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A

WEEKLY

NEWSPAPER,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES,

VOL. 2.

SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1866.
CONTENTS.

for money

THE CHRONICLE.

Monetary Base and

Mr. Sher¬

man’s Loan Bill
The May Report of the National
Debt
Tax Legislation in Congress
The Wall Street Forgeries
The Spaniards in Valparaiso
The State Tax on Sales

The
645

Niagara Ship Canal.

540

chinery.
Some

,■

NO. 45.

will arise to
,

cause any

strain

on our

financial

ma

,

apprehension

prevail lest the new funding
by Mr. Sherman on "Wednes¬
Latest Monetary and Commercial
547
English News
550 day should have the! effect of causing a certain degree of
517 Commercial and Miscellaneous
543
News
stringency. But it is easy to see that the effect of that mear
551
sure should it become a law will be to
THE BANKERS’ GAZETTE AND COMMERCIAL TIMES.
impart increased ease
Commercial Epitome
Money Market, Railway Stocks,
to
550
monetary affairs for the bill only authorizes the negotia?
U. S. Securities, Gold Market,
Cotton
560
BreadstulTs
Foreign Exchange, New York
tion of the consolidated government bonds at
-561
par, and it is
City Banks, Philadelphia Banks
Dry Goods
56*2
National Banks, etc
553 Export* and Imports
563-64
very evident that it would be practically impossible .‘ to ne¬
Sale Prices N. Y. Stock Exchange
557 Prices Current and Tone of the
National, State, etc., Securities.
Market...
558
5C3-G7
gotiate a large loan at five per cent »if the slightest pressure
THE RAILWAY MONITOR AND INSURANCE JOURNAL.
or
stringency prevailed.
'
Railway News
568!
ous Bond List
570-71
It is true, as has been said, that the
Railway, Canal, etc., Stock List.
569 Insurance and Mining Journal...
proposed loan is not
572
Railrerid, Canal, and Miscellanc| Advertisements
573-76
to be floated by
the issue of more currency. This course is
inadmissible, and would defeat its own purpose. But, in
every point of view, it is certain that, whatever other object
tions may be urged against Mr. Sherman’s
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle is issued
funding scheme,
every Satur¬
as at
present developed, the supposition that it may tend to
day morning by the publishers of Hunt's Merchants’ Magazine
with the latest news by mail and
telegraph up to midnight cause derangement or stringency in the money market is
.....

....

615
516

Imports of Foreign Dry Goods at

New York.
The United States Debt

550
550

seems to

bill introduced into the Senate

:

$i)e €l)ronicU.

of Friday. A Daily Bulletin is issued every morning with all without foundation.
the Commercial and Financial neics of the
previous day up to
the hour of publication.

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The

Commercial

and

Financial

Chronicle, with Tint Daily

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$12 00
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For The Daily Bulletin, without The Commercial
'

Chronicle, (exclusiveof postage)

Postage is paid by subscribers at their

and

Financial
,

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post-office. It is, on the Chroni¬
cle, 20 cents per year, and on the Daily Bulletin $i 20 in advance.
awn

WILLIAM B. DANA & CO,, Publishers,
60 William

Neat Files for

holding the Chronicle

can

be had at the Office.

Price

75.

MONETARY EASE AND MR, SHERMAN'S LOAN BILL,
Among the questions
most attention
among

,

which seem at present to attract the
financial men, one of the chief is
whether the existing ease in money will continue. And the
general opinion seems to be that no interruption need be seri¬
ously apprehended of the smooth operation of financial affairs.
The reasons for this opinion are that there is an
increasing
accumulation of idle capital in the financial centres, and that
no sudden contraction of the
currency will be made by the
government, inasmuch as it is an indispensable condition for
the realizing of Mr. McCulloch’s plans of
consolidating the
debt that the money market should be
kept in an easy, tranquil condition. Moreover, the dullness of business at this
season of the year renders it probable that no sudden demand




••

•

1

TflE MAY REPORT OF THE NATIONAL DEBT.
It has been

urged,

argument against the withdrawal
of our redundant paper money, so as to restore the
currency to a healthier condition, that such a withdrawal
as an

of part

must of

necessity produce stringency in the money market.
If any of our readers hold this incorrect
opinion they will do
well to look at the debt statement which we

publish else,
during the month of April
last the legal tender notes in circulation were diminished fifteen
millions, half the cancelled notes being greenbacks. Still
the loan market continues easy, and no
monetary pinch of
even the slightest and most
temporary violence has super¬
The same principle was illustrated in a still more re¬
vened.
markable manner, and on a much greater scale,
during the
last fiscal year, whenalthough loans were
negotiated by Mr.
McCulloch to the amount of 1,475 millions of dollars ; still
during the very same period the active currency of the coun¬
try was diminished,” by means of the compound interest notes,
to the extent of considerably more than 100 millions.
This lesson, familiar to financial
statesmanship, that the
currency can be controlled, under certain conditions, without
tightening the money market, is also, as we have said, very
clearly illustrated by. the May statement of the debt • and to
this cardinal principle we have a very significant and
gratifying
corollary at the present moment, in the fact.dhat jrehen.a
great funding loan act is passing through Congress, Mr.
where.

Street, New York.

;

It will there be

seen

that

546

THE CHRONICLE.

[May 5,1860.

McCulloch is

inaugurating the great movement of consolid¬ the House. This measure is in many respects a great im¬
ating the debt, by taking steps to bring our paper money into provement on former tax laws, but it contains two provis¬
a sounder and less redundant condition.
The truth is, that ions in which we trust a change will be made. The first
there are periods of the year when a very small dimunition has reference to the
proposed increase of the tax on cotton.
of the volume of the currency would cause much mischief, No
person conversant with the facts can doubt that in Brit¬
while at other seasons, as now, a very considerable depletion ish India and elsewhere, an
extraordinary impulse has been
of the channels of the circulation is not onlv harmless, but
given to the production of cotton, and that this country will
easily accomplished. Mr. McCulloch’s practical knowledge not easily regain its old monopoly in this important
and sagacity has enabled him to seize on the right
moment, branch of business.
Now, to increase the tax on cotton is
,and to withdraw his currency in the right way.
really to give a premium to our foreign rivals ; to discrim¬
But there are other matters of interest in the national inate against the southern
producer; and to legislate to the
debt statement just issued.
We ventured last month prejudice of our own national interests. It is our wisest
to say that the purchase of ten-forty five per cent bonds? policy to set free from all
unnecessary burdens this impor¬
which took place on behalf of the Government in March, was tant branch of trade on which depends the
recuperation of
a
special case, and would not be repeated. We now find that that part of our country which has suffered the most from
our information was correct.
No change whatever has taken the desolating ravages of the war.
And from obvious
place in the outstanding aggregate of ten-forties.
The five- causes the raising of cotton will be attended with so much
twenties of 1865, however, have increased by the sale of of incertitude during
the next year or two; and will prob¬
$5,828,000, and the sixes of 1881 $29,500. Of seven-thirties ably in so many cases disappoint the just expectations of
about half a million more have been brought up, and of the those, who, under
auspices apparently promising, have gone
south and invested their capital; that at present we ought
compound interest notes five millions.
In regard to the compound notes, the aggregate of which rather to diminish the pressure of taxation than to increase
is now $167,072,141, some persons are of
the opinion that it. Even wrere the country placed in such an emergency
the interest ought to be added on to the
principal in the re¬ that new taxes must be laid, and laid anywhere and anyhow,
so that we
port. A morning paper advocates this view as follows :
might raise a revenue and replenish an exhaus¬
ted exchequer, cotton is one of the last things which a farIn making up the statement of the public debt, it seems to us that
there is one item which is not correctly put. If a merchant were asked seeing financial statesman would touch.
But at present when
for a statement of his accounts, accrued interest would necessary figure
the Treasury is full; when we are about to lessen the weight
as a part of the sum
eventually to be paid. There are one hundred
and sixty seven millions of compound iuterest notes.
If we assume of taxation; in an act which contemplates the remission of
“

that one year’s interest is due on them, the public debt is nearly ten
millions greater than it sums up by the Treasury statement; if more
than one year’s interest, so much more must be added ; if less than one
year, so much must be deducted.
Whatever the amount of interest
actually accrued, that sum, or an approximation to it, ought to be fur¬
nished in the statement.
In the case of other interest-bearing securi¬
ties this is not necessary, because the interest is a payable interest, can
be calculated by the public, and is extinguished at fixed intervals ; but

in

compound interest notes, the silent growth of principal is constantly
going on. When these notes mature they will represent not one hun¬
dred and sixty-seven millions, but over two hundred millions, and
they
at this present writing really represent a larger sum than
they indicate.
It makes very little difference whether the debt is
twenty millions more
or less, but it does make a
great difference whether or not the Federal
Government should be regarded as perfectly frank and even
scrupul¬
ously honorable in its official statements.”

some

75

millions of the fiscal burdens which oppress our

national

industry; it would surely be a great mistake, an
egregious blunder, if we put a heavier burden on cotton which
is already too much taxed, while we are
relieving the fiscal
pressure and making it lighter every where else. On na¬
tional grounds then, and as an act of justice to our fellowcitizens engaged in the cotton business, we hope the tax will
not be increased as is proposed, until time has been
given for
the trade to resuscitate and to develop itself.
We do not
claim a permanent exemption from heavier taxation.
The
time will come, and perhaps earlier than is in some
quarters
anticipated, when we shall derive a very large revenue from
a
wisely imposed duty on cotton. And this very produc¬
tive tax, when the proper time arrives, may take the
place
of a multitude of galling imposts, which we shall be
glad to
get rid of. To tax cotton too heavily now, would be to put
off indefinitely, or, at least, to retard for a considerable time,

If, however, the plan here advocated could be adopted, the
public would never know what might be the real aggregate
of outstanding notes at any given time, or how much of the
reported sum was principal and how much interest. Be¬
sides, it is contrary to the ordinary usage to report in the
manner
proposed an amount of interest which is not yet due.
the realization of that desirable movement. In a year or
The interest on the compound notes cannot very well be re¬
two probably, these objections will no
longer hold, but till
ported till it is due and actually paid. For these reasons
then, we had better not try to increase the tax; for if we do,
then, if there were no others, we think that Mr. McCnlloch’s
we shall
assuredly give a check to business, and thus derive
method, though open to some objection, is, on the whole,
less revenue to the Treasury, besides inflicting evils of no
the best.
We must not omit to notice the diminution of the amount small magnitude on vast interests connected with our com¬
of the debt.

Eight months

merce

and trade.

the aggregate was 2,757
The second point to which we referred arises out of the
millions, and now it is only 2,689 millions. We have sixtyeight millions of debt less on this showing than we had on attempted changes in the income tax. The new bill proposes,
our
Treasury books on the 31st August. We do not wish first, to exempt $1,000 from duty in all cases, instead of $600
as at
present; and secondly, it would charge large incomes
to lay undue stress on this fact, and
only cite it in this place
of rich citizens five per cent instead of ten
to confirm the statement we ventured some time
per cent, which is
ago, that in
the rate under the old law.
Both these changes in the law
all probability our national debt has reached its
highest we think are
ill-advised. The first would exempt from the
point, and that all future government loans will have as
tax a vast multitude of
their object the simple conversion of one class of
persons who ought to pay it; and
security
into another.

ago

the second would relieve those in affluent circumstances from

bearing their fair equitable share of the public burdens.
These two charges, if made, would very materially curtail
TAX LEGISLATION IN CONGRESS,
the amount of the Treasury
receipts from the income tax,
We hear from Washington that the
Ways and Means and would introduce the intolerable principle, happily un¬
Committee favor some amendments and
important modi¬ known as yet to our fiscal legislation, of relieving the rich of
fications of the Tax Bill which was recently introduced into their burdens and
discriminating against the poor.




May 5,1866.]

THE CHRONICLE.

THE WALL STREET FORGERIES.
The

reign of paper
lation, embezzlement,

not be taken that the

is always fertile in fraud, pecu¬
as well as in prodigality and extrava¬
gance. But since the excitement relative to the Ketchum
frauds, nothing has produced in financial circles a more pro¬
found impression than the discovery on Wednesday evening
of the forgeries by which John Ross has defrauded a number
of banks and private individuals of various sums, amounting
in the aggregate to little less than half a million of dollars.
money

The criminal has been known in Wall street for

more

than

year, and has been ostensibly engaged in business as a
broker. Of his antecedents little is known, and as his
nections and manners, unlike those of young
not

Ketchum,

gold
con-

were

mystery how he, though almost a stranger, contrived to
get into his hands so large an amount of funds at any one
time.
How long he has been engaged in such nefarious
transactions is not known, nor has it transpired whether he
had any accomplices. It is not easy, however, to believe
that projects of so complicated a character could have been
devised and carried into execution by one man, however ex¬
perienced and accomplished an adept he might be in the arts
•

and

appliances of counterfeiting.

Three distinct kinds of fraud

goodness of a check should be attested
by some safeguard, which shall not be open to such frauds
as those we have been
contemplating. Several methods of
accomplishing the object have been proposed for this pur.
pose, and one immediate result of the Ross frauds will, no
doubt, be to give an adequate protection to the recipient of
checks purporting to be certified as
good by the banks on
which they are drawn.
TI1E SPANIARDS AT VALPARAISO.

a

calculated to inspire special confidence, it is somewhat of

a

547

It is

perfectly natural that the news of the bombardment
of Valparaiso by the Spanish fleet,
under imperative orders
from Madrid, should have been received in this
country with
a
deep feeling of indignation, and there can be but little
doubt that if Commodore Rodgers,
commanding our own
squadron in the harbor of Valparaiso, had taken upon him¬
self the responsibility of
interfering by force to prevent the
consummation of the Spanish Admiral’s
purpose, he would
at once have become a
popular hero in the United States.
As

we

understand the Commodore’s

transaction made

to

the

own

report of the

Secretary of the Navy, the chief

consideration which restrained him from thus interfering
the fact that the British interests
imperilled in

was

Valparaiso

charged against the crim¬
enormously larger than the American. “ I had no in¬
First, the forgery of four cheques, two of them pur¬ tention,” he writes,.“of becoming a catspaw to draw Eu¬
porting to be drawn by Howes & Macy for $54,000 each, ropean chesnuts out of the fire, and then have the power I
and two by Alfred Speyer for $64,800 each.
The names served, laughing at my singed paws, while they enjoyed the
and certifications on these cheques w~ere forgeries, and the fruits of my temerity.” There is a certain
inconsistency be¬
whole were executed with such skill as to show that they tween this ground of forbearance and the
theory upon which
were from the hand of an
Commodore Rodgers originally proposed to
expert counterfeiter. The cheques
the English Ad¬
were deposited in the bank, and
miral to take joint action in
drawn against before the
preventing the bombardment;
fraud was discovered.
an
inconsistency concerning which it is worthwhile for us, in
Two other cheques were drawn by him in his own name the interests of commerce and of international
law, to utter
and the certification marks of the Continental and Union a timely word.
banks were forged thereon.
The belligerent right of the Spaniards to bombard Val
Of these cheques one was for
$63,125 and the other for $63,062 50. They were duly paraiso is contested by Commodore Rodgers in his report
paid away by him to respectable firms from whom he had upon the theory that as “ the mode of warfare proposed by
bought gold, and were detected after passing through the Spain seemed to him (Commodore Rodgers) such as would
Clearing House.
provoke private animosity rather than coerce national will,
The third species of fraud was, if possible, of a still more it was not directed to its
legitimate end, and consequently
dangerous character, and consisted of the forging of bonds of might be resisted.” Now, putting aside all question as to
the Michigan Central Railroad. "VYe have examined some the abstract
decency or indecency of the Spanish action
of these alleged forgeries and they
certainly are so well exe¬ against Valparaiso, in regard to which no question will pro¬
cuted that without the use of a powerful lens no one would
bably be raised outside of Spain itself, it is certainly most
for a moment think of
challenging or suspecting their genu fortunate that Commodore Rodgers’ practical second thought
ineness. Of this fact no further proof need be
sought than occurred to him in time to arrest the putting into effect of
is offered by the fact that not
only the Union Bank but also his theoretical first intention.
the eminent firm of Groesbeck & Co. were induced to
It is a lamentable thing that in the latter half of the nine¬
accept
some of these bonds as collaterals for a loan.
It is, how¬ teenth century a Power which is
seeking, like Spain, to re¬
ever, worthy of note that the forger had the adroitness to lull cover something of its long-lost
prestige among the nations
suspicion asleep by first purchasing through the last-named of Christendom, should sully its flag by such a military
firm some genuine bonds
bearing precisely the same num¬ policy as the government of Isabella II. has seen fit to adopt
bers which he subsequently
impressed on his fictitious ones. towards the Republic of Chile. But it would be a thing
Such is a general view of the
astounding series of crimes still more lamentable, that the authority to plunge great na¬
with which John Ross is
charged. He is still, we believe, tions like the United States and England into war should be
at large and is
reported to have converted the proceeds of vested in naval commanders on distant stations, acting upon
his crimes into
their own opinion of the probable moral effect of
compound interest notes.
It is not
belligerent
very^
complimentary to our detective police system that he still measures adopted by one of two belligerent parties, in whose
continues to elude its vigilance.
vicinity the said commanders might happen to be cruising.
Some very irritating controversies have arisen out of this The emotional satisfaction which the American
people might
case
among the losing creditors of the absconding criminal, have derived from hearing that a Spanish fleet had been sunk
which will probably be adjudicated in the courts of law. Into
by the guns of our squadron defending the harbor and city
these we of course forbear at
present to enter. There is? of Valparaiso, would have been dearly purchased by the es¬
however, one general caution which is obviously suggested tablishment of a precedent more than likely to work serious
by the facts of this case ; namely, that the present system of harm and embarrassment to ourselves at some future time.
certifying checks in this city needs improvement. In the
Upon the theory of Commodore Rodgers, the captain of an
hurry of a business so extended and so rapidly increasing as English or French man-of-war of sufficient force lying in the
9 ‘that of
many of our principal brokers, too much care can¬ harbor of Greytown at the time of the bombardment of that
inal.

<r




are

were




THE

648

[May 5,1S66.

CHRONICLE.

place by Commander Hollins, would have been justified in
opening his batteries upon the American vessel engaged in
that act.
Upon the same theory, too, France or England
would have been justified in declaring war against the Union
for the purpose of breaking the blockade of Charleston, it
having been abundantly published to the world at the begin¬
ning of our late civil strife that the leading statesmen of
those countries looked upon that blockade as calculated to
“provoke private animosity rather than coerce national will.”
Logical and moral consistency would have forbidden Com¬
modore Rodgers to abandon his purpose of saving A alparaiso, conceived as a lofty duty of humanity and interna¬
tional law, out of any regard either to his own personal and
professional safety in the premises, or to the relative im¬

passed imposing heavy taxes upon

transactions of brokers

smuggled through with
a
secresy which indicates that its promoters were afraid to
have it submitted to the test of public opinion, and with a
suddenness which shows that it was deemed unsafe to admit
the discussion of it^ merits.
The main features of the bill
consist in the imposition of the following rates of duty upon
and auctioneers.

The

measure was

the sales of brokers and

auctioneers :

First—All wines and ardent
of $1 on every -Si00.
Second—All goods, wares,

spirits, foreign or domestic, at

merchandise and effects imported from any

place beyond the Cape of Good Hope, at the rate
$ 100.
Third—All other

goods,

the rate

wares,

merchandise

production of any foreign country, at the rate
every §100.

of fifty cents on every

or effects which are the
of seventy-five cents on

Probably the sales and resales at New York of the classes
of commodities here subjected to tax will not aggregate be¬
low 8600,000,000 per annum.
On a large proportion of the
should have been thus logically and morally inconsistent.
products "the wholesale profits are very light ; so that a tax
We think, however, that the government at Washington of A@ 1 per cent amounts to a serious drawback upon the
will lose no time in taking such decisive action in concert gains of the merchant.
The duty would, of course, have to
with the powers most largely interested in the South Pacific be charged by the agent upon the buyer or seller. If upon
commerce, to bring this senseless and dangerous quarrel be¬ the seller, he would find it unremunerative to continue his
tween Spain and the South American States to q close.
That I business, and would either remove to some place where he
both parties to the quarrel are in the wrong is palpably ap¬ could supply his customers free from the tax, or employ his
parent, and it is by no means clear that dhe Chilians, who* capital in some other manner. If upon the buyer, lie
would prefer making his purchases at Boston or Philadel¬
seem to have been originally the less responsible of the two
for the outbreak of hostilities, are not to-day, to say the least, phia, where commerce is free from such imposts.
In either
quite as much to blame as the Spaniards for the continuance case, the trade of New York would inevitably be seriously
of these hostilities.
damaged. A duty of A@1 per cent upon wholesale trans¬
In the present temper of civilization smalt and weak States actions is quite sufficient to render an important proportion
of tjie trade of this cifcy unprofitable; and having that effect,
are in less danger than ever they were in before, of suffering
injury at the hands of stronger communities ; but precisely its ultimate result would be to banish a large amount of our
For years, Boston held a compara¬
for this reason, small States are much more sorely tempted business to other cities.

British and the American interests put in
jeopardy by the Spanish fleet. But it is very satisfactory,
we
repeat, that our high-spirited and sympathetic sailor
portance of the

and offer tive monopoly of the trade in Eastern products; the muni¬
especially cipal authorities imposed a tax of J per cent upon sales of
true of such small States as the Spanish-American republics, teas, and ever since, that important trade has been held by
which enjoy an extensive commerce with the rest of the New York merchants. The policy of our own Legislature
world, carried on chiefly by foreign enterprise, and sustained is to drive that branch of commerce, and other branches
by foreign capital. In the case of Valparaiso, for example along with it, back again to Boston, by the imposition of
it is admitted that the damage done by the recent bombard¬
duty double that which banished it from thence. In the
ment, fell in an overwhelming proportion upon the French. foreign wool trade there has always been a close competition
English, German, and American property; and it needs but between this city and Boston. The New England metropo¬

ever before were, to inflict injury' upon
insult to their more powerful neighbors. This is
than

they

a

make one understand lis has an important advantage in being nearer to the manu¬
how much more easy and agreeable it must be for a Chilian facturers of that section than New York, and it has been
Congress to pass patriotic resolutions, and for a Chilian exe¬ only by dint of superior enterprise that the wool brokers of
cutive to exhort his people to bear calamity with courage, this city have been able to secure the lion’s share of this
when the charges of executing these resolutions and the bur¬ important branch of commerce. The Eastern manufacturers,
den of that calamity are mainly to fall, not upon Chilian, but aware that they must pay A@4 per cent more here than at
Boston, may, of course, be expected to give the preference
upon foreign shoulders.
to the Boston market.
There are mills in New England
The United States already have a very extended system
a

slight knowledge of human nature, to

of intercourse with States

their

situated

as

Chili is, in respect to

foreign relations of commerce and finance.

which "ivo their half million
O

-

aware

three

that,

or

'

can

those

into this market when they are
their purchase, they must pay to the State

Our geo¬ buyers be expected to

graphical position in the world, and the peculiar genius of
our people, make it certain that this system of intercourse

orders for wool:

come

upon
four thousand dollars ? In this

city there is sold, annu¬

further, and, indeed, indefinitely

ally, not less than 8*25,000,000 of dry goods at public auction.
developed; and while we are heartily ready to join with the By the removal of these goods to Philadelphia or Boston
civilized world, in reprobating whatever of atrocity or outrage for sale, the importers could save about 8200,000of duty;
may mark the course of Spain towards Chili, or any other is it to be supposed that such an important economy would
power, we owe it to ourselves not to be over-hasty in inter¬ not induce the selling of a large amount of dry goods at
posing precedents of American origin between the power of those cities ? And would not the increase of auctions at those
the Union and the many possible or probable rites, to which places, tend to divert thither much of the private trade in
American honor and American interests are now, or may be foreign dry goods of which wo have now almost an exclu.
hereafter exposed, at any one or another point in the vast sive advantage % The new duties may be shown to operate
circumference of our commercial relations with the rest of similarly in the case of all the leading branches of our for¬
mankind.
'
eign commerce. These allusions serve to show that the enforcement of this law must result in incalculable injury w
THE STATE TAX ON SALES.
with such States must be still

public are taken by surprise with the dis¬
that, at the late session of the Legislature, a bill was

The commercial
covery

of this port.

before
banish trade from New York

Indeed, had the problem

the

commerce

the

Legislature been, how to

May 5,1866.J
to

THE

CHRONICLE.

competing cities of New England and Pennsylvania,
better solution could have been given than this very me a

the

no

sure.

We

are

at a loss to conceive what motive

can

have led

to

adoption of this suicidal act. If it be supposed that the
aim was simply revenue, then it is difficult to conceive that
a body of men, undertaking to legislate for the largest and
wealthiest State on the Continent, could be so utterly ignor¬
ant as ndt to perceive that the measure is fraught with the
most serious danger to our commerce.
If we assume that
the object sought was the multiplication of lucrative offices
for politicians ; then we are compelled to admit that legisla¬
tive corruption has gained an ascendancy utterly incompatible
with commercial prosperity.
Some regard the measure as
instigated by a few merchants, who desire to get rid of the
mediation of brokers and auctioneers.
This supposition
would seem to be countenanced by the fact, that the duty is
imposed upon the transactions of these parties only; and
the

bond of S5,000, with two sureties, is required from them
by the law. The middlemen are no doubt a thorn in the side
of merchants who would prefer coming into direct con.
that

a

549

indifferent.

W hatever may be the result of the
pre¬
sent agitation, it
may be regarded as certain, that if the
Legislature of the State of New York will not, at an early
are

not

day, authorize the commencing'of this work, the Western
producers will find an outlet to the possible detriment of the
commerce

of the State.

A bill to

incorporate the Niagara Ship Canal Company had
already passed both Houses of Legislature at Albany, and
was
signed by the Governor on Tuesday of last week. It
empowers the company to construct a canal of sufficient di¬
mensions to carry
shipping from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario ;

reserving the right to the State at a future day of purchas¬
ing and operating it as a part of the canal system. The
Senate, however, attached to the bill the extraordinary proviso,
that the company should not
begin the work till the Erie
Canal shall have been enlarged to a
capacity enabling it to
carry boats of a size capable of holding twenty-five thousand
bushels of corn. The friends of the measure were
obliged
to accede to

this, and remain

content with

a

law which

re¬

cognizes the principle they had in view, although leaving it
to future legislation to allow it
to be put into practice. The
tact with buyers.
The auctions, too, are regarded as a nui¬ folly, as well as absurdity of this measure of the admirers
sance by a class of importers who
prefer doing their business of the canal, has been demonstrated at a very early period
at private sale.
The broker and the auctioneer, however, by this action of Congress overridingandpromising to super¬
perform important services to both buyers and sellers, for a sede the dilatory proceeding of the Legislature of the State.
very moderate charge; and no stronger evidence of their
We do not share in the apprehension which have been
put
value to the community could be given, than the fact
they forth, that the construction of the Niagara Ship Canal would
are so extensively employed.
They supply the brain and both reduce the revenues of the Canal Fund, and divert a
energy of our exchanges; and we could" no more dispense large part of the Western commerce from its
present chan¬
with their functions, than the jobber could conduct his busi. nels.
Every increase of the means of transportation on this
ness without
buyers or salesmen.
continent will add to the volume and
profits of business. We
Serious doubts are entertained of the
constitutionality of have everything to gain, and nothing to lose by' the adoption
the law; and the question will probably be tested at an
early of a liberal policy. The matter of revenue to the State, even
day before the courts. The bill has the serious defect in if it should be diminished, is a minor consideration. It is
construction that it imposes a tax without
specifying the not a wise or statesmanlike policy to construct public works
object to which the proceeds shall be applied ; while Art. for the sake of income. The
province of Government is to
VII, § 13 of the State constitution provides that—
promote the public welfare, and for doing this it is entitled

“Every law which imposes, continues or revives a tax, shall distinct¬
ly state the tax, and the object to which it shall be applied; and it shad
not be sufficient to refer to
any other lawr to fix such tax or object/’
It would seem probable that,

upon this ground at least, the
pronounced unconstitutional.
rarely seen the mercantile community so exasp¬
erated under a sense of
legislative outrage. All feel that
their interests are
gravely threatened, and that an immediate
We cannot but hope that the au¬
remedy must be found.
law may be
We have

thorities will hold the execution of the law in
abeyance until
either the courts have declared it

islature has cancelled the

unconstitutional,

or

the leg¬

wrong.
O

THE NIAGARA SHIP CANAL
The bill to
and make

an

incorporate the Niagara Ship) Canal Company,

to

support from taxation.

When private enterprise is re¬
come into
competition with
public works, then the Government is assuming the prerog¬
atives of a despot, and overstepping its
legitimate sphere. If
the canals of the State are not operated so as to
produce a
revenue sufficiently ample to pay their expenses,
it must be
be evident that their management is too costly, or that they
have become inadequate for the requirement of commerce.
This is an age when rapidity of movement is often of the ut¬
most importance.
Then, again, it is a violation of the comity existing between
the States and districts of our country, for New York to
interpose barriers to commerce, on the pretext that her rev¬
enues are in danger.
The policy is unjustifiable as well as
short-sighted. New York cannot prosper except the other
a

stricted because it threatens to

appropriation in aid of the enterprise, passed
parts of the Union are also prospering.
Indeed, the com¬
Representatives at Washington on Wednesday. manding position, in point of wealth, &c., of this common¬
It is now under the consideration
of the Committee on Com¬
wealth, her advancement from a fourth to tie first rank in the
merce of the
Senate, and will probably be reported favorably. sisterhood of States, is owing almost entirely to the liberal
Public opinion has
rapidly matured in its favor, and it has character of her policy in commercial .matters. It is no time
in former
years attracted attention in
Congress.
Mr. now to hesitate; the same generous liberality should be con¬
Lincoln, it is well known, was always ardent and positive in
tinued, and then we may rely confidently upon the operation
the expressions of his
opinion in its favor. The last Con¬ of the laws which govern commerce to assure our pros¬
gress repeatedly debated the
matter; and now we find it perity.
again under consideration. It is claimed that it falls
legiti.
We have no dread of the formation of a new. outlet for
mately within the scope of the powers to regulate commerce
the trade of the West through the St. Lawrence river.
Ex¬
and therefore is within the
sphere of Congressional legisla¬
perience has shown that this is hardly practicable. Vessels
tion. Boston and
New'England have, perhaps, as much in¬ to cross the ocean
require deep keels and sharp bottoms;
terest in the matter as the
city and State of New York; and
whereas, owing to the shallowness of the harbors of the
the efforts
put forth by Eastern capitalists to secure railway
Western lakes, only broad flat-bottomed shipping can enter
communication with Lake Ontario and Canada show
they them. This makes it necessary to break bulk at an intermethe House of







[May 5,1806..

CHRONICLE.

THE

550

IMPORTS

FOREIGN

OF

NEW YORK FOR FOUR

AT

DRY GOODS

favors incalculably the con¬
MONTHS FROM JANUARY 1ST.
channels. Besides, half the
CONSUMPTION.
1864.
1865.
1S63.
year, the river is bound with ice, at the period when the re¬
Manufactures of wool
$6,861,142 $12,059,855 $3,913,621
quirements of western commerce for an open route to the
2,512,164
3,7S4,246
1,453,459
do
cotton
do
silk
3,633,481
7,405,105
2,157,747
seaboard are most imperative.
Indeed, it is almost as haz¬
do
flax
3,091,743
4,003,485
1,975,910
Miscellaneous dry goods.
646,607
1,122,950
1,826,752
ardous to navigate the St. Lawrence as to double Cape
Horn.
Hence, so far, every endeavor to open trade with : Total entered for consumption. $17,221,480 $29,079,443 $10,147,344
WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE.
1863.
1864.
1865.
Europe through that river, has been abandoned.
Manufactures of wool
$1,251,563 $2,794,252 $1,2,370,219
Besides we have a competition, more formidable than the j
do
cotton
563,839
1,191,681
1,371,149
1,344,587
do
silk
910,3-15
1,617,664
St. Lawrence, and a hundred millions of Canadian capital to
do
flax
1,529,384
494,850
1,367,213
a necessity which
tinuance of trade in its present

diate

point;

FOR

ENTERED

1866.

$12,915,558
7,884,277

8,334,863
5,997,799

8,192,021
$38,324,018
1866.

$5,845,379
3,286,245
2,865,798
2,100,470

•

The termination of the war has

be invested in Canada.

Miscellaneous

given the Mississippi to the West and the restoration of com¬
merce down
that river, has already affected, the carrying
business.
This was to have been expected, and not to be de¬

come

We have

this view will

We

FOREIGN

GOODS

DRY
MONTH

ENTERED

OF

and

YORK

j

do
do
do
do
do

1864.

THE

$1,763,674

285,675
655,567
419.287

404.666

350,847

1,085,482

723.072

1,040,900
1,295,425

810,588
330,168

381,305

1,247,103

134.506

687.188

$4,273,441

$2,509,347

$6,640,286
V

WITHDRAWN

FROM WAREHOUSE.

1863.

Manufactures of wool
do
do

Miscellaneous dry
Total withdra’n
Add entered for

goods

313,201

777.933

288.331
283.752

803,563

71,669

46,356

2,350,802

.

$3,198,455 $6,778,550

the market...
ENTERED

FOR

Miscellaneous dry goods
Total entered for warehousing.
Add entered for consumption..

Total entered at the

port

Below we give the figures

$689,695
506,106
201,611
474.128

71,605

1S64.

$487,551
92,727
154,697

2,509,340

$3,966,376

$10,948,407

1865.

$301,108
212,271
211,803
460.187

68,449

.84,900

$946,804

$1,360,359
2,500,347

4,273,441

$4,384,007

$5,220,245

$1,177,867,292 $1,180,236,342 $1,186,092,843
$118,577,939

$121,751,970

131.497,854

62,264,000
8,536,900
174,012,141

62,258,000
8,536,900
172,012,141

62,620,000
6,036,900
167,012,141

2,362,000

2,362,000

2,362,000

1,632,000

2,272,000

2,272,000

s..

V 818,044,000

817,014,000

816,512,650

s..

)

lawful

$1,179,475,236 $1,186,207 011 $1,188,313,545

INTEREST HAS CEASED.

$167,350)

$930,680

$877,730

$930,680

$877,730

$423,435,373
$423,435,373

$422,749,252

27,523,734

28,005,452

$415,164,818
28,192,017

$450,959,107
$450,959,1(

$451,754,704

$443,356,885

618,000
200,630

indemnity Bonds.

and notes

\cro-re"ate of debt on

00hasceased

which interest

Currency

Gold certificates

AnTount

INTEREST.

9,665,160

9,036,420

$463,5S6,707 $461,419,864

$452,392,755

$55,736,192
$o5,736,192

$62,069,701
60,077,680

$76,676,407

$116,018,959
$116,018,959

$122,147,381

$137,987,029

12,627,600
12,627,6

of deposit

Aggregate of debt

}

$985,780
G NO

bearing no interest

in Treasury—

Coin

*

60,282,767
60,282,767

Currency
Total in Treasury
Debt bearing interest, in coin
,...
Debt bearing inter’st in lawful money
Debt on which interest has ceased...
Debt bearing no interest ;

186G.

$1,578,336
572,138
756,657

520,482
156,487

for the four months of the year :

kinds'

LEGAL

One and two

61,310,622

$1,177,867,292 $1,180,236,342 $1,186,092,842
-1,185,428,980 1,186,207,011 1,188,313,545
985,780 930,680
877,730
463,586,707 461,419,864 452,392,755
$2,827,868,759 $2,827,793,896 $2,827,676,872
19'? Ofl'? fK>Q
116,018,959 122,147,381 137,987,029
in;

nio

TENDER NOTES IN

years’ 5 per cent notes..

United States notes

(currency)

.’

nsn

Cate0t ilTonetarg anir

100 t An

001

CIRCULATION.

$8,536,900
423,435,373

174,012,141
Aggregate legal tender notes in circul $605,984,414
years’ 6 per ct comp. int. notes

$8,536,900
422,749,252
172,012,141

$6,036,900
415,164,318
167,012,141

$603,298,293

$588,213,359

Commercial Cnglwl)
\

[From our own

$3,590,094

Correspondent.]
London, Saturday,

6,640,286

$3,969,706 $10,230,380

of all

Cash in treasury

Three

143,410

$2,033,205
2,350,802

Texas

a™rebate debts

$4,308,121
0,640,286

WAREHOUSING.,

1S63.
Manufactures of wool
do
cotton
do
silk
do
flax

682,020
135,050

$2,205,109 $1,457,029
4,273,441

1,016,000
75,000,000

75,000,000

Three-years’ Notes

cent

do

Other bonds

171,219,100

1,016,000
75,000,000

INTEREST IN LAWFUL MONET.

DEBT ON WHICH

7.30 per

171,219,100

1,016,000

I860.

$1,818,040

324.103
533.368
503,733

$847,653

from wareh’se..
consumption..,

Total thrown on

1865,

$525,209

38,077

silk
flax

money

100,000,000
71,(03.500

18,415,000

'RECAPITULATION.

86.226
235.352
113.442

cotton

do

1S64.

$373,656 $1,072,236

.

of debt bearing
interest

Vo-rrreoate

100,000,000
65.175.500

172,769,100

Fractional currency

$910,037

consumption. $2,350,802

61,263,000

100,000,000

I860.

1805.

$1,543,537

159,309

2d
3d

o
do
o
do

do
do

50,000,000
139,313,150
614,780,500

514,780,500

(Union Pacific
.n., E.
R.R., rj. Div.
i.n., 1st s.. )
vears’ treas.

Three

8,908,343
20,000,000
7,022,000

20,000.000
7,022,000
18,415,000
60.000,000
139,284,650
514.780.500

50,000,000
139,288,110

cific R.)....

7.20 do
7.30 do
7.30 do

May 1.
$9,415,250

8,908,312

8,908,342
20,000,000
7,022.000
18,415.000

do

do

April 1.
$9,415,250

$9,415,250

31,1867.

cent Temporary Loan1J 10 days’ \
do
j notice, f
do
Certificates (oneyear).
One and two-years' notes
Three years’ com. int.notes..
Thirty-year bonds (Central Pa¬

do
do
do
do
do
do

COIN.

March 1.

United States Notes

$830,954

Manufactures of wool
do
cdttou
silk
do
do
flax
Miscellaneous drygoods

,

DEBT BEARING

FOR

DEBT.

BEARING INTEREST IN

Aggregate of debt bearing coin interest

6

$65,706,857

of the public debt, prepared from
of the Treasury, for March 1, April 1

July 1,1S68.
January 1. 1874
r..
January 1,1871
December 31,1880
June 30,1881..
June 30.1801, exe’d for 7.30s
May 1, 1867-82 (5.20 years)..
Nov. 1, 1870-85 [5.20 years)
Nov. 1,1870-84 (5 20 years)
March 1.1874-1904 (10.40s).
J uly 1, '81 (Oregon war) ...
J uile 30,1881

t

4 per

$5,121,286 $17,382,289
10,147l344 38,324,018

$23,885,626 $35,477,140 $15,268,630

May 1, idfifi :

do
do
do
do
do

CONSUMPTION.

FOR

$6,397,697
29,079,443

3,039,508
3,363,159
2,595,851

give below the statement

Denominations.
6 per cent, due December

NEW YORK.

NEW

545,487

$6,664,146
17,221,480

port

DEBT

APRIL.

1803.

Total entered for

AT

239,118

reports of the Secretary

the

give below our usual monthly review of the imports of foreign
dry goods at New York. The total for the month shows a decrease
over the other men hs of the year, as we stated would be the case in
our reviews for February and March.
Still the total for the mouth is
much larger than the same periods of any other year given below, and
the figures for the four months are very greatly in excess of the previous
years, being $55,706,557 this year, against $15,268,630 for 1865, and
$35,477,140 for 1863. While we are importing so extensively, it is
gratifying to know that our exports are also unusually large. The total
cotton exported from the whole country since September has, as will
be seen in our cotton report in this number of the Chronicle, reached
now a little over 1.250,000 bales, thus giving the United States a credit
abroad of about $200,000,000. The following is the movement of
foreign dry goods at New York for April:,
OF

237,576

THE UNITED STATES

We

IMPORTS

253,441

flax

991,963
707,244
1,312,012

792,144
1,3:15,741
971,213

1,310,197
1,352,693
1,167,805

dry goods

Total entered at the

House of Representatives.

IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS AT

$7,838,889

silk

Total entered for warehousing.
Add entered for consumption..

maturity the action initiated by the

out to carry out to

1866.

$1,870,949

cotton

do
do
do

Miscellaneous

i

adopted by the great majority of our citizens. When the
ship-canal bill was introduced into the Assembly, it did not
have thirty supporters, and yet so thoroughly convinced
were the members by the discussion, able on both sides and
exhaustive of the subject, that it received a large majority.
If it had been canvassed and debated as ably and fully in the
Senate, the proviso which we have mentioned would never
have been appended.
But the measure has only been post¬
poned. The Legislature of 1 Still has given it acknowledg¬
ment, and another one will, we trust, remove the impedi¬
ments ; if the Senate of the United States should hesitate to
carry

/

I

be ultimatelv

1865.

$3,061,023

$2,580,009

Manufactures of wool

eastward with less hindrance.
doubt that

no

WAREHOUSING;
lSb4.

FOR

1863.

But the desire to maintain our own supremacy
should induce our people to ask and grant the construction j
of a new route eastward, which will enable the products of j

491,082

-

$6,956,S81 $14,588,922
10,147,344 38,324,018
$20,596,341 $36,281,078 $17,104,225 $62,912,942
$7,201,635
29,079,443

$3,374,861
17,221,480

ENTERED

precated.

the west to

maiket...

Total thrown outlie

341,542

230,825

154,264

dry goods.

Toral withdra’n from wareh’se-.
Add entered for consumption..

April 21, I860.

sud¬
Bwfrt

prominent feature in this week’s financial news, is the
den and unexpected annpancemenfc of £he suspension of Banned s
The moat

May 6,1866.]

THE CHRONICLE.

Company at Liverpool.

This bank

was founded in the year 1809,
private undertaking under the title
of Messrs. Barned <fc Co. until July last year, when it was organized
on
the basis of a joint-stock company under the Limited
Liability Act.
The purchase money for the business was fixed at £160,000, and the
amount of capital authorized was two millions sterling, in
forty thou¬
sand shares of fifty pounds each. Up to the present time, £10
per
share has been called up, thus leaving the
proprietors of the bank, who
are said to number 600, responsible
for £40 per share. The announce¬
ment was made on Wednesday last, and at that time the
suspension

mg

and the business

was

551

carried

•r

For week

on as a

attributed to the withdrawal of facilities by the London
agents of
the Bank. At present, the public is
was

•-

ending April 21.

Mon. Tues. Wed.

United States 5-20’s, 6
per cent
Virginia 6 per cent..."
do
5.per cent
Atlantic and Great Western, New
York

69*

69*

cent’1875
$100 shares, all paid...
7 per

“

Marrietta and Cincinnati. 7 per cent...
New York Central, 100 dollar shares...

Panama Rail, 7 per cent, 187*2, 2d

Fri.

70*
56*
51

74

Pennsylvania section, 1st mortgage
do

69*
56*
51

51

section, 1st mortgage,

consolidated mort. bonds
Erie shares, 100 dollars, all
paid
do Convertible bonds, 6
per cent
Illinois Central, 6 per
cent, 1875
“

Thur.

74

70*
56
50

66*

‘

70
56
50

74
72
65

73
53

Sa

66

74
72
65

54*
74*

53

54*

54*

73*

74
82

74*

34*
74*

81

81

73*

72*
80*

72*

79*

69

79*

69

69

67*

67*

IH.83
72

79*

...

..

81

67*

mort.

101

101

81

72*

102

102
unacquainted with .the details of Pennsylvania R. R. Bonds, 2d mort,, 6
per cent
the affair, but the matter will soon
SI
81
81
81
be^placed in competent hands, and
$50 shares
40
40
40
40
it is hoped the position of the shareholders will
Philadelphia and Erie, 1st mortgage,
prove less unfavorable
1881, (gua. bv Penu. Railroad Co)
73
73
73
73
than was at one time anticipated. The total liabilities are said to be
do
with option to he paid in
Philadelphia
£3,260,000. This suspension has necessarily operated prejudicially on
73
73
73
Canada 6 per cent,
1.
94
94
94*
94
94*
94
the market for banking and financial
do
5 per cent,
78
companies’ shares, more especially
78*
7S*
78*
78*
on the latter.
The fall in prices, however, is not
heavy, the effect of the
The recent heavy fall in the value of cotton has
necessarily created
present failure being by no means so great as that caused by the revela¬ an uneasy feeling in commercial circles.
Already are several failures
tions as to the mode of conducting the business of the Joint Stock Dis¬ spoken of as likely to be announced
during the next few weeks, some
few
count Company. Nevertheless, the
quotations have, in many instances, in a houses, transacting business in a large way, being represented as
very unsatisfactory
given way, and at times considerable depression has been apparent. and as the present and position. The decline in cotton is now heavy,
prospective supplies are large—much larger than
The affairs of the Joint-Stock Discount
Company are now seldom talked was anticipated a few months since by even the most sanguine—it does
of, but several of the directors, who held office at the boards of other not seem possible that any recovery is likely to take place. The de¬
cline of the present week is not the result of
undertakings, have been compelled to resign their positions.
any want of buyers, for
the sales both for home
consumption and for export have been quite
On the other hand, the consol market has become
firmer, chiefly from
“

two causes,

viz., the

pacific intelligence respecting the relations of
Austria and Prussia ; and, secondly, from increased investments on the
part of the public. The quotations, however, are still low, but are
about one-half per cent above the late lowest
point. The highest prices
on the
days enumerated were :
more

FOR

THE WEEK

ENDING

APRIL

86*

86*

21.

87

86*

h

Stock at
“

1S65.
bales.

Sat’day.

87*

87*

Hie demand for money

for commercial purposes during the week has
decidedly limited. In the open market the quotations have given
way, money being obtainable at ^ to, in some instances, ^ per cent be¬
low the bank rate, so far as the best
paper is concerned. The directors
of the Bank of England have not made
any change in their minbeen

1866.
bales.

575,480

Liverpool

in London

819,890
120,258
100,000

70,607

American cotton afloat
Indian cotton afloat

Monday. Tuesday. Wed’day Thnr’day Friday.
Consols

up to the average. The fall, therefore, is to be attributed to the abun¬
dance of the
supply. The extent of this supply will be seen in the
annexed statement of the amount of stock at and afloat for
Liverpool
and London at this date:

30,000
348,400

Total

551,150

:

1,024,487
1,591,298
From the above it will be seen that our
supplies are now almost 600,000 bales in excess of last
year, and the total

supply actually on hand,
including the quantity afloat, is equal to the wants of spinners and ex¬
porters—estimating these requirements at 60,000 bales weekly—for a
period of 26 weeks. The following comparison sh6ws the extent of the
decline in the value of cotton since the first of
April:
Mar. 31.
d.

Middling Upland

Apr. 21.

Fan

d.

d.

14*
14*
14*

Orleans

4*
4*
4*

19*
Mobile
discount, and, from the nature of the bank return, it was
18*
Egyptian
15
5
certainly impossible for them to have altered their limit for accommo¬
Broach
8*
4*
dation. The statement, indeed, exhibits a
falling off in the demand for
Arrangements have recently been completed for stowing the new
cable on board the Great Eastern
discount, the decrease in “ securities” being to the extent of
steamship. Two hundred miles of
£406,000; cable have
already been conveyed to the ship from the works of the
but, on the other hand, the reserve of notes and coin has been
largely
According to
diminished, whilst there is a diminution of £345,000 in the supply of Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Company,
present arrangements, the Great Eastern will start on her new voyage
bullion. In some respects, however, the
position of the money market at the end of June, or at the beginning of July.
Considerable anxiety has been felt as to the
is satisfactory, and there is a
tendency to lower rates thereby en¬
safety of the Inman
Steamship City of Washington, which left New York for Liverpool
gendered ; but still the large shipments of cotton from Bombay, and on
the 31st of March. The City of Baltimore, which left New York on
the possibility, therefore, of a drain of silver to the
East in payment of the 6th of
April, has arrived, but has brought no tidings of the missing
the material exported to this
country, will cause the directors of the vessels. Twenty guineas premium have been.paid at Lloyd’s to effect
bank to act with caution. The latest news from
Bombay shows a fa¬ past insurances.
imum rate of

......

vorable movement in the

exchange, so far as this country is concerned,
quotation on London being 2s l£d per rupee ; but, as the par of
exchange is Is ll£d, the rate is far from satisfactory. The last sale of
bills on India by the India Council
showed, however, that the demand
the

for remittance to the East has fallen

off, but considerable quantities of
gold have recently been withdrawn for shipment to France,
evidently
for the purchase of silver for
export from Marseilles ; and the silver
market, though quiet, exhibits firmness. The quotations for accommo¬
dation in the open market are as follows:
Per Cent.

1
5*@.
I 4 months’bills
6*@ V% 6 months’ Dills
5
| 6&4 months’ bank paper...

30days’ bills....

60 do
do
3 months’ bills

*

On the Continent there have been several

advance; at Hamburg,
rate is
very

uncertain,

decline iu the

a

so

that

Bank
rate.

$

At Paris

c.

no

Open
$

Frankfort

Bank

6*

Turin
Brussels
Madrid

...

Open

rate.
$ c.

c.

5

Amsterdam

an

At Turin the

be given:

can

market.

5*
5*-6

Berlin

quotation

6*(fo
6 (g>

at Frankfort,

:

rate of discount.

reliable

3*

Vienna

changes

Per Cent
6 (fo

St. Petersburg...

4

1

•

6*

bonds,

at

instances, had
mentioned




a

and prices have, in

Total for the week

some

were as

under;

the

Week.—The

1864.

E*
6*-7

drooping tendency. The behest pricey pp the days

for

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.

Drygoods

considerably extensive dealings in United States
fluctuating, but at improving prices. Other American

securities have been in but moderate
request,

Exports

imports this week are
general merchandise and dry goods, being $6,229,635
against $7,624,164 last week. The exports are $4,718,633 this week
against1 $6,255,521 last week. Included in the exports are 16,816
bales of cotton, 570 bbls pot ashes, 22,362 bbls wheat
flour, 2,455bbls
cornmeal, 37,562 bush rye, 81,236 bush oats, 7,868 bush peas, 43,582
bush corn, 378,350 galls petroleum, 3,623 bbls
pork, 644 bbls and 1,161
tcs beef, 1,315,431 pounds cutmeats, 11,491
pounds butter, 89,056
pounds cheese, 189,281 pouds lard, 11 bbls rice, 110,100 pounus tallow,
682 hhds and 2,522 other pkgs crude tobacco, 77,333
pounds manufac¬
tured do, as may be seen from our
summary of articles exported given
in the Commercial Epitome.
The following are the imports at New
York for week ending (for dry-goods)
April 27th, and for the week
ending (for general merchandise) April 28 :

4*

There have been
6-20

and

both in

$ c.

—

•

Imports

less

market.

—

Hamburg

COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.

...

General merchandise....

Previously reported.
Since January 1

In

1865.

$1,340,534

$425,924
696,6:36

6,128,399

$7,468,933
70,992,041

$78,460,974

1866.

1

$1,906,886
4,322,749

$1,122,560
43,765,244

$6,229,635
110,739,557

$44,S87,804

$116,969,192

report of the dry-goods trade will be found the imports of dry
goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
specie) from
tfce jpprt of New York to foreign ports, for the week ending *£ay 1 \
our

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THE

'
$2,008,843

1866.

1865.

$2,499,208

$2,953,674

62,209,804

For the week

4y,586,768

Previously reported

Course

WEEK.

1864.

1S63.

$4,718,603

department will be found tlie official detailed
ment of the imports and exports for the week
The following will show the exports of specie from the port of
York, for the week ending April 28, 1S66 :
Apr. 25—Brig Ed. Hill, Ponce—

27—Brig Madeira, Para^—
27—Brig Bachelor, Arroyo—

27—Steamer

New

C-,

O

Sunday
Monday
Tuesday

c.

O
•

Teutonia, Hamburg—

126% 127%

127%! 128 \ <4 27%'1328 |'Saturday,
128 % > 128% j 127% j 127% i (Sunday
127 Jo 127% 127% [12778

3
4
5

6428

j

[Same time in

Same time in
1865
1864...
1863
1862
1861
1860
1859.-.

$9,942,869
“8.571,581

$5,425.21611858
16,189.879 1S57
16,985,080| 1856
12.909,782; 1855
2,500,000 1854

6.057,265

7,852,912
7,366.058
3,794,078

7,174,646j 1833
16,202,663j 1852

Rica arrived at

inst, from Aspinwall, bringing the California mails
following is her treasure list
FROM

e

SAN FRANCISCO.

A. Belmont & Co
Panama Railroad Co.
Walter Watson & C. M.
Mildred

Dabney, Morgan & Co....
Wells, Fargo & Co

77,670 95; Wells, Fargo & Co
93,437 6SJC. Stevens.

900 00

$65,017 21 [B. Collins...,,
21,333 5-1. Eugene Kelley & Co

86,500 00
32.326 15

j II. Marcuse

129.023 00 Bacon & Russell

25,500

A. E. & C. E. Tilton
Order
Lees & Waller
Total

31,782 19
.......

93,437 86
1.800 00

-

09, L. Marcence & Co

500,000 00: McKesson &> Robbins
250,000 00j

2,500 00

4s0 00

$1,318,270 72

The steamer Golden

/*ge sailed from San Francisco, for Panama,on
the 26th ult., with $1,060,909 in treasure, of which $776,505 was on
New York account, to arrive on the 10th or 11th of the^current month.
•

receipts of treasure from California since January 1, 1806, have

The

been

follows

a-?

12 TL

:

.1111263s' !l.:7%jl26%|12G%!! Supclay
|
|
29 j
Thursday.:... 12 127%'.127%! 127 i 127% j I Monday
30 127%
Friday
13427
-127 !l20%fl2G%|
Sat unlay
14j 126%; 126%, 125% 420% i April, 1860.., 128% 129%

19

Arizona

31

Henry Chauncey

New York.

7,983.155
8,372,992

9,040,607
9,770.4<i<)
10.585.92s

729,802
809.459
1,318,271

exports of treasure from March 1 to date have

March 2—Per White Swallow to Hong
March 6—Per Olga to Yokohama
March 10—Per Sacramento:
To New York
To England
—
To Panama
March 12—Per Jennie to Shanghae
March! 2—Per Jennie to Yokohama
March 14—Per Franklin to Ilong Kong

2,430.19s
3,879,26c,
5,088.31')
6,557,60o

673,615

New York
Arizona
Costa Rica

9

20
1

$ 085,016
1.485,314

1,469,286
1,425,553
3.89,837

Costa Rica

5.
12
23

To date

$ 685,610
799,706
.944.878
1,449,074
1,209.048

New York
‘
Henry Chauncey
Atlantic
New York
Henry Chauncey

February 1
February 9
February 21

April
April
May
The

been

11,904,199
as

follows

:

$635,631 36

Kong.

March 19—Per Golden Age:
To New York
To France
To Panama
March 22—Per Smyrniote to Honolulu
March 2S^-Pcr Rattler to Ilong Kong
March 2$—Per-Comet to Honolulu
March 30—Per Constitution:
To New York

10,000 00

188.449 8S

5,000 00—
A

$867,003 21
40.960 00
4.592 00
192.340 00

..

$710,753 21
,

.

20,000 00-

$873,303 21
20,000 00
342.57s 29

$309,459 44
7,354 86—

$439,334 88

$9,525,514 89
12,639,090 69

Decrease this year

$3,113,575 SO

Treasure Movement

at

the first four months of 1866, and the

corresponding period for the pre¬
the amount exported to foreign countries for
also

seven

years;
months and years :
—New Supply.Exports to
-Excess of
Foreign
Rec’pts from Foreign.. Total
Months, etc. California. Imports. Amount. Countries. N’w supply. Exports.
January.;.... $1,587,987 « $72,771 $1,560,758 $2,700,336 $
$1,015,588
February... A 3.600.072 t 172,122’ 3,772,494
1,807,030 --1,963,1(54March..
285.854’4,253.414
1,(415.039 - 3,208,405
3,9(77,590
191.719
April
1,731,040
590,662
1,140,373
-1,539,321
same

i

Quar. 1S66 10.694,970

“

1865 6.934,192
1864 4,164,850
3863 5.711,615
1802 8.131.197
3801 13,130,148
5860 11,902.650
.

“
“
“
“

“




Exchange

157
102

April.—The following table shows the

for

COURSE OF EXCHANGE FOR APRIL.

Day
1..
2

!
4..
5..
(>.-.
7..
8..
9..
10..
11..

12

.

13.
14..
15j_.
16..
17..
18..
1!)..

20..
21..

Amsterdam.
Paris,
cents lor
centimes
ilorin.
for dollar.

London,
cents for
.51 pence.

.j6»Vw<SW,%

537 W© 532%

11)0% (7(4 00%

533%@52S%

100 V©.ir>0%

r 33% (7/528%

100'%%/

©530

106%© 100%

535
535
534

10f.%(dyl00,%

535

106 V

100%©106,%

cents for

70
70

@70%'
@70%
@70%

■70

35.%'@35%
353« @35%

70
70

35

@33%
35%@3o%
77 '©77% 35% @35%
76/%@,77 3© 35% @35%
7(5% @77% 35% @35%
7 6% @77.% 3534© 35 X

69% ©70%
70% @70%
70 ©,70/%
70 ©70%

@40%
©40%
403* @40%
40 3-8 @40%

@77%
77%© 77%
77%©7.7%
77%@77%
77 ©>77%
77 ©77%;

35%@5o%
35%@;io%
35% @35%
35/% @35%
35% @35%
35%@35%

70%@70%
70% @71
70%@7l

76/%@77%

7034©70%

77% @78/%

35%'@35%
35# @35%
35% @36
35%@35%
35%@36

70%@77

(2/531%
(77530

39%@‘l6% 70%@,77* ’

76%@.77%

©40%
@40%

40/18@.40/%'
403u @40%'

528% ©523%
528%©523%

40

528%©,523%
528%© 525
528%@525

77

403a ©40%
40 @403%
40

528% @525

70%@77
76% @77%

(7740%

40
40

531 %©. 527%
107%© 107 % 530 ©526%
107% ©107%. 528%© 526 %
1073 j @10 7% 528%@526%

3 07 %@ 107%

107 V, ©108

thaler.

35%@35%
35,%@>35%
353 a @35%
35%©35%

39V@40%
3 9%@40%

@528%

1U7%©107%
107%©108
107%© 108

Berlin,
cents for

M. banco.

70%@77%
70% (7/; 77%
76%@77%

40

307%©;107%
107%'@107 3 s

Hamburg,

Piemen.

cents for
rix daler.

39?8'@40%
39%(7?,10.%
39%@-l0%
39%'©40>3

69%@70%

70
70

@70%
@7034

@70%

©70%

70%©; 71
70 @70%
70

@70%

1859 10,288,819

107%'© 107%
107%© 107%

528%© 523;%

40

528;%@525

77

107%©V108%

530

77%©78/%

35

70%©71
70% @71
70,%@7! %
70%©71%
70%@71%

$722,466 $11,417,430 $6,*149,067 $5,268,369 $
638:706 7,572,898" 5,461,216
2,111,682
020,1911 4.785.041 16,158,082 •
...11,373.041
546,554
Ch2qS, 169 .17,148,514
10,890,345
310,144
1
4,472,760
8,471,311 '12,944,101
17.035.703 30.365,851
2,876,296 27,289,555
7,177,734
5,282,421
657,505 12,460,155

527,615

10,816,431 14,279,959

'

©40%

@77%
77%@7S

@108%
@108/%'

©522%
526%©. 524%
5273* ©52;%

©108/%

527% @526%

403« ©40 3 a
40%@40;%
40/%@41
40 3 3 @41
40%© 41

29.-.
30..

106%@108%

5.23%©517%

40%@41

77%©/>7S%

35%@30/%

71

Apr

106? a @108%

537 (.<@51734

39%© 41

106%© 108%
107%©.10SJa
108 @109%

530©

70%©7S%
77 ©.78;%
77 ©,79
78 ©79%

35

Mar
Feb
Jan

69%@71%
70%©71%
70%@71%
71 @71%

24..
25..
26..

27..
28..

108
108
108

Gold

.

©41
40%©41
40% @41

532% ©,5173<

523%©*15

77%©78

40

518%
•

@-634
35% @36%
35%@30%
36 @36%

Certificates.—The following is an official

certificates issued,

*3,463,525

©71%

table of the gold

redeemed, arid outstanding on the 30th of April:
Redeemed.

Issued.

Denominations.

$132,620
2,504,500
10,608.000
53,500,000
860,000

$83,900
1,372,200
7.952,000
47,565,000
860,000

$67,605,120

$57,S33,100

100s
1.0U0S
■5.000s
10,000s
Total

-

Outs’d’g
$4S,72’0
3,162.3,00
6, 000
-

5 000

$9,772,020

-The

following is a
deposits and coinage at the Mint of the United Stales
Philadelphia, during the month of April, 1S66 :
Statement 'for April.

statement of

DEPOSITS.

deposits from all

Value.

sources

Total

[Silver deposits, including
$1,593,789 40| purchases
/

No. ofpes.

Denomination.
Double

60,610

Eagles...

$21,399 11

$1,615,18S 51

deposits'
GOLD COINAGE.

Value.
[Denomination. No. ofpes.
$1,392,200 00,Fine bars
'
13

Value.

$7,229 77

G9,G|p $1,399,429 77

Total.
SILVER.

New York.—The

followiog is a statement
showing the supply of treasure from California and foreign countries for

*

167

daily fluctuations of Exchange (long) on Loudon, Paris, Amsterdam,
Bremen. Hamburg, and Berlin, at New York, for April, 1S66:

Gold

122.520 58

January 1, I860
Corresponding period of 1865

.

125%
146%
184%l 166% 179*’
157% 145% i5d»
102 102% |

151% 154%

Value.

Total since

“

of

1,000 33

$3,426,806 28
6,098,708 61

1st

Course

United States Mint

142.550 00

Total since March 1,1S6G
Previously this year

vious

i.25%

gold.

20s

$073,616 33

To England
To Panama

the

127

price of silver during tlie mouthvhas generally maintained the

uniform rate of 5 to 6 below

23..

At date.

Steamship.

January -12

March
March
March
March

126%

oo

Date.
Janua y

i26%

W
Wednesday..

7,232,761

California.—The steamship Costa

this port on the 1st
and treasure. The

120$

126% 126%
126% 126%
126% 1273, 426%
127% 128 1127%
128% 129%

128

7,127.^,127^ 12>7

126%

126% 127

22 j

127%
Sunday...*... 8
128%
9 127%: 127% [125
126% Friday ....
Monday.
129% 129%
nesdav
Tne
10! 12,He 120% 123% 125%i 'Saturday .. .28; 129%1129%|12S% 128%

The

$5,SS8,9G0

sincc-January 1,1S66

from

o

5,815,086

Previously reported.

Treasure

o

o

19 127% 127%

Thursday

500
German silver..—...'
...5681
!
j
|
Sunday
151
|
30—Steamer America, Bremen—
...4681
Monday
16 125% j 126
3.500
i 125% 125% |
American gold
..3681
Tuesday..... .17 125% 126%' 125% 126%i
...2681
$73,880 Wednesday... 18 126% 427% 420% 127%!
Total for the week.

Total

£

1

•

Thursday
Friday.
Saturday

.2

a>

High’st

CJ

Date.

.....

......

Wednesday...

21,880

American gold

I'Js.iStn Lowest. Closing.

5

Date.

a

!

15,000

Liverpool—

tu

L_

;

10,000

American silver

following is the course of gold

April.—The

for

COURSE OF GOLD FOR APRIL.
tb

state

$20,000

American silver

;

Gold

79,464,893

60,116,159

In the commercial

American gold*
27—Steamer City of Boston,

of

for the mouth:

$64,709,212 $52,540,442 $62,125,002 $81,183,526

January 1

Since

[May 5,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

552

39,600

Half Dollars....

S

361 46

39,608

$20,161 40

319,000

$10,470 00

l,32S,0e0

$21,550 00

$19,800 00iFine bars..

Total

.

corrER.

Cents
Two Cent pieces.
Total...

850.000

129,000
'....

$8,500 00-ThreeCent pi<y
2,580 00j

...’

e#
i

RECAPITULATION.

Gold Coinage....
Silver.
Total No. of

1,328,000
39,603
pieces

United States Assay
statement

of

’ 20,161 4G|

1,437,231 $1,441,141 23

;

Office

at

$21,550 00

New YoRK*g|£he following is a
States A?*ily Office jjt: New

business at the United

York, for the month ending April 30, 1866 :
DEPOSITS OF GOLD.

Foreign coin
Foreign bullion
United States bullion

,'
00
43,000.00

1,536,000 00— $1,586,000

ifey 5,1866.]

THE CHRONICLE.

DEPOSITS OF

*

SILVER, INCLUDING PURCHASES.

Foreign coins
Foreign bullion

YORE*-BY AUTHORITY. CHAP. 647.
chapter sixty-two of the laws of eighteen hundred and fortysix, aud other acts additional to the same.

$15,650 00
16.000 00
14,000 00

Unitea States onllion (contained in gold)
Old coins
Lake Superior
Nev oa
Total deposits, payable in bars

100 00

The people

250 00

-

13,000 00—

$59,000 00

$50,000 00
do
do
coins
1,595,000 00—$1,615,000 00
Gold bars stamped
$1,378,539 21
Transmitted to United States mint, Philadelphia, for coinage...
$1,798,SbO 00
Assistant Treasurer’s Statement for April.—The following is
-

the official statement of the business at the Sub
of

April, 1866

Treasury for the month

:
RECEIPTS

AND

Balance April 1^ 1866

$73,891,325 10

Receipts during the month:
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

$11,093,212 18
7,873,121 78

Loans
Internal revenue

46,780,293 G9

32.594.063 41

Balance April 30, 1866

$88,080,555 35

$10,289,404 47

24,100,549 42
14,668,130 13

13,811,114 95—

Balance

$9,432,419 29

By balance, cr. interest accounts
By appropriations
To

$1,850,662 55
175,418 08— $2,020,081 53

payments—coin
do

187,231 45

notes

115,010 44—

362,241 S9

Balance

$1,663,839 64

By receipts for customs in April
do

do

do

Increase

do

do

1866

$11,093,212 18

1865

6,389,560 11

186G

$4,703,652 67

By balance, cr. bullion and expense account for Assay Office...
$1.327.217 70
By coin received during the month.
By fine bars
199,122 18

$675,174 78

1,526,339 SS
$2,201,514 66

To

payments in coin
do

$1,718,295 97

fine bars

437 976 63—

2,156,272 80

♦

Balance

$45,241 86

By funds in hand, in Assistant Treas. Office
do
do
Assay Office
By fine bars in Assay Office
By unparted b illion in Assay office
Bullion at .the Mint for

$9S,9S5,37S 89
.27,750 87— 99,013,129 76
90,80S 74
8 )4,927 07
465.611 85— 1,361,437 60

coinage

'

Less temporary loan to
Less due depositors

$100-374,567 42

$512,774 60

be reimbursed

876,413 93— $1,389,188 53

Balance

Act

$9S,9S5,34S„89

Fund

National Debt.—The

following bill to authorize
thirty year five per cent loan was introduced into the Senate on Wed.
nesday by Mr Sherman and referred to the Finance Committee:
to

the

.

making the sale; and the account, to be. made in writing, as directed by
section t wenty-seven of title on.q .o.f chapter seventeen of part one of the Revis¬

405,026 95—

By balance, cr. disbursing accounts April 1
By receipts during the month
To payments

uvery one hundred dollars.
2. All goods, wares, merchandise and effects, imported from any place beyond
the Cape of Good Hope,.at the rate of fifty, cents on every hundred dollars.
3. All other goods, wares, merchandise or effects, which are the production of

person

$32,189,036 49

Post-office drafts

Section 1. Section 1% chapter sixty-two, of the laws of eighteen hundred and
forty-six, is hereby amended so as to read as follows :
All goods, wares and merchandise, and other species of personal
property,
which at any time shall be exposed to sale by public auction, or offered for sale
by sample or otherwise by brokers, with the exceptions mentioned in the second
section of this act. and in the fifth section of title one, chapter seventeen, of part
one of ihe Revised Statutes, shall be subject, each and every
time that they shall
be sold, to fees or duties at the follow i tig Yates, namely:
lv All whies and ardent spirits, foreign or domestic, at the rate of one dollar

.

$120,674,618 79

Payments during the month:
Treasury drafts

as.follows-:

any foreign country, at the rate .of seveuty.-five cents on every one hundred dol¬
lars.
X
These fees shall be calculated on the sums for which the goods so exposed or
offered for sale shall be struck offor sold, and.shall iu all cases be made by the

465,196 27
171,927 93
7,61<>,000 00
17,520.500 00
3,39130
2,012,944 23—

Post-office Department
Transfers
Coin notes
Patent fees..
Miscellaneous

Passed April 13, 1866.
of the State of Heu) Yor7s\ represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact

on

DISBURSEMENTS.

Ori account of customs

LAWS OF NEW

An Act to amend

ed

Statutes, shall be made by

auctioneer, and broker under oath, on the
year, subject to the penalties for noncompliance imposed upon auctioneers in said title.
One-half of the fees or
duties to which damaged goods are now subject shall be paid into the treasury
every

firstMonday in July and January in each
of the State.
Sec. 2. Section two of

chapter three hundred, and ninety-nine of the laws of
eighteen hundred and forty-nine is hereby amended so as to read as follows:
The Comptroller is hereby authorized to employ an agent or agents, whose
duty it shall be to carry this act into effect, who shall examine, as often as twice
in each year, and whenever the comptroller deem it necessary, the books and
accounts of sales kep- bv the auctioneers, who.shall .have given bonds for the
payment of lees or duties on goods sold at public auction, and of brokers who
shall have given .bonds for the payment of fees .or duties on goods vended by

them, as si eel tied by law. The .compensation of such agents shall b© fixed by
the Comptroller; and such agent or agents shallhave full power to administer
an oath to each auctioneer or broker, and to require such information as maybe
necessary to ascertain the true amount of goods sold by such broker or auc¬
tioneer.
Sec. 3. No person authorized to exercise the
cute the duties of such office, and no broker

.

an

State of New York,
\
Office of the Secretary of State, f
I have compared the preceding with the original law on file in this offiefe,
do here y certify that the same is a correct transcript therefrom and of
whole of said original law.
=

on

the National

£{)e Bankers’ ©alette.

Debt, and for funding the

Be it enacted

ducing the ratein such form thereon, to issue registered or coupon bonds of the
of interest
United States
of
denominations

and
such
as he may prescribe,
payable, principal and interest, in coin, and bearing interest at the rate of not
exceeding five per cent per annum, payable eemi-anmtallv, such bonds to be
made payable in not over thirty years from date, to be issued to an amount suf¬
ficient to cover all outstanding or existing obligations ol the United States, and
to be disposed of in such manner and on such terms, not less than par, as the
Secretary of the Treasury may deem most conducive to the interests of the Gov¬
ernment.
Provided, That the expense of preparing, issuing, and disposing of
such bonds shall not exceed two per cent of the amount disposed of; and pro¬
vided, also, that the said bonds and the proceeds thereof shall be executively
used in paying up or retiring the obligations or indebtedness of the United
States other than United States notes.
Sec. 2. And be it farther enacted, That the bonds issued under this act shall
be known as the -.‘consolidated debt of the United Stares,” and the same shall
be exempt from taxation in any form by or under State, municipal or local au¬

thority; and in consideration of the reduction of the
the negotiation of said bonds, the same and the
therefrom shall be exempt from the payment of

States.

rate of interest effected by
interest thereon and the income
all taxes or duties to the United

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the amount of interest saved by sub■titution of five per cent bonds for other Government securities shall be applied
to the payment of the principal of the national debt: and that- for the
purpose
of insuring the

payment thereof, and in lieu of the sinking fund contemplated

by the act Of February 25, 1862, the sum of at least $30,000,000, including the
saving of interest aforesaid out of any moneys in the Treasury nor otherwise
appropriated, shall be annually applied to the reduction .or extinguishment of
•said debt, in such manner as may be determined by the
Secretary of the Treasury,
or as Congress may hereafter direct.
Sec. 4. And be it farther enacted, That, for the purpose of enabling the Secre¬
tary of the Treasury to prepare for the funding or payment of the outstanding
Treasury notes hearing interest at the rate of seven and three-tenths per cent
per annum, holders of such notes are hereby required to advise the Secretary of
the Treasury, in such manner as he may prescribe, atleast six months before the
maturity of such notes, whether they elect that such notes shall be paid at ma¬
turity or shall be converted into bonds of the United States, commonly desig¬
nated as “Five-twenty Bonds,” and the right on the part of such holders of con¬
verting such Treasury notes into bonds shall be deemed and taken to be waived
as to each and every note in relation to which notice shall be
given as above pre¬
scribed, and the Bame shall be paid at maturity in lawful money of the United
States.

Laws
-

of

New York Taxing Auction

and

Brokers’

Sales.—The

following ia an official copy of the law just passed by the New York
Legislature, taxing sales of merchandise made by auctioneers or brokers:




Secretary .of State.

.

same.

by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in
Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized, if
he shall deem it expedient for the purpose of funding the National Debt aiid'rc-

and
the

Francis C. Barlow,

a

An Act to reduce the rate of interest

.

auctioneer shall exe¬
engaged in Bellinir goods, wares,
merchandise or effects, subject to fees or duties oy the laws of this State, shal.
engage in such business un{il such broker or.auctioneer shall have entered into
a bond to the people of this State, with two sufficient freeholders as his sure¬
ties, in the penalty of five thousand dollars .each, conditioned for the faithful
performance of the duties of his office, and for the payment of the fees or du¬
ties that are or shall be imposed by law, and .that shall accrue on sales, made by
him or under his direction, by virtue of his.office,. Such bond shall be taken
and approved by the agent appointed by the Comptroller, iu pursuance of chap¬
ter three hundred and'ninety-nine of the laws of eighteen hundred and fortynine ; but if executed in a city where there is no such agent, it shall be taken
and approved by the mayor or recorder of such city; and if executed by an
auctioneer appointed for a county, shall be approved by a judge of the county
court for such county; such bond when executed shall be transmitted to the
Comptroller, within ten days after such execution, and a copyp aced on file in
the office of the agent, or where there is no agent, in the office of the county
clerk of the county in which the same shall have been taken and approved. The
fees to be paid to the agent approving such bonds shall be five dollars; and for
approval of the returns to be made of sales, three dollars ; and for flung the duplicate copy of the aforesaid bond, fifty cents; every broker or auctioneer who
shall sell any goods, wares, merchandise or effects, as specifhd in this act,
without having filed the bonds required by law, or who shall neglect to make or
render the accounts, or pay over the duties required bylaw, shall be deemed
guilty-of a misdemeanor, and punished by imprisonment not exceeding onq
year, or by fine not exceeding one thousand dollars, or by both such fine and im¬
prisonment.
office of

give .in. pur- Bulletin from day t.a day. lists of bonds, &c.,Iost, and
.declared!. These, tables will, he coutinued daily, and on"Saturday
morning, such as. have been, published through, the week in the Bulletin
will l.>e collected and published in the.Chronicle.
Below will be found those
published the last week in the Bulletin.
We

dividends

.

...

DIVIDENDS,
1* AYAliLE.

rate

NAME OF COM?ANY.

t\

c’t.

BOOKS CLOSED.
WHEN.

WHERE.

Banks,

FirstNatioiY. of J crscy City
Nassau Bank..
e.
Concord Railroad
Nashua & Lowell
Northern New

Hampshire

Manchester & Lawrence..

.At Bank.
At Bank.

Mayl.

May* 10.

May;2 to May 10

.

4
Mayl. Bost’n,T.Mer.Ex
$4 p.s May 1.
do Mark.N. Bk
$3 car
1. do Treas.Office
$4 ass
4
May 1. | Manchester.

j-M’y

-

f jN.Y.Nat.BkCom

Chicago, Bur. & Quincey...; $5 p. M’y 15

jBost..49City Ex. April 27 to May 18

I

i Others, Amos. T

\

Hall, Chicago.

L!

May 14.1 Camden, N. J.
May So. i Philadelphia,.

West

Jersey R. R. Co
25pc
5
Pennsylv nia R. R. Com o'y
BUSINESS
The

AT

STOCK

THE

May 2 to May 10.

BOARDS.

following shows the description and number of shares sold at the Reguntly on each day and for the week ending on Friday:
SR.
505

Bank Shares
Railroad shares, viz :
Central of New Jersey

Chicago & Alton...
Chicago, Bur. & Quincy
Chicago & Great Eastern.
Chicago & Milwaukee....

100

Cleveland & Pittsburg....
Cleveland & Toledo..

125

100
260

200

100
250

.

100

800
600

.

4,100

2,*700

•

9,’ 630

400

100

■

5,000
300
509

200
700

*

m

i

.

4*,200

600.

150

..

200
250
100

31,725
6,076

4*to6

34^630

700
28

3,700

8,950

39,555
1,800
4,543

lffOOO
.14)00

4,500. ..8,270
500
500

....

3,050 13,925
750
2,211

10

■

380

3,761

....

2,415

8,305:
,

m

30

3,011

....

4,500

3,*306

1,000

.

100
714

'

100.

-

3,930
Illinois Central.

..

.....

5,350

Fri’y. Week.
200
1,206

150
....

100
100

.i.

Del., Lack. & Western...
Hudson River..

Thurs.
221

Wed.
130

Taes.

109

..

Chicago A; Northwestern.
Chicago & Rock Island...
Cleveland, Col. & Cine....

25

Mon.

•

300

400

720

1,400

88

THE CHRONICLE.

554
Indianapolis & Cincinnati.

13

Long Inland

•

Marietta <S: Cincinnati

•

•

'klO

....

*500
60

i75

4,200

*250

1,*406

....

•

•

•

•

•

.

.

50

’200

St.

Louis, Alton & T. H..
Stonington

18
2 800

3,600

Reading R. R

100

2’,(’too

Pitts., Ft. Wayne & Chic.

•

•

700
175

3470

5,979

‘266

12.500

4,200

41,000

330

1,000

2,980

•

-

-

315

,

•

....

1,800

50

60

200

200

2,400

1,400

4.850

2,100

8,700

8,000

6.370
900

10,460

2,860

335

.

.

....

....

1,221
2,100

100
40

*

-

840

....

The Monet Market.—The

l*,oi6

100

•

'*4*6
1400

•

10,800

8,100

1,200

•

100
80

#

Milwaukee «fe P. du Chien.
Milwaukee *fe St. Paul
Morris & Essex
New Jersey
New York Central
New York & New Haven.
Ohio & Mississippi ($100)
Panama

•

13

....

....

•

...

Michigan Central Ii. R
Michigan Southern

....

•

34(10
18

....

200

....

[May 5,1866.

14,371
34,749

week

course

Feidat, May 4, P. M.
of financial affairs during the

has

tended toward a steady increase of ease. The week
opened with a bank statement showing an increase of $5,909,996
on
deposits, and an addition of $2,985,334 to the legal tenders, with
a
disproportionate increase in loans and discounts. The banks con¬
tinue to receive currency from the interior ; and their surplus bal¬
ances have been offered to brokers, for fixed
periods, at 3@4 per
cent, and in

some

instances without

success.

There has been

more

1,100

inquiry for money for stock speculation ; but the demand has been
11
Toledo <fc Wabash
;;;;
readily met at 5 per cent, and in some instances at 4 per cent.
Miscellaneous shares, viz
The announcement of the Secretary of the Treasury, that no more
American Coal
100
100
Ashburton Coal
200
[200 monies will be received on temporary loan, except upon Clearing.
Atlantic Mail
50
300
206
550
Boston Water Works
300
800
700
1,800 House certificates, and that after May 15 the rate of interest on the
Brunswick City
Canton
'600 1,200 3466 1450 2*,906 lVi6b 10,650 6 per cent temporary loan will be reduced to 5 per cent, has had
Cary Improvement
the effect of adding to the ease of the market; although the full
Central Amer. Transit
Central Coal
*100
*100 effect will
probably not be felt until the reduced rate of interest
Cumberland Coal
466
‘goo
600
*300
400
500
2,800
Del. & Hudson Canal
goes into operation.
Mariposa
2,*900 3’sbo 3*, 600 2*700 1*700 8,800 23,666
The Eoss forgeries, involving losses to the amount of
Pacific Mail
50
50
100
nearly
115
115
Pennsylvania Coal
$400,000, have temporarily disturbed the market, by showing the
1*325
'600
*900 1,100 1,200
950
Quicksilver
6,075
700
100
900
300
200
Spting Mountain Coal
2,200
facility with which false collaterals may be negotiated, and the lia¬
800
Spruce Hill Coal
2,300
4,000
2,800 7,700
3,900 21,500
Union Navigation
500
300
200
bility to heavy loss from fraudulent loans.
Union Trust
50
50
Discounts are comparatively quiet. The opening of navigation
W estern Lnion Telegraph
255
*210 1,776 2,805 2,351
1,31*6
8,707
Wilkesbarre Coal
has not been attended with the increase of produce bills usual at
‘200
‘200
Wyoming Valley Coal....
‘sob
600
The volume of transactions in shares at the two boards,
comparatively, for this season of the year.
There is a very active demand for prime
each day of the two last weeks, and the total for the same weeks, is shown in
paper, with a strictly moderate supply.
Prime names range most¬
the following statement:
/—Reg. Board.-^
The extreme
Open Board.—v—Both Boards-^ ly at 6a7 per cent, with exceptions at 5£ per cent.
Last Prev's
Last
rev’s
Last
Prev’s
abundance of money has partially relaxed the cau ion as to names
week. week.
week. week.
week. week.
Saturday
11,065 15,723
12,100 24.400
24,065 40,123 which prevailed earlier in the
season, and second class paper is more
Mondav
19,782 54,028
26,400 47,130
54,182 102,158
Tuesday
19, HO 72,484
31,500 43.100
50,669 115.584 easily negotiated.
"ii

1

•

•

•

....

#

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

>

f

....

....

"

....

.

....

....

•

•

*

*

*

•

•

•

•

....

«...

•

•

1

Wednesday
Thursday
Friday

21,991
21.906
41,1<j6

Total of week

32,554
39.234
28,215

23,100
45,100

34,300

135,949 242,738

47,700
26,500

37,400

.45,091
67,006
75,436

79,754
65,734
65,615

182,500 226,230

318,449 468,968

weekly since the commencement
following statement:
Week ending Regular Open
Both
| Week ending Regular
Board.
Friday.
Board. Board. Boards
Friday.
9.. 206,849
January 5
181,350 243.900 425,2501 March
January 12
339,109 328,400 667,509; March
16.. .206,312
23.. .261,106
January 19.... 243,815 272,300 516.115 March

Percent.
4 @5
I Good endorsed bills, 3 &

Call loans
Loans on bonds & mort..
Prime endorsed bills, 2
months

6

|

@7

|

Percent.

4 months

6
7
9

do single names
| Lower grades

@ 7
@8
@15

of the year are

The transaction in shares

United States Securities.—The week

shown in the

.

January 26

247.743
February 2.... 201,107

301,400
239,700
227.SU0

February 9... .209,140
February 16
234 285

549,143 March
440,S07; April
436.940 April
462.9851 April

228,700

Februurv23
1S7.913
March ' 2....217,961

30.. .122,563

13.. .250,118
20.. .176,956
27. .242,738

1 83,200

6.. .170,934

Open

Both

Board.

Boards

opened with a general
weakness in Government securities, the result of a reaction from

418,149

speculative activity of last week.

211,300
213,450
335,910
208.200
247,490

419,762

597,016
330,763
418,334

214,650

464,768

208,650
226,230
34,300

385,606

371,113i April
468,968
221,500 439,461 May
41,136
4.
75,436
The Government and St-ite, etc., bonds sold at the
Regular Board, daily, last
week, are given in the following statement:
.

Sat.

U. S. 6’p, 1881.
U.S 6’8(5-20’a).
U.S 6’a <oldj
U.S 5’a (10-408
U.S 5’s (old)
U.S 7-30 notes
U.S Certifie’s.
State

Mon

1.111

41,000

133,500

Tues.

Wed.

$5,000 $20,000
314,000
97,500
3,000
92,500
28,500

Thnr.

$15,200 $18,000
135400

10,500

467.000
2.000

13,000

95,500

Fri.

Week.

$84,000 $142,000
782.000 1,616,600
2,000
65,500
5.000

69,000

bonds, viz

38,800
5,000

21,500
4,000

13,000

94,000

84,100

17,000
418,500
5,000
320,400
9,000

:

California 7’s,
Connect’t 6's.
Georgia 6’s...
Illinois6's

$3,000

$3,000
.

.

.

#

Kentucky 6’s.

......

•

,

•

.

•

•

Louisiana 6’s.

.

,

r,

.

Minnesota 6's.
Missouri 6’s..
N.Y. State 5’s.
N.Y. State 6’s,
New York 7’s
N. Carolina 6's
Ohio 6’s
Rhode Isl'd 6s.
S. Carolina 69.
Tennesee 6’s..

Fiye-twenties declined £al per
Ten-forties reacted from 96£, the highest price of last
cent, and
week, to 94£. Wednesday it was announced that Senator Sher¬
bad introduced into

Congress a bill authoriziug a 5 per cent
loan, running thirty years, with principal and interest payable in
gold, and exempt from taxation. This had the effect of renewing
speculation on the gold-bearing bonds, and especially on the Tenforties, which steadily advanced to 96£, yesterday, but have since
declined, and close at 95$.
man

The

steamship Scotia brought an amount of Five-twenty bonds,
variously estimated at $1,500,000 to $2,500,000 from Europe; but
the bonds are readily absorbed, without any apparent effect
upon
the market.

The statement of the Public Debt of

May 1st has had a favorable
Governments. The return shows that $5,828,000 of
Five-Twenty bonds have been issued in exchange for short date
loans. The Compound Notes have been reduced during the month
of April $5,000,000. These notes are in active demand at £
per
cent above par, with simple interest.
Certificates of Indebtedness are scarce, being generally held out
of the market; the correct quotation is 100£al00£.
effect upon

...

Michigan 7s.

6)4® 6

$1S,000

26,000 $10,000

10,000

$29,000

$2,000
2,000
2,000

3,000

85,000

5,000

15,000

14,000
20,000

6,000

1,000
3,000

13,000

20,000

5.000

5,000

10,000

50,< 00

$8,000
57,000

25,000

138,000

....%

Virginia 6’s...

The interest

500

6,000

i,6oo

3,000

5,000

City bonds, viz.:
Brooklyn citv
Jersey City 6’s

41.000

6,000

26,500

9,000

inst.

on

all the issues of Five-twenties matured

on

the 1st

The

following are the closing quotations for each issue, ex
coupon:—issue of 1862, 102al02£ ; do of 1864, 101£al02 ; do of
1865,102.

N. Y. citv 6’s
The following is a summary of the amount of
Governments, State and City
securities, and railroad bonds sold on each day :
•

Total for

*

Sat.

U. S. Bonds
U. S. Notes

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thnr.

Fri.

the week.

69,000

Railroad Bonds..

83.000
84,000

Total amount....

$410,500

335,800

State&City bonds

25,500
55,000
23,SOD

253,300

146,800

13,000
48,000

94,000
17,000

84,100
72,000

12,000

21,500

40,500

329.460

342,500
194,800

695,0001,125,100 2,966,500
.

The totals of each class of securities sold in the first three months of the
year
and weekly for the last five weeks, are shown in the statement which follows:

Governments

March

Bonds.

$95*2,900

3,846,500

$3,035,500

$12,155,700

2.591.900

1.691.500

1,692,100

9,822,000

3,006,700

2,903,600

781.240

10,622,840

with

a

$55,000

$2,164,700

sign

on

504,850

$3C8.000
361,000
447,060

102,000
176,700

546,200

401.000

249.500

1,511.300
3,737.650
2,803.800

867,000

820,000

329,400

842,500

213,500
194,800

Notes.

and for the weeks ending on Friday—
March 30
$841,200

“

May




State, &c.,

S. 6’9, 1881 coup
S. 5-20’8, 1862coupons.
S. 5-20’8,1864
“
..
S. 5-20’s, 1865
“
..
S 10-40’s,
“
S 7-30’s 1st series
S. 7-30’s 2d Series
S 7-30’s 3rd series.,...
S. lyr’a certificates

$3,340,100

,

6

339,5>0

13
20
27

3,6)7.100

4

708.800

Total
amount.

'

4,226,000

2,966,500

Mar. 29.

«•

U.
U.
U.
U.
U.
U*
U.
U.
U.

Railroad
Bonds.

Bonds.
Januarv
February

“

weeks:

3,931,300

,

“

subjoined closing quotations for leading Government securi¬
ties, will show the difference in prices as compared with previous

$174,500 $211.500 $149,000 $73,800 $562,500 $928,500 $2,099,800
43,800
67,500
13,000

April

The

Eailroad

105
104*
104%
-

104%
92
100%

100%
100%
99^

Apr. 6. Apr. 13. Apr. 20. Apr. 27. May 4.
104% i 104%
105)4
108%
JO9*
104%
103%
104%
106%X.C.I02%
104%
103%
105%X.C.l02
2104%
104
103%
104%
105%x.C.102
91%
92
95%
93%
95%
100%
100%
101%
101%
102
100
100%
101%
101%
101%
99%
100%
101%
101%
102
99%
99%
99%
l00
100%

Miscellaneous Securities.—The week

opened
speculative activity ; apparently a matter of de¬
the part of the speculators for higher prices, intended to
and

lull in the

draw out sellers’

options upon which the market might be ulti¬
mately put up. A partial fall in prices had the result of drawing
out a considerable amount of short sales; but no sooner were

May 6,1866.]

THE CHRONICLE.

these contracts made than

prices immediately strengthened.

Upon

the average, however, prices stand about the same as one week ago.
The low price of Erie stock has a depressing effect upon prices

generally.

It is understood that stock is largely oversold, and there
strong effort on the part of those on the “ short ” interest to
keep the price down. To-day a considerable amount of stock was
thrown upon the market for speculative effect, the result being a
decline from 74^ at the opening of the market to 731 at the close.
Other stocks sympathised with this tendency on Erie, and closed
is

a

lower than at the

opening of business.
prevailing opinion appears to be, that the speculative holders
of stocks cannot afford to unload at present prices, and that a strong
effort will be made to put up prices before the close of the
spring
-campaign. The great ease in the money market favors any opera¬
tions of this character, and it would
appear quite probable that
such will be the policy of the “ long side ” of the street.
The roost important movement has been in
Michigan Southern,
of which a large amount of stock has been thrown
upon the mar¬
ket, putting down the price from 82f a week ago, to 77^
yesterday.
To-day the price opened at 78f, and closes at 78£.
Chicago and Northwestern continues strong, under clique man¬
ipulation, closing at 61£ for preferred, and 29 for the common
stock. The comparatively low prices of some of the minor railroad
stocks has induced a speculation which has brought up the
price 2@
3 per cent; Milwaukee and St. Paul
has advanced about
preferred
5 per cent.
*

The

The

following are the closing quotations for leading stocks,
pared with those of previous weeks :
Quicksilver

Mar. 23. Mar. 29. April 6.
44%
43%
43%

40%
47%

Canton Co

41%
47%

Mariposa pref....
New York Central
Erie
Hudson River....

9i%

81%
108%

7S%
107%
100%

102

Reading
Mich. Southern..

82%

84
101
79

Michigan Central
Clev. and Pittsb.
Clev. and Toledo.
Northwestern....
“

preferred

Rock Island
Fort Wayne
Illinois Central

80%
110%
27%
56%

117%
92%
..

.

44%

126%

53
53

....

92%
74%
109%

109%

101
81

104
89%

93

73%

26

92%

55%

«...

44%
54
59

57%
23%

73%
110%

103

105

82%

'

8

73%
110%
107%
i8%

107%

55%
118

....

25%
OO l

93

92%
72%
108%
81%

26%

90%

....

45

102%
103%
80%
80%
111% xd.101%

....

79%
109%

955%
54%
16% xd.113%

....

45

50
52

47
....

93

com¬

Apr 13. Apr. 20. Apr. 27 Mav 4

40%

91%
115

27

82%

104%
29%

56%
120
96

59
123

104%
29

01%

123%

98%

114%

82

122

100

121%

The Gold Market.--Gold

has3been active and fluctuating during the week. On the 30th, in anticipation of the payment of the
May interest on Five-Twenties, the price declined to 12.5$, and on
the morning of the 1st inst. the price opened at 125-J-. It soon be¬
came apparent, however,
that a large amount of “ short ” contracts
were maturing, which
had to’be provided lor by the disbursements
of the Sub-Treasury: and the demand for this
purpose caused an
advance of 1£ before the close of business.
The importers were
also large buyers on account of exchange. The
improved supply
has caused a fall in the rate of interest on gold
loans to about 6
per cent per annum ; but the price has not been materially reduced
by the disbursements of interest,. To day the quotation has ranged
at 127*al27£, and closes at
The payments, at the Sub127f.
Treasury, on account of interest, up to the close of to-uay, amount
to about $6,000,000.
The debt statement for May
1 shows an increase of $14,606,707
in the amount of coin in the
Treasury during April.
The steamship Costa Rica, from
Aspinwail, brought $1,318,270
in specie and bullion.
The export of specie on
Saturday amounted to $53,8S0., The
Persia took out on
Wednesday $126,000 in specie.
The following have been the
highest and lowest quotations for
gold, on each of the last six days:
28
80,
1,

A?ril
May

Highest. Lowest.
129)* 128* May
127%

127

Highest. Lowest

2.

125%

“

4‘

“
“

44

24.
25.
26.
27.

43(5,737
341,805
397,253
294,823
250,167

93
50
51
18

39

Total
$2,246,307 21
Balance in Sub-Treasury morning of April 23

Deduct payments during the week
Balance




Saturday evening
during the week

on

acreage

The

following table shows the aggregate transactions at the SubTreasury since January 6
W eeks

Custom
House.

Ending
Jan

Sub-Treasury

13....

20....
27....
Feb. 3....
10....
17....
24....
Mar. O.

2.754,363

5,398,128

2,893.097

21,717,241
14,527,352

2,698,796
3,386,934
2,247,835

20,414,139
25,071,303
20,934,822

2.464.482

4,960.916

2,5"9,419
2,451,344
2,863,009

10,052,215

14,093,013
15,116,574
15.592,793
12,194,496
22,988,451
29,170,183
15,658,306
12,773.-11 S
8,609,222
5.937,768

8.941.303

11,100,549

13,324,981

11,790.124

14....
21....

2,857,703
2,585,507

5,359.749

28....

1-',008,189
21,953,904

2,246,307

14,119,991

97,773,823

.

.

17....
24....
31....
r*

Apr.
it
it

Balances.

dec
inc
inc

83,021.790
90,325.685
97,591.349

-

3,220,047
3,347,422
3,201,734

10....

kt

Changes in

\

Payments. Receipts. Balances.
$2,107,341 $23,808,750 $15,861,866 $07,988,957
2,334,094
8,341,643
15,837,971
75,485,284

0....

**

1

9,437,020
6.044.893

/

14,088,239
13,937,517

New York City Banks.—The
condition of the Associated Banks
week

8-4,181,009

89,810,018

$S,006.883
7,496,327
8,095.784
5.029,548
9,547,908
9,522,645
8,461,099
8,750,043
9,413,001
8,101,404
3,633,306
10,114,447
2,159,177
1,534,856

inc
inc

99,358,5IS

S9.835.873
98,296,973

dec
inc
inc
dec
dec
inc
dec
inc
dec
inc
inc
inc

107.053,016

97.0-40,015
89,478,010
93,111.916
82,997.460
85,150.646

6,704,395
7,265,664
182,473

following statement shows the

the City of New York tor the
ending with commencement of business on April 28, 1866 :
r-

Average amount of

-

Loans and

Banks.
New York..
Manhattan
Merchants’
Mechanics’

oi

discounts.
$6,633,147
5,015,462

.Specie,
$1,280,256

7,471.299

5,392,955
4.867,079

$939,927

70-1,716

deposits.
$7,298,263

tenders.
$4,402,540

13,624

5.157,247

483,147

633.480

5,875,102

307,053

423,766

80,137
704,360
89,789
201,419
33,027
135,622
716,901
29,529

425,833

4.319,346
3,149,314
8.723,015

2,636,347
3,799,869
1.970,116

246,329

9,475,967

,

3.753.632

4,141.993

Tradesmen’s
Fulton

2,999,995

Chemical

Merch’ts Exchange
National

2,960

286,200
02-1,041
21.404

20,399

868,631

1,105,672
919.594

2.247,366
2,099,066
707,190

454,451

2,249,914
922.103

314,795

2,184,91*6

612,994
418,029
167,459

67.952

1,056,052
3,257,588

14,778

6,795

906,172

132.071

-796.741

93,260
25.462

1,349,651

120.786

2,669.632

5,529,260

Ocean
Mercantile
Pacific

'

Republic
Chatham
Peo ole’s
North America
Hanover

604,458

244,379

11.925

10,379,078
21,603.937
6,647,774
3 882,941
3,111,129
1.868,294
4,826.814

330.401

4,620,354

504,0*2

554,563
41,596

3,318.050

6,617,869
9,031,872

592,969
2.316,720
4.373,750

900.000

27,196

6.655,776

794,562

2.960.952

879,751

30,095

298,950

19,842
123,608
78,503

2.974,928
1,602,652

1,173,613

£53,616

4,499,815
2.005,164
1,242,705
2.645,817
1,748,3 9
1,309,000
5,959,971
1,240,866
1,955,263
2,146,763
1,356,562

2 003,774

33,355

1.850,015
1,346,508
2,390,225

•

131.499
7.410
295.430
218,4 15

51.558
15.000
34,450
22,776
205.708
56.742

1,599,000
9,446,735

•

88.401

51,177
125,443

2.620,554

Irving
Metropolitan

189,900

:

1,472,101
•2.308,120
2.817,978
2,826,282

893.467

135,716

20,051

4,636
490,416
717,238
834,292
27,742

3,050,330
2,924,017

31,525
29,130

3,098.406

193.721

481,522

2,002,992
1.164,587
1,693.642

.

38,779

216,427
119,640
221,900

4,566,547

13,828
■'

14,219,805
1,346,331

26.390

1,544,283
910,354

92,500
514.099

47,974
172,820
9,919

984,546

Park
Mech. Bank’g As'n
Grocers’
North River
East River
Manuf. *fc Merch'ts
Fourth National...
Central
Second National...
Ninth National....
First National
Third National
N. Y. Exchange...
Drv Dock
Bull’s Head

-

22.4*21
66.711-

1.134,391

Imp. & Traders...

20,068

1,000.090
308,000

4,017
8.704

1.415,389

14,934,731

66,483
42,093

13.057.444

81,083
12,718
217,050
1,200
2.520,589
1,484.227

1.494.776

2.527,660

525,000

2,380,000
461,766
787,312
907,775
7^3,499

1,164.330
572,000

1,015,000
1,136,321

41

1,795,153

*,950

252,244
794,350

1,179.398

436.058

3,499,479
14,852.517
1,385,862
1.068,845
1,365,452
649,118

944,585

4,085,935
485,418
441, &55
216,112

11,445,678

245,058
275,772
3,530,233

1,072,472
13.834,603

4,550,283

896.612

867,450

6.870,366

310,502
2,086,120

448,854

4.178,006

1.876,759

SI.644
3,411

798,220

2.983,477

1,178,423

268,124

644.031

294,523

33,000
139,313

80,589,022

7.6SS

.

1,146,370
719,973

9,143

6,138

S5,647

$245,017,692

8,243,837

25,377,280

202,718,574

Clearings for the week ending April 12S, 1860

$545,339,665 07
22,197,187 20

“

The deviations from the return of last week
r

640.782

2,319,790
3,303,905

214,4S1
1,209,239
497,347

Specie

247,8**1
935,400

2.030.883

13,748
107,236

11

682,280

15.28-4

579,259
100,777

*

617,800

44,206

6,284,007
3.029,535
3.493,144

“

3,729,967
1,979,745

269.973

1,192,201

Manufacturers’....

Balances

3,397,272

2,726.246
3.464,945
2.081.870
2.457.666 A
5.026,852

497.772
190.571
105.1 00

2.213,547

Broadway

Totals*.

1,629,799

1,788,589

Butch. & Drovers..
Mecli’s & Traders..
Greenwich
Leather Manufact’s
Seventh Ward.!:..
State of N. York...
American Exe'ge..
Commerce.

Loans

Legal

2.703.715

Union

Citizens’
Nassau
Market
Sr. Nicholas
Shoe and Leather.
Corn Exchange...
Continental.
Commonwealth.
Oriental
Marine...
Atlantic

■N

Net

1,995,492
5.315,631
3,137.021

.

America..
Phenix

Circnlation.

are as

Inc.. $2,950,629 | Deposits
Dec. -1,251,526 I Legal Tenders
Inc..
531,423 |

follows

:

Inc. $5,909,9f6
Inc.
2,986,334

123

12(5%
127%

127%

4.

127%

The changes indicate a continuance of extreme monetary ease,
while the increase in loans shows ajpartial improvement in the ac¬

The transactions for last week at the Custom House
and SubTreasury were as follows:
Custom-house.
-Sub-TreasuryReceiDts.
Receipts.
Payments.
April 23.
$525,519 70
$10,105,729 64
$2,687,540 09
“

gold certificates issued, $4137,140. Included in
receipts of customs were $486,000 in gold and $1,760,307 in
gold certificates.
the

Circulation

128%

3'.

125%

T tal amount of

Citv

The market closes active but unsettled.

Cumberland Coal

555

265,708 49
761,026 90
1,387,892 15
947,725 56
469,524 84

2,016.951 79
2,672,963 39

$13,937,517 58

$14,119,991 07
97,591,319 SO

2,477,197.41
1,948,039 50
2,317,298 89

tivity of business.
The several items compare as
weeks :
Loans.
Jan. 6, 66 233.185.059
Jan. 13,.. 234.938,193
Jan.20,
239,337.726
..

$111,711,340 03
13,937,517 58

$97,773,823 S5
182,473 49

Jan.27,.. 240,407,836

Feb. 3...
Feb.10...
Feb.17...
Feb.24...

242,510.382
242,60S,872
243,068,252
239,776,200

Mar. 3... 235,339,412

Mar.10... 233,068,274
Mar.17... 233,517,378

Specle.

follows with the returns of previous

Circnlat.ion.

Legal
Deposits.

Aggregate

Tenders.
15,778,741 18,588,428 105,482.254 71,617,487
1(5,852,568 19.162,917 197,766,999 73,019,957
15,265,372 20,475,707 198,816,248 72,799,892
13,106,759 20,965,883 195,012,454 70,319,146
10,937,474 21,494,234 191,011,695 68.796,250
10,129,806 22.240,469 188,701,463 68,436,013
10,308.758.22,983,274 189,777,290 64.802,980
14.213,351 22,959,918 183,241.404 61,602,726
17,181,130 22,994,086 181,444,378 58,760,145
16,5(53,237 23,033,237 180,515,881 64,341,802

370,617,523
608,082,837
538,919,311
516,3 3,672
508,569,123
493,431,032
471,886,751
497,150,087
526,539,959
594,204 912

185,438,707 CS,402,764

579,216,509

15,015,242 23,303,057

Clearings.




THE.

556

69,496,033 593,448,860
72,158,099 529,240,648
71,445, 65 602,315,743
73,910,370 578,537.855
77.602,688 535,834.774
80,589,022 545,339,668

23,243,406 185,868,245
23.736,534 .188,554,592
11,486,295 24,127,061 189,1)94,961
11,085,129 24,538,981 193,153,469
9,495,463 24.045,857 196,808,578
8,243,937 25,377,280 202,718,574

13,945,651

Mar.24... 234.500,513
Mar. 31... 237 356,099
Apr. 7... 242,643,753

11,93! 1.892

Apr.14... 244,001,830
Apr.21... 242,067,06:3
Apr. 23... 245,017,602

comparative statement
shows the average condition of the leading items of the Philadel"
phia Banks for the last and previous weeks :
Philadelphia

Banks.—The following

April 21.

Capital

•

$14,642,150

45,762,733
936,876
18,660,513
35,448,955

Specie
Legal Tenders.
Deposits

....

8,779,166

Circulation....

890,244

18,949,719

Loans.

Date.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar.
Mar.

47,607,558
47,233,661

1,007.186
1,012,980
1,008,825
1,000,689

47,249,383
46,9S 1.337
46,865,592
46,604,752

996,312
953,207
1,026,408
1,041,392

46 690,788

1,055,694
1,026.068

47,350,423
47,254,622

17
24
3
10
Mar. 17
Mar. 24
Mar. 31

46,642,150
46,043 4SS
46,028.641

Apr. 7
Apr. 14
Apr. 21
Apr. 28

-•=

45,762,733

previous return

'•

;
.<

8,580,200

946.282

8,761,219

8,779,166

Banks statement compares as

i

April 16.

.

01.250,882

Loans

.

Deposits

86,120,897
411,693
19,309,145
11,688,105
11,856,547
36,9)6,182
•

22,856,656
744,425

23,635,043 ^'.’22,469,483
744,011
777,198

Total to date

$269,948,355

„

in
trust for National Banks, as security for circulating notes, and for
deposits of public moneys with banks designated as Government
depositories, on Saturday last, was $357,597,550.
The following comparison shows the progress of the National
Banks, in respect to number, capital aud circulation, from January
The amount of United States

bonds held by Treasurer Spinner

1866*:
44

Circulation.

Banks.

Capital.

1,626
1,626
1,628
1,628
1,628

Date.

44

407,5(19.203
407.599.203
407.759.203
407,759,203
407.759.203
407.359.203

240,094,560

407.858.203

254,902,275
257,072,910
253,432,790
260,656,750
261,638,920
262,816,870

6..
13...
20...
27...

February 3...
44

10..

1,629

44

17...
24...
3...
10...

4

17...

1,629
1.629
1.630
1,637
1,643

44

24...
31...

1.643
1.644

7..

252,920,620
245,806.510
248,734.715
251,360,050
253,116,380

1.645
1,645
1,645
1,650

44

March
March
•

44

April
44

44
44

14...
21...
23...

.National

Banks;

Quarterly

407,858,203
407.858.203
409.408.203
409.405.203
409.408.203

264,2-17,170
265,382,560
266,504,340
268.029.040

269,948,355

Reports.—Abstract of the

quarterly reports of the National Banking Associations of the
United States,; showing their condition on the morning of the first
Monday in July and October, 1865, and January and April, 1866,
before the commencement of business on that day :
LIABILITIES.

Julv’65.

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
Real estate, furniture, etc..

Jan. ’66.

1,856,107

4‘539,525
2,585,201
72, *09,854

26,078,028

paid
Remit’s, <fc other cash items

Due from National Banks..
Due from other banks and
bankers
U. S. bonds deposited to se¬
cure circulation
Other U. B. bonds & secur’s

Oct, ‘65.

1,136,265
11,231,257
2,338,775
2,243,210
41,314,904
76^977,539

Premiums

17,393,232

14 703.282

89,978,981

‘

Aggregate

v

April ’66.~

; £525,955,51/1

2,125, on

1,806,663
15,436,296
8,198,717

16,895,56*

4,927.60)!

*

89,837^684"

j-107,912,7801

391,744,S50 j 272,634,200 } 440 380 450
'
1 150,577,400 f
20,406.442
16,247,241
Bills, etc., of other bauks..
21,657,896
16.909,365
14,966,144
9,437,060
Specie
Other lawful money
187,846,546
193,094,365
168,426,165
Other stocks, bonds, etc...) 13,569,120
19,907,675
19,048,518
-

30,964,423
33,800,865
4,451,708

)

45,413,275
1

6,639,165

-

944,054'

transactions for Wednesday’s steamer

large scale, and caused a sharp

London Comm’l..
do
bkr a'long
do
do short

advance iu rates, from

May 4.
@108#
109 ©109#
110#® 5.16#@5.15
5.12#© 5.20 @5.16#
5.18#® 5.15
3*#@ 36#
41 @ 41#

April 27.
106#© 307#

April 20./.

April 13.
106#@ 106#
107#® 107#
108)4® —

106#® 106#
10734® 107#
108)4® —

108
109

108

©108#
@

—

5.22#®5.21#
6.23#@5.21# 5.2°#@5.25
do short
5.20 @5.17# 5.25 @5.21# 5.20 @5.18#
Antwerp
5.31 #@5.27)4 5)31#@5.27# 5.5u#@5.22)4
Swiss
5.27)4@5.26# 5.27#@5.2n# 5.23#@5.21#
35#@ 35#
Hamburg
35)4® 35)4
35)4® 36#
40#@ 41
Amsterdam
40 @ 40#
40 @ 43#
40 #@ 41#
41#© 41)4
Frankfort..
40#@ 40#
40# @ 40)4
77)4® 78
78#@ 79
Bremen....
76#® 77)4
76#@ 77#
71)4® 72
70#@ 71#
70 @ 70#
Berlin
70 ® 70#
Foreign Banking.—The following is the return of the Bank of
Paris, long

‘

‘

.

England forjthe week ending April 18, 1866 :
DEPARTMENT.

ISSUE

£28,041,815 Government, debt

Notes issued

£11,015,100

■

Other securities.;

.

Gold coin and bullion

3^,984,900

13,041,815

....

£28,041,Si5

£28,041,815
BANKING DEPARTMENT.

£14,553,006

Proprietors’ capital

3,195,808

Rest
Public

4,045,459
13,971,790
440,230

deposits,
deposits
Seven day aud other bills.
Other

Government securities
Other securities
:
Notes

2,23 ,51°
105,490,619
87,564,330

13,682,345

-I 225,625,750
-j 315,850,300
18,279,816

13,854,882
193,542,749
17,379,739

$1,128,455,481 1,359,768,074 1,402,480,964 1,442,407,737

-

£36,206,287

•

compared with that for the previous week, shows the

following: changes:

>

;£321,325

£28,011,815 Decrease
22,303,795 Increase

Circulation issue.:
Circulation active
Public Deposits

13,971,790

10,644,254
18,976,716

984,214

;

Decrease

.406,115
345,006
30,591

3,195,808
5,738,020

Decrease
Decrease
Increase
Decrease

6,5S5,317

Decrease

13,889,112

partments
Seven day and other bills...
The, Rest
Notes in reserve..
Total reserve (notes and c oin)
in banking department....

258,440
11,559

Decrease
Decrease
No change

4,045)459

Other Deposits
Government securities
Other securities
Coin and bullion in both de¬

The

5,738,020
847,297

•

£36,206,287

The return,

£10,644,254
• 18,976,716

...

Gold and silver coin

440,230

17)M)6

579,705

following is the return ol the Bank of France, made
April. The return for the previous week i idded :

G03.146
up to

the 19th

f.

Capital of the bank
Profits, in addition to capital

f.

c.

c.

182,500,000
7,044,770

182,500,000 0
7,044,776 2

899,888,975 0

22,105,750 14
4,000,000 0
S91,902,125 0

0
2
22.105,750 14
4,000,000 0

;

Reserve of the bank and branches
New reserve
f
Notes in circulation and at the branches..
Drafts drawn by the bank on the branches
of the bank payable in Paris or iu the

provinces

April 12,1866.

April 19. ISuG.

DEBTOR.

7,083,957
92,134,906
154,803.601
20,905,707
972,740
10,441,550

t

Treasury account
Accounts current at Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Dividends payable
Various discounts
Re-discounts

25
0
65
0
75

'

6,674.573
90,090,630
150,810,998
26,004,209

48
14
60

0
1.038,811 75

2,074,992 92

Sundries

9<837,519 34
2,074,992 92

9,200,752 73

10,638,528 34

1,419,313,876 16

Surplus of receipts not distributed

1,407,722,914 73

510,456,800 88

503,725,759 72
109,798 24
292,352,516 67
285,267,689 0
9,042,700 0

70

...

...

CREDITOR.

Cash and bullion

.

Commercial bills overdue.
Ditto discounted in Paris
Ditto in the branches
Advances on bullion in Paris
Ditto in the provinces.
i Ditto on
public securities in
Ditto in the provinces

192,700 72

.

$301,306,477 $485,314,029 $498,843,447

Expense account

l 44,687,810

71,472,863

additional

that date is 1,650,
but seven of these have not received, and will not receive, any cir¬
culation. Practically, there are but 1,643 in operation.
National currency issued for the week ending April 28,1866
$1,919,315
Amount previously issued
268,029,040

January

were on a

38.396,210

nominal number of National Banks authorized to

6,

89,067,502

Included elsewhere.

depositories, or] National
created during the week ending April 28, 1866. The

National Banks.—No
were

$41,900,000
86,723,001
401,113
19,549,614
11,049,715
8,942.907

$41,900,000

A87,606,696
'■

[■

)

118,502,658 f 21 S41,641

..

April 30.

April 23

40,994,055
13,308,980

Due from other bauks
Due to other banks

59.768,983
4,931,060

4,722,725
412,871

Foreign Exchange.—The

‘

.

457,648
19,902,647

Specie
Legal Tender Notes

23,159,408

530,283,242
29,150,730

$1,126,455,481 1,359,768,074 1,402,480,964 1,442,407,737

32.144,250

32,257,653
32,762,280
34,640, S64
35,448,955
36,032,862

$41,900,000

Capital

Circulation (National)
Circulation (State)

?

8,666,230
S,720,270
8.743,396

949,116
936,876
890,244

31,303.565

—

-

j

reaction in the purchases
Philadelfor to morrow’s mail. Importers appear to have deferred transac¬
tions until the payment of the interest on the May coupons, in
Deposits.
35,342,306 hope of being able to buy gold lower ; the consequent demaud for
36,618.004
36,947,700 both gold and exchange put up the rates of both to figures at which
36,214,653 remitters are not
disposed to operate. There is a consequent reac35,460,881
34,681,135 of
per cent., in the rates of sterling, from the highest quotations
34,464,070
33,926,542 of the week ; prime bankers sixty days bill closing at 109@109F
33,052,252
The following are the closing quotations for the several classes
32,835,094
32,504,508 of
foreign bills, compared with those of the three last weeks :
32,102,427

981,932

Boston Banks.—The last Boston

Banks,

Surplus funds

*

29,747,236

which, however, there has been a slight

990,630

•

45 <114,699

follows with the

7,226,369
7,319,528
7,357,972
7,411,337
7,432,535
7,668,365
7,819,599
7,843,002
7,732,'/70
8,161,049
8,248,100
8,4:18,184

890,822
9S3,085

46,774,150

3
10

17,947

Circulation.

Specie.

45,941,001

2
8
15
22

‘

the condition of the

following comparison shows
phia Bauks at stated periods :
The

Jan.

.

36,032,862

46,632
289,906
574,007

513,608,888

48.170.381
90,044,837
24,386,182
38.713.381
32,350,274

248,886,282

213,239,530

495,979,818

79.541,594
1

Prolits
Nat'l Bank circul’n outsd’g.
Dividends compared
Other items

$1,070,001

.

171.321,903

131.452,158
396,634,813
*8,032,720
7: ,261,045

Notes in circulation
A
Individual deposits
U. S. deposits
Due to National Banks.,..
Due to other bauks

Aggregate
Increase
Decrease.
Increase
Increase..
Increase.,

46,832.734

8,761,219

Loans

resources.

$325,834,558 $398,157,206 $403,357,346 $409,273,534

Capital stock paid in

April 28.

$14,642,150

[May 5,1866.

CHRONICLE.

11,395,300 0

11,797,800 0

12,004,500

Paris

of the bank & branches
Expenses of management.;.;.......;....
Sundries,

,

3,430,000
11,780,700

Ditto on obligations and railway shares
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on securities in the Credit Foncier
in Paris.
Ditto in the provinces
#
Ditto to the State
Government stock reserve
Ditto other securities
Securities held

Hotel and property

.

303,883,470 91
287,244,023 0

'

v~&597,900 0

5,989,200
31,386.200

"‘30,747.500 0

.j9,989,700 0

19,908,400
606,800
445,800
60,000,000
12,980,750
36,171,987
100,000,000
8,434,688
1,094,915
13,332,748

596,000 o
406,600 0

0
0
0

14
91

,

!*

00

0
70
90

;. .1,419,313)8.76 16

60,000,000
12,980,750
36,171,987
100,000,000
“

0

If
91
0
8,432,i74 .0
1,089,220 6

18,019*518 99
.

W

557

THE CHRONICLE.

[May 5,

EXCHANGE.

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW YORK STOCK

(REPRESENTED BY THE CLOSING SALE REPORTED OFFICIALLY ON EACH DAY OF THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, MAY 4.)
Satur. Moii

Gold Co!n_.a-.
States 6s, 1867

115

do
63,1868
registered.
do
6s, 1881
coujwn
do * 6s, 1881
registered.
do
6s, 5-20s.
coupon. 106
do
6s, 5-20s..
registered.
do
6s, 5-20s (2d issue).
coupon 10554
do
68, 5.20s
do
....registered
do
6s, 5.20s (3d issue)
coupon
do
63, 5.20s,
do
.....registered
do
6s, Oregon War, 1S81
do
do.
(* yearly).
6s,
do.
do
5s, 1871
coupon.
do
5s, 1871
registered.

5s, 1874
5s, 1874
5s, 10-40S

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

108

—

!108% 109

preferred
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy
Chicago and Great Eastern.... ;
Chicago and Milwaukee.
do

96

10154 1015a 1G2
10156 101% 101541101% 10154
10154 10154 10154 101% 102
101% 1005a

Joliet and

74

94

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

84

84

Cumber.and Coal, preferred
Delaware & Hudson Canal
Harlem Gas ,..;
Manhattan Gas Light

Mariposa Mining
Mariposa Preferred
MetropolitanGas.,..—^
Metropolitan Gas....
New York Steamship
Nicaragua Transit.. T..
Pacific Mail Steamship
do
do
Scrip
Pennsylvania Coal.
Quicksilver Mining
uuhed Stated Telegrnph
M1

m

Art

•

.

*

...

-

.W«®ternUawn Wegraph..
W jontosillfj CoS.




111
100
100 12154 121

80

110% 110%
12054 119% 120% 122%

•

50

.100

100

»

—

40

preferred.... ..100

100
100
100

preferred

108
79

82

40

40

•

78%

40

10854 ics%
78% 78%

_

78%

95%
-

51
66

—

60

—

50

66

69%

100

120

92% 92%

9258

2654

26

26%

.70
255

50

98
98% 995$ 100
10554 10654 107% 10754

99

9S
105

100

106

34
62

34

100
100

;

92%

92%

25%

93%

■

—

S

preferred....

94

—

—

85

86%

—

91

—

Interest.........

do
do
do
do

Extension..*..
1st mortgage.,.,
consolidated....
..

85

85

—

Chicago and Rock Island, 1st mortgage

—

—

99%

—

97

73%

—

—

yo
—

91
67

9054
9054
6754

9054

68

68

68

do.

2d mort

—

93

*75
-

95%

95%

Q4X/

95

_

-

Chicago, extended
do

do

97

18S8..

5th mortgage,

do

86

do

Erie, 1st mortgage, 1868
do 2d mortgage, 1864.
do 2d mortgage, 1879
do 3d mortgage, 1883.
do 4th mortgage, 1880
Galena and

-

-

2d mortgage

-

_■

.

Hannibal and St. Joseph, 1st Mortgage

Harlem, 1st mortgage, 1869-72

100
—

do
do
2d mortgage, 1868....,
Hudson River, 1st mortgage, 1869
do
2d mortgage, (S. F.),
do
3d mortgage, 1875
do
convertible, 1867

——

1885....

—

102%
-

Illinois Central 7s, 1875... /
Lackawanna and Western Bonds
Marietta and Cincinnati, 1st mortgage.

--

104

1 nn

lUVJ

•

-

Michigan Central 8s, 1869-72
do

do

-

8s, new, 1882

ichigan Southern, Sinking Fnnd
do
o

.

Miscellaneous.

Central Coal
Central American Transit

74%

50

50

Income...

do
do
do
do

10354 10354 103% 103
8354 8454 8354 81

Improvement Stock.

Canton, Baltimore

74
SO

73%

74%
‘7%

100

Cleveland and Pittsburg, 2d mortgage
do
do
3d mortgage, conv..
do
do
4th mortgage.....
Cleveland and Toledo, Sinking Fund

68

American Coal
Atlantic Mail Steamship.

137%

100

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, 8 per cent...
Chicago and Milwaukee, 1st mortgage
Chicago and Northwestern, Sinking Fund...

do

69,1878
6s, 1887
6s, 1867....7
Be, 1S68....
5s, 1870...
5s, 1873
6s, 1874
5s, 1S75
5s, 1876
5s, 1890
5s,F. Loan, 1868

135

50

do

do

do

New York 7s, 1875
do
69,1876

do

82% 82% 82
104% W4% 104%

—

Buffalo, New York and Erie, 1st mort, 1877..
Chicago and Alton, Sinking Fund
do
1st mortgage
do

Jersey City 6s, Water Loan
\

61%
123%

Atlantic and Great Western, 1st mort
do
do
2d mort

94

6s, Water Loan
6s, Public Park Loan
6s,

124

29

-

War Loan
Municipal.
Brooklyn 6s;......
.

28%
59%

Railroad Ronds:

Wisconsin 6tf,

do
do
do

—

—

Loans

coupon

CO r-n

Terre Haute
do
preferred. 100

do

do

South Carolina 6s
Tennessee 6s, 1868
do
6s, Long
do
5s

124

100 74% 73%
100 78% 77%

Long Island

St. Louis, Alton and
do
do
Second avenue
Sixth avenue

74

—

100

Reading
74
77
74

59%

81

50

Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago

74

2854

58%

122

Morris and Essex
100
New Jersey.
100
New York Central
100
New Haven and Hartford
100
100
Norwich and Worcester..
Ohio and Mississippi Certificates
do
do
do
preferred..
Panama.
s
100

Michigan 6s, 1873
do
69,1878
do
6s, 1883
do
7s, 1868

28

58%

59%

100

Mississippi and Missouri.>...

^

98

GO
28

do
do
guaranteed...100
Milwaukee and Prairie dn Chlen
:
100
do
do
do
1st pref.. .100
do
do
do
2d pref... 100
100
Milwaukee and St. Paul
do
do
preferred
100

War Loan

.10% .11

94

43

50 82%

Chicago

Marietta and Cincinnati
do
do
1st
do
do
2d

1862
1865

—

—

50 10454 104

McGregor Western......

’79, after 1860

74

i

l!3

100

Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati

Indianapolis and Cincinnati

do
7s, War Loan, 1878
do
7s, Bounty Loan, 1890
Minnesota
Missouri 6s
•••••
••••
do
6s, (Hannibal and St. Joseph RR.)...
do
6s, (Pacific Rlt.)
New York 7s, 1870
do
69,1866....
do
6s, 1867
do
6s, 1868
do
6s, 1872
do
69,1873
do
6s, 1874
do
6s, 1875
do
6s, 1877..
do
5s, 1866
do
5s, 1868
do
5s, 1871
do
5s, 1S74
do
59,1875
do
5s, 1876
do
7s, State Bounty Bonds.
North Carolina 69
Ohio 69,1868...'
do 63,1870
c
do 6s, 1875
do 6s, 1881
do 6s, 1S86
Rhode Island 69..

Thur.

96

100

Michigan Central
Michigan So. and N. Indiana

1868-72

Wed.

117

100

preferred..

101J

95

do
do

Virginia 6s,

do

90%

—

100
100

Chicago and Northwestern..’.

101 % 10154

9454 9456

do 1879
do
War Loan

2*3
Kentucky 6s,
Louisiana 6s

100
100

do

Delaware, Lackawanna and Western
Eighth Avenue

do
1870
do 1877

Indiana ns,

do

Cleveland and Pittsburg...
Cleveland and Toledo

Canal Bonds, 1860
Registered, 1860

■

[C5
91

90

100

102
102

108

do
do

Chicago and Alton

102

State.

do
do

Pue»

110

.100;

Chicago and Rock Island:*. 1.

105% 101% 101% 102

coupon. 955s

6s, Certificates,

6s, coupon,

Central of New Jersey..-

Erie....
do preferred
Hannibal and St. Joseph
do
do
preferred
Harlem
..,
do
preferred
Hudson River
Illinois Central

Caliiomia 7s, large
Connecticut
Georgia 6s,
Illinois

11554 11554

10S>8
i 10854 10854 109
10534 1015^10154 101 % 10254
102% 101%; 10156 102
102
101561102

registered.

registered.
Pacific R. R.. .(cur.).
7-30s Treas. Notes—1st series.
do
do
do
'id series.
do
do do
....'id series.

do

120

coupon.

53, 10-40s
6s, Union

do

108

Mon.

isatur

SECURITIES.

Railroad Stocks.
119

registered.

Fri.

t

.

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

iTiiur

1255*'

American
(Tutted

Wed

Tues.

i29 %

SECURITIES.

100

62

125

i()0
100
ioo
:... 100

57

126

5654 5754 5954 59%

126
59

44

100 44%

45

4554

45

44%

1254

100

24

13

2454 24

24

2354

ion
,100

do
do
do
do
do
do

St.
218

100
100
100

...100

145
53

5454

64%

54%

do
do

5854 69%
40

—

do
do
do
do
do
do

6s, 1887
6s, Real Estate
6s, subscription;
7s, 1876....
7s, convertible, 1876
7s, 1865-76....-

.

—

—

—

_

-

do
do

,

do
do ;

2d mort.
3d mort.

-100* 100*i
-

do

Toledoand

do

•

-

do

do1

do

do

do

2d moTt.

Interest

•

80

ude

93*

so'

90
78

93*
-

83

-

r.

L

S3

-

—

84

2<

Waba§W*l8t mortgage,'

do

‘84

.

Louis, Alton and Terre Haute, 1st mort..
do
dp
2f
do
do

5754 57

—

.

Mississippi, 1st mortgage
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago, 1st mort
■

50

—
—

—

.

Ohio and

11 0

100 225
100

86

OO/vj

Mississippi and Missouri, Land Grants’.
New York Central 6s, 1883.../.

4454

1254
2554

7s.

Goshen Line, 1868

Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien, 1st mort...
Milwaukee and St. Paul; let mortgage
do
do
Income....

100
50

50
100

2d mortgage,

do
do

-

92

OA

.

-

77*i 73>S
"1

.

—.

78*f

-

J

89
—

558

THE CHRONICLE.

[May 5,186«.

NATIONAL, STATE AND MUNICIPAL SECURITIES LIST.
vnuct

j

Amount

•

Kate.l

American Gold Coin
National Securities.
Bonds of 1847
registered.
9,415,250'
do
1848......
con/ton
| 8,908,342
do
do
do
1860
con/ton
;
5
do
do
.registered
1
do
1853......
20,000,000
do
do
.registered
do
1861..%...
282,728,150’ 6
do
'do
,

j 1,016,000 j

Due.

do
do
do

1119 ><120
1 1-j

i

‘

(

Jan. &
!

!

1874-'

July

Jan.

.

I105
102

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

..

j
(May & Nov.! 1SS4 -j
1882

....

;

do

Bds.

RR. Bds.

000,000
4,903,000
820,000
1,500,000

Baltimore, Md.—Improvement..

...

108>. 10S*
iio5 ; ...

1881
July; 1881

| May & Nov.

6

j

108*.) O'.)

Jan. & Julv 1881 i
it

S ‘July

‘

96*j

225.000

850,000
300,000

Alb. Nor. RR...

do

j 95

I

do

lit)

Alleghany City', Pa.—City

iJau. & July 1871 \ I

1864

1

!

H)2)a':

101.^,102^1

Miscellaneous, j

N.W.Virg.RR.j
Water Loan...

3,500,000

6,000,000

J., A.,J. &O.

554,000 6

Park...

197,700!
'740,0001

1,949,711

5,550,900 6
216,000 : 6
299,000 7
571,000
300,000

6
6
7
7
7
20,(XX) 8
250,308 7
50,(XX) 6
650,000 7
319,457 5
400,000 7
125,000! 6
130,000 6
500,000 6
375,000 6
122,000! 6
118,000! 7
650,000 7
7
6
6

...

do

,

]

,

.

Massachusetts—State Scrip
do
do
do
do
do

...

do
do
War Loans...
...

State Scrip

do
War Loan
do

do
do
do
do
Renewal Loan
do
War Loan
do
War Bounty Loan...
Minnesota—State Bonds
Missouri—State Bonds
do
State Bonds for RR..
do
State Bonds (Pae. RR)
do
State Bonds (H,«fcSr.J)
do
Revenue Bonds
New Hampshire—State Bonds..
do
War Fund Bds
New Jersey—State Scrip
do
War Loan Bonds..
New York'l
do
do
do
General Fund
'
do
do
do
do
do
Bounty Bonds
do
do
do
do
do
do
Caoial Bonds.
do
do
'

do
do
do
North Carolina—State

Ohio—Foreign
do
Foreign
do
Foreign
do
Foreign

1

1

i]

Loan

220,000
6,429,000
1.150,044;

May A; Nov. 18s0
do
j 1894
Jan.
July;*71 *71

1,1.22,0001 7
8

602.000! 6

700.000! 7

1,189.780

0

500.00"! 0
800,000; (j

909,007 J 5

442,901!

5
900.000; 5

800.000j

5

25,506,000 7
702,000
3.050,000

O.OOOJXKI!

2,250,000

5(X).000j
900.000;
192,585

...

Virginia—Registered Bonds
do
Coupon Bonds
do
Sterling Bonds
Wisconsin—State Bonds
do

War Fund Bonds...

do

War Fund Certif...,

1883

;

July 1868

i

j*73 ’83:
! 1878 {

j

j Jan. ct Juiyl

I Jan.

4.095.3091

2,400.000; 0

679,000' 0
5
29,209,000! 5
3.000.000 0

6,168,000

3,889,000; 0

2,595,510 0
2,347.340! 5
2.115.400; 0
13,911.900: 0
175,000! 6
1,050,000 6
21,888,398! 6
12,972,000! 6
1,800,000 6

do
do

}i808
j 1878

j

!

do
i pleas.:
May ct Nov.j isos
;Jau. ct July 1875
do
; 1878
/Jan. ct July is, 77
Ja. ctJuf
J AJifcO j i860
do
| 1872
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

;io3*

do
do

do

l,878,90o

190,OOo!

402,763!

Railroad

90*!
90*
GS

San

Real Estate...;.

2,083,20o!
1,966,000

Francisco, Cal.—City Bonds,
do
City Fire B.
do
City Bonds!
do
do
do

C.&Co’tyB.
C.&Co’tyB.
C.&Co’tyB.

do

C.&Co’tvB.

WrvxmQTox, Deb—City Bonds..,

6
6

600, OOo 6

1,800,000
2,748,000
150.00()

.

500,000
154,000
102.000
895,570
490,000

1,(XX),000
2,500,000
1,400,00))
2,000,000
949.700

4,996,000
1.442.100
652.700
739,222

2,232,800
7,898,717
1,009.700
1,800,000
985,326
1,500,000
600,000
500,000
300,000
200,000

150,000
260,000
1.496.100
446,800
1,464,000

6
6
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
5
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
6
6
6
5
6
6
6
6
5
5
7
6
6
6
6
6
6
6

523,000
425,000
254,000
484,000 6
239,000 6
163,000 6

Sewerage
Improaement..
Water
narbor
}....
Wharves
Pacific RR
O. &M. RR.....
Iron Alt. RR

5
5
5
5
5
6

399,30o
3,066,07i!
27o,00o 6

Railroad B'ds

.

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
Feb. & Aug.
Jan. & J uly
Jan. ct July

Apr. & Oct.

-

’Sacramento, Cal.—City Bonds...
do
County B’ds
St. Louis, Mo.—Municipal

Various.

605,000’ 6

483,900!

Railroad Bonds.

City Loan....
Rochester, N. Y.—City Bonds...
do
City Bonds...

May ct Nov.

1.200 000} 6

00,00() 6
150.000 5
200,00o 6
3,000,20o 5
2,147.00o 5
900.0<\) 5
100, Q0p 6

City—Water Stock..
do
Water Stock
do
CrotonW’r S'k
do
CrotonW’r S'k
do
W'r S'k of *49
do
W'r S'k of ’54
do
Bu. S'k No. 3.
do
Fire Indem. S.
do
Central P'k S.
do
Central P'k S.
do
Central P'k S.
do
C.P.Imp.F. S.
do
C.P.Imp. F. S.
do
Real Estate B.
do
Croton W’r S.
do
Fl.D't. F'd. S
do
Pb.B.Sk. No. 3
do
DocksctSlipsS
do
Pub. Edu. S'k.
do
Tomp.M’ket S
do
do
Union Def. L
do
do
Vol. B'nty L’n
do
do
Vol.Fam.AidL
do
do
Yoi.Fam.AidL
NewYorkC'nty.—C't House S'k
do
do
Sol.Sub.B.R.B
do
do
Sol.S.ctRf.R. B
do
do
Sol.B’ntyFd.B
do
Riot Dam.R. B
do

rar.

Jan. it Julv 1800
do
do
do
do
do
do

Apr. it Oct.! 1808
do
i IS 8
Jan. & July

425,000

New York
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do

j1874

i

100,000

Portland, Me.—City Bonds
do
Railroad Bonds,
Providence, R. I.—City Bonds...

i 1871
„

219,000

PHiLADELrniA, Pa.—City Bds,old
do
CityBds, new
do
City Bds,old
do
City Bds, new
Pittsburg, Pa.—City Bonds

1873
1874
1875
1877
I860
1808

Jim. it Dec
Jan. & July
do
do
Jan. & Julv
do

300,000; 6

rar. 1

Julyj’71 ’72|
jJ.Au.J.ctO. j 1870 100*1
I Jan. ct July pleas. 1
&

9,749,500

1.600,000!

'
j

jJan. A: July; 1374 j

4.500.000!

2.183.532-

;

4
6
7
5

911,500

11 New Haven. Ct.—City Bonds..

do
31883
Jail, ct July!*71 '89i
do
j’72 ’871
do
i*72'85
do
11860

13,701,000!

6
7,000.000 6
3,000.000; 6
431,0 0 9
5:15.1 u.0: 6
l,050,0o0; 6
95,000i 6
731.000! 6

'rar.

r! 1880
May & Nov.} 1890
Jan. »fe July; 1367

345.000: 7

:

; *75 *78

do
do
do

2100XK); 6

379,800!

....

Jan. «fc

1,750,000 f 6

1,009,500;

do
do
do
do
Domestic Loan Bonds
Pennsylvania—State Bonds
do
State Stock
do
Military L"n Bds
Rhode Island—State (War) Bds.
South Carolina—State Stock...
Tennessee—Improvement Bonds
do
Improvement Bonds
do
Railroad Bonds.
Vermont—State Certificates
do
War Loan Bonds

do
do

1,08SU1MI; 0
2500H)0! 7

25u.0001

j

10
8

do
City Bonds...
Milwaukee, Wis.—City, re-adj’d
Newark, N. J.—City Bonds
do
City Bonds
*New Bedford, Dias's.—City Bds.
New London, Ct.—City Bonds...
! Newport. R. T.—City Bonds

ji890-'

Vat ions,

Water Bonds..

;Marysville, Cal.—City Bonds

var.

Quarterly 11870

502.20S j

Loan
Loan

Quarterly
Quarterly

Louisville, Ky.—City Bonds
ij
do
City Bonds....
do

’07

1.727.00
072.0 '0i

107,000!

Bonds.'.

93

Jan. & Julv '80 ’89,

j

4,800,0011 i
8,171,902}
3,192,763! 6

1,103,(XX)

Loan
Foreign Loan
Foreign Loan
Foreign Loan




Mar.itSept.iYiO

5320 MK):

2,450.0"l»!

Michigan—$2,000,00a Loan

'07 .09'

j..

5,398,(KH)

7
6
7

913,000
l,030,000 j 6

...

3.9-12,0U0|

**

993,000; o
634,200 ; 6
1,281,000 ! 6
121,540 6

Nov!

...Idem. !

6
0
4
5
6

583,205!

6
6
285,000 6
1,352,600 10
178,500 10
329,000 6
1,1:33,500 6
300,000 7
960,000 7

457,000

429,900

-

1.000.000
(V7K

7

FRIDAY.
Bid

’70 ’74
’65 ’69
’70 ’82
1879

95" l66“
•

var.

1913
1870
1870
1873
is75
1386

1890-

Asked

•

•

101

•

100*

....

82" 83”
95

....

**

*

*

99*
99

99*

100

9a

1S90

99*

M.,J.,S,&D. ’65’82

6,580,410
1,205,010

July}l87G

510,000]

May & Nov
July

B.&O.R.cowj3 (
f

B. & O. RR..

1102>t

I!

July

Jan. &

|

{May

do

Jan. &

1,000,000

102

| May & Nov. j 1SS5 -]

6

J.,A.,J.&0

York&Oum.R.

..

Louisiana—Stare Bonds (RR)
do
State Bonds (RR)
do
State Bonds for B’ks,
Maine—State Bon ds
do
War Loan.;
Maryland—Stale Bonds
do
State Bds .coupon. /
do
State Bds inset idol \
do
State Bonds.co/Qxm.

Payable

Jan. & July
do
do
do
Jan. & July
do

$90,000

Albany, N.1.—City Scrip
do
City Scrip
do
Wa'ter Loan

coupon. )
! 102)a' Bangor, Mo.- City Debt
0
do .registered, f 1100,000,000!
do
Railroad Debt
1805 ...coupon.
Boston, Mass.—City Bonds0,10-5
71,003,500 j.
do“
do .registered. 1
!
do
do
City Bonds
do (10-40s)
1804
.cc»//>on. )
95 )i
do
053x1 1
City Bonds
’Mar. & Sept. ,1904
do
do
do .registered. f 171,219,100; 5
do
Wa'ter Loan Stg
93.1
Union Pacific RK. Bonds of 1805 S 4,031,0001 0
Jan. & July !l895
do
Water Loan
7.30 Feb. »fc Aug. 1807 j 101
Treasury Notes (1st series)
(
10*2Vi Brooklyn, N.Y.—City Bonds
do
do
do
(2d series)
< 810,512,050 7.30 Jim. & Dec.: lstiS |]o1* kjo
Improved St’k
do
do
(3d series)
(
do
Pub. Park L’n.
jT.:J0 Jan. A July 1863 ,101 h-v*
Debt Certificates
hooig
do
Water Loan
62,620,0(X)j
i
State Securities.
Buffalo, N.Y Municipal Bonds
Alabama—State Bonds
2.109,000!
do
&
1877
Municipal Bonds
do
do
f«
Jan.
648,00"!
Chicago, Ill.—City Bonds
do
do
do
do
* 11870
do
City Bonds
088,000;
CALiFORXiA-wtate Bonds
' i
do
)
'80 107 ;109
do
Sewerage Bonds ..
2,472,000
do
Suue Bonds large )
do
Water Bonds
'109
Connecticut—War Bonds
;Jan. & July j’72
8,000.000
Cincinnati, O.—Municipal
’9.2j 95
Georgia—State Bonds
'Jan. &> July, 1880 j
do
Water Bonds
2,073,750|
do
do
do
do
1872
1
525,000 ■
|;Cleveland, O—City Bonds
Illinois—Canal Bonds
IJau.
1,325,0891
do
Water Bonds
July|.Y,o '701 ...
do
do
do Registered
do
1,722,2001
Sewerage Bonds
do
do
Coupon Bonds
1,386,570:
|*00‘05;
Detroit, Mich. —City Bonds
do
do
do
do
’09*70’
2.371,725!
I'
do
City Bonds
do
do
do
do
1.081,077'
|’70 *77
1
do
City Bonds
do
do
do
do
11879
2UJHKI
clo
Wa'ter Bonds...
j
do
War Loan Bonds
do
llt>79
1,157,700!
i
Dubuque, Io.—City Bonds
Indiana—State Bonds
230,000| 5 ; Jan. & July j 1800 ’
do
Railroad
do
do
do
2,058.173! 2}8
! Hartford, Ct.—City Bonds..
do
1800 !
do
War Loan Bonds
do*
Park Bonds.....
1,225,500 ! 0 1 May Jb Nov .isos j
Iowa—State Certificates
200.000, 7
do
Railroad Bonds.,
j Jan. & July 11880 j
do
WarJLoan Bonds
do
300,000 j 7
do
Water Bonds....
j 1877 !
Kansas—State Bonds
200,000 : 7 'Jan. & July|*70 *78
Jersey City, N. J.—City Bonds.
Kentucky—State Bonds
Jan. A July, *00 ’73
do
447,000!
do
City Bonds.
do
1
State Bonds..
i
do
do
do
3,2.04,000*
Water Bds
j*08’72'
do
do
do

pal
Due.

Rate.

I

| Asked!

Lid

INTEREST.

•Outstanding.!

DENOMINATIONS.

Jan. & Julv 1S67

.

|
Oregon War Bds {yearly)
do
do
(k yearly) \coulX)nBonds (5-20s) of 1802
coupon.
do
do
do .registered. ( j5l4,7S0,5OO:'

Amount

1

FRIDAY.

pal

J Jan. & July 11868 -]f

7,022,0tX)!

.

I

Payable.

Princi-

liuciua

j

'

1

INTEREST.

Outstanding.'

DENOMINATIONS.

'65 ’74
’7S ’79
’65 ’a5
’67 ’77
’72 ’73
’70 ’78
’65’71
Jan. & July ’65 ’95
do
1869
do
’81 ’97
do
’65 '79
’65 ’82
1881
Apr. & Oct. 1876
Jan. & July ’79 ’87
do
1S88
do
1895

89~ 9i”
95” 95*
117

....

%

.

•

.

S6
85

•

•

•

•

*

•

•

•

92* 94
•

•

•

£3*

....

95”
95

....

Apr. & Oct.
Jan. & July
do
do
/
do
do
June &Dec.

var.

1879

1890
1871

’69 ’79
1865
Apr. <fc Oct. 1871
Jan. & July ’65’72
Various.
’75 ’77
Jan. & July ’65 ’80
Various. 1882
Feb. & Aug 1876
Jan. & July 1883
June &Dec. ’65 ’81
Various,
'65’75
do
’77 ’83
Jan. & July var.

Various,
do

93

94

91

var.

1887

May &Nov.
Jan. & July
do
June &Dec.
Feb. & Aug
Jan. & July

Apr. & Oct.
Jan. &

July

Apr. & Oct.

Jan. & July
May & Nov.
_

do

1894
’70’83
1S73
65 ’84
67 ’87
73 ’84
70 ’81
1379
isso

92
92

i89o

Feb. & Aug 1890
do
75’79

92

May & Nov 1875

Apr. & Oct
May & Nov

88

’70 ’73
1868

do
1898
Jan. & July 1887
9i‘
do
1898
do
9i'
1887
Feb. & Aug 1876
May & Nov. 1873
do
1883
do
1878
do
1866
do
’67 ’76
do
1873
do'
’65’ 69
Jan. & July
1864
May & Nov. 1867
do
1865
do
’66 ’73
do
’75-’89
May &JNov. ’73-’76 91
do
91
’80-’81
do
91
’83 ’90
do
91
77-’82
do
’65 ’81
Jan. & July
’65 ’82
do
’65 ’93
do
88* 88*
’65 ’99
do
92* 93
var.
Jan. & July
1913
do
68’
’66’83
Various.
96
94
’68 ’71
94
96
Apr. & Oct. 1885
Mar.&Sept. 1876
Jan. & July
1893
do
Various, ’65 ’82
’65 ’82
do
Jan. & July ’65’76
Jan. & July ’88- 9b
1884
do
Jan. & July ’65 ’83
’65 ’90
do
’79 ’88
do
’71 ’87
do
85
’71 ’83
do
’65 ’86
00
’67 ’81
do
85
71 ’73
do
72 ’74
do
74’77
do
85’
May & Nov. 1871
Jan. <fc July 1866
1875
do
1888
do
77 ’76
do
April & Oct. 1883
Jan. & July 1884
•

•

•

At/TAM/VI/O

Mr*

THE CHRONICLE.

May 5, I860.]

Spirits Turpentine

$1)t Commercial ©imeo.
~~

The course

Night, May 4.

RECEIPTS OP DOMESTIC PRODUCE FOR

of trade has been interrupted the past week by peculiar

The u removals” among active business men have been
unusually numerous. The current season has witnessed the transfer of
two important branches of trade to entirely different quarters of the
city. The wool trade has nearly deserted Pine street for lower Broad¬
way and Beaver street, while there has been a pretty general move¬
ment of the fur trade up town. The other circumstance that has proved
an obstacle to trade i^ the consternation that exists among brokers in
consequence of the law passed by the Legislature of New York at the
recent session respecting the tax to be levied upon their sales. This
tax is regarded as oppressive and ruinous, and the brokers have been
in daily consultation with reference to the measures that can be adopted
avoid its burdens.
The

following is

a

statement of stocks of leading articles of foreign

and domestic merchandise at this market:
1866.

r-April 1.
Beef, barrels and tierces
Pork, barrels
Tobacco, foreign, bales..
Tobacco, domestic, hogsheads—
Coffee, Rio, bags
Coffee, other, bags
Coffee, Java, mats
Sugar, hogsheads
Sugar, boxes
Sugar, bags

27,361
99,246
9,198

80,916
61,570

1865.

May 1.—>
24,874
90,424
7,477
27,040
76,682
42,524

May 1.
77,474
91,974
6,056
26,079
21.711

22,024

44,669

118,987
42,078

116,114
49,764

20,565
72,000
38,354
72,072
91,276

21,930

Milado, hogsheads
Molasses, hogsheads

279

This

4,810

10,378

94

99

23,296
12,700
7,771
25,116
5,019
23,721

24,476

8,100
454.000
13,950

5,600
5,420
209,700
43,600
4,827

11,539
31,810
9,022
12,000

6,224
56,440

36,600

depression prevailing at our last re¬
port, but has been without activity.
Breadstuff* have experienced further speculative advance in flour and
wheat, but coarse grains have been rather dull and heavy.
Provisions show no new feature of importance.
The speculative ex¬
citement in Pork has run very high, and the fluctuations in prices un¬
usually sharp, with a somewhat higher range. The operators for a rise
are a Western
clique; and on Wednesday sales of new crop were made
as
high as $29.62$, cash, and $30, buyer June, while the lowest price
yesterday was $28.37^. The stock is large, but the receipts are very
light, and the Western markets relatively higher than this, with a South¬
ern demand for all this
surplus. Lard has been Arm but dull Bacon
has done a little better towards the close, with some revival of
ship¬
ments to Liverpool, stimulated by extreme low freights and the advance
in Exchange. Beef has remained very firm with a light stock, small re
ceipts, and steady demand. Butter is drooping under increasing sup¬
plies, cheese is nearly nominal.
Groceries have been firm, but with a very moderate trade, mainly
owing, no doubt, to the circumstances above detailed.
Naval stores have been more active.
The demand for
has taken

large, and

some

spirits turp¬
improvement in the prices

place.

Tar, also, is rather firmer.
There has been more doing in petroleum, and yet no marked
activity.
Prices have had an upward tendency
through the firmness of holders,
and diminished receipts, but
buyers do not take hold freely.
In oils, we notice a decline in crude whale, and an advance in linseed
oil, with large sales of both. Other oils quiet but firm.
There has been a slight improvement in South American
dry hides
within the past three days, but the trade remains rather
quiet, with a
large stock. Leather has ceased to decline, and closes more active.
Metals have again become dull, and have pretty uniformly
a down¬
ward tendency, although no important
changes are made in quotations.
Tobacco has been quiet; Tallow has been active and advancing ; also
Stearine.
Wool has been in

good demand, and the sales have been large.
There is a partial revival of freights, but at low rates. The ship¬
ments by steamer to
Liverpool to-day were at 8d. per bushel for Corn,
and

fd.

per

lb. for cotton.

Latest.—To-day’s markets show

a

large advance in Flour and

Wheat,and a considerable decline in Corn. Pork recovered the decline
of
yesterday, and the closing sale this afternoon was 1,000 bbls. new
crop at $29 50. Lard was higher at the close. Coffee and Teas were
more
active, but on private terms. Raw Sugars were active and ad
vancing—lair to good refining 10i@l0|c., with sales 1,000 hhds., and
.3,500 boxes. Refined sugars were advanced £c—best crushed 15|c*




_

Ashes, pkgs...

..

Oats
Com

3,505

42,288

Rye

260

record

1,697

follows:
made.]

was

Since
Same
Jan. 1. time’65

81

Breadstuff's—
Flour, bbls
29,261
300
Wheat, bush

Rosin

5,310

3,455

143,380

9,864

51

31,322

3,041

Tar

523,153

Barley..'.
Grass seed...
Flaxseed
Beans
Peas
C. meal,bbls.
C. meal.bags.
B. W. Flour,

711,600

Pitch
71,256
17.340 Oil cake, pkgs .
390,663 989,350 Oil lard
481,506 628,425,011, Petroleum.
14,140 ^15,160:Peanuts, bags.

bags
Cotton, bales
Copper, bbls...
..

97,785
2,252

1,086

3,646
125

2.232

3,195

9,811
197

314,159
6,198

130,970

113,833
44,679

173, "35

1,822

Egtrs

78,846

69,560

3,133
4,692

38,747 +147,190
187,411

9,264

305,940

6,045

5,403

Rice, pkgs
126,836; Starch

40

196,432
3,324
725,625

2,530

1.008
2,120

8,450

3,514
1,854
1,661

57,482
9,102
30,795

20,195

538

30,655

160

6,501

Dressed
No.;

21,825

& bbls
Naval Stores—
Crude trp,bbl
....

[Tobacco

Tobacco, hhds.

701,900'|Whisky, bbls..

Rice,

258

entine

17,661

596

334

Spirits turp¬
*

Tallow, pkgs..
12.433

10,973

1.375

118

Wool, bales...

.318

57,940
67,295

547

bbls

1,364

95,250

3,351

Spelter, slabs..
Sugar, hhds &

Grease, pkgs...
Hemp, bales...
Hides,No .... 4,754
Hops, bales....
Leather, sides. 22,258
Lead, pigs
Molasses,hhds,

44,380

37,666

191

Stearine

5,032

64,724
80,885
43,103
71,‘350
3,751

121

1,130

76
206
14

Dnedfruit,pkgs

218

Beef, pkgs, .
Lard, pkgs..
Lard, kegs..

2,720

*203

Copper, plates.

5,422
9,728
2,375

pS&:

18,421

1,018
28,268

....

Cheese
Cut meats...

32,711

477

Since
Same
Jan. 1. time165

This
week.

{Provisions—
3,825 180,186
625 116,-49 *171,615
Batter, pkgs. 10,606

Malt

Hogs,

81,769
rough,

1,969

bush

+

Including malt.
EXPORTS

OF

15,704

Including bags reduced to barrels.

LEADING

ARTICLES.

The following table shows the exports from this
articles of commerce for the week ending May

port of some leading
1, since January 1,

1866, and for the corresponding period in 1865 :
[Oil cake, bacon, butter, cheese, lard, and tallow are given in 100 lbs.]

16,529

6,111

Cotton has recovered from the

entine and rosin has been

week.

no

ending May 4, since
as

WEEK, AND SINCE JAN. 1.

THE

[Of the items left blank in 1865

867

301

Rice, E. I, cleaned, bags
Rice, E. I., uncleaned, oags
Hides, No
Gunny cloth, bales
Gunny bags, bales
Hemp, Manilla, bales
Jute, bales
Linseed, bags
;
Saltpetre, bags

975

5,941

Molasses, barrels

higher and active—selected white selling at

The receipts of domestic produce for the week
Jan. 1, and for the same time in 1865, have been

circumstances.

to

was

92^c., and Common Rosin closed at $3 50. Late this afternoon there
was a sale of 1,000 slabs Malacca Tin at 20c.,
gold.

^DOMMERCIAir~]EPITOME.
Friday

559

For
the
week.
570

Ashes, pts, bbls

Since Same
Jan. time
1,’66. ’65.

1,634
39

Ashes, Prls,bls
Beeswax, lbs.

89,559

For
the
week.

2,698

Pitch, bbls.

186 Oilcake;

C.meal,bbls
Wheat, bus.
Rye, bush

37,562

.

347,258

381.985

41,448

47,505

102,409

22,362
2,455

186,150

183,612

10
263

11,471
121

Tar. bbls...

.372

8,267
3,280
88,147
5,692

119,608

Petrol., gals 463,330 9,120,5:38 2,504,607
9,374
9,470
Whale, gals
67,696
34,740
Sperm, gals
623
Lard, gals..
400
7,042
22,503

16,440

44

192,226

Provisions.

142,331

16,816 235,143
823
13,053

Oats,bush..
Peas, bush..
Candles, bxs.
Cotton, bales.
Hay, bales. .
Hops, bales..
Naval Stores,
C.Turp.bbls
S.Tnrp.bbls
Rosin, bbls.

1, ’66. ’65.
725

....

43,6122,086,418
81,236 665,8:34
7,493
20,680
25,822
3,070

Corn, bush.

19,675

101,811 Oils.

Breadstuff's.

Flour, bbls.

55

Since Same
Jan. time

Pork, bbls..
2,742
Beef,bbla&tcs. 1.843
Bacon,
10,129

Butter....
Cheese
Lard
10,603 Staves M
Tallow

38,435
32,437
198.890

46,343
45,015
198,U56
53,897

121

7,395

914

30,504

89,138

1,S98

123,037

208

3,082

128,573
4,657

1,101

55,700

83,370

3,577
Tobacco, pkgs
*578 Tobacco,mf,lbs. 77,333
4,519j Whalebone, lbs 25,006
4,339

34,254

54,538

963.0181,504,542
176,902
37,S47

following table shows the foreign imports of certain leading
commerce at this port for the week ending April 27, since Jan.
1, 1866, and for the corresponding period in 1865 ;
The

articles of

[The quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.]
For
the
week.
51

Buttons

2,329
Coal, tons
Cocoa, bags...
Coffee, bags
34,454
Cotton, bales.
Drugs, &c.
85
Bark, Peruv
207
Blea p’wd’rs
....

..

Cochineal...
Cr Tartar
Gambier....

...

52
60
74
167
71
323

Gums, crude
Gum, Arabic
Indigo
...

Oil, Olive...

Opium
Soda, bi-carb
Soda, sal....
Soda, ash...

....

2,500
778
188
25

Flax
Furs

17

Gunny cloth

•

,

Hemp, bales..
Hide's^ &c.

•

•

49
84
559
1

Bristles

Hides,dres’d
India rubber..

Ivory
Jewelry, &c.
Jewelry

•

50
460

Hair

'

1,001
171,029

1,490

15,753

2,698
7,419

7,053
227
614

5,765
5,303

1,945
1,533
6,767
1,941

35,688
341
52 634

9,312
15,946
5,018
1,513

7,911
2,426
48,368
748

3,864
10,729
;

695

9
25

259

Linseed

6,466

116,246

Molasses

5,775

38,981

Watches....

Metals, &c.

Same
time
1865.

2,S07
218,101
5,911
244,193

105
3
25

Brimst, tns.

Madder
Oils, ess

Since
Jan. 1,
1866.

422

767

37.894

863

•

London, 20th

72

2,126

149
5,552
1,820
67.350
Iron, RRb’rs 10,886
56,014
170,035
Lead, pigs.. 21,794
67,989
Spelter, lbs. S30.016 4,293.603
Steel
57.544
25,912
1,597
112.286
260,637
Tin, bxs
10,649
Tin slabs,lbsl09,616 2,S86,833 1,130,681

636

hhds

766
tes & bbls.
13,215
221 Sugar, bxs&bg 12,191
Tea
54,618
760 Tobacco
58-8
646 Waste
270
-

•

Same
time
1865.

Hardware..

7,186 Rags
S38 Sugar,

•

18,808

11,889

67,303

73,685

126,262
358.438

103,797

9,999
4,596

308,582
3,7S5

2,304

2,460|Wines, &c.
539
507

Wines

3.055

47,923

5,068

15.748

Champ, bkts

117,151

6,830

3,974jWool, bales..
30,978
2,290
17,941
267;Articles reported by value.
12,78 {‘Cigars
$36,557 $449,685 $112,048
3,201 Corks
9,884 Fancy goods.
1,070

752
43,918
65,938 1,552,347

Fish

2,441

571,418

20,807

503,388
194,019

1,378 Fruits, &c.
959

1,067

9,493

Lemons....

6,850

192,851

Oranges

2,702

131,288
480,215
384,419

...

Nuts
Raisins....

16,714

11,341

239 Hides,undrsd.239,120 2,498,251

9,302

481,252
144,185

156,448

975,015
694,936

3,679
2,694

112,736

19.245

26,617

1,401

417

51,960
61,768

41,572

9,312 Spices, &c.
72

23.788
1

40,759

1,053 Rice
Cassia

Ginger...
162
Pepper
197Saltpetre

....

....

4,323

.

967

8,961 Woods.

42,497

-

Cutlery......

Since
For
the
Jan. 1,
1866.
week.

695

105

15,090

3,318

97,923

23,155
43,392

84,215

71,406

Fustic

Logwood ..
Maliogany.

.

April—Baring’s Circular reports

,...

as

follows;

firm at full prices. At the Dutch Trading Company’s sale of
86,000 bags Java and Padang, held at Amsterdam, prices ruled % cent lower for
ood ord; blue sorts steady, but green lower; good ord quoted 44 cents.
Coffee very

[May 5,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

560

,

pig £21(7/ £2110s.
Linseed—Import for the week 10.292 qrs. Prices are 6(1/7?Is lower in all posi¬
tions, and hardly any business passing. Calcutta on the spot retails at 71s for
ord, and 72s for Alirzapore and Patna. Bombay is worth 72s Od. For arrival wc
hear of no transactions. There are sellers of Black Sea for summer shipment
at 63s.
Import into London since 1st January 98,809 qrs against 153,795 last
year. According to last advices the quantity afloat from the East Indies was as
follows: Calcutta to London 13.559 qrs agai st 154.300 qrs in 1865, Calcutta to
Liverpool 2,946 qrs against 13.551 qrs in 1865, Calcutta to Hull
qrs against
35,193 qrs in 1885, Bombay to London 10.948 qrs against 13,562 qrs in 1865, and
Bombay to Liverpool 5.800 qrs against 10,522 qrs in 1865.
Linseed ^akes continue in good demand w ithout alteration in price. New

period of any previous year, and the result up the
prices named. We thus see that the United States has not a monoply
of the cotton trade, and the sooner this is understood the better it will
be for the country, She may regain it, but only after the most careful
nursing. The patient is too reduced to be able to bear severe bleeding.
During the week the market has been very dull, but prices have re¬
covered fully two cents of the decline of last week, Holders are not
ottering their stocks, and look with confidence for further reaction. The
late heavy shipments have materially reduced stocks at all points, and
the total at the principal ports of the United States does not now ex¬
to al for the same

good quality. Privately during the week 5.0( 0 bale- sold from £17<g£25 ; 4,000
Dales cuttings sold privately from £6 5s(7?£0 10. being 5s F ton dearer
Saltpetre dull—1,200 bags Bengal sold at 23s for 5 to 2)4
cent refraction.
Indigo—The quantity declared for the sale of East India to commence bill
May so far amounts to *8.786 chests.
Iron—Welsh quiet: Rails and bars £0 '0s f. o. b. in Wales. Scotch pigs advanced early in the week to 80s, but have since receded to 73s cash for mixed i
Nos. on the*Clyde.
Lead firm—Common

ceed 440,000

lower, and 4Ss sellers French.

Oils—Fish: Sperm is firmly held, and £121(3,123 now demanded:
fine Colonial has been made at the latter price ; pile Southern £50;

a

Petro- j

sale of

.pale seal I

bales.
past week are about 9,000

bales, and the market

The sales of the

closes

quiet at the following quotations :
„

$ lb

Ordinary

Upland.
26
28
31
33
36

Good Ordinary
Low Middling

_

York in barrels £11 5s.
Naval Stores—Spirits turpentine arc
leum 2s 3d refined, spirits Is 5d.

exceeds thus far The

aggregate receipts this season from new sources

sheathing £96,

Copper very flat—Tough cake aad tile £91, best selected £94,
Y. M. sheathing 9d.
Corn—There has been some improvement in the market this week, and prices
of wheat show generally an advance of about Is
qr.
Hemp—Of 1,000 bales Manila at public sale nearly the whole realized from £42
10s@.£t5 10s for ord to good current quality. £ 17(7/ £48 for fair to good Sorsogan,
and £52 15s©£53 for good Boluzan, being about 20s U ton lower. Of 170 bales
Sunn about 90 bales sold at £19 for fair to good, being again easier.
Jute—There was a fair demand at the public s des. and of 4.800 bales offered
about two-thirds realized previous prices, viz. from £1615s(?? £25 for common to

■Middling
Good Middling

28
31
83

.

36

receipts of Cotton at this market for the week
ing (Friday) were as follows :
The

ending this evenBales.

From

Bales. 1

From
New Orleans
Texas
Florida

N. Orleans
Mobile. & Texa»
27
27
29
29
32
31
34
34
38
37

Florida.
26

462

1,069
£51@52; cod £48. Linseed has been very quiet throughout the week, and
1,8551Norfolk, Baltimore, Ac
cloees dull at 39s@39s 3d on the spot.
(Per Railroad...
3,099
Tin—Engli-h dull; blocks 91s. bars 92s. refined 94s, straits 80s(7?80s 0d.
RiCE-rl4,000 bags sold at 3d;f/6d decline : Rangoon 10s 3d,fBasscin 10s Od. and South Carolina
Necranzie ils 3d. 2.3 0 bags Madagascar from Mauritius were bought in at 19s
9,264
Total for the wedk.-.
880,595
©22s. A cargo of 1,800 tons Rangoon sold at 10s- Od for the Continent.
Previously reported.
Rum—170 puns Berbice sold at 1s 5Xd, 50 puns Demerara at Is Gd for good,
Is 7>£d forflne, and 60 lilids'Mauritins at Is 4>i<l.
Total since July!
889,839
Spices—Pepper: Black; 2.500 hags Penang were bought in from 3^,d'3'3Yd, j
-Tiie exports of cottou from this port have been as follows":
and 209 bags Slngapore'Whitc'nt ONd. 500 bags Pimento were chiefly with¬
drawn from 2|d(33(l tor common to good. Of 150 bbls ginger part sold from 67s
—Week e nding—■—
May 2.
©70s for ord, with mid to line from b2t(3,95s.
April 11. April 18. April 25.
dull at £24 5s.
Spelter
10,573
18,58617,762
14,103
To Liverpool
bales
Sugar—The market continues dull, and in the few sales made rather lower' To otlieiv-British
3,000
ports
485
308
3,892
prices have been submitted to.
To Havre
2,416
Tallow flat.
St. Petersburg Y C declined to 46s Gd on the spot and up to
To other French ports
\
920
683
35
June, and 48s October to December.
1,109
To Bremen
Tea market dull, but prices are without material change.
982
704
Good common To Hamburg.
863
1,101
25
246
Congou Is l>£d
lb. 15,860 pkgs tea sold at public salt' this week, and by To other German ports
513
8
private contract 5,000 pkgs uneoloivd Japans have been sold at 01V
lb.
2,896
To various Continental ports
1,915
Liverpool Provision Market, April 21.—Our own correspondent writes:
21.001
20.142
22,277
16,816
Total for the week
The provision market during the past week has shown ‘generally a dull and
414,243
370,965
391,966
350,823
Previously reported
languid demand. There has been very little enquiry for bacon, and where sales
391,966
414,243
431,059
370,965
were pressed a slight decline has been submitted to.
The same remarks maybe Total from N. York since July 1, ’65.
applied to hams. The stock of cheese has been reduced to so small a compass
Savannah, April 'll.—The statement for this week shows receipts of
that quotations are nominal.
I here are no lino qualities of American and Cana¬
dian butter left on the market, and middling sorts are pressed ofl’by holders at,
6,081 bales, against 5,850 bales last.week, and the shipment of 13/771
in some cases, exceedingly low figures.
No change noticeable in lard, sales- bales, against 3,540 bales last week. Market has been unsettled-, and
being only in retail .-t previous prices. The demand for both beef and pork is
prices were nominal. Freights to Liverpool are
to
a consumptive- enquiry.
limited to
.

•

....

•

.

•

•

„...

....

ports -jj-c bv steamers,

weekly statement:

COTTON.
Friday, P. M..,- May 4.

~£d.@&d., and domestic
Below is the usual

and by sailiug vessels ^c.

Week

end’g

Week.end’g Week end’g

Week enefg

,—April 6—, ,—April 13—, .— April 20—,.—April 27—^
Sea Isl. Upld. Sea Isl. TTpl’d. Sealsl. Upl’d. Sealsl. Upltff"

During the week the receipts have reached about 33,000 bales, and
Stock-Sept. 1...
2S1 3,724 281 3,724
281
3,724 281 3,724
exports about 40,000 bales. Below we give our table of the move¬ Received this week
192
5.691
31
4,069
93
5,757
...
6,081
ment of cotton at all the ports'since September 1, showing at a glance Received previously.... 7,459 173.222 7,651 ISO,434 7,682 184,503 7,721 189,830
the total receipts, exports, stocks, Ac.:
Total receipts
7,932 182,637 7,963 188,227 8,056 193,9S4 8,002 199.635
Exported this week....
233 7,299
60 4,208
5
3,535
299 13,471
RECEIPTS AND EXPORTS OF COTTON (BALES)
SINCE SEPT. 1, AND STOCKS
Exported previously... 6,819 163,596 7,120 168,206 7,ISO 172,414 7,259 177,049
the

DATES

AT

Recc’d

O titer

Great

ports.
Sept. 1. Brit’n. France. for’gn. Total.
New Orleans, Apr.2S. 612,799 293,602 108.SG9 IS,102 420.570- 187,319
88-4,723 191,108
34,967
1,230 227,305
Mobile, April 28
94,118
406
81,740
4,680
39.581
30,726
Charleston, April 28. SI,050
63.418
63.418 130,734
Savannah, April 2S.. 204,116
153,979
1,739
1,770
53,872
Texas, April 21
50,363
59,66-1
New York, May 4*.. 126,720 362,326
33,455 37,120 432,910
27,810 112,433
27,810
Florida, April 11.... 135,385
58,568
21
21
N. Carolina, May 4...
53.508
2S,551
28,551
Virginia, May 4
290
Other ports, May 4..
15.900
15,610
....

....

•

.

.

.

.

.

•

133.710

58,9271 ,273,535

*

By Railroad, Canal and River.
Our advices are not so favorable with

Stock.

153.416
59,342
5.515
9,554

12,192
190,000
7,121

a

....

1 ,788,S911,005,998

Stock

to North.

Ports.

Total

Total exports
on hand

,—Exported since 8ept. 1 to—, Shipm’ts

since

•

MENTIONED.

710,908

...

437,200

....

New Orleans.

7,653 170,895 7,180 172,414 7,185 175.949 7,558 190.521
1,236 18,721
...
......
971 20,699
444 9,114

April 28.—-The receipts for this week are 10,303 bale*
Below are the receipts for a series of

against 10,801 last week,
weeks:
Week
-

ending’ Jnn. 19—bales.
“

*•

26

Feb.
it

it

“

u
“

“

“

2
9
10
24

15,468

“

“

10

24
31

“

April ‘ 7

“

“

“

14

“

.

21
23

“

12,492
16,473

Mar 3
“

Mar.17—bales.

16.427: Week endin g

21,080
21,362
21,673
19,592

! 17,002
11,680
15,237
18,133
12,849
10,801
10,303

The stock on hand was 153,446 bales.
Freight to Liverpool 9-16 .
to New York |c.
Exchange on London 139@141f. Sight on New
York
prem. Exports for the week were, to Great

Britain 11,740

bales;"to

France 3,337 bales; to Spain 1,238 bales ; to St. Petersburg
“51 bales ; to New York 212 bales ; to Boston 599 bales.
The New Orleans Price Current of April 28 says: “We learn that
the crevase at the Tackwood plantation, on the left bank below the

regard to the coming crop. In
destroyed the plant in city, has been closed. Many plantations will be rescued, in consequence
from ruin.”
many instances, while complaints of the seed there and elsewhere are
Mobile, April 28.—We have received by mail one week’s later dates,
frequently heard. Should it become necessary from these causes, or any and give below the statement for the last four weeks. Receipts last
other, to replant to any extent, the present low prices at Liverpool, week"were 4,684 bales against 6,393 bales the previous week, and the
and the five ceut tax proposed by Congress, would probably have the shipments the last week were 3,835 bales,as follows: 2,891 to Liver¬
effect of discouraging planters .and leading them to substitute corn or pool. 884 to France, and GO bales to New York. The European new«
had unsettled the market, so that business was suspended, ancl quota¬
wheat as a more profitable crop.
For if, to the cost ol raising cotton in tions were nominal. Exchange on London, 130@184$, Sight on New
olden times, the extra expense the planter is put to now, besides this York, -jc. discount to par.
Week ending Weekending Week ending Week ending
five cent, tax be added, we will find there is very little margin left for
,—April 7.—, ^-April 14.—, ,—Arpil 21—, /—Arpil 28—,
profit, in case the cotton must be laid down at Liverpool at the present St’kon h. Sept. 1, ’65.
24,290
24,290
24,290
...
24,290
Received this* week..
6.859
5,159
5,393
4,6a4
price, 14d.@lod. Under these ciicumstauces does it net become our Received previously 362,586 369,445 369,445 374,604 374,646 380,039 3S0,039384,723
legislators to consider well whether by this increased taxation they are
393,735
39S,894
404,329
409,013
not killing the goose that lays the golden egg.
The theory of this five Exported this week.. 2,243
16,263
10,024 ’ ... . 3,835
Exported previously. 313,925
316,168
332,431
342.455
cent tax rested on the supposition that the United States had a monBurped and lost
3,5S4 319,752 3,381 335,812 3,381 345,836 3,381 349,671
oply of the cotton trade, and that the sources of supply would very de¬
On hand and on ship¬
cidedly fall off as soon as the American product could be sent to mar¬
board not el’d......
73,983 .A
58,493
59,342
ket. This supply has fallen off in two or three instances, but still the
Charleston, April 28.—The statement of cotton for the week clos-




said to have

,

...

.

■

-

1

'*■

11

“"A

■

i

are

■

the Southwest raiu and frost

THE. CHRONICLE.,

May 5,1866.]

ing April 27 shows that the receipts were 3.26S hales, and the exports
8,972 bales.. Of the expoits 3,76 \ bales went to Liverpool. 4<>6 bales to

Spain, 416 to New York, 375 to Boston, and 47 to Philadelphia.
Freights to Liverpool are firm at 4d. to 9-16d for Upland and Id. for
Sea Island. To New York by strainer 1c, and by sail -ge(Tt>4c.
Ex¬
change on New York, eight, £ discount to J premium. Sales of cotton
for the t^eek about 1800 bales.
Middling closing nominally at Sic.
The following is the statement for the last three weeks :
Week

Weekending

ending
,—April 20—,
Seals. I'pl'd.
362
1,610
1,610

.—April 13—,
Sea Is. Upl’cL
hand Sept. 1, 1865.
Receipts from Sept. 1, 1865,

Stock

4.295
61

73.494

2,871

4.356
269

4,657

75,104

4,718

7 i,975

4,987

80,974

4,175

—

Exports since Sept. 1, 1861,

69,303

4,175

to
...

Total exports

70,253
1,889

4,202

27

220

72,142
3,852

70.253
4,851

482

Stock

4,202

72,112

4,422

7

—

516

i

following

of

the receipts to be 654 bales for that week,
time and since Sept. 1st

was

2,000 bales

Bales. |

04,446

Total shipped since Sepr. 1.
Stock on hand April 17

01,712
2,421

00,510

Sept. 1.

67,143j

;

Total receipts since

Bales.

6,462.Shipped week ending April 17.
105jShipped previously

hand Sept. 1,1865..
Rccei’d week ending April 17.
Received previously
Cotton on

LIVERPOOL

27-4

JAN.

1

-

...bales.

Brazil, Egypt, &c

Exports.

1806.

1865.

1866.

536,505
333,374
421,427

4,606
12,043

82,649

1865.

American

19.

APRIL

TO

Imports.
87,430 '
314,175
227,918

Total

69,020

54,716
103,198

85,669

East Indian

240,563

The London Cotton Market has been heavy in the extreme, and prices have
fallen about 2d per lb.
The imports, deliveries, &c., for the year have been :
1865.
bales.

1866.
bales.

124,881

83,785

126,369

73,SOS
96,011

72,593

1S64.
bales.

Imports from Jan. 16 April 19
Delivery same period.
Stock, April 19

90,633
70,607

120,258

Bombay, April 14. The fortnight’s shipments of cotton have been large, viz :
Owing to unfavorable intelligence>from Liverpool, the trade is
greatly depressed, and prices are lower
Dhollerah is quoted at 14*d; Broach
14* ; Oomrawuttee 14* ; aud Comptah 14* per lb."
70,000 bales.

BREAL'STUFFS.
Friday, May 4,18CG, P. M.

*

statement

week. Below is the statement:

per

AT

e*

the

movement at Houston under date of April 17. It will be
that the receipts were only 195 bales for the week. A statement

we gave March 13 showed
and the average before that

COTTON

4,980

'

the coston
seen

EXPORTS OF

AND

75,994

605

~

April 17.—We have received

Houston,

2,999

890

beginning of week
Exports for the week

-

76.365

1,610

70,667
2,827

4,279

...

Total

-

I'pl'd.

to

Receipts for the

{

ending
,—April 27—..

Seals.
362

16

beginning of week
week

«

362

on

Week

IMPORTS

561

The

deficiency in the supply of flour continues, and for some days
prices have been experiencing a moderate but steady advance, until the
sales to-day show tlie highest figures of the current crop year. There
is, however, much irregularity in the market, different holders offering
the same brand 50c apatt.
There are very few ground extras to be
had under *9. and the better grades of spring wheat flours bring from
$10 50 to $11 per bbl. No increase in the supply can be expected
until supplies of wheat reach Black Rock and Oswego, from which flour
may be made and shipped thence by canal to this market.
This will

April 21.—We have received one week later statement by be about the first oi June. In the meantime, it remains to be seenwhat
mail from Galveston. Sales for the week 1,177 bales, against 650 last will be the effect upon this market of the anticipation of these increased
week, and 182, 2,466, and 751 for the three previous weeks. Receipts supplies, and the check to the demand which extreme prices will pro¬
for the week have been 3,277 bales, against *2,626 bai'es last week, anc
bably impose. At the same time, it must be remembered that prices
the shipments 618 bales, as follows : To New York 512, and to New
are relatively much higher throughout the West than in this market,
Orleans 106. Market closed quiet and unsettled, with middling at S9@
40 currency. Freight, by sail ti> Liverpool, 9-16{« |(i.; to New York
just an we are higher than Liverpool.
lc steamer, and | sail. Exchange on New York, at sight,par to
prem
Wheat has also materially advanced, and today Amber Club was
Sterling, 105@108.
Weekending
Week ceding . Weekending generally held at $2 and upward, while the finer grades of white wheat
April 7
,—April 14.—,
April 21—were firm at $2
3. The stock in store is pretty full for the sea¬
1606.
1801.
I860.
1661.
1800.
ISO!
Stock on hand Sept. 1...
8,103
18,857
3.1OS son, but no supplies are expected till late in June. Speculative holders
13.857
8,108 15,857
Received this week
1,37!)
2,122
8.404
1,124
2,020
.1,2.7
are
consequently able to force their views upon buyers. But millers
Received previously
127.873
99,937 129.252 102.050 131,878 105,523
Received at other ports..
18,592
29,900 18,715
24,502
18,824
25,019 buy very sparingly., There is some wheat on the Lakes for Buff do and
Total
101,701 129,137 104,450 133,253
107,883 185,434 Oswego; but this fact has little influence here, because it is believed
The receipts at Galveston each week since the 1st of January have that none of the earlier shipments will reach this city.
Corn has materially declined. There are large quantities oa the way,
been as follows:
Bales.
Bales.
Bales.
and no encouragement for holders to longer attempt to support price?.
4,337 Mar. 24
Jan 12
6,624 Feb. 16
1,1(62
o-YXl
23
31
“19
2,791
8,234
The decline to-day was sufficient to permit the renewal of Liverpool
j April 7
“26
6,632 Mar. 3
L379
10
14
Feb. 2...—
2,597
4,568
2,626 shipment?.
Oats have been drooping. Rye active and firm. Barley
17
21
9
’..
1,234
3,277 dull and
heavy.
European Cotton Market.—Our own correspondent, under date of
The following are closing quotations:
April 21, gives the following review of the Liverpool and London Flour, Superfine State and
Wheat, Chicago Spring
Galveston,

,

*

,

.

....

“

“

o

“

“

“

“

“

....

Cotton markets

Western

:

$ bbl $7 35® 8 00

fper bushel 1 40(5> 1 9-5

Extra State

Liverpool Cotton Market has been subject to numerous fluctuations dur
ing the week. At the commencement the demand was decidedly active, and
considerable business was transacted, at an average advance in prices of *d to
Id per lb. With continued heavy arrivals, coupled with the announcement of
the suspension of Bamed’s Banking Company, the trade on Wednesday and
Thursday was very heavy, aud the whole of the above improvement in the quo
tations was not only entirely lost, but holders had to submit to a further reduc¬
tion. Yesterday, as compared with Friday week, the quotations showed a re
duction of Id to 2*d per lb, the heaviest fail being in Egyptian qualities. Amer¬
ican cotton has fallen l>i'd to 2d per ib. The aggregate transactions of the week
are tolerably large, being 67,840 bales, viz.: 89*50 bales to the trade, 19,260 for
export, and8,710 bales on speculation. The prices current are now as under:
Ordinary & Fair and Good Good &
Fair.
Middling.
Fine.
.28 @30d.
86 ®14d.
58 (a 72
IS (3 20
29*®—
24 ^/•2616
—
1'-><(<114At
®—

Sea Island
Stained

Upland

Mobile....
New Orleans

1

Texas
The

12*® M*
12v,(Tel4*

16*®—
17 ®—

12*®14 *

16*®—

—

®_

—

®

—

®—

following table show’s the comparative prices of middling cotton for four

years:
1863. 1S64. 1865. 1860. I
d.
d.
d.
d.
Middling—
21
Broach
27* 13*
Dhollerah...
■21* 27
13* 14*

Middling—

20

The

26*

11*

1865. 1803.
d.
d.
16

10*

1801. 1866.

Egyptian, &c

West India, &c
East India
China and Japan

1865.

276,080
75,920
64,430
23,530

40,090
44,750

330,060

89,250

67,959
16,720

203,680
620

184.100
53,700

287,180

2,650

to

Total

...

Stock.

Bales.

1864........

..

1863

..

1868........
1861........

Below-we

for 1865 ahd




..

..

414,460
364,980
397,320
952,770

ve the

614,180

423. ISO

819,890

series of years has been as follows :
Stock.
Bales. Stock.
1860
1,015.890 1857
1859
432,610 1856
1858
427,020 1855
..

,.

-

12 00@16 50
10 00® 11 10
11 25®16 50

5

Corn

Peas, Canada

95
58
62
18

1 20® 1 30

Malt

00® G 00

1 10® 1 20

1 50® 2 40

White beans

and

Jersey
Brandywine
meal,

84
85

78®
45®
51®
1 00® 1

Rye
Oats, Western
Jersey and State
Barley

Rye Flour, fine aud super¬
fine

77®
84®

-

Western Yellow

8 75®12 50

choice extra

2 35® 3 00

Corn, Western Mixed

4 00® 4 40

The movement in breadstuff's at this market has been as follows:
RECEIPTS.

:

-1865.-1866.
the w’k. Since Jan. 1, For the w’k. S’e Jan. 1.
.

'

73,420
6,675

711,600
147,190

800
24.135
105

17,340
628,425

260

522,490
125,720
69,330
542,785
13,990

6,600

324,350

13,225

3,ISO

406,930

26,440

31,310
4,910

Flonr, bbls
Corn meal, bbls...

300

Wheat, bush

84,490

Corn, bush
Rye, bush
Barley, &c., busli.
Oats, bush

15.160
171.645

989,350

,

6*

s*

-1865.
-isr.fi.
For the w’k. Since Jan. 1. For the w’k. S’e

!

68,730

,

72,090
102,480
•

17140

252,260
72,780

Flour, bbls
Corn meal, bbls
Wheat, bush....

22,265
2,485

Corn, bush

43,615

Rye, hush
Oats, hush

37,565

81,035

Bales.

675,350
518,650

633,230

imports and exports at Liverpool from Jan. 1 to April 19

EXPORTS.

351,4-15
44,635
100,295
2,060,135
181,590
621,820

15,610
2,885
14.150
5,595

.

.

Jan. 1.

381,985
47,405
186,150
142,330

»

Milwaukee —The
of
of

following tables show the receipts and shipments
leading articles of breadstuff's during the past week and since the 1st
January, with comparative statistics :
RECEIPTS.

,

575,480

a

..

8 40®11 85

Double Extra Western
and St. Louis
,
Southern supers
Southern, fancy and ex.
Canada,
to
common

-

The stock at this date for

com¬

good

FOREIGN

115,33!)

11,380

Western,

mon

8*

-Stocks1866.
1865.

1866.

bales.

Extra

1 76<q> 2 90
2 20® 2 50
2 55® 2 6o

d.

following quantities have been taken bv the trade in sixteen weeks from

American
Brazil

Red Winter
Amber State and Mich.
White

6*

Jam 1,1865-66:

trade—n

9 00® 9 50

d.

15

/—Taken by

Milwaukee Club

Shipping R. hoop Ohio.

The

8 30® 9 35

Flour, bbls.
Wheat, bus!
Oats, bush.
Corn, bush.
Barley, busl
Rye, bush..

..

>

Week end’s Since Same time
1865.
April 28.
,Jan. 1. •
78.498 '
29.006
6,601
530.829
139,093
1,456,955

182,064
8,569
6,976

2,080

99,202

131,745
113,457

82,200
30, $74

42,953
24,177

SHIPMENTS.

,

,

Week end’g Since S’e time
1865.
April 28. Jan. 1.

6,392

382,161
32,209

142,798
31,353
722,216 174,320
35,529
44,461

....

2.530

8,720

6,324

1,100

653
207

Receipts of Flour and Grain from the three last crops, commencing
Sept., compare as follows:

with the 1 st of

THE CHRONICLE.

562
Flour,
1865-6
1864-5..
1863-4

bush.

bush.

per cent

bush

168,007
174,318
195,000

197,872
139,930
253,487

during the week, and standards are now quoted at 21 *(g)22$,
although sales are made by outside parties at 20 cents. Nashua X X
is quoted at 22$.
Amory 87 inch 22$> Indian Head A 37 inch 22$, do
B 30 inch 18, do E 48 inch 32$, Nashua extra A 36 inch 20. do fine C
40 inch 20, do fine D 36 inch 17, Wachusetts 22, Indian Orchard W 83
inch 18, do B B 33 inch 19, do C 37 inch 21, do N 36 inch 22, do A 40
in. 24, Atlantic heavy A 37 in. 22, do P A 37 in. 21, do A H 37 in. 21.
Bleached Sheetings and Shirtings are in considerable demand
there being a great many goods taken at the extreme low prices at
which they are now offered. Many leading makes which have hereto¬
fore been held above the market are now reduced 5@10 per cent. New
York Mills are now held at 47$. Wamsutta 42$, and Lonsdale 32$, Canoe 27 inch 11*. Grafton 3-4 13, do 7-8 14, Methun 3-4 12. Aquidnecks
4-4 19, do 7-8 18, White Rock 36 inch 35, W-altham L 72 inch 70,« do
X 33 inch 42, do W 42 inch 30, do M 81 inch 95, do N 90 inch 106.
Drills are in some demand especially for heavy goods. Globe Steam
Mills 19, Park do 18, Pepperill and Indian each 25, Boote 26, Stark

Rye.

bush.

bush.

522,754
55^,019
690,120

8,718,962
2,619,900
9,159,579

390,113
122.440
275,366

Barley,

Corn,

Oats,

Wheat,

bbls.

119,942
72,633
129,851

Chicago.—The following tables show the movement in breadstuffs
during the week ending April 28, and from January 1st, to date, with
comparative statistics:

Receipts.

/

Since
Jan. 1.

Last W’k.

Flour, bbls....
Wheat, bush..

566,603

Rye

Barley

S’e time
1865.

68,236
334,541

23,330
113,848
795,851
211,797
18,933

307,194
780,129
1,183,236
654,009
64,405

42,446

80,278

GRAIN

AND

■,

Since
Jan. 1.

185,570

2,833,281
1,290,661
165,178
69,652
FLOUR

Shipments.

2,123,667
2,300,969
116,588

403,422

1,385,884

133,966
14,165
2,600

,

159,073
1,234,254

34,655

173,918

Corn
Cats

,

Same time.
Last w’k.
1865.

1,379,207
1,680,516

36,102
24,272

STORE.

IN

The following table, compiled from the official reports of the ware¬
housemen to the Secretary of the Board of Trade, shows the amount
of flour and grain in store on the 28th, compared with the amount in
store at the same date last year :
April 28, April 28,
April 28, April 28.

Flour.

173,918

6,583

Milwaukee
Toledo
Detroit
♦Cleveland

16,740

receipts
Rye

14,165
1.049

6,KJ6

7^0
548

345

180,497
152,237

10,724
16,928

15,559
21,169

78,928

28,031

13,295

4,484

23,496

9,972

433,536

77,542
82,164

363,467

57,591

244,17S

Estimated.

The

export of breadstuffs to Great Britain and Ireland from Sept. 1,

1866, has been as follows :

C. Meal,
bbls.

April 20,
April 24,
Baltimore
April 24,
Boston....
April 27,
Calif, and other ports. April 24,
Total,
abouti
do
do

4,601

5,370,813
7,790
423,016
682,096

300

1866....

4,900

1866

Philadelphia

bush.

1,136,979

97,399

April 27, 1S66....

v

Com,

bush.

"20

bbls.

To date.

Wheat,

4,229

Flour,
From
New York
New Orleans

1866...
1866
1866

1,179
22,395

57,389

17,810

1,198,969
1,516,171

6,501,525

114

9,721,495

240,220

1,139

126,173

16,655,319

5,752,966

4,249

97,817
792.802

do
do

988,935
TO

•

•

•

73,359

(NTINENT.

THE

Flour,

Wheat,

Corn,

bush.

bush.

bush.

3,159

236,S37

68,111

34,627

7,176

1,118
4,277
13,801
36,598
105,913

Total
abouti
do
do

Rye,

bbls.
From New York to Anril 27, 1866.
From other ports, to latest dates.

do
do

236,837
13,965
235,218

.

41,803
11,485

68,111
83,463
215,236
1,305,788

-12,535

58,411

Liverpool, 21st April.—Since our last there has been a steady consumptive
demand for wheat and flour at a rather improving prices. Indian com has also
been in fair request, partly on Irish account.
Tuesday’s market was well at¬
tended by millers, who seemed disposed to purchase wheat more freely than of
late, and a fair amount of business was done at an improvement of 2d per cental.
Flour also met a more ready sale, and 6d to Is per sack dearer.
Transactions
in Indian corn were more numerous than extensive, and prices were rather

against buyers. At to-day’s market there was but a limited attendance of buy¬
ers, and the trade in wheat and flour was slow at Tuesday's prices. Indian corn
was in moderate request, without change in value.
QUOTATIONS.
s. d

s! d.
do
do
do
do

Philadelphia & Balt

Ohio

Canadian
Sour and heated

d.

6(§y9
10 0®10
28 6@29
38 0@ 38
27 0®27

.

FARMER 8

s.

8

100 lbs

Canad..per

Wheats Chic. & Milwaukee
Week ending 14th
Same time 1865

per

do Amber Iowa
24 0@27 0 Ind. coru, mixed per480
26 0@27 6 Peas, Canadian.. per 504
21 0423 0 jOatmeal,
240
..

.

d.

s.

22 0@25 6

Flour, extra State, .per bbl.

lbs
lbs

lbs

9
2
0
6

6

DELIVERIES.

55,193 qrs. at 44s. 5d.

April, 1866

61,605

do

40s. Id.

IMPORTS.

Wheat,
qrs.

United States and Canada
Total for week

9,094
186,838

Total since 1st January
Same time 1865

Flour-.-^ I. Com.
sacks.
bbls.
qrs.
2,600
21,961
,

2,600
56,900

54,565

8,598
214,492
96,370

21,961
277,120

30,891

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.
Friday, P. M., May 4, 1866.

Domestic Goods have been

generally

more

animated during the week

although with a strong downward tendency. The accumulating stocks
and the low price for cotton make holders willing to dispose of goods
at such concessions, from day to day, as the market demands. The
stock of cotton in the hands of manufacturers is now small, and they
are able to replace at a far lower figure.
The decline is not so much
like a panic as it was at one time last week, but is steadily keeping pace
with the general return to lower prices. This is accelerated in some meas¬
ure by the operations of certain leading jobbers, who are continually
placing goods upon their floors at from two to five per cent below what
it is believed they paid for them. The low price of brown goods admits
of some export demand, and there has been about $80,000 exported
during the past week, principally to China.
Brown Sheetings and Shirtings

goods, although




more so

are

not

as

active

as

16,

moderately active at the decline of 5@10 per
do 63 21, Albany 3-3 15, do 6x3 13$.
Albany Ticks 13, American 20, Amoskeag A C A are quoted at 62$, A
50, B 45, C 40, D 35, but these are extreme rates.
Denims and Cottonades are in good request for the better makes,
but there is no firmness in quotations.
Wauregan 27 inch 22, Albany
17$, Amoskeag 6U, Manchester 84, York 50.
Printing Cloths are dull and declining.
10$ cents is offered while
holders ask 11*, with nothiug of moment doing
Prints are more steady and the demand is fair. There is little
change in price from last week. Garners 20, Amoskeag pink 19, do
purple 18, do shirting 16, do dark 16, do light 16, do mourning 16
Swiss Ruby 15, Lowell dark 15, do light 15, Wamsutta 15, Dusters 15,
Columbia full madders 14$, Concord madders 15, do purples 15, Glen,
Cove full madders 12$, Wauregan fancies 16$. do rubies 17$, do pinks
17*, do purples 17*, Merrimac W 20, D 19, Arnolds 15, American 17,
National (Spragues) 16$, do madders, green, blue and white and blue
and orage 18$, canary 17$, solid colors 18, mourning 16. *
Ginghams are in some demand, and as the supply is not large prices
are more steady.
Lancaster 25, Glasgow 23 nett, and sold ahead.
Lawns are quiet, with little change in prices.
Dunnell Manufactur¬
ing Co.’s 1,400 quality sell at 26 regular; Lodi fancy, mourning and
plain solid colors, 23 nett, do 1,400 quality 25, do 1,600 do 27$, and
Pacific Co.’s fancy 26**
Jacoonets are quiet but steady. White Rock 21 for high colors, and
19 for plain.
Silecias are in fair demand, and prices are about the same for small
parcels. Large lots command a reduction. Social Mills 27$@32$.
Cambrics are steady, with fair demand for good makes ; poorer grades
are in abundance and dull.
Monville 14 for black, 15 for plain, and 17
for pink.
MousLrN De Laines still sell at steady rates.
Manchester, Pacific,
and Hamilton 23, all wool 40, Challies 26.'
Balmoral Skirts are in fair demand for leading makes.
Pontoosuc
Spring colors $40 per doz, Gilberts, black and white, $36, do four X
fancy $39, and Park Mills high colors $37.
Cloths are in more demand, especially for finer qualities, while poorer
Prices are nominal.
grades are dull, and pressed at great sacrifice.
Cotton warps sell at $1.95 for No 1, $1.85 for No 2, and $1.75 for No
3; 6-4 Conshohocken do $2,25@$2.75 ; 6-4 all wool black doeskins
$3.25@$3.76; Leicester ladies’cloths $1.65.
Cassimeres are in better request for the new makes and prices are
remunerative. Millville £ fancy cassimeres $1 37*@$2, silk mixed do
$1 50, Evans, Seagrave & Co’s £ fancy $1 37*@$2, F. M. Billou <fc
Co’s do $1 25@$2, S.
H. Sayles, do $1 25@$l 60, Babcock & Moss,
$1 60@$2, Campbell
Co’s do $L 37*@$2, Mechanicsville Co’s do
$1 37*@$2, plough, loom and anvil 50c, Dighton’s silk mixtures $1 62$
@$2 12$, Farmer’s A Union cassimeres 47$ cents, Carolina mills fancy
do $1 00@$1 25, tan mixture $1 62$@$2, Peacedale fancy do$l 26,
do black and white check 85c, American mills fancy $1 62* for £, and
$3 60@§4 for 6-4, East Windsor Woolen Co’s £ $1 25@$1 75, Gran¬
ville mills £ fancy $1 25.
Carpets are without change in price while the demand is fair. Lo¬
well Co’s iDgrain sell at $1 60 for superfine, $1 75 for extra super, and
$2 15 for three-ply, Hartford Co’s $1 60 for medium superfine, $1 75
for supetfine, $2 07* for Imperial three-ply and $2 25 for extra threeply. Biussels $2 45 for 3 fr. $2 55 for 4 fr. and $2 65 fo 5 fr.
Linen is in steady request at 12@16 for Hucabuck, 21 for bleached

cent.

2,600

26,533
12,330
* 3,696

8,569

#

holders pressing
Orchard are quoted
Andrascoggiu and Bates 16, Newmarket 16$, Naumkeag 21 and

Satteen 27.
Stripes and Ticks

Barley.

759,713
289,720 1,002,862

5,316

at

729,150
93,351
148,065

Oats.

83,014

1

.

Corset Jeans are quite active at still lower figures,
sales in many instances at nomiual figures. Indina

127.966

Corn.

616,603

139,093
26,697
13,367
10,492

14,428

Totals
Previous week
Cor. week, 1865
♦

Wheat.

34,475

Chicago

Standard 24.

1S66.

1865.

1866.

1865.

66,250 | Oats, bush
.31,872
742,888
Wheat, bush
866,452 1,116,536 | Rye
133,330
Com
281,857 | Barley
1,022,110
199,129
Weekly Receipts at Lake Ports.—The following shows the
at the following lake ports for the week ending April 28 :
Flour, bbls

[May 5,1866.

*

most other

than last week. Prices have declined 5@10

are

Connecticut, Stripes 20,

and 20 for unbleached.
Foreign Goods are somewhat irregular as
animated than last week. The stocks now in

yet, but generally more
hands of importers are

unusually large and operates to depress prices of both foreign and do¬
mestic, while the decline in cotton and unsettled condition of the mar¬

goods give buyers less confidence. Some leading
styles of dress goods are still quite steady while other makes are dull
and declining.
ket for domestic

Manchester Dry Goods

date of

Market.—Our

Saturday, April 7, writes

own

correspondent under

;

and cloth has revived, in consequence of
the improvement in the raw material at Liverpool. The aggregate business
transacted, however, is by no means extensive ; nevertheless, prices are slightly
higher than at the close of last week. For yarns the demaud has been limited,
and it is only in certain departments that even moderate transactions are heard
of. The disturbed state of German politics still excites uneasiness and appre¬
hension among the continental buyers, and except the execution of current or¬
ders, which in general are of trifling magnitude, nothing appears to have been
done for Germany, nor for the other markets of the continent. For mule yams
there has been rather more inquiry for the East, leading to some business at
prices which show a decline since Friday’of about Id per lb. V ater twist from
At Manchester business in yarns

16a

upwards, although steadier, is not iu active request, but some fair trausac.

May 5,1866.]

THE

CHRONICLE.

tions are reported for China in some of the better qualities at prices which in
dicate a decline similar to that quoted above on mule. The lower counts of
water twist, although far from being in active request, still maintain their value
with comparative steadiness, and appear to have given way to a less extent than
anything else. Twist and pin crops, from 60’s downwards, whirh at the close
of last week showed extreme heaviness, and were almost unsaleable, have, to

WITHDRAWN

firmness; and although, in the absence of business, prices are diffi¬
slightly steadier. The finer counts of sin¬
gle and two-fold yarns remain tolerably"firm so far as quotations go, but the de¬
is less active, and sellers looking for orders could no longer
mand for them
realize the prices of last week.
A very similar state of affairs prevails in ihe cloth market, and beyond some
improvement in tone, and a sufficiency of business to afford some test of what
prices really are, very little change is observable. Some transactions are re¬

ported (in all cases at very low prices) in printers, shirtings and jacconets, but

instance have the quantities been large. For the heavier classes of goods
the inquiry, although more general, is at prices 'so extremely low that
hardly
any business has resulted, and it is difficult to ascertain the actual value of do¬
in no

mestics, T cloths, L cloths, &c.
The

leading quotations are

76'
54

$37,509
25,398
Carpeting... .113
32,254

Cloths

Total....

k

Numbers

16 to 24 30
d.
d.

quality

Common

15*
16*

Second quality

quality

1G to 24
d.

END

Weights...
Prices

24*

26*
28*

26*

30*

60
d.

70
d.

80
d.

90
d.

25*
27*

26*
28*

32*

30*

28*
30*
32*

30*

29*

21

22*
24*

GRAY

22*

50
d.

32*
34*

34*
36*

37£

SHIRTINGS,

—45 Inches56
64
66
72
lb. oz. lb. oz.
lb. oz.
lb. oz.
8 4
9 0
10 0
10 8
15s. 9d. 17s. 3d 20s. Od. 23s. Od.

—

Gingams

$24,967
48,051
?,958
7,819

10
23

OF

COTTON.

Muslins
5
Emb. muslins 19
Laces
11
Braids & bds. 4

1,743
6,000

Hdkfs

4

Spool

6

1,319
1,254

2,809

Hose

15

4,457

..

1,689
321 $103,066

.;
MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Silks

33

Crapes

$67,848

*2

1,295

1
6

...

1,388
4,45-4

Plushes
Velvets
Total

Ribbons

94

Braids & bds.
Silk & worst.
Silk & cotton

80,525

8
1
3

4.545

Laces
Shawls
Cravats

1,329
2,059

_

2
4
4

&cot..

7

2,561

—

478 $132,149
MISCELLANEOUS.

2
1

$2,942
P82

2

Matting.... 6,753
Embroideries

FOR

WAREHOUSING.

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

87
:f,e

Woolens
Cloths

Pkgs. Value.
1
644
00
31,232
1
2,149

$39,398 Blankets

1

668

Carpeting.. ...29

7,340

Worsteds

Pkgs. Value
1
370

Lasting*

Braids & bds.10

Cot. & worst..30

6,281
7,924

220

$95,906

1
43

13,086

84

Shawls

$29,065

Total....
MANUFACTURES

Cottons.....21
Colored

—

$7,922
1,834

6

OF COTTON.

Laces
9
Braids & bds...4

Hdkfs
Hose

2,916
3,040

importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending May
3,1866, and the corrssponding weeks of 1864 and 1865, have been us
follows:

-1864.Pkgs.
Value.
Manufactures of worn... 668 $284,877
do
cotton..
271
80,481
do
silk
457
215.344
do
flax.... 800
202,954
Miscellaneous dry goods. 4533
93,101

-1865.
Value.

654
391
179
442
60

WITHDRAWN

FROM

WAREHOUSE

AND

Pkgs.

$188,522

1726

$876,758

$623,337

THROWN

do
do
do

cotton..
silk
flax....

Miscellaneous dry goods.

682
288
50
364
49

$260,541
77,101
90.722

15,828

2097

132.000

21,269

INTO

$831,098

THE

MARKET

80,000
165,743
27,071
$586,327
623,337

$1,406,086

4976

$1,209,664

cotton.,
silk

42,329
142,232

220
84
72
63

632

50,596

10696

29,065
61,711
21,464
49,020

$590,657

11135
2097

$257,166
831,098

10

20,560
16,134
1,846

$101,374
876,758

2319

1726

623,337

$978,132

4045

$1,213,994

41

....

Miscellaneous drygoods.

DETAILED
The

following is a detailed
ending May 3, 1866 ;

831,098

615

19.666

6965

flax

$772,876

SAME PERIOD.

$297,900
56,600 ‘

236
6729

....

132,149
46,655

10673

WAREHOUSING DURING THE

do
do
do

103,066
170,488

8576
2097

840
190
42

4

$95,906

13232

;

STATEMENT.

statement of the movement the past week

ENTERED

FOR

CONSUMPTION.

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

Woolens

Pkgs.
...

Cloths

Carpeting

..

Blankets
Total

Value.
I$68,489
20,154
.179
47,772
4
2,415

.127
33

....

Pkgs.

Value.
4,697 Lasting*

Shawls......

6
Worsteds.. .100
Hose
4

Worsted y’m 33

Pkgs.
4

48.026 Braids & bds. 41
410- Cot. & worst. 46

[ 8,944

Value
2.293

24,976
17,157

577

245,333

23
2
325

8,243
81,119

549

$175,648

Vestings.....

2

Silk & worst.
Silk & cotton

1,433
12,465

4
7

3.570

175

$189,569

MANUFACTURES OF COTTON.

a

Cottons
Colored
Prints

101
45
1

$45,109
13,879

6

1,404

Ginghams....
Total

7%

Emb’d mus’n 12
Velvets
1

7,914

Laces
17 ■"
Braids & bds. 17

8,697

392

Gloves....
Spool...

..

Hose

7,313

782

MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

SUks

55

grapes
Velvets

$82,295
2,810

..

Ribbons

63

|

Laces..

4,888

2
6

Gloves.
Cravats

62,235

Shawls.

..

..

..

20
1
1

11,905
184

1,007
691

Braids & bds. 12

Total.
MANUFACTURES

Linens
260
Lixens & cot. 2

Total

....

$89,427

Laces

506

Hdkfs

9
15

6,086

FLAX.

5,333

15,322

Thread

Hemp yarn

11
..

8

305

3,691
1,187

$115,466

MISCELLANEOUS.




.....

Clothing

31

Embroideries 20
Millinery.... 4
; 84
Corsets

...A

Laces

3,252

Silk & cotton. .1

418
$61,711

Embroideries..2

871

10,696

$3,408 Matting.. 10.6SS

6

$21,464

$49,020

^

44,741

Total

(EXCLUSIVE

SPECIE)

OF

PORTS

FOR

FROM
THE

THE

WEEK

Segars,

cronstadt.

cs

Oars

Petroleum,

NEW

OF

PORT
ENDING

Quan. Value

Quan. Value.
19
7,466

Tobacco
bis..-

stems,

5,846
852
100

57

771

Cotton, bales..25
Emery,bbls.. ..10

195
463

250

galls
99,441 $50,691 Maizena, bbls. .35
Sew mach, cs.113
Ext. logwood,
bxs
1500
7,431 Wagon.
1

YORK TO FOREIGN

1, 1866.

MAY

6,082
200

'

92,760 Clocks, bxs
4
$12,533
LIVERPOOL.
1,076 Ind rub goods,
cs
1
75 Cotton,
201
\
511 Cassia, buds,
bales, ...10,5731,609,782
bxs
17
740 Bacon, lbs772,003 107,684
Woodware, cs..3
290
Dried apples,
Cheese, lbs 75,242 10,745
bbls
5
95 Tallow, lb 105,100 11,387
$152,960
DANISH WEST INDIES.
Furs,cs
10
320
8,155 llams. lbs..,1,GOO
450 Shoulders,
3
Sugar, bxs
4
207 Ess oils, cs
300
lbs
100,101 12,046
Perfumery, bxlOO
350 Clothing, cs
1
Mfd tobacco,
Pork. bbls....629 16,264
Whalebone,
lbs
5330
lbs
1,250
6,COO Rosin, bbls...721
2.467
6,000
Wool, bales..343 88,722
Drugs, cs
60
695
Candles, bxs.. 300
1,070
$204,357 Beef, tes
675 23,896
BREMEN.
Soap, bxs
600
987
Shoulders,
Spices, pkgs... 16
22,400
bbls
2,688
181 Clothing, cs....3 2,000
Books, cs
6
675
Brandy, bbls...10
168 W' alebone,
lbs
Furniture, cs.. 6
10,046 12,749 Shoe pegs, bb!s22
136
80
Lard, lbs
1000
! 210 Ivory nuts,bgs704
2,304 Clocks, bxs...191
3,268
Flour, bbls.. 1145 10,b72 Tobacco, cs.,1893 57,245 Woodware,
Bread, pkgs...20
84 Rubber, bales. .81 10,000
pkgs
120
362
Tobacco, hhd.. .1
608 Cotton, balesl,109 123,443 Sew mach, cs.360 13,373
804 Purk, tes
Hams......... 1174
276 Hops, bis
40
25
1,125
325 Peas, bush..6.743
Petroleum,
8,092
Segars, cs
8
1,192 Tobacco, hhds360 56,957 Rye, bush.. .8,593
galls
2410
7,734
593 Beef, bbls
100
Rope, coils.... 10
30,000
1,500 Staves
3,100
Cotton waste,
749 Leather, bales 499 10,965
Skins, bale
1
bales..
..4
221 Tobacco,
Sperm oil, gals623
1,526
Pork, bbls
53
267 Whalefoots,
22
1,375
ceroons
262 Furniture, cs.. 17
lbs
Butter, lbs
636
8,800
16,555
1,700
670 Tobacco stems,
Cedar logs....455
Beef, bbls
40
1,700
200
hhds
222
Beans, bush.. 100
9,924 Agl implmts,
175 Rosin, bbls 2632
Carriage
1
7,980
pkgs
407 27,968
100 Staves
Cheese, lbs...430
24,170
2,260, Coffee, bags-1,448 39,831
432 Rye. bush...8,813
Hoop skirt, cs..1
9,733 Mahog’y Igs ..50
800
Miscellaneous....
1,939 Ext logwood,
4,700
Fustic, tons..100
bxs
2000
9,924 Furs, bales
37
9,350
2,027 Pot ashes, bbl 100
20
$23,759 Rum, puns
4,700
HAMBURG.
Tobacco, baleslOO
1,150 Dry goods,
hales
62 18,100
Rye, bush.. .6,000
6,108 Potashes, bblsl09
4,231
50 Shoe pegs, bblsl2
60 Drugs, pkgs...10
Machinery, Jcs.. .1
1,200
Ext logwood,
750 I. R. goods, cs..5
Effects, cs
10
1,592
bxs
Britan ware, cs. .2
2,157 10,635 Tonca beans,csl2
1,047
306
Guns, cs
4
1,500 Dry goods, bis. 15
1,500 Skins, bales. ...26 13,857
Cedar logs.... 106
852 Hemp, bales... .9
2,324
Honey, tcs.....50
138
Rosin, bbls.. .848
2,800 Sago, cs
900 11,415 S. P. ware, cs.. .2
100
955 Gainbier, bis. .613 14,337 Dental instrum’ts,
Tobacco, hhds. 9
Shoe pegs, bbls31
120 Miscellaneous....
67
cs
1
800
Shoe nails, bxs.18
400
Washita stone,
Hides
200
789
500
$332,991
bxs
9
ANTWERP.
Verdigris, cks ..6 2,793
Machinery, pkg27 3,250
Tobacco, cs.. ..69 2,668 Rosin, bbls .3,001 10,455 Hardware, c->.. ..5
110
Cotton, bales.513

Ext fustic,bxs 100
Shoe pegs, bbls54
Sew mach, cs..ll

-

>

OF

.

Leath gloves. 12 $18,915
Kid
gloves... 7
3,974
Matting
231
3,232
Oilcloth
25
2,729

2,836

63

Leath.gloves.

$320,518

6867

3250
1726

$43,168

Braids & bds.. .2

MISCELLANEOUS.

DURING

752
821
158
478

.117,347

9

1,839

24,881

72

11,355

Q.uan. Value.

$196,166

$529,328
876,758

100
63
22

1

1,313

27

EXPORTS

8162

Manufactures of wool...

Vestings

....2

Ribbons.

Linens

$245,333
175,648
189,569
115,466
105,082

1433
6729

Total th’wn upon mak’t

22

779

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

577
549
175
305
491

106,040
175,506

494
397
84
576
1699

&5,136

Pongees

$15,539 'Velvets

Value.

THE SAME PERIOD.

Manufactures of wool...

11
2

4, 1866.
-1866.-

Pkgs.

...

Silks
Satin

Total
ENDING MAY

267

MANUFACTURES OF 8ILK

The

ENTERED FOB CONSUMPTION FOR THE WEEK

215

8,706

6,847 $46,656
ENTERED

-50 Inches—
64
66
72
lb. oz.
lb. oz. lb. oz.
10 4
11 0
11 8
19s. 9d. 22s. Od. 24s. Od

2,706

781

100
d.

34*
36*

Col. & cuffs.. 1
Straw goods. 103

30,323

5

Total

6729

8,284

1,999

$170,488

Thread

2,083

Total

Sus & elas...
Total

88*

4

2,235

5

IMPORTATIONS OF DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK,

Total

1,762

158

Leath.gloves.
Kid gloves. .

YARD8.

56
lb. oz.
8 12
17s. Od.

kdo

38 to 42
d.

EXPORT,

40
d.

18*
20*

28 to 32
d.

>21*
22*
24*

FOR

17*

18*
GOLD

Reeds

TWIST

154,394

533

2,643
61,193

7521320,518

29
145

Prints
Total

i

12#
14*
20*
MULE

3,763

Worsteds.... 330

DeLaines.... 1
Braids & bds. 5
Cot & wos’d.151

2,831

9

Linens.......462 $125,270 - Hdkfs

EXPORT.

6 to 12
d.

Common quality..
Second quality
Best quality ..*|.

Pkgs. Value.

13

Shawls

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

TWIST FOR

Numbers

Pkgs. Value.

Blankets

MANUFACTURES

Cottons
Colored

WAREHOUSE.
OF WOOL.

v

under:

as

WATER

Best

Pkgs. Value.

Woolens

more

cult of quotat on, they appear to be

FROM

MANUFACTURES

some extent, recovered their steadiness; and, at about Id. per lb. below the
rates of Friday, some moderate transactions are reported. For two-fold yarns,
below 100, the demand remains languid, but during the last two days they ex¬

hibit

563

3,526
10,183
2,163
34,237

Straw goods. 61
Feath & flow, i 9
Snap. & elas. 17

17,313
1,605
7,200

—

491 $105,082

Mfd tobacco,-

Ref.

lbs...

11,131
Mfd tobacco,
bales

150

Muskets, cs.,.425
wood,
721
logs

Cedar

1,358

Petroleum,
galls
85,130 34,218

1,405
31,875

$44,673

..

100

$2,014,355

bx8,..v

250

LONDON

4,236

Corn, bush. 18,530 14,400
Oats, bush.81,036 39,559

1,244

Petroleum,
galla.,,. .86,551 31,011

ROTTERDAM.

Rosin, bbls.. 1,120

3,000 Ext. logwood,

J Cotton, bales.704 104,840

Miscellaneous.

564

THE CHRONICLE,
Quan. Value.
Quan. Value20 s 200 Rice, bags....200 1,921
500
20,000
Clothing, cs ... .1
182 Bricks
Cheese, lbs.2,565
679 Drugs, pkgs.. 135
6,075
Oil meal, cks .40
' 800 Hoops, bals..262
655
Boxes, cs
2
1,440
139 Corn, bush. .1,600
Paint, pkgs
1
100 Empty hhds .281
520

Quan. Yalne.
Books, cs
1
Coffee, pkgs..246
Cond. milk, cs.20
Cocus wood,
tons
50

250

Tobacco, hhds. 16

6,000
4,T84
200
1,000
2,701
327
1,400

Photo

109

6,883

Cond milk

10

2,095

Grease, lbs
.800
Corn starch,

124

02

312

50

216

Hemp, bis

81

Opal oil, galls2>53

Shoe pegs,

bbls50

1,543
200
0,718

Carriage rn’tls,

Ess oils, cs.,.,45
Sew mach, cs.. .4
Cedar, pcs.... 232

Weed, bales.. 158
Benzine, eall 1817
Naptha, galls 7333

Spts turpentine,
bbls

Seeds, pkg

Mahogany,
crot’hes

Lard, lbs.. .80,siO
Bacon, lbs.232,004
lbs

11,200
459

18,400

20,GS9

lbs

4.256

4,500

130

Drugs, pkgs....5

39,423

Oil cake.1,755,S96

Shoulders,
lbs

130,211

14,323

Pig’s hair, bis.25

1,250

Whalebone,
lbs

8,960

11,648

Prepared corn,
bxs

1

10S

Tobacco, balesl40
mat’ls,

2,751

1

124

2

1

150
300
107

10

150

cs

Glassware,
Carriages
Books, cs

Pork, bbls... .200
Rosin, bbls... 200

.

2,100
5,429
810

$274,114
BRISTOLS.

Rosin, bbls.. .739
Corn, bush.. 7S7S
Tar, bbls
Ill
Staves, No. .3,600
Oil cake,

3,0'0

6,500
320
GOO

211,570

4,500

$14,920
GRANGEMOUTH.

Petroleum,
galls
66,333

16,260

GLASGOW.

bxs
Oars

933

632

bales
'..300
Dental chairs,
bxs
3
Oars
294

:

10,183
425

300

Lignum vita?,
....516

600

Corn, bush. .9,237
Rye,- bu-h .14,156
Rosin, bbls.. .500

7,390

...

12.740

2,188

$34,458

670

96

.

105

Oysters, bxs..500
2,031 Leather cloth,

3,680
200

Petroleum,
4441

Pork, bbls.. .1507
Beef, bbls
46
Beef, tes
36
Bread, pkgs... 120
39

Hops, bales
4
Mfd tobacco,
lbs
20,263
Candles, bxs .120
Leather, sides. 162
Hams, 1 bs... 2,120

Pitch, bbls
50
Tea, pkgs
46
Corn, bush.. 3,587
...

Leather,

rolls.. .8
Dried fruit.... 150

...

.

Shooks & li...86

110

2,500
galls
389 Lard, lbs.... 9,000

logs
Books, cs
Jewl ashes,

13
1

bbls
Oars

750

205

407

bbls

117

25

195
1,331
326
656

$146,275

910
149

481

3,852
39,641
7,275
292

.

2

Furniture, cs...27
Candles, bxs.. 150

galls

Shooks & H

Tobacco, cs.... 11
Lumber, ft.00,000
Shingles.. .15,000
Peas, bags.... 200
Corn, bush 1,280

Mfd tobacco,
lbs
,15,457

Tobacco, hhds. 10

.

1,573
835

1,111
359
1,370
150
229

Si.

China, Glass &
Botles....
China

.336

Glass
5,923
Glassware.. ..176
Glass

13,754

Drugs,

BILBOA.

52

3,000
265

1,950
Total

$62,987

Reg antimony.26

5,550

631

1,259

Optical

Jewelry

Whiting

1,266

.1,925

Scammony

Anil ine cols
,

Santonine
-..
Soda nitrate
Soda caustic. 110

538

120
2S0
949

Gypsum

100

Ptg ink, pkgs r .3

BOO

575
1,307

$23,530 Mfa iron, pkgs. .3

115

Lumber, ft. .2,777

Shooks

804

75

.

Miscellaneous....

CUBA.

...3,900

Lard, lbs.. .94,860
Glassware, cs.40
Plaster, bbls.. ;20
Paper, rms..8,400

48,000
1

619 Canvas, cs
4,050 Petroleum,
368
galls
26,^20

8,700
18,035
483

Vitriol of copper
Other

Furs

715

Figs

45,665

Lemons..
Nuts

7 1,030

7 Pine apples

AFRICA.

Dry goods, cs .23 1
4,527 Furniture; cs—2
2,640 Spts .turp, cs...50

Sugar, bis
50
Lamps, pkgs... .2
14,477 Flour, Dbl».... 50

17

Bananas
Citroh
Currants
Dried fruit

$30,674

55

701

....

Saltpetre.

Melodeon

163

2,639
140
800

Brazil wood..,.
Cork
Fustic

Lignum vita?....
Logwood, M

401

1,532
105
300

"1,384
13,47:

2,367
75v

Oranges..:.

.

,.
;

Prunes..........
Plums
Raisins *■;

669
2.06C
4,323
8,115

Furniture...
Grindstones...
Hair.;
50

1,712
6,983

Hair cloth... .13

6,136 :

32,435
9,761

460
7,490
Hemp...
Honey....... 409 12,729
70
Hops
3,723

14,577

*

129

Ind. rubber .*559

6,8 2

Ivory.,..

Iron, pig,
,

1,475

tons

22,

69,048

64

3,694

576

25,727

Potatoes...,

Rags....

Lead, pigs.21,794 116,718

Rope

4,502

Salt

5,440
293
1,754

4,394,
5,684

Seeds.

38,629

52,935

,

1,731
Wire
6
6,813
2,235 Zinc,lbs ..202,541
267 Spices— ‘
Cassia..
6,S5(
Cloves
16,
2,702 linger;
Mustard.,.'.
18C
Pepper.
26,82'
8,
pimento
.

286

U,341i Stationery, &c.—

bgs.::...12,191 178,230
409
1*594
Tea* ......54,618 656.648

Tapioca

Trees and plants '

18,912
246

ToVs

-

3.679
1,459

...222

Tobacco..

11,242

.

....

V

6,026
-Linseed.... 6,466 ’ 29,275
769 2,160
Soap
Sugar, hhds, bblB; '
and tefe .13,216 673,419
Sugar, boxes &

21,683

Tin, bxs... 10.649
Tin, slabs.1258,
109,616 lbs....

J

Caster seed 2,000

1,472
1,478

1,597

40.751

Statuary........

251

lbs
830,016
Silverware.
1

9?

636 22,549s '

Rice.

391

Spelter,

14,613

5,019
2,937

.

5,432

Saddlery... ...6

’’

Oil paintings... 8
2,789
Perfumery,.. .130 14,304

Pipes

Metal goods... 20
Nails
22
Needles..
6
Old metal
Plated ware
2
Per. caps..12
Steel..

318

6,767

3,273 '
Molasses...5,775 125,020 ;

Iron, other,
tons:...

43,337

1

Machinery.....62
Maccaroni

8

Iron, R, R.
bars
10,886
Iron, sheet,
tons

632

...

748

72 34,261

tns

Fruits, &c.

109

2,7?S
529
1,940
623

1,224

Nux vomica
Flor sulphur.....

Copper.
Cutlery

52

Alum

1

2,043

981
773
189

Chains and an¬
chors .'.
16

Furs, &c

203

140

Watches.. ..-..25

3,780

4,565
1,535

Petroleum,

gals

Other*

13,181
1,166
16,926
7,765

.7
266

6,669 Woods—

4

Iron, hoop,

Sumac... —800
Vermillion—33

818
100

Lard, lbs

175
850
40

96

...

9 26,281

Nautical

5.597

2,251

Books, cs
7
2,620 Clothing, C8....1

50

.4,080

46
5

9,061

Asphaltum

-

Musical

Guns
73
Hardware... .149

Sponges
53
Sugar of lead. .8

22,839
755

Furniture, cs...31

Clocks, cs
4
$12,503 Lumber,ft.. 10,000
Rosin, bbls.. .306

3,409

Soda, hi

625

Brandy, bbls...50
Cotton gins, cs 12

.

Paper
890

Mathematical.. 2

Surgical........1

33,600

Paints

200

Rum, bbls...1,8:23

...

Engravings

3,986

serves...

'5,914 Jewelry, &c.t—
m
12,101

"

Books

Sauces and pre-

„

CONSTANTINOPLE.

55
23

27TH, 1866.

...

$18,894
6,875

AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK FOR THE

...

car¬
bonate.. .2.500
do sal.....778
do ash
188

tons

Perfumery,

Hoops

matls, pcs295

Miscellaneous

r

275

501
509

R R

‘

500

488

350
504
320

380
800
500

Peruv Bark.... 85

123
878
554

39,480 19,770 Lima wood,

Staves

Shooks,

4,232

400

lbs
690
52,206
3,318
Willow
643
1,091 Leather, Hides, &c.
Other
Blea powd.'.. .207
Bristles
49 11,760
4,111
1,797
MiscellaneousBrimstone,
Hides, dress¬
.84 37,779
tons
ed
Baskets.'. ....69
105
2,843
2,487
Chalk...
251
523 Hides, undrs’ed. 239,120 Bricks
Cream tartar. .25
581 Boxes.....
663
5,797 Pat. leather....2
2,691 Liquors, Wines, &c.—
Buttpns..
51 14,664
Chickory
.155
440
Oochineal
3
4'650
4,365 Burr stones
1,054 Ale....
978
Brandy.
374 10,929 Clay...
Gums, crude..52
2,981
do
arabic. .60
225
180
1,223 Cheese
2,746 Cordials
6,355
621
Gin
185
do
6,162 Cigars
36,557
copavi.21
681
782
Porter.
do
100
Coal, tons..2,329
copal... 5
6,653 r
835
10
Cqrks....
752
Indigo....,.. .74 10,318 Rum
622
Clocks
Lie paste
20
105
2,080
40 1,443 Whisky
Lie root
921
4,162 Wines
15,743 78,844 Coffee,bgs.34,454 689,174
Madder
1G7 32,499
Fancy goods.... 65,938'
Champagne,
bask
Oils.
79
3,055 26,305 Fire crackers
3,596
6,614
Feathers..:
6,713 Metals, &c.—
1,685
Oils, ess..... .71
...25
5,819 Brass goods
1
178 Flax
Oils, linseed..47
1,163
Bronzes
.2
828 Fish
6,86
Oil, olive
323
2,441

Argols

766

250

4,67S
6,974

plate... .45

<xc,—
Acids. .7
56
Arrow root ....9

• 857

2 0
1,029
559

2,049
3,739

lbs...;.... 1.466
Mfd wood, pkgsl5 -1Wine, pkgs.. --12 "v
Furniture, cs..27

as

14.920 Instruments—

5,226

Potash, hyd.. .42
Quinine

Hoops, bdls...507
5,350 Boards, pcs.. 1,493

SPECIE)

ENDING APRIL

1,4751

121

Petroleum,

.

Sugar, bxs....368
Mfa tobacco,

540
388
67

~

ware— I

383
1,002
175

cs

510 Ptg paper, rms.20

Petroleum,
galls
10,755

Shooks

220

160

6,000
1,235
1,300

60

$60,345 Grand total.... $4,718,633

Earth’nw’c.. .174

$19,479

cs

Rum, bbls

1,060

[The qnantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.] Pkgs. Value.
Pkgs. Value.
' Pkgs. Value

600

1,655

26

cs

748

WEEK

5

265

053

Matches, cs.... 26

Cassia,

CADIZ.

galls

630 Coal oil,gals 2,000
990 Soap, bxs.... ..20
244 Alcohol, ca,...800

880

IMPORTS

635

2,722

pkgs.,..
23
1,500
Instruments, c619
1,800
125
7,105 Leather,pcs.... 16
1,085 Machinery: cs. .59 15,150

Hardware, cs,.3l
Cutlery, cs
3
Shooks

675

105

,14,036

gals

250

1,300

528 Glassware,

Perfumery, bxs.30
Petroleum, “ "

(OTHER THAN DRY GOODS AND

Logwood, tons.27

498

100

Lard, lbs... 19,371

...360

.432

.

Peas, bbls

Perfumery, cs..84
Drugs, pkgs...35

215

Miscellaneous....

7,817

15

250
170

Furniture, cs..30

.96
3,978 Hams, lbs
59,100
4,167 Staves
12,816

Candles, bxs.2024

Bread,, pkgs.. .52S
Butter, lbs.. ..920
Hams, lbs..7,410
Drugs, cs
4

129
933
450
207

58 > Cheese, Iba. .2,358

1,000

126

Pkld fish, bbls.37

272

39

Live stock,
head

12,932

3,511 Perfumery; bxs.7
475 Flour, bbls.. .all
515 Matches, cs.. .780

386 Spirits turpentine
10
cs.
250
2,236 Tea, pkgs
10
210 Palm oil, pipes. .2
4,652 Cond milk, cs..l0
304 Pepper, bgg .... .5
1,598 Bran, bgs.. .200
Matting, rolls. .42
132 Matches, cs....20
409 Lumber, ft.78,000
489

Perfumery, bxs300

480

39

bales

420

.

.

920 Pepper, bgs
30
227 Drugs, pkgs.... 76
729 Nails, kegs....25
2,482 Clocks, cs.'
3

Tobacco, hhds. 10
Kerosene,

Lard, lbs

120




•

14

cs

Drugs, pkgs.... 48

Candles,

4

BRITISH WEST INDIES.

.144

Woodware,
pkgs

$6,600 Flour, bbls... 100
FRENCH WEST INDIES
Hoops, bdls.. .586
0,336 Bread, pkgs.. .170
135 Flour, bbls... .699
89
1,502 Candles, bxs.. 350
1,450 Btef, bbls
25
000 Soap, bxs
100
3,185 Fork, bbls
Matches, cs... .17
692 Corn meal,

Glassw’e, pkgs.33

Flour, bbls..4.337
Live stock, hd.75
Hay, bales.... 150
Corn meal,

1,833
303
1,026
646

.

bbls

646
1,070
350

Hams. lbs...4,120

Tobacco, hhds. 5
Lard, lbs.... 1,750
Miscellaneous....

1,250

Beef, bbls..
10
Hams, lbs...4,301
9,490 Butter, lbs. .1,549

Clocks, bxs....14
Dry goods, cs.. .3
Staves
6,000

56

.

Kerosene,

250

80
257

Cheese, lbs.. .400

Shoes.cs

BRAZIL.

VENEZUELA.

Codfish, qtls.. .30
Hams, lbs..10,268
Pkld fish, bbls.30
Soap, bxs i .3,200
Butter, Ihs—1,200
Flour, bbls.... 245
Gunny cloth,

175

Flour,bbls..3,313 36,176 Dry goods,

350
450
96
164
252

Rope, pkgs.... 13

400
900
600

$20,076 Confectionery,

$14,657

..

90
1,069 Preserves, cs... 12
1,375 Pork, bbls
45
G68
Ice, tons
150
620
$713,526 Hardware, cs.. .4
229
MARSEILLES.
79
1
Clothing, cs
70,025
6,300 Sew much, cs.. .3
109 Staves
Euamld cloth,
Corn meal, lihdlO
6
cs
300 Corn meal,
7.368

1,800
33,583

JAPAN.
180
639 Agl implts,
pkgs....
6
620
1,086 Hardware, cs..53
269 Belting, cs
1
Clocks, cs.
5

1,500 Rosin, bbls...100
1,120 Lard, lbs... 13,219
101 Bread, pkgs.... 30
118 Paper, reams. 800

Miscellaneous....

$70,920

230

164

500
250
190

...

bales

217

.

Corn, bush....800
Oats, bags.... 100

Pork, bxs
Oil, trail s

Sew mach, cs.. .4
3,752 Glass ware,pkgs 42
160 Hardware, Dxs.. 9
1,440 Lumber, ft. 10,027
1,400 Mfd iron,pkgs.. 11
600 Drugs, pkgs.. .70
2,050 Miscellaneous

HATTI.

Lumber, ftll7,194
Shingles— ..20,000
Codfish, qtls. 160
Pork, bbls
50
Pkld fish, bbls. .40
Flour, bbls....250
Hams, lbs
632
Lard, lbs
2,0\K)
Butter, lbs.... 510
Cheese, lbs...604
Tobacco, bales.50
Soap, bxs
700
Candles, bxs.. .50
Rice, bbls..... .11
D’d fish, bxs. .500
Sugar, bxs ... .13
Coal oil, galls.250
Nails,kegs23

...

2i0
75

bbls

?

...

Nutmegs, cks.. .1
Sugar, bbls ...2

Beef, bbls

.

Maplewood,

bbls
940
Cement, bbls. .100

cs

2,000

cs
8
4,800
$113,183 Agl implem’tsl57
900
BRITISH GUIANA.
Turpentine,
bbls
4
116
5,465
Pork, bbls....2"8
4.000 Perfumery,
Beef, bbls....210
750
Mat hes, cs... .50
pkgs.....
6
760
Flour, bbls.. 1,100 10,255 Confectionery,
821
cs
4
1,100
Paper, rms..2,400
432
1,060 Hose, bales
Peas, bbls
75
2
823 Stationery, bx?.26
736
Corn, bush....700
Coin meal,
1,174
Cheese, lbs. .5,tj§4
885 Shoes, cs
bbls
500
.To 1.200
1,883 Hams, lbs.. 11,262
Bread, pks... .435
2,097
1,950 Straw hats, cs...4
Lard, lbs... .9,200
1,817
1,1S8 Potatoes, bbls.400
Cheese, lbs. .4,144
1,200
Shooks
120
1,000
2,100 Fancy goods, cs 1
Live stock, hd.83
1,635 Bacon, lbs..8,930
1,460
100 Books, cs
150
.1
Hay, bales
25
663 Eggs, bbls.
Lard oil, bbls. .10
406
25
144 Live stock,
Peas, bags
50
200
heads
4
Furniture, CS....4
2,500
344 Drygoods, cs. ..2
Coal oil, galls.700
100
1,897 Mfd tobacco,
Hams, lbs...7973
154
lbs
460
Woodware,
.530
827 Beef, kegs
431
pkgs
75
426
Turpentine,
Beans, bbls....37
360 "Woodware, ’
...10
bbls
35
..10
150.
Tar, bbls
50
pkgs.
..0
227 Pickles, cs
.542
Tea, pkgs
130
141 Backfat, lbs.2,200
374
Candles, bxs. ..50
.16
247 Cement, bbls ..350
822
Hake, cs
700 Bricks
Staves
900
10,000
36,000
Tobacco, hhds..2
530 Tobacco, cs.. 30
1,315
450
Salt, sacks. ...200
207
$39,509 Gas fixtures....2
HAVRE.
254
Furniture,cs... .5
600
Cotton,
Tallow, lbs. .5,000
bales.
600
3,892 G69,f08 Palm oil, cks
.4
Potashes, bbls.01 14,743 Lumber, ft. 15000
750
1,340 Provisions,
Rosin, bbls.. .400
546
Sweepings,
pkgs
100
27
bbls
173
2,100 Miscellaneous..
Cedar, logs.. .730 10,300
Maple, pcs....101
1,846
$118,376
PORTO RICO.
Ashwood, logs. .2
39

87,355

Hardware,

152

370
2,569
1,44®
1,200

..

cs

1
Miscellaneous...

COLONIES«

Flour, bbls. 10,924
Corn meal,

Hides

17

445
3,003

Hoop skirts, cs.10 11,904
1,272 Leather, cs
6 m 2,520
131 Machinery,
pkgs
19
2,432

cs..

BRITISH NORTH AMERICAN

galls

1,050

.

Hogs hair,

elks

2

..

.

Shoe pegs,
bbls

cs..

Opium, cs.
4
Trunks, pkgs.. 41
Butter, lbs. .7,322
Masical iust, cs. 1
Sew mach, cs..rf3
Hardware, cs 39
Hay, bales.... 648
Stone, tons .300
Match splints,

..

....450

lbs

.

Iron sale

34,929

Spermaciu,
Beef, tes
Mf tobacco,

d^als....... 3,300 2,103

.

4,743

Vf

Quan.Valua
Quan. Value.
Quan. Value
CHINA.
Mfd tobacco,
Powder, *
lbs....
2,547
€97 Kerosene,
kegs
4,S87 8,099
670 Bread, pkgs
Empty bxs....675
88
9
ass ware, cks..5
256
Rosin, bbls...483
1,743 Kerosene,
Mfd iron, bxs. ..1
60
1,300
829 Ind rub hose,
gal*
bales
1
324
Books, cs
2
169
5
21
$60,809 Matting, rolls..45
1,925 Pitch, bbls
GENOA.
Rosin, bbls
5
25
Firecrackers,
bxs
104
140 Lard, lb«... .2,160
477
Petroleum,
661
2,700 Snuff, bxs
1
61 Paint, pkgs ...15
6,075
gals
Codfish, qtls...10
113
Tobacco, hhds.57
6,270 Wooden ware,
Mfd iron, pkgs.^4
Rosin, bbls...400
151
l,i00
pkgs
50
150
800 Turpentine, cs.10
400
3,477
Logwood, tons.42
112 Coal, tons
Rosin, bbls.... 16
257 Domestics,
bales
350 63 413
$10,970 Tobacco, hhds ..3 1,202

Soap, bxs

200
13,500

[May*' 5) 1866.

...

.588

Tomatoes

>

Waste.

.

...270

9,178

15,050 ?■
326
9,563.

2,694 Wool, bl«T. .2,29(1228.-TT4 V ; 1
Wax..;....!:
735
1,224 >
.

..

417

14,476

i

!

Other.,.;.
»

Total

282

;
<>.

,$4,822,24^'

jij866.]

>

Native Ceylon

CURRENT.

PRICES

THE CHRONICLE.

565

21 ©
-23*
19*©
22*
Laguayra..
-18* ©
20
SLDomingo
IT* @
17j
Copper—Duty, pig, bar,and ingot, 2*; old copper,
2 cents $ lb; manufactured, 30
$ cent ad val.; sheath¬
ing copper and yellow metal, in sheets 42 inches long
and 14 inches wide,
weighing 14 © 34 oz. % square
foot, 3* cents $ B). All cash.
Copper has been dull and inactive, and prices are
■-

Maracaibo...

Gam,Myrrh, Turkey.
Senegal
Gnm Tragacanth, Sorts
Gum Tragacanth, white flakey...
Hyd. Potash, Fr.and Eng. ..(gold)
Iodine, Resublimed
Ipecacuanna, Brazil

WHOLESALE.

.

pg- AH goods deposited in public stores

or bonded
warehouses must be .withdrawn therefrom, or the
duties thereon paid within one year from the date of
the originnl importation, but may be withdrawn by
the owner for exportation to Foreign Countries, or

:

may
ern

be transhipped to any port of t-he Pacific, or West¬

Coast of the United states, at any time before the

expiration of three years from the date of the original
Importation, such goods on arrival at a Pacific or
Western port, to be subject to the same rules and
regulations as if originally imported there; any goods
remaining in public store or bonded warehouse be¬
yond three years shall be regarded as abandoned to

fl fl>

#

Bolts

Braziers’
Baltimore
Detroit

the Government, and sold under such regulations as

Portage Lake

the

Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe. Mer¬
chandise upon which duties havo been paid may re¬
main in warehouse in custody of the.officers of the

Cordage—Duty, tarred, 8; nnt
other untarred, 3* cents $ fl).

customs at

Tarred Russia
Tarred American
Bolt Rope, Russia.

the expense and risk, of the

owners

of said

merchandise, and if exported directly from said cus¬
tody to a Foreign Country within three years, shall be

entitled to return duties, proper evidence of such
merchandise having been landed abroad to be furnish¬
ed to the collector by the importer, one per centum
of said duties to beTetained by the Government.
53©*" In additian to the duties noted below, a discrim¬
inating duty of 10 per cent, ad val. is levied on all
imports under flags that have no reciprocal treaties
Ipith (he United States.
On mil goods, wares, and merchandise, of the
growth or produce of Countries East of the Cape of
Good Hope, when imported from places this side of the
Cape of Good Hope, a duty of 10 por cent, ad val. is
levied in addition to the duties imposed on any such
articles when imported directly from the place or places
of their growth o* production ; Raw Cotton and Raw
Silk excep'ed.
The tor in all eases to be 2,240 lb.

Ashes—Duty: 15 fl cent ad val.
Pot, 1st sort.
$ 100 lb
6 75 ©

A nclior*—Duty:
Ot 209 lb and upward
.

*

6

87*

©

Pearl, 1st sort

If ces wax—Duty,

American yellow

2* cents $ lb.
$ lb

II

©

20 <j£ cent ad val.
$ B>
?8

Bones—Duty: on invoice 10 f? cent.
shin
ton
80 00

Rio Grande

40

©
©

Bread—Duty, 30 $ cent ad val.

•••$ &

-

Navy

6*

©

••

Pilot

©

Crackers

Breadstuff*—See special report.
-•

'Bristles—Duty, 15 cents; hogs hair, 1 $ lb.
American, gray and white...$ fl)
70 © 2 50
Butter and Clieese.—Duty:
With increased ^receipts
is firm.

Butter—
N. Y.,
do
do
do

4 cents.

butter is declining. Cheese

Welch tubs, strictly fine,

Pa., common to
.

30
28
20

do

do
Cheese—

com.

do"

do

83
.

to ined.

,

17

common

English dairy
Vermont dairy

©
©
©

•

33
40
85
80

Factory made dairies
Farm dairies .I
•

©

20

in dium

do firkiDS,-finer kinds, yellow .
West. Re erve, good to fine, yel.
do
*•' com. to medium
Southern Ohio

,

.

IS

.

47
45

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

•

Canada, uniform and fine
do ' ordinary, mixed
Mich ,111.,Ind. & Wis., g. to f. yel.

.

,

.

38
42
40
35
•

•

85
,

,

83
30
22
22

20
.

.

21

©

..

.

80

Stearic
Adamantine

Cement—Rosendale

81

©

20* ©
fl bbl

..

21*
1 75

@

t

inch and upward

$ fl>-

8$ ©

Coal—Duty, bituminous, $1 25 $ ton of 28 bushels,
80 fl) to the bushel pother-than bituminous, 40 cents
fl 28 bushels of 80 U>; fl bushel.
Liverpool Orrel..fl ton of2,240 B>
© 10 00
Liverpool House Cannel
13 00 ©
Anthracite
8 50 ©
Cocoa,—Duty, 3 cents $ lb.
Caracas.

..(gold).(in bond)..fl fl)
Maracaibo (gold)..
do
......
Guayaquil .(gold)
do
.

26 ©

27*

©
@

15*

..

15

i<CO,ffee—Duty: When imported direct in Ameri-

efafi dr

equalled vessels from the place c.f its growth
or.production; also,.thd growth of count!ies this side
the Crtpe of Good Hope1 when imported indirectly in
Americnp or equalized vessels, 5 cents fl tt>; all other
10 $ cent ad valorem in addition.
(Coffee has been steady for the better qualities but
only moderately active, and closes quiet and lower.
RTo, prime, duty paid ....... .gold
20 ©
20*
do good
...gold
19 @
19*
do fair
IT* ©
18
...gold
dp ordinary...gold
13* © ; 16*.
d» fWr to good cargoes.
.gold >
IT* ©
19
Jtva,mst8 and bags....i^gold r > *5* ©
26*




20

$1 fl)

#

,

,

,

••

Corks—Duty, 50 fl cent ad val.
Regular, quarts.. .*7..f) gross
Short Tapers

55

Mineral
Phial.

45
12

.

Licorice Paste, Spanish
Licorice Paste, Greek

241
84

•

•:

,

,

Oil Anise
Oil Cassia
Oil Bergamot
Oil Lemon
Oil Peppermint, pure

29

Manila, 2*
©
©
©
©

21
,

19
2S

Oxalic Acid.

,

.

©
©
©

©

.

.

8

90

1

4 50
5 00
6 25
2 90
4 00
6 75

©
©
©
©
©
©
©

40*
..

..

85
6 00
..

15
11

©

..

©
©
©
©
©

fl B)
...

California, brown,

English, white

...

Senna, Alexandria
Senna, East India

35
65
85
8

©
©
©
©
40
©
45
©
00
©
55 ©
©
©
47* ©
12 ©

Seneca Root

Shell Lac
Soda Ash

(80 fl cent)
Sugar Lead, White
Sulphate Quinine, Am
Sulphate Morphine
Tartaric Acid
(gold)
Valerian, English

(gold)
fl

oz.

fl lb

,

Vitriol, Blue

~

2 60
•

120 00

(gold)
SO 00

.

•

54
19
50
15

©
©
©
©

_

.

72
..

©210 CO
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

35 00
..

.

~

.

..

-

27 CO
25 00
22 00
22 00
..
..

© 85 00

©

^

©

Fish—Duty, Mackerel, $2; Herrings, $1; Salmon
$3; other pickled, $1 50 ^ bbl.; on other Fish,
Pickled, Smoked, or Dried, in smaller pkgs. than bar¬
rels, 50 cents fl 100 B>.
The Fish market is dull especially for Dry Cod
,

©

which is lower.

Mackerel is in better demand and

Sierra
.(gold)

2S

.

© 55 00
5
..

40

1

©

Si

©
©

5*
42*

17* ©
@
18* ©
©
..

bulk.'..
:..
fl gallon
fl lb
(gold)

Cobalt, Crystals, .-.in kegs.
Cochineal, Honduras
Cochineal, Mexican
Copperas, American
Cream Tartar, prime
Cubebs, East India.

1 20
1 75

..

2 70 @
50 fl
36 ©

112 fl)s
(gold)
(gold)

80

(gold)

2)

Catch
Cuttlefish Bone

fl cwt.
fl bbl.
Pickled Scale.
fl bbl.
Pickled Cod.....
fl bbl.
Mackerel, No. 1, Mass, shore
Mackerel, No. 1, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 1, Bay
Mackerel, No. 2, Mass, shore
Mackerel, No. 2, Bay
Mackerel, No. 2, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 3, Mass, large
Mackerel, No. 8, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 3, Mass
Salmon, Pickled, No. 1
Shad,ConnecticutjNo. l.fl hi', bbl.
Shad, Con-ect cut, No. 2
Herring,Sealed..
fl box
Herring, No. 1...
Herring,pickled
fl bbl.

Epsom Salts

Logwood

more or

oz.

60

Gamboge
Ginger, Jamaica, bl’d, in bbls
Ginseng, Southern and Western..
Gum Arabic, Picked
(gold)
Gum Arabic, Sorts
Gum Benzoin
...(gold)
Gum Copal Cow
....

do

.

..

7 00
22 00

IS 7
18 75

17 75

© 18 00

17 75

© IS 00
©
@
©
© 36 00
©
©
..

.

..

..

..

-

..

6/* ©
52* ©
5 00 ©

.

65
55
7 00

nominal.

fl * cask
fl box

10

©
©

88

©
62* ©
42 ©
~i
©
31 ©

1C5

.♦

80

®

8t ©
i?' ©

..

©

©

fl E>

Citron, Leghorn

©
©
13| ©
10 ©
29 ©
28

Almonds, Languedoc
Provence

do

14
15
80
29
27
47

25

fl box
fl hf. box
7..fT qr. box

^

© *
©

44

Sicily, Soft Shell

,

"

80

28

Dates.....

do
Shelled
Sardines.....
V' do

3 90

18

Prunes, Turkish
do
do

©

3 85
8 70

Bunch...

Currants

20

;

s

! do Layer

.bales
.fl fl)

Gambier

le

Raisins, Seedless

Flowers, Arnica.

Folia, Buchu.

5 75

.

13

fl

©

©
© 4 25
© 7 50
© 22 50
© 19 00
© 19 00
©

Flax—Duty: $15 fl ton.
Jersey
fl
17 ©
23
-Fruit—Duty: Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plnms and
Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds, 10; Almonds, 6; other
nuts, 2; Dates, 2; Pea Nuts, 1; Shelled do, 1*, Filbera
and Walnuts, 3 cents fl fl); Sardines, 50; Preserved
Ginger, 50; Green Fruits, 25 fl cent ad val.
Fruit has been in bet’.er demand although prices are

fl)

Flowers, Benzoin

...

4 00

'

3*
47*

.

Duck-Duty, 30 fl cent ad vaL
00
Ravens, Light
fl pee
00
Ravens, Heavy
Scotch, G-ourock, No. 1 per yard.
95
Cotton, No. 1
.<$yard
Dye Woods—Duty free.
Camwood
(gold). ..fl ton
30 00
Fustic,Cuba
Fustic, Tampico
19 66
Fustic, Savanilla
(g°ld)
18 00
Fustic, Maracaibo
do
20 00
Logwood, Campeachy
(gold)
26 00
Logwood, Hond
24 00
IiOg wo od, Tabasco
(gol d )
21 00
Logwood, St. Domingo
21 00
Logwood, Jamaica

4

,

45

#

.

Dutch

Verdigris, dry and extra dry.

Dry Cod
Dry Scale

Leon, bags
Peppers—Zanzibar.,
Bleaching Powder
Borax, Refined
Brimstone, Crude
fl ton
Brimstone, Am. Roll
fl fl)
Brimstone, Flor Sulphur
Camphor, Crude, (in bond).(gold)
Camphor, Refined

Myrrh, East India.

8*

higher.

Bird

Gtun

fl fl)
fl bush.

Feathers—Duty: 30 fl cent ad val.
85
fl fl)

(gold)

Bi Chromate Potash
Bird
Peppers — African,

Gpm Gedda
Glim Damar

30
24
4 25

Prime Western
do Tennessee

Bark, Calisaya
Berries, Persian
Bi Carb. Soda, Newcastle

Extract

•

,.

lui
..

Mustard, brown, Trieste

do

•

24
36

(gold)

SapanWood, Manila

©
©

65

(gold)

(gold)

Coriander
do
do

5

55

©
m

#

Limawood
Barwood

..

25

Sarsaparilla, Hond
Sarsaparil4a, Mex...
Seed, Anise
do Canary
do Hemp
do Caraway

40
SO
4 50

(gold)

Rose Leaves
Salaratus
Sal Ammoniac, Refined
Sal Soda, Newcastle

do
do
do
do

.

..

Quicksilver
Rhubarb, China

50
40

Drugs are in steady but moderate demand,
CL*
Acid, Citric
(gold)
©
Alcohol
....fl gall.
©
25 ©
Aloes, Cape
fl fl)
85 ©
Aloes, Socotrine
Alum
4* ©
55 @
Annato, fair to prime.
Antimony, Regulus of
12* ©
24 ©
Argols, Crude
Argols, Refined
(gold)
28* ©
Arsenic, Powdered
3* ®

Chamomile Flowers
Chlorate Potash
Caustic Soda

,

Phosphorus

*70

50

,

2 55

00
75 ©
121 ©
65 ©

6 56

(gold)

Prussiate Potash

gallon; Aloes, 6 cents $ fl); Alum, 60 cents fl 100 lb;
Argols, 6 cents $ lb; Arsenic and Assafcetida, 20;
Antimony, Crude and Regulus, 10; Arrowroot, 80 $
cent ad val.; Balsam Capivi, 29; Balsam Tolu,
30;
Balsam Peru,50 cents $ lb; Calisaya Bark,
80 $ cent
ad val.; Bi Carb, Soda, i*; Bi Chromate Potash, 3 cents
$1 fl); Bleaching Powder, 80 cents fl.100 lb ; Refined
Borax, 10 cents fl fl); Crude Brimstone, $6; Roll
Brimstone, $10 $ ton; Flor Sulphur, $20 $ ton, and
15 $ cent ad val.; Crude Camphor,
30; Refined Cam¬
phor, 40 cents fl fl).: Carb. Ammonia, 20 fl cent ad
val.; Cardamoms and Cantharides, 50 cents fl fl);
Castor Oil, $ l fl
gallon; Chlorate Potash, 6 ; Caustic
Soda, 1 *; Citric Acid, 10; Copperas, *; Cream Tartar,
10; Gubebs, 10 cents fl fl); Cntch, 10; chamomile
Flowers, 20 $ cent ad val.; Epsom Salts, 1 cent fl
fl); Extract Logwood, Flowers Benzola and Gam¬
boge, 10 $ cent.; Ginseng, 20; Gum Arabic, 20 $
cent ad val.; Gum Benzoin, Gum
Kowrie, and Gum
Damar, 10 cents per tt>; Gum Myrrh, Gum Senegal,
Gum Geeda and Gum Tragacanth, 20 fl cent ad
val.;
Hyd. Potash and Resublimed Iodine, 75; Ipecac and
Jalap, 50; Lie. Paste, 10; Manna, 25; Oil Anis, Oil
Lemon, and Oil Orange, 50 cents; Oil Cassia and Oil
Bergamot, $i $ fl); Oil Peppermint, 50 fl cent ad
val.; Opium, $2 50; Oxalic Acid, 4 cents $ fl>; Phos¬
phorus, 20 $ cent ad val.; Pruss. Potash, Yellow, 5;
Red do, 10; Rhubarb, 50 cents fl fl): Quicksilver,
15
$ cent ad val.; Sal ^Eratus, 1* cents $ fl); Sal Soda,
* cent $ fl); Sarsaparilla and Senna, 20 $ cent ad
val.; Shell Lac, 10; soda Ash, *; Sugar Lead, 20 cents
fl fl); Sulph. Quinine, 45 fl cent ad val.; Snlph. Mor¬
phine, $2 50 fl oz.; Tartaric Acid, 20; Verdigris, 6
cents fl fl); Sal Ammoniac,
20; Blue Vitriol, 25-fl
cent ail val.; Etherial Preparations and
Extracts, $i
fl fl>; all others quoted below, free. Mot-t of the
articles under this head are now sold for cash.
(All

Cantharides
Carbonate Ammonia,in

4
4
6
2
3

(gold)

Opium, Turkey

.

Drugs and Dyes—Duty, Alcohol, 40 cefits $

Assafcetida
Balsam Capivi:
Balsam Tolu.
Balsam Peru

Solid

,

4 00

.

.

Madder, Dutch
(gold)
Madder, French, E. X. F. F. do
Manna, large flake
Nutgalls Blue Aleppo
(gold)

45
45

Cotton—See special report.

Cardamoms, Malabar
Castor Oil, Oases

Clliatns—Dnty, 2* cents $ fl).
Qne

red

...

50
50

'.^Candles—Duty, tallow, 2*; spermaceti and wax,
8; stearine and adamantine, 5 cents fl fl).
Sperm
- fl fl)
..
©
do,: ,patent,
50
©
Refined sperm,city
'....
40 ©

,•

Manila,

»

©

©
8 m> ©
5 50 ©
©
2 50 ©
4 ©
25 ©
42 ©
23 ©
32 ©
30 ©
8
©
7* ©
1 75 ©
42 ©

Liccorice, Paste, Sicilv

45

nominal.)

46
40
48
8

do
fair to good
Firkins,
* fir. tubs, strictly fiue
■^Western, good to choice

,

©
24 ©
©
©
©
28 ©
29* ©
28* ©

85
85

Licorice Paste, Calabria

nominal.

60
55
40
1 00
3 55

©
©

Jalap
Juniper Berries
La^ Dye

,

Sheathing, new,
Sheathing, &c., old
Sheathing, yellow

60

Gum

-

©

60
34
19

©

82

©

86

©

20

-

566

THE CHRONICLE.

Figs, Smyrna

18

...$ lb

Brazil Nuts

Filberts, Sicily

12

Walnuts, French

12

Drixd Fruit—
N. State Apples
Blackberries
Black Raspberries
Pared Peaches

Unpealed do
Cherries, pitted,

22

©
©
©
©

8

9

.cash.

do

...$ ft>
...

•

,

©
©
©
©
©
©

.

23
12

new...

••

,

10

gold.

.

15*

Tampico and Metamoras..

.

.

Wet Salted Hides-

Gold

.

gold for

on

currency

North, and Ea*t.
No 1.

Beaver, Dark.... $ lb
do

Pale

Bear, Black

1
1
5
4

@ 2 00
@ 1 50

'.... 4 00

Badger

@ 8 00

90 @ 1 50

Cat, Wild

90 @ 1
10 @
5 00 @10
.10 00 @75
3 U0 @10
I 00 @ 2
00 @ I
1 25 @ 3
5 50 @10

do House
Fisher

Fox, Silver
do Cross
do Red
do Grey

Lynx
Marten, Dark
do

pale
Mink, dark

50
20
00
00
00
25

3
«

3
1

25

1

50
50

20 @

Raccoon

70 @ 1 00

75 @ 1 Oil
40 @

12

Glass—Duty,Cylinder
not over 10x15
and not over

American

1 00
50
10

Window Polished Flato
inches, 2$ cents $ square foot; larger
16x24 inches, 4 cents $ square foot;
or

o

6x 8
8x..
llx 4
12x19
18x22
20x31
24x31
25x36

to
to

to
to
to
to
to

to

80x46 to
32x50 to

over

Window—1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th qualities.

(Subject to

a
8x10
10x15
12x18
16x24
20x30
24x30
24x36
30x44
32x48
32x56
o— I

11

discount of 2s @ :;o $ cent.)
50 Xfl
*■
50 feet
..

K
5
6
6
7

K.i

50

00

50
00

7 50
9 00
10 00
11 00
12 00
13 00
15 00

....

Above

©
@
@
@
©
@
@
@
@

7 25
7 75
9 25
9 50
11 75

14
16
17
IS
@ 20
@ 24

50
00
00
00
00

00

English &nd French Window—1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th
qualities.
(Single Thick)—Discount20 @ 30 per cent.
6x8 to 8x10
$ 50 feet
6 00 @ 7 75
8x11 to
11x14 to
12x19 to
20x31 to
21x31 to
24x36 to
80x45 to
82x50 to

10x15
12x18

6
7
7
12
13
15
16
18

16x24..*.
24x30
24x36
30x44.
32x48
32x56

50
00
50
00
00

00
00
00

@

8 25

@
©
@
@
@
@
@

10
15
16
IS
20
24

50
50
50
DO
50
00

Gunny Bagrs—Duty, valued at 10 cents or less,
$ square yard, 3; over 10, 4 cents $ lb
Calcutta, light and heavy $ pee
@
19
..

Gunny Cloth—Duty, valued at 10 cents or less
$ square yard, 3; over 10,4 cents $ ft).
Calcutta, standard
yard
25 @ "
26 j

Gunpowder-Duty, valued at 20

cents or less

$ lb, 6 cents $ lb, and *20 $ cent ad val.; over 20
$ lb, 10 cents $ lb and 20 $ cent ad val.
Blasting (A)
$ keg of 25 lb
© 5 00

cents

,

Shipping and Mining

.

Rifle

7 50

Sporting, in 1 tt> canisters... $ lb

40

©
©
©

5 50

1 10

Buenos

$ lb

Ayres,mixed

29

©
©
©

27

Hog, Western, unwashed
Hay—North River, in bales $
100 lbs, for shipping

Undressed

GO

©

$ lb

10
10

$ ft) gold

do
do
do
do
do
California, Mexican
Porto Cabello
do
Vera Cruz
do
do
Tampico
Matamoras
do
San Juan and Cent. Amer... do
Maracaibo
do




>

dead greer

black, dry

do

©

buflalo

.

cash.
do

21
14

©
@
©
©

do

.

•

..

gold.

,

.

,

do

171©
16|@
16
■

•

©
©

17*©
16 ©
12 @
..

..

..

..

..

••

65

17

16*
13

SO ©

85

25
20

$ ft>

do of 1864..

65
45

@
©

Horns—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.
Ox, Rio Grande

$C

Ox, Buenos Ayres

18 00

00

13 00

Para, Coarse..
East India... f

55
.

Carthagena, etc.,
Guayaquil

..

..

Indigro—Duty

@
@
@
@

120 00

@250
@200
@125
@100
©175
©150
@110
© 70
@110
@100

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
@150 00

hhd., culls.
bbl., extra
bbl., heavy
bbl., light
bbl., culls

oak, hhd., heavy
do
hhd., light

Oude.

do
do
do
do

120

Kurpah
Madias
Manila
Guatemala

70
85

(gold)

75

(gold)

Caraccas

@
@

2 00
1 25

@
@
@
@

1 25
1 35
1 c5
85

*70

Iron—Duty, Bars, 1 to 1* cents $ ft>; Railroad,
$ 100 ft>; Boiler and Plate, 1* cents $ ft>;
Sheet, Band, Hoop, and Scroll, 1* to 1* cents
$ H>;
Pig, $9 $ ton; Polished Sheet, 3 cents $ K>.

70 cents

Iron has been less active

during the week at easier

rates.

v

Pig, Scotch, Best,No l(cash) $ ton
Pig, American, No. 1
Bar, Swedes,assortedsizes (in gold)

42 50
40 00
95 00

@ 45 00
@ 42 00
@;< 5 00

^-Store Prices—,

Bar Swedes, assortedsizes

155 00

@
@'15 00
00 @105 00
00 @195 00
00 @145 00
@145 00
00 @147 50
50 @175 00
00 @215 00
9 @
10
29
'30
@
8
6* @
Oj @
00 @ 85 00
....

Bar, English and American,Refined 110 00
do

Common

100

Scroll,

145
135

Ovals and Half Round
Band
Horse Shoe

140

Rods, 5-8 @ 3-16 inch
Hoop

117
150

Nail Rod
$ ft)
Sheet, Russia
Sheet, Single,Double and Treble..
Rails, English.. .(gold)
$ ton

do

56
SO

American

Ivory—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.
East India, Prime
East India, Billiard Ball

African, West Coast, Prime
African, Scrivellos, West Coast..

©

3 50

©

2 75

4 50
3 00

2 00

2 50

Lead-Duty, Pig, $2 $ 100 ft>; Old Lead, 1* cents
$ lb; Pipe and Sheet, 2£ cents $ ft).
$ 100 tt>

..

Spanish

8 20

German

8 20
8 20

*

English
Bar

$ ft)

..

..

@
@
@
@
@
@

8 45
8 45
8 45
9

li*

Leather—Duty: sole 35, upper 30 $ cent ad val.
Leather is firmer and in better demand.
do
do
do
do
do

do
do

cash.$ lb

middle... do

do

Hemlock, B. Ayres,«fcc..Pt do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do

middle, do

heavy .do
California,light, do .T...
do
do

.....

middle do

heavy, do

Orinoco, etc. l’t. do
do
middle do
do
heavy., do
do & B. A, dam’gd all

weights
do
do

Oak,

do

poor

all

@

32

@
@
@
47 @
17 @
23 @
31 @
81
@
28 @
30 @
30 @
26 @
28 @
26 @

42
43
45
51
19
29
32

33
42

do
do

do

80
37

heavy.... do
light Cropped
do
middle
bellies

do

Slaughter in rough, .cash.

Slaughter indo mid. light... do
rough, h’vy do
&

23

82
29

81
81
27
29
27
27

V @

19
29
82
40

26
28
34

heavy

Cedar,

17

@
@
@

(American
15
12
12
10

Mansanilla
Mexican
Florida....,

'

$ cubic ft.
$ ft)

Bahia

@
@
@
©
©
©

..
"

2 50

18

15
15
11
8

@

5 00

©
©
©

1 05
75
60

©

41

©

There is a fair demand at steady rates.
New Orleans
$ gall.
86
Porto Rico
60
Cuba Muscovado
40
do Clayed
37
English Islands
45

65

Nails—Duty; cut 1*; wrought 2*; horse shoe

cents

$ lb
Cut, 4d. @ 6iM

Clinch
Horse shoe,

Copper

$ 100 ft)

,

6 50

@
@
@

forged (8d)

$ ft)

28
5n

Yellow metal.
Zinc

..

..

....

8 25
80
35
20

Naval

Stores—Duty: spirits of turpentine 30
$ gallon; crude turpentine, rosin, pitch, and
tar, 20 $ cent ad val.
cents

Naval Stores are in moderate demand.
firmer and Turpentine quiet.

Turpentine, N. C
Tar, American

$ 280 fl)
$ bbl.

do foreign
Pitch

Rosin,
do
do
do

Rosin ia

..

2 25
8 25

common

strainednndNo. 2
No. 1
Pale and Extra (2S0

8*vi*

lbs.)

..

Spirits turpentine, Am....$ gall.
Oakum—Duty free

$ fi>.

7 00
10 00
87

@ .5 CO
©
@ 3 00
©
© 4 00
© 8 25
6 00

© 9 50
© 12 00
90
@

10| @

12*

Oil

Cake—Duty: 20 $ cent ad val.
City thin oblong, in bbls—$ ton
in

bags
Western thin oblong, in bags

@

....

@ 45 00
....

-

44 50

@

....

Oils-Duty: linseed, flaxseed, and* rape seed, 28
cents; olive and salad oil, in bottles or flasks, $1:
burning fluid, 50 cents $ gallon; palm, seal, and cocoa
nut, 10 $ cent ad val.; sperm and whale or other fish
(foreign fisheries,) 20 $ cent ad valorem.
Olive, 13 bottle baskets..
© 5 1*
do in casks
Palm

Linseed, citv
Whale
do refined winter....

$ ft)
...$ gall

Sperm, crude
do

1 60
12
1 45
1 00
1 10
2 c5

winter, bleached.

do
unbleached
Lard oil
Red oil, city distilled....
do
saponified
Straits
Paraffine, 28 — 80 gr....
Kerosene....(free)...
do

2 45
1 80
85

©
©
©
©
@
©
©
©
©
©

1 65

12*
1 46

1 15
.i

1 85

©
1 20
58

,

.

©
©
©

55
60

Paints—Duty: on white lead, red lead, and
litharge, dry or ground in oil, 3 cents $ lb; Paris
white and whiting, 1 cent $ ft); dry ochres, 56 cents
$ 100
: oxides of zinc, 1* cents $ ft); ochre, ground
in oil, $ 150 $ 100 ft); Spanish brown 25 $ cent ad val.;
China clay, $5 $ ton; Venetian red and vermilion,
25 $ cent ad val.; white chalk, $10 $ ton.
12
Llthrage, American
$ ft)
©
Lead, red, American
12
...
©
do white, American, pure, in oil
16
©
do while, American, pure, dry.
14* ©
9 ©
Zinc, white, American, dry, No. 1.
do white, American, No. 1,1 noil
101
9* ©
2 75 © 8 50
re, yellow,French,dry $ 100 B>
do
10
groun.inoil
$ lb
9* ©
1 50 ©
Spanish brow a dry
$ 100 ft)
do
9
8 @
ground in oil.$ lb
Paris white, No. 1
3 50 © 8 75
$ 100 lbs
do
do Am
$ 100 lbs
©
Whiting, American
2* ©
2f
1 30 @ 1 35*
Vermilion, Chinese
lb
..

j*
.

.

.

©

1 50
2 00

free.

Spruce, Eastern
$ M feet
20 00
Southern Pine....55 00

©
@
@
@
@
@

8 0 i

..

@

Lime—Duty; 10 $ cont ad val.
Rockland, common
$ bbl.
do

20
25
23
25

....

$ ft)

-.

20

18
18

Cedar, Nuevitas

do

8 00
3 50

Galena

©
@

14* @

Mexican

do
do
do

75

..

Mansanilla
Honduras

@

17

Nue vitas

do

95
nominal.

do

50

.

Molasses—Duty: 8 cents $ gallon.
$ ft)

do

Rosewood—Duty

Mahogany, St. Domingo, crotches,
$ foot
do
St. Domingo, ordinary
logs
do
Port-au-Platt, crotches.
do
Port-au-Platt, logs

Rosewood, Rio Janeiro

frke.

Bengal

do

00

@125 00
@?00 00
@250 00

wood)
75
70
60

00
00
00

§200 00

Maliograny, Cedar,

..

Rubber—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.
Para, Fine...,
$ B>
72* @
Para/ Medium
65 @

00
00
00

.

$ M.

free.

India

Rosewood and
• •

Red

©.
@15 00

Lumber, Wood*, Stave*, Etc.—Duty
Lumber, 20 $ cent ad val.; Staves, 10 $ cent ad val.;

©
©
©

©

#

@ 80
@ 83
@100
@
@ 65
@ 90
@ 70
@ 40

00
06
00
00
00
00

hhd., extra
hhd., heavy
hhd., light

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

10

ft).

do
15
18

do
do

23
16
.

00
00

HEADING—white oak, hhd

20

©

©

9

P gallon.
gall.

Hide*—Duty, all kinds, Dry or Salted, and Skins,
10 $ cent ad val.
Hides are in some request but prices favor buyers.
Di
>ry Hides—
Buenos Avres
Montevideo
Rio Grande
Orinoco
California

do

do

@230 00
@350 00
@150 00
@
@
10*

840 00
120 00

(gold)

(gold)

Calcutta, city sl’ter.

Oak, Slaughter,light

220 00

Russia, Clean
Jute
Manila
Sisal

©

14

exti a
pipe, heavy
pipe, light
pipe, culls

do
do

25
25
16

30

Hemp—Duty, Russian, $40; Manila, $25; Jnte,
$15; Italian, $40; Sunn and Sisal, $15 $ ter; and
Tampico, 1 cent $ ft).
American, Dressed
$ ton 325 00 @335 00
do

24

25
29
80
4
55
80
65
85
100

,

••

do

*

STAVES—
White oak, pipe,

m m

23 @

.

Pipe and Sheet

Hair—Duty

free.
Rio Grande, mixed. .(cash)..

} cash.
do

.

,

.

..

00

25
00
80
90

24x39 inches 6 cents $ square
oot; above that, and not exceeding 24x60 inches, 20
cents $ square foot; all above that, 40 cents $ square
oot; on unpolished Cylinder, Crown, and Common
Window, not exceeding 10x15 inches square, 1*; over
hat, and not over 16x24,2; over that, and not over
24x30, 2*; all over that, 3 cents $ 2).
and not

arger

Kip .$

,

..

.

.

-

Maple and Birch

.

..

East India Stock—

00 @ 7 00
40 @ 1 00
40 @ 1 00
10 @
20
00 @ 5 00
00 @50 00
00 @ 6 00
00 @ 2 00
50 @ 1 00
00 @ 2 50

65 @
75 @
35 @
8

50

10 @

White

do

@ 1 50

@
@
@
20 @

«0

Skunk, Black
do
Striped

25

00 @ 1 25
00 @10 00

00
10
00

5 00 @ S 00

Opossum

B. A. & Rio Gr.

50 @ 8 00
00 @
50

1 50 @ 3 00
3 00 @ 6 00
10 @
35

Musk rat,
Otter

do
do
Upper Leather Stock—

8*
8*
8*

..

i. do
do

City

No. 1.

.$ skin 5 00 @15 00

..

brown.

Jo

1 *0
1 25

Western.

©
8 ©
©
©
©
©

do
do
do

.

Furs— Duty,

prices.

Laths, Eastern
$ M
Poplar and W. wood B’ds^fe Pl’k.
Cherry Boards and Plank^r
Oak and Ash

11*

P

gold.
.

10 $ cent.
Prices—Add premium

11

White Pine Box Boards
White Pine Merchant. Box Boards
Clear Pine

Black Walnut

Buenos Ayres..
Rio Grande

50

10
11

©
10*©
10 ©
11 @

do
do
do

.

,

45
30
18

• •

9 ©
10 ©

do

>

.

15
30

@

..

Dry Salted Hides—

13
14

[May 5,1866.

© 25 00

© 65 00

f

..

do
do
do

Trieste
California &

English..

American

Venetian red, (N. 0.)

$ cwt.

93
1 20
28
2 75

.

95
@
@ 1 25
80
@

©

♦»**

THE CHRONICLE.

May 5,1866.]
ft)

fl *on
fl bbl.

16 00
32 00
5 00

@ 20
©
@ 5
@ 25
@

fl ton
tt>

15

00
10
<>0
49

in bond....

do

...$ bbl.

Residuum

Planter

@
©

are very quiet
Cassia, in mats

43
39

@

42
88
5 00

6 50

Paris—Duty: lump, free; calcined,

fl cent ad val.
Blue Nova Scotia

20

fl ton.

White Nova Scotia
Calcined, eastern
Calcined, city mills

@

..

■

4 00
2 40
2 50

@
@
©

...

.f) bbl.

..

Provisions—Dnty: beef and pork,
and lard, 2 cents $ lb.

1

cent;

Pork hasb>en irregular and only mod rately active,
but closes excited and higher. Beef is quiet but firm.

$ bbl.

do
[do extra mess
do
new
do
do India mess

24 50

*

Old

mess,

@ 25 00

2S 00

Pork, mess, new
do prime mess
do

23 02

@ 24 00
@
@ 29 00
@ 23 50
@
@
21*
@
17*
@
Hi
@
©
12*
@
@
@
15*

..

do prime, do

..

fl 2>

Lard, in bbls.r
do kettle rendered

IS
..

Hams, pickled
do
dry salted
Shoulders, pickled....

do
dry
Beefhams...#
Bacon

1<5*
16*
lli

,

salted

..

$ bbl.

..

14*

Nutmegs, No. 1

10* ©

do
do
do
do
do
Loaf

City colored
Canvas

Country mixed

Rice—Duty: cleaned 2* cents $
cents, and uncleaned 2 cents $ tt>.
Carolina

dressed

Salt—'Duty: sack, 24 cents fl 100 lb
fl 100 ft>.

5*

43
,

1 60
2 7 >
2 75

Liverpool .ground....
do

hn e.Ashton’s

..(mid)
fine, .Vorthington’s....
fine, Jeffreys »fc Darcy’s

do
do
do

,

bulk, 18

.

2 75

fine, Marshall’s

Onondaga,

com. fine.
do
do
210 tt>
do
do
Solar coarse
Fine screened
do
F. F
..240 lb
..

2 40
1 90
40

bbls.

bgs.

.

do

3

©
@
©
©
@
©
©
@
@

,

©
@

©

,

1 70
2 h5
2 85
*

„

2 50
2 CO
42

©

.

4d

bgs.

45

©

,

,

50
3 00
3 25

Saltpetre—Duty: crude, 2* cents; refined and
$ lb

pure
Crude
Nitrate soda

gold

..

fl ft>
$ bush.

s* ©
@

12
6 75

@

2 65

6 5o
2 50

Timothy, reaped
Flaxseed, Amer. rough
Linseed, American, clean... fl tee
do
American,rough.$ bush

©

..

....

Calcutta

3 35

Bombay

do
do

....

©
©

.

i

.

3 40

©

Shot—Duty: 2* cents $ ft).

Drop and Buck

....

fl ft>

9*@

10*

do

1

medium, No. 3 @ 4....

8 50
8 50

Tampico

Matamoras

Payta

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Bolivar

..

gold
gold

..

..
..

65
..

gold.fl fl)
........gold
gold
30W
gold

Honduras
Sisal....
Para
VeraCruz

Chagres

...
..

Madras, each
Cape.'.

Deer, San Juan

..

^

Buenos Ayres
Vera Cruz

(

@ 9 50
@16 00

14 50

Skins—Duty: 10 $ cent ad val.
Goat, Curacoa
$ lb (cash)
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

@12 00

8 i 0

do
No. 1 @ 3
China thrown
Italian thrown

@9 00
@ 9 00

10 00

Japan, superior

gold

gold......
Port C. and Barcelona gold
*

.

35

@

@
@
@

52*

@
@
@
@
@
@
@

52*
52*

@
@
57* @
50 @
@
..

..

$ ft).

15

@




domeatlo.

10* @

Medium

do

do
Medium
do r Common

do
do

ft)s(Western.)—Ex.fine, bright...

50

do
ft>s

do

Fine

(Virginia)—Ex. fine, bright...

do
do
do

52*
52*

do
do
do

Fine
Medium
Common

12*
14*
15

15*

16*

val.
22*
21*

21*

do
do

40

15*

Clear Havana.
do
d<> Cndnecticut Feed
New-York Seed, Conn.
Penn.
do
do
(

Common Cigars

9

17
20

60
45
35
12

15

10*
6

105
80
27

©
©
©
©
©
75 @
©
@
82* @
82* @

85
28

Domestic—N. E. Ram.
Bourbon Whisky
Corn Whisky

@

@

(cur.)

(gold)
(gold)

Burgundy Port
Sherry

(gold)

,

(gold)

Sherry
d ►
Malaga, sweet

(gold)

do

(gold)

(gold)

dry

(gold)

Claret, in hhds
do

(go d)
(gold)

incases

Champagne

(gold)

85
85
85
30
26

1$ 00

95 00
t25 GO

00
00
00
00

@ 1 15
©
—
@ 1 30
@180

6
5
6
5
5

00
50

40
80
45

@ 10 50
@
@
@
@

10 50
10 50
10 00

10 50

@

..

©
©
@ 10 00
..

..

80
50
00
00
n0
95
0.J
00

8
2
4

2
2

75
00
60
90
00
45
50
20

2
2 00
S5
1 25
4 00
S5
90
1 25
25

art 10 00
00
15
10
©
10
10
10
00
00
©
75
©
© 8 50
© 4 90
© 2 60
© 6 00
© 2 26*
© 8 00
© 1 45
© 8 00
© 8 00
© 1 20
© 1 25
© 1 75
1 50
)150 00

©
©

85 00
2 60 @
12 00

30 00
@ 25 00

Wire—Duty: No. 0 to 18, uncovered,$2to $3 50
$ 100 ft), and 15 fl cent ad val.
No. 0 to 18
5@J0 fl ct off list.
No. 19 to 26
20 fl ct. off list.
No. 27 to 36
25 $ ct off list.
Telegraph, No. 7 to 11 Plain. $ ft)
8 @
J

Wool—Duty; costing 12 cents

or less
over 12 and not more than 24,
over 24 and not over 82,10, and 10
fl cent ad
cents

$ ft);

» ft), 8
6 cents;

valorem;

82,12 cents $ ft), and 10 $ cent ad valorem ; on
skin, 20 $ cent ad val.
Wool is quiet, and pices are almoet nominal.
American, Saxony fleece ...fl ft)
65 ©
70
over

the

.

do
do

full blood Merino

55

* and * Merino

47

Extra, pulled
Superfine
No. 1, pulled
California, unwashed
do
do

52
47
88

S8
20

common

pulled

Texas

80
15
82
27
82
18

Peruvian, unwashed
1
Valparaiso, unwashed
S. American Mestizo, unwashed..
do
common, unwashed..
Entre Rios, washed
do
unwashed
S. American Cordova

22
43
42
25
15
85
20
22
85

Persian
do

washed

Mexican, unwashed
Smyrna, unwashed
do

washed

100

2* cents $ ft).
Sheet

$ ft)

62
50
57
52
45
40
25

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

45

25
83
80
87
28

i

24
43
46

©
©
©
©
©
©
@
@

80
25
45

25
25
45

ft); sheet

12*@

18

Freights-

To Liverpool
Cotton
Flour
Petroleum

:

d.

s.

fl ft>
$ bbl.
,r

Heavy goods..
Oil

Corn, bulk and bags

fl bush.

Beef
Pork
To London;

7 6

$ ton

..

Oil

Wheat
Corn
To Glasgow
Flour
Wheat

fl bbl.

fl tee.
$ bbl.
fl bush.
:
;

.fl bbl.
fl bush.
fl bbl.
fl ton

Heavy goods

Oil
Beef
Pork
To Havre:
Cotton

fl tee.
fl bbl
1

fl ft)

Hops

Beef and pork
Measurement goods

fl bbl.

fl ton

Wheat, in shipper’s bags.. fl bush.

Flour
Petroleum

©
©
15 0
..

Flour
Petroleum
Beef.

fl bbl.
:

Lard, tallow, cut meats, etc f? ton
Ashes, pot and pearl
—*

© 5
@ 10
© 15
@

6
0
0
8

8*

fl tee.
$ bbl.

Heavy goods

d.

@
5-16
..@19

..

Wheat, bulk and bags

s.

9-82
..

fl ton

Corn, bulk and bags

20 00

18 00

..(cur.)
(<, ur.)

Wines—Port.

Petroleum

@ 80
@105
@ 45
@ 80

80 00
25 00

do

Otard, Dnpuy & Co
(gold)
Pinet, Castillion & Co. ...(gold)
Renault & Co
(gold)
Jules Robin
(gold)
Marrette & Co
(gold)
United Vineyard
Propr...(gold)
Vine Growers Co
(gold)
L“gerfreres
(gold)
Other brands Cognac
(gold)
Pellevoisin freres
(gold)
A. Seignette
(gold)
Hivert Pellevoisen
(gold)
Alex. Seignette
(gold)
Arzac Seignette
(gold)
Other brands Rochelle... .(gold)
Rum—Jamaica
(gold)
St. Croix
(gold)
Gin —Different brands
(gold)
Whisky—Scotch and Irish .(gold)

Pork....
28
26
80
26

55 00

Wrapper.

Brandy—J. & F. Martell ...(gold)
Hennessy
....(gold)

African, unwashed

U*
14*

28
25

Cigars (domestic).
Seed and Havana, per M

..

128

Donskoi, washed

--

Medium
Common.....

..

and not over 100, 50 cents f) gallon and 25 $ cent
ad valorem; over $1 $ gallon, $1 $ gallon and 25
fl
cent ad val.

50
50
75

9

63* @

..

Wines
and Liquors— Liquors — Duty;
Brandy, first proof, $3 per gallon, other liquors, $2.50
Wines—Duty: value set over 50 cents $ gallon 20
cents $ gallon and 25 $ cent ad valorem; over 60

50

6

©
7* ©
©
12 ©
14 ©
45 ©
40 ©
80 ©
10 @
8 ©
7 ©
5 ©

fl ft)

...

Madeira
do
Marseilles

..

Navy S)s—Best Virginia A N.Y..

52*

11

......

X ft)s—(dark) Best Virginia

50
75
40

Spelter—Duty: In pigs, bars, and plates, $150 $ lb
Plates,foreign....,
:....$ ft)
8* @
9
do

do
do
do
do
do

Manufactured (in bond)—
10s and 12s—Best Virginia & N.Y„

Soap—Duty: 1 cent $ lb, and 25 $ cent ad val.
Castile

..

Havana, fillers

60

57* @
50

15*
14*

Common leaf do
Medium do do
Good
do do
do do
Fine
Selections do do
Conn, selected wrappers
do prime wrappers
do fair wrappers
do fillers
New York running lots
Ohio
do,
New York and Ohio fillers
r
Yara

Silk—Duty: free. All thrown silk. 35 $ cent.
Tsatlees, No. 1 @ 3
$ ft)
10 50 @ 11 00
Taysaams, superior, No. 1 @ 2 ...
9 50 @ 10 00
Canton, re-reeled, No. 1 @ 2

15*

11*

Tobacco-Duty: leaf 38cents $ ft); and manu¬
factured, 50 cents $ ft)- Cigars valued at $15 or less
per M., 75 cents per lb., and 2o per cent ad valorem;
over $15 r*nd not over $3t), $1.25 per lb. and 30
per
cent ad valorem; over $40, and not over $45, $2 per
lb. and 50 per cent ad valorem; over $46, $3 per
pound and 60 per cent ad valorem.
Tobacco is moderate for manufactured, leaf is mod¬
erately active at low^r rates.
Lugs (light and heavy) $ $ (gold)
4* ©
n

....

,

..

..

Seeds—Duty; linseed, 16 cents; hemp, * cent fl
lb; canary, $1 $ bushel of 60 ft); and grass seeds,
30 $ cent ad val.
Clover

18*
14*
14*

10*

Tin—Duty: pig, bars, and block,15 fl cent ad
Plate and sheets and teme plates, 2* cents $ ft).
Banca
(gold)
fl ft)
©
Straits
(gold)
2L @
English
(gold)
21 @
Plates; charcoal I. C
18 CO @ 13
fl box
do
10 00 @ 12
1. C. Coke
do
Terne Charcoal
11 00 @ 12
do
Terne Coke
9 50
@ 9

18
9
4

©
8* @
©

..

II*

18
8

•

partially refined, 3 cents; nitrate soda, 1 cent fl ft).
Refined,

to 12
to 15
to 18
to 20

@
@
@
@
@
@
©
©
@
©
©
©
@
©
©

Sales have been made du j.ng the week at lower
figures but holders still ask these rates.
90 © 1 00
Hyson, Common to fair
do
1 10 @ 1 25
Superior to fine
do
Ex fine to finest
1 85 © 1 50
90
70 ©
Young Ilyson, Common to fair ...
do
1 10 © 1 80
Superior to fine ...
do
Ex fine to finest...
1 40 © 1 70
1 10 © 1 20
Gunpow. & simper., Com. to fair
do
do Sup. to fine,
1 30 ©
1 45
do
do Ex. f, to finest
1 50 @ 1 80
H. Skin &Twankay,Com, to fair,
55 ©
60
do
do
65 ©
70
Sup’rtoflne..
do
do
Ex f. to finest.
75 ©
80
Uncolored Japan, Com. to fair ...
80 ©
85
do
do
90 ©
95
Sup’rtofine..
do
Ex f. to finest.
do
1 00 © 1 10
65 ©
70
Oolong, Common to fair
*
do
80 © 1 00
Superior to fine
do
Ex fine to finest
1 20 © 1 60
60 ©
70
Souchong & Congou, Com. to fair,
do
do
80 ©
90
Sup’rtofine.
do
do
Ex f. to finest
1 00 © 1 50

cents

Turks islands
Cadiz

10
do 13
do 16
do 19
white

10*
11*
9*
6*
10*
10*

14*
Sumac—Duty: 10 fl cent ad val.
Sicily
$ ton 110 00 @195 00
Tallow—Duty: 1 cent fl ft>.
American, prime, country and city
$ ft)
ii* @
12
Tea—Duty: 25 cents per ft).

@ 13 00
© 9 12*
;

do

13*
9*
10*
11*
12*

10* @

Crushed and powdered
White coffee, A
Yellow coffee

B>.; paddy 10

11 50
S 75

$ 100 ft).

East India,

do
do
do
do
do

9* @
9* ©

Granulated

5*
H
12*

©
©
11* ©
3* ©

lb*

Havana, Boxes D. S. Nos. 7 to 9

12

5
1

95

92
87* @
23
Pepper,..
22* @
Pimento, Jamaica
(gold)
20* @
Cloves
(gold)
27* @
28*
Steel—Duty: bars and ingots, valued at 7 cents fl
ft) or under, 2*cents; over 7 cents and not above 11,
3 cents fl lb ; over 11 cents, 3* cents
$ ft> and 10 $
cent ad val.
(Store prices.)
22
English, cast, fl lb
17 @
German
14* @
16*
12
American, spring,
10 @
12
English, spring
11 @
Sugar—Duty: od raw or brown sugar, not above
No. 12 Dutch standard, 8; on white or clayed, above

Molado, 2* cents

Whalebone—Duty: foreign fishery, 0p.c ad t»L

South Sea
North west coast
Ochotsk
Polar

22*

@

90 @

(gold)
(gold)

-

Rags—(Domestic).
White, city
Seconds

(gold)

Sugar has been fairly active during the week, with
firm.

@

..

20

Mace

material change in p ices, closing
Porto Rico
$ ft>
Cuba, inf to common refining ..
do fair to good
do
do fair to good grocery
..
do prime to choice do
do centrifugal
'
do Melado

@ 20 50

21 00

45

no

@

..

16 U0

new

gold fl ft)

Ginger, race and African

on

do

with little of interest to note.

No. 12 and not above No. 15 Dutch standara, not refin¬
ed, 3*; above 15 and not over 20,4; on refined, 5; and

hams, bacon,

Beef, plain mess

and

ginger
Spices

Petroleum—Duty: crude, 20 cents; refined, 40
cents fl gallon.
»
27
26* ©
Crude, 40 @ 47 gravity .. $ gall.
55
57
©
Refined, free

Naptha, refined

cents; nutmegs, 50
pimento, 15; and

eaS

..

567

6
0

@17 6
@25 0
©
©
@86
© 2 6

[May{5; 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

568

earnings. This plan of operating the roads will be of great value
to the companies, by preventing competition, and enabling them to
operate at lower charges with greater profit. It is, of course, im¬
material over which road the-business is carried ; the result will

®l)e RatLucit] ill o nit or.
Mississippi

Missouri Railroad.—In November last

and

the

Mississippi and Missouri Railroad
meeting and appointed a committee to ratify the
sale of their roads, equipments and lands to the Chicago and Rock
Island Railroad Company for the sum of $5,500,000, payable chief¬
ly in the bonds of that company. This has now been consummated,
and the bonds will be distributed among the holders of the M. *fc M.
^securities. The stock is put in at 1G per cent, land grant bonds at
70, and the 1st mortgage bonds of the eastern division at par and
accrued interest. The ether secn-rilies get from 32 to 70. This
gives the Rock Island Company nearly half a million acres of land,
besides the road, etc. at much less than the original cost.
stock and bondholders of the

Company held

the

a

New' York Railroad Matters.—The Governor has

same.

National B ankers’Express Com.

Express Consolidation.—The

the 1st of May paid over to the Adams, American,-and
Express companies, three-quarters of the $5,000,000
which the first named company obliged itself to contribute to the
respectiveTapitals of the two other companies, under the arrange¬
ment entered into on the 1st of January,, by which the National
Bankers’ Company will be merged into the old companies. The
arrangement will be completed by payment of the remaining fourth
pany, on

United States

the 1st of June.

on

Mississippi

and

Canal.—On the 1st of

Lake Michigan Ship

vetoed the

Maya bill was introduced into the House of Representatives byMr#
Albany and Susquehanna and Whitehall and Plattsburg bills, re Ross, of Illinois, authorizing the construction of a ship canal, for
centl}7 passed by the State Legislature—the first appropriating the passage of armed and naval vessels from the Mississippi River
$500,000, and the oilier $450,000 from the State treasury to aid in to Lake Michigan, which was favorably received, read twice, and
their construction. The bill authorizing the Central Company to referred to the Committed on Roads and Canals.
modiiy their charges passed both branches of the Legislature, but
Niagara Ship Canal.—the bill authorizing the construction of
wTas also returned without approval by the Governor.
this canal passed the House of Representatives on the 1st of May,
Cedar Yalley and Minnesota Railroad.—It is reported by a vote of S5 lo 32.
that the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Company have pur¬
Russian. Railroads.—An official statement, recently published,
this road, which extends from Cedar Rapids to the Minne¬ gives the length and cost of the railroads owned by the several Rus¬
chased
sota State line, and intend to complete it forthwith.
If this be cor¬ sian companies, as follows
Cost, roubles
Length,
rect, the Northwestern Company have acquired a property that
Per mile
Total.
versts.
Comp an iks.
Great liussnm
169,1853,920
104,623
1,617
will prove very valuable as a feeder to their Iowa line.
264
13,561,231
66,976
Itigu-DunnUorg
/

Railroad

Consolidation.—The. Milwaukee

and Prairie du

Chien, and the Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad

Moscnw-lijazau

Companies have

Vol«ra-Dou
.2.10 s e 0 \ v - J ara si 0 f

COMPARATIVE
-Atlantic & Great Western.1804.

(322 :n.)

(426 m.)

$•207,303
220,011

1804.

3-17,018

107,200
311,070

400,422

311,521
332,008
406,076

..

410.815
400.080
521.17 4
005.523

220,733

440.044

...I

500,752

I

,ddli

$100,991
151,413
195,803
162,723

178,786

.

206,090

224,257
5312,165

409,250
401,280

...Sep

5351,554
320,879

.

...Oct..
.

.

—

.Nov..
.Dee..

(600 m.)

307,803

252,015

307,919
230,824

2,770,484

4055.830

J une.

565,145

.

u g..

...sep..
«.Oct...
..No v..
...Dee.:

—

—

—

.

.

206,410,7S0

RAILROADS.
-—Chicago

720,750

(G70 m.)
$523,500. ..Jan..
403,0341 ..Feb..
523,744. ..Mar.
.A pril.
..May.
.July
..Aug..
..Sep..

910.707
923.886

710,378

...Oet..
.Nov..
,..DCC.

749,191
510.000

.

;.

(1S2 771.)
$158,735
175,482
243,150
185,013
198.079

243,178

June..

.

707,508

503,401

and Rock Island.-

18047

7-47 0 42
702.002

000.005

..A

—

400,200
408,338
585,(523

480,710
-510,300

*

3,840,091

$273,875

..Mar..
.Anril.

—

357,956

(000 m.)
$541,003
482,10 4

817.830
300,355
421,303

—

62,240
62,240

102,94g
mile, aud the rouble about 79

i860.

18555.

.July.

,

3535,985

uue.

PRINCIPAL

..May..

.

—

355,270

J uiy..

OF
iso 47

30

322,277

a

-Chicago & Northwestern.

1806.

299,063
258,480

81,081

4,591.748
4,173,881

cents.

(280 in.) (280 in.)
$280,503- |$210,171. ..Jan..
207,913 ..Feb..
275,282

.Aug..

..

710,011
731,270

3d

.

.

P/ch.
.Mar..

..April
..May .

738,527
677,025

306,847
381,>10

(257 m.)

(420 m.)
$504,092. .Jan.

£310.711

The verst is about two-thirds of

EARNINGS

1805.

15,000,000

2,005

Total

—Chicago and Alton.-

I860.

1865.

,

MONTHLY

185
73

'..

..

agreed to consolidate their earnings. The first puts in 235 miles of
road, and shares in the proportion of 4o per cent of the earnings :
the latter puts in 275 miles of road, and shares 54 per cent of the

,

.

.

224,980
271,140

331,494
321,865
336,617
321,037

►

.

.

1805.

1866.

(182 in.) (182 in.)
$305,554 $237,555
24(5,331
174,164
280,403
226,251
180,172
227,200

311,ISO
232,728
288,095
384,290
300,707
261,141

190,227

'

3,700,970
Erie
180-4.

6,568,063
Railway.
1805.

(7S1 7n.)
(781 in.)
$08-1,837 $1,001,007
*
947,110
934,133
1.114.508 1,256,567
1,000,507 1,458.453
1,072,203 1,333
1,041,075 1,177
994,317

1,202
1,331

Year

.

.

>

ISO 4.

1S05.

(708 m.)

(797 J7i.)
$1,187,183. ..Jan

.

(70S m.)
$571,536

$5327,900

983,855... Feb..
1,070,434... Mar..
..April.
May

416,588

y-.

4253,57S

p...

459,762

528,972
616,665

4253,797

516.608

.

406,373

460,5753

..June.,

510.100

617,682
51b, 103
747,409

—

—

..

—

1.222.508
1,2*2 4,900

1,438,015
1.522,472

t...

586,904
799,2536
661,5391

ov..

657,1-11

611,589
0153,887

1,331,217

1,429.765

ec...

603,402

518,088

6,329,447

7,181,208

1,105,304
1,301,005

.

.

6,11-4,566

.

1,336,

13,429,643 13,434,775

,

739,7536

7,900,931

1864.

1864.

(251 in.)
$77,010

(70S m.)
...Tan.
512.027 ...Feb.
516.822 ...Mar..

$582,828
—

—.

—

—

.

..Aug..
..Sep.,

—

—

....Oet...
.Nov.
.Dee..
..

—

..

—

1864.

(524 in.)
£256,000
’

30 4,443

.338,45 4
330,051
207.120

315,258
278,801
358,8(52
402,219
40 4,568
443,034
411,800

4,110,154

1803..

(524 i/i.)
$363,000
306,301
413,323
306,213
353.104
402,122

1S64.

InOO.

(524 in.)
$314,508.

fan.

283,177. .Feb..

412,393. .Mar..
April.
.May..
J

July..
.Aug-.
..Sep..

800,083
424,206

484,173
521,636

..Oct...
.Nov..
.Dec..

408,421

300,192

4,868,951

une.

—

78,697
91,809
91,375
93,078
90,576

—

—

—

117.004

96,90S
95,4553

..Oct...
.Nov...
.Dee...

—

.

114.512

—

.

104,587

—

.

.

1,222,017

3,960,946

.

1861.

(4(58 in.)

$290,670
457.227
(511.207

588,066
525,751
532,011
506,(540

625,547
.775,3 50
704,3 5
691,55
914,08




18(55.

(408 m.)
673.504
857,583

733,860
637,186
646,995
584,523

72,135. ..Mar..

140,418
186,747
212,209
130,547
113,309
168,218

106,089
140,943

pril.

853,702

June

149,090
117,013

170,555

223,020

1,9S5,571
1865.

..May..
June.

.Oet
.Nov
.Dee

.

'

1864.

(210 m.)
$178,119. ..Tan...

1805.

(2 42 in.)
$79.7535

(242 in.)
$144,084

.

139.171

202.771

132,896

.April.,

123,987

149.855

177.025

..May...

127.010

155,730
144,042
218,230

173,722

...T si ue.
..J uiy.

156,5338

—

302,596
332,400

...Sep..

—

269,459
222,924

Aug.
Sept..,

244.114
5375.534

Or t

221,570

•

..

v....

220.209

.Dec—

265,154

.No

2,050,323

2,926,678

—

1866.

344,700
350,348
372,618

3,311,070

3,793,005

.

284,319

-Western Union.
1865.

1804.

uco.
(484 in.)

(1-10 m.)
$30,840

$226,059 ..Jan...
194,167 ..Feb...
r...

37.483
42 0533

April..

41,450

256,407 .Ma
—

.May

—

—

.

J

48.5359

...

63,118
50,303

uric..

J uiy..
An;r...

—

—

49.903

60,565

.Sept....

—

.Oet

—,

.

56,871

(157 in.)
$43,716
37,265
,

82,378

—

—

.

*

45,102
36,006
39,299

75,677
92,715

64,942

61,770

.Dec

42,195

37,830

..Year..

•

1866.

(177m.)

33,972
653.862
82,147
68,130
59.862

.Nov...,.

-

''

304,463
349,285

..Year,

—
—

246,109
326,236

412,553

.

.

- "*■

2539,139
313,914
271,527
290,916

346.243
275,950

.

J. 374.5534

$379,981
5375,534
y301,010
1247,023

1865.

278,006

,—

—

f 271,725

.

—

Mississippi

...Oct..
.Nov..
..Wee

—

191.5 >5

139,626

208,008
162,604

268,176

..Aug..

—

1538 738

203,785
202,966
204,726

223.242

..July.

.

144,001

218,236

224.957

.June.

—

155,753

160,299

234.104

■

..May..

—

—

2,535,001

95.843

162,570

.April.

260,466
309,261
269,443

124.175. -..Mar..

0,841

.Feb...
192,133. ..Mar...

155.893.

.

^-Toledo. Wab. & Western

386(5.

4,504,546

$259,223 $267,541

5395,579
346,717
171,125

129,227

328,869

$210,329

251,9 6
241,3*0

221.033
198,135

329,105

413,501
4b0,661
490,693
447,669

.Jan..

237.562

3

1866.

122,621. ..Feb..

95.905

164,710

1,40.2,100

Year

—

L., Alton £ T. Haute.-

157,786

858.500
712,302
580,963

.

110.604

1(50,497

,

705.938

...Sen..
...Oct:..
.Nov.
.Dec.-

310,504
22(5.840

$170,078
153,903

474,733, .Feb..,
654,390. ,.Mar..
.April.

.

.July..
..Aug..

-177.159

$11*0,872
117,485

.Jan..

,

A

1865.

(285 m.)
(285 m.
$5306,324 $282,4 d
279,1537
265,73S
344,228
33V*
337,240
401,456
365,663

(340 m.) (340 m.)

203,01S

224,838

191.648
126.970
99.662
86.4 2

.Feb..

.

—

(310 m.)

106,209

..May..

(210 in.)

JulyAug.
.Sept

712.495

70,740

(210 m.)

(408 m.)

$600,144 $555,488.

88.221

1804.

i860.

$131,707.

84.897.

-St.

-Pittsh., Ft.W.,& Chicago.

$98,181
86,328

74.283

$121,770. ...Tan..

1864.

1866.

C2:34//t.)

(234 in.)
$08,183

178.526

—Ohio &

1S65.

•'

(2534 m.)
$51,945
46,474 .
(54,993

405,510
376,470

’.

—

(234 m.)

1864.

18(56.

(234 m.)

408,445
410,S02

—

(234 m .)
$102,740
115,135

1,711,281

5 Year

1865.

5348,802
3538,276
271,553
265.780
263,244
346.781

.

^-Milwaukee & St. Paul.—.

-Mil. and Prairie du Chien.-

273,348

—

1,038,165

..Year

$252,435

—

83,993

...July.
.

—

72.389

..June,

(285 in.)

.

89,904

3,223,OSS

Michigan Central.

1864.

1866.

(251 in.) (251 in.)
$98,112
$90.125., Jan...
84,204.. .Feb...
3*4,626
953,503
82,910.. .Mar...
82,186
April..
.May...
73,843
June..
110,186
10-,032
.July..
111,156
..Aug...
120,051
..Sep...

74,41*9

..April.
...May

—

1865.

*

/—Mich. So. & N- Indiana.-

3,095,470

..Year..

—

•Marietta and Cincinnati.—*

Illinois Central.

1S06.

—,

Year

—

587,078

689,383

-

569

THE CHRONICLE.

May 5,1866.]

••

RAILROAD, CANAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS STOCK LIST.
Companies.

Quarterlv. Apr 4 ?;.x
10" 113,186,902: April and Oct1 Apr.. 4

....100

.

127 i ■...
Washington Branch..-..100)] 1,050,000' April and Oct! Apr. ..5
4.1-1 4.250i Feb. and Aug: Feb.. 3
BeHefontaine Line
100
400
997,112
Belvidere, Delaware
.109
000,000 Quarterly. .Apr.
Berkshire
250.000 June 7v Dec. j Dec
50
Blossburg and Coming......
■/.:
100 8,500,009
Boston, Hartford and Erie...
97 ! 98
.509 1.830,0! K) Jaa. and Jidv Fan
Boston and Lowell
;
.tls=,
.10" 4.076.071 fJan. and-!illv -Qm .4
Boston and Maine......
11 :lV i 30
.100 3.160.009 fan. and Jiilv:-)an .5
Boston and Providence.
1
"A 130 i
.100 -1.590.0W Jail, a ml Julv -.1 an
Boston and Worcester..
j

Old Colony and Newport..
t V>\vegtf
auij Syracuse

.-t

.

Aug!

i

.:jf. j

;:

preferred.. 50

do '

ill8

Catawissa.
do
preferred

•

—

135

<>Sl,0d5}Jnm and.hi!v Jan

r6"
50

Cape Cod.'

1,150.000!

-

Cheshire (preferred)

0j

Jan/

100
50

Chester

preferred

do

do

Chicago and Rock Island

0*1

I 00
59
1109: 11!
to '
51

/ 1

i

i •••*
4)074 ')(;>

.

p.v;/

413)-/1.11
60

69

2V.

6.00;).00(6

1"0

100 2,()0<MH)Oj
Cincinnati and Zanesville
Cleveland, Columbus, & Ciuein.lOOj 6,000.00*!;Feb.and

1111

Aug!Feb-..5

1

;5

.

.

‘v'w ;'iu.
no

To!-Mo,
do
Tioga:.

..

59 j 10,247,050 j Jan.

100} 1,550,050

Des Moines 'Valley.Detroit and Milwaukee:
do
do
pref.

5.

1

137

Feb. & Aug.! Fe'o. .5
Jam and July! Jam. .1

'.. 109 3,540,000

Fitchburg.

Quarter!}'.

3,000,090

107

108

....

.

500. (TO
860. (H (1

34
6j

90|

.499

.re.,. .44"
.4(.!V
.

.

.

high Navigation..

I

!•.’.! I.*!.’!.’!!

70

65u.09o; Apr. and (Jctj
863.150 Feb. and Aug Feb. .2

759,990,
5.S!9.V75r.

Quarterly.'' j
;

1x-3•’|
j.........
IJiOO.ioO.Jan. and July Jail.. .6
Quarterly.'- j
i

j

oOj

..

70

125,00u:Jan. and July Jan,..3%>

.

726,800!

100

167>; MO

;Jan...2

317,050; January

I

98
46

I

*

?5; L550,3!!3' ...7
j
25! 8,228,595!
... !
5()| 1,633,3501 Feb. and Aug] Feb. .3
.100 10,000,OooFcb. and Aug: Feb.10
10()i 2,528,24o|Fel>. and 'Augj Feb .10
50j 200,000 ....
. j
-50i 5,101,OVA May and Nov]May. .5

..

:34
63

141

I

t

100 1,025.000Feb. and Aug|Feb. .6
preferred
100 1,175,0"U Feb.and Aug)Feb..5
'Penns;, ’mania and New York... 50|
138,086
j
Schuylkill Navigation (consol.). 50; 1.908,20*1 Feb. and Augj Feb. ,6a.
do
preferred. 5"j 2,888,805 Feb. and Align Feb.. 6
Susquehanna and Tide-Water.. 501 2,051,000

;i42^

140

do

89
108

April.

'osji

05

and July; Jan...3

!
do
1 >t preh iuo» 1.709.00"’
2d pre1.199, 1,00().(,|.)0)
do
!
j
Wabash and V, extern.. 51!
June and Dec! June.3
do
preferred. 50 i 98t.7!.*o Juueand Dec,Dec. 3)ki

0/ M-frris (f'onsolidated)

.

5.253.836

u

270

1*3*’ 114**

607.111
274.490
811.599 lam aud J uly! Jan 4
Ah-rmt'ur and Caumla
4"0j 2.80;?.i.f00 i uneand Dec! h’ec .4
Vermont.and Massachusetts.. .19(9 2,8i"»),( (): Tan. and July j Jan...2
Wairi'ii
.Vo 1498,::":) Jam and July! Jan.. .3
Western (Ma1
Rtf' 5,027.790,Jan. and July!Jan...0
;
Whnv.'tor and Xa-hua../.
45| 1,141.05", Jam and July Jan...

la

t'V*i

250

.

106

!••

v

.liite 1,100,(3

rsa\v..

Mono'ngahela Navigation...,

107J3 108

Forty-sec*d St. & Grand St. F'y.lOU
750,909 April and Oci ‘Apr .5
Hannibal and St. Joseph
,100| 1,900.009
do
do
pref.. .100
109
Hartford and New Haven
Housatonic
100

1

..

Aug.! Feb. .3)*

.400 8,535.700 Feb. Sc

600.000

Peoria, and

Ddaw.iro Division
D» la ware and Hudson
Delaware and Rariian
1 .anca.sterand Susquehanna

1101

t

10.570,10!)} Feb. Sc Aug. j Feb..4 '

50)

...’.*.’’.*.’.100!

Chesapeake and Delaware
Chesa\>eake and Ohio

Eighth Avenue, X. Y.
.100 1,000,009 Quarterly/ j Apr
590,000 Feb. and Augj Feb. .2D
Elmira, Jefferson. Sc OanandagualOO
500.090 Jam and July,
Elmira and Williamsport
,...
50
500,00')! Jan. and July!’Jam. .3D
do
do
pref... 50
..

.......’ pi 1;

.

CitnnL

Dubuque and Sioux City
100 1.751.577
Mar 7
do
do
pref. ....100 1,982480 March
Eastern, (Mass)
...100 3,155.000 Jan. mul July Jam.

100

.

Wrights vi lie, York A Gettysb'g 50

100 1,500,009

’

Erie
do preferred.
Erie and Northeast

.....

...

952.350

100

|
N. Y .190;

vC

Troy and Fusion.i-.iven’ u- ii.....
I Frica aed Black Hivtr
.

and July j Jam. .5

.

i (r *

..

!. ri*r .yarn!

J

;

400.183 4am and Julvi Jan.. .8

5(>j

Delaware.

Delaware, Lacka., & Western

do

■

130

100 1,591.loojJau. and Juhj Jam. .4
J
409 1,5824 6fj ......
%
100 2,316,795 (

-.

eejii »'.troLiia

>yraeu*'"-, J >ingta iltoii
'el ! .: 1 Mill! C
'•nvi! Avenue (N. V

^

500,000!
J
Coney Wand and Brooklyn
1"*'
892.!):t1;!
;i
Connecticut and Passumpsic.. 100
drr
du
p ref. 109 1,255.29;''-Ian. and duty plan.. .3

Covington and Lexington
Dayton and Michigan

.

.

Cleveland and Pittsburg
o0j 5,408,910 j Jan. and July! Apr '66
Cleveland and. Toledo
50; 4,634,8U0j April and OctgApr. ..8
....‘I Qiiarn-riy. j Mar.. 2
Columbus Sc Indianapolis Cent. 100
Columbus and Xenia.
50 1.490,swjJam and J ulyi Jan.. .5
Concord
50 1.500.000} "ayaud XovlM.ly.A
850.0; )9:Jau. and Julyl-lan.. .81
Concord and Portsmouth
100

100j

CuMi! A'-muie (N. V.)........ .199
in Valiev ,V PottsviUe.. 501
Y.)
>,\ 10 -vvi nne
199;

111

105

.,

Rome. W: itertown & Ogdensb'‘guo; 1,771.175 . ■5ah. and Julv! Jan...5
lint laud a:ml Buriing’on..
i"9-j .2.2:1.3.37"
St.#-:Ouis, Alton, re Terre Haul el 99 2.::9(),9i IO;
do ’
do
Annually. :Muy. .7
plV i'4(H)| J.700.990;
st. I.niiiS, J.ich. onvide A Chic.I"*';
I
Sandusky, Day turn and Qiucin. .lot), 2,989.090(k>
do
])•.’•,'f.lnO: 354,866 Feb. and Aug!Feb. .3
c:.*.,,!■,<!'*- Man s Held & NewarklOOl
862.54 j
j
... ..
in-yl! ill \ alley
501 576,950* Jan. and July! Jan.. ,2>s

■

;

Cleveland, Painesville *fc Ashta.lOOj 5.000.9004an. and Juiy 'Jan

Connecticut River

‘

.1! 9'

.

T:\>y. s. dem

S>-

April and Oct j Apr.. ..">

!
Chicago Air LiuelOO 1,100.125 j
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton.100 3,000.000!Apr and OehjApr ..4

482400 Feb. and Aug, Feb
7,000,900' (Quarterly. • Apr

218,100;
5(5; 5.069,.!5(i;Ja

.

69L
prof..100|l2.99i.Ti<i}.iu!’e Sc Pec.;Juno..3V! 1241

Cincinnat i and

J

-

! "7"!

January.

8,609,C001 Jan. and ilnhyJan..

'50.20,('»H).(»HLMay and Nov May. .5

BaUimoreCentlOOj

aim

Sn-atn a; i and Wiot"ha!l.7v. 1 Pit land

!

1

•

*

5
.5
.5
.

'

4,*;-

1

871,900

Mai/
lou 1,783,2;)!" Mar and Sep. Mar.

1(K>, 2,-13540"! Maraud Sep.
Chicago Burlington and Quiney.lOOj 8.-j*0.510;May A No*. May
Chicago and Great Eastern... * .100j
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska
1901 i,099. "00
Cliicago an d M ilwa ukee
It KM 2.250.000*
Chicago and Northwestern
lwjl 160.927
do

:

i

591 2,290.00; i j Feb.
Aug
1( K) j 11,500,009 !• Qua r-terly.

Central of New Jersey—
Central Ohio—
.*

Valley
Chicago and Alton

682.60"

PhOade'ph'a

....

5
; De. ‘05 :
Philadelphia and Reading ...... 501:20.240.6*3'
109
Phi'e., 'reimant’n, A NorrisFn. 50!, 1,47f‘>,80u!Apr. and Oct Apr. .4
; 126
25
Piiihi.. Wiim'iigtun re Baltimore 50* 8,973.300 Apr. and Oct> Get .o
Piireburg ami Connells vi!!e..... SO, 1,774.023!
j
*»..(;••
Piitsburg. Ft. Wayne AChicagolOO 9,8b7.0uOj Quarterly. ! Apr ..2^1*005 H*6>>
....ICO
!’ortland. s.vo, and i’ortsuHuitnlOOi 1,500.009 Juneand Dec Dec..4
12% 124
1(H)! 1,700,000 Jan,and July-Jail.:.4
Providence and Worcester
Racine and Mississippi
.lot"
1 lari mu and Delauun. Bay
...
j
...1(K>; 2,360.700'
15 us-FiiiT o. Saratoga consol.. 1(0
800.000*April and Oct! Apr. .A%

.

do

100
.100-

....

1 —PHhuie’Lhia and Erie

.

v

j

.

....

]! Pennsylvania...;...

..

•

j

...

..loo!
50;

..

Panama (a/d-Steamship).
a;insula,

.

•

4Dg rv :
492.159
'.
10 l.OOO.OO" Feb. and Aug! Feb
1,000.0(!'. Feb. anti
Feb.
Brooklyn City..,
366.000!
Brooklyn City and Newtown., 400
.100 366.009
100 850.90"}.!an. and•!nlv.-Jan.
Buffalo, New York, and Erie...400
40" 2.2150.00" Feb. Sc Aug.; Fe '
Buffalo and State Line
100
1
10(i
Burlington and Missouri River. 100 1.000.0;)"
400 ,4.98s, 1st1 Feb. and Ang} Feb
Camden and Amboy
50
378455
Camden and Atlantic

12,.-rjifH85')!

’preferred, .too! 2,950,500!

.

199

1

100.19,822,85"{

.

.

p'd. Bid. Ask

Last

Periods.

New York Proviuen.cc & BostonlOo 1,508,000
Quarterly. Apr... 3 100^!
795.360 ............ i
!••
Ninth Avenue
.100:
93
Nortliern of New Hampshire.. .100 8,008,400; May and Nov May3&4aq 60.)$
to
90
Non hern Central
59 4,518,900! Quarterly.
Apr.
! 8'»
50 3,150.150
North Pcnu-wlvania
101 il05
Norwich and 'Worcester
lOOj 2,338,600 Jan. and Julv Jan..
•9 1
Ogdcimburg & L. Champlain.. 400t 3,077,000
26 M1 263jf
Oliio and M is
ippi
1 Jan
08
i 70
do

11UD 413

•

Ohio...

:

landing.

Bid. A sled:

(Last p*d.

Periods.

Hatlroad.
Alton and St Louis...
Baltimore and

our-

Companies

Friday.

Dividend.

Stock

Friday.

Dividend.

5()i

1 ui* m
do preferred
West Branch and

820,000

44

64; 1 5

30>i; 31

Q r~or~ non

50j 2,.8*.000

Susquehanna.10o|
100 1480,000 Jauiand July; Jan...4
50;
119^'11034- vv oinmg Valley
100 0,563,250 April and Oct ■ Apr.. 5
lUixrellaneoiis,
494,389
50
Huntingdon and Broad Top
American < 'oal
25
do
do
190,750 Jan.and July 1 Jan.. .3D
pref. 50
.100!
123
American Telegraph
Illinois Central
100 3,374.400 Feb. and Aug; F<9) .5
A'd'.burton <'oal
120
50}
Indianapolis and Cincinnati.... 50 l,6S9.'.)90pIar. .& Sep.iMar..4
.100
.3
Atlantic Alail
Indianapolis and Madison
loo
Boston Water Power
0 Jam and July ! 3 an... 4
do
do
pref. .100
Brunswick City
100 i
Jeffersonville
50
.251
0
Brooklyn Gas.
Joliet and Chicago
40" 1,500,000 Quarterly. Apr.. .14 i p5
.100
C’ii n t o n T i n provem ent
90
Kennebec and Portland (new) .400
1
Ca»*y Improvement
Lackawanna and Bloomsburg.. 50
Cenlral American Trans
109
' do
do
pref. 50
Cent ml Coal
.-.109
6,632,; ) Quarterly Apr.. 2^ |1M2K 123
Lehigh Valley
....;. 50
Citmms (Brooklyn) Gas........ 29
Lexington and Frankfort
50
516,57: 4 Feb. and Ang AUg. .2
Consolidai ion Coal, Aid
lio
ii Jail, and J11U
100}
Little "Miami
50
j Jam. .5
51
Cumberland Coal, preferred ..-..100
) Jam and Julv Jan*. .3
Rittle Schuylkill
50
2"
Fanners Loan and Trust
75
5
() uarterlv.' 1 Feb. .2
Liong Island
50
do
preferred
Ilndson River..-.

,

....

1,100,000:Jan.and JnlyjJan.,.5
750,000 Apr and Oct.jOct.. .4

.

.

60

Feb. and An:

1,500,000

2,500,000

t’5

.

’

*

"

'

.

-

...

Louisville and Frankfort
Louisville and Nashville

1

Louisville,New Albany & Chic.100
100

j

McGregor W estern

Apr and Oct April. 3

..j

.

0

)

P’d). and Aug Feli
Feb. and Aug Feb

3,819,:

j

i

10

j

'.3/' •io'
.

41

)

3s

’1

25

111)
May and Nov May. .4
Jan. and Julv Jan.. 5
198A, 109
1 Feb. and Ang Aug. .3y.
78
Michigan Southern and N. Ind.MOO
A/ 78A.;
do
do
Feb; and Aug Feb. .5
MO !
gitaran.lOO
Milwaukee and Prairie Du ChienlOO
70
| 90
do
Feb. and Aug Feb.. 4
97
do
S 94
1st pref.100
do
100
do
Feb. and Aug Feb..SKI 90
2d i>ref.l()o
50. i 53
Milwaukee and St. Paul
iuo
do
Feb. and Aug Aug. .SKI 66
! <;s
preferred
100
Mine nill & Schuylkill Haven.. 50
Jan. and Julv Jam..4
....110
Morris and Essex
Feb. and Aug Aug. .3 a. 8.2 1
50
!
Nashua and Lowell
42 ■■
100
600,009 May and NovlMay. .4
|
Naugatuck.
4
loo 1,100,000 Feb. and Aug Feb.. 7 i
1
New Bedford and Taunton
400
500,000 June and Dec Dec.. 4

Mj^hig 111 Central

)

100

...

•

....

*

New Haven and

New

Jersey

Northampton.. 100
50

'jew Rondon Northern
10"
New York and Boston AirLine.lOj
Ne* York Central
100
New York and Harlem
50

738,538

do

preferred......
New York and New Haven




.

.

'

5,085,050

Aug} Feb.. 3

1.

1,500,000 Jan. and July!Tan,. .4
100
Quarterly. }.Apr.,.4

1

1

128^4
35X

xo

bo

2,000.009 Feb. and Aug Feb.,

59

5,000.000
600,000
4,000,0! Mi

35

2,000,000 Jan. and July Jam. .5
1,000,000 J an. and J11 h Jan... 4
6,000,000
5,000,009

42^

44*’
175

44 N

l,000.(MVt! Jam and July Jan...4

45X

266“

644,090

500.000}

mi

00 5 V"/<J

50 1,090,090
Jersey city and lloboken Gas.. 21/ 1.000,00"j
Manhattan Gas
50j 4,000,009 -Jamand July Jam..5
100 5,097,600j
Mariposa Gobi,.do
preferred
..1!)0| 5,7744"" /..
TMetro poll tan O U £*
.100 2,800,000
V.
Minnesota
50| 1,000,009
New Jersey Consolidatod ...... 10} 1,000-,000
New Jersey Zinc
.100 1,200.0001
New York Gas Light
50 1,000,009: Stay and Nov X ov
V
Neyv York Life and Trust
1.00 1,000,009!Feb. and Aug F.5&10ca’

..

11

"

Nicaragua Transit
Pacific Mail

.400
.....100

Scrip (50 paid)

Pennsylvania Coal

........

.

50j 5.200,000

100110,000,000' Jan. and July! Jan. ’65.5

Rut land Marble

Spring Mountain Coal
Western Union (Russian
Union Steamship

..300!

exten)...i

Union Trust
United StulvsTelegraph
United States Trust
Western Union Telegraph

Yalley Coal

232
215
145

54

150

54^

Jan. and J uly

25: 1,000,000

Sa-rinaw Laud. Salt and Mm
25!
MVvt. Union Tel.. Russ. exten..l00!

70

Feb

Quarterly. Feb.
Quarterly. Apr.

25[ 1,000,000!

Quartz Hill
Quicksilver......

..ti Wyoming

1,000,000}
../
4,000.009} (Quarterly.

100 3,"00,000

2,500,090;

(

.......

...

,500,000 Jan. and July

Jan...5
Feb

’....!

100! 1,000.000

95

.300.' 3,000,000 Feb. and Ang Aug. .4
100| 1,000,000 Jan.and July:Jan...5
lot).22,000,000; Quarterly,
passed. .60
,50

•

r

..1160

•

J/.

50

.

*

120K|

1

Feb. and

'

•

;

700,000

783,017
24,380,000

•

.

4,395,800 Feb. and Ang IVllg. .5

..

........

6.

j

!

•

1.01 ().()(«»

•

....

t

....

New Haven, N. Load., & Ston .100

June..2)$/

International Coal

1()()

Maine Central
100
Marietta and Cincinnati
50
do
do
1st pref. 59
do
do
2d pref.. 50
Manchester and Lawrence
100

50

Hampshire and Baltimore Coal. 100

j

Macon and Western

Harlem Gas

Fel). and Aug Feb.. 2
Feb. and Aug Feb ..3>;

1

50
.400

Quarterly.

4,000,000

750.000, Jan. and Jrly «Tan.,.5

009 1,250,000 Feb. and Aug Feb

60^
50

570

THE CHRONICLE.

[May 5,1866.

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST.
INTERE8T.

ing.

O

3j

,G

Payable.

5*
CO

•r->

DESCRIPTION.
T3

<

Ph

Railroad:
antic and, Great Western

,

2d
do
A ttantic and St. Lawrence:
Hollar Bonds

do

6,000,000
988,000

Baltimore and Ohio:

Mortgage (S. F.) of 1&84
>

do
do

1855
1850
1853

:

BMefontaine Line:
1st
1st
2d
1st
2d

Mortgage (B. & I.) convertible.
do
do
do
do

do
do

extended...

(I. P. &C.)

do
Belvidere Delaware:
1st Mort. (guar. C. and A
2d Mort.
do
3d Mort.
do

%..

200,000

400,000
1,700,000
867,000
4,269,400

Loan

(S. F.) convert

inconvert..

Mortgage

„„

Mortgage (consolidated)

Chicago and Northwestern:

Preferred Sinking Fund
1st Mortgage...
Interest Bonds.
Consol. S. F. Bonds, conv. till 1870
Extension Bonds

Chicago and Rock Island:
1st

Mortgage
Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton:
1st Mortgage
do

May & Nov. 1877
Jan. & July 1893
Ap’l &,Oct. 1883

Jnl^

467,000
3,167,000
680,000

Jan. & July 1883
1883
do
M’ch& Sep 1890

5,000,000

Ap’l & Oct.

2,000,000

Jan. &

1,250,000
3,600,000
756,000

2,000,000
484,000

1,397,000
379,000

1895

70

July 1898

84

90

Feb. & Aug 1885
do
,1885

90
83
80
75

91

May & Nov. !1863
Quarterly. J1915

Feb. & Aug J885
Jan. &

July 1870

do

1867
1880

1,300,000

May & Nov 1893

Mortgage

491.500

Mahoning:
Mortgage
ana

do

.

.

.

Dividend Bonds

Sunbury and Erie Bonds
Cleveland and Pittsburg:

2d Mortgage
3d
do
convertible
4th
do

Cleveland and Toledo:

Sinking Fund Mortgage

Connecticut River:
lit Mortgage
Connecticut and

Mortgage

Mortgage Bonds
do

Dayton and Michigan
1st Mortgage
2d
do
8d
do
Toledo Depot

Delaware

:

Bonds

:

Mortgage, guaranteed

Dela ware. Lackawanna and Western:

Mortgage, sinking fond




July

Feb. &
M’ch &

900,000

500,000
1,129,000
1.619.500
1,108,124

M’ch & Sep 1873
do
1875
Jan. & July 1892

2,205,000

Jan. &

do

Feb. & Aug 1SS2
May & Nov. 1875

0

Jan. &

1,350,000

Hannibal and St. Joseph:
Land Grant Mortgage
Convertible Bonds

3,437,750
633,600
700,000

July 1885

250,000

M’ch &

Ap’l & Oct.

283,000
2.655.500
642,000
162.500

Jan. & July
do
do
do

-

600,000

Sep

do

Jan. &

1878

91

1904
1904

July 1875

9QQ.Q00

Jan, & JbIt *871

99

100

100

7

7

6

Jan. &

1865

July

April & Oct 1881
July 1883

90

Jan. &
Jan. &

July

1883

t

191,000 -6 Jan. & July 1877

3,890,000

7

Feb. & Aug 1870

102

110,(XX) g

fund

.

1,907,000

192,000
523,000

do
1869
J’ne & Dec. 1885
7
7 May & Nov. 1875
do
1867
7

102#

101#

500,000

May & Nov 1870
500,000 6 Feb. & Aug 1875
i

:

Illinois Central:
1st

Mortgage, convertible
do
Sterling
Redemption bonds..T

6,837,000 7 April & Oct 1875

2,896,500
2,563,000

do
do

o

6

75

102

1875
1890

600,000 7 Jan. & July 1866
do
1870
364,000 10

i 500,000

7

Jan. &

July

1866

6S5,000 7 May & Nov. 1881

2d
Mortgage
Joliet and Chicago:
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
Joliet and 'Northern Indiana:
1st mortgage
Kennebec and Portland:
1st Mortgage
2d
do
3d
do
La Crosse and Milwaukee:
1st Mortgage, Eastern Division....
2d
do
do

1,000,000

7

Jan. &

July

1869

Lehigh Valley:
1st Mortgage

1,465,000

6

May & Nov.

1873

187,000 7 April & Oct 1873
600,000

2d
do
Goshen Air Line Bonds
Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
Milwaukee and St. Paul:
1st Mortgage
do
2d

99ft

8

Jan. &

July 1874

800.000 6
230,000 6
250,000 0

April & Oct
do
do

1882

1870
1861
1862

100
100
90

100

903,000 7 May & Nov. 1872
90

500,000 6 Jan. & July 1870
225,000 7 May & Nov. 1890
1 804 000

2,691,293
..

7

JLooo

300,560 7
7

do
Feb. &

1883

Aug

1892

80

300,000 7 May & Nov\ 1888

..

1,000,000

1S85

7

*

2,230,500
4,328,000

8
8

Feb. &

Ang 69-72
April & Oct 1882

4

855,000 7 Mav & Nov. 1885
do
2,253,500 7
1877

'651,000

7 Feb. &

105
107

91# 92
87# 88

1868

93

402,000 7 Jan. & July 1891

99

:

Naugatuck:
1st Mortgage[(convertible)
N. Haven, N. London dk Sumington:
00

July

960,000 7 April & Oct 1877

Mississippi and Missouri River:
1st Mortgage, convertible
2d
do
sinking fund

Mortgage,.,

Jan. &

800,000

fund

Michigan South. & North. Indiana:
1st Mortgage, sinking fund

Hit

8

1,300,000 6 May & Nov 1883

Oskaloosa
1st
do ■
1st Land Grant Mortgage
2d
do
do
do
Morris and Essex :
1st Mortgage, sinking fund

1867
1881
18—
18—

Jan. A July 1875
M’ch & Sep 1881

1,500,000

74

96

J’ne & Dec. 1876

161,000
109.500

73

7

927,000 0 Feb. & Aug 1883

fund

Dollar, convertible
92

1870

1,037,500 7 Jan. & July 1876
do
1876
1,000,000 0

McGregor Western:—1st Mortgage
Michigan Central:

87# 90

July

1,000,000 10 April & Oct 1868

Mortgage West. Division
do" “ East.
do

Sinking F’nd do

600,000

and Western.,

7

Mortgage

1873
1864
1875

91# 93

■

927,000

Extension Bonds
Louisville and Nashville:
"|rtt MfiVtri-JiprO
1st Memphis Branch Mortgage
Marietta and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage,
Scioto and llocking Valley mort

Feb. & Aug 1880
do
1874

Aug
Sep

Dec|1888
Sep 1875

7

....

850,000
244.200
648.200

....100

149,000 7 Jan. & July 1870

Long Island:

1890

800,000

Passumpsic River:

Cumberland Valley:
do

Jan. &

97#

93

Western, (111.):

Little Miami:
1st Mortgage
Little Schuylkill: ■
1st Mortgage, sinking

99

1879
1883

:

....

80

Sep

1,086,000

do

Indianapolis and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage
Indianapolis and Madison:
1st Mortgage
Jeffersonville;

109#

Nov. 1868

M’ch &
do

1,963,000

Mortgage, sinking fund

Indiana Central:
1st Mortgage, convertible
do
2d

85#

7

•

1st

90
95

90

926,500 7 June &
3,816,582 6 M'cb &
1

1st Mortgage
2d
do

82
82

July 1S73

95#! 96

Huntington and Broad Top;

’75-’80

Jan. &

Mortgage

Cleveland. Painesville and Ashtabula:

1st

100

May & Nov. 1875

May & Nov.

Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati :

l«t

1882

1,249,000

Cincinnati and Zanesville:

1st
2d

July 1873
Ap’l & Oct. 1879

Feb. & Aug 1890
77
77
May & Nov 1890
M’ch & Sep 1865
Ap’l & Oct. 1885
Jan. & July 1876
’57-’62
do

1,100,000

Chicago and Milwaukee:

1st

1SS3
1889
J’ne & Dec. 1893

Jan. &

6,000,(XX) 7
4,441,600 7 April & Oct;lS80

convertible
do
'

1st Mortgage
do
2d
sinking
Housatonic:
1st Mortgage
Hudson River:
1st Mortgage
do
1st
do
2d
sinking
3d
do
Convertible

Aug
May & Nov.

7

000,000 7 May

4/mooo

Hartford and New Haven:
1st Mortgage
Hartford, Providence and Fishkill:

Aug 1870

2.400,000

income

...

convertible

Harrisburg and Lancaster:
New Dollar

Feb. &

519,000

Chicago and Great Eastern:

.

95

1870

600,000

Bonds, (dated Sept. 20, 1860)

-

96

Ap’l & Oct. 1866
Jan. & July 69-’72

:

..

do
do
do
do

96#

-

Mortgage.

Feb. &

1,365,800
1,192,200

Mortgage (Skg Fund), pref

do

1,000,000

2d
do
Grand Junction

Aug

950,000

do

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy:

1st
2d3d

Mortgage

Galena and Chicago Union:

July 1879

1872

Railway:

Great

1876

698,000 7 Ap’l & Oct. 1888

Mortgage

1st

Aug

5

Williamsport:

Erie and Northeast:

:

Cleveland

Sinking Fund Bonds

j

Feb. &

739/200 6 Feb. & Aug 1874

Sterling convertible

Feb. &

800,000

(Sink. Fund)

do

do

3

450,000

Mortgage Bonds

let

96#

Jan. &

800,000

OB

(Mass.):

East Pennsylvania:

2d
3d
4th
5th

900,000
600,000

do

(Antral Ohio:
1st Mortgage W. Div
1st
do
E. Div

1st

96

1st

141,000

Mortgage

Thrust Mortgage
do

2d section

420 000

Erie

490,000
493,000

,

Central of New Jersey:

do
do

do

do

J’ne & Dec. 1867
M’ch & Sep 1885
Feb. & Aug'1877

do

<

300,000 7 Jan. & July 1S63
1894
do
600,000 7

Mortgage, 1st section..

97#

do

J’ne & Dec. 1877
May & Nov 1872

M

s

•-

7

734,000

Bonds

500,000

2d
do
Catawissa:
1st Mortgage

Chicago and Alton

1st

1870
1870

Jan. &

TJ

2,500,000 7 May & Nov. 1875
1864
do
1,000,000 8

Mortgage

1st
Eastern
96
93
96

348,000

Dubuque and"Sioux City:

90

Feb. A Aug 1865
do
'1865
Jan. & July 1870
1870
do
1889
do

2,000,000
380,000

.

2d

do
do

400,000

Buffalo, New York and Erie.
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage....
Bufalo and State Line.

1st

88

Jan. & July 1866
70-’79
do

200,000

Mortgage Bonds

1st

1st

May & Nov. 1871

100,000

Sinking Fund Bonds

1st
1st
2d

1,000,000
5(X),000

200,000
250,000

2d
do
3d
do
4th
do
Income

*85

1st

Boston and LoweU:

Cheshire

368,000

422,000
116,000
650,000

Princpal payole.

Payable.

8 Ap’l & Oct. 1887
7 J’ne & Dec. 1874

$1,740,000

Income Bonds
Detroit and Milwaukee:
1st Mortgage, convertible
2d
ao
Detroit, Monroe and Toledo:

Elmira and

300,000

do
do
do

Camden and Atlantic:
1st Mortgage

Mortgage Bonds

85

Ja Ap Jn Oc 1867
Jan. A July 1875
1880
do
Ap’l & Oct. 1885

150,000

Mortgage

1st Mortgage—
Income
Erie and Northeast
Camden and Amboy:
Dollar Loans
Dollar Loan
Consoldated ($5,000,000)

85

1866

1,000.000
1.128.500
700,000
2,500,000

589.500

Boston, Concord and Montreal:

1st
2d

1879
1882
1882
1879
1881
1876
1883

& & Nov. 1878
ay

347,000

Blossburg and Coming:
Mortgage Bonds
1st
1st
2d
2d

do
do
do
do
do
Jan. & July

484,000

Sterling Bonds
do
do
do

Ap’l & Oct.

+->

S

Railroad:
Des Moi nes Valleu:

:

1st Mortgage, sinking fund, (Pa.)
$2,500,000
2d
do
do
2,000,000
Eastern Coal Fields Branch..do
400,000
lit Mortgage, sinking fund, (N. Y.) 1,000,000
2d
do
...do
777.500
1st Mortgage, sinking fund, (Ohio) 4,000,000

do

ing.

n

•rH

FRIDAY.

INTEREST.

Amount
outstand¬ d

.5*2

outstand¬

DESCRIPTION.

FRIDAY.

08 <D

Amount

Aug

4,600,000 7 Jan. & July 1893
1,500,000 7 April & Oct 1893
1,000,000

7

Jan.

400,000 8
590,000 7

3,612,000
kq* non

3,500,000
300, (XX)

7

&July
do
do

May & Nov.

1875
1876
1876
1877

7

uO

May & Nov.

83# 85

56

59#

1883

7

100

1915

7 Jan.

92

&July 1876

450,000 7 M’ch& Sep 1861

900,000

6 Jan.

$ July 1808

*

671

THE CHRONICXas

May 5,1866.]

LIST (continued).

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND
INTEREST.

c3

^3
o

ing.
Railroad:

<3

Payable.

a ss

T3

S

Fei ry Bonds of 1853
New London Northern:
1st General Mortgage...
New York Central:
Premium Sinking Fund Bonds
Bonds of October, 1S63 (renewal)
Real Estate Bonds.

Jan. &

July

Sandusky, Dayton and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage (extended)

1869

2d

Feb. &

Aug

1S73

|6

Jan. &

July

1885

1st Mortgage
Second Avenue:

6

May & Nov

1883

1st

89*

7
7

1,398,000
604, IKK

! 7

Feb. & Aug
{
do
do

7
7

1,000,000 7

1S76
1876

102

1876

102*

May & Nov.

1872

Feb. & Aim
do

97

1893

1868

94

97

'

912,000

7

June & Dec

1,088,000

6

April & Oct

232,000

6

Feb. &

Aug ’73-’78

!

6

Jan. &

Baltimore and

150,000 ; 6

July
Quarterly.

1855
1866

Plain Bonds

220,700

6

April & Oct

84

85

1874

Mortgage Sinking Fund
Susq. S'k'g Fund...
Northern New Hampshire:
2d

North Pennsylvania :

1

Chattel Mortgage
Rorth- Western Virginia:

Mortgage (guar, by Baltimore). 1,500,000' 6

do
(guar, by B. & O. RR.)
do
( do
do
do )
do
(not guaranteed)..
Roncich and Worcester:
General Mortgage
Steamboat Mortgage

Ogdensburg and L. Champlain:

•

96
94

6

Jan. &

7

April & Oct

1869

29

Mortgage (Sunbury & Erie)..

7
7

Mch &

93

83
83

Sept 1884

Jan. &

July

7
6
6

April & Oct
April & Oct
April & Oct

1877
1881
1901

Philadelphia and Reading:
Sterling Bonds of 1836

408,000
182,400
2,856,600!
106,000
1,521,000
976,800

do
do
do
Dollar Bonds of 1849
do
do
1861
do
do
1843-4-8-9

Sterling Bonds of 1813
Dollar Bonds, convertible
Lebanon Valley Bonds, convertible
:

564,000
60,000

5
5

6
6
6
6
6
7

PhUadd., filming. & Baltimore:

6

Jan. &

400,000

6

Feb. &

5,200,000

r*
1

Semi

5,160,000 7

2d
do
3d
do
Akron Branch: 1st

July

2d
do
Racine and Mississippi:
1st Mortgage
Raritan and Delaware Bay:
lBt Mortgage, sinking fund
2i
do
Convertible Bonds

1,438,000

Ang

140,000

7

800,000

Renssdaer & Saratoga consolidated:[
1st Mort. Rensselaer & Saratoga .

Saratoga & Whitehall....

Troy, S. & Rut. (guar.)
Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg:

.

Mortgage (Potsdam & Watert.)

do
(do
do )
do
(Watertown & Rome)
do
do )
(do
Rutland and Burlington:
1st Mortgage

paid 1865

Sacramento Valley:

^

1st Mortgage...
2d
do
St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute:
1st Mortgage
2d
do
preferred
2d
Income
do

St. Louis, Jacksonville <& Chicago:
Ut Mortgage
11 rt * f T t • .* f r • ' f r ' r' t f»

7

do

July

do
do

7

200,000
123,0(H)

7
7

800,000

7

1,800,000
937,500

7

Mortgage

Aug! 1S65

Feb. &

do
do
Jan. & July

1S75
1865

1

....

|

71fc
•

•

•

.

....

1875

1885
,

1882

Julvi

Jan. &

April & Oct

,

,

.

•

c

•

•

*

•

♦

•

•

....

••

•

•

m

•

•

•

•

>

....

1895

•

•

....

j ....

90X
25M

2,000,000 7 June & Dec 1S61
1,135,000 7 Jan. & July i 1867

98

2§*

'

550,600 6 Jan. & July 1883
600,000 7 Feb.

Ang !

&

•

....

....

•

•

-

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

t

•

•

•

•

•

•

••,

1875

554,908

8

April & Oct j 1878

4,319,520

5

April & Oct ’68-’71

S50.000

6

1,000,000
150,000

6
6

1875
do
Jan. & Julv ’66-’76
June it lice D’m’d

596,000 6 Jan. & ynly 1890
1890
do
200,000 6

,

-—
.

...

•• •

....

399,300 7 Jan. & July ! 1873

..

.

—

73

KX 73

18817

7

:

• •

•

•

88
89

1874

Apr Sr (>ct I
May «& Nov. 1
Mur. & Sep.
j

6

.

175.000 6 May & Nov.
25,000 6 Jan. & July
do
500,000 6

77

76
....

1870
1871
1877

97*
•

•

•

•

t

.

•

»

•

•

•

•

•

*

*

*

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

*

•

%

Canal

Chesapeake and Delaware:
1st Mortgage Bonds
Chesapeake and Ohio:

2,382,109

6

Jan. &

Marvland Loan.

2,000,000

6

4,375,000 5

Ja Ap Ju
do

1st
2d

Mortgage, sinking fund
do

do

1,699,500 6

July
Oc

—

1886
1870
1890
1885

....

800,000 6 Jan. & July 1878

Mortgage
do

Erie of Pennsylvania:
1st Mortgage Bonds
Interest Bonds

.

600,000 7 June »& Dec
900,000 7 Mch & Sept
Jan. & July
do

1865
1868

1864

752,000

7

2,778,341

6

Mch &

Sept

182,000

Unsecured Bonds

....

1865
1870

161,000 6

Lehigh Navigation:

Mortgage Bonds

1912
1912
1884

93
83

101

6

Jan. &

760,000

6

April & Oct

6

May & Nov.

87

•

•

•

....

1876

590,000

80
•

July 1876

•

•

•

•••

«v

1876

....

•

•»

.

Pennsylvania <6 New York:
1st Mortgage (North Branch),

....

9«

i

85*

Schuylkill Navigation

.*

IstMortgage
do

2d

Susquehanna and Tide-Water:
Marvland Loan

1875

do

Sterling Loan, converted
Coupon Bonds
Priority Bonds,

1888
1888

1,764,330
3 980,670

6
6

Mch &
Jan. &

Sept

July

586,500 6 May & Nov.

Improvement

1872
1882
1870

....

6

do

6

May & Nov.

J

1864

2,500,000

74*
75
•

•

•

*

[00

1.000,000 6 Jan. & July 1865
do
1865
200,000 5
do
1878
1,1110,000 6

325,000

+

...

....

1883

5T
90

,

k

....

1876

Sept

1st

1879

Feb. & Ang 1863
do
1863

1st

1st

7 1 ipril&Oet.

....

tt*r

7

t r * 9

Mortgage...

....

450,000 6 Jan. & July 1878
750,000 6 Jan. & July 1878

24

...

80

T9

Miscellaneons:

Cincinnati and
82
38

400,000 10 Jan. & July 1875
329,000 10 Feb. & Aug 1891

....

Susquehanna:

Mortgage

Wyoming Valley :

Covington Bridge

Mortgage Bom's

M anposa

Mining:
IstMortgage
2d

2,200,000 7 3emi an’ally 1894
do
1894
2,800,000 7
1,700,000 7 May & Nov. 1894

(Pa.):

Mortgage.

West Branch and

Jun. & Dec. 1874
do
1862
Mch & Sept 1871
do
1880

t • 9 t

7
7

:

do
Guaranteed (Baltimore) Bonds

1st
7

!

Morris.

400,000 7 May & Nov. 1890
do
1890
340,000 7
do
1880
500,000 7

800,000

1

j

Mortgage

Union
Mch &

i

7

....

500,000 6 Jan. & July 1863
1 1867
do
180,000 6
i

Monongahda Navigation;
Mortgage Bonds

1

Mortgage

r*

....

1889

1,000,000 7 Mch & Sept

Reading and Columbia:

s

do
(no interest)
Vermont and Massachusetts >
1st Mortgage
Warren :
1st Mortgage (guaranteed)
Westchester and Philadelphia:
1st Mortgage (convert.) Coupon
2d
do
,
registered

1st

an’ally 1912 100

8 Jan. &

250,000

152,355

050,000 4
200,000 7

Delaware and Hudson :

1,000,000 7 Feb. & Aug 1881
do
1881
500,000 7

-

1,500,000 7

300 000
300 000

Delaware Division :

1884

2,000,000 7 April & Oct
200,000 7 Jan. & July

mortgage
Pittsburg and SteubenvUle:
1st Mortgage

.

Preferred Bonds

Jan. & July 1867
do
1880
95
April & Oct 1870 93
Jan. & July 1871
do
1880
87* 88"
do
1880
do
100*
188(5 100
do
1886

692,000

Mortgage Loan
Pittsburg and ConneUsville :
1st Mort. (Turtle Cr. DivQ.
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago :
1st Mortgage

7 June & Dec ! 1894

Xr _Tnlr

•

....

Sept; 1S66

Sterling Bonds, guaranteed

92

258,000 6 May & Nov. 1S68

1st Mortgage

.Tun

(conv. into U> S. 6s, 30 yr. )

93*

1876

7

900,000 7

do

1875

119,800 6 Jan. & July 1865
do
1S85
292,500 6

Consolidated Loan
Convertible Loan

int

do

Mch &

do
2,500,000 7
| 1884
1,000,000 7 May & Nov. 1875

Albany and W. Stockbridge Bonds
Hudson and Boston Mortgage
Western Maryland ;
1st Mortgage
1st
do
guaranteed
York (S' Cumberland (North. Cent.):
1st Mortgage
96

7

600.000

,

2d

....

1876

1,391,000

.

Dollar Bonds.......

70

....

1872

Aug

April & Oct

r*

.

Feb. &

1.180 000

Sterling (£899,900) Bonds

1870
1875
1872

7

4,000,000

(general)!

PhUadd., Germant. & Norristown:

n0

83
83

• •

•

•

94,000

Troy Union:
Mortgage Bonds

1st
2d

1874

575,000
5,000,000

(general)

2d
do
do
3d
Convertible

Land Grant

37*

1,000,000

Mortgage

j

....

July 1875

7

*...

Sinking Fund Bonds
Equipment bonds
Troy and Boston :
1st Mortgage

Union Pacific

Jan. &

7

1,400,000

Indianajx)lis:

Mortgage, convertible
Third Avenue (N. Y.):
1st Mortgage..^
*.
Toledo, Peoria and Warsaw :
1st Mortgage

do

July ’72-’87

do
Feb & Aug.

2,283,840 6

sterling

Terre Haute and

1st Mort.

4,980,000 6 Jan. & July 1880
2,621,000 6 April & Oct 1875

Mortgage

Mortgage

Western (Mass.):

1,029,000

Philadelphia and Erie:




do

1,150,000

Philadelphia and Baltimore Central:

7$

April & Oct

846,000 7

Pennsylvania:

1st
2d
1st
2d

7

416,000

Mortgage

1st Mort.
1st Mort.

10

1

do
do

PhUaddphia and Trenton

....

200,000 7 Jan. & July r1871

Syracuse, Binghamton and New York
1st

May & Nov

7

Vermont Central: *

1,139,000

sterling

,

84

225,000! 7 Jan. & July ’70-’80

Mortgage
Pacific, (S. W. Branch):
Mortgage, guar, by Mo

1st

1873
1873
1885
1885

83

100.000 i 7 Jan. & July 1874
300,000 7 Feb. & Aug 1870

750,000 7

1st

do
do

500,000 6

Jan. & July
do
do
do

2,900.000 7 Jan. & July 1872
do
1872
850,000 i 7

Oswego and Syracuse:

1st
1st
2d

1,000,000 6
500,000 6

1,494,000

1st Mortgage
2d
do
(now stock)
Ohio and Mississippi:
1st Mortgage
1st
do
2d
do
( W.D.)

1st

2.500,000

2,500,000 6 April & Oct 1880
do
1887
360,000 10

Mortgage Bonds

Valley and PottsvUle :

IstMortgage

Toledo and B abash :
1st Mort. (Toledo & Wabash)—
1st do
(extended)
2d
do
(Toledo and Wabash)..
2d
do
(Wabash and Western)

1866
1875

1,500,000 6 Jan. & July irred.

;

do
do

m

<

■

1st

1,000,000

Mortgage
Northern Central:

2d
2d

M
.

M

500,000 7 June & Dec 1867

Staten Island:
1st Mortgage

i

3,000,000

1,290,000

Mortgage

Shamokin
91

2.925,000 i 6. June & Dec 1887
165,000 6 May & Nov. 1S83
do
1883
663,000 6

....

1st

1st

T3

'd

•H

1900
J475

Feb. Sr, Ang

7

201.500

Sandusky, Mansfield and Newark:

6,917,598
..

Mortgage Bonds
New York, Providence and Boston:

1st

A

1,000,000

do

300,000

Bonds of 1865
New York and Harlem :
1st General Mortgage
Consolidated Mortgage
3d Mortgage
Neiv York and New Haven:
Plain Bonds

2d
do
Peninsula:

Princpal payble.

Payable.

—

<

485,000 j 6

Subscrip. Bonds (assumed stocks).
Sink. Fnnd B’ds (assumed debts)..
Bonds of August, 1859, convert....

State Loans

7

$500,000

Mortgage
New Jersey:

1st

ing.
Railroad:

1st

Panama:
1st Mortgage,

Description.

m

,

New Haven and Northampton:

1st
2d
3d
3d

Amount
outstand¬ 6

.

Amount

outstand¬

Description.

FRIDAY.

INTEREST.

FRIDAY.

r-*

do

1st

Mortgage

QuicksUver Minitig ;
76

1st
2d

Mortgage
do

Western Union

1st Mortgage

•

•

•

7

Jan. &

July

1884

•

»

•

•

*

•

i

1,500,000 7 Tan. & July 18—
2,000,000 7 April & Oci *8
*

Pennsylvania Coal:
90
79
73

•

600 (MX)

500,00(
0,00i

Telegraph;

2,000,000'

Feb. & Ang

1871

*

June & Dec

n

Ian. & July

1873
1879

7

7

F$n. #

July W-tB

....

•

•

•

•

•• •

•

*»>♦

THE

572

insurance ant)

[May 5, 1806.

CHRONICLE.

PETROLEUM STOCK LIST—Friday.

ittiwng Journal.

Bid. Ask.

Companies.

Adamantine Oil

INSURANCE STOCK LIST.
Dec.

COMPANIES.
.

.....

31,1SG5.
Net
Assets.

Mi
[arine Risks.

Joint Stock Fire:
2.1
Adriatic
50
/Etna*

Albany City

200,000
10), 000

Bowery
Broadway
Brooklyn (L. I.)
Capital City (Albany)..
'.

014.101 Jan. and Julv. Jan. (15.. .5

287.373 Feb. and An/.
4 30.000 March and Sep
211.270 Mavalid Nov.
227.032 ■Feb. and Aug.
353.311 Juno and Dec.
20 >,582 Feb. and Aug.

2')o.(;l)o1

153.000
2uo 000

100 1

500.000
2oo.oou
4 00.000

178.201
548.380
318.OS
200.277
538,472.
227,330
401.701
210.081

i

250.000

310.503

500.000 1,532.88s
4 18.200
400,000
200.000
240.133;

250,0(11)

10a !
1(H) 1
.

Exchange
l

loo

I

401
i

Excelsior

17
10

Firemen’s....
Firemen’s Fund
Firemen's Trust
Gallatin
Gebhard
Germania
Glenn’s Falls.
Globe
Greenwich
Grocers’
Guardian
Hamilton
Hanover

50

100

Jan. .'GG .5
Feb. ■»)')..5
•Iall.'()() .5
Oct. ‘Go.. .5
Jan. ‘titi .7
Mar. 'G4. .5
Jan. and Julv. J ulv‘G1 .5

15
50

Harmony (F. & M.)t

50

Hoffman
Home

50

200.000

100| 2.000.000
2.0OO.000

Hope

5o

200.000

Howard....,

50

300.0IK)

100

200.1 MW
200.000

Humboldt.

Importers’ and Traders’. 50
Indemnity..
loo

Devon
Elect ie

00

-

.

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

1 40

...

•

...

.

.

.

.

•

•

.

•

.

•

•

•

•

’

•

•

•

•

....

.

.

i 60

85

Enniskillen

.

1

....

8

Enterprise
Equitable

5
2
...10
,...10
5
....10
5
5
....

....

------

.

.

.

....

.

....

....

.

75

....

50

J

uly ’(15 ..5

Feb. ’GG. .5

Apr.
J Jan.

-Inly ‘(>5

....20

Hammond

iso

.

.

.

.

Hevdriek
Hevdrick Brothers

..

...

.

.

....

.

25

45

1
...,20

Iii'-h Gate
Home
Homowack

....

-

.

.

.

Tiievbnn«tible
O

v

2 90

xJ

....

ni‘?e

.

....

,

.

.

.

.**

Lily Run

....

...

....

.....

•

.

•

.

20
3

..

,

.

.

j 021,301 1
I

■

.

1

1

•

1

i

*

Great Western*
Mercantile Mutual*..;-,
,

Wash lug-ton*.

...




.t;

1

1

Jan. and July. Tan. ’GG.3%
do
Jan. ’66.3%
040,000 1.822.-100
287 400
581,OSi) F-b. and Aug. Feb. ’G6...2

i

.

1

-

Canada
Central

•

95

70

.

•

•

•

5 00
15
20
2 50
2 10

....

....

•

.

•

•

....

25

30

60

65

....

.10
5
.10
.10
5
5
.10
.10
5
.10

•

.

•

•

.

4

Petroleum

8

....

'

+

10

„

....

7 50
25
9 55

....

20
9 40

•

....

.10

..

.10
5
5
.10
100 1

•

•

•

C(

.

80
5

.

Companies.

-

•

•

•

45

10

•

•

•

•

•

Bid. Askd

1
-

3%
5%

Eagle River

Evergreen Bluff’...
Flint Steel River..
Forest City
Franklin
Grand Portage
Great Western
Hamilton...
Hartford
Hilton

9%

.....

2
2
25

2%
1«

...

19
10
33
8
1
2

.

Lake Superior
Manhattan.
Mendota

5%
5

0%

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

—

25
—

....

1 07
4 00
41
3 90
1 85

•

60
00
00
50
40
70
00
40
50
40
2 05
2 50
1 08
5 CO
45
4 00
2 00

La Crosse

Liberty
Liebig

—

,

”*45 “50
*

42 00
....

....

IN. Y. & Nova Scotia.

....

.

!
'

....

i

....

...»

....

15 (0

...

V

.

.

50

...»

....

.

.

..

18 00
2 50

....

....

—
....

....
....

*

*

..

Texas

—

Virginia City.
Waadingham

—

9 55
75
45

4 75
95

5 00

....

•

•

•

5

66

r

5

Denbo
Manhan
Phenix

10
2 50

:
r

50

Co.umbian

10

Schuylkill
Wilkesbarre

2 00

100

Wells, Fargo & Go

v>.

•

•

•

•

>

3 00

47

60

20 00
3 00

4 10
8 00

Express:

Adams

..

70

50

«...

,

50

". ..100

....

•

25

1 05

Iron

-

-

55

15 0)

Lead and Zinc:

-

13

4 65

....

Copake
Lake Superior

10

Sheldon and Columbian

—

Mount Pleasant
Coal

•

.

4 50

...

Smith & Parmelee..

4 25

.

....

......

50
50

5

25

Quartz Hill
Rocky Mountain

i

40

....

Wallkill
3 50

....

3%

5

10

....

-

...

Hohnan

Hope
Kip & Buell

....

....

....

5
25

Gunnell...
Gunnell Central.

....

....

25
O'
50
00
25
0u
39

2
2
2
4
2
1
3
16
2

—

Eagle

42 00

....

—

Elmore

....

11

Quincy

Superior.

Downieville

Consol..... 10

Norwich
Ogima

Rockland

...

....

—

Corydon

....

....

—

Pewabic
Princeton
Providence
Portage Lake

—

Consolidated Grt

;...

...

8%

Lafayette.

New Jersey
New York

....

2
2
5 1
2
100 16
25 1
—

Bob Tail

....

12 30
1 95

10

11 ope

Hudson
Huron
Indiana
Isle Royale
Knowlton

—

....

....

2%

,

...

....

24%
.....

...

...

5

Copper Creek
Copper Falls
Copper Harbor....

....

....

-

Ontonagon

J4 int Stock Ulariuc:

j
1
>1,000,000 3,177,437

2%

Dover

.

(Bufljno)

13%
17*

Dacotah

,

....

4 y,

Bav State
Bohemian
Boston
Caledonia

.

....

—

....

Aztec

.

.

•

5

Gold:
Ada Elmore
15 66 Altona
American Flag....
2'6o Atlantic & Pacific
2 00 Bates & Baxter

paid 3

.

.

.

«...

.

Copper:
Adventure......
Albany & Boston..
Algom ih
Aunita

.

.

3 00
15

60

.

..

Bid. l Tsk.

Companies.

.

.

,

.

.

.

•

•

MINING STOCK LIST—Friday'.

.

.

•

10

.

....

....

....

.

1 Webster
20 j' W.Virg. Oil and Coal..
1 1 Woods & Wright....

....

io

.

....

....

.

Vesta
Watson

|

<

.

.

.

Venango (N. Y.)
Venango & Pit Hole.,

....

....

....

1

3
Union
.10
0
United Pe’tl’m F’ms...
United States
.10

....

....

....

Tygart’s Creek

....

.

3 60

....

3
5
.50
.10

Tack Petr’m of N.Y
Talman
Tarr Farm
Terragenta
Titus Oil
Titus Estate

....

....

....

•

....

.

Success

....

-

•

....

.

Story & McClintock....

...

•

•

•

3 75

2 00

Standard Petroleum....

....

.

•

•

j Sherman & Bamsdale..

....

....10
Island
2
Ivanboe
5
Ken. Nat. Pet & Min.
....10
Knickerbocker^.
Lamb's Farms
'...
5
Estonia & SagcR
1
Libert v

.5

.

.

•

....10
....10
5

Hickory Farm

.0

.

•

.

ITurd Pan

.5

.

•

.

.

•

2 30

1 Sugar Creek

.4
.5
.5
.5 ins
.5 135

.

■

Southard

..c

•

3 30

2X

Shade River

•

....

•

! Second National

-...

'i

.

•

10

.

....

’G5..5
'GG.3%

Jan. ‘(Mi
Jan. ’GG
Jan. ’GG
Jau.’GG
Jan. ’GG
Jan. 'Go
Jan. 'GG

•

•

•

....

....

.

....

10

....

.

90

....

....

•

...

.

Petroleum Consol
Pit Hole C. No. 2
Pit Hole Creek
Pithole Farms
Plumer
President
Rawson Farm
Revenue

lTamiltonMcClintock

-

•

....

.

Pennsylvania Oil
Pepper Well Petroleum

....

E.verett
Eureka
Excelsior
■ 1...
2
Fee Simple
...% 5
First National
1
Forest Citv
....10
Fountain Oil
5
Fountain Petroleum.
Fulton Oil
5
Germania
...JO
Great Republic
G‘t Western Consol. ...100
10
Guild Farm

....

.

.

.....

•

8
Noble & Delaneter
Noble TVell of N. Y.... .25
.10
North American
.10
Northern Light
.10
Oak Shade
100
Oceanic
.10
Oil City Petroleum
Oil Creek of N. Y
5
Pacific
Palmer Petroleum
.10

25

.

.

Kan....

N.Y,Ph. ABalt.Cons

7

.

....

.

....

.

....

.10

•

•

....

.

.

.

2 00

....

Empire and Pit Hole

Julv '05 ..(» 80
150,0'M)
Feb.‘05 ..5 100
International
loo 1,000.1 KK) 1,818,518
do
Fcb.’r*o.3>; 100
200.000
202.018
do
Aug. ‘G5. .5
Irving
25
Jefferson
30
200.000
281.020 March and Sep Mar. '(iG j;
108,350 Jau. and July. June’03,3%
150,000
Knickerbocker
do
330.021
4(( 280,000
July ’Go . .5
M
do
108.108
Jan. ’(Hi .5
Lafayette ^Brooklyn) ... 50 150.000
Lamar
100
300.000
do
Jau.’GG..5
407,380
Lenox
25
150.000
do
102.04s
July ’G5 .4
28 1.157
do
Jan. ‘GG .7.5
Long Island (Brooklyn). 50 200.000
Lori Hard*
2 >i 1,(M)0.(HM) 1 402.081 Jan. and Julv. Jan. ‘GG .5 100
Manhattan....’
lo
500.000 1,078.577
do
Jan. ’GG .10 115
Market*.
.100
do
200.000
300.432
Jan..’(!() 3%
Mechanics’ (Brooklyn).. 50
do
150.000
180.1521
July‘G5 .5
do
Mechanics’ and Traders’ 25
203.000
J uly ‘(55 .(I 130
220,058
Mercantile
200.000
237.000
loo
do
Jan.'GG
4
Merchants’
20 7.011
do
Julv ’Go .10
501 200.000
J ulv ‘05 .5
do
Metropolitan* !
1,000.000 1,045,08-1
Montauk (Brooklyn)
do
18H.05*.
50! 150.000
July ‘(55 .5 100
Nassau (Brooklyn)
50i 150,000 243.107 Jan. and Jul\T. Jan.'GG .7 150*
National
do
200,002
Jan. *GG .8
37% 200,000
New Amsterdam
25
350,325
do
300,000:
July ‘05 . .5 110
N. Y. Cent. (Union Spj.100
100.000
155,150
N. Y. E-putable
210.0IH)
35
281,83s Jan. and Julv. Jan. ’GG .4
N. Y. Fire and Mar
100
200.000
283,507 Fob. and Aug. Fc*l>.’()0.3%
Niagara
50 1,000.(MK) 1.204.030 Jan. and Julv. Jan. ‘GG .(> 115
North American*
50, 1,000.000
75!.053
do
Jan. ‘GG .5
North River
25
400 21S April and Oct. Apr. ‘GG. .4
350,000
Northwestern (Oswego). 50
221.007 ■Jau. and Julv. July‘G5 . .5
150,(hW
Pacific.
280.200
do
Joi ‘GG..5
Park
i;
2iH).000
233.003
100
do
July’04 .'5 100
Peter Cooper...
187.012
do
150,000
20
Jan. ‘GG ..5
150.0(H)
188.050 Feb. and Aug. Feb. ‘GG .4
People's
20
1,0>K).(HH) 1,008.202 Jan. and J uly. July ‘G5 .5 115
Eeliei
50
200.000
do
2s«0.028
July ‘05 . .5 110
100
300,000
558.047
do
Republic*
•Tan.‘G0.3%
Resolute*
100
200.000
do
27:\017
Jan.’GG .3%
200.000
214.000 Feb. and Aug. Feb. ‘(ii*. .5
Rutgers’
r
25
St. Mark’s..
150.0(H)
do
25
170.020
Fob. ’<>5. .5
St. Nicholas! .*
1 >2.845 Jan. and Julv. July ’(i3 . .4
2
150.000
50 1.000.000 1.548,001 1 Feb. and Aug. Feb.‘G0.3% 125
Security*!
Standard
I 200.000
275.030 Jan. and Julv. Jan. ’GG .5
Star
217.281
do
UK),j 200.0(H)
Jau. ’GG ..5 105
20 4.037
200. (H Hi
Sterling *
lot
200.000
213,711 Fob. and Aug. Feb. ’GO..4
Stuyvesaht„
2.1
Tradesmen’s
2.' l
150.000
200.001 Jan. and July. July ’(55 . .5
United States
2t I
352.800
do
250,000
1 Jan.’GG
.5
Washington*../,
5( j 400.000
088,301 Feb. and Aug. Feb. ’GG. .G 125
Western
377.077
300,000
lot
Williamsburg Citv
5
101.733 Jail, and July. Jan.'GG... 5
100,000
do
Jan.’GG ..5 95
500,000
I
■
r

.

1 90

....10
....10
....50

Emp’e Citv Petrol'm

.

.

237.551 •Tan. and Julv.
283.331 Fob. and Aug.
241.50> April and Oct.
IsO. 750 Jan. and July.
do
108,800
do
550,00!
do
503,880
do
238,808
do
3,508.004
do
238.031
do
424.0171
do
210.380!
do
211.320
223.181 Feb. and Aug.

400,000
300.00 >

.

•

16

....

.

De Kalb

.

200.000

45

....

....

"

200.000
150.000

,

.

75

....

....10
Commonwealth
10
Consolidated of N. Y.

.

200.000
200.01)0

—

....

.

150.000

50 !
25
50

.

101,228
1 >7ax3

200.000
500.000
100.000

10

Julv'Gl.3%

.

....

Clifton
Clinton
Columbia (Pbsr)
Commercial

....

.

278.488 Jan. and

150.000

50 I

....

do
Jan. 'G‘5.10
Feb. and Aug. F.3% p. sh.
5
Jan. and J uly. Julv’05
do

40
39

.

....

July *G1 .4

do
veh. and Aug.
Jan. and Julv.
Anril and Oct.
•Jan. and Julv.
March and Sep

Brooklvn
Buchanan Farm
Banker Hill
California .7
Cascade
Central

*

Cherry Run Oil
2
Cherry Run Petrol'm
Chcrrv Run & Shenango. 5

100.255

200.0'. H»

j

5
10
5
....10
5
...100
5
...100
....10

....

•

....

5
Mount Vernon
,c 5
National
.10
New England
New York
5
N. Y. & Alleghany
New York& Kent’y Oil.100
r
New York& Kent’y Pet.
5
New York •& Newark..
5
N. Y. & Philadel

....

211.4 18

150.000

(Bklyn) in |

....

....

..

150.000
50.000
20 1.000

St'k(Meridian)KK)

....20

....

10

.10
.10

j Mingo

...

•

....

Monon^ahela

July. Jan. ‘GG .5
Jan ‘t;<)..3>; io6
do
J ulv 'Go .5
do
305.050
do
Jan. ‘GG .5
102.281 May and Nov. May
G 06
250,002 Jan. and July. Jan. ‘GO .G 100
Jan. ‘GG .5 115
do
707.073

200,000

3o|1

Exchange

July

■108. 108 April and Oct. Apr. ‘GG..5
253.225 •Ian. and Julv. Jan. ‘(Hi. .5
Jau 'GG
.5
do
300,424
180.0 i i Feb. and Aug.

300.'ton
200,000

501|

Eagle T
Empire City
Ear. Joint

Jan. and

■

Continental*

Aug. ’(i5..4
Dec. '(15.. .0
Feb. ’iib..5

Aug. ‘Go.10

do

278,380

Feb. ’til!...5
Alar. ’GO. .5

210 002

1500)00
300.000
210.000

2< 1

.!..10

•

2

.

Montana

.

200.000
800. (KK)
200.000

25
25
17

r,

•

....

....

! Marietta
i Mercantile
1 Mineral Point

....

....

Blood Farm.
Bradley Oil

115
-130,01*2 Jan. and July. Jan. ')>;>..
233.020 -fan. and Julv. Jan. •<;fj3>;

3i*0.OtH)

25

....

■

•

.10

| Maple Grove
I Maple Shade of N. Y

....

..

10

par

! Manhattan

....

-

July.

250.000

j
1

....

.

Bergen Coal and Oil.
Black Creek

500.0: *0

7i !
Too

Clinton
Columbia*
Commerce.
Commerce (Albany)..
Commercial
Commonwealth.

paid.

2*00,000
200,000

200.000

......

City

r-t

Anderson
Beech Hill
Beckman
Bennehoff
Benuehoff

....

....

McClintockville

McElhenny
! McKinley

...100
....10
..10
5
....10
2
& Pithole.
....10 11 25 11 50
Run

ISO 4S()

!

Central Park.
Citizens’

Croton

w>

150 000
200 000

100

American*
American Exchange...
Arctic
Astor
Atlantic (Brooklyn)
Haiti c
Eeekman

Corn

^

Last

Periods.

313.775 Jan. and
233.301
do
250.250

$300,000

Agricultural, (Waiert'n). 5
80
Albany

'

dividend.

7 ... ~

v

Dating, and thus (1) write Capital.

!

10

par

Alleghany
Allen Wright

Bid. Ask.

Companies.

....

1 15

..

nriseeU ancou ««

llvi
Quicksilver,.,

par.10054 00

utland Mart

Saginaw, L. i

& M.

54 25

THE CHRONICLE.

May 5, J866.]

5?8
Miscellaneous.

4

t

E. R. Mudge, Sawyer&Co.
No. 35 & 37 i’AKK
AGENTS

permanent

policies-

PEACE,

Y.,

FOR

WASHINGTON MILLS,

Clsicopec Manufacturing Co.,

SARATOGA
Victory Manufacturing Co., and
BURLING POX WOOLEN CO.

METROPOLITAN

Tracy, Irwin Sc Go.,
NO. 400

COMPANY,

INSURANCE

BROADWAY,

IMPORTERS A\D JOBBERS
OF

Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods,
108

AND

110

YORK.

NEW

BROADWAY,

including

a

superb stock of

DRESS

GOODS,

AND

Cash

Capital,

-

-

-■

-

-

-

$i,000,000

1866,

-

-

00

NEW

•«

,

Assets, Jan. i,

HOSIERY and WHITE GOODS.

-

1,645,98498

SKIRT,

1866.

J. W. Bradley’s
DUPLEX ELLIPTIC.

Manufactured solely bv

WESTS, BRADLEY Jb CARY, 97 Chambers Street.
79 Sc 81 Reade Street, N. Y.

Metropolitan Insurance Company of New York, being convinced of the great convenience and
safety of the system of Deposit Insurance, so long and successfully practised in Europe, and in some of
the other States of the Union, has decided to adopt the same in its own business, whenever it may be
The

desired

DIVIDEND.

.

by the party seeking insurance.

the

confined to dwelling liouses exclusively,

Tills mode of Insuring will be
And will be conducted

on

the

foliowing plan

The assured is required, on the issuing of the policy, to deposit with
agreed on, not to exceed the aggregate of ten annual premiums, which

REGAINS

AS

Fulton National Bank

;

P E R M A N E NT

A

has declared

the Company such sum as may be

a

dividend of Five Per r’ent out of the

earnings of the last six months, payable to the stock¬
holders on and after May 1st. (The Bank assumes
the Government tax.)
Transfer books closed till May 2. Bv order,
R. H. HAYDOCK, Cashier.

DEPOSIT

long as the property stands and the party desires to continue the insurance. If the property he sold, it
provided that tne insurance shall still hold good for sixty days longer in order to give time to make the
necessary change in the policy.
so

is

Whenever the assured shall elect to terminate the insurance, or the same shall he
above mentioned, the assured will be entitled to receive hack the whole sum
per cent, which, with the interest, constitutes the premium reserved by the Company.
as

Henry A. Smythe, W. H. Foster, W.H. Sanford,
President.
Cashier.
Asst. Cashier.
The Central National Bank
)
Of the City of New York, v
New York. April 19, 1866.
j

terminated by sale
deposited, less live

DIVIDEND.
A dividend of SIX (0) PER CENT,
*

has been this
day declared out of the profits of the last six months,
payable, free from Government tax, on thglstday
of May next.

The Company reserves to itself, as heretofore, the right to cancel any risk, on due notice, in which case
the whole deposit, without any deduction, will be returned to the assured. This right can be waived by
the Company when parties going abroad desire to secure against change.
An

The transfer hooks will he closed from the 25th
inst. to May 1, inclusive, f
HENRY A. SMYTHE,
President.

example of the practical working of this system is here presented:

Mr. Smith has

a

house which he desires to insure for $5,000, the annual premium on that sum $12 50,
this sum, deposited with the Company, makes the insurance jierpetual, with¬

ten years’ premium is $125 ;
out further payment of any

THE AMERICAN EXCHANGE NA¬
TIONAL BANK, New York, April 20, 1866.-A
Semi-annual DIVIDEND of FIVE PER CENT, has
been declared, payable, free of government tax, on
and after the first -day of May next.
The Transfer
Books will he closed on the 21st inslnnt fmd reopen¬
on the 2d day of May.
ed
E. WILSON, Cashier.

kind.

When the property is sold, or the assured desires to ahondon the insurance, he applies to the Company
and receives hack $118 75 of the $125. If the Company elects to cancel he receives liis whole $125, and the

bargain is at an end.
The advantages of this method of insuring, in the case of dwellings, where permanent security is
especially desirable, rendering unnecessary the constant watchfulness now required, in order to prevent a
policy from lapsing, at an unlucky moment, cannot fail to he perceived and appreciated here, even more
than elsewhere. The immense amo-mt of dwelling property in this city, forming, in many cases, the
hulk of great estates, must find this system especially valuable for its permanency and safety.

Bankers, Merchants,
And others should send

by the
EXPRESS, 65 Broadway,
they have unsurpassed facilities for the rapid and

IIARNDEN
When insurance must be renewed frrvm year to year, the best memories may sometimes fail, and then
property on which families depend for their sole support may disappear in an hour—once made, insurance
by deposit need never to be remembered again, except where circumstances call ior its discontinuance.

as

safe forwarding of
GOLD .SILVER, JEWELRY, & MERCHANDISE
of every description. Also for the collection of notes
drafts hud hills, bills accompanying M-oods, etc.

It keeps alive without watching.. Insurance by this method is obviously cheaper as well as more secure.
Thus,$5,000 coats,say $1250 per annum, ona first class dwelling; while on|$125 ( the amount to he deposited)
the interest at seven per cent, is but $875. If the risk runs in this way ten years, the Company gets $8 75

{>er annum forinsuring $5,000, and at the premium $9 37. being five per cent, retained when
reclaimed—making the average annual end $6 25 more,
s

We have no doubt.that as fast as this simple and convenient
commend itself to all insurers of dwellings that few will think

REAL

the deposit

M

system becomes understood, it will so fully

on

WILLIAM K STRONG,
JOHN

ROBERT MI C. GRAHAM;
EDWARD A. STANSBURY,

BROADWAY,

GRANT,

NEW

YORK.

Agent for the sale of Landed Estates, Mines, Tobacco
and Cotton Lands in Virginia, Tennessee, North and
South Carolina, Georgia, Ac., now offers properties
of great value, many of which cover Gold, Copper,
Lead, Plumbago, Iron, and Coal Mines, Waterpower, and Mineral Springs. The fullest informa¬
tion with regard to the "above may he obtained
through this oiliee.
References : Messrs. Gilman, Son & Co., M. K.
Jesup & Co., Phelps, Dodge & Co., A. R. Wetmore
& Co
Satterlee & Co., Latbrop, Ludington & Co.,
Wilson G. Hunt, Esq., John Torrey, M. D., U. S.
Assay Ollice.

DIRECTORS:

GRAHAM,

Bureau.

HASTINGS

S.
70

explanations of the working of this plan, under every variety of circumstances, will be furnished
application to the Company.

JAMES LORIMER

ining

of protecting them on any other plan.

Full

ESTATE
AND

„

C, HENDERSON,

GUSTAVUS A. CONOVER,

,

VARNfJAt.
R. MoILvaIne,

JOSEPH B.

B0 W2S

MARTIN BATES,

-

PASCHAL W. TURNEY,

FREDERICK H. WOLCOTT,
HENRY PARISH,
DUDLEY B. FULLER,
JOHN A. GRAHAM,
GILBERT L. BEECKMAN;
CHARLES P* KIRKLAND,

;

FRANKLIN‘H. DELANO,
4

WATSON *E.'CASE,

LOUR AIN FREEMAN,

.

•

.

JOSEPH B. VARNUM, Jb,

-

^
f

2^”The MERCANTILE AGENCY of R. G. DUN
just issued a new and closely revised

EDWARD MACOMBER,
J. LORIMER GRAHAM, Jr.
SAMUEL D. BRADFORD,

& Co. have
edition of

THE

.

with

JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM, President,
JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM, Jr.,

SORTER; Secretary.

WM'R, WibgTrbRTH, As£t Secretary.




REFERENCE BOOK.

names of nearly two hundred thous¬
and merchants and traders in the United States,

containing the
an
'

Estimate of tlie Capital
possessed by each, and an indication of their

ROBERT M. C. GRAHAM, Vice-President,

H?fii

Just Published.

2d Vice-Pres.

GENERAL CREDIT STANDING.
4

the most complete and reliable
guide in credit transactions erer issued.
This work is by far

[May 5,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.
THE

Commercial & Financial
Chronicle

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY’S
THROUGH LINE

To

California,

Is published early every Saturday moraine contain
ing tne latest news up to Friday night. It is

Editorial

First—Exclusively devoted in its

Columns to the discussion of subjects relating to
the interests of Finance and
the exclusion of politics and

Commerce, to

other general

topics.
Second—Furnishes the most accurate information
to the Merchant and Banker on all matters

relating to their occupations—by means of thor¬
ough and well prepared reports and full statistical
tables.
Third—Affords a weekly record, of conveni¬
ent form to be kept oil tile, and bound at
the end of each volume, (half-yearly) and
so
furnish a complete history of Commer¬
cial and Financial transactions.

accomplish these objects THE CHRONICLE

To

is modeled after the well known English paper
“
The Economist,” and is essentially unlike any other

paper

published in this country.
CONTENTS.

THE CHRONICLE is divided into heads

or

de¬

And Carrying the United

arranged.

They

are as

RIV¬
ER, FOOT 3f Canal street, at 12
o’clock noon, on the 1st, 11th, and
21st of every month (except when those dates fall on
Sunday, and then on the preceding Saturday), for
ASPINWALL, connecting, via Panama Railroad,
vrith one of the Company’s steamships from Panama
for SAN FRANCISCO, touching at ACAPULCO.
MAY:

1st—Arizona, connecting with Golden City.

Departures of 1st and *21st connect at Panama

zanillo.
e

ich adult.

An experienced Surgeon on board. Medicines and
attendance free.
For passage tickets or further information, apply
at the Company’s ticket office, on the wharf, foot of
Canal street, North River, New York.
F. W. G. BELLOWS, Agent.

,

FOR

6th. THE BANKERS GAZETTE—Giv¬

ing

Declared and

list of all Dividends

a

Bonds lost

of the

or

stolen for the week;

a

review

Money Market, Stock, Gold, and

Foreign Exchange Markets for the week ;
Bank Statements for the week, with compara¬
tive statements; progress and condition of Na¬
tional Banks, Foreign
Bank Stock List.
6th. A

Banking, and a

TABLE OF SALE

in the United States.

A

special Report

A Dry

on

Returning, Leave Savannah, every

Saturday, at 3

o’clock, P. M.
Bills of Lading furnished and signed on
For further particulars, engagement of

the Pier.
Freight or

GARRISON & ALLEN, Agents.
5

Bowling Green, N. Y.

Agent at Savannah. B. H. Hardee.

9th. WHOLESALE

New York Market.

TABLE

OF

RAILWAY, CA¬

12th. A TABLE OF RAILWAY, CA¬
NAL AND MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS.

13th. THE INSURANCE AND MINING

JOURNAL.

A Daily Bulletin
published every morning and
by carriers in New York, and mailed o all

And Price Current is

THE BULLETIN

CONTAINS,

Receipts of Domestic Produce.
5. Jobbers Prices of Dry Goods for the day.
DAILY

RULLETIN

WILL BE ISSUED TO MERCHANTS IN LARGE

NU3IBERS,
CURRENT, WITH THEIR CARDS PROMI¬

NENTLY INSERTED AT THE HEAD.
TERMS OP SUBSCRIPTIONS PER

YEAR, EXCLUSIVE OP

POSTAGE:

COMPANY,
No.

45 WALL STREET.

$400,000 00
156,303 98

Cash

capital
Surplus."

$556,303 98
24,550 00
DORAS L. STONE,
President.

Benj. S.

Walcott, Secretary.

JACOB

REE>E, President.

HARTSHORNE, Secretary.

CHAS. D.

COMPANY",
(trinity building,)-

This company

$1,164,380

insures against MARINE and IN

LAND NAVIGATION

Risks, on cargo and freight.

No time risks or risks upon

hulls of vessels ar

taken.

profits of the Company ascertained
10, 1S55, to January 1,
1865, for which certificates were issued

The

from January

$1,707,310

amount to

Additional
to

profits from January 1,1865,
January 1, 1866

Total

profit for eleven years
previous to 1863 have

189,024

$1,896,834

The certificates

$1,107,24

Feb. 20,1866.'

THOMAS HALE, Secretary.

Niagara Fire Insurance
company:

NO. 12 WALL STREET.

$1,000,000

CASH CAPITAL

270,353

SURPLUS, JANUARY 1st, 1865

Losses equitably adjusted and promptly paid.
Chartered 1850.
Cash Dividends paid in 15 years,
253 per

cent.

JONATHAN D. STEELE, President.
P.

Oil and Salt

Company.

Capital $500,000, in 100,000 shares of $5 each, par
value.

President, M. W. Wilson; Secretary, M. H. Ber¬
gen ; Treasurer, Chas. R. Braine’
Directors, Henry W. Wilson, James O. Giblin,
Chas. W. Miller, and William B. Smeeton.
OFFICE-78 BROADWAY", NEW Y'ORK.

Marine & Fire. Insurance.

THE DAILY BULLETIN, alone
William B. Dana Sc

NO. 10S BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

$1,000,000

Cash Capital
Assets Nov. 1, 1865, over

1,600,000

This Company insures at customary rates of pre¬
mium against all Marine and Inland Navigation Risks
on Cargo or Freight; also against loss or damage by
Fire.

NOTMAN, Secretary.

The Mutual Life InsuRANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK.

CASH ASSETS, Sept. 1st, 1865, over $13,500,000

,

e

twenty-five percent of the net
profits, without incurring any liability, or, in lieu
thereof, at their option, a liberal discount upon the

5 00

Co.,

PUBLISHERS;
60 YrRRam Stmt, New York,

equitably adjusted and promptly paid.
Scrip Dividend declared Jan. 10,1855,
All losses

FIFTY PER CENT
JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM, President,
ROBERT M. C. GRAHAM. Vice President,
JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM, Jr., 2d V. P.

Hmtry fl. Porter, Secretary.

00

FREDERICK S. WINSTON, President.
R. A. McCURDY, ViceTPresident.

Secretaries,

.

(ISAAC ABBATT,
w. MORRIS.

fTI1EO.

Actuary, SHEPPARD HOYLANS.

Morris Fire and Inland
INSURANCE COMPANY,

Cash Capital &

STREET, NEW YORK.

.

.

Surplus, $781,000 00.

Insures Buildings, Merchandise, Furniture, Ves¬
sels in Port and their Cargoes, Leases, Rents, and
other insurable Property,
AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE BY FIRE,
at the lowest rates charged by responsible Compa¬
nies.
,

If Premiums are paid in Gold, Losses will be paid

in Gold.
The Assured receive

premium.

THE CHRONICLE with DAILY' BULLETIN,.$12 00
THE CHRONICLE without
do
10 00




HENRY" S. LEVERICH.

[METROPOLITAN INSURANCE CO.,

1. A list of Bonds Lost anti Dividends Declared
2. Prices of Bonds. Stocks and Securities.
3. Prices of Gold and Foreign Exchange.
4. Full Price Current of the General Markets and

AS A PRICE

AMOS ROBBINS,

WILLIAM REM SEN,

NO. 31 PINE

other subscribers.

THE

of Directors:

ALFRED EDWARD, President.
WM. LECONEY, Vice-President.

SMITH’S FERRY Sc BEAVER CREEK

NAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BONDS.

served

Board

THOS. P. CUMMINGS,
HENRY" M. TABER,
ROBERT SCHELL,
JOSEPH FOULKE,
STEP. CAMBRELENG, WILLIAM H. TEKRY,
THEODORE W. RILEY, FRED. SCHUCHARDT.
JOSEPH GRAFTON,
JACOB REESE,
JNO. W. MERSEREAUJL. B. WARD,
D. LYDIG SIT Y DAM,
JOSEPH BRITTON,

<

10th. THE RAILWAY MONITOR.
11th. A

SOLICITED.

ONLY FIRST CLASS RISKS

New York,

Hanover Fire Insurance

CUR"

PRICES

Damage by
responsible

Company.

been redeemed in cash

Miscellaneous.

Goods Report.

RENT, containing full quotations of the prices^
on Friday, of all leading articles of Commerce in the

201,588 14

DIVIDEND TWENTY PER CENT.

to Savannah by
Y"ork,

Have been placed on the route
he Atlantic Mail Steamship Company of New
and are intended to be run by them in a manner to
meet the first-class requirements of the trade.
The Cabin accommodations of these ships are not
excelled by amr Steamers on the coast, and although
their carrying capacity is large, their draught of wa¬
ter enables them to insure a passage without deten¬
tion in the riverSan Jacinto, Sat. April 28 I San Salvador, Sat.May 19
San Salvador, “
May 5 San Jacinto, “
26
San Jacinto;
“
“ 12 | San Salvador, “ June 2

Gross Assets
Total Liabilities

Breadstuff's.

26,850 00

-

-• -

Assets, Jan. 1st, 1866

January 1st 1866.

special Report on Cotton, acknowl¬
edged to be the best and most complete published

-

-

This Company Insures against Loss or
Fire on as favorable terms' as any othar

1,500 Tons Burthen each.

7th. A TABLE OF NATIONAL,STATE
AND CITY SECURITIES.

A

-

111 BROADWAY.

SAN JACINTO,
Commander, Winslow Loveland,

Passage, apply to

8th. THE COMMERCIAL TIMES-Con
taining an epitome of the movements of trade for
the week; complete tables of the Total Receipts
of Domestic Prod uce for the week and since
Jan. 1. Also, of Exports and Imports for
the week and > ear of all leading articles of
commerce, with a comparative statement of the pre¬
vious year.

Total Liabilities Losses Paid l a 1865

SAVANNAH, GA.,
Every Saturday.
The Elegant Side-Wheel Steamships

PRICES, on

day of the week, at the New York Stock Ex¬
change of Stocks and Securities sold.

each

Capital- ----- $200,000 OO
Assets, Mareli 9, 1866 - - 252,55*» 22
Cash

SAN SALVADOR,

3d. FORETON NEWS-It is with great plea
se¬
we are able to announce that we have
cured the services of one of the editors of the lead¬

4th. COMMERCIAL A MISCELLANE¬
OUS NEWS.

OFFICE, NO. 92 BROADWAY.

Commander, Joshua Atkins, and

sure

and financial affairs.

Company,

Fire Insurance

Pacific Mutual Insurance

Empire Line

books.

ing London journal— The Economist—who will, in a
weekly letter, report the foreign markets specially
for TilE CHRONICLE, furnishing the freshest and
most reliable information with regard to commercial

One hundred pounds

Baggage thecked through.
allowed

ness men.

new

with

for South Pacific ports: 1st and 11th for
Those of 1st touch at Man¬
Central American Ports.
steamers

jects relating to Finance, Commerce, and
other questions of general interest to busi¬
2d. LITERATURE—Notices of

-

10th—Henry Chauncey, connecting with St. Louis
21st—New Y"ork, connecting with Sacramento.

follows:

1st. EDITORIAL ARTICUES-prepare
with great care by competent writers, upon sub¬

Hope

States Mail,
LEAVE PIER NO. 42 NORTH

partments, under which the contents of each numDer
are

Insurance.

Steamship and Express Co’s.

DIRECTORS:
Edward Rowe,

*

William Mackay,
Ezra Nye,
Joseph Morrison,
Daniel W. Teller,
Henry J. Cammann,
Charles Hickox.

Albert G. Lee,
George Miln,
J. C. Morris,
Robert Bowne,
JohnD. Bates,
Edward C. Bates,
E. A. STANSBURY, President,
ABRAM M. KIRBY, Vice-President
ELLIS R. THOMAS, Secretary.
G. M, Harwood, General Agent,

575

THE CHRONICLE.

May 5,1866.]
J=

Bankers.

Insurance.

Bankers.

Sun Mutual Insurance

Importers’ and Traders’

COMPANY.

No. 44 Wall

49 WALL STREET.

ASSETS, Dee. 31, 1865

-

Keep constantly

$2,716,424 32

-

DIVIDEND THIRTY PER CENT.
This

Company insures against Marine Risks on

Vessels, Freight, and Cargo; also, against Inland
Navigation Risks.
Premiums paid in gold will he entitled to a return

premium in gold.
MOSES H. GRINNELL, Pres't.
EDWARD P. ANTHONY, Vice-Pres't
Isaac H. Walker, Sec’y.

The Mercantile Mutual
INSURANCE COMPANY.
OFFICE No. 35 WALL STREET, NEW YORK.

CAPITAL.

DEPARTMENT,
which, it is believed, supplies a want not hitherto
adequately met by banks or brokers. Returns are
obtained in the quickest time, and at the lowest rates
possible, upon accessible places in the United States
and the Canadas. The proceeds, as soon as received,
are credited, and notices sent at once of amount of
COLLECTION

«

f>roceeds so credited,When notes for whom the col¬
ections
made.
to the parties returned under
are

are

protest, notice is at once sent to owner of the fact,
saving the necessity of calling one^ or more
times to inquire whether or not a note»has been

thus

JAMES BUELL, President.

paid.

E. II.

Perkins, Jr., Cashier.

Lr. T. Morton

ORGANIZED APRIL, 1844.

Customers, vp to the
present time, Losses amounting to over

profitable, this Company will hereafter make such

cash abatement or discount from the current rates,
when premiums are paid, as the general experience
of underwriters will warrant, and the nett profits re¬
maining at the close of the year, will be divided to
the stockholders.
This Company continues to make Insurance on
Marine and. inland Navigation and Transportation

Risks, on the most favorable terms, including Risks
on Merchandise of all kinds, Hulls, and Freight.
Policies issued making loss payable in Gold or
Currency, at the Office inNew York, or in Sterling,
at the Office of Rathbone, Bros. & Co., in Liver¬

"

n

.ssue

on

Securities
on

Commission.

John Munroe & Co.,

ee

Eastern Bankers.

Burnett, Drake & Co.,
BANKERS,
BOSTON.
Personal attention given to the purchase and sale
Stocks and Bonds at the Boston Brokers’ Board.

of

Page, Richardson & Co
BOSTON,
’

114 STATE

,

STREET,

BILLS OF EXCHANGE ON LONDON
JOHN MUNROE Sc
ALSO

CO., PARIS.

ISSUE

ISSUE

Commercial Credits for *he purchase of Merchan¬
dise in England and the Continent.
Travellers’ Credits for the use of Traveller*
abroad.

Southern Bankers.

BANKERS,
STS.,

States, available in all the principal cities of the
world: also,
COMMERCIAL CREDITS,
For use in Europe, east of the Cape of Good Hope,
West Indies, South America, and the United States.

RANKERS,

Depew & Potter,
BANKERS,

PARIS

,

NO. 11 BROAD

a

318 BROADWAY.

The Corn

which may he checked for at

sight.
Special attention given to the purchase and sale

1 $500,000

Exchange
BANK,

PHILADELPHIA.

Attends to business of Banks Sc Banker*
on

liberal terms.

J. W.

DEPOSITS,

j Capital,

NATIONAL

STREET, NEW YORK,

FOUR PER CENT PER ANNUM ON

Central National Bank,

A. G. GATTELL, Pres’t.
|
A. WHILLDIN, V. Pres’t f

Allow interest at th6 rate of

Also Comrercial Credits

First

TORREY, Cashier.

National,

OF

Bank,

RICHMOND, VA.,

of
GOVERNMENT SECURITIES.

$3,000,000.

Has for sale all

descriptions of Government BondsCity and Country accounts received on terms mos
favorable to our Correspondents.
Collections made in all parts of the United State

Miscellaneous stocks and bonds
on commission.
Collections made promptly on all

HENRY A. 3MYTHE, President

W. H. FOSTER, Cashier.

points.

&
BANKERS,

NO. 16 WALL STREET, N. Y.
GOVERNMENT SECURITIES,
AND OTHER STOCKS, BONDS, &c.,
bought and sold on Commission for Cash Only.
Deposits received subject to check at sight, as
with Banks.
DEWITT C. LAWRENCE,
Member New York Stock Exchange.

LAWRENCE,

Lockwood &

—

H. G.

FANT, President.

Glover, Cashier.

BANKERS,

Hutchings Badger,

BANKING

Sc

EXCHANGE

OFFICE,

St., CHICAGO, ILL.
Collections made on all parts of the Northwest.
Stooks, Bonds, Gold, and Government Securities
bought and sold on commission, either inNew York
or
Chicago, and carried on margins when desired.
New York correspondent and reference,
Messrs. L. S. LAWRENCE & CO.

LIVERPOOL.

subscriber, their representative and Attorney,
in the United States, is prepared to make advances
on shipments to Messrs. Drake, Kleinwort & Cohen
London and Liverpool, and to grant mercantile
credits upon them for use in China, the East and
West Indies, South America, <fec. Marginal credits
of the London House issued for the same purposes.
The

SIMON DE

52

B.

36 DEARBORN

.

Drake Klein wort &Cohen
LONDON ANB

Western Bankers.

Co.,

No. 94 BROADWAY AND No. 6 WALL ST.

JOHN R. CECIL,

Butler, Cecil, Rawson & Co.

city and all accessible

(Late Secretary of State.)

Interest allowed upon deposits of gold and currency
subject to check at sight Gold loaned to merchants
and bankers upon favorable terms.

Co.,

points in the South.
S. A.

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW,

curities

Brothers

Government.
Collections made in this

Dealers in Government and other Se¬

Lawrence

Designated Depository and Financial Agent of the

bought and sold

HENRY W. POTTER.

and Canadas.

WM, A, HALSTED.

Designated Depository of the Government.
D. L. ROSS, Presiden t
J. H. STOUT, Cashier.

Deposits, subject tc

CORNER OF PINE AND NASSAU

STREET, NEW YORK,

late

Bank,

CIRCULAR NOTES AND CIRCULAR LETTERS
OF CREDIT,
For the use of Travelers abroad and in the United

Bankers.

Capital

Tenth National

GOLD, STOCK, AND BOND BROKERS.

executed abroad

Duncan, Sherman & Co.,

NEWCOMB, Vice-Prest.
C. J. Despard, Secretary.

partsof Europe, etc., etc.

$1,000,000

RICHARD BERRY, President.
ANTHONY HALSEY, Cashier.

AND

A. William Heye,

Issue Circular Letters of Cred l for Travelers in

RANK.

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

rdc

tion of Dividends, Drafts. &c

Charles Dimon,

AND

CO.

The Tradesmens

London,

Cheques at sight.
Prompt attention given to the Co

L. Edgerton,
Henry R. Kunhardt.
John S. Williams,
William Nelson, Jr.,

NO., 7 RUE SCRIBE,

for

Interest allowed

Daniel T. Willets,

AMERICAN

bought and sold

Orders

Aaron L. Reid,
Elhvood Walter,
D. Golden Murray,
E. Ilaydock White,
N. L. McCready,

CIIAS.




Compound Interest Notes of 1864 Sc
1865 Bought and Sold.

to

Bank, for Travellers* use.
Government Securities, Stocks
Bonds

Loan.

No. 240 BROADWAY.

suit purchasers; and also to
Circular Letters of Credit, on this

sums

2d, & Sd series,

LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON GOVERN¬
MENT STOCKS TO BANKS AND BANKERS.

•

prepared to draw Sterling Bills of
Exchange, at sight, or sixty days, on the

Hennings, Harold Dollner,
Francis Hathaway, Paul N. Spofford.
ELLWOOD WALTER, President,

CYRUS J.

New Y6rk State 7 per cent. Bounty

NATIONAL

Arc

Union Bank of

STOCKS

Per Cent Bonds of 1881,
Per Cent 5-20 Bonds of 1862,
“
“ *
1864,
“
“
1865,
Per Cent 10-40 Bonds,
3-10 Per Cent Treasury Notes, 1st,
Per Cent Currency Certificates.

291
CAPITAL

NEW YORK.

Geo. W.

No. 8 WALL

6
6
6
6
5
7
6

WALL STREET,

35

TRUSTEES.

Joseph Walker,
James Freeland,
Samuel Willets,
Robert L. Taylor,
William T. Frost,
William Watt,
Henry Eyre,
Cornelius Grinnell,
E. E. Morgan,
Her. A. Schleicher,
Joseph Slagg,
Jas. D. Fish,

issues of

STATES
INCLUDING

Co.,

&

Bankers,

EIGHTEEN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS.
For the past nine years the cash dividends paid to
Stockholders, made from ONE-THIRD of the net
profits, have amounted in .the aggregate toj
One Hundred, and Twenty-one and a
liall' per cent.
Instead of issuing a scrip dividend to dealers, based
on the principle that all classes of risks are equally

hand for immediate delivery a

on

VERMILYE Sc

The Company has paid to its

pool.

UNITED

$1,366,699

Assets, Jan. 1st, 1866

.,

Street. New York.

*1,500,000

Banks, Bankers, and Dealers’ accounts] solicited.
For the accomodation of the mercantile public, the
officers of this institution have organized a special

Co

&

ERMILYE

BANKERS.

Bank.

National

(insurance buildings,)

V

VISSER,

Exchange Place, New York,

L. A. Green,

A. L. Mowry,

L. A. Green

C. A. Boynton.

& Co.

BANKERS.
No. 15 WEST THIRD

STREET, Cincinnati, Ohio,

REFERENCES:

David Gibson, Cincinnati,
Ninth National Bank, New

York,
Wilson, Gibson & Co, New York,
B, M, Runyan, St, Louis, Mo,

[May 5, 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

l H. C. FAHM>TOCK,
■< EDWARD DODoE,

JAY COOKE,
)
WM. G. MOORHEAD, >
n. D COOKE,
)

(

Washington aye
Nassau,

No. 12 OLD

corner

of Wall Street, in this'city.

.

Carleton, Foute 8c Co.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS

and to all business of National
JAY COOKE & CO.

Banks,
March 1, tS6f>.

Corn, Tweedie 8c Co.,j
Stocks,Bonds,Gold, Foreign Exeliangc \
BOUGHT

and

SOLD

COMMISSION.

& Commission

Bankers

MERCHANTS,

S
STOCK

.

A. P.

W. GOODMAN,

Dan

a

AND EXCHANGE BROKER,

pro¬

STREET, ROOM 1.

Goodman 8c

Merrill,

F A CTO 12 S

€ OTTOX

General

Commission

ToUaeeo and Woui.
Agents for the purchase,

Mercliaiits,

or

lease of Southern

purchase and slvp plantation machinery of
description—si am engine.-, saw nulls, grist

3f. Now Street,
New York City.

Gray, Mcllvainc IJro’s, Washington Murray, Esq*

No. 22 STATE
JAMES A.

DUPEE,

BROKERS,
STREET, BOSTON.

JAMES BECK,

19 & 21 NASSAU

J. s. Sellers ,fc C’o.,
J. W. & T. P. Gillian,

iuid

Connni^ion

S3 JOHN

.To Capitalists.

Iilcrchant,

Attention is called to the

STREET, NEW YORK.
SEVEN PER CENT. ‘

prompt at¬

Consignmentsof Cotton,.Wool, Hides, Ac.,

tention.

solicited.

Best of references given if

FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS

required.
OF THE

B. C.

SAM L 15. ( AI.DWELT..

Caldwell 8c
Successors to

MORRIS, JR.

Morris,

OSWEGO

AND

ROME

RAILROAD

COMPANY.
C'

Brewer «fc Caldwell,

Interest

FACTOKS

COTTON

Department.

guaranteed and payable by the

A NT'

General

Bankers and Bickers.

H

49 EXCHANGE PLACE,

Galwey, J. L. Kirkland, W. B. Dinsmore, Jr

OLD

NO. 5 WILLIAM

ROAD
in the

REFERENCES:

Galwey, Casado & Teller,
Caldwell & Morris.

strictly

criisigiiTnenfs of

Colton,
Wool, Hides and Naval Stores, by our friends iuNew
Orleans, Mobile and Galveston,
on

Mechanics’ National Bank, X. Y.
Messrs. Gilman, Son A Co., Bankers. N. Y.
Messrs. Drown & Ives, Providence, u. I.

Gatlin

PETROLEUM AND MINING STOCKS,

RAILWAY SHARES, GOVERNMENTS, Ac,
At all the Stock Boards.

May and November.

FIRST-CLASS
Cash advances made

*

8c

cheap and *
DESIRABLE INVESTMENT.
Further information

LATE SATTERTllWATTE
AND
"

No.

ERAGBS,

’

JAS. S. SATTERTHWAITE.

application to

SJ. W. HOPKINS,
„

BROTHERS,

Insurance Brokers*
01 WILLIAM STREET,

W. STUYYESANT CATLIN.

on

E. A. «fc

Sattertliwaite,

ADJUSTERS (fF A\

SECURITY,

and will be sold ou terms that render them a very

STREET,

Broker in

COMPANY,

City of New York, on the

These Bonds are a

REFER to

J. C. Morris,

ROME, WATERTOWN & OGDENSBUEG RAIL¬

First Days of

8c Co. j

o f f m a n

commission merchants,
NO. 21 WHITEHALL ST., NEW YORK.

BANKERS AND BROKERS.

Railway Sliares, Bonds, and Govern¬
ment Securities bought and sold.

Commission Merchants,

SLII*, NEW YORK.
All orders for the purchase of Goods will receive
prompt ailenrion.
CO

Galwey, Kirkland 8c Co.,




\ Galveston, Texas.

Houston, Texas.

Miscellaneous.

(of the late linn of Neilson Wardwell & Co.)

ular attention.
Special attention is given to th? trace
action of all business connected with the Treasury

B. C. Morris,
Harbecks & Co.,

Galveston, Texas,

ardwell,
v.-.r-u r’u-*Burtis, French
Woodward, j
^ork City.
J. If. Brower & Co.,-i
It. B. Clifford,
^-Ncw Orleans, La;
Campbell & Strong, )
Hun. J. H. Reagan, Palestine, Texas.Judge G. F. More, Austin, Texas.
T. II. McMahan & Gilbert, ) a.,„.
'

STREET, NEW YORK,

Itecefve Deposits from Banks, Bank
nd otliers. Orders for the Purchase and
ers
Sale nfGovernment Securities receive partic¬

W. T.

COUNSELLOR AT
LAW.

Importer and Dealer in Har. ware,

All orders entrusted to him will receive

BANKIU5S,

AND

J. M. W

Jeremiah M. Ward well,

HENRY SAYLEs

Culver, Penn 8c Co.,

Glenn,

Ts prepared to attend to, and collect promptly, all
Claims or other business committed to his charge in
Middle or Southern Texas.

New York.

STOCK

FET.

REFERENCES .*

sale,

Lands.
every

Marsh
Si rami Street,

AND

Messrs. Ward & Co., Wm. & John O. Erica, Weston

Dupee, Beck 8c Savles,

ALEXANDER, Agent.

REMOVED FROM S3 JOHN STREET

ATTORNEY

|
Exchange on London and Paris bought and sold on j mills, ic.. Re., of late*.! style mid improvement.
Aist>, railroad <-<juipm»*er and supplies purchased
Commission—also Gold Stocks, Bonds, and Gold.
and forwarded without delav.
GOODMAN & MERRILL,
references and securities.
&

JAMES A.

New York.

Will

No. 30 PINE

2-14^391 43

;

AGENCY,

J. M. Wardwell,

Special attest ion-given to consignment s of Cotton,

,

Liabilities,

MERRILL, Jr.,

Mississippi.

I. F. Green, Chs. M. McGhee

W

.

DIRECTORS,
Joseph OnuRcn
Drayton Hillyer, Robert Buele,
Tnos. A. Alexander,
Ebenkzkr Flower,
Walter Kknky,
Elipiialet A. Bulkeley,
Chas. II. Brainard,
Roland Mather,
William F. Tuttle,
Samuel S. Ward,
George Roberts,
Austin Dunham,
Thomas K. Brace,
Gustavu* F. Davis,
Erastus Collins,
Edwin D. Morgan, of New York.
Assets. Jan. 1,186(3,
$1,067,455 80

TO 15 CLIfF ST

Stocks, Bonds and Governments bought and, sold
exclusively on Commission.
Columbus Powell,

Tobacco, raid other

Consignment;? of Cotton,
duce solicited.

President

No. 62 Wall Street.

promptly and carefully attended to.

Orders

STREET, NEW YORK.

BROAD

33

$3,000,000

NOS. 33 BROAD STREET AND 86 NEW STREET.

POWELL, GIS.EE\f <fc CO.

1819.

THOMAS A. ALEXANDER,
LUCIUS J. 1IENDEE, Secretary.

NEW YORK

Office, No. 29.
C.

INCORPORATED

Capital

SIERfllANTS.

COMMISSION

■

✓

Hartford, Conn.

and

ADOLPHUS M. CORN.
DAVID TWEEDIE,
Members of the New York Gold Exchange.
EDWIN I). FOSTER.
Member of the Noav York Stock Exchange.

BEOKER,

AND .STOCK

EXCHANGE

Co.«

Insurance

ZEtna

.

(FORMERLY OF NEW .ORLEANS.)

Securities,

on

Davis,

R. M.

STREET, NEW YORK.

and Government

JOHN E. KAIIL, Secretary.

STREETS.

Consignments and orders solicited.
CARLETON, FOUTE & CO.
New York, Feb. 1, 1366.
References—Duuean, Sherman & Co., Bankers,.
New York; I. B. Ru tland, Hill &; Co.. Bankers, New
York: Third National Bank, St. Louis, Mo.; Hon.
Thos. II. Yeatmau, Cincinnati, Ohio; flOn. James
Speed. Attorney General U. S., Washington; J.
Smith Speed, Louisville.

BANKERS & BROKERS,

No. 30 BROAD

$705,989 83

RUDOLPH GARRIGUE, President.

,

G. N.-CARLETON, A. M.'FOUTE, New York.
R. 15. SPEED, A. M. SUMMERS; New Orleans.
J. 11. SPEED, W. B. DONOilO, Memphis.
W. M. COZART, J. J. STOCKABD, Mobile.
-

j

issues; to orders for purchase and ale of stocks,
and gold,

205-9S9 83

TOTAL ASSETS

Agents.

NOS. 33-BROAD AND 30 NEW

and exchange of government securities of

bonds

Commercial

General

will he resident partners.

all

$500,000 O

CAPITAL.,

AND

House, and Mr. Pitt Cooke, of Sandusky, Ohio,

sale,

CASH

Co.,

BROADWAY, N. Y.

SURPLUS) Jail. 1st,I860

Clark, Dodge & Co.,

We shall give particular attention to the purchase,

NO. 175

NEW YORK.

New York, Mr. II. C. Faiikestock, of oiir Washing¬

.

WATER ST.

cor.

houses in

Mr. Edaakyrd Dodge, late of

ton

SLIP,

.

Philadelphia, and j
have this day opened an office at No. !
our

Germania Fire Ins.

Thackston,

Tobacco, Note and Exchange Broker.

Jay Cooke & Co.,
In connection with

S.

E.

PITT COOKE.

BANK E 11 S

Fire Insurance.

Commercial Cards.

Bankers and Brokers.

70 Beaver Street.

Counting: Houses and Offices
ui) in best style, and at short notice, with
CARPET, COCOA MATTING, CHINA MATTING
Fitted

AND OIL CLOTHS.

.

DOREIUUS & NIXON,
45

WARREN STEET, N.

.•
w

Y.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102