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1968

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BULLETIN

U..S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
W IL L A R D W IR T Z , S E C R E T A R Y

NO. 1601

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
BEN BURDETSKY, ACTING COMMISSIONER
OCTOBER 1968

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 — Price 70 cents







PREFACE
The Capital Flow Matrix, 1958, is a product of the research carried out by the Interagency
Growth Project. The work on capital flows was done in the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Division of
Economic Growth, by Jack Alterman and Ronald E, Kutscher, assisted by Robert L. Ball and
Arlene K. Shapiro.
The Office of Business Economics, U.S. Department of Commerce, made significant contri­
butions to this work, not only in making basic data available, but also through helpful comments
and suggestions.




iii

CONTENTS
Concepts and d e fin itio n .....................................................................................................................
Relationship to national accounts ..............................................................................................
U s e s ............................................................................................................................................................
Techniques and m ethods ..................................................................................................................
Capital flow s, 1958 ...............................................................................................................................
L im ita tio n s...............................................................................................................................................
Appendix ..................................................................................................................................................

PAGE
1
3
5
6
7
9
31

Tables:
1. Capital flow s, 1958, by m ajor industry group,
producers* v a lu e s ........................................................................................................
2. Capital flow s, 1958, by m ajor industry g r o u p
(percent distribution by consum ing industry) ...........................................
3. Capital flow s, 1958, by m ajor industry group
(percent distribution by producing industry) .......................................
4. D irect and indirect em ploym ent im pact of $1
B illion Capital investm ent, selected
in d u s t r ie s ........................................................................................................................
A -l Capital flow s, 1958, producers* value ..................................................................
A -2 Capital flow s, 1958, percent distribution by
consuming in d u s tr y .....................................................................................................
A -3 Capital flow s, 1958, percent distribution by
producing industry .....................................................................................................




1
17
23
29
43
53
63

CAPITAL FLOW MATRIX, 1958
The purpose of this capital flow matrix is
to carry the interindustry flows of the 1958
input-output table by the Office of Business
Economics 1 / one step further by showing the
transactions of capital goods among producing
and using industries. In a conventional inputoutput table the output of each industry is dis­
tributed to each of the intermediate industries
of the economy as well as to final demand, e.g.,
consumer expenditures. The output of capital
goods industries destined for domestic busi­
ness capital investment, however, is not distri­
buted to the industries actually purchasing the
capital goods but to a single final demand
category covering “gross private domestic
fixed capital formation.” The capital flow
matrix is therefore a logical extension which
traces the transaction between capital produc­
ing and capital consuming industries.

were produced domestically or manufactured
abroad. 4 / It includes the trade and transpor­
tation cost of delivery to the purchaser and
pipelines, and communication lines. Residen­
tial construction as well as commission on all
real estate transactions was not distributed to
purchasing industries in the capital flow matrix,
although in concept they are included.
3/ Equipment included in the capital flow
matrix covers large machinery items usually
associated with business investment such
as c o n s t r u c t i o n machinery; metalworking
machines; special industry machines such as
textile industries or printing trade machines;
computers and o t h e r business machines
including typewriters and adding machines;
large material handling equipment such as
hoists; e l e c t r i c generating equipment; air­
planes; trucks; and railroad equipment. Other
items included in the capital flow matrix,
but which usually may not be associated
with business investment are carpets, desks,
c h a i r s , filing cabinets, and other office
furniture; stoves, refrigerators, and food prep_aration e q u i p m e n t used by restaurants;
business use of automobiles including fleet
operations and automobile expenditures by
doctors, lawyers, and other self-employed
individuals; and many smaller implements,
tools, and instruments used by the private
sector. A fuller description of all items
included can be found in the appendix.
& / The capital flow table contains a row called
imports among the capital producing sectors. In
the treatment of imports within the 1958 inputoutput study, this import row would include only
imported capital goods allocated directly to
gross private capital formation. However, it does
not cover all of the imported capital goods, since
most are transferred to the comparable domestic
intermediate industry. The allocation from this
industry is made to final demand without desig­
nating the proportion that comes from imports
and the proportion that comes from domestic
production.

Concepts and Definitions
The capital purchases covered in the capital
flow matrix are conceptually consistent with the
definition of capital expenditures used in the
national income and product accounts as well as
that used for the interindustry transactions
table for 1958 prepared by the Office of Busi­
ness Economics. This definition includes net
plant 2 / and equipment 3/ purchases by the
private sector of the economy for the year
1958, regardless of whether the capital goods
Morris R. Goldman, Martin L„ Marimont,
and Beatrice N. Vaccara, “Interindustry Struc­
ture of the United States for 1958,” Survey of
Current Business, November 1964; also Survey
of Current Business, August and September 1965.
2/ The plant included in the capital flow ma­
trix is all new construction as well as major
alterations and additions by the private sector.
This includes residential construction, nonresidential buildings such as offices, industrial
buildings, stores, churches, private schools, and
private hospitals, and other nonbuilding con­
struction such as private electric power, gas
1/




1

Interm ediate T ransactions
(in p u t-o u tp u t flow ta b le )
\

Consuming
in d u stry
Producing
in d u stry
Industry
In d u stry
In d u stry
In d u stry

1 ...
2 ...
3 ...
4 ...

F in al
Demand

Gross
p riv a te
Indus­ Indus­ Indus­ Indus­ c a p ita l
try
forma­
try
try
try
tio n
2
3
4
1
2
2
3
2

1
1
2
1

0
1
1
4

4
4
1
1

4
0
0
3

C ap ital Flow M atrix
\
Output

Producing \
in d u stry

GNP
7

Value
ad d ed .. . . . .

2

3

1

1

O utput..............

11

8

7

T otal
Indus­ Indus­ Indus­ Indus­ c a p ita l
try
try
try
try
produced
2
4
3
1

1 ...
2 ...
3 ...
4 ...

1
0
0
1

0
0
0
2

2
0
0
0

1
0
0
0

4
0
0
3

T otal
c a p ita l
consumed . . . .

2

2

2

1

7

Industry
Industry
In d u stry
Industry

11
8
7
11

11




Consuming
in d u stry

2

fied within these sectors. In industries or lines
of capital where extensive leasing is prevalent,
this capital is shown in the capital flow matrix
in the using rather than owning industries,
particularly in relation to computers, con­
struction equipment, and railroad cars.

installation cost wherever applicable. In addi­
tion, the definition includes the transportation
and trade cost for transaction on used capital
goods as well as real estate commissions on
the sale of plant. 5/ It excludes, on the other
hand, purchases by domestic corporations for
use in overseas subsidiaries, any equipment
purchased by the Federal Government or by
State and local governments, and exports of
capital goods. It does not cover the value of
land in any transactions, liquid assets of any
form, 6/ and inventory accumulation. However,
it does cover all capital purchases by the
private sectors of the economy including non­
profit institutions, private universities, and
hospitals.

Relationship to National Accounts
The capital flow matrix can be viewed as an
addition or extension of two existing sets of
national accounts. These are the income and
product accounts and the input-output system
of flows of goods and services. Perhaps the
extension can be viewed in this simple form
which assumes gross private capital is the only
measure of final demand. See opposite page.

The industry definitions used in the capital
flow matrix are identical to the 1958 interin­
dustry sales and purchases industry categories.
In the Office of Business Economics inputoutput study, there are 82 producing and 82
consuming industries. In the capital flow
matrix, there are 36 producing industries
(inasmuch as all industries do not produce
capital) and 77 purchasing industries, i j To
be consistent with the treatment of industries
within the Office of Business Economics study,
the capital purchases represent purchases by
establishments rather than companies classi5/ There are several items which con­
ceptually are part of gross private domistic in­
vestment and whicn are shown in the totals
columns as well as in the 1958 Office of Busi­
ness Economics input-output matrix but are not
distributed to a consuming industry in the capital
flow table. These include commission on real
estate transactions, transactions in buildings
between final users, and changes in net stocks
of used goods.
§ ] Excluded also is capital consumed on cur­
rent account which is no longer considered cap­
ital in the national accounts.
T j The Office of Business Economics inputoutput study has 87 industries of which 82 are




3

Input-Output Tables. The first section of the
preceding chart illustrates an interindustry
transactions table with four producing and four
consuming industries. By reading across the
rows of the input-output table for any industry,
the sales of its output to each industry, includ­
ing itself, can be seen. In addition, the chart
shows the sales from this industry to final
demand. (Shown here as gross private capital
formation, excluding any purchases by the other
final purchasers-consumers, government or
foreign.) For instance, it can be seen, by
reading across the row, that industry 1 sells

Intermediate industries. Only the intermediate
industries are considered in the capital flow
matrix. The 5 intermediate sectors which do not
consume capital are interindustry sales and purchases(ISP) 80, imports; ISP 81 and 82 which are
dummy sectors; and ISP 78 and 79, Federal and
State and local enterprises, the capital purchases
of which, in the national income accounts, areL
treated as general government purchases and are
shown as final demand purchases.

In the input-output table capital investment
purchases are shown only as purchases by
gross private capital formation from the capital
producing sectors. Any sales by the capital
producing industries to other industries rep­
resent only repair parts. Therefore, the
marketing pattern among the various indus­
tries purchasing capital goods are not avail­
able. These marketing patterns do become
apparent in a capital flow matrix.

two units of its output of 11 to itself, it sells
one unit to industry 2, no units to industry
3, and four units to industry 4. Its sales
to final demand (or gross private capital
formation) are four units completing its 11
units of output.
The input-output flow table also can be read
down the columns. The columns show purchases
by an industry from each industry, including
itself. Again, for illustration, by examining
column 1, the inputs (or costs) to industry 1 can
be determined. For industry 1 to produce its
output, requires inputs of two units from itself,
two units from industry 2, three units from
industry 3, and two units from industry 4. Its
costs include purchases from value added (two
units); this represents industry l ’s expendi­
tures for employee compenstation, deprecia­
tion, proprietors’ income, indirect business
taxes, and profits. The 11 units of inputs for
industry 1 equal the 11 units of output as do
the output and input for each of the other indus­
tries. The final entry at the bottom of each
column and at the end of each row is the total
output or input for that industry. 8/

Capital Flow Tables. The final portion of
the chart shows the relationship between the
capital flow table and an input-output table
where capital allocated from an industry
to gross private capital formation becomes
the control total for capital produced by this
industry in a capital flow matrix. By reading
across the rows of the capital flow matrix,
just as in a conventional input-output matrix,
the sales of capital producing industries to
each of the capital purchasing industries can
be determined. To continue the example for
industry 1 described in the section on inputoutput, the four units of industry 1 output
allocated to gross private capital formation
represents the capital production control total
for industry l ’s in the capital flow matrix.
The d i s t r i b u t i o n of these four units of
capital production can be seen from row 1 of
the capital matrix as follows: one unit to itself,
no units to industry 2, two units to industry 3,
and one unit to industry 4.

8/ The input-output illustration above of input-output transactions table shows actual trans­
actions between purchasing and producing indus­
tries. Input-output data, however, usually are
presented in three separate tables. In addition
to the transactions table which is usually table 1,
the second table presents direct requirements
per dollar of output for each industry. These
relationships which are called input-output co­
efficients or technical coefficients are deter­
mined by dividing the dollar value of each
industry’s input by the dollar value of its output.
The third table in the usual presentation of
input-output data is the total requirements table.
The total requirements table, or inverse ma­
trix, is the algebraic solution of the direct re­
quirements or t e c h n i c a l coefficients. The
inverse matrix allows one to calculate the total
(direct and indirect) impact of a change in demand
for one industry’s product on all industries in
the economy.




In a similar fashion, the column in the capital
flow matrix shows purchases of each of the
capital consuming industries from the capital
producing industries. For industry 1, the
column shows the distribution of its capital
purchases among the capital producing indus­
tries. Thus, for industry 1 of the two units of
capital that it purchases, one unit comes from
itself and one unit from industry 4. It can be
seen from this example, that there are several
obvious differences between a capital flow ma­
trix and an input-output table. First, the sum
of the rows in a capital matrix for an industry
does not necessarily equal the sum of the col­
umn as was the case in an input-output table.
4

Second, not all industries in a capital flow
matrix are producers of capital; in the inputoutput matrix all industries are producers. 9 j
Finally, a capital flow table does not have an al­
location to final demand or value added as do
industries in the input-output system. However,
just as in an input-output table, the rows of the
capital flow matrix can be thought of as the
marketing patterns of each type of capital
produced. Similarly, the columns of the capital
flow matrix show the distribution of that indus­
try’s capital purchases among the capital
producing industries.
Uses
The development of the capital flow matrix
for 1958 was primarily for use in the Inter­
agency Growth Project. 10/ In thiS project it
was used to determine a distribution of capital
by producing industry consistent with the rela­
tive industry growth rates. In this procedure,
the major changes in capital input patterns
such as increased use of computers andinstruments were projected to 1970. To yi^eld an
estimated capital distribution by producing
industry, derived estimates of capital by con­
suming industry were applied to the projected
1970 capital coefficients, thus deriving a level
of capital production for each capital producing
industry. This derived estimate of capital by
producing industry was used as a means of
modifying the initial estimates of capital by
producing industry in the 1970 final demand
bills of goods.
Another possible use of the capital flow
matrix is to analyze the varying marketing
patterns of capital goods industries. This is
difficult with the conventional input-output
tables since, in these tables, capital goods
industries intermediate sales are only repair
parts and the capital items are shown as pur­
chases from the final demand sectors. With
the capital flow matrix, however, a marketing
pattern for capital producing industries can be

found similiar to the one for noncapital produc­
ing industries found in the conventional inputoutput tables.
Labor Requirements
Table 4 illustrates an additional use of the
capital flow tables. This table shows the direct
and indirect employment impact of one billion
dollars of capital investment in seven selected
industries. These estimates are derived by
using the capital input pattern for these indus­
tries in the 1958 capital flow matrix and apply­
ing each in turn to an interindustry employment
table. 11/ In this way, not only are the direct
employment requirements estimated but also
the indirect employment. Direct employment
would be the employment required to fabricate
a capital good, such as a metalworking machine,
in its final stage of manufacture. All of this
employment, therefore, would be in the metal­
working machine manufacturing industry. In­
direct labor, on the other hand, would include
all other employment required to produce a
given capital good. For a capital good such as
a metalworking machine, indirect labor would
include that employed by the suppliers of raw
materials such as steel, iron ore, nonferrous
metals, as well as the employment required in
the utilities, advertising, and other service
industries which contribute indirectly to the
production of a metalworking machine.
The industries covered by table 4 were se­
lected so that a wide variety of capital consump­
tion patterns would be included. It can be seen
however, that the total labor impact of a billion
dollars of capital expenditures in each of these
industries is in a relatively narrow range of
jobs (98-111,000). However, the range of the
impact on individual industries can be quite
not, in fact, have output in the more conventional
use of the term.
10/ See BLS Bulletin 1536, Projections 1970:
Interindustry Relationships, Potential Demand,
Employment.
11/ Jack Alterman, “Interindustry Employ­
ment Requirements," Monthly Labor Review,
July 1965, pp. 841-850.

9/ There are exceptions to t h i s in mbst
input-output tables where certain special pur­
pose industries such as dummy industries may




5

pronounced. This range is revealed by an ex­
amination of the various industries listed in
table 4. For example, in the new construction
industry, between 1,792 and 31,172 jobs are
required for one billion dollars of investment
in these selected industries. A good reason foi
this range can be found from the capital flow
table A -l. It can be seen that investment in the
new construction industries is largely for
equipment; thus it would follow that a small
proportion of its employment impact would be
in the construction industry. On the other hand,
a high proportion of the investment by the
medical, educational and nonprofit sector is for
new construction, explaining its high employ­
ment requirements from the new construction
industry.
Several other industries can be highlighted
for the different impact that the various invest­
ment patterns have. Investment by the farm
sector has a large impact on the farm mach­
inery industry and a very small one on all
others. The construction machinery industry
is affected greatly by investment in the con­
struction industry, but only moderately by the
other selected industries’ investment. Invest­
ment by the iron and steel manufacturing indus­
try on the metalworking machinery has a
sizable effect on the metalworking machinery
industry, but much smaller impact is felt from
the other selected industries. The employment
impact of investment by the food and kindred
products industries and the medical, educa­
tional and nonprofit sector is more widely dis­
tributed among a large number of industries.
This example of the employment impact of
investment illustrates another use of the
capital flow tables. It is planned that at some
future date the 1963 capital patterns for all of
the industries will be translated into the em­
ployment requirements.
Techniques and Methods
The basic source of the capital production
data by industry is the Census of Manufactures;
additional estimates are by the Office of Busi­
ness Economics. These data included not only




6

the level of capital production by industry but
sufficient supplementary detail, in many cases,
to work with product detail rather than sector
aggregates. The procedure followed in allocat­
ing capital production to the consuming indus­
tries was varied. The detailed estimates of
products within each capital producing sector
were allocated separately where such detail
existed, and a method could be found to allocate
separately each product. For example, in farm
machinery (ISP 44), not much is gained by al­
locating separately most of the farm mach­
inery, such as discs or harrows, since alarge
portion of all types of farm equipment goes
directly to the farm sector. On the other hand,
the product detail available in the special
machinery category (ISP 48) was particularly
relevant, since it separated this sector’s al­
location to investment into such items as tex­
tile industry machines, food products industry
machinery, and chemical industry machinery.
Thus, the method of allocation of capital to
consuming sectors and the detail in which it was
allocated varied, depending on the type of
equipment to be distributed and information
available to make this preliminary distribu­
tion. For some types of equipment, such as
computers and metalworking machinery, data
existed on the industrial distributions of exist­
ing stock of this type of equipment which was
used for the initial distributions. For other
types of equipment, such as typewriters, office
machines, and certain types of scientific and
professional equipment, the preliminary dis­
tribution was made using an industrial distri­
bution of the occupations or professions closely
associated with this equipment. In many cases
the type of machine determined the initial
allocation; for instance, textile industry mach­
ines were distributed to the textile industry
(largely ISP 16), cigarette and cigar-making
machines to the tobacco manufacturing industry
(ISP 15). For a few types of capital equipment,
a distribution was made based on the distri­
bution of an industry’s output. The distribution
of electrical generating equipment followed
such an approach where ah industrial distribu­
tion of electricity generated was used. An
industrial distribution of nonproduction work-

Manufactures; Census of Mineral Industries;
and the Survey of Capital Expenditures, pre­
pared by the Office of Business Economics and
the Security and Exchange Commission. An
investigation of large disparities between these
sources and the initial estimates from the
capital flow matrix was made and, wherever
possible, the differences were reconciled.
Because of conceptual and coverage differ­
ences, it was not possible in every case to
make complete reconciliations. In sectors
where two independent estimates of capital
investment existed, the one which conceptually
was closer to the definition of that industry in
the capital flow matrix generally was accepted.
Where no estimate existed, an independent
estimate was made. After a control total of
capital expenditures by consuming industry
was decided upon and a method arrived at for
distributing each type of capital equipment
produced, the capital flow table was then
brought into final balance.

ers was used to distribute purchases of office
furniture and carpets and rugs, since these are
the employees most likely to be using this
equipment. In many cases, of course, the initial
distribution of equipment to consuming industry
was based on judgment. (See appendix for a
fuller description of methods.)
The distribution of new construction or plant
could be made in many instances based on end
use of construction, i.e., hospital going to the
medical sector (77), utility construction to
electric, water, gas and sanitary services (68),
and social and recreational construction to the
amusements sector (76). Industrial construc­
tion was distributed among the manufacturing
sectors by using a distribution of plant expen­
ditures by industry obtained from the Census
of Manufactures.
After all equipment and plant had been dis­
tributed to a consuming sector by the best meth­
od which could be found, totals were derived for
each consuming sector. These totals of capital
investment by consuming industry were com­
pared with other sources of information on
investment by industry, such as Census of

Capital Flows, 1958
Capital purchases by major sector are shown
in the following tabulation:

Capital expenditures b y purchasing sector, 1958
,

Equipment

Plant

42,192

25,047

17,145

Agriculture, forestry,
and fishery................

4,544

3,156

1,388

Mining .......................

3,326

1,251

2,075

Construction ................

963

933

30

Manufacturing................

9,686

6,475

3,211

Transportation, communi­
cations and public
utilities
................

10,969

5,754

5,215

.......................

4,696

3,263

1,433

All other.....................

8,008

4,215

3,793

Sector
Total.........................

Trade




Total

7

This tabulation shows the amount of capital
purchases by each of the seven major sectors
distributed between expenditures for plant and
for equipment. This information is a summary
of the data in the capital flow matrix, table 1
and table A -l.

and expenditures on equipment shows the same
sectors predominating; however, communica­
tion and public utilities are the largest pur­
chasers of plant.
In examining the distribution of capital inputs
by major sectors (table 2), similar patterns of
the proportion of capital investment going to
plant and the proportion going to equipment are
found in agriculture, most manufacturing sec­
tors, and trade. This pattern shows that roughly
two-thirds of the expenditures by these sectors
were for equipment and the other one-third for
plant. In construction, a radically different
picture emerges; nearly all of the expenditures
are for equipment. In only a relatively few sec­
tors is the reverse found, namely, plant repre­
senting a larger proportion of expenditures
than equipment. Mining is one such sector. The
explanation for the large expenditure for plant
in mining can be found in one of the mining
subsectors, crude petroleum and natural gas
drilling where exploration and drilling costs
are counted as plant expenditures. In communi­
cation and public utilities, plant represents a
larger portion of capital expenditures than
equipment, because plant covers outside lines
built by utilities and communication firms.
Within manufacturing there is remarkably
small variation in the plant-equipment distri­
bution for the major sectors except for the
petroleum refining group. However, an exa­
mination of table A-2 shows that at the more
detailed industry level much greater variation
in the plant-equipment allocation is found.

The detailed 1958 capital flow tables are
presented in two sets of three tables each. The
first set of tables (1,2, and 3) shows the capital
flow data for major industry groups. Table 1
of this set has the dollar value of capital pro­
duction and consumption by industry. Table 2,
in this set, presents capital coefficients by
consuming industry for each of the major
sectors. This table illustrates the capital
input patterns for each of the major sectors
of the economy and is calculated by taking a
percent distribution of the columns in table 1.
Table 3, capital distribution by producing
industry, for each of the major sectors, shows
the same data as table 1, but as a percent dis­
tribution of each row. This presentation pro­
vides information on the marketing pattern
between the capital producing industries and
their major purchasing sectors.
Appendix tables 1, 2, and 3 show the same
information as in the text tables but in the full
industry detail, i.e., 77 consuming industries
rather than 29 major sectors shown in text
tables 1, 2, and 3.
An analysis of the major sector tables will
highlight the data presented in the 1958 capital
flow matrix. A few observations from the more
detailed tables also will be made.

An examination of the distribution of equip­
ment expenditures among the various types for
each of the major consuming sectors reveals
a greater degree of variation in the sector’s
purchasing patterns (table 2) than was found
generally in their plant and equipment mix. The
prevalent pattern is for each sector to have one
large item which accounts for from 20 to 40
percent of its total capital expenditures. This
capital item is usually of a very specialized
type which is made often specifically for use
by the particular industry and often is not used
widely, if at all, by other sectors. In agricul­
ture, for example, this purchase is farm mach-

As seen in table 1, the manufacturing sector
purchased the largest amount of capital of any
major sector in 1958. The $9.7 billion of
capital equipment purchased by the manufac­
turing sector exceeded by over $1 billion the
communication and public utilities sectors’
purchase of $8.4 billion of capital. The service
sector (business services, personal services,
amusement, auto repair, and medical, educa­
tional and nonprofit groups) and agriculture
and trade, are large purchasers of capital. A
separate examination of expenditures on plant




8

inery. In most metal manufacturing industries,
it is some type of metalworking machine. In
nondurable manufacturing sectors the special­
ized capital item is special industry mach­
inery. The exception is the chemicals sector,
where general industrial machinery is more
important. In most of the nongoods producing
sectors (transportation, trade, and service)
some form of transportation equipment usually
is the most important single purchase. In public
utilities and communication, however, the larg­
est single purchase is electrical equipment.
Again, less conformity to this pattern is noted
in the more detailed industry consumption
pattern (table A-2).

level (table A -3). For instance, in the more
detailed capital flow table, the marketing pat­
tern of a larger number of capital producing
industries is spread widely among purchasing
sectors. Still, farm machinery, aircraft, other
transportation equipment (which includes both
railroad equipment and ships and boats), serv­
ice industry machinery, electrical transmis­
sion and distribution equipment, radio, TV and
communication equipment, and professional
and scientific equipment, among the major
capital producing sectors sell more than 50
percent of their output to one sector.

An examination of table 3 allows one to ana­
lyze the marketing pattern for each of various
t y p e s of capital equipment, as well as for total
plant and equipment expenditures. For in­
stance, this table shows that over one-fifth of
all capital expenditures in 1958 were for plant
and equipment purchases by the manufacturing
sector. Also about one-fifth of capital pur­
chases were made by the communication and
public utilities group. Communication and
public utilities purchase more than one-quarter
of total plant.

This effort to construct a capital flow matrix
was undertaken as part of the Economic Growth
Project and it was possible to give only limited
resources to this work. It represents one of the
first efforts at constructing, for the U.S. econ­
omy, a comprehensive table showing all flows
of capital for a single year. Because it is a
first effort and because of the scarcity of the
type of data necessary for this purpose, its
limitations should be emphasized. For each of
the industries outside the manufacturing sector
at the detail we are working, control totals of
capital purchases by consuming industry were
not always available and such gaps had to be
filled by crude estimates. Also, where more
than one estimate for a sector was available,
a selection had to be made as to the one which
seemed most consistent with the capital flow
work. Information on distribution of sales of
capital equipment also is extremely limited.
Therefore, it was necessary to find other data

Limitations

For individual capital producing industries,
marketing patterns of at least two types seem
to emerge. First, are those industries which
sell about two-thirds of their output to one
sector. This pattern is exemplified by farm
machinery, metalworking machinery, special
industry machinery, general industrial mach­
inery, as well as aircraft, other transportation
equipment, and electrical machinery among
the larger capital producing sectors. The other
pattern is a wide distribution of the items among
all purchasing sectors, such as found in motor
vehicles, furniture and office and computing
machinery. The margin industries, trans­
portation and trade, (ISP 65 and ISP 69) also
show this pattern, as would be expected, since
the margin on various types of capital equip­
ment does not vary widely enough to concen­
trate margins in any sector. 12/ Again, many
of the patterns observed at the major sector
detail do not hold true at the detailed industry




12/ The valuation of each capital item in the
capital flow matrix is the value at the site of
production. However, the total value of capital
investment for each industry is at purchaser
value or cost to the investor. The difference
between value of capital investment at pur­
chaser prices and at producer prices is trade
and transportation margin. The margin for
transportation represents freight costs for
delivery of the capital goods; trade margin is
the return to the wholesaler or retailer for
handling capital goods.
9

which could be used as a guide to distribution
of a given type of capital among consuming
industries.

and plant, require more than one year for
installation. The Bureau of Labor Statistics
currently is pursuing some of these questions.
A limited amount of investigation has been
undertaken on the stability of an industry’s
capital inputs by type. Also, a major research
effort is underway currently to estimate a
capital flow table for 1963 which will comple­
ment the work at the Office of Business
Economics on a 1963 input-output table.

Since this capital flow matrix represents
only one year and a recession year at that, it
is not possible at this point to know how atyp­
ical 1958 may be and to what extent capital
input patterns have any stability, particularly
since many types of capital, both equipment




10







Table 1. C apital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group, Producers' Values
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Consuming in d u strie s
Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.

A g ric u ltu ra l,
fo re s try ,and
fish e ry
se rv ice s
1-4

Mining
5-10

C onstruction

M anufacturing

Durable goods
m anufacturing

1 1 , 12

13-64

13, 20-23,
35-64
5

8
1

—

4

2

1

21

23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts............

1

7

1

1

2

6

(I/>

12

170

103

12

6

8

40
42
43
44
45

H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
Other fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts....................................
Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il fie ld m achinery.........

47
48
49
51
52
53
Si
55
56
S7
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

M etalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
Special in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service in dustry m achines.................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
Honsehnld Appl i anrps-T. TTTT. . . t r . T- Tl t I f l T1. . tT.
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
Radio te le v is io n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
E lp rfrn n ir rnmpnnpnf"q Anri a rre fisn ries,
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
Motor v eh icles and equipm ent...........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
T ransportation and w arehousing......................................
f\fs Pnmmuni r af i nnc pyr pphrnflrfraQf ing
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71 Rpal p sfafp anri rpnfal
RO firnuc Import-.* of goods Anri sprvirp.s . . r , t . _ r t . _
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See footnotes a t end of ta b le .




15
19
15
..........
662
47

31
7
15
1,444
56

3
7
4

83

21

243
47
105
19
78
157
1,070
1,198
716
361
96
325
7
4
80
14
7
373
43
89
155
42
26
124

151

132

861

454

3,326
1,251
2,075

963
933
30

16
9,686
6,475
3,211

16
5,074
3,435
1,639

6

455
36

69
40
3
27

21

12

117
4

34

1

13

2

12

11

(i/)
5

..........
5
__

7
( 1 /)
4

4
64

3
676
15
75
4

10

2

163

2

8

21

<I/>

2

52

2

1

1

2

5

..........

71

28

596
4,544
3,156
1,388

11

10

49
10

63
113
1 ,0 2 0

250
312
215
30
276
3
52
13
5
135
27
24
50
16
15
68

Table 1. C apital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group, P roducers' V alues--C ontinued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
" ----------Producing in d u strie s
17
20
22
23
32

Consuming in d u strie s
■—

F u rn itu re and
fix tu re s

Stone, c la y ,
and g lass

Prim ary m etals

13

Lumber and
wood
products
2 0 , 21

22, 23

35, 36

37, 38

<I/>

( in

( in

( in

( 1 /)

( in

Ordnance

M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts, except c o n ta in e rs............
Household f u rn itu re ..............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts............

2

4

(I/>
3

<!/)

1

( in

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

<i/>

3

2

5

39

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
S?

a /)
(i/)
( I /)
5

6

1

3

20

( in

1

1

7

13

( in

1

8

Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il fie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
M etalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
Special in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Sftrvi rp inH nsfry mflrhinPQ. - - it irr
--i
F.1
r* ■ inHiiefi'i al pqm' pmPnf anH apparafnc
Si Hr»n«phr»1 H appl i anrPc
T
rr
SS F.l p rfri r 1 i gh t*i ng And ui ri ng pqn l pmPnf . . . . r . T. . T
56 R adio, te le v is io n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
S7 I?1
i r* rnmp^nPnhc anH arrpccor*! pc
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
41 fifhpr tT an sp n rtatin n pqin'pment- . T. r ............. rr . . T
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
63 O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
f% r.ommnmVflfiftnQ pyr pp f- KrnaHra ot* 4ng
f%
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71 Rp p I P.fiffltp and rpnfal
80 Hrnca impnrfc nf
c and api*vi rpe
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




6

1

19

1

8

2

83

13
23

8
10
2

2

5

2

2

3
( 1 /)

( in

35
14
4
37
40
12
1

( in

5

20

445
31
177
19
2

2

2

5

55

(in

(in

( 1 /)

<I/ >

(in

1

1

(in
2

(in
1

( 1 /)
5
..........

( 1 /)

1

( 1 /)

(in
(in

i

1

31

1

4
1

i

4

6

65
46
19

( 1 /)

(in

4
1

1

14
5

1

23
3
3

29

5
3

10

5

20

26

10

33

124

303
205
98

12

1

106
72
33

373
242
130

1,599
1,043
555

Table 1. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group, Producers' V alues--C ontinued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
F abricated
m etal
products
39-42

Consuming in d u strie s
Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
1n r

0A T

n 4

,

i

»

* t- n
1

n

f-

.

M achinery ,
except
e le c tr ic a l
43-52

T ran sp o rtatio n
equipment

Instrum ents

53-58

59-61

62, 63

1

( 1 /)

E le c tric a l
machinery

1

1

( 1 /)

2

2

16

Cl/>

11

( 1 /)

1

3
( 1 /)

9

1

*

22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts...........

15

4
25

1

2

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

7

7

43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent..........................................

4
( 1 /)

46 M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
47 Metalworking machinery and equipm ent......... ..
48 S pecial in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
52 Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s .......................
SA Hmiaphnl <1 app 1 i anrAs T_ t I r i r r r - 1 III1IITTIII1TrT
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
56 R a d io .te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....
S7 E lp r fr n n ir rnmpnnpnfn apH a r r A s a n r ip a ,T, ,

, , , .

1

4

15
150
14
15
7
29

27
153
5
31
62
9
67

( 1 /)
3

( 1 /)
3

1
1

10

1

i

58
59
60
A1
62
63
64
65

6
1

4
( 1 /)
1
1
111

1
6

1

(l/>

( 1 /)
( 1 /)

x

16
77

38

13

20

1

11

22

2

29
3
34

45
7
63

9
8

1

(l/>

<i/>

13

23

9

1

3

1

M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
1
1
1
( 1 /)
(l/>
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
14
2
13
7
15
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
1
3
1
13
<l/>
5
(lfhpr fran cp n ffafin n Pqii'ipmPnf
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
3
5
5
5
3
O ptical.ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
1
6
5
( 1 /)
(I/>
2
M iscellaneous m anufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . .
4
( 1 /)
T ransportation and w arehousing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. .1. . .
.
9
2
6
fkf% f*.r\
A
n
o
O v Dp t *
r
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
. .
.
. .
R
I Pfff^fP apH rpnt"a 1
r( (
,
AO ea -1mpnr f- a nf
anrl Qprvl
16
Total p lan t and equipm ent .....................................................................................................................
619
504
741
473
135
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
350
536
92
428
313
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
153
191
205
159
43
See footnotes a t end of ta b le .
71

pa




13

Table 1. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group, P roducers' V alues--C ontinued
(M illions of d o lla rs)

~ ----~

Consuming in d u strie s

17
20
22
23
32

M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts,except c o n ta in e rs............
Household fu rn itu re ..............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ........................................ ..
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

Nondurable
m anufacturing

64

'

Producing in d u strie s

M iscellaneous
m anufacturing

<!/)

14-19,
24-34
3

( 1 /)
4

66

8

5

1

Food and
kindred
products
14

Tobacco

T ex tile s and
apparel

15

16-19

1

( 1 /)

Cl/)

3
9

<l/>

1

1

11

1

( 1 /)

1

(l/>

9

(I/)
........

........

8

8

1

160
37
56

18
4
4

<l/>

8

6

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

2

43 Engines and tu rb in e s............................................................
44 Farm machinery and equipm ent...........................................
45 C onstruction,m ining,and o il fie ld m achinery.........
47
48
49
51
52

Metalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
Special in d u stry machinery and equipment............
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................

R1P r fr i r inH iicfri al orju-i pmPnf
SZi Hnusp.hnl H appl i anres - - Tt_____

55
56
S7
58
59
60

- t ____

E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
R adio, te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
F.1 Pr frnm ’ r o nmpnn pntc anH arrPQ cnri Pc
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................

fil flfhpr fra n sp n rl'a fifu i

pqiiipmpnt'

,..tT1 •i1 i

itt

62 Scientific and controlling instruments.........
63 O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing......................................
f\f\ pAiwntin4 PAfi nnc oyp opt* KrrtflHracfi
69 W holesale and r e t a i l t r a d e .; ...........................................
71 Rpa 1 patafp and ra n ta l
AD (Irnc a i mprtr fr*a n f
a ayiH cPt*\rj roc
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent............................................................ ..
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




15
44
51
948
404
147

5

21

17
8
12

(I/)

66

49
7

10

anrl AppArafnc

ttttt _______ r -

<I/>

Cl/)

2

28

l

nA
(i/>

2

16
166
19
30
56

9

Cl/)

4
( 1 /)

2

(I/)

<!/>
(I /)
(I/)

1

238
15
65
105
26

5

150
7
7
42

5

2

9
2

3
( 1 /)

174
3
16
5
11

7

( 1 /)
1

(I/)

(I/)

5

2

(l/>
13

( 1 /)

1

(l/>

2

2

56

14

<l/>

3
5

15

406

108

3

38

157
106
51

4,612
3,040
1,572

39
24
15

386
313
73

11

14

2

1 ,0 0 0

684
316

1

Table 1. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group, P roducers' V alues—Continued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Paper and
a llie d
products
24, 25
17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
20 Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts,except c o n ta in e rs...........
22 Household fu rn itu re ..............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ..........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts...........
34 Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u c ts...........................
39 Metal c o n ta in e rs.....................................................................
40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
42 Other fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts....................................
43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
44 Farm machinery and equipm ent..........................................
45 C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery.........
46 M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
47 M etalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
48 Special ind u stry machinery and equipm ent................
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
52 Service ind u stry m achines.................................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
54 Household a p p lia n ce s............................................................
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
63 O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ransportation and w arehousing......................................
6 6 Com nunications,except b ro ad castin g .............................
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l........................................................
80 Gross im ports of goods and s e rv ic e s ...........................
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See footnotes at end of ta b le .




(I/)

P rin tin g
and pub­
lis h in g

1

Chemicals
and a llie d
products
27-30

31

Rubber and
p la s tic s
products
32

1

(I/>

(I/>

(1/)

1

( 1 /)

( 1 /)
4

<I/>

(1/)
3
1

6

1

12

2

( 1 /)

( 1 /)

<I/>

1

1

1

8

18

(1/)

2

26
4
15

3

40

7

12

2

14

( 1/ )

1

191
64
19

172

Cl/)

(1/)

29
159
231
26
3

15
5

3

11

2
12

(1/)

(1/)

(I/)
14
(1/)

1

10

6

3

6

(I/>
58
16

3

4

1
7

(1/)
19
1
5

51

32

581
434
147

424
283
141

Leather and
le a th e r
products
33, 34

2

22

17
44
28

41
37

1

19

( 1 /)

8

8

( 1 /)
2
12

Petroleum

17

( 1 /)
3

( 1 /)
3

( 1 /)

1

( 1 /)
15

( 1 /)
3

2

2

5

1

27
3
32
47

2

1

(1/)
1
(1/)

2

20

7

6

3

<I/>

1

2

2

14

6

( 1 /)
3

(1/)
1

105

43

20

6

808
303
506

204
159
45

49
43
7

1,120

799
322

Table 1. C apital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group, P roducers' V alues--Continued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Consuming in d u strie s
Producing in d u strie s

T ransporta­ Communica­
tio n s and
tio n and
warehousing public
u tilitie s
6 6-68
65

17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
. ,
, . _, . , . _ . . . . . .
22 Household fu rn itu re ..............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
40
42
43
44

4

2
6

11

56
<l/>

27
1

H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
Other fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts....................................
Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
Farm machinery and equipm ent...........................................

379
17
392
16
28

1

ftH

P t»A e

i

a Atn n A T* !■ a

rp tira
rtf

1

o n m lo

. r . . t
am i

od

Tr -

72-77

17

4

42
247
34

16
78
<I/>

31
206
3
3

33
..........

26
7
24
84

3
4
13
14
15
9
76
34
118
33
108
508
37
42

T otal

10

45
£
126
798
52
5
10

94
72

22

182

3
75
362
348

666

239

573

2,521
1,893
628

8,448
3,861
4,587

4,696
3,263
1,433

2,140
1,089
1,051

5,868
3,126
2,742

16
42,192
25,047
17,145

8

19
18
65

1

74
64
3

11

27
43
11

1 ,1 0 0

2

6

730
5

40

12

7

12

4
260
13

6

40

66

1

15
194
261
896
4

144
5
..........
23

2

10

11

1

24

1

5
991
3
26
5

4
20

4
1

313
1
10
1
2

49
20

178
253
119
33
5
85
2

,

i r Af l

T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )
.....................................................

1/ Less than $500,000.
2 / Motor v e h ic les include not only tru ck s but business
purchases of autom obiles.




Services

36
657
26
23
317
107
146
71

17

aw

p «a

69

Finance,
insurance,
and re a l
e s ta te
70, 71

708
166
576
1,670
1,319
352
1,153
1,468
1,051
1,016
955
1,617
93
25
1,009
27
83
^ 3 ,5 7 5
358
1,178
532
1 A^
IDJ
279
507
362
3,747

8

A7
tx A OmH ntnl>nt~
r%
/ifi CnA/«4 el l
t»w
nont an/1 Dmi 4nmon t"
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
52 Service indu stry m achines.................................................
^ F 1 Drfr'l n -inHuct ill DqiH pinDnh avwl DppflV*Dfiie
54 Household a p p lia n ce s............................................................
SS R1 # c lig h tin g nnrl w iring f»qui pmenf....................
■
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s......................
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent..........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
63 O ptical,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
AA Pa—mt«%4r* +4 e DvADnf Krn
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71

W holesale
and r e ta il
trad e

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of in d iv id u al item s may not
equal to ta ls ,

16

Table 2. C apital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group
(Percent d is trib u tio n by consuming in d u stry )
'

Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s

A g ric u ltu ra l,
f o re s try ,and
fish e ry
serv ices
1-4

Mining
5-10

C onstruction
11,

12

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.

M anufacturing
13-64

Durable goods
manuf ac tu rin g
13, 20-23,
35-64

0.1

23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

<l/>

1

0.1

(1 /)

(1 /)

0 .2

0

0 .2

0 .2

(\/\

0.7

1 .8

2 .0

(1 /)

(l/>
<l/>

(1 /)

0.1

0.1

0.1

40
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
52
53

H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
Other fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts....................................
Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling machinery and e q u ip m e n t......
M etalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
Special in d u stry m achinery and eq u ip m en t..............
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service indu stry m achines.................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
SU H rttisp h n l H a p p l 1a n r p s . T 1 I t T r l l 1 I i l l l r T t t l I I T I I I I
.
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
56 R adio, te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
S 7 F I PofrArvi n I'ninpnnPnf q anH ar rpoanri pq (
f ((
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent..........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
63 O p tical.o p h th alm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
f\f\
r o f l Ano ovrApf K r n a / 1 r a o h 4 n ^
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
7 1 R p a l pafat-p and rPnf- a 1 . T . . t
......... T - R O flrn q e 1 mpnr f a n f gnnHa s t r eprv{ n>a , ......... , T ,
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo otnotes a t end of ta b le .




0.7

0.4

0 .2

0 .6

0.3
31.8

0.5
..........
19.9
1.4

1 .2

0.3
0.7
0.4
0.7
47.3
3.8
1.3
3.5

0.1

1 .1

0 .6

0.1

( I /)
0.3

0 .6

<l/>

1 .6
0 .2

1 .1

1.0

0 .2

0 .2

1.3
1 .1

0 .8

1.3

1 .6

3.5

1.5
0.9

2.5
0.5

2 .2

1 1 .1

2 0 .1

12.4
7.4
3.7

4 .9

1.0

0 .6

3.4

6 .1

4.2
5.4

0.1

0.2
(1 /)

Cl/)

0.1

0 .2

0.5

(1 /)

0.1

0.1

0.1

0 .2

1.9

16.9

0.1

0 .2

1 .6

0 .8

0.1

0 .6

0 .2

(I/)

(1 /)

0.1

0.1

(1 /)

..................

1 .6

0 .8

13.1

1.0

0.1

14.9
0.3
1.7

0 .8

0.3

0.1

0.1

3.9
0.4
0.9

2.7
0.5
0.5

1 .6

1.0

2 .2

0.4
0.3
1.3

0.3
0.3
1.3

4 .5

13.7

8.9

9.0

0 .2

0.3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

69.6
30.5

37.3
62.4

97.0
3.1

67.0
33.2

67.6
32.3

17

Table 2. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group—Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by consuming in d u stry )

13

-------Consuming in d u strie s
Producing in d u strie s
17
20
22
23
32

Lumber and
wood
products
2 0 , 21

Ordnance

F u rn itu re and
fix tu re s

Stone, c la y ,
and g lass

22, 23

35, 36

M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts,except c o n ta in e rs............
Household f u rn itu re ...............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts............

0.2

<l/>

0.6

0 .1

2.7
0 .1

1.4
0.3

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

0.3

1 .0

2.2

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
52

0.2

1.9

0.7

0 .1

2.0

1.1

Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il fie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking m achinery and equipm ent.........................
S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
r

al

a p p a ra fn a

0 .1

37, 38
<I/>

0 .1

0.3
3.1
0 .1

Prim ary m etals

0 .1

1.8

0 .1

0.8

<l/>

0 .1

1.4

0.6

6.2

8.4

2.8

2.2

..........
27.4

12.2
21.6

9.8

2.4
0.5
1.3
( 1 /)
0.3
1.3
27.8
1.9

0.6

2.0

10.8

11.1

0.2

0 .1

1.6

3.4

12.0

15.6
3.0
7.3
..........
3.1

0.8

..........

0 .9

3.2
0.3
1.8

0.8

( 1 /)
9.4
3.6
1 .0

3.2

1.2

Unit eohn 1 /I appl i an roc

55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 R adio , te le v is io n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
^7 IM

( 1 /)
0.4

0.7

( 1 /)
0.4

( 1 /)
0.3

<l/>

0.7

(l/>
4 .8

( I /)
7.8

...................

0.2

( 1 /)
0.9
0.3

0 .1

/» /tntnnAnonfa an/1 a/«/«AoeAl*4 Oe

58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
O p tical.o p h th alm ic,and photographic eq u ipm ent...
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................

f\fk

rAmmtm i r a f i nno O vrPpf KrnflHra ot- 4

69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................
71

R oal p efat'P

AO (!rnea

1

artA

r P n fa l

,

r

,

,

0 .1

2.4

10.2

0.3
1.3
0.3
0.4
0.3

1.8
..................

0.6
0 .1

0.4
1.3

...................

1.3

0 .1

0.8

0.4

0.6

1.4

0.2
0.2

0.2

1.2

1.2

1.3

9.0

8.5

9.3

9.0

7.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.3

mpr»r t- e rvf g-nnH q anH eortrf rAo

T otal p lan t and equipm ent..................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




70.6
29.5

6*7.4
32.4

18

68.4
31.6

65.2
35.0

65.3
34.7

Table 2. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group—Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by consuming indu stry )
'

Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts...........

F abricated
m etal
products
39-42

M achinery,
except
e le c tr ic a l
43-52

0.1

0.2

E le c tric a l
machinery

T ran sp o rtatio n
equipment

Instrum ents

53-58

59-61

62, 63

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.5
3.3

0.4
2.2

0.3
2.7

0.3
2.5

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

1.3

1.0

1.3

1.5

0.9

0.1

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

3.0

0.2

0.2

46
47
48
49
51
52
53

M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
Special in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
S ervice in d u stry m achines.................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
Hnnaphnl H nppl 1 anrps
..
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....
S7 E lp rfrn n lr rnmpnnpnfji pnH a rf psanr i
1
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent............................. .............
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
ft1 f)t-ViPr tTflnapnrhafinn PqiripraPnl*
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
63 O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ransportation and warehousing.................. ..
ftft frwnmnn-i rat“i nn a pvrppl*
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...................................... ..
71 Rp p I psfai-p anH
, , , , t , , , , , ,, , , , ,
fifl flrnaa Import’s nf onnHa anH sprxri ops r t
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo otnotes a t end of ta b le .




pa

T

t

0.8

0.6

0.8

0.9

0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................

0.2

0.1

0.2

3.6

0.2

2.6

23.5

12.4
3.2
3.6
7.3

3.0
29.9

20.6

0.7
4.1
8.3

2.0

2.9
3.0
1.4
5.8

2.8

2.4

28.3
1.0
1.2

10.1

6.7
0.5
5.9

0.1

0.1

0.1

3.7
0.5

0.5

0.1

2.7
1.9

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

2.8

1.8

0.5

2.3

0.3
1.4

0.2

1.4
0.3

2.1

0.2

1.2

9.1
( 1 /)
0.4

0.1
0.6

T. _

6.2

0.7
7.2

1.1

0.8

1.4

2.5
3.6
0.3
1.4

8.4

9.2

9.4

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.0

0.5

1.1

0.8

0.1

0.1

0.3
1.4

0.1

0.3
1.5

0.4
1.4

1.0

9.4

11.3

100.0

100.0

0.6

2.1

69.8
30.5

72.4
27.6

19

66.3
33.7

69.0
30.9

68.0

31.8

Table 2. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group—Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by consuming in d u stry )
Consuming in d u strie s
Producing in d u strie s
17
20
22
23
32

——
-____

M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts, except c o n ta in e rs............
Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p r o d u c ts ......

M iscellaneous
manuf ac tu r ing
64

Nondurable
m anufacturing
14-19,
24-34

Food and
kindred
products
14

Tobacco

T e x tile s and
apparel

15

16-19

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

1.4

0.3
0 .9

0.2

0.3

2.6

2.0

2.8

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

0.1

0.8
1.8

0.7

2.2

1.2

0.4
0.4

0.2

0.6

0.3
0 .9

0.4
..........

1.3
..........

1.6

..........

0.6

22.8

45.1

0.3
1.4

3.5
0.8

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
52

Engines and tu rb in e s .............................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il fie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking m achinery and equipm ent.................. ..
S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
S ervice in d u stry m achines.................................................
R1 t-f •{r* inH iisfrial PqnipmPnf and apparafita , , , ,
SA Hnnsp.hnl d appl i a n ra s __ 1r . - . . TltTTT1. T___1- 11T- T
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
S 7 R1pnf rnn i n rnmpnnPfifs and arrpaenr'ipe ,
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
fil flthpr fran sp n rfafln n P(|iii'pmPnt' (1. . TI 1T_ . TII(I ,
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
63 O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m a n u fa c tu rin g ...........................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
Pnmmiini r afinno Pvr
Krna/fraofin^
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................
7 1 Rpal
and rpnf~a 1 . , r , ,
t r,
ftO Ciyiqr impnrf~q rtf gnnda and cprtri rPe
T otal p la n t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




0.8

<I/>
<I/>

3.0
13.4

1.1

11.0

20.6

5.4
7.8

8.8

3.2
1.4

0.1

6.4

1.1
0.2

<I/>

<l/>
0.4
0.3

0.6

(1
Vi/A/

<I/>

0.1

2.9

5.2
0.3
1.4
2.3

0.1

0.3
( 1 /)
0.3
1.3

16.6
1.9
3.0
5.6
0 .9

<I/>
0 .4
n/\
Vi/ /

5.5
7.6
0.6

0.8

4.1
1.4
2.8

0.3
2.5

1.9
0.1
1.2

0.1

0.2

15.0
0.7
0.7
4.2

5.1

<l/>
3.4

0.8

0.2

0 .9

0.6

0.6
1.2

1.4

1.1

0.7
1.4

9.5

8.8

10.8

8.5

9.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

0.2

67.6
32.4

66.0

34.1

20

0.2

68.5
31.6

1.5

60.9
39.2

81.1
18.9

Table 2. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major In d u stry Group—Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by consuming in d u stry )
Consuming in d u strie s
Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
20 Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts,except c o n ta in e rs............
22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
34 Footwear and o th er le a th e r p r o d u c ts ......................
39 M etal c o n ta in e rs.....................................................................
40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
42 O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts....................................
43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent.................. ........................
45 C onstruction,m ining,and o il fie ld m achinery.........
46 M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
47 Metalworking m achinery and equipm ent.........................
48 S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
49 G eneral in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
52 Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
54 Household a p p lia n ce s............................................................
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent..........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
63 O ptical,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
66 Com munications,except b ro a d ca stin g .............................
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l........................................................
80 Gross im ports of goods and se rv ic e s ...........................
T otal p la n t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent..................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See foo tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




Paper and
a llie d
products
24, 25

P rin tin g
and pub­
lis h in g
26

( 1 /)

0.1

31

(/
I)

(/
1)

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

1.6

0.8

2.2

an

0.1

0.4
5.2
1.3

3.0

1.5

1.1

0.9

Petroleum

1.2

0.3
1.9

0.2

0.1

0.1

4.5
0.7
2.5

0.7

3.6

7.1

1.1

2.0

1.3
0.1

1.5
(in

1.0

0.3

0.1

0.4

0.1

° .i

2 6

0.9

2.6

32.8
3.2

40.5
0.4
2.9

</
l>

0.1

11.1

0.5

</
l>

0.3

U/>

2.3

Leather and
le a th e r
products
33, 34

Rubber and
p la s tic s
products
32

Chemicals
and a llie d
products
27-30

14.2

1.8
10.6

2.1

20.1

2.4
0.3
0.7

5.4
3.4

18.2
4.0

0.1

(/
I)

(in
0.4

38.3
4.4
9.5

1.1

</
l>

4.7

0.1

2.1

0.2

20.6

0.3

0.3

0 .1

1.3

0.1

</
I>

0.1

0.1

(in
1.9
0.3
2.5
0.9

4 .4

2.4
0.3
2.9
4.2
0.5

0.2

0.1

0.2

0.2

1.3

1.2

1.3

0.7

8.7

7.5

9.4

100.0

100.0

100.0

2.1

3.4

0.1

0.1

1.0

0.5

74.6
25.3

21

0.1

66.6

33.3

71.3
28.7

(in
1.3
0.5

ci/)

3.9

1.5

0.5

0.2

0.8

1.4

1.5

5.4

9.8

11.6

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

0.1

37.3
62.5

77.8

22.1

86.1

13.9

Table 2. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group--Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by consuming in d u stry )
Consuming in d u strie s T ransporta­
tio n and
warehousing
65

Producing in d u strie s
17
20
22
23
32

Communica­
tio n s and
public
u tilitie s

M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts,except c o n ta in e rs............
Household f u rn itu re ...............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

66-68

0.2

<l/>

0.4
1.1

( 1 /)

0.1

0.7

<I/>

W holesale
and r e ta il
trad e
69

F inance,
in su ra n ce ,
and re a l
e s ta te
70, 71

0.4

0.2

0.9
5.3
0.7

0.7
3.7
<l/>

S ervices

T otal

72-77
0.2

0.1

0.5
3.5

( 1 /)
0.3
1.9

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

( 1 /)
(1 /
V£/19
1.7
0.4
1.4
4.0
3.1

0.1

0.8

0.1

40
42
43
44
45
46
48
49
51
52
53
S4
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts....................................
Engines and tu rb in e s .............................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il fie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
Special in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
Hmisehol d A p p l i anres . T ________T _ _ . . T T______1 . T. T. . rT
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
R adio, te le v is io n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m e n ts.....................
O p tical.ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent. . .
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................

f\f\ Prmnniini ra f 1 nne

pvrPpt Krna^ract"in^

69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................

71 Rpal Psfa^P And rp n ta l
,
ftf) Clirnc g im pnrfa r»f grinds And cprui rPQ

1
t(

T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................

0.3
0.7
0.3

4.5

0.8

0.2

0.7

0.3
<l/>

2.6

4.6

0.5

0.9

1.1

0.8

1.7
0.4
0.1

(I/>

13.0
0.1

0.1

0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2
1.6

0.7
2.5
0.7
2.3

0.2
12.1
0.6

0.1

0.9
(l/>

8.6
0.1

0.6

0.1

0.1

7.7
10.3
35.5

1.7

21.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

..........
0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

( 1 /)

7.2

(l/>
0.9
4.3
4.1

100.0

75.1
24.9

0.4
1.4

0.8

..........

0.9

0.4
0.1

0.2

0.8

1.6

1 .0

1.5
..........
3.1
..........
..........

10.8

( 1 /)

0.2

0.9
0.2

<I/>

14.6
( 1 /)
0.5

0.3
3.0
4.3
2.0

2.7
3.5
2.5
2.4
2.3
3.8

0.6

0.2

0.1

0.1

1.5
(l/>

0.1

0.6

0.2

11.2

2.4
8.5

<I/>

0.4
0.4
5.4

2.0

0.1

1.5

2.5

1 .0

1.2

14.2

11.2

9.8

0.9
8.9

100.0

100.0

45.7
54.3

69.6
30.5

100.0

100.0

50.8
49.1

100.0

53.1
46.7

59.5
40.6

0.6

1.8

0.8
2.8

1.3
0.4
0.7
1.2

\±j j

1/ Less than .05 p e rce n t.




0.2

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of in d iv id u al item s may
not equal to ta ls .

22

Table 3. C ap ital Flow s, 1958
By Major Industry Group
(Percent d is trib u tio n by producing in d u stry )
—

Consumi ng in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ..........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts............
40 H eating,plumbing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
42 Other fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts....................................
43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
45
46
47
48
49
51
52
53

C o n stru e tio n ,m ining,and o il fie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
Special in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffic e ,computing,and accounting m achines................
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
^nti^phnl H appl {flnrAa f
............... 1 . . . .
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....
7 1?1o o i r rArppnn0 |it‘
arrAccnri pq
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
63 O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing.....................................
/” /•

— *****

• _

^ •

v#'*

*- K

j

_

Mining

C onstruction

5-10

1 1 , 12

63.7

27.3

( 1 /)

0.9
1.9

1.2

34.1
4.4
4.2

11.3

2.6

2.8

2.0

86.5
4.3

50.2
13.2

4.7
3.8
0.3
2.7

1.4
11.1

0.3
<I/>
0.7

0.1

7.8

0.3
0.8
0.8

0.4
4.3
0.7
0.4
34.5
3.1
0.9
3.3
1.1

1.3

0.6

M anufacturing
13-64
16.8
9.1
16.2
21.0

22.7
75.0
34.2
28.1
18.0
1.0

5.7
44.1
92.7
81.5
68.0

35.4
9.7
20.4
7.7
17.4
7.5
54.5

Durable goods
manuf ac tu rin g
13, 20-23,
35-64
11.7
9.1
9.7
12.7
12.5
11.8

5.9
8.4
0.5
4 .6
31.8
88.2

17.0
29.7
21.1

2.9
17.3

0.6

2.0

8.2

4.5
0.7

..........
4.1

9.9
12.3
7.4
29.1
24.8
9.3
24.3

3.5

23.1

12.3
100.0

1.1

0.4

9.7
4 .6
48.8
5.7
3.4
7.9
1.9
9.4
9.0
5.3
13.5

100.0

0.2

4.2
18.9
4.3
6.4

14.0

4.7
1.9
0.5
4.4
4 .0
0.4
0.5
5.5

15.9

4.0

0.6
0.1
1.6

0.5

0.6

0.3
0.6

. #

69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71 pnaf Pot'al'P anA rpnf- n 1 (
, . . . . r T.........
ftf) rrAofi i m n n r f a r\£ nr\r\Aa ansi o i noo
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See foo tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




A g ric u ltu ra l,
fo re stry ,a n d
fish e ry
se rv ice s
1-4

12.6

7.9
5.0

8.1

12.2

10.8

23

2.2

3.8

0.2

22.8

25.7
18.7

11.9
13.5
9.6

Table 3. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group—Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by producing in d u stry )
Consuming in d u strie s

13

Producing in d u strie s
17
n/s
22
23
32

Lumber and
wood
products
2 0 , 21

Ordnance

M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
* I ni l _ J ____ J
n _.
•
Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ......................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts......... ..

F u rn itu re and
fix tu re s
22, 23

Stone, c la y ,
and g lass
35, 36

37, 38
0 .9

2.2

( I /)

0.2

0.5

0.3

0.3
0.5

0.2

0.2
0.1

1.6

0.2

0.4
0 .9
0 .4

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

<I/>

0 .4

0.4

0 .7

43 Engines and tu rb in e s ................... . . . . . . . . . . .................

(l/>
( 1 /)
( 1 /)
1.5
0.7
0.7

0.1

0.4
1.4
2.3
..........
5.6

0.5

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.5

0.2

0.3

45
46
47
48
49
51

C onstruction,m ining,and o i l fie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking m achinery and equipm ent.........................
S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
!Sprvi {ndnefry marhi o t
T( t TT. ( , , , , ,
fll onu 4nmonf onH flnnorfl hue
J J 1?1 U&,Lw lllUUoki ACIl CI^UApiUCUL ttUU a|/poAai>U9t • • • •
£*JLC?W /»
*»Z Hnnaohn 1 A appl 'i a n rp a ,
l
1 . . . T. (
T
SS E1 f r l r 1
and u i n g aqiripmpnf , T, , ( T,
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
aAiwnnnOfi^e av%/I
Ae
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l oiachinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts ...................................... ..........................
61 (ll’har t-ranapnrfa t 1 r»r» a<jtrlpinpnt’ , . TTtT__ t . 1TIirtT
~
(% S r le n f lf lr and ro n frn IH n g I n i it n i M n f R ,.,,,,,,,,
“
?
63 O ptical,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing......................................
fk
fk
Ane iSYrAph KrnaHracf i na
69 W holesale and r e t a i l t r a d e . . . .........................................
71 Rpii I PAt-nt-p und rpnf-a 1
i i i « « i t i i t-tiTi< ■ ■ ■ ■
SO ^rno ^m p n r t 1q n f

^A nda

0.8

1.7
1.2

5.5
5.0
3.4

0.1
0.1
0.6
1.1

1.5

2.7
3.8
0.3
2.5
3.8

0 .4
5.7
38.5
2.1

1.2

16.8
1.9

0.1

0.2

0.1

0 .4

3.4

0.3

0.3

0.6

0.1

0.1

0.1

1.7
0.4

0.1

(l/>
0.1

0.8

0.1

0.2

0.3
0.3

0.8

0 .9
0.4
1.5

0.6

0.1

( 1 /)
0.3

4.3
0 .9
4 .0

0.1
0.2

..........

0.3
0.4

0.8

0.2

0.7
0.3
0.7

0.3

0.3
0 .9

0.2

0.7

0.3

0 .9

3.3

0.2

0.7
0.8

0.3
0.3

0.9

0.2
0 .1

0.6

0.2

0.8

3.6
3.9
3.3

( 1 /)
0.1

0.1

1.6

a^d earyl

T otal p la n t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




1.0

0.4

Prim ary m etals

24

1 .0

Table 3. C ap ital Plows, 1958
By Major Industry Group--Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by producing ind u stry )
'——

Consumi ng in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s

F abricated
m etal
products
39-42

M achinery,
except
e le c tr ic a l
43-52

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.

0.9

3.3

22 Household fu rn itu re ..............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts............

0.9
2.3

3.3
3.0
3.0

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

1 .0

1.2

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
52
53

Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
Farm machinery and equipm ent...........................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
M etalworking m achinery and e q u ip m e n t.....................
S pecial in d u stry machinery arid equipm ent................
General in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service indu stry m achines......... .......................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
SZl Hmisphnl H appl i anri>s i Ti
, , , , ,,
iir iti
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....
P 1 O rfm ni r rnmnnnrint*e jams)
Aa
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
A1 nt-hpr fran opnr fafi on pijirl pmpnf . r r T T r i «
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
63 O ptical.ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing......................................

1.8

0.6

0.8

(1/)

( 1 /)
( 1 /)
7.5
13.2
0.3
3.0

4.3
13.0
0.7
1.3
1.5
0.7

6.1

0.9
4.3

1.8

E le c tric a l
machinery

T ran sp o rtatio n
equipment

Instrum ents

53-58

59-61

1.3
9.1
1.3
1.3

1.7

0.4

1.6

0.3
0.4

0.8

0.9
0.3
0.7
(l/>
(l/>
0.3
9.7
0.9
1.1

2.9
0.3
2.1

2.0

62, 63

1.7

0.2

1.3

0 .1

0.6

1 .0

0 .1

( in
( in

( in
( in

4.5
6.6

3.3

1.4

0 .1

2.1

0.2

4 .4
0.7
4 .0

( in

0.9
0.5

111

r/ ^

«<!/»« e i
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e .....................................................
y

• »*

___ __ . i
_

f Qoa| Aofpfn

a1

T otal p la n t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See foo tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




1.1

1.3

0.2

(1/)

2.3
0.7

1 .0

0.4
0.3

0.2

1.2

1.3
33.9
0.6

0 .1

1 .0
0.6

( 1 /)

0.7
1.3

1 .0
(1/)

0.8

1 .0

0.4

0.6

1.7

2.2
1.2

25

1.6

0.4
3.7
0.4
0.9
3.7
1.3

0.5

<I/>
0 .1
0.6

3.0

0 .1

1.1

1.6

0.3

1.2

1.4

100.0

1.3
0.9

11.0

0.3

1.3

2.2

1.2

0.3

( in

1.8

2.3

1.3

2.4
2.3

1.3
0 .9

1.8

0.3
0.3

1.1

0.2

Table 3. C apital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group--Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by producing in d u stry )
Consuming in d u strie s
Producing in d u s trie s
17
20
22
23
32

------------

M iscellaneous, t e x t i le goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p ro d ucts,except c o n ta in e rs............
Household f u rn itu re ...............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ..........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

M iscellaneous
m anufacturing

Nondurable
m anufacturing

64
0.3

14-19,
24-34
5.1

0.3
0.5

6.5
8.3

1.0

0.3

Tobacco

T e x tile s and
apparel

15

16-19

0.1

0.2

1.1

2.1

<l/>

1.1

0.1

10.2

1.1

0.1

0 .9
1.3
1.3

75.0
22.4

75.0
2.5
2.5

<I/>

1.2

0.8

( 1 /)

0.9

22.2

43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................

9.6
0.5

0.2

( 1 /)
C l/)
1.3
Special in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
S ervice in d u stry m achines....................................
E lu r tr ir indimt"r-i al PijidjmiMit’ and apparatita r t 1 t
Household ap p l1rnires. f , , , t T , t r 1 T I t r , , T
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent ................................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
5 7 K1 A r f f o n l

1.2
0.8
1.2

( 1 /)

6.8

3.1
7.7
7.7
2.9
5.7
2.5
6.5
4 .4

0.6

0.3
0.1

r n m p n n p n f a a n d a r r P a a n r i e a , T . . , , t T_ , ,

1.6

58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts ....................... ..........................................

0.1

ft1

O t’lner* t’r a n n p n r l ' A f l n n e q u i p m e n t - t T T t l t t , t t t > t , TTt t

62
63
64
65

S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts..............
O p tic a l , ophthalm ic , and photographic equipm ent...
M iscellaneous m anufacturing ......................... ............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing ............................................................
ftft ro irn n iiir) r a t i rm n p y r p p t h r n a d r a s t i n g . . T
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................

0.4

1.1

12.3
4.5
64.5
38.3
14.3

1.8

48
49
51
52
SI
54

Food and
kindred
products
14

0.1

<l/>

5.5
19.7
15.8
4 .0

0.1

(I/)
0.1

4 .5

0.6

11.3

0.6

11.8

1.8

0.2

0.2

2.9
5.9
0.5

0.3
(I/)

1.5
0 .5

1.2

0.4

0.4
1.4
0.9
4.2
1.8

0.8

0.1

7.7
1.9
0.4

0.1

( 1 /)
0.3
0.3

0.1

0.4

0.1
0.1

0.6

7.9

0.4

2.7

0.2

1.0

10.8

0.6

0.1

1.0

0.4

10.8

2.9

0.1

1.1

0.4
0.4
0.3

0.1

12.2

0.9
1.4
0.5

7 1 R e a l e s t a t e a n d r e n t a l t - T- - T T 1 I . T . T , T I . r . l t , f T T ,
Af) H r n a a l m p n r t~a n f g n n d a a n d a a r v i r a a

T otal p lan t and equipm ent .............................................................................
T otal equipm ent .........................................................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................

10.9
9.1

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




26

2.4
2.7
1.8

0 .1
0 .1

Table 3. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major Industry Group--Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by producing in d u stry )
Consuming in d u strie s

-— ._____
Producing in d u strie s
17
20
22
23
32

'

M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p ro d u cts,except c o n ta in e rs............
Household fu rn itu re ..............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts............

46
47
48
49
51
52

M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
S pecial in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
1?1 a/*
*nrin efr-l o1 o/nii nmAvif aiwl annarafne
■

1.2

0.4

0.3

0.1

1.1

0.4

0.3

0.1

1.0

3.6
2.5

43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................

31

2.2

0.8

0.6

P rin tin g
and pub­
lis h in g
26

0.5

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

Leather and
le a th e r
products
33, 34

Rubber and
p la s tic s
products
32

1.2

Paper and
a llie d
products
24, 25

1.2

0.4
0.9

0.9

1.8

0.4
0.3

2.6

( 1 /)

Chemicals
and a llie d
products
27-30

3.1
5.6
7.5
2.4

Petroleum

0.4
8.1

9.7
2.1

0.1
................

1.6

<l/>

3.2

0.7

2.6

13.0

11.7

10.9

6.1

0.2

22.0

1.2

1.8

(I/)

( 1 /)

J J EiIGLWL 1 L lilU U m w i l a i
0.2

2.6

0.3
C i|U X pulC llL a ilU
0.5

0.3

0.9
0.4
( 1 /)
1.1

1.9

0.3
1.2

0.1
0.1

0.6

1.3

1.1

2.8

4.1
2.7

3.5
0.8

0.1

( 1 /)

a p p a i o L1U. 0 • • • • •
o

0 .1

1.1

0.3

0.3

0 .1

0 .1

( 1 /)

( 1 /)
<l/>

0.2

0.5
..........

*t/j. U n n q a Vih 1 A a p p l ^ u n p p a

55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....

0.7

0.4

0 .1

1 .0

( 1 /)
0.3

0.3
0.4

0.2

0 .1

1.4
0.4

*\7 F 1 O n f t“rtn *1 /» r n m n A n A n f a a n /1 a A A A a e A i* io a

58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
O ptical,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................

££

rAimitm

{ A fl f 4 AAfl

AH

o o fa fA

0.2

0.7
0.9
2.7
8.7
3.6
0.7

0.6

0.2

0 .1

1 .0

2.8

1.1

0.6

0 .1

1.3

0.8

2.8

1.2

0.5

0 .1

1.3

1 .0

0.5

0 .1

1.1

1.2

0.6

0.8

0.8

2.7
3.1
1.9

1.9

1.8

0.5
0.6

0 .1

11.5

0.4
1.4

0 .1

0.3

................

0.6

(I/>

AvAAnf Kt*AS/)AQO^inA

69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................
y1

0.8

0.3
4.3
0.4
0.4
0.7
1.7
1.3
0.7

a n rl r o u t* a 1

a a lm iN A rh a n f rv/tf'wl a an /1

aoo

T otal p la n t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo otnotes a t end of ta b le .




27

2.9

0.3

0.2

(l/>

Table 3. C ap ital Flows, 1958
By Major In d u stry Group—Continued
(Percent d is trib u tio n by producing in d u stry )
Consuming in d u strie s
Producing in d u s trie s
17
20
22
23
32

^

---------

M iscellaneous te x t i le goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood pro d u cts,ex cep t c o n ta in e rs............
Household f u rn itu re ...............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

40
42
43
44

H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts....................................
Engines and tu r b in e s ...........................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................

46
47
48
49
51
52
^
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking m achinery and equipm ent.........................
Special in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
1?1
r*
a1
avwl
• •••
Household a p p lia n c e s............................................................
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent....................
R a d io .te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m e n ts....................
O p tical.o p h th alm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
o/ininmanh
nnndmfiifl
uiCLLIlv lllUUOki l a i CljlllplUCUL auu appoioLUsi

•

69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................
71
ftn Clirrtcc
nf
t
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
Rpa 1 Pat'at’P anH rpnfa
{mpnrfa

1

r

,

, . . T, ,

^nn/te anH apnr

4 rpa

,

T ransporta­
tio n and
warehousing
65

F inance,
in su ran ce,
and re a l
e s ta te
70, 71

Services

5.1

38.2

8.9

21.9

8.6
3.4
1.1

5.0
7.1
0.9

33.2
31.0
65.3

12.6

24.6
25.7
6.5

1.2

10.3
1.3

53.5
10.3
67.9

1.4
18.4

0.4

1.2

1.0
2.1

1.1

7.1
6.4
0.3

2.7
4 .5
0.7

68.0

9.5
3.9
2.5
18.6
5.4
72.9
76.0

25.0
72.4
18.6
12.7
4.1
1.3
..........
4.3

25.0
0.5

8.0
2.4
0.9
0.7

21.6
3.0
8.0
3.2
10.6

53.1
2.3
45.1
24.9
4 .0

2.0

(I/>
19.6
..........
3.9

66.0
3.7
3.9
4 .3
5.1
0.9
1.9

1.1

0.4
25.6
1.3
4 .0
..........

2.0

13.7
0.7

3.4
1.9
17.7
26.5
7.3
35.3

21.6
8.5
8.8

33.8
14.2

0.9
4.3

43.1
18.3
7.3
1.9
59.6
65.4
52.6
14.0

17.8

6.3

15.2

20.1

4 .9

0.9

8.8
0.2
0.8
0.2

9.3

0 .4
4.8

1.0
2.2

6.1
1.0
14.7
100.0

0.8
1.2

5.5
27.7

9.8

11.2

5.1
4 .4

14.0
12.5
16.0

,

6.0
7.6
3.7

15.4 26.7

13.1
8.4

6.1

T otal

72-77

8.9

1/ Less than .05 p e rce n t.




Communica­ W holesale
tio n s and and r e t a i l
trad e
p u blic
u tilitie s
66-68
69

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of in d iv id u a l item s may not
equal to ta ls .

28

Table 4. D irect and In d ire c t Employment Impact of $1 B illio n C apital Investm ent, S elected In d u strie s

Industry number and t i t l e

1
2
3
4
5

L ivestock and liv e sto c k p ro d u cts....................................
Other a g ric u ltu ra l p ro d u cts...............................................
F o restry and fish e ry p ro d u cts...........................................
A g ric u ltu ra l,fo re stry ,a n d fish e ry se rv ic e s ..............
Iron and fe rro a llo y ores m ining......................................
6 N onferrous m etal ores m ining.............................................
7 Coal m ining......... ........................................................................
8 Crude petroleum and n a tu ra l g a s..................................
9 Stone and clay mining and qu arry in g .............................
10 Chemical and f e r t i l i z e r m ineral m ining.......................
11 New c o n s tru c tio n ......................................................................
12 M aintenance and re p a ir c o n stru ctio n .............................
13 Ordnance and a c c e s so rie s......................................................
14 Food and kindred p ro d u cts....................................................
15 Tobacco m anufactures...............................................................
16 Broad and narrow fa b ric s,y a rn and thread m i l l s ...
17 M iscellaneous te x t i le goods and flo o r c o v erin g s..
18 A pparel...........................................................................................
19 M iscellaneous fa b ric a te d t e x tile p ro d u c ts................
20 Lumber and wood p roducts,except c o n ta in e rs..............
21 Wooden c o n ta i n e r s ................................................................
22 Household fu rn itu re ................................................................
23 O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ........................................ ..
24 Paper and a llie d p roducts,except c o n ta in e rs............
25 Paperboard c o n tain ers and boxes......................................
26 P rin tin g and p u b lish in g ........................................................
27 Chemicals and se le c te d chem ical p ro d u cts..............
28 P la s tic s and sy n th e tic m a te ria ls ....................................
29 D rugs,cleaning,and t o i l e t p re p a ra tio n s.......................
30 P a in ts and a llie d p ro d u cts.................................................
31 Petroleum re fin in g and re la te d in d u s trie s ................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts..............
33 L eather tanning and in d u s tria l le a th e r p ro d u c ts..
34 Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u c ts.............................
35 G lass and g la ss p ro d u cts......................................................
36 Stone and clay p ro d u c ts..................................................... ..
37 Prim ary iro n and s te e l m anufacturing...........................
38 Prim ary nonferrous m etals m anufacturing............
39 M etal c o n ta in e rs........................................................................
40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts ...
41 Stam pings,screw machine p ro d u cts, and b o lts ............
42 O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts......................................

Other
a g ric u l­ co nNew c­
stru
tu ra l
tio n
products
415

Iro n and
s te e l
manufac­
tu rin g

444
928
209
96
143

308
331
412
25
14,592
665
105
279

411
919
233
90
145
206
298
350
500
24
17,818
650
64
267

328
168

182
73

383
610
63
79
197
146
392
266
152

868

183
150
170
145
369
325
376
25
12,553

201

20

1,792
675
49
259

688

84
255

6

6

265
139

268
134
128
126
676
43
75
448
497
229
1,005
476
254
64
117
154
1,164
15
24
284
833
6,750

110

115
2,142
55
141
76
594
255
1,242
569
286
67
158
196
1,365
31
59
279
1,808
5,793
1,075
31
1,843
1,618
1,314

1,102
27
941
1,348
1,762

See note a t end of ta b le .




Food
and
kindred
products

29

*

6

122

113
2,460
76
440
680
667
293
1,196
601
287
69
148

201

1,085
24
30
337
1,967
4,775
1,612
275
2,684
1,269
1,667

6

122

44
2,756
49
281
604
598
236

1,120
534
209
61

121

215
619
13
26

202

2,380
4,797
1,667
33
2,997
1,164
1,541

Trade,
T ranspor­ including
ta tio n
and ware­ e atin g
and
housing
drinking
places
406
845
238

86

158
189
338
311
352
25
11,524
606
92
252

6

283
172
129
83
2,823
53
713
854
581
255
1,040
609
332

66

203
188
899
18
23
372
1,776
5,303
1,496
33
2,309
1,055
1,772

466
995
224
107
133
180
309
331
399
28
14,105
709
49
279

6

456
331
114
151
2,730
103
1,004
3,548
753
398
1,268
682
385
71
190

200

1,536
25
41
509
1,900
4,439
1,430
54
1,809
1,434
1,753

M edical,
educa­
tio n a l ,
and non­
p ro fit
o rg an i­
zatio n s
476
1,253
386

112
111

186
266
411
760
30
31,172
603
161
276

6

295
160
107
56
4,631
67
702
2,359
786
330
1,358
692
270

68

170
260
815
17
35
346
3,511
3,619
1,471
41
3,283
774
1,376

Table 4. D irect and In d ire c t Employment Impact of $1 B illio n C apital Investm ent, S elected In d u s trie s —Continued

Ind u stry number and t i t l e

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

Engines and tu rb in e s ...............................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent............................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery............
M aterials handling m achinery and e q u ip m e n t.......
M etalworking m achinery and equipm ent...........................
Special in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent..................
G eneral in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent..............
Machine shop p ro d u c ts............................................................
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines..................
Service in d u stry m achines....................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s............
Household a p p lia n ce s...............................................................
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.......................
R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication equipm ent.........
E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.........................
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipm ent.
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent.............................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................. ................................................
Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent.........................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m e n ts.......................
O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic e q u ip m e n t....
M iscellaneous m anufacturing...............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing.........................................
66 Communications,except b ro a d ca stin g ................................
67 Radio and te le v is io n b ro a d ca stin g ..................................
68 E le c tric ,g a s,w a te r,a n d sa n ita ry s e rv ic e s ..................
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e .................................................
70 Finance and in su ra n ce .................. ..........................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l..........................................................
72 H otels; personal and re p a ir s e rv ic e s ...........................
73 B usiness s e rv ic e s .....................................................................
74 Research and developm ent......................................................
75 Automobile re p a ir and s e rv ic e s .........................................
76 Amusements..............................................................................
77 M edical, e d u c a tio n a l,and n o n p ro fit o rg a n iz a tio n s..
78 Federal Government e n te rp ris e s .........................................
79 S ta te and lo c a l government e n te rp ris e s .......................
TOTAL................................................. ..............................................

Other
a g ric u l­ c o nNew c ­
stru
tu ra l
tio n
products
874
17,158
878
127
894
219
2,116
1,188
89
163
746

837
757
21,955
216
3,416
793
3,421
910
603
675
1,581
109
254
544
281
421
5,178
321
640
299
126
236
4,981
681
137
746
15,428
1,748
303
1,026
2,805
53
309
188
432
933
419
97,795

210

420
203
136
•
467
4,450
233
608
263
55
301
5,035
665
183
733
16,925
1,865
318
946
3,741
51
396
213
442
1,044
429
103,022

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of in d iv id u al item s may not equal to ta ls .




30

Food
and
kindred
products
311
356
242
936
832
9,207
2,218
680
1,632
2,104

2,011

296
519
628
484
334
4,231
591
521
2,574
89
449
4,860
742
171
708
14,923
1,846
322
1,017
3,488
43
396
208
449
949
409
104,094

Iron and Transpor­
s te e l
ta tio n
manufac- and ware­
tu rin g housing
575
85
457
765
18,419
1,244
7,027
711
477
232
3,730
156
536
369
331
138
737
489
616
1,228
113
432
4,667
795
162
706
12,659
1,812
324
1,007
3,143
35
374
192
429
827
384
111,008

672
484
598
1,417
724
99
1,186
801
624
738
1,710
229
530
1,277
533
552
2,387
5,535
19,651
445
113
382
4,521
629
144
710
12,087
1,687
282
973
2,947
55
349
181
445
843
393
105,801

M edical,
Trade,
educa­
including tio n a l ,
e atin g
and non­
and
p r o f it
drinking
o rg a n i­
places
z atio n s
261
213
271
901
1,067
1,490

1,122

597
1,323
3,895
1,780
742
607
773
406
401
5,872
197
414
448
63
1,643
5,020
702
182
724
17,495

1,888

341
999
3,727

111

413
*18
454
1,037
426
103,857

135
337
193
206
422
330
543
438
1,416
661
1,238
359
813
513
520
733
997
440

100

5,670
417
675
4,949
658
207

666

12,783
1,925
315
920
4,225
30
487

221

457
883
396
110,086

Appendix
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF METHODS FOR THE CAPITAL FLOW MATRIX, 1958
The following section presents a description of the procedures used in the initial distribution
of capital equipment in the Capital Flow Matrix, 1958.
After this initial distribution, capital expenditures were derived for each consuming sector
in the capital flow matrix. The comparison of these totals with independent control totals neces­
sitated changing the initial distribution of capital purchases in many cases.
The allocation of capital was made from the producing sector, i.e., the marketing pattern of
capital produced was estimated. The estimates of the amount of capital produced by each sector
were obtained from the Office of Business Economics (OBE). The matrix reflects use of capital
rather than ownership by the respective interindustry sales and purchases (ISP) sectors.
For each category of producer durable equipment:
1. The new ISP number is given followed by the sector title.
2. The producers’ value and trade and transportation margins are given. All figures are in
thousands of dollars.
3. For each producer durable category the specific producer durable equipment items in the
sector are given. Each of these is followed by its SIC number. This information is based
upon data supplied by the Office of Business Economics.
4. There is a description of the method of distribution used. In many cases the description
is based on a judgment. When some other system was employed, the source used is noted. !
The main consuming sectors also are listed, and in some instances their relative mag­
nitude of consumption is pointed out.
Interindustry Sales and Purchases Category (ISP)
ISP 17 Miscellaneous Textile Products:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

44,645
1,311
7,511

Producer Durable Equipment (PDE) consists of: carpets and rugs, Standard Industrial Classifi­
cation Number (SIC) (2271,2,9; 2291051).
Method of Distribution. Percent breakdown of nonproduction workers for 1958 by ISP sector
excluding farm. Source: Employment and Earnings and Survey of Current Business.
ISP 20 Lumber and Wood Products:
Value:
PDE consists of:




Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin
wooden vats and tanks, noncoopered (SIC 2499566).
31

5,920
605
963

Method of Distribution. Judgment: it was decided that these noncoopered wooden vats and tanks
were used mainly for storage of bulk items. They were distributed to farm, food processing, and
transportation sectors.
ISP 22 Household Furniture:
Value:
PDE consists of:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

126,206
4,306
8,653

household type furniture purchased for business use (SIC 251).

Method of Distribution. Percent distribution of nonproduction workers for 1958 by ISP sector
except farm. Source: Employment and Earnings and Survey of Current Business.
ISP 23 Other Furniture and Fixtures:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

798,350
21,116
347,136

PDE consists of: wood office furniture (SIC 2521), metal office furniture (SIC 2522), public buil­
ding and related furniture (SIC 2531), partitions and shelving (SIC 254), Venetian blinds and shades
(SIC 2591), and furniture and fixtures, not elsewhere classified (n.e.c.) (SIC 2599).
Method of Distribution. The method of distributing other furniture and fixtures was the same as
that used for carpets and rugs and for household furniture because the same type of employee would
be using office furniture. Since partitions and shelving was such a large part of this category, more
emphasis was placed on the trade sector. Other exceptions to the general method: wood office fur­
niture went primarily to trade, finance and insurance; business services; and medical, educational,
nonprofit organizations and related services (sector 77). Public building furniture all went to med­
ical, educational, nonprofit organizations and related services. Hospitals beds were allocated
to sector 77. Restaurant furniture all went to trade.
ISP 32 Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastics Products:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

52,318
1,566
6,162

PDE consists of: flat transmission belts (SIC 3069113) and plastic dinnerware and plastic and
rubber gas/water hose (SIC 3069, 79).
Method of Distribution. Flat transmission belts went to all sectors which use belt driven mach­
ines, conveyors, and equipment utilizing this type of belt drive. Plastic dinnerware went exclu­
sively to trade.
ISP 34 Other Leather Products:
Value:




Producers’ value
32

4,705

Transportation margin
Trade margin
PDE consists of:

116
3,487

saddles, whips and harnesses (SIC 31990).

Method of Distribution.
to other farms.

A portion was given to amusements, some to livestock, and the remainder

ISP 39 Metal Cans, Shipping Barrels, Drums, Kegs and Pails:
Value:
PDE consists of:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

10,202
388
158

beer barrels (SIC 3491312)

Method of Distribution. The largest portion was given to beverage industry (14); the rest went to
liquor wholesalers and retailers (trade).
ISP 40 Heating, Plumbing, and Fabricated Structural Metal Products:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

707,859
16,831
33,724

PDE consists of: heat transfer equipment and steam condensers (SIC 34431), water tube and fire
tube steel power boilers (SIC 34433), metal pressure tanks and boiler shop equipment (SIC 34435).
Method of Distribution. Some items were allocated directly using detailed breakdown such as oil
field tanks, farm storage tanks and liquid gas tanks. Metal pressure tanks and vessels were distri­
buted by judgment basis to sectors utilizing them. Water tube and fire tube steel power boilers and
heat transfer and steam condensers were distributed by a percent breakdown of electrical energy
purchased, generated and sold by ISP. Source: 1963 Census of Manufactures, subject report on
“Fuels and Electric Energy,” (Series MC63(P)-2, January 8, 1964).
ISP 42 Other Fabricated Metal Products:
Value:
PDE consists of:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

166,145
4,650
94,213

safes and vaults (SIC 3492) and valves and fittings (SIC 3494).

Method of Distribution. Valves and fittings were distributed to those industries and sectors which
flow liquids or gas. The 1958 Census of Manufactures was used to get a breakdown of safes and
vaults, most of which were bank safes and vaults and safe deposit boxes which were given to the
finance and insurance sector.




33

ISP 43 Engines and Turbines:
Value:

Producers* value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

576,461
9,357
71,640

PDE consists of: steam engines and turbines (SIC 3511) and internal combustion engines, not
elsewhere classified (n.e.c.) (SIC 3519). The “other” category is distributed among the following:
gasoline, diesel, nonauto motive, gas and outboard.
Method of Distribution. The 1963 Statistical Abstract was used to determine that, in 1962, the
electrical output of the country was divided as follows: 86 percent from the public utilities sector
and 14 percent from all other sources. Steam engines and turbines were split in the same ratio.
The 14 percent that went to all other sectors was distributed by using a percent breakdown of
electricity purchased, generated, and sold by ISP from a subject report on “Fuels and Electric
Energy,” 1963 Census of Manufactures (Series MC63(P)-2, January 8, 1964).
Gasoline and diesel engines were distributed by using a percent breakdown of the “Horsepower of
Power Equipment Available in Manufacturing, December 31, 1962,” a subject report, 1963 Census
of Manufactures (Series MC63(P)-1, November 21, 1963).
Outboard motors were given mainly to amusements; the remainder were distributed widely by
judgment to many sectors.
ISP 44 Farm Machinery and Equipment:
Value:

Producers* value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

1,669,612
53,151
405,379

PDE consists of: wheel tractors (SIC 35222), planting and seeding machinery (SIC 35223), plows
and harrows (SIC 35224), harvesting machinery (SIC 35225), haying machinery (SIC 35226), farm
dairy machinery (SIC 3522810), cultivating and weeding machinery (SIC 3522815), crop preparing
machinery (SIC 3522821), poultry equipment (SIC 3522831), barn and barnyard equipment (SIC
3522841), farm elevators (SIC 3522871), garden tractors (SIC 35228815), spraying and dusting
machinery (SIC 3522891), lawnmowers (SIC 35227), and other farm machinery (SIC 35228).
Method of Distribution. All of this category was given to farm with three exceptions: some
garden tractors, half of the lawnmowers and some of the “other” category were given to many
sectors. These items were distributed using a percent breakdown of gardeners and groundskeepers
(except farm) by industry. Source: Census of Population, 1960, “Occupation by Industry.” Also, in
the “other” category, half the farm blowers were given to transportation due to this sector’s huge
grain storage facilities.
ISP 45 Construction and Mining Machinery:
Value:




Producers* value
Transportation margin
Trade margin
34

1,319,091
38,681
147,354

PDE consists of: off-highway wheel tractors (SIC 35311,3), tracklaying tractors (SIC 35312,3),
construction machinery and equipment (n.e.c.) (SIC 35314,9), mining machinery and equipment
(SIC 3533).
Method of Distribution. After a more detailed study of the types and relative values obtained
from the 1958 Census of Manufactures, most of the construction machinery was given to the con­
struction sector. Some tractors went to farm and logging, some concrete equipment to stone and
3lay manufacturing, some washers and grinders and large shovels to all mining sectors.
All mining machinery was apportioned to the mining sectors and oil field machinery to petroleum
mining.
Leasing seems to be a major problem in the allocation of construction machinery.
ISP 46 Materials Handling Equipment:
Value:
PDE consists of:
(SIC 3537).

Producers* value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

351,833
8,126
27,330

conveyors (SIC 35351), hoists (SIC 35361), industrial trucks and tractors

Method of Distribution. Judgment: emphasis was on sectors with heavy equipment, those which
move large bulk items, and mining.
ISP 47 Metalworking Machinery:
Value:

Producers* value
^Transportation margin
Trade margin

1,153,203
25,162
123,176

PDE consists of: metal cutting-type machine tools (SIC 3541), metalworking machines, except
machine tools (SIC 3542), metal molds (SIC 3544213), forging dies and die-cast sets (SIC 3544131-51),
power driven handtools (SIC 3548211-26), metalworking machinery, (n.e.c.) (SIC 3548).
Method of Distribution. Distributed by a percent breakdown of metalworking machinery from a
McGraw-Hill survey in the American Machinist, June 1963.
ISP 48 Special Industry Machinery
Value:

Producers* value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

1,468,374
24,555
127,655

PDE consists of: food products machinery (SIC 3551), textile machinery (SIC 3552), woodworking
machinery (SIC 3553), woodworking machinery for home workshops (SIC 35532), pulp and paper
industry machinery (SIC 3554), printing trades machinery (SIC 3555), special industry machinery,
(n.e.c.) (SIC 3559). The last category was further broken up using the 1958 Census of Manufactures.
Ratios obtained from the value of shipments, table 6A, were applied to the value of the n.e.c.




35

category. It was broken down into the following categories: chemical industry machinery, foundry
machinery, plastic-working machinery, rubber-working machinery, petroleum re fining machinery,
tobacco manufacturing machinery, clay-working machinery, cement and concrete machinery, shoe­
making and repairs machinery, cotton-ginning machines, metal cleaning, degreasing, finishing,
drying machines, electronic-tube-making machines, electronic nonmetallic processing ovens,
kilns, and lehrs, fuel-fired kilns (cement, wood and chemical processing, other nonmetallic
processing ovens and furnaces, and other special industry machines).
Method of Distribution, It is reasonably well established that the industry utilizing this type of
equipment was fairly well isolated by its descriptive Census title. Therefore, the distribution was
made generally on this basis.
ISP 49 General Industry Machinery:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

1,050,818
21,174
171,819

PDE consists of: pumps and compressors (SIC 3561), blowers and fans (SIC 3564), industrial
patterns (SIC 3565), industrial furnaces and ovens, electrical (SIC 35671), fuel-fired (SIC 35672),
and general industrial machinery, n.e.c. (SIC 3569).
Method of Distribution. Pumps and compressors went to all sectors, especially to those which
flow liquids and gas or petroleum, and to trade, transportation, and public utilities. Blowers and
fans, dust collection and air purification equipment went to all industries but especially to coal mining,
metal mining, manufacturing, trade, and medical, educational, and related services. Industrial pat­
terns were apportioned to the major machinery makers, rubber and plastics, and to m iscel­
laneous manufacturing. Industrial furnaces and ovens went primarily to metal manufacturing.
For distribution of general industrial machinery, n.e.c., a greater detail was obtained from the
1958 Census of Manufactures.
ISP 51 Office, Computing, and Accounting Machinery:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

1,015,811
23,188
273,006

PDE consists of: computing and related equipment (SIC 3573,74), typewriters (SIC 3572),
scales and balances (SIC 3576) including -railroad and motor truck scales, industrial scales,
retail and commercial scales and miscellaneous scales, office and store machinery, n.e.c.
(SIC 3579).
Method of Distribution. A percent distribution of computers by industry was obtained from a
study by Diebold Group, Inc., Use of Electronic Computers, unpublished (1962). This was used
to apportion electronic computing and processing equipment. To distribute related equipment which
includes punched card systems, accounting and bookkeeping, adding and calculating machines,
a percent distribution of office machine operators was obtained from the Census of Population,
1960, “Occupation by Industry.” The same source was used to obtain a percent distribution of
office machine operators, secretaries, and stenographers to apportion typewriters and other
36




office and store machines. This category includes duplicating, dictating, check handling, time
recording, autograph and other machines. Scales and balances were distributed as follows:
railroad and truck scales to transportation, retail and commercial scales to trade and industrial
scales to all industries by judgment. Cash registers went to the trade sector.
ISP 52 Service Industry Machinery:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

955,253
39,786
301,646

PDE consists of: automatic vending machines (SIC 3581), laundry and drycleaning equipment
(SIC 3582), industrial vacuum cleaners (SIC 35893), air conditioning and refrigeration machinery
(SIC 3585), measuring and dispensing equipment (SIC 3586), and service industry machines, n.e.c.
(SIC 3589).
Method of Distribution. Automatic vending machines went to trade; commercial laundry and drycleaning equipment to the personal services sector; industrial vacuum cleaners went primarily to
trade but also to personal and repair services, real estate, and medical, educational services, and
nonprofit organizations. Some parts of the refrigeration machines Category were apportioned
directly to trade and warehousing (transportation) and all the rest was distributed by a percent
breakdown of air conditioning and refrigerator repairmen by industry from the special occupational
publication, cited previously, of the Bureau of Census, 1960. Measuring and dispensing equipment
went primarily to trade and secondarily to transportation. The smaller items in the not elsewhere
classified category included floor sanding, carpet-sweeping equipment and household and farm water
softeners. These were distributed to all sectors. The larger items in the not elsewhere classified
category were distributed as follows: commerical cooking, industrial water softeners and dish­
washing machinery to trade, personal and repair services, and medical, educational services, and
nonprofit organizations; floor waxing and polishing machinery to construction sectors.
ISP 53 Electrical Transmission and Distribution Equipment:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

1,616,843
46,365
154,680

PDE consists of: electrical measuring instruments (SIC 3611), power distribution and specialty
transformers (SIC 3612), switchgear and switchboard apparatus (SIC 3613), motors and generators
(SIC 3621), industrial controls (SIC 3622), welding apparatus (SIC 3623), and electrical industrial
apparatus, n.e.c. (SIC 3629) which consists mainly of capacitors (SIC 36291).
Method of Distribution. This category was distributed mainly on a judgment basis. Electrical
measuring instruments went chiefly to communications, radio and TV, and personal and repair
services. Power distribution and specialty transformers all were given to the utilities sector.
Switchgear and switchboard apparatus went mainly to utilities; some went to transportation and
some to communications. Motors and generators went primarily to utilities and to others producing
their own electricity. Industrial controls, welding apparatus and apparatus,n.e.c.>were distributed
to all manufacturing using a percent breakdown of sector output.




37

ISP 54 Household Appliances:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

92,776
2,824
19,226

PDE consists of: household cooking equipment (SIC 3631), household refrigerators (SIC 36321),
household laundry equipment (SIC 3633), electric houseware and fans (SIC 3634), household water
heaters (SIC 36391), sewing machines (SIC 3636), household vacuum cleaners (SIC 3635).
Method of Distribution. Cooking equipment went primarily to trade, household refrigerators
to trade, household laundry equipment to personal services and trade, electrical houseware and
fans to trade, household water heaters primarily to trade, industrial sewing machines to apparel,
and household vacuum cleaners to personal services.
ISP 55 Electrical Wiring and Lighting Equipment:
Value:
PDE consists of:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

25,466
685
3,297

lighting fixtures (SIC 3642) and lightning arrestors (SIC 3643).

Method of Distribution. Some portable residential type fixtures, other fluorescent fixtures, and
special commercial and institutional fixtures and lamps were distributed to all sectors based on out­
put. Most of the equipment involved here was assumed to be purchased by trade, personal and repair
services, and medical, educational services, and nonprofit organizations.
ISP 56 Communications Equipment:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

1,008,776
21,062
62,215

PDE consists of: radio and television receiving sets, except communication type (SIC 3651),
telephone and telegraph apparatus (SIC 3661), radio and television transmitting, signaling, and
detection equipment (SIC 3662).
Method of Distribution. All of telephone and telegraph equipment went to communications,
except teletype, a portion of which went to printing and publishing (newspapers) and to finance
and insurance (stockbrokers). Most radio and TV communications equipment went to radio and
TV broadcasting. Two items were distributed widely: intercom equipment and electrical alarms.
ISP 57 Electrical Components and Accessories:
Value:
PDE consists of:




Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin
magnetic recording tape (SIC 36795).
38

26,650
644
1,432

Method of Distribution. Fifty-five percent to all sectors utilizing computers by a percent break­
down of computers owned and leased (source: Diebold study, 1962); 28 percent to the communica­
tions equipment sector (manufacturers of phonograph records); 12 percent to radio and TV broad­
casting; and 5 percent to the communications sector.
ISP 58 Miscellaneous Electrical Machinery and Equipment:
Value:

Producers’ value
83,419
Transportation margin
1,780
Trade margin
14,633
PDE consists of: storage batteries (SIC 3691), wet-cell primary batteries (SIC 3692), X-ray
and therapeutic apparatus (SIC 3693).
Method of Distribution. Industrial truck storage batteries were distributed the same as indus­
trial trucks (see ISP 46); communications type batteries went to communications; railroad airconditioning and lighting batteries went to transportation. All X-ray and therapeutic apparatus
went to medical and educational services, except industrial X-ray equipment which was distri­
buted to a wide range of industry.
ISP 59 Motor Vehicle and Equipment:
Value:

Producers’ value
3,575,464
Transportation margin
88,477
Trade margin
689,601
PDE consists of: truck and bus bodies not sold to manufacturing (SIC 3713), ambulance and
hearses (SIC 371307-5), truck trailers (SIC 3715), truck tractors and chassis (SIC 37172), motor
buses (SIC 3717311), passenger cars (SIC 3717).
Method of Distribution. The truck and bus bodies category was distributed as follows: vans to
trade, transportation, and personal and repair services; panel, delivery and pick-up trucks to
trade and personal and repair services; dump to mining and construction; stake and platform to
farm and food processing; others to scattered sectors. Ambulances went to medical services
and hearses to the personal services sector (mortuaries). Motor buses went almost exclusively
to transportation, a small amount going to educational and nonprofit organizations. Passenger
cars, truck trailers, trucks, tractors, and chassis were distributed by trying first a percent
breakdown of intermediate purchases of repair services by ISP from the input-output tables,
and second, by using the distribution of gasoline purchases from the input-output chart. Neither
of these gave a reasonable distribution of passenger car and truck purchases, so significant
changes from the initial distributions were made, based largely on judgment.
ISP 60 Aircraft and Parts:
Value:
PDE consists of:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin ^
Trade margin

357,810
4,818
44,154

aircraft (and accessories) (SIC 3721).

Method of Distribution. Major portion of airplanes went to transportation sector. These were
the large commercial planes. Smaller business aircraft were distributed to all sectors. Dollar




39

amounts were arrived at by judgment. A percent breakdown of airplane pilots and navigators by
industry from the 1960 Census of Population was tried for the distribution of the business air­
craft. It was found unsatisfactory because of several irregularities in the distribution.
ISP 61 Other Transportation Equipment:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

1,178,300
8,848
36,934

PDE consists of: railroad service type locomotives (SIC 37411), other industrial locomotives
(SIC 37412), rebuilt locomotives (SIC 37414), freight train cars (SIC 37422), streetcars (SIC 37423),
other auto trailers (SIC 37991), farm wagons (SIC 3799211-221), boat trailers (SIC 3799291), other
transportation equipment, n.e.c. (SIC 37992), ships, new construction (SIC 37313), ships conversion
and repair (SIC 37316), new boats (SIC 3732), and boat repair (SIC 37324).
Method of Distribution. Locomotives were given almost entirely to transportation; a few went
to mining. Trailers and coaches were allocated to trade and transportation, farm wagons to the
farm sectors. Ships and boats went mainly to transportation, a small amount to the amusement
sector. Freight and passenger cars were distributed largely to transportation; however, some
were apportioned to the mining and manufacturing sectors. The n.e.c. category and smaller
items were distributed primarily to trade, transportation, construction, and amusements.
ISP 62 Professional, Scientific, and Controlling Instruments:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

531,543
17,031
76,309

PDE consists of: laboratory balances (SIC 3811271,61), laboratory furniture (SIC 3811281-9),
other scientific instruments (SIC 381211,41), gas, water and other liquid meters (SIC 3821),
other mechanical and measuring instruments (SIC 3821), surgical and medical instruments
(SIC 3841), orthopedic, prosthetic instruments, and surgical supplies (SIC 3842), and dental
equipment (SIC 3843).
Method of Distribution. A percent distribution of dentists, physicians, surgeons, and natural
scientists from the 1960 Census of Population, “Occupation by Industry” was used.
After further comparisons, it appears as though, under the method of apportionment used, food
processing got an excess of the value, and utilities andiron and steel, too little.
ISP 63 Optical and Photographic Equipment:
Value:

Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

162,809
5,589
17,077

PDE consists of: field glasses and telescopes (SIC 3831031), microprojectors (SIC 3831051),
microscopes (SIC 3831053), optical measuring instruments (SIC 3831071), other optical instru-




40

merits and lenses (SIC 3831098), ophthalmic goods (SIC 3851), still picture equipment (SIC 38611),
photocopy and microfilm equipment (SIC 38612), motion picture equipment (SIC 38613).
Method of Distribution. This category was distributed on a judgment basis. Field glasses and
telescopes went to agriculture and forestry services, mining, transportation (mainly airport
facilities and pilots), amusements, construction, and educational and nonprofit organizations. Micro­
projectors went to medical and educational services, microscopes to chemicals, drugs, research,
and mainly to the medical and educational services sector. Optical measuring instruments were
apportioned to a wide range of sectors but primarily to aircraft and motor vehicles, research and
development, and medical and educational services. Ophthalmic goods, which is entirely composed
of industrial goggles and protectors, went to all manufacturing industries but mainly to metal
manufacturing. Still picture equipment went almost exclusively to printing and publishing and
personal and repair services (where photo labs and portrait studios are located); some went to
educational services, and some to business services. Photocopy equipment was given to printing
and publishing, and microfilm equipment to business services, educational and nonprofit organi­
zations (libraries). All 35 MM movie equipment went to amusements as did most of the 16 MM
equipment. Some 16 MM equipment went to personal and repair services, some to business
services, and some to educational services.
ISP 64 Miscellaneous Manufacturing:
Value:

Producers* value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

278,695
8,804
31,426

PDE consists of: musical instruments (SIC 3931), sporting and athletic goods (SIC 3949),
luminous tube and bulb signs (SIC 3993111), signs, n.e.e. (SIC 3993000), chemical fire extin­
guishing equipment (SIC 39991), coin operated amusement machines (SIC 39992), and beauty
and barbershop furniture (SIC 3999311).
Method of Distribution. Musical instruments and sporting and athletic equipment went to
amusements and to educational and nonprofit institutions. Most of the luminous tube and bulb
signs and the fire extinguishing equipment went to trade. The remaining portion of these latter
two items in addition to other signs was distributed to all industries. Coin operated amusement
machines went largely to the amusement sector; what remained was given to trade. Beauty
and barbershop furniture all went to personal and repair services.
ISP 65 and 69 Transportation and Trade:
Value:

Transportation margin
Trade margin

507,242
3,747,475

Method of Distribution. Transportation and trade were distributed within producing industries
by the margin ratios of that producer durables category. These ratios were obtained from the
input-output tables of OBE. The individual transportation and trade values then were summed
by consuming industry.
ISP 66 Communications (except radio and TV broadcasting):
Value:




Producers* value
41

361,814

PDE consists of:

see comments.

Method of Distribution.

See comments.

Comments. This item is the capitalized payrolls for installation of transformers, switch­
boards and other communications equipment. These payrolls are capitalized and depreciated like
capital equipment but are not included with equipment costs. Method of distribution was to take
a percent breakdown of communications equipment (ISP 56) and to apply this to the total value
of this category, thus apportioning it in the same manner as the equipment which was installed.
ISP 71 Real Estate and Rental:
Value:

Producers’ value

PDE consists of:

1,209,000

margin on residential and nonresidential construction.

Method of Distribution. This item was not distributed separately.
ISP 80 Gross Imports of Goods and Services:
Value:

Producers’ value

PDE consists of:

special and general industrial machinery.

Method of Distribution.




15,500

The above was placed in ISP 80. It was apportioned as follows:

ISP 48 Special Industry Machinery:
Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

15,068
912
2,042

ISP 49 General Industrial Machinery:
Producers’ value
Transportation margin
Trade margin

432
26
58

42

Table A -l. C ap ital Flows, 1958
Producers' Values
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Consuming in d u strie s

L ivestock
and
liv e sto c k
products

gricul­ Iron and N onferOther
F o restry Atu ra l ,
a g ric u l­
and
fe rro ­
rous
tu ra l
fish e ry fo re s try , a llo y
m etal
and
products products fish e ry
ores
ores
mining
se rv ice s mining

Coal
mining

Crude
p e tro ­
leum and
n a tu ra l
gas

Producing in d u s trie s
17
20
22
23
32
34
39
40
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts,except c o n ta in e rs............
Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u c ts...........................
M etal c o n ta in e rs.....................................................................
H eating,plumbing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
Other fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts....................................
Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery.........
M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking m achinery and equipm ent.........................
Special in d u stry m achinery and e q u ip m e n t........
G eneral in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
Household a p p lia n ce s............................................................
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
Radio te le v is io n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent...
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.................. ..........................
T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing......................................
6 6 Communications,except b ro ad castin g .............................
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l........................................................
80 Gross im ports of goods and se rv ic e s ...........................
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See footnotes a t end of ta b le .




(I/)
(I/)

Cl/)
(l/>

(l/>
(l/>

(!/>

1

( I /)
( I /)

24
4

6

2
8

1,204
37

2

10

29
8

1

23
( I /)
1

Cl/)

2

5
31

1
3
1
<l/>
1

18

10

2

2

1

501
4
28

1

1
2

2
13

<l/>

3
( I /)
( I /)
1

55

( I /)

Cl/)

4
1

3,269
2,381
888

43

98
10

3

Cl/)

Cl/)

Cl/)

3
1

1

1

1

1

6

6

10

1
6

1

1

1

<l/>

ci/)

<l/>
2

( I /)

Cl/)
3

118
118

CI/)
CI/)
3

15

Cl/)
Cl/)
4

154
142
12

177
132
45

4

3

Cl/)
28
1
15
18

Cl/)
1

13
76

15

17

99
3

Cl/)

1

6

5

1

CI/)
Cl/)

1

57
57

6

305

CI/)
CI/)

9

1

4

6

1

22

12

78

1

461

600
500

36

84
14

6

166
5
24

1,100

37

2

CI/)
14

2

4

8

185

1

CI/)

CI/)

1

1

1

CI/)

207
176
32

2,552
599
1,953

Table A -l. C ap ital Flows, 1958
Producers' V alues—Continued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous t e x t i le goods and flo o r coverings.
20 Lumber and wood pro d u cts,ex cep t c o n ta in e rs............
22 Household fu rn itu re ........................................ .....................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
34 Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u c ts...........................
39 M etal c o n ta in e rs.....................................................................
40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
42 O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts....................................
43 Engines and tu rb in e s .............................................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent............................. .............
45 C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery.........
46 M aterials handling m achinery and e q u ip m e n t......
47 M etalworking m achinery and equipm ent.........................
48 Special in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
49 G eneral in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
52 S ervice in d u stry m achines.................................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p a ra tu s.........
54 Household a p p lia n ce s............................................................
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 O ther tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
63 O p tic a l,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent. . .
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
6 6 Com munications,except b ro a d ca stin g .............................
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l.......................................................
80 Gross im ports of goods and s e rv ic e s ..................
T otal p la n t and equipm ent................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




Stone
and clay
mining
and
quarrying

Chemical
and f e r ­ co nNew c­
stru
tiliz e r
tio n
m ineral
m ining
11

10

1

1
<I/>

( I />

Broad
M ainte­ Ordnance
and
nance and
Food and Tobacco
narrow
and
re p a ir
kindred
manu­
fa b ric s ,
co n stru c­ acces­ products fa c tu re s yarn and
so rie s
tio n
thread
m ills
12
16
13
14
15

(1/)

5

(1/)

1
<I/>

(I/)
(1/)
1

(l/>
2
( 1 /)

(l/>

(1/)
<l/>

3

<l/>

8

2

(l/>

6

4
46
5

51
11
14
5
(l/>

(1/)

3

(1/)
(1/)
<I/>

11

3

1
(1/)
3

8

2

(1/)
(1/)

6

361

29
9
19
8

13
7

( 1 /)
95
7
4
15
3

(l/>

(I/)

<i/>
5

<I/>

3

10

2

5

1

4
<i/>

(I/)

<I/>

1
1
1

6

<I/>

26

86

2

44

( I /)
<l/>

( 1 /)
1

2

88

2

2

< l/>

148
116
32

(I/)

1

< !/)
( 1 /)

774
744
30

189
189

(1/)

6

16
166
19
30
56
9
<I/>

137
2

<l/>

8

(l/>

(1/)

18
4
4

65
46
19

4
( 1 /)
1

150
7
7
42
2

14

1,000

684
316

9
2
3
(l/>

(1/)
1
(l/>
2

(I/>

103
2
5
2
4

1
(1/)
2

(1/)

7

< I />

<1/)
1
<I/>

39
24
15

188
163
25

Table A -l. C ap ital Flows, 1958
Producers' V alues—Continued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
20 Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts,except c o n ta in e rs............
22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
34 Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u c ts...........................
39 Metal c o n ta in e rs.....................................................................
40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal products*.
42 Other fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts.................. .................
43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent................................,..........
45 C onstruction,m ining,and o i l f ie ld m achinery.........
46 M a terials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
47 Metalworking m achinery and equipm ent.........................
48 S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
49 G eneral in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent......... ..
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
52 Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
54 Household a p p lia n ce s............................................................
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,an d communication e q u ip m e n t....
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
63 O ptical.ophthalm ic.and photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
6 6 Com munications.except b ro a d ca stin g .............................
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ..............................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l........................................................
80 Gross im ports of goods and se rv ic e s ...........................
T otal p lan t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




M iscel­
M iscel­ Lumber
laneous
laneous and wood
te x tile
f a b r i­ p ro d u c ts, Wooden
cated
Apparel
goods
except
con­
and
t e x tile
ta in e rs
con­
flo o r
products ta in e rs
coverings
17

(1/)
Cl/)

1

Cl/)

18

(1/)
1
6

Cl/)

19

Other
fu rn i­
tu re
and
fix tu re s

21

20

House­
hold
fu rn i­
tu re
22

23

(I/)

Cl/)

Cl/)

Cl/)

<i/>

Cl/)

Cl/)

( I /)
4

Cl/)
(l/>
Cl/)

Cl/)

Cl/)

2

1

Cl/)
5

1

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1

( 1 /)

Cl/)

Cl/)
Cl/)

Cl/)
Cl/)

6

6

19

Cl/)

1
1

Cl/)
Cl/)

1

8

33

30

1

< I/>

8

1
1

Cl/)
Cl/)

3

Cl/)
1

Cl/)

Cl/)

75

( 1 /)
22

12

8

1

1

1

2

Cl/)

Cl/)
( I /)
1

4
1

1

Cl/)
< l/>

Cl/)
15
3

C1/)

Cl/>
Cl/)

Cl/)
1

Cl/)

Cl/)

2

1

Cl/)

3

2

( I /)

Cl/)

( 1 /)

<i/>

1
1

3

Cl/)

1

25
16
9

289
192
97

158
56
16

Cl/)
3

8

1

6

3

Cl/)
1

1
6

43

25

13

45

25
4
14

1
1
<l/>
1

1

2

119
91
28

( 1 /)

1

30

Cl/)

(I/)
1

( 1 /)

<I/>

( 1 /)

1

11

1

(l/>

4

53
43

1

1

< I/>

8

Cl/)
Cl/)

1

6

6

Paper
and
a llie d
prod­
u c ts ,
except
con­
ta in e rs
24

14
12

2

67
46
21

39
27
12

477
369
107

Table A -l. C ap ital Flows, 1958
Producers* V alues—Continued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
zu Liuuu6 ic cUiu wood products ^oxcdpt c o u tsin ^ rs ••• •••
22 Household f u rn itu re ...............................................................
23 O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
„, _
...
. .,
i,

Chemi­
Petroleum
D rugs,
P la s tic s c le an in g , P ain ts re fin in g
P rin tin g c a ls
and
and
and
and
and
and pub­ se le c te d sy n th e tic t o il e t
a llie d re la te d
lis h in g chem ical m a te ria ls prepa­
products indus­
products
t r ie s
ra tio n s
26
27
28
29
30
31

Paperboard
con­
ta in e rs
and
boxes
25
( 1 /)

1

(l/>

( 1 /)

( 1 /)

( I /)

CI/)

(l/>

(I/>
5
( 1 /)

<l/>

< !/)

2

6

<l/>

<l/>

<l/>
4
<l/>

3

3

43 Engines and t u r b i n e s ........................................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
/r p
«•.
**
«
11 _
7 Mp fa 1uatVi mpphinAvy anH Prjiri pmpnf
48 S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
49 G eneral in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
5? Serui re in d u stry nuirhines .. tI f , M
rf,
^^ E l Prfrn /» lliUUQti n 1 pnin nmonf nnrl annarahne
1
J «/ blCU Lllt *n/lnefri'JLdX C^UipUICiIU dllll appcLLaLUo • • • • •
SA HmiaphnlH app 1 i anrpc
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
^7 E l Pr*PrAnn r* r*AmnnnOnf c an/l aoroeeAf*i £*c
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r t s . . . . . . . .................................................

1
8

( 1 /)

( 1 /)

1

( 1 /)
3
( 1 /)

1

3

31

3

8

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

1
8

1

<I/>
2

.

2

<l/>

ft 1 f i t h p r f r f l n s p n r f f l f i n n

62
63
64
65

58
16

<l/>

12

2

(l/>

(l/>

1

1

(l/>

CI/)
2

5
172
2
12

( 1 /)

4

60
147
13

45
53

x

22

1

6
1

5

32
26
3

3

6

4
21

23
4
4

1

x

17
44
28

x

x

17

41
37
8

( 1 /)
2

( I /)
<l/>

( 1 /)

(l/>

(l/>

(l/>

2

1

1

<l/>
( 1 /)

<l/>
3

<l/>

10

< i/)
4

( 1 />
14
<l/>

<I/>
17

( I /)
2

(l/>
4

<l/>
3

(l/>
3

2

c i/)

C i/)
15

1

..................

2

1

..................

P r j u i pm*»nf~

S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m e n ts.....................
O ptical,o p h th alm ic,an d photographic equipm ent...
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w a re h o u s in g .................................

f \ f \ p A m m iin i

2

2

12

8

2

A

32
9

x

1

1

Rubber
and
m iscel­
laneous
p la s tic s
products
32

( 1 /)

( 1 /)
19

<l/>

30
25

2

x

20

9

9

4

2

1

2

1

1

1

1

7

3

5

<l/>

2

8

C l/)
3

1

1

2

1

6

a />
3

8

32

59

23

15

8

43

20

104
64
40

424
283
141

637
447
189

234
181
53

178

71
58
13

808
302
506

204
159
45

1

n n o p y r p p f K r n flH p p o f i n ^

69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ...............................................
71 Rpa I P n f p f p and r p n f f l l - T - - r - - --- t
AO (Ifn c c JUupU 1. t o U o U U lQ a llU epf*ti^rpc
Ow U L U O d imnpffe n fl g A n rU o afiH o C L V I t C D • • • • • • • • • • • • •
T otal p la n t and equipm ent ......................................................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




1

46

111
66

Table A -l. Capital Flows, 1958
Producers' Values—Continued
(Millions o£ dollars)
Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous te x t i le goods and flo o r coverings.
20 Lumber and wood p ro d u c ts,except c o n ta in e rs............
22 Household f u rn itu re ...............................................*
..............
23 Other fu rn itu re and f i x tu r e s .........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts............

Leather
Stone
tanning Footwear G lass
and
and
and in ­
and
d u s tria l o th er
g lass
clay
le a th e r le a th e r products products
products products
33

34

35

( 1 /)

( 1 /)

<I / >

Primary
iro n
and
s te e l
manufac­
tu rin g
37

( 1 /)

ci/>

<I/ >

( 1 /)

( 1 /)

( 1 /)

<I/>

(I / )

1

ci / )

1

2

6

( 1 /)

(I/>

4
( 1 /)

1

( 1 /)

9
( 1 /)

( 1 /)

2

( 1 /)
(l/>

36

( 1 /)

( 1 /)

4

( 1 /)

2

(I/)

1

5

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..

(I/)

1

1

43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................

( 1 /)

(I/)

1

2

11

1

1

1
1

(l/>
35
13
3

( 1 /)
c
13
336

45 C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery.........
46 M aterials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
4 y M pfalunrlring marh'lnpry anH (KjinpmPnf , , a
ZR
l
1T»Hii.Qt"T*y martvinery and eqit4pment* _ T_ T. TTt
49 General in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
RprvirA indiicfry m arhlnps
,.
( 1
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
q/. UaiioaV I A annl 4amAaa
ia
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring eq u ip m en t..................
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts ................................................................
6 9 Sr»4 Mi,ii f4r and rn n frn l 1 4 « g 4r»« f"t*irniPnt a , 1 T, , , 1 , , t
63 O ptical,ophthalm ic,dlid photographic equipm ent...
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing .....................................
6 6 Com munications,except b ro ad castin g .............................
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ................................................
71
Oofaf o an /1 i*nn
AH
4mnArf* o af aaaHq a«%/]
aao
T otal p la n t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................

6

13

1

1

1

4

14
5
4
1

21

4

18
4
9
( 1 /)
7
109

1
22

( 1 /)

7
47
10

22

21

10

35

51

8

126
9

<10
5

1

10
1

45

10

4

2
5
4
13

1
1

(I / )

(I/ >

( 1 /)

C i/)

1

C1/)
3

( 1 /)

1

C l/)
( 1 /)

C l/)

(I/)

1

<I/>

1

(I / )

( 1 /)

C1./)

Ci/)

2

6

8

..........

1

(I/)

4

1

..........

( 1 /)
7

C i/)

1

( 1 /)
27

( 1 /)

1

1

Ci/)

1

5

10

2

20

( 1 /)

(I / )

(I / )

1

3

(I / )

(I/ )

( 1 /)

1

1

4

14

1

Cl/)

Ci/)
( 1 /)

6

1

3

2

4

5

28

88

36

4

19

34
29
5

71
39
32

302
203
98

1,159
753
406

439
290
149

60
37
23

193
131
62

( 1 /)

15
13
2

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




Primary
H eating,
nonferplumb­
Metal
rous
c o n ta in ­ ing , and
m etals
s tru c ­
e rs
tu ra l
manufac­
m etal
tu rin g
products
40
38
39

47

1

2

1

Table A-l. Capital Flows, 1958
Producers' Values—Continued
(Millions of dollars)
Stamp­ Other
Construc­
ings,
fabri­
tion,
Farm
screw
cated
machine metal Engines machinery mining,
and
and o il­
products products turbines and
field
and
equipment machinery
bolts
42
44
43
45
41
17 M iscellaneous t e x t i le goods and flo o r coverings,
Cl/)
( 1 /)
(l/>
(1/)
(I/)

20
22
23
32
34
39
40
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

Lumber and wood pro d u cts,ex cep t c o n ta in e rs............
Household f u r n itu r e .................................................. ..
O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts............
Footwear and o th e r le a th e r p ro d u c ts...........................
M etal c o n ta in e rs.....................................................................
H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts....................................
Engines and tu rb in e s ........................., .................................
Farm machinery and equipm ent. • • • • .........• • • • .............
C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery.........
M a terials handling m achinery and equipm ent. . . . . .
M etalworking m achinery and equipm ent.........................
S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
G eneral in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent...........
O fflee,com puting,and accounting m achines................
S ervice in d u stry m achines..................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
Housdiold appliances •••• ...................................................
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication equipm ent. . . .
E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent..........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
O ther tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g i n s t r u m e n t s ..........
O ptical,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent.••
M iscellaneous m anufacturing............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w a re h o u s in g .....................
6 6 Com munications,except b ro ad castin g .............................
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ..............................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l........................................................
80 Gross im ports of goods and se rv ic e s .........................
T otal p la n t and equipm ent................................................
T otal equipm ent................................................................ ..
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................

(l/>

2

2

Cl/)

(l/>
3
(l/>

Cl/)

3

1

(l/>

( 1 /)

2

( 1 /)
( 1 /)

( 1 /)

4
32

5
7

3
3

<l/>
5
( 1 /)

1
1
2

50

3
9

3

5
3
( 1 /)
4

(1/)
(l/>

( 1 /)
1

( 1 /)
( 1 /)

(l/>

<l/>

(I/)

2

1

(l/>

( 1/)

7

4

1

6

3

2
1

46
(I/)
( 1 /)

47
( 1 /)
1

48
Cl/)
1

( 1 /)

4
<l/>

3
( 1 /)

1

1

1

1

( 1 /)
<I/>

( 1 /)
( 1 /)

1

3

2

<I/>
<I/>
4
43

Cl/)
( 1 /)
( 1 /)
4
13

4
4

5
3

6

3
5
3
2

1

2
2
1
1
1

2

1

5

2

14

13

<±/>
( 1 /)

(l/>
( 1 /)

(I/)
Cl/)

(l/>
<l/>

( 1 /)
( 1 /)

QV)
3

<l/>

<l/>

(l/>

1

( 1 /)

(I/)
3
( 1 /)

1

1

1

.........

( 1 /)

Cl./)

<I/>
(I/)
( 1 /)

( 1 /)
( 1 /)
( 1 /)

( 1 /)
( 1 /)
( 1 /)

1

1

( 1 /)
( 1 /)
(1 /)

2

2

(1 /)
( 1 /)
<I/>

( 1 /)

(1/)

5
( 1 /)
( 1 /)

11

14

4

124

127
96
31

45
30
14

3
0 />

86

38

See footnotes at end of table.




( 1 /)

(l/>
2
<i/>

Materials Metal­ Special
handling working industry
machinery machinery machinery
and
and
and
equipment equipment equipment

48

1

( 1 /)
(1 /)

5

6

2

15

47
34
13

60
41
19

19
14
5

122

2

98
24

2

12

15
90
75
15

Table A -l. C ap ital Flows, 1958
Producers' V alues—Continued
(M illions of d o lla rs)

' n.

Consuming industries

Producing industries
17 Miscellaneous te x tile goods and floor coverings.
20 Lumber and wood products,except containers..........
22 Household furniture.........................................................
23 Other furniture and fixtures.......................................
32 Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products...........
40 Heating,plumbing,and structural metal products..
43 Engines and turbines.......................................................
44 Farm machinery and equipment.......................................
46 Materials handling machinery and equipment...........
47 Metalworking machinery and equipment.......................
48 Special industry machinery and eq u ip m en t........
49 General industrial machinery and equipment...........
51 Office,computing,and accounting machines...............
52 Service industry machines.............................................
53 Electric industrial equipment and apparatus.........
SZl Hnnsphnl rl appl-ianrps,
55 Electric lighting and wiring equipment...................
56 Radio,television,and communication equipment....
57 Electronic components and accessories.....................
58 Miscellaneous electrical machinery and equipment
59 Motor vehicles and equipment.......................................
60 reraft and parts_____, t ____rT. rrTtTTrtTTTtTttg
61 Other transportation equipment...................................
62 Scientific and controlling instruments...................
63 Optical,ophthalmic,and photographic equipment...
64 Miscellaneous manufacturing................................
65 Transportation and warehousing...................................
6 6 Communications,except broadcasting.....................
69 Wholesale and reta il trade...........................................
71 Real estate and rental . . r. - Tt- . ITT. 1rrii rt, ir, ,
.
Sfi flrr»sa -Imports nf grinds and serwires
Total plant and equipment.............................................
Total equipment........................................................... ..
Total plant (new construction)...............................
t r i > t i ■ r i •

, - ,

ri

i

General
Electric
O ffice,
indus­ House­
indus­ Machine- com­
tria l
puting , Service trial
hold
shop
industry equip­
machin­ products and
ery and
account­ machines ment and appli­
ances
equip­
appa­
ing
ment
machines
ratus
49
50
52
51
53
54
Cl/)
C1/)
Cl/)
<I/>
(I/)
(I/)
( 1 /)

( 1 /)

Cl/)
3
Cl/)

1

1

1

( 1 /)
Cl/)
( 1 /)
j
43

1

3
(I/)

Cl/)
( 1 /)

3

28

<I/>
2

4
4

1

2

<I/>

14

1

(I/>

(I/)

2

C1/)
.........

a n

(I/)

(I/)
<I/>
( 1 /)

4
<l/>

1

1

1

1

1

(I /)

( 1 /)
Cl/)

( 1 /)
(I/)

( 1 /)
(I/)
( 1 /)

Cl/)
Cl/)

6

31

6

17

35

2

Cl/)
2

2

3
35
<!/)

6

2

Cl/)
<I/>

Cl/)
Cl/)

(I/)

Cl/)

1

5
(I/)
4

2

1

4
9
1

7

3
4
1
6

1

1

8

CI/)
3
(I/)
3

2
8
1

13

■

1

1

Cl/)

<l/>

( 1 /)
CI/)
l
(i/)
l
i

<l/>
(l/>
( 1 /)

(I/)
Cl/)
Cl/)

2

1

l
(i/)
(I/)

ci/)
(1/)

i
a />
a /)
2

1

13

9

13

5

10

4

5

Cl/)
116
79
37

109
69
40

93
66

41
30

40
30

51
41

10

10

See fo otnotes a t end of ta b le .




( 1 /)

(I/)

Cl/)
3
Cl/)

Radio,
Electric te le v i­
lighting sion,
and
and
wiring communi­
equip­ cation
ment equipment
56
55
Cl/)
<l/>

49

i

28

<1 /)
Cl/)

a /)
i

( 1 /)

<i/>
3
a /)

1

1

Cl/>

1

1

1

2

Cl/)
Cl/)

CI/)
( 1 /)

CI/)
Cl/)

(I/)
1

( 1 /)
(I/)

ci/>
11
8

2

1

1

11

111

76
35

ci/)

1

1

2

12

178
103
74

Table A -l. Capital Flows, 1958
Producers' Values—Continued
(Millions of dollars)
Consuming industries

Producing industries
17 Miscellaneous te x tile goods and floor coverings.
20 Lumber and wood products,except containers...........
22 Household furniture............................ ............................
23 Other furniture and fixtures.......................................
32 Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products...........
34 Footwear and other leather products.........................
40 Heating,plumbing,and structural metal products..
43 Engines and turbines........................................................
44 Farm machinery and equipment.......................................
45 Construction,mining,and o il field machinery.........
a { I# .

.• |

|

•

n il

J

a

#_

47
/ft
49
51
52
53
•\/i
55
56
S1
58
59
60

Metalworking machinery and equipment.......................
C A i *1 • J
.
«•
J
» .
General industrial machinery and equipment...........
Office,computing,and accounting machines...............
Service industry machines.............................................
Electric industrial equipment and apparatus.........
UauaaKaI A annl 4 ae
Electric lighting and wiring equipment...................
Radio,television,and communication equipment....
El «rt'rn^v| r* rnnipnnApf s anH aprpcanr't pa , - - , Ti
Miscellaneous electrical machinery and equipment
Motor vehicles and equipment.......................................
Aircraft and parts............................................................
(%1 ApKai* f v a n o n A r f a f ^ A n
nm A nf
62 Scien tific and controlling instruments...................
63 Optical,ophthalmic,and photographic equipment...
64 Miscellaneous manufacturing...................................
65 Transportation and warehousing................................
a «%
o

AvA A nt*

57
<I/>

Miscel­ Motor
laneous
elec tri­ vehicles Aircraft
and
and
cal
equip­ parts
machin­ ment
ery and
equip­
ment
58
59
60
ci/)
( 1 /)
<I/>

Other
trans­
porta­
tion
equip­
ment

Scien­
tific
and con­
trolling
instru­
ments

Optical,
ophthal­
mic, and
photo­
graphic
equip­
ment

Miscel­
laneous
manu­
fac­
turing

61

62
CI/)

63
(i/>

64
CI/)

<l/>
Cl/)
Cl/)

CI/)

Cl/)

2

2

CI/)

CI/)

CI/)
4

1

1

Cl/)

2

Q7)

1

Cl/)

( 1 /)

1

2

1

10

( 1 /)
.........

(I/)

<I/>

7
<I/>

1

1
1

5

3

07)

(I/)

2

1

1

<!/>

3
(I/>
<I/>

Cl/)
<!/>

Cl/)
Cl/)

Cl/)
Cl/)
Cl/)

CI/)
Cl/)

6

52

22

Cl/)
( 1 /)
5
3

26

13

21

1

( 1 /)
<I/>
17
5
2

5

1

4

1

5

17

7
Cl/)

8

4

3
7
Cl/)

1

8

2

12

Cl/)

CI/)

1

20

6

6

2

10

( 1 /)
Cl/)

a /)
4

<I/>
18

Cl/)

1

Cl/)
Cl/)

CI/)
l

1

CI/)
Cl/)

(I/)
9

Cl/)

Cl/)

1

1
2

1

1

1

12

Cl/)

Cl/)

2

2

Cl/)
Cl/)
Cl/)

Cl/)
( 1 /)

2

1

( 1 /)

1

1

(I/)
( 1 /)
ci/>
Cl/)

6

70
47
24

Cl/)
(1 /)

7

1

15
30
3
37

(I/)

(I/)

(l/>

1

20

4
<l/>
4

1

1

1

3
2

3
4

1
1

Cl/)
4
(I/)
( 1 /)
ci/)
Cl/)

1

ha

Cl/)
5
Cl/)

Cl/)

3
Cl/)

1

1

1

2

17

6

8

4

15

221

83
44
38

84
59
25

52
33
18

157
106
51

1

5

3

2

34

22

* 315
245
70

1

n rt

69 Wholesale and reta il trade...........................................
71 Rpa1 pofafp anH rpnfal
r
l .
80 Gross imports of goods and services. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total plant and equipment.............................................
Total equipment............................................. ................
Total plant (new construction)...............................
See footnotes at end of table.




Elec­
tronic
com­
ponents
and ac­
cessories

16
5

50

138
83

Table A -l. C ap ital Flows, 1958
P roducers' V alues—Continued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous t e x t i le goods and flo o r coverings.
20 Lumber and wood p ro d ucts,except c o n ta in e rs............
22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ....................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
34 Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u c ts...........................

39 Metal containers...............................................................
40 Heating,plumbing,and structural metal products..
42 Other fabricated metal products.................................
43 Engines and turbines.......................................................
44 Farm machinery and equipment.......................................
45 Construction,mining,and o il field m achinery.....
46 Materials handling machinery and equipment...........
47 Metalworking machinery and equipment.......................
48 Special industry machinery and equipment...............
49 General industrial machinery and equipment...........
51 Office,computing,and accounting machines...............
52 Service industry machines.............................................
53 Electric industrial equipment and apparatus.........
54 Household appliances.......................................................
55 Electric lighting and wiring equipment...................
56 Radio,television,and communication equipment....
57 Electronic components and accessories.....................
58 Miscellaneous electrical machinery and equipment
59 Motor vehicles and equipment.......................................
60 Aircraft and parts..................................................... ..
61 Other transportation equipment................................
62 Scientific and controlling instruments...................
63 Optical,ophthalmic,and photographic equipment...
64 Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
65 Transportation and warehousing...................................
6 6 Communications,except broadcasting...........................
69 Wholesale and reta il trade...........................................
71 Real estate and rental...................................................
80 Gross imports of goods and services.........................
Total plant and equipment.........................................
Total equipment.............................................................
Total plant (new construction)...............................

Trans­
p o rta ­
tio n and
ware­
housing

Communi­
c atio n s ,
except
broad­
c astin g

65

66
3
18

11
27

1

(l/>
24

3
14

(1/)

(l/>

10
23

379
17
392
4
5

8
17
8

19
17
65

1

1

2

11

2
40

1
15
194
261
896
4
2
1
24

22

(l/>
91

27
43

1

12

11

(l/>
107

1
630
1
7
75
(I /)

1
95
3
3

(1/)
t

20

1
(I /)
10

Whole­
sa le
and
r e ta il
trad e

Finance
and
in s u r­
ance

Real
e s ta te
and
re n ta l

69

70

71

17

(1/)

71
30
3
902
5
5

1
(1/)
49
4
23

42
247
34
3
4
13
14
15
9
76
34
118
33
108
508
37
42
40

1
5
991
3
26
5
94
72

182

362
90

47

33

225

666

2,521
1,893
628

2,257
1,347
910

333
329
4

5,858
2,185
3,673

4,696
3,263
1,433

51

20

<l/>

2

9
54

7
24

(I/)

33
6

60

3
250

10

12

1
1

4

6

8

See footnotes a t end of ta b le .




Radio and E le c tric ,
te le v i­
gas,
w a ter,
sion
and
broad­
sa n ita ry
c a stin g
se rv ice s
68
67

20

4
1

135

1
178

1

10
1

< l/>

2

-----

14
159
(2/)
755 ^
705
50

8

80
1,385
384
1,001

Table A -l. C ap ital Flows, 1958
P roducers' V alues—Continued
(M illions of d o lla rs)
Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s

17 Miscellaneous te x tile goods and floor coverings-,
20 Lumber and food products,except containers...........
22 Household furniture.........................................................
23 Other furniture and fixtures.....................................
32 Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products...........
34 Footwear and other leather products.........................
39 Metal containers...............................................................
40 Heating,plumbing,and structural metal products..
42 Other fabricated metal products.................................
43 Engines and turbines.......................................................
44 Farm machinery and equipment....................................
45 Construction,mining,and o il field machinery.........
46 Materials handling machinery and equipment...........
47 Metalworking machinery and equipment.......................
48 Special industry machinery and equipment...............
49 General industrial machinery and equipment...........
51 Office,computing,and accounting machines...............
52 Service industry machines.............................................
53 Electric industrial equipment and apparatus.....
54 Household appliances......................................... ..............
55 Electric lighting and wiring equipment...................
56 Radio,television,and communication equipment....
57 Electronic components and accessories.....................
58 Miscellaneous electrical machinery and equipment
59 Mbtor vehicles and equipment.......................................
60 Aircraft and parts............................................................
61 Other transportation equipment.................................
62 Scien tific and controlling instruments..................
63 Optical,ophthalmic,and photographic equipment...
64 Miscellaneous manufacturing.........................................
65 Transportation and warehousing...................................
6 6 Communications,except broadcasting........................
69 Wholesale and reta il trade...........................................
71 Real estate and rental...................................................
80 Gross imports of goods and services.........................
Total plant and equipment....................................... ..
Total equipment..............................................................
Total plant (new construction)...............................

H otels;
personal
and
Business
re p a ir
s e rv ic e s , se rv ice s
except
auto
72
73
2

74

M edical ,
educa­
tio n a l
and non­
p ro fit
o rg a n i­
z atio n s
77

Amuse­
ments

75

76

T otal

<l/>

1

A

1

2

2

12

45
6

11

48
2

5
29
<l/>

—

2

12

a /)

14
a /)

2

14
12

( 1 /)

1.

2

O
J

16
26

19

O
A

<i/>

13

A

7
12

7

(l/>
4
199
72

27
(l/>
74
14

1

17

20

1

26

10

1

1

5
a /)

75
39
12

13

20
2

2

9

C l/)
169

151

19

35
5

10

( 1 /)
224

16
2

10

1

13
1
I
35
92
14

8

23
/>
18
107
7

304
17
15
23

76

43

172

1

12

17
21
20

50

4

2

1

1

12

1

164

109

8

(l/>

126
798
52
5
10

Z

A

25

101

o
J

1

24

(1

708
166
576
1,670
1,319
352
1,153
1,468
1,051
1,016
955
1,617
93
25
1,009
27
83
3,575
358
1,178
532
163
279
507
362
3,747
2

( /)

888

<5/*

823
65

1/ Less than $500,000.
2/ Commissions on re a l e s ta te tra n s a c tio n s , 1,209.
3 / 21,607, including fo o tn o tes 2 / , 4 /, and 5 / .
4 / Used s tru c tu re s , 804.
5 / Nonfarm re s id e n tia l c o n stru c tio n , 19,812.
6 / 62,389, inclu d in g foo tn o te 3 / and used equipment not sepa­
r a te ly shown.




Auto­
m obile
re p a ir
and
se rv ic e s

Research
and
develop­
ment

52

16
704
42
480
3,028 *42,192
725
570
41
404
301
986
25,047
134
1
76
2,042 *17,145
424
7/ 36,957, in cluding nonfarm re s id e n tia l s tru c tu re s .
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of in d iv id u a l item s may
not equal t o t a l s .
SOURCE: T o tals of each row from O ffice of B usiness
Economics, U.S. Department of Commerce, Survey of C urrent
B usiness, September 1965.

Table A-2. C ap ital Flows, 1958
Percent D istrib u tio n by Consuming Industry
(P roducers' values)
Consuming in d u s trie s

Producing in d u s trie s

A gricul­ Iron and NonferL ivestock Other F o restry
tu ra l ,
fe rro
rous
a g ric u l­ and
fo re s try , a llo y ­
and
m etal
and
liv e sto c k tu ra l fish e ry
ores
ores
products products products fish e ry
se rv ice s m ining mining
2
1
3
4
6
5
fr. 2

23 O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................

( 1 /)
<l/>
n /\j
\±j

0 1

40 H eating,plum bing,and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts..
42 O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts....................................
45 C onstruction,m ining,and o il f ie ld m achinery.........
A7 lufA+*a1 4M
rv
an /1
mmftnt~
Aft CnAo4n 1 ^nilMSfinr
4nAi*it
a/in^ nawAnf
AQ RMiAral 4mdiist*v“f a1
nory anA aqn4 pmonf (
51 O ffice,com puting,and accounting m achines................
52 S ervice in d u stry machi nesTf t f t , TT, t f 1 f ,
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
5A VAiioolinl A flppl4flticea
f
171A^f t*4 1 4#rk^4n#t anil u4i^4fiA aah4 mnAfi♦*
56 R a d io ,te le v isio n ,a n d communication e q u ip m e n t....
^7 VI A^frA«i4#« AAmnAviAnf a saiI a^AftsfiAi*4 as
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r t s » . . . . T. . tT T tt. rtT trtT tT . TfTttr
61 O ther tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts..............
63 O ptical,ophthalm ic,and photographic equipm ent.••
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.................. ..........................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
^
.
. •
. t J .#
69 W holesale and r e t a i l tra d e ..............................................
71

Dasl

As f af a

a«/
i 1

a

0.7

0 .2

0 .1

0*7
16*8
0 .9

36.8

..........
31.9

1 .1

2 .6

0 .2

0.9
<i/>

0 .1
2 .1

n /\

( 1 /)

0.5
( 1 /)

0.4
<l/>

0 .2

0 .2

1.4
54.4
8.9

30.2

0.3

0 .1

( 1 /)

1 .2

1 .0

0.5
0.5

1 .8

0 .1

44.0
3.7

47.3
4.7

1 2 .0

(1 A
\±J J

2 .2

1.4

2 .8

3.9

0 .2

0 .2

0 .1

0 .1

0 .1

0.5

0 .2
(1 /\

0 .2

31.4
8.5

( 1 /)

0 .1

3.8
0 .9

0.5
0 .4

0 .1

(l/>

0.3

0 .2

2 .2

0 .1

( 1 /)

0 .2

0.7

8

0 .1

0 .1

0 .4
0 .9

0.5

d/\
\±f /

0.5

0.7

1.4

n/\

0.4

0.4
0.4
5.0
0 .2

( 1 /)
0 .1

/1A
0 .1

15.3

0 .4
6.3

0 .1

1 .8

4.7
4.5

5.5

1 .2

0.4

0.7
3.2
0.3
3.5

0 .6

0 .8

0 .1

0 .1

0 .1

0 .1

0 .1

0 .1

0 .1

2 .0

2 .1

1 .8

1.9

0.7
( 1 /)
<l/>
0 .5

14.5

10.5

8.7

9.6

3.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

0 .1

15.1
0.5

0.9
( I /)

2 .2
0 .1
0 .2

0 .1

1 .2

1.7

1 0 .0

14.1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

38.3
0 .2

1.7

1 2 .6

0 .6

0 .8

0 .8

4.0

7.2
0 .1

( 1 /)
1 .1

( 1/ )

0 .6

1

T otal p la n t and equipment 2 /...........................................
T otal equipm ent..................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




0.5

7

Crude
p e tro ­
leum and
n a tu ra l
gas

0 9

0 .1

(l/>
( 1 /)

Coal
mining

54.6
45.5

72.7
27.2

53

92.5
7.5

75.5
25.2

84.5
15.3

23.3
76.5

Table A-2. C apital Flows, 1958
P ercent D istrib u tio n by Consuming Industry--C ontinued
(Producers' v alu es)
Consuming in d u strie s

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
20 Lumber and wood p ro d u cts, except c o n ta in e rs.........
22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
34 Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u cts...........................
39 Metal c o n ta in e rs......................................................................
40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products
42 O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts..................................
43 Engines and tu rb in e s ............................................................
44 Farm machinery and equipm ent...........................................
45 C on stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m achinery...
46 M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
47 M etalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
48 Special in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines............
52 Service in d u stry m achines..................................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
54 Household a p p lia n c e s............................................................
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent,..................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent......... .................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
63 O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
64 M iscellaneous m a n u fa c tu rin g ........................................
65 T ran sp o rta tio n and w arehousing......................................
6 6 Communications, except b ro ad castin g ...........................
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l......... ..............................................
80 Gross im ports of goods and se rv ic e s ...........................
T otal p la n t and equipment 2 / ...........................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................

Stone
and clay
mining
and
quarrying

Chemical
and f e r ­
New
t i l i z e r co n stru c­
tio n
m ineral
mining
10

12

0.6

(1 /)

0.7
( 1 /)

0 .1

2.7

0.3
0.9

0 .1

0 .1

0.6

1.7
0.3

0.5
( 1 /)

0 .1

16
( 1 /)

0 .2

0.1

15

13
0.2

0 .1

1.7
( 1 /)

0.7

3.1

0 .4

1.9

2.0

0.8

0.3

0.3
0.5

0.3

1.8

0 .2

0.4
0.4

0.8

0 .1

0 .1

0 .6

46.6

50.1

0.6

3.7

3.8

1 2 .0

0.8

4.3
34.5
7.7

52.2
5.4

9.2
3.1
0 .2

0 .1

8.8

0.5

1.1

2.4

8.1

0 .1

1 .0

1.5

( 1 /)

2.0

( 1 /)

U /)

0.2

0 .1

0 .4
3.5

0 .1

7.4

0. 6

4.5

2.0

0.4

1.6

0.9

1.7

1.9

8.4
15.6
3.0
7.3
3.1
0.7

0.5

78.2
21.6

16.6
1.9
3.0
5.6
0.9

22.8

( 1 /)
0.4
( 1 /)

0.3
2.5

5.5
7.6

0.6

0 .2

0 .1

0 .1

0.2

13.8

2.4

5.1

0 .8

0 .8

15.0
0.7
0.7
4.2

0 .1

0.2

0 .1

1 .8

0 .2

( 1 /)

0.6

2.1

0.4
1.3

13.7

13.4

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1.4

2.8
1.2

0.5
0 .1

0.9
( 1 /)
3.6
0.1

0.9

0.8

1.5
1.1

0.5
1.5

9.0

100.0

0 .2

0 .8

0.8

0 .1

2.3

U /)

54.8

2.2

0 .2

10.8

10 0 .0

0.6

1.6

17.7
0.3

0.2

0 .1

2.0

2.4

97.5
2.5

See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




11

Broad
M ainte­
and
nance and Ordnance Food and Tobacco
narrow
re p a ir
and a c ­
kindred manu­
fa b ric s ,
c o n stru c ­ c e sso rie s products fa c tu re s yarn and
tio n
thread
m ills

54

96.0
3.9

100.1

70.6
29.5

100.0

68.5
31.6

100 .0

60.9
39.2

100.0

86.7
13.2

Table A-2. C apital Flows, 1958
Percent D istrib u tio n by Consuming Industry--C ontinued
(Producers' valu es)
Consuming in d u stries-

M iscel­
M iscel­ Lumber
laneous
laneous and wood
te x tile
f a b r i­ products,
goods
Apparel
excerpt
cated
and
te x tile
con­
flo o r
products ta in e rs
coverings

Producing in d u strie s

17

17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
22
23
32
34

Household fu rn itu re ..............................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u cts...........................

18

0 .2

0 .6

1.9

5 .0

0 .4
4.4

0 .2

0 .2

0 .6

1.5

43 Engines and tu rb in e s.............................................................

0.7

0.9

0.9

....
1 .0

56.9
0.7

27.6
0 .8

....
32.0
1.4
4.9

^^ C i
v i r* IUUU9 L i l»c! X CVJ[U |/1
J J 17 1 l c l i r ? .1 i n/^neht*i n 1 a n it i nmant* d u l/1 a p p o L a h u o • • • • •
1 UCUL a n l a n n a r a t n c

1.5

SA H mi Rp hnl H s p p l

1 .0
0. 1

0 .2

0 .1

0.5

2 .0

1.3

2 .6

( 1 /)
3.1
0.5

4.0

r omp o no nf ' C

unH

61
69

Othpr

tran sp o rts H

1 f 1 r*

anH

on

pq iH pm p nt , - T I f t i t - - « i i i

oon frol l i n g

.......................................................

flnmmunl r a t i n n s f

R p ol

SO C r n c c

p statp

a

..................................................................... ..................................................

r p n t a l ____ T .

anH

^ mpnrf' c

(1 /)

0.1

0 .1

0 .1

1.5

0.3
3.2

0 .2

1.4
0 .2

0 .6

0.1

1.0

0 .6

5.2
0.9
3.0

0.1

0.1

....

0 .8

0 .2

5.8

1.5
1.5
1.7
0.7
33.3

0 .4
0.7

0.1

..........................

2 .0

2 6 .1

1.0

0 .2

3.0

1 .1

6.5

3.0

54.4
3.8
1.3

1 .6

3.6
0.4

2.9
31.7
1.5
2.7
2.5
0.3
4.8

3.1

0 .6

33.2
1 1 .6

3.4
( 1 /)
0 .6

a / )

0.4

a / )

0 .4

0 .1

0 .1

0 .8

0 .6

( 1 /)
4.5

<l/>
5.1

a / )

0.3

0 .8

(l/>
10.3
0.4
1.4
0. 3
0.4
0.3

0.7

1 .2

0.3
1.5

0.5

1 . 1

1 .2

0.4
1.3

0 .2

0 .3
1.3

1 .2

1.4

0 .1

7.7

a / )

1 .8
0 .1
1

0 .4

,3

0 .6

0 . 1

0 .2

1.3

pypp pi- h r o n H o ^ c U n g . .

69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e
71

0 .1

0 .1

, ,

I n s t rnmpn f c t .

63 O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing................

66

2 .0

at

Rri p n t

0 .1

a ro o c cr k r i oc

58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent.................................... ..
60
rrraft
nd p o r t s ..Ttt....T.tt..tfTttttttTt,,tt
A1

( 1 /)

2 .6

....

7.0
2.5
4.8
4.7

Kl o p h m n i n

(1 /)

2 .1

a

^7

24

..........................

1.5

55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..

23

0.1

0 .2

1 .1

_ T. - f . . - 1 . . TTT. I T T l t l . ,
_

22

20

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l metal products

45 C o nstruction, m ining, and o il fie ld m achinery...
Mfl
c V nH 1 i n o ma r» i *fn o r y onH orjn ^ pm on f
)
V
47 Metalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
48 Special in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent..........
51 O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines............
S 9 Se»rvi pp i ndusfry m s r h l n#»s . T. t . . . T. t , T lt. t I . ITrtT

21

19

0 .1

Paper
and
Other
llie d
Wooden House­ fu rn i­ a prod­
hold
tu re
con­ fu rn i­
u c ts ,
and
ta in e rs tu re
fix tu re s except
con­
ta in e rs

f

nnoHc

anH

8.5

il.l

9.8

8.5

9.9

9.2

9.4

9 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 8 .0

6 8 .2

. 1 T. . . . . T l f . . t . t 11T1
c or \W r*ac

T otal p lan t and equipment 2
T otal equipm ent
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )

/ .............................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................................................................

80.3

......................................................................................

76.5
23.7

2 0 .0

See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




55

63.4
36.8

66.4
33.5

11.9

31.6

68.5
31.5

77.5
22.5

Table A-2. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Consuming Industry--Continued
(Producers' values)

Consuming industries

Producing in d u strie s
17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
20 Lumber and wood p roducts, except c o n ta in e r s .....
22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s pro d u cts............
34 Footwear and o th er le a th e r p ro d u cts...........................
39 Metal c o n ta in e rs.....................................................................
40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products
42 O ther fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts..................
43 Engines and t u r b i n e s . . . . . . ..............................................
44 Farm machinery and equipm ent...........................................
45 C on stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m achinery...
46 M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
47 Metalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
48 S pecial in d u stry machinery and e q u ip m e n t........
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines............
52 S ervice in d u stry m a c h in e s ...........................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
54 Household a p p lia n c e s .................................................... ..
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s..............
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
61 Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts....................
63 O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing......................................
6 6 Communications, except b ro ad castin g ...........................
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n ta l.......................................................
80 Gross im ports of goods and s e rv ic e s...........................
T otal p la n t and equipment 2 / . . . . . ...............................
T otal equipm ent............................. .....................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




Paperboard
Printing
con­
and pub­
tainers
lishing
and
boxes
26

Chemicals
and
selected
chemical
products

Plastics
and
synthetic
materials

27

28

Drugs,
cleaning,
and
toilet
prepa­
rations

Petroleum
Paints refining
and
and
allied related
products indus­
tries
30

31

32

a/)

0 .1

0.1

(1,/)

0 .1

0.1

0 .1

0.2

0.-2

0.1

0.2

1.2

1.1

3.1

2.4

0.8

2.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.1

a/)

0.1

0.7

4.9

1.3

1.6

4.4

7.1

3.0

1.3

25

0.4

0.6

3.0

2 0

0.3

0 .1

0 .1

(1/)

0.2

0.3

2.2

1.9

0.2

1.0

0.4

29

Rubber
and
miscel­
laneous
plastics
products

1.9

0.5

0.4

0.1

0.2

0.2

a/)

2.3

0.8

1.5

1.0

1.2

9.2

0.6

1.6

1.5

1.1

a/)

0.1

0.3

1.8
10.6

31.2

40.5

9.4

19.2

17.8

32.0

2.1

20.1

8.6

0.4

23.0

22.8

14.9

6.0

5.4

18.2

2.3

2.9

2.1

2.5

1.8

5.8

3.4

4.0

0.1

0.2

0.2

0,6

0 .1

0.1

0.8

0.6

0.8

2.1

1.1

a/)

(1/)

0.3

0.4

a/)

(1/)

a/)

a/)

0 .1

0.4

2.3

0.3

0.2

0.8

0.6

(1/)
0.3

0.1
a/)

0 .1

a/)

0.1

0.2

a/)

a/)

3.4

2.7

0.7

2.4

4.5

1.9

1.3

0 .1

0.3

0.1

0.4

0.3

0.5

3.4
....

—

(1/)

9 ^

4.7

0.9

0 .1

3.9

4.0

4.9

5.5

0.9

4.4

0.3

0.5

1 0

1 7

0 .1

0.2

0 .1

0.2

0 .1

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.2

1.0

1.2

1.2

1.4

1.2

1.5

0.7

1.4

7.6

7.4

9.3

9.7

8.7

11.3

5.4

9.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

61.7

66.5

70.1

77.5

62.9

81.7

37.3

77.8

38.3

33.3

29.7

22.6

37.2

18.4

62.6

22.1

0.3

56

1.5

Table A-2. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Consuming Industry--Continued
(Producers' values)

Consuming industries

Producing industries

Leather
tanning
and in­
dustrial
leather
products

Footwear
and
other
leather
products

Glass
and
glass
products

Stone
and
clay
products

33

34

35

36

Primary
iron
and
steel
manufac­
turing

Primary
nonferrous
metals
manufac­
turing

Metal
contain­
ers

37

38

39

Heating,
plumb­
ing, and
struc­
tural
metal
products
40

17 Miscellaneous textile goods and floor coverings.

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

a/)

a/)

(1/)

0.1

0.3

22 Household furniture............................

0.2

0.5

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

23 Other furniture and fixtures...................

2.1

6.6

2.2

1.8

0.9

1.2

3.3

32 Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products......

3.0

0.6

0.2

a/)

0.8
(1/)

0.1

0.7

0.1

40 Heating, plumbing, and structural metal products

1.4

1.6

2.0

1.3

1.8

4.1

0.6

1.1

0.4

0.9
0.4

0.6

3.7
OA 9

43 Engines and turbines.......................... .

0.8

1.0

46 Materials handling machinery and equipment.....

7.7

3.3

0.9

2.2

(1/)

0.1

11.6

....

0.8
(1/)

45 Construction, mining, and oil field machinery...

1.2

0.4

4.2

1.2

1.5

1.5

1.3

47 Metalworking machinery and equipment

1.1

0.9

29.0

24.7

07 1
J /•1

48 Special industry machinery and equipment........

42.0

36.7

19.9

7.4

1.8

2.4

49 General industrial machinery and equipment.... .

7.2

3.1

7.4

11.5

10.9

11.6

2.2

1.0

51 Office, computing, and accounting machines.....

5.2

11.3

5.0

2.8

0.8

2.2

1.2

0.8

0.1

0.1

0.2

2.4
9 i

o n
z •u

Q O

2.3

D*1

6.5

52 Service industry machines..........
53 Electric industrial equipment and gppgrgfnc
54 Household appliances..................

5.2

55 Electric lighting and wiring equipment.........

0.1

0.2

(j,/)

a/)

a/)

U/)

0 .1

0.1

56 Radio, television, and communication equipment..

0.9

1.5

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.3

0 .6

0.6

58 Miscellaneous electrical machinery and equipment

0.1

(1/)

a/)

a/)

a/)

0.1

0 .2

0.1

59 Motor vehicles and equipment...... .............

4.3

3.7

2.5

9.0

0.6

1.5

1.5

0.8

0.1

0.4

0.2

1.7

0.9

0.7

0.8

57 Electronic components and accessories..........

60 Aircraft and parts..............................

....

....

61 Other transportation equipment.................
62 Scientific and controlling instruments.........

0.4

0.6

a/)

4.2
0.3
n 0

1.7

0.7

0.1

63 Optical, ophthalmic, and photographic equipment.

0.3

0 .1

(i /}

64 Miscellaneous manufacturing....................

0.5

0.9

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.2

0 .3

0 .4

65 Transportation and warehousing........... ......

1.5

1.5

1.0

1.3

1.2

1.3

1.2

1.4

10.3

12.1

7.3

9.4

7.6

8.2

7.1

9.8

66 Communications, except broadcasting............
69 Wholesale and retail trade.....................
71 Real estate and rental................. .
80 Gross imports of goods and services,__ .........
Total plant and equipment 2/.... ...............

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Total equipment..............................

87.8

85.4

54.5

67.5

65.1

66.1

62.2

67.7

Total plant (new construction)...............

12.1

14.7

45.3

32.5

35.0

34.0

37.9

32.1

See footnotes at end of table.




57

Table A-2. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Consuming Industry--Continued
(Producers' values)

Consuming in d u strie s

Stamp­
in g s,
screw
machine
products,
and
b o lts

C onstruc­
Other
tio n ,
Farm
f a b r i­ Engines
machinery m ining,
cated
and
and o i l ­
and
m etal
tu rb in e s equipment fie ld
products
machinery

41

Producing in d u s trie s

42

0.1

0.3
3.9

0.3

0.1

0.3
3.7
0.4

1.2

2.2

1.2

0.7

1.3
0.3

0.7
0.3

1.0
0.6

1.9
40.1

3.5
25.1

12.0

3.5
2.7
..........
3.4

5.4
5.1
2.4

0.1

22 Household fu rn itu re ........................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

0.3

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products
43 Engines and tu rb in e s .............................................................
45 C on stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m achinery...
46 M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
47 M etalworking machinery and equipm ent..................
;q q * i • • **
i
* .
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffic e , computing, and accounting m achines............
52 Service in d u stry m achines........................... ......................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p a ra tu s.........
Hmicohnl H pppl 4
((
((
((1 ( ( r i
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent...................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
“7 T71 r*on-4n nnmnnnnn fe nnH or*poecnr*4 oc
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent..........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
A1 HhVior f ran cpnr h a h ^ r\r» orjin'pmonf
fi'P
p flnrl
m 1 lin o Inct" rnmpnt'
63 O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
66 Communications, except b ro a d ca stin g ...........................
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...........................................
"71 Paol ochafo nnrl ronfol
80 Gross im ports of goods and se rv ic e s...........................
T otal p la n t and equipment 2 /...........................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
i

6.8
0.1
0.6
0.2
1.6

-

(1 /)
0.3

0.2
2.6
0.2

(1 /)

3.6

0.1
0.2

^.1

0.3

45

0.1

46

0.2

1.2

2.9

1.1
0.6
0.1
0.3

0.9

0.7

2.2

1.7

0.3

10.3
11.4

3.5
34.7

3.2
4.2

7.5
6 .4
11.4
6.4

4.9
9.3
3.3
9.1
4.7

7.4

7.8

7.6

3.4
6.3
3.0
7.8

3.4
3.0
1.4

11.8

5.7
3.4
1.5
14.0

0.1

0.1
0.8
0.1
5.9
0.6
0. 2
0.1

0.1
0.8

u /)
0.4

(1 /)
0.4

a /)

a /)

16.7

2.6

0.7

0.1

1.5
0.7
0.5

6.2
0.2

2.8

a /)
4.8
0.9
0.4

4.1
..........
0.5
0.3
0.5

100.0 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

0.4
1.4

67.3
32.5

0.5
1.4

72.6
27.2

0.1

0.1
0.8
0.1

10.3

58

0.5

0.3

10.6

75.5
24.4

0.3

0.8
3.0
0.1

9.0

69.6
30.5

0.3

0.8
3.6
0.1

1.6
11.1

8.5

48

0.5
5.7

0.1

1.4

47

0.3
4.3
0.5

0.1
0.4
1.6
10.8

See footnotes at end of table.




44

0.1

0.1
0.2
2.0

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.

43

M aterials M etal- Special
handling working in d u stry
machinery machinery machinery
and
and
and
equipment equipment equipment

0.5
1.4

68.4
31.4

74.8
25.1

0.2

0.4
3.9
14.1

0.6
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.2
1.6
12.1

13.1

100.0

100.0

80.1
19.8

1.2

0.3

0.2
0.1
0.2
2.3

16.8

83.4
16.7

Table A-2. C apital Flows, 1958
P ercent D istrib u tio n by Consuming Industry*-C ontinued
(P roducers' v alu es)
O ffice,
E le c tric
General
com­
indus­
indus­
tria l
t r i a l Machine- p u tin g , Service
machin­
shop
and
in d u stry equip­
ery and products account­ machines ment and
equip­
ing
appa­
ment
machines
ra tu s
50
49
51
52
53

Consuming in d u s trie s

Producing in d u s trie s

E le c tric Radio,
le v
House­ lig h tin g t esion,i­
and
hold
and
a p p li­ w iring
comrauniequip­
ances
catio n
ment
equipment
54
56
55

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.

0.3

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

22 Household f u r n itu r e ................... .........................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts .. . . . .

0.8
2.8
0.1

0 .5
2 .0
0.1

0.3
3.3
(l/)

0 .3
4.3
0.1

0 .4
2.3
<l/>

0 .4
4 .0
0.1

0 .3
0.5
0.1

0 .3
2.1
0.1

AO H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

1.0

0.7

0.5

1.2

1.6

2.3

1.3

0.6

43 Engines and t u r b in e s .........................................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
45 C o n stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ..•
46 M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
47 M etalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
lxfl Cno/*4 a 1 4nrlitcfrv
n<m» anrl n/nWnmnnf
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent. . . . . •
51 O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines............
52 S ervice in d u stry m a c h i n e s ........................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s.........
SA Household jappl lflnrpcT-tttfTIiri.T-.T-,tttiTttfttI,
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipment ..................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
E lp rfrn n io pnmpnnont"c ^nd
« i «i i i i i i •
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and eq u ip m en t........................................
60 Aircraft and p a r t s .........................................., ....................

0.6
0.2
0.3
2.4
24.2

0 .4
(1 /)
0.2
1.0
39.0

0.3
..........

0.9
0.1
0.1
1.0
27.9

1.4
0 .2
0.6

0 .8
0.1
(1 /)

0 .4
0.1
a /)

2.2

0.7
0.1
0.1
4.4
15.1

14.1

19.6

3.2
3.6
1.4
12.5

1.1
1.3
0.2
5.2

3.3
37.7
0.1
2.6

1.5
13.2
0.9
11.0

3.7
7.7
0.6
6 .0

7 .4
9.2
1.4
13.8

33.0
16.5
0.9
5.3
0.6
6.1

a /)
0 .4

(1 /)
0.1

0.1
0 .8

0.1
0.6

0.1
1.3

0.1
0.6

a /)
0.8
0.2

0 .3
1.0
0 .2

a /)
0 .3
0.6
0.1
0.7
1.3

a /)
4.2

0.2
2.5
0 .3

a /)
6.2
4.5
0.1
0.8
0.3

1.2

1.4
0.1
0.2
1.5

1.4
0.2
0.5
1.5

10.9

8.7

13.9

0 .4
100.0
68.0
31.9

100.0
63.5
36.5

100.0
70.5
29.5

.....

—

1.1
4.6
0.5
7.6

1.8
0.7

1.5

1.1
0.1
0.3
1.4

2.4
0.2
0.8
1.6

1.0
0.1
0 .3
1.5

11.6

9.3

10.8

9.0

6.9

100.0
73.3
26.5

100.0
68.3
31.8

100.0
74.8
25.4

100.0
79.7
20.2

100.0
58.3
41.9

61 Othpr trflnisporffltlnn pqnlpinpnf TtitiTiftitititti

62
63
64
65

66

S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
nommiini

t ions ( pypppf hrna Hrflefing, i«iiit«tit
"

80

T iii

0.1
a/)

0.9

a/)

0.3
1.2

....

fVross imports of goods qnH Bprvlrp*, rtt»Tttri«t«

T otal p la n t and equipment 2/........................................
T otal equipm ent........................................ ................ .
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




a / )

•

69 W holesale and r e ta il t r a d e . . . . . ....................................
71 K p a I pstafp And rpni'fil

0.2
0.1
0.2
1.4

59

Table A-2. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Consuming Industry*'Continued
(Producers' values)
E lec­
tro n ic
com­
ponents
and a c ­
c e sso rie s

Producing in d u s trie s

M iscel­
laneous
e le c tri­
cal
machin­
ery and
equip­
ment

Motor
v e h ic les
and
equip­
ment

A irc ra ft
and
p a rts

Other
tra n s ­
p o rta ­
tio n
equip­
ment

S cien­
tific
and con­
tr o llin g
in s tr u ­
ments

O p tica l ,
oph th al miq and
photo­
graphic
equip­
ment

57

Consuming in d u s trie s

58

59

60

61

62

63

0 .2

0.1

0 .2

0.1

0.1

0.1

22 Household fu rn itu re ................................................. ...
23 Other fu rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................... ... ...........
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

0.1
0 8
0 .4
2.7
0.1

0 .4
2.8
0 .3

0.2
3.1
0 .1

0.5
3.0
0 .2

0.2
0.2
0.2

0 .4
2.2
0.1

0.2
3.0
0.1

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

1.9

1.1

1.2

0 .4

1.1
0.1
0.2

1.7
0 .3
1.0
0.1
0.1
2.1
16.6
6 .3
4.8
9.4
0.9
11.6

1.4

43
44
45
46
47
'*8
49
51
52
53

2.4
2.3
1.4
0.2
1.2

0 .8
0.1
0.1
2.1
9.8

0.7
0 .2
0 .3
5.5
3.5

0.7
0.1
0 .3

0.3
0.1
<l/>

30.7

2.0
3.8
1.6
9.2

3.6
8.3
0 .4
6.9

1.0
8.8
0.4
7.2

24.5
2.6
1.7
3.4
0.6
3.9

0.1
8.3
0 .4
0 .3
0 .8
5.2

0.1
0.5

(1 /)
0.4

0 .3
1.2
0.1

0.3
1.9
0.5

1.8
1.7
0 .3
1.5

3.6
6.7
0.3
1.4

17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
.

1

1

1

,

r,

*- 4 r , n - r r

Engines and tu r b in e s ..........................................................
Farm m achinery and equipm ent................ ... ........................
C o n stru ctio n , m ining, and o il f ie ld m achinery...
M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
M etalworking machinery and equipm ent...........................
S pecial in d u stry machinery and equipm ent.............
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffic e , computing, and accounting m achines............
S ervice in d u stry m a c h i n e s . ................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s..........
H rm

| A g p p l -f g

c (1

r n n ■! r* / « n m n n n A n f o a n /1 A r r o e c n r l 0 6

..................... .

58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...........................................
6 0 A l f c r A 'f t A n ri pflftR. - T . t T ....................................t . t ........................T . .
Al O t'l’w a r ^ r * n n c p n r h g t ”4 n n o / j n ^ p m A n h

62
63
64
65

ii i

i r i i ~r i

r tp o

^ng

0.1
1.0

0.1

3.6
0.1

0.1
1.2
0 .3
0.1
2.8
0.5

1.0
0.1
0.3
1.4

2.0
0 .3
0.6
1.6

0 .4
0 .8
0 .7
1.6

1.5
1.6
0.5
1.3

0.1
1.5
1.2
0.6
4.5
0 .4
6 .0
0.3
0.1
0 .4
1.1

8.3

11.5

10.7

7.7

6.9

10.0

8.3

100.0
66.5
33.6

100.0
75.8
24.3

100.0
77.6
22.2

100.0
62.5
37.5

100.0
54.3
46.0

100.0
70.7
29.4

100.0
64.3
35.7

( | ( ( ( f ( T( ( (

69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................................
"71 R n g l

0.1
0.5
1.5

1.6
9.3
1.1
6 .0

i

S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g i n s t r u m e n t s . .
O p tic a l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
M iscellaneous m anufacturing ............................. .........................................
T ran sp o rta tio n and warehousing .............................................................

f\(\ Pn^nm i lrj

25.8

t . , i i i i - Ti i « i i T t » T - « t i t

55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent. . • • • • • • • •
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
PI

24.5
6.7
2.3
5.9
0.6
5.8

g nH •p o n t’g l f r l i r - - T . t T t p t l f f t T T .t T t . t T

510 ( !^ a g c 4 rapArf e

^

c

AOp

( ((

( (((

T otal p la n t and equipment 2 / ...................• • • • ...................................
T otal equipm ent ........................................................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n ) ......................................................

See footnotes at end of table*




60

Table A-2. C apital Flows, 1958
P ercent D istrib u tio n by Consuming Industry--C ontinued
(Producers' v alues)
Consuming in d u s trie s

M iscel­
laneous
manu­
fa c ­
tu rin g
64

Producing in d u strie s

T rans­
p o rta ­
tio n and
ware­
housing
65

Communic a tio n s,
except
broad
c a stin g
66

Radio and
te le v i­
sion
broad­
c a stin g

E le c tric ,
gas,
w ater,
and
sa n ita ry
se rv ice s

67

68

Whole­
sa le
and
r e ta il
trad e

Finance
and
in s u r­
ance

69

70

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r co v erin g s.........

0.1

0 .2

0.1

(1 /)

(1 /)

0 .4

0.4

22 Household fu rn itu re ......................................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f i x t u r e s .................................................

0.2
2.6
0.3

0.4
1.1
(1 /)

0.1
0 .8
(1 /)

0.1
7.2

an
0.2
( i/)

0.9
5 .3
0.7

1.1
7.1

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l metal p ro d u c ts ....

1.4

0.3
0.7
0.3
0.8
0.7
2.6

44 Farm machinery and equipm ent............................. .....................
46
Z7
l
Aft
49
51
52
53
55
56
57
58
59
60
fil
62
63
64
65
f\ f\
69

M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent....................
Mafo 1
ma/'Vi^nDn? onr) AniWnmani*
Qnop 4 a 1 *fnrliifif’r\i morVi^ nov*\r nn/1 A/niinmAnf
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent....................
O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines....................
Service in d u stry m a c h in e s ............... ..........................« ...
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s..................
Hriii eohnl rl qppl <^nr*pc « t i r i i i t i i t t l | . | | I T l r r l | l
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent............................
Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent...........
E lectro n ic components and a c c e s s o r i e s ..........................
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and e q u ip m en t....
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...................................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts ........................................................................
fithpr
o n «»qirf pmpn t t « i « t t t T T i - r T . t » i » * - S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.............................
O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.........
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.....................................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing...............................................
Pommitn'f ofl one ^ pyrppf
jng, r i t t , , , , , ,
W holesale and r e ta il tra d e .......................................................

71 R a^I pcfflfp f^nrl rAnt~^1
RO Crnce 1 mpnrfe nf

jia/vI g

T- - t r
gnH c ar\/4 rac

, - - , .

0.5
1.0

0 .4

0.5
1.1
1.7
0 .4

0.1
0.5
(1 /)
4 .0

0.2
6.6
0.1
32.2

1.2
0.5
a /)
15.4

(1 /)
27.9
a /)
0.3
3.3
U /)

0.2
28.5
1.0
0.9
6 .0
0.2

0.1
0.1
a /)
a /)
0.8
0.1

0 .3
a /)
0 .3
1.3

0.1
1.6
(IV)
0.6
7.7
10.3
35.5
0.2
0.1
(1 /)
1.0

(1 /)

<l/>
3.0

0 .4

9.5

7.2

0.9
16.0
4 .0

100.0
67.6
32.4

100.0
75.1
24.9

100.0
59.5
40.3

(1 /)
0 .4
0 .3
a /)
2.9
0.1

a/)

0.1
0.1
0 .3
0 .3
0 .3
0.2
1.6
0.7
2.5
0.7
2.3
10.8
0.8
0.9
0.1
0.9
an
0.1
21.1
0.1
0.6
0.1

4.3
0.8

0.4
33.1
1.6
..........
2.6
0.5
0.1
17.9
0.1
0.1

a/)

a/)

0.8

2.0
1.5

0.3
1.9

9.9

3.8

14.2

21.1

100.0
98.8
1.2

100.0
37.1
62.7

100.0
69.6
30.5

100.0
93.4
6.6

2.3

( ....

(

T otal p la n t and equipment 2 /...................................................
T otal equipm ent............................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..........................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




0.8
a /)
(i/)
3.0
13.4
11.0
5.4
7.8
0.1
6.4

6.5
0 .3
6.7
0.1
0.1
a /)

61

Table A-2. C apital Flows, 1958
P ercent D istrib u tio n by Consuming In dustry-'C ontinued
(P roducers' v alu es)
Real
e s ta te
and
re n ta l

Producing in d u s trie s

H otels;
personal
and
re p a ir
se rv ic e s,
except
auto

71

Consuming in d u s trie s

72

Business
se rv ice s

73

0.1
22 Household fu rn itu re .................. ....................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...................................................

0 .3
1.2
5.4
0.3

0.6
4.1
(1 /)

4.3

2.7
0.2
0 .4
2.8

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal p ro d u c ts ....
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent............................................
AA Mof a 1 e Konrl 14nn
anH onu4 nmonf
A7 Mofal unrW n r* ma/«K4nArti an/) Ann1nmAnf
!
48 S pecial in d u stry machinery and equipm ent........................
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent....................
51 O ffic e , com puting, and accounting m ach in es..................
Sp S prvi pp IndiiRfr^y m « rh ^ p s ,,.....................................................
Q*5 TTl ao f*r4 o 4nHii ef o 1 a/iiH nmont" anH annfl rnf“ii c ........... .. * .
‘tZi HniifipVin | H ^ppl i Dnrpc r t T t t T I t . TT- T*TTrlt. T- T*Tlrtr..
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.............................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication e q u ip m e n t......
^7 PI Aof v*nn4 o onmnnnanf c an/) aoooeenrl ac
....
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and e q u ip m e n t....
f\1
f,y

63
64

Ai rrrflf t
pflrffi a a a a t Ba B l f < a i a a i a r i Ba l a a a i l i _*.*
Ot'Viov* f rAn c nftrfn f *nn AntHnmAnf.__ _ _ _ ^ ...................... ..
4
Sr*i ont-i fi n ^nd p n ntrnIH ng 1n*sfr
. TT. T. TT. . (
O p tic a l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent..........
M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................

AA Ponunim4 o nn e
onf
ooef^nn
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ........................................................
y] Dp ^I pcf^fp gnd fenfgl I I t I 1 r . . . r . . TI. TTTTTfTII. I f . . . .
fin
*mnnrf r\f r>AA/)e anrl cAn/^OAe
1
..._
T otal p la n t and equipment 2 /..........................................
T otal equipm ent................................... .......................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )...........................................
a

avo

74

0 .2

0.5
1.8
(1 /)

Research
and
develop­
ment

(1 /)

0.7
(1 /)
0.5
22.4
8.1
2.2
0.2
1.0

12.8

an
19.1

0.1
0.7
0.1
0.3

Auto­
mobile
re p a ir
and
se rv ice s
75

3.9
0.1
10.5
2.0
1.4
4.9
0.2
0.1
21.4
1.4

76

0.1
—
4.3

0.1

0.2
2.5
(1 /)

0 .3
1.9
(1 /)
0 .4

0.1
2.0
1.7

Amuse­
ments

..........
0.8

0.1

3.0
47.2

3.5
0.1

1.4
2.6

5.3
—

3.9

10.9

(1 /)
46.7

0 .3
2.3
3.6

0 .3
0.1
0 .7
(1 /)
0 .3
1.4

M edical,
educa­
tio n a l
and non­
p ro fit
o rg a n i­
z atio n s
/ 77
0.1
0 .4
3.4
(1 /)
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.6

0 .4
(1 /)
2.5
1.3
0.4
0.4
(1,/)
0.4
(1/ )
1.1
3.4
0.5

..........
0.6

0.1
1.9
2.3
2.3

1.7
7.1
0 .3
1.7

8.5
1.3
2.1

(1 /)
0.2
1.6

2.2
0.3
3.1
(1 /)
2.5
14.8
0.9

5.8

18.4

15.5

19.7

15.8

5.9

5.7

100.0
27.8
72.3

100.0
92.5
7.3

100.0
80.8
19.0

100.0
97.8
2.4

100.0
84.1
15.8

100.0
41.4
58.5

100.0
32.8
67.4

0.7
(1 /)

10.0
0.6
0.5
0.8

...

c

1/ Less than .05 p e rce n t.
2/ Excludes used s tru c tu re s and nonfarm re s id e n tia l
s tru c tu re s and commissions on re a l e s ta te tra n s a c tio n s .




NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of in d iv id u a l item s may
not equal to ta ls ,

62

Table A-3. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Producing Industry
(Producers' values)

Consuming industries
Livestock
and
1ivestock
products
Producing industries

1

Other
agricultural
products
2

Forestry
and
fishery
products

Agricultural,
forestry,
and
fishery
services
4

3

Iron and
ferroalloy
ores
mining
5

17 Miscellaneous textile goods and floor coverings.

—

—

—

—

36.4

27.3

—

—

22 Household furniture............................

—

—

—

—

—
—

23 Other furniture and fixtures...................

(in
0.3

(1/)
0.9

<l/>

32 Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products.....
34 Footwear and other leather products............

21.3

39 Metal containers................................

---

6

—

20 Lumber and wood products,except containers.....

—

—

—

27.3

—

—

—

-

—

—

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

1.0

12.8

....

—

—

—

--—

—

3.4
2.6

43 Engines and turbines...........................

1.3

1.3

11.1

72.1
2.8

0.7

-

0.2
—
—

-

0.1

(in

(in

....

—
—

0.3

1.3

1.3

1.2

7.5

0.7
—

0.7
—

0.7
—
23.1

-

—

—

—

47 Metalworking machinery and equipment...........

—

—

—

—

2.2

1.1
—

—

0.8
—
—

6.4

2.0

0.3

....

0.7

2.9

0.2

51 Office,computing,and accounting machines.......

0.1

0.1

52 Service industry machines......................

2.4

0.3

(I/)
....

....

53 Electric industrial equipment and apparatus....

an

0.1

—

—

1.5

6.3

—

—

0.1

. . . .

0.2

0.1

0.2
—

—
—

-

0.3

0.2

0.6

9.4

(in
(in
an

(in
(in

(in

0.3

a/)

(1/)

0.1

0.2

—

0.1

(1/)

—

0.2
—

—

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.6

0.1

0.1
—

—

—

2.4
—

2.0

2.8

....

. . . .

0.1

56 Radio,television,and communication equipment....

7.4

1 .8

—

48 Special industry machinery and equipment.......

55 Electric lighting and wiring equipment.........

5.9

3.9

49 General industrial machinery and equipment.....

—

—
—

0.3

....

46 Materials handling machinery and equipment.....

—

8

0.1

0.9

57 Electronic components and accessories..........

7

(in

1.3

54 Household appliances...........................

Crude
petro­
leum and
natural
gas

....

40 Heating,plumbing,and structural metal products..

45 Construction,mining,and oil field machinery....

Coal
mining

<l/>
....

42 Other fabricated metal products................

44 Farm machinery and equipment........ ...........

Nonferrous
metal
ores
mining

0.1

0.1

0.3

—

—

—

—

58 Miscellaneous electrical machinery and equipment

0.6

2.5

0.3

0.8

1.5

1.4

0.9

0.4

59 Motor vehicles and equipment...................

4.6

14.0

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.8

60 Aircraft and parts.............................

1.4

1.1

0.3

1.5

61 Other transportation equipment.................

2.0

2.4

1.9

0.1

0.7

0.5

1.3

1.3

62 Scientific and controlling instruments......... .

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.1

3.3
0.1

0.1

—

0.3

—

0.1

0.1

0.1

64 Miscellaneous manufacturing....................

0.8

0.7

(in

0.1

(in

(in

— 0.1

65 Transportation and warehousing.................

2.5

10.8

0.2

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.8

66 Communications,except broadcasting.............

....

63 Optical,ophthalmic,and photographic equipment...

—

—

—

0.2

—

—
0.4

0.4

—

—

—

0.5
—

—

—

80 Gross imports of goods and services............

—

—

—

—

—

—

2.9

2.6
—

—

71 Real estate and rental.........................

69 Wholesale and retail trade........ .............

12.3

—

0.3

0.5
—
—

-

2.0
—
—

Total plant and equipment......................

2.6

7.8

0.1

0.3

0.4

0.4

0.5

6.0

Total equipment..............................

2.4

9.5

0.2

0.5

0.6

0.5

0.7

2.4

Total plant (new construction)

2.9

5.2

....

---

0 . 1

0.3

0.2

11.4

See footnotes at end of table.




63

Table A-3. C apital Flows, 1958
P ercent D istrib u tio n by Producing Industry--C ontinued
(Producers' v alu es)
Consuming in d u s trie s

Stone
and clay
mining
and
quarrying

Chemical
and f e r ­
New
t i l i z e r c o n stru c ­
m ineral
tio n
mining

Broad
M ainte­ Ordnance
and
nance and
narrow
Food and Tobacco
and
re p a ir
fa b ric s,
kindred
manu­
c o n stru c ­ a c c e s­ products fa c tu re s yarn and
s o rie s
tio n
thread
m ills

9

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
n/\ |

-1 I ij-l. i.j
t 4

■
»

i -jl 4 .. n * r
-j
■

nvnn i f

__n

10

11

12

13

14

15

..........

..........

..........

0 .3

2.2

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1
0.1

0 .2
0 .4

0.6
0.6

0.2
0.2

0 .3
0.2
0.1

2.1
1.1
1.1

(1 /)
0.1
0.1

0.2
0 .4
0.2

0 .3
3.7
0.7
0 .4
27.3

0.1
0.6

a /)

0.8

0.7

Producing in d u strie s

(1 /)

0.6

•

23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ..................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

45
46
A7
48
49
51
S?

62
63
64
65

C o n stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ...
M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent• • • • • .
Maf a1unrlr4mr» moah'tnarn sn/l
nmAnt~
Special in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffic e , com puting, and accounting m achines............
^ e rv lrp |ndufifry mflrhlnpR,
1 1 o r t-1-4r» ^ nrluct* r*4 1 osjti 4 pman f- pnH
7
(
Hr»i1cp>V<r»1H gppl i ^nrpc
1?1
t-4 14 nVi #" 4nr* on/4 « 4 f4nn Anti 4nmonf . .
Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent. •
FI
rnn4r PAmnAnonf c n/4 o^/«AflCAr4
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipmemt
Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent..........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts .................................................................
Ot"h**r transport" on pqut pmpnf r . . _____ . T__ T. irT
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
M iscellaneous m a n u fa c tu rin g ........................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................

66

fnm m u n t r * ^ t " t o n c ^

^^

54

a

f*

56

j

a

58
59
60
61

pypppt

t t i t

Rp p I

AO C l m s s

p s t^ fp

a nH

I m p o r t 's

06

r p n ♦"fl 1 T t r r T i i i t - T t t i T r i T i i « « i
g n rtH e

0.5
0 .2

U / )

a / )

(1 /)
0.2

(1 /)

0.1

(1 /)

a/)

a / )

0.1

0.4

0.3

0.1

0.3

0.1
0.3

0.1

a/)

2.5
0.6
1.8
0.8
1.3
0 .4

0.6
0 .3
1.5
0 .3
0.2

0.1

0 .4

0.1

(1 /)

0 .4
0.7
0.1
0.1
(1 /)
..........
0.8

0.1
(1 /)
0 .3

0.7

pnH

e p r v ir p c , .

0.1

u/>

0.5

0.4

1.6
3.8
0.7
0.5
0 .2
0.6
..........
3.3

0.4

0.3

2 .8

0.4

0.2

0.5

0.3

0.2

a/)

..........

0.1

............

0.1
a/)

0 .3

4.5
11.3
1.8
2.9
5.9
0.5
1.2
0.4
1.4
0.9
4.2
1.8
0.6
7.9

0.1

7 .0
0.1
0 .5
0.2
0,3
1.1
0.7
0.2

0.1

U / )

0.6
0.2
0.3
(i/ )

0.4

0.1

0 .2
0.1

0.1

0.3

0.1

0.2

0.6
2.7

0.1

0.3
0.5

0.2

2.9

0.1

0.5

0.1

0.2

•

, , ,

T otal p la n t and equipm ent ..................................... .................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo otnotes a t end of ta b le .




0.9
0 .4

3.5
1.3

(1 /)
(1 /)
(1 /)
1.5
0.7
0.7
0.2
0.5

75.0
2.5
2.5
0.8
0.4

•i •• ■

69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e . . ............................................. ..
71

3.9
3.2

(1 /)
7.2

(1 /)

ac

h r n f l H r g e f 'l n j» r

16

64

1.8
3 .0
0 .2

0 .4
0.8
............

0.2
0.2
0.1

2.4
2.7
1.8

0.1
0.1
0.1

0 .4
0.7
0.1

Table A-3. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Prbducing Industry*-Continued
(Producers' values)
Consuming in d u s trie s

Producing in d u strie s

M iscel­
M iscel­
Lumber
laneous
laneous and wood Wooden House­ Otheri­
te x tile
fu rn
hold
fa b r
roducts, con­
goods
Apparel catedi­ p except
tu re
and
and
ta in e rs fu rn i­
tu re fix tu re s
te x tile
con­
flo o r
products ta in e rs
coverings

Paper
and
a llie d
prod­
u c ts ,
except
con­
ta in e rs

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

17 M iscellaneous te x t i le goods and flo o r coverings.

0.6

0.1

0 .3

(1 /)

<i/>

0.1

0.1

0.3

22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ..........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts .. . . . .

oa

0.1
0.2

0.5
0.7
0.6

0.1
0.1
0.3

0 .3
0.5
1.4

(1 /)
(1 /)
0.2

0.1
0 .3
0.1

0.1
0.1
0.1

0 .3
0.6
1.3

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

0.1

0 .2

0.1

0.4

0.3

0.1

43 Engines and t u r b in e s .........................................................

0.1

0 .2

(1 /)

1.0
0 .4
1.4
2.1

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.3

(1 /)
(1 /)

3.5
2.5
2.5
(1 /)
1.1
0.9

45
46
47
48
49
51
S'}
S4

55
56

S7

58

59

C on stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ...
M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
Metalworking machinery and equipm ent ..............................................
S pecial in d u stry machinery and equipm ent ..............................
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent ......................
O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines. . . . . .
Sprul r . ind n sfry mfirhlnpe, t r t T r t l . Tt1t t T. T t t t I . t
E le c tric in d u stria l pqiii pnu>nt'
^pparfit’iis t f , , r
H o u s e h o l d appl { / H i r e s . TTT_ TT _ T T TT T _ _ , . _ T , _ t t T t r T t
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent ..............................
Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
E l e c t r o n i c components
nH
o c (
_
(
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent ...............................................................................

—

—

0 .3
2.1

0.1
0.6
0.1
(1 /)

2.2
0.1
0.8
0.3
0 .4
6 .0
1.0
0 .2

a/)

U /)
0.1

0.1

(1/)

u/>

0.1

0.5
(1 /)
0.1
(1 /)
0.1

<I/>

.........
5.1
0.1
0 .2

0.5
0.1

—

(1 /)
0 .2

.........

24

0.3
1.1
(1 /)
0.1
0.1
(1 /)
0.1

a/)

10.8
5.3
1.6
(1 /)
0 .2

0.5
0.1

1.5
0.1
0.2
(1/ )

(1 /)
(1 /)

0.2
0.1

0.1
(1 /)

0.5
0.1

(1 /)

a/)

(1 /)
0.1

a/)

(l/)

0

60 Ai re re ft and p a rts . __ Tt Tf tT. TtTTtTr- l t I
61 O ther tra n sp o rtflti on erjui pment TTt t , ITTTT1t, tItTI
62 S c i e n t i f i c e n d c o n t r o l l i n g i n s t r u m e n t s , T. . TrTrr.

63 O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing............................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing..................................

66 Oomminl r« 11on a ( excep t h roa d c^ st i n g ( . TT1fTtt1T1I
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e .........................

71 Reel e a t e t e end r e n t a l - . r . TrTTTIIIIITTTf It ri t i II
fiO flross im p orts o f goods end s e r v i c e ^ , | T t I , , , , , , , ,

T otal p la n t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent.............................................................. ....
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................

See footnotes at end of table.




0.1

(l/)

0 .2

0.8
0.3

(1/)

0.1

0.2
0.2
0.5
0.5

0.1
0.1

0.5
0 .3

0.1
0.1

0.3
0.2
0.7
0 .3
0.7

0.1

0 .4

0.1

0.7

a/)

0.2

0.1

1.1

0.1

0.7
0.8
0.6

«/)
a/)
a/)

0 .2
0.2

0.1

1.1

—

(1/)

(1/)

(1/)
a/)

0.1
0.2

(1/)
0.1

0 .3
1.2

—

.

0.1
0.2

0 .3
0 .4
0.2

0. 1

65

0.1
0. 1

0.1

0. 1
0.1

1.5
0.6

Table A-3. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Producing Industry--Continued
(Producers' values)
Petroleum Rubber
Drugs,
Chemi­
Paper­
and
P la s tic s c le an in g , P a in ts re fin in g
c a ls
board P rin tin g
m iscel­
and
and
and
and
and
con­ and pub­
laneous
ta in e rs lis h in g se lec te d sy n th e tic t o il e t
a llie d re la te d
p la s tic s
chemical m a te ria ls prepa­ products indus­
and
products
t r ie s
ra tio n s
products
boxes

Consuming in d u s trie s

25

Producing in d u s trie s

26

27

28

29

30

31

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r cov erin g s.

0 .2

1.2

0.5

0.2

0 .4

0.1

0 .4

0.3

22 Household f u r n itu r e .......................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

0.1
0.3
0.5

1.2
1.0
0.9

0.5
1.0
1.4

0.2
0 .3
0.8

0.3
0.7
0.8

0.1
0.2
0.1

0 .4
0.8
0 .4

0 .3
0.6
0 .3

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

0.1

0 .4

0.1
(1,/)
..........
0.7

0 .3
..........
..........

0.4
0.6
0.2
(1 /)

0 .4
0.6
0.1
a /)

0.4
1.3
..........

8.1
9.7
2.1
(1 /)

0.9

43 Engines and tu r b in e s ................... .......................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
45 C on stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ...

4 .4
5 .0
2.1
0.1

0 .3

0.7

11.7
0.2
1.2
(1 /)

1.0
1.9
3.1
5.1
0.6
0.1
0.1

0 .5

2.2
0.8
0.2

1.4
0.7
4.1
14.0
1.3
0.1
0 .3

0 .1

0.2
0.1

0 .4

0 .1

0.1

a />

0.5
0.1
0 .2

a /)

Ay
mA
i i i ifa
48 Special in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice , com puting, and accounting m achines............
( r ■■■

52

Service

industry

■

m a c h i n e s ....... , ............ T ........

*57 FI mpf r* jliiuuokiaoi djuxpoieuj j citiu o|)pai<ikU9«
4n/tnef o 1 omH nmnnf anH annarafne
Cticwiiiv
*»A Hon aoVinl d pppl 1flnroe lT-1 I I l r t Tr l l TTI l 1- Tt 1I- l r i r _
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent*.
^y R1
AmpA^ont* e
(( (( (
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l m achinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent................................ ..
60 A irc ra ft and p a r t s . . . . . .............. .....................................
w

r

• « #•

r

..

f | * g n c p A r f^ ^ 4An

62
63
64
65

0.7
0.2

(1 /)
0.1
..........

0 .3
0 .4
0.1

0.1
0.2

0.1
11.5
0 .2
1.0

0.2
0.5
0.6
2.5
4.7
1.1
0 .3
1.6

0.2

0.8

1.6

0.2
0.3
0.2

1.0
1.1
0.8

1.5
1.8
1.1

m/|ii4 pm ont*

S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts..........
O p tic a l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
M iscellaneous m anufacturing
..
T ran sp o rta tio n and warehousing
f \( \
one eyrppt*
tt t
69 W holesale and r e ta il t r a d e . . . .
...........
71
pfifAfp and rAnt’fll . TTTtTtItTt- TTTfT- Tt t l t f t Tr
ftO nroee ^npn^’t’e nf goods ^nH cpr*\/^
ti a
1
T otal p la n t and equipm ent......... .................................... ..
T otal equipm ent..................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n ).........................
..

.................

...................................

.........................................

rVintmtin'i o fl t* 4

0 .4
1.0

2 .1

1 .6

2 .5
0 .3

0 .4
0 .4

0 .1

( 1 /)

^

h r n ^ W r * ^ c f - { nj> (

. 1T

.................................

See footnotes at end of table.




0 .1

1.1
4.1
2.7
0.1
1 .0

0 .7
0 .1

0 .6

1.6
1.1
0 .2
0.4

0 .2

1.1
0 .3
4 .3
0 .4
0 .4
0.7
1.7
1.3
0.7
0.6
1.1

0 .6

0 .4

0 .2

1.2

(

..

Al

0.2
(1 /)

an

0.1
an
0 .1
0 .2
1 .7
0 .7
0 .1

0 .1

..........
0 .7

32

0 .4
U /)
1.1
1.9
2.8
3.5
0.8
an

0.1

0 .3
0.1
a /)
0 .1
0 .3
0 .6
0 .2
0 .6

, , r

66

0 .6
0 .7
0 .3

0 .4
0 .4
0 .4

0 .2
0 .2
0 .1

1.9
1.2
2.9

0 .5

0 .5
0 .6
0 .3

Table A-3. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Producing Industry--Continued
(Producers' values)
Consuming in d u s trie s

Producing in d u s trie s
17
20
22
23
32

Prim ary
L eather Footwear
Stone
iro n
G lass
tanning
and
and
and
and
and in ­
o
s te e l
clay
g lass
d u s tria l le ath er r
th e
le a th e r products products products manufac­
tu rin g
products
33

34
0.1

35

0 .4

0.2
0.5
0.5

(1 /)
0.1
0.8

0 .4
0.8
0.4

0.2

0.5

0 .3

0.1

a /)

0 .2

0 .3

0 .2

0 .4
(1 /)
2.7
3.6
0.2
1.5
3.3
0.8
(1 /)
0 .4

2.6
2.5
1.6
(1/ )

0.1

0.1

2.9
2.5
1.8
(1/ )
0 .4
3.8
29.1
1.4
12.0
0.9

1.9
9.4
0.7
4.8

0 .3
1.9

1.0

0.1

2.0
4 .0
0.7
0.2
0.5
0 .4
0.8

(1 /)

0.1

43 Engines and tu rb in e s......................................................... ..

<y>
0.3

0.1

0 .4
0.1
0.1

0.9
0.1

0 .4

1.0

0.5
0.4
0.1

7 11
7

4n4
/ ii
m a/ Hn tA f an Annawafue
1 ii n fi
/
iiiuuvtLMA 6qui|iiiiciiw oiiu ) apptt&ftvuo* • • • •
SA Hmia.hnlA gppl 1
| i r t itttriiTTriiiriii?i-itTt




(1 /)

0.6
1.2
0.7

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

(1 /)

0.1

0.3
0.7
0.1

0 .2
0.1

0.1

0.5

(1/)

U/)

0.1

(1/)

a/)

(1 /)

..........

2.8

0.1
0.6

1.2
0 .3

0.5
0.1

0.1

a/)

0.1

0.1

a/)

0.1

0.1

0.2
0.8

a/)

0.1

0.1

0.8

2.3

1.0

a/)

0.1

0 .2
0 .2
0 .2

0.7
0.8
0.6

2.6
2.8
2.4

1.1

..........
an

a/)

0.1
a/)

0.1
a/)

67

a/)

0.2
0.1

0.1

0 .8
0.1
0.4
0.5

0.1

0,2
0.1

0.5

a/)

0.1

.......

0.6
0 .2
1.2
0.8
3.7
0.8
0.6
2.9

(1 /)
..........

(1/)

40

0.6

0.1
0.2
0 .3

See footnotes at end of table.

39

.......

0.1
0 .3
0 .4

55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
57 E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s s o rie s . ...................
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and e q u ip m en t.. ....................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a rts ........................................ ..
61 Ot'her frunepnrtflf 1on erjul pment~, - tT-f r < l l i r l , , , , t
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g instru m en ts................ . •
63 O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing .................................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing ................. ...........
66 namin'! r . 1 1nna f oiyr.pt' hmArir^eft ngT - r i - i T T T i T r r
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...................................
71
ACtfl
*• • • ,«.• «. 1■1
SO Crnss Inpnrf* ftf gnruis ^nrt corvt rao ( a a t ■■
T otal p la n t and equipm ent. ..............................
T otal equipm ent. .................................. ............
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................

38
0 .3

0 .4

(1 /)
(1 /)
0.8

C o n stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ...
M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent.. . . . .
M etalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
S pecial In d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent...........
O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines............
S? Service infiust’ry marhinAS. -r t TTtTrt- r t t T . TttTTrTt

37

.......

0.1

M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood pro d u cts, except c o n ta in e rs..........
Household fu rn itu re . .................. ..........................
O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s .................. ..
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u c ts .••• ••

45
46
47
48
49
51

36

H eating,
Primary
plumb­
nonferMetal
in g , and
rous
c o n ta in ­ s tru c ­
m etals
e rs
tu ra l
manufac­
metal
tu rin g
products

0.3
0.2
0.3
0.6
0.8
0.3
1.1

1.0

0.9

0.1
a/)
(y )
...

_

0 .3
0.2
0.2
0.1

0.1

(1 /)
0.3
0.5

0.1

0.5

a/)

0.1

0.1

0.1
0.1

0.5
0.5
0.4

Table A-3. Capital Flows, 1958
Percent Distribution by Producing Industry--Continued
(Producers' values)
Consuming in d u s trie s

Stamp­
in g s,
screw
machine
p roducts,
and
b o lts
41

Producing in d u s trie s

C onstruc­
Other
tio n ,
Farm
f a b r i­ Engines machinery m ining,
and
cated
and o i l ­
and
m etal tu rb in e s equipment
fie ld
products
machinery
42

43

44

45

M aterials
M etal­ Special
working in d u stry
handling
machinery machinery machinery
and
and
and
equipment equipment equipment
46

47

48

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.

0.2

0.3

0.1

0.1

0 .2

1*0

0 .8

0.6

22 Household fu rn itu re .................. ...........................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ..........................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

0.2
0 .3
0 .8

0.3
0.6
0 .3

0.1
0.2
0 .3

0.1
0.2
0 .3

0 .2
0 .3
0.6

0.1
0.1
0.8

0 .8
0.6
0 .3

0.6
0.3
0.2

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

0.2

0 .4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

43 Engines and tu rb in e s .............................................................

0.1

0 .3
(1 /)

0.1
(1 /)

a /)

0.1
(1 /)

0.7
4.3
..........
0 .4
0.3
..........
0.3

1.3
2.8
..........
0.6
0.6
0 .3
0.5

1.5
0.6
..........
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.2

..........
0.8
0 .3
0.2
0.5
0 .3
(1 /)
0.2

0.1
(1 /)
0 .8
0.5
0.1
0.5
0 .3
0 .2
0 .3

0.6
0.2

0.1
(1 /)
(1 /)
1.2
3.7

0.1
(1 /)
(1 /)

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

0 .4
0 .4
0 .2
0 .9

0.5
0.3
0.1
0.8

0.2

0.3
0.1

0.1
(1 /)

0 .2
a /)

0 .2
(1 /)

0.1
a /)

0.2
(1 /)

0.1
U /)

0.4
0.1
an

0.1
a /)
0.1

(1 /)
0.1
0 .2

a /)
a /)
..........

0.1
(1,/)
0.1

(1 /)
a /)
0.1

0.9

(1 /)

(1 /)

an

an

an

0.1
0.1

0.1
a /)
0.1
0.2

(i/)
a /)
0.1

0.1
a /)
0.1
0 .4

(i/)
a /)
0.1
0 .4

45
46
47
48
49
51
52
53

C o n stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ...
M a terials handling m achinery and equipm ent............
M etalworking machinery and equipm ent........................
S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
General in d u s tria l m achinery and equipm ent...........
O ffic e , com puting, and accounting m achines............
Service in d u stry m achines.......................... ..
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s. . . . .
14mi
1rl
( i i ■i
iii
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 R adio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
^*7 171a/'f* rnn4r* rAmnnnanf e anH
oo
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...................................... ..
60 A irc ra ft and p a r t s . . . ..........................................................
A1 Hi- fi-an caar*fof,4nn
nmnnt
SclApI-! f i r find ro nfrn) 1 Ing i net* 1*11mint's t t Tt t t TTr _
63 O p tic a l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent..
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rta tio n and w arehousing......................................
66 Communications, except b ro ad castin g ......................... ..
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
y\ Rp^l Afil'pt'A And rptlf^l i t t « t t i r i t t t i * » i i r T i r « i - f t
ftO rirACc 4rapArf c nf j»aaH ^nH corwf
|
T otal p la n t and equipm ent.............................................
T otal equipm ent....................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
c

an

0.2
0.1
0.1
a /)
0.1
0.3
..........
0 .3

0.2
0 .4

0.1
0.1

an

0.1

0.1

0 .2

0.1

0 .4

0.3

0 .3
0.4
0.2

0.1
0.1
0.1

0.1
0.1

0.1
0.2

<l/>
0.1

0.3
0 .4

97.2
0.2
0.3

0. 1

0.1

an

0.1

0.1

aac

0.3
0 .3
0.2

1 .1

0 .4

See footnotes at end of table.




0.1
0.1

an

i.o

68

Table A-3. C apital Flows, 1958
P ercent D istrib u tio n by Producing Industry--C ontinued
(Producers' v alu es)
Consuming in d u s trie s

Producing in d u s trie s

General
in dus­
tria l
machin­
ery and
equip­
ment
49

E le c tric
O ffice ,
indus­
com­
Machine- puting, Service
tria l
in d u stry equip­
shop
and
products account­ machines ment and
ing
appa­
machines
ra tu s
50

0 .4

0.1
0.1

0.1

0.1

a /)
..........

0.1
0.1

0.2
0.2

0 .4

22 Household fu rn itu re ........................... ............................ • . .
23 O ther fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ....................................
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

0.7
0.4

0.2

0 .4
0.3

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

0.2
0.1




2.4

(1 /)
(1 /)
0 .3
3.7

0.4
0.4

0.1
0.1

0.8

0.2

(1 /)
0 .4

0.2

un
u /)

0.9

(1 /)

0 />
(1 /)

0.1
0.1
a /)
0.1

0 .4
u /)
(1 /)

0.2
0 .3
3.5
(1 /)

0.2
0.1

<y>
2.3

0.1

a /)
0.3

0.1

0 .4

0.5

(W)

0 .4

0.1

0 .3

(1 /)

(1 /)
(1 /)

0.3

0.3

0 .3

0.3
0 .3

0 .3

0.2
0.2

0.1
0.1
0.1

2.8

0.2

0.2

69

0.8
0.1

0 .3

0.3

0 .3

0.1

(1 /)
(1 /)
0 .3
2.7

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

0.2
0.1

U /)

0 .4
0.3

(1 /)
(1 /)
0.5
0.5

(1 /)
a /)
a /)
0 .3

0.3
0 .3

53

0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1

0.7

(1 /)
(1 /)

52

0.2
0.2
0 .4
0.1

17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.

43 Engines and tu rb in e s............................................................
44 Farm m achinery and equipm ent...........................................
45 C onstruction, m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ...
46 M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent............
47 Metalworking machinery and equipm ent.........................
AA Qpoo4a 1 nHncfry
nory ^nsi oqiM pmonf*
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines............
52 Service in d u stry m achines..................................................
53 E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s..........
Hnncohnl d appl i anre c r r _tT1IT_TI__I I i n r i l I ( I I ,
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
S7 El e rtro n lp component’s Anri A rrpscnrl pc r
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent...........................................
6 0 A1 r r n i f t Anri p a rts , ^ . t T. - ___
6 1 Ot"her tra n s p o rta tin n aqul pnant r . . T. Tir. r t 1t t t t Tt T
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.................. ..
63 O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing...........................
65 T ran sp o rtatio n and w arehousing......................................
6 6 ComnunlcationS| except* hroaH r^stlng, r t T. f - I t < t ( ,
69 W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
71 Reel e s ta te And r e n ta l__ ___T___T___TiTt rf!»t.T«
80 G r o s s i m p o r t s o f g o o d s end s e r v i c e s , r . f t T,
T otal p la n t and equipm ent..................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .

51

(1 /)

0.1

0 .3

0.1
0.1
0.2
(1 /)
0.1
0 .3

0 .3
0 .3
0.3

0.2

E le c tric
House­ lig h tin g
and
hold
iring
a p p li­ wequip­
ances
ment
54

55

Radio,
te le v i­
sio n ,
and
communi­
catio n
equipment
56

0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1

0.1
0.1
(1 /)
0.1

0 .4

0.1

0.1
0.1

0.2
0.1

0.1

a /)

0 .4
0.5

0.2

(1 /)
(1 /)

(1 /)
(1 /)

1.5

3.0

0.1

(l/)
0 .3
(1 /)

0.2
0.8
0.1
0.8

a/)

0.5
0.3
0 .4

0.6

0.2
0.1

0.2
0.1

(1 /)

0.3

a /)

(1 /)

29.8
0 .3
(1 /)

0.3

0.1
0.2
a/)
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

1.1

0.2

0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1

0 .3
a /)

0.1
0.2
0.1

0 .4
0.4
0 .4

(1 /)

0.2

0 .4

0.3

Table A-3. C ap ital Flows, 1958
P ercent D istrib u tio n by Producing Industry--C ontinued
(Producers' v alu es)
N.

Consuming in d u s trie s

Producing in d u s trie s

E lec­
tro n ic
com­
ponents
and a c ­
c e sso rie s
57

22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f i x t u r e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............
32 Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............

0.2
9 1
0.2
0.2
0.2

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products

0.2

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
52
53
14
55
56
57
58
59
60

Engines and tu rb in e s ...........................................................
Farm machinery and equipm ent............................... ..
C o n stru ctio n , m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ...
M aterials handling machinery and equipm ent.. . . . .
M etalworking machinery and equipm ent........................
Special in d u stry machinery and equipm ent................
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines.. . . . .
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p ara tu s..........
HnnephnlH gppl 4 | p r p s , t i i t . i i t t « f « » i i f i Tr * » » « « t r «
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent................ ..
Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
E le ctro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts ................................................................

0.1
(1,/)
a /)

62
63
64
65

S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g in stru m en ts.....................
O p tic a l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
M iscellaneous m a n u fa c tu rin g .........................................
T ran sp o rta tio n and warehousing......... ............................

17 M iscellaneous t e x tile goods and flo o r coverings.

ft1 flfhpr t"rf«n Rpoft"* t"1 on pqii'ipfflpnt'r r T T T t r t t t t t t t t . t r

ftft r.nmiiinl

1 nns ( pvrppf KirnaHraeHng, ,

69 W holesale and r e ta il tr a d e ..............................................

M iscel­
laneous
e le c t r i ­
cal
machin­
ery and
equip­
ment

Other
tra n s ­
p o rta ­
tio n
equip­
ment

O p tic a l,
S cien­ o p h th al­ M iscel­
tific
and con­ mic* and laneous
photo­
manu­
tr o llin g graphic
fa c
in s tr u ­ equip­ tu rin­g
ments
ment

59

60

0.1

0.6

1.0

0.1

0.3

0.1

0.3

0.1
0.1
0.1

0.6
1.2
0.5

0.9
0 .8
0.9

0.1
(1 /)
0 .3

0 .2
0 .2
0.1

0.1
0.2
0.1

0.3
0.5
1.0

0.1
0.3
0.1
a /)
a /)

0.8
0.6
0.6
(1 /)
(1 /)
1.9
4.5
1.4
1.4
2.9
0.3
2.3

0 .4

0.1

0.1

(I/)

0.3

0 .3
Q /)
<l/>
1.3
1.9

0.1
(I/)
(1 /)
1.3
0 .2

0.1
(1 /)
(l/>

(1 /)
(1 /)
a/)

0.2
a /)
a/)
1.3
1.8
1.2
0.8
1.2
a /)
0.6

58

...........

1.5
0 .3
0.2
0 .4
a /)
0 .3

Motor
v e h ic les A irc ra ft
and
and
equip­
p a rts
ment

0.5

a /)
0.2

a /)
0.1

0.2
a /)
4.1

a /)

a /)
..........

a /)
a /)

0.1

62

2.2

0 .4
0.8
0.4
1.3

0.3
0.7
(1 /)
0 .4

0.1
0.7
U /)
0 .4

1.5
0.4
3.8
0 .3
0.2
0 .4

0.7
1.8
3.6
0.7
0.1
3.2

0.2
0.1
3.6
0.6
0.1

0.2
a /)

0 .3
1.5
0.8

0.1

0.1

a /)
0.1

a /)
a /)

0.2

0.1

1 .0

0.6
2.2
0 .4
0.6

0.2

0.1

0.9

0.5

0.2

0.1

0.7

0.2

0.1

0.5
0.6
0.5

pfifafp ftnri rpnffl 1 t T i i i t t T T - t t i i i i t t t i . t i i t t
RO ftr*msK import’s o f goods qnd sp r v ir p s , t t t t t t . . » i . t

61

0 .1

0.4
a /)
a /)
0.1

0 .3
a /)
<l/>
0 .3
0.9
0 .1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

63

1.1
0.1
0.1
0.2

a /)
0.1
0.1

a /)
0.2

a /)
0.1
0.3

64

0.3
0.1
1.6
0.1
0.1
<l/>
0.1

2.1

a /)

0.1

0.4

0.1

0.4

0.1

0.4

a /)

0.1

71

T otal p la n t and equipm ent.................................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
See fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




0.1

a /)

70

1 .0

0 .4

0.2
0.2
0.2

0 .2
0.2
0 .1

0.1

0.4

0.1

0.3

Table A-3. C apital Flows, 1958
Percent D istrib u tio n by Producing Industry--C ontinued
(Producers' v alues)
Consuming in d u s trie s

Producing in d u strie s
M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
Lumber and wood p roducts, except c o n ta in e r s .....
Household f u r n i t u r e ................................................
Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ...........................................
Rubber and m iscellaneous p la s tic s p ro d u cts............
Footwear and o th er le a th e r p roducts...........................
Metal c o n ta in e rs.......................................... ..........................
H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products
Other fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts ...................................
Engines and tu rb in e s........................................................
Farm machinery and equipm ent.................... ......................
C o n struction, m ining, and o il fie ld m achinery...
M aterials handling machinery and e q u ip m e n t......
Metalworking machinery and equipment.........................
Special in d u stry machinery and e q u ip m e n t........
General in d u s tria l machinery and equipment.....
O ffice, computing, and accounting m achines............
Service in d u stry m achines.................................................
E le c tric in d u s tria l equipment and a p p a r a tu s .....
Household a p p lia n ce s......... ................... ..............................
E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
E lectro n ic components and a c c e s so rie s.......................
M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
Motor v e h ic les and equipm ent..........................................
A irc ra ft and p a r ts ........................... .....................................
Other tra n s p o rta tio n equipm ent......................................
S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g instru m en ts.....................

63

Optical,

64
65
66
69
71
80

M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
T ran sp o rtatio n and warehousing......................................
Communications, except b ro ad castin g ...........................
W holesale and r e ta il tra d e ...............................................
Real e s ta te and r e n t a l . . . . ...............................................
Gross im ports of goods and s e rv ic e s...........................
T otal p lan t and eq u ip m en t...............................................
T otal e q u ip m e n t............. ................................................
T otal p lan t (new c o n stru c tio n )......... ........................
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




and

photographic

equipment.

Communi­
c a tio n s,
except
broadc astin g
66

65

17
20
22
23
32
34
39
40
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

ophthalmic,

T rans­
p o rta ­
tio n and
ware­
housing

Radio and
te le v i­
sion
broad c a stin g

8.9

2.7

67
0.3

8.6
3.4
1.1

2.6
2.3

0.3
3.0

0.1

1.2
10.3
1.3
1.2
1.4
18.4

0.6
1.7

0.2
1.2

1.1
2.7
4.5
0.7

0.1

0.1

2.2

E le c tric , Whole­
gas*
sa le
w ater,
and
and
r e ta il
sa n ita ry
se rv ice s trad e
2.1

38.2

7.1

1.8

2.1
1.8
0.8

33.2
31.0
65.3

6.9
6.8

5.7
3.0
(1 /)

53.5
10.3
67.9
0.3
0.4
0 .4
6.8
3.0
0.3
55.8

25.0
0.5
8.0
2.4
0.9
0.7
21.6
3.0
8.0
3.2
10.6
53.1
2.3
45.1
24.9
4.0
2.0
5.5
27.7

2.9
62.5
3.9
8.9
2.1
0.1

3.1
9.4
12.0
3.6
0.6

19.0
0.5
2.7
0.2
1.4
1.1

(1/)

9.5
3.9
2.5
18.6
5.4
72.9
76.0
0.8
1.2
0 .4
4.8

(1 /)
6.1

4.3

2.2
0.9

a/)

1.5

0.7
9.3

0.9
0.8
1.3
(1 /)

4.9

0.3
3.9
100.0
2.4

6 .0
7.6
3.7

5.4
5.4
5.3

71

0 .1

71

69

a/)

6.6

70

Real
e s ta te
and
re n ta l

68

a/)

5.6

Finance
and
in s u r­
ance

19.6
0 .3

3.6

0.3
24.6
1.2

0.1

..........
1.9
13.7
0.7
3.8
0.2

1 .0
0.1

4 .0
..........
0.1

..........

0.2

5.0
..........
0.8
(1 /)

33.8
14.2

0.9
2.8

..........
1.5

6 .0

17.8

4.2

2.1

13.9
8.7
21.4

11.2
13.1
8.4

1.8
2.8
0.3

3.3
1.6
5.8

1 .0

Table A-3. C apital Flows, 1958
Percent D istrib u tio n by Producing Industry--C ontinued
(Producers' v alues)
Consuming in d u s trie s

H otels;
personal
Business
and
se rv ice s
re p a ir
se rv ic e s,
except
auto

Producing in d u strie s

72

17 M iscellaneous te x tile goods and flo o r coverings.
A| «
|
1 .1.*. _ _ _ _ _ _ ( •
22 Household fu rn itu re ...............................................................
23 Other fu rn itu re and f ix tu r e s ......................................

5.5

3.7

8.6
6 .0
4 7

3.6
3.6
0.2

Research
and
develop­
ment

40 H eating, plumbing, and s tru c tu ra l m etal products
44 Farm machinery and equipm ent...........................................
45 C o n struction, m ining, and o il fie ld m ach in ery ...
L(\
l
fl 1 e VanH 1 4nrr marli^nory onrl o/|nj| pmont1
i
48 S pecial in d u stry m achinery and equipm ent................
49 General in d u s tria l machinery and equipm ent............
51 O ffice , computing, and accounting m achines............
5? Service in d u stry m achines. .................. ............................
^ Irl p p fri r inH ucfrifll
pmonf onH opporof'iie |
S4 Nnn sehnl H flpp1ifinci»sTr. - . T- f l I T t T T l t l r t l t t T t t l I t
55 E le c tric lig h tin g and w iring equipm ent.....................
56 Radio, te le v is io n , and communication equipm ent..
S7 F.1 er t rnni r rnmpnnpnt' e
^ rp c c n H e s f I I ,
58 M iscellaneous e le c tr ic a l machinery and equipment
59 Motor v e h ic le s and equipm ent...........................................
60 A irc ra ft and p a r t s . . . . . . . . . . Tt__ rt r»Ti »t t T»f»t i
61 Other trunsport^itlnn equl pment ITT. tT. Tt Tt i r t t rt 1
62 S c ie n tific and c o n tro llin g 1n strum ents TTTT. TTTTt
63 O p tica l, ophthalm ic, and photographic equipm ent.
64 M iscellaneous m anufacturing.............................................
65 T ran sp o rta tio n and warehousing......................................
66 nommuni r a t io n s, except hroadcast i ngTr. . TTT. IITI1
69 W holesale and r e ta il t r a d e . . . .........................................
71 Real e s ta te and r e n t a l . . . . . . . . .........
80 Gross im ports of goods and services., TTTfII, - I l l t
T otal p la n t and e q u ip m e n t.........................................
T otal equipm ent...................................................................
T otal p la n t (new c o n stru c tio n )..................................
IJ Less than .05 p ercen t.

D istrib u tio n does not include used goods, nonfarm
re s id e n tia l stru c tu re s or commissions on re a l e s ta te
tra n s a c tio n s .




73

3.4
1.2
0.7
1.5

74

Auto­
mobile
re p a ir
and
se rv ice s
75

....
0.2

0.9
0.9

....
(1 /)

1.9
(1 /)
7.3
1.5
0.6

..........
0.1
2.0

10.0

0.9
1.5
0.2

1.7
1.7
0.1
66.0

9.8
12.7
1.3

0.1
10.6
7.4
4 .0

2.3
30.7

4.4

2.9

0.2
0.2
0.2

2.1

1.7
2.3

0.1
0.2

2.2

0.8
2.4

3.3

0.8

0 .4

a /)
1.9
1.1
1.6
0.1

1.9
0.1

(1,/)

T otal

77

1.8

1.2
2.9
1.6

0.1
0.1
0.5
(1 /)

1.6

3.4
4.3
1.0
4.2
2.8

0.3
4.7

76

0.9

0.1

0.5
a /)
0.4
20.9
4.4
21.3
7.2
0.9

Amuse­
ments

M edical,
educa­
tio n a l
and non­
p ro fit
o rg an i­
z atio n s

0.1
6.3

8.7
1.0

100.0
100 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
iIUU . u
no n
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

0.2
1.5
0.7
1.1

0.9
0.1
7.4
4.1
0.7
14.0
5.7
1.3
4.5
41.7
2.6
3.9

a /)
0.3
1.5

0.4
0.6
1.9
0.1
11.3
38.4
1.3

2.0

1.1

4.6

1.2
1.6

1.7

7.2
3.9
11.9

0.4

1.2

2.5

57.1
10.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100 0
100.0

5.5
4.6

iLno • o
UU U
u /)io o .o

100.0
100.0

N0T£: Because of rounding, sums of in d iv id u al item s may
not equal to ta ls .

72
☆

U .S . G O V E R N M E N T

P R IN T IN G O F F IC E

: 1968 0 - 3 2 1 - 9 9 6




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