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ABR AHAM LINCOLN

Lesson Plan
L E S S O N

and the

FIVE-DOLLAR NOTE

D E S C R I P T I O N

In this lesson, students participate in a puzzle activity to identify leadership characteristics that Abraham Lincoln possessed. They review the changes in the redesigned $5
note and consider how Lincoln’s leadership characteristics contribute to the fact that
he is pictured on the $5 note. Students look at a timeline of Lincoln’s life and identify
significant events in his road to the White House. They play a game to review content
learned in the lesson.

G R A D E

L E V E L

5-8

C O N C E P T S
Characteristics of money
Coins
Counterfeit
Currency
Money
Timeline

O B J E C T I V E S
Students will:
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Describe leadership characteristics possessed by Abraham Lincoln.
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Describe the characteristics of money.
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Explain why Lincoln is featured on the $5 note.
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Identify important events in Lincoln’s road to the White House.
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Identify features of the redesigned $5 note.

Permission is granted to reprint or photocopy this lesson in its entirety for educational purposes, provided the user credits the
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EE0805 02/16 Rev. 12-16

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S T A N D A R D S

National Standards in History
Historical Thinking Standards for Grades 5-12:
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Standard 1: Chronological Thinking
•	 E. Interpret data presented in timelines and create timelines.

National Standards in Economics
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T I M E

Standard 11: Money makes it easier to trade, borrow, save, invest, and compare
the value of goods and services.
•	 Benchmarks 1, Grade 8: Money is anything widely accepted as final payment for goods and services.
•	 Benchmark 5, Grade 8: Most countries create their own currency for use
as money.

R E Q U I R E D

75-105 minutes

M A T E R I A L S
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Copies of Handouts 1 and 2 to provide one set of puzzle pieces for each group.
Prepare as follows: Glue a bill front from Handout 1 to a puzzle back from Handout 2. Cut the puzzle pieces apart.
Transparent tape for each group of students
Copies of Handouts 3, 5, 6 and 7 for each student
A copy of Answer Key: Lincoln Vocabulary for the teacher
Copies of Handout 8 to provide a set of true, false and top-it cards for each group
Copies of Handouts 4, 5 and 9 for each group
Visual of Handout 4
A copy of Answer Key: Lincoln and the $5 Note Questions for the teacher
Items for demonstration:
•	 a very heavy item such as a rock or a brick

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ABR AHAM LINCOLN

Lesson Plan

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■■

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FIVE-DOLLAR NOTE

•	 a sugar or salt packet
•	 a bag of brussels sprouts or broccoli or a turnip
•	 a clear plastic container with a lid filled with dirt
•	 a deck of cards
A poster(s) of the new $5 note—order or download from
https://uscurrency.gov/sites/default/files/security/pdf/5_2008-Present_Features.pdf
Small prizes for teams that win the game in the Closure section of the lesson

P R O C E D U R E S
1.	

Introduce the lesson by asking students the following questions.
•	 What do we use as money in the United States? (dollar bills and coins)
•	 What are the denominations of dollars in the United States? ($1, $2, $5,
$10, $20, $50 and $100 notes)
•	 Who is pictured on the front of a $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 note?
(Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, Hamilton, Jackson, Grant and Franklin)
(Note: Students may be accustomed to using the term “bill.” However, the title/label
on each piece of currency is “Federal Reserve Note.”)

2.	

Point out that money is anything widely accepted in exchange for goods and
services. The United States and most other countries use currency, which is
money usually made from some type of paper-like material, and coins, which are
usually minted from some combination of metals. In the United States, the currency is called “dollars” and the coins represent a dollar or some part of a dollar.
Each coin has a different name. Ask students to name the coins. (penny, nickel,
dime, quarter, half-dollar, dollar)

3.	

Divide the students into groups of 4-5. Distribute a set of puzzle pieces cut from
Handout 1: Puzzle Front and Handout 2: Puzzle Back to each group. Instruct students to refer to the side of the puzzle pieces on which there is a single word—for
example, “Persistent”—and assemble the puzzle.

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4.	

When groups have finished the puzzle, distribute tape to each group and tell students to tape the puzzle together. Then distribute a copy of Handout 3: Lincoln
Vocabulary to each student. Ask students to match the definitions on Handout
3 with the words in the puzzle by entering the correct word in the blank space in
front of a definition.

5.	

Use Answer Key: Lincoln Vocabulary to check student answers. Instruct groups
to turn the puzzle over. Discuss the following:
•	 What does the puzzle look like on this side? (five-dollar note)
•	 How do the vocabulary words relate to the five-dollar note? (characteristics
Lincoln possessed)

6.	

Point out that these characteristics made Lincoln the person he was. Furthermore, many of these characteristics contributed to his ability to lead the United
States during a terrible Civil War.

7.	

Explain that just as Lincoln had characteristics that made him a good leader
and great President, money also has characteristics. In order for money to be
”good”—that is, easily used in exchange for goods and services—it should have
certain characteristics.

8.	

Divide the students into groups of 3-4. Distribute a copy of Handout 4: Characteristics of Money to each group. Ask them to read through the list of possible
characteristics of money and decide which five are the most important if money
is to work well—that is, to be exchanged for goods and services. Allow about
10 minutes for students to work.

9.	

Display a visual of Handout 4 and ask each group to share its results. As groups
share results, tally their choices on the visual. Discuss the following:
•	 Why did you think that the characteristics you identified are important?
(Answers will vary.)
•	 Of the characteristics you identified, which do you think is most important?
(Answers will vary.)
•	 Is there a reason why you think one of the characteristics should not be
included? (Answers will vary.)

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10.	 Explain that economists—people who study the economy and money—have
identified characteristics that are important for something people use as money
to have. Those characteristics are: portable, durable, divisible, generally acceptable and relatively scarce. Discuss the following:
•	 Portable means easy to carry. People want their money to be easy to carry
in their pockets or wallets. If money is easy to carry, it is easier for people to
trade money for other things.
•	 Durable means that an item is long-lasting. It can withstand being washed,
crumpled in pockets, stuffed into socks and so on. People want money that
won’t dissolve, spoil or crumble.
•	 Divisible means that an item is easy to divide into smaller amounts. If something is divisible, it is easy to have the right amount to trade for other things.
•	 Generally acceptable means that people will accept the item as payment for
their work or as payment for goods and services. Money that is uniform is
more readily acceptable. This means that people expect one piece of currency, a coin or any item serving as money to have the same appearance and
quality as another.
•	 Relatively scarce means that money, like any other economic good, must
be scarce in relation to people’s desire for it in order for the money to have
exchange value. Everyone shouldn’t be able to grow it, draw it or find it.
11.	 Give each group of students one of the demonstration items (bag of brussels
sprouts, container of dirt, deck of cards, rock or brick, and packet of sugar or
salt). Distribute a copy of Handout 5: How Does This Item Size Up? to each
group. Tell the student groups to examine their item, discuss the characteristics
that may or may not pertain to their item, record answers to the questions listed
on the handout and prepare to share their ideas with the class. Allow time for
groups to work. Have groups share their responses with the class. Discuss the
following for each item:
•	 Would this item be easy to carry around to make purchases? (yes—sugar
packet, deck of cards; no—brick or rock, brussels sprouts, container of dirt)
•	 Does the item maintain its value when broken or divided into pieces?
(no for all items)
•	 Is this item generally acceptable? (no for all items)
•	 Is this item uniform? (yes for packets of sugar and decks of cards; no for
container of dirt, brussels sprouts and rock or brick)
•	 Is this item relatively scarce? (no for all items)

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•	 Is this item durable; that is, long-lasting? (yes for rock/brick, deck of cards;
no for brussels sprouts, packets of sugar; maybe for container of dirt, although it
could be spilled and become clumpy when wet)
•	 Is U.S. currency portable? (Yes, because it is easy to carry in a wallet, pocket
or purse.)
•	 Is currency durable? (Answers will vary.)
•	 The average life of a $1 note is 22 months. The life of higher-denomination
notes is longer. U.S. currency survives the washer and dryer when left in
pants’ pockets.
•	 Is U.S. currency divisible? (Yes, because there are different denominations.)
•	 Most societies have different denominations of coins and currency so that
people can more easily pay for goods and services. Having different denominations provides divisibility.
•	 What are the denominations of U.S. coins and currency? (penny, nickel,
dime, quarter, half-dollar, $1 coins, $1 note, $2 note, $5 note, $10 note, $20
note, $50 note and $100 note)
•	 Is U.S. currency generally acceptable? (Yes.)
•	 People accept dollars as payment for their work and in exchange for goods,
services and resources. U.S. currency is uniform in quality.
•	 Is U.S. currency relatively scarce? (Students will probably answer yes because
they have heard family members say that there isn’t enough money.)
•	 The Federal Reserve System controls the amount of money available in the
U.S. economy. Money does not grow on trees. If it did, it wouldn’t be scarce.
12.	 Explain that once a nation decides on what to use as currency, it is important
for the government of that nation to keep the currency safe and secure so that
people trust that the money they receive and spend is authentic. The government must make sure that the currency remains portable, durable, divisible,
generally acceptable and relatively scarce.
13.	 Refer the students back to the front of the $5 note puzzle. Point out that one
way that the U.S. government ensures that the currency maintains these
important characteristics is to redesign the currency every 7 to 10 years. The
$5 note is the most recent note to be redesigned. By redesigning the currency,
the government makes it more difficult for people to counterfeit currency. To
counterfeit something means to make a fake or false version of it. It is important

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that people not be able to make counterfeit U.S. currency, and it is important
that people be able to easily recognize true or authentic U.S. currency.
14.	 Distribute a copy of Handout 6: Features of the $5 Note to each student. Tell
students to use the handout to take notes. Explain that the graphic organizer lists
select vocabulary words/phrases. To help ensure that essential facts are captured,
instruct students to include each of the words/phrases in fact—that is, in declarative sentences. Display a poster of the new design of the $5 note and discuss
general features of the new design as follows:
•	 The Bureau of Engraving and Printing prints U.S. currency.
•	 Once currency is printed, Federal Reserve banks release it into circulation.
•	 The new design makes it harder for counterfeiters to create fake notes. The
design makes it easier for people to check to be sure notes are not fake.
•	 The new $5 notes are the same size and use enhanced versions of the same
portraits and historical images from previous $5 notes.
15.	 Open an internet connection, type in the following address:
https://uscurrency.gov/sites/default/files/security/pdf/5_2008-Present_Features.pdf
Tell students to continue taking notes on the graphic organizer as you discuss the
following about the front of the redesigned note:
•	 Watermarks: There are two watermarks on the redesigned $5 note. (There
was only one on the previous version of the note.) A large number “5” watermark can be found to the right of the portrait of Lincoln. A second watermark—a column of three smaller “5”s—has been added to the note and is found
to the left of the portrait. To see the watermarks, hold a note up to the light.
•	 Security Thread: The embedded security thread is to the right of the
portrait. (It was to the left of the portrait on the previous version.) The
letters “USA” followed by the number “5” in an alternating pattern are visible
along the thread from both sides of the note. The security thread glows blue
when held under ultraviolet light. To see the security thread, hold the note
up to the light.
•	 Serial Numbers: The unique combination of eleven numbers and letters
appears twice on the front of the note. On the new $5 note, the left serial
number has shifted slightly to the right, compared with previous designs.
•	 Federal Reserve Seal: The universal Federal Reserve Seal can be found
to the left of the portrait. This seal is used to represent the entire Federal
Reserve System. Beneath the serial number to the left of the portrait, there

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is a letter and number which identify the Federal Reserve bank that issues
the note into circulation.
•	 Symbols of Freedom: A symbol of freedom has been added to the background of the redesigned note: “The Great Seal of the United States,” featuring an eagle and shield. This is printed in purple to the right of the portrait.
An arc of purple stars surrounds the portrait and The Great Seal.
•	 Portrait: The oval borders around President Lincoln’s portrait have been
removed. The portrait has been moved up and Lincoln’s shoulders have been
extended into the border.
16.	 Tell students to continue taking notes on Handout 6.
Discuss the following about the back of the redesigned note:
•	 Vignette: A vignette is a picture or illustration. The vignette on the back
of the $5 note is a picture of the Lincoln Memorial. The oval borders around
the Lincoln Memorial vignette have been removed. Engraving details have
been added, framing the Lincoln Memorial against a sky full of clouds.
•	 Color: There are small yellow “05”s printed to the right of the
Lincoln Memorial.
•	 Low-vision feature: The large, easy-to-read number “5” has been enlarged
and printed in high-contrast purple ink.
17.	 Ask the students why they think Lincoln is pictured on the front of the $5 note.
(He was an important U.S. president. He demonstrated important leadership qualities, such as honesty, persistence, reliability and so on.) Remind students that the
characteristics they identified in the puzzle activity help explain why Lincoln is
featured on the $5 note. Lincoln is an important historical figure whose portrait
is readily recognized.
18.	 Distribute a copy of Handout 7: Road to the White House to each student.
Open an internet connection and type in the following address:
www.historynet.com/abraham-lincoln-timeline or www.historyplace.com/lincoln.
(Note: These are links to timelines on the internet.) Explain that this is a timeline
of Lincoln’s life. Discuss the following:
•	 A timeline displays key events for a period of time. It often includes pictures
and written commentary and is arranged chronologically.
•	 The Lincoln timeline identifies key events in Lincoln’s life. Explain that a
decade is ten years.

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19.	 Explain that as students view the timeline, they should enter on their handout
two events from each decade that they think were very important on Lincoln’s
road to the White House, such as Lincoln entering the race for the legislature or
his participation in debates and so on. Point out that students will use the information on the timeline they create to write a paragraph about Lincoln’s road to
the White House.
20.	 Tell students to pair with another student in their group and discuss the
information they identified on their timeline and their reasons for choosing the
specific events that they selected. After students have had time to work, discuss
the following with the class. If needed, refer back to the interactive timeline.
(see links on previous page)
•	 What were significant events that you included in your notes for the first
years of Lincoln’s life? (Answers will vary.)
•	 When and where was Lincoln born? (Feb. 12, 1809, outside of Hodgenville, Ky.)
•	 When did Lincoln’s mother die? (1818)
•	 What were significant events you included in your notes from 1821-1830?
(Answers will vary.)
•	 What were significant events you included in your notes from 1831-1840?
(Answers will vary, but may include Lincoln announcing his candidacy for state
legislature in 1832.)
•	 What were significant events that you included in your notes from 1841-1850?
(Answers will vary, but might include his work for Henry Clay, his election to the
House of Representatives or his work for Zachary Taylor.)
•	 What were significant events that you included in your notes from 1851-1860?
(Answers will vary, but might include his election to state legislature, his failure
to be elected to the senate, his joining the Republican party, his opposition to the
Dred Scott decision or the Lincoln-Douglas debates.)
•	 When was Lincoln shot? (April 14, 1865)

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C L O S U R E
21.	 Divide the students into teams. Give each team a true card and a false card from
Handout 8: True or False and a copy of Handout 9: Score Sheet. Tell the teams
that they will participate in a game. Review the rules of the game as follows:
•	 Teams must designate a team member who will hold up the true or false card
in response to answers. Teams must designate a member to keep score.
•	 Teams will listen to statements. Team members must decide whether a statement is true or false.
•	 The teacher will call for answers. Only the designated team member may display the answer card. Once a card is displayed, the answer may not be changed.
•	 Teams will receive 5 points for a correct answer. Teams will lose 5 points for
an incorrect answer.
•	 If a team feels very confident about its answer, its members may choose to
“top it” by raising their Lincoln Hat card. This will double the score earned
or deducted for that question.
•	 The designated team member will record the score after each question.
22.	 Begin reading questions from Answer Key: Lincoln and the $5 Note Questions
one by one. When all questions have been read, have teams total their scores.
Provide small prizes for members of the winning team.

A S S E S S M E N T
23.	 Use the timeline created on Handout 7 to write two paragraphs about Lincoln’s
road to the White House. The paragraphs should include some of Lincoln’s
characteristics as identified on Handout 3. Each paragraph should include a topic
sentence along with primary and secondary support for the topic sentence. A
topic sentence expresses the topic or controlling idea of the paragraph. Primary
support sentences are those that directly support the controlling idea. Secondary
supports provide specific information that reinforces the primary supports.
24.	 Write a paragraph comparing and contrasting the former $5 note with the newly
redesigned $5 note.

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SOURCES FOR CONTENT OF THE LESSON
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Redesigned $5 note
www.moneyfactory.gov/newmoney/
Characteristics of Lincoln: The Accomplishments of President Abraham Lincoln downloaded from http://home.att.net/%7Erjnorton/Lincoln87.html
Ketcham, H. The Life of Abraham Lincoln, Chapter XXXV. Literary
Characteristics. Downloaded from www.authorama.com/
life-of-abraham-lincoln-37.html

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Handout 1: Puzzle Front

Directions: Cut out the rectangle
below. Glue it to a puzzle back cut
from Handout 2. Cut out the puzzle
pieces to provide one set of puzzle
pieces for each group.

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Handout 2: Puzzle Back

Persistent
Intelligent

Honest

Motivated

Flexible

Hard-working

Dependable

Directions: Cut out the rectangle
below. Glue it to a $5 note cut from
Handout 1. Cut out the puzzle pieces
to provide one set of puzzle pieces for
each group.

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Handout 3: Lincoln Vocabulary
Match each word on the puzzle with the correct definition by writing the word from
the puzzle piece on the line in front of each definition below.

	

characterized by hard work; puts forth great effort to get the
job done

	

having high degree of mental ability; revealing good judgment or sound thought

	

responsive to change; able to adapt

	

desires to do something; wants to take action

	

reliable; deserving of trust

	

refusing to give up or let go; persevering obstinately

	

displaying integrity; truthful; not false

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Answer Key: Lincoln Vocabulary
Match each word on the puzzle with the correct definition by writing the word from
the puzzle piece on the line in front of each definition below.

hard-working	

characterized by hard work; puts forth great effort to get the
job done

intelligent	

having high degree of mental ability; revealing good judgment or sound thought

flexible	

responsive to change; able to adapt

motivated	

desires to do something; wants to take action

dependable	

reliable; deserving of trust

persistent	

refusing to give up or let go; persevering obstinately

honest 	

displaying integrity; truthful; not false

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Handout 4: Characteristics of Money
Talk with the other members of your group and circle the five characteristics the group
members think money should have in order to be useful—used easily to buy goods
and services.
Colorful—having or showing lots of color
Divisible—easily divided into larger or smaller amounts
Durable—long-lasting
Pretty—attractive; pleasing to look at
Washable—can be washed without fading or injury
Acceptable—satisfactory; worthy of being accepted
Scarce—not freely available
Portable—easy to carry
Rectangular—shaped like a rectangle
Circular—shaped like a circle
Solid—can’t be broken or torn

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Handout 5: How Does This Item Size Up?
Use the description below to decide whether your group’s item has the five
characteristics of money.
Portable means easy to carry. People want their money to be easy to carry in their
pockets or wallets. If money is easy to carry, it is easier for people to trade money for
other things.
1.	

Is your item portable? Why or why not?

Durable means that an item is long-lasting. It can withstand being washed, crumpled
in pockets, stuffed into socks and so on. People want money that won’t dissolve, spoil
or crumble.
2.	

Is your item durable? Why or why not?

Divisible means that an item is easy to divide into smaller amounts. If something is
divisible, it is easy to have the right amount to trade for other things.
3.	

Is your item divisible? Why or why not?

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Handout 5: How Does This Item Size Up?
Generally acceptable means that people will accept the item as payment for their
work or as payment for goods and services. Money that is uniform is more readily
acceptable. This means that people expect one piece of currency, a coin or any item
serving as money to have the same appearance and quality as another.
4.	

Is your item generally acceptable? Why or why not?

Relatively scarce means that money, like any other economic good, must be scarce in
relation to people’s desire for it in order for money to have exchange value. Everyone
shouldn’t be able to grow it, draw it or find it.
5.	

Is your item relatively scarce? Why or why not?

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Handout 6: Features of the $5 Note
Use this page to take notes about the redesigned $5 note. Each of the words or titles
below should be included in at least one fact-telling (declarative) sentence in your notes.
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Federal Reserve banks
Watermarks
Security thread
Serial number
Federal Reserve seal
Symbols of freedom
Portrait
Vignette
Color
Low-vision feature

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Handout 6: Features of the $5 Note

Notes
Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Federal Reserve banks

Watermarks

Security thread

Serial numbers

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Handout 6: Features of the $5 Note
Federal Reserve seal

Symbols of freedom

Portrait

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Handout 6: Features of the $5 Note

Notes
Vignette

Color

Low-vision feature

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Handout 7: Road to the White House
Directions: Enter two events from each decade of Abraham Lincoln’s life that are very
important in his road to the White House—a total of 11 of the 12 boxes. The first of
the 12 boxes is already completed for you with Lincoln’s birth.

1851-1860

1851-1860

1831-1840
1831-1840
1809-1820
1809-1820

1861-1865

1841-1850

1841-1850
1821-1830
1821-1830

1809

Feb. 12: Lincoln’s birth in Kentucky

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. www.stlouisfed.org/education

23

ABR AHAM LINCOLN

and the

FIVE-DOLLAR NOTE

Handout 8: True and False Cards

TRUE

FALSE

Permission is granted to reprint or photocopy this lesson in its entirety for educational purposes, provided the user credits the
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. www.stlouisfed.org/education

24

ABR AHAM LINCOLN

and the

FIVE-DOLLAR NOTE

Handout 9: Score Sheet

Directions: Circle your team’s score for each question.
Question
Number
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Team
Answer

Correct
Answer

Score
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5

Top It
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5
–5

+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10
+10

–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10
–10

Totals
Final Score

Permission is granted to reprint or photocopy this lesson in its entirety for educational purposes, provided the user credits the
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. www.stlouisfed.org/education

25

ABR AHAM LINCOLN

and the

FIVE-DOLLAR NOTE

Answer Key: Lincoln and the $5 Note Questions
Read each statement and allow several seconds for teams to decide on the answer.
Ask teams to show either a true or false card.
1.	

There are three watermarks on the redesigned $5 note.
Answer: False. There are two watermarks on the redesigned $5 note.

2.	

The Lincoln Memorial is pictured in the vignette on the back of the
redesigned $5 note.
Answer: True. The vignette is the scene displayed on the back of the note.
The scene on the back of the $5 note is the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

3.	

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) prints U.S. currency.
Answer: True. More information about the BEP can be found at
www.moneyfactory.gov.

4.	

Abraham Lincoln was the second president of the United States.
Answer: False. Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States. He served
in office from 1861 to April 1865.

5.	

The new $5 note was issued on March 13, 2008.
Answer: True.

6.	

“Persistent” means reliable and deserving of trust.
Answer: False. “Persistent” means refusing to give up. When someone is reliable
and deserving of trust, we refer to them as “dependable.”

7.	

Historians describe Lincoln as honest.
Answer: True. Many historians agree that the term “Honest Abe” is an accurate
description of Lincoln.

8.	

The new $5 note has more color than the old $5 note.
Answer: True. The most notable change is the purple color on the note. However,
there is also printing in yellow.

9.	

Counterfeit money is fake money.
Answer: True. One definition of counterfeit is the representation of currency
intended to deceive recipients.

Permission is granted to reprint or photocopy this lesson in its entirety for educational purposes, provided the user credits the
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. www.stlouisfed.org/education

26

ABR AHAM LINCOLN

and the

FIVE-DOLLAR NOTE

Answer Key: Lincoln and the $5 Note Questions
10.	 The features on the redesigned $5 note make it easier for people to make sure
that a note isn’t counterfeit.
Answer: True.
11.	 The U.S. Mint prints currency.
Answer: False. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing prints currency.
The U.S. Mint mints coins.
12.	 Abraham Lincoln was born in Springfield, Ill.
Answer: False. Abraham Lincoln was born on Feb. 12, 1809, in Hodgenville, Ky.
13.	 The Great Seal of the United States is a symbol of freedom that is found on the
redesigned $5 note.
Answer: True. The Great Seal of the United States features an eagle and shield.
This is printed in purple to the right of the portrait. An arc of purple stars surrounds
the portrait and the Great Seal.
14.	 The Federal Reserve banks put currency into circulation.
Answer: True. Beneath the serial number to the left of the portrait, there is a letter and
number which identify the Federal Reserve bank that issues the note into circulation.
15.	 Serial numbers on U.S. currency are repeated on various notes.
Answer: False. The serial number on each piece of U.S. currency is a unique
combination of 11 letters and numbers.
16.	 Abraham Lincoln never failed when running for political office.
Answer: False. In 1832 he ran for Illinois legislation and lost. In 1856 he ran for
U.S. Senate and lost.
17.	 Something that we use as money should be colorful in order to be easy to use to
buy goods and services.
Answer: False. The characteristics that make something a good form of money are:
generally acceptable, divisible, portable, durable and relatively scarce.
18.	 Something that we use as money should be divisible in order to be easy to use to
buy goods and services.
Answer: True. The characteristics that make something a good form of money are:
generally acceptable, divisible, portable, durable and relatively scarce.

Permission is granted to reprint or photocopy this lesson in its entirety for educational purposes, provided the user credits the
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. www.stlouisfed.org/education

27

ABR AHAM LINCOLN

and the

FIVE-DOLLAR NOTE

Answer Key: Lincoln and the $5 Note Questions
19.	 A person who wants to do something or who wants to take action on a project
can be described as “motivated.”
Answer: True.
20.	 It is legal for anyone to manufacture U.S. currency.
Answer: False. Manufacturing counterfeit U.S. currency or altering genuine currency to increase its value is a violation of Title 18, Section 471 of the United States
Code and is punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 or 15 years’ imprisonment, or both.

Permission is granted to reprint or photocopy this lesson in its entirety for educational purposes, provided the user credits the
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. www.stlouisfed.org/education

28


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