @

shipping

“

“

“

1 08

Italian
Manila

light
crop,heavy.

“

Snorting, in 1 ft canls’trs.ft ft 86© 30

Dry Hides—

•

32
80

72
62

47

SALT^ETRli-^orthl11gt,S 2 50

46

©
©
@
©
©
©
©
88
28 ©
30 ©
80 ©
26 }*©
80 ©

2 75

Liverpool,gr’nd.V sack
Liv’pMfine,Ashton’s,g’d

....

40
88
38
38
40
42

midd'
lie....

“X@ 18

ft 100 ft 8 00

Turks Islands., ft buah.
Cadiz

8 62}*@8 75
^-cash.ftft

Oak, slaughter, heavy

00

@18 €0
12 00 @17 50
15 00 @26 00
ft ft
17 @
19
14fc@
15

In bond

42)*@6 55
6 42>*@6 87

“

•tf

Rangoon, dressed. .gold 5 60

net.8 62><@8 75

Pipe and sheet

...

.@

itCM

24 60
26 00

r.

Carolina

6

“

Bar

“

Jute
HIDES—

23
79
65
20

® 3 50
@
25
©
81
@

English

“

gold 29 @
“ 28X@

...

“

LEATHER—

Blasting (B).... ft 25 ft keg. 4 00©
Shipping and mining
4 50©
Kentucky rifle
6 50©
Meal
6 00©
Deer
5 50©
Rio Grande, mix’d,ft ft
Buenos Ayres, mixed.

sfegL

gold.6 42>*@6 50

German

—

22©

Tampico

17^®
Cochineal, Hondur..gold
Cochineal, Mexican. “
Copperas, American ....
Cream tartar, pr .. .gold
Cubebs, East India

standard....yard

ft for

3K@
4^@

Cantharides

Chamomile flowers, ft ft
Chlorate potash ,.. .gold
Caustic soda
“

15X©

45

ft 100 ft

Spanish

North River, in bales ft 100

31
©
© 3 77}*
U'A
©
3)4
©

21 ©

@

^Hog,Western,unwash.cur. 8 ©

in

Brimstone,cru.fttongld45 00 © 40*66

Brimstone, Am. roll ftit>
Brimstone, flor sulphur.
crude
(in
Camphor,
gold
bond)

LEADGalena

—

GUNPOWDER-

85

•

ft ton. 150 00©
“ . 80 00©
gold 17 00©

....

....

“

Calcutta, light & h’vy, p. c.
GUNNY CLOTH-

2 35
2 35 © 2 40
19
17 ©
75
....©

8X@

44X

Fustic, Cuba. “
...
Fustic, Tampico
...
17 00©
Fustic, Jamaica
15 00® 16 00
Fustic, Savanilla
....© 16 00
Fustic, Maracaibo....
....@
Logwood, Laguna....
....©
Logwood, Campeachy
....©
Logwood, Honduras.
....©
Logwood, Tabasco...
Logwood, St. Domin.gold 20 00©
Logwood, Jamaica
20 00@
Limawood
cur. 65 00©
Barwood
gold 25 00©
Sapanwood,Manila ..cur. 40 CO©
Pjog
V quint. 6 50@ 7 37X
Dry cod
Pickled scale
ft bbl. 5 ( 0©
Pickled cod
ft bbl. 6 2i@ 650
Mackerel, No. 1, shore
26 00©
Mackerel, No. 1, Halifax
©
Mackerel, No. 1, Bay
25 00©
Mackerel, No. 8,
©
Mackerel, No. 2, Halifax
©
Mac’rel, No. 3, Mass., large
@15 50
Mackerel, shore, No. 2
15 5 ©
Mac’rel, No. 3, Mass., med. 9 50©
Salmon, pickled, No. 1
24 00@2.5 00
Salmon, pickled
ft tee. 32 00@35 00
$ box.
5^@
Herring, scaled
45©
Herring, No. 1
Herring, pickled
$ bbl. 5 00@ 7 00

Calcutta

Alum

@
@
©

Western, g’d to prime.ft ft 16

COTTON—See special report.

Aloes, Cape
Aloes, Socotrine..

DYE WOODSCamwood ....gold,

©

FRUITS—See special report.
GROCERIES—See special report.
GUNNY BAGS-

50 © 70
12 © 40

DRUGS AND DYESAlcohol, 95 per cent

50

FLAX—

55 @ 70
1 40 @1 70
35 © 50

$ gro.

@

Beer hams
Hams
Shoulders

120 00@180 00
120 00@145 00
120 00©
120 00©

100 00@155 00
125 00@180 00
ft ft
8X@ 9}*
Sheet, Russia
11 @ 12
Sheet, sing., doub. & treb.
5X@ 7
Ralls, Eng. (gold) .. ft ton. 57 00© ....
Rails, American
77 00©

—

22 A

22X@

38

Pork, prime meas
Pork, prime
Beef, plain meaa.
Beef, extra meaa

Rods, %@3-16 inch
Hoop
Nail, rod

DUCK-

CheeBe-

©

Scroll
Ovals and half round
Band
Horse shoe

11X

(80 p. c.). .gold 2 25 @ 2 44
“
— @
Sugar lean, W’e
26
Sulp. quinine, Am., ft oz — © 2 25
Sulphate morphine, “
3 75 © 9 00
Tartaric acid (chrj stal)
gold
ft ft.
51 ©
Tapioca
10X@ li
Verdigris, dry & ex. dry
44 @ 45
Vitriol, blue
@ 12X

Butter—

50
43
83
44
28
88
29
34

25 @
20 @

Shell lac
Soda ash

Creamery pails
State firkins, prime .......
State, firkins
State, half-firkins, choice.
State, half-firkins, ordin’y
Welsh tubs, prime
Welsh tubs, ordinary
Western, prime
Western, fair
Penn., dairy, prime
Penn., dairy, good

8

....

ft bbl.5

fork,newmesa
ork, old mesa..? bbl.90 00

Bar, Swedes, ordin.sizes..140 00© ....
Bar, Eng. & Amer., refined 95 00@100 00
Bar, Eng. & Amer.,com’n. 87 50© 90 00

©

35

Residuum

PROVISION 8—

....

1 70 @175
....© 80
11 @ 12

Senna, Alexandria
Senna, East India

BUTTER AND CHEESE-

1st regular, quarts,
do superfine
1st regular, pints
Mineral
Phial

©

20 @
11 @

Seneca root

40 00® 42 00

Philadelphia fronts

Sperm, patent

>

Naptha, refln., 68-78 gray. 10k®

STORE PRICES.

76 @ 77

—

607

....

Sago, pearled

..

Factory fair
Farm dairies, prime
Farm dairies, fair

90

150 @800

Salaeratus
Sal ammoniac, ref. gold.
Sal soda, New’le, ref.e’d

BREADSTUFFS—See special report.
BRICKS—
$ M 9 00®
Common hard
Crotons
18 00@ 20 00

Factory prime

21

Suicksilver
hubarb, China

41

©

@

85 ©
84 ©

Phosphorus
Prussiate potash,Amer.

@ 7 62X

40 @

@ 3 00

2 50

Oxalic acid

BEESWAX-

Araerlcanyellow ...V lb

Kj %J

40 00@ 41 00
Pig, American, No. 1
Pig, American, No. 2...... 87 00® 88 00
Bar, refined, Eng. & Amer. 85 00© ....
Pig, American Forge
86 00©
36 00© 38 00
Pig, Scotch, No. 1

5 75 @ 6 00

...

Opium,Turkey ....gold. 9 25 @ 9 50

ASHES—

BONES—
Rio Grande shin..$ ton

.‘si >,

>

IRON—

@ 4 00

8 75

Oil lemon
Oil peppermint, pure
Oil vitriol

The Duties on Foreign Imports were pubUshed in the Chronicle of August 14.

V 100 ft 7 25

iHii

THE CHRONICLE.

6,1869 ]

PEICES CURRENT.

Pot, 1st sort

i: *: t

-

©

@
@
@ 28

11 X@

12

FREIGHTS—
,—STEAM.

>

SAIL.

>

To Liverpool : s. d.
s. d.
s.d. s. d.
ft ft
X @9-16
©
Flour
ft bbl 3 ,0 ©—
© 2
H. goods ;ft ton 35 0 @40 0
..>,@27 6
90
Oil.....
@60 0
C’n.h &b.ft bu.
©
8
Wheat..h. & b. 0 8}*@-...
©
Beef
ft tee.
@7 0
© 5 6
...
Pork::...ft bbl. ....@5 0
© 4 0
To IIavbe :
* by sail.
$ ;. .j f C.
6
Cotton
....ft ft
K®
Tobacco
ft hhd. 8 00 '© 10 00
ft ft .... ©
Tallow
X
Cotton

i

...

...

...

...

....

...

-

.

M .=!

MeMuren

?o

Mel!

£. ft*'O

...

o

Measurement gf>
Heavy goods.ft ft

@ 0 35

X©

keg. 0 46 @ 0

Petroleum..ft c. of 10 gall. 0 45 © 0
R’road Iron. ft ton of2240 ft
Coal
m oo
.,...10 00

608

THE

CHRONICLE.

v

*i1"** *

.t

/

-.

*

v

-

•

[November 6# 1869

.

;

■

Iron and Railroad Materials.

Dry Goods.

N.B.FALCONER& CO

NAYLOR &

IMPORTERS OF

STAPLE

AND

NEW

FANCY

British DressGoods,
VELVETS,

VELVETEENS)
Umbrella Alpacas and
Gingham^ Ac.,
NO.

CHURCH

*17

Between Walker and

ST R RET,

'

YORK,

PI1ILA.,
208 So. 4th stree

Railroad Iron,
Old Rails,

TYRES,

Frogs, and all other Steel Material for
Railway Use.

Bessemer

HOUSE IN LONDON:

NAYLOR,

BENZON A
34 Old Broad Street,

Llspenard.

who give speoial attention to

CO.,

as well as Old

Correspondents In America:
Messrs. Jay Cooks & Co., New York, Messrs. Jay
Cooks & Co., Washington, Messrs E. W. Clabks
&

Co., Philadelphia, Mr. J. Edgab Thomson, Phila¬
delphia

Ralls, Scrap Iron and Metals.

Novelty

Iron

Rails, &c.

U. S. BONDS AND AMERICAN RAILWAY SECU¬
RITIES NEGOTIATED.

orders for

Railroad Iron,

Miscellaneous.

For Boston Daily.

Gilead A. Smith,

BOSTON,

CAST STEEL

~

Bartholomew Ho time, opposite Bank
of England.
LONDON, E. C.

CAST STEEL BAILS,
Cast Steel

...,

Iron and Railroad Materials.

CO.,

80 State street.

99 John street.

it

Works,

S. W.

Hopkins London.
& Co.,
street,

58 Old Broad

AND

Noe. 77 Sc 83 Liberty

METROPOLITAN STEAMSHIP CO.’S

Street,

69

Neptune Steamers,
SAILING TUESDA

x

S,THURSDAYS & SAT DRDAYS

Palm and Ornamental Iron Works of all kinds for

AND

W

Railroad Bonds,

fitcfifelir,

For Railroad
tion wlrti the
American

Railroad Iron

Asland, Wm, P. C iyde and P. S and ford
1,C00 Tons Each,
SAILING ON INTERMEDIATE DAYS.

From PIER 11

N.

R., at 5 P. M.

Connecting at Boston with Fitchburg, Boston and
Lowell, Boston and Maine and Eastern Railroad, and
la New York with the Erie Railway. Freights taken
and throagh rates given to and from all points on the
above Roads and their connections. No charge tor

Whariarge in Boston.
Genl.

Railroad Iron,
Street Rails and Light
Rails for Mines.

Companies and Contractors In connec
purchase and sale of both Foreign and

AND

Street, New York.

am

o

AND

Buildings.

Mma k

Broadway, New York,

TOWN, COUNTY, CITF, STATE,

COMPRISING

NEPTUNE, NBREUS and GLAUCUS,
2,000 Tons Each,

71

Negotiate In Europe and America every description

Corner Broadway, New York.

OUTSIDE LINE OF

A

EQUIPMENTS

Railroad

T

We

ways

Companies.

beg to call the attention of Managers of Rail¬
and Contractors threughont the United States

and Canada to our superior facilities for
executing
orders at manufacturers prices, for all descrintiona oi
both AMK til CAN and FOREIGN
™

OLD RAILS AND SCRAP PURCHAS¬
ED AND SOLD.

Railroad Iron.

AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

We are always in a position to furnish all
sites, patterns and weight of rail for both steam and horse

WM. P.

CLYDE,
Snpt. and Agent, Pier II N.R.

H. M. WHITNEY, Agent, Central Battery Wharfs,
Boston.

BURDON

SPIKES.

roads, and in any quantities desired either for IMME¬
DIATE OR REMOTE delivery, at anv port in the
United States or Canada and always at the very lowest
current market prices.
We are also prepared to sup¬
ply

Henry Lawrence & Sons,

Thomas

MANUFACTURERS OF CORDAGE

METALS.

FOR EXPORT AND DOMESTIC USE.
162 FRONT

STREET, NEW YORK

J. Pope & Bro.

292 PEARL

STREET, NEAR BEEKMAN STREET
NEW YORK

MEDITERRANEAN

SCHNITZER,

38 CENTRAL WHARF,

Rails,

of American and Foreign manufacture, rolled to any
desired pattern and weight for linlal yard and of
approved lengths. Contracts for both IKON AND
STEEL RAILS will be made payable in United States
currency for America, and in either currency or gold
(at the option of the buyer) for Foreign; when desir¬
ed, we will contract to auppiy roads with their
monthly or yearly requirements of STEEL OR IRON

RALLS, taking their

GOODS.

IRON.

T.

Bessemer Steel

IRON.

Wm. D.

BOSTON.

IRON

McGowan,

IRON BROKER.

OLD RAILS IN TRADE FOR NEW
furnished, receiving the difference in cash, and allow¬
ing the highest njarket price for their Old Ralls, and
if necessary, receiving the latter after the delivery of
the New Ralls.
Orders for Foreign Ralls, both Steel and Iron, will
be taken for tra^.mission by Mail or
through the cable
^

Offer for sale

Liquorice Stick* and Paste.
Wools of every
Gams
“

7 3

WATER

ST., PITTSBURGH, PA.

descriptions
“

Opium and Persian Berries.
Canary and Hemp Seed,
ft'ige, Raisins, Boxwood,
Otto Hoses, Ac

Iron Cotton Ties
OF

SUPERIOR
WITH OR WITHOUT

FOR

Francis

Spies,

SALE

8ooth

Street, New York)

(Formerly with Messrs Moses Taylor & Co.)
ADVANCES MADE ON APPROVED SHIPMENTS
Merchandise to my friends in South America. British
and Spanish West Indies, Great Britain, India and
Australia.

Insurance.

est

possible rates of freights.

S. W.
ۥ

CHEAP.

245 Pearl Street.

MERCHANT,

66

BUCKLES,

Cheapest and Best.BUTLER’S PAIEIT COTTON TIES,
FOR BALING COTTON.

AffetsGold, $ 17,690,390
AJfets in the
U. States
■

45




2,000,000

William St

Hopkins & Co.,
ROPE.

STEEL, CHARCOAL and B. B., of the very best
quality, suitable for §hips. Rgging, Suspension
Bridges. Guys, Derricks. Inclined Planes, Hoisting
purposes, &c. A Large Stock constantly on hand at
JOHN W. MASON Sc CO.’S,
43 BROADWAY.

Iron Cotton Ties,
COTTON

TIES.

MANUFACTURED by thk

QUIN Sc ARNOLD, A sente,

The Liverpool& Lon¬
don & Globe Ins. Co.

Address

71 Broadway. New York.

WIRE

This Tie is made of the best Belgian Iron, and re¬
ceived the highest premium at the Louisiana State
Fair, for strength and simplicity.
For sale very cheap.
43 BROAD STREET.

HOUSE,

68 OLD BROAD STREET,
for execution at a fixed price in Sterling or on com¬
mission at the current market price abroad when the
order is received in London; shipments to be mads
at stated periods to ports in America and at the low¬

D. LITTLEJOHN Sc CO.,

GENERAL SHIPPING AND COMMISSION

No,

QUALITY,

LOBBON

Patent Nut & Bolt
(LIMITED).

Iron Cotton Ties.
The undersigned, Sole Agents In New
■ale and distribution of the

York, for the

ARROWTIE AND SELF-FASTENING
WROUGHT ICtON BCcKlE TIES.
Manufactured

by J. J; McQOMB, Liverpool, reipect-

foliy solicit orders for dell vary In New York or other
ports in the United States, or at Liverpool.

SWENSON, PERKINS dc CO.,
BEA

STREET.

Co.,

Birmingham, on hand, and for sale in quantities
purchasers. Apply to
WILLIAMS Sc GUION,

to suit

71 Wall st.

For Baling

Cotton,

BEARD9*9 PATENT IRO* LOCK AND

SELF-ADJUSTING

TIES,

Unsurpassed for Strength and Rapidity of Adjus

ment.

BEARD A* BRO,,
457

BROADtWA


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102