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MESSAGE OF THE

President of the United States
TRANSMITTING

The Alternative Budget




FOR THE SERVICE OF THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30

1923

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1921




TABLE OF CONTENTS.
StateSubject.

ment

Page.

No.

j of the President of the United States............. ‘.................. ................................................................................................................................... v

and vi

Report of the Director of the Bureau of the Budget.. .....................................................................................................................................................

vii

Balance^ statement of (1) the condition of the Treasury at the end of the fiscal year 1921, (2) the estimated condition of the
Treasury at the end of the fiscal.year in progress (1922), and (3) the estimated condition of the Treasury at the end of the
ensuing fiscal year, 1923............................................................................................................................................................................................

1

a 3-4

Detail statement of expenditures by organization units, etc., fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years....................................

2

A5-18

Summary of ordinary receipts by sources of revenue, fiscal year 1923, compared “ ith prior years............................................. ...........
w

3

a 19-20

Postal Service:
Statement of expenditures and receipts, postal revenue, fiscsU year 1923, compared with prior years................... .......................

4

a 21

Detail statement of expenditures from postal revenues,- fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years............... ..............................

5

a 22-23

6

a 24-25

7

a 26-38

8

a 39

Consolidated current balance sheet, at close of business June- 30, 1921..................................... ..............................................................

9

a 40

Consojidated statement of operations, fiscal year 1921......... .......................................................................................................................

10

a 41

Current balance sheet, general fund, at close of business June 30, 1921.....................................................................4 . .......................
.

11

a 41
a 42

Supplemental statements:
Comparative statement of ordinary receipts and expenditures, showing, by sources of revenue and character of expenditure,
how the estimated financial condition will be reached at the close of the fiscal years 1923 and 1922, and the means by which
the actual condition was reached at the end of the fiscal year 1921, June 30, 1921......................................................................... ..
Detail *statement of ordinary receipts by organization units and sources of revenue, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior
years'.........................; ................................................................................... ....................................................................................... ................
Statement of annual, permanent, and other appropriations, including balances of appropriations of prior fiscal years, available
for expenditure during fiscal year 1922, as of November 1, 1921.................................................................................................: ..............
Financial statements:

General fund, statement of operations, fiscal year 1921................................................................................................................................

12

Current balance sheet, public debt (loan funds), at close of business June 30, 1921................................................................. . . . . .

13

a 43

Public debt (loan fund), statement of operations, fiscal year 1921....................................................................................... ....................

14

a 43

Statement of public debt of the United States outstanding at close of business June 30, 1921.. *.....................................................

15

a44-45

a 45

Cumulative sinking fund statements—
Actual, fiscal year 1921........................................................................... ...................................................................................................... •

16

Estimated, fiscal year 1922............................................................................................................................................................................

17

a 46

Estimated, fiscal year 1923......................................................... .................................................................... . ..........................................

18

a 47

19

a 48

Proposed public debt issues and redemptions, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years........................... . ...................................
Estimates of appropriations, fiscal year 1923, compared with appropriations fiscal year 1922:

legislative Establishment.................................................................................................................................................................... .............................. * ”

1

Executive Office and Independent Establishments................................................ ....................................................................................................

34

Department of State...............................................................................................................................................................................................................
Treasury Department................................................................................................................................... ..........................................................................

. 80
-

97

Wax Department, including Panama Canal j ................................. ............. ....................................................................................................................

171

Navy Department...........................................*............................................................................................ ...................*....................................................

299

Interior Department...................................................................... ........................................................................................ ...............................................

345

Post Office Department....................................................... .'....................................................................................: ............................................ ..............

548

Department of Agriculture......................................................................... ..........................................................................................................................

563

Department of Commerce............................................................. .......................................................................................... ............................................

671

Department of Labor............................................................................................................ .................................................................................................

739

Department of Justice............. ........................................................................................ .....................................................................................................

751

District of Columbia................................................................................................... ............................................................ ..........................................

-

779

Recapitulation................................................................................................................................................................................................................ ..........

' 881 ■

Index...........................................................................................................................: ....................................................r................- ......................................

893




in




MESSAGE TRANSMITTING THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET.
To the C o n g r e s s o f t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s :
I submit herewith the Alternative Budget for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923, as required by
section 205 of the Budget and accounting act, 1921*
The information regarding revenues and expenditures is the same as that contained in the Budget, with such,
changes in arrangement as will better present the facts in connection with the spending departments.
The estimates of appropriations in the Alternative Budget have been so assembled and correlated that all esti­
mates for any given department are included in one chapter.
W arken
T he W

h it e

H

o u se,

, .

December 5 1921




G. H a r d i n g .

v

MESSAGE TRANSMITTING THE BUDGET.
To the C o n g r e s s o f t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s :
I submit herewith the budget of the United States for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923. It will be noted
that the estimated ordinary expenditures for 1922 show a reduction of $1,513,537,682.20, compared with the actual
ordinary expenditures for 1921; and that the estimated ordinary expenditures for 1923 show a reduction of $447,704,239 under 1922, making the estimated ordinary expenditures under the budget for 1923, $1,961,241,921.20 less than
the actual ordinary expenditures for 1921. Including transactions in the principal of the public debt and investment
of trust funds, the total estimated expenditures for 1922 show a reduction under the total actual expenditures for
1921 of $1,570,118,323.30, and the total estimated expenditures for 1923 show a reduction of $462,167,639 under the
total estimated expenditures for 1922, making a reduction in total expenditures in the estimated budget for 1923,
as compared with the total actual expenditures foi\1921, of $2,032,285,962.30. It will also be noted that the total
estimated receipts for 1922 are in approximate balance with the total estimated expenditures, including reduction
in the principal of the public debt, and that the total estimated receipts for 1923 are within approximately $150,000,000
of a balance with the total estimated expenditures of that year. Such a discrepancy is unavoidable, when authoriza­
tions of expenditure are being enacted during the process of budget closing, but ways are provided for relatively easy
adjustment without added taxation.
For the purpose of providing a portion of the funds necessary to balance the budget for 1923, in which the esti­
mated expenditures exceed the estimated receipts by the sum of approximately $150,000,000, I recommend the
following legislation in connection with the naval appropriation bill for 1923, which would result in the eventual
automatic release of $100,000,000 now held in the naval supply account of the Navy Department:
“ Hereafter, until the naval supply account shall have been reduced to a maximum sum of $150,000,000, which
shall not thereafter be exceeded, one-half of all reimbursements otherwise due to the naval supply account, whether
from current issues or from sales, shall be covered into the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts, and only one-half
shall be credited to the naval supply account.”
With continued pressure for economy in all departments and the passage of such legislation, the balancing of
total receipts and total expenditures for the fiscal years 1922 and 1923 should be accomplished.
I also transmit herewith the report of the Director of the Bureau of the Budget on the budget of the United
States and the operations of the Bureau of the Budget.
The details of the budget are shown in the accompanying statements, and may be briefly summarized as follows:
Budget Summary.
{Exclusive of postal revenues and postal expenditures paid from postal revenues.]
1923, estimated.

1922, estimated.

Excess of expenditures
Excess of receipts.........

$3, 338,182, 750
3,505, 754, 727

$3, 943,453, 663
3,967, 922,366

167,571, 977

Total receipts.......................; .............................................................. .............
Total expenditures, including reduction in principal of public debt

24,468, 703

h it e

H

$5, 624,932,960.91
5, 538,040, 689. 30
86, 892, 271. 61

W arren
The W

1921, actual.

ou se,

December 5. 1921.
V
f




G. H a r d i n g .




REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET
TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
The P r e s id e n t .
S i r : I transmit herewith a report on the budget of the United
States for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923, in accordance with
section 209 of the budget and accounting act, and a general report on
the operations of the Bureau of the Budget.
B udget summary.
[Exclusive of postal revenues and postal expenditures paid from postal revenues.]
1923 (estimated).
Total receipts..................................................
Total expenditures (including reduction in
principal of public debt).. ... .. ... ... „
Excess of expenditures . . . . . .
Excess of receipts......................... . .................

^ 1922 (estimated), j

$3, 338,182,750.00

j

1921 (actual).

S3,943,453,663.00

$5,024,932,960.91

3,505,754,727.00

3,967,922,366; 00

5,538,040,689.30

11G7,571,977.00

24,468,703.00

86,892,271.61

1 See note 1.
N ote 1.— By continued pressure for economy and if the recommended legisla­

tion in connection with the naval appropriation bill for 1923, directing the
reduction of the naval supply account in the sum of $100,000,000, is enacted,
it is estimated that funds will be provided to balance the budget for 1923
as above.
Note 2.— In 1923 war savings certificates of the par value of $5S5,000,000 will
become due, It is assumed that these maturities will be met by refunding.
Since these notes were discounted at the time they were sold, by prepayment
of interest, the Government did not realize par upon the same to the extent of
$125,000,000. It would be consistent, therefore, with conservative business prin­
ciples if the amount of the discount should not be permanently funded but
should be retired as soon as possible out of surplus income.
N ote 3.— To reconcile these totals with those shown in the Treasury Report
it is necessary to add to the above figures for both receipts and expenditures
for the fiscal year 1^22 the sum of $25,000,000, and for the fiscal year 1923,
$7,000,000, on account of reduction of capital stock of the United States Grain
Corporation. This transaction occurred after the preparation of the statement
of estimated expenditures for the fiscal year 1922, made by the Secretary of the
Treasury August 4, 1921, amounting to the sum of $4,550,000,000.
Summary of budget expenditures for 1923, estimated expenditures for 1922,
and actual expenditures for 1921, exclusive of Postal Service expenditures
paid from postal revenues.
Estimated
budget
expenditures,
1923.
Legislative....................................................................
Executive office............................................................
State Department........ . .... * ................................ ...
Treasury Department.........*.............. .......................
W ar Department........ ................................ ...............
Panama Canal............................................ .
N a n Department........................................................
Interior Department...... .............................................
Indian Service........................................................
Pensions.................................................................

Estimated
expenditures,
1922.

$16,265,215
227,045
10,432,624
168,997,160
369,902,107
7,358,839
431.754.000
41,799,022
31,883,000
252.350.000

$15,984,446
227,045
11,406,032
169,871,163
389,091,406
7,219,849
478.850.000
35,005,829
33,135,000
258.400.000

Actual
expenditures,
1921.
$18,994,565.17
197,341.68
8,780,796.84
476,352,192.21
1,101.615,013.32
16,461,409.47
650,373,835.58
39,687,094.86
41,470,807.60
260,611,416.13
VII




VIII

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.
Sum m ary of budget expenditures for 1923, etc.— Continued.
Estimated
budget
expenditures,
1923.

Estimated
expenditures,
1922.

Actual
expenditures,
1921.

$3,276,454
48,172,270
48,637,100
i 105,000,000
20,131,800
4,796,916
16,825,568
73,911,081
438,122,400
337,679,235
4,756,344

$5,230,650.15
130,128,458.02
62,385,702.93
57,452,056.48
30,828,761.55
8,502,509.55
17,206,418.03
130,723,268.26

16,9S3,165
22,275,063
35,000,000

83,596,418.52
22,558,264.16

2,127,053,927

2,574,758,166

4,088,295,848.20

283,838,800

272,442,200

261,100,250.00

30,500,000
25.000.000

30,500,000
25.000.000

73.939.300.00
26.348.950.00

Post Office Department..........................................
Deficiencies in postal revenues..............................
Department of Agriculture..........................................
Expenditures for good roads.................................
Department of Commerce...........................................
Department of Labor...................................................
Department of Justice and Judicial.............................
Shipping Board and Fleet Corporation.......................
United States Veterans' Bureau................................
Railroad Administration and transportation act........
Federal Board for Vocational Education...................
Other independent offices, including War Finance and
Grain Corporations...................................................
District of Columbia..................*.................................
Increase of compensation................................ ............
Purchase of obligations of foreign Governments..........
Purchase of farm loan bonds........ ... *........................
Deduct unclassified repayments, <$c.............. .

$3,357,092
21,509,666
47,497,530
1125,7(50,000
19,939,970
6,301,835
18,415,681
50,495,735
455,232,702

Ordinary expenditures.......................................

5,529,244
17,034,583
25,070,877

Reduction in principal of the public debt:
Sinking fund........................................ . ...... .......
Purchase of Liberty bonds from foreign repay­
ments............................. *...........*......................
Redemption of bonds and notes from estate taxes..
Redemption of securities from Federal Reserve
bank franchise tax receipts................................

730*7ii*669.98
104,671,772.62

73,896,697.44
16,781,320.79
922,593.14

30.000.000

60.000.000

60,*724,500.00

369,338,800

387,942,200

422,113,000.00

Investments of„trust funds:
i
Government life insurance fund............................
Civil-service retirement fund and District of Co­
lumbia teachers’ retirement fund.......... ...... . |

20,162,000

22,022,000

20,325,152.88

8,200,000

8,200,000

8,161,956.87

|

34,362,000

30,222,000

28,487,109.75

Total net reduction in principal of public debt

Interest on the public debt...................................... .
Total expenditures.............................................

975,000,000

975,000,000

999,144,731.35

3,505,754,727

3,967,922,366

5,538,040,689.30

1The above table includes estimates of additional expenditures during 1923 and 1922 for good roads,
authorized by the act of Nov. 9,1921.
Excess of estimated expenditures over ordinary receipts, fiscal year 1923.......... ................$167,571,977.00
Excess of estimated expenditures over ordinary receipts, fiscal year 1922..........................
24,468,703.00
Excess of ordinary receipts over expenditures payable therefrom, fiscal year 1921.............
86,892,271- 61

Summary of estimated oi'dinary receipts by sources of revenue for the fiscal
years 1928 and 1922 and of actual receipts for the fiscal year 1921r exclusive
of postal revenues.
Estimated
receipts, 1923.

Estimated
receipts, 1922.

Actual receipts,
1921.

Intemal-revenue receipts:
Income and profits tax.......................................... $1,715,000,000
Miscellaneous.........................................................
896,000,000

12,110,000,000
1,104,500,000

$3,206,046,157.74
1,390,380.823.28

Source.

Total internal revenue.......................................

2,611,000,000

3,214,500,000

4,596,426,981.02

Customs receipts............................ ..............................

330,000,000

275,000,000

308,564,39lr00

Miscellaneous receipts:
Interest, premium, and discount—
Interest on loans to foreign Governments.......
Interest on miscellaneous obligations of foreign
Governments................................................
Dividend on capital stock of United States
Sugar Equalization Board...........................
Discount on bonds and notes purchased........
Interest on public deposits, etc.......................

25,000,000

25,000,000

12,815,675.60

29,625,379

i6,3i3,379

30,000,000.00
10,675,194:55
15,887,368:95

Total interest, premium, and discount........

54,625,379

41,313,379

87,705,546.01

18,327,306.91




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

IX

Summary of estimated ordinary receipts, etc.— Continued.
o
Source-

'

Estimated
receipts, 1923.

Estimated
receipts, 1922.

Actual receipts,
1921.

Sale of Government property:
Sale of war supplies............................ ................
Miscellaneous Government property............... ...

5100,500,000
6,372,970

$141,200,000
6,598,716

$183,692,848.69
11,114,617.65

Total sale of Government property...... .............

100,872,970

147,793,716

194,807,466.34

1,500,000
1.500.000
5,000,000
4.500.000
1,039,370

1.500.000
1.500.000
5.000.000
4.000.000
1,690,312

1,530,439.42
1,731,022.44
9,725,716.24
2,591,297.93
1,410,681.09

Public domain receipts:
Sale of public lands................................................ '
Land fees (registers' and receivers')......................
Receipts under oil leasing acts............................... :
Forest reserve fund..........................................
Other......................................................................
Total public domain receipts............. , . . . ........
Net earnings, Federal reserve banks (franchise tax)...
Profits on coinage, bullion deposits, etc............. .......
Excess profits of licensees of Food Administration....
Rent of public buildings and grounds.......................... |
Fees, fines, penalties, forfeitures, etc.:
Consular and passport fees..................................... 1
Tax on circulation of national banks.....................
Customs service.....................................................
Navy fines and forfeitures..................................... i
Naturalization fees.................................................
Immigration head tax...........................................
Judicial............ ...............................................
.................... ................................................
Other

14,139,370

13,690,312

16,989,157.12

30,000,000
12,498,000

60,000,000
18,498,000
1,001,100

60,724,742.27
12,610,210.05
7,078,988.55
1,151,162.83

10,464,492
4,496,840
1.450.000
2.200.000
700,000
3,000,000
7,125,000
5,971,690

6,849,556.25
4,799,615.73
1,173,285.63
1.506.628.13
912,601.16
5,767,893.69
4,557,006.41
3.742.413.13

i ,002,200
9,373,800
3,879,022
1.500.000
1,000,000
1,000,000
3,854,364
7.700.000
8,649,849

1

Total fees, fines, penalties, etc............................

36,957,035

35,408,022

29,309,000.13

Gifts and contributions:
For river and harbor improvements......................
For Forest Service cooperative work.....................
Other................................................ ...................

3,000,000
2,000,000
115,000

3,500,000
2,000,000
120,000

3,774,947.68
1,946,041.18
871,879.80

. Total contributions............................................

5,115,000

5,620,000

6,592,868.66

Sale of sealskins....... ...................................................

851,572
325,000
5,105,702

851,572
1,825,000
5,232,984

1,024,886.81
932,532.78
3,385,938.85

30,500,000

30,500,000

83,678,223.38

1,250,000
1,000,000

100,000,000.00
954,835.00
1,000,000.00

Repayments of investments:
Principal of loans made to foreign Governments...
Liquidation of capital stock, United States Grain
Corporation.. -.............. . . . . . . . ................. .
Liquidation of capital stock, Federal land banks..
Return of advances made to reclamation fund___
Principal of loans made by United States Housing
Corporation.........................................................
Total repayments of investments................

1,250,000
1,000,000
100,000

100,000

97,032.33

32,850,000

32,850,000

185,730,090.71

Assessments and reimbursements:
Salaries and expenses, national bank examiners...
Expenses of national currency..............................
Reimbursement, cost of maintaining American
Armv on the Rhine............................................
Work done for individuals, corporations, et al___
Other.................................................... ................

1.900.000
78S, 341

1.900.000
976,446

1,583,037.11
886,777.01

2.400.000
718,856
1,236,470

2.400.000
758,751
1,291,470

11,154,467.22
854,737.95
5,050,923.07

Total assessments and reimbursements.............

7,043,667

7,326,667

19,529,942.36

District of Columbia:
Revenues of the District of Columbia...................
United States receipts, District of Columbia
sources............................. ........................ .

15,963,415

15,386,981

14,439,985.93

490,000

448,000

561,106.29

Total District of Columbia....... .......................

16,453,415

15,834,981

15,001,092.22

Panama Canal receipts................................................

13,315,000

11,760,000

12,280,741.79

Trust fund receipts:
Government life insurance fund—
Premiums on converted insurance..................
In te r e s t--..-.......--....................................*

31,170,000
2,000,000

26,717,000
1,000,000

22,051,778.15
1,058,652.62

33,170,000

27,717,000

23,110,430.77

Total Government life insurance fund.........




X

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.
Summary of estimated ordinary receipts, ctc.— Continued.
Estimated
receipts, 1923.

Estimated
receipts, 1922.

Actual receipts,
1921.

Civil-service retirement and disability fund...............
Soldiers' Home permanent fund.................................
Army, Navy, and Marine Corps deposit funds...........

8835,500
840,000
1,750,000

5582.990
840,000
1,600,000

$70,502.94
821,009.01
359,924.47

Indian moneys:
Proceeds of labor...........................................
Proceeds of sale of Indian lands and lumber.........
Other......................................................: ............

19,000,000
2,000,000

20,000,000
2,000,000

20,443,157.66
2,016,001.80
85,792.49

Total Indian moneys.........................................

21,000,000

22,000,000

22,544,951.95

Miscellaneous trust funds.............................................
District of Columbia trust funds..................... ............

611,040
1,821,900

581,040
1,621,900

683,895.23
1,355,331.10

Source.

Total trust fund receipts....................................

60,028,440

54,942,930

48,946, (H5.47

Total miscellaneous receipts...............................

397,182,750

453,953,663

703,800,412.95

Add excess of cash receipts, as per Treasury statement,
over receipts by warrants, as above......................
Total ordinary receipts, exclusive of postal reve­
nues................................................................

16,141,175.94
3,338,182,750

3,943,453,663

5,624,932,960.91

The total estimates of appropriations for the fiscal year 1923
were prepared under Executive pressure, continually exerted for
retrenchment wherever consistent with efficiency, and as originally
presented to the,Bureau of the Budget amounted to $3,923,919,970.48,
which includes $586,532,950 payable from postal receipts. The final
revision by the Bureau of the Budget, after impartial examination
and consideration of the items, led to a further reduction of $1&2,806,310.95, which was accepted by the departments, leaving the esti­
mates as finally determined upon and contained in the budget at
$3,801,113,659.53. These figures include sinking fund, other reduc­
tions of'the public debt, interest on the debt, and Postal Service pay­
able from postal revenue.
The estimates of appropriations as contained in the budget for
the fiscal year 1923 are exhibited in detail, by departments, as
follows:
Comparative statement of estimates of appropriations for 1928 and appropria­
tions for 1922.
Estimates of
appropriations,
1923.
Legislative........................ .
Executive office................
State Department............ .
Treasury Department........
War Department...............
Panama Canal.............
Navy Department. - .........
Interior Department..........
Indian Service.............
Pensions......................
Post Office Department_
_
Department of Agriculture.
Department of Commerce..

S16,493,845.95
228,880.00
10,580,901.16
161,665,897.82
360,500,923.47
4,241,174.00
425,952,367.13
33.330.865.00
32.558.077.00
252,350,000.00
3,412,000.00
46.860.668.00
20,675,326.25

Appropriations,
1922.
$17,196; 203.39
228,880.00
10,637,769.09
164,692,941.29
388,536,062.41
9,000,000.00
425,818,079.37
46.400.205.00
33,517,554.67
265,500,000.00
3,241,705.55
48.349.559.00
17.265.060.00

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XI

Comparative statement of estimates of appropriations— Continued.
Estimates of
appropriations,
1923.

Department of Justice................................. . ......................... . . ....
Shipping Board and Fleet Corporation.............................................
United States Veterans' Bureau and c*6rresponding appropriations
in 1921.............................................................................................
Other independent offices................ ..................... . ...... ................
District of Columbia...................................................... ................
Increase of compensation................. ................ ..................... .

Appropriations,
1922.

56.564.632.00
18,505,556. 00
50.501.500.00
385,921,702.00
22.997.001.00 ‘
27,195,476.75

$4,904,835.75
15,779,238.50
73.959.000.00
230,573,620.00
21,675,335.00
22,559,712.99
35.000.000.00

Ordinary....... ....................................... ................ ...... .......

1,880,536,793.53

1,834,’865,762.01

Reduction in principal of the public debt:
Sinking fund....................... .......*............. ...............................
Purchase of Liberty bonds from foreign repayments..................
Redemption of bonds and notes from estato taxes.....................
Redemption of securities from Federal reserve bank franchise
tax receipts....... .
........ ............................................ .

283,838,800.00
30.500.000.00
25.000.000.00

272,442,200.00
30.500.000.00
25.000.000.00

30.000.000.00

60.000.000.00

Principal of the public debt.................................... ..........

369,338,800.00

387,942,200.00

Interest on the public debt........... ...... ............................. .............

975,000,000.00

975,000,000.00

Total, exclusive of Postal Service payable from postal revenue.
Postal Service, payable from postal revenue.....................................

3,224,875,593.53
576,238,066.00

3,197,807,962.01
574,092,552.00

Total, including Postal Service...............................................

3,801,113,659.53

3,771,900,514.01

USE O F T H E BUREAU OF T H E BUDGET BY TH E PRESIDENT AS A N AGENCY
FOR IMPOSING AN EXECUTIVE PLAN IN ROUTINE BUSINESS OF GOV­
ER N M E N T.

Concurrently with the establishment of the Bureau of the Budget
the President announced his determination, to assume his full re­
sponsibility as the head of the governmental business organization,
and directed the Director of the Bureau, in accordance with the pro­
visions of the budget law, to immediately suggest to him such im­
provements in existing governmental business methods as could be
legally inaugurated by him through Executive orders. Upon the
submission to him of information revealing certain defects the Presi­
dent decided to use the Bureau of the Budget as his first agency
for imposing the pressure of an Executive plan for the unified con­
duct of governmental routine business and for retrenchment in
governmental expenditure where consistent with efficiency. Coin­
cident with this also came his consideration of the principles, cus­
toms, and precedents which should accompany the creation by
Executive order of appropriate machinery designed to create a situa­
tion in the affairs of the Government business corporation such
as exists in every well-managed ^private corporation where the
head can transmit with the minimum of obstruction and delay a
unified plan of routine business to be carried out by his subordinates.
The President then followed the only possible course by which,
as in a private corporation, all those in authoritative relation to
expenditures of Government could be impressed with an Executive
plan, and on June 29, 1921, called them en masse for instruction.







Xn

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET*

At this meeting, attended by the Cabinet and some 500 department
heads, heads of establishments, and bureau chiefs, he outlined his
position, and under his instructions and in his presence the Director
of the Budget explained the methods to be followed in carrying out
his purpose. As a result of this meeting at the end of 30 days a
reduction in expenditures for the present fiscal year (1922) was
promised the Executive by the business organization in the amount
of $112,512,628.32. A part of this sum was expected to be realized
by actual economies and part by the deferring of expenditures to
subsequent years. In this connection it should be stated that there
will never be expended during a fiscal year all of the moneys appro­
priated for that year. A limited percentage is expended during
subsequent years and a much smaller percentage is never expended,
but is subsequently covered into the Treasury or reappropriated
for similar or new purposes. As a result of the Executive pressure
upon the departments this percentage has been largely increased,
as will be apparent from the amounts here stated.
On August 4, 1921, the Secretary of the Treasury stated to the
Committee on Ways and Means that “ according to the latest ad­
vices received from the spending departments and after taking into
account all estimated reductions in expenditure reported to date the
Treasury estimates that the total expenditure for the fiscal year 1922
for which provision should be made out of the current revenues of
the Government will be about $4,550,000,000. This in itself would
mean a substantial reduction in current revenues and expenditures
below' the fiscal year 1921.”
At the time that this statement was made by the Secretary of the
Treasury the results of the imposition of Executive pressure upon
the spending departments, inaugurated at the meeting called by the
President of the body of the business organization of Government,
had not been fully developed. On August 10, 1921, after a confer­
ence, announcement was made through the Secretary of the Treasury
that the administration, in cooperation with the Committee on Ways
and Means, had determined to reduce the ordinary expenditures of
the Government for the fiscal year 1922 by at least $350,000,000 below
the revised estimates presented by the Treasury on August 4, to wit,
about $235,000,000 in addition to the $112,512,628.32 above men­
tioned. It was also announced that the Treasury would provide for
two items of estimated public debt expenditure for the fiscal year
1922 out of other public debt receipts during the year to the extent of
$170,000,000. Thus the expected aggregate reduction in expenditure
for the fiscal year on the above basis was announced as $520,000,000,
leaving the estimated total expenditure for the fiscal year 1922 as of
date August 10, 1921, about $4,034,000,000. It will be noted from
the foregoing statements that the present estimated expenditures for

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XIII

1922, including sinking fund, are $3,967,922,366, thus indicating that
the $520,000,000 reduction in ordinary expenditures determined upon
August 10 will be exceeded by the sum of $62,000,000, making the
total reduction $582,000,000. As compared with the actual total ex­
penditures for 1921 of $5,538,040,689.30, the total expenditures for
the Government for the present fiscal year 1922 of $3,967,922,366 in­
volve a net reduction from all causes of $1,570,118,323.30. Further­
more, continued Executive pressure, affecting also the estimates for
1923, enables the budget for that fiscal year to be based upon an esti­
mated total expenditure of $3,505,754,727, which is a still further re­
duction of $462,167,639 under the estimated expenditures for 1922.
The attitude and determination of the President of the United
States in relation to the use of the Budget Bureau as an agency for
the imposition of his policy for the reduction of governmental ex­
penditures not only as regards the expenditures for the fiscal year
1923 but for the present fiscal year 1922 is most important. I f
he had not taken this position and action, the expenditures for 1922
and the budget herewith presented for 1923 would have been far
different as regards the majority of their items. For the first time
in the history of our country a national budget has been prepared
based on estimates from the spending departments acting under a
strong and continued Executive pressure for economy and efficiency*
T H E BUDGET PRESENTED FOR TH E FISCAL TEAR 1 9 2 3 IS BASED U PON TH E
A M O U N T OF CASH W H IC H M UST ACTUALLY BE W ITH D RAW N FROM THE
TREASURY DURING T H A T FISCAL YEAR.

In presenting the budget of the United States for the fiscal year
1923, covering the sum of $3,505,754,727, in compliance with the
requirements of the budget act, the Director of the Budget has
prepared it upon the basis of the amount of cash which must actually
,be withdrawn from the Treasury during the fiscal year 1923.
The method of appropriation of money heretofore followed has
resulted in a condition of things under which it is almost impossible
for either the Executive, Congress, or the Secretary of the Treasury
to have before them a true picture of the fiscal condition of the
Government at any particular time. Although Congress has by
stringent penal law prohibited the creation of deficiencies and clearly
indicated that its annual appropriations were intended to limit the
amount to be expended for such period, yet millions of dollars have
been annually spent by the departments above the estimates sub­
mitted at the beginning of the fiscal year, and in recent years, due
to the great sums appropriated in connection with the war, hun­
dreds of millions of dollars have been so expended, by the depart­
ments, a course made possible by deficiency and supplemental appro­
priations, the existence of revolving funds, and unexpended balances.







XIV

REPOET OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

The distinction between the appropriations for a given year and
the actual expenditures for that year should be clearly borne in
mind. Appropriations for any given year do not represent the
money actually spent during that year, but are intended to cover the
obligations which ure incurred in that period, part of which are paid
currently and a part of which mature and are discharged in sub­
sequent years. Consequently the expenditures of a year must be
composed of the amounts maturing in it, some of which were appro­
priated in previous years and some of which are covered by the
current appropriations. In addition to this should be added the use
of permanent and indefinite appropriations which require no annual
action by Congress and funds from other sources.
While the Director of the Budget presents with the estimates the
information necessary to enable Congress to make its appropria­
tions in the former way, it is urged that if it will pass the budget
providing simply for the amount actually to be expended during the
fiscal year, with Executive pressure now being exerted to keep the
departments within the limits of this expenditure, a continuance of
the method will automatically largely eliminate the indefinite cash
demands currently made in the past by departments on account of
unexpended balances in addition to their current appropriations.
A system by which requests for appropriations are based upon the
actual need of money for disbursement during the fiscal year for
which the appropriation is made will thus tend to prevent hereafter
the wide, indefinite, and fluctuating margin between the expenditures
for any given year and the appropriations requested of Congress to
cover the same period.
Again, if Congress will follow this method, it will at the end of
each fiscal year of necessity direct its attention to the relative im­
portance of existing work and projects, considering the then state
of the Government and public business, thus promoting a moi*e
intelligent consideration of appropriations. Under the old system,
where after the authorization of a project a continuous appropria­
tion was made in an amount estimated as necessary to complete it.
it passed, for all practical purposes, outside the ken of Congress.
It is inconceivable that as the fiscal condition of the Government
changes'and as business conditions in the country change, to say
nothing of the particular conditions which surround any given gov­
ernmental project, this annual reexamination of the project or ac­
tivity in connection with the advisability of passing the enabling
appropriation will not be beneficial in tending toward the elimina­
tion of useless expenditure and waste.
The fact that contracts are let by the Government which, of neces*
sity, can not be completed within the fiscal year during which they
are let does not imply the necessity of immediately making available




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XV

to the contracting department the entire sum of money eventually
to be expended on the contract. While in many instances the amount
appropriated has been only that which- could properly be expended
during the year for which the appropriation was made, there have
been other instances in which the total amount called for by the
project was appropriated at one time, without regard to the need for
expenditure during the current year. No properly organized private
corporation would handle its business in this way. The head of a
private organization in charge of policy would have in mind, as a
matter of course, his sources of revenue at the time the contract is
Jet, and also the demands upon them which will result from the carry­
ing out of the contract. But he would not complicate his entire busi­
ness system by announcing to the subordinate in charge of a certain
contract that he could draw indefinitely, and without notice to the
head of the corporation, whatever money was necessary in carrying
out its terms. On the contrary, in order to insure the best attention
on the part of the subordinate to the contract, and to insure that he
himself would be properly informed as to the work being done under
it, he would require the one in charge of the contract to report to him
periodically his need of cash to complete payments under it. It is a
fallacious argument, therefore, to maintain that a continuing appro­
priation must accompany any contract extending beyond a single
fiscal year.
The whole habit of making continuous appropriations to which the
Government has been committed in the past is only an encourage­
ment to a lack of scrutiny of public work by the head of the depart­
ment under which it is carried on, and an encouragement to shift­
lessness and carelessness on the part of the subordinates more directly
concerned in it. The more rigid the system under which continuous
attention to the conduct of the business of Government is made man­
datory on the part of Congress and the business administration the
more efficient will be the conduct of Government.
Finally, this system of preparing the budget will confine the at­
tention of the Executive, of Congress, and of the public to the one
great important question, to wit, the relation of the money actually
to be spent by the Government to the money actually to be received
by the Government in any given year, all its outstanding obligations
and indefinite commitments, projects, and enterprises considered.
This will enable Congress, with more intelligence, to determine at any
time both the necessity for retrenchment and the ability of the Gov­
ernment to engage in additional projects to be initiated by Congress
outside of the budgetary provisions.
There exists such a mass of undetermined liabilities arising out of
unexpended appropriations of former years, and so much resulting
uncertainty as to the true amount of expected receipts and expendi­




XVI

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

tures? that it would seem that Congress should recognize the situa­
tion and immediately repeal all outstanding continuous appropria­
tions and “ revolving funds/’ save in those cases, if any, where the
particular character of governmental activity may require a limited
fund as working capital, giving, of course, proper recognition to
legally enforceable obligations standing against them. Thus again
the relative importance of projects may have the consideration by
Congress and the Executive alone made possible by this course. By
such an act there will be uncovered for reconsideration a number of
practically forgotten projects which are eating up money that would
not be devoted to such a purpose if the present situation had been
in the mind of the appropriating power when it first acted.
The naval supply account fund is a conspicuous example and one
as to which (because of intensive study given it) an immediate spe­
cific change can be recommended.
This fund is the outgrowth of several acts of Congress, the latest
being the act of March 1, 1921 (41 Stat., 1169). It constitutes a
“ revolving fund ” or permanent working capital for procuring and
issuing standard supplies, and under the legislative provision last
mentioned it stood at a total on June 30,1921, of $255,476,277.54.
The existence of such fund, in some reasonable amount, is un­
doubtedly advantageous to the Navy in many ways in permitting
supplies to be purchased through one central authority at times of
low prices, in eliminating competition through bids by different pur­
chasing agents against each other, in avoiding middlemen’s profits,
and in preventing waste through deterioration. It also permits a
reserve to be created and maintained, particularly of imported ma­
terials necessary in the event of war. The fund is kept intact in
actual operation by charging against the proper appropriation the
cost of supplies as and when issued to ships, etc., and at the same time
crediting the fund with the same amount.
The report of Col. John Stephen Sewell to the Bureau of the
Budget, prepared after careful study, indicates that if the present
inventory of supplies were properly balanced $150,000,000 would be
a suitable amount for this fund. The present inventory, however, is
not so balanced that each item bears the same proportion to the total
of all items in stock as its annual consumption bears to the total con­
sumption of all items. To the extent that the account is used for
procurement abroad of standard commercial supplies, he recommends
$90,000,000 as a reasonable amount, and $60,000,000 for the balancing
of the inventory and procurement of standard supplies originating in
this country, a total of $150,000,000. I f this limit were to be placed
upon the fund, then in three to five years $100,000,000 would be auto­
matically released and made available for other uses. This reduction
would require action by Congress.




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OP BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XVII

Based upon Col. Sewell’s recommendation, and with the concur­
rence of the Secretary of the Navy, I therefore recommend legislation
in connection with the naval appropriation bill for 1923 embracing
substantially the following provision :
Hereafter, until the naval supply account shall have been reduced to a maxi­
mum sum of $150,000,000, which shall not thereafter be exceeded, one-half of all
reimbursements otherwise due to the naval supply account, whether from cur­
rent issues or from sales, shall be covered into the Treasury as miscellaneous
receipts, and only one-half shall be credited to the naval supply account.
PRINCIPLES INVOLVED IN METHOD OF PREPARATION OF TH E BUDGET FOR
10 2 3 AND TH E SELECTION OF NECESSARY PERSONNEL IN TH E BUREAU
OF TH E BUDGET.

In preparing the budget the director has availed himself of advice
and experience from every available source, both inside and outside
the Government agencies. He has received generous and valuable
assistance from both the Bureau of Efficiency and the Institute for
Government Research. The aim has been to submit the facts re­
quired in the different portions of the act in the most simple, con­
densed, and easily understood form consistent with full and accurate
information.
The statements include all ‘ordinary expenses of the governmental
operations proper and so much of the public-debt expenditures as is
required to be made in the year out of the current revenue; that is to
say, the sinking fund and debt expenditures out of receipts especially
earmarked for the purpose. The statements do not include publicdebt obligations intended to provide for maturing obligations by new
loans or refunding operations. This information appears later in
the balanced statements of Treasury operations furnished under
other subsections or paragraphs of section 201. The attempt is made
in this table only to reach a comparison in summary form between
the ordinary receipts and the grand total of the expenditures which
have to be met out of ordinary receipts.
This summary statement is followed by detailed statements of
expenditures arranged, first, in the order and amounts of expendi­
tures by departments, and, second, with relation to the objects of
expenditure; and these in turn are followed by a detailed analysis
of the revenues from the various sources of Government income.
The budget concludes with a statement in detail of appropriations
requested by the several departments for the fiscal year 1923 as
revised by the bureau. This takes the place of the former Book of
Estimates.
In the budget the estimates follow the same order and arrangement
as the appropriation acts for the fiscal year 1922, in order to enable
a more ready and accurate comparison by Congress between the
77891— 21------ ii




XVIII

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

appropriations for the two years. This form and order is changed
in the alternative budget so that all appropriations for any given
department may appear together in one appropriation bill or chapter
of the bill. It is understood that the committees of Congress have
been rearranged for the purpose of considering the alternative budget
in this form. This rearrangement, together with a continual revi­
sion of the wording of the estimates eliminating useless duplication,
is in itself a decided step in advance and will gradually reduce into a
more workable document the departmental estimates.
Between the period of September 15, at which date he receives the
details of the desired appropriations for 1923, and December 1, the
Director of the Budget was expected, under the provisions and
spirit of the budget act, to so pass upon the appropriations re­
quested as to 'enable him to express an intelligent opinion in con­
nection therewith to the President of the United States. The mere
statement of the fact that there are submitted to him the items of
desired expenditures on the part of 41 departments and independent
establishments of Government, each with its perplexing problems
and many separate items of requests requiring investigation and dis­
cussion, will indicate the difficulties of the situation.
Under the provisions of the law the budget officers are appointed
by the heads of the respective departments and independent estab­
lishments of the Government. The assumption underlying the law
probably is that through officers acquainted by contact with the
business of their respective organizations, and acting under the
supervision of their chiefs, the Director of the Budget could secure
that information upon which it would become possible for him to
base intelligent recommendations to the President in connection with
the adjustment, increase, or curtailment of departmental demands.
At the same time the law recognizes the desirability and necessity
for impartiality in connection with the consideration of the re­
quests of each department. In fact, the whole law is based upon
such an assumption, and the recognition of the necessity for this
by Congress has resulted in the creation of the Budget Bureau.
As he found it necessary, it was, therefore, in accordance with the
spirit of the law that the Director of the Budget, in considering
the requests made by the departments and establishments for appro­
priations, and the reports of the respective budget officers of the
departments, interjected wherever possible a consideration by an
impartial mind. The recommendations made in the present budget,
herewith submitted, are not, therefore, those of the Director of the
Budget, following simply the interpretation of departmental needs
made by the department head and a budget officer responsible to
him, but they are also made after approval of impartial investiga­




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XIX

tors representing the Director of the Budget and acting under his
authority.
Even if the Director of the Budget had not done this, still the ma­
chinery of the budget law, used as an agency for Executive pressure,
would have produced a great improvement over the old system in
connection with appropriations, for it must be remembered that, for
the first time in our history, departmental heads and budget officers
have been making estimates of their necessities after a strong impo­
sition of an Executive policy of retrenchment preceding the prepara­
tion of the estimates. The importance of this can not be overstated.
The reductions in expenditures outlined in the budget herewith pre­
sented are largely due to the proper interpretation of the President’s
policy by the heads of departments and the budget officers.
Under the budget law as it now stands the work of intelligent busi­
ness revision of appropriations involving the expenditure of over
$3,000,000,000 must be done by the Director of the Budget, the as­
sistant director, four advisers of the director’s selection, to be com­
pensated at the rate of $6,000 per year, the balance of the organization
being secured under civil-service rules at salaries not exceeding $5,000
per year. The Director of the Budget has no hesitation in stating that
this could not have been done this year, and in the future it can not be
so accomplished without recourse to personnel already in the Govern­
ment employ, no matter to what extent the appropriations or salary
limitations involved in the law might be increased. The Director of
the Budget was fortunate in being able to call in a body of business
men who, at a time of emergency in the Government’s business affairs,
responded to that patriotic instinct characteristic of every good
American and left their business to become Federal employees at
$1 per year. The Director of the Budget has also been assisted
by Members of Congress and others whose connection with gov­
ernmental business affairs in the past enabled them to give in­
valuable practical advice in connection with the estimates. As a
result of this experience the Director of the Budget is satisfied that
the solution of the problem of intelligent revision of appropriations
is to be found, as usual, in the principles recognized in a successful
private enterprise.
The Director of the Budget, as the adviser of the President, who
is the head of the Government business corporation, must have the
advice of those who are experienced in the conduct of the business,
by practical and continuous contact with it. Their advice, however,
should be impartial and given in terms of the President’s policy, dis­
tinguished from the necessarily partial viewpoint of one connected
authoritatively with the given activity. This must be accomplished
by drawing upon the personnel of the different departments in build­
ing up the organization of the Bureau of the Budget, selecting such




XX

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

men as have shown in the preparation and revision of the estimates
for 1923 their qualifications for this important work. It is necessary
that all connected with the Bureau of the Budget realize fully the
fact that they are responsible, under the Director of the Budget,
solely and alone to Executive authority, so that the President of the
United States, through the Director of the Budget, may have truly
impartial as well as accurate and authoritative information upon
which to base Executive policy. This principle must also be recog­
nized and its necessity understood by the heads of the departments
from which such personnel is drawn. It may be necessary in some
cases to obtain this personnel by detail for a probationary period, in
order to fully confirm the qualifications of the man in question,
before transferring him to the Bureau of the Budget.
The Director of the Budget, becoming acquainted progressively
with the business of the Government and with the men carrying it on,
will thus have built up an organization of experienced assistants,
which organization could not be duplicated in any other way, even
with greatly increased appropriations by Congress. Selection for
this work, responsible as it is directly to the President of the United
States, should be looked upon by the body of the organization as a
high appreciation on the part of the Executive of the ability, char­
acter, and competence of the men selected. Such a plan is that pur­
sued in all successful business organizations of calling into contact
with the executive and his agents the impartial minds from the
business organizations best qualified to aid in thinking in terms of
policy for the entire institution as distinguished from any particular
portion of it.
The temporary service so splendidly rendered in this formative
period by minds drafted from among the leading business men of
the country is being gradually taken up by men selected from the
various departments who have been found qualified to continue the
work. The Director of the Budget states without hesitation that
the Government has at its command among the existing staff of its
business organization men of the high ability demanded who, because
of their large experience, it would be impossible to match, what­
ever the compensation involved, by recourse to outside employment.
These men in the office will be assigned particular departments,
between which and the Budget Bureau they will function continu­
ously as liaison officers. Charged with the duty of thinking in
terms of the President’s policy, they will bring to the heads of the
departments and the chiefs of bureaus with whom they will be in
continual contact a better realization of how the plan of their par­
ticular department can be made to better accord with the plan which
the President has established for the Government as a whole. Con­
tinued contact with the departments, moreover, will enable them the




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXI

more intelligently to advise the Executive, through the Budget
Bureau, upon the irreducible minimum of expenditures beyond
which, with a due regard for efficiency, the Executive will not de­
sire to go. With the passage of time this body of practical advisers
will improve in efficiency and effectiveness, and the estimates of the
Budget Bureau in consequence will be received with continually in­
creasing confidence by the Executive and by Congress. The fact that
these men will not be political employees, coupled with the fact that
the administration of the Bureau of the Budget must be entirely
nonpartisan, will tend to establish in the minds of all that the
Budget Bureau is only an agent of ordinary routine business, work­
ing alone for economy and efficiency, and not at all as an adjunct
of party or administration.
The Director of the Budget desires to express his sincere appre­
ciation of the invaluable service in connection with revision of the
estimates of the first budget rendered by the following gentlemen,
who, at the nominal compensation of $1 per year, accepted appoint­
ment as advisers and gave unstintingly of their time and labor.
They have had a most important part in the work of the bureau:
A. R. Barnes, Chandler B. Beach, R. Floyd Clinch, Henry M. Dawes,
Rufus C. Dawes, A . J. Earling, Samuel M. Felton, Floyd Charles
Furlow, E. F. Mack, Alexander H. Revell, Col. John S. Sewell,
Hon. Lawrence Y . Sherman, Ernest J. Stevens.
FU N CTION S OF T H E BUREAU OF T H E BUDGET.

There is a tendency on the part of many to assume that the Bu­
reau of the Budget is established primarily for the sake of reducing
expenses. The Bureau of the Budget is designed, through its facili­
ties for securing information, to be in a position to give impartial
advice to the President and to Congress in all matters regarding
the proper business functioning of Government. Because at the time
of the establishment of the Budget Bureau there was a great neces­
sity existing for the reduction of governmental expenses, and since
under the old decentralized system of governmental business great ex­
travagance existed, the activities of the bureau which became most
prominent were those where it acted as an agent for the imposition
of Executive pressure in forcing down expenditures where not in
contravention of congressional mandate and efficiency,. ^This is but
one function of the Budget Bureau*
It must be as willing to advise an increase in appropriations where
the same is clearly in the interest of governmental efficiency and true
economy as it is to advise reductions in expenses, which at the pres­
ent time are so necessary. It;is only by this method, under which
it gives an impartial business judgment as to the necessity for ex­




XXII

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

penditures and the functioning of Government, that it can, in the
long run, maintain its proper influence with the Executive and with
Congress and justify its existence.
RECEPTION OF THE BUDGET BY CONGRESS.

- In possession, under the Constitution, of the sole power of appro­
priation, Congress, in passing the budget law, has created an
agency to assist in securing for its benefit impartial information
from proper sources in connection with its intelligent consideration
of appropriations. In the complete supervision of the budget which
Congress of necessity must exercise in connection with the appro­
priating power the Budget Bureau will be of assistance in pro­
portion as its work is in "accord with the principles of common sense
and correct business. It should be nonpartisan, impartial, and im­
personal, and so operated as to create that impression upon the
mind of Congress. To the extent that it can, through the mainte­
nance of the necessary machinery for accurate preliminar}^ investi­
gation, make proper recommendations concerning the estimates to
the President it will deserve and doubtless receive the approval of
the Congress.
The presentation by the President of the budget to Congress, as
revised by him after receipt from the Director of the Budget, should
create in any given matter of appropriations more than a prima facie
case in the mind of Congress. Provided the bureau functions prop­
erly it should create a strong presumption that any particular case
had been properly investigated and all the reductions recommended
in connection with the expenditure involved which are possible with­
out material interference with governmental efficiency. It is to be
expected that since the preliminary estimates have been made under
pressure by the Executive for proper retrenchment, where consistent
with efficiency, it will not be necessary, as heretofore, for Congress
to make radical cuts upon the estimates of the budget with any un­
certainty as to what will be the result as it affects efficiency. The
President of the United States, when he sends the budget to Congress,
is presumed to send it with all the reductions in expenditures which
can be effected without undue impairment of governmental business
processes. In the preparation of the budget he has had at work an
authorized agency in the bureau not only in ascertaining the reason­
ableness of desired appropriations but in continually imposing pres­
sure upon the departments for a reduction in the estimates wherever
proper and possible. The examination by Congress of the items of
the budget as recommended by the President in the same spirit in
which he presents them will make impossible the recrudescence of the
former condition of things, in which departmental officers have




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXIII

habitually made their estimates for a greater sum than they expected
to receive from Congress.
The course of Congress in the past in making radical reductions in
the estimates presented has been the only protection which the public
has had against departmental extravagance. There is now the pro­
tection afforded by Executive supervision of estimate making. The
Bureau of the Budget is simply a business organization whose ac­
tivities are devoted constantly to the consideration of how money
appropriated by Congress can be made to go as far as possible toward
the accomplishment of the objects of legislation. I f it functions
properly, it has not and can never have any purpose but that of the
Executive and Congress in seeking the imposition, thrqughout the
Government administration, of correct business principles in routine
business administration. The investigations of Congress, made in
connection with its constitutional power over appropriations, are an
invaluable and indispensable protection to the public. Nothing but
a wicked interposing of partisan motives into the discussion of that
which is fundamentally a business question can make congressional
investigations into public expenditures anything but beneficial. By a
proper functioning the Budget Bureau in time should create such a
feeling of confidence in its effectiveness as to make it continually of
greater assistance to Congress in their consideration of appro­
priations.
USE OF TH E BUREAU OF T H E BUDGET BY TH E CHIEF EXECUTIVE AS A N
AGENCY FOR IMPROVING ROUTINE BUSINESS OF TH E GOVERNMENT.
A. THE FAULTS TO BE CORKECTED.

Heretofore our Government, in routine business administration,
has labored under difficulties analogous to those of a private corpora­
tion in which—
First, the president of the corporation gave practically no atten­
tion to its ordinary routine business. He avoided his responsibility
for the proper conduct of the business of the corporation, and neither
assumed nor delegated active control over it.
Second, the administrative vice presidents of the corporation were
allowed to run their several departments without any enforced con­
tact in the discussion of routine business matters of the corporation
and as if each separate department was an independent authority in
all matters of routine business.
Third, because of the lack of any outlined business plan, resulting
from the absence of executive pressure and supervision, the several
departments operated with almost an entire lack of coordination.
No system existed for making purchases or in selling material along
business lines under a unified policy. A lack of material or facili­




XXIV

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET*

ties on the part of any one department resulted in no adequate search
being made for the existence of such supplies or facilities in the
hands of another department, which might be available. In almost
every case recourse was had to the open market.
Fourth, the corporation was not operated for profit, and its prin­
cipal funds for operating expenses were obtained by a levy upon
stockholders (an appeal to Congress for an appropriation, involving
a collection through taxes or imposts).
Fifth, no balance sheet of the corporation as a whole was ever pre­
pared. No complete inventories of its properties existed. No state­
ment of its current assets, such as salable material and current sup­
plies, had ever been made, nor was there any easy method existing of
securing it.
Sixth, when cash was placed by the stockholders at the disposal of
the corporation for its purposes, the custom was to notify the different
departments that a certain amount of credit was available with the
treasurer of the corporation, to be drawn upon as might be necessary
to meet any estimated expenditure involved. Each department would
then enter upon its books the amount of cash allotted to it with which
to pay for its projects, against which it had the right to currently
draw. The treasurer, however, kept no accurate account of these con­
tingent obligations, which eventually crystallized into cash demands
upon him, thus resulting in money being drawn from him continually
in excess of the estimated annual running expenses. Nothing but very
rough estimates could be secured at any time by the treasurer as to
what the cash demands upon him in any given year would be, since
to the estimates for annual running expenses was to be added an in­
definite amount of money demands arising out of former commit­
ments.
Seventh, as a result of all this, the corporation, in effect, seldom
reconsidered an unwise project entered into by any department. The
custom grew up among the departments of the corporation to regard
it as an obligation upon the part of each to spend any levy made for
its benefit without reporting to the president of the corporation, to
its directors, or to the stockholders as to whether continued expendiure upon the project was wise under any given new set of circum­
stances.
Eighth, so firmly embedded in the minds and in the affections of
the administrative heads of the departments became the feeling of
independence of an executive control, owing to its complete lack of
exercise, that conferences looking toward the correction of evils aris­
ing out of a lack of coordination in the business were apparently
avoided lest out of that contact information would develop which
might stimulate the head of the corporation to an invasion of the
independent control of the deepartments.




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXV

Ninth, the administrative heads of the departments of the corpora­
tion were selected, as a rule, with less reference to their business
qualifications than to their qualifications as advisers to the president
of the corporation along other lines than routine business adminis­
tration. At the inception of their appointment they were intro­
duced to a business with which they were generally unfamiliar and
were compelled to rely largely upon the advice of subordinates who
Avere wedded to the theory of the right of independent operation of a
department. The tenure of their administration was often less than
four years. As a rule, they became the earnest advocates of depart­
mental plans which their inexperience in departmental business pre­
vented them from fully comprehending in all their aspects. Being
held to no responsibility by the executive head to operate their de­
partments along a unified corporation policy in routine business,
they became, therefore, in general, only a shelter and protection for
the independent operation of departments. Instead of becoming
conduits, as in the properly run corporation, for the imposition of
an executive plan, made in the interests of the corporation as a whole,
upon the body of the business administration, they became, of neces­
sity, more or less of an obstruction to the occasional flow of execu­
tive authority in routine business. Their general position was, of
necessity, determined by the advice of those operating the depart­
ment under the theory that it was independent, while there existed
no one to place before them the necessities of the corporation consid­
ered as a whole.
Tenth, the subordinate members of a departmental organization of
the corporation were encouraged to state the needs of their particu­
lar subdivision of their department directly to the agency of the
corporation (Congress), which made the desired levy upon the stock­
holders (the public). This custom, in violation of all the rules gov­
erning the correct functioning of the successful corporation, tended
to increase the confidence of these subordinate officials in opposing
any change operating to subordinate departmental control in rou­
tine business to an executive control of the corporation.
Eleventh, a general public interest in the operations of the cor­
poration encouraged subordinate members of its business organiza­
tion, including its administrative vice presidents, in making pro­
grams of business and expenditure to consider their relation to pop­
ular approval, whether right or wrong, thus often foreclosing a
question of policy which was properly in the purview of the presi­
dent of the corporation alone. A premium was often placed upon
the expenditure of money as distinguished from its saving, since un­
informed public approval is often reserved for activity arid appar­
ent enterprise in extending the corporation’s functions, irrespective
of their wisdom.




XXVI

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

Practically all of the last ten defects of the corporation were the
direct result of the first one, to wit, that the president of the corpora­
tion gave practically no attention to its ordinary routine business.
B. THE

COORDINATING AGENCIES ESTABLISHED BY EXECUTIVE ORDER
FAULTS IN THE ROUTINE BUSINESS OF GOVERNMENT.

TO

RECTIFY

For the imposition of unified methods in the ordinary business of
the Government the President has established, by Executive order,
the following agencies, which are engaged in coordinating, in all
matters of routine business, the activities of the separate departments
and establishments:
,
First, the Federal Purchasing Board. On the Federal Purchasing
Board there is detailed the chief purchasing officer of each depart­
ment or establishment, with a chief coordinator as chairman, named
by the President. The chief coordinator has the authority, limited by
a right of appeal in case of any difference in opinion, to impose co­
ordinating orders. He can thus prevent competition between the dif­
ferent departments in outside purchases, not only by preventing them
from raising the price on each other, but where large quantities of
standard commodities are to be purchased, by ordering one depart­
ment to execute the purchase for itself and as agent for the others.
By Executive order it was directed that in each executive depart­
ment and independent establishment of the Government there shall
be a director of purchases and a director of sales, who shall coordi­
nate all activities involving purchases and sales within their re­
spective departments and be in direct liaison with the chief coordina­
tor. These directors of purchases and sales are subject to call by
the chief coordinator for conference in all matters involving the co­
ordination of sales and purchases in the various departments of the
Government service. This was the system adopted in the American
Expeditionary Forces. It is the exact system existing in many large
private industries which have been formed by the amalgamation of
original units located in different parts of the country.
The power in shaping a unified purchasing policy for the Govern­
ment is as great as that which would be possessed by a central or­
ganization which would take over all Government purchases, but
with this great advantage over a central organization— that there is
no interference with the pressure from a point of departmental sup­
ply necessity upon a procurement agent,directly responsible to it.
Even where there is a coordinating order imposed, a representative
of the head of the department which needs supplies is alwajr able
s
to interpret its necessities, both as regards speed in delivery and
location of delivery.
Again, the coordinating control does not interfere in a multitude
of small purchase'transactions by the department where the ques­

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXVII

tion of competition is not involved. A central purchasing agency
for the Government of the United States which would assume to
take over the procurement and distribution of all Government sup­
plies would be a complete failure. Not only has the Federal Pur­
chasing Board proved already by its successful operation its adapt­
ability to the necessities of the situation, but the principles which
govern it have been tested out by years of recognition in practice by
private business enterprises.
Second, the Federal Liquidation Board, created in accordance
with the same principles and form of organization, is now coordi­
nating sales, under a unified plan, of the large surplus stocks of the
various departments of the Government. It is composed of one rep­
resentative from each department or establishment having sales
activity, presided over by the chief coordinator, general supply.
The decisions of the chief coordinator, general supply, as to any
coordinating action is final, subject only to appeal to the head of his
department by any member. The importance of the work of this
board is self-evident. Under the old system, where surplus stocks
were sold by the independent departments irrespective of each other
an absurd and demoralizing situation existed. It was the custom
of the independent departments to sell their surplus stocks with
practically no reference to the needs of the other departments for the
material sold. In some cases property was sold at public auction by
one department, purchased by an outsider, who then reisold it at
large profit to another department of Government. A t the time of
the institution of this board departments were in the open market
for large amounts of material which were on hand in the other
departments. An enormous loss has resulted to the Government
from this condition of things.
The Federal Liquidation Board formulates policies and plans de­
signed to knit the activities of the several departments and estab­
lishments concerned with the liquidation of stocks into a Federal
business association to bring about business methods calculated
effectively to safeguard the interests of the Government.
Third, the organization of corps area coordinators. For the pur­
pose of making a practical extension of the principles involved in
the Federal Purchasing Board and Federal Liquidation Board over
the entire country a system of corps area coordinators has been
created. The points of location of Government stocks are so scat­
tered, and the diffusion of the points of purchasing activities so
great, that central boards at Washington would be unable to cope
with the situation without representation at all centers of govern­
mental purchasing and sale activities. Accordingly, for convenience,
the territory of the United States was divided into nine areas, corre­
sponding to the nine Army corps areas, and in each area an official







XXVIII

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

was selected by the President by detail from a department, who is
known as the coordinator for general supplies for the several execu­
tive departments and independent establishments having activities
in that area. It is to be noted that these corps area coordinators are
responsible to the chief coordinator, general supply, and through
him to the President of the United States, and not to the heads of
the departments and independent establishments. They locate and
inspect surplus accumulations of Government stocks, regardless of
whether or not these stocks have been reported surplus by the de­
partments, and report thereon to the chief coordinator, general sup­
ply, Washington, D. C., as well as to the head of the department,
having particular reference to the existence of accumulated stocks
which appear to be in excess of reasonable reserves or current needs.
In connection with the immensely important matter of interde­
partmental transfer of surplus stocks, the neglect of which in the
past has involved the United States Government in the loss of hun­
dreds of millions of dollars, the corps area coordinators play a most
important part in determining the field needs of the separate de­
partments and establishments. They extend the power to insure
uniformity in prices received and sales effected in the corps area.
They exercise general supervision over the purchase functions of
the several departments and establishments in their section. They
have the power to fix, over the head of the department, the price
of the commodity involved in interdepartmental transfer, which, of
course, is simply a matter of bookkeeping, but which, under the old
system of independent functioning between the departments, proved
a great obstacle to the transfer of property.
In short, this corps area organization, together with the Federal
Purchasing Board and the Federal Liquidation Board, the latter
two located at Washington, enables the entire purchase and supply
situation throughout the country to be properly handled.
Fourth, the surveyor genera] of real estate determines, subject to
the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, as provided by law, in
what manner and to what extent the premises of the Government of
the United States outside of the District of Columbia shall be oc­
cupied and used, by what departments, bureaus or offices, and estab­
lishments. He has the power to assign and reassign rooms therein
to all such Federal officials, clerks, and employees as in his judgment
and discretion should be thus supplied, but he makes no assignment or
reassignment until after full and complete conference with the head
of the particular service directly concerned. He has the power to
abrogate or terminate existing leases by negotiation or by notice or
other action thereunder. No leases for Government uses for a period
of longer than one year or for an annual rental of more than $500




REPOET OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXIX

can be made except upon approval of the surveyor general of real
estate and the Secretary of the Treasury.
The creation of this power in the surveyor general of real estate
by Executive order prevents the large waste occasioned by renting
from private owners space which the Government, in its buildings,
already has at its disposal. In this power to determine what changes
should be made in the interest of economical and efficient use of lands,
buildings, and portions of buildings for the benefit of the General
Government, he is assisted by the area coordinators, general supply,
who report to him the necessary information as to real estate holdings
under ownership or lease which are located in their corps areas.
Fifth, Federal motor transport agent. A general survey of the
motor transport situation throughout the United States revealed the
fact that the rule of absolute fixed assignments of motor vehicles
to executive departments and independent establishments of the
Government was handicapping the Government in the use of its
motor transport. The motor transport of a department might be
overtaxed when there were motor vehicles standing idle in another
department. Civilian trucks were being hired when a department
was confronted by an emergency when the same service could be
performed within the limits of the Government service itself. In
the different corps areas of the country the coordination of motor
transport will be put into effect by the area coordinators, general sup­
ply, upon the approval of the plan by the chief coordinator, general
supply, at Washington. The head of each department or establish­
ment names a representative under the corps area coordinator for
each area in which the department or establishment has motor
vehicles in operation. The District of Columbia has been made a
separate area for the purpose of coordinating motor transportation.
A coordinator for motor transport has been designated for that dis­
trict and large savings are being currently effected by these or­
ganizations.
Sixth, the Federal Traffic Board. The overlapping of .service and
duplication of effort are nowhere more apparent than in the con­
duct of the traffic business of the Government. The expert, Mr. E. C.
Caples, who examined this situation for the Director of the Budget,
estimates that the Government’s transportation bill annually is ap­
proximately $200,000,000. In the present situation no attention is
given to the proper classification of articles shipped by the United
States, and Government classification is out of line with commercial
business. Government property should be relisted under commercial
names. Kaw materials should be billed out as raw materials and
not as finished products. The classification committees of the rail­
roads in specifying rates applicable to the thousands of articles
listed in the classification have given the Government little or no




XXX

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

consideration as to the volume or nature of its business. The sav­
ings to be effected through proper handling of the Government’s
traffic, including reclassification, the correct routing of its business,
and a reduction in number of the various rate groups and depart­
mental traffic departments, is difficult to compute, but should be very
large.
The Federal Traffic Board is established under the chief coordi­
nator, general supply. Its activities are directed by its chairmen,
under the title of coordinator for traffic, who shall, under the general
direction of the chief coordinator for general supply, select the
committees for the board and direct the time and place for their
meetings. The head of each department and establishment making
shipments from time to time shall designate one representative to
serve as a member of the board. The classification of commodities
and the instructions governing shipments and methods of settling
transportation accounts, approved by the coordinator for traffic,
shall, as far as applicable and in conformity with law, be binding
upon and govern all departments, bureaus, agencies, and offices of
the Government in all shipments made by them. A ll questions
pertaining, to the classification of materials, or terminal switch­
ing, freight rates, etc., which require the application of remedial
measures, will be submitted to the coordinator for traffic either
for adjustment with the classification committees representing
the carrier or for the presentation of a complaint with the In ­
terstate Commerce Commission. The decision of the chief coordi­
nator, general supply, shall be final in the event of disagreement as
to classifications, instructions governing shipments, and methods of
settling transportation accounts, subject only to an appeal to the head
of the department concerned.
A committee composed of practical railroad men will be consulted
in connection with securing from the carriers cooperation in impos­
ing coordination in Government traffic as regards classifications and
economical methods.
Seventh, the Federal Board of Hospitalization. The total appro­
priations in 1921 for the administration of the Veterans’ Bureau, the
office of the Surgeon General of Public Health, the Surgeon General
of the Army, the Surgeon General of the Navy, the Superintendent of
Prisons, the president Board of Managers National Home for Dis­
abled Volunteer Soldiers, aggregate $745,985,292. Of this amount,
‘p489,000,000 were paid in pensions, leaving as a total expenditure
outside of pensions, $256,985,292. There are engaged in the functions
of these bureaus 47,512 people, with a total cost of salaries for 1921
of $85,430,177. In these departments at the present time, including
the Army and Navy, the United States is feeding and housing about
500,000 people. The property under their control represents hun­




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXXI

dreds of millions of dollars. It is necessary that the expenditures of
these great departments should be coordinated, thus preventing over­
lapping of service, extra ownership of supplies, overemployment,
unnecessary rentals, prevention of unnecessary installation, and
various other incidental matters which naturally pertain to such
large activities. The Federal Board of Hospitalization is created for
that purpose.
The duty of the board is :
(a) To consider all questions relative to the coordination of hos­
pitalization of the departments represented.
(&) To standardize requirements, to expedite the interdepartmental
use of existing Government facilities, to eliminate duplication in the
purchase of supplies, and the erection of buildings.
( c) To formulate plans designed to knit together in proper co­
ordination the activities of the several departments and establish­
ments, with a view to safeguarding the interests of the Government
and to increasing the usefulness and efficiency of the several organiza­
tions, and to report to the President thereon.
The chief coordinator of the Federal Board of Hospitalization
presides over the board and is responsible for its efficiency and for
developing its activities along practical lines. After a full discussion
of any question by the board, the decision of the chief coordinator of
the board will be final as to any action to be taken or any policy to
be pursued, but any member may appeal from the decision of the
chief coordinator of the Federal Board of Hospitalization to his
own immediate superior. The recommendations of the board will
be carried into effect by the head of the department or establishment
directly concerned.
Eighth, the Federal Specifications Board. A Federal specifica­
tions board has been created, of which the Director of the Bureau of
Standards, Department of Commerce, is ex officio chairman. The
head of each department and establishment purchasing materials or
services in accordance with specifications prepared in such depart­
ment designates one representative to serve as a member of the Fed­
eral specifications board. The duty of the board is to compile and
adopt standard specifications for materials and services, and to bring
specifications into harmony with the best commercial practice wher­
ever conditions permit, bearing in mind the desirability of broaden­
ing the field of supply. In event of disagreement on specifications, or
on methods of procedure, the case will be submitted to the chief
coordinator, general supply, whose decision shall be final as to the
action taken, subject only to appeal to the head of the department
concerned.
There was formerly in existence an interdepartmental standardiza­
tion committee composed of representatives of the following depart­




XXXII

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

ments: War Department, Navy Department, Treasury Department,
Department of Agriculture, Department of the Interior, Post Office
Department, Panama Canal, Shipping Board, United States Em­
ployees’ Compensation Commission, Commissioners of the District
of Columbia, and Department of Commerce. The findings of this
committee as to a common specification are in the nature of what is
called < a recommended specification.” No one had the authority to
£
approve and make mandatory the adoption of such specification by
the various departments of the Government; neither was there any
authority competent to settle the case on its merits in the event of
a disagreement.
There is also in existence a committee on the standardization of
petroleum specifications, authorized by Executive order dated July
31, 1918.
The Federal Board for the Standardization of Specifications will
take up and carry to a prompt conclusion a complete survey of all
existing specifications, with a view to the adoption of common speci­
fications where more than one now exists for a particular commodity.
Ninth, the interdepartmental board of contracts and adjustments.
This board is in process of formation, and a description of its pro­
posed functions and field of activity is contained in the Executive
order just issued for its establishment, as follows:
1. Without limiting in any manner the jurisdiction or authority of heads of
executive departments and independent establishments over the subject matter
of Government contracts as the same is now defined by law, but for the pur­
pose of standardizing contract forms, securing the adoption of uniform policies
as regards construction work and uniform practices of interpretation and nego­
tiations both preceding and following the actual execution of such contracts,
there is hereby established in the office of the chief coordinator, general supply,
a board to be known as the interdepartmental board of contracts and adjust­
ments, the members and functions of which board shall be as follows:
2. The head of each executive department, including the Department of
Justice, shall organize a department board made up of one representative
of each bureau having the independent right to enter into contracts on behalf
of the United States. Such department board shall recommend policies to
control in the standardization of contracts within such department. They
shall choose from their number a chairman and any other necessary officers.
3. The chairman of the several department boards, together with a repre­
sentative designated by the head of any independent establishment now
authorized by law to enter into important contracts, and the chief coordinator,
general supply, shall constitute the interdepartmental board of contracts and
adjustments, and shall serve without additional compensation.




‘ REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXXIIi

4. This board shall be presided over by a chairman, who shall be the repre­
sentative of the Secretary of the Treasury. The chairman shall, upon being
advised of the complete membership, call the members of the board together
for purposes of organization. The board shall adopt such by-laws and appoint
such committees and subcommittees as may be deemed advisable and necessary
to accomplish the end sought.
5. The functions of this board shall be—
First, to standardize in general, wherever possible, the forms and methods
of contract letting, to the end that a uniform policy on the part of the Govern­
ment may control the making of such contracts, and with a further view to
such changes in the form thereof as will tend to enlist the interest of the con­
tractor on behalf of economy and promptness of execution and eliminate those
uncertainties of construction and hazards to be assumed by the contractor
which have hitherto operated to increase the cost of Government work and
supplies.
Second, to recommend general policies in the settlement of outstanding obli­
gations arising out of contracts of the United States, such as methods of de­
termining and enforcing damages, of settling disputes as to questions of fact,
and of determining the final compensation of contractors.
Third, in an advisory capacity and when requested by the head of any de­
partment or establishment or his representative upon the board—■
(а) To review and revise important contracts and agreements made or about
to be made on behalf of the United States.
(б) To advise officers authorized to contract and operating under contract as
to the proper interpretation of contracts in process of execution.
(t?) To assist in the negotiation of important contracts and agreements relat­
ing to personal services, supplies, or construction work.
G The chairman of the board is charged with the responsibility for the
.
efficient working thereof and for its development along the practical lines above
indicated, and in such other ways as may become apparent after full study of
the situation by the board or any committee thereof. After a full discussion of
any question by the board and a full opportunity to the members to be heard
thereon, the decision of the chairman will be final as to the action to be taken
or the policy to be pursued. But any member may appeal therefrom to the head
of his department or establishment, who shall have final authority in the matter.
The chairman of the board may detail an assistant to sit with the board to
represent him in matters of routine.

The General Supply Committee was created by section 4 of the act
of June 17, 1910 (36 Stat., 531), which directed the Secretary of the
Treasury to advertise and contract for all supplies of fuel, ice, station­
ery, and other miscellaneous supplies for the executive departments
and other Government establishments in Washington, D. C., when
the public exigency did not require the immediate delivery of the
article. By Executive order of December 10, 1918, the General Sup­
ply Committee was designated as the agent through which the han­
dling and transfer of surplus office material, supplies, and equip­
ment of the executive departments and other establishments of the
Government in the District of Columbia should be carried out, and
the Executive order of September 3, 1919, extended this activity of
the General Supply Committee to the field services outside of the
77891— 21------ in




XXXIV

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OP BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

District of Columbia. These Executive orders provided that pur­
chase in the open market should not be made of any materials or
supplies which could be obtained through the General Supply
Committee.
The General Supply Committee, functioning under this act and
these orders, handled large quantities of surplus materials and sup­
plies for the Government departments and establishments, but it
could deal only with those articles which were reported to it as
surplus and had not definite means of enforcing the obvious inten­
tions of the regulations where the materials or supplies available
differed slightly from those required.
With the establishment of the chief coordinator, general supply,
the Federal Purchasing Board and the Federal Liquidation Board,
the General Supply Committee, working in the closest cooperation
with these agencies, has been of material assistance in working out
practical operating systems, and has in return received great assist­
ance in the matter of locating surplus supplies which in some cases
had not been yet reported surplus, as well as in securing the accept­
ance of materials and supplies differing slightly from the original
request where this would result in preventing a purchase in the
open market.
This is unquestionably resulting in greatly increased economies
in the matter of interdepartmental transfer of materials and sup­
plies, thereby eliminating the necessity for many open-market
purchases.
RELATION OF T H E COORDINATING M A C H IN E R Y TO TH E CHIEF EXECUTIVE,
TO TH E DIRECTOR OF T H E BUDGET, AND TO TH E BUSINESS ORGANIZA­
TION OF GOVERNMENT.

Where the statutes of the United States prescribe methods to be
followed in governmental business administration they, of course,
limit Executive discretion by their terms, but in all routine business
of government, where a method is not prescribed by law, it follows
of necessity that methods may be imposed by the Executive, as in all
other forms of business organization. An Executive regulation
covering governmental business methods is simply a formula in
which a method of conducting business is outlined in an order.
The executive powers which the President has invoked in the
establishment of coordinating machinery for the unifying of gov­
ernmental business are therefore only those inherent in the position
of the head of the Government business administration, where not
limited by law. The Executive orders creating these agencies are
signed by the President and are announced through the Budget
Bureau.

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXXV

In any discussion of these agencies created through Executive
order by the President to assist him in the imposition of a unified
plan for the transaction of the routine business of the Government
it can not be too strongly emphasized that they are concerned only
with routine business and not with matters of governmental policy.
Policies of government are determined by the Executive and by
Congress. When Congress passes a law appropriating money for
the cost of governmental activities and projects it becomes the duty
of the Executive, in so far as these expenditures are concerned, to
see that the money is devoted to the objects of appropriation in the
most economical and efficient manner possible. These coordinating
agencies established by the Executive are for the sole purpose of
enabling the President in matters of routine business to so coordi­
nate the activities of the different departments and establishments
as will insure the most efficient and economical expenditure of the
money appropriated by Congress. The powers they exercise, the
questions which they consider, the circumference of their activities
are all concerned fundamentally with the routine of business meth­
ods as distinguished from anything in the nature of governmental
policy. They operate simply as a mechanism to make more effective
the policy adopted by Congress and the Executive.
These agencies, concerned alone with efficient and economical
methods, should operate in the same manner whatever the political
changes which may occur in administration. Like the Budget Bu­
reau and other agencies for the imposition of business policy, they
are impersonal, impartial, and nonpartisan. They can never prop­
erly become the subject of partisan dissension. They must exist as
agents concerned with routine methods of business at the disposal
of the Executive and Congress indefinitely. I f they are not kept
in existence there will be an immediate reversion to the demoralizing
lack of coordination among the independent departments and es­
tablishments which has obtained in the governmental business ad­
ministration in the past.
Made up from the continuing body of public employees and con­
cerned simply with the unification of the business machine, their
sphere is one outside of politics and of general policy and in the
realm alone of business common sense.
These agencies derive their authority solely from the President,
but the same reasons of convenience and efficiency which led the
President to use the machinery of the Budget Bureau in connection
with the imposition of Executive business policy upon the business
administration make advisable d close supervisory contact between
,
the Director of the Budget and the coordinating agencies created by
Executive order now in operating existence. The condition of gov­







XXXYI

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

ernmental business administration, developed by the investigations
of the Budget Bureau, brought to the attention of the President, re­
sulted in his decision to establish them. They are concerned, as is
the Director of the Budget, with a bird’s-eye view of the Government
business situation and with the doing of business in terms of a
single Government and its interests as distinguished from, but con­
sistent with, the interests of the separate departments and establish­
ments. To strengthen their supervisory relations to the separate de­
partments and establishments they need a constant and sympathetic
liaison between themselves and the President of the United States,
who is the source of their authority.
I f in the future there should at any time come into office an Execu­
tive indifferent to the operation of the Government as a business
machine there would, under the immutable laws of human nature,
immediately spring up an effort on the part of the independent de­
partments and establishments at first to curtail and restrict the ac­
tivities of the coordinating agencies and then to wipe them out of
existence. The fact that this country may be so unfortunate as to
pass through an Executive administration indifferent to its obliga­
tions to apply correct business principles to the functioning of Gov­
ernment business makes it a supreme duty for the President to now
protect as completely as possible, by Executive regulation, by custom,
and by his authority, the coordinating agencies recently created by
him.
The Director of the Budget, being of necessity not only under the
law but under the practical exigencies of the situation, in close con­
tact with the President of the United States in all matters of routine
business policy, becomes the natural agent for the interpretation of
the situation and needs of these coordinating agencies to the Presi­
dent. It is essential, too, that the Director of the Budget, charged
with the duty of advice to the President in connection with the eco­
nomical and efficient operation of the Government in its ordinary
business, should himself have the closest contact with them, since
through them alone can he be properly advised as to correct business
and interdepartmental relations. Besides being agencies for the
execution of Executive policy, these coordinating agencies become
the natural collectors of information regarding the processes of rou­
tine governmental business, which, in turn, may become the basis of
Executive policy involving changes in the coordinating agencies
themselves, and the creation of new ones.
In the well-managed business organization the closest contact
between the source of information and the power which can compel
corrective action is always maintained. It must be remembered that
we are discussing only routine business functioning. What we* call
“ red tape ” in Government business largely results from the lack of

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXXVII

contact between those sensible of errors in administration and those
in authority responsible for their correction. The less cumbersome
the machinery for the transmission of the Executive will, and the
closer the contact between those associated with it and the President
himself, the more effective will be the functioning of the Government
as a business machine.
To sum up, the President, in assuming for the first time his posi­
tion of business responsibility over governmental business adminis­
tration, upon the advice of the Director of the Budget, based upon
information which the investigation of the Bureau of the Budget has
supplied, has created certain agencies of coordination through which
his business policy will be transmitted to the business organization.
This emphasizes the importance of the passage of Executive advice
and instruction through the Director of the Budget to the coordi­
nating agencies. The same principle is involved as was recognized
in the budget law itself when the Bureau of the Budget was made to
operate directly under the President and not under any department
of a lesser but coordinate authority. The only agency in existence
which bears such a relation to the Chief Executive that it can be
made a proper conduit for the transmission of Executive authority
in routine business matters to the coordinating agencies for trans­
mission to all departments and establishments is the Bureau of the
Budget.
Coordinating agencies should be created from the body of existing
employees and not by legislation, where their personnel would neces­
sarily be built up by outside appointments. I f the creation of these
coordinating agencies were to be attempted by act of Congress, they
would sink at once into the position of bureaus and lose almost en­
tirely the power inherent in direct representation of the President.
The advantages of the creation by Executive order from the body of
the administration of these coordinating agencies, which are now in
successful operation, are:
First, they more authoritatively will convey the pressure necessary
in carrying out the plan of the Chief Executive in the interests of
the Government as a whole.
Second, they will be headed and composed of men appointed be­
cause of their experience and ability in connection with the work in
question, familiar with the environment in which they are to work,
and without the outside and distracting pressure of political con­
siderations.
Third, while more effectively functioning because of the above rea­
sons, they will operate without appropriations being made necessary
for their own salaries or for a large personnel. They will not afford,
therefore, a nucleus for a steadily increasing cost and complexity of
operation.







XXXVIII REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

An examination of the Executive orders which form the basis of the
organizations of the coordinating agencies above mentioned will
develop:
First, that they involve no transfer of authority the location of
which has been fixed otherwise by statute.
Second, that they involve the delegation of no questions of policy
save that of economy and efficiency.
Third, that they are simply agents by which, where not otherwise
determined by Congress, unified methods of ordinary business can be
imposed by the Chief Executive.
Fourth, that they are created simply to give the President of the
United States, in his relation to the business administration, the same
agencies of contact and transmission of authority as obtain in any
private organization.
Fifth, that they involve no material addition to the expense of gov­
ernmental administration.
Sixth, that they are nonpartisan, being composed of men already in
the Government service, simply detailed for this duty.
Seventh, that they are in effect simply a regrouping under an
executive leadership of certain of the present employees of Govern­
ment of such experience, contact, and relation in its routine business
as enables them, detached from departments and acting directly
under the President, to make possible the application of common-sense
business methods.
It can not be too often reiterated that this most important reforma­
tion in the governmental business system is dependent upon the Pres­
ident of the United States himself, and upon his continued assump­
tion of his responsibility as its business head. The minute he relaxes
his attitude of attention to this duty there will be felt the natural
pull of the departments and establishments toward the old system
of complete independence and decentralization. This is because of
laws firmly embedded in human nature which have existed since man
began. Budget laws or other legislative enactments can not change
human nature, and, while compelling the letter of cooperation, can
not compel its spirit, which is, above all things, essential in business
organization. The President, and the President alone, can do this,
for his attitude toward the heads of the departments and the inde­
pendent establishments is a matter constantly in their minds. What
he desires it becomes their interest as well as their duty to do, where
consistent with right principles and in accordance with law. In the
absence of his expressed desire what becomes their selfish interest in
action is inevitably along the lines of decentralization and the re­
establishment of the old condition of things, with everything running
haphazard,




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XXXIX

These great coordinating agencies have already effected large
savings in Government business administration. They have pre­
vented the absurd duplication and competition existing among the
departments and establishments. They have corrected the practice
fry which the supplies and facilities of Government have been kept
in water-tight departmental compartments, compelling recourse con­
stantly to the open market, notwithstanding the Government already
had on hand the supplies or facilities purchased. They enable the
Government to transact routine business with the advantages enjoyed
by private business organizations, and prevent its spoliation, made
easy by the former ignorance and indifference on the part of a de­
partment of the business status and transactions of another. Through
their agency the routine business of the Government, for the first
time, is being conducted along sound business principles.
RELATION OF TH E BUREAU OF THE BUDGET TO THE CABINET.

As stated before, the use of the Budget Bureau by the Executive
as an agency for securing economy and efficiency in routine business
has developed the fact that the advice and information emanating
from the interested departments alone is not sufficient to enable the
Bureau of the Budget to carry on its functions with full effectiveness.
The first lien of a departmental policy upon a departmental mind,
whether it be that of the head of the department, budget officer, or
the chief of a bureau, is such that the Executive, to be safe in im­
posing a business policy in terms of the Government’s interests as an
entity, must have an impartial consideration of the departmental
view in order to determine the necessities of departmental programs
as related to an executive policy for the whole.
The Director of the Budget is glad to state that with the Cabinet,
and with the heads of independent establishments, there has been
evinced from the first a determination to think in impersonal terms,
and to favor all regulations, customs, and precedents which would
afford the Director of the Budget, in so far as he acted as the repre­
sentative of the President, the same ease of access to them and to their
subordinate chiefs as would necessarily pertain in any well-managed
private business organization. This required abrogation on their
part of many of the old customs arising out of over 100 years of a
decentralized status quo in the governmental business organization,
which presented an insuperable obstacle to anything approximating
unity of policy or plan in Government business administration.
Under the regulations and customs now established, any such action
and contact as the Director of the Budget must have with the heads
of the different departments and establishments, where he repre­
sents the President in the imposition of a unified policy, he meets no




XL

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

obstruction arising out of personal dignit}^ or past precedent. The
Cabinet heads and heads of independent establishments immediately
acquiesced in the principle that the President must establish an
agency so empowered in its relations to them that, as in any private
organization, his agent in gathering information could compel &
contact of separate departmental authority in the consideration of
any coordinated action for the benefit of the Executive. The Di­
rector of the Budget, therefore, under the regulations and customs
now established, lias the same powers that an agent of the president
of a corporation would have under the same circumstances.
The departmental trend of thought, stabilized by over 100 years,
manifested itself to some extent in connection with the establishment
.by the President of the coordinating agencies essential to the carding
out of the unified business policy in government. The detail of an
employee from a department or establishment to the coordinating
agencies established by Executive order occasionally evoked the objec­
tion that the salary of such an employee should no longer be charged
against the department in question. The thought that through the
agencies to which such detail is made an enormous saving will inure
to the departments during the existence of such a coordinating agency
was, in some cases, overlooked by the affected department head. It
is, above all things, necessary in the institution of a proper govern­
mental business system to change certain trends of thought arising
out of the old status quo which has been responsible for the destruc­
tive chaos in Government business arising out of the independent
attitude of departments unsubjected to Executive control.
It is to be remembered in this connection that no criticism can be
properly directed against the department heads under the old sys­
tem for thinking alone in terms of the interests of their department
and its program. The head of a department is not in a'position,
except under very exceptional circumstances, to have a bird’s-eye
view which will enable him to reason in any other than in terms of his
own department; Again, it is his duty to think in such terms. The
planning of coordinating action along the lines of a unified business
policy is the function of the Chief Executive.
A general line of demarcation between the viewpoint of the inter­
ested department or establishment and the viewpoint of an agency
thinking in terms alone of the general business situation of the Gov­
ernment obtains practically in every department and independent
establishment of the Government. The absence in the past of any
authority thinking in terms of the common interests of the Govern­
ment as a whole has involved the United States Government in hun­
dreds of millions of dollars of unnecessary loss. Questions of busi­
ness policy important enough to demand the attention of the Execu­

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XLI

tive and of Congress have at times not even been presented for con­
sideration to the department head himself.
There must be but one business head. Let no one misunderstand
the importance of the power of the President of the United States
in its relation to this universal disposition to submit to business co­
ordination manifested by the individual departments and estab­
lishments of the Government at this time. Underneath whatever
has been done in the way of correcting the chaos in governmental
routine business which the President of the United States con­
fronted was the sense of responsibility to him in the mind of each
man to be affected.
The Director of the Budget was authorized by the President to
make a public statement of certain fundamental principles which
must underlie the budget, to w it:
1. The Director of the Budget in gathering information for the
use of the President acts for the President, and his calls upon the
chiefs of bureaus and other administrative officers for purposes of
consultation or information take precedence over the Cabinet head
of a department or any head of an independent organization.
2. The budget representative in each department, being appointed
by the Cabinet head, will present to the Director of the Budget the
views of the Cabinet head upon the wisdom of conclusions drawn
by the Director of the Budget for the use of the Chief Executive
and Congress; but, as in the case of bureau chiefs and other officers,
the call of the Director of the Budget for their presence and advice
takes precedence over the Cabinet head.
Upon the continued recognition of these principles the effective­
ness of the Bureau of the Budget must depend.
RELATION

OF

BUDGET

OFFICERS

DEPARTMENTS, TO TH E

OF

BUSINESS

DEPARTMENTS

TO

ADM INISTRATION

TH E

HEADS

OF

OF GOVERNMENT,

AND TO T H E DIRECTOR OF TH E BUDGET.

The same principles involved in the relation of the President of
the United States to the Director of the Budget are involved in
the relations of the department head to the official named by him
as the budget officer of his department. The latter, charged with
the duty of collecting information and the giving of advice relating
to general departmental business for the use of the head of the
department as well as for the use of the Director of the Bureau of
the Budget, should be a man whose relation to the separate activi­
ties of the department is impartial. A department head should
never appoint as budget officer of his department one who'is in
control of an activity which will be materially affected by budgetary
recommendations.







XL II

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

The act approved June 10, 1921 (Public, No. 13), entitled “An
act to provide a national budget system and an independent audit
oi Government accounts, and for other purposes,” provides in part
that—
Sec. 214. (« ) The head of each department and establishment shall designate
an official thereof as budget officer therefor, who in each year under liis direc­
tion and on ur before a date fixed by hiiu shall prepare the departmental esti­
mates.
(£») Such budget officer shall also preparts under the direction of the head of
the department or establishment, such supplemental and deficiency estimates as
may be required for its work.
S ec. 215. The head of each department and establishment shall revise the
departmental estimates and submit them to the bureau on or before September
15 of each year. In case of his failure so to do, the President shall cause
to be prepared such estimates and data as are necessary to enable him to in­
clude in the budget estimates and statements in respect to the work of such
department or establishment.

The foregoing provisions of law require that the departmental es­
timates, including supplemental and deficiency estimates, shall be
prepared by the budget officer under the direction of the head of his
department or establishment. They further require that the estimates
shall be revised by the head of the department or establishment prior
to submission to the Bureau of the Budget. The spirit of the budget
law contemplates that the budget officer of each department or estab­
lishment shall represent the head thereof in the restriction of estimates
to economical figures, and in such other fiscal operations as may be
necessary from time to time in the administration of the budget law,
and to this end that the budget officer should report direct to and
perform his work directly under the head of his department or estab­
lishment. This should not be construed as investing in budget offi­
cers any powers or authorities which properly devolve upon the heads
of bureaus or divisions within a department or establishment, but
is intended solely to indicate that the duties devolving upon budget
officers, as such, should be performed directly under the head of the
department or establishment. It is essential, of course, that there
be full and complete cooperation between budget officers and the
heads of the operating, administrative, or supervisory bureaus or
agencies within a department or establishment.
To the end that nothing may interfere with the responsibilities de­
volving upon budget officers, it is desirable that the heads of depart­
ments and establishments clothe their budget officers with authority
to call for such information and data from the several.divisions and
branches of the departments and establishments as may be necessary
to enable the budget officers to prepare the estimates under the direc­
tion of the heads of the departments and establishments. It is simi­
larly desired that the plans and policies formulated by the heads of
departments and establishments as the basis of estimates for appropria­




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XLIII

tions be communicated to the budget officers and through them com­
municated, by and with the authority of the heads of the depart­
ments and establishments, to the several divisions or branches of the
departments and establishments where such communication is neces­
sary.
The adoption of the general procedure as above outlined will en­
able the Director of the Budget to obtain from budget officers definite
and accurate information at all times concerning departmental esti­
mates or the requirements upon which departmental estimates are
based, and there will be avoided the lost motion which might be
occasioned if budget officers were not made the medium of the head
of a department or establishment by or through which all informa­
tion essential to the preparation of estimates would -be transmitted
and received.
EXECUTIVE HEGUI-ATIONS.

The Executive regulations provided by the budget law to be issued
by the President as governing the operations of the Bureau of the
Budget have been a matter of evolution arising out of the new en­
vironment of the Budget Bureau and the determination of the Presi­
dent to use it as an agency for the imposition of Executive pressure.
It would have been impractical for the President to have drawn these
regulations at the inception of the work of the bureau. Having di­
rected the bureau to proceed along certain lines, he has issued such
regulations as, in his judgment, were necessary, after a report to him
by the bureau of the authority required as determined by its ex­
perience.
The Executive purpose which underlies these budget regulations,
in addition to outlining the method of procedure under the express
terms of the budget law, was to secure the machinery for the trans­
mission of Executive policy and control in the routine business of
the Government such as exists in any well-organized private busi­
ness organization. It could only be determined from the actual ex­
perience of the bureau just where latent opposition having its
roots in human nature and in a century of undisturbed departmental
independence would show itself to the imposition of Executive
authority along the lines of proper coordination and unified business
policy. The bureau has, under these regulations, the same standing
which similar agencies in private business must have to their heads
to successfully function.
DEFICIENCY AFPKOPRIATIONS.

The effect of continuous Executive attention and pressure accom­
panying an Executive plan for economical and efficient methods
upon the old custom on the part of the departments of an easy reli­




XLIV

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

ance upon deficiency and supplemental appropriations should be
emphasized. It is difficult to overstate the influence upon the cur­
rent administration of governmental business of a determined atti­
tude on the part of the Chief Executive against requests for defi­
ciency appropriations. The head of a department or establishment
will endeavor to evade, in every possible way, the asking for a defi­
ciency appropriation, and his one best way is by the reduction of
expenses and the more efficient administration of his department.
The Director of the Budget feels confident, therefore, that the
estimate for expenditures for 1923, upon which the budget is based,
will not be increased except through appropriations initiated by
Congress or by the Executive as a result of emergency 01* unforeseen
conditions arising after the preparation of the budget.
There exists in Government now, because of the attitude of the
Executive, a prime essential in the successful functioning of all pri­
vate and public business organizations, to wit, a continuing strong
sense of responsibility to the policy and business plan of the organi­
zation as imposed by the Executive head. In any private business
organization, in proportion as a lack of responsibility to the Execu­
tive head develops in the minds of subordinate officials of depart­
ments, the efficiency of the organization diminishes. There can not
be, of course, in an organization as large as the Government, a con­
tinuous contact with the executive head himself in the matter of
the details of functioning in the subordinate business units. There
is in every property organized business organization decentraliza­
tion in connection with authority over the method o*f the functioning
of a subordinate department, but machinery exists by which the head
of the subordinate department is at all times, through contact and
explanation, thoroughly advised of the general policy of the organi­
zation in accordance with which the activities of its subordinate
units are to be carried on.
The Cabinet is one agency for the establishment by the Chief
Executive of his business policy. He has made the Bureau of the
Budget another agency so far only as the conduct of the routine
business of the Government is concerned. The coordinating organi­
zations created by Executive order are also means of supplying the
departments the contact with the business policy of the Chief
Executive as it relates to routine business.
The continuity of Executive pressure through these agencies
upon the body of the business organization is certain to be reflected
in an almost complete cessation of the habit of reliance upon defi­
ciency appropriations. Besides preventing requests for deficiency
appropriations, the imposition of Executive pressure along the line
of a unified governmental business policy, and the information
developed by the contact provided by the coordinating agencies be­




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XLV

tween the departments, bring about a comparison of standards of
expenditures and efficiency, with resulting improvement. This con­
tact also encourages initiative in suggestions from the body of the
different organizations along the lines of proper coordinating action.
There are now implanted in the minds of the business organiza­
tion of the Government three principles:
First, that the business organization of Government hereafter
assumes that the minimum amount of money to be expended in any
fiscal year is not of necessity the sum appropriated in advance by
Congress, but the smallest amount upon which the business of the
Government can be efficiently administered under the program out­
lined by Congress.
Second, that there should not be in the minds of the business ad­
ministrators of Government a too easy reliance upon the custom of
deficiency appropriations.
Third, that where Congress has directed the expenditure of cer­
tain sums for specific purposes, an Executive pressure will now be
exerted for more efficient and economical administration in order to
produce greater results from the given expenditure, and also, whereever possible, to complete the given project for a less amount than
the total appropriated for the purpose.
Similar rules obtain in every well-organized private business
institution. That they have not heretofore characterized the busi­
ness operations of Government has been because of the absence of
Executive control and the habit of department heads of appealing
direct to Congress, unsubjected to any business plan made in the
interests of the Government as a whole, their action being deter­
mined by their conception of the needs of their department or estab­
lishment as an independent organization. In this attitude of the Chief
Executive lies the hope and expectation of a great lessening of the
amounts requested under deficiency appropriations.
REGROUPING OF ACTIVITIES.

Section 209 of the budget law provides that—
The bureau, when directed by the President, shall make a detailed study of
the departments and establishments for the purpose of enabling the President
to determine what changes (with a view of securing greater economy and effi­
ciency in the conduct of the public service) should be made in (1) * * *
(2)
* * * (3) the assignment of particular activities to particular serv­
ices, or (4) the regrouping of services.

By joint resolution of December 29, 1920, Congress has provided
for the organization of a “ Joint Committee on Reorganization to
make a survey of the administrative services of the Government for
the purpose of securing all pertinent facts concerning their powers
and duties and distribution among the several executive depart­




XLVI

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

ments and their overlapping and duplication of authority: also, to
determine wlmt distribution of activities should be made among the
several services with a view to the proper correlations of the same,
and what departmental regrouping of services should be made.’*
This joint resolution was supplemented on May 5, 1921, by another
authorizing the President to appoint a representative of the Execu­
tive to cooperate with this joint committee.
In order to prevent an embarrassing overlapping and duplication
of activities between this congressional joint committee and the Bu­
reau of the Budget the President, at the suggestion of the Director of
the Budget, concurred in a recommendation that the consideration
of a general regrouping of activities should be left to the joint com­
mittee, who could, in their discretion, call upon the Bureau of the
Budget to act for them as an agent in gathering information. Since,
at this date, the report of the joint congressional committee is not
available, the budget herewith transmitted is necessarily framed
upon the assumption of the continuance of normal activities of the
Government already in existence and as now constituted. The
alternative budget, except as to changes in form only, is likewise
based upon the same assumption. I f the report of the joint com*
mittee is accepted in principle and followed by appropriate legisla­
tion, or if any of the existing proposals for the reclassification of the
salaries of civilian employees should be enacted into law, such legis­
lation would greatly simplify the preparation of the budget in
future years.
Neither the budget nor the alternative budget, therefore, contain
any recommendations as to the elimination or regrouping of activi­
ties.
There exists in the present^ grouping of activities under the de­
partments a juxtaposition in many cases of activities so entirely
unrelated to each other in their nature and scope that a regrouping
of them will result in not only a larger measure of direct coordina­
tion by a single supervising authority, but in a more effective com­
mon functioning.
The great waste and extravagance heretofore existing in govern­
mental business administration, however, has not resulted so much
from an admittedly improper grouping of activities in certain de­
partments as it has from a complete lack of Executive control im­
posing coordination between departments and establishments them­
selves. From his contact with the departments and establishments
of the Government the Director of the Budget is glad to state that
as a rule they operate with efficiency and with a considerable degree
of economy, considered as independent organizations. In so far as
the regrouping of scattered activities under one department head
imposes in him a power of coordination by order, regrouping is in




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XLVII

the interests both of efficiency and economy. It must be remembered,
however, that there is a limit, in a Government so large as this, to
effective regrouping. In every well-organized business institution
there must be, of necessity, in some of its constituent parts, certain
agencies which function for the benefit of the part, to enable it prop­
erly to fulfill its relation to the whole. What is, therefore, an appar­
ent separation among the constituent parts of a business organiza­
tion of any given activity is often because the resulting efficiency
of the part is more important than any economy which would be
produced by the consolidation- of the activity.
For example, if the Secret Service of the United States, now
divided into many separate independent agencies responsible to dif­
ferent department heads, should be consolidated as a whole, the
resulting economy in expenditure might produce an inefficiency in
departmental functioning wholly incommensurate with the savings
effected. Centuries of evolution in military organization have pre­
served the principle that in an}' separate service there must be a con­
tinuing responsibility upon any agent responsible for supply directly
to the representative of the service at the point of necessity. A t the
cost of certain theoretical economy each department, to be kept in
the most efficient condition, must have reserved to it a complete con­
trol over certain vital functions. The secret service of the Post Office
Department and of the Treasury Department, for instance, are
highly specialized. The instructions of the head of either of these
departments to the agents of a consolidated national Secret Service
would probably not be carried out as effectively and promptly as
where there is a direct responsibility and dependence on the part of
the agent to the head of the concerned department. Pressure, to be
most effective, must come from the point of necessity direct upon the
agent upon whom is the responsibility for meeting it.
The coordinating control exercised in the Government business
organization by coordinating agencies, and in the military organiza­
tion by the General Staff, in no wise implies a substitution of a
central body for the separate departments or services. Whether a
regrouping of certain governmental activities will result in economy
or not, great care must be taken under a general plan to not build
up central organizations to take over activities heretofore scattered
among the departments where such a course will break down, to
a dangerous extent, the autonomy of the separate departments.
In all successful business organizations there is a compromise,
determined by experience, between a complete centralization of
each activity and its decentralization. A regrouping of activities
should therefore, in the f^rst instance, not be accompanied by plans
setting up new organizations to take over, in their entirety, certain
functions now separately exercised by the independent departments




XLVIII

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

until the practical effect of such a course has had most careful con­
sideration from the standpoint of the resulting effect on efficiency.
THE RELATION OF A UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTING TO TH E PREPARA­
TION OF TH E BUDGET AND ITS CONSIDERATION BY CONGRESS.

The purpose of the budget act is to enable the President, as the
responsible head of the administration of the Government, to present
to Congress an annual business program which shall contain the
necessary information concerning the financial requirements of all
the departments and establishments of the Government, and the
resources from which this program of expenditures may be met, in
such form as clearly to indicate the application of business principles
to the Government’s administrative activities.
One of the most important aids in budget making lies in the
system of accounts. The object of keeping accounts is twofold:
First, to furnish an open record of the financial transactions of the
officers of the Government charged with the responsibility of spend­
ing public moneys; and, second, to furnish the means of holding the
disbursing officer to the faithful discharge of his duties. The first
relates to information, and the second relates to control, the control
being exercised through the critical functions of audit operating on
the accounts. The Bureau of the Budget is primarily concerned
with the information feature of accounting, while the general ac­
counting office is primarily concerned with the control aspect.
The detailed preparation of the budget is largely based upon the
accounts. The presentation of the estimates must necessarily fol­
low the form of the accounts. I f there be confusion in the sys­
tem of accounts it will reappear in the budget. A uniform system
of accounts is, therefore, essential to the intelligent preparation of
the budget in whatever form the latter may be eventually pre­
sented. The records of the detailed receipts and expenditures of
public money should be kept in accordance with some uniform
classification in order that (1) the requirements of the different
departments and establishments may be fully and readily com­
pared; (2) statements of expenditure for the same objects may be
stated in identical language in each spending office, thus facilitat­
ing easy, rapid, and intelligent examination and control; (3) to
furnish a basis for the estimates, the appropriation acts, the report­
ing of financial data, and the audit— all upon a uniform system;
and - (4) to enable a sufficiently concrete picture of the total financial
operations of the Government to be assembled within a reasonable
compass, thus greatly facilitating the examination of the budget
by Congress and eliminating the necessity for much detailed ex­
amination of witnesses.




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

XUX

At the present time there is no such uniform classification in use
by all departments, and the established practice of many years
varies widely in the different departments. Indeed, in the majority
of cases there is no clear distinction drawn between expenditures
of such widely different character as those for ordinary current
expenses of operation and expenditures for the acquisition of prop­
erty which increases the permanent assets of the country.
There is also no uniformity in nomenclature. Accounts are kept
for identical objects of expenditure under various names, and this
variety has naturally found its way into the estimates, into the ap­
propriation acts, and into departmental reports of receipts and
expenditures. For example, “ Contingent expenses” may include
one class of objects for one department and another class for an­
other. The same is true of the loose terms “ General expenses,”
“ Miscellaneous expenses,” and “ Necessary expenses.” Each or­
ganization unit has, to a considerable extent, its own system of ac­
counts. Congress has attempted to control this situation by minute
and specific designations and limitations for each appropriation in
the appropriation acts, but this effort at legislative control has, as is
generally conceded, broken down. It perhaps did operate with
some degree of effectiveness when the Government organization was
relatively small and the expenditures but a fraction of the present
annual outlay.
It is strongly urged that the Comptroller General prescribe the
forms, systems, and procedure for administrative appropriation and
fund accounting, including a uniform standardized classification for
use in the several departments and establishments of the Government,
and that this uniform system and standardized classification be en­
forced through the administrative examination of fiscal officers’ ac­
counts and claims against the United States. This will permit the
preparation of the budget and the making of appropriations, as well
as the reports of all receipts and expenditures of all departments, in
such form as to be clearly intelligible.
This procedure would not only permit a careful analysis of the
expenditures of each department or establishment by its own ad­
ministrative officials, and a more rapid and intelligent audit on the
part of the Comptroller General, but would also permit the Presi­
dent, through the Bureau of the Budget, to make intelligent com­
parisons between the different departments and establishments, as
well as to furnish in much more detailed and instructive manner the
information necessary to intelligently modify requests for appropria­
tions in such a way as to conform with the administrative policy. It
would also greatly shorten the labors of the committees of Congress
dealing with appropriations and the Congress in consideration and
passage of these supply bills.
77891— 21------ iv




1,

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

The essential elements of such a classification fall into five groups:
1. Organization units.
2. Functions or activities.
3. Character of expenditure.
4. Object of expenditure.
5. Funds.
The classification by organization units refers to the setting up
of all records and accounts separately for each executive department
or independent commission, board, bureau, office, agency, or other
establishment of the Government. This primary classification is
crudely accomplished under existing practices.
Classification by functions involves a subdivision of the classifica­
tion by organization units with reference to the results to be accom­
plished by each subdivision of the department or establishment which
may be devoted to the accomplishment of a separate function or series
of functions. This classification by functions is accomplished under
existing practices to a certain extent, but since in the development
of various organizations many subdivisions or units of organization
have developed a plurality of functions in some cases not closely
related, a redistribution, or at least a further division, of such func­
tions will be of benefit.
The classification by character of expenditures involves a distinc­
tion between expenditures of a routine or recurrent character and
expenditures involving the acquisition of property or other assets.
A further analysis by character should be made under each of the
heads mentioned. For instance, the routine or recurrent expenses
should be divided into—
Administrative expenses.
Operating expenses.
Fixed charges.
Kepairs.
Replacements, etc.
The acquisition group should be further classified under such head­
ings as:
Eeal property.
Investments in securities.
Loans to foreign Governments, etc.
The classification by objects of expenditure involves a distinction
referring particularly to the class of object or service purchased and
would involve such headings as:
Compensation for personal services.
For services other than personal.
For materials and supplies.
For buildings and structures, etc.

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

LI

The classification by funds involves a distinction with regard to
the class of funds from which expenditures are made and would in­
volve such heads as:
General funds.
Loan funds.
Special trust funds.
Working capital (or revolving) funds.
The first four of these classifications bear a progressive relation­
ship to each other. That is, total expenditures would be divided
according to organization units; the expenditures of organization
units would be divided according to functions; the expenditures ac­
cording to functions would be divided according to character; and
the expenditures according to character would be divided according
to object.
The fifth classification, by funds from which the expenditures are
made, would be shown separately in the nature of a recapitulation,
and the expenditures from each fund classified as far as possible by
organization unit, character, and function.
While such a classification could not be thoroughly and satisfac­
torily developed without trial and modification in the light of actual
experience in its use, a very reasonable basis for its institution can
undoubtedly be established from a study of various municipal and
commercial classifications which have been highly developed for the
use of such organizations. These classifications which are in satis­
factory operation do not cover so wide a scope as the multitudinous
activities of the Federal Government, but by considering classifi­
cations referring to various types of activity, and the reference of a
tentative classification to the departments and officials concerned,
it is felt that a classification can be established which will require
only minor readjustments in the light of experience.
Section 309 of the budget and accounting act, 1921, directs the
Comptroller General to prescribe the forms, systems, and procedure
for administrative appropriation and fund accounting in the several
departments and establishments, and for the administrative ex­
amination of fiscal officers’ accounts and claims against the United
States. The office of the Comptroller General of the United States
has but recently been established and as a consequence this has not
yet been done, but it is understood that the Comptroller General has
the matter under consideration.
Until such a system is established it will be very difficult to make
an intelligent analysis of the operations and other expenditures of
the several departments and establishments, and since such analysis
frequently furnishes the only possible basis for the intelligent formu­
lation of future policy, this matter is of vital importance, not only







UI

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

to the development of the effective use of the Bureau of the Budget,
but also to the saving of time of the Congress in its careful examina­
tion of the budget.
The institution and enforcement of this system will permit the
Comptroller General to prepare comparative statements of the opera­
tions of the various departments and establishments in such a way as
to show Congress where efficient operation is obtained and where
improvement should be required. It will also permit a comparison
of the actual expenditures with the estimates upon which the appro­
priations were based, not simply in total or by broad classifications
varying with each department, but in detail which will apply equally
to all departments.
CONCLUSION.

In making this report the Director of the Budget will state that
his connection with the bureau is limited as to time, in accordance
with an understanding which he had with the President at the time
of his appointment. His purpose in making this announcement at
this time is to emphasize the fact that his recommendations are
made in an impersonal way, with fundamental business principles
and their proper preservation in their application to governmental
business administration alone in mind.
The Executive regulations recommended, the precedents, customs,
and mode of procedure instituted during the operations of the
Budget Bureau have all been considered in relation to the fact that
it is to be a continuing, impartial, impersonal, business agency of
the Government and not at all with any regard to their effect upon
the existing personnel of the administration or of the bureau. It
is with the same general purpose of preserving the effectiveness of
the Budget Bureau as a business machine that Congress should
approach any question in which is involved a consideration of its
activities.
The Director of the Budget from the inception of the bureau,
in connection with its work, has received assistance impartially
from members of both parties in Congress, from business men, and
from employees of the Government. They have joined with him
in an effort to make the bureau useful, not in any way as concerned
with general policy either of Government or of political parties, but
as a disinterested agency covering routine business matters alone.
The initiative necessarily involved in suggesting and emphasizing
the application of fundamental business principles to the unco­
ordinated system of routine business of Government has naturally
resulted in a temporary and undue prominence being given to the
activities of the bureau in the public mind and in the mind of the
business administration of the Government, such as should not prop­

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

u n

erly attach to it in the future in the interests of its efficiency. Had
not the former uncoordinated condition of the Government’s busi­
ness been productive of such maladministration, the institution of
the Bureau of the Budget and the coordinating agencies created by
Executive order would have been accomplished with the correspond­
ing lack of discussion which would characterize the simple and nat­
ural application of sound business principles to a mismanaged
private organization.
The Director of the Budget desires to express his appreciation of
the invaluable assistance received from his associates in the Bureau of
the Budget.
To Mr. William T. Abbott, the indefatigable, resourceful, and able
Assistant Director of the Budget; to those two great coordinators of
the American Expeditionary Forces, Gen. George van Horn Moseley,
assistant to the director, formerly assistant chief of staff, G -4,
G. H. Q., and Col. Henry C. Smither, chief coordinator, general sup­
ply, formerly assistant chief of staff, G-4, S. O. S .; to that indis­
pensable, able, and constructive assistant to the director, Lieut. Col.
J. C. Roop; to Mr. Donald B. MacLeod, Chief, Division of Estimates,
that man of ability and long experience upon whom we have so greatly
leaned; to my inseparable associate of the long years, Lieut. Francis
J. Kilkenny, assistant to the director; to Mr. Charles W . Collins,
counsel; to Mr. E. J. W . Proffitt, special investigator; to Mr. B. A,
Mattingly, special investigator; to Mr. Howard Baker, assistant to
the director; to Mr. II. Guy Chase, secretary to the director, whose
faithful services recognized no restrictions upon time and labor— the
Director of the Budget desires to make a public expression both of
his deep obligation and high regard.
To the Hon. Francis E. Warren, chairman of the Committee on
Appropriations, United States Senate, and to Hon. Martin B. Mad­
den, the present able chairman of the Committee on Appropriations,
House of Representatives, whose close cooperation with the Bureau of
the Budget is so indispensable to its proper functioning, the Director
of the Budget desires to make public expression of his appreciation
of their assistance.
To Brig. Gen. Herbert M. Lord, Chief Finance Officer of the United
States Army, upon whose advice, time, ability, and great experience
throughout the entire tenure of his office the Director of the Budget
has so continually drawn, he desires to publicly express his gratitude;
as also to Brig. Gen. Charles E. Sawyer, who has been a constant and
successful participant and counselor in the work; to Hon. James W .
Good, one of the founders of the budget law, and to Hon. Swagar
Sherley, who has given so generously of his time and invaluable coun­
sel, both former chairmen of the Committee on Appropriations,
House of Representatives; to Mr. Henry P. Seidemann, of the Insti­
tute for Government Research; and to Mr. Marcellus C. Sheild and







LIV

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

Mr. John C. Pugh, clerk and assistant clerk of the Committee on
Appropriations, House of Representatives.
And finally, sir, to the President of the United States, to whose
assumption of responsibility as the business head of the Government,
in connection with the budget law, is due whatever improvement has
been achieved in the administration of governmental business, and
in whose attitude and great interest lies the hope of further improve­
ment, I desire to express a deep sense of obligation for unstinted
confidence, support, and encouragement.
C h a r l e s G. D a w e s ,
Director of the Bureau of the Budget.
D e c e m b e r 5,1921.
E x e c u t iv e O rder.

I
hereby prescribe the following rules and regulations with regard to the
preparation and submission of the budget and the conduct of the Bureau of the
Budget :
Revision of the estimates.— Pursuant to the provisions of section 207 of the
budget and accounting act, the Bureau of the Budget, under the supervision of
the Director and subject to review and determination by the President, shall
assemble, revise, reduce, or increase the estimates of the departments or estab­
lishments as submitted to the bureau. The Director of the Budget shall de­
termine the plan as to the contents, order, and arrangement of the estimates.
In increasing or decreasing the estimates of the appropriations necessary for
any department or establishment he shall take into consideration any proper
reduction in working forces, reduction in compensation, and the elimination of
unnecessary activities. Estimates, however, in respect to the principal or in­
terest of the public debt shall be subject to revision only with the concurrence
of the Secretary of the Treasury. For the purpose of assisting the President
with information in the formation of business policy for the Government the
estimates of appropriations and of expenditures and receipts, when assembled
and revised by the bureau, shall be transmitted by the director to the President
as soon as possible after their receipt from the departments and establishments
by the bureau, in the form of a consolidated statement of estimated revenue
and expenditure, with supporting schedules.
2.
Concurrently with the transmission of the estimates by the Director of
the Bureau of the Budget to the President, the Secretary of the Treasury shall
transmit a statement for the information of the President, showing, from the
point of view of the Treasury, the relation between the estimated appropria­
tions and expenditures and the estimated receipts of the Government. This
statement shall contain all necessary memoranda and tables, together with
such other comments as may be pertinent to the subject matter of the budget,
including suggestions and recommendations as to how the revenue needs of the
Government may be met. The Secretary of the Treasury shall at the same
time prepare and transmit to the President, for incorporation in the budget,
the figures for the actual expenditures of the Government for the last com­
pleted fiscal year, the figures for the actual and estimated receipts for the
last, the current, and the ensuing fiscal years, required by subdivisions (b ),
(c ), and (<Z) of section 201 of the budget and accounting act, and also the
financial statements required by the provisions of subdivisions ( f ), (g ), and
( h ) of the same section. The Secretary of the Treasury shall, if the estimated
receipts for the ensuing fiscal year, on the basis of laws existing at the time




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

LV

the budget is transmitted, plus the estimated amounts in the Treasury at the
close of the fiscal year in progress available for expenditure in the ensuing
fiscal year, are less than the estimated expenditures for the ensuing fiscal year,
make recommendations to the President for new taxes, loans, or other appro­
priate action to meet the estimated deficiency. If, on the other hand, the aggre­
gate of such estimated receipts and such estimated amounts in the Treasury
is greater than such estimated expenditures for the ensuing fiscal year, the
Secretary, for the information of the President, shall make such recommenda­
tions and suggest such financial measures as in his opinion the public interest
may require. The'Director of the Budget shall make available to the Secre­
tary of the Treasury, at his request, any information in the possession of the
bureau or any of its employees in respect to the receipts and expenditures of
the Government and any other matters that may be pertinent to the business
of the Treasury. The Secretary of the Treasury shall make available to the
Director of the Budget, at his request, any information in the possession of the
Treasury or any of its employees in respect to the receipts and expenditures
of the Government and any other matters that may be pertinent to the business
of the budget.
'3. The Director of the Budget, in gathering information for the use of the
President, acts for the President, and his calls upon the chiefs of bureaus
and other administrative officers for purposes of consultation or information
take precedence over the Cabinet head of a department or any head of an
independent organization.
4. The budget officer in each department, being appointed by the Cabinet
head, will present to the Director of the Budget the views of the Cabinet head
upon the wisdom of conclusions drawn by the Director of the Budget for the
use of the Chief Executive and Congress; but, as in the case of bureau
chiefs and other officers, the call of the Director of the Budget for their presence
and advice takes precedence over the Cabinet head.
5. The coordinating agencies established by the Executive are for the pur­
pose of enabling the President, in matters of routine business, to so coordinate
the activities of the different departments and establishments as will insure
the most economical and efficient expenditure of moneys appropriated by
Congress. They provide the machinery through which, with the minimum
of obstruction and delay, the Executive may impose a unified plan of govern­
mental routine business. The Director of the Bureau of the Budget shall
have general supervision over the work of the coordinating agencies hereto­
fore created by Executive order, subject to such instructions as may hereafter
be issued by the President.
6. The chief coordinator, general supply; appointed under the provisions of
Executive order of July 27, 1921, shall exercise general supervision, subject to
the Director of the Budget, over the coordination of the routine business
activities of the governmental organization, with particular attention to
methods of purchasing, liquidation of supplies, specification of materials,
advertising, warehousing, employment, manufacturing, disbursing, and other
ordinary business activities of the Government.
7. The decision of the chief coordinator, In all matters of coordination,
shall be transmitted to the heads of departments or independent establishments
concerned, and shall be final, except that such heads may appeal to the
Director of the Budget within four days after the receipt of notice of the
coordinating order, and if not sustained by the Director of the Budget may
appeal to the President of the United States within six days after the
decision of the Director of the Budget. I f such appeal is not taken or is




LVI

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

not sustained, the decision in question shall stand, and shall be published to
those affected by the heads of the departments concerned.
S.
The heads of departments and subordinate officials will retain all present
responsibility with respect to individual business transactions, subject to such
policies as may be imposed 111 the manner indicated above.
9. All persons heretofore or hereafter appointed to duty under the chief co*
ordinator, either in Washington or in the corps areas of the country, shall be
regarded as so appointed or detailed by the President of the United States,
and they shall not be subject to reassignment by department heads except as
authorized by Executive order. Such persons shall not be.required to submit
any report to any department except such as may be required as to their loca­
tion or assignment or for purposes of pay, the intention being to prevent any
interference with their direct responsibility to the President of the United
States and his agents, the Director of the Budget and the chief coordinator.
The above does not apply to departmental representatives on the various coordi­
nating boards, and in case of those detailed to coordinating duty in addition
to other duties it applies only with respect to such coordinating duty.
10. All bureau chiefs and employees of the executive Government are di­
rected to furnish any available information desired for purposes of coordina­
tion or to attend any conference 011 coordination at the request of the chief
coordinator. It shall not be necessary for any duly authorized representative
of the Director of the Budget, of the chief coordinator or any coordinating
authority established by Executive order to secure the approval of the head of a
department or military or naval authority of a request for information for
use in connection with the activities of the coordinating bodies. The duly
authorized agents of the Director of the Budget, of the chief coordinator, or
of the coordinating boards shall have access to all books and papers of the
various departments and independent establishments which contain any in­
formation pertinent to the subject under consideration for coordination.
11. All departments and establishments must be so organized for the transac­
tion of matters of routine business as to facilitate their proper cooperation with
the general coordinating agencies. Where the existing form of the organiza­
tion of the routine business of the departments and establishments or the
form of reorganization suggested by the head of the department or establish­
ment does not, in the judgment of the Director of the Bureau of the Budget,
properly meet the requirements of the situation, the Director of the Bureau
of the Budget shall recommend to the President the form which, in his judg­
ment, such departmental organization should take to that end. In his final
determination of the form of organization the President will then consider
the recommendations of the department head or head of the independent
establishment concurrently with those of the Director of the Budget.
12. All coordinating agencies made subject by Executive order to the super­
vision of the Director of the Budget shall make quarterly reports to him of
their activities for transmission by him to the President.
W ar r e n G. H a r d in g .
T h e W h it e H o u se ,

November 8, 1921.
D ig e s t of O rders a n d C ir c u l a r s .
BUREAU OP THE BUDGET.

Circular No. I, June 27, 1921: Requests heads and assistant heads of execu­
tive departments and independent establishments, chief clerks, chiefs and as­
sistant chiefs of bureaus, etc., to be present at a meeting of the administrative
organization of the Government held June 29, 1921.




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

LVII

Circular No. 1, June 29, 1921: Announces the four basic principles of budget
operations in the United States.
No. 1. The Budget Bureau must be impartial, impersonal, and nonpolitical.
No. 2. The Director of the Budget has no responsibility in the matter of
Government business administration under the law save for the administration
of his own bureau; he is simply an adviser of the President and Congress in the
matter of correcting business administration.
No. 3. The Director of the Budget in gathering information acts for the
President and his calls upon the chiefs of bureaus, etc., for purposes of con­
sultation or information take precedence over the Cabinet head of a depart­
ment or any head of an independent organization.
No. 4. The budget representative in each department appointed by the Cabinet
head will present to the Director of the Budget the views of the Cabinet head
upon the wisdom of conclusions drawn by the Director of the Budget, and the
call of the Director of the Budget for their presence and advice takes precedence
over the Cabinet head.
Circular No. 13, June 30, 1921: Invites attention to budget and accounting act,
section 214, paragraphs (a) and (5), and requests advice as to name, position,
location, and telephone number of official in each department and establish­
ment designated as budget officer to prepare departmental estimates and sup­
plemental and deficiency estimates. Directs that replies be addressed to the
Director of the Bureau of the Budget, Treasury Department, and marked
“ Budget Officer.”
Circular No. 2, no date: Directs that bureau chiefs submit estimates to budget
representatives at earliest possible moment, so that budget representatives and
the Director of the Budget in consultation may prepare tentative new budget
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1922, by July 31, 1921. “ While the first
draft of the tentative budget as a whole should be completed by July 31, it will
be continually revised during the year in the interest of economy and efficiency,
and must always be considered as fixing the maximum of expenditure.”
Circular No. 3, June 3 0 ,1 9 2 1 : Directs budget officer of each department, etc.,
to attend meeting to be Ijeld in the office of the Director of the Budget, room
374, Treasury Building, on Friday, July 1, at 10.30 a. m., the meeting to be
called to order by the President of the United States.
July 1 ,1 9 2 1 : Copy of the President’s brief address to the oudget representa­
tives at the meeting called in circular No. 3.
Circular No. 4, July 1 ,1 9 2 1 : First budget regulations: (1) The budget officer
for each department, etc., will secure from the head of each bureau or branch an
estimate of the portion of the funds available for the fiscal year 1922 the ex­
penditure of which is indispensable in carrying on the activities of such bureau
or branch, and the resulting balance which may be saved under each appropria­
tion, and will submit such estimates to the head of his department for approval
or modification, thereafter communicating them to the Director of the Budget,
who will, in his discretion, confer directly with the head of the department,
with a view to a modification of the estimates, or will make recommendations
in regard thereto to the President.
(2) The estimated savings under the several appropriations will be sub­
mitted by the Director of the Budget to the President for his approval, and
upon such approval the balances thus saved will be designated as a *' General
reserve** and so carried under their respective appropriation titles on the
records of the Director of the Budget and of the department.
(3) The amount approved by the President for expenditure under an appro­
priation title shall be considered as the maximum available for obligation dur­




T.VTTT

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

ing tlie fiscal year. Estimates of expenditures, once approved, will be subject
to further study and revision during the fiscal year and all possible additional
savings will be effected. To this end the heads of bureaus will maintain upon
their financial records additional sums reserved from obligations so that, if the
developments of the fiscal year permit, these amounts may be added to the
general reserve.
Circular No. 5, July 6, 1921: Heads of executive departments, etc., ordered
to cause an immediate survey to be made of amount of material, supplies, and
equipment not now being efficiently used. Departmental surplus for which a
specific use within the current fiscal year is not foreseen must be turned over
to the General Supply Committee of the Treasury Department for reissue to
other branches of the Government service.
(2) A thorough investigation of all files must be made with a view to releas­
ing any filing equipment not absolutely essential; active records to be con­
solidated and inactive records removed to less expensive transfer or storage
cases.
(3) Only standard contract articles may be purchased in providing furniture
and equipment for offices in such cases as Government property is not obtain­
able by transfer.
(4) Effort must be made to utilize such types and styles of equipment as are
available from the surplus stock, and where no typewriters are available for
reissue or transfer within the department, used typewriters in possession of the
General Supply Committee of the Treasury Department must be utilized, irre­
spective of make.
Circular No. 6, July 5, 1921: Transmitting Form No. 1 to be used in prepara­
tion of revised budget for the fiscal year 1922, to be submitted to Director of
Budget by July 15, 1921, and instructions for preparation of revised budget on
this form.
Circular No. 7, July 8, 1921: Directing that whenever advertisements for
bids are contemplated in connection with surplus property available for dis­
posal, before such advertisements are made public copies of the same in the
exact form in which intended to be published shall b£ sent to Surplus Property
Division or corresponding agency of each executive department.
Circular No. 8, July 7, 1921: Calling for certain specified information as to
indefinite appropriations and authorizations available for expenditures for
fiscal year 1922 under existing law to be transmitted to the Director of the
Budget by July 15, if possible.
Circular No. 9, July 11, 1921: Additional information in connection with
statement required on Form 1 ; that is, omit increase in compensation and print­
ing and binding paid from departmental and bureau allotments. Include per­
manent and indefinite appropriations for 1922; make no deductions in columns
3 and 5 on account of transfer to civil-service retirement and disability fund.
Take care in the case of special and trust funds not to include credits in column
2 which may also appear as estimated appropriations and expenditures in
column 3. Total appropriations for 1922 (listed) will be basis of column 3
and should be checked with totals made up by Bureau of the Budget before
final completion of statement.
Circular No. 10, July 12, 1921: Calls for report as to what reports are to be
discontinued under authority of second deficiency appropriation act for the
year 1921, approved June 16,1921 (quoted), and estimated savings to be effected
thereby.
Circular No. 11, July 15, 1921: Instructions and sample form for submission
of estimates of appropriations for annual budget and the schedules of expendi­
tures to accompany the same.




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

UX

July 15, 1921, no number: Directing purchasing agents to get in immediate
touch with Shipping Board with an idea to seeing if any of their surplus mate­
rial at Hog Island can be profitably used by another bureau.
Circular No. 12, July 21, 1921: Directing that sales of Government surplus
property cease and all selling agencies dealing with the sale of Government sur­
plus property be so notified until Executive order announcing Institution of
coordinating machinery shall be issued shortly.
This order does not apply to transfers of surplus property from one depart­
ment of the Government to another and is not intended to prevent the depart­
ments from taking advantage of any exceptional or seasonal opportunities for
the sale of property, especially perishable property.
Circular No. 13, July 21, 1921: Modifying requirements of Circular No. 7,
copies of proposed advertisements for bids before publication should be sent to
the following four departments, addressed as indicated, to comply with cir­
cular of July 18. When total value of supplies required at any one time aggre­
gate less than $100, informal inquiry will suffice.
United States Shipping Board, Director of Supply and Sales.
W ar Department, Director of Sales.
Navy Department, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts.
General Supply Committee, the chairman.
Circular No. 14, July 22, 1921: Relative to organization of permanent confer­
ence on printing, purpose, representative, authority, and time of meeting.
Letter of July 23, 1921, in answer to one from Interior Department: Fieldservice requirements should be filled from General Supply Committee surplus
only when required for use within economical shipping distance of Washing­
ton, D. C.
Committee does not crate furniture for shipment but delivers to ordering
office.
When field offices are discontinued, all surplus furniture and supplies should
be promptly reported to General Supply Committee, but should not be for­
warded to General Supply Committee unless specific request is made for
such shipment, as cost of packing and transportation might exceed value of
articles in many cases.
Circular No. 15, July 27, 1921: United States divided into nine areas,
corresponding to nine Army corps areas, and coordinator for general sup­
plies selected for each area. Duties of such coordinator outlined. Office of
chief coordinator, general supply, created in the office of the General Sup­
ply Committee, and his duties outlined. Director of purchases and a director
of sales to be appointed in each executive department, duties, etc.
Circular No. 16, July 29, 1921: Designations of chief coordinator, Col. H.
C. Smither, three assistants in his office; four officers for duty with corps
areas; officers of Navy Department to be announced later.
Circular No. 17, August 2, 1921: Advance report of estimates of appropri­
ations for fiscal year 1923, stated by appropriation titles and amounts only
in order in which they will appear in regular estimates, to be furnished
Director of Budget on or before September 1, 1921. New proposals to be
briefly explained in accompanying note.
Corresponding appropriations for
fiscal year 1922 to be set opposite the amount of the estimates. Report to be
made on estimate blank No. 1 and delivered to Division of Estimates, Bureau
of the Budget. Is preliminary, and does not take the place of the regular
submission of estimates on or before. September 15.
Circular No. 18, August 17, 1921: Construes Executive order of August 27,
1919, as imposing upon the General Supply Committee duty of searching for




LX

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

articles needed by departments where there is reason to believe that such arti­
cles can be spared by another department. Amends Budget Circular No. 7,
making necessary to send inquiries only to General Supply Committee. Amends
Budget Circular No. 13, eliminating necessity of referring requirements where
total amount involved does not exceed $100 and where good business judgment
dictates that transfer is not economical.
Circular No. 19, August 17, 1921: Director of the Budget will not view with
favor any salary increases or perfunctory enlargement of clerical forces. In
preparing estimates for 1923 all possible economies relative to purchase and
handling equipment and supplies, use of office space, limitation of printing, or
any activities not absolutely necessary, should receive careful attention.
Circular No. 20, August 16, 1921: Whenever one department receives from
another department under a law of general application material, equipment,
lands, etc., which the law permits to be transferred without funds, an amount
equal to the value of the properties transferred should be set aside by the
receiving department in its “ General reserve.” (See Order No. 4, July 1, 1921.)
When supplies are transferred from one department to another, they are to be
used directly by department receiving them, unless otherwise specified by law.
Circular No. 21, August 16, 1921: Makes head of each department or estab­
lishment responsible for distribution within his department of Executive orders
received from Bureau of the Budget.
Circular No. 22, August 18, 1921: The jurisdiction, control, and custody' of
Government-owned property vested by law in Secretary of the Treasury (30
Stat., 614) is extended to cover all rented premises outside District of Columbia
and military reservations, except those specifically designated by law. Au­
thority delegated to Secretary of the Treasury to be exercised through Super­
vising Architect Secretary of the Treasury shall designate an official, with
sufficient personnel, as surveyor general of real estate, who will act under
general direction of chief coordinator general supply.
The duties of the
surveyor general of real estate will be to collect all necessary information per­
taining to owned or leased real estate of whatsoever character or wheresoever
situated, and to determine what changes should be made in interest of General
T
Government. The surveyor general of real estate shall be assisted by area
coordinators in collection of information, etc., and heads of departments shall
furnish such information as he requests. He shall have power to assign and
reassign to Federal officers and employees, in his discretion, offices and rooms in
Federal buildings, but no such action will be taken until after conference with
head of department. The surveyor general shall have authority, subject to
approval of Secretary of the Treasury, to abrogate or terminate existing leases
by negotiation, or notice, or other action thereunder. No leases of premises
for Government uses for a period longer than one year or for an annual rental of
more than $500 shall be made except upon approval of surveyor general of
real estate and Secretary of the Treasury. The Secretaries of War and Navy
shall supply surveyor general of real estate with general information regard­
ing Government-owned and leased property on Government reservations for use
in economic adjustment and concentration of Government depots and housing
facilities. It is not intended that the surveyor general interfere with alloca­
tion by heads of departments of their real estate for purpose of their depart­
mental use, but to advise heads of departments and establishments of improve­
ments suggested by records of his office.
Circular No. 23, August 18, 1921: It is manifestly to the best interests of the
General Government at present to supply one department as far as possible
from stocks of another department, although articles so furnished have not been




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

LXI

declared surplus, since some stocks are still abnormal and have not been ad­
justed to present conditions, irrespective of any apparent situations as to de­
clared surpluses* Requests should be made on General Supply Committee and
chief coordinator to take steps with view to having desired articles made
available.
Circular No. 24, August 22, 1921: Director of the Budget should be furnished
each month, not later than the 15th, a statement of total actual disbursement
for preceding month; also statement of additions, if any, to “ General reserve,”
or savings, as defined in paragraphs 2 and 3 of first Budget regulations. (Bu­
reau of the Budget circular dated July 1, 1921.)
Circular No. 25, August 25, 1921: Federal Purchasing Board. There shall
be organized in General Supply Committee a directorate of purchases to be
known as the Federal purchasing board, to be composed of one representative
from each department having authority to purchase supplies. The board will
have assigned to it all questions of purchase of the several departments and
establishments represented on it. While the power to purchase and coordinate
purchases is centralized in the board, it shall be its policy to decentralize admin­
istration matters and actual execution of purchase. Such articles as are
needed in common by all departments will be allocated by board to proper
department best fitted, in its opinion, to perform that particular function for
whole Government service. Board will endeavor to standardize requirements
so that joint purchasing may be the rule. It shall be duty of board to formu­
late plans and policies designed to knit purchasing activities of the several
departments into a Federal business association and to bring about business
methods such as will effectively safeguard interests of the Government service
and promote confidence of private business interests in dealing with the Gov­
ernment. The chief coordinator, who will act as chairman, will be responsible
for efficiency of board.
Circular No. 26, August 25, 1921: Federal Liquidation Board: There shall be
organized in the General Supply Committee a directorate of sales to be known
as the Federal liquidation board, to be composed of one representative from
each department having sales activities. Its duties shall be to formulate plans
and policies designed to knit sales activities of the several Government depart­
ments concerned in liquidation of stocks into an association and bring about
business methods such as will effectively safeguard the Government’s interests
and to promote confidence of private business interests in doing business with the
Government The chief coordinator will be responsible for efficiency of the
board.
Circular No. 27, August 25 ,192 1: The efficient and economical management of
the Government Printing Office requires that orders, so far as possible, be
executed in order of receipt. Disarrangement of this plan by putting through
orders for rush work results in extra expense, otherwise unnecessary, amount­
ing to over $300,000 annually. Orders for rush work, therefore, should be held
down to a minimum and should receive approval of department representative
of permanent conference on printing before being executed.
Circular No. 28, September 1, 1921: Requests examination and report of pur­
chases and contracts made in June, 1921, to see that contracts and obligations
have not been entered into in June for the purpose of leaving no unobligated
balance to credit of bureau at the close of the fiscal year, and as check against
further continuance of such practice.
Circular No. 29, September 2 ,1 9 2 1 : Requests estimate of expenditures during
year 1923 “ out of unexpended or unobligated balances remaining to your credit
from appropriations Of previous years of every class except definite annual
appropriations ” not later than September 5.




LXU

REPOET OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

Circular No. 30, September 8, 1921: Specific instructions for arriving at esti­
mate called for in Circular No. 29.
Circular No. 31, September 12, 1921: Instructing department representative to
attend meeting September 16, at which subject of coordination of motor trans­
portation used by departments and independent establishments of Government
in the District of Columbia will be discussed, and to be prepared to inform chief
coordinator of number of motor vehicles now in use by department.
Circular No. 32, September 13, 1921: Requiring statements (a) of buildings
rented within District of Columbia for use of Government, (b) of Governmentowned buildings in District of Columbia, and (c) of employees below fair stand­
ard of “ efficiency ” to accompany annual estimates of appropriations to Bureau
of Budget.
Circular No. 33, September 15, 1921: Calling for survey of all telephone equip­
ment now in use and requesting sis regulations re telephone service therein
enumerated to be enforced.
Circular No. 34, September 19, 1921: Rescinding Circular No. 12 in so far as
it directed the stopping- and suspension of sales of Government property.
Circular No. 35, September 23, 1921: Requiring the head of each executive
department, etc., to name representative in each area in which motor vehicles
are in operation, said representative to inform area coordinator of location,
kind, and number of all motor transportation, etc., and area coordinator will
form plan for coordinating use of motor transport to meet interests of General
Government.
Circular No. 36, September 28, 1921: Designating Col. Clarence O. Sherrill,
officer in charge of public buildings and grounds, as coordinator motor trans­
portation, District of Columbia, to carry out provisions of Circular No. 35.
Circular No. 37, October 4, 1921: Authorizing the chief coordinator, general
supply, to exempt from the operation of Bureau of the Budget Circular No. 7,
July 8, 1921, as amended by Circular No. 13 (par. 3 ), July 21, 1921, and Cir­
cular No. 18 (par. 3 ), August 17,1921, such items as are known not to be in sur­
plus in any department, such items as are obviously impractical of transfer due
to distant location of the requiring agency, services required in connection with
delivery, public service utilities, etc.; calls attention to the fact that responsi­
bility rests with every department head to insure that every proposed purchase
of his department not specifically exempted is forwarded to the General Supply
Committee.
Circular No. 38, October 7, 1921: Instructing that if supplemental or de­
ficiency appropriations are actually needed they be transmitted to Director of
Bureau of the Budget for his investigation and recommendations before October
20, 1921. Letter of transmission and supporting documents should indicate
clearly that there has been no waste in expenditures nor obligations incurred
against either the letter or spirit of antideliciency act.
Circular No. 39, October 10, 1921: Transmits a communication from the
Bureau of the Census regarding use of punching, sorting, and tabulating ma­
chines of the Census Bureau by other departments, with request that the matter
be given consideration to determine whether such use can not be made with
benefit to the Government as a whole.
Circular No. 40, October 11, 1921: Requests information as to how much
“ repay ” printing will actually be required during the next fiscal year, giving
proper consideration to the elimination of all documents and reports where the
public benefit is not commensurate with the expense.
Circular No. 41, October 10, 1921: Creating the Federal traffic board for
the purpose of effecting economies and better business administration through­
out the Government services in the handling of passenger and freight ship­
ments, as well as shipments by express and parcel post. The board is estab­




REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

LXIII

lished under the general supervision of the chief coordinator, general supply.
It will make complete study of traffic problems in cooperation with representa­
tives of the Interstate Commerce Commission and of the carriers. It will establish
uniform classifications and plans for improving and standardizing methods of
making shipments and settling accounts. The activities shall be directed by the
coordinator for traffic under general direction of the chief coordinator, gen­
eral supply. The head of each department and establishment s^hall immediately
designate one representative to serve as a member of the board and report his
name to the chief coordinator, general supply, who will call the initial meet­
ing. Heads of departments and establishments will furnish the necessary in­
formation and clerical assistance. Classifications and instructions shall, as
far as applicable and in conformity with the law, be binding on all departments
and establishments. All questions of this character requiring remedial meas­
ures to be submitted to the coordinator for traffic for adjustment or the pres­
entation of a complaint to the Interstate Commerce Commission. In the event
of disagreement as to classifications or instructions or on methods of procedure,
the case will be submitted to the chief coordinator, general supply, whose
decision shall be final, subject only to an appeal to the head of the department
concerned.
Circular No. 42, October 10, 1921: Establishing the Federal specifications
board for the purpose of coordination and economy in the procurement of
material and services used by the Government under specifications prepared
in the various branches thereof, to avoid duplication of effort, and the better
utilization of resources and industries. It will compile and adopt standard
specifications and bring specifications into harmony with the best commercial
practice wherever conditions permit. The Director of the Bureau of Standards
is ex officio chairman of the board, and shall select committees and direct meet­
ings, subject to the approval of the chief coordinator, general supply. The
head of each department and establishment purchasing materials or services
in accordance with specifications prepared in such department shall immedi­
ately designate one representative to serve as a member of the Federal speci­
fications board and such assistants as may be necessary. The chief coordi­
nator, general supply, shall call the initial meeting of the board. Specifica­
tions prepared and adopted by the board and approved by the Director of the
Bureau of Standards shall as far as applicable be binding upon all depart­
ments and establishments. In the event of disagreement the decision of the
chief coordinator, general supply, shall be final, subject only to appeal to the
head of the department concerned.
Circular No. 43, October 17, 1921: Designating Commander C. G. Mayo,
United States Navy, as coordinator for traffic. (See Circular No. 41, Oct. 10,
1921.)
Circular No. 44, November 1, 1921: Creating Federal board of hospitaliza­
tion for the purpose of coordinating the separate hospitalization activities of
the Army, the Navy, the Public Health Service, St. Elizabeths Hospital, the
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Indian affairs, and Veterans’
Bureau. The board shall consist of a chief coordinator, designated by the
President, who shall be president of the board, Surgeon General of the Army,
Surgeon General of the Navy, Surgeon General of the Public Health Service,
the Superintendent St. Elizabeths Hospital, the president Board of Managers
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, the Commissioner of Indian
Affairs, and the Director of the United States Veterans’ Bureau. The board
shall consider all questions relative to coordination of hospitalization of the
departments represented. It shall standardize requirements, expedite inter­
departmental use of existing facilities, and eliminate duplication in the pur­
chase of supplies and the erection of buildings. It shall formulate plans to
knit together in proper coordination the activities of the several departments




LXIV

REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF BUREAU OF THE BUDGET.

and establishments with a view to safeguarding the interests of the Govern­
ment and to increasing the usefulness and efficiency of the several organiza­
tions, and shall report to the President thereon. The president of the board
shall be responsible for its efficiency and for developing its activities along prac­
tical lines. His decision shall be final, subject to appeal by a member to
his own immediate superior.
Circular No. 45, November 3, 1921: Appointing Gen. Charles E. Sawyer chief
coordinator of the board of hospitalization. (See Circular No. 44.)
Circular No. 40 (dated Nov. 9, 1921) : Directing that the heads of depart­
ments and establishments shall, when calling for bids for manufactured arti­
cles, forward a copy of the circular advertisement to the W ar Department
Arsenal Orders Branch in order to obtain bids where the W ar Department
arsenals can economically manufacture such articles. Failure to submit an
estimate or reply to an inquiry before the time designated for opening bids
will indicate the inability of the War Department to manufacture the articles
under consideration. The Arsenal Orders Branch will furnish full information
regarding the conditions under which orders for manufacture above referred to
are accepted.
Circular No. 47, November 22, 1921: Creates an interdepartmental board of
contracts and adjustments, for the purpose of standardizing contract forms and
securing the adoption of uniform policies in connection therewith. Each de­
partment is directed to organize a -department board for similar purposes.
The chairmen of the several department boards, together with representatives
of the independent establishments, constitute the interdepartmental board of
contracts and adjustments. The chairman of the board shall be the represent­
ative of the Secretary of the Treasury, and the board shall adopt such by-laws
and appoint such committees and subcommittees as may be necessary and ad­
visable. The functions-of the board shall be—
First, to standardize forms and methods of contract letting, with a view to
fostering economy and promptness of execution and eliminating hazards to be
assumed by the contractor which have hitherto increased, the cost of Gov­
ernment work.
Second, to recommend general policies in the settlement of outstanding obliga­
tions arising out of contracts.
Third, in an advisory capacity, when requested by the head of a department
or establishment, to review and revise important contracts; to advise officers
concerning interpretation of contracts and to assist in the negotiation of con­
tracts.
The chairman of the board is charged with the responsibility for its efficient
operation and development. His decision will be final, subject to appeal by
any member to the head of his department or establishment, whose decision
shall then be final.

BUDGET STATEMENTS.
77891— 21------ v







B u d g e t S t a t e m e n t N o . 1.

Balanced statement of (1) the condition of the Treasury at the end of the fiscal year 1921,'{2) the estima ted condition of the
Treasury at the end of the fiscal year m progress, 1922, and (3) the estimated condition of the Treasury at the end of the
ensuing fiscal year, 1923.
Reference to
statement.
1921, actual.*

1923, estimated.

No.

1922, estimated.

$16,265,215. 00
227,045.00
10, 432, 624. 00

$15, 984,446.00
227,045.00
11, 406,032.00

$18,994,565.17
197, 341. 68
8,780,796.84

168, 997,160. 00

169.871.163.00

476,352,192. 21

369, 902,107. 00
7, 358, 839. 00
431, 754,000. 00

389.091.406.00
7, 219, 849. 00
478, 850,000.00

1,101, 615,013.32
16,461,409. 47
650,373, 835.58

41,799,022.00
31, 883,000. 00
252,350,000.00

35,005,829.00
33,135,000. 00
258,400,000.00

39, 687, 094. 86
41,470, 807. 60
260, 611, 416.13

3,357,092. 00
21, 509, 666.00

3,276,454.00
48,172, 270.00

47,497, 530.00
2 125,700,000.00
19, 939, 970.00
6,301,835.00
3,973, 675.00
14,442,006,00

48, 637,100. 00
2 105, 000, 000. 00
20,131, 800.00
4.796.916.00
3.171.047.00
13, 654,521.00

62, 385, 702. 93
57,452,056.48
30, 828, 761. 55
8,502,509. 55
3,869,225.06
13, 337,192. 97

50,495, 735* 00
455,232,702.00

73, 911,081. 00
438,122,400.00

130,723,268. 26

5, 529,244.00

337, 679,235. 00
• 4, 756,344.00

730, 711, 669. 98
104, 671, 772. 62

17, 034,583.00

16,983,165.00

83, 596,418. 52

25,070, 877.00

22, 275,063.00

22,558, 264.16

Pase.

a5
a5
a5
a6
a6

a

8

a9
a9

A lO

a 12
a !2

a 12
a 21
a !2

a 14
a 14
a 15
a 15
a 16
a 16
a 16
a 16
a !6

A17
a 17

Al7
a 17
Al7

A. Expenditures:
1. Ordinary expenditures—
1. Legislative..*...............................................................
2. Executive Office (excludes independent offices)___
3. State Department............................................................
4. Treasury Department (includes War Risk Insur­
ance in 1921 and excludes investment of Govern­
ment life insurance fund)...........................................
5. War Department—
1. War Department, exclusive of Panama Canal.
2. Panama Canal.......................................................
6. Navy Department...........................................................
7. Interior Department—
1. Interior Department, exclusive of Indian
Service, pensions, and civil service retire­
ment fund investment.....................................
2. Indian Service......................................................
3. Pensions.................................................................
8. Post Office Department, exclusive of Postal Service,
payable from postal revenues—
1. Department proper..............................................
2. Deficiencies m postal revenues........................
9. Department of Agriculture—
1. Department of Agriculture, exclusive of
“ good roads” ......................................................
2. Good roads..................... .......................................
10. Department of Commerce..........................................
11. Department of. Labor......................................................
12. Department of Justice.....................................................
13. Judicial...............................................................................
14. Independent offices—
1. Shipping Board and Emergency Fleet Cor­
poration ................................................................
2. United States Veterans’ Bureau......................
3. Railroad administration and transportation
act, 1920................................................................
4. Federal Board for Vocational Education..___
5. Ail other, including War Finance and Grain
Coiporations........................................................
15. District of Columbia (excludes teachers>retirement
fund investment)...........................................................
16. Miscellaneous—
1. Increase of compensation.....................................
2. Purchase of obligations of foreign Governments
3. Purchase of farm loan bonds...........1...............
17. Deduct: Unclassified repayments, etc.....................

35,000,000.00
73,896, 697.44
16, 781.320. 79
922, 593.14

2] 574, 758,166.00

4,088,295, 848.20

283, 838,800.00
30.500.000.00
25.000.000.00

272,442,200.00
30, 500,000.00
25.000.000.00

261,100,250.00
73.939.300.00
26.348.950.00

30.000.000.00

60.000.000.00

60.724.500.00

369,338,800.00

387, 942,200.00

422,113,000.00

T O T A L O R D I N A R Y E X P E N D IT U R E S .. 2,127,053, 927.00
a 18

2. Reduction in principal of public debt— payable out of
ordinary receipts—
1. Sinking fund.......................................................................
2. Purchase of Liberty bonds from foreign repayments..
3. Redemption of bonds and notes from estate taxes.. .
4. Redemption of securities from Federal reserve
banks franchise tax receipts.........................................
Total reduction in principal of public
debt—payable out of ordinary re­
ceipts.......................................................... .

5, 230, 650.15
130,128,458.02

1On basis of Daily Treasury Statement, June 30, 1921.
* Includes estimated additional expenditures authorized by act of Nov. 9,1921.




▲
3

A4

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Balanced statement of (1) the condition of the Treasury at the end of the fiscal year 1921, (2) the estimated condition of the
Treasury at the end of the fiscal year in 'progress, 1922, and {& the estimated condition of the Treasury at the end of the
)
ensuing fiscal year, 1923— Continued.
1

Reference to
statement.
1923, estimated.
No.

1922, estimated.

1921, actual.

$20, 162, 000. 00

$22, 022, 000. G
O

|20, 325,152. 88

8,200,000. 00

8, 200,000. 00

S, 161, 956. 87

34, 302, 000. 00

30, 222..000. 00

28,487,109. 75

975, 000, 000. 00

975,000, 000. C
O

999,144, 731.35

3, 907, 922, 366. 00

5, 538, 040, 689. 30

2,110,000.000. 00
1.104; 500, 000. 00

3,206.046,157.74
1,390,3S0, 823. 28

3,214,500,000.00
275, 000,000. 00

4,596,426,981.02
308, 564, 391. 00

Pairo.

A. Expenditures— Continued.

2 1

A. Investment of trust fund?—
1. Government life Insurance Fund..............................
2. Civil Service Retirement Fund and District of
Columbia Teachers’ Retirement Fund..................

a 18

Total trust fund investments.....................
Al8
a 25

6

4. Interest on the public debt.......................... .........................

G R A N D T O T A L E X P E N D IT U R E S , including
trust fund investments, sinking fund, and other reduc­
tion in principal of the public debt, payable out of

j
3

j

Al9

j

B. Ordinary receipts:
1. Internal-revenue receipts—
1. Income and profits tax................................................... 1, 715,000,000.00
896, 000, 000.00
2. Miscellaneous....................................................................
Total internal-revenue receipts2.............. 2,611. 000,000. 00
330,000,000. 00
2. Customs receipts..........................................................................
3. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and
397,182, 750. 00
trust funds...................................................................................

G R A N D TOTAL. O R D IN A R Y R E C E IP T S 1**. 3,338,182, 750.00

a 20

453, 953, 663. 00

719, 941, 588. 89

3,943, 453, 663.00

5, 624, 932, 960. 91

C. Excess of ordinary receipts over expenditures payable therefrom
D. Excess of estimated expenditures payable from ordinary re­
ceipts over ordinary receipts........................................................
E. Balance in general fund at beginning of year................................
11

a 41

167,571, 977. 00
420,125, 250. 84

24,468, 703. 00
444, 593,953. 84

357,7oi, 682.23

F. Balance in general fund at end of year.............................................

252,553,273. 84

420,125, 250. 84

3 444,593,953.84

86,892,271.61

1 To resrmcile these tDtals with those sho;vn in the Treasury report, it is necessary to add to the above figures for both receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year 1922 the sum
of $25,000,000 and for the fiscal year 1923, 87,000,050, on account of reduction of capital stock of the United States Grain Corporation. This transaction for 1922 occurred after the
preparation of the statement of estimated expenditures for 1922, made by the Secretary of the Treasury, Aug. 4, 1921, amounting to the sum of $4,550,000,000.
a Internal revenue collections for the fiscal years 1923 and 1922 are estimated on basis of act of Nov. 23, 1921.
* To agree with Treasury Statement of June 30, 1921, aid the balance of S105,0S4,151.92, which represents the balance of public deb treceipts (loan funds) on June 30,1921.




BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A5

B u d get Sta te m e n t N o . 2.

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years.
D

e t a il

by

O r g a n i z a t i o n U n it s

and

Ch a r a c te r

of

E x p e n d it u r e s .

[Supports summary Budget Statement No. I.]
Classification.

Estimated; 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.1

1. ORDINARY EXPENDITURES:
1. L E G I S L A T I V E —
1. Current operations—
1. Senate—
1. Salaries and mileage of Senators..................................................
2. Salaries, officers and employees...................................................
3. OnTjtingpnt fixpfmsfis.
....... ........ ........ ......... . . . _____
4. Gratuities and miscellaneous........................................................

$771,000.00
1,200,000.00
240,000.00
23,000.00

$771,000.00
1,230,000.00
300,000.00
22,240.00

Total, Senate..............................................................................

2,234,000.00

2,323,240.00

2,470,110.61

2. House of Representatives—
1. Salaries and mileage of Members and Delegates.....................
2. Salaries, officers and employees...................................................
3. Contingent expenses.......................................................................
4. Gratuities and miscall unions - ...
. - -.. .

3.449.500.00
2.161.025.00
334,735.00
54,740.00

3.449.500.00
2.179.478.00
175,782.00
4,240.00

3,637,900.05
2,459, 906.30
461,001. 65
60,000.00

Total, House of Representatives...........................................

6,000,000.00

5,809,000.00

6, 618,808.00

11,000.00

58,957.15

129, 938.00
815.691.00
5,737,782.00
413.762.00

183.790.00
850.710.00
5,216,060.00
398.790.00

2 1,424,887. 35
913,900.18
5,750,950.82
226,342.56

7,097,173.00

6, 649,350.00

8,316,080.91

594, 501.00
110,000.00
129,350.00
10,000.00
800.00

466.173.00
100,000.00
121.205.00
8,000.00
800.00

598,067.61
141,516.77
115,749.90
8,455.34
641.00
22,195.16

844, 651.00

696,178.00

886, 625.78

3. Legislative miscellaneous..........................................................................
4. Government Printing Office—
1. Salaries............................................................................................... .
2. Leaves of absence and pavment for holidays...........................
3. Public printing and binding........................................................ ;
4. Office of superintendent of documents......................................
Total,’ Government Printing Office......................................
5. Library of Congress—
1. Salaries...............................................................................................
2. Increase of Library
.
3. Care and maintenance....................................................................:
4. Contingent expenses..................................... ..................................
5, Trust fund, bequest of Gertrude M. Hubbard, interest.........
6; Miscellaneous............... ....................................................................
Total, Library of Congress......................................................

$811,212.24
1,445, 535.37
213,363.00
,

6. Botanic Garden—
1. Salaries................................................................................................
47,391.00
47.391.00
57,067.16
2. Improvements...................................................................................
26.725.00
25j 866.49
42,000.00
Total, Botanic Garden.............................................................

89,391.00

74,116.00

82,933.65

Total, current operations, legislative...................................

16,265,215.00

15,562,884.00

18,433,516.10

2. Public works—
1. Memorial to Abraham Lincoln.................................................................

421,562.00

47,350.12

Total, public works, legislative.............................................

421,562.00

47,350.12
18,480,866.22
513,698.95

3. Add cash expenditures in excess of warrant distribution.............................
Total, legislative........................................................................

16,265,215.00

15,984,446.00

18,994,565.17

2. E X E C U T IV E O F F IC E —
j
1. Current operations—
i
1. Salary of the President...............................................................................
2. Salary of the Vice President.....................................................................
3. Salaries and expenses, Executive office................................................
4. Miscellaneous................................................................................................

75.000.00
12.000.00
115,045.00
25,000.00

75.000.00
12.000.00
115,045.00
25,000.00

75.000.00
12.000.00
120,799.68
3,091.57

Total, current operations, Executive office......................... 1

227,045.00

227,045.00

210,891.25
210,891.25
13,549.57

2. Deduct warrant distribution in excess of cash disbursements....................
Total, Executive office............................................................

227,045.00

227,045.00

197,34l. 68

* Actual expenditures by warrant for fiscal year 1021, brought to cash expenditures, as per Treasury statement, by adjustment of departmentalt otals. Increase of compensation
included in 1921.
* Includes increase of compensation in 1921 for all branches of Government Printing Office




THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

A6

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e ta il b y

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n it s a n d

C h a ra cte r

o f E x p e n d i t u r e s — Continued.

i
Classification.

Estimated, 1923.

|

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

1. O R D IN A R Y E XP E N D ITU R E S— Continued.

3. S T A T E D E P A R T M E N T —
1. Current operations—
1. Department proper—
]. Salaries and expenses...................................................................
2. Increase of compensation.................................. *......... ..
3. Miscellaneous items
..................................................................

$867,363.00

$856,575.00

113, 820. 00

109,020.00

$952, 703.16
156,535. 65
204,027.13

Total, department proper...........................................

981,183.00

965, 595.00

1, 313, 265. 94

1,454, 728.00
3, 488, 300.00
800,000. 00
1,185, 000.00
250, 000.00

1.382.000. 00
3, 354, 750.00
800,000.00
1.000.000.00
250,000.00

1,329,126.01
2,213, 243. 78
967,353.41
705,106.15
431, 219.18

400, 000.00

252, 615. 98

2. Foreign intercourse—
1. Diplomatic salaries............... .........................................................
2. Consular salaries..............................................................................
3. Contingent expenses, foreign missions......................................
4. Contingent expenses, consulates.................................................
5. Post allowances......................................................* .......................
6. Emergencies arising in the Diplomatic and Consular
....................................................................................
Services
7, fV )fprifvnce on T/inutatirvn of ArmnmfiTltfl
>T
-, , ,
__
8. Miscellaneous items........................................................................

819, 935. 00

583.000.00
200.000.00
1,571,752.00

Total, foreign intercourse. .........................................

8, 397,963.00

9,141,502.00

6,310, 553.49

3. International bureaus and commissions................................................

465, 428. 00

710,835.00

407, 970.53

4. Nonadministrative expenses—
1. Payment to Republic of Panama................................................
2. Relief and protection of American seamen..............................
3. Prisons for American convicts in foreign lands.......................
4. Rescuing shipwrecked American seamen.................................
5. Miscellaneous payments................................................................

250.000. 00
220.000.00
15,000.00
3, 000.00
50.00

250, 000. 00
220,000.00
15,000.00
3, 000. 00
100.00

250,000.00
208,184.46
5, 982. 92
3,354. 95
50.00

Total, nonadministrative expenses..........................

488,050. 00

488,100. 00

467,572. 33

Total, current operations, State Department........

10,332, 624.00

11,306,032.00

8,499,462.29

2. Trust funds—
1. Estates of decedents...................................................................................
2. Other...............................................................................................................

2,000.00
98,000. 00

2,000.00
98,000.00

1, 377.49
60, 570.86

Total, trust funds, State Department......................

100,000. 00

100,000. 00

61, 948.35'
8,561,310. 64
219,486.20

3. Add cash expenditures in excess of warrant distribution............................
Total, State Department............................................

411,888. 98

10,432,624.00

11,406,032.00

8,780,796.84

944,724.00

1,008,691.00

778, 520.00

924,090.00

1,653,141. 83
14,154,309.10
946,390. 82
933,014.46

4. T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T —
1. Current operations—
1. General—
1. Salaries, Secretary’s Office and divisions thereof...................
2. Increase of compensation..............................................................
3. Contingent expenses of the department....................................
4. Miscellaneous items.........................................................................
Total, general.........................................................

2. Miscellaneous offices...............................................................................

1, 723,244.00

1,932,781.00

17, 686,856. 21

1,960,930.00

1,981,361.00

1,833,774.20

3. Bureau of War Risk Insurance 1
—
1. Salaries and expenses......................................................................

9,553,867.07

2. Nonadministrative expenses—
1. Military and naval compensation...................................
2. Military and naval family allowances............................
3. Military and naval insurance.....................................
4. Medical and hospital service............................................
5. Government life insurance fund.....................................

127,416,407.31
14,855,449.26
75,852, 541.96
4, 989,765. 46
2,526,624.08

Total, nonadministrative expenses..........................

225,640,788.07

Total, War Risk Bureau..............................................
4. Federal Farm Loan Board ...........................................................
5. Bureau of the Budget.................................................................................
Included in X . S. Veterans Bureau for 1922 and 1923. (Independent Offices, item 14).
T




235,194,655.14

260.420.00
154.800.00

242,220.00
160,000.00

208,416.75
5,000.00

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

a7

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 19B3> compared with prior years— Continued.
D e ta il b y

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n it s a n d

C h a ra cte r

o f E x p e n d itu r e s —

Continued.

Estimated, 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

$11,550, 000. 00
160,000.00

$11,400,000. 00
211, 000. 00

$10,813, 748. 57
9, 536. 42

3. Nonadministrative expenses (refunds, drawbacks, etc.)—
1. Debentures or drawbacks, bounties or allowances. .
2. Repayments to importers, excess of deposits............
3. Other refunds and drawbacks.........................................

15,000,000.00
7,000,000.00
39, 700. 00

20, 300, 000.00
6,700,000.00
10,400.00

10,948, 364.23
12, 522,339. 74
38,199.46

Total,nonadministrative expenses.

22,039, 700.00

27,010,400. 00

23,508,903.43

Total, Customs Service........................

33, 749, 700.00

38, 621,400.00

34,332,188.42

Classification.

1. ORDINARY EXPEND ITU RES— Continued.
4 . T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T — Continued.
1. Current operations—Continued.
6. Customs Service—
1. Collecting the customs revenues............ *____
2. Compensation in lieu of moieties and scales.

Internal Revenue Service—
1. Expenses of collecting.. ..............................................................
2. Enforcement of prohibition and narcotic acts........................
3. Miscellaneous items.......................... .............................................
4. Nonadministrative expenses, refunding taxes erroneously
collected........................................................................................

42, 999,190.00
10,000,000.00
35,000.00

37,229,190.00
7, 500,000.00
35,000. 00

33,138, 636.45
6,819,486. 23
13,942. 67

13,212,000.00

1 13, 268,600.00

30,503, 919.08

Total, Internal Revenue Service.

66,246,190. 00

58,032, 790. 00

70,475, 984.43

420,440.00
10,394, 205.00

415,440.00
10, 776, 876.00

2 3, 407, 596. 08
3 338,131. 27
358,184.42
5, 572, 770. 76

2,633,000.00
1,375, 670.00

1, 860,000.00
1,395,330.00

658, 605. 75
1,489, 619.11

5,504,041.00
1, 030,105.00

6,698,532.00
966,660. 00

14,034, 731. 52
665, 710.37

6, 534,146.00

7, 665,192. 00

14, 700, 441. 89

11,631,167.00

12,825,155. 00

12, 805,403.07

6,029,382.00
500.000.00
3, 990, 000.00

4, 633,470.00
501.000. 00
4,297,000.00

17,812, 997.31
952, 307. 69
35,437, 847.37

760.000.00

200.000.00

11,279,382.00

9, 631,470. 00

54,203,152. 37

7,544, 820. 00

7, 709,580.00

7,730, 920. 95

230,000. 00
50,000.00

253,000. 00
50,000. 00

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

Accounting offices.....................................................................................
Sub treasuries..............................................................................................
Secret Service, suppressing counterfeiting and other crimes........ .
Bureau of Printing and Engraving.......................................................
Preparation and issue of Federal reserve notes and farm loan
bonds (reimbursable)...........................................................................
13. Mint Establishment...............................................................................

14. Commissioner of the Public Debt—
1. Salaries and expenses of loans.....................
2. Distinctive paper for United States securities.
Total, Commissioner of the Public Debt.
15. Coast Guard.
16. Public Health Service—
1. Salaries and expenses...................................................................
2. Epidemic diseases.........................................................................
3. Medical and hospital services...................................... ..............
4. Nonadministrative— aid to States and universities in pro­
tecting military and naval forces against venereal diseases
Total, Public Health Service...................................
17. Supervising Architect of the Treasury— Operation and mainte­
nance of public buildings.................................................................... .
18. Miscellaneous nonadministrative expenses1. Charges on bullion sold........................
2. Promoting education of the blind—
3. Other.........................................................

(4)

72,032.20
........ 833.13

Total, miscellaneous nonadministrative expenses..

280,000.00

303,000. 00

72,865.33

Total, current operations, Treasury Department...

156,188,114. 00

153,552,595. 00

461,074,566.15

2. Public Works—
1. Existing projects—
1. Customhouses, court houses, post offices, etc...........................
2. Marine hospitals...............................................................................
3. Quarantine stations................................... .................................
4. Hospital facilities and construction............................................

6,204,181.00
550,000.00
294,865. 00
1,800.000. 00

4,605,157. 00
300.000.00
300.000. 00
7,713,411. 00

8,134,344. 62

Total, existing projects...........................................
2. New projects, National Archives Building and Treasury vault___

8,849,046. 00
500,000.00

12,918,568.00

8,134,344.62

Total, Public Works, Treasury Department..........

9,349,046.00

12,918,568.00

8,134,344. 62

1 Exclusive of estimated credits in receipts of $23,000,000.
* Transferred to General Accounting Office July 1,1921. (Independent Offices, item 14).
* Discontinued.
4
Included in Interdepartmental Social Hygiene Board in 1921.




THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

AS

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1928, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e ta il b y

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n it s a n d

C h a ra cte r

o f E x p e n d i t u r e s — Continued.

Classification.

Estimated, 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

1. ORDIN AR Y EXP EN D ITU R ES—Continued.

4 . T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T —Continued.
3. Special funds—
1. Philippine Islands—Customs and internal revenue collections----2. Porto Rico— Internal revenue taxes collected in United States on
articles produced in Porto Rico..........................................................
3. National bank examiners— Salaries and expenses.............................
Total, special funds, Treasury Department.

$1, 500, 000. 00

$1,500,000. 00

$2, 014, 760. 51

100, 000. 00
1, 860,000. 00

100,000. 00
1, 800,000. 00

1, 919,029. 78
1, 609,211. 80

3,460,000. 00

3, 400,000. 00

472,730,371.24
3,621,820. 97

5. Add cash expenditures in excess of warrant distribution.
Total, Treasury Department.....................

5, 543,002. 09
12,021,541. 62

4. Securities trust fund.........................................................................

168,997,160. 00

169,871,163. 00

476,352,192. 21

3, 492, 757. 00
(2)

3,102, 842.00
1,542, 658.00

2,486, 890. 87
2, 888,168.40
1,123,032.38

3,492, 757.00

4,645, 500.00

6,498,091. 65

154,448,400.00

155, 921,117.00

75, 762,300. 00
4, 777, 600. 00
1,287, 600.00
448,200.00
2, 217, 800.00
14,964,400.00

104, 751, 883.00
5, 949,000.00
1, 996,300. 00
597, 900.00
3,190,100.00
19,159, 700.00

2,096,000.00
28,946,600.00
2, 695,000.00
1,492,200.00

2,295, 800.00
25,453,000.00
898,300.00
2, 225,000.00

4, 713,000.00

5, 589,430.00

293, 849,100.00

328,027,530.00

419, 701,524.43

4, 660,300.00
850,000.00
72,000.00

5, 200,000.00
900,000.00
85,000.00

5,347,136.99
966,341. 66
80,789.56

5,582,300.00

6,185,000.00

6,394,268.21

6, 673,000.00

1,397,500.00

i7,566.'6o

’ *‘ *24,'666*66

* ' *29i*850’66

100,000.00

4,570,000.00
12, 401,966. 67
. . . . 55,445.67
703, 885.30
1,456,101. 78
441,128.49

309, 906,507.00

340,379,530.00

452,222,412.20

224.000.00
386.400.00
14,000.00
136.000.00
749.300.00
44, 245.400.00
1, 800.000.00
300,000.00
796.800.00

2.096.100.00
8.384.500.00
1,098,000.00
149, 725.00
848,500.00
29, 850,000. 00

3,592,964.84
48,140,362. 71
728,132.17
189, 776.80
897,598.77
58,820,322.30

400,000.00
1,811,551.00

575,135.00

56,651,900.00

44,638,376.00

112,944,292.59

5. W A R D E P A R T M E N T —
1. Current operations—
1. Department proper—
1. Salaries and expenses.......
2. Additional employees.......
3. Increase of compensation.
Total, department proper.
2. Military Establishment—
1. Pay, etc., of the Army.............................................
2. Increase of compensation............................ ..........
3. Army account of advances......................................
4. Quartermaster Corps.................................................
5. Ordnance Department................... .........................
6. Medical Department................................................
7. Engineer Department..............................................
8. Signal Service............................................................
9. Air Service................................................................
10. Vocational training of soldiers...............................
11. Military Academy........................ . .........................
12. National Guard........ .................................................
13. Civilian military training camps..........................
14. Chemical Warfare Service......................................
15. Registration and selection for military service.
16. Miscellaneous items................................................ .
Total, Military Establishment.
3. Soldiers’ homes—
1. National homes for disabled soldiers .
2. State homes for disabled soldiers___
3. Soldiers’ home interest account.......
Total,,soldiers’ homes.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Medical and hospital service.................................. .
National cemeteries....................................................
Monuments...................................................................
Nonadministrative— War claims and relief acts.
Increase of compensation (miscellaneous).......... .
Miscellaneous items...................................................
Total, current operations, War Department.

2. Public Works—
1. Existing projects—
1. Arsenals...................................................................... .
2. Fortifications and other works of defense..................
3. Military posts, buildings, etc....................................... .
4. National and military parks....................... .............. 7
5. Buildings and grounds in and around Washington.
6. Rivers and harbors......................... *
...............................
7. Flood control, Mississippi River.................................
8. Bridge across Potomac at Georgetown.......................
9. Other...................................................................................
Total, existing projects.
’ Deduct, excess of credits.
> Included in salaries and expenses for 1923.




424,357,422.05
15,985,116. 24
20, 603,527.39
1 111, 775,358. 84
42, 268,953. 83
6, 826,589.94
' 1 33,538,743. 81
7,011, 518. 7j0
30,913, 798. 28
3, 855,419.08
1,410, 967.17
7, 970, 815.42
27,187. 25
1, 873, 592. 57,
769,385.31
1,141,333.85

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A9

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e t a i l b y O r g a n i z a t i o n U n i t s a n d C h a r a c t e r o p E x p e n d i t u r e s — Continued.

Classification.
1. O RDIN ARY EXP EN D ITU RES— Continued.
5 . W A R D E P A R T M E N T — Continued.
2. Public works— Continued.
2. New projects, military posts....................................................................
Total, public works, War Department....................

Estimated, 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

$1, 292,000.00
57,943,900.00

3. Special funds—
1. Wagon roads, bridges and trails, Alaska fund......................................
2, Funds rmtitribntprj fnr nyprs and harbor5 improvements. ___ ____
*
3. Ot*d*ifl;noe material, powder, etc....................... . . .
50,000.00
4. Other special funds..................................................................................... .................. t ..............

$44, 638,376.00

$112, 944, 292.59

247, 993. 54
100,000. 00
1,497,500 00
75,000 00
100,000.00 .............. i34,*209*09

Total, special funds......................................................

50,000.00

1, 772, 500. 00

382,202.63

4. Trust funds—
1. Pay of the Army, deposit fund..................................... ..........................
2. Payment of principal of S^ldi^rs’ Home perma/nant fund..............
3. PrpsprvatioT), hfrthplacp of Lincoln- - - - * ............. ...........................

1,200,000.00
800,000 00
1,700.00

1,500,000. 00
800; 000 00
1,000.00

' 1 2,159, 271. 52
1, 271,876.21
1,700.00

Total, trust funds.........................................................

2,001,700. 00

2,301,000.00

1 885,695.31
564, 663,212.11
536,951,801.21

5 t Add cash expenditures in excess of warrant distribution .. n - - T - __
Total, War Department.. ., - ..............
5 (2) P A N A M A C A N A L —
1. Maintenance and operation...................................................................................
2. Sanitation, Canal Zone.....................................................................................
. -,
_____
3, Civil government, Panama ^anal and Canal 5^one.. ........
4. Construction and equipment................................................................................
5. Increase of compensation.......................................................................................
6, Miscellaneous................................................................................................

369,902,107.00

389,091,406.00

1,101, 615,013.32

5,608, 699.00
778,400.00
971, 740.00

5,375,129.00
845,000.00
916, 720. 00
83,000.00

12,459, 850. 82
854,304.18
992, 851.36
1,891,242.32
31,983.10
159.01
16, 230,390.79
231,018. 68

7. Add excess of cash expenditures over warrant distribution........................
Total, Panama Canal...................................................
6. N A V Y D E P A R T M E N T —
I. Current operations—
1. Department proper—
1. Salaries and expenses.....................................................................
2. Additional employees....................................................................
3. Increase of compensation............................................... *...........
Total, department proper...........................................

7,358, 839.00

7, 219, 849.00

16,461,409.47

1,145,000. 00
968,000. 00

1.124.000. 00
1.036.000. 00

1,348,134. 29
1,389,624.94
797, 632. 71

2,113,000.00

2,160,000. 00

3, 535,391.94

2. Naval Establishment—
142,452,000. 00
202,469,924.00
1. Increase of the N a v y .* .............................................................
99,198,000. 00
136, 695,000.00
180,297,758. 21
148, 754,000.00
2. Pay of the Navy...................................... ........................................
18,943, 627. 52
3. Increase of compensation..............................................................
1 333,660,373. 64
4. General account of advances........................................................
24, 606,454. 62
15, 000,000.00
16.195.000. 00
5. Bureau of Aeronautics....................................................................
1 10, 000,000. 00
226, 623,334. 57
1 10,000,000. 00
6. Naval supply account fund..........................................................
71.309.000. 00
97,930,395. 49
64, 665,000. 00
7. Bureau of Supplies and Accounts...............................................
44,066,651.20
13, 631, 000. 00
16,170, 000. 00
8. Bureau of Ordnance........................................................................
7, 514,000.00
6, 698,000. 00
10,998,397. 81
9. Bureau of Yards and Docks.........................................................
8, 734,000. 00
36,853,498. 87
8,828,000. 00
10. Bureau of Navigation.*..................................................................
19.000.000. 00
22.611.000. 00
34,534,125. 31
11. Bureau of Construction and Repair............................................
18,600, 000. 00
19,006, 000. 00
12. Bureau of Engineering...................................................................
33,459,963. 90
3.117.000.00
2.990.000. 00
4,520,558. 27
13. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery................................................
28, 713,000. 00
27,844,000. 00
35,300, 359. 61
14. Marine Corps.....................................................................................
2.230.000.00
2.252.000.00
15. Naval Academy...............................................................................
2,477,347. 99
\
16. Miscellaneous—
642,792. 63
1 Nonadministrative—judgments of courts.
367,000. 00
720,000.00
2 Other.......................................................................................
309,416. 58
Total, miscellaneous.....................................................

952,209.21

419, 775,000. 00

463,518,000. 00

620,374, 232. 94

Total, current operations, Navy Department-----




720,000.00

Total, Naval Establishment......................................

Deduct, excess of credits.

367,000. 00

421,888, 000. 00

465,678,000.00

623,909,624.88

AlO

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1928, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e t a i l b y O r g a n i z a t i o n U n i t s a n d C h a r a c t e r o p E x p e n d i t u r e s — Continued.
Estimated, 1923.

1. O R DIN ARY EXP E N D ITU R E S—Continued.
6 . N A V Y D E P A R T M E N T — Continued.
2. Public works—
1. Existing projects—
1 Navy yards and stations............................................................. .
2. Depots for coal ............ , ...............................................................
3. Buildings and grounds..................................................................
4. Naval operating base................................. . ............. . ..................
5. Naval hospitals and supply depots............................................
6. Marine barracks.............................................................................
7. Naval training stations, buildings, etc. ..............................
8. Naval magazines, proving grounds, etc....................................
9. Temporary office buildings..........................................................
10. Miscellaneous...................................................................................

$4, 219, 000.
597, 000.
78, 000.
435, 000.
1,116,000.
1,226, 000.
2, 000, 000.
968, 000.

Actual, 1921.

Estimated, 1922.

$4, 252, 000.
306, 000.
37, 000.
248.000.
1, 475, 000.
660, 000.
1, 073,000.
395.000.

Classification.

440,000. 00
8, 886,000. 00

Total, existing projects................... ...........................

2,193, 000. 00

$8, 678,808. 21
341,156. 92
1, 662,058. 80
1,460, 916.17
405,903. 06
150, 500. 81
1, 008,140. 99
17,225. 84
56,444. 63
430, 633. 67

12, 832, 000. 00

14, 211, 789.10

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

2. New projects—
180, 000. 00
1. Navy yards and stations..............................................................
390, 000. 00
85,000. 00
2. Naval magazines and proving grounds *
. ................
3 Nfl vftl npprfiting
_____ _ __ . , . _. . . _. _T
4, 000. 00
15,000. 00
4. Other.................................................................................................. 00
145, 000.
501, 000. 00
Total, new projects.................................................... .

980,000. 00
9,866, 000. 00

Total, public works.....................................................
3. Special funds—
1. Naval hospital funds............................................................... ..................
2. Fines and forfeiture fund....... .................................................................
3. Clothing fund......................................................................... ....................

340,000. 00
13,172,000. 00

14, 211, 789.10

1
C)

'

1, 745, 015. 24
1,332,993. 94
6, 542, 791. 79,

O

9, 620, 800. 97

Total, special funds.....................................................
4. Trust fund—pay of the Navy, deposit fund.....................................................

(2)

(2
)

|

647,852, 818. 99
2,521, 016. 59

5. Add cash expenditure in excess of warrant distribution........... *................
Total, Navy Department............................................
7 . I N T E R I O R D E P A R T M E N T (exclusive of Indian Service and pen­
sions)—
1. Current operations—
1. Department proper—
-1. Salaries and expenses.....................................................................
2. Increase of compensation..........................................................
3. Miscellaneous items........................................................................

110,604.04

431, 754,000. 00

478, 850,000. 00

650,373,835. 58

5, 747,400. 00

4,972,230.00

424,647. 00

234,812. 00

5,100,492.01
2,266, 726. 68
5, 721.12

Total, department proper...........................................

6,172,047. 00

5,207,042. 00 j

7,372,939. 81

Public Land Service..................................................................................
Geological Survey........................................................................................
Bureau of Mines...........................................................................................
Fuel yards, District of Columbia............................................................
National Park Service................................................................................

2,225,250. 00
1,721,060. 00
1, 473,465. 00

2,336,000. 00
1, 614,340.00
1,486,'788. 00

1,566,610. 00

1,351,920. 00

2,394, 972. 95
1.623.156.18
3, 861,262. 95
3 228,601. 52
1.099.117.18

7. Institutions-^
1. St. Elizabeths Hospital............... . ................................................
2. Other beneficiaries..........................................................................

1,000,000.00
503,160. 00

1,000,000. 00
448,160. 00

1,047,489. 72
401,423. 87

Total, institutions..................... . ..................................

1, 503,160. 00

1,448,160. 00

1,448,913. 59

8. Territories—
1. Alaska (exclusive of special funds)—
1. Salary, governor of Territory............................................
2. Contingent expenses........... ...............................................
3. Legislative expenses...........................................................
4. Care and custody of insane in Alaska.......... t ________
5. Education of natives in Alaska.......................................
6. Medical relief in Alaska.....................................................
7. Protection of game in Alaska...........................................
8. Reindeer for Alaska............................................................
9. Suppressing traffic in intoxicating liquors in Alaska..

7,000.00
12,000.00
47,010. 00
134,150.00
340,000.00
90.000.00
25.000.00
10.000. 00
15,000.00

7,000. 00
7,500. 00
127.000.00
285.000. 00
100.000.00
25.000. 00
10.000. 00
15,000.00

6,708. 33
8,224 28
44,581. 72
113,882. 69
321,723. 32
86,329. 25
24,657.31
6,507.12
13,439. 25

Total, Alaska.................................................................

680,160.00

576,500. 00

626,053.27

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

* It is estimated that the amounts included as expenditures under appropriations shown above to be transferred to these funds will be the only expenditures made.
* It is estimated that no expenditures in excess of receipts will be made under these funds.
* Deduct, excess of credits.




A ll

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e t a il b y O r g a n iz a tio n

U n it s

and

C h a r a c te r op E x p e n d itu r e s —

Classification.

Continued.

Estimated, 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

]. ORDINARY EXPEND ITU RES— Continued.
7 . I N T E R I O R D E P A R T M E N T — Continued.
1. Current operations— Continued.
8. Territories—
^Continued.
2. Hawaii—
1. Salaries, governor and secretary.....................................
2. Contingent expenses.................................................t........
3. Legislative expenses..........................................................

$15,400. 00
5,000. 00
30,000. 00

$11,000..00
3, 450. 00

$11,000. 00
3,348. 01
30,000. 00

Total, Hawaii................................................................

50,400.00

14,450. 00

44,348. 01

Total, Territories..........................................................

730,560. 00

590,950.00

. 670,401. 28

9. Nonadministrative expenses—
1. Colleges for agriculture and mechanic arts..............................

2,500,000. 00

2,500,000. 00

2,500,000. 00

Total, current operations, Interior Department..

17,892,152.00

16, 535,200.00

20, 742,162. 42

2. Public works—
1. Existing projects—
1. Interior Department buildings....................................................
2. Capitol buildings and grounds.....................................................
3. Furnishing office building, Senate............. ...............................
4. Maintenance, office building, Senate.................*
.......................
5. Maintenance, office building, House of Representatives----6. Capitol power plant........................................................................
7. Columbia Hospital for Women and Lying-in Asylum..........
8. Buildings and grounds, Columbia Institution for the D eaf..
9. Repairs and improvements, courthouse, Washington............
10. Buildings and grounds, Howard University.................... ..
11. Buildings and grounds, St. Elizabeths Hospital.....................

30.000. 00
195, 750. 00
7, 500.00
65.000. 00
107.000. 00
335.000. 00
20.000. 00
12,000. 00
3,000. 00

12. Reclamation Service—
1. Auxiliary reclamation fund, Yuma project, Arizona.
2. Reclamation fund, construction and operation of
reclamation projects.........................................................
Total, Reclamation Service.......................................

228, 500. 00
54,000. 00

30.000. 00
117,50£). 00 .............. i7 0 ‘ iii.*82
5.000. 00
7,224. 04
50.000. 00
65, 901. 50
76.000. 00
89,565. 39
311.000. 00
345,793. 75
20.000. 00
2.000. 00
3,000.00
2, 805. 68
116.000. 00
114,500.00 .............. i03,*378*8i
54,000. ,00

122, 545.15

7,011,000.00

5,511,000. 00

5,950,300.54

7,065,000. 00

5, 565,000. 00

6,072, 845. 69

13. Alaskan Engineering Commission—
1. Construction and operation of railroads in Alaska.. .

4, 772,220. 00

4, 783, 850. 00

9,560,868.11

Total, existing projects...............................................
2. New projects, Reclamation Service.................................................

12,840, 970. 00
400,000. 00

11,193, 850.00

16,418,497. 79

Total, public works, Interior Department.............

13,240, 970. 00

11,193,850. 00

16,418,497. 79

3. Special funds—
1. Five, three, and two per cent funds, sales of lands..........................
2. Deposits by individuals for surveying public lands..........................
3. Protection and improvements of Hot Springs, Ark...........................
4. Public schools, Alaska fund............................................... •
*...................
5. Payments to States under oil-leasing act..............................................
6. Other special funds.....................................................................................

65.000.00
60.000.00
63,900. 00
50,000.00
1,500,000.00
1,000.00

60,000.00
65.000.00'
79,470.00
50.000.00
1,569, 309.00
' 51,000.00

138,193.03
66,033.22
82,758. 81
73,312. 51

Total, special funds, Interior Department.............

1, 739,900.00

1,874,779.00

360,506.82

funds—
Personal funds of patients, St. Elizabeth's Hospital.........................
Pension moneys, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital...........................................
Civil service retirement funds.................................................................
Other trust funds.........................................................................................

75.000.00
200,000.00
8,600,000.00
51.000.00

75.000.00
200,000.00
5,097,000.00
30.000.00

166,223.18
16,940. 09
3,100,000.00

Total, trust funds, Interior Department...............

8,926,000.00

5,402,000.00

3,283,163.27

4. Trust
1.
2.
3.
4.

40,804,330. 30
1,117,235.44

5. Deduct warrant distribution in excess of cash expenditures...................... I




Total, Interior Department.......................................

209.25

41,799,022.00

35,005,829.00

39,687,094.86

a

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

12

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1928, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e ta il b y

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n it s a n d

C h a ra cte r

Classification.

1. O R D IN AR Y E X P EN D ITU R ES— Continued.
7 (2) I N D I A N S E R V I C E —
1. Current operations:
1. Current and contingent expenses...........
2. Fulfilling treaty obligations......................
3. Miscellaneous supports..............................
4. Support of Indian schools.........................
5. Interest on Indian trust fund accounts.
0. Civilization of the Sioux...........................
7. Miscellaneous expenses.............................

o f E x p e n d i t u r e s — Continued,

Estimated, 1922.

Estimated, 1923.

Actual, 1921.

$1,775,000. 00
900.000. 00
630.000. 00
3.820.000.00
1.083.000.00
275.000.00
1.900.000.00

$1,715,000.00
900.000.00
715.000.00
4.450.000.00
1.300.000. 00
175.000.00
1.880.000.00

$1,444,109. 65
595,190.15
700,258.19
4,788,118. 33
1,129, 733.11
430,634.00
4,139,414. 21

Total, current operations, Indian Service.

10,383,000.00

11,135,000. 00

13,227,457. 64

2. Trust funds—
1. Indian moneys, proceeds of labor.................................
2. Miscellaneous trust funds of Indian tribes.................

19,000,000. 00
2,500,000.00

20,000,000. 00
2,000,000.00

23,905,143. 77
4,338,206.19

Total, trust fu n d s.___

21, 500,000. 00

22,000,000. 00

28,243,349. 96

Total, Indian Service.

31,883,000.00

33,135,000. 00

41,470, 807. 60

243,275,000. 00
8,725,000.00
350,000.00

249,275,000.00
8,725,000. 00
400,000.00

251,394, 689. 21
8, 886, 899. 71
329,696.78
130.43

252,350,000. 00

258,400,000.00

260, 611,416.13

3,045,092.00

2, 948,454. 00

312,000.00

328,000. 00

1,968,552.02
345,315. 77
1,374,014. 56
227,648. 26

3,357,092.00

3,276,454.00

7 (3) P E N S I O N S —
1. Army........................................
2. Navy.........................................
3. Fees of examining surgeons.
4. Other........................................
Total, pensions.

8. P O S T O F F I C E D E P A R T M E N T (exclusive of expenditures
from postal revenues)—
1. Current operations—
1. General—
1. Salaries and expenses..........................................................
* 2. Increase of compensation.................................................. .
3. Additional compensation, Postal Service..................... .
4. Miscellaneous items.............................................. ..............
Total, current operations..................
2. Federal control of telegraph and telephone system.

5,111,239.40
119,410, 75

3. Add cash expenditures in excess of warrant distribution.
4. Deficiencies in postal revenues.............................
Total, Post Office Department.
9. D E P A R T M E N T O F A G R IC U L T U R E —
1. Current Operations—
1. General—
1. Salaries and expenses......................
2. Increase of compensation...............
3. Miscellaneous items..........................

3,915, 530. 61
1,195,708.79

3,357,092.00
21,509,666.00

3,276,454.00
48,172,270.00

5,230,650.15
130,128,458.02

24,866,758.00

51,448,724.00

135,359,108.17

4, 925,300.00

6,345,000.00

“ *455,"300.*66'

* " '44i *200.'66

6,242,868.99
3,012,856. 60
366,052.17

Total, general.

5,380,600.00

6,786, 200.00

9, 621,777.76

2. Weather Bureau..............

1, 601,500.00

1,500,000.00

1,532,492.10

3. Bureau of Animal Industry—
1. General expenses.*...........................
2. Meat inspection, animal industry.

4, 518,610.00
3,875,000.00

4,410,600.00
3,750,000.00

4,050,922.16
3,653,315.06

8,393,610.00

8,160,600.00

7'704,237.22

2,355,800.00

2,220,000.00

2, 241,398. 2L
1,953,124. 68
236,346.57

Total, Bureau of Animal Industry.
4. Bureau of Plant Industry—
1. General expenses..................... .............................
2. Farmers' seed-grain loan.....................................
3. Purchase and distribution of valuable seeds.
4. Experimental vineyard purchases.................. .




Total, Bureau of Plant Industry.

so; ooo. oo
27,000.00
2,355,800.00

2,297,000.00

T

4,430,869.47

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

a

13

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e ta il b y

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n its a n d

C h a ra cte r

o f E x p e n d itu r e s —

Classification.

Continued.

Estimated, 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

1. ORDINARY EXPEND ITU RES— Continued.

9. D E P A R T M E N T O F A G R IC U L T U R E —Continued.
1. Current operations—Continued.
5. Forest Service—
1. General expenses........................................................................ .
2. Cooperative fire prevention of forested watersheds, navi­
gable streams. (Included in special funds, below.)
3. Payments to States and Territories, national forests fund.
(Included in special funds, below.)
4. Acquisition of lands for protection of watersheds, naviga­
ble streams..................................................................................
5. Federal forest-road construction................................................

$5, 887,000.00

$4,000,000.00

$4,892,006. 77

550,000.00
204,500.00

1,500,000.00
2r000,000.00

1,179,472. 82
3, 821,409.75

6, 641,500.00

7, 500,000.00

9, 892, 889.34

6. Bureau of Chemistry*
7. Bureau of Soils...........

922.000.00
304.000.00

900,000.00
275,000.00

913, 637. 92
440,257.79

8. Bureau of Entomology—
1. General expenses...................................................
2. Preventing spread of moths................................
3. Prevention of spread of European com borer.

862,000.00
590.000.00

122.000.00

770.000.00
385.000. 00
245.000.00

748,691.34
434, 209.54
375, 954.07

Total, Bureau of Entomology......................

1, 574,000.00

1,400,000.00

1, 558, 854. 95

9. Bureau of Biological Survey..........................................

779,020.00

703,800.00

741,053.22

10. States Relations Service—
1. General expenses...........................................
2. Cooperative agricultural extension work.

3.125.000.00
6.080.000.00

3.065.000.00
5.580.000.00

3,112, 941. 70
5,031,577. 73

Total, States Relations Service...........

9, 205,000.00

a, 6 5
4 ,000.00

8,144,519.43

Total, Forest Service.

11. Bureau of Public Roads—
1. General expenses............................................................... .............
2. Cooperative construction of rural post roads, etc.................. .
3. Cooperative construction of roads and trails, national for­
ests............................................................................................
Total, Bureau of Public Roads.
12. Bureau of Agricultural Economics (includes Bureau of Markets,
Crop Estimates, and Office of Farm Management)—
1. General expenses.............................................................................
2. Salaries and expenses, wool division.........................................
3. Enforcement of United States cotton-futures act...................
4. Enforcement of United States grain-standards act.................
5. Enforcement of standard-contamers act....................................
6. Administration of United States warehouse act.....................
7. Stimulating agriculture and facilitating distribution of
products.........................................................................................
8. Classification of cotton, revolving fund.....................................
Total, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.

Total, current operation, Department of Agriculture___

23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.

Enforcement of future trading act...................................... ..................
Enforcement of packers and stockyards act.........................................
Enforcement of the insecticide act.........................................................
Federal Horticultural Board...................*...............................................
Division of Publications.......................................... .................................
Purchase of nitrate of soda........................................................................
Demonstrations on reclamation projects...............................................
Experiments in dairying and live stock production..........................
Operation and management of Center Market.....................................
Eradication of fdot and mouth and other contagious diseases of
animals.......................................................................................................
Suppressing spread of pink boll worm of cotton..................................
Eradication of date scale..........................................................................
Protection of lands involved in Oregon and California railroad
forfeiture suits...........................................................................................
Prevention of spread of Mexican bean beetle......................................
Nitrate plant........................ r.....................................................................
Field station, Woodward, Okla................................................................
Miscellaneous................................................................................................

* Deduct, excess of credits.




370.000.00
125, 700,000.00

320.000.00
105,000,000.00

403,835.35
57,452,056.48

900.000. 00

1, 720,000.00

1,224, 736. 77

126,970,000.00

107,040,000.00

59,080,628. 60

1, 815,000..00
14,500.00
144.000.00
550.000.00
►*14,300.00
125.000.00

1, 675,000. 00
14.000.00
135.000.00
533.000.00
3, 600.00
77.000.00

1, 700,313. 71
20,424. 20
151,932. 73
566, 821.01

50,000.00

50,000.00

6, 872. 35
1 81, 241. 70

2,702,800.00

2,487,600.00

2,365,122.30

100,000.00
400.000.00
123.000.00
125.000.00
122,600.00

194.000.00
117.000.00
134.000.00

38.500.00
89.000.00
170.000.00

29.000.00
83.000.00

108.047. 63
145,947.13
122,760.48
9,155,873. 62
32,443. 36
71,289.63

60.000.00
540.000.00
14.500.00

60,000.00
464.000.00
14.500.00

60,755.14
503,473. 59
2, 000. 00

35.000.00
24.000.00
249.000.00
11.500.00
137.000.00

25.000.00

68.000.00

17,500.00

245.000.00
9,500.00
83.400.00

27,347.32

169,068,930.00

149,341,600.00

116,673,777.80

120.000.00

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

a!4

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e ta il b y

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n its a n d

C h a ra cte r

o f E x p e n d i t u r e s — Continued.

Classification.

Estimated, 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

1. O R D IN AR Y EXP END ITU RES— Continued.

9. D E P A R T M E N T O F A G R IC U L T U R E —Continued.
2. Special funds—
1. Payments to States and Territories, national forests fund................
2. Roads and trails for States, national forests fund...............................
3. Cooperative fire prevention of forested watersheds, navigable
streams.......................................................................................................
4. Payments to school funds, Arizona and New Mexico......................
5. Cooperative work, Forest Service........................................................
6. Refunds to depositors, excess of deposits............................................
7. Miscellaneous special funds......................................................................
Total, special funds, Department of Agriculture *

$1,200,000. 00
588, 600. 00

$1,107,500.00
568, 000. 00

395,000. 00
70.000. 00
1, 800,000. 00
75.000.00

395,000.00
70.000. 00
2,080,000. 00
75.000.00

4,128, 600. 00

4,295,500. 00

73,229.75
2,197,977. 24
111, 191.11
161.42
3,926,055. 73
120,599,833. 53
762,074.12

3. Deduct warrant distribution in excess of cash expenditures.....................
Total Department of Agriculture, including “ Good roads ’

$1,180,063.13
363,433. 08

173,197, 530.00

153,637,100. 00

119,837,759.41

222,410. 00

192, 210. 00

3.54,850. 00

*ii7,*5o6.'66

182, 697. 73
2,519, 707. 52
180, 885. 62

377, 260. 00

309, 710. 00

2,883,290. 87

10. D E P A R T M E N T OF C O M M E R C E —
1. Current operations—
1. General—
1. Salaries.............................................................................................
2. Increase of compensation............................................................
3. Miscellaneous items......................................................................
Total, general.

00
00
00
00
00
00

1, 634, 649. 52
6,257,455. 53
850,577. 23
1, 925, 361. 92
968, 636. 58
316,760. 58

83, 725. 00
7, 764, 985. 00

63, 275. 00
7, 776,435. 00

64,579. 58
8,846, 753. 95

7,848, 710. 00

7, 839, 710. 00

8,911,333. 53

9. Bureau of Fisheries.......................................................................

1,247, 900. 00

1,124, 660. 00

1,195,377.00

Total, current operations, Department of Commerce...

19,024, 970. 00

18,405,000. 00

24,943,442. 76

2. Public works—
1. Existing projects—
1. Lighthouses, beacons, fog signals, light vessels, etc.
2. Fish hatcheries...................................................................

500, 000. 00
20, 500. 00

1,086, 500. 00
16,800. 00

807, 975. 95
129,084. 04

520, 500. 00

1,103, 300. 00

937,059. 99

375, 000. 00
19, 500. 00

613,500. 00

Total, new projects....................................................

394,500. 00

623,500. 00

Total, public works, Department of Commerce.

915,000. 00

1,726,800. 00

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Bureau of Standards..........................................
Bureau of the Census.........................................
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
Coast and Geodetic Survey..............................
Steamboat-Inspection Service.........................
Bureau of Navigation..........................................

8. Bureau of Lighthouses—
1. Salaries.......................
2. Lighthouse Service.
Total, Bureau of Lighthouses..................................

Total, existing projects.
2. New projects—
1. Lighthouses, beacons, fog signals, light vessels, etc.
2. Fish hatcheries...................................................................

1, 729,545.
2,245, 990.
1, 878, 760.
2,404, 950.
935,240.
356, 615.

00
00
00
00
00
00

1,434,385.
3,243,500.
1,202, 250.
2, 046, 500.
895,740.
308, 545.

10,000. 00

25,880,502. 75
4,948,258.80

3. Add cash expenditures in excess of warrant distribution.
Total, Department of Commerce..............

937,059. 99

19, 939, 970. 00

20,131,800. 00

30,828,761. 55

469,835.00

233,285.00

” 78*933*66'

*136*758*66'

140, 000.00
616, 655.95
100,036.53

548, 768.00

370,043.00

856,692.48

248.266.00
691.462.00

251.174.00
706.681.00

257,144.12
668,668.71

11. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R —
1. Current operations—
1. General—
1. Salaries.................................
2. Increase of compensation.
3. Miscellaneous items..........
Total general.
2. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

3. Bureau of Naturalization..




BUDGET STATEMENTS.

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e ta il b y

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n its a n d

C h a ra cte r

o f E x p e n d itu r e s —

Classification.

1. O R D IN AR Y EXP EN D ITU RES— Continued.
1 1 . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R — Continued.
1. Current operations— Continued.
4. Bureau of Immigration—
1. Salaries.................................................
2. Regulating immigration..................
Total Bureau of Immigration.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Children’s Bureau..............................................
Employment Service.......................................
Women’s Bureau........................... ...................
Commission of Mediation and Conciliation.
Total current operations, Department of Labor.

2. Public works, immigrant stations.................................................

Continued.

Estimated, 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

$70,117.00
3, 894, 849.00

$75, 732.00
2, 777, 572.00

$1, 111,-021.81

3, 964, 966.00

2, 853, 304.00

4, 037, 455.92

208,483.00
315, 488.00
96, 402.00

264, 856.00
215, 557.00
70, 896.00

6, 073, 835.00

4, 732, 511.00

6, 669, 066. 39

228,000.00

64, 405.00

310,846.11

Total Department of Labor.

Total current operations.
2. Public Works:
1. Existing projects—
1. United States penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kans...
2. United States penitentiary, Atlanta, Ga..................
3. United States penitentiary, McNeil Island, Wash.
Total existing projects.............................................
2. New projects, United States penitentiary, McNeil Island, Wash.,
farm land . * .................................................................................................
Total public works, Department of Justice.

254,
357,
82,
154,

677.04
711.91
645.00
071.21

6, 301, 835.00

4, 796, 916.00

651, 620.00

649,720.00

2,500,000.00
684,055.00

2,000,000.00
321, 627.00

(EG
G
* 501, 903.35
778, 755. 81
2, 320, 732.87
532, 535.69

3, 835, 675.00

2,971,347.00

4,133,927.72

65,000.00

171, 500.00

20,000.00
8,200.00

129,180.20
5,177.94
47,498.15

199,700.00

181,856.29

"is’ooo."6o
83,000.00

8, 502, 509.55

55,000.00
138,000.00

199, 700.00

181, 856.29
4,315,784.01
446,558.95

Deduct warrant distribution in excess of cash disbursements.
3,973, 675.00

3,171,047.00

3, 869,225,06

193.400.00
324.000.00
927.500.00
74.725.00
86.880.00
96,910.00
169.000.00
9,000.00

193.400.00
324,000.00
913.500.00
75,000.00
86,880.00
94, 510.00
168.500.00
9,000.00

172,986.73
321,240.26
857,821.59
64,874.91
84,498.62
94,149.39
154,854.44
10,441. 67

1,881,415.00

1,864,790.00

1,760,867.61

2,300, 000.00
2,595, 250.00
1.250. 000.00
375, 000.00
1.250, 000.00
1,200, 000.00
240, 000,00
1,473, 416.00
776, 925.00

2.250.000.00
2.345.250.00
1.175.000.00
375.000.00
1.250.000.00
1.200.000.00
240.000.00
1,000,000.00
1.252.556.00
701,925.00

2,184,726.74
2,374,919.94
1.055.795.25
331,451.31
1,219,765.47
1.131.436.25
231,849.54
953,425.88
1,327,572.00
765,382.98

Total expenses, etc., United States courts.

12,560, 591.00

11,789,731.00

11, 576,325.36

Total current operations, judicial................

14,442,006.00

13,654,521.00

13,337,192.97

Total judicial.....................................................

14,442,006.00

13,654,521.00

13,337,192.97

Total, Department of Justice..............
13. J U D I C I A L
1. Current operations:
1. Salaries—
1. Supreme Court...............................................
2. Circuit courts..................................................
3. District courts and retired judges.............
4. United States courts of customs appeals.
5. Court of Claims.................................. : .........
6. District of Columbia courts........................
7. Territorial courts............................................
8. National park commissioners.....................
Total salaries.
2. Expenses, etc.. United States courts—
1. Salaries, fees, and expenses of marshals.........
2. Salaries and expenses of attorneys....... .............
3. Salaries and expenses of clerks............................
4. Fees of commissioners............................................
5. Fees of jurors............................................................
6. Fees of witnesses.....................................................
7. Fees of bailiffs..........................................................
S. Support of prisoners................................................
9. Operation and maintenance of penitentiaries.
10. Miscellaneous items................ ................................




2, 926, 434.11

6, 979, 912.50
1, 522, 597.05

3. Add cash expenditures in excess of warrant distribution.

12. D E P A R T M E N T O F J U S T I C E
1. Current operations:
1. Salaries and expenses..............................
2. Increase of compensation........................
3. Detection and prosecution of crime. ..
4. Miscellaneous items..................................

Actual, 1921.

1,100, 000.00

A l6

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e ta il b y

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n its a n d C h a r a c t e r

op E x p e n d itu r e s —

Classification.

Continued.

Estimated, 1923.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

1. O RD IN AR Y EXPEND ITU RES— Continued.

14. IN D E P E N D E N T O F F IC E S—
1. Current operations—
1. Shipping Board—
1. Salaries and expenses...............................................................
2. Emergency shipping fund......................................................

$495, 735. 00
50, 000,000. 00

$411, 081. 00
73, 500, 000. 00

$365, 977. 55
92, 563,969. 57
92, 929,947.12
37, 793,321.14

3. Add cash expenditures in excess of warrant distribution.
Total, Shipping Board...........................................

50,495, 735. 00

73, 911,081. 00

2. United States Veterans’ Bureau—
1. Salaries and expenses...............................................................

26,521, 702. 00

6, 820,400. 00

160,000,000. 00

588, 000. 00
145.000.000. 00
2,040, 000. 00

62, 703,000. 00
127,000, 000. 00
72, 000,000. 00

59.830.000. 00
141.657.000. 00
76.492.000.00

7, 008,000. 00

5, 695,000. 00

Total, nonadministrative expenses....................

428, 711,000.00

431,302,000. 00

Total, United States Veterans’ Bureau.1........

455, 232; 702. 00

438,122,400. 00

2. Nonadministrative expenses—
1. Losses on war risk insurance of American vessels,
their cargoes, etc.......................................................
2. Military and naval compensation.............................
3. Military and naval family allowances......................
4. Military and naval insurance (after deducting
premiums of $21,915,000 for 1922 and $17,786,000
for 1923)........................................................................
5. Vocational rehabilitation............................................
6. Medical and hospital services....................................
7. Losses on converted insurance— Government
life insurance trust fund..........................................

3. Railroad administration and transportation act, 1920.................
1. Deduct excess of warrant distribution over cash ex­
penditure................................. ................................................

337, 679,235. 00

130,723, 268. 26

739,019,362. 64
8,307, 692. 66

Total railroad administration and trans­
portation act.......................................................

337,679,235. 00

730, 711, 669. 98

4. Federal Board for Vocational Education—
1. Salaries and expenses—
1. Board proper...................................................................
2. Rehabilitation of persons disabled in industry.. .

197,822. 00
74,422. 00

197,822.00
74,422.00

196,512.43
47,888.14

Total salaries and expenses..................................

272,244. 00

272,244.00

244,400.57

2. Nonadministrative expenses—
1. Vocational rehabilitation.............................................
2. Cooperative education in agriculture....................
3. Cooperative education— Teacher training..............
4. Cooperative education in trade and industry___
5. Rehabilitation of persons disabled in industry.. .

(2)
1.761.000.00
940.000.00
1.622.000.00
934.000.00

(2)
1,362,600. 00
981.000.00
1,372,500.00
768.000. 00

101,049,138.97
1,071, 814.37
798,887.96
1,037, 711.45
469,819. 30

Total nonadministrative expenses.......................

5, 257,000. 00

4,484,100.00

104,427,372.05

Total Federal Board for Vocational Educa­
tion .........................................................................

5,529,244.00

4,756,344.00

104,671,772. 62

390,480.00

388,520.00

25,000.00
170.500.00
595.595.00
9,886.00

122.350.00
586.368.00
9,886.00

459, 637.90
1,667,977.48
50.00
20,945.97
144,528.13
659,485.82
10, 602.46
67,931.37

5. All other—
1. Alien Property Custodian...........................................................
2. American Relief Administration (European Food Relief)
3. Arlington Memorial Amphitheater Commission..................
4. Board of Mediation and Conciliation.......................................
5. Bureau of Efficiency.....................................................................
6. Civil Service Commission............................................................
7. Commission of Fine Arts.............................................................
8. Council of National Defense.......................................................
9. Employees Compensation Commission—

^ 1. Salaries and expenses.....................................................
2. Nonadministrative expenses; United States em­
ployees compensation payments...........................

146,400.00

138,600.00

165,590.50

2,651,600.00

2,522,400.00

2,364,177.34

Total Employees Compensation Commission.

2,798,000.00

2 ,6 6 1 ,0 0 0 .0 0

2,529,767.84

1Included in Treasury Department and Federal Board for Vocational Education in 1921.
* Transferred to United States Veterans* Bureau in 1923 and 1922.




a 17

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e t a i l b y O r g a n i z a t i o n U n i t s a n d C h a r a c t e r o p E x p e n d i t u r e s —Continued.

"Estimated, 1923.

Classification.

1. ORDINARY EXPEND ITU RES—Continued.
I d . I N D E P E N D E N T O F F I C E S — Continued.
1. Current operations— Continued.
5. All other— Continued.
10. Federal Power Commission........................................................
11. Federal Reserve Board..........................
12t Forlorn,1 TrnHo Commission______ _____ ______ _____________
13. General Accounting Office..........................................................
14. Housing Corporation.....................................................................
15. Interdepartmental Social Hygiene Board. . . .......................
16. Interstate Commerce Commission............................................
17. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.....................
18. Railroad Labor Board..................................................................
19. Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway Commission..................
20. Smithsonian Institution—
1. Institution proper (includes §60,000 trust fund).........
2. National Museum............................ ....................................
3. National Zoological Park..................................................
Total Smithsonian Institution.................. ...................
21. Superintendent, State, War, and Navy Department
Buildings.....................................................................................
22. Tariff Commission.........................................................................
23. Temporary Government West Indian Islands..................
24. Other independent bureaus and offices...................................
25. Special fund—indigent of Alaska.............................................

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

$72, 500.00
948, 500.00
2.424.946.00
1.267.435.00
4,995, 240.00
246,000.00
398, 650.00
100,000.00

943.500.00
2.089.433.00
1.076.700.00
224.500.00
5,130, 578.00
197, 720.00
448, 650.00
100, 000.00

$21, 526. 99
4,493, 633.34
1,010,956.10
0)
1,'322, 237. 63
932,599.92
6,097,061.30
184, 600.52
385,094.78
140, 619.56

171.006.00
425, 966.00
131.959.00

200, 941.00
411, 965.00
127,884.00

282,101.02
413,999.44
200,407.81

728,931.00

740, 790.00

896,508.27

1,464,420.00
373, 500.00
(2
)

*

$51, 375.00

1,510,055.00
298.300.00
343.440.00
35,000 00
25, 000.00

2, 204,713. 55
311,629.55
343,440.00
300, 670.91
14,093.06

25,000.00

24,220,312.45
26. Add excess of cash expenditures over warrant distribution.
59, 376,106.07
Total, all other..................................................................

17,034, 583.00

16,983,165.00

83,596,418.52

Total, current operations, independent offices.........

528, 292, 264.00

871; 452, 225.00

1,049,703,129.38

Total, independent bureaus and offices......................

528,292,264.00

871,452,225.00

1,049,703,129.38

15. D I S T R I C T O F C O L U M B I A —
1. General fund—
1. General government..............................................................................
2. Protection of life and property..........................................................
3. Health and sanitation..........................................
.......... *
4. Highways.................................................................................................
5. Charities and corrections.....................................................................
6. Education................................................................
...... ..
7. Recreation...............................................................................................
8. Miscellaneous........................................................................

1, 514,175. 00
4, 039,962. 00
2,193, 935. 00
1.619.300.00
3, 274, 670. 00
6.780.280.00
451,835. 00
45, 520.00

1,339,141. 00
3, 708, 607. 00
2, 014,040. 00
1,450,340. 00
2,751, 967. 00
6, 931,140. 00
341, 220. 00
51, 000. 00

2,125,816. 94
3, 532,489. 23
2,219, 691.89
2,736,118. 76
3,128, 745. 84
5,676,457.74
191,443. 34
173, 624. 31

Total, general fund.............................................................
2. Public service enterprises.............. ..............................................................
3. Interest and sinking fund...............................................................................
4. Trust and special funds.............................
.............
...........

19, 919, 677.00
3,251,200.00
400, 000. 00
1,500,000. 00

18, 587,455.
1, 242, 200.
975,408.
1,470, 000.

00
00
00
00

23,082, 259.54
523, 995. 38

5. Deduct excess of warrant distribution over cash expenditures..........
Total, District of Columbia..............................................

19,784,388. 05
1,032, 947. 71
975,408. 00
1, 289,515. 78

25, 070,877. 00

16. M IS C E L L A N E O U S —
1. Increase of compensation 3..............................................................................

22, 275, 063. 00

22, 558, 264.16

35,000,000.00

2. Purchase of foreign obligations—
1. Belgium....................................................................................................
2. Czechoslovakia.......................................................................................
3. France.......................................................................................................
4. Greece.......................................................................................................
5. Italy...................... ..........................*
.........................................................

10,469,467.89
1,732,165.64
40,000,000.00
5,000,000.00
16,695,063.91

Total purchase of foreign obligations.............................

73,896,697.44

3. Purchase of farm loan 5 per cent bonds.....................................................
1. Add excess of cash expenditures over warrant distribution___

8,600,000.00
8,181,320.79

Total purchases farm loan 5 per cent bonds................

16,781,320.79

1 7 . Deduct unclassified repayments, etc.................................................................. ........

922,593.14

Total ordinary expenditures............................................ 2,127,053, 927.00
*Included in Treasury Department for 1921.
* Included in Naval Establishment for 1923.
* Expenditures for fiscal year 1921 included in departmental expenditures.

77891—21------vi



2,574,758,166.00

4,088,295,848.20

AlS

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years— Continued.
D e t a il b y O r g a n iz a tio n

U n it s a n d

C h a ra cte r

o f E x p e n d itu r e s —

Classification.

Continued.
Estimated, 1922.

$283,838,800.00

$272,442,200.00

$261,250,250.00
150,000.00

283, 838, 800.00

2. REDUCTION IN PRINCIPAL OF THE PUB IC DEBT, PAYABLE
FROM O RDIN ARY RECEIPTS:
1. Sinking fund (Victory notes in 1921)...........................................................
1. Deduct excess of warrant distribution over cash expenditure..

Estimated, 1923.

272,442, 200.00

261,100,250.00

2. Purchase of Liberty bonds from foreign repayments—
I. Second Liberty loan, converted, 4£ per cent................................
2. Third Liberty loan, 4^-per cent........................................................
3. Fourth Liberty loan, 4J per cent......................................................
Total purchase of Liberty bonds from foreign repay­
ments .................................................................................

Actual, 1921.

2,145, 950.00
44,365, 550.00
27,427, 800.00
30,500,000.00

30, 500, 000.00

3. Redemption of bonds and notes from estate taxes—
1. First Liberty loan, converted, 4^ per cent....................................
2. Second Liberty loan, converted, 4£ per cent................................
3. Third Liberty loan, 4£ per cent.........................................................
4. Fourth Liberty loan, 4£ per cent......................................................
5. Victory Liberty loan notes..................................................................

73, 939,300.00
199, 300.00
6, 607, 500.00
6, 787,650.00
11, 924,400.00
960,450.00
26,479,300.00

1. Deduct excess of warrant distribution over cash ex­
penditure..................................................................................

130,350.00

Total redemption of bonds and notes from estate
taxes...................................................................................

25,000,000.00

25,000,000.00

26,348,950.00

4. Redemption of securities from Federal reserve bank franchise tax
receipts............................................................................................................

30,000,000.00

60,000,000.00

60, 724,500.00

Total net reduction in principal of the public debt,
payable from ordinary receipts..................................

369,338,800.00

387, 942, 200.00

422,113, 000.00

3. INVESTMENT OF TRUST FUNDS—
1. Government life insurance fund....................................................................
2. Civil service retirement fund and District of Columbia teachers’ re­
tirement fund................................................................................................

26,162,000.00

22,022,000.00

20,325,152.88

8, 200,000.00

8,200,000.00

8,161, 956.87

Total trust fund investments...........................................

34,362,000.00

30,222,000.00

28,487,109.75

4. INTEREST ON TH E PUBLIC D E B T ........................................................................

975,000,000.00

975,000,000.00

999,144,731.35

Total expenditures............................................................

3,505, 754, 727.00




3, 967, 922, 366.00 | 5,538,040, 689.30

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A l9

B u d g e t S t a t e m e n t N o . 3*

Estimated receipts, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years.
ORDINARY RECEIPTS.
[Summary by sources of revenue, fiscal year 1923, compared with estimated receipts in fiscal year 1922 and actual receipts in fiscal year 1921
exclusive of postal revenues.]
Reference to state­
ment.
Source of revenue.
No.

Estimated receipts,
1923.

Estimated receipts,
1922.

Actual receipts,
1921.

Page.

a4

1. Internal revenue receipts:
1. Income and profits tax.
2. Miscellaneous..................
Total internal revenue.

a4

2. Customs receipts.

a4

3. Miscellaneous receipts:
1. Interest, premium and discount—
Interest on loans to foreign Governments.............. ..
Interest on miscellaneous obligations of foreign
Governments..............................................................
Dividend on capital stock of U. S. Sugar Equaliza­
tion Board.........................................................................
Discount on bonds and notes purchased......................'
Interest on public deposits, etc.....................................

|1, 715,000, 000.00 $2,110,000, 000.00
896,000,000.00 1,104,500, 000. 00
2, 611,000,000. 00
330,000,000. 00

3,214, 500,000. 00
275,000,000. 00

$3,206,046,157. 74
1,390,380,823.28
4,596, 426, 981.02
308,564, 391.00

18,327, 306.91
25,000,000.00

25,000,000.00

12,815, 675. 60

29,625,379.00

16, 313, 379.00

30,000, 000. 00
10, 675,194. 55
15, 887,368. 95

Total interest, premium, and discount.

54,625,379.00

41,313,379. 00

87, 705,546. 01

2. Sale of Government property—
Sale of war supplies...................................................
Miscellaneous Government property.....................

100, 500,000. 00
6,372, 970.00

141,200,000. 00
6, 598, 716.00

183, 692, 848. 69
11,114.617. 65

106, 872,970.00

147, 798, 716. 00

194,807,466. 34

1.500.000.00
1, 500,000.00
5.000.000.00
4, 500,000.00
1,639,370. 00

1, 500,000.00
1.500.000.00
5, 000,000.00
4.000.000.00
1, 690, 312.00

1,530,439.42
1,731,022.44
9, 725,716.24
2,591,297.93
1,410,681.09

14,139,370.00

13, 690,312. 00

16,989,157.12

30.000.000.00
12.498.000.00

60,000,000.00
18,498,000.00

1,002,200.00

1,001,100. 00

60, 724, 742.27
12, 610, 210.05
7,078,988.55
1,151,162.83

9.373.800.00
3.879.022.00
1.500.000.00
3.854.364.00
7, 700,000. 00
8, 649,849.00

10,464, 492.00
4,496, 840. 00
1,450, 000.00
2,200, 000.00
700, 000.00
3,000, 000. 00
7,125,
5,971, 690.00

6,849, 556.25
4,799, 615. 73
1,173, 285.63
1,506, 628.13
912, 601.16
5, 767, 893. 69
-4,557, 006.41
3,742, 413.13

36,957,035.00

35,408,022.00

29,309,000.13

3.000.000. 00

3, 500,000.00

3, 774,947. 68
1,946,041.18
871,879.80

Total sale of Government property.
3. Public-domain receipts—
Sale of public lands.............................
Land fees (registers’ and receivers').
Receipts under oil leasing acts..........
Forest reserve fund..............................
Other........................................................
Total public-domain receipts.
.4.
5.
6.
7.

Net earnings, Federal reserve banks (franchise tax).
Profits on coinage, bullion deposits, etc................... ..
Excess profits of licencees of Food Administration..
Rent of public buildings and grounds.........................
Fees, fines, penalties, forfeitures, etc.—
Consular and passport fees....................
Tax on circulation of national banks.
Customs service___ : .............................
Navy fines and forfeitures....................
Naturalization fees.................................
Immigration head tax............................
Judicial......................................................
Other..........................................................
Total fees, fines, penalties, etc.

1.000.000.00
1,000,000.00

ooo. oa

9. Gifts and contributions—
For river and harbor improvements..
For Forest Service cooperative work.
Other..........................................................

2.000.000.00
115,000.00

2,000,000.00
120,000.00

Total gifts and contributions.

5,115,000.00

5,620,000.00

6,592,868. 66

10. Sale of sealskins................................... ......................................
11. Naval hospital fund receipts...................................................
12. Miscellaneous unclassified receipts.......................................

851,572.00
325,000.00
5,105,702.00

851,572. 00
1,825,0.00. 00
5,232,984.00

1,024,886. 81
932,532.78
3,385,938.85

30,500,000.00

30,500,000.00

83, 678,223.38
100, 000,000.00
954,835.00

13. Repayments of investments:
Principal of loans made to foreign Governments..........
Liquidation of capital stock, U. S’. Grain Corporation.
Liquidation of capital stock, Federal land banks____
Return of advances made to reclamation fund.............
Principal of loans made by U. S. Housing Corporation.




Total, repayments of investments....................

1, 250,000.00

1, 250,000.00

1,000,000.00
100,000.00

1,000,000.00
100,000.00

32, 850,000.00

32,850,000.00

1,000,000.00
97,032.33
185, 730,090.71

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated receipts, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years—Continued.
ORDIN ARY RECEIPTS— Continued.
Reference to state­
ment.

Source of revenue.
No.

Estimated receipts,

Estimated receipts,

1923.

1922.

Actual receipts,
1921.

Page.

3. Miscellaneous receipts—Continued.
14. Assessments and reimbursements:
Salaries and expenses, national-bank examiners..........
Expenses of national currency..........................................
Reimbursement, cost of maintaining American
Army on the Rhine..........................................................
Work done for individuals, corporations, et al..............
Other........................................................................................

$1, 900, 000.00
788, 341.00

$1, 900, 000.00
976, 446.00

$1, 583, 037.11
886, 777.01

2, 400, 000.00
718, 856.00
1, 236, 470.00

2, 400, 000.00
758, 751.00
1, 291, 470.00

11,154, 467.22
854, 737.95
5, 050, 923.07

7, 043, 667.00

7, 326, 667.00

19, 529, 942.36

15. District of.Columbia:
Revenues of the District of Columbia.............................
United States receipts, District of Columbia sources..

15, 963, 415.00
490, 000.00

15, 386, 981.00
448, 000.00

14, 439, 985.93
561,106.29

Total, District of Columbia............................................

16, 453.415.00

15, 834, 981.00

15, 001, 092.22

16. Panama Canal receipts.............................................................

13, 315, 000.00

11, 760, 000. 00

12, 280, 741.79

31,170, 000.00

Total, assessments and reimbursements.
A38

a 30

17. Trust-fund receipts:
Government life-insurance fund—
Premiums on converted insurance.
Interest..................................................

26, 717, 000.00

2 , 000, 000.00

1, 000, 000.00

22, 051, 778.15
1, 058, 652.62

33,170, 000.00

27, 717, 000.00 -

23,110, 430.77

835, 500.00
840, 000.00
1, 750,000.00

582, 990.00
840, 000.00
1, 600, 000.00

70, 502.94
821, 009.01
359, 924.47

19, 000, 000.00

2,000, 000.00

20, 000, 000.00
2,000,000.00

20, 443,157.66
2, 016, 001.80
85, 792.49

21,000,000.00

22, 000,000.00

22,544, 951.95

Miscellaneous trust funds.............
District of Columbia trust funds*

611,040.00
1, 821, 900.00

581, 040.00
1, 621, 900.00

683, 895.23
1, 355, 331.10

Total, trust-fund receipts.. . .

60, 028.440.00

54, 942, 930.00

48, 946, 045.47

Total, miscellaneous receipts.

397,182, 750.00

453, 953, 663.00

703, 800, 412.95

Total, Government life-insurance fund.
Civil-service retirement and disability fund. . .
Soldiers’ Home permanent fund..........................
Army, Navy, and Marine Corps deposit funds.
Indian moneys—
Proceeds of labor.................................................,
Proceeds of sale of Indian lands and lumber.
Other........................................................................
Total, Indian moneys.
a 28,

38

18. Add excess of cash receipts, as per Treasury statement,
over receipts by warrant, as above.................................
1 and 7

A4,38




Total, ordinary receipts, exclusive of postal
revenues..........................................................................

16,141,175.94
3, 338,182, 750.00

3, 943,453, 663.00

5, 624, 932, 960.91

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

a

21

B u d g e t S t a t e m e n t N o . 4.
POSTAL SERVICE.

Statement of estimated expenditures and receipts for thefiscal year 1928 compared with prior years.
Reference to state­
ment.

Estimated, 1923.
No.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

Page.
a 22

A. Postal Service expenditures:
1. General—Undistributed......................
2. Inspection Service.................................
3. Special services......................................
4. Poat offices................................................
5. Domestic transportation service........ .
6. Foreign transportation service.............
7. Balances due foreign countries............
8. Village delivery service....................... .
9. Rural delivery service...........................
10. Star route service...................................,
11. Manufacturing and repair operations.
12. Losses and indemnities..................
13. Miscellaneous...........................................

$12, 500.00
2,009, 000.00

$10, 201,02

285,746, 050.00
146,409, 400.00
6, 700, 000.00
681, 000.00
1,350, 000.00
85, 935, 000.00
13,230, 000.00
10,710, 000.00
4,050, 000.00
4,249, 025.00

576,238,066.00
8,014,400.00

561,087,975.00
7,915,705.00

621,008,962.81

Deduct retirement fund.
Total expenditures.........
B. Postal
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

$13, 000.00
2,113, 150.00
6, 000.00
299,129, 400.00
148,017, 641.00
6,960, 000.00
501, 500.00
1,300, 000.00
87,185, 000.00
14,233, 000.00
8,700, 000.00
4,465, 000.00
3, 614, 375.00

568,223, 666.00

553,172,270.00

621,008,962. 81

481, 604.000.00
26,500, 000.00
14,700,000.00
7,500,000.00

442,380,000.00
26,000,000. 00
14, 500,000.00
7,000,000.00

300, 000.00
100,000.00
260,000.00
10, 000,000.00
900.000.00
4,400,000.00

280,000.00

403,892,342.98
25,499,780.14
14,106, 686.92
6,855,700.88
.06
282,380.92
99,852.23
233, 621.89
8,476,942.02
584,588.41
3,121,783.54

Service receipts:
Sale of postage stamps and other stamped paper.............
Second-class postage paid in money . ................................
Third and fourth class postage paid in money..........
Box rents.....................................................................................
Letter postage paid in money................................................
Foreign mails transit service......................................., _____
Fines and penalties..................................................................
Dead letters..................... ........................................................ .
Revenues from money-order business.................................
Unpaid money orders more than 1 year old......................
Interest and profit, Postal Savings System...................... .
Miscellaneous sales of Government property and other
miscellaneous receipts..........................................................
Total receipts.

C. Excess of expenditures over receipts......................
Less adjustment to Treasury Statement basis.
a3

Net excess of Postal Service expenditures over postal receipts.

1 Exclusive of retirement fund in 1921.




6, 000.00

100,000.00
240.000.00
9,500,000.00
800.000.00
3, 800,000.00

1, 829, 362.48
6, 000.00
270, 595, 448.29
224,180, 111.20
5,917, 938.27
410, 706.04
1,125, 398. 85
81,307, 674.70
13, 567, 951.30
11,852, 788.76
5,320, 725.36
4,884, 656.54

450.000.00

400,000.00

337,594.71

546,714,000.00

505,000,000.00

463,491,274.70

21, 509, 666.00

48,172,270.00

157,517, 688.11
27,389,230.09

21, 509, 666.00

48,172,270.00

130,128,458.02

a22

the

ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

B u d g e t S t a t e m e n t N o . 5.
POSTAL SERVICE.

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1928, compared with prior years, detail statement by activities, etc.
Reference to
statement.

ExpendituresClassification.
Estimated, 1923.

Page.

a 21

1. General undistributed:
1. Electric power, light, etc..........................................................
2. Travel expenses, Postmasters General and Assistant
Postmasters General and Postal Savings System............
3. Increased compensation, Postal Service employees..........
Total, genera] undistributed.
2. Inspection Service: Post-office inspectors.....................................
3. Special services: Special assistant to the Attorney General...
4. Post offices:
.
1. Compensation to postmasters..............................................
2. Compensation to assistant postmasters.............................
3. Clerks (including temporary clerk hire)..........................
4. Printers, mechanics, and skilled laborers........................
5. Watchmen, messengers, and laborers.. *........................
6. Separating mails.....................................................................
7. Unusual conditions in j>ost offices.....................................
8. City delivery carriers (including temporary carriers).
9. Vehicle service.......................................................................
10. Mail-messenger service.........................................................
11. Car fare and bicycle allowance..........................................
12. Special delivery service (fees and car fare)......... ..........
13. Rent, light, and fuel.............................................................
14. Miscellaneous items...............................................................
Total, post offices.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

$'7,500.00

$7,000.00

$8,040.51

5, 500.00

5,500.00

2,123.70
36.81

13, 000.00

12, 500.00

10,201.02

2,113,150.00

2,009, 000.00

1, 829, 362.48

6,000.00

6,000.00

6,000.00

43,300, 000.00
6,300, 000.00
119,400, 000.00
97, 400.00
5,000, 000.00
790, 000.00
225, 000.00
80,150, 000.00
15.000, 000.00
7,500, 000.00
1,050, 000.00
6, 517, 000.00
13.000, 000.00
800, 000.00

42,300, 000.00
6,250, 000.00
114,600, 000.00
82, 400.00
4,481, 250.00
775, 000.00
225, 000.00
76, 650, 000.00
15,000, 000.00
7,215, 400.00
950, 000.00
6, 017, 000.00
10,500, 000.00
700, 000.00

42,681, 434.33
5,598,, 335.96
110,012, 218.02
89, 451.21
3,339, 984.00
708, 490.84
185, 780.14
72,309, 173.17
15,311, 126.86
4,913, 487.22
860, 221.60
6,012, 015.51
7,873, 445.40
700, 284.03

299,129,400.00

285,746,050.00

270, 595,448.29

1,525,400.00

5. Domestic transportation service:
1. Power-boat service—
1. Powerboats..............................
2. Airplane and airplane service.

2,200,000.00

1,189,400.00
1,500,000.00

986,307.50
1,495, 813.30

Total, power-boat service..

3,725,400.00

2,689,400.00

2,482,120.80

95,000,000.00

95,532,000.00

174, 736,697.64
1, 292,443.52

Total, railroad transportation.

95,000,000.00

95,532,000.00

176,029,141.16

3. Railway Mail Service—
1. Salaries...............................1..............
2. Travel expenses and allowances.,
3. Miscellaneous items.........................

43, 600,000.00
2,915,241.00

2,000,000.00

43,000,000.00
2, 757,000.00
1,717,000.00

41,461,116.63
2,770,892.98
841, 880.41

Total, Railway Mail Service.

48, 515,241.00

47,474,000.00

45,073,890.02

4. Electric and cable car service—
1. Regular service........... ■
..................
2. Unusual conditions........................

777,000.00

714,000.00

585,978.18
8, 981.04

777,000.00

714, 000.00

594,959.22

148,017,641.00

146,409,400.00

224,180,111.20

6, 960,000.00
501,500.00
1,300,000.00
87,185,000.00

6,700, 000.00
681,000.00
1,350,000.00
85,935,000.00

5, 917,938.27
410,706.04
1,125,398.85
81,307, 674.70

283,000.00
13,950,000.00

230,000.00
13,000,000.00

258, 884.52
13,309,066.78

14,233,000.00

13,230,000.00

13,567,951.30

2. Railroad transportation—
1. Railroad service___
2. Blue-tag service.

Total, electric and cable car service.
Total, domestic transportation...........
6.
7.
8.
9.

Foreign mail transportation service.
Balances due foreign countries.........
Village delivery service.....................
Rural delivery service.......................

10. Star route service—
1. Alaska star route service*
2. Other star route service. .




Total, star route service.

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A 23

Estimated expenditures, fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years, detail statement by activities, etc.— Continued.
Reference to
statement.

Expenditures.
Classification.

No.

Estimated, 1923.

Page.

11. Manufacturing and repair operations:
1. Manufacturing of postage stamps............................................
2. Manufacturing of stamped envelopes and newspaper
wrappers...................................................................................
3 Manufacture of postal cards......................................................
4. Mail bags and equipment..........................................................

Estimated, 1922.

Actual, 1921.

$1,400, 000. 00

$1,460, 000. 00

$1, 564,395. 27

4, 500,000. 00
750,000. 00
2, 050,000. 00

5, 500, 000. 00
750, 000. 00
3,000,000. 00

6, 322,127. 96
1,107, 484 01
2, 858, 781. 52

8, 700,000. 00

10, 710,000. 00

11, 852, 788. 76

12. Losses and indemnities:
1. Losses bv fire, burglary, e t c i................................................. ..
4,365,000. 00
2. Indemnities, domestic mail......................................................
100,000. 00
3. Indemnities, international registered mail
...........................

4,000,000. 00
50,000.00

15, 289.16
5, 298, 091. 29
7,344. 91

Total, manufacturing and repair operations___

Total, losses and indemnities................................

4,465,000. 00

4,050,000. 00

5,320, 725. 36

13. Miscellaneous:
1. Payment of rewards—
1. Rewards.............................................................................
2. Information.......................................................................

25,000. 00

17,000.00

12,875. 00
5,134. 90

Total, payment of rewards......................................

25,000. 00

17,000. 00

18,009. 90
190,548.15
26,470. 96

2. Unpaid money orders more than one year old.....................
3. Motor vehicle truck service......................................................
4. Other miscellaneous items—
1. Stationery..........................................................................
2. Special joint commissions, Postal Service.................
3 Twine and tying devices...............................................
4. Post-office equipment and supplies (includes office
appliances)....................................................................
5. Shipment of supplies......................................................
6. Freight on stamped paper and mail bags (includes
distribution of stamped envelopes and newspaper
wrappers).......................................................................
7. Labor-saving devices..................................................
8. Postal Laws and Regulations, printing and binding.
9 Other...................................................................................

1, 600,000. 00

492,000.00

610,000. 00

1,755,492. 34
177, 759. 72
701,214. 40

1,150,000. 00
286,050. 00

1,226,000. 00
270.000. 00

1,296,254. 98
185* 974. 73

139,875.00
426,300. 00
55,000. 00
150.00

144, 875. 00
381.000. 00

111, 230. 36
417, 558. 23

150.00

4,142. 77

Total, other miscellaneous items.......... ................

3,589,375. 00

4, 232,025.00

4, 649, 627. 53

Total, miscellaneous.................................................

3,614,375.00

4,249,025.00

4,884, 656. 54

576, 238,066. 00
8,014, 400.00

561,087,975. 00
7,915,705. 00

1 621,008,962. 81

Deduct, retirement fund.................................................................
4

1,040,000.00

Total expenditures, Postal Service.....................

568, 223, 666. 00

553,172,270.00

621,008, 962. 81

a 21

1Exclusive of retirement fund In 1921.




THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1023.

a 24

B u d g e t St a t e

Comparative statement of ordinary receipts and expenditures, showing how the estimated financial condition will be reached
fiscal year 1921,
S um mary

by

Sources

of

O r d in a r y R

Reference to state­
ment.

evenue

and

Ch aracter

op

Receipts.
Source of revenue.

No.

Estimated, 1923.

Page.
a 19

A. Receipts:
1. Internal-revenue receipts—
1. Income and profits tax.
2. Miscellaneous.................
Total internal-revenue receipts.
2. Customs receipts........................... .................
3. Miscellaneous—
1. Interest, premium, and discount................................
2. Sale of Government property......................................
3. Public domain receipts.................................................
4. Net earnings, Federal reserve banks (franchise tax)
5. Profits on coinage, bullion deposits, etc...................
6. Excess profits of licensees of Food Administration.
7. Rent of public buildings and grounds......................
8. Fees, fines, penalties, forfeitures, etc........................
9. Gifts and contributions.................................................
10. Sale of sealskins............ .................................................
11. Naval hospital fund receipts.......................................
12. Miscellaneous unclassified receipts............................
13. Repayments of investments.........................................
14. Assessments and reimbursements..............................
15. District of Columbia receipts.......................................
16. Panama Canal receipts..................................................
17. Trust fund receipts.........................................................
18. Excess of cash receipts over warrant distribution,
as above........................................................................
Total miscellaneous receipts.

Estimated, 1922.

Actual,11921.

$1, 715, 000, 000. 00 $2,110,000, 000. 00 S3,206,046,157. 74
896, 000, 000. 00 1,104, 500, 000. 00 1, 390, 380,823. 28
2, 611, 000, 000. 00
330, 000,000. 00

3,214, 500, 000. 00
275,000, 000. 00

4, 596,426, 981. 02
308, 564,391. 00

54, 625, 379. 00
106,872, 970. 00
14,139,370. 00
30,000,000. 00
12, 498, 000. 00

41, 313, 379. 00
147,798, 716. 00
13, 690, 312. 00
60,000,000. 00
18,498, 000. 00

1, 002, 200. 00
36, 957, 035. 00
5,115, 000. 00
851, 572. 00
325, 000. 00
5,105, 702. 00
32, 850, 000. 00
7, 043, 667. 00
16,453, 415. 00
13, 315, 000. 00
60,028, 440. 00

35,408, 022. 00
5, 620, 000. 00
851, 572. 00
1,825, 000. 00
5, 232, 984. 00
32,850, 000. 00
7, 326, 667. 00
15,834, 981. 00
11, 760, 000. 00
54, 942, 930. 00

87, 705, 546. 01
194, 807, 466. 34
16, 989, 157.12
60, 724, 742. 27
12, 610, 210. 05
7, 078, 988. 55
1,151, 162. 83
29,309, 000. 13
6, 592, 868. 66
1, 024, 886. 81
932, 532. 78
3, 385, 938. 85
185, 730, 090. 71
19, 529, 942. 36
15,001, 092. 22
12,280, 741. 79
48, 946, 045. 47

1,001, 100. 00

16,141,175. 94
397,182, 750. 00

453, 953, 663. 00

719,941, 588. 89

5, 624, 932, 960. 91

a4

Total receipts, all sources.....................................

3, 338,182, 750. 00

3, 943,453, 663. 00

a4

B. Excess of estimated expenditures over estimated receipts,
fiscal years 1923 and 1922.............................................................

167,571, 977.00

24,468, 703. 00

Total..........................................................................

3, 505, 754, 727. 00

3, 967, 922,366. 00

5, 624, 932, 960. 91

1 On basis of Treasury daily statement.
1 Represents those disbursements of the Government which do not constitute expenses of administration strictly speaking. Examples of such expenditures are interest on the
public debt, pensions, grants, subsidies and contributions, refunds and drawbacks, indemnities, military and naval insurance, and the like.
3 Includes vocational rehabilitation payments made by Bureau of Vocational Education in 1921.




BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A 25

N o . 6.

MENT

at the close of the fiscal years 1923 and 1922, and the means ly which the actual condition was reached at the end of the
June 30, 1921.
E x p e n d it u r e , F i s c a l Y e a r 1923, C o m p a re d w it h P r i o r Y e a r s .
Reference to state­
ment.

Expenditures.
Character of expenditure.

No.

Estimated, 1923.

Page.

2

a5

Estimated, 1922.

C. Expenditures:
1. Current expenses including equipment........... ' .............. SI, 085,474, 779.00 $1, 526,021,545.00

Actual,11921.

$2,913, 833,620. 31

2. jNfonadministrative expenses 2—

999,144, 731. 35
260,611,416.13
324,163,302. 96

5, 257. 000. 00
35,251, 700. 00
6,697,150. 00

4. 484.100. 00
40; 279', 000. 00
6, 037, 500. 00

3,377.976.24
54, 012, 822. 51
10, 606, 712. 01

1, 709,807, 600. 00

1,651, 916,961. 20

125, 700,000.00
46, 045,400. 00
7, 35S, 839. 00
9, 349,046. 00

105,000,000. 00
29, 850,000. 00
7, 219, S49. 00
12,918, 568. 00

57,452,056. 48
58, 820, 322. 30
16,461,409. 47
8,134, 344. 62

11, 898, 500. 00
9, 866,000. 00
13, 210,970. 00
1, 281, 000. 00

14. 788. 376. 00
13,172; 000. 00
11,193.850. 00
2, 412; 467. 00

54,123,970. 29
14,211,789.10
16.418,497. 79
i; 477,112. 51

Total public works..........................................

2

975, O O O O 00
C, C.
258,400,000. C
O
425, 607,000. 00

224; 739, 755. 00

196. 555,110.00

4. District of Columbia.................................................................
5. Deficiencies in postal revenues..............................................

25,070, 877. 00
21, 509, 666. 00

22.275,063. 00
48,172,270.00

].
2.
3.
4.

a 12

a6, 16

2

975,000, O O 00 '
C.
252, 350, 000. 00
421, 703, 000. 00

Total nonadministrative expenses 2 .......... 1, 696, 258, 850.00

2

a 16

Interest on public debt..........................................
Pensions..........................................*
...............................
War Risk and l T S. Veterans’ Bureau payments3. .
.
Vocational education and rehabilitation of per-

5. Refunds and drawbacks, etc.....................................
6. Other...............................................................................

2
9

a8

2

a9
a7

2

aS

2
2

AlO
A ll

2

a !7

4

a 21

3. Public works—
1. Rural post roads (good roads, etc.)..........................
2. Rivers and harbors......................................................
3. Panama Canal...............................................................
4. Public buildings under Treasury Department...
5. Public works under War Department other than
Rivers and TTarbors and Panama Canal.............
6. Public works under Navv Department.................
7. Public works under Interior Department.............
8. Other public works....................................................

22, 558, 264.16
130.12S, 458. 02
73, 896, 697. 44
16, 781,320. 79

Total investments........................................
a 18

227,099, 502. 56

-

6. Investments—
1. Purchase of foreign obligations.................................
2. Purchase of farm-loan bonds.....................................

2

•

90,678,018. 23

a4
a4

261,100,250. 00
161,012; 750. 00

369,338,800.00

387,942, 200. 00

422,113,000.00

9,403,500. 00

11, 367,778.00

17, 825,119. 68

9. Trust funds—
1. Indian moneys..............................................................
2. Civil service retirement fund....................................
3. Investment of trust funds................ *.......................
4. O th e r............................................................................

21.500.000.00
8,600,000.00
34.362.000. 00
9,496,500. 00

22,000,000.00
5,097,000.00
30,222,000.00
8,461,800. 00

28,243,349.96
• 3,100,000.00
28,487,109.75
2,057,285.43

Total trust funds..........................................
1
1

272,442, 200.00
115, 500,000.00

8. Special funds..............................................................................

a 18

283,838, 800. 00
85, 500, 000. 00

Total reduction in principal of public debt
payable out of ordinary receipts..............

2

7. Reduction in principal of public debt, payable out of
ordinary receipts—
1. Sinking fund..................................................................
2. Other...... .......................................................................

73,958,500.00

65,780,800.00

61,887,745.14

Grand total expenditures* **...................... 3,505,754,727. 00
D. Excess of ordinary receipts over expenditures chargeable to
ordinary receipts, actual, 1921........................................................

3,967,922,366.00

5,538,040, 689.30




Total................................................................

3,505,754,727. 00

86,892,271. 61
3,967, 922,366.00

5,624,932,960. 91

a

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

26

B u d g e t S t a t e m e n t N o . 7.

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1923 compared with prior years.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip t s D e t a i l e d

by

Sources and

Referenco to state­
ment.

O r g a n iz a t io n

U n it s .

Estimated receipts.

Actual receipts 1021
(on basis of Treas­
ury Daily S t a t e ­
ment).

Source and organization units.
No.

Tage.

a4

Al9

A. Internal revenue:
1. Income and profits taxes...............
2. Miscellaneous Internal Revenue*

$1,715,000,000.00 $2,110,000,000.00
896,000,000.00 1,104,500,000.00

33, 206,046,157.74
1, 390, 380,823.28.

2, 611,000, 000.00

3, 214, 500, 000.00

4,596,426,981.02

330, 000,000.00

275, 000, 000.00

308, 564,391.00

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands:
1. Legislative— Public funds—
1. Senate—
1. Sales of miscellaneous Government property.

2,000.00

2,000.00

2,408.43

2. House of Representatives—
1. Sales of office material........................................
2. Sales of miscellaneous Government property.

4,000.00

4,000.00

2,056.27
825.22

Total House of Representatives..

4, 000.00

4,000.00

2,881.49

3. Government Printing Office—
1. Sales of miscellaneous Government property

325,000.00

325, 000.00

412, 372.09

101, 900.00
145,000.00

101,800.00
140,000.00

91,299.62
133,687.85
33.29

246, 900.00

241,800.00

225,020.76

650.00

600.00

1,092.99

578,550.00

573,400.00

643,775.76

Total internal-revenue receipts. . .
B. Customs.




4. Library of Congress—
1. Sales of miscellaneous Government property.
2. Copyright fees.......................................................
3. Miscellaneous moneys, Copyright Office.___
Total Library of Congress.
5. MiscellaneousTotal Legislative public fund
receipts..........................................
2. State Department—
1. Public funds—
1. Interest, premium, and discount—
1. Interest on public deposits................. .
2. Interest on debts due United States
by individuals...................................... .
3. Gain by exchange...................................

2,000.00
20, 000.00

2, 000.00
20,000.00

2,270.24
23,157.14

Total interest, premium, and
discount..........................................

22,000.00

22,000.00

25,451.89

3.000.00

24.51

2. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material........................................
2. Miscellaneous Government property.

2.000.00

2.000.00

3,575.68
3,923.44

Total sales of Government prop­
erty.................................................

5,000.00

5,000.00

7,499.12

8,123, 800.00
1,250,000.00

9.081.302.00
1.383.190.00

5,676,850.61
1,172,705.64

9,373,800.00

10,464,492.00

6,849,556.25

1, 800.00

1,800.00

1,712.75

1 000.00

1,000.00

2,551.97
393.75

Total reimbursements..........

2,800.00

2 , 800.00

4,658.47

5. Miscellaneous............................................

400.00

400.00

361.03

Total public fund receipts.

9,404,000.00

10,494,692.00

6,887,526.76

3. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.—
1. Consular fee3.
tula
2. Passport fees..
Total fees, fines, penalties, etc___
4. Reimbursements—
1. Cost of extradition cases...................... .
2. Relief moneys furnished American
citizens and prisoners of war............ .
3. Board furnished Japanese seamen___

3.000.00

,

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A 27

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1923 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by

S ou rces

and

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n i t s —Continued.

Reference to state­
m ent.

Estim ated receipts.

Source and organization units.
No.

1923

Page.

1922

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands—Continued.
2. Trust funds—
1. Repayments by French Government: Repre­
sentation of interests in Turkey....................
2. Claim of Howard LeRoy O’Brien, Coxswain
William B. Donnelly and L. R. Ferguson,
of U. S. S. Monocacy........................................
3. Claim of Ivan Gerassimovitch...........................
4. Salvage proceeds...................................................
5. Estates of decedents.............................................
6. Other trust funds...................................................

Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury Daily S ta te­
ment).

$288,299. 89
27,380. 00

10,000.00
4, 537. 67
2,917. 60
2,076.41

Total trust fund receipts .

$300,000.00

$300,000. 00

335,211. 57

Total State Department.

9,704,000.00

10,794, 692.00

7,222,738. 33

3. Treasury Department—
1. Public funds—
1. Interest on loans of foreign Governments
held by the United States—
1. Cuba..........................................................
2. France........ ............................................
3. Great Britain and Ireland....................
4. Greece.......................................................
5. Liberia......................................................
6. Provisional Government of Russia.. .

301,600.55
2,659,740. 55
13,244,444. 73
784,153. 34
'
700.00
1,336,667. 74

Total interest on loans to foreign
Governments................................

18,327,306. 91




Interest on miscellaneous obligations of
foreign Governments held by the United
States................................................................ .
3. Other
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

interest, premium, and discount—
Interest on farm loan bonds.................
Interest on public deposits..................
Interest on loans to farmers in
drought-stricken areas...................... .
Interest repaid by central branch
Union Pacific Railroad......................
Interest on loans to railroads.............. .
Gain by exchange...................................
Discount on bonds and notes pur­
chased....................................................
Total other interest, premium,
and discount..................................

4. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material........................................
2. Land and buildings................................
3. Miscellaneous Government property..
4. Reimbursement for
Government
property lost or damaged..................
Total sales of Government prop­
erty.................................................
5. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.
1. Tax on circulation national bank____
2. Franchise tax: Surplus earnings of
Federal reserve banks........................ .
3. Fines for violation of national bank­
ing laws.............................. .................
4. Fees, fines, etc., custom service..........
5. Forfeited installments, Liberty bonds.
6. Forfeitures by contractors................... .
Total fees, fines, penalties, etc. . .
6. Gifts and contributions: Contribution by
New York Liberty Loan Associations-----

25,000,000. 00

25,000,000.00

12, 815, 675. 60

8,467,325. 00
3,940,000.00

8,467,325.00
4,221,000.00

8,306,075.00
5, 668,852.42
44,691. 61
16,316.28

15,000,000.00
3,041.94
10,675,194.55
27,407,325.00

12,688,325.00

24,714,171. 80

725.000.00
229.000. 00
107,300.00

725.000.00
229.000.00
114,300.00

45,140.54
246,260.00
458,923.02
7,367. 79

1,061,300.00

1,068,300.00

757,691. 35

3,879,022. 00

4,496,840.00

4,799,615.73

30,000,000.00

60,000,000.00

60,724,742.27
1,300.00
1,173,285. 63
20,825.46
15,501.29

2,000.00

2,000.00

1,500,000.00

1,450,000.00

35,381,022.00

65,948,840.00

66,735,270.38
225,000.00

A 28

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1923 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by

S ou rces

and

U n i t s — Continued.

O r g a n iz a tio n

Reference to state­
m ent.

Estim ated receipts.

Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury Daily S t a t e ­
ment).

Source and organization units.

No.

Page.

1923

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including‘ Panama Canal and sales of
public lands— Continued.
3. Treasury Department— Continued.
1. Public funds— Continued.
7. Repayments of investments (principal)—
1. Repayments of loans (principal) to
foreign Governments (act of Sept.
24, 1917)—
1. Belgium..................................... 2. Cuba.............................................
3. Czechoslovakia..........................
4. France........................................ .
5. Great Britain and Ireland____
6. Greece........................................ 7. Italy.............................................
8. Liberia....................................... .
9. Rumania................................... .
10. Serbia...........................................
Total repayments of loans
(principal) to foreign
Governments......................
2. Liquidation of capital stock of Federal
land banks............................................

$1, 512,901. 66
474,500. 00
34,567,861. 81
46,517,633. 57

605,326.34

$30, 500,000. 00

$30,500,000. 00

83, 678,223. 38

1, 250, 000. 00

1, 250,000.00

954,835.00

Total repayments of invest­
ments (principal)...........

31,750,000.00

31,750, 000. 00

84, 633, 058. 38

8. Assessments— Salaries and expenses na­
tional bank examiners..................................

1,900, 000. 00

1, 900,000.00

1, 583, 037.11

788, 341. 00
500, 000. 00

976,446. 00
500.000. 00

886,^77.01
110,126.86

6,570.00

6, 570.00

73,973.50

75.000. 00

130.000. 00

27,700.33

1, 600.00
600, 000. 00

1, 600.00
600.000.00

4,223.32

25,000.00

25,000.00

2,006,511. 00

2,249, 616.00

1,102,801.02

12,498,000.00
112, 000. 00

18, 498,000.00
112, 000. 00

12, 610, 210.05
98, 866.27
3,520, 82

12, 610,000.00

18, 610,000.00

12,712,597.14

137,116,158.00

159, 215,081.00

223,606, 609. 69

200, 000. 00

‘200, 000.00

9. Reimbursements—
1. Expenses of national currency.............
2. Fumigating and disinfecting vessels.
3. Money recovered in narcotic and pro­
hibition cases......................................
4. Expenses of international service of
ice observation and patrol.................
5. Expenses of inspectors, manufacture
of internal revenue stamps..............
6. Care of immigrants, Ellis Island.___
7. Care of seamen........................................
8. Other.........................................................
Total reimbursements.
10. Miscellaneous—
1. Profits on coinage, bullion deposits,
etc...................... ...................................
2. Rent of public buildings, grounds, etc.
3. Other receipts......................................
Total miscellaneous..........
Total public fund receipts..
2. Trust funds—
1. District of Columbia teachers retirement
investment fund............................................ .
2. Premium on converted insurance— Govern­
ment life insurance fund...............................
3. Interest on investment of Government life
insurance fund.................................................
4. Other.......................................................................

10.000. 00

(*)
e)

10,000.00

0)
(i)

.

22,051,778.15
1,058,652. 62
2,249.74

Total trust fund receipts.. .

1 See United States Veterans' Bureau.




200,000.00

200,000.00

23,112, 680.51

Total Treasury Department.

137, 316,158.00

159,415,081.00

246,719,290.20

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

a

29

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1923 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by

S ou rces

and

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n i t s — Continued.

Reference to state­
ment.

Estimated receipts.
Source and organization units.

No.

1923

Page.

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands— Continued.
4: War Department—
1. Public funds—
1. Interest, premium, and discount—
1. Interest on advanced payments to
contractors, deficiency act of Oct. 6,
1917.......................................................
2. Interest on public deposits................. .
3. Gain by exchange...................................

$1,500,000.00
13,488.00
12, 672.00

$2, 750,000.00
13.488.00
12.672.00

$667,383.05
20, 232.49
19,008.08

1,526,160.00

2,776,160.00

706, 623. 62

Total interest, premium,
and discount....................
2. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material..........................................
2. Land....................................................*--•
3. War plants, including explosive
plant at Nitro, W. Va.........................
4. Ordnance material..................................
5. War supplies............................... - ...........
6. Reimbursement for Government prop­
erty lost or damaged...........................
7. Condemned animals................................
8. Garbage and refuse..................................
9. Miscellaneous Government property..
Total sales -of Government
property..............................
3. Revenue producing enterprises—
1. United States telegraph lines...............
2. United States transports........................
3. United States Army tank line..............
4. United States Army Radio Service...
5. Operation of town of Anatol, N. J----6. United States laundry and dry clean­
ing operation........................................
7. Shoes, clothing, hat, and miscellane­
ous repair shops...................................
8. Receipts from stud fees.........................
9. Photographs and motion picture films.
Total revenue producing
enterprises..........................
4. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.:
1. Fines for violating regulations.
2. Forfeitures by contractors____
Total fees, fines, penalties, etc.
5. Gifts and contributions:
1. Royalties on (Col. I. N.) Lewis ma­
chine gun...............................................
2. Contributions for river and harbor im­
provements.............................................
3. Contributions for improvement of roads,
bridges, and ferries............................
Total gifts and contributions.
6. Reimbursements:
1. Cost of maintaining American Army on
the Rhine (payment by German ,
Government under terms of armis­
tice)...........................................................
2. Work performed by War Department
for individuals, corporations, and
others.........................................................
3. Other.............................................................
Total reimbursements.
1Included in other items.




1922

Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury Daily S ta te ­
ment).

(l)
(')
(')

(l)

503, 772. 25
244, 257.50

(*)

779,418. 00
169,049. 92
181,598, 778. 78

0)

100, 000. 00
100,000,000.00

150.000.00
140,000,000.00

6, 766.00
60,000.00
175,000.00

6,766.00
60,000.00
178.000.00

,

15, 297. 90
5,460. 94

100,341,766.00

140,394,766. 00

183,316,035.29

225, 296.00

225,296.00

195, 876.36
38,103.23
7, 616.34
2,042.95
4,987.94

20,000. 00

2,160.00
o

20,000.00
12,160.00

O

2,010,000.00

2,110,000.00

900,000.00
50, 000. 00
50,000.00

910,000.00
50,000.00
50,000.00

3, 257,456.00

3,377,456.00

248, 626.82

200. 00
14, 070. 00

200. 00
14, 070. 00

21,105. 45

14, 270. 00

14,270. 00

21,105.45

3,000, 000. 00

3,500,000. 00

3, 774,947. 68

115, 000. 00

120, 000. 00

118,746. 61

3,115,000. 00

3, 620, 000. 00

4,413, 960. 41

2,400,000. 00

2,400,000.00

11,154,467.22

227,856. 00

227,856. 00

356,794.99
1,393. 60

2,627,856. 00

2,627,856.00

11,512,655.81

520, 266.12

A30

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1928 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by

S ou rces

and

O r g a n iz a tio n

Reference to state­
ment.

U n it s —

Continued.

Estimated receipts.
Source and organization units.

No.

Page.

1922

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands—Continued.
4. War Department— Continued.
1. Public funds— Continued.
7. Miscellaneous:
1. Rent of public buildings, grounds, etc.
2. Other............................................................




Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury Daily S ta te­
ment).

$796,100. 00
34,816. 00

$939, 239. 82
7,875. 22

Total miscellaneous..................

831, 916. 00

830, 916. 00

947,115. 04

Total public fund receipts_
_
2. Trust
1.
2.
3.

$795,100. 00
36, 816. 00

111, 714,424. 00

153, 641,424. 00

201,166,122.44

840, 000. 00

840, 000. 00

1,200, 000. 00

1, 000, 000. 00

funds:
Soldiers’ home permanent fund.......................
Pay of the Army deposit fund.........................
Preservation, birthplace of Lincoln................

2, 040. 00

2, 040. 00

821, 009. 01
158,248. 70
2,040. 00

Total trust fund receipts.

2, 042,040. 00

1, 842, 040. 00

981, 297. 71

Total, War.Department..

113, 756,464. 00

155,483,464. 00

202,147,420.15

5. Panama Canal— Public funds—
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Waterworks.............................................
2. Miscellaneous Government property.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Total sales of Government property.
Taxes, licenses, fines, etc., Canal Zone.............
Tolls............................................................................
Net profit, business operations.............................
Miscellaneous............................................................
Adjustment to cash basis...............................
Total Panama Canal— Public
fund receipts...........................

115,000. 00

120,415. 61
26, 968. 90

115, 000. 00

200, 000. 00

147, 384* 51
216,036.15
11,310,598. 62
239, 686.’ 13
655. 91
366,380. 47

13, 000,000. 00

210, 000. 00
11, 500, 000. 00
50, 000. 00

13,315, 000. 00

11, 760,000. 00

12,280, 741. 79

6. Navy Department—
1. Public funds—
1. Interest, premium, and discount—
1. Interest on advanced payments to con­
tractors.....................................................
2. Interest on public deposits................... .
3. Gain by exchange.....................................
4. Interest on debts due United States by
individuals............................................ .

100 000 00

100, 000. 00

200, 874. 94
15,564.14
162, 787.29

250,000. 00

# 288,000.00

18,999.01

Total interest, premium, and
discount...................................

350,000. 00

388,000. 00

398,225. 38

12, 000. 00
500.000. 00
500.000. 00

12, 000. 00
500, 000. 00

14,890. 37*
74,953. 04
2,084,129. 21

2. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material............................................
2. Naval vessels..............................................
3* War supplies...............................................
4. Reimbursement for Government prop­
erty, lost or damaged..........................5. Ordnance material....................................
6. Miscellaneous, condemned materials,
etc.............................................................
Total sales of Government prop­
erty............................................
3. Revenue producing enterprises:
1. United States Navy Radio Service___
2. Freight, shipments to French Govemment on Nj
Navy vessels.
Total, revenue producing en­
terprises...................................
4. Fees, fines, penalties, etc., Navy fines and
forfeitures............................................................
5. Reimbursements, work performed by Navy
Department.....................................................*.

, .

60,000. 00

1, 000,000. 00
60, 000. 00

70,292.25

100. 000. 00

100, 000. 00

1,000,000. 00

1,000,000.00

4, 831,271. 72

2,172,000. 00

2, 672, 000. 00

7,075,536. 59

500, 000. 00

500,000. 00

•666,371.84
613,919.30

500, 000.00

500, 000. 00

1,280,291. U

1,000,000.00

2,200,000.00

1,506,628.13

200, 000. 00

200,000.00

204,142.10

A31

BUDGET STATEMENT^.

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1928 compared with prior years—Continued.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by

S ou rces

and

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n i t s — Continued.

Reference to state­
ment.

Estimated receipts.
Source and organization units.

No.

Page.

1923

1922

Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury Daily S ta te­
ment).

Cf Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands—Continued.
6. Navy Department— Continued.
1. Public funds— Continued.
6. Miscellaneous—■
1. Rent of public buildings, grounds,
etc............................................................
2. Purchase of discharges, Navy and
Marine Corps........................................
3. Naval hospital fund................................
4. Clothing and small stores fund..........
5. Other...........................................................

$30, 000. 00

$30, 000. 00

10, 000. 00
325,000. 00
10,000. 00
50,000.00

10,000. 00
1,825,000. 00
10, 000. 00
50,000.00

23, 207.
932,532.
35,416.
39, 271.

Total miscellaneous..........................

425,000/00

1,925, 000. 00

1,063, 312. 73

Total public fund receipts.............

4, 647,000.00

7, 885, 000. 00

11,528,136.07

2. Trust funds—
1. Pay of Marine Corps, deposit fund................
2. Pay of Navy, deposit fund.................. ■
..........
3. Navy pension fund, principal..........................

350, 000. 00
200,000. 00
4,000. 00

400, 000. 00
200,000. 00
4, 000. 00

102, 689. 37
98, 986.40
2,863. 53

Total trust fund receipts.................

554, 000. 00

604, 000. 00

204,539. 30

Total, Navy Department................

5,201,000.00

8,489,000. 00

11, 732, 675. 37

2, 000. 00
325,000. 00

2, 000.00
350, 000. 00

3,013.15
383, 246. 87

46, 950. 00

46,950. 00

2,537. 89

46,950. 00
64,000. 00

46,950.00
66,000. 00 .................97*989*61

7. Interior Department—
1. Public funds—■
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material..........................................
2. Sales to Indians.......................................
3. Reimbursement for
Government
property lost or damaged....................
4. Sales of publications, Geological
Survey....................................................
5. Miscellaneous Government property..




Total sales of Government prop­
erty...................................................
2. Public domain receipts—
1. Sale of public lands................................
2. Land fees, registers and receivers___
3. Depredations on public lands..............
4. Deposits by individuals for survey­
ing public lands...................................
5. Proceeds of town sites.............................
6. Sale of land, timber, etc. (Coos Bay
'
and Oregon and California landgrant fund).............. ..............................
7. Revenues of national parks...................
8. Receipts under oil leasing acts............
9. Sale of lands, Yuma auxiliary
reclamation project, Arizona..........
10. Royalties on coal mined and royal­
ties and rentals on potash deposits..
11. Sale of miscellaneous land and tim­
ber .............................................................
Total public domain receipts___
3. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.—
1. Fees on letters patent.............................
2. Miscellaneous fees, Interior Depart­
ment............................................ ............
Total fees, fines, penalties, etc----4. Gifts and contributions, Grand Canyon Na­
tional Park, Ariz...............................................
5. Repayments of investments (principal):
Return of advances made to reclama­
tion fund......................................■
.....................

$32, 884. 71
05
78
88
31

484, 900. 00

511,900.00

486, 787. 52

1, 500,000. 00
1, 500. 000. 00
35, 000. 00

1, 500, 000. 00
1,500, 000. 00
40,000.00

1,530,439. 42
1, 731,022.44
68,646. 25

41.000. 00
100,000. 00

81, 000. 00
140.000.00

62,324. 51
36, 679. 35

500.000.00
428, 870. 00
5,000,000. 00

500.000. 00
389, 575.00
5,000. 000.00

414, 689.42
384, 276.18
9, 725,716. 24

425.000.00

425.000. 00

330, 659. 95

19.000. 00

15, 650. 00

24,859. 73

90, 500. 00

99, 087. 00

86,957. 34

9,639,370.00

9, 690, 312. 00

14,396, 270. 83

3,323,800. 00

2, 791,300.00

2, 696,502.46

58,120. 00

58,170. 00

64,896.05

3,381,920. 00

2,849,470.00

2,761,398.51
1,835.50

1,000,000.00

1,000,000.00

1,-000,000.00

a

32

the

ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1923 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by S ou rces

and

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n i t s —Continued.

Reference to state­
m en t.

E stim ated receipts.

Source and organization units.
No.

1923

Page.




Actual receipts 1921
{on basis of Treas­
ury Daily S ta te ­
ment).

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public laods— Continued.
7. Interior Department— Continued.
1. Public funds— Continued.
6. Assessments—
1. Construction charges..............................
2. Drainage assessments... *.................... .
Total assessments.
7. Reimbursements—
1. Costs collected from estates of de­
ceased Indians...............................
2. Reimbursement account appropria­
tions made for Indian tribe..............
3. Surveying railroad and private land
claims......................................................
Total reimbursements..
8. Miscellaneous—
1. Rent of public buildings.......................
2. Water and ground rent, Hot Springs
Reservation, Ark.................................
3. Alaska, licenses and sales receipts___
4. Other..........................................................
5. Unclaimed funds of patients, St.
Elizabeths Hospital............................

1922

§4,000. 00
2, 500. 00

$4, 000. 00
2, 500. 00

$5, 649. 66
1,591. 75

6, 500. 00

6, 500. 00

7,241. 41

80, 000. 00

95, 000. 00

96, 646. 53

50, 000. 00

50,000. 00

33, 729. 48

2, 500. 00

27, 395.00

5, 727. 55

132,500. 00

172, 395. 00

136,103. 56

6,100.00

6, 000.00

16, 454.98

52, 000.00
23, 500.00
20, 000.00

50, 000.00
25, 500.00
20,000.00

63, 560.67
31, 885.20
987.65

1, 200.00

1, 432.00

102, 800.00

102, 932.00

112, 888.50

14, 747, 990.00

14, 333, 509.00

18,902, 525.83

19,000, 000.00

20,000, 000.00

20,443,157.66

2, 000, 000.00

2, 000, 000.00

2,016,001.80
85, 792.49

21, 000,000.00

22, 000, 000.00

22, 544, 951.95

835, 500.00

582, 990.00

70, 502.94

305, 000.00

275,000.00

210, 934.26
74, 075.27
54,148.31
2, 372.55

Total trust fund receipts___

22,140,500.00

22, 857, 990.00

22, 956, 985. 28

Total, Interior Department.

36, 888, 490.00

37,191, 499.00

41, 859, 511.11

60, 000.00

60,000.00

56, 344.05

Total miscellaneous..............
Total public fund receipts.
2. Trust funds—
1. Indian moneys—
1. Indian money, proceeds of labor.........
2. Proceeds of sales of Indian lands,
lumber, etc............................................
3. Miscellaneous Indian moneys...............
Total Indian moneys .
2. Civil service retirement and disability funds.
3. Personal funds of patients, St. Elizabeths
Hospital.............................................................
4. Pension moneys, St. Elizabeths Hospital___
5. Surveys within railroad land grants................
6. Outstanding liabilities: Lands.........................

8. Post Office Department— Public funds—
1. Sale of Government property: Office material.........
2. Revenue producing enterprises: Revenue from ad­
ministration expenses, telegraph and telephone
lines................................................................................
3. Miscellaneous, excess earnings, telephone service.
Total, Post Office Department,
public fund receipts.....................
9. Department of Agriculture— Public funds—
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material.....................................................
2. Surplus war material........................................ .
3. Miscellaneous Government property............ .
4. Reimbursement for Government property
lost or damaged................................................
Total sales of Government property

25, 621.08
81,942.36
60,000.00

60,000.00

163, 907.49

500.00
135, 000.00

500.00
200,000.00
130,000.00

4, 252.41
6, 829.84
140, 735.79

2, 000.00

2, 000.00

2,881.36

137,500.00

332, 500.00

154,699.40

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A33

Estimated receipts, exclusive of postal revenues, fiscal year 1928 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y R e c e ip ts D e t a ile d

b y S o u r c e s a n d O r g a n i z a t i o n U n i t s — Continued.

Reference to state­
ment.

Estimated receipts.

Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury D a ily State*
ment).

Source and organization units.
No.

1923

Page.

1922

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands— Continued.
9. Department of Agriculture— Public funds— Continued.
2. Public domain receipts—
1. Sales of public lands...........................................
$4, 500,000.00
2. Forest reserve fund
........................................... .

$4, 000, 000.00

$1, 588.36
2, 591, 297.93

4, 500, 000.00

4, 000, 000.00

2, 592, 886.29

Total public domain receipts........
3. Revenue producing enterprises, United
States telegraph lines..................................... j
4. Gifts and contributions, Forest Service
cooperative fund..............................................

5,500.00

5, 500.00

5, 312.37

2,000, 000.00

2,000,000.00

1, 946,041.18
k

5. Reimbursements—
1. Work performed by Agriculture De­
partment for individuals, corpora­
tions, and others..................................
2. Inspection of food products..............

60, 500.00
98, 000.00

60, 500.00
98,000.00

60, 345.30
97, 352.00

Total reimbursements.....................

158, 500.00

158, 500.00

157, 697.30

6. Miscellaneous—
1. Rent of public buildings, grounds, etc.
2. Other...........................................................

1, 000.00
35,300.00

1,000.00
35,300.00

1,005.00
32, 705.84

Total miscellaneous..........................

36, 300.00

36, 300.00

33, 710.84

Total, Department of Agricul­
ture, public fund receipts..........

6, 837, 800.00

6, 532, 800.00

4, 890, 347.38

10. Department of Commerce, public funds—
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material......................................................
2. Reimbursement for Government property
lost or damaged............. ..................................
3. Miscellaneous Government property........

50.00

50.00

3,774.31

3,000.00
110,854.00

3,000. 00
54,000.00

6,552.12
102,798. 21

Total
sales of
Government
property............................................

113,904.00

57,050.00

113,124. 64

2. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.—
1. Testing fees, Bureau of Standards....................
2. Other........................................................................

70,000. 00
4, 505,375.00

100,000.00
2,497,940.00

66,359. 67
305,904.84

Total fees, fines, penalties, etc___

4,575,375.00

2,597,940.00

372,264. 51

3. Miscellaneous—
1. Rent of public buildings, grounds, etc..........
2. Sale of sealskin.....................................................
3. Other.......................................................................

6,000.00
851, 572. 00
1,950. 00

6,000.00
851,572.00
1,950.00

6,204.17
1,024,886.81
1,005.62

Total, miscellaneous..........................

859,522.00

859,622.00

1,032,096.60

Total Department of Commerce,
public-fund receipts.....................

5,548,801.00

3,514, 512. 00

1,517,485.75

11. Department of Labor, public funds—
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material.......................................................
2. War supplies..........................................................
3. Miscellaneous Government property..............

1,500.00

1,500.00

28,470.27
3,021.34
9,427.20

Total
sales of
Government
property.......................................

1,500.00

1,500.00

40,918. 81

1,000,000.00

700.000.00

912,601.16

428,000.00
40,000.00
3,854,364.00

300.000.00
40,000.00
3,000,000.00

328,643.78
67,677.48
5,767,893. 69

5,322,364.00

4,040,000.00

7,076,816.11

2. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.—
1. N atunilization fees...............................................
2. Collections, Department of Labor (immi­
gration fines)......................................................
3. Forfeitures, bonds of aliens...............................
4. Immigration head tax........................................
Total fees, fines, penalties, etc___

77S9X—21------vn




A34

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1928 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by

S ou rces

and

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n it s —

Reference to state­
ment.

Continued.

Estimated receipts.

Actual receipts 1921
. (on basis of TreasI ury Daily S ta te ment).

Source aiul organization units.
No.

Page.

1923

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands— Continued.
11. Department of Labor, public funds— Continued.
3. Miscellaneous—
1. Receipts from telephone service..................
2. Other....................................................................




Total miscellaneous.

1922

$1,500. 00
1, 500. 00

$1,600.00 ,
1,500.00

3, 000. 00

3,100.00

$1,532. 55
141.38

1.673. 93

Total, public-fund receipts........
Deduct account rent buildings, grounds, etc.

5, 326, 864. 00

Total Department of Labor.........

5, 326, 864. 00

4,044,600. 00

7, 111, 693. 18

200. 00

200. 00

210. 63

200. 00

200. 00

28,000. 00

28,000. 00

190. 83
120. 00
941.15

500.00

500. 00

499.02

Total sale of Government prop­
erty..................................................

28,700.00

28, 700.00

1,751.00

3. Revenue producing enterprise— operating textile
mill, Atlanta, Ga............................................

75,000. 00

75, 000. 00 }

1,000.00

1,000. 00

662. 88
80.00

1,000. 00

1 , 000 . 00

742. 88

104,900. 00

104,900.00

2, 704. 51

12. Department of Justice, public funds—
1. Interest, premium and discount—interest on
public deposits..............................................................
2. Sale of Government property—
1. Office material....................................................
2. Land and buildings............................................
3. Miscellaneous Government property............
4. Reimbursement for Government property
lost or damaged..............................................

4. Miscellaneous—
1. Rent of public buildings, grounds, etc.
2. Other...............................................................
Total miscellaneous.
Total Department of Justice,
public-fund receipts....................

,119,40S. 85
7, 715. 67

13. Judicial, public funds—
1. Interest, premium, discount, etc.— interest on
bonds.............................................................................
2. Sale of Government property— miscellaneous____
3. Fee3,
1.
2.
3.
4.

5.33
27,047. 88

fines, penalties, etc.—
Judicial fees and costs.......................................
Judicial emolument fees..................................
Judicial fines, penalties, and forfeitures___
Fees collected outside incorporated towns,
Alaska—Alaska fund......................................

225.000. 00
800.000.00
6, 500,000. 00

750.000.00
6,000.000.00

197,914.47
674,926.35
3, 509,835. 69

175,000.00

175.000. 00

174,329. 90

Total fees, fines, penalties, etc___

7,700,000. 00

7,125,000.00

4,557,006. 41

4. Miscellaneous—
1. Unclaimed moneys remaining in registry of
courts 5 years or longer..................................
2. Unclaimed wages of seamen remaining in
registry of courts for 6 years or longer___

35,000.00

35,000. 00

25, 330. 36

7,000.00

7,000.00

6,941.13

42,000.00

42,000. 00

32,271.49

7, 742,000. 00

7,167,000. 00

4, 616,331.11

Total miscellaneous......................
Total judicial, public-fund re­
ceipts.............................................. .
14. Independent offices—
1. Shipping Board—
1. Sales of Government property— office ma­
terial........................................’ ..........................
2. Miscellaneous........................................................
Total Shipping Board.

200, 000.00

27,009.15
5. 65
27,014.80

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A35

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1928 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by

S ou rces

and

O r g a n iz a tio n

Reference to state­
m ent.

U n i t s — Continued.

Estim ated receipts.

Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury Daily State­
ment).

Source and organization units.
Page.

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands— Continued.
14. Independent offices— Continued.
i
2. Railroad Administration and transportation act—
1. Interest, premium, and di^oounU Interest
on loans to railroads........................................
2. Sales of Government property— office ma­
terial................................................................-

$138,000. 00

18, 282. 59

Total Railroad Administra­
tion and transportation
act........................................

138,000.00

102,282. 59

3. United States Veterans' Bureau, trust funds-^
1. Premiums on converted insurance................
2. Interest on investment of Government lifeinsurance funds..............................................
Total United States Veter­
ansf Bureau......................
4. All other—
1. Alien Property Custodian—
Sales of (Government property— office
material................................................ .

$84,000. 00

$31,170, 000. 00

26, 717,000.00

0)

2,000,000. 00

], 000,000.00

0)

33,170,000. 00

27, 717, 000. 00

0)

200. 00

200. 00

2. Committee on Public Information—
Sales of Government property—office
material..................................... * .........

4, 925. 98

3. Council of National Defense—
Sales of Government property—
1. Office material___ / ....................
2. Miscellaneous Government
property................................... .

9,107.14
367.00

Total Council of National
Defense..............................
4. Federal Board for Vocational Education—
1. Interest, premium, and discount”
interest on public deposits............

2,688. 22

9,474.14

22, 694.00

22, 694.00

23, 577.79

2. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material............ I...............
2. Miscellaneous Government
property................................. ,

300. 00

300.00

1,779. 64

Total sales of Government
property..............................

300. 00

300. 00

3,024. 65

3. Miscellaneous—
1. Special fund for vocational re­
habilitation..............................
2. Other.............................................

300.00

300.00

1,075.95
3.00

300.00

300.00

1,078.95

Total Federal Board for
Vocational Education_
_

23,294.00

23,294.00

27,681. 39

6, Federal Power Commission—
1. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.— licenses*,
2, Miscellaneous........■
..................................

59,284.00
150. 00

24,010.00
150. 00

81.94

Total Federal Power Com­
mission...............................

59,434.00

24,160.00

81. 94

Total miscellaneous.,

'See Treasury Department.




1,245.01

A36

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimated receipts, exclusive of postal revenues, fiscal yeor 1923 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d i n a r y R eceipts D e t a il e d b y S o u r c e s a n d O r g a n iz a t io n U n it s — Continued.

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands— Continued.
14. Independent offices— Continued.
4. All other— Continued.
6. Federal Reserve Board—
1. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.— taxes ac­
count deficiencies in reserve against
deposit...................................................
2. Assessments on Federal reserve
banks for salaries and expenses
Federal Reserve Board......................
3. Miscellaneous...........................................




$15. 491. 70
4, 819,339. 72
344.18

Total Federal Reserve Board .

4 ,835,175. G
O

7. Federal Trade Commission—
Sales of Government property— office
material..................................................

$700. 00

8. Food Administration—
1. Interest, premium, and discount—
dividend on capital stock of the
Sugar Equalization Board.............. .
2. Sales of Government property—
office material...................................
3. Miscellaneous— excess profits of li­
censes of Food Administration........

30,000,000.00
18, 740. 23
7,078,988.55

Total Food Administration.

37,097,728. 78

9. Fuel Administration—
1. Sales of Government propertyoffice material...................................
2. Miscellaneous........................................

31,696.09
70.14

Total Fuel Administration.

31,766.23

10. Grain Corporation—
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material..............................
2. Miscellaneous
Government
property.....................................

4,917.17
27.75

Total sales of Government
property......................................
2. Repayment of investments— liquida­
tion capital stock, U. S. Grain
Corporation...........................................

4,944.92
100,000,000.00

Total Grain Corporation.
11. Housing Corporation—
1. Interest, premium, discount, etc.interest on loans.............................
Sales of Government property—
1. Office material..............................
2. Miscellaneous
Government
property.....................................
3. Disposal of properties.................
Total sales of Government
' property..................................... .
3. Revenue producing enterprises— op­
eration of properties..........................
4. Repayments— loans (principal)...........
Total Housing Corporation.,

100,004,944. 92

$297,000. 00

416,000.00

610, 297.06
1,360.21

2, 033,000.00

2,095,000.00

283.17
2,000,524.42

2.033.000.00

2,095,000.00

2,002,167.80

1.013.000.00
100,000.00

1,013, 000.00
100,000.00

1,530,557.98
97,032.33

3,443,000.00

3,624,000.00

4,240,055.17

BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A 37

Estimated receijHs, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1923 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d in a r y

R e c e ip ts

D e ta ile d

by

S ou rces

and

O r g a n iz a tio n

Reference to state­
ment.

U n i t s — Continued.

Estimated receipts.

Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury D a ily S ta te ­
ment).

Source and organization unts.
No.

1922

Page.

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands—Continued.
14. Independent offices— Continued.
4. All other— Continued.
12. Interstate Commerce Commission—
1. Sales of Government property........... .
2. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.— certify­
ing railroad tariffs, etc.....................
3. Reimbursements — printing
State
forms...............................................
4. Miscellaneous...........................................




$9,710. 49
$4, 000.00

$4, 000.00

9,000.00

3, 679.05

9,000.00
316.10

Total Interstate Commerce Com­
mission ...........................................

13, 000.00

13,000.00

13. Smithsonian Institution—
1. Sales of Government property—
office material...............
2. Miscellaneous....................

480.00

480.00

Total Smithsonian Institution___

480.00

480.00

13, 705. 64

99.47

14. Superintendent State, War, and Navy De­
partment buildings—
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material.............................
2. Miscellaneous...............................

99.47

2, 242.80
66,946. 94

Total sales of Government prop­
erty..............................................
2. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.—sale of
privileges...............................................
3. Miscellaneous...........................................

18,000.00

25,000.00

Total Superintendent State, War,
and Navy Department build' Na
mgs.

18,000.00

25,000.00

69,189. 74
838.05

70,027.79

15. War Industries Board—
Sale of Government property— office
material.....................................................

12,502.81

16. War Trade Board—
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material............................
2. Miscellaneous Government property.

19,225.11
25, 539. 55
44, 764. 66

Total War Trade Board17. Miscellaneous—
1. Sales of Government property—
1. Office material..............................
2. Miscellaneous
Government
property.....................................

255. 97

Total sales of Government prop­
erty...............................................
2. Other.........................................................

452. 21
4,063. 59

196. 24

4,515. 80 *

Total miscellaneous.
Total all other..........
Total independent office—Public
fund receipts..................................

3,557,408. 00

3, 710,834. 00

146,400,138. 54

36, 727, 408. 00

31, 565,834. 00

146,529,435.93

a

38

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1023.

Estimated receipts, exclusive o f postal revenues, fiscal year 1923 compared with prior years— Continued.
O r d i n a r y R e c e ip t s D e t a il e d

by

Sources and

O r g a n i z a t i o n U n i t s — C o n tin u e d .

Reference to state­
ment.

Estimated receipts.

Actual receipts 1921
(on basis of Treas­
ury D aily S ta te ­
ment).

Source and organization units.
No.

Page,

C. Miscellaneous receipts, including Panama Canal and sales of
public lands— Continued.
1§, District of Columbia—
1. Revenues of the District of Columbia—
1. General fund......................................
2. Water funds......................................
3. Industrial home school fund.........
4. Escheated estates relief fund....... Total revenues of the District of
Columbia...................................... .
2. Trust
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

funds—
Teachers’ retirement fund..................
Policemen and firemen’s relief fund.
Washington redemption fund.............
Permit fund...................... .....................
Miscellaneous trust-fund deposits___
Total trust funds.
Total receipts District of Co­
lumbia........................................... .

$14, 885,315. 00
1,070, 000. 00

$14, 308, 881. 00
1,070,000. 00

8, 000. 00

100. 00

8, 000. 00
100. 00

15,963, 415. 00

15,386,981. 00

Total fees, fines, penalties, etc___
3. Assessments— assessment and permit work.
4. Miscellaneous— sundry receipts.....................
Total United States receipts from
District of Columbia sources___

1, 621, 900. 00

1, 421,900. 00

1,355,331.10

17,585,315. 00

16, 808, 881.00

15, 795,317. 03

1
3

a4
a 19




Grand total, ordinary receipts,
exclusive of postal revenues___

197, 861.
161,168.
148,826.
21, 239.
826, 234.

67
67
20
76
80

1, 752. 90
25,000. 00
210, 000. 00

200, 000. 00

21,491. 56
236,151. 06

235,000. 00

220, 000. 00

257,642. 62

225,000. 00
30,000. 00

200, 000. 00
28,000.00

247,325.15
54,385. 62

490,000. 00

448, 000. 00

561,106. 29

20,000. 00

3,839. 32
2,192. 25

Total receipts not classified by de­
partments or services— Public
fund receipts.................................

Total ordinary receipts, exclusive
of P°
postal revenues.
Add adjustment to cash basis (cash collections in excess of warrant
distribution).

14,439, 985. 93

200, 000. 00
165.000.00
148.000.00
21,000. 00
887, 900. 00

17. Receipts not classified by departments or services—
1. Gifts and donations1. Moneys received from persons unknown.
2. O th er..............................................................

Total miscellaneous receipts, in­
cluding Panama Canal and sales
of public lands (all items listed
under “ C ” ) ....................................

78
58
85
72

00
00
00
00
00

240.000.
175,000
150.000.
25,000.
1,031,900.

16. United States receipts from District of Columbia
sources—
1. Sales of Government property—sale of alley be­
longing to United States...........................................
2. Fees, fines, penalties, etc.—
1. Fees, justice of municipal courts.
2. Miscellaneous fees, etc...................

$13,360, 377.
1,072, 249.
7,181.
176.

6,031. 57

397,182, 750. 00

453,953, 663. 00

703,800,412.95

3,338,182, 750. 00

3, 943, 453, 663. 00

5, 608,791,784. 97
16,141,175.94

3,338,182,750.00

3, 943, 453,663. 00

5, 624, 932. 960 91

a39

BUDGET STATEMENTS.
B u d g e t S t a t e m e n t N o . 8.

Statement of balances of appropriations June SO, 1921, and of appropriations for the fiscal year 1922 {including revised
estimated permanent and indefinite appropriations) as of Nov. 1, 1921, reported by the Division of Bookkeeping and
Warrants.
f Budget and accounting act, 1921, sec. 201 (e).|

Balances of appropri­
ations, Juno 30, 1921. '

Legislative establishment.......................................................
Executive office.........................................................................
State Department.....................................................................
Treasury Department...............................................................
War Department......................................................... *............
Navy Department....................................................................
Interior Department.................................................................
Post Office Department...........................................................
Department of Agriculture....................................................
Department of Commerce.......................................................
Department of Labor...............................................................
Department of Justice.............................................................
Independent establishments:
Railroad administration and transportation a c t . . . .
Shipping Board and Emergency Fleet Corporation.
United States Veterans’ Bureau...................................
Other independent offices..............................................
District of Columbia............................................................
Panama Canal............................................................................
Purchase of obligations of foreign Governments...............
Sinking fund..............................................................................
Other public debt redemptions............................................
Interest on the public debt...................................................
Increase of compensation, estimated...................................

Appropriations for fis­
cal year 1922, in­
cluding estimated
permanent and in­
definite appropria­
tions, revised.

$4, 372, 646.29
.26, 850. 21
10, 084, 980. 72
68, 877, 406.16
597,014, 060.38
173, 670, 051. 35
73,147/ 822.00
1,346, 374.07
222, 772, 556. 29
6,823, 929. 90
682, 450. 99
2,621, 460. 47

$17,195, 635. 97
229, 652. 77
10,165, 861.33
164,236, 496. 62
373, 387, 105. 62
425,573, 142. 23
344,096, 167.18
3,304, 662.58
46,131, 652. 98
17,291, 059. 73
4,905, 157.20
16,164, 350. 84

197,321,502. 74
7,353,837.84
1 226,486, 007.55
9,185, 284. 08
5, 627,390. 05
2, 833,593.02
402,481,258. 91

73,959,000.. 00
230,573,620. 00
21,574, 289.46
21, 548,053- 51
9,000,000. 00

Total.

$21,568, 282. 26
256, 502. 98
20, 250, 842.05
233,113, 902. 78
970,401, 166. 00
599,243, 193. 58
417, 243, 989.18
4, 651, 036. 65
268,904, 209. 27
24,114, 989. 63
5,587, 608.19
18,785, 811.31

272,442, 200. 00
115.500.000. 00
975.000.000. 00
35,000,000. 00

197,321, 502. 74
. 81,312, 837.84
457,059, 627. 55
30, 759, 573. 54
27,175, 443. 56
11, 833, 593.02
402,481, 258. 91
272,442, 200.00
115,500, 000.00
975,000, 000. 00
35,000, 000. 00
5,190,007,571.04
574,092,552. 00

Total, exclusive of Postal Service____
Postal Service payable from postal revenues.

2,012, 729,463.02

3,177,278,108. 02
2 574,092,552. 00

Total.............................................................

2,012, 729,463.02

3, 751,370, 660. 02 ! 5,764,100,123. 04

1Includes Army, Navy, and Marine Corps allotments of pay.
a Not carried on books' of the Treasury, but added here to complete the total.
Notr.—The appropriations as stated above are exclusive of appropriations for 1922 that were made available for expenditure during 1921, the balances of -which are included in
the first column.




A 40

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.
B u d g e t S t a t e m e n t N o . 9.

Consolidated current balance sheet1 at close of business June SO, 1921.
Reference to state­
ment.
Assets.

Liabilities, reserves, and surplus.

Amount.

Amount.

No.

A. Cash in Treasury offices.
B. Cash in depositories:
1. Federal reserve banks.
2. Special depositories...
3. Foreign depositories..
4. National banks.............
5. Philippine Treasury. .
Total cash in depositories.

$3S7, 482, 925. 71

C. Liabilities:
1. Treasurer’s checks outstanding.................
2. Deposits of Government officers—
1. Post Office Department................. .
2. Board of trustees, postal savings
systems—
1. Five per cent reserve.........
2. Other deposits......................
3. Comptroller of the Currency,
agent for creditors of insolvent
banks...........................................
4. Postmasters, clerks of courts, dis­
bursing officers, etc......................

79,813,107. 67
393, 289,000.00
54,046, 571. 69
21, 209, 579. 73
8,056, 639.10
556, 414, 898.19

Total liabilities........................
D. Reserve for dej>osits:
1. Redemption of Federal reserve notes (5
per cent gold fund).................................. .
2. Redemption of Federal reserve bank
notes (5 per cent fund)............................
3. Redemption of national bank notes (5 per
cent fund)...................................................
4. Retirement of additional circulating
notes, act May 30, 1908...........................
5. Exchange of currency, coin, etc............

8,

681. 40

22,478,013. 53
3, 982,054. 76
191, 947.47
1, 619,871. 72
72, 821,386. 69
101,451, 955. 57

259, 696,087.04
8, 924, 096.55
18,509,382.82
67, 560.00
5,570, 636.16

Total reserve for deposits.......
Total liabilities and reserves..

a 41
a 43

394, 219, 718.14

E. Surplus:
1. At beginning of year, July 1, 1920 (gen­
eral fund).................................................
11
13

292, 767, 762. 57

357, 701, 682. 23

2. Addition during year—
1. Ordinary receipts (general fund).
2. Public debt receipts (loan funds).

86, 892, 271. 61
105,084,151.92

Total addition during year—
10
Total cash assets.

943,897, 823. 90

1 On basis of daily statement of the United States Treasury.




a 41

191, 976,423. 53

Total surplus..............................

549, 678,105. 76

Total liabilities, reserves, and
surplus.....................................

943,897,823.90

A41

BUDGET STATEMENTS.
B u d g et Sta t e m e n t

No. 10.

Consolidated statement o f operations 1 fiscal year ended June 30, 1921.
Reference to state­
m ent.

Fiscal year 1921.
No.

12
14

Page.

a42
a 43

A. Receipts:
1. Ordinary receipts (general fund)..
2. Public debt receipts (loan funds).

a 42
a 43

B. Expenditures:
1. General fund........................
2. Public debt (loan funds)2.

$5,624,932, 960. 91
8,864,998, 322. 61
14,489, 931, 283. 52

Total receipts..............................
12
14

5,538,040, 689.30
8, 759, 914,170. 69
14,297,954, 859.99

Total expenditures.
a 40
a 40

C. Excess of all receipts over all expenditures............................
D. Surplus in general fund at beginning of year, July 1,1920.

191, 976,423. 53
357, 701, 682.23

a 40

E. Surplus balance at end of period, June 30, 1921....................

549, 678,105. 76

» On basis of Treasury daily statement.

* Excludes redemptions-of debt payable from “ Ordinary receipts.”

B u d g e t S ta te m e n t

N o . 11.

Current balance sheet1 at close of business June SO, 1921.
GENERAL TUND.
Reference to state­
ment.
* Assets.

Liabilities, reserves, and surplus.

Amount.
No.

Amount.

Page.

A. Cash in Treasury offices and depos­
itories................................................... $838,813, 671.98

B. Liabilities:
1. Treasurer’s checks outstanding...............
2. Deposits of Government officers—
1. Post Office Department___ . ____
2. Board of trustees, postal savings
systems—
1. Five per cent reserve...
2. Other deposits................
3. Comptroller of tne Currency,
agent for creditors of insolvent
banks..............................................
4. Postmasters, clerks of courts, dis­
bursing officers, etc.....................
Total liabilities.
0. Reserve for deposits:
1. Redemption of Federal reserve notes (5
per cent gold fund).................................
2. Redemption of Federal reserve bank
notes (5 per cent fund)..........................
3. Redemption of national bank notes (5
per cent fund)... - .........................
4. Retirement of additional circulating
notes, act May 30, 1908..........................
5. Exchange of currency, coin, etc.............

$358,681.40
22,478.013.53
3* 982,054. 76
19.1,947.47
1, 019,871. 72
72,821, 386. 69
101,451 955. 57

259,690,087.04
8,924,096. 55
18,509,382. 82
67, 560.00
5,570, 636.16

Total reserve for deposits..-..,
Total liabilities and reserves.

12
12
Total cash assets.

838,813,677.98

1On basis of dally statement of the United States Treasury.




A42
a 42

292,767.762. 57
394,219,718.14

D. Surplus:
1. At beginning of year, July 1, 1920.
2. Addition during year___ * ...............

357, 701,682. 23
86, S92,271. 61

Total surplus............................ ..........

444,593. 953. 84

Total liabilities, reserves, and surplus

838,813,671.98

a 42

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.
B u d g e t St a t e m e n t

No. 12.

Statement o f operations,1 general fund, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921.
Rererence to state­
m ent.
I

Fiscal year 1921.

No.

Page.

A. Receipts, by sources of revenue:
1. Internal-revenue receipts—
1. Income and profits tax. ............................................................................*...................
2. Miscellaneous.............. . .......................................................................................................

$3,206,046,157. 74
1,390,380,823. 28

Total internal-revenue receipts...................................................................................
2. Customs receipts...........................................................................................................................

4, 596,426,981. 02
308, 564, 391. 00

3. Miscellaneous receipts:
1. Interest, premium, and discount....................................................................................
2. Sale of Government property...........................................................................................
3. Public-domain receipts...................................... ...............................................................
4. Net earnings, Federal reserve banks (franchise tax)...................................................
5. Profits on coinage, bullion deposits, etc................................. .....................................
6. Excess profits of licensees of Food Administration.......................................................
7. Rent of public buildings and grounds............................................................................
8. Fees, fines, penalties, forfeitures, etc..............................................................................
9. Gifts and contributions......................................................................................................
10. Sale of sealskins....................................................................................................................
11. Naval hospital fund receipts.............................................................................................
12. Miscellaneous, unclassified receipts................................................................................
13. Repayments of investments..............................................................................................
14. Assessments and reimbursements.....................................................................................
15. District of Columbia receipts............................................................................................
16. Panama Canal receipts........................................................................................................
17. Trust fund receipts..............................................................................................................
18. Excess of cash receipts over warrant distribution as above......................................

Al9

87, 705, 546. 01
194, 807, 466. 34
16,989, 157.12
60, 724, 742. 27
12, 610, 210. 05
7,078, 988. 55
1,151, 162. 83
29,309, 000.13
6,592, 868. 66
1,024, 886.81
932, 532. 78
3,385, 938. 85
185,730, 090. 71
19, 529, 942. 36
15,001, 092. 22
12,280, 741. 79
48, 946, 045.47
16,141, 175. 94

Total miscellaneous receipts..........................................................................................

719, 941,588.89

10

a 41

Total receipts.....................................................................................................................

5, 624, 932,960. 91

6

a 25

B. Expenditures, by character of expenditure:
1. Current expenses, including equipment...................................................................................

2, 913, 833, 620. 31

2. Nonadministrative expenses:2
1. Interest on public debt.......................................................................................................
2. Pensions.......................................................... ........................................................... ........... .
3. Other..................... ................................................................................................................. .
Total nonadministrative expenses 2...........................................................................

a 25

999,144,731.35
260, 611,416.13
392,160,813.72
1, 651,916,961. 20

3. Public works—
1. Rural post roads (good roads, etc.)............................................................ .....................
2. Rivers and harbors........................................................................................ .......................
3. Panama Canal................................................................................................*...................... .
4. Other public works.............................................................................................................. .

57,452,056.48
58,820,322.30
16,461,409. 47
94,365, 714.31

a 25

Total public works......................................................................................................... .

227,099,502.56

a 17

4. District of Columbia........................................................................................................................ .
5. Deficiencies in postal revenues......................................................................................................

22,558,264.16
130,128,458.02

6. Investments:
1. Purchase of foreign obligations......................................................................................... .
2. Purchase of farm loan bonds...............................................................................................

73,896,697.44
16,781,320. 79

Total investments................................................... ....................................................... .

90,678,018.23

7. Reduction in principal of public debt, payable out of ordinary receipts—
1. Sinking fund.......................................................................................................................... .
2. Other.........................................................................................................................................

261,100,250.00
161,012, 750.00

Total reduction in principal of public debt, payable out of ordinary receipts,

422,113,000.00

8. Special funds.......................................................................................................................................

17,825,119. 68

a

21

a 18

2
6

a 18
a 25

9. Trust funds:
1. Investment of trust funds...................................................................................................
2. Expenditure of trust funds..................................................................................................

28,487,109. 75
33,400, 635.39

Total trust funds..............................................................................................................

61,887,745.14

10

a 41

Total expenditures...........................................................................................................

5,538,040,689.30

11
11

a 41
a 41

C. Excess of ordinary receipts over expenditures payable therefrom...................................................
D. Balance in general fund at beginning of year........................................................ ...........................

86,892,271.61
357,701,682.23

11

a 41

E. Balance in general fund at end of period................................. ............................................................

444,593,953.84

1 On basis of Treasury daily statement.
*
Represents those disbursements of the Government which do not constitute expenses of administration strictly speaking. Examples of such expenditures ere interest on the*
public debt, pensions, grants, subsidies, and contributions, refunds and drawbacks, indemnities, military and naval insurance, and the like.




A43

BUDGET STATEMENTS.
B u d g e t S ta te m e n t

N o . 13.

.

Current balance sheet at close of business June SO, 1921
PUBLIC DEBT (LOAN FUNDS).
Reference to state­
ment.

Surplus.

Amount.

Assets*

No.

A. Cash in Treasury offices and deposi­ $105,084,151. 92
tories.

14

Page.
A 43

B. Surplus:
1. At beginning of year.......................
2. Addition during year...................... ...........$105,084,151.92
Total siirnliiR.. . . . ___________ ______

Total caflh a s s e t s ................. 105,084,151. 92

B u d g e t S ta tem en t

105. 084.151. 92

N o . 14.

Statement of operationspublic debt (loan funds), fiscal year ended June SO, 1921.
Reference to state­
ment.
Fiscal year 1921.
No.

10

Page.

A 41

A. Public debt receipts and deposits:
1. Treasury notes, Series A-1924................................................................................................... - ................
2. Certificates of indebtedness..........................................................................................................................
3. War savings certificates and thrift stamps................................................................ ................................
4. Postal savings bonds*.___ : ...........................................................................................................................
5. Deposits for retirement of national-bank notes and Federal reserve bank notes (act of July 14,
1890, and Dec. 23, 1913)............................................................................................................................
6. Deduct Liberty bonds and Victory notes (counter entry)................................. *................................
Total public debt receipts and deposits.
B. Public debt expenditures:2
1. Interest-bearing debt—
1. Certificates of indebtedness.
2. War savings securities...........
3. First Liberty loan..................
4. Second Liberty loan.............
5. Third Liberty loan................
6. Fourth Liberty loan..............
7. Victory Liberty loan notes**
Total interest-bearing debt.
Debt bearing no interest—
1. Funded loan of 1907, matured July 2, 1907....................................
2. Refunding certificates, matured July 1,1907................................
3. Loan of 1908-1918......................................................................... . . . .
4. Fractional currency...............................................................................
5. Old debt matured at various dates subsequent to July 1, 1861.

, $311,191, 600. 00
8,486, 964, 950.00
26, 587,420. 61
178,880. 00
40,090,415. 00
14, 943. 00
8,864, 998,322. 61

8,552,225,500.00
160,256,308.19
900.00
12,300. 00
5,800. 00
148,050. 00
9, 652,250. 00
8,722,301,108.19
3, 600.00
60.00
143,300.00
681. 50
4,720.00

Total debt bearing no interest...........................
3. National-bank notes and Federal reserve notes retired.
10

a

37,460,701. 00

Total public debt expenditures 2.....................

8, 759, 914,170. 69

A 41

13

152,361.50

13

43

A 43

C. Excess of public debt receipts and deposits over public debt expenditures, exclusive of redemptions
made out of ordinary receipts............................................................................................................................... .
D. Balance in' public debt (loan funds) at beginning of year..............................................................................

105,084,151. 92

E. Balance of public debt (loan funds; at end of period.......................................................................................

105,084,151.92

* On basis of daily Treasury statement.
* Excludes redemption of debt payable out of “ Ordinary receipts.”




A44

th e

a l t e r n a t iv e

B U DGET, 1023.

B u d g et St a t e m e n t

No. 15.

Statement o f the 'public debt o f the United States outstanding at the close o f business June 30, 1921.
Amount outstanding*

INTEREST-BEARING DEBT.

Bonds:
2 per cent consols of 1930.............................................................
4 per cent loan of 1925 ..................................................... - .........
2 per cent Panamas of 1916-1936................................................
2 per cent Panamas of 1918-1938................................................
3 per cent Panamas of 1961..........................................................
3 per cent conversion bonds of 1946-47.............. . ........... .. *
2£ per cent postal savings bonds (first to twentieth series) .

$599,724,050. 00
118,489,900. 00
48, 954,180.00
25, 947, 400. 00
50,000, 000. 00
28,894,500. 00
11, 718, 240. 00
$883,728,270.00

First Liberty loan—
3$ per cent bonds of 1932-1947...........................................
Converted 4 per cent bonds of 1932-1947.........................
Converted 4£ per cent bonds of 1932-1947.............. .*___
Second converted 4£ per cent bonds of 1932-1947.........

$1,410,074,250. 00
17, 982,800.00
520, 709, 600. 00
3,492,150. 00
1,952,258,800. 00

Second Liberty loan—
4 per cent bonds of 1927-1942.......................
Converted 4} per cent bonds of 1927-1942.

77,870,150.
00
3,238, 666,400.00
3,316,536,550.00

Third Liberty lo a n 41 per cent bonds of 1928...............................
Fourth Liberty loan—
per cent bonds of 1933-1938......................

3, 611,560, 300. 00
6, 354,860,350. 00
15, 235,216,000. 00

Notes:
Victory Liberty loan—
4f per cent notes of 1922-23.
3§ per cent notes of 1922-23.

3, 272,852,350.00
640,928,000.00

Treasury notes—
Series A-1924...........................

311,191, 600. 00

3,913, 780,350. 00
311,191,600.00
Certificates of indebtedness:
'Pax__
Series TS-1921......... .
Series TD-1921.........
Series T S -2-1 921 ....
Series TM-1922.........
Series TJ-1922...........

341,969,500.00
389,557,500. 00
193,302,000.00
288, 501, 000. 00
314,184, 000. 00
1,527,514, 000.00

Loan—
Series C-1921.,
Series F-1921..
Series G-1921.
Series H-1921.
Series A-1922.

155.492.500.00
192.026.500.00
128,886,500. 00
190.511.500.00
256,170,000.00
923,087, 000. 00
215,875,000.00
32,854,450. 00

Pittman Act.
Special...........

2,699,330,450.00
War savings securities:1
War savings certificates, series 1918..
War savings certificates, series 1919..
War savings certificates, series 1920..
War savings certificates, series 1921..
Thrift stamps, unclassified sales, etc.

580,175,584.02
62,490,941. 38
28,925,797.06
11,865,447.91
10,647,640. 00
694,105,410.37

Total interost-bearing debt outstanding.

23,737,352,080. 37

MATURED DEBT ON WHICH INTEREST HAS CEASED.

(Payable on presentation.)
Funded loan of 1891, continued at 2 per cent, called for redemption May 18, 1900,
interest ceased Aug. 18,1900.....................................................................................................
Funded loan of 1891, matured Sept. 2, 1891.'.......................................................................... .
Loan of 1904, matured Feb. 2,1904........................................................... ................................
Funded loan of 1907, matured July 2, 1907...............................................................................
Refunding certificates, matured July 1, 1907............................................................................
Old debt matured at various dates prior to Jan. 1, 1891, and other items of debt
matured at various dates subsequent to Jan. 1,1861..........................................................
Certificates of indebtedness, at various interest rates, matured...........................................
Loan of 1908-1918............................................................................................................................

1, 000. 00
19.800.00
13.050.00
380,800.00
10,350. 00
893,960. 26
9,244,000.00
376,660. 00

10,939,620.26
Total matured debt outstanding on which interest has ceased.
1
Amountaissued of theseries of 1918 and 1919 are on basis of reports of sales; amounts issued of the series of 1920 and 1931 are on basis of cash receipts by Treasurer of the United
Statts and include receipts from sales of thrift stamps and Treasury savings stamps.




BUDGET STATEMENTS.

A45

Statement of the 'public debt of the United States outstanding at the close of business June 30, 1921— Continued.
Amount outstanding.

DEBT BEARING NO INTEREST.

(Payable on presentation.)
Obligations required to be reissued when redeemed:
United States notes..................................................................................................................
Less gold reserve.......................................................................................................................

$346,681,016. 00
152,979,025. 63
$193,701, 990. 37

Obligations that will be retired on presentation:
Old demand notes.....................................................................................................................
National bank notes and Federal reserve bank notes assumed by the United
States on deposit of lawful money for their retirement..............................................
Fractional currency..................................................................................................................

53,012. 50
32, 204, 594. 00
1,999,310.90
$227, 958, 907. 77

j

Total debt bearing no interest outstanding...............................................................

23,976, 250, 608.40

Total gross d eb t1................ ..............................*..................................................................
Matured interest obligations, etc.:
Matured interest obligations outstanding.............................* ...........................................
Discount accrued (partly estimated) on war savings securities, series of 1918 2
Discount accrued (partly estimated) on war savings securities, series of 1919 2___
Treasury warrants outstanding..............................................................................................
Disbursing officers’ checks outstanding..............................................................................

99,497,510. 22
95, 273, 993.11
6, 640,184. 50
21,584,162. 21
147,199,302. 25
370,195,152. 29
24,346,445, 760. 69

Balance held by the Treasurer of the United States as per Daily Treasury Statement
for June 30, 1921 (see statement No. 9, p. a 40).......................... ..........................................

549, 678,105. 76

Net debt, including matured interest obligations, etc.s.............................................

23,796, 767,654. 93

1 The total gross debt June 30, 1921, on the basis of daily Treasury statements, was $23,977,450,552.54, and the net amount of public debt redemptions and receipts in transit,
etc., was 51,199,944.14.
* Accrued discount calculated on basis of exact accrual at rate of 4 per cent per annum compounded quarterly, \rith due allowance for cash redemptions to date.
» No deduction is made on account of obligations of foreign Governments or other securities held by the United States Treasury.
Issues of soldiers' and sailors’ civil relief bonds not included in the above: Total issue to June 30,1921, was 1195,500, of which $141,700 has been retired.

B u d g e t S ta te m e n t

N o . 16.

Cumulative sinking fund account, fiscal year 1921.
[To nearest one hundred dollars.]
Debits.

Detail.

Total.

Total debits..............................




Total.

i C. Expenditures, on account of principal:
1 Not /v q i flYTiflnnitilrofl v ltio r y
qI
:
jl. iitst taou uAptjiiuituicSj
|
Liberty loan notes.....................

$254,844,600

D. Unexpended balance at end of year
carried over to fiscal year 1 9 2 2 ...

A . Balances at beginning of year, Julv 1, 1920..
B. Sinking fund appropriations:
1. 2-| per centum of aggregate amount of
Liberty bonds and Victory Liberty
loan notes outstanding on July 1,
1920, less par amount of obligations
of foreign governments purchased
under the several Liberty loan acts
and held by the United States on
July 1, 1920 (sec. 6, Victory Lib­
erty loan act of Mar. 3,1919)..........
2. Unaccrued interest on Victory Liberty
loan notes purchased up to June
15, 1921 (par. (a), sec. 6, act ap­
proved Mar. 3, 1919).........................

Credits.

1,385,400

Total credits............................

256,230,000

$253,404,900

2,825,100
256,230,000

A46

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.
B

udget

S t a t e m e n t N o. 17.

Cumulative sinking fund account, estimated for fiscal year 1922.
Detail.

Debits.

A. Balance at beginning of year, July 1,1921__

$1,385,400

13. Sinking fund appropriations:
2\ per centum of aggregate amount of
Liberty bonds and victory Liberty
loan notes outstanding on July l,
1920, less par amount of obliga­
tions of foreign governments pur­
chased under the several Liberty
loan acts and held by the United
States on July 1,1920 (sec. 6, Vic­
tory Liberty loan act of Mar. 3,
1919)......................................................
2. Interest (par. (a), sec. 6, act approved
Mar. 3, 1919)—
1. Secondary credits, December
15, 1921—
1. Accrued interest on notes
purchased prior to
June 15, 1921..............
2. Accrued interest on notes
purchased between
June 15, 1921, and
Dec. 15, 1921...............
2. Secondary credits, June 15,
1922—
1. Accrued interest on notes
purchased prior to
Dec. 15, 1921...............
2. Accrued interest on notes
purchased between
Dec. 15, 1921, and
June 15, 1922..............




Total interest.. . . . .

Total.

Credits.

C. Expenditures, on account of principal
(estimated):
1. Net cash expenditures.................

Total.

$272,442,200

253,404,900

$5,864,100

1,450,600

7, 314,700

8, 765, 300

1,571,900

10,337,200
17,651,900

Total sinking fund
a p p ropriations,
fiscal year 1922

271,056,800

Total debits...........

272,442,200

D. Unexpended balance at end of year

Total credits.............................

272,442,200

A47

BUDGET STATEMENTS.
B

udget

S t a t e m e n t N o. 1 8 .

Cumulative sinTdng fund account, estimated for fiscal year 1923.
Debits.

Detail.

Total.

A. Balance at beginning of year, July 1, 1922.

C. Expenditures on account of principal
(estimated):
1. Net cash expenditures............... .

B. Sinking fund appropriations:
1. 2£ per centum of aggregate amount of
Liberty bonds and Victory Liberty
loan notes outstanding on July 1,
1920, less par amount of obligations
of foreign governments purchased
under the several Liberty loan acts
and held by the United States on
July 1, 1920 (sec. 6, Victory Lib­
erty loan act of Mar. 3,1919)..........
2. Interest (par. (a), sec. 6, act approved
Mar. 3, 1919)—
1. Secondary credits, Dec. 15,
1922—
1. Accrued interest on notes
purchased prior to
June 15, 1922.............
2. Accrued interest on notes
»urchased between
une 15, 1922, and
Dec. 15, 1922..............

f

Credits.

Total.

$283,838,800

$253,404, 900

$11,909,100

1, 644,450
13,553,550

2. Secondary credits, June 15,
1923—
1. Accrued interest on notes
purchased prior to
Dec. 15, 1922..............
2. Accrued interest on notes
purchased between
Dec. 15, 1922, and
May 20, 1923..............
Total interest.
Total sinking fund
a p p ropriations,
fiscal vear 1923...




Total debits.

15,198,000

1,682,350

16,880,350
30,433,900
D. Unexpended balance at end of year.
283,838,800
283,838,800

Total credits.

283,838,800

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

a 48

B

udget

S t a t e m e n t N o. 19,

Proposed public debt issues; and redemptions and purchases fiscal year 1923, compared with prior years.
10n basis of daily Treasury statements.]
Estimated, fiscal yet

Estimated,

year 1

Actual, fiscal year 1921.

PUBLIC DEBT EXPENDITURES.1

Certificates of indebtedness:
Loan and tax..............................................................................
Pittman Act...............................................................................
Special issues..............................................................................
Victory notes.....................................................................................
War savings securities:
Series of 1918............................................................................... .
AU other series........................................................................... .
Liberty bond retirements................................................................. .
Retirement of Federal reserve bank notes and national-bank notes.,
Old debt retirements........................................................................ .
Total public debt expenditures, including public debt expenditures charge­
able against ordinary receipts.....................................................................
Deduct public debt expenditures chargeable against ordinary receipts, included
in above expenditures:
Sinking fund......................................................................................................
Purchases of Liberty bonds from foreign repayments......................................
Redemptions of bonds and notes from estate taxes...........................................
Retirements from Federal reserve bank franchise tax receipts........................ .

*2,150,000,000
55.875.000

$2,485,552,500
43,500,000
24,000,000
332,439,450

$2,450,843,500
160,000,000
32,854,450
1,250,000,000

' '2*663*933*350

,

010, 000,000
10, 000,000

100 000,000

1G0,256,308

100,000

100,000

.......99,'492*850
37,460,701
152,361

5,600,408,350

4,179,297,950

3,182,854,170

15,000,000
55,500,000
115,000,000

55.500.000
55,000,000

8283,838,800
30,500,000
25.000.000
30.000.000

Net; other public debt expenditures.......................................................

369,338,800

1272,442,200
30,500,000
25.000.000
60.000.000

5,231,069,550

387,942,200

*261,100,250
73,939,300
26,348,950
60,724,500

422,113,000
2,760,741,170

3,791,355,750

PUBLIC DEBT RECEIPTS.

Treasury savings securities.....................................................................
Deposits to retire Federal reserve bank notes and national-bank notes.
New issues of securities, including Treasury notes and certificates........
Excess of public debt receipts over public debt expenditures, exclusive of redemp­
tions, chargeable against ordinaryreceipts in fiscal year 1921, applied to public
debt expenditures in fiscal year 1922.

100,000,000

40,000,000
5,091,069,550

5,231,069,550

75,000,000
130,000,000
3,481,271,598

3,686,271,598

26,587,421
40,090,415
2,799,147,486

2,865,825,322

105,084,152
5,231,069,550

105,084,152

3,791,355,750

2,760,741,170

1 The expenditures on account of Treasury certificates of indebtedness and the receipts on account of new issues of securities as shown in this statement do not include Treasury
certificates which are issued and retired within the same fiscal year.




ESTIMATES OF APPROPRIATIONS
REQUIRED

FOR THE SERVICE OF THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1923.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

C H A P T E R I .—L E G IS L A T IV E E S T A B L IS H M E N T .
Budget, page 5.

UNITED STATES SENATE.

Salaries and Mileage of Senators—
Salaries of 96 Senators (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 454, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1252, sec. 1 ) .................................. ................................................................................................
Mileage of Senators (same acts).........................................................................................................

$720,000. 00
51,000.00
$771,000. 00

Salaries, Officers and Employees, Senate—
Office of the Vice President:
Secretary to the Vice President (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, pp. 454-457, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p • 1252, sec. 1).................................. - ..............................................
Clerk (same acts).......................................................................................... ...............................
Messenger (same acts)..................................................................................................................
Total....... ........................................................................................................$6,600.00
Chaplain of the Senate (same acts)........................... .....................................................................
Total....................... ; ...................................................................................... $1,200.00
Office of the Secretary:
Secretary of the Senate, including compensation as disbursing officer of salaries of
Senators and of the contingent funds of the Senate (same acts) .................................
Assistant Secretary, Henry M. Rose (same acts)..................................................................
Chief Clerk (same acts)................................................................................................................
Reading clerk (same acts)..........................................................................................................
Financial clerk (same acts)........................................................................................................
Assistant financial clerk (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 454, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921,
vol. 41, p . 1252, sec. 1; Apr. 18, 1921)...............................................................................
Minute and Journal clerk, principal clerk, librarian, enrolling clerk, and printing
clerk, at $3,000 each (same acts)..................................*......................................................
Executive clerk (same acts).......................................... ............................................................
File clerk, chief bookkeeper, assistant Journal clerk, and 3 clerks at $2,500 each
(same acts)..................................................................................................................................
First assistant librarian, and keeper of stationery, at $2,400 each (same acts) . . . . ___
Two clerks, at $2,220 each (same acts)...................................................................................
One clerk, at $2,100 (same acts)...............................................................................................
One clerk £same acts).................................................................................................................
Assistant librarian (same acts)........................................................................................ ..........
Skilled laborer (same acts)..................................................................... .*..................................
One clerk (same acts) , . . .............................................................................................................
Assistant keeper of stationery (same acts).............................................................................
Assistant in stationery room (same acts)................................................................................
Messenger in library (same acts)...............................................................................................
Messenger (same acts)................................................................................ ..................................
Assistant messenger (same acts)................................................................................................
Laborers: 3 at $840 each; 2 at $720 each; 1 in stationery room at $1,200 (acts July 16,
1914, vol. 38, p. 454, sec. 1; Mar.'S, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1252, sec. 1; Public No. 1,
approved Apr. 18, 1921).........................................................................................................
Superintendent of document room (same acts)....................................................................
First assistant (same acts).........................................................................................................
Two clerks at $1,440 each (same acts)...............................................................................
Skilled laborer (same acts)....................................................................................... .................
Total.............................................................................................................. $98,710.00
Clerks and messengers to the following committees: Agriculture and Forestry— clerk,
$2,500; assistant clerk. $1,800; assistant clerk, $1,500. Appropriations— clerk, $5,000;
2 assistant clerks, at $2,500 each; 3 assistant clerks, at $1,500 each; messenger, $900.
To Audit, and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate— clerk, $2,500; assistant
clerk, $1,600; assistant clerk, $1,500. Banking and Currency— clerk, $3,000; assist­
ant clerk, $1,800; 2 assistant clerks, at $1,500 each. Civil Service— clerk, $2,500;
assistant clerk, $1,600; assistant clerk, $1,500; additional clerk, $1,200. Claims— clerk,
$2,500; assistant clerk, $2,000; 2 assistant clerks, at $1,500 each. Commerce— clerk,
$2,500; assistant clerk, $2,220; assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant clerk, $1,500. Con­
ference minority of the Senate— clerk, $3,000; assistant clerk, $1,800; 2 assistant clerks,
at $1,500 each. District of Columbia— clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant
clerk, $1,500. Education and Labor*—
clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant
clerk, $1,500. Enrolled Bills— clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,600; assistant clerk,
$1,500; additional clerk, $1,200. Expenditures in the Executive Departments—
77891— 21-------1




4,000.00
1, 600.00
1, 000. 00
1,200.00

6, 500. 00
5, 000. 00
3, 250. 00
4,000.00
4,000. 00
3, 600.00
15,000.00
2, 750. 00
15,000.00
4,800. 00
4,440. 00
2,100.00
1, 750.00
1,800. 00
1, 200.00
1,440. 00
2,000.00
1,200. 00
1,000.00
1,440. 00
1, 200.00
5,160.00
3,500. 00
2, 500.00
2, 880. 00
1,200.00

$771,000.00

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1023.

2

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
i
' Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
Peneral o! jcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at l arge, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount t appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
required for each detailed object.
1922.
priation

IIudp*t, page 6.
Salaries, Officers and Employees. Senate—Continued.
clerk, §2*500; assistant, clerk, $1,600; assistant clerk, $1,500; additional clerk, $1,200.
Finance—clerk, $3,000; assistant clerk, $2,220; assistant clerk, $1,600; 2 assistant
clerks, at $1,500 each; 2 experts (1 for the majority and 1 for the minority), at S2.000
each, assistant clerk, $2.100. Foreign Relations—clerk, $3,000; assistant clerk, $2,220;
assistant clerk, $1,500. Immigration—clerk, $2,500: assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant
clerk, $1,500. Indian Affairs— clerk $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant clerk,
@1,500. Interoceanic Canals— clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant clerk,
$1,500. Interstate Commerce—clerk, $2,500; 2 assistant clerks, at $1,800 each; assist­
ant clerk, $1,500. Irrigation and Reclamation— clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,600;
assistant clerk, $1,500; additional clerk, $1,200. Judiciary— clerk, $2,500; assistant
clerk, $2,220; 2 assistant clerks, at $1,800 each; assistant clerk, $1,500. Library—
clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,600; assistant clerk, $1,500; additional clerk, $1,200.
Manufactures— clerk. $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant clerk, $1,500. Military
Affairs—clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $2,220; 3 assistant clerks, at $1,500 each.
Mines and Mining— clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk. $1,600; assistant clerk, $1,500; addi­
tional clerk, $1,200. Naval Affairs—clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $2,220; 2 assistant
clerks, at SI.500 each. Patents— clerk, S2,500; assistant clerk, $1,600; assistant
clerk, $1,500; additional clerk $1,200. Pensions— clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk,
$1,800; 4 assistant clerks, at $1,500 each. Post Offices and Post Roads—clerk, $2,500;
assistant clerk, $2,220; 3 assistant clerks, at $1,500 each. Printing— clerk, $2,500;
assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant clerk, $1,500. Privileges and Elections—clerk, $2,500;
assistant clerk, $1,800; assistant clerk, $1,500. Public Biuldings and Grounds— clerk,
$2,500; assistant clerk, $1,600; assistant clerk, $1,500, Public Lands and surveys—
clerk, $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,800; 2 assistant clerks, at $1,500 each. Revision of the
Laws— clerk. $2,500; assistant clerk, $1,600; assistant clerk, $1,500; additional clerk,
$1,200. Rules— clerk, $2,720, to include full compensation for the preparation bienni­
ally of the Senate Manual, under the direction of the Committee on Rules: assistant
clerk, $1,800; assistant clerk, $1,500; Territories and Insular Possessions— clerk, $2,500;
assistant clerk, $1,G00; assistant clerk, $1,500; additional clerk, $1,200; in all (acts
July 16, 1914, vol. 88. pp. 454-457, sec. 1; Mar. 5, 1921, vol. 41, VV* 1 ^ 2 , 1253, sec. 1;
Jane 16, 1921, vol. 42, p. 64, sec. 1)........... ............................................................................... $260, 960. 00
Clerical assistance to Senators: For clerical assistance to Senators whx) are not chairmen
of the committees specifically provided for herein, 70 clerks, at $2,500 each; 70 assist­
ant clerks, at $1,600 each; 70 assistant clerks, at $1,500 each, $392,000. Eighty-four
additional clerks at $1,200 each, 1 for each Senator having no more than 1 clerk
and 2 assistant clerks for himself or for the committee of which he is chairman,
$100,800; in all (same acts)............................................................................................................
492,800.00
For compiling the Navy Yearbook for the calendar year 1921, under the direction of the
chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs (same acts)....................................................
500.00
Total........... *..................................................................................................... $754,260.00
Office of Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper:
Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper (same acts).....................................................................
6,500.00
Assistant Sergeant at Arms (same acts).................................................................................
2, 500.00
Assistant doorkeeper (same acts)..............................................................................................
3, 600.00
Acting assistant doorkeeper (same acts).................................................................................
3, 600, 00
Two floor assistants, at $2,500 each (same acts)....................................................................
5, 000. 00
Messengers, 5 (acting as in stan t doorkeepers), including one for minority, at $1,800
each (same acts)................................................^..............................* .....................................
9,000. 00
Thirty-seven messengers, including one for minority, at $1,440 each (same acts)___
53,280.00
Messenger (same ads)..................................................................................................................
1,000, 00
Messenger at card door (same acts)........................................ ..................................................
1, 600. 00
Clerk on Journal work for Congressional Record, to be selected by the official report­
ers (same acts)...........................................................................................................................
2, 800.00
Storekeeper (same acts)........................................ .....................................................................
2,500. 00
Stenographer in charge of furniture accounts #nd records (same acts)...........................
1,200.00
Upholsterer and locksmith (same acts)....... ...........................................................................
1, 440. 00
Cabinetmaker (same acts)....... , ...........1....................................................................................
1, 200, 00
Three carpenters, at $1,080 each (same acts).........................................................................
3,240. 00
Janitor (same acts)........................................................................................*.............................
1. 200. 00
Four skilled laborers, at $1,000 each (same acts)................................................. *
...............
4,000. 00
Laborer in charge of private passage (same acts'>
.................................................................
900. 00
Three female attendants in charge of ladies ’ retiring rooms, at $720 each (same acts) .
2,160.00
Three attendants to ladies' toilet rooms, Senate Office Building, at $720 each (same
a c ts)..................................................................................................’ ......................................
2 , 160.00
Chief telephone operator (same acts)................................ .....................................................
1,500. 00
Four telephone operators, at $900 each (same acts)............................................................
3, 600. 00
Night telephone operator (same acts)......................’ ..............................................................
720. 00
Telephone page (same acts).......................................................................................................
720. 00
Superintendent of press gallery (same acts).........................................................................
2,500.00
Assistant superintendent of press gallery (same acts).........................................................
1, 600. 00
Messenger for service to press correspondents (same acts).................................................
1,000.00
Three laborers, at $800 each (same acts)........... *....................... ............................................
2 ,400.00
Thirty-four laborers, at $720 each (same tlets)........................................ ! ......................... .
24,480. 00
Sixteen pages for the Senate Chamber, at the rate of $2.50 per day each during the
4, 720. 00
session (118 davs) (same acts)..................................... *...................................................
Total........; ..................................................................................................$152,120.00




LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923—“
Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

fill:lget, paije 7.
Salaries, Officers and Employees, Senate— Continued.
For police force for Senate Office Building, under the Sergeant at Arms:
Sixteen privates, at $1,050 each; special officer, at $1,200 (acts July 16, 1914, vol.
88, pp. 454-457, sec. 1; Mar. 8,1921, vol. 41, pp. 1252, 1258, sec. 1; June 16,1921,
vol. 42, p. 64, sec. 1) .............................................................................................................
Total............................................................................................................ $18,000.00
Post office:
Postmaster (same acts) .............................................................................................. . ...............
Chief clerk (same acts)................................................................................................................
Eight mail carriers and 1 wagon master, at $1,200 each (same acts)...............................
Three riding pages, at $912.50 each (same acts)...................................................................
Total............................................................................................................$17,837. 50
Folding room:
Foreman (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 88, pp. 454-457, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p.
1258, sec. 1)................................................................................................................................
Assistant (same acts) . . ................................................ ................................................................
Clerk (same acts)...........................................................................................................................
Seven folders, at $1,000 each (same acts)...............................................................................
Seven folders, at $840 each (same acts)..................................................................................
Total............. ................................................................................................ $17,080.00

Total amount to 1 e Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

$18,000.00
2, 500. 00
1, 800. 00
10,800. 00
2, 737.50

1, 600.00
1.400.00
1.200.00
7. 000.00
b, 880.00
$1,065, 807. 50

Reporting Debates and Proceedings, Senate—
For reporting the debates and proceedings of the Senate, payable in equal monthly in­
stallments"(acts July 16,1914, vol. 88, p. 458, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p> 1254, sec. 1).
Contingent Expenses, Senate—
For stationery for Senators and the President of the Senate, including $7,500 for sta­
tionery for committees and officers of the Senate (act Mar. 8,1921, vol. 41, p. 1254, sec. 1).
Postage stamps: For the office of the Secretary, $200; for the office of Sergeant at Arms,
$100; in all, $300 (same act) .............................................................................................................
For maintaining, exchanging, and equipping motor vehicles for carrying the mails and
for official use of the offices of the Secretary and Sergeant at Arms, $10,000, or so much
thereof as may be necessary (same act).............. ..........................................................................
For driving, maintenance, and operation of automobile for the Vice President (same act).
For materials for folding (same act) ...................................................................................................
For folding speeches and pamphlets, at a rate not exceeding $1 per thousand (same act) .
For fuel, oil, cotton waste, and advertising, exclusive of labor (same act).............................
For purchase of furniture (same act)................................................... ..............................................
For materials for furniture and repairs of same, exclusive of labor (same act)......................
For services in cleaning, repairing, and varnishing furniture (same act)................................
For packing boxes (same act)..............................................................................................................
For rent of warehouse for storage of public documents for the Senate (same act)................
For miscellaneous items, exclusive of labor (same act)................................................................
For expenses of inquiries and investigations ordered by the Senate, including compen­
sation to stenographers of committees, at such rate as may be fixed by the Committee
to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate, but not exceeding $1.25
per printed page (same act)............................................. ...............................................................
For Senate kitphens and restaurants (act Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p* 1427, sec. 1)....................
Total, Senate.




$1,149,687. 44

44,844. 00

44. 844. 00

25,000.00

20,000.00

300.00

300. 00

10,000.00
3.000.00
1, 500. 00
10,000. 00

10,000. 00
2, 240. 00
1, 500. 00
5, 000. 00

,

2, 000. 00

2 000. 00

5.000. 00
3.000.00

5,000. 00
3, 000.00

2. 000. 00

2, 000. 00

970. 00
1,800. 00
125,000. 00

970.00
1,800. 00
100, 000. 00

100, 000. 00

100, 000. 00
35, 000.00

2,171, 22L 50

2, 254, 341.44

4

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service o j the fiscal year ending June 80, 1928— Continued.
General objcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Jarse, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount

required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 8.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro*
1922.
priation.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

Salaries and Mileage, Members and Delegates, House of Representatives—
For compensation of Members of the House of Representatives, Delegates from Terri­
tories, the Resident Commissioner from Porto Rico, and the Resident Commissioners
from the Philippine Islands (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p . 458, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921,
vol. 41, p. 1255, sec. 1) .. - . ............................................................................................................ $3, 304, 500. 00
For mileage of Representatives and Delegates and expenses of Resident Commissioners
(same acts)..........................................................................................................................................
175,000. 00
$3,479,500. 00
Salaries, Officers and Employees, Home of Representatives—
Office of the Speaker:
Secretary to Speaker (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 458, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1255, sec. 1)...................................................................................................................... ....
Clerk to Speaker’s table (same acts).......................................................................................
For preparing Digest of Rules (same acts)...........................................................................
Clerk to Speaker (same acts).....................................................................................................
Messenger to Speaker (same acts) ............................................................................................
Messenger to Speaker’s table (same acts)...............................................................................
Total............................................................................................................. $12,600.00
Chaplain:
For Chaplain (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1255,
sec. 1)..........................................................................................................................................
For compensation of Henry N. Couden, Chaplain emeritus (H . Res. Jan. 6, 1921;
act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1255, sec. 1)............................................................................
Total............................................................................................................... $2,700.00
Office of the Clerk:
Clerk of the House of Representatives, including compensation as disbursing officer
of the contingent fund (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921,
vol. 41, V. 1255, sec. l ) ............................................................................................................
Chief Clerk (same acts)...............................................................................................................
Journal clerk (same acts).............................................................................................................
Reading clerks, 2, at $4,000 each (same acts)............................................... ........................
Enrolling clerk (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1255,
sec. 1; II. Res. June 21, 1921)..............................................................................................
Disbursing clerk (increase of $600 submitted) (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1255, sec. 1)..................................................................................
Tally clerk (increase of $700 submitted) (same acts)..........................................................
Chief bill clerk (increase of $1,000 submitted) (same acts)...............................................

4, 000. 00
3, C O 00
O.
1, 000. 00
1,600. 00
1, 200. 00
1, 200. 00

1,200.00
1, 500. 00

6, 500.00
4, 500. 00
4, 000. 00
8, 000. 00
4,000. 00
4,000. 00
4,000.00
4, 000. 00

Explanation: These increases a recom ended in order to equalize the com
r,e
m
pensation of these three
em
ployees with that received by the journal clerk and the reading clerks, the responsibility, im
por­
tance, and volume of their respective duties seem to justify it.
ing
File clerk (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38f p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1255,
sec. 1)........................................................................................................................................
Assistant to disbursing clerk (increase of $850 submitted) (same acts)..........................

3,250.00
3,250.00

Explanation: The w of the disbursing office has increased during the last two years about 300
ork
per cent, due chiefly to placing M bers’ clerks on the pay roll. The duties of this clerk are responsi­
em
ble, involve many details and a know
ledge o accounting and bookkeeping, and the proposed com­
r
pensation is m nearly com ensurate than that now paid.
ore
m
Stationery clerk (increase of $800 submitted) (same acts).................................................

3, 000.00

Explanation: The proposed increase is justified on the ground of greater volume of business due to
the increased number of persons patronizing the stationery room the number of M bers’ clerks
,
em
alone having been doubled in the last two years.
Assistant to Chief Clerk, and assistant enrolling clerk, at'$2,500 each (same acts). . .
Librarian (same acts)..................................................................................................................




5, 000.00
2,100.00

$3,479,500. 00

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

5

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923—‘Continued.
(lencral object (title of appropriation), date of nets, references to Statutes at large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.
It m ille t , nagc*!).

Salaries , Officers and Employees, House of Representatives—C on tin u ed.
O ffice o f the C lerk— C on tin u ed .
Assistant librarian (th e a ct of Ju ly 10,1014, appropriated $1,800, w h ich was increased
b y H ouse resolution of A u g . 1,1019, to $2,100, w h ich am oun t is carried in the a ct of
Mar. 3,1021, for the cu rren t fiscal year. T h e an om aly is presented of the librarian
and an assistant r e ce iv in g the sam e am oun t of co m p e n sa tion ) {acts July I6t 1914,
vol. 88 , p. 459 , sec. 1; Mar. 8, m i , voL 41, p. 1255, sec. 1 ) .........................................
Assistant file cle rk (same acts) ....................................................................................................
C lerks—
3 at $2,000 e a ch (submitted) ....................................................................................................
5 at $1,800 e a ch (submitted) ....................................................................................................
4 at $1,G00 ea ch ( submitted) ....................................................................................................

$ 2 ,100 .00
1. 900.00
G, 000.00
9, 000.00
G 400.00
,

Explanation: Recommended in lion of the following: Clerk at $1,$00; assistant librarian, and mes­
senger and assistant journal clerk, at $1,S00 each; clerks, at Sl,t>so each; bookkeeper and assistant in
disbursing office, at Il,ft00 each: 4 assistants to chief bill clerk, at 51,500 each, as provided in the act of
Mar. 3,1921 (act Mar. 3, 1021, vol. 41, j>. 12.V see. 1),
».
This arrangement would make possible the detail of these clerks to an.v duty that may be required
of them according to their respective experience and ability, and permit of promotions and demo­
tions, when desirable. Tho net increase would bo SI,760.
S tenographer to C lerk (in crease of $000 su b m itte d ) (acts July 16, 1914> vol. 88,
p . 459, sec. 1; Mar . 8 , 1921, vol. 4U p> 1255, sec. 1 ) ............................................................

2, 000.00

Explanation: The duties arc thosoofaronfi lent ial secretary to the Clerk, and arc many and varied.
Tho proposed salary is hardly commensurate, and the present salary is totally inadequate.
L ocksm ith and ty p e w rite r repairer (change of title su b m itted ) (same acts) .................
M essenger in C hief C lerk 's office, and assistant in station ery room (same acts) ...........
Messengers, 3 , at $1,100 each (title s d rop p ed to p erm it o f th eir d eta il w herever
necessary) (same acts) ....................................................................................................................
Stenographer to jou rn al clerk (same acts) .................................................................................
N in e teleph on e operators, at $1,200 each (act Mar. 8 , 1921, vol. 41, p • 1255, sec. 1 )..
Three session telep h on e operators, at $100 per m onth from D ec. 1, 1022, to Mar. 31,
1923 (same a ct) .................................................. ..............................................................................
Substitute teleph on e operator w hen required, at $2.50 per d ay (same act). .................

1, 300.00
2, 400.00
3 ,3 0 0 .0 0
1 ,0 0 0 .0 0
10,800.00
1,2 0 0 .0 0
500.00

Explanation: Tho Increase of 525 per month for tho annual and session telephone operators here
submitted Is in accordance with a concurrent resolution adopted by the House July 26,1921, pending
In the Senate.
Laborers—
3, at $900 each (same act) .................................................................................... .....................
0, at $720 each (acts July 16, 1914, roL 88, p . 459 , sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41,
p . 1255, sec. 1 ) ..........................................................................................................................

2 ,7 0 0 .0 0
6 ,4 8 0 .0 0

Explanation: This Is an increase of one laborer, at 1900, for duty in the bathroom, made necessary
by tho superannuation of a faithful employee who has been in the service of the House over 50 years,
but who, by reason of employment in the legislative branch, can not receive the benefits of the civil
service retirement act. The nine laborers arc recommended at the same compensation and in lieu
of the following: Six laborers, at $?20 each; pagein the enrolling room, $?20; two janitors, at $720 each.
A llow a n ce to C h ief Clerk for sten og rap h ic and typ ew riter services (aefs July 16,
1914♦ vol. 3S, p . 459, sec. 1; Mar. 8, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1255, sec. ; ) . . . . . . . ^ ...............
T o ta l............................................................... ................................................... $113,680.00
Clerks, messengers, and ja n itors to com m ittees:
A cco u n ts:
Clerk (same acts) ..........................................................................................................................
A ssistan t clerk (same acts) .......................................................................................................
Ja n itor (same acts) .......................................................................................................................
A g ricu ltu re :
Clerk (same acts) ..........................................................................................................................
A ssistan t clerk (same acts).......................................................................................................
J a n itor (same acts)................................................................. .....................................................
A p p rop ria tio n s:
Clerk, $4,000, and $1,000 a d d itio n a l so lo n g as the p o sitio n is h e ld b y th e present
in c u m b e n t (sawie acts)................................................. ....................... .................................
A ssistant cle rk (act June 16,1921, vol. 42, p . 49, sec. 1 ) ..............................................




1 ,0 0 0 .0 0

2,500. 00
1 ,8 0 0 .0 0
1 ,0 0 0 .0 0
2 ,5 0 0 .0 0
1,800. 00
1,000. i)0

5 ,0 0 0 .0 0
4 ,0 0 0 00

Total amount to I c Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal yea.each head of appro
ending June "
priation.
1922.

P
)

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the fiscal year ending June 30} 1923— Continued.

General ol jcct (title of appro; ri ition), date of acts, references to Statutes at I arpe, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

ismiget,
10.
Salaries, Officers and Employees, House of Representatives—Continued.
Clerks, mt'ss* ng^rs, and janitors to committees— Continued.
Appropriations— Continued.
Five assistant clerks, at 53,000 each (four additional authorized in second de­
ficiency act, June 16, 1921) (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
1921, vol. 4U V' 1255>S * * ).........................................................................................
€C
$15>00a 00
Assistant clerk and stenographer (acts June 16, 1921, vol. 42, p. 49, sec. 1;
July 16. 1914, roL 39, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, P 1255, sec. 1) . . . 2 , 5 0 0 . 00
*
1, 900. 00
Assistant clerk (same acts). . .................................... .......................................................
Assistant clerk (same acts)................................................................................................
1,800. 00
Janitor (same acts)...............................................................................................................
1,000. 00
Banking and Currency:
Clerk (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, V* 1255,
see. 1).................................................................................................. - .............................
2,000.00
Assistant clerk (same acts).................................................................................................
1, 200. 00
Janitor (same acts)...............................................................................................................
720. 00
Census:
Clerk (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1256,
sec. 1 ) .................................................................................................................................
2,000. 00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Claims:
Clerk (same acts)..................................................................................................................
2,500. 00
Assistant clerk (same acts).................................................................................................
1, 200. 00
Janitor. (same acts)................................................................................................................
720. 00
Coinage, Weights, and Measures:
Clerk (same acts)..................................................................................................................
2,000. 00
Janitor (same acts)...............................................................................................................
720. 00
District of Columbia:
Clerk (same acts)........................................................ ..........................................................
2, 500. 00
Assistant clerk (same acts)............................................. ...................................................
1,800. 00
Janitor (same acts)................. *............................................................................................
720. 00
Education: Clerk (same acts)....................................................................................................
2,000.00
Election of President, Vice President, and Representatives in Congress: Clerk
(same acts)..................................................................................................................................
2 ,000. 00
Elections No. 1:
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2,000. 00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
1,000. 00
Elections No. 2:
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Elections No. 3:
Clerk (same acts).................... ..............................................................................................
2,000. 00
Janitor (same acts)................. ..............................................................................................
720.00
. Enrolled Bills:
Clerk (same acts).............................................................................................................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts)....................... *......................................................................................
720.00
Flood Control:
2,000.00
Clerk (same acts)......... ........................................................................................................
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Foreign Affairs:
Clerk (sam* acts)...................................................................................................................
2,500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts).................................................................................................
1,800.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Immigration and Naturalization:
Clerk (same acts)..................................................................................................................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720. 00
Indian Affairs:
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2 ,500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts) . . *...........................................................................................
1,800.00
720.00
Janitor (same acts) ................. ..............................................................................................
Industrial Arts and Expositions:
' Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts).............................................................................................. ; ................ _
720.00
Insular Aftairs:
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2,000. 00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Interstate and Foreign Commerce:
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2,500.00
Additional clerk (same acts)...............................................................................................
2,000.00
Assistant clerk (same acts) ..................................................................................................
1,500.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
1,000.00
Irrigation of Arid Lands:
Clerk (same acts). . . ..............................................................................................................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720. 00




Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

7

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 11.
Salaries, Officers and Employees, House of Representatives— Continued.
Clerks, messengers, and janitors to committees— Continued.
Invalid Pensions:
Clerk (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1256,
$2,500.00
sec. 1).................................................................................................................................
Stenographer (same acts)....................................................................................................
2,190.00
Assistant clerk (same acts).................................................................................................
2, 000.00
Janitor (same acts)...............................................................................................................
1, 000.00
Judiciary:
Clerk (same acts)..................................................................................................................
2, 500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts) .............................................*..................................................
1,600.00
, Janitor (same acts)........... ....................................................................................................
1, 000.00
Labor—
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts)........................................................... ....................................................
720.00
Library—
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2,000.00
720.00
Janitor (same acts)............................................. .................................................................
Merchant Marine and Fisheries:
Clerk (same acts)..................................................................................................................
2, 000.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Military Affairs:
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2, 500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts).................*.............................................................................
1, 500.00
Janitor (same acts)............................................................................................................
1,000.00
Mines and Mining:
2,000.00
Clerk (same acts).............................. ... ................................................................................
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
.720.00
Naval Affairs:
Clerk (same acts).............................. ....................................................................................
2, 500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts).................................................................................................
1, 500.00
Janitor (same acts)...............................................................................................................
1,000.00
Patents:
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Pensions:
Clerk (same acts)......................................j ..........................................................................
2, 500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts).................................................................................................
1, 606.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Post Offices and Post Roads:
Clerk (same acts)...................................................................................................................
2, 500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts) .................................................................................................
1,400.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
1,000.00
Printing—
Clerk (same acts)...................................... ...........................................................................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
1, 000.00
Public Buildings and Grounds—
Clerk (same acts).................... ..................................................................... - ................- .
2, 500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts). . . ...........................................................................................
1, 200.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Public Lands—
Clerk (same acts)___ ; ...........................................................................................................
2,000.00
Assistant clerk (same acts).........■
........................................................................................
1,200.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Reform in Civil Service: Clerk (same acts)...........................................................................
2,000.00
Revision of the Laws—
Clerk (same acts).......................... ........................................................................................
3,000.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
Rivers and Harbors—
Clerk (same acts)........... .......................................................................................................
2, 500.00
Assistant clerk (same acts)............................................................... ..................................
1,800.00
Janitor(same acts)................................................................................................................
1,000.00
Roads—
Clerk (same acts).......................................................................................*..........................
2,000.00
Janitor (same acts..................................................................................................................
720.00
Rules—
Clerk (sam-e acts)............. ...............................................................- ....................................
2,000.00
Assistant clerk (same acts).................................................................................................
1,500.00
Janitor (same acts)................................................................- ..............................................
720.00
Territories—
Clerk (same acts)........................................................................................... ........................
2,000.00
Jamitor (same acts)................................................................................................................
720.00
War Claims—
Clerk (same acts).............................................................- *............................’.....................
2,500* 00
Assistant clerk (same nets)............................................. ....................................................
1,200.00
Janitor (same acts..............................................................................................................720.00




Total amount to l:e
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal jear
ending June 30,
1922.

8

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

General ol jcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 12.
Salaries, Officers and Employers, House of Representatives—Continued.
Clerks, messengers, and janitors to committees—Continued.
Ways and Means—
‘ Clerk (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 459, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1256,
sec. 1 ).....................................- ......... ................................................................................
Assistant clerk and stenographer (same acts) . ..............................................................
Assistant clerk (same acts) ................................................................................................
Janitor (same acts)..............................................................................................................
Janitor (same ads)........., ...................................................................................................
Total.......................................................................................................... $197,570,00
Office of Sergeant at Arms:
Sergeant at Arms (same acts)....................................................................................................
Deputy Sergeant at Arms (same acts)....................................................................................
Cashier (same acts)......................................................................................................................
Two bookkeepers, at $2,400 each (same acts)................................................... ....................
Deputy Sergeant at Arms in charge of pairs (same acts) ...................................................
Pair clerk and messenger (same acts).....................................................................................
Messenger (sa?ne acts)........................................... ............................... ......................................
Stenographer and typewriter (same acts)..............................................................................
Skilled laborer (same acts).......... .............................................................................................
Hire of automobile (same acts).................................................................................................
For police force, House Office Building, under the Sergeant at Arms:
Lieutenant (same acts)...................................................................................^
...........................
Nineteen privates, at $1,050 each (6 authorized by the second deficiency act, June
10, 1921, vol. 42, p. 49, sec. 1) (same acts)......................................................................
Total............................................................................................................. $40,290.00
Office of Doorkeeper:
Doorkeeper (sa?ne acts) .............................................................................. ................................
Maintenance and repair of folding room motor truck, $500 or so much thereof as may
be necessary (same acts)........................................................................................................
Superintendent of document room (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 460, sec. 1; Mar.
8,>1921, vol. 41, /> 1257, sec. 1)...........................................................................................
•
Special employee m document room (Joel Grayson) (same acts)............... ....................
Assistant in documemt room (W. Ray Loomis) (act Mar. 8, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1257,
sec. i ) . . . . . . . . ......................................................................................................................

$3,000.00
2,000.00
1,900.00
1,000.00
720.00
6,500.00
2,500.00
4,000.00
4, 800.00
1, 800.00
1, 800.00
1,400.00
900.00
840.00
600. 00
1,200.00
19,950.00
5,000.00
500.00
2, 900.00
2,500.00
2,500.00

N ote.—The act of M 3,1921, provides for this employm
ar.
ent "as editor and com
piler of the Weekly

and M
onthly Com
pendium and as assistant in the docum room But as no provision has been
ent
.”
m
ade for the printing of the Weekly and Monthly Com
pendium since the close of the secondsession.
Sixty-sixth Congress, the designation of editor and com
piler of these publications is om
itted.
Assistant superintendent, document room (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p 460, sec. 1;
Mar. 3f 1921, vol. 41, p . 1257, sec. 1).................................................................................
Superintendent, reporters’ gallery (same acts)....................................................................
Special employee (same acts)...................................................................................................
Assistant clerk, document room (same acts)........................................................................
Assistant clerk, document room (same acts).........................................................................
Chief janitor (title changed by adding word “ Chief” ; this employee has charge of
janitor force) (same acts)........................................................................................................
Eight assistants, document room, at $1,280 each (same acts)...........................................
Two messengers in charge of telephones, at $2,160 each (one for the minority) (acts
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1257, sec. 1; Apr. 18, 1921, vol. 42, p. 2, sec. 1).............

2,100.00
2,000.00
1,800. 00
1, 700.00
1, 600.00
1,500.00
10,240.00
4,320.00

N ote.—It is recom ended that the title of these employments be changed to that of “ Floor man­
m

agers of telephones.” as m nearly corresponding to the actual duties. The telephone serviceproper
ore
(the switchboard) is located in the House O
ffice Building, the service being “ m charge" of a chief
operator and an assistant, and the duties perform by the persons in question are in connection
ed
with the branch booths in the cloakroom for the convenience of Members on the floor of the House.
s
Assistant messenger in charge of telephones (same recommendation as to title,
namely, “ Assistant floor manager of telephones” ; see note above) (act Mar. 31
1921, vol. 41, p . 1257, sec. 1).................................................................................................
Seventeen messengers, at $1,180 each (increase of 1 by II. Res. Feb. 25, 1921) (acts
July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 460, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p* 1257, sec. 1)..............
Messenger to press room (same acts)........................................................................................
Janitor, document room (same acts)........................................................................................
Two female attendants in ladies’ retiring rooms, at $800 each (same acts)..................
Seventeen laborers, at $720 each (same acts)........................................................................
Two cloakroom men, at $840 each (same acts).....................................................................
Seven cloakroom men, at $600 each (same acts)..................................................................
One cloakroom man, at $600 and $120 additional so long as held by present in­
cumbent (same acts)...................................................................................... : ........................
Superintendent of folding room (same acts)..................................................................................
Foreman (same acts).................................................................................................. ..................
Chief clerk to superintendent of folding room (same acts)... ............................................
Three clerks, at $1,600 each (same acts).................................................................................
Shipping clerk (same acts)..........................................................................................................
Thirty-one folders, at $900 each (same acts)____*................................................................
Two laborers, at $720 each (in lieu of 1 laborer and 1 janitor, at $720 each (same acts)
Two drivers, at $840 each (same acts) ................................................................. ..........*____
Two chief pages, at $1,500 each (same acts) ..........................................................................




1,500.00
20,060.00
1,000.00
920.00
1,600.00
12,240.00
1, 680.00
4,200.00
720.00
2, 500.00
2,100.00
1,800.00
4,800.00
1,200.00
27,900.00
1,440.00
1,680.00
3,000.00,

Total amount to le Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

9

LEGISLATIVE ESTAISLLSILMEXT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.

General objcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at I arpc, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, pag«* liL
Safari?*, Ojfictrs and Employees, House of Representatives— Continued.
Superintendent of folding room— Continued.
Two telephone pages, at §1,200 each (authorized by II. Res. 015, Fob. 25, 1921
(act Apr. 18, 1921, vol. 42, /). 2, sec. 1)............................. : ..............................................
Fortv-two pages, during thq session (118 days), including 2 riding pages, press
gallery page, and 10 pages for duty at the entrances to the Ilall of the House, at
$2.50 per day each (same acts)...............................................................................................
Fourteen messengers, on soldiers' roll, at $1,200 each (same acts)..................................
T o ta l......................................................................................................... $160,590.00
Minority and special employees:
For 6 minority employees authorized and named in the resolution of Apr. 11,1921,
at $1,800 each (act Mar. S, 1921, vol. 4U p. 1257, sec. 1)...............................................
For assistant department messenger, authorized and named in resolution of Dec.
7, 1897 (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 460, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1257,
sec. 1).................................................................. ........................................................................
To continue employment of the assistant foreman of the folding room, authorized
in the resolution of Sept. 30, 1913, at $3.85 per day (same acts).................................
To continue employment of the person named in the resolution of Apr. 28, 1914,
as a laborer (same acts)............................................................................*.............................
To continue employment of the laborer authorized and named in the resolution
of Dec. 10, 1901 (same acts)........................................... . ......................................................
Successors to any of the employees provided for in the 5 preceding paragraphs
may be named by the House of Representatives at any time.

1 Total amount to lie
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

j

Amount appropriated
for the 11seal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$2,400.00
12,390.00
16,800.00

10,800.00
2,000.00
1, 405.25
840.00
840.00

Note.—(1) In the first of the preceding paragraphs the num of em
ber
ployees is increased from5 to
fi in accordance w the resolution of Apr. 7, 1921, and as these em
ith
ployees perform like duties and
such duties as the m
inority loader and M bers require of them, their m
em
eaningless titles are dropped
and they arc treated as m
inority em
ployees.” the com
pensation being the sam in each case.
e
(2) The paragraph form
erly under this n
ea'd providing for tho employm of \ . Ray Loom as an
ent
V
is
assistant in tho docum
ent room is included under the head “ Ollke of the D
oorkeeper.” (3) Tho
paragraph form
erly in this category providing for a special m
essenger at S ,500 is om
I
itted, the incum
­
bent being deceased and a successor not having been named.
Conference minority:
Clerk (same acts)...........................................................................................................................
Assistant clerk (same acts)..........................................................................................................
Janitor (same acte).........................................................................................................................
To continue the employment of messengers in the majority and minority caucus rooms,
to be appointed oy the majority and minority whips, respectively, at $1,200 each
(same acts)................................1.........................................................................................................
Office of majority floor leader:
Clerk (act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p ■1257, sec. 1)......................... ..........................................
Assistant clerk (same act)................................................................. ’.........................................
Janitor (same act)................................. .......................................................................................
Total.............................................................................................................. $28,285.25
Office of the Postmaster:
Postmaster (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 461, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, P* 1257,
sec. 1)...........................................................................................................................................
Assistant postmaster (same acts)...............................................................................................
Registry and money-order clerk (same acts)..........................................................................
Thirty-four messengers (including 1 to superintend transportation of mails), at
$1,200 each (same acts)............................................................................................................
Laborer (same acts).......................................................................................................................
For hire of vehicles for carrying the mails, $4,200, or so much thereof as may be
necessary (same acts)................................................... ............................................................
Total.............................................................................................................. $53,420.00
Official reporters of debates:
Six official reporters of the proceedings and debates of the House, at $6,000 each
(same acts)...................................................................................................................................
Assistant (same acts).................................................................. .................................................
Six expert transcribers, at $1,200 each (some acts).............................................................
Janitor (same acts).........................................................................................................................
Total............................................................................................................. $47,180.00
Stenographers to committees:
Four stenographers to committees, at $6,000 each (same acts).........................................
Janitor (same acts).........................................................................................................................
Total.............................................................................................................. $24,980.00

2, 500.00
1, 500.00
1,000.00
2, 400.00
2, 500.00
1, 500.00
1, 000.00

4,000.00
2, 200.00
1, 500.00
40, 800.00
720.00
4,200.00

36,000.00
3,000.00
7,200.00
980.00
24,000.00
980.00

Total, salaries of officers and employees................................................................................................

$687, 295.25

$685,280.25

Clerk Hire, Members and Delegates, House of Representatives—
For clerk hire necessarily employed by each Member, Delegate, and Resident Com­
missioner in the discharge of his representative duties, $3;200 per annum, in monthly
installments, or so much thereof as may be necessary (acts July 11, 1919, vol. 41,
p. 162, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p- 1258, sec. 1)............................................................................................

1,408,000.00

1,408,000.00




10

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 192?.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj thejiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to R vised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, pago 14,
Contingent Expenses, Ho use of Representatives—
For expenses of special and select committees authorized by the House of Representa­
tives (act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, P- 1258, sec. 1)........................................................................
For reporting hearings of committees at such rate as may be fixed by the Committee on
Accounts, not exceeding $1.25 per printed page (same act) .................................................
For telegraph and telephone service, exclusive of personal services (same act) ..................
For salaries and labor specifically authorized by the House of Representatives (same act)..
For expenses incident to the funerals of deceased Members and for compensation and
funerals of deceased employees of the House of Representatives (same act).....................
For miscellaneous items, including purchase of typewriting machines, ice, towels,
laundry, newspapers, and all other necessary expenses not included under any other
heading (same act)................................................................... ........................................................
Total....................................................................................................................................

Total amount to lie Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
1922.
priation.

$40, 000. 00
20 , 000 . 00
65.000. 00
15.000.00
35, 000.00
15, 000.00
190,000.00

N ote.—The six preceding paragraphs represent segregation of one paragraph formerly carried in the
legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation bill, as follows:

For miscellaneous items and expenses of special and select committees, exclusive of salaries and labor,
unless specifically ordered by the House of Representatives, the initial appropriation for which was $75,000
for many j^ears; but it was found necessary each year to augment this with deficiency appropriations
which considerably increased the appropriations for objects coming under this heading, the total appro­
priation for each year of the 10-year period from 1912 to 1921, inclusive, having been as follows:
191 2
1913
191 4
191 5
191 6
191 7

$190,000.00
210,375.00
157,000.00
115,000.00
82,500.00
102,000.00

191
191
192
192

8
9
0
1

$120,000.00
238,827.21
425,325.76
235,000.00
Total.......................................... 1,936,027.97

The average annual total appropriation for these objects was $193,602.80, the larger part of which was
absorbed by four chief items included in tho foregoing allocation, namely, expenses of special and select
committees, reporting committee hearings, telegraph and telephone service, and expenses of funerals. In
other words, the expenditures from this fund were more specific than they were miscellaneous. (See hear­
ing on legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation bill, 1921, pp. 2344-2345). Hereafter, when a de­
ficiency appropriation may be required for one of these specific purposes it can be more clearly differen­
tiated than when under the designation of “ Miscellaneous items.” The amounts estimated for the objects
mentioned in the foregoing paragraphs are based approximately on the expenditures for the fiscal year 1921
for like purposes, the total appropriations for which were $235,000, after deducting $20,000 for restaurant
equipment and other unusual expenditures, such as the funeral of the late Speaker Clark. The total
amount estimated is $3,000 less than the annual average for 10 years, or $190,000; and as it can not be fore­
seen exactly what demands upon these funds may be made by authorizations of the House or by future
conditions the expenditures may be more or less accordingly. These figures, however, furnish as nearly
accurate bases as possible upon which to make initial appropriations for all objects heretofore embraced
within the classification of ‘‘ Miscellaneous items.”

For wrapping paper, pasteboard, paste, twine, newspaper wrappers, and other necessary
materials for folding, for use of Members, the Clerk’s office, and folding room, not in­
cluding envelopes, writing paper, and other paper and materials to be printed and
furnished by the Public Printer, upon requisitions from the Clerk of the House, under
provisions of the act approved Jan. 12, 1895 (same act).........................................................
For furniture and materials for repairs of the same, including not to exceed 112,000 for
^ labor, tools, and machinery for furniture repair shops (same act).................... ..................
For stationery for Representatives, Delegates, and Resident Commissioners, including
35,000 for stationery for the use of the committees and officers of the House (same act).
For postage stamps: Postmaster, £250; Clerk, $450; Sergeant at Arms, $300; Doorkeeper,
$150; in all (same act).....................................................................................................................
7 or driving, maintenance, repair, and operation of an automobile for the Speaker(sa7ne
' 0 .......................................................................................................................................................

10,000. 00
30, 000. 00
60,000. 00
1,150. 00
2,240.00

Contingent expenses, House of Representatives (exclusive of one-half ($100)
for contingent expenses, Capitol Police, estimated under -‘ Capitol Police” )
n all..........................................................................................................................................................,




$293,390. 00

$178,390.00

11

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

General objcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to bo Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

Budget, page 15.
Folding Speeches—
For folding speeches and p am ph lets, at a rate not e x ce e d in g $1 per thousand ( act June
16, 1921, vol. 42, p. 49, sec. 1) .....................................................................................................
Gratuities to Widows, etc., of Deceased Members—
T o p a y the w idow s, e tc., of d eceased M em bers of the H ouse of R epresentatives (sub­
mitted) ........................................................................................................................................................

$8,000. 00

$8,000.00

52,500. 00

N ote .—Six Members of the present (Sixty-seventh) Congress have died, and the estimate is based
upon the chronology of the Sixty-sixth Congress, wherdta there occurred 14 deaths.

Expenses, Contested-Election Cases—
T o pay contestants and contestees their expenses, re sp e ctiv ely, n ot e x ceed in g $2,000
each (12 parties) ( act M ai. 2 , 1887 , vol. 24 , p . 445, sec. 1) ...............................................

24,000. 00

N ote.—I n the present (Sixty-seventh) Congress 6 contested-election cases have come to the official
notice of the Clerk of the House.

Compiling, etc., Contested-Election Cases—
For services in com p ilin g , e tc., the con tested -election cases of the S ixty-seven th Con­
gress ( act June 5, 1920, vol. 41, p. 1036, sec. 1) .......................................................................... .

4.000.00

N ote.—There was no appropriation for the fiscal year 1922, one appropriation being for an
entire Congress.

Clerical Assistance, Sixty-seventh Congress—
For assistance rendered during the S ix ty -se ve n th Congress in com p ilin g list of reports
to be m ade to Congress, etc. (act Mar. 1, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1181, sec. 1; submitted) ........... .

5.000.00

N o t e —There was no appropriation for the fiscal year 1922, one appropriation being for an
entire Congress.

T ota l, H ou se of R ep resen ta tiv es......................................................................................

5,961, 685. 25

5, 759,170.25

9,350.00

9, 350. 00

30,000.00

40.000. 00

4,000.00

4 ,000.00

42,450.00

49,950.00

N ote .—The greater part of the difference between the estimated total amount for 1923 and the appro­
priations for 1922 is due to the inclusion of items in the former not heretofore included in the estimates,
such as gratuities to widows, etc., of deceased Members, expenses in contested-election cases, and like
items for which appropriations have been made heretofore, but which, on account of their indefinite­
ness, were not estimated.

L E G I S L A T I V E M IS C E L L A N E O U S .

Budget, pages 7 and 15.
Salaries and Expenses, Joint Committee on Printing —
F or clerk, $4,000; in spector, u n der section 20 of th e act ap p rov ed Jan. 12, 1895, $2,250;
stenographer, $1,500; for expen ses o f co m p ilin g , preparing, and in d ex in g th e Con- gressional D irectory , $1,600; in all, $9,350, one h alf to b e disbursed b y th e S ecretary
of the Senate and the other half to b e disbursed b y the Clerk o f the H ou se ( acts July
16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 458 , sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 11. p. 1254, sec. 1) ................................. .

Budget, pages 8 and 15.
Legislative Drafting Service—
For salaries and expen ses o f m aintenance of th e L egislative D rafting S ervice, a3 author­
ized b y section 1303 o f the “ R e v e n u e act of 19 18,” in all, 530,000, one h alf to b e
disbursed b y th e S ecretary o f th e Senate and th e other half to b e d isbursed b y the
Clerk o f the H ou se ( acts Feb. 24, 1919, vol. 40, p. 1141; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p • 1255,
sec, 1) ...........................................................................................................................................................

Budget, pages 8 and 14.
Statement of Appropriations —
F or preparation, un der th e d ire ctio n o f th e C om m ittees on A ppropriations o f th e Senate
and H ou se o f R epresen tatives, o f th e statem ents for th e second session of th e S ix ty seventh Congress, sh ow ing appropriations m ade, n ew offices created, offices the
salaries o f w h ich h a v e b e e n om itted , increased, or red u ced , in d efin ite appropriations,
and contracts au th orized , together w ith a ch ron ological history of th e regular appro­
priation bills, as requ ired b y law , $2,000, to b e paid to th e persons designated b y the
chairm en o f said com m ittees to d o said w ork (act Mar. 4,1921 , vol. 41, p . 1426, sec. 1)

Budget, pages 7 and 14.
Salaries , Capitol Police —
F or captain , $1,800; 3 lieutenants, at $1,200 ea ch ; 2 sp ecia l officers, at $1,200 each ;
33 privates, at $1,050 ea ch ; on e-h alf o f said privates to b e selected b y the Sergeant at
A rm s o f the Senate and on e-h alf b y th e Sergeant at Arm s o f th e H ou se; in all, $42,450,
one h alf to b e disbursed b y th e S ecretary o f th e Senate and the oth er h alf to b e dis­
bursed b y the Clerk o f th e H ou se ( acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 458, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
1921, vol. 41 , p. 1254, sec. 1) ........................... ‘....................... : ............................................. , .........

Budget, pages 7 and 14.
Contingent Fund, Capitol Police—
F or con tin g en t expen ses, $200, on e half to b e disbursed b y the Secretary of th e Senate
and th e oth er h alf to b e disbursed b y the Clerk o f th e H ouse (act Mar. 3,1921 , vol. 41,
p . 1254, sec. 1 ) .............................................................................................. ............................................ .

200. 00

200. <
)0

F or purchasing and su p p ly in g uniform s to C apitol p o lice (act Mar. 4,1921, vol. 41, p .
1426, see. 1) ..................................................................................................................................................

2,000.00

2,000.00

Total, Legislative Miscellaneous...............................................................................

88,000.00

105,500.00

Budget, page 14.
Uniforms for Capitol Police , House o f Representatives—




12

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f ike fiscal year ending June 30, 1928— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

B u d g e t, p age 11 6.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

A R C H IT E C T O F T H E C A P IT O L .

Salaries , Office of Architect of the Capitol—
A rch ite ct of the C apitol (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p . 492, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1291, sec. 1) .........................................................................................................................................
C hief clerk and accou n tan t (same acts ) ...............................................................................................
C iv il engineer (same acts) ........................................................................................................................
Construction draftsman (same acts) ......................................................................................................
T w o clerks, at $1,200 each (same acts) .............................- .................................................................
C om pen sation to disbursin g cle rk (acts Mar. 3 , 1879, vol. 20 , p. 391, sec. 1; July 16,1914 ,
vol. 38, p. 492, sec. 1 ) ............................................................................................................................
L aborer in charge o f w ater-closets in central p ortion o f the C apitol (acts Mar. 3, 1921,
vol. 41, p . 1291, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 492, sec. 1; Mar, 3, 1921, vol. 41, p.
1291, sec. 1 ) ...........................................................................................................................................

$6,000 .00
3,0 00.0 0
2,400. 00
2,000. 00
2,4 00.0 0
1,000. 00

660.00
L aborer for clean in g rotunda, corridors, d om e, and the o ld library p ortion of Capitol
(same acts) ..........................................................................................................* .....................................
660.00
T w o laborers in charge of p u b lic closets of the H ouse o f R epresen tatives and in the
terrace, at $720 each (same acts)........................................................................................................
1,440.00
F orew om an o f charw om en (same acts) .................................................................................................
480. 00
E ighteen charw om en (same acts) ...........................................................................................................
4 ,3 20.0 0
B u d g e t , p a g e 7*
----------------------U n d er A r ch ite c t o f th e C apitol:
C hief engin eer (same acts ) . . . ........................................................................................................
2,1 60.0 0
A ssistant engin eer and electrician (same acts) .........................................................................
1, 800. 00
T h ree assistant engineers, at $1,440 each (same acts) ............................................................
4, 320.00
T e n elevator con d u ctors, at $1 200 each (same acts) ..............................................................
12,000. 00
T w o m achinists and electricians, at $1,400 each (same acts) ..............................................
2,800. 00
F our laborers, at $720 each (same acts) .......................................................................................
2,880. 00
L aborer in charge o f Senate to ile t room s in old lib ra ry space (same acts) .....................
660. 00
A tten d a n t for se rv ice in old lib ra ry p ortion o f th e C apitol (same acts) ...........................
1 ,5 00.0 0
T o ta l.................................................................................................................... $28,120.00
F or th e S enate O ffice B u ild in g , u n der the A r ch ite c t o f the C apitol, su b je c t to th e c o n ­
trol and su pervision o f the Senate C om m ittee on R u les:
F ourteen elev ator con d u ctors, at $1,200 each (same acts) ....................................................
16, 800.00

$24,360. C
O

$28,110.00

44, 920,00

44, 920. 00

41,040. 00

T o ta l.................................................................................................................... $16,800.00
B u d g e t, page 9.
U nder A rch itect o f the C apitol (form erly Superintendent of the Capitol B u ild in g and
Grounds), 41 Stat L ., 1291:
C hief engineer (same acts) ...............................................................................................................
Four assistant engineers, at $1,440 each (same acts)...............................................................
M achinist (same acts) .........................................................................................................................
E lectricia n (same acts).............................................................................. ........................................
T w en ty-fou r elevator conductors, in clu d in g 14 for service in the H ouse Office Build*
in g, at $1,200 each, w ho shall b e under the supervision and direction of the
A rch itect o f th e C apitol (same acts) ......................................................................................... Laborer (same acts) .................................................................................................................... ........
. Three charw om en, at $240 each (same acts) ........................................................... ■...................
*

41,040. 00

110,320. 00

114, 070. 00

153,500 00

70. 000.00

2 ,1 6 0 .0 0
5, 760.00
1} 400.00
1,4 00.0 0

28, 800.00
800.00
720.00

T ota l.................................................................................................................... $41,040.00
T ota l, salaries u n d e r A r ch ite c t of th e C a p i t o l ...........................................................................................
B u d g e t, page 513.
Capitol Building and Repairs —
F or w ork at the C apitol and for general repairs thereof, in c lu d in g cleanin g and repair­
in g works o f art, flags for th e east and west fronts of th e cen ter o f the C apitol and for
S enate and H ou se O ffice B u ild in g s; flagstaffs, halyards, and ta ck le; wages of m e­
ch a n ics and laborers; p urchase and m aintenance, and d riv in g o f m otor-p ropelled ,
passenger-carrying office v e h ic le s ; and not e x c e e d in g $100 for the purchase of te ch ­
nical and necessanr reference b ook s and c it y d irectory , $60,000 (increase o f $93,500
su b m itte d ) (acts Mar. 4,1921 , vol. 41, p. 1396, sec. 1; June 16,1921 , vol. 42, p. 44, sec. 1) ............................
Employees.
Salaries:
Curator...................................... .......... per month..
Mechanician................................................... do___
Plumber......................................................... do.
Storekeeper....... ............................................ do___
Laborer.......................................................... do___
Laborer (3 hours daily).................................. do___
Wages:
Carpenters................................................. per day..
Painters.. . . .................................................. do___
Metal worker............................. ! ...................do___
Plumber......................................................... do___
Laborers......................................................... do.
Laborer {one-half time).................. ....................
Miscellaneous and temporary labor....................




Rate.

! Estimated, Estimated. Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.

I

Number.

1162.50 !
160.00 1
133.33 ,

10 0|
2 .0
70.00 '

20.00

8.40-5.50 '
8.00-6.50

8.00
8.00
3.20-2.25
1.00
3,000.00

j

1
1
1
1
1
1

3
3

1
1
1

Number.

1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2

Number.

3

$7,989.96
24,336.00

$7,989.96
13,065.54

$7,749.96
28,338.17

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

13

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

Budget, page 514.
Capitol Building and Repairs — C on tin u ed.
Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Stationery and books.............................. .......................................
Transportation..................................................................................
Material.... ............. ..................... .................. .................. ..........
Repairs................... .........................................................................
Miscellaneous.. . ................ . ............. ......................................
Marble work, 1921..............................................................................
Congress provided for special emergency repairs for 1922, and appro­
priated therefor... . ........... ..................... ............................... .
Painting dome, central portion of building, corridors, and rooms...
Special repairs to roofs and runways.................................................
Replacement of all ventilating ducts, flues, etc., on roof.......*............
Completion of marble floors, House wing of the Capitol....................
Waterproofing portico, floors and steps, main entrances Senate
and House wing, Capitol. . .
........
......................................

$200.00
1,000.00
12,500.00
10,000.00
3,974.04

31.500.00
3,250.00
31.500.00
17.250.00

$200.00
1,500.00
7.000.00
5.000.00
3,744.50

$245. IS
862.93
15,885.10
19,803.58
3,419.08
25,206.00

31,500.00

10,000.00

Total........................................................................................ 153,500.00

70,000.00

101,510.00

Improving the Capitol Grounds—
F or care and im p rov em en t of grounds surrounding th e Capitol, S enate, and H ouse Office
B uildings, p a y of one clerk , m ech an ics, gardeners, fertilizers, repairs to pavem en ts,
walks, and roadw ays (act Mar. 4 , 1921, vol. 41 , p p ■ 1396-1397 , sec. 1) ................................
Employees.
Salaries:
Landscape gardener............................. per month..
Clerk.............................................................. do___
Gardener. *....................................................do___
Laborer....................................................... -do___
Do............................................................do___
Stone mason.................................................. do---Wages:
Tree expert................................................ per day.
Laborers........................................................ do.
Miscellaneous and temporary labor....................

Rate.
5125.00
140.00

Number.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

10 0
0 .0
80.00
55.00

10 0
0 .0
3.50
3.00-1.25
1,500.00

Salaries......................................................................
Wages............... ,........................................................

Number.

1
1
1
1
1
1

$46, 000. 00

5, 000.00

Estimated, Estimated;
1923.
1922.

$40, 750. 00

5,000. 00

1, 500.00

1, 5 0 0 .0v

xpendod,
1921.
Number.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

24

24
$7,200.00
22,045.50

$7,200.00
19,002.00

*7,200.00
21,311.38

1,750.00
3.000.00

1,800.00
2.700.00

439.75
3,657.93
378.57
956.75
1,901.78
5,094.35

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Plants, seeds, sods, fertilizers....................................... .
Tools, machinery, motor trucks, motor mowers...........
Removing snow............................................................ .
Material..........................................................................
Repairs to walks, pavements, etc..................................
Trees..............................................................................
Miscellaneous and material................................. ..........
High pressure water service, hydrants, etc...................
In addition to the estimate for 1922, Congress appro­
priated for tree work, sidewalks, and pavements.......

1.000.00
2,000.00
3,000.00
754.50

1.100.00
2,000.00
700.00
300.00
948.00

3,601.13

10,250.00

Total.........................................................................................

40,750.00

46,000.00*

44,750.00

Budget, page 482.
For such trees, shrubs, plants, fertilizers, and sk illed lab or for th e grounds of the L ibrary
of Congress, as m ay b e requested b y the S u p erin ten d en t o f th e L ibrary B u ild in g
(same acts) ................................................................................................................................. .................
For such trees, shrubs, plants, fertilizers, and sk illed lab or for th e grounds of th e Capitol
and th e S enate an d H ou se O ffice B u ild in g s as m ay b e requ ested b y th e A rch itect of
th e C ap itol B u ild in g (same acts) ........................................................................................................

Budget, page 514.
Engine Bouse . and Senate and House Stables , and Maltby Building —
F or repairs and im prov em en ts to steam fire-engine house. Senate and H ouse stables, and
M altby B u ild in g , in clu d in g personal services, $1,500; this and the three foregoing
sums m ay, in the d iscre tio n o f the Secretary of the Interior, be e x p e n d e d for purchase
of articles w ith ou t reference to se ctio n 4 of the a ct a p p rov ed Jufie 17, 1910, con cern in g
purchases for e x e c u t iv e d epartm en ts (act Mar. 4, 1921 , vol. 41, p- 1397, sec. 1 ) .............
Employees.

Rate per
diem.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1922.
1923.
Number.

Number.
2

Number .

1
2

1
2
3

3

8

1
1
2
3

$800.00

$153.18

375.00
250.00
75.00

8.09
832.61
6.12

1,500.00

1,500.00

1,000.00

5
p

Wages.. .. ..................................................................

$8.40
8.00
8.00
3.20

7*%?
cn S
J e*
888

Carpenters......................... ......................................
Tinners................ .................. ..................................
Painters.............. .................. .................. .................. .
Laborers..................................... ............................... .
OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Material................ ............. .................. ................ .
Repairs................. ................................. .
Miscellaneous................................ ..............................




000.00
4 ,0 0 0 .0 0

14

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

General objcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed objcct.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

B u d g e t, p age 515.

Maintenance, Senate Office Building —
F o r m aintenance, m iscellaneous item s and supplies, and for all necessary personal and
o th er services for the care and operation of th e Senate Office B u ild in g , un der th e
d irection and su pervision of the Senate C om m ittee on K ules (act Mar, 4, 1921, vol. 41,
t p. 1427, sec. 1) ............. . . . ................................................................................................................................................. .
Furnishing , Senate Office Building —
F or furniture for th e Senate Office B u ild in g and for labor and m aterial in c id e n t thereto
and repairs thereof, w in d ow shades, awnings, carpets, glass for w indow s and b ook ­
cases, desk lam ps, w in d ow ventilators, nam e plates for doors, and com m ittee tables,
e le ctric fans, e t c . (act Mar. 4 , 1921, vol. 41, V■ 1427, sec. 1) ....... ........................................................................
Maintenance, House Office Building —
F or m aintenance, in clu d in g m iscellaneous item s, and for all necessary services (same act) .............................
Capitol Power P lant —
F or lig h tin g th e Capitol, Senate and H ou se Office B uild ings, and Congressional L ibrary
B u ild in g and the grounds ab ou t th e same, Coast and G eod etic S u rvey, th e U n ion
S tation group o f tem porary housing, B ota n ic Garden, Senate stables and engin e
house, H ou se stables, M altby B u ild in g , and fold in g and storage rooms of the Senate;
p a y o f su perin ten d en t o f meters, at the rate o f $1,600 per annum , w h o shall in sp ect all
gas and ele ctric m eters o f the G overn m en t in th e D istrict of C olum bia w ith ou t ad d i­
tional com p en sation ; for necessary personal and other services; and for m aterials and
lab or in c o n n e ctio n w ith the m aintenance and operation of th e heating, lighting, and
p ow er plant and substations co n n e cte d therew ith (same act ) ............................................ $135,000.00
F or fu el, oil, and co tto n waste, and advertisin g for the pow er plant w h ich furnishes heat
and lig h t for th e C apitol and Congressional b u ildin gs and other bu ild in gs sp ecified
in the foregoing paragraph (same act) ..............................................................................................
200,000.00

$65, 000. 00

$54,000. 00

7, 500. 00

5,000. 00

107,000. 00

76,000. 00

335,000. 00

311,000. 00

8 2 5,57 0.00

682, 570 00

3 3 ,020 .00

2 4 ,060 .00

T h is and the three foregoing appropriations shall b e e x p en d ed b y the A rch ite ct of the
C apitol un der th e su pervision and d ire ctio n o f th e com m ission in con trol of th e H ouse
Office B u ild in g , ap p oin ted un der the act a p p rov ed Mar. 4,1907, and w ith ou t reference
to section 4 of the act ap p rov ed June 17, 1910, co n cern in g purchases for e x e c u tiv e
d epartm ents. T h e D epartm ent of th e Interior, the Coast and G eod etic S u rvey, and
th e U nion S tation group of tem porary hou sing shall reim burse the C apitol pow er p lant
for current su p p lied during the fiscal year 1923, and the am ounts so reim bursed shall
b e cred ited to th e appropriations for the said p la n i and b e available for th e purposes
nam ed therein.
T o ta l, u n d e r A r ch ite c t o f th e C a p ito l.......................................................................................................
B u d g e t, page 15.

L IB R A R Y O F CONGRESS.

Salaries, Library of Congress—
G eneral adm inistration:
L ibrarian (acts Feb. 19, 1897, vol. 29 , p. 544, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 88 , p. 462 ,
sec. 1; Mar. 8 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. 1) .........................................................................
C hief assistant librarian (in crease o f $1,500 su bm itted) (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 88 ,
p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 8 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1) ...........................................................
C hief clerk (increase of $500 su bm itted) (same acts).............................................................
L ibrarian’s secretary (increase o f $420 su bm itted) (same acts) ...........................................
Assistant ch ie f clerk ( submitted ) .......................................... ........................................................
O n e stenographer and typ ew riter to ch ie f assistant librarian (submitted ) ....................
O ne assistant in charge supplies (submitted) ...........................................................................
Clerks:
O ne (increase of $160 su bm itted ) (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 88 , p. 462, sec. 1;
Mar. 8,1921, vol. 41} p. 1258, sec. 1) ................................................................................
T w o, at $1,160 each (increase of $160 each su bm itted) (same acts) ........................
Stenographers and typew riters:
O ne (increase of $160 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................................
O ne (increase of $260 su bm itted) (acts May 10, 1916, vol. 89, p. 78, sec. 1; Mar.
8 , 1921, vol. 41 , p. 1258, sec. 1) ........ .................................................................................
One m essenger (increase of $60 su bm itted) (acts July 16,1914 , vol. 88 , p . 462, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41 , p. 1258, sec. 1 ) . .....................................................................................
O n e m essenger to c h ie f assistant librarian (increase o f $60 su bm itted ) (same acts)..
O n e ju n ior m essenger (increase of $240 su bm itted ) (same acts) .........................................
O perator o f p h otograp h ic c o p y in g m ach in e (increase of $240 su b m itted ) (same acts).




7,500. 00
6,000. 00
3 ,0 0 0 .0 0
2 ,2 2 0 .0 0
2,0 0 0 .0 0
1,6 00.0 0
1,440. 00

1,360. 00
2,3 2 0 .0 0
1 , 3C0.00
1,160. 00
900.00
660. 00
660.00
840.00

15

le g is la t iv e e s ta b lis h m e n t.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,1922.
priation.

B u d g e t, page 16.

Salaries, Library of Congress— C on tin u ed.
M ail and d e liv e ry :
Assistants:
O ne in charge (in crease of $200 su bm itted) (acts Mar. 3, 1917, vol. 39, p. 1077,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. 1 ) .................................................................
C hief (increase of $160 su bm itted ) (same acts) ................................................................
One (increase o f $200 su b m itted ) (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 462, sec. 1;
Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1) ...........' ..................................................................
O ne (increase of $120 su bm itted) (acts May 10 , 1916, vol. 39, p. 73, sec. 1; Mar.
3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................................
O ne (increase of $240 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................................
One ju nior messenger, at $480 (increase of $60 su bm itted) (acts July 16, 1914, vol.
38, p . 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1) ...................................................

$1,800.00
1,3 60.0 0
1,160.00
900.00
840.00
480.00
$6, 540.00

B ibliog raph y :
Chief of d iv isio n (increase of $600 su bm itted ) (same acts) ...................................................
Assistants:
O n e (increase o f $720 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................................
O ne (increase of $660 su bm itted) (acts May 10,1916, vol. 39, p. 73, sec. 1; Mar.
3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. 1) ..........................................................................................
O ne (increase of $300 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................................
O ne (increase o f $240 su bm itted) (same acts) .......................................................................
Stenographer and typ ew riter (increase of $300 su bm itted ) (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38,
p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41. p . 1258, sec. 1) ......................... *................................
O ne ju n io r m essenger (increase of $480 su bm itted ) (same acts) .........................................
R ead in g room s (in clu d in g e v e n in g s e r v ice ) and sp e cia l co lle ctio n s:
S u p erin ten d en t (in crease of $600 su b m itte d ) (same acts ) .....................................................
Assistants:
T w o, at $2,260 e a ch (increase of $460 e a ch s u b m itte d ) (same a c ts ).. ......................
O ne in sp e cto r o f stacks ( submitted ) ......................................................................................




120,020.00

9 2 ,020 .00

2 ,8 8 0 .0 0

11 ,9 4 0 .0 0

B inding:
Assistants:
O ne in charge (increase of $120 su bm itted) (same acts) ...............................................
O ne (increase of $120 su b m itte d ) (acts May 10,1916, vol. 39, p. 73, sec. 1; Mar. 3 ,
X921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1) ........................................................ ......................................
O ne ju n io r m essenger (increase o f $60 su b m itte d ) (acts July 16 ,1914 , vol. 88 , p. 462,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921 , vol. 41, p 1258, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................

12, 380.00

3 ,1 8 0 .0 0

Catalogue, classification and shelf:
Chief of d ivision (increase of $600 su bm itted) (same acts)...................................................
C hief classifier (increase of $1,000 su bm itted) (same acts)................................................... '
Chief of shelf-listing section ( submitted) .....................................................................................
Assistants:
F our, at $2,260 each (increase of $460 each su bm itted) (acts July 16,1914 , vol. 38,
p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p ■ 1258, sec. 1) ..................................................
S even, at $1,760 each (increase of $260 each su bm itted) (same acts) ......................
Six, at $1,620 each (increase of $220 each su bm itted) (same acts) ............................
T w e lv e , at $1,620 each (increase of $420 each su bm itted) (same acts) ....................
Six, at $1,260 each (increase of $260 each su bm itted) (same acts) ............................
Fourteen, at $] ,260 each (increase of $300 each su bm itted) (saine acts) ................
Three, at $1,260 each (increase o f $340 each su bm itted) (acts May 10, 1916, vol.
39, p, 73, sec. 1; Mar . 3, 1921, vol. 41, P- 1258, sec. 1) .............................................
O ne (increase of $160 su bm itted) (same acts)...................... . ..........................................
T hirteen , at $960 each (increase o f $120 each su bm itted) (same acts) ....................
T hirteen , at $900 each (increase of $300 each su bm itted) (acts July 16,1914, vol.
38, p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1) ...........................................
F our, at $900 each (increase of $360 each su bm itted ) (same acts) ............................
O ne ju n io r m essenger (increase of $480 su bm itted ) (same acts) .........................................
F iv e ju n ior messengers, at $480 each (increase o f $60 each su bm itted) (same acts)..

$ 5 ,560 .00

17,470.00

Order and accession:
C hief of d ivision (increase of $500 su bm itted) (same acts)...................................................
, Assistants:
One (increase of $510 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................................
O ne ( submitted ) ...........................................................................................................................
O ne (increase of $160 su bm itted) (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 462, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41 , p . 1258. sec. 1) ...................................... ........................................
T hree, at $1,160 each (increase of $200 each su bm itted) (same acts) ......................
T w o, at $960 each (increase of $120 each su bm itted) (acts May 10,1916, vol. 39,
p. 73, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, see. 1) .....................................................
Tw o, at $900 each (increase of $300 each su b m itted ) (acts July 16, 1914, vol.
38, v • 462, sec. 1 : Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. l ) .............. ‘. . . ......................
' O ne (increase of $320 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................................
One ju n ior m essenger (increase o f $480 su bm itted ) (same acts) .......................................
One ju n ior m essenger (increase of $60 su b m itted ) (same acts) ...........................................

8 .6 4 0 .0 0

3,000.00
2,010.00
1, 620.00
1,3 60.0 0
3 ,4 80.0 0
1, 920.00
1, 800.00
900.00
900.00
480.00

3,6 00.0 0
3,000.00
1,760.00

9,040.00
12,320. 00
9,720. 00
19,440.00
7, 560.00
17, 640. 00
3,7 80.0 0
1,0 80.0 0
12,480.00
11, 700.00
3,600. 00
900.00
2 , 400.00

1,6 2 0 .0 0
1,0 80.0 0
480.00

3,6 00.0 0
2,2 20.0 0
1,620.00
1,2 60.0 0
1,0 80.0 0
1,2 60.0 0
900.00

3, 600.00
4 ,5 2 0 .0 0
1 .5 6 0 .0 0

16

t h e a lt e r n a t iv e b u d g et,

1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the liscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro*
1922.
priation.

B u d g et, page 17.

Salaries, Library of Congress— C ontinu ed.
R e a d in g room s— C on tin u ed.
A ssistants— C on tin u ed.
O ne in room for the b lin d (increase of $420 su b m itted ) (acts July 3,1918, vol. 40 ,
p. 765 , sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41 , p . 1258, sec. 1 ) ...................................................
Six, at $1,360 each (increase o f $160 each su bm itted) (same acts ) .........................
T hree, at $1,200 each (increase o f $200 each su bm itted) (same acts ) ......................
T w o, at charging desk at $1,160 each (increase of $80 each su b m itted ) (acts
July 16, 1914 , vol. 88 , p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p . *25$, sec. i ) ____
F iv e , at $1,080 each (in clu d in g one for Tonor library and one for W ashington
lib ra ry ) (increase of $120 each su b m itted ) (acts May 10 , 1916, vol. 39, p. 73,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. 1) .................................................................
One in room for the b lin d (increase of $180 su bm itted) (acts Mar. 3, 1917, vol.
39, p . 1077, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. 1) ..........................................
Three, at $960 each (increase of $120 each su bm itted) (acts May 10, 1916, vol.
39, p . 73, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41 , p* 1258, sec. 1) ..............................................
T w en ty-seven , at $900 each (increase o f $60 each su bm itted) (same acts) ............
S ix, at $840 each (increase o f $240 each su b m itted ) (same acts) ...........................*
T w o, at $840 each (submitted) .............................................................................. ................
O ne stenographer and typ ew riter at $1,160 (increase of $200 su bm itted ) (acts July 16,
1914, vol. 38, p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. 1) ...................... ..........
A tten d an ts:
Senate reading room , one (increase of $120 su b m itted ) (acts May 10, 1916, vol.
39, p. 73, sec. 1; Mar . 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. 1 ) ..............................................
R ep resen ta tives’ reading room, one (increase of $120 su bm itted) (acts July 16,
1914, vol. 38, p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1 ) ........................
R ep re se n ta tiv e s’ reading room , one (increase of $60 su bm itted ) (acts May 10,
1916, vol. 39, p. 73, sec. 1; Mar . 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1 ) . . •...................
T w o in clo a k room , at $840 each (increase of $60 each su bm itted) (same acts) ___
T w o for gallery and alcoves, at $840 e a ch (increase of $300 each su b m itted ) (acts
July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1 ) ____
One telep h on e reference assistant (increase of $240 su b m itted ) (acts July 3 , 1918,
vol. 40 , p. 765, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1258, sec. 1 ) ............................................
F our ju n ior messengers, at $480 each (increase of $60 each su bm itted) (acts July 16,
1914, vol. 38, p . 462, sec. 1 ; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1 ) .................................
T w o w atchm en, at $840 each (increase of $60 each su bm itted) (acts May 10, 1916,
vol. 39, p. 73, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1258, sec. 1 ) ..............................................

$1, 620.00
8 , 1G0.00
3, 600.00
2, 320.00

5, 400.00
1, 080.00
2,
24,
5,
1,

880.00
300.00
040.00
680.00

1 ,1 6 0 .0 0

1, 080.00
1, 080.00
900.00
1, 680.00
1, 680.00
960.00
1, 920.00
1, 680.00
$77, 900.00

M anuscript:
C hief of d iv is io n (in crease of $600 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................
Assistants:
C hief (increase of $720 su bm itted) (same acts) ................................................................
O ne (in crease of $300 su bm itted ) (same acts)...................................................................
O ne ju n ior m essenger (increase of $240 su bm itted ) (same acts) .........................................




11,420 00

11,270.00

D ocum ents:
C hief of d iv is io n (increase o f $600 su bm itted ) (same acts) ...................................................
Assistants:
O ne (in crease of $510 su b m itte d ) (same a d s) ...................................................................
O ne (in crease of $120 su bm itted ) (acts May 10 , 1916, vol. 39. p. 73, sec. 1; Mar.
3 , 1921. vol. 41, p. 1259, sec. 1) .........................................................................................
O ne translator (increase of $420 su bm itted ) (acts Mar. 1 , 1919, vol. 40, p. 1220,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1259, sec. 1) .........................................................................
O ne translator (increase o f $240 su b m itte d ) (same acts).......................................................
O ne stenographer and typ ew riter (increase of $200 su bm itted) (acts May 10, 1916,
vol. 39, p. 73, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41 , p. 1259, sec. 1 ) .............................................
O ne ju n ior m essenger (increase of $60 su bm itted ) (acts July 16,1914 , vol. 38, p. 462,
sec. 1; Mar 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................

$64, 980.00

1 5,110.00

P e rio d ica l (in clu d in g even in g serv ice):
C hief of d iv is io n (increase of $1,000 su bm itted ) (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 462 .
sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................
Assistants:
C hief (increase o f $510 su bm itted) (same acts) ................................................................
T w o, at $1,260 each (increase o f $300 e a ch su bm itted) (acts May 10 , 1916, vol.
39, p . 73, sec. 1 ; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1259, sec. 1) .............................................
O ne (in crease of $420 su bm itted ) (same acts) ...................................................................
T hree, at $1,080 each (increase o f $240 each su bm itted) (same acts) ......................
O ne (in crease of $120 su b m itted ) (same acts) ...................................................................
O ne stenographer and typ ew riter (in crease of $200 su b m itted ) (acts July 16, 1914 ,
vol. 38j p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921 , vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1 ) ...................................... *.
T w o ju n io r m essengers, a t $480 each (in crease of $60 each su b m itted ) (same acts)..

9 ,1 20.0 0

7, 740.00

5 ,8 80.0 0

3 ,0 0 0 .0 0
2 ,0 1 0 .0 0
2, 520.00
1 ,2 6 0 .0 0
3 ,2 4 0 .0 0
960.00
1 ,1 6 0 .0 0
960.00

3, 600.00
2 ,0 1 0 .0 0
960.00
1, 620.00
1 ,4 40.0 0
1,160. 00
480. 00

3 ,6 00.0 0
2 ,2 20.0 0
j , 260.00
660.00

17

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj thejiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required /or each detailed object.

Total amount to Le Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 3o,
priation.
1922.

Budget, page 18.
Salaries, Library o f Congress— C on tin u ed.
Maps and charts:
C hief of d ivision (in crease of $600 su bm itted) ( acts July 16,1914 , vol. 38, p . 462,
sec. 1; Mar. S , 1921, vol. 41 , p . 1259, sec. 1) ........................................................................
Assistants:
O ne (increase of $510 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................................
O ne (increase of $300 su bm itted ) (same acts)...................................................................
O ne (increase o f $120 su bm itted) ( same acts) ...................................................................
O n e (in crease of $120 su b m itted ) ( acts May 10 , 1916, vol. 39, p . 74, sec. 1; Mar.
8 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................................
O ne ju n ior m essenger, at $660 (in crease of $240 su bm itted ) ( acts July 16, 1914 ,
vol. 38, p 463, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1) ...........................................

[
■
$3, 600.00
2,0 10.0 0
1,2 60.0 0
1,080. 00
960.00
660.00
$9, 570.00

S em itic, S la v ic, and O riental literature:
C hief of d iv is io n , at $3,000 (same acts) ........................................................................................
Assistants:
O ne (in crease o f $1,500 su b m itte d ) (saTne acts) ...............................................................
T w o, at $ 1 ,6 2 0 e a ch (su bm itted).. ........................................................................................
One (increase of $180 su b m itte d (acts July 16 ,1914 , vol. 38, p . 463, sec. 1; Mar.
3 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 1259, sec. 1 ) ..........................................................................................
One ju n ior m essenger (in crease o f $60 su b m itte d ) (same acts) ...........................................

5, 840.00

12, 520.00

Law library:
L aw librarian (increase of $600 su bm itted ) (same acts) .........................................................
One stenographer and typ ew riter (submitted) ..........................................................................
Assistants:
T w o, at $1,560 e a ch (increase of $160 each su bm itted (acts July 16, 1914, vol.
38, p . 463, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p • 1259, sec. 1) .........................................
O ne in c r e a s e o f $300 su b m itted ) (same acts) ...................................................................
One (increase of $240 su b m itted ) (same acts) ...................................................................
One (increase of $240 su b m itted ) (same acts) ...................................................................
One for e v e n in g se rv ice (increase of $260 su bm itted ) (same acts) ............................

4, 260.00

6, 510.00

Congressional reference lib ra ry :
Custodian (increase o f $250 su bm itted ) (same acts)................................................................
Assistants:
One (increase of $60 su b m itte d ) (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p . 463 , sec. 1; Mar .
3, 1921, vol. 41 , p . 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................................
One (increase of $120 su b m itted ) (acts May 10,1916 , vol. 39, p. 74, sec. 1; Mar.
3, 1921, vol. 41, V‘ 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................................
One (increase of $120 su bm itted ) (same acts) ...................................................................
T w o ju n io r messengers, at $480 each (increase of $60 each su bm itted ) (acts July 16,
1914, vol. 38, p. 463, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p • 1259, sec. 1) ................................

5. 840.00

5, 640.00

S m ithsonian d ep osit:
C ustodian (increase o f $510 su b m itte d ) (same acts) ................................................................
Assistants:
One (increase o f $510 su b m itted ) (same acts) ..........................................................
One (increase of $120 su bm itted ) (acts July 3 , 1918, vol. 40, p . 766, sec. 1; Mar .
3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................................
One ju n ior m essenger (increase of $240 su bm itted ) (acts July 16 ,1914, vol. 38, p. 463 ,
sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41 , p. 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................

7, 600 00

8, 430.00

P rints:
C hief o f d iv is io n (increase o f $1,000 su b m itte d ) (same acts) ......................
Assistants:
One (increase of $510 su b m itted ) (same acts) ..........................................
T w o, at $1,260 e a ch (increase of $300 each su bm itted ) ( same acts).
One ju n ior m essenger (increase o f $480 su bm itted ) ( same acts) ...............

$ 7 ,680.00

9, 590.00

M usic:
C hief of d iv isio n (increase of $600 su bm itted ) ( same acts) ...................................................
Assistants:
O ne (increase of $510 su bm itted ) ( same acts) ................................ .................................
O ne (increase of $160 su bm itted) (same acts) ...................................................................
T w o , at $960 each (increase of $120 each su bm itted ) ( ants May 10, 1916, vol. 39,
p. 74, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1) ........ ............................................
One ju n ior messenger (increase of $480 su bm itted) (acts July 16 ,1914, vol. 38, p. 463,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1259, sec. 1) ........................ '...............................................

9 ,4 0 0 .0 0

3,6 00.0 0
2,0 10.0 0
1,1 60.0 0

1, 920.00
900.00

3, 000.00

2, 010.00
2, 520.00
900.00

2, 010.00
2, 010.00
960.00
660.00

2,2 5 0 .0 0

1, 260.00
1.0 8 0 .0 0
960.00
960.00

3, 600.00
1 ,1 6 0 .0 0

3 ,1 2 0 .0 0
1, 260.00
840.00
780.00
1, 760.00

3 .0 0 0 .0 0
3 .0 0 0 .0 0
3, 240.00
1,0 8 0 .0 0
*480.00
10 ,800 .00

Salaries, L ibrary o f Congress p ro p e r.
77891— 21------- 2




5 ,8 2 0 .0 0

367, 250.00

283, 380.00

18

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service o j the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of approending June 30,
priation.
1922.

B u d g e t , p a g e 1!).

Salaries , Library of Congress— C ontinu ed.
C opyright Office:
‘R egister (increase o f $500 su bm itted) (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 86S, sec. 1; Mar.
3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, stc. 1 ) ................................................................................................
Assistant register (increase o f $300 su bm itted) (same acts) ...........‘ .....................................
C hief clerk (s u b m itte d )...................................................................................................................
Clerks:
Four, at $2,260 each (increase of $260 each su bm itted) acts July 16 , 1914, vol. 38,
p. 463 , sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41 , p . 1259, sec. 1 ) ..................................................
Four, at $1,800 each (same acts) ...........................................................................................
T w o, at $1,760 each (increase of $160 each su bm itted) (same acts) .........................
F iv e , at $1,620 each (increase of $20 each su bm itted ) (same acts) ...........................
O ne (in crease o f $120 su bm itted ) (same acts) ..................................................................
E ig h t, at $1,560 each (increase o f $160 each su bm itted ) (same a cts) .......................
T en , at $1,360 each (increase of $160 each su bm itted) (same acts) ....... ..................
T en, at $1,160 each (increase o f $160 each su bm itted) {same acts) ..........................
E ig h teen , at $1,080 each (increase of $120 each su bm itted) (acts May 10,1916 ,
vol. 39 , p. 74, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1) ......................................
T w o, at $960 each (increase o f $100 each su bm itted) (same acts) ..............................
T en, at $900 each (increase of $120 each su bm itted ) (same acts) ..............................
Four, at $900 each (increase o f $300 each su bm itted ) (same acts) ............................
One (increase of $420 su bm itted ) (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 463, sec. 1; Mar.
3, 19217 vol. 41, p. 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................................
One (same acts) ...........................................................................................................................
F our ju n ior messengers, at $480 each (increase of $60 each su bm itted) (acts Mar. 3 ,
1917, vol. 39, p. 1078 , sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1 ) . . ........................
Arrears, sp ecial serv ice:
Three clerks, at $1,360 each (increase o f $160 each su bm itted) (acts July 16, 1914,
vol. 38, p . 463, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1) ........................................
O ne porter (increase o f $120 su b m itted ) (acts May 10, 1916, vol. 39 , p. 74, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1) ......................................................................................
O ne ju n ior m essenger (increase of $60 su bm itted ) (acts Mar. 3 , 1917, vol. 39 , p.
1078, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259, sec. 1) ............................................ , ................

$4,500. 00
3,300. 00
2 ,4 6 0 .0 0

9 ,0 4 0 .0 0
7 ,2 0 0 .0 0
3 ,5 2 0 .0 0
8 ,1 0 0 .0 0
1 ,6 2 0 .0 0
12,480 .00
1 3 ,600 .00
1 1 ,600 .00
1 9 ,440 .00
1,9 20.0 0
9 ,0 0 0 .0 0
3 ,6 0 0 .0 0
900. 00
480.00
1,920. 00

4 ,0 8 0 .0 0
900. 00
480. 00
$120,140.00

T otal salaries, L ibrary o f Congress an d C oypright O ffice...........................................................................
L egislative R e fe re n ce : T o en a ble the Librarian of Congress to em p lo y com p eten t persons
to gather, classify, and m ake available, in tra n sla tio n , in d ex es, digests, com pilations,
and b u lletin s, and otherwise, data for or bearin g u p on legislation, and to render su ch
d ata serv icea ble to Congress an d com m ittees and M em bers thereof, $45,000 (increase
o f $20,000 su b m itte d ) (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 462, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41 .
p. 1259, sec. 1 ) ......................................................................................................................................................................
(1) The approximate number of persons intended to be employed and the rate of compensation to each
are given below. It is proposed that the grades for 1923 shall be as follows:
Director, $5,000.
legislative assistant, $3,000 to $4,000.
Chief ind exers and compilers (United States, British and foreien law section). $2,000 to $3,000.
Administ rative assistants, $2,000 to $3,000.
Reviser of translators, $1,800 to $2,500.
Research assistants:
Senior, $1,800 to $2,500.
Junior, $1,200 to $1,700.
Law clerks:
Senior, $1,800 to $2,000.
Juhior, $1,400 to $1,600.
State law clerk, $1,600 to $1,800.
Indexers and compilers:
Senior, $1,600 to $2,000.
Junior, $900 to $1,500.
Translators:
Senior, $1,^00 to $1,800.
Junior, $1,200 to $1,500.
Bill digest clerk, $1,200 to $1,500.
Stenographers:
Senior, $1,200 to $1,500.
Junior, $900 to $1,100.
Typist:
Senior, $1,080.
Junior, $840 to $900.
Administrative clerk, $1,400 to $1,500.
Clerical assistants, $660 to $lt320.
Operators, photo and other duplicating machines, $S40 to $1,200.
Messengers;
Senior, $780 to $S40.
Junior, $420 to $600.
There will also be some special contract services paid for under special arrangement.




$104,740.00

4 8 7,39 0.00

388,120.00

4 5 ,000 .00

25 ,000 .00

19

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

B u d g e t, page 2 0 .

Salaries , Library o f Congress— C on tin u ed .
L egislative R e fe re n ce — C on tin u ed.
(2) The force in part increases or diminishes in response to the number and character of the calls
from Congress. The statement given below shows the staff at its maximum:
Rate.

Director............................................per annum. $5,000
Legislative assistant................................... do—
3.000
Research assistants:
.0 0
Senior................................................... d o .... 2 0
1,800
Do..................................................do..
1,600
Junior................................................... d o..
1.400
Do..................................................do..
Law clerks:
Senior................................................... do___ 2,000
Do..................................................do___ 1,900
D o..................................................do___ 1,800
Indexers and compilers:
1,600
Senior................................................... do—
Junior................................................... do___ 1.400
Do.................................................. do___ 1,300
,2 0
Do..................................................do___ 1 0
Do..................................................do----- 1,080
Stenographers, junior................................. do___ 1,080
Administrative clerks___*
..........................do___ 1.400
Clerical assistants:
0
Senior................................................... do___ 1,2 0
D o................................................ .do___ 1,080
Operator in charge photo-duplicating machine
...................................................... per annum.. 1 00
,2
Assistants at salaries of less than $1,000 and
special assistants during session of Congress___
Total.................................. .........................
Salaries.................................................................

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

Expended,
1921.

Number.

Employees.

Number.

Number.

1
1
1
1
1
1
3

1
1

35
$45,000

18
$25,000

23
i $30,814.52

i Amount In excess of appropriation covered by deficiency appropriation of $6,500, approved Mar.
1,1921.
D istribution o f card in d e x e s;
F or s ervices in co n n e ctio n w ith d istribu tion o f card in d e x es and other p u b lica tion s
o f th e L ib r a iy :
C hief o f d iv is io n '(increase o f $600 su b m itte d ) (acts June 28, 1902, vol. 32, p.
480, sec. 1; Mar. 4 , 1915, vol. 88 , p . 1005, sec. 1; Mar. 8,1921 , vol. 41 , p . 1259,
sec. 1) ........................; ............................................................................................ ...................
C hief assistant (increase o f $210 subm itted).(sam e acts) ...............................................
Assistants:
T w o, at $1,860 each (increase o f $260 each su bm itted ) (acts Mar. 8 , 1917,
vol. 89, p . 1078, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, f - 1259, sec. 1 ) .........................
T w o , at $1,760 each (in crease of $260 each su b m itted ) (acts Mar. 4,1915, vol.
88 , p. 1005, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41 , p . 1259, sec. 1 ) ..................................
O n e (same acts) ...................................................................................................................
O n e (submitted) ....................................................................................... ...........................
T hree, at $1,440 each (increase of $40 each su b m itted ) (acts Mar. 8 , 1917 ,
vol. 89, p . 1078, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p • 1259, sec. 1) .........................
F our, at $1,360 each (increase o f $160 each su b m itted ) (same acts) ................
T w o, at $1,310 each (increase o f $210 each su bm itted ) (acts May 10 , 1916,
vol. 39, p. 74, sec. 1; Mar. 8 , 1921, vol. £ 1 , p. 1259, sec. 1) ........................... *
T w o , at $1,260 each (in crease o f $160 each su b m itted ) (same acts) ..................
F our, at $1,260 each (in crease o f $260 e a ch su b m itted ) (same acts) ................




$3,600. 00
2,010. 00

3,7 20.0 0
3 ,5 2 0 .0 0
1,5 00.0 0
1,6 20.0 0
4 ,3 2 0 .0 0
5,4 4 0 .0 0
2 ,6 2 0 .0 0
2 ,5 2 0 .0 0
5,040. 00

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

20

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

general object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

B u d g e t, page 21.

Salaries , Library of Congress— C ontinu ed.
D istrib u tio n o f card in d e x e s— C on tin u ed.
F or services o f assistants at salaries less than $1,100 p er annum and for p iecew ork
and w ork b y the hour, $24,000, in c lu d in g not e x ceed in g $500 for freight charges,
expressage, postage , traveling expenses con n ected w ith such d istribu tion , and
expenses o f atten d ance at m eetings w h en incurred on the w ritten au th ority and
d irection o f the Librarian (increase of $3,000 su bm itted) (acts of May 10,1916 ,
vol. 39, p . 74, sec. 1; Mar. 8 , 1921, vol. 41, p- 1259, sec. 1) ..............................................

$24,000.00
$59, 910.00

Estimated,
1923.

Employees.
Salaries:
Assistants, $420 to $996 per annum (to $1,100in 1923).
Piecework and work by the hour (35 to 70 cents per
hour; one-half cent for each typewritten heading;
16 cents per thousand for sorting cards; 85 cents
per thousand for alphabetizing cards; $0.00051 to
$0,002 per card for drawing cards)..........................
Assistants, $420 to $996 per annum (to $1,100in 1923)..
Piecework and work by the hour..............................
General objects of expenditure: Travel expenses, freight
charges, postage, etc.....................................................

Estimated,
1922.
Number.

Number.

3 ,0 0 0 .0 0

2,500. 00

1 ,3 2 0 .0 0

960.00

Expended,
1921.

Number .

$50.900.00

26

25

25

* 16

14

14

$17,500
6,300

$15,900
5,000

$17,850.07
6,503.05

200

100

111.97

24,000

21,000

124,465.09

i Amount in excess of appropriation ($21,000 plus credits) covered by appropriation made in
deficiencies act, approved June 16,1921 ($2,700).
T em porary services: F or special an d tem porary service, in clu d in g extra special serv­
ice s of regular em ployees at the discretion o f the Librarian, $3,000 (increase of $500
su bm itted) (acts Feb. 24, 1899, vol. 8 U p. 95, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1259,
sec. 1 ) ........................................................................................... .................................................................
(1) It is not feasible at this time to estimate the number of persons intended to be employed and the rate
of compensation to each. The number increases and diminishes as the necessity requires.
(2) During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1921, the following number of persons were employed at the
rates of compensation indicated below:
Rate.
Personal service (salaries):
$1,400.00
Per ft’nniim............................. .............
840.00
Do................. ........................................
720.00
Do.............................................................
660.00
Do...................................................
600.00
Do..............................................................
540.00
Do..............................................................
480.00
Do.............................................................
420.00
Do..............................................................
125.00
Per month............................................ ...........
100.00
Do......................... ...................................
55.00
Do..............................................................
50.00
Do................... ........................................ .
6.00
Per diem..........................................................
3.00
Do..............................................................
1.83
Do......................... v ............................... .
.75
Per hour...........................................................
.70
Do..............................................................
.50
Do..............................................................
.40
Do.................................................... .........
13.67
Agreed price for certain piece oi work....................
63.13
Do....................................................................

Expended,
1921.
Number.

Estimate,
1923.

Estimate,
1922.

1
3
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
4
1
1
1

$2,500.00

$3,000.00

$2,500.00

Carrier serv ice: F o r serv ice in c o n n e ctio n w ith the Senate an d H ouse Office B uildings,
$1,320, or so m u c h thereof as m a y b e necessary (increase o f $360 su b m itted ) (acts Mar.
4, 1909, vol. 39 , p . 936 1 sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 1260 , sec. 1) ......................................

Employed.

Rate per
annum.

Messengers.............................................................. $420-$720
Salaries.. ...................... ......................................
2 to 4 part tim&




Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

Expended,
1921.

Number.

Number .

Number.

12

$1,320.00

12

$960.00

12

$943.67

21

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriation required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Larpe, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed objcct.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

for the fccal. year
ending June 30,
1922.

Budget, pa^e 22.
Salaries * Library o f Congress— C on tin u ed.
Sun day o p e n in g : T o en a ble th e L ib ra ry o f Congress to b e k e p t op en for reference use
on Sun days and legal h olid a y s, w ith in the discretion o f th e Librarian, in clu d in g the
extra services o f em p loy ees and th e services of ad d ition a l em p loy ees un der the L ibra­
rian, $13,125, o f w h ich $625 shall b e im m e d ia te ly available, or so m u ch thereof as m ay
b e necessary (in crease o f $3,125 su b m itted ) (acfs A p r . 28, 1902, to l. 32 , p. 130, sec. 1;
Mar. 3t 1921, voL 41, p. 1260, sec. 1) ................................................................. . .............................

Employees.

Salary
Estimated,
per diem.
1923.
Number.

In charge..
Assistants.
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do*___
Do......

1$7.00
1 3.75

10.00
9.00
8.25
7.75
6.75
7.50
6.50

1
1
2
1

Estimated,
1922.

477,480.00

110,000.00

100,000.00

1
'*5

5.00
5.50
4.50
5.00
4.00
4.50
3.50
4.00
3.00
3.75
2.75
3.50
2* 50
4.00

'*4
"i

,.’i
'i9
"i

...

2.00
3.00
2.00

“i
*2
*‘i

12.00

**i

3.00
»2.50
2.50

...

1.50
*1.25

50

47

47

$13,125

Total..

60 9,74 5.00

Number.

1
1
2

6.00

Do.......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do......
Do...... .
Do........
Do...... .
Do...... .
Do......
Do...... .
Do.___

$10,000.00

Expended,
1921.

Number.

$1 3,125.00

*$9,899.25

*$10,100.75

1Serves five-eighths of a day.
1Serves one-fourth of a day.
* $100.75 expended in fiscafyear 1921 from $625 immediately available offiscalyear 1922.
N o te.—The basis of compensation is the rate paid in the particular position on the regular working
roll, plus an allowance (“ time and half-time'’ ), recognizing the fact that the serviceis for Sunday and
holidays. The above is the maximum number employed at any one time. This number decreases
when the need of the service permits.
T o ta l salaries, L ib ra ry o f Congress....................................................................................................................

Increase o f Library o f Congress—
P urchase o f bo o k s: F or purch ase o f book s for the L ibrary, in c lu d in g p a y m en t in ad van ce
for su bscrip tion books, an d so cie ty p u b lica tio n s, an d for freight, com m issions, and
travelin g expen ses, a n d all other ex pen ses in c id e n ta l to the acq u isition o f book s b y
purchase, g ift, b e q u e st, or ex ch an ge, to co n tin u e availa ble during th e fiscal year
1924, $100,000 (in crease o f $10,000 su b m itte d ), together w ith the u n e x p e n d e d balance
o f th e sum ap p rop riated for th is o b je c t for th e fiscal y ea r 1922 (acts Feb. 19t 1897,
vol. 29, p. 544 , sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1260, sec. 1) ....................................................
L aw book s:
F or p urch ase o f b o o k s an d for p eriod ica ls for the law lib ra ry , u n d er th e d irection
o f th e C hief J u stice (same acts) ..............................................................................................
F or purch ase o f n e w b ook s o f reference for the S uprem e Court, to b e a part o f the
L ibrary o f Congress, an d p u rch ased b y the m arshal o f the Suprem e Court, un der
the d ire ctio n of th e C hief Ju stice (same acts) ....................................................... ............ ..
P eriod icals an d new spapers: F or purch ase o f m iscellaneous p eriod ica ls an d new spapers
(same acts) ...................................................................................................................................................

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

Expended,
1921.

Books, law books, periodicals and newspapers......................... i $104,800.00
2,600.00
Freight, expressage, etc.......................................... ...............
.............. ............................. . . . ...................
Travel expenses.
600.00

i $94,900.00
2,500.00
600.00

n $94,918.22
2,500.00
581.78

108,000.00

98,ooaoo

98,000.00

Designation.

1Does not include new books of reference for the Supreme Court (1923, $2,000 :1922, $2,000; 1921, $2,000).
* Including outstanding orders.




$1 00,000.00

3 ,0 0 0 .0 0

2 ,0 0 0 .0 0
5 ,0 0 0 .0 0

22

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service of the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at I.arge, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

Budget, page 23.
Contingent Expenses, Library o f Congress—
F o r m iscella n eou s and c o n tin g e n t expenses, stationery, supplies, stock, and m aterial
d ir e c tly p u rch ased , m iscellaneous tra velin g expenses, postage, transportation,
in cid e n ta l expen ses c o n n e cte d w ith the adm inistration o f the L ibrary and the C opy­
righ t Office, in c lu d in g n o t e x ce e d in g $500 for expenses o f atten d ance at m eetings
w h en in cu rre d o n th e w ritten au th ority and d irection of the L ibrarian , $10,000
(in crease o f $2,000 su b m itte d ) (acts Feb. 19, 1897, vol. 29, p. 544, see. 1; Mar. S, 1921,
vol. 4 U v. 1260. sec. VI............................................................................................................................

Object of expenditure.
Stationery supplies..........................................................
Typewriter supplies........................................................
Rubber stamps, dies, presses, and numbering machines
Travel expenses..............................................................
Street car tokens.............................................................
Telegrams and long-distance telephone messages...........
Postage stamps and international postal cards...............
Transfer charges (expressage, etc.)........................ *........
Post-office box rent.........................................................
Tools................................................................................
Mail bag and repairs........................................................
Duplicator supplies.........................................................
Photostat paper and developing powders.......................
Miscellaneous photostat supplies.............................. .

Estimated
1923.
700.00
450.00
150.00

20 0
0 .0
150.00
20.00
350.00
1.00
16.00
10.00
46.00
20 .0
00
700.00
7.00

10,000.00

Estimated
1922.
$5,097.00
290.00
300.00
250.00
115.00
10.00
237.00
10.00
16.00
5.00
45.00
75.00
1,500.00
50.00

8,000.00 |

$10,000.00

Expended
•1921.
$5,573.71
333.58
381.55
287.92
118.50
10.77
337.00
13.18
16.00
7.50
121.49
1,768.71
56.20
19,026.11

1 Amount in excess of appropriation ($26.11) covered by credits: $29.15 on account of sales of photo
duplications to Government Institutions and $18.94 through return of photostat spools.

Care and Maintenance, Library o f Congress—
C ustody, care, and m aintenance o f th e L ibrary B u ild in g and G rounds:
F or S u p erin ten d en t o f th e L ibrary B u ild in g and G rounds (acts Feb. 19, 1897, vol.

29, p. 545, sec. 1; Mar. 4, 1915, vol. 38, p. 1006, sec. 1; Mar. S, 1917, vol. 39, p.
1079, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1260, sec. 1) ..............................................................

,

C lerks:
O ne (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 464, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1260,
sec. 1) ......................................................................................................................................
O ne (same acts) ............................................................................................................................
O ne (same acts) ............................................................................................................................
O ne (same acts ) ...........................................................................................................................
O ne prop erty clerk (acts May 10, 1916, vol. 39, pp. 73, 74, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol.
41, p . 1260, sec. 1) ...........................................................................................................................
One m essenger (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 464, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p1260, sec. 1) .......................................................................................................................................
O ne assistant m essenger (same acts) .............................................................................................
T h ree te lep h on e sw itchboard operators, at $720 each (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38,

p. 464, sec. 1; May 29, 1920, vol. 41, pp- 639-640, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p1260, sec. 1) .......................................................................................................................................
O ne captain o f w atch (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 464, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol.
41 , p . 1260, sec. 1) ...........................................................................................................................
T w o lieutenants o f th e w atch, at $1,000 each (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 464, sec.
1; Mar. 1 , 1919, vol. 40 , p. 1221, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p * 1260, sec. 1) ____
T w en ty -tw o w atchm en, at $900 each (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 464, sec. 1; Mar.
3 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 1260, sec. 1) ..................................................................................................
T w o carpenters, at $900 each (same acts) ................................................... ...............................
O n e d ecorator (acts May 29, 1920, vol. 41, pp. 639-640, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1260, sec. 1) ..................................................................................................................................
O n e painter (acts July 16 ,1914, vol. 38, p . 464, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, p • 1260,
sec. 1) ...................................................................................................................................................
O n e forem an o f laborers (same acts) ..............................................................................................
S ix te e n laborers, at $660 each (same acts) ..................................................................................
O n e b o o k clea n er (act Mar. 3, 1921 , vol. 41, p . 1260, sec. 1 ) ...............................................
O ne laundress (acts May 29, 1920, vol. 41, pp- 639-640 , sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1260, sec. 1) ......................................................................................................................... ........
T w o attendants in la d ie s’ rooija, at $480 each (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 464, sec.
1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 1260, sec. 1) ..................................................................................
F ou r c h e c k b o y s, at $360 each (same acts) .................................................................................
O n e mistress o f ch arw om en (same acts) .......................................................................................
O n e assistant mistress o f ch arw om en (same acts) ........................ ............................................
F ifty -e ig h t charw om en, at $240 each (same acts) ....................................................................
O n e c h ie f en gin eer (same acts).......................................................................................................
O n e assistant en gin eer (same acts) ................................................................................................
T h ree assistant engineers, at $900 each (same acts)................................................................
O n e e lectrician (same acts) ...............................................................................................................
O n e m ach in ist (same acts) ................................................................................................................
O n e m ach in ist (same acts) ................................................................................................................




$3, 600. 00

2,000. 00
1, 600. 00
1,400. 00
1 ,0 00.0 0
900. 00
840.00
720. 00

2,1 6 0 .0 0
1,4 00.0 0
2,000. 00
19,800. 00
1,8 00.0 0
1,4 0 0 .0 0
900.00
900. 00
10,560 .00
720.00
660.00
960.00
1,4 4 0 .0 0
425.00
300.00
13,920.00
1 ,5 00.0 0
1 ,2 00.0 0
2,7 0 0 .0 0
1,5 00.0 0
1,0 00.0 0
900.00

$8,000.00

23

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates o j appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated *
appropriated under
for the' fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

B u d g e t, page 24 .

Care and Maintenance, Library of Congress— C ontinu ed.
C ustody, care, and m aintenance o f the L ibrary B u ild in g an d G rounds— C ontinued.
T w o w irem en, at $900 each (acts July 16, 1914: vol. 38, p . 464; sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921.
vol. 41 , 7>. 1260, sec. J ) . ....................................................................................................... ........
One p lu m ber (same a c ts ) ................................................................................................................
F our elevator con d u ctors (on e ad d itional su bm itted ), at $720 each (same a cts) .........
T en skilled laborers, at $720 each {same acts) ..........................................................................

$1,800.
900.
2,880.
7,200.

00
00
00
00
$92,985. 00

$92,26 5.00

3 ,0 0 0 .0 0

3,000. 00

1 6 ,000 .00

16 ,0 0 0 .0 0

N ote.—One additional elevator conductor submitted. There are three large main passenger ele­
vators, one of which must be in operation from 8 a.m. to 10 p. m. (two shifts) and one from 8 a.m.

to 4.30 p. ra. The necassity of simultaneously operating all three elevators at times now requires
temporary detail of unskilled operators. This is dangerous to machinery and to passengers.
Sunday Opening, Building fo r Library of Congress—
F or extra services o f em ployees and ad d ition a l em ployees under the superintendent to
p ro v id e for the op en in g o f the L ibrary B u ild in g from 2 u n til 10 o ’ clo ck post-m eridian
on S undays and legal h olid ay s (acts A p r. 28, 1902, vol. 32 , p. 131, sec. 1; July 16,
1914, vol. 38, p. 4&4, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1260, sec. 1) ..........................................

Salaries:
Telephone operator.....................
Captain or lieutenant of watch. ..
Watchmen..................................
Attendant...................................
Check boys.....................................
Mistress charwomen or assistant...
Charwomen.................................
Miscellaneous temporary service.
Wages:
Chief and assistant engineers...........
hi<
Electrician or wireman.,.................
Wireman or skilled laborer..............
Elevator conductor..........................
Skilled laborer and laborer..............
Miscellaneous and temporary labor..

Rates.

82.23
.33-3.09
2.23
1.48

11
.1
1 31- .93

.74
2.23-1. 11- .74

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated.
1922.

Number.

Employees (1921,58 days; 1922,57 days; 1923,
57 days).

Number.

1
1
4
1
2
1
1
2

1
1
4
1
2
1
1
0

Expended,
1921.
N umbet .

1
1
1
2
1
1
0
4

5

4.64-3. 71-2.79
4. 64-2.79
2 79-2.23
.
2.23
23-1.66
23-1.66
*1,650.00
1,350.00

Total.

SI, 650.00
1,350.00

51,626.05
1,320.90

3,000.00

Salaries..
Wages...

3,000.00

2,946.95

Fuel, Lights T etc., Library o f Congress—
F or fu el, lights, repairs, m iscellaneous supplies, e le ctric an d steam apparatus, c ity
d irectory , stationery, m ail an d d e liv e ry serv ice, an d all in cid en ta l expenses in con ­
n ection w ith the c u sto d y , care, an d m aintenance o f said b u ild in g and grounds (acts
Feb. 19, 1897, vol. 29, p. 545, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p * 1260, sec. 1) ..........................

Temporary employees.

Sheet metal worker................
Stonemasons...................
Skilled laborers and laborers.,
Wages..................... .................................. .

Rates.

57.60
4.00-9.00
2.67-2.50

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

Expended,
1921.

Number .

Number.

Number.

1

1

5200.00

5200.00

51,635.46

5.700.00
2.800.00

3.820.00

5,730.83
2,028.74

1.500.00
1.500.00

1.450.00
1.700.00

1,800.00
1,900.00
300.00
300.00

1.300.00
1.800.00
230.00
300.00

1,331.39
197.80
2,942.32
1,777.56
1,700.65
260.98
313.20
34.33

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Miscellaneous expenses incident to care and
maintenance of building and grounds............. .
Repairs to building and equipment..................
Mail and deliverv service, including fuel and
upkeep of vehicles.................................. ..........
Machinery and special equipment.......................
Cate equipment.......................................... ..........
Electric lamps.......................................................
General telephone service.....................................
Stationery, office supplies, and postage.............. .
Repairs to roof (materials only)...........................
Pointing exterior stonework (materials only).....
New roof covering over octagon (materials and
contract)........................................................... .
Refitting old boiler room (materials and contracts)
Total.




2,000.00

4,993.10
3,993.29
16,000.00

12,800.00

26,939.65

24

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimites o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
1922.
priation.

Budget, pa.ffe 25.
Permanent Repository fo r the Declaration o f Independence and the Constitution of the United
States—
F or p ro v id in g a safe, perm anent repository o f appropriate design, w ithin the L ibrary
o f Congress b u ild in g , for the originals of the D eclaration o f In d ep en d en ce and the
C onstitution o f the U n ited States, $12,000; the said am oun t to be im m ed ia tely avail­
ab le (submitted) .................................................................................................................................................................. ..
Furniture , Library o f Congress—
F or furniture, in c lu d in g partitions, screens, sh elvin g, caf£ equ ipm en t, and electrical
w ork pertain ing thereto (acts Feb. 19, 1897, vol. 29, p. 545, sec. 1; Mar. 8 , 1921, vol. 41 ,
p. 1260, sec. 1) ..........................................................................................................................................
$12,000.00
F or exten sion o f th e steel stack for storage of catalogue cards in th e Card D iv ision (in ­
6,0 00.0 0
crease o f $1,000 su bm itted ) ( same a c ts ) .........................................................................................
For m ap cases fofr the D iv isio n of Maps and Charts (submitted) ................................................
6,000.00
The first of the two items abovo submitted for $6,000 each is to provide extension of the existing steet
stack for the storage of catalogue cards in the Card Division.
An average expenditure of $5,000 per annum is necessary for extension of this stack. Owing to recent
high costs,the annual extensions have fallen behind the actual need, and for the current year the appro­
priation of $5,000 has been curtailed to an expenditure of $3,333. This curtail must be made up as soon
as possible.
The second of the items is to provide additional cases for tho Division of Maps and Charts.
Extension of the special steel map-filing cases for flat filing is important, owing to the present congestion.
Many important maps and charts can now only be tied in rolls and bundles of rolls. Constant demand
makes this crude system almost intolerable both to the user and to the Library. The sum requested will
provide only a fraction of the equipment needed by the Map Division.
General objects of expenditure.
Miscellaneous furniture, including tables, desks, stands,
hardware, book trucks, floor coverings, curtains, desk fans,
book supports, cabinets, etc.................................................
Card catalogue cases.................................................................
Machines (typewriting, ribbon, adding and computing)....... .
Repairs to miscellaneous furniture (materials and supplies).
Partitions........................................................ ........................
Screens.................................................................................... .
Shelving...................................................................................
Electric work............................................................... .......... .
Express, freight, and drayage................................................ .
Awnings...................................................................................
Extension of steel stack for cards (Card Division)...................
Map cases for Division of Maps and Charts............................ .
Total..

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,

$4,82o. 00

1922.

$1,732.00
2.500.00
900.00
400.00

$12,000.00

24,000.00

$17,000. 00

800.00

800.00

878,53 0.00

714,545.00

Estimated,
1921.

2,000.00

500.00
500.00
75.00
500.00

300.00
500.00
500.00
75.00
1.360.00
3.333.00

$4,867.60
2,601.00
1,967.79
1 ,318.10
316.08
83.60
6 21.57
1 68.77
10.37

24,000.00

13,600.00

11,954.88

2,000.00
1.500.00
1.500.00
500.00

10 0
0 .0

6,000.00
6.000.00

Budget, page 859.
P erm an ent S p e cific A p p rop riation :

/icqnest o f Gertrude M . Hubbard, Library of Congress: Interest Account—
. T rust fu nd o f $20,000, th e interest on w h ich , at 4 p er cen t p er annum , is to b e used for
the purchase o f engravings and etch ings to b e a d d ed to the “ Gardiner G reene H u b ­
bard C o lle ctio n ” ( act A u g . 20 , 1912, vol. 37, p. 319) ...................................................................
N ote. —The estimate for “ Printing and binding," Library of Congress, under sec. 2, act of May 8,1872
(R. S., p. 720, sec. 3661), will be found on page 30.

T ota l, L ibrary o f Congress....................................................................................................




25

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 80, 1928— Continued,
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

B u d g e t, page 25 .
B O T A N IC G A R D E N .
Salaries, Botanic Garden—
F or director (act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1261, sec. 1) ..................................................................
$3,000. 00
One assistant d irector (same act) ...........................................................................................................
1,8 00.0 0
One clerk (same act) ...................................................................................................................................
1,6 0 0 .0 0
1,250. 00
O ne greenhouse forem an (same act) .....................................................................................................
One head gardener (same act) .................................................................................................................
1 ,2 00.0 0
1,180.00
One gardener in charge o f greenhouses (same act) ........................................................................ .
F our gardeners at $1,100 each (same act) ............................................................................................
4 ,4 00.0 0
One outside forem an (same act) .............................................................................................................
1,000.00
T w o clerks at $1,150 each (same act) ....................................................................................................
2,3 00.0 0
T w o sh ipping clerks at $1,000 each (same act) ............................................................ .....................
2 ,0 00.0 0
One general m ech an ic (su bm itted ; am ount d e d u cted from lum p-sum portion o f this
estim ate) (same act) ................................................................................................................................
1,5 00.0 0
One carpenter (same act) ..........................................................................................................................
1,4 04.0 0
O ne carpen ter (same act) .............................................................................................. ...........................
1,170. 00
O ne painter (same act) ...............................................................................................................................
936.00
N ine sk ille d laborers at $864 each (same act) ....................................................................................
7,7 76.0 0
S k illed laborers and laborers at rates to b e fix e d b y the director (same act) ........................
16 ,000 .00
A ll u n der the d irection o f the J oin t C om m ittee on the L ibrary.
------------------- —
B u d g e t, p a ge 2 6 .
Improving Botanic Garden—
F or procurin g m anure, soil, tools, fu e l; purchasing trees, shrubs, plants, and seeds;
m aterials an d m iscellaneous su p p lies; travelin g expen ses an d p er d iem in lie u of
subsistence o f the d irector an d h is assistants n o t to e x c e e d $300; street car fares
n ot e x c e e d in g $25; office e q u ip m e n t an d con tin g en t expen ses in con n ection w ith
repairs and im p rov em en ts to B ota n ic G arden; exchan ge, care, and m aintenance
of m otor-p ropelled d e liv e r y v e h ic le s; purchase of botan ical books and periodicals
n ot to e x c e e d $100; general repairs to bu ildin gs, heatin g apparatus, p a ck in g
sheds, storeroom s, an d stables; p ainting, glazing; repairs to footw alks and roadw ays;
repairing an d p u ttin g com fort stations in sanitary c o n d itio n ; repairs and im p rov e­
m ents to d ire cto r’s resid en ce; recon stru ction o f greenhouses; all u n der the d irec­
tion o f th e Join t C om m ittee o n th e L ibrary, $28,000. T h e sum of $25 m a y b e
e x p e n d e d at a n y one tim e b y the B o ta n ic Garden for the purchase o f plants, trees,
shrubs, an d other nursery stock , w ith ou t reference to section 4 of the act ap p rov ed
Ju ne 17, 1910, con cern in g purchases for e x e c u tiv e departm ents an d other govern­
m ental establishm ents in W ashington (acts May 29, 1920, vol. 41, p . 640, sec. 1; Mar.
3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1261, sec. 1 ) ..........................................................................................................
2 8 ,0 $ ). 00
F or con stru ctin g co n d u its an d in stallin g all m ains, cables, apparatus, e tc ., in clu d in g
the e m p lo y m e n t o f all n e e d e d services, necessary to p rov id e the B ota n ic Garden with
heat an d lig h t from the C apitol p ow er p lan t; th e w ork to b e d on e un der the super­
v ision o f the A rch ite ct o f the C apitol (subm itted).......................................................................
20 ,000 .00

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

$48,51 6.00

$48,516. 00

48 ,0 0 0 ,0 0

28,000.00

96,516.00

76,516.00

The principal reason in asking for the item of $20,000 for providing heat and light from the Capitol
power plant is that of economy. Since 1916 the price of coal has steadily increased until, at this tune,
not less than $6,000 a year is needed to provide the necessary quantity. In less than four years, at this
rate, the total cost of installation will have been covered. In addition to this important consideration
are those of dependability of the power-house service, cleanliness through absence of large quantities of
coal, and the saving of storage space.

General objects of expenditure.
Manure, soil, etc........................................................................
Trees, shrubs, seeds, and plants................................................
Miscellaneous material and supplies.................................... .
Travel, car fares, office equipment, and supplies.....................
Miscellaneous expense incident to repairs and improvements
to gardens and buildings, including reconstruction of green­
houses......................................................................................
Motor and horse drawn vehicles and upkeep...........................
Repairs to footwalks and roadways..........................................
Fuel
Periodicals..................
Fumigatingplants (2).
For providing Botanic Garden with heat and light from Capi­
tol power plant..
plant.................................................................... .
3
Total.,
T ota l, B o ta n ic G arden




Expended,
1921.

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

$175.00
5.925.00
2.600.00
900.00

$175.00
5.200.00
2.575.00
675.00

$157.75
5,757.45
2, 491.71
870.17

8.500.00
3.300.00

8.450.00
3.200.00

6,500.00

6,000.00

2,755.33
2,813.92
4,485.48
6,070.88
88.52

100.00

50.00
400.00

20,000.00
48,000.00

26,725.00

25,491.21

26

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 192S— Continued.

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
• required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 55 9 .

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

U N D E R T H E P U B L IC P R I N T E R .
OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC PRINTER.

Salaries , Office o f the Public Printer —
P u b lic P rin ter (acts Jan . 12 , 1895, vol. 28, p. 608, sec. 17; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p- 1428,
sec. 1) ..........................................................................................................................................................
P riv ate secretary (same acts) ............................................................................................... .,................
Purchasing: agen t (same acts) ..................................................................................................................
Congressional R e c o rd clerk (same acts) ...............................................................................................
C h ie f clerk (same acts) ..............................................................................................................................
A ssistant p urch asin g agen t (same acts) ...............................................................................................
Cashier and paym aster (same acts) .......................................................................................................
P a y in g teller (same acts) ..........................................................................................................................

$6 ,000 .00
2, 500. 00
3 ,6 0 0 .0 0
3 ,0 0 0 .0 0
2,7 5 0 .0 0
2,500. 00
2 ,5 0 0 .0 0
2 ,0 0 0 .0 0

C lerks—
T hree, at $2,000 each (same acte) ...................................................................... ...........................
T w o o f class 4 (same acts) ................................................................................................................
F iv e o f class 3 (same acts) ................................................................................................................
F our of class 2 (same acts) ................................................................................................................
F our o f class 1 (same acts)........................................................................................................... ....
S ev en , at $1,000 each (same acts) .................................................................................................
P ay m a ster’s guard (same acts) ................................................................................................................
C hief d oork eep er (same acts).......................................................... ........................................................
D oork eep er (same acts)* ...........................................................................................................................
T h ree assistant doorkeepers, at $1,000 each (same acts) ................................................................
C hief d e liv e ry m a n (same acts) .................................................................................................................
F iv e d e liv e ry m e n , at $950 each (same acts) ......................................................................................
T e le p h o n e sw itch boa rd operator (same acts) .....................................................................................
T h ree assistant telep h on e sw itchboard operators, at $600 each (same acts) . ■
.........................
T w o m essengers, at $840 each (same acts) ..........................................................................................
T h ree m essenger b o y s, at $420 each (same acts) ..............................................................................

6,0 00.0 0
3, 600.00
8,0 00.0 0
5, 600. 00
4,800. 00
7,000. 00
1, 000. 00
1,2 00.0 0
X, 200. 00
3 ,0 0 0 .0 0
1 ,2 00.0 0
4, 750. 00
720.00
1,8 00.0 0
1, 680.00
1, 260.00

$77,660. 00

$149, 090. 00

9,180.00

9,180.00

44,040.00

Note.—Forty-one employees transferred to printing and binding, as follows:
Accountant, at $2,500; assistant accountant, at $2,250; chief timekeeper, at $2,000; 1
clerk, at $2,000; 6 clerks of class 4; 8 clerks of class 3; 8 clerks of class 2; 5 clerks of class
1; 6 clerks, at $1,000each; 2 clerks, at $900each; and 2 messengers, at$420each; total.. $58,190.00
The following places dropped:
Two clerks of class 4; 1 clerk of class 1; 2 clerks at $1,000 each; 4 clerks, at $900 each; 2
doorkeepers, at $1,000 each; 2 messenger boys, at $420 each; total................................. 13,240.00

44,040.00

290,298.00

300,000.00

544,308.00

560,000.00

965,486.00

1,062,310.00

Total transferred and dropped........................................................................................ 71,430.00
Estimated for 1923............................................................................................................ . 77,660.00
Transferred and dropped.................................................... .............................................. 71,430.00
149,09a 00
O ffice o f th e D e p u ty P u b lic P rin te r;
D e p u ty P u b lic P rin ter (acts Jan. 12,1895 , voL 28, p. 608, sec. 49; Mar. 4 , 1921, vol. 41 ,
pp. 1428-14 $ ! , sec. 1) .............................................................................................................................
Clerks—
O n e o f class 3 (same acts) .................................................................................................................
O n e o f class 2 (saint acts) ......................................... .................................................... ..................
O ne (same acts) ....................................................................................................................................
M essenger (same acts) ................................................ .......................................................................
W a tch F o rc e :
C aptain (acts Jan. 12, 1895 , vol. 28, p . 608, sec. 49; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p p . 1428-1481 ,
s e c .l ) ..........................................................................................................................................................
T w o lieu ten a n ts, at $900 each (same acts) ..........................................................................................
F ifty -se v e n w a tch m en , a t $720 e a ch (same acts) .............................................................................

4 ,5 0 0 .0 0
1 ,6 0 0 .0 0
1,4 0 0 .0 0
840.00
840.00

1 ,2 0 0 .0 0
1 ,8 0 0 .0 0
4 1 ,0 4 0 .0 0

Payment fo r Holidays. Government P rinting Office—
T o e n a b le th e P u b lic P rinter to c o m p ly w ith th e p rovision s o f th e law granting h olid a y s
a n d th e E x e c u tiv e order granting h a lf h olid ay s w ith p a y to th e em p loy ees o f th e
G ov ern m en t P rin tin g O ffice (acts Mar. 4,1909, vol. 28, p . 1021, sec. 1; Mar. 4 , 1921, vol.
41 , p- 1428, sec. 1) ............................../ ................................................ ................................................................................
Leaves of Absence, Government Printing Office—
T o en a ble the P u b lic P rin ter to c o m p ly w ith th e provisions o f the law granting 30 days
an nu al lea v e to th e em ployees o f tn e G overn m en t P rin tin g O ffice (acts Jan. 12, 1895,
vol. 28, p. 608, sec. 1; Mar. 4 , 1921f vol. 41, p . 1428, s e c .l) .......................................................................................
T otal, salaries, e t c ..............................................................................................................................................




27

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj thejiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
Oeneralobject (tltlo of appropriation), da to of acts, references to Statutes at Larne, or to Uovised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed objcct.

p a g e 5(>0.
PUBLIC FRINTINO AND BINDING.
P rinting and Binding —
For p u b lic p rin tin g, p u b lic bin d in g, and paper for p u b lic p rin tin g and bin d in g, in c lu d ­
ing the cost o f p rin tin g the d ebates and proceed ings o f Congress in the Congressional
R ecord , and for lith ograph ing, m ap pin g, and engraving, for both Houses o f Congress,
the Suprem o Court of the U nited States, the Suprem e C ourt o f the D istrict o f C olum ­
bia* the U nited States C ourt o f Custom s A ppeals, tho C ourt o f Claim s, the L ibrary of
Congressj tho S m ithsonian In stitu tion , the Interstate C om m erce Com m ission, the
International Bureau o f A m erican R e p u b lic s, the E x e c u tiv e Office, tho U nited States
G eographic B oard, and the departm en ts; for salaries, com pensation , or wages of all
necessary em ploy ees a d d ition a l to those herein sp e cifica lly appropriated for (in clu d ­
ing the com pensation o f tho forem an o f bin d in g, the forem an of prin tin g, and the fore­
m an o f presawork at $3,000 e a ch ); rents, fuel, gas, e le ctric current, f^as and eloctric
fixtures; b ic y cle s , ele ctrica l v eh icles for the carnage o f p rin tin g and p n n tin g supplies,
and the m aintenance, repair, and op eration o f th e sam e, to be used o n ly for official
purposes, in c lu d in g th o m aintenance, repair, and operation o f m otor-propelled
passenger-carrying v e h icle s for official use o f the officers o f the G overnm ent P n n tin g
Office w hen in w n tin g ordered b y the P u b lic P rin ter (n o t e x c e e d in g $1,500); freight,
expressago, telegraph, and te le p h o n e se rv ice ; furniture, typew riters, and carpets;
travelin g expen ses, stationery, postage, and a d vertisin g; directories, tech n ical books,
and books o f reference, n ot e x c e e d in g $500; a d d in g and n u m b erin g m achines, tim e
stam ps, and other m achines o f sim ilar character; m a ch in ery (n ot e x c e e d in g $100,000);
e q u ip m en t, and for repairs to m ach in ery, im p le m e n ts, and bu ildin gs, ana for m inor
alterations to bu ild in gs; necessary e q u ip m e n t, m aintenance, and su pp lies for the
em ergen cy room for the use o f all em p lo y e e s in the G overn m en t P rin tin g O ffice w ho
m ay be taken su d d e n ly ill or re ce iv e in ju r y w h ile on d u t y ; other necessary con tin ­
gent and m iscellaneous item s authorized b y th e P u b lic P rinter; and for all the
necessary m aterials and e q u ip m e n t needed in the prosecu tion and d eliv e ry and m ail­
in g o f the w ork (acfc Jan. 12, 1895, xoL 28 , p . 608, sec. 49; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41 , p*
1428-1431, sec. 1) .................................................................................................................................

Employees.

Total amount to bo Amount appropriated
appropriated under j for tho fiscal year
each head of approending June 30,
priation.
1922.

$5 ,8 2 6 ,5 1 4 .0 0

*$6,250, 390.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,

1923.

1922.

1921.

N um ber.
Salaries:
Number.
Number.
Superintendent of buildings.............. per annum.. 53,600.00
1
1
Foreman of printing, foreman of bind­
ing, foreman or presswork, assistant
foreman of printing (night), superin­
3,000.00
tendent of accounts................... ........... ..do...
Medical and sanitary officer..........................do...
2,600.00
Foremen, assistant foreman of print­
ing (day), chief of jacket writers* sec­
tion, chief of estimators' section,
assistant superintendent of accounts,
storekeeper, chief engineer........................ do...
2, moo
Linotype machinist in charge, mono­
2.400.00
type machinist in charge, clerk..................d o ...
2 moo
,
Assistant foreman........................................do....
Foremen, chief computer, assistant
2.300.00
foremen.....................................................do.
2
2
Assistant storekeeper, chief clectriciar,
chief machinist, chief carpenter,
2.250.00
assistant foremen, allotment clerk............. do___
1
0
Computers................................................... do___
2.200.00
S
Chief timekeeper, bookkeeper, chemist,
foreman, assistant medical and sani­
2,000.00
5
5
tary officer.......................................... ....d o ___
1.500.00
II
1
1
Officeman, cost clerk, clerks, draftsman........ do..
1
0
1.600.00
Clerks, wefghmaster................................d o ___
1
0
1..m oo
2
Clerk, officeman........................................... do.
3
1.400.00
14
Clerks.......................................................... do.
14
1.252.00
1
Clerk............................................................do___
1
1.200.00
Clerks, matron............................................ do___
7
1
0
1.000.00
Clerks, nurses...............................................do...
900.00
2
Clerks.......................................................... do___
l\
Cleaner in charge..........................................do___
720.00 '
1
1 !
0
G O 00
O.
1
1
Cleaners....................................................... do___
1
1
560.00
1
1
Charwomen........... .....................................do___
Messenger boys............................................ do...
420.00
Wages:
Officeman.............................................per diem..
1
6.00 !
IS
Clerks, helpers, messengers.......................... do_
_
3.60 |
2
Skilled ana unskilled laborers......................do___
2.80 I
13
Estimators, Jacket writers............... per hour rate..
.90 I
Assistant foremen, assistant machin­
ist in charge, chief copy editor,
chief revisers, electricians in charge,
in charge of sections, linotype ma­
chinist In charge, machinist in
charge, officemen, electrotype
molaers in charge, press reviser,
stereotypes in charge, electrotype
42
finishers in charge..................................... do....
1721 22Xclusive
W1,702.70 (Smithsonian Institution) and $125,000 (Department of Agriculture), a total of 5166,702.70, carried in deficiency act of June 16,1921, made available




28

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.
B u d g et, p a p s 5 6 1.

Printing and B inding — C o n tin u e d .
Rate.

Employees.
W ages—Continued.
Assistant foremen, bookbinders in
charge, engineer in charge, electri­
cians, electrotype finishers, elec­
trotype finishers, electrotype molders, ink maker in charge, linotype
machinists, linotype operators in
charge, metal mixer in charge, ma­
chinists, makers-up in charge,mon­
otype machinists, officemen, press
revisers, pressmen in charge of
plates, pressmen in charge, plunjbers, plateman in charge, roller
maker, referees, saw flier, steamfitter in charge, stereotypers, foundiy lockups................................... per hour rate.,
Bookbinders, cabinet maker, carpen­
ters, compositors, copyholders,
copy editors, deskmen, linotype
operators, machine operators, marblers, monotype keyboard opera­
tors, makers-up, officemen, paper
cutter, pressmen, press correctors,
proof readers, platemen, plumbers,
steamfitters, plumber-steamfitter,
referee, painters, revisers* ruling
machine operators, sheet metal
worker........................................................ do___
Blacksmiths, engineers, electrotype
helpers, in charge of section, knife
grinders, stock keepers............................... do_
_
Stock keeper..................................................d o....
Carpenter.......................................................d o...,
Electrotyper helper, engineers’ help­
ers, folding machine operators,
foremen, office helpers, gathering
machine operators, leather cutters,
stock keepers, helpers.................................d o...
Caster helpers, helpers, machine
helpers, machinists’ helpers, officoman, office helpers......................................d o...
Directresses, firemen, helpers, motor­
cyclists, office helper, signature
pressman in charge, stockkeeper................ d o ...
Banders, counter, clerks, examiners,
folders, head pager, helpers, mail
carrier, messengers, office helpers,
oilers, press feeders, signature
pressmen, stockkeepers...............................d o ...
Chauffeurs, counters, elevator con­
ductors, folding-machine feeders,
messengers, helpers, office helpers,
sewing-machine operators, stock­
keepers........................................................ d o ...
Machine operators, messengers, per­
forators, ruling-machine feeders,
skilled laborers, unskilled laborers............. d o ...
Messenger boys.............................................. d o ...
Salaries
Wages i...

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1922.
1923.

Number,

$0.80

230

.75

1,481

.70
.65
.62*

Number .

Number.

230

238

1,532

1,582
16

16

1

1
1

43

51

38

144

146

147
5
G

60

356

384

252
1,062
30
3,895

1 20
,1
4,062

1,131
29
4,115

$265,472.00 $256,972.00 $252,822.00
5,345,477.00 5,557,816.00 5,658,790.00
5,610,949.00 5,814,788.00 5,911,612.00

» Basic day rate (313 working days); comparative figures only; includes also $58,190, salaries of 41 em­
ployees of the accounting division provided for 1922 and expended 1921 under legislative, office of the
Public Printer. '(See note under u Office of the Public Printer.” )
Objects of expenditure.

Estimated,
1923.

Expended,
1921.

Estimated salaries and wages, basic dav rate, 1923......................................... $5,610,949.00
Estimated night rate (20 per cent earnings)....................................................
68,000.00
5,678,949.00
Less estimated holidays........... .......................................................................
290.298.00
....... ................
Less estimated leaves of absence.................................... .*
544.308.00
834,606.00
4,844,343.00

$325,981.80
622,220.02

Salaries and wages............................................................................................ 4,844,343.00

5,123,284.10

OTHER OBJECTS OV EXPENDITURE.

Paper................................................................................................................ 4,050,000.00
Material and supplies.......................................................................................
550.000.00
Machinery.........................................................................................................
100.000.00
Lithographing and engraving..........................................................................
176,000.00
Miscellaneous..................................... .............................................................
106,171.00

3,679,064.71
619,808.30
2,100.00
260,794.41
243,751.33

19,826,514.00

9,928,802.85

1

i The estimated repay income for 1923 is $1,000,000, and the printing and binding appropriation necessary
is estimated at $5,826,514. The repay income for the fiscal year 1921 totaled $5,785,146.




Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

29

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service o j the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed objcct.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
priation.
1922.

Budget, page 562.
Congressional Record Index—
F or salaries and expen ses o f p rep aring the sem im on th ly and session in d ex es o f the C on­
gressional R e co rd , u n der th e d ire ctio n o f th e Join t C om m ittee on P rin tin g, as follow s:
C hief in d e x e r (acts Jan. 12 , 1895, vol. 28, p. 60S, sec. 17; Mar. 4 , 1921, vol. 41, p p *
1428-1481 sec. 1) .............................................................................................................................
Cataloguer (same acts) .......................................................................................................................
T w o cataloguers at $1,800 each ( same acts) ...............................................................................

$3,000. 00
2,5 00.0 0
3, 600. 00
$9,100. 00

$9,100. 00

227,83 3.20

215,393.20

183,000.00

180.000. 00

OFFICE O SUPERINTENDENT O DOCUMENTS.
F
F
Salaries, Office o f Superintendent o f Documents—
Superintendent (acts Jan. 12,1895, vol. 28, p. 60S, sec. 17; Mar. 4,1921, vol. 41, p •1481,
s e c .l ) ................ ................................................................................. ....................... : .....................
3,500.00
Assistant superintendent (same acts)........ ......................... ...........................................................
2 ,500.00
Clerks:
Two of class 4 (same acts)..........................................................................................................
3.600.00
Three of class 3 (same acts).......................................................................................................
4,800.00
Five of class 2 (same acts).........................................................................................................
7,000.00
Eight of class 1 (same acts)........................................................................................................
9,600.00
Eleven, at $1,000 each (same acts)..........................................................................................
11,000.00
Thirty-four, at $900 each (increase of 24 submitted; 24 clerks at $840 omitted) (same
acts).............................................................................................................................................
30,600.00
Cataloguer in charge (increase of $200 submitted) (same acts)................................................
2,000.00
Cataloguers:
5,400.00
Three at $1,800 each (submitted) (same acts).......................................... ...........................
Two at $1,600 each (in lieu of 2 cataloguers at $1,500 each; increase of $100 each
(submitted) (same acts)..........................................................................................................
3,200.00
Ten at $1,400 each (submitted) (same acts)..........................................................................
14,000.00
Seven at $1,200 each (increase of 3 submitted) (same acts)............................................
8,400.00
Cashier (same acts).............................................................................................................................1,600.00
Librarian (increase of $300 submitted) (same acts)....................................................................*
1,800.00
Foreman (same acts)...........................................................................................................................
1,600.00
Assistant foreman (sart\e acts)...........................................................................................................
1, 200.00
Labor necessary in making distribution of Government publications (same acts).............
116,033.20
Note—One cataloguer at SI.100; 8 at SI,000 each; and 4 at $900 each omitted. Rearrangement of the
salaries ofthelibrarian, 20 cataloguers nowprovided for, and the addition of 3 cataloguers make a total in­
crease of $11,000. Catalogue work is approximately six years behind the requirem
ents of law, due to ina­
bility to fill cataloguer vacancies on account of low salaries; persons capable of filling the positions abso­
lutely refuse the small pay, and increase requested is an em
ergency measure. Increase from $840 to $900
for24 clerks (amounting to $1,440) is requestedin order to adjust the present inequitable situation whereby
ordinarylaborers receive $876.40 and clerks $840. The qualifications required ofclerks by the Civil Service
Com issionaresofarabovethoserequiredoflaborers astodemand, forthe good ofthe Government service,
m
that they receive a m equitable rate of pay.
ore
General Expenses, Office o f Superintendent o f Documents—
For furniture and fixtures, typewriters, carpets, labor-saving machines and accessories,
time stamps, adding and numbering machines, awnings, curtains, books of reference,
directories, books, miscellaneous office and desk supplies; paper, twine, glue, en­
velopes, postage, car fares, soap, towels, disinfectants, and ice; drayage, express,
freight, telephone and telegraph service; repairs to buildings, elevators and ma­
chinery; preserving sanitary condition of building, light, heat, and power;
stationery and office printing, including blanks, price lists, and bibliographies,
$40,000 ($1,000 additional submitted); for catalogues and indexes, not exceeding
$18,000 ($2,000 additional submitted); for supplying books to depository libraries,
$90,000; equipment, material, and supplies for distribution of public documents,
$35,000 (acts Jan. 12,1895, vol. 28, p. 60S, sec. 17; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1431, sec. 1 )............................

Objects of expenditure.
Catalogues and indexes.....................................
Books for depository libraries...........................
Pricelists....... ..................................................
Printed office supplies, paper, and blank cards
Miscellaneous stores..........................................
Stencils..............................................................
Envelopes..........................................................
Wrappers......................................... ................
Strawboard, including mailing tubes...............
Light, heat, and power.....................................
Preserving sanitary condition of building........
Repairs to building, machinery, and elevator..
Telephones, drayage, etc..................................
Equipment.......................................................




Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
$18,000.00
90.000.00

$16,000.00
90.000.00

5.000.00
4.000.00
16.000.00

5.000.00
4.000.00
16.000.00
19,000.00

6,000.00
6,000.00

20,000.00
2.000.00
5.000.00
4.000.00
3.000.00

2.000.00
2,000.00

183,000.00

2.000.00
2,000.00

$7,553.80
119,999.72
4,681.8?
5,874.50
4.610.43
4,376.25
15,810.24
30,954.57
2,609.37
4.786.35
4.199.44
3.025.35
2,009.96
1.991.02

180,000.00

212,482.90

6,000.00
6,000.00
2.000.00
5.000.00
4.000.00
3.000.00

30

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj thejiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

B u d g e t, page 56 3 .

General Expenses , Office o f Superintendent of Documents — C ontinu ed.
RECAPITULATION OF ESTIMATES, 1923.
Salaries, Office of the Public Printer................................<.......................................
Salaries, Office of the Deputy Public Printer...........................................................
Salaries, watch force..............................................................................................,___

$77,660.00
9, ISO. 00
44,040.00
„____________ $130 880.00
Payment for holidays.........................................................................................................................
290*, 298.00
Leaves of absence................................................................................................................................
544,308.00
Total salaries, etc......................................................................................................................
Public printing and binding:
Salaries and wages................................................................................................. $4,844,343.00
Paper....................................................................................................................... 4,050,000.00
Material and supplies............................................................................................
550,000.00
Machinery...............................................................................................................
100,000.00
Lithographing and engraving. . ...........................................................................
176,000.00
Miscellaneous..........................................................................................................
106,171.00

965,486.00

9,826,514.00
Less estimated repay.............................. .................................................................... 4,000,000.00
------------------- 5,826,514.00
Congressional Record index...............................................................................................................
9,100.00
Salaries, Office of Superintendent of Documents.................................................... $227,833.20
General expense ana distribution of public documents, Office of the Superin­
tendent of Documents...............................................................................................
183,000.00
------------------- 410,833.20
Total under the Public Printer.............................................................................................. 7,211,933.20

T o ta l u n der th e P u b lic P rin te r...........................................................................................
Estimates,
1923.

Objects of expenditure.
Salaries, Office of the Public Printer.............................
Holidays.........................................................................
Leaves of absence...........................................................
Salaries and wages, printing and binding.......................

Revised esti­
mates, 1922.

$7, 211,933. 20

Expended,
1921.

$130,000.00 $188,190.00
290.298.00
296,618.00
514.308.00
581,000.00
4,844,343.00 4,924,980.00

$196,837.77
325,981.80
622,220.02
5,123,284.10

4,050,000.00 4,050,000.00
550.000.00
550.000.00

3,679,064.71
619,808.30

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Paper..............................................................................
Material and supplies...................................................
Machinery...................................................................I..
Lithographing and engraving.........................................
Miscellaneous...................................................................
Total........ *............................................................
Less repay estimated.......................................................

10 .0 0 0
0 0 .0

176,000.00
106,171.00

100 0 .0
.0 0 0

250,000.00
221,078.00

2,100.00

260,794.41
243,751.33

10,792,000.00 11,161,866.00 .11,073,842.44
4,000,000.00 4,800,000.00 5,785,146.00

Allotted appropriation required.....................................
Congressional Record index............................................
Salaries, Office of Superintendent of Documents............
General expense, office of Superintendent of Documents

6,792,000.00 6,361,866.00
9,100.00
9,100.00
227,833.20
215,390.00
183,000.00
180,000.00

"*1*98*447.36
212,482.90

Total under the Public Printer.............................

7,211,933.20 6,766,356.00

5,699,626.70

5,288,696.44

P U B L IC P R I N T I N G A N D B IN D IN G .
T h e follow in g are the estimates for p u b lic p rin tin g, b in d in g, and paper for the same* as
furnished b y th e L ibrary o f Congress and th e several e x e cu tiv e departm ents, and
offices, un der th e provisions o f section 2, a ct o f M ay 8, 1872 (R e v . Stat., p . 720, sec.
3661), and section 2 o f sundry c iv il act o f June 30, 1906 (34 Stat., p . 762):
STATE DEPARTMENT.

Printing and Binding —
1 P rin tin g and bin d in g, to b e e x e cu te d u n der th e d irection o f th e P u b lic P rinter (in ­
crease o f $26,500 su b m itte d )

.

$81,500.00

TREASURY DEPARTMENT.

Printing and Binding —
P rin tin g, and p aper for th e sam e; bla n k books, b in d in g, ruling, and all other work for
th e Treasury D epartm ent (decrease o f $50,000 s u b m itte d )
P rin tin g and b in d in g for th e G eneral A cco u n tin g Office, in clu d in g m on th ly and annual
ed ition s o f selected d ecision s o f th e C om ptroller General (submitted)

700,000.00
25,630.00

WAR DEPARTMENT.

Printing and Binding —
F or prin tin g and b in d in g for th e W ar D epartm ent, its bureaus and offices: Provided ,
T h a t th e sum o f $3,000, or so m u ch thereof as m ay b e necessary, m ay b e used for th e
publication,* from tim e to tim e, o f bu lletin s prepared u n der the d irection o f the Sur­
geon G eneral o f th e A rm y , for th e in stru ction o f m edical officers, w h en ap p rov ed b y
th e S ecretary o f W ar; an d n ot e x ce e d in g 545,000 shall b e available fo r p n n tin g and
b in d in g u n der th e d irection o f th e C hief o f E ngineers (decrease o f $150,000)




300,000.00

$7, 723,193. 20

31

LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
I Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount 1 appropriated under
ending June 30,
required for each detailed object.
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.
B u d g e t, page 5 6 4 .

n a v y d e p a rtm e n t.

P rintin g and Binding —
F or the N a v y D ep artm en t, in c lu d in g n o t e x c e e d in g $50,000 for the H y d rog rap h ic
O ffice .........................................................................................................................................................

$250,000.00

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.

Printing and Binding —
220, 700. 00

F or th e In terior D epartm ent*
PATENT OFFICE.

Printing and Binding —
F or th e P atent O ffice: F or p rin tin g th e w e e k ly issue o f patents, designs, trade-m arks,
prints, and labels, e x c lu siv e of illustrations; and for prin tin g, engraving illustrations,
and b in d in g th e Official G azette, in c lu d in g w eek ly , m on th ly , b im on th ly , and annual
in d ices (increase of $105,000 s u b m itte d ).......................................................................................

690,000.00

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.

Printing and Binding —
F or the U n ited States G eological S u rv e y : F or engraving th e illustrations necessary for
th e annual report o f th e d irector, and for th e m onographs, professional papers, b u lle ­
tins, w ater-su pp ly papers, and th e report on m ineral resources, and for prin tin g and
b in d in g th e sam e p u b lica tio n s, of w h ich sum n o t m ore than $45,000 m ay b e used for
en gravin g...................................................................................................................................................

140,000. 00

BUREAU OF MINES.

Printing and Binding —
F or the U n ited States B ureau o f M ines: F or prin tin g, engraving o f illustrations, and
b in d in g bu lletin s, te ch n ica l papers, m in e rs’ circulars, and other p u blication s to carry
ou t th e purposes of th e a ct of F e b . 25, 1913 (form erly in clu d e d in allotm en t for I n ­
terior D e p a rtm e n t)........................................ ............................... .*......................................................

44,000.00

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT. .

Printing and Binding—
F or th e P ost Office D epartm ent, in clu d in g postal savings and th e m oney-order office
(increase o f $450,000 s u b m itte d )....................................................................................................... 1,0 50,0 00.0 0
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

Printing and Binding —
F or the D ep artm ent o f A griculture, in clu d in g the annual report of the S ecretary of
A griculture, as required b y the a ct ap p roved Jan. 12, 1895, and in pursuance of the
joint, resolution nu m bered 13, a p p roved Mar. 30, 1906, and also in clu d in g n ot to e x ­
ceed $300,000 for farm ers’ bu lletin s, w h ich shall b e adapted to the interests of the
p eop le o f th e d ifferen t sections o f th e coun try, an equ al proportion of four-fifths of
w h ich shall b e d e liv e re d to or sen t ou t u n der the addressed franks furnished b y Sena­
tors, R epresen tatives, and Delegates in Congress, as th e y shall d ir e c t ..............................

850,000.00

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE.

Printing and Binding —
F or prin tin g and b in d in g for the D ep artm ent o f C om m erce, in clu d in g the Coast and
G e od etic S u rv ey and th e B ureau o f the Census: Provided, T h a t an am oun t n o t to
e x ce e d 1 p er cen t o f this allotm en t m ay b e e x p e n d e d for salaries o f persons d eta iled
from the G overnm ent P rin tin g Office for service as c o p y editors (increase o f $225,000
s u b m i t t e d ) . . . . . ................................................................................. ....................................................

550,000.00

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

Printing and Binding —
F or prin tin g and b in d in g for the D epartm ent o f L abor, to b e un der th e control o f the
P u b lic P rin ter (increase o f $50,000 s u b m itte d ).......................................................... ................

2 5 0,000.00

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE.

Printing and Binding —
P rin tin g and b in d in g for th e D ep artm en t o f Justice, to b e e x e cu te d u n d er the d irec­
tion o f th e P u b lic P rin te r...... .............................................................................................................
For th e S uprem e Court o f th e U n ited States; and the p rin tin g for the Suprem e Court
shall b e d on e b y the p rin ter it m a y em p lo v , unless i t shall otherw ise order (increase
o f $5,000 s u b m itte d )........................................................ .....................................................................
For the Suprem e Court o f the D istrict o f C olu m b ia ......................................................................
P rin tin g and b in d in g for th e U n ited States Court o f Customs A p peals, to b e e x ecu ted
under the d ire ctio n o f th e P u b lic P rin ter (decrease o f $300)..........- .....................................
P rin tin g and b in d in g for th e C ourt o f Claim s, to b e e x e c u te d u n der the d ire ctio n o f the
P u b lic P rin te r ..........................................................................................................................................

40,000,00

2 0 ,000 .00
1,5 00.0 0
900.00
3 0 ,000 .00

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS.

Printing and Binding —
F or the L ib ra ry o f Congress, in c lu d in g th e co p y r ig h t office an d th e p u b lic a tio n o f the
Catalogue o f T itle E ntries o f th e co p y r ig h t office, an d bin d in g , reb in d in g , an d repair­
in g o f lib ra ry books, an d fo r b u ild in g an d grou n d s....................................................................




2 5 0,00 0.00

32

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 565*

e x e c u t iv e

o f f ic e .

Printing and Binding —
P rin tin g and b in d in g for the E x e cu tiv e Office, to b e ex e cu te d un der the d irection of
the P u b lic P rin te r.................................................................................................................................

$ 4 ,0 0 0 .0 0

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.

Printing and Binding —
F or p rin tin g and b in d in g for the C iv il S ervice Comm ission, to b e ex ecu ted un der the
d ire ctio n o f th e P u b lic P rin ter.........................................................................................................

7 5 ,000 .00

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION.

P n n txng and Binding —
F o r the S m ithsonian In stitu tion : F or p rin tin g and b in d in g the annual reports of the
Board o f R egen ts, w ith general ap p en d ixes, the edition s of w h ich shall n ot ex ceed
10,000 copies, $10,000; un der the Sm ithsonian In stitu tion , for th e annual reports of
the N ational M useum , w ith general ap p en d ixes, an d for prin tin g labels and blanks, and
for th e bu lletin s and p roceedings of the N ational M useum , the ed ition s o f w h ich
shall n o t e x c e e d 4,000 copies, and b in din g, in h alf m orocco, or m aterial n ot m ore e x ­
pen siv e, scie n tific book s and pam ph lets presented to or acqu ired by* the National
M useum library, $37,500; for th e annual reports and bu lletin s of th e B ureau of A m er­
ica n E th n o lo g y , an d for m iscellaneous p rin tin g and b in d in g for th e bureau, $21,t)00;
for th e annual report of the N ational G allery o f A rt, and for prin tin g catalogues, labels,
and blanks, $1,000; for m iscellaneous p rin tin g and b in d in g for th e International
E xch an ges, $200; the International Catalogue o f S cien tific Literature, $100; the
N ational Z oolog ica l Park, $300; the A strop h vsical O bservatory, $300; and for the
annual report o f th e A m erican H istorical A ssociation, $7,000 (decrease of $13,600 su b­
m itt e d ).......................................................................................................................................................

7 7 ,400 .00

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION.

Printing and Binding .
—
F or prin tin g and b in d in g for th e Interstate C om m erce C om m ission, $150,000, o f w h ich
sum not e x c e e d in g $10,000 shall b e availa ble to prin t and furnish to th e States at cost
report-form b la n k s........................................................................................... .............. .......................

150,00 0.00

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS.

Printing and Binding —
F or p rin tin g and b in d in g, to b e e x e cu te d u n der th e d irection o f th e P u b lic P rin ter
(increase o f $5,000 s u b m itte d )...........................................................................................................

30 ,000 .00

UNITED STATES GEOGRAPHIC BOARD.

Printing and Binding —
F o r p rin tin g and b in d in g for the U n ite d States G eographic B oard (decrease of $1 ,000 )..

1 ,0 0 0 .0 0

5,831,630.00
RECAPITULATION.

State D ep artm en t................................................................................................................................................
8 1 ,500 .00
T reasury D ep a rtm e n t........................................................................................................................................
700,00 0.00
300,000.00
W a r D ep artm en t....................................................................................................................................... ..........
N a v y D e p a rtm e n t. *..........................................................................................................................................
250,00 0.00
In te rio r D ep a rtm en t......................................................................................................................... ................
22 0,70 0.00
B ureau o f M in es..................................................................................................................................................
4 4 ,000 .00
P aten t O ffice .........................................................................................................................................................
690,000.00
G eolog ica l S u r v e y ...............................................................................................................................................
140,000.00
Sm ithsonian In s titu tio n ............................................................................................. ......................................
7 7 ,400 .00
D ep artm en t o f J u stice .......................................................................................................................................
40 ,0 0 0 .0 0
S uprem e C ourt o f th e U n ite d States............................................................................................................
20 ,0 0 0 .0 0
S up rem e C ourt o f th e D istrict of C olu m bia...............................................................................................
1 ,5 0 0 .0 0
U n ite d States Court o f Custom s A p p e a ls ...................................................................................................
900.00
C ourt o f C laim s....................................................................................................................................................
3 0 ,000 .00
P ost O ffice D ep a rtm en t....................................................................................................................................
1 ,0 5 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0
850,000.00
D ep artm en t o f A g ricu ltu re ........................................................................... . ................................................
D epartm ent o f C om m erce............................................................................. * ......................................... .... *
550,00 0.00
D ep artm ent o f L a b o r.........................................................................................................................................
250,00 0.00
L ibrary o f Congress............................................................................................................................................
250,00 0.00
E x e c u tiv e O ffice..................................................................................................................................................
4 ,0 0 0 .0 0
C iv il S e rv ice C o m m issio n ................................................../ ................................. *.......................................
75 ,0 0 0 .0 0
G eneral A c co u n tin g O ffice ............................................................... ...............................................................
25 ,6 3 0 .0 0
Interstate C om m erce C om m ission ............................................... ............................. ......................................... 150,00 0.00
International U n io n of A m e rica n R e p u b lic s ............................................................................................
3 0 ,000 .00
’U n ite d States G eog rap h ic B o a r d ...................................................................................................................
1 ,0 0 0 .0 0




5 ,8 3 1 ,6 3 0 .0 0

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

LK(IISLATIVK MSTABUSH M KXT.

33

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923 -Continued.
<ieneral object (title of appropriation), dato of nets, references to Statutes at I*arge, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
require*! for each detailed object.

Total amount to bo Amount appropriated
appropriate*! under j for tho fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

HKCAFITULATION* OF ALLOTTED ESTIMATES

Objects of expenditure.

State Department.............................................
Treasury Department......................................
War Department..............................................
Navy Department............................................
t ntorior Department........................................
Patent OITlco.....................................................
Geological Survoy.............................................
Smithsonian Institution...................................
Department of Justice.......................................
Supremo Court, United States..........................
Supremo Court, District of Columbia...............
United States Court of Customs Appeals.........
Court of Claims.................................................
Post Ofllco Department...................................
Department of Agriculture...............................
Department of Commerce.................................
Department of Labor........................................
Mbrary of Congress...........................................
Executive Oilleo...............................................
Civil Service Commission..................................
Interstate Commerce Commission....................
General Accounting Office................................
International Union American Republics........
United States Geographic Board.....................
Congress (estimated).

Estimates
by depart­
ments, 1923.
$81,500. ou
700.000.00
300.000.00
250.000. 00
26-1,700.00
090.000.00
140.000.00
77,400.00
40.000.00

20.000.00

1,500.00
900.00
30.000.00
1,030,000.00
850, 000. 00
550, 000. 00
250, 000. 00
250,000.00
4,000.00
75.000.00
1.7), (X ). (X)
X

Estimated
cost by
Public
Printer, 1923.

*09,193.00
591.300.00
251, 700. (X
)
213, m 00
224.730.00
585.810.00
118,800. (X
)
65, 714.00
38.205.00 i
12.735.00 I
1,698.00 !
761.00 :
25.470.00 '
891,450. (X
)
721,650. (X
)
400,950. (X
)
212.250.00 ;
212,250. (X)
2,547. 00
03, 675. (X)
127.350.00

Allotments,
1922.

$55,000. (X
)
750.000.00
450.000.00
250, (X ). 00
X
265.000.00
585.000.00
140.000.00
08,297.34
40.000.00
15.000.00
1.500.00

1 00.00
.2
30.000. (X
)
600 0 0
0 , 0 .0
850, (X ). 00
X
325, (X (X
X). )
200.000. (X
)
250,0(X). 00
3, (X ). (X
X )
75.000.00
150.000.00

25,470.00
845.00

25, (X ). 00
X
2,000. (X
)

1,863,555.00

1,000.01) ;

2,290,000.00

5,831,630. (X
)
,* 8,020,630.00 16,792,000.00 1 7,450,997. 34
!
;

1The reduction by the Public Printer in tho cost of tho work, as ostimated by tho departments (Congress
included) ($8,025,630), approximate* " * ---------approximates 15.1 per cent.
ncluded)
* Proposed savings in the cost of t] work covered by thcso allotted figures are estimated by tho Public
tho
Printer at approximately $1,123,536,

Appropriations for 1922 not asked for 1923
T otal, L eg isla tiv e E stablish m en t . .

77891-21-




$476,977. 50
$17,233, 455. 95

17,792,813.39

34

th e

a l t e r n a t iv e

budget,

1923.

ESTIMATES OF APPROPRIATIONS REQUIRED FOR THE SERVICE OF THE FISCAL YEAR EM)LNG JUKE30,1923.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at I.arpe, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appropriation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

C H A P T E R I I .—E X E C U T IV E O F F IC E A N D IN D E P E N D E N T
E S T A B L IS H M E N T S .
E X E C U T IV E

Budget, page 26.

O F F IC E .

the president.

Salary of the President—
C om pensation of the P resident of the U nited States (R . S^ p. 24, secs. 152, 153; acts of
Mar. 4 , 1909, vol. 35, p. 859 , sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 464, sec. 1; act Mar. 3,
1921, vol 41, p. 1261, sec. 1). . ....................................................................................................................

$75,000. 00

THE VICE PRESIDENT.

Salary o f the Vice President—
C om pensation of the V ice President of the U nited States (R. S ., p. 24, secs. 152-154; acts
Feb. 26, 1907, vol. 84. p. 993, sec. 4; July 16, 1914, vol.'38, p . 464, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921,
vol. 41 , ?> 1261, sec. 1) ...........................................................................................................................
•

12,000. 00

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATER.

B u d g e t , pag<> 2 7 .

Salaries, Executive Office—
S ecretary (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 464 , sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1261, sec. 1) . .
E x e cu tiv e clerk (same acts)....................................................................................................................
C hief clerk (same acts)................... ..........................................................................................................
A p p o in tm e n t clerk (same acts) ...............................................................................................................
R e co rd clerk (same acts) ...........................................................................................................................
T w o expert stenographers, 1 at $3,000 and 1 at $2,500 (same acts)...........................................
A cco u n tin g and disbursing clerk (same acts) ....................................................................................
T w o correspondents, at $2,500 each (same acts) ................. ................................... .........................
Clerks:
T w o, at $2,500 each (same acts) .....................................................................................................
Four, at $2,000 each (same acts) ....................................................................................................
S even of class 4 (same acts) .............................................................................................................
T w o of class 3 (same acts) ................................................................................................................
F our of class 2 (same acts) ................................................................................................................
T h ree of class 1 (same acts) ..............................................................................................................
Messengers:
T hree, at $900 each (same acts) .....................................................................................................
T hree, at $840 each (same acts) ................... ..................................................................................
T h ree laborers, at $720 each (same acts) .................................. ...........................................................

$7, 500. 00
5,000. 00
4,000. 00
3, 500.00
2,500. 00
5,500. 00
2, 500. 00
5,000. 00
5, 000. 00
8,000. 00
1 2 ,600 .00
3 ,2 0 0 .0 0
5, 600. 00
3, 600. 00
2, 700. 00
2,520. 00
2,160. 00

80, 880.00

Provided , T h a t em ployees o f the e x e c u tiv e departm ents and other establishm ents of
th e e x e c u tiv e bran ch o f the G overnm ent m ay b e d eta iled from tim e to tim e to the
office o f the P residen t o f the U nited States for su ch tem porary assistance as m ay b e
necessary.
Contingent Expenses, Executive Office—
F or con tin gen t expenses of the E x e cu tiv e O ffice, in c lu d in g stationery, record books,
telegram s, teleph ones, book s for library, fu rn itu re and carpets for offices, autom obiles,
expen ses of garage, in c lu d in g labor, sp ecia l services, and m iscellaneous item s, to b e
e x p e n d e d in the discretion o f the P residen t (act o f Mar. 3,1921 , vol. 41 , p . 1261 , sec. 1) ...............................
B u d g e t , p a g e 566.
Traveling Expenses of the President—
F or tra velin g ex pen ses o f th e P residen t o f th e U n ited States, to b e ex p e n d e d in his
discretion and a cco u n te d for on his certificate so le ly (act Mar. 4,1921, vol. 41 , p. 1390,
sec. 1) ........................................................................................................................................................................................
T o ta l, E x e c u tiv e Office .
N o te . —The estimate of the Executive Office proper for printing and binding, under sec. 2. act of

May 8, 1S72 (R. S., p. 720, sec. 3001), will bo found on p. 32.




36,000. 00

25,000. 00
228,880.00
I

35

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS,

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be t Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of approending June 30,
priation.
1922.

Budget, page 483.

Repairs , Fuel, e tc E x ec u tive Mansion —
F or ordinary care, repair, and refurnishing of E x e cu tiv e M ansion and for purchase,
m aintenance, and d riv in g o f horses and v eh icles for official purposes, to b e ex pen d ed
b y contract or otherw ise, as th e P residen t m ay d eterm in e (acts Mar. 2 , 1867, vol. 14,
p. 466, sec. 2; Mar. 29, 1867, vol. 15, p. 9, sec. 7; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, pp. 1389, 1390,
sec. 1) ..........................................................................................................................................................
F or fuel for th e E x e cu tiv e M ansion and greenhouses (same acts) ............................................
For care and m aintenance o f greenhouses, E x e cu tiv e M ansion (same acts) .........................
F or repair to greenhouses, E x e cu tiv e M ansion (same acts) .........................................................
F or recon stru ctin g 1 greenhouse, E x e cu tiv e M ansion (same acts)............................................

$50,000.
14,000.
9,000.
3,000.
6,000.

00
00
00
00
00
$82, 000. 00

Objects of expenditure.
Salaries......................................
Wages.......................................
Transportation..........................
Furniture and furnishings........
Supplies and equipment............
Telegraph and telephone service
Repairs and maintenance----Light, heat, and power.............
Miscellaneous items..................
Total.................................

$76, 000. 00

8, 600.00

8, 600. 00

Estimated, i Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1923.
1922.

0 0 0 $31,000.00
0 .0
0 0 0 10,0 0 0
0 .0
0 .0
75.00
75.00
00 0
0 . 0 7.000.00
0 0 0 I 5.000.00
0 .0
15.00
710.00

15.00
9, 710.00

.0
0 0 0 12,000 0
0 .0
2 0 0 1,200.00
0 .0
82,000. 00

70,000 00 |

$31, lG 75
.‘i.
9, 873. O
S
G 70
9.
4, 505. 09
4,754. 14
12. 09
7, 070. 08
12,338. 39
1,285.51
71,080.23

Lighting, etc.,'Executive Mansion, etc.— ■
F or lighting the E x e cu tiv e M ansion, grounds, and greenhouses, in clu d in g all necessary
expenses o f installation , m aintenance, and repair (acts Mar. 2 , 1867, vol. 14, p . 466,
sec. 2 ; Mar. 29, 1867, vol. 15, p . 9, sec. 7; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41 , p. 1890, sec. 1). . .........

Objects of expenditure.

Estimated, Estimated. IExpended,
1922.
! 1921.
1923.

Salaries............................................................................................... i $1,650.00 $1,650.00
250.00
250.00 1
Wages.............................................................................. *.................t
300.00
Repair and maintenance.................................................................... !
300.00 j
Lighting............................................................................... „............ , 6,400.00 I 6,400.00
Total.........................................................................................

8,600.00

8,000.00 .

$1,638.68
252.12
275.44
5,895.45

8,061.0

Budget, page 482.
Improvements, Executive Mansion —
F or im p rov em en t and m ain ten a n ce o f E x e c u tiv e M ansion grounds (w ith in iron fen ce)
[same acts) ..................................................................................................................................................

10,000.00

For constructing new iron fence in grounds o f White House between the house and the south
lawn area (submitted) .............................................................................................................................

4,000. 00

14, 000.00

5 ,0 0 .0 0

T ota l u n d er E x e c u tiv e O f f i c e ............................................................................................................................ .

333,480. 00

318,480. 00




36

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June SO, 1928— 1 ontinued.
C
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 567.

Total amount to be j Amount appropriated
appropriated under ' for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
priation.
1922.

ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN.

Salaries and Expenses, Office of Alien Property Custodian — ^
F or expen ses o f th e A lie n P rop erty C ustodian authorized b y the act en titled “ A n act
to define, reg u late/ and p unish tradin g w ith the en em y , and for other p urposes,”
ap p rov ed O ct. 6, 1917, as a m en d ed ; in c lu d in g personal and other services and rental
of quarters in the D istrict o f C olum bia and elsewhere, per d iem allow ances in lie u
of su bsistence not e x c e e d in g $4, tra velin g expenses, p rin tin g and b in d in g, law
books, books o f reference and periodicals, su pp lies and eq u ip m en t, and m aintenance,
repair and op eration o f m otor-propelled passenger-carrying v eh icles: Provided, T hat
this ap p rop riation shall n o t b e availa ble for rent o f b u ildin gs in the D istrict o f C olum bia
if su itab le sp ace is p ro v id e d b y th e P u b lic B u ild in g s Com m ission ( act Mar. 4,1921 ,
vol. 4U p • 1378, sec. 1) ..........................................................................................................................

Objects of expenditure.

Rate per annum.

salaries*.
Alien Property Custodian...........................
.....
Managing director....... .
Directors.....................................................
(ieneraL counsel................... .
.......
.Special litigation counsel..........
........
Associate general counsel............................
Attorneys....... .
. ............. . ...........
Chiefs...........................................................
Assistants................. ..................................
Accountants................................................
Bookkeepers........................ .
Secretary to custodian................................
Office manager............................................
Editorial clerk.............................................
Statistical clerk...........................................
Personnel and disbursing officer.................
Stenographers.............................................
Auditors......................................................
Typists........................................................

$5,000.00
$6,000.00- 5,000.00
6,500.001.00
6,000.00- 5,000.00
6,000.00
5,000. 00
4,500.00- 1,800.00
5.000.00- 2,600.00
3.000.00- 2,400.00
3.000.00- 1,500.00
2.000.00- 1,400.00
3,300.00- 2,700.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
2,000.00- 1,800.00
3.600.00- 2,600.00
2,000.00- 1,200.00
3.600.00- 2,000.00
1.700.00- 1,200.00

Budget, page 568

llerks,
Clerk typists..............
File clerks..................
Mimeograph operator.
Blue printer..............
Engineer....................
Telephone operators..
Chauffeurs..................
Firemen.....................
Unskilled laborers.
Watchmen, messengers, charwomen, and
elevator conductor...................................
Total, salaries..

$ ,0 0 00-$l, 200.00
2 0.
1,800. 00- 1,200.00
1,600. 00- 1,200.00
1,400. 00- 1,200.00
1 0 . 00- 1,000.00
,2 0
1,500.00
1,300. 00- 1,100.00
1,150. 00- 1,050.00
1 0 . 00- 1,000.00
,1 0
1 0 . 00- 1,000.00
,1 0
1,100.00-

r

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
Number.

1
1

1
1
1
26
3
8
4
•4
1

Number .

1
1

i '
i
i
26
3
8
4
4
1

1
1
25

1
1
23

20

19

Number .

1
1
3
1
1
1

27
7

2

1
1
1
1
2
2
1

15
27

29

420.00

24
$326,520.00 $326,520.00

$386,403.43

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Building.................................
Equipment.............................
Maintenance of equipment___
Rent, light, heat, and power..
Stationery and printing..........
Telephone and telegraph........
Freight and drayage...............
Per diem and travel expenses.
Maps, books, and periodicals..,
Miscellaneous. * .....................
Total.




150.00

20 0
0 .0

2.500.00
25.000.00
4.500.00
4,000.00
150.00

2.500.00
35.000.00

i,sdo.oo

300.00

300.00
1.800.00

113.90
57.24
2,319.42
35,250.57
4,6S4.00
7,206.06
294.00
9,533.30
266.90
1,778.69

376,920.00

392,620.00

447,907.51

1 .000 0
2 .0

10.000 0
.0
4,000.00
300.00

12,000 0
.0

$376, 920. 00

$375,000. 00

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AN1) INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

37

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending Ju ne 30, 1923— Continued.

(Jeneral object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, pap* 58?).

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of approending June 30,
priation.
i 1922.

BOARD OF MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION,

Board of Mediation and Conciliation —
For carrying on the work o f the U nited States Hoard of M ediation and C onciliation,
including:—
Salaries:
Com m issioner o f M ediation and C onciliation (submitted) ............................................
Assistant C om m issioner of M ediation and C onciliation (submitted) .........................

$7,500. 00
5,000. 00
$12, 500. 00

A dm inistration:
Salaries or com pensation , to b e fixed b y the board, of clerks or other em ployees
of the b oa rd ; travel expen se o f m em bers and em p loy ees; stationery; office
supplies and e q u ip m e n t: p rin tin g and bin d in g; books of reference and p eriod ­
icals; all ex pen d itu res to be approved b y the chairm an of the board; all
expenses of boards of arbitration first to be ap p roved b y the Board of M edia­
tion and C o n cilia tio n ................................................................. '.........................................
T ota l, B oard o f M edia tion and C o n cilia tio n .
B u d g e t , p at;e 2 7 .

12, 500. 00

12, 500. 00
25, 000. 00

BUREAU OF EFFICIENCY.

Salaries and Expenses, Bureau o f Efficiency—
Salaries and con tin gen t expen ses, in c lu d in g tra velin g ex pen ses; su pp lies; stationery;
p urch ase an d e x ch a n ge of eq m p m e n t; prin tin g and b in d in g ; p er d iem in lieu o f su b ­
sisten ce; not to e x ce e d $100 for law books, books o f reference and p eriod icals; and not
to ex cee d $150 for street car fare ( acts Feh. 28,1916, vol. 39, p . 15, sec. 1; July 3, 1918,
vol. 40 , p. 768, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1261, sec. 1) ......................................................
I
j Estimated,
|
1023.
I
1
i Number.
1
7,500 |
0,000-10,000 ;
6,000
1
5.5(10- 500
2,500- 5,000
Rate per
annum.

Personal services (salaries).

Chief..............................................................
Do...........................................................
Assistant chief...........................................
D o ................................................................

Investigators ami accountants......................

Estimated, i Expended,
1922.
|
1921.
Number.

Number.

1

1

1

I

3
it
1
2

15
l.'i
2
3
3

-> 0
,0 0
1.000- 1 0
,S 0

Chief clerk.... ...................... *.....................

Do................................................................

2 . 000- 2,250

Librarian and principal file elo-.k.................
Assistant librarian and file clerk..................
-Secretary to chief....................... ...............
Assistant investigators and clerks................
Stenographers and typists............................
Telephone operator and skilled laborer........
Messengers.....................................................
Temporary clerical assistance.......................

1,400- 1,600
1,500
1/200- 2,400

1,100- 2 00
,0
720- 1.000
900- 1,0S0
720- 1,400

7
12
1
3
15
S
O

GENERAL OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

4. Car-fare........................................................... !.

5. Equipment, material, etc.................. : ___ 1
.
6. Telephone and telegraph service................L
7. Law books, books of reference, and period- i
icals..........................................................1
.
«. Miscellaneous..............................................i.




o;t

$120,090

$137,01S 92
.

3,000
3,000
150
2,500
SO
O

1,000
1,000
100
1,000
600

996.23
1,771.81
82.50
942.20
583.72

100
1,170

50
560

57.89
723.30

175,000

125,000

142,176.57

j

2. Stationery and printing........................ .1
3. Travel (transportation and subsistence)... j*

Total.

45

|16J,2S0

1. Personal services (salaries).

175,000. 00

$125, 000. 00

38

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 80, 1983— Continued.
General objoct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Larjre, or to Revised statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

ISin ( s o t , piiiye 2 8 .

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under i for the fiscal year
each head of appro- 1 ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.

Salaries , Civil Service Commission —
T h ree com m issioners, at $5,000 each (acts Jan. 16,1883, vol. 22, pp. 403-404, sec. 1; July
16 , 1914, vol. 38, p. 465, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1252, sec. 1) ..................................
C hief exam iner (increase of $500 su bm itted) (same acts) .............................................................
Secretary (increase of $1,500 su bm itted) (same acts).....................................................................
Assistant ch ief exam iner (increase of $1,200 su bm itted) (acts Feb. 25,1903 , vol. 32, p. 866,
sec. 1; July 16 , 1914, vol. 38, p. 465 , sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1252, sec. 1) ...........
Assistant secretary (in lieu of ch ie f of d ivisio n , at $2,400, w ho acts as assistant secretary;
increase of $600 su bm itted) (same acts)..........................................................................................
S u p erin ten d en t of field force (su b m itted ; now at $3,000 on lum p-sum roll for additional
e m p lo y e e s)...............................................................................................................................................
C hief, E x am in in g D ivision (in lieu of exam iner, at $2,400; in crease of $1,200 su bm itted)
(acts Mar. 4 , 1911, vol. 36, p. 1185, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 465, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
1921, vol. 41, p. 1252 , sec. 1 ) ................................................................... ..........................................
Certification clerk (increase of $400 su bm itted) (acts Mar. 1,1919, vol. 40, p. 1223, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1252, sec. 1) ...............................................................................................
E xam iners:
T w o, at $3,000 each (in lieu of 2, at $2,400; increase o f $1,200 su bm itted) (acts Mar. 4 ,
1911, vol. 36, p. 1185, sec. 1; July 16, 1914 , vol. 38, p. 465, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921 ,
vol. 41, p - 1252, sec. 1) .................................................................................................................
E igh t, at $2,400 each (in lieu of 4, at $2,400, 2 chiefs of d ivision , at $2,000 and 2 a d d i­
tion al; increase of $5,600 su bm itted) (acts Feb. 25, 1903, vol. 32, p. 866, sec. 1;
Mar. 4 , 1911, vol. 36, p. 1185, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 465 , see. 1; Mar. 3,
1921, vol. 41, P ■ 1252, sec. 1 ) ......................................................................................................
F iv e , at $2,200 each (in lie u of 3, at $2,000 and 2, at $1,8100; increase of $1,400 su b ­
m itte d ) (same acts) .............................................................................. ..........................................
S ix , at $2,000 each (4 in lie u of 4 exam iners, at $1,800 and 2 in lieu of 2 clerks, at
$1,800 each ; increase of $1,600 su bm itted) (acts Mar. 4, l b l l , vol. 36, p. 1185 , sec. 1 ;
July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 465, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p< 1252, sec. 1) ..............
Clerks:
S ix o f class 4 (4 a d d ition a l in lie u of 4 of class 3; decrease o f 2 as a b o v e ) ( R. S . , p. 27,
secs. 167-169; acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38 , p. 465, sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p.
1252, sec. 1 ) ........................................................................................... ..........................................
T w en ty -fou r o f class 3 (d ecrease o f 4 su b m itte d ) (same acts) ............................................
T h irty -n in e o f class 2 (same acts) ............................................... ..................................................
F ifty -tw o o f class 1 (same acts) ......................................................................................................
F i f t y s ix , at $1,000 each (in lie u Of 34, at $1,000 and 22, at $900; increase of $2,200
su bm itted ) (same acts) ..................... *..........................................................................................
C h ief m essenger (submitted) ....................... *..................................................................................
M essenger (increase o f $60 su b m itted ) (same acts) ...................................................(..............
Assistant m essenger (increase of $180 su bm itted) (same acts).............* .............. '..............
S killed laborer (increase o f $180 su b m itted ) (same acts) ......................................................
T w o teleph on e operators, at $1,080 each (increase of $360 on 1 and 1 ad d ition a l su b ­
m itted) (same acts) .........................................................................................................................
F our m essenger b o y s, at $420 each (same acts) ........................................................................
Custodian force:
E ngineer (increase o f $240 su bm itted (same acts) ..................................................................
General m ech an ic (increase o f $240 su bm itted) (same acts) ..................................... ..........
Tfyree firem en, at $900 each (in crease o f $360 on 2 an d 1 a d d ition a l su bm itted )
(same acts)............ ............................................................................................................................
T w o w atchm en, at $900 each (increase o f $360 on 2 su bm itted) (same acts) ................
T w o elevator con d u ctors, at $900 each (increase o f $360 on 2 su bm itted) (same acts)..
F our laborers, at $900 each (in crease o f $720 on 3 and 1 a d d ition a l su bm itted)
(same acts) ......................................................................................................................................... ,
O ne charw om an (fu ll tim e; su b m itted ).....................................................................................
F our charw om en, at $240 each (sam e a c ts )...............................................................................
O ne auto tru ck d river (su b m itte d )..............................................................................................

$15,000.00
4, 000. 00
4.000. 00
3, 600. 00
3.000. oO
3,600.00
3, 600.00
2, 400. 00

6.000. 00

19,200.00

11, 000. 00
12,000.00

1 0,800.00
38,400. 00
5 4 .600 .00 i
62.400.00 |
56 ,000.00
1,0 80.0 0
900. 00
900. 00
900.00
2,160. 00
1,6 80.0 0

1, .080.00
1,080. 00
2 .7 0 0 .0 0
1.8 00.0 0
1 ,8 0 0 .0 0 ,
3 ,6 0 0 .0 0 j
600.00 I
960.00 I
960.00 j

$331,800.00

D istrict secretaries:
T hree, at $2,500 each (in lieu of 2 at $2,400 each and 1 at $1,800; increase of $900
su bm itted ) (acts Feb. 3,1905, vol. 32, p. 643, sec. 1; July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. i65,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1252, sec. 1) ..........................................................................
O ne (sam e a c t s ) ..................................................................................................................................
F our, at $2,000 each (sam e a c t s ) ...................................................................................................
F our, at $1,800 each (decrease o f 1 su b m itte d ) (sam e a c ts )................................................
Clerks:
O ne of class 4 (sam e a cts)................................................................................................................
O n e of class 3 (sam e a cts)......................................................................................... .......................
O ne of class 1 (sam e acts).................................................................................................................
E ighteen clerks, at $1,000 each (6 in lieu of 6 at $900 each; 5 in lieu of 5 at $840
each? increase of $1,400 su bm itted) (sam e a c t s ).................................................................
Messenger b o y ........................................... .. * t . . . * .........................................................................*____

Provided, T h a t the C iv il S e rv ice C om m ission shall in c lu d e in its estim ates for
1924 item s c o v e rin g th e field force deta iled from departm ents and offices, an d the
heads o f su ch departm ents and offices shall in their estimates for 1924 m ake corre­
sp on d in g red u ction s in th e appropriations from w h ich th e em ployees d eta iled to the
C iv il S e rvice C om m ission h a v e b e e n p a id .




$305. 420.00

47,980.00

Salaries, Field Force, Civil Service Commission —

45. 680.00

7, 500.00

2,200.00
8,000.00
7.200.00
1.800.00
1,600.00

1,200.00
18,000.00
480.00

39

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date o f acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 29.
Salaries , Expert Examiners, Civil Service Commission —•

!

i
For the em p loy m en t of expert exam iners not in the F ederal service to prepare ques­
tions and rate papers in exam inations on special su bjects for ,which exam iners with
!
the service are not av aila ble (acts Mar. 4 , 1911, vol. 36, v. 1186, sec. 1; July 16, 1914,
vol. 38, p. 465, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, voL 41, 7>- 1252, sec. 1 ) ..................................................................................

Personal services.

j

Rates.,

ESti m ed*
Number.

Number.

........... i

15-20
$2,000.00

$2 ,000 .00

$2, 000. 00

43 ,100 .00 j

50, 000. 00

Expended, 1921.
\ Number.

Examiners ................ ............. per diem.. $50.00 ..................... .....................i
Do.............................................. do___ 25.00 I..................... .................... !
15-20
Do.............................................. d o .... 10.00 i
15-20
5.00 ..................... .....................
D o ........ ........ . ......................... (jo ...
D o ................ .................. ..... do ...
4 00 ..................... .....................
Do.......................
.. . . per hour..
1.00 !..................... .....................!
* Salaries.............................................

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

l
1
7
1
4
1

15-20
15
$2,000.00 ..............
!

A m ount .

$200.00
812.50
382.85
5.00
548.00
48.00

1,996.35

Additional Employees, Civil Service Commission —■
F or ad d itional em p loy ees for the C iv il S ervice Com m ission (acts July 3,1918 , vol. 40,
p. 769, sec. 1; Mar . 1 , 1919, vol. 40, p. 1223, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, p. 1252, sec. 1 ) ................................

Personal services.

!
1
j' Rate
Estimated, > Estimated,
per
1923.
1922.
,annum.

Number.
Salaries:
Number.
11
1
Superintendent of field force.......- ...................... $3,000
21
Examiner......................... ............................
2,000
4
Clerks.................................................................... i 1,800
4
4 1
4
Do................................................................... ' 1,600
6
6
Do................................................................... ! 1,400
Do................................................................... 1,300
14
Do................................................................... 1,200
14
Do................................................................... 1,100
Do................................................................... 1,000 !
Temporary clerks and examiners, $900, $400, $200,
per annum, $1.50, $0.75, $0.50 per hour and $2.22
per diem...................... .....................................
Messenger boys and charwomen, $600 to $240 per
annum............ ..............................................
............!......................
Wages:
Miscellaneous and temporary labor, $900, $840,
$720 per annum... . . . . . . . ...........

30
Salaries..................... ......................... .....................
Wages....................................... ........................

1
i.....................

Total........................................................ .
Balance unexpended.......................................... .

!

29 |

Total appropriation, 1921.......................

$43,100

Expended,
1921.
Number.

4
15
25
8
8
7
14
11
4
96
$96,807.31
3,172.50

$43,100

99,979.81
20.19
100,000.00

!

1 Submitted in statutory roll estimates.
=New.
N ote .—If all positions estimated for under the heading “ Salaries, Civil Service Commission,” are
specifically appropriated for on the statutory roll then this lump sum for additional employees may be
reduced by $6,600, the present salaries of six of the additional employees estimated for on the statutory
roll.




40

t h e a l t e r n a t i v e BUDGET, 1023.

Estimates'of appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General objcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at I arpe, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

Budget, page 30.

Salaries and Expenses , Employees ’ Retirement A ct , Civil Service Commission—
T o carry out ih e p rov ision s of section 13 of the a ct entitled “ A n act for the retirem ent of
em p loy ees in the classified c iv il service, and for other p urposes,” a p p roved M ay 22,
1920, in c lu d in g personal services in the D istrict of C olum bia, stationery, prin tin g,
purchase o f books, office e qu ipm en t, and other su pplies ( acts June 5, 1920 , vol. 41 1
p. 886, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41 , p. 1252, sec. 1) ......................................................................

Personal services.

Salaries:
Clerks...............
Do..............
Do........... .
Do..............
Do..............
Do..............
Do..............
Do..............
Do..............
Do..............
Messenger boys.
Do..............

Rate
per

S ,0 0
20

$40. 000. 00

Estimated, ! Estimated, I Expended,
1923.
!
1922.
1921.
Number.

Number.

Number.

1,800
1,700
1,500
1,400
1,300

2
1

10
,2 0
1,1 0
0
10
.0 0

4
3

1
1
1

900
420
360

25
Salaries.,

$40, 000. 00

33

$35,000.00

$35,000.00

$42,124.71

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Stationery..........................................

Printing..........................................

Purchase of books..............................
Office equipment and other supplies.
General reserve..................................
Total.

1.500.00
300.00 j
50.00 L
1.650.00 '
1.500.00 i.

1.500.00
300.00
50.00
3.150.00
40,000.00

40,000.00

3,055.58
404.37

*4*40s!05
49,992.71

Salaries and Expenses, Civil Service Commission —
F or exam in ation o f presidential postm asters, in clu d in g travel, printing, stationery,
contingent expenses, ad d itional exam iners and investigators, and other necessary
expen ses o f exam inations, fiscal year 1923: Provided , T h a t n o person shall be em ­
p lo y e d hereunder at a rate o f com p ensation e x ce e d in g $1,800 per annum , e x ce p t 10
at n ot to e x ce e d $3,000 ( act June 16, 1921 , vol. 42 , p. 59, sec. 4 ) ............................................

Objects of expenditure.

Estimated,
1923.

Traveling expenses..........................................................................................
Stationery...........................................................................................
Contingent.........................................................................................
Total.......................................................................................

00,000.00 !

75,000. 00

Estimated,
1922.

$25,000.00
1,500.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
31,500.00

$31,750.00
1,500.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
39; 750.00

60,000.00

75,000.00

T otal, salaries and expen ses, C iv il S ervice Com m ission .

524, 880. 00

518.10 . 00

Traveling Expenses , Civil Service Commission—
F or necessary tra velin g expenses, in c lu d in g those of exam iners actin g un der the d irec­
tio n o f the com m ission , and for expenses o f exam inations, and investigations held
elsew here than at W ashington, and in c lu d in g n ot e x ceed in g $1,000 for expenses of
atten d ance at m eetings o f p u b lic officials w h en sp e cifica lly d irected b y the com m is­
sion ( act Mar. S. 1921 , vol . 4U P• 1252. sec. 1 ) .........................“ ....................................................




20,000. 00

20.000. (1
0

41

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
Oenerat object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed olJect.
Hi i « ( ,

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
each head of appro*
1922.
priation.

pag«* IU .

I

P im tin g en l a n d M iscella n eou s E xpense#, C iv il S ervice C om m ission —

Fur contingent and m iscellaneous expenses of the C ivil S ervice Com m ission, in clu d in g
furniture and other equ ipm ent and repairs thereto; purchase and exchan ge of ty p e ­
writers, ca lcu latin g m achines, and other labor-saving d e v ices; supplies; advertising;
telegraph and teleph one serv ice; freight and express charges, fuel, heat. light., and
power; w indow w ashing; street-car fares not to ex ce e d $!<)(); stationery; law books,
books of reference, directories, newspapers, and periodicals, not to ex ceed §500;
charts; purchase, exch an ge, m aintenance, and repair of m otor trucks, m otor cycles,
bicy cles, and one m otor-propelled passenger-carrying v e h icle to be used on fy for
official purposes; garage rent; m aintenance and repair of electric con d u it; postage*
stamps to p repay postage on m atter addressed to Postal Union coun tries; and sp ecia ld eliv erv stam ps; in all (a ct Mar. S, 1921, v o l. 41> p . 1252, s e e . / ) ................................................................

Objects of expenditure.
Operating expense?:
Ashes and rubbish removed...................................
Coal and wood for heating plant.............................
Electric power for elevators,lights, and machines.,
Express, freight, and drayage.................................
laundry scrvice......................................................
Telautograph service............4.................... ............
Telegraphing........................ ..................................
Telephones..............................................................
Motor truck maintenance........................................
Ice...........................................................................
Total..

$50, 000. 00

10, S75. 00

10,875. 00

611, 755. 00

604.975. 00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

$135.00

2,100.00
2,200.00
700.00
50.00
309.00

$135.00
2.400.00

2.200.00

2, moo

700.00
50. 00
309.00
2,300.00

1,4(10.00
30.00

1,400.00 |
30.00 '

0.200.00

15,721.00

Equipment, supplies, and repairs:
I ile cases and filing devices......................................................
*
Furniture and office equipment.................................................
Office machines, typewriters, duplicators, etc...........................
Custodian equipment, awnings, fans, flags, trucks, etc.............
Supplies expendable, cleaning materials, paint, oil, etc...........
Repairs and parts for office machines........................................
Miscellaneous, emergencies, and contingencies..........................
Foreign postage and spceial-delivcry stamps.............................
Car tickets..................................................................................
Library reference books, periodicals, etc...................................
Envelopes...................................................................................
Paper stock, including typewriting und duplicating paper.......
Official stationery and supplies..................................................
Supplies for oflice machines.......................................................

l(K ( )
). X
500. 00
0 0.00
0
0 0.00
0
300. 00
0 0.00
0

Total........................................................................................
General reserve................................................................. ...............

34,276.00
................

Grand total..

$50, 000. 00

G O 00
O.

956.00
400. (M
l

00
0.00

700.00
500.00
100. (X
)
IX <>
). X

0,200.00

i

t
i
,

$133.80
2.370.71
2,225.10
710.57
45.13
259. 44
2,500. 00
G 145.11
,
081.7ft
30.00

15,721.00!

15,137.68

1,800.00
900.00 .

2,666, 5S
652.06
1,382.03
1,674.06
1,895.66
1,514.78
1,136.31
87.00
99.00
3*9.64
9,862.35
8,720,27
2,696.%
2,124.10

1,200.00

2.500.00
1.500.00
1.400.00

1,000.00
90.00
10 0
0 .0
3:a o
o

Sf 500. IX
)

7.500.00
2.350.00
2,080. 00
31,276.00 ;
3,000.00

50,000.00 , 50,000.00

34, S62.30
49,999.9S

Rent of Building , Civil Service Commission—
F or rent of b u ild in g {same act) ...................
(The owner of the building requests an increase in rental of $3,341.90, making the total of $20,219.90 for
rent. Should the item of rent be not granted by Congress then the commission requests the following
appropriation for removal to and refitting its new quarters.)

Removal from Present Quarters, C ivil Service Commission —
F or m ovin g the C ivil S e rv ice Com m ission from its present quarters to a new location ,
and for the purchase o f necessary furniture, carpets, curtains, awnings, and other
absolutely neceasary item s for the fu rnishing and e q u ip m e n t of its new' offices, in c lu d ­
in g the hiring of lab or and the purchase o f m aterial for constructin g sh elvin g and
m aking alterations and repairs to office equ ip m en t, to co n tin u e availa ble during
the fiscal years en d in g Ju n e 30. 1923 and 1924............................................................................ 1 $ 1 5 , 000. 00
T otal. C ivil S ervice C om m ission ................................................................................................................................
The estimate of the Civil Service Commission for printing andbinding, under section 2, act of May 8,
1S72 (R. S. 720, sec, 3661), will be found on page 32.
* Not included in total.




42

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1D23.

Estimates o f appropriations required for the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 566.

c o m m is s io n

o f f in e

Total amount to be [Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each H
ead of appro- j ending June 30,
priation.
j 1922.

arts.

Expenses , Commission o f Fine A rts—
F or expen ses m ad e necessary b y the act ap p roved M ay 17, 1910, en titled “ A n act es­
tablish ing a C om m ission o f F in e A rts,” in clu d in g the purchase o f periodicals^ ifiaps,
and book s o f reference, to b e disbursed, on vouchers a p p roved b y tne com m ission, b y
the officer in charge o f p u b lic b u ildin gs and grounds, who shal I be the secretary and shal I
a ct as th e e x e c u tiv e officer o f said com m ission : Provided , T hat expen d itu res for su b­
sistence shall not b e restricted b y the lim itations o f existin g law (act Mar. 4 t 1921, vol.
41, p. 1378, sec. 1) ....................................................................................................................................
Objects of expenditure.

Rale per
annum.
$2.500.00
1,320.00
720.00

Total salaries.

$10,000. in)

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

N m er.
ub
1
1
1

Number.

$4,540.00

Salaries:
Assistant to the Secretary.......................................
Stenographer and typewriter.................................. i
Messenger boy......................................................... .

$10, 000. 00

®4,540.00

$4,475.00

3.000.00

3,000.00

2,430.41

1,850.00
260.00
350.00

1,850.00

1,081.7S
285.10
S24.71

1 ,0 0 0
0 0 .0

10,0 0 0
0 .0

1
1
1

Number.

1
1
1

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURES.

Traveling expenses (estimated at one meeting a month
including committee travel and meetings, at rate of
3300 per meeting)........................................................,
Printing of annual report and other printing, photo­
graphs, books of reference, necessary official plans '
and maps, etc.............................................................
Telephone and telegraph service...................................
Miscellaneous office supplies and other service, files,etc.
Unexpended balance.....................................................
Total*
B u d g e t, p age

589.

e m p lo y e e s ’ c o m p e n s a t io n

20 0
0 .0

350.00

c o m m is s io n .

Salaries , Employees* Compensation Commission—
T hree com m issioners, at $4,000 each (acts Sept. 7 , 1916, vol. ,39, p. 742 , secs, 1-42; Mar. 4,
1921 . vol. 41 1 p * 1378, sec. 1 ) ...............................................................................................................
Secretary (same acts) ..................................................................................................................................
A ttorn ey (same acts) ...................................................................................................................................
C hief statistician (same acts) ...................................................................................................................
C hief o f accou n ts (same acts ) ...................................................................................................... ; ..........
A ssistant ch ie f o f accou n ts (same acts) ................................................................................................
A cco u n ta n t (sajne acts) ..............................................................................................................................

SI 2, 000. 00
3, 000. 00
4.000. 00
3, 500. 00
2,500. 00
1, 600. 00
2, 250. 00

C laim exam iners:
C hief (same acts) ................. . ..............................................................................................................
Assistant (same acts). ........................................................................................................................
A ssistant (same a c ts ) ... .....................................................................................................................
F iv e assistants, at $1:600 each (same acts) .................................................................................
S p ecial agents:
T w o , at $2,000 each (submitted) .....................................................................................................
T w o , at $1*800 each (acts Sept. 7 , 1916 , vol. 39, p. 742, secs. 1-42; Mar. 4,1921, vol. 41,
p . 1378, sec. 1 ) .................................................................................................................................
T w o , at $1,600 each (same acts) .....................................................................................................
Clerks:
S even of class 3 (same acts) .............................................................................................................
T w e lv e o f class 2 (same acts) ...........................................................................................................
T w en ty -sev en o f class 1 (same acts) .............................................................................................
Three at $1,000 each (same acts) ....................................................................................................
C hief teleph on e operator (same acts) ....................................................................................................
M essenger (same acts) .................................................................................................................................
E xperts and tem porary assistants in the D istrict of C olum bia and elsewhere, to be p aid
at a rate not ex ce e d in g $8 p er d ay, and tem porary clerks, stenographers, or typists
in the D istrict of C olum bia, to be p aid at a rate not ex ceed in g $100 p er m onth (same
acts) ...................................................... *.......................................................................................................

Contingent Expenses , Employees 1 Compensation Commission—

2, 250.00

2.000.00
1,800. 00

8, 000. 00
4.000. 00 |
3, 600.00 |
3, 200. 00 I

I
11,200. 00 |
16,800. 00 |
32,400. 00
3.000.00

1.000.00 1
840. 00

10,000.00
~

F o r fu rn itu re and other e q u ip m en t and repairs thereto; law books, book s of reference,
period icals, stationery, and supplies, travelin g expenses; prin tin g and b in d in g to be done
at the G overn m en t P rin tin g Office, m edical exam inations, traveling and other expenses,
a n d loss of wages p a y a b le to em ployees u n der secs. 21 and 22 of the a ct o f Sept. 7,1916.
a n d fo r m iscellaneous item s (acts S e p t 7, 1916, vol. 39, p. 742, secs. 1-42; Mar. 4,1921.
vol. 41 , p . 1379, sec. 1 ) .........................................................................................................................
1Estimated, j Expendi1923.
tures, 1921.
Furniture, equipment, and repairs........................................................................ S3,800.00
Books, stationery, and supplies............................................................................
2,750.00
Printing and binding.............................................................................................
5,450.00
Traveling expenses.................................................................................................j 7,000.00 I
Miscellaneous..........................................................................................................[ 3,000.00 j




22,000.00

$7,80S. 49
4,815.28
8,669.58
5,792.15
2,798.64
29,884.14

128,940.00

124,940.00

22,000.00

20,000. 00

43

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

Budget, page 590.
Employees' Compensation Fund —
F or the p aym en t of com p en sation p ro v id e d b y “ A n act to p ro v id e com pensation for
em ployees of the U n ited States suffering injuries w h ile in the perform an ce of their
duties, and for other p u rp o se s,” ap p rov ed Sept. 7, 1916, in c lu d in g m edical, surgical,
and hospital services and su pplies p ro v id e d b y sec. 9 and the transportation and
burial expen ses p ro v id e d b y secs. 9 and 11, to be availa ble u n til ex p en d ed (acts Sept .
?, 1916, vol. 39, p . 742, secs'. .1-42; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1379, see. 1 ) ..................................
T ota l, E m p lo y e e s ’ C om pensation C om m ission.

Budget, page 863.

$2, 650,000. 00

$1, 800, 000, 00

2, 800, 940. 00

1, 944, 940. 00

1 .7 6 1 .0 0 0 .0 0
1 .7 7 2 .0 0 0 .0 0
1 .0 9 0 .0 0 0 .0 0

1.5 1 4 .0 0 0 .0 0
1.5 25 .0 0 0 .0 0
1.0 90.0 00.0 0

200, 000.00

200,000.00

4 ,8 2 3 ,0 0 0 .0 0
1,034, 000.00
75 ,000 .00

4, 329, 000.00
1,034, 000.00
75, 000.00

5, 932,000. 00

5 ,4 3 8 ,0 0 0 .0 0

FEDERAL BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION.

Coopera live Vocational Education in Agriculture .......................................................................................
Cooperative Vocational Education in Trades and Industries ....................................................................
Cooperative Vocational Education , Teachers, etc .........................................................................................
Salaries end Expenses. Federal Board for Vocational Education ............................................................
T hat there is h ereby an nu ally appropriated, ou t of an y m on ey in the Treasury not
otherwise appropriated, the sums p ro v id e d in section s 2, 3, and 4 of this act, to b e
paid to the re sp e ctiv e States for the purpose of cooperating w ith the States in p ayin g
the salaries of teachers, supervisors, and directors of agricultural su bjects, and teachers
of trade, hom e econ om ics, and industrial su bjects, and in the preparation of teachers
of agricultural, trade, industrial, and h om e econ om ics su bjects; and the sum p rov id ed
for in section 7 for the use o f the Federal B oard for V ocation al E d u ca tion for the
adm inistration of this act and for the purpose of m aking studies, investigations, and
reports to aid in the organization and co n d u ct of vocation al ed ucation, w h ich sums
shall b e ex p e n d e d as hereinafter p ro v id e d ( act Feb. 23, 1917 , vol. 39, pp. 929-936,
secs. 1-18) ...................................................................................................................................................
Cooperative Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons Disabled in Industry ...............................................
Salaries and Expenses , Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons Disabled in Industry ..........................
T h a t in order to p ro v id e for the p rom otion of v o ca tio n a l rehabilitation of persons d is­
abled in in d u stry or in an y legitim ate o ccu p a tio n and their return to c iv il e m p loy ­
m ent there is h e re b y approp riated for the use of th e States, su b je ct to the provision s
of this act, for the purpose o f cooperating w ith them in the m aintenance of v ocation al
rehabilitation o f su ch d isabled persons, and in retu rn ing v oca tion a lly rehabilitated
persons to c iv il em p lo y m e n t for the fiscal year en d in g June 30, 1921, the sum of
' $750,000; for the fiscal year e n d in g Ju ne 30,*1922, and thereafter for a period of tw o
years, th e sum of $1,000,000 an nu ally. Said sum s shall b e allotted to the States in
th e proportion w h ic h th eir p op u lation bears to the total p opu lation in th e U n ited
States, not in clu d in g Territories, ou tly in g possessionsf and the D istrict of C olum bia,
accord in g to the last p re ce d in g U nited. States census: Provided , T hat the allotm en t
of funds to an y State shall n ot b e less than a m in im u m o f $5,000 for an y fiscal year.
A n d there is lierebv appropriated th e follo w in g sum s, or so m u ch thereof as m ay b e
n eed ed , w h ic h shall b e used for the purpose o f p ro v id in g the m in im u m allotm en t to
the States p ro v id e d for in this section , for the fiscal year en d in g June 30, 1921, the
sum of $46,000; for th e fiscal vear e n d in g June 30, 1922. and an nu ally thereafter, the
sum of $34,000. * * *

Budget, page 864.
S ec. 6. T h a t there is h e re b y approp riated to the F ederal B oard for V oca tion a l E d u ca ­
tion the sum o f $75,000 an nu ally for a period of fou r years for the purpose of m ak in g
studies, in vestigation s, and reports regarding the v oca tion a l reh ab ilitation of d isabled
persons and their p lacem en ts in su itab le or g ain fu l occu p a tion s, and for the ad m in ­
istra tiv e expen ses of said board in c id e n t to perform ing th e d uties im p osed b y this
act, in c lu d in g salaries o f su ch assistants, experts, clerks, and other em p loyees, in the
D istrict o f C olum bia or elsew here as the board m ay d eem necessary, actual tra velin g
and other necessary expen ses in cu rred b y the m em bers of the board and b y its
em ployees, un der its orders, in c lu d in g attendants at m eetin gs of ed u cation al asso­
ciation s and other organizations, rent an d e q u ip m e n t of offices in the D istrict of
C olum bia and elsew here, purchase o f book s o f reference, law books, and p eriod icals,
stationery, typew riters and exch an ge thereof, m iscellaneous su pp lies, postage on
foreign m a il, p rin tin g and b in d in g to b e d on e at the G overnm ent P rin tin g O ffice,
and all other necessary expen ses (act June 2 , 1920, voL 41, p p . 735-737 , secs. 1 ,6 ).
T ota l u n d e r F ederal B oard for V o ca tio n a l E d u c a t io n .............................................




44

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 11)23.

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 80, 1923— Continued.

General objcct (title of appropriation)! date of acts, references to Htatutes at I, ar*:(\ or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

B u d g e t, page 804.

FKHKItAL TOWER COMMISSION.

Reclamation Fund , Special Fund
Payments to States tinder Federal Water Pontr Act , Special Funds S e c . 17. T hat all proceed s from any Indian reservation shall he placed to (lie cred it of
the Indians o f such reservation. All other charges arising1from licenses hereunder
shall ho paid into the Treasury of the United States, su b ject to the follow in g d istribu ­
tion: T w e lv e and on e-half p er cen tu m thereof is h erebv appropriated to b e paid into
the Treasurv o f tho U nited States and cred ited to “ M iscellaneous receipts
50 per
cen tu m o f the charges arising from licenses hereunder for the o ccu p a n c y and use of
p u b lic lands, national m onum ents, national forests, and national parks shall be paid
into, reserved, and appropriated as a part of the reclam ation fund created b y the act
of Congress know n as the R eclam ation A ct, ap p roved June 17,1002; and 37$ per centum
of the charges arising from licenses hereunder for the o c cu p a n c y and use of national
forests, national parks, p u b lic lands, and national m onum ents, from develop m en t
w ithin the boundaries o f an y State shall be paid b y the S ecretary o f the Treasury to
su ch State; and 50 p er cen tu m of the charges arising from all other licenses hereunder
is h e re b y reserved and appropriated as a sp ecia l fund in the Treasury to be expen d ed
un der th o d irection o f the S ecretary o f W ar in the m aintenance and op eration of dams
and other navigation structures ow ned b y the U nited States or in tn e construction ,
m aintenance, or operation o f headwaters or other im provem en ts of navigable waters
of the U nited States (act June 10, 1920, vol. 41, pp. 1072, 1073, sec. 17).




Total amount to le Amount appropriated
a
appropriated under
for the nscal year
ending Juno 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

45

KXKriJTlVK OFFICK A X I) IXDtit’ KXI)KNT KSTABUSKM ENTS.

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
I Total amount to bo Amount Appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

f ieneral object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Kcvfced Statutes, and estimated amount 1 appropriated under
m inimi for each detailed object.
each head of appro­
priation.

Budget, page 500.

kkdkkai, t k a u k com m ission .

Salaries, Federal Trade Commission—

Five commissioners, at .$10,000 each (arts Sept. iiti, 1914, r()t>
y
».
sees. 1-11; Mar.
4, 1921, vol. 41, />. /.WW, see. 1)...............................................................................................
Secretary (same arts).......................................................................................... . ........................
For all other authorized expenditures of the Federal Trade Commission in performing
the duties imposed b y law or in pursuance of law, including personal and other serv­
ices, supplies and equipment, law books, books of reference, periodicals, printing
and binding, garage rental, traveling expenses, newspapers, foreign postage, and
witness fees and mileage in accordance with sec. 0 of the Federal Trade Commission
act (same aets).

Kate per j Estimated, j Estimated, Expended,
annum. \ 1923. J
1922.
1921.

Employers.

Attorney am! examiner.......................................
Special examiner.................................................
Special expert, special examiner...................................
SjM
’cial attorney, ?|>ecial examiner, and attorneys and
examiners.........................................................

.

Examiners and special agents....................................
Examiner and attorneys and examiners.....................
Examiner, special agent, and attorneys and examiner .
Examiner and attorney and examiner........ ............. . .
Examiners,special agents, and attorneys and examiner? .!
Examiners and attorneys and examiners................... .
Examiners, special agents,and attorneys and examiner* .
Chief clerk............ . . .................................................
Examiners and special attorneys............... . ..............
Special agent............................................................. .
Examiners, special experts, special attorney, special ex­
aminers, special agents, clerks, and nttorneyes and
examiners......................................................
Examiner....................................................... .

.;
.i
.

Examiners and attorneys and examiners..
Examiner................................................
Do.....................................................
Do....................................................
Attorney and examiner............................
Examiner................................................
.1
Clerk.
Clerk, attorney and examiner, special agents and ex­
.
aminers.
.
Examiners and attorneys and examiners...........
Examiners and special agents...........................
.
Examiner.........................................................
Snccdnl attorney, examiners, and special agents.
Examiner.........................................................
Special agent....................................................

,

Examiner
I ! I __ 1 III-I......... !
II
Do.
,i
Clerks, special agents, and examiners..........................
Special expert, examiners, special agents and clerks.
Clerks, special agents, and examiners................
Clerk................................................................ .
Clerks to commissioners, clcrks, sj>ecial agent, exam­
iners, and multigraph operator........................
;
Clcrks...............................................................
f
Clerks and examiners.........................................
Examiners.........................................................
i
Do............................................................ .
!
Clerk and special agent.....................................
Clerk to commissioner, clerks, and examiners....
Clerk and examiner...........................................
Clerks.....................*
...........................................
Examiners and clerks....................................... .
Do...............................................................
Clerks.................................................................
Examiners and clerks.........................................
Special expert, examiners and clerks..................
Examiner, general mechanic, and clerks........... .
,,
Draftsmen, multigraph operator,examiners and clerks..




i Xu
fS
,00».00 !
7 .7 .0
, )0 0
0,000.00
j
5.0 0 o ;
0. o
4 SO0
, O. 0
4 .moo
,
4 10 0
,2 1 .0
4,000.00
3,W 0
l. 0
3,600.00
3,500.00 i
3,300.00 !
3,2 C
50. O•
3,200.00 I
3,100.00 j

1
1
to
3
3:
r
>
.s
2!
1I
0
3
1 I
2'
1i
21
1I

3,000.00
1
9
2,940.00
1
2,880.00 !
4
2,820.00
4
2,800.00
11
2.760.00 !
1I
2.740.00 !
ii
2.700.00 i
1
2,(H .0 !
O0
1
2,520.00 !
1
2,.moo
7
2,460.00
2
2,400.00
5
2,340.00
i
2,280.00
7
2,260.00
2,250.00
1
2,220.00
1
2,200.00
2
2,160.00
2,100.00
4
2,000.00
1
2
1.920.00
4;
1,800.00
i;
1,800.00
2 1
2
1.740.00
2
1,680.00
a'
■
1,650.00 ..............!
1.640.00
1
1,620.00
Ij
1,600.00
3»
1,560.00
i;
1,520.00
1;
1,500.00
9!
1,44a0
0
1 !
3
i,4oaoo
*i
i,3saoo
1
7
2
1
1,320.00
1,260.00
4j
1,200.00
3 |
6

tt * r
N m er. N mtr .
ub
1
\
1
1
2
2
!)
1
0
2
3
o
3
4
5
8
1
2
2
2
8
1
2
3
:i
9
1
3
1
i
«
>
2
1
I
'

1 !
8
1j
4
4
1
1
I
1
1!
1
7
9I
s
1
7;
i;
l!
2!
4i
1
2
4
1
2 j
2
2!
6;
1
1
3
1
1
9
1
3
8
1
7
2
1
4
3
6

2
7
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
*
3
1
8
1
«
i
i
1
1
2
7
1
9
7
1
3
3
2
9
1
1
2
5
2
2
2
0
2
0
1
1
1
8
3
0
6
5
1

5,000. 00

$50,000. 00
5,000.00

900,000. 00

900,000.00

955,000.00

Total, Federal Trade Commission.

$50,000. 00

955,000.00

TII1-: AI/mtXATlVK lU’IH T \ > X
JK , \ '2

4()

k'stimales of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1023—■
(JontiniKnl.
General object (title of appropriation), date of nets, reform cos to Statutes at Laritc, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to lie Amount appropriated
for tho fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

pai;e 501.
Salaries i Federal Trade Commission- -C on tin ued.
i Itate per ■Estimated, i Estimated, Expended,
annum.
1923,
1922.
1921.

Employees.

Number.

Do..
('forks, messengers, assistant messengers, telephone
operator, and laborers, $1,000 to $IS0 per annum —

Numlxr.

NumUr.

1

$1,110.00
1,100.00

1

2

3
17 j

17

2X

31 j
1

301 !

144

$700,000.00 $001,400.00 j $683,147.7 i

Salaries..
OTIIKIt O JK
U CTM OF EXrHNMTUBKS.

0 .0
1 2 0 .0 : 125, 0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0
150.00
5, ttia o
. o
10,0 0 0 ! 1 , 0 0 0
0 .0
5 0 .0
0 00
15,000.00 : 2 , 00 .0
2,500.00 I 1 , 00 .0
0 00
250.00
235.00
r , io o
> o. o
00 0
0 .0
20 0
0 .0
. 2,000.00
00 0
0 .0
<*)
l.V M (X
lX ). )
(*
)

Travel expenses.................
Rental of quarters *..........
Witness Tees and mileage...
Stationery and supplies_
_
Furniture and equipment,,
Electric light aim power...
Telegraph and telephones,.
Hooks and periodicals....................................................
Reporting proceedings...................................................
Contract services............................................................
Miscellaneous items (including press clippings, laundry,
freight and express, postage, car tickets, garage rental,
etc.).............................................................................
Printing and binding.....................................................

70,728.53
5.150.00
5,700.30
18,493.04
2.324.00
127.70
3,428.47
1,979.7S
0,081.22
0,274.54

0 0.00
0

4,299.01
10,812.92

5,000.00

2 , .moo
7

40, 00 .0
00

Total..................................................................... ................... 900,000.00 j 900,000.00

I

825,148.21

1 Estimate lor u Rental of quarters” covers rent of Held branch offices in New York and Chicago and are
based on leases for tho current fiscal year.
1 Estimate for u Reporting proceedings” included in estimate for "Contract services,” tho former class of
ic
service is now carried on tho books of the commission under the heading of Contract Services, which covers
all miscellaneous service rondered on a contract basis.

Budget, page 591.

g e n e r a l ac c o u n tin g

o f f ic e .

Salaries and Expenses , General Accounting Office—
For carrying o u t the p rov ision s of the a ct o f June 10, 1921, establishing the General
A cco u n tin g O ffice, in c lu d in g salaries of officers and em p loyees, actual traveling e x ­
penses and per d iem in lieu of su bsistence w h ile absent on official business outsid e the
D istrict of C olum bia n ot to e x ce e d $50,000, rent, purchase, and exchan ge of books, and
con tin g en t and m iscellaneous expen ses ( act June 10, 1921 , vol. 42, p p . 28-27, secs.
801-SIS) ........................................................................................................................................................

Employees.

Rato per
annum.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1923.
1922.
X umber.

Comptroller General....................................................... $10,000.00
Comptroller of Treasury.................................................
6,000.00
Assistant Comptroller General.......................................
7,500.00
Assistant Comptroller of Treasury.................................
4,500.00
Assistant to Comptroller General...................................
6,000.00
Auditor...........................................................................
5,000.00
Do.............................................................................
4,000.00
Chief clerk.......................................................................
3,000.00
Do.............................................................................
2,500.00
Do.............................................................................
2,250.00
Chief of division..............................................................
3,600.00
Do.............................................................................
3,000.00
Do.............................................................................
2,500.00
Do.............................................................................
2,460.00
Do.............................................................................
2,250.00
Do.............................................................................
2,000.00
Chief of appointment division........................................
2,500.00
Chief of division and chief clerk.....................................
2,250.00
I nvestigator....................................................................
3,000.00
Special assistant.............................................................
3,000.00
Assistant to chicf of division............. ............................
2,750.00
Do.............................................................................
2,500.00
Do.............................................................................
2,250.00
2,250.00
Assistant to chief of division and law clerk...................
Assistant to chief of division and chief clerk..................
2,500.00
Do.............................................................................
2,250.00
Assistant to chief of division and disbursing clerk........
2,250. O
O
Assistant to chicf of division.......................................... ‘ 2.000.00
Do.............................................................................
i,m o o
Do.............................................................................
1,900.00
Do............................................................................. i 1,800.00
Law clerk and chief of section........................................ ; 2,000.00
Chief of section................................................................ ! 2,500.00
Do.............................................................................
2,25a 00
Do.............................................................................
2,000i00
do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i,soaoo . .
. . . . . . .

1

Number.

1

Number.

9
1 j
2
2!
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i

■
*Including Auditor for War Department, who received $1,000 in addition to regular salary of $4,000 under
mthority of sundry civil act for auditing Panama Canal accounts.




$2, 468, 601. 00

$2, 019, 550.00

KXKri'TIVK o m C K

AND IXDKPKXDKKT KSTAllLISH'MKNTS.

41

Estimates of appropriations required for the service oj the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
! Total amount to be
Amount app. .
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount | appropriated under for tho fiscal year
required for each detailed object.
■ each head of appro* ending June 30,
priatton.
1922.

It u Iget, p :w r>!)2.
<
Salaries and Expenses , General Accounting Office—C ontinu ed.
Employees.

Assistant chief of *cCtion..
Do..............................
Do..............................
Do..............................
Chief of subsection...........
Disbursing officer.............
Deputy disbursing ollkvr.
Private secretary.............
Attorneys.........................
i>o.....................
Do..............................
Do..............................
Do..............................
Do..............................
liiiw clerks........................
D o.............................
Do..............................
Do..............................
Do..............................
Do..............................
Do..............................
Chief accountant..............
Expert accountants..........
Acrountants.....................
Do..............................

l>
«......................

Do.............................. .
In vostift.itor*....................
Principal clerks................
Clerks.
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Reviewers..........................................
Check assorted..................................
Operatives..........................................
Duplicating machine operator...........
Do...............................................
Carpenter...........................................
Foreman of messengers and laborers.
Do................................................
Chief messenger..................................
Messenger...........................................
Do................................................
Assistant messengers..........................
Skilled laborers..................................
Laborers.............................................
Do................................................
Do................................................
Messenger boys..................................
Do................................................
Forewoman of charwomen................
Charwomen........................................

Rate per ! Estimated,! Estimated, Expended,
annum.
1923.
1922.
1921.
Number,

1:
1
0

$J. 200.
2.000.

1,!«).

1
*
i

;i,Ouo.
|,S O
O.

I» t 0
>0.
otx).

4.000.
H X).
.W

:j. 1 0
0.

:1,000.
‘, \750
2, ’>00.
2.100.
2 . 250.
2 .2 K
1 I.

2 00.
.0

I,800.
1,600.
:{,00O.
2,100.
5 00 .
2.400.
2,100.

2 00.
,0
2 00.
.0
2,0 0
0.
2 00.
.0
1 $00.
.

IS

li

1 0.
,2 0
1,140.
1 0.
,1 0
1,080.
1,0 0
0.

194 i

210
2

2
fiS
37
6

1,7(0.
1.620.
1,(300.
1.400.

237
327
3SS

274
378
537

11
0

191

3
2
6

7S !

9 |
0

900.
2,100.

8 |.

1 0.
,0 0
1X ).
X
m
l.iOO.
1 0.
,2 0
1.400.
1 0.
,2 0
1 0.
,0 0
1 0.
,0 0
m

4

70 !

1

i

I
1L
11
.

2
14
37
7

720.
900.
720.

2

G .
tiO

33

1
1

600.
4S0.
420.
660.
240.

13

1,5

1,513

1,927

.$2,318,340.00 $2,102,450.00

GENERAL OHJGCTS Or EXPENDITURE.

50.000.00
40..000.00
2, 000.00

-I-

1.353.00
43,950.00
1.807.00

462.00 I
45,315.00 J
1,50S.00 !

9,151.00

700.00

OTHER OBJECTS Of EXPENDITURE.

Miscellaneous items..........................................




1

?ii

Traveling e\tenses.......................................................
Rent.
Telephone service..........................................................
Rooks, purchase and exchange.....................................
Office supplies (including stationery) and equipment.
Repairs and maintenance.............................................

Total.......................................................

Number,

1,‘X ).
X
2, (X ).
X

Total.......................
Personal services, salaries.

Number.
i

j

2,463,601.00 2,150,465.00

48

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June SO, 1928— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 593.

h o u s in g

Total amount to bo j Amount appropriated
appropriated under i for the fiscal yeai
each head of approending June 30,
priation.
1922.

c o r p o r a t io n .

Salaries, Housing Corporation —
For officers, clerks, and other em ploy ees in th e D istrict of C olum bia necessary to co lle ct
and a ccou n t for the receipts from the sale of properties and the receip ts from the oper­
ation of un sold properties of the U nited States H ou sing C orporation, th e Bureau of
Industrial H ou sing and T ransportation, p rop erty com m an deered b y the U nited States,
through the S ecretary of the D ep artm en t o f Labor, and to c o lle ct the am ounts ad vanced
to transportation fa cilities and others: Provided , T h at no person shall b e e m p loy ed
hereu nder at a rate o f com pensation e x ce e d in g $5,000 p er annum , and o n ly one
person m a y b e e m p lo y e d at that rate ( actsMay 16,1918 , vol. 40 , p. 550, sec. 1; June
4 * 1918, vol. 40, p. 595, sec. 1; July 11, 1919, vol. 41, p . 55, sec. 1; June 5, 1920, vol. 41 ,
p. 987, sec. 1; Mar. 4 , 1921, vol. 41, p p . 1425, 1426, sec. 1 ) ............................................................

Employees.
Director.......... ..................... ..................... ..................
Assistant director. . . .......................... ............................
Fiscal supervisor...................................... . . ................
Real estate manager.......................................................
Utility accountant..........................................................
Traveling auditor...........................................................
Accountant.................
. . . . .................
E ngineer...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........
Assistant real estate manager........................................
Auditor... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................
Bookkeeper.....................................................................
Auditor........... ..................................... .........................
D o............................................................................
Law clerk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ____ . . . . ...................
Disbursing clerk.............................................................
Secretary........................................................................
Clerks..............................................................................
Do............................................................................
Do............................................................................
Do............................................................................
Do............................................................................
Junior clerk...........
................................
Messenger.......................................................................
Laborers........... ..........................................................

Rate per
annum.

$65, 725. 00

$70, 000. 00

11,000.00

1 5 ,0 0 0 .00

0, 000 00

10, 000. 00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1921.
1923.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

3
1
2
3
1
1

$5,000.00
4,500.00
4,800.00
4.000.00
3.800.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.000.00
2.800.00
2.700.00
2.600.00
2.000.00
3.000.00
2.025.00
2.000.00
1.800.00
1,600.00
1,500.00
1.400.00
1.200.00
1,100.00
840.00
950.00

4
1
3
2
2
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
3
6
4
2
2
1
2

2

2

27

30

42

$65,725.00 $70,000.00

$84,495.57

Contingent Expenses, Housing Corporation— ■
For contingent and miscellaneous expenses of the offices at Washington, D. C., including
purchase of blank books, maps, stationery, file cases, towels, ice, brooms, soap, freight
■and express charges; telegraph and telephone service; printing and binding; and all
other miscellaneous items and necessary expenses not included in the foregoing, and
necessary to collect moneys and loans due the corporation (acts May 16, 1918, vol. 40,
p. 550, sec. 1; June 4, 1918, vol. 40 , p. 595, sec. 1; July 11, 1919, vol. 41, p . 55. c. 1;
June 5,1920, vol. 41, p • 937, sec. 1; Mar. 4,1921, vol. 41, p p •14^5,1426, sec. 1) ............... •
Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.

General objects of expenditure.

$7,000.00
700.00
100.00
1,000.00
700.00
1,500.00

$7,500.00
700.00
100.00
1,000.00
700.00
2,000.00

$7,437.71
1,157.10
19.75
1,124.25
1,381.54
1,962.39

11,000.00

Traveling expenses.............
Telephone and telegraph. . .
Stationery...........................
Printing and binding..........
Blank books, file cases, etc.
Miscellaneous......................

12,000.00

13,082.74

Cost o f Appraisal —
F or th e cost of appraisal un der contract loans m ade to ex p e d ite transportation facilities

(acts May 16, 1918, vol. 40, p. 550, sec. 1; June 4, 1918, vol. 40, p. 595, sec. 1; July 11,
1919, vol. 41, p * 55, sec. 1; June 5, 1920, vol. 41, p. 937, sec. 1; Mar. 4, 1921, vol . 41,
pp. 1425, 1426, sec. 1 ) ...............................................................................................................................
i

: Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1921.
1923.

Field service.......................................... ............................................
Miscellaneous.............................................. .......................... ..........




$4,600.00
1,400.00

$5,600.00
400.00

$3,843.32

6,000.00

6,000.00

3,843.32

49

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 80, 1923— Contmuod.
CJenerlaobJcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Largo, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to bo Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
oach head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

Bud got, page 61)4.
Collections—
For tho collection of m o n e y d u o from th o sale of real and other p rop erty under tho p ro­
vision of the act a p p rov ed Ju ly 19, 11)19, tho co lle ctio n of rentals from unsold p rop ­
erties, in clu d in g necessary oflico and travel expenses outside of the D istrict of Colum ­
bia (acts May 16, 19IS, vol. 40, p. 550, sec. 1; June 4 , 1918, vol. 40 , p. 595, sec. 1; July
11, 1919, vol. 41, p. 55, sec. 1; June 5, 1920, vol. 41, p . 987, sec. 1; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41,
pp. 1426, 1426, sec. 1) ..............................................................................................................................

$33, 700. 00

135,000.00

949,000.00,

960,000.00

Estimated. Estimated, Expcndod,
1923.
1921.
1922.
Bath, Me., salaries.............................................................................
Quincy. Mass. (Including Newport, R. I.; Lowell, Mass.; Ports­
mouth, N. II.; Jamestown, R. I.):
Salaries....................................................................................... .
Oflico and travel expenses...........................................................
Bridgeport, Conn. (including Now London, Groton, and 'VVaterbury, Conn.; Watervliot, N. Y.; Staten Island, N. Y.):
Salaries........................................................................................
Oflico and travel expenses......................................................... .
Philadelphia, Pa. (including Now Brunswick, N. J.; Bethlehem,
Pa.: Elizabeth, N. J.; Pompton Lakes, N. J.):
Salaries....................................................................................... .
Office and travel expenses...........................................................
Cradock, Va. (including Truxtun, Va.):
Salaries........................................................................................
Oflico and travel expenses...........................................................
Erie, Pa. (Including Alliance, Ohio; Niagara Falls, N. Y.; Niles,
Ohio; Butler, Pa.; Ilion, N. Y.; Warren, Ohio; Sharon, Pa.;
Milton, Pa.):
Salaries........................................................................................
Ofllcc and travel expenses...........................................................
Rock Island, 111. (including Davenport, Iowa; Moline, 111.; East
Moline, III.; Muskegon', Mich.):
Salaries.........................................................................................
Office and travel expenses...........................................................
Watertown, N. Y.:
Salaries.......................................................... * .................................
Office and travel expenses...........................................................
Bremerton. Wash., salaries................................................................
Vallejo, Calif.:
Salaries.........................................................................................
Office and travel exponses...........................................................
Hammond, Ind., salaries...................................................................
Miscellaneous......................................................................................

S 20 0
t, 0 .0

SI, 200.00

SI, 200.00

3,500.00
500.00

3,400.00
450.00

3, S03.32
209.70

3,000.00

.moo

3,600.00
500.00

4,005.00
701.85

4,000.00
500.00

4,000.00
500.00

4.295.84
169.64

4,200.00
500.00

4,287.50
500.00

7.895.84

3,600.00
500.00

3,600.00
500.00

3,900.00
420.95

4,000.00
500.00

3,900.00
600.00

5,187.50
762.24

G O 00
O.

825.00
150.00

1, 000.02

2,000.00

2,000.00

2,766.66

3,000.00
400.00
600.00

3,000.00
500.00
G O 00
O.

3,105.32
75.68
161.41
823.55

33,700.00

34,112.50

40,484.52

Operation of Projects—
W ashington, D istrict o f C olum bia, G overn m en t H otel for G overn m en t W orkers: For
m aintenance, operation, and m anagem ent o f the hotel and restaurants therein, in ­
clu d in g repla cem en t o f equ ip m en t, personal services, and p rin tin g: Provided , T h at
no person shall b e e m p lo y e d hereu nder at a rate o f com p ensation ex ce e d in g $5,000
per annum , and on ly one person m ay b e e m p loy ed at that rate (acts May 16, 1918, vol.
40 , p. 550, sec. 1; June 4 , 1918, vol. 40 , p. 595 * sec. 1; July 11,1919, vol. 41, p . 55, sec. 1;
June 5, 1920, vol. 41, p. 937, sec. 1 ; Mar . 4, 1921, vol. 41, p p . 1425, 1426, sec. 1) .................

Employees.
Salaries:
General manager................................. per annum.
Mechanical superintendent........................... do*..
Superintendent of food service...................... d o ...
Special disbursing agent and auditor............d o ...
Laundry superintendent............................... d o ...
Head cashier.................................................. d o ...
Assistant superintendent, food service..........d o...
Dormitory superintendent............................ d o ...
Paymaster......................................................d o ...
Chefs...............................................................d o ...
Electrician, foreman...................................... d o...
Carpenter, foreman........................................ d o ...
Plumber, foreman.......................................... d o ...
Secretary to general manager........................ d o...
Refrigeration engineer....................................d o ...
Plumber.........................................................d o ...
Carpenter....................................................... d o...
Electrician......................................................d o...
Steam fitters.................................................. d o...
Electricians.................................................... d o...
Painters.......................................................... do.*.
Carpenters...................................................... d o...
Paper hanger.................................................. d o ...
Storekeeper....................... ............................ d o ...
Fire chief........................................................d o ...
Baker............................................................. d o ...
Infirmary superintendent..............................d o ...
Clerk.............................................................. d o ...
Firemen (steam)............................................ d o ...
Night auditor................................................. d o ...
Bookkeeper.................... t ..............................d o...

77891—21------ *



Rate.

$5,000.00
4,500.00
3,600.00
3,500.00
3,400.00
2,400.00
2,400.00
2,400.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
1,992.00
1,920.00
1,920.00
1,920.00
1,S4S.00
1,848.00
1,818.00
1,848.00
1,848.00
1,800.00
1,800.00
1,800.00
1,800.00
1,740.00
1,560.00
1,500.00
1,500.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1921.
1923.
Number.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
I

3
1
1

Number.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1

Number .

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
i
1

50

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates of appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 80, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 595.
Operation o f Projects- -C on tin ued.
Employees.
Salaries—Continued.
Clerk.................................................... per annum
Cooks............................................................. do..
Firemen.......................................................d o ..
House men.................................... ...............do..
Chief telephone operator................................d o..
Chauffeur and mechanic................................d o..
Cooks.............................................................do..
Baker's assistant...........................................do..
House man.................................................... do..,
Butcher......................................................... do...
Cooks..... .......................................................do..
Clerks.............................................................do..
Utility man................................................... do..
Registrar........................................................do..
Clerks.............................................................do..
House managers............................................ d o..
House men.................................................... do..
Stewardess.............................................*.___do..
Cooks..................................................... ....... do..,
Receiving clerk.............................................. d o ..,
Butcher..........................................................do..
Steward’s assistants...................................... do..
Laundry foreman..........................................do..
Watchmen..................................................... do..,
Patrolmen (fire).............................................do..,
Chauffeurs..................................................... do..,
Truckman..................................................... do...
Head waitress................................................do. *.
Nurse (infirmary)......................................... d o...
Watchwomen................................................ d o...
Laborers........................................................ do...
Laundry forelady..........................................d o...
Utility man................................................... do...
Receiving clerk.............................................. d o...
Telephone operators...................................... d o...
Nurse (infirmary).......................................... d o...
Head waitress................................................d o...
Cooks............................................................. do...
Porter............................................................ do...
Cashier........................................................... do...
Mail clerk.......................................................do...
Nurse (infirmary)..........................................d o...
Miscellaneous and temporary help, less than........

Rate.

51,500.00
1.500.00
1.440.00
1.440.00
1.440.00
1.440.00
1.320.00
1.320.00
1.320.00
1.320.00

1.260.00
1,260.00
1,260.00
1,200.00
1, 200.00
1,200.00
1, 200.00
1,200.00
1,200.00
1,200.00
1,200.00
1, 200.00
1,200.00
1, 200.00
1, 200.00

1,200.00
780.00
1,200.00
1,200.00

780.00
1.140.00
1.050.00
1.080.00
1,080.00
1,080.00
1,080.00
1,080.00
1,080.00
1,080.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.
Number.

1
2

6

Number.

1
2

2

1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
0
1
1
2
1
5
5
2

1
1
1

6

5

1
2

6
2

1
1
3
1
1

3

9
2

Number.

2
1
2
9
2
1
0
1
1
2
1
5

1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
0
1
1
2
1

5

5
5

2

2

1
1
1

6

1
1
6
'
5
1
1

350

5
1
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
351

1
1
5
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
351

495

499

499

30

Wages:
washman............................................... per week.
Porter.............................................................d o...
Wrin german.................................................. d o ...
Truck helper..................................................d o...
Upholsterer....................................................d o...
Wringerman.................................................. d o...
Utility man................................................... d o...
Tumbler girl.................................................. d o...
Flat-work girls...............................................d o...
Seamstresses.................................................. d o...
Press operators.............................................. d o...
Ironers........................................................... d o...
Do........................................................... d o...
Flat-work girl................................................ d o...
Do........................................................... do...
Ironer.............................................................d o...
Flat-work girls...............................................d o...

1,020.00
1,020.00
1,020.00
1,000.00

1
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
2
1
1

30

30

30.00
25.00
22.00

20.00
20.00

20.00
18.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
14.00
13.00
12.00

12
.00
11
.00

Personal services:
Salaries..........
Wages.............

$432,564.00 $440,248.00
19,436.00 24,752.00

Total*

452,000.00 465,000.00

467,888.28

452.000.00 465.000.00
365.000.00 375.000.00
45.000.00 50.000.00
18.000.00 18.000.00
4.600.00
4.600.00
2.300.00
2.300.00
1.250.00
1.250.00
1.500.00
1.500.00

150.00

467,888.28
385,487.99
51,950.30
17,935.50
4,556.93
2.745.60
1.237.60
1,133.31
1,537.17
6,730.15
1,311.10
12,946.78
8,695.95
762,16
10,955.46
18,285.96
138.41

949,000.00 960,000.00

994,298.65

$446,066. i
21,821. <

GENERAL OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Personal services..
Provisions...........
Coal.....................
Electricity............
Gas.,
Rubbish and ashes removal.....................
Gasoline and oil.......................................
Printing....................................................
Stationery............. ...................................
Telephone service.....................................
Maintenance and repair...........................
Dormitory supplies..................................

Laundry supplies...................................

Infirmary supplies and drugs..................
Workshop supplies and repair materials.
Restaurant supplies.................................
Miscellaneous, freight, travel, telegrams..
Total.




2,000.00
7.000.00
2.000.00

14,950.00
7,000.00
750.00
9.500.00
16,000.00
150.00

2,000.00
7.000.00
2.000.00
8.500.00
7,000.00
500.00
5.200.00

10,000.00

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
1922.
priation.

51

KXKCUTIVK OFFICE AND INDKPKNDKNT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 80, 1928— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, anil estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget* page 5SM
S.
Maintenance, Unsold Properly —
To maintain and repair houses, buildings, and improvements, which are unsold (ac/s
May 16, 1918, vol. 40, p. 550, sec. I : June 4, 19 US vol. 40, p. 595, see. 1; July 11, 1919,
\
vol. 4U p . 55, sec. 1; June 5, 1920, vol. 4 l y p. 987, sec. 1; Mar. 4 >1921, vol. 41 1 pp. 1425,
1426, sec. J)...............................................................................................................................

Total amount to bo Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

$5, 000. 00

$10,000.00

10,000.00

10,000. 00

1,080,425. 00

1,110,000.00

139, 500. 00

139,500. 00

2,330,470.00

1,000,000.00

N ote.—Mo expenditures in 1921.

For expenses incident to foreclosing mortgages, conducting sales under deeds of trust,
or reacquiring title or possession of real property tinder default proceedings, includ­
ing attorney fees, witness fees, court costs, charges, and other miscellaneous expenses
(same acts).
Note.—No expenditures In 1921.

Total, Housing Corporation.................................................................................................
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION.

Interstate Commerce Commission—

For eleven commissioners, at $12,000 each; secretary, $7,500; in all, $139,500 (acts Feb.
4 , 1887, vol. 241 p. 879, secs. 1-24: Feb . 28, 1920, vol. 41, p. 456 , chap. 91; Mar. 4. 1921 %
vol . 4U pp. 1880-1881, see. 1; June 16, 1921, vol. 42. p. 29, sec. 1) ....................................
For all other authorized expenditures necessary in the execution of laws to regulate com­
merce, including per diem in lieu of subsistence not to exceed $6 and actual expenses
for subsistence not to exceed $7 per day, $2,400,000, of which sum there may be ex­
pended not exceeding $50,000 in the employment of counsel; not exceeding $3,000
lor necessary books, reports, and periodicals; not exceeding $1,500 for printing other
than that done at the Government Printing Office; not exceeding $100 in the open
market for the purchase of otlice furniture similar in class or kind to that listed in the
general supply schedule; and not exceeding $75,000 for rent of buildings in tho Dis­
trict of Columbia: Provided, That the Interstate Commerce Commission may employ
by contract or otherwise expert stenographic reporters for its official reporting work:
Provided further, That the Commission may sell, at a rate per page equivalent to
the cost of making them, copies of transcripts of its proceedings, and that the commis­
sion may use the proceeds of such sales to defray the expense thereby incurred (acts
Feb. 4 ,1887, vol. 24, p. 879 , secs. 1-2 4: Feb. 28 , 1920, vol. 41 , p. 456 , chap. 91; Mar. 1 ,
1921 , vol. 41 , p. 1159, sec. l ; Mar. 4 >1921 , vol . 41 » p. 1880-1881 , sec. 1 ) ..........................
Rate per
annum.

Chief counsel...........................................
Director.......................... .......................
D o....................................................
Assistant director....................................
Chief examiner........................................
Assistantcounsel....................................
Assistant director....................................
Chief of bureau, and attorney................
Attorney examiner.................................
Assistant director....................................
Accountant and statistical assistant......
Chief of section.........................................
Chairman board of referees.....................
Statistical analyst...................................
Member board of referees........................
Attorney examiner.................................
Examiner................................................
Assistant chief of bureau, and attorney.
Chief of bureau........................................
Assistant director....................................
Engineering assistant.............................
Chief inspector of service..........................
Office assistant............................. .........
Assistant counsel....................................
Assistant chief examiner........................
Senior examiner......................................
Classification agent.................................
Attorney.................................................
Senior examiner......................................
Assistant to director...............................
Examiner and attorney..........................
Examiner of accounts.............................
Engineer examiner..................................
Statistical analyst...................................
Service agent...........................................
Examiner................................................
Assistant statistician..............................
Statistical analyst...................................
Attorney........................................... ......
Senior examiner......................................
Engineer examiner................................. .
Financial examiner.................................
Assistant secretary..................................




$10, 000.00

10,000.00
7.500.00
7.500.00
7.500.00
6.500.00
G 500.00
,

,

6 000.00

6,000.00
6,000.00
6,000.00

5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
1.500.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4,200.0C
4.000.00
4.000.00
4.000.00
4.000.00
4>000.00
4.000.00

4.000.00

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,

Expended.

Number.

Employees.

Number .

Number.

1922. *

1
1
1
1

3

1921.

52

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed otject.

Budget, page 5 9 7 .

Interstate Commerce Commission - Continued.
Employees.

Senior railway signal engineer*.
Senior examiner.......................
Examiner.................................
Assistant chief of section..........
Statistical analyst....................
Special agent............................
Chief of bureau.........................
Attorney.. ___________
Assistant statistician...................
Senior examiner...........................
Disbursing clerk...........................
Assistant chief of section..............
Express agent..............................Specialagent............................... .
Service agent................................
Engineer examiner.......................
Examiner of accounts..................
Examiner.................................... .
Accountant...................................
Chief of section..............................
Senior examiner...........................
Do...........................................
Financial e xamin er......................
Assistant chief of section..............
Examiner.....................................
Assistant to Secretary..................
Special agent................................
Accountant...................................
Assistant chief of section..............
Railway mail pay expert.............
Chief clerk and purchasing agent..
Junior examiners..........................
Attorney................................
Special agents.........................
Examiners....................................
Senior clerks.................................
Private secretaries........................
Assistant statisticians...................
Assistant chief of bureaus.............
Appointment clerk......................
Engineer examiners......................
Examiner of accounts...................
Financial examiners.....................
Examiners...................................
Junior examiners.........................
Senior clerks.................................
Chiefs of section............................
Attorney.......................................
Examiners of accounts.................
Financial examiner......................
Attorney.......................................
Examiner......................................
Junior examiners.........................
Chief clerk bureau of service........
Chiefs of section............................
Cashier..........................................
Private secretary..........................
Senior clerks.................................
Accountant...................................
Attorney.......................................
Examiner of accounts................. .
Senior clerk...................................
Assistant attorneys..................... .
Special agents............................. .
Private secretaries.......................
Law clerk....................................
Legal assistant.............................
Senior clerks................................
Chiefs of section...........................
Assistant to Secretary.................
Assistant chief of section.............
Chief clerk to director of traffic...
Chief clerk to director of service..
Examiner of accounts..................
Examiners...................................
Financial examiners....................
Senior clerks................................
Examiners of accounts................
Assistant attorney.......................
Senior clerks................................
Junior examiner..........................
Senior clerk........ 1.......................
Do..........................................
Chief clerk to director of traffic. **
Assistant attorney.......................
Senior clerks................................
Examiner....................................
Chiefs of section...........................
Librarian.....................................
Assistant chief of section.............
Accountant..................................
Examiners of accounts................
Special agent...............................




Rate per
annum.

$4,000.00
3.900.00
3.900.00
3.900.00
3.900.00
3.900.00
3.900.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.500.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.240.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
2.940.00
2.880.00
2,880.00
2.760.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.640.00
2.640.00
2.640.00
2.640.00
2.640.00
2.640.00
2.640.00
2.640.00
2.520.00
2.520.00
2.520.00
2.460.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.340.00
2.340.00
2.250.00
2.280.00
2.250.00
2.250.00
2.220.00

2,220.00
2,220.00
2,160.00
2,160.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

Expended
1921.

Number .

Number.

Number.

1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
5

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4

1

16

1

1
1

1
4
1

1
1
0
2
1
1
2
2
6
3
1
2
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of approending June 30,
1922.
priation.

53

KXECUTIVK OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at I-arj;©, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to he j Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for tho fiscal year
each head of approending June 30,
prlation.
1922.

B u d g e t , p a g e 57)8.
Interstate Commerce Commission— Continued.
Kate per
annum.

Attornoy..........................................................
Senior clerks.....................................................
Assistant attorneys..........................................
Printing clerk..................................................
Senior clerks.....................................................
Examiner of accounts......................................
Assistant chief of scction.................................
Report writer...................................................
Senior dork......................................................
Do.............................. ...............................
Assistant attornoy...........................................
Senior clerks.....................................................
Electrician.......................................................
Foreman mechanic..........................................
Engineer............ .............................................
Clerks...............................................................
Do..............................................................
Do..............................................................
Assistant attorney...........................................
Clerk................................................................
Clerks..............................................................
Do................. ................................ ..........
Law clerk.........................................................
Typewriter repairman.....................................
Carpenter— ....................................................
Examiner of accounts................... ... „............
Junior clerks.....................................................
Do..............................................................
Do..............................................................
Do..............................................................
Assistant engineer............................................
Junior clerks.....................................................
Chicf telephono operator..................................
Faroman laborer........ ......................................
Skilled laborer.................................................
Telephone operator..........................................
Underclerks......................................................
Do..............................................................
Telephone operator............... ..........................
Assistant foreman laborer................................
Underclerks......................................................
Underclerks, telephono operators, watchmen,
elevator conductors, messenger boys, labor­
ers,and charwomen.......................................
Salaries................ ............................................

Estimated,
1923.

Expendod,
1921.

Estimated,
1922.

Number.

Employees.

Number.

52, 1 X . 00
<>
2, 100. n
o

Number.

1
29

1
59

1
32
2
1
39
1
1
1
55

8
1
I
1
04
1
70

5
1
1
1
60
2
49
1
4
60

55
1
7
I
1
1
49
2
48
1
1
3
56

1
1
1
8
50
36
7
1
85
1
1

1
1
1
6
42
39
1
1
107
1
1

9
19
1
1
1

7
29
1
1
3

131
_ 113
II, SS2,710.00 $1,835,870.00

$1,527,014.28

34
2
1
44

2,100.00
19 0 0
, S ,0

1,9*0.00
1.980.00
1, 9S0.00
1.980.00
1.920.00
1.800.00
1.800.00
1.800. (X
)
1,800.00
1,800.00
1.800. IX
)
1.740.00

1

1 50.00
.6
1 2 .0
.0 0 0

1, G O 00
O.
1,600.00
1.500.00
1.500.00
1.500.00
1.500.00
1.500.00
1.440.00
1, 140.00
1.380.00
1.320.00
1 200.00
1, 200.00
1, 200.00
1 200.00

81
I
1
1
1
39
58
4
1
85
1
I
1
1
6
13
1
1

.

,

1 00.00
,2

1, 200.00
1.140.00

1.080.00

, 2 .0
1,0 0 0
1, 020.00
1 020.00

900.00

1
35
1
1

123

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENPmjRE.

Transportation..................................................
Subsistence........................................................
Communication.................................................
Stenographic services.........................................
Other services..:...............................................
Stationery..........................................................
Other supplies................... ................................
Officc furniture..................................................
Mechanical office equipment.............................
Books.................................................................
Other equipment...............................................
Rent of buildings...............................................
Other rents........................................................
Miscellaneous items—now work and special
investigation................................................

49.033.00
42.532.00
9.000.00
88.390.00
25.000.00
25.000.00
25.000.00

39.233.45
32,632.96
8,470.71
57,614.89
24,335.23
26,675.68
33,794.92
33.008.45
25,884.10
2,980.05
12,454.52
74,350.40
1,832.30

50.933.00
44.332.00
9.000.00
88.396.00
25.000.00

10 0 .0
.0 0 0

15.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
3.000.00
5.000.00
80.000.00

10 0 .0
.0 0 0

15.000.00
3.000.00
12.500.00
75.000.00
7.000.00

6.000.00

61.299.00

17.469.00

2,330,470.00

2,200,000.00

1,900,282.03

T o enable th e Interstate C om m erce Com m ission to enforce com p lia n ce w ith sec. 20 and
o th e f section s of the a ct to regulate com m erce as am ended b y the a ct ap p rov ed June
29, 1906, and as am en d ed b y the transportation act, 1920, in clu d in g the em p loy m en t
o f necessary sp ecia l a ccou n tin g agfcnts or exam iners, an d in clu d in g p er d iem in lieu
o f subsistence n o t e x ce e d in g $6 ( acts June 29, 1906 , voL 34,
593, sec. 20; Feb. 28,
1920, vol. 41, p. 456, chap. 91; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p p . 1380-1381, sec. / ) .........................

Employee4.
*

Director.........................
Assistant directors......... .
Chief depreciation section.
Examiners.......................

D o...........................
Do........................... .
D o...........................

D o ..............................

Do........................... .




Rate per Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1921.
1922.
annum.
Number.

17,500.00
6, 000.00

6,000.00
5.000.00
4.500.00
3.900.00
3.600.00
3.300.00
3.000.00

1
1
5
6
8

3

14
14
14

Number.

1
1
8
5
6
1
2
3

9
16

Num ber.

3

1
5
6
1
1
4

9
16

$5 75,0 00.0 0

$5 00,0 00.0 0

THE ALTKUXATIVK BUIHIKT, 1923.

54

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June. 30, 1923—Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Lartfo, or to Hovised Statutes, und estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to bo Amount appropriated
for tho fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
cach head of appro­
1922.
priation.

Budget, page 500.
Interstate Commerce Commission — C ontinu ed.
Employees.

Examiners............. .......... .
Do.............................................................................
Do.............................................................................
Do............................................................................
Do............................................................................
Examiner....................................................................
Senior clerks............... ............................................
Do.............................................................................
Junior clerk........... .......................................... ............
Junior Clerks........... . ....................................................
Underclerks, messenger boys, and unskilled laborers...
Salaries............................ ...........................................

Rato per
annum.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
11)23.
1921.

Number.
Number.
Number .
11
11
12,700.00
17
2, m o o
12
13
2.400.00
15
15
17
2.220.00
G
9
15
7
2,100.00
15
11
1
1
1.980.00
3
5
3
1.500.00
4
1.740.00
8
0
3
5
2
1.620.00
9
8
1.500.00
8
1
1
1.380.00
1.320.00
2
3
5
(',
1.200.00
900-240 1
2
2
2
$443,800.00 $414,700.00 $341,373.41

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.
33,915.10
77,924.90
14,500.00
4,800.00

S upplies.................. ............................
Total.....................................................................

20,352.80
45,587.20
14,500.00
4,800.00

28,240.51
81,294.00
12,753. lf>
17,977.83

|575,000.00

Transportation............................................................. .
Subsistence..................... ...................

500,000.00

481,038.91

T o en a ble th e In tersta te C om m erce C om m ission to k e e p inform ed regarding and to
en force c o m p lia n ce w ith acta to p rom ote the safety o f em p loy ees and travelers upon
railroads; the a ct requ irin g com m on carriers to m ak e reports of a ccid en ts and author­
izin g in v estig ation s th ereof; and to en a b le th e Interstate C om m erce C om m ission to
in v estig ate and test block-sign al and train-control system s and ap p lia n ces in ten d ed
to p rom ote tho safety o f railw ay op eration , as au th orized b y the jo in t resolution
a p p ro v e d Ju ne 30, 1906, and the p rov ision s o f th o su n d ry c iv il act a p p rov ed M ay 27,
1903, in c lu d in g the e m p lo y m e n t o f in sp ectors, and p er d iem in lieu o f su bsistence
n ot e x c e e d in g $6 ( acts Mar. 2, 1893, vol. 27, p . 581, secs. 1-8; Feb. 28 , 1920, vol. 41,
p. 456, chap . 91;Mar. 1 , 1921, vol. 41 , p . 1159, sec. l;M a r . 4 , 1921, vol. 41 , pp. 1380-1381,

sec. 1).................................................................................................................................
Employees.

Chief of bureau..........................................................
Assistant chiefs of bureau...................................... .
Engineer-physicist............ ................................ .
Senior railway signal engineer......................................
Chief attorney........... ................................. ..............
Attorneys.............................. ................................
Senior railway signal engineer......................................
Senior mechanical engineer..........................................
Attorney................. ................. ...........
Engineer examiners................................................... .
Inspectors................ ..........................
Do.........................................................................
Statistician................................................................ .
Law clerk..............................................................
Senior clerk.................................................................
Chief clerk...................................................................
Senior clerks............................................ ...................
Do.........................................................................
Do.........................................................................
Junior clerks................................... ............................
Do.........................................................................
Underclerk.................................................................
Do.............................. ..........................................
Underclerks, messenger boys, and unskilled laborers...
Salaries.......................................................................

Bate per Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
annum.
1923.
1922.
1921.
$5,000.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.000.00
4.000.00
4,000.00
3,000.00
3.600.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
2.400.00
1.080.00
1.980.00
1.950.00
1,860.00
1,800.00
1.740.00
1.630.00
1.500.00
i,3saoo
1,320.00
1.300.00
1.080.00
1, 020.00
900-240.00

Number.
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1

Number.
1
2
1
1
1
2
1

52

54

I
I
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1

1
2
2
1

4

3

1
1
I

1
1
1

3
3
2

5
I
I

Number.

1
2

x

1
2
1
1
1
2

52
\
1
1
2
2
2

4
1
1

4

$225,800.00 $237,420.00 $212,069.04

G ERAL O JE T OT E
EN
B CS
XPEN ITU
D RE.
Transportation, subsistence, supplies, and incidental
expenses........................................ ...................
Total..................................... ..........................




124,200.00 112,580.00

121,023.48

350,000.00 350,000.00

333,092.52

$350,000. 00

$313,600.00

55

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates oj appropriations required j o r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
1922.
priation.

B u d g e t, p age 6 0 0.

Interstate Commerce Commission — C on tin u ed.
F or all au th orized ex p en d itu res un der th e provisions o f the a ct of F ebruary 17, 1911,
“ T o prom ote the safety of em p loy ees and travelers up on railroads b y com p ellin g
com m on carriers engaged in interstate com m erce to eq u ip their locom otives w ith
safe and suitable boilers and appurten ances th e re to ,” and am end m ent of Mar. 4, 1915,
ex ten d in g “ the sam e powers and duties w ith resp ect to all parts and appurtenances
o f the lo co m o tiv e and te n d e r,” in clu d in g such stenographic and clerical h elp to the
c h ie f in spector and his tw o assistants as the Interstate C om m erce Com m ission m ay
d eem necessary, and for per d ie m in lieu of subsistence n ot ex ce e d in g $6 ( acts Feb . 17,
1911, v o l 36, p. 913 , secs. 1- 10; Mar. 1 , m i . vol. 41 , p. 1159, sec. 1; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41 ,
pp . 1380-1381 , sec. 1 ) ...............................................................................................................................
Rate per
annum.

Employees.

Chief inspector.....................
A ttorney............................
Assistant chief inspectors ...
Senior mechanical engineer.
Do.................................
Inspectors...........................
Senior mechanical engineer.
Senior clerk..........................
Do.................................
Senior mechanical engineer..
Law clerk............................ .
Senior clerk...........................
Do................................. .
Junior mechanical engineer..
Clerk.....................................
Do..................................
Do..................................
Clerks....................................
Junior clerks....... ............:..
Do..................................
Do..................................
Do..................................
Underclerk............................
Do.
Do.

$300,000. 00

$290,000.00

1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0

1 ,7 5 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0

Sxpended,

1923.

55,000.00
4.500.00
4.000.00
4.000.00
3.600.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
2.640.00
2.400.00
2.400.00

1
1

50

2.100.00

1.980.00
1.800.00
1,800.00
1.740.00
1.620.00
1.500.00
1.440.00
1.380.00
1.320.00

1
.200.00
1,020.00

1,080.00
900.00
600-480

Salaries..

$192,620.00 $196,960.00 $192,572.00

GENEEAL OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Transportation, subsistence, supplies, and incidental
expenses......................................................................
Total.

107,380.00

93,040.00

300,000.00 290,000.00

104,685.
297,257.70

Valuation of p rop erty of carriers: T o enable the Interstate C om m erce Com m ission to
carry out the objects of the act entitled “ A n act to am end an act entitled ‘ A n act to
regulate com m erce^ ap p roved F eb. 4, 1887, and all acts am endatory th e re o f” b y pro­
v id in g for a valuation o f the several classes o f prop erty of carriers su bject thereto and
securing inform ation con cern in g their stocks, bon ds; and other securities, approved
Mar. 1,1913, in clu d in g p er diem in lie u o f subsistence not ex ceed in g $6, and in clu d in g
not ex ce e d in g $20,000 for rent o f bu ildin gs in the D istrict of C olum bia ( acts Mar. 1 ,
1913, vol. 37 , p . 71, sec. 1; Feb. 15, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1103, chap. 59; Mar. 4 , 1921, v o l 4U
pp. 1380-1381, sec. 1) ............................................................................................................................... .

Employ©

Director of valuation......................
Supervising engineer.......................
Member engineering board..............
Member advisory board..................
Supervisor land appraisals..............
Supervisor of accounts....................
Solicitor..........................................
Assistant supervising engineer........
Assistant supervisor of accounts___
Assistant supervisor land appraisals
Analyst............................... *.........
Resident engineer...........................
District engineer.................. ..........
District accountant.........................
Valuation attorney.............. .
Valuation analyst................ ..........
Assistant supervisor of accounts___
Attorney.....................................
Senior examiner..............................
Assistant District engineer..............
Examiner.......................................
District accountant.........................




Rate

$ 0 0 .0
1 ,0 0 0
9.000.00
9.000.00
9.000.00
9.000.00
9.000.00
7.500.00
7.500.00

6.000.00
6,000.00
6,000.00
6,000.00
6,000.00
6,000.00
6,000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00

Estimated,

Expended,

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

56

Estimates oj appropriations requiredf o r the service oj the fiscal year ending June 30> 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 001.
Interstate Commerce Commission — C on tin u ed.
Employees.

Chief of section..................................................
Senior civil engineer............. . ....................
Office engineer.................... . . .......... . ......... .
Senior structural engineer.............................
Cost engineer....................... .......... ........... .
Senior mechanical engineer.......................
Senior signal engineer........ ...............................
B ridgo engineer.......................................... .
Senior architect.............................. .............
Senior telograph and telephone ongtneer..........
Valuation analyst..............................................
Senior examiner.............................................
Accountant........... ...........................................
District accountant...........................................
Senior civil engineer.........................................
Senior telegraph and tclephono engineer...........
Senior signal engineer............. .
.......
Accountant........................................................
Valuation analyst..... .......... . . . . . . . . . ........
Senior examiner.......................
........
Senior civil engineer................................ ........
Senior electrical engineer....................... . . ........
Compiler.................................... .......................
Senior land appraiser........................................
Examiner.......................................... ...............
Senior civil engineer............. ...........................
Senior clerk.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Senior signal engineer........................ ...............
Accountant....................................... ...............
Assistant valuation attorney...........................
Senior land appraiser........................................
Senior telegrapn and telephone inspector.. . . . . .
Senior civil engineer..........................................
Valuation analyst............................ . ........
Senior structural engineer.................................
Senior mechanical engineer.............................
Senior electrical engineer...................................
Senior signal engineer........................................
Senior architect..................................................
Attorn ey.......................................... . ..............
Accountants........... ......................... ............. .
Compiler............... .......................... ............... .
Senior inspector motive p o w e r ................
Senior land appraiser........................................
Senior inspector car equipment........................
Senior clerk.* . . . . . .
. . . . . . ..
.....
Senior civil engineer.......... . ........................... .
Senior structural engineer..................... .
Senior civil engineer................. ............... .
Senior telegrapn and telephone engineer..... ..
Senior structural engineer.................................
Senior inspector car equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Senior inspector motive power.........................
Senior mechanical engineer.. . . . . . . . . . ............
Accountant........................................ .
Senior land appraiser........................................
Compiler............................................................
Senior land appraiser................... .
Senior clerk........................................................
Attorney.. . . . . . . . . . . . ..................
Accountant................................................ .
Chief clerk..........................................................
Senior civil engineer..........................................
Senior electrical engineer...... ...........................
Senior mechanical engineer............... ............. .
Senior structural engineer.............. ..................
Senior signal engineer...................... .................
Senior architect..................................................
Chief clerk...................................., ....................
Senior clerk.......................................................
Senior inspector car equipment.........................
Senior inspector motive power..........................
Accountant.......................................................
Senior land appraiser.........................................
Senior telegrapn and telephone engineer..... . . .
Senior telegraph and telephone inspector.........
C o m p ile r .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Senior structural engineer.................................
Senior civil engineer.........................................
Senior land appraiser.............................. .
Accountant........... .................. .......... .
Senior civil engineer............ ............. . . . . . . . . .
D o ................................................... ............
Senior electrical engineer............................ .
Senior mechanical engineer................................
Senior structural engineer......... .......................
Senior signal engineer........................................
Appraiser of machine tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .




Rate per
annum.

$5,000.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
4.200.00
3,000.00
3.900.00
3.900.00
3.900.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.600.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3.300.00
3,300.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
2, SS0.00
2, SS0.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.640.00
2.640.00
2.520.00
2.520.00
2.500.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.400.00
2.280.00
2 2S0.00
2.250.00
2.220.00
2,220.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2,100.00

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

Expended,
1921.

Number.

Number.

Number.

1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
2
7
2
1
6
12
2
3
1
2
9
1

1
5

5

5
1

5

3
3
1
1

3
3
1

1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
7

6

5

4

2
1
1
1
2
5

2
1
1
5

14
1
4
3
3
1
3

14
1

26
1
5
2
4
1
5
1
1
3
2

3
1
1
17
1
23

1
1
15
6
4
1
7
75

5
1
1
3
1
1
1
6
1

2
5

26

3

1

5
5

11
1
16
1
4
4
2
2
2
1
21
1
16
2
2
4
1
5
2
1
1
9
16

1
1
1
5

11

15
5
11
7
3
3

14
4
9
8
3
3

2
4
4
10
5
4

2
4
3
23
20

1

1
7
2
18

10
1
5
3
3
5
3
4

1
1

2

3S
6
10
7
2
1
5

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
fort tho fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

KXKCMTIVK OrtKJK AND IKDKPKXDKNT ESTABLISH MKNTS.

57

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923—‘Continued.
(icncral objcct (title of appropriation), <lute of acts, rrfrrem.vs to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed objcct.

pafce 602.
Interstate Commerce Commission— Continued.

Km ploy cos.

Chief clerk............................................. .
Telegraph Inspector.................................
Senior inspector car equipment...............
Telephone Inspector.................................
Accountant..............................................
Senior land appraiser...............................
Telegraph and telephone* inspector..........
Senior tolegraph and telephone engineer.
Inspector of motive power.......................
Senior clerk...............................................
Compiler...................................................
Senior civil engineer.................................
Junior civil engineer.................................
Junior architect........................................
Telograph inspector..................................
Junior mechanical engineer.......... . .........
Junior olectrical engineer.........................
Junior structural engineer....... *----- . ----Telegraph and telephone inspector..........
Senior clerk...............................................
Senior signal engineer...............................
Senior structural engineer........................
Senior clerk...............................................
Junior civil ongineer.................................
Junior mcchanical engineer.. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspector car equipment..........................
Telegraph and telephone inspector..........
Telegraph and telephone engineer...........
Senior architect........................................
Junior architect........................................
Junior structural engineer........................
Computer..................................................
Senior clerk...............................................
Senior civil engineer.................................
■ Junior civil engineer................................
Senior mechanical engineer......................
Senior structural ongineer........................
Junior structural engineer........................
Senior architect............................. *.........
Junior signal engineer..............................
Chief clerk................................................
Senior clerk...............................................
Compiler...................................................
Senior land appraiser...............................
Junior mechanical engineer......................
Telegraph and tolephono inspector..........
Junior architect.......................................
Junior electrical engineer..........................
Junior telephone and telegraph engineer.
Computer..................................................
Clerk.........................................................
Junior civil engineer.................................
Do......................................................
Junior electrical engineer.............. ......... .
Junior mechanical engineer......................
Junior structural engineer........................
Junior architect........................................
Senior land appraiser...............................
Junior land appraiser...............................
Chief clerk.................................................
Clerk.........................................................
Computer................................................ .
Clerk.........................................................
Junior civil engineer............................... .
Junior mechanical engineer..................... .
Clerk.........................................................
Draftsman.................................................
Junior civil engineer............. .................. .
Junior mechanical ongineer.......................
Junior structural engineer........................ .
Junior architect....................................—
Chief clerk..................................................
Clerk..........................................................
Computer...................................................
Junior land appraiser............................... .
Junior clerk................................................
Junior mechanical engineer.......................
Junior civil engineer.................................
Junior clerk................................................
Junior land appraiser............................... .
Junior civil engineer.................................
Junior clerk_ ...........................................
_
Computer.............................- ...................
Junior clerk...............................................
Junior civil engineer. ...............................
Junior clerk...............................................
Do........................................................
Junior structural engineer................ . .......
Junior mechanical engineer..................
Junior civil engineer.................................
Junior clerk...............................................
Skilled laborer.........................................
Underclerks...........................................
Junior civil engineer..................................




Rate per
annum.

J2,1 0 0
0. 0
2.100. (X
)
2.1 0 0
0. 0
2.100. (X
)
2, 1 0 0
0 .0
2,100.00
2, 1 0 0
0 .0
2. 100. 00
2,100.00
2,100.00
2, 1 0 0
0 .0
1 8 .0
,0 (1 0
1.950.00
1.980.00

1.980.00
1.980.00
1.080.00
1.980.00
1.980.00
1.980.00
1.980.00
1.920.00
1,9*20.00

1.920.00
1.920.00

1.920.00
1.920.00
1.920.00
1.920.00
1.920.00
1.920.00
1.920.00
1.860.00
1,800.00
1,800.00
1,800.00
1.500.00
1.800.00
1,800.00
1,800.00

1.500.00

1.800.00
1,800.00
1,800.00
1,800,00
1.500.00
1.800.00
1,800.00
1,800.00
1,800.00
1.740.00
1.740.00
1.650.00
1.650.00

Estimated,
1923.
Numbtr.

Estimated,
1922.
Number.

3

1
3

10
5
5

3

2

2

15

2
1
1

1
1
5

1
6
5

2

10
2
5
5

3
1
2

12

3
7
10

2
2
1

4

4

2

1
4

3

2
1

1
1
1
15

4

4

11
2

13
2
1

4

5

29

25

19

62
1
5

62
5
3
1

2
2

1
1
1

1.200.00

,

3
3

6

1.500.00

1 200.00

1
3
1
15

28

1.500.00

1.140.00
1.080.00

2

5

1.500.00
1.500.00

1,200.00

1

1
1
5
1
2
2
1
32

1.500.00

1, 200. 00.
i, 2oaoo

1

s

2

1
9
o

1

37

1
1

1

1.560.00

1,3 Q0
S. 0

1
2
3
3
2

2

13

3

1.380.00
1,38a 00
1.340.00
1,32a 00
1.320.00
1, 26a 00

1
1
4

28
1

1.650.00

1.500.00
1.450.00
1,44a 00
1,44a 00
1.440.00
i,3saoo

1

1

1

4

4

1.680.00

1.500.00

7
2

10
3
2
1
2

1.650.00

1.500.00
1.500.00

3
1
1
1
38
8
4
2
1
6

7

1.680.00

1.650.00
1.620.00
1,56a 00
1.560.00

Number.

' s‘i

10
2
1
2
1

1.650.00

i

1

1.650.00

1.680.00

Expended,
1921.

4
31
1
2
3
2
5°
$
1

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
cach head of appro­
1922.
priation.

58

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
General objcct (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

B u d g e t, p a g e 60 3 .

Interstate Commerce Commission — C on tin u ed .
Rate per
annum..

Employees.

$1,080.00

Underclerks___
B o ..............
Underclerk.......
Messenger boys.

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

Expended,
1921.

Number.

Number .

Number.

2
2

,960.00

18

1 020.00

2
2

900 to 480

1

25

$1,252,270.00 $1,488,020.00 $2,096,830.81

Salaries.............
GENERAL OBJECTS 0¥ EXPENDITURE.

,

88.700.00
60,000.00
5,400.00
20.400.00
16.200.00
500.00
41.875.00
14.655.00

Total.

100 000.00

5.000.00
32,500.00
25,000.00
9,480.00

10.000.00

39S, 654.67
106,919.10
5,233.24
18.661.24
13.745.24
71,578.11
172.54
16,927.52

1,500,000.00

Subsistence................... .
Transportation...............
Communication.............
Stationery and supplies..
Equipment, general.......
Rent...............................
Stenographic services_
_
Miscellaneous..................

1,750,000.00

2,723,722.47

75.000.00
5.000.00

The estimate of the Interstate Commerce Commission for printing and binding, under sec. 2, act of May
8, 1872 (R. S. 720, sec. 3661), will bo found on p. 32.

$5,194, 970.00

T otal, Interstate C om m erce C om m ission .

$4,893,100.00

NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR AERONAUTICS.

B u d g e t, page 6 0 3.

National Advisory Committee fo r Aeronautics—
F or sc ie n tific research, te ch n ica l in v estig ation s, and sp ecia l reports in th e field o f
aeronautics, in c lu d in g th e necessary lab ora tory and tech n ica l assistants; tra velin g
ex pen ses o f m em bers and e m p lo y e e s; office su pp lies, p rin tin g, and other m iscellaneous
expen ses, in c lu d in g te ch n ica l p erio d ica ls and book s o f referen ce; eq u ip m en t, m a in ­
ten an ce, and op era tion o f [L a n g le y M em orial A eron au tical L a b o r a t o r y ! research
laboratory, and co n stru ctio n o f a d d ition a l b u ild in g s necessary in c o n n ection th ere­
w it h ; m ain ten a n ce and op era tion o f one m o tor-p rop elled passenger-carrying v e h ic le ;
[a n d purch ase, m ain ten a n ce, and o p era tion o f one passenger-carrying m otor c y c l e j ;
personal serv ices in th e field an d in th e D istrict o f C olu m bia: Provided , T h a t th e sum
to b e p aid ou t o f this a p p rop riation for c le rica l, d raftin g, and m essenger serv ice for the
fiscal year e n d in g June 30 ,192 3, shall n o t e x c e e d [$ 3 0 ,0 0 0 J $42 , 000; in all. $250,000
(acts Mar. 3, 1915 , m l . 38, p . 930, sec. 1; Mar. 4,1921, vol. 41, p . 1381, sec. 1) ................. .

Personal services (salaries and wages).
Salaries:
Executive officer............ . ................
Assistant secretary...........................
Assistant purchasing agent..............
Auditor................................. ..........
Translators.......................................
Technical assistants.........................
Senior staff engineer.........................
Mechanical engineers........................
Junior mechanical engineers............
Chief physicist..................................
Assistant physicists..........................
Airplane test pilot............................
Secretary aerodynamics committee.
Chief clerk.........................................
.Clerks....................................................

Stenographers...................................
Typists..............................................
Mechanical draftsmen......................
Messenger boy ..................................
Wages:
L.eadingman machinist....................
<
Instrument makers and machinists.
Leadingman carpenter.....................
Patternmakers.................................
Leadingman engine mechanic..........
Engine mechanics............................
Airplane mechanics..........................
Tool-room attendant........................
Firemen and helpers........ - ..............

Rates per annum. Estimated. Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
N umber.

$5, 400.00
3 800.00
,
2 500.00
,
1 920.00
,
800.00- 1, 500.00
200.00- 3, 000.00
4, 200.00
000.00- 2, 400.00
800.00- 1, 500.00
4, 200.00
000.00- 2 700.00
,
3, 000.00
14.00 p. d. w
.a.e
2, 400.00
800.00- 1, 140.00
560.00- 1. 200.00
380.00- 1, 200.00
800.00- 1, 200.00
600.00

Number.

1
1
1
1
3
2
1
4
5

1
2
1
1
1
3
5
4

208.00
860.00- 1, 560.00
2, 208.00
860.00- 1, 758.00
1 980.00
,
1 800.00
,
800.00
J 500.00
;
400.00- 1, 206.00

N um ber .

1
4
2
1
2
1
1
1

3
5
4

1
0
1
1
5
1
2
1
3
3

1

4

8
0
Salaries.,
Wages...




$108,886.00 $97,160.00
46,736.00 38,000.00

$90,786.65
33,180.38

250,000.00

200,000.00

59

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for cach detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

Budget, page 604.
National Advisory Committee fo r Aeronautics- Continued.
Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.
GENERAL OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE,

$28,800.00
33,740.00
1.270.00
5.890.00

pment...............................................................
Supplies.................................................................... .
Transportation and communication........................ .
Travel....................................................................... .
OTHER OBJECTS OP EXPENDITURE.
Special reports1..............................................................

$18,400.00
28,200.00
950.00
5,790.00

$16,694.49
26,834.33
901.52
6,587.94

14,678.00

11,500.00

16,225.00

250,000.00

200,000.00

199,210.31

10,000.00

Construction of new laboratory buildings.................

8,000.00

1During the fiscal year 1921, the committee expended $46,725 for special reports, covering investiga­
tions conducted in other Government and private laboratories. As the committee, however, received
from the Navy allotments amounting to $30,500 for research work conducted by the committee for the Navy,
the amount so received bv the committee has been applied to offset the amount expended by the commit­
tee for special reports, and the difference, amounting to $16,225, is reported as the net expenditure for special
reports.
RAILROAD LABOR BOARD.

Salaries and Expenses, Railroad Labor Board —
Salaries o f 9 m em bers o f th e L abor B oard , at $10,000 each ( acts Feb. 28, 1920, vol. 41, p .
474, sec. 316; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1367, sec. 1 ) .....................................................................
Salary for secretary o f th e L abor B oard ( same acts) ........................................................................

$90,00 0.00
5,000. 00
$95,000. 00

F or all other au th orized e x p e n d itu re s o f th e L abor B oard in p erform ing the d u ties im ­
posed b y law , in c lu d in g personal and other se rv ice in th e D istrict of C olum bia and
elsew here, su p p lies an a e q u ip m e n t, law b ook s and b o o k s o f reference, p eriod icals,
p rin tin g and b in d in g , tra vel ex pen ses, p er d iem in lie u o f subsistence, rent o f quarters
m the D istrict o f C o lu m bia i f sp ace is n o t p r o v id e d b y th e P u b lic B u ild in g s C om m is­
sion, ren t o f quarters ou tsid e the D istrict o f C olum bia, w itness fees, and m ileage
(same acts) ....................................................................................................................................................

Rate per
annum.

Estimated, Estimated, E x j elided,
1922.
1923.
Number.

Members.......................
Solicitor.........................
Secretary.......................
Supervising statistician.
Assistant secretary.......
Examiners.....................
Chiefstatistician...........
Research clerk...............
Supervisor of dockets...
Schedule expert “ A ” .-.
Schedule expert “ B ” ...
Reporter........................
Disbursing officer..........
Private secretary...........
Chief clerk.....................
Statistical clerks............
General clerks (a)..........
General clerks (b)..........
General clerks fc)..........
General clerks (d)..........
Stenographer (a)...........
Stenographer (b )...........
Stenographer (c)..
Stenographer (d )....................
Computing machine operator.
Telephone operator.................
Comptometer operator............
Multigraph operator...............
Sergeant at arms.....................
Typists.,
Salaries (regular)................................................
Salaries (temporary)..... ....................................
Salaries (reporting service)................................

Number.

$10,000

Num ber .

1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
6
3
1
1
1
0
1
5
1
5
1
1
1
4
1
4
1
1
1

7.500
5.000
5.000
4.500
4.500
4,300
4.200
4.200
4/200
3.600
3.000
3.000
2.700
2.700
2.400
2.700
2.400

2,100
1,800
2,100
1,800
1.600
1.500
1,620
1.500
1,800
1.500
1,620
900
1.400

$261,140.00 $284,140.00 $247,664.53
5,860.00
5,860.00
11,524.77
15,000.00 20,000.00

GENERAL OBJECTS OP EXPENDITURE.

Expenses incident to personal services:
(a) Subsistence............................................
(b) Transportation......................................
Rent and storage................................................
Stationery and office supplies............................
Furniture and equipment..................................
Telegraph and telephone service.......................
Printing and binding.........: ..............................

4.000.00
9.000.00
55.000.00

4.000.00
9.000.00
65.000.00

3,000.00
25,000.00

3.000.00
30,000.00

10.000.00 10.000.00
6.000.00 12, 000.00

2, 121.02
6,450.25
56,335.11
9,321.96
24,167.17
2,295.69
47,340.78

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

M
iscellaneous..................................................
Total.....................................................




7,000.00
5,072.51
6, 000.00
400,000.00 450,000.00 j 412,293.79

305,000. 00

275.000. 00

40 0,00 0.00

T ota l, R a ilro a d L a b o r B o a rd .
Employees.

$95,000. 00

370.000. 00

60

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to bo
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

B u d g e t, page 8 6 5.

Relief of the Indigent , Alaska F und , Special Fund —
In d efin ite appropriation o f 10 per cen t o f the receipts from licenses collected outside of
incorporated tow ns in A laska, to b e e x p e n d e d for the relief of persons in A laska w h o
are in d ig n t and in cap acitated through nonage, old age, sickness, or acciden t ( acts
Jan. 27, 1905, vol. 33, p . 616, sec. 1; Feb. 9. 1909, vol. 35, p. 601, sec. 7; Mar. 3 , 1913,
vol. 37, p . 728, sec. 1 ) . „ ...........................................................................................................................
Redistribution, Funds fo r Indigent, Alaska Fund , Special Fund —
In d efin ite appropriation ' f su ch portion of the fu nd for relief of in d igen t in A laska as
m a y rem ain u n e x p e n d e d and b e returned to the Treasury, available for relief in other
division s o f th e T erritory w hen n eed ed ( act Mar. 3, 1913, vol. 37, p . 728, sec. 1) ................
B u d g e t, page 6 1 2.

$25,000. 00

$25,000. 00

89 ,000.00

89 ,000 .00

392, 500. 00

350,000.00

s h ip p in g b o a r d .

Salaries and Expenses, United States Shipping Board —
F or 7 com m issioners, at $12,000 each ; secretary, $5,000 ( acts Sept. 7, 1916, vol. 39 , p.
728, secs. 1-26; July 15, 1918, vol. 40 , p. 900 , secs. 1-3; June 5, 1920, vol. 41, pp. 9881008, secs. 1-25; June 5, 1920, vol . 41, p . 891 , sec. 1; Mar. 4 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 1367,
sec. 1) ..............................................................................................................................................................
F or all other e x p en d itu res au th orized b y th e a ct a p p rov ed S ept. 7, 1910, as am ended,
in c lu d in g th e com p en sation o f attorneys, officers, naval architects, special experts,
exam iners, clerks, and oth er em p loy ees in the D istrict of C olum bia and elsew here;
an d for all oth er expenses, in c lu d in g th e rental of quarters outsid e the D istrict of
C olum bia, law books, b o o k s o f referen ce, p eriod icals, p rin tin g and bin d in g, and
actual necessary expen ses o f m em bers o f the board, its special experts, and other
em ploy ees, or p er d iem in lie u o f su bsistence w h en allow ed pursuant to sec. 13 of the
su n d ry c iv il ap p rop riation a ct ap p ro v e d A u g. 1, 1914, w h ile up on official business
aw ay from th eir designated posts o f d u ty (same acts) ..................................................................

Employees.

General counsel...............
Admiralty counsel..........
Do............................
Special expert.................
General solicitor.............
Do............................
Special expert.................
Do.............................
Attorney.........................
Assistant counsel............
Assistant to chairman....
Assistant counsel............
Special expert.................
Examiner.......................
Assistant general counsel
General solicitor.............
Attome;
AdmiraJ
Attorney.
Commerce attorney,
Assistant counsels..
Attorney............... .
Assistant secretary.,
Attorney............... .
Assistant counsel...
Attorney................
Examiners..............




Rate per
■annum.

$10,000.00
10,000.00
7.600.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
8.500.00
7.500.00
7.200.00
7.200.00
6,000.00

6,000.00

5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00
4.500.00
4.500.00
4.000.00
4.000.00
4.000.00
4.200.00
3.900.00
3.800.00
3.600.00
3.600.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
Number.

Number.

Number.

KXKCUTIVK OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

61

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
; Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, reference* to Statutes at Largo, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount ! appropriated under
ending June 30.
required for eaeh detailed object.
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.
B u d g e t , p a g e ttlii.

Salaries and Expenses, United States Ship]nng Board—C on tin u ed .
Km ploy ees.

Ilute per
annum.

Attorneys.......................................................................
Exa miner.......................................................................
Clerk to commissioners...................................................
Examiners......................................................................
Chief cleric.......................................................................
Appointment clcrk.........................................................
Assistant disbursing officer............................................
Assistant counsel............................................................
Senior clerks...................................................................
Division chiefs................................................................
Purchasing agent...........................................................
Examiner.......................................................................
..
Clerks to commissioner?*......... .................. ............, T
Kramirtflr...t, ................... ................ . 1
IT
Senior clerks and accountants........................................
Assistant purchasing agent............................................
Printing clerk.................................................................
Senior clerk.....................................................................
Senior clerks..................*................................................
E x a m in e r .L
* .
....
.....
Purchasing agent............................................................
Cabinetmaker.................................................................
Senior clcrk.....................................................................

$:i, 500. tJ
O
.'K oo
xx
x 200. oo
3.000.00
3.000. 00
3.000.00
3.000.00
3,000.00
2,700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2.700.00
2,400.00
2,400.00
2, 400.00
2, 400.00
2, 400.00
2,2S0.00
2,160.00
2,010.00
2,010.00
1.930.00
1.950.00
1.860.00
1,800.00
1, S00.00
1, S00.00
1,800.00
1,680.00
1.640.00
1.560.00
1.560.00
1.440.00
1.410.00
1.410.00
1.440.00
1.320.00
1.200.00
1,200.00
1,200.00
1,080.00
1,080.00
960.00

Clerks and stenographers...............................................
Chief draftsman.............................................. *............
Librarian........................................................................
Typewriter mechanic.....................................................
Cierks and stenographers................................. .............
Clerk...............................................................................
Clerks, stenographers, and typists.................................
Assistant librarian..........................................................
Tclcphono operator........................................................
Stenographers, clerks, and typists.................................
Library assistant............................................................
Typewriter mechanic.....................................................
Stenographer^, typists, and clerks.................................
Clerks, typists, porters, and watchmen..........................
Mimeograph operator.....................................................
Telephone operator........................................................
Do.............................................................................
Assistant clerk................................................................
Do.............................................................................
Porters, laborers, and messengers, $960 to $600 per
annum.........................................................................

312,000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1 )2 .
1 .1
1922.
1921.
Number.

Number.

2

1
1

1
1
1
1

3
1
I
1
1

1
2

2
1
1

Number.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4

G

5

1

\

i

G

5
1
1

G

1

I

5
1
1
1
5
1
13
1

1
5
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
7
1
11
1

16

20

1
9

6

1
12
7
1

1

3
1

3

3
1
1
1
1

I
1
12
I
1
1
s
1
19
1
1
21
1
1
13
9
i

1
1
1

1

10
153 i

Salaries............................................................................

i

9
109

51
171

$246,200.00 $247,559.64

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Subsistence....................................................................
Transportation...............................................................
Communication...............................................................
Printing..........................................................................
Furniture........................................................................
Mechanical equipment...................................................
Miscellaneous office equipment......................................
Stationery and photostatic supplies...............................
Books and periodicals.....................................................
Newspapers....................................................................
Janitor supplies...............................................................

$1,500.00
3,500.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
5.000.00
10,000.00
1.000.00
25,000.00

500.00
2,000.00
6,000.00
4.000.00
3.000.00
8.000.00
500.00

551.66
6.302.69
8.325.70
2.603.37
9,502.63
802,56

2,500.00

24,000.00
2
,000.00

Miscellaneous services.....................................................
Miscellaneous supplies....................................................

1,400.00
500.00
7,000.00
3,000.00

1
,000.00
700.00
6.500.00
1.500.00

31,921.84
2,415.28
28.92
1,041.42
723.52
7,633.06
1,933.96

Grand total............................................................

392,500.00

306,000.00

321,446.65

10 0
0 .0

10 0
0 .0

F or th e in vestigation o f foreign d iscrim in ation against vessels and sh ippers o f the U nited
States, in c lu d in g personal services in th e D istrict o f C olum bia and elsew here, actual
necessary tra velin g expen ses, and p er d iem in lieu o f su bsistence w hen allow ed pur­
suant to section 13 o f the su n d ry c iv il appropriation act a p p roved A ug. 1, 1914 (acts
S ept . 7, 1916, vol. 39, p p . 728-738, sec. 26; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1367, sec. 1) .......................................
Emergency Shipping Fund —
F or ad d ition a l am ou n t required for the expen ses o f the U n ite d States E m ergen cy F le e t
C orporation d uring the fiscal year e n d in g June 30, 1023, for ad m in istrative purposes,
the p ay m e n t o f claim s arising from the can cellation o f contracts, dam age charges
and m iscellaneous adju stm en ts, m aintenance and operation of vessels, the com p le tio n
o f vessels now u n der con stru ctio n , and for e a r n in g o u t the provisions o f an a ct en title d
“ A n a ct to p ro v id e for the p rom otion and m aintenance o f the A m erican m erchant
m arine, to repeal certain em erg en cy legislation, and p rov id e for the d isposition,
regulation, an d use o f p ro p e rty acq u ire d th ereu n der, and £or o th e r p u rp os es,”
a p p rov ed Ju ne 5, 1920 (acts Mar . 4, 1921 , vol. 41 , p • 1382, sec. 1 ; June 16, 1921, vol.
42, p . 35, sec. 1; A u g . 24,1921, vol. 42, p . 192, sec. 1) ............................................................................................
T ota l u n d er S h ip p in g B o a rd .....................................................................................................................%




$20,000.00

$20,000.00

50* 00 0,00 0.00

7 3 ,500 ,000 .00

5 0 ,5 0 1 ,5 0 0 .0 0

7 3 ,959 ,000 .00

62

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923,

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1023.. Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Largo, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 605.
International Exchanges— *

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
approprated under
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
priation.
1922.

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION.

F or th e system o f international exchan ges betw een the U nited States and foreign
coun tries, u n d e r th e d irection o f the Sm ithsonian In stitu tion , in clu d in g necessary
em p loy ees and purchase o f necessary books and periodicals (act Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41,

p. 188$, sec. 1) ..................................................................................................................................

Employees.
Salaries:
Assistant secretary.....................................
Chief clerk...................................................
Correspondence clerk..................................
Stenographers and typewriters...................
Clerks..........................................................
Library cataloguers.....................................
Agents.........................................................
Wages:
Skilled laborers...........................................
Laborers......................................................

Rate per annum.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.
Number.

Number.

1
1
1
2
6
2
2

1.080.00-

3
3

3
3

3
3

$16,980.00
4,920.00

$16,584.25
4,847.50
469.25

$15,685.62
4,680.00
392.10

Freight, hauling, postage, etc............................
Boxes (packing)................................................
Equipment........................................................
Miscellaneous items...........................................

19,500.00
2,400.00
800.00
400.00

24,500.00
2,400.00
800.00
399.00

25,346.80
2,592.70
965.86
336.92

Total........................................................

45,000.00

50,000.00

50,000.00

Salaries.........................................................
Wages................................................................
Transferred to retirement fund..........................

780.00
660.00

1
1
1
2
6
2
2

Number .

52,000.00
2,000.00
1,860.00
1,800.00- 1,080.00
1.500.00- 800.00
1.440.00- 1,200.00
900.00- 250.00

1
1
1
2
6
2
2

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.




$45,000.00

$50, 000. 00

63

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISH MENTS.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the fiscal year ending Ju ne SO, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object

! Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for tho fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

Budi*<*t, pa^e <>0H
.
American Ethnology—
F or c on tin u in g eth n olog ica l researches am ong the A m erican Ind ian s and the natives of
H aw aii, in c lu d in g th e ex ca v a tio n and preservation o f archaeologic remains, under
th o d irection of the S m ithsonian In stitu tion , in c lu d in g necessary em ployees and the
purchase o f necessary book s and p eriod icals (act Mar. 4 t 1921, vol. 41, p. 1383, sec. 1) ___

Employees.

Rate per.annutn.

Salaries:
I
Chief............................................................ !
*3,000100
Ethnologists................................................ i 2,400.00- 1,500.00
Archaeologist (2 mouths)............................ !
1,800. (X
)
Deputy disbursing agent (4 months)............I
2,200.00
Clerk............................................................!
1,500.00
Stenographer and typist..............................I 1,200. 00, 1,320.00
Illustrator....................................................
2,000,00
Editor.......................................................... |
2, 200.00
Clerk and editorial assistant........................I 1, -100.00, 1,500.00
Librarian,
* ---------1,500. (X
)
900.00
Photographer...............................................j
Messenger boys............................................ j 780.00- 720.00
Wages:
M 0
0.0
I^atKJrer...................................................... !
660.00
Temporary labor (2 to 3 months)............... I
Salaries.................................................................................

Number.

1
0
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1

$31,693.33
S O 00
C.

Number.

1
G
1
1
1
2

Number .

1
1
1
1
1

7,500.00

7,500.00

15,500.00

15,500.00

1
6
1
1
1
2
1
1

1
1
1

3

$30,901.00
860.00
792.33

$28,575 00
660.00
657.07

500.00

Transferred to the retirement fund................... ..................

$40, 000. 00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1023.
1921.
1922.

500.00

386.00

W
ages................................................. ..............

$44, 000. 00

356.00
548.67

423.30
455.57
340.92
310.83
200.72
265.77
2,874.53
3,825.33
4,895.87

GENERAL onJECTS OP EXPENDITURE.

Rooks.....................................................
Furniture, fixtures, e tc.........................
Supplies, stationery................................
Miscellaneous..........................................
Postage, telephone, and telegraph..........
Photographic and scientific equipment..
Special services.......................................
Manuscripts............................................
Travel and field expenses......................
Reserve...................................................

200.00

m6
7
200.00

400.00

200.00

200.00

3,412.00
5,000.00

400.00
1.992.00
3.420.00
5.000.00

44,000.00

46,000.00

1,000.00

.

1 000.00

Total.

43,484.91

International Catalogue o f Scientific Literature— *
F or the cooperation o f th e U n ited States in th e w ork o f the International C atalogue of
S cien tific L iterature, in c lu d in g the preparation o f a classified in d e x catalogue of
A m erican scien tific p u b lica tio n s for incorporation in the International Catalogue,
clerk hire, purchase o f necessary book s and p e riod icals, and other necessary in c i­
dental expen ses (act Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, P- 1383, sec. 1 . ) ................................................

Employees.

Rate per
annum.

Assistant In charge....... ............. ............... .........
Classifier............... .............. . ....... ..........................
Clerk (1 month)..............................................................
Clerk...............................................................................
Messenger boy..................................................... .

$2,400.00
1.740.00
1.320.00
1.380.00
780.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.
Number.

Number.

Number.

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

$8,410.00

$6,249.75
160.25

$5,999.96
146.87

0,410100

Salaries............................................................................
Transferred to the retirement fund*........................ .

1
1
1
1
1

6,146.83

GENERAL OBJECTS OP EXPENDITURE,

S u p p lie s ................. .......................... .......................
Travel.............................................................................
Miscellaneous items.. . . . . . . . . . .
................ .

1,000.00

1,000.00

90.00

90.00

578.10
714.95
57.50

Total......................................................................

7,500.00

7,500.00

7,497.38

Astrophysical Observatory—
F or m ain ten a n ce o f th e A strop h y sical O bservatory, u n d er th e d irection o f th e S m ith ­
sonian In stitu tion , in c lu d in g assistants, purch ase o f necessary b ook s and p eriod icals,
apparatus, m ak ing necessary observation s in high altitu des, repairs and alterations
o f bu ild in gs, and m iscella n eou s.ex p en ses (act Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, P • iS8St sec. 7 ) . . .




64

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

Budget, page 607.

Astrophysical Observatory— C on tin u ed.
Employees.

Rate.

Salaries;
Director and assistant secretary .per annum $3,000.00, $2,000.00
2 100.00
A id.................................................... do___
1,800.00
Assistant........................................... d o....
1.320.00
Clerk (2 months)...............................do___
1.200.00
Computer (1J months)......................do___
Assistant computer...........................do___ 1,080.00, 1,200.00
2.500.00
Observer in field............................... do___
1.200.00
Assistant in field...............................do___
Wages:
Instrument maker............................ do___
1.500.00
1.50
Attendant (5 months)............... per diem..

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
Number.

$10,744.50
1,659.00

$9,077.35
1,662.12

12,403.50
313.00

10,739.47
249.77

12,716.50

10,989.24

200.00
125.00
160.00
150.00

200.00
125.00
150.00
125.00

95.64
125.58

148.50
2,000.00

183.50
2,000.00

137.20
1,548.78

15,500.00

Salaries..............................................................
Wages................................................................

Number.

$1 ,0 0 0
1 2 .0

,

15,500.00

13,000.00

1
1
1
1

1,696.50

Transferred to the retirement fund..

1
1
1
1

Number.

GENERAL OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Apparatus.........................................................
Books................................................................
Building repairs................................................
Supplies, tools, etc.............................................
Telephone, telegraph, freight, and miscella­
neous items....................................................
Travel and field expenses..................................
Total.

103.56

Furniture and Fixtures, National Museum—
F or cases, furniture, fixtures, and appliances required for the e x h ib itio n and safe­
k eep in g of collection s, in clu d in g necessary em ployees ( act Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, P138$, sec. i ) . A

Employees.

Shop foreman........ ............. . *................. ......................
Shop foreman (1 month 20 days)....................................
Cabinetmaker *....... . ......... ..................... . ....................
Carpenters.......................................................................
Foreman of painters.......................................................
Painter...........................................................................
Tinner’s helper...............................................................
Skilled laborer (3 months).............................................
Wages.............................................................................
Transferred to retirement fund......................................

Rate per
month.

$125.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
110.00
100.00
65.00
100.00

$20,000.00

$20,000.00

73,000.00

70,000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
Number .

1

Number.
1

Number .

1
1

1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1

$8,700.00

$8,483.00
217.00

$7,948.29
190.12

50.00
500.00
1.500.00
1.500.00
50.00
1,050.00
700.00
200.00
100.00
2,000.00
300.00
800.00
100.00
2,000.00
450.00

50.00
500.00
1.500.00
1.500.00
100.00
1,000.00
700.00
300.00
100.00
2,000.00
300.00
700.00
100.00
2,000.00
450.00

18.85
1.098.50
1.899.50
1,033.25
50.00
1,143.41
860.84
817.63
96.00
3,037.21
207.49
865.85
55.40
214.60
376.00
9.83

20,000.00

20,000.00

19,993.77

1
2
1
1
1
1

,

1

2

1
1

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Special services...............................................................
Exhibition cases.............................................................
Storage cases...................................................................
Drawers, trays, boxes.....................................................
Frames, etc....................................; ................................
Hardware.......................................................................
Tools and equipment...............................................
Cloth, cotton, etc......................................................
Lumber..........................................................................
Paints, oils, brushes.................................................
Office furniture, etc........................................................
Slate..........................................................................
Glass jars..................................................................
Compressed cork.............................................................
Leather...........................................................................
Total..................................................................

Beating and Lighting , National Museum —
F or heating, ligh tin g, e le ctrica l, telegraphic, and teleph on ic service, in clu d in g the pur­
chase o f 2 boilers an d a n ew feed w ater heater for the heatin g p lan t in the Natural
H isto ry B u ild in g (act Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1S83, sec. 1)




65

EXECUTTVK OFFICE AND TNDKPKXDRNT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), (late of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount j
required for each detailed oVjec t.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal yeai
appropriated under
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

B u d g e t, page 608.

Heating and Lighting, N ational Museum — C on tin u ed.
Rate per
j month.

Employees.

1
Assistant engineers............................................. . .........

1

$150.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
115.00
100.00
90.00
90.00
95.00

Electricians................... ........................... .. ..............
Skilled laborer (electrician and locksmith)....................
Skilled laborer (electrician)............................................
Blacksmith.....................................................................
Plumbers........................................................................
Telephone operator.......... .............................................
Firemen, electrician's helper, oilers, elevator conduc­
tors, laborers....................... ..................................... 75.00-55.00
Miscellaneous and temporary:
100.00
Assistant engineer (4 months, 1922 and 1923)..........
100.00
Electrician (18 days)....................... ................
75.00
Firemen (4 months, 1922 and 1923)..........................
60.00
Elevator conductor (3 months 5 days).... . . . . . . . .
60.00
Laborers (4 months, 1922 and 1923).........................
W a g e s ........................ .................. ............................
............................. .
Transferred to retirement fund.......

Estimated, IEstimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

1
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1

! Number.
1
3
1
2
2
1
1
I
2
1

15

15

1

1

2

2

2

Number.

Number .

1
3
1
2
4
1
1
1
2
1

17

2

1
5
1
3

$32,0S0.00 $31,387.00
693.00

$30,243. O
S
604.87

GENERAL OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Special services..............................................................
Coal and wood............. ..................................................
Gas.................................................................................
Electricity................... ..................................................
Telephones.....................................................................
Electrical supplies..........................................................
Rent of call boxes...........................................................
Heating supplies...........................................................
Telegrams.. . . . . . ..... .......................................... ..........
Boiler feed water heater and accessories. . . .

1,000.00
29,000.00
150.00
1.500.00
1.600.00
2,000.00
200.00
2,370.00
100.00
3,000.00

1,000.00
29,000.00
150.00
1.500.00
1.600.00
2,000.00
200.00
2,370.00
100.00

1,435.70
31.053.50
194.00
2,464.30
1,643.81
1,549.94
200.00
4,446.82
100.00

Total.....................................................................

73,000.00

70,000.00

73,936.02

HEATING AND LIGHTING, 1923.

This item provides for the heating, lighting, electrical, telegraphic, and telephonic service for the seven
buildings under the Institution,'which are located in the Mallbetween B Street NW. and B Street SW. and
Ninth and Twelfth Streets. The floor area of these buildings is 770,941 square feet, or 17§ acres, the cubic
contents of same 12,835,222 cubic feet, and the square feet of heating surface 132,640.
The main heating plant is located in the Natural History Building at the foot of Tenth Street NW., and
furnishes light, power, etc., to all of the buildings during the entire year, but it is necessary to augment
this plant during the months of December, January, and February by the use of the old boilers in the Arts
and industries Building. Of the appropriation of $70,000 for the current year, $29,000 is allotted for coal
and $32,080 is required for the employment of the 35 mechanics, laborers, etc., required to operate the
plant. (In this connection attention is called to the very small salaries paid to all of the employees on this
roll, which averages from 50 to 75 per cent less than are paid in private industry in Washington and less
than is paid in many branches of the Government service.)
The estimate for this item for 1923 is $28,500 in excess of the appropriation for the present fiscal year and
$24,500 greater than the appropriations provided in the sundry civil and deficiency bills for 1921. It covers
three items—$23,000 for two additional high-pressure boilers of similar size to those now in use or one of
double the horsepower, which, if installed, would reduce the cost of operation of about $4,000 annually
and would obviate the necessity of operating the auxiliary plant in the Arts and Industry Building; a
new boiler-feed water heater (the old one being worn out and inefficient) at a cost of $3,000, including
changes in piping, etc., the purchase of which would save approximately 150 tons of coal annually; the
balance, $2,500, is for increasing the allotment for coal from $29,000 to $31,500.
It is estimated by the engineer that during a normal year 4,000 tons of coal will be required. The largest
possible allotment for the purchase of coal from our present appropriation is $29,000, consequently in order
to have a sufficient amount it will be necessary to increase this auotment by $2,500 or $3,000. The allotment
of $29,000 for the present year—1922—will undoubtedly be inadequate and unless the contract price for
coal is lowered (it now vanes from $7.65 to $3) it will be necessary during the winter to ask for an additional
appropriation of between $2,000 and $3,000.

Preservation of CollectionSj National Museum —
F or con tin u in g p reservation, e x h ib itio n , and increase o f collection s from the su rv ey in g and
ex p lorin g e x p e d itio n s o f the G overnm ent, and from other sources, in c lu d in g necessary
em ployees, all other necessary expen ses, and n o t e x c e e d in g $5,500 for drawings and
illustrations for p u b lica tio n s (act Mar. 4,1921 , vol. 41 , p. 1383, sec. 1 ) .........................................

Employees.
Salaries:
Scientific and administrative staff—
Administrative assistant to the Secretary,
per annum...................
Head curators................. .......... per annum..
Curators...,..................... .....................d o ..,.
Do............................. ..................... d o ..,.
Associate curators........... .....................d o ....
^
Do............................ .
Assistant curators...........
D o............................. .................... do___
Do..................... .
77891— 21----- - 5




Rate.

$5,000.00
3,500.00
2,400.00
1,800.00
2,400.00
2,100.00
2,200.00
2,040.00
1,800.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

Number .

1
3
11
1
4
1
1
2
11

Number.

1
3
11
1
4
1
1
0
10

Number.

1
3
11
t
4
1
1
2
8

$312, 620.00

$312,620.00

66

THE ALTERNATIVE BtfDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 80, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 609.
Preservation o f Collections , National Museum — Continued.
Employees.

Rate.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

Sala ries—Con ti nued.
Scientific and administrative stafl—Continued.
: Number .
Assistant curator..................... per annum.
81,620.00
1
Do..................................................d o ...
1,200.00
1
Aids..................................................... d o...
1,500.00
1
Do.................................................. d o...
1,400.00
2
Do..................................................d o...
1,200.00
11
Philatelist.............................................d o .*.
1,500.00
1
Chiefs of offices—
Superintendent of buildings and labor.do...
2,520.00
1
Assistant superintendent..................... d o...
1,800.00
1
Chief of correspondence........................ d o...
2,400.00
1
Disbursing agent..................................d o ...
2,000.00
1
Property clerk......................................d o...
, 1,800.00
1
Editor.................................................. do.*.
2,400.00
1
Assistant librarian............................... do...
1,600.00
1
Photographer.......................................do*..
2,100.00
1
Appointment clerk...............................do.*.
2,000.00
1
Shipper................................................ d o ...
1,200.00
1
Preparators and recorders—
1,500.00
Taxidermists........................................ d o ...
Do..................................................d o...
1,320.00
1
Do.............................................. '..do...
1,140.00
2
D o..................................................d o...
1,080.00
1,020.00
D o..................................................d o ...
1,020.00
Assistant taxidermist.......................... d o ...
1
1,200.00
Osteologist........................................... d o...
1
Plaster and papier mfLch£ worker........ d o...
1,200.00
Assistant photographer........................ d o ...
1,200.00
1
Preparators.......................................... d o...
1,500.00
2
Do..................................................d o...
1,400.00
2
Do..................................................d o...
1,200.00
2
Do..................................................d o...
1,020.00
5
Shipper................................................ d o...
1,200.00
1
Carpenter-preparator........................... d o ...
1,400.00
1
Foremen-preparators........................... d o ...
1,200.00
1
Classifier..................... ........................ d o ...
1,200.00
1
Recorders............................................. d o...
1,320.00
2
Cataloguers...........................................d o...
1,200.00
2
Do..................................................d o...
1,080.00
1
Skilled laborer......................................d o...
1,080.00
1
Clerical stafl—
Finance clerk....................................... d o...
2,100.00
1
Clerk.....................................................d o...
1,720.00
1
Do.................................................. do.*.
1,620.00
Correspondence clerk........................... d o...
1,500.00
1
Clerk........................... .........................d o...
1,500.00
1
Clerk (6 months).................................. d o...
1,320.00
1
Clerks (1 for 6 months 1922 and 1923).. .d o...
1,200.00
9
Clerks................................................... d o...
1,100.00
Do..................................................d o...
1,020.00
2
Stenographer and typewriter (5 months),
per annum...*...........................................
1,800.00
1
Stenographer and typewriters...per annum.
1,500.00
1
Do........................................ ......... d o ...
1,320.00
3
D o.................................................. d o...
1,200.00
5
Stenographers and typewriters (3 for total
of 7 months, 1921; 2 for 1921)...per annum.
1,020.00
3
Typists................................................. do.*.
1,020.00
2
Preparators, clerks, typewriters, skilled
laborers................................... per annum.. 960.00-720.00
9
Miscellaneous and temporary acting curator
(2 months, 1921; 3 months, 1922), per
annum....................................................
2,400.00
Assistant........................................ do.
1,500.00
Aid.................................. ............. do.
1,200.00
preparator..................................... d o ...
1,020.00
Preparators (equivalent to 1 for 6 months)
per annum......................................... .
900.00
Clerk (2 months)..................per annum..
1,020.00
Stenographers and typewriters (7 months)
per annum...........................................
1,200.00
Stenographer and typewriter (2 months
per annum........................................
1,020.00
Typist (3 months, 1921; 3 months, 1922]
per annum........................................
1,200.00
Typists (equivalent to 1 for 17 months;
per *ynrmm................ **..**..............
1,020.00
Cataloguers.......................... per annum
1
1,020.00
D o............................................do.
900.00
Watch, labor, and cleaning force—
Captain of watch..................................do.
1
1,200.00
Foremen...............................................do.
2
1,200.00
Skilled laborer-foremen 9 months).......do.
1,200.00
1
Lieutenants of watch, watchmen, laborer
messengers, forewomen, charwomen, a
tendants.................................. per annum 900.00-240.00
168
Attendant, female (7 months).......per diem
1.50
1
Miscellaneous and temporary—
Watchmen..............average per annum
720.00
660.00
Laborers......................................... do..
240.00
Charwomen....................................do.
480.00
Messengers..................................... do..




Number .

1
1
2
2
11
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
5
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1

Number.

1
1
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
4
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1

2

1
1
1
1
1
1
S
1
2

1
1
3
5

1
1
4
4

3
2

5
2

9

9

1

1
1
1
1

i
i
i

9

2
1
2
1
1

1

1

7
1
2

1
2
1

1
2
1

168
1

204
1
11
6
s
3

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

67

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates oj appropriations required f o r the service oj thejiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
priation.
1922.

Budget, page 610.
Preservation o f Collections, N ational Museum — C ontinu ed.
Employees.
Wages:
Carpenters (3J months in all)..........per annum
Cabinetmakers (3 months)......................... do___
Attendants (Sundays and holidays)...per diem.

Rate.

*1,200.00

Estimated. Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
Number.

Number.

Number.

1, 200.00
2.00-3.00

$294,823.00 $288,698.75

$273,740.52
1,694.50

6,124.25

Wages.

275,435.02
5,382.02

2.097.00
8.400.00
900.00
2.400.00
2, 000.00
800.00

1.200.00

6,404.37
13,635.90
804.07
3,877.22
3,163.81
573.00
3,028.75

312,620.00

312.304.16

Total.......................................
Transferred to the retirement fund.,
GENERAL OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Special services.......................
Supplies..................................
Stationery..............................
Freight and cartage................
Field and traveling expenses..
Drawings and illustrations___
Specimens...............................

2.097.00
8.500.00
800.00
2.400.00

2,0 0 0
0 .0
650.00
1.350.00

Total.

312,620.00

Building Repairs, National Museum —
F or repairs o f b u ild in g s, shops, and sheds, in c lu d in g all necessary labor and m aterial
(iact Mar. 4 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1383, sec. 1) .........................................................................................

Employees.

Cabinetmaker.............................................per month.
Tinner.................................................................. do___
Painter..................................................................do___
Bricklayer and plasterer.......................................do___
Laborer.................................................................do___
Miscellaneous and temporary:
Painters.................................................. per diem..
Painters................................................per month..
Painter.......................................................... do.
Laborers........................................................do.
Wages....................................... .
Transferred to retirement fund..

Rate.

100.00
100.00
100.00

55.00

Number .

$5,460.00

$5,340.00
120.00

Total.

2,000.00

2,000.00

500.00

500.00

15,000 00

15,000.00

$5,374.67
67.50

5,460.00

5,442.17

900.00
600.00
500.00
350.00
1,565.00

900.00
700.00
450.00
300.00
1,565.00

400.00
25.00

400.00
25.00

855.00
616.22
288.43
325.56
1,551.62
60.70
375.58
29.80
•49.00
35.00
52.50
265.00

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

Number.

7.00

100.00

95.00
55.00

GENERAL OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Special services___
Cork flooring.*.....,
Lumber.................
Hardware, etc.......
Paints, oils, etc..*..
Glass..................... .
Cement.................. .
Slate...................... .
Wire mesh doors....
Rubbers and felts...
Stationary awning..
Ventilighter............

$10, 000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.
Number.

$100.00

$10, 000.00

10 0
0 .0
10 0
0 .0

10 0
0 .0

100.00

10,000.00 10,000.00

9,946.58

Books, National Museum —
F or purchase o f book s, p am ph lets, and p eriod icals for reference (act Mar . 4, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1383, see. 1) . ...........................................................................................................................................
Postage, National Museum —
F or postage stam ps and foreign postal cards (act Mar. 4,1921, vol. 41,
1383, sec. 1 ) -----National Gallery o f A rt —
F or th e adm inistration o f th e N ational G allery o f A rt b y th e S m ithsonian Institution,
in clu d in g com p en sation o f necessary em p loy ees an d necessary in cid en tal expenses
(act Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, V• 1383, see. 1 ) ..........................................................................................




68

TITE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 11)23.

Estimates of appropriations required jor the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
appropriated under , for the fiscal year
each head of appro- ’ ending June 30,
priation.
1922.

Budget, page 611.
National Gallery of A rt —C ontinu ed.
Employees.
Salaries:
Director..................................
Recorder................................. .
Stenographer and typewriter..
Watchman-clerk..................... .
Watchmen...............................
Wages:
Laborers...................................
Charwomen .......................... .
Miscellaneous and temporary—
Carpenter (1 to 2 months)..
Painter (1 month).............

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

Rato per annum.

Number

Number

$4, 600.00
1,320.00,1,500.00

Salaries.,
Wages..,

720.00,

1,200.00
900.00
720.00

660.00
240.00

1,200.00
1,110.00
. $ 0 0 .0
1 ,2 0 0
.1

$10,003.50
1.897.50

JS, 559.05
2,4.50.12

11,901.00
259.00

11,009.17

12,160.00

11,208.54

1,400.00

1,240.00

2,22$. So

1,200.00

80 0
0 .0

1,121.49
421.33

15,000.00

15,000. 00

14,980.21

1,800.00

Transferred to the retirement fund..
GENERAT. OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Exhibition cases and repairs..........................
Supplies, transportation, travel, and telephone,
freight and express charges..........................
Miscellaneous...................................................
Reserve............................................................
Total.

Number.

340.00

300.00
500.00

199.37

Budget, page 865.
Smithsonian Institution—Interest Accm nt —
T o pay for the erection of buildings and expenses o f the Sm ithsonian Institution, being
interest on the funds derived from the bequest of James Sm ithson and others (R. S .t
p. 728, sec. 3689) .......................................................................................................................................
T otal un der Sm ithsonian In s titu tio n .
The estimate of the Smithsonion Institution for printing and binding, under sec. 2, act of May 8,1872
(R. S. 720, sec. 3661), will be found on page 32.




$60,000.00

j

160,000.00
609,120.00

605,120.00
i

69

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Largo, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amountappropriated
appropriated under
for the fiscal year
each head of appro­
ending June 30,
1922.
priation.

B u d g e t, page 69 .

S T A T E , W A R , A N D N A V Y D E P A R T M E N T B U IL D IN G S .
Salaries, Office o f Superintendent, State , War, and Navy Department Buildings —
Office o f the su perintend ent, for th e follow in g em p lo y e e for the ad m inistration of the
force under th e su perintend ent: A ssistant to su perin ten d en t (act Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41,
pp. 1280-1282, sec. i ) .........................................................................................................................................................
S ta te, W ar, and N a v y D ep artm en t B u ild in g , for t h e fo llo w in g em ploy ees for m a in te­
nance and p r o t e c t io n :
A ssistant su p e rin te n d e n t (.R . S ., secs. 167-169 ; acts Mar. 3, 1883, vol. 22 , p. 553,
sec. 1; July 16 , 1914, vol. 38, p. 483, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p p . 1280-1282,
s e c . l ) . . . ..................................... . . ................................................................................................
$ 2 ,0 0 0 .0 0
T w o clerks class 1 (same acts) ........................................................................................................
2 ,4 0 0 .0 0
C lerk (same acts) .................................................................................................................................
1 ,0 0 0 .0 0
C hief e n g in eer (same acts) ...............................................................................................................
1,8 00.0 0
F iv e assistant engin eers, a t $1,200 each (same acts) ..............................................................
6, 000.00
E lectrica l m ach in ist (same acts) ....................................................................................................
1,2 00.0 0
Captain o f th e w atch (same acts) ..................................................................................................
1 ,2 00.0 0
T w o lieu ten a n ts o f th e w a tch , a t $840 each (same acts) .......................................................
1, 680.00
T h irty -eig h t w atchm en, a t $720 each (same acts) ...................................................................
27,360.00
Carpenter (same acts).........................................................................................................................
1,0 00.0 0
C hief ele ctricia n (same acts) ..........................................................................................................
1,4 0 0 .0 0
E le ctricia n (same acts) ......................................................................................................................
1,200. 00
M ach in ist (same acts) .........................................................................................................................
1 ,0 0 0 .0 0
P ain ter (same acts) ................................................................ * ..........................................................
1 ,0 00.0 0
P lu m ber (same acts) ............................................................................................... . .........................
1,0 00.0 0
T hree d yn am o tenders, a t $900 each (same acts ) . . ................................................................
2, 700.00
Seven sk illed laborers or general m ech an ics, a t $840 each (same acts) ............ ..............
5 ,8 8 0 .0 0
B ricklay er (same acts ) . . ...................................................................................................................
1, 200.00
M essenger (same acts) ........................................................................................................................
840.00
Chauffeur (same acts) ........................... .............................................................................................
1,0 0 0 .0 0
Forem an o f laborers (same acts) .....................................................................................................
840.00
10 ,080 .00
F ourteen firem en, a t $720 e a ch (d ecrease o f 2 s u b m itte d ) (same acts) ...........................
F ifteen elev ator con d u ctors, a t $720 each (d ecrea se o f 1 su b m itte d ) (same acts) ........
10,800 .00
T w o forem en or forew om en , a t $780 each (same acts) ...........................................................
1, 560.00
F orty-eight laborers, at $660 each (decrease o f 2 su bm itted ) (same acts) .......................
31,680. 00
G ardener (same acts) ..........................................................................................................................
720.00
T hree attendants, at $480 each (same acts) ................................................................................
1,4 40.0 0




123,460.00

15,060. 00
P otom ac Park bu ild in gs (N a v y and m un ition s), for th e follow in g em ployees for m ain ­
tenan ce and p ro te ctio n :
Assistant su perin ten d en t (acts Mar. 28, 1918, vol. 40, p. 483, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921,
vol. 41 , VP- 1280-1282, sec. 1) ............. .......................................................................................
Clerks:
O n e o f class 4 (samt acts) ------ j ...............................................................................................
T w o o f class 3 (same acts) .........................................................................................................
T w o o f class 2 (same acts) .........................................................................................................
T h ree o f class 1 (in crease o f 1 su b m itte d ) (same acts) ................................................. *
T w o at $1,000 each (same acts ) . . . . . . t . T. . T. . T. T t T
: T
. . . . . . . . . . T. . .

$3,600.00

119,980.00
W alker-Johnson B u ild in g , 1734 N ew Y ork A v e n u e , for the follow in g em ployees for
m aintenance and operation :
E ngineer (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 88 , p. 483, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, pp- 12801282, sec. 1) ................................ .....................................................................................................
T h ree firem en, at $720 each (d ecrea se o f 1 su b m itte d ) (same acts) ...................................
T hree elev ator con d u ctors, at $720 each (same a c ts). ............................................................
F iv e w atchm en, at $720 each (same acts) ..................................................................................
G eneral m e ch a n ic or sk illed laborer (same acts) ......................................................................
S even laborers, at $660 each (same acts) .....................................................................................
O ne atten dant (same acts) ................................................................................................................

$3, 600. 00

15,780.00

1,2 00.0 0
2,160. 00
2,160. 00
3 ,6 00.0 0
840.00
4, 620. 00
480. CO

2 ,0 0 0 .0 0
1 ,8 0 0 .0 0
3 ,2 0 0 .0 0
2 , 800.00
3 ,6 0 0 .0 0
2? 000.00

70

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o j appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

B u d g et, page 70.

Salaries, Office o f Superintendent , State, War, and Navy Department Buildings — C ontinu ed.
E otom a c P a rk b u ild in g s— C on tin u ed.
T h ree m essengers, at $720 edch (acts Mar. 28, 1918, vol. 40, p. 488, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
1921 , v o l 41, p p . 1280-1282 , sec. 1 ) .......................................................................................
Q hief engin eer (same acts ) ...............................................................................................................
A ssistant engin eer (same acts) ........................................................................................................
F ou r assistant engineers, at $1,400 each (same acts) ..............................................................
Storekeeper (same acts) ...................................................................................................................
C h ief e le ctricia n (same acts). .........................................................................................................
T w o electrician s, at $1,400 each (same acts) ........................................................ ' . ..................
T w o electrician s, at $1,200 each (same acts) .............................................................................
Forem an o f carpenters (same acts) ................................................................................................
T h ree carpenters, at $1,400 each (same acts) ............................................................................
F our carpenters, at $1,200 each (decrease of 1 su bm itted) (same acts)...........................
Forem an of painters (same acts) ....................................................................................................
" T w o painters, at $1,200 each (same acts) ....................................................................................
T w o painters, at $1,000 each (same acts) ....................................................................................
P lu m ber (same acts) ..........................................................................................................................
T w o plum bers, at $1,200 each (decrease of 1 su bm itted) (same acts) ..............................
T w o steam fitters. at $1,400 each (same acts) .............................................................................
O n e steam fitter (decrease o f 1 su b m itted ) (same acts) ..........................................................
M achinist (same acts) ........................................ ! ..............................................................................
F our sw itch boa rd operators, at $1,200 each (same acts)........................................................
F our general m ech anics, at $1,000 each (same acts)..............................................................
C aptain of th e guard (same acts)...................................................................................................
T hree lieutenants of the guard, at $1,080 each (same acts) .............................. ...................
T h re e sergeants of th e guard, at $930 each (same acts) .........................................................
T w en ty -th ree guards, at $720 each (same acts) ........................................................................
T w en ty -th ree guards, at $780 each (same acts) ........................................................................
F ire marshal (same acts) ...................................................................................................................
Forem an of laborers (same acts) .....................................................................................................
T w o assistant forem en of laborers, at $960 each (same acts) ................................................
S ix forem en of forew om en, at $780 each (same acts) ..............................................................
O n e hu ndred and forty laborers, at $660 each (same acts) ..................................................
T w e n ty -o n e fem ale laborers, at $480 each (decrease o f 1 su bm itted ) (same acts) ........
Laborers and charw om en (decrease of $7,800 su bm itted) (same acts)..............................

$2,160. 00
1,800. 00
1,600. 00
5 ,6 00.0 0
1, 200.00
1,600. 00
2 ,8 00.0 0
2 ,4 00.0 0
1,600. 00
4, 200.00
4 ,8 0 0 .0 0
1,4 00.0 0
2,400. 00
2,0 0 0 .0 0
1,4 00.0 0
2 ,4 0 0 .0 0
2 ,8 0 0 .0 0
1,2 0 0 .0 0
1,400. 00
4,800. 00
* 4,000. 00
1,6 00.0 0
3 ,2 4 0 .0 0
2 ,7 90.0 0
16,560.00
17,940. 00
1,0 80.0 0
1,4 00.0 0
1 ,9 20.0 0
4,680. 00
92 ,400 .00
10,080. 00
112,200. 00

$334,850. 00
M all office bu ildin gs, for the follow in g em ployees for the m aintenance and p rotection of
the tem porary office bu ildin gs in the M all (U n its C, D, E , and F , located in H en ry
Park, Seaton Park, and th e S m ithsonian G rounds):
A ssistan t su perin ten d en t (actsMar. 28,1918, v o l 40, p. 483 , sec. 1; Mar. 3 , 1921, v o l
41, p p . 1280-1282 , sec. 1) ............................................ j .............................................................
C h ief cle rk (same acts) .......................................................................................................................
Clerks:
O ne, class 3 (same acts) ............................................................................................................
T w o , class 2 (same acts) ............................................................................................................
T h ree, class 1 (same acts) .........................................................................................................
T w o , a t $1,000 each (same acts) .............................................................................................
T w o m essengers, at $720 each (same acts) ..................................................................................
C hief engin eer (same acts) ................................................................................................................
A ssistant to c h ie f engin eer (same acts) ............................................................... .........................
T hree assistant engineers, at $1,200 each (same acts) ............ ................................................
Storekeeper (same acts) .....................................................................................................................
Forem an o f carpenters (same acts) ............*..................................................................................
F ou r carpenters, at $1,400 each, (same acts) ...............................................................................
F iv e carpenters, at $1,200 each (decrease of 1 su bm itted ) (same acts) ___ : ...................
C hief e le ctricia n (same acts)............................................................................................................
T w o electrician s, at $1,400 each (same acts) ..............................................................................
F ou r electrician s, at $1,200 each (decrease o f 2 su b m itted ) (same acts) ..........................
F orem an o f p lu m bers (same acts) ____-..........................................................................................
T w o p lum bers, at $1,200 each (decrease o f 1 su b m itted ) (same acts) ...............................
T w o steam fitters, a t $1,200 each (same acts) ....... .....................................................................
M achinist (same acts). : ........... ..........................................................................................................
F orem an o f painters (same acts) .....................................................................................................
T w o painters, a t $1,200 each (same acts) ....................................................................................
E ig h t general m ech an ics, a t $1,000 each (same acts) .............................................................
S ix firem en, at $840 each (same acts) ................ '.........................................................................
S e v e n firemen^ at $720 each (same acts) .....................................................................................
C aptain o f the guard (same acts) ....................................................................................................
T h ree lieu ten a n ts o f th e guard, at $1,080 each (same acts) ..................................................
F ire marshal (same acts) ....................................................................................................................
T h ree sergeants o f th e guard, at $930 ea ch (same acts) ..........................................................
O n e sergeant o f th e guard (same acts) . ........................................................................................
E ig h ty guards, at $780 each (same acts) ........................................... ..........................................
F orem an o f laborers (same acts) .....................................................................................................
T w o assistant forem en o f laborers, a t $960 each (same acts) ................................................




2 ,0 0 0 .0 0
1 ,8 0 0 .0 0
1,6 00.0 0
2 ,8 0 0 .0 0
3 ,6 0 0 .0 0
2 ,0 0 0 .0 0
1 ,4 4 0 .0 0
1 ,8 0 0 .0 0
1 ,6 00.0 0
3,6 0 0 .0 0
1,2 0 0 .0 0
1 ,6 0 0 .0 0
5 ,6 00.0 0
6 ,0 0 0 .0 0
1 ,6 0 0 .0 0
2 ,8 0 0 .0 0
4 ,8 0 0 .0 0
1 ,4 0 0 .0 0
2 ,4 0 0 .0 0
2 ,4 0 0 .0 0
1 ,2 0 0 .0 0
1 ,4 0 0 .0 0
2 ,4 0 0 .0 0
8 ,0 0 0 .0 0
5 ,0 4 0 .0 0
5 ,0 4 0 .0 0
1 ,6 0 0 .0 0
3 ,2 4 0 .0 0
1 ,0 8 0 .0 0
2 ,7 9 0 .0 0
840.00
62 ,400 .00
1 ,4 0 0 .0 0
1 ,9 2 0 .0 0

$345,530.00

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

7i

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1928— Continued.

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Totah amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

B u d g e t, p age 71.

Salaries, Office o f Superintendent State, War, and Navy Department Buildings — C ontinu ed.
M ali office bu ild in gs— C on tin u ed.
N ine forem en or forew om en, at $780 each (acts Mar. 28, 1918, vol. 40, p . 483, sec.l;
' Mar. 3 , 1921, vol. 41, p p . 1280-1282, sec. 1 ) ........................................................................
F ifty-eigh t laborers, at $660 each (same acts) ........... ...............................................................
Laborers and charw om en (decrease o f $6,640 su bm itted ) (same acts) ..............................
T en fem ale laborers, at $480 each (same acts) ...........................................................................

$7 ,2 0 0 .0 0
38,280.00
63,360.00
4, 800.00

Tem porary office b u ild in g (1800 V irgin ia A v e n u e N W .), for the follow in g em ployees
for the m aintenance and p ro te ctio n o f the b u ild in g :
Clerk class 1 (acts Mar. 28, 1918, vol. 40, p. 483, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p .
1280-1282, sec. 1) .............................................................................................................................
Chief engineer (same acts) ................................................................................................................
Assistant engineer (same acts) ........................................................................................................
Six firem en, at $840 each (same acts) ..........................................................................................

1, 200.00
1,4 00.0 0
1,0 00.0 0
5 ,0 40.0 0

$263, 850.00

$275,290.00

38,650.00

42, 730. 00

203,480.00

217,520.00

979,470.00

1,023,910.00

N ote.—F our coal passers, at 1720 each, omitted.

E lectricia n (same acts) .............................................................................. ........................................
Carpenter (same acts) ..................................................................................................................... ....
General m e ch a n ic (same acts) .........................................................................................................
T hree sergeants o f th e guard, at $930 each (same acts) ..................... ...................................
T w elv e guards, at $780 each (same acts) ................................................................. ...................
Forem an o f laborers (same acts) .....................................................................................................
Forem an or forew om an (same acts) ...............................................................................................
T en laborers, at $660 each (same acts) ..................... ............................................ .......................
Laborers and charw om en (decrease o f $720 su bm itted) (same acts) .................................
T w o fem ale laborers, at $480 each (decrease o f 1 su bm itted ) (same acts) ......................
T em porary office b u ild in gs for e m p loy ees for th e m ain ten a n ce an d p rotection o f th e
tem porary office b u ild in g s k n ow n as follow s: W ar T ra de B u ild in g , b etw een B and
C Streets and T w en tieth and T w en ty -first Streets N W .; F o o d A d m in istration B u ild ­
in g N o. 1, b e tw e e n E ig h teen th and N in eteen th Streets and C and D Streets N W .;
F ood A d m in istration B u ild in g N o. 2, be tw e e n N ew Y o rk A v e n u e and D Street and
N ineteenth and T w e n tieth Streets N W .; F u el A d m in istration B u ild in g s N os. 1 and
2, b ou n d ed b y V irgin ia A v e n u e and E ig h teen th and C Streets N W .; F u el A d m in is­
tration B u ild in g N o. 3, on D Street, betw een T w e n tie th and T w en ty-first Streets
N W .; H . L . P ettu s B u ild in g , o n N in eteen th Street, be tw e en V irgin ia A v e n u e and
D Street N W .; and A r ch ie B u tt B u ild in g , 1725 N ew Y o rk A v e n u e N W :
Assistant su perin ten d en t (acts July 11, 1919, vol. 41, p p • 47-48, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921 ,
vol. 41 , p p . 1280-1282, sec. 1) ..............................................................................................................
P rin cip al clerk (same acts) ..................................................... .................................................................
Clerks:
One, class 3 (same acts) .....................................................................................................................
One, class 2 (same acts) .................................. ..................................................................................
Three, class 1 (same acts) ..................................................................................................................
T w o messengers, at $840 each (same acts) ..........................................................................................

1,2 0 0 .0 0
1,2 0 0 .0 0
1, 000. 00
2,7 90.0 0
9,360. 00
840.00
780. 00
6,6 0 0 .0 0
5, 280.00
960.00

2, 000.00

2 , 000.00
1, 600.00
1,4 00.0 0
3 ,6 0 0 .0 0
1,6 80.0 0

N ote .—Chief electrician, at $1,600, omitted.

E lectrician (same acts)................................................................................................................................
1,400. 00
T w o electricians, at $1,200 each (decrease o f 1 su bm itted ) (same a d s ) ..........................
2,4 00.0 0
F orem an of carpenters (same acts) .............................................................................................. 1, 600.00
Carpenter (same acts) .........................................................................................................................
1,400.00
T hree carpenters, at $1,200 each (decrease of 1 su bm itted ) (same acts) ..........................
3 ,6 00.0 0
P lu m ber (same acts) ................................ - .........................................................................................
1,400.00
T w o plum bers, at $1,200 each (same acts) .................................................................................
2 ,4 00.0 0
Steam fitter (same acts) .......................................................................................................................
1,400.00
T hree painters, at $1,200 each (same acts) .................................................................................
3, 600.00
Six general m ech an ics, at $1,000 each (same acts) ..................................................................
-6 ,000 .00
Assistant engineer (same acts) .........................................................................................................
1,400. 00
Three assistant engineers, at $1,200 each (same acts) .............................................................
3 ,6 0 0 .0 0
T hirteen firem en, at $840 each (same acts) ................................................................................
10,920.00
S ix coal passers, at $720 each (d ecrease o f 5 su b m itte d ) (same acts) ...............................
4 ,3 2 0 .0 0
Captain o f the guard (same acts) ....................................................................................................
1, 600.00
T hree lieutenants o f guard, at $1,080 each (same acts) .................................. .......................
3 ,2 40.0 0
E ight sergeants of guard, at $900 each (same acts) ...................................................................
7,2 00.0 0
E ig h ty guards, at $780 each (same acts) ........................................... ............ .............................
62 ,400.00
F ire m arshal (same acts) .................................................... ...............................................................
1 ,2 00.0 0
Forem an of laborers (same a c ts) .....................................................................................................
1,0 0 0 .0 0
T w o assistant forem an o f laborers, a t $840 ea ch (same acts) ................................................
1, 680.00
S ix forem en or forew om en , at $720 ea ch (same acts) .............................................................
4 ,3 2 0 .0 0
T w en ty -six laborers, at $660 each (same acts) ...........................................................................
17,160.00
F iv e fem ale laborers, at $480 each (same acts) ......... ...............................................................
2 ,4 0 0 .0 0
L aborers and charw om en (decrease o f $6,440 su b m itted ) (same acts) ..............................
43,560 .00

T ota l salaries, O ffice o f S u p erin ten d en t.......................................................... - ........................................




72'

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 72.
Fuel, Lights. etc.—
State, War, and Navy Department Building:
For fuel, lights, repairs, miscellaneous items, printing, and city directory (R. S.,
p. 27, secs. 167-169; acts Mar. 3, 1883, vol. 22, p. 553, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38,
p. 483, sec. 1; Mar. 1, 1919. vol. 40, p. 1240, sec. 1; Mar. 3. 1921, vol. 41, pp* 1280, sec. 1 ) .................................................................................................................................

Objects of expenditure.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$54,000. 00

$55,000. 00

S, 500.00

9,000 00

185,000.00

220, 000. 00

Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1923.

Fuel..................................................................................................................................... $41,250.00
2,400.00
Electricity................................................................................................ ........................
Plumbing and steam fitting supplies.......................................................................
800.00
Painters’ supplies...........................................................................................................
950.00
Carpenters’ supplies.......................................................................................................
700.00
Electrical supplies...........................................................................................................
750.00
Cleaning supplies..............*............................................................................................
1,200.00
Lamp renewals................................................................................................................
800.00
Building material, boiler and engineer supplies....................................................i
3,000.00
Tools and equipment....................................................... ............................................ *
115.00
Miscellaneous................................................................................................................... .
1,948.00
75.00
Printing.............................................................................................................................
Directory.............................*.............................................................................................
12.00

*49,597.37
1,575.65
840.23
1,185.67
995.36
820.40
3,560.10
1,138.76
7,469.97
656.23
2,601.92
86.51

Total........................................................................................................................; 54,000.00

70,540.17

12.00

Walker*Johnson Building:
For fuel, lights, repairs, and miscellaneous items (July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 483,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, pp. 1280-1282, sec. 1) . ........................................................

Objects of expenditures.

Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1923.

Fuel................................................................................
Electricity...................................................................
Plumbing and steam fitting supplies.........^____
Painters' supplies......................................................
Carpenters* supplies..................................................
Electrical supplies......................................................
Cleaning supplies........................................................
Lamp renewals...........................................................
Building material, boiler and engineer supplies
Tools and equipment................................................
Miscellaneous..............................................................

$5,000.00
1, 200.00
80.00
200.00
380.00
100.00
370.00
250.00
670.00
50.00
200.00

*5,200.00
1, 200.00
87.51
168.59
393.36
90.60
365.36
221.78
791.52
63.69
218.63,

Total...................................................................

8,500.00

S,S01.O4

Potomac Park buildings:
For fuel, lights, repairs, miscellaneous items, printing, and city directory, including
maintenance, repair, exchange, and operation, of one motor-propelleii passengercarrying vehicle to be used for official purposes only (acts Mar. 28,1918, vol. 40,
p. 48S, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, ml. 41, p. 1280-1282, sec. 1) ..................................................

Objects of expenditures.

Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1923.

Electricity. ,

AlUUiUUlt, OUU SiKHU UllUlfc................................................................................... j

O 200. 00 1

Painters’ supplies.......................................................................................
,
1 20000
Carpenters’ supplies.................................................................................. |...............o’ 500! 00
Electrical supplies..................................................................................
!
l 100 00
Cleaning supplies........................................................................................ |.............” . 1 12’ ooo! 00
Lamp renewals................................................................................................................. '
6,500.00
Building material, boiler and engineer supplies....................................................
8, 000.00
Tools and equipment...............................................................................
3 000.00
Miscellaneous....................................................................................................................
2*53s!00
Printing..............................................................................................................................
100.00
Directory...................................................................................................
12.00
Totals.......................................................................................................................




185,000.00

*101,59S. 65
35,851.98
5,826.15
1,315.52
9,837.26
1,168.78
12,222.17
6,749.84
16,113.16
4,0 U. S4
2,479.63
102.93

12.00

197,332.91

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

73

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— 1 ontinued.
C
!
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 73.
Fuel, Lights, etc.— Continued.
Mall office buildings:
For fuel, lights, repairs, motor cycle and truck repairs, supplies and exchange of
same, miscellaneous items, printing, and city directory (acts Mar. 28, 1918, vol.
40, p. 483, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, pp. 1280-1282, sec. 1) ......................................

for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$117,000. 00

$160,000. 00

22,300.00

27,500.00

109,000. no

140,000.00

Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1921.

Objects of expenditures.

F u e l...*........ ......................... .......................................................................................... *54,000.00
21,250.00
Electricity.......................................................................................................................
3,500.00
Plumbing and steam fitting supplies........................................................................
1, 000.00
Paints and oils.................................................................................................................
11, 000.00
Carpenters’ supplies..................................................................................................
Electrical supplies..................................................................... .................
2, 000.00
7,500.00
Cleaning supplies.......... .............................................. ....................................
2,500.00
Lamp renewals................................................................................ .............................
4,500.00
Building material, boiler and engineer supplies...................................................
1.500.00
Tools and equipment............................. .......................................................................
Miscellaneous...................................... .............................................................................
7,888.00
Directory.......................................................................................................................
12.00
Printing............................ ........................................................... ............ ................
350.00
T o ta ls...... .......................................... ........ .................

117,000.00

*80,765.27
32,172.83
4,675.25
1.301.86
16,596.63
3.130.87
9,628.23
3,792.56
5,999.35
3,148.39
10,594.52
12.00
516.27
172,334.03

1S00 Virginia Avenue N W .:
For fuel, lights, repairs, ground rent, miscellaneous items, and printing (acts Mar.
28, 1918, vol. 40, p. 483, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, pp. 1280-1282, sec. 1) ............

Objects of expenditures.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

I

Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1921.

Fuel................................................................................
Electricity....................................................................
Plumbing and steam fitting supplies...................
Painters’ supplies......................................................
Carpenters’ supplies..................................................
Electrical supplies......................................................
Cleaning supplies........................................................
Lamp renewals............................................................
Building material, boiler and engineer supplies
Tools and equipment................................................
Miscellaneous...............................................................
Printing.........................................................................
Ground rent......................... . ......................................

$4,950.00
4.500.00
500.00

8,523.36

*6,060.96
4,640.38
698.46
130.96
. 1,271.88
209.50
762.66
192.04
1,541.91
119.07
237.44
14.00
6,879.12

Total...................................................................

22,300.00.

22,758.38

200.00
1.200.00
300.00
750.00

200.00
800.00

100.00

256.64

20.00

Temporary office buildings:
For fuel, lights, repairs, ground rent, miscellaneous items, city directory, and
printing (acts July 11, 1919, vol. 41, p . 48, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, pp. 12801282, sec. 1)..................................................................................................................................

Objects of expenditures.

Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1921.

H eat..................................................................................................................................... *21,450.00
Electricity....... .......... ............................. ...................... j . . ...........................................
17,480.00
Plumbing and steam fitting supplies..... .................................................................
3.000.00
Painters’ supplies.......................... ............................. ..................................................
1. 000.00
Carpenters’ supplies........................... ........................... . ..............................................
5.500.00
Electrical supplies............................... - ..... .............. . .................................................
1, 000.00
Cleaning supplies...... ................................. ............. . . ...................................................
4.000.00
Lamp renewals.... ................................................................. .*...................... ..
1. 000.00
Building material, boiler and engineer supplies.....................................................
6. 200.00
Tools and equipment......................................................................................................
740.00
Miscellaneous...................................................................................... .............................
903.37
Printing.......................................................................................................................... .
60.00
Directory.. ............................................................................... .......... ............................
12.00
Ground rent......................................................... ...............
46,654.63
Total.........................................................................................................................

109,000.00

*30,232.91
20,952.24
3.061.35
1,119.60
5,753.22
1,163.43
4.407.35
965.92
7,590.06
802.41
979.08
57.03
12.00
56,444.94
133,541.54

1,635,410. CO
19,300.00

Appropriations for 1922 not asked for 1923...................................
Total, State, War, and Navy Department Buildings .




1,475,270.00

1,654,710.00

THK ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923*

74

Estimates o f appropriations required for the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
(ieneral objcct (title of appropriation), date of nets, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed objcct.

Budget, page 50 7.

Salaries:
Commissioners.......................
Secretary......................................

Clerks to commissioners1.. *..

Special experts1.........................
Research clerks...........................
Statistical clerks.........................
Special clerks...............................
Assistant librarians...................
Clerks and stenographers.........
Telephone and supply clerks..
Duplicating machine clerks...
Skilled laborer.............................
Messengers....................................
Total salaries1.......................
Expenses of field investigations*
Domestic.....................................
Foreign.........................................
Supplies and equipment................
Printing and binding......................
Miscellaneous items of expense.. .
Total.

Rate per annum.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.

Number.
$7, m o o

ft.000.00
2t000.00
000.00- 2,000.00
000.00- 1,440.00
00.00- 1.320.00
180.00- 2, 000.00

.mop- 1,50 0
0.0

000. 00060.00
440.00- 1,200.00
440.00- 1,000.00
1,320.00
200. 00600.00

6
1
6
50
10
12
4
1
35
2
2
1
3

Number.

Numhrr

6
1

5
1

42
6
9
4
1
26
1
1
I
3 !

40
10
8
3
1
25
1
1
1
3

$280,000.00 1248,400.00

$221,255.08

30.000.00
35.000.00

10.000.00
20,000.00

12,000.00
10,000.00
8,000.00
20,000.00
1,600.00

9,027.23
7,254.22
13,721.69
29,6S2.68
< 14,045.57

375,000.00

300,000.00

* 294,986.47

* As specifically authorized by law.
* Number of employees subject to variation according to requirements of the work.
* Includes 2} per cent deduction for retirement fund.
* Included rental of office building to June 30,1921.
* Two vacancies on the commission—one for entire year, one for nine months, amounting to $12,500.




Amount appropriated
for tho fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

tariff commission.

United States Tariff Commission—
For salaries and expenses of the United States Tariff Commission, including purchase
and exchange of labor-saving devices, tho purchase of professional and Bciontific
books, law books, books of reference, and periodicals as may be necessary, as author­
ized under Title VII of tho act entitled “ An act to increase the revenue, and for other
purposes,” approved Sopt. 8,1916, and the commissioners and their authorized agents
while absent from the United States and engaged upon official investigations in foreign
countries, may be allowed actual, reasonable, and necessary traveling expenses in
accounts approved by tho Tariff Commission (acts Sept. £, 1916, % 39y pp. 795-798,
oL
secs. 700-709; Mar. 4, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1384, sec. 1) ..................................................................

Objects of expenditure.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each hoad of appro­
priation.

i

$375, 000.00

$300,000. 00

EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS.

75

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1023— Continued.
General object (tltlo of appropriation), date of ai ts, references to Statutes at Largo, or to RovLsed Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 614.

IJN ITK D

Salaries, central office:
Director.......................................................
General counsel.........................................
Assistant directors...................................
Do................................ ........................
Do.........................................................
Do.........................................................
Director of rehabilitation (abolished)
Medical doctors.........................................
Do.........................................................
Do.................................. ......................
Do.........................................................
Do.........................................................
Associate counsels...................................
Attorneys, assistants, special experts,
reviewers, examiners, etc..................
D o.........................................................
Do.........................................................
Do.........................................................
Do.........................................................
Attorneys, doctors, assistants, re­
viewers, examiners, etc.................... .
Do.........................................................
Do.........................................................
Do.........................................................
Do.........................................................
Clerks, stenographers, typists, e tc ...
Do....................................................
Do....................................................
Do....................................................
Do....................................................
Do....................................................
Do....................................................
Minor clerks, messengers,laborers, etc.

I

Estimated,
1023.

Kate.

510,000.00

Estimated,
1922.

Num
ber,

Number*

1 $29, 268, 325.00

Number.

7.500.00
7.500.00
7.000.00

1
1
2

6.000.00
f>
,000.00
6.500.00

6,000.00
5.500.00
5.000.00
4.500.00
4.200.00
4.750.00

1

5.500.00
5.000.00
4.500.00
4.250.00
4.100.00

3
4
4

4.000.00-3, 750.00
3.750.00-3, 500.00
3.500.00-3, 000.00
3.000.00-2, 500.00
2.500.00-2, 000.00

7
139
13
89
79

2.0 0 00-1, 500.00
0.

1.800.00-1, 600.00
1,600.00-1, 400.00
1.400.00-1, 300.00
1.300.00-1, 200.00

1.200. 00-1, 100.00
1, 100. 00- 96a00
960.00-

4S0.00

1

210
273
1,069
1,255
578
4S7
69
216

1
25
33
29
78
119
171
379
865
1,173
282
1,446
301
257

30
33
33
87
131
198
406

1,000
1,355
382
1,501
301
257

5,187

$6, 000,000.00
*1,492,890.00

*$8,185,135.29
* 1,2S7,900.37

7,492, S90.00

19,473,035.66

48

1 52

$90,912.00

$90,912.00

1 $291,070.26

Number.

Number.

$7,000,000.00

Total salaries.
2,400.00-1,500.00

Total salaries (field investigation
force)...............................................
Salaries. Arlington Building:
Assistant superintendent.
Assistant superintendent..
Master mechanic.................
Clerk.......................................
Engineer................................
Assistant engineers.............
Firemen.................................
Elevator starter...................
Elevator starter...................
Elevator conductors..........
Oiler........................................
Electrician............................
Electrician.............................
Wiremen................................ .
Skilled laborer......................
Plumber.................................
Plumber's helper................
Painter...................................
Carpenter..............................
Janitor.................................... .
Assistant janitor..................
Laborers, male.....................

$26,921, 702.00

Expended,
1921.

4,533

Field investigation force of central
office (field examiners).......................

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

STATES V E T E R A N S ’ B U R E A U .

Salaries and Expenses, United States Veteran#' Bureau—
For an amount sufficient for carrying out the provisions of an act entitled “ An act to
establish a veterans’ bureau and to improve the facilities and service of such bureau
and to further amend and modify the war risk insurance act. approved A up. 0, 1921,”
including salaries and expenses of the central office at Washington, D. C., and
regional offices, and subomces, and including salaries, stationery and minor office
supplies, furniture, equipment and supplies, printing and binding, rentals and
alterations, heat, light, and water, miscellaneous expenses, including telephones,
telegrams, freight, express, law books, books of reference, periodicals, ambulance
service, towel service, laundry service, repairs to equipment, storage, ice, taxi service,
car fare, stamps and box rent, traveling and subsistence, salaries and expenses of
employees engaged in field investigation, motor vehicles, including purchase, main­
tenance, repairs, and operation of same, salaries and operating expenses of the Arling­
ton Building and annex, including fuel, electric current, ice, asn removal, and mis­
cellaneous items (act Aug. 9, 1921, vol. 42, p. 149, sec. 8) ......................................................

Personal service (salaries).

Total amount to bo
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Number.

2.250.00

2,000.00
1.800.00
1.400.00
1.400.00

1.200.00

7a 0
2 0

i,ooaoo

1.400.00
720.00
900.00
1.400.00
1.440.00

17

2

1.200.00
900.00

if 2oaoo
i,ooaoo
i , 2oaoo
i , 2oaoo
i ,m o o
i(ooaoo
66a oo

IS

2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
32

1 The administrative expenses of the United States Veterans* Bureau for the fiscal year 1922 will be paid out of three appropriations, v iz :1 Salaries and Expenses, Bureau of War
1
Risk, 1922," ‘ 'Vocational Rehabilitation, 1922,° and “ Medical and Hospital Services, 1922.’*




THE ALTERNATIVE liUIM
SET, 1923.

76

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923—Continued.

Geueral object (title of appropriation), <!atc of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for cach detailed object.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$160,000,000.00

*125,000,000.00

Ilu<lgt*t, png<< 01 5.
Salaries and Expenses, United States Veterans* /iurfau— Continued.

I’crsonal services (salaries)—Continued.

Estimated, ; Estimated.
1023.
!
1022.

Rate.

Number,

H ila ries, A r lin g t o n B u i ld in g - C o n t in u e d .

Laborers, female......................................
Matron........................................................
Captain of watch.....................................
Lieutenant* of ivatch................ . ...........
Watchmen..................................................
Head of char force................................... ;
Assistant heads of char force................ i
Charwomen................................................!

12

*660. 00
660.00
1,400.00
900.00
720.00

1
3
50

Number.

8
I
1

s
i
l

3

1

10
1

3
48

3
132

m oo
o.
720.00
moo

I

Total employees..

Number.

Expended,
1921.

3
150

3
164

1

257

273

>306

$130,390.00

Total salaries____

S133,860.00

* *127,589.85

4, $3$

5, SO
S

6,101

17,221,302.00 *7,717,662.00

*9,891,695.77

200,000.00

264,245.59
295,449.25
241,552.95

Total employees, central office,
field investigation force, an«l
Arlington Building.........................
Total salaries, central ofllce, field
investigation force, and Arling­
ton Building......................................
OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

200,000.00
100,000.00

Stationery and minor office supplies........
Furniture, equipment, and supplies........
Printing and binding.....................................
Miscellaneous expenses, including tele­
phones, telegrams, freight, express,
foreign postage, street car fare, law
books, books of reference, periodicals.. .
Traveling expenses, exclusive of field
Investigations................................................
Expenses of employees engaged in field
investigations, exclusive or salaries.......
Operation, maintenance, and repair of a
motor propelled passenger vehicle.........
Operating expenses of the Arlington
Building and annex, including fuel,
electric current, ice, ash removal, and
miscellaneous items, exclusive of
salaries............................................................

150,000.00

150.000.00
180.000.00

50.000.00

40.000.00

77,535.09

50.000.00

20. 000.00

115,928.32

100.000.00

409, OSS. 00

208,929.74

400.00

400.00

400.00

50,000.00

*60,000.00

* 46,885.53

7,921,702.00

8,777,150.00

11,142,622.24

Total, central office, field invcsti-:
' gation force of central office, and 1
Arlington Building..........................
Salaries and expenses of regional offices
and suboffices (see statement follow­
ing)...................................................................

19,000,000.00 20,056,815.00

Total salaries and
expenses!, j
United States Veterans* Bureau.-

26,921,702.00 28,833,965.00

11,142,622.24

1 On account of reorganization during the fiscal year 1921, the column headed “ Expended, 1921,”
shows the pay roll as of June 30, 1921, but the total salaries are for the entire year.
* Bureau W a r Risk Insurance.
> Estimated expenditure from appropriation “ Vocational rehabilitation. 1922.”
* Vocational rehabilitation.
* Expended by Treasury Department for purposes for which appropriation is asked for 1923.

Estimated expenditures by the district offices for administrative purposes for the fiscal pear 1923.

Rentals
District. and alter*
ations.

Heat,
light,
and
water.

SIS9,214
254,466
167,34S
43,731
89,183
102,440
114,320
249,645
91,249
89,019
106,572
90,388
64,563
69,556

$4,86$
6,547
4,306
1,125

T o ta l.. 1,721,694

44,302

I . * .. . . .

2........
3

4
5

6
7

8

9..........

10........
11........
12.......
1 3
1 4

2, 2S
M

2,635
2,941
6,423
2,348
2,290
2,742
2,325
1,669
1,789

Motor
ve­
hicles.

Tele­
Freight
phone Travel Equip­
Mis­
and
and
and
ment and trans­ cellane­ Salaries.
tele­ subsist* supplies. porta­
ous.
cnee.
graph.
tion.

*5,031 *13,711 *S6,743
6,767 18,439 116,657
4,450 12,129 76,719
3,168 20,018
1,165
6,462 40,885
2,371
7,423 46,962
2,724
3,040
8,283 52,409
6,638 18,090 114,447
6,612 41,839
2,426
6,450 40,806
2,367
7,722 48,857
2,834
2,407
6,549 41,437
1,716
4,678 29,598
5,043 31,887
1,849

Total
estimated
adminis­
trative

*207,233
278,700
183,285
47,895
97,677
112,196
125,207
273,420
99,939
97,488
116,729
98,997
70,712
76,180

*9,674 *!4,8SS *1,556,734 *2,088,096
13,010 20,029 2,093,5S8 2,808,203
8.556 13,167 1,376,838 1,816,798
3,440
2,235
359,797
482,604
7,017
733,747
4,559
984,195
8,060
5*237
842,818 1,130,495
8,995
5,845
940,556 1,261,596
12,764 19,643 2,053,926 2,754,996
7,179
4,665
750,745 1,007,002
7,003
4,551
732,331
982,305
5,448
8,385
876,814 1,176,103
7,112
4,621
743,663
997,499
5,080
531,187
3,307
712,510
3.556
5,472
572,266
767,598

45,785 124,759 789,294 1,885,658

88,028 135,470 14,165*010 19,000,000

Military and Natal Compensation—
For military and naval compensation for death or disability (acts Oct. 6 , 1917, vol. 40,
p. 398; Aug. 9, l$2t, vol. 42, p. 149, sec. 8)................................................1...............




i:\KcrTI\T, O IT K ’K AX11 I N DKPKXDKXT KSTABUSII MKNTS.
’

77

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June 30 y H)23---Continued.

(iimer.il oljji'i't (title uf appropriation), date of uoIm reference* to Statutes at l-argo, or to Revised Statute's, and estimated amount
,
required for each detailed objcct.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated *
for tho fiscal year
appropriated under
each Head of appro* ! ending Juno 30,
print ion.
i
1922.

!

Budget, patri* 010*

M
edical an H
ti ospital Services—
For medical, surgical, dental, dispensary, and hospital services and facilities* con­
valescent care, necessary and reasonable after care, welfare of, nursing, prosthetic
appliances, medical examinations, funeral and other incidental expenses (including
transportation of remains), traveling expenses, and supplies, and not exceeding
$100,000 for library books, magazines, and papers, for beneficiaries of tho United
States Veterans’ Bureau, including court costs and other expenses incident to pro­
ceedings heretofore or hereafter taken for commitment of mentally incompetent
persons to hospitals for care and treatment of the insane, $72,000,000: Provided, That
no part of the money hereby appropriated shall be used for the payment of commuta­
tion of quarters, subsistence, and laundry or quarters, heat ana lijjht, and longevity
to anv emplovee other than the commissioned medical officers provided for by statute
(acts \ flr. 3, *
V
1919, ml. 40, p. 1$02; Aug. 9, 1921, vol. 42, p. 150, sec. 8)............................
This appropriation shall be disbursed by the United States Veterans* Bureau, and such portion thereof
as may bo necessary shall bo allotted from timo to time to the United States Public Health Service, the
Board of Managers of tho National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, the W ar Department, the Navy
Department, and transferred to their credit for disbursement by them for the purposes set forth above.
The allotments to tho said Board of Managers of the National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
shall also Include such sums as may be necessary to alter, improve, or provide facilities in tho several
branches under Us jurisdiction so as to furnish adequate accommodations for such beneficiaries of the
United States Veterans' Bureau as may be committed to its care.
The allotments made by the United states Veterans’ Bureau to the United States Public Health Service
for the care of beneficiaries of that Bureau by the said service shall also be available for expenditure by the
U nited states Public Health Servico on that account for necessary personnel, regular and reserve com­
missioned officers of the Public Health Service and clerical help in the District of Columbia and elsewhere,
maintenance, equipment, leases, fuel, lights, water, printing, freight, transportation, and travel, and
maintenance and operation of passenger motor vehicles.
The allotments made to tho War Department, the Navy Department, the Interior Department, and
other governmental agencies shall be available for expenditure for care and treatment of beneficiaries of
the United States Voterans* Bureau, for improvement and extension of existing facilities, or for acquisition
of additional facilities by purchase or otherwise under the various headings of appropriations made to said
departments as may be necessary.
Estimated,
1923.
Army hospitals:
Average number patients.......................
Number hospital days.............................
Estimated cost per patient per diem *

Estimated,

Expended,

1922.

1921.

1,247

575.
210,017
$3.65

1,477
5)9,105
S4.28

455,075

Estimated cost of hospitalization.
Alterations and repairs....................

$2,306,133.16

$1,992,615.50
40,000.00

$767,100.00
750,000.00

Total allotment.......................................
Navy hospitals:
Average number of patients....................
Number hospital days...............................
Estimated cost per patient per diem

12,306,133.16

$2,032,515.50

$l,517,10a00

1,200

924
337,200
$4.24

205
74,784
$3.00

$1,699,529.34

$1,428,069.12
35,000.00

$224,589.12

$1,699,529.34

$1,463,069.12

$224,589.12

3,9S7

3,201
1,169,533

1,208
440,933

$2,000,000.00
$500,000.00

<$1,301,714.92
$3,768,285.08

$4,910,600.00

$2,500,000.00

$5,070,000.00

20,381
7,603,440
________ $4.38

16,821
6,139,592
________ $4.64

18,526
6,761,907
_________11.53

$33,274,873.02

$28,493,698.56

1.964.240.00
1.718.710.00
2.700.830.00

2,000,000.00
2,179,614.26
2,750,000.00

$30,656,331.87
1,528,517.29

39,658,653.02 ! 35,423,312.82

32,181,849.16

883,90$. 00

900,000.00

1,718,710.00
589.272.00
785.690.00
712.037.00
117.855.00
122.765.00
78,57a 00
7,856,96a 00

1.500.000.00
500.000.00
700.000.00
725.000.00

227,135.15
931,712.25
162.77
145.440.03
1,648,208.58
527,79a 76
758,124.88
716,339.58
127,588k 88
134.973.03
79,978.41
• 1,861,877.50

Estimated cost of hospitalization.
Alterations and repairs....................
Total allotment.....................................................
National Homes for Volunteer Disabled Soldiers:
Average number of patients.................................
Number hospital days.............................................
Estimated cost per patient per diem *...............

438,000
$3.88

1,455,255

Estimated cost of hospitalization.
Alterations and improvements • ..
Total allotment.....................................
United States Public Health Service:
Average number of patients. . . : ........ .
Number hospital days........................... .
Estimated cost per patient per illem..
Estimated cost of hospitalization.................................
Opening new hospitals, maintenance, repairs, etc..
Dental services, clinics.....................................................
Operation of dlipensaries.................................................
Total allotment............................................................... .
United States Veterans’ Bureau:
Medical personnel (paid by United States Public
Health Service)................................................................
• District offices.......................................................................
Salaries.
Administrative expenses............
Transportation of beneficiaries..
Travel expense of beneficiaries..
Physical examinations (fees). . .
Medical and surgical (special)...
Supplies (orthopedic), etc...........
Hospital services (contract)........
Burial awards..................................
Dental services (fees)....................

$4.38

. 120,000.00

125.000.00
80,000.00
5.000.000.00

1 Administrative expenses for 1923 will be paid out of the appropriation for1 Salaries and Expenses,
*
United States Veterans* Bureau, 1923/*
; * Per diem cost for 1921-22 includes “ pay of personnel,” not included in 1921.
* Per diem cost for 1921 shows partial cost; no record of total expenditures from appropriations direct
to home.
* Includes undistributed balance, $628,663.26.
* Alterations and improvement 1921-22 dependent on action of Secretary of Treasury's hospital com­
mittee.
* Paid b United States Public Health Service, 1921.




$72,000,000:00

$23,326,638.00

78

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 80, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$127,000,000. 00

$52,978,657.00

Budget, page 61 7.
\Medical and Hospital Services- -Continued.
Estimated,
1923.
United States Veterans’ Bureau— Continued.
District organizations (regional and suboffices)—
Salaries...........................................................................
Equipment and supplies, including stationery,
printing and binding, furniture, etc..................
Miscellaneous expenses. . ......................................
Travel and subsistence..............I............................
Motor vehicles.................................... . . . . ..................
Rentals..........................................................................
Heat, light, and water...............................................
Telephone and telegraph.........................................
Freight and transportation......................................
Undistributed balance............................................. .

Number.

Total United States Veterans’ Bureau..
Total of allotments and disbursements..

Number.
$9,114,812.00
1.734.360.00
99.185.00
281,637.00
55,000.00
1.601.746.00
38.655.00
87.637.00
53.586.00

Expended,
1921.

Number.
1*3,089,568.92

1364,507.31

1907,147.95

Total district organizations..................................
Contract hospitals—
A v e r s e number of patients (see United States
Public Health Service above) 3............................
Estimated number patient days.............................
Estimated cost per diem...........................................
Estimated cost of contract hospitalization..........
Contingency fund...............................................................

Estimated,
1922.

13,066,618.00

8,004
2,921,700
*3.61
*10,559,311.48

9,162
3,344,100
*3.68
$12,306,288.00
$250,000.00

$23,425,084.48
$72,000,000.00

$35,272,906.00
*76,691,803.44

4,361,224.18

*11,523,556.00
*50,520,094.28

» Paid by United States Public Health Service.
* Figure for 1921-22 includes patients in United States Public Health Service hospitals and St. Eliza­
beths, while in 1921 figure included patients in United States Public Health Service, St. Elizabeths, and
contract hospitals. Both figures include disbursements for operations and equipment of hospital
division, purveying department, freight, travel, etc.

Vocational Rehabilitation—
For an amount for carrying out the provisions of the act entitled “ An act to provide
for the vocational rehabilitation and return to civil employment of disabled persons
discharged from the military and naval forces of the United States, and for other pur­
poses,” approved June 27, 1918, as amended: Provided, That no person who has been
declared eligible for training under the provisions of the vocational rehabilitation
act, for whom training has been prescribed, and who has been notified by the bureau
to begin training shall be eligible to the benefits of said act in the event of his failure
to commence training within a reasonable time after notice has been sent such person
by the bureau (acts June27,1918, vol. 40, p. 617; Aug. 9, 1921, vol. 42, p. 150, sec. 8) . . .
Does not include administrative expenses for vocational rehabilitation, which will be paid out of the
appropriation for “ Salaries and Expenses, United States Veterans’ Bureau, 1923.”
Item.

1 1923

Administrative:
Salaries....................
Travel, employees..

*7,980,461.46
652,844.52
461,493.54
1,350,712.80
968,010.84
157,583.16
247,630.68
90,047.52
112,559.40

Supplies..
R ent............................. .
Communication........ .
Miscellaneous............. .
Freight and express.,
Printing...................... .
Total administrative expense..
Direct expense:
Allowance..........................................
Construction and labor..................
Institutional equipment................
Instructors.........................................
Job employees..................................
Medical attention............................
Medical examination......................
Medical supplies..............................
Miscellaneous....................................
Subsistence........................................
Teachers’ salaries.............................
Training supplies...........................
Travel.................................................
Tuition...............................................
Total direct expense..

1921

12,021,343.92

9,708,690.32

$109,040,411.90
55.093.17
848,434.89

111,388,782.24
56.279.70
866,707.38

77r966,753.20
75,661.72
349,681.07

• 220,372.70

225,118.80

132,569.04

143,242.25

146,327.22

76,694.37

55.093.17
121.204.91
1,267,143.02
3,371,702.68
738,248.54
11,139,052.77

56.279.70
123,815.34
1,294,433.10
3,444,317.64
754,147.98
11,379,755.34

61,682.58
96,606.53
394,003.48
1,987,226.42
530,636.39
7,895,229.59

127,000,000.00

129,735,964.44

89,566,744.39

127,000,000.00

141,757,308.36

99,383,323.59

Other items.............................
Grand total....... ..........

$7,151,514.51
422,651.08
362,616.46
769,338.49
521,320.53
76,435.59
244,929.42
69,626.30
90,257.94

107,888.88

i 1923 administrative expenses will be paid out of an appropriation for “ Salaries and Expenses,
United States Veterans’ Bureau, 1923.”




EXECUTIVE OFFICE AND INDEPENDENT ESTABLISHMENTS*

79

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated .
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,

$385, 921,702.00

$230,573,620.00

Budget, page 864.
United States Government Life Insurance Fund, Special Fund—
All premiums paid on account of insurance converted under the provisions of Article
IV of the war risk insurance act shall be deposited and covered into the Treasury to
the credit of the United States Government life insurance fund and shall be avail­
able for the payment of losses, dividends, refunds, and other benefits provided for
under such insurance. Payments from this fund shall be made upon and in accord­
ance with awards by the director.
The Bureau of War Risk Insurance is hereby authorized to set aside out of the fund so
collected such reserve funds as may be required, under accepted actuarial principles,
to meet all liabilities under such insurance; and the Secretary of the Treasury is
hereby authorized to invest and reinvest the said United States Government life in­
surance fund, or any part thereof, in interest-bearing obligations of the United States
and to sell the obligations for the purposes of the said fund (act Dec. 24, 1919, vol. 41,
p. 376, sec. 18).
Losses on War Risk Insurance of American Vessels, Their Cargoes, etc., Special Fund—
Indefinite appropriation of the receipts from premiums on war-risk insurance of vessels
and cargoes, available for payment of liabilities under such insurance (acts Sept. 2,
1914, vol. 38, p. 711, sec. 3; June 12, 1917, vol. 40, p. 103, sec. 4)Military and Naval Insurance, Special Fund—
Indefinite appropriation of the receipts from premiums on war-risk life insurance,
available for payment of liabilities under contracts of insurance (act Oct. 6,1917, vol.
- 40, p. 400, sec. 1).
Vocational Rehabilitation, Special Fund—
Indefinite appropriation of amounts received and covered into the Treasury as gifts and
donations from either public or private sources to aid in providing and maintaining
courses of vocational rehabilitation of disabled persons discharged from the military
or naval forces of the United States (acts June 27,1918, vol. 40, p. 619, sec. 7; Feb. 26,
1919, vol. 40, p. 1179, sec. 1).
Total, United States Veterans’ Bureau .

372,500.00

Appropriations for 1922 not asked for 1923 for independent offices..........
Total under Executive Office and Independent Establishments.




459,517, 683.00

325,857,995.00

ESTIMATES OF APPR O PR IA TIO NS REQUIRED FOR THE SE RV IC E OF THE FISC AL Y E AEiNDLNG JUN E 3 0 , 1 9 2 3 .
R
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 32.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

C H A P T E R I I I .-D E P A R T M E N T O F S T A T E .

Salaries, Department of State—
Secretary of State (R. S p . 32, sec. 199; acts Feb. 26, 1907, vol. 34, p. 993, sec. 4; Feb. 17,
1909, vol. 35, p. 626, secs. 1-3; Mar. 4, 1909, vol. 35, p. 861, sec. l ; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1263, sec. 1) ..................................................................................................................................
Undersecretary of State, to be appointed by the President, by and with the advice
and consent of the Senate (increase of $2,500 submitted) (act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1263, sec. 1) ..................................................................................................................................
Assistant Secretary (R. S., p. 32, sec. 200; act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ___
Second and Third Assistant Secretaries, at $4,500 each (R . S., p. 32, sec. 200; act Mar.
3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ....................................................................................................
Director of the Consular Service (acts Aug. 5, 1919, vol. 36, p. 119, sec. 1; July 16, 1914,
vol. 38, p. 466, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ..................................................
Officers to aid in important drafting work, 8 at $4,500 each; 5 at $4,000 each; 15 at $3,500
each; 15 at $3,000 each; 17 at $2,500 each; to be appointed by the Secretary, any one
of whom may be employed as chief or assistant chief of division or as chief of bureau,
or upon other work in connection with the foreign relations (acts Aug. 5, 1909, vol. 36,
p. 119, sec. 1; July 15, 1914, vol. 38, p. 466, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1917, vol. 39, p. 1082, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ...........................................................................................
Assistant Solicitors of the Department, to be appointed by the Secretary, 1 at $4,500 {sub­
mitted); 5 at $3,000 each; 2 at $2,500 each (acts Apr. 17, 1900, vol. 31, p. 97, sec. 1;
June 22, 1906, vol. 34, p. 402, sec. 1; Aug. 5, 1909, vol. 36, p. 119, sec. 1; July 16, 1914,
vol. 38, p. 366, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1917, vol. 39, p. 1082. sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, p . 1263,
sec. 1)..................................................................................................................................................
Chief clerk, who shall sign such official papers and documents as the Secretary may
direct (increase of $1,000 submitted) (R. S. p. 32, sec. 201; acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38,
p. 466, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ..............................................................
Law clerks, 1 at $2,500; 2 at $2,250 each; 3 at $2,000 each (acts Mar. 4, 1915, vol. 38,
p. 1008, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1)...............................................................
Law clerk and assistant, to be selected by the Secretary to edit the laws of Congress
and perform such other duties as may be required of them, at $3,500 and $2,500,
respectively (increase of $1,000 each submitted) (acts Mar. 3, 1901, vol. 31, p. 972,
sec. 1; Feb. 25, 1903, vol. 32, p. 867, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 466, sec. I; Mar.
3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1).....................................................................................................
Two translators at $2,100 each (acts Mar. 4, 1875, vol. 18, p. 349, sec. 1; Apr. 17, 1900,
vol. 31, p. 97, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38. p. 466, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263,
sec. 1) ..................................................................................................................................................
Private secretary to the Secretary (increase of $500 submitted) (acts Mar. 3, 1885, vol. 23,
p. 395, sec. 1; Feb. 25, 1903, vol. 32, p. 867, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 466, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ...........................................................................................
Private Secretary to the Undersecretary (increase of $500 submitted) (acts Mar. 1, 1919,
vol. 40, p. 1224, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ......................................................
Clerk to the Secretary (acts June 22, 1906, vol. 34, p. 402, sec. 1; June 16, 1914, vol. 38,
p. 446, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ......................................................................
Clerks:
Twenty-seven of class 4; 30 of class 3, 40 of class 2; 63 of class 1 (3 of whom shall be
telegraph operators); 40 at $1,000 each; 10 at $900 each (R. S., p. 27, secs, 167-169;
July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 466, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ......................
Lithographer (acts Mar. 1,1919, vol. 40, p. 1224, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1 .
Chief messenger (act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1)........................................................
Eight messengers (same act)...............................................................................................................
Twenty-seven assistant messengers (same act)............................................................................
Four messenger boys at $420 each (same act).............................................................................. ..
Packer (same act)..................................................................................................................................
Seven laborers (same act)....................................................................................................................
Four telephone switchboard operators (same act)........................................................................
Chauffer (same act)................................................................................................................................
Ten charwomen (same act).................................................................................................................

$12,000.00
10, 000.00
5, 000. 00
9, 000.00
4,500.00

196,000.00

24,000.00
4,000.00
13,000.00

6,000.00
4,200.00
3,000.00
2,500.00
1,800.00

277,200.00
1,400.00
1,000.00
6,720.00
19,440.00
1,080.00
720.00
4,620.00
2,880.00
1,080.00
2,400. 00
$614,640. 00

80




Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$603,640.00

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

81

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 80, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 33.
Additional Employees, Department of State—
For temporary employees in the Department of State, $275,000: Provided, That no
person shall be employed hereunder at a rate of compensation exceeding $4,500 per
annum and not more than eight persons shall be employed hereunder at a rate of com­
pensation exceeding $1,800 per annum. No money appropriated by any other act shall
be used during the fiscal year 1923 for employment and payment of personal service
in the Department of State in the District of Columbia (act Mar. 8, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1268,
sec. 1).................................................................................. ..................................................................

Employees.

Drafting officers*.
Do................... .
Do................... .
Do................... .
D o................... .
Do................... .
Clerks.................... .
Do................... .
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Other employees..
D o ...................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................
Do.....................

Rate per
annum.

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

$4,500
3.500
2.500
2,160

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

$275,000. 00

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$275,000.00

Expended.
1921.
3
4
4

2,100
2,000

2
1
'6

1,800
1,600
1.500
1,400
1,320

13
17
4
24

1,200
1,140

1,100

100

.....

100

39

12

960
900
840
720
660
600
480
420
240

61
7
52

2
5

1
6
$275,000.00

Total.

12

36
7
7
107

1,080

1,020
1,000

2

147

$275,000.00

$392,377.79

The foregoing figures show the last per annum rate of compensation paid to employees during the fis­
cal year or part of year.

Stationery, Furniture, etc., Department of State—
For stationery, furniture, fixtures, typewriters, including exchange of same, repairs and
material for repairs (act Mar. 8, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1268, sec. 1) ................................................

Other obiects of expenditure.

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

30,000.00

Expended.
1921.

1, 000.00

i, 200.00
800.00

$7,180.62
2,730.09
750.27
13,525.77
3,401.95
887.51
1, 200.00
314.33

Total for contingent expenses..................................................

30,000.00

30,000.00

29,990.54

s s s s s

Paper and envelopes..............................................................................
Miscellaneous stationery, supplies.....................................................
Typewriters, and repairs of same.......................................................
Office and filing equipment..................................................................
Miscellaneous office equipment................................■
..........................
Repairs to furniture and fixtures.......................................................
Portrait of ex-Secretary of State........................................................
........... . . . . . . . . .
Miscellaneous..
. . . .............................................

m m

$7,500.00
2.500.00
2.500.00
12, 000.00
3.500.00

30,000. 00

Exchange of Automobile—
Exchange of passenger automobile for official use of the Secretary of State (submitted).. .
Books and Maps, Department o f State—
For books, maps, and periodicals, domestic and foreign, for the library (act Mar. 8, 1921,
vol. 41, p• 1268, sec. 1) .................................. ....................................................................................
77891— 21-------6




4,500. 00
5,000.00

5,000.00

82

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923—Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 34.
Contingent Expenses, Department of State—
For miscellaneous expenses, including maintenance and repair of a motor-propelled
passenger vehicle, to be used only for official purposes; automobile mail wagons,
including repair and exchange of same; street car fare not exceeding $150, and other
items not included in the foregoing (act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1)................
Object of expenditure.

Estimated,
1923.

Automobiles, repairs, gas, oil.............................................................
Care of c l o c k s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................................... .
Railway fares, cab hire........................ ........................................ .
Street car fare..........................................................................................
Freight, drayage. express......................... ............... .......................
Telephone service.............. ..
...................................
Newspapers and publications...........................................................
Ice...............................................................................................................
Laundering, towels, e t c .....................................................................
Sanitary supplies, soap, etc................................................ ...............
Miscellaneous............... .....................................................................

$5,060.00
240.00

Total...............................................................................................

15,000.00

Estimated,
1922.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 33
1922.

$15,000. 00

$15,000. 00

1,500. 00

1,500.00

57,820. 00

57,820. 00

1,003,460.00

987, 960. 00

Expended,
1921.

1, 000.00

*4,580.83
240.00
5.00
48.00
9.58
7,384.80
698.57
624.63
589.61
336.26
482.72

15,000.00

15,000.00

15,060.00
240.00

100.00

100.00

7,500.00

7,500.00

600.00
500.00

600.00
500.00

i , 66o.6(f

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Rent of Buildings, Department of State—
For rent of buildings in the District of Columbia, for storage and garage (act Mar. 3,1921,
vol. 41, p* 1263, sec. 1) ......................................................................................................................
Passport Bureaus, Department of State—
' For salaries and expenses of maintenance of passport bureaus, as follows: At New York,
N. Y ., $20,820; at San Francisco, Calif*, $7,500; at Chicago, 111., $17,500; at Seattle,
Wash., $4,500; at New Orleans, La., $7,500, in all {act June 16, 1921, voL 42, p. 61, sec. 4) . .
N ote.— The estimate for “ Printing and binding,” State Department, under sec. 2, act of May 8,1872
(R. S., p. 720, sec. 3661), will be found on page 30.

Total, Department of State, salaries and contingent expenses................................




83

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

Estimates o f appropriations required for the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 295.

Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
each head of appro­
ending
June 30,
priation.
1922.

FOREIGN INTERCOURSE.

Salaries of Ambassadors and Ministers—
Ambassadors extraordinary and plenipotentiary to Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Chile,
France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Spain, and Turkey, at
$17,500 each (/?. S., p. 293, sec. 1675; acts Mar. 1, 1893, vol. 27, p . 497, sec. 1; Mar. 2,
1909, vol. 35, p . 672, sec. 1; May 16, 1914, vol, $8, p. 378, sec. 1; Sept. 29, 1919, vol. 41,
p . 291, sec. J;SepJ. 4,
p. .7.70, sec. 7; J/ar. 2, -79^,
4^, p. 1206, sec. I ) . . . $227,500.00
Envoys extraordinary and ministers plenipotentiary to China, Cuba, the Netherlands,
36,000.00
ana Luxemburg, at $12,000 each (act Mar, 2, 1921, vol, 41, V.
sec. -7)................ ..
Envoys extraordinary and ministers plenipotentiary to Austria, Bolivia, Bulgaria,
Czechoslovakia, Colombia, Costa Rioa, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador,
Finland, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama,
Paraguay, Poland, Uruguay, Persia, Portugal, Rumania, Salvador, Siam, Sweden,
Switzerland, and Venezuela, at $10,000 each, and to the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes,
$10,000; in all (acts Dec. 6, 1913, vol. 38, p. 241, sec. 1; Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1206,
sec. 1) . . . ; ..........................................................................................................................................
300,000.00
Minister resident and consul general to Liberia (i?. S ., p, 295, sec, 1683; Mar. 2, 1921,
' vol. 41, p. 1206, see. 1) ....................................................... v ........................................................
5, 000.00
Agent and consul general at Tangier (act Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p . 1206, sec. 1) .................
7,500.00
Agent and consul general at Cairo (acts Jan. 8,1874, vol. 18, p. 285, sec. 1; Mar. 2, 1921,
vol. 41, p. 1206, sec. 1) ....................................................................................................................
7,500.00
$583, 500.00

Employees.

Rate.

Salaries of secretaries in Diplomatic Service:
Class 1............................................................ per annum ..
Class 2......................................................................... do___
Class 3......................................................................... do___
Class 4......................................................................... d o * ...

$4,000.00
3.625.00
3,000.00
2.500.00

Total salaries for secretaries.........................................

50,000.00

50,000.00

403,600.00

65, 000. 00

65,000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1921.
1923.

Number.

Number.

Number.

22
28
29
41

20
26
30
36

$379,000.00 $379,000.00

$354,250.00

22
28
29
41

Salaries, Diplomatic and Consular Officers while Receiving Instructions and in Transit-*To pay the salaries of ambassadors, ministers, consuls, vice consuls, and other officers
of the United States for the period actually and necessarily occupied in receiving
instructions and in making transits to and from their posts and while awaiting recog­
nition and authority to act in pursuance with the provisions of section 1740 of the
Revised Statutes, $65,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary (i?. S ., p. 309,
sec. 1740; act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1206, sec. 1) .................................................................




$583, 500.00

407,500.00

Provided, That no salary herein appropriated shall be paid to any official receiving
any other salary from the United States Government.
Salaries, Charges d1
Affaires ad Interim—
For salaries for charges d’affaires ad interim (R. S., p. 295, sec. 1685; act Mar. 2,1921,
vol. 41, p. 1206, sec. 1)................................................................................................................................................
Salaries of Secretaries, Diplomatic Service—
•
For salaries of secretaries in the Diplomatic Service, as provided in the act of Feb. 5,1915,
entitled 4
‘An act for the improvement of the foreign service,” as amended by the act
making appropriations for the Diplomatic and Consular Service for the fiscal year
ending June 30,1917, approved July 1,1916, and the act making appropriations for the
Diplomatic and Consular Service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1921, approved
June 4, 1920 (acts Feb. 5,1915, vol. 38, p. 805, sec. 2; July 1,1916, vol. 39, p. 252, sec. 1;
June 4, 1920, vol. 41, p. 740, sec. 1; Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p. 1206, sec. 1) ........................
379,000.00
Japanese secretary of embassy to Japan (same acts)...................................................................
5, 500.00
Turkish secretary of embassy to Turkey (increase of $1,900 submitted) (same acts)...........
5,500.00
Chinese secretary of legation to China (same acts).......................................................................
5,500.00
Chinese assistant secretary of legation to China (same acts)......................................................
4 ,000.00
Japanese assistant secretary of embassy to Japan (same acts)..................................................
4,000.00
Turkish assistant secretary of embassy to Turkey (increase of $2,000 submitted) (same
acts)......................................................................................................................................................
4,000.00

.84

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDCxET, 1023.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 296.
Clerks at Embassies and Legations—
For the employment of necessary clerks at the embassies and legations, who, whenever
hereafter appointed, shall be citizens of the United States, $394,828; ana, so far as
practicable, shall be appointed under civil-service rules and regulations (act Mar. 2,
1921, vol. 41, p . 1206, sec. 1) ...........................................................................................................
Employees.

Salaries:
Clerks at embassies and legations, per
annum ..............................................................
D o ..........................................per annum ..
Do..
.do___
.d o___
D o.
D o.
.d o___
D o.
.do___
D o.
.d o___
D o.
..d o ....
D o.
.d o . .. .
D o.
.d o ..* ,
D o.
.d o—

, Amount appropriated
j for the fiscal year
i ending June 30,
j 1922.

I
$394,828. 00

$300,000. 00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.

Rate.

Number.
$3,600.00
3.000.00-3,500.00
2.500.00-2,900.00
2.400.00
2.000.00-2,300.00
1.800.00-1,900.00
1.500.00-1,700.00
1.200.00-1,400.00

1. 100.00
1, 000.00

600.00-

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appropriation.

Number.

7
30
9
103
19
3

18
37

22
78
24
7

2
1
2

8

900.00
$394,828.00 $278,800.00

Total salaries.

$434,260.00

Salaries, Interpreters to Embassies and Legations—
Interpreter to legation and consulate general to Persia (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1207,
sec. 1)...................................................................................................................................................
Interpreter to legation and consulate general to Bangkok, Siam (R . S., p. SOS, sec. 1693;
act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1207, sec. 1)..................................................... ..............................
For 10 student interpreters at the legation to China, who shall be citizens of the United
States and whose duty it shall be to study the Chinese language with a view to sup­
plying interpreters to the legation and consulates in China, at $1,500 each, $15,000:
Provided, That the method of selecting said student interpreters shall be nonpartisan:
And providedfurther, That upon receiving such appointment each student interpreter
shall sign an agreement to continue in the service as an interpreter at the legation
or consulate in China so long as his services may be required within a penod of
five years (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1207, sec. 1)............. ..................................................
For the payment of the <jost of tuition of student interpreters in China, at the rate of
$350 per annum each......................................................................................................................
For six student interpreters at the embassy to Japan, who shall be citizens of the United
States and whose duty it shall be to study the Japanese language with a view to
supplying interpreters to the embassy and consulates in Japan, at $1,500 each,
$9,000: Provided, That the method of selecting said student interpreters shall be non­
partisan: And provided further, That upon receiving such appointment each student
interpreter shall sign an agreement to continue in the service as an interpreter at the
embassy or consulates in Japan so long as his services may He required within a
period of five years (same acts).....................................................................................................
For the payment of the cost of tuition of student interpreters at the embassy to Japan,
at the rate of $200 per annum each (same acts)........................................................................
For four student interpreters at the embassy to Turkey, who shall be citizens of the
United States and whose duty it shall be to study the language of Turkey and any
other language that may be necessary to qualify them for service as interpreters to
the embassy and consulates in Turkey, at $1,500 each, $6,000: Provided, That the
method of selecting said student interpreters shall be nonpartisan: And provided
further, That upon receiving such appointment each student interpreter shall sign
an agreement to continue in the service as an interpreter to the embassy and con­
sulates in Turkey so long as his services may be required within a period of five
years (same act).......................... . ................................................................................'...................
For the payment of the cost of tuition of student interpreters at the embassy to Turkey,
at the rate of $200 per annum each (same act)............................. . ..........................................

$2, 000. 00
2, 000. 00

15, 000. 00
3,500. 00

9,000. 00
1, 200. 00

6, 000.00
800. 00
39,500.00

39,500.00

1,800.00

1,800.00

No person drawing the salary of interpreter or student interpreter as above pro­
vided shall be allowed any part of the salary appropriated for any secretary of lega­
tion or other officer.
Employees.

Rate.

Student interpreters.........................................per an n u m ..

$1,500.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1921.
1923.

Number.
Total salaries....................................................................

Number.

Number.

20

12

11

$30,000.00

$18,000.00

$16,500.00

Quarters for Student Interpreters at Embassies—
For rent of quarters for the student interpreters attached to the embassy to Japan (act
Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1207, sec. 1)......................................................................... .................
For rent of quarters for the student interpreters attached to the embassy to Turkey
(same act).............................................................................................................................................




1, 200.00
600.00

85

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statute* at Larne, or to Revised Statute.?, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, pac© 21)7*
Contingent Expenses, Foreign Missions—..
To enable the President to ptovide, at the public expense, all such stationery, blanks,
records, and other books, seals, presses, flags, and signs as he shall think necessary
for the several embassies and legations in the transaction of their business, and ako
for rent, repairs, postage, telegrams, furniture, typewriters, including exchange of
same, messenger service, compensation of kavasses, guards, dragomans, and porters,
including compensation of interpreters, translators, tho compensation of dispatch
agents at London, New York, San Francisco, and New Orleans, and for traveling and
miscellaneous expenses of embassies and legations, and for printing in the Depart­
ment of State, and for loss on bills of exchange to &nd from embassies and legations,
including such loss on bills of exchange to officers of the United States Court for
China, and payment in advance of subscriptions for newspapers (foreign and domes­
tic) under this appropriation is hereby authorized, $800,000: Provided, That no part
of this Bum appropriated for contingent expenses, foreign missions, shall be expended
for salaries or wages of persons not American citizens performing clerical services,
whether officially designated as clerks or not, in any foreign mission (R. S ., p. $10,
tec. 1748; act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1207, sec. 1)...................................................................

Objects of expenditure.

Rent of office..................
Messenger and janitor.
Gratuities.......................
Cab. carriage, and boat hire.
Light
Pifnting and 1
1 binding.......................
Postage..................................... . .........
Telegraphing.......................................
Telephone............................................
Duty and freight...............................
Travel expenses.................................
Loss by exchange..............................
Stationery and supplies..................
Newspapers.....................
Fuel ana illuminants.......................
Supplies for cleaning and toilet.. .
Water and ice.....................................
Uniforms..............................................
Miscellaneous......................................
Repairs to buildings.........................
Repairs to furniture and fixtures.
Furniture and fixtures....................
Books.
Compensation of dispatch agents and clerks.
Shipping cases.........................................................
Typewriters..............................................................

Total..

$155,155.00 *155,155.00
78.687.00
78.687.00
1.425.00
1.425.00
9 .956.00
9.956.00
18,000.00
18,000.00
12,000.00 12, C O 00
O.
9.400.00
9.400.00
2S3,945.00 2S3,045.00
9.000.00
9.000.00

11,000.00
3.000.00

11,000.00

42.300.00
4.000.00
21.755.00
3.674.00
3.912.00
820.00
29.963.00

3.000.00
10.046.00
42.295.00
4.016.00
21.755.00
3.674.00
3.912.00
820.00
29.963.00

2.280.00

2.250.00

10,000.00

20,000.00
8.000.00
1,015.00
13.407.00

2, 000.00

20,000.00
8.000.00
1.015.00
13.407.00

2,000.00
400.00

2,000.00

2,000.00

42,822.00

800,000.00

Total..

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
• 1922.
1921.
*300,000.00 *300,000.00

*145,000.00

300,000.00

246,581.55

200,000.00 200,000.00

100,000.00
1,581.55

25.000.00
50.000.00
25.000.00

25.000.00
50.000.00
25.000.00

179.136.00
22.392.00
44.784.00
22.392.00

300,000.00

300,000.00

1 268,704.00

1 These expenditures for 1921 are only estimated. Drafts and accounts already received amount to
*268,7M, and all have not yet been received. A deficiency of *30,000 is indicated in the appropriation for
transportation.




300,000.00

992,000.00

OTHER OBJECTS OT EXFENtUTtTRE.

Transportation....................
Subsistence..........................
Transportation of effects..
Miscellaneous..................

300, 000.00

‘ *29,'267*78
99.223.50

300,000.00

Total.,

$800,000.00

*109,816.00
219,816.08
599.28
12,974.02
17,735.77
14.597.48
9,362.36
129,140.78
12,473.26
11.855.15
6,637.58
10,549.50
37.003.49
7.575.60
26,420.47
6,339.18
4,411.51
935.30
108,995.15
13,881.44
6,216.74
8,240.03
2,089.05
13.721.16
1.645.60
1.513.00
314.62
1.786.00
6.50

Transportation of Diplomatic and Consular Officers—
To pay the itemized and verified statements of the actual and necessary expenses of
transportation and subsistence, under such regulations as the Secretary of State may
prescribe, of diplomatic and consular officers and clerks in embassies,’ legations, and
consulates and their families and effects in going to and returning from their posts, or
when traveling under orders of the Secretary of State, but not including any expense
incurred in connection with leaves of absence (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p •1208, see. 1).

Regular.......................................
Deficiency...................................
Deficiency (audited claims).

$800,000.00

42,819.00

800,000.00

Employees.

Amount appropriated
for tho fiscal year
ending Juno 30,
1922.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1021.

400.00

Miscellaneous office equipment........................*.........................
Engraving se a ls .............................................................................
Reserve for emergencies................................................................
Reserve for outstanding accounts (actual and estimated).
Unexpended balance......................................................................

Total amount to bo
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

86

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 1923—Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 298.
Steam Launch for Embassy at Constantinople—
Hiring of steam launch for use of embassy at Constantinople {act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1208, sec. 1) ...................................................................................................................................
Rent*of Groundsi Embassy at Tokyo, Japan—
Annual ground rent of the embassy at Tokyo, Japan, for the year ending Mar. 15, 1923
(same act).............................................................................................................................................
Annual Expenses of Cape Spartel Light, Coast of Morocco—
Annual proportion of the expenses of Cape Spartel and Tangier Light on the coast of
Morocco, including loss by exchange (treaty May SI, 1865, vol. 14, p . 679; act Mar. 2,
1921, vol. 41, p ■1208, sec. 1)...........................................................................................................
Bringing Home Criminals—
Actual expenses incurred in bringing home from foreign countries persons charged with
crime (^ . S., p. 1022, sec. 5275; act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p * 1208, sec. 1)..........................
Rescuing Shipwrecked American Seamen—
Expenses which may be incurred in the acknowledgment of the services of masters and
crews of foreign vessels in rescuing American seamen or citizens from shipwreck or
other catastrophe at sea (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1208, sec. 1) .......................................
Emergencies Arising in the Diplomatic and Consular Service—
To enable the President to meet unforeseen emergencies arising in the Diplomatic and
Consular Service, and to extend the commercial and other interests of the United
States and to meet the necessary expenses attendant upon the execution of the
neutrality act, to be expended pursuant to the requirement of section 291 of the
Revised Statutes (R. S .} p. 49, sec. 291; R. S., p. 1024, secs. 5281-5291; acts Mar. 4, 1909,
vol. 35, p. 1089, secs. 9-18; Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p •1208, sec. 1)..........................................
Allowance to Widows or Heirs of Diplomatic or Consular Officers Who Die Abroad—
Payment under the provisions of section 1749'of the Revised Statutes of the United
States to the widows or heirs at law of diplomatic or consular officers of the United
States dying in foreign countries in the discharge of their duties (R. S., p. 311, sec.
1749; act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1209, sec. 1) ......................................... *...............................
Transporting Remains of Diplomatic Officers, Consuls, and Consular Assistants—
For defraying the expenses of transporting the remains of diplomatic and consular officers
of the United States, including consular assistants and clerks who have died or may
die abroad or in transit, while m the discharge of their official duties, to their former
homes in this country for interment, and for the ordinary and necessary expenses of
such interment, at their post or at home (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1209, sec. 1) ____
International Bureau of Weights and Measures—
Contribution to the maintenance of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures,
in conformity with the terms of the convention of May 20, 1875, the same to be paid,
under the direction of the Secretary of State, to Baid bureau on its certificate of appor­
tionment (treaty May 20, 1875, vol. 20, p. 714, arts. 9, 10, 11; act Mar. 2 , 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1209, sec. 1)................................................................................................... -•
...............................
International Bureau for Publication of Customs Tariffs—
To meet the share of the United States in the annual expense for the year ending Mar. 31,
1923, of sustaining the international bureau at Brussels for the translation and publi­
cation of customs tariffs, pursuant to the convention proclaimed Dec. 17, 1890 (treaty
July 5, 1890, vol. 26, p. 1520, art. 9; act Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p. 1209, sec. 1)...............
Water Boundary, United States and Mexico—
International Boundary Commission, United States and Mexico: To enable the Presi­
dent to perform the obligations of the United States under the treaties of 1884, 1889,
1905, and 1906 between the United States and Mexico, including not to exceed $600
for rent (treaties Nov. 12, 1884, vol. 24, p. 1011; May 1, 1889, vol. 26, p. 1513, Art. I I;
act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1209, sec. 1).................................... ...................................; .........

Employees.

Rate.

Commissioner......................... *.......................... per an num ..
Consulting engineer......... .............................................do___
Secretary........................................................................... d o .. . .

55,000.00
4,500.00
4,000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended.
1922.
1921.
1923.

Number.

Personal services.........................................................................

Number.

1
1 ..............V f
1
$13,500.00

$4,000.00

Number.
1
1
1
*12,965.37

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.
Expenses incident to personal services:
Traveling and subsistence................................................

952.77
488.00
' 59.50
24.85
4.00

1,400.00
Telephone............ ........... ............................................................
Telegrams.....................................................................................
Rent of post-office box.............................................................
Equipment, printing, clerks, etc...........................................
Miscellaneous e x p e n s e s ......................... ............................
Water measurement.................. ..............................................

5,000.00

Total....................................................................................

25,000.00

5,100.00
1,000.00

421.41

5,000.00

14,915.90

1 The appropriation for 1922 was so small that the services of tbe commissioner and secretary were dis­
pensed with, and the salary of the consulting engineer cat to W.000 for the fiscal year 1921-22.




Total amount to be Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
appropriated under
ending June 30,
each head of appro­
1922.
priation.

$1, 800.00
250.00

$250.00

250.00 ,

250.00

2. 000.00 I

2, 000.00

3.000.00

3.000.00

400, 000.00

200, 000.00

2.500.00

2.500.00

5.000. 00

5.000.00

2.895.00

2.895.00

6, 000.00

6. 000.00

25,000.00

5,000.00

87

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 192S— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 299.
Boundary Line, Alaska and Canada, and the United States and Canada—
To enable the Secretary of State to mark the boundary and make the surveys incidental
thereto between the Territory of Alaska and the Dominion of Canada, in conformity
with the award of the Alaskan Boundary Tribunal and existing treaties, including
employment at the seat of government of such surveyors, computers, draftsmen, and
derks as are necessary; and for the more effective demarcation and mapping, pur­
suant to the treaty of Apr. 11, 1908, between the United States and Great Britain, of
the land and water boundary line between the United States and the Dominion of
Canada, as established under existing treaties, to be expended under the direction of
the Secretary of State, including the salaries of the commissioner and the necessary
engineers, surveyors, draftsmen, computers, and clerks in the field and at the seat of
government, expenses of printing, and necessary traveling, for payment for timber
necessarily cut in determining the boundary line not to exceed $500, and commutation
to members of the field force while on field duty or actual expenses not exceeding $5
per day each, to be expended in accordance with regulations from time to time pre­
scribed by the Secretary of State, $54,400: Provided, That hereafter advances of money
under the appropriation “ Boundary line, Alaska and Canada, and the United States
and Canada, may be made to the commissioner on the part of the United States and
by his authority to chiefs of parties, who shall give bond under such rules and regula­
tions and in such sum as the Secretary of State may direct, and accounts arising under
the advances shall be rendered through and by the commissioner on the part of the
United States to the Treasury Department as under advances heretofore made to chiefs
of parties: Provided, That when the commissioner is absent from Washington and from
his regular place of residence on official business he shall be allowed actual and neces­
sary expenses of subsistence not in excess of $8 per day (treaties June 15, 1846, vol. 9,
p. 859, Art. I ; Jan. 24,1908, vol. 32, p. 1961, art. 1; act Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p - 1210,
sec. 1)................ ........................................................................................ ...........................................
Employees.
Salaries:
Commissioner.............................................. per annum ..
Topographic engineers, $4,500 to $2,840............do___
Cartographic engineers, $3,240 to $2,040........... do___
Mathematicians, $3,240 to $2,160........................do___
Clerks, $2,500 to $1,980...........................................d o .. . .
Wages:
Hands (temporary field employees), $125 to $60 per
month.................................................................................
Salaries.............................................. ...........................................
Wages............................................................................................

Rate.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each bead of appro­
priation.

$54,400.00

$36,500.00

125.00

125.00

2,550.00

2,550.00

100, 000.00

100, 000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1921.
1922.

Number.

Number.

Number.

$5,000.00

24

24

$34,680.00
9,630.00

$30,260.00
9,775.00

$29,689.99
3,353.90

9.720.00
2.338.00
48.00
400.00
50.00

10,612.50
4,892.50
48.00
400.00
50.00

1.350.00

4.900.00
1,38100

3,135.00
102.36
19,568.34
2,250.60

1,200.00
66, 000.00

2,850.69
3,060.12
2,106.00
566.45
108.13
206.37
963.95
115.91
14,176.35
436.88
3,771.26

73,485.70

11,600.00

8,650.00

54,400.00

64,835.70

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.
Expenses incident to personal services:
Subsistence.........................................*...............
Transportation...................................................
Rent and storage.......................................................
Office supplies, stationery, etc........................
General expenses.......................................................
Photographic work.
---------- r
1 material.
Engraving. _ _
Printing m a p s .....................................................
Printing and binding (reports and atlases).
Paper for maps.
Total...................................................................................
Less expenses of field parties under treaties not yet
completed—
.......................................................................
Total...................................................................................

200.00
100.00

200.00

2,192.00
151,406.00

* $*,*93-34 of the amount shown is for engraving contracted for prior to the fiscal year 1922.

International Bureau at Brusselsfor Repression o f the African Slave Trade—
To meet the share of the United States in the expenses of the special bureau created by
article 85 of the general act concluded^ at Brussels July 2, 1890, for the repression of
the African slave trade and^ the restriction of the importation into and sale in a certain
defined zone of the African continent of firearms, ammunition, and spirituous
liquors, for the year 1923 (treaty July 2,1890, vol. 27, p. 918; act Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41,
p. 1210, sec. 1) ......................................................................................................................................
International Prism Commission—
For subscription of the United States as an adhering member of the International
Prison Commission and the expenses of a commission, including preparation of
reports (acts Feb. 28,1918, vol. 87, p . 692, sec. 1; Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p . 1210, sec. 1) . . .
International Union o f American Republics—
Pan Ajnerican Union: For Pan American Union, $100,000: Provided, That any moneys
received from the other American Republics for tne support of the union shall be
paid into the Treasury as a credit, in addition to the appropriation, and may be
drawn therefrom upon requisitions of the chairman of the governing board of the
union for the purpose of meeting the expenses of the union and of carrying out the
orders of the said governing board: And provided further, That the Public Printer is
authorized to print an edition of the monthly bulletin not to exceed 6,000 copies per
month, for distribution by the union during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923
(acts July 14,1890, vol. 26, p. 275, see. 1; Aug. 18,1894, vol. 28, p . 418, sec. 1; Mar. 2,
1921, vol. 41, p. 1210, sec. 1h
.....................................




88

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.

Budget, pape 300.
International Bureau o f the Permanent Court of Arbitration—
To meet the share of the United States in the expenses for the calendar year 1921 of the
International Bureau of the Permanent Court of Arbitration, created under article
22 of the convention concluded at The Hague July 29,1899, for the pacific settlement
of international disputes (treaty July 29, 1899, vol. 32, p. 1793, art. 29; act Mar. 2,
1921, vol. 41> p. 1211, sec, 1) .................................................................................................... t..............................
International Commission on Annual Tables of Constants, etc.—
To the International Commission on Annual Tables of Constants and Numerical Data,
Chemical, Physical, and Technological, as established by the Seventh International
Congress of Applied Chemistry in London and as continued by the eighth congress
in New York, as a contribution by the United States toward the publication of annual
tables of constants, chemical, physical, and technological (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1211, sec. 1)...........................................................................................................................................................
International Institute of Agriculture at Rome, Italy—
For the payment of the quota of the United States for the support of the International
Institute of Agriculture for the calendar year 1923 (treaty June 7, 1905, vol. 35, p.
1918, art. 10, pt. 2) ................................................................................................ .......................
$19, 577. 00
For salaiy of the one member of the permanent committee of the International Institute
5 ,000.00
oi Agriculture for the calendar year 1923 (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1211, sec. ? )___
For the payment of the quota of the United States for the cost of translating into and
printing in the English language the publications of the International Institute of
5, 000. 00
Agriculture at R o m e ....................................................................................................................
International Railway Congress—
To pay the quota of the United States as an adhering member of the International
Railway Congress for the year ending Apr. 15,1923 (act Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p. 1211,
sec. 1) ......................................................................................................................... .........................
International Sanitary Bureau—
For the annual share of the United States for the maintenance of the International
Sanitary Bureau for the year 1923 (treaty Oct. 14, 1905, vol. 35, p. 2094, art. 10, pt. 2;
act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1211, sec. 1) .....................................................................................
Salaries and Expenses, United States Court for China—
Judge, $8,000; district attorney, $4,000; marshal, $3,000; clerk, $3,000; stenographer
and court reporter, $2,400; printing and binding opinions of the court and court ex­
penses, including reference law books, $10,000. The judge of the said court and the
district attoney shall, when the sessions of the court are held at other cities than
Shanghai, receive in addition to their salaries their necessary actual expenses during
such sessions, not to exceed $8 per day each, and so much as may be necessary for said
purposes during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923, is appropriated (acts June 30,
1906, vol. 34, V. 816, sec. 1; June 4, 1920, vol. 41, p. 745, sec. 1; Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1211, sec.. l ) ....................................................................................................................................
c
Employees.

Salaries:
Judge....................................
District attorney............. .
Marshal.................... ............
Clerk.....................................
Stenographer.......................
Compensation of employees:
Comprador......................... .
Stenotypists........................
Chinese servants................

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1921.
1922.

*8,000.00

*8,000.00

$8,000.00

4.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
2.400.00

4.000.00
3.000.00
3.000.00
2.400.00

4.000.00
3.000.00
1,517.88
2,168.90

820.00
910.00
1.180.00

820.00
910.00
1.180.00

809.44
905.16
1,179.76

350.00
65.00
1.500.00
460.00
140.00
30.00
340.00

350.00
65.00
1.500.00
460.00
140.00
30.00
340.00

360.31
64.50

235.00
1.500.00
900.00
350.00
15.00

235.00
1.500.00
900.00
350.00
15.00

203.00

203.00

87.44
» 1,624.93

30,400.00

30,400.00

28,118.39

1,355.00

1,355.00

1,354.96

31,755.00

31,755.00

129,473.33

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Travel.
Printing and binding opinions of the court.
Telegrams................................................................
Telephone................................................................
Water and ice........................................................
Furniture and fixtures........................................
Books........................................................................
Repairs to furniture and fixtures....................
Stationery and supplies......................................
Fuel.
Lights...........................................................................
Cleaning and toilet supplies...................................
Rent of post-office b o x ....................................
Miscellaneous............................................................. .
Reserve for outstanding accounts (estimated).
Total....................................................................................................
Circuit expenses (appropriation in addition to court expenses):
Commissioner’s per diem prescribed by law ............................ .
Total expenditures.

1,000.00

2.00

1,000.00

2.00

........ 4*58*35
138.41
30.45
339.68
792.31
233.08
1,193.77
877.49
321.96
13.35

1.20

1 The esjenditures for the quarter ended June 30, 1921, are roughly estimated and included in this
amount. The accounts for that quarter have not yet been received.




Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$2, 000. 00

$2, 000.00

500.00

5t)0.00

29,577.00

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

18,000.00

400.00

400.00

11,323.16

2,830.79

30,400.00

30,400.00

89

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the fiscal year ending June 80, 1923—Continued.

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at I-arge, or to Rovised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for cach detailed objcct.

Sltfrigt’ t, imgo 801.
Bureau of Interparliamentary Unionjor Promotion of International Arbitration—
For the contribution of the United States toward the maintenance of the Bureau of tho
Interparliamentary Union for the promotion of International Arbitration at Brussels,
Belgium (act Mar. 2 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1112, sec. 1)...................................................................
International Office of Public Health—
For tho payment of the quota of the United States for the year 1023 toward tho support
of the International Office of Public Health, created by the international arrangement
signed at Rome, Dec. 0, 1007, in pursuance of article 181 of the international sanitary
convention signed at Paris on Dec. 3, 1003 (treaties Dec. 8 , 1903, pt. 2; Dec. 9, 1907,
vol. 34, p. 2001, art. 3; act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1212, sec. 1) . .........................................
Arbitration of Outstanding Pecuniary Claims Between the United States and Great Britain—
For the expenses of the arbitration of outstanding pecuniary claims botween the United
States and Cireat Britain, in accordance with the special agreement concluded for that
purpose Aug. 38, 1010, and the schedules of claims thereunder, including salary and
expenses of the tribunal, and of the agent, counsel, joint secretary and other assist­
ants, contingent expenses, and peronal services and rent in the District of Columbia,
and elsewhere, notwithstanding the provisions of anv other act (treaty Aug. 18, 19101
vol. 37, p. 1626, pt. 2; act Mar. 2 , 1921, vol. 41, p. 12*12, sec. 1)............................................

Salaries:
Agent..................
Counsel...............
Do............... .
Joint secretary.,
Chief clerk..........
Law clerks.........
Stenographers..
Messengers.........

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922..

$2, 000. 00

$2, 000.00

3, 860. 00

3,860. 00

72,430. 00

52,770.00

2,250.00

2,250.00

25,000.00

25,000.00

Estimated,
1923.

Rato.

Employees.

Total amount to bo
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

$10,000.00

Number.

7,500 00
5.000.00
3.000.00
2.500.00
2.500.00
1.400.00

m oo

Personal services..

$42,780.00
OTHER OBJECTS OP EXPENDITURE.

Rent of offices for Joint secretaries..............................................................
Miscellaneous:
Supplies, printing, stationery, and other contingent expenses.
Expenses of the tribunal (United States share):
Honoraria of arbitrators........................................................................
Stenographer for arbitrators.................................................................
Traveling expenses of arbitrators.............. .......... ............................
Reporting proceedings. .
Printing of proceedings.
Printing, stationery, and supplies..
Messengers for arbitrators..................

480.00
15,000.00
5,400 00
180.00
2.500.00
3,000.00
2.500.00
500.00

9a 00

Total.

72,430.00

International Radiotelegraphic Convention—
For the share of tlie United States for the calendar year 1923, as a party to the interna­
tional radiotelegraphic conventions heretofore signed, of the expenses of the radiotelegraphic service of the International Bureau of the Telegraphic Union at Berne
(treaties Nov. 3, 1906, vol. S7, pp. 1569-1597, pt. 2; July 5, 1912; act Mar. 2,1921, vol.
41, p. 1212, sec. 1) ......................................- ......................................................................................
United States Section of the Inter-American High Commission—
To defray the actual and necessary expenses on the part of the United States section
of the Inter-American High Commission, $25,000, to be expended under the direc­
tion of the Secretary of State (acts Feb. 7, 1916, vol. 39, p. 8 , sec. 1; Mar. 2, 1921,
vol. 41. p. 1212, sec. 1).......................................................................................... ............................
Employees.

Rato per
annum.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
* 1922,
1921.

Number.
Assistant Secretary General.................................................. .
Juristic expert........................... ................................................
Research assistant.....................................................................
Executive clerk....................................... . . . . . . ..........................
Clerks, stenographers, and typists, $1,200 to $1,700 per

Anm
n u ..................................................

Messenger................... ............................................................ . . .

$1,500.00
4.000.00

2. 000.00
2, 100.00

1
1
1
1

Number.

I
1
1
1

11
1
1

15
1

600.00

Salaries..........................................................................................

Number.

$21, 000.00

$20,500.00

400.00
300.00
2,400.00
600.00

200.00
2, 75a 00

300.00

500.00

918.76

25,000.00

25,000.00

24,379.06

$20,363.48

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Expenses incident to personal services:
Subsistence.......................................................................
Transportation....................................................................
Stationery, printing, and binding........................................
Postage, telephone, telegraph, and cable..........................
Equipment and supplies and books of reference and
subscriptions to economic publications...........................
Total...........................................................................................................

300.00

750.00

*5la31
* 1,748.49
* 838.02

1 Temporary clerical assistance from time to time, hereafter to be dispensed with by employment of one
additional typist permanently.
* There have yet to be submitted for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1921, printing bills from the Gov­
ernment Printing Office estimated to aggregate $325, telephone and telegraph bills estimated to aggrep t e $125. and transportation bills estimated to aggregate $50, making in all probable additional expend*




90

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 802.
Waterways Treaty, United States and Great Britain—
International Joint Commission, United States and Great Britain; For salaries and
expenses, including salaries of commissioners and salaries of clerks and other employees
appointed by the commissioners on the part of the United States, with the approval
solely of the Secretary of State, expense of printing, cost of law books, books of refer­
ence and periodicals, and necessary traveling expenses, and for one-half of all reason­
able and necessary joint expenses of the International Joint Commission incurred
under the terms of the treaty between the United States and Great Britain concerning
the use of boundary waters between the United States and Canada, and for other
purposes, signed Jan. 1 1 , 1909, $38,000, to be disbursed under the direction of the
Secretary* of State: Provided, That no part of this appropriation shall be expended
for subsistence of the commission or secretary, except for actual and necessary
expenses, not in excess of $8 per day each, when absent from Washington and from
his regular place of residence on official business: Provided further, That a part of this
appropriation may be expended for rent of offices for the commission in the District
of Columbia, in the event that the Public Buildings Commission is unable to supply
suitable office space (treaty Jan. 11, 1909, vol. 36, p. 2458, art. 12, pt. 2; act Mar. 2,
1921, vol. 419 P• 1213, sec. 1)............ I ............................................................................................

Employees.

Rate.

Salaries:
Commissioners............................................per annum..
Secretary and special disbursing officer........ do___
Clerk-stenographer...................................... ........do___

$7,500.00
4,000.00
2,050.00

Salaries........................................................................................ .
Compensation for temporary labor and clerical assist­
ants and reporting hearings................................................

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

$38,000.00

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$44,000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.

Number.

Number.

Number.

3
1
1

3
1
1

3
1
1

$28,550.00

$28,550.00

1 $23,425.00

*2,500.00

1.500.00

5,857.11

*1,450.00
*2,450.00

800.00
1.200.00

300.00
215.00
35.00
*2,500.00

200.00
215.00
35.00
*5,500.00

1,568.16
2,509.10
2,917.20
1,634.62
243.02
38.01
4 410.56

38,000.00

38/000.00

38,602.78

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Expenses incident to personal services:
Subsistence...........................................................................
Transportation...................................................................
Rent and storage.......................................................................
Stationery and office supplies and equipment..................
Telegraph and telephone service...........................................
Repairs and maintenance........................................................
Miscellaneous item s.. . . .
Total.............................................................................

_____
_____ ___ ______________________ „________ ^ ________________ j commission report, maps,
charts, etc.
* No Commission decisions printed in 1921.

Third Pan American Scientific Congress—
To meet the actual ana necessary expenses of the delegates of the United States to the
Third Pan Amei^can Scientific Congress, to be held at the city of Lima, Peru, in the
year 1923, and of their clerical assistants, $25,000, to be expended in the discretion
of the Secretary of State (act June 4> 1920, vol. 41, P* 747, sec. 1) (submitted)................
Payment to the Government of Panama—
,
To enable the Secretary of State to pay to the Government of Panama the eleventh
annual payment, due on Feb. 26, 1923, from the Government of the United States
to the Government of Panama under article 14 of the treaty of Nov. 18, 1903 (treaty
Nov. 18, 1903, vol. 33, p. 2238, art. 14; act Mar. 2 , 1921, vol. 41, J>. 1213, sec. 1) ............
International Research Council—
To pay the annual share of the United States, as an adhering member of the International
Research Council and of the Associated Unions^ organized at Brussels, July 18-28,
1919, as follows: International Research Council, $129; International Astronomical
Union, $772; International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, $290; International
Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, $1,338; International Union of Mathematics, $129;
in all, $2,658; to be expended under the direction of the Secretary of State (act Mar. 2,
1921, vol. 41, p. 1213, sec. 1) ...........................................................................................................
International Commission on Public and Private International Law—
For the payment of compensation to, and the necessary expenses of, the representative
or representatives of the United States on the International Commission of Jurists,
organized under the convention signed at the Third International American Con­
ference Aug. 23, 1906, approved by the Senate Feb. 3, 1908, and ratified bjr the
President Feb. 8,1908, for the purpose of preparing drafts of codes of public and private
international law; and for the payment of the quota of the United States of the expenses
incident to the preparation of such drafts, including the compensation of experts
under Article IV of the convention (treaty Aug. 23, 1906, vol. 37, p.. 1557, sec. 6; act
Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p . 1213, sec. 1) (submitted).......................................................................
Embassy, Legation, and Consular Buildings and Grounds—
For the improvement of the agency and consulate building at Tangier, Morocco (sub­
mitted)......................................................................................................... '........................................
International Hydrographic Bureau—
For the second annual contribution of the United States toward the maintenance of
the International Hydrographic Bureau (act Mar. 2, 1921, voL 41, p. 1215, sec. J ) . . .




25,000.00

250,000.00

250t 000.00

2 ,658.00

2,658.00

15,000.00
14,435.00
3,860.0

2, 500. 00

91

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$2,009,500.00

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

91,909,500.00

25.000.00

25.000.00

35.000.00

35.000.00

Budget, page 303.
Salaries, Consular Service—
For salaries of consuls general, consuls, and vice consuls, as provided in the act approved
Feb. 5,1915, entitled “ An-act for the improvement of the foreign service,” $1,974,500.
Every consul general, consul, vice consul, and wherever practicable every consular
agentshall be an American citizen (acts Apr. 5, 1906, vol. 34, p. 100, sec. 1; Feb, 5,1915,
vol. 38, p. 804, sec. 1; Mar. 4, 1919, vol. 40, p. 1333, sec. 1; Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p . 1215,
sec. 1)................................................................................................................................................. $1,974,500.00
For salaries of seven consular inspectors, at $5,000 each..........................................................
35,000.00

Employees.

Salaries, Consular Service:
Consuls general, $4,600 to S12,000 per an­
num ....................................................................
Consuls general at large............... . .per annum ..
Consuls, $2,000 to $8,000 per annum......................
Vice consuls of career, $2,500 to $3,000 per
annum.............................. .................................

Estimated,
1923.

Expended.
1921.

Number.

Number.

48
7
334

42
3
313

46
7
330

120

$5,000.00

95
$1,763,750.00

$2,009,500.00 $1,909,500.00

Total of salaries..
Consuls general:
Class 1............................................ per annum ..
Class 2 . . . . . .................................................do___
Class 3......................................................... do___
Class 4......................................................... do___
Class 5 ............................................. .......... do____

Estimated,
1922.

Number.

Rate.

Number.

$12,000,00
8, 000.00
6,000.00

Number.

2

Number.

2

2
11
8

21

20

$318,500.00

$302,000.00

$274,500.00

Number.

Number.

$35,000.00

$35,000.00

Number.

Number.

5.500.00
4.500.00

Total for consuls general.
Consuls general at large....................per annum ..

14
15
16

1

1

1

Number.
3

$5,000.00

Total for consuls general at large................
Consuls:
Class 1............................................ per annum ..
Class 2......................................................... do___
Class 3........................................................ do____
Class 4......................................................... do___
Class 5......................................................... do___
Class 6......................................................... d o ., ..
Class 7......................................................... d o .. ,.
Class 8......................................................... d o .. ..
Class 9............. ...........................................do___

000.00
000.00
000.00

1
1

40
50
60
90
80

500.00

000.00
500.00

000.00

$15,000.00

Number.

1
1

40
45
60
91
80
11

11
1

48
96
79

1

12
1

$1,263,500.00 $1,244,500.00

$1,168,000.00

500.00

000.00

Total for consuls.,
Vice consuls of career:
Class 1.............................................per annum ..
Class 2......................................................... do___
Class 3......................................................... do___

13
9

26
30

3
29
51

$322,500.00

$258,000.00

$216,250.00

70,000.00

70,000.00

70,000.00

$3,000,00
2.750.00
2.500.00

Total for vice consuls of career.

Number.

Number.

Number.

Vice consuls in charge..

Expenses of Consular Inspectors—
For the actual and necessary traveling and subsistence expenses of consular inspectors
while traveling and inspecting under instructions from the Secretary of State, $25,000:
Provided, That inspectors shall be allowed actual and necessary expenses for sub­
sistence, itemized, not exceeding an average of $8 per day (acts Apr. 5,1906, vol. 34,
p. 100, sec. 1; Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p. 1215, sec. * ) . . .............................................. '..............
Salaries of Consular Assistants—
For 20 consular assistants (R. S ., p. 304> sec. 1704; acts Map 21, 1908, vol. 35, p. 180,
sec. 1; Apr. 15, 1918, vol. 40, p. 528, sec. 1; Mar. 2 , 1921, vol. 41, p . 1215, sec. 1) .........

Employees.

Salaries:
Consular assistants.....................................per an num ..
D o ........ .............................................................. do___
D o .............. . ........................................................do___
D o ....................................................................... do____
Total of salaries for consular assistants....................




Rate.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1923.
1922.

Number.
$2,000.00
1,800.00
1.650.00
1.500.00

Number.

Number.

4
5
7
4

3
1
5
7

3
1
3
7

$34,550.00

$23,250.00

$26,550.00

92

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj thejiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (titlo of appropriation), (Into of act*, references to Statutes at Largo, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 304.
Post Allowances to Diplomatic and Consular Officer#-To enable the President, in his discretion, and in accordance with auch regulations as
he may prescribe to make special allowances by way of additional compensation to
diplomatic? and consular officers and consular assistants and oflicers of the United
States Court for China in order to adjust their official income to the ascertained cost of
living at the posts to which they may be assigned (act Mar. <, 1921, vol. 4t, p. 1215,
?
sec. 1)......................................................... ...........................................................................................
Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

Employees.

Post allowance for diplomatic and consular officers:
Totals for—
Diplomatic officers outside China, $3,500 to $230 per annum.
Diplomatic officers in China, rate based on exchange rates.
Consular officers outside China, $1,200 to $100 per annum ..
Consular officers in China, rate based on exchange rates...
United States Court for China, rate based on exchange rates.

Estimated, 1923.

$27,900.00
9,500.00
189,400.00
24,000.00
5,000.00

$102,370.30
12,786.37
275,705.87
46,641.20
9,727.62

255,800.00

Total for post allowance.

*27,900.00
9,500.00
189,400.00
24,000.00
5,000.00

255,800.00

447,231.36

Estimated, 1922.

Allotted, 1921.

Rate.
Num­ Amount. Num­
Amount. Num­ Amount.
ber.
ber.
ber.
Post allowance for Diplomatic Service:
Diplomatic officers___ per annum.
Do.......................................... do___
D o.......................................... d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...
Do.......................................... do___
D o .* .....................................do___
D o . . . . ...................................do___
Do.......................................... do___
Do.......................................... d o ....
Do.......................................... do___
Do.......................................... do___
Do.......................................... do___
D o.......................................... d o . . . ,
Do.......................................... do___
Do.......................................... d o ...,

$3,500.00 j

$3,500.00

1.500.00 !
1.300.00 ;

37.500.00
2,600.00
32.400.00
9.900.00
13,000.00
1.800.00

2,000.00 !
1.200.00 i
1, 100.00 ,
1,000.00 i




$3,600.00

200.00
100.00
S
I

2.000.00
1.950.00
1.900.00
1.880.00
1.850.00
1.800.00
1.750.00
1.700.00
1.680.00
1,660.00
1.500.00
1.480.00
1.420.00
1.400.00

'4‘s66‘6o'

6.500.00
9.200.00
2.700.00
3.200.00
400.00

600.00
500.00
400.00
300.00

7,000.00

*4 s
* 66.'66‘

500.00

3.500.00
3.240.00
3.000.00
2.850.00
2.680.00
2.500.00
2.400.00
2, ISO. 00
2.080.00

$3,600.00

7,000.00

900.00 j

Total post allowance of
diplomatic officers.................
Post allowances Consular Service:
Consular officers............ per annum.
Do.......................................... d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...
D o.......................................... d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...
D o...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do....................... ..................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
D o...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
D o...........................................d o ...
D o...........................................d o ...
D o...........................................d o ...
Do..........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do............................... .......... d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................do___
Do...........................................do___
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................do___
Do...........................................d o ...
D o...........................................d o ...
Do...........................................do____
Do..................................... . . . d o . . . .
Do...........................................d o .. ..
Do...........................................do___
D o...........................................do___
D o...........................................d o „ . .

2,000.00

6.500.00
9.200.00
2.700.00
3.200.00
400.00

4,500.00

37,400.00

37,400.00

108,400.00
3.500.00
3.240.00

6, 000.00
5.700.00

2. 650.00

6, 000.00

27,000.00

6, 000.00

IS

27,000.00

1. 350.00

1.370.00
1.350.00
1.250.00
1.230.00

1. 220.00
1, 210.00
1, 200.00
1. 100.00
1.0.50.00

990.00
900.00
880.00
870.00
850.00
840.00
800.00
750.00
730.00
710.00 i

30.000.00
2.400.00
2.180.00
2,080.00
38.000.00
1.980.00
1.900.00
1.880.00
3.700.00
1.800.00
3.500.00
3.400.00
5.040.00
1.660.00
49.500.00
1.480.00
1.420.00
1.400.00
1.380.00
1.370.00
2.700.00
15.000.00
4.920.00

1. 220.00
1,210.00
6,000.00

1,15a 00
1.130.00

1. 000.00

1, 200.00

70,000.00

70,000.00

1.150.00
4.520.00
3.300.00
1.050.00
47.000.00
990.00
5.400.00
880.00
870.00
2.550.00

m oo
8,000.00

11.250.00
2.190.00
1. 420.00

Total amount to bo
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

$250,000.00

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$250,000.00

93

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923—Continued.
General objcct (title of appropriation), date of acta, reference;! to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, anti estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro*
priation.

Amount appropriated
for tho fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$1,400,000.00

$1,400,000.00

Budget, page *305.
Post Allowances to Diplomatic and Consular Officers— Continued.
Estimated, 1923.! Estimated, 1922.

I

Allotted, 1921,

Rate.
Num­
Amount.
ber,
Peat allowances Consular Service—Con.
Consular ollicers..........per annum..
D o.......................................... d o ....
Do.......................................... d o .*..
Do.......................................... do .*.,
Do.......................................... d o ...,
Do.......................................... d o ...,
Do.......................................... do___
Do.......................................... do.
Do.......................................... d o ...,
D o.......................................... d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...
Do.......................................... d o ...,
Do.......................................... d o ...,
Do.......................................... d o ...,
Do.......................................... d o ....

Amount. Num­ Amount.
ber.

m oo

$700.00

tv o oo
o.
630.00
620.00
600.00
500.00
450.00
440.00
400.00
370.00
360.00
350.00
300.00
250.00
230.00

$23,400.00 |
48,000.00 |

660.00
890.00
720.00
600.00
500.00
900.00
440.00
800.00
370.00
080.00
400.00
400.00

39 $23,400.00
96 48,000.00

351,140.00

5,000.00
24,000.00

130,000.00

29,000.00

Total..

189,400.00

5,000.00
24,000.00

China:
United States Court for China.
Consular Service..........................

1,500.00
13,500.00

189,400.00

Total.,

1,500.00
13,500.00

29,000.00

150,000.00

000.00
230.00

20, 000.00

NoTE.— The above totals of tho post allowances in countries other than China for the years 1921 and 1922
differ materially from tho appropriations for those vears, and the total for tho year 1923 differs from the
amount estimated for that year, for the reason that for each year tho totals as given include tho sum of the
amounts that would have been paid, or will bo paid, provided each officer concerned had received, or
should receive, the full annual allowance based upon his annual rate.
In practice this difference between the total arrived at as above and tho appropriation does not arise,
as it Is covered by a saving on allowances in favor of tho department on account of leaves of absence of
officers, transit periods when they are traveling under orders, and promotions in the service, which amounts
to approximately 15 perconturn per annum of the total estimated allowances.
In China the amount granted consular officers and the officials of the United States Court for China, for
post allowances is the difference between tho prewar rate of the Mexican silver dollar, which was approxi­
mately 43 cents in United States currency, and the current value which at present is about 50 cents.
Because of the great difference between the present price of silver and that prevailing throughout 1920
and 1921, the amount required for post allowances in China for 1922 will be small compared with the two
previous years.

Allowance for Clerks at United States Consulates—
Allowance for clerk hire at consulates, to be expended under the direction of the Sec­
retary of State, $1,400,000. Clerks, whenever hereafter appointed, shall, so far as
practicable, be appointed under civil service rules and regulations (acts Apr. 5 , 1906,
vol. 84, p> 101, sec. 5; Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1215, sec. 1) .......... *......................................
Allowance for clerk hire at consulates.

Employees.

Rate.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

Number.
Clerks.................................................................... per annum,
D o................................................................................do___
D o................................................................................do___
D o................................................................................do___
D o .............................................................................. do___
D o........................... ....................................................do___
D o ................................................................................do____
D o.......................................................... .....................do____
D o................................................................................do___
D o................................................................................d o * ...
D o................................................................................d o ....
D o................................................................................do____
D o................................................................................do____
D o................................................................................do____
D o...... ... ..................................................................... d o .,..
D o ................................................................................d o ....
D o................................................................................do____
D o................................................................................do____
D o................................................................................d o .*..
D o................................................................................do____
D o................................................................................d o .. ..
D o................................................................ ..............do___
D o ................................................................................do___
D o ................................................................................do___
D o................................................................................d o ,. ..
D o................................................................................ d o ....
D o................................................................................do___
D o................................................................................ do___
D o ................................................................................do___
D o ................................................................................d o .. ..
D o................................................................................ d o ..* .
Clerks, $000 to $000.................... ................................ . . d o . . . .




$4,500
3.600
3.200
3,120
3.000
2,800
2,730
2.700
2.500
2.400
2,260
2,250

2.200
2,100

1
1
1

1,900
1,800
1.700
1,650
1,610
1.600
1.500
1,440
1.400
1,300

1
1
1

Number.

1
1
8
36

1
1

50

50

23

100

100

‘ iso*

'iso'

71
4
137

6

2,060

2.000

Number.

1

2
3

1

8
34

2

4
2

1,200

18

1,100

2

1

1,128

1,0S0

1,000

10

10

208

208

1

5

202

94

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service of the fiscal year ending June, SO 1923— Continued.
Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$103,700.00

$103,700.00

15,000.00

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Largo, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

15,000.00

220, 000.00

150,000.00

Budget, page 306.
Allowance for Clerks at United States Consulates— Continued.
Allowance for clerk hire at consulates—Continued.

Rate,

Employees.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1921.
1923.

Number.
Clerks,
Clerks,
Clerks,
Clerks,
Clerks,

1800 to 1899........................................... per annum.
$700 to $799........................................................ d o ...
$600 to $699........................................................ d o .. .
$500 to $599........................................................ d o .. .
up t o $499.........................................................d o ...

47
78
128
28

Total for clerk hire at consulates.............................
Reserve Chinese exchange allowance................................

Number.

Number.

120

120

54
85
75
52
133

$1,389,530
10,470

$1,389,530
10,470

$1,149,341

1,400,000

Total.

47
78
128
28

1,400,000

1,149,341

Salaries and Expenses of Interpreters and Guards to Consulates—
Interpreters and guards to be employed at consulates, to be expended under the direc­
tion of the Secretary of State (acts June 11, 1874, vol. 18, p. 70, sec. 1; Mar. 2, 1921,
vol. 41, p • 1216, sec. 1) ......................................................................................................................
Employees.

Rate.

Salaries and expenses of interpreters and guards to con­
sulates:
Interpreters and guards........................... per annum ..
D o.
do.
D o..
do___
do___
D o..
do___
D o.
Do.
do___
D o.
do___
D o.
do___
D o.
do___
D o.,
do___
D o.
d o ...
D o.
d o ...
do___
D o.
Interpreters and guards, $500 to $599................do,
Interpreters and guards, $400 to $499................do,
Interpreters and guards, $300 to $399................do,
Interpreters and guards, $200 to $299................do.
Interpreters and guards, up to $199..................do,
Prison guards.......................................................... do___
D o........................................................................d o ..

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.

Number.
$3,000.
2.500.
1,650.
1.500.
1,400.

1,200.
1,000.
960.
900.
800.
775.
650.

8

14
3

Number.

Number.

7
4
3

6
2
6

\6
2
6

3
5
4

3
5
4

1
1
2
6
6
7
7
3

650.
600.

Totals for interpreters and guards..........................

8
1
1

$103,700.00

$83,476.00

$69,372.00

Expenses of Prisons for American Convicts—
Expenses of maintaining at Shanghai, under charge of the United States marshal for
China, an institution for incarcerating American convicts and insane in China, $2,000;
for salary oi deputy marshal, $1,200; assistant deputy marshal, $800; in all, $4,000
(R. S., p. 792, secs. 1421- 1422; act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1216, sec. 1) ........................
Paying for the keeping, feeding, and transportation of prisoners in China, Chosen, Siam,
and Turkey, and of those declared insane by the United States Court for China, $9,000 .
Rent of prison for American convicts in Smyrna, Turkey, and for wages of keepers of the
same, $1,000......................................................................................................................................
Rent of prison for American convicts in Constantinople, Turkey, and for wages of keepers
of the same, $1,000.................... .....................................................................................................
Relief
belief and protection of American seamen in foreign countries and in the Panama Canal
Zone ana shipwrecked American seamen in the Territory of Alaska, in the Hawaiian
Islands, Porto Rico, the Philippine Islands, and the Virgin Islands (R. S ., p'. 881, secs.
4554-4591; act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, 7>.1216, sec. 1) .................................................................
Expended, 1921.
Object of expenditure.

Estimated, Estimated,
Expended
1922.
1923.
at consu­
lates.

Board and lodging.............................................. $75,000.00
45.000.00
Medical aid...........................................................
Transportation..................................................... 90.000.00
5.000.00
Clothing...................................................... ..........
5.000.00
Other expenses...................................... .............
Total............................................................

220,000.00

Expended
directly.

Total.

$75,000.00
45.000.00
90.000.00
5.000.00
5.000.00

$61,747.11
37,943.54
17,911.38
4,294.26
4,247.99

$11,667.38
231.25
54,982.79
61.20

$73,414.49
33,174.79
72,894.17
4,355.46
4,247.99

220,000.00

126,144.28

66,942.62

1 193,036.90

l This amount represents accounts received on Sept. 15,1921. A number of the accounts of consulates
for the June quarter, 1921, have not been received; hence the amount does not represent the actual
expenditure* for the year. The total expenditures to Oct. 10,1921, show a deficiency of $3,958.43.




$4,000.00
9, 000.00
1 , 000.00
1 , 000.00

95

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

Estimates oj appropriations required jo r the service oj thejiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$5,000.00

$5,000. 00

50.00

50.00

1, 200, 000*00

1, 000, 000.00

International Trade-Mark Registration Bureau, Quota of United States—
For the annual share of the United States for the expenses of the maintenance of the
International Trade-Mark Registration Bureau at Habana, including salaries of the
director and counselor, assistant director and counselor, clerks, translators, secretary
to the director, stenographers and typewriters, messenger, watchmen, ana laborers,
rent of quarters, stationery and supplies, including the purchase of books, postage,
traveling expenses, and the cost of printing the bulletin (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1216, tec. 1) ......................................................................................................................................

9,600.00

14,112.00

International Latitude Observatory at Uhiah, Calif\
—
For the maintenance of the International Latitude Observatory at Ukiah, Calif., and for
the continuance of the work thereof until the station is turned over to the Geodetic
and Geophysical Union (act June 4, 1920, vol. 41, p. 748, sec. 1) (submitted)..................

2, 000.00

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 859.
Permanent indefinite appropriation:
Pay of Consular Officers for Services to American Vessels and Seamen—
Allowance to consular officers, who are paid in whole or in part by fees, for services
necessarily rendered to American vessels and seamen, as provided in the act of June
26, 1884 (act June 26, 1884, vol. 23, p. 56, sec. 12)....................................................................
Budget, page 307.
Foreign Hospital at Capetown—
Annual contribution toward the support of the Somerset Hospital (a foreign hospital) at
Capetown, $50, to be paid by the Secretary of State upon the assurance that suffering
seamen and citizens of the United States will be admitted to the privileges of said
hospital (act Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1216, sec. 1) ........................................................................
Contingent Expenses, United States Consulates—
Expenses of providing all such stationery, blanks, record and other books, seals, presses,
flags, signs, rent (so much as may be necessary), repairs to consular buildings owned
by the United States, postage, furniture, including typewriters, and exchange of
same, statistics^ newspapers, freight (foreign and domestic), telegrams, advertising,
messenger service, traveling expenses of consular officers and consular assistants,
^compensation of Chinese writers, loss by exchange, and such other miscellaneous
expenses as the President may think necessary for the several consulates and con­
sular agencies in the transaction of their business and payment in advance of sub­
scriptions for newspapers (foreign and domestic) under this appropriation is hereby
authorized (i?. S., p . 310, sec. 1748; act Mar. 2,1921, vol. 41, p. 1216, sec. 1) ....................

Objects of expenditure.

R ent...........................................................................
Loss by exchange...................................................
Telegrams.................................... ............................
Furniture.*.*..........................................................
Freight, expressage, drayage, and duty..........
Shipping cases.........................................................
Stationery and supplies........................................
Messenger, janitor, watchman............................
Light and heat........................................................
Telephones................................................................
Printing and binding............................................
Taxes and rates.......................................................
Repairs to buildings..............................................
Repairs to furniture...............................................
Postage......................................................................
Traveling e x p e n se s*.....___ . . . . . . . _________
Newspapers..............................................................
Cab, carriage, and boat hire................................
Advertising abroad.................................................
Supplies for cleaning and toilet. *..................... .
Water and ice.......................................................... .
Flags, etc....................................................................
Uniforms...................................................................
Rent of post-office boxes...................................... .
Miscellaneous office equipment and Supplies..
Books and publications.........................................
Moving expenses......................................................
Publication of death notices.................................
Typewriters...............................................................
Engraving seals........................................................
Miscellaneous........................................................... .
Reserve for emergencies and new offices..........
Outstanding accounts (estimated).................... .
Unexpended balance (approximately).............

Estimated,
1923.

Estimated,
1922.

Expended,
1921.

$330,000.00
125.000.00
80,000.00

$310,000.00
125,000.00
75.000.00
24,200.00
25.000.00
9.000.00
70.000.00
95.000.00
35.000.00

1 $252,850.95
116,831.17
51,402.87
22.708.50
19,718.92
8,749.50
56,011.00
95.972.51
27,85& 23
16,615.27
58,357.56
10,837.48
5,076.27
8.908.53
31,621*66
3,388.65
8,375.63
10,113 49
648.60
5,642.86
4,726.35
1,969.82
3,367.99
1.178.54
8,435.60
4,643.20
1,608.58
62.65
9,917.25

120.000.00
25.000.00
9.000.00
70.000.00

100,000.00
35.000.00
25.000.00
55.000.00
15.000.00
15.000.00

10.000.00

40.000.00

10.000.00
9.000.00

10,000. 0 '
0
650.00
5.000.00
4.500.00
2.500.00
3.400.00
1.500.00
9.000.00

6.000.00
2,000.00
100.00
8,000.00
150.00

12,000.00
62,200.00

20.000.00
45.000.00

10.000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
40.000.00
5.000.00
9.000.00

10.000.00
650.00
5.000.00
4.500.00

2.000.00

3.400.00

1.200.00

9.000.00
5.000.00
1,800.00

100.00
8.000.00
150.00

12,000.00
20,000.00

Total............................................................................ 1,200,000.00 1,000,000.00

13a 10

11,786*88

* 20,000.00
* 120,475.39

1,000 000.00
,

1 These figures are not exact but are computed according to the existing foreign exchange rates.
* These are a few* outstanding accounts for the June quarter which will probably not exceed the $20,000
specified.
* This unexpended balance is largely due to:
(а) Rent (saving due to exchange)............................................................................................................$90,000
(б) Telegrams (to reimbursements).......................................................................................................... 30,000
Total............................................................................... ................................................................................ 120,000




96

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1£>23.

Estimates o f appropriations required for the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 3 0 8 .
Entry of Aliens into the United States—
Expenses, passport control act: For expenses of regulating entry into the United States,
in accordance with the provisions of the act approved May 22, 1918 (acts May 22,
1918, vol. 40, p. 559, secs. 1-4; Mar. 2, 1921, vol. 41, p■ 1216, sec. 1)...................................

Employees.

Salaries:
Clerks............................................................ per annum.
Clerks, $2,500 to $2,600 per annum..............................
Clerks............................................................ per annum.
D o ....................................................................... d o ...
Do........................................................................d o ...
D o ....................................................................... do.
.d o ...
D o ..
,.d o ...
D O .,
D o ..
-d o ...
D o ..
..d o ...
.d o ...
D o .,
D o ..
.d o ...
D o ..
.d o ...
.d o ...
D o ..
.d o ...
D o .,
D o ..
-d o ...
D o.
.d o ...
Clerks, $900 to $999 per annum.
Clerks, $800 to $899 per annum.
Clerks, $700 to $799 per annum.
Clerks, $600 to $699 per annum.
Clerks, $500 to $599 per annum.
Clerks, up to $499 per annum ...
Personal services:
Salaries............
W ages..............

Rate.

Estimated, Estimated,
1923.
1922.

Number.
$3,000.00
2.400.00
2.300.00
2.200.00
2,100.00

20
2
5

Number.

20
2
5

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation .

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$425, 000. 00

$600,000* 00

1, 000.00

1, 000. 00

100, 000.00

100, 000.00

Expended,
1921.

Number.
3

6
7

1

3

1

2, 000.00

34
31

1,800.00
1.700.00
1.650.00
1.600.00
1.500.00
1.400.00

1
4
4
4

1. 200.00
1, 120.00
1, 100.00
1, 000.00

6
1
1
1
65
16
26
39
18
104
$361,282.00 $361,282.00

$360,398.00
1,839.34

20, 000.00

20, 000.00

8,273.31

200.00

200.00

3.000.00
12,800.00
4.000.00

3,000.00
13,300.00
3,500.00

50.46
1,831.50
11,180.83
2,382.82
8,517.08

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Expenses Incident to personal services:
Travel expenses...............................................................
Contingent expenses:
Telegrams........................................................................
Typewriters......................................................................
Furniture and equipment............................................
Printing.............................................................................
Estimated third quarter for fiscal year, 1921.........
Immigrant stations................................................................
Reserve for emergencies........................................................
General reserve fund (surplus reserve estimate, 1922).
Total for vise work.

10, 000.00

10, 000.00

13,718.00

13,718.00
175,000.00

425,000.00

600,000.00

394,473.34

Budget, page 85 9.
Miscellaneous Indefinite Appropriations—
Refunding penalties, etc., erroneously exacted (act June 26,1884, vol. 23, p. 59, sec. 26).,
Refunding moneys erroneously received and covered (R. S., p. 725, sec. 3689).................
Refunding passport fees (act June 4,1920, vol. 41, p * 751, sec. 4) ...............................................
Negotiations for revision of fur-seal regulations for North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea
(act Apr, 8 , 1904t vol. 33, p. 586, secs. 1-3)......................................................... .......................
International Union of American Republics, receipts from sales, rents, etc. (acts July
26,1894, vol. 18, p. 151, sec. 1; June 16,1906, vol. Si, p. 291, tec. 1) .................................
Salaries and Expenses, United States Court for China—
Indefinite portion (act May 6,1910, vol. 36, p. 343, sec. 1)........................................................
Miscellaneous Trust Funds—
Indefinite appropriation of all moneys received by the Secretary of State from foreign
Governments and other sources, in trust for citizens of the United States or others,
and covered into the Treasury, to be paid to the ascertained beneficiaries thereof as
determined by the Secretary of State and certified by him to the Secretary of the
Treasury (act Feb. 27, 1896, vol. 29, p. 32, sec. / ) .....................................................................
Estates of decedents (R. S., p. 305, sec. 1709).....................................................................*.......

8,957,000. 79
692,808.30

Appropriations for 1922 not asked for 1923*
Total, Foreign Intercourse, including permanent and indefinite appropriations.
Total under State Department.............................................................................. ..........




9,577,441.16
10,580,901.16

9,649,809.09
10,637,769. 09

E S T IM A T E S OF A P P R O P R IA T IO N S R E Q U IR E D FO R T H E S E R V IC E OF T H E F IS C A L Y E A R E.NDLNG JUiNE 3 0 , 1 9 2 3 .

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 34.

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

CHAPTER IY — TR EASU R Y DEPARTM ENT.
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY.

Salaries, Office of Secretary of the Treasury—
Secretary of the Treasury (R . S .t p. 38, sec. 233; acts Mar. 3, 1875, vol. 18, p. 396, sec. 2;
Feb. 26,1907, vol. 34, p. 993, sec* 4; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921,
vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ...................................................................................................................
Undersecretary of the Treasury (act June 16, 1921, vol. 42, p. 61, sec. 4) ............................
Assistant to tne Secretary, to perform such duties in the office of the Secretary of the
Treasury as may be prescribed by the Secretary (acts Mar. 3, 1917, vol. 39, p. 1083,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1).............................................................................
Three Assistant Secretaries, at $7,500 each (increase of $2,500 each submitted) (R. S.,
p. 38, sec. 234; acts June 23, 1874, vol. 18, p. 205, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1875, vol. 18, p. '396,
sec. 2; July 11,1890, vol. 26, p. 236, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
• 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1).........................................................................................................
Clerk to the Secretary (acts Mar. 3, 1875, vol. 18, p. 396, sec. 2; Mar. 3, 1887, vol. 24, p.
601, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) . .
Executive clerk (acts June 17,1910, vol. 36, p. 485, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 12637 sec. 1).............................................................................
Stenographer (increase of $200 submitted) (acts July 31, 1894, vol. 28, p. 170, sec. 1;
July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ....................
Three private secretaries, at $1,800 each (acts July 31, 1886, vol. 24, p. 179, sec. 1; July
16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1917, vol. 39, p. 1083, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol.
41, p. 1263, sec. 1) ........................................................................................................................
Government actuary, under control of the Treasury (increase of $1,000 submitted)
(acts Mar. 3, 1881, vol. 21, p. 391, sec. 1; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p . 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
1921, vol. 41, p . 1264, sec. 1) .........................................................................................................
Clerks:
Two of class 4 (decrease of 2, 1 transferred to Division of Appointments and 1
dropped) (jR. S., p. 27, sec. 167; acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3
1921, vol. 4 t % 1264, sec. 1).................................................................................................
p.
Three of class 3 (decrease of 4, 2 transferred to disbursing clerk’s office, 1 to the
Division of Deposits, and 1 dropped) (same acts)............................................................
Two of class 2 (same acts)...........................................................................................................
One of class 1 (same acts)...........................................................................................................
3sengers:
Chief messenger (same acts).......................................................................................................
Two assistant chief messengers, at $1,000 each (same acts)...............................................
Three, at $900 each (same acts)........................ .......................................................................
Four, at $840 each (decrease of 2) (same acts)......................................................................
Messenger boy (same acts)..................................................................................................................
Total, office of the Secretary proper........................... .......................................
77891— 21-------7




$12, 000. 00
10, 000.00
5, 000. 00

22,500.00
3,000.00
2,400.00
2, 000.00
5,400.00
5,000.00

3,600.00
4,800.00
2,800.00
1, 200.00
1 ,100.00
2, 000.00
2,700.00
3,360.00
* 600.00

$89,460.00

$92,440.00

97

98

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923—-Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estim
ated amount
required for each detailed object.
Budget, page 3 5 .
Salaries, Office of Chief Clerk and Superintendent—
Chief clerk, including $300 as superintendent of Treasury Building, who shall be the
chief executive officer of the department, and who may be designated by the Secre­
tary of the Treasury to sign official papers and documents during the temporary ab­
sence of the Secretary, Undersecretary, and Assistant Secretaries of the department
(R . S. 38, sec. 235; acts Mar. 3,1875, vol. 18, p. 396, sec. 2; July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467,
sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1264, sec. 1)..............................................................................
Assistant chief clerk (acts May 29,1920, vol. 41, p. 643, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1264,
sec. 1)..................................................................................................................................................
Assistant superintendent of Treasury Building (acts Aug. 5, 1882, vol. 22, p . 225, sec. 1;
July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921,
4*, p. 1264, sec. 1) ..........................
Administrative clerk (acts July 3,1918, vol. 40, p. 770, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, uoZ. 41, p. -72G
4,
sec. 1)...................................................................................................................................... , .........
Clerks:
One (R. S. p. 27, secs. 167-169; acts Mar. 3, 1875, vol. JS, p. 306, sec. 2;
5, 7&?2,
t> Z 22, pp. 225, 226, sec. J/
o.
7&S6, wZ. 24, p. -773. sec. i ;
.76, 1914, vol
38, p. 467, sec.
J / a r . u o Z . 4-7, p. 1264t sec. J).................................................
Four of class 4 (same acis).........................................................................................................
One of class 3 (same acts)...........................................................................................................
Four of class 2 (same (ids)......................................... •..............................................................
Five of class 1 (same acts)............................................*................................... .......................
One (same acts).............................................................................................................................
Note.—One at $900 dropped.
One operator of photographic copying machine (same acts).....................................................
Two messengers, at $840 each (same acts).....................................................................................
Two assistant messengers, at $720 each (decrease of 1) (same acts)...................................... ..
One mimeograph operator (acts July 3, 1918, vol. 40, p. 770, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1264, sec. 1) . . ......................... ...................................................................................................
One messenger boy (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol 41, P -1264,
sec. 1).......... .......................................................................................................................................
One storekeeper (same acts).............................................................................. ..............................
Telegraphers:
One (acts July 3,1918, vol 40, p. 770, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol 41, p . 1264, sec. 1) ........
One (same acts).......................................................................................... .................................
One telephone and telegraph operator (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
1921, vol 41, p. 1264, sec. 1) .... ....................................... ...........................................................
Three telephone switchboard operators, at $720 each (acts July 3,1918, vol 40, p. 771, sec.
1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol 41, p. 1264',,sec. 1) ......................................................................................
One mechanical superintendent (acts May 29, 1920, vol 41, p . 643, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921,
vol 41, p•1264, sec. 1)....................................................................................................................
One chief engineer (acts July 16,1914, vol 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol 41, p•1264,
sec. 1)...................................................................................................................................................
Four assistant engineers, at $1,000 each (including 1 for outside buildings) (same acts)..
Eight elevator conductors, at $720 each, and the use of laborers as relief elevator conduc­
tors during rush hours is authorized (same acts)......................................................................
Eight firemen, at $720 each (same acts)............... ..........................................................................
One coal passer (same acts)................................................................................................................
One chief electrician (acts Mar. 1,1919, vol 40, p. 1225, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p•
1264, sec. 1)........................................................................................................................................
One locksmith and electriciarf (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol
41, p. 1264, sec. 1)............................................................................................................................
One captain of the watch (same acts)........................................................................: ...................
Two lieutenants of the watch, at $900 each (decrease of 1) (same acts)................................
Sixty-five watcKmen, at $720 each (same acts)........ \ .................................................................
One foreman of laborers (same acts)........................................................................................ * . . .
One assistant foreman of laborers (same acts)...............................................................................
Eight chauffeurs, at $720 each (acts July 3,1918, vol 40, p. 771, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol
41, p. 1264, sec. 1).................................................................................................................... r. . .
Four automobile truck laborers, at $660 each (decrease of 2) (acts May 29,1920, vol. 41, p.
643, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol 41, p. 1264, sec.l)......................... ..............................................
Skilled laborers:
One (decrease of 1 ) (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p . 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, P1264, sec. 1)................................................................................................................................
Two, at $720 each (same acts)...................................................................................................
Two electricians, at $1,200 each (same acts)..................................................................................
One wireman (same acts)....................................................................................................................
Thirty-nine laborers, at $660 each (decrease of 6) (same acts)..................................................
One plumber (same acts)...................................................................................... ..............................
One painter (same acts).......................................................................................................................
One plumber’s assistant (same acts).................................................................................................
One attendant for emergency relief room (acts July 3,1918, vol 40, p. 771, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
1921, vol 41, p •1264, s e c .l)....................................................................... ..................................
One head of char force (acts Mar. 1, 1919, vol 40, p. 1225, sec. 1; Mar 3,1921, vol 41, p*
1264, sec.l)............................................................................................. ..........................................
Eighty-five charwomen, at $240 each (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,
1921, vol 41, p. 1264, see. 1) ............ ...........................................................................................
Two carpenters, at $1,000 each (same acts)....................................................................................
Note—One carpenter, at $720, dropped.




$4,000. 00
3,000.00
2,500. 00
2, 000.00

2,000. 00
7,200.00
1,600.00
5,600.00
6,000.00
1 , 000.00
800.00
1,680.00
1,440.00
720.00
420.00
1, 200.00
1,400.00
1 , 200. 00
1,200.00
2,160.00
2,250.00
1,400.00
4,000.00
5,760. 00
5,760. 00
600.00
1,600. 00
1,400.00
1,400.00
1,800.00
46,800.00
1, 200.00
840.00
5, 760.00
2, 640.00
840.00
1,440.00
2,400.00
900.00
25, 740.00
1 , 100.00
1 , 100.00
780.00
660.00
720.00
20,400.00
2, 000.00

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30f
1922.

T n KAS V KY I)K PA IIT MUN T.

99

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923—Continued.
I
Ueueral object (title of appropriation), date of nets, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes,and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Ilufigot, paife iM.
Salaries, Office of Chief Clerk and Superintendent— Continued.
Winder Building and Annex, Seventeenth and F Streets NW.:
Ono engineer (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Afar, 3, 1921, vol. 41, p.
1264, sec. 1)...............................................................................................................................
Three firemen, at $720 each (same acts)................................................................................
One elevator conductior (same acts). . ........... ........................................................................
Four watchmen, at $720 each (decrease of 2) (same acts)..................................................
Three laborers, at $GG0 each, 1 of whom when necessary shall assist and relieve tho
elevator conductor (decrease of 1) (same acts)..................................................................
Ono forewoman of char force (same acts)...............................................................................
Twelve charwomen, at $240 each(*am« acts)........................................................................
One female laborer for ladies’ toilets (acts Afar. 1, 1919, vol. 40, p. 1226, see. 7;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1264, sec. 1)..................................................................................
Cox Building, 1700 New York Avenue NW .:
Two watchmen, at $720 each (acts July 16,1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921,
vol. 41, p. 1264, sec .l)............................................................................................................
One laborer (same acts)...............................................................................................................
Auditor's Building (formerly Bureau of Engraving and Printing):
One forewoman of char force (same acts)...............................................................................
Twenty-five charwomen, at $240 each (same acts)..............................................................
Two elevator conductors, at $720 each (1 additional submitted) (same acts)..............
Seven laborers, at $660 each, 1 of whom when necessary shall assist and relieve the
elevator conductor (same acts)..............................................................................................
One female laborer (in lieu of 2 at $480 each, dropped) (same acts)...............................
Ono skilled laborer (same acts).................................................................................................

Total amount to bo
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

j Amount appropriated
| for the fiscal year
. ending Juno 30,
| 1922.

$1,000.00
2, ICO. 00
720.00
2,880.00
l f 980.00
480.00
2,880.00
6G0.00
1,440.00
660.00
480.00
6,000.00
1,440.00
4 ,620.00
660.00
840.00
$217,310.00

For employees for the care and protection of buildings for the accommodation of such
bureaus of the department as may be assigned thereto, at annual rates of compensation
as follows:
506-508 Fourteenth Street NW. (Coast Guard and Division of Printing and Stationery):
One laborer, who shall assist elevator conductor when required (decrease of 1) (acts
Mar. 1, 1919, vol. 40, p. 1226, sec. 1; Mar. 3,1921, vol. 41, p. 1264, sec. 1).................
One elevator conductor (same acts).........................................................................................
Three firemen, at $720 each (same acts).................................................................................
Three watchmen, at $720 each (same acts)............................................................................
Six charwomen, at $240 each (same acts)...............................................................................
1412-1414 Pennsylvania Avenue NW. (Division of Printing and Stationery):
One laborer for men’s toilets and to assist elevator conductor when required (de­
crease of 1) (same acts)............................................................................................................
One elevator conductor (same acts).........................................................................................
Three firemen, at $720 each (same acts).................................................................................
Two watchmen, at $720 each (same acts)...............................................................................
Six charwomen, at $240 each, (same acts)...............................................................................
Graham Building, 412-416 Fourteenth Street NW. (General Accounting Office, Treasury
Department Division):
One female laborer for ladies* toilets at this building and also at 506-508 Fourteenth
Street NW. (same acts)......... 1................................................................................................
Two laborers, including 1 for men’s toilets and to assist elevator conductor when re­
quired, at $660 each (decrease of 1) (same acts)........................ ......................................
One elevator conductor (same acts). . . . ..................................................................................
Three firemen, at $720 each (same acts)......................................................................... .
One forewoman of char force (for 506-508 and 412-416 Fourteenth Street NW. and
1412-1414 Pennsylvania Avenue NW. (same acts)..........................................................
Eight charwomen, at $240 each (same acts)...........................................................................
Three watchmen, at $720 each (same acts)............................................................................

22,980.00

660.00
720.00
2 ,160.00
1,440.00
1,440.00

660.00
1,320.00
720.00
2 ,160.00
480.00
1,920.00
2,160.00

Arlington Building, Vermont Avenue and H Street NW.
Operating forceincluded in estim
ates of the United States Veterans* Bureau.




30,780.00

660.00
720.00
2,160.00
2,160.00
1,440.00

Note.—Three fem laborers, at $660each, w appropriated forthe buildings 506-508 Fourteenth
ale
ere
Street NW., 1412-1444 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., and the Graham Building, 412-416 Fourteenth
Street NW.. for 1922, but 2 have been droppedin tho estim
ates for 1923. The help heretoforeprovided
for the W
alker-Johnson Building, 1734 New York Avenue NW., namely, 1 forew an ofcharwom
om
en,
at $660, and 16charwom at $240each, has been dropped fromthis estim because the building is
en,
ate
now under the jurisdiction of the Com
ptroller General.

Treasury Department Annex, Pennsylvania Avenue and Madison Place:
Two assistant engineers, at $1,200 each (acts Mar. 1, 1919, vol. 40, p. 1226, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1265, se c.l)...................................................................................
One plumber (acts May 29,1920, vol. 41, p. 644, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1265,
s e c .l ) .........................................................................................................................................
Three firemen, at $720 each (acts Mar. 1,1919, vol. 40, p. 1226, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921,
vol. 41, p. 1265. sec. 1).......................................................................................................
One coal passer (acts May 29, 1920, vol. 41, p. 644, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p.
1265, sec. 1).................................................................................................................................

$228,350.00

2,400.00
1,200.00
2,160.00
660.0C

100

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
Amount appropriated
for the nscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$30, 320. 00

4,840. 00

4, 840 00

51,260.00

Budget, page 37.
Salariesy Office of Chief Clerk and Superintendent— Continued.
Treasury Department Annex— Continued.
One oiler (acts Mar. 1, 1919, vol. 40, p. 1226, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p * 1265,
sec* 1)..........................................................................................................................................
Four elevator conductors, at $720 each (same acts)............................................................
Five watchmen, at $720 each (same acts)..............................................................................
Eight male laborers, at $660 each (3 to attend toilets and relieve elevator conduc­
tors) (same acts)........................................................................................................................
Two female laborers, at $660 each (same acts).....................................................................
One janitor (same acts)......................................................................... *....................................
One wireman (same acts)...........................................................................................................
One carpenter (same acts)..........................................................................................................
One head of char force (same acts)..........................................................................................
Twenty-five charwomen, at $240 each (same acts)..............................................................

Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

$30,320.00

General obiect Ititle of aonropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

51,260. 00

$900.00
2,880.00
3,600.00
5,280. 00
1,320.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,200.00
720.00
6,000.00

Treasury garage, 316 Fourteenth Street NW .:
One automobile mechanic (same acts)............................................................................................. 1,400.00
Two assistant automobile mechanics, at $1,000 each (same acts).................................... ......... 2,000.00
Two watchmen, at $720 each (same acts)...................... ................................................................ 1,440.00
Treasury Department Annex, Fourteenth and B Streets NW.:
One carpenter (acts July 11, 1919, vol. 41, p. 43, sec* 1; Mar. 3, 1921, xol* 41, p.
1265, sec. 1)...............................................................................................................................
One plumber (same acts)............................................................................................................
One electrician (same acts)........................................................................................................
Two mechanics, at $900 each (same acts)..............................................................................
One captain of the watch (same acts).....................................................................................
Two lieutenants of the watch, at $900 each (same acts)............ ........................................
Twenty-one watchmen, at $720 each (same acts)................................................................
One janitor (same acts)...............................................................................................................
One head of char force (same acts)..........................................................................................
Two assistant heads of char force, at $480 each (same acts)..............................................
Seventy charwomen, at $240 each (same acts).....................................................................
Eight male laborers, at $660 each (same acts).......................................................................
Four female laborers, at $660 each (same acts).....................................................................

1,200. 00
1,200. 00
1,200.00
1,800.00
1,400.00
1,800.00
15,120.00
1,200.00
660.00
960.00
16,800.00
5,280.00
2,640.00

For the operating force of the Liberty Loan and Register’s Annex Buildings and the
necessary clerical assistance in the office of the chief clerk and superintendent (here­
tofore a part of the lump sum of $130,000, transferred to the office of the chief clerk and
superintendent from the appropriations, “ Expenses of loans,** “ Collecting internal
revenue,” and “ Salaries ana expenses, Bureau of War Risk Insurance/* under act of
Mar. 3,1921) (submitted)..........................................................................................................................................
For the sum of $30,000 to be deducted from the appropriation “ Collecting internal
revenue ” and credited to the appropriation for the office of the chief clerk and super­
intendent, Treasury Department, to be available for the employment of personnel in
such office.

Titles of positions.

Rates of pay.

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1921.1
1923.

Number.
$2,250.00
Chiefs of sections................................ ..... ................
2,000.00
Electrician in charge.......................... ..................
Clerks.............. ......... ............................. .
2,000.00
1,800.00
D o.............................................................................
1,600.00
Do.............................................................................
1.400.00
D o..................... ......................................................
1.200.00
Do.............................................................................
$1,200.00-1,000.00
Mechanics.................... ............................ ............ .
1,800.00-1,200.00
Locksmiths and electricians._ ____. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,400.00-1,000.00
Carpenters.................................... .
Wiremen......................................................................
900.00
i ; 400. 00- 1, 000.00
Engineers and assistant engineers.........................
720.00
Firemen, chauffeurs, and elevator conductors..
900.00- 720.00
Skilled laborers and messengers..............
660.00- 480.00
Laborers and messenger boys.......... .
840.00
Telephone operators..........................
Watch force...................................... .....................
1,400.00- 720.00
Matrons and char force........... .
660.00- 240.00
Total number..................................................
Total salaries.................................................

1
4
1

Number*

•

2
6
2

Number.
2
1
1
3
3
4
2
2
6
4

2
1
2
2
1
13
4
24
4
41
81

2
3
3
2
1
15
6
30
5
57

181

218

268

$105,000

$130,000

$180,120

M

1
19
6
34
5
88
87

* The positions shown in column 4 were paid during 1921 from the following appropriations: “ Expenses
of lo a n s/' $106,220; “ Collecting war revenue,” $39,140; “ Salaries and expenses, w ar Risk Insurance,”
$34,760; and the employees detailed under the supervision of the chief clerk.




75,000.00

TIlKASUItV

okpautmkkt.

101

Estimates of appropriations required for the service of the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923—Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of

B u lle t,

references to Statutes at Lar^e, or to Heviscd Statutes, ami estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

Total amount to be
aporopriatcd under
d
m
[f
eael head of appropriation.

Amount appropriated
for the nscal year
ending June 30,

1022.

SIS.

Salaries, Office of Chief Clerk and Superintendent—Continued.
General Supply Committee:
Superintendent of supplies (increase of $1,000 submitted) (act* June 17, 1910, vol.
86, p. 486, nee. / ; July 16, 1914, vol. 88, p. 467, sec. / ; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, V- U65,
sec.l)..........................................................................................................................................
Clerk*:
Chief (increase of $250 submitted) (acts Mar. / , 1919, vol. 40, p. 1226, sec. 1;
Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1265, sec.l)..........................................................................
Three of class 4 (acts July 16, 1914, vol. 38, p. 467, sec. 1; Mar. 8, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1265, se c.l)..................................................................................................................
Throe of class 3 (same acts)................................................................................................
Ono (same acts)............................................................................................. ....................
Four of class 2 (1 additional submitted) (same acts)...................................................
Six of class 1 (1 additional submitted) (same acts).....................................................
Twelve temporary clerks for four montns, at $100 each per month (increase of
$25 each per month submitted) (same acts)..............................................................
One assistant messenger (acts July 3, 1918, vol. 40, p. 771, sec. 1; Mar. 8, 1921, vol.
41, p. 1265, sec. / ) ....................... '...........................................................................................
One laborer (acts Mar. 3, 1917, vol. 39, p. 1083, sec. 1; Mar. 8, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1265,
sec.l)..........................................................................................................................................
One messenger boy (acts Mar. 1, 1919, vol. 40, p. 1226, sec. 1; Mar. 8, 1921, vol. 41,
p. 1265, sec. 1)..........................................................................................................................

$3,500.00
2,250.00
5,400.00
4,800.00
1,500.00
5,600.00
7,200.00
4,800.00
720.00
660.00
480.00
$36,910.00

For traveling expenses of the General Supply Committee when authorized by the
Secretary of the Treasury (submitted)............................................................................................................
N ote .—T ho increases submitted as shown above under the General Supply Committee, viz, $5,050
under salaries, and $2,500 for traveling expenses, as * e ll as tho increase of $45,000 submitted as below
under the title1 General Supply Committee, Transfer of Office Material, Supplies, and Equipment,”
1
are rendered necessary on account of the largely increasing volume of office material, supplies, and
equipment being handled through the General Supply Committee under the present organized
effort to efTcct economies through the coordinating purchase, transfer, and disposal of surplus Gov­
ernment materials. Tho responsibilities and duties of tho employees in charge have been corre­
spondingly increased, and the necessity for the additional employees and increase in the amount
available for expenses of handling and caring for the material is urgent.

General Supply Comm ittee, Transfer of Office Material, Supplies, and Equipment—
For salaries of employees, office equipment, fuel, light, freight, electric current, tele­
phone service, maintenance of motor trucks, and other necessary expenses for carry­
ing into effect the Executive order of December 3, 1918, regulating the transfer of
office material, supplies, and equipment in the District of Columbia falling into dis­
use because of the cessation of war activities, $165,000: Provided, That no person shall
be employed hereunder at a rate of compensation in excess of $3,000 per annum, and
not more than five persons Bhall be employed at a rate in excess of $1,800 per annum
each: Provided further, That the said Executive order shall continue in effect until
June 30. 1923, without modification, except that the price charged shall be the cur­
rent market value at time of issue, less a discount for usage, but in no instance shall
the discount be less than 25 per cent, and that the proceeds from the transfer of appronations thereunder shall be covered into the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts:
*
rovidedfurther, That the heads of the executive departments and independent es­
tablishments and the Commissioners of the District of Columbia shall cooperate with
the Secretary of the Treasury in connection with the storage and delivery of material,
supplies, ana equipment transferred under the foregoing order: Providedfurther, That
typewriters ana computing machines transferred to the General Supply Committee
as surplus, where such machines have become unfit for further use, may, in the dis­
cretion of the Secretary of the Treasury, be issued to other Government departments
and establishments at exchange prices quoted in the current general schedule of sup­
plies or sold commercially. Repairs to typewriting machines (except bookkeeping
and billing machines) in the Government service in the District of Columbia may be
made at cost by the General Supply Committee* payment therefor to be effected by
transfer and counterwarrant, charging the proper appropriation and crediting the ap­
propriation “ General Supply Committee, Transfer of Office Material, Supplies, and
Equipment.** All purchases of typewriting machines during the fiscal year 1923 by
executive departments and independent establishments for use in the District of Co­
lumbia or in the field, except as hereinafter provided, shall be made from the surplus
machines in the stock of the General Supply Committee. The War Department shall
furnish the General Supply Committee, immediately upon the approval of this act,
a complete inventory of the various makes, models, ana classes of typewriters in its
possession, the condition of such machines, and the point of storage, and shall turn
over to the General Supply Committee such typewriting machines in such quantities
as the Secretary of the Treasury from time to time may call for by specific requisition
for sale to the various services of the Government. If the General Supply Committee
is unable to furnish serviceable machines to any such service of the Government, it
shall furnish unserviceable machines at current exchange prices and such machines
shall then be applied by the service of the Government receiving them as part pay­
ment for new machines from commercial sources in accordance with the prices fixed

?




2,500.00

$31,860.00

102

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service o f the fiscal year ending June SO, 1923— Continued.
Total amount to be
appropriated under
cach head of appro*
priation.

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

Budget, page 39.
General Supply Committee, Transfer of Office Material, Supplies, and Equipment— Contd.
in this act. And in selling typewriting machines to the various services the General
Supply Committee may accept an equal number of unserviceable machines as part
payment thereon at the exchange prices quoted in the current general schedule of
supplies (acts Feb. 25, 1919, vol. 40, p . 1163, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1265, sec. 1).

$365, 000.00

$120, 000.00

Total, salaries office of chief clerk and superintendent, and General Supply
Committee....................................................................................................................

006,120. 00

497,410.00

General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amount j
required for each detailed object.

1

Employees.

! R| *«P W

1Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
;
1921.
1923.

I
r

Number.
Chief of division..........................................................................
D o............................................................................................
Typewriter repair men.............................................................
Carpenters and cabinetmakers..............................................
Machinists...... ........... * . . . . ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chauffeurs and guards.............................................................
Laborers and messenger b oy..................................................

$2,500
2,160
1,800-1,000
1.700-1,000
1.700-1,200
1,200
900-840
720-4S0

Salaries...-....................................................................................

Number, j Number.

1
2
23
18
8
2
9
39
5107,120

* 0 1ft
17 2

6,030
3,850
2,000
1,000

|

1
2
23
18
8
2
9
39

6,030
3,850
2,000
1,000

11,163.00
4,509.00
1,961.20
1,832.78

120,000

115,000

!

1
2
19
14
7
2
9
36

!
‘
,
>
j
SQA.

41 2
3 .0

OTHER OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE.

Shop supplies and equipment................................................
Motor supplies and equipment..............................................
Electric current, telephones and fuel...................................
Miscellaneous items...................................................................
Freight on surplus supplies from point of storage to
Washington, D . C., to be shipped in bulk and dis­
tributed to the various services by the committee........
Packing and carting of surplus furniture, etc., for ship­
ment to field service.............................................................
Expenses due to the creation of the Chief Coordinator's
Office___ ....................................................................................
Unexpended balance in 1921..................................................

15.000
20.000
10,000
103.00
165,000

Contingent Expenses, Treasury Department—
Newspaper clippings and books: For newspaper clippings, financial journals, law books,
city directories, and other books of reference relating to the business of the depart­
ment (act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1272, sec. 1) .............................................................................

Objects of expenditure.

Newspaper clippings and financial journals..............................................
Directories..........................................................................................................
Law books and books of reference........................................................
Transferred to general accounting office.....................................................
TotaL......................................................................................................

Freight, expressage, and moving furniture, etc........................................
Telegraphing (commercial lines)...................................................................
Telegraphing (Federalreserve wire charges).............................................
Telephones......................................................................................................
Miscellaneous supplies...............................................................................
TotaL....................................................................................................

$200.00
100.00
700.00

$175.00
50.00
445.00
330.00

$196.80
103.55
637.44

1,000.00

1,000.00

937.79

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1922.
1923.
1921.
$100.00
3.600.00
10,000.00
6.750.00
50.00

$100.00
3,600.00
10,000.00
10,750.00
50.00

i4,6Sl*77
44.71

20,500.00

24,500.00

18,362.91

$47.16
3,589.27

N o t e . — The estimated item of 510,000 for telegrams on the leased wire of the Federal Reserve Board
has heretofore been paid from the appropriation “ Expenses of loans/'




1, 000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1923.
1922.
1921.

Freight, telegrams, etc.: For freight, expressage, telegraph and telephone service (acts
Mar. 1, 1921, vol. 41, p . 1160, sec. 1; Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1272, sec. 1)........................

Objects of expenditure.

1, 000. 00

20, 500.00

18,000.00

103

Til HAS UIIY DKPAUTMEN T.

Estimates o f appropriations required fo r the service of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923—Continued.
Total amount to be
appropriated under
each head of appro­
priation.

Buildings.

Total..

$2,400.00
12,500.00
2,150.00

2.400.00
12,500.00
2.150.00

540,000.00
40, (K ). 00
M
2.400.00
8,000.00
2.150.00

57,050.00

92,550.00

540,000.00

Purchase and maintenance of motor trucks: For tho purchase, exchange, and repair of
motor trucks to be used for official purposes* only (same acts)................................................

Objects of expenditure.

Maintenance, forage, and care of horses.....................................................
Repairs to carriages and harness..................................................................
Purchase of light truck.....................................................................................
Repairs and maintenance of motor trucks, motor cycles, etc..............
Repair and maintenance of 1 automobile for the secretary of the
Treasury..........................................................................................................
Estimated unexpended balance...................................................................

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1923.
j
1922.
$35.34

$3, .moo
1,500.00

5,000.00

Total..

5,000. 00

, Estimated, Expended,
Estimated, I*.
1921.
;
1922.
1923.

17,050.00

Walker-Johnson, 1731 Now Vork Avenuo N W ..........
IC^Uter's Building, 119 1) Street N E ...........................
Winder Annex, Seventeenth and K Streets N W ___
Merchants* Transfer and Storage, 022 K Street N W .
Cox Building, 1709 New York Avenue N W ................

$57, 050. 00

5 ,000. 00

paije »5.
Contingent Expenses, Treasury Department— Continued.
For rent of buildings (art Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, />. 1272, see. 1).

Amount appropriated
for the fiscal year
ending June 30,
1922.

$17, 050. 00

fletieral object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to lie vised Statutes, and estimated amount
required for each detailed object.

'3*
566.66'

$1,119.25
692.95
677.83
2,426.61

M LO
& O
5,000.00

-1,910.61

N ote .—T he stables were abolished and the horses and carriages were sold at public auction on Aug. 1,
1921.

Automobile for the Secretary of the Treasury: For the purchase of an automobile for
the official use of the Secretary of the Treasury (submitted).................................................
I’ile-holdera and cases: For purc hase of file holders and file cases {actsMar. 1,1921, vol. 41,
p. 1160, see. 1; Mar. 3t 1921, vol. 41, p. 1273, sec. 1; July 16, 1921, vol. 42, p. 39, see. 1) ..

Objects of expenditure.

Kile cases, storage sections, etc......................................................................
Card cabinets, cases, etc............................................................ ....................
Boxes for filing checks........... ......................... .......... ..................... .............
Desk t r a y s .... .................... ......................................... ..................................
Transferred to general accounting office.....................................................
Total...

. . ............................................................... .........................

5, 000. 00
(>,000. 00

25,000. 00

Oils, shovels, grates, etc......................................................... .............. .
Total.......................! ..................................................................................

$5,000.00
700.00
250.00
50.00

$5,000.00
700.00
250.00
.50.00
6, 00a 00

6,000.00

12,000.00

24,000.00

17,332.70

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1922.
1923.

$24,500.00
500.00

$24,500.00
500.00

$31,323.46
520.82

|

25,000.00

25,000.00

31,&H.2S

|

Miscellaneous electric-light fixtures, lamps, etc........................................

$23,000.00
200.00
1,800.00

$23,000.00
200.00
1,800.00

$23,095.49
190.12
2,123.03

Total........................................................ *..................................................

25,000.00

25,000.00

25,408.64




25,000. (10

$6,681.58
868.30
210.37
14.45
9,555.00

!
Gas, etc.: For purchase of gas, electric current for lighting and power purposes, gas and
j
electric light fixtures, electric-light wiring and material, candles, candlesticks,, drop!
lights and tubing* gas burners, gas torches, globes, lanterns and wicks (same acts) ............................................ j
!
1
j
Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
Objects of expenditure.
1921.
;
1922.
1923.
Electric current

25,000.00

Estimated, Estimated, Expended,
1921.
1922.
1923.

Fuel, etc.: For purchase of coal, wood, engine oils and grease, grate baskets and fixtures,
blowers, coal nods, coal shovels, pokers, and tongs (acts Mar. 1, 1921, voL 41, p. 1160,
sec 1; Mar 3 1921, vol. 41, p . 1273, stc. 1) ......................................................................................................................................

Objects of expenditure.

12, 000.00

104

THE ALTERNATIVE BUDGET, 1923.

Estimates oj appropriations required jor the service oj the jiscal year ending June 30, 1923— Continued.
General object (title of appropriation), date of acts, references to Statutes at Large, or to Revised Statutes, and estimated amoun
required for each detailed object.

Budget, page 5G.
Contingent Expenses, Treasury Departmen/— Continued.
Miscellaneous items: For washing and hemming towels, purchase of awnings and
fixtures, window shades and fixtures, alcohol,'benzine, turpentine, varnish, baskets,
belting, bellows, bowls, brooms, buckets, brushes, canvas, crash, cloth, chamois skins,
cotton waste, door and window fasteners, dusters, flower-garden, street and engine
hose, lace leather, lye, nails, oils, plants, picks, pitchers, powders, stencil plates,
hand stamps and repairs of same, spittoons, soap, matches, match safes, sponges, tacks,
traps,, thermometers, toilet paper, tools, towels, towel racks, tumblers, wire, zinc, and
for blacksmi thing, repairs of machinery, removal of rubbish, sharpening tools, street
car fares not exceeding $500, advertising for proposals, and for sales at public auction
in the District of Columbia, of condemned property belonging to the Treasury Depart­
ment, payment of auctioneer fees, and purchase of other absolutely necessary articles
(act Mar. 3, 1921, vol. 41, p. 1273, sec. 1)........................................................ ................................................... .

Objects of expenditure.
_
Snan.swenninpcornnound. etc.............
Brooms, mops, etc....................................... . . . . ..... ............................. .
Towels and towel laundering.........................................................................
Cheesecloth. . . . . . . . . *....................................................................................
Rubber stam ps. . ..................................... ....................*..................................
Street car tickets. . ........ . . .......................................... ....................................
Advertising.......... . ........... ....................................
.......................................
.Miscella neous it em s............................................. ............................................
Transferred to general accounting office____ ________________ ________
Trttal___