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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

B U L L E T IN O F T H E U N IT E D S TA TES )
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S )

M I S C E L L A N E O U S

• • ■ ■ No. 319
S E R I E S

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTM OF LABOR
ENT

ns HISTORY, ACTIVITIES, AND ORGANIZATION




BY

GUSTAVUS A. WEBER
Member of Staff, Institute for Government
Research

OCTOBER, 1922

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1922

FOREWORD.

The manuscript of this bulletin was originally prepared for use as
one of a series of service monographs of the United States Govern­
ment issued by the Institute for Government Research of Wash­
ington, D. C. By an arrangement made with that organization the
Bureau of Labor Statistics has been enabled to publish it in its
present form.
ii




CONTENTS,
Pago.
Chapter I.—History----------------------------------------- --------------- —------------ 1- 9
Beginning of agitation for a Department of Labor in the Federal
Government____________________________________________________
1
The first governmental labor organization in the United States______
2
Creation of a Federal Department of Labor________________________ 2- 3
Establishment of a Department of Commerce and Labor___________
3
Establishment of the present Department of Labor with a Bureau of
Labor Statistics----------------------------------------------------- ----------------3
History of functions and activities________________________________ 4-9
Chapter II.—Activities---------------------------------------------------------------------- 10-24
Functions----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10
Activities concerning:
Wholesale prices_____________________________________________ 1 1 .1 2
Retail prices and cost of living_______________________________ 12-14
Wages and hours of labor------------------------------------------------------- 15.10
Employment and unemployment---------------------------------------------- 16.17
Women in industry__________________________________________ 17.18
Workmen’s insurance and compensation_______________________
IS
Industrial accidents and hygiene---------------------------------------------- 19
20
Conciliation and arbitration__________________________________
Labor laws of the United States and court decisions____________ 20, 21
Foreign labor laws-------- ^----------------------------------------------------- 21
21
Vocational education________________________________________
22
Labor as affected by the war_________________________________
22
Miscellaneous studies_____________________ :__________________
22
Labor indexes and bibliographies_____________________________
22
Monthly Labor Review______________________________________
Other activities-------------------------------------------------------------------- 23. 24
25-28
Chapter III.—Organization__________________________________________
Office of the Commissioner of Labor Statistics_____________________
25
Office of the chief statistician------------------------------------------------------- 26
26
Special field investigations___________________________________
Division of correspondence and files_________________________ _ 26
Division of accounts_________________________________________
26
26
Division of supplies_________________________________________
27. 28
Statistical division--------------------------------------------------------------------27
Wages and labor conditions_________________________________
°7
Wholesale prices____________________________________________
Retail prices________________________________________________
Cost of living_______________________________________________
Industrial accidents-------------------------------------------------------------- 2<
27
Strikes and lockouts_________________________________________
28
Volume of employment_______________________________________
28
Editorial and research division___________________________________
28
Law division____________________________________________________
29
Appendix A.—Outline of organization________________________________
Appendix B.—Classification of activities_________________ '___________ - 30
Appendix C.—Publications----------------------------------------------------------------- 31-33
Appendix D.—Laws_________________________________________________ 34-36
Appendix E.—Financial statement____________________________________ 37, 88
Appendix F.—Bibliography---------------------------------------------------------------- 39-42
Appendix G.—Chronological list of publications----------------------------------- 43-59




III




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
NO. 319

WASHINGTON

OCTOBER, 1922

T E B R A O L B R ST T IC IT H O Y A T IT S,
H U E U F A O A IST S: S IST R , C IV IE
A D O G N A IO .
N R A IZ T N
CHAPTER I.— HISTORY.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics is one of the executive bureaus
of the Department of Labor. It is charged with the duty of “ ac­
quiring and diffusing among the people of the United States useful
information on subjects connected with labor in the most general
and comprehensive sense of the word,” and of investigating “ the
causes of, and facts relating to, controversies and disputes between
employers and employees as they may occur.” Its functions are edu­
cational, not administrative.
BEG IN NING OF AG ITATION FOR A DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR IN
THE FED ER AL GOVERNM ENT.

The movement for the creation of a Federal department to look
after the interests of the working people in the United States began
soon after the close of the Civil War. At a conference of labor
representatives held in Louisville, Ky., in August, 1865, for the pur­
pose of considering the existing problems of unemployment and in­
adequate wages, the following resolution was adopted:
Every department of the Federal Government is now and has been officered
by professional men, business men, or manufacturers. They are or have been
employers of labor or counselors of employers. Naturally their sympathies are
not with labor. There should be at Washington a department of labor to be
officered by men who are of and with labor, the duty of that department to
be the guarding of labor interests in every way now known or which hereafter
may become known.

After the Louisville conference individual labor leaders took up
the agitation, and demands were made at various times by labor
organizations for the creation of such a department. Realizing the
futility of the efforts to obtain an executive department of labor at
that time, the movement subsequently took the’form of agitation for
the creation of a Federal bureau of labor and of similar bureaus in
the individual States.1
1 Department of Labor: Annual Report of the Secretary of Labor for 1920.



1

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

2

TH E FIR ST GOVERNM ENTAL LABOR ORGANIZATION IN TH E
U N ITED STATES.

The first governmental organization created for the specific pur­
pose of collecting and compiling information relating to labor con­
ditions in the United States was the Massachusetts Bureau of Sta­
tistics of Labor, which was organized by virtue of an act approved
June 23, 1869. The project for such an organization was originally
proposed in the recommendation of two legislative commissions in
Massachusetts, the first in 1866, recommending “ that provision be
made for the annual collection of reliable statistics in regard to the
condition, prospects, and wants of the industrial classes,” and the
second, in 1867, recommending that “ a bureau of statistics be estab­
lished for the purpose of collecting and making available all facts
relating to the industrial and social interests of the Commonwealth.”
The functions of this first bureau, as defined by the act of June
22, 1869, are “ to collect, assort, systematize and present in annual
reports to the legislature, on or before the first day of March in each
year, statistical details relating to all departments of labor in the
Commonwealth, especially in its relations to commercial, industrial,
social, educational, and sanitary condition of the laboring classes,
and to the permanent prosperity of the productive industry of the
Commonwealth.”
The substance of this language found a place in nearly every
law subsequently enacted creating a State labor bureau and also
in the Federal law originally creating the United States Bureau of
Labor. Fourteen other States of the Union followed the example'
of Massachusetts in creating such a bureau before the Federal Gov­
ernment took such action.
CREATION OF A FED ER A L DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR.

Efforts in Congress for the establishment of a Federal bureau of
labor had their beginning on April 10, 1871, when a bill was intro­
duced in the House of Representatives by Congressman George F.
Hoar “ to provide for the appointment of a commission on the
subject of wages and hours of labor and the division of profits be­
tween labor and capital in the United States,” which passed the
House but was not enacted. A resolution to inquire into the ex­
pediency of the establishment of a labor bureau in connection with
the Department of Agriculture was introduced December 5, 1871,
but failed to carry. Bills for the creation of a labor bureau or
commission were introduced on December 11, 1871, January 6,
1874, March 31, 1876, May 5 and December 8, 1879, April 12,
1880, December 13, 1881, and December 4, 10, and 11, 1883, but all
of them failed to receive the approval of Congress. On April 23,
1879, the legislature of Massachusetts sent a resolution to Congress
asking for the establishment of a national bureau of labor. On
February 12, 1884, the Committee on Labor of the House of Rep­
resentatives, after considering various bills, favorably reported one
to establish and maintain a department of labor statistics, which
passed the House on April 19, 1884, and was later amended. The
bill as finally formulated established a bureau of labor in the De­
partment of the Interior and became a law June 27, 1884 (23 Stat.



HISVOEY, ACTIVITIES, AND ORGANIZATION.

3

L. 60). The earlier bills to which reference has been made were
introduced as the result of the establishment of the Bureau of Sta­
tistics of Labor in Massachusetts. The later bills, those introduced
in the year 1879 and subsequently, resulted from the various peti­
tions of labor organizations.
The United States Bureau of Labor of the Department of the In­
terior was organized in January, 1885, After it had been in exis­
tence for several years, a request was made of Congress by the
Knights of Labor that a department of labor, independent of
any of the general departments, be created, and on June 13, 1888,
a law (25 Stat. L. 182) was enacted providing that 4 there shall
4
be at the seat of government a Department of Labor, the gen­
eral design and duties of which shall be to acquire and diffuse
among the people of the United States useful information on sub­
jects connected with labor, in the most general and comprehensive
sense of that word, and especially upon its relation to capital, the
hours of labor, the earnings of laboring men and women, and the
means of promoting their material, social, intellectual, and moral
prosperity.” These functions, with others that have since been
added, remain in effect to the present time. The act also defined
the organization of the department and the duties of the com­
missioner, and provided for the transfer of the Bureau of Labor, its
duties, etc., to the Department of Labor. The new department,
therefore, simply continued the existence of the Bureau of Labor,
but with independent functions. The head of the department re­
tained the title of commissioner and did not have a place in the
Cabinet,
ESTA BLISH M EN T O F A DEPARTM ENT OF COMMERCE A N D LABOR.

An act approved February 14,1903 (32 Stat. L. 825), establishing a
new executive department known as the Department of Commerce and
Labor, provided that, among other offices, the existing Department of
Labor be placed under the jurisdiction and supervision of the new de­
partment, this provision to take effect and be in force July 1. 1903.
Accordingly the former Department of Labor became a bureau of the
Department of Commerce and Labor. As no provision was made
for any change in its general design and duties, the activities of the
Bureau of Labor continued to be carried on as before.

ESTA BL ISH M EN T O F THE PRESENT DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR
W ITH A B U R EA U OF LABOR STATISTICS.

On March 4,1913, an act was approved (37 Stat. L. 736) establish­
ing the present executive Department of Labor, which transferred
the Bureau of Labor from the Department of Commerce aiid Labor
to this new department, naming it the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
defining its duties, and providing that all the powers and duties there­
tofore possessed bv the Commissioner of Labor should be retained and
exercised by the Commissioner of Labor Statistics.
Thus the present Bureau of Labor Statistics has successively had
the titles of Bureau of Labor, Department of the Interior; Depart­
ment of Labor, without the status of an executive department ; Bureau
of Labor, Department of Commerce and Labor: and Bureau of
Labor Statistics, Department of Labor.



4

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
H ISTO RY OF FUNC TIO N S A N D ACTIVITIES.

Aside from the special investigations and other temporary duties
imposed upon the Commissioner of Labor Statistics by Congress,
there have been but few changes in the law with regard to the func­
tions of the bureau and the duties of its officers. The functions of
the bureau have been entirely educational, except during the period
from May 30, 1908, to September 7, 1916, when the bureau was
charged with certain administrative functions in the enforcement
of the act granting to certain Government employees the right to
receive compensation for injuries sustained in the course of their
employment.
The original act of June 27, 1884, required the Commissioner of
Labor to “ collect information upon the subject of labor, its relation
to capital, the hours of labor, and the earnings of laboring men and
ivomen, and the means of promoting their material, social, intellectual,
and moral prosperity.” It required the Commissioner of Labor to
make a report annually, in writing, to the Secretary of the Interior
“ of the information collected and collated by him.”
In accordance with this provision, the Commissioner of Labor,
immediately upon the organization of the bureau in January, 1885,
began an investigation of industrial depressions. This was followed
by investigations relating to convict labor, strikes and lockouts, and
working women in large cities. The results of these investigations
were published as annual reports, the one on convict labor being made
in response to a special act of Congress (24 Stat. L. 346). No other
publications were issued by this bureau while it remained a branch
of the Department of the Interior.
In 1888, when the bureau was made a separate department, the
Commissioner of Labor was required, in addition to the duties already
prescribed, “ to ascertain at as early a date as possible, and whenever
industrial changes shall make it essential, the cost of producing arti­
cles at the time dutiable in the United States, in leading countries
where such articles are produced, by fully specified units of produc­
tion, and under a classification showing the different elements of cost,
or approximate cost, of such articles of production, including the
wages paid in such industries per day, week, month, or year, or by
the piece; and hours employed per day; and the profits of the manu­
facturers and producers of such articles; and the comparative cost of
living and the kind of living” ; also “ to ascertain and report as to
the effect of the customs laws, and the effect thereon of the state of
the currency, in the United States, on the agricultural industry, espe­
cially as to its effect on mortgage indebtedness of farmers; and what
articles are controlled by trusts or other combinations of capital,
business operations, or labor, or what effect said trusts or other combi­
nations of capital, business operations, or labor have on production
and prices.” He was required to “ establish a system of reports by
which, at intervals of not less than two years, he can report the gen­
eral condition, so far as production is concerned, of the leading indus­
tries of the country.”
During the 15 years of its existence as a separate organization
(from 1888 to 1903), the Department of Labor issued 14 annual, 9
special, and 6 miscellaneous reports, giving the results of investiga


5'
lions undertaken in accordance with the above general instructions
and in compliance with special directions of Congress.
The annual reports related to railroad labor, cost of production of
iron, steel, coal, etc., cost of production of textiles and glass, indus­
trial education, building and loan associations, strikes and lockouts
(two reports, issued in 1894 and 1901, respectively), work and wages
of men, women, and children, economic aspects of the liquor problem,
hand and machine labor; water, gas; and electric-light plants under
private and municipal ownership, wages in commercial countries,
trade and technical education, and cost of living and retail prices of
food. The reports on cost of production included also cost of living,
wages, and other conditions of the working people engaged in the
industries covered, and were made in compliance with section 7 of
the act of June 13, 1888.
The special reports issued during this period related to marriage
and divorce, labor laws of the United States, analysis and index of
all reports issued by bureaus of labor statistics in the United States
prior to November 1, 1892, compulsory insurance in Germany, the
Gothenberg system of liquor traffic, the phosphate industry of the
United States, the slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New York, and
Philadelphia, the housing of the working people, and the Italians in
Chicago.
The miscellaneous reports related to white-pine lumber in the
United States and Canada, total cost and labor cost of transforma­
tion in the production of certain articles in the United States, Great
Britain, and Belgium, history and growth of the United States
census, effect of the international copyright law in the United States,
and two reports of the commissioner, published in 1902 and 1903,
respectively, on Hawaii.
On October 1, 1888, an act (25 Stat. L. 501) was approved pro­
viding for the creation of temporary boards of arbitration for
settling controversies and differences between railroad corporations
and other common carriers engaged in interstate transportation of
property or passengers and their employees, a representative to be
appointed by each side to the controversy and a third to be selected
by the other two, the award, when made, to be transmitted to the
Commissioner of Labor for publication of its terms. The act also
provided for the appointment of a special investigation committee
whenever the President deemed it necessary in order to prevent an
interference with interstate commerce, two commissioners being ap­
pointed by the President and the third member and ex officio chair­
man being the Commissioner of Labor.
This act was superseded on June 1, 1898, by another (30 Stat. L.
424) providing that “ whenever a controversy concerning wages,
hours of labor, or conditions of employment shall arise between a
carrier [engaged in interstate commerce] and the employees of such
carrier, seriously interrupting or threatening to interrupt the busi­
ness of said carrier, the chairman2 of the Interstate Commerce
Commission and the Commissioner of Labor shall, upon the request
of either party to the controversy, with all practicable expedition,
HISTORY, ACTIVITIES, AND ORGANIZATION.

2 An act approved March 4, 1911 (36 Stat. D. 1397) gave the President power to
designate any member of the Interstate Commerce Commission to exercise the powers
and duties which the act of 1898 conferred upon the chairman.



€

THE BTJEEAU O F LABOE STATISTICS.

put themselves in communication with the parties to such contro­
versy and shall use their best efforts, by mediation and conciliation,
to amicably settle the same; and if such efforts shall be unsuccessful,
shall at cnee endeavor to bring about an arbitration of said contro­
versy in accordance with the provisions of this act.”
During the existence of these laws the Commissioner of Labor
.Statistics was frequently called upon to act in the capacities indicated
when labor controversies arose between common carriers and their
employees. This act was superseded by an act of July 15, 1913 (38
Stat. L. 103), entitled 44'An act providing for mediation, conciliation,
and arbitration in controversies between certain employers and their
employees,” which provides for the appointment of a u board of
mediation and conciliation,” the members of which are all appointed
by the President. This act therefore eliminated the Commissioner of
Labor Statistics from participation in the settlement of dispute*
between common carriers and their employees.
On October 3,1893., an act was approved (28 Stat. L. 3) authoriz­
ing the President to direct the Commissioner of Labor to perform
tire duties of superintendent of the census under the direction of the
Secretary of the Interior until the work of closing the Eleventh
Census was completed. This was done, and for several years the
Commissioner of Labor divided his time between these two services.
In November, 1895, the Department of Labor began the publi­
cation of a bulletin in accordance with authority given in an act
approved March 2, 1895 (28 Stat. L. 805). This bulletin was pub­
lished bimonthly until May, 1912. It contained leading articles,
consisting of special studies and investigations made by members of
the bureau and others but not of sufficient size to justify publication
as separate reports, summaries of annual, special, and miscellaneous
reports, digests of reports of State bureaus of labor statistics and of
foreign statistical publications, decisions of courts affecting labor,
'opinions of the Attorney General, and labor laws of the Federal Gov­
ernment and of the various States when enacted. While originally
limited to 10,(M ) copies, laws were subsequently enacted (Act of June
M
1, 1897, 30 Stat, L, 61; Act of June 6, 1900, 31 Stat. L. 644) raising
the editions to 15,000 and later to 20,000 copies.
On July 1,1898, the Commissioner of Labor was authorized by an
act of Congress (30 Stat. L. 648) to compile and publish annually
in the bulletin of the Department of Labor an abstract of the main
features of the official statistics of the cities of the United States
having over 30,000 population. The first annual abstract of the
statistics of cities appeared in Bulletin 24, September, 1899. The
work of compiling and publishing this information was transferred
to the Bureau of the Census by order of the Secretary of Commerce
and Labor in 1903,
By an act of Congress approved April 30, 1900 (31 Stat. L. 155),
the Commissioner ©3 Labor was required to collect and publish an­
nually statistical details relating to all departments of labor in the
Territory of Hawaii. This act was modified on April 8, 1904 (33
Stat, L, 164) so as to require reports every five years instead of
annually. Five reports of this character have been issued.
On April 28, 1902, a provision was made in an appropriation
act (32 Stat. L. 168) for a subvention to the International Associa­
tion for Labor Legislation, the Government being represented in



HISTOEY, ACTIVITIES, A OEGANIZATION.
lsTD
T
that organization through the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This
subvention was appropriated for annually by Congress, but the
appropriation for this purpose for the fiscal year 1921 was not used,
and Congress has omitted it in subsequent appropriations.
Pursuant to a resolution of the Committee on Labor of the House
of Representatives requesting a report upon u a bill limiting the
hours of daily service of laborers and mechanics employed upon
work done for the United States, or for any Territory, or for the
District of Columbia, and for other purposes” (H. R. 4064. 58th
Cong., 1st sess.), a large portion of the force of the bureau was
engaged, in 1904 and 1905, in the collection of such data.
The incorporation of the Department of Labor as a bureau in the
Department of Commerce and Labor on July 1, 1903, resulted in
no change in the character or scope of its functions.
During its existence as the Bureau of Labor in this department,
from July 1, 1903, until March 4, 1913, 7 annual, 3 special, and 24
miscellaneous reports were issued.
The annual reports, in so far as they were the results of special
investigations or studies, were discontinued in 1910, and the last
special report was issued in 1905. Instead of these reports, it be­
came the policy of the bureau to issue more frequent and less
voluminous miscellaneous reports.
The annual reports issued during this period by the Bureau of
Labor related to wages and hours of labor, convict labor, strikes
and lockouts, labor laws, workmen’s insurance and benefit funds in
the United States, workmen’s insurance and compensation systems
in Europe, and industrial education. The special reports dealt
with labor laws of the United States, regulation and restriction of
output, and coal-mine labor in Europe. The miscellaneous reports
covered a large variety of subjects,3 part of the reports being ex­
tracts from bulletins and annual reports, and the remainder, and by
far the greater part, being reports of studies and investigations
made by the bureau and published as congressional documents.
Among the latter is the most elaborate piece of work ever under­
taken by the bureau, an investigation of the industrial, social,
moral, educational, and physical conditions of woman and child
wage earner in the United States, resulting in a series of reports
published in 19 volumes. This investigation was directed by an act
of Congress. (Act of January 29, 1907, 34 Stat. L. 866.)
On May 30, 1908, an act was approved (35 Stat. L. 556) granting
compensation for injuries to certain classes of artisans and laborers
employed by the Government of the United States, the act becom­
ing effective August 1, 1908. This act charged the Department of
Commerce and Labor with the preparation of the forms and regu­
lations for carrying out the act and with the examination and ap­
proval of claims arising under it. The work of outlining the
method of procedure and preparing the blanks and regulations lot
making reports and filing claims, as well as the details of the ad­
ministration of the act, under the direction of the Secretary, was
intrusted to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Upon the enactment
of the law creating the Employees’ Compensation Commission,
September 7, 1916 (39 Stat. L. 742), the function of administering8
8 See p. 44.



8

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

this service was transferred from the Department of Labor to the
newly created commission.
A complete change in the system of publications of the bureau
was made on July 1, 1912, when the annual and special reports and
the bimonthly bulletins were discontinued. The latter had at that
time reached 100 in number. Since then the Commissioner of Labor
Statistics has made no annual report other than that made by each
bureau chief to the Secretary of Labor giving a statement of the
activities of the bureau during the fiscal year. Bulletins are pub­
lished at irregular intervals, and contain matter which, under the
old system, would have been published chiefly in the form of annual
and special reports. By this new system the results of investigations
are brought before the public more promptly. These bulletins are
issued in series and each number contains matter devoted to one of
the series of general subjects. The bulletins are numbered consecu­
tively and up to No. 236 they also carry consecutive numbers under
each series. Beginning with No. 237 the serial numbering has been
discontinued. The designations of the series issued at that time
were as follows: Wholesale prices; retail prices and cost of living;
wages and hours of labor; women in industry; workmen’s insurance
and compensation; industrial accidents and hygiene; conciliation
and arbitration (including strikes and lockouts); labor laws of the
United States (including decisions of courts relating to labor) ; for­
eign labor laws; miscellaneous series.
On August 23, 1912, an act was passed (37 Stat. L. 407) which
created a Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce in the Depart­
ment of Commerce and Labor. This act transferred from the
Bureau of Labor to the newly created bureau the following duties
originally prescribed by the act of June 13, 1888, “ to ascertain, at as
early a date as possible, and whenever industrial changes shall make
it essential, the cost of producing articles at the time dutiable in the
United States, in leading countries where such articles are produced,
by fully specified units of production, and under a classification show­
ing the different elements of cost, or approximate cost, of such ar­
ticles of production, including the wages paid in such industries per
day, week, month, or year, or by the piece; and hours employed per
day; and the profits of manufacturers and producers of such articles;
and the comparative cost of living, and the kind of living; what
articles are controlled by trusts or other combinations of capital,
business operations, or labor, and what effect said trusts or other
combinations of capital, business operations, or labor have on pro­
duction and prices.”
The act of March 4, 1913, creating a Department of Labor and
transferring this bureau to the new department under the title of
Bureau of Labor Statistics, provided “ that the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, under the direction of the Secretary of Labor, shall collect,
collate, and report at least once each year, or oftener if necessary,
full and complete statistics of the conditions of labor and the prod­
ucts and distribution of the products of the same, and to this end
said Secretary shall have power to employ any or either of the
bureaus provided for his department and to rearrange such statisti­
cal work and to distribute or consolidate the same as may be deemed
desirable in the public interests; and said Secretary shall also
have authority to call upon other departments of the Government



HISTORY, ACTIVITIES, AND ORGANIZATION.

9

for statistical data and results obtained by them; and said Secretary
of Labor may collate, arrange, and publish such statistical informa­
tion so obtained in such manner as to him may seem wise.”
The Bureau of Labor Statistics continues to perform its functions
under this and previous acts.
From early years the bureau received a small annual appropria­
tion for the purchase of books and periodicals necessary for use in its
work of compiling statistics of labor. In this way and by inter­
change with other governmental bodies, trade-unions, employers’
associations, and other collective labor bodies, and private philan­
thropic and research organizations in the United States and foreign
countries, a library was built up by the bureau that has been consid­
ered one of the best and most complete labor libraries extant. This
library has been of the greatest value to the bureau in its research
work and has also been used freely by the public. In 1916 this library
was consolidated with that of the Children’s Bureau and made a
departmental library. With this library at its disposal the bureau is
extraordinarily well equipped for research work along all lines of
labor activity,




C H APTER

I I .— A C T I V I T I E S /

FUNCTIONS.

The present designation and organization of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics date from the act of March 4, 1913, creating the Depart­
ment of Labor. Section 3 of that act changed the title of the bureau
from Bureau of Labor to Bureau of Labor Statistics arid that of
Commissioner of Labor to Commissioner of Labor Statistics. After
placing the bureau under the jurisdiction and supervision of the
Department of Labor the same section specifies that “ all the powers
and duties heretofore possessed by the Commissioner of Labor shall
be retained and exercised by the Commissioner of Labor Statistics.”
This language refers to the act of June 27, 1884, which provides
that: “ The commissioner shall collect information upon the subject
of labor, its relation to capital, the hours of labor, and the earnings
of laboring men and women, and the means of promoting their ma­
terial, social, intellectual, and moral prosperity,” and to section 1 of
the act of June 13, 1888, which specifies that the then Department
of Labor (now the Bureau of Labor Statistics) shall “ acquire and
diffuse among the people of the United States useful information on
subjects connected with labor, in the most general and comprehensive
sense of that word, and especially upon its relation to capital, the
hours of labor, the earnings of laboring men and women, and the
means of promoting their material, social, intellectual, and moral
prosperity.” Section 4 of the organic act of the present Department
of Labor further requires the Bureau of Labor Statistics, under the
direction of the Secretary of Labor, to “ collect, collate, and report
at least once each year, or oftener if necessary, full and complete
statistics of the conditions of labor and the products and distribution
of the products of the same.”
Considered with reference to its statutory relations to the Depart­
ment of Labor and to the general purpose of this department as
prescribed by its own organic act, the Bureau of Labor Statistics
may be regarded as having (subject to the direction of the Secretary
of Labor) fact-collecting, fact-collating, and fact-reporting powers
and duties, statistical and otherwise, coextensive with all the adminis­
trative powers and duties of the Department of Labor regarding the
welfare of wage earners.
A C T IV IT IE S .

In carrying out the purpose for which the Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics was created, data are collected in various ways and from
various sources—by personal visits of agents in the field, by corre­
spondence, by consulting reports, trade journals, and other pub­
lications, by contract with experts to make special studies, and in
4 In this chapter are considered especially those activities in which the bureau has been
engaged during its present organization, namely, since the act of Mar. 4, 1913.
10



HISTORY, ACTIVITIES, AND ORGANIZATION.

11

other ways. All the material in the publications of the bureau,
whether prepared in the bureau or contributed by persons specially
contracted with, is carefully edited in the office and all facts and
figures are verified, whenever practicable, by comparison with the
original sources.
While the bureau in former years presented the results of its
studies in the form of annual and special reports and bimonthly
bulletins, its present forms of publication are 13 series of bulletins,
some published annually and others at irregular intervals, and a
periodical entitled “ Monthly Labor Review.”
The results of each important study appear in the form of a bulle­
tin, the nature of the study determining the series in which it
appears.
The titles of the series indicate the character of the studies under­
taken by the bureau in recent years. They are: Wholesale prices:
retail prices and cost of living; wages and hours of labor; employ­
ment and unemployment; women in industry; workmen's insurance
and compensation (including laws relating thereto): industrial acci­
dents and hygiene; conciliation and arbitration (including strikes
and lockouts) ; labor laws of the United States (including decisions
of courts relating to labor); foreign labor laws; vocational educa­
tion; labor as affected by the war; miscellaneous series,
The data for the series of reports on wholesale prices, retail prices,
and cost of living, and wages and hours of labor are obtained through
special agents and by correspondence, special arrangements usually
being made in advance where correspondence is resorted to. These
studies occupy by far the larger portion of the time of the employees
of the bureau, as they involve not only much field work but also a
very great amount of computation, tabulation, and analysis.
W H O LE S A L E PR IC ES.

Wholesale price figures were first compiled and published by the
bureau in 1900, covering the period 1890 to 1899. and since 1902 they
have been compiled and published annually a as bulletins and monthly
as articles in the Monthly Labor Review. Since March, 1922, a
special monthly price statement has been prepared and published
about the 15th of the month following that to which the data relate.
A monthly press statement is also issued. The price figures m each
annual report cover the period from 1890 to the year preceding the
year in which published. They are presented both in the form of
money quotations and of index numbers.* Some bulletins have been
5
published that are devoted mainly to a presentation of index num­
bers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign countries,
The price quotations used in the reports are obtained, as far as
possible, for the various commodities in their primary markets.
For most articles weekly prices are secured. In a large number of
instances, particularly since the beginning of 1918, it has been pos­
sible to obtain average monthly prices. For the commodities whose
° No report was published in 1917 or in 1918, owing to the situation brought about by
the World War, but the report for 1919 contains data for all years since 1890.
5A discussion of the history and methods of compiling index numbers ami of impor­
tant changes made in 1914 and in 1922 is given in Bulletins 181 and 284 and in the
Monthly Labor Review for July, 1922.



12

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

prices are quite stable, as certain textiles and building materials, only
first of the month prices are given.
Special agents and clerks copy these figures from the original
sources wherever found, and under the direction of experts compile
them at the office of the bureau. The figures are also published, in
advance of the annual reports, but in briefer form, in the Monthly
Labor Review.
These statistics of wholesale prices enable one to trace price
changes in more than 400 important commodities in the principal
primary markets of the country, while the relative prices and index
numbers constructed from the money prices show the general trend
of prices through the period from 1890 to the present. The whole­
sale index numbers are of chief value in studying the principles gov­
erning prie^ fluctuations.
In^^^year 1914 the price quotations'were increased in number,
the commodities carried were more accurately defined, and many
more markets were included. At the same time the method of cal­
culating index numbers was thoroughly revised in order to show
more accurately actual price movements. Another complete revision
of these index numbers was made by the bureau in 1922. This revi­
sion consists of (1) a regrouping of the commodities and the addi­
tion of a considerable number of new articles, and (2) the use of
the 1919 census data for weighting purposes in place of the 1909
census data formerly employed. Index numbers of wholesale prices
for Canada have been published with those of the United States regu­
larly since 1911 (Bulletin 93), for Great Britain in 1915 and since
1917 (Bulletins 173 and 226), and for other foreign countries in 1915
and since 1921 (Bulletins 173 and 284).
In addition to the publication of wholesale price data collected
each month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly furnishes such
data to other branches of the Government for use in their official
publications, as follows: To the Federal Reserve Board, for inclu­
sion in the chapter on “ Price movement and volume of trade,” ap­
pearing each month in the Federal Reserve Bulletin; to the Division
of Housing and Building, Bureau of Standards, Department of
Commerce, for use in a chart showing changes in prices of building
materials issued each month by that office; to the Bureau of the
Census, Department of Commerce, for use in the Survey of Current
Business, published monthly; to the Bureau of Agricultural Eco­
nomics, Department of Agriculture, for use in its reports.
Much information is also supplied at irregular intervals to the
Federal Trade Commission, the Tariff Commission, and other
branches of the Government. The Statistical Abstract of the De­
partment of Commerce also contains wholesale data in specially pre­
pared form, supplied each year by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
R E T A IL P R IC ES A ND COST OF L IV IN G .

Cost-of-living statistics were obtained and compiled by the bureau
in connection with the studies of the cost of production of iron, steel,
coal, glass, and the textiles in the United States and Europe con­
ducted in the years 1888 to 1890 and published as the sixth and seventh
annual reports of the Commissioner of Labor. An extensive inves­



HISTORY. ACTIVITIES, AND ORGANIZATION.

13

tigation of the cost of living and retail prices in the United States
was undertaken in 1902 and 1903, the results of which were pub­
lished as the eighteenth annual report of the Commissioner of Labor.
From 1905 to 1913 annual statistics were compiled (except for a few
years), the statistics as published in the bulletins each year being
cumulative for the period beginning with 1890.
For the years 1914 to 1916 annual statistics of retail prices were
published for periods beginning with 1907. For subsequent years
these statistics have been for periods beginning with 1913, but in 1917
and 1918 the publication of the bulletin on retail-price statistics was
temporarily suspended. Statistics of prices and cost of living have
been published in the Monthly Labor Review since the beginning of
its issue in July, 1915. More recently separate reprints of these
statistics have been issued for wider distribution than is possible
with the Monthly Labor Review. Advance information is also given
out in the form of press bulletins.
In the earlier reports the retail price data compiled by the bureau
covered only food prices, but at present reports are published present­
ing for the most important industrial cities the retail prices of the
principal articles of food, the weight and prices of wheat bread,
and the retail prices of important articles of dry goods, of anthra­
cite and bituminous coal, and of gas for household use.
The retail price figures are published in the form both of average
money-price quotations and of index numbers. The retail-food index
number is used frequently in wage discussions, food being 38 per
cent of the entire family budget and retail-food figures being avail­
able each month, while cost-of-living figures; as a whole are pub­
lished but quarterly.
These index numbers of all food combined are made from weighted
aggregates of actual money prices in order that each commodity may
have an influence equal only to its relative importance in the con­
sumption of the average family, and the year 1913 is used as the base.
From January, 1913, to December, 1920, 22 articles of food were used
in computing the cost of food, but beginning with January, 1921, 43
articles have been used. By a system of “ linking ” the continuity
of the index number is preserved, although the articles on which it is
based have been increased and the quantities of each changed accord­
ing to an investigation made in 1918 and 1919.
Data are furnished to the bureau by approximately 1,500 retail
stores, 200 bakeries, 230 retail coal dealers, 80 gas companies, and 225
dry goods companies. This information is furnished by the dealers
voluntarily on blanks supplied by the bureau.
In the case of food, the retail dealers who furnish the information
are selected through personal visits of agents of the bureau, the
dealers being largely owners of neighborhood and chain stores which
are patronized by workingmen’s families. After the agent has
selected a store, arrangements are made for the retail merchant to
send to the bureau a statement of prices of the various commodities
on the 15th of each month thereafter. Return visits to the various
firms are made by agents of the bureau whenever it is necessary to
make personal inquiries concerning the monthly price quotations.
5895°—22-----2




THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
M
The merchants who furnish the information covering dry goods
were in the first instance personally visited by agents* after which
the data were obtained by correspondence. The stores selected are
large and representative department stores. The prices quoted are
the regular retail prices.
The coal prices are quoted by coal dealers, who supply the informa­
tion at the request of the bureau. The coal dealers in each city are
asked to? quote prices on the kind of coal usually sold for household
use. The prices are for coal delivered to consumers but do not in­
clude charges for storing the coal in the cellars or coal bins when
extra handling is necessary.
Gas prices are quoted quarterly, for the 15th of March, May, Sep­
tember, and December of each year, the data being furnished by the
gas companies at the request of the bureau.
All of the work of tabulating and analyzing the retail prices is
done in the office of the bureau.
In addition to the annual compilations, special reports and articles
e m retail prices have been published from time to time. In January,
1917, an investigation of the cost of living of wage earners in the
District of Columbia was undertaken in compliance with a joint reso­
lution of Congress (H. J. Res. 91, 39 Stat. L. 857), the results of
which were published in a series of articles in the Monthly Labor
Review. Included in this investigation were a study of wage-earn­
ing women in the District and a dietary study made in cooperation
with the Office of Home Economics, States Relations Service, of the
Department of Agriculture.
The retail price work has been greatly increased since the begin­
ning of the war in order to meet the country-wide demand for in­
formation covering the increased cost of living. This has necessitated
the sending of agents into the field to get additional retail merchants
to report retail prices. To meet legitimate demands for accurate
information as to prices of food in different localities, the bureau is
now publishing the average retail prices of 43 food commodities in
51 cities throughout the United States.
In August, 1918, the bureau began a country-wide investigation of
the cost of living,, the material collected to be used as a basis in making
wage adjustments and in weighting index numbers of retail prices.
One of the features of the inquiry was the gathering of information
from families covering their expenditures for one year for the various
items of food and of clothing, and for housing, fuel, furniture, and
miscellaneons expenses. This information was collected by special
agents who called upon representative families in each locality
visited. Data collected in this investigation have teem published at
various times in the Monthly Labor Review. The information also
serves as basic material for the quarterly statements of changes in
cost of living in the United States published in the Monthly Labor
Review.
Retail-price data are furnished monthly to the Bureau of the
Census of the Department of Commerce and to the Bureau of Agri­
cultural Economics of the Department of Agriculture, and at irregu­
lar intervals to the Division of Conciliation of the Department of
Labor and to the Office of the Quartermaster General of the War
Department for use in their educational and administrative work.



HISTORY, ACTIVITIES, AND ORGANIZATION.

15

WAGES AND HOURS OF LABOR.

No other subject has received so much attention by the bureau as
that of wages and hours of labor. Over one-half of the reports and
bulletins that have been issued have dealt in one way or another
with wages and working hours, many of them having been exclu­
sively devoted to this subject. With few exceptions the statistics
of wages and hours of labor collected by the United States and by
other Governments have until recent years lacked uniformity in
method of compilation and are therefore not strictly comparable.
Since the adoption of the present system of wage compilation, the
statistics of wages and hours of labor presented in bulletin form have
been collated according to a uniform plan, and have therefore been
made very much more useful for comparative study.
The statistics of wages and hours of labor are published by the
bureau in bulletin form and as articles in the Monthly Labor Beview. As soon as any data are ready for publication summaries are
prepared for the press in mimeograph form. The wages and hours
data published by the bureau are of two kinds—those obtained
from the pay rolls of representative establishments, and the union
scales of wages and hours of labor obtained from the records of
labor organizations. There are many large establishments in im­
portant industries which employ both union and nonunion labor,
or only the latter, and for such establishments the union wage scales
would not indicate the wage conditions. In some establishments,
even though they may employ only union labor, the union wage
scales are constructed mainly on a piece-rate basis. In such cases it
is necessary to get pay-roll data in order to ascertain the hourly,
daily,# or weekly earning. In many establishments, on the other
hand, union wage scales on a time basis prevail. In order, therefore,
to make the presentations of wages and hours of labor as complete
as possible, the bureau compiles and publishes data obtained from
both sources.
The statistics of wages and hours of labor derived from the pay
rolls of representative establishments in selected industries are pub­
lished at irregular intervals, an entire bulletin being devoted to a
given industry. In selecting: the establishments for this purpose an
endeavor is made to have all the States represented in which the
particular industries are of material importance, as determined by
the census of manufactures of the Census Bureau. The data are
mostly obtained by personal visits of special agents to the plants.
Some information, however, is obtained by correspondence under in­
structions and on schedules prepared: by the bureau. The wage data
obtained by the bureau are the actual earnings and number of em­
ployees on the pay roll during one typical pay-roll period of the
year. A few more comprehensive studies have been made in which
the number of employees and the pay rolls of the entire year have
been used. The data published as a result of this class of wage
studies show the full-time weekly earnings, the full-time hours of
labor per week, and the rates of wages or earnings per hour in the
principal occupations of the industries studied.
The information concerning union wage scales and hours of labor
is compiled and published annually. The original data are procured
by special agents who visit business agents and other officers of the



16

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

unions in the several cities and consult wage scales, written agree­
ments, and trade-union records wherever available. The field work
involves thousands of interviews with local union representatives.
The union scales of wages and hours of labor have been compiled
and published since August, 1913, the data of the first report cov­
ering the period from 1907 to 1912.
The statistics of hourly rates of wages and earnings and weekly
hours of labor, showing as they do the differences in rates and
hours from place to place, from time to time, from industry to in­
dustry, and from occupation to occupation, are used in many ways.
In practically every important wage dispute they are consulted.
Employers in making wage adjustments and employees’ organiza­
tions in preparing wage scales make frequent use of them. Members
of Congress require them in the consideration of tariff and other
proposed legislation, and requests for the data are frequently made
by other Federal departments and bureaus, State bureaus of labor,
and wage-adjustment committees. Sometimes these calls upon the
bureau necessitate special field investigations and the compilation
of data on wages and hours of labor which do not appear in the
regular publications of the bureau.
EM PLO YM ENT AND UNEM PLO YM EN T.

The data collated and published on this subject are of two lands,
a monthly statement of the volume of employment published in the
Monthly Labor Review, and studies made at irregular intervals for
publication either as bulletips or as articles in the Review.
The monthly statement of the volume of employment is collated
from returns received from over 3,000 representative establishments
in 43 manufacturing industries, and it is planned to increase the
number of establishments reporting. This monthly statement shows
the number of persons on the pay roll, the amount of the pay roll,
and comparisons with the preceding month of the same year and
with the same month of the preceding year. Mimeographed advance
press summaries are issued as soon as the monthly material is ready
for publication. In addition to these statements, which appear in
the Monthly Labor Review, about two months after the period to
which they relate, it is planned to issue mimeographed statements
of the total volume, together with a current index of employment.
These statements will probably appear early each month and will
cover the pay-roll period of the 15th of the month preceding.
These monthly statements, besides giving a picture of the extent
and trend of employment in the United States, throw much light
upon the seasonality and irregularity of employment in certain in­
dustries and show the necessity for smoothing the employment
curve by better organizing the labor market, securing orders long
in advance, stabilizing demand, fitting together industries having
different seasons of activity, and mitigating the results of extreme
fashion fads. By watching the course of employment as shown
in these statements, the employment manager can estimate the op­
portuneness of his labor policy. Furthermore, it has been observed6
a Journal of the American Statistical Association, June 1922, p. 239: “ Cycles of Em­
ployment and Unemployment in the United States,” Part II, by W. A. Berridge.



HISTORY, ACTIVITIES, AND ORGANIZATION.

17

that wage rates normally lag several months behind changes in
amount of employment and that the buying power, which is a com­
posite product of the volume of employment and wage rates, also
lags somewhat behind employment. By following the course of
employment, therefore, a business man can approximately forecast
the buying power of the public and govern himself accordingly in
his production of commodities or in his purchases of stock.
The special studies on employment and unemployment published
in bulletin form vary greatly in their character and scope. Among
the most important of these have been intensive investigations into
unemployment in New York City and 28 other cities. These studies
deal with the number of persons out of work and the duration of
unemployment in all the more important occupations and industries
in the cities covered.
The investigation in New York City consisted of a complete census
of 104 representative city blocks in various sections of the city. It
was supplemented by a further census of the families living in
3,703 individual tenement houses and residences, covering a still
wider range of distribution. The enumeration was begun January
30, and finished Februarv 17, 1915. The result was published in
April, 1915.7
Investigations were made in 16 other cities in the East and Middle
West in March and April, and in 12 cities in the Rocky Mountain
and Pacific Coast States in June and July, 1915, and another survey
was made in New York City in August and September, 1915. The
canvasses were made by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. of New York. The returns of
these canvasses were tabulated in the statistical bureau of the Metro­
politan Life Insurance Co. and edited and published by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics in July, 1916.8
Other studies have been made of unemployment among women in
department and other retail stores of Boston,9 regularity of employ­
ment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment industries,10 public em­
ployment offices in the United States,11 and employment system of the
Lake Carriers’ Association.12 The bureau has also published the
proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conferences13 and of the
meetings of the American Association of Public Employment
Offices,14 and has reproduced a number of British publications deal­
ing with some phases of this subject.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics keeps in constant touch with the
State and municipal public employment offices, being represented at
their conferences, and publishes from time to time such statistics
of their activities as are of national interest.
W O M E N IN IN D U ST R Y .

Studies relating to woman and child labor legislation and their
working conditions, and statistics of the employment of women and
children in industry, like wages and hours of labor, have occupied a
considerable part of the attention of the bureau, the most elaborate
* Bui. 172.
8 Bui. 195.
9 Bui. 182.
19 Bui. 183.



11 Bui. 241.
12 Bui. 235.
« Buis. 196, 202, 227, 247.
14 Buis. 192, 220.

m

th

m

bureau

oe

l a b o r ?s t a t is t ic s .

investigation ever undertaken? by the bureau having been devoted to
this subjects
The present series o £ studies om u Women in industry;!’ inaugurated
by the bureau in 1912, relates to earnings, hours; oi labor, duration
ofi employment,, night work,, maximum? working day,, conditions of
labor,, trade education- unemployment,, war work,, and: employment
in certain industries; Some studies:in this series also relate to child
labor. No.- bulletins in this series have been issued? since 1917, as in
July, 1918, the Women in Industry Service, now the Women’s Bureau;
was organized for the special consideration ofi the subject of women
in industry, , but current information, concerning woman and? ehild
labor igr frequently published in the Monthly Labor Review.
These studies have been, made im part by regular employees o'®the
bureau and in part by persons under special contract.
Through the publication of these studies much light has been
thrown upon the: subject ofi woman and child labor,- and there*has
5
*
been pointed; outto legislators the way to protect women and children
against exploitation, starvation wages, unsuitable employments; and
other improper working conditions#,
W O R K M E N ’ S IN S U R A N C E AND COM PEN SATIO N.

The first study of workmen^ insurance undertaken by the bureau
related tor compulsory insurance in, Germany, and less elaborately
to the insurance systems of other European, countries. The results
of this study were published as a special report-of the Commissioner
of Labor in 1893.10
In 1905 the Bureau of Labor undertook two elaborate studies, one
of workmen’s insurance and benefit funds in the United States, and
the other of workmen’s insurance and compensation systems in
Europe. The material for the first-mentioned1study was obtained
by special agents and the data were prepared in the office.. For the
other study, existing reports and other publications were, mainly de­
pended upon, some information having been obtained; by correspond­
ence with, insurance bureaus of foreign countries. The report of the
first-mentioned" study appeared in 1908 and of the other in 1909.
Frequent studies of workmen’s insurance and compensation have
been made by members of the bureau and by others specially em­
ployed, and the results published in articles ih the bimonthly bulletiiis.
Since the adoption of the present system of labor studies, one of the
series of bulletins has been devoted to accounts and discussions of
workmen’s compensation and insurance laws and systems, under the
title of a Workmen’s insurance and compensation. In this series of
studies are also published^ the proceedings of the meetings of the
International Association, of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions. Current information on workmen’s insurance and conn
pensation is also published in. the Monthly Labor Review.
^R eport on condition o f woman and1child wage earners in the United: States, 19' vols.,
S. Doe. 646# 61sfc COng*, 2S; sess;

^Commissioner of Labor, Fourth Special Report, 1898.




HISTORY, ACTIVITIES,, AND ORGANIZATION.

m

IN D U S T R IA L A C C ID EN TS AND H Y G IE N E .

Since almost the beginning of the bureau’s activities, chapters in
reports, bulletins, and articles in the Monthly Labor Review have
frequently been devoted to the subjects of accident prevention, acci­
dent statistics, and accident legislation, and to industrial hygiene and
sanitation. These studies have been made by members of the bureau
and by persons under special contract. By showing the severity and
extent of industrial accidents and occupational diseases, and the pre­
ventive measures adopted in the more advanced countries and estab­
lishments, these studies have furnished an incentive and have pointed
the way to the reduction of such casualties.
In order that the subject of accident and disease prevention may
be intelligently dealt with, the bureau has for years been active in
efforts to standardize the statistics of accidents and occupational
diseases, and much has been accomplished in this direction by its co­
operation with State bureaus of labor and industrial commissions.
This standardization aims to make comparable, for the whole coun­
try, statistics of accidents and diseases, by industries and occupations,
by States and localities, and by causes and results.
By its representation on the committee on statistics and compensa­
tion insurance cost of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions, which committee is composed of
statisticians of State and Federal compensation commissions and
of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the bureau has
participated in the working out of definitions and standards for
uniform reporting and tabulating of industrial accidents, the classi­
fication of industries for the purposes of accident statistics, the
classification of the causes of accidents, the classification of the
nature, location, and extent of disabilities caused by industrial
accidents, and the devising of standard tables for the use of com­
pensation commissions for recording accident experience and com­
pensation costs.
The bureau has been very closely identified with the efforts qf the
American Engineering Standards Committee to develop American
standard safety codes. This effort originated directly from the
formulation of codes to govern the operation of the navy }^ards and
arsenals during the World War. At the suggestion of the president
of the National Safety Council a survey was made at that time of
Government establishments producing war material, and on the
basis of this survey safety regulations were drawn up and adopted,
the Bureau of Standards taking an important part in this work.
Two subsequent conferences were called by the Bureau of Standards
to consider the whole subject of national safety codes, the outcome
of which was a decision to proceed with the development of such
codes under the auspices of the above-mentioned committee. The
Bureau of Labor Statistics has cooperated with this committee
directly and through its membership in the International Association
of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions and in the Associa­
tion of Governmental Labor Officials of the United States and
Canada. About 50 codes are under consideration.




20

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
C O N CILIA TIO N AN D A R B IT R A T IO N .

The compilation of statistics of industrial disputes has been one of
the bureau’s activities since the beginning, four annual reports, a
number of miscellaneous reports, and many bulletin articles having
been devoted to this subject under the old system of publications.
Likewise many bulletin articles and a number of reports have dealt
with industrial conciliation and arbitration.
The studies of conciliation and arbitration under the present sys­
tem include statistics of strikes and lockouts, the results achieved
under collective trade agreements, and the experience of this and
other countries in dealing with the problems arising out of the rela­
tions of employers and employees. These studies serve to bring about
policies of cooperation and mutual understanding.
LABOR L A W S OF T H E U N IT E D ST AT E S AND COURT DECISIONS.

Complete compilations of labor laws have been made by the bureau
and published in 1892, 1896, 1904, 1908, and 1914, and annually for
laws enacted in each succeeding year. The complete compilations
also include annotations of court decisions, Most of the labor laws
are reproduced in full as given in the published session laws. Cer­
tain classes of labor laws, however, are presented only in digest or
summary form, this being done when they yield readily to sum­
marization without loss of clearness of statement, when they are
of so uniform a type that a mere statement of the subject of the
enactment or the reproduction of a single statute is practically a
presentation of them all, and when their classification as labor laws
is possible only by a somewhat liberal construction of the term.
Special compilations of labor laws are made from time to time and
published in the series on “ Labor laws of the United States ” or in
one of the other series of bulletins. Among the compilations of this
character that have been prepared in recent years are those on work­
men’s compensation and insurance laws, minimum-wage legislation,
wage-payment legislation, 10-hour maximum working clay for women
and young persons, prohibition of night work of young persons,
mediation and arbitration laws of the United States, and Federal
and State laws relating to convict labor.
The court decisions reproduced are mainly those rendered by the
Federal courts and by the State courts of last resort, though in some
cases the opinions of subordinate courts of appellate jurisdiction are
used. In reproducing these decisions from the various Law Re­
porters, representative types are usually selected, though a more
general inclusiveness is practiced in cases affecting the constitution­
ality and construction of workmen’s compensation laws and laws
affecting the status and activities of labor* organizations. Consid­
erable attention has also been paid to the decisions construing the
Federal employers’ liability act. Opinions of the Attorney General
of the United States construing Federal labor legislation are also
reproduced.
These decisions and opinions are published in abridged form, the
facts usually being stated briefly, and quotations being made setting
forth the conclusions reached and the grounds therefor. Sometimes
the findings of the courts are stated in the editor’s own language.



HISTORY, ACTIVITIES. AND ORGANIZATION.

21

When the bimonthly bulletins were published, labor laws and
court decisions were published currently in each issue. Since the
adoption of the present system of publications a compilation of all
the labor laws of the United States, with decisions of courts relating
thereto, was published in 1914,17 and labor laws enacted and court
decisions rendered each year have been published annually, together
with a cumulative index of the laws. Important enactments and
decisions are also published in the Monthly Labor Review.
The compilations and digests of labor laws and decisions are pre­
pared in the office of the bureau by permanent members of the staff.
For this purpose the bureau keeps on file and up to date sets of
the session laws of all the States and of the Federal Government
and current files of the various Law Reporters.
F O R E IG N LABOR L A W S .

The first compilations of foreign labor lawT were made for publi­
s
cation in a series of articles which appeared in the bimonthly bulle­
tin beginning with the issue of' November, 1899, and ending with
the issue of March, 1901.18 Since the adoption of the new series of
bulletins on “ Foreign labor laws,” but one study in this series has
been made, namely, that on the administration of labor laws and
factory inspection in certain European countries.19 A large num­
ber of the publications of the bureau, however, contain reproduc­
tions, digests, discussions, and references to foreign labor laws re­
lating to the subjects treated in the respective reports. These have
usually been compiled and prepared in the office of the bureau from
sources at hand in the library. Notices of newTlabor legislation en­
acted in foreign countries appear in nearly all of the issues of the
Monthly Labor Review.
V O CA TIO N A L EDUCATION.

Industrial or vocational education in the United States and for­
eign countries has been given considerable attention by the bureau
almost since its creation, two annual reports and a number of bulle­
tin articles having been devoted to this subject prior to the year 1912.
The studies of vocational education consist of twT elaborate sur­
o
veys—one made in Richmond, Va., and one in Minneapolis, Minn.—
and a bulletin on short-unit courses for wage earners. Bulletins on
conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist in­
dustry of New York City, and wages and regularity of employment
in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry, containing results of studies
in vocational education, are also classed with this series.
These studies call attention to the need for vocational education,
and furnish a basis of facts for the development of the right kind
of industrial training.
Bui. 148.
is Buis. 25, 20, 27, 28, 30, and 33.
18 Bui. 142.




n

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
LA BO R AS A F F E C T E D B Y T H E W A R .

A series of studies begun during the war relates to labor as
affected by the war. This consists of studies* published in bulletin
form, of foreign food prices as affected by the war; industrial poi­
sons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives; labor con­
ditions* industrial efficiency and welfare work in British munition
factories; employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain
during the war; a history of the United States Shipbuilding Labor
Adjustment Board and a history and description of the work of the
National War Labor Board. The studies which relate to foreign
conditions are mostly reproductions and digests of British publica­
tions prepared in the editorial and research division.
M ISCELLANEOU S STUDIES.

In addition to the above-mentioned groups of subjects that have
occupied the attention of the bureau, many other studies have been
made that can not be included in those groups. The results of these
studies have appeared in the form of or as parts of annual, special,
and miscellaneous reports and bulletins, and as bulletins anct
Monthly Labor Review articles. Among these may be mentioned:
Apprenticeship, bonus systems, building operations in cities, coop­
eration, building and loan associations and other savings institu­
tions, company stores, convict labor, cost of distribution, cost of
production, education of adult workers, factory inspection, the food
situation in Central Europe, hand and machine labor, home work*
housing of the working people, illiteracy, immigrant labor, indus­
trial communities, international action affecting labor, liquor prob­
lem, labor organizations, mutual relief associations among Govern­
ment employees, negro labor, night work, padrone system, peonage,
poor relief, profit sharing, public baths, public utilities, restriction
of output, statistics of cities, Sunday work, sweating system, and
welfare work.
LABO R I N D E X E S A N D B IB L IO G R A P H IE S.

Considerable attention is given to the preparation of labor indexes
and bibliographies. Indexes are prepared from time to time for
publication, both as separate bulletins and in connection with other
studies. Bibliographies of labor publications are at times prepared
as appendixes to bulletins and they have also been issued as a regular
feature of the Monthly Labor Review. For the latter digests and
reviews are prepared of publications of special importance. The
labor indexes and bibliographies are described in Appendix C
(p. 32).
M O N T H L Y LA BO R R E V I E W .

Much of the attention of the bureau is given to the publication of
the Monthlv Labor Review, an account ox which is given in Appen­
dix C (p. 31).




*HISTORY, ACTIVITIES, A®D ORGANIZATION.
r

ta

O T H E R A C T IV IT IE S .

In order to assist the Federal Government to work out and estab­
lish a definite war labor policy, the Bureau of Labor Statistics under­
took to study the several types of collective bargaining in; the cloth­
ing industry,, and to discover the effects of trade agreements made
through collective* bargaining, in adjusting labor, difficulties, main­
taining industrial peace and continuity of production, and establish­
ing proper standards in industry. The results obtained in the cloth­
ing-industry study were of considerable service to the War Depart­
ment in establishing standards of wages, hours of labor, and output.
In view of the increased industrial hazard from accident and dis­
ease resulting from the great industrial expansion due to the war,
the bureau made special studies of accident hazards in the iron and
steel industry, and of hazards from industrial poisons in the manu­
facture of airplane wings and of explosives.
In order to answer numerous requests for information concerning
the extent to which women were being employed in industry in place
of men as a result of war conditions^ the bureau made an investiga­
tion of the employment of women in the manufacture of munitions.
The demand for information on labor conditions in the belligerent
countries of Europe during the World War was met by the reproduc­
tion, in the form of a special group of bulletins and of articles in
the Monthly Labor Review, of digests of British, French, and other
foreign official reports on hours, fatigue, health, welfare work, the
employment of women and juveniles, labor unrest, and other mat­
ters concerning conditions of labor in those countries.
The bureau has prepared and supervised the printing of a series
of 15 pamphlets for the United States Employment Service giving
descriptions of occupations in various industries. The object of these
descriptions of occupations, which are based on investigations ex­
tending over practically the entire United States, is to furnish defi­
nitions of the various occupations in the industries, so that specifica­
tions for labor may be uniform, and also to furnish a means by which
the prospective employee may be informed as to the nature of the
work he will be expected to do.
Data as to building permits in representative cities of the country
are now being compiled and published by the bureau, in articles in
the Monthly Labor Review and in annual bulletins, continuing and
enlarging the scope of reports previously issued by the Geological
Survey. The data cover residential and nonresidential buildings,
showing the number and estimated cost of new buildings, and addi­
tions, repairs and alterations, and, in the case of residential buildings
(which include family dwellings and apartments),the number of fam­
ilies to be accommodated. These data indicate the provision being
made to meet the housing shortage resulting from the war, the relative
cost of construction, and the state of employment in the building trades.
The bureau is constantly endeavoring to secure fuller cooperation
among the various State labor bureaus of the country and to help
the States to establish uniform standards in labor statistics, labor
legislation, and labor-law administration. One method by which it
aims to accomplish this is to keep the various State labor bureaus
fully informed of the activities of the labor bureaus of other States,



24

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

of the Federal Government, and of foreign countries, and thus bring
into comparison the labor laws, administrative practices, and statis­
tics of the different States and countries. The media for giving this
information are the bulletins and the Monthly Labor Review, espe­
cially the latter.
The bureau endeavors to eliminate duplication of work by har­
monizing and coordinating its work with that of the various State
labor bureaus in all investigations in which the State labor bureaus
and the Federal bureau are concerned, by giving assistance to the
State labor bureaus when requested and by inducing them to supply
the Federal bureau with such information concerning wage scales,
employment, and other labor matters as they may collect and which
the latter desires to utilize. The Commissioner of Labor Statistics
also uses more direct means to bring about such cooperation, such as
personal contact with the State commissioners of labor and partici­
pation in national and international conferences on labor matters.
In addition to the issuing of publications giving the results of
its studies and cooperating with other Federal and State bureaus,
the Bureau of Labor Statistics devotes much of its time to the prepa­
ration of special memoranda in response to inquiries of committees
of Congress and individual Congressmen and of other persons and
organizations seeking information in regard to labor and other
social conditions.




CHAPTER III.—ORGANIZATION.
Owing to the changeable character of a large part of the work of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it has not, been considered practicable,
except in the case of the routine administrative work, to have a hard
and fast system of divisions and sections, such as is common in most
governmental bureaus. While the employees are grouped in desig­
nated divisions and sections, no legal recognition is given to this
grouping, and the employees are frequently shifted from one division
and section to another according to the needs of the work in hand.
It should be understood, therefore, that while the divisions and sec­
tions described below exist at the present time there is no permanency
in their organization or personnel.
As at present constituted, the organization of the bureau may be
outlined as follows:
Office of the commissioner.
Office of the chief statistician:
Special field investigations.
Division of correspondence and files.
Division of accounts.
Division of supplies.
Statistical division:
Wages and labor conditions.
Wholesale prices.
Retail prices.
Cost of living.
Industrial accidents.
Strikes' and lockouts.
Volume of employment.
Editorial and research division.
Law division.
A brief description of the duties and responsibilities of these
offices, divisions, and sections follows:
OFFICE OF TH E COMM ISSIONER OF LABOR STATISTICS.

The commissioner is the executive and administrative head of the
bureau. He decides its policies (subject to approval by the Secretary
of the Department), plans its investigations, and directs its work.
It is the duty of the commissioner to outline in a general way the
various studies carried on by the bureau, both those undertaken for
the first time and those that are of a continuing character. Much of
the commissioner’s time is necessarily taken up with conferences
with persons outside the bureau. The commissioner passes upon all
questions of personnel; that is, upon matters regarding appointments
and promotions, subject to the action of the Secretary of Labor.
The commissioner is assisted by a private secretary.



25

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

26

O FFIC E OF THE CH IEF STATISTICIAN .

The chief statistician is required by law to perform also the duties
of chief clerk. He is the chief executive officer under the commis­
sioner, having general supervision over all the divisions of the bu­
reau, including the force in the field. As chief statistician he car­
ries into effect the plans outlined by the commissioner for investi­
gations in the field and for work done in the office. He also initiates
and! carries forward: certain lines of statistical and investigational
work when so directed by the commissioner.
Ashchief: clerk he is in general charge of the business administra­
tion* of the bureau, such as the accounts, correspondence, files, ap­
pointments,- supplies* etc. He a«fs in the place of the commissioner
in the absence of the latter.
The chief statistician has an assistant, who assists him in his ad­
ministrative work.
Under the: office of the chief statistician are the followings divisions:
Special field investigations, correspondence and files, accounts, and
supplies.
SPE CIAL F IE L D IN V E S T IG A T IO N S ,

The special field investigations are made by agents engaged upon
special studies. They report directly to the commissioner and the
chief statistician and not through any division chief. These field
agents are often aided in the tabulation and preparation of their
work by the other divisions, and their manuscripts are subject to
scrutiny, verification, and editing by the editorial and research divi­
sion.
D IV IS IO N OF CORRESPO NDENCE A N D F IL E S .

In the division of correspondence and files are centralized all cor­
respondence, records, and files.
D IV ISIO N OF ACCOUNTS.

The chief of the division of accounts is designated as the financial
clerk of the bureau. This division^ has charge of all matters govern­
ing the expenditure of any of the appropriations under which the
bureau operates. Here are handled the pay rolls, experlse accounts
of agents in the field, and the appropriation fund accounts. Under
ordinary conditions the bureau operates under three appropriations,
one for salaries:, one for miscellaneous expenses, and a small appro­
priation for the purchase of publications. Miscellaneous expenses
include the salaries of a, few employees who serve as special agents
on field studies, and expenses such as transportation charges, con­
tracts for special work, and miscellaneous expenses.
D IV ISIO N OF SUPPLIES.

The division of supplies has charge of and issues the supplies for
the use of clerks and other employees in the office and in the fields
A small supply of all of the bureau’s publications that are available
is also kept by this division for emergency use.



h is t o r y , a c t iv it ie s , a n d o r g a n iz a t io n .

27

STATISTICAL D IVISIO N.

The statistical divisian has charge of the statistical work of the
bureau^ and is composed of the following sections: Wages and labor
conditions, wholesale prices, retail prices, cost of living, industrial
accidents, strikes and lockouts, and volume of employment. The sta­
tistical division is in charge of two statisticians, who have general
supervision of the work, each section being in charge of a division
or section chief.
W A G E S A N D LABOR CONDITIONS.

The wages and labor conditions section is the statistical, computing,
and tabulating division for the major part of the bureau’s work.
Here the statistics of wages and hours of labor are collected, tabu­
lated, and prepared for publication in bulletins and the Monthly
Labor Review.
W HOLESALE

PRICES.

The wholesale prices section collects and prepares material relat­
ing to wholesale prices for use in the Monthly Labor Review, in
special monthly statements of wholesale prices of commodities and
in the annual bulletins on wholesale prices. It also prepares special
tables on wholesale price figures in response to inquiries reaching the
office from various persons and organizations.
R E T A IL

PR ICES.

The functions of the retail prices section are similar to those of
the wholesale prices section. Material is prepared for use in the
Monthly Labor Review and for the annual reports, and special work
is done as demands are made upon the division.
COST OF LIVING.

All the office and field activities concerning the collection and pub­
lication of information on the cost of living are carried on by this
section. Most of the original information on cost of living is ob­
tained by special agents, who also do the work of compiling and
preparing data for publication.
IN D U S T R IA L A CCIDENTS.

The industrial accidents section conducts studies of the trend of
accident frequency and severity in various industries, as well as the
causes of accidents and the methods adopted or which might be
applied in the matter of accident prevention.
S T R IK E S AND LOCKOUTS.

The strikes and lockouts section keeps in touch with strikes and
lockouts in the United States by consulting the files of newspapers
and other sources of information, and sending out questionnaires
to those concerned. The information thus collected is then compiled
and published quarterly in the Monthly Labor Review.



28

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
V OLUM E OF E M P L O Y M E N T .

The activities concerning employment and unemployment are ^car­
ried on in the volume of employment section. This work involves
the compilation of data from monthly reports received by the bureau
from a large number of manufacturing concerns in various indus­
tries as to the number of employees and amount of pay roll, for pub­
lication in the Monthly Labor Review.
EDITORIAL AND RESEARCH DIVISION.

The editorial and research division is one of the most important
divisions in the bureau, as every publication that is issued is here
finally revised and put in shape for the printer, and whenever pos­
sible, all facts and figures appearing in the manuscript are verified.
This division has charge of the compilation of data and the prepara­
tion of many of the special articles which appear in the Monthly
Labor Review, such as articles on wages and conditions of labor
in foreign countries, cooperation, housing, industrial hygiene, etc.
Examination is made of official and other publications, both domestic
and foreign, for the purpose of utilizing in the Monthly Labor Re­
view such labor information as may be of public interest. This
division also determines in a large measure the character of the ma­
terial that is to appear in the Monthly Labor Review. A section of
the division has the handling of the proof-reading work.
This division is in charge of a chief, and an assistant chief acts in
his absence and has charge of the proof reading.
LAW DIVISION.

The law division, which consists of a chief and an assistant, keeps
on file copies of session laws of all the States and of the Federal
Government and of current issues of the various Law Reporters. In
this division are prepared the annual bulletins on labor laws and
court decisions, special bulletins, and articles and digests relating to
these subjects appearing in the Monthly Labor Review.




A P P E N D IX E S ,

APPENDIX A.—OUTLINE OF ORGANIZATION.

The following is a summary of the personnel of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, Department of Labor, September 1, 1922, classified
according to organization, which, however, is frequently changing
owing to the constant shifting of the personnel within the bureau:
P E R S O N N E L O F T H E B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IST IC S, S E P T E M B E R 1, 1922, A N B
A N N U A L SA LA R Y RATES.
D esignation.

Office of the commissioner.
C om m issioner.........................
Secretary to com m issioner.

Office of the chief statistician.
Chief statisticia n .....................................
A ssistan t to chief sta tisticia n ..........
S tatisticia n ................................................
D o...............................................
C orrespondence clerk ..........................
F inancial clerk ........................................
Stenographer............................................
F ile clerk....................................................
M em ber of G eneral S u p p ly Com­
m ittee an d d ep artm en t p h y ­
sician.........................................................
A ssistan t station ery an d prop­
erty clerk................................................
In v estig ator. . . •.....................................
C lerk-stenographer................................
D o ........................................................
C opyist an d u tility m a n ....................
M essenger...................................................
A ssistan t m essengers...........................
L aborers.....................................................

Statistical division.
Chief of d iv isio n .....................................
D o .........................................................
D o .........................................................
D o .........................................................
A ssistan t chief of d iv isio n .................
D o .........................................................
D o .........................................................
Chief of sectio n ........................................
D o .........................................................
D o ....................................... 1...............
D o .........................................................
Special agent—statistica l clerk—
D o .........................................................
D o .........................................................
D o .........................................................
D o ........................................................
D o ........................................................

N um ­ A nnual
ber of salary
em ­
ployees. rate.1

Statistical division—Con.
1 $5,000 Special agen t—statistica l c ler k . . .
1 1,600 S tatistical clerk.......................................
D o ........................................................
D o ........................................................
2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

3,000
1,600
2,920
2,760
1,600
2,280
1.400
1.400

1
1
1
1
2
1
1

2,000
1,200
2,280
1,200
1,000

2
1
1
2
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1

2,520
2,280
2,000
1,800
2,000
1,800
1,600
2,280
2,000
1,600
1.400
2,280
2,000
1,800
1,600
1.400




900
840
720
660

C lerk-draftsm an.....................................
C lerk-stenographer................................
D o ........................................................
Stenographer...........................................

N u m ­ Annual
ber of sa la ry
em ­
ployees. rate.1

2 $1,000
6 1.400
10 1,200
4
1,000
1 1,200
1 1.400
1 1,200
1 1,200
77

Editorial and research division.
E d itor (chief of d iv ision )...................
A ssistan t chief of d iv ision .................
Secretary to ed itor................................
E ditorial clerk.........................................
D o .........................................................
D o .........................................................
E ditorial clerk an d translator.........
M anuscript ed ito r..................................
D o ........................................................
D o .........................................................
In d exer and research w orker...........
P roof reader an d cop y p rep a rer...
A ssistan t proof reader and cop y
preparer..................................................
T ranslator..................................................
Clerk-stenographer................................

1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

3.000
2,280
1,600
2.000
1,800
1,600
1,800
2,000
1,800
1.400
1,800
1,800
1.400
1,200
1.400

18

4
4
9
12
4

T h is rate does not include an y bonus.

5895°—22------3

D esign ation .

Law division.
Chief of d iv isio n ....................
A ssistan t chief of division.
Stenographer..........................

Detailed to other offices of the
department.

C lerk......................................................
C op yist..................................................

1,200 Grand total, bureau em ployees —

1
1
1

2,760

1
1
2

1,200

123

29

1,200
1,200

900

APPENDIX B.—CLASSIFICATION OF ACTIVITIES,

1. Investigations by special agents and research experts and colla­
tion and publication of returns from various organizations:
[a) Annually—
1. Wholesale prices.
2. Retail prices.
3. Union scales of wages and horn's of labor,
(5 ) Irregularly—
1. Wages and hours of labor.
2. Cost of living.
3. Employment and unemployment.
A Women in industry.
5. Workmen’s insurance and compensation.
6. Industrial accidents and hygiene.
7. Conciliation and arbitration.
8. Vocational education.
9. Labor as affected by the war.
10. Other labor data.
2. Compilation and publication of labor laws :
(a) Annually, United States.
( b ) Irregularly, foreign countries.
3. Extracting, digesting, and publishing court decisions affecting
labor: Annually, United States.
4. Preparation and publication of a monthly review of labor infor­
mation.
Preparation and publication of labor indexes and bibliographies.
30




APPEN DIX C,—PUBLICATIONS.

The publications of the Bureau of Labor Statistics are issued in the
form of bulletins, which appear at irregular intervals; a monthly
periodical, entitled Monthly Labor Review; a monthly statement
of wholesale prices of commodities; a monthly reprint from the
Monthly Labor Review of a chapter on prices and cost of living; and
mimeographed press statements, some of which are issued monthly
and others when special occasions for their issue arise.
M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w .—This periodical gives information con­
cerning the current work and publications of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics and of other agencies of the Federal and State Govern­
ments and of foreign countries which relate directly to labor mat­
ters; also information from other sources having a bearing upon
labor in all parts of the world. The contents of the Monthly Labor
Review usually consist of one or more leading or special articles and
a large number of shorter articles, digests, extracts, and special sta­
tistical compilations.

The following list of special articles which appeared m the
Monthly Labor Review for the first six months of 1922 will give an
idea of the character of the information published in that form:
Recommendations of the President on labor and agriculture; Dis­
armament in industry; What is personnel research ?; Trend of em­
ployment in the manufacturing industries in the United States, June,
1914, to December, 1921; Rise of factory labor in India; Wages and
hours of labor in bituminous coal mining in the fall and winter of
1921-22; Cost of living in coal-mining towns; Extent of operation
of bituminous coal mines ; Unemployment survey in Columbus, Ohio;
Effect of the tax exemption ordinance in New York City on hous­
ing; Wages and hours of labor in anthracite coal mining in Penn­
sylvania in January, 1922; Shipping strike in Hongkong; Necessity
for conservation of forests in the Southern States; and Development
of collective bargaining in the men’s clothing industry in the United
States.

The shorter articles are usually grouped under the following
heads: Industrial relations and labor conditions; prices and cost of
living; wages and hours of labor; minimum wage; labor agreements,
awards, and decisions; employment and unemployment; housing;
industrial accidents and hygiene; workmen’s compensation; labor
laws and court decisions; labor organizations; woman and child
labor; strikes and lockouts; conciliation and arbitration; coopera­
tion ; immigration; what State labor bureaus are doing; current notes
of interest to labor; and official publications relating to labor.
A reprint from the Monthly Labor Review of the chapter on
prices and cost of living is published each month for distribution
among those specially interested in such information.
A cumulative index of all articles published in the Monthly Labor
Review, which will be of great assistance for readv reference to all
articles which have appeared in that publication, is in press.



31

32

THE BUREAU OE LABOR STATISTICS,

W holesale prices o f com m odities. —A monthly publication, giving
detailed actual and relative wholesale price figures, is issued about
15 days following the close of the month to which the figures relate.

B u lletin s. —These publications, which are issued at irregular in­
tervals, contain the results of important and sometimes very elab­
orate studies and investigations on matters pertaining to labor.
Some of the subjects are treated annually and others at irregular
intervals. The bulletins are grouped in series of general subjects
as follows: Wholesale prices; retail prices and cost of living; wages
and hours of labor; employment and unemployment; women in in­
dustry ; workmen’s insurance and compensation; industrial accidents
and hygiene; conciliation and arbitration; labor laws of the United
States; foreign labor laws; vocational education; labor as affected
by the war; and miscellaneous. An account of the nature of the
information contained in each of these series is given in the chapter
on “ Activities.”

L a b o r in dexes .—Three important indexes have been issued by the
bureau and a fourth is in press:

Analysis and index of all reports issued by bureaus of labor statistics in the
United States prior to November 1, 1892. Washington, 1898. 376 pp.
Index of all reports issued by bureaus of labor statistics in the United States
prior to March 1, 1902. Washington, 1902. 287 pp.
Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics up to May 1, 1915. Washington, 1915. 233 pp.
Cumulative index of the Monthly Labor Review of the United States Bureau
of Labor Statistics, July, 1915, to December, 1920 (Volumes I-XI), (In
press.)

The first two mentioned indexes of the publications of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics open up for.convenient reference an extensive
and valuable body of information covering the years prior to 1902,
and make these publications of the bureau serve as an historical
treatise on labor subjects as well as a handbook on practically every
phase of labor in the United States.
The index of the publications of the bureau up to May 1, 1915, is

a subject index, and the subjects treated cover in a comprehensive
way the activities of the bureau in its field of research and investi­
gation from its organization in 1885 to 1915. This subject index is
supplemented by the individual indexes which many of the special
reports contain. Among the special indexes may be mentioned the
cumulative index published annually from 1914 in the bulletins of the
Bureau of Labor Statistics relating to the labor laws of the United
States.
The cumulative index of the Monthly Labor Review, which is
now in press, is an analytical subject index, including authors, offi­
cials, and official and nonofficial organizations whose publications
and activities have entered into the text of the Review. The basis
for this index is a standard list of subject headings selected in co­
operation with labor experts and cross-referenced. The subjects
represent the standardized labor terminology of recent labor litera­
ture.

L a b o r bibliograph ies. — Current labor literature of the United
States and foreign countries has been featured regularly in a spe­
cial section of the Monthly Labor Review since its inception in
1915 and in the bimonthly bulletin before that time, and important
books have been given special reviews. These annotated labor




APPENDIXES.

33

bibliographies have been of value to librarians and students of labor
in keeping abreast with labor publications and movements, especially
during the recent period of unusual industrial activity.
The bureau has issued bibliographies and reading lists on many
special subjects, and in 1919 an extensive list of the labor press of
the United States and foreign countries was published in the
Monthly Labor Review for June, 1919 (pp. 33L-353), covering over
500 entries of current labor papers and journals issued in the United
States and foreign countries.
All of the publications listed and reviewed by the bureau are a part
of the Library of the Department of Labor.
P ress and oth er advance n otices .—In addition to the printed pub­
lications, the Bureau of Labor Statistics issues press notices and
other mimeographed publications containing advance summaries of
information obtained by the bureau. Of these, the mimeographed
statements of index numbers of wholesale prices and of retail prices
are issued about the middle of the month following that to which
the figures relate. Other mimeograph statements are issued when­
ever information of current public interest concerning the results of
the bureau’s work is available for publication.
D istrib u tio n .—Up to July, 1920, all the publications of the bureau
were furnished gratis, but owing to the shortage of paper and the
high cost of printing at that time the#size of the Monthly Labor
Review was cut down and it was put on a subscription basis to all
except labor departments and bureaus, workmen’s compensation com­
missions and other offices connected with the administration of
labor laws, and all organizations exchanging publications with the
Bureau of Labor Statistics. The bulletins are still furnished free
as long as the bureau has a supply available. The publications are
also sold by the Superintendent of Documents.




A PPEN DIX EL—LAWS.
im m x

to

law s

d elate

m

to

the

bureau

.

"Creation:
Department of Labor_______________________________ 25 Stat. L. 182.
37 Stat. L.736.
Department of Commerce and Labor________________32 Stat. L. 825.
Bureau of Labor, Department of Commerce and
L abor____________________________________________32 Stat. L. 827.
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor___37 Stat. L. 737.
Personnel:
Commissioner of Labor Statistics___________________ 25 Stat. L. 182.
37 Stat. L. 737.
Pub. No. 183, 67th Cong.
Chief statistician (chief clerk)_____________________ 25 Stat. L. 182.
Pub. No. 183, 67th Cong.
Statutory positions______________ r__________________Pub. No. 183, 67th Cong.
Functions:
Department of Labor_______________________________ 25 Stat. L. 182.
37 Stat. L. 736.
Secretary of Labor_________________________________37 Stat. L. 736.
Commissioner of Labor Statistics___________________ 23 Stat. L 60.
25 Stat. L. 182.
81 Stat. L. 155.
88 Stat. L. 164.
37 Stat L 737
Chief statistician (chief clerk)____________________ 25 Stat. L. 182.
3 4 S ta t. L. 442.
Labor statistics of H aw aii_________________________ 31 Stat. L. 155.
38 Stat. L. 164.
Bureau of Labor Statistics---------------------------------------37 Stat. L. 737.
Publications:
B u lletin ____________________________________________ 28 Stat. L. 805.
30 Stat. L. 61.
31 Stat. L. 644.
Labor statistics of H aw aii_________________________ 31 Stat. L. 155.
33 S tat L. 164.
Appropriations:
For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1928-------------------Pub. No. 183, 67th Cong.
T E X T OF L A W S CONTROLLING P R E S E N T O R G A N IZ A T IO N AND O P E R AT IO N
OF B U R E A U .

A ct

of J une

13, 1888.— An act to esta b lish a D ep a rtm en t of Labor.
[25 Stat. L. 182.]

[ S e c t i o n 1]. There shall be at the seat of government a Department of Labor,
the general design and duties of which shall be to acquire and diffuse among
the people of the United States useful information on subjects connected with
labor, in the most general and comprehensive sense of that word, and espe­
cially upon its relation to capital, the hours of labor, the earnings of laboring
men and women, and the means of promoting their material, social, intellectual,
and moral prosperity.
S ec. 2. The Department of Labor shall be under the charge of a Commis­
sioner of Labor, who shall be appointed by the President, by and with the
advice and consent of the Senate; he shall hold his office for four years, unless
sooner removed.
S ec. 4. During the necessary absence of the commissioner, or when the office
shall become vacant, the chief clerk shall perform the duties of commissioner.

34




AP

Sec. 7. * * * I t shall be the duty of the commissioner also to ascertain and
report as to the effect of the customs laws, and the effect thereon of the «tabe
of the currency, in the United .States, on the agricultural industry, especially
as to its effect on mortgage indebtedness of farmers. * * * He shall also
establish a system of reports by which, at intervals of not less than two years,
he can report the general condition, so far as production is concerned, of the
leading industries of the country. The Commissioner of Labor is also specially
charged to investigate the causes of, and facts relating to, all controversies and
disputes between employers and employees as they may occur, and which may
tend to interfere with the welfare of the people of the different States, and
report thereon to Congress. The Commissioner of Labor shall also obtain such
information upon the various subjects committed to him as he may deem desir­
able from different foreign nations, and what, if any, convict-made goods are
imported into this country, and if so, from whence. ,
A ct of Marc h 2, 1895.—A n act m ak in g app ro p ria tio n for legislative, ex ecu tive,

en d ju d icia l expenses of th e G overnm ent for th e fiscal y e a r en din g J im e 89,
1896, and for oth er purposes.

- [28 Stat. L. 805.]

The Commissioner of Labor is hereby authorized to prepare and publish a
bulletin of the Department of Labor, as to the condition of labor in this and
other countries, condensations of Btate and foreign labor reports, facts as to
conditions of employment, and such other facts as may he deemed of value to
the industrial interests of the country, and there shall be printed one edition
of not exceeding ten thousand copies of each issue of saM bulletin for distribu­
tion by the Department of Labor.1
c o pril 30, 1900.—A n act to p ro vid e a govern m en t fo r th e T e rrito ry of
tf

A A
&.

H a tm ii.

[31 Stat. D. 155.]

ec 76 (as amended by act of April 8. 1904 (33 Stat. L. 164]). * * * It
shall be the duty of the United States Commissioner of Labor to collect, assort,
arrange, and present in reports in nineteen hundred and five, and every five
years thereafter, statistical details relating to all departments of labor in the
Territory of Hawaii, especially in relation to the commercial, industrial, social,
educational and sanitary condition of the laboring classes, and to all such
other subjects as Congress may by law direct. The said commissioner is
especially charged to ascertain the highest, lowest, and average number of
employees engaged in the various industries in the Territory, to he classified
as to nativity, sex, hours of labor, and conditions of employment, and to report
the same to Congress.2
A ct of F ebruary 14, 1903.—A n act to esta b lish th e D ep a rtm en t of C om m erce
and Labor.

t32 Stat. L. 825.]

Section 1. There shall be at the seat of the government an executive de­
partment to be known as the Department of Commerce and Labor.
Sec. 4. * * * The Department of Labor * * * and all that pertains
to the same, be and the same hereby [is] placed under the jurisdiction and
made a part of the Department of Commerce and Labor.
A ct of J une 22, 1906.—A n a ct m ak in g app ro pria tion s fo r th e leg isla tive, e x ­
ecu tive , and ju d icia l expen ses o f th e G overn m en t for th e fiscal yea r ending
Ju n e 80, 1901, vend for o th e r purposes.

[34 Stat. L. 442.]

That the following sums be, and the same are hereby, appropriated, out of
any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, in full compensation
1The of 15,000 appropriation bill June that (30 6, L. <31 authorizes the
civil
4, 1397
printing sundry to exceed 20,000 copies ofwhile singleof June Stat.1900 61), Stat. L. 644),
authorizes not actcopies of each issue,of any otherwise it wasan extraIdentical with the
issue as almost edition.
act2Theamended. called for annual reports,
as original



36

TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

for the service of the fiscal year ending 1907, for the objects hereinafter ex­
pressed, namely:
* * * Bureau of Labor: For compensation of the * * * chief statis­
tician, who shall also perform the duties of chief clerk, $3,000.
A ct of Mabch 4, 1913.— A n a c t c r e a t i n g a D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r .
[37 Stat. 736.]
S ection 1. There is hereby created an executive department in the Govern­
ment to be called the Department of Labor, * * *.
S ec. 3. The following named offices, bureaus, * * * now and hereto­
fore under the jurisdiction of the Department of Commerce and Labor and
all that pertains to the same, known as the * * * Bureau of Labor,
* * * and the Commissioner of Labor, be, and the same hereby are, trans­
ferred from the Department of Commerce and Labor to the Department of
Labor, and the same -shall hereafter remain under the jurisdiction and super­
vision of the last-named department. * * * The Bureau of Labor shall
hereafter be known as the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Commissioner
of the Bureau of Labor shall hereafter be known as the Commissioner of Labor
S tatistics; and all the powers and duties heretofore possessed by the Commis­
sioner of Labor shall be retained and exercised by the Commissioner of Labor
Statistics.
S ec. 4. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, under the direction of the Secretary
of Labor, shall collect, collate, and report at least once each year, or oftener
if necessary, full and complete statistics of the conditions of labor and the
products and distribution of the products of the same, and to this end said
Secretary shall have power to employ any or either of the bureaus provided
for his department and to rearrange such statistical work and to distribute or
consolidate the same as may be deemed desirable in the public interests; and
said Secretary shall also have authority to call upon other departments of the
Government for statistical data and results obtained by them ; and said Secretary
of Labor may collate, arrange, and publish such statistical information so ob­
tained in such manner as to him may seem wise.
S ec. 9. The Secretary of Labor * * * shall also, from time to time, make
such special investigations and reports as he may be required to do by the
President, or by Congress, or which he him self may deem necessary.
A ct o f Mabc:& 28, 1922.— A n a c t m a k i n g a p p r o p r i a t i o n s f o r t h e D e p a r t m e n t s o f
C o m m e r c e a n d L a b o r f o r t h e f is c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e SO , 1 9 2 3 , a n d f o r
o th e r p u rp o se s.

[Pub. No. 183, 67th Cong.]

The following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury
not otherwise appropriated, for the Departments of Commerce and Labor for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923, nam ely:
* * * Bureau of Labor Statistics. Salaries: Commissioner, $5,000; chief
statistician, who shall also perform the duties of chief clerk, $3,000; statistician,
$3,000; six statistical experts, at $2,000 each; employees—two at $2,760 each,
one $2,520, five at $2,280 each, one $1,800, six at $1,600 each, seven at $1,400
each, two at $1,200 each ; special agents—four at $1,800 each, six at $1,600 each,
eight at $1,400 each, four at $1,200 each ; cl wks—eight of class four, seven of
class three, ten of class two, seventeen of class one, eight at $1,000 each;
two copyists at $900 each; messenger $840; three assistant messengers at $720
each ; two laborers at $660 each; in all $172,960.
Per diem in lieu of subsistence not exceeding $4 of special agents, and em­
ployees, and for their transportation; experts and temporary assistance for
field service outside of the District of Columbia, to be paid at the rate of
not exceeding $8 per d a y ; temporary statistical clerks, stenographers, and type­
writers in the District of Columbia, to be selected from civil-service registers
and to be paid at the rate of not exceeding $100 per month, the same person
to be employed for not more than six consecutive months, the total expenditure
for such temporary clerical assistance in the District of Columbia not to exceed
$6,000; traveling expenses of officers and employees, purchase of reports and
m aterials for reports and bulletins of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, $69,000.
For periodicals, newspapers, documents, and special reports for the purpose
of procuring strike data, price quotations, and court decisions for the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, $300.
Total, Bureau of Labor Statistics, $242,260,



APPENDIX E.—FINANCIAL STATEMENT.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics receives direct appropriations from
Congress and in addition shares in the general appropriations made
to the Department of Labor for rent, stationery, printing, and other
miscellaneous expenses. During the years 1918 and 1919 it also re­
ceived allotments from the National Security and Defense Fund.
The bureau has received no continuing appropriations and in but one
instance (1910) has it benefited by the reappropriation of a surplus.
The figures in the following table are distributed under the general
heads for which congressional appropriations have been made. In
all cases “ appropriations ” include deficiency appropriations. Ex­
penditures are figured on the accrual basis. Under “ salaries” are
listed only appropriations for statutory positions. In addition con­
siderable amounts are paid for salaries out of the lump-sum appro­
priations, “ miscellaneous expenses,” and “ appropriations for special
work.” The items under “ allotments from National Security and
Defense Fund” for 1918 and 1919 also include salaries. The figures
given for “ increase of compensation ” cover all the additional com­
pensation (bonus) received by the bureau under the acts of July 3,
1918, November 1, 1919, and June 29, 1922.




37

APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE BUREAU
Salaries.
Fiscal
year.

Library.

Appropriations lor
special work.

DO
00

LABOR STATISTICS FOR I90f TO fteft

Increase Allotments from
of com­ national security ihd
pensa­
defense fund.
tion.

Medical exami­
nation for
injured em­
ployees.

Total.

Appropriation.

Expendi- Appro­
priation.
ture.

Appro­
Ex­
Expendi­ Appro­ pendi­ Appropria­ Expendi­ priation Appro­
pria­
and ex­ priation.
tion.
ture.
ture.
tion. ture.
pendi­
ture.

$107,480.00
107,480.00
107,480.00
107,480.00
107,480.00
103,100.00
3 102,283.67
102,160.00
&136,391.67
137,880.00
137,880.00
148,280.00
172,960.00
217,140.00
172,960.00
172,960.00

$106,295.37
106,426.96
106,157.94
104,025.16
105,244.72'
101,177.78
99,767.64
97,953.10
135,277.60
136,904.80
136,580.52
142,442.09
164,498.67
212,738. 69
167,009. 49
169,948.67

$172,570.00 $170,578.77
$63,828. 72 $1,000.00 $454.68
322.570.00 315,261.34
63,663. 21| 1,000.00 698.57 i $150,000.00 t $144,472.60
53,967.62; 1,000.00 952.11 1 150,000.00 1140,996.46
322.570.00 311,074.13
72,833.33! 1, 000.00 981.45
172.570.00 177.839.94
1
64,090.00 1,000.00 996.19
$3,000.00 $249.00 175.570.00 170,579.91
83,562.84 1,000.00 999.48
3.000.00 173.34 191.190.00 185,913.44
63,555.54 1,000.00 987.99
$000.00 399.00 170.373.67 164,710.17
68,367.41 1,000.00 996.64 <10,000.00
3>000.00:2,935.91 185.250.00 172,328.81
$000.00:2,903*28 204.481.67 203.084.95
63,918.57 1,000.00 985.50
66,950.02 1,000.00 960.33
3.000. 2,986.89 20$ 970.00 207,802.04
00
3.000. 2,353.31 213*970.00 210,307.06
00
62,969.59 1,000.00 924.83 6 8,000.00 €7,478.81
301.430.29 263,143.24
63,165.11 1,000.00 991.02 7 5,000.00
$8,060.29 *'175*566*66 * $49,184.73
831,821.31 800,156.50
69,315.60 300.00 295.91
13; 561.31 9575, 000.00 552,485.01
362,335.96 355,721.86
102,045. 75 300.00 291.46
40,645.06
277.299.30 268,765.61
72,418.32 300.00 299.50
29,030.30
270,414.66 266,111.31
2$, 154.66
67,751.29 300.00 256.69

$64,090.00
64,090.00
64,090.00
2 64,090.00
64,090.00
84,090.00
64,090.00
69,090.00
64,090.00
67,090.00
64,090.00
64,090.00
70,000.00
104,250.00
75,000.00
69,000.00

Ex­
Expendi­ Appro­ pendi­ Appro­ Expendi­
pria­
ture.
tion. ture. priation. ture.

1 Investigating the condition of woman and child workers. Unexpended balance July 1, 1909, made available for 1910.
2 Balance of 1909, $10,122.38 reappropriated.
4 International Congress on Social Insurance.
6 Appropriation, $137,880, less deduction of $1,488.33, continuing resolution July 1-15,19l4i
®Inquiring into cost of living in the District of Columbia, appropriation $6,000; expenditure $5,986.79; compiling material on first-aid methods, appropriation $2,000, expenditure
$1,492.02.
7 Compiling material on first-aid methods; no expenditure.
8 Survey of cost of living.
'
. _.
9 Survey of cost of living: Allotment $325,500, expenditure $324,824.44. Industrial survey: Allotment $240,500, expenditure $227,660.57.
3Including $123.67, continuing resolution, July 1- Aug. 23,1912.




T H E BU R EA U OF LABOR STATISTICS,

1907..........
1908..........
1909..........
1910..........
1911..........
1912..........
1913..........
1914..........
1915..........
1916..........
1917..........
1918..........
1919..........
1920..........
1921..........
1922..........

Miscellaneous
expenses.

OF

A P P E N D IX F.— BIBLIOG RAPHY.5

This bibliography lists only those works which deal directly with
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, its history, activities, organization,
methods of business, problems, etc. It is intended primarily to meet
the needs of those persons who desire to make a further study of this
service from an administrative standpoint. It does not include the
titles of publications of the bureau itself, except in so far as they
treat of this service, its work and problems. iNor does it include
books or articles dealing merely with technical features other than
administrative of the work of tlie bureau.
O F F IC IA L PU BLICATIO N S.

Canada.

D e p a rtm en t of L abour.

United States labour monthly review.
v. 16; 241-242.)

(In its

Labour Gazette. Sept. 1915,

A n n o u n cem en t o f th e p u b lic a tio n o f th e first issu e o f th e M o n th ly R ev iew o f th e
B u reau o f L ab o r S ta tis tic s .

C h il e .

M in isterio de indu stria y obras pubUoas.

La Oficina del trabajo en Estados Unidos. Santiago de Chile, 1907. ,27 p.
A digest o f Bulletin No. 54 o f the United S ta te s B u reau o f L abor.
H a n g e r , G. W. W.
Bureaus of statistics of labor in the United States. (In Bulletin U. S.
Bureau of Labor no. 54, p. 991-1021.)
U

In clu d es in fo r m a tio n con cern in g th e F ed era l B u reau o f L abor.

nlted

S ta tes.

B u reau of E ducation.

Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(In its Guide to United States publications, compiled by Walter I.
Swanton. Washington, 1918.. p. 118-119. Bulletin 1918, no, 2.)
(In its The Federal executive departments as sources of information
for libraries. Compiled by Edith Guerrier. Washington, 1919. p.
194-8. Bulletin 1919, no. 74.)
----- B u reau of Labor.
Analysis and index of ail reports issued by bureaus of labor statistics in
the United States prior to Nov. 1, 1892. Washington, Govt, print, off.,
1893. 376 p. (Its Third special report.)
T h e a n a ly sis o f rep o rts o f th e F ed era l b u reau is fo u n d o n p. 2 1 8 -2 3 5 .
------------Annual report of the Commissioner of Labor. The first-twenty-fifth.
March, 1886-1910. Washington, Govt, print, off., 1886-1911. 29 v.
Commissioners: Carroll D. Wright, 1885-1904; Charles P. Neill, 1905-1910.
F ou n d also in the congressional series o f public documents.
T h e se a re n o t a d m in istr a tiv e rep o rts, b u t a re r ep o rts o f sp ec ia l s tu d ie s and in ­
v e s tig a tio n s o n a v a r ie ty o f subjects*

---------—Bulletin, v. I-XXIV (no. 1-100). Nov. 1895-May, 1912. Washington,
Govt, print, off., 1896-1912.

C on tin u ed b y th e B u lle tin o f th e U n ite d S ta te s B ureau o f L abor . . . no.
1 0 1 -1 1 1 , fo llo w e d by th e B u lle tin o f th e U n ite d S ta te s B u reau o f L abor S ta tistic s,
N o. 1 1 2 B u lle tin s (1 8 9 6 -1 9 1 2 ) c o n ta in o rig in a l in v e stig a tio n s o f labor p rob lem s, a b str a c ts
o f S ta te a n d fo reig n lab or rep o rts, la w s a n d d ec isio n s a ffe c tin g labor, a n d m iscel­
la n e o u s n ew s. L ater b u lle tin s a re issu e d in 13 d ifferen t series, d ev o ted to a num ber
o f su b jects.

C om piled by M. A lice M a tth ew s.




39

40
U

T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

S t a t e s . B u reau of Labor. Exhibit of the Bureau of Labor at the
Louisiana purchase exposition . . . Washington, Govt, print, oft., 1904. XIV,
p. 969-1490, plates, plans, tables, charts. ( I ts Bulletin . . . no. 54, Sept, 1904.)
T h e “ In tr o d u c tio n ,” b y G. W . W . H an ger, te lls h ow th e e x h ib it w a s prep ared .
T h e secon d a r tic le d escrib es “ T h e w o r k in g o f th e U n ite d S ta te s B u rea u o f L ab or,”

n it e d

b y C arroll D . W rig h t. T h e th ir d a r tic le is by G. W . W . H an g er on “ B u rea u s o f
s t a tis tic s o f lab or in th e U n ited S ta te s.” T he rem a in d er o f th e b u lle tin c o n sists o f
a r tic le s on a v a r ie ty o f su b jects o f in te r e st to labor.

------------A letter from the Commissioner of Labor to the Honorable Secre­
tary o f the Interior, declaring the policy of the bureau. Washington, 1885.
3 p.
----- ------Publications of the U. S. Bureau of Labor prior to July 1, 1912.
Washington, Govt* print, off., 1912. 13 p.
—:------ —Regulations governing field employees, effective May 1, 1910. Wash­
ington, Govt, print, off., 1910. 25 p.
-------------Special report of the Commissioner of Labor . . . Washington,
Govt, print, off., 1889-1905. 12 v.
—

T h e se rep o rts h a v e b een issu e d in v a r io u s e d itio n s.

B u reau of L abor S ta tistic s.
Labor and the war. Organization of the war labor administration com­
pleted. (In its Monthly Labor Review, Aug. 1918, v. 7, p. 283-291.)

O u tlin es th e c o o p e ra tiv e r e la tio n s e x istin g b etw een th e B u reau o f L abor S ta ­
tis tic s an d th e In v e stig a tio n a n d In sp e c tio n S erv ice o f th e D ep a rtm en t o f L abor.

------------Monthly Review of the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics . . . v. 1,
July, 1915, to date. Washington, Govt, print, off., 1915 to date.
N a m e ch a n g ed to M o n th ly L ab or R ev iew , J u ly , 191 8 .
—— ----- Official rules and regulations of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
April, 1921. Washington, Govt, print, off., 1921. 10 p.
------------Publications of the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics . . . Wash­
ington, Govt, print, off., 1913 to date.
■----------- Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of
Labor Statistics up to May 1, 1915. September, 1915. Washington, Govt,
print off., 1915. 233 p. (I ts Bulletin no. 174.)
----- C ongress. Join t C om m ission on L a w s O rganising E x ecu tive D e p a rt­
m e n ts (kn ow n as the Dockery-Cockrell Commission).
Department of Labor. (In its Organization of the executive depart­
ments . . . at the national capital . . . Washington, 1893. p. 163164. S. Rept. no. 47, 53d Cong., 1st sess. Serial no. 3148.)
— ------------Department of Labor. (In its References to laws organizing
—
executive departments . . . at the National capital. Washington, 1893, p.
125-126. S. Rept. no. 41, 53d Cong., 1st sess. Serial no. 3148.)
------------H ouse. C om m ittee on A ppropriation s.
Legislative, executive and judicial appropriation bill. Hearings . . .
Washington, Govt, print, off., 1885 to date.
T h e h ea r in g s b efo re th is c o m m ittee co n ta in m u ch in te r e stin g testim o n y con cern in g
the a c tiv itie s o f th e B u reau o f L abor.
------------ S elect C om m ittee on th e Census.
Statistics of certain cities. Report to accompany H. R. 15807 [repealing
provision of act by which Commissioner of Labor is authorized to
compile abstract of statistics of cities of over 30,000 population] Feb. 13,
1903. [Washington, Govt, print, off., 1903] 2 p. (H. Rept. 3767, 57th
Cong., 2d sess. Serial no. 4415.)
----- D ep a rtm en t of C om m erce and Labor.
Bureau of Labor. (In its Organization and law of the Department of
Commerce and Labor. Washington, 1904, p. 69-64.)
In c lu d e s t e x t o f p o r tio n s o f v a r io u s a c ts r e la tin g to th e B u rea u o f L abor.
------- — Bureau of 'Labor. The relations of labor and capital. (In First
annual report of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 1903. Washington,
1903. p. 27-30.)

O u tlin es th e p o lic y o f th e d ep a r tm en t w ith resp e ct to “ c a p ita lis ts a n d w ag e re­
c e iv e r s ” a n d r e v ie w s th e y ea r ’s w ork o f th e B u rea u o f L abor.




APPENDIXES,
U

41

S t a t e s . D ep a rtm en t of C om m erce and L abor. Bureau of Labor. (In
Reports of the Department of Commerce and Labor. 1904-1912. Report
of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor and reports of -bureaus. Washing­
ton, 1905-1913.)

n it e d

its

1 90 4 , p. 1 7 -2 0 , 1 0 5 - 1 2 1 ; 1905, p. 2 0 -2 4 , 7 7 - 9 2 ; 190 6 , p. 1 7 -1 9 , 7 3 -8 8 ; 1907, p.
2 5 -8 0 , 2 1 3 -2 2 9 ; 1908, p. 3 6 -4 2 , 3 1 1 - 3 1 8 ; 1909, p. 1 1 -1 2 , 9 1 - 9 8 ; 1910, p. 6 1 -6 3 ,
3 9 9 - 4 0 9 ; 1 91 1 , p. 6 9 -7 1 , 4 1 1 - 4 2 2 ; 191 2 , p. 7 0 -7 3 , 4 2 1 -4 3 3 .

------------Official regulations of the Bureau of Labor. (In its Rules and regula­
tions governing the Department of Commerce and Labor in its various
branches. Washington, 1907, p. 141-157.)
------------Order transferring from Bureau of Labor to Bureau of Census certain
statistics of cities. July 1, 1903. 1 p. (Dept, circular 3.)
----- D ep a rtm en t of L abor.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. (In Annual reports of the Department of
Labor. 1913 to date. Report of the Secretary of Labor and reports of
bureaus. Washington, 1914 to date.)
1913, p, 2 4 -2 9 , 3 4 5 - 3 5 1 ; 1 91 4 , p. 5 8 -6 3 , 5 2 1 - 5 2 8 ; 191 5 , p. 5 6 -6 0 , 8 9 - 9 8 ; 1916.
p. 8 9 -9 1 , 1 3 7 - 1 5 0 ; 1917, p. 1 2 0 -1 2 2 ,, 1 6 3 -1 7 2 ; 191 8 , p. 1 6 0 -1 6 2 , 2 3 5 - 2 4 3 ; 1919,
p. 2 2 5 -2 2 7 , 3 1 5 -3 2 5 ; 1920, p. 1 6 1 -1 6 3 , 2 7 3 -2 8 2 ; 1 92 1 , 2 1 -2 4 .

------------Publications of the Department of Labor available for distribution
. . . Washington, Govt, print, oif., 1913 to date.
-----------Regulations of the Department of Labor, in effect October 15, 1915.
Washington, Govt, print, off., 1915. 259 p.
----------- Report relating to section 10 of act creating the Department of Labor.
Letter from the Secretary of Labor submitting report prepared in pursuance
of section 10 of the act approved March 4, 1913 . . . entitled “An act to
create a Department of Labor,” . . . Washington, Govt, print, off., 1917.
11 p. (H. Doc. 1906. 64th Cong., 2d sess. Serial no. 7240.)
T h e S ecreta ry
w h ic h o v e r la p in
ca lls a tte n tio n to
th e P u b lic H e a lth

o f L ab or e n u m er a te s th e v a rio u s a c tiv itie s o f h is D ep a rtm en t
c er ta in p a r tic u la r s th e w ork o f o th er G overn m en t ser v ice s. H e
th e o v e r la p p in g o f w ork o f th e B u reau o f L abor S ta tis tic s w ith
S erv ice, th e B u reau o f M ines, and th e Office o f M ark ets.

----- P resid en t [Roosevelt], 1901-1909.
Recommendations for compilations of labor laws of the various States and
for other reports to be made by the Bureau of Labor. (In M s Fourth
annual message to Congress, Dec. 6, 1904).
------ T rea su ry D epartm en t.
Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury transmitting estimates of appro­
priations required for the service of the fiscal year . . . Washington,
Govt, print, off., 1885 to date.
----------- D ivisio n of bookkeeping and w a rra n ts.
Digest of appropriations for the support of the Government of the United
States . . . Washington, Govt, print, off., 1885 to date.
W e ig h t , C a k eo ll D .
The working of the Department of Labor. Washington, 1901. 17 p. (U. S.
Bureau of Labor. Monographs on social economics. I.)
A sh ort h isto r y o f th e D ep a rtm en t, it s o rg a n iz a tio n a n d fu n c tio n s a n d ch a racter
o f it s w ork .

----- The working of the United States Bureau of Labor.
U. S. Bureau of Labor, no. 54, Sept. 1904, p. 973-989.)

(In

Bulletin of the

O rigin, o rg a n iz a tio n , an d fu n c tio n s, ch a ra cter o f wT
ork, a n n u a l rep o rts, sp ecial
rep orts, lis t o f b u lle tin s, etc.
U N O F F IC IA L PUBLICATION S.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(In American labor year book, 1917-18. New York, 1918. p. 225-226.)
Department of Labor and Census Statistics.
(In Documentary history of American industrial society. Cleveland, O.,
1910, v. 9: 224-226.)
A r eso lu tio n o f th e N ew Y ork co n g ress o f th e N a tio n a l L abor U nion , 1868,
fa v o r in g th e crea tio n of a “ D ep a rtm en t o f L ab or ” and an in q u iry by th e C ensus
Office in to “fa c ts th a t con cern th e w h o le p eo p le.”

E v e b h a e t , E l f b id a .

Labor bureau.
(In her Handbook of United States public documents. Minneapolis,
1910. p. 89-91.)




42

T H E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS,

FiAIRLIE, JOHN A ,

Statistical bureaus [the Bureau of Labor].
M s National administration of the United States of America.
New York, 1905. p. 238-234.)
G a u ss, H . O.
[The Bureau of Labor.]
(In his American government New York, 1908. p. 775-778.)
H a s k i n , F r e d e r i c J.
Department of Commerce and Labor..
(In h is American government. New York, 1911. p. 143-158.)
(In

C on tain s a p aragrap h a b o u t th e B u reau o f L ab or.

I n t e r n a t io n a l A s s o c ia t io n o f O f f ic ia l s
I n s p e c t io n a n d I n d u s t r ia l C o m m is s io n s .

of

B

ureaus

of

L abor, F

actory

Proceedings of 1st to 28th annual meetings, 1883 to 1913.

A sta te m e n t o f th e a c tiv itie s o f th e U n ite d S ta te s B u rea u o f L abor, b y th e C om ­
m issio n e r o f L ab or, w ill be fou n d in th e fo llo w in g r e p o r ts o f p r o c e e d in g s:
3 d a n n u a l c o n v en tio n , B o sto n , 188 5 , p. 1 2 5 -1 3 7 .
7 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , H a r tfo r d , C onn., 1 8 8 9 , p. 1 8 -2 3 .
1 4 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , D etr o it, 1 8 9 8 , p . 2 8 -3 3 .
1 5 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , A u g u sta , M e., 189 9 , p . 4 3 —4 6 .
1 6 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , M ilw au k ee, 1 9 0 0 , p. 3 7 -3 9 .
1 7 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , S t. L ou is, 1 901, p, 8 2 -8 5 .
1 8 th a n n u a l c o n v en tio n , N e w O rlean s, 1902, pi. 7 5 -7 8 .
1 9 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , W a sh in g to n , D . C'., 1 903, p . 6 9 -7 1 .
2 0 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , C oncord, N. H ., 190 4 , p. 4 3.
2 2d 'ann u al c o n v e n tio n , B o sto n , 1 9 0 6 , p. 2 3 -2 7 .
2 3 d a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , N orfolk , V a., 1 9 0 7 , p. 5 3 - 5 4 .
2 4 t h a n n u a l c o n v en tio n , D etr o it, M ich ., 1 90 8 , p. 2 9 .
2 5 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , R o ch ester, N . Y ., 1909, p. 1 3 1 -1 3 4 .
2 6 th a n n u a l c o n v e n tio n , H en d er so n v ille, N .'C ., 1 9 1 0 , p . 9 1 - 9 6 .
2 7 th a n n u a l co n v en tio n ,, L in coln , N eb r., 1 911, p. 3 5 —4 0 .
M

eeker,

R

oyal.

A plan for more effective cooperation between State and Federal* labor
offices.
(In Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the United States
and Canada. Proceedings of the second annual convention. Detroit,
1915. p. 81-85.)

V ariou s a c tiv itie s o f th e B u rea u o f L ab or S ta tis tic s d escrib ed b y th e C om m issio n er
o f L abor.

----- Some features of the statistical *work of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
American Statistical Association. Quarterly publication, March. 1915, V. 14:
431-441.
R e la te s m a in ly to in d ex n u m b ers o f p rices.
— —Work of the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics in its relation to the
business of the country. American Academy of Political and Social Sciences.
Annals, Jan., 1916, v. 63: 263-271.
Pow derly, T . V.
The Labor Bureau.
(In M s Thirty vears of labor. 1859-1889. Columbus, O. [1889] p.
302-327.)

T h e crea tio n o f th e n a tio n a l B u reau o f L ab or, 188 4 , in th e D ep a rtm en t o f th e I n ­
te r io r ; te x t o f a c t ; sele c tio n o f C arroll D . W r ig h t t o be f ir s t c o m m is s io n e r ; a lso th e
a c t to c re a te a D ep a rtm en t o f L abor, J u n e 30, 1 88 8 , u n d er th e ch a rg e o f a O om m issto n e r « f L ab or.

C. H., and L e l a n d , W. G.
Bureau of Labor.
(In th eir Guide to the archives of the Government of the United
States in Washington. 2d ed. rev. Washington, 1907. p. 235.)
W h a t U n c l e S a m D o es n o t D o fo r W o m e n in I n d u s t r y .
New Republic, July 29, 1916, v. 7:324-326.

Van Tyne,

A p lea fo r an in d e p en d e n t w o m e n s b u reau in t h e D ep a rtm en t o f L ab or to rep la ce
th e W o m an ’s D iv isio n in th e B u reau o f L abor S ta tis tic s .

C a r r o l l D.
The working of the Department of Labor.
Cosmopolitan, June, 1892, v. 13: 229-236.
----- Working of the Department of Labor. Scientific American supplement,
April 26, 1902, v. 53; 22002-22004.

W

r ig h t ,




A P P E N D IX

—CHRONOLOGICAL L IST OF PU BLICA TIO N S,
AXOTJAX R EBOOTS.

•First, 1886.
•Second, 1886.
•Third, 1887.
•Fourth, 1888.
•Fifth, 1889.
•Sixth, 1890.
Seventh, 1891.
•Eighth, 1892.
•Mntli, 1893.
Tenth, 1894.
"Eleventh, 1895-96.
•Twelfth, 1897.
•Thirteenth, 1898.
•Fourteenth, 1899.
•Fifteenth, I960.
•Sixteenth, 1901.
Seventeenth, 1902.
Eighteenth, 1903.
•Nineteenth, 1904.
Twentieth, 1905.
•Twenty-first, 1906.
Twenty-second, 1967.
Twenty-third, 1908.
Twenty-fourth, 1909.
Twenty-fifth, 1910.

Industrial Depressions.
Convict Labor.
Strikes and Lockouts (1881 to 1886).
Working Women in Large Cities.
Railroad Labor.
Cost of Production: Iron, Steel, Coal, etc.
Cost of Production: The Textiles and Class (2 vols.).
Industrial Education.
Building and Loan Associations.
Strikes and Lockouts (1887 to 1894) <2 vols.).
Work and Wages of Men, Women, and Children.
Economic Aspects of the Liquor Problem.
Hand and Machine Labor (2 vote.).
Water, Gas, anil Electric-light Plants under Private
and Municipal Ownership.
Wages in Commercial Countries <2 vols.).
Strikes and Lockouts <1881 to 1900).
Trade and Technical Education.
Cost of Living and Retail Prices of Food,
Wages and Hours of Labor.
Convict Labor.
strikes and Lookouts (1881 to 1905).
Labor Laws of the United States.
Workmens Insurance and Benefit Funds in United
States.
Workmen’s Insurance and Compensation Systems in
Europe (2 vols.).
Vol. I. Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Gernaany.
Vol. IL Great Britain, Italy, Norway, Russia,
Spain, Sweden.
Industrial Education.
SPE C IAL R E PO R T S.

•First, 1889.
•Second, 1892.
•Third, 1893.
•Fourth, 189a
•Fifth, 1893.
•Sixth, 1893.
•Seventh, 1894.
•Eighth, 1895.
•Ninth, 1897.
•Tenth, 1904.
•Eleventh, 1904.
•Twelfth, 1905.
* S u p p ly ex h a u sted .



Marriage and Divorce.
Labor Laws of the United States (second edition,
revised, 1896).
Analysis and Index of all Reports Issued by Bureaus
of Labor Statisties in the United -States prior to
Nov. 1, 1892.
Compulsory Insurance in Germany.
Gothenberg System of Liquor Traffic.
Phosphate Industry of the United States.
The Slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New York, and
Philadelphia.
The Housing of the Working People.
The Italians in Chicago.
Labor Laws of the United States.
Regulation and Restriction of Output*
Coal Mine Labor in Europe.
43

44

TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.
M ISCELLANEOU S R E PO RTS.

*1897. White-pine Lumber in the United States and Canada. (Published as
S. Doc. 70, 55th Cong., 1st sess.)
*1898. Total Cost and Labor Cost of Transformation in the Production of Cer­
tain Articles in the United States, Great Britain, and Belgium.
(Published as S. Doc. No. 20, 55th Cong., 3d sess.)
*1900. History and Growth of the United States Census. (Printed as S. Doc.
194, 56th Cong., 1st sess.)
*1901. Effect of the International Copyright Law in the United States.
*1902. Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1901. (First report,
printed as S. Doc. 169, 57th Cong., 1st sess.)
*1903. Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1902. (Second report,
printed as S. Doc. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.; printed also in Bulletin
No. 47.)
*1904. Trade and Technical Education in the United States. (Part of Bulletin
No. 54.)
*1904. Housing of the Working People in the United States by Employers.
(Part of Bulletin No. 54.)
1904. Wages in the United States and in Europe. (Part of Bulletin No. 54.)
1904. Bureaus of Labor in the United States and Foreign Countries. (Part
of Bulletin No. 54.)
*1904. Public Baths in the United States. (Part of Bulletin No. 54.)
*1905. Labor Disturbances in the State of Colorado from 1880 to 1904,
inclusive, with Correspondence Relating Thereto. (Printed as S.
Doc. No. 122, 58th Cong., 3d sess.)
*1905. Eight Hours for Laborers on Government Work. (Printed as a docu­
ment of House Committee on Labor, 60th Cong., 1st sess.)
*1906. Third Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1905.
(Printed as H. Doc. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.; printed also in Bulletin
No. 66.)
*1909. Laws Relating to Compensation for Industrial Accidents in Foreign
Countries. (Part of 24th Annual Report, 1909.)
1909. Investigation of Western Union and Postal Telegraph-Cable Companies.
(Printed as S. Doc. No. 725, 60th Cong., 2d sess.)
*1910. Pension Funds for Municipal Employees and Railroad Pension Systems
in the United States. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 427, 61st Cong.,
2d sess.)
*1910. Investigation of Telephone Companies. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 380,
61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*1910. Civil Service Retirement, Great Britain and New Zealand, by Herbert
D. Brown. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 290, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*1910. Civil Service Retirement, New South Wales, Australia, by Herbert D.
Brown. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 420, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*1910. Strike at Bethlehem Steel Works, South Bethlehem, Pa. (Printed as
S. Doc. No. 521, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*1910. Increase in Cost of Food and Other Products. (12 tables.) (Printed as
S. Doc. No. 349, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*1911. Fourth Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, 1910. (Printed
as S. Doc. 866, 61st Cong., 3d sess.; printed also in Bulletin No. 94.)
1911. Conditions of Employment in the Iron and Steel Industry in the United
States. 4 volumes. (S. Doc. No. 110, 62d Cong., 1st sess.)
*Yol. I. Wages and Hours of Labor.
*Vol. II. Wages and Hours of Labor, General Tables.
Vol. III. Working Conditions and the Relations of Employers and
Employees.
Vol. IV. Accidents and Accident Prevention.
1911. Vocational Guidance. (Part of 25th Annual Report, 1910.)
1912. Conciliation, Arbitration, and Sanitation in the Cloak, Suit, and Skirt
Industry in New York City. (Part of Bulletin No. 98.)
*1912. Strike of Textile Workers in Lawrence, Mass., in 1912. (Printed as
S. Doc. No. 870, 62d Cong., 2d sess.)
1912. Miners’ Strike in Bituminous Coal Field in Westmoreland County, Pa.,
in 1910-11. (Printed as H. Doc. No. 847, 62d Cong., 2d sess.)
Supply exhausted.



APPENDIXES,

45

*1912. Summary of the Wages and Hours of Labor—From the Report on Condi­
tions of Employment in the Iron and Steel Industry in the United
States. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 301, 62d Cong., 2d sess.)
*1910-1912. Report on Condition of Woman and Child Wage Earners in the
United States. (Printed as S. Doc. No. 645, 61st Cong., 2d sess.)
*Vol. I. Cotton Textile Industry.
*Vol. II. Men’s Ready-Made Clothing.
*Vol. III. Glass Industry.
*Vol. IV. Silk Industry.
*Vol. V. Wage-Earning Women in Stores and Factories.
*Vol. VI. The Beginnings of Child-Labor Legislation in Certain
States; a Comparative Study.
*Vol. VII. Conditions Under Which Children Leave School to Go to
Work.
*Vol. VIII. Juvenile Delinquency and Its Relation to Employment
*Vol. IX. History of Women in Industry in the United States.
*Vol. X. History of Women in Trade Unions.
*Vol. XI. Employment of Women in Metal Trades.
*Vol. XII. Employment of Women in Laundries.
*Vol. XIII. Infant Mortality and Its Relation to the Employment of
Mothers.
*Vol. XIV. Causes of Death Among Woman and Child Cotton-Mill
Operatives.
*Vol. XV. Relation Between Occupation and Criminality of Women.
*Vol. XVI. Family Budgets of Typical Cotton-Mill Workers.
*Vol. XVII. Hookworm Disease Among Cotton-Mill Operatives.
*Vol. XVIII. Employment of Women and Children in Selected In­
dustries.
*Vol. XIX. Labor Laws and Factory Conditions.
1913. Mediation and Arbitration Laws of the United States.
*1913. Compensation for Injuries to Employees of the United States arising
from Accidents Occurring Between August 1, 1908, and June 30, 191L
(Report of Operations under the Act of May 30, 1908.)
*1913. Increase in Prices of Anthracite Coal Following the Wage Agreement of
May 20, 1912. (H. Doc. No. 1442, 62d Cong., 3d sess.)
*1914. Federal and State Laws relating to convict labor. (Printed as S. Doc.
494, 63d Cong., 2d sess.)
*1914. A Study of the Dress and Waist Industry for the Purpose of Industrial
Education. (Part of Bulletin No. 145.)
1916. Labor conditions in Hawaii. (Printed as S. Doc^ 432, 64th Cong., 1st
sess.)
B IM O N T H L Y BU L L E T IN S.

[B e sid e s th e a r tic le s in d ic a te d b elo w a m a jo rity o f th e B u lle tin s from N o. 1 to N o. 100
c o n ta in d ig e s ts o f rep o rts o f S ta te b u reau s o f la b o r s ta tis tic s and o f fo r e ig n sta tis tic a l
p u b lic a tio n s ; a lso d ec isio n s o f c o u r ts a ffe c tin g labor, o p in io n s o f th e A tto rn e y G eneral,
an d labor la w s o f th e v a r io u s S ta te s en a c ted from tim e to tim e .]

*No. 1—Nov., 1895. Strikes and lockouts in the United States from January 1,
1881, to June 30, 1894. (Summary of Third and Tenth
Annual Reports.)
Private and public debt in the United States, by George K.
Holmes.
Employer and employee under the common law, by V, H.
Olmsted and Stephen D. Fessenden.
*No. 2—Jan., 1896. The poor colonies of Holland, by J. Howard Gore, Ph. D.
The industrial revolution in Japan, by William Eleroy
Curtis.
Notes concerning the money of the United States and
other countries, by William C. Hunt.
The wealth and receipts and expenses of the United
States, by William M. Steuart.
*No. 3—Mar., 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Anzin, France,
by W. F. Willoughby.
* Supply exhausted.

5895°—22---- 4




TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

46

*Ng. 4—May, 1896. Industrial communities: Coal Mining Co. of Blanzy,
France, by W. F: Willoughby.
The sweating system, by Henry White.
♦ No. 5—July, 1896. Convict labor.
Industrial communities: Iron and steel works of Friedrich
Krupp, Essen, Germany, by W. F, Willoughby.
♦ No. 6—Sept., 1896. Industrial communities: Familist^re Society of Guise,
France, by W. F. Willoughby,
Cooperative distribution, by Edward W, Bemis, Ph. D.
♦ No. 7—Nov., 1896. Industrial communities: Various communities, by W. F.
Willoughby.
Rates of wages paid under public and private contract, by
Ethelbert Stewart.
♦ No. 8—Jan., 1897. Conciliation and arbitration in the boot and shoe industry,
by T. A. Carroll.
Railway relief departments, by Emory R. Johnson, Ph. D.
♦ No: 9—Mar., 1897. The padrone system and padrone banks, by John Koren.
The Dutch Society for General Welfare, by J. Howard
Gore, Ph. D.
♦ No, 10—May, 1897. Work and wages of men, women, and children. (Sum­
mary of Eleventh Annual Report.)
Condition of the Negro in various cities.
Building and loan associations.
♦ No. 11—July, 1897. Workers at gainful occupations at the Federal censuses
of 1870, 1880, and 1890, by William C. Hunt.
Public baths in Europe, by Edward Mussey Hartwell, Ph.
D., M. D.
♦ No. 12—Sept., 1897. The inspection of factories and workshops in the United
States, by W. F. Willoughby.
Mutual rights and duties of parents and children, guard­
ianship, etc., under the law, by F. J. Stimson.
♦ No. 13—Nov., 1897. The Italians in Chicago. (Summary of Ninth Special Re­
port.)
The anthracite mine laborers, by G. 0. Virtue, Ph. D.
The municipal or cooperative restaurant of Grenoble,
France, by C. Osborne Ward.
♦ No. 14—Jan., 1898. The Negroes of Farmville, Va.: A social study, by W. E.
Burghardt Du Bois, Ph. D.
Income, wages, and rents in Montreal, by Herbert Brown
Ames, B. A.
♦ No. 15—Mar., 1898. Boarding homes and clubs for working women, by Mary S.
Fergusson.
The trade-union label, by John Graham Brooks.
♦ No. 16—May, 1898. The Alaskan gold fields and the opportunities they offer for
capital and labor, by Sam. C. Dunham.
♦ No. 17—July, 1898. Economic aspects of the liquor problem. (Summary of
Twelfth Annual Report.)
Brotherhood relief and insurance of railway employees, by
Emory R. Johnson, Ph. D.
The nations of Antwerp, by J. Howard Gore, Ph. D.
♦ No. 18—Sept, 1898. Wages in the United States and Europe, 1870 to 1898.
♦ No. 19—Nov., 1898. The Alaskan gold fields and the opportunities they offer
for capital and labor, by Sam. C. Dunham.
Mutual relief and benefit associations in the printing
trade, by William S. Waudby.
♦ No. 20—Jan., 1899. Condition of railway labor in Europe, by Walter E. Weyl,
Ph. D.
♦ No. 21—Mar., 1899. Pawnbroking in Europe and the United States, by W. R.
Patterson, Ph. D.
♦ No. 22—May, 1899. Benefit features of American trade unions, by Edward W.
Bemis, Ph. D.
The Negro in the black belt: Some social sketches, by
W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, Ph. D.
Wages in Lyon, France, 1870 to 1896.
Supply exhausted.




APPENDIXES.

47

*No. 23—July, 1899. The attitude of women’s clubs and associations toward
social economics, by Ellen M. Henrotin.
The production of paper and pulp in the United States,
from January 1 to June 30, 1898.
*No. 24—Sept., 1899. Statistics of cities.
*No. 25—Nov., 1899. Foreign labor laws: Great Britain and France, by W. F.
Willoughby.
*No. 26—Jan., 1900. Protection of workmen in their employment, by Stephen D.
Fessenden, A. B., LL, M.
Foreign labor laws: Belgium and Switzerland, by W. F.
Willoughby.
*No. 27—Mar., 1900. Wholesale prices: 1890 to 1899, by Boland P. Falkner,
Ph. D.
Foreign labor laws: Germany, by W. F. Willoughby.
*No. 28—May, 1900. Voluntary conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, by
John Bruce McPherson.
System of adjusting scale of wages, etc., in certain rolling
mills, by James H. Nutt.
Foreign labor laws: Austria, by W. F. Willoughby.
*No. 29—July. 1900. Trusts and industrial combinations, by Jeremiah W. Jenks,
Ph. D.
The Yukon and Nome gold region, by Sam C. Dunliam.
Labor Day, by Miss M. O. de Graffenried.
*No. 30—Sept., 1900. Trend of wages from 1891 to 1900.
Statistics of cities.
Foreign labor laws: Russia, The Netherlands, Italy, Nor­
way, Sweden, and Denmark, by W. F. Willoughby.
*No. 81—Nov., 1900. The betterment of industrial conditions by Victor H.
Olmsted.
Present status of employers’ liability in the United States,
by Stephen D. Fessenden.
Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr. Luigi Einaudi.
No. 82—Jan., 1901. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the United
States, by W. F. Willoughby.
Prices of commodities and rates of wages in Manila.
The negroes of Sandy Spring. Maryland: A social study,
by William Taylor Thom, Ph. D,
The British workmen’s compensation act and its opera­
tion, by A. Maurice Low.
No. 83.—Mar., 1901. Foreign labor laws: Australasia and Canada, by W. F.
Willoughby.
The British conspiracy and protection of property act and
its operation, by A. Maurice Low.
No. 34.—May, 1901. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Azel Ames, M. D.
Social economics at the Paris Exposition, by N. P. Gilman.
The Workmen’s compensation act of Holland.
*No. 35—July, 3901. Cooperative communities in the United States, by Rev.
Alexander Kent.
The Negro landholder of Georgia, by W. E. Burgliardt Du
Bois, Ph. D.
*No. 36—Sept., 1901. Statistics of cities.
Statistics of Honolulu, Hawaii.
*No. 37—Nov., 1901. Railway employees in the United States, by Samuel
M’Cune Lindsay.
The Negroes of Litwalton, Virginia : A social study of the
“ Oyster Negro,” by William Taylor Thom, Ph. D.
No. 38—Jan., 1902. Labor conditions in Mexico, by Walter E. Weyl, Ph. D.
The Negroes of Cinclare Central Factory and Calumet
Plantation, Louisiana, by J. Bradford Laws.
Charts exhibited at the Pan American Exposition.
The Quebec trade disputes act.
No. 39—Mar., 1902. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1901.
♦ Supply exhausted.




48

TH E BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

*No. 40—May, 1902. Present condition of the hand-working and domestic iridustries of Germany, by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D.
Workmen’s compensation acts of foreign countries, by
Adna F. Weber.
Working of compulsory conciliation and arbitration laws
in New Zealand and Victoria.
The compulsory arbitration act of New South Wales.
No: 41—July, 1902. Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
Beef prices, by Fred C. Croxton.
The True Reformers, by William Taylor Thom, Ph. D.
*No. 42—Sept., 1902. Statistics of cities.
Labor conditions in Cuba. (Amendatory of article in
Bulletin No. 41.)
Report to the President on anthracite coal strike, by Carroll D. Wright.
*No. 43—Nov., 1902. Italian bureau of labor statistics.
*No. 44—Jan., 1903. Factory sanitation and labor protection, by C. F. W.
Doehring, Ph. D.
No. 45—Mar., 1903. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1902.
*No. 46—May, 1903. Report of the anthracite coal strike commission.
No. 47—July, 1903. Report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii. (Reprint
of second Report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii, S. Doc. 181, 57th Cong., 2d sess.)
♦ No. 48—Sept., 1903. Farm colonies of the Salvation Army, by Commander
Booth Tucker.
The Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A social study, by Richard
R. Wright, jr., B. D.
*No. 49—Nov., 1903. Cost of living. (A summary of the Eighteenth Annual
Report.)
Labor conditions in New Zealand, by Victor S. Clark,
Ph. D.
Industrial conciliation and arbitration act of New Zea­
land.
*No. 50—Jan., 1904. Labor unions and British industry, by A. Maurice Low.
Land values and ownership in Philadelphia, by A. F.
Davies.
*No. 51—Mar., 1904. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1903.
The union movement among coal-mine workers, by Frank
Julian Warne, Ph. D.
*No. 52—May, 1904. Child labor in the United States, by Hannah R. Sewall,
Ph. D.
*No. 53—July, 1904. Wages and cost of living.
♦ No. 54—Sept., 1904. The working of the United States Bureau of Labor, by
Carroll D. Wright.
Bureaus of statistics of labor, by G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Bureaus of statistics of labor in foreign countries, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Value and influence of labor statistics, by Carroll D.
Wright.
Strikes and lockouts in the United States, 1881 to 1900, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Wages in the United States and in Europe, 1890 to 1903, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Cost of living and retail prices in the United States, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Wholesale prices in the United States, 1890 to 1903, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Housing of the working people in the United States by
employers, by G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
Public baths in the United States, by G. W. W. Hanger,
Ph. D.
Trade and technical education in the United States.
Hand and machine labor in the United States.
Labor legislation in the United States, by G. A. Weber.
Labor conditions in Hawaii.
Supply exhausted.



APPENDIXES.

49

*No. 55—Nov., 1904. Building and loan associations in the United States, by
G. W. W. Hanger, Ph. D.
The revival of handicrafts in America, by Max West,
Ph. D.
*No. 56—Jan., 1905. Influence of trade-unions on immigrants, by Carroll D.
Wright.
Labor conditions in Australia, by Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
*No. 57—Mar. 1905. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1904.
Street railway employment in the United States, by
Walter E. Weyl, Ph. D.
The State cooperative accident insurance fund of Mary­
land.
*No. 58—May, 1905. Labor conditions in the Philippines, by Victor S. Clark,
Ph. D.
Labor conditions in Java, by Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
The new Russian workingmen’s compensation act, by
I. M. Rubinow.
*No. 59—July, 1905. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries,
1890 to 1904.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1904.
Laws relating to child labor in European countries.
*No. 60—Sept., 1905. Government industrial arbitration, by Leonard W. Hatch,
A. M.
The eight-hour law and enforced labor contracts in the
Panama Canal Zone.
*No. 61—Nov., 1905. Labor conditions in Porto Rico, by Walter E. Weyl,
Ph. D.
A documentary history of the early organizations of
printers, by Ethelbert Stewart.
*No. 62—Jan., 1906. Municipal ownership in Great Britain, by Frederic C.
Howe, Ph. D.
Conciliation in the stove industry, by John P. Frey and
John R. Commons.
Laws relating to the employment of children in the
United States.
*No. 63—Mar., 1906. Course of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1905.
*No. 64—May, 1906. Conditions of living among the poor, by S. E. Forman.
Benefit features of British trade unions, by Walter E.
Weyl, Ph. D.
*No. 65—July, 1906. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries,
1890 to 1905.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1905.
*No. 66—Sept., 1906. Third report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii.
(Reprint of H. Doc. 580, 59th Cong., 1st sess.)
*No. 67—Nov., 1906. Conditions of entrance to the principal trades, by Walter
E. Weyl, Ph. D., and A. M. Sakolski, Ph. D.
Cost of industrial insurance in the District of Columbia,
by S. E. Forman.
*No. 68—Jan., 1907. Free public employment offices in the United States, by
J. E. Conner, Ph. D.
Laws of foreign countries relating to employees on rail­
roads, by Lindley D. Clark, A. M., LL. M.
*No. 69—Mar., 1907. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1906.
*No. 70—May, 1907. The Italian on the land: A study in immigration, by
Emily Fogg Meade.
A short history of labor legislation in Great Britain, by
A. Maurice Low.
British workmen’s compensation acts, by Launcelot
Packer, B. L.
*No. 71—July, 1907. Wages and hours of labor in manufacturing industries,
1890 to 1906.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1906.
*No. 72—Sept., 1907. Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian unskilled immigrant labor­
ers in the United States, by Frank J. Sheridan.
Economic condition of the Jews in Russia, by I. M.
Rubinow.
* S u p p ly exh a u sted .



THE BUEEAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

50

""No. 73—Nov., 1907. Laws relating to the employment o f women and children.
Laws relating to factory inspection and the health and
safety of employees.
*No. 74— Jan., 1908. The legal liability of employers for injuries to their em­
ployees in the United States, by Lindley D. Clark,
A. M., LL. M.
Summary o f foreign workmen’s compensation acts.
British workmen’s compensation act o f 1906.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act o f 1907.
British trade disputes act of 1906.
*No. 75— Mar., 1908. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1907.
Industrial hygiene, by George M. Kober, M. D.
♦No. 76—May, 1908. The Canadian industrial disputes investigation act o f
1907, by Victor S. Clark, Ph. D. .
What is done for the unemployed in European countries,
by W. D. P. Bliss.
*No. 77— July, 1908. Wages and hours o f labor in manufacturing industries,
1890 to 1907.
Retail prices of food, 1890 to 1907.
Compensation for injuries o f artisans and laborers in the
service of the United States.
Cost of living o f the working classes in the principal in­
dustrial towns o f Great Britain.
♦No. 78— Sept. 1908. Industrial accidents, by Frederick L. Hoffman.
Mexican labor in the United States, by Victor S. Clark,
Ph. D.
Cost of living o f the working classes in the principal in­
dustrial towns o f the German Empire.
British old-age pensions act o f 1908.
♦No. 79—Nov., 1908. The mortality from consumption in dusty trades, by
Frederick L. Hoffman.
Charity relief and wage earnings, by S. E. Forman.
♦No. 80— Jan., 1909. Woman and child wage earners in Great Britain, by
Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
Minimum wage act, 1908, New South Wales.
♦No. 81—Mar., 1909. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1908.
♦No. 82— May, 1909. Mortality from consumption in occupations exposing to
municipal and general organic dust, by Frederick L.
Hoffman.
♦No. 83— July, 1909. The women’s trade-union movement in Great Britain, by
Katherine Graves Busbey, A. B.
Cost o f living o f the working classes in the principal in­
dustrial towns o f France.
Earnings and hours o f labor in British textile industries.
No. 84— Sept., 1909. Accidents to railroad employees in New Jersey, 1888 to
1907, by Frederick S. Crum, Ph. D.
The Minnesota iron ranges, by G. O. Virtue, Ph. D.
♦No. 85— Nov., 1909. Review of labor legislation o f 1908 and 1909, by Lindley
D. Clark, A. M., LL. M.
Laws of various States relating to labor, enacted since
January 1, 1908.
♦No. 86— Jan., 1910. Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of 1907, by
Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
Phosphorus poisoning in the match industry in the United
States, by John B. Andrews, Ph. D.
List o f industrial poisons, by Dr. Th. Sommerfeld in col­
laboration with Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D., and Dr. Felix
Putzeys.
International Association for Labor Legislation and its
publications.
British trade boards act, 1909.
Earnings and hours of labor in British clothing industries..

Supply exhausted.




APPENDIXES.

§1

*No. 87—Mar., 1910. Wholesale prices, 1890 to March, 1910.
Wages and hours of labor o f union carpenters in the
United .States and in English-speaking foreign countries,
by Efchelbert Stewart.
Prices of wheat, bread, etc... in Milan, Italy, 1801 to 1908.
Cost o f living o f the working classes in the principal
industrial towns o f Belgium.
Earnings and hours of la b o r in British building and wood­
working industries.
*No. 88— May, 1910. Cost of living of families of moderate income in Germany
in. 1907-8.
Trend o f wages in Germany, 1898 to 1907.
Wages and hours of labor in German woodworking indus­
tries in 1906.
Wages and hours of labor in Austria, 1906 and 1907.
No. 89— July, 1910. Child-labor legislation in Europe, by C. W. A. Veditz,
Ph. D.
*No. 90— Sept., 1910. Fatal accidents in coal mining, by Frederick L. Hoffman.
Recent action relating to -employers’ liability and work­
men’s compensation, by Lindley D. Clark, A. M., LL. M.
Essential features of a compensation law ; Chicago con­
ference of November, 1910.
Summary of foreign workmen’s compensation acts.
Cost of employers’ liability and workmen’s compensation
insurance, by Miles M. Dawson.
*No. 91—Nov., 1910. Working hours o f wage-earning women in selected indus­
tries in Chicago, .by Marie L. -Obenauer.
Labor laws declared unconstitutional by Lindley D.
Clark, A. M„ LL. M.
Old-age and invalidity pension laws of Germany, France,
and Australia.
Review of labor legislation of 1910, by Lindley D. Clark,
A. M., LL. M.
Laws of various States relating to labor enacted since
January 1, 1910.
*No. 92—Jan., 1911. Industrial accidents and loss of earning pow er; German
experience in 1897 and 1907, by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D.
Workmen’s compensation and insurance: Laws and bills,
1911, by Lindley D. Clark, A. M., LL. M.
Resolutions of the sixth delegates’ meeting of the Inter­
national Association for Labor Legislation.
Report of Illinois commission on occupational diseases.
*No. 93—Mar., 1911. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1910.
Repoiff o f British Board of Trade on cost of living in the
principal industrial cities o f the United States.
Reports o f British Board of Trade on cost of living in
England and Wales, Germany, France, Belgium, and
the Lhiited States.1
Hours of labor of men, women, and children employed in
factories in Austria.
*No. 94— May, 1911. Fourth report of the Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii.
*No. 95—July, 1911. Industrial lead poisoning, with descriptions of lead proc­
esses in certain industries in Great Britain and .the
western states of Europe, by Sir Thomas Oliver, M. D.,
F. R. C. P.
The white-lead industry in the United States, with an
appendix on the lead-oxide industry, by Alice Hamilton,
M. A., M. D.
Deaths from industrial lead poisoning (actually reported)
in New York State in 1909 and 1910, by John B. An­
drews, Ph. D.
Laws enacted during 1911 requiring the report of occupa­
tional diseases.

Supply exhausted.




1 Reprint of this article now available.

52

THE BUREAU GE LABOR STATISTICS.

♦No. 96— Sept., 1911. Working hours, earnings, and duration of employment o f
women workers in selected industries of Maryland and
o f California, by Marie L. Obenauer.
Employment o f children in Maryland industries, by Marie
L. Obenauer and Mary Conyngton.
Attitude o f Massachusetts manufacturers toward the
health o f their employees, by Wm. C. Hanson, M. D.
The workmen’s insurance code o f July 19, 1911, o f Ger­
many, translated by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D.
♦No. 97— Nov., 1911. Review of labor legislation of 1911, by Lindley D. Clark,
A. M., LL. M.
Laws of various States relating to labor enacted since
January 1, 1911.
♦No. 98—Jan., 1912. Mediation and arbitration o f railway labor disputes in the
United States, by Charles P. Neill.
Canadian industrial disputes investigation act of. 1907.
Conciliation and arbitration of railway labor disputes in
Great Britain. (Conciliation and arbitration agreement
of 1907.)
Attitude of employing interests toward conciliation and
arbitration in Great Britain, by A. Maurice Low, M. A.
Conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain. (Concilia­
tion act of 1896.)
Attitude of labor toward conciliation and arbitration in
Great Britain, by Arthur E. Holder.
Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the cloak,
suit, and skirt industry in New York City, by Charles
H. Winslow.
Industrial courts in France, Germany, and Switzerland,
by Helen L. Sumner, Ph. D.
No. 99— Mar., 1912. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1911.
Wholesale prices in Canada, 1890 to 1911.
♦No. 100— May, 1912. List of industrial poisons and other substances injurious
to health found in industrial processes.
Act providing for a tax on white phosphorus matches and
for prohibiting their import or export.
BU L L E T IN S P U B L ISH E D IN SE R IE S SINCE JU LY 1, 1912.

The publication of annual and special reports and of bimonthly bulletins was
discontinued July 1, 1912, and since that time bulletins have been published at
irregular intervals, each number relating to one o f a series o f general sub­
jects. These bulletins are numbered consecutively, beginning with No. 101,
and up to No. 236 they also carry consecutive numbers under each series.
Beginning with No. 237 the serial numbering has been discontinued. The desig­
nations of the series and the titles o f the bulletins in the order o f their numbers
fo llo w :
SERIES.

Wholesale prices.
Retail prices and cost of living.
Wages and hours o f labor.
Employment and unemployment.
Women in industry.
Workmen’s insurance and compensation (including laws relating thereto).
Industrial accidents and hygiene.
Conciliation and arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).
Labor laws o f the United States (including decisions of courts relating to
labor).
Foreign labor laws.
Vocational education.
Labor as affected by the war.
Miscellaneous series.

Supply exhausted.




APPENDIXES.

53

BULLETINS.
No. 101. Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany, by Frederick L. Hoff­
man. 1912.
No. 102. British national insurance act, 1911. 1912.
No. 103. Sickness and accident insurance law of Switzerland. 1912.
*No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sani­
tary ware factories, by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D. 1912.
*No. 105. Retail prices,
1890 to 1911. Part I. 1912.
*No. 105. Retail prices,
1890 to 1911: General tables. Part II. 1912.
*No. 106. Retail prices,
1890 to June, 1912. Part I. 1912.
No. 106. Retail prices,
1890 to June, 1912: General tables. Part II. 1912.
No. 107. Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany, trans­
lated by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D. 1913.
No. 108. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1912. 1912.
*No. 109. Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices in the
United States, by Frank B. Sargent. 1913.
No. 110. Retail prices, 1890 to October, 1912. 1913.
*No. 111. Labor legislation of 1912. 1913.
*No. 112. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1912. 1913.
No. 113. Retail prices, 1890 to December, 1912. 1913.
*No. 114. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1912. 1913.
No. 115. Retail prices, 1890 to February, 1913. 1913.
No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration o f employment of wage-earning women
in selected industries in the District of Columbia, by Marie L.
Obenauer. 1913.
*No. 117. Prohibition of night work o f young persons. 1913.
*No. 118. Ten-hour maximum wr
orking-day for women and young persons. 1913.
No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin, by Marie
L. Obenauer. 1913.
- No. 120. Hygiene of the painters’ trade, by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D. 1913.
*No. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer, by N. C. Adams. 1913.
No. 122. Employment o f women in power laundries in Milwaukee, by Marie L.
Obenauer. 1913.
*No. 123. Employers’ welfare work, by Elizabeth Lewis Otey, Ph. D. 1913.
*No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New
York, by Charles H. Winslow. 1913.
No. 125. Retail prices, 1890 to April, 1913. 1913.
*No. 126. Workmen’s compensation laws of the United States and foreign coun­
tries. 1914.
*No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods of protection,
by William C. Hanson, M. D. 1913.
*No. 128. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries,
1890 to 1912. 1913.
*No. 129. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture in­
dustries, 1890 to 1912. 1913.
*No. 130. Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer, by J. Chester
Bowen. 1913.
*No. 131. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, 1907 to 1912, 1913.
No. 132. Retail prices, 1890 to June, 1913. 1913.
*No. 133. Report of the Industrial Council o f the British Board of Trade on
its inquiry into industrial agreements.
*No. 134. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe and hosiery and knit
goods industries, 1890 to 1912. 1913.
*No. 135. Wages and hours of labor in the'cigar and clothing industries,* 1911
and 1912. 1913.
No. 136. Retail prices, 1890 to August, 1913. 1913.
No. 137. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam
railroad cars, 1890 to 1912. 1913.
*No. 138. Retail prices, 1890 to October, 1913. 1914.
*No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. 1914.
*No. 140. Retail prices, 1890 to December, 1913. 1914.
*No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead, by Alice Hamil­
ton, M. A., M. D. 1914.

Supply exhausted.



$4

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

*No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain Euro­
pean countries, by George M. Price, M. D. 1914.
No. 143. Union scale of wages and hours o f labor, May 15, 1913. 1914.
No. 144. Industrial court o f the cloak, suit, and skirt industry o f New York
City, by Charles H. Winslow. 1914.
No. 145. Conciliation* arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist in­
dustry o f New York City, by Charles H. Winslow. 1914.
*No. 146. Wages and regularity o f employment and standardization of piece
rates in the dress and waist industry o f New York City, by N. I.
Stone, 1914.
*No. 147. Wages and regularity o f employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt
industry, with plans for apprenticeship for cutters and the educa­
tion o f workers in the industry. 1914.
*No. 148. Labor laws of the United States, with decisions o f courts relating
thereto. 1914.
No. 149. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1913. 1914.
♦No. 150. Wages and hours o f labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries,
1907 to 1913. 1914.
*No. 151. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry in the United
States, 1907 to 1912. 1914.
*No. 152. Decisions of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1913, by Lindley D.
Clark, A. M., LL. M. 1914.
No. 153. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, mill work, and furniture
industries, 1907 to 1913. 1914.
*No. 154. Wages and hours o f labor in the boot and shoe and hosiery and
underwear industries, 1907 to 1913. 1914.
♦No. 155. Compensation for accidents to employees o f the United States. 1914.
No. 156. Retail prices, 1907 to December, 1914. 1915.
♦No. 157. Industrial accident statistics, by Frederick L. Hoffman. 1915.
♦No. 158. Government aid to home owning and housing o f working people in
foreign countries. 1914.
*No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory school experiment.1915.
No. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor o f women in Indiana mer­
cantile establishments and garment factories, by Marie L. Obenauer and Frances W. Valentine. 1914.
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911
to 1913. 1914.
No. 162. Vocational education survey o f Richmond, Va. 1915.
No. 163. Wages and hours o f labor in the building and repairing o f steam
railroad cars, 1907 to 1913. 1914.
No. 164. Butter prices, from producer to consumer, by Newton H. Clark.
1914.
No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture o f storage batteries, by Alice
Hamilton, M. A., M. D. 1914.
♦No. 166. Labor legislation of 1914. 1915.
♦No. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries,
by Chas. H. Verrill. 1915.
No. 168. Wages and hours o f labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1913.
1915.
♦No. 169. Decisions of courts affecting labor, 1914. 1915.
No. 170. Foreign food prices as affected by the war. 1915.
♦No. 171. Union scale o f wages and hours o f labor, May 1, 1914. 1915.
No. 172. Unemployment in New York City, New York. 1915.
♦No.' 173. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign
countries. 1915.1
No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau o f
Labor Statistics up to May 1, 1915. 1915.
♦No. 175. Summary o f the report ©n condition o f woman and child wage earners
in the United States. 1915.
♦No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determinations in Oregon, by Marie L.
Obenauer and Bertha van der Nienberg. 1915.
No. 177. Wages and hours o f labor in the hosiery and underwear industry,
1907 to 1914. 1915.




* Supply exhausted.

1 See No. 284.

55

APPENDIXES.

No, 178. Wages and hours o f labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to
1914. 1915.
*No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry, by Alice Hamilton,
M. D. 1915.
*No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for
women. 1915.
No. 181. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1914. 1915.
*No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores
of Boston, Mass. 1916.
*No. 183. Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment in­
dustries 1915
*No. 184. Retail prices, 1907 to June, 1915. 1916.
*No. 185. Compensation legislation of 1914 and 1915. 1915.
*No. 186. Labor legislation o f 1915. 1916.
No. 187. Wages and hours o f labor in the men’s clothing industry, 1911 to
1914. 1916.
No. 188. Report o f British departmental committee on the danger in the use of
lead in the painting of buildings. 1916.
*No. 189. Decisions o f courts affecting labor, 1915. 1916.
*No. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries,
1907 to 1914. 1916.
No. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite-coal industry, by E. SydenStrieker. 1916.
No. 192. Proceedings of the American Association o f Public Employment Offices.
1916.
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts, by May Allinson,
Ph. D. 1916.
*No. 194. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 1, 1915. 1916.
No. 195. Unemployment in the United States. 1916.
*No. 196. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, held at Minneap­
olis, January, 1916. 1916.
No. 197. Retail prices, 1907 to December, 1915. 1916.
*No. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry, by Charles H.
Winslow. 1916.
No. 199. Vocational education survey o f Minneapolis, Minn. 1916.
*No. 200. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1915. 1916.
*No. 201. Report of the Committee on Statistics and Compensation Insurance
Costs of the International Association o f Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions. 1916.
No. 202. Proceedings o f the Conference of Employment Managers’ Association
of Boston, Mass., held May 10, 1916. 1916.
No. 203. Workmen’s compensation laws o f the United States and foreign coun­
tries, 1916. 1917.
No. 204. Street railway employment in the United States. 1917.
No. 205. Anthrax as an occupational disease, by John B. Andrews, Ph. D.
1917.1
No. 206. The British system of labor exchanges, by Bruno Lasker. 1916.
No. 207. Causes of death, by occupation, by Louis I. Dublin, Ph. D. 1917.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States, by Boris Emmet. 1916.
No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades, by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D., and
Charles H. Verrill. 1917.
No. 210. Proceedings o f the Third Annual Meeting o f the International Associa­
tion of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Columbus,
Ohio, April 25-28, 1916. 1917.
No. 211. Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States, by Hugh
S. Hanna. 1917.
No. 212. Proceedings o f the Conference on Social Insurance called by the In­
ternational Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions, Washington, D. C., December 5-9, 1916. 1917.
*No. 213. Labor legislation o f 1916. 1917.
No. 214. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1916. 1917.
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. 1917.
*No. 216. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building, by Lucian
W. Chaney and Hugh S. Hanna. 1917.2

Supply exhausted.



1 See No. 267.

2

See No. 256.

56

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

*No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity
o f industrial employment of women and children, by Mary Conyngton. 1918.
No. 218. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to
1915. 1917.
No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives,
by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D. 1917.
No. 220. Proceedings o f the Fourth Annual Meeting o f the American Associa­
tion of Public Employment Offices, Buffalo, N. Y., July 20 and
21, 1916. 1917.
No. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. 1917.
No. 222. Welfare work in British munition factories. 1917.
No. -223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the
war. 1917.
No. 224. Decisions o f courts affecting labor, 1916, by Lindley D. Clark and
Augustus P. Norton. 1917.
No. 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture
industries, 1915. 1918.
No. 226. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1916. 1917.
*No. 227. Proceedings o f the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia,
Pa., April 2 and 3, 1917. 1917.
No. 228. Retail prices, 1907 to December, 1916. 1917.
No. 229. Wage-payment legislation in the United States, by Robert Gildersleeve Paterson. 1917.
No. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. 1917.
No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic
dusts), by Frederick L. Hoffman. 1918.
No. 232. Wages and hours o f labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to
1916. 1918.
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada, by
Benjamin M. Squires. 1918.
*No. 234. The safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917,
by Lucian W. Chaney and Hugh S. Hanna. 1918.
No. 235. Employment system o f the Lake Carriers’ Association, by Paul F.
Brissenden. 1918.
No. 236. Effects o f the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. 1918.
No. 237. Industrial unrest in Great Britain. 1917.
No. 238. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufac­
turing, 1916. 1918.
I No. 239. Wages and hours of labor in cotton goods manufacturing and fin­
ishing, 1916. 1918.
No. 240. Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws o f the United States up
to December 31, 1917, by Carl Hookstadt. 1918.
No. 241. Public employment offices in the United States, by John G. Herndon,
jr. 1918.
No. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917, compiled and translated by
Alfred Maylander. 1918.
No. 243. Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and foreign
countries, 1917 and 1918, by Lindley D. Clark. 1918.
*No. 244. Labor legislation of 1917, by Lindley D. Clark. 1918.
No. 245. Union scale of wages and hours o f labor, May 15, 1917. 1919.
No. 246. Decisions of courts affecting labor, 1917, by Lindley D. Clark and
Augustus P. Norton. 1918.
No. 247. Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y.,
May 9-11, 1918. 1919.
No. 248. Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting o f the International Asso­
ciation o f Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Boston,
Mass., August 21-25, 1917. 1919.
No. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health o f
Munition Workers Committee. 1919.
No. 250. Welfare work for employes in industrial establishments in the United
States. 1919.
No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton manufacturing industry, by Arthur
Reed Perry, M. D. 1919.

* Supply exhausted.



APPENDIXES.

57

No. 252. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing in­
dustry, 1917. 1919.
No. 253. Women in the lead industries, by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D.
1919. «
No. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations, by Stephan
Bauer (translation by Mrs. Annie M. Hanney and Alfred Maylander). 1919.
No. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. 1919.
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building, by Lucian W.
Chaney. Revision of Bulletin 216. 1919.
No. 257. Labor legislation of 1918, by Bindley D. Clark. 1919.
No. 258. Decisions o f courts and opinions affecting labor, 1918, by Lindley D.
Clark and Martin C. Frincke, jr. 1919.
No. 259. Union scale o f wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1918. 1919.
No. 260. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1918.
1919.
No. 261. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufactur­
ing, 1918. 1919.
No. 262. Wages and hours of labor in cotton goods manufacturing and finish­
ing, 1918. 1919.
No. 263. Housing by employers in the United States, by Leifur Magnusson.
1920.
No. 264. Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Meeting of the International Asso­
ciation of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, held in
Madison, Wis., Sept. 27-29, 1918. 1919.
No. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
Preliminary report. 1920.
No. 266. Proceedings of the seventh annual convention of Association of Gov­
ernmental Labor Officials of the United States and Canada, held at
Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920. 1921.
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease, by John B. Andrews, Ph. D.
Revised edition. 1920.
No. 268. Historical survey o f international action affecting labor. 1920.
No. 2,69. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1919. 1920.
No. 270. Retail prices, 1913 to December, 1919. 1921.
No. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and United States, by
Charles Patrick Sweeney. 1920.
No. 272. Workmen’s compensation legislation o f the United States and Canada,
by Lindley D. Clark and Martin C. Frincke, jr. 1921.
*No. 273. Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the International Associa­
tion o f Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, held at To­
ronto, Canada, Sept. 23-26, 1919. 1920.
No. 274. Union scale o f wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1919. 1920.
No. 275. Comparison o f workmen’s compensation laws of the United States and
Canada up to Jan. 1, 1920, by Carl Hookstadt. 1920.
No. 276. Standardization of industrial accident statistics. Reports of the com­
mittee on statistics and compensation insurance cost o f the Inter­
national Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commis­
sions, 1915-1919. 1920.
No. 277. Labor legislation of 1919. 1921.
No. 278. Wages and hours o f labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1920.
192J.
No. 279. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining: An­
thracite, 1919 and 1920; Bituminous, 1920. 1921.
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye intermediates,
by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D. 1921.
No. 281. Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Meeting of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, held
at San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920. 1921.
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washing­
ton, D. C., by Victoria B. Turner. 1921.
No. 283. History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
1921.
No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign
countries. Revision of Bulletin 173. 1921.

Supply exhausted.



58

THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

No. 285. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States, by Lindley D. Clark.
1921.
No. 286. Union scale o f wages and honrs of labor, May 15, 1920. 1921.
No. 287. History o f tbe W ar Labor Board. 1921.
No. 288. Wages and hours of labor in cotton goods manufacturing. 1920.
1921.
No. 289. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufactur­
ing, 1920. 1921.
No. 290. Decisions o f courts and opinions affecting labor, .1919-1920, by Lind­
ley D. Clark. 1922,
No. 291. Carbon monoxide poisoning, by Alice Hamilton, M. A., M. D. 1921.
No.’ 292. Labor legislation o f 1920. 1921.
No. 293. The problem o f dust phthisis in the granite stone industry, by Fred­
erick L. Hoffman, LL. D. 1922.
No. 294. Wages and hours o f labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing
industry in 1921. 1922.
No. 295. Building operations in representative cities, 1920. 1922.
No. 296. Wholesale prices, 1890 to 1920. 1922.
No. 297. Wages and hours o f labor in the petroleum industry, 1920. 1922.
No. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry,
1910 to 1919.
No. 299. Personnel research agencies: A guide to organized research in em­
ployment management, industrial relations, training, and working
conditions, by J. David Thompson. 1921.
No. 300. Retail prices, 1913 to December, 1920. 1922.
No. 301. Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administra­
tion, by Carl Hookstadt. 1922.
No. 302. Union scale o f wages and hours of labor, May 15, 1921. 1922.
No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement o f railway labor disputes, by
Clyde Olin Fisher, A. M., Ph, D. 1922.
No. 304. Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Meeting o f the International Asso­
ciation of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. 1922.
No. 305. Wages and hours o f labor in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to
1920. 1922.
No. 306. Occupational hazards and diagnostic signs, by Louis I. Dublin and
Philip Leiboff. 1922.
No. 307. Proceedings of the eighth annual convention o f the Association of
Governmental Labor Officials of the United States and Canada.
1922.
No. 308. Labor legislation of 1921. (In press.)
No. 309. Decisions o f courts and opinions affecting labor, 1921, by Lindley D.
Clark and Daniel F. Callahan. (In press.)
No. 310. Industrial unemployment, by Ernest S. Bradford.
No. 311. Proceedings of the ninth annual meeting of the International As­
sociation o f Public Employment Services.
No. 312. National health insurance in Great Britain, by Henry J. Harris,
Ph. D. (In press.)
No, 313. Consumers’ cooperative societies in the United States in 1920, by
Florence E. Parker. (In press.)
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies in America and in foreign countries, by
Edson L. Whitney. (In press.)
No. 315. Retail prices, 1913 to 1921. (In press.)
No. 316. Hours and earnings in anthracite coal mining in January, 1922, and
in bituminous coal mining in winter o f 1921-1922. 1922.
No, 317. Wages and hours in lumber manufacturing, 1921. (In press.)
No. 318, Building operations in representative cities, 1921.. (In press.)
SP E C IA L P U BLICATIO N S.

Tentative quantity and cost budget necessary to maintain a family o f' five
in Washington, D, C„ at a level o f health and decency. 1919.
Wages and hours of labor in the coal mining industry in 1919. 1919.
Minimum quantity budget necessary to maintain a worker’s family o f five at
a level o f health and decency, 1920.




APPENDIXES.

59

Descriptions of occupations, prepared for the United States Employment Serv­
ice, 1918-19:
Boots and shoes, harness and saddlery, and tanning.
Cane-sugar refining and flour milling.
Coal and water gas, paint and varnish, paper, printing trades, and rubber
goods.
Electrical manufacturing, distribution, and maintenance.
Glass.
Hotels and restaurants.
Logging camps and sawmills.
Medicinal manufacturing.
Metal working, building and general construction, railroad transportation,
and shipbuilding.
Mines and mining.
Office.employees.
Slaughtering and meat packing.
Street railways.
Textiles and clothing.
Water transportation.

M O N T H L Y LABO R R E V IE W .
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume
Volume

1, July to December, 1915, Nos. 1 to 6.
2, January to June, 1916, Nos. 1 to 6.
8, July to December, 1916, Nos. 1 to 6.
4, January to June, 1917, Nos, 1 to 6.
5, July to December, 1917, Nos. 1 to 6.
6, January to June, 1918, Nos. 1 to 6.
7, July to December, 1918, Nos. 1 to 6.
8, January to June, 1919, Nos. 1 to 6.
9, July to December, 1919, Nos. 1 to 6.
10, January to June, 1920. Nos. 1 to 6.
11, July to December, 1920, Nos. 1 to 6.
12, January to June, 1921, Nos. 1 to 6.
13, July to December, 1921, Nos. 1 to 6.
14, January to July, 1922, Nos. 1 to 6.







INDEX
Accidents, industrial______________________________ 8 ,1 1 ,1 9 , 23, 27, 43, 44, 45, 52, 54, 57*58
Accounts division--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------26
Activities, classification of_________________________________________________________
30
Administration of labor laws, uniform standards in----------------------------------------------23
American Association of Public Employment Offices----------------------------------------- 17, 55, 56
( S e e a l s o International Association of Public Employment Services.)
American Engineering Standards Committee--------------------------------------------------------19
Analysis and index of reports of bureaus of labor statistics______________________ 5, 43
Annual reports-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 7, 8,11, 43
A pprenticeship________________________________________________
22
Arbitration, conciliation, and mediation of labor disputes__________________________ 5-6,
8, 11, 20, 44, 45, 52, 53, 54, 57, 58
Arbitration, temporary boards of__________________________________________________
5
Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the United States and Canada_____ 19, 57
Attorney General, opinions of----------- ------------------------------------------------------------------- 20, 54
( S e e a l s o Labor laws.)
Benefit funds____________________________________________________________________ 7, 18, 43
Bethlehem Steel Works, strike a t__________________________________________________
44
Bibliographies, labor___________________________________
32-33
Bibliography of Bureau of Labor Statistics___________________________ ^
------------------ 39-42
Boards of mediation and conciliation______________________________________________
5
Bonus system s_______________________1_____________________________________________
22
Books, appropriations for------ *
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------9
Building and loan associations__________________________________________________5, 22, 43
Building permits in cities_____________________ _________________________________ 22, 23, 58
Bulletins, contents of__________________________________________________ 6, 8,11, 32, 45-58
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Department of Agriculture-------------------------------12,14
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce------------------------------------------------------------8
Bureau of Labor, Department of the Interior, creation of-------------------------------------3
Bureau of Labor Statistics, changes in name and status of-------------------------------3, 7, 8-9
Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce----------------------------------------------------12,19
Bureau of the Census-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 12,14
Bureaus of labor statistics in United States and in foreign countries-------------------44
Canada, white pine lumber in -------------------------------------------------------------------------------5
Census, Commissioner of Labor in charge of--------------------------------------------------------6
Census, history and growth of-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 44
Chief Statistician, Office of-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------26
Cities, statistics of-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 6, 22
Civil-service retirement, Great Britain, etc________________________________________
44
Cloak, suit, and skirt industry, conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in----------44
Industrial court of------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------54
Coal-mine labor in Europe------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 7, 43
Codes, national safety---------------------19
Collective bargaining________________________________________________________________ 23, 55
44
Colorado, labor disturbances in, from 1880 to 1904-----------------------------------------------Combinations of capital and of labor, articles controlled by, and effect upon pro­
duction and prices---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4, 8
Commissioner of Labor Statistics, Office of_______________________________________
25
Common carriers, arbitration, etc. of labor disputes of----------------------------------------- 5—
6
Compensation for injuries to employees____ 4, 7, 8, 11,18, 43, 44, 45, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57
Compulsory insurance in Germany--------------------------------------------------------------------- 5,18, 43
Conciliation and arbitration. ( S e e Arbitration.)
Condition of employment in the iron and steel industry----------------------------------------44, 45
Condition of leading industries-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Condition of woman and child wage earners in United States____________________ 7, 45
Conditions of the working people--------------------------------------------------------------------------5
Convict labor_______________________________________________________________ 4, 7, 22, 43, 45
Cooperation________________________________________________________________________ 22, 58
With other services--------------------------------------------------------------------12, 14, 17, 19, 23—
24
Copyright law, international, effect of, in United States___________________________
5
Correspondence and files division--------------------------------------------------------------------------26
Cost of liv in g ____________________________________________________ 4, 5, 8, 11, 12-14, 43, 52
Cost of living section_______________________________
27
Cost of production--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4, 5, 8, 22, 43
Court decisions____________________________________________ 11, 20-21, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57
Currency, effect of state of------------------------------------------------------------------------------------4
4
Customs laws, effect of-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Decision of courts______________________________________ _ 11, 20-21, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57
Department of Commerce and Labor, creation of---------------------------------------------------3
Department of Labor, creation of--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3, 8
Disputes, industrial. ( S e e Arbitration; Strikes and lockouts.)
Distribution of publications----------------------------------------------------------------------------------33
Division of conciliation, Department of Labor------------------------------------------------------14
Dress and waist industry, study of----------------------------------------------------------------------45

4

5895°—22-----5




I

II

INDEX,

Page.
Economic aspects of the liquor problem____________________________________________ 5, 43
Editorial and research division_________________________________________________ 28, 43, 44
Education—
Of adult workers-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------54, 57
Industrial---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5, 7, 21, 43, 45
Trade and technical____________________________________________'________ 5, 21, 43, 44
Vocational---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11, 21, 44, 52, 54, 55
Effect of the international copyright law in United States________________________ 5, 44
Eight hours for laborers on Government work__________________________ ;__________
44
Employees’ compensation. ( S e e Compensation for injuries to employees.)
Employees’ Compensation Commission, United States_____________________________ 7, 8
Employment and unemployment_________________________________ 11, 16-17, 52, 55, 56, 58
Employment managers’ conferences_____________________________________________ 17, 55, 56
Employment Service, United States---------------------------------------------------------------------23
Factory inspection-------------------------------------------------------------------22, 54
Federal Reserve Board______________________________________________________________
12
Federal Trade Commission_________________________________________________________
12
Financial statem en t-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 37—
38
Food situation in Central Europe---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22, 56
Foreign labor law s----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8, 11, 21, 52
Functions_____________________________________________________________________ 1, 3, 4, 8,10
Gas and electric light plants---------------------------------------------------------------------------------5
Geological Survey---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------23
Gothenburg, system of liquor traffic----------------------------------------------------------------------- ' 5, 43
Hand and machine labor_________________________ _______________________________ 5, 22, 43
Hawaii, report of the Commissioner of Labor on_________________________________ 5, 6, 44
History and growth of the United States census---------------------------------------------------- 5, 44
H istory of functions and activities------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4—
9
Of legislation---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1-3
Hours of labor__________________________ 4, 7, 8 ,1 1 ,1 5 -1 6 , 43, 44, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58
Hours of service of laborers and mechanics in United States employ_______________ 7, 44
Housing of working people_______________________________________________ 5, 22, 43, 44, 54
Hygiene, industrial_______________________________ 8, 11, 19, 23, 27, 44, 52, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58
Increase in cost of food and other products_______________________________________
44
Increase in price of anthracite coal, 1912___________________________________________
45
Index numbers of prices, etc-------------------------------------------------------------11 ,1 2,13, 14, 54, 57
( S e e a l s o Prices.)
Indexes, labor------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 22, 32, 43, 54
Industrial accidents and hygiene___________________ 8, 11, 19, 23, 27, 44, 45, 52, 54, 57, 58
27
Industrial accidents, section of-------------------------------:-----------------------------------------------Industrial depressions--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4, 43
Industrial education------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5, 7, 21, 43, 45
( S e e a l s o Education.)
Information, special-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------24
Insurance, compulsory, in Germany--------------------------------------------------------------------5, 18, 43
Insurance, workmen’s ---------------------------------------------------------------- 7, 8, 11, 18, 43, 52, 53, 55
( S e e a l s o Compensation.)
International action affecting labor----------------------------------------------------------------------- 22, 57
International Association for Labor Legislation------------------------------------------------------ 6—
7
International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions______ 18, 19,
55, 56, 57, 58
International Association of Public Employment Services------------------------------------58
( S e e a l s o American Association of Public Employment Offices.)
International copyright law, effect of-------------------------------------------------------------------5
Interstate Commerce Commission, chairman of-------------------------------------------------------- 5—
6
Iron and steel industry, condition of employment in ---------------------------------------------44, 45
Italians in Chicago-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------43
Knights of Labor----------------------------------------------------------------3
Labor as affected by the war----------------------------------------------------------------------- 11, 22, 23, 52
Labor bibliographies____________________________________________________________ 22, 32-33
Labor conditions in belligerent countries of Europe----------------------------------------------23
Labor controversies of employees of common carriers--------------------------------------------- 5, 6
Labor disputes. ( S e e Arbitration; Strikes and lockouts.)
Labor disturbances in Colorado from 1880 to 1904-----------------------------------------------44
Labor exchanges------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------55
Labor indexes--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 22, 32, 43, 54
Labor laws and court decisions_________ 5, 7, 8,11, 20-21, 28, 43, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58
Labor legislation, uniform standards in administration of-------------------------------------23
Labor library------------------------------------------------------------------------9
Labor standards in the clothing industry--------------------------------------------------------------23
Labor statistics, uniform standards in -----------------------------------------------------------------23
Lake Carriers’ Association------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 17, 56
Law division --------------------------------------------------28
Lawrence, Mass., strike of textile workers in, in 1912--------------------------------------------44
Laws, labor. ( S e e Labor laws.)
Laws, mediation and arbitration, of United States— ’-----------------------------------------45
( S e e a l s o Arbitration; Labor laws.)
Laws relating to compensation for industrial accidents------------------------------------------44, 52
( S e e a l s o Compensation.)
Laws relating to convict labor-------------------------------------------------------------------------------45
Laws relating to the Bureau of Labor Statistics—
Index___________________________________________________________________________
34
Text_____________________________________________________________________________ 34—
36
Library, labor_______________________________________________________
9
Liquor problem, economic aspects of---------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 43
Liquor traffic, Gothenburg system o f----------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 43
Louisville, Ky., labor conference in 1 8 6 5 ™ ----------------------------------------------------------1



INDEX,

f

III

Page.

Marriage and divorce-------------'---------------------------------------------- --------------------------------5
Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics of Labor--------------------------------------------------------- 2 ,3
i M ediation and arbitration laws of the United States--------------------------------------------45
\
( S e e a l s o Arbitration.)
Mediation and conciliation, board of-------- ;-------------------------------------------------------------6
Mediation. ( S e e Arbitration.)
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co---------------------------------------------------------------------------17
Miners’ strike in bituminous coal field in Westmoreland County, Pa., in 1910-11__
44
M iscellaneous series of studies-------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----22, 52
Monthly Labor Review, contents of________________________________________ 11,22, 31, 59
Mutual relief association among Government employees___________________________ 22, 57
National Safety Council----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------19
National War Labor Board------------------------------------------------------------------------------------22
22
Negro labor_______________________________________________________________________
Night work_________________________________________________________________________ 22,53
Occupations, description of----------------------------------------------------------------------------59
Opinions of the Attorney General------- ------------------------------------------------------------------- 20, 54
( S e e a l s o Labor laws.)
Organization, outline of___________________________________________________________
29
Output, regulation and restriction of---- ----------------------------------------------------------------- 7, 22
Ownership, private and municipal, of water,gas, and electric-light plants__________
5
22
Padrone system ____________________________________________________________________
Pension funds for municipal employees and railroad pension systems in United
S ta tes___________________________________________________________________________
44
P eonage____________________________________________________________________________
22
Personnel research agencies----------------------------------------------------------------------------------58
Phosphate industry------------------------1----------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 43
Poor relie f-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------22
Press and other advance notices-------------------------------------------------------------11, 13,15, 16, 33
45
Prices of anthracite coal, increase of______________________________________________
Prices—
R etail_________________________________ 5, 8, 11, 12-14, 27, 43, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58
W holesale______________ :________________________ 8, 11-12, 32, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58
Profit sharing-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------22, 55
Profits of manufacturers and producers------------------------------------------------------------------ 4, 8
Publications—
Change in system of-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------8,11
Description o f __________________________________________________________________ 31-33
Distribution of------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------33
List o f -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 43-59
Public baths in United States______________________________________________________ 22, 44
Public u tilitie s------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------22
Quartermaster General, War Department,Office of________________________________
14
Railroad corporations, arbitration, etc. of labor disputes of---------------------------------- 5-6
Railroad labor-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 43
Railroad pension systems in United States________________________________________ 7, 44
Regulation and restriction of output--------------------------------------------------------------------- 7, 43
Reports—
Annual_________________________________________________________________ 5, 7, 8, 11, 43
Miscellaneous-------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------- 5, 7, 8,11, 44
Special_______________________________________________ __________________ 5, 7, 8, 11, 43
Retail prices and cost of living_____________ 5, 8, 11, 12-14, 27, 43, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58
Retail prices section---------------------------------------------------------------------------------27
Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board,United States,history of--------------------------------22, 57
Slums of Baltimore, Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia________________________ 5, 43
Special field investigations------------------------------------------------------------------------------------26
Special inform ation------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 14, 16, 24
Special publications-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------58
Special reports_____________________________________________________________ 5, 7, 8, 11, 43
State labor bureaus---------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------- 2, 23, 24
State Relations Service, Department of Agriculture-----------------------------------------------14
Statistical division------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------27
Statistics of industrial accidents, standardization of-----------------------------------------57
Statistics of cities-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 6, 22
Strike a t Bethlehem steel works---------------------------------------------------------------------------44
Strike of textile workers in Lawrence, Mass., in 1912--------------------------------------------44
Strikes and lockouts------------------------------------------------------ 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, 27, 43, 44, 52, 53, 56
Strikes and lockouts section----------------------------------------------------------------------------------27
Supplies division___________________________________________________________________
26
Tariff Commission__________________________________________________________________
12
Telegraph and cable companies, investigation of---------------------------------------------------44
Telephone companies, investigation of-------------------------------------------------------------------44
Trade and technical education----------------------------------------------------------------------- 5, 21, 43, 44
( S e e a l s o Education.)
Total cost and labor cost of production------------------------------------------------------------------ 5, 44
Trusts, articles controlled by-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4, 8
Unemployment. ( S e e Employment and unemployment.)
Vocational education------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11, 21, 44, 52, 54, 55
( S e e a l s o Education.)
Vocational guidance------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 44, 54, 55
Volume of employment section-------------------------------------------------------------------------------28
W ages_____________________________________ 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, 15-16, 43, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58
W ages and labor conditions section----------------------------------------------------------------------27
Wages in commercial countries--------------------------------------------------------------------------------5, 43
W ages in United States and in Europe-------------------------------------------------------------------44
War Department_______________________________________________________________
23



IV

INDEX,

Page.
War, labor as affected by the------------------------------------------------------------------ 1 __ 11, 22, 23, 52
War Labor Board, history of---------------------------------------------------------------------------------58
Water, gas, and electric-light plants-------------------------------------------------------------- :_____ 5, 43
Welfare work____________________________________________________ _______________ 22, 53, 56
44
Westmoreland county, Pa., miners’ strike in bituminous jcoal field in, in 1910-11__
White-pine lumber in United States and Canada------------------------------------------------ ^— 5, 44
W holesale prices_____________________________________ 8,11 -12, 32, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58
Wholesale prices section_________________________________________________
27
Woman and child wage earners in United States, condition of------------------------------- 7, 45
Women in industry_______________________ 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, 17— 23, 43, 45, 52, 53, 54, 55, 57
18,
Women’s Bureau----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------18
Work and wages otf men, women, and children, report on________________________5, 43, 54
Working women in large cities, report on-------------------------------:----------------------------- 4, 43
Workmen’s com pensation____________________ 4, 7, 8 ,1 1 ,1 8 , 43, 44, 45, 52, 58, 54, 55, 56, 57
Workmen’s insurance------------------------------------------------------------------ 7, 8 ,1 1 ,1 8 , 43, 52, 53, 55




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