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HUNT’ S MERCHANTS’ MAGAZINE,
&

W e e k ly

g U ir js p a p e * ,

R E P R E S E N T IN G T H E IN D U S T R IA L A N D C O M M E R C IA L IN T E R E S T S OF T H E U N IT E D S T A T E S .
CE n tered a c c o rd in g to A ct of O o u x iess, l a th e y e a r 1 3 9 5 , b y tb e Wil l ia m B. D ana Co m pajtt . In th e offlee of th e L ib r a r ia n of O o ngress.J

VOL 61.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1895.

NO. 1,587.
W etk ending November 18.

S h e (T h eom cte.
Terms of Subscription—Payable In Advance:
F o r O ne Y e a r ...................................... ......................................................$ 1 0 00
F o r S ix M o u th s.........................................................................................
6 00
E u ro p ean S u b scrip tio n (In clu d in g p o s ta g e )........................... 12 00
Earoj>ean S u b sc rip tio n S ix M onths (In clu d in g p o s ta g e ).
7 00
A n n u a l S u b sc rip tio n In London (In c lu d in g p o s t a g e )___£ 2 10s.
S ix Moe.
do.
do.
ao.
___ £1 10s.
T he tKVMTOBS’ S u r J ’LXHBKT will b e furnished aithout extra charge
to every annual subscriber of tbe C ouM sactA U and Financial
C h RONICLS.
The Statk and Cirr S tirc tr-w e x T will a lso be fu rn ish e d without
extra charge to e v e r y s u b s c r ib e r of th e C h ao xiclx .

Terms of Aovertlsliur—(Per Inch space).

Syracuse. .......
W
UmltJjtion----.■scranton................
B in g h a m t o n .. . .
T o ta l M id d le ..

P r o r ld e n c e ........ ..

On* t im e .................................. S3
5 0 |T h re e M onths (13 t im e * ) ..$ 2 5 00
One M onth
<4 tim e s ) .. 11 0 0 , s ix M on th s
(2 6 ” ) . . 43 00
T w o M on th s
(8 " ) . 13 0 0 1 T w e lv e .M onths (52 '* ) . . 58 00
(T he a b o v e te rm s for o n e m on th a n d u p w a rd a r e for s ta n d in g card s.)

F a ll H ir e r ..................

London Agents:
M essrs. E o w t s o s * S m it b . 1 D ra p ers' G a rd en s, E. 0 ., w ill t a k e su b­
T o ta l N ew K u * ...
s c r ip tio n s a n d a d v e r tis e m e n ts , a n d s u p p ly t in g le c o p ie s of th e p ap er
C h ic a g o .........................
a t Is. each
W I L L I A M H . D AN A C O M P A R E , P u b lis h e r s ,
M ilw a u k e e .................
P in e S l r r r l , C o rn e r o f P e a r l S tr e e t,

Post Orrtca Box 958.

kkw

YORK.

— On page 915 will be found the detailed returns, by .States,
o f all tbe national banks, under the Com ptroller's call o f Sept.
2$, 1895. kindly furnished us by the Comptroller, The returns
for July 11. 1895, were published in the CltaoXICLK o f Sept. 14.
1895. page 461.

The follow in g table, made up b y telegraph, etc., indicates
that the total bank clearings o f all the clearing houses o f the
United States fo r the week ending to-day. November 23, have
been 11,098,793,249, against *1,179,908,345 last week and $991,312,863 the corresponding week o f last year.

N o Y ork................... ..
Boston ------------- — . . . . ___
rhliA .lm pt.ls....... ........ . . ____
B a ltim o re --------- -------------- Chisago . . . . . ____ . . . . . . . ___
S5 L o a n ....................... ......... .
No or O rleans. ................. ...
8 «veo e(ll«s. 5 <t*y«.........
Other citie s. 5 day#...................

77.8I2.1S5
««,277.34*
11.630.494
79,793,407
2J.528.318
11.133.612

Total a il cu ts*. 5 d s y t __
A ll citie s. 1 d a y .................... .

*783.437,234
190.117.263
*913,654.488
165,238.761

Total a il ettie* tor w eek..

*>.098.793,240

S s n F r a n e ls c o ..........
S a l t L a k e C it y .........
S e a t t l e . . . . — .............

P«r Cmt.

T o ta l P a e i f l e ... ..

f 449.241.283
70.94S.105
56.6Hl.548
11,830.286
78.898.582
19.758,712
10,225,144

+10-4
+ 90
+18*9
- 09
+ l*i
r 90
+ 8*9

K a n sas C i t y . . . ........

fC97.383.858
139.941/276

+ 06
+ 7*3

•837.324.934
153,987,931
4991.312.865

f 911
+18-9

1894.

102.129 442
13,516.750
6.72-4,775
6,794.891
7.076.251
8 607,6* 0
1 ,7 * M M
2.619.94 ■
975 7*1
396.000
410.865
285,000
377,6*1
105.474
200.718
818,078
8*2.30 *
14 6,7*),6 *4
27.1P i.44i
1.4*6,438
1.712.622
560,6 H
ifir.
621.412
417.778
131.721
216,022
*4.299,060
hb’

8 p ..k a n o —
Hloox F a l l s . . . . . . . .

IT«Jk Xndt$H Hmwmher 2 !.
1895.

8i»rtn*ttJeld, O hio ..

T o le d o * ... .................
T o t. M id . W e s t li

CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS.

Ct.*A KINGS.
R rturni 6* 1 *hqr-ip*.

In d ia n a p o lis ..........

97.037,4 21
d.72-‘.0‘R'
2/HM.732
1.9 4 *e;i
U '- s V .i •
1,54 4.4 »>
•
1.600.116
1,037,784
761.952
167. u :
116,007.116

S t . P a u l . . . . ..............
8 t . J o s e p h .......... ..
lie s M o tn ij* .. . . . . . . .
W i c h i t a . . . . . . . ..........
T opeka. . . . . . . . . . . . .
ila s t lw t v
.....
D a v e n p o r t* ....
T o t. o t h e r liY est.

+10*8

Tbe full details o f clearings for the week covered by the H o u s t o n .,.,.............
above statement will be given next Saturday. W e cannot, of
course, furnish them to-day, bank clearings being made up by
the various clearing houses at noon on Saturday, and hence in N a s h v i l l e ... ,...........
the above the last tw enty-four hours o f the week have to be
in all cases estimated, as we go to press Friday night.
Our usual detailed figures for the previous week, covering
B lrro in jib a rn ..............
the returns for the period ending with Saturday noon, Novem­ Ja c k s o n r H I o ,..........
ber 18, are given below ,and we also present the results for the
corresponding week in 189-1, 1893 and 1893. In comparison
with the preceding week there is an increase in the aggre­
T o ta l S o u t h e r n ..
gate exchanges o f about eighty-four million dollars, but
T o ta l a l l ..................
at New York alone the gain is sixty-six millions. Con­
O u tsid e N. Y o rk .
trasted with the week of 1891 the total for the whole country
shows an increase o f 13‘4 per cent. Compared with the we*-k
o f 1893 the current returns record an excess of 19'2 percen t
and the lose from 1892 is 11-7 percent. Outside of New York H alifax.....................
the gain over 1894 is 10’9 per cent. The excess over 1893 H a m ilt o n ..................
T o ta l C a n a d a .... .
reaches Ifl 2 per cent, and making comparison with 1892 the
falling off is seen to lie 4-8 per cent.
* N o t In c lu d e d in

U ltw i
10 6 1i 46(
4,l«A.W2f.
6.72 i 667
9,994.688!
l.M 1,00f
77* 217
1,107.07V;
458 2H ;
4 IH 3*6
8 6 3 .'h3
62.746
•9.fV0|
40,410.394 j
2 8 ,7 3 1 ,* 3
14,048.8 44
6.6&P.728;
S.VCO.OOu;
3,769.108
2.870.604
8.902.921
2810.0101
l.V W S l*
1,008.928
1,664.2*8}
1.145.607;
1,391,316
760/ «*>
■486 f m
294.575
215.93-'
859.600
.356,99ft
76.1H0.8.2

l,l?0,O<H.2*5
f-27 4To,31V
14,813.751
s> 5 > ,in i
1,238.11.)
1.0*1,396
77M.343
26,148, ? » l
to tn ls.

2i.2Ao.U5l

-H3-C

850,00ft
10.407.248

935,000
25 00H.04

TIIE CHRONICLE.

802

TH E f i s a .s c i a l

s it u a t io n

.

Tnc u ilaeccts a fleeting political affairs in Europe
have rentalkod upon on a subsequent p ge; the
situation has improved since the beginning of the
week. Foreign uxaikets though have not recovered
suatsrialtj; the m 'St of the time the.? have continued
feverish and u n s e t t l e d . O .10 day, to be sure, the situ­
ation would appear to bo somewhat relieved, but then
sgai t would follow rumois of a more acute embarrass­
ment among perhaps another lot of over-loaded
speculators, the older cripples having been “ carried
through” by some good Samaritan capitalist. Indeed,
if there is one distinctive feature of the existing
Kaffir crisis as cabled to New Y ork it is the
easy way in which moneyed men and financial corpora­
tions have converted themselves into charitable insti­
tutions. We hear first of one bank and then of another
and then of a leading financial house by turns lifting
aome one or more exhausted speculators out of their
dilemma. Last week the cable told of a vast pool of
money collected in Paris j ust to help the struggling
crow d, the apparent sentiment being that a man who
g o t swamped dealing in Kiftirs was entitled to the
sympathy and aid of the two maikets. In the mean­
tim e Wall Street has read the cables, wondered, and
k ep t -'juiet.
Ttte truth is, far too much imnortanceis given to the
crisis in progress in Europe as an influence affecting
ou r market. It is our currency situation that moves
E urope in regard to A aerican investments. Weeks,
amd even months ago, before the tension in London and
Paris and Berlin began, foreign exchange was ju .t
about as high as it is now. It was the anomaly of
su ch a rate so persistently continued at such
a period of the year that led to the return
•of American securities. As soon as gold exports
begin this distrust abroad was strengthened,
a n d so more gold exports followed.
Inasmuch
as our merchandise shipments are increasing, the net
balance having become favorable now (see summary
•of foreign trade at end of remarks on foreign exchange
in this article to-day), it is possible that there may be
aoon a suspension of the gold outflow for a time, though
the large interest payments due Europe the first of
January, added to a continued inflow of securities
from abroad, may result otherwise. However that
may be, whether the gold movement stops or goes on,
tliea ciion will depend upon conditions here, not upon
s p culation in Europe. I f we want to correct the
foreign exchange market permanently and bring it
back to a normal state, the remedy lies at home— in
xiio halls of Cotgrt8s and nowhere else.
T h e new TruLk-Line agreement was finally adopted
th is week by the unanimous approval of the Presidents
•of the roads, and we give it in full on subsequent
pages. We are obliged to confess, however, that in
the form in which it now stands it is quite different in
a number of essential respects from the compact orig­
inally proposed. We are not referring in this to the
rnaoy changes in the wording and phraseology of the
agreem ent, which were evidently made to bring the
a o iie m e clearly within the provisions of the statute.
Hut sii.ee the meeting on October 10, when the orig­
inal vote in approval of the agreement was taken, the
form of the contract has been revised again and again,
a u u the revision, it is now seeD, ha3 involved the
■elimination o f a good many features and provisions
• k ic k appear necessary to its successful working.
'

[V ol. L X I.

The clause giving the Board of Managers authority
to offer rewards for information that will secure con­
viction for violations of the Inter-State law has been
omitted. This by itself would not be a matter of any
great consequence. But taken in connection with other
omissions and alterations it is rather significant. Both
the agreement submitted September 20 and that sub­
mitted October 10 provided thatin case of complaints the
Board of Managers of the Association might examine
officials and employees regarding the subject matter of
the investigation under oath. The words “ under
oath ” have now been omitted. In the agreement
submitted September 20 it was provided that each road
should deposit 2$ per cent of its gross revenues from
business subject to the agreement until the deposit to
the credit of such road should reach 850,000, and
thereafter 1 per cent, but the percentage could be
reduced by the Board of Managers if it became evi­
dently excessive for the ends desired. The agreement
acted on October 10 continued the provision of a
monthly deposit but made the percentage only 1 per
cent from the start, with the right of reduction as in
the first instance in case the amount became excessive.
Under the agreement as we now find it only a deposit
of 85,000 is required from each road, with such further
sums monthly “ as the Managers may decide to be
necessary to defray the expenses of the Association
* * and to provide for such forfeitures as may
be adjudged” — thus practically reducing the amount
on depodt at any time to this first payment of
85,000.
Under both the September and the October agree­
ments if a company withdrew from the compact without
the unanimous consent of the other companies, it for­
feited all the money it had paid in. The intention
was to have large deposits and to make the pecuniary
consideration at stake so great that no company
could afford to withdraw, thus giving permanency to
the arrangement.
This feature has been wholly
changed, for now in the contract we read that if any
company fails to pay the fines assessed against it, “ then
any other company may withdraw from this agreement
upon giving thirty days’ written notice to the man­
agers, and such company so withdrawing shall he
entitled to the residue o f the fu n d s it has contributed.”
I f this clause had been expressly framed to facilitate
withdrawals it could not be better adapted for that
purposp. Of coarse all the acts of the parties to the
agreement are dependent upon the approval of their
boards of directors, but this has not heretofore proved
a barrier to withdrawals.
It only remains to add that while all the previous
forms of the agreement provided that the compact
should continue in existence for five years and there­
after until ninety days’ notice, the present form says
it shall continue for five years subject to ninety days
notice. Ic is true the clause regarding the abolition
of separate agencies and the organization of jo in t
agencies is retained, bat it is a question whether
that
idea
can be made effective in view o f
all the weak points here enumerated and which
are so obviously calculated to destroy the permanency
of the arrangement. It will all depend upon the
honesty and good faith of the parties to the contract.
But so have all previous contracts. As a matter of
fact, the new agreement in the shape in which
it has been finally put differs in no esssential par­
ticular, except in the proposition to abolish sepa­
rate agencies, from the numerous other agreements

X ovembeb 23, 1S95.]

THE CHRONICLE.

S93

which have come and gone during the last dozen : Frankfort it is 3 per cant. A ccording to our sp'ci I
cable from L melon the B ink of England gains! £>32,years.
The October return of gross earnings of the Chi­ 275 bullion during the week and held at the clese of th e
cago & X orth Western has been awaited with consider­ week £41,540,043. Oar correspondent further ad vises
able interest. The St. Paul in that month had in­ us that the gain was due to th eim oort of £4S1,000 ( o f
creased its gross earnings in the large sum of $860,968, which £-313,000 were from the United States, £160,
and there was a dtsire to see whether the Xorth West­ 000 bought and £3,000 from Paris), to receipts from
ern could show an equally noteworthy addition to its the interior of Great Britain of £321,000 and to ex­
receipts. The return was issued yesterday afternoon, ports of £210,000, of which £100,000 were to the Cape,
and makes it evident that both roads have been favored £35,000 to Sm th Am erict, £30,000 to Ronmania a n i
in much the same way. The return gives the earnings £45,000 to other points.
of the X orth West, for October 1895 as 13,774,590,
The foreign exchange market was dull and arm un­
which compares with only #2,905,333 for October 1894, til Wednesday afternoon, when it was influenced by
an increase of #869,257. These figures are significant offerings of bills against intended exports of gold on.
as reflecting tho large grain movement in that section Siturday, some o f the regular shippers draw ing
and the activity o f trade resulting from it.
against their consignments, while others who were re­
The bank return o f last week showed a surplus re­ mitting gold in lieu of exchange did not draw bills.
serve o f $20,404,050. That statement was made on The supply of commercial drafts against cotton was
declining averages for cash, the bulk of the withdrawals light, some being delivered on contract, bat very few
of legal-tenders for exchange for gold required fors ip against current movements of the staple, and ban kers
ment to Europe having occurred toward the end of who usually handle fairly large amounts of these bills
the bank week. The withdrawals early this week at this season say that they have rarely known tho
were #1,750,000, and on Wednesday #1,000,000 more offerings to be so small. The business in exchange
was taken. The outlook then was for a material re­ is light, the profits limited, and the outlook is nob
duction in cash to be shown by the statement o f this encouraging. The de nand for remittance seems to b »
week; that is to say, the current reports led to the be­ general and so greatly in excess of the supply as to com ­
lief that the shipments of gold by Saturday’s steamer pel exports of gold. On Monday the few com mercial
would amount to about $4,000,000 (actually the ship bills received by the mail ware promptly absorbed and tho
ments as reported below proved to be #4,600,0OC>), and market was firm with rates for actuU business n n this tended somewhat to stiffen rates for money on call changed, o m p ir e d with Friday of last week, at 4 8 7 }
after the opening of the week, a tendency which was @ 4 88 for long, 4 8 9 }@ 1 894 for short and 4 8 94®
increased by some calling in o f loans by foreign bank­ 4 89} for cable transfers. On Tuesday the mar­
ket continue 1 firm, thongh then there ware some g ild
ers, thereby reducing the offerings.
Money on call, representing bankers’ balance’ , has, bills offered against an intended shipment on
L szird Freres engaged $1,250,000 anil
for the reasons referred to in the foregoing, loaned Thursday.
not only at 1J per cent, but more largely than last L. von Il iffnann & Ge. #500,000 geld for export on
week at 2 per cent, the loans at each rate bring about Wednesday, bat no bills appeared against these sh ip­
equal in amount, making the average for the ments, and the market continued firm. On W ednes­
week about 1}. Some of the banks and trust com ­ day dearer disconnts in London caused a fall in rates
panies loaned at 1 } per cent early in the week, but for ac’ ual business in long sterling to 4 874@4 8 7 },
later they maintained 2 per cenL Transactions in but sight bills and cable transfers ware not qnotably
time loans have been confined to long dates and to lower, thongh there were some drafts in the m arket
lOme special Contracts with institutions not usually in against intended gold exports on Saturday, and W. II,
the market. The demand has been light and the Crossman & Bro. withdrew #1,000,000 gold from tho
offerings have not been liberal. Kttos are 2 per cent Sab Treasury for shipment on the following day. On
for thirty days, 2 } per cent for sixty to ninety days, 3 Thursday the market was quoted as dull and barely
per cent for four and 3 }@ 4 per cent for five to seven steady in the morning in consequence of further offer­
months. The demand for commercial paper has been ings of bills against intended shipments of gold on
lighter this week, influenced by the outlook for lower Saturday, and rates for actual business were 4 8 7 } @
bank reserves; the supply has not increased, and busi­ 4 87} for long, 4 89@1 89} for short and 4 8 9 }@4 8 0 }
cable transfers, bat in the afternoon th e
ness has been restricted to the best names. Quotations for
quoted
as
firm,
indicating
the
are 3|@1 p ercent for sixty to ninety day endorsed market
bills receivable, 4 @ 4 } for four months’ commission absorption of the offerings. It was then reperted that
house and prime fonr months’ single names, 4 }@ 5 for the Bhipmen'sof gold on Siturday would most lik ely
prime six months' and 5 and above for good four to be large in the aggregate. B iring, Msgoun & Co.
withdiew #500,000 from the Sub-Treasury and gave>
six months’ single names.
notice of the requirement of #500,000 more. Yesttx^
The only feature in the European financial situation
other than those above noted has been the transfer by day the other withdrawals were by Ileidelbach, Ickelthe Chinese agent of £5,000,000 to the representative heimir & Co., #750,000 ; Lazwd Freres, $800,000 of Japan on Saturday at the B»nk of England, being Muller, Schall & C o., $500,000; L. von Hoffmann tk .
tho indemnity p»id to Japan for the retro session of the Co., #500,000; llin d y & Ilirm an, #50,000, and W. I f .
These with th ose
Liao-Tung Peninsula.
The money, it is stated, will Crossman & Brother, #1,000,000.
remain^ in tho Bank subject to draft by Japan. previously mentioned make the shipments to-day # t ,—
The Bank o f England minimum rate of discount 600,000, and for the week #7,350,000. Of the #4,600,—
remains unchanged
at
2
per cent, but the 000 to go to-day, #3,100,000 was taken in the form o f
Bank o f Bombay has raised its rate from 3 bars, the Treasury Department having reduced th e
to 4 per cent. The cable reports discounts of sixty to charge for bars from 1-10 of one per cent to 1*16 oF
ninety-day bank bills in London 15@ 1 } percent. Tne one per cent. The following show3 the daily poateol
open market rate at Paris is l j and at Berlin and , rates of exchange by leading drapers,

THE CHRONICLE.
IT
,.
T b u r*..
W ed s v. t&, S u v. 18. N ov. 19 N ov. 20. Nov. 21.
’o
88*
88*
00
00
tv
88*
88*
«**
*8*
Barter _
00
00
SS*
jfiSK?:
88*
88*
mi
90
00
88*
88*
t***
« *
lU o k o !
00
(H
*
1*0
i»o
y»>
f HiiihiL...
88*
88*
KH*
MX
MX
90
1*0
if
00
00
) BfegEtL. y»>
ss*
RH*
HS*
88*
88*
90
00
00
€ H ijthtl...
«,
S8«
83*
88*
H 8*
1*0
90
IK
)
1*0
1 s iB h l’. . : y.i
88*
SM
8
88*
M e rc h a n t*' m toO d a rn . 8 8 *
G
O
1*0
00
O
1*0
of
.. f BijrtdU... D

Kn.N ov. 22
88*
90
88*
90
88*
90
88*
90

83K

F o n s te s T r a c k m o v e m e n t o p t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s .
JLn th e fo llo w in g ta b le s th r e e o lp h e rs (000) a r e In a l l oases o m itte d .
Exports.

(XTOtlER.
31 orch’diK '.
G o ld ..............
g llv e r ......
G»:*d In o re.
S ilv e r In ore

1
S 7 .0 1 ?
1.874
4.594
14
ICO

.--------------- 1 89 4 .--------------

Im port4.
t

Excess.
1

Exports.
t

Imports.

7 5 .0 5 0
1.788
1.326
207
1.129

+ 1 1 .9 0 1
+ 86
+ 3 .2 0 9
—193
- 1 ,0 2 9

8 3 .6 5 3
1,083
4,408

6 0 ,0 2 0
l,fl0 2
963
74
507

E xeat

*
+ 2 3 ,68J
—520
+ 3,4 45
~ 74
-507

The annual report of the Baltimore & Ohio South­
western Bail wav for the year ending June 30 1895 has
been issued this week. Though it is the second report
o f the new company, it is the first one covering the
operations of a full period of twelve months; for the
first four months of the previous year the property was
atill operated by the two constituent companies out
o f which the consolidated company has been formed,
namely
the Ohio
&
Mississippi
and the
Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railroad.
The
late year was of course an unfavorable period, and the
road suffered from much the same adverse influences
and conditions as the Baltimore & Ohio (whose re­
port we review to-day on another page), of which
system the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern forms a
part. There were the crop failure, the continued
depression in business and the low rates; and
President Edward B. Bacon also notes that the
prolonged strike in the coal regions of Ohio in the
latter part of the fiscal year greatly depleted
the earnings of the road. Notwithstanding these vari­
ous drawbacks it was found possible to increase the
gross earnings 86-1,838 and the net earnings $9,737 as
compared with the year preceding. The total of the
gross earnings reached $6,323,035 and the total of the
net income was $2,308,181. This latter was sufficient
to meet all the obligatory charges and rentals,
and leave a surplus of $212,056, out of which
the 2,1 per cent paid on the $8,750,000 of “ A”
income bonds the 1st of November was made. Mr.
Bacon points out that though gross earuiugs in the
late year were $635,562 less than in 1892-3, before the
panic, the net is only $97,000 less than in that year,
and he says that the comparison is suggestive of what
may be expected from the operations of the company
when normal conditions prevail.
The following statement gives the week’s movements
o f money to and from the interior by the New York
banks.
TF*#k B Hint) Nov. 22,1895,
C u r r e n c y ........
T o ta l gold a n d legal tenders.........

Received 61/ Shipped b%
N. V. Baitiu,. N. T. Bank
4,711,000
475,000

W ith the Sub-Treasury operations and gold exports
- the result is as follows.
Out o f
Banks.

W eek E n din g N ov. 2 2 , 1895.

In to
Banks .

B a n k s ’ in t e r io r m o v e m e n t, a s a b o v e
S n b -T r e a s . o p e r . a n d g o ld e x p o r t s ..

$ 5 ,1 8 8 ,0 0 0
1 7 ,2 0 0 ,0 0 0

N et Change in
Bank H oldincs.

$ 3 ,0 6 9 ,0 0 0 G a in .$ 2 ,1 1 7 ,0 0 0
2 0 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0 L o s s . 3 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0

T o t a l g o ld a n d le g a l t e n d e r s ........ $ 2 2 ,3 8 6 ,0 0 0 $ 2 3 ,7 6 9 ,0 0 0 L o s s . 1 ,3 8 3 ,0 0 0
88*
90
8HK

The mar ket clo ed steady on Friday at 4 88} for sixty
dav and 4 90 for sight. Hates for actual business were
4 8 ?4 @ 4 8 7•} for long, 4 89@4 89} for short and 4 8 9 }@
1 spj for cable transfers. Prime commercial bills were
87@4 87} and documentary 4 864@4 86f. The Bureau
..if Statistics at Washington has this week issued the re­
turn of the foreign trade of the United States for the
month of October. We give the figures below in com­
parison with last year:
,-----------------1895.----------------- .

V o l . L X 1.

Net I n te r io ,
Movement

$2,685,001 Gaiti.i2.02S,Oh
384,000 Gain.
91,01 (1

$5,180,000 $3,009,00(1 Gniu.-2.117 o(io

The following table indicates the amount of bullion
in the principal European banks this week and at the
corresponding date last year.
Novemb&r 22, 1894.

November 21 ,189 5.

Bunk o f

Gold.

Silver.

Total.

Gold.

Silver.

£

£

£

£

£

49,232,695
13.223,294
12,878,000
10.830,000
6.776,000
1,372,000

41.540,043
127,561.904
45,597,535
35,604,000
18,834,000
10,941,000
4,116,000

41,510.043
78,279,299
32.374,271
22,726,000
8,004,000
4,165.000
N at. B elgiu m .
2,744,000

E n g la n d .........
F ra n ce ............
G e rm a n y.......
A u s t.-IIiin g ’y
S o a ln ...............
N e th e rla n d s .

35.018 132
75,695,000 49.568.000
38,183,‘j O 15 696,000
O
15,015 000 14,313,000
8,004,000 10,030,000
4,078, '00 6,771.000
3,330,667 1,065,333

Total.
£

85.018,132
128.261,000
53.779,000
29,328,000
18,031,000
10,849,000
4,996,000

T o L tb ls w eek 159.832,613 04,361.989 284,194,602 182,323,799 97,941,333 280,265,132
T o t. ore v . w ’ k 159,169.130 94.463,295 283,632.425 180,758,356 97.236,607 277,995,02

WHY

NOT SETTLE THE
CURRENCY
QUESTION N O W t

There was one point in Secretary Carlisle’ s forcible
and suggestive speech at the Chamber o f Commerce
dinner Tuesday -night which will not only attract
special attention hut will receive from the people at
large hearty endorsement. It was the closing portion
of his remarks, and we give it in full below because of
its importance and because it unquestionably voices
the public sentiment and touches a public need.
Mr. President, I promised to say but little, and perhaps
ought to stop here ; but the situation seems to demand, or at
least it seems to justify, one or two other suggestions.
Much of our financial trouble has been caused by doubt
and speculation, here and abroad, concerning the views and
purposes of our people at large and the policies of the politi­
cal parties to which they are attached. This is a government
by parties, and investors in our securities ard in our indus­
trial and commercial enterprises watch with the greatest in­
terest and soliciiude every manifestation of popular opinion,
especially at the periods when, under the Constitution,
changes are to'be made in the chief executive office.
It is of vast importance that these douots and speculations
should be set at rest in order that the world may certainly
know what is to be our permanent monetary policy and ad­
just its trade and direct its financial enterprises accordingly.
Vague and indefinite declarations by the great political or­
ganizations of the country not only increase doubt and dis­
trust abroad but encourage harmful agitation at home, and I
hold, therefore, that it it the duty o f all who are or who may
become in any degree responsible for the welfare of the
country to insist that there shall be no further equivocation
or evasion in our trea'ment of this great subject.
Let us have no more ambiguous phrases, no more inconsist­
ent and irreconcilable clauses in party platforms or iu public
utterances, but let us make our meaning so clear and our pur­
pose so plain that they can be neither misunderstood nor suc­
cessfully misrepresented.
If a majority of the people of the United States are in favor
of the maintenance of the present standard of value and op­
posed to the free and unlimited coinage of legal-tender silver,
they ought to have an opportunity to say so in a form which
will preclude all controversy as to whether they have said so
or not. On the other hand, if a majority of our people are in
favor of abandoning the present standard of value and estab­
lishing silver mono-metallism by the free and unlimited coin­
age of that metal into full legal-tender money, they should
have an opportunity to say that.
When this issue is directly presented we need not fear the
result. Such an appeal to the common sense, the commercial
integrity and the national pride of our people trill not be in
vain, and when the contest is over the question will be settled,
fiuallv and conclusively settled, in accordance with the general judgment of the most advanced nations and the real in ­
terests of our own country.

The substance of the foregoing is that men in politi­
cal life, and party conventions in their platforms, when
speaking of currency reform, use words, with rare
exceptions, not to enlighten but to confuse the public
as to tbtir meaning. This every one will admit is
the fact, and among the non-political class and especi­
ally among those who contend for sound money we do
not believe a dissent could be obtained to the proposal

N o v e m be r 23, 1895 ]

THE CHRONICLE.

o f Mr. Carlisle that hereafter these vague expressions
be discarded and frank openness be substituted. His
conclusion, too, will find in the same circles an equally
cordial response— that “ when the currency issue is
directly presented there need be no fear of the result."
We may add that “ vague and indefinite declarations5'
never formed a party, never aroused public opinion,
never created enthusiasm, and “ without enthusiasm
nothing great wa3 ever achieved.”
Moreover, there is a formidable body of our people
stronger in its purpose than ever before to prevent so
far as it can the longer neglect of the currency derange­
ment. These people are found in large numbers among
the business classes everywhere. They see plainly that
they have suffered and are suffering from the dofects
in our discredited note system, and care little for other
political issues until its stability is re-established,
not by some temporary make-shift, but permanently.
There are obviously many States east o f the Mississippi
where the prevailing idea is that the public will divide
at future near-by elections on some other question.
Ttiat certainly is not trae of the heretofore doubtful
StatW ^1
where the vote in November was largely
-controlled' ^y the feeling that the safer method
as matters stood
was to support
the party
which has boe^: historically the more reliable in financial
emergencies afld not-tlie one more widely tainted with
silveufafartes and Populistic alliances. Of course this
was by no means the only inflaenes. Probably exSenator Warrter Miller’s resolution in the political
convCdtjon of Sis party, added to his subsequent independffjfT'oourse and speech in New York City, had
much to llo with the one-sidod character of the vote in
this State. Tftere was a directness and a boldness
throughout in his method and words, besides a great
twin-moral idea underlying them which, with the
result that followed, well illustrate and show the force
of Mr. Carlisle’s remarks.
* Wo repeat then that the urgency of currency reform is
sure to lead a large body among the commercial classes
to act regardless <Jf party if they can secure something
solid to staud upon.
Industrial prosperity is at stake.
There is no way fn 'which the beginnings of business
activity already secured can be developed into the
broader form of general buoyancy the country is
anticipating except by removing the cause which is in­
fecting with uncertainty the future of values. It is the
simplest of propositions that so long as the least doubt
is felt as to the ability of the Treasury to redeem all
its promises in gold, there can be no free enterprise.
While that donbt exists every venture must bo in
thralidom to the most disturbing o f fears. We have
illustrations to-day in this city. There are for example
a number o f large undertakings, calling for a very
large amount of money, held in abeyance here, simply
awaiting a better market. All this is well known
in financial circles.
It is a familiar fact, too,
that these cases are merely representative; what is
true of them is true only in a more complete and
absolute sense of the interior of the country. Enter­
prise in the South or West depends upon fresh money
and easy borrow ing; that again depends upon confi
donee, and the basis of all confidence is a stable cur­
rency. Even the price the producer gets for his crops
is lessened by the same depressing cause. If, fo re x ample, we could have a term of general confidence all
the indications are that cotton spindles in America
would increase as rapidly as they could be made, the
demand for co lon would be enlarged and consequently

895

become more urgent. Our prosperity too is always in­
fectious. Great Britain would feel it because we are
her best custom er; the Continent also would feel it
because our purchases there would be enlarged; hence
t h . natural result upon the industry in question would
be that even the largest crop of cotton we are likely
to raise would find ready consumption at a good price.
But it seems almost foolish to repeat matters
so evident about
which
we
have
so often
written. We only refer to them now to recall how
universal the loss is that is being caused by our
unfortunate currency system, at a time too when
industrial conditions are so favorable that we almost
have within our reach a term of prosperity greater
than ever before realized.
Congress is about to meet. We think in that con ­
nection these thoughts may be useful. The situation
iu the Senate with reference to parties is such that
party measures are not likely to succeed. Besides
that, we are in the midst of another phenomenal drain
of gold- We are producers of gold and if it were not
for its connection with our currency derangement the
public would be no more concerned over the outflow
than they would be over au export o f cotton. U n d er
existing circumstances the movement is decidedly
dispiritiog*; it already has in a measure checked enter­
prise and if present conditions are allowed to continue
we cannot doubt, indeed we know, what will follow —
first another bond sale and then another bond sa le ;
what next ? Does not the emergency demand, and is
not the industrial condition of the country favorable,
for financial legislation of a useful sort ? Is it not
also reasonable to assume that the party which ob­
structs curative action will suffer harm ?

THE GREAT NO R TITERN R A IL WA Y.
T » e monthly returns of the Great Northern issued
during the course o f the year .tad made it evident that
the company would be able to present a very good
exhibit of income in its annual report. The report
has now been issued, and it bears out expectations in
that regard. In fact, for a year o f unfavorable con di­
tions the showing must be considered as very satisfac­
tory indeed.
We say a year of unfavorable conditions, for though
during the twelve months ending June 30 1895 there
was on the whole an imprivement over the twelve
months preceding, and the Miuitoba roal as a conse­
quence was able to recover a considerable portion of
the tonnage lost in 1893 4, yet the general state
of trade and the agricultural situation also iu some
respects continued decidedly adverse. The reader will
recall that business interests all over tho United States
remained greatly depressed the larger p m of the
twelve months, and the Northwestern and Pacific sec­
tions of the country of course shared iu the common
depression, though in the case of the G o at Northern
there was special development in certain directions which
served in some degrees as an offset. As regards the ag.
ricultural situation, that was partly better and partlj
worse than in the year preceding. President Hsli,
speaking with relation to the year’s influences, remarks that the wheat and grain crops of Minnesota
and North Dakota showed an increase over the pre­
vious year of about five million bushels, or 150,000
ton3. But this increase, though .important, is not as
significant as it might seem, for comp m s >u is with a
very poor year. On the other baud, in South Dakota

898

THE CHRONICLE

and some o f the other States the crops in 1894 ( -vtiich
counted in the results for 1894-5) wero un almost com ­
plete failure.
At first light it may seem as if the poor crops in
South Dakota and Nebraska could not have been much
of an influence in the affairs of the Great Northern,
since comparatively little of the mileage of the system
lies in or connects with those States. But as it hap­
pens the company has two lines in the afflicted sec­
tions whose earnings are reported separately, and from
theie we can judge of the effects of the crop failure on
it. The two roads referred to are the Duluth Watertown A Pacific and the Willmar & Sioux Falls. The
latter is 205 mi’ es in length, and runs from Willmar
to Yankton, on the boundary line between South Da­
kota and Nebraska. Its gross earnings for 1893 4 had
been ♦589,710; for 1894-5 the amount was only $355,800, a decline of $234,000, or about 40 per cent. The
Duluth Watertown & Pacific is a much smaller road,
being only 70 miles in length, and lies wholly in
South Dakota.
It is simply a small branch line or
feeder. - Its gross earnings in 1893 4 had been no more
than $36,540; but for the late year they were only
$15,346, a contraction of about 60 per cent. The
Great Northern gets a long haul on the traffic coming
from this feeder, and hence while the earnings of the
Duluth Watertown & Pacific itself were but $15,346,
the earnings of the Great Northern main line from
business contributed by that branch were seven times
as much, or $105,495. Assuming that the same ratio
existed in the year preceding, the loss of revenue to the
Great Northern from the decline in the earnings of this
branch must have been between $140,000 and $150,000.
In the case of traffic coming from the Willmar & Sioux
Falls, the haul is much shorter, and the earnings of the
Great Northern upon business contributed by that
road in the late year were only $148,812; but obviously
here also there must have been a considerable loss of
revenue to the Great Northern from the falling off in
the business of this line.
The roads mentioned constitute two of the several
proprietary lines of the Great Northern. The com­
pany has a two-fold interest in these proprietary lines
(1) as owner of their stock or their stock and bonds
combined, and (2) in the revenue derived from traffic
contributed by them. It has thus suffered in a double
way from the unfavorable results attending their opera­
tion. The one of the adverse effects we have shown in
the preceding paragraph. The other may bo illus­
trated by reference to the income account of the W ill­
mar & Sioux FalD. This road in 1893 4 showed a
balance of $172,867 over and above expenses and fixed
charges for the year, and out of this balance a divi­
dend was paid of $150,000, which went into the treas­
ury of the Great Northern as the owner of the whole
stock of the road. In the late year, under the diminu­
tion in earnings, the incoma fell $53,084 short of meet­
ing the charges for the year; hence no dividends
could be paid, and the Great Northern’ s income from
investments was diminished to that extent.
As to the remainder of the various proprietary com­
panies, there was at least one other where the profits
were smaller than in the previous year : the Northern
Steamship Company while having greatly increased its
business, as a result of the low rates received shows
a deficiency of $115,958 below expenses for the late
year, against a balance of net earnings for 1893-4 of
•61,087. The other proprietary companies, however,
di I better than in the year preceding.
This applies

[V ol. L X L

to the .Montana Central, the Eistern of Minnesota, the
Minneapolis Uuion, the Sind Coulee Coal Company,
and the Great Northern Express Company, the im ­
provement being particularly marked in the case of the
first two.
It is important to bear in mind these facts regard­
ing the proprietary companies, because examination of
the income account of the Great Northern will show
that the company received for interest and dividends
in 1894 5 only $845,548, against $1,217,804 in 1893 4.
The falling off is not to be attributed entirely to less
favorable results in 1894-5 than in 1893 4. In some
cases the dividends paid in the previous year had been
considerably in excess of the income of that year, the
company in order to get a return from its investments
in the proprietary lines (in a year when such a return
was so sorely needed to offset the deficiency in theoperation of the Manitoba road) having in several in­
stances distributed a considerable portion of the accu­
mulated surplus of other years. In the late year the
dividends came strictly out of the income o f the
year—that is, no drafts were made on previousyears. It is evident, too, that some of the other items
of miscellaneous income were exceptional in 1893-4.
Thus for interest and exchange the company had re­
ceived in that year $243,099; for the late year the
amount was but $21,912. Bills receivable counted fo r
$109,807 in 1893 4, for only $53,655 in 1894 5; r e n ta ls
declined from $236,134 to $223,640, and the income
from various miscellaneous items from $179,671 to
$158,081. • Altogether the company’ s income from in ­
vestments and outside sources in the late year was but
$1,307,836, against $1,991,516 in the previous year, a
loss o f almost seven hundred thousand dollars.
We give prominence to this falling off in the other
income of the company because the fact that the com ­
pany was able to forego the $700,000 shows how
satisfactory have been the results of operations for the
year. In 1893-4, even with the income that much
larger, the company did not quite earn the 5 per cent
dividend paid, there being a deficiency of $104,154.
But for 1894-5 the dividends are shown to have been
earned in full, with a surplus balance of $1S9,508 to
carry forward. The difference of course is accounted
for by the great improvement in the revenues of the
Minitoba lines. In 1893 4 the revenues of these lines
fell $908,170 short of meeting the rental guaranteed
by the Great Northern. For 1894-5 the revenues are
$131,672 in excess of the rental.
Of course the Manitoba lines constitute the main
part of the system, and it is desirable, therefore, to see
how the great improvement in results was established
after the heavy loss in 1893-94. We find that the com­
pany carried 2,946,920 tons of revenue freight in 1895
against 2,593,749 tons in 1894, an increase of 353,171
tons, or 13f per cent.
President Hill states that a
good share of the increase came from the newer
portions of the system’s lines in Montana and on th e
Pacific Coast, and that the largest relative increase
in tonnage was on the Montana Division. On th is
tonnage the road gets a long haul, and the effectis seen in the much larger expansion proportionately
in the tonnage movement one mile than in the tonnage
itself.
For the late year the aggregate o f th e
tons one mile was
1,022,173,154, as against
799,306,864 tons in 1894,
giving
an increase
of
222,866,290
tons,
or 27J
per
cent.
In
amount of freight handled the increase, as shown, was
only 13J per cent. The road did not move as much

N ovember 23, 1895.]

THE CHRONICLE.

freigh t as two years before, in 1392 3, bat its tonnage
movement was 20 per cent in excess of that for that
year and decidedly the largest in the company’s his­
tory. Tae passenger traffic shows an increase of 3-70
per cent in ths number of passengers carried and a
decrease of 5 17 per cent in the number carried one
mile; in both cases the amounts are decidedly smaller
than two years ago, which reflects the business depres­
sion prevailing. We notice that the passenger train mile­
age again further increased, and was 2,176,297 in 1895,
against 2,043,427 in 1894 and 1,971,476 in 1893. Every
one knows that it is not possible to curtail train service
with a falling off in travel, and these comparisons indi
cate the desire of the Great Xorthern management to
furnish increased accommodations to the public— a
policy which must secure popular favor for the line,
and in the end also promote its best interest.
T n e statistics, however, which are deserving of most
attention are those relating to the train loads and the
earnings per train mile, for these show the ability and
economy with which the road is operated, and also its
favorable physical characteristics and condition. The
earnings per freight train mile fell off slightly, being
♦ 2’45 for 1895 against $2 54 for 1894, but the report
notes that the decrease resulted entirely from a further
decline in the average rate received, and that there was
another increase in the tonnage hauled per train. The
average freight rate in the late year was but little over a
cen t per ton per mile— 1*014 cents— which compares
with 1 096 cents in 1893-4 and 1*232 cents in 1892 3.
In two years the decline has been almost 20 per cent,
in part of course as the result of the increase in the
proportion of grain, ore, lumber, coal and other freight
taking very low rates.
As regards the freight train load we pointed out a
year ago that the record of the Great Xorthern in this
respect was a vtry favorable one. The figures are
given in the report this time. They relate to the
Manitoba lines and show that on these lines the train
load was 237 tons in 1894-93, against 227 tons in
1893 94. On the Xorthern Pacific, the Great North­
ern's moat direct competitor, the train load in the
same two years was respectively only 164 and 145 tons.
Thus we observe one of the particulars in which there
is a great difference between the two roads. Put the
results for the Manitoba also compare favorably with
the large Eastern systems ; for instance the Xew York
Central’s average load for the late year was 252 tone,
and the Lake Shore’s average for the calendar year
1894 was 267 tons, as against the Manitoba's 237 tone.
Combining the freight and the passenger movements,
the earnings per train mile for the Manitoba in 1S95
were 12*02 against 12*035 in 1894.
But owiug to the
farther increase ia the train load the road wa3 able to
reduce the average expense per train mile from ♦PIGS
to 11*10, and the result is a profit of 92 cents per
train mile in 1895 against 87 cents for 1894. The
N orthern Pacific gets somewhat higher average rates
o n both passenger and freight than the Manitoba—
its freight rate in the late year having been 1*11 cents
as against the Manitoba’ s 1*014 cents, and its average
per passenger per mile 2-77 cents against 2*55 cents on
the Manitoba— but as its train loads are so much
smaller it can show only *1*08 earniugs per train mile,
while the M .nitoba earn?, as we have seen, 82*02 per
train mile. It happens that the expanses per train
mile were exactly the same for the two roads,
namely $1*10,
Hence the difference in tho gross
earnings per train mile is also tho difference in the

897

net earnings, and thus while the profit of the M tnitoba per train mile ia 92 cents that of the X orthern
Pacific is only 58 cents.
In making these comparisons, we do not wish to be
understood as expressing any opinion on the question
whether it would be possible to obtain the same degree
of efficiency in operation in the case of the Xorthern
Pacific as in the case of the Manitoba. The answer to
that question of course depends upon a variety of
considerations, in which differences in location, profile,
grade, alignment, general physical condition, &c.,
would form a prominent part, and it would require
study and investigation by experts to reach an intelli­
gent conclusion. It is sufficient for our purpose to
know that at present results are decidedly iu favor of
the Great XortherD. The bearing of this on the rela­
tive cheapness with which the Great Xorthern lines
are operated is perfectly obvious. The ratio of e x ­
penses and taxes to
gross
earnings
on
the
Manitoba in the late year was 53*01 per cent;
on the Northern Pacific it was 07*80 per cent.
The Great Xorthern has in the past been criticised
because its percentage was so small. Aside from
the fact that it is always costly to operate a prop­
erty by receivers, as in the Xorthern Pacific
case, the 'circumstance that train loads on the
Manitoba are 45 per cent heavier than on the Xorthern
Pacific suggests one way in which the Manitoba has
been able to keep its operating cost low. N o one needs
to be told that there is economy in large train bads,
for the energies of railroad managers have in recent
years been chiefly directed toward that end. But it is
not generally understood that aside from tho direct
saving in labor and other itcm3 there is also an indi­
rect saving in the reduction of the cost of repairs to
track, &c. With train loads of 164 tons on the Northern
Pacific and 237 tons on the Great Northern, three
locomotives running over the former will haul but little
more freight than two over the latter. I f it be assumed
that the damage to road-bed, track, &c., occasioned by
a moving train, ia caused mainly by the engine, it is
obvious that the co3t to repair wear and tear in hauling a given load will be smaller where the work is
done by two locomotives than where it is done by
three.
It ia proper to say that though both the gross and
net earnings of the Manitoba in the late year were ma­
terially increased— the gain ingro33 was 81,764,583 and
in net $1,059,627— the total in neither case wa3 a3 largo
as two years ago. For the current year of course the
outlook i3 exceedingly encouraging. The crops ia the
country tributary to the company ’s lines are the largest
ever raised, and Mr. Hill says that the year should
3how the best net earnings in tho company's history.
The returns for the portion o f the year already
elapsed give promise that this favorable fore­
cast will be realized, as for the four months
to October 31 gross earnings show an increase
of $803,780 for the Manitoba lines and of $921,614 for
the whole Great Northern system, including the East­
ern of Minnesota and the Montana Central. Tho
finances of the company are in excellent condition.
There are no bills or loans payable outstanding; the
ordinary current liabilities on June 30 1895 amounted
to $4,194,572, and the current assets (cash and ac­
counts and bills receivable) to $3,769,123. There were
also at tire same date $835,684 of deferred liabilities,
while the value of tho stock of fuel aud materials o a
hand was $605,692,

1

898

THE CHRONICLE.

TURKEY AND THE SU LTAN’S LETTER.
The situation in Turkey and as between Turkey and
tbe great signatory Powers still commands wide intert jt. There has been change; but it can hardly be said
that the change has brought about as yet any material
improvement. The massacres are said to continue;
Mohammedan fanaticism shows no positive signs of
abatement; and according to late accounts the Pera
district of Constantinople, where the foreign ambassa­
dors and consular agents for tbo most part have their
homes, and where there is a large European popula­
tion, Germans preponderating, is in a state of excite­
ment, dreading attack.
Special interest was given to the general situation
last week by the pointed and emphatic utterances
of the Marquis of Salisbury. Interest this week
centres in the letter of the Sultan to the British
Prime Minister, and the reading of the same at the
conference of the Colonial agents in London. This
latter affair is characterized by more than one
feature of novelty. It is the first time, we believe,
that any of the great crowned heads lias paid such
heed to the utterances of the Prime Minister of any
country as to write him a personal letter piteously
regretting what had been said, and begging him to
take the first opportunity to present the petitioner in
a more favorable light. It is also, we believe, the first
time that a British Prime Minister has so far departed
from the customary and long-established forms of
diplomacy as to make known and comment upon the
contents of such a document at a meeting of gentlemen
who had nothing whatever to do with the general
government. A sufficient justification of the proceedng, however, is found in the fact that the document
jeferred to was a personal communication from the
Sultan to the Marquis.
Lord Salisbury, it will be remembered, in bis Man­
sion House speech had expressed doubts as to the
honesty of the Sultan in carrying out promised reforms,
or, as the Sultan himself puts it— “ doubts as to my
good intentions.” Lord Salisbury had said more— he
had said that the government which persisted in doing
wrong was bound to bring about its own destruction,
and that if the Turkish Government did not imme­
diately bring about radical changes the great Powers
united would take the work out of its hands. It was
ihis menace, perhaps, more than the distrust expressed
that prompted the letter. No one knows better than
Sultan Abdul Hamid that the interference of the
great Powers, especially in the form of occupation,
would mean death to the Ottoman Empire. Whatever
u to be done, occupation at least must be hindered.
That the Sultan was in dead earnest when he wrote—
that he really means what he says— wo cannot doubt.
“ T repeat,” he says, “ that I will execute the reforms.
I will take the paper containing them, place it before
me and see that every article is put in force. This is
my earnest determination, and I give my word of
honor. I wish Lord Salisbury to know this, and I beg
and desire his Lordship, having confidence in these
declarations, to make another speech by virtue of the
friendly feeling and disposition he has for me and my
country. I shall await the result of this message with
the greatest anxiety.” This is the language of a man
profoundly in earnest; and we do not wonder that
Lord Salisbury so felt it, and made haBte to comply
with the request.

[ V ol. L X I

Tne Sultan has reason to thank the British Premier.If Mr. Gladstone had been in power, there is but littlelikelihood that such a letter would ever have been
written; but if written, we all know that the response,
would have been different, Mr. Gladstone long since,
ceased to have any faith in the Turk. Responsible in
a large measure for the treaty of Berlin in 1878, which,,
among other things guaranteed the integrity of the
Turkish Empire, and fully alive to the dangerous com ­
plications which would follow upon its disruption..
Lord Salisbury is naturally willing to be reasonable
with the Sultan in this the hour of his greatest d if­
ficulty, and to extend to him such opportunity as his.
own power and the circumstances of the case permit,.
That a certain temporary advantage has resulted from
the Sultan’ s letter, taken in connection with Lord Sal­
isbury’ s kindly remarks, we cannot doubt. There is a
pause in the proceedings. His Lordship in what he
said regarding the letter showed his usual wisdom..
He made no promises either for himself or for
the government of which he is the head. H s
language
revealed
sympathy
for
the
S u ltan ;
but it was in strict harmony with his speech,
at the Mansion House. It was not for him— it was notfor the British Government— to assume undivided re­
sponsibility in the premises. Whether action should
be tak-n at- once or whether there should be a little,
temporary delay, thus giving the Sultan an oppor­
tunity to reveal not only his intention but his ability,,
it was for the signatory Powers to say; and if action
became necessary, “ whatever was done must be donewith unanimity.” “ We and all the Powers are in aposition common to those who are obliged to act to ­
gether— namely, that if othera do not agree with them,,
they cannot have their own way— but I in no wise de­
sire to intimate by these words that the slightest shadeof disagreement has arisen among the Powers.’
If
he had spoken other than he did— if he had indicated
a disposition to act alone or in any way to saddle hieown government with responsibility, the effect might
have been very different. He might have alienated
the other governments; for governments are like men.
— subject to jealousy.
The question which is now uppermost relates to the
ability of the Sultan to carry out his programme of re­
form. H e has promised to put the paper before him ,
and to see that every article is put in force. Granting
that he is willing, has he the power? I f he has the.
power, why has he been so slow to exercise it? Re­
forms were promised by and they are specified in the
Treaty of Berlin. They have never been put in execu­
tion. W hy? Either from the want o f will or front
the want of power. I f from the want of will, the Sul-,
tan is placed in an awkward and most unenviable
light; and we are not allowed to wonder at those
who see in his piteous letter nothing but aneffort of despair, wrung from him by stern and in e x ­
orable necessity. Taking, however, a generous view
of the Sultan’s conduct, and admitting that for the
present at least he is really and honestly in earnest in
his purpose to carry out reform, the question is still,
pertinent— has he the power?
Lord Salisbury throwssome doubts on this head, not direotly, but in a way
not to be easily mistaken. In his remarks on the.
death of Rustem Pasha, he advances the opinion that
if there were men such as he around the Sultan the
active interference of the Powers would not be neces­
sary, and the present problem would be solved by the
natural operation of the counsels of an enlightened-

THE

Noveuibeb 28, 1895.]

CH RO N ICLE.

minority working through efficient and competent in­
struments. Such men are wanting. It w.t3 not so
twenty-five years ago, he reminds us, when there were
many men quite competent to fill the place left vacant
by the death of the Turkish Ambassador to tue Courto f St. James; and he does not forget to add that the
“ terrible Armenian problem is quite as much the want
of competent men as it is the want of adequate laws.
It remains to be seen, therefore, what success will
attend the Saltan's efforts to carry out reform. A few
days at most will suffice to reveal the p rosp ect; and if
the massacres continue only a few days can be granted.
The entire civilized world i3 looking on with horror at
the atrocities which are being committed in every de­
partment of the Turkish Empire where Christian and
Turk are brought into contact. A n attack by the
Mohammedans on Pera would almost to a certainty
disconcert all peaceful plans and projects. There are
numerous other spots about which much the same may
be said. Oae thing is abundantly plain ; and that is,
if the Sultan cannot restore and re-establish order
throughout his dominions, he cannot introduce re­
forms.
Until the law is respected reform is simply
an impossibility.
If he cannot establish order and
make the law respected, what is to follow? If it is de­
cided not to take any steps in the way of dismember­
ment, but on the contrary to abide by the terms of the
treaty of Berlin and preserve the integrity o f the Otto­
man Empire, reform being still an imperious necessity,
it will be necessary for the signatory Powers to come
to the Saltan’ s assistance. Joint occupation under
certain specifier! conditions would restore order and
give the Sultan the needed strength to execute his re
forma. At present it does seem as if this was to be the
way oat of the difficulty.

THE

BALTIM ORE

<•
£

OHIO

REPORT.

Like the other large trunk lines, the Baltimore &
Ohio had trying conditions to contend against in the
fiscal year eudiog June 30 1895, for which the annual
report has been issaed tho present week. In the pre­
vious fiscal year under the great depression in business
and the other adverse influences, agencies and circum ­
stances for which the year will always be distinguished,
the gross revenues o f the road had been reduced from
$26,214,807 to $22,502,662, a decrease of $3,712,145,
or about 14 per cent. It was hoped that in the late
year a considerable portion of this loss might be re­
covered. Actually the gross earnings increased only
$314,520. The explanation however is not far to seek.
Business rocovery daring the twelve months covered
by the report made only slow progress, the spurts of
activity being fitful, spasmodic and irregular until
towards the end of the year. With the removal of the
disturbing agencies in tho bituminous coal fi -Ids,
whiob had checked production so largely in the pre­
vious year, coal-mining was prosecuted with extraor­
dinary vigor for a time, in the endeavor to replenish
depleted stocks of coal, and as a result the coal tonnage
of the Bdtim ore & Ohio, which is 3uch an important
item of traffic with the road, was considerably enlarged
for a while; a n i the presence of that factor and the
slight revival in trade which occurred, is seen in a gain
in the freight revenues of the road of $1,674,586.
On the other hand, passenger revenues fell oil in the
large sum of $1,381,901, reducing them from $6,431,058 to $5,049,097. Here again the explanation is very
simple. The previous year had included the psriod of

899

t he World’s Pair, so that the loss merely marked a re­
turn to normal conditions. Besides this, the quite ex­
tensive failure of the grain crops in 1894 was an u n ­
favorable element. It not only diminished the gra in
tonnage over the trunk lines but it was perhaps still
more distinctly an adverse influence in curtailing the
purchasing power of lirge sections of the community.
The Western part of the Baltimore & Ohio system was
of course most affected, since those lines are more ex­
clusively dependent upon crop conditions. As show­
ing the effect of this crop shortage we may note that
while the system as a whole records #314,520 im­
provement in gros3 earnings over the year preceding,
on the lines west of the Ohio there has been no im ­
provement at all, but actually a decrease.
Tne
statement is true as to both gross and net, for
while the former dropped from $5,481,449 to 15,228,793, the latter declined from $1,240,818 to $971,121.
It follows that the improvement referred to occurred
entirely on the lines east of the Ohio; on these lines
gross earnings rose from $17,021,213 to $17,588,389,
and net earnings from $5,701,156 to $6,045,017.
The better results on the Eastern lines are to bo
ascribed not alone to the fact that the poor crops were
less an influence on those lines, but also to the fact that
it was these lities mainly that got the benefit of the in­
crease in the tonnage in coal. Still another unfavorable
factor remains to be mentioned, namely the very un­
satisfactory rate situation which p-evailed and which
of course extended to both the Eastern and the Western
lines. President Charles F. Mayer makes particular
reference to this, saying that the demoralization in
freight rates which began so seriously in 1894 was in­
tensified in the late fiscal year, during part of the lat­
ter half of which rates were lower than ever before, af­
fecting all classes of traffic. In steam coals, so im port­
ant a branch of the com pany’s freight traffic, ho ob­
serves, the prices for tho greater part o f tho'late fiscal
year were the poorest on record. This condition he
well says wa3 not due to any demand upon the part of
consumers but solely to tho reckless competition in­
augurated by some of the pro lacin g regions and the
lines to which they were tributary. But for the ju d i­
cious economies observed and the better handling of
traffi; rendered possible by the increased facilities and
improvements in every department of the system, the
rate situation, he remarks, would have produced even
less satisfactory net results.
We have already pointed out that on the system as
a whole tho increase in gross earnings over the year pre­
ceding was $314,520. This was accompanied by an
augmentation of $240,355 in expenses, leaving a gain
of only $74,165 in net. But there was a falling off of
#355,262 in the income from other sources, and at the
same time an increase of $237,062 in the property’ s
fixed charges— chiefly for interest on the te i inal
bonds. The result is that the balance remaining above
expenses and taxes was $437,567 lesa in the lata year
than in the year preceding. Yet the inceme account
shows a surplus on the operations of the year in the
sum of $639,517, equal to 2$ per cent on the $25,000,000 of common stock outstanding.
As is kuown,
however, the company has suspended the payment of
dividends, and nothing has been distributed to the
stockhol lers out of the year’s income. In the pre­
vious year the surplus had been $1,136,902, equal to
about 44 per cent, and that was the percentage paid
in dividends out of that year’ s income. It should be
understood that the $639,516 surplus has been arrived

900

rH E

CH RONICLE.

[VOL. L X I.

at in the usual way, that U after allowing for very
COTTON-MANUFACTURING A T F A L L R IV ER
ex usiv e contributions in redaction of the bonded
I N 1895.
debt** lues* through car payments, &c. In the late
The year 1895 has been a fairly satisfactory one to
ar th» se contributions amounted to $770,164, which
equal to over 3 per cent on the common stock, the cotton-manufacturing corporations of the United
States as a whole and to those located at Fall River in
The ompany, as is known, has made very large out
The season did not open auspiciously
lays for terminals, belt lines and other like purposes in particular.
because of a slack demand for goods; production was
recent years, in order properly to handle and develop
its traffic, and the fact that the revenues had fallen ofE consequently below normal, and yet the prices obtained
at a time when charges on these outlays began to accrue left little or no margin for profit. In fact, the treas­
mado it advisable to pursue a prudent policy in the urer of one of the leading corporations in Fall River
matter of the distribution of dividends. The traffic of informs us that the first six months of tho season (cov­
the system appears to be steadily developing. For ering the closing quarter of the year 1894 and January,
1895 the freight tonnage was 16,080,423 tons, or hut February and March 1895) was a period of very little
little less than the 16,356,405 tons moved in 1893, the profit to the spinners of fine cotton yarns, and that
largest in the road’s history. But freight earnings, most of their money was made in the last six
notwithstanding the recovery in tonnage, were only months of the year. Early in the spring the in ­
• 15,591,062 in 1895, against •17,561,997 in 1893 quiry for ootton textiles showed a marked improve­
— that is
they wore nearly two million dol­ ment, which filled the mills with orders and set all the
lars less. This makes it evident that the decline idle spindles and looms in motion. It thus happens
in rates has played a very prominent part in that the season has proved to be much more favorable
keeping down revenues. The outcome of the rate to the cotton mill interests th tn even the most sanguine
troubles has been the final adoption this week by the had reason to anticipate at its opening.
T l is gratifying condition of affairs is ascribable to
trunk lines of the new agreement for the maintenance
of rates, and it is hoped that this will work a great several causes. Tne first, and probably the most
change in the situation. The grain harvests the pres­ important, was the contract perfected in February
ent year have been excellent, and President M tyer says between the Government and a syndicate of bankers
that the continued steady increase in the already large whereby the Treasury’ s depleted gold reserve was
volume of business, with the restoration of rates, replenished and confidence in the financial stability o f
promises an early return of railroad traffic to remunera­ the country restored. A revival of business activity be­
tive conditions.
gan almost immediately thereafter, being at first slight,,
The company spent somewhat larger amounts for but improving month by month as the season advanced,,
Maintenance of Equipment and for Maintenance of until almost all branches of industry shared in it, though:
Way and Structures in the late year after the few to agreater extentthaucotton-manufacturing. The
reductions in the year preceding. Under the for­ improvement in the demand for goods was naturally
mer head the expenditure was •2,092,716 in 1895 followed by a gradual increase in prices, thus widening
and $2,052,106 in 1894, and under the latter head the margin for profit. But the cotton mills were also
•2,846,233 against $2,672,050. We notice that the ex­ favorably situated in another particular. We have in
penditures include 13,469 tons of steel rails and over a mind the extremely low prices at which the supply of
million cross-ties— 1,034,717. Mr. Mayer says it was the raw material had been obtained. Ia fact the
deemed wise to continue to make improvements and to cheapness of cotton induced mill-owners to buy more
charge a large portion of the cost to operating ex­ largely than for a number of years past, so that at the
penses.
The expenditures, he observes, have been close of August they carried a heavier stock than at
confined mainly to material improvements in road-bed, the close of any recent season.
bridges and culverts, and such improvements in
We are unable to make as thorough an analysis of
Maintenance c f Equipment as would prove most effec­ the workings of the Fall River corp irations as we
tive, wlile upon improvements or enlargements of would desire, owing to the aversion of m in aging offic­
(taticns, platforms, buildings and the like the expen­ ials to furnish us complete returns. The manufactur­
ditures were restricted to what was necessary for ing corporations of Massachusetts are required by law
proper maintenance OLly. “ The very careful and to make annual returns to the State authorities, and in.
thorough manner in which all the company’s work__ many cases it is only from those reports that we are
both current and improvements— has been done in the able to learn anything as to the earnings, & c., o f
past few years enabled the management to maintain most of the mills.
The statement given below is
the property in all departments, and to largely improve therefore compiled largely from returns made public
it in some, at a minimum expenditure. The roadbed at the time of reporting to the State officials.
over the entire system has never in the history of the
NET EARNINGS.
Name—
1895.
1893.
189 2 .
company been in the superior condition which it is at
1 89 1 .
Am L in en c 0 ..............
$ 3 1 ,6 9 5
$ 7 5 ,3 2 5
$ 1 1 3 ,8 2 3
N o m in al;
present,”
B - r n a r d M fg, C o........
3 7 ,0 0 0
7 5 .0 0 0
I he expenditures for new construction during the
year were only $641,306. The amount of loans and
btlls payable was reduced $100,214, and on June 30
189o was $4,019,440. Including these loans, the aggri gate of all current liabilities, together with interest
taxes, rentals, etc., accrued but not due, was $13,417,i f ; ° “ h 8" d cash a88ets “ t the same date’ were
*8,770,229. In addition there were $4,543,157 of ad­
vances on lines leased and operated and $17,398,697 of
bonds and stocks in other companies held. Fuel and
material account stood at $978,420.

22,904,
9 2 ,0 0 0
117,059
8 0,335
140 804
8 7 ,0 0 0
1 94 ,67 1
134 ,37 3

2 0 0 ,3 5 9
1 0 1 ,77 3
130,575
1 2 3 ,00 0
5 3 .0 0 0
7 7,0 37
3 ,5 0 0
9 9 .0 0 0
1 7 1 ,3 9 7
6 5 ,3 4 1
2 0 9 ,9 2 6
1 1 6 ,27 6
1 8 1 ,8 2 9
119 ,08 3

6 2,1 67
150 ,88 2
7 5 .9 44
15-1,719
8 8 ,6 9 3
3 5 ,7 7 4
1 2 9 ,0 0 0
1 7 ,3 2 8
1 0 5 ,42 9
1 4 7 ,12 0
6 1,3 98
1 4 2 .63 2
8 0 ,0 8 4
1 8 0 ,0 2 4
8 8 ,8 7 0

_ T o ta l............ ............. $ 1 ,5 2 1 ,7 8 9
_

$ 1 ,7 9 6 ,4 2 4

$ 1 ,6 2 9 ,8 6 7

B o rder C ity M fg. Co.
F lin t M ills ....................
Globe Y a rn M ills _
_
G ran ite M ills ...............
L a u re l L ak e M ills ___
M erch an ts’ Mfg. C o ..
R obeson M i l l s .........'..
R . B o rden M fg Co. .
Sagam o ro M fg. C o ....
Seao o n n et M ills..........
Staffo rd M ills................
T ecnm seh M ills ..........
U nion Cot. M fg. C o ..
W am p an o ag M ills_
_

100,014,
5 2 ,0 0 0
1 00 ,93 7

99,000

3 1 ,0 0 0

150,994

* E stim a te d a t o n e-h alf th e e a rn in g s of 1892.

* $ 3 1 ,0 0 0
8 0 .9 0 0
3 7 ,9 3 3
‘ 7 5 . >00
4 2 ,1 5 4
15,341
3 6 .3 3 2
1 6,0 80 4 9 .0 0 0
7 3 .0 0 0
4 ,5 0 0
4 3 ,1 4 5
2 8 ,6 4 2
9 1,0 00 *4 5 ,0 0 0

$ 6 4 6 ,8 8 7

1 N et 103S.

It will be obser ed that we omit altogether from the
above comparison the figures for 1894. In explanation.

THE

N ovember 23, 1893.]

we would state that the exhibit that year wa3 so de­
cidedly unsa'isfa^tory— opirations in a number of cases
netting an actual loss— that we were able to obtain but
very few returns from any source. The conditions io
1895 are wholly changed. A 'l the mills that have as
yet held their annual meetings nuke quite favorable
financial statements— statements that show that all
Tegular dividends have been paid out of current earn
Inga; that allowance has been made for depreciation
that improvements have in many instances been pro
Tided for, and that additions ha m been made to surplus
account. Of course the mills generally have not earned
as much money as they did in either 1892 or 1893, but
the fact must not be lost sight o f that in the earlier
months o f 1895—January and February— the mills
were not run to their full capacity, and furthermore
that although since the beginning of March all ma
chinery has been bnsily employed it was not until some
what later that the upward movement o f prices began
Nevertheless the sixteen mills for which comparative
figures are given for all the years have earned ml over
13 percent in 1895, against a little loss than 16 per
cent in 1893 and about 14 por cent in 1392. A number
o f the corporations most favorably situated have done
better this year than in either 1893 or 1892. Con­
trasted with 1891 every mill in the list makes a better
showing. Oor readers of course understand that these
are net earnings and not the gross earnings of the
mill", allowance in each caso having been made for de
predation o f plant, &c.
Turning onr attention first to the dividend results
for the last quarter of the year, we find that thirty-five
corporations, representing a capital o f ♦20,828,000,
have distributed 1130,750 daring the period in 1895,
or an average return of 2-07 per cent. In the corres­
ponding quarter of 1894 the amount pa:d out was only
♦245,400, or an average o f 1*20 per cent, and in 1893
shareholders received in the aggregate ♦400,420, or
1-9*2 per cent on the r holdings. The details for the
fourth quarter are as follows :
T o c n r u QrAM Tia
im 'j and l » L
Amarittmn
Barrmbf Maamftf C » ......
B*rn«r*l M*uaP* ><t........
florQae C l f M»naT* Co.

gonna# Mill#
««■*«..
Mill*
0 > n * o ;cg t M
eat ♦ ill*..*.
Corn#U Mills .
P#* .l Mil *
P «*

tHHdend* l«m . U t i M

C p l,
a ita
m/m

■P.

11W.

Increase
or
A *vw»«#jf. P. C.! Amount. Decrease
|i0 ,0 to; . N > tl»vl4#nd. +W »)
<
. Ho OlTtOenO.
01.3 j
O
fflH I
tO f»
.O
V 0O
15.000 + Q
l»,*»t +344,000
•9,000! 3
7.500
7,1001 m
M O .So <3tvld*mi +2.400
O;
0,00 H IM
0.000
0,000 *4 ,0 0
-7 0
*V «} !■ *
>

Ho 0iir*d#n+j

*
I
*
400.050 * if
•
m
l»,0On 9
i
*
400.000! 9 H
WO.KjO

m
ntm t
11,*00 8 ! 11/“*
-*¥ 0
.< 0
I ! 1.<
2
E * A+\000
1.000.000 V* #0.000' IH 1 .'
5
*■ - 9
•
1
-H
.000
15.000
l* »•
,.-*
1,000.000
Kltwr P&lilp M its ... . . ..
*§. *0
0 01
,0 0
I.-sk»* Mill*.... . . . .
4M >»
0 .O*!
?.v».oooi *
1 .0 0 . .Mo dtvl1«m1. +15.000
6 01
M ock A oio*' M ill*........ ..
1 0.0
0* J \
•pftO CN 2
O
18,000
• fftrch ka’ #’ M u u t r * (jo,.
.0 O
H|dividend. + 1 O
M * n »r« Co..
.V o d lftd tsd, ..V o
3
«.**> +1*00i
m
tfniiwiM M *___
Kt m
■iwKivfs Mm#.
!* > > -7.000
,* *
• - 15.000
H
AQ
h .<>1
*m
,> \
M 0 + 1,000
,0 0
F oe
Pocmmmt M *n u f« Co. ....
6O O
0 OO
id O . Vo dividend.* + 1 0 . 0 *0
.'-O
Kichurd B 'tdfQ i f tg. C o..
+ .P O
30
3.000 .Ho Uvidand
ffc0l»««ero M'JU.......
*90.000
u
0O 0
O .»<
M U o a f C o ...
i*».»0*: M
500,001 9
10.0 0 So • l i v i d # 1*1 . + 1 0 .0 0 0
;
8#nf**r4 Spinning C o ___ _!
«#cono#t Ml!is _____
12.-001
..
Q +2.75<)
3
fHt*Mills...... ....... ............ 550.050 19 l'.ooG] Itio 4.000 +*,000
u M #
tU ..........................
H
-+ ■ 5 0 0
5.3001,.H
1
W*A*
muj»
1 .0 0 14
0 0;
9
vtdrnd. t e
M *^«i?#etarV Co.
f '*,»«»
9
5.000 ..N o U
7.50O: +3.500
Tecomseo M ........
itt*
6
00,000 M 10.000 m
18.011 4
0
,< >
l«.noo; -« V0
T r o t C ot * W jf& T C oJ
*>
0.000 afl
15,00*3 +\500
W od 8
j&
9
Uni > Cotton M #nT #C o
n
750.000
3
11.330
W*mD*n'>*tr M in i,.........
750.000
J Hdividend. +11.250
+•*930
W
oetkaao# Xilii...........
550. s 0 1
>
H 9.250 ..N o
Total# .
. . . . . m,fm.oco 9V
7 490,7501 it 20 $2*5,400 +185.8.0
n*m wm*. .

90111

C H B O N IC L E .

__
rank# Vtuiw J H
8lota# Tarn Mill*. H I M
RarvntTM
...........

• Bern (-annual.
t<h*c ipUal o f 88O0.0OO.
t On capital o f 8400,000,
I On capital o f $20,478.0 < .
0
a And 0 per cent, extra dividend.

The fact that some five mills have merely maintained
the rate o f distribution of 1894 is no occasion for sur­
prise. It is well known that it is the policy of some of
the corporations to pursue a very conservative course,
making but little change from year to year in the reg
ttlar dividend no matter bow great the profits, but
occasionally reducing accumulated surplus by declaring

a large extra dividend. Aside from the five corpora—
tions referred to, there are twenty-seven which have
increased the amount paid out in the quarter tim yea r,
some of them materially. The Birnaby M fg. Oo. and
the Metacomet M fg. Oo. have passed their dividends
after having pursued a similar course in 1894. and the
Osborn mills have reduced their rate.
Combining the above results with those for the nine
months (published in the C h r o n ic le of August 17,
page 265), we have the following exhibit for the full
year. It will be seen that thirty six establishments,
with an aggregate capital of #21,828,000, have returned
to shareholders 11,772,925 in 1895, or an average of
8-12 per cent, against #1,128,000, or 5-25 per cent, in
1894 The exhibit in detail for 1895, compared with
1894, is as follows:
W a it s
1895 and 1894.

Capital.

American Linen Co..........
B*rnabv- Manufae’g C o~..
Barnard ManufjC’K C o ....
Border City M anTjf C o .,.
Bourne Mi l#......................
Chaco Mill# ........................
Co nan'cot Mill#.................
Cornell Mill# .....................
OavolM fll#.........................
Flint Mill#...........................
OlObe Tarn Mill#................
Grange Mill* ...................
Hargraves M ill*..............
Kerr Thread C o.................
King Philip Mill*...............
Laurel Lake Mill*..............
Mechanics’ Mills................
Merchants' M anofac'g Co.
Metacomet Man’f g C c __
Sarraumnseti Mills.............
Osborn M ills.......................
Poeasae' Mann fact V C o ..
Ut**n*rd Burden MTV Co.
Robe# m Mill#....................
'iwsrmir# Mftr. Co............
Sanford Spinning C o ........
Seaermnet M ill#......... .
S^ove M il#
Slade Ml!<»
Stafford M
111*

tk«v*n.i M feettir’g Co.
anu
Tecumseh Mill* ................

Troy Cot. it V Mfa. C o....
V

Onion Cotton M’ f 'g C o ....
VTampanoag Mill#.............
Weetaro**# Mills.............. .
T otal*,.,..

...

Dividends ISttt. Dividends 1894. Increase
or

P. 0. Amount. P. C. Amount. Decrease

4
$50,000
8800,000 7
$39,000 +21,050
400,000!..N o dividend.
8.000
«.!» ' —
10.5 H +0,600
I
23,100
830,000; 7
l*
175,000
1,000,000
70.000 +105,000
7
4s.«K)0 +26,000
7+ K 1
01 t 2
+>5.000 10
30.000
6O0.OOO! 8
30.000! 0
120.000 5^'
3.000 +3,000
M- 3
400.000 0
21,0 0 fl
94.000
A
se.oon
400.000 fl*
2 .0 *) +2,000
10
46,400; 8
580.000: 8
40.400
72.000! 5
1.300.000: «
W O-'.OOO + V W
6 ‘K
1,0)0.000 GH
a
05,000; •
57.000
800,000
44JWI +1:888
5«,000 514
1,005.000 5
5C.0t» ..N o dividend. +50,000
0> O 0
>.OO
1,000,000 6
0 .')O
O O
$4,000!
400.000 0
22.000 + .0 0
2 0*
48,750
750,000 ***
75»\000
22,6* 0 +36.200
56.000
800.000 7
O
48.000 + 8. C O
288.0*0 No dividend. . .No dividend.
28.00 5
400.000. 7
2),< K +8. TOO
* K)
7 , 42,0*H j 7
)
48.000
Sd.OfO ft
800.000 ■ 0 }
• 4,00*)
800.000 7
W
.000" n4 28.000
>
11,700 .No dividend.
350.000;
900,00015 35
ais.ox58,600
89,500 t*
500.000 5+
12.000
«>,0oo:
OO O’ *3
O.OO
99.000
550.000 7
9\W
o
85.750
5M-.000 9
. *!
8,2V)
it,uuu P
ot.ooo ‘ 7
800.000
8
56.0 *0
a *o oo») 9
6.000',. No dividend,
500.000
9H
90.000
-— ■*n> • ■
*
8 .Oi»l
* 0
61.000
«7 .V »
I
750.000!
43.000
350.D
00
26.873
dlvlden 1

1030 1

$31.628.000 8-19 #1.772,023 15*26 #1,128.000 h 4,095
64

* IH P«r cent On capital o f $800,000.
f Oo capital o f $800,000.
t On capital o f $ 4* , 000.
10
t On capital o f $31,478,000.
a Including extra dividend o f 10 > *r cent.
<
b InNudlng extra dividend o f

H per cent.

c Including extra dividend o f 6 per cent.

This statement for the full year bears out what we
have said abovo as to the satisfactory character of the
1895 results— twenty-nine mills have paid out a greater
amount this year than last and five h i v i m i d e n o
change in their rate of distribution. The Metacomet
Manufacturing Company, which passed all its divi­
dends in 1891, has followed a like course this year, and
the Birnaby Manufacturing Campany, while paying
11 per cent last year has abstained from declaring any
dividends in 1895.
The Border City M mufacturing
Company, in addition to its regular dividends, has re­
turned to stockholders #100,000, or 10 per cent on their
investment, and the Sagamore Manufacturing Company
has made an extra distribution of #162,000, or 18 per
cent on its capital. T o furnish a more comprehensive
comparison we have compiled the fo llo w in -, which
embraces the years back to 1886:
Years.

O o m p a m ts , --------- .

Number.

1 8 3 5 ..................... ............
18 9 4................. .............
1893....................
ISOS.....................
1 8 9 1 ....................
1 S 9 0 ....................

36
35

1SHH.................... .............
1S87..................... ............

33
33

ISSfl.................

lS sii.................

N o t s in c e 1 8 8 9 h a v e th e

Capital.

$ 2 1 ,8 2 8 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,4 7 8 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,2 7 8 .0 0 0
1 9,8 5 8 .0 0 0
1 8 ,5 5 8 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,0 5 8 ,0 0 0
1 8,5 58 ,0 0 0
1 7.0 0 8 ,0 0 0
17,2 04 ,7 0 0
1 6 ,1 1 0 ,2 0 0
s h a r e h o ld e r s

.------ D iv id e n d !. -

Amount.

P, 0

$1.7 7 2 ,9 2 5
1 ,1 2 3 ,0 0 0
1 ,7 0 0 ,3 1 0
1 ,4 9 2 ,2 6 0
91 1.850
1 ,4 2 0,87 0
1,8 0,7 0 0
1 ,6 9 6,04 0
1 ,4 2 7,99 0
1 ,0 1 7 ,6 5 0

8*12
6-25

8 02

7 52
4*93
7 «2

9*97

9 -6 3
8-30
6*50

i n F a l l R 'v e

cotton-manufacturing establishments received in the
aggregate so great a return on their investment, and
contrasted with 1894 and 1891 the showing is particu
larly satisfactory.
As showing the relation this year’s dividends in the
case of individual mills bear t i those for a series of

TH E

902

[ Y o l . L X I.

CH R O N ICLE.

•following, which embraces

tions of the Northwest the roads had not yet begun

wrations." The intention is |to feel the benefits of the present year’ s large grain
afcio with
te years:

Average
9

804.

1809

1 8 9 7 .1 8 8 0 . ’ 8 0 - ’ 9 4
184)3. 1 6 0 1 . 1 8 0 0 . 1 8 S 0 . 1 8 8 3 .
7 )4

7 )4
.

yj* , p .

lt t

8
10

13

7 )4

10
0

0

0

0

1 0 )4

a

0
0
7H

—

7

5

5

8

6 )4

7 )6

3 )4

‘ 7

0

4 )6

6 )4
7

10
12

7

4 )4

10
8
5
0
8
a
7H 10)6

5

8

c

6
8
12
1

m

10

7

0

M ills - ..
C o ...

0
12

7

m

0

a t,

24

7

7

.a n t s ' M f i r . O n,

Troy u f c w , i t f i r . o o

8
8

31

6 )4

M g a n s e t t M I lls l 7
axn
O * a M ills .. . . . . .
sb >
a. ik i l e a M f i r . C o . , 7
ft*** j o r ® M f g . C o ,
M i l l s ............

4 )4

8

9

0 )4

U li atim* M U a . ~
tx

M

6
6
8
8

o

1 L a k e M ills .

am h

12
0)6

7

12

g

Y a rn M in * ..

M e rc

1
6

14

1 7 )4

17

11

0

20
12

8
0

0
6
0

7 «
7

7 )6

38

years

13
18

22)6
0
11
8
8
22
6
8M
0)6
7 )6

8
0
6)6
18

14

24

0
8
20

10

20

30

ia« 12« m
8 2 -3
8« 6
0
1
2 S« 1
0 0 7 -0
a
7>4
8 a
1
2
IB
M
17
02
-0
0 a
iH
7 7 -1 6
0
6 OH W
8
m
7
O
K
0 0
OH
« 8
0
%
8 3
m
1
1 8
81-6
1
2 7
8 7
IX
0
1M
6
17
18
6
21 8

%
m 8
17
6
11)6
7
0
m
wm p a n u n i t M i l l s , . 8
The
nineteen represented in the table have made a better
return this year on the capital invested than was the
case on the average in the preceding nine years. If,
however, wo should make the comparison cover only
the years since 1890 it would be found that in eleven
instances this year’ s rate of distribution has been
greater than was the average for the five years 1890—
1894.
While at the present time the demand for cotton
goods is somewhat less active than it had been, the
mills are apparently well supplied with orders, some
mill men reporting that business is in good condition
and that they have all that they can possibly do, and
at satisfactory prices. Altogether, the outlook for the
coming year is believed to he quite promising.
RAILROAD NET EARNINGS IN
SEPTEMBER.
As was the case in August, our statement of net
earnings for September records only moderate improve­
ment over the same month last year. The cotton
movement was decidedly smaller thau in 1894, and in
the winter wheat districts some of the roads suffered
from a falling off in the traffic in wheat. Rates in the
West were badly demoralized and a war broke out, the
difficulties, however, being adjusted before the close of
the month. The strike of the ore miners in Michigan
continued until the 30th of September, and in addi
tion there were strikes of coal miners at special points
in various parts of the oountry. The favorable offsets
were the continued revival in trade, which operated
most largely to the benefit of the roads in the Bast, and
the heavy movement of spring wheat in the North­
west. The lines running out of Louisville had an ad­
vantage in the holding of the Grand Army encamp­
ment at that point.
The result of these various influences is a gain of
$3,078,273, or 5'38 per cent, in the gross earniags,
and of 1973,556, or 4 -90 per cent, in the net earnings,
as may be seen by the following.

rea r and
n u m ber
o f roa d s.
Septem ber.

G ro s s

1
1895.

1894.

Jan uary

to Septem ber
( 1 8 2 roa d s.)

In crea se.

1895.

1

1894.

$
5 9 ,4 7 2 .0 3 8

f
5 4 ,8 1 5 ,8 4 0

*
+ 4 ,6 2 3 ,1 9 8

*
2 1 ,7 8 2 ,1 9 1

A
„
2 0 ,8 4 3 ,4 2 5

, *
+ 9 3 8 ,7 6 0

1891

(1 4 8 )

0 6 ,1 4 0 ,8 4 0

0 1 ,5 5 2 ,7 9 1

+ 4 ,5 9 4 ,0 5 5

2 4 ,8 9 5 ,9 2 3

2 2 ,5 6 0 ,5 7 1

+ 2 ,3 2 9 ,3 5 2

1892 (1 2 7 )

0 8 ,5 3 9 ,0 1 3

6 0 ,5 8 2 ,5 3 2

+ 1 ,9 1 7 ,0 5 1

2 4 ,9 0 2 ,1 6 3

2 4 ,0 8 7 ,1 4 4

+ 2 3 5 ,0 1 9

1893

(1 3 1 )

5 8 ,1 9 5 ,9 8 0

6 4 ,9 1 7 ,6 2 2

-0 .7 2 1 ,0 4 2

2 1 ,5 7 8 ,7 4 4

2 3 ,6 4 3 ,0 6 7

- 2 ,0 0 4 ,3 2 3

1894

(1 4 1 )

5 0 ,0 8 3 ,6 5 7

6 9 ,8 3 1 ,5 2 1

-3 ,7 4 7 ,8 0 4

1 8 ,8 5 7 ,3 1 3

2 1 ,9 3 1 ,1 3 8

— 3 ,0 7 3 ,8 2 5

18 95 (1 4 1 )

0 0 ,2 5 8 ,3 1 6

5 7 ,1 8 0 ,0 4 4

+ 3 ,0 7 8 ,2 7 2

2 0 ,7 0 3 ,1 6 9

1 9 ,7 9 0 ,8 1 3

+ 9 7 2 ,5 5 0

\ 4 8 2 ,0 1 4 ,9 0 0

+ 4 3 ,8 8 4 ,6 1 5

J a n . 1 to
S ep t. 3 0 ,

*

*

Q r o s i e a r n 'i i

0 0 ,2 5 8 ,3 1 0

5 7 ,1 8 0 ,0 4 4

*
%
*
3 , 0 7 8 ,2 7 2 0 1 1 , 7 4 8 ,9 3 2 5 7 8 , 4 9 7 ,9 8 0

3 3 ,2 5 0 ,9 7 2

O p e r. e x p .,.

3 9 ,4 0 5 ,1 4 7

3 7 ,3 3 0 ,4 3 1

2 , 1 0 5 , 7 1 0 4 2 2 , 6 5 4 ,9 0 0 1 0 1 , 7 7 4 ,3 0 2

1 7 ,7 8 0 ,0 6 4

M e t c a m 's

2 0 ,7 6 3 ,1 0 0

1 9 ,7 9 0 ,0 1 3

____ 9 7 2 , 5 5 6

1 8 9 , 1 9 3 ,9 8 6 1 7 8 , 7 2 3 ,6 5 8

%

IS ,G O ,3 0 8

moderate in themselves, but they follow very heavy
losses iu the same month of the two previous years.
However, except in the case of the spring-wheat sec:

1 7 2 ,6 8 3 ,2 5 1 1 0 0 ,7 6 9 ,4 2 9 + 1 1 , 9 1 3 , 8 3 2

1890

( 1 3 9 ) 5 2 5 ,8 0 9 ,5 8

1891
1892

( 1 7 0 ) 5 8 4 , 3 7 5 , 2 5 4 5 6 4 , 1 1 7 ,0 8 3 + 2 0 , 2 5 8 , 1 7 1
( 1 6 0 ) 6 1 4 , 8 2 0 ,0 5 3 5 7 9 , 8 4 6 , 6 5 8 + 3 4 . 9 7 5 , 2 9 5

1 9 3 , 2 3 8 ,9 4 8 1 8 7 , 1 7 0 , 2 4 6

+ 6 ,0 6 8 ,7 0 2

1803

( 1 4 0 ) 5 7 3 , 4 9 9 , 2 9 6 5 7 0 . 9 1 2 .4 9 0

-3 ,4 1 3 ,1 9 4

1 7 4 ,6 6 6 ,2 7 0 1 8 1 ,9 3 6 ,6 0 7

— 7 , 2 7 0 ,8 9 7

1894

( 1 6 8 ) 5 0 3 , 5 2 9 ,8 3 8 5 7 0 , 3 2 5 , 3 6 5 - 7 2 , 7 9 5 , 6 2 7

1895

( 1 8 2 ) 0 1 1 , 7 4 8 ,9 3 2 5 7 8 , 4 9 7 , 9 6

+ 3 3 ,2 5 0 ,9 7 2

1 8 9 , 2 0 8 ,4 6 7 1 8 0 , 2 3 4 , 5 6 0

+ 8 ,9 2 3 ,9 0 7

1 6 3 ,0 9 3 ,2 2 0 1 7 3 ,8 9 8 ,9 3 6 - 2 0 , 2 0 0 , 7 1 0
+ 1 5 ,4 7 0 ,3 0 8

1 8 9 ,1 9 3 ,9 8 6 1 7 3 ,7 2 3 ,0 5 8

In the case of the individual roads we have some
fair-sized gains and only a few large losses. In the
gross the losses above $30,000 are confined to the
Southern Pacific with $163,494 decrease, the U nion
Pacific with $110,313 decrease, the San Antonio &
Aransas Pass with $41,953 decrease and the Oregon
Improvement with $38,147 decrease; and in the net to
the Southern Pacific with $230,203 decrease, the A tch ­
ison with $201,394 decrease, the Louisville & Nashville
with $118,241 decrease, the Reading with $103,489 de­
crease, the San Antonio & Aransas Pass with $54,338
decrease and the Western N ew York & Pennsylvania with
$49,916 decrease. The falling off in several of these latter
cases has been occasioned by heavy expenses. As re­
gards the gains, they come from widely separated sec­
tions, both in gross and net. Am ong those in the
gross we may enumerate the Reading with the Goal &
Iron Company, which has $698,638 increase, the Penn­
sylvania $547,479 increase, the St. Paul $272,916 in ­
crease, the Burlington & Quincy $262,260 increase,
the Central of New Jersey $154,211 increase, the
Illinois Central $143,832 increase, the Burlington
Cedar Rapids & Northern $127,329, the Mexican Cen­
tral $112,222, the Northern Pacific $109,022, the
Southern Railway $100,843, the Wabash $100,050, &c.
In the net the St. Paul has $339,757 increase, the
Northern Pacific $198,696, the Burlington & Quincy
$164,131, the Pennsylvania $157,311, the Illinois Cen­
tral $145,756, the Central of New Jersey $116,688, &c.
The following is a full list of the changes above $30,000— both losses and gains:
P R IN C IP A L

CHANGES

IN

P h i l . & R e a a l a a d e 0 . S| i f
P e n n s y l . ( 3 r o a d s ) f ............

G R O S S

E A R N IN G S

5 4 7 ,4 7 9
'2 7 2 , 9 1 6
2 6 8 ,2 6 0

C e n tra l o f N e w J e rs e y I l l i n o i s C e n t r a l ....................

1 5 4 ,2 1 1
1 4 3 ,8 3 2

B u r l, L e d . R a p . & N o r..
M e x i c a n C e n t r a l .................
N o r t h e r n P a c i f i c . ..............

1 2 7 ,3 2 9
1 1 2 ,2 2 2
1 0 9 ,0 2 2

S o u t h e r n . R a i l w a y ..............
W a b a s l i . . .............................
N a s h . C lia tt. & 8t . L . . . .

1 0 0 ,8 4 3
1 0 0 ,0 5 0
5 1 ,7 4 4

M e x . In te r n a tio n a l. . . .
B a i t . <fe O h i o ( 2 r o a d s ) .
C a n a d i a n P a c i f i c ..................

4 7 ,2 1 2
4 7 ,0 9 0

S ta te n

4 2 ,3 2 3

t T h e
g ro s s o n
lin e s $ 2 5 9 ,0 2 3 .

E a s te rn

lin e s

T o ta l

h
o
h
e

io . M ilw . &
rth e rn P a c
ic . B u r l. &
n n s y l. (3 m

$ 2 8 8 ,4 5 6

EARNINGS IN

22

1 4 5 ,7 5 6
1 1 6 ,6 6 8
7 1 ,3 3 9

S o u th . P a c ific

t T h e n e t in c r e a s e d
W e s te r n lin e s .

a n d

$ 3 5 3 ,9 0 7

o n

S E P T E M

1 5 7 ,3 i l l

M e x i c a n C e n t r a l ...................
W a h a s h ................. .. ........................
M e x i o a n N a t i o n a l ..............
S o u t h e r n R a i l w a y ..............

$ 1 6 3 ,4 9 4
1 1 0 ,3 1 3
4 1 ,9 5 3
3 8 ,1 4 7

W e s te rn

B E R

.

In crea ses

I l l i n o i s C e n t r a l .............. ...
C e n t r a l o f N e w .T e rs e y .
C a n a d ia n P a c if ic .
U n i o n P a c i f l e (6 r o a d s ) .

E. I l l i n o i s ............
B u rl. O il. B a p . & N or..

......................$ 3 , 0 1 6 , 7 8 0

( r e p r e s e n t in g

$ 3 3 9 ,7 5 7
1 9 8 ,6 9 6
1 6 4 ,1 3 1

&

3 2 ,8 5 1

1 4 r o a d s ) ..........................

S t . P a u . 1 ." .
i f l o __________
Q u in c y . ..
a d s ) t ____

C h ic .

S t, L .

S o u t h . P a c . (6 r o a d s ) . . *
U n i o n P a c i f i c (6 r o a d s ) .
n A n t. & A ra n s . P a s s
O r e g o n I m p r . C o .................
T o ta l

.

$ 4 2 ,2 0 6
4 0 ,8 4 6
3 3 ,3 6 6

8a

Increases*
O
N
C
P

B E R

( r e p r e s e n t in g

2 4 ro a d s )

in c r e a s e d

N E T

S E P T E M

C le w . C i n . C h i c . &

4 4 ,3 4 0

Is l. R a p . T r a n s it

IN

In c r e a s e s .
C h e s . & O h i o ...............................
M e x i c a n N a t i o n a l ............
C h ic a g o & E . I l l i n o i s . ..

$ 6 9 8 ,6 3 8

C h i c . M i l w . & S fc P ............
C h ic . B u r l . & Q u in c y . .

30.

In crea se.

Y ear
In crea se or
P r e c e d in g . D ec r e a s e .

Y ear
G iv en .

1 8 9 0 (1 2 7 )

PRINCIPAL CHANGES IN
S eptem ber.
( H I roads.)

N e t E a r n in g s .

E a rn in g s.

In c r ea se o r
Y ear
P reced in g . D ecrea se.

Y ear
G iv en .

7 0 ,9 8 4
6 8 ,4 6 5
6 8 ,3 0 7
6 1 ,0 6 5
5 1 ,3 7 9
4 5 ,9 0 5
3 3 ,5 5 8
$ 2 0 ,1 9 4

o n

S ta te n

Is l. R a p . T r a n s .

T o ta l

$ 3 1 ,4 4 6

( r e p r e s e n t in g
r o a d s ! ............

(6

$ 1 ,6 2 9 ,8 1 7

ro a d s )*

$ 2 3 0 ,2 0 2

A t . T o p . & S . F e (3 r ’ d s )
L o u is e . & N a s h v ille . . .

2 0 1 ,3 9 4 ,
1 1 8 ,2 4 1

P h il. & K e a d . a n d C . & I .
S a n A n t. & A ra u . P ass,
W e s te rn
& P e n n ..

1 0 3 ,4 8 9
5 4 ,3 3 8
4 9 ,9 1 6

N. Y .

T o ta l
1 4
E a s te rn

( r e p r e s e n t in g
r o a d s ) .......................
lin e s

a n d

$ 7 5 7 ,5 8 0

$ 1 3 7 ,1 3 7

THE

November 23, 18S5.]

CH RONICLE.

When arranged in groups, every group has an in ­
crease in gross with the exception of the Southwestern
and the Pacific, and every group an increase in net
with the exception of the Southwestern, the Southern
and the Eastern and Middle, the falling oil on the latter
two, however, being very trifling, leaving the South­
western as the only one with any considerable loss in
net, and for this the reduced cotton movement is of
course mainly responsible. The largest percentage of
improvement in net— namelv 22'67 per cent— is made
by the Northwestern group, where the heavy springwheat movement has played a prominent part in the
result ; only one road in that group has fallen behind
in the net, namely the Chicago Burlington & Northern.
In the Middle Western group the Increase in net is
15*08 per cent, but this is due almost entirely to the
favorable return of the Illinois Central.
&rom Earrnng*.

S x cr iu s OK
Group.

t«s83.

T o t . . m i f<t»>

m n.

vm .

•
t
IS.290.9S2 U^OB.127
im jr n 1
f.lS8v«2i
Ai43.«S0(
7,27S. H i
aw.
AS>17.272 4,934.9U
10.9|9,2SS 1LC<H.C09
M17JW58
L3tfS.6S»

Trank \tnm».(U)
Antbr*. eOftl.(T)
4 MM.flS.)
MM. Wetl'DJW
KonJa«re#t'a..t7)
ck?s;ti3w.;Bfml*>
PxeUSe CcrtM l Tf
U
Boa&*r&....(&4i
M exican...... (*i

3
*>
New Baffl'd.(IS)
TTaek Iln*#^ l7
AStfenrs. 00*1(14)
M w d i*... ..c m
Mid.
North west'll JVi
flootbirMt'Q a i l
1**0 O M ff(IB
C M
8oat6«m
K aztckfl.»... iti

N«t. Earning*.

tm i.

m j M .o m

t
5,irt2,22fr
t.S53.SVi
£23,041
1.44S.370
3,142,33^
i.329,647

Inc. or Dec.

»
s & o jm
1.320,171
mtjasn
U84H.S87
SjMBjait
1^00.430
4.33»),275
3J2ll.U3r.|
4W.7HS'

»
+ » ) 1,227
4-33,120
-B.5S0
+IS0.7B3
-iU.H2.522
-^•0.7)^3
-K00.83*
—4UK»
+1*7.739

P .C
3-H2
2*51
0*79
1608
22*67
10*39
2*54
0*19
30 60

20.7t3.189 is.nw.swl

-MGi.SSS

4*90

z m js a o
SW.SOT

S2.23»^7l! IS.ISS0.901
+1,094,235 8*22
17U»2.*25 6^073,982 SU S«,I8“ > +4.937,790 980
15.t35».4>7 +1.2**0»f5!
t9.tm.4tsf WUS1.012
8*28
10.702,984 io,S9M8it; +410.000 mm
s v n s .070 z v jti.n m
m jm m m a o jm ,n > ; I0.0IS.IB5 a,0«c\335 -F1,075ijm 24*54
m jm jm
UMKMM1 IM O M U l + 1,*07.901 r s i
«yr««,W 3 I t U W K I 9^22.021 J +82S.019, m s
77.»i*.TU *M70..‘rl3 23,103,430-; 4 8.707.074 11*97
Z K m .in ; iS^»2.VVl W W K 7U I4t*y79.:i97j ~21«.6*3 1*39
13-JU.1M
4,442J m
4,417,900| + 1.124,423 25*46
8U.74HS02 STMMUMB 1*0.199JKA 73^7*KAy>. 4-l5,*70U4Ca

Te*~ fins

8*91

T ti* fo llnw tn jr U a Hut of lb© road* Include*! an*l«*r ea ch ffroup lo the
forecot n s ta b to:

H KtjLfu
ew n s i.

ftwf'n «nk

A M ain*.4

< > *4 *0 *6 . 4

Omj

B
ats*** £ Aro-m
u-ik." .X. Y. 1'hil*. A Noef.4
Bofmtntft-.n A RatlMtf.* X. v. A K-ck. Bwucti."
j Xtw tn *'*ntra4.
ihm
£ Albanv.4

C b a m p !-*

ft. R, A Lynn.*
?Piro#04K*t Park 4 C, L#l.*
Rfidcittjn A
Kir
•HatMQ UUn-l K. T
Cl*r «oa4ors S l*»u»ford.4 jSumy Cior* 4 C Ml
t
*
Pitotttnsrff ,*
:
4 !W aw are,

{too*** r. * wu.4

M C* tr • *
ain* * » l

N«w iKmfatn Northern.*

B WM w
+ : MW

I Valley.*

W t#m Sid,
m

* Wtntam
N. T, S ..................
It 4 Hartford-,"
Phil. R*wfrwr 4 X. IS. *
VmmmrA V«|l«y,*
frw*k Lttwi.
B. 4 0.. F*«t «,f Ohio.

Ctattfcdfani Pactfle.
N o r th e r n P n e tB c .
Ur*tfon lm pnor*a»*at Co.
Rio Grand# Weetifffi.
Han. Pram. 4 North. Pan.

4 Branch**.

H, Y. 4 P*on.

i C h l i s . 4 IS , l i f e *
i
t f a i t M ia h *

Uo, Pa*. iJ tiT 4 trait.
a .
W * 4 *fo'»en**n.
PlldlC C U
iHt
.

I’ tciOc. -

Qat. lia r. 4 a A
j f^oala. W«at«rf4.
Sfonrau'* U , 4 T.

M. T . T * t . 4 M at
; T**'« m 4 S qw O r lean#.
!

f*aclQ
«

90S

For the nine months ending September 30 we are
able to include a good many road3 which will not fur­
nish monthly returns. For this period every group
save only the Northwestern has a gain in gross, and
every group, with the exception of the Southern, an
increase in net. The aggregate increase is $33,250,972, or 5-75 per cent, in the gross, and $15,470,308, or
8'91 per cent, in the net. W ith reference to the large
percentage of increase for the Middle Western section,
the same remark holds good as in the case of the result
for Septem ber, it is due largely to the exceptionally
favorable return of the Illinois Central.

THE

NEW

TRUN K-LIN E

AGREEMENT.

The new Trunk-Line agreement was unanimously
approved by the Presidents of the Trunk Lines and
their principal Western connections at a meeting held
on Tuesday, November 19. Since the publication by
us in our issue of October 12 of the form of the contract
submitted at the meeting on October 10 (and which as
stated at the time after being slightly changed had
then received the approval of the Presidents of the
roads), the agreement has been revised several times,
and in the process of revision has been amended in
important particulars, S me of the alterations have
clearly been made with the view to avoiding any
doubt as to the legality of the contract. Other amend­
ments, however, have also now been incorporated in
the agreement, and these it seems to us are calculated
to weaken the compact. We make some comments on
the subject in our article on the Financial Situation.
The following is the agreement in f u l l .
A G R E E M E N T AS F IN A LLY A D O P T E D .
PREAMBLE.
PCTKrOHffa OF THIS AtiREE-MBbT.

T o a id in fu lfliliiiK th e p u r p o s e s o f th e I n te r -S ta te C o m ­
m e r c e A c t , to c o o p e r a t e w ith e a c h o th e r a n d a d ja c e n t tr a n s­
p o r ta tio n a s so c ia tio n s, to esta b lish a n d m a in ta in re a s o n a b le
a n d ju s t rates, fa r , s, ru le s a n d r e g u la tio n s o n S ta te a n d In te rS ta te tr a ffic , t o p r e v e n t u n ju s t d is c r im in a t io n a n d to s e c u r e
th e r e d u c tio n a n d c o n c e n t r a t io n o f a g e n c ie s a n d th e in tr o ­
d u c t io n o f e c o n o m ie s in th e c o n d u c t o f th e fr e ig h t a n d pas­
s e n g e r s e r v ic e , ih e

B a ltim o re .feOhio KH. Co..
B a ltim o re A Ohio B outhW n R v Oo.
f t n i n l UU, Co ot N. J ,,
C h e sa p ea k e , t Ohio R y. Co.,
Clilragro A E rie RK. Co,.
C hloaao * G ranil T ru n k R v. Co,.
C lev e. C ln. C hie. & St. L H r. Co.,
Del, L eek. A W estern UR. Co.,

New Y ork C hie. A S t. I,. ItR. Co.,
New Y ork O ut. * W est. liy . Co.,
N orthern C ontrol R y, Co.,
P e n n sy lv a n ia C om p any,
IV n u sy lv a n la R R. C o m p an y,
P h il* . .V R ea d in g HR. Co.,
Philo, wtlm. ,v B a lt. RR. Co..

Onion P a * O . P. Hr
Or*. «h . L. 4 Utah 4 i r
4 Or. Ialand.
Pl(tsl). & l.akn Erie RR. Oo.,
Kan. OUT 4 Omaha.
D e t r o it O r a n d l l a v . A M ll. R y . C o .,
PHtsli. ,V Western Ry. Co.,
O tntral Branch. 4 c.
ALeh’n Col. 4 I*ac.
E rie HR. C om pany,
P itts. C ln. Ohio. ,V S t L. R y. Co..
Vlaalla 4 Talar*.G rand R ap id s a Ind. RR. Co.,
T erro H a u te ,k In d ia n a p o lis HR
J r fmH V .
kttth tKU
G rand T ru n k R y, Oo. of C an ad a,
Co. (V a n d a lln L in e ),
Alabama Midland,
L ak e Sho re & Mteh. So. R y. Co.,
T oledo P o o n a .V W estern R y . Co.,
lo a n a A Wwtt P o'at.
LehlKti V a lle y R R . Co.,
W abash R R . Co..
A tla n tic4 l>«nr.
M ichigan C en tral RR. Co.,
W est Sho re R R. Co.,
Sir. 4 A tlantic
Bran.wick 4 W estern.
N.Y. C en tra l & H a d . R iv. R R. Co.,
Carolina Midland.
d o h e r e b y c o n s t it u t e th e J o in t T r a ffic A s s o c ia t io n (h e r e in a ft e r
Central of Georgia. ♦
Cbarmar 4 OarPrurton.
c a lle d th e a s s o c ia t io n ), a n d m a k e th is a g r e e m e n t f o r th e
Chesapeake 4 Ohio.
p u rp o s e o f c a r r y in g o u t th e o b je c t s a b o v e n a m e d . O th e r
<7h*s. Ohio 4
Cln. 4 Ken. Hoothern.t
c o m p a n ie s rnay b e c o m e m e m b e r s of th e asso ciatio n as p r o ­
Col. Netrp. 4 U n rtn t.*
v id e d jn
"Sid e T h r e e .
•
0*d«4«n 4 Attala Un.
Oeonrta.
A R T IC LE ONE.
Ouortfla 4 Alabama.
1
«* » dottioern 4 rta .
HOARDS OP ADMINISTRATION O r TIIK ASSOCIATION.
j . T
>
4
_ iW ahaM hCnoaiar 4 W e * c * O u jf 4 C h io w o .
4!
. Tampa 4 K, W.
mmm** m . * n , t *
am
S e c . 1. T h e a ffa ir s o f th e a s so c ia tio n s h a ll b e a d m in is te r e d
N. r . Ontario 4 w#*t.
Bore o *4«r Ran. 4 Nor. Kan. City Mem. 4 Bir,
b y th ree b o a r d s , w ith d u tie s as h e r e in a fte r s p e c ifie d :
i/exlriiiton 4 K astf
SC f . 3m*q. 4 West,
i'Chkk B «n . 4 North.
B an, 4 Qtuney.
Phi la. 4 FUadfn*.
Lou 1 ! 1»e 4 Nashville
st
(a) A b o a rd o f c o n t r o l.
Macon 4 Birmingham.
Chlft, Mii. 4 St Pa«l.
Ooal 4 Iron,
(b ) A b o a rd o f m a n a g e rs h e r e in a fte r c a lle d th e m a n a g ers.
I>af«eh % Iron Ran*®.*
ttunm it Branoo,
Memphis 4 Charleston.
l»sk#ns V«1 Coal.
Mobile 4 Ohio.*
o u t a s . 4 Ati.*
(c) A b oa rd o f a r b itr a tio n h e r e in a fte r c a lle d th e a r b itr a t­
Nash. Chat. 4 Ht. 1* u 1
*
|o«ra Central
m
***t*mand Mufciis.
Adlrmdu-k.
Northeastern o f Geoncla. ors.
Kwnkok 4 Westetn.
Addlw.n 4 Penn.4
Ohio H irer.
Minn. 4 dt.
S e c . 2. W h e r e v e r th e te r m tr a ffic is u sed h erein it m ea n s
vTrttfAlMOm.
Annamdi* Wash. 4 Bal. ♦
Ohio H irer 4 Charles.
Petenbunr.
b oth fr e ig h t a n d p a ssen g er tr a ffic
Arkansas Midland.
Aftarheny Vallwt.
Baeeor 4 Arooatook.t
Rich. Fred. 4 Pot.
Aten. Top. %*»ania
Ht,
4 Han Fran.
Bath A Hammond sport,
Rich, 4 Petersoarx.
A R T IC LE TWO
Brooklyn KleTated
H*r. Fla. 4 W estern.
Allan? ic 4 Pact fid.
TRAFFIC 8CR.IKCT TO TUB ASSOCIATION.
Barr. Roan. 4 Pin*.
Stir. Bpffs. Ocala fit Gulf.4
Atwtln 4 Trjrth west.
Buffalo 4 Htis^rBehanna.*
______ _________Ds«T#f 4 Rio (ir.
Southern R -llw ay
S e c . 1. The. a s so c ia tio n sh a ll h a v e ju r is d ic t io n o v e r a ll c o m ­
Tonnelton Klnffm.4 F ar.4
4 Attamte.
QmMR b i At'sntMi.
Kareka Springs.
,_
, Bberland all*r.
p e titiv e tr a ffic (s u b je c t to th e e x c e p t io n s n o te d in S e c t io n 2 o f
Cam her land V alles.
P», Worth 4 Rio Grand# j W aste'll of Alabama.
Kan. C. Pt. H 4 Mem.
|West Va. C. 4 I*.
OonkiTte At. V. 4 P 4
th is a r tic le ) w h ic h passes to, fr o m o r th r o u g h th e w e s te rn
K»n. City Northwestern.* VVrttfhisT. 4 TenniUe.
Kim Ira Port, 4 No.4
Kan. Cits 4 Beatrice.*
tfasfia* /load*
te r m in i o f th e tr u n k lin es, v iz ., T o r o n t o . C a n .; S u sp e n sio n
Fan Brook.4
tfooaao Tun. 4 ......
s- - -_________ WU.*
Rio Grand* Bonthem.
Mexican Central.
B r id g e , N ia g a ra F a lls, T o n a w a n d a , B la ck R o c k , B u ffa lo , E ast
.Jamestown 4 I/»ke Krl*. Ht. I»tiUp South western.* Mexican International
!*»«« lsliM
l*!.4
B A 4 A. Pas*.
aa rif,
M
exican N
ational.
B u ffa lo , B u ffa lo J u n c t io n , D u n k ir k a n d S a la m a n c a , N. Y . ;
.Mantiatfan Bier at ed .4 filverton.
'Mexican Northern,
E r ie , P itts b u r g and A lle g h e n y , P a .; B ella ire, O h io ; W h e e lin g ,
| k i a « k . 4 Macig.
'‘%

Bv 4 O - W «*» o f Ohlm.
, c*». Lahanoct 4 No.*
B. 4 O. 9oathw«at*rn.
fCta. Port*. 4 V irginia.
Cia*. t%*. ♦h;c. 4 Bt, I*.
4 Hooih’a .
P fw rti 4 Ka»t*rfn.
tUtHU Lart*. 4 N*r.
Qran4 Trunk of Canada. ! thRrdU 4 Markina©.
Chfs. 4 <*4. Trank.
*1#tn i o o # « 4 K is to m ,
Detroit Or,Ha*. 4 MM. ;flin t 4 Pera Marq.
L*k# dtinv* 4 Mlcb.
Orntd flap 'll<4 Ind,
•
X. T. f'«rat. 4 Had. It*
lUlnot* Caetraf.
N.T.Chtow • 4 St. !- •
■ _______
Ia4lar»a D*e. 4 W.
P « 8 * i n . Kaat of p, 4 15 tad. lit. 4 1
Pitta. 4 B l k l j ( r » n R aiiw ar.
PhUadnlphia 4 Krl*K anaw ha 4 Michigan.
PtUah. Cltt. Oh. A S t L Lake K, Alllan** 4 + j.
puta. Toaiig*. 4 A*b. Lak* Krl a 4 VF<*»t.
W*taMh
Lottltr. N. A. 4 Chie.
A n fb r< u it* O o f
j M .«
3 k
Central of Xmw
i Pitta. Mar. 4 CtoioMlo.
0*1- 4 Hoflxsm—
: PUfsbarif 4 Wm m .
tH m
AliMia? 4 Ho#fjoM9li,jxa.4'^a*. Fa*. 4 fffft.
ff. V. 4 Canada.4
mm V »li*r 4 H Umls.
O
R#nm, 4 Barntnffa.*
Tr>i*do 4 Ohio Central.

ft* J e rs e y 4

N ew

T o rk .*

' T e x . H n h .V a l.4 N .W * s rt.F

i M o n te re y 4

M e x . G o lf.*

* For monf-h only.
* For the nine months onlr.
t Wesnef ad * these WkKsrtl lines in oar table by taking an ostlmate for 1SU4
00 which to has# th e incrm#t or fUer&u* reported fo r th is year.

P a r k e r sb u r g , C h a r le sto n a n d K e n o v a , W . V a ., a n d A s h la n d ,
K y ., aDd s u c h o th e r p oin ts a s m a y h e r e a fte r he d e sig n a te d b y
th e m a n a g e rs as su ch te r m in i: a lso a ll tr a ffic w h ic h m a y pass

fH E

904

[ V o l , L X I.

CHRONICLE.

„th**r ju n c tio n s o f th e co m p a n ie s p arties h e re to w h ich
th rou gh
w h i n p a w in g th r o u g h a n y o f th e te rm in i o r ju n c it inclui
o v e o r liereaD er s p e cifie d , a n d su ch o th e r traffic. as
tion s al
-oitn n on c o n se n t o f th e parties be h e re a fte r in c lu d e d
m a y by
' f f l c V T h e fo llo w in g sh all n ot b e in clu d e d :
,
( t i O w l, c o k e , iron o re , m ill c in d e r , lim e sto n e a n d p tro"d estin ed t> o r c o m in g f r o m F lo r id i, G e o r g ia ,

Horth and S o u th C a ro lin a . V .r g in ia and W e s t V ir g in ia sou th
o f the sou th lin e o f th e C h e sa p e a k e & O l i o R a ilw a y .

ARTICLE TH REE.
TUB BOARD OF CONTROL.

S e t . 1. T h e p resid en ts o f th e co m p a t ies fo r m in g th e asso­
c ia t io n and o f su ch o th e r c o m p a n ie s as m a y ^ o m e p a rlie s
( .t to >hall co n stitu te the b o a rd o f 0 in tro l, w h ic h shall m eet
m e w ritte n requ est o f a n y th ree o f its m e m b e rs.
, . c . 2 In ca se o f the a b sen ce o f a n y m e m b e r o f th e b o a rd
o f c o n tr o l fr o m a m e e tin g the n e x t ra n k in g o ffic e r in such
c o m p a n y h a v in g ju r is d ic tio n o v e r traffic w ill h a v e a u th o r ity
t o a c ; in h is p la ce a n d stead.
. . . . . .
„„
t>n 3. E a ch m e m b e r o f th e b o a rd o f c o n tr o l shall ba e n ­
titled to o n e v ote, e x c e p t th a t n o s y s te m as d esig n a ted in
A r t ic le F ou r shall h av e m o r e th an th re e v o te s in th e a g g re ^ It shall r q u ire th re e -fo u rth s o f th e e n tire n u m b e r o f
a u th o r ize d v o te s to a d o p t a n y p r o p o sitio n c o m in g b e fo r e the
b oa rd o f c o n t r o l.
. .. _
.
,
S ec 4 T h e b o a rd o f c o n tr o l shall fix tha salaries o f an y
c o m m is s io n e r s a p p o in te d b y the m a n a gers.
T h e salurirs o ’ o th e r o ffice r s a n d e m p lo y e e s o f th e a s so c ia ­
tio n sh all b e s u b je c t to its r e v ie w a n d a p p r o v a l.
T h e board o f c o n tr o l shall s e le ct th e a rb itr a to r s a n d fix
th eir com p* n sation a n d te rm o f s e rv ice .
S a c 5. T h e board o f c o n tr o l shall a p p o in t a n a u d itin g c o m ­
m itte e , w h o shall e x a m in e a n d re p o rt to it u p o n th e a c c o u o ts
o f th e a ssociation .
.
8 a c . 6. T n e b o a rd o f c o n tr o l shall p re scrib e th e co n d itio n s
a n d ru'eSfU nder w h ich a d d itio n a l r a ilw a y sy ste m s o r c o m ­
pan ies shall b e c o m e parties h ereto a n d b s re p re se n te d u p o n
th e b oa rd o f m a n a gers.
S e c . 7. O ily th e b o a r d o f c o n tr o l sh a ll c o n sid e r a p p e ils
fr o m th e a ctio n o f th e m a n a g ers o 1 a ll q u e stio n s as to rates
o r fares, e x c e p t d iffe re n tia ls.
S e c 8. P e n d in g d e c isio n s b y the b o i r d o f c in tr o l th e d e c is ­
io n s and ord ers o f the m in a g e r s s h i l l p r e v a il.

p a n ies u n d e r th e a u t h o r ity a n d ru les o f t i n B o a r d o f C o n t r o l.
S e c . 8. E a c h m a n a g e r s h il l h old o ffic e d u r in g th e c o n t i n u ­
a n c e o f th is a g r e e m e n t, s u b je c t to th e p le a s u re o f , a n d s h a ll
be c o m p e n s a te d b y , th e s y s te m a p p o in t in g h im .

A R T IC LE F IV E .
RELATING TO THE DUTIES AND POWERS OF THE MANAGERS.

S e c . 1. T h e m a n a g e rs sh all h a v e th e ir p r in c ip a l o ffic e in
N ew Y o r k C ity a n d sh a ll c o n t in u e in sessi >n s u b je c t t o
th e ir ru les. T h e y sh a ll e le c t a c h a ir m a n a n n u a lly .
S e c . 2. T h e m a n a g e rs sh a ll a d o p t th e ir r u le s a n d p e r fe c t
th e ir o r g a n iz a tio n . I t s h a ll, h o w e v e r , re q u ir e th e a ffir m a tiv e
v otes o f th r e e -fo u r th s o f th e ir e n tir e n u m b e r t o a d o p t a n y
p r o p o s itio n c o m in g b e fo r e th e m .
S e c . 3. In c o n s id e r in g q u e s tio n s w h ic h e x c e p t io n a lly a ffe c t
th e in terests o f a n y c o m p a n y p a r ty h e r e to u n r e p r e s e n te d
u p on th e b o a r d o f m a n a g ers, su ch c o m p a n y s h a ll b e a d v is e d
th e r e o f a n d be a ffo r d e d an o p p o r tu n ity u n d e r th e r u le s o f th e
m a n a g ers f o r p r e se n tin g to th e m its v ie w s b e fo r e fin a l a c t io n
is ta k e n .
,
, „
S e c . 4. T h e m a n a g e r s sh a ll c o n s tr u e th is a g r e e m e n t a n d all
r e s o lu tio n s a d o p te d th e re u n d e r.
S e c . 5. A l l a p p lic a tio n s f o r d iffe r e n tia ls a n d f o r c h a n g e s in
rates, fa r e s, c h a r g e s a n d ru les sh a ll b e m a d e to th e m a n a g e rs .
T h e ir a c tio n u p o n d iffe r e n tia ls a n d u p o n a ll q u e s t io n s e x c e p t
as t o ra tes a n d fa r e s sh a ll b e s u b j - c t to a p p e a l, b u t o n ly to
th e a rb itra tors. T h e ir a c tio n as to rates a n d fa r e s ( e x c e p t
d iffe r e n tia ls ) s h il l be s u b j c t to a p p e a l o n ly t o th e b o a r d o f
c o n tr o l.
, „ ,
. . .
D e c is io n s a n d o rd e rs o f th e m a n a g e r s s h a ll b e c o m p lie d
w ith u n t il s u c h a p p ea ls are d e c id e d .

A R T IC LE SIX .
APPOINTMENT OF COMMISSIONERS.

T h e m a n a g e rs m a y a p p o in t n o t m o r e th a n th r e e c o m m is ­
sion ers a n d s h a ll d efin e th e ir p o w e r s a n d d u tie s .
ARTICLE SEVEN
RATES, FARES, CHARGES ANI) RULES, THEIR OBSERVANCE AND RELATION
TO INTER-STATE ACT

S e c . 1. T h e d u ly p u b lish e d s c h e d u le s o f ra te s , fa r e s a n d
c h a r g e s , a d th e ru les a p p lic a b le th e r e to n o w iu f o r c e a n d
a u t h o r iz e d b y th e c o m p a n ie s p a rties h e re to u p o n th e tr a ffic
c o v e r e d b y th is a g r e e m e n t (a n d file d w ith th e I n te r -S ta te
C o m m e r c e C o m m is s io n as to s u c h o f s a id tr a ffic as is in t e r ­
s t a t e ) . are h e reb y r e a ffirm e d b y th e c o m p a n ie s c o m p o s in g th e
a s so c ia tio n , arid th e c o m p a n n s p a rties h e r e to s h a ll w it h in
ten d a y s a ft e r th is a g r e e m e n t b e c o m e s e ffe c t iv e file w it h th e
m a n a g e rs co p ie s o f all s u c h s ch e d u le s o f ra tes, fa r e s a n d
ch arg* s a n d th e ru les a p p lic a b le th e r e to .
A RTICLE FOUR.
S e c . 2. T h e m a n a g e r s sh all fr o m t im e to t im e r e c o m m e n d
THE BOARD OF MANAGERS.
s u c h c h a n g e s in sa id rates, fa r es, c h a r g e s a n d ru les as m a y be
S ec 1. The board of m an agers sh ill consist of not less than r e a s o n a b le a n d ju s t a n d n e c e s s ir y f o r g o v e r n in g th e tr a ffic
n in e m em bers, of w hich each of the follow in g nine system s c o v e r e d b y th is a g r e e m e n t and f o r p r o t e c t in g th e in te re sts o f
sh a ll design ate one :
th e p a rties h e r e to th e re in , a n d th e fa ilu r e to o b s e r v e s u c h
B ilt im o r e & O o io S v s ‘ e m , n o w c m p ris in g th e B a ltim o r e & r e c o m m e n d a tio n s b y a n y p a rty h e r e to as a n d w h e n m a d e
O h io R ailroad lin e fr o m P u iU d e lp b ia to P a rk e rsb u rg a n d s h a ll b e d e e m e d a v io la t io n o f th is a g r e e m e n t . N o c o m p a n y
fr o m P n il id e lp h ia to C h ic a g o , v ia W h e e lin g and via P it s- p a r ty h e r e t o sh a ll t h r o u g h a n y o f its o ffic e r s o r a g e n ts d e v ia te
b u r g a n d G o n n e lls v ille ; B i l t i m i r e & O h io S o u th w e s ern ,
f r o m o r c h a n g e th e rates, fa r e s, c h a r g e s o r ru le s h e re in r e ­
C le v e la n d T erm in al & V a lle y and th e P itts b u r g & W estern
a ffirm e d o r s o r e c o m m e n d e d b y th e m a n a g e r s , e x o e p t b y a
ra ilroa d c o m p a n ie s , and all th e ir lea sed , c o n tr o lle d o r o p e r ­ r e s o lu tio n o f its b oa rd . T h e a c tio n o f s u c h b o a r d s h a ll n o t
ated lin ts.
a ffe c t th e rates, fares, c h a r g e s o r ru les d is a p p r o v e d , e x c e p t to
C h esap eak e & O hi S y ste m , n o w c o m p r is in g th e C h tsa p ake th e e x t e n t o f its in te re st th e re in o v e r its o w n r o a d . A c o p y
& O h io, C le v e la n d C in cin n a ti C n ic a g o & S t. L o u is and o f th e r e s o lu tio n o f th e b oa rd o f a n y c o m p a n y p a r ty h e r e to
lin es c o m p o s in g that sy ste m , K a n k a k e e & S e n e ca and the a u t h o r iz in g a n y su ch c h a n g e sh a ll be im m e d ia t e ly f o r w a r d e d
P e o r ia & E astern ra ilro a d c o m p a n ie s , a n d all th e ir leased, b y th e c o m p a n y m a k in g th e sa m e to th e m a n a g e r s , a n d s u c h
co n tr o lle d o r o p e ra te d lines.
c h a n g e sh a ll n o t b e c o m e e ffe c t iv e u n t il th ir t y d a y s a ft e r th e
E r ie Syst* rn, n o w o o m n risiilg th e E rie R a ilro a d C o m p a n y and d a te o f th e r e c e ip t o f s u c h re s o lu tio n b y th e m in a g e r s
The
the C h ica g o & E rie R a ilro a d C o m p a n y , a n d a ll th e ir leased, m a n a g ers, u p o n r e c e iv in g s u c h n o tic e , sh a ll a c t p r o m p t ly
c o n tro lle d o r o p e ra te d lines.
u p o n th e sa m e f o r th e pr itection o f th e p a rti s h e re to .
G ra n d T ru n k S y ste m , n o w c o m p r is in g th e G ra n d T ru n k
S e c 3, T h e p o w e r s c o n fe r r e d u p o n th e m a n a g - r s s h a ll b e
R a ilw a y C o m p a n y o f C a n a d a a n d its a ffiliation s w est o f th e so c o n str u e d a n d e x e r c is e d as n o t to p e r m it v io la t io n o f th e
S t. C la ir R iv e r , v iz , th e C h ic a g o & G ra n d T r u n k , C in c in ­ I n te r-S ta te C o m m e r c e A c t o r a n y o th e r la w a p p lic a o le t o th e
n ati S a g in a w & M a ck in a w , D e tro it G ra n d H a v e n & M il­ p r e m ise s o r a n y p r o v is io n o f th e c h a r te r s o r th e la w s a p p lic a ­
w a u k e e , M ich iga n A ir L in e and th e T o le d o S a g in a w & Mus- b le to a n y o f th e c o m p a n ie s p a rries h e r e to , a n d th e m a n a g e rs
g o n ra il v a v c o m p a n ie s , a n d a ll th e ir leased, c o n tr o lle d o r sh a ll c o -o p e r a t e w ith ih e I n t e r s t a t e C o m m e r c e C o m m is s io n
op era ted li as
t o s e c u r e s ta b ility a n d u n ifo r m it y in th e ra tes, fa r e s , c h a r g e s
L a c k a w an i a S ystem , n o w co m p r is in g th e D ela v a re L a c k a ­ a n d ru le s esta b lish ed h e re u n d e r.
w a n n a & W e s le rn R tilroad and ils leased lin es, a n d the
A R T IC LE EIG H T.
S y r a c u se B iD gh am ton & N e w Y o r k R a ilro a d , a n d a ll th eir
PROPORTIONS OF COMPETITIVE TRAFFIC.
leas*d, co n tr o l), d o r o p e r a te d lines.
T h e m a n a g e rs are c h a r g e d w ith th e d u t y o f s e c u r in g to e a ch
L e h ig h V a lle y S y s e m , n o w c o m p r is in g the L e h ig h V a lley
c o m p a n y p a r ty h e r e to e q u it a b le p r o p o r t io n s o f th e c o m p e t it iv e
R a ih o a d , and all its lea sed , c o n tr o lle d o r op erated lines.
P e n r s y lv a t i a S y s te m , n o w c o m p r is in g th e A lle g h e n y V a lle y , tr a ffic c o v e r e d by th is a g r e e m e n t s > fa r as c a n be le g a lly d o n e .
A R T IC L E NINE.
C u m b erla n d V a lle y , C in cin n a ti & M u sk in g u m V a lle y , G ra n d
R a p id s & In d ia n a , N o rth e rn C en tra l. P e n n s y lv a n ia , P e n n ­ RELATIONS TO NON-OONCURRING COMPANIES AND DIVISION OF RATES
AND FARES.
sy lv a n ia C o m p a n y , P h ila d e lp h ia W ilm in g t o n & B altim ore,
S e c . 1. T h e m a n a g e rs s h a ll d e c id e a n d e n fo r c e th e c o u r s e
P it 'e b u r g C in cin n a ti C h ic a g o & St. L o u is a n d T e rre H au te
& In d ia n a p o lis (V a n d a lia L in e ) ra ilro a d c o m p a n ie s, and w h ic h s h a ll be p u rsu e d w ith c o n n e c t in g c o m p a n ie s n o t p a rtie s
to th is a g r e e m e n t w h ic h fa il o r d e c lin e to o b s e r v e th e rates,
all th eir leas d , c o n tr o lle d o r o p e r a te d lines.
V a n d m ilt S y ste m , n o w c o m o n s in g the B eech C re e k , C a n ­ fa r e s, c h a r g e s a n d ru les e s ta b lis h e d u n d e r th is a g r e e m e n t .
a d a South* ru a n d its leaded lines, D u n k ir k A lle g h e n y V a l ­ T h e in terests o f c o m p a n ie s p a rties h e r e to in j ir io u s ly a ffe c t e d
ley & P ittsb u rg . L a k e S h o re & M ich ig a n S o u th e rn , M ich i­ b y su ch a c tio n o f th e m a n a g e rs sh a ll, in su ch in sta n ce s , b e a c ­
c o r d e d re a s o n a b le p r o te c t io n in sn fa r as th e m a n a g e r s c a n
g a n C en tral and its leased lin es. N e w Y o r k C e n tra l & H u d
s o n R iv e r , N e w Y o r k C h ic a g o & S t. L o u is . P it 's b u r g & le g a lly d o so.
S e c . 2. W h e n in th e ir ju d g m e n t n e c e ss a r y to th e p u r p o s e s
L a k e E r ie , R o m e W a te r to w n & O g d s n s b u r g , W a ik ill V a lle y
a n d W est S h o re ra ilroa d co m p a n ie s , and a ll th eir leased, o f th is a g r e e m e n t, th e m a n a g e rs m a y d e t e r m in e th e d iv is io n s
o f rates a n d fa r e s b e tw e e n c o n n e c t in g o o m p in i e s p ir c ie s
con troH - d o r o p e ra te d lines.
W a b a -li S y s e m , n o w c o m p r is in g th e W .ib a sh R u T road and h e r e to a n d b e tw e e n th e m a n d c o n n e c t io n s n o t p ir t ie s h e r e to ,
a ll its leased, c o n tr o lle d o r o p e r a te d lin es east o f th e M issis­ k e e p in g iu v ie w u n ifo r m it y a n d th e e q u itie s in v o lv e d .
sip p i R iv er.
A RTIC LE TEN.
S ec 2. A d d itio n a l m a n a g e rs r e p re se n tin g o th e r sy ste m s or
LIMITATION OF POW ERS OF FREIGHT LINES.
c o m p a n ie s w h ic h are n o w o r m a y h e re a fte r b e c o m e parties to
I t is r e c o g n iz id a n d a g r e e d th a t e c o n o m y in th e o p e r a t io n
th is a g re e m e n t, m a y b e d e sig n a te d l>7 su ch sy ste m s o r c o m ­ V
th r o u g h c o -o p e r a t iv e a n d c o m m is s io n f r e ig h t lin e s a n d th e

THE

N ovember 23 1SU5.J

905

CH RO N ICLE.

lim ita t io n o r te r m in a tio n o f m a n y o f th e ir e x is t in g p o w e r s
a n d f i m c tic n s a re a b s o lu te ly r e q u ir e d , a n d th e co m p a n ie s
p a rties h e r e to w ill a c t i v e ly c o -o p e r a t e w it h th e m a n a g e rs a n d
s o m a n a g e s u c h lin e s as to a c c o m p lis h s u c h re su lts.

co m p an y so w ith d ra w in g sh a ll be e n title d to th e re sid u e o f
the fu n d s it h a s c o n tiib u te d .
A R T IC L E N IN E T E E N .
BOARD OP ARBITRATION.

A RTIC LE ELEVEN.

S ec . 1. There sh a ll be a p erm an en t b oard of a r b itr a tio n
c o n sistin g of three d isin te re sted persons to w h ich a p p e a ls
T h e m a n a g e r s sh a ll h a v e a u t h o r ity to o r g a n iz e s u c h jo i n t sh a ll be m ade a s to a ll qu estio n s, in c lu d in g d iffe re n tia ls, a r i s ­
fr e ig h t a n d p a s s e n g e r a g e n c ie s as t h e y m a y d e e m d e sira b le , in g u n d er th is a g re em en t, ex cep t th e d e te rm in a tio n of r a t e s
p r o v id e d th at i f s u c h j o i n t a g e n c ie s a te e s ta b lis h e d th e y s h a ll an d fares.
b e s o a rra t g e d as w ill g i v e p r o p e r re p r e s e n ta tio n t o e a ch c o m ­
S ec . 2. A ll d ifferences b etw een th e p a rtie s h ereto a s to
p a n y p a r t y h e re to .
a n y la w fu l m easu re n ec e ssary to c a r r y out the o b je cts of th e
asso ciatio n , excep t a s to ra te s an d fare s, sh a ll be su b m itte d to
A R T IC L E T W E L V E .
a n d be fin a lly decided b y th e a rb itra to rs.
MANAGERS TO APPROVE CONTRACTING AGENCIES.
S ec . 3. P e n d in g decisio n s of the a rb itra to rs th e d e cisio n s
N o s o lie iiin g o r c o n t r a c t in g p a -s e n g e r o r fr e ig h t a g e n c y
s h a ll be m a in ta in e d d ir e c t ly o r in d ir e c t ly b y a n y o f th e c o m ­ an d o rd ers of th e board of co n tro l a n d m a n a g e rs sh a ll p re ­
p a n ie s p a rties h e r e to o r b y a n y fr e ig h t lin e in c o n n e c t io n v a il.
S ec . 4 H earin g s sh a ll be h ad upon a ll q u estio n s a r b itr a te d ,
w ith th e tr a ffic c o v e r e d b y th is a g r e e m e n t , e x c e p t w ith th e
a p p r o v a l o f th e m a n a g e rs , a n d n o p e r so n w h o is d e c id e d b y u n d er th e Tides estab lish ed b y th e a rb itra to rs a n d a p p ro v e d
th e m a n a g e r s to b e o b je c t io n a b le s h a ll be e m p lo y e d o r c o n ­ by th e board of con tro l, a n d the d ecision of th e a rb itr a to rs o r
of a n y t w o of th em sh a ll be fin al.
tin u e d in s u c h a g e n c y .
MANAGERS MAT ORGANIZE JOIST AOENCIES.

A R T IC L E TW ENTY.

A R T IC LE TH IR TE EN .
MANAGERS SHALL DEFINE DOTIES OF CONTRACTING AGENCIES.

AMENDMENTS.

S iC . 1. T h e m a n a g tr s s h a ll d e fin e ih e a u t h o r it y a n d d u tie s
o f a ll p erso n s a c t in g as c o n t r a c t in g a n d s o lic it in g f i e i g h t a n d
p a s s e n g e r a g e n ts in r e la tio n t o th e tr a ffic c o v e r e d H ereby,
a n d , w ith d u e te g a r d t o th e r e la tiv e in te re sts in v o lv e d , th e y
m a y d e te r m in e th e n u m b e r o f s u c h p e rso n s to be e m p lo y e d .
T h e p a rtie s h » r e t o s h a ll o b se i ve a n d e n fo r c e th e o rd e rs o f the
m a n a g e r s f r o m lim e to t im e issu ed in th a t b e h a lf.
S ec . 2. S u c h c o n t r a c t in g a n d s o lic it in g a g e n ts as th e m a n ­
a g e rs a p p o in t s h a ll b e c a r r ie d u p o n th e p a y -r o lls o f th e a sso ­
c ia t io n .
S e c . 3. T h e G r a n d T r u n k C o m p a n y m a y a p p o in t s o lic it in g
a g e n ts to b e lo c a te d at su ch p o itu s in C a n a d a as m a y be n e c ­
essa ry t o m e e t th e c o m p e t it io n o f C a n a d ia n lin es n o t p a rtie s
h e r e to , b u t s u c h pets- n s sh a ll in a ll r e s p e cts b e s u b je c t to
th e ru les o f th e m a n a g e rs.

A m en d m en ts to th is a g re em en t sh a ll o n ly be m ad e b y th e
u n an im o u s vote of th e p ai tie s hereto.

A R T IC LE FO URTEEN .

A R T IC LE TWENTY-ONE.
WHEN AGREEMENT BECOMES EFFECTIVE, AND ITS DURATION.

S e c . 1. T h is a g r e e m e n t s h a ll n o t be e ffe c t iv e u n til it s h a ll
h a v e b een a p p r o v e d b y th e b o a r d s o f d ir e c to r s o f th e s e v e r a l
c o m p a n ie s p a rties h e r e to . C e r tifie d c o p ie s o f r e s o lu tio n s g iv ­
in g f u c h a p p r o v a l s h a ll b e file d w ith th e m a n a g e rs.
SEC. 2 . 1 h is a g r e e m e n t sh a ll ta k e e ffe c t J a n u a r y 1, 1896,
a n d c o n t in u e in e x is t e n c e f o r fiv e y e a r s th e r e a fte r , s u b je c t t o
n in e t y d a y s w r it te n n o t ic e b y a n y c o m p a n y o f its d e s ir e t o
re tir e th e r e fr o m .
In witness whereof, th e c o r p o r a t io n s p a rties h e r e t o h a v e
c a u se d th e f o r e g o in g a g r e e m e n t t o b e s ig n e d b y th e ir r e s p e c ­
tiv e p r e sid e n ts aDd th e seal o f th e ir r e s p e c t iv e c o r p o r a t io n s
t o b e a tt a c h e d h e r e to o n thia
day o f
189 .

COMPLAINTS AND INVESTIGATIONS THEREOF.

W h e n in th e ju d g m e n t o f th e m a n a g e r ! th e ir in fo r m a tio n
o r a n y c o m p la in t s s o w a r an ts, th e o ffic ia ls a n d e m p lo y e s o f
th e c o m p a n ie s p a rtie s h e r e to m a y b e e x a m in e d , a n d in su ch
in v e s tig a t io n a n y o r all o ffic ia ls o r e m p lo y e e s m a y be n o tifie d
t o a tte n d a i d a n y o r all m a tte rs a ffe c t in g d ir e c t ly o r in d i­
r e c t ly th e tr a ffic h e re in c o v e r e d m a y b e c o n s id e r e d .

A R T IC L E

FIFTEEN'.

REPORTS AND DATA TO n»: FCRN1SHRD.

T h e c o m p a n ie s p a r t u s h e r e to a g r e e t o fu r n is h to th e m a n ­
a g e r s a ll r e p o rts , p a p e rs a n d in fo r m a tio n rela in g t o th e traffic
c o v e r e d h e r e b y w h ic h m s y b e r< q u e s t* d b v th e m .

A R T H U R SIXTEEN'.
FORFEITURES FOR VIOLATONS OF AGREEMENT.

F or a n y a c tio n b y a n y p a r ly h e r e to w h ic h in th e ju d g m e n t
o f th e m a n a g e rs c o n stitu te * a v io la t io n o f th is a g r e e m e n t th e
o ffe n d in g c o m p a n y s h a ll f o r fe i t t o th e a s so c ia tio n a su m to b e
d e te r m in e d b y th e m a n a g e r* , n o t e x c e e d in g lo .O 0, b u t w h e r e
th e g ro ss r e c e ip ts o f th e tr a n sa ctio n in w h ic h th is a g r e e m e n t
is v io la te d s h a ll e x c e e d f5,G0O th e o ffe n d in g p a r ty sh a ll a t th e
d ir c r e io n o f th e m a n a g e rs fo r fe it a s u m n o t e x c e e d in g su ch
g ro ss n c i p t s . S u c h f o r fe i u res s h a ll b e a p p lie d to th e p a y ­
m e n t o f th e e x p e n s e s o f th e a s s o c u t io n , p i n pt th a t th e o f fe n d ­
in g c o m p a n y sh a ll n o t p a r tic ip a te in su ch a p p lic a tio n o f its
o w n fo r fe it u r e .

A R T IC LE 8EVERTEE.V.
DEPOSITS, EXPENSE FUND AND PROVISION FOR FORFEITURES.

S e e . 1. U p o n th e c a ll o f th e m a n a g e r s a ft- r th is a g r e e m e n t
b e c o m e s e f f » c t i v e e a c h c o m p a n y p a rty h e r e to sh a ll d e p o sit
w ith th e m th e s u m o f liv e th o u sa n d d o lla r s , a n d in a d d itio n
th e r e t o , u p o n th e ir lik e c a ll. * n ch fa r th e r stu n * m o n t h ly ,
based u p o n th e g r o - s e a r n in g ! o f e a -h c o m p a n y p a rty h ereto
f r o m th e tr a ffic c o v e r e d h e i e b y , a* th e m a n a g e rs m a y d e c id e
t o be n ece ssa ry to d e fr a y th e e x p e n s e # o f th e a * * o u a t io n , in ­
c lu d in g th e salaries o f th e c o m m is s io n e r s a n d a rb itr a to rs , and
to p r o v id e f o r su ch fo r fe it u r e s a-t m a y be a d ju d g e d .
S k c . 2 A n y fo r fe it u r e m a d e b y s n y c o m ita n y p a rty h ereto,
u n d e r th e r u b s , s h a ll b e ta k e n fr. m th e s u m s c o n tr ib u te d by
s u c h c o m p a n y a n d charge-1 in w h o le t o its a c c o u n t . I f ita
d e p o s it at th e tim e , e x c lu s iv e o f its staid o r ig in a l c o n tr ib u tio n
o f liv e th o u a n d d o l l i r s , sh all be in-ttffl -tent, it sh all p a y to
th e m a n a g e r* s u c h d e fic ie n c y w ith in fifte e n d a y s a ft e r th e
f o r fe it u r e is fin a lly a d ju d g e d .
fJ*C. 3. T h e b a la n c e o f s a id d * p > «it* r e m it in g at th e e x p i­
r a tio n o f th is a g r e e m e n t sh a ll b - d iv id e d b e tw e e n th e c o m ­
pan ies th en p a ttie s h e re to in th e r a tio in w h ic h th e y h av e
c o n tr ib u te d , less th e a m o u n ts fo r fe it e d .

A R T IC LE EIGHTEEN.
RETIREMENT FROM THE IdREKMKNT.

A n y p a r ty r e t ir in g f r o m thia a g r e e m e n t b e fo r e th e final
c o m p le t io n o f th e tim e her- in fix e d , e x c e p t b v u n a n im o u s
c o n s e n t o f th e p a rtie s h e r e to , s h a ll n o t be e n ti le d to a n v r e ­
f u n d fr o m th e r e s id u e o f d e p o s its r e m a in in g a t th e c lo s e o f
th is a g r e e m e n '. b u t i f a n y c o m p a n y fail* to o b s e r v e a n d b e
o v e r n e d b y th is a g r e e m e n t , w h ic h f.tc t sh a ll b e d e te r m in e d
y th e a r b itr a t o r s , a n d th e n fa ils to p a y it# fo r fe it u r e s w ith in
fifte e n d a y s a f ;e r s u c b d e c is io n o f th e a r b itr a to r s , th en a n y
Other c o m p a n y m a y w it h d r a w fr o m th is a g r e e m e n t u p on
g iv i n g th ir ty d a y s w r it te n c o t i c e to t h e m a n a g e rs a n d su ch

IMPORTS, EXPORTS AND IMMIGRATION
FOR OCTOBER.
T h e B u r e a u o f S ta tis tic s h a s issu ed a d e t a ile d s ta t e m e n t o

l

th e fo r e ig n c o m m e r c e a n d im m ig r a t io n o f th e c o u n t r y f o r th o
m o n th o f O c t o b e r , 1885 a n d 189-4, a n d f o r th e ten
e n d in g O c t o b e r 81, in 1895 a n d 1894, ns f o llo w s ;

m o n th s

M R H N IS .
ECAD E
1895.—Exports—Dom estic.............

$85,092,383
1,924.85/

10 m o t. e n d O ct. 31.
#631.510, “ 4 2
13,427,904

T otal.................................
Im ports—Free o f d u t y ....
Dutiable.............

887.017,210
#37,749.592
37.300.720

$6 14,944.706
$322, ‘ 49,918
3 >3.314,,*37

*75,056,312

$6 76,004,455

T o ta l.................................
E xcess o f e x p o r t s ..........................
Excess of im port-................ ...........
1894.—Export#— DoroiwiEio.............
F oreign............ .

O cto b er.

*11,960,928
♦42,482,42*
1.170,099

8 3 1 .li9 .7 4 9
$611,770,679
15,500.718

T ota l.................................
S88.653.121
Import*—Free o f d u t y .... . . . $30,615,608
D utiable..............
29,404,318

$600,271,397
$328,691,549
234,918,479

T ota l..... ...........................

*60,019,986

$563,610,028

Excess o f exports............................
$23,033,135
GOLD COIN AND BULLION.
1895.—Exports... ............................. *
*1,"73 .497
•
Im ports..................................
1,747,778

$96,661,369
$75,061,179
30.627,715

E xecs#of exports.............................
1894.—E x p o r t s ,...............................
Im port*....... ..........................

*11,436,401
*91,549,322
18.291,010

*86,121
*1.042.814
1.602,005

Excess o f ex p ort*.............................
#519,951
GOLD IN ORB,
1895.—ExporLs.................................
*13,810
fijopoxt*..................................
207,202
Excess o f Im p o r ts.............................
1894.- E xport*.......... ............... .
Im ports...................................

#193,392
" 73,834

$73,295,312

$140,163
1,513,314
$1,172,851
*25,559
611,503

Excess o f Im p o rts ...........................
$73,834
SILVER COIN AND BULLION.
i 895.—E x ports..................................
$4,594,147
Im ports............................. .
1,825,127

$43,7,59,057
9,305,791

Excess o f exports..............................
1894.—E xports...................................
im ports...................................

$13,953,266
$39,74 4,139
8,309,318

$3,269,320
963,595

*01 5,91 4

Excess o f exports.............................
*3,115,119
SILVER IN ORK.
1895.—Exports . ............................
$19,910
Im ports,. . . . . . . .....................
1.128,414

$31,134,791

Bxoces o f im ports ............ ............
lo 9 * .—E x ports.................................
Im ports........................... ....

*1,028,674
$ --------506,707

*10 ,037 ,072
a$20O,101
6,186,637

Exouse o f Im ports................... .........

$503,707

$5,930 ,536

a. Gold an d s ilv e r.

$ 1 9 9 ,8 2 5
ID.256,89 7

[ V o l . L X I,

L'HE CH RO N ICLE.

906

.— Shares, ooth sides.—* -------- Balances, one side.---------Sheets •

IMMIGRATION.
October.
X umber.

1 0 mo#, end. Oct. 31 # 1 8 9 4 Number

16,06(3
16,824
3 2,3 90

1**94.— ale*.
M
F ew a!

T o ta l..........

124,537
94,157

2 7,209

T o U l .........

2 82 ,22 2

1 2 ,4 «0
14,719

1895 - Male*
Fern *U

161 ,57 4
120.648

218 ,69 4

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF GOLD AND
SILVER AT SAN FRANCISCO.
T h r C o lle c to r o f C u stom s at San F r a n c is c o has fu rn ish e d
us this w e e k th e d e ta ils o f im p o rts a n d e x p o r ts o f g o ld a n d
s ilv er th ro u g h that p o r t f o r th e m o n th o f O cto b e r , a n d th e y
are presen ted b e lo w , to g e th e r w ith th e fig u r e s fo r th e p r e ­
c e d in g

m o n th s, th u s

c o m p le t in g th e results f o r

th e

ten

m on th s o f th e ca le n d a r y e a r 1895. T h e im p o r ts o f g o ld w ere
a little g re a te r than in S e p te m b e r , th e a m o u n t r e ce iv e d re a ch ­
in g $108,078, o f w h ic h $15,312 w as in c o i n ; a n d o f silv er th ere
ca m e in $199,139, o f w h ic h $133,899 w a s b u llio n .
T h ere
h a s been re c e iv e d d u r in g th e ten m o n th s a to ta l o f
$1,306,981 g o ld a n d $1,738,843 s ilv e r, w h ic h co m p a re s w ith
$1,196,503 g o ld a n d $1,983,429 s ilv e r in 1894.
T h e s h ip ­
m en ts o f g o ld d u r in g O c to b e r re a ch e d $112,310 c o in a n d $ /0
b u llion , a n d th e e x p o r ts o f s ilv e r h a v e b een $833,309 c o in
and $.530,800 b u llio n . F o r th e ten m o n th s th e e x p o r ts o f g o ld
h a v e been $165,998 a g a in st $682,874 inS1894 a n d $10,818,089
silv er has been sent o u t, a g a in st

$10,408,842 in 1894.

The

e x h ib it fo r O cto b e r a n d th e ten m o n th s is a- f o l l o w s :

Cleared.

Jauuary...
February.
March......
April ......
May.........
June........
July ......
A tu ;a it...
Septemb’r
O ctober...

Shares. Value Shares. Cash. Cleared

Total Value.

6,689
6,088
5.858

12.728,200 730,570,000 17,048,400

63,444

1.091.000
63.700.000 1,483,100
997,500
65,000.000 1,133,500
1,493.600
85,400,000 1,920.400
1.710,500
94,500,000 1,399,300
3.151.900 162,900.000 2,157.200
2.070,100 114,500,0n0 1,544,6 0
2.345.900 132,400,500 2,101,100
1.975.200 127,000,000 1.993,300
2.742.000 146.40'\000 2,241.500
2.107.200 113,800,000 1,572,300

0,434
6,616
6,540
0.434
7,891
6.402
0,939
6,792
6.756
7,387

19I.031.7U0 12.125,475,000 10.S8I.900 1095,600,500 17.552.800

06.590

1,364.000
1,036.400
1.452.100
1.384.800
1.551.100
1.147.800
938.500
1,580.300
1.235.200
1,049,500

1,088,600,000
7*4.800,000
1.076,441.000
868.700.000
1,200,300.000
842.800.000
734,700.000
1,186.400,000
969.100.000
1,069,000,000

lO m os... 155.085,400 9,810.141,000
1895January...
February..
March......
April........
May..........
June........
July..........
A ugust.. .
September
O ctober...
lO m os...

13.593.500
12.030.600
19,057,700
15,799 200
28,2>0.100
17.365.600
22,270.400
18.349.100
24,738,200
19,607,300

69.100.000
56.2W.000
81.809.000
77.200.000
91.700.000
65.300.000
57.070.000
96.900.000
71.800.000
63.500.000

6,839
5.598
6.581
6.401

2,041,000
1,396.900
1,928.700
1,418.900
1.938,500
1,184.000
1.328.500
2.161,900
1.627.000
1,723,000

18.363.000
12,847.60)
16.912.900
14.728.000
19,140.800
13.186,700
10,911.400
18,370.200
14.847.900
16.780.900

896.200.000
762.100.000
1.207.500.000
1,00$,800,000
1.603.400.000

1.101.200.000

1.457.975.000
1.281.700.000
1,54 4,100.000
1.266.500.000

6.958
5.716
6.718

T h e s to c k s c le a r e d n o w are A m e r ic a n C o t t o n O il c o m m o n ,
A m e r ic a n S u g a r c o m m o n , A m e r ic a n T o b a c c o c o m m o n . A t c h ­
is o n , C en tra l o f N . J ., C h esa p ea k e & O h io , C h ic a g o B u r lin g to n
& Q u in c y , C h ic a g o G as, C h ic a g o M ilw a u k e e & S t. P a u l c o m ­
m o n , C h ic a g o & N o r th W e s t e r n c o m m o n , C h ic a g o R o c k I s la n d
& P a c ific , D e la w a r e & H u d s o n , D e la w a r e L a c k a w a n n a &
W estern , D is tillin g & C a ttle F e e d in g , G e n e r a l E le c t r ic , L a k e
S h o re & M ic h ig a n S o u th e r n , L o u is v ille & N a s h v ille , M a n h a t­
ta n , M issou ri K a n s a s & T e x a s p r e fe r r e d , M is s o u ri P a c ific , N e w
Y o r k C e n tra l, N e w Y o r k L a k e E rie & W e s t e r n , N e w Y o r k &
N e w E n g la n d , N e w Y o r k O n ta r io & W e s t e r n , N e w Y o r k S u s ­
q u e h a n n a & W e ste rn p r e fe r r e d , N o r th e r n P a c if ic p r e fe r r e d ,
N a tio n a l L e a d c o m m o n , P h ila d e lp h ia & R e a d in g . S o u th e r n
R a ilw a y c o m m o n a n d p r e fe r r e d . T en n essee C o a l & I r o n , T e x a s
& P a c ific , U n io n P a c ific , U n ite d S ta te s L e a t h e r c o m m o n a n d
p r e fe r r e d , U n ite d S tates R u b b e r c o m m o n , W a b a s h c o m m o n
and p r e fe r r e d , W e s te r n U n io n a n d W h e e lin g & L a k e E r ie
com m on .

IMPORTS o r BOLD AND SILVER AT SAN KRANCISOO

4
:
MONTHS.

SILVER.

GOLD.
Bullion

Coin.

Total.

Coin.

$
45,696
25,586
33,741
59,964
83,554
112,107
42,4 00
90,240
88,818
92,866

$
82,884
26,903
43,737
110,979
93,938
601,091
51,730!
90,485
97,136
108,078

6,893
1,502
990
257,696
11,348
32,994
7,135
10,708
227,877
75,440

1895.
J a n u a r y ...
F eb ru ary..
M arch........
A p ril..........
M ay..........
J u n e ..........
J u l y ...........
A QYiMl---8epteiub’r.
O cto b er...

$
37,188
1.317
9,996
51.016
10,384
4** **,1)8.1
9.33C
245
8.318
15,212

1*1.10 mos

631,989 674,972 1,306,961

Bullion.

$
136,592
101,407
116,633
111,093
117,378
74,830
128,955
76.171
119,501
123,699

Total.

$
143,485
102,909
117,623
368,789
128,726
107,824
136,090
86,879
347,378
199,139

632,583 1,106,259 1,738,842

EXPORTS OF GOLD AND SILVER FROM SAN FRANCISCO.
MONTHS.

BulVn

Coin.

Total.

1 Coin.

Bullion.

L o n d o n , S a t u r d a y , N o v . 9 ,1 8 9 5 .
T h e m o n t h ly se ttle m e n t o n th e P a r is B o u r s e
c o n c lu d e d w it h

less d iffic u lt y th a n

w a s a n t ic ip a t e d .

u n a b le to p a y th e ir d iffe r e n c e s , b u t f o r

s f,5 4 5
3,075
10,121
17,081
7,993
56,064
79,321
62,844
61,748
112,316

1,160
25
460
70

$
$
$
$
112,160 764,700
53,545
876,860
86,674 403,500
3,270
490,174
88,862 1,374,000 1,462,862
10,121
17,031
410,218 914,020 1,324,238
8,013
341,146 771,193 1,112,339
56,064
311,133 491,400
802,533
80,481
238,875 560.000
798,875
62,869
248,349 3 25 .00 0
573,349
62,208 1,209,400 813,350 2,022,750
112,386
833,309 5 20 ,80 0 1,354,109

T'L 10 rnoel 461,058

1,935

465,993 3,380,126 6,937,963 10.818,089

J u n e ..........
August —
Bepteiob’r.
O cto b er...

Stock

$
200

bo

Exchange

O l e a r in q - H

ousb

T r a n s a c t io n s . — T h e

■ iib jom e d s ta te m e n t in clu d e s th e tr a n s a ctio n s o f th e S to c k
E x c h a n g e C le a rin g -H o u s e f r o m N o v . 11 d o w n to a n d in c lu d in g
F r id a y , N o v e m b e r 22; a lso th e a g g r e g a te s f r o m J a n u a r y t o
O c to b e r , in clu s iv e , in 1895, 1894 a n d 1893.

Cleared

Total Value.

Nov. I t . .1.6 10 .2 0 0
“ 1 2 .. 894,300
“ 1 3 .. 900,100
44 14. 1.157,000
" 15. 1,021,300

if

91,8 00 ,0 0 0
5 3,500,000
5 6,700,000
7 7,600,000
7 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

Tot. w k ..4 ,2 7 8 ,8 0 0 2 85.900,000
WklaMtyTi.575 ,30 0 334,200,000
1893$

371 ,90 0 1 9 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0 3 1 1 ,80 3 1 ,5 3 2
2 7 8 ,70 0 1 8 ,9 0 0 ,0 0 0 5 1 3 ,1 0 0 1,581

January...
February..
March......
A pril-......
May.........
June........
July.........
Auiruet ..
September
October...

2X.644,600
26,108,900
24.691, loo
2o.802.600
28.200.600
17.190,700
19,686,700
17.669.400
10,020,300
19,004.700

2.064,709.000
1,744,400,000
1,090,000.000
1.421,800,000
1,738,900,000
1.010.900.000
1.100.000.000
961,300,000
936,400,000
1,172,400.000

10 m os... 217 327,300 13,846,309.000

s t o o d th a t th e fir m w a s a b le t o
fr ie n d s c a m e fo r w a r d
c a p it a l in t o th e firm .

8,000,000
2,687,900
2 ')3 U
,7 ,.S 0

8,300,600
3,529.000
3,784,100
2,331,000
4,870,100
1,789,800
2,752,600
2,320.200
L.988.000
2,043,000

6.839
0,161
7,080
6,006
7,200
6,395
6,016
8,882
6,950
6,683

21,685,100 1,280,611,000 28,718.400

oljio

2,311,800
2,869,500

1,082.000

1,796,300
1,470,200

1,380.000

1,783,600

210.700.000
172.701.000
167.900.000
153.300.000
161.110.000
90.200.000
88.100.000
73.900.000
72.100.000
90.600.000

fo u r t h o c c u p ie d a
It

is u n d e r

p a y 80 p e r c e n t a n d

to p a y th e r e m a in d e r a n d
I t is b e lie v e d

th a t

p u t fr e s h

n o w th a t th e liq u id a t io n

is n e a r ly a t a n e n d in P a ris , b u t w e a k n e s s w ill c o n t in u e f o r
s o m e tim e

b e ca u s e o f th e

sta te o f C o n s t a n t in o p le .

h eavy

losses a n d

becau se o f th e

A t first th e r e s ig n a tio n o f th e G o v ­

e r n o r o f th e C r e d it F o n d e r m a d e a v e r y b a d im p r e s s io n , b u t
h is s u c c e s s o r in sp ire s c o n fid e n c e .

T h e r e s ig n a tio n w as c a u s e d

b y a v o te o f th e C h a m b e rs a g a in s t m e m b e r s o f

e it h e r H o u s e

h o ld in g o ffic ia l p o s itio n s in p u b lic c o m p a n ie s .
T h e n ew s fr o m
th e m e m o r y

C o n s ta n tin o p le is v e r y s e rio u s.

o f liv in g

m en

has T u r k e y b e e n

N e v e r in

in s u c h u t t e r

T h e S u lta n h a s w it h in a f e w w e e k s t w ic e c h a n g e d

h is m in is te r s, a n d he se e m s in c a p a b le o f
day by

5 0 7 ,60 0 2 6 ,4 00 ,0 0 0 474 ,10 0 1,659
3 3 1 7 0 0 2 2 ,6 00 ,0 0 0 4 5 9 ,00 0 1,5 7 7
8 9,300 4 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0 6 3,3 00
331
6 4.500 3 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0 5 5,300
316
100,900 5 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0 86,200
326
6 9,700 3 ,6 0 0 .0 0 0 6 6,5 00
311
4 7.500 2 ,4 0 0 .0 0 0 4 0,5 00
298

The

v e r y im p o r t a n t p o s it io n iu th e o u t s id e m a r k e t.

115,209
8 3,3 00
8 7 ,2 0 0
104.400
8 7,5 00

Tot. w k ..5 ,3 8 3,20 0 3 53 ,60 0,0 00
W k la s ty rl.3 0 8 ,5 0 0 3 7 5 ,0 0 0 .0 0 )
Nov. 1 8. 951 ,60 0 60.1 00 ,0 0 0
•• 1 9 .. 741 ,90 0 51,600,000
• 20 1,112,500 74,9 00 ,0 0 0
4 2 1 .. 931 ,20 0 6 2,300,000
4
44 2 2 .. 541 ,60 0 3 7,000,000

t h ir d

b u sin ess w ith t h e E a st, a n d t h e

c h ie f o f w h ic h is h im s e lf an E a s te rn m a n , h a d a lso f a ile d , b u t

t o a n y d e c is iv e a c tio n .

352
316
327
334
330

fo u r

T w o o f th e s e

I t w a s r e p o r te d h e re f o r a w h ile th a t a

8hares. Value Shares. Cash. Cleared.

6 ,7 0 0.00 0 129 ,70 0
4,100,000 7 6,7 00
4 .8 0 0,00 0 1 0 7 ,80 0
5 ,7 0 0,00 0 8 7,400
5 ,1 0 0,00 0 7 2 ,5 0 0

I t ts

h a v e b e e n d e c la r e d d e fa u lte r s , b u t th e y w e r e in a sm a ll w a y

an arch y.

•rroCK EXCHANGE CLEARING HOUSE TRANSACTIONS.

— Shares, both sides.—. --------- Balances, one side-------->Sheets

a ll th a t o n ly

firm s w e r e f o u n d to be s e r io u s ly e m b a rra s s e d .

a t th e la st m o m e n t it r e c e iv e d h e lp .

1895.
Jan u ary..
F ebruury..
M arch........
A p ril..........

had

q u it e tr u e th a t a v e r y la rg e n u m b e r o f w e a k s p e c u la to r s w e r e

fir m w h ic h d id a v e r y la r g e
Total.

w h ic h

b e e n lo o k e d fo r w a r d to w it h so m u c h a p p r e h e n s io n h a s b e e n

o f bu sin ess.

SILVER.

GOLD.

[F ro m o u r ow d co rresp o n d en t.!

day.

m a k in g u p h is m in d

M assaores o f A r m e n ia n s a re r e p o r t e d

In o th e r q u a rte rs th e r e a p p e a rs to

b e fie r c e

f ig h t in g b e tw e e n M a h o m m e d a n s a n d C h ristia n s, a n d in s h o r t it
lo o k s as i f th e E m p ir e w e r e g o in g to p ie c e s.
a ll o v e r E u r o p e is th at a p e a c e fu l s o lu t io n

S till, th e b e lie f
w ill b e f o u n d .

H a p p ily a ll th e p o w e r s a re n o w a c t in g to g e th e r .
e r n m e n t is a n x io u s to

E very G ov­

p r e s e r v e p e a c e , a n d all h a v e

been

r o u se d b y th e g r a v it y o f th e s itu a tio n to p u t fo r w a r d th e ir
b est e ffo r t s to p r e v e n t an o u tb u r st. B u t w h ile e v e r y b o d y is
h o p e fu l th a t th e r e w ill b e n o w a r , n o b o d y c a n w e ll see w h a t
th e fin a l a r r a n g e m e n t w ill be.

The

b est h o p e is

fo u n d e d

u p o n th e a p p a r e n t c o r d ia lit y w ith w h ic h E n g la n d a n d R u ssia
a re n o w a c tin g .
H e r e a t h o m e th e v a r io u s d iffic u ltie s h a v e b e e n a g g r a v a t e d
b y th e u n fo r t u n a t e s tr ik e u p o n th e C ly d e . T o e m a s t e r s h ip ­
b u ild e r s in S c o t la n d a n d I r e la n d
port one

a re u n d e r c o n t r a o t to s u p ­

a n o t h e r a g a in s t t h e ir w o r k

p e o p le .

As

th e

sh ip

b u ild e r s in B e lfa s t w e r e u n a b le o r u n w illin g to a r r a n g e w ith
th e ir m en , th e s h ip b u ild e r s in G la s g o w lo c k e d o u t 25 p e r c e n t

TH E

November 23, 1895.]

o f th e ir e n g in e e r s a n d th e m e n r e s p o n d e d b y a g e n e ra l strik e.
T h e b est o p in io n s e e m s to b e th a t th e e m p lo y e r s w ill h a v e to
g i v e w a y — firstly , b e ca u se th e S c o t c h s h ip b u ild e r s a d m it th a t
th e y h a v e th e m s e lv e s n o e a u -e o f q u a r r e l w it h t h i i r e m ­
p lo y e e s ; s e c o n d ly , b e ca u s e th e o r d e r s o n h a n d a re v e r y n u m e r ­
o u s ; a n d th ir d ly , b e c a u s e s o m e o f th e s h ip -b u ild e r s are u n d e r
c o n t r a c t w it h th e G o v e r n m e n t , a n d it is e x p e c t e d
G o v e r n m e n t w ill in sist u p o n f u lfilm e n t o f

th a t th e

th e c o n tr a c ts .

M o n e y h as been in d e c id e d ly b e tt e r d e m a n d th is w e e k ,
o w in g p a r tly to w it h d r a w a ls o f g o l d f o r P a r is a n d f o r T u r k e y
a n d p a r t ly to th e w ith d r a w a ls f o r S c o t la n d .

A t thi3 tim e o f

th e y e a r th e re is a lw a y s an e x p a n s io n o f th e n o te c ir c u la t io n
in S c o t la n d , a n d u n d e r o u r la w s th e b a n k s h a v e to ta k e g o ld
f r o m 1 o n d o n in c o n s e q u e n c e .

T r a d e is v e r y a c t i v e , a n d w e r e

an arch y

5 0 ,5 7 9 .2 1 7

* 8 ,7 1 3 ,2 9 7

+ 1 .8 6 5 ,9 5 0

+ 3-83

v e r y d u ll a n d

in a c tiv e all

A s a lr e a d y s a id , n o b o d y e x p e c ts

w a r ; b u t y e t th e p u b lic is v e r y n e r v o u s a n d fe w v e n tu r e
th e r e fo r e t o in c u r fre s h risk s. T h e s m o o th n e s s w it h w h ich
th e P a ris s e ttle m e n t h a s b e e n c o n c lu d e d h as b r o u g h t a b o u t a
b e tte r fe e lin g , a n d th e r e w o u ld p r o b a b ly b e a s lo w r e v iv a l
n o w w e r e i t n o t f o r th e n e w s f r o m T u r k e y .
t h e b est o p in io n is, b o th

Of b a n k e r s a n d

f o r c e d s e llin g is a t a n e n d , w h ile o n

H e r e in L o n d o n
b r o k e r s , that the

th e o th e r h a n d th e re is

in flu e n tia l b u y in g , e s p e c ia lly in th e m in in g m a rk e t. B u i
w h ile th e re is re a so n t o b e lie v e th a t th e m a r k e t w ill b e s u p ­
p o r te d th e r e s e e m s lit tle g r o u n d f o r h o p e th a t th e re w ill b e
a n y m a te r ia l im p r o v e m e n t u n til o r d e r is r e s to r e d in T u r k e y .
Cta M o n d a y th e f o r t n ig h t ly s e tt le m e n t o n th e S t o c k E x ­
c h a n g e b e g in s h e r e , a n d as th e fa l l d u r in g th e fo r t n ig h t in all
in te r n a tio n a l s e c u r itie s , a n d e s p e c ia lly in T u r k is h , has been
c o n s id e r a b le , th e r e is s o m e fe a r th a t th e d iffe r e n c e s m a y n ot
b e p a id .

B u t in s p it e o f th a t th e r e is a c o n fid e n t fe e lin g th at

t h e cr is is is o v e r .

A lo n g w it h th e p o litic a l d is o r d e r s in T u r ­

k e y th e r e h as b e e n a s e rio u s fin a n c ia l c r is is .

T h e A r m e n ia n

a h o p s e v e r y w h e r e h a v e b een c lo s e d , a n d th e A r m e n ia n s th e m ,
s e lv e s in la rg e n u m b e r s h a v e h a d t o ta k e sh e lte r in tire c h u r c h e s .
C o n s e q u e n tly th e A r m e n ia n s are n n a b le t o m e e t th e ir o b lig a ­
tio n s.

I t is r e p o r te d , to o , th a t it h as b een

fo u n d

im p o s s ib le

t o w a r e h o u s e g o o d s im p o r t e d a n d th a t th e lig h te r s th e re fo re
a r e fu ll o f s t o c k s

w h ic h c a n n o t b e d e liv e r e d .

O ne con se­

q u e n c e w as a ru n u p o n th e I m p e r ia l O t t o m a n ,B i n k . T o sto p
th is th e G o v e r n m e n t g r a n t e d a m o r a t o r iu m o f f o u r m o n th s,
w h ic h , h o w e v e r , th e b a n k s d id 'n o t ta k e a d v a n ta g e o f , a n d th e
r u n has c o n t in u e d u p to th e p resen t.
B u t n o b o d y d o u b ts th a t th e O tto m a n Bogstk w ill c o m e s u c c e m fu lly o u t o f th e tr ia l. T h e G o v e r n m e n t h a s o ffe r e d i t a

T h e f o llo w in g r e t u r n s h o w s th e p o s it io n o f th e B a n k o f
E n g la n d , th e B a n k ra te o f d is c o u n t , th e p r ic e o f c o n s o ls , & c.,
c o m p a r e d w ith th e la s t th r e e y e a i s :
1896.
1894.
1893.
1892.
N op. «.
Nov. 7.
-You. 8.
£
£
a
£
20,52*7,005 3d.S08.595 85,981.040 20,02*.730
Circulation........ ................... .
4.0*9,740
Public deposits........... ................
6,384.975
4,013,535
4.800,821
Other depoaita.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .......
Government eecurtuea..........
Otheraecuritle* .......................
1
te*erre o f note* end coin........
Coin A bullion, both departm’ ta
Prop, reserve to liabilities..p. c.
Bank r a t e .......... ....... per cent.
ConaoU. 2K per c e n t .................
Silver.............................................
Ci«**nrur-House r e t u r n s .........
• Nov. 8.

m a r k its a p p r o v a l o f th e a c tio n o f th e

b a n k , has e x t e n d e d its c o n c e s s io n s f o r t w e lv e y e a r s .
to t a l n o te c ir c u la t io n o f th e
d e p o sits in T u r k e y a r e s m a ll.

The

25.505.752
51.40 .,049
4<MWtt.<m

37,011,807
15,301.917
18.474,743
96,444.285
35,152,830

53

<52*

4 M ‘>d.70d

14.82*0,525

30,074,288
11,087,598
24,8*5,052

16,079.628
25,593,505
40*

28.700,230
13,750,140
22,800,880
ll.7V9.7lSD
24.374.400

«K

2
2
3
3
102 5-10
100H
98 1-16
'•?W
SO 15-104.
2D %+•
38 13100.
82*44.
157.502,000 107,912.000 108,914,000 110,004,000

T h e fo llo w in g s h o w s th e im p o r t s o f c e r e a l p r o d u c e in t o t h e
U n ited K in g d o m d u r in g th e first te n w e e k s o f th e s e a s o n ,
c o m p a r e d w ith p r e v io u s sea son s :
m roirrs.

1895.
Im p o rta n t w h e a t.c w t.1 3 .2 S S .6 2 0
lU rioy.......................... 5 .7 0 2 ,3 9 0
O a ts................................... 2 .3 6 3 .0 * 0
P ea* ...............................
4 6 7 ,3 7 0
lle a n * ................................
7 6 7 .7 9 0
tu d tan oorn_______
7 .5 7 6 ,6 0 0
F lo u r ............................... 3 .0 1 8 .6 5 0

1 89 4 .
1 4 ,5 3 2 ,0 3 9
7 .6 -3 ,8 0 9

2 ,7 6 6 .6 0 0
4 6 3 .3 5 3
9 1 1 .6 0 ?
4 ,7 2 9 .9 6 4
4 .1 1 3 .8 7 8

1 89 3 .
14.032,134
6 .1 3 5 ,8 7 5
2 .8 7 4 ,6 0 2
8 1 9 ,0 2 2
!.0 1 c ,6 7 9
5 ,* 6 5 ,1 0 3
4 ,7 1 5 ,3 6 0

1892.
1 3,8 6 2 ,8 5 3
4 ,7 7 7 ,6 5 8
2 ,9 9 2 ,7 0 8
3 9 7 ,2 7 1
1 ,1 1 3 ,1 4 6
6 ,8 2 0 ,0 2 9
4 .2 1 9 ,0 5 0

S u p p lies a v a ila b le f o r c o n s u m p t io n ( e x c lu s iv e o f s t o c k s o n
S e p te m b e r 1):

189 5 .
W heat lm p o rta d .o w t.1 3 ,2 6 5 .0 2 0
Im port* of Hour.......... 3 .6 1 8 ,6 5 0
Bale* of hom e-grow n. 2.SU2.6C6
T o ta l.................
1 9 ,7 7 0 ,8 7 6
1895
Aver, p rice w h e a t w eek .2 5* m i .
A verage p m e .
.2 3 * l i d .

1894
1 89 3 .
1892
1 4 ,5 3 2 .0 3 9 1 4 .0 3 2 ,1 3 4 13 862 8 5 3
4 .1 1 3 ,8 7 8 4 ,7 1 5 .3 6 0 4 ,2 1 0 0 5 0
4 ,1 7 9 ,1 1 2 5 ,1 0 6 ,3 3 3 5 ,3 6 2 8 7 9
2 2 .8 2 5 .0 2 9
1894.
18* Od.
19*. 2d.

2 3,8 5 3 ,8 2 7
1893.
2 7«. 4(t.
26s. 1 01.

T h e f o llo w in g s h o w s th e q u a n titie s o f
m a ize a floa t t o th e U n ite d K in g d o m :
ThUvreek. Lott week.

W h eat....................q r» .
flo u r , e q u a l lo q r» .
M a li* ......................q ra .

m o r a t o r iu m o f a m o n t h , w h i c h it h as d e c lin e d ; a n d th e G o v ­
e r n m e n t, fu r t h e r to

+ 3 78

10 m o n th s..

T h e m a in in flu e n c e h a s b e e n th e r io t in g

in T u r k e y .

+ 6 .8 3 8 ,7 3 6

T h e r e -e x p o r ts o f f o r e ig n a n d c o lo n ia l p r o d u c e s in c e J a n u a r y
1st s h o w th e f o l l o w i n g c o n t r a s t :
1 89 5 .
1894.
Difference.
£
R e-e x fo rts .
£
£
Per Ot.

T h e In dia

T h e r e is a fa ir

Is, IJ g d . p e r r u p e e .

and

1 8 0 ,6 1 0 ,5 6 7

+0-39
—9-67
+ 2-34
-1 -7 5
+ 4-92
—0-60
+ 11-71
+ 10-22
+ 1 0 -5 8
+ 8-25

w e ll, r e c e iv in g n e a r ly

b e e x c e p t io n a lly

e n te r th e m a r k e t.

b een

10 m o n th s.. 1 8 7 ,4 1 9 ,3 0 3

+ 7 2 ,3 5 6
—1 ,7 1 1 ,0 5 4
+ 1 2 4 ,1 2 7
—3 0 7 .5 6 5
+ 8 6 0 .5 3 2
—109,055
+ 2 ,1 6 0 ,9 5 0
+ 1 ,9 0 0 ,2 5 5
+ 1 .8 6 2 ,6 2 0
+ 1 ,6 8 0 ,8 7 0

—10*56
—12*74
—9*20
+ 3 7 -3 7
4-6*35
+ 1-30
4 -1 I 6 5
+ 20-72
4-2*65
-0 -6 3

T h e s ilv e r m a r k e t c o n t in u e s v e r y s t r o n g .

m a r k e ts h a v e

1 8 .1 5 1 ,8 8 0
1 7 ,6 7 9 ,1 1 9
1 8 ,0 9 8 ,9 0 3
1 7 .5 59 ,8 7 6
1 7,4 8 4 ,2 1 2
1 7,9 0 9 ,1 5 5
1 8 ,3 9 8 ,5 3 6
1 8 ,5 8 1 ,2 4 0
1 7 ,4 9 9 ,8 2 0
1 9 ,1 * 7 ,9 9 0

—4 59 .3S5
—6 4 3 ,39 6
—4 9 6 ,2 8 7
+ 1 ,7 9 7,75 3
+ 3 1 1 ,6 7 7
4-67,593
4 -5 00,187
+ 1 ,0 6 2,32 2
+ 9 7 .2 2 0
—3 7 1 ,2 3 4

d e m a n d fo r I n d ia , b u t a s y e t J a p a n h as n o t b o u g h t , t h o u g h it

T h e sto ck

1 8 ,2 2 4 ,2 3 6
15,9 68 ,3 9 5
1 8,5 2 3 ,0 3 0
17,2 52 ,3 1 1
1 8 ,3 4 1 ,7 4 4
1 7 ,3 0 0 ,1 0 0
2 0 ,5 5 9 ,4 8 6
2 0,4 8 1 ,4 9 5
1 9,1 6 1 ,9 1 0
2 0 ,8 3 6 ,8 6 6

4 ,3 4 6 ,6 4 3
5 ,0 5 1 ,7 2 0
5 ,3 4 2 ,8 )6
4 ,8 1 0 ,3 6 2
4 ,9 0 4 .1 0 8
5 ,1 9 8 ,1 8 0
4 ,2 8 9 ,7 6 4
5 ,1 2 7 ,3 8 0
3 ,8 1 0 ,6 1 6
5 ,8 3 1 ,6 3 3

it is b e lie v e d

g rea t ju s t n o w .

th r o u g h th e w e e k .

J a n u a r v ............
F e b r u a r y ........
M arch...................
A p ril...................
M a y.......................
J u n e ......................
J ul v .......................
A u g u st...............
S e p t e m b e r ___
O ctober............

3 .8 S 7 .2 5 8
4 ,4 0 7 ,* 2 4
4 .3 4 6 ,5 9 9
6 ,6 0 8 ,3 6 2
5 ,2 1 5 ,7 8 5
5 ,2 6 5 ,7 7 3
4 ,7 8 9 ,9 5 1
6 ,1 8 9 ,7 0 2
3 ,9 0 7 ,8 3 6
5 ,4 6 0 ,4 0 4

th a t th e e x p a n s io n o f th e c ir c u la t i o n w o u ld

is b e lie v e d th a t sh e w ill so o n

t lie e x p o r ts s in c e J a n u a r y 1st h a v e b e e n as f o llo w s :
189 5 .
1894.
Difference.
E x po rts .
a
a
&
Per Ot.

J a n u a r y ...........
F eb ru ary ___
M arch................
A p ril...................
M ay.....................
J u n e ....................
J u l y .....................
A u g u st...............
S e p te m b e r_
_
O ctober............

it n o t f o r th e s tr ik e o r lo c k - o u t u p o n th e C ly d e

C o u n c il has a g a in s o ld its d r a ft s v e r y

907

CH RO N ICLE.

1 ,8 9 9 ,0 0 0
2 4 8 .0 0 0
6 2 2 .0 0 0

K n g lla ti F i n a n c i a l

1 ,8 4 8 ,0 0 0
2 2 1 ,0 0 0
1 66 .00 0

2 3 ,4 8 4 7 82
1892.
28* 9<i
2 8 s. 8 d .

w h e a t , flo u r

1894.
1 ,8 8 9 .0 0 0
3 0 7 .0 0 0
3 0 5 .0 0 0

and

1893.
2 ,5 7 0 .0 0 0
2 6 0 ,0 0 0
.............

la r n c ln - P e r c a m e .

T b e d a ily c lo s in g q u o t a tio n s f o r s e c u r itie s . <fcc,, at L o n d o n
are r e p o r te d b y c a b le as f o llo w s f o r th e w e e k e n d in g N o v 22*

B a n k is u n d e r £ 9 00,004, a n d th e
The

B a n k , o n th e o th e r h a n d ,

h as in a c tu a l g o ld a b o u t £ 1 ,30 0 ,0 0 0 ; a n d as b e h in d it th ere
a re p o w e r fu l g r o u p s o f b a n k e r s in L o n d o n a n d P a ris, it ca n

London.

Bat.

Mon.

Tucs.

Wed.

S liv e r, p e r o z . . . .............d. 3 0 ’»
3 0 H „ 301% , 30%
30=* 30%
Oonsola, n e w , 25* p, ot* 106% 106% , 1 (0
106% 106
U 0%
For avc-: u.,%............ ..... K 0%
10 %. ] 106
105*4 106
106->1?
o b ta in a n y a m o u n t o f a s sista n ce th a t it r e q u ir e s . T h e O tto ­ F F ch re n te s (In P a ris) fr I100-90 lti(f7 S 1100 30 00*124|(00'47% i,0-27%
Atoll. Top. A 8 . F e . . . . . | 18
17% j 17%
17% . 17%
17%
m a n B a n k in d e e d is o n e o f th e b e st m a n a g e d a n d s o u n d e s t in C an ad ian P a c ific ............ \ 59%
39% ! 59%
57%
58A 57%
t
II) :H
C h esap eak e A O h io ,...
10%
19%
11*
Iso,
E u rop e,
18%
Ohio. M ils . A 8 l. P a u l.
77
77%
76%
76%
76% 76%
100 la 100% i 99%
A s a m a tte r o f c o u r s e , d e a lin g s in all d e p a r tm e n ts a re sus­ Illin o is C e n tr a l___
99%
99
9w
Luke Shore ... ....... . 154
15 1
'153% 153% 163 % 1 '3%
p e n d e d f o r th e t im e Iw in g . .S ca rce ly a n y t h in g is d o in g in th e
L o uisv ille A Sr»RhvUle.. 55
52% i 54%
55
52%
53%
A m e r ic a n m a rk e t, a n d B r itis h r a ilw a y s to c k s a re d - d i n i n g ,
1 r 0*\
M exican C en tra l 4 * ..
71
704
70
s 70
70
t h is is tn e more s in g u la r b e c a u s e tr a d e is ra p id ly im p r o v in g ; Mo. K an. A T ex c o m .... w %
127, ; 133s
U%
13%
13%
N. Y. C en tra l A Hudson IOC
U 2% 101% 102
102%
in d e e d b a n k e rs sa y th a t th e v o lu m e o f b u sin e ss at p r e se n t is
102
S . Y. L ak e E rie A W est,. 1 0 4
10%
9%
•13
94
127
a
as la rg e as in 1990—o n e o f th e v e ry b est tr a d e y e a r s in o u r
76
2d oonsoia.
76
75%
75 4
75*9 75
h isto ry .
N Y. Ont. A W estern .. 1 6 ‘4
16
15 %
15
15*8 15%
Norfolk A W est’n, p ref
u%
10%
11
l( %
'h e im p o r ts d a c e J a n u a r y 1st h a v e b e e n as fo llo w s :
10% 1 0 %
N orthernPaclH o, p r e f .. 16%
16
| 154
15%
153*
15
1 9 9 5 .* r
1994.
Difference.
514
54%
54%
P e n n s y lv a n ia .................
5**3
54 4
54%
farm e rs.
a
a
st
Per CL Phil. A R ead ., p e r sh are
5%
3%
6%
5% ! 5 ‘4
5
J 4 0.-.A ry........... 3 8 ,7 9 3 ,0 6 3
3 9 .f S 8 ,6 t 3
—1,705.5-14
- 4 * 3 S ou thern K y., com
11%
11%
lt %
114
10% 11
F * i .m a r j ___ 2 9 ,1 3 1,1 83
3 *,!/» 1,093
—5,9 l >,596
—17 21
do
p r e f 'd _
_
36%
3ft H
*
304
354
35%
35
M arch............... 3 5 ,9 9 0 ,5 9 0
3 S .3 2 7 .0 3 ?
+ 6 5 3 ,5 5 3
+ 1-95 Union P a -ilio ............
10
9% 1 9%
94
8%
9
W abash, p r e f ...........
A p ril........ .
3 l.3 1 l.3 5 9
35,1)1.5,781
- 6 7 1 .1 2 3
-P 9 1
204
20
204
19%
18 A 19%
M a y ........................ 3 1 ,7 5 2 ,0 8 6
3 1 ,1 3 1 ,0 6 0
+ 6 1 6 ,0 2 6
+ 197
' T h ird a sse ssm e n t p a id .
J o n .- ...................... 3 1.8 9 4 ,5 9 4
3 4 ,2 * 8 .9 7 9
—3 * 5 ,0 9 5
—POO
J u l y .................... 3 5 4 2 * .U 2
3 1 ,9 3 5 ,5 5 3
+ 3,20 2,5 80 + 10-31
Am nwt ............ 3 4 .0 1 1 ,«0 5
3 1.1 ,3 8,5 2 1
+ 2 .9 7 2 .7 -1
+9*30 t f f o m t n c u c i a l a n t i i j U s c c t U u t e o u s
8 . , it,., r . . . . 3 0.0 1 8 .8 5 4
3 0 ,2 40 ,1 6 1
+ 378.393
+ P2S
O etotw r............. 3 0 ,9 4 4 ,1 6 8
3 5,6 6 8 ,3 6 5
+ 1 ,1 8 5 ,7 8 3
+3m 2
N a t io n a l B a n k s . — T h e following inform
ation r e g a r d i n g
ent:
t o m on th*.. 3 4 0 ,7 6 8 ,4 6 4
3 1 0 ,2 7 0 ,9 7 5
+ 4 7 8 ,4 8 9
+0 14 n a t io n a l banks is from t h e Treasury Departm

TH E

90S

[ V o l . L X I,

CH RONICLE.

H i TEONAI. BANKS OKOUNIZMIi.

Ki t l„n .) lu u k of I.sfa ro tto , L o u isian a. C a p ita l,
Vw ( ii s r d P riu ld eo t; 8. R P arkeraon , C a a iiler.
lin er' i s . t i u u i l Hank of liufniila, Alabam a. C apital,
f70,tKHD J P. Pop, P resident; C. P. R oberts, Cashier.
.

— T h e s u rp lu s o f th e O ld C o lo n y T r u s t C o m p a n y , B is t o n ,
th e la s t s ta te m e n t to th e S ta te C o m m is s io n e r s Bhow s, has
b een in cre a s e d to $750,000.
C it y

B a ilr o u d

B r o k e r s ’ Q u o ta tio n s .

S e c u r itie s —

rOBATK KXISTKNOB KXTKNDKD.

8 ,1 0 7 —The lo w k Not

.,n « l B a n k

8 ,1 0 8 - T h e Fir* i Nfk i o n a l
r 23, 1 9 1 5 .

o r

B a n k

In
o f

s

M o in e s ,

L e h lg h to n ,

Io w a , u n til

O o to b e r

P e n n s y lv a n ia ,

u n til

IN UQCIDATION.

4 ,8 4 1 .—
The Fir* t Hut
October i 4 , 1895*
l u i ’ ' i r s a n d E x p o r t s f o r t h s W e e k . — 'T h e f o l l o w i n g a r e
t i„. im p o rts at N'e v Y o r k fo r tlio w e e k e n d in g fo r d r y g o o d s
N o v e m b e r 14 and fo r th e w eek e n d in g f o r g e n e ra l m e r ch a n d ise
N o v e m b e r 15; a lso totals sin ce th e b e g in n in g o f th e first w eek
in J a n u a ry .
rOBKION IMPOSTS AT NEW TOttK.
18 93 .

1892.

F o r W eek ,
D ry G o o d * .....
G « u * i m e r ’ d is e .

(

18 9 5 .

13 9 4 .

$ 2 ,2 9 2 ,5 0 2

$ 1 ,0 5 4 ,3 5 4

$ 1 ,5 7 3 ,8 0 S

6 .2 9 7 ,7 5 8

$ 2 ,4 6 9 ,1 9 4
S ,6 7 1 , 0 4 6

6 ,0 2 1 ,1 8 3

7 ,6 5 7 ,4 0 2

$ 1 1 ,1 4 0 ,2 1 0

$ 7 ,3 5 2 ,1 1 2

$ 7 ,5 9 7 ,9 9 1

$ 9 ,9 4 9 ,9 0 4

D r y Q o o d t ........... $ 1 1 3 , 5 7 8 , 1 2 3
3 9 8 ,0 7 3 ,8 5 7
C ta u ’ l m e r ’d U e .

$ 1 1 1 ,2 6 8 ,5 7 1
3 7 8 ,3 7 2 ,5 8 9

* 7 6 ,^ 0 8 ,4 3 9
3 0 5 ,2 2 3 ,4 2 6

$ 1 3 0 ,2 3 0 ,0 8 3
3 3 3 ,8 0 8 ,4 6 2

* 5 1 1 ,6 5 1 .8 3 0

$ 4 3 9 ,6 3 9 ,1 6 0

$ 3 8 3 ,1 3 1 ,9 1 5

$ 4 6 4 ,0 3 3 ,5 4 5

T o t a l ................
S in ce J u h . 1 .

T o tn l 46 w e e k*

A tlan. Ave., B ’k ly u —
Con. 5s, g., 193l-.A<feO
Im pt. 5 s, g., 1934.. J & J
31
B leek. S t. & F n l.F .—Stk.
111
is tin o rt., 7 b, 1900. J & J
B’ w ay &7th A vo.—
Stock.
lstm ortu.Sa, 1904. J&D SlOO^
2d mort., 5s, 1914. J & J §110
B’w a y 1st, 5s, guar. 1924
2d 5 s.ln t.a8 ren t’1.1905
Consol. 5 8 ,1 9 4 3 ...J&D
Brooklyn C ity—S to c k ....
Consol. 5s, 1941...J & J
Bklyn.Crosst'n5H. 1908
B k l’n.Q’nsC o.& Sub.lst
B klyn.C. &N’wV wn—S tk
5 b, 1939 ........................... $110*4 lllh
13
Brooklyn T raction...........
P referred..........................
C entral CrosBtown—S tk .
1st M .,6 s.l9 2 2...M & N
Oen. Pk. N. & E. B iv .—S tk .
r
Consol. 7 b, 1902... J&D
C hrist’p'r& 10th S t —Stk.
1st inort,, 1898 ...A & O

18 9 4 .

* 7 ,9 6 7 ,6 3 0
3 2 7 ,0 3 3 ,3 4 3

$ 7 ,6 2 2 ,9 9 4
3 1 3 ,7 5 0 ,8 6 2

T o t a l 4 6 tv ^ e k a .

$ 3 4 5 ,3 2 8 ,9 1 9

$ 3 3 5 ,0 0 0 ,9 7 3

$ 3 1 1 ,3 7 3 ,8 5 6

$ 3 1 3 ,9 6 3 ,9 1 7

T h e fo llo w in g ta b le s h o w s th e e x p o r ts a n d im p o rts o f s p e c ie
at the port o f N ew Y o r k f o r th e w e e k e n d in g N o v e m b e r 16 and
sin ce J a n u a ry 1, 1895, a n d fo r th e c o r r e s p o n d in g p e r io d s in
1894 and 1893:
Im p o r ts .

Id ,

G ro a t

B r i t a i n .................

F ra aoe...........................
G e r m a n y .....................
W est In d ies................

Morten.................

S i nth A m erica..........
A ll o th e r
T o ta l
T o ta l

S in c e J a n , 1 .

8 3 ,2 5 0 ,0 0 0

2 ,4 0 0 ,

$ 1 5 ,8 3 6 ,6 2 1

13,808,082'
8,342,086
8 ,4 2 2 ,1 0 4

$ 5 1 ,3 5 1
1 ,6 7 2

1 ,4 5 7 ,2 5 4 ,

5 ,7 6
1 ,6 1
1 ,0 2
5

1 2 0 ,2 6 *
2 ,3 0 6

c o n n tr ie s .
1 8 9 5 .
1 8 9 4 .

2 6 1 ,4 8 3
$ 3 ,2 7 3 ,6 0 0 ;$ 7 4 ,3 6 1 ,8 9 4
1 6 ,0 2 2
8 5 .4 7 6 ,4 7 4

E x p o rts

1 ,9 .8
8 ,8 5 3
9 ,7 3 6
5 ,1 2 2

7 1 2 ,8 3 4
8 6 ,1 3 0

$ 1 7 5 ,5 9 3 1 * 2 5 ,1 3 1 ,2 1 4
6 ,1 8 4
7 9 8 ,3 3 9

1 5 ,3 6 5 ,6 6 1
6 1 ,0 6 6 ,4 5 6

W eek .,

W e st

$ 1 ,0 1 5 ,8 0 7

Im p o r ts .

I n d i e s ......................

S in c e J a n .

1.

$ 3 2 ,4 1 8 ,2 5 8
1 3 5 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,1 4 2
1 5 8 ,8 6 1
399

S in ce J a n

W e e *.

$ 1 ,3 7 0
4 ,1 9 2
95

s

$ 5 5 ,7 5 7
5 ,3 2 1
7 ,1 2 0
3 6 8 ,5 0 0

8 8 3 ,5 8 5

4 3 3 ,2 7 8
7 3 7 ,4 9 2

3 1 ,7 7 9

2 2 ,0 5 2

S o u t h A m e r i c a ..............
A l l o th e r c o u n trie s ..

8 1 ,0 9 5

T o t a l 1 8 9 5 .................
T o t a l 1 8 9 4 .................
T o t a l 1 8 9 3 .................

$ 1 ,0 9 6 ,9 0 2

* 3 3 ,6 4 4 ,0 2 4

*6,157

$ 1 ,6 2 9 ,5 2 0

4 6 9 ,5 8 1
8 3 5 ,1 0 0

3 0 .2 0 3 ,0 2 1

1 2 ,8 0 8
3 ,1 6 1

1 ,5 5 6 ,6 0 8
3 ,1 0 1 ,2 7 4

2 7 ,9 7 3 .1 9 6

100
94

10

A s k .

175

108

105
199
20 1
B o n d s , 6 s , 1 8 9 9 ...................... 1 0 6
S t . P a u l ..............................................
72
7 0 S3
B o n d s , 5 s ........................................ $88
90
S t a n d a r d p r e f ............................ * 1 0 7
108
72
7 3 *3
W e s te rn G a s
..........................
68
70
B o n d s , 5 s . . . .................
...
?92
94

B a s t B i v . i s t 5 s ..

100
1001 *
61
3 3 Vj

86M
1 A n d a d o rn e d in te r e s t.

10034
63
3 4 *4
87

" E x r ig h ts .

B y M essrs. R , V . H a r n e t t & G o .:
Sharis.
9
2 0 0

C h a th a m
iE o lia n

N a tio n a l

O rg a n

&

B a n k ............................................................................................................ 3 3 5
M e r i d a n , C o n n ............... ................................ 8 0

M u s ic C o . o i

B y M essrs, A d r ia n H . M u lle r

O t th e a b o v e im p o rts d u rin g th e w e e k in 1895 1130,228 w e re
A m e r ic a n g o ld c o in and $1,882 A m e r ic a n s ilv e r c o in . O f th e
e x p o r ts d u rin g the sa m e tim e $3,273,600 w e r e A m e r ic a n g o ld
c o in .

& Son:
B on d s.

S h a res.
C o .2 0 5 %

$ 6 ,0 0 0

1 9 4 B k ly n
G a s - L . C o ................. 1 7 6 1 a
2 1 9 h o T h ir d A v e .R R .C o .1 8 8 -1 9 0 %

$ 4 ,0 0 0

1 0 0 P e o p le 's G a s - L i g h t C o . o i
B r o o k l y n . ........................................1 1 0 %

6s, 1 9 0 0 .
A & O
. __________ 1 0 8 %
$ 1 5 ,0 0 0
S o u th
C a r o lin a
6s,

1 8 0 B 'k ly n

&

N . Y . F e rry

B ’k y n
C ity
R R . C o.
5 s , 1 9 1 6 -1 9 4 1 .
J & J
... .
1 1 4 %

N . Y . &
S o u th B r o o k ly n
F o r t y C o ....................................... 2 6
F u lto n
M u n ic ip a l
G as
C o . o i B r o o k l y n ....................... 2 3 0 %
2 ,4 0 0 B r o o k ly n C ity R R . C o . 16 6
4 0
1 0

N . Y

B a la n c e

D ry

R iv e
J & D
$ 3 ,0 0 0
19 0 2

$ 1 7 ,0 0 0
K in d e r h o o k & H a d .
R y C o. b o n d s,
1 9 0 9 .................
$

P e o p le ’ s T r u s t
C o.
o f
B r o o k l y n ........................................2 3 2

— A lim ite d a m o u n t o f C o lu m b u s (O h io ) G as C o m p a n y ’s
first m o r tg a g e fiv e per c e n t g o ld bon d s is o ffe r e d f o r sale b y
M essrs. R e d m o n d , K e r r & C o ., N e w Y o r k and P h ila d e lp h ia .
In th eir a d v e r tis e m e n t e lse w h e re a sta te m e n t is g iv e n s h o w ­
in g n et ea rn in g s, in te re st ch a rg e s, &-c., a n d o th e r in te re stin g
d eta ils r e g a r d in g th e c o m p a n y ’s affa irs.
— 1 n c o n n e c t io n w ith th e d e fa u lt o n W a lla o e C o u n ty , K a n
b o n d s , M essrs. J a m e s A . B r o w n & C o . a d v e r tise that at tlie
re q u e st o f h old ers o f these b o n d s th e y c o n te m p la te ta k in g
step s to p r o te c t th eir in terests. T h e y re q u e st c o m m u n ic t?
tionB fr o m oth e r h old ers.
— Mr. B. S t . J o h n H o y t , w boB e o ffio e is a t N o, 66 B ro a d ­
w a y , a d vertise T erre H au te ( I n d .) a n d o th e r c h o ic e street
ra ilw a y b o n d s. M r. H o y t m a k e s a s p e c ia lty o f th is class o f
in v estm en ts.

N . Y . F e rry

$ 3 , 0 0 0 P o i t l a n d . M i c i . , 'W a t e r
C o. b o n d s, 19 09 . N o v . 1 8 9 5 ,
c o u p o n s o n ...............................................

120 %

gjmMug and

20

26

15

g im m cteX ,

S amuel D. D avis & Co.,
BANKERS,
NO. 4 0 W

i l t

$ T ., M iIV

S a m u e l D. Da v i s .

*7

& 29 P IN E

BANKERS,
STREET,
6 5

&

C o.,

-

NEW

YORK.

S ta te S tr e e t, A lb a n y ,

I N V E S T M E N T

S E C U R I T I E S .

Geo rg b B a r c l a y Mo f f a t .

M

YORK.

C h a s . B . V a n N o st r a n d ,

Spencer T rask

T h e M in n eap olis & St, L o u is c o u p o n s m a t u r in g D ce m b e
1, 1895, w ill be paid a t th e C en tra l T ru st C o m p a n y .
- S u e ca rd o f G u sta vu s M aas, w h o has m a d e a s p e c ia lty o
m isc e lla n e o u s s e cu ritie s f o r m a n y y e a rs.

&

b o n d s, 1 9 0 6 .
O c t.,
18 95 ,
c o u p o n s o n ................................................

C o . 6s , c e r t’ s o f In d e b te d ­
n e s s , 1 9 1 1 .............................................. 1 0 8 %
$ 9 , 0 0 0 B ’k l y n &
N . V . F e rry
O o. 6s. 1 9 1 1 .
J & J .......................

20

8 ,0 0 0

K a n k a k e e W a te r C o .
b o n d s , 19 0 8 .
J a n ,,’ 1 8 9 4 ,
c o u p o n s : o n ......................
...................
$ 6 ,0 0 0
E s c a n a b a W a te r C o .

B r o o k ly n .................. ......... 99%

$ 4 ,5 0 0 B ’k l y n

r R R . oons. 7 s, 19 02 .
. . . . ....................................................1 1 8 %
C it y o f C in o in 'a t i 7 % 0 ,
.
J & J
....................1 1 9 %
& in t.

$ 5 ,0 0 0 N . V . P r o v . &
B o s to n
R R . 7s, 13 9 9 .
. J & J ................. 1 1 2 %

B r o o k ly n
T r u s t C o . ..........3 8 3 %
K e e le y M o t o r C o ., N e w
E n g . C o . re o -d p ts .5 5 c . p e r s h .
E ig h th
W a rd
B a n k
o f

B on d s.

— Mes t-rs, H . A m y & C o. o ffe r to in v e sto rs a lim ited
a m o u n t o f 6 p e r c e n t 1st m o r tg a g e g o ld bon d s o f th e S a n Juan
S m e ltin g & M in in g C o m p a n y , O m a h a a n d G ra n t S m e ltin g
C o m p a n y , lis t res. T h e b o n d s m a tu re in 1015, a n d it is c a l­
c u la te d th a t u n d e r th e o p e r a tio n s o f th e lease these b on d s
w ill be retired lo n g b e fo r e m a tu r ity at 110 p e r c e n t . A m a jo r ­
ity o f these b o n d s has a lre a d y been p la c e d in E u ro p e .

in t.

E r ie
J u n c tio n
R R . 1 s t 7s,
19 0 0 .
J & J .......................................... 1 1 0 %
$ 3 ,0 0 0 C e n tr a l P a r k
N .& E .

R R
............................................. .. . . 1 7 0
T h e N a s s a u B a n k , N . Y .1 5 1
M e m h .
N .
Y . P ro d u c e
E x c h a n g e ....................................$ 3 5 5
2 4 B r o a d w a y I n s . C o ............... 1 1 3 4 4

1 0

in t.
in t.

$ 3 ,0 0 0 C ity o f C in c in n a ti 6s,
1 9 i6.
M & N ............................ 1 1 8 &
$ 5 ,0 0 0 S u s p e n s io n
B r id g e &

D o c k $ 1 2 5

4 0
1

1 7

C o.

$ 7 ,0
0 N . Y . 6s o o n s o ld .s to c k ,
19 01 .
J & J
............................ 1 1 5 &

1 0 0 D e a d w o o d T e r r e M in in g
C o.
$ 2 5 e a c h ..
$ 1 0 0 lo t
1 5 D ry D o c k E . B . &
B a tt.

2 5
5 0 0

G a s

$ 7 ,0 0 0 N . Y . 5 s c o n s ld . s to c k
19 28 .
M & N
..
. 119% &

H a m i l t o n T r u s t O o .............1 9 6 1 *
K i n g s C o u n t v B a n k ____ 1 1 3

25

W illia m s b u r g

1 8 8 8 .......... ..................................... $ 12 5

2 5

3 0

S U ver

G r o a t B r i t a i n ....................

N . Y . &

Since Jan.).

W eek .

8 4 2 ,0 7 0 ,8 8 0

21,200

B id .

Auction Sales.— A m o n g o t h e r s e c u r itie s th e f o l l o w i n g n o t
r e g u la r ly d e a lt in a t th e B o a r d , w e r e r e c e n t ly s o ld a t a u c t x n .

■SPORTS AND IMPOSTS OP SPECIE AT NEW TOSS

W eek .

C O M P A N IE S .

P e o p l e ’ s ( B r o o k l y n ) ............... 100
P e o p l e s ’ ( J e r s e y C i t y ) ____ 1 7 0
M e t r o p o l i t a n ( B r o o k l y n ) . 210
W i l l i a m s b u r g ................................ 3 0 0
105

195

$ 7 ,8 7 6 ,9 9 6
3 0 5 ,9 9 2 ,0 2 1

S o

140
150
90
9 9 *9

200

3 3 8 ,0 3 0 ,6 6 9

E x p o rts.

'

1 8 95

F o rth ®
w e e k ..
P ro v . re p o rte d .

$ 7 ,2 9 8 ,2 5 0

~

tio o

G A S

A sk.

B id .

C O M P A N IE S .

C o n s u m e r s ’ ( J e r s e y C ity ) .

|

~

G a s S e c u r i t i e s — B r o k e r s ’ Q u o ta tio n s .
G A S

18 93 .

‘

§ A n d a c c r u e d in te r e s t,
x E x - d iv ld e n d .

T b e f o llo w in g is a s t a c e r o e u i o i

1 8 9 2 .

A sk.

C o lu m b u s & 9 t li A v e . 5 s .
1143a 1 1 5
170
173
D . 1 ). E . B . & B a t ’ y — S t k .
$107
114
1 10
1 s t , g o ld , 5 s , 1 9 3 2 .J & D
85
104
S c r i p ....................... ....................... $ 1 0 3
29*
360
E ig h th A v e n n e — S to c k ...
$110
103
S c r i p , 6 b , x 0 1 4 .....................
198
195
325
315
4 2 d & G r. S t. F e r .— S to c k
75
70
4 2 d 8 t.& M a n .& S t.N .A v ,
1 s t m o r t. 6 s, 1 9 1 0 .M & S $11534 1 1 7
$112
70
72
2 d m o r t. In c o m e 6 b . J & J
$ 1 0 4 ^ I O 6 V2
1 6 *4
1 6 *a
116
l l 6 Va L o n g I s l a n d T r a c t i o n ------H 434 1 1 5
L e s .A v e .& P a v .F e rry 5 b.
167
166
1 0 9 * 2 110*2
M e tr o p o lita n T r a c t io n . . .
1 1 4 Vj
157
N in th A v e n u e — S t o c k . . .
105
167
170
S e c o n d A v e n u e — S to c k ..
103
1 s t m o r t.,5 s , 1 9 0 9 .M & N H 0 7 > s 1 0 8 * 3
175
103
D e b e n t u r e o s , 1 9 0 w.J & J
202
198
S ix th A v e n u e — S to c k —
14
186
188
T h ird A v e n u e — S to c k . . .
61
59
121*3
121
1 s t m o rt., 5s, 1 9 3 7 . J & J
175
190
300
T w e n ty - T h ir d
S t.— S t’k
$118
105
100
! Deb. 6s, 1903.
164
167
105
U n io n B y — S to c k ..
115
$ 101*2 1 0 4 * a
1 s t 5 s , 1 9 4 2 ...............
155*
150
1 0 1 *«
W e s t o h e a t ’ r , 1 s t , p m ., 5 s ,
105

• p s c ie )fr o m Hi - p >rt o f N ew Y o r k to fo r e ig n p ires fo r th e
w e e k e n d in g N o v e m b e r 19 a n d f r o m J a n u a r y 1 to d a te :
BXPOBT8 TROM NEW TOttK FOB THE WEES.

B id .

B id .

A l e x a n d e r M. W h it e , J r

o f f a t

& W

h i t e

,

BANKERS
30

P I N E

S T R E E T ,

-

.

N E W

INVESTM ENT SECU RITIES.

TO R K .

fH E

November 23, 181)5. |

U n it e d
S t a t e s B o n d s .— G o v e r n m e n t b o n d s h a v e b e e n
w e a k a n d q u o t a t io n s a r e lo w e r . S a les a t th e B o a r d in c lu d e
$39,000 as, c o u p ., a t 1 1 4 % t o 1 1 5 % ; §14,000 4 s, c o u p ., 1907, a t
112 t o 11214: §1.000 4s, r e g ., 1907, a t 1 1 1 % ; §35,000 4s, c o u p .,
1925. a t 120% t o 121% . a n d §40,000 4s. r e g ., 1925, a t 1 2 0 % t o

g lie g a u k e r s ' (fiaaette.
d i v i d e n d s

Ka'tte o f O.i'npaay.

909

CH RONICLE,

.

120%.

Per \ When
Bootes closed.
I (JeiU, I Payable. i (Days inclusive.)

j

F o ll o w i n g a r e th e c lo s in g p r ic e s :

R a ilr o a d s .
Interest yoo.
Non. Xov, Xov. Xov. Xov.
B o ston A M ain e oooi. (q u ar t —
i 1% J a n .
1 INov. 26 to Dec.
1
Periods 16.
2 J.
21.
22.
18
ID.
C a tax risea p re f. atoeks s u n t ............. i 3% Nov.
2 0 -t o -------------Cbio. B u rl. a iju m , y d in a r.) . . .
i1
Deo.
!7 iN o v . 25 to Nov. 30
Q.-Meh. * 97 * 4*7 - 97 * 97 * 97 * 97
F t M S M n i ...................................................I 3 « t J a n ,
—'- to ------------- 29. ..........................cen­ Q .-I
* a i % 1113! *1115, * 1 1 1 % * 1 1 1 % m u *
B lc h ta o a il A P e te rsb u rg . . _
_
3% J a n . ---------------t o -------------- ts, luirt................ re*. Q .-T a n .. *112%
an
112 • i l i a . * n i 5 i
4 b. 1 9 0 7 ............. sonp.
U .'% * LI2
R ls e e lla n e « u ».
ll0 5 t
4 b, 1 9 2 5 ................ re*. q .- Fei>. *121*4 *12114 *131% *121 *121
L a c le d e i> i» L ig h t p re f .............. *3t» Deo. l i t Dee. 1 to Deo. 18
12 L
\
Q - Feb. *121% -121H 121 % *12
N atio n al L e a d u r e f. (q u a r ) ...............[ l-h IDeo. 16! Nov. 30 to Dec. 16 Is, 1 9 2 5 ............ coup. u .- Feb. *115 * U 5 "115 *114% *111% *1 2o\*
i\
5a. 1 9 0 4 ................ r e s .
s ix t h A ven u e KK ................................ 120
Nov. — ------------ to ------ ——
115 *L1J% 11 ’ A
5 «, 1 9 0 4 . . . . . . .coup. Q.- Feb. 115*4 tlo>4 115
S tlilw e l-B leroe A S u iith -Y aile;
6a, o n r’o y ,'9 6 ...r e * . J . Js J *102 *102 *102 *102 *102 * •1)5
|,re t. H|mr >
........................................
2
Deo.
2 Nov, 21 to Deo. 1
6a. a a r ’e y ,'9 7 . .re * . J . A J *104% *101*9 *101% * 1 0 1 % *101% * o i •
6e, m ir’e y ,'9 8 - .. -e*. 1. V .5 *108 *104 *108 *108 *104 •lOd
• 0 1 1tile 1 p e r ce n t on a c c o u n t of a c c u m u la te d d iv id en d s.
I P a r t of this on a cco u n t of la r g e r e a l e s t a t e sa le s.
6 s, o u r 'o y ,'9 9 .. r e g . J . A ) *110% M l0 % *1 1 0 % *110% * 1 1 0 % *110>«
4s, (C her.i 1 8 9 6 .reg . M arc h . '1 »()% *100 % *10>% * 1 0 0 * *100% m o o t *
W A D I. S T R E E T . F R I D A Y . B O V . 2 2 . K S 9 3 .- 3 P . M . | 46, (C h e r.)1 8 9 7 .re * . M arch . •i0 0 % *100% • loot, *100% *100% * i o o q
4a, (Cher.) 1 8 9 3 .re*. M arch . *100% *100% *1005, *100 A * 100% -io o -\
T h e M o n e y M a r k e t a n d F i n a n c i a l S i t u a t i o n . — F o r e ig n |4a. 1C her.) 1 89 9 . re*. M arch. •1005k *100% •100% *5 00% *100% *100%
liq u id a t io n o f s e c u r it ie s a n d t h e g o l d e x p o r t m o v e m e n t h a v e ! ■T h is la th e price bid a t th e m o rn in g bo ard, no sale vra s m ade.
b e e n t h e le a d in g fe a t u r e s o f in te r e s t a n d in flu e n c e in W a ll i
U n it e d S t a t e s S u b -T r e a s u r y .— T h e f o llo w in g ta b le s h o w s
S t r e e t d u r in g t h e w e e k . T h is liq u id a t io n , s o f a r as A m e r ic a n ; re ce ip ts a n d p a y m e n ts at th e S u b -T r e a su r v .
p r o p e r t ie s a r e c o n c e r n e d , b e g a n m o n t lis a g o , b u t lia s in cre a s e d i
Balances.
d u r in g r e c e n t w e e k s . T h e g o l d e x p o r t s a r e in o b e d ie n c e t o : Date.
Payments.
Receipts.
Coin.
Ooin Otrt's. Currency.
a n a t u r a l la w tlia n w h i c h t h a t o f g r a v it a t io n is n o t m o r e j
$
s
i
$
i
$
c e r t a in .
Nov. 10! 1.8-0.484
2,863,118 84.455,050
876,085 97 ,9-8 ,329
T h e T r u n k -lin e T r a ffic A g r e e m e n t h a s th is w e e k b een r a ti­
•* I8i 4 .23“ ,3 10
2.«88,961 86,091,60)
‘ 06,209 97,670,901
“ 19
2,973.450
3,686.090 84,680 587
1,373,665 91,8 >1,927
fied a n d is t o g o i n t o e f fe c t J a n u a r y 1st. I t is h o p e d th a t th e
“ 20
2.100.021
1,325,315 9 9 ,1 .3 ,6 6 1
2,678,053 83,839,t»4l
** 21
1,624,33(5
2.190,344 83,201,399
1,165,399 98,339,051
r e s u lt o f th is m e a s u r e m a y b e a m o r e u n if o r m a n d e q u it a b le
6,289,103 82,019.188
1,073,108 93.908,420
4 2 2 j 5,583.781
4
s t a n d a r d o f tr a ffic ra te s t h r o u g h o u t th e c o u n t r y .
............................................. ....
W e a r e i n fo r m e d b y e x c e ll e n t a u t h o r i t y t h a t i t is q u it e u n - j Total 19.400,308 20,701,672 ............
c e r t a in w h e n

t h e n e w R e a d in g p la n w ill b e a n n o u n c e d .

It

C o in s .— F o ll o w i n g
c o in s :

m a y b e d e la y e d s e v e r a l w e e k s.

T h e la te s t r e p o r t s o f r a ilr o a d e a r n in g s a r e a m o s t e n c o u r - [ S o v e r e ig n s ........... ? ! 86

Napoleon* ........... 3 85
X X K elohm ark*. 4 70
75 P e s e t a s ............ 4 75
b e lt . T h is m u s t tie d u e t o th e m o v e m e n t o f s m a ll g r a in a n d |Span . Doubloons. 15 5 0
g e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e , a s th e r e c e ip ts o f c o r n a r e n o t as h e a v y j .Max. D oubloons. 15 5 0
F in e g o ld bar* —
par
a s a t th is t i m e last y e a r . T h e L a k e S h o r e r e p o r t fo r th e i
a g in g fe a t u r e .

An

in c r e a s e o f

tr a ffic is n o te d in th e c o m

S e p t e m b e r q u a r t e r s h o w s a n In cre a se o f n e a r ly 30 p e r c e n t in
e a r n in g s , a n d th e N o r t h W e s t , r e tu r n s f o r O c t o lie r a re $809,257
in e x c e s s o f la st y e a r .
T h e o p e n m a r k e t ra te s f o r c a l l lo a n s d u r in g t h e w e e k o n
s t o c k a n d h i n d c o lla t e r a ls h a v e r a n g e d f r o m 1J^ t o 2 p er
c e n t . T o - d a y ra te s o n c a ll w e r e 1 ^ t o 2 p e r c e n t . P r im e
c o m m e r c ia l p a p e r is q u o t e d a t
t o I f j p e r c e n t.
i ’fte b a n s of E n g la n d w e e k ly s ta t e m e n t o n T h u r sd a y
s h o w e d an in cre a se in b u llio n o f £593,275. a n d th e p e r ce n ta g e
o f re se rv e to lia b ilitie s w a s 57*59 a g a in s t 58’ 16 last t w k : th e
d is c o u n t r a te r e m a in s u n c h a n g e d a t 2 p e r c e n t. T h e B a n k o f
F r a n c e s h o w s a n in c r e a s e o f 0,823,000 fr a n c s in g o ld a n d
1,200,000 fr a n c s in s ilv e r .
The N e w Y o r k C ity C le & r in g -llo t u e b a n k s in th e ir s ta te m e n t
o f N o v . 10 s h o w e d an in cre a s e in th e r e s e rv e h e ld o f *717,200
a n d a s u r p lu s o v e r th e r e q u ir e d r e s e r v e o f $30,104,050,
a g a in st $19,200,050 th e p r e v io u s w e e k .

1888.
Nov. 10.

•

DtJTtrtn-trmtn

! P rtv . w eek.

I

•

1894.
H o t. 17.

•

1893.

j Noe. 18.

I

8

2O.404.050 I n c .1 ,144,000 62.974.Q5o' 05,470,475

F o r e i g n E x c h a n g e .— T h e m a r k e t fo r f o r e ig n e x c h a n g e
h a s c o n t in u e d A rm th r o u g h th e w e e k . T h e s u p p ly o f c o m ­
m e r c ia l b ills ha.-! b o o n in s u ffic ie n t t o m e e t th e d e m a n d , a n d
t h e d e f i c i e n c y h as b o o n m a d e u p b y d r a w in g s a g a in s t g o ld
e x p o rts.
S h ip m e n t s o f g o l d
f o r th e w e e k a g g r e g a t e
$17,330,000, in c l u d i n g $1,000,000 w h i c h g o e s t o -m o r r o w .
T ix J n y a c t u a l ra te s o f e x c h a n g e w e r e a s f o l l o w s : B ankers,
s i x t y d a y s s t e r lin g , 4
S7?4": d e m a n d , 4 8 9 @ 4 89££j

c a b le s , 4 89*4(84 St>',£.
P oste d rate* o f le a d in g b a n k e ts a re a s f o l l o w s :
So*emb*r 23.

P rim e h an k e r* ' ste r lin g b ill* on London..
Voram^ntarj c o m m ercia l...............................
P a ri* b an k er*' (tra n o e i......................... .........
An»*ter<tam (guU ders) b a n k e r* ................. .
F ra n k fo rt or B rem anirw lohinarke) b'k ere'

thzly D ay.

Dtmctna.

4 S31
*
4 90
4 3 7 9 4 87 Q
4 s e q « 4 86%
::::::::
6 1 7 S 9 I6 ta ,« 5 I5 » g 9 1H&16
4 0 > «»*o 3 l a
40*1*940%
9 5 * 8 9 9 5 1 1 !,
9 5 8 ,8 * 9 5 %

T h e fo l l o w i n g w e r e th a rates o f d o m e s t ic e x c h a n g e o n N ew
F o r k a t th e u n d e r -m e n t io n e d c it ie s t o -d a y : 8 a v a n n a h , b u y in g
*4 d is c o u n t, s e llin g
p r e m iu m ; C h a r le sto n , b u y in g par,
s e llin g 14 p r e m iu m ; N e w O rle a n s, b a n k , p a r ; c o m m e r c ia l
$4 p er $1,000 d is c o u n t ; C h ic a g o , 30c. p e r $1,000 p r e m iu m ;
8 t . L o u is , 0 0 ® 75c, p e r $1,000 p r e m iu m .
M

cu rren t

» | 4 90
9 3 90
9 4 So
9 i 82
D15 75
<*15 75
» % prem .

q u o t a tio n s

in

g o ld

fo r

F in e s ilv e r b a r s ... — 6 % 9 — 69»*
F ive fr a n c s . ...........— 9 0 * — 95
M exican d o lla r s .. - 5 4 ® — 5 5
Do uneoui’n ia l.. — — <»------P eru v ia n s o l s .. . .. — 49 » — 51
E n glish s ilv e r . . . 4 85 a 4 92
l>. 8. tra d e d o lla r s - 55 9 — 5

S t a t e a n d R a i l r o a d B o n d s .— S a le s o f S t a t e b o n d s a t t h e
| B o a r d in c lu d e 810,000 V ir g in ia fu n d , d e b t 2-8s o f 1991 a t (32,
$10,000 V ir g in ia Os d e f d , tr u s t r e c t s ., s ta m p e d , a t (3% a n d
j $8,000 N o. C a r o lin a c o n . 4s a t 100.
T h e v o lu m e o f b u s in e s s in th e r a ilr o a d b o n d m a r k e t h as
I b e e n r e s t r ic t e d , w it h s u c h a c t i v i t y a s is n o t e d c h ie fly c o n ­
fin e d t o a f e w issu es. In m o s t c a s e s q u o t a t io n s a r e lo w e r
, th a n la s t w e e k , th e d e c lin e a v e r a g in g a b o u t o n e p o in t .
T h e s e c o n d it io n s a p p ly t o th e A t c h is o n issu es, C h e sa p e a k e
\& O h io , M o. K a n . & T e x a s , N o r th e r n P a c if ic , R e a d in g ,
S o u t h e r n R y . a m i T e x a s & P a c if ic b o n d s .
T h e e x c e p t io n a l fe a t u r e s a r e O re. S h o r t L in e 6s, w h i c h h a v e
a d v a n c e d 8 % (Hunts o n b u y i n g s a id t o b e b y p a r tie s r e p r e ­
s e n t in g in s id e in te r e s ts . T h e b u y in g is a c c o m p a n ie d b y a n
u n o ffic ia l s t a t e m e n t t h a t th o in te r e s t o n th e s e b o n d s w ill
j h e r e a ft e r b e p a id p r o m p t ly . O re. S . L . & U . N . c o n . re cta ,
h a v e a d v a n c e d f r o m 5 8 % o n th e 12th in s t . t o 63.
The
U n io n P a c if ic issu e s h a v e b e e n fir m a n d s te a d y u n d e r lib e r a t
sales.
R a i l r o a d a n d M is c e lla n e o u s S t o c k s .— T h e s t o c k m a r k e t
h a s b e e n h e a v y a n d d e p re sse d d u r in g t h e w e e k u n d e r th e in ­
flu e n c e s a lr e a d y m e n t io n e d . T h e o u t s id e p u b lic a r e d is p o s e d
t o k e e p a l o o f f r o m s t o c k s p e c u la t io n , a n d in v e s to r s a r e b u y ­
in g s t o c k s o n ly w h e n t h e y a r e o ffe r e d a t lo w fig u r e s. A s a
c o n s e q u e n c e b u s in e s s a t th e S t o c k E x c h a n g e h a s b e e n la r g e ly
in th e h a n d s o f p r o fe s s io n a l r o o m tr a d e rs.
T h e g r a n g e r s t o c k s h a v e b e e n s u s t a in e d b y t h e e x c e ll e n t
tr a ffic r e t u r n s o f th o g r o u p , s o f a r a s t h e y 'h a v e a p p e a r e d ,
a n d h a v e s u ffe r e d o n ly f r a c t io n a l d e c lin e s . T h e c o a l s t o c k s
h a v e b e e n e x c e p t io n a lly d u ll, in s o m e c a s e s s c a r c e ly e n o u g lt
h a v in g c h a n g e d h a n d s t o e s ta b lis h q u o t a t io n s , a n d in a ll
'
c a se s 'U q q tu a tio n s h a v e b e e n n a r r o w . L o u is v ille & N a s h v ille
lias b e e n fr e e ly s o ld f o r f o r e ig n a c c o u n t a m l d e c lin e d n e a r ly 2
p o in ts . R e a d in g w a s w e a k , u n d e r r e p o r ts o f a h e a v y assess­
m e n t in th e r e o r g a n iz a t io n . S o m e o f th e le a d in g S o u t h w e s t ­
e r n s h a re s h a v e d e c lin e d b e tw e e n 1 a n d 2 p o in ts . M a n h a tt a n
E le v a t e d h a s b e e n f r e e ly sold s in c e th e a n n u a l r e p o r t w a s
issu ed la s t w e e k , a n d d r o p p e d t o 9 8 % o n W e d n e s d a y , t h e
lo w e s t p o in t it lias r e a d ie d s in c e 1891.
T h e in d u s t r ia l lis t lias b e e n g e n e r a lly s te a d y , w it h s o m e
n o t a b le e x c e p t io n s . A m e r ic a n T o b a c c o h as b e e n m o s t a c t i v e ,
a n d u n d e r a d e c is io n b y th e A t to r n e y -G e n e r a l o f th is S t a t e
t h a t th e c o m p a n y is v io la t in g th e la w in its m e t h o d s o f b u s i­
n ess it d e c lin e d t o 8-1% o n W e d n e s d a y , w h i c h w a s it s lo w e s t
p o in t o f th e y e a r , a n d c lo s e s a t 8 8 % . W e s t e r n U n io n is n e x t
in p o in t o f a c t i v i t y a n d s o ld d o w n t o 8 6 % , o n a d e c is io n b y
th e U n it e d S ta te s S u p r e m e C o u r t w h i c h h e ld t h a t th e U n io n
P a c if ic R a ilr o a d h a d n o r ig h t t o m a k e a lea se g i v i n g t o t h o
W e s t e r n U n io n a m o n o p o ly o f its lin es. T h e r e h a v e b e e n
r u m o r s o f a s c h e m e t o oppo.se b y le g a l p r o c e e d in g s t h e r e o r ­
g a n iz a t io n o f th e C h ic a g o G a s C o m p a n y , a n d t h e s t o c k h a s
b e e n w e a k in c o n s e q u e n c e . P a c if ic M a il h as lo s t a p a r t o f t h e
a d v a n c e n o t e d la s t w e e k .
D e c lin e s o f o n e p o in t h a v e
o c c u r r e d in G e n e r a l E le c t r ic a n d T e n n . C o a l & I r o n . U . S .
L e a t h e r p r e fe r r e d lias lo s t 3 % p o in ts , c lo s in g a t 6 6 % .

C a p it a l................... 6 1 .1 4 2 .7 0 0
6 1 .0 2 2 ,7 0 0 0 0 .9 22 ,7 0 0
S a r p io s .................
7 2 .8 S 9 .0 0 0 '
7 1 .2 5 8 ,0 0 0 7 1 .6 05 ,1 0 0
Doan# A d l* «’n t». 482.9J3.5oO , Dec 2.989,7O O!408,9 3 7 ,0 0 0 4 0 1 ,7 3 2 .8 0 0 !
C ir c u la tio n .......... 1 4 ,1 04 ,3 0 0 D ee. 199 .00 0 1 1 .1 70 ,0 0 0 14,0 76 .0 0 0 i
N et d e p e e iU ........ 5 2 ...2 2 8 .1 0 0 Dec. 1 .7 0 7 ,8 0 0 !5 9 4 ,5 4 7 ,4 0 0 4 6 1 ,0 3 1 ,1 0 0 ;
S p a d e ...................... 0 5 .7 0 7 .9 0 0 I n c . 1 ,3 4 0 ,6 0 0 9 4 ,4 2 1 ,1 0 0 8 9 ,9 2 4 ,3 0 0
L e g a l t e n d e r * .... ‘ 0 .1 9 3 ,3 0 0 Dec. « 3 1 ,4 00 1 1 7 ,1 8 9 ,8 0 0 8 1 ,7 1 7 ,2 0 0
R ese rv e held........ 1 5 1 ,9 6 1 .2 0 0 In e . 7 1 7 .2 0 0 2 1 1 ,0 1 0 ,0 0 0 1 81 ,04 1.5 00
L e g a l reee rv e . . . 1 3 1 ,5 5 7 ,1 5 0 Dec. 4 2 0 ,3 0 0 1 48,630,353 1 1 0 ,1 7 1 ,0 2 6 !
SnrpSnereserve

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VOL. L A l.

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*1
*7
9

5 3 *3
14%
31%
31%
20
85
99%
! 4%

3 0 *2
3 0 *2

0 *8
9%
9
5
9%
13%
*7 0
•*2 9

75
31

95%

10% I

75
31

*7 0
*2 9

95% ;

51
18 5%

51
185
16

15

32%
3

33

31%
42 %

31%

11%
•1 %

11%
4%
15%
25
10

10 % 1 0 %;

*11

*3 2 %
3

33%
3
•

4

%

16

*20
9
*

4%
9%

*1 7 %
55
*2 7
*1
11
*5
“

7
8%
9
6

.1 %
16%
24
9
’ 5
11
18
55
32
19

10 %
4%

15%
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*8
4%
9 ‘4
18
o il;
*2 6

11

3
11%

4

%

15%
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*7
5

16
24
10

4%
10%
18

f;
9%
1 /1 -7 %
53
*2 6
*1 7
*1 1 9

54%
32

*1 1 9

13%
•2 6

120%
64
6%
13%
30

*8 8
11 6

91
116

90
* ..............
116
*1 1 3

‘ 59
6
•1 3 %
*2 6

22 % '

21 %

35%

11%
35%
9

11 % 11%1
8%
%
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*7 5
9%
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*7 %

9
%
4 0
77%
9%
5
7%
20%

10%
13%
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13»j
42%

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6

10

*°8
*3 5
*7 5
9%
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7 %
1908
13%
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4%

120%

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64
6

6%

12%

14%
30

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*1 1 3

20 %

9 8 %
9 8
88 % I
85%
104%
104%
64%

!
'
!

5

5

31 %
1G 4
167
67%
32%

3 1 >4
1*67
67 %
33%

148%
19%
y its
32
92%
6
30%
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105
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32 %

*1 9
9
*4 %
9%
17 %
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7
1 3 %
09%
37
90%

7%
13%
13 4t
0%
37
90%

1 h c v .-

7 >4

32%

10

*10

10%

‘ 2%

4%
14%
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9%
5

4%
9%

10%

17 %
55

17%
54%
32

6
12%

*2 6
*1 7
118
*5 9

63

12 %

5%

12 %

18%

19 %
1 4

19 1 9

8 4 %
10 3%

8 6 %
103%

1

33%

151
105
*6 7 %
31

172
6 7 r>a
32%

7%

7M
14% |

7
14

70
3G 1»

13
71%
36%

88%

68%
35%

90 % l

86 % 88%l

14

11 % 12 %
70% ;
36 %

17%
55
32
19
118
63
5%

12 %

*2 6

2 9
90
11 6

3 5

4 2 %
6

8%
4%

10%

*1 1 3

21% 21%
10% 10%

18%
13%
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15%
23

39

10 %

5
7%

3%
4%

90
1 1 6

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116

14 %

12 %

15%

11 %

19

21
8%

8%
*4 %
7
18
13
‘ 4 0
*4

%
%
%
%

1 9
67 %
99 %

9 9 14
84 %
1 0 0 %

33 %

8%

%
j

%
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*7 5

4 0
7 7 %
8% '

5
7%

;
,

8%

%

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8%

7%
18 %

19% ;
141s!
13%
4 ‘2 % ! * 4 0 %
(i
*4 %
19%
67%
10 1
99 %
86%
1 0 0 >4

19%
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3 0 *a
30%
91
4=8
3 0 %
*1 5 1
168
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32

1 9 7a 1 5 1
S3
16

5 1 -%
9%
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99 u
99
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52

12 %

10%
34%

8% ;
%
4 0
77%
9
5
7%
19%
14
42%
5
19%
68%

29
29

13%

84%

17%
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*1 7
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99

4%

12%
G 8%
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87

o
o
o
o

n
n
u
u

19

121
12%

6%

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18
13
41
*4

2 ,9 8 5
4 5 0

40

41 % '
5
18 %
68% ,

83%
10 0%

63%

11%
66 %
35%
86%

1 A l l a s s e s s m e n ts f> a id .

0
7
7 %
9 %
4 %

A u g . 28
A u g . 28
A p r.
1
M a r. 2 7
S e p t.
4

1 7
1
5
5

4
7 %
5 %
1

O c t
1
S e p t. 1 0
S e p t.
9
M a y 11

20

1 3 4
4 1 0 6
11 %

J u n e 2 0
S e p t.
4
J u n e 13

1 6
5 5
1 2 3

J a n .
J a n .
M a r.

15 5 %
1 0 %

M a r.
J a n .

3 2 %
2 6
1 0 0

J a n .
N o v .
J a n .

202

81 %
5%
19

J a n .
J an.
J a n .

15 %
69
8 0 9
1 3 4 %
3 ,0 7 4
8 3
3 1 0
5
2 ,1 8 0

F eb .
J a n .

M a r.
M a r.
J a n .

3 0 0
4 5 0
5 0 0

J a n .
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M a r.

9 8 %
9 1 %

N o v .
M a r.

5 0 0
2 4 1

1 4

M a y

7
3
1
2

M a y
M a y
J a n .
J a n .

M i s s o u r i P a c i f i c ...............................
M o b i l e A O h i o ......... ...........................
N a s h v .C h a tta n o o g a & S t. L o u is
N e w
N e w

Y o rk : C e n tra l A H u d s o n .
Y o r k C h ic a g o A S t. L o u is
D o
D o

N o rth e rn

A

p re f.
N a v ig a t io n C o .
A
&
R
O

U ta h
E v a n
e a d in
h io . &

N o r th .
s v ille .
g ..............
S t. L .

R o m e W a te rto w n A O g d e n s b .
S t. L o u is A l t . & T e r r e H a u t e .
S t . L o u i s S o u t h w e s t e r n .................
D o
S t. P a u l A

p re f.
D u l u t h ..................................

O h io

8
9
0
0
2

%
%
%
%
%

4%
30%
168
67 %
3 2 %

A

L a k e

.............................
p re f.
E r i e ....................

D o
W is e . C e n . C o ., v o t i n g

1 ,7 3 1
3 1 0

9 2 %
1 1 %

M a r.
F eb .

5 ,0 3 7

6 5
2 4
7 %

A p r.
F eb .
M a r.

3 0 0

1 6

F eb .

200

2 9
1 7 6
1 4 %

Ja n .
S e p t.
N o v .

6%
2 1
2

J u n e
J u n e
M a r.

100

25
8 ,1 4 2
1 ,6 5 0
4
7
4
9

M is c e lla n e o u s
S to c k s .
A m e r i c a n C o t t o n O i l C o ............
D o
A m e r ic a n

p re f.
S u g a r R e fin in g C o .

o n s o lid a te d G a s C o m p a n y . .
is . A C . F . C o . , t r . c t s . a U in s . p d .
e n e r a l E l e c t r i c C o . .........................
a t i o n a l L e a d C o ............................ ...

D o
p re f.
N o r t h A m e r i c a n G o ............................
P a o l t t e M a i l .............. ...................................
P
P
S
T

i p e L i n e C e r t i f i c a t e s ......................
u llm a n P a la c e C a r C o m p a n y i l v e r B u l l i o n C e r t i f i c a t e s ____
e n n e sse e C o a l Ir o n & R R .. .

7
13%
1 1 % U n i t e d S t a t e s L e a t h e r C o ...........
D o
p re f.
68%
U n i t e d S t a t e s R u b b e r C o ____
W e s te rn U n io n T e le g ra p h .. .

(| L o w e s t i s e x

0
5
5
2

9=3 M a r.
2 % J a n .
1 3
F e b .
1 7
3 %

8 0 0
3 3 0
7 0 ,1 1 0
17 7
3 5 4

3
7%
1 5
4
2
1
1 1

d iv id e n d .

A p r.
J a n .
F eb .
M a r.
J a n .

3 %
8
5
2 %

J a n .
A p r.
A p r.
M a y

3 5 %

10

F e b .

4 %
8 %

J a n .
J an.

8
8
4
6 %

F e b .
O e t.
M a r.
A p r.

4 1 8
1 ,4 5 8

100
2
1 3
6
1

,5
,9
,3
,5

2
6
0
0

0
5
9
1

1
8
1 0
1

1 ,7 5 0

3 ,4 2
7
8 6
1 1 ,8 9
3 ,4 6

8
5
0
0
0

2 6 0

200
3 ,4 8 5 ,
3 0 9

1 0 8
1
D o
p re f.
A m e r i c a n T o b a c c o C o .................... 1 4 9
1
D o
p ro f.
C h ic a g o G a s C o ., t r u s t r e o e ip t s
D o .C e n t.T r. C o .e n g .e ts .o f d c p .
5 2
C
D
G
N

0
2
1
7

7 ,0 5 0

p re f.
tr . c tfs

D o
p re f.
U .S . C o r d .C o . ,tr .i- e c . a ll in s .p d .
P r e f . , t r . r e c . a l l in s . p d .

30 %
87 %

M a r.
M a r.
J a n .

C e n t r a l ....................

W a b a s h .......................

9
9 %
2 %
1 %

1 8 %
1 3 %
6 4

P a e i l l o ....................................

D o
p re f.
P i t t s b u r g A W e s t e r n , p r e f ____
R i o G r a n d e W e s t e r n .........................

A

I jI O O
2 .8 2 5
9 ,7 6 0
1 7 ,8 3 4

1 s t p re f.
2 d p re f-

r e g o n 8 I1. L i n e
e o r ia D e c a t u r
h ila d e lp h ia A
i t t s b u r g C in n .

18 %
D o
1 3 % ;W lie e lin g

00%
98
84%
102

6%
13%

A u g . 2 9
O e t. 2 2

5
9
2
6
13

M in n e a p o lis A S t. L o u i s . . .
D o
1 s t p re f.
D o
2 d p re f.
M i s s o u r i K a n s a s A T e x a s ............
D o
p re f.

T o le d o

7%

14
1
3
3
9

4 6
1 2 3 %

F eb .
J a n .

1 .8 2 5
6 0 0

77 %
D o
p re f.
8 % U n i o n P a c i f i c ........................... ...................
5
IU n io n P a c ific D e n v e r A G u lf .

18%
68
1 )9 % 1
98

M a r.
M a r.

4 8 ,1 5 8
215

33% i
D o
p re f., v o t in g tr u s t, c e r t.
S % T e x a s A P a c i f i c .........................................
% j T o le d o A n n A r b o r A N . M ic h .

%
%
%
%

1 0 7 %
1 4 9 %
8 4 %

35 %
82

200

rre H a u te —
p r e f ..........................

10

8%
*4 %

M a r.
F eb .
J a n .

2 8 %
1 0 4

2 3 ,2 0 9
2 ,0 3 0

r a n d e ....................
p re f-

*2 6
29
D o
p re f.
90
S t. P a u l M in n . A M a n it o b a . ..
*1 1 3
116
9 1 5 o S o u t h e r n P a c i f i c C o .............................
9 1 1«
_
% 1 0 % :S o u th e r n ,v o tin g t r u s t , e e r t if .

*3 4
*7 5

M a r,
M a r.

2
1 6
9
5
1 0
7
1 3

4 6 %
6
2 0

O
P
P
P

17%
56
32

%

F eb.
F eb .
J a n .
J a n .
M a r.
N o v .
J a n .

4 1 ,2 6 0

9
4%
10

33%
8%

M a r.
M a r.
Ja n .

8 7 %
1 3 7
60 %

6 ,0 4 8
1 8 0

200

,8
,4
,1
,1

9
0
2
5

6
7!
3!
7 1

8% J a n .
2 9 % J a n .
S % J a n .
% N o v .
3 6
O e t.
7 3
J a n .
7 %
3%

M a r.
F eb .

5 %

M a r.

1 2 %
8 %
35
2 %

J a n .
F eb .
F eb.
M a r.

1
0
8
9

8 %
2
6 %
0 %

F eb .
F eb .
Ja n .
J a n .

8 3 %

N o v .

6 2 %
57 %
1 1 6 %
21 %

S e p t. 3 0
A u g . 2 9
S e p t.
4
S e n t.

3
2
8
1 5

8
8
5
3 %

8 8 %
2 2
6
1
2
11

6
0
9
9

%
%
%
%

1 0
2
8
6

3
6 %
8
2

O c t.
16
N o v . 2 2
A u g . 28

S
J
J
J

J a n .
S e p t
S
M
S
M

1 %
4 %
8 %
4

M a y

6 5 %
2 1 8
1 9 %

A u g . 15
J u n e 18
M a y 11
2
1
1
1

1
8
3
8

8%
2 7
3 2
1 1 %
7 %

M a y
M a y
J u n e
A u g .
S e p t

1
1
1
2

3
1
1
9
7

2 2 %
2 2 %

S e p t
4
M a y
13

6 0 %
3 4 %

S e p t. 2 3
S e p t
5

1 9 %
1 2 0

J u n e 1 7
N o v . 15

68
9 %
1 9 %

7
5 8

F e b .
F e b .

3 3 %
8 6

N o v .
Jan ,

i 2 d a s s e s s ’ t p a id .

§ 3 d

6
3
9

S e p t.
0
M a y 11
M a y 15

2 6 %
1 4 %

A u g .
1
M a y 1 0

4 4 %
1 4 %
4%

J u ly
9
S e p t
3
M a y 1 4

4 9
8 1

J u n e 1 4
M a r. 2 1

1 7 %
8%
1 0 %
2 6 %
1 8 %

M a y 1 1
S e p t.
4
S e p t.
3
S e p t.
3
J u u e 2 7

5 4 %
7 %

J u ly
S e p t.

121 %

3 0 %
7 9 %

M a y 1 3
M a y 13
J u n e 13

1 0 7
1 1 7
11 6

A u g .
1
M a y
27
A u g . 28

J u ly
J u ly

9 0 8
1 0 7 ,8 7 7

J u n e
S e p t
S e p t.

3 5 %
9 5
1 1 6 %

2 ,7
9
8 ,7
3 1 ,6

%
1 %

17

1 4 % J a n .
4 3 % J a n .
16% M a y
1 9 % J a n .

38
9 4 %

0
5
5
0

3 1

c t
9
u g . 2 8
a y 13
c t. 2 4

M a y 1 1
J u n e 1 5

M a r.
F eb .
J a n .
J a n .

7
5
4
4

M a y
O
A
M
O

1 5 %
3 2 %

1 4 9 %

10

e 18
t.
5
e 1 9
t.
5

3 4 %

N o v .
J a n .
M a r.

10,000

5
4

e p t.
4
a y 2 4
e p t.
4
a y
7

J u n
S e p
J u n
S e p

2 7
8
10
1
7

N o v .
J u ly

J a n .
J a n .
J a n .
J a n .
J a n .
A p r.

e p t
3
u l y '2 3
u n e 2 6
u ly 2 3

19
J u n e 2 6
4 1
S e p t.
9
4 2 ia S e p t.
9

0 0 %
4 9 %

7
6
8
6
6
1
1
1

4

3 % M a y 11
0
J u ly
9
2 % J u ly 2 9
7 ' M a y
8
6
S e p t.
5
8 % S e p t.
4
0
S e p t.
5

6 3 %
6
8 1 2 6
1 3 %
0
5
2 5 %
2 6 %
3
7 8 %
6
2 %
6
3
2 0
9 5 %
' ” '5 3 1 5 4
6 0
2 2 ,4 8 0
1 3 %
7 4

,2
1 ,5
2 3 ,2
5 ,5
1 ,2
8
1 ,2
7 ,1

e p t. 2 0
e p t.
3
a y 13
e p t.
9

53 %
11 4 %

3 00
7 0
6 4 ,6 6 0
4 3 4

2 ,1 2 7
4 4 0

S
S
M
S

S l%
1 2 %
16
1 4 7
69
4 7
9 0

1 ,2 3 9
135

1 ,0 3 5
43.
7 3 0

2 3 %
3 6 %
2
6 6 %

4 9
3 3
4 8

8 0 0
830

g I s l a n d ..................................................
g I s la n d T r a e . , a l l in s . p d .
i s v i l l e A N a s h v i l l e ....................
is v . N e w A lb a n y A C h ic ..
D o
p re f.

D o
O re g o n R ’y

*5 %
*1 2

*6 7 %
31
6%
14

L
L
L
L

14%
23

63

*1 6 0
*1 6 4

3 3 %)
101

in g V a l. A T o l
p re f.

I l l i n o i s C e n t r a l ..........................................
I o w a C e n t r a l ...............................................
D o
p re f.
L a k e E r i e & W e s t e r n ..............
D o
p re fL a k e S h o r e A M ic h . S o u t h e r n .

5
1
2%
2%

*59

148
19%

168
67%

69%
3 8
8 8 %

29%
20
85
100
13%

4%
14%
*1 9
*7
4%
9%

*9 1 %
4%
30

12% 12%

13%
29%

7
3
1
2

O rn .

p re f.
S t . L . ..
p re f.

N . Y . L , E . & W ’n , 2 d in s ’t p d ..
D o
p r e f., 2 d in s ’t p d .
N .Y . & N . E . , t r , re c s . a llin s . p d
N e w Y o rk N e w H a v e n A H a rt.
18512 18512
N e w Y o r k O n ta r io A W e s te rn .
15
1 4 7s
10%
10 % N e w Y o r k S u s q . A W e s t., n e w .
D o
p re f.
32
*3 1
*2 %
3 % N o r f o l k A W e s t e r n ...............................
D o
p re f.

91%
45b
31

68 %
‘3 5
87 %

99
23 %
84%
53%

6 1 2 ‘a
§20

30 %
30%

6 7n
14

10 0

62%

99

101

D o
C le v e . C in e in . C h ic . A
D o

J a n .

2 4 % N o v .
%. F e b .

5 0 0
4 0 0
2 ,1 4 5

M a n h a tta n E le v a te d , c o n s o l. .
M i c h i g a n C e n t r a l ............................

52%
9%
27

*7 0
*2 8

3 1 .1 s
30 %

6%
*1 3 %

a n - b ill a n d a s k e d ; n o s a le m a d e .

21 %

100 % 101 %

65
C AM
148
148
19
20

101
13%

53

*3 1 %

6

=8
4 0
77 %
9%

12 %

*11

120 %

8%

13%
75
31

32

119
*5 9

*6 5 *3
07 %
9 9 % 10 0%
9 7
9 8

.....

100

8
0%
5
2

83
16

‘ 19
*7 5
99 %

85

15

15%
2 4

1

20

§23

4%

C h ic a g o S t. P a u l M in n . A
'

1
5
0%
1

73

*

11 %

11
*3 1
*3
9%
4%
14%

29,

13%
30%
30 %

*4 6
185

50
18 6
15%

120%
63

03%
0 4 ’3
149%
1 4 8 k ! 1 4 8 U
20 1 1 8 %
IfU n
31
31%
3 2 )4
3 2
1 30%
31
90%
90%
92 M
*4%
5
4 - 'r
30%
31% |
31
170
07%

50

*2 6
*1 7

65%

04%
149% 149%
19%
19%
31 %
81 %
32
3138
92 %
02

53

20% 20%
*1 8 5
14%

3 4 %

8%
4%
7%

!

98%
88%
105

04%

9%

19

6%
12%
39
90

23
83%

13%
*7 0
*2 9
§12%

31

11% )

*7 5

68
101 %

98 %
87%
10 4%

18%
53
32

100

35

8%
%
*3 4

20%

*6 6
9 9 %

10 %

101

35

%
4 0
77 %

19% )

5

100%

11%

36% !
9

O O -H
6 6 -4 1
100 % 100 %

11

21% 21%'

%

11%

9%
5
7%
20%
14%
42 %
5

15%

27

29 %
*1 9
*7 5

75

9 %

16%
53%
9%

13%
29%

3 0 6 fl

99%
1 3 *4

85

*20% 21
‘4 5 %
*1 8 4 %

13%

%
29%
29 %

*7 2

83%
52 %

02

12

30 %
19%
19‘a
*7 5
So
99 % 100%
* 13 1 3 1 4 %

20

*4 5 %
..............!
185
{*1 8 4
15%
155a
15%

*4 5
*1 8 4

52

9
1
3
2

*9 6 %
*1 0

73%
151
83

*9 8
23

4
9
2
6

*34

934

..................................
..................................
..................................
r s e y ....................

D o
p re f.’
C h i c a g o & N o r t h w e s t e r n ............
D o
p re f,
C h ic a g o R o c k I s la n d & P a c in o

C o lu m b u s H o c k
20>3
D o
| *5 9
1 2 8 7e 1 2 S 7 e,
168
166
1 3 % D e n v e r A R io G
*1 2 %
%
D o
4 5
45
%
E v a n s v ille A T e
30
*2 6 % :
I
G re a t N o rth e rn ,
*1 1 7
120

10

99

41 %
123

I

35
24

525%

P a c i f i c ...............................

3 %

2 2 ,0 9 2

7 1 ,1 7 5

11 %

108
13
45
3 0
118
9S%

*20

A

1 0 1 3t
D o
p re f.
7 4 % C h ic a g o M llw a n k o e A S t. P a u l

■ lO ^ s
*9 0

166
*1 2 %
45 %
*2 6 %
11 $

10%

A t la u lie

18

137% 12 7%
105% 10 5%
i 1 19% 1 1 9 %
74 % 74%

21
01

S to c k s .

- B a ltim o r e & O liio
C a n a d ia n P a c if ic
C a n a d a S o u llie r n
C e n tra l o f N e w J e

H ig h e s t .

L o w e s t.

5 ,1 8 0

10 1%
74 1,

95

*5 8 %

100% 101%
'

15%
18%

*1 2 1

* 20 %

150
83

%
5 6 %
57
54 %
10 7 %

it .

1 . 6 % C e n t r a l P a e i l l o ..........................................
% C h e s a p e a k e A O h i o ............................

4 -1 % '

10

6%
6
1%
7

H

A t,. T o p . & S .F e , a l l In s ta ll, p a id
D o . p r e f . , w h e n is s u e d . -

»1 6 0
..............C h i c a g o & A l t o n .......................................
v84 %
8 4 % O liie a g o B n r l ln g t o n A Q u in c y
.....................C h i c a g o A E a s t e r n I l l i n o i s . . .

123
4 2

*4 1
*9 0

188%

15
31%
31%

1 5 0

121

IS »\

5 4

70%
127
105%

117

10 %

*3 3
*1 1 %

*

*8 6
47

4%
12 7

74%

1 2 8 % 12 9*4
128% 129
120%
1 2 0
168
168% 168% *1 6 6
1 0 7 *8 1 6 7 %
13%
*1 2 %
I* i a
1 4 *4
443a
■1 3 %
4 4 *3
4 5
4 7 *4
4 7
U 7
30
3 0
30
*2 6
3 0
*2 0
3 0
j *2 0
118% 118%
*1 2 0
1 2 3
120
120
■*1 2 0
124
9 7 *2
97W
9 8 io
98%
98%
O S 1!)
*9 ^%
99%
10
10
*1 0
10%
*10
1 0 *a
3 4 *2
34 %
35
3 4 *8
$3
3413
*2 2 %
24 %
24
2 3 *3
*22%
*2 4 1
21
2 3 *9
73% 73 %
7 4
7 4
74
7 4
1 74%
71%
1 4 S 78 1 4 8 % * 1 1 8 % 1 5 0
1 4 9 -U 1 1 9 H i
‘ 14 8% 130%
85
*8 3
85
$5
*8 3
*8 3
*8 3
85
j
16%
17
1 6 *8
1 7 *3
17
16%
U 7
18
!
52% ,
51
5138
53
51%
5 2 *2
5 3 %
54%
9%
9%
*0 %
934
9\
9%
9%
26
20 %
*2 6
27
26%
27
99
9 8 *4 1 0 0
9 8 *8
9 8 3 * 1 0 1 *3
99
*9 $
101
99
9 9 % 10 0
^ '9 3 %
2 3 *8
23%
2 3 *2
23%
2 3 *8
23 %
23%
84%
*8 3 %
8 4 *2
81
*8 3 %
$4
83
84%

10

10 %

io i%

1 *27

10 6 %

•1 2 9 %
*1 6 8

5
5
5
1 0

54%

*5 4

V 0
127
105%
10 5 *3 1 0 5 %
10 5*4
150
*1 4 7
150
*1 4 7
75%
75%
7 5 *8
•1 1
4 0 !|
10%
1 0 *4
123
123
121
‘ 121
42
*4 0 %
- H 7S
11%
95
*9 0
95
*9 0
19%
20
20
1 9 78
61
*5 8 %
61
7 4 *a

7 j5 %

*20

1 0 7 *2
16%
18%

— 5 %
%

57
5 6 *2

16 %
25%

16%
•2 5 %

17% '
*2 6
|

17%

i

•100 101%
1 0 0

<>7 * 3
54 %

*1 0 0

8 0 *4
♦4 6 %

26

5 7 *3
57 %
54*3

1 6 *2
“ -v

*4 ’■£* *4
5 7 %

%m

1 7 *8

R a n g e fo r y e a r 18 95 .

S a le s o f
th e
W e e k,
S h a re s .

P R IC E S .

7 8 %
69 %
25 %
41

J a n .
O c t.
O c t

17 8 %
69 %
4 6 %

102 %
9
1 7

11
2 3
31

S e p t 3 0
S e p t. 1
J a n . 18
A u g . 20
M a y

34 %
181

2
3

13

S e p t. 1 8
M a y 10
J u n e 1 7
O e t.
9
S e p t. 1 0
S e p t.
O c t,
O c t

9
5
5

3
2434 M a y
9 7 ‘% M a y 2 7
J u n e
3
4 8

29 9538

S e p t.

a s s e s s ’t p a id

3

THF*

K oyjembek 23, lb95.’|
yi-’ IY V- »ft tv S l ' l C i

KV

IJUCMVB STOCKS
f I n d ic a te s a n ils ted .

P R I C E S ( ( J o o i t n a e d )—INACTIVE

«\V4B
Nov. 22.

B id .

; Range (saint) in 1895.

A sk.;

LotcesL

Bid.

A s k .)

*1,059.7 #12,050,0
— id iS u w lB X .
2,mi), 1 19,394,0
W sah A ttan C o ....—
054.0 8.M52.0
M erchants’........ ........ j p o o 5
Meehan!.:*'------------ 3*000,0 2,15^0 9.104.0
2.340.1 17.857.4
America-----------------412,9 4.205.0
P h s o ix ........................ j i:S§S;S

o tr.................... ! 1,000 ,0 2,200,0
750.0
74.2
T rad esm en 's.... . ...)

*1,010,0
1,212,0
1.433.0
1,12 n.*j
3.947.4
449.0
H flfl 0 7.155.4
1.933 1
184.0
23.770,3 $,450.5
3.807.3
810.3
0.005,2
6 52.1j
1.630,0.
194.01
2.430.0
1*0.0
1.067.8
166,7!
2.988.0
208.5 i
1.740.5
272.6
3.858.9
100.5,
23,781 0 1. U0.oS
21.137.5
015.5!
M T O i 973*5'
0,925.1 1.565.1
3.5388
629.2,
12.742^3 1.301.8
6,995.7; 014.8

SE C U R IT IE S.

62,080.0 #13,700.0
3,084.0 14,693.0
80*2.2 *
i
0,388,8
1.M98.U 8.770.0
1.935,4 20,694,0
626.0 4.111.0
2,501,2 29,701,7
208,2
1,848,5
4.488,0 23,720,0
312,4; 4,
1.640.4 6.929.6
141.0 1.473.6
355,0! 2.400.0
1,073,9
215.8
821.1
2.774.0
187.4 1,920,2
517.8 2.640.0
8,403,0 17.009.0
4.345.7 15374.0
657.4 5301,1
1.340.5 7.989.7
423,0 3.271.0
2,692,8 14,140,8
915.1 6,345,4
413,7 8.302.0
974,8; 0,084,7
1*971.0* 19.*291,9
670.6
880.0 3.532.4
2.982.4
8<M.4: 4.275.4
3.358.0
705.0 9.968.2
935.6 5.897.0
1.840.0
450.1
2.030.0 21,210,0
7.028.0 81.090.0

300.0 7.305.4
Chemical . . . . . .
eoo.o
101.3
M erchants' K*rh *e
S a lla tin N atio n al... 1,000,0 1.0*54,4
224,9,
300.0
B u tc h e r* * Drover*'
370,2
Mechanics*« Trad**; 400.0
G reenwich — ...........5 *300.0'
3 •
000.0 4JK0.7:'
Leather ManahK'Ta
300.0
107.1
Seventh N a tio n a l-.
40O.6
(State of New Y o rk .. 1,200.«J
0
2.440.0
A merman exch a n ge 5.000.
5,000^0 3.502.0
Broadw ay------- , . . . . . 1*000,0 1.010.5
0
M ercantile............ ... 1.000.
422,7
470,1'
P a c ific .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
012.2
M pobi'.c------- -------- [ 1.500.0
C h ath am ............... .. ■ 450.0 1,000,4
240.0 2,110,8
220,0
*
P eo p le* ---- - . . . . . . . 1 200.0
700*0
504,4' 6.807.6
621.5
North A m erica.........
1,000.0* 1.052. * 15,000.4:- 4.002.8
a sm v e r .......
500.0
U%ni 3.M04.O
211*6)
I r r t a * ..—
000,0
370,5; 2.934.4 j 647.2,
CU isan'*_____ —
ff in f il
e *> 500.0
——
201.3! 2.437.4
144.8
M arket £ FnUoBe..! 750,0. 047,1! 4.03i.Mj 402.3
A L eath er...... 1.000,0
33.2: 3 .n o .a s 371.0
8,090.1' 1.570.0
Com K tc b a o g i..... l.OOCl.O 1.200.9
933.0
CMStttfflVUkl..a . . . . . . 1,000,0 210 4 4.501.7
300.0^ 413.1 1,786.0: 100.0
Or?ent*i
XmporterVATrader* LM mi.O 6.521.0 20.398.0s 3.531.0
0!
0145.0! 45,407,7: 3.423.0
P a r * ................
-j 3.000.
114.0
14l,4j U i6 ,3 |
KMt R iv er__ ....... i 250.0
1.8.404,71 048.8j
ir>mrm Na t o n a l.... 3.200.0
0
720,0'
632.0 9.417.0
C entral ttmtoMd*... 3.000.
020,0} 5.205.01 991.0
N atio n al....
3.088.8
471.1
NlSttl N*UOn*l........; 750.0
500,o; 7. m ^ i| 22,t)03.8! 770.0
r m t N ational..........
255.0 9,223 fi 2.208.9
TWH N a tio n a l...... 1,000.0
300.0
1,318,0!
83,0
144.3!
N»Y, Nat. Exchange
2-Vo.fi
Be w s tr -----6Al,3i 2.M34.0! 463.0]
200,4). 474.2, 2.922.3
729.2
New York Otranty..
750,0.
325.0
2.0OM.&
Gerraan A raa m a n ..
500.0 1,2M4.-4 10.038,6 1.393.1
K itU m al,..* ..
507.2
100.0 LOSS,8, 0.
877.8'
F ifth
.... .
000.2: 2.876.3 203.7
200,0
Gefaaao Wixrhmittm. ,
200.0 031,7! 3.315.9 648,3i
0 trn raiti*. *— as * * e e »i
500.0
977.2
mmt**.__ _
654,3! 6.077.1
607.3' 7.355.2 1.030.5
tklnoolft. . . . . . . a . .. ..
200.0
700.5
033.4 4.414.3
0»rH«Wt.. aA.a . . . . . .
eon.o;
213.4
r tflh N ational__ _
.312,9 1.
n o
RaMc of the Meirop.
786,31 4.602.1! 885,U
200,0
S
205.1 2.483. O 21*4.0
w e s t Side . . . ...........
25-_,.3 5,127e0i 743.0
5*10,0
......
2 00 ,0
R tQ i
32M.7 1,745,0; 206.0
W w t«m N atio n al.. 2,100.0
5^5,O 9,732.8! 935.8
i
W ri t N m
i
t.
f n ..
5,372.0
869.5
300,0
500,0!
581,6 2.0--9.0
201,4
fHrat
N ational..
1, 200,0
» m CTaim Ban
is
410,65 7.876.9 826,9,
500,0!
14H.6 2,105,7
L ih frtv N at. B u k *
42,0
S .T . Prod. K ie l tfm . 1, 000.0
m
484,0
• 3,7i*7,3
T o fk ................... a 81.122,7 72.889.0 492 933,5 6S 70? ^

160.3

3.104.1
2.428.0
1.026.0
628,1
4,094,3
539.3
260.0
328,0;
140.3
376.6
4.046.6
932.8
525.6
467.0
979.8
1.014.6

1.021*1

17.949.1
10,941,0
0,485.0
4.124.0
21,033.6
10.681.2
1.179.0
3.092.0
3.480.0

2 , 022.8

Nov. 22.

B id.

Hangs (sales) in 1 8 9 5 .

A sk .

Lowest.

B id .

I Highest
153 Oot.
43 S e p t.
119% M a y
15% Oot.
19 Oot.
100 A u g .
25 J u n e
■% M ay
l
106 J u ly
11% J u u e
41% S e p t.
100 Sep t.
9% J u n e
164% S en t.
3 4 A u g.
31 A ug.
102 % J u u e
112% J a n .
7 0 Oot,
82% Oot.
41% M ar.
33% Ju n e
92 M ay
50 J a n
23 Nov.
63 N ov.
72 Oot.
31% J u n o
12 S la y
9 Ju u e
10% A u g .
3 40 J u l y
4% M a y
20 A pr.
12% M a y
33% Oot.
5 0 S e p t.
98% J u n e
1 1 5 % 8 u p t,

BONDS NOVEMBER 3 2 .
SE C U R IT IE S.

A sk .

A la b a m a — la s s A, 4 to 5 .........
C
10 9 % 111%) MI tso o ri—F u n d ..................1894-1895
C lass B. 5 s ...........- ..................... 1906[ 108%
N orth C a ro lin a —0 s. o ld ............ J A J
to o i'0 3 ! F u n d in g s o t ..................................1900
C U ssC , 4 s .....................................
lo l
New bonds, J A J .......... 1892-1898
C h ath am R R
l
1 S p e c ia l t a x ,C la s s I.
150
l
7*. A rk a n sas C e n tr a l R R . ..
8 j C o n so lid ated 4 s ..........
.1 9 1 0 105% 106
L o u isia n a — s , c o n s ......... ........... *31 4
7
6 s.
.1 9 1 9
sta m p e d 4 s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
io T
0*5*9
6 «, no n -fu n d .............................. 1888
” i ’%
J N e w Y o r k C it y H a n k S t a t e m e n t f o r th e w e e k e n d in g
N o v e m b e r 18. 18W .
W e omit two ciphers (00) in ail cases.
Ba s k s .
100s om itted.)
Capital Surpl’s Loans. Specie. Legalt. Depot:*/

rUndiaates actual sales J

m is c e lla n e o u s S to c k s .
A d am s E x p re s s ..................................100 147 151 140 J a n .
A m erican B a n k N ote Co f ................. 42
44
37 MayA m e ric a n E x p re s s .........................1 0 0 [116 116% 109 F eb .
Am. S p irit M fg. Co. (w hen Issued)If
12% Nov.
45% Oot.
P re ferred (w h en is s u e d ) !!... . . . . .
89 S ta r.
A m er. T ele g ra p h & C a b le ------- 1 00 194
23
13 M ar.
B a y S ta te G as 1 ! .........
50
B ru n sw ic k C o m p an y......................100
% M ar.
1%
Chic. Ju n o . B y . 4 S to ck Y a r d s .100
89 F eb.
14
Colorado C oal & Iro n D e v e l..-100
4 M ar.
23% M ar.
C olorado F u e l 4 I ro n ....................100 130%
98
50 Feb.
P re fe rre d ..........................................100
3
Colum bus 4 H o o k in g C o a l.........1 00
3%
2% J a n .
C om m ercial C a b le ... . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0 0 163
145 M ay
33
28% A pr.
C onsol. C oal of M a r y la n d ...........100
28% M a y
D etroit G as......................................... 50
96
E dison Eleo. 111. of N . Y ..............100
97% 94% M ar.
EdDon Eleo. 111. of B r o o k ly n .. 100
106 A u g.
45% Feb.
E rie T elegrap h 4 T eleph one ..1 0 0 :o T
70 J u ly
I llin o is S te e l...................................... 100 577
30% Feb.
In terio r C o n d u it 4 I n s ................. 100
23 JulyL a cle d e G a s-----------. ..1 0 0 *23
P re fe rre d .....................
100 *88
81 M a r.
60
M ary lan d C oal, p r e f........................100 47
50 J a n .
; M ich ig a n -P en in su la r C a r C o. . . 100
2 0 % 2 0 Oct.
52 J a n .
P re fe rre d ...........................................100
39 Fob.
M inn esota Iro n ..................................100 6S% 70
17% J a n .
U N atlonal L in seed O il Co ______ 1 0 0 2 2 % 24
5
N atio n al S ta rc h M fg. C o..............100
7
5 Jan .
6
|
New C e n tra l C o al..............................100
9
6 Jan .
8% M ar.
8 % 10
11O n tario S ilv e r M in in g ....................100
310 J a n .
i [P e n n sy lv a n ia C o a l...............
5 0 3 20
Q u ick silv e r M in in g ..........................100
2
3 1 2 Jan .
16 %l 12% J a n .
P re fe r r e d ...........................................100
.........■ 7 M ar.
T e x a s P a c ific L a u d T r u s t...........100
.........| 3% J u ly
i U. 8. C o rd ag e, g u a r ., tr. o e rtfs.1 0 0 127
42
4 6 i 36 M a y
1:0. S. E x p r e s s . , , . . . . . ......................100
94% : 91% Nov.
92
V. B. R ub b er p r e f e r re d .................100
........ ! 89% Nov.
■Wells. F a rr o E x p re ss ..........
100 i 199

Y O R K S T O C K E X C H A N G E P R I C E S .— S T M TE

SE C U R IT IE S.

3TOOKS.

I n active st o c k s .
ITI n d ic a te s u n liste d .

\ Highest.

H m ilr o a d s t o c k * .
........ 170 J u ly 1 70 J u ly
v o an v & 8txaguebBOBA........... ..1 0 0 170
5
10 j 4 > M ar. 12 M ay
s
B a it , A O. S. \r. p re f., n e w .........100
B s lie r ilie A S o u th . III. p r e f ...- 1 0 O
B r a w n as S. Y. A ir L in e p r e f ..1 0 0 104 l o t % 101 is A pr. 105 J u ly
B roo klyn E lev a ted 1f.........-.......... 100 201s 211*1 19 J u ly
21% A ug.
2 0 1 19 A pr. 24 M ay
Buffalo R o ch ester A: P itta b n rg -1 0 0
54
Pro (e rre d ___ . . . . . . . . . . . —...1 0 0
58 J a n .
60 A pr.
60
B a r i Ood&r R ap id * & N o r..........100
45 M ay
54 Sep t.
58 Nov. 64% Oct.
C lev . L o rain & W heel, p r e t........ 10O *5a%
140 A pr. 167 Sep t,
C le v e la n d 4 P it ts b u r g .................. 50 107
9
8
Dee Mo nea is F oi t D o d g e ...... 100
0 ‘s I>b.
11 J u n e
53
30 J a n .
P re fe rre d ......................
100 49
55 J a n e
J5%
2% M ar. 10% Nov.
u n in th 8o. Sho re <t A tia n tio 1 .1 0 0
5
5 i* M ar. 10% J u n e
P r e f e r r e d ’! ..............
100 10
9 A pr. 21 Sep t.
F lin t * P ere M a rq n e lte ................ 100
34 A pr. 50 S ep t.
P re fe rre d ...........................................100
% Oct.
Or. B ay W in. * S t . P. t r .r e o -----100
%
>
4
2 M ay
% Oct.
P re fe rre d Eras* roo ts------- ..1 0 0
4% M ay
%
H onatou A T exna C e n t r a . ------100
3%
‘T %
1 1* M ar.
3% Sep t.
Illin o is C en tra l teased tin e s -----100
8 6 M ay
90 J u ly
In d ia n a Illin o is 4 lo w a , .. .....1 0 O
164
17% J u l y
24 M ay
7% Nov. 10 Apr.
K an a w h a 4 M ic h ig a n --------------100
K eokuk 4 D ee M oln ee................... 100
3 Jan .
3>*
6 M ay
P re fe rre d ....................
100
1 7 is
13% M ar. 17% J u ly
L o u is v .S t. D enis 4 T e x a s .. . . .. 1 0 0
>
«
1 A ug.
1 % A pr.
M ahoning C o al.................. ........... . . 5 0 108
M etropo litan T ra ctio n *!................100 ;109%
83% Apr. 114% Nov.
8 M ar. 14% Sep t.
M ex ic an C e n tra l................................1 00
2%
"i%
1 % A pr.
M ex ican N a tio n al t r . c t f s .------ 100
4 MayM orris 4 E s s e x ................................. 50
150 Feb. 170 Oot.
New J e r s e y 4 S. V..........................100
P re fe rre d .......................................... 100
N, Y. L a c k . 4 W estern ..................100
114*4 Feb. 118 F eb.
80
58 M ar. 70 A ug.
N orfolk 4 S o u th e rn ........................ 100 70
5
Ohio S o u th e rn ............................. . .. 1 0 0
15
4 J u n e 19% M ay
5
P eo ria 4 E a ste rn ..............................100
9
• Jan .
2
10% A ug.
R e n sse la e r 4 S a r a t o g a . . .. .........100 1*0 ...... 178 J u ly 183 A pr
R io G ran d e W estern p re f.......... 100
39
3 0 M ar. 46% M ay
11
T o led o 8S. L. 4 K a s s s s C ity Y ..1 0 0
7
»
i5 J u n e 11 Oot.
No p ric e F r i d a y ; la t e s t p rice th is w e ek .
! A c tu a l s a le s .
NEW

911

CH RONICLE.

B id .

A sk.

85

89

T en n e sse e — s , o ld ...........1892-1898
6
6a, new b o n d s ____ 1892*8-1900
do
new s e r ie s ....................1914
Compromise, 3 A -5 -6.*-----

1912

3 s .........................................................1913
R ed em p tio n 4 s . . . . . * ............,1 9 0 7
do
4 % s....................... 1913
1 P e n ite n tia r y 4 % a.....................1913

i

f i i ’ a 62
6%

Virginia funded debt, 2 -3 s ...l9 9 1
6s. deferred t*«t reo'ts, sta m p ed

N ew Y o r k G itj* B o s to n a n d P h i l a d e l p h i a B a n k s :

Chfitoi dc
SjvtD.
Legal/. Drpotlts.t Circ’t'n.
Ba n k s . Surplu*. Loan*.
N. V.*
s
$
OCL 19,. 135,288,4 604,320,3 01,851*9 00,509,3 #81.924,1 14,131,1 032.773.0
“ 20.. 136*288,4 502.492.8 03.151.7 88,201,3 630,063,2 14.060.3 041.024.0
Nov. 2.. 195*28^4 600.091.8 04/208,8 85,851,2 520,802,4 14,452,0 057.284.0
“
9.. 134.011.7 405,928,2 04.410,3 80.824,7 527.935,8 14.303.3 586,307.9
“ 10.. 134.011.7 492.933,5 05,767,9 86,103,3 520,228,0 14.104.3 052.497.0
hom •
Nov. 2.. 09.351.8 177.315.0 11.198.0 6,260,0 167.189.0 8.790.0 100.158.6
** 9.. 09.351.8 170.048.0 11.148.0 0,100.0 100.410,0 8.873.0 109.242.7
16.. 09.351.8 174.050.0 11.118.0 0.039,0 104.321,0 8.848.0 97.037.4
P h lla . *
Nov. 2.. 35,810,3 111.725.0
30.248.0
112,313,0 6.309.0 80,071,1
30.050.0
111,420.0 6,340*0 70.659.4
•* 9.. 36,810*3 111.558.0
•• 10.. 35*810*3 111*103,0
30.748.0
113,209,0 0*336,0 80,703,8
• Wt omit tt*K cipher* in all thru
>
tlnoiadiDK for Bo« tou and P h il*
del phi* the item * duo to other bank*.*'
*
M ls c e lla n e o t u a n d U n lis t e d

Ch. lo n .A 8. Y d».--C ol.t.it.I6*i
Col. C. «fc I. Dor el. gu.
Colorado Fuel—Qon. 6a...........
Col, dt Hook, Coal A r.~ 6«, «
Cons.Qa* O0a.Cljlo.— i t «;i»,5'
l
Cobsol. Coal co n r. 6 s.........
Dotcon. l « t
.........
Kdioon Klbo. 111. Co.— i t 5 i .
l
l i t conaol., K«ld, 5 »................
Do
of B k lyn., l i t S i . . . .
K qnit 0.-L .,N .Y ., cons.g. 5».
E quitable G. a f .—l i t e «—
Henderson B ridge—l i t g. 0*.
IlltBQikHfNRuieU 5 s...........
Non-cohr. deb 5»...................
lo t. Cond.
Ina. deo. 0*........
N o t « m- m 6 ”

in d lo a t e a p r ic e

B onds :

(U lic e lla n e o D i B o n d s.
Man hat. Boat’ ll H. A L. K 4a.
Metropol. TeL A TeL 1st 5i>
M ich-B enin. C ar le t 5 »_
_
M utual Onion T olar.—08 r . .
J5T V. A K. J Tolop. gon, 6 a..
.
Northwostorn T elegraph—
7»,
IPeople’* Gao A C. 1 l i t r . 0».
Co., ChloiffO s... S3d g. 0 m.
l» t con». g. Ga.........................
PJeia. V alley C o a l- la t g. 0a.
Monday Crook Coal l i t g 0a..
U. 8. Leather—8. f. <leb., g.,0a
W oitorn Union Tolog.—• ..
Wh«y>LLK.AP!‘ *« Coal latfia
U llH il^ d H onda.
Ann Arbor. l» t 4 h, w h en iaa'd
icon)stock Toim el—Ino 4 a ..

m ie c H ln n f o n i H on d o.
Boston Un. *i*s tr .certa.. 5m.

b id ;

“ a ”

p n o e

m to * .

*

L a te s t p r ic e

B a n k S t o c k L is t — L a te st pric<^ thla w e e k .

BANKS.
Bid. Ask.
330
Am. K xoh ... 109
German Am.
G erm an ia....
Broadway ... 240
Greenwich ..
Butcha’AUr.
H a n o v e r,....
C e n tra l......... 1X7 * 120
C hase.............
Chatham___ 335 34lT liu . A Trad V
Chemical ... 4000
C ity ................
Leather if f * ’
BANKS.

20*252,9
7.171.2
3.335.3
4.300.1
7.389.1
8.353.1
888,2 6*037,2
M an h attan ..
240,6' 1.081.7 Coin mb la__
M arketA F ul
1.194.2, 0.000,5 Commerce... 204
Mechanloe'..
3500, 2.038.0 C on tinen tal. 128*0 185
M’c h i’ A Tru’
777.01 6.991.0 Corn Kxoh.. 290
M erca n tile..
230.01 1.530*0 E ast R iv e r..
M erchants’-2.191.2 10,479,4
Merch’ta Ex
003.1 6.610.0
M etropolis. .
600,0 2.922.7
Mi. Morrlw...
8*255*1
2 130,1 Flr«tN „ 8.X. ......... .......... N:i««»U...........
N. Ams’diirn
80*3,7 3.353.3 14th S tr e e t..
[New Y o rk ...
620.228 8 G allatin......... 300 .......... iN .Y .C o’n ty .

40 b.

*110*ob
*i*06‘%b

th is

101 a.
lOOiflb.
100 b.
llO ’flb.
n o a.
68 b.
70 b.
7>*b
* « « *

(* N o t lis te d .)

Bid. A ik . | BA N K S. Bln. A ik
N Y. Nat.Ex
N inth...........
......... ......... 19tb W ard.. 120 125
|N. A m erica.
ii o
O rien ta l. . . .
175
315 350
273
522
People’s . . . .
....
140
Prod. Ex.*..
670** ....
107
106
410
i*88
155 ShoeA Le’th
130
115
150
105
232
680

121

Htateof N.Y. 100
T h ird ____ 104

Union 80. ♦
. . . . . . Union*..........

..... .....

112
. . . . . . Wont, S id e.. 280

TH E

1)12
B O ST O N ,

P H IL A D E L P H IA

[ V ol. L X I.

CH RO N ICLE.
AND

B A L T IM O R E

STOCK

EXCH AN GES.

' .S h a r e P r i c e s — n o t P e r C e n t u m P r i c e * .
A ctive S t o c k i.

S a tu rd a y , 1 M onday,
Nt^v. 18.
Nov. 16.

klO-

.100

Ann
Bai'
a*i

17% 17^8

.100,

100

17^

17%
%

T u esday,
N or. 19.
167a 17%
58
7r»\
*17%
18
203
*206
177
*11%

W ed n esd ay,
Nov. 20.
I6*fl 17
’ *6

B id.

A sk.

17

58
75%
..........
18
203
........
177%
12%

‘ 75
76M
*17% 17 7q *17%
17%
17% 17%
2<‘8 *4 208*6 208%
*206
‘ 206
*.......... 177*6 177%
12
12 * ..........
*55 ........ x 55
85
8 5 7e 8550
'*8*0%
75% 74% 75% 74%
14% 14%
1*>
50
50
50% 50

* 7 5 % .........
17& 1 74
18
18
, c , f, . ?
208 208
203 208
Ik^t.
*206
........
1 0 0 l 206
1W
€«11
"
8o*tc
100] 178 178 ‘ 177>s 177%
BtMtc
12
12
100 *11*6 12
MS.
**
OeoU
100
F t*
100 ”S5% 86*« '88 % *8*7% 85%
Q uin. ”
Ohio.
75% 75% 71%
00
Ch!©. d ll. A g t P. (PhU ) .] &o| 75*0 75®a
11%
15
15
C ho‘ A ti.v
50
50*6 50%
lOOf 4 8 \ 50
Ctt. III Ity if In d f
66
50i*---uH 'n
“
metric It
93
93 a 92% 91% 93
93
93
U.10C 93
n ic h b a r e
40
40*9 3 9 78 40*4
40% 40%
50 %0% 41
L*hl*h Va le y ., fthU
M
aine Oi tra l (Bos! »).100 '137** 138 112 114*6 111 115 114 il4 %
Metro pol’n Trao-Y f/V 0 .1 0 0 lll°8 11
11*4 11*4
11*4 11M 1 1 % l l 7e 11% 1L% 50
M rxlcan C NU'l (Boil 0 .1 0 0
50
49
49
48
100 *43
New
84
84
84*4 84
84
81% 81*fl 81%
100
Kl ,
Fro
69% 69%
*69*6..........
N orthern C en tral (Balt.). 50
1 % 4%
4
4%
4% 4%
Northern PaoiQc fJPAitoJlOO * *4*4 i®8
158
16
15% 15% *15
P referred
'*
100 *16*6 IG'^ 10 179
179 179
179 179
179
Old Colony........ (Boston) 100 1 7 8 * 179
JhM tosylv ttn l»...fP A tio .). 50 5 3 3« 53% 53% 53=8 53% 53% 53% 53=8
P eoyle’eT raetlon
"
50 *57*6 575. 57% 57%
5
581„
4% 51,
4*&16 50i
She
5*«
P hila. x R eading.
k
“
50
72^8 72%
PbUtt-lelph True.
"
50 72*4 723a 72% 72% 72% 72w
8%
8%
*3 % 9
*9*6 9%
* 9 \ 10*4
Onion P acific. -. (Boston) .100
.y ila c o l!a 4 ie o u a S t o c k s .
99 % 100 % 100 101
Am.SuK'r Rcfin.fif Boston)... 100 100* 100 101
99
99
98
98% 98
99
99 *c 98
P r e f e r r e d .....
--199 199**
199% 200 *189% 200
Bell T eleph one..
M
100 199»« 200
67% 38%
68% 70
71*6 72%
Boet & M ontana.
“
25 7 2 * i 73*4
16 7s 15% 15=8 15% 15%
B u tte & Boston..
“
25 17*6 17% 16
300 300
303 303
305 305
C alum et «S H ecla
c
*'
25 305 305
*65
69
Canton C o ............ (Balt.). 100
58
57% 58*4 58*4 58% 58
Consolidated G as
"
100 ’ 5 8*i *59%
35% 40
41% 45
40*6 43
Elee.Stor. B iit’yU(PA*/a.).100 44 *4 45
36
41%
41
45
46
45*» 45** 40
f P referred U
*'
100
*61% 62
61% 62
62
62
E rie T ele vbofie.(Boston). 100 *61% 62
30% 3 0 7s
31*4 3l*»
G eneral E lectric.
“
100 *313a 313j
*62
64
62
62
62
62
P re fe rre d ..........
“
100
21
*20
20% *20
*20
21
* 20*4
21
L an eo n Btorefler.
“
50
47
4-6
16% 46% 46
"46
47
L^hThCoal&N&v. (Philo.) 50 *46
85
83
85
*85
86
85
*85
87
V, E .Telephone (Boston). 100
84% 84%
85
inU’dG as Im p.H fi'A ifa.y. 50 86*« 86*6 86% 86% 85
67
69%
71% 76
eu bach L ig h t 1i
“
5 76*6 *:6% 76% 7 68
*2
*2
2%
*2
2*8
*2
2*8
feet End L a n d .. (Boston)
* Bid and ask ed prioes: no sa le wab m ade.
Inactive S to c k s .

T h u rsd ay,
Nov. 21.

In a ctiv e s t o c k s .

F rid ay ,
Nov. 22.

S a les
of th e
W eek,
Shares.

16*« 1 6 78 9 ,6 3 5
5 0
*% l
4 0
*55*a 56 %
11
*75
76
3o
1 7 7s *17*4 173j
610
17% 17^4
17%
168
208YI 203*6 208*6
.......... 206 208
62
177% 178*4 178*4
224
12
12
12
48
.......... *45
85% 84*4 84% 1 3,336
75% 74*6 74% 1 3,920
1,010
14
14
2,512
50*4
50% 50
17%

252
92**
1,973
403$
138
11,012
112
1,371
H*6
195
51
817
91
lo
71
900
43s
1,300
15
146
179*4
1,101
53%
138
2 8,1 22
5
5V
4 78 5
1,053
72% 72% *72*4 73
147
*8%
9
8%
8%

92*6
92%
40% 4038
136
138
109
1 3
H % *11
50*6
50
87
90
*70
*4
4%
4*4
*11% 15% 15
179
179 179
53% 63% 53*6

92%
40%
*136
1 13 k !
*11*4
50
83

R a n g e of s a le s in 1895.
L o w est.
338 J a n .

H ig h est.
3 0

5 0 J a n . 23
)9 7e M ar. 8
69*8 M ar. 11
14*6 J a n . 23
14% J a n . 30
206*6 M ar. 13
196*6 J a n . 2
1 60 J a n . 2
5 A pr. 13
43 F eb. 28
69*8 M ar. 4
54 M ar. 9
11*8 M a y 11
34*8 Feb. 2
63*2 No v. 9
82% J a n . 11
27*6 M ar. 8
125*6 J a n . 7
81 Apr. 2
5% J a n . 31
41 Nov. 9
75 Nov. 6
6 4 J a n . 29
2*6 J a n . 30
13 F eb. 27
176 *4 J u n e 1
48% J a n . %»
43% J a n . 26
3*3 ib M ar. 4
71 Nov. 11
8 M ar. 12

2350 Sep t. 2

2

M ay I S

66*4 S ep t, £ '
>

76*4 Nov. 152130 J u n e 1 7
21*4 J u n e 17
213 J u l y IO
2 07 Oot. 3
180 Sep t. 9
16 M a y 13
60*6 M a y 14
923g Aug. 28
78*5a Sep t. 3
17*8 Sep t. 4
5 7 7s Aug. 2 2
87 J a n . 3
98 A u g. 2 3
4 3 Sep t. 3
140 J u l y 8
115 Nov. 1 »
1 4 S ep t. 4
51 Oot. 3 L
91 N ov. 22
70*4 J u n e 7
7 7a M ay 13
25% M ay 14
182*6 J u n e 19
57*4 Sepfc. 4
69*« Oct. 11
l l 3 i e S ep t. 5
9 9 ‘4 J a n . 2
17*8 M a y 10

101*4 9950 100*4 1 7,165 8650 J a n . 7 120*4 J u n e 1 3
715 9 0 J a n . 8 107 A u g. 1
99
98% 99
330 175*6 Apr. 17 210 M a y 2 0
199% 199 2 00
69 ^ 66*4 67% 23,891 33*s J a n . 2 99*6 J u l y 3 0
7 ,4 9 0
9 M ar. 12 28*6 J u l y 31
15% 14% 15%
161 280 M ar. 12 3 30 J u l y 2 9
300 300
300
__. . .
"67
70
67 J u l y 27 91*6 J a n . 1 6
911 5734 Nov. 18 67 Oct. 2 9
58
58
*5 7 % 59
6 ,8 8 6 26 J u n e 13 75*6 Oct. 19
38
40% 35% 38
3,321 28 A pr. 5 76 Oct. 19
37
38
39% 41%
244 45% F eb. 13 69% Oct. l f r
61% 6 m
6 1 % 61*.
230 2 5 7 M ar. 4 4L Sep t. 9
*30% 30% *30% 30 %
*02
64
13 60 Feb. 5 7 2 J u ly 8
*62
64
* 20 % ..........
5 20% N-op . 7 25% A pr. 10
20% 20%
46%
134 40% M ar. 8 49% S ep t. 5
46
46% *46
81% 85
51 66 F eb. 15 91 J u ly 1 5
85
85
1,2 9 7 67 A pr. 2 93% Oot. 28
86
85% 8 5 1 *85
67
69
3,951 36 M ar. 2 m 98 Oot. 2 8
69
72
"2
*2 ...........
2%
2 J a n . 30 3316 M a y 4

100*4
98%
199
67%
15%
3 00

L s id .

A sk .

57
is 53
r | lll7 117%
U 06% 107%
§ 97 100
§104 104%
99%
§ 99
§ 98
99
5 9 4 % 95%

B on ds.

B id . A sk .

P eo p le’s T rae. tr u s t ce rts. 4 e ..l9 4 3
93
94
86%
P erk io m en , 1 st s e r .,5 s .l9 1 8 , Q—J 101% 102%
264% 265
P h ila .& E rie gen . M. 5 g .,1 9 2 0 , A&O 117
....
42
Gen. m o rt., 4 g . . . . . . .1 9 2 0 , A&O 103%
..........
2%
P h ila & B e a d , n e w 4 g „ 195 8 , J & J
C a ta w ie e a ......................
78% 79
48%
2d m ort. 6 s.............. ...1 9 1
1 st p ref. incom e, 5 g , 1 9 5 8 , F eb 1 31
1st p re fe rre d ............
3 1%
50
55
2d p ref. in co m e, 5 g , 1 9 5 8 , Feb. 1 16% 1634
C en tral Ohio..................
15
18
Chicago & W est M ich. (.
3 d p ref. inoom e, 5 g , 1 9 5 8 ,F eb . 1 11% 12
99
141% 143
C onnecticut A P a s s ..
5 97
2d, 5 s ..................................1 9 3 3 , A&O 117
240 245
80
5 79
Connecticut R iv e r—
Consol, m o rt. 7 s .......... 191 1 , J& D 129 130
26% 27%
§ 90
Consol. T r a c t of N.J.U (
91
Consol, m o rt. 6 g ___..1 9 1 1 , J& D
161 ..........
Oelaware&JBoundBr.
80
§ 75
I m p ro v e m e n ts!. 6 g ., 1 89 7 , A&O f0338 103%
9
12
* 72% 75%
Con. M .,5 g .,sta m p e d ,1 9 2 2 , M&N
35
Preferred.
37
§119 120
T erm in al 5 s, g . . . , . . 1 9 4 1 , Q.—F . 105%
55%
§129 131 1P h il. W llrn. & B a it., 4 s . 1 9 1 7 , A&O
.......... 68
P referred U....................
“
§ 75
80
P itts . C. & St. L „ 7 s . . ..1 9 0 0 , F&A 115
..
Hunt. A B road T o p ...
“
31
§ 98
99
K oohester R a ilw a y , oon. os ..1 9 3 0 104 105
53 153%
P re ferred ........................
“
* 63
65
S o h u y l.R .E .S id e .lst 5 g. 1 9 3 5 , J& D m % 1 1 2 .
21
Kan. C*y F u 8 . A Mem. (Boston).
19
§122 1212
U nion T erm in al 1 st 5 s .............F&A
P re ferred ........................
60
“
65
L. R ock & F t. S ., le t , 7 s .. 1905, J& J § 96
97
. B o n d s . —B altim ore.
64%
L ittle S c h u y lk ill......... (Phila.).
'.o u le.,E v .& S t.L .,1 st,6 g .l9 2 6 ' ‘ ~ §107 108
A tla n ta & C h a ri., l s t 7 s, 1 9 0 7 , J & J 122 123
____ 69%
Mine H ill A 8 .H aven
“
2 m ., 5—6 g .......... .....1 9 3 6 ,
93
§ 88
B a ltim o re B elt, 1 st, 5 s . 1 99 0 , M&N 105 105%
Neauueboning V a l . . .
“
A.C. S., WV l, U. . . . .
I O J , / llU 5
S!
jlO §107 109 B a lt. C. P ass. 1 st 5 s . . ..1 9 1 1 , M&N 114% 114%
OV
OJ
North A m erican C o ..
“
4 % ~ 4% M exican C e n tr a l,4 g ..-.1 9 1 1 , J & J § 67% 67%' B a lt. T raotlon, 1st 5 s ..1 9 2 9 , M&N 109 n o
84%
North P e n n sy lv a n ia .
“
1 st oonsol.ineomeB, 3 g, non-oum
20% 21 I E xtern & irnp t. 6 s ___1901, M&S 104% 105
Oregon Short L in e ... (Bouton).
9
8%
2d consol. Incom es, 3e, non-eum
10 % 11 | No. B a lt. D lv., 5 s .........1 94 2 , J& D 110% ;111%
___
P en uay Ivan la A N. W . (Phila. ) .
38
N. Y . & N .Eng,, 1 st, 78,1 90 5, J& J- *125% 125% B altim o re & Ohio 4 g ., 1 9 3 5 , A<fcO 103=8 104% .
........ . 25% i 1 st m ort. 6 b........ ..........1 90 5 , J & J *115 115%
P k ilad el. A E rie..........
*
*
P itts . & Conn., 5 g _ 1 92 5 , F&A
_
1%
R u tla n d .......................... ( Boston) 2 % 2d m ort. 6 s ................... 1 90 2 , F&A *113 113%
S ta te n I sla n d , 2d, 5 g .1 9 2 6 , J & J
P re ferred ........................
“
69
71
Ogden. & L .C .,C o n .6 s...l9 2 0 ,A & C §10 6 107
Bal.&OM o 8. W .,1 s t ,4 ^ .1 9 9 0 , J & J
S o u thern..................
(Ball.).
10% 11
Ino. 6 s .............................................1920 §____ 20
C ap e F .& Y a d .,S e r.A .,6 g .l9 1 6 , J & fj 65
75
“
P referred ..............
33
34
B u Hand, 1 s t,6 s ...............1 90 2 ,M&N 5 110 % 111
S e rie s B ., 6 g . „ „ . . __191 6 , J& D
53
W est E nd.........................(Boston).
69
69%
2d, 58.................................1 8 9 8 ,F&A §100% 101%
S e rie s C., 6 g
.
. 1916, J& B
51
P re fe rre d . . . . . . . . . .
"
92
93%
C ent. Ohio, 4*s g ...............1 93 0 , M &f
United Cos, of N. J . . (Phila.).
239% A lleg h en y V al., 7 3 -ll)s, J8 9 6 , J & J 103
Cent. P a ss., 1 st 5 s .........1 93 2 , M&N
Went JerB©jf......................
"
59
60
A tla n tic C ity 1 st 5s, g ., 1 9 1 9 ,M&1S 1 0 1 % 103% C ity & Su b., 1 st 5 s . . . ...1 9 2 2 , J&D 112% 112% .
W est Jersey1A A lla n .
1
1
.......... 26
__ C h a ri. C o l.& A u g ,ex t.5 s. 1 91 0 , J&.) 107% 108%
B elv id ere D el., 1 st, 6 s .. 190 2 , J& D
W estern N.Y. A Penn
“
3% 3 % Buffalo B y. eon. 1 st, o s............ 1931 105
__ Col. & G reen v., l e t 5-0 S.19 1 7, J& J 114 114%
W ihconaln C e n tra l.. . (Boston).
4%
5
C ataw isea, M ., 7 s .......... 1 90 0 , F&A
86
88%
P re fe rre d .......................
“
.......... 20 C k o o . O k l a . & G u l f , p , i o r l i e n 6 s . n o % 105% 0 a .C a r . & N or. 1 st 5 g .,1 9 2 9 , J& ,;
105
" ----- ;la P a o ., 1 st 5 -6 S ...1 9 2 2 , J & J 115%
Worc’st.Naflh.ARoch.
"
112 118
C itiz e n s ’ 8 t . K y . o I ln d . , o o n . 5 s . l9 3 3
93
91
.MthCELLAJN EOD8.
C o lu m b . S t. R y „ 1 s t, c o n . 5 s . . 1 9 3 2
103
6 s............................... .......... 1 9 0 4 , J& J 116% i i s
Allouez M In’g, a sst pdf i?o«/on;.
% 1 C o lu iu b . O . C r o s s to w n , 1 s t,5 s .1 9 3 3
S e rie s A , 5 s . . . . .............192 6 , J& J 115 116
A tlan tic M ining..........
“
15% 16
C o n s o l. T r a o t , o f N . J . , l s t , 5 s , 1 9 3 3
86
86%
4 ^ 8 .................................... 1 9 2 5 , A&C
B ay S tate Gas l i ..........
“
11
11% D e l . & B ' d B r ’ k , l e t , 7 s . 1 9 0 5 , F & A 125 128
o g .1 9 1 1 ,:
105
Boston L a n d ........ ..
"
4
!4% E a s t o n & A m . l B t M . , 5 s . l 9 2 0 , M & S 107%
t 7 s .l8 9 8 , J& J 108%
C entennial M in in g ...
"
■15 •25 E l m i r . & W i l m . , 1 s t , 6 s . l 9 1 0 , J & J
118
95% 96
Fort Way he E lect. II..
*
*
25
2 H e s t o n v i l l e M . & F . , e o n . 5 s . . 1 9 2 4 110%
1%
iiR u u a iu iu ,, 1BU UO----XUUO, JJOS C 115
UC
F ran klin M inin g........
*
*
11
25
12
H u n t . & B r t d T o p , C o n . 5 s . ’ 9 5 ,A < 5 £ C
107
2d S e rie s, 6 s ...............................1 9 1 1 M&6
117
Frenchman's B ay L’d.
5
1
1 % L ek ig li N ay. 4 J*s............1914, Q—j
111
3 d S e rie s, 6 s ............................. 1 9 1 6 , M&f
113%
BJlnolfl tttecl..................
100
77
78
2 d 6 s, gold......................1897, J& D 106% 107
4 th S e rie s, 3 -4-5s................... 1 9 2 1 , M&i
K earsarge M in in g ....
-«
25 15
15%
G eneral m o rt. 4 !sb , g . 1 9 2 4 ,0 —F 101
5 th S e rie s, 5 s _______ 1 9 2 6 , M&f 105 - " 105%
Osceola M ining............
25 25
25% L ek igb V al.C o al 1st 5 s,g . 1933, J & J
i0 2 %
P ullm an P a la c e C ar.
_
110*4 liO %
100 167 168
L ek ig h V a lle y , 1 st 6s . .. 1898, J& D 108%
116% 117
Pyx.M -yivanla S te e l.. (Phila.). 100
44
2d 7 8 . . . . ......................... 1910, M&f 134 .....
118% 120
P rc rm red tl....................
“ 100
75
_. 1
MISCELLANEOUS.
Quincy M inin g.......... . (Boston). 25 119 120 N Consol. 6 ..........................1 92 3 , J& B 124
ew ark P assen ger, eon. 5 s ... 1930 104% ........ .
Tam
T am arack M in in g ....
“
25 185 136 North P enn. 1 s t, 7 S ....1 8 9 6 , t t * l .
121% 12 2 %
101%
F u n d in g 5 s .___ . .. . 1 9 1 6 , M&N
W ater P ow er................
100
1
1% I Gen. M. 7 s-------------...1 9 0 3 , J& J 124
E x ch a n g e 3 V; b . . .. . .. 1 9 3 0 , J & J 106% *■■■«•
WftfitiDgh. Elec. A M ,.
50 34% 34
P e n n sy lv a n ia g e n , 6 s , r . . l 9 l 0, V ar 131
P ref., cu m u la tiv e.
50 54% 5 4 % Consol. 6s, o
..............1 9 0 5 , V ar 120%
F un d ed debt, 2 -3 s.........1 9 9 1 , J & J
61% 62
. P o n d s —B o s t o n ,
Consol. 6 s , r .......................... ...1 9 1 9 . V 118 ...........
ar
A tIo ii.c fc «.F .1 0 0 .y r.ig .,I9 8 9 , J & J 7 7 % 7 -%
108% 109
C
4>,
’jM ^
Sd2% -4s, g., C lass A . .19 8 9, A&O * 26% 26% P a . on at. Tr. C a ng l,7 s ... 1 9 1 3 ,,J& U
116% 117
& N. T .
a
1906
125
G O • ■ ■ e s o .a e i . m M
..-.1 9 3 9 ,s ir & J 107 107%.
Boston U nited Gas 1 st 5s,
* 78
80
con- ..................... — 1930 ,
107 107%
■Of O 1 T
J
’
eludes overdue coupons.
H U n listed.
§ And ac c ru e d I n te r e s t
Prices oj 2iot ember 22.
A tlan ta a C n srlo tte (Balt.).

THE

N ovem ber 33, 1895 ]
NEW

913

( H E O N IC L F

Y O K E S T O C K E X C H A N G E P R I C E S { C o n t i n u e d ) —A C T / F N

BONDS NOVEMBER 2 2 AND FOR YEAR 1 * 9 5 .

t
\ £ £ n0 ,<a''<je Oates) in 1895 R ailro ad and M isobl . B onds . /,,(er,i ° l rice ' !la’L OatesJ in 1 89 5 .
O‘
p
Be
M is c e u B o x e s , » » « * '« / ‘net
------------_ ------------ Pervxl on. 2 2 .
Lowest.
Highest.
______________________________ Period Voc. 22. Lowest.
U ghesi.
110 Nov. 114 Aug. Mo. P ao .—le t,o o n ., 6 g ___1920 M A N
A n ie r. C otton O il, d eb ., 8 g . 190 0 Q F I I l l ' s
: 83 M ar. 104 Sep t.
A :.T o p .* 8 .F .- 1 0 0 - y r ..4 | .l9 8 9 J A J I 77%
g
3d, 79 ........................................1 9 ° y M A N io.M ., 103 Ml*r - H i Oot.
62 i l a r . *84*4 Sep t,
Pao. o{ Mo.—le t ,e x ., 4 g.1 9 3 8 F A . M n IJ21' 300*9 M ar. 1 06 J u n e
4
16% M ar. i3 7 % S o p t.
S - l s f C l " A " 1 st in s t a ll'd . 89 A & O 1 2 6 <
2d e x t. 5 s ...........................1938 : j % ,
79% Nov, 84% Sep t.
8 0 's
N ew g en . 49. w h en I s s u e d . - .............
163 M ar.
n
8 t ,L .& I r .M t l8 t e x t .,5 8 .1 8 9 7 p ? t 1{,1? ! 100 M ar. 108 J u n .e
4 9 b. 47% Nov. 59*2 Sep t.
A djuntm ent 4 s, w h en issu e d . . . . . . .
103% J a
2 d , 7 g .................................1897 M * m
CoLMidl&ud—CODS., 4 g .l9 4 o F A A !♦ 2 7 a. 17 M ar. 130% Sept.
|101*e Nov. 105
C airo A rk .& T ex ft3 ,7 g . 1897 ! j * n ig d -b ! 97 M ar. 103% Oot.
o lL jJ u u e
A tL A Pao —G u a r .,4 ^ — 1 9 3 , . . . . . . . . ‘ 4 5 b. 44*e J a n .
Nov.
G en.R ’y & la u d g r .,5 g .l9 3 1 a c q io n . 74% A pr. 8 8 *sSopt.
B r K jklyu E l e v . - l s t , b g .1 9 2 4 A A O 105 b. 86 M ar. 108 M ay
U n ion E tev ated .—t > g ....l9 3 , M A 5 103%b. 84% M ar. 107% O c t M obile & Ohio—N ew , 6 g - 1 9 2 7 j J d IS P , * • 115 M ar. 1 2 1 A ug.
>
G en eral m o rtg ag e, 49-----1938: a, ,x a
B ’k ly n W b rfA W .li—U t,5 s,g .% 5 t A A 10 2 % 102 Sep t. 103*4 J u n e
62 M ar. 69 *9 J u n e
C a n a d a S o u th e rn .—1 st 5a 1 90e J A J 1 1 1
109 J a n . 1 1 2 % Ju u e Nash. Ch. & S t L. - 1 st, 7s. 1913 j * j i n ? k 130 M ar 133 Oct.
o i 5u
............... . . . . . 1 9 1 3 a1 & © 108*4 102*9 M ar. 108% JulyC onsol., 5 g
............. ...1 9 2 8 a A O q?
93*9 A pr. 100 Sept.
50 J a n . f 67*9 Oct. N at'l S ta rc h M J g . - l s t , 6 s . 1920 M J
C e i t . G a .- a AW . 1 stoon. 5s. 1929 . . . . . . . f 64
h i?
Sep t
,w
C e n tr a l o fN . J .- C o n a .,7 s .l8 9 9 Q - J '1 1 1 b. 111*4 Oct- 113 J u n e N Y C e n tra l—D e b t e r t .4 s .l9 0 5 jM & N 101 l k ’ 102 M ar. , 105 o e p t.
%b. 9 0 J a n - 100 Sep a
•116% b. 114 M ar. 121 J a n .
1 at, M u ^ n ,7 8 . . . . . ,v ; . . 1 90 3 :J & J 144 40. l 2 o*9 J a n . 126 J u n e
C onsul., 7 s ............................. V * *
y
111 J a n . 120 Oct. | D eb en.,58, coup.. 1 8 8 4 ..1 9 0 4 y 4 S .i yi *i3 2 j - l105% Aipr. I I O I 4 A m r
;
O S lo A ir.
G en eral m o rtg a g e ,5 g - .- } 9 ®/ J * 3 119
110%1 A ug
.
L eh .*W .B .,c< m .,7 e,as’d .l9 0 i/ Q -M 107% 1 G1 9 . Mtar. ni o A .. g .:;I g - Y- & H a rlem , 7 9 ,1 ^ 8 .1 9 0 0 ,5 ! ,fe x i- I l l b-!ll4 Nov. 119% Apr.
101% V . . . I n
u_
92% b. 85 M ar. 92 J a n . ;! K .W . * O gd.,oonsol., 5 8 .1 9 2 2 U a q l l i * j 113 % Apr. 119*a S e p t
“
m o r tg a g e s * . 191s
_
A m . Dock A I m p .,5 a ....1 9 2 i 4 A J 11644b .1111*4 Apr. 116% Nov. i W est Shore, g u a r., 49 _ 2 3 6 1 jj 4 j JxX Js 103% Feb. 107% J u n e
101 % Feb. 107% S e p t i N. Y .O h la & S t L .—4 g . . . l 9 3 7 a A O f 9 3 %. 101% Feb. 107 Sep t.
C e n tra l P aeitte.—G old, its .189 8 ! J A J j 107
on 136 J u u e
C hea. A Ohio.—S e r A , 6 g .l9 0 8 ; A A O; 121 a 117 A pr. 121 Feb. N. Y. Lack. & W.—1 st, 6 9.1 92 1 j a j IdO 0. IOI W
116*4 Apr. 121*9 S e p t i C onstruetton, 5 s .................1 9 2 3 jp a a m **b. 113*4 Feb.' 117 *4 S e p t
M o rtg a g e, 6 g . . . . . . . . —.1911 A A O 119
N .Y .U E .* W .- l8 to o n .,7 g .l9 2 o ;1£ ,fe s . . . .
l e t co n so l., 5 g .....................1 9 3 9 * A N 109 isb. 103% M ar. 1112% S e p t
12 5 % U a r. 144 Nov.
2d 00U90L, 8 g .....................1 9 0 9 !j ^ o 1 7 ,% I 55% Feb. 191*3 Sep t.
7 9 t a 69*9 Mur. 33% J u u e
G en era l4 % s, g .................... 1992 M A 8
98%
B .A A .D t v .,l» t e o n ..4 g .l9 S 9 jJ A J
9 1 Feb. 99 J u l y jj Lone D ook.ooneol., 6s,g. 193'., , A o ,}3J b-,126 Feb. 133 S e p t
“
2 d e o n .,4 g .l9 3 9 J A J . 88 a. 8 5 A pr. i 90 J u n e N. Y. N. H. & H.—Con. deb. otfs! A a o 133 ^ 135*., Nov. 147% J u n e
E U * .L e x .A B !g 8 * n .- 5 g .l9 0 2 M A 8] *102 b. 9 5 M ar. 103 A ug. N. Y. O n t * W .--R ef .4 s ,g . 1992 y j j s 9 - A b- 83 J a n . ; 95% A ug.
‘
_
C h ic .B u r l. A
C o u .,7 s .l9 0 3 J A J j 120*4 118 M ar. 123*4 J u n e ; C onsol., 1 st, 5s, g . . . _ 193*.*j a ij l l y b , 109*2 J u u e j l l 3 M a y
D eb en tu re, 5 s............ ..........1813 M A N 101 b. 98*9 M ar. 105 Dot. N.Y.s u a A w . —I 8 tr e f .,5 8 g .l9 3 7 ij * j
b 95 J u n e :108 J a n .
C o n v e rtib le 5 « . . . . . . ... . .1 9 8 3 M A 8 104*s
98** M ar. 109 A ug. i M idland of N, J ., 6 s, g . 1910; a a O 1l a ^ b-|U4% J u n e 119 J a n .
Den v er Di v isio n 4 * .......... 1922 F a A 9 6 b. 93 *2 Feb. 97 J u ly | Norf.de W.—1 0 0 -yea r, S s.g .lb S l * j a j , bb !*• 48% Feb.
70 Apr.
N eb ra sk a E x te n sio n . 4 ». 1927 51A N 9 0 b. 38% Feb. 94*4 S e p t No .P a o llte —le t ,c o u p .,t ig . 1921 j a J 117 b- 112 F eb. ------ J u n e
119% *
G eu arai, 2 d ,o o u p ., 6 g . 1933 a a 0 1 0 2 .3>).! g i7 a Mm-. 104 S o p t
H an .A 8 tJ o s .- C o n s . ,8 s. 1911 M A 8 120*9*. 115 *s M ar. 125 A ug.
C hic. A E. 111.—1 st,* . f.,0«.19O 7 J A D 116*9 b. 114 J u u e 117*s M a y i G en eral, 3d, ooup., 6 g . . l 9 3 7 ; j a D 71%
49 M ar. 7 4 * a S e p t
Q o n so L .S g ............. . . . . . . . 1 9 3 4 A A O 126*9*'. 121% A pr. 127% A u g. i Consol, m o rtg ag e, 5 g . . . 19391 j a D I 37
24 J a n . : 45 J u n e
Col. tr u s t go ld n o tes, 6 s .l3 9 3 j > a N * 80%
x
.
G en eraleo n ao L , 1 st, 5 S -1 9 3 7 M A N 101 D 96 Feb. l o i S e p t
70 M ar. 89 J u u e
C h ic a g o A E rie .—1 st., 5 g . 1982 M A K 110 b. 7 7 M ar. 114 O u t j Ohio. * N. P ao ., 1 s t 5 g . 1910 a A O t 41*8 137 Jauu *51 *2 S e p t
S e a t L .8 . & E . ,l 8 t g*L0.1931 F a A •149 a. t33 J a il. 151% S e p t
Inco m e, 5#............................. 19»2l G et. I 3 0 a 14% M ar. 3 4 A ug.
C h ic.G as I,. A C .—1 s t , 5 g . . 1937 J A J
93
90 J u n e 96% J u n e No. Paolflo A M o u t—8 g .. 193 3 ; m a 8 32
M ar. 1 41 M ay
e h lo .M ll.A 8 t P .—Con, 7 » . 1905; J A J 127 *sb. 125 Feb. 129% J u u e No. PaolUo Ter. Co.—6 g . . . 1933; J a J 103 K 30 J a n . ilOtl J u l y
98
**.
1 s t ,S o u th w e st D ig ., 8 * .- 1 9 0 « jJ A J 110 > 114*% M ar. 119*4 J a n e t Ohio * Mis&.-'Con. *. f.,7 9 .1 3 9 9 j a J 107 K'i!l0 6 A ug. 108% J u n e
b
b.
'
1 s t , 80. M inn. Dlv , « s , . . 1 9 l o ; J A J 118 % 115 M ar. 1119 J «uie ■Ohio S ou thern—1 s t ,6 g... 1921 j a d 92
96 Jan .
M ay
l» t ,C h .* P a c .W .D lv .,5 » .tt t 2 l J A J 115% 109% Feb. j i i s J u n e ; Ge n e ra l m o rtg ag e, 4 g .. . 1 9 2 1 j M a N 3 | a 8i- M ay 52% A pr.
b-! 29%
C h lc .A M o .K lv .D ty.,5 # . 1920.1 A J jI 109
104 Feb. 110 A ug. ; O regonIm pr.O o.—I a t , 6 g . l 9 l u ! j a D 9 3 %
92 O c t 101 O o t
W t*c. A M lo m ,0 1 v .,5 g .l9 2 1 J A J *113 b. 107% J a n . 113 O c t i C o n «o l„ i5 g ........................... 1 9 3 9 a A O : 35
3^
Nuv. 55 M ar.
T e rm in a l, 5 g ......................1 9 1 4 J A J 1 1 2 b. 108*4 Feb. U g J u n e Ore. R.& Nav.Co. —1st, 6 g. 19.19 j A J 111% X 06\ J a a . 1 1 2 ^ J u n e
'
C on »oL ,5 g . . . .................. 1 9 2 . J A D
Gen. M ., 4 g ., s e r ie s A . ..1 9 8 9 J A J * 95*9b. 87 Feb. 38*9 A ug.
t7 3 J a a . 1 0 3 % A u g .
MU. A Nor.—1st, co n ..8 s. 1913 J A D 118 0. 118 J a n . jl2 0 F eb . Penn. Oo.—4% g .t ooup in . 1921 J A J 113% b'1 0 9 % J a n 1 1 6 % J * n e
■Chic. A N , W .— o u s o l.^ a la lA q —F 139 b. 138 M ay 143% J a n . Peo. Deo. * E v an sv . - 0 g . 1920:J A J : 103 %b. 92 Feb. ,101 Nov.
C
C oupon, go .d , 7 s . . . . . . . . 1 9 0 2 J A D •124% ,- 119% J u n e 123*4 Fob. I E v an sv . D ivision , 6 g ...l9 2 t > M a 8 103
93 M ar. 103% J u ly
34 b. 25 Fob. ;*37 O ot
2d m o rtg ag e, 5 g .................192 6 M A S
S in k in g r a n d , 8 s ................. 1929' A A U 111 b. i l l J u n e 126 J a n .
’"
G
S in k in g fu n d , 5 s ...... ...........1929 A A U 104 b. 108 *4 A p r. 112% A ug. j P hlla. & R ead .— en., 4 g . 1959 ,1
67 J a a . : 8 I O u t
S in k in g {and, deb en. ,5 » . 1933 M A .8 * l l u b, 105*4 M ay 112% A ug.
1st prof. Income, 5 g ...” . 1 9 5 9 7 ..* ." ! 3 0 %b. 19% M ar. * 41 % Sep t.
2 5 -y e a r deb enture* 5 s . . . 190v -9 A N *107 a 104% M ay ,08 J a n .
2d prof. Incom e, 5 g . .. . 1 9 5 9 ; ......... 16%
9% M ar, 25% S e p t
3d pref. Incom e, 5 g ___ 195-*: . , I 12
E x te n sio n , 4 a .................. ..1 9 2 8 F A A 1 0 3 b.j 93*4 M ar. i0 3 J u ly *
6% M ar. i 19 % Sopt.
C h k s .a l.A F a e .- 8 s .,co up .1 9 17 1J A J 132 b .! 126 J a n . 131*4 O c t | P ltta iiu rg & W estern —4 g . 1917 J A ,i 8 2 b. 80 Atir
go
88% S ep t.
77
83 j a 3
E xten sio n an d c o l , 5 s . . . 1 9 3 4 jJ A J 105*9 100 F eb. : 107 *9 J une R loG r. W estern —le t , 4 g .1 9 3 i J A J
79% J u n e
8 0 -y e a r d e b e n tu re ,5 a ...1 9 2 1 | M A 8 95 b. 83 M ar. too A ug. - it J o . A Gr. I s la n d —6 g .,1 9 2 V J I A N ! 60 a . 1 5 1 Feb 16 6 A u g.
«b
C hic. S t P . M- A O.—8 s . . . .1 9 3 0 J A D 128 > 122 Feb. ! 130 N o v .; 3 t L. A 8 an F r.—6 g .,C L li.l9 0 j .M A N l U g l i . ’ l U t A pr 118 A u g.
9 0 b. 8 2 Feb. 94 M a y I 6 < „ 0 1 a * « C ..................... ..1 9 0 0 M A N l l 3 % b . | l l i M%r. 113 A ug.
C le v e la n d A C an to n .—5 s .. 1917 J A J
C .C .C , A l . —C o n a o l,7 g .1 9 1 4 J A D •13 5 b. 122 J a n . 135 S e p t j G en eral m o rtg ag e , 6 g . . 1931 I A -I 103 a. 102 J a n 112 J u u e
G en eral co n so l., 8 g . . . . . 1934 J A J 128*9*,. 119 Feb. 120*9 Nov. ; Corn), g u a r. 4 », g .............. I9 6 0 A A 0 * 50 b.j 4.) M ar.
58% S o p t
C .C .0 .* 8 t C.—Peo.AK.,4mlW4<l A A 0
8 2 a . 7 4 M ar. 34% J u l y j 3 t L. So. W e s t —1 s t 4 i, g. 193 * M A N 7 3
1 6 2 Ja m
82% Out.
17 Apr. 2 8 *s J u l y j 2 d , 4 s, g .. Incom e . . . ...1 9 3 9 .1 A I 30%
Incom e, 4 a .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1998: A p r il.: 22*9
16% J a u
40% S e p t
Col. Coat A ir o n .- 8 * .........1900 F A A 102 a 9 2 M a y lo i% O o t | I t P .M .A if .—D a k .E x .,0 g . 1 9 to d A N 120 b. 115 M ay 123% J u n e
Col. A 9 ta A ve. gu . 5 « , g . . . l 9 9 3 i t A 6 114 *sb. 110% J u l y 115*4 A ug.
1st c o n so l, 6 g ..........
193.1 J A J , 120 b. 1 1 5 % M ar. 124 Nov.
Col il.V a l.A T o t.—Con.r‘> g .l»31 M A 8 80'S'I. 85*4 Oct.
95% A ug. j
“
reduoed to 4 % g .1 A J j'1 0 6 a . io o % J a u . 100% ( l e t
98 A pr.
G e n e r a l,8 g ,. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 9 0 4 4 A D 84 b. 88 J a n .
M o n tan a E xtem do u, 4 g .1 9 3 7 J A D! ____ _ 84% A pr.
95% J u l y
D e n v e r * K ibO r.—ls t .7 g .1 8 0 u M A N 114*ib. 112% M ay 1 13% O ot * S a u A n tA A .P .—le t,4 < ..g ii.,’ 4.i j A .1! 6 0 b. 5 2 Ja m
63 J uue
9 0 b. 79 J a n . , 94% S e p t Sav . F la, A W e s t—lfe.4,6g. 193 1 A A O' ...............112 Ja m
1 s t c o n so l.. 4 g. . .. . . . . . . 1 9 3 1 1 J A J
117 J a u .
D ul. 8o. Bh. A A tl.—5 * . . .1 9 3 7 :4 A J 100 a 90 F eb . l o i O ot \So. C ar. A G a.—1 s t 5 g ...1 9 1 ;) M A N ______ 94% Nov. 98% A ug
F t . W. A D e n v .C ity .—6 * . 1921 J A D t 89 b. 85 Feb. 74*4 S e p t ' so. PaolHo, A rts,—6 g .. 1909-10; J A J 9 7 b.i 8 6 M ar. 1101% J u n e
8 * L H .A i8 a n A n .- M .A P .D .l» t ,> A Nj 93%
1
9 0 M ay 9 t% o a t so. P aolU o ,p el.—61J . . . 1905-12; A A Oj’ U l b. 109% Ja m j l l 5
Sep t
1st co nso l., go ld, 5 g ___.1 9 3 7 A A
94
G eo E le c tric , d eli. 5 s , g . . . l 9 2 2 ;J A D : 21 b. 97 J a u . 93% J a n .
83 Feb. ! 95% A ug.
105 b. 99% Ja m 110 J u n e
BOOS. A T . t5em t,,ge». M ,g .l0 2 i1 A A O 70% ; 81 Feb. ; 74% S e p t ; 90. Paolflo, N. M .- 6 g ......... 1 9 l i ; j A
d i n o l s O t i t r a l . —4 s , g . , . . 19531M A Nl 101 b. 98 J a n . 1*15 S e p t S ou thern—1 st co n s, g ., 5 « . 199 i J A
96
84% Ja m
99% J u u e
W estern U ties, 1 st, 4 s , g . 1951 F A A 101 % i. 102% M ay 104% J u l y j E. T eam roo rg. lien 4 -5 9 .1 93 s M A
94 a .j 79% Fob. ! 0 4% O ot
J u t * G reat Nor.—1 st, 8 g. 1919 M A -V 117 b. 117 Feb. 122 A u g .; E, T. V. A U.—1 st, 7 g . . . 1900 J A
112%% i n
J u l y 116 Ju n o
Con-5 g ................................1950 M A
3 4 4 - 5 s ................................ ..1 9 0 9 M A 8; I 74 b, 67% M ar. 84% A ug. ,
107% 102% Feb. I l l S e p t
Io w a C e n tr a l.—1 st, 5 g. . .. 1 » 3 8 :J A D j 9 8
! 94% M ar. 98% N or. ! G eo rgia Pao. 1 st 5-84, g . 1922 J A
110 b. 107% M ar. 115 Ju n o
K in g s Co. E lse .—1 s t, 5 g . . 1925 J A J
8 0 * 4 4 68 J a n . 85 M a y | K noxv. A Ohio l » t Os, g . 1925 J A
115 b. 1 1 1 % M ar. 116% O ot
J a
. •V ' n V. ,
J I
.1 0
ig so b sts u s e .—1 s t . , 5 g . . . . i u i » q - r I 26*9 1 9 0 % Feb. 93% J u n o ! H Io h .A D an v.o oU .. 69.,, g. .|19111 ,1 o t J ----- . . . . . 1118 J a m 1 2 2 % Ju n e
l * k e E rie A W est.— « .. . .1 8 3 7 J A J U 7% b. 112% J a n . 118 S e p t ! W o st.N o .O a r.lsto o u .O s.g lh ll J A J 1 1 5 %b. 109 Feb. 116% Ju n o
5
LM hore.—C on.op., l » t , 7 » . 190 6 J A J 1 18 b.j U S J u l y 113 J a n . : TenmO. L A K y .—Tern D.,1 st,6 g A A 1.) 93 b. 7 7 J a m
90% O ot
B irm in g h am D lv., 6 g . . 1917 J A Jj 96
OMtsoL0 0 9 a . . 3 4 , 7 * . . .. 1 2 0 3 : 4 A D 123 % > 122 J a n e 124% M a y
78 Mar. 99 J u n e
<.
L lu t A v .A P a v .F .g m S a g .lh O d ’ M A Si 1 14 k ! 110% J u u e j 115 Nov. fo x a s A P ao lflo - 1 st, 5 g ..2 0 0 U J A D 88%
83% J a a .
94% S o p t
2d, Incom e, 5 g.................... 2 00 M arch
Dong I s la n d .- 1 s t OOQ.,5 g. 1341 <
4—4 132 b. 117% J a u . 123% J u n e
22 %
32 S e p t
21 % J a n .
95 M a y 102 A u g. i Tot. A nn A r. A N. M.— i g. 102 4: M A N 192 %b. * 75 M ar. 19 5 O o t
G en eral m o rtg ag e, 4 g .. 193* i A D
99%
___. *).
107 A pr. u o % M ar. Toledo A Ohio C e n t —5 g ,1 9 3 5 !J A J 110% 107% Feb. 1 1 2 % Ju n o
t o i l s , A I a sh .— o n s., 7 s . 1828 1 4 0 107
C
N.O. A M ob ile, 1st, 8 g . . 193 9 J * J 12*3 b .! 115% Fob. j 122% S o p t fo l. 8 t L. A K a m O .—6 g . . l 9 1 0 J A D I 77%
67 Feb. 181% O ot
“
“
2 d , 8 g , . 1939 4 A J io o b. 103% M ar. 108 J u l y Union Paolflo—6 g ..............1 89 s J A J 109*8 102% M ar. 111% Oct.
E xt. sin k in g fu n d, 8 ....... 1399 M A 8
G en eral, 6 g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1930 J A D •118 b. 114 Feb. 120 J u u e
99
8 9 M ar. 101% Aug.
C o lla te ra l tru st, 4% .........1 91 s M A N ■140 b. 133 M a y t0 3 A ng.
U n ltled , 4 g ........................ 1940 4 A J
ao*9b. 71 % M ar. 85 J une
X o o is. N .A .A O & .—U C ,8s.l9H > J A J 113 *4b. 106 J a n . 114% Nov. [ Gojd dm OOL tr u s t n o tes. 1 8 9 1 F A A 98% a. 83 F eb. i 99 S o p t
93% Feb. 1106% S o p t! Kam Pao.-D em D lv., 6 g. 1899 M A N 113
O m » o l.,6 g ................
.1 9 1 8 A A O 102
103 % M ar. 114% Oot.
1 st c o n s o l, 6 g ...............1910 M A N I 78
02 Feb. 87 O ot
Lon » , 8 t E. * T e x a s .—6 g. 1917 F A A 6 2 a 55 Feb. 80 J u ly (
M M ihattee consol. 4 s .......... 199*.i, A A O • 9 9 * s a 98 J a n . 102 A ug. j O regon S h o rt L in e—6 g .. 1922 F A A 110 % t87 % J a n , 110% Nov.
39 Feb. I ti l% O ot
M etro . E le v a te d .—1 st, 8 g. 1 908,1 A J 12 l* s b, U 8 % J » n . 123 J u n e ; O r,S.E .A U t'hN .—O o m S g.l9 19 iA A O I 03
32 Feb. 46% s o p t
2 d . 8 s ...........................
1899 M A N 106% 106 M ay 109% O ot I U .F. D en.A G ulf.oom , 5 g .l9 3 0 ;J A D 38
M ich . C e n t —ls t ,o o n s ,,7 s . 1902 U A S -1 1 4 % a 117 M a y 1 2 2 % S e p t U. S. C ord.—1 st o o l, 8 g .,1 9 2 4 J A J I 42 b. 35*4 J u n e 64 Ja m
C o n so l., 6 s ......................... .1 9 0 2 *1 A N •108% b. 1 0 8 % J u n e 111 J u l y V irg in ia M id.—GemAL, S s . 1936 M A N 100 b. 91% Feb. 1 04 O ot
M U .L a k s 8 h .A W .- la t .6 g .1 9 2 1 M A N 130 b. 127% M a y 135 A ug. W abash—1 s t ,5 g . ................. 1939 M A N 106% 104% M ay 109% Sep t.
2d m o rtg ag e , 5 g ................1 9 3 9 ;F A A
03% Feb.
70%
E xtern A Im p ., 5 g . . . . . . . 1929>F A A I l l *sb. 109 A pr. 115 J a n .
81 S e p t
0
M u m .A .e tL .—Issco B .b s.g. 1931 M A S • 100 %b, 99% Nov. 104 T O ot W e s t N. Y. A P a . - l s t .5 g .1 9 3 7 J A J 103 %b. 102% J a m 111% O ot
Gen. 2-3-4*, g o ld ---------- 1943 A A 0
45% J u u e 5 0 7e S e p t
43
M o . K. A K —1 st 5 a g .,g u . 1942 A A O 91 b. 81 J a n . i 97% S o p t
79% Feb. ! 91% Aug. W e s t Un. T o l—
OoL tr. 5 s. 1933 J A J 110 a. 106 J a m 111% J u n e
86
M ,K . * T e x a s .—1 st, 4s, g . 1990 J A D
4 4 F eb. i 6 9 % S e p t i WUo. C e n t Co.—1 s t 5 g ,.1 9 3 7 ,J A J I 53% I 4 4 M ar. 161% Sopt
61%
3d. 4s, g ...................................1990 f A A
«OTK.—“ b " in S ate* price b id ;
i.
price a sk ed ; therango is made up from aotual sales o n ly . • Latest prloe tills weak. 1 Trust reoelpts.
R a ilro a d

a sd

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE P R lC E S -(C «n tla a ed ).-/J V A O T rra BONDS—NOVEMBER 3 3 .
SE C U R IT IE S.

Bid.

iif t ilr o & d B o n d * ,
lttoe* Rxchangt Ft v +m.
A la b a m a M id .—1 st, g ., g u a r . 1928
90
A , T . % S » - 2 4 , 4 * . 01a»* B. 1939
C h icago * 3 1 Lou. - l * t » 0* 1915
O jl, Mtd. 1 st, g .,o * ..................1930
A ll, *• P v '. - 'M V .
q* 1907
WfwU rn DfriwIiHi taconi*. ..1 9 1 0
« if
+%
•*
» ** > 1 IP

Aa k.

s e c u r it ie s .

B a lt. A O h i o « o l d ..............1 9 2 5
raort., Kohl, 68. . .. . .. 1 9 8 8
W. Va. A P itts.—1 st, g ., 5 s ..1990
B. A O. 8.
1 st, g ., 4 % «...1 9 9 0
.....
Mcinon. R iv e r, 1st g .,g . 5 *. ..1 9 1 9
Oent’l Ohio R eor.—1 st, 4% s. 1930
121%
A k.A O h.Juno.—ls t,g ,5 s ,g u . 1930
Brooklyn E lev ated —2 d , 5 s. ,.1 9 1 5
8e w ill* A B .B .—ls r ,g .5 s ,g m l9 12
4
* e i n » » k A W n —l* r„ g . t* . *933

B id.
112*4
‘ 114

A sk.

SE C U R IT IE S.

Bid.

Ask

B ull. Rooh. & P itts .—G en., 5S.1 9 37 97
99
Rooh. P ., 1 st, 0 s ...................1921 123 125
Rooh, A P it ts .—Cons. 1st, 08.1922 121 123%
' 108
B ud. A Su sq u o h .—1st, 5a, g .,1 9 1 3
l*oT ‘
*104^
Oonaol. A o o llab tr u s t, 5 s . ..1 9 3 4 *100
*102*11
M lun’ A S t. D. - 1 s t , 7s, g u .,1 9 2 7
A
7*7
Io w a 0 . & W e s t —1 st, 7 » ___1909 *103
*
88%
Oed. R ap. I. F. A N., 1 st, 0S.192O 10 L
1st. 5* . . . .
.............. ...1 9 2 1
..........
.........

ME
i ro»

CH RONICLE.

tvol. l x i .

: xajuanQk i ’ ItICES.—INACTIVE BONDS—f ContinuedJ—NOVEMBER, 32,
B id .

S E C U R IT IE S .

85

Fu p.M .—Pfc Huron—la t , 5a 1939

Ask.
91%

B id .

S E C U R IT IE S .
N o rf.d W .—

A d iu s tm e n t M . , 7 s l9 2 4

A sh .'

102

*75
E q u i p m e n t , 5 s ...................................... 1 9 0 8
.... Cen A P en.—l a t g . 5 b. ...1 9 1 8 107
*55
C l i n c h V a l . 1 s t 5 s ...................... - 1 9 5 7
1 st con, g., 5 h .............................1943
60% !
R o a n o k e d S o .— ls t , g u . 5 s , g . l9 2 2
! Ft. Worth d R .G .—l a t g ., 5 s ..1928 * 5 8
*85% 86
S c io to V a l. A N . E . — 1 s t , 4 s ,.1 9 9 0
Gal. B a r . d San A nt.—la t , 6 a . 1910
107
O h i o A M i s s — C o n s o l . 7 s ..............1 8 9 8
2d more., 7 a .................................1905 102
119%
2 d c o n s o l . 7 s .................................... . . 1 9 1 1
Ga. Car. d Nor.—1st, gu. 5a, g .1 9 2 9
l109
S p r i n g . D i v . — I s t 7 s ......................... 1 9 0 5
G rand R ap. A I n d —Gen. 5 a ..1 9 2 4 ;
G e n e r a l 5 s ...................................................1 9 3 2
40
jG. B. W. A 8 t. P .—la t , eon. 58.1911
1 100
001
O h i o R i v e r R R . — l e t , 5 s .............. . 1 9 3 6 *i 00
1%
2d ino. 4 s ............ .
. .. . .. 1 9 0 6
G e n , g . , 5 s .................................................. 1 9 3 7
Houaatonio—Cons, gold 5 a ....1 9 3 7 124 1 2 6 %
N. H aven A D erby, C o n a.5 a..l9 1 8 11-4% 1 1 8 % O m a h a A S t . L o u i s . — 1 s t . 4 s . . 1 9 3 7 *52"
84
O re g o n A C a lifo r .— 1 s t, 5 s , g .1 9 2 7
H oub. d T . C.—Waco d N. 7 a.. 1903 130
111 % l O r e g . R y A N a v . — C o l . t r . g . . 5 s . l 9 1 9
7034
1st g ., 5a (Int. g td )................... 1937
3%
...
107
P e r m - P . C . G . A S t . L . 0 n . g . 4 % s A 1 9 4 0 ‘ l ll il
; Cons. g. 6a (int. g td )........ ...1 9 1 2
36
D o
do
S e rie s
* 1 1 0 ia l l l i f t
1 Debent. 68, prin. d in t. g td . 1897
M l
I14is
80
i
P . C . d S . L . - l 8 t , c . , 7 s ..........................1 9 0 0
| D obeiit, 4a, prim & in t. gtd. 1897
HI
1
P i t t s . F t . W . & a — 1 s t , 7 s . . . 1 9 1 2 *140
Illino is C en tral—la t , g ., 4s ...1 9 5 1 1 12
)11
106
2 d , 7 s .........................................................1 9 1 2
la t . gold, 3 % a.............................1951
3 d
7s
1 9 1 2
Gold ...............................................1952 103
JJg,
C l i . S t . L . & P . — 1 s t ' , C O D .5 s , g . . . 1 9 3 2
117
C airo B ridge—4 a....................... 1950
113%|___
117
c104%
C l e v . & P . - C 0 U 6. , B . f d „ 7 0 - 1 9 0 0
8p rin gf. D iv.—Coup., 6 s---- 1898
109%|. . . . .
G e n . 41 , 0, g . , “ A
............ . . . 1 9 4 2
M iddle D iv.—R eg., o s............1921; rl 14
1 0 4 % .......
B t. L . V . & T . H .— 1 s t, 6 s ., 7 0 .1 8 9 7
1 0 5
C, 8 t. L .& N . O.— e n .L ,7 a . 1897 105
T
, flu. 19121 *105 .......
2 ( 1 , 7 s .............................................................. 1 8 9 8 1 0 5
1st, consol., 7a........................ 1897 105
___1926 103 Hi.......
2 d , g u a r . , 7 s ...........................................1 8 9 8 1 0 5
Gold, 5s. co up on................... 1951 121
_ 1896 *95 j .......
_
G d .R .& I .E x t.— ls t, 4 % s , G .g . l9 4 1 * 1 1 0
M emp. D iv., l a t g . 4 a ........ 1951
. f ..1 9 0 1 ; 104% ! . . . .
135
P e o . & E . - I n d . B . & W . - l 0t , p f . 7 S . 1 9 0 0
1 1 1 J ,
Oed. F a lla & M inn.—1st, 7a. .1 9 0 7
5 s ..1919; *100%.....
O h io C n d .& W .— I s t p r e f . 5 s . . 1 9 3 8
. 1919 99 100 In d . D. A Spr.—1 st 7a, ex . op. 1906
*84
110
P e o r ia & P e k . U n io n — 1 s t , 6 s .1 9 2 1
In d . His. A Iow a.—1st, g , 4 S ..1 9 3 9
88%
....1 9 2 1
rU 4«
.(u,
9 4 *a
2 d m o r t g . , 4 ^ , 0 .................................... 1 9 2 1
68
75
1st, e x t., g. 5 a............................. 1943
>A Iow a Div.—5 «...119051 ........ ..........
s .. . 90 51
110
25
31
P i t t s . C ie v e . & T o l — 1 s t , 6 s . . . 1 9 2 2
d Indiana Coal—la t 5 b.1936 ........ 103 1 In t. A G. N’n.—3d, 4a, g . . . —- 1921
.1936
1
72
P itts . & L . E r . - 2 d g . 5 a , “ A ” . 1 9 2 8
K ings C o .-F .E L ,lat,5 ,g .,g ii.A .1 9 2 9 *65
:hL MU. A St. P.—l»t,8a,P.D.1898 109% 111
10 4
P i t t s . M e . K . & Y . — 1 s t 6 s _____ 1 9 3 2
Sd. 7 3*108, P. D ..................1898! 123
127% L a k e E rie A W est.—2d g ., 5 s . 1941
P i t t s . P a i n a v . <fe F . — 1 s t , 5 s . . . 1 9 1 6
L. 8. d M .Sou.—JB.dE.—New 7 s .’98 107% 1 1 0
1«L 7a. $ £.. R .D ................... 1902 126% jl28
126
P itts .8 1 ie n .& L . E . — 1 s t,g .,5 s .1 9 4 0
83
Det. M. d T.—1st, 7 a.............. 1906
U t, I. 4 M ..78.......................1897 123
1 s t c o n s o l . 5 a .......................................... 1 9 4 3
L ak e Shore—Div. bonds, 7 s . 1899 10b %
127
1*1, I. A IK, 70.......................1899 1*3
P itts . & W e s t.— M . 5 s , g ,1 8 9 1 - 1 9 4 1
130
K al. A ll. & G. R .—1 st gu . 58.1938 115
........ .............1903 126
P i t t s . Y ’g s t ’ n & A . — 1 s t , 5 s , o o n , 1 9 2 7
M ahon’g Coal R R .—la t , 5a 1934 *116%
l*t, I. & I). Extension, 7 e ...l9 0 8 330
105
R io G r a n d e S o .— 1 s t , g . , 5 s . . . 1 9 4 0
Leb ig li V .,N. Y .—l a t gu.g. 4 %s. 1940
1st, L a * . A Dav., 5 h.......... 1919 109%
113
S t . J o s . & G r . I s . — 2 d i n c ____. . 1 9 2 5
i n , 11 .A D., 78....................1910 * ----- 129% L ehigh V .T erm .—1 st gu . 5 a ,g .l9 4 1
K a n . 0 . & O m a h a ^ ls t, 5 s .. 1 9 2 7
L eh igh Y ’y Coal—l a t 5 a ,g u .g .l9 3 3
1*1, H A D., 53....................1910|*106
S t. L . A . & T . H .— T e rm . 5 s ,. 1 9 1 4
105 107
Iiltohf. C a r.d W est.—1 st 6s. g .1 9 1 6
0 Hciwro A Paoilio Div., 6 s ..19101 117%
102 %
B e l i e v . & S o . 1 1 1 .— 1 s t , 8 s . . . 1 8 9 6
L ittle Rook A M.—1st, 5a, g .. 19-57
M au ral Point D iv. 5 s ............ 1910 107 \
L
B e l l e v . & C a r . — 1 s t , 6 s . ______1 9 2 3
Long Islan d —1st, 7 s ...................1898 107
104
0, A L. Sup. Div., 5s............1921 108 %
96
C J ii.S t.L .A P a d .— l s t , g d . g . 5 s l9 1 7
F e rry , 1st, g ., 4%a...................192 2
Fargo d8ou?h., 6 b, A aau...l924 114
S t . L o u i s S o .— 1 s t , g d . g . 4 s . l 9 3 1
Gold 4 a.......................................... 1932
90
Inc. oOQTillflk. fund, 5 s ....1 9 1 6
N. Y .& R ’w a y B .—1 s t,g. 5 s. 1927
10 3 3 4
do
2 d in c o m e , 5 s . 1 9 3 1
Dakota A Gt. South., 5 s ....1 916 10778
4 3
C a r . & 8 I i a w t . — 1 s t g . 4 s ____ 1 9 3 2
2d m o rtg ., in o .........................1927
MIL d Nor. wain line—6 s ...1910 119 120%
N .Y.& M an.Beaoh.—1st, 7 s, 1897 103% 105
S t. L . & 8 . F .— 2 d 6 s , g ., c l. A . 1 9 0 6
113%
Ohi o. dN o rw.-3 0 -y e a r deb. 5s. ?.9 21 107%
N, Y .B .dM .B .—1 st con. 5a,g. 1935 *100%
G e n e r a l 5 s ......................... ........................ 1 9 3 1
95
Eaoanaba d L. 8. let, 6a....1 901 110
B rookrn& M ontauk—1st,6 s .1911
1 s t , t r u s t , g o l d , 5 s ......................... 1 9 8 7
0*8 M. A Minn.—let, 78 ....1907 r117
80
la t , 5 s ........................................ 1911
Towa Midland—1st, 8s........ 1900 116
K a n . C ity & 8 — 1 s t, 6 s , g . . . l9 1 6
No. Shore B r.—1st o o n .5 s,g .l9 3 2
F t. S. & V . B . B g . - 1 s t , 6 s ...1 9 1 0
Peninsula—lat, conv., 7 s ...1898
100
40
L o u i8 .E v an s.d St. L .—C on.5s.1939 K
K a n s a s M id la n d — 1 s t, 4 s , g .1 9 3 7
Ohio, d Milwaukee—1st, 7 s .1898 109
L o u is.d N a sh .—Cecil. B r. 7 s ..1907
S t. P a u l C ity R y , c o n . 5 s , g , . . 1 9 3 7
W In. A St. P.—2d, 7s............1907
87% 95
E. H. & N ash.—1 st 6 s, g . . . . l 9 1 9 n o
G o l d 5 s , g u a r ................. ..................... 1 9 3 7
MIL d Mad.—lat. 6s............1905 i’l i
105
P en saco la D ivision, 6 s.......... 1920
Ofct. C. F. A St, P.—let, 5s. 1909 108%
S t. P a u l & D u lu th — 1 s t, 5 s ....1 9 3 1
r1*1*2%
109
St. Louis D ivision, 1st, 6 s .. .1 9 2 1 *124
northern III.—let, 5s........ 1910
2 d m o r t g a g e 5 s .................................... 1 9 1 7
105 107
2d, 3 s..........................................1980 *66
Mil. L. 8. AW.—Con.deb.,5a.1907
S t. P a u l M in n & M .— 1 s t, 7 s .. 1 9 0 9
'107
Mich. Div., 1st, 68.............1924 ‘ 126 130
N asliv. d D ecatur—1 s t,7 s .. 1900 114 115
2 d m o r t . , 6 s ................................................1 9 0 9
118
Ashland Division—1st, 6e 1925 *124
S. f . , 6 a S . & N. A la ...............1910
M i n n e a p . U n i o n — 1 s t , 6 s ____ 1 9 2 2
126
Ch.R.I.dP— D .M .dF.D .lat4s.l905
10-40, gold, 6 s..........................1 924 100%
M o n t . C e n .— 1 s t , g u a r . , 6 s . .1 9 3 7
118
i«t, 2 His..............................1905
5 0 -year 5s, g .,............................193 7
103
1 s t g u a r . g . 5 s ..................................1 9 3 7
103
104
Extension, 4a.................... 1905
104%
P ens, d A t .- 1st, 6s, g o ld .. .1 9 2 1
E a s t. M in n ., 1 s t d iv . 1 s t 5 s .1 9 0 8
‘104
Keokuk d Dea M.—1st, 5a.. 1923
Collafc. tru st, 5a, g ............ ...1 9 3 1 103 106
W ilm a r & S io u x F .— 1 s t, g ,5 s .l9 3 s
90
Ohio. 8t. P .& Minn.—la t,6 b. . .1918 129
N ash.Flor.& S.—1st, g u ., 5 s . 1937
S a n F r a n . & N . P .— 1 s t, g ., 5 ? ,1 9 1 9
103
tSL Paul 4 8 . C.—lat, 6s.......1919 12d
K entu cky C en tral—4s, g . .. 1987 8 J
S o u th e rn — A la . C e n t., 1 s t 6 8 .1 9 1 8
Okie, d W. Ind.—lat, a. f., 6a. 1919
Lou.N .A lb.dC h.—G en.m .g.58.1940 74
7 4 ia
A t l. & C h a r.— 1 s t, p r e f., 7 s .. 1 8 9 7
General mortgage, 6s.......... 1932 118^
M em phis d C hari.—6s, g o ld .. 192 4
I n o o m e , 6 s ..........................................1 9 0 0
Oln Haiu. d D.—Con. 8. L, 7a.1905 120
1 st con. Tenn lien , 7 s............ 1915
112
C o lu m . & G r e e n .— 1 s t, 5 -6 S .1 9 1 6
*d, gold, 4%a......................... 1937
M exican Cent. Consol.—4s, g .1 9 11
E . C e a n . V. & G a .- D iy is .5 s 1 9 3 0 ‘ 1 1 4
(Hu. D. A Ir’n—lat, g». 5 b, g.1941 108% 110
1st, cons, incom e 3s, g .......... 1939
R ic h .* D a n .— E q . s. f. g . 5 s . l9 o 9
*9 7
oiev. Ak. A Col.—Eq. & 2d 68.1930
Mex, In tern atio n al—1st, 4s,g. 1942
D e b e n . 5 s, s ta m p e d ......1 9 2 7
102
10214
a c . c . d 8 t . L., Cairo div.—4s, 1939 '9 0
M exican N ational—1st, g ., 6 s .1927
Y ii- ’a M id . — S e r ia l s e r .A , 6 s . 1 9 0 6
86.-Lou.Div.—1stool. ta't4a,g. 1990 91
92
2d, incom e, 6 s, “ A” ................ 1917
S e r i e s B , 6 s . ...................
1 9 11
Bpring.dCol.Div.—lst,g. 4a. 1940
2 d , incom e, 6 s, “ B ” .............. 191 7
8
S e r i e s C , 6 s ........................................... 1 9 1 6
White W. Val. Div.—lat,g. 4a. 1940
M ich igan C en tral—6 s ................1909 119%
S e r i e s D , 4 - 5 s ..................
1 9 2 1
Oln.Wab.dM. Div.—lat, g.4w.l991 94
97
Coupon, 5 s................................. .1 9 3 1 117 . . . . . .
S e r i e s F , 5 s ........................................... 1 9 3 1
O n. I. St. L. A C.—lat,g.,48.1936 99 100
M o rtgage 4 s ................................1940 104 108
W a s h .O .& W .— 1 s t o u r .g u .4 s .1 9 2 4
Oonaol, 6a.............................. 1920
B at.C .& 'Strgis.—I s t,3 s ,g .g u .l9 8 9
T e r. R R . A s ’n o f S t. L . ~
Oin.8aLQ.ACl.—Con.lat,g.58,1928 110%
MLnn.d 8t. L.—1st, g. 7 s . . . . . . 1927 *145 146%
1 s t , 4 1 ^ 8 ........................................ . . . . . . 1 9 3 9
C. Col Chi. d Ind.—lat, 78,8.1.1899 109
Io w a E xten sio n , 1st, 7 s........1909
130
1 s t , c o n . g . 5 s ........................ 1 8 9 4 - 1 9 4 4
1 0 3 ifl
Gonad. sink, fund, 7a.......... 1914
Sou thw est E xt.—1st, 7a........1910
S t.L .M e r. B r . T e rm ., g .o s ,g u „ 1 9 3 0 *1 0 3 *4
Oin.d8pr.—l8t,C.C.O.dI.7a.l9ul *112 114
P acific E xt.—1st, 6 s ...........1 9 2 1 *119% _____ T e x a s & N e w O r l e a n s — l s i , 7 s . 1 9 0 5 n o
Oleve. Lorain d SVh.—1st, 5s. 1933
1 03* M o .K .d T ex .—1st, e x t., 5s, g .l 9 a 4 *80 _____
<
S a h in e D iv is io n , 1 s t , 6 s . . . . . 1 9 1 2 * 1 0 8
_______
Clove & Mah. V.—G d d . 5a ... 1938 119% 125
Mo.K.&T.of T e x .ls t,g u ,5 s .g .l9 4 2
80
C o n s o l . 5 s , g .............................
1 9 4 3
84
*9 4
Dei. Lack, d W.—Mon, 7 b___1907
135
K an sas C ity d P ., 1 s t,4 a ,g .. 1990 65
75
T e x . & P a o ., E . D .— 1 s t , g . 6 S .1 9 0 5
Syra. Bing, d N. Y.—lat, 7s. 1906 127"
D al. d W aco—1 st. 5 s ,g u ..,.1 9 4 0
T h ir d A v e n u e ( N .Y ).— 1 s t 5 s , 1 9 3 7
12 1
1 2 2 "4
Morria d EasexpS t, 7a....1 9 1 4
-la ‘
1.42% M issouri P a cific—T ru st 5 s .. 1917
89
T o l . A . A . & C a d . — 6 s .................... . . 1 9 1 7
Bonds, 7a............................ 1900 116 118
l a t co ll., 5s, g ............................. 1920 *
76
T o le d o A . A . & G ’d T r . — g . 6 3 .1 9 2 1
9 3
7a of 1871........................... 1901 117%
S t L .d l. M .~ A rk.B r.,l8t, 7 s .1895 105% ____ T o l . A . A . & M t . P i . — 6 s ..................1 9 1 9 ............
la t , eon., g u a r.. 7 s ...............1915 142%
M obile A Ohio—1 st e x t., 6s. ..1 9 2 7 115 ........ T o l . A . A . & N . M . — 5 s , g .............. 1 9 4 0
W a r r e n - 2 d , 7 a .................................. l a O O
113
St. L. & C airo--4s, g u a r ........ 1931
. . . . . . T . & O . C — K a n . & M . , M o r t . 4 8 . 1 9 9 0 ........... " 8 3 "
D.&H.Can.—Pa.Q)v.,coup.7 9 7 143
a.l l
M organ’s L a. & T.—1 st, 6 s.. . . 1920 114
T o l.P .& W .— 1 s t 4 s , in o .f’ d . o o u .J u ly
8 0
79
A lb an y d 8uaq —la t,g u .,7 a . 1906
129
1st, 7s............... ........................... 1918 125
U ls te r & D e l.— 1 s t, c o m ,6 .,5 s 1 9 2 s
a t, (
g e a r.,
1 0 5 3 t
...1 9 0 6 119
Nash. C hat. & St. L .—2d, 6 s . '1901
U n i o n P a c i f i c — 1 s t , 6 s ................. . . 1 8 9 6
10 8 %
Be
1st, oup. , 7fl.l9 2 1 141
108%
N. O. d . No. E.—P r. 1., g :, 6 s ,.1915 *106J ........
1 s t , 6 s ................................................... . . . . 1 8 9 7
r. T r a m v
one. 6i9, g . 1910
1 0 8 * s 1 (3 8 %
N. Y. C en tral.—Deb. g. 4 s___1905 103
l e t , 6 s ........................................................... .1 8 9 9
tropol. I
1 0 9 %
t,gu. iC.Gs.1911
.
1 0 9 ^
N. J . J u n e —G uar. 1st, 4 s .. . 1986 *100
C o l l a t e r a l T r u s t , 6 s ______. . . . . 1 9 0 8
9 6
H ...1828 *89
Beech C reek—la t , gold, 4 s .. 1936 *108
C o l l a t e r a l T r u s t , 5 s ____ . . . . . 1 9 0 7
.......
_____ r|T
75
r. A. 1911
21
Oew. & Rmae,r 2d 5 a ,g „ g u.i9 1 5
K a n s a s P a o ifio — 1 s t 6 s , g . 18 9 5
________
.0 9 * 3
5 68.1937 1 0 2 %
U h ca & B l. R lv.—is , g„ gu.1 92 2 105
1 s t , 6 s , g ................................... — . . . . 1 8 9 6
11 0% 111
___1897 1 0 4 %
. . N- Y-,,& P " ’ .—1st, g., 4 s .g u .l9 9 3
C . B r. U
P - F , 0 . , 7 s ................ 1 8 9 5
_ 1919 116 116% !.*,. Y. « w , wwu _
*, E lev ated—1st, 7 s....................... 108 108*4
N.
A t e h . C o i. A P a o .— 1 s t , 6 s . . . 1 9 0 5
38
4 0
....1 9 2 3 108 1 0 9 % N . Y . N . H . A H . 1st,
A t c li. J . C o . & W .— 1 s t, 6 s . . .1 9 0 5
4 0
_ 1920 115 1 X 7 ;N. Y, & N orthern—1st,re^ .4 s’ 1903 it
_
g. 5s..* 1927
125”
U . P . L i u . & C o l.— 1 s t , g . , 5 s . 1 9 1 8
_______ 1
38
....1 9 2 8 102 if 2% N. Y. Suaq. A W e a t,-2 d , 4 % i 1937 *....... .
O r e g .S , L .& U .N .,o o l.t r s t ., 5 s . l9 1 9
3 0
_ 1920
_
142
j Gen. m ort., 5a, g ........ .......... 1940
..............
82%
U t a h & N o r t h . — 1 s t , 7 s ____ _ 1 9 0 8
_ 1908 115
_
1 W llk .& E ast.—1 st,gtd.,g._ 1942
5s
93%
G o l d , 5 s ..........................................
1926 * 9 0
....1 9 1 6 1 3 7
. . . . . .
N orthern P ac.—D ivid’d scrip e x t
55
U ta h S o u th e rn — G e n ., 7 s . 1 9 0 9
| J a w e s R iv e r V al.—la t , 6 s . . . 1936 *25
E x t e r n , 1 s t , 7 s ................................ 1 9 0 9
6 4 *s
|
S p o k a u e A P a l . — 1 s t , 6 s ...........1 9 3 6
77
V a U e y R ’ y C o . o f O .— C o n . 6 s . 1 9 2 1
..1 9 0J *105
B t.P a u l A N . P .— G e n ., 6 a ..1 9 2 3
W a ba sh—
120%
..1901 104% 107
H n le u a A R e d M ' u - i s t.g ., 6 a . 1 9 3 ?
__T D e b e n t u r e , S e r . A .................... 1 9 3 9
*10
..1921
D u lu lli& M a iu to b a — ls l, g . 6 s l9 3 6

96

y.19131 .......
..1 9 2 1 * 1 1 0 %

*75

D u l.& M a n

D

a f c D

iv . - J g it lli?

G e n . 1 s t , g . , 6 s . . . . . ............

90
.1 9 3 0 * —.
.19 2 6 . . . . * 90
.19 2 0 '117% 118%
.19391 93
9334

193 8

C e n t.W u s liin g c o D - l8 t ,g . ,6 s '.1 9 3 8
N o r f o l k * . S o u c h ’ n — 1 s t , 5 s , g .1 9 4 1
N o r f o l k * W e s t.— G e n e r a l, t i s .1 9 3 1
N e w R i v e r 1 s t , 6 s .............................1 9 3 2

D e b e n tu r e , S e rie s

.......

C Td’Alene— 6s, gold.1916
ffiU
1st,

100
102
120

110
108

B ..................’

1939

D e t . <fc O h i o . E x t . 1 s t , 5 s . a . . 1 9 4 0
S t l .K .O .& N .— S t C .B d g e 6 s . l9 0 W e s t N .Y . & P a .,g e u .g . 3 -3 -4 s 1 9 4 3
I n c o m e 5 s ................................................... 1 9 4 3
W e s t.

V a. C . &

P itts .—

2 5 %

*9 7 %
105

2 6 *s

98
- --

17 %

1 s t, 6 s . l9 i i

109

112

W h e e l. & L . E . — 1 s t . 5 s , g o l d . . . 1 9 2 6
E x t e n s i o n & I m p , g . , 5 s ............1 9 ’ c
W i s . C e n t , i u c o i n e 5 s ........................ 1 9 3 7

le 4

______ lft

...... _ _ r
92
A E xt., 6 s . _________ ..1 9 3 4
............ 1 1 0
a re th e Latest q u o tatio n s m ade th is week.
t f o r M is o e U a n e o u * a n d U n l i s t e d B o n d s . —S ee 3 d p a g e p re c e d in g .
Im p .

m
m

48

THE

-Nov e m be r 23, 1895.]

No. of
banks.

A BSTH ACr FROM

1895.

CH RO N ICLE.

915

R E P O R T S O F T H E N A T IO N A t B A N K S M A D E T O T H E C O M P T R O L L E R S E P T . 2S, 1 8 9 5 .

Deposits.
Capital.

Surplus.
Individual, j

Other.

Loans t£ dis­ Gold and
Gold
counts. (Incl'u gold 0. H. Treasury
overdrafts.) certificates. certificates.

Silver.

Silver Ltg.tend,r8
Treasury t£ U. S. efts,
certific'les deposits.

$
8
2 ,6 0 4 ,1 1 6
82 11,1 21 ,0 0 0
f M L am e.............
1 ,3 9 9,19 2
5 .8 8 0 .0 0 0
50
8 N. H am p sh ire.
7 .0 1 0 .0 0 0
1 .6 0 1 ,4 0 5
49
« V erm o n t...........
55 5 2.2 5 0 .0 0 0 14,72 , , ’ 85
S B o s to n .............
3 Mas?*., o th er .. 213 4 4,892,500 1 5.015,559
5 ,1 2 i.Oc'4
58 1 9 .5 37 ,0 5 0
* B hode Islam 1.
7.761,004
82 2 2 ,3 9 1 ,0 7 0
z' C o n n e c tic u t...
i T o tal Div.Nu. 1 5 8 - 163 0 s 1,620 I s . 252 .54 5
i N ew Y ork C ity
50 50,95* ,60 0 4 2 ,1 2 6 .2 * 3
2 .1 5 0 .0 0 0
1 B roo klyn...........
5
1 .3 5 2 .0 0 0
1 .4 0 2 ,5 0 0
1.5 5 0.00 0
- A lb a n y .............
6
2 N. Y ork, other 273 33,084/ 40 11,420.412
7 .8 0 3 .0 0 0
2 N ew J e r s e y . . . 102 14,4 18.350
S P h ila d e lp h ia ..
41 2 2 .1 6 5 ,0 0 0 14,4 36 ,0 0 0
9 ,0 4 2 .3 1 8
30 1 2.009.425
• P it t s b u r g ........
* P e n n a ., o th e r . 340 40.1 5 J.650 19.2 *2.101
1 T o ta l Div.N o.2 447 175 6 :0 . ,6 5 I0 7 .5 a 4 .5 8 4
f D e la w a r e ___
9 7 7 .4 0 0
2 ,1 3 3 ,9 8 5
18
* B a ltim o re
22 1 3 .2 4 3 ,2 6 0 4 .6 6 2 ,7 5 0
- M a ry la n d , oth.
l,5i> 7.770!
4t> 3 ,8 1 1 ,7 0 0
1 ,3 7 3 ,0 0 0 .
2 W ashington . ..
12
2 .5 7 5 .0 0 0
1 0 0 ,0 0 0 '
2 O u t- C ol., oth.
2 5 2 .0 0 0
1
H V ir g in ia ............
37
2 ,8 0 3 ,5 1 7
4 ,7 9 6 .3 0 0
31
3 .2 9 7 .0 0 0
7 9 2 ,4 1 7
1 W est V irg in ia .
1 T o ta l D lvN o.3 It* 7 3 0 .1 0 9 ,2 4 5 12 ,2 4 6 ,a- 4
f N orth C aro lin a
7 8 0 ,4 2 3
27
2,71 Ud>00
( 8 o a th C aro lin a
77 *,876
18
1.9 is.* 00
' S a v a n n a h ........
2 2 3 .0 0 0
7 5 0 ,0 * 0
2
8 1 2 .2 5 0
| O eorgia, o t h ...
2 .7 6 6 .0 0 0
27
3 7 9 ,4 0 0
L F lo r id a .............
1 .4 3 5 .0 0 0
18
5 8 2 ,2 '4
2 A la b a m a ___
26
3 .4 8 5 .0 0 0
* M ississip p i___
380,
10
8 5 5 .0 0 0
a New O r le a n s ..
2,4 1.7,fO
2 .9 0 0 .0 0 0
9
3 2 7 .0 0 0
10
s L o u isian a, oth.
7 60 .00 0
0 4 5 .2 2 :
214 2 1 .3 7 9 ,7 3 0
s T e x a s ................
* A r k a n s a s ........
2 8 1,925
1 .2 2 0 .0 0 0
7 2 0 .9 0 0
j L o u isv ille . . . .
? 3 .6 0 1 .5 0 0
2 .5 7 9 ,0 9 6
| K en tu ck y, oth.
9 ,5 0 7 .9 0 0
| T en neeeee___
l,$t/7/**5
♦8 8 ,3 2 5 .0 0 0
1 T o tal Dlv J?o .4 *92 ) 61,6191130 17.062.9at/ C in c in n a ti. . . .
13
8 .4 0 0 .0 0 0
2 ,7 5 5 .0 0 0
4 Cteveiam d . . . .
12
9.300,00* j l .98 0 .0 0 0
2 O hio, o th er ..
222 2 7 ,7 4 5 .3 3 9
8.0 3,634
2 In&imuk...........
111 1 4.4 2 2 .0 I
4 .6 0 6 ,0 8 3
2 C h ic a g o . ..........
21 2 0 .9 0 0 .0 0 0 1 0,4 7 3 .7 0 0
5 flUixhta*, o th er.
199 l7,71,b (H >
6 .4 7 4 .6 4 6
. D e tro it.............
0
3 .6 0 0 .0 0 0
6 0 8 ,0 0 6
BS
a M lchlg'n.otJher
9,834,0410) 3 ,0 1 8,51 1
* M ilw a u k e e ...
5
3 ,2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ;
37 6 ,0 0 0
7e
S W isconsin,Oth.
T.220MN
1 .9 .6 .3 4 ►
1 T o tal Div.N o.5 7 5 6 .1 2 3 .4 4 2 ,3 9 9 * 0 ,3 5 7 ,9 1 9
Dea M o in e s...
2 3 6 .0 0 0
4
8 00 ,00 0
Io w a, o t h e r ...
163 1 2.6 3 0 ,0 0 0
2 .8 8 7 ,8 i 1
S t.P a u lA Viltir,
13
1,4* 4 ,5 0 0
9 .0 0 0 .0 0 0
M lnnee-ita.osh
9 4 4 .2 0 5
66
6 .0 4 5 .0 0 0
a S t. la m ia ..........
1 ,8 5 1.00 0
0 .4 0 0 .0 0 0
8
C 9t. Jito^vb........
1 40 .00 0
a
1 .1 0 0.00 0
S K an sas C ity .
3 .5 5 0 .0 0 0
ft71,OOo
* M tasourl, oth 'r
7 4 1 ,43 5
43
3 .6 1 5 .0 0 0
? K a n s a s .............
122
1 ,4 .0 ,0 7 4
0,0»7,HH*
> Omah s A U s e .
13
5 .1 0 0 .0 0 0
5 01 . OOO
| N eb rask a, oth. 104
1.2 M i.0 9 i
♦3.540.000
J North D ako ta
32
2,16ft .000
3 9 8 ,2 8 3
J South D akota
2 .0 3 5 .0 0 0
4 1 5 .4 0 0
33
T o tal Dtv.No.it J H * 7l,9 e7 ,tO O 1 2,8 92 .5 0 4!
< N e v a d a .............
2
2 *2 ,0 o 0
128,IM>
1 S a a F ran cisco .
2
3,50<MH>0< l^Oo.OOO
2 C a lifo rn ia , nth.
20
6 .0 2 5 .0 0 0
1 ,0 6 0 .4 0 0
g O regon...............
35
3 .3 7 0 .0 0 0
5 8 5 .5 9 6
£ W ash in gto n ..
4 .0 5 5 .0 0 0
1. 8 0 ,3 3 7
47
T Total D t» No,7 H i 1 6.3 3 2 .0 6 6
4 .2 .4 ,3 3 3
j A n i o u a . .. . . . " " r ft
*W,eOO
4 l.3»t> :
* C o lo rad o .. . .
45
6 ,4 3 7 ,0 0 0
1 ,7 1 4 ,8 5 6
* I d a h o .................
2 l.«7 .V
11
7 2 5 .0 0 0
* M o n tan a . . . . .
6 5 2 ,3 1 .
4 ,1 5 1 ,6 0 0
S N ew M exico .
8
1 45.500!
6 5 0 .0 0 0
* O k la h 'a A I. T.
13I,A00{
12
ISt. 0 .0 0 0
3 U t a h ...................
11
7 0 9 ,6 4 0 :
3, tiX ,000
5 W y o tn ln g ........
ID *,44s
11
8811.000
\ To h iD iv.W o S 129
3,770.*1»9

8
*
8
$
#
$
15 ,0 8 Q,963
8 84 ,81 3
2 2 ,1 43 .9 3 9
152 ,25 3
2 9 .0 7 0
122,357 1 08 .8 tO
3 1 9 ,2 5 3
4 0 8 ,4 3 6
8,3 6 7,61 -'
1 1.168,166
166 .76 2
99.17S 101,475
3 1 ,8 *0
206,181
4 9 8 ,18 3
46.932
1 2.S32.681
5 9 ,0 2 J
8 ,7 2 1 ,8 2 8
77,111
2 3 ,2 2 0
2 57 ,86 3
2 2 3 , 825 157,547,6*22 6 ,6 5 8 ,7 6 9 1 .9 6 0.06 0
1 12 ,09 7.0 17
19*2,159 1,952.27/ 7 ,03 8,008
7 8 ,7 8 8 ,7 9 0
9 0, a46 1 10 ,52 0,8 12 3 .2 7 5,19 8
533 ,51 0 612 ,95 9 1.9 9 2,06 6
2 32 ,50 0
6 6 5 .8 3 0
2 0,4 2 3 ,8 1 2
113,340 2 10 ,77 1
3 6 .8 0 0 ,9 9 6
85,8* 2
1 i 4 ,7 2 0
6 5 4 ,6 9 4
4 6 ,6 1 0 .3 LO 1,944,9,14
3 1,0 0 4 .6 3 0
1 38,03
3 5 \, 67
*210,619
3 79 ,07 0
756 ,23 1
2 7 7 .0 9 4 .5 8 8
976 .43 9 3 57 ,62 4,5 26 1 4,334,133 2 ,7 7 0 ,4 6 0 1 ,3 2 5.70 5 3 ,3 9 7 , 01* 11,2 24 .3 1 6
2 * 9 ,7 0 1 ,0 0 7 1 ,0 2 3,87 6 364,034,20,7 3/,0 6 1,66 5 9 ,3 6 7 ,7 0 0
5 92 ,82 3 3,7i9.2ftO 7 3,0 78 ,8 6 6
1 5 ,7 0 9 ,2 2 0
2 35 ,31 2
1 0,8 t»9 ,9i3
44,655 2 9,809 1 ,9 0 1,01 2
8 9,5 14
175 .00 0
4 2 2 .14 5
5 ,2 5 7 ,2 1 2
7, 5 5,332
21,314
3 2.748
3 0 1 .0 0 0
4 8,2 25
3*25.941
9 2,7 8 9 .5 9 3
5 19 ,87 9 450,695 2 .7 1 3 ,0 9 8
418 ,08 3
99,9 17 ,9 8 5 4,20 ,7*4
5 9 3 ,4 8 0
6 ,2 9 2 .0 0 0
*255,395
5 1 ,3 6 2 ,3 2 s 1, 83,7 3a
3 2 9 .0 i* 314.3^3 649 ,50 5 2 .1 3 4 ,7 5 7
9 0 ,7 9 7 ,9 2 9
9 7,0 0 8 .8 6 0 7 ,8 3 2 , W l
505,451 2,848.401 5 9 6 5 ,14 1
169,209
1 99 .05 0
34,084-,30 L
3 1 4 ,7 •
4 3 ,3 70 ,6 6 9 3 ,1 0 6,81 1
566,407 1,747.253
179,143
3 7 .:,1 0 0
837.551 i , 0 7 7 ,2 1 6 3 ,4 6 5 ,0 4 4
I t 8 .7 1 9 ,5 3 6
1 08.422,2: 7 5 .6 9 0,29 3
5 55 .53 0
2 78 ,78 9
7 03 ,45 5,6 14 2 .4 6 2 ,3 1 4 7 8 2 ,3 5 0 .6 0 9 6 0 .4 66 .4 5 9 11,893,871) 3 .1 6 .',14 1 9 ,5 5 2 ,6
9 2 ,2 3 : ,11 2
143.74ft
4 ,8 2 6,43 2
5 0 ,i» i
113,293
16/00
5 ,5 2 1 .6 6 6
44?836
129 ,59 7
2 .,6 8 V ,0 2
7 5,059 869 .21 8 1,500.*; 97
516 ,80 0
129,166
3 2.8 33 ,6 7 7 1 ,7 9 6 .8 -6
3 78 ,82 4
77,311
4 8 ,3 8 0
9 ,3 8 4 ,7 5 5
9,601,98.9
185,287
2 8 8 .60 9
0
334.981
9 t5 r9 ,9 7 8
3 7,727 4 1 2 ,7 1 s
0.8 7 7,39 *
6 5 5 ,»5 0
5 0 0 ,1 0 2
5 0.559
124,5 iO
7 95 .68 4
0 1 7 ,00 0
5 2,000
2 2,866
5 ,5 8 6
11,247
3 9,0 20
1 3 ,2 4 5 ,0 .7
8 2.8 50 18 1,78!
5 5 5 ,97 0
1 3 ,7 35 ,1 2 0
5 9 7 ,25 4
5 5 1 ,9 5
3 57/ 41
.-.Oi 6,475
8 ,6 8 3 .4 0 2
7 4,3 52
3 9 ,7 3 0
4 2,3 76
9 0.103
3 4 1 ,29 9
6 6 ,4 4 0 .0 3 0
79,489.891 3 ,6 9 4.991 1..-I67.3SU
9 1 1 ,92 0
37 1,060 1,8 9,5 1 8 3 ,3 7 4 ,6 6 5
318 ,2 '■
* ,6 5 0 ,6 1 6
6 7 .SOU
-.6,778
l o
0 4 .2 3 9
6 .3 1 4 .. r a
144 .06 3
129/ 93
5 1 ,9 *5
3 60
8 .5 7 5 ,4 6 7
130,»sO
5 ,7 8 5 ,3 0 1
6 0 ,6 6 6
154,589
16,000
5 64 ,46 1
15,0tn
1,2*7.01
•19,000
5 8,1 7 a
3 0 ,1 4 9
234/ 63
7 7 ,8 2 0 12.-,«8 5
4,7 JO
5,134,95*
6.8 9 .8 2 3
5 6 7 ,98 6
5 4 ,0 2 6
5 7,854
5 ,1 0 0
3 ,9 5 0 .1 3 5
, 2,378
109,178
3 ,“ 14,790
66.231
2 3 ,1 2 7
4 25 2 so
3 6,870
6,5 *9.3 81
5 ,6 3 6 ,1 7 2
9 .,0 1
7 5 ,2 7 c
8 1,4 12
2 4 9 ,03 3
0 5,1 22
10.500
5.3 8 6
19.1 *2
2 .0 0 8 .3 6 1
1 ,6 1 0,06
14*1,752
4 3 3 ,10 0
1 6 ,(5 9 ,0 8 4
177,630
8 3 ,9 7 s 9 * 1 .3 3 8 1 ,0 -3 ,2 6 0
1 3,9 37 ,2 5
1 .5 7 9 .8 9 0
7 0,4 79
260
•12.563
39,814
12,052
2 ,2 8 1 ,0 7 2
3 3 ,2 5 2 .6 0 4
197/-10
586 ,37 2 * 7 7 ,6 s4 1 ,8 9 1 ,2 6 8
3‘ii',O U
5 1, 8 8.6 10 1,3 0 0.2 to
7 8 ,7 1 8
2,3»»o
39,4*.i
22,2*21
1,7 *2.3 86
2.358,588 3,1 80
3 3 .s7 2
4 ,5 0 6 ,0 9 2
0 -1 ,9 7 .
5,0 0 0
445.055
6 57 ,32 5
8 .6 5 2 .8 7 9
2 5 .9 2 0
8 8,1 *1 1 1 5 ,5 *8
1 1 ,7 6 0 .0 3 3
472.51 U
19,3 85 ,4 9 4 ' 5 9 1 .55 5
•131,955
209,741
8 4 5 ,'1 7
165.325
1 3,6 68 ,1 2 k
121,17*
2 / 0 /0 8
1 8.310,795
8 35 .06 3
i0 7 .9 a 9 .ift9 1,087.4.«
1 * 8 .7 2 3 .6 7 “ 5 ,3 4 9 ,4 3 5 5 8 ,2 0 0 . 1 ,* 8 1 ,1 0 3 2 ,154.12c 6 ,2 3 3 ,9 0 2
1 *.86 s .72
2 0 . J3 8 .2 1 ■ 1 ,0 8 2 .7 . 7
3 2 7 .1 1 0
74,5,903
61,70s* 3 2 9 ,7 * 9 2 ,3 6 5 .1 1 3
2 0 3 .5 0 0
1 9.4 48 ,6 2 *
54.0*24
7 6 ,9 0
76,351
2 0,9 8 7 .1 5 2 l , 5.0 .823
721 500
* 5 3 ,9 5 1 1 3 0 . .56*. 2 .0 8 3 ,6 4 3
2 0 7 .7 2 0
6 1,0 *9 .11 1
5 3 0 ,3 .2
7 0 ,9 1 0 ,0 0 3 3 ,9 2 0.40 1
3 4,151.421
1 8 3 ,s !0
3 5 ,4 8 3 .8 5 3 .9 9 4,71 4
*287,191; 2 7 4 ,S20 1 5 8 2 ,7 3 3
101,771
3 7 0 ,7 0 7 2,166.0*24 9 ,0 2 8 .2 2 1
6 ,26 1 .1 2 8
600,194
9 3 ,3 * 5 ,0 5 “ 14.900,4 2 2 ,6 5 3 ,7 7 0
3 2 9 ,20 0
4 7,713 264
400,32*1 3 0 2 ,6 4 . 1 ,5 5 9 ,2 1 2
5 1,0 5 2 ,6 5 3 3 ,1 8 2 . 36
8 49 ,60 7
I I , . 0 2 .1 2
1*2,000
*277/ 80
66.84*1
75.6S7
16. U 4 .0 tU 1.1 14,682
6 8 1 ,8 3 3
2 6 .8 7 6 .5 3 9
5 3 ,9 2 0
201,2*2-2 1 3 ,7 3 s
9 1.045
29.7 31 ,1 0 7 1 ,5 * 7 ,3 3 0
6 5 7 ,3 :6
17,** 0,8 6 5
357,839
7 6,8 32 :
7 4,7 85
16,597,501 2 ,1 3 7 695
530 ,55 1
21,0 38 .4 2 7
1 4 8 ,1 -8 1 1 0 ,74 0
2 2,0 3 4 .7 9 8 1 .5 8 6 ,8 0 9
128 ,19 8
3 6 ,9 8 0
4 9 8 ,5 8 8
3 2 5 .5 7 0 ,4 * 6 ! 3 ,7 0 2.70 8 3 8 7 ,s9 8 ,0 8 3 3 4 ,9 8 4 .2 2 7 * ,0 o 7 ,7 'lo 2.13-2.088 3 ,8 2 7 .0 »7 2 0 ,3 6 8 ,7 7 9
7 0 ,9 * 7
1. * 2 6 ,5 4 i
2 ,3 1 1 ,0 3 0
3*2,63.
4 ,6 0
112,0*8
2 3,0 7 1 ,0 7 3
144,280
3 2 ,9 1 3 ,2 9 0 1 ,4 * 5 ,0 6 8
1 05 ,71 0
2 1 5 ,2 5 6 1 2 7 ,3b3
8 9 8 ,9 9 9
1 0,848,525
456.97-2 2 ,1 3 5 ,6 7 0 2 ,7 3 7 ,0 6 0
* 7 , 00
1 5 1 ,2 0 9
7 5,6 1b
6 35 .S03
1 5 .0 0 0 ,-0 *
4 1,807
102,216
5 7 ,2 3 7
9 8 2 ,4 9 5
1*2,910
1 6,6 37 .8 7 *
3 0 4 ,0 3 6
1 8 .0 02 ,5 7 0
3 2 2 ,76 0
5 1.2 57 016,1.73 3 ,2 0 4 ,6 1 5
475.O00
3 0 ,* 5 9 , <39 1 ,3 s 8 ,9 * 0
2 ,0 4 0 .2 U
44,959
1 60 ,73 2
3 ,7 9 9 ,7 0 7
10,560
2 7 ,e 6 6
7 2,703
1 6 .6 3 6
9.737,21**
9 * ,6 2 0
9 5.930
11,821,514
7 8 7 .0 2 0
0 5 .4 9 * 185,779
7 6 9 ,7 0 9
0 ,0 0 9 ,1 5 0
7 ,8 7 4.31 7
3 21 .86 5
1 1 ,9 1 0
7 1,4 78
4 5,418
2 3 4 ,20 8
10,8 27 ,/ 9 0
257.141
4 6 ,7 8 0
1 6 6 ,4 * 6 120.732
19,6*7,916 1 .1 0 8,*35
5 3 8 .53 9
9 ,1 7 0 ,3 0 0
106.307| 103 ,21 7
338,441
11,1 58 ,7 9 6 1,623,997
4 0 ,0 6 0
3 7 3 ,37 9
8 .8 1 7,81 6
7 8 ,4 9.
30,97-2
13,1 12 .5 6 b
5 3 ,0 8 7
7,1*00
214 ,29 7
5/201,200
1 2,260
*57,452
5 ,6 3 7 ,8 2 9
20,9991
13,585
148,199
2 0 s ,788
3 ,5 3 3 .0 3 0
2 4 1 .1 0 0
4,000
144,29*2
3 .5 0 8 ,9 5 2
2 7 ,6 8 5
2 9 ,8 * 0
173 821
1 37 ,8 4 5 ,1 4 * 3 ,0 * 0 .3 3 7 1 84 ,02 0,0 90 f i . 0 3 3 .1 2 2
7 0 4 .95 0 1,150,2/b 1 ,7 8 3,79 5 7,9v*4.349
47 7,989
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4,017
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3 0 .4 :5
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6 47 ,42 9
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3 2 ,0 9 0
3 0,6 20
7 ,2 6 2 .5 0 4 1 ,6 8 6.48 3
5 ,0 3 5 ,1 1 4
12 MOO
100,730
3 9 ,7 *2
1 1.326,184
15,000)
185,900
l ’* :7,454
11.588,144 1 .3 .0 ,8 0 1
123,745
15,535
8 .3 1 1 ,2 5 5
160
. 6.075
7 ,4 6 0 ,2 5 8 1,2 2 3,26 0
2 4,000
348 ,68 8
7 .6 5 9 ,8 8 0
7 4.0 02
2 3 .1 1 0
8 4.8 JO
4 3 ,3 6 9
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9 ,4 8 0.14 7
8 2 4 .5 * 3
3 8,300;
363 ,02 0 1 3 5 ,7 * 2
3 2 .7 1 0 .t2 1
6 1 5 ,2 .6
3 c, *35.482 5 .3 0 0 ,3 6 *
3 4 0 ,8 7 0
14,548
16.62.)
7 c 1,0* 1
2 .6 >5
6 *5 .4 9 3
126,904
1 2.412
1 91 ,85 3 1 19 ,60 c 1 ,1 7 2 ,5 3 6
403.6*.'4
1 9,8 *7 ,72 7 3 .6 5 5 .8 8 3
2*.35.3,860
8 6.1 70
1 .9 9 4 , -1*2
16,740
44.5*)4.
1 ,352.07*
18,615
2 08 ,31 5
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3 3 ,8 2 *
14,0 67 ,7 2 9
1 04 / '50
so , ,9 7
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808,631
1 0,000
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2 3,3 "tl
1 69,*61
1 ,6 * 2 , s0 8
6,917
1,947,121
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L'HE CHRONICLE.

9M
>

[ V o l . L X I.
Latest Gross Earnings.

Investment
AMD

JJsulwad intelligence.
RAILROAD

EARNINGS.

Th.- following table shows the gross earnings of United
H t a it s railroads (and a ls o a few Mexican and Canadian roads)
fo r the latest i s riod reported. The statement includes every

Roads.

Week or J/ol

1895.
$

-II

1895.

1894.

$

9

$

96,679
14,751,614
345,297
543,260
3,039,648
1,980.504
3 7,414 1 ,4 3 2,99 5 1,456,318
11,178
32,703
3,038
3 9 ,3 -3
3 0 6 ,7 8 l
585,274
3 1.2 43
4 ,802;
33,749
8.194*
3 85 .05 7
332,006
8 5,973 3 789 852 3,979,501
887.1 16
2 2.4 25
849.457
2 1 1 ,0 1 0
2 4,518
238,858
4,175
1,030,
10,844
8.1 SI | 4 5 2 ,74 9
356,456
2 4 5 .08 9
3,7 3 7
225,686
6,3 6 0
3 1 6 ,01 9
314,014
6 5.56')
9,1 4 3
62,363
6 ’ ,961 3 ,0 4 2,76 4 2,876,286
3 7.2 6 2
4 4.0 85
326,936
14 715
154,363
3 2 6 ,76 3 3 ,5 1 2 ,7 8 6 3,516,404
14.735
129 .14 0
152,881
2 7.083 1 .3 0 4,52 1 1,23 i.O i0
4 2 8 .07 0 1 6,9 99 303 16,723,139
5 8.916 2 ,8 2 4 ,4 .7 2,491,313
1 2,237
3 5 3 ,6 5 7
352,874
7 ,7 3 0
5 8,7 16
62,320
933
110.167
54,755
28,195 1,0 0.7 0 2 1,041,521
161 ,09 2 8 ,1 7 3 ,6 3 4 7,276.809
141.750 1 ,8 9 3 ,9 :0 1,581,002
82,901 3 ,8 1 8 ,1 5 1 3,667,399
5 6,174
518 ,65 3
472,682
5 1 .0 0 0 2 .7 1 7,37 1 2,644,516
14,265
4 0 1 ,8 2 <
405,250
3 9 .* 5 0 1 ,7 0 1,73 2 1,546.154

8 4 ,9 0 0
1 1.500
10,384
Humest’ nAHhen O ctober. ..«
Illinois Central. O ctober. . J2 , ,0 3 , 1“ 8 1,841,814 1 6,160.300
39 i , 143
10,634
11,214
Ind. Deo.AWeat. 1st w kN ov;
5 6 2 .44 7
56,744
4 9. 5 9
I lid. 111. A Iowa. Heptemb’r.
9 2,8 60 107.214 3 ,2 2 1 ,4 5 0
In.A G t.North’ u 2d wk Nov.
3 8.3 00
4 4 ,8 0 0 1 ,9 0 2.36 6
Unteroo. (Mex.i W kN ov. 2
12.0 >9,
4 ,3 0 0
19,607,
4 .26 M
10,741
9 1.209
3 1,1 26
24,973;
382
12,351
5.117
8.0 8 0
7,98Gj
71,651
39.251
19,2 V2
3 2 8 .26 0
7.337
3 1.4 49
427.495
6 0.837
18.209
7 ,9 9 0
5,8 9 0
31,5 3 9
190,014
1 8*,962
7 6.173
55,733
5 9.0 00
11.590
44.001
4 6 8 ,90 4 3 3 1 . 3 2 5
225,913 2 9 5 ,89 2
4 68 .00 0 461 .00 0
13,00b
11.000
4 9 1 .00 0 472 .00 0
6.744
7 .8 1 4
376,224 3 17 .99 0
93,000 10 3,170
470,814 425 ,99 8
1.883
2,112
32,6^5
3 0,0 62
10.675
9 .6 8
,185,304 3 ,8 3 6,23 0
,323,167 2 ,0 7 7,12 5
579.362 4 5 1 ,8 5 0
83,966
7 9.5 06
1 83 ,0 J5 156 ,34 0
2 50 ,43 7 232 ,33 8
4,002
3 ,8 9 5
5 86 .38 0 559 ,53 8
5 46 ,73 4 46 3,116
3,1 2 7
2,8 1 1
18,432
1 4,262
18,873
1 6,577
15,539
2 1,631
23,601
3 7.738
270.517 3 08 ,66 4
3 2 4 .02 6 2 97 ,72 5
P e n n s y lv a n ia ... Sep tem b’r. ,78 6 .5 39 5 ,4 9 8 .0 8 3
PeoriaD eo.A E v 2d wk Nov.
17,255
16,755
Petersburg........ S ep tem b ’r.
4 4,330
3 7,5 33
Phila. A E rie... S ep tem b ’ r. 4 17 ,60 7 3 92 ,40 9
Phila. A Read’g. Sep em b’r. ,9 J1.5 62 1.785.151
Coal A ir. C o... Septom b’r. 345.261 1 ,7 9 3,03 4
TotalbothCos. S ep teu ib ’r. .27 U,823 3 .5 7 8.18 5
Pitts.O.C.ASt.L O ctober. .. ,53 7 ,9 5 6 1 ,3 9 5,77 6
Pitts. Mar. A On. O c to b e r,..
4.6 1 5
4,259
Pitt.Shen.AL.E, 2d w k Nov.
1 2,504
10.425
PittBb. A West . 2d w kN ov.
3 4.747
3 0 .5 9 8
Pitts. Cl. A Tol 2d w k Nov.
1 6,280
1 5,8 30
Pitts. Pa. A F. 2d w kN ov.
6.941
9 ,0 3 7
Total system.. 2d w kN ov.
5 7,968
5 >,465
Pitt. Young, a a . O ctober. ..
191,939 1 5 5 .72 3
Qulnoy O.AK.C O ctober. ..
2 5,3 28
2 3 .2 7 6
Rich.Fr’ksb.AP. S ep tem b ’r.
5 5,0 59
5 1,6 12
Rich. A Peterab. S ep tem b ’r.
2 8,2 43
2 6.3 92
Rio Gr. South’n . 1 st wkN ov
10,361
7 ,6 0 4
Rio Gr.West’n., 2d w kN ov.
4 9,7 00
4 0 ,1 0 0
Sag.Tusoola&H. O ctober. ..
1 1,952
12,429
8ag.Val. A 8t. L. S ep tem b ’r.
7,3 3 5
7.4 0 3
8L L. A. A T . H 2d w kN ov.
2 6.8 20
3 2 ,5 0 0
8t.L.Ken’ etA8o. O ctober. ..
6.069
4 .1 7 7
8t.L.8outhw’rn, 2d w kN ov. 112,900 1 3 9 .0 0 0
8t. P aulA D u l’th O ctober. .. 2 1 2 ,44 4 1 5 9 ,72 2
San Ant. <s A .P . S ep tem b ’r. 223 ,44 2 2 6 5 ,39 5
S.Fran.AN.Pao. 1st w kN ov
13,381
13,257
Sav.Fia. A West. Sep tem b’r. 2 60 ,12 4 2 7 3 .32 6
Sner.Hhrev.A So 2d w kN ov.
8.338
9.1 8 9
Sllverton............ O ctober. ..
9 ,1 5 0
8,147

_
Io w a C e n tra l_ 2d wk Nov.

iron H allw ay... O ctober. .. I
ja ck . T .A K .W . Sep tem b’r. I
Jameat’n A L. £. Septom b’r.
Kana whaA Mich 2d wk Nov.
tTlsu road from which regular weekly or monthly returns K.C.F.Scott AM 1st wk Novi
c a n he obtained. The first two columns of figures give the K.C. Mem.A Bir. 1st wk Nov
gro»s earnings for the latest week or month, and the last two Kan.C. N. W .. . O ctober. ..
Kan.O. A Beat O ctober. ..
c o l n u n s the earnings for the calendar year from January l to K.
C. Pitta. A G ..
2d w k Nov.j
« » i l I n c lu d in g niioh latest week or month.
Kan.C. Sub. Belt 2 d w k N o .
Keokuk A West L t w k Nov
The returns of the street railways are not included in this L. £ rie ALLA So. O ctober. ..
L. Erie A W est.. 2d wk Nov.
Lehigh A Hud.. O ctober. ..
Jan. 1 to Latest Date.
Latest Gross Earnings.
Lex’gton AEast. S ep tem b ’r.
Long I Bland— O ctober. ..
Ho AIM
1890. I 1894.
1894.
\Wttknrilo 1895.
Lob. Ang. Term O ctober. ..
LouiB.Ev.ASt.L 2d wk Nov.
S
'
$
Igiuisv.ANashv. 2d wk Nov.
129,088 Louis. N.A.AOh.
15.935
1 ) 9 .6 3 '
18,423
A <Iron ia o * .. . . . SepU*inb*r.
1
397,913 Lou. St.L.A Tex. ‘2 l wk Nov.
386,113
46.767
51,068
A U . M lU au d .. Septeiub’r.
4th wkOct.
231,801 212.267 1,861.170 1.56^,234 Macon A B irm .. O ctober. ..
A llegheny V ai. Heptemb’r.
55,884 Manlstique........ O ctober. ..
68.4-4 .
5,919
1 1,682
A rk. M id la n d ... Septem b’r.
Atoti. T. A 8. F«s 2d wk Nov. 651,091 680.3 54 24,759,650 24,3 6,002 MempliisAChas 1 st wk Nov
tf46 5,267,342 tM exioanC ent.. 2d w k Nov.
S t. L. A S au F. 2d wk Nov. 119,061 127,303 &ia8v
79.4 ?9 3.225,613 2,716.699 Mexican Inter’l S ep tem b ’r.
74.162
A tlan tic A Pm j . l wk Nov.
A «g . to ta l.. 2d wkN ov. £ 4 4 .3 1 1 887,1 6 33,178,93 * 32,360,*>4 * IMex. National 2d wk Nov.
334,047 Mex. Nortnern.. Sep tem b’r.
327,778
41.386
45,057
AUMutivA W. P September.
13 7,980
4 7 9,9 rt
13,733
12,758
A llan . A DanV. 2d wk Nov.
R’ way W kN ov. 2
180.111 IMexlcanS o....... 4th wkOct.
182,0 J7
23.295
24.858
A n»tln A N’we«t SopM mb'r.
Mexican
4 6,322
50,606
H alt.Che*. A A tl. Heptemb’r.
Min neap. A St. L. d wk Nov.
B.A O .K a»tlsluc« October. .. 1.087,515; 1.635,595 14,4 <0,428 14,066,912 M.
St.P.ASSt.M . ..
O ctober.
WeAlorn L iu e- October. .. 555.500 519,815 4,(>08,411 3 ,8 7 9 ,-3 8 Mo. Kan. A Tex. 2d w kN ov.
2,243.015 2 .1 5 5 ,4 i 0 19,098,839 17,946,750 Mo.Pao.AlronM 2d wk Nov.
T o ta l..............October.
BaLAO. Sou’w “d w kN ov. 1 1,98-, 129,814 5,577,576 5,450.84*
Central Br’ch. 2d w kN ov.
537,»41
40,608
2 3,199
BangorAArooio. Heptemb'r.
68,532
Total ........ 2d w k Nov.
19,620
19,030
4.883
B ath A H aiu’ U'U Septem b’r.
4 .0 J3
A
17,72
17.598 Mobile A Birm.. 2d w kN ov.
B lr. A A tla n tic .. October. ..
3.042
1.654
Mobile
Ohio..
B rooklyn K iev .. 2 1 wk Nov.
36,310
3 2,120 1,816,379 1,501,650 Mont. AMex.Gif. October. ..
..
379 058 Nash.Oh. A St. L. O ctober. ..
380,285
43,961
Brum iw 'k AWe-t Soptem b’r.
49,00 7
ctober.
Baft. Koch..tr I’n t 2d wk Nov.
6 1,826
61.74 < 2,627,367 2,33 <,570 Nevada Central. O u g u st---A
Hufr.il>' A 8ut*<i . Soptem b’r.
48,420
30,171
N. Jersey A N . Y. S
B ar.C .K ap .A
lo t wkN ov 130,330
76,641 3,688,814 3,157,271 New OrL A S o ’ u. Oep tem b ’r.
..
757.208 N. Y .C .A H . K.. O ctober. ..
Camden A A tl.. S ep tem b'r.
94,647
819,838
86,682
C an ad tan l’ aclfi* 2 1 wkN ov. 5 08,00» 437,00- 15,y08,539 16,198,956 N. Y .L. E. A W.. J uctober.
l y ............
4 -,6 2 5 N .Y .Pa. AOhio.
41,302
C a r.M id la n d .... October. ..
6,696
7,220
J u u e ..........
Cent, of G eorgia Heptemb'r. 4 6 l , *37 456,210
C en tral of N .J .. Soptem b’r, 1,181,218 1,027,007 9,507.919 9,059,100 N .Y .O nL A W ... 2d wk Nov.
N. Y. Susa. A W S ep tem b ’r.
C en tral P acific. Heptemb'r. 1,221,391 1,318,628 9,539,748 9,618,696 Norfolk A West
303,356
C hariest*nA S*v. J u n e ..........
58,282
361,766 N.Ttho’ru (Ga,). 2d wk Nov.
47,999
Cheraw .A D a ri.. 'Sep tem b’r.
12,151
80,744
59,670 North’n Central S ep tem b ’r.
9 .04
Ghee. A O hio— 2d wk Nov. 207,561 190,416 8,375,027 7,911,347 North’n Paoiflc Sep tem b’r.
Chee.O. A So. W .. October. . I 240.861 231,629 1,967,261 1,756,541 Ooonee A West. 2d w kN ov.
S ep tem b ’r.
Chic. Bur. A No Sep teiub’r . 1 211,423 225.689 1.297,321 1,301.550
Chic. Bur. A Q .. Sep tem V r. 3.098,106 i.8 2 9 ,-4 6 22,565.UO l 23,380,722 Ohio R iver........ 2d w kN ov.
Ohio Riv.A Cliafr
C hic.A Kant. i l l 2dwkN ov.|
8 -,* 6 6
88,664 3,313,653 2,910,859 Ohio Southern. O ctober. ..
:9d w k Oct.
Chicago A E ric J u l y ............ 187,149 158.533 1.350,3*5 1,234.124
*
L.
Chlo.G LW eat’n 2d w kN ov.'
90,317
71.235 3,49 *,014 3,196.503 Omaha A SL Co. M arch ........
Oregon Imp.
Sep tem b’r.
Chic. M ll.A S t.P . 2d w kN ov. 852,569 564,410 26,153,937 24,“ 1 2 ,-1 4
Chle.A N ’thw ’ n. October. . 3,774.590 2,905,333 25,801,245 24,573,940 Pacific M ail___ Sep tem b’r.

C hlc.P eo.A 8L L kd wk Nov.
20.163
810,712
701 ,27 0
20,226
Chlc.K’k L A P October.
1.710,795 L,617,150 12,676,208 13,737,043
C nlc.8t.P.M .AU. Heptemb’r. 8 4 L 1 9 6 703,487 4.974.022 5,2', 6,133
Chic. A W . Mich 2d w kN ov.
29,774
29,982 1.512.023 1,388.291
Cln.G a. A Porte. October. ..
6.592
6,667
55,407
58,055
Cln. A Kent. 8ou. Septem b’r.
796
8 >4
C ln.Jaok.A .Mac 2d w kN ov.
14,774
12,314
546,793
517,878
Cln. N.O. A T. P 3d wk Oct.
70,000
72.000 2,876,000 2,699,000
A la.G t.S o u th . 2d w kN ov.
44,373
5
34,782 1,342,5 < 1,230,867
N. OrL A N. £. 3d wk Oct.
38,000
29.000 1,028,206
866,862
A la. A Vlckftb. 3d wk Oct.
14,000
395,723
14.000
396,003
V icks.Sh. A P . 3d wk O ct
14,000
14.000
400,408
404.184
E rlonger S ysL 3d wk Oct. 175,000 160,000 5 ,8 8 7,33 7 5,451,049
Cln. Porta. A V . October. . .
28,401.
25,465
228,260
2 1 1 ,104
Clev.AkronAO o A u g u s t ....
82,620
73,096
598.106
567,346
C le r.C a n .A 8 o .. 4th wkOct.
2 4,314
558,651
23,381
505,543
CLCln.Ch.A8LL 2d wk Nov. 277,567 273,830 12,170, *92 11,095,563
Peo. A E ast’n. I at w kO ct.
39,816
32,916 1,494,373 1,196,179
GL Lor.A W heel 2d w kN ov.
36,065
27,656 1,262,008 1,089,126
OoL M id lan d — October. .. 175,000 150.946
OoL 11. V .A T o i O c to b e r... 304,766 307,810 2 ,1 4 7 ,0 :6 2,245.598
Col. Sand’y A H l» t wk Nov
18,573
15,154
795,893
694.681
C >iuaa A L ake .jO ctober. ..
2,400
1,700
16,420
18,359
C *T »tal..................A u g u st___
1,196
772
5.089
6,694
Cumb’l’d V alley. Heptemb'r.
81,679
80.247
622.895
583,986
D env. A Klo Or 2d wk Nov. 164,400 150,800 7,047,654 6,495,779
D et.L ans’gANo. 2d w kN ov.
20.565
22,021 1,003,439
945,805
I>et. A M acklu ac Septem b’r.
24,510
15,589
285.068
188.198
D ul.A Ir’nR ange sep ten ib ’r. 305.896
1,809,820 1,259,211
D ulutho.S.& A U .11at wk Nov
33,670
31,063 1,543,838 1,471,233
E Lfln.Jol.A E aat,O ctober. .. 131,395 107,164
932,567
858,646
E urek a Sp rin gs. Heptemb’r.
5.021
6,651
49,545
51,442
E ra n a .A in d ’pllf 2d wk Nov.
5,272
5,674
249,677
247.065
E van*. A Rich. |2d w kN ov.
2,540
2,456
97.1 14
92,583
B ra n sv . A T. II. 2d wkN ov.
23,778
23,308
958,006
911.065
F itch b u rg ............ Sep tem b’r.
680.077 653,789 5,412,137 5,094,93 L
F lint A P. M am . 1st wkN ov
48,318
44,679 2,140,887 2,054,059
FLW ’thADen.C. A u g u s t ...
73,629 113.731
FLW . a Rio Or. 2d wk Nov.
12,600
15,071
3*31,4*2*8
307,102
G ads. A AtL 0 . . October. ..
940
576
7.444
5,404
G eorgia R R ........ 1 wk Nov.
2d
3 3,793
34,127 1,108,774 1,131.250
G eorgia A A la . 1 th wkOct.
14,700
13,337
381,395
356,185
®**GaPla A No jSep teiub’r.l
57,876*
58,5861
484.067:
488,387
Geo. So. A F la .. IOctober. ..
82,3261
80.882*
677,486
714,459
Or. Kan. A Ind 2d wkN ov.
38.324
37,237 1,819,263 1,662.144
Cln. R.A FLW. 2d wk N ovJ
8 ,5 8 0 (
8,854'
3 89.22 S
357,703
fr a v e rs e C ity . 2d w kN ov.
671
594
38,903
40,627
M us.G . R. A I 2d wkN ov.
2,0121
1 ,9 3 5 1 105,096
92,825
ToL a ll lln e * 2 d wk Nov.
4 9,587
4 8 .0 :0 2,352,490 2,153,299
G rand T ru n k .. W kN ov.16 392 .22 4' 403,325 15,941,009 15,958,774
Ohio. A G r.T r.j WkNov. 2
58,0431
54,997 2,313,597 2,284,888
D eLG r.II.AM WkNov. 2
2 1 ,3 1 1 1 20,117
816,001
851,966
G reat North’n I 1* ? ’
M . O cto ber,. . 12,095,474 1 ,7 6 7,37 7 1 11,461,135 9,593,768
E ast of M Jn n .1
October. . J 266,176 223,772' 1,258,964
974,313
M on tan av-en tO ctob er.
157,954 156.818' 1 .2 7 7 ,1 8 7 1,236,953
«
(October. . 2 ,5 19,604 2,147,967 13,997,286 11,805.034
° ct<,ber- ••!
6.898 5,204
3 6,109
3 4,540
Hoos.Tnn.AWU. October. . .
5,4451 4 012!
4 8,6 43
34,202
Houa.fc.AW.Tex 3d w k O c L 1
19,012) lGlsQoi
451,212
333,899

Jan. 1 to Latest Date.

1894.

8o. Pacific Co.—
Gal.Har.AS.A Sep tem b’r.
Louis’aW est. S ep tem b ’r.
Morgan’ sL AT S ep tem b ’r.
N.Y.T. A M ex. Sep tem b’r.
Tex. AN. Orl.. Septom b’r.
Atlantic sys.6. S ep tem b ’r.
Pacific system Sep tem b’r.
Total of all.. Sep tem b’r.
Affiliated lines Soptem b’r.
Grand total. Septom b’r.
So. Pac. of Cal S ep tem b ’r.
8o.P ao.of Ariz Sep tem b’r.
S o.Pao.of N.M S ep tem b ’r.
Northern R y.. S ep tem b ’r.
8outhem R y ... 2 dw k Nov.
Staten Esl. R. T. Septom b’r.
etonyCl.ACM t.. Septom b’r.
Summit Branch. Sop tem b’r.
Lyk. VaL Coal Soptem b’r.
Tofc’l both Co’s O ctober. ..
Texas A Pacific. 2d w kN ov.
Tox.8.ValAN W O ctober. ..
Tol.A.A.ANo.M. 2d w kN ov.
Tol. A Ohio Cent 2d w k Nov.
Tol. P. A West. 1st w k Nov
ToL St. L .A K .C 2d w k Nov.

4 2 3 .4 9 0
8 2.173
4 26 .03 0
2 2 ,9 4 9
1 37 ,24 2
,11 2 ,6 12
2 .977,391
4 .090.003
6 15 ,17 2
,7:4,78-*
9 31 ,27 7
168 ,61 1
8 0,073
193,831
423 .68 3
135 ,98 7
4,457
9 8,7 64
6 6,1 90
202 396
169,149
3.4 5 0
2 1,055
4 0 .5 9 0
2 0.822
44 311
Q a t e r A D e l_ S ep tem b ’r.
_
39 r 6*
Wm a sh . . .
b
2d w k Nov. 2 4 4 .6 5 2

9 ,5 7 9 ,6 6 9 8,783,505
19,4 25 ,6 1 2 18,730,104
510 ,59 9
673,316
19,936,211 19,403,420
2.742,6*26 2,598.094
1 ,0 1 6,02 7
914.777
3 ,9 2 1 ,8 7 1 3,798,675
1 6,533
17,682
247,377
26 1.327
77,557
7 0,495
3 6,1 16 ,2 9 6 34,315,493
1 4,693,797 13,761,192
3 ,1 3 1 ,7 9 7 2,552,623
3 ,2 3 J, 202 3,299,753
1 ,6 1 1,54 1 1.363.186
8 ,2 48,9 > 8,9:4,706
6
3 5,7 99
39.836
4 ,7 0 6 ,6 4 7 4,353,376
1 6,555,109 14,547,453

1 *,134

22,773

626.522
7 4 5 ,7 7 6
134,3 J4
1 4 9 ,90 2
554.325
5 7 9 .2 9 4
121,285
6 7 ,3 3 0
2 ,4 0 9 ,9 4 5 2.846,066
3 ,2 7 8 ,5 * 4 2.862.186
46,8 *6.673 42.244.641
737,292
7 8 6 ,09 2
4 0 6 ,39 1
398 314
3 ,1 0 3 ,3 2 2 2,887.264
15.456.69j 14,657,363

1 6 ,6 *7 ,6 3 5 15,248.132
3 2 .1 0 4 ,3 3 1 29.905 515
1 2 ,6 60 ,3 8 9 11,754,947
29 104
3 6.3 28
405 233
5 3 9 .59 4
1 ,4 9 9.2^ 8 1,232,107
578.765
7 5 1 ,43 5
297,8 43
3 0 6 .48 3
2 ,6 0 1 .6 4 9 2,151,519
985,414
1 ,4 8 0 ,5 2 4
197.698
2 15 919
521.644
5 51 ,6 0 0 ,
250,906
2 5 4 ,91 9
3L
1,558
3 61 ,23 8
2,065.9£ 8, 1,840,335
101,148
9 7,2 93
61,006
6 3.1 T4
I,
11,157,868
38 .59 5
3 4 292
23 554
4 .2 7 0 ,6 3 4 3,964.903
1 ,2 7 4 .4 1 6 1 204 987
1 ,3 9 6.17 8 1,226,742
722,715
7 0 8 .22 1
2 ,4 * 3 ,4 8 9 2,827,361
268.0.M
2 8 8 ,6 4 7
41,083
5 6,2 88

4 1 9 ,5 0 7 3 ,3 4 3 ,6 0 7 2,9^4,969
1 0 J .3 0 0
7 6 2 ,3 - 9
902,080
5 0 1 ,41 3 4 ,0 1 5 .3 3 9 3,955,070
2 9.3 47
170,785
178,584
139 .40 3 1 ,1 9 0 ,5 * 0 1,102,532
l,2 2 6 ,0 7 o 9 .6 3 6 351 8 977,942
3 ,0 ^ 7 ,4 2 1 23 691.011 22,838 937
4 ,2 5 3 .4 9 7 3 3.327,391 31,816,879
763,654 4 ,0 5 4 ,5 1 0 3,819,760
5.0 0 7.15 1 3 7 ,3 81 ,5 1 1 35,636,639
7 92 705 7 ,6 4 9 ,6 7 3 6,638.537
196 ,67 9 1 ,6 0 6 ,5 2 6 1,478,364
8 1,4 45
671 151
7 7 3 ,9 8 9
220,271 1 ,4 4 3 ,4 4 3 1,586,256
4 07 ,63 3 1 5,853,505 15,412.979
9 3,6 64
9 4 6 ,5 0 4
843,756
4,9 5 3
3 6,7 01
38,650
7 7,7 06
8 57 ,41 5
670.941
7 9,0 74
602.512
5 14 038
2 23 .4S 9 1,5 7 3 847 1,496 942
2 22,19
5 ,6 4 9,92 1 6.003,116
6.1 8 9
3 2.3 59
36.897
2 0.055
926,602
9 6 6 ,91 1
4 4 ,0 6 6 1 ,5 8 1 .1 9 8 1,580,064
16,865
8 3 8 ,34 3
756.343
4 2,3 02 1 ,6 3 1,660 1,395.099
40 164
319 ,15 4
320 074
2 3 1 ,9 7 5 I I .
1 0 .7 .oi>l
0 1 3O-J3.’?

THE CHRONICLE,

November 23 1895.j
;

L a test G ro ss E a r n in g s .

B olds
'■W e e k o r M o '

U nion P a e i a e On. P a,'. R R ,,
O r .S .I .A D .H
8 t .J o a .i a d .l e
K a n -C .iO m
T o t J L J .A G .I .
C e n t.S r ......... a

~

1891.

1 to L a te s t D a te.

1895.

W
’th&D.C. sk-ptoinb'r

W a o o A S o rth w . ;Septeinb*r.
West Jer m g ....... Septolttb’r.
W .V .C en.A P itt* O cto b e r, ..
W est V * .* Pitts A iiK U .it....
W estern o f A la., S ep tetu b’ r
Wort. M aryla nd . iB ep tem i/r.
W est. if . V. A Pa 2.1 wit N ov .
W heel. A L, Erie 2d vrk N o r .
W iscon sin Cent. 1st wit N ov
W rU h tsv .A r » n ;O cto b e r.

2 5 1 823

73 «29

38,209
158,789
107,122
35 213
52,551
135.301)
70 200
29 950
99,865
9,721

917

l* f wee* o f N o v e m b e r .
St. J o se p h A (Id. Isla n d .

• Harare* < iv eo d o n ot Inclu d e O regon Rj-. A S itr., Uu. Pae. D e n v e r A

On If, D en ver LeadvtU e A Ottanuton, M o u U n a Union e n d L eav en w o rth

» Includes Saratoga from ferries, etc., not jrt tea separately. j Mexi­
can oomner. c taeindes only half of does m wiiton union Paotllo has
a elf Interest.

Alabam a, t it. S o u t h e r n ...
A ton. T o p . a » s n . r e — .
fit. L ouis A su n FT.........
A tla n tic A P a e lfle ,..
A tla n tic A O nnvti « ____
B u t a u u o b o a ta w e e t
B r o o k ly n E le v a te d ...........
B ttffaxo Root). A P t m b ’g.
C anadian P a o lb e ............. .
Cbssepe& ice A O h io .........
C h ica go A Ka*S- UUliOia
C h ica g o ttre a t W estern..
C h ica g o MUW. A » t , P aai
Cain. f w n » A 8 1 Louis
Okie, A W est M Ic b lk a n ..
Cln. J a ck so n A M acm n sw
C lev, taut. Clue. A 8t. L -.
O U r e . L orain A W b e e iy . •
D en ver A R io O r a n d e ,.,,
D e tro it L a o s '* A N o rth 's
R v a a sv A tw U anapoU s
E v a n s ville A R ich m on d .,
ffr a a s v . a f e t r e H a u t e ..
P L W orth A R ib G ra n d e.

Qebrgfa................... .

a r e n a R ap id* A In d ia n a
c m . R ich. A PL W ayne
T ra v e rse C ity .................
M ia . O r. R apid* A l i d .
Orasia T ru n k o f' 0 » b «mi* .
t n te ru 'l A a t . X e r t n 'n . . .

f e n central.......

K an aw h a A M M k u . . -,
K an. C ity PI t u b . A O u lf
K a n ,C ity A Suburb, B elt
t a k e E rie A W se ta ra .. . . .
le n d a v . R y a n s * * 88. L
DwolevUlk A N a e b v u i* ...
U m t M , S . .Albany A C h ic .
Mr « lean C e n tra l...............
M a t te * * N a u o a a i.............
Mtu n e*p ol;» A St. Lotil*
M o. M m a m t A f e t a * ____
Mo. P a cto e A Ir o n M s ....
C en tral B ra n ch ......... .
Mm-tie A B irm ingh am
I * v f o r * ( m l A W est'*
N o rfo lk A W estern, ____
N orth ern f a c ia ls ,............
O h io R iv e r ............................
P eorta D e c. A E r a o e r ...
Piste, sh ed . A U Erie . . .
P lttsb u r* A W estern----- R io U f » M e W e s te r n . . . . .
St. L em * AIL A f Haute.
8 t L o a i* B ooth w estern ,
Bbertnau ttbreve, A S o ..
S ou th ern R a ilw a y _______
T ara* * P a c .n o .................
T o L A n n a . A X. Mt- n ..

T oledo A (Jbio C en tra l .

l o l . a t, L. A K an . C it y ...
W abash. .. ............. . . .
W estern » . T. A P a n s ...
W h eelin g A U » E r i e ...

T o ta l (6 5 ro a d k i........

189 4.

41,373.:

39,7*2

1 2 ,7 5 -!
1 * 1 .6 8 7 1

0 -0 ,3 5 4
127.303!
79.480,
I. 1,733
12 0,91 4'
3 2 .1 2 0
6 i ,7 » 3 '
43 7.00 0
19-*.410,

651,1)9 L
H 9.601
74.102!
30,4*0;
e 3,326-:

SOLDO!)
207,661
83..S68

90,317

8 5 2 ,5 0 9
2 0 ,1 0 3
29,77 i
1 *,774

277,567
3 0 ,IK ..
16 4,40 0
20,58.•>
5,2 7*

2.510

23,77s
12,606

33,793

38,321
8 .5 10
671

2.012

392,32*

92,860
43,059
10,741
12,35
5,117
71,054

8 1 .449 ,

427.4*5
0 0 ,8 4 7

H jJ ft
44.001

245.31.11

40MOO1
677*4
81,960;

250,497.;
54 6 .7 4 4

18,-432!

17,2551

43,5.) 4,
5 7 .9 6 8

i!>,70«i

26,420;

n'J.auo;
•iMi
4 2 3 ,6 -a

1«9,149'
*21.055

40.390
44 .3 4C
24 4,052

70.200
29,950,
7 ,9 6 0 .6 4 5

08,664

71,235,

604,410'

Increase.

12.314

* 7 3 ,0 .id
2 7 ,6 5 0
1 5 0 ,8 0 0
2 3 .6 *1
5,87 s
2,4 3 a
23.30.0
15,071
3 4.127
37,'237
0,3 4
!<94
1,933
403,425
107,214
3 7 ,4 4 *
8,1 94

Decrease,

*

4,591

4 ,2 .0

29,263
8,24 i
5.327
075
7,827

1,884

71,0416

17,! 43
302

10.0*2

288,119

2 0 .228
2 9 ,0 8 i\

63
3 .4 6 0

204

3.7J7

8,409

13,601

84

47l

1.0R5
77
77

402
2.471
334

™ 274

11,101
14,354

4,615

2,547

*.l»l

4 ,1 7 0
1,3 40
3,6-43
4,3 00

39,9111

'Tjriil

3.7.17
87 .981
2 7 .043
4 2 i ,o ? o
10 4,00 2

82,901

3si,-i50
2:13,892
4 0 1 .0 0 0
I I.
7,0 4 4
79.5061
21 2 ,3 3 8
40*., 4 ill

14,242'
1 6 ,755 '
lo .4 2 j;
5»,4eS|
4 0 ,1 0 )
3 2 ,3 0 0
1 3 9 .0
'

9,109

685

29,922

"iTfs'i
" 7.600
S.Ooo
01)0
4 ,4 6o

" 0 .7 2 3
89,979

*T,ioo

19,139

8 1,319

4,1 70
50 0
2,071)
2.5 0 3

9,000

5,600
3 6 ,100

4 0 7 .0 1 1
2 2 2 ,1 9 3
2 0 .0 5 5
4 1,000
42.3U2'

16,050

231.373

851

12,877

6 9 ,1 0 0
25,315;

1,100

7 ,5 5 3 ,1 4 7

T,oou

5 3,6 44

"a ,vie

2,039;
4,63 1

658.038

24 9,94 0

4 0 8 ,1 9 9

* * t laensaaa (5 4 1 p . s . '. .

For tb« first weak of November our final statement cover*
70 road*, and show* 8*86 per cent gain in the aggregate.
le t w eek

>f S m m n b e r ,

P re v 'ly re p orted (09 r'd*)
D u lu th 80, S h o w A A l l ..
In d ia n * D ecatu r A W ert.
K * n . o t t y t n , a , A M em ,
K a a . 0 . Mata. A B lrtu—
K « o » k A W eateeii. . . . . . .
M einpm e A C harlertun .

1895.
*
8,3.50,3 i'U
3 3 ,6 7 0
a s 307
11,214
9 1 ,808
31.121
8.0 66
3 1 .5 1 -

In crea se.

$
16,501

$

42

D eere, se.

8

2()th of the month. Beside* the roads furnishing monthly
return*, we have addui this time the road* which make quar­
terly returns.
T h e
u n d er

r e tu r n s

o f

th e

a sep a ra te h ea d

Latest (irons Earnings fcy Weeks,—The latest weekly earn —see p a g e 9 t l .
ingu tn the foregoing are separately summed up as follows:
For the second week of November our preliminary statement
Send*
iso n
P uosy
a
covets 65 roads, and ehowsVtl ter cent gain in the aggregate A d dJ u ly A to eSopt. lv ’0 ___
l
3
over the same week last year.
Jan. 1 10 S ep t. 3 9 ___
1893.

1894.

$
16,93i
13,3 s i
8.9 4 0

- __ r
13,257
12i
10,1 84 ,6 1 0 10 .6 6 7 ,5 2 9 San F ra n cisco A No. 1’ ac.
11,304
2 ,3 5 5
3,809,5711 3 ,6 1 8 ,2 6 3 S herm an Shrave. A S o ...
136,396
001.189
8 9 5 ,6 4 1 9 2 .7 7 3
T o ta l (7 9 ro a d * )_______ 8 .6 31.8 0J 7 ,9 2 3 ,9 2 8
19.051
88.805
560,102
771.307 S e t in cre a se f8 '8 8 p. o .i.
70 2 ,8 7 5
510.599
673.310
195,123
277.907
Net E iraings ttoutlilf to Latest Dates,—The following
15 770 117 18,906.296
203,257; 2.178,065 1,996,281 shows the gross and net earnings to latest dates of all S tsaml
113.731
railroads furnishing monthly statements. The compilation
171,211
36.039
113 918
118.529 1,31',612 1,212.203 include* every road from which we can get returns of this
93. 22
920,669
818 920 character and in that form is given once a month. Early re­
31,293
242,.-9-1
213 356
50,570
305,573
367,922 turns art published from week to week, as soon as issued, but
133,517
065,919
938.903
69,100 2.872,233 2 719,170 for the convenience of our readers all the roads making re­
25.315 1,157,403 1,07*,695 turns are brought together here in the week in which we pub­
93 9 - 8
6 9 .8 0 2
8 135
6 5 .1 8 0 lish oui monthly article on net earnings—say on or about the

T o p e k a A 8octth w estern.
a rb e e e # * u re s in clu d e resu lts out e a sed lin e * .

2<f week of Sotember.

1895.

1891.

*

Septem ber.
S ep tem b 'r.
S epteaiti'r.
S epterab’ r.
1st w k N ov
2d w k N o v .

i& g a J S fjI s e p to V r .
G r'd t o ta l.'* Septem ber.
U .F a o. 1 ) . A Q S ep lem b 'r.

Ft

18 9 5 .

Ja n .

1894.
7 ,6 0 2 ,8 0 0
8 1 .0 6 3
4,0.416
10,03 4
8 3 ,972
2 2 .4 2 5
0 ,3 6 0
2 8 .1 8 5

D ecrea se.

87 2,90 3
2,61/1

C
185,304
"6,1*14

680
5,235
8,701
1,720
3,3 43

s tr e e t
a t

r a ilw a y s

to e

g iv e

b y

th e m s e lv e s

th e ex trem e etu i o f th ese ta b u la tio n s

-arose Earnings.-

1895.

1894.

$

$

l a .9 0 i

5 3 ,6 1 3
1 8 ,423
1 1 9 ,8 3 7
5 1 .0 6 8
390,11 !
1 4 8 ,3 0 3
2 3 1 .6 0 1
1 ,8 8 4 ,1 7 0

2 2 ,1 2 2
6 0 ,9 3 6
1 5 ,985
U 9 .0 3 8
4 6 ,7 6 7
397.1) 13
12 7,44 9
2 1 3 .2 6 7
1 ,5 6 7 ,2 3 4

A d ir o n d a c k ...............Sep t,
J a n . 1 to S ep c. 3 0 ___
A laba m a M id la n d .. .Kept,
Jan. 1 to Hop-- 3 0 . . .
J u ly 1 t o . 9 ~ i t . 3 0 . . . .
JUlekheny V alley ..S e p t .
Jan 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
A im a p. W ash. A H a lt.—
J u ly 1 t o S ep t. 3 0 . . . .
1 9 .2 5 9
1 7 ,9 8 0
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
4 3 ,0 7 5
4 5 ,0 0 3
A rkansas M id la n d . . Sep t.
11 ,842
5 ,9 9
Jan. I to Sept, 3 » ___
8 8 .1 7 1
5 4 ,8 3 4
A L T . A S , P# . . . b .S ept. 2 ,3 4 0 .1 0 4 2 ,4 1 1 ,4 5 4
Jan. 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . 8 0 ,4 7 7 ,6 5 2 1 9 ,9 7 2 ,*81
J u ly l to Sep t. 3 0 . . . 6 .8 0 7 ,5 2 0 0 ,4 5 1. 6 13
8t. L, A San P r .b .S e p t .
5 3 9 .3 5 9
5 5 8 ,9 8 0
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 , . . . 4 ,3 1 3 ,0 7 8 4,3 13,537
J u ly 1 t o Sept. 3 0 . . . . 1 ,5 5 0 ,5 3 3 1 ,5 9 5 ,8 5 8
A H a m lo A P ao. b .S ep t.
2 9 0 .5 0 9
2 3 9 ,7 1 4
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 ' —
2 ,7 5 2 .8 9 1 4 ,9 7 8 ,6 4 7
Ju ly i to Sept. 3 0 . . , .
a 7 7 ,0 3 l
7 J 5 ,5 ‘ » )
A g u re g ste total, b .s e p t . 3 ,2 1 0 ,0 3 1 3 .2 1 0 ,0 7 8
Jan. 1 K, se p t. 3 0 . . . . 1 7 ,5 4 3 ,5 3 1 2 0 ,0 0 ),085
J u ly I 'iiS e p L S O . . . 9 ,2 9 4 ,0 8 4 8 .7 6 1 ,0 7 7
Atlanta, A W, p o in t.S o p t.
4 4 ,057
4 1 ,386
Jitn. I to Sept. 3 0 . .
3 2 7 ,7 7 8
3 8 t ,0 7
Ju ly 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . .
11 3,34 7
107,262
A tla n tic A D a n ville Sept.
4 5 ,9 3 8
3 8 ,9 t 2
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . .
4 0 2 ,1 6 1
35O .072
J u ly l to Sept. 30 . . .
13 8 ,8 3 8
122,892
A ustin A N orttiw
SepL
2 4 ,358
2 3 ,3 9 5
Jan. I t o S e p t . 3 0 . . .
18 2 ,0 9 7
180,111
B a ltim o re « O h io—
U n ee S. O. U lj ..O o t 1 ,6 8 7 ,5 1 5 1 ,6 35,5 95
Jan. 1 to O o t 31 ...1 4 ,1 9 0 .4 2 8 1 4 .0 6 0 ,9 )2
Ju ly 1 to O ot. 3 1 . . . . 6 .4 9 3 ,8 9 7 6 ,4 7 6 ,3 0 1
U n e « W. O. R b . .O ot.
5 5 5 ,5 0 0
.419.315
Jan. 1 to D o t 3 1 . . . 4 ,6 9 8 ,1 1 1 3,8 7 >.013
J u ly 1 t o Oot. 31 . . . 4 .0 0 6 ,9 1 9 1 ,7 88,2 33
T o t ,b o t b » y » t e m » b .O o t 2 ,2 1 3 ,0 1 5 2 ,1 5 4 ,1 1 0
Jan. 1 to «.»«, 3 1 . . . . 1 9 , 09 3 ,9 19 1 7 ,1 4 6 ,7 5 0
J u ly l to O ot. 31 . . . 8 ,5 0 1 ,8 1 8 8 ,2 6 1 ,5 3 9
B, A O .S o u t b w .......... Sept.
6 0 4 ,7 0 7
5 8 7 ,5 4 3
Jan. 1 t o S e p t 3 0 . . . . 4 ,7 1 3 ,5 0 2 4..V.12.3.8
J m y l 10 Sept. 3 0 . . . . 1 ,7 16,4 33 1 ,6 8 6 ,0 7 9
B an gor A V ro o k to o k S e p t
6 8 ,5 3 2
1 0 ,609
Jail. 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . .
53 7, t i t
2 4 3 ,4 9 9
Bath A H a m m o n d * ..S e p t.
4 ,0 6 3
1,893
Jau. 1 to S o p L 3 0 ....
1 9 ,8 2 0
1 9 ,0 3 0
B e n n in g to n A R u tla n d —
J u ly t to 8 e p L »* > ....
0 7 ,8 5 0
0 2 ,9 4 9
J a u . 1 to SepL 3 0 ___
16 8,02 8
10 9,14 1
B iro- A l l - m lo .b .S a p t .
2 .1 4 7
1,7 80
Jan, 1 to Sopt. 3 0 . . .
1 4 ,6 8 5
1 5 ,0 4 4
J u ly 1 t o S ep t. 3 0 . . . .
0 ,5 8 2
5,0 1 2
B o sto n A A lb a n y , b J u ly l to Sep t. 3 0 . . . 2 ,1 9 0 ,0 19 2 ,3 3 0 ,3 5 5
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . 0 ,8 1 8 ,2 5 0 6 ,5 2 1 ,0 3 9
flOkton A M a in e .b —
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 3 0 , . . . 15 ,9 7 3 ,0 2 2 1 ,5 3 3 ,0 1 0
Jan, 1 to f3epe. 3 0 ,...1 3 ,9 7 1 ,9 0 5 1 1 ,9 8 1 ,8 9 5
B ust. R e v . B. A L yn n —
Ju ly t to Bept, 3 0 . . . .
1 0 7 ,7 3 9
11 1 ,8 7 5
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . . .
217,53.3
2 2 0 ,5 3 3
B rill* ,.to n A B a c o B lv .—
J u ly l to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
10 ,748
P .603
J a n . I to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
2 5 ,1 7 5
2 3 ,1 0 8
B ro o k ly u E levated a S e p t.
15 0,73 1
1 2 5 ,6 9 6
Jan. 1 t o Sept, 3 0 . . 1 ,6 80,4 15 4 ,2 9 8 .5 8 7
Ju ly 1 to Sopt. 3 0 . . . .
1 5 7 ,7 0 0
3 8 0 ,9 9 0
B ra n sw lo k A W est .S ept,
4 9 ,0 0 7
4 3 ,9 0 1
J a u . I to Sep t. 3 0 . . .
3 8 0 .2 8 3
3 7 9 .0 5 3
Ju ly 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
1 J «,7 5 5
120,477
B u lL R ooh.A P ltts .b .S e p t.
2 6 7 ,4 8 5
2 8 0 .0 9 9
J a n . 1 to SepL JO . . . 2 ,2 5 0 ,3 3 0 4 ,9 3 0 ,3 1 3
J u ly 1 to Sapt, 3 0 . . .
8 3 1 .2 1 9
8 4 7 ,4 2 5
B uffalo A S u m iie h Sop t.
1 8 ,4 2 0
3 0 ,1 7 1
Ju ly i to s o p t. 30 . . .
1 3 0 ,5 9 4
7 6 ,4 1 1
B url. Ceil. R. A N o .a Sopt.
4 9 1 .8 3 1
3 6 4 ,5 0 5
J a n . 1 to ep t. 3 0 . . . . 2 ,9 1 9 ,2 7 1 2 ,0 7 0 ,6 3 1

-E el E a r m n g s-

r*5 ,9 5 9

1 1 .653
8,1 25
5 0 ,0 7 4
10 .213
9 ,4 8 0
1 8 ,6 7 0
9 0 ,8 8 9
7 4 8 .2 7 2

1894.

$

9 ,1 6 2
1 6 .3 8 7
5 ,8 0 9
3 1 ,1 3 9
7 ,7 3 1

7,533

1 ,1 7 5
9 9 .3 5 4
6 2 1 ,5 2 3 .

4,7 5 9
5 ,8 7 3
11,382
1 3 ,8 6 9
7 ,0 4 2
1,421
2 1 .7 1 0
2 3 ,4 3 2
4 2 0 ,0 7 1
5 6 7 ,7 9 1
3 ,5 2 3 ,5 9 4 3 ,3 3 0 ,2 0 1
1 ,0 6 0 ,6 0 2 1 ,0 9 3 ,5 2 0
2 2 5 .2 0 8
2 5 7 ,2 3 5 1 ,6 4 7 ,7 8 5 1 ,0 0 1 .9 5 7
82 5,85 1
7 2 1,28 8
d .< f.89l
2 1 ,4 3 4
21*1,721
18 3.32 1
2 0 ,135
10 5 ,9 3 9
6 4 5 ,0 7 3
8 1 6 ,4 6 7
5 ,3 3 8 ,1 0 0 5 ,1 1 8 ,3 7 .)
1 ,7 06.9 45 1 ,9 * 8 ,7 9 0
18.455
1 5 .1 0 7
11 8 ,7 9 5
1 08,744
3 6 ,5 2 2
34,125
1 1 .137
7,4 9 7
8 1.030
15,258
3 0 ,2 8 4
9 ,2 5 9
1 1 ,030
1 1 ,5 2 7
0 0 ,0 3 2
04,879
60 1 .1 9 1
6 2 2 ,9 0 1
4 ,0 3 9 ,3 15 4 ,6 1 4 ,5 0 .)
2 ,2 3 1 ,2 1 7 2 ,4 2 9 ,- 7 2
1 4 8 .9 0 3
13 8,18 0
5 8 5 .0 7 1
9 0 5 ,0 8 8
5 3 7 ,3 8 7
3 9 0 ,0 3 6
702,371
7 7 1 ,9 3 3
5 ,6 2 4 ,3 6 3 5 ,2 0 9 ,5 8 0
2 ,8 2 3 ,6 0 1 3 ,8 2 5 ,8 9 8
2 4 3 ,1 2 1
2 5 1 ,4 4 7
1 ,8 6 2 ,0 8 0 1 ,7 0 7 ,5 7 4
0 5 9 ,6 3 3
6 3 2 ,7 9 3
2 0 ,2 1 9
18 ,318
16 7,11 1
73.083
3 ,3 0 0
2 ,8 1 2
7 ,9 4 5
0 .9 1 7
3 0 ,0 3 t
4 7 ,449
32 7
d e l. 1,767
707

1 7 ,3 3 L
2 0 .1 0 7
450
1 ,3 8 0
839

9 8 9 ,1 3 9
2 ,3 0 1 ,5 1 3

8 6 2 .9 0 3
2 ,1 7 1 ,2 3 8

1 2 ,098 ,671
4.1 39, J61

1 ,7 9 3 ,4 5 3
4 ,3 3 8 ,0 7 4

5 9 ,1 3 0
8 0 ,1 1 2

6 1 ,2 2 4
8 1 ,0 3 0

3 .7 5 3
6 ,2 6 7
5 9 ,3 5 0
7 0 2 ,5 2 0
1 8 0 ,8 4 3
1 7 ,8 0 2
0 5 ,5 5 7
2 8 ,5 3 1
8 5 ,1 7 1
61.5,204
2 8 3 ,5 6 1
2 7 ,7 5 7
6 2 ,681
15 7 ,7 0 8
8 0 7 ,7 3 7

5 ,5 7 3
9 ,6 9 5
4 3 ,5 6 7
4 9 6 ,4 8 0
1 3 4 ,9 0 0
1 6 .463
9 2 ,3 7 1
39,39*2
10 1 ,3 3 8
5 2 7 ,1 0 7
2 9 0 ,3 2 9
1 4 ,9 0 3
3 0 ,0 6 7
8 9 ,3 9 9
8 4 8 ,5 3 7

CHRONICLE.
.......

—1
'

-

1894

■&«

1895.

—a r o s t t J iia r n in t/ s .-

1894

3 3,453
276,319
757,208
1 77rf osu
673,206
744.515
19,7)86,989 4,488,773 4 ,0 0 8,96 0
2,559
3.449
9,348
4 1 4 i».r,
9,902
9,021
9,493
19,783

ily 1 to Sopt. 3 0 . .* .
OhScuI)lur. Jc N orth. b.Sept.
to. 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . ..
l
Chic. E a t h A Quin, b Sept.
Jain. 1 to Sept. 3 0 ....*
Ohicug;o A E;i*t Ill8..Sept.
Ju
Ohio. 1
_
Ja ,u, 1 tO Sept. 3 0 _ !
Jc fly 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . ..
Chic. Jfe W. M ich ....... Sept.
_
Ju itt. 1 to Sept. 3 0 _
, & Mn .b .S ep t
can. Js
Jau. 1 to Sept. 30
J uiy l to Sept. 3 0 ___
Clnn. A- K ent, S o ....S e p t .
C?lu. Leb. A North —
Ju ly 1 te^Sept. 30 . . .
J an. 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___

d n , P orts. «fc V jr.b ..S ep t.

Jan. 1 to Sopt 3 0 ___
Ju ly 1 to Sept, 3 0 . . . .
C larendon * Pitts.—
Ju ly 1 to Sopt. 3 0 ___
Jan. 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
Clev. A kron d tC o l.b Juue
Jan. I to June 30 . . .
Ju ly l to J u u e 3 0 . . . .
Glove. C auton A So..Sept.
*
Jan. 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___
Ju ly 1 to Sepc. 3 0 . . .

37,616
1 00 ,04 4
28,527
199,860
79,553

7,941
22,163
75,618
134,433
861,031
57,763
494,294
196,436
,238,528
>,237,165
,692,955
P eoria A E ast'n a.Sopt.
171,140
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 _
_
,454,557
J u ly 1 to Sopt. 3 0 ___
515,554
Clev. Lor, «fc 'W heel.. J u l y
159,272
J a n . I to J u ly 31 . . .
737,486
Colurub. N ew b.Js L au r.—
J u ly 1 to Sopt. 30 . . .
15,406
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___
47,758
Col. Hook.V. «fe T ol.b.A ug.
259,202
J a n . I to Aug. 3 1 _ : ,553,2 75
_
C ry sta l................ ........ Aug.
1,196
J a n . 1 to Aug. 3 1 _
_
5,089
C um berland V alley..Sop t.
84,679
J a n . 1 *to Sept. 3 0 _
_
622,885
D elaw are A Hudson—
R enne. < S a ra to g a b
ft
—
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 30 . . .
739,157
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 _
_
,745,441
N. Y. & C an ad a b —
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . ..
279 ,37 7
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . ..
682,856
A lb an y 4s 8 u sq ,b —
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .. ,046,948
30 . . . : ,869,465
Del. Lack. & W estern—
N. Y. Luck. & W est.—
J u ly i to Sept. 3 0 _ ! ,505,010
_
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . . i ,16 5 ,4 20
S y ra c u se Bing. 6c N. Y .—
J u ly 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
263.829
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 _
_
692,136
en. A K. G rand e.bSo pt.
661,693
J a n . 1 to SepL 30___ 5 ,1 8 3 ,1 5 4
J u ly 1 to S o p t 30 . . . 1,973,952
et, him». & N or. ii .Sept.
105,448
J a u . l to Sopt. 3 0 . . ..
86 2,30 6
otroit A M ac k 'e.u .S o p t.
2 4 ,510
J a n . 1 to Sopt. 3 0 . . . .
28 5 ,0 6 8
J u l y 1 U>Sepl 30.
98,028
Utb & [ r(>n R ’f!G St
30 5,89 6
J a n 1 mi S -pt! 30.
1,809,820
lu th So. £ & A tl.
ih.
J u ly 1 tt» s©pi/. 30
428,257
J a n . 1 t<
6. 30
1,327,400

D unk. AUegh V. & i\ —
J u ly 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
Jan. l to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
El In Joliet ft E .n ..S e p t
Jau. i t. Sopt. 3 0 . . . .
July 1 t Sopt 3 0 . . . .

Elm
Juh

on. & K
Tortli.-

opt. 3 0 . . . .
.Sopt.

7 2 ,0 0 6
17 3,34 2

33,330
91.021
2 3.564
185,639
63,323

203,902
412,121
373,090
3,037,33-4
511,111
3,533,161
13,830
113,902
4,431
5 .7 5 4
5,535
262,912
2,2 0 5.9 13
8 ) 4,053
80.046
514,173
2 2 8 ,5 14
109,339
352,969
1 ,2 2 4,90 4
8 ,7 1 2,42 3
85.773
3 26 ,09 0
1,0 0 5,61 0
6,849,-166
2,20^,702
42,955
207.936
7,783
8.4,183
39,554
324

14,979
37,818
7,403
38,556
20,026

13,942
33.049
4,924
3 6,172
15,372

9,352
d e l 932
4,901
2 9,980
5,391
14,744
71,958
17,165
13,234
428,119
152,667
112,751
896,091
248,494
317,757
61,708
11,318
12,364
4 30 ,49 0
103,255
4 6,358
197,495
50,101
5 4 ,4 9 0
1.205,677
348,519
361,834
9,260,636 2,562,311 2,290,868
3,343,316
967,976
780,833
150.699
46,421
41,365
1,163,263
376,982
164,065
449 ,93 6
134,703
122,282
128,512
55,702
47,716
5 84 ,68 0
216,925
136,956
1 4,1 90
5 0,414
330,937
1,658,114
772
6,694
80,247
583,986

1,372

2,0 20

def. 2,686

1,115
3 8,709
201 ,13 6

11,379
182,291
7 1 4 ,80 7
214
2,413
34,504
187,552

708,798
1 ,6 7 3,97 6

3 3 6 ,94 4
566 ,48 0

347,350
5 8 5 , j25

235,963
601,883

103,332
192,036

68 918
101,276

1,032,632
482,649
2,836,413 1 ,1 1 8,18 6

513,600
1,214,193

2 ,2 7 0,45 9
5 ,9 5 4,40 8
256 ,26 6
689,0/8

137 ,92 7
5 8 3 ,63 7
663

1 ,4 1 1,26 0 1,213,777
3,249,518 2 , 8 5 6 , 4 . 5 3
144,312
330,941

122,091
332,042

286,926
2 ,1 9 0 ,9 6 4
868,482
27,621
18 5,02 9
3,2 00
117,816
2 3 ,601
19 4,52 2
1,2 5 9 ,2 1 L 1 ,0 4 4 ,6 7 6

29 9 ,8 8 0
1,8 74,7 95
73 2,82 5
28,068
13 4,55 3
5,602
81,731
19,205

65 3,03 9
4 ,7 89,2 79
1,7 36,7 08
10 7,80 7
802,101
15,589
188,198
5 6 ,394

53 4,08 9
1 ,2 7 6 ,0 6 4

80 1,17 3
26 1,95 9

7 0 ,892
17 6,40 9
9 8 ,283
75 1 ,4 8 2
25 7,01 8

11 5,57 2
319,521
5,0 21
4 9 ,545

12 2 ,5 6 4
28 6 ,4 5 3
6,6 51
5 1 ,442

01,200

17L 671
416,189
489,758
3,705,7 76
453 ,73 3
3 ,4 1 9,85 5
18,700
7 7.9 74
4.907
2 1.918
7,0 5 0
270.251
2 ,2 4 5,79 9
815 ,26 9
7 4,736
5 44 .45 0
211,51.6
88,165
2 51 ,16 0
1,339,045
8 ,1 2 8,51 3
154.238
4 id ,219
1 ,3 4 5,36 7
8 ,0 8 1 ,5 4 9
3 ,1 0 3,99 5
4 4,513
220.785
10,318
6 3,7 17
3 8,623
1

14 7,02 6
4 8 5 ,1 4 6

747,117’
194,190
384,755

1 7 ,6 5 0
1,365
6 ,2 8 2 d ef.52 ,553
2 7 ,2 7 5
33,653
2 6 8 ,1 9 7
207,239
8 0 ,775
68 ,310
4 3 ,3 6 1
8 2 ,1 8 7
2 ,6 0 4
26,001.

51 ,217
79|645
3,878
2 8 ,5 0 4

1894.
S
B

F a ll B ro o k —
J u ly 1 to Sopt. 3 0 ___
1 8 5 ,1 2 6
16 3 ,9 9 1
J a u . I to Sept. 3 0 ___
4 8 a,3 9 0
4 3 7 ,3 0 5
F itc h b u r g —1>
Ju ly 1 to Sopt. 3 0 ___ 2 ,0 1 0 ,6 8 8 1 ,9 0 0 ,0 0 3
J a u . 1 to Sop t. 3 0 ___ 5 ,4 1 2 ,1 3 7 5 ,0 8 4 ,9 3 1
2 0 8 ,4 1 4
2 0 1 ,0 1 6
Flint ,fe P ore M a r .a .S e p t.
J a n . 1 t o 3op t. 3 0 ___ 1 ,8 5 4 ,5 5 3 1 ,7 9 2 ,4 1 7
Ft. W orth Js D e u .C .6 . A n s .
7 3 ,6 2 9
11 3 ,7 3 1
Ft. W orth & R io G r Sept.
3 2 ,0 7 4
3 9 ,2 9 2
Ja n 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . .
25 1 ,9 1 1
19 3,35 6
Gadsden & A tt, U n ...O c t.
940
576
J a n . 1 to O ct. 3 1 ........
7 .4 4 4
5 ,4 0 4
G e o rg ia , a ...............O c t .
17 4,45 3
1 5 9 ,3 8 4
Jau. 1 to O ct. 3 1 . . . . 1 ,0 3 9 ,6 7 9 1 ,0 5 6 ,7 0 7
J u l y i to Oot. 3 1 . . . .
166,423
44 2 ,5 4 1
G eorgia & A la ir a d .S e p t .
4 6 ,6 5 7
4 5 ,6 3 1
J a n . 1 to 8 <pt. 80 . . .
340,9.45
3 1 9 ,4 5 0
J u ly 1 to Sept. 3 0
12 5 ,3 9 9
111,495
G a .S o u t l T n * F l a . b S o p t .
6 6 .3 4 8
6 4 ,9 5 6
Jau. 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
5 9 5 ,1 6 0
6 3 3 ,5 7 7
J u ly 1 to Srpfc 3 0 . . . .
2 0 8 ,6 5 0
21 0 ,7 4 6
+rana R a p . & I n d ...S e p t.
24 2 ,9 0 8
2 3 9 ,9 7 9
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . . 2 ,0 1 4 ,0 5 9 1 ,8 3 2 ,8 4 6
Gr. T ru n k o f C an .. . Sept. 1 .6 8 5 ,5 1 3 1 ,6 7 2 ,7 6 2
J a n . 1 to S .'pt. 3 0 . . ..1 2 ,9 0 5 ,8 6 9 1 2 ,9 1 7 ,0 9 6
J u ly 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . . 4 ,8 6 1 ,3 7 9 4 ,6 6 3 ,9 5 0
C ole, & G r’ d T r ....8 e p t .
23 3,59 7
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 n ___ 2 ,0 3 3 ,1 1 5
.Inly 1 to Sept. 3 0
7 1 0 ,0 o 7
D et. Gr. H. & M il...S ep t.
10 0,77 8
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 ___
7 4 7 ,7 9 3
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . . .
29 6 ,0 3 6
G u lf & C h ica g o , b ___ O ct.
6,898
J a u . 1 to O ct. 3 1 ___
3 6 ,10a
H o rsa o T u m & W Um.Sopt.
4,5 25
3 8 ,1 9 8
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___
H ou st. E , & W. T e x . A ug.
4 3 ,4 4 4
J a n . 1 t o A u g, 3 1 . . . .
35 0.27 8
J u ly 1 to A u g. 3 1 ___
8 0 ,0 0 7
Illin ois C e n tra l, a..S e p t. 1 ,7 2 9 ,0 9 2
J u ly 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . . 4 ,8 7 7 ,8 1 4 4 ,3 9 2 ,6 7 5
iud. D e c. & W e st. .Sept.
4 4 ,988
4 0 ,9 2 0
J a n . 1 t o Sapt. 3 0 ___
34 3 ,2 5 5
2 9 7 ,3 7 4
J u ly 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
12 7,35 9
1 3 2 ,5 2 9
In d ian a 111. & I o w a .S e p t.
5 6 ,7 4 4
4 9 .6 5 9
J a n . I to Sept. 3 0 . . .
56 2 ,4 4 7
5 4 3 .2 6 0
Io w a C e n tra l......... b.S ep t.
15 9 ,4 2 0
1 3 9 ,1 5 2
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . . 1 ,1 5 7 ,1 1 1 1 ,2 2 8 ,7 3 3
J u ly 1 -------- * 30
-------" to Sept. " "
42 4,61 1
4 1 2 ,7 6 8
Iron R a ilw a y ___ b . . S e p t
4 ,1 5 0
3,6 1 5
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . ..
3 6 ,878
2 9 ,6 6 5
J u ly 1 t o s e p t 3 0 ___
11 ,582
1 0 ,4 4 4
Ja ck . T am . & K . W ..S ept.
L
1 9 ,607
3 9 ,373
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . .
3 0 6 ,7 8 2
5 8 5 ,2 7 4
J a m e st’ n & L. Erie. S e p t
4 ,2 6 5
4 ,3 6 2
J a n . 1 t o Sept. 3 0 . . .
3 1 ,243
3 3 ,7 4 9
K a n a w h a & M ich .b .S e p t.
3 7 ,5 3 2
3 6 ,1 7 9
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___
32 3 ,7 1 1
2 7 8 ,9 8 1
J u ly 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___
11 1 ,2 6 9
1 0 3 ,5 0 8
Kan. C. F t. S. A M .a Sept.
3 9 9 ,4 6 2
3 8 7 .2 6 0
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___ 3 ,2 9 5 ,5 0 5 3 ,4 8 8 ,6 9 7
J u ly 1 to S e p t 3 0 ___ 1,1 67,3 65 1 ,1 3 2 ,4 9 6
Kan.C. M em . & B .a .S e p t
8 9 ,553
7 8 ,6 5 4
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 o ___
7 2 8 ,7 7 0
7 3 2 ,8 3 0
J u ly 1 t o Sep t. 3 0 ___
25 0 ,1 0 5
2 3 3 ,5 5 3
K an . C ity N o r th w e s t e r n J u ly 1 to Sep t.
3 0 . .6.2 ,0 8 08 0
. 6 2 ,0
6 7 ,091
Jan. 1 to S e p t
3 0 18 6,03 7 3 7 2 1 4 ,3 1 0
. . . . 18 6 ,0
K a n sa s C ity & B e a trice —
J u ly 1 to Sept.
3 0 . . . .1,2 66 4
1 ,2 4
3 676
J a n . 1 t o Sep t.
30
9 ,8 1 4
3 ,7 3 ,7 9 3
93
3 9 ,0 9 1
K eok u k A W e s t ’ n . b . S e p t
3 9 ,0 9 1
3 3 ,1 5 7
J a n . 1 to Sent. 3 0 . . . .
2 6 8 ,6 9 4
2 7 6 ,2 5 2
L. E r ie A ll. & S o.a . .S e p t.
6 ,4 7 3
7 54 7
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
5 7 ,5 7 9
5 3 ,2 2 0
L ake E rie & W e st.b .S e p t.
2 9 2 ,3 5 9
3 1 6 ,7 3 0
J a n . 1 to Sept, 3 0 . . . . 2 ,5 6 9 ,3 6 3 2 ,4 4 9 ,5 6 6
L ak e S h ore & M ich. So. lb—
J u ly 1 t o S e p t 3 0 ----- 5 ,5 0 2 ,4 7 0 4 ,8 9 2 ,0 5 8
Jan. 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . .1 5 ,1 6 6 ,4 6 3 1 4 ,2 8 8 ,3 8 5
L e x in g to n & E ast’n.Sep t.
1 8 ,2 5 2
14 715
Jan. 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . .
154,363
........
L o n g Is la n d —b
J u ly 1 to S e p t 3 0 ----- 1 ,4 3 8 ,4 9 4 1 ,4 0 5 ,4 7 2
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . . 3 ,1 8 4 ,5 2 6 3 ,1 8 9 ,6 4 1
L ou isv . E y . & St. L A u g.
1 4 4 ,3 7 8
13 1 ,5 4 5
Jan. l t o A ug. 3 1 ....
9 1 2 ,9 7 5
9 1 7 ,6 1 0
L ou isv . & N a sh v . b.S ep t. 1 ,6 9 3 ,9 3 4 1 ,6 8 8 .6 9 0
Ja m 1 to Sept. 3 0 ....1 4 ,1 9 3 ,1 5 3 1 4 ,0 2 8 673
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . . . 5 ,1 0 4 ,0 3 6 4 ,8 1 0 ,2 6 0
L o u isv . N. A . & C .a .S e p t .
3 0 4 ,5 1 8
2 8 1 ,6 6 3
J a n . l t o Sept. 3 0 . . . . 2 ,3 8 0 ,8 5 0 2 ,0 9 3 ,7 5 7
Ju ly l t o Sep t. 3 0 . . . .
9 0 7 ,8 4 2
7 9 8 ,6 2 1
L o u isv . S t L .& T e x .S e p t
3 8 ,9 2 5
3 3 608
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . .
3 0 5 ,9 9 4
3 1 2 ,4 8 4
M a co n & B in n in g ...S e p t.
5 ,1 6 3
5 ,5 1 7
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
5 0 ,7 2 6
5 4 ,5 9 0
J u ly 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . .
1 5 ,283
1 8 ,3 3 5
M a in e C en tra l J u ly 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . 1 ,5 1 0 ,0 8 9 1 ,3 3 2 ,7 4 0
Ja m l t o Sept. 3 0 . . . . 3 ,8 1 7 ,9 1 9 3 ,4 5 0 ,7 0 7
M an h a tta n E le v a t e d —
J u ly 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___ 2 ,0 7 4 ,1 9 3 2 ,0 4 9 ,8 1 0
J a n . 1 t o S e p t 3 0 ...... 6 ,9 0 4 ,6 5 9 7 ,0 9 6 ,2 3 0
M a n is tiq u e ..................Sep t.
8 ,1 6 4
4 ,4 1 9
J a n . 1 t o Sept. 3 0 ___
1 0 4 ,2 9 7
5 5 ,7 3 8
M em p h is < t Ohas’ n . .S e p t
S
11 4 ,3 0 1
10 1,19 6
J a m 1 to S e p t 3 0 ___
8 2 7 ,2 t 6
88 7 ,1 7 8
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
3 1 2 ,7 3 2
2 8 8 ,2 5 6
M e x ica n C e n t r a l....S e p t
7 4 8 ,7 7 6
6 3 6 ,5 5 4
Jan. 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___ 6 ,8 5 7 ,5 3 1 6 ,2 1 7 ,8 8 3
_

C hw . O.Js So’ wn. b.Sep t.

4 56 .21 0
l \iS'4 835 1,19 1,105
, s i 0f.j| 1,027.007
), 507*019 9 ,0 5 9,10 0
1,221,394 1,318,628
1
9 .6 1 8,68 6
47.999
361,766
393,350
12 I rV
9,045
5 9.670
80,744
27,905
19*041
831,510
789 .30 4
r,072,155 6,659,633
2,534,141
203,179
211.604
.726,307 1,524,912
626,763
566 ,90 0
225,699
211,423
,297.324 1,301,550
,093,106 2,8 >9,846
,563,001 23,380,722
335,183
301,817
987.427
895 ,52 3
,082.291 2 ,8 0 9,37 5
.574,796 2 0,759,975
,034,518 7 ,0 3 1,67 9
155,642
180,379
.289,427 1.175,930
59,021
5 4,344
458,365
466,829
178,952
175,035
851
796

1895.
$

R oa d s.

3r» 'JSii

P* ® u h io -.rt..b c p u

[V ol . LXI.

.. .........
—

N et W a r n in g s .—

18 95.

$
9 0 ,2 9 8
1 9 5 ,7 8 5
6 8 9 ,0 4 0
1 ,6 1 4 ,9 3 5
6 0 ,639
4 6 9 ,9 7 6
6,5 9 1

1894.

Sf
9 5 ,4 2 3
1 7 2 ,1 6 3
7 0 1 .6 6 6
1 ,5 5 7 ,7 5 0
6 0 ,9 3 5
4 8 3 ,8 3 9
2 9 ,6 5 9

1 1 ,5 3 4
2 1 ,4 8 6
6 9 ,0 5 9
4 2 ,8 3 0
569
336
2 ,9 9 2
4,4 4 3
£ 8 0 ,1 8 6
g-78,293
£ 2 0 6 ,2 3 1 g ;9 9 ,5 5 6
g l 4 1 ,4 6 9
g l4 L ,5 6 5
1 4 ,6 1 1
14 ,759
2 4 ,6 2 0
2 6 ,7 3 9
1 7 ,0 9 0
1 8 ,6 8 8
2 6 ,4 1 4
9 ,6 6 4
1 3 2 ,0 3 9
1 7 8 ,3 1 3
8 3 ,6 3 3
4 2 ,4 4 0
5 6 ,6 6 7
6 9 .2 3 7
4 5 2 ,0 6 1
4 5 5 ,3 8 4
5 7 3 ,3 8 8
5 6 0 ,0 8 7
3 ,8 5 0 ,6 8 8 3 ,6 4 3 ,7 9 4
1 ,5 0 4 ,9 8 7 1 ,3 5 8 ,9 2 5
2 ,6 8 7
574
9 0 ,714 d e f. 10 ,166
2 0 ,1 0 9 d e f .5 6 ,2 7 3
1 8 ,7 2 7
2 0 ,1 8 2
9 1 ,7 9 0
9 8 ,5 1 9
5 2 ,7 2 1
4 8 ,3 4 0
4 ,2 9 0 d e f.1 ,9 2 9
4 ,8 4 5
1 ,0 7 3
2 ,1 7 4
d e f .81
1 3 ,1 4 4
8 ,2 6 7
1 0 ,125
1 0 ,131
1 0 2 ,8 0 6
6 9 ,9 9 5
1 3 ,5 5 3
1 5 ,8 9 6
5 5 1 ,0 5 4
4 0 5 ,2 9 8
4 ,3 7 4 ,8 7 3 3 ,0 7 7 ,6 8 8
1 ,4 5 3 ,9 6 8 1 ,0 4 9 ,2 8 2
1 1 ,998
1 3 ,011
1 1 8 ,5 9 0
6 7 ,2 6 0
4 6 ,4 6 4
5 0 ,6 7 1
14,138
5,1 0 7
1 6 3 .3 6 4
12 3 .6 9 3
6 3 ,5 9 5
4 1 ,3 4 8
4 0 1 ,1 8 8
3 6 4 ,0 7 4
1 6 4 ,0 3 8
1 2 9 ,9 1 4
142
94 2
4 ,5 3 9
5 ,1 1 5
42 8
2 ,5 9 8
d e f.3 ,3 4 6
5 ,6 7 0
2 2 4 ,0 6 2
2 8 ,4 8 7
1 ,3 7 2
1,1 43
6 .6 4 1
2 ,0 3 6
1 0 ,7 4 9
1 0 ,9 4 2
7 5 .3 6 2
6 5 ,4 6 5
2 6 ,4 6 6
2 9 ,8 1 3
1 3 0 ,0 4 9
1 1 9 ,2 1 6
1 ,0 1 0 ,7 6 9 1 ,0 3 6 ,9 8 3
3 6 5 ,3 6 3
3 4 9 .6 6 7
7 ,3 9 6
1,6 43
6 4 ,0 5 0
7 4 ,5 0 9
1 7 ,8 5 4
1 5 ,448
d e f.1 ,0 42
1 3 ,6 9 2

1 ,5 7 7
1 6 ,6 4 6

d e f. 3,4 82 d e f.1 1 ,598
d e f.1 6 ,9 4 1 d e f.2 5 ,5 4 4
1 1 ,7 1 0
1 8 ,9 0 2
8 2 ,2 9 0
8 6 ,8 9 1
1,0 5 6
805
2,7 8 2
7 ,6 8 8
1 4 4 ,5 1 8
1 5 7 ,4 3 9
1 ,1 4 2 ,7 1 9 1 ,0 5 2 ,2 1 7
1 ,9 2 6 ,5 7 1
5 ,5 0 3 ,2 8 6
4 ,1 3 2

1 ,7 1 9 ,1 4 0
5 ,2 5 0 ,3 8 1
4 ,7 4 5

6 6 8 ,5 0 9
1 ,2 1 7 ,2 2 1
5 3 ,4 7 4
1 9 6 ,0 1 8
5 5 5 ,8 8 0
4 ,6 1 5 ,9 8 0
1 ,7 2 4 ,3 9 7
1 2 0 ,7 9 5
8 2 5 ,0 0 8
3 7 8 ,4 9 9
1 1 ,2 7 8
5 9 ,3 1 0
d e f.1 ,5 0 9
d e f.1 ,4 3 3
def, 4,2 7 2

6 3 3 ,4 7 6
1 ,2 4 1 ,5 6 2
3 3 .3 8 3
1 8 6 ,1 4 0
6 7 4 ,1 2 1
5 ,0 7 6 ,5 6 0
1 ,8 4 0 ,5 8 5
1 0 3 ,3 4 6
6 6 4 ,0 0 4
2 9 8 ,3 0 2
8 ,9 6 6
5 8 ,4 5 2
418
6 ,7 8 6
2 ,4 6 2

6 3 4 ,8 4 5
1 ,4 3 8 ,2 6 3

4 6 0 ,9 4 8
1 ,2 0 6 ,8 6 0

7 5 5 ,0 6 4
2 ,7 7 8 ,9 0 2
3 ,2 0 9
6 1 ,0 3 4
3 2 ,4 2 1
5 7 .8 6 3
5 8 ,9 0 5
2 8 2 ,2 4 8
2 ,7 7 2 ,9 2 5

7 9 9 ,1 7 5
3 ,0 0 6 ,9 0 1
2 ,1 5 9
3 4 ,2 1 9
2 0 ,7 3 7
8 8 ,0 6 9
4 0 ,9 4 6
2 2 1 ,1 8 3
1 ,9 9 5 ,3 6 2

THE CHRONICLE.

INOYHMBBIt 28, 1SB5.]
-Gross Eam inys.Koads.

-Xet Earnings.-

1894.
1895.
Ie95.
1 89 4 .
X
*
$
£
$
1 4 1 ,75 0
183.962
5 2,1 08
3 3 ,5 2 7
1 .0 9 3 .9 2 0 1 ,5 8 1.00 2
7 3 0 ,5 1 8
6 0 .1 0 5
334.211 C 180.847 c l 3 4.9 12
3 75 ,03 7
3 ,2 5 1 .0 1 3 3 .1 2 2 .3 1 4 c 1,462,317 c l , 2 9 3 ,00 6
5 6.1 74
5 5,7 33
3 1 ,2 2 4
2 9 .1 1 6
4 7 2 .6 3 2
5 1 0 .6 5 3
2 77 .52 1
247 ,51 3
184 ,13 5
193,176
8 9,5 06
8 7,504
1.3 7 4.13 1 1 ,2 4 9 ,2 1 7
5 5 6 .8 S 9
4 57 .76 5
4 6 5 .9 0 3
5 4 0 .53 0
2 )1 .2 6 6
196.579
2 0 .7 9 7 d ef. 1,036 d ef.3 ,6 3 6
2 0 .2 3 0
3 7 6 .2 2 4
3 1 7 .9 9 0
132 ,08 6
133.775
2 .7 1 2 .6 2 0 2 .5 9 8 ,0 9 i
S 8 * ,0 0 3
85*>,1m5
1 ,1 1 4 ,2 3 1 1 ,0 0 3 .6 0 4
1 10 ,66 2
355 .07 4

M ex. In te rn a tio n a l..S e p t.
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___.
M exican n a tio n a l .S ep t..
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ...
M e x ic a n N o rth e rn ..S ep t.
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 o ___
M inn, A S t. L o u is.a -S e p t..
J a n . I to S ep t. 3 •---- .
J u ly 1 to Sept. 30 . .
M obile & B itn jin g 'm .A u * .
M obile A Ohio............O c t. .
J a n . 1 to Oct. 3 1 ___
J u l y l to Oct. 3 1 ___.
M o n terey A M ex. G ulf—
2 91 .81 7
2 45 ,13 8
J u l y 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ___
8 0 3 ,6 0 7
9 2 3 ,0 2 7
J a n . I to S ep t. 3 0 . .
4 2 5 ,9 9 8
N aah.C h. & S t. L .b .. O ct.
4 7 0 ,8 1 4
J a n . 1 to Oct. 3 1.
3 .9 2 1 .0 7 1 3 ,7 9 3 ,6 7 5
J u l y 1 to Oct. 3 1 . . 1 ,0 3 5,73 3 1 .5 4 7 ,1 3 5
2 ,1 1 2
1,3*3
N evad a C e n tra l........A n*.
17,602
1 6 .3 3 3
J a n . X to A uk. 3 1 . . . .
3,9 5 8
3 .1 1 6
J u l y t to A u * . 3 1 _
_
N ew E n g lan d —
J u l y 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . . .. 1 ,6 1 1 ,1 7 0 1 ,4 4 0,61 5
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ___ 4 ,5 0 3 ,8 2 4 3 ,9 1 2 ,3 7 2
New J e r s e y A N ew Y orlrI ' 5,1 2 5
9 4 .9 5 3
J u l y 1 to S ep t. 3 ■ . . .
2 4 7 ,3 7 3
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
2 6 4 ,32 3
N ew London N o r th e rn 1 8 4 .17 9
172,019
J n l y 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . . ..
4 8 5 ,3 0 9
4 6 2 ,0 3 2
J a n 1 to S e p t. 3o . . .
7 ,4 3 6
N ew O rl. A S o u tb -a .-A n g .
6 .6 2 6
60,371
5 0 .3 9 3
J a n . 1 to Anir. 3 1 ___
1 2.407
J u l y 1 to An*. 3 1 ___
12,701
X. Y . C e n tra l A H ad .—
1 1 ,0 0 0 ,5 0 6 1 0 ,3 40 ,3 2 3
3 1 ,9 3 0 ,9 9 2 3 0 ,4 7 9 ,2 8 3
N. Y . Chic. A S t. 1 _ J n ly X to S ep t. 3 0 . . . 1.5 ■ .0 6 7 1 .4 3 0,00 3
’6
J a n . X to Sept- 3 0 . . . 4 ,4 9 6 ,0 0 1 3 ,9 6 3 ,6 7 6
N .Y .L . K. A W e .r o . J u l y 2 .3 2 3 .1 0 7 2 ,0 7 7 .1 2 5
J a n . 1 to J u l y 3 1 . . .. 14,6 93 ,7 9 7 1 3 ,7 6 1 ,1 9 2
2 1 .4 2 3 ,7 1 3 2 1 .2 7 3 ,1 2 6
O et 1 to J u l y 31

. 8 ,3 2 3 ,2 5 5 7 ,2 3 7 .0 1 5
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ___.21,844,3X 1 1 9,4 7 9 ,7 0 0
N, Y. O nt. A W e e t.a .S e p t.
3 0 9 .36 7
3 08 .51 8
J a n . t to Sep t. 3 0 ___ 2 ,7 1 7 .* »7 2 .9 0 4 .1 3 0
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 30 . . . 1,033,931 1 ,0 5 7,17 0
N. Y. P lill A N orfolk—
2 4 8 .0 1 6
J u l y l to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
2 56 ,91 4
J a n . 1 to S ep t. S o _
_
6 9 4 ,24 4
7 03 ,00 3
N. Y. A Knelt. R each J u l y 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . , .
1 4 9 ,9 7 6
170,244
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . .
2 4 2 .9 1 3
2 i t , 3 69
143.063
W. Y. S u -. A W eat b a ep t.
154 .34 0
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 ___ 1 .6 4 1,54 1 1*361.1*6
J u l y l to S ep t. 3 0 ___
5 6 4 ,9 4 9
4 7 3 ,4 6 7
N o rth eastern of G a.S ept
4,002
. 3 ,9 9 3
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
9 >,836
3 5 ,7 9 9
5 4 6 ,13 0
5 3 9 .38 4
N orthern C e n tra l, b. Sept.
J a n . X to g e n t. 30 . . . 4 ,7 0 6 ,0 4 7 4 .3 3 3 .3 7 6
North’ ll P n e lfle .b 8 * p t 2 ,3 1 2 .1 4 5 2 .2 0 3 .4 2 3
J a n . X to S e p t. 3 0 . . . 12,6-40.249 1 ,1 9 9,20 8
J u l y l to Sept- 3 0 . . . 5 ,5 0 6 ,9 2 1 4 ,7 4 3 ,0 0 2
O kdenah. A L. Cham p la it
J u l y X to S ep t. 3 o .. . .
2 2 2 ,0 3 7
2 1 6 ,9 3 7
3 7 2 ,7 9 0
5 9 6 .0 9 3
J a n . 1 to S e p t. 3 0 . . .
9 t.5 0 0
Ohio B l r e r .b .............S e p t.
8 0,9 73
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
5 1 4 ,5 9 2
6 1 3 .2 9 3
1 4.715
O hio R iv e r A C ha*. Sep t.
13,202
1 31 ,02 9
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 ___
117 ,74 7
Ohio S o u th e rn . . . ..A u *.
6 9 ,5 0 0
6 9 .7 7 4
J a o . I to Au<. 3 1 . . .
4 6 4 .1 1 4
4 2 9 ,1 1 5
J u l y X to A ug. 31 ..
129,606
1 41 .21 8
5 ,7 * 6 .3 3 9 5 ,4 0 8 ,0 8 3
J a n . I to S ep t. 3 0 ....4 6 ,9 4 0 .6 7 3 4 8 ,2 1 4 ,6 * 1
U d m went P. A E. SepL
In e. 2 3 9 ,0 2 3
J a o . X to S ep t. 3 0 ___
Inc. 3 .2 5 5 .5 0 0
P e o ria Dec. A K v . . . A n*.
1 01 .81 0
6 7.6 74
J a n X to A u*. 3 1 . . . .
3 3 0 .1 0 7
3 1 8 .71 8
1 1 .3 3 0
P eteraho T *.................. S ep t.
3 7 ,5 3 8
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 30 . . .
100.391
398,3X 1
J n l r X to S e p t 3 0 , . . .
11 2 .0 0 9
121 .72 8
P h lla-lelp b i.i t K riebSepA
1 1 7 ,6 0 7
3 9 2 .10 9
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 ___ 3 ,. 0 3 ,3 2 3 2 .8 8 7 .2 0 1
|
P hil*. A R a a d tn * . .S ep t. 1 .9 3 1 ,3 0 2 1 .7 8 5.15 1
J a o . X to Sept. 3 0 ___1 5 .1 3 S .S 0 9 ! 1 ,0 3 7 ,3 -3
Dec. I to 8 -.p t 8 0 ...1 7 ,0 0 8 .8 2 7 1 8 ,1 0 9 ,8 9 1
C oal A Iro n Co.. ■ e p t 2.315,281 1 ,7 9 3 .0 3 1
S
J a n . t to S ep t. 3 0 . . . 18,0 47 ,0 3 5 15.2 18 ,1 3 2
Dec. X to Sept- 3 0 . . . . 1 8,2 35 A 90 1 7 ,5 2 7 ,1 1 3
T o ta l both Co’* . . ..S e p t 1 .2 7 0 ,8 2 3 3 .5 7 8 .1 8 5
J a n . X to S e p t 3 0 . . ..3 8 ,1 0 4 ,3 3 1 2 9 .9 u S .5 1 S
D ee. X to S e p t 3 J . . . 3 9 .2 4 1 ,3 1 7 3 3 .9 37 ,3 3 7
P h il. B ea d . A N ew K n*.—
J u l y 1 to S ep i. 3 0 . . .
2 1 3 .1 0 3 1 8 0 ,3 0 1
J a n , 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . .
5 0 3 .3 0 0 1 )5 ,5 1 2
P itta. C. C. A S t. L ...O u t
1 .5 3 7 .9 3 8 1 ,3 9 5 .7 7 8
J a n . 1 to O e t 31 ...1 3 ,0 0 0 ,3 9 9 1 1 ,7 51 ,9 4 7
P itt*. M ar A ilWts- .S e p t
3 .7 7 0
3 ,7 7 4
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . .
3 1 .6 9 3
2 1 ,9 4 5
P ltta b n r* A W e e ie rn S e p t
2 87 ,94 7 2 5 9 ,1 0 0
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
2 ,1 0 9 ,5 2 4 1,7 1 3 ,5 6 8
J u l y 1 to S ep t. 30 . . .
8 8 1 .5 1 2 7 2 0 .9 7 0
P itt*. Y ea n * * . A A .-.O o t
1913)39 155 ,72 3
J a n . 1 to O c t 3 1 . . . .
1 ,1 8 0 ,5 2 4 9 3 5 ,4 1 4
P roep. P k. A C oney I*L—
J n ly 1 to sep t, 3 0 . . . .
7 1 ,4 9 5
8 1,4 29
J a o . 1 to 8 » p t 3 0 . . . .
1 17 ,89 3 129 ,00 4
B leb . F re d . A P o t. .S e p t.
5 5 ,0 5 9
5 1 ,8 1 2
J a n . 1 to Sept 3 0 . . .
5 5 1 ,6 0 0 5 21 ,61 4
- J u l y 1 to s e p t 3 0 . . . ,
175,944 157 ,80 4

9 1,1 61
6 2,452
2 9 3 ,1 0 3
2 3 6 ,9 7 5
2 00 ,02 1
171 ,92 3
1,0115,451 1 ,5 1 3 ,8 9 2
7 2 2 ,3 3 3
6 6 1 .30 5
43
333
189
342
121
def. 229
5 2 7 .7 8 7
1 ,3 3 1 ,9 1 3

409 ,31 7
9 13 ,53 3

2 3 .0 0 5
3 6,5 13

15,074
3 1,2 73

7 6,3 14
1 70 ,18 8
def.1,70'2
def. 1 1,003
d ef.4 ,9 0 5

7 0 ,2 5 0
1 6 8 ,6 :8
d ef.4 3 3
def. 3.921
def. 1,479

3 ,3 5 1 ,9 8 1 3 ,7 2 6 .0 8 3
9 ,0 6 8 ,7 1 1 10.1 73 ,5 1 7
3 98.00-)
i
8 2 0 ,1 1 0
7 04 .42 4
•61 2.7 17
•5*9 ,4 8 6
*3.7 27 ,33 7 •3 .54 1 ,2 7 9
*5,7 37 .71 7 •6 ,0 1 2 .9 3 2
3 .2 0 8 ,3 0 2 2 ,7 5 1,29 9
7 ,1 5 3,23 1 6 ,5 7 2 .0 1 2
8 2,0 71
8 8 ,6 3 7
7 5 0 ,5 3 0
8 0 9 ,6 6 6
3 t l, 1 1 7
3 4 5 .0 6 3
7 2 ,2 9 7
173 ,71 1

7 1,0 15
170,556

115,211
8 2.8 92
6 8 ,0 7 3
3 6,4 38
7 8.1 61
4 9.740
0 0 2 .0 2 2
452.901
2 3 -,3 9 7
129,601
4 38
671
9,540
1 ,9 0 8
1 96 ,71 2
191 ,36 6
1 .3 1 5.32 3 1 ,3 1 7,17 4
1 ,1 7 1.47 1
9 72 ,77 6
1 ,1 0 7,58 1 u .g a o .m u
2 ,5 3 1 ,0 7 5 1 ,8 4 6,53 8
01.O U
3-1,031
2 1 3 ,1 0 3
2 02 .74 9
3 0 .7 7 0
4 0 ,2 3 0
2 17 ,63 1
19.9,07 J
1,314
2 .6 0 7
2 0 .7 2 0
5 ,0 0 0
2 5 .0 1 0
4 0.6 90
2 1 9 .8 5 0
1 5 1 ,7 0 6
82.763
1 0.7 06
2 ,1 1 2 .1 1 1 2 ,0 9 2 ,2 1 7
13,7 13 ,1 1 4 1 2 ,6 8 6 .1 7 0
In e. 137.137
Inc. 1 ,9 5 8 .2 3 6
3 5 .6 0 5
1 1,893
1 9 1 ,1 9 0
1 5 2 .95 0
19,287
19,618
151,331
111,798
8 5 ,6 2 2
6 1,111
1 2 7 ,9 3 8
1 2 1 ,07 9
8 5 3 .3 5 5
7 5 6 ,8 3 6
8 72 ,22 3
9 1 2 .9 0 8
6 .7 0 7 ,8 2 8 8 .2 6 0 ,0 1 0
7 ,3 9 2 ,4 9 9 7 ,0 4 0 ,2 3 8
d f.200 ,09 1 d ef.1 2,5 22
d f.5 0 7 ,0 3 0 d el. 2 3 ,4 1 8
9 4,0 36
d f.0 9 4 ,4 6 3
809,701
7 0 6 .2 1 2
8 ,2 9 0 ,5 9 2 0 ,2 3 6 .5 9 2
8 ,0 9 8 .0 2 6 7 ,1 )4 .2 7 4
8 1,0 23
151 ,06 8
4 2 7 .2 1 2
3 ,4 0 0 .0 6 3
1,005
279
9 7,0 35
7 1 3 ,5 0 8
2 9 2 .0 7 8
9 0 ,7 1 0
0 0 6 ,7 0 0

5 1,527
114.783
3 0 2 ,2 4 0
2 ,8 7 2 ,2 5 8
3 07
4,119
9 0.1 23
5 4 0 .80 5
2 0 2 ,8 2 0
7 1,017
4 00 ,93 1

1 7,3 42
7 ,2 3 2
1 6,933
181.471
6 3 ,9 2 0

3 8,8 07
8,4 8 2
1 4,497
18.3,203
5 0,1 66

919
-Gross Earnings.-

189*5.
1895.
1394.
1094.
$
$
$
$
2 6 ,3 1 2
2*n
,243
9,3 1 3
tiioh. A P ete rsb u rg . .S ep t.
4 ,8 2 2
2 5 4 .9 1 9
2 5 0 ,9 0 6
6 8 ,1 3 2
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ---6.1.939
S9 .S7 5
3 1 ,0 3 5
3 2,9 06
J u l y 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . .
1 7 ,4 9 6
3 4 ,8 3 0
2 4 ,0 3 6
4 2 .3 9 2
Kio G rande South. b .S ep t.
18.016
2 0 5 .74 1
1 49 .67 7
3 2 .7 6 2
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 ___
1 2 7 ,82 9
104.441
67.057
4 1 9 ,2 8 9
5 3.9 11
J u l y 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
2 3 3 ,4 2 6
2 1 8 ,24 9
1 0 1 ,43 9
8 6 .3 1 7
Rto G rande 'V e s t.b .S e p t.
1 ,7 1 9 ,4 9 3 1 ,5 2 4,2 35
6 19 .33 9
4 5 1 ,9 0 0
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3
6 7 5 ,0 8 9
5 5 9 .9 2 6
2 7 1 .3 2 2
J u l y 1 to Sep t 30 . . .
1 9 3 ,7 8 9
1 0,951
11,353
3 .5 8 5
f a r , Tns. A H u ro n . .S e p t.
4 .3 1 1
8 5 .3 4 1
8 3 ,7 1 9
1 7 ,0 1 7
2 1,1 02
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ___
7 .3 3 5
7 .4 0 3
2 ,0 2 4
3 a*. V alley A S t. L ..9 e p t.
1,6 .9
6 3.1 74
6 4 .0 0 6
1 2,737
J a n . i to S ep t 3 0 —
1 9,0 67
113,361
5 5.7 03
1 1 6 ,6 7 4
S t. Louis A lt& T .H .b Au*.
5 3 ,5 3 9
8 19 ,35 3
64 2.558
3 5 9 .7 7 2
3 13,911
J a n . 1 to A uc. 31 . . .
2 2 5 ,4 7 6
2 1 2 ,6 6 8
9 4,3 63
J u ly 1 to A n *. 31 . . .
1 11 ,05 2
St. Louis S o u th w e ste rn —
7 4 ,6 41
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 3 0 , . . 1 ,1 3 0 ,4 2 9 1 ,0 6 4.14 1
1 8 9 .6 3 9
3 7 6 ,8 6 0
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ___ 3,432,5.54 3 ,0 3 3 ,0 4 4
3 1 3 ,9 2 0
4 7 ,1 1 4
1 51 ,51 3
S t.P a u lA D u lu th .b ..A u * .
1 46 .74 5
6 0 ,1 8 1
»9 7 ,4 4 0
2 1 0 .5 4 5
8 9 9 .0 )S
J a n . 1 to A u* 3 1 — .
2 6 0 ,8 5 4
2 *1.398
2 7 0 .3 5 7
7 7 .6 0 i
J n l y l to A u*. 3 1 ___
1 05 ,15 7
2 2 3 ,4 4 2
103,471
2 6 5 .39 5
1 57 ,80 9
S an A nt. A A ran. P .S e p t
33 ,74 1
2 8 0 ,5 2 5
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 _
_ 1 ,3 9 6.17 3 1 ,2 2 6 ,7 4 2
8 2 .6 3 3
9 1 .0 2 9
3 4 ,3 * 6
4 1 ,2 3 4
San Fr. A N P a c .a ..- O e t
6 4 4 .3 4 0
7 0 0 .4 5 3
2 2 9 .6 2 3
J a n . 1 to Oet. 3 1 ___
2 6 2 ,9 2 5
3 3 1 ,8 9 0
34 4.549
133,067
J u ly l to O c t 3 1 _
_
1 6 0 ,1 5 6
2 6 0 ,12 4
2 7 3 .3 26
6 6.1 03
5 8 ,8 0 7
8 a v . F la . A W est.b .S e p t.
7 2 1 ,7 5 3
0 1 1 ,0 3 1
J a n . 1 to S e p t 30 . . . 2 ,4 4 3 .4 8 9 2 ,8 2 7 .3 8 1
7 79 ,71 7
7 8 1 ,3 0 0
1 8 7 ,71 5
J u l y 1 to Sep t. 30 . .
1 5 2 ,5 3 1
S tiv e r Sp . O oala A G o lf—
4 4,5 10
1 5,1 26
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . .
4 1.233
19.471
1 3 9 .5 2 3
4 7 .0 7 6
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . .
1 2 0 ,92 8
5 1 .9 3 3
10,195
4 .0 ) 0
7 ,3 8 »
1,947
S llv e r to n .......................S e p t
4 7,133
3 2 ,9 3 3
2 2,926
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . . .
1 3 ,0 )5
S o u th ern P aolflo—
4 1 9 .5 ) 7
G al. H A S . A nt. b .S ep t.
4 2 3 .1 9 0
1 6 3 ,7 6 6
1 7 3 .1 0 6
9 7 1 ,4 0 7
8 0 9 ,1 1 1
Jo n . 1 to Sep t. 3 3 .. 3 ,3 4 3 .6 0 7 2 ,9 44,989
1 09 ,30 0
8 2 ,1 7 3
3 0 .9 2 0
m u ls ta n a W est. b.Sep t.
6 7 ,3 1 8
7 0 2 .3 8 9
7 0 9 .0 8 0
3 3 5 ,7 2 4
J a n . I to Sep t. 3 0 ..
3 2 6 ,6 0 6
4 2 6 .0 3 0
-('v an 's La.A T .b .S e p t
5 01 .41 3
6 2 ,3 3 3
1 11 ,00 5
7 6 3 .4 0 1
J a n 1 to S e p t 3 0 .. 4 ,0 1 5 .3 3 9 3 .9 5 5 .0 7 0
6 )5 .7 3 1
2 2 ,9 4 9
N .Y .T ex. A M b .S ep t.
2 9 ,3 4 7
1 0,779
1 6 ,9 2 2
1 7 0 ,78 5
178 ,53 4
5 0 ,7 4 2
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 ..
6 2 ,2 5 8
1 37 ,21 2
1 3 9 ,40 3
T ex as A N. 0 . . b . . 8 e p t
5 5 ,1 1 5
5 2 ,9 7 0
1 .1 9 0 ,5 3 0 1 ,1 0 2 ,5 3 2
403,921
4 3 9 ,1 5 9
1 .1 1 2,61 2 1 ,2 2 0 .0 7 0
33 7,407
1 6 1 ,1 2 6
9 ,0 3 0 ,3 5 1 8 ,9 7 7 ,9 4 2 2 ,5 9 0 ,2 1 5 2 ,3 3 1 ,7 2 9
P aolilc sye te m b .S e p t 2 ,9 7 7,30 1 3 ,0 1 7 .1 2 1 1 ,1 3 1 ,9 9 0 1 ,2 3 8 .4 7 3
J a n . 1 t o S e p t 8 0 .2 1 ,0 9 1 .0 4 1 2 2 .8 3 8 .9 3 7 7 .7 1 1 .9 1 0 8 .1 3 5 ,7 3 7
T o ta l of a ll - . . . b S e p t 1 ,0 9 0,00 3 1 ,2 5 3,19 7 1 ,1 7 2 ,3 9 7 1 .7 0 2 ,5 9 0
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3
.3 3 ,3 2 7 .3 9 1 3 1 ,8 1 0 ,8 7 9 10,1 30 ,1 3 1 10,1 67 ,1 6 0
A fflllai-d lin e* b .S e p t
6 1 5 ,1 7 2
7 61 ,05 1
2 5 9 ,0 3 1
1 1 7 ,9 8 2
J a n . 1 to S ep t 3 0 . . . 4 ,0 5 1 .5 1 0 3 ,8 1 9 ,7 0 0 1 ,0 9 9 ,5 9 2
9 2 9 ,2 0 4
OcaaA T o ta l.b ...S e p t . 4 .7 2 1 .--.1 ’-.u 47,151 1,752.011 2 .1 1 0 .5 * 2
J a n . I to S e p t 3 J ...3 7 ,3 3 1 .5 1 1 3 5 ,0 3 0 ,8 3 9 1 1 ,4 3 7 .7 3 3 1 1.3 90 ,0 7 1
So. Pno. of C al b ..3 e p t
9 3 1 ,2 7 7
7 9 2 ,70 5
1 0 3 ,8 0 3
2 9 1 ,5 0 7
J a n I to S e p t 3 0 ,. 7 .6 4 0 .8 7 3 0 ,6 3 8 ,5 3 7 1,097,009 2 ,1 9 1 ,2 2 5
8o. P ao.uf A rlz'a b S e p t
168.611
190,079
1 3 ,1 0 0
7 8 ,0 1 0
J a n . 1 to S e p t 8 0 .. 1 ,0 0 6 .5 2 6 1 ,1 7 8,36 1
1 3 0 ,8 7 4
5 0 1 ,3 9 0
So. Pno. of N. M. b .S e p t .
8 0 .0 7 3
8 1 ,1 1 5
2 1 .3 5 8
3 .1 3 1
J a n . 1 to S e p t 30 .
7 7 3 ,9 8 9
071.151
2 2 8 ,2 6 3
8 1 ,7 9 4
N orthern R iH 'y b .S flp t
198,831
2 20 ,27 1
7 2 ,2 7 4
1 02 ,31 5
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 .. 1 ,1 1 3,44 3 1 ,5 0 6 ,2 5 0
2 0 5 ,3 0 1
5 3 9 .0 2 1
Southern R a ilw a y .a S e p t 1, 0 3 5 ,6 7 4 1, 5 31 ,83 1
5 0 8 ,0 1 0
5 1 7 ,1 7 1
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 ....1 3 , ,029,811 12 ,778,035 3 ,3 1 4 .7 5 0 2 ,9 2 5 ,3 3 9
J u l y 1 to S e p t 30
,00 1 .1 90 1 ,319,950 1 ,3 0 2 ,6 7 8 1 ,1 9 1 ,0 1 0
Staton I. R ap. T r, b ..S e p t
135,987
3.8.834
7 0 ,2 5 0
9 3 ,6 0 1
J a n . 1 t o S e p t '3 0 ....
8 1 3 ,7 5 0
9 1 6 ,5 0 1
3 9 7 ,0 0 3
3 1 2 ,5 0 9
J u l y l to S e p t. 3 0 . . . .
4 1 0 ,7 0 4
3 8 1 ,13 9
2 1 9 ,8 8 0
195,637
S to n y Cl. A C. M . .b .S e p t .
4 ,4 5 7
1,073
1.9 5 3
2 ,5 9 1
J a n . 1 to S c o t 3 0 _
_
3 0.7 01
3 8 ,6 5 0
1 0,845
1 8 ,3 3 3
J u ly l to S e p t 3 0 . . . .
2 4 .6 3 6
1 4,0 00
2 5 ,7 5 8
1 0,4 15
*00111111 B r u n e t t e ...S e p t
9 8.7 04
5 ,0 9 0 d ef.2 ,7 1 3
7 7 ,7 0 0
0 7 0 ,9 1 1
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . .
8 5 7 ,4 1 5
7 0,281 d ef.4 1 ,0 1 3
6 6 ,t9 0
Lyken* V a t C o a l.e .S e p t
7 9 ,0 7 4 d e f.5 ,9 0 1
1 ,7 1 0
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . . .
5 1 4 ,03 8
002 ,51 2 d e f.4 0 ,1 8 1 d ef.3 5 ,7 0 5
T o ta l both Co'o.o. O c t
2 02 .30 0
2 2 3 ,1 8 9
9 ,3 2 3
1 7,9 78
J a n . 1 to Oct. 3 1 ___ ,57 3 ,0 4 7 1, 190 ,94 2
3 9 ,1 1 8 d e f.5 8 ,7 7 0
Tex. S ab . V. A N, W.Bepfc.
3 ,3 9 0
8 00
3.837
1,201
J a n . I to S e p t 3 0 . . .
2 8 ,9 0 9
3 0,7 08
ToL A. A. A No. M ..J u n e
9 9 ,3 1 7
2 ,2 2 4
301
7 9 .9 0 8
J a n . 1 to J a n e 3 0 ___
5 1 6 .3 9 0
5 1 0 .7 9 1
0 0 ,4 0
1 3 2 ,2 6 0
Toledo A O. C en t. b ..8 e p t
179 ,19 7
5 8 ,5 3 2
7 8 ,9 0 3
2 0 7 ,5 0 0
J a n . 1 to S e p t. 3 0 . . . . ,3 1 5 ,0 2 2 1 ,2 9 2,51 9
3 6 8 ,07 1
4 3 0 ,2 2 4
5 4 3 ,3 6 0
6 1 0 ,61 1
J u ly 1 to-SApt 3 0 . . . .
1 8 3 .87 7
2 5 0 ,5 8 0
T oLPeoria A W est, b .O ot
100,312
0 1.1 91
2 9 ,1 0 2
2 8 ,2 3 1
J a n 1 to O o t 3 1 ___
8 1 7 ,52 1
7 3 9 ,1 7 8
1 7 8 ,45 1
1 5 7 ,3 0 7
J u l y 1 to O o t 3 1 ___
3 5 7 ,5 1 2
9 6 ,2 2 5
9 5 ,5 3 3
3 3 9 .0 8 7
T unn elton K iu * A F aro b—
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 3 0 ___
3 ,2 9 4
2 ,7 0 9
1 ,3 9 6
965
J a n . 1 tO S e p t 3 0 . . .
9 ,1 8 5
7 ,8 0 5
4 ,2 0 1
2 ,8 1 9
H a te r A D e la w 'e ...,S e p t.
3 9 ,0 0 8
10,161
1 1,1 35
1 1 .0 3 3
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 _
_
3 1 9 ,1 5 1
3 2 0 ,0 7 1
7 6 .2 6 3
9 1 ,3 2 9
J u l y 1 to S e p t 3 0 _
_
150,188
145,178
5 7 ,3 3 0
5 4 ,8 4 8
C olon P acific Onion Pao. K r ..b .S e p t 1 ,3 6 0,53 1 1 ,4 9 7 ,0 0 7
6 0 0 ,3 6 5
0 2 2 ,7 2 2
J o n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 ..1 0 ,1 8 4 ,6 4 0 1 0 ,6 0 7 ,5 2 9 3 ,7 8 6 ,1 7 2 3 ,2 7 8 ,3 0 0
Ore*. S .L .A C .X .b .S e p t.
5 2 7 ,6 0 7
2 3 3 ,8 1 7
1 3 2 ,5 0 1
1 3 2 .69 7
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 .. 3 ,8 0 9 ,5 7 1 3 ,6 4 8 ,2 6 2 1 ,5 0 7 ,4 9 3 1 ,0 2 0 ,1 7 9
6 2,2 41
8 t.J o s .A G d .J s l. b .S e p t
6 0,0 27
1 1,5 38
1 8,248
J a n . 1 to S e p t 30 ..
4 3 0 ,3 9 0
001 ,43 9
114 ,04 9
8 4,3 68
K an. 0 . A O m .I t...S e p t
0,8 2 9
7 ,1 4 3
d ef.7 8 8 d e f.2 ,9 0 2
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 ..
4 9,051
8 8,8 05 d ef.2 7 ,6 3 4 def. 1 9,940
C ent. B r a n c h ..b .S e p t
2 8,8 70
2 8,968
9 ,6 8 1
10,038
J a u . 1 to S e p t 3 0 ..
2 1 5 ,5 2 0
2 9 8 ,01 3
4 7 ,5 3 2
1 0 9 ,2 2 4
A to li.0 . A Pao. i .
A t-Jew .C . AW . i 11 ® ept
2 5 .0 2 9
3 0,7 50 def. 2,0 0 5
2,3 2 1
J a n . I to S e p t 3 0 ..
1 9 5 ,12 3
2 7 7 ,90 7 d ef.4 0 ,1 5 5
1 1 ,3 5 2
G rand T o t a l..b l...S e p t . 2 ,1 3 7 ,7 5 0 2 ,2 4 8 ,0 6 3
8 8 0 ,7 5 1
8 0 9 ,7 6 ’. 41
J a n . 1 t o S e p t 3 0 ..1 5 ,7 7 0 .1 1 7 1 6,9 0 6 ,2 9 6 5 ,4 7 5 ,7 8 3 4 ,5 7 7 ,0 0 0
tJn. P. D. A Gnlf. b . .. .Sept.
2 3 1 ,8 2 3
7 3 ,6 0 7
2 0 5 ,2 5 7
8 2 .4 7 0
J a n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 ___ 2 ,1 7 8 ,9 0 5 1 ,9 9 0 .2 0 4
4 1 9 ,3 0 0
3 5 3 ,7 0 0
Roads.

THE CHRONICLE.

920
.---- Oross E
taminu*.—
1894.
1895.
1
$
6 ’ .418
V *” Iu! y 1 lo ffc-pt, 3 0 . . . .
3 0 ....
153,v32
Jau
YU* Da
2.446
j u l f 1 10 HOpt,3 0 ... .
7.381
> 1 to B*pt., 3 0 . . . .
.
W »ba«h b. .......... ..P o p t 1.175,561
_ 9.1 9 6,16 3
l 1 to Sent..3 0 _
J u l r 1 to 8 * p t . 3 0 . . . . 3,523,451
Wftbaitb c Jmu. A w c a i’ u—
27.272
y i to Hcpt., 3 0 . . . .
_
63.873
.
Ja n y 1 to pt. 3 0 _
3 8 ,2 .9
Waco X North w'n ..S e p t.
171,211
J a n . 1 to Sept. 30 . . .
V allo y—
T a ik iil
V
5 0,570
f i to S**pt. 3 0 . . .
120,668
J a n . l to **ept. 30 . . .
156.798
r*ey X Br» ..rtopt.
W«wt J e
J a n . 1 to Sent. 3 0 . . . . 1,314,612
107,122
W**i V«l C ent. X l»..O ot,
920,669
J a il . i to Oot. 3 1 . . . .
415,919
J u l j r 1 to Oct. 3 1 . . . .
b
35,213
k
w , V lr* Inl» < Pitt? \ A ug.
242.894
J a n . 1 to Au<. 31 . . .
52,551
f
Weet'u (> Alnhaiuuk.8ept.
365,578
J a n . 1 to 8cpt. 30 . . .
132,077
JuH r 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
135.369
U?i n M ary lan d ..S e p t.
965,919
J a u ., 1 to Sent. 3 0 . . . .
Oot. 1 to S ep t. 30 . . . 1,275,469
W eet.N .Y ..fcP 6 an b 3 o p t.
292,326
____________ 3 0 _
_
,124.038
831,575
J u ly 1 to Sept. 3 0 —
125,718
W heeling < L E rie,. Aug.
fc
256,881
J u ly 1 to Aug. 3 1 ___
9.7 2 4
W rlgh tsv. & T en n....O o t,
69,834
J a u . 1 to O ct 3 1 . . ..
3 1,540
J u l y 1 to Oct. 3 1 . . . .

52/59
137,501

—Net Earning*.—

1895.
*
2 '.8 5 3
5 1,600

1894.
$
15,608
3 6 ,171

1,165
1,06*1
2,052
1.140
2,106
6,562
289,721
311.100
1 .0 7 5 ,5 1 1
8,402.310 2,187,002 1,889,390
833.251
3,066.966 1,125,019
2 1,640
60,229
36.039
143,948

9,387
20.92*
26,092
7 7,390

41,589
17.268
3 1,0 1
101,581
3 9,097
148,529
1 ,2 4 2,20 3
371,798
93,322
35,918
819.920
331,788
394,639
152.073
21,038
34.283
135,710
243,356
20,716
5 0.570
109,652
3 6 7 ,02 2
124,099
38,790
60,096
133,517
346,173
939,905
1 .2 0 3,17 4
155,323
319,042
2,270,701 li6 3 6 ,1 15
9 5 4 .3 0 7 l i 279.457
44,089
130,308
230,467
94,343
8,185 d e f . lJ 5 0
6 5,480
16,553
9,724
29,310

8.8P0
19,167
2 5 .0 '2
5 1.088
18.089
30,256
4 0,$ 7 <
356,114
30,651
277.311
132,216
20.338
133,615
20,157
95,('93
4 1,449
62,937
317.679
418.339
119 .13 7
708,061
378.622
3 *,024
59,248
4,970
21,763
10,462

a S e t e a rn in g s h e re g iv e n a r e a fte r d ed u o tln g ta x e s.
b S e t earn in g* h ere given a r e before d ed u o tln g ta x e s
c A fter d ed u ctin g oth er ex p en d itu res for re p a irs, rep lacem en ts and
g en eral expen ses, not Income ap p licab le to In terest on bonds In 8ept
k j <S lo t; ,010. a e a im t 870,372 la st y e a r , and for nine m onths to Sept. 30
$75 2 ,5 02 , a g ain st .*6,8 ,1 2 c ; a fte r adding earn in g* received from F ed­
era l G overnm ent net from J a n u a r y 1 to Sept. 30, 1395, w a s $ 7 5 .',5 0 2 .
a g ain st $72 5 ,7 88 . This Is the re su lt in .Mexican d o llars treated
(acco r.llu g to the com pany’s m ethod of k eep in g its aooouncs) as equi
v alen t to 80 cents In (Jolted S ta tes m o n e y -th a t is. alt d ep reciation
beyond 20 per cent has a lr e a d y bean allow ed for.
d F igu res for 1895 do not in clude resu lts on A lb an y F lo r id a * Xovtliern a lt e r A ugu st 14, w h ile the figures fo r 1894 do
e R esu lts of coal m in in g op erations o n ly.
B Is eluding other incom e, the n et for October w as $S1,1 32 , a g a in st
$70 ,23 9, and f. om J a n u a r y 1 to October 31 $29 8 ,9 86 , a g a in st
$392,30* for 1894, and from J u ly 1 to Ootober 31, $172,941, a g a in st
$173,815.
l i Included In expen ses for Septem ber, 1895, is $ 1 8 .2 6 ', and fo r J u ly
1 to Sept, 30, 1*95, 816,228, whloh iu form er y e a rs w ould h a v e been
ch arged to betterm ents.
1 m iln- Septem ber q u a r te r th e p resen t y e a r, but not last year, e a r n ­
ings of Concord & M ontreal a re Included.
* A fter ded u cting proportion duo roads o p erated on a p ercen tag e
basis and Including resu lts of op erations of a u x ilia r y com panies, n et
m J u ly , 1995, w as $10 5 ,3 91 , a g a in st $37 7 ,6 73 in 1 8 9 1 ; for sev en
m onths euded J u l y 31 $2,0 18 ,7 / 4 , a g a in s t $ 1,913,345, a n d for ten
m onths from Ootober 1 to J u ly 31 $ (,6 98,721, a g a in s t $3,7 19 ,1 4 0.
I Includes on ly oue-balf of lin e s in whioh Union -Paoilio has a p a rt
Interest. F igures a re given e x c lu siv e of re su lts on O. ogou R a ilw a y *
N avigation. Union Paoiflo D enver * Golf, F o rt W orth & D enver C ity ,
Leavenw orth Topoka * S ou thw estern a n d M o n tau a Union
II In clu d in g incom e from ferries, &o.

M iscellaneous Companies.
- Gross Eamings.-

Net Earnings-

[Vox.,

l x i ..

*
-Inter '/, rentals, tC — -Bal. of Net Earns.—
c

l* 9 o .
1 c 94.
1894.
1895.
$
$
$
$
112 ,91 0
*42,144 ’‘ d ef.1 9 ,0 5 7
115,763
Chic, it E a s t I llin o is Sepd.
3 4 1 ,51 0 * 1 1 4 ,6 4 3
*18 ,49 7
347 ,19 8
J u ly i to Sept. 3 0 . . .
3 3,0 94
8 ,2 7 3
3 6,2 40
9 ,8 6 1
Ohio. A W est M ic h ..S e p t.
2 9 8 ,04 7 d ef.3 4 ,6 8 9 d ef.9 0 ,1 1 1
3 0 5 .47 4
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ___
2 39 ,91 9
2 3 8 ,62 9
121 ,91 5
1 0 9 ,8 9 0
Olev. Cin. Oh. A St. L. Sept.
7 04 ,95 3
7 0 8 ,82 0
2 5 9 ,1 5 6
7 5 ,8 8 0
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ---9 ,6 L9
3 6,8 02
3 6,8 02
4 ,5 6 3
P eo ria A E a ste rn ..S e p t.
1 1 0 ,40 5
1 10 ,40 5
2 4,2 98
1 1 ,8 7 7
J u l y 1 to Sep t. 30 . . .
2 0 0 ,1 0 6
201,388
8 5,5 38
9 9 ,7 7 4
D enver & Rio G r'de.Sept.
607 ,17 2
2 8 3 ,0 4 2
5 85 ,44 0
125,653*'
J n ly 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . . .
2 8,532 d e f.2 .3 7 7
2 9,998
def. 46 A
Det. L ana. A N o r....S e p t.
2 70 ,88 9
269,579 d ef.8 5 ,8 6 0 d f.1 3 5 ,0 2 6
J a n . l to Sep t. 3 0 —
D uluth & Iro n R a n g e —
8 3 1 ,6 2 4
2 1 3 ,05 2
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 30 . . .
5 1 ,2 4 6
5 1,005
9 ,6 3 4
F lin t A P e re M a rq ..S e p t.
9 ,6 8 9
1 0,0 21
4 59 ,95 5
4 6 3 ,39 8
2 0 ,4 4 1
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 —
10,208
10,444
’* 305
K an aw h a A M ich__ Send.
'7 3 6
3 0,814
3 1,9 19 *def.4,343 * d ef.2 ,1 0 6
J u l y 1 to S ep t. 3 0 —
1 2 1 ,33 0
1 13 ,07 0
8,719
K an. C. F t. S. A M ...S ep t,
6 ,1 4 6
331,14.4
3 4 2 ,1 9 0
2 3 ,1 7 3
J u l y 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . . ,
1 8,523
13,867
1 1,229 d ef.6 ,4 7 1 d e f.9 ,5 8 6
Kan. C. Mem. A B lr.S e p t,
4 1 ,6 0 4
3 3,6 87 d ef.2 3 ,7 5 0 def. 18 2 39
J u l y 1 to Sep t. 3 0 —
6 0 ,1 4 0
5 7,5 60
8 4 378
L. E rie A W est’n ___S ep t.
9 9 ,8 7 9
5 21 ,50 7
5 07 ,33 6
6 2 1 ,2 1 2
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 —
5 4 4 ,3 3 2
8 4,6 79
8 3 ,5 6 9
L ousy - N. A. & C h ..Sep t,
3 6 .1 1 6
1 9 ,7 7 7
2 5 1 ,66 0 . 2 4 8 ,6 3 0
1 2 6 ,»2 9
J u l y 1 to S ep t. 3 0 —
4 9 ,6 7 2
125,225
130 ,73 2
Nashv. C hat. & S t .L .. Oot.
7 4 ,7 9 9
4 1 ,1 9 1
5 0 0 ,89 9
5 1 2 ,5 7 2
2 2 1 ,4 3 4
J u ly I to Oot. 31 . . .
148,7 332 30 .65 0
2 2 6 .2 2 3
P itts. C. C A Sr. L . . .Oot.
1 9 6 ,5 9 3
7 6 ,0 3 1
J a n . 1 to Oot. 3 1 — 2 ,5 9 3 ,3 1 5 2 ,3 5 2 ,8 6 3
8 1 2 ,71 8
5 1 9 ,3 9 5
3 ,5 5 7
3 ,5 5 7 def. 1,533 d ef.1 ,9 3 8 Sag. V a lle y A S t. L.-Sept.
3 2 ,0 1 9
3 2 ,0 1 0 def. 19,2 73 d e f.1 2 ,9 4 3
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 —
t3 6 ,4 5 4
135,65 4
1 9,2 49
St. Lo uis A lt. A T. H . Aug.
1 7 ,8 8 5
1263,817
1267,06 L
9 5,9 25
J a n . 1 to A ug. 31
8 6 ,8 5 0 167,291
163,388
2 7,0 77
J u ly 1 to A ug. 3 1 ---4 1 ,9 6 4
17,129
1 7,233
c a n F ran . & N o.P ao...O ot,
1 7 ,2 6 7
2 7 ,0 0 1
171 .91 6
J a n . 1 to O op. 3 1 ___
172 ,98 1
5 7 ,7 0 7
8 9,9 44 .
6 8,516
6 8 ,9 3 2
J u ly 1 to Oot. 31 —
6 9 ,5 5 1
9 1 ,5 2 4
48,735
5 9 ,7 0 0
Tenn. C oal I. & R R .Oot.
7 3 ,5 9 9
1 3 ,0 0 0
4 98 ,31 5
59 7,600
J a n . 1 to Oct. 31 . ..
3 2 2 ,0 7 2 df. 1 0 8 .2 0 0
3 8,231
3 3 ,2 9 i
Toledo A Ohio C en t-Sept.
”2 0 ,4 6 9
*45 ,73 9
119, ,48
1 0 2 ,59 1
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 30 . .
*6 4 ,9 6 9
*14 9 ,3 3 1
23,029
2 3 ,4 9 6
W est J e r s e y A B rs .Sept.
1 6,063
17,383
233,361
1 9 5 ,94 9
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ___
1 1 1 ,4 3 7
1 6 0 ,4 6 5
Hoads.

* A fte r a llo w in g fo r o th er incom e reo eiyed .
f T h ese c h a rg e s a r e sim p ly for Cases a a d r e n ta ls of le a s e d lin e s a n d
do n o t in c lu d e bond In terest.

STREET R U L W A I S AND TRACTION COMPANIES
The folio wing table shows the gross earnings for the latest
period o f a l l s t r e e t railways from w hich we are able to obtain
weekly or monthly returns. Tne arrangement o f the table is
the same as that for the steam roads—that is, the first tw o
columns o f figures give the gross earnings for the latest
week or month, and the last tw o colum ns the earnings for
the calendar year from January 1 to and including such
latest week or month.
_ STR E ET R A ILW A Y 3 A N D T RACTION
_
G ross
E a r n in g s .

Latest Oross Earnings.
Week orhto\ 1895.

1894.

COM PANIES.
Jan. 1 to Latest Date.

1 89 5 .
$

1894.

B a ltim ore T r a ctio n ... O c to b e r..
9 9,238 8 9,8 7(
9 35 ,31 5 827,540
B ath St. R y . (N. Y .) .. O c to b e r..
1,764
1 ,5 9 6
1 8,676
17,065B in g h a m to n St. R y ... S ep tem b 'r. 12,553 12.597
9 7,075
90,741
EdlsOnEI.ILCo.,N.Y.Oot.
6 2,717
68,62 6 B rid g e p o rt T r a c t io n . Istw kN o v.
4,231 2 6 0 ,0 1 0 1 1 0 ,9 3 9
5,59*
J a n . 1 to Oct. 3 1 . . . .
7 0 3 .4 H
623 ,91 8 B r o ck to n Coil. St. R y. O c to b e r.. 2 5,763 23,651 2 3 1 ,97 5 189,286
Ed. El. nLCo., B k lyn Sept.
2 5,720
6 2,548 5 3,561 2 6 3 ,09 5 256,684
13,295 B r’ k ly n Queens & Sub J u n e ........
J a n . 1 to 8epc. 30___
155 ,25 3
120,563 B r o o k ly n T ra ctio n —
A tla n tio A v e ........... O c to b e r.. . 82,851 89,312 7 0 6 ,26 8
E rie Teleg- Jc Teleph. Co,813,998
B r o o k ly n B. & W. E. O c to b e r.. .
6,1 5 4 1 35 ,64 3 1 13 ,77 6
7,937
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . ..
274 ,84 2
258,798
111,826
tS ,0 8 4
T o ta l.................
O c to b e r... 9 0,788 9 5,466 8 5 3 ,04 5 942,620L acled e Gas-L. C o ...S e p t.
............................... ..
65.188
6 4,794 B uffalo R y .................... S ep tem b ’r. 146,735 1 31 ,18 6 1,252,574 1,138,161
J a n . ] to Sept. 3 0 ............................ \
586,086
536 ,17 6 C h ester T ra ct io n ........ Sep tem b’r. 23,221 21,397
M exican T elephone. Aug.
9,1 1 2
8,3 8 0
4,399
54,131 56,537 4 3 1 ,9 2 2 4 0 7 ,0 7 0
3,143 Chic, v So. Side R. T. J u l y —
M ar. 1 to Aug. 3 1 . . . .
5 5,810
5 3,720
27,040
23,061 Ciu. N e w p o rt & C ov .. S ep tem b ’r. 6 1,092 50,461 4 6 6 ,5 9 6 364,844C ity E leo. (R om e.G a.) O c to b e r...
M ilw au kee Gas-L.Co. .Oot.
1,693
12,370
4 5,498
4 0,5 77 C ity & Suburb. (Balt.) A
J a n . 1 to Oet. 3 1 ..............................
318,161
269,148 C itizens’ T ra c.,P ittsb . J uulg u st___ 102,55
y_
_
53,391 49,075
Oregon Im p. C o .a ...S e p t.
270,517
308.684
37.189
4 4,9 30 C lev ela n d E le e t r io ... J u n e . . .
135,063 148,812 6 91 ,19 7 607,577
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . . 2 ,4 0 9,94 5 2 ,8 4 6,06 6
283,573
514,822 C olu m bu s R R . (G a .).. J u n e . . .
*5,027
*19,795
Deo. 1 to 8 ept. 3 0 . . . . 2 ,6 8 7,20 1 3,127,013
3 05 ,46 6
536,365 C olum bus 8t. R y. (O.) 2d wkfNov. 10,957 10,239 547 ,59 1 49i',538Paoiflo M all.................Sept.
321 ,02 6
297,725
49,795
35,100 C o n e y Islan d & B ’ lyn. O ctober. .. 2 5,367 22,043 3 3 5 ,7 5 s 274,589
J a n . 1 to S e p t. 3 0 . . .. 3 ,2 7 8,58 1 2 ,8 6 2,18 6
587,729
443,281 C o n so l T rae. (N. J . ) .. S ep tem b ’r. 245,538 201,885 1 ,8 6 9 ,6 3 5 1,566.420
M ay 1 to Sen t. 3 0 _ 1,8 0 8,89 $ 1,622,838
_
307,838
315.068 D e n ve r C on. T ra m w . O c to b e r... 6 9,103 5 8,913 604,287 607,350
Tenn. Coal L a R U ...O o t........................
7 ,6 1 0
3,795
122,334
72,700 D e rb y S treetyR y ......... S ep tem b ’r.
J a u . 1 to Oot. 3 1 ................................
u th
R .............
820,387
189,400 D lelutrioSt. ra e., P hila S ep tem b ’r. 18,797 18,737 1 5 6 ,67 7 15 i',033
E e
T
S ep tem b ’r. 247,024 163 ,28 2
n e t ,r<R“ l t fOr tfio su b sid ia ry com panies a fte r d ed u ctin g E rie E lec. M otor C o .. Sep tem b 'r. 14,952 1 3,409 114 ,35 1
the dtv d eed s pa d by those com panies. Of th e d iv id en d s so p a id .Flushing & C ollege Pt. O o to b er.. .
1,67$
1,151
G a lv e sto n C i t y K y ... O c to b e r... 17,634 16,643
184 ,63 9 105,650
1895 a g a ln « t w i tha a 7 b ?.b 0le*rapU * T elephone Co. in th e q u a rte r in
iS 9 o , a v a li st $(,1 587 In the q u a rte r in 1891. The B rie Telegraph & H e s to n v ille M. & F.—
A r e h S tre e t___
O c to b e r... 3 4 ,2 0 4 19,328
du n '
' 011 tB l’ “ 'r
0111 $ 18 , 0oo of th is in both y e a r s in *
R a c e S tre e t........
cm idem l o le n e per cent, lea v in g a su rp lu s of $ 2 5 .l5 u iu 1895 auaiimtO c to b e r...
8,36z
2,6 6 7
T o t a l ................
$ 1 3 ,V 7 in 1894, which ad d ed to the abo ve su rp lu s of the su b sid ia ry
O c to b e r... 4 2,5 66 2 1,995 406,954 251,444
E foosick R y ...........
Ootober. ..
•om^anit-8 m akes tne com bined su rp lu s iu 1895 $ 3 6 ,9 7 5 , a g a in s t $ i f f
680
9,6 3 7
In te rsta te C onsol, of
N orth A t t l e b o r o ... S ep tem b ’r. 1 2,293
interest Charges and ■ u rp lu s .-T h e following roads, in L eh igh T r a c t io n ......... O o to b e r...
9,487 10,200
99,499
_
2,577
addition to their gross and net earnings given in the foregoing, L ock H a v e n T ra ctio n A u g u st_
L ora iu St. R y ............... O ctober. ..
6,784
6 8,436
also report charges for interest, &e., with the surplus or deficit L ou isv ille R y ............. Sep tem b’r. 1158724 105,025 966,698 875,604
above or below those charges.
L ow ell L aw . & H a v .. Ootober. .. 30,83z 23,324
363,431 2 3 8 ,0 1 3
L y n n & B o s t o n ........... 2d w kN ov. 21,645 20,018 1 ,2 4 5,32 6 1 ,1 2 7 ,5 0 9
^
renlalh & - ~ ' '-Bat. of Net Earn*-. M etrop. (K a nsa s C ity) A u g u st___ 164,153
M e tro p o lita n (N. Y .). S ep tem b ’r. 571,113 483,700 4 ,3 8 i j 587
Boat,.
18s9 5 ’
189 4 ’
««■
1894.
M etrop .tW ask ., D. C.) 12 d a ysS ep
7,410
4,175
rOumdf-u A A ll......... 8 ept.
12,232
12,821
2 3,0 06
20 630
M o o ig o m e r y St. R y .
c to b e r...
4,640
4,031
28,018
4 2 jl0 8
J a n l t o B e p t - J O ....
128,998 1 15 ,89 4
160,’l i l M on trea l S treet R y ... O ctober. .. 102,323
O
88,293
Cblc liu r l * G dlnoySept.
8 15 ,00 0 797 ,24 8 6 7 1 ,03 5
427 656 N ash ville 3t. R y ........ M a y............. 2 7,867 27,22:*
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 ---- 7 ,3 3 5,00 0 7,175’, 2 2 9 7 9 3 ,5 1 3 1,5 3 7 ’, i l l N cw b u rg E le c t r ic ___ Octobor. ..
6 ,5 9 1 4,548'

1895.

1891.
' *
148,219
148,555
1 ,1 6 9,37 7 1,32 ‘,440
56,338
3 5,1 83
399 ,96 2
283,007

1895.

1894,

$

$

THE CHRONICLE

N ovember 23, 1895.]

Latest Earnings Reported, Jan. 1 to Latest Date-

921

— Gross Earnings.-----. ------ Net Earnings.------ .
1894.
1395.
1695.
1 89 4 .
*
$
$
1 3,797
1 8.7 37
1 0 .7 5 4
D uluth S treet R v.-Sep fc.
1 1.1 06
$
$
«
156.6 7
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 30 . . .
1 5 1 ,0 3 3
8 7, <H6
6 . =>19
K ew E n g lan d 5 t.—
$
5 7 ,4 ai
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 30
3 4 ,2 (2
3 2 ,0 3 4
5 7 ,8 12
W in ch ester A v e — O ctober. .. 1 6,280 16,114 2 0 1 ,5 1 7 177,701
2 ,"8 7
1,9 5 7
2 5,705
2 6.1 40 F o rty-Sec.St.M u n h .A St.N .A v e —
P iy m ’th Jt K ingston O ctober. ..
J u l y 1 t >Sept 30 .
16 i,12L
1 64 ,85 5
2 6,1 49
3 2 ,1 6 8
T o ta l.......................... O ctober. .. 13,37^ lu ,0 7 l 2 2 7 2*>2 201.841
New H av en 3 t. R y . .. S ep tem b 'r. 19,592 14,>57 150,049
9 2,4 76 F lu sh in g & C ollege P t R y
5.777
6.168
4 .2 8 1
J u l y 1 to Sep t. 3 J —
7 ,5 0 6
N ew London S t R y .. S ep tem b ’r.
1 ,28 5
New O rujaus T raction latw k N o v . 32,032 2 0,3 IS 1 ,13",391 8 03 ,00 2 G alveston C ltv R R .a .O c t.
1 7,6 U
4 .6 8 l
5 ,4 5 2
1 0,043
N ew ton S t. R v .___. . . J u n e .......... 10,048
8.9 5 7
1 3 4 .6 J9
J a n . 1 to Oet. 31 —
165 ,65 0
6 7 , >28
5 3,126
N. Y. & H a rie o i.......... S ep tem b ’r.
7 52 .55 9 804',700
In te r-S ta te Cons 0 . S tr e e t
N ortham pton S t. Rj>.
R y. (No- A ttleb K .S ep t.
1 2,2 93
6 .1 3 6
6,324
(M a ss . /..
.............. A u g u st_
_ 10,315
5 8.203
_
O g le n sb u rg S t. R y . S ep tem b 'r.
3.0 3 5 . . . . _
Ja m e sto w n 8 tre e t R y.—
39.411
3 4 ,1 6 3
I 'a te r .o n R y ----------- O ctober. .. 2 >,385 2 1.109 247 ,97 9 2 03 ,76 9
J u l y 1 to S co t. 3 0 ___
P eo p le's T ra c. IP h iiiw S ep tem b ’r. 194,103 137,331 1 ,5 3 3 .5 -8 885.8 (7
JaU 1 to Sept. 3 0 . . . .
7 4,0 33
6 8.4 13
_
2 3.506
I’ortsm o u tli S t. B y . . . A u g u st_
1 9,3 30 L a k esid e R y. (M ali a n o y.P a .)
PoTteepei^ A W app F . S ep tem b 'r. 12.002 . . . . . . . .
7 3,1 55
3 ,7 1 3
J a n . 1 to J a n e 3 0 ___
1 0,500
B ead iu g T ra c tio n ........ S ep tem b ’r. 2 0.138 16.641 142,539 124,342
L eh igh T ra c tio n , . a . .Oot.
1 9,200
2 ,7 9 9
9.4 9 7
5,2 4 8
3 ,2 5 6
3.227
R oano ke S tr e e t........... O c to b e r...
9 9 .4 9 9
3 7,401
J a n . 1 to Oot. 3 1 _
_
7 1,389 0 8 ,8 0 0 719 ,75 3 616,122
B o c b e sie r B y ............. O ctober.
4 5.435
2 0,455
J u l y 1 to Oet. 3 1 _
_
S ep tem b 'r.
8,107
9,5 3 0
ScliuylSU J! T ra c tio n ...
5,543
4 .8 1 4
S c h u y lk ill V ai. True.. J u l y ............
6 ,7 3 4
L o rain S tre e t R y ........Oot.
3 ,3 3 8
Borax.ton T ractio n . O c to b e r... 2 0,417 2 1.6 10 2 43 ,43 2 2 0 9 ,03 3
J a n . 1 to Oet. 3 1 ___
0 8,430
3 2,5 13
Seeond A ve. (P ltw b .j O ctober. .. 3 9.0 08 2 1 ,2 -3
115 8 ,7 2 4
>92.116
L o u isv ille R a ilw a y . Sep t,
105,03^
4 3.5 48
0.075
7 ,9 2 3
StoiXX C ity T ract io n ., O c to b e r...
........
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 30 . . .
8 7 5 ,0 0 1
■468,590
9 0 0 .01 3
4 0 1 ,8 5 3
...............
25,773 10,0 7
........
9 ,2 9 4
L o w ell L u w r'eeA Q ,O ot.
2 3,3 24
3 0.9 32
4 733
13.258 17,398
S y r a c u s e C onsol.......... O ctober.
3 8 3 ,43 1
2 3 3 ,0 1 3
J a n . l to Oet. 3 1 ___
1 33 ,50 7
0 3 ,8 0 7
2.978
6yraen.Be fc*» e-Sldc B y. O ctober. ..
S y r a e a s e S t, K B.......... O ctober. .. 2 1,767 11,874 199,390 12 3,507 L yn u A B oston ........Sept.
111,728
135.952
6>
.417
9 1 ,6 8 8
7,571
T au nton St. B y ........ .. J u n e . . . . . .
3 4.3 88
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 — 1 ,0 )4 .8 4 9
501 ,30 1
9 8 3 ,7 1 7
4 1 4 .7 3 *
8 .6 1 120,7 4
T erre H a u te Kl’e, B y, O ctober. . 11,998
8 3 ,2 2 6
Oct. 1 to Sep t. 30 . . . 1 ,3 3 1 ,3 8 9 1 .2 1 8 .1 »9
5 9 3 ,9 9 7
4 9 2 ,1 0 0
T hird A re . ( 5 . V i
sep tem b 'r. 235,331 204,375 1 .9 9 3 ,3 2 s 1,558,206 M ark et S tr e e t B y .—
T oronto B y . ............... S ep tem b 'r. 1 8 .29 • 104,130 7 4 0 ,0 8 9 7 2 ),2 6 4
J an . t to J u ue 3 0 _
_ 1 ,4 3 9,53 3 1 .5 1 9,53 9
4 8 8 ,02 1
5 1 1 ,3 5 3
107,402 188,554 1,0 3 3,03 b 1 ,6 5 2.05 1
T w in C ity B a p .T r .t i. O ctober.
Union <X. Bedford). Octot»er.
15,507 12,861 1 05 ,01 2 141,54/ M etro p o litan S tre e t R y.,N .Y .—
J u ly i to Sep t. 30 . . . 1 ,5 3 2,12 5 1 ,3 0 7,33 2
7 32 ,07 3
5 1 6 ,6 2 5
U nion Hy, (S .e in a w i S ep tem b 'r. 11,551
9 9,5 3
........... .. 1,901,2*45
J a n . l to s e p t .jo . . . . 4 .2 5 1 ,5 6 3
U nion B y. (S a ra to g a ) J u n e ..........
1.575
2 .1 4 U n ited T. a t tP ov i S ep tem b ’r. 1 .8 ,3 4* 149,291
4 ,64 )
2,501
M ontgom ery St. K y..O ot.
4,0 3 1
2 ,3 4 3
4,109
3,3 1 5
W akefield A ^totie . . . O ctober. .
47,923
3 2,5 11
J a n . 1 to Oot. 3 1 . . . .
4 2 .1 0 3
2 1,0 13
1 3 ,0 9 7
1 0,6 72
2 0 3 055
W a te rb a ry T r a c tio n .. O ctober. .. 2 2,4 36
2 7 ,8 6 7
N u h v llle S tre e t Rv M ay
2 ,’ ,221
1 2,136
1 2 ,1 6 2
W ent E nd i Boston}
Oeto ,e r. .. 6 3 5 .00 0 0 45.000 0 ,4 5 9,00 0 5 ,7 4 1 ,0 0 0
M ay l to Apr, 3 0 ---3 0 4 .4 7 0
3 11 .99 6
125 ,52 7
1 0 i.9 > 7
314
33nj
W ert sdxer© iC oun.). O ctober. ..
6 ,5 9 2
N owburgb E l-o. R y . .O ct.
4 ,5 tS
2 ,4 3 2
1,003
W Hkeab.A W y .V a lte j October. .. 4 1.106 3 5,275 3 00,23* 324,039
4 6.919
3 2 ,7 9 1
2 5,5 15
J u ly 1 to Oot. 31 . . .
1 8 ,8 6 3
3,0 9 2
.............|
W iiin io g io n s t r e e t . .. S ep tem b ’r.
2,i*0J
Wor©«*u?<- C onsol........ S ep tem b’r. 4 4 ,0 4h 3 5,0 20 3 2 4 ,9 2 0 ' 2 7 2 ,4 4 4 New London S t. R y.S e p t.
5 ,7 7 7
2 ,6 2 0
6 ,1 8 8
2 ,0 4 0
8 1,5 73
New O rlean s Tract..*tepfc.
5 0.1 98
2 3 .9 1 7
U 1.648
* R ead to p ro e e n .o f r*co n «trn eu o o .
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . . ,
9 8 6 ,1 1 4
4 11,210
0 9 1 .5 1 7
2 3 3 ,5 5 9
I E arning-) luc.-ea ck la r g e ly on a c c o u n t o f O. A. R. en e a m p m c u l In.
X
N. Y. A ITarlem —
1 >7.629
2 >7,733
5 0,8 17
J u ly t to Sep t. 3 0 . . ..
5 7 ,7 0 1
J a n . 1 to SepL 3 0 ....
752,-559
8 0 4 .7 0 0
2 5 0 . • 85
2 9 1 ,5 1 0
Street R ailw ay Net E araiajfs.— Ia the fo llo w in g wry s h o w
10.315
6,311
0.-151
North »m p;oo S t.R y . 4 u s.
4 ,0 5 9
b oth the grout an 1 the a c t e&raiag* to latest d u e s o f a il STR3KT
J a n . i to A ug. 31 . . .
5 8 ,2 0 5
.... ...
........
2 8 ,5 5 4
ra ilw a ys froua w hich w e have been able to p rocu re m on th ly
O akland (Qftl.i C on«oL —
J a n . 1 to J u n e 3 0 . . .
6 2,3 42
10,2 43
returns. A s in the case o f the steam r o a l s t h ) retu rn j o f the
O akwoud S t. B y ........S ep t.
........
3 ,0 0 0
d ifferen t roads are published b y us e a ih w eek as so m a i r e ­
2 1 ,1 0 9
2 3,3 85
1 0,833
P aterson R » llw a y ....O e t.
8 .1 8 3
ce iv e d , and o n ce a m >uth (on the th ird or t in fou rth S a tu r­
J a n . 1 to Oet 3 1 , . . .
2 4 7,979
•201,709
1 0 1 ,81 0
7 2 ,0 3 5
rV
1 2 ,0 0 !
4 ,* 5 0
d a y o f the m onth) w e b ria g alt the roads rep ortin g togeth er, P*It’p*.C ity A V FH l’i sep .
J * n . 1 to S ep t, 3 0 _
_
7 3 ,1 5 1
2 1.7 27
a s i* d o n e t o - d a y .
71.3.99
6 8 .8 0 0
3 3 ,3 9 0
R ochester R a ilw a y ,,.O c t.
3 3 ,8 9 5
w— Gross I t f r iim a i,— a
—
Earnmat.— —
J e n . 1 to Oct. 31 . . .
7 1 1 .7 5 3
6 1 8 ,13 2
2 9 1 ,3 2 7
2 6 1 ,5 2 1
1894.
1895.
1993.
1894
s b n y lk tll T ra ctio n . .9) p t
9 ,5 3 6
8 .1 0 7
5,335
2,9 8 7
toaris.
1
»
•
*
S cran to n T ractio n , .O et.
2 0,4 17
2 1,0 10
1 8,979
9 ,3 0 7
A lb a n y Kail w a r —
113.X10
J a n 1 to Oet. 31 . . .
2 4 3 .4 3 2
20,1,1)33
8 1 ,0 7 3
d u ly t to 6«?pt. 30 . . .
1 43 .14 7
1 2 6 ,5 '3
0 1.1 94
3 9 ,5 0 4
J u ly 1 to Oot 31 . . .
112,035
9 1,203
5 9 ,4 9 0
3 8,7 51
3 2 3 ,87 6
1 5 7 ,0 .3
Jam , 1 t o -e,*t. 3 J . . .
3 8 7 ,43 5
119,9 45
B a te s tr e e t Rv .......... Oat,
1,590
7 93
1.764
85 Second A re. r r (N. Y .t—
J u ly 1 to S ep t 3 0 . . .
2 8 4 ,59 3
2 7 » .« 2 I
0 4 .7 4 0
8 8 ,2 3 3
17,*>05
J » u . 1 to Oes. 31 . . .
l* ,« 7 0
0 ,4 9 0
3,9 4 9
J a r i. 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . . .
7 5 9 ,1 2 2
1 *0 ,2 29
7 1 9 ,9 9 1
172,703
B im rb a m o n S t. Ry Sept.
12,597
6 .S37
0 592
lM U
Sio ux C ity T rue'Ion Oct.
7 ,9 2 1
0,0 7 5
957
2 ,0 0 2
J * n . 1 to S e p t 3 0 . . .
8 7 .0 7 5
9 0 ,7 *1
4 1 ,3 2 0
3 9 ,5 3 8
S tein w ay R a ilw a y —
14, V20
3 5,9 76
B rid g ep o rt T ran t'n O j A
1 2 .4 0 J
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . . .
1 07 ,34 3
0 8,0 27
5 2 ,4 0 0
3 0 ,1 3 0
1 00 ,70 9
J a n , 1 to O a t 31 . . .
2 5 1 .(1 2
1 23 ,07 4
Brae kton b a i t , H y..O et.
23,7 ©3
21,051
10,5 21
1 1 .3 8 0 T h ird Ave. R R . IN. Y.>—
J u ly 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
7 2 5 ,71 9
6 1 4 ,8 1 9
301 ,8 44
3 5 8 .7 0 2
2 3 1 ,9 7 5
0 5 ,0 2 1
Ja n . 1 t o O c t . 3 1 ....
1 8 J.2 9 0
9 1 ,9 2 7
J a n , 1 to S ep t. 3 0 ___ 1 ,9 9 8 ,3 2 0 1 ,5 5 8 .2 0 0
7 3 2 ,3 0 1
9 0 8 .3 2 8
8 * k iy a 0 » A N e w to w a —
108,299
104,130
0 3,6 03
5 3,374
J u l y 1 lo Heps. 3 0 . . .
137,801
1 18,137
5 5,535
0 7,5 70 Toronto S tru c t R v .. Sep t,
J a n , 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . . .
7 1 0 ,0 3 9
7 23 ,20 1
3 7 3 ,4 2 0
3 1 6 ,4 5 4
B ro o k ly n B . l k f c t - b T ro y C ity —
J o i y 1 t » S e p t 3 0 , . . . 1.2
1 ,3 0 4,71 7
566,711
5(15,754
J u ly l to Sep t. 30 . . .
1 38 .48 9
7 2 ,2 7 0
118,910
6 1,7 09
8 5 0 ,1 1 0 1 ,263, UO
J » a . 1 lu S e.-t. 3 0 ___ 2 ,6 9 t,5 3 i 3,39SS,'I7S
J a n . 1 to » p f c 30 . . .
3 6 1 ,8 0 7
3 1 6 ,8 1 7
1 7 9 ,1 8 i
1 61 ,55 3
5 3.581
B 'k ly a Q ua* a* S Sob. Ja n e
t
19,131
62.V46
3 4 ,9 7 2
168 .55 4
Twin C ity R ap id Tr .O ct.
1 0 7 ,40 2
9 8 ,5 5 7
9 3 ,5 7 1
2 4 3 .0 9 3
2 5 6 ,0 8 1
J*a. t to Jan # 3 0 a ..
7 4.877
4 1 ,3 6 9
J a n . 1 to Oot. 31 . . . 1 ,0 3 3.03 0 1,6 >2,051
9 2 8 ,8 0 2
9 0 8 ,0 9 2
B ro o k ly n T r a e tio a —
1 1,4 96 U nion R y. (N ew York)-—
A t, Art tic Aveau© .J u ly
6 6 .5 3 3
9 2,5 14
3 4,7 89
J u ly 1 to Sep t. 30 . . .
0 0,3 05
6 9 ,1 6 6
135 ,37 5
1 38 .33 8
4 6 2 .24 0
5 5 9 .4 3 7
J ad. 1 to J u l y 31
d ef 129
2 1 2 ,0 6 4
Jn n . 1 to Sept. 30 . . .
3 ii,o a
3 8 3 ,7 2 2
1 15 ,81 0
1 7 3 ,74 3
2M T 7
2 8 .9 1 8
11,90 >
R k ly t i B A W E nd ro ly
13,929
11.55 4
U nlonSt. Ry. ISav' w j.S ep t.
6 ,2 5 3
J a n . X to J u l y 3 l„ .
7 3 ,7 3 4
2 7,305
.... . . .
J a n . 1 to Sopt. 30 . . .
9 9 ,5 7 8
4 3,375
103.469
4 .037
4 2 ,3 7 1
T o ta l ................... H«pt.
102 ,90 7
570
493
1,575
2 ,1 4 7
7 6 3 ,25 7
8 47.100
121,019
3 1 7 ,3 9 7 Union R y.o f S ir a t* a .J u u o
J a n . 1 to S ep t. 3 0 . . .
VS'ab rb u r/ T racilon ..O ot.
2 2 ,4 3 0
8,1 6 2
Buffalo R a ilw a y . ..8 « p L
1 4 5.73 >
0 0 ,2 4 1
1 3 1 .19 1
7 0 ,3 7 7
J a u ' * Oct. 31 . . .
2 03 ,05 5
8 4 .1 9 5
J a n , 1 to Sept. 3 0 _ 1 .2 3 2.37 4 1 ,1 3 9,16 1
_
0 0 9 .5 3 9
4 9 3 ,2 9 3
2 3 3 ,0 1 2
4 59 ,58 9
4 1 0 ,99 4
131 ,07 7
J u l y 1 to S ep t. 3 0 ___
W cidcheeter E le c tric J u ly 1 t ■s e p t 3 0 _
_
3 8,1 52
2 8,656
8 ,2 0 5
1,116
1 ^.9 >
1
5 0 ,5 3 7
9 ,8 5 2
C alf-A So S u le K T . b Ju ly
54,131
107,211
5 3 ,1 3 7 W llkeab. A W y. V aL .O ct.
4 31 .92 4
407 ,07 3
J a n . t to J u ly 3 1 _
_
4 1,1 00
2 1,6 79
3 5.9 75
1 9 ,2 6 0
Jn n . 1 to Oot. 3 1 _
_
3 2 4 ,0 3 9
1 91 ,18 3
3 0 3 ,28 8
1 0 7 ,0 0 6
1 5,141
2 1 ,9 9 7
...
C h e ster (P a.) T r a c t .8 « p t
23.221
J u l y i to d e p t 3 0 . . , .
.... ...
4 0 ,1 1 0
7 4 .1 9 7
W ilm ington S t. R y . S ep t.
3,0 9 2
2 ,9 0 0
1,328
873
1 8,0 79
6 1 .0 3 2
5 9,401
2 7,7 10
C lan . N ewp, A C iv .S ep t.
W orcester C o n .8 t K y.Sep.
3 5,6 29
2,2 7 2
1 3,3 92
4 1,0 18
9 >,43 4
400 . V 1 ;
3 6 4 ,9 4 4
11 9,10 9
J a n . 1 to Sept. 3 0 ___
110,711
O et. 1 to Sep t. 3 0 ___
4 5 9 ,0 9 0
3 5 1 ,53 4
0 8 ,5 1 1
3 2,3 90
7 4 ,1 0 2
0 4 ,2 >9
3 0,658
CU lreae* of In d 'n ap . Apr.
a Net e a rn in g s her© g iv e n a rc a f t e r d ed u ctin g ta x e s ,
9 3 ,2 5 )
108 ,22 9
264 ,39 3
2 3 5 ,9 1 0
J a c . 1 to A p r. 3 0 . . .
b Net ea rn in g s h ere g iv e n a r e befo re d e d u c tin g ta x e s .
1,691
531
........
C ity E lec. ( R om e,G *. )«iO ci.
] R oad In pm ce^e of reco n stru c tio n .
1 2 ,170
3,9 1 3
A p r - 1 In OeA 3 1 . . . .
t E a rn in g s for S ep tem b e r la r g e ly in c re a se d by G, A . R. en cam p m e n t
in L o u isv ille .
4 8 .0 2 2
C ity A S ub .R y (B a lU A u g .
1 0 2 ,5 5 9
4 7 ,3 5 7
1 3 5 .0 J3
1 48 ,91 2
58,19,3
C lev ela n d E le ctric .J u n e
In terest Charges and Surplu s.—The fo llo w in g street rail­
2 0 0 ,3 2 3
2 3 3 ,77 3
a n , 197
0 0 7 .3 7 7
J a n . t to Ju n e J o . . .
ways in add ition to their gross a n d n et earn ings g iv e n in the
........
j 1,536
15,027
C o tu is b w BB . | 3 a .U J u n e
1 1,785
J a n . 1 to J u n e 3 0 _
_
foregoin g also rep ort ch arges for interest, & c,, w ith th e sur­
2 5 ,2 1 2
2 5 ,1 2 3
9 2 .0 9 8
4 1 ,0 30
C oInm tm tlO .i St. R y, Out.
2 4 8 ,5 3 7 plus or deflc a b ove or b e lo w those ch arges.
470,035
269,031
6 2 4 ,58 9
Jan. 1 to O ct. 31 . . .
r-Tnta 'st, rentals, A c.-, —7J«i of Net Earns.-,
C on ey I sla n d A. B A lyn ,—
1 89 5 .
1894.
1895.
1804.
5 3 ,6 4 5
115,905
7 2,991
Ju ly 1 to S e p t JO . . .
1 3 4 ,76 0
Roads.
$
$
9 0 ,0 1 9
2 5 2 ,31 0
137 .95 7
J a n 1 io S ep t, 3 0 . . .
3 1 0 ,3 8 0
D en ver Done. T ram ..O ct.
1 7,491
17,737
1 0 ,8 9 6
5 ,8 7 9
2 3 .0 1 0
5 8 ,9 13
2 9,397
0 9.1 03
D e a r e r Con. T ram w . Oot.
J n u . 1 to Oct. 3 1 . . . .
1 7 4 ,3 6 8
177,211
5 7 ,3 0 9
5 5,1 48
2 3 3 ,3 5 9
2 31 .73 5
0 0 6 ,3 5 0
J a n . 1 to O ct. 31 . . .
6 1 4 ,2 9 7
L o u isv ille B y .........Sep t.
*40,181
*37,036
5 2 ,2 3 5
1 0,0 52
743
4,3 5 0
3,7 9 5
D erb y S tre et R y .. 8 -p t.
7 .6 1 0
J a n . 1 to Sep t. 3 0 . . .
*34 1 ,4 9 0 *34 3 ,9 0 8
1 2 4 ,00 4
5 9 ,9 5 0
D ry Dock E. K. A B»M»—
5 8 .1 1 4
196,755
1 82 .96 2
4 9 ,8 4 8
J u l y l to 8apL iO .. .
* Inolu il b proportion o f 5 p e r ce n t d iv id en d on $ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 p re fe rr d
103 ,18 8 sto ck.
131,071
J a n , 1 to S ip t. 3 3 . __
5 51 ,03 0
432 ,77 5
E ak m n g s.

Week or Mo

1895.

1894.

1895.

1894.

Roads.

LHE CHRONICLE.

9*22

ANNUAL
A n n ual Kr|»<

lie f o llo w in g is a n in d e x to a l l a n n u a l
ids a n d m is c tilla u e o u s c o m p a n ie s w h ic h
tln> C h r o x io l e s in c e th e la s t is s u e of
m u st .
R e p o rts o f s t r e e t r a i l w a y s w ill
s u e o( t h e N o v e m b e r S t r e e t R a i l w a y

.u .m n l l ................. son, (Ctt : M t»«m rt K a n sas & T e x a s ................... M

, * {•
uau.li<« .......... 7Is Northern PneUe.......................
*
, . ;te! I Pullman's PulueuCar...................
r,.|............. ..717. 7.’2 |Scuttle ljikoShore A ISnstorn.......
:
i . rr»’ Haute .......... T South Carvllnu k Georgia..........
it)
I ■v ■......C ttru
.
M l.................

*?g
747
7*7
747
8^7

.... ................. s* > Western N. V. & Penn......720, 710, 7ol
A

lla Hi more A Ohio Railroad.
Report fo r the year ending June SO, 1895. J
nual report of Piesident Chas. F. Mayer w ill be
• w h e re in t h e CHRONICLE.

uparmive statemeui ot operations, earnings, charges,
hree years is as follows :
O PERATION S, BARKIN GS AN D EXPENSES.

MHe$ o p erated Ju n e 30

1894*85.
2,005
‘

1803-94.
2,065

1892-93.
2,053

..........
16,080,423
13,357,175
16,356,405
T e n * f r e ig h t o a r r te
id le ..2 ,4 7 0 ,8 2 2 ,8 0 8 2 ,1 6 0,91 9 ,4 7 2 2 ,6 9 1,67 5 ,4 2 4
T o n * f r e ig h t c a r ’ d .
8,207,608
9 ,6 2 6 ,9 2 8
10,956,456
P a s s e n g e r * c u r r ie d .........
2 97 ,82 5,9 22 4 1 9 ,8 5 9 ,8 8 6 40i ,401/165
F ii* * o n g e r * o a r ’d . I r a il
a
$
■
$
H o r n in g s fr o m —
15,591,062
5 ,0 4 9,09 7
706,603
611,738
858,662

13,9 16 ,4 7 6
6 ,4 3 1 ,0 5 8
6 99 ,62 0
674,971
789 ,53 7

17,561,997
6,617,929
586,879
659,631
788,371

T o tal e a r n in g s ....................

2 2 ,8 17 ,1 8 2

2 2 ,5 02 ,6 6 2

26,214,807

G eneral ex p en ses............
C onducting tran sp o rtatio n .
M aiuicnune? of » quipmeilfc.
Mttim. of w ay and stru ctu re

1 ,6 1 5,08 4
9 ,2 1 7 ,0 li
2 ,0 9 2,71 6
2,846,233

P a A fio n g e ra .. . . . . . . . . . . . .
M a i l . . . . . . . . . .......................
E s p r e s s ....................................

M^CtllAUenUS.................

O p era tin g E x p en ses—

1894.
$
2 ,5 1 5 ,2 4 1
9 0 6 ,5 2 5

1 ,1 8 5 ,1 5 4

9 7 7 ,0 5 9

1 .3 8 7 ,5 0 0
4 2 ,9 5 4

3 ,0 6 2 ,8 9 6

3 1 4 ,01 4
4 17 ,62 1

321,3882 71 ,18 8

$

s. d o es not in c lu d e a n n u a ls in t o - d a y 's C h r o n i c l e .
»_
jpam
Volume 01—
Page.

j l U .l l (

2 .6 1 0 ,3 7 5
9 7 8 ,42 0

1895.

REPORTS.

i.

IttY.

[V ol. LXI.

1,732,394
9 , 104,139
2,0.52,106
2 ,6 7 2 ,0 5 0

1,797,501
10,599,664
3,3*3,488
3,261,329

B ills and a cco u n ts re ce iv a b le ......... .....................
M aterials o n h a n d (su p plies, fu e l, e t c ) ...........
Due fro m a g en ts, cu rre n t fre ig h t and p assen ­
g er b a la n c e s ........... .................................................
Cash w ith d e p o sita rie s held fo r c o m p le tio n o f
term inals co v e re d b y term ina l lo a n ...............
Cash in h a n d s o f officers an d a g e n t s ........
Cash in h a n d s o f fo re ig n and d o m e stic a g en ts
to p a y co u p o n s nu e J u ly 1 ...............................
C ash in hand s o f T re a s u r e r ........... ................—

1 5 0 ,0 6 7 ,8 0 7 1 5 2 ,6 1 3 ,4 3 8
T o ta ls............................ ............................
L ia b ilitie s —
3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 ,0 0 0 .0 0 0
1st p re fe rre d s t o c k ......... ........................................
2,0< 0 ,0 0 0
2 , 00 (>, 000
2 d p re fe rre d s t o c k .................................................
C om m on s i o e k ...............................
. ........... - 2 4,9 9 7 ,7 0 0 2 4 ,9 9 7 ,4 0 0
2 ,3 0 0
2,6 0 0
687,375
687,-575
2 1.6 7 1 .0 0 0 2 5 .8 0 1 .0 0 0
2 8 ,4 6 9 ,0 6 0 27,54 6 ,0 0 0
2 1.2 1 4 .0 0 0 2 1 .4 9 4 .0 0 0

G roun d r e n t lie n s .....................................................
Bor d ed d e b t secu red b y m ort. lien m ain line.
B on d ed d e b t secu red b y mttr. lien an d c o lia t’ l
Bonded; d e b t secu red b y c o lla te r a l.....................
L oa n 1 8 9 4 (term in als), d u e 19 34, D eo. a n d
•June, 4 1 p e r Sent.......................... ...................
q
B on d s a ssum ed b y the B a ltim ore & O hio R R .
D u e to sin k in g fu n d s............................................
D iv id en d s an d co u p o n in terest u n ca lle d f o r ..
Due to B. & O. E m p loyees’ R e lie f D e p t ..........
Due o P ittsb .& W est.E m p loy ees’ R e lie f Dept.
D ue to P itts b ’g J u n c.E iu p lo y e e s’ R e lie f Depb.
W ashington B r a n c h ........... ...................................
O ther ro a d s........... .....................................................
Traffic b a la n ce s due co n n e ctin g lines .............
A e c ’d in f. on fu n d .d e b t & loan s to Ju neS O ........
A ccru e d rentals to J u n e 30 .............................
A ccru e d ta x e s to Ju n e 3 0 .....................................
Special lo a n s a n d bills p a y a b le ..........................
P a y-rolls fo r J u n e, p a y a b le in J u ly ....................
A c co u n ts p a y a b l e ....................................................
In d ividu als a n d c o m p a n ie s ...................................
Due T erm in a l p r o p e r tie s ......................................
U nclaim ed w a g e s ......................................................
W ages a tta ch e d ..........................................................
P ro fit an d lo s s ...........................................................

8 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
6 80 ,00 0
107 .15 7
2 0,5 97
3 8 5 ,7 5 2
18,196
1,1 5 0
8 6 1 ,62 8
1 ,3 7 9,36 8
3 2 ,3 6 7
1 ,2 3 6 ,1 9 8
3 2 3 ,2 9 3
272,7(53
4 ,0 1 9 ,4 4 0
8 1 9 ,29 8
1 ,7 5 1 ,6 3 5
8 6 5 ,94 0
1 ,3 8 7 ,5 0 0
3 2 ,7 8 4
9 .2 7 2
2 5 ,2 9 2 .0 8 5

8 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
6 80 ,00 0
9 6 ,8 4 2
2 0 ,6 8 0
3 0 5 ,63 1
8 ,3 5 9
8 ^ 9,1 89
1,74 8,5 1 3
1 0 2 ,56 2
1 ,2 2 2,77 3
2 9 1 ,7 0 6
2 6 1 ,26 2
4 ,1 1 9 ,6 5 4
7 3 0 ,9 1 2
2 ,6 7 9 ,1 7 2
1 ,6 7 3 ,3 7 2
3 1,7 6 >
8 ,9 3 6
?4,7 3 3 ,7 2 6

T o ta ls............................................................................. 1 5 0 ,0 6 7 ,8 0 6 1 5 2 ,6 1 3 ,4 3 3

Haltim ore & Ohio Southw estern B a ilw a y .
('Report f o r the year ending June SO, 1895.J

The remarks of President Edward R. Bacon in the annual
Total exp en se*..................
15,8 01 ,0 4 4
1 5,560,689
19,041,982
report are given at length on a subsequent page.
Net e a r n in g s ... ..................
7,016,138
6 ,9 4 1,97 3
7,172.8V 5
The results for the years ending June 30 were as below :
P er eeut oper. ex p . to earn .
69-25
69-15
72-64
OPERATIONS FOR TEAR ENDING JUN E 3 0 .
The above earnings are analyzed by divisions as follows :
• G ross E a r n in g s — s
—
1894 95.
1893-94.
Y e a r e n d . J u n e 30.
$
#
M ain Stem Div’u. . I0,8i 6,337 1 0,685,629
P arker*'tirg BPnoll. 731,421
753,401
W ashington B r’nch. 6 24 ,v !2
656 ,56 1
P hilad elp h ia L in e ... 1,776,317
1,833,842
PKtMmrg D i\ision. 3,016,727
2,602,333
W h»-el.P.tt*.AU.Div
633,775
489,447
M idland D ivision ..
399,910
3 47,3u0
C en tral Ohio Dlv’n 1,106,602
1,069,428
Luke Erin Division
714,171
706,093
S tr a its v M e D iv’n.
123,572
99,623
Chicago D ivision .. 2,500,715
2 ,8 7 0,54 7
Akron D ivision . . .
393,794
388 ,45 8

,------- Net
1894-95.

E a r n i n g s ------.

$

4 ,1 4 2,10 7
167,717
174,410
558,482
921,141
81,161
98.004
206,833
108,487
def. 2,015
504 ,88 0
54,931

1893-94.
$
4,107,708
175,084
205,001
514,070
709,312
def. 10,019
75,732
166,658
128,400
def. 12,445
815 198
69,274

T o ta ls .................. 2 2,817,182 2 2 ,5 02 ,6 6 2
INCOME ACCOUNT.

7,0 1 6,13 8

6,941,973

1894-95.
Net e a rn in g s ........................................... $ 7,0 16 ,1 3 8
A dd oth er incom e................................ 1,627,595

1893-94.
$6,9 41 ,9 7 3
1,982,857

1892-93.

m T o ta l........ ............................................ $8,6 43 ,7 3 4

Net earn in ga W ashington b ran ch .

174,410

57,172,825
2,251,377

8,9 2 4,83 0 $9,4 24 ,2 0 3
2 0 5 ,00 0
213,537

A v ailab le incom e...........................$ 8,4 69 ,3 2 4 $8,7 1 9 ,8 3 0 $9,2 10 ,6 6 6
Deduct—
Inr. on boDda, re n ta ls, ta x e s, <fco..$6,759,643 $ 6,5 22 ,5 8 1 $6,697,225
D iv id e n d s o n c o m m o n B to c k .........................................
l,i2 4 ,9 3 5
1,249,854
D ividends on p referred stock.................................. 300,000 ,00 0
300
300.000
T o tal......................................................$7,0 59 ,6 4 3 $7,9 47 ,5 1 6 *8,2 47 ,07 0
S u rp lu s....................................................... $ 1,409,681
$77 2 ,3 1 4
$963,587
From w hich paid—
Car tru st bonds....................................... $ 550,000
$ 550,000
$ 5 5 0 ,0 '0
To C ity o l B alt, for P. < C. R R ..........
fc
40,000
40.000
4 0,100
Cash a p p ro p ii’ua to sin k, f u n d s ,...
58,058
58,058
58,058
8om. < Cam. RR. trad io bonds................................8,500 13.000
fc
25.000
W heel age oar tru st p a y m e n ts................................ 113,606
99,289
86,653
$760,347
T o ta l........ ............................................ $77 0 ,1 64
$759,711
L eav in g a b alan ce of............................ $63 9 ,5 17
$11 ,96 7
$ 203,877
GENERAL BALANCE SHEET JUNE 30.
.
1895.
1894.
Assets—
«
$
Cost o l ro a d .................................................................
3 7,197,227 3 7,146,226
B ridge over Ohio R iv er at. Ben wood, \V. V a ..
1 , Os 2,818
1,032,818
B rid ge over Ohio R iv. a t P ark ersb u rg, W. V ..
1,353,424
1,353,424
HoUiug e q u ip m e n t................................. .................. 12,711,561 12,886,705
R ea l fp ta te —
cost 10 co m p an y................................
4 ,3 5 6,76 1
4 ,3 5 6,62 4
Cost of o ih er roads—
B altim ore A Ohio & C hicago R a ilro a d ..........
9 ,2 4 7,45 0
9,247,450
Ohio & B altim ore Short Lino R a ilro a d .........
—
291,901
290,240
Skipulsh B ranch R R ..............................................
10,435
B ull W ash. & A lex. B r’oh of th e W ash C ity
& Point Lookout H R ...........................................
540,000
540.000
P h ila d elp h ia Branch R a ilro a d ..............
7 ,2 4 0,50 7
7,172,348
E quipm ent of B. & O. c a r t r u s t ..........................
•1,277,5;0
3,860,062
Sin kin g funds—
On acco un t ste rlin g loan, d ue 1P95................
3,799,412
On acco un t ste rlin g lo an , due 1 9 0 2 ................
5,27.8*988
4.905,988
On account s ie tlln x loan, duo U ilO ...............!
3 ’a 7 6 ’ l9 2
3 ,1 1 8 ,. 0
On account sH Tliiig IciiUj.duo 1927. . ........
968 000
6 86,688
i)ii um o u n t B ait. W ash. A A lex. B la n c h of
c
Wnnii, c it y a P oint Lookout KR. C o..........
7 9,000
79.000
Uiiiny =teu in crem en t aud ap p ro p riatio n s ot
aln sin x funds.................................................................
107 157
96.842
held by tru stee s 39,560,’ B7 39,5 60 ,1 8 7
ijn in i- am) fiook- of o ilie r co rp o ratio n s.......... 17,3 03 ,6 9 7 16,805,172
AUTiuioi-a i"f co naiiu o ilu n , ito ..............................
4 543 157
4,124,071
lin e Ironi 01 In r railro ad s In g en e ra l aooouut.
zldOSiflOS 2,111,609
Af.unn oaianoes duo from couneollng lin e s ...
412,913
4 23 ,12 4

1 894-5.
922
M iles o p erated J u n e 3 0 ...................................
P a sse n g e rs c a r r ie d ............................................. 2 ,4 5 0 ,4 5 3
P assen gers c a rrie d one m i l e ........................ 8 4,3 3 5 ,1 5 5
R a te p e r p asseD ger p e r m ile ........................
1 9 5 cts.
Tons m o v e d ............. ............................................... 3 ,6 7 8 ,0 3 6
Tons m oved one m ile.
R ate p er t o n p e r m ile ...................................

189 3 -9 4 .
922
2,40.1,478
8 0 ,1 8 2 ,3 6 7
2-03 c te .
3 ,5 7 3 ,1 2 6
------------------

0 * 7 8 4 c ts .
4 ,0 6 4 ,1 9 4
1 ,6 4 5 ,0 7 6
3 3 5 .2 8 0
1 7 9 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,454
8 9 ,0 3 2

0 -7 9 9 ets.
$
3 ,9 0 2 ,0 4 6
1 ,7 4 5 ,7 8 7
3 3 5 ,0 1 7
1 7 »,i 009 ,2 8 9
8 9 ,0 5 8

6 ,3 2 3 ,0 3 6

6 ,2 6 0 ,1 9 7

6 2 3 ,7 1 7
6 3 0 ,3 8 9
4 2 9 ,7 6 7
2 ,3 3 3 ,2 3 2

5 6 3 ,7 2 2
. 7 0 9 ,8 0 5
4 5 3 ,3 7 4
2 ,2 3 7 ,1 0 2

4 ,0 1 7 ,1 0 5
2 ,3 0 5 ,9 3 1
2 ,2 5 0

3 ,9 6 4 ,0 0 3
2 ,2 9 6 ,1 >5
2 ,2 5 0
2,568

T o ta l in c o m e ..............................................
D e d u ct in te re st on b o n d e d d e b t ...............
R e n ta l B. < 0 . 8. W. T erm inal C o ........... .
fe
T a x e s an d a sse ssm e n ts..................................
In terest b a la n c e ..............................................

2 ,3 0 8 ,1 8 1
1 ,7 6 1 ,4 8 6
6 0 ,0 5 0
2 7 0 ,2 4 6
4,3 9 3

2 ,3 0 1 ,0 1 3
1 ,6 9 4 ,3 5 3
5 7 ,5 ' 0
2 6 4 ,7 3 0

T o ta l d e d u ctio n s .......................................
Surplus i n c o m e ...............................................

2 ,0 9 6 ,1 2 5
2 1 2 ,0 5 6

2 ,0 1 6 ,5 8 3
2 8 4 ,4 3 0

Earnings—

$

F re ig h t........ ».......................................................
P a sse n g e r................................... .................
M a il............................................ ........................
T e le g r a p h ............................................................
M isce lla n e o u s...................................................
T o ta l e a rn in g s ..........................................
Operating e x p e n s e s —
G en era l e x p e n s e s .............................................
M ain ten a n ce o f w ay an d stru ctu re s........
M a in ten a n ce o f e q u ip m e n t..........................
C o n d u ctin g t r a n s p o r t a t io n ........... ............
N et e a r n in g s .....................................................
D iv id en d s C entral U n ion D e p o t S to c k ..
In te re st b a la n ce ...............................................

tire at N orthern R ailw ay.
(R ep ort f o r the year ending June SO, 1895.J

The annual report of Mr. J. J. Hill, President, is given at
length on subsequent pages, together with the revenue and
the income account, and the general balance sheet.
The earnings a n d expenses of the Great Northern Ry. com­
piled in the usual complete form for the C h r o n i c l e , are
shown below for four years. The Great Northern proprietary
lines are not included here, being stated separately by the
company.
OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.

M iles of r ’d J u n e 3 0.
Equipment—
L o c o m o tiv e s..............
P ass. eqaL m enfc...
F re ig h t eq uip m en t.

1894-95.
3 ,7 3 0
412

318
1 3,818

O p era tio n s -

1893-94.
3,721

1892-93.
3 ,7 0 9

1 8 9 1 -9 2 .
2,873

412
318
1 3,818

4 00
286
13,431

327
268
1 1 ,9 3 7

P a s * .c t r r ie d (N o.).. , 1 ,0 5 8 ,7 9 8
1 ,0 2 0,97 6
1 ,4 3 3,93 9
1 ,6 0 0,55 3
P ass, ca r. 1 m ile .. 7 2 ,7 0 0 ,4 4 6 7 6 ,6 6 3 ,7 4 1 8 4 ,9 16,282 8 2 ,3 3 3 ,4 1 7
A y ra te p. pas. p. m.
2*551 cts.
2 361 ota.
2*525 cts.
2-464 cts
F r ’ g h t (t nst ear’ d 1 .
4
2 ,9 4 6 ,9 2 0
2 ,5 9 3 ,7 4 9
3 ,1 0 3 ,6 4 7
2,9 iti, 7 0 6
F r’b t (t’ns) car. 1 iu . 1 02 2 17 31 5 4 7 9 9 ,3 0 6 ,8 14 8 5 4 ,1 2 3 ,8 2 5 787,8.80,742
A v . ra te p . ton p. m ,.
1 ’014 cts.
1-096 cis.
1*232 c is.
1-234 ets.
Earnings—
$
$
$
$
P a sse n g e rs.................. 1 ,8 5 4 .8 2 2
1 ,8 1 0 ,3 3 0
2 ,1 4 5 ,2 9 3
2 ,0 2 8 ,9 4 9
F r e ig h t ......................... 1 0,3 6 *,032
8 ,7 6 2 ,9 8 4 1 0 ,5 2 2 ,8 0 5
9 ,7 2 >,486
M ail, ex p . .re n ts,& c .
8 9 0 ,03 6
7 7 2 ,04 3
8 5 4 ,48 3
8 5 4 ,6 9 3
T o t.g ro sse a rn ’g s . 1 3 ,1 0 9 ,9 4 0

1 1 ,3 4 5 ,3 5 7

13,522,581^ 1 2 ,6 0 4 ,1 2 8

CHE CHRONICLE

XovaitBBB 23, 1895.}
1893-91.

1891-92,

E xp en ses—
M a s-a iof w a y . e t c .. .
N U iot o f fticojiin ’ t..
T ra n sp b ria tion .........
G e n e r a l ......................
T & xea ...........................

18 94 95.
$
1,9 09,313
95 0.9 3 7
3,5 5 0 3 9 9
72 9,5 1 3
4 5 9 ,1 1 6

1,7 67,4 47
855,63 6
3 ,2 1 9 ,1 7 2
6 4 6,62 5
411,94 3

1892-93.
$
2,1 0 7 ,4 1 3
1 ,0 45,4 19
3 ,4 1 3 ,2 7 7
7 0 9,30 7
3 7 5,55 4

T o t a l.....................
N et e a r n m g s .............
P . ct. o f e x . t o earns.

7 ,6 0 5 .6 7 8
5 ,5 0 4 ,2 6 2
5 8 -0 1

6 ,9 0 0 ,7 2 3
4 ,4 4 4 ,6 3 4
60 -82

7 ,7 1 0 ,9 7 0
5 ,8 1 1 ,0 1 1
57 -02

7 ,5 0 0 ,8 4 9
5 ,1 0 3 ,2 7 9
59-51

* N o t in clu d in g c o m p a n y ’ s freig h t.
INCOME ACCOUNT,
18 94-9 5.
1893 94.
M u ltip le —
8
$
5 ,5 0 1 ,2 6 2
4 ,1 4 4 ,6 3 4
N et e a r n in g * .............
13 3,19 7
11 3,91 7
la t .o n b o n d s o w u 'd .
7 3 1 .6 3 1
1 ,0 8 4 ,6 0 8
Itiv on s t 'e k a o w n ’d .
:
K e n t .o ( le a sed line*
2 2 6 ,6 4 0
I n t. an d e x c h a n g e ..
2 1 .912
2 4 8 ,0 9 9
5 3 ,6 5 5
1 0 9 ,-0 7
B ib s r e c e iv a b le ........
179,071
15 8,08 1
O th e r I n c o m e ............

1 8 92-9 3.
¥
5 ,8 1 1 ,0 1 1
2 4 4 ,0 4 0
7 0 ,1 3 6
19 1 ,5 1 9
2 5 6 ,6 8 9
9 2 ,8 3 0
16 3 ,3 3 9

1 8 9 1 -9 2 ,
$
5 ,1 0 3 ,2 7 9
3 4 0 ,1 8 7
1 8 ,0 3 6
1 7 8 ,2 5 6
2 4 9 ,7 6 3
1 3 5 ,6 3 0
17 ,547

6 ,8 1 2 ,0 9 3

6 ,4 3 6 ,1 5 0

6 .8 3 0 ,1 6 3

6 ,0 4 2 ,6 9 8

5 ,3 7 2 ,5 9 0
1 ,2 3 0 ,0 0 0
15 p . e.)

5 ,3 1 2 ,6 5 5
1 ,1 8 7 ,5 0 0
(5 p. c.)
4 0 ,1 5 0

4 ,6 4 7 ,1 4 9
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
(5 p. o . )
681

4 ,0 9 9 .2 2 4
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
(5 p . a.)

T o ta l....................

$

2 ,2 4 1 ,5 1 3
99 5,06 8

3,289,90i
604,752
367,551

D ieb u rtem en lt—

K e m .-S t.P M .A M .R y
D lv » o n fU .N o. at’ek
K ate o f dividend___
M ls c e lla n e o a s ..........

T o ta l d isb a rs t*. 6 .6 2 2 ,5 9 0
6 ,5 1 0 ,3 0 5
5 ,6 1 7 ,8 3 0
5 .0 9 9 ,2 2 1
B a la n c e ................... ... su r.1 8 9 ,5 0 8 d e l.1 0 4 .1 5 5 ar 1 ,1 82,3 33 su r.9 4 3 ,4 7 4

Kansas City Meinphi* & Birm ingham R ailroad.

923

now seems to be no doubt that a large proportion of the lake
tonnage from Chicago will in future be loaded at South
Chicago.
Statistics.—Tbe comparative figures of earnings, expenses
and charges for four yeais, and the balance sheet for three
years, compiled in the usual form for the Chronicle, are as
follows ;
18 94-9 5.
18 9 3 -9 4 .
1 8 9 2 -9 3 .
1 8 91-9 2.
T on s ca rried 1 m ils .1 2 6 ,8 2 4 ,6 1 6 1 3 7 ,9 8 3 .5 7 8 1 2 6 ,8 2 1 ,9 4 8 1 0 2 ,5 7 2 ,8 6 6
$ 0 -007 2
A y ra te .p .tcm p e rm .
$ 0 -0 0 6 8
$ 0 -0 0 7 6
$ 0 -0 0 6 8
*
*
E a r n in g s —
$
1 ,0 5 0 ,8 1 2
F rom freigh t, A c —
99 0 ,0 1 8
8 6 8 ,0 6 4
7 7 0 .1 2 1
P a s s e n g e r s ...............
13 ,693
1 1 ,9 0 4
16,703
1 7 ,449
E x p re s s an d rnlsceL
13,901
2 6 .0 0 3
1 5 ,6 9 3
3 2 ,1 4 4
R e n ts ...........................
2 ,2 5 0
2,591
2,3 7 5
2,3 0 7
9 2 0 ,0 3 2

8 1 5 ,1 3 4

M a iiite u a n ce o f w a y ,
M ainten'oe o f e q u ip .
C on d u ctin g tra u sp ,G en ’ I e x . a n d ta x e s .

1 2 2 ,6 7 7
10 0 ,9 8 0
3 7 6 ,4 1 0
13 0,70 5

9 9 ,3 1 0
1 0 9 ,2 6 6
36 1 ,1 8 5
1 3 0 ,1 0 3 .

9 1 ,0 9 1
10 1,80 5
3 6 2 ,5 6 2
11 9,21 5

8 5 ,6 3 6
8 0 ,1 4 3
2 9 2 ,5 2 5
8 9 ,6 2 3

T o ta l.....................
N et e a r n in g s ....
P. e. e x p . to e a r n s ...

7 3 0 ,7 5 2
6 9 9 ,9 6 1
3 4 9 ,9 3 4
3 2 0 ,4 6 1
(87-62)
(6 8-59 )
INCOME ACCOUNT*
18 94 95.
1 8 9 3 -9 4 .
$
$
3 4 9 ,9 3 4
3 2 0 ,4 6 1

6 7 7 ,6 7 3
2 4 2 ,3 5 8
(73-60)

5 4 7 ,9 3 2
2 6 7 ,2 0 2
(67-22)

1 8 92-9 3,
$
2 4 2 ,3 5 8

1 8 9 1 -9 2 .
$
2 6 7 ,2 0 2

2 8 9 ,0 8 5

2 7 8 ,9 0 0

T o t a l . . . ................

1 ,0 2 0 ,3 2 6

1 ,0 3 0 ,6 8 6

E x p en ses—

N et earnin g* ...........
D ed u ct—

_____ •
)
3 0 3 ,9 5 0 f

1 0 ,941
3 2 4 .4 7 8

I n te re st o n b o n d s ..
M isce lla n e o u s...........

1 7 ,2 9 9 )
4 4 ,0 2 8
f Report f o r the year ending June 30, iSOS.J
Secretary Charles Merrtatn say* :
3 7 9 ,4 4 7
T o t a l ...................
3 2 1 ,2 4 9
2 8 9 ,0 8 5
2 7 3 ,9 0 0
“ Since tbe i wt printed report in 1882, the plan of reorganiza­ B a la n c e ...................
d e f.2 9 ,5 1 3
d e f.7 8 8 d e f.4 6 ,7 2 7 d o f. 1 1 ,6 9 8
tion of the old securitise of this cotaptny, which was sub­
1MV4NCK SHEET .JO.YK 3 0 .
mitted to the bondholders on Nor. 23. 1893, h n beeu su ;c«w1895.
1894.
1893.
A ssets—
fully carried out and the a w securities issued thereunder.
S
1 2 ,3 8 1 ,3 0 8 1 1 ,9 7 6 ,0 2 2 11,975.995
Since tlie reorganization, the earnings of the road have been C o n stru ctio n am i Im provem en t
4 6 .170
5 6 .691
15,438
more tiian sufficient to provide (or tlw interest upon the new N ew eq u ip m en t ................................
3 2 6 .7 3 7
3 7 2 ,5 6 8
3 2 2 ,83 0
mortgage bonds, ami the prospects are encouraging for the C osh on b a n d ................... .
2 1 ,1 5 4
2 0 .7 4 8
6,138
1 1 4 ,2 4 3
9 5 ,9 0 5
91,829
future. The company is, without Boating debt and the physi­ Due from agen t* .......... ......... ........
M aterial* on b a n d ..............................
4.9,040
3 9 ,1 2 0
34,298
cal condition of the road and ns equipment, alth ugh good, R a ilw a y c o m p a n ie s ........................
5 9 ,5 6 3
4 9 ,4 9 0
86,680
is being constantly unproved with a view of ultimately pro­ In d iv id u a ls and co m p a n ie s . . . . .
0 2 ,6 9 5
5 6 ,1 5 6
3 9.6 13
B ills r e c e i v a b l e ................................
551
551
0,929
ducing ihe best net results for it# security hold -r*.”
I n s u ra n ce ...........................................
6,823
Earnings, expenses, charges, etc , were as follows in 1894-5 M iscella n eou s ......... ........................
12 0 ,4 5 8
21 3,70 1
188,352
and 1868-4 :
9 6 ,9 1 8
P ro fit and lo** a c c o u n t __________
6 7 ,4 0 5
60,618
e sk m so s a s p

K srsm as.
18 94-5 .
73f»%S2
2 3 6 ,6 2 7
5 3 ,0 9 6

1893-4.
#
7 6 3 ,8 0 4
2 4 9 ,5 3 9
6 4 ,504

T o ta l . . . ....... ...................... ............................. 1 ,0 3 5 ,0 0 5
O p era tin g ex p ea a ea .........................
........... . 0 7 3 .5 7 4

1 ,0 7 7 .8 4 7
89 5 ,8 0 7

M a m in a ,—

Pr» i « b t ......................................................................... .
.
M ali, nit P R **, A « ...................................... .............. .

Net earn in g*
______ ________. . . . . . .
P er c e n t o f e x p en se* W earn in g * .......................
m m m m a c c o u n t ..

10 3,0 2 7
# 2

1 8 2,04 0
83-1

1804-5.

1893-4.

$
163,047
0,912

Set earning*.........................
M l*eeiiaia« - o s in t e r e s t ____. . . . .

R eceiv ed from K & r. 8. A M

1 3 ,8 2 5 ,2 6 5

UaM wutC apltai s t o c k ............... .........................
F1r*t m o rtg a g e b o n d * ........ ........ .
E qu ipm ent OOtO*...................... ......
m l!* pay ab le ...................
.....
D ue o th e r ra ilw a y c o m p a n ie s .. . .
In d iv id u a ls and co m p a n ie s . . . . . .

Pay-rolls..............

...............

U nclaim ed w a g es ..............................
P ay m a ster's a ccou n t ............. .........
V o n o h -t* a u d it e d ...............................
A c cr u e d in terest o n b o n d s .............

8 ,0 0 3 ,0 0 0
6 ,8 3 3 ,0 0 0
2 0 4 ,5 0 3
19 0 ,7 5 0
9 0 .5 8 3
2 1 ,2 0 0
3 5 .4 0 1
1.4 04
1,489
7 6 ,7 1 9
5 6 ,874

T ota l itabttllla* . . . .................... 1 3 ,3 2 5 ,2 6 5

1 2 ,9 0 2 ,5 1 8
6 .0 0 0 ,0 0 0
6 ,0 7 9 ,0 0 0
2 8 6 ,4 0 2
12*7,5 >0
11 9,30 0
3 0 ,0 0 7
2 8 ,2 1 0
1,340
620
6 8 ,7 9 3
5 2 ,2 1 9

12.841.851
6 , 00 0,00 0

6,079,000
287.086
11 9.90 2
2 0 7 ,5 9 5

31,954
1.4 0 8
97 8
6 2 ,7 7 8

52.025

12 ,9 0 2 ,5 1 8

—T . 69, p. 476.

17,716

isT.'as?

T o t a l .................
T n .lu r t—
In terest o n b o n d * .

GENERAL

INVESTMENT

NEWS.

14 3,31 1

Reorganization Plans, Etc.—'Tho following is an index to
all statement* relating to default*, foreokriUre sale*, reorgani­
zation plans, reorganization committee!, payment of coupon*,
l i t s w u i . t t l l .a s c * »a*K t jtn .r 1, 1895,
and receiverships, of the principal companies, that have
iMtlf*1
hiaMHHu€ m t o f * w * l.
# 1 4 ,2 4 0 ,1 2 2 Oot«iBoost»e*,......... 9 5 ,9 5 6 ,0 0 0 been published in the Chroniclk since the last editions of
3,131,140 the lx Victors' and the Str - kt R ailway S ppplkmknts were
Cmi at eqUipeM-Bi,.
1,337,(011 G en era ! m art, b o n d s
Bond* owned . . . ___
8 0 .0 0 0 ta en ia e b o n d * _____ _
0 ,2 * 2 .2 3 0 issued, ail earlier facts of this nature being net forth therein,
Material*........... .
1, 000,000
4 5 .9 8 3 l * t rot. Bir. E quip Co.
It, does not, however, include matter in to-day’s Chronicle,
C«*h __ .......... ...
5 1 ,8 4 * 1st a iort M em . E quip.
B i l l * r e c e i v a b l e ..........
1 8 9 ,0 0 0
The following abbreviation* are used: Plan for reorganiza­
180,111 C o ................................
K. C r. 8. A M HR.
.
1 7 .3 9 2 tion or readjustment plan: coup, for coupon payments; dr),
T ru st aeeetratn .........
5 6 ,1 3 3
6 .8 4 0 A e e m e d b o n d int. ...
tradlc guaranty ...
for default; Com. for committee.
17,592 C o o p s , a o t p resented.
7 .1 »9
. Trent setonats.
,
lUlMtOADS.
6 5 ,0 1 2
iseowe account..... .
7 5 6 .3 2 6 M ijieriJSaaeoo*. . . . . . . .
n,irr.ao*!i*-(Con.)
Tmume 61—
Pam.
V o lu m e 01—
P a ste
Snndu*.

T o ta l.............
— V. 6 0 , p. 302.

......................

........ 9 1 6 .7 1 4 .s 7 3

4 2 .3 7 3

T o U L ....................... # 1 6 ,7 1 1 ,8 7 3

Elgin Joliet * Eastern Railway.
fR epttrt for ym r ending June 30, 1S05.)
President Samuel Spencer in the ilfth annua! report aays:
General Rem it*.—The increase io gross earning* in 1893
over 1.894 wasfWMWO, or 8 per cent, white the increme in net
earning* wa* 929,473, nr 9 per cent, This result ha* been
secured by greater efficiency < f service in all departments
<
and not by any depreciation of property. On the contrary
the property ha* been improved. Tuts general depress! .n in
ali branches of manufactures and other industries which had
prevailed throughout the preceding year continued through­
out the year, and there wa* a large loss of revenue from these
sources.
The increase in both gross and net earnings of the company
under such adverse conditions, especially whan considered in
connection with the large l s«a upon almost all railways
throughout the country, must be regarded as gratifying and
encouraging.
Extension to South fthh'nga —The extension to South Chic­
ago referred to in the last annual report was opened for
business on October 27. 1884.
Notwithstanding the short
grain crop the success of the two new vlevators has been so
encouraging to their owners that two others of one million
bushel* capacity each are now under construction. There

Atnh. Top. k 8. Fo. .......... t o t e 74D. 793
do
do
r e o r g . 749. 82»
Atefo.
Af, k Pac . . .
M t i 870
Blrra. Shelf,A Tettn, Itlre r,. ..rmtrg,
Capo f u r k m
Val......... . . .m h 749

m
do
reorg. ?4 ), 870
S
w do
p la n
** *■ io . __
ptan m
»y
r. Caajb. Gap k Chle. . .... ,mU

m t. o f (U , H r . - S a n k
B oto« S t Col . . . .

At I, ...mh

um Southertt.
ftn,

....... emra. 7*8
hlo*«« r w d * A St, I, .fo n d . 79i, 870
9«»B'> tt«* ..................

Inn. t Grew, IUv®r.................. t i n H 7»
lerfltotid Onnton A Sputb. ..ream, tfd
ijl, A H ook-!'« » ! A Iron.. ...tram . h;o,
d am l,. Sand. * Hocking m h :tfi, «ao
TJanlWin A North urn
.r*cvr. 8Ti
Dt*tunng A Cottle Feeding..,mr»; 7 2
I>
Green Bay Wluoan * St. P ,.. . p l a n 7»9
lutarnat'l Pack. A Prov..........rror.j. T M
T

OragQB Tmtir. C o , - .............. . Com, 872
u rejvn S. L k \J, N . e o u p . 760. J M , 872
Cr©ffon fly* A N av

m h

J«jlk»nvme r. A St, h ......• cry. 780 Davenport k H Inland*
•
ock
Lotllsv, Southeastern..........f o n d ,
Jaeksonv. T. k K. W
...... rtarg.
J a r r l* .C o n k lin M ortg. C o .......... Mile,
Kentucky k tnd. B r id g e ......... c o m .

705, M l , |?I

P
futuertti V n* A AHbiuna -. .mU ?f»0
en

Pflorta ftaeatur k Kvatia.. . . . r t g r g . H3:l
Phlla. k Reading.................. .pf/in 7»5
M , Joseph k Or, Island. .......f a r e d , 831
hriiiUL? L. shore k Eastern.. . r m r q , 785
Toledo St. h . k Knn. CltT...... 785
Union Paclflr*.............. . . . c o u p , 751, 785
do
fJo
r w r g . 832, 872
YVnsh, k Chosap. Beach ... ... m k 795
W
ljt0on«U Central............
i
coup* 795
STRKirr JlATT,WAT8.
Anbury Park & Betmar*. , . r e m r , 793
Ai:»«ujta Street lly ......... . . . . r c t v r . 793
Chattanooga Electric ............. , » a h 749
do
'Jo
mm?. 793
Chic, k So. Side It. T. C o ....... C o m . 471
do
do
r e e n r . fltu
...r m r q .

750 Donrrer Clt v Unhte................. . m h
S7|
Jior ‘ehotMl» ............. p l a n
o n OaHysborg El. Stroot R y .... reew.
n n Houston City Struct. R y........ fnretl,

Looisv. 8 I,. ATexas .......nan. tin
1

L o n g Islaurl T r a c t i o n , . , . .

753

470
749
■
i

Mucrtn A nirmlDRimm..,.........m>t 930 New Jersey Kl cctrlo.......... ...cott)). *71
- •Mobile A filter,)
.................... m l, 703 N orth,v K
" * ......... River fN. V,), ...m lt 088
n*i
M o n tg o m e ry A E n fa n t* .................sat* 793
do
do
Monigent. 1 u«*. * Mcm(>lds.fcr,tl. 830 ■
iramgc Mountain Cubic.
rz n r -

g. V.. Lake Erie A \V
V Pen- ■ — - ......M sit,
le,
K.

Norfriern Paalflc,... .
* »
. s o u p , 730 Synmnso Street Rv................ a a i m l , 704
d»
freer., 760, 794. 831. 872 I

American TobacooCompany, —L i t i g a t i o n Ittofdey-Qen*
eral Hancock ha* given permiaaion to C, A, Whelan ’ Oo.,
&
of SyTacuw, as raqueHm, upon filing a bond of indemnity,
to have a suit begun in the name of the State to prevent thin

(V o i. U U „

THE CHRONICLE.

(24

Chicago ft N orthern P acific 11It. —Reorganization Plan. —
The sub-committee appointed to prepare a plan of reorganiza­
tion, it is expected, will report a plan to the com m itteeduring the com ing w eek.—V .6 1 , p. 68.
Tut1
Chicago P ackin g ft P rov ision —Dividend.— The follow in g
circular has beeu sent from the L i n l o i o.fi.ce regarding the
non-payment of a dividend on the com m on stock:
8y*tem— A tla n tic & P a c ific R R .— Foreclosure.—
A fter p a v in g in te re s t upon the o u tsta n d in g bonds a u d a t ’ o th e r ftxodi )ii>*, N. M., N ovem ber 21,
rtontch f r 3tn Albuqm ■ 1
c lia r a e s . th e b u sin ess of th e C hicago co m pany -h o w s a Loss fo r th e s i x .
rette business
urder which
iv'c n at length
i company as
their iounsel the

t«s Trust Com pany has secured from

er
orde refertin g to a Master in Chancery

my and facta in the foreclosure case. The testisaid, will b s largely taken in New York City. V.

Atchison Topeka & Santa Pe.— Proposed Officers—The
lion committee held another meeting this week
adjourned until Monday, November 2,0, at which
understood, Mr. E. P. Ripley, Third Vice-President
•aeo Milwaukee & St Paul, will be elected to the
o f the c« nipany, and Mr, D. B. Robinson, who as
nresi
Ptesident has been operating the road u> der the reP ir n
1 be continued as Vice-President — V. 61, p. 870.
1
ceive
Baltimore A Ohio HR.—Annual M eetin g-N ew Directors.—
T( President's remarks from the report submitted at the snii ■ j meet ng is given on other pages of to-day ’s C h r o n ic l e . In
,
the election of directors four changes were made, representa­
tion being given to four influential banking houses through
which a few years ago a large amount of the com om y ’s stock
was placid abroad. The new directors are as follows: Geo.
Louis Fitzgerald. President of the Mercan ile Trust Companv, of New York; Eugene Delano, of Brown Bros & Co.,
bankers, London and New York; William A. Read, of Vermilye
< Co., New York; Howland Davis, of Blake, Boissevain
fc
ft Co., Lordon. The members of the directorate re­
elected are William F. Burns, William H. Blackford, W il­
liam F. Frick. Maurice Gregg. George C. Jenkins, Aubrey
Pearre, Alexander Shaw and G-orge A. von Lingen, There
are also two State directors who are named by the Board of
Public Works. These have been Messrs. J W illiam Baugh­
man and J. McKenney White.— V. 61, p. 829.
Baltim ore & Ohio Southwestern Py.— Directors Elected.—
On Thursday, Nov. 21, at the stockholders’ meeting, the fol­
lowing directors were elected : Edward R. Bacon, William
L. Bull, Edgar T. Welles. Edward R . Bell, John H. Davis,
William Mertene, W . W . Peabody, Frederick H. Alms, Lowe
Emerson, Augustus B. Ewing, Frank W. Tracy and James
Sloan. Jr ; Francis P a w , succeeding Patrick Buchan, the
London director, deceased ; Alexander Shaw succeeding Gen.
Otland Smith as a Baltimore & Ohio representative; Henry
W. Poor of New York succeeding John P. Heseltine an Eng­
lish director. Mr. Edward R . Bacon was re-elected president.
The annut-1 report will he found on other pages of to-day’s
C h r o n ic l e .— V, 61, p. 793.
Bay State Gag.—Annual Meeting.—At the annual meeting
Tuesday, Nov, 19, at Wilmington, Del., J. Edward Addicks,
James G. Shaw, Newell Ball, J. FraDk Alles and John H.
Bati man were elected directors. Two other directors were
elected, but resigned to provide vacancies for directors to be
hereafter elected to represent other gas interests under nego­
tiation.
New Acquisitions.—The stockholders of the company also
authorized the board of directois to issue ‘ ‘such stocks as pro­
vided by its charter and enter into such obligations” as the
beard shall deem necessary to carryout the policy of “ receiv
ing ownership or securing coutrol o f” valuable gas properties.
Earnings.—The Boston Commercial Bulletin says;
Tbo net earnings o f ihe five com pan ies con stitu tin g the B a y State Gas
• jm olcate f o r t b o year end ing Ju n e 30. 1895, ag g rega ted $5 51,352,
whi n there was distributed in d ivid en d s $ 5 0 1 ,9 0 0 . The in terest
charge* on tlte $ 1 . ,000,( 00 B oston U nited (la s first 5s a m oun t to
$450,000, and the sinking fu nd requirem ent*to $0 0 ,0 0 0 . The com n antherefore, earned the full charges on the first- Beries o f bon ds in
what 1- p robably rho year o f tbo sh arpest com p etition th a t it w ill h a ve
to mm t The charges on the seoon ds am oun t to $ 1 5 0 ,0 0 0 . There are
$ 1 ,5 0 0 .0 (0 to $ 2 , 0110,000 firsts in the treasury o f the com n a n y . and
the Incom e from these affords h a lf en ou gh to m eet th a t requirem ent,
reduclni: Un- am ount that tlie com p an y had to b o r r o w fr o m ab ou t $ 5 0 ,000 to $75,000. - V. 01, p .7 9 3 .

Brooklyn Heights B R . — Long Island Tra tion.— Quar­
Heights is the operating company of
the L I. Traction. Earnings of the system for the quarter
i,
ending Sept. 80 have been reported as follows:
Smos.cnd,
Gross
Net
Interest.
Balance.
S
'-J.t. 30.
earnings.
earnings.
taxes, etc.
surnlus
terly.— The Brooklyn

1 8 0 5 ...................... $ i ,20 5,07 4
1 8 9 4 ........................ 1,304,717

$ 5 6 0 ,7 1 2
5 8 5 ,7 5 5

$ 5 1 6,7 26
49 5,25 5

$49,986
70,500

The operating expenses in the 1895 quarter include a con­
siderable amount expended for betterment of tracks and
equipment.—V. 61, p. 323, 830.
Central Branch Fn lon Pacific R R . — Atchison Colorado
A t’ aclflc KIL— Atchison Jew ell Comity & Western RR. —
Far. closure Suits.—At Topeka, Kan., Wednesday, Nov. 30,
foreclosure suits we>e brought under the mortgage of each
of tin se cr mpanies by Samuel Carr, the mortgage trustee.—V
60 p. 1144.
Chicago Gas.—Application f o r Injunction,—By mutual
consent the bearing of the application for an injunction
against the reorganization has been postponed until Dec. 2 —
V. 61, p. 793.
Chicago Heneral R a ilw ay—Mortgage.—The directors this
week approved the form of trust deed for the mortgage of
?10.000,000 recently authorized securing 5 per cent 40-year
hot da,—V. 59, p. 968.

m onths e n d in g Oon. 5. H 9 5 , of $4,1 03 85. o r S S I I. Hio d ir e c to rs o f
th e f’h to ic o oom pany oonsider ch at th e in te re s ts of th e c o m p a n y
w o uld be b e s t Borved b y not re d u c in g th e p re s e n t s u rp lu s , w h ioh
am o u n ted to $6 to,884 as a t Ap it ■ la s t,o th e r th a n is n e c e s s a r y to p a y
>
d iv id en d upon th e p referen c e sh ares.
B y o rd er of the Board.
A v d r bw W . B i r r , S e c r e ta r y .

The half-yearly dividend on the com m in stock was reduced
last spring from 5 to 3 per cent. A Chicago paper says:
B o s’ ness h a s been v e r y d u ll, b u t th e co m ing s ix m o n ih s p ro m ise tosh ow co n sid e rab le im p ro vem en t. O w ing to t h s e u o r m o u s o o r a c r o p 'h e su p p ly of hogs pro m ises to bs p le n tifu l, a n d h e a v y o ffe rin g s-w ill
n a tu r a lly b rin g ab o u t a lo w er m arie --1 p rice, r ile C hicago P'toktogC om pany w ill also dorivo som a bonoflo from tli8 op eration, of tlio no w
p la n t a t Forn W orth, re c e n tly secu red b y it. T he p la n t h a s a c m a c it y
of 2,5 00 ho£s a d av , an d w as fitted up a y e a r ago a t a co st of $ 100,000.
The co m p an y e x p e c ts to p u t th e p la n t In o p e r a tio n in th e very near
fu tu re , s t a r tin g in by k illin g 1,000 ho-^s a d a y .

C hicago ft Southeastern B y —Improvements, E tc.— A ccordiog to the St. Louis Globe Democrat work has begun on
the re-building of this road between ADderson and W aveland.
Its business is reported good since the new Brazil extension
from Waveland to Brazil was opened. The road, it is said,,
may be extended to Muncie during the com iog year, and
possibly through to Lima, O. A t present it is 108 n ites in
r
1 ngth.—V . 61', p. 324.
>
Chicago W isconsin & M innesota R R . (W iscon sin Cen­
tr a l)—Income Coupons.—N o'ice is given that outstanding in­
come coupons of the Chicago W iscontin & Minnesota (W is­
consin Central System), which matured on or before Sepfc.1, 1895, will be paid each with acciued interest at 5 per cent on
presentation at Room 81. No. 50 State S'reet, Boston. Inter­
est stops Nov. 30 next.—Y. 61, p. 795.
Colum bus Sandusky ft H ocking R y .—Final Notice.—
Notice is given to holders of first mortage bonds and
equipment bonds o f the Columbus Shawnee & H ocking and’
Sandusky & Columbus Short Line and of corsolidated bondsof the Columbus Sandusky & Hocking to deposit the same
and becom e parties to the reorganization agreement on or
before December 20, 1895, or they will be debarred from all
benefit under such agreement.
The new s curities are being engraved and w ill be ready for
issue early in the year. This is one of the quickest reorgani­
zations on record.—V. 61, p. 830.
D elaw are Lackaw anna ft W estern R R .— Quarterly.—
Earnings o f the D. L. & W . leased lines in New York State
for the quarter ending Sept. 30 have been reported as follow s:
3 m os. en d .
S ep t. 30—

G ross
ea rn in g s.

N et
ea rn in g s.

1 8 9 5 .................$ 2 ,5 0 5 ,0 1 0

$ 1 ,4 1 1 ,2 6 0

1 8 9 4 .................„ 2 ,2 7 0 ,4 5 9

1 ,2 1 3 ,7 7 7

R e n ta ls ,
a n d ta x es.

B a la n ce,
su r p lu s.

$ 6 2 0 ,7 4 9

$ 7 9 0 ,5 1 1

6 2 0 ,7 4 9

5 9 3 ,0 2 8

—V . 6 1 , p . 42 0.

D etroit R ailw ay (D etroit, M ich.)—M ortgage F iled —This
company has filed a mortgage for $1,800,000 to the Cleveland
Trust Company, of Cleveland, as trustee.—V . 61, 749.
Eastern Trunk Lines—Articles o f O rganization A p p ro v e d ,.
— A t a meeting of the presidents of the Trunk Lines and t.heir
principal Western connections, held at the offioe o f the Trunk
Line Association November 19th, the articles of organization
of the Joint Traffic Association were unanimously approved
by every party to the agreement and it was agreed to make it
effective January 1st, 1896. The presidents then went into
executive session in regard to the appointment of the Board
of Arbitration and shortly adjourned until December 12th to
complete that work. The board of managers w ill doubtlessbe announced within a few days.
The Committee on Revision was continued with pow er to
arrange ali details, procure signatures to the engrossed agree­
ment and to decide as to the delivery of copies to the proper
public authorities, the press, etc. The copies o f the agree­
ment, completed, have been furnished to the members o f the
press in accordance with this authority.—Y . 61, p. 794.
E rie RR.— Consolidation.—The new com pany, in line withthe policy o f consolidating its system, has acquii'ed all the
stock o f the Buffalo & Southwestern, which runs from
Buffalo to Jamestown, 66 miles. This road was operated
under lease by the old company, and will now be merged intothe reorganized company.
The entire capital stocks o f the Arnot & Pine Creek and
Lockport & Buffalo have been acquired and practically ail
the stock of the Buffalo New Y ork & Erie. The intention isto bring all the leased lines, w ith the exception of the Roches­
ter & Genesee Valley and Cleveland & Mahoning V alley com ­
panies [w’ hich will continue to be held under the lease], into
the direct ownership of the Erie Railroad Company.
The appointment of a receiver for the Now Y ork Pennsyl­
vania & Ohio is in pursuance of the plan and will not inter­
fere with the operation of the road by the Erie. Beginning
December 1 the entire system, New York to Chicago and
branches, w ill be operated by the new company. The m ort­
gage has been completed and the new securities are n ow being
eDgraved and w ill be issued as soon as possible.—V . 61, p. 871,
Forty-second St. M anliattanville & St. Nicholas Ave. Ry.
—Quarterly.—Earnings for the quarter ending Sept. 30 havebeen reported as follov s:

THE CHRONICLE.

N ovember 23. 1895. J

925

Lim a ft N orthern R R .—New Mortgage —This company is
reported to be filing a mortgage to secure $1,2 JO,000 of 5 per
cent bonds, the Manhattan Trust Company beiug trustee.
1 8 9 4 ........... . ................ 1 6 4,65 3
3 2 ,4 6 7
1 ,0 0 0
This is the northerly extension of ths Ouio S iu 'h ern . Toe
—V. 60. p. 794.
Green Ray W inona & St. Paul B B .— Foreclosure—A t Mil­ work now going on is from L im i north, about 35 miles, with
waukee, Wts., on Wednesday, N ov. 20, the application of the a junction with the Toledo St. Louis & Kansas City road,
Farmers' Loan ft Trust Com oany for a decree ordering the and it is expected to complete this division by Ja m m y.
gale of this road wag granted by J u ig e Seaman, Bitting in the The next division to be put under contract will also he about
35 miles, b inging the road to Adrian, M ica.— V . 61.
United States Court,—V. 61, p. 749.
3 m o n th s
G ross
N et
O th er I n t e r e s t ,
e n d . S ep t. 3 0 —
e a ’- n i n a s . e a r n i n g s , i n t o n e , t a x e s , e t c
1895
................. f 160,121 § 2 6 ,1 4 9 $ 1 ,0 0 0 $ 1 0 ,7 0 0

N et
B a iu n ce,

d e f $ 3 ,5 5 1
3 0 .7 1 7 sur. 2 ,7 5 0

L ittle Rock & Hem phis RR.—Safe Postponed.—A t Littl e
Rock, Ark , on Wednesday, Nov 20, the sale o f this road was
p wtp med again until the fourth W edneslay ia January.
This is the fourth postponement.— V. 61, p. 611.

Houston City Street By.— Reorganization.—The bond­
holders' committee {Aloert N. Parlin, Chairman, 36 Uni m
Street. B ston), has issued a circular and presented a plan of
reorganisation. The circular states that the r <ad is in bad
physical condition—rails light a -d only 5 miles (out o f 29)
ballasted and on paved streets. Tni* they say accounts for
many o f the existing damage suits, aggregating $300,000,
several o f which are in judgm ent. For improvements
$100,000 should be expended. The $137,000 o f 7 per cent
bonds are in default and must be provided for. The com ­
mit! ee b beves, how. ver, that gross earnings o f $ 200,000 per
annum can safely be expected.
Plan. -The plan provides for the readjustment o f the capi­
talization of the old com pany or for the formation after forecloeurti sale o f a new com pany, but in either case the bonds
outstanding after reorganization to be as follow s :

Metropolitan Traction.— Eighth Avenue— The agreement
with the Eighth Avenue road is being drawn, and when
ready will be submitted to the stockholders. Meantime its
terms are withheld.— V. 61, p. 871.
Metropolitan Traction System Sixth ATenue R R .—
Extra Div dead.—The Sixth Avenue RR Co. is paying a d iv i­
dend o f 20 per cent, including the usual sem i-annuil distribu­
tion, the extra amount having been made possible by large
sales of real estate. The anuu.il rental from the Metropolitan
Street Ry. hereafter will be $145,000 instead of $152,500,
which was paid until the recent surrender of the Sixth Avenue
depot property.—V . 60, p. 562; V . 61, p. 8TI.

J\ r* i Mortgages per emt 2 0 -y e s r bond*. Issue lim ite d to ...$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
Of w h ich to p re se n t b o n d h o ld er! for 5 0 p e r c e n t p rin c ip a l
of old bond* ................................. ............- ......................................
5 0 0 .0 0 0
F o r »«.* s s m e n t s ................. ...............
............. ....
125.0 H) j
To r e t ir e li st m o rtg ag e 7 *.............................. .............................
1 3 7 ,0 0 0
To p u t road tn s a fe co nd itio n for o p era tio n
........ ..............
lu o .o o o
F o r tu tn re extension# , se ttle m e n t of cla im * , 4 c .................
136,000
M s per cent income*
To p re «e n t bondholders fo r 50 p e r
5 0 0 ,0 0 0
cent p rin c ip a l of old bonds ........................................................
O ver d u e co up on s....................................... ..............................................
1 5 0 ,0 0 0 ;

Muskegon T erm in a l.—JV«p Bonds and Stock. — A stock­
holders’ meeting is to be held at Muskegon, M ich., on D 'c. 10,
to vote on a proposed increase o f the capital stock to $1,050,000. and an is<ue o f $3,0 10,000 bonds. In addition to the
road propos-d to be built by the com pany it is intended to
put on steam transfer boats across Lake Michigan, from the
western terminus of the com pany's ro td to Milwautee.
Nassau Electric RR.—East River & A tla itlc Ocean RR.

E xch a n ge o f Securities . — T h e o ld s t o c k a n d b o n d s p a y t h e
( B rooklyn) -In corp ora tion .—The East River ft A tlantic
a s s e s s m e n t s n a m e d b e lo w a n d r e c e iv e :
Ocean RR., with $3,00 U.H)0 authorized capital stock, was in ­
—--------- And Receives------------ - corporated Saturday, Nov. 23, by Nassau Electric parties (P,
Pays
Assistin'!.

New
1st Utgt.

New
Incomes.

*

$
550

*
5 00

New
Stock.

H. Flynn and associates), to build about 30 mil-»a o f trolley
road in Brooklyn, including lines on Hicks S reet. Livingston
50
8treet, Sixth Avenue, Etc. These lines are desired in order to
*
....
....
P a r.
. . . . round out the system, including the A tactic A 'e n u i road.
10
10
....
100 | —V. 61, p. 829.
New Turk Lake Erie * Western RR. - E r i e RR. - B o r i s
Bondholders who have cun’ rih otel one per cen t will be
credited on this subscription with the amount already paid. Cuffed—The 6 p-r cent collateral trust bonds h iv e baen called
Assenting bonds should he d -p sited with the International for payment at 110 and accru -d interest on Feb. 13. 18)8, in ­
terest ceasing that day. The bonds will bo p at J at cbo (Tailed
Trust Company, No. 45 Milk Street, Boston. Mass.
A n n u a l Statement.—The earnings and expenses for the S ales Tru-t C itnpanv.
year ending November 1, 1893, g iv e i herewith, include the i On December 4. at the office o f J. P. M irgan & Co., w ill be
earning* o f the H uiston Heights Street Rv. Co , which has a ; paid the receivers’ certificates and the $2,500,000 reorganiza­
mileage o f
miles. The earnings during this period were tion first lien bonds.
somewhat extraordinary, ow ing to the Confederate Reunion I Assessment.—The third insaltneot o f the asiessmenton the
common stock, amounting to $'! a share, and on the preferred
held at Houston during the month o f May.
stock, amounting to $3 a share, was payable this week, The
Gross
Net
Oth-r
Damage*
Met. on Insurant*, Remote
earn'at. tam'gs. receipts. 4 Court «*••, 7* 4 notes, tames. 4c, I IH St Ry. fourth instalment is payable Dec 23.
New York * Long Island B rid g e .—Supreme Court De­
117,897 71,603
5 ,* l l
29,785
8,370
18,182
13.967
cision —In the proceedings brought by thm o tnpany to se­
Leaving a balance o f $8,310.— V. 61, s. 611.
cure the condemnation o f land for its bridge, the N iw Y o rk
.Supreme Court G-neral T.-rro has decided that, ow ing to a de­
fin d s >B T u n n e l Ry — Reorganise ition Plan. —At a m eeting
fect in the act. of the Legislature under which the proceedings
of th e English b ondholders, h e e l in L on don , N iv. fl, it was
were brought the company docs not possess the right to con ­
decidrd that a plan of re rgsniz tlion w h ich h*d been re­ demn property. The act embraces, the Court d “cides, more
ceived from America shou ld be m ade the basis of an a gree­ than one subject, a thing forbidden by the State Constitution
m en t between the English and A m erican interests. Tnis
aa regards private bills.—V . 60, p. 522,
plan proposes the crea tion of $2,300,000 prior lien 5 per c e n t
New York A New Jersey B ridge -Stockholders' M eeting.—
t
b on d s; n ew rlr*t m ortga ge in com e b in d * $ 1, 100, 000 n ew pre- !
)
;
ferred stock It.OOO.'iOO; co m m o n st»ck $2,000,000. The h o ld ­ At the meeting o f stockholders’ at 214 B roidw ay on Tuesday
ers of the £3*jO,0OO bo tde sold in L in d n are aslce.l to p a y the follow ing board of directors was elected:
J* m e » S. C larkso n . Dm S f-ln e * . lo w s : Jo h n S. R u n n e l!* . G en eral
an a*#e*#m«nt of 80 p-r cen t, w h ich is to be a ccepted by way
Holder* o r -

*
-Old b o n d s ................1.0 0 0
“ d co n p o n sto Sept.
1 8 0 5 . in c lu s iv e . . . . . . .
O ld s t o c k . .. ............... 100

*

o f subscription (■ r $ 430.000 prt >r lien bonds, and to exch a n ge
their L in d s at par fo r $1 ,500.600 first m ortga ge in com e b in d s,
an
additional
$225,000 in preferen ce stock to be dts
tributed to represent lows o f interest, dtc. I f this schem e
be a ccep ted , the A m erican interests intim ated they would
be w illin g to find >me hair the rn on -y w h ich w ould be reqttired to lie raised under the plan.

C ounsel P u llm an C o m p an y, C hicago; Win. J . t , i l t a . P h ila d e lp h ia ;
D aniel N. Lockw ood, Buffalo; Lout* W indm ttUer, New York: F rodarlok
Pet e r. P o tter B u ild in g . New Y ork; C h arles A. S in y lle . New Y ork;
j Wlpi in i B ell. Pro lu c e E x ch an g e, New Y ork; W illiam II E ly. Now
j Y ork; L o re n z » D uncan, B ro o klyn ; Jo h n L o tg h ra u , P re sid e n t’ M anu­
fa c tu re rs ' B a n k , B ro o klyn ; C h arles II S w a n . B ro o klyn ; J o h n 0. A dam s,
j Nowti a r g .
j President Clarkson reported important pro rres% and said

that as Boon as th e location of th e bridge was decided they
Indiana E lectric BB. (Hoaheit, l a d .)—M srtgage F iled .— would be in v position to make financial arrangements.
Toe .Sinking Fund Commission Wednesday decided to locate
On Friday, N iv, 15. this com pany executed a m ortgage for
$500,000 tn favor o f the Royal Trust Company, o f Chicago, as the New Y ork lerminu* of the bridge between Fifty-ninth
trus ts#, Thi« m trtgage r-pl tc-*» the to irtgage of 1814 for j and Sixtieth streets, 100 feet west o f Eleventh Avenue,—V . 60,
the sam e amount which the ctm pan y has decided to cancel, p. 1059
the cancellation bei- g now in pro»rre«s.
New Y#rk Pennsjlv m i a * Ohio RR.— Erie RR — Receiver.
Iron R a ilw ay—Annntif R eport.—Tnts com pany b report — At Akron, O.. on Wednesday, John Tod, o f Cleveland,
•hows for the year ending June 30, 1895: Gross earnings, Vice-President of the c itnpanv, was made its receiver
This is in accordance with
$49.8-<0; net over operating expenses. $11,137, contrasting pending sale in foreclosure.
with $48,077 gro*» and $3 025 net in 1893 91. A new locom o- ' the Eri» reorganizition plan, bv which the property is to ba
tive and 50 tons of steel rails have b-en ourchaaed. The j merged into the new Erie RR. Com pany.—V . 61, p. 872.
capital stock is $600,000; « o>>u us uayahle, $5,181; bills pay­
N orfolk ft ITastern ItR. -R eorganization P la n — The Phila­
able, $40,247; cash on hand is #1.057.
delphia Ix'dgcr says: * The reorganization plan is not to be is­
Lake Shore m M ichigan 8 m thern Ry — Q utrterly. — \sued, it ia now stated, till near the close of the year.”
Earning* for the tju arter and the nine months endiog Sept. 1 Northern Piiclll: R R —G reat N orth ern R y .—In ju n c­
tio n .—A i St. Paul on Saturday, Nov. 16. Judge K elly
80 have been reported aa follows :
filed a deciuon granting an injunction against the proposed
8 most. n u l . f f r o t t
N et
O th er
I n t t r f.il.
B a la n c e
traffi: agro m m t between these companies. The injunction
0 t ( A , 30.
ta r n * iff* . ta r n -in n * .
in tn M * .
tO M 9 , § t c ,
fo r d ic * .
189”. .. . $ .r*o/,470 9 t, m i j 7 l s i 47,^97 §1.154*897
$921,571 was applied for bv a shareholder of the Northern Pacific.
18*4. ...
MW 4.059 1,7*9,14 > 133.101 1.140.101
714,140
Th >decision embraces the follow ing points :
9 month $
The proposed trafllo a rra o g e m e it Is a co n so lid atio n .
1<9 .
$3,503,296 $152,912 $3,332,912 $2,473,28 6 ; of th e S ta te of M tunesot > th e G reat N orthern and the
,
lS 9 i
...
U.2SS.395 5,251.331
325.034 3,310,0)4
2,235.331 roads m e p a r a lle l »nd co m p etin g lin es. T he traffic
th erefo re, c o n tr a ry to the p ublic polloy of th s S ta te
—V. « l,p .3 6 6 .

U n d er th e la w s
North trn Paoido
a rra n g e m e n t Is,
an d th e g e n e r a l

THE CHRONICLE

[V ol. LX I.

rter does n ot co n ta in , |resolved so soon as this sum shall be received, which it is be­
tjon, -tin* rig h t to m ake lieved will be during the present year, to declare a dividend
i pow er w a s over g iv en of 10 per cent to the stockholders of record at or about the
lt> L e g isla tu re an d tlio

w t h Hhurn Tracti

i t'liainaav -—Election.— kb the annual
‘ th L w .v k u t <'.ml i -it, N. J., th e fol­
io N Sehgman. 0. 0. UuyKr.- l. ri.-k Edey, J. W. Henning,
M Wicker, of New York; Walther
i : j. I*. Haley, E. W. Olark, Jr., o f
in' Abbott, of Boston, rhe com pany
im - debt.' and has over $150,000 cash
and other cash assets amounting to

date of declaration. Out of tho $865,183 the directors w ill
expend approximately $270,000 to cover cost of litigation and
compensation for all services rendered by those conduct­
ing the negotiations now completed. After paying the 10
per cent dividend and this sum of $270,000, about $75,000 will be left in the company’s treasury to be invested
against unforeseen contingencies. By this agreement the
company is relieved from all liability on account o f the
tripartite bonds and its endorsement on the bonds of the
Montgomery & Eufaula,—V . 60, 523, 1008.

St. Lawrence & A dirondack R R .— M ohawk & M a lo n e New York Central * Hudson R iver R R .—Line to M ontreal.
Champlain KIL—Quarterly.—Earn­ —For some time it has been known that Dr. W . Seward WebbOgUt‘ iiHburg J La
t,
ing September 80 have been reported was preparing to obtain an independent connection with the
Canadian Pacific Railway bridge near Montreal for his Mo­
S mouth* mil
oral*
S'ft
Other
Interest,
Xet
hawk & Malone Road, which is under lease to the New Y ork
, un s , .
e a r n in ']<
e a r n in g s .
in c o m e ,
fu s es , 16c.
b a la n c e .
|H *, “ '
«
* i,lis t!
* 0 7 .5 4 0 sur. $1H,130 Central. To form a part o f this line there were consolidated
under the title of the St. Lawrence & Adirondack Railroad
V 'i'H iisS T 6 1,9 U
453 6 7,6 78 d o t
5.308
on Nov. 18 the Malone & St. Lawrence Ry. and the St. Law ­
-v !
ifl's.
Ohio Southern KIt.—Meeting o f Security Holders.—F irst rence Sc Adirondack Railway, forming a line 32 miles in length,
ns.— u iIn- meeting at the office of R J. Kim- already in operation, from Malone, N. Y ., to Valleyfield,.
i.ji,; in .. Hi B roil dSirei t, New Y ork, on Saturday, November P. Que. The consolidated company, o f which Dr. W ebb is
HI, about one-third of the capital stock and about one-third President, has $590,000 capital stock and $640,000 bonds out­
, • the
•
tgage bonds issued were represented. standing. Dr. W ebb, it is stated, has acquired control of a
Among there present were Mr. C. N. Haskell, counsel for the strip of railroad running from Valleyfield to Beauharnois,.
receivers of the company, and Mr. James D. Smith, Chairman Que., and will construct a new line from the last-named
o f the Committee of Reorganization. Mr. Smith made a place to Caughnawaga, making direct connection with the
:uent as to the work of the committee, but said that no aforementioned bridge across the St. Law rence.—V. 61, p. 794,
plan fer recrganizaiion was yet matured.
*t. Joseph R a ilw ay, Light, Heat & P ow er— St. Joseph
General Rush C. Hawkins, who had a large interest in the T raction & L ig h tin g —R eorganization.— The St. Joseph
road previous to the control by the present owners, made a Railway, Light, Heat & Pow er Company has been incor­
statement in regard to the value of the property, and ex­ porated to succeed to the property of the St. Joseph
pressed bis confidence in its future, if properlv managed Traction & Lighting Company, sold in foreclosure Aug. 21,
The road bad suffered much during the last year for the want and purchased for the bondholders for $300,000. The new
of motive power, but the recent purchase of six large, first- company has an authorized capital stock of $3,500,000, half of
class engines it is expected will enable them to show fr >m which w ill be preferred, and assumes $100,000 W yatt Park
this time forward a gratifying increase of earnings.
bonds. The incorporators are W . T. Van Brunt, R . A.Brow n,.
Tiie counsel fer the receivers stated that they expected to J. R. Van Brunt. St. Joseph; W . M. Harriman, New Y ork
pay promptly the interest on the first mortgage bonds due City.—V. 61, p. 326.
I lecember 1st, and it was hoped that arrangements would be
Syracuse B ingham ton & New Y ork R R .— Quarterly.—
completed by which they would be able to take care of their
floating indebtedness and future payments so that a fore­ Earnings for the quarter ending Sept. 30 have been reported
as follow s:
closure and assessment would not be necessary.
R. J. Kimball & Co. announce that they will continue to
3 m o n th s
G ross
N et
In terest,
B a la n cey
ea rn in g s.
ea rn in g s.
ta x es, e tc .
s u r p lu s.
receive addresses of holders of the second mortgage bonds, e n d . S e p t . 3 0 —
$ 1 4 4 ,3 1 2
$ 4 4 ,9 0 5
$ 9 9 ,4 0 7
189-d............................. $ 2 6 3 ,8 2 9
for the purpose of having them more fully represented at a 1 8 9 4 ............................... 2 5 6 ,2 6 6
12 2 ,0 9 1
4 4 ,9 0 5
77,186future meeting.
—Y . 61, p . 322.
Resolutions were passed approving of the course of the
T h ird Avenue R R .— Forty-second Street M anhattan r ille
receivers and also of the committee, and the meeting & St. N icholas Aveaue RR. — Control A cquired -E dw a rd
adjourned subject to the call of the chairman.—V. 61, p. 872. Lauterbacb, counsel and a director o f the Third Avenue
Oregon Short Line & Utah & Northern Ry.—Interest Company, is quoted as saving: “ It is true that we have ac­
on Oregon Short Line Gs.—The opposition to the payment of quired the Forty-second Street and Boulevard line. The con ­
the February. 18115, coupon on the sixes has been withdrawn, tract of purchase has practically been consummated, but in­
and it is expected that at the hearing next Tuesday the Court asmuch as certain details are yet to be arranged I do not care
will order the payment, with interest to date, as aho the to speak of the terms of settlement.” It is reported that a
interest on the August, 1894, coupon between the date of its majority of the capital stock has been purchased,—V. 60. p.
maturity and the time of payment, December 6. It is re­ 794; V . 61, p. 872.

ported that a new consol, committee is to be formed, which
will at once prepare a plan of reorganization, under which
the sixes will be undisturbed.—V. 61, p. 872.
P h i l a d e l p h i a & Reading RK.—Reorganization. —It is un­
d e rsto o d that the general scope of the plan has been determim d upon and that the details are now being perfected by
the sub committee. It has yet to be submitted to the commiltee as a whole and must then be approved by J. P. Mor­
gan & Co., so that probably ten days will elapse before the
plan will be publicly announced. The principal provisions of
the plan are the protection of the general mortgage 4s, the
retirement of car tiusts and the supplying for working capi­
tal. Tie- first, second and third preference incomes and com­
mon stock will, it is expected, be assessed 20 percent. The
deferred incomes will also have a small assessment. The new
securities, will be: New general 4s, and first and second pre­
ferred and common stock. As intimated above, the propor­
tion of new securities to be given in exchange for the old is
not yet finally settled and is open to revision.—V. 61, p. 872.
Port Royal & Western C a ro lin a —Foreclosure Sale.—This
road, including the Augusta & Knoxville, was sold at Green­
wood, South Carolina, on Wednesday to A. R. Hutchinson,
representing Samuel Thomas and Thomas Ryan, of New
5 orb, for $3,650,000, the upset price —V. 61, p. 704.
Rochester Railway (Quarterly).—Earnings for the quarter
ending September 80 have been reported as follows:
3 m o n th * e n d G ross
i n g S e p t . 30. e a r n m g s .
1 8 9 5 ...................$230,798
1 8 0 4 ................... 210,825
—V . 61, p. 333.

I fe t
ea rn in g s.

$1 03,2 83
02,401

O th er
in co m e .

$ 1 ,777
7,023

I n terest,
t a x e s , if:c .

B a la n ce,
su r p lu s.

$ 7 3 ,5 1 0
7 6 ,1 3 4

$3 1 ,5 5 0
2 4 ,190

South western HR. ( o f Georgia).— Aw- Lease—D ividend. 0tll0l8> circular to the stockholders gives the facts regan
mg the new lease to the Central of Georgia Ry. The lease
tor nil years, and under it dividends o f 5 per cent per at
num -net to stockholders” began to accrue Nov. 1 189;
they are payable Jan. 1 and July 1, that for January ne;
representing only two months’ rental. The defaulted rent;
at .i per cent tier annum from July 1, 1802, to Nov. 1, 1891
amounting to 8865,183, is also to he paid. The directors hav

Union Elevated R R . (C hicago)—B ond Issue.— This com ­
pany, known as the Union Loop Company, is reported to have
decided to issue $3,000,000 of bonds. The total authorized
issue, it is thought, will be $5,000,000.—V . 61, p. 753.
W estern Union T eleg ra p h .—Decision Regarding Union
Pacific Lines.— At W ashington, Nov. 18, Mr. Justice Harlan
announced the unanimous decision o f the Supreme Court,
that the Union Pacific Railway Company did not possess the
right to give practically exclusive privileges to the Western
Union Telegraph Company to maintain telegraph lin -s along
its right o f way; and that the Government may maintain a
bill of equity to compel the railway com pany to construcand operate its own telegraph lines. The decision sustains
the Circuit Court in the Nebraska District and overrules the
Court of Appeals. The Court holds untenable the claim of
the United States for recovery of moneys paid for Govern­
ment messages sent over the lines since 1881.—V . 61, p. 660.
W h eelin g & Lake Erie R y.—Prospects.—General Manager
A . G. Blair is quoted as saying:
T he W h eelin g & L ake E rie the first fo u r m on th s in th e n e w fisoa l
y e a r b e g in n in g J u ly 1 w ill s h o w n e t e a rn in g s o f o v e r $ 1 8 0 ,0 0 0 ,
w h ic h is eq u a l to the fix e d oh a rg es a n d 4 p e r c e n t o u the p re fe rr e d
sto ck . W e e x p e c t to sh o w e v e n b e tte r resu lts lo r th e b a la n c e o f the
fisca l y e a r , as the n e w co n tra cts, w h ich are m a d e e a rly in th e season ,
w ill b e at a d v a n ce d p rices. T h e a rra n g e m e n t w it h th e B a ltim o re &
O hio f o r the use o f th e V a lle y R o a d an d its te rm in a ls b y th e W h e e lin g
& L ake E rie is n o t y e t in o p e ra tio n , as the B a ltim o re &* O hio has n o t
p e r fe c t e d its p la n s to p ro v id e fo r th e o p e ra tio n o f the n e w line b e ­
tw e e n C levela n d an d W heeling. T he e n tra n o e in to C le v e la n d w ill a d d
la r g e ly to th e earn in gs o f th e W h eelin g & L a k e E rie an d a lso to th e
V a lle y road .

The full effects of the coal agreement entered into last March
will Dot be shown, he says, until next year.—V. 6t, p. 569.
W isconsin Central—Reorganization.—The C h r o n i c l e is
informed that Mr. George Coppell, chairman of the Reorgani­
zation Committee, is making an investigation w ith the aid
of an expert accountant, to determine whether the earnings
of the road w ill ju stify an early reorganization or whether
it w ill be wiser to wait for an improvement in business in the
territory traversed by the road before submitting a plan to the
security-holders.—V. 61, p. 795.

THE CHRONICLE.

November 23, 1895 ]

J U 'p o v t s

a n d

927

J3o ctu n c u ts .

BALT IMORE & OHIO RAILROAD CO MPA NY.
SIX T Y -N IN T H A N N U A L REPORT—FOR THE Y E A R ENDED JU NE 30, 1893.
Of f i c e

B a l t i m o r e & O h io R a i l r o a d C o m p a n y , {
B a l t i m o r e , November 8, 1893.
)

of the

Tb the Stockholders o f the B altim ore db Ohio Railroad Com pany:

The President and Directors submit tbe follow ing statement o f the affairs of the Com pany for the year ended
June 30, 1895.
The General Balance Sheet, the tabular Statements of the General A u ditor, and the Report o f the General Manager,
are appended;

General Income Account.

OPERATIONS FO B TH E Y E A R .

Year Ended
June 30, 1S95.

E arn Bros.

$
1 5 ,5 9 1 ,0 6 2
5,0-19,097
7 0 6 .6 0 3
6 1 1 ,7 3 7
8 5 8 .6 8 2

$
13,916,-170
6 ,4 3 1 ,0 5 8
6 9 9 ,6 2 0
6 7 4 ,9 7 1
7 8 0 ,5 3 6

P ro m —
M&a

T in s Y e a r .

Year Ended
June 3 0, 1894.

.......................................................................... .................................................................

01
27
05
80
08

2 2 .8 1 7 ,1 8 2 24

Increase.

06
17
20
39
53

1 ,6 7 4 ,5 8 5 98

2 2 ,5 0 2 ,6 6 • 35

Decrease.

$

3 1 4 ,5 1 9 89

8 ,9 8 2 85
7 8 ,1 4 3 55

1 ,3 8 1 ,9 6 0 90
6 3 ,2 3 3 59

O rgRA rtK ii E x c e ss e s .
1 ,6 4 5 0 83
9 ,2 1 7,01 1
2 .0 9 2 ,7 1 8
2 ,8 4 6 .2 3 2

M a in te n an c e o f W a y anti S tr u c tu r e * .................................................................................

96
19
03
71

1 .7 3 2 ,3 9 4
9 ,1 0 4 ,1 3 9
2 ,0 5 2 ,1 0 5
2 ,9 7 2 ,0 5 0

08
12
51
36

1 1 2 ,8 7 2 07
4 0 .6 1 0 52
1 4 ,1 8 2 35

8 7 ,3 1 0 12

T o tal E x p e n se s....................................................... ................................................................

1 5,8 01 ,0 4 3 89

1 5 .5 6 0 .6 8 9 0 7

2 4 0 .3 5 4 82

N et E a rn in g s from tb e O p eration* of Hie P ro p e rty ..................... ...........................
A dd in co m e from o th er S o u r c e * .........................-............ ............... ..................................

7 ,0 1 9 ,1 3 8 35
1 ,6 3 7,59 5 4.5

6 ,9 4 1 ,9 7 3 29
1,9 8 2,85 7 29

7 4 ,1 6 5 0 7

T o t a l...................... ..................... .............................. ...............................................................
D ed u ct N et E a rn in g s from W a sh in gto n B ran ch

8 ,6 4 3 .7 3 3 SO
1 7 4 ,40 9 63

8 ,9 2 4 .8 3 0 57
2 0 6 ,0 0 0 66

A v a ila b le In co m e..................................................................................................................
F rom w h ich d e d u c t I n te re st on Bonded In d eb ted n e ss, R e n ta ls, T a x e s and
o th e r C h a r g e s . . . . . . . .......... .................... ............... ................................................................

8 ,4 6 9 .3 2 4 18

8 ,7 1 9 ,8 2 9 91

6 ,7 5 9 .6 1 3 18

6 ,5 2 2 ,5 8 1 13

1.709,681 00

2 ,1 9 7 .2 4 8 78

4 8 7 ,5 6 7 78

1 8 0 ,0 0 0 O
O
1 2 0 ,0 0 0 00

1 8 0 ,0 0 0 (XI
1 2 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
62 1.935 0 0

6 2 4 ,9 3 5 00

300 , O O O
O O

9 24 .93 0 00

lu r iiijr r * .
D tfid o o d on l*fc P refarnK l S to c k , « p e r c e n t ....................................

.......................

Dtvld«&(i on Com m on b to c k ............. "...................................................................................

1,409.081 0 0

Prom w hich Pajrm ’ ta h a v e b een m ad e to r e tir e B onded Ind eb ted ness, vU .:
P rin c ip al C a r T ru st B o n d ,.....................
........................................................................
P rin c ip a l E -iutpm ent T ru st H o a d s ,S e rie s jk.. . . . . . . . . . . . ........................ ...........
P rin c ip a l K-pUpment T ru st Bonds, S e rie s » ................................. ........................
W h e cla g e Oar T ru st p a y m en ts ..........................................
—
P a y m e n t to th e CUy of B altim o re for th e p u rch ase of its In terest in the
P itts b u rg A f'onnelbrrU ln R a ilro a d .............................................................................
C ash A p p ro p ria tio n * b» S t a k in g F u n d s .....................................................................
S o m e rset A C am b ria R a ilro a d Traftlo Bond*........................................................... .

2 5 0 .0 0 0 00
100.000 no
2 0 0 .0 0 0 00
1 1 3 ,6 0 6 * 1
4 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
5 8 ,0 5 7 81
8 ,5 0 0 O
O

1 ,272,313 78
2 5 0 .0 0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 0
2 0 0 ,0 0 0
9 9 .2 8 8

00
00
00
74

2 5 0 ,5 0 5 73
2 3 7 ,0 6 2 05

1 3 7 ,3 0 7 22

1 1,317 17

4 0 .0 0 0 00
58,057 8 l
1 3.0 00 0 0

»
\,50 0 0 0

7 7 0 ,1 6 t 02

7 6 0 ,3 1 6 55

9 ,8 1 7 47

639.51(1 98

T o ta l...........................................................................................................................................
L e a v in g a B a la n c e of. ...........................................................................

3 5 5 ,2 6 1 84
2 8 1 ,0 9 6 7 7
3 0 ,5 9 1 04

5 1 1 ,9 0 7 23

1 2 7 ,54 9 75

Grout Earning*. Ex/mnscs and Net Earning* o f Each Division.
The follow it g table ihow e the gro-s earnings, the expenses and the net earnings o f the Main Line and Branches, and
each Division o f the System , for the year ended June 30, 1395, with comparison for the year ended June 30, 1S94 :—

Cross

M * tx L n t , in c lu d in g B ra n c h e s’ .........................................
pA A K S K S M rk o B t » u i ___ _ ■
_____. . . . . . . . . ________ . . .
W ashixotox B e » x r f i ..................................................................

P iiltA o ri.i-H lA D m a t o x ” . . . . ................................................ ;
P rm m irR o D irt-u o x***........................................... ...................
W iis a i.tx u F it t s , A B alt . D tv tsto x ................. ..................
S ttliU JD DlVtSlOX........................................................................
c t m u t . O nto D m a to x .........................................................
L a r i . R a ts r t m m w ....................... ............................................
8 T » * r r » r u x jt O r r is to x ...............................................................
ctucaoo m m s m __ ...» ..........................................
A x * o x D m s t o s (In clu d in g W oo ster B r a n c h ).............

-

j

1895.

1894.

j

8

$

Eamingt.

10,8 00 ,3 3 7 10 1 0 ,6 8 5 ,6 2 9 26
731,121 (to 7 5 3 .4 0 0 69
624,811 80
6 5 6 ,5 0 0 6 9 ,
1 .7 7 6 .3 1 7 23 1,«33^»*1 7 *
3 ,0 1 5 .7 2 6 9 5 1 2 ,6 0 2 ,5 3 3 -r l
6 3 3 ,7 7 3 17
189,447 0 6
800,909 9 6
3 4 7 ,3 0 0 11
1,0 9 0,60 1 77 1 ,0 8 0,42 8 17
71 1,171 01
7 06 .09 2 91
123,571 ssi
9 9 ,6 2 3 3 2
2,500,7-11 59 2 ,8 7 0 ,5 1 6 53
3 9 3 ,7 9 3 7 5
3 8 8 ,4 5 8 00

Er/tente!.

1 89 5 .

Net Earnings.

1894.

1895.

1 8 9 ).

8
$
8
8
6 ,6 6 4 ,2 3 0 09 6 ,5 7 7 ,9 2 1 68
4 ,1 4 2 ,1 0 7 08 4 ,1 0 7 ,7 0 7 i5 8
5 7 8 ,3 1 0 20
107,710 73
563,701 27
175,084 4 3
150,402 24
174 ,49 9 H2
2 0 3 ,0 0 0 6 0
4 5 1 ,5 6 0 33
1 ,2 1 7 ,8 3 5 61 1 ,3 1 0,77 1 90
5 1 4 ,0 0 9 82
5 5 8 ,18 1 62
9 2 1 ,1 4 1 48
709 ,31 2 30
2 ,0 9 1 ,5 8 5 37 1 ,8 9 3 ,0 2 1 14
8 1 ,1 6 0 72 Def. 1 0,010 08
552,61 1 13
4 9 9 ,4 6 6 14
9 8,001 44
3 0 1 ,9 0 5 52
2 7 1 ,5 6 7 73
7 5 ,7 3 2 38
0 0 2 .7 7 0 02
2 0 0 ,8 3 3 40
8 8 9 ,7 0 8 37
1 0 0 ,05 7 55
0 0 5 .0 8 1 05
5 7 9 ,6 9 2 97
1 0 8 ,48 0 90
120,399197
1 2 5 ,5 8 0 92
112,008 15 D ef. 2 ,0 1 5 03 Def. 12,41-1 83
5 0 4 .8 8 0 55
1 .9 9 5 ..0 1 "1 2 ,0 5 3 ,3 4 8 22
8 1 5 ,19 8 31
3 3 8 .8 6 2 97
3 1 9 ,1 8 3 87
5 4 ,9 3 0 78
0 9 ,2 7 4 19

T o t a l.......................................................................... I 2 2 .8 1 7 .1 8 2 21 2 2 ,5 0 2 ,6 6 2 35! 1 5,8 0 1 ,0 4 3 89 1 5 ,3 0 0 ,6 8 9 07

7 .0 1 0 ,1 3 8 35

6 ,9 4 1 ,9 7 3 28

A com pan-on of the twelve months ended June 30,1895, with the twelve months ended June 30,1891, shows the follow ing:
$314,519-89 or 01 ’40 ppr cent.
Increase in gro«« earnings................
240.354 82 or 01-54
**
'* operating expenses..........
74.165 07 or 01 -07
**
" net e a rn in g s.............. ..
1,674 585 93 or 12-03
'*
** earrings from fre ig h t___
.1.381.960 90 or 2149
Decrease in earnings from passengers
.2,723.248, or 20-39
•
•
Increase in tons m ov ed .........................
.1.419,320,
or 1474
Decrease in passengers carried............
The M arx Ltxr. axu B s a x c h o - em b ra c e th e fo llo w in g R o a d s: The W in c h este r A P otom ac, th e W in c h este r A S lr a s b u rg , am i tho H a rriso n
hnriT nr.iiM .ti: the so u th B r a n c h : 'h o F a irm o n t M o rg an to w n & P itts b u r g h ; th e C onfluence * O a k la n d ; th e G rafto n & B etln g to n ; tho
W ash in gto n C o u n ty : th e B a ltim o re A N ew Y o rk : th e B a ltim o re B e lt (Its p a sse n g e r b u sin e ss. M ay an d J u n e , 1 89 5 ).
*' The i ’ntr.At*r.i.pnf a D r rts to s em b rac es th e B a ltim o re A P titla d e lp h ia R ailro ad an d Hie P h ila d e lp h ia B ran ch .
•-•T ile piTrsiTCRiirr l.tv t s p .x em b race., the fo llo w in g R o a d s: T lie P ittsb u rg h A C o n n c lls v ille ; th e S o m erset * C a m b ria ; fh e H lo k m a n
R itr.: < . Mo m - t'lf tsani A B rn ad ferd ; the F a y e tte C o u n t y ; the B e r lin ; the O h io & B a ltim o re Short. L in o (E a ste rn D ivision ).

[V ol. LXI.

THE CHRONICLE.

928

nue for the fiscal year
in Passenger R
ired with the previous fiscal
1893, as com pari
t
Hi-* greater part of the large earnings from
oluuihinn E*| aition travel accrued to the
lion in freight rates, which began so sen„ intensifi d in the past fiscal year, during
half of which freight rates were lower than
' the I
r i!
iied affecting all classes of traffic,
tfore f
e«
important a branch of this company's
<iaU
,
I
tr fli •, the prices for the greater part of the past fiscal
frr
th e lowest ever known.
,
d ,iion was not due to any demand upon the part ot
Thi
hni solely to the reckless competition lnaugunu- il by Mane of the producing regions and the Lines to which
thit mavVfford'siime Illustration of the extent to which this
em end rate demoralization had extended by stating that,
compared with 1893—the 1 lrgest tonnage and revenue year of
i ’em pany —the tone one mile in 1895 showed a decrease of
fi.an.iOO per 'cent, while the revenue therefrom showed a de­
crease of 11-22 100 per eeut, the classification b e i n g in favor ot
tltif* latter yp&r.
1I0
\V forcibly do such facts emphasize the urgent necessity
for til- adoption of m asures to correct the evil, and to secure
u, ihe public w hat it most desires, namely, uniform and rea­
sonable rates, with the efficient service to insure which these
ar*» so essential.
, ,
But for the judicious economies observed, and the better
handling o f traffic, rci dcred possible by the increased facilities
and improvements in every Department of the System, this
rate situation would have produced even less satisfactory Net
Results.

R elief Department.
Tne Report of the R lief Department for the twelve months
ended June 30, 1895, w ill be printed for di jtnbution am ongst
the members. The follow ing shows the condition ot tin t D e^ The active membership at the close of the fitcal year was
35,710, being an increase oi 331 as compared with the previous
year.
T he re c e ip ts a n d Incom e d u rin g th e y e a r en ded J u n e 3 0,
01
A nd th e d isb iirao in en ts H ave b e e n — . . . - ........ - - — v •-,v *
From th e co m m encem en t of th e B e lie f A sso c ia tio n to th e
clo se of th e fisc a l y e a r th e d isb u rsem en ts h a v e b e e n .........4 ,6 1 o ,4 7 7 84

The amount due depositors by the Savings Feature was :
.................$ 7 8 0 ,6 6 8 42
A t th o clo s e o f the fisca l y e a r o f 1 8 9 4 ...............
................. 8 5 6 ,0 4 2 74
A t th e clo s e o f the fisca l y e a r o f 18 J o — . -----Tu e d e p o sits a u r iu g thecfis c a l -y e a r h a.v e b e e 1 1 ; V , ' Y “ 7*1 2 6 7 ,5 8 6 19
r he ep o sits d rin s w i iiw u i" 0 - . .. .. . — n

T he w ith d ra w a ls of th e dep o sito rs d u rin g t h e fis c a l y e a r
Q 011 Q
4>
h a v e b e e n ..................................................................................................... 1 93 ' 211 87

The amount due by borrowers under the provisions of the
Savings Feature was :
A t th e clo se of th e fisc a l y e a r 1 8 9 4 ................................................. ? b S o’i o t
A t th e clo se of th e fisc a l y e a r 1 8 9 5 ................................................. 6 8 9 ,4 Zo 77

An extra dividend of one and one-half percent was declared
on all deposits drawing interest at the close of the fiscal year,
thus making the interest for the year equivalent to five and
one-half per cent p -r annum.
The funds for the Savings Feature are loaned only to
employees of the Company, to enable them to purchase or
improve homesteads or to release liens thereon.
A t t h e close of the fiscal year there were 318 names on the
Pension roll the disbursements on this accou it for the year
having been §34,890 05, and for the whole period $373,05 4 37.

Tonnage of the Year, with Com
parison.

P H IL A D E L P H IA DIVISIO N .

The tonnage moved on the entire System is shown by the
following statement
Tons ca rrt .d in

T on s c a r r ie d in

.

1890
1884
8.6 29,0 48
18 85 ......... *.................... 8,4 22,9 36 1 8 9 1
1 8 8 6 .............
9,8 07,6 86 18 92
18 93
1887.
10,572,893
1 8 8 8 ................................ 11,195,940 1 8 9 4
1 8 8 9 ................................ 12,161,380 18 95

........................ 13.988,176
........................ 14,858,972
........................ 15,738,859
........................ 16,356,405
........................ 13,357,175
........................16,080,423

The follow ing is the result for the twelve months ended
June 30, 1895 •
.$ 1 ,7 7 6 ,3 1 7 23
. 1 ,2 1 7 ,8 3 5 61

G ross E a rn in g s .
E x p e n s e s ............
N e t E a r n in g s ..............................................................................

$ 5 5 8 ,4 8 1 62

Construction and betterments.

The follow ing is the comparison of the Philadelphia D ivi­
sion for the twelve months ended June 30, 1895, with June
30, 1894:

T he aggrega te ex p en d itu res fo r C on stru ction an d B etternu ns - for the I w aive m onths liavo b e e n ................................i .
F o r the tw elve m onths en d ed Ju n e 3 0 ,1 8 9 4 , th ey w e r e ... 1,1 50,o9 0 64

18 9 5 ,
1894.
P e r O t.
d r o s s E a r n in g 3 .$ 1 ,7 7 6 ,3 1 7 23 $ 1 ,8 3 3 ,8 4 1 7 8 D e o .$ 5 7 ,5 2 4 55
3 -1 4
E x p e n s e s _______ 1 ,2 1 7 ,8 3 5 6 1
1 ,3 1 9 ,7 7 1 9 6
D e c .1 0 1 ,9 3 6 3 d 7'7 2

A. d ecrease fo r tlio 12 m onths en d ed Ju ne 3 0 ,1 3 9 5 , o f. $ 5 0 9 ,2 8 4 53

This sum of §041,306 11 has been charged to the different
inves'rnent accounts to which the expenditures appertained.
It is distributed as folio vs :
Id n es East nf B a ltim ore................................................................... $ 1 7 2,1 50 27
M ain Stem and B ranches.................................................................. 269,215 36
r u t - b u r " D iv ision ...........................................................................
3 2 ,462 97
Trans-O hio D iv is io n ........................................................................... 167,477 51
$641,3 06 11

F o r details of these expenditures for Construction see table

“ B," appended to the Report of the General Manager,

Sinking Funds.
The Company has mantained through the year its cash appropriati ms to the Sinking Funds of its Sterling Loan due in
1927, and the P. & C. Consolidated Mortgage Loan due in
1926. These two Funds now aggregate $1,594,044.
The investments for the appropriati its and increments of
the Main Line Sinking Funds, in pursuance of the agreement
to that f ffect, have been made in the Consolidated Mortgage
five per cent one-hundred-year Binds of this Company,
These investments in the hands of the Trustees of the Main
Line Sinking Funds now amount to $3,23 ,196, viz., $4,865,000
Consolidated Mortgage Five percent one-hundred-year Bonds
o f the Company, and $3,366,196 of other first-class interestbearing bonds. See “ Sinking Funds,” Balance Sheet, Table
“ E ” in pamphlet.

N e t e a r n in g s ..

$ 5 5 8 ,4 8 1 6 2

$ 5 1 4 ,0 6 9 82 I n c .$ 4 4 ,4 1 1 8 0

8 '6 4

Staten Island Rapid Transit Railroad.
The follow ing is the comparison for the twelve months
ended June 30, 1895, with June 3), 1894 :
1895.
G ro ss E a r n in g 3 ..$ 8 7 5 ,3 4 2 51
O per. e x p e n s e s .. 4 7 1 ,6 7 1 58

18 9 4 .
$ 1 ,0 3 1 ,3 7 3 2 4
6 2 3 ,9 1 7 88

N e t e a r n in g s ...$ 4 0 3 ,6 7 0 93
In t., rtls. & ta x e s. 3 4 4 ,5 2 3 2 7

$ 4 0 7 ,4 5 5 36
3 5 0 ,4 4 0 59

S u r p lu s ..........

$ 5 9 ,1 4 7 66

$ 5 7 ,0 1 4 7 7

I n cr

a se.

D ecrea se.

$ 1 5 6 ,0 3 0 73
1 5 2 ,2 4 6 30
$ 3 ,7 8 4 43
5 ,9 1 7 32
$ 2 ,1 3 2 89

The statement o f the Staten Island Rapid Transit R lilroad
Company, in this Company’s Annual Report, heretofore in­
cluded the receipts front the Whitehall Ferry.
That Ferry having become a separate organization, its op or ations are not included in the above statement, w hich a c ­
counts for the decrease in E timings and Expenses of the
Staten Island R ip id Transit Railroad Company.
That Company has recently cl osed a co itract far the c o n ­
struction of the passenger station, sheds and approaches at
St. G -org-s, which will give very sup trior much needed
facilities both passmger and freight, at this, its most im ­
portant, terminal.

Baltimore Belt Railroad.
On the first o f May last the Baltimore Belt R lilroad was so
far completed as to be open for passenger traffic—the trains

Payment to the City o f Baltimore on Account o f the being hauled by the regular passenger power of the PuiladelPurchase o f its interjest in the Pittsburgh & Con phia Division.
nellsville Railroad.
On the fourth of August last the line was opened to the

freight trains o f the Company, hauled by the oue electric
motor which was ready for use at that time.
W ith this transfer to the Baltimore Belt Railroad Line of
the entire passenger and freight traffic of the Company be­
tween Baltimore and its Philadelphia Division, the water
Payment o f kqidpment Trust Bonds.
transfer from Locust Point, Baltimore, to Canton, was in
The Equipment Trust obligatio is of the Company have August last abandoned.
been issued as follows :
The line is now completed, with the exception of the freight
yards and up-town passenger station. It is, in every particular,
C u r Trust of 1 8 8 7 ...............................
.$2,500,000
E q u ip m en t T ru st, Series A, 1889
. 1,000,000 an admirably planned and constructed w ork, thoroughly
E q u ip m e n t Trust, Series B, 1890.
. 2 , 000,000 suited for tt e purpos s for which it was designed, and well
worth the time and money expended upon it.
$5,500 ,000
The Company has recently established, bm not yet co n10 per cent of the principal sum is payable annually; and plsted, four freight yards upon the line, in the most ra p iily
there has been accordingly paid as follow s.
grow ing part of the city, at which an active business is al­
Tin- Car T ru st L oan o f 1887 fo r $2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 , eig h t annual
ready being done. These facilities w ill, in the very near
p aym en ts, avgi-i-giiting........................................................
«2 O oqo fu'ure, bring to the Company a large volum i of additional
qa
T ho E quipm ent T ru -t Loan o f 1889, Series A , fo r $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 , ’
’
freight traffic.
s ix a n im a l p a y m en ts.................................................
600 Ot
The up-town passenger station—“ Mount Royal Station ” —
T h o E qu ipm ent T ru st L oan o f 1890, Series’ B, fo r $ 2 !6 6 o ,00 0
’
fo u r an nu al p a y m e n ts .............................
80 0 000
was com m enced in August last, and will be ready for occu pa­
tion in the early spring. It is very eligibly located, and will
T o ta l B onds paid and ca n celed .
.$3,400 ,000
B a la n ce ou ts ten d in g and unpaid
.$2 ,100,000 offer every convenience and facility to that large and grow ing
residence section of the city.
The Company has made its nineteenth annual payment of
$10,000 to the City of Baltimore on account of the purchase of
the city's interest in the Pittsburg & Connellsville Railroad,
leaving still due $210,000 of the original sum of $1,000,000.

N o v e m b e r 23, 1895.]

THE CHRONICLE

The Electric Power House at Camden Station, which is to
supply poorer for the Electric Motor train service in the tun­
nel, and light for the tunnel, the yards shops, buildings and
offices of the Company in the City of Baltimore, has been in
successful operation since June last.
The two remaining Electric Motors, to complete the equip­
ment of three, will be finished before the close of the present
calendar year.
The entire freight and passenger service through the tunnel
wiil then be hauled by electric motors, and in view of the
aucofasfui operation of the Motor in serwee since August 4th,
no doubt is entertained of the entire success of the undertak­
ing, making railroad tunnel service, heretofore so undesirable,
as agrees! ie to the traveling public as that in the open.

Terminal Properties.
Of the important terminal properties of the Company
referred to in last Annual Rsporc, thus • at Pittsburgh and
District of Columbia have not been completed during th- past
fiscal year as was contemplated, owing to legal difficulties in
obtaining the right of way for the railroads to be cons- ructad
in connection therewith. It is expected these obstacles will
be entirely removed and the work completed during the cur­
rent calendar year. The work at the Cumberland terminal is
being rapidly pushed for completion by the early spring.
The appropriations for the above will complete the Ter­
minals covered by the Termioal Loan. They 9re provided
for by the $1 ,S97,5t)0 reserved from the procee is of that L >
tn,
which sum D placed with the Special Depubari-s for this
Fund, as shown in Balance Sheet, pages 10 and 17 o f pam­
phlet.

Sterling Loan of 1870 for &800,000.
The 6 per cent Sterling loan of the Company for £800,000,
negotiated in 1870, matured March 1, 1895, and was paid on
that date through the operation of the Miscellaneous Bonds
in the Sinking Fund provided for in that Loan, amount­
ing to............................................................................... $2,202,412
And through the Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent
100-year Bonds of the Biltimore & Ohio Riilroad
Company, as provided for in the Mortgage of De­
cember, 1887. covering the same, amounting to....... 1.*83,000
This has eff. cted a reduction of the total Funded Debt, as
compared with 1894, of 12,202,000.
The Cleveland Terminal d Valley R ailroad Company.
r
The Valiev Railway, extending from Vat'ey Junction to
Clev, land, of which the Baltimore < Ohio Railroad Company
£
has held a cor trolling interest through ownership of stock,
has recently been reorganized upon a a n t'd and conservative
basis under the title of the Cleveland Terminal < Valley
S
Railroad Company, in which reorganized oompany the Balu
more & Ohio Company retain a controlling intere-t.
The Biltimore & Ohio Com piny has so'd to the new com­
pany the valuable terminal properties it had acquired in
Cleveland, with the vi-w of giving the new company proper
terminal facilities for its own business and enabling it to fur
nish the much-needed terminals for several Lines desiring
such facilities in Cleveland.
Contracts for the use of its terminals and part of its line
have already been mtde with the Wheeling & Lake Erie
Railway Company. It is expected similar contracts will
shortly be made with with one or two other important lints,
in additi m to one t listing contract made by the Receivers
of the old Company.
The property, as reorganized, will be a very valuable ad­
junct to the Baltimore & Ohio Svstero.
The Biltimore <£ Ohio Railroad Company has agreed to en­
dorse the |8,OOO,flO0 Four per cent One-Hundred Year Coupon
Bonds of the reorganized company.

929

The continued steady increase in the already large volume
of buinees—with the restoration of r ites which ic is reason­
ably expee'ed must be made—promise au early return of rail­
road traffic to remunerative conditions.
The proposed agreement of the “ Joint Traffi •Association,”
in connection with which your Company ha* f o r a long time
been earnestly engaged, will, when attained, materially aid the
maintenance'of these very important and desirable conditions,
Attention is called to the tables attached to the pamphlet
report, which give in detail information connected with the
several subjects.
A. Earnings and Expenses of all lines East and West of the
Ohio River.
B. Statement of Net Earnings and Income and Fixed Charges
on all Lines of the System, together with the profit or
loss upon each.
C. Statement of income from sources other than the Opera­
tion of the Railroad System.
D. Statement of Interest Charges, Taxes, Rents, etc.
E. General Balance Sheet.
F. Profit and Loss.
G. Statement of entire Funded Debt of the B dlimore & Ohio
Railroad Company’s System, including that for account
of tlie Baltimore & Ohio and Chicago Riilroad Compa­
nies, the Parkersburg Branch Railroad Company, the
Philadelphia Branch and the Baltimore & Philadelphia
Railroad Company ; also the Funded Debt of the Pitts­
burg & Conn ILville Railroad Company.
H. Bor da for which the Company is Guarantor.
I. Leases of the Company.
J. Profit and Loss, Washington Branch.
The President and Directors take great pleasure in again
acknowledging the faithful and efficient se n ic s of the offi­
cers and employes of the Company during the past fiscal year.To their special efforts is due the 'admirable condition of the
Company's property, uod*r a reduced expenditure in most
Departments o f the service.
By order of the Board,
CHARLE8 F. MAYER,
President.

BALTIMORE & OHIO S O U T H W EST ER N
RAILWAY CO MP AN Y.
SECOND ANNUAL R EPORT-FOR TUF, FISCAL YEAR
ENDING JUNE 80, 1895.
C i n c i n n a t i , O h io .

To the Stockholders o f the Baltim ore it Ohio Southwestern
Railway Company.

The President and Directors submit the following report of
the results of tue op-rations of this O in p iu y for tin year
ending June 31, 1895.
f ir e * . E a rn in g * ....................... ................................................................$ 0 ,3 2 3 ,0 3 5 5 0
O p eratin g E x p en se -, 03-53 p e r c e n t ........................................... 4 ,0 1 7 ,1 0 3 8 6
N et K ik vin o * .......... .................................................................. ¥ 2 ,3 0 5 ,0 3 1 64
Adit M iscellan eo u s R e c e ip t* ...........................................................
2 ,2 5 0 0 0
D educt—
T ax** an d A sse ssm e n ts,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ¥ 2 7 0 ,2 4 6 4 4
R en ta l of T e rm in a l P ro p e rty ...........................
6 0 .0 0 0 0 0
4 ,3 9 3 17
In te re st an d D isco u n t...........................................

$ 2 ,3 0 8 ,1 8 1 6 4

3 3 4 .0 3 9 61

Net E arn in g* a p p lic a b le to I n te r n * !........................................¥ 1 ,9 73 ,54 2 03
I n te re st on Bond* a n d E q u ip m en t C e r t lt lc a t e s .................... 1 ,7 6 1 ,4 8 5 9 4
N e t In co m e

¥ 212,056 19

As this Company commenced i‘ s operations November 1st,
1893, the comoxrisoos in this report are mid * with the op *n White the continued depression in business during much of tions for the year ending June 30th, 1891, i-eiog for the last
the past fiscal year, and the extreme low rites of freight pre­ four montijs o f the Ohio & Mississippi Railway and the
vailing during iha sain*, has rendered it proper for the man­ Baltimore & Ohio Southw stern Railroad compinies and the
agement to exercise every economy consistent with a proper first eight months of this Company.
maintenance of the property, it has been deemed wise to con­
In crea
rn in g s .......... .................¥
1 0 0 p e r cent*
tinue to m a k e improvements in the '* Maintenance of Way In c re a se In G row E a g E x p en se * ................... 62.937 92
se in O p era tin
53,101 27
1-34 p e rc e n tand Structure*” an l “ Maintenance of Equipment” and to In crea se In Not K n r a ln g * ................................ 9 .7 3 6 55
•42 p e r cent415 p e r cent*
continue as heretofore to charge a large portion o f ibeee ex­ Inereiissvln Freight E a rn in gs,.......... .......... 162,147 67
577 p e r ce n tD eere* v ,n t a s s e a g e r E a rn in g * ..................... 100,711 52
penditure* to Operating Expenses.
The percentage of cost of operation was 63'58 per cent, as
In these Departments the expenditures have been confined
mainly to mat* red improvements in Road-bed, Bridges and compared with 63 82 p<*r cent for the previous ye>r.
The earnings of this Company have been seriously aff cted
Culverts, and such improvements in “ Maintenance of Equip­
ment” a* would prove most effective, while upon improve­ by the failure of the corn crop, which is so essential to this
ments or enlargements of Stations, Platforms, Buildings, Company’s revenues, and by the several labor strikes which
and the like, the expenditures have been restricted to what prevailed during the year.
The prolonged strike in the coal regiont of Ohio in the
was neces*arv for proper maintenance only.
latter part of the fiscal year greatly depleted the earning*,
The expenditure s f r the fiscal year have been :
which have been further reduced by a continuance of the low
F o r M aloten»tu> «of W ay a m i S tr u c tu r e s
...............— ¥ 2,840,232 71
F o r M a in ten an ce o f E q u ip m e n t.......... ............................................ 2 ,0 0 2 ,7 1 6 03 tariffs whi'-ii prevailed for a greater part of the year.
For C o a stru c tlo a ........................................................................................
0 1 1 ,30 6 11
Notwithstanding these serious difficulties which the man­
Ail these expenditures upon “ Maintenance o f Way and agement have encountered in operating the property, it is
Structures ' and “ Maintenance of Equipment” have been gratifying to report that the gross earning* have been in­
creased $62,837 82 and the net earnings $9,738 55. This has
charged to Operating Expenses.
The very csrefui and thorough manner in which all the been due to the maintenance of the economies which existed
Company's work—both current and Improvements—has been during the previous year, and to the judicious expenditures
done in the past few years, enabled the Management to main­ for improvements and betterments.
The year immediately preceding the Consolidation, the
tain lb* property in all Departments, and to largely improve
gross earnings of the Company were $6,958,599, being $635,503
it in some, at a minimum expenditure.
This great,
The Road B-d over the entire System has never, in the his­ above the gross earnings for the last y"ar.
tory of the Company, been in the superior condition which it shrinkage in business we believe is due mainly to the causes
we have mentioned, and to the great financial depression
is at pri sent.

the

930

[ V o l . LX1.

c h r o n ic l e .
l i a

U '

b i l i t i e s

.

t k c management
B a la n ces
gross earnings tlie
J u n e 3(», 18 95.
were for that year, C a p ita l S to ck , P r e f e r r e d ......................... $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
p be expected from C a p ita l S to ck, Com m on............................... 1 0 .0 0 0 ,0 0 0 00
F u n d ed j o
51,2(>ofJoU 0 0
2 6 2 ,0 0 0 UU
con te m pi a ted i m- t u n a e u D jeb t i n - - - - - - . . ^
E quip. T ru st C e rtifs., S e rie s A , B & C.
3 2 2 ,7 2 4 00
ditions prevail.
B ills P a y a lr te ..................................
5 6 ,6 9 4 13

*ed $306,925, $94,925 of the

llf pi>r cent M ortgage Bonds be-

$350,000 being sold for im ­
ho plan of C onsolidation ;
the old liv e per can t Bonds

E q u ip m e n t L e a s e W a r ra n ts (O. & J L
x .)
U n p aid W ages, J u n e R o lls, e t c ..............
A ccru ed I n te r e s t on B o n d s............----A ccru ed I n te r e s t on E qu ip t. C e r tirs ..
P ast-D u e C oupons U n p a id .......................
U n p aid In t. on B.&O .S.W . R R .inoom os
T a x e s A ccru ed b u t n o t D u e.....................
A u d ited V ouchers, P a y a b le .....................
D ue in d iv id u a ls a n d C o m p a n ie s ......
T raflio B a la n c e s D ue to O ther R o ad s.
A ccru ed R e n ta ls, R e a l E s t a t e .. . . . . . .
T e rm in al C o n tract (U nfinished Work)
E qu ip m en t T ru s t C ertifs. C alled I n ...
A g e n ts ’ D rafts lo r C harges, O utstT ng
S p e c ia l R e se rv e F u n d ..................................
M isc e llan e o u s.................................... - - - - - - S u rp lu s Incom e B. & O. 8. W . R R . Co.
to Nov. 1, 1 8 9 3 .. .. ....................................
P ro fit a n d L o ss................................................

2 3 0 ,6 3 3 52
7 7 1 ,3 4 2 65
5 ,5 8 0 00
2 6 ,5 2 5 0 0
2 5 ,5 0 1 7 2
1 6 9 ,0 3 8 17
3 3 6 ,9 7 3 86
250 74
9 9 ,9 8 2 4 4
4 ,8 1 5 0 2
5 6 ,3 9 0 9 9

I n c. o r D ec.
I n a b ilitie s .

I. $366,925 00
D. 7 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
I. 318,0*24 0 0
D. 4 3 ,7 7 0 60
I.
2 3 ,3 7 7 51
D. 5 6 ,6 0 9 58
D.
1 ,3 5 0 0 0
D.
2 ,2 9 2 5 0
I.
1 0 ,8 5 1 72

D. 229,10122

D. 72,758 78
re been made upon the
D. 33,478 24
i of seventy-five pound
rh)
I.
327 39
D. 41,496 73
laid in the main line of the Ohio
therefrom has been laid
2,000 00
sn
tl
2 5 ,6 2 4 4 2
I.
2,822 83
inch, thereby completing all of
I. 105,769 13
1 0 5 ,7 6 9 13
in thi i branches of this Division,
1 3 ,8 5 2 72
I.
10,566 71
high Mate of efficiency ; eight hunthi
D. 170,988 67
fty-two cars of different classes have been added
•ed
I. 233,12712
2 6 6 ,9 3 1 15
ip]moot ; the thirty-six iron bridges under constructhe
tl„. list fiscal year have been completed; five
Totals.............................................. $84,047,879 66
I. $349,945 14
>n c
H i!, * of -tilings and commercial tracks have been added and
slir.-o- stations Inivv been constructed and improved, an elec­
tric pbint and other improved machinery placed m the bhops,
making a t o ta l expenditure of $781,488 74, the details o f which
are more fully set forth in the Vice-President’s report sub­ G R E A T NOR TH ERN RAILWAY CO M PA NY .
mitted herewith.
.
,
Tin r,- have been paid on account of these improvements SIXTH AN N U AL REPORT FOR THE FISCAL Y E A R
ENDING JUNE 80, 1895.
f |:;a 704 74, and the balance, when duu, will be paid from
cash on hand and bonds provided to be used for equipment,
betterments and improvements under the plan of Consolida­
The President and Directors submit the follow ing report
tion. The equipment trust certificates and lease warrants for the year ending June 30, 1893.
_
maturing during the year to the amount of $113,770 60 have
During the year ending June 30, 1895, this Company has
been paid from moneys derived from the same source.
enjoyed a reasonable increase in the volume of its freignt
The car equipment, motive power, plant and property have traffic, a good share o f which has com e from the newer por­
been greatly improved and thoroughly well maintained dur­ tions o f its lines in Montana and o d the Pacific Coast.
ing the year, and the respective properties are in excellent con­ The largest relative increase in tonnage has been on the
dition. It bas been the aim of the management to make all of Montana Division. The wheat and grain crops of Minnesota
the improvements of the best and most substantial character and North Dakota show an increase over the previous year of
Contracts were made during the low price of iron and steel about five million bushels, or 150,000 tons.
for sixteen bridges, which will be finished within the next
A material reduction in the average rate received per to a
per mile w ill be noticed, which is mainly due to the larger
fiscal year.
A contract has been made with the Cleveland Cincinnati amount of grain, ore, lumber, coal, etc., carried, w hich pay
Chicago & St. Louis Railway Company, which will go into proportionately lower rates
effect the first part of the next fiscal year, for the use of the
The passenger traffic shows a decrease in the volume of
Louisville Branch between Mount Vernon and Jeffersonville, a business with an increase in the average rate. This may be
distance of fifty-two miles, at the rental of $27,500per annum, attributed to the general condition of the business of the
and the payment of a proportion of operating expenses, main­ country and a consequent falling off in emigration to the
tenance, improvements and taxes thereon, to be determined newer States. Tnere has arisen, however, during the present
on a wheelage basis. This is an advantageous contract for summer, a considerable movement on to the fertile and low this Company.
priced lands of North Dakota and Minnesota, and it is be­
Improvements under the Terminal contract have been prac­ lieved that intelligent efforts on the part of the people and
tically completed, and the facilities afforded and the econo­ the railways will result in extending this settlement to the
mies realized in the operation of ihe property, created thereby, States farther west, and particularly to the State of W ash­
are far in excess of the sixty thousand dollars rental paid ington, w hich for timber, fruit, stock-raising, general farm ­
therefor.
ing, mining, etc., has no superior in the Union.
The net revenues derived from the operation of the prop­
The operation of your railway has during the year met
erty are $212,056 19, a sum sufficient to pay two and a-quarter with no serious interruptions from snows, floods, or other­
per cent on the 4 A ” Income Bonds for the period covered by wise, with the exception of the forest fires along the line o f
1
this report.
the Eastern Railway in Saptember, 1894.
It is our painful duty to record the d°ath of our esteemed
The work o f permanent improvements of track, replacing
associate, Patrick Buchan, Esq , of London, which occurred sixty with seventy-five pound steel rails, changing pile c u l­
in June last. Mr. Buchan was a leading member of one of verts and trestles into solid embankments with either stone
the London Committees representing the security holders on or iron water-ways, and replacing wooden bridges with steel
the Consolidation which created this Company and its accom­ structures of strong design, has been continued as heretofore,
plishment was largely due to his labors. He was a Director and w ill be continued until all temporary structures are
also of the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railroad Company changed into permanent ones. To do this as it has been done
from its organization. He was a most valued member of the will take from three to four years.
respective Boards and throughout performed his duties with
The track, bridges, buildings, shops and locom otive and car
unswerving fidelity to the interests committed to his charge. equipment are all in good order and condition.
The operations of the Company have been conducted with
The permanent character of the work done on the mountain
mark, d regularity and comparative freedom from casualties ; portions of your line during construction and since has
and the vice-presidents, other officers and employes in all de­ enabled the Company to operate its line in those sections with
partments are entitled to commendation for their faithful and safety and great econom y. The Board of Directors wish to
efficient services.
call particular attention to the fact that-, while the cost of
Your attention is respectfully called to the report of the operation per train mile, w hich includes the cost of mainte­
Vice-President and General Manager, and to the Auditor’s nance of track, equipment, renewals, improvements, etc., is
statements, herewith submitted, for information in detail.
unusually high, your Company’s earnings per train mile, both
By order of the Board of Di'ectors,
gross and net, will compare very favorably with those of
ED W AR D R. BACON, President.
other railways similarly situated, or even with those of rail­
ways enjoying a m uch larger traffic at rates as high as or
GENERAL BALANCE SHEET JUNE 30, 18 95, COMPARED WITH higher than the ratps received, by your Company.
JUNE 30, 1894.
A t the time of making this report, the crop for the year
A SSE TS.
1895 indicates the heaviest grain tonnage ever hauled by the
B a la n ces
I n c. o r B ee.
road, w hich will be handled under more favorable conditions
J u n e 3 0 ,1 8 9 5 .
A ssets.
The fiscal year ending June 30,1896, should
Cost o f R oa d and A p p u rten a n ces........$ 7 8 ,0 5 2 ,4 1 1 89
$8 3 ,3 2 4 61 than ever before.
C on stru ction .....................................................
38 8 ,4 3 8 99
. 311,976 07 show the largest net earnings in the history of the Company.
E quipm ent <iw n ed .......................................... 2 ,0 1 0 ,4 0 4 44
42 5,76 2 49
During the year the Company opened its new shops at
E quipm ent Leased..........................................
51 2 ,2 0 0 00
Bei-urlti f o f O ther C om pan ies................... 1 ,0 1 4 ,7 7 5 0 0
Spokane, where it has ample facilities for doing all the repair
Real Estate
7,7 0 5 25
work on the equipment used on the W estern Divisions.
I.
50 00
Cash on H a n d ...........................................
25 5 ,0 8 5 95
I.
8 2 ,8 6 5 69
Large additions have been made to the terminal and
Cash w ith F isca l A g en ts.........................
804,671 11
D . 358,222 66
United sta tes G overnm ent.....................
8 7 ,018 25
D.
1,864 31 division yards at Minneapolis, Melrose, W est Superior and
Truffle B al’ ces clue from O ther R oad s.
3 8 ,855 26
I.
1 6 ,1 0 6 58 Duluth.
D u e from In d ividu als an d C om panies
I.
2 2 0 ,6 0 4 63
7,216 20
On the Great Lakes there has been carried a large tonnage
A g e n ts’ C urrent B a la n ces......................
1 5 0 ,1 3 8 75
D.
3,7 6 2 71
Bilk. Receivable.....................................
300 00
D. 239,802 69 during the year ; but most of it at very low rates,
M. A 0 . 8, tv. T erm inal C o ......................
1 0 2 ,1 4 0 28
The Northern Steamship Company’s second passenger
D.
5,0 00 00
A dvances to Freight Lines, e t c ............
1 7 ,3 7 7 49
r.
506 34 steamer, “ North Land,” was put into service early in June,
M lsculhineous............................................
68 ,572 0 0
D.
2 ,4 1 0 1 5 and the season is showing a very satisfactory increase in the
Ma rials
1 S u p p lies...........................
31 0 ,5 8 0 37
X.
33 ,199 68
traffic of both passenger steamers, particularly iu the travel
T o ts
.$ 8 4 ,0 4 7 ,8 7 9 66
I. $3 49,9 45 1 4 brought by them to your railways.
1PP

P ill

hi

Brought forward .....................................................
M ain tenan ce o l O rgan ization o f St. P. M.
& M. H y...........................................................
O ther R en tals....................................................

R E V E N U E ACCOUNT, FROM ST. P A I L M IN N EAPO LIS < MAN Ife
T U B A R A IL W A Y 'S L E A S E D I 0 N E 8 .
Y E iit e s c e d j u k e SO, 1895.

fo r

931

THE CHRONICLE.

Novlmbkk 28, 1895.]

E a r n in g s :

$10,365,031
1,854,821
376,439
163,632
350,014

F r e ig h t ..............
P a s s e n g e r ........
M a s !....................
E x p r e s s ............

M iscellaneous.

T o ta l........................................................................................

73
94
63
16
36

5 ,372,590 20

f----------------- ------

$131,671 93

INCOM E A C C O U N T O F G R E A T N O R T H E R N R A IL W A Y ' CO.
FOR TEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1895.
Surplus E arn in g s from O perations under Lease o f St. P .
M. A M . R y . . . : .........................................................................
$1 3 1 ,6 7 1 9 3
Oth e r In c o m e :
In te re st on B on ds O w n ed ............................. $113,917 31
D ivid end s on S tock s O w n ed .........................
731,631 00
R en tals from Lines L e a se d ..........................
228.640 39
In terest and E x c h a n g e ...................................
21 ,912 18
B ills R e ce iv ab le ...............................................
53,654 71
Inoom e from O ther Bourees.........................
15S.080 94

T o ta l O p eratin g E x p e n se s........................... $7 , 146,462 1
5
T a x e s .........................................................................
459,215 5
4
------------------- 7 ,605,677 69
$5 ,504,262 13 .

'R.yrx v ^|^ •
To S t. P. M. «fc M. R y. Co., G u ara n te ed In ­
te r e s t o n S t. P . M. & 31. R y. B ond*, P aid
a n d A ccru ed (see d e ta il on p ag e 9 3 2 ) .. .$ 3 ,5 1 4 ,8 6 6 18
G u ara n te e d D iv id en d s of 6 p er c e n t on
th e C a p it a l* took of S t. P. M .A M. R y .C o . 1 ,2 0 0 ,0 0 0 00
I n t e r e s t on G re a t N o rth ern R y. C o lla te r a l
T r u s t B o nd s, se c u re d *fcrjr 8 t. P. M. A M.
R y ., P acific E xten sio n B o n d s ......................
6 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 0

$5 ^ 0 4 ^ 6 2 1 3
5

Su rplu s from E a rn in g s St. P. M. A M. R y., tran sferred
to Incom e A ccou n t o f G reat N orthern R y. C o................

G ross E a rn in g s..........................................
$13,109,939 82
O peratin g E x p e n s e s :
C ond u ctin g T ru n -p o rta tio u ................................ $3 ,556,698 9
1
M ain tenan ce o f E q u ip m en t................................
950,937 0
4
M aintenance o f Road an.l stru c tu re s ......... 1,909,313 26
G e n e ra l E x p e n s e s.................................................
729,512 94

N et E a rn in g s.............................................
From w h ich has been paid—

$5*3/4 S6 6 iS
____
6 ,o < 02
4
51,150 QO

T o ta l........................................................................................ 1,307,836 53
T o ta l Incom e .......................................................................... . $ 1,4 3 9 ,5 0 8 4 6
From w hich has been paid D ividends as fo llo w s :

A u g u st 1, 189 4 , l 1 p e r c e n t............................
*

N ovem ber 1, 189-1, 1*4 per c e n t...................
F eb ru ary 1, 1895, 1 *4 p e r ce n t.....................
M ay 1, 1895, 1*4 per ce n t..............................

$ 3 1 2 ,5 0 0 O
O

312,500 00
312,500 00
312,500 00
----------- -------

1,250,000 00

B a lan ce, T ran sferred to Profit and Loss......................

$189,508 *46

C O N D E N SE D G E N E R A L B A L A N C E S H E E T JU N E 30. 1895.
jv, Cost o f Properties and Secu rities O w ned.
St. P. M. A M. Ry. P ifltte E xten sion
B onds In hands o f Trustees a* S ecu rity
fo r G rea t N orthern Ry. Co/# C o lla te ra l
Truitt Bond# ...........................„............. .
Addition* and Im provem ent# U» P rop­
e rty Leased from St. P au l M inneapolis
<k M anitoba Hr. C o ................ ............. .
CtHutEST Asse ts .

Cash in St. P au l O ffice

......... . *......... .

C ash in N ew York Office............ .

C ash la London Offic* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D ue from A g e n ts ,...........................................
D ue from V .ft. P ost Office D e p a rtm e n t...
D ue from IT. 8 . fo r Trtto*i>ort»tioti.............
A d va n ced C h arge*.......... .........................
Bill# R e ceivab le.......... ....................................
D ue from O ther Co’* am i In d ividu al*.......
Value ©f M aterial, Fuel and 8 up pile* on
H a n d ............... .. .............................. ... ........

$2 5 ,000,000 OO
By Capital 8toefe.......................................... .
(X iliit e r a l T ru st B u n d s.................................
15,000,000 00
Ci'KRKNT LlAttlUTlKS.
$884,576 65
15,000,000 00 j Audited V ouchers U n paid..........................
U n p a i d P a y-R o lls........ ....................................
578,618 32
lo t . due u n d e rlea se from St. P. M. A M. Ry. 1,230,535 50
D U s. due un der lease from St. P. M.AM. R y.
1,692 00
311,267 13 j
2, ISO OO
Uupuid D ivs. on Q npltal Stock Ut. Nor. Ry.
**
3,660 00
U npaid Coups. Gt. N or, B y. < ol. Tr. Bonds.
D ue to O ther Com panies and Individual*. 1,493.009 82
$390.2 15 70
1,194,572 20
iMOJW0 6 7
D e f e r r e d L i a b i l it n:s.
300.7*2 73
T a x es not y e t due...................... ...................... 9232,907 11
354,028 36
Gt. Nor* R y, Bond Jut. A ccru e d .n o t d u e ..
2 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
101,857 60
Rental o f Sr. I'.M .AM . R y. Accrued, n it duo
402,776 67
0.202 72
12,920 58
8 3 5 ,6 8 4 1 1
E x cess o f R eceipts o v er Paym ent*. St. P.
164,219 2*2
$2,591 13
M. A M. Ry., A ccou n ts in Liquidation ..
1, 197.920 21
3,769, 12*2 8-2 Fund fo r Perm anent Im provem ent# and
Reiiew ais. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ ...................
1,059,125 61
605,692 02 j Surplus Earns, o f P ro p rietary Com panies
In hand# o f G reat N orthern Ry. C o ....... . i . 886,668 46
3,613,311 60
B alan ce— Profit and Loe*.............. ......... .
$31,905,871 23

6 .5 6 1 .6 9 0 8 0

$5 1 ,591,953 20

$5 1 ,591,953 2 0

G R O SS E A R N IN G S , O P E R A T IN G E X P E N S E S , T A X E S A N D NET
E A R N IN G S O F T H E L IN E L E A S E D FROM T H E ST. P A U L
M IN N E A P O LIS A M A N IT O B A R A IL W A Y CO. F O R T H E
L IN E A N D P E R M IL E O F R O A D O P E R A T E D . FO R
T H E F IS C A L Y E A R E N D E D JU N E 3 0 , 1895.C O M
P A R E D W ITH P R E V IO U S F IS C A L Y E A R .*

S T A T IS T IC S O F F R E IG H T AN D PA S S E N G E R T R A F F IC F O R Y E A R
E N D E D J U N E 30, 1895, C O M P A R E D W IT H P R E
V IO U 8 F IS C A L Y E A R .
ISUBKASK.

1804.

D i j *c h i p t i o v .

A m o u n t.

OROd SURGINGI*.
Per cent

18544.

1883.

79 0624 810.385.031 73 ........... .F re ig h t.............
14 1482
14*54.821 04 ......... ................................
378,430 83 .............. .M o lL .,..........
1 2482
183,832 18
a-tfflm
350,014 38
----* 13. 100.030 H .
2

* 8 .702.084
1 .910.329
301,778
143,993
323.271

j Per tent.
03.77-2385
85115 9588
58 2-8801
37 1-2692
0 7 1 2-8493

1* 05,

4,81.1,400

Conducting TraiiApor'n $3 ,219,171 88 49-0111
935,633 80 13*1804
49*0441
t>.',0,087 *M M aintenance o f K q n lp’ i
i
20-7169 14* 0 ,3 1 3 26 * Malf»teti*c«> o f Rond * 1,707,417 35 27-2385
0
and Structure#.
*
646,524 82 9 9 6 3 7
10-7080) 7304442 M ..G e n e ra l E*pea*e#
$6 ,488,779 21
$7 ,146,462 15
* S tatem en ts do not Include the W. A ft. F. R y. n or D. W. A P. Ry.

SU M M A R Y OF EARNINGS AND E X PE N SE S/
1897*.

1894.

*13 .10 0 3*3 9 82 . . . . . . . . . __Gro8.<* E arn ln ifs.......... .............. $ 1 1 ,3 1 5 ,3 5 6 90
6 ,4 8 9 ,7 7 9 21
7 ,1 1 6 ,4 6 2 15 ..................O p e r n ilB f E xpei»*e#....................
$ 6,9 63 ,$ T 7 67 .................... .N et E a rn in g * ....
159,215 54 .................................... T » x c » ....................................

* 4 ,8 5 6 ,5 7 7 69
111,912 83

* 5 .5 0 4 .2 6 2 1 3 . . . . . . . . . . . ___ Net Ini *»me. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

* 4 ,1 4 4 .0 3 4 86

on© m ile .................................
E a rn in g * from f r e ig h t tr a ff ic ..
AVKUAGE*.
m ile ............

Ptm* rereru
p e r tr a in .

per loaded car ..................

18,405,567 28 2725
4,857,8*2 21*7874

87,427,048

221,263,439 26*6087

2,693,749
049,068

•

3.717,404
1

06.100,423
22.327.525

1.242,807

474,597 14*6353

13 6162
121,420 8*7060

1,022.17.1154
799^00.801 222.866,290 27*8824
#10,566,602 12 48.947,14087 41,608,361 25 17*9763

ft

w oo.

•m 8 0651

5S8-10!
227,038

2 » J,0761
12.241
12 46

9.938 4*3772

Decrease.

2,170.207
1.068,798

2.048,427

P asse n g e r* c a r r ie d o n e m ile ....

72.700,440

76,068,741

Cent*.

Cent*.

Ct U.\

1*096

1014

*'082, 7*4818

Increase.
Inc.
1 7,870 H u m

37,822 8*7044

Decrease.

12,541.120 27 42.389.234 44
f 1*1670’

$1*1664
Cent*.

Cm tt.

D ec

037 *3013
$0*09 3*5483

12.278
2*54

Ear nine* tier • • ght train mih
Fam ines per ton per m ile.....
PASSENGER TRAFFIC.
Mileage of paasenger trains ..
Passengers carried................. .

A VKUAGtS.

792.818 22*6195

2.046,1)20
7 7 0 ,IHJ

s

Percent

P .C m t

n o .w i.r w ?

Total cAr m ileage........

Total..
1891.

3.620.682

*3,6f»5.B80
27.1K5.itr?

Mileage or loaded freight
Mileage o f empty freight c

$ 11,345,356 90!

OPERATING R K l t i n j R
Per cent

F it E IG H T T R A F F IC .
M11outre o f f r e ig h t a n d m l
t r a in * .............. ......

Dec.

3,963,208 j 5*1097

Incrcntc.

In c.

4151,891 83 6*3573
Cent* .1
-as; *1021)

57-19

2,301
TOOj 8*0471
T O T A L T R A IN S .
M ile a g e o f f r e ig h t a n d pii^nen
5,669,000
920.688 16*5323
g e r t r a i n s ................... ............... ..
6,480,097
E a rn in g s fro m f r e ig h t a n d p a s­
s e n g e r tr a f f ic ,... ........................ 118,096,628 30 411.330.37511 f 1.700,268 08! 15*5275

O p era tin g E xp ense* and T u x es, p e r cen t
56*01 .................. of Oro** E a rn in g s........ .—

60-82

E a rn in g * p er tr a in p e r m ile .. , .
E x p en ses p er tra in p e r m ile —
N et e a rn in g * p e r tr a in p e r m ile

$3*491 1 1 Utnm Traffic E a rn in g s p e r M ile o f Road
1 3 9 7 m . O p eratin g Expense.* perRU lttO f B ojmI.

* 3 ,0 1 3 14
1,723 31

81.7,83 31 ........ N et E a rn in g s per M ile of R oad.........

* 1 ,2 8 9 83

3 ,7 6 5 9 9 A v e ra g e M iles of R o ad U n der O peration

3 ,7 6 5 29

54*51

O p e ra tin g E xp en ses, p e r c e n t of G ross

statem ent# do not in clu d e the W. J ft. F. Ry. nor D . W. A P. Ry*
k

*

w

j

D tcrtotr.

12 02
t l 10
4*921

,
'

$2,035
11.165;
4*87

tree.

4*016 *7371
4*065 5*5793

Jncreme.

\ l nr.

4*0501 5*7471

4 H ad the a v e r a g e revenue p e r to n per mile for 1805 been t h e same as 1894 th o
G ross E a rn in g s o f t h e C o m p an y from F r e ig h t T ra ffic w o u ld h a v e been
18198 la rg e r. T h e d e c re a s e In a v e r a g e e a r n in g s p er F r e ig h t T r a in M ilo co m es
e n t ir e ly fro m d e c re a s e In t h e a v e r a g e e a r n in g s p er to n p er m ile , t h e r e b e in g a n
In c re ase o f n e a r ly te n GO) to n s , a s sh o w n , in t h e re v e n u e to n n a g e h a u le d p e r
t r a in .

THE CHRONICLE.

< )32

-l'.H 'K BONDED D1CBT AND FIX ED CHARGES OF
> \Cl'. M IN N K APO US A MANITOBA RAILW AY
PANY. GUARANTEED BY GREAT NORTHERN
~~

^ A m ount o f

,4t c r i i t t l
trim *
$0,

y * «r

lH-ACUtl*TION OK BONDED
P*;nr.

A m ount o f
B o n d s O u tsta n d ­ A n n u a l I n te r ­
est C h a rge.
i n g d u t y 1,

1895.

1895.

$ j « 2,i i ! 3 »*o
Flrmt M ortgage, 7 % ..
4 'Wtw»o im . Set oud M ortgage, 0% - Dakota E vtension. First
3 4 0 .5 6 0 0 0 .........M ortgage. 0 % ........ .
stw>,,o io 4
hi i.'eiisaliOnteO M art., 0% .
83 7 ,1 *5 OO
M art.. 4% %
M ontam i Fxten>‘ n. First
S t 2 ,2o o HO ____ M ortgage, t o — ..
;,*> l ,*n|S l s .Paelhe Exteimlai*.
.
Gr at N orthern R ailw ay,
COO.iHio0 0 t olhiteral Tru>t, 4 % ..
$•4,114,860 I S ................. T ota l..................
St o c k .
s i . Paul M inneapolis A
. M anitoba Ry. Co., 6 % ..

•$2 ,1 2 0,9 00 00
8 ,0 0 0,00 0 00

$ 14 8 ,4 63 00
480.000 00

5 .6 7 6.00 0 00
1 3 ,8 ! 4 ,0 0 0 0 0
18,903,000 00

340 ,56 0 00
800,640 00
853,335 00

7 .8 0 5 .0 0 0 00
111,545,454 54

3 12 ,20 0 00
581,818 18

U S ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 00

B lock C ars .....................................
F u rn itu re C a r s ................................
R e fr ig e ra to r C a r s .........................
E x p r e s s F re ig h t C a rs..................
H a y C a r s ..........................................
C a b o o s e C a r s .................................

$ 2 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 00 $1,2 00 ,0 0 0 00

. i Main T r a c k , in clud ing secon d , third,

3,770-10

T otal ILmdsn i d Stock p er m ile o f M ain T ra ck .

8 ,4 8 6
2 ,6 7 0
10 0
52 8
1 ,1 5 2
107
6
6
216
47
364
40
8
6
7
1
1
73

478
1,1 52
103

__

—

4
6

....

6
192
40
364
37
6
6
(J
1
1
73

12

12
7

__

__

i

__
__

318 29
$ 1 ,410 31

T o la l Charges p er m ile o f M ain T ra ck ..

* This am ount does n o t in clu d e $ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 B on d s called fo r P a y m e n t
j i i i y 1. I'm :,, out does in clu d e * 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ca lled Jor p a ym en t A u g u st 15
an l $7 25,0 00 called fo r p a y m en t N ov em b er 1. le>95.
> Tins does not includ e y 3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 St. P. M. w M. B onds Pao. E x te n ­
sion underlying tlie G reat No "th em R a ilw a y C om p an y’s C ollateral
T ru st UoLd>. i lie latter being sh ow n instead.

O K I.A T NORTHERN' R A IL W A Y AN D P R O P R IB T U R Y LINKS.
M a in T ra ck
M ile s .

S t . P . M . d I f. T t y . —
W illm ar Divlsin'u...................................................
F ergus Falls D iv isio n .........................................
B recken rid ge D iv is io n ......... .................... .
N orth ern D iv isio n ......................... ............. .—
D akota D iv ision ....................................................
M ontana D iv isio n ................................................
Kftlispell D iv ision ................................................
•
Caseade Di v ision ..................... ............................

T otal F irst M ain T ra ck ................................
S econd tra ck ........................... .............................
F ourth , F ifth and S ixth T ra ck s.......................

....

—
....

—

865

1 ,2 7 4

13 ,8 1

P R O P R I E T A R Y C O M P A N IE S .

T ea r E n d ed J u n e

3 0 ,1 8 9 5 .

E a r n in g s —

F re ig h t................................................................................................... $ 1 ,3 6 7 ,6 3 3 03
P a s s e n g e r ............................................................................................
1 0 2 ,9 8 8 05
M a i l . . . - ......................................................................................................
4 ,8 0 3 00
E x p r e s s ..................................................................- .................. ........
3 ,7 4 7 03
M is c e lla n e o u s ...................................................................................
1 9 ,2 7 6 37
G ross E a r n in g s .............................................................. .............. $ 1 ,1 9 8 ,4 1 7 48
O p- r w i n g e x p e n s e s —
C on d u ctin g T ra n s p o r ta tio n ................................. $ 4 3 4 ,4 2 0 75
M ain ten a n ce o f E qu ipm en t...............................
7 7 .1 3 0 4 7
M a in te n a n ce o f R o a d an d S tru ctu re s........... 1 5 6 ,^ 3 0 16
G e n e ra l E x p e n s e s ..................................................
9 8 ,0 2 4 57

N e t E a r n in g s ..........................................................
In c o m e fr o m R en ts, E le v a to rs, e t c .................
R e n ta ls P a id f o r L in es L e a se d ..........................
In te re st o n B on d s, P a id an d A c c r u e d ...........

$ 6 8 7 ,4 5 4 77
1 2 8 ,6 2 2 75
,
$ 8 6 ,4 0 2 00
23 ,00 u 0 0
---------------------

S u rp lu s....................................................................
F ro m w h ich hits b een p a id a D iv id e n d o f . . .
3 ,7 1 9 -9 4

27-83
<>•28
13-05

B a la n c e t o P ro fit an d

$ 8 1 6 ,0 7 7 5 2
3 2 1 ,4 0 2 0 0
$ 4 9 4 ,6 7 5 52
4 5 0 ,0 0 0 00

L o s s ...........................

$ 1 4 ,6 7 5 52

50-16
M ontana C e n tr a l R

T otal Main Tracks, St, P. M. & M. R y.
lea sed ..............................................................

3,7 70-10
475*42

T ota l tracks cov ered by S. P. M. & M. Ry.
bonded d eb t sh ow n liy p re ce d in g sta te­
m en t................................... ................. .............
Oth er T r ack s L eased r y g r e a t N o r t h ­
ern R y —
O regon Short Line, U nion D e p o t Co. and
Seattle Lake Shore & E a stern R y . in SpoE v e re tt A M on teC risto R y .,E v e re tt, W ash..

T o ta l
M ile s .

167*84
570-77
419*99
585*88
593-71
562*92
506*62
312-2.1
3,719 94

2
1

T o ta l O p e ra tin g E x p e n s e s ..............................$ 7 66,4 0 5 95
T a x e s ................................................................................
4 4 ,5 8 6 76
--------------------8 1 0 ,9 9 2 71

TRACK STATEMENT.
L in es L ea sed fr o m

1
1

E a s t e r n R a i l w a y C o m p a n y o f M in n e s o t a .
T his C o m p a n v o w n s e x te n s iv e T e rm in a l Y ards, D o ck s , W a reh ou ses,
E le v a to rs, etc., in W est S up erior, W is., a n d D u lu th , M inn., w h ich are
u sed f o r the e n tire G re a t N orth ern S ystem .
M ilea g e o f M ain T ra ck .................................................................... 7 2 -3 9 M iles.
C a p ita l S to ck (all o w n e d by G rea t N orth ern R y . C o .)----- $ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
B on d e d D e b t ...................................................................................... 4 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
I n te re st C harges p e r a n n u m ........................................................
2 3 5 ,0 0 0 00
In com e fo r

lnt* r« -i C harges per m ile of M ain T r a c k ................ $1,0 9 2 02

<. uarantecd D ividend p e r m ile o f M ain T ra ck .......

a il w a y

C om pan y.

M ilea g e o f M ain T r a c k ................................................................. 2 5 6 6 0 M iles.
C ap ita l 8 to e k (alL o w n e d b y G rea t N o rth e rn R v . C o .)___ $ 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
B on d e d D e b t ....................................................... .............................. 8, 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 0
In te re st C harges p e r a n n u m ........................................................
4 9 5 ,0 0 0 00

4,245*52

I n co m e fo r T ea r E n d ed J u n e

3 0 ,1 8 9 5 .

E a r n in g s —

4-80
5 ’25

M ain Line op era ted b y G reat N orth. R y. Co.

1005

1005

F re ig h t..........................................................................................................$ 1 ,2 3 4 ,5 3 2 22
P a s s e n g e r— , .........................................................................................
2 6 4 ,3 9 6 91
M a il..................................................................................
2 1 ,3 5 7 7 0
E x p r e s s ...........................................................................
1 5 ,3 6 3 18
M isce lla n e o u s...........................................................................................
1 5 ,2 3 9 8 6

-3,729*99

S id e T ries.

P r o p r ie t a r y L in e s —
M ile s .
E a -te rn R y . o f M in n esota .......................
. 43-46
M ontana O n t r ! R y ............................................. 39*22
W illm a r A S iou x F alls R y ...................
15-37
D uluth W atertow n A P acific R v ...........
4-08
M innea polis Union R y .............................
5-04
Second T ra ck ....................................
2-63
P a cific Coast L in es....................................
20-05

T ota l m iles o f R oad in sy stem .....................

G ro ss E a r n in g s ...................................................................................... $ 1 ,5 5 0 ,8 8 9 8 7

M a in T r■
>
A llie s .

O p era tin g E x p en ses—

72-39
256-60
205*25
69-84
2-63

C on d u ctin g T r a n s p o r ta tio n ..................................
M a in ten a n ce o f E ju ip m e n t ..................................
M a in ten a n ce o f R o a d a n d S tru ctu re s ................
G en era l e x p e n s e s ......................................................

159-10

T o ta l O p e ra tin g E x p e n s e s ............................... $ 1 ,0 2 7 ,1 4 1 65
T a x e s ...............................................................................
2 3 ,5 3 3 93
---------------------- - 1 ,0 5 0 ,6 7 5 5 8

T o ta l First M ain T ra ck , P rop rieta ry
L inos........................... ............ .
T ota l Serdiid .Main T ra ck an d Side
T ruck*, P rop rieta ry L in es....................... 130-45

130*45
4,4 95-80

T r a d a l l k ind s, in sy s te m ..

5,151-83

ilictirea m L-.-t iin- • .Miles o f R oa d O p e ra te d ” (3,765-99) used in a sce r­
tain in g earnin gs am i e x p en ses p e r m ile o f r o a d , eto.

of great northern -

r a il w a y

$ 5 3 9 ,6 3 3 27
1 5 9 ,5 5 1 85
2 2 6 ,0 9 1 4 5
1 0 1 ,8 6 5 08

N e t e a r n in g s ......................................................................................
M isce lla n e o u s I n c o m e ............................................................... ’ ..

$ 5 0 0 2 1 4 29
18,’9 1 6 71

R en ta ls P a id fo r L in es L e a s e d ................
$ 3 ,6 0 0 0 0
^
In te r e s t o n B o n d s, p a id an d a c c r u e d ....................... 4 9 5 ,0 0 0 0 0
-----------------4 9 8 ,6 0 0 00
S u rp lu s t o P ro fit an d L o s s ..................................

N
,ortll,,i'1 R a ilw a y tra m s run th rou gh to Seattle
1

.... "-1' 1 tines tracks, 30 miles should bo- adder! to these

eq uipm en t

T o ta l.

749
49 3

T o ta l F glit. an d W o rk E q n ip t 1 1 ,079

$27,971 24

. .1 I » !.;. jut m ile o f Matu T ra ck ..................... $ 2 2 ,6 6 6 3 4
■
*1” ui Bu*rk p er m ile o f M ain T ra ck ..................... 5,304 90

1

E . R y.

10 0
60 0
100
50

7,6 3 7
1,5 7 7

B a lla s t C a rs....................................
D e rrick and T o o l C a rs................
Steam S h o v e ls ...............................
R o ta r y S n o w P lo w s .....................
P ile D r iv e rs .....................................
D itch in g C a r ...................................
F L a n g e r............................................
O th er W ork E q u ip m e n t.............

$85 ,15 1,3 54 54 $4,1 17 ,0 1 6 18

riti. til th a n d s i x t h m a i n t r a c k s ...........................

. . . *1

21. C . R y .

G. X . I ty .

C la s s —

F r e i g h t E q u ip m e n t B o x C a r s ............................................

600.000 00

yt , - i l l gi;(; i < .........Grand T o ta ls .......... $ 1 0 5 .4 5 4 ,3 5 4 54 $ 5,317,016 18

T o ta l m iles

[VOL. LXI.

$20,531~00

P e rce n ta g e o f O p e ra tin g E x p e n s e s t o E a rn in g s , e x c lu d ­
in g t a x e s .......................................................
6 6 -2 3
P e rc e n ta g e o f O p era tin g E x p e n s e s t o E a rn in g s ','in clu d m g T a x e s . . . ...........................
67*75
E a rn in g s o f G re a t N orth ern R y . u p o n bu sin ess c o n t r ib ­
u ted b y M o n ta n a C en tral R y. d u rin g th e y e a r ........................$ 1 ,2 6 6 ,0 2 4 53

and

P R O P R IE T A R Y LIN E S J U N E 30, 1S95.

Class—

JLocomotivcs........... ......

0 . X . R y.

37 0

P assfni-.fh E q u ip m e n t -

rslerp im r C a rs.......................■

23

12

E . R y.

19

38

Jo in in g J a r s .

M . 0 . li t / .

BuftVt Sm okers...............
C o a ch es..............
T ou rist Ca r s . . . . . . * ' * * * |

P a sse n g e r and B n g g o g o ........
B a g g a g e . M ail am i E x p ress .
B u sin ess C ars___
SLTotnl P assen ger E quipm ’t .

2
2

10

38
3
12

' 6

8

295

412

3

s
125
24

T o ta l.

137

” 4

13

W

30
77
5
31S

& S io u x F a l l s R

I n co m e fo r

S
8

il l m a r

a il w a y

Co m pan y.

M ile a g e o f M ain T r a c k .......................................... ...................... 205*25 M iles
C apital S to ck (nil-o w n e d b y G rea t N orth ern R y . C o . ) / / . $ 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 00
B o n d e d d e b t ...........................................................................
o izqk. non on
In te re st C harges p er a n n u m ..............................”
’l8 1 ,2 5 0 0 0
T ea r E n d ed J u n e

E a r n in g s —

3 0 ,1 8 9 5 .
’

P a t L e n V r .........................
S

; , , ................................................................................................

M is c e lla n e o u s .......................................................
G ross E a r n in g s .............................

$ 2 5 7 ,2 4 7 I S
1 9 ,3 6 9 30
1 805 1 4
$ 3 5 5 ,8 0 0 6 S

THE CHRONICLE.

November 23, 1895.]

Brought forward .................................................................................... ..
Operating Expenses—
C o n d u ctin g T r a n s p o r ta tio n .....................................$ 1 1 2 ,0 9 4 09
M a in ten an ce
E q u ip m e n t...................................
2 4 ,5 6 4 76
M a in te n an c e of R o ad an d S t r u c t u r e s .............
6 1,7 69 71
G en eral E x p e n s e s ........................................
2 3 ,0 7 3 73

93 a

$3 JJ,Soo 66

T?Iie C om m ercial 3£imes.
COMMERCIAL

EPITOME.

F rid a y N ight , N ovem ber 2 2 ,1 3 9 5 .

T o ta l O p e ra tin g E x p e n se s.............................$ 2 2 1 ,5 0 2 29
T a x e s ........ ...................................................................... .
1 1 ,3 3 0 3 3
-------------------

The movement o f general merchandise has been o f m od­
erate proportions and confined principally to thoroughly sea­
N et E a rn in g s . . . . . . ..............................................................
$ 1 2 2 ,9 1 3 04
M isc e lla n e o u s l u c u iu c ..........................................................................
248 0 0 sonable goods. No serious disturbance o f values has taken
place, although on the average the tone o f most markets is
$ 1 2 3 ,1 6 6 04
In te re st on B o n d s, p a id a n d a c c r u e d ...........................................
1 8 1 .25 0 00 slightly easier. The export trade has proven moderate. The
D ef. fo r y e a r , c h a rg e d a g s t. P ro fit of p rev io u s y e a r s .
$ 5 8 ,0 8 3 96 latest general compilation of information regarJing condition
of wheat crop was favorable, the previous drought having
P ercen t, of Qp&t, E x pc-uses to E a rn s., e x c lu d in g T a x e s .
62*25
**
“
**
in c lu d in g T a x e s .
65*45 been broken by sufficient moisture to prom ote growth, and a
E a rn in g s of G reat N o rth ern R>\. M ain L in e, u pou bustrenewal o f seeding in some localities affording promise for
nesa co n trib u ted oy W . J 8. P. K y. d u rin g tlie y e a r ___ $ 1 4 8 ,8 1 1 61
k
good average results. W ithin a day or tw o a sharp fall in
temperature has occurred in Middle and Western latitudes.
D uluth W a terto w * & P a cific R ailw ay * C o m p a s r .
There is a more hopeful feeling in mercantile circles regard­
M ileag e of M ain T r a c k ............................................................... ..
6 9 - 4 M iles.
C ap ita l S to c k tali o w n e d by G rea t N orth ern K y. C > .> ....
$ 7 3 0 ,0 0 0 0 0ing market conditions at foreign business centres.
B o n d e d D eb t (all o w u e d b y G re a t N orth ern Ky. C o.) . . . .
1 ,3 7 5 ,0 0 0 0 0 For lard on the spot there has been only a very limited in­
In terest C harges p e r a n n u m ...... ..................................................
8 2 ,5 0 0 .0 0
quiry and prices have deeliaed, closing at 5*Toc. for prime
I n c o m e f o r Y e a r E n d e d J u n e 3 0 , 1895.
Western, 5 40c. for prime City and 6*15:. for refined for the
E a r n in g s —
F re ig h t ................
$ 1 0 ,1 1 6 3 6
P a s s e n g e r .......... .............................
1,7 7 3 69 Continent. There was no speculation in the local market for
M a i l . . . . . . . ......................
1,78* 15 lard futures, but nominal prices were quoted lower in re­
E x p r e s s .. . .. .........................................................................
1,1 7 8 24
190 28 sponse to weaker adviees from the W est, where selling was
M is c e ll a n e o u s .,............................. ..... .................................... .
G ross E a rn in g s
$ 1 5 ,3 4 0 72 quite general, prompted by heavy receipts of swine at primary
points, closing easy.
Operating Expenses —
2 3 2 ,8 8 2 62

C o n d u c tin g T r a n s p o r ta tio n .............................................. $ 1 2 ,0 6 5 69
M a in ten an ce o f E qu ip m en t ...................................
1.219 50
M a in ten an ce o f R oad an d S t r u c t u r e * ........................ 1 0 ,7 4 7 30
G en eral E x p e n se s.................
1,371 15

d a i l y c l o s in g p r ic e s o f l a r d f u t u r e s .

tfat

Von.

rues.

Wed.

Ihurg.

K ovem ber............................. 0. 5 -t5

5 '8 0

5 sO

530

580

JVt.
575-

Pork has been in slow demand and piic?s have weakened
slightly, closing* at $9 59<§$10 for mess, $10 75@ $ll 25 for
3 0 ,3 2 2 19 fam ily and $10 50<a$12 50 for short clear.
Cut meals
D efic it from o p e r a t io n ................ .................................... ....................
$ 1 4 ,9 7 5 47 have sold slowly and prices have weakened a trifl»,
M iscellan eo u s in c o m e ........ .................................................
23 0 0
closing at 3Jf<85?4c. for pickled bellies. 12@ 10 lbs, average,
N et D eficit fo r y e a r , tr a n s fe r r e d to P ro fit a n d Los* . . . . .
$ 1 4 ,9 4 7 47 5 ^ (»5 ? 4c. for pickled shoulders a i d 8
for pickled
hams. Beef has been quiet and prices have been easier,
E a rn in g s of G reat N orthern R y .. M ain L in e, upon b u si­
n e ss co n trib u ted b y D, W. J r. K y,. a n d lin e b etw een
e
$ 1 0 5 ,4 9 4 72 closing at $7 50(3$8 for extra mess, $9®$.0 for packet, $10@$12
B en son an d W a terto w u d u rin g th e y e a r ..........................
for family and $l6m'$17 for ex tia India me-s. Beef hams
have been quiet at $H 50@$15. Tallow has been moderately
M is n e a t o h * L 'xiftx I l.U L g .ir Co w f a x t .
active and pi ices have held steady, closing at 4 l ^c. Oleo
ThU r’onaoany ow n s t l o
n ib t* M itfisapoH s. M in n .,
in c lu d in g tJm«m D*;j» .*t mii dots 0 * tr 1 .<x. »to u e a r c h b rid g e , a c ro ss the -tearine has been quiet and unchanged, closing at 5>Jc.
M U slsslp pt River.
L ud stearine has sold slow ly. but prices have been unchanged
M ile a g e of M ain T r a c k Cfir*t a n ! *< - m 1 in * -k *1. ................... 5*26 M ile* at i')1 (§6)£c. Cotton-seed oil has been quiet, closing at 25} » 3
,
C a p ita l S to c k ta ll own*- i b y Ur.* *t A u r4 it.ru K> .C o ,I . . . . . . $ 5 0 0 ,1KM» < » 28c. for prime ciude and 21' J 29' ]c. for prime yellow .
h
Bonded D*?ut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................................................2,*©0«ooo rw»
In terest € b M r g m p c r a n n u m ..............................
16 1,50 0 00 Butter has l«*»n in light supply and steady for the choice
grades, closing at 14<i3c. for er-atnery. Cheese has been
income fo r Year Ended 7u**« fit*, I § 9 5 ,
dull and cash r, closing at I !.4 . T^c. for State factory, full
E a rn in g s, R e n ta l* . e tc ................................................... ....................... $ 3 0 1 ,5 6 2 28
cream. Fresh tggs have bteu quiet but steady, closing at
O p e ra tin g &*pet»**sr*................. ............ .. * ............. $ 5 4 ,33-t 15
T a x e s . . . ; . , . , . , . . . , ......................... ............. .............
1 .1 4 5 5 5
23@28JjJc, for choice Western,
--------- ---------5 5 ,4 8 0 OO
Coffee has been neglected beyond demand to m eet urgent
warns and tone o f market ruled generally easy. Rio quoted
N et E a r n i n g * ........................
$ 2 4 9 ,0 8 2 28
at I 5 I4C. for No. 7. good Cucuta at l vi,.,e. and standard qual­
M G o d U a c^ U *
5 9 5 34
ity ja v a at 28^'(327c. Contracts for future delivery have
#2499177 62
I n te r e s t on Bond**, P a id a n d A c c n ie t l... . . . . . . . .
1 61 ,50 0 00 shown moderate*animation only at slightly fluctuating rates,
closing somewhat east r,
S u r p l R S . _ ______ „„ . ................ ..
_
$831,177 62
The follow ing were the final arking prices:
T o ta l O p era tin g E x p e n se s......................................... $ 2 5 ,4 0 3 04
T a x e s . . . . . . . . . . . ......................
4 ,9 1 * 55

75.000 0 0

F rom w h ich h a s been p aid a D ividend of.

B a la n c e , c re d ite d to P ro fit a n d L o ss.............. ..

8 1 3 ,1 7 7 62

No rth ern srcA M sun* C o m im n t .
intome far Year Ended March 3 1 , 1895.

E a rn in g s ..............................................
. . . . . . ....... ..................... *5 4 9 .4 6 3 97
O p r a t f o g SSfipfllse*......................................... ..................
.....
6 6 5 ,4 2 2 52
B a la n c e , Lomt. ................................. ........................................

# 115,958 55

G r e a t N o rth e r * E x p r e ss Co w fxxv .
Income for F e a r Ended June 3 0, 1895.
E arn in g s from O p eratio n
........................ .................................... .. $ 4 3 9 ,2 4 3 79
M ig r a tin g E xp en ses an d T a* e* ..............................# 195,674 58
P aid R a ilw a y s fo r T ra n s p o r ta tio n ....................... 1 9 3 ,1 7 ] 26
---------- ------- 3 9 3 ,8 4 5 84
f 15,397 95

B ala n ce, 8 o rp in s E a rn in g '
S t in s C o m e C o a l Co m p a c t .

income fo r Year Ended June 3 0 .1 8 9 5 .
C oal Sales .................... .............................................. $ 7 6 8 ,6 5 3 28

Incom e iro m O ther S o u r c e * ....................................
3 1 .4 9 5 0 6 ___
•----------------- $ 8 0 3 ,1 4 8 34
O p eratin g E x p e n se * ..................................... .......................
594,268 22

Balance, fifirpt*** EimrtiiR*......................

$208,880 12

F ro m w h ia h h m b e e n p a id a D iv id e n d o f . ................. .............

Balance, credited to Profit and Loss---- -. . . . . ------

200,000 *»o

#8,880 12

T en nesfita «10ed p e r t o n is c h a r g e d to coa t o f co n i t o p ro v id e ft S in k­
in g F o n d a g a in st th e ultim a te m in in g o u t o f the C oal P r o p e r ly . Thia
JTtind now
t o $ 1 1 1 ,9 6 5 ,

#

#

#

#

*

*

#

JAMJE3 J, H ILL,

President,

Vov............ ............U iO c .
D -c.........................1* 35c.
J a n ........... ..
1 4 1 5 c.

F e b , . . . .................1 4 0 5 c . M a y ......................13*45c.
M arc h ................... 1 3 9 0 e . J u n e .............. .. 13 ’ iOo.
A i> rli.................... 13‘07c. J u l y .......................12-cOo.

Raw sugais have not shown quite so much animation in
consequence of reduced offerings, but buyers continued bid­
ding former rates freely. Centrifugal quoted at 33g3. for 96deg. test, and muscovado at 3c. for 89-deg. test. Refined sugais moderately active and slightly irregular; granulated,
quoted at 4*£c. Teas generally easy in tone.
Kentucky tobacco has had a 3 I0 W call, but for choice grades
prices have been firmly held; sales 150 hhds. S ed leaf to­
bacco has also sold slowly but piices have been fairly steady;
sales for the week were 1,073 c iscs, as fo llo w s : 500
oases 1894 crop, Pennsylvania seed leaf. I0@12j;<]c.; 100 cases
1892 crop, Pennsylvania seed leaf, 9@ ltV £c.; 50 cases 1893
crop, Pennsylvania Havana eeed. lli« : 112c.; 175 cases 1894
crop. New Kngland Havana, ll@ 1 9 c.; 150 cises 1893 crop,
Wisconsin Havana, 3<§9c.. and 100 cases lb94 crop, Zim m er’s,
1IJjjO.; also 1,300 bales Havana, 68c. @ §105, and 150 bales
Sumatra. 60c.@$2 95 in bond.
1 he amount ol business transacted in the market for Straits
Ud has been small, and prices have declined in response to
weaker foreign advices, closing easy at 14-35o. Ingot copper
lias been dull and prices have declined sharply, closing easy
at 11c. for Lake, Lead has advanced slightly and the close
was quiet hut steady at 8*22£(c. fpr domestic. Spelter has
declined, and the close was weak at 3 30@3'B5o. for domestic,
Pig iron has bet n steady, dosin g at $12@ 1 1 50 for domestic,
fc
Refined petroleum has been quiet and easier, closing at
8'23c. in bids., 8-75c. in bulk and 9c. in cases; crude in hols,
has been nominal; naphtha unchanged at 8 25c, Crude cer­
tificates have dtclined, closing at $1 60 bid. Spirits turpen­
tine has also declined, closing dull at 27]4@28c. Resins have
been steady, closing at $170ot$l 73 for com m on and good
strained, W eol has been dull hut steady. Hops have been
quiet Lut fairly steady.

THE CHRONICLE.

[V ol. LXI.

In addition to above exports, our telegrams to night also
! give us the follow ing amounts o f cotton on shipboard, not
cleared, at tne ports named.
W e add similar figures for
IE Crop , as indicated by our telegrams Mew Y ork, w hich are prepared for our special use by Messrs.
r, is given below. For the week ending Lambert & Barrows, Produce Exchange Building.
receipts have reached 312,129 bales,
ON SH IPBO ARD , NOT CLEARED—FOR
st week and 197,981 bales the previous
Leaving
1 receipts since the 1st of Sept., 1895,
Nov. 2*2 at—
Stock.
Great France. Other Coast­
Total.
388,790 bales for the same period of
Foreign wise.
Britain.
e since Sept. 1, 1895, o f 1,122,779 bales.

0 T T 0 N.

F r i d a y N i g h t , November 23, 1895.

Tuts.

Wed.

2,670

8.370

5,890

7,100 15,293 1 7,‘ 39 14,388
935 2,727 2,542 1,460
..........
..........
5,087 2,019 5,231 5,469

9,115
1,319

2,352

Mon.

Sat.

Receipts iit-

»; in n 11,442
nr limn*
Mobil© .................
F lo r id a ...............
S a v a n n a h ..........
B run s w 'k , Ac.

P t. R o ya l, Ac.
W ilm in g to n . . . .
W ash’ton, Ac.
N orfolk................
W e*t P o in t..
N’port N., Ac
Sew Y o rk ..........
B o sto n ................
B a ltim o re ..........
P a lla d e lp h ’ft &
<

T/iure.

2,318

2,045
3,841

1,460
1,050

1,539
..........
1,042
..........
1,285
2,396

803
1,090

521

337
867

30
860

......

......

......

.......

150

68

219

127

......
839
..........
1,980
1,731

1,303
..........
2,238
2,094

680
259

1,232
..........
1,277

1,665
..........
1,527

1,756

......

......

.......

Fri.

Total,

4 0,732
3,214
7 3.8 12
1 0,466
379
25,762
5,969
11,396
75
7 ,6 3 8
46
10,439
12,877
623
1,1 7 0
4,4 6 2
414
2,047 2,047
1,8 2 2
999

6,185
3,214
9,217
1,483
379
5,135
5,969
2,852
75
1,650
16
1,431
1,765
623

ToPis th is weak 27,492 41,415 37,952 36,135 25,921 43,514 212,429

The following shows the week’s total receipts, the total since
Sept. 1, 1895, and the stock to night, compared with I st year.
This jSince Sep.
Week. I 1 ,1 8 9 4 .

This Since Sep.
Week. I 1 ,1 8 9 5 .

C a lv e s t& n ...
T ex. C ity, &e.
New O rleans
M obile............
F lo r id a ..........
S a v a n n a h .. .
Br'wiok.Ao
C h a rle sto n ..
P. R oyal,& c.
W ilm ington..
W asn’n, &o
N orfolk.........
W est Poim
N’p’tN ., &o
New Y o r k ...
B o sto n ..........
B a ltim o r e ..
f>
hiladel.,<fce.

40,732
3,214
73.312
10,466
379
25,762
5,969
11,396
75
7,638
46
10,139
12,877
623
1,170
4,462
2,047
1,822

Stock.

1894.

1895.

Receipts to
Sow. 22

451,956
30,893
717,468
86,096
11,603
378,659
52,786
152,451
23,445
95,938
2 94
111,863
74,493
7.161
7,386
32,688
9,450
16,384

75,124 ' 7 90 ,91 7
2,984 1 25,027
120,973 1,031,012
8,6 2 8 , 97,699
12,692
698
33,382 516,4 58
6,100
58,025
22.086 221,514
7,325
46,631
12,259 139,707
87
368
30,083 182,352
16,689 122,708
2,847
14,499
4,4 8 0
15,315
55
3,2 ? 6
2 7,946
4,921
3 0,870

1894

1895.
131,671
0,405
339,622
32,600
1
93,636
6,428
57,443
1
19,006
1
38,536
10,256
2,541
178,670
18,000
23,590
10,849

227 ,62 2
372,909
21,703
1 39 ,06 7
9,1 7 0
9 2,537
....

3 1,296
.. .

4 9,891
3 4,941
7 ,6 2 4
9 3,808
2 2,000
2 3,606
12,313

112,429, :.3!il,017|3r>I.9*2l3 ,3 8 3,79 0 J)6 9 ,2 5 3 1 ,1 3 8,48 7

In order that comparison may be made with other years, we
Receipts at—

1895. 1 1894.

1893.

1892.

G alves’n,ito.
New O rleans
M o b ile ..........
S a v a n n a h ...
C har’ ton,&o.
WUm’ton.& c
N o rfo lk ___
W. Point,&o
AH o t h e r s ...

43,946
78,108
73,312 120,973
10,466
8,628
23,762
33,382
1 1 ,4 7 1 ; 29,411
7,084
1 2,346
10,139
30,083
13,500
19,536
15,849
19,475

5 2,737
8 8,317
9,143
43,462
15,404
12,670
30,482
1 9,234
19,557

57,449, 61,940
7 3,1 66 112,296
8,2 Ll| 11,345
3 7 ,6 0 0
44,403
14,249 J 17,176
8,7 6 6
8,450
17,352
22,539
15,83S| 14,974
19,133' 20,102

291 ,00 6

2 6,290 2 4 ,8 2 2
8,802
11,901
1,000 1 5.0 00
None. 1 0,5 00
None.
1.500
None. None.
1 .200 1 0,3 50
None. 1 9.0 00

284
3,2 0 8
None.
560
None.
5 ,0 0 0
None.
None..

9 0 ,0 6 4

9 ,0 5 2

2 4 2 ,49 5

7 2 6 ,7 5 8

T o tal 1 8 9 4 ... 2 04 ,62 9 62,166 136,113 1 3 ,3 9 7
T o tal 1 8 9 3 ... 189,811 1 3,1 16 114,165 1 6,1 47

4 16 305
3 3 3 ,23 9

7 2 2 ,1 8 2
7 5 0 ,6 5 3

New O r le a n s ...
G a lv esto n ..........
C h arlesto n ........
M o b ile................

New York . . . .
O th er p o r ts _
_

T o tal 1 8 9 5 ... 1 02 ,98 8 4 0,391

212,129

351,942

| 1890
34,057
8 4,699
12,463
42,673
13,562
5,884
20,676
17,603
21,474

253,091
S in ce 8 ep t. ll 2261,017 3 ,3 8 3,79 6 2696,719 2 4 9 3 ,2 21 '34 7 2,6 86 3 19 9,252

i ,
uvoutiiH icoiLU tt LOtcll
of lGn, JSj bales, o f which 67,705 were to Great Britain, 29 553
to I ranee and 63,587 to the rest of the Continent, B
eloware
'
the exports for the week and since September 1, 1895.
In JS 22.
a ov

Exports
from—

\From Sept. 1,1895, to Nov. 22 18^5
Export e to! Great I
Conti- Total Great
Brit'n yranci nent. Week Britain Franc<
lota
nent.
_______ Jteporited to—

G a lv e s to n ..
15.42?
14,593 30,018
T e x . C ity , &c..! i.r 00
1.23? 2,837
Now O r le a n s ..! 10.X4I3 28,592 26,776 74,513
M obile & P en .
4,621
452i
9,840
10,865 20,211
B ru n s
8,1501
1,587 8,091
9,582 9,522
f o lk .........

it Point,.
8,1148
M il

1,798

9,006
1,117
41 81
609

2,350
300

139,238 33,237
3,100
161,281 92,553
18,495
20,918 13,261
19,709
31,268
17,919
6,689
1,615
77,071
52,912
21,119
718

8,004
100

105,815

GKt.885 153,155

9 i.n ;2 » 253 541

942 8011257,2*2

,8 5 S ?|
rt Itoya I.

64,579
H ,80
116,782
10,105
117/87
7,615
69,786
51,41523

53,810
300
16,403
1,150

242,054
17,90 <
370,819
28,600
157,860
27,351
104051
69,329
6,112
1,645
339,785
53,212
37,622
1,868

521,983 1,258,023
810^90 2,010,433

7 3,1 45
5 7 ,2 4 0
2 1,0 00
1 6 ,3 6 0
8 .5 0 0
7.5 0 0
1 8 ,7 5 0
4 0 ,0 0 0

2 6 6 ,4 7 7
7 4,4 31
7 2 ,6 3 6
4 1,0 83
2 4,1 00
3 1,0 36
1 59 ,91 0
5 7,075

Speculation in cotton for future delivery at this market has
been irregular duriDg the week under review. A t the open­
ing the offerings were quite free, but within a few days
selling exhibited greater caution and values strengthened.
During Saturday prices gained 6@7 points in consequence of
unexpected steadiness at Liverpool, w hich served to stimulate
covering by the shorts. The feeling on M onday was tame,
and after a small gain at opening rates fell away again
and closed apparently tame.
Tuesday opened with a
break o f 12@13 points on Southern selling orders and
recovered sufficiently to reduce net loss to 4 points,
the decline
having attracted, a covering
dem and.
W ednesday morning brought another fiaomentary decline,
but some free covering on foreign account served as a reac­
tionary influence, and 3 points net advance was secured at
the close. Yesterday covering continued, upon w hich an
additional advance of 10 points took place, buyers acting
upon an assumption that crop movem ent w ill run smaller.
To-day the market opened higher on strong foreign accounts
and indications of a small crop m ovement, but failing to
draw new orders eased off again at the close. Cotton on
spot quiet, but closes firmer at 8%c. for middling uplands.
The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 1,256,600
bales. For immediate delivery the total sales foot up this w eek
1,665 bales, in clu d in g ------ for export, 739 for consum ption,
226 for speculation and 700 on contract. The follow in g are
the official quotations for each day o f the past week —
November 16 to November 22.
Rates on and off middling, as established Nov. 22, 1898,
by the Revision Committee at w hich grades other than
middling may be delivered on contract:
on.
Pair . . . . .................. ..........o. l t t
M iddling F a ir .................— 78 on.
S tr ic t Good M id d lin g ........ ^
on.
Good M iddling...................
5l0 on.
S tr ic t Low M id d lin g .......... s 10 oft.
Low M id d lin g ....................... 7, off.
B triot Good O r d in a r y ....
6 Oft.

251 ,76 4 313,225

Tot. th is wk.

| 1891.

2 1,749
3 3,239
5.0 0 0
5,300
7 .0 0 0
2,5 0 0
7 ,2 0 0
2 1,0 00

Good O r d in a r y ..................c. 1% off.
Good M id d lin g T in g e d .. .
E ven
S t r ic t M id d lin g S t a in e d .. 732 oil"
M id d lin g S t a in e d ................ i , 6 off'
S tr ic t L o w M id. S t a in e d ., so.,. offL o w M id d lin g S t a in e d _ 1 3 s '" off_

On this basis the prices for a few o f the grades would be as
follow s.
U PLAN DS.

S a to

G ULF.
G ood O rd in a ry ..............................
L ow M id d lin g ................................
M iddling .........................................
G ood M id d lin g .............................
M iddling F a ir ................................
S T A IN E D ,

M on T ues W ed

s 5le
She
8%
9he

8 ° 16
S'16
8%
9 516

7q
7 ' 5ie
8%
S U l6
9^4

S a t.

G ood O r d in a r y ..............................
Low M id d lin g ......... ....................
M id d lin g ............. ..........................
G ood M id d lin g ..............................
d id d lin g F a ir ......... ......................

M on T nes

z >
8h,

70,6
8q

! l l *«

T l16

9 9ie

9»10

m arket

r is
and

W ed

7*3
83 in
8%
8 i5 ,s
913

7
85 2
830

sa le s

F li.

7Vi
7^8
715, e 715 6
8 ! ia
8 hs
8%
858
8L1,„ 8 U 10 8 ‘ 310
93e
9 >4
9-4
T il.

F r i.

71s

7 12

8q
8%
8 “ is
943

8- 6
8%
8 L5,0
98s

75S
8 “ ta
8%
91,0
9%

Th.

F r i.

S a t. , M o il T ile s W e d

L ow M idd lin g.................................
M iddling . . . .................................
S trict M i d d l i n g ............................
G o o d M id d lin g T in g e d ............. .

Th.

7 14

7
7 _
7 : 516 7 ‘ 516
85,.,
8 “33
8%
838

7 is
1^2
8L

.

The total sales o f cotton on the spot and for future delivery
each day during the week are indicated in the follow ing
statement. For the convenience o f the reader w e also add
a colum n w hich shows at a glance h ow the m arket closed on
same days.
SPOT MARKET
CLOSED.

S a t’d a y .
M onday
T u esday
Wed Via v
T hur’d’y
F rid a y ..
T o ta l.

Q u ie t.....................
Quiet ..................
Q uiet at lif t d ec.
D ull.........................
D ull.........................
Q’ t & s t ’y , 1s a d ..

SALKS OP SPOT AND CONTRACT.

Ex­
port.

Oon- Spec- Con­
sump. ul’t’n tract.

149
131
156

200

—•
. .. .

—-

103

2 26

7 39

226

7 00

Total.

149
131
156
7 20
329

300

Sates o]
Futures.

1 37 .70 0
2 2 2 ,6 0 0
2 4 2 ,S00
224 ,80 0
197 .70 0
2 31 ,00 0

1 ,6 6 5 1 ,2 5 6 ,6 0 0

to

CO
OS

oo
o o o o o o o o o o
.0 0 _ O O O O O O P O O O
n o o o c o o © 01 o o o o o o
g o e s Or-ToV COt^oTHOt-

O
S PCCO b
o o o o o o -? n ?
O O-F
~ < 0010^0000 oi is:
qooqcooq
o o -Tcococo
o ' «# r “ o - x co
C O C O h l 'l - - ? H , 23
© © cco © ©
CCO
OOOOOON

«%

IIS

»

to
C o oo
O
^
ci g g g
Cl
^ • f o V o n ' Clr-i
to CIC C CSC|
O ’ci
1 to
05

OOOPC1C5N (
-o Q o o asco o C
<
O
<
©©.©, 0 0 ^ 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 01 oi^oqqascDci © I
asCOOCO^r-T © t- Jin cocoa® t
5201 i<
5
co »o »o c o p o r ^ in « OtfH
"
,
0H
rjl H Cl to | C -F to lO X- O CO s‘ 3 t> - liicrioco ©
CO
00
C
O
to H i- o - f
h*t
OOOO­
OOOOC ,
M O O O O O O ---------------------- „

t - — -•_?jr_r
,

«3 ^
W.- o P
C *'5 " ^ a s
O
r-t
©

C co
O

8|8|
a ? » j
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t- o -s' m i® P O
S

.“•4 3
5
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t I j s i

.

.

Motemrnt $o November 22 1895.
Itaeiptt.
Shipm'ts Slock
Thii
Thit
Since
teeek. Sept. 1,-95. w ee*. Nov, 22

T o w n s.

k

Movement to .Vomit tier 2 3 , 1 89 1 .
Receipts.
TKu
week.

Since
Sepf.1,’94.

8hPZ'u
week.

****
*»«>. 23.

15,111
514
488
3 ,5 2 0
1 2,750
2 4 7 1 2 ,8 6 2
4.990 2 0 ,3 7 8
8 1 ,1 5 5
4 ,7 9 0
0 1 ,6 1 7
4,751
14,913
2 6 ,5 0 1
1.891
3 008
6,0 2 9
2 ,8 5 1
3 ,0 5 4
5 3 ,0 5 4
I
f-1 rl
3 0,8 49
2,0 1 2 10,292
5,476
3 5,8 35
4 ,4 0 3
15,587
®~
•
H
l«
0 -C
O
5 1 ,2 9 5
5,809 15,4 17 ! 7,231
Mu
4 7 ,3 4 0
8,4.83 i 5 ,2 1 2
,o o o o o o o o o
© o O O t-a o c i i
ts.
• j j j j i tQ
X
j
P O O P
C O O t ',r "-1 t21,4 19
5 25
1,2 8 6
0.058
2.3,992
. 0
5,789.
O O C O T COCO t
ooooooo
O O O P
o o o x w r o to
3 2 ,6 2 9
679 13,248
5.9 3 6
3 9,3 05
_ P 0_ D P
1
j
f
o
q o c-F 'tfci_ r-t
7 ,8 8 8
4 ,3 9 5
s a>t> c q c o oi © p i lolq' sq J----1 O-F-f-CI ‘
ll
2 lfco»n^«o« c T o’S ^ s
*£• co
a
5 3,093
8,522 2 0.1 04
o^
12,364
9 9 ,5 6 0 10,3 *7
oi P k o as of tC coas © as coco- f oi 2 C 01 o cooo C c t-^ a c
o
O
O c io T s
31 ,924
-*(0 J.'-C'l'*
uo oi.es i- aiio flo o -f.io S COCOCICOO f B CO CO 10
o
to
w
4.224 35,87-1
9 ,3 9 5
101,237
1 16 ,22 6 1 0,545
2 2 ,0 9 7
t> H
oo
« , « oo h -f | ~ ©*p<»i-_-FS to
cr:
C0«5 CD
34,201
1,000 12,070
2 ,2 8 8
40,704
1 ,0 6 4
8 .1 0 2 £
I 'H
r-4
ico 3
tH
ro
7,991
1.081
3H,.»77
2 ,6 1 8
4 8 ,9 5 3
3 ,3 4 6
5 ,8 7 2 %
CO o o o o o o o o
>Ca-FP i - 3 o p o n - f c rI
28,881
6,7 3 5
7 ,1 7 7
OOO iDhci co
5 0,2 36
o o o o o o o o
2,2 1 0
?«rsHCi (
8 ,1 3 9
8,06.1 t
. o g g o o o o oi o o O
81
q q P a ia s o i cc
1,277 |
Cl -10.0 C d OS 01 I
im
239 | 544
153
3 ,2 0 6
557
553 „
C C lO flgcicoo ci-f **©©.-« . © W H O P r lH '
OC
o’ d ^ P H w co
4 5.7 52 i 1,537 23.939 | 7 ,9 8 9
4.7:<1
6 5 ,1 1 0
6,587
1 8.4 57 3
H tF TF01|>
H O t-OtHri [»
§ "$ 8 8
HrtOPbb2 ,3 0 0
3.881 I 2 ,9 1 8
1 0.200
1,515
COiumtme. M t a e x s s t m .
O P H
i
1 0,880
O
I
ift »o m cs - f i
GO H tO C S**
O
3 .0 5 2 2
iP.S §
2,0 00
<lrern v tlle .t
1 0,280
5 ,5 0 0 I 2,8 5 2
1,500
2 2,749
3,186
j C C
O O
5 ,5 2 2 “ £ ~
1,821 j
3.020
2,133
18,139 1 l .000
2 0.6 24
H o rtdleo,
5,3 1 8
2 .0 5 3 = P q
2.382
.V sto h ri,
3.274
2 6,6 39
2,864
9,435
33,314
3 ,2 0 8
7 ,6 8 7 - p u
VI.-liRhnrK,
•1,507 j 35,161
1,895 15,759 l 4.319
2 7 .9 1 0
3,6 1 8
1 0 .583
0 ^ 0 Yrntao C ity ,
3.215
2 7,7 80
3,1 5 0
2,073 13,392
4 ,7 6 2
2 5 ,3 0 2
8 ,3 3 9 s $ :
gwwgSgSj
3 5 ,0 7 0
8t. I.oiil.,
M is so u r i
2 3 4 ,3 3 5 2 7,0 26 4 0,4 44
57.541
3 4 0 .5 0 2 5 4 .1 7 0
3 5 ,9 8 2 : ~
^ | i C h a rlo tte ,! . .C
1,000 !
as f I t p l l i i
1 1,053
1,000
y asouju
1,318
13,588
3 0 0 .
1,418
•i | : 3 s s s ^ ls g :
tS
it
0 J
5
So * c^q- fc ® 3 r . » ~ O" o c lt» le l(t!i,
3 d I
i ,008
2 .7 0 0 i! 2 ,7 1 9
10,851
008
£*.
19,014
2,494
1 ,8 7 5 ® S
c< n
2
o . W J. ipr)j a p. . _3. . ( 3_ i s s ^ i r
3§ S - - £1SJ 8,® «2-S a 5 g « a C in c in n a ti. O h i o . . . . ,
10.718 ‘ 6 7 .5 5 8 1 0,0 96 9,969 19.812 1 0 5 ,17 8 2 0,138 1LVW2 g g 2g
Pt
g d ^ -d fc. ; 3 o r® a
£2 e'S,S 5 l£ «
G reenw ood ; 8, tu soust
752 I 9 ,8 8 2
7 16
891
5 56
16,679
891
a§ «8J3
. . . . . . 5 ^ to
3
| l l ^ 3 8j
M
450 !
£5 Tw ^ *
o ?
400
7 ,8 2 9
.Vewtiorry,t
3 50
600
7 ,8 2 9
6 00
"®
S •—?<■5,i -o
si
S 8 - I Memphis,
Tskksmbs 2 6 ,1 6 0 2 3 1 ,9 1 6 1 4.623 127 ,74 0 3 9 ,3 7 0 2 8 1 ,5 1 7 3 2,5 35 1 0i2'j i m9 = £■§
l . ,8 9 £ *•£
a S *
<•-* C
3(
s
H le,
a VB hvU
3 70
014
0 .7 2 2
442
3,251
3,0 1 8
;'2--''3 |£ £ < ^Dpooo^ J r|- P 2 «„r-4 m
33
1 6,949
S g |2& D 2 j ; S - l a 2 2 2 ‘<
TKXJl —
S
B ren h am ,
829
3 ,7 4 3
3 7 .1 1 8
77,494 10,325
1,110
5.1 1 3
*
^3!g5caaJcaciJflaeeoSc6 »
-> 3 OGICJ ‘f t
22S J iHolg®*® 3 < | o ®'3® 3 o 3 | I o sjfo |i O a jC -r O p ® « S. D alla*.
1,097
2 2 ,2 7 0
1.265
1,0 1 8
3 .9 3 6
3 6,091
■ t 6f» Zs m $
“
4 ,0 8 0
O
4 3 ,2 9 5
4 0 ,9 4 4
5 4 7 ,8 0 2
4 0.6 84
6 3.7 96
9 1 0 ,48 0 6 1,5 02
6 0:& 9 l 1 1 1
t s t l i l l l i l l l l l f HH H5 S S E l g
g « t ^ o o o o o o o o o d t-i *
Sc c ^ S < * %t G one t o n ,
i>
SS ooasmwscoroeotoaDQD
S3S22S3SS2
SSwiSmC ’ £ *5 OP £ * S
COCO
3 o tt- s
ToUl, 81 towns...., '175,304 1 889.000 154,410 471,914 289.759 2.705.093 282,540 408.438* ~~
-j

hT to’ © ®
io

*

E oX aala,
Al a b a m a . . .
M o n tso m ery
**
<
*
a
g S -o j L ittle Book, Ar kt* s s a s
s
*? as S » A lb a n y ,
_
UKOKGIA_
♦
*
A thene,
.s
l * r*
— * ^1 - A tla n ta ,
•
*
d *2 A
1
*
®
-e A uitn eta,
«
s - - g C o lu m bu s,
«»
_
**
Meoon,
* , U *P *3
>
Rome,
o i s J IxmldvlUp,K k st o c k t
l a 18
S h re v e p o rt, Lootsiaka..

a | I l Helms,
§ l§ i
H elen a,

S

§

T.I7

4.755
1,608
S
7 ,1 5 3
627
2 ,2 0 0
l,.l7 l!
5,o oy
1,640
1.050
3,374

73 3
o j
-‘»rj c8 P
w £ “ ' ce
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^ 2jC ^ o
S i “ rf®

a

b

S - *

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o

r s i l l l s "5JS1I

W
P

Market, Salet and
Prices of
FUTURES

X
>

a
a

Market,
Range and
Total Sales.

D A IL Y P R I0K 8 AN D BALES ON NVTURXS FOR BACH
November.

December,

Jan u ary.

February.

M
P
H

I
fa O

° 3

q

C
D

P A

3 S

S a le s , t o t a l................
Prloos p aid (ran go )
C lo sin g ........................
T h n rsd ay, N ov. 2 1 S a le s , t o t a l................
Prlooa p a id (rau ^ e)
O lo eln g........................
S a le s , t o t a l................
P ric e s p aid (ran ge )
C lon ing........................

o

May.

June.

MONTH.
July.

.1 tty ust.

September.

October.

Hindi or.
A v 'g e .. 8-11 A v ’g o ., 8 -1 3 A v ’g e .. 8-17 A v 'g e .. 8-21 A v 'g e .. 8-20 A v’g o .. 8*30 A v 'g e .. 8-35 A v 'g e .. 8-39 A v 'g e .. 8-41 A v’ffe.. §*1l A v ’sre..
A v ’ rc .. 8*03
137,700
100
4 .5 0 0
5 3,8 00
0 ,1 0 0
0 4 ,0 ' 0
2,1 0 0
4 ,4 0 0
5 00
700
TOO
2(H)
8*03 ir 8-4 r, 8*11® 8 i 0 ® 8-13 8 -1 5 * 8-1!) 8 *2 0 * K 22 8 - 2 4 » 8-2 - 8*30® 8*31 s : i: i ,j s-8 7 R-37# 8-41 6*39# 6*4*2 § * 3 9 » §*45 — #
§•03# —
E asier.
8 - 1 0 - 8*12 8 - 1 1 - 8-12 8 1 (1 - 8 1 7 8-20— 8*22 8 - 2 5 - 8-20 8*30— 6 31 8 3 4 - 8-35 8 * 8 7 - 8-3S 6 '3 9 - § ‘40 6 * 4 0 - 6*42
—
8-04— 8-06
H ig h er,
A v 'g e .. 8 -2 0 A v 'g e .. 8 -1 9 A v 'g e .. 8 21 A v 'g e .. 8 *2 0 A v 'g e .. 8*32 A v 'g e .. 8*30 A v 'g e .. 8*41 A v 'g e , ■ 8-4.'- A V g e .. 8' 10 A v 'g e. a IH A v 'g e ..
M on day, Nov. 1 8 A v’g e .. 8-10
9 ,8 0 0
100
8 5,1 00
5 .2 0 0
9 5 .9 0 0
Baled, t o t a l................
2 2 2 .0 0 0
1 0.300
:»0o
3,000
500
3 ,3 0 0
2,0 0 0
P rloe* p a id (ran ge ) 8*0.5 ft 8*55 — -a s* 20 8-11 If H-25 8*15 ® 8 30 8*20® 8-33 8 21® 8*38 8 20 ® 8*12 8-:s:l# 8-40 «> 37» 8*40 6 40# M-M §•42# 6*55 — 9 _
8-OS® 8-13
8 - 1 2 - 8-14 8 - 1 2 - 8-13 8 - 1 0 - 8-17 8*21— 8*22 8 25 — 6 20 s*:in — H*:t j 6*34— 8*65 §*37— 6 -..'lO 6 * 3 9 - 8*40 6*42*- 8*43
C loning.........................
Low er.
K-Ofl— 8-07
—
D eclinin g. A v 'g e .. 8 0 1 A v ’g e ., 8 ‘02 A v 'g e ,. 8-07 A v ’g e. 8 1 1 A v 'g e ,. 8-10 A v 'g e .. 8-22 A v 'g e ,. 8-25 A v 'g e .. 8-29 A v'ge... 8-H4 A v 'g e .. s-:i2 A v 'g e ,.------- A v 'g e .. 7-98
T u esd a y, Nov. 1 0 300
5.0 0 0
Baled, t o t a l.................
2 12 ,80 0
1)0,900
9 ,OoO
1 17 ,20 0
1.300
3 00
6 .1 0 0
2 00
3,1*1«»
2 ,3 0 0
P riced p aid (re nge) 7-05 a 8-37 8-01# —
8 0 0 * 8-08 8 03 9 8 13 SOM® 8 17 8" 12 i» 8-21 8-17® 8-25 8*21 o 6*30 6 * 2 8 « 6-30 6*3-1# 6 ’35 6*30# H‘37 — » _
7 95 9 8*00
8*08— 8*10 8 - 0 8 - 8 < 9 8*12— a 13 8*17— 8*18 8 * 6 1 - 8*62 8 - 2 0 - 8-27 8 ‘2 9 — 8*30 § 3 3 - §*35 §v3 5 — 1*3(1 m
>
g*39
— —
C lo sin g ........................
S te a d ie r.
*
7 * 9 9 - 8*01

6t

m
h

April,

S a tu r d a y , N or. 1 0 —
Baled, t o t a l .............. .
Prloos p aid (ran g e )
C lo sin g ........................

#'

J

s
o
oo

Marclt.

W k |Total s a le s th is w eek
tr* C A v e r a g e p rice , w eek
.

■
** « 7 ,r “
H .loo
114 .60 0
2 ,io o
8 1 5 * 8-27 8*20 «i 6*30 8*83# 6*35 6*2»® 6-37 6*32# 6*35 8-117 * 8-39 — *
8 - 2 4 - 8 85 8*28— 8*30 6 * ;m - 6*3 i §*37— ft*36 8 V 9 — 6 40 8-41— 8-411
3

—

A v ’g e ..------- A v ’g e .. R-15 A v 'g e .. 8-21 A v'gp. 8*25 A v 'g e .. 8-31 A v'ge. 8 -3 i A v'g e «•!<> A v 'g e .. «• III A v 'g e . s ir. A v i f r ., 6*45 Av’ g e ..
S te a d y .
197,700
1.3C0
......
6,8 0 0
9 1,300
0 .0 0 0
7 1 ,0 0 0
7 .8 0 0
5,5 0 0
1,500
216*
8-O s* 8-22 8 -1 7 * 8-20 8*22 ® 8 30 8-27® 8-35 8*31® 8*38 8 - 8 « » 8**4 6*4-1 a - 13 6 '1 3 # 8-16 8 -4 .5* —
8 00 w 8-45 — if —
— 9
§* 47 **. §*4§ § ‘4 9 — $*50 $ * 5 1 - 8-53
8 - 2 1 - 8*22 8-21— 8-22 8 - 2 5 - H lgh er.
8*30— 8*31 8*34— 8*3.5 8*30— 8*40 H-13— 6*41

__
-

8*00
2 00
6*08# —
§ 1 6 - $ * l«

—

— 9 6 20
$*14— 8*10

2 2 4 ,8 0 0
~ 2 .9 0 0
8 8 ,SI Hi
8-03 u 8-39 — « — 1 8-01® 8-12 8 -0 5 * 8-18
>
8 - 1 1 - 8-13 8 - U - 8 1 2 8 1 5 - 81(1
E anler.

7 ,4 0 0
2 8 1 .00 0
m
8 * 2 0 » 8*57 8*20® 8 32
l-.aslor.
8 - 2 1 - 8-23 8*22— 1.250,600

O is a le s sin ce S e p .l ,’96* 1 9 ,4 08 ,1 0 0

500
8T1

1,000
8*10® 8*21
8 * 2 0 - 8*21

1 2,3 00
on ooo
0 . ioo
tO 1.800
5,000
8 -2 3 * 8-35 8*26 • 8*37 8 33® 8*41 8-30® 8-45 6 4 2 » 6 50 8 -4 7 « 8"52 §*49# §*50 «*5n# 6-57
8*25— —
8*30— 8*31 8 3 1 — 8*35 8*38— 8*39 §*42— § 4 3 s m - §*47 6*4 § - 8*49 § 4 9 - 6*50

3 0 ,4 0 0
814

482 .60 0
8 '1 8

4 2 ,4 0 0
8*22

3 8 8 .4 0 0
8*27

0 3 ,2 0 0
8*32

4 1 si woy.'M» 1 ,0 5 0 ,0 0 0
0
- —..— ,0 0 0

9 ,0 6 8 ,7 0 0

3 9 5 ,9 0 0

5 ,9 2 4 ,8 0 0

180,500

5 9.7 00
§*3«
!
5 0 7 ,10 0

§03® $ * 0 5 - 8*07
A v’ kc.

— #

6 (5 0 0
6*40

4 .0 0 0
§*42

10,600
8*43

.

5.1013
$ 07

$ 3 ,4 0 0

18.100

3 5 ,2 0 0

...

1 6,0 00

2 .E c | , i
0^.

t3

.

THE CHRONICLE.
: o t t ' , n a t Ot h e r M a r k e t s . —
m id d lin g c o tto n a t fiioulhern
i d s fo r e a c h (lav of t h e w e e k .
QUOTATIONS y >B MIDDLING COTTON ON—
Frt.
I Wectne . Thuri
8 ',8
81,»

p

M
8

8*8

8 'io

8%
8%

8 ;ts

8%
phlla^ e q h l*
An ifus
Meojp lie ..
8*4 Lotl i t . ..
H
U o uti O ...
C inein
Lou's vl i l t , .

$\

8
83

8*8
8*ie
8*16
8 Si
8%

S?i
S ’ i « «- J9
81 6
8*3
S' 8
8U
8 ‘-I

8"*8

8°u
8
81' o
8 6
8 ’ ic

8 r , ie

8
8',o

81|S
H'a
8 1ifi

8*8
8 'io
8 *4
8i.i

b’Si

lay (
c lo s in g q r o t a t io n s to - d a y (Friday)
South e r a n iA rk e ts w e r e a s f o llo w s .
P
_
7 \ L ittle Rook_
i
7'\ M o n tg o m ery...
Col? m Kn.« C A.
7% N a s h v ille ..........
f5r» urn Jii«, M t**.»
7 7h N atchez
JS alati ft,...... **

at other important
N ew b erry____

Raleigh.........

73i

S e lm a ................
S h re v e p o rt._
_

7%
7»ie

R; e i i t s f r o m t h e P l a n t a t i o n s . —The following table
in licates the actual movement each week from the plantations.
The figun s do not include overland receipts nor Southern
consumption; they are simply a statement of the weekly
m iv.Hu nt from the plantations of that part of the crop which
finally reaches tlie market through the outports.
FT«4Jt
i R ec e ip t* a t th e P o r t e . jSt’ft a t I n t e r i o r Toum*. Ittx’ pt8 from Plant'ns.
a r u n r .0 - j lg#3_ | ;8 9 ( | 1885
1893. | 1891. 1895. 1893. 1894. 1896.
O fil. lb ........IC86.739 3 3 *.in | 2 *0 059
•• 25........1368.23*’400.078 2*5.438
Not. 1 .. . . . j a S 4,7621431,448 251,087
8 ........206. I l l 396.6621197,931
“ 15. .. 1290,571 [871,402 229,7 49
” 22 - 1291.016 351 1*42 212,429

227,101 238.895
276.082 274.205
221,500 323,725
348,118 371,327
368,0 6 402,210
400.6891408.4 28

32 ',1 0 7
408,119
379,810
317.7 39
345,069
312,019

208,191
325.574
304,901
416,175
451,020
471.914

427,027 345,008
441,043 352,821
460,903 290,6t 7
444,004 24“,112
402,654 205,01 0
358,161 233,317

The above statement shows; 1.—That the total receipts
from the plantations since Sept. 1, 1895, are 2,700,231 bales;
in 1S91 were 3,734,899 bales; in 1893 were 3,030,212 bales,
2.—That although the receipts at the outports the past week
were 212,12:* bales, the actual movement from plantations was
only 231,3.7 bales, the balance going to increase the stocks at
the interior towns. Last year the receipts from the plantations
for the week were 337,161 bales and for 1893 they were
312,019 bales.
O v e r l a n d M o v e m e n t f o r t h e W e e k a n d S in c e S e p t . 1.—

33 c give below a statement showing the overland movement
fo, the week and since September 1. As the returns reach us
by telegraph late Friday night it is impossible to enter so
larger/ into detail as in our regular monthly report, but all
the principal matters of interest are given. This weekly
publication is of course supplementary to the more extended
monthly statements. The results for the week ending Nov 22
ami since Sept. 1 in the last two years are as follows.
1895.

X o v em h er 22.
Week.

1894.

Since
Sept. 1.

Since
Sept. 1.

Week.

h ip p e d —

Via St. Louis...........
Via C airo.........................
Via Parker City.........
Via Evansville......... .
Via Louisville.............
Via Cincinnati...........
Via other routes, &c.

27.926
10,806
659

195,440
89.461
8,299

11*089
2,690
2,763

21,981
24,209

T o tal jrross o v e rla n d .. . . . . . . . .

55,933

Between intfiior towns..____
Inland, &c., from South_____

54,170
17,271
2,100
123
12 442
10,756
8,383

328,113
131,666
6,843
1,282
59,768
56.066
4G,432

398,61' 105,2-15

630,470

59,22'

9,501
97
2,299

Deduct shipments—
Overland to N. Y., Boston, &o.

T o tal to be d ed u cted ..................

65,908
1,569
16,495

12,677
628
2,052

74.187
9,482
28.187

11,89"

83,972

15,357

111,856

L eav in g tota l n e t ove r la p d * .. 44,036
• Inclu d ing m ovem ent by r a il to C anada

314,645

8!) 888

518,614

I he loregoing shows that the week’s net overland movement
IIV f .H
L e?IL 4M 38 h.ales> against 89,88.8 bales for the
week in.181)4, and that for the season to date the aggregate net
ucl
overland exhibits a decrease from a year ago of 203,969 bales,
In Sight and Spinner**
Takings.

1895.
I Since
Wetk' | Sept. 1.
-rrr- .

K**c*lptg a t po rts to N or. 2 2 .......... 212,429
Ifet o v e ila o il to Nov. 2 2 .......... ’ ]* ’ 44,036 2,2 6 1,01 7
Southern consum ption tu JNov’ 22 22,000 314,645
235,000
T o tal m a r k e t e d .. .. . . . . . . . .
278.465 2,810,662
In te rio r stocks in e x c e ss___, . ’ *** 20,888 4 39 ,21 4
Cam e into sigh t d u rin g w eek . 299,353
T o tal in sig h t Nov. 2 2 ...............
3 ,2 4 9,87 6
N orth'q epionerstafc'gR to Nov. 22 79,062

|

1894.
nr. ,, i SpL j
IVer/c. \ Since

351,9-12 3,383,796
89,888, 518.614
2 0,000 210,000
4 61 ,83 0 4,112,410
6,219 351,103
168,019

617,527 138,924

4 ,4 0 3 ,5l'3
865,422

d u rW the w e e k ' that there has
into sight
Mrne week oi l ';,
f e ’ aKa,nst *6?,049 bales for the
t nirrVi^ac
*
that the decrease in amount in sight
tc-mght as compared with last year is 1,213,637 bales,
S

[VOL. L X I.

W e a t h e r R e p o r t s b y T e l e g r a p h . — Our advices b y tele­
graph i his evening from the South indicate tint the weather
has been favorable for the gathering and marketing of cotton
during the week. The temperature has been slightly Io ver,
but there has been a quite general absence of rainfall. Pick­
ing is completed in a number of sections and is drawing to a
close in many other districts.
Galveston, Texas.—Reports from about all sections of the
State indicate that picking is practically completed. Dry
weather has prevailed all the week. The thermomet.r has
averaged 50, highest 74 and lowest 44.
Palestine, Texas.—We have had no rain during the week.
The thermometer has averaged 55, the highest being 80 and
the lowest 30.
Huntsville, Texas.—There has been no rain during the week.
The thermometer has averaged 55, ranging from 32 to 78.
Dallas, Texas. —Picking is completed and no top crop will
be madf . The yield wrll be very shore. We have had no
raiu during the week. Uhe thermometer has rang.d from 26
to 81, averaging 54.
San A n ton io, Texas, —The weather has been dry all the
week. Average thermometer 58, highest 80, lowest 36.
Luling, l e x m —We have had no rain duriDg the week.
The thermometer has averaged 56, the highest being 75 and
the lowest 36.
Columbia, le x a s .— Dry weather has prevail d all the week.
The thermometer has averaged 56, ranging from 32 to 79.
Cuero, Texas.—W e have had no rain during the week. The
thermometir has ranged fr. m 36 to 75, averaging 56.
Brenham, Texas.—There has been no rain the past week.
Average thermometer 55. highest 74 and lowest 36.
Bellon, Texas — It has been cry ail the week. The ther­
mometer has averaged 55, the highest being 75 and the lowest
36.
F ort W orth, Texas.—We have had no rain during the week.
The thermometer has averag d 52, ranging from 28 to 76.
Weatherford, T ex a s — Dry weather has prevail, d all the
week. The ihtrmometerhas avtraged 52, the highest being
74 ai,d tlie lowest 31.
New Orleans, Louisiana.— The weather has been dry all the
week. Average thermometer 60.
Shreveport, Louisiana.—W e have had only a trace of rain
on one day of the week. The thermometer has averaged 55,
the highest being 80 and the lowest 31.
Columbus, M ississippi.— Dry weather has prevailed all the
w\ek, The thermometer has averaged 54, ranging from 33
!o 78.
Leland, Mississippi.—We have had no rain during the
week. The theimometer has ranged from 29 to 82, averaging
5v5,
Vicksburg, Mississippi.—We have had rain on one day
of the pist v e r k , ihe rainfall reaching nineteen hundredths
*
of an inch. Average thermomeler 56'9. highest 73, lowest 43.
Helena, Arkansas. — Colton is nearly all picked. A few
farmers are holding on to their crop. Dry weather has pre­
vailed ail the week. The thermometer has averaged 53, rang­
ing from 28 to 75.
Tittle Bock, Arkansas. —Telegram not received,
Memphis, Tennessee.—We have had rain on one day of the
week the precipitation being five hundredths of an i n c h weather now threatening. The thermometer has ranged
from 28 to 74. averaging 5P4.
Nashville, Tennessee, Rain has fallen on one day during
the week, the precipitation reaching fifteen hundredths of an
mch Average thermometer 48, highest 73, lowest 27.
Selma, Alabama.—Telegram not received.
Mobile, Alabama.—The week’s rainfall has been one
hundredth of an inch on one day. The thermometer has
averaged 56, the highest being 70 and the lowest 41.
M ontgomery, Alabama.— Farmers are maketing their crop
more freely now. Picking ,s virtually finished and the crop
hereabouts turns out much shorter than expected. Killing
frost on one day. No ram all the week. The thermometer
avPr8ged 53 and ranged from 42 to 65.
Madison, F lo r id a ,- Picking is nearly done. There has been
lam on one day of the week, but to an inappreciable extent
Average thermometer 67, highest 79 and lowest 34.
^
U T h ! \ u e° r9la- ~ yV have had dry weather all the
m
ie
(kfan'd the lowestT^f6ter 1 S avera& ^ the highest being
&
e<

™ e T al\nah’ Geo.rS ia .-B ^ m has fallen on two days of the
Th«^h!h e'PreCi pU? t,0a reachlDhundredths of an inch,
lb s thermometer has averaged 56, ranging from 35 to 72
Augusta, G e o r g ia .- It has been dry all the week The
theimometer has ranged from 31 to 70, averaging 51 '
d £ l arf e ? 0n' S°,Uth- CaroUn a .-T h e r e has been raii on two
t
n/h T h « r ek’ tne/ aln a11 bfclDK nine hundredths of an
J
7 1 a n d ^ ow e™ °3 r r
averaged 56>
highest beingStateburg, South Carolina.—A general kilim"- frost ocT?er! W m lhU? da? morninS- Ic has been dry ail the week
“ ot? e*er hasjiveraged 53, ranging from 31 to 69.
Greenwood, South Carolina. —There has-been rain on two
fnTh8 ° T t e tLeek t0 tbe ef ent of nineteen h u n d r d t l o f l m
inch.
■nch. The thermometer has ranged from 16 to 58, averaging
35,
■Wilson, North Carolina. —We have had no rain durinv the
week. Average thermometer 53, highest
W s t 30. S

THE CHRONICLE.

N ovember 23, 1885.]

T h e f o l l o w i n g s t a t e m e n t w e h a v e a ls o r e c e iv e d b y te le g r a p h *
s h o w in g th e h e ig h t o f th e r iv e r s a t t h e p o in ts n a m e d a t
8 o 'c l o c k N o v e m b e r 2 1 , 18 9 3 , a n d N o v e m b e r 2 2 , 1894.
,Vot. -21, '9 5 . H er. 22 , ’91
F eet.

F ret,

3*1
2*3

H ew O r le a n s ............
M e m p h is ...................
N a s h v ille ...................
S h r e v e p o r t ...............
VinJrahorK................. .

3-1
0-9
*1-1
*5*1
4-4

22

1*1
5*0

.B -lo w ze ro o f « a a « e .

BOMBAT HBCBirrs AND SHIPMENTS FOR POOR VBARS.
I Sh i p m e n t s t h i s ireck .

S h ip m e n t s s n e e Sept. 1

l* » s |

1S9I

im

......

7 .0 0 0

7 ,0 0 0

t.OOO
3 .0 0 0
(5,000
3 .0 0 0

........ 1 ............................
i i.o o o ............... l.n o o

l- O c t

......... I .l.OOo

6,000!

C o n ti

T h is j S in c e
Sept. 1.

Total.

ite m .
6 4 ,0 0 0
17 .000
3 5 ,0 0 0
5 7 ,0 0 0

Wee*.

6 3 .0 0 0 1 1 ,0 0 0
2-2,000 6 ,0 0 0
6 1 .0 0 0 1 3 ,0 0 0
0 0 ,0 0 0 1 # 0 0 1

1 7 7 .0 0 0
9 7 ,0 0 0
10 6 ,0 0 0
5 7 ,0 0 0

A c c o r d in g to th e fo r e g o in g B it a b a y a p p ia r s t i s h o w
a n t o r - e a s e c o m p a r e d w i t h to st y e a r i n t h a w e e k ’ s r e c e i p t s o f
3 v > 0 i b a le s .-toil a n t n e r e c u v i n a h i p n m t s o f 7 ,<*0) b a t o s , a n d
t h e s h i p m e n t s s i n c e S y p t . 1 s h o w a n i o c jv t .s e o f 4 8 ,0 d 0 b a l e s .
T h e m iv e m e n t a t O i l e a t t v M a lm s a i l o t h e r I n d ia p o r t s f o r
t h e la s t r e p j r t e d w -e k a n d s i n c e Che 1st o f d .- p t s m b a r , f o r t w o
y e a r s , h as been a s fo llo w s .
** O : i k p e r t s " c o v e r C e y l o n ,
T u t i o o r i n . K a r r a su ae a n d C t o o n a i t
$ h ifttifa 'tttlM f o r t h « w m k .
(fr o n t

T * t* t *11—
1 8 9 5 ........ .
1 9 * 4 ..........

0 *m i
B rita in .

T v fo t.

n cu t.

C»i<- tt.i—
l s 9 5 .........
1 8 9 4 .........
M a r lia e 18«-->.........
10<M., ...
A L o th e r * —
3 8 » J .......
1 9 9 4 _____

$ h - p m e n i s M im e S e p t ,

2 ,0 0 0

C & nU n e a t

1.

T < A at.

i t0 0 o
3 ,0 0 0

4.0O0
2 ,0 0 0

s .0 0 0
5 ,0 0 0

1M K i

U ,0 0 0
1 0 ,0 0 0

1 0 ,000
9 000

2 1 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,0 0 0

3*000
**.**>.

1 3 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,000

2 1 .0 0 0
16,000

3 1 .0 0 0
2 4 ,0 0 0

3 .0 0 0
l.o o o

2 ,0 0 0

1,0 00

3 ,0 0 0
—

.•****

5 ,0 0 0
lAMi*)

a s ,o o o
2**0 00

3 5 ,0 0 0
2 3 ,0 0 $

63 000
3 2 ,0 0 0

T h s a b o v e t o ! sis f o r t h e w e e k s h o w t h a t t h e m o v e n t >m f r o m
t h e p o r t s o t h e r t h a n B o m b i v is 1 ,0 0 0 b a l e s m o r e t h a n t h e s a m e
w -e k la s t y e a r .
F o r t h e w h o le o f I n d ia , t h e r e fo r e , t h e t o t a l
s h i p a m t ( s i n c e S e p t e m b e r 1, 1705, a n d f o r t h e o o r r e s p i n l i n g
p s r io d s o f t h e t w o p r e v io u s y e a r s , a r e a s fo llo w s .
E x ro K rs

* i;« o r c

t o

r ito R

5,323
561
219

la v a o n a h ......... ...............
Jharleston_______ ______
Florida, & o.—...................

40,329
4,934
1,748

3,661
337
275

Total.............................

Stock.

S m ce
8e p t . 1. 1895.

1894.

36,304 13,801 20,534
2,743 2,302 2,400
1,717 2,010 1,036
40,764 18,113 23,970

i he e x p o r t s fo r th e w e e k e n d in g t h is e v e n in g r e a c h a t o t a l
o f 5 ,5 0 0 b a le s , o f w h i c h 5 ,4 0 1 b a le s w e r e t o G r e a t B r i t a i n , 99
to c ra n ee a n d —
t o R e v a l, a n d th e a m o u n t fo r w a r d e d to
N o t h e m m i l l s h a s b e e n 2 ,3 5 5 b a le s .
B e lo w a r e th e e x p o r t s
f r h e w e e k a n d s i n c e S e p t e m b e r 1 i n 18 45 a n d 1 8 9 4 .

E x ports
fro m —

W eek E n d in g X ov. 22. S in c e S ep t. 1, 1895, N arlk ’n AtiUs
G rea t F r’n c c
G rea t F r’n c e
T otal.
T ota l. B r il'n
itC.
B r il'n . etc.
........

3,935
1,166

8,818
1,015

99

399
.........

*/a a iifl, &e
tFirl’ t 'n ,* c
iortda, Ao.
m * York-..
Soatou . . . . .
it*uim ore..

3,935
1.160

T ota l........

5,401

99

Total 1894..

33

101

300
......

j S in c e
1.

3,562

1,707 10,555
1.615
.. .
1,6*26 5,188
......
...... ......

2,330 10,922
:
50
219
973
_____i _____
_
......

5,500 1 1,025

3,333 17,358

2,555,11,945

5,009

1,792 13.073

........

131

3,058

1,351

A considerable portion of the Sea Diand cotton shipped to
f «reigu ports goes via New York, a n d some small amounts via
d wton and Baltimore. Instead of including this cotton ior
he week in which it leaves the Southern outporis, we follow
i he same plan as in our regular table of including it when
a Tially exported from New York, A c . The details of the
shipments of Sea Island cotton for the week will be found
under the head “ Shipping News,” on a subsequent page,
Quotations Nov 22 at Savannah, for Floridas, common,
lOjic,; medium Urn, 13ntc.; choice, 15}£c.
Charleston, Carol was, medium fine, 23 to 21c.; fine, 23c.
ful'y H , 2»i to *37o.: extra fine, 85 to 40c.
dc
J c t e B c t t s , B a OQINO, & c — T h e i n q u i r y f o r j u t e b a g g i n g
ha* been e x tr e m e ly lig n t d u r in g t h e w e e k " u n d e r r e v ie w , th e
r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r t h is c r o p y e a r h a v i n g b e e n q u i t e f u l l y s u p ­
p lie d ,
F o r w i n t e r d e l i v e r y r o u n d l o t s a r e B e in g o f f e r e d a t
9 - j c . f o r 1?4' I ds ., 4<4'c f o r 3 lb s , a n d 4 :,.l'< l..fo r s t a n d a r d g r a d e * .
J m e b u t t e n a v e r u io d d u l l a t 1 l - 1 0 c , t o r p a p e r q u a l i t y a n d
1} j \ f o r m i x i n g .

w b ia

iv .o o o t

1894.

186,000

1.000

1493.

74.000

0,000

113,000

A f.R X an o.tt a R k
a n d SittPM E N r s .-—T h r o u g h a r r a n g e
m e n u w e h t v • m i la w i t h M e s s r s . D a v i e s , B e c a o h i & C o ., o f
L i v e r p o o l a n i ,-V lex tn I r m , w e n o w r e c e i v e a w e e k l y c a b l e o f
t h e n iv e r u *n ts o f o u t .t o n a t A l e x a n d r i a , E g y p t . T h e f o l l o w i n g
a r e t o e r e c e ip t s a n d s h ip n m is fo r t h e p a s t w e e k a n d f o r th e
c o r r e s p o n d in g w e e k o f t h e p r e v io u s t w o y e a r s .

AieMtndrm, Merest,
Smemtwr 20
.

1 m94.

180$,

B&smipu |e»tntar»*i.*.e
Till#
H0 »«N
»
X,

5
250.000
2*4* 1,000 1

1893.

j

*
40,000 j
1,1 iH,wm II

260,0110
1 ,3 5 6 ,0 0 0

Since
fklM.
Since | T his i X n e e
T*$*
,
|
week* Sept, U mmk. Sept. 1 teeek . S ep t. 1.
!
9 ,0 0 0 ; 108,00 0! 22.000 60,000
10,0 0 0 ! 70,0001 IC.oOO 43,000
' . . ... !
178,OOO! 3 S.0‘ 10 163,000 ‘
Total E urope____ _

E xport* (littlMH*
hWvfptml
Tm O0aU0f8.il

* A o a a ta r I * 9 9 o a ta J *.
t O f *rlsl»ti s.i a n i c iOAta 11 1 5 , 7 ,0 )1 ba le*; In 13 1 1 , 3 ,3 1 8 hales; la
1 .3 9 3 ,3 ,0 2 1 [•*:>».
T o ts s t it e m s n t s h o w s t h t t th e r e c e ip ts f o r t h e w e e k e n d in g
N o v . 2 0 . w e r e 2 ) 1, i ) J c t o t srs a n 1 t h e s n i p n j u t s t o a l l E u r o p e
2 5 ,0 0 0 b a t e s .
M a n . b b s ruts M a r k b t . — O n r r e p o r t r e c e i v e d b y c a b l e t o n i g h t
f r o m M a n c tie ctte r s t a t e * t h a t t h e m a r k e t is s t e a d y f o r b o t h
y a r n s a n d s h ir t in g s .
T h e d e m a n d f o r b o t h y a r n a n d c l o t h is
im p r o v in g .
W e g iv e t h e p r ic e s fo r t o d a y b e lo w a n d le a v e
t h o s e f o r p r e v i o u s w e e k s o f t h is a n d l a s t y e a r f o r c o m p a r i s o n :

( b e . S h ir t - C h tB n
e m n n & n 1 /5 /,
in f t n ex t.
V p tilr

0.
4 . §„ ti. *.
Oe. 13 6**1 > 7 % x 7 ^ m
** 2 S 0 %
!1 * 4 0 » n
1 0 90
M st. 1
i n
m
8
i- 7 4
« 1.1 0 % gft7% x 5 - m
« 22 O5* of 7 % 4 4 % »f>

0,
n

10

ll»%
iB H

0

S

32* C o p ,
Is& isL

*L
4.
l-N . 5 .,
4^
■1%
j
l .->,3 j '- i
4 M „ )Ss
t h e 5 *'<s
1*M 7 ? l *

<1.
aoh.
#0%
-i6 H
# 0 h

^0
'« 0 %

(1
s,
f. >*••>:
& J ,« 6
4 % -* 0
*% »6
3 36
3 a6

ton (Colored ttn4 uneotortd)
exported to—

Total yard* of above......
Total rains* o f above,......
Value per y a rd.,.,,..................

4.
3>o
4
3
2
1%
2

V nW n
M id ..
U pId s
4.

3 'g-a
3 '9
3132

3
3%

7SS
'Z .S O
ll)(,vi«
ftjilo
m .w t
,m

ij m

urn

Serm an y....... .

France.................................... .............

Jther oountrle* In Europe....... .
3rttl*h North America................
iext&
o

Central A m erican State* A B rltllb

Hondar&s,

Guba

Puerto Rico,*.,.*,*,.
3anto Domlnsro......

W In ies.-,
est d

8 r**fi.
U n ite d S ta te * o f C o lo m b ia * !!
eroGimtrtei I So. America,..,
rta* in I

Obtai*............... I ...............

B r it is h A u stral»v8t% . . . . * , „ ..........
B r iu n n In d ia a n d
In d ie s* .
O th e r c«> a n trie s
in
A s ia
a nd
O cean l e a . .... .
A f r i c a .,
. ....
> th e r c o a n trte a

Eist

tare* o f....

Atrerw ete v*la«i of ail ontjtnri trnnn*

13%)

P lI-*
'A
l,\-W,2 H
J
?2.5?l
1,401,710
«37.M
45
l.O .SJa
iO
*^srfs
2,5W
wnm

1,U1.:U
5
SWM&

!

Value* 0/ other Manufactures (
Cotton exported to—

United Kingdom.........................

1801.

um .

United Kingdom..................yard*
term*nr ...............................
P ra n ce...,.,,,____ ____ ....
Jtnor oounlrlw in Europe,...
British North America.. .... .
Mexico...................... ............
Central American State* and
Brltlth ti or.dura*..............
C sfta....................
..
Puerto Kloo...........................
Santo I) insingo ...........
Other <Ve*t lodte*................
Argentina Republic,.........
3rail! ....................................
United State* o f Colombia...
HbarooaotrleelnS, America
Ihlna ................................ .
Brit. Po«*es'u* In A n*trala*!»
British lo-ltaand K.ou indie*
Hber Onaatrie* In Asia and
Ocean iea..............................
tfrlca.......... ........... .
....
Wiar conntre*....................

Argentine BepabUc,

B H H it. S h i r k
im p -, m m !n n n
ta J in m i ,

*.
4
i
4
4
•l
4

‘t u a n m i e s o f ManU/aetures o f Cat- Month endin', Stpt 80. 0 ma*. ending S pt, 30

O th e r

130l

18 95.
93*
fw M .

T h is
T h is 1 S in ce
w eek . Se.pt. 1. w eek .

Domestic Exports o r Cotton M anufactories. —Through
the courtesy of Mr, W. C. Ford, Chief of the Bureau of
Statistics, we have received this week a statement showing the
T fu* I S in c e
T h is | Milid$- j Thist | $ tn e e
exports of domestic cotton manufactures for September and for
W€€te. j Mept , 1* | teeek , J S ep t, I.
ereett* j S ep t. 1.
the nine months ended Sept, 30, 1895, with like figures for the
1 *C)00
61,000 corresponding periods of the previous year, and give them
T#
0OOj
05,000
_____!
22 000'
51,000 below.________
1,000
$2,000
5,000
1895..

ay
A ll other port*

a l l

1894.

1895.

I n d i a C o t t o n * M o v e m e n t F r o m .a l l P o r t s . — T h e r e c e i p t
a n d s h i p m e n t s o f c o t t o n a t B o m b a y h a v e b e e n a s f e l l -v , ( o
t h e w e e k a n d y e a r , b r i n g i n g t h e f i g u r e s d o w n t o N o v . 31.

1

S e a I s l a n d C o t t o n M i v e m e n t . — W j h a v e r e c e i v e d tn s
(F r id a y ) e v e n in g o y t e le g r a p h f r o m t h e v a r io u s p o r t s t h e
d e t a il s o f t h e S e a I s l a n d c o t t o n m o v e m e n t f o r t h e w e e k .
T oe
r e c e i p t s f o r t h e w e e k e n d i n g t o - n i g h t ( N o v . 2 2 ) a n d s in . e
S e p t . 1, 18 9 5 , t h e s t o c k s t o - n i g h t , a n d t h e s a m e i t e m s f o r t i e
c o r r e s p o n d i n g o e r i o d s o f 1894, a r e a s f o l l o w s .

R e c e ip ts to X or. 22,

• B elow Zero « f g a u g e .

tear] G 1 Conti ;
reat
G rea t j
\lirift, I item r,J B r i t a i n
.
‘at-

9 3

1

(U .A S
UA
*0390
*16*440
30.0^0
|4
H
173,134
34,04*
19.471
47110
8,01'
l,nm
6/70
iS
.l
4m i
i
7,0tm

26,208
U.0I3
204
*331.431

lSlfi.
1884.
8.7n3.073 7 O.3 0
.O 2 M
1,5 0,627 1,101,213
8-2
100,0*4
513,881
30M i
447,810
O3 >
m . 7H 5**57,80/ 7< f5 ,.K8
«M 7 1,0*4,003 2*073,479
feU
i,4 W C » 10.279.400' 0,012,473
* .n H
2ii,n55
305,877
1.3.505
W 4
o, 07
1,003,475 3,250,145
10.341,290
2,0 9 -H l/Sw.W
i
O
1,620,2*8 7,708 1 14,0 *7,*98
82
fill',783 4*834.33}
... H
U
1.422.4J« 20 «Hi.i H 18.352.0*7
u,m.vw 81*230,275 4 ,582,8*43
0
4 7*551
3
3*,05
525,540
227,&Q 2,152,067 3.9.5,725
J
20>tO 9*871,994 7,558,703
O
S
7*7,185 7,«91 2V 0,105,442
2,3i«,05tt 5008.045 0,316,393
14,808 tm 133,3852*7 147.348,320
*8 u :4 *7,20f,7o8 ■
8 ,fld
*8,004,210
*-0531
**0581
**'• 8
59
m ip m
2iU,mm

*2U,2\t $211,271
15f,0:n
10,847
151.038
1
9
5,33i
5.831
2,521
05.310
«'.2 0
1,105.0?h 1,1»'5,0(H
7,334
101,429
101,420
8,007
57,089
57.080
2,201
40.007
40 0 -7
8.058
1-1
4
0,053
1,3511,08)
11.080
A.O &
0O
40,803
i*,«W
1 .981
3
2.28“
1
9
8«,-88
0,000
8 084
08-v
O
18»1
27,071
27 7
,0 1
«.932
3 ,^ 4
0 8)
30,588
2,1*0
1 ,H O
0O
10.8 3
0
5,175
4
7*022
47,022
. 455
ms
bH
tr
28.686
151,341
151.311
2,310
i 0,0is
10,014
1
,054
J5,0iO
15,008

%u,&m

*207,573 *2,180,854 13,190,851
•1.080 10fl0,»0i.rW
U

THE CHRONICLE.

938

Omom lumwAonwato A l A
T I-L

IN 1895.—la our

N aw Yo r k .
Receipts

editorial columns thU weok will be found an article under the
above caption.
K x p o h t s o r UOTTON GOODS FROM liR B A t B B 1TM N ,

-B e lo w

i of cotton yarn. goods, &c.. from Great
liri a n for the month of O c t o b e r and s i n c e January_1 in
igog «,<! js . , m compiled by us from the British Board
n
It will he noticed that we have reduced
the movement all to pounds.
___________ __
emitted.
1893.

1894.

1805.

1891. ! 1805.

Yd*.

tm .
Lb*

lotoX of AU.

C loth .

YamAThrtad.

Yd*.

Lb*.

Lb*.

U>*.

1894.

Lb*.

Lb*,

106,930
97,4871 107,992
103.443 109,901

January • ■
•
F e b r u a r y ...
M »r*b . . . . . .

»,0 3 9 10,931
91,507, 80,830
*1 310 80.70V

403,104 401.0511 87,4911 80,999
400,0071 406,91ij 763901 87.748
415,023 473.02V 78.008; 89.195

112,548

ffo C U tq u a r

7I.48& 00,890 L880.88* 1.401.481 ’811.981 263.030

813,473

324,828

100.185
100,7411
87,177;

A p M .................
24.042 SlO^l* 403.038 419,17*1 70,143 78,941
M a y . , ........... 85,18' 19,053 399.493; 407,95' 76,6051 70,828
j on#, ............. 19.740! 20.Ot* ' 333,008 403,788 , 07,437 76,042

09,757
98,483
98,090

T o t. 83 q u ar. 08.9l»| 60,619 1,157,609 1,280.016 210,185 231,811 888.108
S1.86*j 22.891 470.407 459,827 00,240 80,495' 112,098
23,042 80,842 432.087 427,829 81,885 80,477, 104,877
32.00:1 19,887 411,470 425,840 78,499 80.197 100,602

292,330

60,99:1 63.020 1,323,030 1,313,002 250,074 347.160; 317,507
7sj
21.878' 24,073 442.847 486,509 83,B 21,444; 108,760

310,789
115,517

.j 1
,034
. I 10,800

1.071
17,801

109,386
101.319
100,084

J u ly .........
A u g u s t...........
S e p te m b e r ..
T ot, 3d q u ar
O ctober. ..

S to c k in g s a n d s o c k s ...................................................
8 u n d ry a r tic le s ........................... .........................

. 1,048,737 1,062.834

T o ta l e x p o rta o f ootfcon m a n u f a c tu r e s .

The foregoing showB that there has been exported from the
United Kingdom during the ten months 1,048,727,000 lbB.
of manufactured cot ton. "against 1,082,334,000 lbs. last year, or
a decrease of 13,607.000 lb3,
A further matter of interest is the destination of these
exports, and we have therefore prepared the following
statements, showing the amounts taken by the principal
countries during October and since January 1 in each of the
last three years:
» IP O RTS OF PIECE GOODS AND YARNS TO PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES IN
OCTOBER, AND PROM JANUARY 1 TO OCTOBER 3 1 ,

[V o l. L X I.
B 08T O N .

P h i l a d e l p h ’a

T hi*
S in e e
w ee k . S e p t. l .

S in ce
Thi*
w e e k . S ep t. 1 .

T h i*
S ince
w e e k . S ep t. 1 .

N. O rle a n s...
T e x a s _ __
_
S a v a n n ah
M o b ile ___
F lo r id a - ........
8o. C a ro lin a
No. C aro lin a
V i r g in i a . . ..
N o rth , p o rts
T e n n ., & c...
F o r e ig n ......

9,2 M
7.249
11,502

105,420
71,80?
85,707

879
3,315
200
1,320

2.721
28.452
0,401
11,897

T o t a l......

33,530

1,170
15

L ast y e a r .... 45,800

B a l t im o r e .
T h is
w ee k .

Since
S ept. i .

......
5,403
......

41,541

...........
54

........
500

1,588

11 ,22$

..............
............
..............
18,546
54,927
28,220
0,603

100
849
3,235

......

389
1,406
14,502

8,7C0

23,823
..........
7,403

7,880
3,037

2,000
4.399
G,S4fl
220

321,647

17,308

152,840

1,738

17,945

5,807

45,449

371.421 23,226

157,122

5,470

33,248

13,703

91,899’

1,547

S h i p p i n g N e w s .— T h e e x p o r t s o f c o t t o n f r o m t h e U n i t e d .
S t a t e s t h e p a s t w e e k , a s p e r latest m ail r e t u r n s , h a v e r e a c h e d
1 4 3 ,9 0 2 b a le s . S o f a r a s t h e S o u t h e r n p o r t s a r e c o n c e r n e d th e s e a r e t h e s a m e e x p o r t s r e p o r t e d b y t e l e g r a p h a n d p u b li s h e d in
t h e C h r o n i c l e l a s t F r i d a y . W i t h r e g a r d t o N e w Y o -rk w e in c l u d e t h e m a n if e s t s o f a l l v e s s e ls c le a r e d u p t o T h u r s d a y .
Total bales;.

N ew Y o r k — L iv erp o o l, p e r ste a m e r B ovlo, 3 ,7 7 2 _ Cuflo,
To
_
2,8 4 5 u p lan d an d 300 S ea I s la n d ............ ..........................................
To H u ll, p er stea m er G alileo , 5 2 9 .........................................................
To H av re, p er ste a m e r L a G ascogne, 7 6 2 u p la n d a n d 99 Sea
Isla n d
........................................................................................................
To B rem en , p e r stea m ers H a v el, 2 0 0 _ W erra , 1 00 .................
_
To H am b urg, p er ste a m e r P a tr la , 7 5 0 ............. .............................
To A n tw erp , p e r stea m er F rie sla n d , 1 0 0 ..........................................
To G enoa, p er stea m ers F u ld a , 298 .. P o n tiao , 1 0 0 .................
To N aples, p er ste a m e r P o n tia c . 2 5 0 ....................... .......................
Ne w Or l e a n s —To L iv erp o o l, per stea m ers In v en to r, 3 ,2 0 9 ..
J a m a ic a n . 6 ,6 6 0 __ M arin o, 6 ,8 9 2 ....... ..................... ....................
To M an ch ester, p e r ste a m e r W ooler, 3 ,9 0 0 ...................................
To H a v re, p er ste a m e rs B en rid ge, 8 ,9 8 1 ___N ia g ara , 3 ,5 5 8 .
To B rem en , p e r steam ers A ld g ate , 8,8 6 3 ...A m a n a . 7 ,4 4 7 ..
To H am b urg, p e r ste-nners O burnum , 905 ...G a lic ia , 2 ,6 2 6
To G enoa, p er ste a m e r S ir G arnet W o lseley, 7 72 .......................
Ga lv esto n — Liverpo ol, p e r ste a m e rs B eu cro y, 6 ,5 1 1 __ *
To
G overnor, 6 ,6 2 3 .. .. S t . Jero m e, 5 ,5 5 8 ...........................................„
To H av re; p e r ste a m e r B len heim , 4 ,6 9 8 ............................. ............
To H am b u rg , p e r stea m er P a rk la n d s, 615 ........................... . . . .
T exas Cit y —T o L iv erp o o l, p e r ste a m e r 8 t Je ro m e , 1 ,5 0 0 _ ?.
_
M o bile —To V era Cruz, per stea m er R a v e n s la le , 9 9 3 .....................
P ensacola — Liverpool, p e r stea m er C o llin gh am , 3 ,2 0 0 ..........
To
S avannah —To B rem en, p e r stea m er C ape Com orin, 5 ,2 0 1 ___
To H am b urg, p e r stea m er Cape Com orin, 6 0 0 ....................... . . .

6 ,4 1 7 ’
529
861
300

750
100

393
2501 6 ,7 6 1
3,9 0 0
1 2,539
16,3103 ,5 4 1
772.
1 8 ,6 9 2
4 ,6 9 8 625

1 ,5 0 0

<193

3 200
5 ’201
’6 0 0

To Genoa, p er ste a m e r G reatham , 2 .7 0 0 ...................

2 ,7 0 0

B r u n s w ic k — To L lv erp o -I, p er ste a m e r Iu islio w e n lie a d , 4 ,7 2 9

October.

Piect Good*—Yards.
(000a omitted.)

1895.

1894.

Jan. 1 to Ocl. 31.

1863.

1895.

1894.

1893.

East In d ie s ................................... 177,432 2 12,999 215,214 1,097,958 2,122,534 1,670,039

T u r k e y , E g y p t a n d A frlo a ... 70.8M8 8 <,058 02,222
C h in a a n d J a p a n .......................... 66,417 27,593 33,862
E u ro p e (e x c e p t T u r k e y ) ......... 22,790 1O.0K0 25,017
59.014 55,605 36,452
N orth A m e ric a ........................... 28,090 30,470 23,826
All o th e r c o u n tr ie s .................... 28,700 20.148 20,015

071.892
439,925
233,519
445,729
229,222
288,150

0-15,005
407,552
231,802
544,340
27L,S80
305,909

527,182
367,540
219,065
510,900
228,388
247,865

T o ta l j a r d s ............................. 442.847 485,509 423,208 4,204,301 4,430,971 3,800.985
£4,099 £4,368 £ 4,0-4 £38.787
F a m s —Lb*.
(009s omitted.)
H o lla n d .. .......................................
2,028 9,220
30,619
29,644
4,372 4,405
29,721
23,302
Oth. E u ro p e (e x c e p t T u rk e y ) 5,041 ■1,445 3,200 4L581
34,334
30,600
3,013 4,909
35,240
31,913
C h in a a n d J a p a n ..........................
3,075 1,009 2,073
20,770
21,876
22,851
2,153 2,493
25,769
21,935
1,502
934
14,240
11,113
8,867
T o ta l lb s .................................... 22,684 22,520 19,548 213,173 195,008 109,208
T o ta l v a l u e . . . ........................
£860
£839
£845
£7,730
£7,753
£7,442

u p la n d and 7 7 5 S ea I s la n d ................................................
To B rem en , p er ste a m e r S yd en h am , 4 ,1 0 0 ................
P ort B o yal To L iv erp o o l, p e r stea m er St. G eorge, 9 ,6 1 0 .........
To B rem en , p er stea m er E m p ire, 4 ,8 9 9 ................................
.................
Wilmington —T o G hent, p e r steam er t ita n ic , 4 ,2 7 5
BOSTON—To L iv erp o o l per ste a m e rs C olum bian, 2 ,2 0 1 _ Corin'_
th la , 2 ,1 5 7 — P h ila d e lp h ia n , 1 ,7 8 1 _ S ach em , 1,492
_
To Y arm o uth , p e r ste a m e r B oston, 10 0 ........... . _____ '
m
B a ltim o re -T o L iv e r p o o l, p e r ste a m e r Sed gem o re, 3,44,8 ...........
To R o tterd am , p er stea m er U rblno, 2 9 9 .......................
'
T o t a l.

5,5034 ,1 0 0
9 ,6 1 0 -

„ ,8 9 9
4u

4 ’ 275 .

’

7 631

'lOO -

3 448
’ 299 -

.............................. 1 4 3 ,9 0 2 .

The particulars of these shipments, arranged in our usual
form, are as follows.

Mull d
B re m e n ,
L iv e r - M and Clamk
T „
.
T ’0 c 'i e s izr- H a v re, b u r g .
,1New Y o rk . 6,417 529
861 1,0 6 0
N. O rlean s. 1 6,7 61 3 .9 0 0 1 2,539 1 9,851
(G alveston.. 1 8,692
4,698
623
T e x a s C ity 1,500
M o b ile ........................
P e n s a c o la . 3 ,2 0 0
T h e E x p o r t s o p C o tto n from New York this week show a S a v a n n a !!..
5,8 0 1
B run sw ick
4 ,1 0 0
decrease compared with last week, the total reaching 9,605 P o rt R o y a l 5,503
9,6 1 0
4 ,8 9 9
bales, against 23,459 bales last week, Below we give our W ilm in gt’n
..........
Boston........ 7 ,6 3 1
usual table, showing the exports o f cotton from New York, B altim o re.. 3,448
------

Antwerp,

Yar-

G hen t
m o u th d
dt H ot- S o u th V era
te r d a m .E u r o p e . Oru,z. T ota l.
100
6 t8
9 HOT.
772 ............ 53 8 23
2 4 ,0 1 5
1 .0 0 0 9 93
993
3 ,2 0 0
...... .... 5 ,1 0 0
1 0,9 01
.................
9,603-.
...........................
14,509.
4 ,2 7 5 ...........
4 .2 7 5
too 7 ,7 3 1
299
3 ,7 4 7

and the direction, for each of the last four weeks; also the
T o t a l . . . . 7 2 ,7 6 2 4 ,4 2 9 1 8,098 3 6,3 26 4 ,6 7 4 6,520 1,0 9 3 1 4 3 .90 2
total exports and direction since Sept. 1, 1895, and in the la t
Below we add the clearances this week of vessels carrying
column the total for the same period of the previous year.
cotton from United States ports, bringing our data down to
the latest dates.
■ X P O B T B I-I C O T T O N ' ( B A L K S ) F R O M N E W Y O R K S IN C E 8 B P T . 1 , 1 8 9 5 .
Week Ending—
Exported to—

Nov.

L iv e rp o o l.....................
O ther B ritish porta .

!•
2,313
1,359

T ot. to Gt . B r it ’n . 3,672
H a v re ___ _____
O ther F rench p o rts..

Nov. | Nov. i Nov.
8.
15. ’ 22.

1,822
3,2 6 6

9,947
1,644

1,348

T otal F r e n c h ___

1,212

1,349

B r e m e n ..........................
Ham burg'..............
O ther p o rts..................

5,378
500
3,763

66h! 6,514
M BO .......... I
459 3 ,2 6 4

T ot . to No .E urope
8 p ain . I ta ly , «!fce_ _
_
A ll o th er ...............
T otal S p a i n , &q . .

T h e F o l l o w in g

600

64,931
13,040

75,533
35,129

6,946
1

1 ,2 1 2

600

Same
period
previous
year.

6,417
529

5,188 11,591
1

Total
since
Sept. 1.

77,971

110,662

861

8,004

9,904

861
I

8,C04

9,904

300
750
100

21,505
5,808
1 4,067

15,178
10,738
22,672

9,841

2 ,2 6 9 1 9,878

1,150

4 1,380

48,588

2,8 0 0

1,400^ 1,390

648

11,931
499

22,931
334

2.800

1,400| 1,3 9 0

648

12,430;

23,265

are the

G r o ss

r e c e ip t s o p

C o tt o n a*-

New York. Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore fo r the pal
week, and since September 1 , 1 8 9 5 ,
"

Oalveston - T o L lv erp o o l-N o v . 1 6 - S t e a m e r B ish o p sg a te, 4 ,7 1 4 ........
4 34519 Steam 6 r F ra n eiso a, 6 ,3 6 9 ....N o v . 2 0 —S te a m e r Y o la g e ,
Tf c c o ^ S Y 6 5 U 8t6am6r Zamp9’ 6'9 4 0 - — Nov . 1 9 —steam er
Cit y - To L iv erp o o l—Nov. 1 6 —S te a m e r B iskoD sgate 1 600

Ne w Os l e a n s —T o L iv erp o o l—Nov. 1 6 —S tea m ers D an ie l, 5*650* V e sta

3N6 h - 8 t“
i
t S 8 « Z M 7 2 S2 r
l
“ S a u ta n d eriu o , 6 ,2 2 1 ........ Nov. 1 9 D u n k irk —Nov. 21 S tea m er A u stra lia , 5 , 1 4 7 .
S ? T>StmienU Nolv 21 U s te a m e r W en nin gto n, 7 ,7 0 0.
5 ? v a l, Nov,„ 2 “ S te a m e r W ilinw dene, 6 ,025.
S

' N?y- 15—Steamer Juan Forgas, 3,100

Mo bile

L lv e ^ o o l- ^

4 521

SAVAS n T l '
1 8 - 9 t6 am er “
- ^ r , 5 ,9 1 1 upTo B rem en—Nov. 1 6 - S t e a m e r D orothea R iokm ers 10 365
° H A R ^ ton- T o Liverp^ool-N ov. 1 6 - S t e a m e r St. N in ian , 5 ,3 3 8 u p la n d
WiLMiNeKTON^To B?em en —
^ e f m ir E as try7 9 582
B° 9 i^
^
^
n
^
. i5 - s te a m e rc ^
^
“ ^ov. i8 -

BA 1±o.H .avie -jnov^ 11—Steamer Massaoequa, Q ueensm ore, 2 ,0 3 1 .
“
e S . T r l f ? j - 4 3 - S t e .,m e r 10 j .
To B rem en Nov. 20 —S tea m er R o lan d , 1,9 ,o
T c A n tw o -N u y . 15—
Steam©'- Storm K ins; 400

p" “ 5 K ‘ 7 A V i b ’ I K i r ^
To A n tw erp —Nov. 1 5 —S team er N ederlan d, 3 00 .

Cotton freights the past week have been as follows.

.......

THE CHRONICLE.

November 23, 1895.]

Wetlnes. Thurs.

Satur.

Mon.

Tuts.

Hi

33 j

hi

Hi

! S3

so t

% S 3 0t
....
25t

....
1*9301
....
251

%a>30i
....
251
....
%

....
%®30l
....
251

ilT e r p o o l............ d.
Do
........... a
H a v r e .................... d
D u n k ir k ...............c

25t
Do .................. c
H a m b u rg ...............e

>
4

%

%

%

ft-i.
333
___
1*9301
....
25 f

939

export business stimulated a demand from “ shorts” to cover
contracts, and prices advanced. The spot market was fairly
active, shippers having been the buyers. The sales included
No. 1 Northern at
15 16c. over December f. o. b. afloat,
according to time of delivery; N. Y . inspection do. at l % @
l % c . over December f. o. b. afloat, and No. 1 hard spring at
SJgC. over December f. o. b. afloat.
OULT CLOSING PRICES OP NO. 2 HED WINTER WHEAT.

%

Sal.
Mon. Tues.
Wed. Thurs
Fri .
613t
645g
64^
G4%
641 q
04%
65
65d!
65%
6558
65%
A m sterd am ........ e. 27% -30t 27*3-30 27i*-30 27% -30t 27LJ-30! 27Lj*30t
6 5 is
67%
....
....
67 A
67
6 6 78
R e v a l, v. H atu b <t. “ it s
^32
7 ia
7aa
7a :
7S3
67St
6 7i*
67 Sg
66%
67®3
66%
Do v. H u ll...rf. ■W-Shts
___
67^t
67%
67%
J u n e d e liv e r y .
S1S
310
316
31S
31S
673s
___0. 6 7 78
6 7 7s
6 7 7s
67%
-A .
...
....
....
B a r c e lo n a ............ d.
....
....
G e n o a ........... . a .
There has been a quiet market for Indian corn futures and
!i84®532 944 ®S32 984®5S3 9€4 2 533
T r ie s te , O ctober.d.
5SV
s i 12Sl l 84 211S8U «4 211J8U * 21158U t4 2112SU 64 prices have shown some irregularity. The near-by deliveries
A n tw erp , Oot...<f. 13I25-7i>
have made fractional gains, owing to large clearances from
4 7S.
7«4
7« .
7« l
Te4
G h en t, v . A nt W p.d
the seaboard and a small movement from the interior, while
S-&A4
H,
®
"-4
9*4
Hi
the distant months have gradually weakened. In the spot mar­
t Genes nee p e r 100 lb a.

ket shippers have been limited buyers and prices have ad­
vanced slightly. The sales yesterday included No. 2 mixed
at 33c. f. o. b. afloat and No. 2 white at 33c. f. o. b. afloat.
.V r 22, To-day the market was easier in response to weaker advices
o
from the West. Toe soot market waS quiet. The sales in­
7 9 .0 0 0 cluded No. 2 mixed at 871*0. delivered and37b£@375s .f. o. b.
'c
3 ,3 0 0 afloat for early delivery.
2,’ 00

L iverpool.—By cable from Liverpool we have the following
statement of the week’s sales, stocks, &e., at that port.
.Vor. 1 : Xon. 3
S ale* of t h e w e e k ............ bale*
Of w h ich ex p o rte r* t o o k ...
Of w hloh sp e c u la to r* t o o k ..
S a ie e A m e ric a n ..............................
A c tu a l e x p o r t .......................... . . .
F o rw a rd e d .........................................
T o ta l sto c k —E stim a te d ........ ..
Of whloh A m erican —E atin-'d
T o ta l Im port o f th e w e e k ____
Of w hloh A m e r ic a n ___ ____i
A m ount a flo at.............. ............. ..
Of w h ic h A m e r ic a n .................

71.0 00 :
1,400,
4,1 0 0

0 0 ,0 0 0

.V'ir. 13
84.000

5.1 0 0
2 ,900:
3,2 0 0
5,4 0 0
51,0001
75,0 00 ;
7 3.0 00
s.0001
5,0 0 0
4,000!
8,000
74,.....
0 4 ,0 0 0
6 3,000
7 5 .0 0 0
9 9 1 ,0 0 0 , 9 1 2 .00 0 933,0011 9 1 3 .00 0
7 8 9 ,0 0 0 ’ 7 9 2 .0 0 0 7 9 ,01)0 8 1 0 .00 0
6 «,0 0 o 101 .00 0 ■ 99,000!
9 0 .0 0 0
8 t.O O 7 2.000
C
.‘>0.000
7 0 .0 0 0
u tx .o o o 1 7 i,0 t 0 189,000, 200.000
14 5 , 000 : 105,000: 100,000! 1 90 ,00 0

e Ji.ooo;

Th*< tone o f the Liverpool market for spot lo a d futures each
day o f the week ending Nov. JJ and the daily closing prices
o f Spot cotton, have le-.-n as follows.
Spot.

Saturday Monday. Tuesday. WstPday ra arw C y .

M a rk e t, {
1 :45 p. N.J

Firm.

M jrtllp J ’d*.

41*3*
1 4,0 00
1,5 0 0

S a te is ......... ...
Sp ec, Me ip .

K
nalm
r.

4 H ,,
12,000
1,000

** *,*
1 2,0 00
1,0 0 0

Good

Friday.

1 2 ,0 0 0
l f*K >
H

ISuier.

IIudan'E .

41^3

demand

4»u
1 2,0 00
1,000

12,000
1*500

fulurri.

M a rk e t, { itSSiH* *
-s-K-t m -

1 :4 5 p. M j
L
M a rk e t, j

4. T.M. s

el la#.

S tM d f.

m U m * m U n i y *1 «Rm 4f m
m d
s
.
m
i
txr m
i
1-44 #4Z-M m
4,
%*k d#.
J1-84 *kd- 2-«4 IM
rm .
nom
cf.Snoi
*%nm
r*ne#
n ae # .

Quiet m
ar

lU t d i

Vmrj

at «* 4 r

.S S

Steady.

The price* o f futures at Liverpool for each day are given
below. PriceH are on the buria o f Uplands, Law Middling
clause, unless otherwise aut'ed.
§^

The pries* are gle*n in pent

4 > 4 61-1.. rind Z 0 1 meantf & 1-4* Id.
»L
t
M&f. 1 1 it*
1
Mar. 22.

»n $u r.
IM
» . H.

4
*\H.

a n d tilth s.

H f•
«u T up#,
1M
4 1:45 4
i* at. t\ Mi I*. S 1. M.
.
I. *

T h u s: l i

\% .
1 '45
t* 4 .
4

d. run re. Frl,
4 1:45 4 ; . ■ ;
r, M r. s*. I*. w 1. H 1.
.
. * . *

d.
d.
ft.
ft
4.
4.
4. d. d. 4
•t.
,r
X&Tetnf)i?r 4 2 > 4 25 4 20 4tH 4 2 4 4 22 t 22 ( 2 4 1 24 4 27 4 31 4 30
M
Kor.-litre ... 4 21 4 2 4 4 ‘2 427 4 24 4 21 4 21 4 24 4 24 4 20 4 30 4 29
__ 4 10 4 24 4 2H 4 27 4 23 4 21 4 21 4 23 4 23 4 20 129 4 28
Jill.-fflb.. 4 20 4 24 4 ** l * 7 4 23 4 21 4 21 123 • 23 4 20 4 29 i
24 >
4
Feb. ilcli... 4 21 425
- 4 24 4 21 4 21 4 24 4 24 4 20 4 30 4 29
Meb. AnrtL 4 22 4 20 4 20 4 2« 4 24 4 22 422 4 24 4 24 4 27 4 30 4 29
AprtEJtaj. 4 22 1 27 4 30 4 20 ■ 2 4 23 . 23 42it 4 25 4 28 4 311 30
.
i -'*
M
Jky-Jan«*.,. 4 24. 12m 4 32 4 31 4 20 1 2 44 214 20 4 27 420 4 33 4 31
JuvtShJ oljr, 4 20 4 20 4m 4 32 • 2? 4 2.7 4 23 4 23 4 2M4 30 4 34 4 3
4
*2
*1
4
July Am? • . 4 2 4 30 4 1 4 1 33 4 2# 4 M 1 2 4 20 • 20 4 31 4 3 433
l
*>
A ii& S n p t , . 4 M 4 20 1 33 4 32 4 23 V i? i M 4 28 4 28 4 30 4 34 4 33
...

B R E A D S T U F F S .
Fkidat , November 22, 1895.
For wheat flour there has been an exceedingly slow and
uninteresting market Bayers have been very indifferent,
and with free offering* prices for spring patents have
declined about 10c, per bbl. The low grades of winter-wheat
flour have also (wen offered more freely and prices have
been lowered ah- it 5 to 10c. j»-r bid. A moderately active
but!nets h»s been imneactrd in ry<- flour at steady prices.
Buckwheat ti> >ir was easier torlier in tha wei k, but at the
close the more favorable weather caused a steadier feeling.
Corn meal lias sold slowly ami price- have further declined.
To day the market for wheat flour was dull and etay.
Sp* nutation in the market for wheat futures has bpen ex­
tremely *low and pric*.H fluctuatid within the narrowest lim­
its in the absence of new or interesting features until yester­
day, when doll and depressed foreign advices, coupled with a
free movement of the crop at the Northwest and favorable
conditions for the growing winter wheat crop, prompted
liquidation by tired “ longs" and prices declined,, In
the epot market a limited amount of business has been
transacted with shippers, but at easier prices. The rates yes
terday included No I hatd spring atSMgO. over December
f, o. b. afloat; No. 1 Northern at l;%c. over D-ceml» r f. o. b.
afloa-; No 2 do. at December price f. o. b. afloat, and choice
No. 2 red winter at about 4c. over D ceoiher f. o. b. afloat.
T o-d iy the market was weaker during early ’Change in re­
sponse to easier foreign advices, but later reports of aa active

D AILY CLOSING P B I0B 8 OP NO. 2 M IXED OOEN.

Sat.

.0.
N ovem ber d e liv e r y .........o.
D ecem ber d e liv e r y ......... 0.
o.
J a n u a r y d e liv e r y ............. o.
M ay d e liv e r y ...............
e.

Mon.

36
3538
35%
35»8

Tues.

3 o 78
35%
35%
35%

35 7s
35%
35*8
35%

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri,

36%
35%

357,
3 1 7g

35%

36
35%
35%
35%

35^8

Oats for future delivery have received very little attention,
and in the absence of sustaining features prices have grad­
ually declined. In the spot market the amount of business
transacted has been s m a ll and p r ic e s have been easier. The
sales yesterday included No. 2 mixed at 23c. in elevator and
No. 2 white at 2 tl^ @ 2 L s .%in elevator. To-day the market
was dull but steady. The spot market was quiet aud a trifle
weaker. The sales included No. 2 mixed "at 22r '@33c. in
l
q
elevator. No. 2 white was quoted at 2-1l £o. asked.
DAILY CLOSING PRICKS OF NO. 2 NIXED OAT*.
Sat.

Mon.

December delivery.......c . 23%
J a n u a r y d e liv e r y .............i ..............
.c
F e b ru a ry d e liv e r y ___ A0. . . . .
.0. 25%
M ay d e liv e r y . . .

23%
23%
....
25%

Tues.

Wed.

23%
2 3 ’9

21%
23%
-. . .
25%

25%

Thurs.

23%
2 3 3h
23%
35%

Fri.

23
21=8
23%
23*8

The following are closing quotations ;
FLOCK.

F lu e ......................V b b !.* 2 15® 2 40 P a te n t, w in t e r ............ $ 3 5 0 0 * 3 75
Su p erfin e___________ 2 15 v
«5 O ily m ill* e x t r a s . . . . .
3 D
O
E x tra, No. 2 ............... 2 5<i a 2 85 R ye flour, * u p e rfln e .. 2 5 0 * 2 9 0
E x tra . No. 1 ..................... 2 UO* 3 10 B u ck w h e at flour . . . . 1 3 0 » 1 3 5
C lea r* .............. .............. . 2 75 a 3 23 Corn m e a l—
S t r a ig h t* ........................ 3 20 A 3 45
Western, .to___ ... 2 *5 * 2 40
P aten t, s p r in g ........... 3 40 ■ 3 0 0
r ___ . . 4
.......... d y w in e .. .........
B r a n ..........................
245
I W heat flour In a aak * se ll* a t p rice* below th o se for b a r r e ls . |
G RAIN.

• C orn, p e r b u sh —
o,
•" est’ ll m • i x‘ e d . . . 35 O
W
07 w
No. 2 m ix e d ............ 3 0 % *
« l 3 70
>
Western yellow.. 8? *
White................. 0 * ■» 07
W estern W h ite ___ 37
d a te —M ixed, p er bn. 22 q® 25
R ye23 * 27
W h ite.......................
W estern , p e r bu sh . . . . . 9
No. 2 m ix e d ............ 22% a 23*4
S ta te an d J e r s e y . . ___9
No. 2 w h ite ............... 24 % » 3 5 % B a r le y —W e ste rn .. . . 4 3 9
S ta te 2 -ro w ed .........
S ta te (i-ro w ed . . . . .
■ •
W h e a tS p rin g , p e r b n » h ..
R ed w in ter No. 2 ..
R ed w in t e r .. . . . . .

e.

01

c.

• 074

00 9

0.
39
37-8
40
10

47

....

The movement of breadstuff* to market aa indicated in tho
statements below is furnished to us by the Statistician of the
New York Produce Exchange. We first give the receipts at
Western lake and river ports, arranged so as to present the
comparative movement for the week ending Nov. 10, 1895,
and since August 1, for each of the last three years:
Receipt* a —
.1

t’hlcairo.. . . .,
M ilwaukee..
Duluth . . . . . .
MinnenpolU.
Toleffo.......
Cleveland
St. LouIj* ,....
Peoria...
Kansas Oily *
Tot.wk.’»5(
Same
Same wfc.’f'S.
Since Auy. 1.

J*\/wr.
Whtat.
Com.
OaU.
Barley.
By*.
lb, 9u*h.32 lt> BujhAHIb, J?u,60 lb»
SM,.1»<K5. j BiuVW 1*.
a
72.783 1,437,787 1,005,591 1,911,450
47,510
7*5,172
m.K'.oo
100 600
17,550
247,000
404,760
40,439
•50.010 3,S«3.«98
21,34 4
183.000
28.743
2.413.00)
*2.84'i
198.100
214.7* 0
<5.2X1
1,800
I.8S0
1.90O
2,050
27 23D
82,2 «
8S7
t»2.X3»
n .m
2> six
177,100
21.600
262,301
109,715
100.500
10,100
77,700
2,100
4,060
IA.H00
482,300
a ; 8.100
157,097
3,00?
.......
******
CS2,030 7,055,801 1,978.091 2.803,587 1.553,510 130,094
60 393
440,668 4,233.043 1.370,580 1,308,070 1,116,20}
288.0 11 5.50S.353 2,074,33 2 2.128.533 1,157,730
88 355

MtfH...........
1.SW
3............

M 53J35 04074P17 30.779.1-81 54,427,353 H3.70l.409 1,509,349
6 58rt,5*5fi 83.380,0 *4. ji.n r ,:.: * 35,035,753 17,101,000 012 L O
O
H
5.335.155 81.01 *.2151 53.O S 097i 4 •
lf> U,603,9011 1.43 *.207

The receipts of flour and grain at the seaboard ports for the
week ended Nov, 16, 1895, follow:
H
ece.ipt* at —

Flour,
bbU
.

Wheat,
hush.

Com,
bush.

Barley

But.
bush.

N York.......... .. IS«.133 1,554
ew
.335 714,050
185
-5 .6 0
Boston ......
5 4
,i>
20.1,002 303,141 SlfjS?
672
Montreal.......... .. 28,.m 121.767 113,5 '0
2. > 0
.8
25 41
1 .1 7 143.054 130 043
3 -5
01 0
,0 0
Philadelphia.....
H oiore.........
aiti
28.667 450 4S
O 40.174
1,271 22.379
.'• 8 3.*,0»9
.ID
E
tichuiorul .......
5 21
4
0 000
50
New Orleans.....
10,800 334.501
83.075 ........
Total week. .. .. 487.007 1,074,200 2,053.«18 1,807.639 205 0
22,001
.7 1
W
eek* 1891....... .. 430.880 l,5ti2.58l 0-41 4 »iJ,0«9 20 1 2
,3 8
.7 5
3,481
The total receipts at ports named in last table from Jan. 1
to Nov. 16 compare as follows for four yeats:

[V L I.
ou X

THE CHRONICLE.

94U
.‘-297,047
' .b
,'A
,d
k
*60.771
.24*.3*0

1*1 g ra te

1892.
1898.
17,390,069
17.2*7.857
114.107 538
80.013,4^7
t»l,50a 536
49.088.603
62.010,407
*“.577,2i4
4 373,009
3,"« 1.426 .
3,7*0,272
1,937 503
255.82" 821
j
189,070,113

18,106.404
it*A
ind
(|
|H
429.780
137.210.2*8

from the several seaboard ports for the wees
, 1895, are shown in the annexed statement:

e expo

IT?wat.

uau
bush.

F lo u r,

Corn

bbljt.
S ii.203

bush.

it f j o j

2 8 ’ .1 iO

Rye
bush

31.0 ‘8
8,055

31.11'
102

60 >,844

Peas
bush

8.042

*0,510
3.7

o i.o o i

81,395

2 •.U I
i

Tctta* w o d X ............ 8 *0.910
ami? t»;no 18J 7 » 7 , U 3

1.787.011
109,601

2 i t I8-*
434.818

ie m n a a l ....................

? 0 J '9

82.0 8
0.984

so,no
Thi destination of theee exports for the week and since
t e p t . . 181*5, is as l- low. We add the totals for the corresg periods of last year for comparison:
- Wheat.-

Week

H,

Week
No v, 10.

-C o rn . ---------Week Since Sepl.
Nov. 16. 1, 1895.
6 ukA,
bush.

i 1S8.817
11,3-1

. 42.SH

1.729,529
160,8 *4
368.<H*8
281,883
79.510
6,9 8

57 6.452
232.1U
2.4 00

i. 1896.
6twK.
0.83 ,222
2,09i>,0^3
7,590

19,953

173,589

2.031.8 8
3.159.110

N ov.

836,919 9.102.000 1.780.011 14,998,7<J0
930.599
797,143 11.438,030
199.551

L 1895.
bbls.

9 9} >23
77 «.oal
8.478
12.146
40,050
0.492

W v af,
bum.
5.52 *,000
York....... ..
iad.000
Oo afloat.
Alb u i f . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Buffalo......................... 2.177.000
Oo
afloat.........
C hicoso................
27,905.000
Oo ?'iflo at...........................
M ilwaukee................... 032,000
do
aflo at...................... ..
D u lith ......................... ft,98o(ooo
l>o
aflo at...........................
ToltdO............................ 1,019,000
Do afloat............................
D etroit......................... 447,000
Oo afloat,...........................
Ojtwesto .................... ..
3» 0O
0
St. Load...................... 1,350.000
Do afloat.
'flnnatl..........
43.COO
Ho uoa..
508.000
Tor mto........ ...
71,000
M ontreal.................... .. . . . .
2*5,000
Philadelphia........ .
18 1,000
P o rta. ........................
94,000
In Ilonapolls............... 182,000
Kansas City................. 1,304.000
Baltimore.................... 488.000
Minn sa polls................. 15,071/XK)
Oa Mississippi River..................
Oa Lakes............... 2.394.000
On canal and r iv e r.., 1,162,000
T o tal Nov. 10.1895.60,320.000
T o tal Nov 9 1895.50.937,000
T o ta l Nov. 17, LS94.84,2"2.000
T o tal Nov 18. I893.7tl.754.000
T ot U Nov. 19.1892 09,530,000

T HE

DRY

Oom,
bush.

Oats.
bush.

Ryt,
bush.

fl £0,0)0
2 o. h*'0
16,000
237,000

2,0 <8,000
i L0 0
75.000
215.000

25,000
338.000

1,037,000

419.000

22*1000

Burly
bus .

?.0j0
*87 000
l,0*2.uu0
a-.noo
‘ 63,000
825,000

60,000

2?2,odo

129,000

7,000

32,000

) 2,000

530.000

14,000

19,000

41.000
9,000
21.000
27.000
2(53.000
434.000

50,000

107,000

Gl.Ono
24 >.000
591.000

2?,oob
ujfcooo
97.0*0

07 1,000
241,000

149.000
21fi,000

' 03',0^0

877,000
754,00c

4.370,000

5.972.000
6,239.000
9,110,000
4.6/1.000
7,921,000

1,287,000
1.100.000
505.000
595.000
1,235,000

4 017,000
3.810.000

2.705,000
7.320.000
12.235,000

4,000
8 >.000

GOODS

2 ,000

7 ,0 .0

4.000

144
13
3,925

4,2 2 5
2 ,8 « 4
4 8.7 71
3,7 2 9
1 8,762
8 ,6 9 0
1 5,629
2,4 0 4
1 0,325
5 6,1 18
6,5 0 8

850
807
29
51
127
1,153
102

T

IOr

50
16
7
140
284
252
387
26
1 >9
<
1,57 •
44

5 ,0 8 7
3 ,0 1 2
7 1 ,0 3 3
8 ,4 8 5
2 0,7 61
7 ,4 2 2
1 5 ,9 7 6
1 ,9 4 3
8 ,9 4 2
4 9 ,9 5 6
3 ,2 1 6

2,9 3 0

1 93 ,83 3
2 0 ,3 1 8

200 ,41 5
T o ta l....................................... 7,465
’ “ r o ia New E n g lan d m ill p o in ts d lreo t.

2,9 3 0

2 14 ,15 1

7,163
....

1895.
Stock of Print Oloths—
Nov. 16.
A t P ro v id en ce, 61 s q u a r e s .................... 9 2 ,0 0 0
At F a ll R iv er, 64 s q u a r e s .............. ....... 26,000
At F a ll R iv e r, odd s iz e s ......................... 5 7,0 00

189 4

135,000

3, 515,00a

3.947.000
2.812.000

TR AD E .

P «c e m

189 3

Nov. 17.

Noe. 18
212,000

4 6 .0 0 0
1 4.000 )

101,000 1

3 1 4 ,0 0 0

1 6 1 ,0 0 0

5 2 6 ,0 0 0

F oreign Dry Goods.—The market has been dull as a rule.
Holiday gi o is in fair request. For spring ODly moderate
orders bav*- come to hand. Dress goods, silks, riobons, linens,
and hosiery firm in price.
Im p o r ta tio n s a n d W a r e h o u s e W ith d r a w a ls o f D ry G o o d s

g
S
•329^8
5 2 kg l a
c
C£g
s
©.
©!
P .
a•
p ;
£j

a
PH

“to

H
og
a
CD g*
P1
B*

1 OJ±
V
o !af ; | v
irregular ^'tapestries' h S 4 ” b ^ * , S “ d 1S - i to
tO f*
~,z •P . a d , hot new pricts on ingrains are still withheld . 5 O>3
P

HMp ©

w V oob

if*-co to oo o
^J.O jO
O
o'co'lti cc'ik.

© CtU 35
t —5 O
7'O

O so

Mp p p to
I H © c oiVc iu
T
035 to
>
U
p p p ocptixX C
) O
-4 C Hfowb'w
O
1 3 ©>tOX 4- ©
05
I
OO C —cotox
5

S

PM re f© R

s s r *3;l s
?

The market for cottons for the current season has passed
through another dull week, both in staples and dress fa1
'lies.
Ssf
Tlie weather has been a decidedly restrictive influence hoth
here ami elsewhere, the temperature, until towards the close - I w
b !j oo »
co*»
coco MCCwfiOW
•focco OO CO c c cc ©
rulire to , high for a normal distribution bv either lubbers or < i U ©
3 /C
O
0 £ t - a O ' i c«
0»
retailors, and keeping business at first band; on q u it e a limited
scale The weakness m raw cotton has also had an unfavor­
•©to
p ip
able effect inclining buyers to pronounced conservatism wiih
C © O —OcOW
O•
00 C > C
5 0 -c*
©i<l
regai< to .he future and to contend for lover prices on imme­
1
Cno CCOCOt^^
►C O -• O
—O
t^CC IhC W*-Q»
0
diate supplies The tendency has been in tbeir favor on staple
cottons, for although prices of leading makes are generalIv
quite steady ilu re are more fr< qui nt instances of other sel­
$ l©
Oo
o
lers pioving easier to trade with, even though there does not
05 CA O 3
V0 *O r— t O
5
< (OC >*C 7 to ©too G OC5 X
1CC C(O
C
app' ar to be any material increase in available stocks The
©
_© 0 ©0 — •
» 5 40
©t 0 C tO'-CX X
5 O O i.
demand for spring fabrics in fancy cotton goods keeps up
©*
>0
Hi0 ppt I
0 ento
well, and prorpecis for the coming season are decidedly en­
p If0bJT oo y.j -J.O05 O I 0 b b l f- © —o C
5 - - O iO U Ir-1 -1 -J
couraging, The woolen and worsted goods department
5
t
O
o
'i C
‘ 1M M TC O
P_p CO X » t o 05 SIS
show a good demand for new heavy-weight overcoatings, hut
p p to C w
O
H « cof c
r. '£
r >
C*^V coh
sr quiet for the current season in hoth m-n’s-wear f a b r ic s
O—
- •X X to tf*
>
(Xif*
,
0 -1 —-oco
C
and dress goods. The jobbing trade has been dull outside of
a
a
specialties and holiday goods.
cuisine ot
M
.
I © tO4 4CX
I -< >
CX
W o olen Goods.—The demand for Clay worsteds in new
—to C
o- o; y» ^ t
o
o co to co ’0 1O
-■
—
*
0 to —£ ►
0
•)
a ^ -J f to —C
1O
,
cem7v
\ Z P r^
r°
g£°d ,at the d a n c e d p r i L rm
I -—,
s br> —
' ! , ™ '
T r2 aJ but few other lines of heavy1,<
'e
tfe. Vl
M
—
Ot 35
.^ h Minings opened. In overcoatings, however, the dis5
Ll t© at0 Mitx c; O to
_
.
(O
tXp
05 X p ooto oop
I . i samples tor next, fall is quite general in both Dlain
teb too ^ u o g .» bio to b ©t a>b
<1
o
^ io "law j> s s i^co
tfc* © 0 5
>
■i
v
l
P:„
n ,?,T Pr c
this
oo
f*h r Z « a v/e" aC!a n dK" 0 ir 6, y„ T1:,e_e g u la r Lr e sm declared s o n ’s week
0,-1 cox -JCOO 0 0
—V
j
ti.
n,
k,
8 ir r
f o
la s t se a
o —
to ,0 rw r rpnt
a-um last season's prices
XM
> tv £
-* ' •
chinchilins i r r l . d n r Vrn<1 r- ’1Kh gcod a- fu c b as f r 'ezes and
CiO m — to lx
p j D ip C p
jop pwtocw
V* X
J4» to b-iboo —
cent
cline
a h le %
SV h as-b een
3
O’ O ’
© '-O Miy-iooi
t
Ot rf!» no co
rf-H1 to OKI** C
O
i^ai HCCCb to
an d » u V i« m e D r y
^
^
heen
i-tness is

r ^

(Tee* Since Jan. 1.,

1 78 ,04 5
2 2 ,3 7 0

T o ta l.........................................
C hin a, v ia V a n c o u v e r* ,..

T o ta l stoolr (p ie c e s '..........................1 7 5 ,0 0 0

N e w Y oke , Friday , P. M „ November 23, 1895.

^R
Z

189 4 .

Since Jan. 1.

The tendency of the market in brown sheetings and drills
is ia favor o f buyers, and business has been reported this
week at a. decline from recent top prices in some quarters.
Most leading makes are, however, well enough sold ahead to
be steady. The demand for bleached goods is dull through­
out, and in these also there are some sellers easier to deal
with. Kid-finished cambrics are weak and fully l^c. lo ver
to sell than best prices recently quoted. Silesias, percalines
and other linings tend in favor of buvers. Wide sheet­
ings inactive in all makes but unchanged in price..
Cotton flannels and blankets dulb Denims dull and
irregu'ar; ticks quiet at previous prices, checks and stripes,
plaids, cheviots and cottonades inactive a 'd featureless.
Printed fabrics in satmes, tissues and special finishes sell well
for spring, as do shirting prints. Dark fancies and other
regular lines in quiet requt sk with prices firm. Ginghams,
,
ai d specialties in woven patterned fabrics for spring are in
good demand. Staple ginghams firm but hu-iness light.
Print ciotbs close with sellers of extras at S ^ r. after a week
of inactivity.

39,000

4.02 7.000

G reat B r it a in .............................
O ther E uro p ean ........................
C h in a ..............................................
I n d ia .................. .............................
A rab ia............................................
A trlo a ..............................................
W est I n d ie s................................
M exico..........................................
C en tral A m e ric a ......................
Booth A m e r ic a .......... ...............
O tner C o u n tries........................

1895.
Week

3 ft 4.07S
116.821
33.908

139,000

3,000

N ov. 18.

The value of the New York exports for the year has-

I T ,000

2 070
19 V)00
12,000
51.000
5.000
5) * 000
8.000

to

5,640.013' been $8,075,499 in 1895 against $10,162,633 in 1894.
145.810

281.000

20,000
20.000
10.000
4,000
240.UO0

New Y o r k

8.934,4711

The visible supply of grain, comprising the stocks in granary
at the principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard
ports, Nov. 16. 1895, was as follows:
2n stare at—

Business in woolen and worsted dress goods quiet at firm
prices.
Domestic C otton G oods. —The exoorts o f cotton goods
from this port for the week ending: November 18 were 7,465
packages, valued at t317,925, their destination being to the
ooints specified in the table below:

gi : b ; Q

O
b
X
X
t-4
b
O
©
I
X
C
M
if*

ju —ta —
c *•©’ ■ X
•’
MW—10-1
—© © « X
t >
to to © co
•
to © C —K
•O )
—X -^ © to
1 i
H*sJ 03 01 ©
•

5

*5
o ?8
a
w
Pfej
J
x •*.
C «S
O
p'©

) t
fx

1 | • © 1<X
5© W
>( p O - O —
1j " l b o b b

i

©•cox ©tx
0 a,5©t ^ CM*
50
tf* to —o

p —M —
b cob o b
© I )£ ■>-4
• -£

W r*O 3
M t5

M
"1—CM 0
5 tOX
5

C WC
O
p > t f- p p C 99
O

bbbbo

rf^C w o ©
O

tO o <| * 35
.n
O X X tO

01M —tfc*.
5
t
—

o j M H to h- C
*
O

O) I W p C O < l CO

bbbbb
COWm T

p c o p c o p

i b [ cobio bob
to
t o CO CO c o x
C '-JCQ CO
CM Q

5I

THE CHliONICLE.

N o V-MBER 23, 1895.]

I r /t t g

a a p

C

it y

D

^

a b t m e n t

,

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(Per inch space.)
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T w o M onth*
(8 tim e * !.. 18 00 I T w elve M o n th *(52 tim e * ).. 58 00
(The ab o ve term * lo r one m onth a n d u p w a rd a re (o r S ta n d in g c a rd * .

T h e p u r p o s e o f tb ls S t a le a n d C ity D e p a r t m e n t
te to furnish our subscribers with a weekly addition to and
continuation of the State and City Supplement. In other
words, with the new fact* we shall give, the amplifications
and correction* we shall publish, and the municipal laws we
■hall analyze in the “ State and City Department,” we expect
to bring down weekly the information contained in the
State and City S upplement to as near the current date as
possible. Hence every Subscriber will at all times possess a
complete and fresh cyclopedia of information respecting
Municipal Debts.

941

Bradford, Mass.—Bond Sale.—It is reported that on Nov.
18 this city sold 4 per cent bridge bonds amounti ig to,
§10.500 to the City Five C-nt Savings Bank, H tverhill, Mass,
at 101-39. Seven other bids were received as follows:
«X IM
^
Bid.
c . N. B a rn a rd A C o................................................................................................1 0 1 1 5 5

E H G ay & Co ..................................................................................................... 100 88

R oy era, N ew .nan A Tolrnan ...................................................................... 100 70
J . W. L o n gstreet A C o ...................................... .............................................. 1' 0 63
B rew ste r Oolil> A E stab ro o k ...................................... ..................................100-58
H a v e rh ill S iv ln g a B a n k .............................................................................. ...1 0 0 - 4 5
E. L D ay & Co ......................................................................................................100-279

Tne loan matures at the rate of §1,050 yearly, beginning
July 1, lt96.
B-nekline, Mass.—Bond Offering .—Bids will be received
until Nov. 29 for §40,000 of 10-year school bonds.
Brooklyn. N. ¥ .—Bond Offering. —Propisal* will b ’ re­
ceived uuiil December 2, 1895, by G -orgs \Y. Palmer, City
Comptr ller, for the purchase of bonds ot the City of Br j.k lyn as follows:
LOANS—
T ftrn Due. t LOANS—
T
WAoi Hue.
I'l. tT C Il 8M E B 'SI'S—
BS
VR
F-A C I SlitV S A jt.S M S
TB M
B -M S S r
3>jsF.AA.,$1.0i)ii.. Aug. 1,1910
Bonds—
1 O00 .A u g. 1 ,1 9 1 1 3>*s. F .A 4 ., § 2 1 ,0 0 0 .... 1903-1906
($ 3 ,0 0 0 d u e y e a r ly on A ug. L )
0 ,0 0 0 .... AU«. 1, 1913 3 * *. F. A A ., * 4 0 ,0 0 » . . . . 1 9 0 '-1 9 1 0
••
3 0 . 0 0 0 .. . i l l '4 -1 9 1 9
(stO .O oO itueyc ir ly on Au-r. 1.)
is a .0 0 0 due v e a t lr on A ug. I I
L ocal iMi-BOVKMaST B onds —
3 b s.E .A A :, .*0 ,0 0 0 __ A ug. 1. 1920 3** * I.OtJ.. $10 >,001 .Jan. 1,19X4
.
S chool B uilding B ond* —
3 'a s , J. * J .. $ 2 * 2 ,0 JO..J .iu . 1 ,1 9 3 8
•'

it. -oo— Aug. I, 1912

Piincipd and interest of the bonds will b: payable in gold
coin of the Uaic-d States, and the securities will be exempt
from all taxation except fo- S:ate purp is»s Payment of
purchase money is to be made D icember 3. 181 > at which
,
time the school building and local improvem -nt oonds will be
da ed. The sewer bonds will be dated August 1,1895. Pro­
posals must state the price otl-Trd anl tne descrip ion of
bonds dtsired.
Brooklyn, H I — Bonds Authorized. —W.ter-works bonds
to the amount of §4.000 have been voted.
Cambridge, Mas9.—Bond Sale.—On November 19, 1895. the
city of Cambridge sold $60,000 of 20-year budding 1jail bonds
and §60,000 of 20-year street construction b inds at 109*83 and
§52,000 of 3 )-year sewer loan bonda at 112-81. Thi securities
were all awarded to N. W. Harris & Co. They are dated
October 1, 1895. and interest at the rate of 4 per c-nt is pay­
able semi-annually. Fourteei other b.d* were received for
the loan as follows:
2 0 -W ar

3 0 -W a r

W ljiuin A S e ll'r u in g * r ................................................................ t o -07
B re w ste ', C -bb A- E stab ro o k ................................................ I09r>*
Bunion. U :»e h A C o ....................................................................109-375
R oberts A Co ............ ................................... .............................109 5 7
R. L. V »y A C o ........ .. ............................. ................................109-519
B lake Bros A C o............................................................... .........100-35
S p e n c er T ra sk A Co .................................................................1 09-33
B lm lget, M erritt A Co ...............................................................101-19
E. H KoUmo* A 8 « a . ................... ..................................... 10'> O
B
j 8 to rr« A S m ith . New Y ork .....................................................106-80
n. M. H u m . New Y o r k ..............................
M s-7 7
E G S b in w o o il A O n ............................................ .................103 77
S tre e t. W yke* A Co........................... ..................... ................. 108-24
J . V . L o ngstreet A G o ..................................................... ...1 0 6 07
V

lla-S T O

Bondi.

Bvtula.

1 12 64
B o n d P r o p o s a l s a n d N e g o t ia t i o n s .—We have k 112-557
seived through the week the following notice* of b .nde
H 2 - .5
112-270
recently negotiated and bonds offered and to be offeree for
1 1 1 -S i
112-38
■ale,
IU -8 9
Arlington, Mai A—Bond* A uthorized .—Sewerage bond* of
111-77
1 ' l 35
this town to the amount of §109,00(1 have recently been voted.
llD S T
till!
Avondale, Ohio —Bond Offering .—Proposals will be re11133
Ceived until D o . 4, 1v.i5, by the V ulag* C »u oil, care of II P,
108-13
Cooke, Treasurer, for the purchase of §2,500 o f 5 per cent ]
Catawissa, Pa —Bonds A u th orized —!5lec'ric-ligh'; bonds
street improvement bonds. The securities will be dated Oct.
red
35. 1895, interest w ill be payable * ini-annuilty at the Central of this city lo the amount o f §7,800 will so in b_- o f • for
<
Trust & Safe Deposit Company o f Cincinnati and the principal sale.
will mature at the rate of §150 yeirlv in from om-to ten year*.
Cole Conn'y, Mo.—Bonds Prop)* l. —B mIs to tV- amnint
B nvl Sale —On November 18, 1855, the village of Avondale of §61,000 «-ill probably be issued lor th i coa stru .i m of a
sold §10.000 of 4 per cent 30-year street improvement bonds, i new court-house.
date 1 N ovember 1, 1835. to i f Sirs R-j lolpb Kleybolte & Co., 1
of Cincinnati, for §10,053 and accrued interest. Four other j College Hill. Ohio.—Bond Sale - O i Nov. 18, 1895, tha vil­
lage of College Hill sold $1,859 76 of 6 per c-nt avenue im­
bids were received as fellow*:
provement bond* to the National I. > F tvette B i tk if Cincin­
Am*l BH.
fte*A#ll«rto1 * M*jr»r ... .............. .. ....... ........... ...........$10,025 nati, Ohio, for §1.953 75 and accru'd interest. The seauri i»a
are dated Nov. 18, 1895, interest will b >payable a-inu illv. and
A tU t X
0 4 * k .......... ............................................................................. 1 0 , *25
*
G?rin*n 3f*tfem*l Bittk ....................
................. .
lo,02l $194-76 of the principal will m itur-* in one year and §185
We-*t«ra Oerib 10 B*uk......................................
.
10.000 yearly thereaft-r. Principal and interest will ba p iy able at
Bannock C >unty Id iho. —Bond Sale.—It is reported that the Citiz.os’ National Bank Cincinnati Ohia
this county has sold 6 p -r cent ft 2> year gold funding bond*
Colombo*. Ohio.—Bond Sale.—It is reported that $45,000 of
to the amount of §125,01 to K. H R dlias & vjat.
Ihj o*T cent street imt)*ovement b m Is h iv-> b?an aw ir.led to
B etb 'l, Conn —Bond Sal —0,4 Nov-mber 20,1895, the bor­ the Fourth, National Bank ofC dum bus for a premia n of
ough of Betb.l sold §15,000 of 4 per cm t water-works bonds $93 50. Of the above amount $38,000 running from one to
to E H. G *y& Co. at 103 036(1 and accru*d interest. The eight year*, is ism»d fo : the improvement of High Street,
securilit-s are dated October l, 1893, int rest is payable semi­ $22,000 running from one to ten years for the improvement of
annually on April 1 and October 1, and §1,000 of the principal Lmwood Avenue and §25,000 running fro n one to ten years
will mature on each o f the dates, O.itober 1, 1915. October 1. j for the improvement of Selbach Avenue.
1920 and October 1, 1925. Both principal and interest will be
Columbus, Wis.— Bonds A u th orized — Waier-woiks bonds
payable at the Imp liters'& Traders' National Bank, New to the amount of $25,000 have been voted.
East Minch Chunk, Pa.—B on la A uth orized . —ElectrioNiue other bid* w eT e received for the loan as follows.
liglat bonds of this town to the amou it of § 5,000 havj been
Kid.
authorized.
103J H. F urls..............
t02-»2
<ieo A. Fefavlii M<3o.
Elkins, W. V j .—Bonds Au'horizert. -W a ter-works bonds
102-71
t »r«.'0. le t c h k Co . .
of this town to the am mot of $25,000 will be iaausd.
102-2
Frairei. k. C ooler . . .
1-11-59
E H Koliliiv A Son* . . . . .
Enfield. Cnnn.—Bond Sale.—O i November 21, 1895, this
101-125
K. C, Stun wood A »'n
citv sold $25,000 of 4 per cent bonds to Messrs. Mills & Blanch­
-O ".M
Pf-sfeerA Co «,».
1 '0-3086 ard. of Boston, at par, accrued interest and a premium of
V. W H .rd sA C o..........
.
. 100Aetna Life Insurance Co
$775. The sec irities will mature i i 20 year*, with an option
Blnnt, S, I) -B on d i Proposed ,—It is reported that wattr of calling $5,000 in 10 years and §10,000 in 15 years.
bonds fo r §5,090 will be isi-ued.
Ennis. Texas.—Bond Sale.—Six per cent 40-year refunding
Bulge City, Idaho .— Bonds Authorized .—A vote t.k-n road, bridge and street improvement bonds of E llis M the
November 12 on itauing sidewalk bond* resulted in favor of am- u > of $25,000 hive been sold to Meisrs. Rud dph Kley­
t
___ '
— ~*__ ■ —
the proposition.
1 bolte & Co. of Cincinnati.

THE CHRONICLE,

942

....

■■ - .

Tti»J eltv*» tonffid debt, t-jcehiding the above-mentioned
1805, was $34,800, consisting of $4,800 of
• id v,.:ir k. !,,*ral fund and public setmol bonds, dated Jan. 1,
>
$i:; (K0 of 15-80 year water bonds, dated Jan. 10, 1889,
| ; ■,
r school bonds, dated Sept, 15. 1894:
oinking’ fund vi.OU’ The assessed valuation for 1895 is
$1 ,5011,000 . The population according to local figures is 5,527.
fa r Koekawny, N. Y.— Bond Election .—The electionjto be
hel.i m Far Kock’away on the question of expending §75,000
for sewers, f. r which bonds are to be issued, has been post­
poned from November -‘3 to November 20,
Galreston. Texas.— Bond Offering .—Proposals will be re­
ceived until December 9, 1895, by A. Ferrier, Chairman of
the Finance Committee, for the purchase of §200,000 of 5 per
cent general indebtedness funding bonds of the city of Gal­
v eston . The securities are dated November 15, 1895, interest
will be payable semi-annually on May 15 and November 15,
and the principal will mature November 15, 1915, with an
option of call after November 15, 1905. Both principal and
interest are payable at the office of the City Treasurer or at
the fiscal sgenc-y in New York City.
her particulars regarding this issue will be found in
an mlrcrtiscmcnt elsewhere in this Department.
Galveston, T ex .—Bonds Proposed.—Orders for bonds for a

[VOL. L S I .
-~-v

1

Hatlield, Mass,—Bond Offering.—Proposals will be re­
ceived until December 7 for tbe purchase of 4 per cent water­
works bonds of this municipality to the amount of §30,000,
maturing July 1, 1926.
Helena, Mont,—Bonds Authorized. —It is reported that on
November 15 the people of Helena voted to issue $161,000 o£
5 per cent refunding bonds and §418,000 o f 5 per cent bonds ■
for the payment of outstanding warrants.
Houston, Texns.—Bond News.—The §100,000 of street paving bonds which the city of Houston has been offering have
been destroyed by order of the Common Council and an ordi­
nance authorizing §25,000 of .jail bonds, §39,000 of bridge
bonds and §36,000 of funding bonds is under consideration.
Kings County, N. Y,—Bond Offering.—Proposals will be re­
ceived until Nov. 29, 1895, by County Treasurer Taylor for
the purchase of St,750,000 of registered public driveway and
parkway fund loan bonds dated Dec. 1, 1895, $50,000 matur­
ing July 1, 1915, and §100,000 yearly from July 1,.
1916, to July 1, 1932, and §250,000 of registered public drive­
way and parkway fund loan bonds dated Jan. 1, 1896, andc
maturing at the rate of §50,000 yearly from Jan. 1, 1901, to
Jan. 1, 1905. Both loans bear interest at the rate of 4 per
cent, payable semi-annually on Jan. 1 and July 1.

Kreischerville, N. Y.— Bond Sale.—Four per cent school
bonds to the amount of §6,000 have been sold at 101j^.
Lake City, Fla.—Bond E lection. —A vote will be taken De­
new court-house and insane asylum building have been re­
cember 10 on issuing bonds for public improvements.
ferred to the Finance Committee’.
Liberty, N. Y.—Bond Sale.— Four per cent water-works
Green Bay, Wis.—Proposed Bonds.—This city will issue
during the coming year 5 per cent bonds for improving bonds of this town to the amount of $10,000 have been sold at
102-78.
bridges and parks.
Lincoln, Neb.—Bonds A uthorized.— It is reported that re­
Hartford (Town). Conn.—Bond Call.—Town of Hartford
bonds of the 1880 issue, numbered from 271 to 320, inclusive, funding bonds of this city to the amount of §534,000 will be
have been called for payment on December 31st. when interest issued.
will cease.
Logansport, Ind.—Bond Call.— Notice is given by the cityHastings, Neb.—Bonds Defeated.—W .W . Mills, City Clerk,
reports to the C h r o n ic l e that a vote taken November 5 on officials of, Logansport, Ind., that §160,000 of water works
issuing
of improvement bonds resulted in the defeat funding bonds dated January 1, 1886, are called for payment
of the proposition.
on January 1, 1896. They will be redeemed at the office o f

NEW LOANS.
NEW LOANS.
NEW LOANS.
CITY OF
C IT Y OF
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0
LOGANSPORT, IND. CITY of LISBON, N.D., S U P E R I O R , W I S . ,
T o th e O w n e rs o f tb e C it y o f Ijo g u n s p o r t
I n d ia n a , B o n d * :

TAKE NOTICE
T h a t th e C ity o f L o g an sp o rt, In d ia n a , b a a e le c te d
to d e c la re , a n d d o es h e re b y d e c la re , tb e $75,000
fu n d in g bonds of s a id c ity , d a te d D ecem b er 1, It-85
to b e d u e an d p a y a b le on t b e first d a y o f D ecem ber,
1S05, u n d e r th e term s o f th e optio n o f p rio r p a y m e n t
c o n tain e d in sa id bonds,
O W N E RS of s a id fu n d in g bonds a re h e re b y n o ti­
fied to present, th e ir bonds a t th e b a n k in g h o u se of
W in slo w , L a n ie r & C om pany, or a t f h e b a n k in g
h o u se of N. W . H a rris & C om pany, No. 15 W a ll S t.,
in th e C ity o f New Y o rk, on sa id la s t-n a m e d d a te fo r
p a y m e n t, in te r e s t on s a id bon ds to c e a se on a n d
a f t e r D ecem ber 1,1895.
GEO. P . MCKEE,
M ayo r C ity of L o gun sp o rt, In d.
A t t e s t : J o hn B . W i n t e r s . C ity C lerk.

CIT Y OF

N o tice is h e re b y g iv e n t h a t t h e C ity C o u n c il o f th e
C ity of L isbon, R a n so m C o u n ty , N. D ., w ill, on t h e
2d d a y of D ecem ber, 1895, a t 7:30 P . M , r e c e iv e an d
co n sid er bids fo r t h e s a le of b o n d s o f s a id C ity in th e
sum o f te n th o u sa n d d o lla r s ($10,000), is s u e d f o r
t h e p u rpose of e s ta b lis h in g W a te r -W o r k s in sa id
C ity, in a cco rd a n ce w ith t h e v o te t a k e n a t a s p e c ia l
e le c tio n h e ld in sa id C ity on t h e 22d d a y o f O ctober
1896.
S a id bon ds to be is s u e d in d e n o m in a tio n s to s u it
th e p u rc h a se r, to b e d a te d D e ce m b e r 2d, 1895, p a y a ­
b le 20 y e a rs a f t e r d a te , w ith in t e r e s t a t t h e r a t e o f 6
p e r c e n t p e r an n u m , p a y a b le o n d ie 1 s t d a y o f No­
v e m b e r o f each y e a r. P r in c ip a l a n d in t e r e s t to b e
p a id in N ew Y ork.
B id s fo r th e w hole is s u e o r a n y p a r t t h e r e o f w ill b e
co n sid ered . R ig h t to r e je c t a n y o r a ll b id s is r e ­
s e rv e d . B id s s e n t to t h e A u d it o r s h o u ld b e in c lo se d
in se a le d en v elo p es.
D one b y o rder o f t h e C ity C o u n c il o f t h e C ity o f
L isb o n , N. D.
<*. h . D A Y IE S ,
C ity A u d ito r .

LOGANSPORT, IND.
To th e O w n er* o f th e C it y o f L o g a n s p o rt,
I n d ia n a , B ond* :
TAKE

N O TICE .

BONDS.
S l i a r o u , P a . , R e f u n d i n g ............

r r i MB*1*”
1 ry ’ * - •

O hio. C o u r t- H o u s e '.'.:" '.'.:!*

B enw ell &
S oherm erh orn B u ild in g ,

b a n k e r s

„ ™ *Tl r n ' AI' ISSUES IN THE STATES OF
A S r E C I A I .T V .

h

. e . t io k n 6 b ,

„ T „
„
C ity C o m p tro lle r.
1 . J . E irsm A K D , C ity T r e a s u r e r .
Cit y H

all

,

D ate d S u p e rio r, W is ., N o v e m b e r 7 th , 1895.

MUNICIPAL

BONDS-

,

CINCINNATI, O.

TEXAS.

E ve r it t ,

N E W YO RK & N E W JE R SE Y

° n ly-

Rudolph Kleybolts & Co.,

IN

« W A L K S ! ’.

$40,909 0 1
A n d t h a t o n t h a t d a t e in t e r e s t s h a ll c e a s e , a n
a n y o f s a id b o n d s o r co u p o n s w h ic h m a y b e p r e s e n te d a f t e r D e ce m b e r 31 st, 1895, s h a ll b e p a id w it h
in t e r e s t u p to a n d in c lu d in g D e c e m b e r 31 st, 1896.

si

M ORTGAGE LOANS

City Clerk.

CALL.

N o tic e is h e r e b y g iv e n to e a c h a n d a ll o f t h e h o ld e rs
o f S e w e r Im p ro v e m e n t B o n d s o f t h e C ity o f S u p e r­
io r, W isc o n s in , is s u e d J u l y 1, 1890, s e v e n y e a r s ,
o p tio n a . a f t e r fiv e y e a r s , w it h in t e r e s t s ix p e r c e n t
p a y a b le s e m i- a n n u a lly - J u ly 1 s t a n d J a n u a r y 1 s t e a c h
y e a r a t th e N a tio n a l B a n k o f t h e R e p u b lic , N ew Y o rk
C ity , f o r t h e c o n s tr u c tio n o f s e w e rs in S e w e r D is­
t r ic t s N os. 1, 2, 3 a n d 4, a n d in f ir s t a ll e y so u th o S
B r o a d w a y S t r e e t , a n d to a l l w h o m i t m a y c o n c e r n :
T h a t t h e C ity o f S u p e rio r, W is c o n s in , b y o rd e r o f
t h e M a y o r a n d C om m on C o u n c il o f s a id c it y , d a t e d
N o vem b er 5th , 1895, h e r e b y c a lls in f o r p a y m e n t anc?
c a n c e lla tio n a n d d e m a n d s of t h e h o ld e r o r h o ld e r s
t h a t t h e fo llo w in g S e w e r I m p r o v e m e n t B o n d s, w ith
a ll u n p a id co u p o n s, h e p r e s e n te d f o r payre e n t a t ther
N a tio n a l B an h o f t h e R e p u b lic in N ew Y o rk C ity , o n
or b e fo re t h e 31 st d a y o f D e c e m b e r, 1805, t o - w it :
F o r c o n s tr u c tin g s e w e rs in S e w e r D is tr ic t
N o. 1, b o n d s n u m b e re d fro m 1 to 20 in ­
c lu s iv e o f t h e d e n o m in a tio n o f *500 e a c h ,
a n d bond n u m b e re d 21 o f $23 06. T o ta l. .$10,023 06
F o r c o n s tr u c tin g s e w e r s in S e w e r D is tr ic t
No. 4 b o n d s n u m b e re d fro m 22 to 51 in ­
c lu s iv e o f t h e d e n o m in a tio n o f $500 e a c h ,
a n d b o n d No. 52 o f $88. T o t a l...................... 15,088 00
F o r c o n s tr u c tin g s e w e r in S e w e r D is tr ic t
No. 1. bonds n u m b e re d 53 to 6 6 k , in c lu s ­
iv e ,o f t h e d e n o m in a tio n o f $500 e a c h , a n d
b o n d No. 67 o f $56 75. T o t a l............................ 7,556 7 6
F o r c o n s tr u c tin g s e w e r in f ir s t a ll e y so u th
o f B ro a d w a y , b o n d s n u m b e re d fro m 68 to
83, in c lu s iv e ,o f t h e d e n o m in a tio n o f $500
e a c h , a n d b o n d No. 84 o f $240 00. T o t a l.. 8,240 60

" 5s

FOR SALE B Y

t0 cease 0,1 antl after said JauuGEO. I> McJC.BE.
,
Mayor city of Logansport, Ind.

A ttest: J ohn* b . w in teh h ,

a .

(■ •u n b i i d g e , O h io , W a t e r .....................
414 .
B o n d l l i l l , O h io , W a t e r ............
5?
A s t o r i a , O r e g o n . ( G o ld ) W a t e r . . . " : : : " ' 3 s
w
W o r i J i , T e x a s ( G o ld ) W a t e r ______ 5 s
S t . I m p r o v e m e n t .,5 s
1 I i u r e l I t h ir * : a s ' P ? ' 1001 an< l S e w e r . . . . 5 s
A u ro rn V .i’
I m p r o v e m e n t .............. 5 s

That the City of Logansport, Indiana, has elected
to demure mid does hereby declare, the *160,000
famJIng bonds of said city, dated January 1,1888, to
be due and payable on the first day of January, A.' D.
O hio, K e » u « d in g .......... .
l « « . under the terms of the option of prior payment A f lr iiH io n . O h io , S c h o o l ..........................
contained in said bonds.
C h a r le v o ix , M ic h ., R e f u n d in g .....
O W N E R S of sa id f u n d i n g bonds a r e h e r e b y n o ti« e d to p r e .e n t th e ir bonds at tb e b a n k in g h ou se o f
” . ’ ; ™ rrls * C o m p a n y ,N o. 15 W a ll S tre e t, N ew
, r
lT ’ " n
last-n am ed d a te fo r p a y m e n t, in -

BOND

6% WATER WORKS BONDS.

I n t e r e s t 7 P e r C e n t N e t.
M)

COM M ISSIO N S ch a rg e d b o rro w e r o r le n d e r
u n til loan s h a v e p ro v e n good.

F R A N C IS S M I T H & C O ,.
SAN ANTONPO, T E X A S .

E. C . Stanwood & Co.*
b a n k e r s

,

121 Devonshire Street,
BOSTON.
G I S T S S E N T .U P O N A P P L I C A T I O N .

943

THE CHRONICLE.

N ovember 23, 1895.]

Messrs. N. W. Harris & Co., No. 15 Wall Street, New York
City. Interest on the called bonds will cease on January 1.
The offici l announcement of this bond call will be fou n d
among the advertisements elsewhere in this Department.

Lone Island City, N. Y.— Bond Safe.—City Treasurer Lucien Knapp rep >rts to the CEIRO 'ICLF. that the highest bid re­
N
ceived on Nov 20 for $30,000 of gold bonds for an additional
water supply was 104-15 The securities will bear interest
at the rate of 4
per cent and will run for 20 years. The
loan is secured "by a sinking fund, which receives $1,500
yearly.
The total bonded debt of the city on October 1. 1395. was
$3,327,000. including water bonds to the amount of $377,000.
The sinking funds on the same date amounted to $290,648.
The city's water works are pledged for the redemption of the
water debt. Bonds for $108,000 were issued for the purpose
of erecting public buildings and the proceeds have all been
used for this purpose. The street improvement bonds,
amounting to $573,500, are secured by assessment, and $790,000 of general improvement bonds will be secured in the same
way as soon as the work for which they were issued is com­
pleted. The city’s revenue bonds, which amount to $074 500,
were issued against tax arrearages and the sinking fund for
their redemption amounts to $225,000. From Jan. 1. 1895.
to Oct. 1, 1895, the city treasury receipts were $1,333,838;
disbursements, $941,351; cash balance Oct. 1,1895, was $392,487.
Macon, Ma.—Bond Election .—A vote will be taken Decem­
ber 14 on issuing $50,i«00 of 4*,] per cent city bonds. Interest
on the loan will be payable quarterly on January 1, April 1,
July 1 and October 1. at Macon, and the principal will ma­
ture at the rate of $3,000 yearly after the fifteenth year from
date, and $i.OOO the thirtieth year. Principal and interest
will be payable in gold coin.
Manchester. N, H. — Bonds A u th orized , — Water-works
bonds of this city to the amount of $30,000 will soon be issued.
Marion County. Iowa.—Bond Sate.—On Nov. 13, 1895, this
county sold $30,t)00 of 5 p*r cent court-house bonds, to E. C.
.3tan wood & Co., at 103 799 and accrued ioterest. The secur­
ities are dated Nor. 1,1895, interest will be payable semi-an­

nually at Chicago, III., aDd the principal will mature in 10
years^ wish an option of call after 5 years.
Meagher County School District No. 8, Mont.—Bond
Offering .-Proposals will be received for the purchase of 6 per
cent refunding bonds to the amount of $13,000.
Nashville, Tenn. — Bond Sale .—On November 15, 1895, the
city of Nashville sold $100,000 of 4J.< per cent bonds, issued
in payment of the subscription made by the city to the stock
of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, to Parson, Leach &
Co. The securities are to be dated January 1. 1806, and in­
terest will be payable semi-annually.
Nevada City. Cal.—Bond Offering.—Proposals will be re­
ceived until Dec. 12, 1895, by T. H. Carr, Clerk of the Board
of Trustees, for the purchase of $80,000 6 per cent water bonds.
Interest, together with $1,500 of the principal, will be payable
on the firet Monday in December, 1898. at the office of the
City Treasurer, and yearly thereafter for 40 years.
Ord Irrigation District, Neb — Bond Offering .—Proposals
will be received until Deo. 2, 1895, by E. P. Clements, Secre­
tary of Board of Directors, for the purchase of $50,000 of 6 per
cent district bonds. Interest will be payable annually and
$2,500 of th > principal will mature in 11 years; $3,000 in 13
<
vears: $3,500 in 13years; $4,000 in 14 years ; $4,500 in 15 years ;
$5,000 in 18 years ; $5,500 in 17 years; $6,500 in 18 years ;
$7,500 in 19 years and $8,000 in 20 years from date.' Both
principal and interest will be payable at the office of the State
Treasurer.
Paterson, N. ,1.—Bond Sale.—It is reported that this city
has sold $50,000 of
per cent school bonds, averaging 154£
years, and $20,000 of 5 per cent school bonds, averaging, 1 ‘ 7
years. Both loans were awarded to E. H. Rollins & Sons.
Pendleton School District, Ore.— Bond News.—It is re­
ported that bonds of this district to the amount of $23,000,
recently voted fo j the construction of two new buildings,
the refunding of matured bonds and the funding of floating
indebtedness, cannot be legally issued, as the statutes do not
provide that a school district may issue bonds to take up
floating indebtedness.

___ NEW J.O ANS

N E W LOANS.

NEW LOANS.
SCRANTON, PENNA.,

$ 200,000
*

City of Galveston, Tex.,

MUNICIPAL

i ) i PER CENT

BONDS

T a x E xem pt

SCH O O L BONDS,

FOR INVESTMENT.

5 - BONDS.

H IT* 1 9 1 9 AND 19*20.
P r i c e a n d P a r e I r a ln m fro m

GA l*xwnrt>x. T k x a a . 3Ci> . 16. tmfc.
y

N. W . H A R R I S

TO W U i m IT M A T CONCERN :
f a it f t d b id * w ill im i e m I pnmI b y Urn ChAkramn o f
W io m m C o m m itte e a t fet* office in QmtfMttm*
u n t il nu»ro M o n « i* f. Howwaihar «> t£E6* to r

the paretuue of tfee wboL» l» a e o f
General
(ndahtadiMM* F n n d tn e Honda o f 1*06 o f t h e CUy of
Gstvfwf em
,
Th«*© be*rid* are o f the d^oomtnattan of fl.OOO.
n amberw t from i to SlOtiMEffigffivw;. «un» d ate*! Nwr«m>
N r llv

i

p e r m mt m tm m t p e r

P A R T H Il'L A H N

mmub

The*© bond* mat are Normotxsr 1A 1916. and are

C P OH A F P L K ’ A T IO H ,

15 W A L L ST R E E T ,

-

N EW Y O It M
L

W . N . C oler & C o .,

<*MHKlt8 OF THE NSW YORK AND BOSTOF
STOCK EXCHANGE?,

B A N K E R S.

DEALERS IN COMMERCIAL PAPER.

from
payable **mt-anri«*»!!?. e!*r May
16. Norember if—
«**4 all! be tuM •$$«?*red.
T o mmeh b on d will tw attaebM) f o r ty In tern et co u ­
pon*. each coepoa reprwxnting «t* month*’ inter**t>

& C O .,

BA N K ERS.

M U N IC IP A L B O N D S .
Blake Brothers & C o,,

• a h ja e t to m il a n d rwUsmpiion a f t e r te n y e a r* from
t h e ir date.
Bond* a n d in te r*** mmpmtm a r e p a y a b l* a t th e

m

5

hffie* o f the Oty Treaearer, ay at the ft*r»! aaeoey in
New York Oty.
Tht* l**n« of bonds i* made In ponmamwi o f an or*
dtnano* o f taid City appro***! N.,rember 12.
and in m & v r d m n m w it h Skefttift iSSd of the C ity

STATE

RAHHAU

STREET,

N T., NBW

34 NASSAU STREET.

BOSTON,

YORK.

MUNICIPAL

C hartior, a n d b y a w th o rtty
a n a d mi th e L e g ta ta t*
acre- o f f h « A n t e o f T « x a * ( m m l a t it#
*ee-

BONDS.

W . J. Hayes & Sons,

in AprtL 1«W.
tn addition to t h e at! v a lo rem t a x le v ie d on afj
property tu create a »tnkin$r fond for t h e re d e m p tio n
»
o f the*© bond* and tn provide for the payment f* t
the In te re st, t h e r e M Aim a p p ro p ria te d a m i * e i a p a r t
s

BA N K E RS,

sto n

p e r mmt o f a il d d ttn a o e o t taxes* pawn d u e -Lumi­
n a r y t, M M .

Dealers in M U N IC IPA L BONDS,

Street, W ykes & C o .,

Street Hallway Bond*, and other high grade In-

.etaienta

BOSTON. MASS..

C lev e la n d , O h io,

7 R r c h a n g e P la o e .

44

3 1 1 - 3 1 9 S u p e r i o r Ht

W A L L STKKET,

-

NEW YORK

iobit A StM - g g .V .V B l H ."
Sr t.

Bid* for hr** than par wfRnot be considered, Ail
bid* tnn.*t he accompanied by a certlilrd check for
N C R 1C 1F A 1, A S I» R A I L B O A I )
MA4 ehi^h will be retamed if hid is not accepted.
*),
The field tovejeelany orati bid* I* hereby rceerre*!
fo r fall particular* addrea*.
And nil L o ca l S e cu rltle a B ough t nnd Hold.

BONDS

A . FK R fM K R .
f h i i r a a a O i m . tm Ptoumrt* a n d R e retim e,

W H AN N & SCHLESING-ER

NEW YORK BROOKLYN AND JER
SEY CITY BONDS A SPECIALTY.

M UN IC IPAL

A . Strassburger,

W. E, R. SMITH,

tn

B R O A O M TR E K T.

BONDS.

SKW Y O R K

S T O C K S Ac B O V D S B R O K E R .
M ) E T t l * * S I S T E S T M JS S T S E C U R IT IE S ,

Monto’omerv. Ala.

WARHANTS MSCHOote fe
r S -W
COUNTV. CITY AND

3 NO. P . M m i *

C O ., S e n t i l e , W a a l , .

‘2 WALL STKKET,

I

NEW Y O R K .

THE CHRONICLE.

944

[V o l.

Lxr,

SUatvaee County. K in.—Bonds A uthorized.— Bonds of
—A vote taken November
for water-workd resulted in favor of the this county to the amount of $150,000 for the construction of
a bridge have been voted.
S ipcrinr, Wis.—Bond Call.—Notice is given by the City
Philadelphia Pa. —Bond XrW) —It is retorted that the
t, j. ; 1
the Philadelphia loan of $1.000,000, which is ComptroH-r and Treasurer of Superior, Wis., that $10,909 01
to
offered immediately, has been changed from 3 to %% per of 6 per cent sewer improvement bonds issued July 1, 1890,
cent.
Tne Finance Committee of the Common Council has recom- and optional in five years from dite, are called for payment
tuended a lu in of $3,01 0,"00 for widening Delaware A.venii“, at the National Bank of Redemption in New York City on or
extending the piers and improving She channel of the D la- before December 31, 1895, when interest will cease. The
bonds called are numbered from 1 to 84.
Pmuona, Cal.—Bonds Authorized.—I. R. Garth-ide, City
The official notice giving fu ll particu lars regarding this
Clerk, reports to the Chronicle that water- w.irks bonds of
mona, recently voted, " ill bear interast at the rate of 7 per bond call will be fou n d among the advertisements elsewhere in
rent, payable annually on Jan. 2 at Pomona. The city uas this D epartm ent.
at present no b uided debt and no tl »atlng deot. The water
Suisnn, Cal.— Bond Election. —The citizens of thi3 munici­
ih’bt will be St95,000. The assessed valuation for 1895 is pality will vote Desemoer 18 on issuing $40,000 of water­
$ .,St)0,omi; total tax (per $1 01)0), $19 00. The papulation ac­ works bonds.
cording to local figures is 7,000,
TiinmptnuviHe, Well.— Bonds A uthorizid —Electric light
Rnr'„bridge Comity, Yu.—Bond Sale— R. Moore, Treas: bonds ol this village have been voted.
S
lif e r , r. p o rts to th e Ci’iHONICLE that §51,001 o f 5 p-r cent re­
Trenton, M ich.—Bond E le ctio n —A vote will be taken
fill dirg 1j. iti. 1- nf Ru ikbri ig* Con aty were r c mtly sold by
December 2 on issuing $10,000 of wate.-.vorks bond;,
so!> crijo .iim to lo c a l investors. The securities will ru n seven
year, fn n ,1m u ir y I, 1896. Th >v a n issued to redeem out­
Wallace County, Kansas.—Road Default. —Owners of
s t a n d in g ti per cent bonds du in 19-5, wi.h au optiju of call
bonds of Wallace County, Kansas, on which default has been
a t at y t im e ,
made, are requested to communicate with Messrs. James N.
Rome, dn.—
-Bonds Propos'd —Water-works bonds of the
City nt R me, recently authorized, will probably be placed Brown & Co,, No. 63 Cedar Street, New York City, with a
o i the in irbet early in the coming year, possibly by Feb. 1. view to taking steps for the protection of their interests.
Tjrairi'iii'it will be not over $30,000, th» securities to mature
See advertisement elsewhere in this Department.
not earli. r h in 10 years, and it is hoped to place them at not
over 5 per cent.
W inton Place, Ohio.—Bond Sale.—On Nov. 18, 1895, the
Sargent County, N. IK—Bond Sale.—It is reported that village of Winton Place, Ohio, sold $35,000 of 5 par cent water­
tb s eouniy has sold 6 per cent 20-year bonds to the amount works bonds to Messrs. Mills & Blanchard of Boston for 1 26,202 flit. Eight bids were received for the bonds. The secur­
•of §38,000"
ities are dated May 14, 1895, interest is p tyable semi-annually
Seattle, Wash —Bond E lection.—On D cember 10 the citi- and the principal will mature in 3) years, with privilege of
z i s of SpHtth will vote on the question of issuing a city loan redemption after 30 years. Principal and interest are payable
of $1,250,000 for water works.
at the Fifth National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Perry, Oa •

k x Authorized
/

i

MISCELLANEOUS.

N E W LOANS.

1850.

8125, 000

1895.

M IS C E L L A N E O U S .
R ic h a r d P r ic e M o r g a n .
Ed w ard R. Morgan.

D w i g h t C. M o r g a n

The United States Life
R ich . P. M organ & Sons,
Rapid Transit Ferry Co
Insurance C o.
R A ILW AY EXPERTS,
IN T H E C I T Y O F N E W Y O R K .

i New Y o rk -S ta ten Islan d )

5 Per Cent First Mortgage Cold Bonds
In terest P ayable M ay and N ovem ber.

S25.000 p ay able J a n u a ry , 1S97, 1S9S,
1899, 1900, 1901.
C A P IT A L STOCK,
11,000,000
BONDED D EBT,
050.000
A N N U A L IN T E RE ST C H A R G E S. 82,500
.
1892.
1898.
1894..
Net e a r n in g s ...tl02,088 28
?S)1,247 51
*128,072 20

Pi lee to ner 4 -H p e rc e n t,
sp e c ia l (Jitcuiur on A p p lica tio n .

C.

H

W hite

&

C o.,

BANKERS,

Y i BROADWAY, MEW YO R K .

New Municipal Loans
$100,000 Tacontn, Wash..................... 5s
100.000 San Antonio, Tex................ 0s
00,000 Town oft ortlandville, N. Y., 4s
50.000 New York City Tax Exempt 3s
F ull p a rticu la rs ol the a b o v e and list ol
oth er bond* oflered on a p p lica tio n .

Farson, Leach & C o.,
• C H IC A G O .

2 W A L I , S T ., N . Y .

T h is old a n d lre lia b le C o m p a n y n o w h a s t h e e x p e r ­
ien ce o f fo rty-fiv e y e a r s of p r a c tic a l L if e I n s u r a n c e ,
which h a s ta u g h t It. t h a t t h e sine qvxi n o n o f su c c e s s
Is t h e a d o p tio n o f good p la n s o f in s u r a n c e , a n d th e
p u rs u it o f a lib e ra l p o lic y to w a r d s both it s In s u r e d
and Its A g en ts. T h e se e s s e n t ia ls i t p o sse sse s in an
e m in e n t d eg ree, b u t ju d ic io u s ly te m p e re d b y t h a t
co n serv a tism w hich is th e b e s t p o ssib le s a f e g u a r d of
th e p o licy-h o ld er. I ts c o n tr a c ts a r e in c o n te s ta b le
a f te r tw o y e a rs . T h e y a r e n o n -f o r f e itin g , p ro v id in g
g e n e ra lly fo r e ith e r p a id -u p p o lic y o r e x te n d e d i n ­
su ran c e , a t th e optio n o f t h e p o lic y -h o ld e r. I t g iv e s
te n d a y s of g ra c e in p a y m e n t o f a ll p re m iu m s. Its
co u rse d u rin g th e p a st f o r ty -fiv e y e a r s a b u n d a n tly
le m o n s tra te s its a b s o lu te s e c u r it y .

I c tiv e a n d s u c c e s s fu l A g en ts, w i s h i n g to r e p ­
r e s e n t th is C o m p a n y , m a y c o m m u n ic a t e
w i t h t h e P r e s i d e n t a t t h e S o m e O ffice,
2 6 1 B r o a d w a y , N ew Y o rk ,
O FF IC E R S
G E O R G E H . B U R F O R i ) ....... .. ... .P r e s i d e n t
0 . P . F R A L E IG H .......................................................S e c r e ta r y
A. W H E E L W R IG H T ...................... A s s is t a n t S e c r e ta r y
W M .T .ST A N D K N ................................................. ..A c t u a r y
A R T H U R C. P E R R Y .............................
. . .C a sh ie r
JOHN P . MUN N ........................................M e d ic a l D ire c to r
FIN AN CE C O M M IT T E E :
V S S l6 ;
.................. P r e s . C h e m . N at. B an k
JOHN J . T U C K E R .................................................... ...B u ild e r
R" P re s - Im P* & T r a d e r s ’ N at. B’k
JA M E S R . P L U M ..............................
. . ..L e a t h e

J. Spencer Turner,

A t tb"
„r h o ld ers o f
•s-tii.ib d e lim it bits o ccu rred , w e
rtf'fw to p ro te c t th e ir Interests.
m , , to he re p re se n te d in a n y
Ar,: rw ‘l......
* » co m m u n icate
a m o u n t o f th e ir ho ld in g-.

ab o v e Bonds, upon
contemplate ta k in g
S u ch o th e rs a s m ay
a c tio n w e m ay ta k e
w ith us, g tv lm t ik e

JAMES N BROWN A- do..
.
62 C ADA II STREET, NEW YORK.

IL L IN O IS ,

■G. S. E L L I S .

U. 8. A.

G. S.

E D W IN H . E L L IS .

E L L IS & S O N ,

5 6 T V A IiL S T . , N E W Y O R K ,

P U B L IC A C C O U N T A N T S
A N D A U D IT O R S .
(M r. G. S. E llis, 15 Y e a r s w it h t h e C e n tr a l T r u s t Co
o f N ew Y o rk.)

Experts Sent to any part of the United
States and Canada.
A u d it a n d e x a m in e A c c o u n ts o f In d iv id u a ls , R e
c e iv e r s . C o m m itte e s, A s s ig n e e s , E x e c u to r s a n d C o r­
p o r a tio n s . N e g o tia te u n lis te d S e c u r it ie s , L o a n s , &c

0. W. Haskins,

E. W. Sells,

N o. 2 N a s s a u St r e e t

SU C C E SSO R TO

N ew Yo r k .

B r in c k e r h o f i; T u r n e r & C o .,

Offer t h e ir s e r v ic e s to m a k e

M A N U F A C T U R E R A N D D E A L E R IN

P E R IO D IC A L A N D S P E C IA L
E X A M IN A T IO N S O F A C C O U N TS A N D
RECORDS,
IN V E S T IG A T IO N S O F A F F A I R S ,
a n d to in tr o d u c e
S IM P L E A N D E F F IC IE N T M E T H O D S
O F A C C O U N T IN G .

COTTON SAIL DUCK
a n d a l l k in d s of

COTTON C A N V A S F E L T IN G D U CK ,
C A R COVERING BAG G IN G ,
R A V E N S DUCK, S A IL T W IN E , AC.
F O P E " A W N IN G ” S T R I P E S .
A gent

WALLACE COIJNTT, KAN,
BONDS

D W IG H T ,

H a v in g e x te n d e d e x p e r ie n c e in t h e c o n s tru c tio n
a n d o p e ra tio n o f r a ilw a y s , w e offer o u r s e r v ic e s a s
I n d e p e n d e n t E x p e r t s to e x a m in e a n d r e p o rt
u p o n t h e c h a r a c te r a n d C o n d it i o n o f t h e C o n ­
s t r u c t io n a n d E q u i p m e n t o f R a i l w a y s a n d a ls o
t h e i r Sa f e N e t E a r n i n g C a p a c i t y . W e h a v e
r e c e n t ly e x a m in e d f o r c a p it a lis t s a n d re p o r te d
s e p a r a te ly u p o n n e a r ly a ll o f t h e p r in c ip a l r a ilr o a d s
w e s t o f C h ic ago b e tw e e n C a n a d a a n d M e x ico .

U N ITED S T A T E S BUNTING. CO
Btoct/Uii 8 u p p ly' a li W id th s a n d C olors, a] w a y ,'r

O ver t w e n t y y e a r s e x p e r ie n c e In th e Operating
A c c o u n tin g a n d F in a n c ia l D e p a r tm e n ts of Railw ay*
a n d o th e r c o rp o ra tio n s , a n d h a v e

I n v e s t ig a t e d a n d R e v is e d t h e A c c o u n tin g
S y s t e m o l t h e U n ite d S t a t e s G o v e r n m e n t.

109 D u a n e S tre e t, N e w Y orJ»

WM, FRANKLIN H A LL
BOOKS

ACCOUNTANT AUD ITED

N ew fo rm a desig n ed fo r books o f a c c o u n t.
1Settlement o f In so'vtn t E state .
1X8 Exchan v B .illd tn g r 53 S t a t e S t r e e t
Q

Jos. O . O sgood,
M. A m . So c. C. 13.
C o n s u lt in g E n g in e e r
R e p o rts on In v e s tm e n t P r o p e r tie s f o r B an ker:
a n d I n v e s to rs .
r . w S ? i S a i ! S la r e « llr<i to Physical co n d itio n anc
ch a ra cte i, earnings, m anagem ent, n e e d s, v a lu e , e tc .

R a i l r o a d L o c a t io n a n d C o n s t r u c t io n .
B o sto n .

120 BROADW AY,

-

-

NEW Y O R K


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102