View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

U N IT E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
Frances Perkins, Secretary
B U R E A U OF L A B O R ST A T IS T IC S
Isador Lubin, Commissioner

+

Changes in
Retail Prices of Electricity
1923-38
Prepared by
R E T A IL PRICE D IVISIO N
ST ELL A S T E W A R T , Chief
and
R U T H J. POW ER S, Research Assistant

Bulletin 7S[o. 664
February 1939

U N IT E D S T A T E S
G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G OFFICE
W A S H IN G T O N : 1939

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, Washington, D . C.




Price 15 cents




CONTENTS
Page

Summary and price analysis____________________________________________
Computation of prices and indexes, 1923-38____________________________
Basic data for computing prices and indexes____________________________
Specifications______________________________________________________
Definitions of terms________________________________________________
Types of rate schedules____________________________________________
Development of electric power and appliance industries, 1923-38_________
History of the collection of electricity data by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics_____________________________________________________________

1
17
37
37
37
39
72
77

T a b le s
T able

T able

T able

T able
T able

T able
T able
T able

T able

T able
T able
T able

1.— Indexes of retail prices of electricity for typical monthly con­
sumptions for 51 cities combined, March 1923 to December
1938, inclusive___________________________________________
2.— Prices per kilowatt-hour, by areas and cities, for each of 3
typical monthly consumptions, December 1938 and March
1923_____________________________________________________
3.— Average prices per kilowatt-hour for the typical monthly use
of 25 kilowatt-hours, arrayed by prices in ascending rank for
December 1938, with price for each city in March 1923_____
4.— Average number of customers served monthly in 1937 at speci­
fied consumption levels___________________________________
5.— Prices per kilowatt-hour for the monthly use of 25 kilowatthours monthly in 1923, with effective date, and changes in
subsequent years________________________________________
6.— Weighting factors for indexes of retail prices of electricity for
51 cities combined__________________________________________
7.— Indexes of retail prices of electricity, by cities, March 1923 to
December 1938, inclusive__________________________________
8.— Summarized data used in the computation of retail prices of
electricity, by companies, March 1923 to December 1938,
inclusive___________________________________________________
9.— Current generated by electric light and power industry in the
United States and in each regional area in 1937, and percent­
age of increase over 1926 for eacharea______________________
10.— Number of customers, with percentage distribution of kilowatthours sold and revenue, by class ofservice___________________
11.— Urban residential service— average number of customers, sales,
and revenue for specified years___________________________
12.— Urban residential sales, total revenue, and revenue per kilo­
watt-hour for the United States and each regional area in
1937_______________________________________________________




hi

2

5

6
7

8
18
20

47

73
73
74

75

CONTENTS

IV

Page
T a b l e 13.— Estimates of the increase in the use of 8 electric appliances,

1926 to 1937, inclusive________________________________________

75

T a b l e 14.— Estimated number of kilowatt-hours required annually for 8

electric appliances, 1932 to 1937, inclusive__________________

76

T a b l e 15.— Frequency of collection of residential rate schedules, 1913 to

1938, inclusive_________________________________________________

77

T a b l e 16.— Records of publication of data relating to electricity used for

domestic purposes, 1913 to 1938, inclusive__________________

78

Charts
Retail prices of electricity, 51 cities combined, March 1923 to December
1938, inclusive_______________________________________________________________
Retail prices of electricity for the use of 25 kilowatt-hours weighted
average prices per kilowatt-hour for 51 cities combined and for regions,
March 1923 and December 1938__________________________________________




vm

4

Letter o f Transmittal

U

n it e d

States D
B

epar tm en t of

u r e a u of

L

abor

L abor,
S t a t is t ic s ,

W a sh in g to n , D . C . y F eb r u a r y 1, 1 9 3 9 .

The S e c r e t a r y o f L a b o r :
I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on Changes in Retail
Prices of Electricity, prepared by Stella Stewart, Chief of the Division
of Retail Prices, and Ruth J. Powers, Research Assistant.
I sador L

Hon.

F r a n c e s P e r k in s ,




S ecreta ry o f L a b o r.

u b in

, C o m m issio n e r .




PREFACE

The Bureau of Labor Statistics began in June 1923 the publication
of prices of electricity for residential use for 51 cities. These cities
were those in which the Bureau was already collecting food prices and
were so distributed geographically as to insure prices representative
of conditions prevailing in urban areas in various regions of the
United States. The early prices represented the unit cost to the cus­
tomer based upon the average family consumption of electricity in
each individual city. These prices were used only in the computation
of the cost-of-living indexes.
In 1934 the Bureau, in cooperation with the Federal Power Com­
mission, developed a method for computing typical monthly bills and
unit prices for four specified amounts of current typical of average
household requirements. Electricity is a standardized commodity.
Therefore, this method allowed for price comparisons between cities
even though the typical consumptions chosen for each service might
not be fully representative of the actual use of current in each of the
51 cities. Prices computed by this method were first published by the
Bureau in 1934 and continued to appear quarterly.
The reception of this price series and the public interest in electric
utilities encouraged the Bureau to compute quarterly indexes of the
changes in retail prices of electricity beginning with March 1923.
These indexes, compared with the 3-year average 1923-25, as a base,
were computed for quarterly periods from March 1923 through
December 1938, for each of the 51 cities reporting to the Bureau and
for these cities combined.
The Bureau wishes to express its appreciation of the cooperation of
the utility companies whose rate schedules have provided the primary
data for the computation of the prices and indexes. Not only have the
companies provided the Bureau with the data needed for this bulletin,
but they also review and comment on the prices at each quarterly
period.
Acknowledgment is made of the interest and valuable assistance of
experts in the Federal Power Commission, the Central Statistical
Board, the Edison Electric Institute, and of the staff of “ Electrical
Merchandising/ ’
This bulletin was prepared in the Retail Price Division, under the
direction of Stella Stewart, chief of the division. The section dealing
with the basic data used in computing the indexes was prepared by
Ruth J. Powers. The assistance of Estelle Citrin and Isabel R.
Smiley in the computation of prices and indexes is also acknowledged.
I sador L
D

ecember

1938.




u b in

,

C o m m issio n e r o f L a b o r S ta tistics.
V II

VIII

RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

I

51 CITIES COMBINED

1923

u.s. B ureau




1924

1925

1926

of la b o r statistics

1 92 7

1926

1929

1930

193/

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

193 7

193 6

1939

Bulletin 7 [o. 664 o f the
S
United States Bureau o f Labor Statistics

Changes in Retail Prices o f Electricity, 1923-38
Summary and Price Analysis
The electric-utility industry made great strides during the years
from 1923 to 1938, the period covered by this bulletin. More efficient
methods reduced cost of producing and transmitting current. Pro­
motional rate schedules were developed which offered reduced rates
for a greater use of electricity. The expansion in the use of electricity
for residential purposes was accompanied by and was due, in part, to
the growth of the electric appliance industry. The number and
kinds of appliances in use and their efficiency increased from year to year.
The results of these developments were shown in an increase of
more than 100 percent in the average annual household use of elec­
tricity during these years. This increase was accompanied by an
increase in the total revenue per customer and a reduction of about
40 percent in the average unit price. In 1923 the average annual
consumption of electricity by householders was 368 kilowatt-hours
per customer as compared with 793 kilowatt-hours in 1937, the latest
year for which this information was available. The average annual
revenue per kilowatt-hour decreased from 7.20 cents in 1923 to 4.39
cents in 1937. A more detailed discussion of the progress both of the
power industry and of the electric appliance industry is presented in
pages 72 to 77, together with pertinent statistical data.
The composite indexes presented in table 1 show price changes for
51 cities combined from March 1923 through December 1938. Three
price series were chosen for this purpose based upon the monthly use
of 25, 40, and 100 kilowatt-hours typical of the use of electricity for
(a) lighting and an average use of current for small energy-consuming
appliances, (b) for an increased use of current for lighting and addi­
tional small household appliances, and (c) for the greater use of current
for lighting and appliances including refrigerators. The indexes
measure price changes only, since identical weights were used for each
service in combining the city indexes. This allows for price com­
parison between the services, but gives no indication of the changes
due to the difference in the number of customers billed at different con­
sumption levels. The chart facing this page was constructed from
these indexes.




1

2

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

T a b l e 1. —

I n d e x e s o f re ta il p r i c e s o f ele c tr ic ity f o r t y p i c a l m o n t h l y c o n s u m p t i o n s f o r
5 1 c itie s c o m b i n e d M a r c h 1 9 2 3 to D e c e m b e r 1 9 3 8 , i n c l u s i v e

,

[1923-25=100]

Lighting,
Lighting Lighting appli­
and small and small ances,
Year and month appli­ house­ and re­
ances hold ap­ frigera­
pliances
tor
25 kwh 40 kwh 100 kwh

1923

Lighting,
appli­
ances,
and re­
frigera­
tor
40 kwh 100 kwh

Lighting
Lighting and small
Year and month and small house­
appli­ hold ap­
ances pliances
25 kwh

1931

March________ __
June_____________
September.December____ ___

102.4
102.3
101.3
101.1

102.4
102.2
101.4
101.2

103.7 March.. ...
103.0 June. _____ _
101.8 September._____
101.2 December. ______

88.1
87.8
88.4
88. 3

86.2
86.0
84.0
83.8

82.5
82.4
77. 3
77.0

March. ______ _
June. ________
September. . ... _
December _____

100. 8 ■
100. 5
100.5
100. 5

100.9
100. 5
100.5
100. 5

100.9 March _____
99.8 June.. . . . ____
99.8 September____...
99.8 December ______

87.8
87.6
90.1
89.7

83. 5
83.2
85.6
85.2

76. 7
76 3
78.6
78.1

March________ _
June________ ___
September _ _ __
December___ _ _.

98.0
98. 0
97. 3
97.3

98.2
98.1
97. 4
96.8

97.8
97.6
97.4
97.1

March____ ______
June_____________
September.
December. _ _____

89.4
88.4
85. 7
84.9

84.8
84.3
81. 7
81.2

77. 9
77. 7
75 4
75.1

March_____ ... .
June__________ .
September_____ _
December. _ _____

96.9
96. 5
96. 5
96. 5

96.4
96.1
96.0
96.1

96.0 March___________
95.8 June. ... _______
95.2 September_______
95.2 December__ _____

83.9
83.7
83.1
83.4

80.3
80.2
79. 7
80.0

74.7
74.6
74.2
74.5

March___________
June_____________
September----------December. _ _____

95.0
94.8
94.1
94.0

94.6
94.3
93.5
93.6

93.5
93.2
91.3
91.5

March______ ____
June___.. . _____
September_______
December________

83.0
81.7
80.8
80.7

79.7
78.6
77.8

77.7

74. 2
73. 6
70.5
70. 2

March___________
■ Tltie ........... ..........
i
September_______
December _ _ __ _

93. 7
93.0
92.2
91.2

93.1
92.8
91.1
89.9

91.0
89.7
88.2
87.2

March___________
J u n e .._____ ____
September_______
December. _ _____

80.1
79.8
79. 5
78.3

77.2
76.9
76.6
76.1

69.6
69.4
69.2
68.9

March._ _________
June___________ .
September .
December. _ _____

91.1
90.7
90.0
89.7

89.5
89.0
88.2
87.8

86.6
86.1
85.1
84.4

March_______ ___
June____ _______
September__ ___
December. _____

76. 5
76.4
76.4
76.0

74.8
74.6
74.6
74.4

68.1
67.9
67.8
67.4

March
______
June.
. _____
September
December________

89.3
89.2
88.3
88.3

87.2
87.1
86. 5
86.3

83.3
83.2
82.9
82.6

March___________
June_____________
September_______
December________

75.5
75.4
75.1
74.8

74.1
74.0
73.7
73.4

67.3
67.1
66.8
66.6

1924

1925
1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

1938

There was a gradual decline in the consumer price per unit based
on the use of identical amounts of current throughout the 16 years
covered by these indexes. The decrease ranged from 26.9 percent
for the use of 25 kilowatt-hours monthly to 28.3 percent for 40
kilowatt-hours and 35.8 percent for 100 kilowatt-hours. The rela­
tively greater price reduction for the 100 kilowatt-hour service indi­
cates the benefits received by customers who could avail themselves
of the lower rates offered for higher consumption.
A steady decrease in prices over 5-year periods reveals the acceler­
ated reductions during later years with particular reference to the
monthly consumption of 25 kilowatt-hours, typical of the use of
current by customers with limited incomes. The percentages of
decrease for the three services for which indexes were computed are




SUM M ARY AND PRICE ANALYSIS

3

shown below for each of three periods. The Federal tax of 3 percent
effective in 1932 and 1933 was excluded from these computations.

Period of years
1923-1927_____________________________________________________
1928-1932_______________________________________________ ____
1933-1938_____________________________________________________

Percentage of decrease
25 kwh
40 kwh
100 kwh
8.2
8. 6
11. 8
70
11. 2
16. 7
13.8
10.9
11.9

There was, of course, considerable variation in price levels and in
price changes in the different regions. A study of the regional changes
will give a better understanding of the trends in the indexes. In
table 2 the average unit price for each service is shown for December
1938 and March 1923 for each of the 51 cities and for the cities in each
region combined. The chart on p. 4 shows for the 25 kilowatt-hour
service the differences between March 1923 and December 1938 in the
average price for the 51 cities combined and for each regional area.
The city prices per kilowatt-hour in December 1938 for the monthly
use of 25 kilowatt-hours have been arrayed in table 3 in ascending
order, together with the corresponding price for each city in March
1923. The prices for December 1938 include all State and local sales
taxes, since these taxes constitute a part of the price paid by the
ultimate consumer. This table permits of price comparisons between
cities at the first and last periods for which prices were computed, and
also for a comparison between these periods in any one city.
The number of customers served by each of the reporting companies
in 1935 were used as weights for combining the city indexes into the
composite indexes. When these weights are apportioned to the cities
on the basis of their regional importance, a pattern appears which
explains the difference between the regional price averages and the
averages for the cities included in these regions. So apportioned, the
percentage distribution of weights is as follows, with the total for
each area representing 100:

100 East North Central____ ____100
6
Chicago__________ ... . 43
5
Cincinnati________ ____ 6
65
Cleveland---- --------- ____ 12
Columbus___ . . . ____ 4
14
Detroit___________ ____ 19
5
Indianapolis_____ _____ 5
4
Milwaukee. ... _ ______ 8
1
Peoria____________ ____ 2
Springfield________ ____ 1
South Atlantic_________
100 East South Central____ ___100
Birmingham______ ____ 29
A tlanta...---------------— _“ Ti
Louisville_________ ____ 38
Baltimore__________ . ... 40
Memphis_________ ____ 25
Charleston, S. C____ . . . . 1
Jacksonville________ . . . . 6
Mobile____________ ____ 8
Norfolk____________ ___ 5
Richmond_________ . . . . 8
Savannah__________ . . . . 3
Washington, D. C__ . . . . 26
Mountain____ ________ ... . 100 Pacific_____________ _ ____ 100
Los Angeles _____ ____ 53
Butte______________ ... . 6
Portland, Oreg____ ____ 12
Denver____________ ... . 31
San Francisco.________ 22
Salt Lake City_____ . . . . 63
Seattle.................... ____ 13

New England__________ ___100 Middle Atlantic---- -------....
Boston__________ — 57
Buffalo_____________ ....
Newark. _ __________....
B r id g e p o r t .__ ... ... . 7
New York... . . . . ._
Fall River________ ...... 5
Philadelphia. ____ ....
Manchester.. ... ..._ 3
Pittsburgh.________ . . . .
New Haven. __ ... . . . . 9
3
Rochester.._ ____ ... .
Portland, Maine. _ _
Scranton___________ . . . .
16
Providence.----------West North Central____ ...
Kansas City___ ____ _
Minneapolis________ . . . .
___
Omaha________
St. Louis___________
St. Paul____________

100
17
21
10
39
13

West South C entral.___ . . . .
Dallas_____________ . . . .
Houston _ _ _____
Little Rock________ . . . .
- New Orleans_______ . . . .

100
28
31
7
34




4

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OE ELECTRICITY

RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTR ICITY
W EIGHTED AVERAGE PRICES PER K IL O W A T T -H O U R
FOR 51 C IT IE S COMBINED AND FOR REGIONS
MARCH 1923 AND DECEMBER 1938
25 kwh SERVICE
CENTS

O

2

4

o

2

4

6

8

10

51 CITIES
C M IN
O B ED

NEW
E GA D
NLN

M DE
ID L
A N
TLA TIC

E ST N R H
A
OT
C TR
EN AL

W
EST N R H
OT
CN A
E TR L

SO TH
U
ATLAN
TIC

EAST SO TH
U
CENTRAL

W
EST SO TH
U
CEN AL
TR

M U T IN
O NA

P C IC
A IF

U. S. BUREAU OF LABO R STATISTICS




CENTS

10

5

SUM M ARY AND PRICE ANALYSIS
T

able

2 .— P ric es per k ilow att-hour , b y region and citiesffo r each o f 8 typ ica l m on th ly
co n su m p tio n s , D ecem ber 1 9 8 8 and M a r c h 1 9 2 8

25 kwh
Region and city
New England___ _
Boston____________ _____________
Bridgeport_______ _______________ _
Fall River.
Manchester___ ___________________
New Haven_______________________
Portland, Maine___________________
Providence_________ ______________
Middle Atlantic__________ ____________
Buffalo......................
Newark__________
___
New York_____ ______ _____
Philadelphia_________________ ___
Pittsburgh___________________
Rochester___ ___________________ _
Scranton__________________________
East North Central_____________ ______
Chicago. __________ ______
Cincinnati__________
Cleveland___________ ______
Columbus, Ohio___ _____ ____
Detroit_________________ ____...
Indianapolis . _ _
- Milwaukee_______
Peoria.._ _ . ___ _ . _. _ _ _
Springfield, 111_____________________
West North Central___________________
Kansas City___________________ ...
Minneapolis____ . . . .
Omaha_________ . . . . . . . .
St. Louis_______________ ____
St. Paul___________________________
South Atlantic________________________
Atlanta____ ______________________
Baltimore_________________________
Charleston, S. C___________________
Jacksonville________ _______
Norfolk___________________________
Richmond. _________________ . ...
Savannah____________ ___________
Washington, D. C__ _ _ _ _ ______
East South Central____________________
Birmingham______________________
Louisville____________ ___________
Memphis__________ . ___________
Mobile________________ __________
West South Central___________________
Dallas__________________ ________
Houston____________ _____________
Little Rock... ____________________
New Orleans______________ _______
Mountain______________ _____________
Butte_____________________________
Denver__________ __________ __ __
Salt Lake City.___ ________________
Pacific________________________________
Los Angeles______ ________ ___
Portland, Orcg____________________
San Francisco__________ __________
Seattle_____________ _____ _________




40 kwh

100 kwh

December March December March December March
1923
1938
1938
1923
1938
1923

Cents
6.3

Cents
9.1

Cents
5.8

Cents
8.9

Cents
5.0

Cents
6.8

6.2
5.3
6.3
8.0
5.3
7.4
7.0
6.4
4.5
7.2
6.8
5.7
5.0
6.3
5.0
5.1
5.4
4.0
3.9
4.9
5.6
5.5
5.7
5.0
5.0
4.9
5.1
4.7
4.8
4.8
5.0
4.7
5.3
4.5
6.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
6.5
3.9
4.0
3.9
4.1
3.5
5.2
5.3
4.2
4.8
7.1
6.3
6.2
6.2
6.1
6.5
4.7
4.4
5.0
5.2
5.0

9.5
7.5
9.5
12.0
7.5
8.0
8.9
8.3
5.2
9.0
8.8
7.5
6.9
8.0
10.0
6.7
7.1
7.7
4.6
6.9
6.2
7.0
7.4
7.7
6.0
7.6
7.4
8.5
5.5
6.8
9.9
8.7
8.1
8.0
10.0
7.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
10.0
7.8
7.7
7.6
8.0
9.0
7.5
6.0
5.6
10.0
9.8
8.1
9.5
8.0
8.1
6.2
5.8
6.2
7.2
6.0

5.8
4.8
5.9
7.0
4.8
6.5
6.7
5.9
4.3
6.2
6.2
5.5
5.0
5.7
4.8
4.7
4.9
3.6
3.8
4.8
4.9
5.3
4.8
4.6
4.8
4.5
5.1
4.4
4.8
4.3
4.6
4.6
5.0
4.5
5.6
5.9
5.0
5.0
5.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
4.1
3.5
4.8
4.9
4.2
4.5
6.4
5.6
6.0
5.9
6.1
5.7
4.4
4.1
4.7
4.4
5.0

9.5
7.5
9.5
9.8
7.5
8.0
8.2
8.1
4.8
9.0
8.7
7.3
6.1
7.8
10.0
5.6
5.6
6.5
4.6
6.9
5.2
7.0
5.9
6.2
5.3
6.5
6.6
6.9
5.5
5.5
9.1
8.7
8.1
8.0
10.0
7.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
10.0
7.6
7.7
7.6
7.3
9.0
7.1
6.0
5.2
10.0
9.1
8.1
9.5
8.0
8.1
6.0
5.8
5.0
6.8
6.0

5.1
4.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
4.7
5.5
4.5
3.1
4.4
4.9
3.8
4.0
4.4
3.9
3.5
3.7
2.5
3.6
4.5
3.5
4.0
3.4
3.3
3.0
3.5
3.8
3.6
3.9
3.2
3.8
3.8
3.9
3.9
4.2
4.6
4.6
4.6
4.6
2.9
3.3
3.2
3.6
2.9
3.7
4.3
3.9
3.8
5.1
4.8
4.5
4.4
4.9
3.8
3.1
3.0
3.4
3.1
3.2

6.3
7.5
9.5
6.8
7.5
6.4
7.4
7.6
3.4
7.3
8.5
6.9
4.3
5.5
8.1
4.5
4.3
4.7
4.6
6.9
4.2
6.8
4.2
4.3
3.9
5.0
5.9
4.5
5.5
3.9
7.6
7.2
6.5
6.5
9.5
7.0
6.3
6.3
6.0
9.2
5.3
5.3
4.4
5.9
8.6
6.5
6.0
4.9
10.0
7.7
8.1
9.5
7.9
8.1
5.3
5.8
3.4
5.8
4.1

6
T

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OE ELECTRICITY
able

3. —

A verage v ric es per kilo w a tt-h o u r* b y cities , f o r the typ ic a l m on th ly use o f
2 5 kilow att-hours f o r lighting and sm all a p p lia n ces

[Arrayed by prices in ascending rank for December 1938, with price for each city in March 1923]
December March
1923
1938

City
Memphis
Cleveland- Washington____
Birmingham___

____
_ __

Louisville__
_ __ _ __
Dallas
. _____
Los Angeles________ _______
Buffalo
_ _ _____
Baltimore. _ ________ ______
M inneapolis..............................
Omaha __ _________________
St. Louis..
Houston
_ . . ..
Columbus _ . ___
Pittsburgh_______ _______
Scranton________________ _
P eoria.__ _____________
Springfield____________ ..
St. Paul_______________ __
Norfolk___________ ________
Richmond _________ _
Portland, Oreg_____ ____ _
Seattle___ ___
Kansas City

3. 5
3.9
3.9
3.9
4.0
4.1
4.2
4.4
4.5
4.5
4.7
4.8
4.8
4.8
4.9
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.1

8.0
4.6
10.0
7.7
7.7
7.6
6.0
5.8
5.2
8.0
8.5
5.5
6.8
5. 6
6.9
6.9
10.0
7. 7
6.0
9.9
9.0
9.0
6.2
6.0
7.4

City
Mobile______________ _ __ .
San Francisco_________ __ _
Bridgeport________________
New Haven___ _________ __
Atlanta____ _____ _________
Chicago_________ ________
Indianapolis____ ____ ... __
Detroit______________ ... _.
Philadelphia________
Milwaukee_______ _ ______
Charleston, S. C............ ..........
Jacksonville............... ._ .. ..
Denver__________ _ .
Boston........................ .......... ...
Butte. .........................................
Fall River_________________
Rochester_______________
New Orleans___________ _.
Savannah____ _______ ._
Salt Lake City____________
New York_____ ___________
Providence_________ ____
Little Rock_____ _ ________
Newark. _________________
Portland, Maine.......................
Manchester...........................

December March
1938
1923
5. 2
5. 2
5.3
5. 3
5. 3
5.4
5. 5
5.6
5.7
5.7
6.0
6.0
6.1
6.2
6.2
6. 3
6. 3
6. 3
6.5
6.5
6.8
7.0
7.1
7.2
7. 4
8.0

9.0
7.2
7.5
7.5
8.1
7.1
7.0
6.2
7. 5
7.4
10.0
7.0
8.0
9.5
9.5
9.5
8.0
9.8
9.0
8.1
8.8
8.9
10.0
9.0
8.0
12.0

1 Includes State or local sales taxes where applicable.
For an analysis of the price data, the typical bill and unit price for
the monthly consumption of 25 kilowatt-hours was chosen as most
representative of the use of current by the average customer, who does
not use major appliances. The average number of customers served
at specified consumption levels in 1937 for 42 of the 5Tcities included
in this report is shown in table 4. These data, which were supplied
by the Federal Power Commission, reveal that an average of about
60 percent of these customers consumed 60 kilowatt-hours or less
monthly. From analyses of consumption habits of thousands of
residential customers, it was found that the average consumption for
customers using less than 60 kilowatt-hours per month was about
25 kilowatt-hours and that the great majority of these customers
used current for lighting and small appliances only. This informa­
tion supports the choice of the 25-kilowatt-hour service for purposes
of price analysis. A careful study of the distribution of customers
by consumption levels in the various cities and the price prevailing
in those cities in 1937 indicates a shift toward higher consumption
levels when prices are reduced.
The following discussion of price changes for the 25-kilowatt-hour
service is taken up by cities arranged by geographical divisions. In
the main, this grouping is satisfactory for this purpose. All Federal,
State, and local sales taxes were excluded from the prices in order




SUM M ARY AND PRICE ANALYSIS

7

that the time-to-time and place-to-place comparisons might be based
upon differences in rates only. Weighted average prices were com­
puted for all cities where there was more than one company or when
more than one rate schedule was operative at the same date.
In any discussion of price levels or price changes, it should be remem­
bered that there were differences in cost as well as differences in the
policies of rate-making bodies among the cities included in this report.
As stated above, there was an average decrease of 26.9 percent in
the price for the monthly use of 25 kilowatt-hours between March
1923 and December 1938 for the 51 cities combined. A large part of
this decrease occurred after March 1933. Percentage changes alone
are inadequate for purposes of comparison because of the differences
in price levels among the various cities in March 1923, the date
from which the time changes are measured. The following detailed
price analysis gives a picture of these price levels, of price changes,
and of the intervals between these changes. The city prices used in
this analysis are shown in table 5 with the cities arranged by geograph­
ical areas. Prices as of March 1923 with the date that these prices
became effective are presented together with price changes which
were made in subsequent years.
T able

A—
.

U r b a n r e s id e n tia l c o n s u m p t i o n o f ele c tr ic ity — a vera g e n u m b e r o f c u s to m e r s
s erv ed m o n t h l y i n 1 9 8 7 at s p e c ifie d c o n s u m p t i o n levels

Average
Blocks of consumption number of Cumulative
percentage
in kilowatt-hours
customers
of total
0-10__________________
11-20________ ______
21-30_________________
31-40_________________
41-50_________________
51-60__________________
61-80__________________




329,653
717,642
828, 545
687,665
557,983
460,241
715,681

Average
Blocks of consumption number of Cumulative
percentage
in kilowatt-hours
customers of total

481,417
5.8 81-100________________
18.4 101-150________________ 532,237
182, 285
33.0 151-200________________
123,468
45.1 201-300________________
71,454
54.9 Over 300_____ ________
63.0
Total—....................... 5,688,271
75.6

84.0
93.4
96.6
98.8
100.0
100.0

T

able

5 . — A v e r a g e p r i c e s p e r k il o w a t t -h o u r , b y c itie s , f o r the m o n th ly u s e o f 2 5 k ilo w a tt-h o u r s , i n M a r c h 1 9 2 3 , w ith effec tiv e d a te, a n d ch a n g es

G
O

in su bseq u en t ye a rs

[No sa taxes in d
les
clu ed]

Effective Price
date of
in
price in March
March
1923 1923
1923

Price changes
1924

Cts. Cts. Cts.
New England:
Sept. 1922
9. 5
Boston _ _ _ __ _ _
7.5
7.0
Bridgeport__ .. _ ______ Jan. 1923
Oct. 1922
9. 5 9.0
Jan. 1922 12.0
Jan. 1923
7. 5
7.0
P o r tla n d , M a in e
May 1921
8.0
P r o v id e n c e 2
Aug. 1922
8.9
Middle Atlantic:
5.2
Buffalo - .
___________ Jan. 1923
9.0
8.8
Newark _ _ ___________ Dec. 1922
New York 2 _ __________ Oct. 1922* 8.8
7. 5
Philadelphia ........................... May 1922
Pittsburgh _ _ _ _ _ _ _
July 1919
6.9 6.6
8.0
Rochester
__
______ Sept. 1922
................ Sept. 1920 10.0
Scranton._ __
East North Central:
7.1 6.6
Jan. 1918
Chicago
____ _
Jan. 1921
7.7
Cincinnati
_
____
Cleveland
_ ____ ___ June 19203 4.6
Columbus __ __ _____ _ June 19213 6.9
6. 2
Detroit
___ __ __ __ July 1922
July 1922
7.0
Indianapolis._ _ ___ __
7.4
6.8
Milwaukee ____ _ _____ _ Jan. 1922
7.7
Peoria __ _ __________ _ June 1917
Dec. 1922* 6.0
Springfield
__ ____
West North Central:
IT ansas C i t v
J a n . 1920
7.4 7.5
8.5
Minneapolis
_____ May 1921
O m aha
5.5
Feb. 1922
6.7 )
St. Louis ._ _ ________ Aug. 1922* 6.8 \f 1 6. 6 J..........
9.9
St. Paul_____________________ Apr. 1913



1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

1938

Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts. Cts.
6.2
7.8
8.5
6.5

8. 5

6. 5

6.0
8.5

4.6
8.0

5.5
8.0
10.4
5. 5
7.5

7.0

9. 5

7. 5
5.5
6. 7

5. 3
7.7
7. 3
6.9

6. 2

7. 3

8.0

7. 5
8.6
7.2
6. 3
6.6
3.9

5.9

8.0

/ 7.5 }..........
l 1 7. 0 J
8.0

6.1

6. 5

7. 0
8.5

6.2
7.0

6.6

5.3

9.4

f 7.8 } 7.6 f 7.4 ) 7.1
\ 1 7. 7 /
\ 1 7. 2 f
7.0 6.6
6. 5
9.0

4.8
6. 8

6.0

6.5

6. 2

6.3
6.0
f 5.3
\ 1 5. 0 }..........
J
7.4

4.5

7.0
5.0
4.9
5.8

4.5

7. 2
6.6

5.6
5.4
4.0
5.4

5.7

7.0

7.4
7.4
6.7
5.6

7.7
7.0
6.0
5.0
6.3
6. 5

6.7
4.7

7.0

6.3

5.5
5.0

4.8
6.4

5.9

5.0
4.7
5.0

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

City

139863

8 .1
8 .0
1 0 .0
7 .0
9 .0
9 .0
9 .0
1 0 .0

D ec.
A p r.
N ov.
D ec.
M ar.
M ar.
Aug.
S e p t.

1920
1917
1919
1913
1918
1918
1920
1921

Aug.

1921

7 .7

A p r . 1918
N o v . 1922
A p r . 1921

7 .6
8 .0
9 .0

M ar.
M ar.
S e p t.
O c t.

9 .0
7 .5
7. 5

8. 5
8. 5
7 .5

7 .0

6 .3

5 .9

1 0 .0
5 .2

4. 7

4. 2

D e c . 1913
M a y 1906
M a r . 1917

9 .5
8 .0
8 .1

5 .8
6. 2
7. 2
6 .0

5 .7

(
6 .1
\ 1 5. 7

)
J

9 .4

5 .2

4 .7

4 .4

5 .0
4 .8
7 .3

4 .8

6 .8

6 .4

6 .2
7 .3

7 .5

5. 0

5 .1
6. 6

4 .4
1 3 .9
4 .0
3 .5

4 .4

4 .8
5. 5
6 .1

5 .6
5 .0

3
A v e r a g e p rice for all c o m p a n ie s w a s e ffe c tiv e o n th is d a te .
for in d iv id u a l c o m p a n ie s .

4 .2
7 .0
6 .3

7 .5

6 .0

6. 6

f
\

5 .2

5 .5
5 .2
8 .4
8 .5

5 .8

5. 6

6 .0
6 .0
5 .0
5 .0

5 .5
5 .5

5 .9

8 .0

M ay
Jan.
Feb.
J u ly

6 .0
6 .0

5 .0
5 .5

7 .0

6 .0
5 .6
1 0 .0
9 .8

4 .5
6 .2

3 .9

8 .0

1922
1922
1918
1918

19223
1 9 213
1923
19203

6 .5
6. 5
6 .5

7 .0
7 .0

5 .3

6 .1
7 .4

6 .2

1 S e c o n d c h a n g e w it h in th e y e a r.
2 P rice s in c lu d e fu e l a d ju s t m e n t s a n d are sh o w n for o n ly th ose p eriod s w h e n n e w r ate
s c h e d u le s b e c a m e e f fe c t iv e .




8 .8
5 .0
8 .5

9 .0
6 .7

7 .0

5 .0
5 .2

SUM M ARY AND PRICE ANALYSIS

S
I
1
10

South Atlantic:
Atlanta________
Baltimore______
Charleston_____
Jacksonville____
Norfolk________
Richmond_____
Savannah______
Washington____
East South Central:
Birmingham____
Louisville______
Memphis_______
Mobile________
West South Central:
Dallas____ ____
Houston_______
Little Rock____
New Orleans___
Mountain:
Butte__________
Denver________
Salt Lake City..
Pacific:
Los Angeles____
Portland, Oreg_.
San Francisco....
Seattle_________

See t a b le 8 for rec o rd s

CO

10

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

N e w E n g la n d .— For a monthly consumption of 25 kilowatt-hours,
the average price per unit in March 1923 was 9.1 cents for the seven
cities in this group. This was higher than for any other group. Prices
ranged from 7.5 cents in Bridgeport and New Haven to 12.0 cents
in Manchester. City prices in March 1923 had been in effect for com­
paratively short periods. Reductions occurring at more frequent
intervals in some cities than in others brought the price for the group
to 6.3 cents by December 1938. This was a decrease of 31 percent.
Boston served more than 50.0 percent of the residential customers
in 1935 and the price for Boston, which ranged from 9.5 cents per
kilowatt-hour in 1923 to 6.2 cents in 1938, was a controlling factor
in the average price for the group. Bridgeport and New Haven had
identical rates. The price was 7.5 cents in 1923. Four decreases
were made between this period and the end of 1928. The next
reduction, a slight one, was made in 1932, when the price went to 5.3
cents where it remained. For these cities, the price both in 1923 and
1938 was slightly below the average for the 51 cities combined.
Fall River, with a price of 9.5 cents in 1923 and 6.3 cents in 1938
ranked with the group of high-priced cities at both periods. De­
creases of 0.5 cent each occurred in 1923, 1926, and 1928. There
was no further change until 1935 when a reduction of the same amount
was made in April and another in June. In 1937 the price declined
to 6.3 cents and remained at this level through 1938. Manchester,
at 12.0 cents per kilowatt-hour, had the highest price of any reporting
city in March 1923. There was a decrease to 10.4 cents in 1928
with lesser declines in 1929 and 1930. No further change occurred
until 1935, when the price went from 9.4 cents to 8.0 cents, leaving
Manchester again with the highest price of any of the 51 cities. Port­
land, Maine, showed its first reduction from 8.0 cents to 7.5 cents
in 1928. The latter price remained in effect until 1937, when there
was a slight decrease to 7.4 cents. Over the full interval of 16 years,
the decrease for Portland amounted to 7% percent and this city ranked
next to Manchester in 1938 as one of the relatively high-priced
cities. In Providence, the price was 8.9 cents in 1923. The first
decrease to 8.5 cents was made in 1927; the next, to 7.7 cents, was
made in 1932. Other reductions followed in 1935 and 1936, when
the price of 7.0 cents became effective.
M id d le A tla n tic .— The average price of 8.3 cents per kilowatt-hour
shown for the seven cities in this group in March 1923 was exceeded only
in New England and in the South Atlantic area. City prices ranged
from 5.2 cents in Buffalo to 9.0 cents in Newark and 10.0 cents in
Scranton. The price decrease of 22.5 percent shown for the period
between 1923 and 1938, inclusive, was less than for any other group.
The group price level of 6.4 cents in December 1938 exceeded the




SUM M ARY AND PRICE ANALYSIS

11

average for other groups but was only slightly above that shown for
the New England and Mountain area cities.
Buffalo, which had a price of 5.2 cents in 1923 ranked next to
Cleveland as the lowest-priced city at that date. Only two decreases
were made, one in 1925 and the other in 1934. In December 1938,
Buffalo still ranked with the 10 lowest-priced cities. Newark, with
a price of 9.0 cents in 1923 ranked with the high-priced cities. There
was a decrease to 8.8 cents in 1924 and no further change until 1933,
when there was a decline to 8.6 cents. Later reductions brought the
price in 1938 to 7.2 cents. Only two cities reported a higher price for
that year.
New York City served more than 60 percent of the customers
reported for this area. In 1923, there were seven reporting com­
panies with an average price of 8.8 cents. Five of these companies,
which in 1923 showed prices ranging from 7.0 cents to 12.0 cents,
were, in 1932, reporting the same price, 7.2 cents. In August 1935,
a single rate schedule became operative for these companies and the
price decreased to 7.0 cents. Another reduction to 6.6 cents followed
in 1937. These consolidated companies served more than 95 percent
of the city’s customers. The first decrease for Philadelphia was
made in 1929 from 7.5 cents to 7.0 cents, followed by another de­
crease to 6.6 cents in 1930. Three further reductions in 1933 and
later years resulted in a price of 5.6 cents, effective in 1937.
In Pittsburgh, a price of 6.9 cents was effective from 1919 until
June 1923, when it was decreased to 6.6 cents, a price relatively low
for that period. Further reductions were made in 1928, 1932, and
1935, that in 1935 from 6.2 cents to 5.0 cents being the largest single
decrease for the city. The price for Rochester was 8.0 cents in 1923
and remained unchanged until 1931, when it was reduced to 6.9 cents.
Two decreases followed, one in 1933, the other in 1935. The latter
price of 6.3 cents was unchanged in 1938. Rochester showed prices
above the average both in 1923 and in 1938. Scranton at 10.0 cents
was one of the five cities showing the highest prices in 1923. There
was a decrease to 9.0 cents in 1928 and no further change until 1934,
when the price dropped to 7.0 cents. Additional decreases were
made in 1935 and in 1937. The price of 5.0 cents effective in 1937
was a reduction of 50 percent below the level of 1923. More than
90 percent of this decrease was made after December 1933.
E a s t N o r th C en tra l .— The average price per kilowatt-hour for the
nine cities in this area was 6.7 cents in March 1923. City prices
ranged from 4.6 cents in Cleveland to 7.7 cents in Cincinnati and
Peoria. Five of the nine cities showed prices of 7.0 cents or more.
Cleveland, at that time, had the lowest price of any of the 51 reporting
cities. There was an average decrease of 23 percent for the group
between March 1923 and December 1938. Fifteen percent of the




12

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OE ELECTRICITY

decrease was made subsequent to 1932. This does not adequately
tell the story of the changes for the separate cities in the group.
City decreases ranged from 13 percent for Detroit to 48 percent for
Cincinnati.
Chicago, which served more than 40 percent of the customers in
1935, had the same price of 7.1 cents from 1918 until August 1923,
when it went to 6.6 cents. The next decrease in 1928 was to 6.2
cents, followed by a small decrease in 1932. A substantial reduction
to 5.4 cents came in 1936. Cincinnati made two reductions which
carried the price from 7.7 cents to 7.0 cents in 1928, but the greater
part of the decrease of 48 percent for the full interval came in 1934,
1935, and 1936. The price of 4.0 cents effective in 1936 and con­
tinuing into 1938 placed Cincinnati in rank with the five lowest
priced cities in December 1938. For Cleveland, two prices were in
effect in 1923, that of 5.0 cents reported for the private company
serving more than three-fourths of the customers and 3.0 cents shown
for the municipal company whose facilities for residential service were
limited. The municipal company raised its price in 1925. Both
companies reported decreases in 1933. The municipal company,
which has maintained a lower price level throughout, reduced its
price again in 1937. In December 1938 only one city showed a price
lower than the average for Cleveland.
Columbus, like Cleveland, was served by both a municipal and a
private company, the latter serving more than 90 percent of the cus­
tomers in 1935. In March 1923 the price reported by the municipal
company was 5.0 cents and had been in effect since 1916. That shown
for the private company was 7.0 cents, effective in 1921. The greater
part of the average decline of 28 percent for the companies combined
occurred in 1934, both companies lowering their rates at that time. In
December 1938 the range between the prices for the two companies
had narrowed. That shown for the municipal company was 4.0 cents,
for the private company 5.0 cents. For Detroit the relative decline
was less than for other cities in this group. The price of 6.2 cents,
effective in 1922, was reduced to 5.5 cents in 1926. There was a
smaller reduction to 5.4 cents in 1936.
Indianapolis, with a price of 7.0 cents in 1923, was then served by
two companies with identical rates. The price was reduced to 6.8
cents in 1925. In 1926 there was a merger of the companies and
thereafter Indianapolis was served under a single rate schedule. A
price decrease to 6.5 cents followed in 1927. No further reduction
took place until 1932, when the price went to 6.3 cents. There were
additional decreases to 5.8 cents in 1934 and to 5.5 cents in 1937.
This latter price remained in effect through 1938. In Milwaukee,
which showed a price of 7.4 cents in 1923, there were gradual and
material reductions, the last decrease from 6.2 cents to 5.7 cents




SUM M ARY AND PRICE ANALYSIS

13

occurring in 1935. Peoria, which shared with Cincinnati the highest
price of 7.7 cents shown for the group in 1923, was conspicuous for the
long interval from 1917 to February 1929, with no price change. In
1929 it showed a reduction to 7.3 cents. Additional decreases of 18.0
percent in 1933 and 16.7 percent in 1938 resulted in a decline from
7.7 cents to 5.0 cents over the full period.
Springfield (111.) was another city in this area in which both a
municipal and a private company reported prices throughout the
period covered by these data. Prices for both companies were identi­
cal with the exception of a short period in 1932 and were relatively
low both in 1923, 6.0 cents, and in 1938, when the price had been
reduced to 5.0 cents.
W e s t N o r th C en tra l .— This report covers five large cities in this
area. The price average for the group in 1923 was 7.6 cents per kilo­
watt-hour. Omaha had the lowest price, 5.5 cents, and St. Paul
the highest, 9.9 cents. The group decrease of 36 percent between
March 1923 and December 1938 was the net result of a decrease of
about 7 percent between March 1923 and December 1932; 21 percent
between March 1933 and December 1937; and 12 percent in 1938.
Prior to 1935 the changes in city prices were made infrequently.
The price of 9.9 cents, effective in St. Paul in 1923, remained unchanged
from 1913 through January 1926. During this period St. Paul was
served by two private companies for which prices were identical.
At that time one company acquired the properties of the other and
a decrease of 1.4 cents per kilowatt-hour followed. However, the
greater part of the decrease of almost 50 percent reported for this city
was made after 1934. St. Louis was served by two private companies,
one of which supplied more than 90 percent of the residential customers.
Prices for the companies were identical in 1923. Their only decrease
came in 1933, the smaller company showing a greater reduction. For
the cities in this group rate reductions made subsequent to 1932
brought the prices down in December 1938 to a narrow range of from
4.7 cents in Minneapolis and St. Louis to 5.0 cents in Kansas City
and St. Paul.
S ou th A tla n t ic .— The average price in March 1923 for the eight cities
in this group was 8.7 cents per kilowatt-hour, exceeded only by the
price for the New England area. In seven of these cities the prices
effective in 1923 remained unchanged over long periods, ranging from
8 years for Atlanta to 25 years for Jacksonville, where the price as of
December 1913 was unchanged until April 1938. The price range in
1923 was from 7.0 cents for Jacksonville to 10.0 cents for Charleston
(S. C.) and Washington. Many changes took place in the cities in
this group, resulting in a total decrease between March 1923 and
December 1938 of 46 percent, about two-thirds of which was made
between March 1933 and May 1938.




14

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Jacksonville was served by a municipal company and the price of 7.0
cents per kilowatt-hour in 1913 was relatively low for that period,
but the price of 6.0 cents, effective in 1938, was above the average of
5.6 cents for the 51 cities combined. In both Atlanta and Savannah,
the price to the small consumer was advanced in 1929. No reduction
of account took place in either city until 1934 when Savannah made
its only reduction to 6.5 cents and Atlanta introduced the “ objective
rate plan.” Under this plan, two rates were available, the lower to
those customers using more current in any month than during the
corresponding month of some specified earlier year (see p. 42). There
was another decrease for Atlanta in 1937, and in December 1938 more
than half of the customers were buying current at the lower rate
with an average price of 5.3 cents. Charleston, like Atlanta, intro­
duced the objective rate plan in 1934 with a decrease of about 28
percent during the next four years. In 1938 the lower rate became
the general rate and the price was 6.0 cents, as in Jacksonville. The
Washington price of 10.0 cents was reduced to 7.5 cents in 1925 fol­
lowed by annual decreases to 3.9 cents in February 1932 with no
further decrease. In December 1938, only one city, Memphis, which
reduced its rate in that month, had a lower price than Washington.
In Baltimore, Norfolk, and Richmond, the prices effective in 1918
remained unchanged until 1927. By 1938, prices for each city had
decreased about 44 percent. The price for Baltimore was lower than
for the other two cities.
E a s t S ou th C en tra l .— The average price in 1923 of 7.8 cents per kilo­
watt-hour for the four cities in this group was representative of each of
the cities except Mobile, where the price of 9.0 cents was effective
from April 1921 until February 1929. The reduction of about 50
percent for the group to an average price of 4.0 cents in December 1938
was almost entirely due to changes made subsequent to March 1933
and resulted in a lower price than for any other group. The price of
8.0 cents for Memphis in 1923 was unchanged until 1932, when it was
reduced to 7.0 cents. There was another reduction to 5.5 cents in
1934. Memphis reported a rate reduction effective in December
1938, which brought the price for that city to 3.5 cents, a decrease of
36 percent. This was the lowest price shown for any of the 51 cities
in December 1938. Two of the cities in this group adopted the use of
the objective rate plan, Mobile in 1933 and Birmingham in 1935. As
the consumption of current increased, the price to the customer was
lowered. Mobile made one change after the introduction of this plan
and, with an average price of 5.2 cents in December 1938, ranked
highest in the group. Birmingham made four reductions while this
plan was in effect and in December 1938 returned to a single rate
schedule with a price of 3.9 cents, ranking, together with two cities in
other areas, next to Memphis. The price of 7.6 cents for Louisville in




SU M M ARY AND PRICE ANALYSIS

15

1923 had become effective in 1918 and was at that time lower than the
average for all cities combined. This price was unchanged for 16
years and by 1934, when the first reduction was made, this price was
high. In March 1934, the price was reduced to 5.0 cents, followed by
a further reduction in 1936 and another to 4.0 cents in November 1938,
when Louisville again ranked with the low-price cities.
W e s t S ou th C en tra l .— The price average in 1923 for the four cities in
this group was 7.5 cents per kilowatt-hour. Dallas and Houston were
then among the lower-priced cities and New Orleans and Little Rock
ranked with those showing the highest prices. The group reduction
of 29 percent between March 1923 and December 1938 practically all
occurred in 1934 and later years. Dallas and Houston, in December
1938, again ranked with the cities showing the lowest prices. In New
Orleans, the price remained at 9.8 cents from October 1918 until April
1934. The decrease at this time, with two made afterward, brought
the price to 6.3 cents in 1938. In Little Rock there was no change in
the price of 10.0 cents effective in 1918 until 1930. This was followed
by a second and greater reduction in 1934. The objective rate plan
introduced in 1936 was discontinued in 1938 when a further decrease
was made. New Orleans and Little Rock, in 1938, again ranked with
the higher-priced cities.
M o u n t a i n .— The three widely separated cities in this group had an
average price of 8.1 cents per kilowatt-hour in 1923. The cities in
this area, like those in the South Atlantic area, maintained their prices
over long periods. In Butte there was no change from December
1913 to July 1923. In Denver the price was unchanged from 1906
until 1927, and in Salt Lake City customers received no price reduc­
tion from 1917 through 1928. The average price for these cities was
6.2 cents in December 1938, a reduction of 23 percent below 1923, but
a price level higher than for all other areas except New England and
the Middle Atlantic.
In Butte, the price was unchanged at 9.5 cents from 1913 to July
1923 when it was decreased to 8.0 cents. The next reduction was
made in November 1935 when the price of 6.2 cents became effective.
For Denver there were two decreases, one in 1927, the other in 1932,
with reductions from 8.0 cents to 6.6 cents and later to 6.0 cents. In
Salt Lake City the price was 8.1 cents from 1917 until 1929, when it
was reduced to 7.5 cents. Although the objective rate plan was intro­
duced in 1935, the majority of the customers received no price reduc­
tion until 1936 when the price under the “ present” rate became 7.0
cents. In 1937, the price of 6.4 cents became effective for both rates
and remained unchanged when the objective rate plan was discon­
tinued in 1938. The prices for each of the 3 cities in this group were
above the average for the 51 cities combined both in 1923 and in 1938.




16

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

P a c ific .— The four largest cities on the Pacific coast were included in
this report. They were among the cities showing relatively low prices
both in 1923 and in 1938. In March 1923, the average price was
6.2 cents per kilowatt-hour for the group. Prices were lowest in Los
Angeles and highest in San Francisco. The group price in Decem­
ber 1938 was 4.7 cents, a reduction of 24 percent. Only one group,
the East South Central, showed a lower average price at that date.
Three companies were operating in Los Angeles in 1923. The
municipal company and one of the private companies maintained
identical prices and in 1935 were each serving slightly less than 50
percent of the customers. The price of 5.6 cents was maintained
from October 1920 until August 1927, when it was reduced to 5.0
cents. There was a further reduction to 4.8 cents in January 1930.
In February 1936, there was another decrease to 4.4 cents. In Jan­
uary 1937, the municipal company purchased the private company.
The price of 4.4 cents was still in effect in 1938. The third smaller
company had a higher price in 1923 and its reductions kept it at a
higher price level than the other companies until 1932. Since 1932
all customers in Los Angeles have been served at the same rate and
in December 1938 only seven cities showed a lower price. In Port­
land, Oreg., although two private companies served the city, the price
was the same to all customers throughout the period of this report.
At 6.2 cents per kilowatt-hour in 1917, the price remained unchanged
until 1930 when it was reduced to 5.5 cents. The next and last
change was in 1937, to 5.0 cents. This represented a decrease of
20 percent below the price of 1923. Seattle was served by both a
municipal and a private company. The older municipal company
maintained a price of 6.0 cents fiom 1907 until June 1923, when there
was a decrease to 5.6 cents. The private company, with a price of
6.0 cents in 1920 made a reduction to 5.5 cents in June 1923. No
further change was made until 1935 when both companies made a
decrease to 5.0 cents, a price relatively low and shared in 1938 by
Portland, Oreg., and 7 other of the 51 cities. Two private companies
were serving San Francisco at the same rate in 1923. The price of
7.2 cents effective in February of that year was the highest for the
group. No reduction was made until 1928. This was followed by a
second reduction in March 1930. In June of that year, there was a
merger and, thereafter, San Francisco was served by a single com­
pany. The price was then unchanged until 1936 when it went from
6.1 cents to 5.6 cents and then dropped to 5.2 cents in 1937. This
price, which was still in effect in 1938, represented a decrease of about
28 percent below the level of 1923. San Francisco, however, still had
the highest price of any of the four cities in the group.
This discussion, which covers the price changes for the monthly
consumption level of the average customer, does not take into ac-




COMPUTATION OP PRICES AND INDEXES

17

count the greater number of price reductions made for larger blocks
of consumption. In December 1938, prices for customers using as
much as 100 kilowatt-hours monthly were, in most cases, well below
the level of those discussed in this summary. These prices are shown
in table 2.

Computation of Prices and Indexes
P r ic e s .— The prices computed in 1934 by the revised method were
based upon the use of 25 and 40 kilowatt-hours per month as typical
in large cities of the average use of current for lighting and the usual
small energy-consuming household appliances. The next service
chosen was 100 kilowatt-hours, which allowed for the use of current
for additional appliances including refrigeration. The prices for this
service showed distinctly the results of promotional rates. The
fourth service of 250 kilowatt-hours represented the total current
required when a range was included with the appliances used. The
resulting prices for this fourth service indicated still further the bene­
fits received by customers who could avail themselves of the lower
rates for increased consumption. As the amount of consumption
rose, the price per unit was lower, although the monthly bills advanced
with increased consumption. For the computation of indexes show­
ing the changes in the prices of electricity paid by the residential
customer, the first three typical services were chosen. The fourth
service of 250 kilowatt-hours was not deemed representative for this
historical study of price changes.
In order to standardize the prices, it was agreed to accept the
monthly consumptions of current indicated above as most nearly
approximating the average requirements for the usual five-room house,
including living room, dining room, kitchen, and two bedrooms. It
was recognized that such standardization might not be fully repre­
sentative for each city. These standards were maintained throughout
the entire period covered by the indexes. Although the services
rendered by both the electric-utility and electric-appliance industries
were much more efficient in 1938 than in 1923, it was decided that
these standards were best suited to the residential consumption of
current over this long interval of 16 years, when rate schedules were
being modified to meet the later efficiencies.
For each of these three typical services— 25 kilowatt-hours, 40
kilowatt-hours, and 100 kilowatt-hours— typical monthly bills and
unit prices were computed for each city at quarterly periods beginning
with March 1923. All local, State, and Federal sales taxes have been
included in the Bureau’s computations of indexes, since they con­
stituted a portion of the price paid by the ultimate consumer. The
basic data required to insure both the accuracy and the adequacy of
these computations, including specifications used in computing




18

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

monthly bills, definitions of technical terms, and descriptions of types
of rate schedules are presented in detail in pages 37 to 44. This
supporting information is summarized in table 8, which shows for
each company the types of rate schedules used for each service through­
out the entire period, together with such other significant data as is
pertinent to the resulting prices.
C ity in d e x e s .— Indexes of changes in the retail prices of electricity
related to the 3-year average 1923-25 were then computed for each
of the 3 typical services for each of 51 cities. The cities, arranged
by geographical divisions, whose rate schedules were used in the
computation of indexes, are listed in table 6.

T a b l e 6. —

W e i g h t i n g f a c t o r s f o r i n d e x e s o f re ta il p r i c e s o f e le c tr ic ity f o r 5 1
c o m b in e d

c itie s

[Based upon number of residential customers as of Dec. 31,1935]
Region and city
51 cities combined----------- -----------------------New England:
Boston _____ _ _________ _______
Bridgeport __ _ _______________________
Fall River ___ __ ______ ____ ___
Manchester. ______ _____________ . ___
New Haven _________ ____ _________ ____
Portland, Maine __ _____ ______ __
Providence--------- ----------------------- . _ ___
Middle Atlantic:
Buffalo___________ _________________ __
Newark ___________________ __ - - ____
New York (5 boroughs'). __ _ _____
Philadelphia. __ ------------------------ -------Pittsburgh ___________ . ---------------------Rochester__________________ _____
Scranton_________________ ___ __
East North Central:
Chicago_______________ _____ _____ _ .
Cincinnati _____________________________
Cleveland______________________ ________
Columbus________ ____ _________________
Detroit______________________ __________
Indianapolis________ . . . _______________
Milwaukee__________ __ ---------------------Peoria______ ___________ _________
Springfield, 111_______ _____ _______
West North Central:
Kansas C i t y ... _______________________
Minneapolis________________ __________
Omaha__________________________________
St. Louis________________________________
St. Paul_________________________________

Ratio
weight
100.0
4.3
.5
A
.2
.7
.2
1.2
2.1
1.8
23.7
5.2
1.9
1.3
.5
10.9
1.5
2.9
1.0
4.9
1.2
1.9
.4
.3
1.2
1.5
.7
2.8
.9

Region and city
South Atlantic:
Atla/nta
Baltimore.. _____________________
Charleston, S. C ________________ ... _
Jacksonville________ ________ _ _
Norfolk________________________
Richmond__________________________ _
Savannah._ _________ _ . . . ______ _
Washington, D. C ___ __ _ _ . . .
East South Central:
Birmingham _______ _________________ _
Louisville_______________ _ __________
Memphis_________________ ____ ____
Mobile_____________ _________________
West South Central:
Dallas_____ ____________
Houston_____ __ ______ _______ __
Little Rock _____________________________
New Orleans. __________ _____________
Mountain:
Butte ___________________ _____ ________ __
Denver ________ _______________ _____
Salt Lake City .................. ........ ..........
Pacific:
Los Angeles____________________ .
Portland, Oreg________________ .
San Francisco. ___________________ . . .
Seattle____________ ___________ ________ __

Ratio
weight
0.7
2.6
.l
A
.. 3
5
.2
1. 7
.7
.9
.6
.2
.8
.9
.2
1.0
.l
1.0
.

5

5.6

1. 2
2.3
1.4

For cities served by more than one company, one index was com­
puted by weighting the price for each company by the number of resi­
dential customers served by that company in 1935. For cities served
under the objective rate plan, which comprise two separate schedules
either of which was available to the customers, two indexes were
shown. These city indexes are given in table 7 for the quarters
from March 1926 through December 1938. In all cases the net




C O M P U T A T IO N

OF P R IC E S

AND

IN D E X E S

19

monthly bills and prices per kilowatt-hour are shown both for the
base period and for December 1938. These bills and prices allow for
a more intelligent interpretation of the indexes, which measure time
changes only without regard to differences in price levels at the base
period.
C om p osite in d e x e s .— The city indexes were combined into composite
indexes with the use of weighting factors representing the number
of residential customers served by each company as of December
1935 or that approximate date. These ratio weights are shown in
table 6. It was not possible to obtain separate customer data for
each service and it was, therefore, necessary to use identical weights
for the three services. For this reason, the composite indexes, as
well as city indexes, measure price changes only and take no account
of the variation in the number of customers served at each consump­
tion level. These indexes are shown in table 1 in the Summary.
Since the cities with the greatest population have the heaviest weights,
the trends indicated by the composite indexes are influenced by prices
prevailing in these cities. The usefulness of the indexes for the
100 kilowatt-hour monthly service would be greatly enhanced had it
been possible to compute a second index for this service weighted by
the number of customers actually billed for this amount of current.




20

CHANGES

T able 7.—

IN

R E T A IL

P R IC E S

OF E L E C T R IC IT Y

In d ex es o f retail prices o f electricity, by cities, M a r c h 1 9 2 8 -D e c e m b e r
1 9 3 8 , inclusive

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
N ew England
Boston

Year and m onth

Bridgeport

Fall River

25
kwh
Average, 1923-25:
N et b ill----------------------------------- Price per kwh _ ---------- - - - 1926 —M arch------------------------------------June____ ______________________
September____________________
December --------------------------1927—M arch________ ________________
J u n e ------ ---------------------------Septem ber___________________
December _
_- - 1928 —M arch________________________
June. _ -------------------------------September _ - - - - - - -----December __________________
1929—M arch________________________
June__________________________
Septem ber-- ---------------------December __________________
1930—M arch________________________
J u n e .___ - Septem ber____________________
Decem ber- __________________
1931—M arch-.- ____________________
June__________________________
Septem ber____________________
December - -_
------1932—M arch________________________
_ --- - ----J u n e .- ____
September _ _ - - - - - -------December -----------------------------1933—M a r c h -------- ------------------------.
June
- - - - - - ----September..
------- _ .
Decem ber
__ -- ------ 1934—M a r c h _______________________
June__________________________
Septem ber____________________
December ____
___ __ 1935—M arch- _____________________
June__________________________
Septem ber____________________
Decem ber ______________ _____
1936—M arch________________________
June____________________ ____
Septem ber____________________
Decem ber - - - - - - - - 1937—M arch________________________
June_______________ ___________
September_____ - - __ _____
Decem ber
_1938—M arch. _______ ___________
June_____ ___________________
Septem ber____________________
Decem ber- __ _______________
Decem ber 1938:
N et bill_________________________
Average price per kw h__________

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

$2. 33
9.30
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
83.6
83.6
83.6
83.6
83. 6
83. 6
83.6
83.6
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
70. 7
70. 7
70.7
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4
66.4

$3. 73
9.30
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
72.3
72.3
72.3
72.3
72.3
72.3
72.3
72.3
67.0
67.0
67.0
67.0
67.0
67.0
67.0
67.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
67.0
67.0
67.0
67.0
64. 3
64.3
64.3
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6
61.6

$6. 25
6. 20
100.8
100.8
93.6
93.6
93.6
93.6
93.6
93.6
93.6
93.6
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
83.2
83.2
83.2
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6
81.6

$1.75 $2.80 $7.00
7.00 7.00 7.00
92.9 92.9 92.9
92.9 92.9 92.9
92.9 92.9 92.9
92.9 92.9 92.9
92.9 92.9 92.9
92.9 92.9 92.9
85.7 85.7 85.7
85.7 85.7 85.7
85.7 85.7 85.7
85.7 85.7 85.7
85.7 85.7 85. 7
78.6 78. 6 78.6
78.6 78.6 78. 6'
78.6 78.6 78.6
78.6 78.6 78.6
78.6 78. 6 78.6
78.6 78. 6 78.6
78.6 78. 6 78.6
78.6 78.6 78.6
78. 6 78.6 78.6
78.6 78.6 78.6
78.6 78.6 78.6
78.6 78.6 78.6
78.6 78.6 78.6
75.0 75.0 75.0
75.0 75.0 75.0
77.3 77.3 77.3
77.3 77.3 77.3
77.3 77.3 77.3
77.3 77.3 77.3
75.0 75.0 75.0
75.0 75.0 75.0
75.0 75.0 75.0
75.0 75.0 75.0
75.0 75.0 75.0
75.0 75.0 75.0
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 73.0 69.5
75.0 68.8 57.5
75.0 68.8 57.5
75.0 68.8 57,5

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

$2. 26
9. 00
99.6
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
91.2
91.2
91.2
91.2
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
69.7
69.7
69. 7
69.7
69.7
69.7
69.7

$3. 55
8. 90
99.4
91.6
91.6
91.6
91.6
91.6
91.6
91.6
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
79.8
79.8
79.8
79.8
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
77.5
73.3
73.3
73.3
73.3
73.3
73.3
73.3
73.3
66.9
66.9
66.9
66.9
66.9
66.9
66.9

$8.70
8. 70
99.2
89.1
89.1
89.1
89.1
89.1
89.1
89.1
66.1
66.1
66.1
66,1
66.1
66.1
66.1
66.1
66.1
66.1
66.1
66. 1
66. 1
66.1
66.1
66.1
66.1
66.1
68.1
68.1
68.1
68.1
66.1
66.1
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
59.8
59.8
59.8
59.8
59.8
59.8
59.8
59.8
57.2
57. 2
57. 2
57. 2
57.2
57.2
57.2

$1.55 $2. 30 $5.10 $1.31 $1.93 $4.03 $1. 58 $2.38
6. 20 5. 80 5.10 5. 30 4. 80 | 4.00 6.30 5.90

$4.98
5.00

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.




21

COMPUTATION OF PRICES AND INDEXES

T able 7.—

In d ex es o f retail prices o f electricity, by cities, M a r c h 1 9 2 3 -D e c e m b e r
1 9 3 8 , inclusive — Continued

[1923-25 = 100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
New England
Year and month

Manchester
25
kwh

Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_______________________ $3.00
Price per kwh_________________ 12. 00
1926—March______________________ 100.0
June__-___________- ---------- 100.0
September__________________ 100.0
December________ ___ ------- 100.0
1927—March- ___________________ 100.0
June----- ---------------------------- 100.0
100.0
September. __ ______ _
December_____ - - - - - - - - 100.0
1928—March_____
- _ _______ 86.3
June... _ ---------- ------------ 86.3
September_____ ____________ 86.3
December--------- ------------------- 86.3
1929—March______________________ 79.3
June_________
. - - - 79.3
September. _ _______________ 79.3
December------------ ------------- 79.3
1930—March. __ __________________ 79.3
79.3
J u n e._____ . ____
September_________________ 78.0
December___ _ . ___
78.0
1931—March______________________ 78.0
78.0
June. ___
September__________________ 78.0
December_______ - _____ - 78.0
1932—March______________________ 78.0
78.0
June_____ _ - _________
September __ _ _ _ __
. 80.3
December__________________ 80.3
1933—March... _ ___ __ __ _ __ . 80. 3
June_____
- _ _______ 80.3
September ___ _ _____
- 78.0
December__________________ 78.0
1934—March_______ ____ _________ 78.0
June_____ ________ ________ 78.0
September___ _ _ .
. 78.0
78.0
December___ _____ _ 1935—March__________________
66.7
Ju n e_____________________ - 66.7
September__________________ 66.7
December
66. 7
1936—March____________ ________ 66.7
66.7
June.. . ____________ .
66.7
September______________
December.__________ ______ . 66.7
1937—March______________________ 66.7
June... _ __________________ 66.7
September__________ ______ 66.7
December_________ ____ ___ 66. 7
1938—March______________________ 66. 7
June_____ -_- _ _____ ___ 66.7
September.
_ _ _ _ .. 66. 7
December_____________
66.7
December 1938:
Net bill_____
____________ $2.00
Average price per kwh_________ . 8.00

New Haven

Portland, Maine

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

100
40
kwh kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

$3.90
9. 80
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
93.3
93.3
93.3
93.3
87.9
87.9
87.9
87.9
87.9
87.9
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
85.6
85.6
85.6
85.6
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
71.8
71.8
71.8
71. 8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71. 8
71.8

$6. 75
6.80
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
85.6
85.6
85.6
85.6
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
81.8
81.8
81.8
81.8
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1

$1. 75
7.00
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
85.7
85.7
85.7
85.7
85.7
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
75.0
75.0
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75. 0
75.0

$2.80
7.00
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
85.7
85.7
85.7
85.7
85.7
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
68.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
75.0
75.0
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
73.0
73.0
73.0
73. 0
73.0
73.0
73.0
73.0
73.0
73.0
73.0
73.0
73.0
68. 8
68. 8
68.8

$2.00
8.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.0
94.0
78.6
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94. 0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
92. 5
92. 5
92. 5
92. 5
92.5

$3.20
8.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82. 2
82.2
82.2
84.7
84.7
84. 7
84.7
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82. 2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
82.2
81. 3
81. 3
81. 3
81. 3
81.3

$16. 44
6. 40
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
91.6
91.6
91.6
91.6
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
75.7
75.7
75.7
75.7
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73. 4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4
73. 0
73. 0
73. 0
73. 0
73.0

$2. 80 $5. 00 $1. 31 $1.93 $4.03 $1. 85 $2. 60
7. 00 5.00 5. 30 4. 80 4.00 7. 40 6. 50

$4. 70
4.70

$7.00
7.00
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
92.9
85.7
85.7
85.7
85.7
85.7
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
75.0
75.0
77.3
77.3
77. 3
77.3
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
69.5
69.5
69.5
69. 5
69.5
69.5
69.5
69.5
69.5
69.5
69. 5
69. 5
69. 5
57. 5
57. 5
57. 5

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.




22

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

T able 7.— Indexes of retail prices of electricity, by cities, M arch 1928-D ecem ber
1988, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
New England

Middle Atlantic

Providence

Y ear and month

Buffalo

Newark

25
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

$2. 23
8. 90
98. 5
98.5
98. 5
99.6
100. 8
98. 5
95.2
95.2
95. 2
95.2
95. 2
95. 2
95. 2
95. 2
95.2
95.2
95.2
95. 2
95.2
95.2
95. 2
95. 2
95. 2
95. 2
86.4
86.4
89.0
89.0
89.0
89.0
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
83. 5
83.5
83. 5
83. 5
83.5
83. 5
78.8
78.8
78.8
78. 8
78.8
78.8
78.8
78.8
78.8

$3. 27
8.20
98.4
98.4
98.4
99.6
100.8
98.4
94.7
94.7
94. 7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94. 7
94.7
94. 7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94. 7
94. 7
88.8
88.8
91.4
91.4
91.4
91.4
88.8
88.8
88.8
88.8
88.8
88.8
88.8
85.7
85. 7
85. 7
85.7
85.7
85.7
81.3
81.3
81.3
81.3
81.3
81.3
81.3
81.3
81 3

$7. 43
7. 40
98.2
98.2
98.2
99.6
100.9
98.2
90.8
90.8
90.8
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
78.7
78. 7
78.7
78.7
78.2
78.2
80.5
80.5
80. 5
80.5
78.2
78.2
78.2
78. 2
78.2
78.2
78.2
75.3
75.3
75.3
75.3
75.3
75.3
74.0
74.0
74.0
74.0
74.0
74.0
74.0
74.0
74.0

$1. 25
5. 00
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91. 7
91.7
91.7
91. 7
91.7
91. 7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
94.5
94. 5
94.5
94.5
91.7
91.7
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1
90.1

$1.85
4.60
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94. 4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94. 4
94.4
97.2
97. 2
97.2
97.2
94.4
94.4
91.7
91.7
91.7
91. 7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7

$3.34 $2. 22 $3. 49 *
3. 30 8. 90 8.70
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
95.8 99.0 97.4
98. 7 102.0 100.4
98.7 102.0 100.4
98.7 99.7 94.5
98.7 99.7 94.5
95.8 96.8 91.7
95.8 96.8 91.7
91.6 98.8 91.7
91.6 96.8 91.7
91.6 96.8 91.7
91.6 96.8 91.7
91.6 96.8 91. 7
91.6 86.4 74.5
91.6 86.4 74.5
91.6 86.4 74.5
91.6 86.4 74.5
91.6 86.4 74.5
91. 6 86.4 74.5
91.6 86.4' 74.5
91.6 82.8 72.8
91 6 82.8 72.8
91.6 82.8 72.8
91.6 82.8 72.8
91.6 81. 5 71.4
91.6 81.5 71.4
91.6 81.5 71.4
91.6 81.5 71.4

40
kwh

100
kwh
$6.86
6. 90
95.5
95. 5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
83.1
83.1
83. 1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
81.6
81. 6
84.1
84.1
79.6
79.6
77.2
77.2
77.2
77.2
77.2
77.2
77.2
65.6
65.*6
65.6
65.6
65.6
65.6
65.6
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.0
64.0
64.0
64.0

I

S'6

$1.76 $2. 66 $5.50 $1.13 $1.70 $3.06 $1.81
7.00 6.70 5.50 4. 50 4. 30 3.10 7.20

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.




25
kwh

|

Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_______________________
Price per kwh________________
1926—M arch.._ ______________ _ ..
June_________ _____ _ . . ...
September______ _ ._ _____
December_____________ _____
1927—March______________________
June.. _________________ ...
September_____ _____ _ . ...
December___ ________ ______
1928—M arch... ____________ _____
June_______ ________ .
September___________ ______
December________ .. ______
1929—March______________________
June... . . . _______ ________
September..______ _ _ ______
December________... ______
1930—March_______ _____________
June_________ _______ ...
September... ______ _________
December________________ ._
1931—March______________________
June____ ...
September________ ______ _
December_______ . _ ... _
1932—March_____________ . . . .
June..
. . . ... ..
September__________________
December____ __________ _
1933—March______________________
June______________
Septem ber.._____________ _
December__________________
1934—March______________________
June_____________ . . ... ...
September___________ ... ...
December_____________ _ ...
1935—March______________________
June____ _____ _________ .
September. _. _______________
December_________ ________
1936—March.______________________
June_____ _______ _________
September____ . ______
December____ _______ ... __
1937—March_________ ___________
June_____ _ . . . __________
September.__ _______ _______
December__________ ____ ...
1938—March_____ ____________ ._
June... __________ _________
September__________________
December___ _______________
December 1938:
Net bill______________________
Average price per kw~h_________

40
kwh

$4.39
4. 40

23

COMPUTATION OP PRICES AND INDEXES

T able 7.— Indexes of retail prices of electricity, by cities, M arch 1 928-D ecem ber
1988, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Middle Atlantic
Year and month

New York (7 com­
panies)
25
kwh

Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_______
Price per kwh_ _
1926—March-_ _ _
June— ____
September___
December----1927—March______
June________
September---December___
1928—March_____ 1
June________
September___
December___
1929—M arch._____
June________
September___
December----1930—March______
June. _____
September___
December___
1931—March______
June_____ September___
December___
1932—March___
June. _____
September___
December___
1933—March______
June______ .
September___
December----1934—March____
June. _______
September___
December___
1935—March—. _ __
June_____ .
September___
December___
1936—March____
June. _____
September___
December___
1937—March______
June____ _
September___
December___
1938—March ______
June________
September___
December___
December 1938:
Net bill_______
Average price
per kwh._ ___

40
kwh

100
kwh

Pittsburgh

Philadelphia
25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

25 kwh

40 kwh

100 kwh

$2.11 $3. 36 $8. 23 $1.87 $2. 92 $5. 94
8. 50 8. 40 8. 20 7. 50 7.30 5. 90
94.4 95.0 96.3 100.0 100.0 84.9
94. 5 95.2 96.5 100.0 100.0 84.9
94.5 95.2 96.5 100.0 100.0 84.9
94.5 95.2 96.5 100.0 100.0 84.9
91.7 92.3 93.7 100.0 100.0 84.9
91.3 91.9 93.2 100.0 100.0 84.9
91.1 91.7 93.0 100.0 100.0 84.9
91.1 91.7 93.0 100.0 100.0 84.9
91. 1 91.7 93.0 100.0 100.0 84.9
90. 7 90.9 91.7 100.0 100.0 84.9
89.7 89.9 90. 7 100.0 100.0 84.9
87.2 87.4 88.2 100.0 100.0 84.9
87.2 87.4 88.1 100.0 100.0 84.9
87.2 87.4 88.1 93.0 90.4 78.8
84.9 84.8 85.2 93.0 90.4 78.8
84. 7 84.7 84.9 93.0 90.4 78.8
84.7 84.6 84.8 93.0 90.4 78.8
84. 7 84.6 84.8 93.0 90.4 78.8
84.3 84.2 84.6 88.2 87.3 77.3
84.3 84.2 84.6 88.2 87.3 77.3
84.3 84.2 84.6 88.2 87.3 77.3
84.3 84.2 84.5 88.2 87.3 77.3
86.5 77.3 68.6 88.2 87.3 77.3
86.1 76.8 67.9 88.2 87.3 77.3
85.9 76.4 67.5 88.2 87.3 77.3
85.3 75.8 66.9 88.2 87.3 77.3
87.8 78.1 69.0 90.9 90.0 79.6
87.8 78.1 69.0 90.9 90.0 79.6
87.8 78.1 69.0 86.7 84.7 77.2
87.8 78.2 69.0 86.7 84.7 77.2
85.2 75.9 66.9 84.2 82.2 75.0
85.2 75.9 66.9 84.2 82.2 75.0
85.2 75.9 66.9 84.2 82.2 75.0
85.6 76.4 67.5 84.2 82.2 75.0
85.6 76.4 67.5 84.2 82.2 75.0
87.3 77.9 68.8 84.2 82.2 75.0
87.3 77.9 68.8 84.2 82.2 75.0
87.3 77.9 68.8 84.2 82.2 75.0
85.0 76.4 59.8 80.2 77.1 71.6
85.0 76.4 59.8 80.2 77.1 71.6
85.2 76.7 60.0 80.2 77.1 71.6
85.2 76.7 60.0 80.2 77.1 71.6
85.0 76.4 59.8 80.2 77.1 71.6
85.0 76.4 59.8 80.2 77.1 71.6
80.3 73.5 58.6 80.2 77.1 71.6
80.3 73.5 58.6 80.2 77.1 71.6
80.4 73.7 58.8 80.2 77.1 71.6
80.4 73.7 58.8 74.9 73.6 63.3
80.4 73.7 58.8 76.4 75.1 64.6
81.0 74.2 59.5 76.4 75.1 64.6
80.8 73.9 59.2 76.4 75.1 64.6
80.8 73.9 59.2 76.4 75.1 64. 6

$1. 67
6. 70
99.3
99.3
99. 3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99. 3 97. 2
2
99. 3 97. 2
99. 3 97. 2
3 97.
99.
99. 3 97. 2
99. 3 97. 2
99. 3 97. 2
99. 8 97.2
99.8 97. 2
97.
99.3 97. 2
99. 8 2
99. 3 97. 2
99. 3 97. 2
99. 8 97. 2
99. 3 97. 2
99. 8 97. 2
99. 8 97. 2
99. 3 100. 2
102. 395.697. 2
95.6
95.6
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8
74.8

$2. 36
5. 90
99.2
99.2
99.2
99.2
99.2
99.2
99.2
99.2
99. 2 97. 5
99. 2 97. 5
2 97. 5
99.
99. 2 97. 5
99. 2 97. 5
99. 2 97. 5
97. 5
99. 2 97. 5
99 2 97. 5
99.2
99. 2 97. 5
99. 2 97. 5
5
99.2 97. 5
99. 2 97. 5
99. 2 97.
99.2 97. 5
99. 2 97. 5
99. 2 97. 5
99. 2 100. 5
102.296.197. 4
96.1
96.1
93.3
93.3
93.3
93.3
93.3
93.3
93.3
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8
84.8

$4.16
4.20
99.5
99. 5
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5
99.5 103.4
99.5 103.4
99.6 103.4
99.5 103.4
99.5 103.4
99.6 103.4
99.5 103.4
99.6 103.4
99.5
99.5 103.4
99.5 103.4
99.5 103.4
103.4
99.5 103.4
99. 5 103.4
99.5 103.4
99.5 103.4
99.5 103.4
99. 5 106. 5
5 103.
102.101.5 4
101.5
101.5
98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2
96.2

$1. 71 $2. 48 $4. 87 $1.43 $2.19 $3. 84
6. 80 6. 20 4.90 5.70 5.50 3.80

$1. 25
5.00

$2.00
5. 00

$4.00
4. 00

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
New York.—City sales taxes of 2 percent for December 1934 through March 1938, and of 3 percent for June
through December 1938 were included in the computation of indexes.
Philadelphia—City sales tax of 2 percent was included in the computation of indexes for March through
December 1938.
Pittsburgh.—Indexes for March 1928 through September 1932 are shown for rate A, in italics, and
for optional rate C. Rate A was relatively unimportant after September 1932.




24

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

T able 7.— Indexes o f retail prices of electricity, by cities, M arch 1928-D ecem ber
1938, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Middle Atlantic
Year and month
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill______________________
Price per kwh _ . . _ . ____
1926—March.. __________________
June__________________ _____
September______ ... . -----December _________________
1927—March______________________
June_______ ______________
September.. _. _______ ...
December _______________
1928—March.__ __ _______________
June________ . . . .
September__________________
Decem ber------ -------------------1929—March.__ __________________
June..________ _____ - ______
September _. _ ____ . . .
December _ . . . .
----1930—March._ ___________________
June___------------------------------September__________________
December..
1931—March ... _________________
June.
- -- September________________
December .
. _ . ---1932—March______ ______________
June... .
.. .. ... ___
September
... . . . ..
December . . . . . . . . _
1933—March______________________
J u n e ..____
.
September. ._ . . . ... _
December
. . . ___
1934—March____. .. ______________
June .
..
_____
September__________________
December _ __ .. ____
1935—March. _ _. ____ ____ ____
June.. ____... ... _______
September__________________
December __________ ____
1936—March_________ ___________
June___ . . . . . .. ... .
September_____ ... _____ ...
December . _ _
... _
1937—M arch_____________________
June_______________________
September---------------------------December _
_ ____
1938—March______________________
June. -- . .. ____ ______
September.. _ . ... . _ ____
December__________________
December 1938:
Net bill______________________
Average price per kw h... ____

East North Central

Scranton
Chicago
100 25 kwh 40 kwh 100 25 kwh 40 kwh 100
25 kwh 40 kwh kwh
kwh
kwh
Rochester

$2.00
8.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
85.8
85.8
85.8
85.8
85.8
88.3
88.3
88.3
88.3
85.8
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3

$8.05 $1.66 $2.13
8.10 6. 60 5. 30
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 98.7 99.0
100.0 93.3 98.5
95.7 93.3 98.5
95.7 93.3 98.5
95.7 93.3 98.5
95. 7 93.3 98.5
95.7 93.3 98.5
95.7 93.3 98.5
95.7 93.3 98.5
95.7 93.3 98.5
95.7 93.3 98.5
62.1 93.3 98.5
62.1 93.3 98.5
62.1 93.3 98.5
62.1 93.3 98.5
62.1 93.3 98.5
62.1 93.3 98.5
62.1 93.3 98.5
64.0 96.1 101.5
64.0 93.7 98.6
64.0 93.7 98.6
64.0 93.7 98.6
62.1 91.0 95.7
62.1 91.0 95.7
62.1 91.0 95.7
62.1 91.0 95.7
62.1 91.0 95.7
62.1 91.0 95.7
60.2 91.0 95.7
60.2 91.0 95.7
60.2 91.0 95.7
60.2 91.0 95.7
60.2 91.0 95.7
60.2 91.0 95.7
60.2 91.0 95.7
60.2 80.5 91.0
52.8 80.5 91.0
52.8 80.5 91.0
52.8 80.5 91.0
52.8 80.5 91.0
52.8 80.5 91.0
52.8 80.5 91.0
52.8 80.5 91.0
47.8 80.5 91.0

$4.15
4.10
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
99.3
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
94.0
.94.0
94.0
96.9
93.2
93.2
93.2
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0
88.0

$1.59 $2.26 $4. 41 $1. 25 $1.90 $3.85 $1.34 $1.94
6. 30 5.70. 4. 40 5.00 4. 80 3. 90 5. 40 4. 90

$3. 65
3. 70

$3.10
7.80
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
81.9
81.9
81.9
81.9
81.9
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
81.9
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9
72.9

$5. 50
5. 50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.5
95.3
95.3
95.3
95.3
95.3
98.1
98.1
98.1
98.1
95.3
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
82.9
80.2
80.2

$2.50
10.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
30.0
90.0
90.0
92.7
92.7
92.7
92.7
90.0
90.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0

$4.00
10.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
75.0
75.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
61.3
61.3
61.3
61.3
61.3
61.3
61.3
61.3
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
47.5

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.




25

COMPUTATION OF PRICES AND INDEXES

T able 7.— Indexes of retail prices of electricity, by cities, M arch 1 9 2 3 -December
1938, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25 = 100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[10 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
East North Central
Cleveland (2 com­
panies)

Cincinnati

Year and month

Columbus (2 com­
panies)

100
100
100
25 kwh 40 kwh kwh 25 kwh 40 kwh kwh 25 kwh 40 kwh kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_______________________
Price per kwh___________ _____
1926—March_____ _ ___________
June________________________
September__________________
Decem ber_____ ____
1927—March.. __ _______ _________
June______ _________________
September_____ ... . . .
December_______ __ _____
1928—March. ____________________
June . _____ __ ___ ___
September _ ...
__ ___
December___ . _ __ ___
1929—March________ ___ ________
June______ _________________
September__________________
December___... _. _________
1930—March______________________
June____________
September___ _____ __
December... . _____ _ ..
1931—March______________________
Jun e_______________ _______
September__________ _ _____
December___ _ _ ________
1932—March_______ _______ ____
June. __ _______ _________
September. __ _____ _______
December____ _ . . . ... _.
1933—March. ___________________
June. ______________ _____
September__________________
Decem ber___ ______ _____
1934—March____________________
June . . . _ _____ ._ .
September__________________
December_____
. . . ___
1935—March.__ . . . ________
June... . ______ ___
September________________
December____ ______
1936—March. .
___...
June... _
._ ... __
September. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
D ecem ber__ _____________
1937—March____________________
June______________________
September
._ _____
December_______ __.
1938—March. _ _____
June____
.
September__________________
December_______________
December 1938:
Net bill_______________________
Average price per kwh________

$1.93
7. 70
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
97.4
97.4
97.4
90. 9
90. 9
90.9
90.9
90. 9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
93. 7
93. 7
93.7
93.7
90.9
90.9
90.9
90.9
64.9
64.9
64.9
64.9
58.4
58.4
58.4
58.4
51.9
51.9
51.9
51.9
51.9
51.9
51.9
51.9
51.9
51.9

$2. 60
6. 50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
105.8
105. 8
105.8
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88. 5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
91.1
91.1
91.1
91.1
88.5
88.5
88.5
88.5
65.4
65.4
65.4
65.4
60.6
60.6
60.6
60.6
55.8
55.8
55.8
55.8
55.8
55.8
55.8
55.8
55.8
55.8

$4. 70
4. 70
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
119.1
119.1
119.1
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
89.9
89.9
89.9
89.9
87.2
87.2
87.2
87.2
63.8
63.8
63.8
63.8
61.2
61.2
61.2
61.2
56.4
56.4
56.4
56.4
53.2
53.2
53.2
53.2
53.2
53.2

$1.17
4.70
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103. 5
103. 5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
103.5
106.7
106.7
106.7
85.9
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.4
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0

$1. 86
4. 60
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102. 2
102. 2
102.2
102.2
102. 2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
102.2
105.3
105.3
105.3
85.5
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
82.6
82.6
82.6
82.6
82.6
82.6
82.6

$4.61
4.60
100.9
100.9
100.9
100.9
100.9
100.9
100.9
100.9
97.4
97.4
97.4
97.4
97.4
97.4
97.4
97.4
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
93.3
93.3
93.3
85.0
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82. 5
82. 5
82.5
82. 5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1

$2. 76
6. 90
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0
70.0

$6. 89
6. 90
100.0
93.1
93. 1
93.1
93.1
93.1
93.1
93.1
93.1
93.1
93.1
93.1
86.3
86.3
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.4
81.8
81.6
81.6
81.6
79.2
79.2
79. 2
79.2
79.2
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7
64.7

$1.00 $1.45 $2. 50 $0.97 $1. 53 $3. 55 $1.24 $1. 93
4. 00 3. 60 2.50 3. 90 3. 80 3. 60 4. 90 4.80

$4. 46
4. 50

$1.72
6.90
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100. 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
139863 °

—

39-




-3

26

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OP ELECTRICITY

T able 7.— Indexes

o f retail prices o f electricity, by cities, M arch
1988, inclusive— Continued

1923- December

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
East North Central

Detroit

Year and month
25
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

Milwaukee

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

$1.55 $2.09 $4.25 $1.73 $2. 77 $6.68 $1. 77 $2.29
6.2* 5.20 4.20 6.90 6.90 6. 70 7.10 5.70
100.0 100.0 100.0 97.6 97.6 97.8 96.7 97.4
89.5 92.2 96.2 97.6 97.6 97.8 96.7 97.4
89.5 92.2 96.2 97.6 97.6 97.8 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 96.2 97.6 97.6 97.8 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 96.2 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 96.2 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 96.2 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 96.2 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 96.2 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 96.2 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 94.0 94.8
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 87.3 89.2
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 87.3 89.2
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 87.3 89.2
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 87.3 89.2
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 87.3 89.2
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 87.3 89.2
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 87.3 89.2
89.5 92.2 83.1 94.0 94.0 79.0 87.3 89.2
89.5 92.2 83.1 90.4 90.4 77.2 87.3 89.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 93.1 93.1 79.5 89.9 91.9
92.2 95.0 85.6 93.1 93.1 79.5 89.9 91.9
92.2 95.0 85.6 93.1 93.1 79.5 89.9 91.9
92.2 95.0 85.6 93.1 93.1 79.5 89.9 91.9
92.2 95.0 85.6 90.4 90.4 77.2 87.3 89.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 90.4 90.4 77.2 87.3 89.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 87.3 89.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 87.3 89.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83 1 71.9 87.3 89.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 87.3 89.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 87.3 89.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 79.9 83.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 79.9 83.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 79.9 83.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 79.9 83.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 79.9 83.2
92.2 95.0 85.6 83.1 83.1 71.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 83.1 83.1 71.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 83.1 83.1 71.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 79.5 75.9 65.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 79.5 75.9 65.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 79.5 75.9 65.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 79.5 75.9 65.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 79.5 75.9 59.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 79.5 75.9 59.9 79.9 83.2
89.9 93.2 81.8 79.5 75.9 59.9 79.9 83.2

$4.14
4.10
98.6
98.6
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
93.3
93.3
93.3
93.3
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
90.6
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
81.0
81.0

$1.39 $1.95 $3.48 $1. 38 $2.10
5.60
4.90 3.50 5.50 5.30

$3. 35
3. 40

oo

Average, 1923-25:
Net bill________ ______________
Price per kwh------------------------1926—March_____________________
June................................ ..............
September__________________
December----------------------------1927—March______________________
June._______________________
September------- -------------------December____ ______________
1928—March______________________
June..............................................
September__________________
December---------------------------1929—March______________________
June..--------------------------------September________________ _
December_____ _____________
1930—March_______ ______________
June_____________ _________
September---------------------------December____ ____________
1931—March_______ _____ ________
June________________________
September__________________
December____ _____ _____ ...
1932—M arch..............— _____ ______
June_______________ .. _____
September___________ _______
December----------------------------1933—March..............................._
June_____________________ .
September__________________
December----------------------- _
1934—March______________________
June.______________________
September_________ _______
December--------- ------------------1935—March______________________
Ju n e__________ _______ __ _
September__________________
December_____ _____________
1936—March______________________
June_______________________
September------------- ------------December--------- ------------------1937—March______________________
June------------ ------ ---------------September__________________
December------------ ---------------1938—March________ _____________
June________ _______________
September____________ ____
December_____ _____________
December 1938:
Net bill______________________
Average price per kwh____ ...

40
kwh

Indianapolis

$1.41 $1.90
5. 70 4.80

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
Detroit.—State sales tax of 3 percent was included in the computation of indexes for September 1933
through December 1938.




27

COMPUTATION OF PRICES AND INDEXES

T able 7.— Indexes of retail 'prices o f electricity, by cities, M arch 1923—
Decem ber
1938, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
West North Central

East North Central
Springfield, 1 1
1.
(2 companies)

Peoria

Year and month

Kansas City

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_______________________
Price per kwh........... .........

$1.92
7.70

$2.46
6.20

$4.26
4.30

$1.50
6.00

$2.10
5.30

$3.90
3.90

$1.87
7.50

$2.63
6.60

$4.76
4.80

1926—March______________________
June__.______ _____________
September__________________
December____ _________ — —
1927—March______________________
June________________________
_______
September_____ _
December___________________
1928—March______________________
June________________________
September_____ ____________
December___ __ .
_______
1929—March______________________
June________ ______ — —
September---------------------------December____ ___ ----------1930—March_________________ —
June____________ ___________
September_______ _____ —
December_______ _____ ______
1931—March______________________
June________________________
September __ -------------------December___________________
1932—March______________________
June________________________
September---------------------------December___ __ ___________
1933—March.__ . . . ________ . . June________________________
September---------------------------December______________ ..
1934—March___________________ —
June________________________
September-------------- -----December___________________
1935—March______________________
June________________________
September. _______________
December___ __________ . . .
1936—March . . . ______ _________
June_________________
____
September_____________ _____
December___ __________ _ . . .
1937—March______________________
June________________________
September __________ _____
December__________ _______
1938—March_____________________
June________________________
September______________ .
December__________________

100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 ioo.o
100.0 100.0
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
95.3
92.7
98.2
95.4
98.2
95.4
98.2
95.4
98.2
95.4
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
78.1
81.7
65.1 • 74.8
65.1
74.8
65.1
74.8
65.1
74.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6
89.4
89.4
89.4
89.4
89.4
89.4
89.4
89.4
83.8
83.8
83.8
83.8
83.8
83.8
83.8
83.8
83.8
83.8
78.4
78.4
78.4
78.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
88.3
85.9
85.9
85.9
85.9
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
93.3
93.2
93.2
93.2
93.2
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5
90.5

100.0
100.0
110.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
93.3
93.3
93.3
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
79.8
79.8
79.8
79.8
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4
77.4

100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
100.4
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
93.7
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
89.7
89.7
89.7
89.7
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.0
87.9
87.9
87.9
87.9
87.9
87.9
87.9
88.8
88.8
68.3
68.3
68.3

99.7
99.7
99.7
99.7
99.7
99.7
95.0
95.0
95.0
95.0
95.0
95.0
95.0
95.0
95.0
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
87.4
88.3
88.3
88.3
88.3
88.3
88.3
88.3
89.1
89.1
89.1
89.1
77.5
77.5
77.5

92.0
92.0
92.0
92.0
92.0
92.0
89.3
89.3
89.3
89.3
89.3
89.3
89.3
89.3
89.3
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
86.6
86.6
86.6
86.6
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.9
84.9
84.9
84.9
84.9
84.9
84.9
85.8
85.8
85.8
85.8
80.4
80.4
80.4

$3.34
3.30

$1.25
5.00

$1.90
4.80

$3.02
3.00

$1.28
5.10

$2.04
5.10

$3.83
3.80

December 1938:
Net bill____ __________________ $1.25
Average price per k w h ...______ 5.00

$1.84
4.60

88.8
88.8

100
kwh

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
Kansas City.—State sales taxes of 1 percent for September 1935 through March 1937, and of 2 percent for
June 1937 through December 1938 were included in the computation of indexes.




28
T able

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY
1. — Indexes of retail prices o f electricity, by cities, M arch 1928-D ecem ber
1938, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25 = 100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
West North Central
Year and month

Minneapolis

St. Louis (2 com­
panies)

Omaha

25
kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill______________________
Price per kwh_________________
1926—March_____________________
June... _ . ____________ _
September________ ____ _
December________ _____ _
1927—March. _ _ __ _______ _____
June_______________________
September____ ___________
December__________________
1928—March____________________
...
June________ _ .
September. _____ _ _ _ _ _ _
December___ _ _ _ ______
1929—March _ __ ___ _ _______
June_______ _ __ _ __ _
September____
___
December_________ _ ___
1930—M arch... _________________
June________ .__ ________
September._ ___ ___ ______
December____ __ _ _ ____
1931—M arch... ____________ ___
________
June_____ _
September___ ____ ___
December____ _ __
1932—March_______________ ____
June. ____ ______ _
_
September_____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
December. _. _ ______ _______
1933—March______________________
June _ ___________ _____
September____ ______ _ __
December____ ___________ _
1934—March______ __ _________ _
June________ ___ ________
September_____ _______ _ __
December____ ____ _______ __
1935—March_____ _____________ __
June_______ ______________
September__________________
December__________________
1936—March_____ ______ _____
June _____________ ____
Septem ber..._____ __ ___ _
December___ _ __ ________
1937—March______________________
June_____ ._ _ ___ ___ __
September____ _ _ ___
December_____ _______ _ _
1938—March __ ________ ______
J u n e ...____________________
September. ______ _________
December___________________
December 1938:
Net bill______________________
Average price per kwh_________

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
100 25
40
kwh kwh kwh kwh

100
kwh

$2.14
8. 50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
93.4
86.7
86.7
89.3
89.3
89.3
89.3
86.7
86.7
86.7
86.7
86.7
86.7
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
68.9
68.9
68.9
68.9
55.5
55.5
55.5
55.5

$2.78
6.90
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
83.7
83.7
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
83.7
83.7
83.7
83.7
83.7
83.7
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
78.6
71.8
71.8
71.8
71.8
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2

$4.49
4.50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
91.3
89.9
89.9
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
89.9
89.9
89.9
89.9
89.9
89.9
84.7
84.7
84.7
84.7
84.7
84.7
84.7
84.7
80.4
80.4
80.4
80.4
79.3
79.3
79.3
79.3

$1.38
5.50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4

$2.20
5. 50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4

$2.12
5. 30
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
102.0
102.0
102.0
102.0
99.0
79.2
79.2
79.2
79.2
79.2
79.2
79.2
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.8
80.8
80.8
80.8
80.8
80.8
80.8

$3.61
3.60
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97. 7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97. 7
97.7
97.7
97.7
97.7
100.6
100.6
100.6
100. 6
97.7
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.0
86.8
86.8
86.8
86.8
86.8
86.8
86.8
87.7
87.7
87.7
87.7
87.7
87.7
87.7

$1.19 $1.76 $3. 56 $1.19 $1.90 $3.88 $1.20 $1.72
4.70 4.40 3.60 4.80 4.80 3.90 4.80 4. 30

$3.17
3.20

$5.50
5. 50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
79.6
79.6
79.6
79.6
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
77.3
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5
70.5

$1. 67
6. 70
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
102.3
102.3
102.3
102.3
99.4
70.3
70.3
70.3
70.3
70.3
70.3
70.3
71.0
71.0
71.0
71.0
71.0
71.0
71.0
71.7
71.7
71.7
71.7
71.7
71.7
71.7

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
St. Louis.—State sales taxes of 1 percent for September 1935 through March 1937, and of 2 percent for June
1937 through December 1938 were included in the computation of indexes.




29

COMPUTATION OF PRICES AND INDEXES

T able

7.

— Indexes

of retail prices of electricity, by cities, M arch 1923—
December
1938, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
West North Central
St. Paul

Year and month

100
25 kwh 40 kwh kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill______
Price per kwh.
1926—March--------June...
September. __
December__
1927—March--------June_______
September. __
December__
1928—March_____
June_______
September. __
December__
1929—March_____
J u n e ...____
September..December__
1930—March_____
J u n e.____
September. __
December__
1931—March ____
J u n e._____
September.
December__
1932—March_____
June______
September. __
December__
1933—March_____
June_____ September. __
December__
1934—March_____
June_______
September. _.
December__
1935—March_____
June __ ___
September. __
December—
1936—March.. _ _ .
June.
_
September. __
December__
1937—March_____
June_______
September...
December__
1938—March_____
June____ September. ..
December__
December 1938:
Net bill______
Average price
per kwh____

South Atlantic

$2. 48
9. 90
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
86.3
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6
70.7
70.7
70.7
70.7
64.6
64.6
64. 6
64.6
64.6
64.6
64.6
64.6
50.5
50.5
50.5
50.5

$3.63 $7. 57
9.1(4 7. 60
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
76.6 59.3
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
67.9 55.8
67.9 55.8
67.9 55.8
67.9 55.8
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
65.9 54.2
63.4 52.8
63.4 52.8
63.4 52.8
63.4 52.8
59.3 50.9
59.3 50.9
59.3 50.9
59.3 50.9
59.3 50.9
59.3 50.9
59.3 50.9
59.3 50.9
51.0 49.5
51.0 49.5
51.0 49.5
51.0 49.5

$1.25 $1.85 $3. 75
5.0j4 4.60 3.80

Atlanta

Baltimore

25 kwh

40 kwh

100 kwh

$2.03
8.10
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111. 0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
114.3
114.3
114.3
111.8
108.5
80.22108.5 6
71.
80. 71. 6
80. 2 71.6
80.2 71. 6
80. 2 71. 6
80. 22 71. 6
80. 2 71. 6
80. 2 71. 6
80.
6
80. 71. 6
80. 22 71. 6
71.
80. 26 60.4
71. 71. 6
71.6 60.4
60.4
71. 6 60.4
71.6 60. 4
71. 6 60.4
71. 6
71. 6 60.4
71.6 60.4

$3.24
8.10
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ioo. o
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92. 5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
92.5
95.3
95.3
95.3
93.7
91.0
73.391.0 6
65.
73.3 65. 6
73.3 65. 6
73. 3 65. 6
73. 3 65. 6
73. 3 65. 6
73. 3 65. 6
73.3 65. 6
6
73.3 65. 6
73. 3 65. 6
3 65.
73. 3 65. 6
73. 6
65. 6 58. 6
66. 58.
65. 6 58. 6
65. 6 58. 6
65. 6 58. 6
65. 6 58.6
6
65. 6 58.6
65. 6 58.6

$6.48
6.50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
77.1
79.4
79.4
79.4
79.0
76.7
70. 676.7
60.9
70. 6 60.9
70. 6 60.9
70. 6 60. 9
70. 6 60.9
70. 6 60. 9
70. 6 60.9
70.6 60.9
70. 6 60.9
70. 6 60.9
70. 6 60.9
70. 9 60.9
60. 6 59.4
60.9 59.4
60.9 59.4
60.9 59. 4
60. 9 59. 4
60. 9 59. 4
60. 9 59. 4
60. 9 59.4

100
25 kwh 40 kwh kwh
$2.00
8.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
84.0
86.5
86.5
86.5
64.4
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3

$3.17
7.90
82.1
82.1
82.1
82.1
74.2
74.2
74.2
74.2
74.2
74.2
74.2
74.2
74.2
74.2
74.2
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
71.0
71.0
71.0
65.0
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2
63.2
56.8
56.8
56.8
56.8
56.8
56.8
56.8
56.8
56.8
56.8
56.8

$5. 72
5.70
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
83.1
73.5
73.5
73.5
73.5
73.5
73.5
73.5
73.5
73.5
73.5
73.5
75.7
75.7
75.7
75.3
73.1
73.1
73.1
73.1
73.1
73.1
73.1
73.1
73.1
73.1
73.1
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2
68.2

$1.46 $1.22 $2.12 $1.90 $3.95 $3.85 $1.13 $1.80 $3.90
5.80 4.90 5. 80 4. 70 8. S0 3.80 4.50 4.50 3.90

Indexes for September 1932
of percent
Atlanta.—Indexes for Marchthrough June 1933 show effect are3shown forFederal tax.
1934 through December 1938
the “Immediate” rate, in italics,

and for the “Inducement” rate.




30

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OP ELECTRICITY

T able 7.— In dex o f retail prices o f electricity, by cities, M arch 1 9 2 8-D ecem ber
1988, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25=100
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
South Atlantic
Charleston, S. O.

Year and month

Norfolk

Jacksonville

25 kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_________
Price per kwh___
1926—March _ _____
June______ _
September ___
December
1927—March_____ __
June__________
September. .. .
Decem ber____
1928—March_____
June____ _____
September_____
December__ _
1929—March________
June.. _______
September. _
December ___
1930—March. . . . _
June_______
September_____
December1931—March________
June. ... __ __
September_____
December. _. .
1932—March_____ _
June.
September- _
December- .._
1933—March___ _
June____ _ .
September. _ _
December
1934—M arch_______
June. ...
September_____
December.
1935—March __ ___ _.
June____ _ __
September. _ __
December_____
1936—March________
June_______ .
September _.
December_____
1937—March________
June__________
September_____
December_____
1938—March ... ___
June____ _ _
September___
December. _ __
December 1938:
Net bill_________
Average price per
kwh__ ____

40 kwh

100 kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

$2. 50
10.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0
92.7
92.7
92.7
92.7
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
77.085.0
77.0 68.6
68.6
77.0 68.6
77.0 68.6
77.0 68.6
68.9 59.9
68.9 59.9
68.9 59.9
59.9
63.9 59.9
68.9 59.9
63.9
63.9 59.9
63.9 59.9
68.959.9
59.9
59.9
59.9

$4.00
10.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100. 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
84.9
84.9
84.9
84.9
84.9
87.5
87.5
87.5
87.5
78.7
78.7
78.7
78.7
72.578.7
72.5 63.5
63.5
72.5 63.5
72.5 63.5
72.5 63.5
62.4 56.2
62.4 56.2
56.2
62.4 56.2
62.4 56.2
62.4 56.2
62.4
62.4 56.2
62.4 56.2
62.456.2
56.2
56.2
56.2

$9. 50
9.50
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
75.8
75.8
75.8
75.8
75.8
75.8
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
63.1
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
61.5
61.5
61.5
61.5
68.961.5
48.5
58.9 48.5
58.9 48.5
58.9 48.5
58.9 48.5
56.3 44.2
56.8 44.2
56.8 44.2
56.8 44.2
66.8 44.2
56.8 44.2
56.8 44.2
56.8 44.2
56.844.2
44.2
44.2
44.2

$1. 75
7.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
85.7
85.7
85.7

$2.80
7.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
96.4
96.4
96.4
96.4
96.4
96.4
96.4
96.4
96.4
96.4
83.9
83.9
83.9

$7.00
7.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
70.7
70.7
70.7
70.7
70.7
70.7
70.7
70.7
70.7
70.7
65.7
65.7
65.7

$2.25
9.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
80.1
80.1
80.1
80.1
77.8
77.8
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
66.7
66.7
66.7
66.7
66.7
61.1
61.1
61.1
61.1
61.1
61.1
61.1
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6

$3.60
9.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
80.1
80.1
80.1
80.1
77.8
77.8
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
58.3
58.3
58.3
58.3
58.3
58.3
58.3
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6

$6.30
6.30
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
89.2
89.2
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4

$1. 50
6.00

$2. 25
5. 60

$4. 20
4. 20

$1. 50 $2. 35 $4. 60 $1.25 $2. 00
6.00 5.90 4.60 5.00 5.00

$4.63
4.60

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
Charleston, S. C.—Indexes for December 1934 through March 1938 are shown for the “Immediate” rate, in
ftalics, and for the “Objective” rate.




31

COMPUTATION OF PRICES AND INDEXES

T able 7.— Indexes o f retail prices of electricity, by cities, M arch 1928-D ecem ber
1938, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25 = 100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
South Atlantic
Richmond

Year and month

Savannah

Washington, D. C.

25
kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill______________________
Price per kwh________. . . _____
1926—M arch... _ ----------------------June---- -------- --------------------September__________________
December____________ _____
1927—March________________ _____
June______________ _ _____
September__________________
December__________________
1928—March______________________
June__________ ____ _
September.-------- _ ______
December___ __________ _
1929—M arch... ______ .. ---------June------------- --------------------September._____ _ _____
December___ _ _ _______ _
1930—March._____... . ________ .
June_______________________
September------- ---------- . .
December___ ... __ ._ _. __
1931—March._____________________
J u n e ..--------------- . . . ------September... ----------- ... ..
December__________ ____ _ _
1932—March._____________________
Jun e______________ _____
September... _____________
December. _ ... _________ _
1933—March______________________
June.. ---- -- .. . ------- -September.--------- ---------December...
_______ ...
1934—March______________________
June.. _______________ _____
September. .. ---------- _ _
December___ _ . . .
1935—March______ .. . . . ----- ..
June.. _________ ... .. . .
September. . .. ----------December . . . _ __ ---_ _
1936—March _____ _
June.
---September_______ _ . . .. .
December------- -------------1937—March______________________
June ___... ---------------September.---- -- _ ---------December----------- ------------1938—March____________ ____...
June. ____________ _____
September__________________
December___________ ... ...
December 1938:
Net bill_________*____________
Average price per kwh._ ____

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
kwh

40
100
kwh kwh

$2.25
9.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
80.1
80.1
80.1
80.1
77.8
77.8
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
66.7
66.7
66.7
66.7
66.7
61.1
61.1
61.1
61.1
61.1
61.1
61.1
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6

$3.60
9.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
80.1
80.1
80.1
80.1
77.8
77.8
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
62.5
58.3
58.3
58.3
58.3
58.3
58.3
58.3
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6

$6.30
6. 30
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
96.8
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
89.2
91.9
91.9
91.9
91.9
89.2
89.2
84.1
84.1
84.1
84.1
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.8
73.4
73.4
73.4
73.4

$2.25
9.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
111.0
114.3
114.3
114.3
114.3
111.0
111.0
111.0
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2

$3.60
9.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
94.4
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
94.4
94.4
94.4
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9
65.9

40
kwh

100
kwh

$6.00 $2.29 $3.67 $8. 50
6.00 9.20 ‘ 9.20 8.50
100.0 76.4 76.4 77.7
100.0 76.4 76.4 77.7
100.0 76.4 76.4 77.7
100.0 76.4 76.4 77.7
100.0 68.2 68.2 70.3
100.0 68.2 68.2 70.3
100.0 68.2 68.2 70.3
100.0 68.2 68.2 70.3
100.0 64. 4 64.4 66.8
100.0 64.4 64.4 66.8
100.0 64.4 64. 4 66.8
100.0 64.4 64.4 66.8
100.0 56.7 56.7 61.2
100.0 56.7 56.7 61.2
100.0 56.7 56.7 61.2
91.6 56.7 56.7 61.2
91.6 51.3 51.3 55.3
91.6 51.3 51.3 55.3
91.6 51.3 51.3 55.3
91.6 51. 3 51.3 55.3
91.6 45.8 45.8 49.4
91.6 45.8 45.8 49.4
91.6 45.8 45.8 49.4
91.6 45.8 45.8 49.4
91.6 42.5 42.5 45.3
91.6 42.5 42.5 45.3
94.3 43.8 43.8 46.7
94.3 43.8 43.8 46.7
94.3 43.8 43.8 45.5
94.3 43.8 43.8 45.5
91.6 42.5 42.5 44.1
91.6 42.5 42.5 44.1
91.6 42.5 42.5 42.4
76.2 42.5 42.5 42.4
76.2 42.5 42.5 42.4
76.2 42.5 42.5 42.4
76.2 42.5 42.5 41.2
76.2 42.5 42.5 41.2
76.2 42.5 42. 5 41.2
76.2 42.5 42.5 41.2
76.2 42.5 42.5 40.0
76.2 42.5 42.5 40.0
76.2 42.5 42.5 40.0
76.2 42.5 42.5 40.0
76.2 42.5 42.5 36.5
76.2 42.5 42.5 36.5
76.2 42.5 42.5 36.5
76.2 42.5 42.5 36.5
76.2 42.5 42.5 33.5
76.2 42.5 42.5 33.5
76.2 42.5 42.5 33.5
76.2 42.5 42.5 33.5

$1.25 $2.00 $4.63 $1.62 $2. 37 $4. 57
5. 00 5. 00 4.60 6. 50 5. 90 4. 60

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.




25
kwh

$. 98 $1.56
3.90 3. 90

$2.85
2. 90

32

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

T a b l e 7.— Indexes

o f retail prices o f electricity, by cities, M arch 1928-D ecem ber
1938, inclusive— Continued

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
East South Central
Birmingham

Year and month

Louisville

Memphis

25 kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_________
Price per kwh___
1926—March________
June__________
September____
December. ___
1927—March. _____
June________ _
September____
December .. _
1928—March________
June__________
September____
December_____
1929—March ______
June.. . . . .
September____
December_____
1930—March ________
June. ____ _
September____
December. . _
1931—March________
June____.
September. ...
December_____
1932—March. _______
June. . . ._ .
September._ _
December. ___
1933—March________
June_____
September
December ___
1934—March. _____
June____ ___
September____
December_____
1935—March________
June. _____ _
September____
December_____
1936—March. _____
June__________
September____
December ___
1937—March________
June___ ____
September. _
D ecem ber.___
1938—March________
June__________
September____
December. ___
December 1938:
Net bill_________
Average price per
kwh__________

40 kwh

100 kwh

25
kwh

40 100 25
40 100
kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh

$1.91
7.70
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
81.1
81.1
81.1
81.1
81.1
81.1
81.181.1
52.3
81.1 52.3
52.3
75.8 52.3
75.8 52.3
75.8 52.3
70.6 52.3
70.6 52.3
70.6
65.4 52.3
65.4 52.3
65.4 52.3
58.8 52.3
58.8 52.3
58.8 52.3
51.0

$3.06
7.70
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
75.2
75.2
75.2
75.2
75.2
75.2
75.275.2
75.2 51.0
71.9 51.0
51.0
71.9 51.0
71.9 51.0
68.6 51.0
68.6 51.0
68.6 51.0
65.4 51. 0
65.4 51.0
65.4 51.0
68.8 51.0
68.8 51.0
58.8 51.0
51.0

$5.30
5.30
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
92.6
87.1
89.7
89.7
89.7
89.7
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.576.5
76.6 60.4
74.6 60.4
74.6 60.4
74.6 60.4
60.4
72.7 60.4
72.7 60.4
60.4
72.7
70.8 60.4
70.8 60.4
70.8 60.4
66.1 60.4
66.1 60.4
66.1 60.4
60.4

$1.90 $3.04 $4.38
7.60 7.60 4.40
ltxuT 100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0
103.0 103.0 103.0
103.0 103.0 103.0
103.0 103.0 103.0
103.0 103.0 103.0
100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0
65.8 65.8 86.8
65.8 65.8 86.8
67.8 67.8 89.4
67.8 67.8 89.4
67.8 67.8 89.4
67.8 67.8 89.4
67.8 67.8 89.4
67.8 67.8 89.4
65.8 65.8 86.8
67.8 67.8 89.4
59.6 57.6 84.7
59.6 57.6 84.7
59.6 57.6 84.7
59.6 57.6 84.7
59.6 57.6 84.7
59.6 57.6 84.7
59.6 67.6 84.7
59.6 57.6 84.7
59.6 57.6 84.7
54.2 54.2 82.3

$0.98
3.90

$1.56
3.90

$3.20
3.20

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

$2.00
8.00
iooTo
T
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
90.2
90.2
90.2
87.5
87.5
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
68.8
43.2

$2.90 $5. 90
7.30 5. 90
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
103.0 103.0
92.3 83.8
92.3 83.8
92.3 83.8
89.7 81.4
89.7 81.4
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
75.9 72.0
47.6 48.7

$1.03 $1.65 $3. 61 $0.86 $1.38
4.10 4.10 3.60 3. 50 3.50

$2.88
2.90

Indexes for September
through
of 3
tax.
Birmingham.—Indexes 1932June 1935June 1933 show effect 1938 percent Federalthe "Immediate” rate, in
for
through December
are shown for
italics, and for the "Objective” rate. The index for 25 kilowatt-hours for the "Objective” rate was based
on the minimum bill.
Louisville,—State tax of 3 percent was included in the computation of indexes for September 1934 through
December 1935, and for June 1936 through December 1938.




33

COMPUTATION OF PRICES AND INDEXES
T able

7 . — I n d e x e s o f re ta il p r i c e s o f e le c t r i c i t y , b y c i t i e s , M a r c h
1 9 3 8 , in c l u s i v e — Continued

1 9 2 8 -D e c e m b e r

[1923-25 = 100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
West South Central

East South Central
Mobile

Year and month
25 kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill______
Price per kwh__

$2. 25
9.00
■1 .- ~
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
88.9
91.6
91.6
91.6
91.6
88.9
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
68.9 64.4
64.4 53.3
64-4 53.3
64-4 53.3
64.4 53.3
64.4 53.3
64.4 53.3
64.4 53.3
64.4 53.3
64.4 53.3
64.4 53.3
64.4 53.3

1926—March----June_____
September.,
December1927—March_____
June_______
September.
December.-1928—March_____
June_______
September.-.
December__
1929—March--------June_____
September. __
December__
1930—March-------June_______
September. _December__
1931—March--------June.... - -September.. _
December__
1932—March--------June_______
September. __
December__
1933—March_____
June_______
September. __
December__
1934—Mapch--------June.. -- _
September.. .
December__
1935—March_____
June_______
September
December—
1936—March_____
June..
- September....
December__
1937—March_____
June..
.
September. _.
December..
1938—March____
June_______
September.. .
December. _
December 1938:
Net bill______
Average price
per kwh____

$1.45
5.80

$1.20
4.80

40 kwh

$3.60
9.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
76.4
78.7
78.7
78.7
78.7
76.4
68.9 59.0
68.9 59.0
63.9 59.0
63.9 59.0
68.9 59.0
63.9 59.0
63.9 59.0
63.9 59.0
68.9 59.0
63.9 59.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0
59.0 50.0

$2.13
5.80

$1.80
4. 50

Dallas

100 kwh

$8. 55
8.60
.. "
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
55.6
57.2
57.2
57.2
57.2
55.6
47.4 43.3
47.4 43.3
47.4 43.3
47.4 46.2
47.4 46.2
47.4 46.2
47.4 46.2
47.4 46.2
47.4 46.2
47.4 46.2
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9
46.2 40.9

$3.95
4.00

25
kwh

$1.50
6.00
=====
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
98.7
98.7
98.7
98.7
95.8
95.8
95.8
95.8
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
79.2
79.2
79.2
79.2
70.7
70.7

40
kwh

Houston
100
kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

$2.40 $6.00 $1. 41 $2.08
$4.91
6.00
6.00
5.60
5.20
4.90
■ —-Z-- 1 - J
...... ■= r = =
'*
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
100.0
80.0 100.0
98.4
90.7
98.7
80.7 103.0 101.4
93.5
98.7
80.7 103.0 101.4
93.5
98.7
80.7 103.0 101.4
93. 5
98.7
80.7 103.0 101.4
93.5
95.8
78.3 100.0
98.4
90.7
95.8
78.3 100.0
98.4
90.7
95.8
78.3 100.0
98.4
90.7
95.8
78.3
92.3
91.2
87.7
91.7
76.7
91.2
92.3
87.7
91.7
76.7
92.3
91.2
87.7
91.7
76.7
92.3
91.2
87.7
91.7
76.7
92.3
91.2
87.7
91.7
76.7
92.3
91.2
87.7
91.7
76.7
92.3
91.2
87.7
91.7
76.7
92.3
91.2
87.7
83.3
73.3
85.2
86.4
78.0
83.3
73.3
85.2
86.4
78.0
83.3
73.3
85.2
86.4
78.0
83.3
73.3
85.2
86.4
78.0
83.3
73.3
85.2
86.4
78.0
79.2
71.7
85.2
86.4
78.0
79.2
71.7
85.2
86.4
78.0
79.2
71.7
85.2
86.4
78.0
79.2
71.7
85.2
86.4
78.0
69.2
65.2
85.2
86.4
78.0
69.2
85.2
65.2
86.4
78.0

$3.50

$1.06

$1. 66

$3. 91

$1.20

$1.80

$3.83

3.50

4.20

4.20

3.90

4.80

4.50

3.80

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
Mobile.—Indexes for December 1933 through December 1938 are shown for the “Immediate” rate, in
italics, and for the “ Objective” rate.




34
T able

CHANGES
7 .— In d ex es

IN

R E T A IL P R IC E S

O F E L E C T R IC IT Y

o f re ta il p r i c e s o f e le c t r ic it y , b y c i t i e s , M a r c h
1 9 3 8 , i n c lu s iv e — Continued

1 9 2 8 -D e c e m b e r

[1923-25= 100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
West South Central
Little Rock

Year and month
25
kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_________ $2. 50
10.00
Price per kwh___
1926—March________ 100.0
Ju n e_________ 100.0
100.0
September. ...
December_____ 100.0
1927—March______ . 100.0
100.0
June _ _____
100.0
September____
December. __ . 100.0
1928—March______ _ 100.0
100.0
June____
September _ ___ 100.0
100.0
December
100.0
1929—March.. ...
100.0
June________
100.0
September____
December_____ 100.0
100. 0
1930—March_______
94.0
June_________
94.0
September____
94.0
December
94.0
1931—March________
94.0
June____
94.0
September____
94.0
December ...
1932—M arch... _ _ _ 94.0
94.0
June . . . .
96.8
September . . .
96.8
December_____
96.8
1933'—M arch... . ..
96.8
June .. ... .
94.0
September.
94.0
December_____
94.0
1934—March.. _
94.0
June... . _____
84.0
September. __
84.0
December_____
1935—March.. _ __
84.0
84.0
June__________
85.7
September. __ .
85.7
December_____
1936—M arch... _ _ 77.2 71.3
J u n e ..._____ 77.2 71.3
September____ 77.2 71.3
December_____ 77.2 71.3
1937—March________ 77.2 71.3
June ... _ _ _. 77.2 71.3
September____ 77.2 71.3
December_____ 77.2 71.3
1938—March________
71.4
June ______ _
71.4
71.4
September.. ...
December__ _
71.4
December 1938:
Net bill_________ $1.79
Average price per
kwh_______...
7.10

-

Mountain
New Orleans

Butte

40
kwh

100
kwh

.25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

$4.00
10.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100. 0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
82.4
82.4
82.4
82.4
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
72.5
72.5
72.5
72.5
74.0
71.974.0
65.8
71.9 65.8
71.9 65.8
65.8
71.9 65.8
71.9
71.9 65.8
71.9 65.8
71.9 65.8
63.8
63.8
63.8
63.8

$9. 06
9.10
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69.0
69. 0
69.0
59.6
59. 6
59. 6
59. 6
59. 6
59. 6
59. 6
59. 6
59. 6
61. 4
61. 4
61. 4
61. 4
59. 6
59. 6
59. 6
59. 6
56. 3
56. 3
56. 3
56. 3
57. 4
57.4
57.4 56.3
57. A 56.3
57. A 56.3
57. A 66.3
57. A 56.3
57. A 56.3
57. A 56.3
57. A 56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3
56.3

$2. 46
9.80
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
76.2
64.0
64.0

$3.63
9.10
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
89.5
89.5
89.5
89.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
78.5
62.0
62.0

$7. 66 $2.06 $2.80
7.70 8.30 7.00
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
103.0 99.9 95.6
103.0 99.9 95.6
103.0 99.9 95.6
103.0 99.9 95.6
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
100.0 96.9 92.9
78.3 96.9 92.9
78.3 96.9 92.9
78.3 96.9 92.9
78.3 96.9 92.9
71.8 96.9 92.9
71.8 96.9 92.9
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
71.8 75.1 84.8
62.7 75.1 84.8
62.7 75.1 84.8

$5. 33
5. 30
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
86.9
86.9
86.9
86.9
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
84.4
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0
83.0

$2. 55
6. 40

$5.10
5.10

$1.58 $2.25 $4.80 $1. 55 $2. 38
6. 30 5. 60 4.80 6.20 5.90

$4.43
4.40

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
Little Rock—State sales tax of 2 percent was included in the computation of indexes for September 1935
through December 1938. Indexes for March 1936 through December 1937 are shown for the “Present” rate,
in italics, and for the “Centennial” rate.




35

COMPUTATION OF PRICES AND INDEXES
T able

7 . — I n d e x e s o f re ta il p r i c e s o f e le c t r i c i t y , b y c i t i e s , M a r c h
1 9 3 8 , in c l u s i v e — Continued

1 9 2 3 —D e c e m b e r

[1923-25 = 100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Mountain

25
kwh
Average, 1923-25:
Net bill_________
Price per kwh----1926—March_______
June_________
September____
December_____
1927—M arch----------June_____
September____
December___ _
1928—March______
June... ______
September. _ __
December____
1929—March. _____ _
J u n e._____ _
September____
December_____
1930—March____
June_________
September____
December_____
1931—March._. ... __
June_________
September____
December_____
1932—March________
June__________
September____
December_____
1933—March________
June_______ __
September_____
December_____
1934—March_____ _
June__________
September_____
December_____
1935—March________
June__________
September_____
December_____
1936—March________
June__________
September_____
December____
1937—March. _ ______
June______ __
September____
December_____
1938—March________
June__________
September . ...
December_____
December 1938:
Net bill_________
Average price per
kwh____ ____

Los Angeles (3 com­
panies)

Salt Lake City

Denver

Year and month

Pacific

40
100
kwh kwh

$2.00
8.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
82.5
75.0
75.0
77.3
77.3
77.3
77. 3
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5

$3.20
8. 00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
79.7
75.0
75.0
77. 3
77.3
77.3
77.3
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5
76.5

$7. 88
7.90
100.0
100.0
82.9
82.9
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
61.0
61.0
62.8
62.8
62.8
62.8
61.0
61.0
61.0
61.0
61.0
61.0
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2
62.2

$1. 53 $2. 45 $4.90
6.10 6.10 4.90

25 kwh

40 kwh

100 kwh

25
40
100
kwh kwh kwh

$2.03
8.10
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
92.8
95.6
95.6
95.6
95.6
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
H.794.7
80.6
94.7 80.6
94.7 80.6
94.7
87.7 80.687.7 80.6
80.6 80.6
80.6
80.6 80.6
80.6 80.6
80.6 80.6
80.6
80.6
80.6

$3.24
8.10
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
90.4
93.1
93.1
93.1
93.1
92.3
92.3
92.3
92.3
92.3
92.3
92. 3
92.3
92.3
92. S 70.8
92.8 70. 8
92.8 70. 8
92.8 70.8
83.1 70. 8
83.1 70. 8
74.0 70.8
74.0 70.8
74.0 70.8
74.0 70.8
70.8
70.8
70.8

$7. 74
7. 70
76.7
76.7
76.7
76.7
65.2
65.2
65.2
65.2
65.2
65.2
65.2
65.2
62. 3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
62.3
64.1
64.1
64.1
64.1
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5
63.5 49. 4
63.5 49.4
63.5 49.4
63.5 49.4
63.5 49.4
63.5
63.5 49.4
63.5 49.4
63.5 49.4
49.4
63.5 49.4
49.4
49.4
49.4

$1. 43
5.70
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99. 4
88.4
88.4
88.4
88.4
88.4
88.4
88.4
88.4
88.4
87.4
84.2
84.2
84.2
84.2
84.2
84.2
84.2
84.2
84.2
83.9
86.4
86.4
86.4
86.4
83.9
83.9
83.9
83.9
83.9
83.9
83.9
83.9
83.9
83.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9
76.9

$1. 63
6. 50

$2.30
5.70

$3.83
3.80

$2.29 $5.68
5.70 5.70
99.4 99.4
99.4 99.4
99.4 99.4
99.4 99.4
99.4 99.4
99.4 99.4
88.4 69.3
88.4 69.3
88.4 69.3
88.4 69.3
88.4 69.3
88.4 69.3
88.4 69.3
88.4 69.3
88.4 69.3
87.4 68.2
79.7 61.2
79.7 61.2
79.7 61.2
79.7 61.2
79.7 61.2
79.7 61.2
79.7 61.2
79.7 61.2
79.7 61.2
78.8 58.2
81.2 60.0
81.2 60.0
81.2 60.0
81.2 60.0
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
78.8 58.2
72.3 53.5
72.3 53.5
72.3 53.5
72.3 53.5
72.3 53.5
72.3 53.5
72.1 52.3
72.1 52.3
72.1 52.3
72.1 52.3
72.1 52.3
72.1 52.3

$1.10 $1. 65
4.40 4.10

$2. 97
3.00

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show the effect of 3 percent Federal tax.
Denver.—State sales tax of 2 percent was included in the computation of indexes for March 1935 through
December 1938.
Salt Lake City.—State sales tax of 2 percent was included in the computation of indexes for September 1933
through December 1938. Indexes for December 1935 through March 1938 are shown for the “Present” rate,
in italics, and for the “Objective” rate.




36
T able

CHANGES
7 .— In d ex es

IN

R E T A IL

P R IC E S

OF E L E C T R IC IT Y

o f r e ta il p r ic e s o f e l e c tr ic ity , b y c i t i e s , M a r c h
1 9 3 8 , i n c lu s iv e — Continued

1 9 2 3 - D ecem ber

[1923-25=100]
[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Pacific

Year and month

Portland, Oreg.
(2 companies)
25
kwh

Average, 1923-25:
Net bill________ ____________ ■ „ $1.56
6.20
Price per kwh________ ______
1926—March________ ____ ________ 100.0
June___ __________________ 100.0
September______ ____ _______ 100.0
December. ________ _____ ... 100.0
1927—March_____________________ 100.0
June______________ _________ 100 0
September..----------------------- 100.0
December____________ _____ 100.0
1928—March____ ____ ____________ 100.0
June_______________________ 100.0
September____ ____ ________ 100 0
December...... .................... . _ 100.0
1929—March________ _____________ PH) 0
June________ _______________ 100.0
September.......................... ....... 100.0
December________ _________ 100.0
1930—March......... ................................. 100.0
June___ ______ ____ ______ 100. 0
September.............................. .
December.......... .......................... ! 88.3
1931—March. . __________ _______ ! 88. 3
June... ____________ ________ j 88.3
September.._____ __________ i 88.3
December .............................. . i 88.3
1932—M arch_________ ___________ ! 88.3
June... . ................................... 88.3
September__________________ 90.9
December............... .................... 90.9
1933—March. .................................... 90.9
June... . _________________ 90.9
September__________________ .88. 3
December._________ ________ 88.3
1934—March......... ................................ ! 88.3
June
' 88.3
September _________________
December__________________ i 88.3
1935—March____ _____ ___________ i 88.3
June__________ _____________ 88.3
September ________________ 88.3
December.................................... 88.3
1936—March......... .............................. . 88.3
June_______________________ 88. 3
September_________________ 88.3
December ________
88. 3
1937—March______________________ 88.3
June__________________ _____ 88.3
September________ ____ _____ 88.3
December__________ ________ 80.2
1938—March___________ _________ 80.2
June... ... _________ ____ _ 80.2
September________________ _ 80.2
December__________________ 80.2
December 1938:
Net bill______________________ $1. 25
Average price per kwh_________ 5. 00

San Francisco

40
100
kwh kwh

25
kwh

40
kwh

100
kwh

25
40
kwh kwh

100
kwh

$3.41
3. 40
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100. 0
100.0
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99. 4
99. 4
102.4
102.4
102.4
102.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99. 4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99. 4
99.4
99.4
99.4
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8

$1. 80
7.20
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91.7
91. 7
91.7
91. 7
84. 7
84.7
84. 7
84.7
84. 7
84.7
84. 7
84.7
84.7
84.7
87.3
87. 3
87.3
87.3
84. 7
84. 7
84.7
84 7
84l 7
84.7
84.7
84.7
84.7
84.7
77.8
77.8
77.8
77 8
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2
72.2

$2. 70
6.80
100. 0
100.0
100. 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
88.9
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
83.3
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
80.1
80.1
80.1
80.1
77.8
77. 8
77.8
77. 8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
77.8
74.1
74.1
74.1
74.1
65. 6
65. 6
65.6
65.6
65.6
65.6
65.6
65.6

$5.80
5.80
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
93.1
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
75.0
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
74.6
74.6
74. 6
74.6
72.4
72. 4
72.4
72. 4
72] 4
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
72.4
60.3
60.3
60.3
60. 3
53] 3
53.3
53.3
53.3
53.3
53.3
53.3
53.3

$1. 41
5. 60
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
101.9
101.9
101.9
101.9
99.0
99. 0
99.0
99 0
]
99.0
99.0
88.7
88.7
88. 7
88.7
88.7
88. 7
88. 7
88’ 7
.
88.7
88.7
88.7
88.7
88.7
88.7
88.7

$2. 23
5.60
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
98.8
101.7
101.7
101.7
101.7
98.8
98. 8
98.8
98. 8
98] 8
98.8
98.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89 8
89] 8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8
89.8

$3. 50
3.50
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97. 2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97. 2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
97.2
100.2
100.2
100.2
100.2
97.2
97. 2
97.2
97. 2
97] 2
97.2
97.2
91.5
91.5
91.5
91.5
91.5
91.5
91. 5
91’5
.
91.5
91. 5
91.5
91. 5
91. 5
91.5
91. 5

$1.88 $3. 37 $1.30 $1.77 $3.09 $1.25 $2.00
4. 70 3. 40 5.20 4.40 3.10 5. 00 5.00

$3.20
3.20

$1.99
5.00
100.0
100.0
100.0
100. 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100. 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100. 0
100. 0
100.0
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
101.2
101.2
101.2
101.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98. 2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98.2
98. 2
98.2
98.2
98. 2
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7
94.7

Indexes for September 1932 through June 1933 show effect of 3 percent Federal tax.




Seattle (2 companies)

99 0

BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

37

Basic Data for Computing Prices and Indexes
Prices of electricity typical of the requirements of each of the three
services for which indexes have been presented for March 1923 for­
ward for each of 51 cities, together with the most significant features
of the rate schedules used for computing these prices, are shown in
table 8.
Blocks of consumption for these three services, and for a fourth
service, not included in the indexes, for which prices were computed
for November 1934 forward, are listed below.

Kilowatt-hours
25
40

100
250

Service

Lighting and household appliances.
Lighting and household appliances.
Lighting, appliances, and refrigeration.
Lighting, appliances, refrigeration, and cooking.

Specifications
Following are the specifications which were used for computing
monthly bills from different types of rate schedules for each of the
three services included in the indexes, and also for the use of 250
kilowatt-hours for which no indexes were computed.
Room-count: Five rooms.
Active room-count: In accordance with schedule of rates.
Floor area: 1,000 square feet.
Outlets: Fourteen 50-watt.
Connected load:
Lighting and appliances__________________________________________________
700
Refrigeration_____ _______________________________________________________
300
Cooking____________________________________________________________________ 6, 000
Measured demand:
Lighting and appliances__________________________________________________
600
Refrigeration______________________________________________________________
100
Cooking____________________________________________________________________ 2, 300

Watts

Combination of two rate schedules providing for the use of either one or two
meters for computing cost of 100 kilowatt-hours:
Schedule for lighting: 40 kilowatt-hours.
Schedule for refrigeration or power: 60 kilowatt-hours.

Definitions o f Terms
Definitions of the terms used in the description of rate schedules
follow:
W a t t .— Unit of electrical work: 1 volt (unit of electrical pressure
or force) X 1 ampere (unit of electrical quantity).
K ilo w a t t .— 1,000 watts, equivalent to motor of approximately 1%
horsepower. This is the unit used for expressing the connected load
or the power required by the customer's equipment at any given
instant.




38

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

K ilo w a tt-h o u r . — 1,000 watts working for 1 hour. Example:
The
use of twenty 50-watt lamps or of one 1,000-watt ironer or range for
1 hour.
H o r s e p o w e r .— 745>941 watts.
C on n ected load or m a x im u m d em a n d . — Total watt capacity or actual
demand in watts of all equipment including lights and appliances.
A c tiv e load or m ea su red d em a n d . — These terms represent the cus­
tomer’s average use of equipment, which may be determined either
by test, estimate, or measure. Under the test method the demand is
determined with the use of portable instruments over a designated
period of time, or from the customer’s watt-hour meter. Estimated
demand is based upon factors or tables resulting from known experi­
ence which are usually applied to the connected load. Measured
demand indicates the determination by permanent instruments and
is more generally used for commercial or industrial customers than for
residential customers. The demand is preferably expressed in kilo­
watts, in horsepower, or in kilovolt amperes.
The size of the customer’s home, either as “ room-count” or “ floor
area,” also provides a basis for demand rates. The room-count
usually includes all important rooms in accordance with local realestate count. Occasionally, certain rooms, such as bedrooms, up to
a designated number, are omitted in the count, thereby constituting
what is generally termed “ active room-count.”
M i n i m u m charge. — A large majority of rate schedules designate a
minimum charge which is paid in lieu of the bill computed under the
regular rates for electricity consumed during the month when such
bill is less than the minimum charge.
S ervice charge. — This term, sometimes called a “ customer charge,”
indicates a flat monthly charge per meter or per customer in addition
to the charge for current consumed. It may be used in conjunction
with meter rates or with demand rates.
Example: $1.00 per meter per month plus the energy charge.
D e m a n d charge .— This term indicates a charge for service which
varies between customers in accordance with their “ demand,” “ con­
nected load,” etc. Like the service charge, it is separate from the
charge for energy. It forms an integral part of both the “ Hopkinson”
and “ three-charge” types of rates. Examples are shown in the
description of those rate schedules on pages 41 and 42.
In itia l charge. — As a substitute for independent service charges, a
number of utilities have adopted what is known as the “ initial charge”
rate, under which a fixed sum is charged for a limited commodity
supply or any part thereof and the balance of consumption is charged
for under one of the meter or demand types of rate schedules. Occa­
sionally the amount of the initial charge varies in accordance with




BASIC DATA DOE COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

39

customer demands. In most instances, the initial charge is also used
for the minimum charge.
Examples:
Meter type— $1.00 for the first 5 kilowatt-hours or less used per
month, or
Demand type— 10 cents per room per month, including the use of 3
kilowatt-hours.

The fixed sum has been listed in table 8 as a minimum charge, and
the number of kilowatt-hours covered is shown as the first block. The
rate per kilowatt-hour for the first block was determined by dividing
the fixed charge by the number of kilowatt-hours in the first block.
This form of schedule was classified in accordance with the type
applicable to the method of charge for current used in addition to that
covered by the initial charge.
F u e l charge .— The inclusion of a fuel clause in a rate schedule
provides for periodical upward or downward revisions in the rates per
kilowatt-hour. These revisions are in direct ratio to variations in
the price paid for fuel by the utility at stated intervals of time as
compared with an accepted standard price per ton of coal or per
gallon of oil.
S u rch a rge .— This is a charge over the usual or normal rate.
It is
generally expressed as a percentage, and is added to the bill computed
from the rate schedule.
Types o f R ate Schedules

The standard forms of electricity rates may be divided into two
main classes, meter rates and demand rates, and each of these classes
into different types. The terms used to describe the types of residen­
tial rate schedules which were used for computing net monthly bills
for each of 51 cities from March 1923 forward, are as follows:
M e t e r r a te s

D e m a n d r a te s

Straight line.
Step meter.
Block meter.

Wright.
Hopkinson demand.
Three-charge, or Doherty.

Wright and Hopkinson schedules are sometimes modified by the
inclusion of methods of charge distinctive of other types.
Meter Rates

The term “ meter rate” is applicable to any method of charge based
solely upon quantity, measured in units expressed as kilowatt-hours.
The use of many so-called meter rates is limited by certain demand
features, such as size and capacity of meter, connected load, etc.
These conditions have been disregarded where they would affect only
those customers using a considerably greater amount of electricity
and a greater number or size of appliances than are represented in the
three services for which indexes have been computed. (See p. 45.)




40

CHANGES m

RETAIL PRICES OE ELECTRICITY

Straight lin e .— The term “ straight line” indicates that the price
charged per kilowatt-hour is constant, i. e., does not vary on account
of an increase or decrease in the number of units used. This is the
simplest of all meter rates.
Example: 10 cents per kilowatt-hour.
S te p .— The term “ step” indicates that a certain specified price per
unit is charged for the entire consumption, the rate depending upon
the particular step within which the total consumption falls.
Example:
10 cents per kilowatt-hour for from 1 to 25 kilowatt-hours.
8 cents per kilowatt-hour for from 26 to 50 kilowatt-hours.
E t cetera.

The step rate sometimes results from a series of discounts:
Example: 10 cents per kilowatt-hour.
Discounts:
5 percent for customers using 26 to 50 kilowatt-hours per month.
10 percent for customers using 51 to 150 kilowatt-hours per month.
E t cetera.
B lo c k m eter .— The term “ block” indicates that a certain specified
price per unit is charged for all or any part of a block of such units,
and reduced prices per unit are charged for all or any part of succeed­
ing blocks of such units, each reduced price applying only to a particu­
lar block or portion thereof. This is the most important of the
residential rates. In 1938 schedules of this type were in effect in 45
of the 51 cities. An example of block meter rates follows:
Example:
10 cents per kilowatt-hour for the first 25 kilowatt-hours used per
month.
8 cents per kilowatt-hour for the next 50 kilowatt-hours used per
month.
4 cents per kilowatt-hour for the excess over 75 kilowatt-hours used
per month.

Block meter rates known as “ quick-break” schedules correspond
in general averages to those of the “ demand” type in that the number
of kilowatt-hours in each block is determined to some extent by the
average requirement for lighting and various electric appliances.
The first block may be designed to cover the average use of electric­
ity for lighting, the second for radio and the occasionally used house­
hold socket devices, the third for refrigeration, the fourth for cooking,
etc. Schedules of this type have supplanted many of the demandrate schedules.
Demand Rates

Various types of demand rates have been named for the men who
proposed them. The term “ demand rate” applies to any method of
charge for electrical service which is based upon the size of the cus-




BASIC DATA FOB COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

41

tomer’s installation or its use during a given period of time. The
basis of measurement may be the entire “ connected load” or “ maxi­
mum demand” or it may represent the customer’s average use of
equipment expressed as “ active load” or “ measured demand.” (See
Definitions of Terms.) Demand rates based upon room-count or
floor area were noted in table 8 to distinguish them from those based
upon connected load.
W rig h t d em a n d . — This term applies to a method of charge in which
a maximum price per unit is charged for a certain amount of energy,
and one or more reduced prices are charged for the balance on the
block principle, in accordance with a schedule based upon the use of
the demand, expressed as “ room-count,” “ connected load,” etc.
Example:
First 5 kilowatt-hours per room per month, at 8 cents per kwh.
Next 5 kilowatt-hours per room per month, at 6 cents per kwh.
Next 10 kilowatt-hours per room per month, at 5 cents per kwh.
Excess consumption, at 4 cents per kwh.
M o d ifie d W rig h t d em a n d . — Schedules having a Wright demand
method of charge for the first block followed by meter rates, either
straight line or block, have been classified as “ modified Wright
demand.”
Example:
First 6 kilowatt-hours per room per month, at 8 cents per kwh.
Next 50 kilowatt-hours per month, at 6 cents per kwh.
Excess kilowatt-hours per month, at 4 cents per kwh.
H o p k in s o n

d em a n d . — This

term applies to a method of charge

which consists of two parts:
(1) “ Demand charge,” a sum based upon the demand, either esti­
mated or measured, or the connected load (see p. 38); plus
(2) “ Energy charge,” based upon the quantity of energy used.
(See description of meter rates, p. 39.)
In its simplest form the Hopkinson rate may be illustrated as
follows:
Demand charge: $2.00 per month per kilowatt of demand.
Energy charge: 3 cents per kilowatt-hour.
B lock H o p k in s o n d em a n d . — Either the “ demand charge” or the
“ energy charge” or both may be of the block form.
Example:
Demand charge:
75 cents per month for the first 3 rooms.
10 cents per month for each additional room.
Energy charge:
6 cents per kilowatt-hour for the first 30 kilowatt-hours used
per month.
3 cents per kilowatt-hour for excess over 30 kilowatt-hours used
per month.
139863°— 39------ 4




42

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OE ELECTRICITY

M o d ifie d block H o p k in s o n d em a n d .— This term designates a form
of charge which combines the Wright method of energy charge with
a demand charge of the Hopkinson type.
Example:
Demand charge:
75 cents per month for the first 3 rooms.
10 cents per month for each additional room.
Energy charge:
First 5 kilowatt-hours per room per month, at 6 cents per kwh.
Next 5 kilowatt-hours per room per month, at 4 cents per kwh.
Excess consumption, at 2 cents per kwh.
Three-charge or D o h e r ty .— This term applies to that method of
charge which consists of—
(1) “ Customer charge,” a charge per customer or per meter (see
“ Service charge,” p. 38); plus
(2) “ Demand charge” ; plus
(3) “ Energy charge.”
Parts (2) and (3) correspond to parts (1) and (2) of the Hopkinson
type of rate. An example of the three-charge or Doherty rate
follows:
Customer charge: 75 cents per month per meter; plus
Demand charge: 10 cents per room per month; plus
Energy charge:
First 50 kilowatt-hours per month, at 5 cents per kwh.
Excess kilowatt-hours per month, at 3 cents per kwh.

This type of schedule was designed for commercial and industrial
use of electricity and has had limited use for residential purposes.
Objective Rate Plan and Optional and Supplemental Rate Schedules

The use in a city of two or more residential rate schedules was a
means whereby lower prices per kilowatt-hour of electricity were pro­
vided for larger customers or for customers whose use of electricity
showed an increase as compared with an earlier date. The conditions
under which the lower rate became applicable varied between cities.
Objective rate p l a n .— A method of charge known as the “ Objective”
rate plan was introduced in 1933. Six of the 51 cities for which indexes
were computed were served under this plan, and 4 of the 6 discon­
tinued its use. Following is a record of the cities and the period of
operation:
Atlanta: January 1934.
Little Rock: February 1936-January
Mobile: October 1933.
1938.
Birmingham: April 1935-December 1938. Salt Lake City: October 1935-M arch
Charleston: November 1934r-April 1938.
1938.

Under this plan tw^o separate rate schedules, the higher of which was
called “ Present” or “ Immediate” and the lower “ Objective” or




BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

43

“ Inducement” were simultaneously available. The lower or “ Ob­
jective” rate was automatically made available for customers whose
use of electricity during any month showed an increase as compared
with the corresponding month of an earlier or “ base” year, and special
provisions were prescribed for transition from the use of the higher
to the lower rate schedule.
The plan for transition or “ cross-over” from the use of the “ Present”
to the “ Objective” rate schedule differed in the various cities. Prob­
ably that most generally used provided for the use of “ free” kilowatthours as follows: The cost for electricity used in each of the 12 months
of the base year, computed under the “ Present” rate schedule, con­
stituted the “ base bill” for each month.
When the amount of electricity used in any month was greater than
that used in the corresponding month of the base year, the customer
was billed under the lower or “ Objective” rate schedule. However,
when this bill was less than the base bill, he was charged with the
base bill. To illustrate: It was assumed that a customer using 50
kilowatt-hours in January 1933 would have a base bill of $2.88. If,
in January 1934, he used 56 kilowatt-hours which would cost $2.84
when computed under the “ Objective” rate schedule, the base bill
would apply and the bill would be rendered for $2.88. If 57 kilowatthours were used at a cost of $2.89 under the “ Objective” rate, the bill
would be rendered for that amount. Thus, 6 additional kilowatthours could be used for the base bill at no extra cost.
There were several deviations from this method of billing the kilo­
watt-hours which resulted from the overlapping of costs as computed
under the two rate schedules. Some methods allowed for discounts or
lower rates per kilowatt-hour for the cross-over, others employed an
intermediary or third rate in the transition.
Costs for electricity, under the “ Present” and the “ Objective” rate
schedules which were computed for each of the six cities, represent
the highest and the lowest cost for each specified number of kilowatthours. There were, however, many customers whose bills fell between
the two extremes.
“ 1 0 j o r 1 p l a n ” — A bargain electricity plan was put into effect for
residential customers in Milwaukee in October 1935. Customers
were permitted an increase up to 100 percent of the kilowatt-hours of
electricity used in the corresponding month of the preceding or base
year at an increase of 10 percent over the bill for that month. Energy
in excess of double the amount used in the base year was billed at 2
cents per kilowatt-hour.
Thirty kilowatt-hours for the 10 percent increase were allowed to all
customers who had used less than that amount per month during the
base year. Whenever the bill at the regular rates was lower than
under the “ 10-for-l plan” the regular rates were applicable.




44

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

No method has been found for determining the wide variations in
bills for a specified number of kilowatt-hours. Hence, it must be
recognized that the bills presented in table 8 were the highest appli­
cable for each service and that many customers were billed for lesser
amounts.
O p tion a l rate schedules. — Usually these rate schedules were auto­
matically made available to customers using prescribed equipment or
appliances. Occasionally, they provided a choice between two or
more schedules for the selection of the rate which was most advanta­
geous to the customer. The bill for the entire monthly consumption
was computed under the “ Optional” rate schedule.
S u p p lem en ta l rate schedu les. — These schedules were used in con­
nection with the regular rate schedules, and provided a lower price
per kilowatt-hour for electricity used for specified purposes. There
were two methods of using supplemental schedules. The first method
included the use of two meters— one for lighting and small appliances
billed under the regular rate schedule; and one for major appliances
such as refrigerator, range, water-heater, etc., billed under the lower
“ Supplemental” rate. Under the second method all current was
supplied through one meter. A fixed amount or proportion of the
electricity used during the month was billed under the regular rate
schedule and the balance under the “ Supplemental” rate.
There was a gradual reduction between 1923 and 1938 in the use of
separate rate schedules for major appliances. In March 1923, 12 of
the 51 cities had separate rate schedules for customers using 100 kilo­
watt-hours which included electricity for refrigeration. In December
1938, separate schedules were reported for 2 cities for this service.
R a te schedules, 1 9 2 3 - 8 8 . — Rate schedules effective in the 51 cities
during the 16 years from 1923 to 1938 varied from the simple type of
straight line schedule, which prescribed a fixed price for all current
consumed, to the more complicated types of block demand rates
under which the amount of current paid for at a stipulated price was
determined for each customer in accordance with connected load,
size of house, or kind of appliances used, and therefore, varied con­
siderably between customers in the same city.
Block meter rates were more generally used during the 16 years
from 1923 through 1938 than any other type. In 1923 they represented
about 50 percent of the rate schedules effective in the 51 cities. In
1938 the number had increased to 88 percent. The use of Wright
demand rates, second in importance, showed a decrease. The num­
ber effective in the various cities amounted to approximately 40
percent in 1923 and to 12 percent in 1938. Straight line types,
together with a few step rate types, which represented more than 29
percent of the rate schedules effective in 1923, had all been discon­
tinued by 1938. Hopkinson and three-charge or Doherty rates




BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

45

constituted less than 4 percent of the rate schedules effective in the 51
cities both in 1923 and in 1938.
In describing the types of rates, shown in table 8, it has been found
necessary to limit the data to the provisions applicable to the three
specified services and blocks of consumption for which indexes have
been computed. Under this limitation, many special provisions which
would apply to larger customers were disregarded. Some of the
schedules would fall under a different classification for the larger
customers. For example, a schedule operating as a block meter rate
for the use of equipment for lighting, socket devices, and refrigeration,
but which prescribed a demand charge for the use of a range would
fall under the classification of a Hopkinson demand rate schedule for
the larger service. Some of the rate schedules covered a limited lamprenewal service. The amount of such service varied between cities,
and frequently within the same city over a period of time. These
schedules were noted, but no attempt was made to define either the
limitations or the provisions of the lamp-renewal services. The features
of the rate schedules shown in table 8 are those usually designed to
cover some part of fixed customer costs, such as investment, servicing
of equipment, etc.
The first column shows the cities and type of utility serving each,
together with the period during which the various prices were in effect
in different cities as shown in the last six columns. “ P ” indicates a
privately owned utility, and “ M ” indicates a municipal plant. Under
“ type of rate” is presented the kind of residential rate schedule which
was used for computing prices for the 25 and 40 kilowatt-hour services
and for the 100 kilowatt-hour service. The few instances where prices
for 40 kilowatt-hours were computed under a separate rate schedule or
under the schedule applicable to the 100 kilowatt-hour service have
been noted.
Under “ first block” and “ second block,” the number of kilowatthours represents the amount of electricity to which the rate is appli­
cable. The number of kilowatt-hours covered by an initial charge
and the corresponding computed rate are shown in the columns under
“ first block,” while the entire initial charge is shown as a minimum
charge. The amount of electricity for both the first and the second
blocks represents fixed numbers of kilowatt-hours for meter rates.
For demand rates, the number applies to the specified services as
determined from the specifications shown on page 37. Under “ cus­
tomer charge” is shown the least amount for which a customer was
billed.
Taxes added as a separate item to the customer’s bill have been
included in the prices. These prices and the effective dates are shown
in italics. The Federal tax of 3 percent applicable to all cities from




46

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

June 21, 1932, to September 1, 1933, and the following State or local
sales taxes have been included:
Middle Atlantic:
New Y ork___________________________ 2 p ercen ts Dec. 10, 1 9 3 4 -Apr. 21, 1938
3 percent, _ Apr. 2 2 ,1 9 3 8 -D e c . 15,1938
Philadelphia_________________________2 percent. _ Mar. 1 ,1 9 3 8 -D e c . 15 ,1938
East North Central:
Detroit______________________________ 3 percent. _ July
1 ,1 9 3 3 -D e c . 15,1938
West North Central:
Kansas C ity _________________________1 percent. _ Aug. 27, 1935-June 7, 1937
2 percent. _ June 8, 1937-D ec. 15, 1938
St. Louis____________________________ 1 percent. _ Aug. 27, 1935-June 7, 1937
2 percent. _ June 8 ,1 9 3 7 -D e c . 15 ,1938
East South Central:
Louisville____________________________ 3 percent. _ July
1, 193L-Jan. 14,1936
do____ M ay 13, 1936-D ec. 15, 1938
W est South Central:
Little Rock__________________________2 percent. _ July
1 ,1 9 3 5 -D e c . 15,1938
Mountain:
Denver___________________________________ do_____ Mar. 1, 1935-D ec. 15, 1938
Salt Lake C ity___________________________do_____Aug. 4, 1933-D ec. 15, 1938




T

a b l e

8 ,—

S u m m a r i z e d d a ta u s e d i n the c o m p u ta tio n o f re ta il p r i c e s o f e l e c t r i c i t y , b y c o m p a n i e s , M a r c h 1 9 2 3 —D e c e m b e r 1 9 8 8 , i n c lu s iv e

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]

100 kwh

25 and 40 kwh
City, type of ownership, and
period

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

per
Monthly bill for— Average priceof—
kwh for use

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
ber
ber
ber
ber
ice mum
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
NEW ENGLAND

Boston 1
P.
Ct.
Ct.
Ct. Dol. Dol. Block34... 10 10.0 12,050 Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
2
Sept. 1,1922-Jan. 31,1924 A
1.50 2. 38 3.80 6.00
2.0
Straight___
9.5
0. 75
Mar. 1923_____
2.38 3.80 6.28
2.38 3.80 6.24
June 1923_____
2. 38 3.80 6. 21
Sept. 1Q9Q
1923____
T )p p
2. 38 3.80 6.16
Feb. 1,1924-Aug. 3R 1925~'
Block. __ 1,000 9.5 4,000 8.0
1.50 2.38 3.80 6.25
. 75 Block34. .
10 9.5 10, 000 3.0
____do_____ 1,000 8.5 2,000 8.0
.75 ...d o.3 4____ 20 8.5 10,000 3.0
1.50 2.13 3. 40 6.30
.75 2.13 3.40 5. 85
____do_____ 1,000 8.5 2,000 8.0
. 75 Wright 5_ . 30 8.5
60 5.0
Aug. 16,1928-Aug. 31,1930..
.75 1.95 2.70 5.50
Wright6___ 20 8.5 70 5.0
. 75 __do.6____ 20 8.5
70 5.0
Sept. 1,1930-Aug. 31,1934.
do.6
.75 1. 75 2.50 5. 30
20 7. 5 70 5.0
.75 __do.6____ 20 7. 5
70 5.0
June 21,1932-Aug. 31, 1933...
l
1.80 2.58 5. IS
Sept. 1,1934-Mar. 31,1935.
Wright6___ 20 7.0 70 ^ 5.0
.75 Wright 6__ 20 7.0
70 5.0
.75 1. 65 2.40 5.20
Apr. 1, 1935-Dec. 15,1938.
____do.6____ 20 6.5 70 5.0
70 5.0
.75 1.55 2. 30 5.10
.75 __.do.6____ 20 6.5
Bridgeport
P.
Jan. 1,1923-Dec. 31,1923..
S te p ___
599 7.5
599 7.5
1.00 Step
1.00 1. 88 3.00 7.50
Jan. 1,1924-Dec. 31,1924..
____do_____ 599 7.0
1.00 ...d o _____ 599 7.0
1.00 1.75 2.80 7.00
Jan. 1, 1925-June 30, 1927..
.do__
599 6.5
1.00 1. 63 2.60 6.50
1.00 ...d o _____ 599 6.5
July 1,1927-Sept. 30,1928..
____do_____ 599 6.0
1.00 1.50 2.40 6.00
1.00 ...d o _____ 599 6.0
P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.
Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.
Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).
See footnotes at end of table.



—

—

Ct. Ct. Ct.
9.5 9.5 6.0
9.5
9.5
9.5
9.5
9.5
8.5
8.5
7.8
7.0

9.5
9.5
9.5
9.5
9.5
8.5
8.5
6.8
6.3
7.2 6.4
6.6 6.0
6.2 5.8

6.3
6.2
6.2
6.2
6.3
6.3
5.9
5.5
5.3
5.5
5.2
5.1

7.5
7.0
6.5

7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0

7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0 6.0

BASIC BATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

Net price

Details of rates

T

a b l e

8 .—

S u m m a r i z e d d a ta u s e d i n the c o m p u ta t io n o f reta il p r ic e s o f e l e c t r i c i t y , b y c o m p a n i e s , M a r c h 1 9 2 3 —D e c e m b e r 1 9 8 8 , i n c l u s i v e -

00

Continued

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Net price

25 and 40 kwh

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

City, type of ownership, and
period

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

Monthly bill for— Average price per
kwh for use of—

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
ber
ber
ber
ice mum
ber
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
NEW ENGLAND—Continued

Bridgeport—Continued
Oct. 1,1928-Feb. 29,1932_____
Mar. 1,1932-Feb. 28,1935_ _
June21,1982-Aug. 81,1983
Mar. 1, 1935-May 31,1938 ...
June 1, 1938-Dec. 15,1938 __
Fall River
P.
Oct. 1,1922-Apr. 30,1923_______
May 1,1923-May 31,1926_____
June 1,1926-Dec. 31,1927______
Jan. 1,1928-Jan. 31,1934______
June 21,1982-Aug. 81,1988 .
Feb. 1,1934-Mar. 31, 1935_____
Apr. 1,1935-May 31, 1935______
June 1,1935-Mar. 31, 1937_____
Apr. 1,1937-Dec. 15,1938______
Manchester
P.
Jan. 1,1922-Dec. 31, 1927_______
Jan. 1,1928-Dec. 31,1928_______
Jan. 1.1929-June 30.1930_______



Step... ___
Block.
Block.
_ _ do__
______ d o ________
______d o ________
______d o ________
____ d o ______ _

Block _
____do_____
____do_____
... do__ _
B lo ck .____
Wright 7___

599
400
30
30
500
25
25
25
25
30
30
15

Ct.

5.5
5.3 1,000
5.3 70
5.3 70

9.5 500
9.0 975
8.5 975
8.0 75
8.0 75
7.5 Ex.
7.0 50
6.5 15

25 12.0
21 11.0
21 10.0

50
21
21

Ct. Dol. Dol

599
400
30
30

5.5

1.31 1. 93 4.03

5.3

4.8

2.38
2. 25
2.13
2.00
2.06
2.00
1.88
1. 75
1.58

9.5
9.0
8.5
8.0
8.2
8.0
7.5
7.0
6.3

9.5
8.8
8.1
6.9
7.1
6.9
6.9
6.5
5.9

9.5
8.6
7.8
5.8
5.9
5.7
5.7
5.2
5.0

1.00 3.00 3.90 6. 75 12.0
1.00 2. 59 3. 64 5.78 10.4
1.00 2. 38 3.43 5. 57 9.5

9.8
9.1
8.6

6.8
5.8
5.6

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

1.38 2.20 5.50
1.31 2.10 5. 25 5.3 5.3
1.85 2.16 4.87 5.4 5.4
5.41 5.3 5.1
1.31 2.05

9.5
9.0
8.5
8.0
6.0
6.0
7.0
6.5

500
975
975
75
375
375
50
15

8.6
8.5
7.5
5.0
4.0
4.0
5.0
6.0

.50
.50
.50
.50
2.50
2. 75
.75
.75

25 12.0
21 11.0
21 10.0

50
21
21

6.0
7.0
7.0

Step
Block
Block
___do_____

8.6
8.5
7.5
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
6.0

.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
.75
.75
.75

__-do_____ 500
___do_____ 25
___do_____ 25
_..do_____ 25
Block3___ 25
— do.3____ 25
...d o _____ 30
___do_____ 15

1.00 Block_ ___
1.00 Wright
1.00 ...d o.7____

5.5

4.6
4.7
3.5

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

6.0
7.0
7.0

Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Ct. Ct. Ct.

Ct.
5.5

5.3 1,000
5.3
70
5.3
70

4.6
4.7
3.5

3.80
3. 53
3. 25
2. 75
2.88
2.75
2. 75
2.60
2. 38

9.50
8. 63
7. 75
5. 75
5.92
5.65
5. 65
5.20
4. 98

5.5
5.3

5.4
4.9
4.0

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Details of rates

21 10.0
30 8.0
599
599
599
599
599
400
30
30

7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5. 5
5. 3 1,000
5. 3 70
5. 3 70

8. 0
30 8.0
21 8.0
20 8.0

70
49
50

6. 5
6. 5
6.5
6.5
3 16.7
4 12.5
4 12.5

60
29
64

1.00 2. 34 3.24 5. 36
2. U 3.84 5.52
1.00 2.00 2.80

9.4
9.6

8.1

5.5

7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5. 5
5.3 1,000
5. 3
70
5.3
70

4. 6
4. 7
3. 5

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

3.00 7.50
2.80 7.00
2.60 6.50
2.40 6.00
2. 20 5.50
2.10 5. 25
2.16 5. 41
2. 05 4.87
1.93 4. 03

7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5.5

7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5.5
5.3

7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5.5

5.4
8.0
8.0
8.0

5.0
5.0
5.0

2. 00 2.00
1.00 2.00
1.00
1.94
1.00 1.85

3.20
2.90
2. 63
2. 71
2.60

6.44 8.0
5.90 8.0
4. 73 7.5
4.87 7.7
4. 70 7.4

2. 25
2.23
2.25
2.23
2.25
2.23
2.20
2.23
2. 25
2.20
2.13
2.13
2.13
2.13
. 50 1.93
1.99
. 50 1.87
.50 1.76

3.30
3.26
3.30
3.26
3. 30
3.26
3.22
3.26
3.30
3. 22
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
2.91
2.99
2.81

7.50 9.0
7.40 8.9
7. 50 9.0
7.40 8.9
9.0
8.9
7. 30 8.8
7.40 8.9
7.50 9.0
7. 30 8.8
6. 75 8.5
6. 25 8.5
5.95 8.5
5.85 8.5
5.81 7.7
5.58 8.0
5. 60 7.5
5. 50 7.0

1.00 ...d o .7____
1.00 Block____

21 10.0
30 8.0

4. 6
4.7
3. 5

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

Step__ __
...d o ____
...do_____
_do___ ._
__do_____
Block
Block. . _
...d o_____

599
599
599
599
599
400
30
30

5.0
5.0
5.0

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

Straight 3.
Block .
Wright7_
Block____

30
21
20

Straight _

0. 50

6.5"
6. 5
6.0

. 50
. 50
. 50
.50

.50
.50
. 50
. 50
.50

21
60

70
49
50

7.0

B lock ___ 100 5.0
...d o_____ 75 5.0
...d o_____ 60 5.0
...d o_____ 80 5.0
3 16.7
...d o 8____
Block 8____ 4 12. 5
4 12.5
...do,8____

Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.

5.4
5.0

6.0
4.0

6.0 —
4.0

7.0

P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.
See footnotes at end of table.




21
60

0. 50

Ex.
Ex.
140
125
60
29
64

3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6. 5
6. 5
6.0

1.75
1. 75
1.75
1.25

1.88

1.75
1.63
1.50
1.38
1.31
1.35
1.31
1.31

2.66

Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

8.0

5.3
5.3

5.4

4.9
4.0

8.0
7.3
6.6
6.8

6.4
5.9

8.3
8.3
8.2
8.3

7.5
7.4
7.5
7.4
7.5
7.4
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.3
6.8
6.3
6.0
5.9
5.8
6.0
5.6
5.5

6.5

8.2
8.2

8.1

8.2

8.3

8.1

7.5

7.0
6.7

BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

July 1,1930-Mar. 14,1935______
do.7____
June 21,1932-Aug. 81,1933...
Mar. 15,1935-Dec. 15,1938_____ Block. ___
New Haven
P.
Jan. 1, 1923-Dec. 31, 1923______ Step _
Jan. 1, 1924-Dec. 31, 1924______ ___Ido______
Jan. 1, 1925-June 30, 1927______ __ __do___ ...
July 1 ,1927-Sept. 30, 1928______ ___do. _ ...
Oct. 1, 1928-Feb. 29, 1932______
do
Mar. 1, 1932-Feb. 28, 1935_____ Block
June 21,1932-Aug.1938_____
31,1933..
Mar. 1 ,1935-May 31,
Block
June 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938______
.do
Portland, Maine P.
May 1921-June 30,1927________ Straight
July 1, 1927-June 30,1928 __
Block
July 1, 1928-Oct. 31,1937______ Wright 7___
June 21,1982-Aug. 31,1933..
Nov. 1, 1937-Dec. 15,1938_____ Block __
Providence
P.
Aug. 1, 1922-June 30, 1927 2____ Straight. ._
Mar. 1923________________
June 1923_________________
Sept. 1923 _______ ____
Dec. 1923-Sept. 1924__ _ _
Dec. 1924-Sept. 1925_______
Dec. 1925-Sept. 1926 ______
Dec. 1926_________________
Mar. 1927________________
June 1927.__ ... __ _____
July 1 ,1927-Apr. 30, 1928______ Straight.__
May 1, 1928-Mar. 31,1929_____
.do
Apr. 1, 1929-Jan. 31, 1931______ ___do .. .
Feb. 1 ,1931-Dec. 31, 1931______ ____do_____
Jan. 1, 1932-Apr. 7,1935_____ Block 8 ____
June 21,1982-Aug. 31, 1933
Apr. 8, 1935-Sept. 30, 1936_____ Block 8___ __
Oct. 1, 1936-Dec. 15, 1938______ ____do.8____

CO

T

a b l e

8 .—

Sum m arized data used in the computation of retail prices o f electricity, by com panies, M arch 1923-D ecem ber 1988, inclusive—
Continued
^

Cn

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Net price

25 and 40 kwh
City, type of ownership, and
period

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

per
Monthly bill for— Average priceof—
kwh for use

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
ber
ber
ber
ber
ice mum
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
MIDDLE ATLANTIC

Buffalo
P.
Ct.
Jan. 10, 1923-Jan. 29, 1925______ Wright........ 15 6.0
Jan. 30, 1925-Mar. 31, 1928_____ ____do_____ 15 5.0
Apr. 1 ,1928-Jan. 31, 1934______ __ __do_____ 15 5.0
June 21,1932-Aug. 31, 1933..
Feb. 1, 1934-Dec. 15, 1938______ Block *....... . 15 5.0
Newark
P.
Dec. 1, 1922-Apr. 30, 1924______ ____do______ 500 9.0
May 1 ,1924-Dec. 31, 1926_____ ........do_____ 20 9.0
Jan. 1, 1927-Dec. 31, 1929______ ____do_____ 20 9.0
Jan. 1, 1930-Dec. 31,1931______ ____do_____ 20 9.0
Jan. 1, 1932-Dec. 31, 1932______ ____do_____ 20 9.0
June 21, 1932-Dec. 31, 1932..
Jan. 1, 1933-May 31, 1935______ Block_____ 20 9.0
Jan. 1,1933-Aug. 31, 1933... Block 8......... 11
June 1 ,1935-Dec. 31, 1936_____
9.1
Jan. 1, 1937-Dec. 31, 1937______ ____do. 8____ 11 9.1
Jan. 1, 1938-Dec. 15,1938______ ____d o.8____ 11 9.1




30
30
30
45

Ct. Dol. Dol.
Ct.
4.0
1.00 Wright___ 20 6.0
4.0
1.00 ...d o _____ 20 5.0
4.0
.75 __.do_____ 20 5.0
3.8

500 8.0
480 8.0
30 8.0
30 8.0
20 8.0
20 7.0
11 7.0
19 6.0
11 6.0

.75 Block 8___
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

Wright 3 9.

__.do.3
...do.39___
9__

Block.__ _
___do_____
Block ___ _
Block 8___
...do. 8___
___do. 8___

15

5.0

40
40
40
45

5
5
5
20
20
20
11
11
11

9.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
9.0
9.1
9.1
9.1

50
50
50
30
20
20
11
19
11

Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
4.0
1.00 1.30 1.90 3. 40
4.0
1.00 1.15 1.75 3.20
4.0
.75 1.15 1.75 3. 20
1.19 1.80 3. 30
1. 70

Ct. Ct. Ct.
5.2

6.0
5.0
5.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
6.0
6.0

9.0
8.8
8.8
8.8
8.8
9.1
8.6

3.8

4.6
4.6
. 4-7
3.06 4.5

.75 1.13

2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1. 00
1.00
1. 00

2. 25
2.20
2.20
2.20
2. 20
2.27
2.15
2. 21
1.92
1.84
1. 81

3. 60
3. 40
3. 40
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.20
3.30
2. 60
2. 54
2. 49

7. 25
6. 55
6. 55
5. 70
5.60
5. 77
5. 30
5.46
4. 50
4.44
4. 39

8.9
7. 7
7.4
7.2

4.8
4.4
4.4
4.5
4.3

3.4
3.2
3.2
3.3
3.1

9.0
8.5
8.5
8.5
8. 5
8.8
8.0
8.2
6. 5
6.4
6.2

7.3
6.6
6.6
5.7
5.6
5.8
5.3
5.5
4.5
4.4
4.4

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Details of rates

New York

2

10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0

100
10
5

8.0

2. 50
2. 50
1.00 2. 30
1.00 1.80
1.80

4.00
4.00
3.50
2. 55
2.55

10.00 10.0 10.0
10.00 10.0 10.0
7.90 9.2 8.8
5. 55 7.2 6.4
5. 55 7.2 6.4

10.0
10.0
7.9
5.6
5.6

1.00 2.00
2.15
2.13
2.12
2.10
2.09
2.08
1.00 1.88
1.96
1. 95
1. 94
1.95
1.00 1. 75
1.83
1.82
1.00 1.75
1. 75
1. 75
1.00 1.80
1.80

3.20
3.44
3.41
3. 39
3. 36
3.34
3. 33
3.00
3.13
3.11
3.10
3.11
2.80
2.93
2. 91
2.80
2.80
2.80
2. 55
2. 55

7.80
8.40
8. 32
8.28
8.20
8.16
8.12
7. 35
7.67
7.63
7. 59
7. 63
6.90
7.22
7.18
6.90
6.92
6. 91
5. 55
5. 55

8.0
8.6
8.5
8.5
8.4
8.4
8.3
7.5
7.8
7.8
7.7
7.8
7.0
7.3
7.3
7.0
7.0
7.0
7.2
7.2

8.0
8.6
8.5
8.5
8.4
8.4
8.3
7.5
7.8
7.8
7.7
7.8
7.0
7.3
7.3
7.0
7.0
7.0
6.4
6.4

7.8
8.4
8.3
8.3
8.2
8.2
8.1
7.4
7.7
7.6
7.6
7.6
6.9
7.2
7.2
6.9
6.9
6.9
5.6
5.6

1. 75 2.80 7.00 7.0
1.89 3.02 7.56 7.6
1.88 3.01 7. 52 7.5
1.87 2.99 7.48 7.5
1.85 2.96 7.40 7.4
1.84 2.94 7.36 7.4
1.83 2.93 7.32 7.3
1.82 2.91 7.28 7.3
1.81 2.90 7. 24 7.2
1.82 2. 91 7.28 7.3
Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

7.0
7.6
7.5
7.5
7.4
7.4
7.3
7.3
7.2
7.3

7.0
7.6
7.5
7.5
7.4
7.4
7.3
7.3
7.2
7.3

1 .0 0
1 .0 0
1 .0 0

—

1 .0 0
1 .0 0

Straight
10.0
Block ___ 100 10.0
.-d o .8____ 10 10.0
___do.8____ 10 10.0

100
10
5

9.0
9.0
6.0

90

6.0 ___

1 .0 0

Wright__

90

8.0

90

6.0

7.5

90

6.0

1 .0 0

Wright___

90

7.5

90

6.0

7.0

90

6.0

1.00 Wright__

90

7.0

90

6.0

7.0

90

6.0

1.00 Wright__

90

7.0

90

6.0

10.0

5

6.0

1.00 Block 8___

10 10.0

5

6.0

7.0

400

6.0

10

10

9.0
9.0
6.0

10

See footnotes at end of table.




Block.

Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.

. 1,000

7.0

400

6.0

—

IN D E X E S

12.0
10.5
10.0
7.9
7.3
5.6
5.6

AND

12.00 12.0 12.0
10. 50 11.0 11.0
10.00 10.0 10.0
7. 90 9.2 8.8
7. 30 8.2 7.8
5. 55 7.2 6.4
5. 55 7.2 6.4

1.00
1.00
1. 00
1.00
1.00

P R IC E S

4. 80
4. 40
4. 00
3. 50
3.10
2. 55
2. 55

50 10.0
100 9.0
10 9.0
990 7.0
5 6.0

C O M P U T IN G

3. 00
2. 75
2.50
2. 30
2. 05
1. 80
1.80

Straight. _
12.0
Block___
50 11.0
_.._do_____ 100 10.0
__do.8____ 10 10.0
__-do.8____ 10 10.0
___do.8____ 10 10.0

1 .0 0
1 .0 0

FOR

50 10.0
100 9.0
10 9.0
990 7.0 ::::::
5 6.0

DATA

2

12.0
n .o
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0

B A S IC

. 1:
P.
Sept. 29,1917-May 31, 1927 _ _ Straight...
June 1 ,1927-May 31,1928— _ Block. __
50
June 1,1928-June 30,1929___ ____do_____ 100
July 1,1929-July 31,1930___ ____do.8____ 10
Aug. 1,1930-Dec. 14,1931.. ____do.8____ 10
Dec. 15. 1931-July 31, 1935 . ____do.8____ 10
Dec. 1931-Mar. 1932
.2:
P.
Aug. 31, 1917-May 31, 1928.. Straight___
June 1, 1928-Oct. 31, 1929— Block
100
Nov. 1,1929-Mar. 14,1932.. _ ____do.8____ 10
Mar. 15, 1932-July 31, 1935 . ____do.8____ 10
Mar. 1932 ______
.3:2
p.
Apr. 1, 1922-Dec. 31, 1924... Wright. _ _ 90
Mar. 1923-June 1923___
Sept. 1923___________
Dec. 1923_____________
Mar. 1924_____________
June 1924 _ ______ .
Sept. 1924-Dec. 1924___
Jan. 1, 1925-Dec. 31,1926.... Wright___
90
Mar. 1925_____________
June 1925-Dec. 1925____
Mar. 1926 ____________
June 1926-Dec. 1926.
Jan. 1, 1927-Sept. 30, 1928.._ Wright__ _ 90
Mar. 1927-June 1927___
Sept. 1927-Sept. 1928....
Oct. 1, 1928-June 24, 1931 u__ Wright.. _ 90
Dec. 1928-Dec. 1929 ..
Mar. 1930-June 1931__
June 25,1931-July 31,1935... Block 8__
10
Sept. 1931-Mar. 1932
.4:4
p.
Apr. 1, 1922-Nov. 4, 1928..__ Block_____ 1,000
Mar. 1923-June 1923___
Sept. 1923____________
Dec. 1923_____________
Mar. 1924_____________
June 1924-Dec. 1924 ...
Mar. 1925-June 1925___
Sept. 1925____________
Dec. 1925-Dec. 1926____
Mar. 1927-Sent. 1928....
P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.

Or

T a b l e 8 . — Sum m arized

Or

data used in the computation of retail prices o f electricity, by com panies M arch 1923-D ecem ber 1938, inclusive—
Continued
^

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small applianoes]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Net price

25 and 40 kwh

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

City, type of ownership, and
period

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

1

Customer
charge

Monthly bill for— Average price per
kwh for use of—

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block ,Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
ber
ber
ber
ber
ice mum
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
MIDDLE ATLANTIC—Continued

New York—Continued
Co. 4—Continued.
Nov. 5, 1928-June 24, 193111 Block._ _ 1,000
Dee. 1928-June 1931___
June 25, 1931-July 31, 1935. _ Block s......... 10
Sept. 1931-Mar. 1932 w_
Co. 5:
P.
July 21, 1920-Feb. 28,1925___ Straight __ _
Mar. 1, 1925-Feb. 28, 1927. . _ do___ _
Mar. 1, 1927-June 30, 1928___ Block. _
200
July 1, 1928-July 31, 1929. ___ do_____ 200
Aug. 1, 1929-June 24, 1931. __ ___ do_____ 1,000
June 25, 1931-July 31, 1935 2. ___ do.8____ 10
Sept. 1931-Mar. 1932
Cos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5:2
Mar. 1932 -July 31, 1935. _ _ Block 8____ 10
Mar. 1932____________
June 1932-Mar. 1934___
Sept. 1932-June 1933.
June 1934-June 1935___
Dec. 1934-June 1935_
Aug. 1,1935-Dec. 31,1936.. Block 8____ 10
Sept. 1935-Dec. 1935___
10

Sept. 1935-Dec. 1935.




Ct.

Ct. Dol. Dol. Block. __ 1,000 Ct.
6.0
7.0

7.0
10.0

400
5

12 9.0
9.0
8.5
8.0
7.0
10.0

800
800
500
5

7.5
7.0
6.0
6.0

10.0

5

6.0

1.00 Block 8___

10 10.0

10.0

35

5.0

1.00 Block 8___

10 10.0

6.0

1.00 Block 8____
0.60 1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1,00
1.00

10 10.0

Straight _
129.0
____do____
9.0
Block____ 200 8.5
...d o _____ 200 8.0
--_do_ _ _ 1,000 7.0
— do.8____ 10 10.0

400
5

Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Ct. Ct. Ct.
6.0
1.75 2.80 7.00 7.0

1.75
1.00 1.80
1.80
0.60 1.00 2. 75
1.00 2.25
1.00 2.13
800 7.5
1.00 2.00
800 7.0
1.00 1. 75
500 6.0
1.00 1.80
5 6.0
1.80
1.00 1. 80
5 6.0
1.80
1. 79
1.84
1.80
1.84
35 5.0
1.00 1. 75
1. 75
6.0

7.0
2.80 7.00 7.0 7.0
2. 55 5. 55 7.2 6.4
2. 55 5. 55 7.2 6.4
4.20 9.60 11.0 10.5
3.60 9.00 9.0 9.0
3.40 8.50 8.5 8.5
3.20 8.00 8.0 8.0
2.80 7.00 7.0 7.0
2. 55 5. 55 7.2 6.4
2. 55 5. 55 7.2 6.4
2. 55 5. 55 7.2 6.4
2. 55 5. 55 7. 2 6.4
2. 53 5. 50 7.1 6.3
2.61 5.67 7.4 6.5
2. 55 5. 55 7.2 6.4
2.60 5.66 7.4 6.5
2. 50 4.80 7.0 6.3
50 4.80 7.0
2.
6.3

1.79 2.55 4.90 7.1 6.4

7.0
7.0
5.6
5.6
9. 6
9.0
8.5
8.0
7.0
5.6
5.6
5.6
5. 6
5. 5
5.7
5. 6
5.7
4.8
4.8

4.9

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Details of rates

10

9.6

35

5.6

.90 Block 8„ „

10

9.6

35

5.6

Sept. 1938-Dec. 1938-

Co. 6:
P.
Oct. 1, 1922-Mar. 2, 1926___
Mar. 3, 1925-Feb. 2, 1926..
do_
Feb. 3, 1926-Feb. 28, 1927Mar. 1, 1927-Feb. 28, 1929.
do
Mar. 1, 1929-Jan. 31, 1930... Block
Feb. 1, 1930-July 31, 1933—
do. _ .

June 21, 1982-July 31,
Aug. 1, 1933-July 31, 1937-_ Block _
Aug. 1, 1983-Aug. 81,
1983.
Dec. 10, 1934-July 31,
' 1987.
Aug. 1, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938 ... Block 8.
Aug. 1, 1987-Apr. 21,
1938.
Apr. 22, 1988-Dec. 16,
1938.
Co. 7:
P.
19SS

12

Dec. 1914-Mar. 31, 1928___ Straight ...
Apr. 1, 1928-Apr. 30, 1933... ____do.15__

June 21, 1982-Apr. 80,
1933
May 1, 1933-Mar. 21, 1934- Block 8____
May 1, 1988-Aug. 31,
1933.

Mar. 22, 1934-May 31, 1938.. Block 8____
Dec. 10, 1984-Apr. %,
1

150

8.3

28

7.0

50
Ex.

13.0
12.0
11.0
10.0
9.5
8.5

13.0
12.0
11.0
10.0
8.8
7.0

50 14 5.5

150

5.0 1.00 1.00 2.13 3.20 6.25

8.5

8.0

12

6.4
6.4

28

7.0

1.00 Straight...
1.00 3-charge __

9.5
9.5

13.0
12.0
11.0
10.0
9.5
48 6.0

8.3

21

9.0

.95 Block 8___

10

9.5

21

9.0

10

9.5

24

8.0

.95 Block 8___

10

9.5

24

8.0

35

5.0

.95 Block 8___

10

9.5

35

5.0

Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.

5.20
4.80
4.40
4.00
3.80
3.40

2.32 8.50 7.21 9.3

8.8

2.19 8.80 6.44 8.8 8.2
2.17 8.26 6.88 8.7 8.2
1.00 1.91 2.96 5.96 7.6 7.4
1.95 8.02 6.08 7.8 7.5
1.97 8.05 6.14 7.9 7.6
9.5
9.5

3.20 5. 60
8.80 5.77
3.11 5. 51
8.17 5.62
2.21 8
.20 5.68
.95 1.70 2.45 4.90
1.76 2.52 5.05

9.5

.45
.95 2. 30
2.87
.95 2.15
2.19
2

9.5

P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.
See footnotes at end of table.

3. 25
3.00
2. 75
2.50
2. 38
2. 25

1.00 2.38 3.80 9.50
161.55 161.55 2.38 3.15 5. 55

9.5
4.0

10

1988.
Apr. 22, 1988-May 81,
1988.
June 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938... Block 8___ __ 10 9.5
June 1, 1938-Dec. 16,
1988.




1.00 Block 8___

4.9

13.0
12.0
11.0
10.0
9.5
9.0

50

5.5

4.7
4.7
4-8
4.7
4-8
4.7
4.9
4.7

13.00
12.00
11.00
10.00
8. 75
7.00

1.00 Straight__
1.00 do_
1.00 do
1. 00 do
1.00 B lock ___ 50
8.0
5.0 1.00 1.00 _ _do_____ 100

14

4.8
4.9
4.8
4.9

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
8.0
5.0 1.00 1.00

13.0
12.0
11.0
10.0
50 9.5 50
100 is 6.0 Ex.

5.0 1.00 1.00 Block _ __

1. 76 2. 51 4. 82 7.0 6.3
1.79 2.66 4.92 7.1 6.4
1. 75 2.50 4.80 7.0 6.3
1.79 2.56 4.90 7.1 6.4
.90 1. 65 2.40 4.70 6.6 6.0
1.65 2.40 4.70 6.6 6.0
1.68 2. 45 4.79 6.7 6.1
1. 66 2.41 4.72 6.6 6.0
1.69 2.46 4.81 6.8 6.1
6.0
1. 66 2.42 4.74 6.6 6.2
1.71 2.49 4.88 6.8 6.0
4.72 6.6
1. 66 2.41 4.86 6.8 6.2
1.71 2.48

8
.24

5.72 9.8

Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

9.2

8.6

8
.8

8.9
6.8

9.5
7.9

7.2
6.3

6.0

6.1
6.1

9.5
5.6

8.1

5.7

8.0

5.6
5.8

7.8

5.6
5.7
4.9
5.0

8.2

7.9
8
.0

6.1
7.0 6.8

5.5

BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

Mar. 1936-June 1936___
Mar. 1936-June 1936.
Sept. 1936-Dec. 1936___
Sept. 1936-Dec. 1936.
Jan. 1, 1937-Dec. 16, 1938— _ Block 8____
Mar. 1937-June 1937.
Mar. 1937-June 1937Sept. 1937-Mar. 1938Sept. 1937-Mar. 1938.
June 1938_____________
June 1988_________
Sept. 1938-Dec. 1938....

Oi

CO

T a b l e 8 .— Sum m arized

data used in the computation of retail prices o f electricity, by com panies, M arch 1923-D ecem ber 1938, inclusive—
Continued
^

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
25 and 40 kwh
City, type of ownership, and
period

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

per
Monthly bill for— Average priceof—
kwh for use

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
ber
ice mum
ber
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
ber
ber
MIDDLE ATLANTIC—Continued

Philadelphia 1 P.
May 1, 1922-Apr. 30, 1923—
Block_____
May 1, 1923-Apr. 30, 1924.... ____do_____
May 1, 1924-Feb. 28, 1926—
____do_____
Mar. 1, 1926-June 14, 1929___ ____do_____
June 15, 1929-Aug. 31, 1930— ____do_____
Sept. 1, 1930-Mar. 1, 1933______ ____do.8____
June 21,1932—Mar. 1, 1933 _
Mar. 2, 1933-Aug. 31, 1935___ ____do.8____
Mar.1935-Oct. 31, 1937___ Block s__ __
2,1933-Aug. 31,1933Sept. 1,
Nov. 1, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938___ ____do.*____

12
12
12
12
12
10
10
10
12

• July 1919-June 21,1923________ Wright____
June 22, 1923-Jan. 31, 1928_____ ____do......... .
Rate A.*i7
Feb. 1,1928-Sept. 30,1932— ____do_____
Rate C:
Feb. 1,1928-Sept. 30, 1932— 1 Wright7___

Mar. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938.
Pittsburgh
P.
June 21, 1932-Sept. SO,
1932.




Ct.
8.0

Ct. Dol. Dol. B lock __
7.0
0. 75
7.0
.75 ...d o _____

8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
7.5
7.5
7.5
6.3

75
48
48
36
36
38
40
40
31

11
11
11

8.0
8.0
8.0

23 6.0
23 5.5 —
23 5.5

10

8.0

20

7.0
7.0
6.0
6.0
5.5
5.0
5.0

5.5

Ct.

Dol.
Dol.
Ct. Dol. 0. 75 Dol. 2. 92 6.86 Ct. Ct. Ct.
1. 87 Dol.
7.5 7.3 6.9
.75 1.87 2. 92 6. 32 7.5 7.3 6.3
1.87 2. 92 5. 52
7.3 5.5

12 8.0
12 8.0
12 8.0
12 8.0
12 8.0
10 7.5
10 7.5
10 7.5
12 6.3

75 7.0
48 7.0
48 7.0
36 7.0
36 6.0
38 6.0
40 5.5
40 5.0
31 5.0

.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75

.50 Wright. -.
.50 — do_____
.50 ---do_____

11
11
11

8.0
8.0
8.0

23
23
23

6.0
5.5
5.5

.50 1.73 2.45 4. 25
.50 1. 66 2. 34 4.14
.50 1.66 2.34 4.14

.50 Wright 7__

10

8.0

20

5.5

.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75

-.-do_____
-__do_____
--..do_____
— do.8— __
Block 8___
Block 8___
— do.8____

1. 87
1.74
1.65
1.70
1.58
1.62
1. 50
1. 40

2. 92
2. 64
2.55
2.63
2. 40
2.47
2. 25
2.15

5. 04
4. 68
4. 59
4.73
4.45
4.58
4. 25
3.76

7.5 .
7.5
7.0
6.6
6.8
6.3
6.5
6.0
5.6

7.3
6.6
6.4
6.6
6.0
6.2
5.6
5.4

6.9
6.6
6.6

6.1
5.9
5.9

1.48 2.19 3.84 5.7 5.5

'1.71 2.41 4. 26 6.8 6.0
.50 1. 63 2. 30 4. 30 6.5 5.8

5.0
4.7
4.6
4.7
4.5
4.6
4.3
3.8

3.8
4.3
4.1
4.1

4.3
4.3

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Net price

Details of rates

June 21, 1932-Sept. 30,
1932.
Oct. 1, 1932-Apr. 30, 1935___ Wright 7___
Oct. 1,1932-Aug. 31,1933. Wright18...
May 1, 1935-Aug. 31, 1937.__
Block.—

" "
12
12
12
12

7.0 15
5.0 Ex.
5.0 100

5.0
3.0
3.0

.50 Wright 7__
. 50 Wright 18„
.50 Block____

8.0
8.0
8.3 ~~48~ ” ."5"
8.3 48 5.0
8.3 48 4.5
8.3 38 4.5 —
5

150 10.0 100
150 9.0 100
5.0
50 7.0 Ex.
30 6. 5 40
70 5.0 230
30 5.0 40

9.0
8.0
5.0
5.0
2.5
4.0

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

1.00
1. 00
’ loo" 1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
.50

15
50
50

7.0
5.0
5.0

Hopkinson
-..do_____ - - - - Block 8___
Block 8___ 12
-__do.8____ 12
__.do.8____ 12

4.0
4.0
8.3
8.3
8.3
8.3

Wright 18-_
____do.18...
Block.
Block____
__do_____
—_do--------__do--------

35 10.0
35 9.0
50 4.0
50 4.0
30 6.5
70 5.0
30 5.0

15
Ex.
100

5.0

8.0
8.0
6.9
7.1
6.6
6.3
6.3

7.8
7.1
6.4
6.5
6.0
5.7
5.7

5.5
5.3
5.2
5.4
5.0
4.6
4.4

8.05 10.0 10.0
7. 70 9.0 9.0
5.00 9.0 7.5
5.15 9.3 7.7
5.00 7.0 7.0
4. 85 6.5 6.1
4.25 5.0 5.0
3.85 5.0 4.8

8.1
7.7
5.0

1.50 1.50 2.00
1.25 1.25 2.00
1.00 1.72
1.77
1.66 1.65
1.00 1.59
1.00 1. 59

3.10
2.85
2.54
2.62
2. 40
2.26
2.26

5.50
5. 25
5.24
5. 40
5.00
4. 56
4.41

7.0
2.00 2.50
7.0
2.00 2. 25
3.0 1.50 1.50 2. 25
2.32
3.0 1.50 1.50 1.75
5.0
1.00 1. 63
2.5
1.00 1.25
4.0
.50 1.25

4.00
3.60
3.00
3.09
2. 80
2. 45
2.00
1.90

5.0
3.0
3.0

48" ” 5."5"
48 5.0
48 4.5
38 4.5
Ex.
Ex.
Ex.
Ex.
40
230
40

5.0

4-4
4.1
4.2
4.0

2.37
2.20
2.27
2.00

4

.50 1.25 2.00 4.00

4.0

5.2
5.0
4.9
4.3
3.9

EAST NORTH CENTRAL

Chicago 1
P.
Jan. 1, 1918-July 31,1923_____ Wright____ 13
Aug. 1, 1923-Mar. 31, 1928____ ____do_____ 13
Apr. 1, 1928-Nov. 30, 1932____ ___ do.7____ 15
June 21,1932-Nov. 30,1932.
Dec. 1, 1932-Oct. 1, 1936______ Wright7___ 15
Dec. 1, 1932-Aug. 31, 1933
Oct. 2, 1936-Dec. 15, 1938_____ Wright7___ 32
Cincinnati1
P.
Jan. 6, 1921-Dec. 4, 1927_______ Wright____ 15
Dec. 5, 1927-Aug. 31, 1928______ Block______ 30
Sept. 1,1928-Aug. 9, 1934______ Hopkinson 19 30
June 21, 1932-Aug. 31, 1933___________________
P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.
See footnotes at end of table.



7.1
6.6
6.2
6.4
6.1
6.2
5.4

5.6
5.3
5.3
5.4
5.1
5.3
4.9

4.3
4.1
3.9
4.0
3.8
3.9
3.7

15 6.5
.75 1.93 2.60 4.70 7.7
.75 W right.... 15 8.5
.75 1.88 2. 75 5.60 7.5
60 5.0
.75 Block____ 30 7.5
.75 H opkin- 30 5.0 Ex. 3.0 0.50 .75 1. 75 2.30 4.10 7.0
son.19
______________________________________ 1.80 2.37 4.22 7.2
Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).
Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.

6. 5
6.9
5.8

4.7
5.6
4.1

9.0
8.0
7.0
6.9
5.4

13
13
15
15
68

8.5 15
7.5 60
5.0 Ex.

5.0
5.0
5.0
4.9
2.9
6.5 ...
5.0 ...
3.0 0. 50

0.50
.50
.50
.50
.50

Wright..
...d o_____
...d o.7____
Wright 7__
Wright 7__

16
16
15
15
32

9.0
8.0
7.0
6.9
5.4

16
16
15
15
68

5.0
5.0
5.0
4.9
2.9

). 50
.50
.50
.50
.50

1.77
1. 64
1.55
1.60
1. 51
1.56
1.34

2.24 4. 28
4.12
2.11
2.10 3. 90
2.16 4- 02
2. 04 3. 75
2.10 3.86
1. 94 3. 65

5.9

BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

Sept. 1, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938.._
Rochester
P.
Sept. 1, 1922-May 24, 1927_____ Straight 15___
May 25, 1927-Apr. 15, 1931_____ ____do.15____
Apr. 16, 1931-Oct. 25, 1933_____ Block s____
June 21,1932-Aug. 31,1933..
Oct. 26, 1933-Sept. 24, 1935_____ Block §___
Sept. 25, 1935-July 24, 1938____ ____do.8____
July 25, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938_____ ____do.8____
Scranton
P.
Sept. 1, 1920-July 31, 1928_____ ____do_____
Aug. 1, 1928-Oct. 31, 1930
do _ _
Nov. 1, 1930-Dec. 31, 1933_____ Straight___
June 21,1932-Aug. 31, 1933 . Block. _ _ _
Jan. 1, 1934-Dec. 31, 1934______
Jan. 1, 1935-Feb. 14, 1937
____do_____
Feb. 15, 1937-Nov. 30, 1938____ ____do_____
Dec. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938______ ____do...........

15
50
50

.43 6.7 5.9
4.10 6.2 5.5
4.22 6.4 5.7
4.00 5.0 5.0

1.67
.50 1. 55
1.60
.50 1.25

4■ *
C
rc
Ol

T a b l e 8 .— Sum m arized

Oi
05

data used in the computation of retail prices o f electricity, hy com panies, M arch 1923-D ecem ber 1938, inclusive—
Continued

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Net price

25 and 40 kwh

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

City, type of ownership, and
period

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

Monthly bill for— Average price per
kwh for use of—

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
ber
ber
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
ber
ber
ice mum
EAST NORTH CENTRAL—Continued

Cincinnati—Continued
Aug. 10,1934-Aug. 9,1935______ Wright 7___
Aug. 10, 1935-Aug. 9, 1936_____ ____do.7.........
Aug. 10, 1936-Aug. 9,1937_____ ____do.7____
Aug. 10, 1937-Dec. 15,1938_____ ____do.7____
Cleveland

25
25
25
25

Co. 1:
P.
June 7, 1920-Dec. 31,1925— Straight. _ ..
Jan. 1 ,1926-Dec. 31, 1927..__ Block____ 500
Jan. 1, 1928-Feb. 28,1930.... ____do_____ 80
Mar. 1 ,1930-Mar. 31,1933. _ ____do_____ 40

June 21, 1932-Mar. 31,
1933.
Apr. 1, 1933-Aug. 31,
1933.

Apr. 1, 1933-Apr. 30, 1937... B lo ck .__
May 1, 1937-Dec. 15,1938...
Co. 2:
M.
Jan. 1919-Feb. 11, 1925_____
Feb. 12,1925-May 11,1930._
May 12,1930-Mar. 31, 1933-

June 21, 1932-Mar. 31,
1933.




Block_____

Ct.
5.0
4.5
4.0
4.0

25
25
25
25

Ct.
Ct. Dol. Dol. Wright 7__
3.0
0. 60
25 5.0
3.0
.60 ...d o .7____ 25 4.5
25
25

4.0
4.0

25
25
25
25

Straight—
Block. _ _ 500
--_do_____ 80
--.do_____ 40

5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0

3.0
3.0 —

.60 __.do.7____
.60 — do.7____

5.0
5.0 Ex.
5.0 420
5.0 200

2.8
4.0
4.0

.75
.75
.75
.75

Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Ct. Ct. Ct.
3.0
0. 60 1. 25 1.70 3.00 5.0 4.3 3.0
3.0
.60 1.13 1. 58 2. 88 4.5 3.9 2.9
3.0
.60 1. 00 1. 45 2. 65 4.0 3.6 2.7
1. 00 1. 45
2.5
3.0

.60

Ex.
420
200

2.8
4.0
4.0

.75
.75
.75
.75

2.50

1. 25
1.25
1.25
1.25

2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00

4.0

3.6

5.00
5.00
4.80
4.40

5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0

5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0

1.29 2.06 153 5.2 5.2
4.0 4.0
1.03 1.65 4.13 4 A 4-1

5.0
5.0
4.8
4.4
4 .6

240

4.0

240

2.8

.60 Block- _ _ 240

4.0

240

2.8

.60 1.00 1.60 4.00

50

4.0

50

3. 5

.60 Block. .

4.0

50

3. 5

.60 1.00 1.60 3. 75

4.0

4.0

3.8

2.0
2.0 0. 30
2.5 .30

.75 .75 1.20 3.00
.75 1.05 1.50 3. 30
.75 1. 05 1. 50 3. 30

3.0
4.2
4.2

3.0
3.8
3.8

3.0
3.3
3.3

____do_____ 1,225
____do_____ 1,550
____do_____ 600

3.0 1, 225
3.0 1, 550
3.0 1,800

50

2.0
.75 ...d o _____ 1,225
2.0 6.30" .75 ...d o _____ 1,550
2.5 .30 .75 — do_____ 600

3.0 1,225
3.0 1,550
3.0 1,800

1.08 1.55 3.40 4.3 3.9

4.0

4.1

3.4

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OE ELECTRICITY

Details of rates

Apr. 1,1933-June 5,1937___ Block.

Apr. 1, 1938-Aug. 31,
1933
Columbus

Co. 1:
P.
June 2,1921-June 14,1926._
June 15,1926-Jan. 31,1929..
Feb. 1,1929-July 31,1929-..
Aug. 1 ,1929-No v. 12, 1934..

June 21, 1982-Aug. 81
1933
Nov. 13, 1934-Dec. 15, 1938._

2.9 1,800

Block.

.60 Block.

50

Block.

7.0
7.0 Ex.
7.0 75
6.0 75
30

2.5
5.0
5.0
5.0

Straight.
Block__
...do____
...do____

5.0

60

.50 Block.

7.0
7.0
7.0

6.0

Ex.
75
75

10 4.5
0

10
0

5.0

Oct. 15, 1932-Dec. 12, 1934._ Block.

5.0

4.5

Block.

50

5.0

Block.
P.
July 1, 1922-Mar. 31, 1926____ Wright is...
Apr. 1, 1926-Aug. 31, 1928____ ___ do.is__
Sept. 1, 1928-Oct. 31, 1936_____ ___ do.i8__
June 21, 1932-June SO, 1933-_
July 1,1938-Aug. 81,1983___
Sept. 1,1988-Oct. 81, 1986—.
Nov. 1, 1936-Dec. 15, 1938_____ Block.
Nov. 1,1936-Dec. 15,1988___
Indianapolis 30
Co. 1: July 1922-0ct. 1926. P.
Co. 2: July, 1922-Oct. 1926. P.
(Merger effective Oct.
1926)
July 1, 1922-Dec. 31, 1924_ _. Block _.
Jan. 1, 1925-Feb. 28, 1927— _ ----- do..
Mar. 1, 1927-Apr. 14, 1932-. ___ do..
Apr. 15, 1932-Feb. 7, 1934... ___ do..

4.0

3.8

Block.

30

4.0

Oct. 15, 1932-Aug. 31,
1933
Dec. 13, 1934-Dec. 15, 1938._
Detroit1

June 21, 1982-Aug. 81,
1988

10.8

9.0
9.0

Ex.
Ex.
50

Wright1
1
...do.is..
.. . do.i8__

7.0
6.5
6.3

150
50
50

6.8 150

5.0
5.0
5.0

6.5
6.0
6.0

10.8

9.0
9.0

50

4.5
3.8

Ex.
Ex.
50

3.6
3.6

8.1

40

3.6

Block____
..do_____
Straight3..
..do.3____

7.0
4.1
4.1

150
150

6.5
6.3

.65 Straight 3_
.75 Block
30 4.5
75 ...d o ___
30 I 4.5
Ex, indicates excess kilowatt hours.

10 5.0
0

3.3

3.1

.85 1. 27 2.80

3.4

3.2

2.8

2.80 7.00
2.80 6. 50
2.80 6.00
2.40 5.50

7.0
7.0
7.0

7.0
7.0
7.0

6.2

6.0 6.0
6.2

7.0
6.5
6.0
5.5

5.0

4.9

4.5

5.00 5.0 5.0
5.15 5.2 5A
4.75 5.0 5.0
4.89 5.2 5.2

5.0
5.2

.15
.50
.50
.50
.50

1.75
1.75
1. 75
1.50

1.55 2.47 5.67

.50 1.25

5.0

Block.

40

Feb. 8, 1934-Mar. 31, 1937.__ Block. _
10 5.8
0
Apr. 1, 1937-May 14, 1938... ___ do..
30 5.5
30 5.5
May 15, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938.. ___ do..
P. indicates private utility; M. Municipal plant.
See footnotes at end of table.




.50 Straight..

3.4

4.50 1.25 1.95 4. 50

2.5

Co. 2:
M.
Jan. 1916-Oct. 14, 1932_____ Straight..

June 21, 1982-Oct. 14,

8.6

3.05

1.31
1.35 3.14

1,800

600

50

Straight..
Block___
. . . . .d o ....
___ do__
Block__

.15

2.00
1.29 2.06
.50 1.25 2.00
1.29 2.06

.50

1.00

1.58 3.80

1.55 2.09 4. 25
1.39 1.93 4.09
1.39 1.93 3. 53

1.43
1.47
1.43
.45 1. 35
1.89

.90
.81
2. 25
2. 25

1. 75
1. 69
1. 63
1. 56

3.5

4.0

3.1

5.7

4.8
4.9

4.0

3.8

6.2 5.2

4.2
4.1
3.5

5.5
5.5

4.8
4. \

1.98 8.64 5.7 5.0
8.74 5.9 5.1
1.98 5.64 5.7 5.0
1.89 3.38 5.4 4.7
1.95 5. 48 5.6 4.9

3.5

2.80
2.70
2. 60
2.50

6.5
5.3
5.2

2 4
.0

6.75
6. 53
5. 28
5.15

1.61 2.58 5. SO

7.0
6.5
6.3

7.0
6.5
6.3

6.8 6.8

6.4

6.4

2.14 1.44 2. 30 4.80 5.8 5.8
3.8
.75 1.38 2.10 4.40 5.5 5.3
5.5
4.5
.75 1.38 2.10 4.00 5.5 5.3
5.5
30 4.5
Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

3.6

8.7

3.6

3.4

6.8

5.8
4.8
4.4

BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

139863

June 6 ,1937-Dec. 15,1938.

600

Or

-a

T a b l e 8 . — Summ arized

data used in the computation of retail prices o f electricity, by com panies, M arch 1923—
December 1938, inclusive—
Continued
00

Cb

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Net price

25 and 40 kwh

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

City, type of ownership, and
period

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

Monthly bill for— Average price per
kwh for use of—

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
ber
ber
ber
ice mum
ber
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
EAST NORTH CENTRAL-—Continued

Milwaukee1 P.
Jan. 13,1922-Apr. 14, 1924_____ Wright 7___ 15
Apr. 15, 1924-Aug. 31, 1926_____ ____do.7____ 15
Sept. 1 ,1926-Nov. 8, 1928______ ____do.18____ 27
Nov. 9, 1928-Apr. 30, 1930_____ ____do.18___ 27
May 1 ,1930-Feb. 23, 1931_____ ____do.18___ 27
Feb. 24, 1931-June 14, 1935_____ ____do.18___ 27
June 21, 1982-Aug. 81, 1938__
June 15, 1935-Aug. 31, 1937
Block______ 50
Sept. 1, 1937-July 31, 1938 21____ ____do_____ 50
Aug. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938 21____
do _
50
Peoria
P.
June 23,1917-Feb. 3, 1929______ Wright 7___ 14
Feb. 4, 1929-Aug. 14, 1933_____ . . . . do.7. ... 12
June 21, 1982-Aug. 14, 1938__
Aug. 15, 1933-Aug. 31, 1935____ Wright 22„ . _ 10
Aug. 15,1988-Aug. 31,1983.
Sept. 1,1935-Jan. 14, 1937______ Wright22__ 10
Jan. 15. 1938-Dec. 15, 1938_____ Block.......... 32




Ct.

8.6 12
7.6 12
6.7 Ex.
6.7 273
6.2 173
6.2 123
3.3 50
3.3 50
3. 3 50

9.0
9.0
7. 5
7.5
5.0

Ct. Dol. Dol.

0. 50
5.7
5.7
.50
.50
2.9
.50
2.9
.50
2.9
.50
2.9
2. 8 0.60 .60
2.5 .60 .60
2.3 . 60 . 60

Wright 7__
-_.do.7____
--.doJ8___
-__do.18___
...d o.18___
...d o.18___
Block
...d o _____
__do___ _

15
15
27
27
27
27
50
50
50

.75
. 75
.75
.75
.75

Wright 7_ _
__do.7____
Wright22_..
Wright 22__
Block____

14
12
io
10
32

14 6.0
12 6.0
18 5.0
18 5.0
38 3.0

Ct.

8. 6
7.6
6.7
6.7
6.2
6.2
3. 3
3.3
3. 3

12
12
Ex.
273
173
123
50
50
50

9. 0
9. 0
7. 5
7.5
5.0

14
12
18
18
38

Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Ct. Ct. Ct.
5. 7
0.50 1. 85 2.37 4. 22
5.7
.50 1. 71 2. 23 4.08
2.9
.50 1.66 2.17 3.88
2.9
.50 1. 66 2.17 3.88
2.9
.50 1. 54 2.04 3. 75
2.9
.50 1. 54 2.04 3. 75
1.59 2.10 8.86
2. 8 0. 60 . 60 1. 41 1.90 3. 60
2.5 .60 .60 1. 41 1.90 3.48
2. 3 . 60 . 60 1.41 1.90 3. 35

6. 0
6.0
5.0
5.0
3.0

. 75
.75
.75
.75
.75

1.92 2.46 4. 26

1.83 2.28 4.08
1.88 2.85 4.20
1. 50 2.01 3. 81
1.55 2.07 8.92
1. 50
2. 01 3. 57
1. 25 1. 84 3. 34

7.4
6.8
6.7
6.7
6.2
6.2
6.4
5. 7
5.7
5. 7

5.9
5.6
5.4
5.4
5.1
5.1
5.2
4. 8
4.8
4.8

4.2
4.1
3.9
3.9
3.7
3.7
8.9
3. 6
3.5
3.4

7.7
7.3

6.2
5.7

6.0
5.0

5.0
4.6

4.3
4.1
4.2
3.8
8.9
3.6
3.3

7.5 5.9
6.0 5.0
6.2 5.2

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Details of rates

Springfield

30
30

6.0
6.0

70
70

3.0
3.0

July 1, 1932-Dec. 15, 1938_.__ Block..........

30

5.0

30

4.0

June 21, 1982-June SO,
19S2

July 1, 1982-Aug. SI,
19S8.

Co. 2:
M.
June 1922-Apr. 30, 1931____ Block_____
May 1, 1931-Apr. 30, 1932... ____do_____
May 1, 1932-Dec. 15, 1938... ____do_____

June 21, 1932-Aug. SI,
19SS.

30
30
30

6.0
6.0
5.0

70
70
30

3.0
3.0
4.0

6.0 5.3
6.0 5.3

.50 ...d o _____
.50 Hopkinson.23

30
48

6.0
3.0

70
192

3.0
1.5

.80

0
.50 1.50 2.1 3.90
0
.80 1.50 2.1 3.02
5.11

6.2

.50 Hopkinson .23

48

3.0

192

1.5

.80

.80 1. 25 1.90 3.02

5.0

.50 Block____
.50 H opkinson.23
.50 ...do.23____

—

30
48
48

6.0
3.0
3.0

70
192
192

3.0
1.5
1.5

.80
.80

1.55 16.16
1.169 1.96

5.11

.50 1.50 2.10
.80 1. 50 2.10 3.02
.80 1.25 1.90 3.02

5.4
4.8

5.2 4.9
6.0 5.3
6.0 5.3

5.0 4.8
1.169 1.96 S.ll 5.2 4.9

3.9
3.0
5.1

3.0
5.1

3.9
3.0
3.0

5.1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL

Kansas City 1 P.
Jan. 1, 1920-Sept. 30, 1923______ Wright 18_— 15
Oct. 1, 1923-Aue. 31, 1927______ ____do.7____ 25
Sept. 1,1927-Oct. 31,1929______ ____do.7____ 25
Nov. 1,1929-Apr. 30,1938
do.7____ 25
June 21,1932-Aug. 31,1933 „
Aug. 27,1935-June30,1988
June 8,1937-Apr. 7 , 1937
May 1,1938-Dec. 15,1938______ Wright18___ 50
May 1,1938-Dec. 15,1938 - _
Minneapolis
P.
May 1,1921-Oct. 31,1928_______ Wright7__ 15
Nov. 1,1928-Dec. 31,1931______ ____do.71®
__ 15
Jan. 1, 1932-Jan. 31,1935_______ ____do.71*-,. 15
June 21, 1932-Aug. 31, 1933 _
Feb. 1, 1935-Dec. 31,1936______ H o p k in - 30
son.19
Jan. 1,1937-Dec. 31,1937_______ Wright18—
30
Jan. 1,1938-Dec. 15,1938______ Block... ... 25
P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.
See footnotes at end of table.




8.7 Ex.
7.5 25
7.0 25
6.5 25

5.4
5.0
5.0
4. 5

0.54
.50
.50
.50

Wright 18__
-__do.7____
„_do.7____
— do.7____

15
25
25
25

8.7
7.5
7.0
6.5

Ex.
25
25
25

5.4
5.0
5.0
4. 5

5.0 Ex.

2.5

.50 Wright18_

50

5.0

Ex.

2.5

0.54
.50
.50
. 50

1. 84
1.88
1. 75
1. 63

1.67
1.64
1.66
.50 1.25
1.28

2. 65
2. 63
2. 50
2. 30

5.90
4. 38
4. 25
4.00

7. 4
7. 5
7. 0
6. 5

6.6
6.6
6.3
5.8

2.37 4.12 6.7 5.9
2.32 104 6.6 5.89
2.85 4.08 6. 6 5.
2.00 3. 75 5.0 5. 0
2.04 S.8S 5.1 5.1

15 7.1
1.00 2.14 2.78 4.49 8. 5
1. 00 Wright7— 15 9.5
9.5 15 7.1
1.00 H opkin2.9
1. 25 1.25 2.00 2. 39 4.10 8. 0
8.6 15 7.1
son.24
7.6 15 7.1
2.9
1.19 1.19 1.85 2. 33 4.04 7. 4
1.00 -.d o .24___
1.91 2.40 4.16 7.6
50 2.9 0.48 1.00 H opkin- 30 4.8
50 2.9 .48 1.00 1.66 2.19 3.80 6. 7
4.8
son.19
30 4.8
50 2.9 .29 1.00 1.47 1.99 3.61 5.9
4.8 50 2.9 .29 1.00 Wright18
1.00 Block-- __ 25 4.8
25 3.8
1.00 1.19 1.76 3.56 4. 7
4.8 25 3.8
Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours. Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

6. 9

6.0

5. 8
6.0
5. 5
5. 0
4. 4

5.9
4.4
4.3
4.0

4.1
4.0
4.1
3.8
3.8
4.5
4.1
4.0
4.2
3.8
3.6
3.6

BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

Co. 1:
P.
Dec. 1, 1922-Aug. 14, 1930— ____do_____
Aug. 15, 1930-June 30, 1932._ ____do_____

C
n
CO

T a b l e 8 .—

S u m m a r i z e d d a ta u s e d i n the c o m p u ta tio n o f reta il p r ic e s o f e le c t r i c i t y , h y c o m p a n i e s , M a r c h

1 9 2 3 —D e c e m b e r

1 9 3 8 , in c lu s iv e —

Continued

05

^

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
100 kwh

25 and 40 kwh
Kwh and rate

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

Monthly bill for— Average price per
kwh for use of—

Omaha

P
.

S t. L o u i s

.50 Wright11

4.8

.50 Wright 7_.
.50 ___do.18___

7.6
6.7

4.8

Teo

3.0

160
160

CL Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. CL CL CL
0.50 1. 38 2 20 5.50 5.5 5.5 5.5
.50 1.38 2.20 4. 25 5.5 5.5 4.3
1.42 2.27 4.88 5.7 5.7 4.4
4.8

T o'

.

3.0

.50 1.19 1.90 3.88

4.8

1 5.7
2

.50 1.71 2.19 3. 90
.50 1.66 2.10 3.53

6.8 5.5

1

Co. 1:
P.
Oct. 31, 1919-Aug. 31, 1923-_ Wright7.
Sept. 1 ,1923-Oct. 31,1933._. ___ do.18..

June 21, 1932-Aug. 81,
Nov. 1, 1933-Dec,. 15,1938... Block.
Aug. 27, 1985-June 7,
1987.
June 8, 1937-Dec. 15,
1988.

Co. 2:
P.
Aug. 1, 1922-Sept. 30, 1923.. W right7.
Oct. 1, 1923-Nov. 6, 1933___ ___ do.18..

June 21, 1932-Aug. 31,
1933.




CL
5.5
5.5

7.6 12 5.7
6.7 Ex. 2.4
32

4.8

168

2.4

1 5.7
2

Ex.

2.4

.50 Block.

.50 Wright 7._
.50 ...do.18___

32

Ex.

2.4

4.8

7.6
6.7

2.4

1 5.7
2

Ex.

2.4

1.71 2.17
.50 1.19 1.71
1.20 1.73
1.21 1.74

6.7

5.3

3.63 6.8 5.4
3.14 4.8 4.3
3.17 18 4.8
3.20 4.8 4.4

.50 1.71 2.19 3.90
.50 1.66 2.10 3. 53

6.8 5.5
5.3
6.8
1.71 2.17 3.63 6.7 5.4

3.9

3.5
3.6
3.1

3.2
3.2
3.9
3.5

3.6

OF E L E C T R IC IT Y

Ct. Dol. Dol.
CL
5.5 160
0.50 Straight..
5.5
.50 Wright18..
To'

Feb. 9,1922-May 31,1929_____ Straight.
June 1,1929-Dec. 31,1935_____ Wright18..
June 21,1932-Aug. 31, 1933_
Jan. 1,1936-Dec. 15,1938______ Wright18. ...

P R IC E S

WEST NORTH CENTRAL—Continued

R E T A IL

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
ber
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
ber
ice mum
ber
ber

IN

City, type of ownership, and
period

CHANGES

Net price

Details of rates

150

2.4

. 1: Apr. 1913-Dec. 1938. P.
. 2: Apr. 1913-Jan. 1926. P.
(Purchase effective Jan.
1926.)
Apr. 1, 1913-Jan. 31, 1926 Block. _____
Feb. 1, 1926-Oct. 31, 1928 _ Wright L Nov. 1, 1928-Jan. 31, 1935.-. ___ do." 18.._

30 9.9 Ex.
15 9.5 15
15 8.6 15

6.6
7.1
7.1

Feb. 1, 1935-Dec. 31, 1935... H o p k in son.19
Jan. 1, 1936-Dec. 31, 1937— _ ___do.19_____
Jan. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938
Block______

30
30
25

Aug. 27, 1935-June 7,
1937.
June 8, 1937-Dec. 15,
1938.
St. Paul

25

4.3

.50 Block

2.85 4.3 3.6
2.8
8 4.3 3.6
1.08
1.09 1.46 2.91 4.4 3.6

2.9
2.9
2.9

25

4.3

150

2.4

1.00 Block.. __
1.00 Wright L_
1.00 H opkinson.2*

30
15

9.9
9.5
2.9

Ex.
15

6.6
7.1

1.00 2.49 3. 63 7. 57 9.9
1.00 2.14 2. 78 4. 49 8.5
1.25 1.25 2. 00 2.39 4.10 8.0

L 22

9.1
6.9
6.0

8.2

6.2

4.2

3.0 0.50 1.00 H opkinson.19
3.0 .35 1.00 ...d o.19___
4.0
1.00 Block____

30
30
25

5.0
5.0
5.0

50
50
25

3.0
3.0
4.0

.50 1.00 1.75 2. 30 4.00
.35 1.00 1.60 2.15 3.85
1.00 1.25 1.85 3. 75

7.0
6.4
5.0

5.8
5.4
4.6

4.0
3.9
3.8

8.1
5.0
20.0

100 7.2
1.00 Block ___ 100 5.4
150 3.0 1.00 1.00 __do_____ 50 5.0
25 6.0
1.00 Block 8___ 5 20.0

400
150
25

3.00 2.03 3. 24 6.48 8.1
4.5
3.0 1.00 1.00 2. 25 3.00 5.00 9.0
2.32 3.09 5.15 9.3
6.0
1.00 2.20 2. 95 4.97 8.8

8.1
7.5
7.7
7.4

6.5
5.0
5.1
5.0

6.5
6.7
6.7
5.0

35 5.0
50 4.5
50 4.5
30 4.5 _____

25 6.5
15 6.7
15 6.7
20 5.0

35
50
50
30

5.0
4.5
4.5
4.5

.50 1.07

■fc-00
'

Nov. 7, 1933-Dec. 15, 1938 —

20

5.0
5.0
5.0

50
50
25

2.06

2.46

SOUTH ATLANTIC

Atlanta
P.
Dec. 1920-Dec. 31, 1928________ Block. _ _ _ 100
Jan. 1, 1929-Mar. 31, 1933______ ___do—
50
June 21,1932-Mar. 31, 1933..
Apr. 1, 1933-Dec. 31, 1933
Block 8 _
Apr. 1, 1933-Aug. 31,1933
Immediate:
Jan. 1, 1934-Dec. 31, 1936— B lo ck .____ 25
Jan. 1, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938— ____do.8____ 15
Inducement:
Jan. 1, 1934-Dec. 31,1936— ____do.8____ 15
Jan. 1, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938- ____do.8____ 20
Baltimore P.
Apr. 1917-July 15, 1923________ Wright9___ 50
July 16, 1923-Oct. 31, 1925_____ ____do.9____ 40
Nov. 1, 1925-Jan. 15, 1927______ ___ do.9____ 25
Jan. 16, 1927-Oct. 31, 1929_____ . __do.9____ 25
Nov. 1, 1929-May 31, 1933_____ Block____ 25
June 21,1932-May 31,1933__
June 1, 1933-May 31, 1936_____ Block......... 50
June 1, 1983-Aug.1938______ Block. ____
31, 1933...
June 1, 1936-Dec. 15.
50
P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.
See footnotes at end of table.



5

3

2.26 3.04 5.12 9.1 7.6
6.5
5.8
5.8
4.9

5.9
5.3
5.3
4.7

4.6
3.9
3.9
3.8

8.0 Ex. 5.0
.75 Wright 9__ 50 8.0 Ex. 5.0
.75 2.00 3. 20 6.50
.75 2.00 3. 20 5. 60
8.0 1, 560 4.0
.75 — do.9____ 40 8.0 1,560 4.0
8.0 775 4.0
.75 -_-do.9____ 25 8.0 775 4.0
.75 2.00 2. 60 5.00
7.0 775 4.0
.75 -__do.9____ 25 7.0 775 4.0
.75 1.75 2. 35 4. 75
25 6. 7 200 3.4
6.7 200 3.4
.75 Block
.75 1. 68 2.18 4. 20
1.73 2.25 4.83
5.0 175 3.4
.60 Block.__ 50 5.0 175 3.4
.60 1. 25 2. 00 4.18
1.29 2.06 3.90
4.31
4.5 150 3.3
.75 Block____ 50 4.5 150 3.3
.75 1.13 1.80
Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours. Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

8.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
6. 7
6.9
5.0
5.2
4.5

8.0
8,0
6.5
5.9
5.5
5.6
5.0
5.2
4.5

6.5
5.6
5.0
4.8
4.2
4.3
4.2
4.3
3.9

Block____
_._do.8____
-__do.8____
-__do.8____

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

1. 62
1.45
1.45
1.22

2. 37
2.12
2.12
1.90

5.1

4. 57
3. 95
3. 95
3.85

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

BASIC DATA TOR COMPUTING PRICES AND

June 21, 1932-Aug. 31,
1933.

7.6
4.5
4.1

O
X
ts
m

o>

T a b l e 8 . — Summ arized

data used in the computation of retail prices of electricity, by com panies, M arch 192$—
December 1938, inclusive—

Continued

O

to

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
CHANGES
IN
R E T A IL

9.0
9.0
9.0
8.0
6.0

.50
.50
.50
.50
1.00

Block . . .
Wright 25_.
Hopkinson
...d o _____
Block

50 10.0
30 10.0
3.0
3.0
30 8.5

50
150

Ct. Ct. 9.5
Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. 10.0 10.0 Ct.
0. 50 2. 50 4. 00 9. 50
9.0
4. 00 7.20 10.0 10.0 7.2

40

3.00 2.50
3.00 3.00 2.50 4. 00 6.00 10.0 10.0
3.00 3.00 2. 25 3. 40 6. 00 9.0 8.5
2.32 8.50 6.18 9.3 8.7
1.00 2.12 3.15 5. 85 8.5 7.9
6.0

6.0
6.2
5.8
6.0

20
35
53
50
50

7. 5
6.0
5.5
5.0
5.0

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

B lo ck .__
...d o ,8____
___do.«____
...d o.8____
...d o.8____

10
15
12
15
15

8.0
6.7
8.3
6.7
6.7

20
35
53
50
50

7.5
6.0
5.5
5.0
5.0

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

500
40
40

6.0
5.0
5.0

.50
. 50
. 50
.50

Step........ . 714
Block.
500
Block
35
...d o _____ 35

7.0
7.0
7.0
6.0

500
40
40

6.0
5.0
5.0

.50 1. 75 2.80 7.00
.50 1. 75 2. 80 7.00
1.80 2. 88 7. 21
. 50 1. 75 2.70 4. 95
.50 1.50 2. 35 4.60

50
50
50
100
40

10
15
12
15
15

8.0
6.7
8.3
6.7
6.7

714
500
35
35

7.0
7.0
7.0
6.0

Ct. Dol. Dol.

—

________

Ct.

6.0

2.19 8.2h 6.02 8.8 8.1
1. 92 2. 90 5. 60 7.7 7.2
1. 60 2. 50 5. 35 6.4 6.2
1. 71 2. 54 4. 61
1.50 2. 25 4.20
1. 50 2. 25 4.20

6.9
6.0
6.0

6.3
5.6
5.6

7.0

7.0

6.0

5.9

7.0 7.0
7.2 7.2
7.0 6.8

6.0

5.6
5.3
4.6
4.2
4.2

E L E C T R IC IT Y




Ct.

50 10.0
50 10.0
50 10.0
100 9.0
30 8. 5

OF

Charleston, S. C. P.
Nov. 11, 1919-Nov. 30, 1927........ Block_____
Dec. 1, 1927-Mar. 31, 1929_____ ____do_____
Apr. 1, 1929-Mar. 31, 1931__........ ____do_____
Apr. 1,1931-July 31,1933______ ____dO.26.__.
June j21,1982-July 81,1938..
Aug. 1, 1933-Nov. 25, 1934_____ B lo ck .___
Aug. 1,1988-Aug. 81, 1988...
Immediate:
Nov. 26,1934-Jan. 1, 1936.._ Block. ... _
Jan. 2, 1936-Apr. 30, 1938.. ____do.8____
Objective:
Nov. 26, 1934-Jan. 1, 1936... ____do.8____
Jan. 2 ,1936-Apr. 30, 1938.— ____do.8____
May 1, 1938-Dec. 15,1938______ ____do.8____
Jacksonville
M.
Dec. 1913-Oct. 31, 1929________ Step.......... .
Nov. 1 ,1929-Sept. 30, 1935_____ Block_____
June 21,1982-Aug. 31,1938..
Oct. 1, 1935-Mar. 31, 1938______ Block______
Apr. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938______ ___do______

P R IC E S

SOUTH ATLANTIC—Continued

7.0

7.0
7.2
5.0
4.6




9.0
9.0
8.5
8.5
7.5
7.0
6. 5
6.5
6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0

150
40
150
150
150
150
150
150
60
60
60
50

6.3 . . . . . .
8.1
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
5.5
5.5
3.5
4.5
4.5
4.3

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1. 00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

__-do.3____ 700
-.-do.3____ 700
...do.3____ 700
Wright-— 36
...d o _____ 36
Wright.,., 54
Block
60
...d o _____ 60
— do_____ 60
...d o ........... 30
— do........ 30
__do_____ 50

4.5 1.500
4.5 1.500
4.5 1.500
72
8.5
72
8.5
54
7.0
6.5
60
6.5
60
6.5
60
6.0
60
5.5
60
50
5.0

3.2
3.2
3.2
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.5
3.5
3.5
4.5
4.5
4.3

(27)
(27)
(27)
2.00
2.00
2.00
2. 00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

9.0
9.0
8.5
8. 5
7.5
7.0
6. 5
6.5
6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0

150
40
150
150
150
150
150
150
60
60
60
50

6.3
8.1
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
5.5
5.5
3. 5
4.5
4.5
4.3

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1. 00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

__ do.3.. _- 700
__do.3____ 700
__do.3____ 700
Wright__ 36
...d o _____ 36
Wright__ 54
B lock ___ 60
...d o _____ 60
—_do__....... 60
__do_____ 30
...d o _____ 30
...d o ........ 50

4.5 1, 500
4. 5 1, 500
4.5 1, 500
72
8.5
72
8.5
7.0
54
6.5
60
6.5
60
6.5
60
60
6.0
5.5
60
5.0
50

3.2
3.2
3.2
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.5
3.5
3. 5
4.5
4.5
4.3

(27)
(27)
(27)
2. 00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

9.0
6.0
6. 5

100
150
35

8.1
1.00 Straight 3__
4.0
3.0 1.00 1.00 Block____ " " 6.0
1.00 B lock ___ 25 6. 5
5.0
56

150
35

7.7
7.0
7.2
6.5

9.0
9.0
8.5
8.5
7.5
7.7
7.0
7.2
6.5
6.5
6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0

9.0
9.0
8.5
8.5
7.5
7.7
7.0
7.2
6.5
6.5
6.5
5.6
5.3

6.3
6.3
5.6
5.6
5.8
5.6
5.8
5.3
5.3
5.3
4.8
4.7
4.6

9.0
6.00
2.50 2.25
3.6 1.66 1.00 2. 50 3.40 5.49 10.0
2. 57 3.60 5.66 10.3
5.0
1.00 1.62 2. 37 4. 57 6.5

9.0
8.5

1. 88
1.93
1. 75

10
.8

1.63
1.63
1.63
1.50
1. 38
1.25
2.25
2.25
2.13
2.13

1.88
1.93

1. 75
1.80
1.63
1.63
1.63
1.50
1.38
1.25

3. 60
3. 60
3. 40
3. 40
3.00
3.09
2.80
2.88
2.60
2. 60
2.60
2. 25
2.10

3.60
3.60
3.40
3.40
3.00
3.09
2.80
2.88
2.60
2.60
2.60
2. 25

2.10
2.00

6.30
6. 30
5. 62
5. 62
5. 62
79
5.
5.79
5. 30
5. 30
5. 30
4.80
4. 65
4.63
6.10

6.30
5.62
5.62
6.10

5.79
5. 62
6.79

5. 30
5. 30
5.30
4.80
4. 65
4.63

9.0
9.0
8.5
8.5
7.5
7.7
7.0
7.2
6.5
6.5
6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0

9.0
9.0
8.5
8.5
7.5

6.3
6.3
5.6
5.6
5.8
5.6
5.8
5.3
5.3
5.3
4.8
4.7
4.6

2. 25
2. 25
2.13
2.13

10.0 Ex. 5.2
1.00 Wright
84 10.0 Ex. 5.2
9.24 10.0
1.00 2.50
7.5 Ex. 4.5
.75 -.d o .9____ 84 7.5 Ex. 4.5
.75 1.88 3.00 7.02 7.5
7.0 Ex. 4.5
.75 ...d o.9........ 84 7.0 Ex. 4.5
.75 1.75 2.80 6.60 7.0
6.3 Ex. 4.5
.75 ...d o.9____ 84 6.3 Ex. 4.5
.75 1. 56 2.50 5.97 6.3
5.9 Ex. 4. 5
.75 __do.9____ 84 5.9 Ex. 4. 5
. 75 1. 48 2. 36 5. 68 5.9
.75 Straight...
5.2
5.2
.75 1. 30 2.08 5.20 5.2
Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.
Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

6.5
6.5
5.6
5.3
5.0

6
.1

6
.1

6.0

5.5
4.6

8.7

5.7

10.0

9.2
7.0

7.5
7.0
6.3
5.9
5.2

6.6
6.0

BASIC DATA BOB COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

Norfolk
P.
Mar. 1, 1918-Dec. 31, 1925_____ ____do_____ 100
Jan. 1, 1926-Apr. 30, 1927______ ____do_____ 60
May 1 ,1927-Feb. 28, 1930_____ ____do_____ 100
Mar. 1, 1930-Mar. 31, 1931_____ ____do_____ 100
Apr. 1, 1931-June 30, 1932______ ____do.. .. 100
June 21, 1932-June 30, 1932..
July 1, 1932-Jan. 15, 1934______ Block__
100
July1934-Sept. 30, 31, 1933...
1,1932-Aug. 1934. ___
Jan. 16,
Block _
100
Oct. 1, 1934-Dec. 31, 1934______ ------do_____ 100
Jan. 1, 1935-Feb. 28, 1935______ ------do_____ 60
Mar. 1, 1935-Mar. 31, 1936_____ ____do_____ 30
Apr. 1 ,1936-Dec. 31,1937______ ____do........... 30
Jan. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938.......... ____do.. . . 50
Richmond
P.
Mar. 1 ,1918-Dec. 31, 1925_____ ____do..
100
Jan. 1, 1926—Apr. 30, 1 9 2 7 .___ ____do_____ 60
May 1, 1927-Feb. 28, 1930_____ ____do__ ... 100
Mar. 1, 1930-Mar. 31, 1931
do
100
Apr. 1, 1931-June 30, 1932______ ____do.. ... 100
June 21,1932-June SO, 1932..
July 1, 1932-Jan. 15, 1934______ Block_____ 100
July 1, 1932-Aug. 31, 1933.
Jan. 16, 193^Sept. 30, 1934 ... . Block . . . 100
Oct. 1, 1934-Dec. 31, 1934______ ____do_____ 100
Jan. 1, 1935-Feb. 28, 1935______ ____do_____ 60
Mar. 1, 1935-Mar. 31, 1936_____ ___do_____ 30
Apr. 1, 1936-Dec. 31, 1937______ ____do_____ 30
Jan. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938______ ____do_____ 50
Savannah
P.
Aug. 1, 1920-Nov. 4, 1929. . _ Block_____ 100
Nov. 5, 1929-Mar. 31, 1934_____ ___do_____ 50
June 21, 1932-Aug. 31, 1933
Apr. 1, 1934-Dec. 15, 1938. ___ Block_____ 25
Washington, D. C. P.
Sept. 1, 1921-Dec. 31, 1924_____ Wright9___ 84
Jan. 1 ,1925-Dec. 31, 1925______ ____do.®____ 84
Jan. 1, 1926-Dec. 31, 1926______ ____do.9____ 84
Jan. 1, 1927-Dec. 31, 1927______ ____do.9____ 84
84
Jan. 1, 1928-Dec. 31, 1928 ____ ___do.9
Jan. 1, 1929-Dec. 31, 1929______ Straight___
P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.
See footnotes at end of table.

5.7
5.2

O

00

T a b l e 8 . — Sum m arized

O
f*

data used in the computation of retail prices of electricity, hy com panies, M arch 1923—
Decem ber 1938, inclusive—
Continued
^

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
25 and 40 kwh
City, type of ownership, and
period

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

Monthly bill for— Average price per
kwh for use of—

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
ber
ber
ber
ice mum
ber
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
SOUTH ATLANTIC—Continued

Washington, D. C—Continued
Jan. 1, 1930-Dec. 31, 1930 _____ Straight. _ _
Jan. 1, 1931-Jan. 31, 1932 _____ _ ..do_____
Feb. 1, 1932-Feb. 19, 1933 ___ B lo c k ..___ 50
June 21, 1932-Feb. 19, 1933..
Feb. 20, 1933-Jan. 31, 1934. ___ B lo ck .____ 50
Feb. 20,1933-Aug. 31, 1933...
Feb. 1, 1934-Jan. 31, 1935 ____ Block______ 50
Feb. 1, 1935-Jan. 31, 1936______ ____do_____ 50
Feb. 1, 1936-Jan. 31, 1937______ ____do_____ 50
Feb. 1, 1937-Jan. 31, 1938______ ____do_____ 50
Feb. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938______ ____do_____ 50

Ct.

4.7
4.2
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
S. 9

50
50
50
50
50
50
50

Ct. Dol. Dol. Straight 0.75
do
3.8
3. 6
3.3
3.1
2.9
2.3
1.8 —

.75
.75
.75
. 75
.75
.75
.75
.75

Block
Block __
B lock__
___do ___
- .d o _____
___do_____
- .d o _____

Ct.
50
50
50
50
50
50
50

4.7
4.2
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9

Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol.
0. 75 1.18 1.88
.75 1.05 1. 68
. 75 .98 1. 56
50 3. 8
1.0 1.61
0
.75 98 1. 56
50 3.6
1.0 1.61
0
1. 56
50
50
50
50
50

3.3
3.1
2.9
2.3
1.8

23
150
150

3.8
3.2
3.2

Dol. Ct. Ct. Ct.

4.70
4. 20
3. 85
3.97
3. 75
3.86
3. 60
3.50
3.40
3.10
2. 85

4.7
4. 2
3.9
4
.0
3.9
4
.0
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9

4.7
4.2
3.9
10
3.9
4.0
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9

4.7
4.2
3.9
4.0
3.8
3.9
3.6
3.5
3.4
3.1
2.9

3.75 1.91 3.06 285.30
1.91 3.06 4.91
292. 50 1.91 3.06 4. 61

7.7
7.7
7.7

7.7
7.7
7.7

5.3
4.9
4.6

. 75
. 75
.75
.75
.75

.98
.98
.98
.98
.98

1.56
1. 56
1.56
1. 56

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL

Birmingham
P.
Aug. 1, 1921-July 19, 1930______ Block______ 100
July 20, 1930-Apr. 30, 1932_____ ____do_____ 100
May 1, 1932-June 30, 1933_____ ___do_____ 100
June 21,1932-June SO, 1933..




7.7
7.7
7.7

125
125
125

6.3
6.3
6.3

0. 75 Wright
.75 Wright ,5__
.75 d n .2 5

11
30
25

4.8
9.0
9.0

203.00

1.97 3.15 4.75 7.9 1 7.9

4^8

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Net price

Details of rates

Louisville

Apr. 24, 1918-Nov. 30, 1928____
Dec. 1, 1928-Feb. 28, 1934_____
June 21, 1982-Aug. 81, 1988.
Mar. 1, 1934-June 30, 1936____
July 1, 1984-Jan. 14, 1986...
May 18,1986-June 80,1986July 1, 1936-Oct. 31, 1938_____
July 1, 1986-Oct. 81, 1988. __
Nov. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938_____

Wright7-----

6.5

Wright7___ do.7..
___ do.7..
___ do-18..
___ do.18_
Block..
___ do-

6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0
4.5
3.9
3.9

5.0
5.0
5.0
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5

Wright7.
...do.7___
...do.7. —
...do.18—
...do.18__
Block.
1.00
.70 ...d o .....

20

4.5

4.0

50

To

To"

30

0
To" ” 3 '

8.0 Ex.

___ do.3
*..

See footnotes at end o f table.

500
150

9.0

100

6.5
6.7
6.7
6.7
5.0

3.9

45

5.0
5.0
3.0

2
.0
8
.1

5.0

5.0
4.5
4.5
4.5
4.0

40

1.00
1.00
1.00

Ex.
Ex.
Ex.

3.0
3.0
3.0

30

5.8

3.85
3.75
3.50
3.20
3.20

5.4
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.9

5.3
5.0
4.5

.70 1. 35 2.10
.70 1.25 2.00
.70 1.13 1.80
1.00 301.00 1.56
1. 56
.70

3il. 14 1.90 3.04 4.38
1.00 1.90 3.04 4.3
1.96 8.18 4.51
1.25 2. 00 3.80

1.29
1.29
10
.1
1.18
10
.0
1.08

~3."6"

8.0
5.5
3.0

Ex.
30
500
150

5.0
5.0
3.0
2.0

100

8.1
5.0

To"

20.0

"Wright 7__
Block 8— .
Wright22.
Block 8—
...do,8____

6.2

1. 60 2. 87 4.17 6.4 5.9
.70 1. 55 2. 30 4.05 6.2 5.8
.70 1. 45 2.20 3.95 5.8 5.5

4.0

9.0

..d o____
__do.33___

Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.

7.6
7.6
5.0
To"

.90 Wright 18__
Wright7-.
Wright 18_
Block A__

1.00
1.00

5.0
5.0
5.0
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5

4.5

Block.
Block.

1.00
1.00

30
30
30
180
180
250
250

. 70 1. 55 2. 30 4. 05

6.5
6.7
6.7
6.7
5.0

45

5.0
4.5
4.5
4.5
4.0

.90 2.00
2.06
.90 1. 75
1.80
.90 1.38
.75 .86
1.00

1.00

8.91
3.91
3.6
8.71
3.50
8.61

7.6
5.0

7.8
5.2

5.2
4.3
4-4
4.1

2.90 5.90
7.3
2.99 6.08 8.2 7.5
2. 60 4.80 7.0 6.5
2.68 4.94 7.2 6.7
2.20 4.25 5.5 5.5
1. 38 2.8

3.5

3.5

2. 25
8. 55 9.0
2.00 2.75
2.06 2.88 4.75 8.0 7.1
4.8 8.2

1. 55
1.45
1.00 1.45
1.00 1.45
1.00
1.00

1.00

2.06
2.06
1.70
1.75
1. 60
1.65

7.6
7.6

7.8
5.0
5.2
5.2
4.4
4.5
4.0
4.1

1.20

2.30
2.13
2.13
2.13
1.80

4.05
3.95
3.70
3.95
3.50

6.2

5.8
5.8
5.8
4.8

4.1

4 .2

4.1
4.0
3.9
3.8
3.5
3.2
3.2
4.4
4.4

4.5
3.8
8.9
8.9
3.6
8.7
3.5
8.6

5.9
4.8
4.9
4.3
2.9
6.1

8.6

4.9
4.8

5.8
5.3

4.1
4.0

5.3
5.3
4.5

3.7
4.0
3.5

IN D E X E S

Wright7..
Block 8____
Wright »*..
Block 8___
___ do.8. . .

5.5
3.0
20.0

6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0
4.5

.70
.70
.70
.70
.70

7.6
7.6

5.0

6.5

P R IC E S A N D

Block.
Block.

___ do___

20

Wright 18_
...do.18__
Block.

149
149

P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.




30
30
30
180
180
250
250

Wright7..

Step.
-do..
Block.

Nov. 1, 1988-Dec. 15, 1988—
Memphis
Nov. 15, 1922-Sept. 30, 1932___ Wright is..
June 21,1982-Sept. 80, 1982
Oct. 1, 1932-Jan. 31, 1934______ Wright 7_.
Oct. 1, 1982-Aug. 81, 1988—
Feb. 1, 1934-Nov. 30, 1938_____ Wright i8_.
Dec. 1, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938_____ Block *__
Mobile
P.
Apr. 20, 1921-Jan. 31, 1929_____
Feb. 1, 1929-Sept. 30, 1933_____
June 21,1982-Aug. 81,1988..
Immediate:
Oct. 1, 1933-Mar. 31, 1936...
May 1, 1936 33-Dec. 15, 1938.
Objective:
Oct. 1, 1933-Aug. 31, 1934__
Sept. 1, 1934-Apr. 30, 1936...
May 1, 1936-Dec. 15, 1938...

5.0

B A S IC D A T A F O E C O M P U T IN G

July 1, 1933-Mar. 31, 1935_____
July 1,1988-Aug. 81,1988...
Immediate:
Apr. 1. 1935-Dec. 4, 1935....
Dec. 5, 1935-Sept. 4, 1936— .
Sept. 5, 1936-May 4, 1937__.
May 5, 1937-Feb. 4, 1938....
Feb. 5, 1938-Dec. 4, 1938....
Objective:
Apr. 1, 1935-Dec. 4, 1938....
Dec. 5, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938_____

Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).
Or

T a b l e 8 . — Sum m arized

data used in the computation of retail prices o f electricity, by com pan ies, M arch 1923-D ecem ber 1938, inclusiveContinued

O
O
*

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Net price
100 kwh

25 and 40 kwh
Kwh and rate

City, type of ownership, and
period

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

Monthly bill for— Average price per
kwh for use of—

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 | 40 100 25 40 100
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
ber
ber
ice mum
ber
ber
ice mum kwh j kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
WEST SOUTH CENTRAL

Dallas
P.
Straight..
Mar. 1, 1922-Dec. 15, 1929
Dec. 16, 1929-Aug. 5, 1932
June 21, 1932-Aug. 5, 1932... _do. _
Aug. 6, 1932-Aug. 5, 1934______ Straight___
Aug. 6, 1932-Aug. 31,1933...
Aug. 6, 1934-June 5, 1936_____ Wright ___
Block. . June 6, 1936-July 23, 1937
July 24, 1937-Sept. 2, 1938_____ ____do_____
Sept. 3, 1938-Dec. 15, 1938_____ ____do.8____
Houston
P.
Mar. 15,1922-Sept. 24,1929____ Wright9___
Sept. 25,1929-Apr. 30,1934____ _ _ _do.915_ _
June 21,1932-Aug. 31, 1933..
May 1 ,1934-May 11,1936 ___ Wright18___
May 12,1936-Dec. 15,1938___ Block ___
Little Rock
P.
Sept. 16,1918-May 31,1925-.___ ____do_____
June 1, 1925-Mar. 31, 1930_____ ____do_____




(34)
(34)
(j.)
40
40
40
11
11
11
15
25

a. Dol. 0.50 Straight- (34) Ct.
Dol.
6.0
.50 Wright 18-_ 40 6.0

Ct.
6.0

6.0
5.8
5. 5
5.0
4.8
4.5

100
100
100
74

4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0

7.2 Ex.
7.2 Ex.
6.0 100
4.8 50

200 10.0
200 10.0

300
300

9.0
9.0

—

Wright 18__
Wright i«__
Block...
___do_____
-.-do.8____

40
40
40
40
11

5.8
5.5
5.0
4.8
4.5

.50
.50
.50
.50

4.5
4.5
4.0
4.0

—

.50
.50
.50
.50
.50

100
100
100
100
100
74

Wright 9._
___do.18___
Wright18__
Block-__

15
15
15
25

7.2
7.0
6.0
4.8

.90 --d o _____ 200 10.0
.90 Wright 7.. 25 10.0

Dol. 1.50
Ct. Dol. 0.50 Dol.
4.0
.50 1. 50
1.55
4.0
.50 1.44
1.48
4.0
1.38
4.0
4.0
4.0

.50
.50
.50
50

Ex.
100
100
50

4.5
4.0
4.0
4.0

.50
.50
. 50
.50

300
25

9.0
7.0

—

Dol. Dol. Ct.
6.0
6.0
6.2
5.8
5.9
5.5

2.40 6.00
2.40 4.80
2.47 4.94
2. 30 4.70
4
.84
2.37 4.60
2.20 4.40
1. 25 2.00
1.19 1.90 4. 30
1.06 1. 66 3. 91

5.0
4.8
4.2

1.41 2.08 4.91

1.20 1.80 3. 83

Ct. Ct.
6.0 6.0
6.0 4.8
6.2 4.9
5.8 4.7
5.9 4.8
5.5 4.6
5.0
4.8
4.2

4.4
4.3
3.9

1.41 2. 05 4. 45 5.6 5.1
1.45 2.11 4.30 5.8 4.8
4.58 5.2 5.3
1.30 1.90

5.6

5.2

4.8

4. 5

4.9
4.5
4.6
4.3
3.8

.90 2.50 4.00 10.00 10.0 10.0
5. 00 2. 50 4. 00 6. 25 10.0 10.0

10.0
6.3

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Details of rates

Apr. 1,1930-June 30,1934_______

Hopkinson.ss

30

7.0

30

5.0

0.60

H o p k in son.3
5

30

7.0

30

5.0

0.60

2. 35

June 2 1 ,1 9 3 2 -A u g . 31,1933..

2 .4 3

30

30

5.0

.60

Present.

1936_Jan ^

H o p p i i nH o k k nson.3
5

30

6.0

30

5.0

2.10

.60

193g_

2.1 4

Block.
-_

5.8

40

4.2

.50

50

5.2

50

3.8

.50

5.0

50

.50

4.0

Block.

40

4.2

.50

361.95
3 1.99
6

50

3.8

.50

50

4.6

.50

361.80
361.84
1. 75

40

50

Block. _
Block. __
.50
Block. _ _ - _

5.8
5.2

50
50

5.0

.50

1.79

Feb 1, 1938-Dec. 15,1938

P.

N e w Orleans

Oct. 1 0 ,1918-Apr. 14,1934 _

-

Block.

20

9.1

30

7.8

7. 5
6. 5
9.0

50
50
80

4.0
4.0
4.5

.25
.25

7.8
4.0
4.0
4. 5

1.00 Block _ _ 100
1.00 ___do_____ 25
1.00 Block 8__ 15

9.5
8.0
6.7

100
25
35

8.6
4.0
5.5

Hopkinson
Straight-.Wright 7__
H o p k in ­
son.24

4.5
4.5
7.0
3.0

40

5.0

20

.25
. 25
.25

2.46 3. 63 7. 66 9.8 9.1
2.53 3.74 7.89 10.1 9.3
2.13 3. 25 6. 00 8.5 8.1
1.88 2.85 5. 50 7.5 7.1
.90 1. 58 2.25 4. 80 6.3 5.6

7.7
7.9
6.0
5.5
4.8

MOUNTAIN

Butte
P.
Dee.1. 1Q13-.Tnne 30 1923
Block
July 1, 1923-Nov. 14, 1935_____ ____do_____
.T u n p 9,1 1 9.92-Aun 31 . 1 933
Block 8—
Nov. 15, 1935-Dec. 15, 1938 .

100
25
15

9.5
8.0
6.7

100
25
35

8.6
4.0
5.5

Mav 15. 1906-Jnlv 31.1926
Aug. 1, 1926-Feb. 10, 1927
Ffih. n . 1927-Mar. 14. 1932
Mar. 15, 1932-Dec. 15, 1938..

15
40

8.0
8.0
7.0 30
6.0 Ex.

6.0
5.0

______

8.0
8.0
6.4
6.0

7.9
6.5
5.0
4.8

Block____ 250 8.1 250 7. 2
250 8.1 250 7.2
.90 Block,
.90 2.03 3. 24 8.10 8.1
___do—
4. 5
.90 Straight3_
250 8.1 250 7.2
1.90 2.03 3. 24 5.94 8.1
____do_____ 250 8.1 250 7.2
.90 Wright 25_- 40 5.9 Ex. 4.5
2. 35 2. 03 3.24 5.05 8.1
M. municipal plant. Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.
Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

8.1
8.1
8.1

See footnotes a t end o f table.




9.5
4.5

8.0
8.0
6.6
6.0

Straight ,
do
Block-- ,
____do_____

pc

Mar. 1. 1917-June 24. 1925 ,
June 25. 1925-Feb. 13. 1927____
Feb. 14, 1927-Dec. 31, 1928 _.
P. indicates private utility;

9.5
6.5

4.6
4.4

Denver

June. 21,11932-Aug.1 631,1 91933
M a r 1. 9 3 6 - D . ..
.
38
Salt Lake City P.

1.00 2. 38 3. 80 9.50 9.5
1.00 2.00 2. 60 4.50 8.0
2.06 2.68 4. 64 8.2
1.00 1. 55 2. 38 4. 43 6.2

6.7
5.9

—

.90
.90
.90
.90

30

2.00
3. 38
2.03
2.00
2.00 1. 65
1.80 1. 80 1.50

3.20
3. 20
2. 55
2.40

7. 88
6. 53
5. 00
4.80

1.55 2. 47 4.94 6.2 6.2
1.63 2.45 4.90 6.1 6.1

4.9
4.9
8.1
5.9
5.1'

IN D E X E S

30
50
50
80

_

Block - _
— do_____
.90 ___do.8____

7.1 6.4

AND

9.1
7. 5
6. 5
9.0

Block. _

6.5
6.6
6.3

7 .3

5.2
5.1
5.2
5.0
5.1
5.0
5.1

P R IC E S

50
50
10

.25

50
50
10

36
36 7.2
7.0

7.3

C O M P U T IN G

June 21,1932-Aug. 31,1933. Block- _
Apr. 15, 1934-June 9,1935
do
June 10, 1935-Aug. 14,1938_____
Aug. 15, 1938-Dec. 15,1938_____ ____do.8____

7.4
7.1
7.2

5.4

5.6
5.1

DATA

Feb. 1, 1936-Jan. 31,1938 _
Centennial:
Feb. 1, 1936-Jan. 31,1938— , Block
Feb. 1 ,1 9 3 6 -Jan. 31,1938 ,
Feb. 1 , 1938-Dec. 15,1938 ______

40

8.0
8.2

FOR

6.0

son.3
5
_

J u ly 1 ,1 9 3 5 -Jan. 3 1 ,193 6-

9.4

9.7
8.4
8.6
36 7.8
36 8.0

B A S IC

July 1, 1934-Jan. 31, 1936 _______

3. 20 5. 40

3.30 5. 56
2. 90 5.10
2.96 5.20
2. 82 5.10
2.88 5.20
2. 58 5.00
2.63 5.10
2.50 5.00
2.55 5.10

o>

T a b l e 8 . — S u m m a r i z e d d a ta u s e d i n the c o m p u ta t i o n o f reta il p r ic e s o f e l e c t r i c i t y , h y c o m p a n i e s , M a r c h 1 9 3 8 - D e c e m b e r 1 9 8 8 , i n c l u s i v e —

Continued

05

00

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Net price

25 and 40 kwh
City, type of ownership, and
period

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

Monthly bill for— Average price per
kwh for use of—

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Second block
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
ber
ber
ice mum
ber
ber
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
M OITNTAIN—Continued

Salt Lake City—Continued
Jan. 1, 1929-Sept. 30, 1935_____ . Block 8_

June 21, 1982-Aug. 8, 1938...
Aug. 4, 1988-Aug. 81,1988...
Sept. 1, 1988-Sept. 80,1985...
Present:
Oct. 1, 1935-Sept. 30, 1936.__
Oct. 1,1935-Sept. SO, 1986.
Oct. 1, 1936-Mar. 31, 1937...
Oct. 1,1986-Mar.81,1987.
Apr. 1, 1937-Mar. 31, 1938.
Apr. 1,1987-Mar. 81,1988.
Objective:
Oct. 1, 1935-Mar. 31, 1938....
Oct. 1,1985-Mar. 81,1988.
Apr. 1,1938-Dec. 15,1938_______
Apr. 1,1988-Dec. 15,1988____




11

Block 8____
Block 8____
Block 8____

11
11
11

Block 8____
Rlnok s

11
11

Ct.
8.2

Ct. Dol. Dol.

0.90 Wright25..

Ex. 7.0

8.2

75

7.0

.90

8.2

75

6.0

.90

8.2

75

5.0

.90

8.2

25

5.0

8.2

25

5.0

.90
—

.90

44

Ct. Ex.
5.2

Dol.
Ct. Dol. Dol. 1.88 Dol. Dol.
2.93 4.82
4.5
2.30
4.96
1.94 8.02 5.06
1.97 2.99 4.92
1.92 8.08
4.5
2.30 1.88 2.93 4.82
1.92 2.99 4.92
4.5
2.30 1.74 2. 64 4.82
1.78 2.69 4.92
2. 30 1.60 2. 35 4.82
4.5
1.68 2.40 4.92

Wright 25._
Wright as..
Wright 25_

44

5.2

76

44

5.2

76

44

5.2

76

Block 8„ „
Block 8____

11
11

8.2

25

5.0

.90

8.2

25

5.0

.90

2. 25 3. 75

1.60
1.68 2.80 8.88
1.60 2. 25 3. 75
1.68 2.80 8.88

Ct.
7.5
7.7
7.9
7.7
7.5
7.7
7.0
7.1
6.4
6.5
6.4
6.6
6.4
6.5

Ct. Ct.
7.3 4.8
7.5 5.0
7.7 5.1
7.5 19
7.3 4.8
7.5 4.9
6.6 4.8
6.7 19
5.9 4.8
6.0 4.9
5.6 3.8
5.7 8.8
5.6 3.8
5.7 8.8

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES

Details of rates

O
*4

ti
e
f
M
Q
H
£
O
K
j-

PACIFIC

Los Angeles

200
200
150
140

7.0
5.5
5.3
2.5

1.00 1.98
1. 63
1.40
1. 25
.60 1.20

3.17 7.48
2.60
2.24
2.00 5.00
1.81 3. 31

7.9
6.5
5.6
5.0
4.8

7.9
6. 5
5.6
5. 0
4. 5

7.5
6.0
5.6
5.0
3. 3

35 4.4
35 4.4

75
65

2.3
2.2

.55 Wright9—.
.55 „.d o.9____

35
35

4.4
4.4

75
65

2. 3
2.2

.55 1.10 1. 66 3. 04
.55 1.10 1.65 2.97

4.4
4.4

4. 1
4.1

3.0
3.0

5.6
5.0
4.8

150
125
140

5.3
2.5
2.5

.60 Block. ... 100
.60 Wright9. . 50
.60 ...d o.9____ 35

5.6
5.0
4.8

150
125
140

5.3
2.5
2.5

2.24 5. 60
.60
.60 1.25 2.00 3. 75
.60 1.20 1.81 3. 31

5.0
4.8

5. 6
5.0
4. 5

5. 6
3.8
3. 3

35
35

4.4
4.4

75
65

2.3
2.2

.55 Wright9..
.55 ___do.9____

35
35

4.4
4.4

75
65

2.3
2.2

.55
.55

1.66 3.04
1.65 2.97

4.4
4.4

4. 1
4.1

3.0
3.0

9
30

7.6
5.5

11
40

6.7
3.0

1.00 Wright__
1.00 — do.9____

9
30

7.6
5.5

11
40

6.7
3.0

1.00 1.56 1.99 3. 41
1.00 1.38 1.95 3. 39

6.2 5.0

5.5

4. 9

3. 4
3. 4

34
13
30

5.0
7.3
5.5

40
7
40

3.0
6.7
3.0

1.00 Block........
20l.OO Wright 3l._
— do.®____
1 .0 0

34
13
30

5.0
7.3
5.5

40
7
40

3.0
6.7
3.0

4. 7
5.0
4. 9

3. 4
3. 4
3.4

Nov. 26, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938- Block
34
Saw F r a n c i s c o 30
Co. 1: Feb. 1923-June 1930 P.
Co. 2: Feb. 1923-June 1930 P.
(Merger effective June
1930.)
Feb. 20, 1923-Feb. 29, 1928- ____do.8____ 10
do
Mar. 1 ,1928-Mar. 31,1928__
200
Apr. 1, 1928-Feb. 28, 1930... Wright18__ 30
P. indicates private utility; M . municipal plant.

5.0

40

3.0

1.00 Block____

34

5.0

40

3.0

1.00 1. 25 1.88 3.37 5.0
"1.00 1.56 1.99 3. 41 6.2
1.00 1.38 1. 95 3. 39 5.5
1.J
& *.01 S.49 6.7
1.00 1.25 1.88 3.37 5.0

4. 7

3. 4

40 6.0
.90 1.80 2.70 5.80
6.8
9.0 40 6.0
.90 „_do.8____ 10 9.0
5.0 800 4.0 6.40 .40 ...d o _____ 200 5.0 800 4.0 0.40 .40 1.65 2.40 5.40 6.6 6.0
5.0 140 3.5 ! .40 .40 Wright 18__ 30 5.0 140 8.5 .40 .40 1.65 2. 25 4. 35 6.6 5.6
Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.
Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46).

5.8
5.4
4. 4

June 21, 1982-Aug. 31,
1933.
1, 1936-July 31, 1937— Wright9___
Aug 1, 1937-Dec. 15,1938.— ____do.9____
F eb.

Co. 2: ° Oct. 1920-Dec. 1938 M.
Co. 3: Oct. 1920-Jan. 1937 P.
(Purchase effective Jan.
1937.)
Oct. 11, 1920-July 31, 1927— Block....___ 100
Aug. 1, 1927-Dec. 31, 1929... Wright 9___ 50
Jan. 1, 1930-Jan. 31, 1936— ____do.9____ 35

1.24

1.86

S. 40 4.9 4.6

8
.4

2

J u n e 2 1 , 1 9 3 2 -A u g . 3 1 ,
198 3

Feb. 1, 1936-July 31,1937___ Wright 9___
Aug. 1, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938— ____do.9.........

l.*4
1.10
1.10

1.86

S 40
.

4.9

4.6

8.4

P o r tla n d , O reg .

Co. 1:
P.
June 16, 1917-Aug. 14,1930- Wright
Aug. 15, 1930-Nov. 25, 1937- ____do.9- ___
J u n e 2 1 , 1 9 3 2 -A u g . 3 1 ,
1988

Nov. 26, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938.. Block_____
Co. 2:
P.
Jan. 3 ,1921-Aug. 14,1930— Wright
Aug. 15, 1930-Nov. 25,1937... ____do.9____
J u n e 2 1 , 1 9 8 2 -A u g . 3 1 ,
1933

See footnotes at end o f table.




1 .4 *

B.01

$. 49

5.7 5.0
5.0

3.5

8.5

IN D E X E S

7.9
6.5
5.6
5.0
4.8

P B IC E S A N D

50
1.00 Block
_ do_____ 50
__do_____ 100
___do_ ___ 1,000
.60 Wright 9__ 35

C O M P U T IN G

7.0
5.5
5.3
2.5

BOB

200
200
150
140

B A S IC B A T A

Co. 1:
P.
May 1, 1922-Nov. 14, 1923— Block_____ 50 7.9
Nov. 15, 1923-June 30, 1927__ ____do_____ 50 6.5
July 1, 1927-0ct. 31, 1929____ ____d o ____ 100 5.6
Nov. 1, 1929-Apr. 14, 1932— ____do_____ 1,000 5.0
Apr. 15, 1932-Jan. 31, 1936— Wright9___ 35 4.8

Oi
C
O

T a b l e 8 . — Sum m arized

data used in the computation o f retail prices o f electricity, by com panies, M arch 1923-D ecem ber 1938, inclusive—
Continued
^

■<!

[25 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances]
[40 kilo watt-hours for lighting and household appliances]
[100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigeration]
Net price

25 and 40 kwh

100 kwh

Kwh and rate

City, type of ownership, and
period

Kwh and rate

Customer
charge

Customer
charge

per
Monthly bill for— Average priceof—
kwh for use

PACIFIC—Continued

San Francisco—Continued
Co. 2: Feb. 1923-June 1930—Con.
Mar. 1, 1930-Dec. 31,1935___ Wright I8___

30

Jan. 1, 1936-Jan. 31, 1937— . Block_____
Feb. 1, 1937-Dec. 15, 1938___ ........do—
Co. 1:
P.
July 21, 1920-May 31, 1923.. Block_____
June 1, 1923-June 2, 1935___ ____do_____

June 21, 1982-Aug. 81,
1988.
Seattle

4.5

140

Ct.
Ct. Dol. Dol.
3.5 0.40 0.40 Wright l8_. 30 4.5

140

Ct. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Ct. Ct. Ct.
3.5 0. 40 0.40 1.53 2.10 4.20 6.1 5.3 4.2
1.57 2.16 4.38 6.8 5.4 4.3

40
35

4.0
3.6

200
165

2.5
2.2

.40 Block____
.40 — do..........

40
35

4.0
3.6

200
165

2.5
2.2

45

6.0 Ex.

2.5

.75 Block____
.75 -..d o_____

45
40

6.0
5.5

Ex.
200

.75 Block____

40

5.0

Ct.

40 5.5 200 2.0
June 21, 1932-Aug. 81,
1938
June 3, 1935-Dec. 15, 1938— Block_____ 40 5.0 200 2.0

.40
.40

.40
.40

.40 1.40 2.00 3. 50
.40 1.30 1. 77 3.09

5.6
5.2

5.0
4.4

3.5
3. 1

2.5
2.0

.75 1.50 2.40 4.08
.75 1. 38 2.20 3. 40

6.0
5.5

6.0
5.5

4.1
3. 4

200

2.0

. 75 1. 25 2.00 3.20

6.0
5. 6

6.0
5.5

1.42

2.27 8.50 5.7 5.7
5.0 5.0

Co. 2:38
M.
July 1, 1907-May 31, 1923-__ ____do_____
June 1, 1923-June 2, 1935___ ____do_____

45
40

6.0 Ex.
5. 5 200

2.5
2.0

.75 --_do-------. 75 __do_____

45
40

6.0
5. 5

Ex.
200

2.5
2.0

.75 1.50 2.40 4.10
.75 1.40 2.20 3.40

June 3. 1935-Dec. 15, 1938_.. Block_____

40

5.0

2.0

.75 Block____

40

5.0

200

2.0

.75 1.25 2.00 3.20

June 21, 1982-Aug. 81,
1983

P. indicates private utility; M. municipal plant.




200

Ex. indicates excess kilowatt-hours.

1.44 2.27 3.50 5.8 5.7
5.0 5.0

Dates and prices in italics indicate inclusion of tax (see p. 46)

8.5
3.2
4.1
3.4

3.5
3.2

RETAIL PRICES OE ELECTRICITY

Type of First block Second block
Type of rate First block Secondblock
rate
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv Mini­ 25 40 100 25 40 100
Num­ Rate Num­ Rate Serv­ Mini­
ber
ber
ber
ber
ice mum kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh kwh
ice mum

CHANGES m

Details of rates




BASIC DATA FOR COMPUTING PRICES AND INDEXES

I Rates included limited lamp-renewal services as follows: Boston, Sept. 1, 1922-Aug.
20 Rates for the 2 companies were identical prior to the date of purchase or merger.
31, 1934; Philadelphia, May 1, 1922-Mar. 1, 1933; Chicago, Jan. 1, 1918-Nov. 30, 1932;
21 Beginning Oct. 1, 1935, Milwaukee was served under a “10 for 1” plan. Under this
Cincinnati, Jan. 6, 1921-Aug. 11, 1925; Detroit, July 1, 1922-Dec. 15, 1938; Milwaukee, plan many customers benefited by lower costs for electricity than are shown in the table.
Tan. 13, 1922-June 14, 1935; Kansas City, Jan. 1, 1920-Dec. 15, 1938; and St. Louis, Co. 1, See p. 43 for a description of this plan.
Oct. 31, 1919-Dec. 15, 1938, and Co. 2, Aug. 1,1922-Dec. 15,1938.
22 Combination of “Initial charge” meter rate for first block and Wright demand rate
* Adjustments for cost of fuel were included in the net monthly bills as follows: Boston, based on room-count for second block. The price per kilowatt-hour for the first block
rate for major appliances only, Sept. 1, 1922-Jan. 31, 1924; Providence, Aug. 1, 1922-June was determined by dividing the “Initial charge”, shown as the minimum charge, by the
30, 1927; New York, Co. 1, Dec. 15, 1931-Dec. 15,1938; Co. 2, Mar. 15, 1932-Dec. 15, 1938; number of kilowatt-hours in the first block.
Cos. 3 and 4, Apr. 1, 1922-Dec. 15, 1938; Co. 5, June 25, 1931-Dec._15, 1938.
23 Modified Block Hopkinson schedule with Wright energy charge.
24 Demand charge and minimum charge based on room-count.
3 Rate for major appliances only. The cost of 60 kilowatt-hours was computed under
this rate and the remainder of the 100 kilowatt-hours under the lighting rate. Exceptions:
25 Modified Wright schedule. First block covered by “Initial charge” based on roomFor Birmingham, 70 kilowatt-hours and for Indianapolis, 50 kilowatt-hours were billed count, and subsequent blocks on meter rates. The price per kilowatt-hour for the first
under the rate for major appliances.
block was determined by dividing the “Initial charge”, shown as the minimum charge,
4 A surcharge of 10 percent in Boston and 15 percent in Memphis was included in the by the number of kilowatt-hours in the first block.
prices.
26 This rate applied to the 25 kilowatt-hour service only. The 40 kilowatt-hour service
5 First and second blocks based on floor area.
was billed under a separate schedule consisting of a service charge of $1 per month with
* Modified Wright schedule. First block based on floor area and subsequent blocks on a block meter rate—first 500 kilowatt-hours at 6 cents per kilowatt-hour.
meter rates.
27 Data not available.
7 First and second blocks based on room-count.
28 Combination of minimum bill of $3 under schedule for major appliances, and the
8 “Initial charge” rate. The price per kilowatt-hour for the first block was determined cost of 30 kilowatt-hours under the schedule of rates for lighting.
by dividing the “Initial charge”, shown as the minimum charge, by the number of kilo­
29 The “Initial charge” was subject to a discount for prompt payment amounting to
watt-hours in the first block.
10 percent for Birmingham and 5 percent for Portland, Oreg. (Co. 2) which did not apply
9Modified Wright schedule. First block based on connected load and subsequent to the minimum charge.
30 Minimum charge.
blocks on meter rates.
10 Cos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 merged Aug. 1, 1935. Rates for these companies were identical
31 Minimum charge based on room-count.
after March 1932. Data for the period from March 1932 to August 1935 are shown for the
32 “Initial charge” rate. The amount of the charge was based on room-count. Conse­
quently the price per kilowatt-hour for the first block, which was determined by dividing
companies combined.
the “Initial charge” by the number of kilowatt-hours in the first block, was subject to
II Change in fuel clause.
12 Total charge shall not exceed an amount equal to a maximum rate of 11 cents per variation.
33 Objective rate only was in effect in April 1936.
kilowatt-hour.
13 Total charge shall not exceed an amount equal to a maximum rate of 9 cents per
34 Applicable to 800 kilowatt-hours or less. Customers using more than 800 kilowatthours were billed under a different rate schedule.
kilowatt-hour.
14 Total charge shall not exceed an amount equal to a maximum rate of 8H cents per
35 Modified Block Hopkinson schedule. Demand charge and energy charge based on
room-count.
kilowatt-hour.
18 This rate applied to the 25 kilowatt-hour service only. The 40 kilowatt-hour service 36 Prices are based on the use of 25 kilowatt-hours although the policy of the company
during this period was to render bills on even numbers of kilowatt-hours only.
was billed under the rate schedule outlined for the 100 kilowatt-hour service.
37 Modified Wright schedule. First block covered by “Initial charge” based on con*
18 Meter charge of 75 cents plus demand charge of 80 cents for 1,000 square feet of floor
nected load and subsequent blocks on meter rates. The price per kilowatt-hour for the
area constituted both the service charge and the minimum charge.
17 The number of customers served under rate A gradually decreased, making it rela­ first block was determined by dividing the “Initial charge”, shown as the minimum
tively unimportant after September 1932.
charge, by the number of kilowatt-hours in the first block.
18 Modified Wright schedule. First block based on room-count and subsequent blocks
38 All bills were rounded off to the nearest 5 cents in accordance with billing policy of
on meter rates.
the company.
19 Modified Block Hopkinson schedule. Demand charge and modified Wright energy
charge were based on room-count.

72

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Development of Electric Power and Appliance
Industries, 1923-38 1
Technological and commercial developments in both the electric
light and power industry and in the electric-appliance industry have
had an influence on prices paid by residential purchasers of electricity.
A short resume of these developments illuminates the prices and
indexes presented in this report and allows for a fuller interpretation
of the price changes. The power statistics shown here are for “ all
companies, whether, privately or governmentally owned, which are
engaged in the business of supplying electricity direct to ultimate
customers.” The operations promoted by the Rural Electrification
Administration, the Tennessee Valley Authority, or any governmental
undertaking serving customers directly are included. Purchased
current is not included. Such purchases amounted to about 4 percent
of the total distribution in 1937 and included imports from Canada
and purchases from the Boulder Dam plant of the United States
Reclamation Service.
Complete data for comparative purposes were available only for
the years from 1926 through 1937. During these years, the improve­
ments in techniques and equipment were continuous. The amount
of current generated increased 69.4 percent, with hydroelectric plants
showing a slightly greater increase than those burning fuel. Fuel­
burning plants accounted for 64.4 percent of the total current gen­
erated in 1937 and waterpower for the remainder. For the United
States as a whole, this ratio remained fairly constant during a period
of greatly increased use of current.
The developments in the industry, for the United States as a whole,
were the net result of wide variations in growth among the nine geo­
graphical areas for which data are published. These variations are
shown in table 9 which presents the amount of current generated in
each area in 1937 and percentage of increase over 1926. Not only
are the total increases striking but the relative changes for fuel-burning
plants compared with hydroelectric plants are of particular significance
in view of the development of governmental operations in the South
Atlantic, East South Central, and West South Central areas in the
later years. The proportion of total current generated by fuel­
burning plants in the various areas in 1937 ranged from 16.3 percent
in the Mountain area and 17.0 percent in the Pacific area to 98.1
percent in the West South Central area.

1 Acknowledgment is made to the Edison Electric Institute, “Electrical World,” and “Electrical Mer­
chandising” for the basic statistics from which the tables in 'this section were compiled, with particular
reference to E. E. I. Stat. Bull. No. 5, and the issue of the Electrical World for January 1938.




73

ELECTRIC POWER AND APPLIANCE INDUSTRIES

T able

9 . — C u r r e n t g e n e r a te d b y elec tric lig h t a n d p o w e r i n d u s t r y i n the U n i t e d S ta te s
a n d i n each re g io n a l a re a i n 1 9 8 7 , a n d p e r c e n ta g e o f in c r e a s e over 1 9 2 6 f o r ea ch
a rea

Current generated by-

Total current
generated
Area

Fuel

Waterpower

Percent­
Percent­
Percent­
Kwh in age of Kwh in age of Kwh in age of
1937 increase 1937 increase 1937 increase
over 1926
over 1926
over 1926

Millions

United States_________________________ 115,166
New England______________________
7, 436
Middle Atlantic_______________________ 28, 608
East North Central____________________ 28,175
West North Central_____________ ____ _ 7, 520
South Atlantic_______ --- ____________ 13, 683
East South Central____ _______ ____ _
5,083
West South Central. ______ ________
6, 358
Mountain____________________________
4, 305
Pacific__________________ ____________ 13, 998

69.4
65.0
62.3
62.5
74.7
96.8
98.9
142.3
30.7
59.4

Millions
74,206

68.1
47.8
67.9
67.8
95.5
37.1
48.2
137. 2
131.7
34.2

4, 266
20, 635
25, 915
5,666
6,787
1, 582
6,109
1. 240
2,005

Millions
40, 959
3,170
7,973
2, 260
1,854
6,896
3, 500
249
3, 065
11,993

71.8
95.7
49.5
19.1
31.8
244.5
135.5
408.8
11.1
64.5

The wholesale price of electricity is based in large part upon the
cost of production and transmission and prices are fixed for large
blocks of consumption sold for commercial use. The retail price is
effective only for sales of comparatively small amounts of current
and is maintained at higher levels than the wholesale price. It is
claimed that this price differential is due to the greater cost of market­
ing and serving a larger number of customers at retail with a com­
paratively small consumption per customer. The relatively higher
cost of electricity for residential use is indicated by the fact that
while this class of customers consumed only 17 percent of the current
sold in 1937, it furnished 34 percent of the companies’ revenues.
The average revenue per kilowatt-hour was 4.4 cents. On the other
hand, the large industrial concerns purchased 54 percent of the current
sold at prices which provided 28 percent of the total revenue. The
revenue per kilowatt-hour for this group amounted to 1.1 cents.
The position of the small commercial customers was in-between.

T able

10 . —

N u m b e r o f c u s t o m e r s , w ith p e r c e n ta g e d i s t r ib u t io n o f k ilo w a t t -h o u r s so ld
a n d r e v e n u e , b y c la ss o f s e r v ic e , D e c e m b e r S ly 1 9 3 7

Percentage distri­
bution

Customers
Class of service
Number
Farm_______________________________________________
Residential___ _______ __________ _ ____________
Commercial:
Small___________________________________________
Large..- _____________ ______________________
All others------------------------------- --------------------------------Total__________________________________________
139863°— 39------ 6




Thousands
1, 241
21, 697
3,892
260
74
27,165

Percent­ Kilowattage of hours sold Revenue
total
4.6
79.9
14.3
.9
.3
100.0

2.4
17.0
17.7
53.8
9.1
100.0

3.1
34.0
27.7
28.2
7.0

100.0

74

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

That the growth of the industry was not confined to the sale of
current for commercial purposes is indicated in table 11 which shows
the increase in sales of current for urban household use. The number
of residential customers increased 35 percent between 1926 and 1937,
the total sales of current in kilowatt-hours increased 151 percent,
and the sales of current per customer, advanced 85 percent. Total
revenue rose 58 percent. The companies state that improved service
and higher costs of production absorbed a large part of this increase in
revenue. This statement seems to be borne out by the fact that the
increase in revenue per customer was much smaller, 16 percent.
During the same period, the average unit cost per customer was
reduced 37 percent. A considerable portion of this unit decrease
was the result of a greater use of current for appliances at rates well
below those charged for lighting alone and available to customers
with sufficient purchasing power to take advantage of them.

T able

11.—

U r b a n r e s id e n tia l serv ice— a vera g e n u m b e r o f c u s t o m e r s , s a le s , a n d
r e v e n u e i n 1 9 2 6 a n d 1 9 3 7 a n d re la tiv e n u m b e r s f o r s p e c ifie d y e a r s

Year

Average Kilowatt- Per cus­
Revenue
number hours
tomer Total Average per kilo­
of cus­
sales of revenue annual wattsold
bill
tomers
current
hour

Thou­
sands Millions

1926_______ ____ - _____________________ 15, 714
1937_____________ ___________ _________ 21, 276

6,727
16,875

Kwh

Thou­
sands

428 $469, 272
793 740, 219

$29.87
34.81

Cents

6.98
4. 39

Relative to 1926
1927___________________________________
1929___________________________________
1931___________________________________
1933___________________________________
1936___________________________________
1937___________________________________

108
122
125
121
128
135

112
142
169
169
201
251

104
117
135
139
157
185

109
128
139
133
144
158

101
105
111
109
112
116

97
90
82
79
71
63

The 51 cities for which indexes were computed contain a high per­
centage of the total urban population in each of nine geographical
areas. This fact gives added value to the information in table 12
which shows, by areas, for 1937 the percentage of total residential
sales of current and of the resulting revenue together with the average
unit revenue in cents. It is interesting to note that the Pacific area,
with the lowest revenue per unit of sales, provided for 29.3 percent
of the total production of electric power.




75

ELECTRIC POWER AND APPLIANCE INDUSTRIES

T able

1 2 . — U rban residential sales , total revenue , and revenue 'per kilow a tt-hour f o r
the U n ited States and each regional area in 1 9 3 7

Sales in kilowatthours

Revenue
per kilo­
watthour
Thousands Percent­ Thousands Percent­ (cents)
of dollars
of kwh
age
age

Area
United States__ ___________ _________________
New England_________ ______________________
Middle Atlantic________________ __________
East North Central-- ______________________
West North Central.. ___________ ___________
South Atlantic_________________ _______ ..
East South Central_______________ _________
West South Central____________ _______ _____
Mountain. _______________ _________ _______
Pacific_________________ ________ __________

16,875
1,283
4,145
4,150
1, 533
1,621
650
826
474
2,193

100.0
7.6
24.6
24.6
9.1
9.6
3.8
4.9
2.8
13.0

Total revenue

740, 219
66,093
205, 397
169,043
70, 618
67, 229
23,991
43,225
21,510
73,114

100.0
8.9
27.8
22.8
9.5
9.1
3.2
5.8
3.0
9.9

4.39
5.15
4.96
4.07
4. 61
4.15
3. 69
5. 23
4. 54
3. 33

Electric appliances are revenue builders for the light and power
industry. The appliance industry is comparatively new except for
the production of light bulbs. Some appliances, such as flatirons
and vacuum cleaners, had come into general use prior to 1923, but
sales continued to increase. Other appliances, notably radios,
refrigerators, and large heat-generating equipment, were developed
later. The electric or socket radio was largely developed after 1926.
The method of retailing makes it impossible to show exact figures for
the number of appliances sold and replacements made. The estimated
number of each of eight major appliances in use in 1926 and 1937 are
shown in table 13, together with relative numbers for specified years.

T a b l e 13. —

E stim a tes o f the n u m ber o f each o f 8 m a jor electric a p p lia n ces
use in 1 9 2 6 and 1 9 3 7 , and increase in their use f o r in terven in g yea rs.

Year

Flatirons

Vacuum
cleaners

Washing
machines

Toasters

in

Ironing
Radios 1 Refriger­ mac' ._,es Ranges
ators

390,000 280,000 480,000
1926........ 12,800,000 5.900,000 4, 250,000 4,000,000 405,000
1937........ 21, 250, 000 11,133, 000 12, 646,000 12,077,000 5,443,000 11, 271,000 1,353,000 2,054,000
Percentage relative to 1926
194
123
116
113
125
1927____
119
118
100
314
131
133
171
151
1928........
138
135
567
1,034
474
183
144
146
1929........
155
183
207
154
209
206
894
673
243
156
169
1930____
897
228
154
158
180
206
793
259
1931____
184
1,103
264
157
209
230
1932____
153
598
164
742
1, 256
286
240
205
228
1933____
150
1,544
262
323
168
222
240
747
153
1934____
174
264
1,859
303
244
369
963
156
1935____
182
2,308
426
363
286
271
1, 471
159
1936____
302
2,890
1,344
483
429
189
166
298
1937____
2

1 Based on sales. Number in use not available.
* 1927—sales of socket radios negligible prior to 1927.
Source: Electrical Merchandising, January 1938.
In 1937, there was an estimated saturation of over 100 percent for
flatirons and radios indicating an almost universal use of these appli­
ances. For certain appliances such as vacuum cleaners and refrigera-




76

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OE ELECTRICITY

tors, the saturation was estimated at about 50 percent. For the
appliances developed in later years, a wide market was still available
before a high percentage of saturation was reached. For the eight
appliances shown in table 13, the approximate percentage of satura­
tion in 1937 was as follows:

Percent

Percent

Flatirons_____________________ 103 Radios_______________________ 106
Vacuum cleaners_____________
50 Refrigerators________________
50
Washing machines____________ 49 Ironing machines____________
6
8
Toasters_______________________
47 Ranges_______________________

Engineering efficiency in the electric appliance industry kept pace
with sales promotion. Increased efficiency for electric-light bulbs and
flatirons contributed to better service rather than to a reduction of the
kilowatt-hour requirements. For other appliances, engineering de­
velopments reduced the cost to the consumer. This is well illus­
trated in the case of the refrigerator, where increased efficiency low­
ered the annual kilowatt-hour requirements from 750 in 1925 to 650 in
1930 and to 420 in 1937. The estimated number of kilowatt-hours
required annually from 1932 to 1937, inclusive, is shown in table 14 for
eight appliances.
There was an increase of about 25 percent in the efficiency of elec­
tric lamps between 1923 and 1937, due in large measure to the intro­
duction of gas-filled lamps in 1926. The tendency has been to make
available a wide range of bulbs of varying and increasing wattage.
This allows choice to meet the customer demand with reference both
to the amount of light desired and to the consumption of current.
Statistical data for light bulbs comparable with data for other
appliances were not available.

T able

14.— Estim ated number o f kilowatt-hours required annually fo r 8 electric
appliances, 1 9 3 2-8 7

Year
1932_______________
1933_______________
1934_______________
1935_______________
1936_______________
1937_______________

Flat­
irons
50
50
50
80
80
80

Vacuum Washing Toasters Radios
cleaners machines
36
36
36
24
24
24

24
24
24
30
30
30

50
50
50
30
30
30

90
85
75
100
100
100

Refrig­ Ironing
erators machines Ranges
600
575
535
480
450
420

125
125
125
125
125
125

1,750
1,750
1,750
1,500
1,350
1,200

The increase in the number of residential customers served by the
light and power industry and the larger sales and increased efficiency
of electric appliances accounted in large part for the upward trend
in consumption of electricity by householders. The more widespread
use of promotional rates invited still greater consumption at lowered
cost to the consumer. These factors, together with other powerful
influences, contributed to the marked decrease in the price of current
for residential use in the later years covered by this report.




COLLECTION OF ELECTRICITY DATA

77

The developments indicated in this section, the variations in climate
among the 51 cities, and the differences in customer requirements made
it impossible to determine the kind or number of appliances used by
customers having a monthly consumption of 25, 40, or 100 kilowatthours which were chosen as typical for the purpose of computing the
prices presented in this bulletin.

History of the Collection of Electricity Data by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics
The regular collection of data relating to prices of electricity for
household use was begun by the Bureau in 1917-19 as a part of the
extensive cost-of-living study conducted in those years. Prices and
rate schedules for 32 cities, 19 beginning with December 1914, and 13
beginning with December 1917, as secured in this survey, formed the
nucleus of the Bureau’s records.
The collection of rate schedules by cost-of-living agents in connec­
tion with prices of other commodities and services was continued
through 1920. In May 1921 the work was transferred to the Retail
Price Division and the number of cities was increased from 32 to 51
to include the 19 additional cities covered for reports on retail prices
of food, coal, and gas. Since that time, data have been secured by
mail, supplemented when necessary by personal visits of agents.
A record of residential rates, beginning with December 1913, was
secured in 1923 for each of the 51 reporting cities listed on page 3.
This provided a continuity of price information and also a comparison
with 1913 which was the base period used for computing indexes of
retail prices of food, coal, and gas. Table 15 presents a record of the
dates and frequency of collections of rate schedules for 1913 to 1938,
inclusive.

T able

15.— Frequency o f collection 1 of residential rate schedules fo r electricity,
1 9 1 8-3 8

Year

Frequency of collection

Year

Frequency of collection

1913-17____
1918-20____
1921_____
1922-24____
1925-33____

Annually: Dec. 15.
Semiannually: June 15 and Dec. 15.
May 15, Sept. 15, and Dec. 15.
Quarterly: Mar. 15, June 15, Sept. 15,
and Dec. 15.
Semiannually: June 15 and Dec. 15.

1934______
1935______
1936______
1937-38____

June 15 and Nov. 15.
Feb. 15, July 15, and Oct. 15.
Jan. 15, Apr. 15, July 15, Sept. 15, and
Dec. 15.
Quarterly: Mar. 15, June 15, Sept. 15,
and Dec. 15.

i As of each collection date. A complete record was obtained of all changes for the intervening period.
P u b lic a tio n o j electricity rate schedu les , 1 9 1 3 - 3 4 .— Prior to June 1922,
electricity rate schedules were not published but were used exclusively
for determining changes for the cost-of-living study. Rate schedules
effective through June 1922 were first published for 19 cities beginning
with December 1914 and for 13 cities beginning with December 1917
in the August 1922 issues of Retail Prices and the Monthly Labor




78

CHANGES IN RETAIL PRICES OF ELECTRICITY

Review. Early in 1923 records for December 1913 forward, which
had been secured for each of the 51 cities, were presented in the
August 1923 issues of the above publications, and current reports
for all reporting periods through June 1934 were published regularly
thereafter. These data through 1928 have also been included in the
annual bulletins on retail prices.
Only one rate schedule was presented for each city. Where more
than one was available for residential customers, the schedule under
which the majority of the customers were served was shown. No
attempt was made to present rate schedules in their entirety as many
were designed to include commercial or industrial as well as residential
customers. Rates covering the amount of current used by the average
family, and all important regulations pertaining thereto were shown
in published reports.
P r ic e s o j electricity j o r specified services, 1 9 3 4 - 8 8 .— In November 1934
a new method of presenting electricity data was inaugurated. Net
monthly bills and prices per kilowatt-hour for four typical residential
services were computed and published for each of 51 cities for Decem­
ber 1933 forward. Prices for 250 kilowatt-hours for the use of elec­
tricity for lighting, small appliances, refrigerator, and range have been
computed for quarterly periods since November 1934. For three
services, 25 and 40 kilowatt-hours for lighting and small appliances and
100 kilowatt-hours for lighting, appliances, and refrigerator, prices
which have been computed for March 1923 through December 1938
form the basis of the indexes by cities and for 51 cities combined which
are presented in this bulletin. Details relating to methods of com­
puting prices for all four services appear on pages 37 to 46.
A record of the publication of electricity rate schedules, and of costs
and average prices for each of four services are shown in table 16.

T able

16.— P ublication o f data relating to electricity used fo r domestic purposes,
19 1 3-3 8

December 1913-June 1934, inclusive. Rate schedules by cities
Bulletin number1

Periods covered

334...........................
366_______________
396_______________
418_______________
445_______________
464_______________
495_______________
Retail Prices______

Dec. 15, 1914-Dec. 15, 1922.
Dec. 15,1913-Dec. 15, 1923.
Dec. 15, 1913-Dec. 15, 1924.
Dec. 15, 1913-Dec. 15, 1925.
Dec. 15,1913 and June 15,1925-Dec. 15,1926.
Dec. 15, 1913 and June 15, 1926-Dec. 15, 1927.
Dec. 15, 1913 and June 15, 1927-Dec. 15, 1928.
1928-34. Current reports and partial data for
earlier years were published for each report­
ing period.

December 1933 - December 1938
average prices by cities for 4
domestic services
Current reports have been pub­
lished in the following issues of
Retail Prices
1934: December.
1935: February.
July.
October.
1936: January.
April.
July.
December.
1937-38: March.
June.
September.
December.

1 Current reports were published in Retail Prices and in the Monthly Labor Review. Retail Prices
is a reprint from the Monthly Labor Review. Prior to February 1928 reports for each month were shown
in the issues dated 2 months later. Beginning with February 1928, Retail Prices carried the date of the
current report.




COLLECTION OF ELECTRICITY DATA

79

P r ic e s o f electricity f o r the cost-of-liv in g s tu d y , 1 9 1 3 - 3 8 .—Electricity
rate schedules are used in the preparation of quarterly reports on
changes in cost of living for the United States and each of 32 cities.
Average prices per kilowatt-hour computed as a part of the fuel and
light subgroup for each city are based on the average family consump­
tion for the individual city, and therefore do not provide a basis for
comparison between cities. These prices have not been published.
In 1924, the average prices for the 32 cities were combined as simple
averages, and indexes (1913 — 100) were computed therefrom for show­
ing price changes for the United States. These indexes have since
been published for all reporting periods from December 1913 through
June 1934.




o


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102